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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"




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U. S. SUFf. OF DOCL'MKNTS 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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VOLUME VI • Numbers 132-157 



January 3 -June 27, 1942 






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UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1942 



U, S. SUPERINTfNOENT OF OOCUMEMT* 
SEP 2 1942 



":•:♦: V 5 5, 



Publication 1781 



INDEX 



Volume VI : Numbers 132-157, January 3 -June 27, 1942 



Acheson, Dean G., Assistant Secretary of State : Address 

to Americans of Italian descent, 510. 
Acting Secretary of State. See Welles, Sumner. 
Addresses, statements, etc. See names of individuals 

and specific subjects. 
Advisory Mission to India, 209, 230, 260, 433. 
Africa (see also Union of South Africa) : 
French Equatorial Africa, opening of American Con- 
sulate General at Brazzaville, 273. 
French North Africa, U.S. economic assistance to, 318, 
337. 
Agents of foreign principals, registration of : 
Rules and regulations regarding, 664. 
Transfer of duties from the Secretary of State to the 
Attorney General, 496. 
Agreements, international. See Treaties, agreements, 

etc. 
Agriculture : 
Colombian Agricultural Mortgage Bank, adjustment 
of defaulted bonds, statement by Secretary Hull, 
565. 
Joint arrangements betvreen U.S. and Canada, 313. 
Mission of U.S. to Saudi Arabia, 261. 
National Farm Institute, address by Mr. Berle before, 

168. 
Second Inter-American Conference on, Mexico City, 
Mexico, 568. 
Alaska : Military highway to, 237. 
Aliens, enemy : 
Civilians, treatment of, 445. 
Regulations governing, 66. 
Alliance, treaty between United Kingdom and Soviet 

Union, and Iran (1942), text, 249. 
Ailing, Paul H., Chief, Division of Near Eastern Affairs 

of the Department : Appointment, 252. 
Allocations of commodities from U.S. to other American 

republics, 274, 393. 
Amelioration of the condition of the wounded and the 
sick of armies In the field, convention (1929), 
adherence of El Salvador, 233 ; proposed legislation 
to Implement provisions, 492. 
American Friends of Greece : Address by Mr. Berle at 

Columbia University Club, 257. 
American Hemisphere Exports Office of the Depart- 
ment: Appointment of Olaf Ravndal and desig- 
nation of Albert M. Doyle and Charles F. Knox, Jr., 
as Assistant Chiefs, 499. 



American Political Science Association, New Yobk, 

N.Y. : Address by Mr. Duggan before, 8. 
American republics {see also Commissions, committees, 
etc., international ; Conferences, congresses, etc.. 
International ; Defense, hemispheric ; The War ; 
and individual countries) : 
Aviation training — 
Death of Chilean student aviator in U.S., 328. 
Offer to U.S. of facilities In Cuba, 553. 
Central banks or equivalent institutions, conference 

of representatives, 3S3, 474. 
Cultural relations — 
Address on cultural exchange in wartime, by Mr. 

Thomson, 29. 
Book gifts to English Center In Ecuador, 69. 
Exhibition in U.S. of Chilean art, message of Act- 
ing Secretary Welles, 262. 
Films, educational, production in U.S. for ex- 
change, 263. 
Institutes of culture in, 246. 
Roosevelt Fellowship program, 69. 
U.S. cultural relations officers to, 247. 
Visits to U.S., of Brazilian educator, 224, and 
musician, 83; Chilean educator, 70, and critic, 
154 ; Colombian editor, 555, and historian, 439 ; 
Costa RIcan author and educator, 885 ; Cuban 
educator, 555, and publisher, 539 ; Ecuadoran 
official, 565 ; Guatemalan anthropologist, 154 ; 
Honduran artist and educator, 247 ; Mexican 
editor, 439; Nicaraguan educator, 308; Pan- 
amanian educator, 247; Paraguayan official, 
375 ; Peruvian educator, 94, engineer, 375, and 
official, 374, Uruguayan educator, 555. 
Economic and Financial Control Systems, Inter- 
American Conference, at Washington, D. C, 567. 
Economic cooperation — 
Agreements between U.S., and Brazil, 145, 205; 
Costa Rica, 554 ; Haiti, 353 ; Mexico, 325 ; Nica- 
ragua, 368 ; Peru, 365. 
Highway, Inter-American, construction through 
Costa Rica with U.S. cooperation, 72. 
Fishery science, awards by U.S. of fellowships in, 291. 
Highway, Inter-American, 13, 72. 
Legations In U.S. of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay, 

elevation to rank of Embassy, 47, 48. 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs, Third Meeting, at Rio 
de Janeiro, 12, 55, 77, 88, 117. 

674a 



574b 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American republics — Continued. 

Nationals and officials in Axis countries, exchange 
for Axis nationals and officials in American re- 
publics, 363, 383, 392, 491, 553. 
"Networli of the Americas" program. Inauguration 

by Columbia Broadcasting System, 473. 
Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dispute, settlement, 

94, 194 ; text of agreement, 195. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 
by Bolivia, 90; by Brazil, S9; by Ecuador, 91; 
by Paraguay, 91 ; by Peru, 89 ; by Uruguay, 90 ; 
by Venezuela, 6, 45. 
Solidarity, inter-American — 
Addresses by Mr. Bonsai, 369 ; Mr. Duggan, 8. 
Control of sabotage and subversive activities, pur- 
pose of Emergency Advisory Committee for 
Political Defense, 322. 
Defense Board, Inter- American, 260. 
Views of Brazilian President, comment of Secretary 
Hull regarding, 79. 
Trade, inter-American — 

Commodities allocated by U.S. to, 274, 393. 
Development Commission, establishment of na- 
tional commissions under, 68. 
American Republics Division of the Department : 
Appointment of Philip W. Bonsai as Chief, 252. 
Designation of Selden Chapin as an Assistant Chief, 

223. 
Duties, transfer of certain functions to Cultural Re- 
lations Division, 357. 
American Whig Cliosophic Society, at Princeton, N.J. : 

Address by Mr. Ballantine before, 397. 
Americans : 
Citizens in Canadian armed forces, agreement provid- 
ing for transfer to U.S. armed forces, 244. 
Death of Mrs. Lea Burdett in Iran, 385. 
In enemy or enemy-occupied territory, aid to, 80, 230 ; 

property in, 93. 
Italian descent, address by Mr. Acheson on their part 

in the war, 510. 
Passport and travel requirements — 
Seamen, 231, 292, 437, 563. 
Verification, 261, 480. 
Prisoners of war in the Far East, 92. 
Repatriation from — 
Europe, 363, 392, 491. 
Far East, 522, 536, 553, 563. 
Anglo-American Caribbean Commission ; Creation 229. 
Anniversaries. See under individual countries. 
Appropriations: State Department budget recommen- 
dations for 1943, 46. 
Aranha, Oswaldo, Brazilian Foreign Minister: Corre- 
spondence with Secretary Hull regarding Third 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 88. 
Arbitration: Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary settlement, 
94, 194, 195. 



Argentina (see also American republics) : 
Anniversary of independence, messages from Presi- 
dent Roosevelt to President Ortiz and Acting 
President Castillo, and reply from President 
Ortiz, 497, and from Acting President CastiUo, 
539. 
Former Ambassador to U.S. (Naon), death, 13. 
Mixed Commission, establishment with U.S., for study 
of operation of trade agreement between the two 
countries, 373. 
Resignation of President Ortiz, statement by Secretary 

Hull, 565. 
Torpedoing of tanker "Victoria", U.S. assistance to 

crew, 394. 
Visa fees, reciprocal waiver, agreement with U.S. 
(1942), signature, 441. 
Armed forces of the United States : 

Agreement with Canada providing for transfer of 

U. S. citizens in Canadian armed forces to, 244. 
Application of Selective Training and Service Act to 

Canadian nationals in the U.S., 315. 
Postal concessions by New Zealand to, 404. 
Arms and munitions: 
Proclamation enumerating, 323. 
Regulations governing traffic in, 522. 
Art : Chilean exhibition in U.S., message of Acting 

Secretary Welles, 262. 
Aruba, Curagao, West Indies : 
American Vice Consulate, opening, 71. 
Defense, U.S. assistance to Netherlands armed forcea 
in, 153. 
Assets of Netherlands Government : Preservation at 

time of German invasion, 241. 
Assistant Secretary of State. See Acheson, Dean G. ; 
Berle, Adolf A., Jr. ; Long, Breckinridge ; Shaw, G. 
Howland ; and tinder State, Department of. 
Attorney General of the United States: Transfer of 
duties of Secretary of State regarding registration 
of agents of foreign principals, 496. 
Australasia. See Australia ; New Zealand. 
Australia: Minister to U.S. (DLxon), presentation of 

credentials, 537. 
Aviation training: 
Facilities in Cuba for per.sonnel, U.S.-Cuban agree- 
ment, 553. 
Programs of United Nations in U.S. and Canada, 
coordination, 336 ; of United States for students 
from other American republics, death of Chilean 
student aviator, 326. 
Avila Camacho, Manuel, President of Mexico : Telegram 
to President Roosevelt regarding agreement on com- 
pensation for petroleum properties expropriated in 
Mexico, 352. 
Axis powers, war with United Nations. See individual 
countries; United States, war with Axis powers; 
and The War. 



INDEX 



674c 



Babamas : Labor riots at Nassau, 527. 
Ballantine, Josepb W., Division of Far Eastern Affairs 
of the Department : Address on cultural factors in 
the Far Eastern situation, 397. 
Banks in American republics : Conference of representa- 
tives, 383, 474. 
Bases leased from Great Britain in the Western Hemi- 
sphere: Remarks of President Roosevelt regarding 
reported prolongation of leases, 230. 
Belgian Congo : Adherence to international conventions 
of 1925 and 1931 on opium and distribution of 
narcotic drugs, 178. 
Belgium : 
Anniversary of German invasion, address by Mr. 

Berle, 427. 
Mutual-aid agreement with U.S. (1942), text, 551. 
Belligerent countries. See United States, War v?ith 

Axis powers ; and The War. 
Berle, Adolf A., Jr., Assistant Secretary of State: 
Addresses, statements, etc., on books in wartime, 
434 ; business in the war, 63 ; to Eighth Pan Ameri- 
can Child Congress, 406 ; Greek Independence Day, 
257; National Farm Institute, 168; second anni- 
versary of invasion of Low Countries, 427 ; United 
nations and united peoples, 203. 
Biddle, Anthony J. Drexel, Jr. : Presentation of creden- 
tials as American Ambassador to the Netherlands, 
403 ; to Norway, 438. 
Blaisdell, Donald C, Assistant Chief. Division of Studies 
and Statistics of the Department: Appointment, 
223. 
Blocked nationals, U.S. proclaimed list of : 
In Costa Rica, termination of U.S. - Costa Rlcan 

coordination agreement of 1941, 240. 
Supplement 7, 67. 
Revision I, 154, 
Supplement 1, 220; 
Supplement 2, 274; 
Supplement 3, 337 ; 
Supplement 4, 394. 
Revision II, 433, 
Supplement 1, 492 ; 
Supplement 2, 52-2 ; 
Supplement 3, 563. 
Boal, Pierre de L., American Ambassador to Bolivia: 

U.S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 231. 
Board of Economic Warfare : 
Duties — 
Executive order prescribing, 337. 
Clarification in relation to State Department, 475. 
Bolivia (see also American republics) : 
Ambassador to U.S. (Guachalla), presentation of 

credentials, 275. 
American Ambassador (Boal), U.S. Senate confirma- 
tion of nomination, 231. 
Legation in U.S. and American Legation in, elevation 
to rank of Embassy, 47. 



Bolivia — Continued. 

Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 

telegram from President Roosevelt, 90. 
Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey), agreement on oil 
properties and related matters, 172 ; payment by 
Bolivian Government, 372. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Publications, ofiicial exchange, with U.S. (1942), 

signature, 441. 
Trade, with U.S., notice of Intention to negotiate, 
287. 
Bonds, defaulted, of Agricultural Mortgage Bank of 
Colombia : Statement by Secretary HuU regard- 
ing adjustment, 565. 
Bonsai, Philip W., Chief, Division of American Re- 
publics of the Department : 
Appointment, 252. 

Address on inter-American relations, 369. 
Books : 
Council on Books in Wartime, address by Mr. Berle, 

434. 
Gift to English Center in Ecuador, 69. 
Boundary dispute between Peru and Ecuador, settle- 
ment, 94; (text) 195: appointment of U.S. techni- 
cal adviser to Demarcation Commission, 496. 
Bowers, Claude G., American Ambassador to Chile: 
Designation as special representative of President 
Roosevelt to attend Inauguration of President of 
Chile, 248. 
Braden, Spruille, American Ambassador to Cuba: Ad- 
dress before Cuban Chamber of Commerce In the 
U.S., 319. 
Brandt, George L., Executive Assistant to Assistant 

Secretary of State: Designation, 377. 
Brazil {see also American republics) : 
Economic and financial cooperation with U.S., visit 

to U.S. of Minister of Finance, 145. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 
telegram from President Roosevelt to President 
Vargas, 89. 
Statement by President Vargas on hemispheric soli- 
darity, comment by Secretary Hull regarding, 79. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 12, 55, 77, 
88, 117. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Economic collaboration, with U.S. (1942), discus- 
sions, 145 ; conclusion of series of agreements, 
205 ; exchange of notes between Finance Min- 
ister Souza Costa and Acting Secretary Welles, 
206; statements on occasion of signature, by 
Dr. Souza Costa, 207 ; by Ambassador Martins, 
208; by Acting Secretary Welles, 208. 
Naval mission, with U.S. (1942), signature, 481. 
Visit to U.S. of eminent comjwser, 83; of educator, 
224 



574d 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



Brazzaville, French Equatorial Africa : Opening of 

American Consulate General, 273. 
British Isles. See Great Britain. 
British West Indies : 
American Consulate at St. Lucia, opening, 33. 
Churchill-Roosevelt Highway in Trinidad, 261. 
Brown, Courtney C, Assistant Chief, Division of De- 
fense Materials of the Department: Appointment, 
499. 
Budget recommendations for Department of State, 1943, 

46. 
Bulgaria : 

Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 66. 

79, 141, 273, 392. 
U.S. declaration of war against, 509-510. 
Burdett, Mrs. Lea, wife of Columbia Broadcasting Sys- 
tem representative : Death in Iran, 385. 

Canada : 
Dominion's Victory Loan drive, address by President 

Roosevelt in connection with, 163. 
Treaties, agreements, etc., with U.S. — 
Agricultural arrangements, joint, (1942), texts, 313. 
Extradition (1942), signature, 387; U.S. Senate 
advice and consent to ratification, 502; ratifi- 
cation by U.S., &10. 
Halibut fishery of the northern Pacific Ocean and 
Bering Sea, preservation (1937), regulations 
under, 358. 
Military highway to Alaska (1942), text, 237. 
Nationals residing; in U.S., application of U.S. Se- 
lective Training and Service Act (1942), text, 
315. 
Taxation, double income (1942), signature, 225; 
U.S. Senate advice and consent to ratification, 
501 ; ratification by U.S., 541 ; exchange of rat- 
ifications and proclamation by U.S. President, 
557. 
Transfer of U.S. citizens from Canadian to U.S. 

armed forces (1942), text, 244. 
Unemployment insurance (1942), signature, 376. 
Caribbean, Anglo-American Commission and U.S. Ad- 
visory Committee: Creation, 229. 
Caripito, Venezuela : Opening of American Vice Con- 
sulate, 224. 
Carr, Wilbur J., former Assistant Secretary of State 
and American Minister to Czechoslovakia : Death, 
569. 
Carter, James G., American Consul General at Tana- 
narive, Madagascar: Retirement, 409. 
Castillo, Ram6n S., Acting President of Argentina: 
Anniversary of independence, reply to message of 
President Roosevelt, 539. 
Central Translating Office of the Department : Appoint- 
ment of Rafael Gim^nez as an Assistant Chief, 377. 
Chapin, Selden, Assistant Chief, Division of the Ameri- 
can Republics of the Department : Designation, 223. 



Child Congress, Eighth Pan American, at Washington, 
D.C.: 
Addresses by Mr. Long, 405 ; by Mr. Berle, 406. 
Organizing Committee, 222. 
Personal message of President Roosevelt, 405. 
U.S. delegation, 386. 
Chile (see also American republics) : 
Art exhibition in U.S., message of Acting Secretary 

Welles, 262. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
Act of Habana concerning provisional adminis- 
tration (1940), deposit of instrument of ratifica- 
tion, 441. 
Inauguration as President of Dr. Juan Antonio Rlos, 
designation of American Ambassador Bowers as 
special representative of President Roosevelt, 
248 ; exchange of messages between President 
Rios and President Roosevelt, 275. 
Merchant marine, rules governing, note to Acting 
Secretary Welles from Chilean Ambassador Ro- 
dolfo Michels, 239. 
Student pilot in U.S. aviation training program, death, 

328. 
Visit to U.S. of educator, 70; of critic, 154. 
China {see also Far East) : 
Financial aid from U.S., message from President 

Roosevelt to General Chiang Kai-shek, 142. 
Students in the U.S., employment, 328. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Finance, with U.S. (1942), text, 264. 
Friendship, with Iraq (1942), signature, 249. 
Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 507. 
Use of poisonous gases by Japan, warning by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt against, 506. 
Wood-oil loan of U.S. (1939), repayment, 260. 
Christians and Jews, National Conference of: Address 

by Mr. Geist before, 466. 
Chronology of international events, December 1941 to 

April 1942, 428. 
Churchill, Winston S., Prime Minister of Great Brit- 
ain : Joint statements on conferences with Presi- 
dent Roosevelt at Washington, 561. 
Churchill-Roosevelt Highway In Trinidad, British West 

Indies, 261. 
Cissel, T. Ross, Jr., Assistant Chief, Division of Defense 
Materials of the Department: Appointment, 358. 
Civil service : Rules, amendment excepting certain posi- 
tions from examination, 33. 
Claims conventions, U.S. and Mexico : 
1934, special claims, annual payment by Mexico, 13. 
1941, approval by Mexico, 178; ratification by U.S., 
159; payment by Mexico on exchange of ratifica- 
tions, 274, 309; proclamation by U.S. President, 
330. 
Clattenburg, Albert E., Jr., Assistant Chief, Special 
Division of the Department: Designation, 310. 



INDEX 



574e 



Coffee agreement, inter-American (1940) : Entry Into 

force, 71, 225. 
Collection and solicitation of contributions for relief in 

belligerent countries. See Belief. 
Colombia {see also American republics) : 
American Ambassador (Lane), U.S. Senate couflrma- 

tlon of nomination, 231. 
American Consulate at Ctlcuta, opening, 223. 
Defaulted bonds of Agi'icultural Mortgage Bank of 
Colombia, adjustment, statement by Secretary 
Hull, 565. 
Military mission, agreement with U.S. (1942), sig- 
nature, 501. 
Sinking of schooner "Resolute", statement by Secre- 
tary Hull, 562. 
Visit to U.S. of editor, 555; of historian, 439. 
Columbia Broadcasting System : Inauguration of 

"Network of the Americas" program, 473. 
Combined Food Board, U.S. and Great Britain: 

Creation, 535. 
Combined Production and Resources Board, U.S. and 

Great Britain: Creation, 535. 
Commerce, international (see also American republics, 
Trade ; Economics ; Exports from U.S. ; Foreign 
trade, U.S.; Imports into U.S.; Treaties, agree- 
ments, etc.) : 
U.S. and Bolivia, 287. 

U.S. and Mexico, lists of products on which U.S. 
will consider granting concessions, 280, 328, 374. 
Wheat and wheat flour, suspension by U.S. of import 
quotas on certain varieties, 358. 
Commissions, committees, etc., international {see also 
Commissions, committees, etc., national ; Confer- 
ences, congresses, etc.) : 
Boundary Demarcation Commission, Peru and Ecua- 
dor, appointment of U.S. technical advLser, 496. 
Caribbean Commission, Anglo-American, 229. 
QDnciliation, Permanent International Commission, 

U.S. and Liberia, 34. 
Defense — 

Inter-American Board, 260. 
Joint Commission, U.S. and Mexico, 67, 193. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, national 

commissions under, 68. 
Economic Committees, Joint, U.S. and Canada, 313. 
Food Board, Combined (British-American), 535. 
Mixed Commission (trade), U.S. and Argentina, 373. 
Munitions Assignments Board, Combined (British- 
American), 87. 
Peace commission, international, U.S. and Union of 

South Africa, 83. 
Political Defense, Inter-American Emergency Advis- 
ory Committee for, 322. 
Production and Resources Board, Combined, U.S. and 
Great Britain, 535. 



Commissions, committees, etc., international— Con- 
tinued. 
Raw Materials Board, Combined (British-American), 

87. 
Shipping Adjustment Board, Combined (British- 
American), 88. 
Commissions, committees, etc., national {see also Com- 
missions, committees, etc., international; Confer- 
ences, congresses, etc.) : 
Advisory Mission to India, 209, 230, 260, 433. 
Agricultural Mission to Saudi Arabia, 261. 
Caribbean Advisory Committee, U.S., 229. 
Maritime Labor, Special Interdepartmental Commit- 
tee on, 321. 
War Relief Agencies, Committee on, 80. 
Commodities allocated to other American republics, 

274, 393. 
Ooncillation treaty, U.S. and Liberia (1939) ,34. 
Conferences, congresses, etc., international (see also 
Commissions, committees, etc. ; Conferences, con- 
gresses, etc., national) : 
Agriculture, Second Inter-American Conference, at 

Mexico City, Mexico, 568. 
Central banks of the American republics, conference 

of representatives, 383, 474. 
Child Congress, Eighth Pan American, at Washing- 
ton, D.C., 222, 386, 405. 
Economic and Financial Control Systems, Inter- 
American Conference, at Washington, D.C., 567. 
Mining Engineering and Geology, First Pan American 

Congress at Santiago, Chile, 48. 
Police and Judicial Authorities, Inter-American Con- 
ference at Buenos Aires, 480. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 12, 55, 77, 
88, 117. 
Conferences, congresses, etc., national {see also Com- 
missions, committees, etc. ; Conferences, congresses, 
etc., international ; and United States, Congress) : 
Foreign Service officers, conference at Mexico City, 
408. 
Connally, Tom, U.S. Senator: Press-conference re- 
marks, comment of Secretary Hull regarding, 79. 
Consular and diplomatic personnel, exchange with Axis 
countries. See under Foreign diplomatic repre- 
sentatives in the U.S.; and United States, Foreign 
Service. 
Control of persons entering or leaving U.S., 231, 261, 

292, 437, 480, 563. 
Coordination agreement between U.S. and Costa Rica, 

termination, 240. 
Corregidor, fall of : Statement by Secretary Hull, 392 ; 

message from New Zealand Prime Minister, 392. 
Costa Rica (see also American republics) : 
American Minister (Scotten), U.S. Senate confirma- 
tion of nomination, 231. 



574f 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Costa Rica — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Coordination of trade witli bloclced nationals on 
U.S. proclaimed list, with U.S. (1941), termina- 
tion, 240. 
Highway, Inter-American, construction, with U.S. 

(1942), text, 72. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1&42), signature, 554. 
Visit to U.S. of author and educator, 385. 
Council on Books in Wartime: Address by Mr. Berle 

before, 434. 
Croatia: Adherence to universal postal coBvention 

(1939), 528. 
Cuba (see also American republics) : 
Chamber of Commerce in the U.S., addresses by 
American Ambassador Braden, 319; by Under 
Secretary Welles, 164. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, national 

commission under, 68. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

CofCee, inter-American (1940), deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification, 71. 
Military coUaboration, with U.S. (1942), signature, 

553. 
Trade, supplementary, with U.S. (1941), prodama- 
Uon by U.S. President, 22. 
Visit to U.S. of educator, 555 ; of publisher, 539. 
CCcuta, Colombia : Opening of American Consulate, 223. 
Cultural factors in the Far Eastern situation : Address 

by Mr. Ballantine, 397. 
Cultural leaders: Visits to and from U.S. and other 
American republics, 70, S3, 94, 154, 224, 247, 308, 
374, 375, 385, 439, 530, 555, 565. 
Cultural Gelations Division of the Department (see aUo 
American republics: Cultural relations): 
Appointment of William L. Schurz as an Assistant 

Chief, 223. 
Transfer of certain duties from American Republics 
Division, 357. 
Gumming, Hugh S., Jr., Assistant Chief, Division of 
European Affairs of the Department : Appointment, 
223. 
Curagao: Defense, U.S. assistance to Netherlands 

armed forces In, 153. 
Current Information Division of the Department : 
Appointment of Robert T. Pell as Assistant Chief, 70. 
Liaison with OflBce of War Information, 666. 
Czechoslovakia : 

Lend-lease aid to, 44. 

Nazi mass-terrorization in, 536. 

Dasso, David, Peruvian Minister of Finance and Com- 
merce: Exchange of notes with Secretary Hull in- 
corporating series of decisions on economic collab- 
oration between the two countries, 366. 



Declaration by United Nations (1942) : 
Text, 3. 
Adherence — 

By Mexico and the Philippines, addresses by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 545, and by Under Secretary 
Welles, 548 ; correspondence between Secretary 
Hull and Mexican Foreign Minister Padilla, 546, 
and Philippine President Quezon, 547. 
U.S. the depository for statements of, 44. 
Declarations of war. See under The War ; and individr 

ual countries. 
Defense, hemispheric (see also American republics; 
United States, War with Axis powers; and The 
War) : 
Curasao and Aruba, U.S. assistance to Netherlands 

armed forces in, 153. 
Inter-American Defense Board, 260. 
Lease by U.S. of defense sites in Panama, 448. 
Mexican -U.S. Defense Commission, Joint, 67, 193. 
Sabotage and subversive activities, purpose of Emer- 
gency Advisory Committee for Political Defense 
to recommend control measures, 322. 
Solidarit}-, views of Brazilian President Vargas, com- 
ment by Secretary Hull, 79. 
Defense Materials Division of the Department : Appoint- 
ments as Assistant Chiefs, of Courtney C. Brown, 
499 ; T. Ross Cissel, Jr., 358 ; Henry B. Laboulsse, 
Jr., 32; Livingston T. Merchant, 358; designation 
as an Assistant Chief of Hallett Johnson, 252. 
Democratic Action, Union for : Document alleged to be 

in State Department files, 480. 
Departmental orders. See under Hull, Cordell and 

Welles, Sumner. 
Development Commission, Inter- American : National 

commissions under, 68. 
"Digest of International Law", volume III : Publica- 
tion, 525. 
Diplomatic and consular personnel, exchange with Axis 
countries. See Foreign diplomatic representatives 
in the U.S. ; and United States, Foreign Service. 
Diplomatic officers: Pan American convention (1928), 

178. 
Diplomatic relations, severances of (table), 338. 
Dixon, Sir Owen, Minister of Australia to U.S. : Presen- 
tation of credentials, 537. 
Dominican Republic (see also American republics) : 
American Minister (Warren), U.S. Senate confir- 
mation of nomination, 232. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, national 

commission under, 68. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere, convention (1940), ap- 
proval, 178 ; deposit of instrument of ratification, 

24a 



INDEX 

Doyle, Albert M., Assistant Chief, American Hemi- 
sphere Exports OflSee of the Department : Desig- 
nation, 409. 

"Drottningholni", S. S. : Voyages to and from Lisbon for 
exchange with Axis countries of diplomatic and 
consular personnel and nationals of U.S. and other 
American republics, 363, 383, 392, 491, 522. 

Drugs : International convention of 1925 and 1931, 178. 

Duggan, Laurence, Adviser on Political Relations of the 
Department : Address on inter-American solidar- 
ity, 8. 

Duties and other import restrictions proclaimed in 
connection with trade agreements, application : 
Letter from President Roosevelt to Secretary of 
Treasury Morgenthau, 524. 

Earthquake in Guayaquil, Ecuador: Death of Ameri- 
can Vice Consul Slaughter and wife, 440. 
Economics (see also Finance; Lend-lease; Mutual-aid 
agreements) : 
Address by Mr. Geist, 14. 
Agricultural arrangements, joint, U.S. and Canada, 

313. 
Aid to China, financial and economic, 142, 263 ; to 

French North Africa, 318, 337. 
Board of Economic Warfare, additional duties, 337; 
clarification of functions in relation to State De- 
partment, 475. 
British-American economic warfare procedures, co- 
ordination, 153. 
Business in the war, address by Mr. Berle, 63. 
Collaboration between U.S. and— 
Brazil, 145, 205. 
Haiti, 353. 
Mexico, 325. 
Nicaragua, 368. 
Peru, 365. 
Cooperation between U.S. and Great Britain in the 

Caribbean, 229. 
Problem of economic peace after the war, address 

by Mr. Pas vol sky, 210. 
Raw-materials, munitions-assignments, and ship- 
ping-adjustment boards, combined British and 
American, 87. 
Sugar Act of 1937, suspension of title II (quota pro- 
visions), 358. 
Systems of Economic and Financial Control, Inter- 
American Conference, at Washington, D. C, 567. 
Ecuador (see also American republics) : 

American Ambassador (Long), U.S. Senate confir- 
mation of nomination, 231. 
Boundary Demarcation Commission, with Peru, ap- 
pointment of U.S. technical adviser, 496. 
Earthquake in Guayaquil, death of American Vice 

Consul Slaughter and wife, 440. 
Gift of books to English Center in, 69. 
472772 — 42 2 



574g 

Ecuador — Continued. 

Legation in U.S. and American Legation In, eleva- 
tion to rank of Embassy, 47. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 

telegram from President Roosevelt, 91. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — ■ 

Boundary dispute, settlement with Peru (1942), 
Approval by Peru, 194. 

Resolution of Peruvian Congress, telegram of 
transmittal to Acting Secretary Welles, and 
reply, 194. 
Statement by Secretary Hull, 94; by Acting 

Secretary Welles, 194. 
Telegrams from President Roosevelt to Presi- 
dents of both countries, 94. 
Text, 195. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), deposit of 
instrument of ratification, 51. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American (1940), deposit 

of instrument of ratification, 110. 
Trade, with U.S. (1938), exchange of notes regard- 
ing certain provisions relating to customs 
charges, 221. 
Visit to U.S. of official, 565. 
Eden Memorandum of September 10, 1941 : Problems 

arising in connection with, 81. 
Education : Address by Mr. Hornbeck regarding edu- 
cation's part in war and peace, 512. 
Egypt : Opening of direct radio-photo service with U.S., 

439. 
Eighth Pan American Child Congress, at Washington, 

D. C., 222, 386, 405. 
El Salvador: 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Publications, official, exchange with U.S. (1941), 

signature, 226. 
Red Cross convention (1929), adherence, 233. 
Embassy rank for representation between U.S. and— 
Bolivia, 47. 
Ecuador, 47. 
Netherlands, 402. 
Norway, 438. 
Paraguay, 48. 
Employment : 
Agreement between U.S. and Canada regarding un- 
employment insurance, 376. 
Chinese students in the U.S. unable to return home, 

328. 
Seamen, rules governing as adopted by War Ship- 
ping Administrator, 321. 
Emergency Advisory Committee for Political Defense, 

Inter-American, 322. 
Enemy aliens: 
Civilians, treatment of, 445. 
Regulations governing, 66. 



574h 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Europe, war in. See individual countries; United 

States, War with Axis powers; and The War. 
European Affairs Division of the Department : Appoint- 
ment of Hugh S. Gumming, Jr., as an Assistant 
Chief, 223. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), Act of Habana, 
441; convention, 51, 72, 158, 309, 481. 
Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel with 
Axis countries. See under Foreign diplomatic 
representatives in the U.S. ; and United States, 
Foreign Service. 
Executive agreements. See Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Executive orders : 
Additional duties of Board of Economic Warfare, 

337. 
Civil Service Rules, amendment excepting certain 

positions from examination, 33. 
Defense Commis.sion, Joint, U.S. and Mexico, au- 
thorizing creation, 193. 
Registration of agents of foreign principals, transfer 
of duties from Secretary of State to Attorney 
General, 496. 
Export-Import Bank of Washington : Credit to Brazil 
for mobilization of productive resources, agree- 
ment, 205. 
Exports and Defense Aid Division of the Department : 

Abolishment, 556. 
Exports from U.S. (see also Commerce, international; 
Foreign trade, U.S. ; Imports into U.S. ; Lend- 
lease) : 
Commodities allocated to other American republics, 

274, 393. 
To Bolivia, 289. 
To Peru (1939-40), 26. 
Requirements in wartime, 153. 
Expropriated petroleum properties in Mexico : Deter- 
mination of compensation for, 12, 178, 351. 
Extradition treaties, U.S. and — 
Canada (1942), signature, 387; U.S. Senate advice 
and consent to ratification, 502 ; ratification by 
U.S., 540. 
Great Britain (1931), accession on behalf of India, 
330. 

Far East (see also United States, War with Axis pow- 
ers; The War; and individual county-ies) : 

Americans in, reports, 7, 44, 66, 79, 91, 92, 143, 154, 
192, 209, 323. 

Cultural factors in the Far Eastern situation, address 
by Mr. Ballantine, 397. 

Diplomatic and consular personnel and other na- 
tionals in U.S. and other American republics, 
exchange for those of U.S. and otlier American 
republics in Far East, 536, 553, 563. 

French Indochina, arrest by Japanese of American 
officers in, 323. 



Far Eastern Affairs Division of the Department : Des- 
ignation of Laurence E. Salisbury as Assistant 
Clilef, 70. 
Farm Institute, National, at Des Moines, Iowa: Ad- 
dress by Mr. Berle before, 168. 
Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, 
National Study Conference of: Address by Mr. 
Pasvolsky before, 210. 
Fellowships in fishery science : Awards to applicants 

from other American republics, 291. 
Films, educational: Production in U.S. for exchange 

with other American republics, certification, 263. 
Final Act of Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 
117. 
Finance (see also Economics; Lend-lease): 

Aid to Americans in enemy or enemy-occupied terri- 
tory, 230. 
Aid to China, U.S., message from President Roosevelt 
to General Chiang Kai-shek, 142; text of agree- 
ment (1942), 264. 
Assets of Netherlands Government, preservation at 

time of German invasion, 241. 
Central banks of the American republics, conference 

of representatives, 383, 474. 
Collaboration agreements, economic and financial, 
with U.S., by— 
BrazU, 145, 205. 
Haiti, 353. 
Mexico, 325. 
Nicaragua, 368. 
Peru, 365. 
Defaulted bonds of Agricultural Mortgage Bank of 

Colombia, adjustment, 565. 
Oil properties and related matters, agreement be- 
tween Bolivian Government and Standard Oil 
Co. (New Jersey), 172; payment by Bolivian 
Government, 372. 
Payment by Mexico to U.S. on exchange of ratifica- 
tions of claims convention of 1941, 274. 
Systems of Economic and Financial Control, Inter- 
American Conference, at Washington, D.C., 567. 
Taxation convention between U.S. and Canada, 541. 
Wood-oil loan of U.S. to China (1939), repayment, 
260. 
Financial Division of the Department : Designation of 

George F. Luthringer as Assistant Chief, 70. 
Finland : Hitler's visit to, statement by Secretary Hull, 

522. 
Fisheries : 

Convention for preservation of halibut fishery In 
northern Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, regu- 
lations adopted pursuant to, 358. 
Fellowships in fishery science, U.S. awards to appli- 
cants from other American republics, 291. 



INDEX 

Flag Day : Address by President Roosevelt, 645. 
Food Board, Combined, U.S. and Great Britain, 535. 
Foreign Activity Correlation Division of the Depart- 
ment : Designation of Frederick B. Lyon as 
Assistant Chief, 566. 
Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938: Rules and 

regulations for the administration of, 5C4. 
Foreign diplomatic representatives in the U.S. : 
Argentine Ambassador, former (Naon), death, 13. 
Bulgarian, exchange for American personnel in 

Bulgaria, 66, 79, 141, 273, 392. 
German, exchange for American personnel in Ger- 
many, 141, 392. 
Hungarian, exchange for American personnel in 

Hungary, 6, 79, 141, 273, 392. 
Italian, exchange for American personnel in Italy, 

66, 141, 273, 392. 
Japanese, exchange for American personnel in Japan 

and the Far East, 7, 142, 273, 392, 536, 553. 
Presentation of credentials, 173, 275, 277, 403, 438, 

537. 
Rumanian, exchange for American personnel iu Ru- 
mania, 6, 66, 141, 392. 
Foreign Ministers of American lii-publics. Third Meet- 
ing, at Rio de Janeiro, 12, 5ij, 77, 88, 117. 
Foreign policy, U.S. (see also United States, War with 
Axis powers) : 
Caribbean area, 229. 

Fi-ance and French people, 335 ; Government at Vichy, 
189 ; island possessions in the Pacific, 208 ; North 
Africa, 318, 337 ; territories in Africa, 273 ; Mada- 
gascar, 391 ; Martinique, 391. 
Foreign principals, registration of agents of: 
Rules and regulations regarding, 564. 
Transfer of duties from Secretary of State to Attor- 
ney General, 496. / 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1927", volumes 

I, II, and III : Publication, 525. 
Foreign Service. See United States, Foreign Service. 
Foreign trade, U.S. (see also Commerce, international; 
Exports ; Imports ; Lend-lease ; Treaties, agree- 
ments, etc.) : 
Blocked nationals, proclaimed list of, 67, 154, 220, 

274, 337, 394, 433, 492, 522, 563. 
Coffee agreement, inter-American (1940), entry into 
force, 71; supplementary proclamation by U.S. 
President, 225. 
Economic warfare procedure, coordination with 

British, 153. 
Generalization of trade-agreement duties, 524. 
Operations of lend-lease program, jjroblems arising 
in connection with British White Paper of Sept. 
10, 1941, 81. 
Statement by Secretary Hull, 478. 
With Bolivia, 287. 

With Costa Rica, termination of coordination agree- 
ment on trade with nationals on U.S. proclaimed 
list, 240. 



574i 

Foreign trade, U.S. — Continued. 
With Ecuador, exchange of notes regarding certain 

provisions of trade agreement (1938), 221. 
With Haiti, exchanges of notes regarding certain pro- 
visions of trade agreement (1935), 174, 384. 
With Mexico, lists of products on which U.S. will 
consider granting concessions to Mexico, 280, 328, 
374. 
With other American republics, commodities allocated 

to, 274, 393. 
With Peru, 22-28, 410. 
Fox, A. Manuel, death in China: Statement by Secre- 
tary Hull, 564. 
France : 

Economic assistance of U.S. to French North Africa, 

318, 337. 
Island possessions in the Pacific, statement by Ameri- 
can Vice Consul at Noum& on U.S. policy re- 
garding, 208. 
Madagascar, occupation by the British, 391. 
Martinique, developments in, 391. 
Policy of U.S. toward, note from Acting Secretary 

Welles, 335. 
Relations of U.S. with, statement by Acting Secre- 
tary Welles, 189. 
Territories in Africa, coorieration of U.S. with French 

National Committee, 273. 
Telecommunication convention (1932), Cairo revi- 
sions (1938), approval for French Colonies, 330. 
Fraser, Peter, Prime Minister of New Zealand: 
Fall of Corregidor, message regarding, 392. 
Radiotelegraphic communications with U.S., ex- 
change of messages with President Roosevelt on 
occasion of opening, 196. 
French Equatorial Africa : Opening of American Con- 
sulate General at Brazzaville, 273. 
French Indochina : American officers in, arrest by 

Japanese, 823. 
French North Africa : U.S. economic assistance to, 318, 

337. 
Friendship treaty between China and Iraq (1942), 

249. 
Frost, Wesley, American Ambassador to Paraguay : 
U.S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 231. 

Gases, poisonous, warning by President Roosevelt to 
Japan on use of, 506. 

Geist, Raymond H., Chief, Division of Commercial 
Affairs of the Department : Addresses on Germany 
and the war, 466; on international economic con- 
flict, 14. 

Generalization of trade-agi-eement duties: Letter from 
President Roosevelt to Secretary of Treasury Mor- 
genthau, 524. 

Geneva Conventions. See Prisoners of war convention ; 
Red Cross convention. 

Geology and Mining Engineering, First Pan American 
Congress at Santiago, Chile, 48. 



574j 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



George II, King of Greece : Visit to U.S., program, 523. 
George VI, King of Great Britain : Birthday, message 

from President Roosevelt, 539. 
Germany : 
Address by Mr. Geist, 466. 
Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 141, 

392. 
Hitler's visit to Finland, statement by Secretary Hull, 

522. 
Mass-terrorization in Czechoslovakia, statement by 

Secretary Hull, 536. 
Mexican declaration of war against, 505. 
Severance of diplomatic relations by Venezuela with, 
6,45. 
Glm4nez, Rafael, Assistant Chief, Central Translating 

Office of the Department : Appointment, 377. 
Great Britain: 

Bases leased by U.S. in Western Hemisphere, remarks 
of President Roosevelt regarding reported pro- 
longation of leases, 230. 
Birthday of the King, message from President Roose- 
velt, 539. 
Boards to deal with raw materials, munitions assign- 
ments, and shipping adjustments, joint with U.S., 
87. 
Caribbean Commission, Anglo-American, creation, 229. 
Economic warfare procedure, coordination with U.S. 

procedure, 153. 
Food Board. Combined, with U.S., 535. 
Occupation of Madagascar by British, 391. 
Prime Minister Churchill, joint statements on con- 
ferences with President Roosevelt at Washing- 
ton, 561. 
Production and Resources Board, Combined, with 

U.S., 535. 
Relief to Greece, joint with U.S., 93, 208. 
Treaties, agreements, etc.— 

Alliance, with Soviet Union and Iran, (1942), text, 

249. 
Extradition, with U.S. (1931), accession on behalf 

of Iiidia, 330. 
Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 190. 
Postal, universal (1939), deposit of instrument of 
ratification, and adherence of certain British 
dependencies, 110. 
White Paper of Sept. 10, 1941, procedure for handling 
problems in lend-lease operations arising in con- 
nection with, 81. 
Greece : 

Independence Day, address by Mr. Berle before the 

American Friends of Greece, 257. 
Relief, joint British-American, 93, 208. 
Visit to U.S. of King George II, 523. 
"Gripsholm", motorship : Voyage from Europe, 522 ; 
to Lourengo Marques for exchange of officials and 
nationals of countries in the Far East with the 
U.S. and other American republics, 536, 553. 



GuachaUa, Dr. Don Luis Fernando, Bolivian Ambassa- 
dor to U.S. : Presentation of credentials, 275. 

Guani, Alberto, Uruguayan Foreign Minister : Exchange 
of correspondence with Acting Secretary Welles 
regarding sinking of Uruguayan vessel "Monte- 
video", 240. 

Guatemala : Visit to U.S. of anthropologist, 154. 

Guayaquil, Ecuador : Earthquake in, death of American 
Vice Consul Slaughter and wife, 440. 

Gufler, Bernard, Assistant Chief, Special Division of 
the Department : Designation, 310. 

Haakon VII, King of Norway : Letter of credence for 

presentation by Mr. Wilhelm von Munthe af Mor- 

genstierue as first Norwegian Ambassador to U.S., 

438. 

Habana, Act of (1940) , 441. 

Hackworth's "Digest of International Law", volume 

III : Publication, 525. 
Haiti (see also American republics) : 
Anniversary of independence, message of President 

Roosevelt, 14. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, national 

commission under, 68. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Diplomatic officers (1928), deposit of instrument of 

ratification, 178. 
Economic collaboration, with U.S. (1942), text of 
memorandum covering agreements reached 
during visit to U.S. of President Lescot, 353. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere (1940), deposit of instru- 
ment of ratification, 159; furnishing of partial 
list of species for inclusion in Annex, 233. 
Trade, with U.S. (1935), exchanges of notes re- 
garding certain provisions pertaining to tariff 
preferences, 174, 384. 
Halibut fishery of the northern Pacific Ocean and Bering 
Sea, convention with Canada for preservation 
(1937) : Regulations under, 358. 
Health: Sanitary convention, international (1926), de- 
posit of instrument of ratification by Turkey, 265. 
Hicks, Knowlton V., Assistant Chief, Visa Division of 

the Department : Designation, 252. 
Highways : 

Churchill-Roosevelt Highway in Trinidad, 261. 
Inter-American, appropriation by U.S. for coopera- 
tion in construction, 13 ; construction through 
Costa Rica, 72. 
Military highway to Alaska, 237. 
Historical international events, December 1941 to April 

1942,428. 
Hitler's visit to Finland, statement by Secretary Hull, 
522. 



INDEX 



574k 



Honduras (see also American republics) : 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), deposit of 
instrument of ratification, 72. 
Visit to U.S. of artist and educator, 247. 
Hornbeck, Stanley K., Adviser on Political Relations. 

Department of State : Addresses on education, war, 

and peace, 512 ; on the war, 452. 
Hoyt, Ira Ford, Passport Agent at New York : Death, 

498. 
Hull, Cordell : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Adjustment of defaulted bonds of Agricultural 
Mortgage Bank of Colombia, 565. 

Deaths of A. Manuel Fox, 564 ; of American Min- 
ister Resident Knabenshue in Iraq, 147; of 
American Vice Consul Slaughter and wife in 
Guayaquil, Ecuador, earthquake, 440; of Gen- 
eral Iglesias of Peru, 384 ; of the wife of Amer- 
ican Ambassador Leahy in France, 375; of 
Wilbur J. Carr, 566. 

Declaration by United Nations, 4. 

Fall of Corregidor, 392. 

Hitler's visit to Finland, 522. 

Mexican declaration of war against XSermany, 
Italy, and Japan, 506. 

National Foreign Trade Week, 47S. 

Nazi mass-terrorization in Czechoslovakia, 536. 

Press-conference remarks of Senator Connally, 79. 

Resignation of President Ortiz of Argentina, .565. 

Settlement of Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dis- 
pute, 94. 

Sinking of Colombian schooner "Resolute", 562. 

Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, re- 
turn of U.S. delegation, 117. 

Views of Brazilian President Vargas on hemi 
spheric solidarity, 79. 

War, 363, 445. 
Correspondence — 

Death of American Minister Resident in Iraq, Paul 
Knabenshue, with Mrs. Knabenshue, 148. 

Death of Sydney Yost Smith, with Mrs. Smith, 499. 

Economic collaboration with Peru, with Peruvian 
Minister of Finance and Commerce Dasso, 367. 

Highway, Inter-American, construction through 
Costa Rica, with Costa Rican Minister of 
Public Works, 73. 

Message of solidarity from Northern Ireland, reply 
of appreciation, 45. 
Mexican adherence to Declaration by United Na- 
tions, with Foreign Minister Padilla, 547. 

Mexican declaration of war against Germany, 
Italy, and Japan, with Foreign Minister Pad- 
illa, 505. 



Hull, Cordell — Continued. 
Correspondence — Continued. 

Mutual-aid agreement with U.S.S.R., wiUi Soviet 

Ambassador Litvinoff, 534. 
Philippine adherence to Declaration by United Na- 
tions, with President Quezon, 547. 
Red Cross insignia, prevention of use for com- 
mercial purposes, with Representative Bloom, 
493. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers 
by Venezuela, message of appreciation to For- 
eign Minister Parra Perez, 45. 
Soviet Union's successful resistance to Nazi ag- 
gression, message of congratulation to People's 
Foreign Commissar Molotov, 562. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics, with Brazilian For- 
eign Minister Aranha, 88. 
Departmental orders (see also under Welles, Sum- 
ner) — 
Abolishment of Division of Exports and Defense 
Aid and Division of Studies and Statistics, 556. 
Appointment of officers, 32, 70, 377, 499, 527, 566. 
Liaison between the Department and the Office of 
War Information, 566. 
Regulations governing traffic in arms, ammunition, 
etc., 522. 
Hungary : 

Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 

6, 79, 141, 273, 392. 
U.S. declaration of war against, 509-510. 
Hurley, Patrick J., American Minister to New Zealand : 
U.S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 155. 

Iglesias, General TeCfilo, of Peru: Death in Washing- 
ton, 384. 
Imports into U.S. (see also Commerce, international; 
Exports from U.S. ; Foreign trade. U.S. ; Treaties, 
agreements, etc.) : 
From Bolivia, 291. 
From Peru (1939-40), 27. 

Suspension of quotas with respect to certain wheat 
and wheat flour, 358. 
Income taxation, double, convention for avoidance be- 
tween U.S. and Canada (1942), 225, 501, 541, 557. 
India : 

Advisory Mission of U. S. to, 209, 230, 260, 433. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Extradition, U.S. and Great Britain (1931), acces- 
sion on behalf of India, 330. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, convention provid- 
ing (1940), 110, 158, 267. 
Indochina. See French Indochina. 
Insurance : Decision of U. S. Supreme Court regarding 
handling of claims of New York branch of First 
Russian Insurance Co., 146. 



5741 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Inter-American Conference on Systems of Economic 
and Financial Control, at Washington, D.C., 567. 
Inter-American Defense Board, 260. 
Inter-American relations. See American republics ; and 

individual coun tries. 
International commissions, committees, conferences, etc. 
See Commissions, committees, etc., international; 
Conferences, congresses, etc., international. 
International Conferences Division of tlie Department : 
Appointment of Clarke L. Willard as an Assistant 
Chief, 358. 
International Fisheries Commission : Regulations 
adopted pursuant to convention for preservation of 
the halibut fishery of the northern Pacific Ocean 
and Bering Sea, 358. 
"International Law, Digest of" : Publication of volume 

III, 525. 
Iquitos, Peru : Opening of American Vice Consulate, 

197. 
Iran : 

Death of Mrs. Lea Burdett at Tabriz, 385. 
Defense vital to U.S., announcement concerning eli- 
gibility for lend-lease aid, 383. 
Treaty of alliance with United Kingdom and Soviet 
Union (1942), text, 249. 
Iraq: 
American Minister Resident (Knabenshue), death, 

147. 
Defense vital to U.S., announcement concerning eli- 
gibility for lend-lease aid, 383. 
Minister to U.S. (Jawdat), presentation of creden- 
tials, 403. 
Treaty of friendship with China (1942), signature, 
249. 
Ireland, Northern : Message of solidarity with U.S. from 
House of Commons, transmission by British For- 
eign Secretary Eden and reply from Secretary Hull, 
45. 
Itabira mining properties in Brazil : Development, ar- 
rangement between U.S. and Brazil regarding, 206. 
Italian-American Rally at Washington : Address by Mr. 

Acheson, 510. 
Italy : 
Address by Mr. Acheson, 510. 

Court action by Italian Amba.ssador to U.S., sus- 
pension during wartime by U.S. Supreme Court, 
147. 
Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 66, 

141, 273, 892. 

Mexican declaration of war against, 505. 
Severance of diplomatic relations by Venezuela with, 
6, 45. 

Japan (see also Far East) : 

Alleged killing of nationals in Philippines, 5. 
Arrest of American officers in French Indochina, 323. 
Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 7, 

142, 273, 392, 536, 553, 563. 



Japan — Continued. 

Mexican declaration of war against, 505. 
Severance of diplomatic relations by Venezuela with, 

6,45. 
Warning by President Roosevelt regarding use of 
poisonous gases, 506. 
Jawdat, Ali, Minister of Iraq to U.S. : Presentation of 

credentials, 403. 
Jidda, Saudi Arabia : Opening of American Legation, 

224. 
Johnson, HaUett, Assistant Chief, Division of Defense 

Materials of the Department : Designation, 252-. 
Johnson. Col. Louis, Personal Representative of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt in India : Appointment, 260. 
Johnston, Felton M., Assistant to Assistant Secretary of 

State Long: Appointment, 329. 
Joint Economics Committees, Canada - United States: 
Recommendations for agricultural arrangements 
between the two countries, 313. 
Joint Mexican- United States Defense Commission, 

67, 193. 
Judicial and Police Authorities, Inter-American Con- 
ference at Buenos Aires, 480. 

Key, David McK., Assistant Liaison Officer in the 
Liaison Office, Office of the Under Secretary: Ap- 
pointment. 70. 

Knabenshue, Paul, American Minister Resident in 
Iraq : Death, 147. 

Knox, Charles F., Jr., Assistant Chief, American Hem- 
isphere Exports Office of the Department: Desig- 
nation, 499. 

"Kuugsholm", Swedish motorship: Acquisition by U.S. 
from Sweden, 7. 

Kuppinger, Eldred D., Assistant Chief, Special Divi- 
sion of the Department : Designation, 310. 

Labor : 
Riots at Nassau, 527. 

Seamen, employment rules governing, 321. 
Unemployment insurance laws of U.S. and Canada, 
agreement integrating (1942), 376. 
Labouisse, Henry R., Jr., Assistant Chief, Division of 
Defense Materials of the Department : Appoint- 
ment, 32. 
Lane, Arthur Bliss: 

American Ambassador to Colombia, U.S. Senate con- 
firmation of nomination, 231. 
Anniversary of accession of King Peter II of Tugo- 
slavia, telegram to, 200. 
Latin America. See American republics ; and individual 

countries. 
Leahy, Mrs. William D., wife of American Ambassador 

to France : Death, 375. 
Lease-lend. See Lend-lease. 

Legal decisions : Supremacy of Federal over State jwlicy 
in matter of recognition of foreign government, 146. 



INDEX 



574m 



Legislation (see also United States, Congress), 35, 51, 

74, 84, 112, 148, 160, 179, 19!), 224, 234, 253, 267, 310, 

331, 359, 377, 388, 440, 482, 502, 541, 558, 573. 

Lend-lease (see also Economics; Finance; Mutual aid) : 

Aid to Brazil 206 ; Czechoslovakia, 44 ; Iraq and Iran, 

383. 
Countries declared vital to U.S. defense, list, 243. 
Operations, 81, 242, 3G5, 434. 
L'Heureux, Herv6 J., Assistant Chief, Visa Division of 

the Department : Designation, 252. 
Liaison Office in Office of the Under Secretary of State: 
Designation of David McK. Key as Assistant Liai- 
son Officer in, 70. 
Liberia : 
Conciliation treaty with U.S. (1939), Permanent In- 
ternational Commission under, 34. 
Publications, official, agreement for exchange with 
U.S. (1942), signature, 248. 
Lidice, Czechoslovakia : Reports of demolition by Nazis, 

statement by Secretary Hull, 536. 
Litvinoff, Maxim, Soviet Ambassador at Washington : 
Exchange of correspondence with Secretary Hull 
regarding mutual-aid agreement between U.S. and 
U.S.S.R., 534. 
Long, Boaz, American Ambassador to Ecuador: U.S. 

Senate confirmation of nomination, 231. 
Long, Breckinridge, Assistant Secretary of State: Ad- 
dress before Eighth Pan American Child Congress, 
405. 
Ix)udon, Dr. Alexander, Netherland Ambassador to the 

U.S. : Presentation of credentials, 403. 
Luthringer, George P., Assistant Chief. Financial Divi- 
sion of the Department : Designation, 70. 
Luxembourg : Anniversary of German invasion, address 

by Mr. Berle, 427. 
Lyon, Frederick B. : Designation as Executive Assistant 
to Assistant Secretary Berle and as Assistant Chief 
of the Division of Foreign Activity Correlation, 566. 

Mackenzie King, W. L., Prime Minister of Canada : 
Joint statement with President Roosevelt on coor- 
dination of air training programs of United Na- 
tions, 336. 

MacMurray, John Van Antwerp : 
Resignation as American Ambassador to Turkey, 48. 
Appointment as Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State, 527. 

MacVeagh, Lincoln, American Minister to Union of 
South Africa : U.S. Senate confirmation of nomina- 
tion, 481. 

Madagascar : Occupation by the British, 391. 

Manila : Government officials interned in, 472. 

Maritime Labor, Special Interdepartmental Committee 
on, 321. 

Martinique : Developments in, visit of Admiral Hoover 
and Mr. Reber, 391. 



Martins, Carlos, Brazilian Ambassador to U.S. : State- 
ment on occasion of signing of U.S.-Brazilian eco- 
nomic agreements, 208. 
Mass-terrorization by the Nazis in Czechoslovakia, 536. 
McBride, George M. : Appointment as U.S. technical 
adviser to boundary experts of Peru and Ecuador, 
496. 
Memorial Day address by Under Secretary Welles, 485. 
Merchant, Livingston T., Assistant Chief, Division of 
Defense Materials of the Department: Appoint- 
ment. 358. 
Merchant marine of Chile: Rules governing, 239. 
Mexico {i-re also American republics) : 
American Vice Consulate at Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, 

opening, 51. 
Conference of U.S. Foreign Service officers at Mexico 

City, 408. 
Declaration of war on Germany, Italy, and Japan — 
Exchange of correspondence between Foreign Min- 
ister Padilla and Secretary Hull, 505. 
Statement by Secretary Hull, 506. 
Telegram from President Roosevelt to President 
Avila Camacho, 506. 
Defense, Joint Commission with U.S., 67, 193. 
Development Commission, Inter-American, national 

commission under, 68. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Claims, 
1934, special, with U.S., payment to U.S. under, 13. 
1941, approval, 178; ratification by U.S., 159; 
payment to U.S. on exchange of ratifica- 
tions, 274, 309; proclamation by U.S. Presi- 
dent, 330. 
Declaration by United Nations (1942), adherence, 

546. 
Economic collaboration with U.S. (1942), joint 
statement by Under Secretary Welles and 
Foreign Minister Padilla, 325. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), deposit of 
instrument of ratification, 309. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere (1940), deposit of in- 
strument of ratification, 330. 
Petroleum properties expropriated in. 

Agreement ijroviding for determination of com- 
pensation, with U.S. (1941), appointment of 
U.S. and Mexican experts to make determi- 
nation, 12 ; approval, 178. 
Agreement on compensation, with U.S. (1942), 
text, 351 ; exchange of telegrams between 
President Roosevelt and President Avila 
Camacho, 352. 
Trade, with U.S., notice of intention to negotiate, 
278; lists of products on which U.S. will con- 
sider granting concessions, 280, 328, 374. 
Visit to U.S. of editor and author, 439. 



574n 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Michels, SeCor Don Rodolfo, Chilean Ambassador to 
U.S. : Note to Acting Secretary Welles regarding 
rules governing Chilean merchant marine during 
wartime, 239. 
Mihajlovic, General Draza, of Yugoslavia : Demands 
for surrender, recording of protest by Royal Yugo- 
slav Government regarding, 364. 
Mihanovich, Argentine Navigation Company : Message 
of appreciation for U.S. assistance to crew of tor- 
pedoed tanker "Victoria", 394. 
Mile High Club of Denver, Colo. : Address by Mr. 

Stewart before, 489. 
Military highway to Alaska, 237. 
Military missions, U.S. to — • 
Colombia, 501. 
Peru, 234. 
Military service: Application of Selective Training and 
Service Act to Canadian nationals residing in U.S., 
315. 
Miller's "Treaties and Other International Acts", vol- 
ume 6 : Publication, 569. 
Mining Engineering and Geology, First Pan American 

Congress at Santiago, Chile, 48. 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American Republics, 
Third Meeting, at Rio de Janeiro, 12, 55, 77, 88, 117. 
Missions, U.S. : 

Advisory, to India, 209, 230, 260, 433. 
Agricultural, to Saudi Arabia, 261. 
Military, to Colombia, 501 ; to Peru, 234. 
Naval, to Brazil, 481. 

Procedure with regard to dispatch of missions 
abroad, 476. 
Mixed Commission, U.S. and Argentina : Establishment, 

373. 
Molotov, v. M., People's Commissar of Foreign Affairs 
of the Soviet Union : Conversations with President 
Roosevelt regarding the war, 531. 
"Montevideo" : Sinking, 240. 

Morgenthau, Henry, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury: 
Statement issued jointly with Chinese Foreign 
Minister- Soong on financial agreement between 
U.S. and China, 263. 
Munitions. Sec Arms and munitions. 
Munitions Assignments Board, Combined (British- 
American) : Establishment, 87. 
Munthe af Morgenstierne, Wilhelm, Norwegian Am- 
bassador to U.S. : Presentation of credentials, 4.38. 
Murray, Wallace S., Adviser on Political Relations, 

Department of State: Appointment, 252. 
Mutual-aid agreements (1942), U.S. and — 
Belgium, 551. 
China, 507. 
Great Britain, 190. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 531. 

Naon, Dr. Romulo S., former Argentine Ambassador to 
U.S. : Death, 13. 



Nash, Walter, Minister of New Zealand to U.S. : Pres- 
entation of credentials, 173. 
Nassau : Labor riots at, 527. 
National Conference of Christians and Jews: Address 

by Mr. Geist before, 466. 
National Dry Goods Association, New York, N.Y. : Ad- 
dress by Mr. Berle before, 63. 
National Farm Institute, Des Moines, Iowa : Address 

by Mr. Berle before, 168. 
National Foreign Trade Week: Statement by Secretary 

HuU, 478. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere, convention (1940), 159, 178, 
198, 233, 248, 330, 387. 
Naval mission, U.S. to Brazil, 481. 
Near East : 
Agricultural mission of U.S. to Saudi Arabia, 261. 
Radio-photo service between U.S. and Egypt, opening, 
439. 
Near Eastern All'airs Division of the Department: Ap- 
pointment of Paul H. Ailing as Chief, 252. 
Nebraska State Bar Association : Address by Mr. Gelst 

before, 14. 
Netherlands : 
Anniversary of German invasion, address by Mr. 

Berle, 427. 
Defense of Curagao and Aruba, U.S. assistance to 

armed forces in, 153. 
Embassy rank for representation in U.S., 402. 
Preservation of assets at time of German invasion, 
memorandum from Netherlands Minister to 
Secretary of State, 241. 
Netherlands West Indies : American Vice Consulate at 

Aruba, Curagao, opening, 71. 
"Network of the Americas" radio program : Inaugu- 
ration by Columbia Broadcasting System, 473. 
New Zealand : 

American Minister (Hurley), U.S. Senate confirma- 
tion of nomination, 155. 
Message from Prime Minister Fraser regarding fall 

of Corregidor, 392. 
Minister to U.S. (Nash), presentation of credentials, 

173. 
Po.stal concessions to Allied forces in, 404. 
Radiotelegrapliic communications, opening with U.S., 
exchange of messages between President Roose- 
velt and Prime Minister Fraser, 196. 
Newfoundland : 

Adherence to North American regional broadcasting 

agreement (1937), 572. 
Rescue of personnel from U.S.S. "Truxton" and 
U.S.S. "Pollux" by people of St. Lawrence, 193. 
Nicaragua (see also American republics) : 

American Minister (Stewart), U.S. Senate confirma- 
tion of nomination, 232. 



INDEX 



574o 



Nicaragua — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Economic collaboration, with U.S. (1942), 368. 
European colonics and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), deposit of 
instrument of ratification, 481. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American (1940), deposit 
of instrument of ratification, 267. 
Visit to U.S. of educator from, 308. 
North American regional broadcasting agreement, 1937 : 

Adherence of Newfoundland, 572. 
North Carolina, University of : Address by Mr. Horn- 
beck under auspices of International Relations 
Club, 452. 
Norway : 

Embassy rank for representation in U.S., 488. 
Second anniversary of invasion by Germany, mes- 
sage of President Roosevelt to King Haakon 
VII, 323. 
Notter, Harley A., Assistant Chief, Division of Special 
Research of the Department : Designation, 252. 

Office of War Information : Liaison with State Depart- 
ment, 566. 
Opium : International conventions of 1925 and 1931, 178. 
Orders. See Departmental orders under Hull, Cordell 

and Welles, Sumner ; and Executive orders. 
Ortiz, Dr. Roberto M., President of Argentina : 

Reply to message of President Roosevelt on Argen- 
tine anniversary of independence, 497. 
Resignation, statement by Secretary Hull, 565. 

Pacific area, war in. See Far East ; The War. 
Pacific island possessions of France : Statement on U.S. 

policy toward, 208. 
Padilla, Dr. Ezequiel, Minister for Foreign Affairs of 
Mexico : 
Correspondence with Secretary Hull regarding — 
Mexican adherence to Declaration by United Na- 
tions, 546. 
Mexican declaration of war against Axis powers, 
505. 
Joint statement with Acting Secretary WeUes on 
U.S.-Mexican economic collaboration, 325. 
Pan America. See American republics. 
Pan American Child Congress, Eighth, at Washington, 

D.C., 222. 
Pan American Congress of Mining Engineering and 

Geology, at Santiago, Chile, 48. 
Pan American Day : Informal remarks of President 

Roosevelt to Pan American Union, 355. 
Panama (see also American republics) : 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Lease of defense sites, with U.S. (1942), text, 448. 
Publications, oflBcial, exchange, with U.S. (1941), 
signature, 376. 
Visit to U.S. of educator, 247. 



Paraguay (see also American republics) : 
Ambassador to U.S. (Veliizquez), presentation of 

credentials, 277. 
American Amba.ssador (Frost), U.S. Senate confirma- 
tion of nomination, 231. 
Anniversary of independence, message of President 

Roosevelt, 437. 
Legation in U.S. and American Legation in, elevation 

to rank of Embassy, 48. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 

telegram from President Roosevelt, 91. 
Visit to U.S. of Collector of Internal Revenue, 375. 
Parra-Perez, Dr. C, Foreign Minister of Venezuela; 

Visit to the U.S., 498. 
Passports : 
Agency at Miami, Fla., establishment, 95. 
Agent at New York (Hoyt), death, 498. 
American citizens, verification requirements, 261, 

480 ; seamen, requirements, 231, 292, 437, 563. 
Fees for passport visas, agreement between U.S. and 
Argentina for reciprocal waiver, 441. 
Pasvolsky, Leo, Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State: Address on the problem of economic peace 
after the war, 210, 
Peace : 
Address by Mr. Hornbeck regarding part of educa- 
tion in war and peace, 512. 
Economic peace after the war, address by Mr. Pas- 
volsky, 210. 
Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dispute, settlement, 

94, 194. 
Treaty for advancement of, U.S. and Union of South 
Africa (1940), 83. 
Pell, Robert T., Assistant Chief, Division of Current 
Information of the Department : Appointment, 70. 
Peru (see also American republics) : 
American Vice Consulate at Iquitos, opening, 197. 
Boundary Demarcation Commission, with Ecuador, 

appointment of U.S. technical adviser, 496. 
Death in Washington of General Iglesias, 384. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 

telegram from President Roosevelt, 89. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Boundary dispute with Ecuador, settlement (1942), 
Approval, 194. 

Resolution of Peruvian Congress expressing ap- 
preciation, 194. 
Statements by Secretary Hull, 94 ; Acting Secre- 
tary Welles, 194. 
Telegrams from President Roosevelt to Presi- 
dents of both countries, 94. 
Text, 195. 
Economic collaboration, with U.S. (1942), 365. 
Military mission, U.S. (1942), signature, 234. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere (1940), ratification, 248. 



574p 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Peru — Continued. 

Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Trade, with U.S., 

Notice of intention to negotiate, 22. 
Signature (1942), 410. 
Visit to U.S. of President Pcado, 356, 384, 395; of 
congre.ssman, 374 ; of critic and educator, 94 ; 
of engineer, 375. 
Peter II, King of Yugoslavia : 
Auniversai'y of accession, messages from President 
Roosevelt and former American Minister Lane, 
260. 
Visit to U.S., 554. 
Petroleum : 
Properties expropriated In Mexico — 

1941 agreement providing for determination of 
compensation, U.S. and Jlexico, appointment 
of U.S. and Mexican experts to make deter- 
mination, 12 ; approval by Mexico, 178. 

1942 agreement on compensation, U.S. and Mexico, 
text, 351 ; exchange of telegrams between 
President Roosevelt and President Avila Ca- 
macho, 352. 

Standard Oil Company (New Jersey), agreement, 

172; payment by Bolivian Government, 372. 
Wood-Oil Loan of U.S. to China (1939), repayment, 
260. 
Philippines, Commonwealth of the : 
Alleged killing of Japanese nationals in Davao, 5. 
Declaration by United Nations (1942), adherence, 

547. 
Fall of Corregidor, 392. 

Radio message of President Roosevelt to people of, 5. 
U.S. Government oflScials interned in Manila, 472. 
Plitt, Edwin A., Assistant Chief, Special Division of the 

Department : Designation, 310. 
Poisonous gases, warning by President Roosevelt to 

Japan on use of, 506. 
Police and Judicial Authorities, Inter-American Con- 
ference at Buenos Aires, 480. 
Political Defense, Inter-American Emergency Advisory 

Committee for, 322. 
Political Relations, Adviser on : Appointment of Wal- 
lace S. JInrray as, 252. 
"Pollux", U.S.S. : Rescue of personnel by people of St. 

Lawrence, Newfoundland, 193. 
Portugal : Guarantor for exchange on Portuguese terri- 
tory of Axis and American diplomats and nationals, 
392. 
Postal concessions by New Zealand to Allied forces, 404. 
Postal convention, universal (1939), 110, 423, 528. 
Powers of attorney, protocol on uniformity (1940) : 
Ratification, U.S. Senate advice and consent to, 
266, by U.S. President, 330, deposit of instrument 
by U.S., 422; proclamation by U.S. President, 501. 
Prado Ugarteche, Dr. Manuel, President of Peru : Visit 

to U.S., 356, 384, 395. 
President, U.S. See Roosevelt, Franklin D. 



Prisoners of war: 
Americans in the Far East, 92. 

Convention (1929), adherence of El Salvador, 233; 
application of provisions in the present war, 445. 
Treatment of, 445. 
Proclaimed list of certain blocked nationals : 
In Costa Rica, termination of U.S. -Costa Rican 

coordination agreement of 1941, 240. 
Supplement 7, 67. 
Revision I, 154, 
Supplement 1, 220 ; 
Supplement 2, 274 ; 
Supplement 3, 337 ; 
Supplement 4, 394. 
Revision II, 433, 
Supplement 1, 492; 
Supplement 2, 522; 
Supplement 3. 563. 
Proclamations {sec alto Executive orders) : 

Alien enemies, additional regulations governing con- 
duct in U.S., 66. 
Claims convention with Mexico (1941), 330. 
Coffee agreement, inter- American (1940), entry into 
force, supplementary proclamation declaring, 225. 
Enumeration of arms, ammunition, and implements 

of war, 323. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
convention on provisional administration (1&40), 
158. 
Indian Institute, Inter-American, convention provid- 
ing (1&40), 158. . 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 

Western Hemisphere, convention (1940), 387. 
Powers of attorney, protocol on uniformity (1940), 

501. 
Sugar Act of 1937, suspension of title II (quota pro- 
visions), 358. 
Taxation convention with Canada (1942), .557. 
Trade agreement, supplementary, with Cuba (19^11), 

22. 
Wheat and wheat flour, suspension of import quotas 
on certain varieties, 358. 
Production and Resources Board, Combined, U.S. and 

Great Britain, 535. 
Property : 

American, in enemy or enemy-occupied territory, 93. 
Assets of Netherlands Government and nationals, 
measures of preservation at time of German inva- 
sion, 241. 
Petroleum properties expropriated In Mexico, agree- 
ments regarding compensation, 12, 178, 351. 
Publications (see also Regulations) : 

Agreements for exchange of official publications, sig- 
nature, between U.S. and — 
Bolivia (1942), 441. 
El Salvador (1941), 226. 
Liberia (1942), 248. 
Panama (1941), 376. 



INDEX 



574q 



Publications — Continued. 

U.S. Congress, 35, 51, 74, 84, 112, 148, 160, 179, 199, 
224, 234, 253, 267, 310, 831, 359, 377, 388, 440, 482, 
502, 541, 558, 573. 
U.S. Department of State— 

"Digest of International Law", volume III, 525. 
"Foreign Relations of the United States, 1927", 

volumes I, II, and III, .525. 
List, 34, 51. 74, 112, 149, 160, 179, 198, 234, 253, 267, 
329, 359, 377, 387, 423, 442, 482, 500, 527, 541, 
557, 570. 
"Treaties and Other International Acts", volume 6, 
569. 
Other U.S. Government agencies, 51, 84, 112, 149, 160, 
179, 329, 423, 500. 

Quezon, Dr. Manuel L., President of the Commonwealth 
of the Philippines : Exchange of correspondence with 
Secretary Hull regarding Philippine adherence to 
Declaration by United Nations, 547. 

Quotas, import : Suspension with respect to certain wheat 
and wheat flour, 358. 

Eadiocommunications : "Network of the Americas" 
program, inauguration by Columbia Broadcasting 
System, 473. 
Radio-photo service between U.S. and Egypt: Opening, 

439. 
Radiotelegraph ic communications with New Zealand: 
Opening, exchange of messages between President 
Roosevelt and Prime Minister Eraser, 196. 
Ravndal, Olaf, Assistant Chief, American Hemisphere 
Exports Office of the Department : Appointment, 
499. 
Raw Materials Board, Combined (British- American) : 

Establishment, 87. 
Reciprocity Information, Committee for, public notices 
regarding trade-agreement negotiations between 
U.S. and— 
Bolivia, 288. 
Mexico, 279, 327, 374. 
Peru, 23. 
Recognition of foreign governments by U.S. : Supreme 
Court decision regarding supremacy of Federal 
over State policy in matters of, 146. 
Red Cross : 

Convention (1929), adherence of El Salvador, 233; 
proposed legislation to implement provisions, 
492. 
Insignia, use for commercial purposes, 492. 
Registration of agents of foreign principals: 
Rules and regulations regarding, 564. 
Transfer of duties from Secretary of State to Attor- 
ney General, 496. 
Regulations of U.S. Government agencies, 34, 51, 84, 
112, 175, 199, 267, 331, 3.59, 377, 423, 437, 495, 522. 



Relief : 

Coordination of activities by the President's Commit- 
tee on War Relief Agencies, 80. 
To belligerents, U.S. contributions — 
Revision of rules and regulations, 495. 
Tabulation of funds, 32, 95, 226, 261, 292, 385, 495, 
564. 
To Greece, joint British-American, 93, 208. 
Repatriation. See under Americans ; and individual 

countries. 
"Resolute", Colombian schooner: Sinking, 662. 
Resources and Production Board, Combined, U.S. and 

Great Britain, 535. 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil : Third Meeting of Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics, 12, 
55, 77, 88, 117. 
Rios Morales, Dr. Juan Antonio, President of Chile: 
Inauguration, designation of American Ambassa- 
dor Bowers as special representative of President 
Roosevelt, 248; exchange of messages with Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 275. 
Riots at Nassau, 527. 

Roosevelt, Franklin D. (see also Executive orders; 
Proclamations) : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 
Bases leased from Great Britain in the Western 
Hemisphere, denial of reported prolongation 
of leases, 230. 
Canadian Victory Loan drive, 163. 
Conferences with Prime Minister Churchill at 

Washington, joint statements, 561. 
Coordination of air training programs of United 
Nations, joint statement with Prime Minister 
Mackenzie King, 336. 
Filipino people, message to, 5. 
Flag Day, adlierence of Mexico and Philippines 

to Declaration by United Nations, 545. 
Foreign diplomatic representatives, presentation 
of credentials, remarks in reply to, 173, 276, 
278, 404, 538. 
Opening of direct radio-photo service between 

U.S. and Egypt, 439. 
Pan American Child Congress, Eighth, personal 

message to, 405. 
Pan American Day, 355. 

President Prado of Peru on visit to U.S., welcom- 
ing statement to, 395. 
The war, address to the Nation, 381. 
Warning to Japan regarding the use of poisonous 

gases, 506. 
Washington's Birthday, 183. 
Correspondence — 
Anniversaries of independence, 
Argentina, with President Ortiz and Acting 
President Castillo, 497. 



574r 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Roosevelt, Franklin D. — Continued. 
Correspondence — Continued. 

Anniversaries of independence — Continued. 
Haiti, with President Lescot, 14. 
Paraguay, with President Morinigo, 437. 

Anniversary of accession of King Peter II of Yugo- 
slavia, with King Peter, 260. 

Birthday of King George VI of Great Britain, 539. 

Credentials for presentation by Mr. Biddle as first 
American Ambassador to Norway, 438 ; as first 
American Ambassador to the Netherlands, 
403. 

Financial aid to China, with General Chiang Kai- 
shek, 142. 

Generalization of trade-agreement duties, with 
Secretary of Treasury Morgenthau, 524. 

Inauguration of President of Chile, with President 
Rlos, 275. 

Lend-lease aid to Czechoslovakia, with Leud-Lease 
Administrator, 44. 

Mexican declaration of war against Germany, 
Italy, and Japan, with President Avila 
Camacho, 506. 

Norway, second anniversary of invasion by Ger- 
many, with King Haakon VII, 323. 

Petroleum properties expropriated in Mexico, 
agreement on compensation, with President 
Avila Camacho, 353. 

Radiotelegraphic communications with New Zea- 
land, with Prime Minister Fraser, 196. 

Rescue of personnel of U.S.S. "Truxton" and U.S.S. 
"Pollux" by people of St. Lawrence, Newfound- 
land, message of appreciation, 193. 

Resignation of American Ambassador to Spain 
(Weddell), letter of acceptance, ,306. 

Settlement of Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dis- 
pute, telegrams of congratulations to President 
of Ecuador and President of Peru, 94. 

Severances of diplomatic relations by certain 
American republics, messages of appreciation, 
to President Peiiaranda of Bolivia, 90; Presi- 
dent Vargas of Brazil, 89; President Arroyo 
Del Rio of Ecuador, 91 ; President Morinigo of 
Paraguay, 91; President Prado of Peru, 89; 
President Baldomir of Uruguay, 90; President 
Medina Angarita of Venezuela, 45. 

Use of Red Cross insignia for commercial pur- 
poses, with Senator Van Nuys and Repre- 
sentative Bloom, 492. 
Messages to Congress — 

Annual (Jan. 6), 39. 

June 2, recommendation of recognition of state of 

war with Bulgaria, Hungary, and Rumania, 

509. 

Report to Congress on lend-lease operations (March 

11, 1942), 242. 

Roosevelt-Churchill Highway in Trinidad, British West 

Indies, 261. 



Roosevelt Fellowship program, 69. 
Ruanda-Urundi : Adherence to international conven- 
tions of 1925 and 1931 on opium and distribution 
of narcotic drugs, 178. 
Rubber production : 

In the Amazon valley, agreement between U.S. and 

Brazil for development, 206. 
In Costa Rica, agreement with U.S., for purchase, 
554. 
Rumania : 

Exchange of diplomats and nationals with U.S., 6, 

66, 141, 392. 
U.S. declaration of war against, 509-510. 
Russell, Francis H., Assistant Chief, Division of World 
Trade Intelligence of the Department : Appoint- 
ment, 358. 

Sabotage and subversive activities in Western Hemi- 
sphere, control : Purpose of Emergency Advisory 
Committee for Political Defense, 322. 
St. Lawrence', Newfoundland ; Rescue of personnel 
from U.S.S. "Truxton" and U.S.S. "Pollux" by 
people of, 193. 
St. Lucia, British West Indies: Opening of American 

Consulate, 33. 
Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico : Opening of American 

Vice Consulate, 51. 
Salisbury, Laurence E., Assistant Chief, Far Eastern 
Affairs Division of the Department : Designation, 
70. 
Sanitary convention, international (1928) : Deposit of 

instrument of ratification by Turkey, 265. 
Saudi Arabia : 
Agricultural Mission of U.S. to, 261. 
American Legation at Jidda, opening, 224. 
Schurz, William L., Assistant Chief, Division of Cultural 

Relations of the Department: Appointment, 223. 
Scotten, Robert M., American Minister to Costa Rica : 

U. S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 231. 
Seamen : 
American, passport and travel requirements, 231, 292, 

437, 563. 
Employment rules governing, adoption by War Ship- 
ping Administrator, 321. 
Secretary of State, U.S. See Hull, Cordell. 
Selective Training and Service Act of 1940: Arrange- 
ment with Canada regarding application to Cana- 
dian nationals residing in the U.S., 315. 
.Senate, U.S. See under United States, Congress. 
Severances of diplomatic relations (table), 338. 
Shipping : 
Acquisition by U.S. of Swedish ship "Kungsholm", 7. 
Chilean merchant marine, rules governing, 239. 
Combined Shipping Adjustment Board, British-Amer- 
ican, establishment, 88. 
Employment of seamen, rules governing, 321. 



INDEX 



574s 



Shipping — Continued. 

Sinking of Colombian schooner "Resolute", state- 
ment by Secretary Hull, 562 ; of Uruguayan ves- 
sel "Montevideo", 240. 
Torpedoing of Argentine tanker "Victoria", U.S. as- 
sistance to crew, 394. 
Slaughter, John M., Vice Consul at Guayaquil, Ecua- 
dor: Death in earthquake, 440. 
Smith, Sydney Yost, Principal Administrative Assistant 
and Drafting Officer of the Department : Death, 
499. 
Sobrino, Epifanio J., Chilean student in aviation train- 
ing program in U.S. : Death, 326. 
Solicitation and collection of contributions for relief in 

belligerent countries. See Relief. 
Soong, T. v.. Minister for Foreign Affairs of China : 
Statement issued jointly with Secretary Morgen- 
thau on financial agreement between U.S. and 
China, 263. 
South Africa, Union of : 
American Minister (MacVeagh), U.S. Senate con- 
firmation of nomination, 481. 
Peace-advancement treaty with U.S. (1940), inter- 
national commission under, 83. 
South America. See American republics ; amd indi- 
vidual countries. 
Souza Costa, Dr. Arthur de. Minister of Finance of 
Brazil: Economic agreements with U.S., exchange 
of notes with Acting Secretary Welles, 206 ; state- 
ment on occasion of signature, 207. 
Spain: American Ambassador (Weddell), resignation, 

306. 
Special Division of the Department : Designation of 
Edwin A. Plitt, Frederik van den Arend, Bernard 
Gufler, Eldred D. Kuppinger, and Albert E. Clat- 
tenburg, Jr., as Assistant Chiefs, 310. 
Special Interdepartmental Committee on Maritime 

Labor, 321. 
Special Research Division of the Department : Appoint- 
ment as Assistant Chiefs of Charles W. Yost and 
Henry J. Wadleigh, 566; designation as an Assist- 
ant Chief of Harley A. Notter, 252. 
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) : Agreement with 
Bolivia on oil properties and related matters, 172 ; 
payment by Bolivian Government, 372. 
Standley, William H., American Ambassador to the 
Soviet Union : U.S. Senate confirmation of nomina- 
tion, 155. 
State, Department of (see also Hull, Cordell ; Publi- 
cations; United States, Foreign Service) : 
American Hemisphere Exports Office, appointment of 
Olaf Ravndal and designation of Albert M. Doyle 
and Charles F. Knox, Jr., as Assistant Chiefs, 499. 
American Republics Division, appointment of Philip 
W. Bonsai as Chief, 252 ; designation of Selden 
Chapin as an Assistant Chief, 223; transfer of 
certain duties to Cultural Relations Division, 
357. 



State, Department of — Continued. 

Assistant Secretaries — 

Mr. Berle, designation of Frederick B. Lyon as 

Executive Assistant, 566. 
Mr. Long, appointment of Felton M. Johnston as 
Assistant on legislative matters, 329; des- 
ignation of George L. Brandt as Executive 
Assistant, 377. 

Budget recommendation for 1943, 46. 

Central Translating Office, appointment of Rafael 
Gim^nez as Assistant Chief, 377. 

Cultural Relations Division, appointment of William 
L. Schurz as an Assistant Chief, 223; transfer of 
certain duties from American Republics Divi- 
sion, 357. 

Current Information Division, appointment of Rob- 
ert T. Pell as Assistant Chief, 70; liaison with 
Office of War Information, 566. 

Deaths, of Wilbur J. Carr, 566 ; of Ira F. Hoyt, 498 ; 
of Sydney Yost Smith, 499. 

Defense Materials Division, appointments as As- 
sistant Chiefs of Courtney C. Brown, 499 ; T. Ross 
Cissel, Jr., 358 ; Henry R. Labouisse, Jr., 32 ; Liv- 
ingston T. Merchant, 358 ; designation as an As- 
sistant Chief of Hallett Johnson, 252. 

Departmental orders, 32, 70, 223, 252, 310, 329, 357, 
358, 377, 476, 499, 527, 556, 566. 

Dispatch of missions abroad, procedure with regard 
to, 476. 

Document of Union for Democratic Action alleged to 
be in Department files, false assertion regard- 
ing, 480. 

European Affairs Division, appointment of Hugh S. 
Gumming, Jr., as an Assistant Chief, 223. 

Exports and Defense Aid Division, abolishment, 556. 

Far Eastern Affairs Division, designation of Lau- 
rence E. Salisbury as Assistant Chief, 70. 

Financial Division, designation of George F. Luth- 
ringer as Assistant Chief, 70. 

Foreign Activity Correlation Division, designation 
of Frederick B. Lyon as Assistant Chief, 566. 

International Conferences Division, appointment of 
Clarke L. Willard as an Assistant Chief, 358. 

Liaison Office in Office of the Under Secretary, des- 
ignation of David McK. Key as Assistant Liaison 
Officer in, 70. 

Near Eastern Affairs Division, appointment of Paul 
H. Ailing as Chief, 252. 

Passport agency at Miami, Fla., establishment, 95. 

Political Relations, Adviser on, appointment of Wal- 
lace S. Murray, 252. 

Positions affected by amendment to Civil Service 
Rules excepting certain iwsitions from exam- 
ination, 33. 



574t 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



State, Department of — Continued. 
Public notices regarding trade-agreement negotiations 
with — 
Bolivia, 287. 
Mexico, 279. 
Peru, 22. 
Registration of agents of foreign principals, transfer 

of duties to Attorney General, 496. 
Regulations on entry into and departure from U.S., 

231, 261, 292, 437, 480, 563. 
Relations and functions of State Department and 
Board of Economic Warfare, clarification, 475. 
Special Assistant to the Secretary of State, appoint- 
ment of John Van Antwerp MacMurray as, 527. 
Special Division, designation as Assistant Chiefs of 
Edwin A. Plitt, Prederik van den Arend, Bernard 
Gufler, Eldred D. Kuppinger, and Albert E. 
Clattenburg, Jr., 310. 
Special Research Division, appointment of Charles 
W. Yost and Henry J. Wadleigh as Assistant 
Chief.s, 566; designation of Harley A. Notter as 
an Assistant Chief, 252. 
Studies and Statistics Division, appointment of Don- 
ald C. Blaisdell as an Assistant Chief, 223; 
abolishment of Division, 556. 
Visa Division, designation of Howard K. Travers as 
Chief, 566; of Knowlton V. Hicks and Herv6 J. 
L'Heureux as Assistant Chiefs, 252. 
World Trade Intelligence Division, appointment of 
Francis H. Russell as an Assistant Chief, 358. 
Statements, addresses, etc. See under names of indi- 
viduals and specific subjects. 
Steinhardt, Laurence A., American Ambassador to 
Turkey : U.S. Senate conlirmatiou of nomination, 
70. 
Stewart, James B., appointed American Minister to 
Nicaragua : 
Address on Switzerland, 489. 
U.S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 232. 
Students : 
Chilean in U.S. for aviation training, death of stu- 
dent pilot, 326. 
Chinese in U.S., opportunities for employment for 

those unable to return home during war, 328. 
Roosevelt Fellowship program for exchanges with 
other American republics, 69. 
Studies and Statistics Division of the Department : 
Appointment of Donald C. Blaisdell as an Assistant 

Chief, 223. 
Abolishment, 556. 
Sugar Act of 1937: Suspension of title II (quota jjro- 

visions), 358. 
Sweden : Acquisition by U.S. of motorship "Kungs- 

hohn", 7. 
Switzerland : 
Address by former American Consul General at 
Ziirich regarding, 489. 



Switzerland — Continued. 

Guarantor for compliance of various governments 
concerned with exchange of Axis and American 
diplomats and nationals, 392. 

Tabriz, Iran : Death of Mrs. Lea Burdett, wife of Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System representative, 385. 
Taxation, double income, convention for avoidance be- 
tween U.S. and Canada (1942), signature, 225; 
U.S. Senate advice and consent to ratification, 501 ; 
ratification by U.S., 541; exchange of ratifications 
and proclamation by U.S. President, 557. 
Telecommunications : 
International convention (1932), Cairo revisions 
(1938), approval for French Colonies, 330; by 
Turkey, 540. 
North American regional broadcasting agreement 

(1937), adherence of Newfoundland, 572. 
Opening of direct radiotelegraph circuit between 
U.S. and New Zealand, 196. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics, at Rio de Janeiro: 
Addresses by Under Secretary Welles, 55, 77. 
Delegation from U.S., list of members, 12; return to 

U.S., statement by Secretary Hull, 117. 
Exchange of telegrams between President Roosevelt 
and Brazilian President Vargas, 89; between 
Secretary Hull and Brazilian Foreign Minister 
Aranha, 88. 
Final Act (text), 117. 
Thomson, Charles A., Chief, Division of Cultural Re- 
lations of the Department: Address on cultural 
exchange in wartime, 29. 
Tobar Donoso, Dr. Julio, Minister of Foreign Affairs 
of Ecuador : Note to American Minister Long re- 
garding certain provisions of trade agreement with 
U.S. relating to customs charges, 221. 
Trade agreements (see also under Treaties, agreements, 

etc.) : Generalization of duties, 524. 
Traffic in arms, ammunition, etc. : Regulations govern- 
ing, 522. 
Travel of seamen : Regulations governing, 231, 292, 437, 

563. 
Travers, Howard K., Chief, Visa Division of the De- 
partment : Designation, 566. 
Treaties, agreements, etc., international : 

Agriculture, joint arrangements, U.S. and Canada 

(1942), texts, 313. 
Alliance, United Kingdom and Soviet Union, and 

Iran (1942), text, 249. 
Boundary dispute, settlement, Peru and Ecuador 
(1942) — 
Approval by Peru, 194. 

Resolution of Peruvian Congress, telegram of 
transmittal to Acting Secretary Welles, and 
reply, 194. 
Statement by Secretary Hull, 94 ; Acting Secretary 
WeUes. 194. 



INDEX 



574u 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Boundary dispute, settlement, Peru and Ecuador 
(1942)— Continued. 
Telegrams from President Roosevelt to Presidents 

of both countries, 94. 
Text, 195. 
Claims, U.S. and Mexico — 
1934, special claims, payment to U.S. under, 13. 
1941, ratification by U.S., 159; approval by Mexico, 
178; payment by Mexico on exchange of rati- 
flcatious, 274, 309 ; proclamation by U.S. Presi- 
dent, 330. 
Coffee, inter-America u (1940), deposit of instrument 
of ratification by Cuba and subsequent entry into 
force, 71 ; supplementary proclamation by U.S. 
President, 225. 
Conciliation, U.S. and Liberia (1939), Permanent 

International Commission under, 34. 
Declaration by United Nations (1942), text, 3; ad- 
herences, by Mexico and the Philippines, 546 ; 
U.S. as depository for statements of adherence, 
44 ; statement by Secretary Hull, 4. 
Defense sites, lease of, U.S. and Panama (1942), 

text, 448. 
Diplomatic officers, Pan American convention (1928), 
deposit of instrument of ratiflcation by Haiti, 
178. 
Economic collaboration, U.S. and — 
Brazil (1942), 
Discussions, 145. 

Signature of series of agreements, 205. 
Exchange of notes between Finance Minister 
Souza Costa and Acting Secretary Welles, 
206. 
Statements on occasion of, by Dr. Souza Costa, 
207 ; by Ambassador Martins, 208 ; by Act- 
ing Secretary Welles, 208. 
Haiti (1942), text of omnibus memorandum cov- 
ering agreements reached during visit to U.S. 
of President Lescot, 353. 
Mexico (1942), joint statement by Acting Secretary 

Welles and Foreign Minister Padilla, 325. 
Nicaragua (1942), conclusion of series of agree- 
ments, 36S. 
Peru (1942), text, 366. 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940) (see also 
infra, Habana, Act of), depo.sit of instruments of 
ratification, by Ecuador, 51 ; Honduras, 72 ; Mex- 
ico, 309; Nicaragua, 481; Uruguay, 309; procla- 
mation by U.S. President, 158. 
Extradition, U.S. and — 

Canada (1942), signature, 387; U.S. Senate advice 
and consent to ratification, 502; ratification 
by U.S., 540. 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Great Britain (1931), accession on behalf of India, 
330. 
Final Act of Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Bepublics (1942), text, 
117. 
Finance {see also infra, Mutual aid), U.S. and 
China (1942) — 
Joint statement by Secretary of the Treasury Mor- 
genthau and Chinese Foreign Minister Soong, 
263. 
Text, 264. 
Friendship, China and Iraq (1942), signature, 249. 
Habana, Act of (1940), deposit of instrument of rat- 
ification by Chile, 441. 
Halibut fishery of northern Pacific Ocean and Bering 
Sea, convention between U.S. and Canada for 
preservation (1937), regulations adopted pursu- 
ant to, 358. 
Highways — 

Inter-American, construction through Costa Rica, 

U.S. and Costa Rica (1942), text, 72. 
Military, to Alaska, U. S. and Canada (1942), 
text, 237. 
Indian Institute, Inter- American (1940), deposit of 
instruments of ratification, by Ecuador, 110; 
Nicaragua, 267 ; proclamation by U.S. President, 
158. 
Military collaboration, U.S. and Cuba (1942), signa- 
ture, 553. 
Military missions, U.S. to — 
Colombia (1942), signature, 501. 
Peru (1942), signature, 234. 
Mutual aid (1942), U.S. and— 
Belgium, text, 551. 
China, text, 507. 
Great Britain, text, 190. 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, text, 532; 
exchange of notes, 534. 
Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere (1940) — 
Approval by Dominican Republic, 178. 
Deposit of instruments of ratification, by Domini- 
can Republic, 248; Haiti, 159; Mexico, 330. 
Furnishing of partial list of species for inclusion 

in the Annex, by Haiti, 233 ; Venezuela, 198. 
Proclamation by U.S. President, 387. 
Ratification by Peru, 248. 
Naval mission, U.S. and Brazil (1942), signature, 

481. 
Opium (1925) and distribution of narcotic drugs 
(1931), notifications of adherence by Belgium 
in resjwct of Belgian Congo and Ruanda-Urundi, 
178. 
Peace advancement, U.S. and Union of South Africa 
(1940), international commission under, 83. 



574v 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Petroleum properties expropriated in Mexico — 

1941 agreement providing for determination of 
compensation, U.S. and Mexico, appointment 
of U.S. and Mexican experts to make deter- 
mination, 12; approval by Mexico, 178. 

1942 agreement on compensation, U.S. and Mexico, 
text, 351 : exchange of telegrams between 
President Roosevelt and President Avila 
Camacho, 352. 

Postal, universal (1939) — 
Adherence of Croatia, 528. 

Deposit of instrument of ratification by Great 
Britain, and adherence by certain British 
dependencies, 110. 
Status change of Venezuela under article IV of 
parcel-post agreement (transit charges), 423. 
Powers of attorney, protocol on uniformity (1940), 
proclamation by U.S. President, 501; ratification 
by U.S., 330, U.S. Senate advice and consent to, 
266, deposit of instrument of, 422. 
Prisoners of war (1929), statement on treatment 
by belligerent countries in the present war in 
respect to provisions of, 445. 
Publications, official exchange, U.S. and — 
Bolivia (1942), signature, 441. 
El Salvador (1941), signature, 22G. 
Liberia (1942), signature, 248. 
Panama (1941), signature, 376. 
Red Cross (1929), adherence of El Salvador, 233; 
proposed U.S. legislation to implement provi- 
sions, 492. 
Rubber, U.S. and — 

Brazil (1942), signature, 206. 
Costa Rica (1942), signature, 554. 
Sanitary convention, international (1926), deposit 
of instrument of ratification, with reservation, 
by Turkey, 265. 
Selective Training and Service Act, application to 
Canadian nationals in the U.S., Canada and U.S. 
(1&42), text, 315. 
Taxation, double income, U.S. and Canada (1942), 
signature, 225: U.S. Senate advice and consent 
to ratification, 501 ; ratification by U.S., 541 ; ex- 
change of ratifications, 557 ; proclamation by 
U.S. President, 557. 
Telecommunications — 

Cairo revisions (1938) of 1932 convention, ap- 
proval by France for French colonies, 330; by 
Turkey, 540. 
North American regional broadcasting (1937), 
adherence of Newfoundland, 572. 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Trade, U.S. and— 

Argentina (1941), establishment of Mixed Commis- 
sion to study operation of agreement, 373. 
Bolivia, notice of intention to negotiate, 287. 
Costa Rica, coordination of trade with nationals 

on proclaimed list (1941), termination, 240. 
Cuba, supplementary (1941), proclamation by U.S. 

President, 22. 
Ecuador (1938), exchange of notes regarding cer- 
tain provisions relating to customs charges, 
221. 
Haiti (1935), exchange of notes regarding certain 
provisions pertaining to tariff preferences, 174, 
384. 
Mexico, notice of intention to negotiate, 278 ; lists 
of products on which U.S. will consider grant- 
ing concessions, 280, 328, 374. 
Other countries, generalization of duties pro- 
claimed in connection with, 524. 
Peru, intention to negotiate, 22 ; signature of agree- 
ment (1942), 410. 
Transfer of U.S. citizens from Canadian to U.S. 
armed forces, U.S. and Canada (1942), text of 
exchange of notes, 244. 
Unemployment insurance, U.S. and Canada (1942), 

signature, 376. 
Visa fees, U.S. and Argentina (1942), signature, 441. 
"Treaties and Other International Acts", volume 6: 

Publication. 569. 
Trinidad, British West Indies: Churchill-Roosevelt 

Highway in, 2G1. 
"Truxton", U.S.S. : Rescue of personnel by people of 

St. Lawrence, Newfoundland, 193. 
Turkey : 

American Ambassador — 

Mr. MacMurray, resignation, 48. 
Mr. Steinhardt, U.S. Senate confirmation of nom- 
ination, 70. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Sanitary convention, international (1926), deposit 
of Instrument of ratification with reservation, 
265. 
Telecommunication (1932), Cairo revisions (1938), 
approval, 540. 

Under Secretary of State. See Welles, Sumner. 
Unemployment insurance laws of U.S. and Canada : 

Agreement integrating (1942), 376. 
Union for Democratic Action : Document alleged to be 

in State Department files, 480. 
Union of South Africa : 

American Minister (MacVeagh), U.S. Senate con- 
firmation of nomination, 481. 



INDEX 



574w 



Union of South Africa — Continued. 
Peace-advancement treaty with U.S. (1940), Inter- 
national commission under, 83. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: 
American Ambassador (Standley), U.S. Senate con- 
firmation of nomination as, 155. 
Conversations on the war effort between People's 
Foreign Commissar Molotov and President 
Roosevelt, 531. 
Recognition of Government by U.S., decision by Su- 
preme Court in case involving supremacy of 
Federal over State policy In the matter of, 146. 
Resistance to Nazi aggression, message of congratu- 
lations from Secretary Hull to People's Foreign 
Commissar Molotov, 562. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
AUiaLce, with Great Britain and Iran (1942), test, 

249. 
JIutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 532; exchange 
of notes, 534. 
United Kingdom. See Great Britain. 
United Nations, war with Axis powers. See individual 
countries; Declaration by United Nations ; United 
States, war with Axis powers; and The War. 
United Nations Day: Representatives at White House 

on occasion of, 536. 
United Nations Rally: Address by Under Secretary 

Welles, 548. 
United States: 
Congrtss (see oZso ■MWffer Publications) — 
Letters from President Roosevelt and Secretary 
Hull regarding proposed legislation on use of 
Red Cross insignia for commercial purposes, 
492, 493. 
Joint declarations of war against Bulgaria, Ru- 
mania, and Hungary, 510. 
Messages from the President, 
Annual (Jan. 6), 39. 

June 2, recommendation of recognition of state 
of war with Bulgaria, Hungary, and Ru- 
mania, 509. 
Report of the President on lend-lease operations 

(March 11, 1942), 242. 
Senate, 
Advice and consent to ratification of extradition 
treaty with Canada (1942), 502; powers of 
attorney, protocol on uniformity (1940), 
266; taxation convention with Canada 
(1942), 601. 
Confirmation of nominations in the Foreign Serv- 
ice, 70, 155, 231, 386, 440, 481. 
Economic collaboration with other American repub- 
lics. See under American republics and indi- 
vidual countries. 



United States — Continued. 
Foreign Service (see also State, Department of) — 
Appointments, 49, 71, 155, 197, 223, 232, 273, 307, 

375, 409, 500, 540, 556, 567. 
Assignments, 33, 48, 71, 83, 148, 155, 197, 223, 232, 
246, 307, 329, 356, 375, 409, 440, 499, 539, 540, 
556, 567. 
Conference of officers In Mexico City, 408. 
Cultural relations officers to missions in other 

American republics, 247. 
Deaths of officers, 147, 440, 540; of wife of Am- 
bassador Leahy, 375. 
Embassy, elevation of rank of Legation to status of, 
in Bolivia, 47; in Ecuador, 47; in the Nether- 
lands, 402; In Norway, 438; In Paraguay, 48. 
Examination, 156. 

Missions abroad, procedure with regard to dis- 
patch of, 476. 
Nominations, confirmation, 70, 155, 231, 386, 440, 

481. 
Opening of. 
Consulate General, at Brazzaville, French Equa- 
torial Africa, 273. 
Consulates, at Clicuta, Colombia, 223 ; St. Lucia, 

B.W.I., 33. 
Vice Consulates, at Aruba, Curagao, West In- 
dies, 71; Carlpito, Venezuela, 224; Iqultos, 
Peru, 197 ; Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico, 51. 
Legation, at Jidda, Saudi Arabia, 224. 
Personnel, 
Diplomatic and consular, exchange for represen- 
tatives of Axis countries in U.S., 6, 66, 79, 
141, 273, 392, 491, 522, 536, 553. 
In the Far East, reports on welfare, 143, 192, 

209. 
Interned in Manila, 472. 
Promotions, 176. 
Resignations, 48, 306. 
Retirements, 83, 155, 329, 409, 440. 
Navy personnel of U.S.S. "Truxton" and U.S.S. 
"Pollux", rescue by people of Newfoundland, 193. 
Supreme Court — 
Decision as to supremacy of Federal over State 
policy in matter of recognition of foreign gov- 
ernment, 146. 
Opinion regarding suspension of lawsuits by enemy 
plalntifCs during wartime, 147. 
Treaties, agreements, etc., signed Jan. -June 1942 
with— 
Argentina : Visa fees, reciprocal waiver, 441. 
Belgian Government : Mutual aid, 551. 
Bolivia: Official publications, exchange, 441. 
Brazil : 
Economic collaboration, 205. 
Naval mission, 481. 



574x 



DEPAHTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Canada : 
Agricultural arrangements, 313. 
Application of Selective Training and Service 
Act of 1940 to Canadian nationals in the 
U.S., 315. 
Double income taxation, 225. 
Extradition, 387. 
Military highway to Alaska, 237. 
Transfer of U.S. citizens from Canadian to U.S. 

armed forces, 244. 
Unemployment insurance, 376. 
China : 

Financial aid of U.S. to, 264. 
Mutual aid, 507. 
Colombia : Military mission, 501. 
Costa Rica : 
Construction of Inter-American Highway, 72. 
Rubber, 554. 
Cuba : Military collaboration, 553. 
Great Britain : Mutual aid, 190. 
Haiti: Economic collaboration, 353. 
Liberia: Exchange of official publications, 248. 
Mexico : Petroleum properties, 351. 
Nicaragua : Economic collaboration, 368. 
Other American republics : Final Act of Third 
Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Rio de Janeiro, 
117. 
Panama : Lease of defense sites, 448. 
Peru: 
Economic collaboration, 365. 
Military mission from U.S., 234. 
Trade, 410. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: Mutual aid, 

532. 
United Nations : Declaration by, 3. 
War with Axis powers (see also general heading 
' The War) : 

Addresses, statements, etc., by Mr. Berle, 168, 203 ; 

Mr. Geist, 466; Mr. Hornbeck, 452; Secretary 

Hull, 363, 445; President Roosevelt, 163, 183. 

381 ; Under Secretary Welles, 164, 485, 548. 

Agricultural arrangements with Canada to further 

the war effort, 313. 
Alien enemies in the U.S., regulations governing 

conduct, 66. 
Allied supreme commands in sooithwest Pacific 

area, 4. 
Americans in enemy or enemy-occupied countries. 
Aid and protection of property, 80, 93, 230. 
Ofiicers in French Indochina, arrest by Japanese, 

323. 
Prisoners of war in the Far East, 92. 
Reports on welfare in the Far East, 7, 44, 66, 
79, 91, 143, 154, 192, 209, 323, 472. 
Anglo-American Caribbean Commission, 229. 



United States — Continued. 
War with Axis powers — Continued. 

Anniversary of German invasion of the Nether- 
lands, Belgium, and Luxembourg, address by 
Mr. Berle, 427. 
Annual message to Congress by President Roose- 
velt, 39. 
Application of Selective Training and Service Act 

to Canadian nationals in the U.S. 315. 
Arms and munitions, proclamation enumerating, 

323. 
Assistance to Netherlands armed forces in Curagao 

and Aruba, 153. 
Books in wartime, address by Mr. Berle, 434. 
Business during the war, 63. 
Canadian armed forces, transfer of U.S. citizens 

to U.S. armed forces, 244. 
Collaboration with Cuba, 553. 
Combined British-American raw materials, muni- 
tions, and shipping boards, 87. 
Concentration at White Sulphur Springs of Italian, 
Rumanian, and Bulgarian officials in the U.S., 
66. 
Conferences of President Roosevelt and Prime 
Minister Churchill at Washington, Joint state- 
ments, 561. 
Conversations of President Roosevelt with Soviet 

People's Foreign Commissar Molotov, 531. 
Cooperation of other countries, 

Bolivia, severance of relations with Axis powers, 

90. 
Brazil, severance of relations with Axis powers, 

89. 
Ecuador, severance of relations with Axis powers, 

91. 
Ireland, Northern, message of solidarity from 

House of Commons, 45. 
Paraguay, severance of relations with Axis 

powers, 91. 
Peru, severance of relations with Axis powers, 

89. 
Uruguay, severance of relations with Axis 

powers, 89. 
Venezuela, severance of relations with Axis 
powers, 6, 45. 
Corregidor, fall of, statement by Secretary Hull and 
message from New Zealand Prime Minister 
Fraser, 392. 
Declaration by United Nations, text, 3; statement 
by Secretary Hull regarding, 4 ; adherence, by 
Mexico and the Philippines, 545, U.S. as de- 
pository for statements of, 44. 
Declarations of war against Bulgaria, Hungary, 

and Rumania, 509-510. 
Defense sites in Panama, lease by U.S., 448. 
Developments in Martinique, 391, 



INDEX 



574y 



United States— Continued. 
War with Axis powers — Continued. 

Dlspatcli of missions abroad, procedure witli regard 

to, 476. 
Economic Warfare Board, additional duties, 337; 

relations with State Department, 475. 
Economic warfare procedure, coordination with 

British, 153. 
Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel 
and other nationals, with Bulgaria, Germany, 
Hungary, Italy, Japan, and Rumania, 6, 79, 
141, 273, 363, 392, 491, 522, 536, 553, 563. 
Hitler speech, comment by Acting Secretary Welles, 

239. 
Lend-lease operations, 242, 365, 434. 
Military highway to Alaska, agreement with Can- 
ada, 237. 
Mutual-aid agreements between U.S. and Belgium, 
551; China, 507; Great Britain, 190; U.S.S.R., 
631. 
Occupation of Madagascar by the British, 391. 
Philippines, message of President Roosevelt to 

people of, 5. 
Poisonous gases, warning to Japan by President 

Roosevelt against use of, 506. 
Policy toward France and French people, 335. 
Postal concessions by New Zealand to U.S. and 

Allied forces, 404. 
Prisoners of war and civilian enemy aliens, treat- 
ment of, 445. 
Production and Resources Board and Food Board, 

creation with Great Britain, 535. 
Relief, coordination of activities, 80; U.S. contri- 
butions to belligerents, 32, 95, 226, 261, 292, 
385, 405, 564 ; to Greece, 03, 208. 
Rubber-production in Costa Rica, agreement with 

U.S. for purchase, 554. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 12, 
55, 77, 88, 117. 
Uruguay (see also American republics) : 
Educator, visit to U.S., 555 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 

telegram from President Roosevelt, 90. 
Sinking of "Montevideo", exchange of telegrams be- 
tween Foreign Minister Guani and Acting Sec- 
retary Welles, S40. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
European colonies and possessions in the Americas, 
provisional administration (1940), deposit of 
Instrument of ratrfication, 309. 
Utah State Agricultural College, Logan, Utah, com- 
mencement exercises: Address by Mr. Hombeck, 
512. 

Van den Arend, Frederik, Assistant Chief, Special Di- 
vision of the Department : Designation, 310. 



Vargas, Getulio, President of Brazil : 

Statement on hemispheric solidarity, conunent by 

Secretary Hull regarding, 79. 

Telegram to President Roosevelt regarding opening 

of Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs 

of the American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, 89. 

Velilzquez, Dr. Don Celso R., Paraguayan Ambassador 

to U.S. : Presentation of credentials, 277. 
Venezuela (see also American republics) : 
American Vice Consulate at Caripito, 224. 
Defense of Curagao and Aruba, agreement with Neth- 
erlands for cooperation in, 153. 
Severance of diplomatic relations with Germany, 

Italy, and Japan, 6, 45. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Nature protection and wildlife preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere (1940), furnishing of 
list of species for inclusion in Annex, 198. 
Postal, universal (1939), change in status under 
article IV of parcel-post agreement (transit 
charges), 423. 
Visit to U.S. of Foreign Minister, 498. 
Vessels. See Shipping. 
Vichy Government. See France. 
"Victoria", Argentine tanker : Toi-pedolng, message of 

appreciation for U.S. assistance to crew, 394. 
Visa Division of the Department: Designation of 
Howard K. Travers as Chief, 566; of Knowlton 
V. Hicks and Herv6 J. L'Heureux as Assistant 
Chiefs, 252. 
Visa fees, agreement between U.S. and Argentina for 
reciprocal waiver (1942), signature, 441. 

Wadleigh, Henry J., Assistant Chief, Division of 
Special Research of the Department : Appointment, 
566. 
The War (see also Far East; United States, War with 
Axis powers; and individiial countries) : 
Addresses, statements, etc., by Mr. Berle, 203; Mr. 
Geist, 466; Mr. Hornbeck, 452, 512; Secretary 
Hull, 363, 445; President Roosevelt, 163, 183, 
381 ; Mr. Stewart, 489 ; Under Secretary Welles, 
485, 548. 
Agricultural arrangements between U.S. and Canada 

to further the war effort, 313. 
Aid to China, financial and economic, from U.S., 142, 

263. 
Air training programs of United Nations, coordi- 
nation, 336. 
American republics — 
Address by Under Secretary Welles before Cuban 
Chamber of Commerce in the United States, 
164. 
Hemispheric solidarity, views of Brazilian Presi- 
dent, comment of Secretary Hull regarding, 
79. 



574z 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The War — Continued. 
American republics — Continued. 

Severance of diplomatic relations with Axis powers, 
by Bolivia, 90 ; Brazil, 89 ; Ecuador, 91 ; Para- 
guay, 91; Peru, 89; Uruguay, 90; Venezuela, 
6, 45. 
Third Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Kio de 
Janeiro, 12, 55, 77, 88, 117. 
Anglo-American Caribbean Commission, 229. 
Anniversary of German invasion of the Netherlands, 
Belgium, and Luxembourg, address by Mr. Berle, 
427. 
Annual message of President Roosevelt to Congress, 

39. 
Arrest of American officers in French Indochina 

by Japanese, 323. 
Books in wartime, address by Mr. Berle, 434. 
Canadian armed forces, transfer of U.S. citizens 

to U.S. armed forces, 244. 
Canadian nationals residing in the U.S., application 

of Selective Training and Service Act, 315. 
Chilean merchant marine, rules governing, 239. 
Chinese students in the U.S., opportunities for em- 
ployment, 328. 
Chronology of events, December 1941 to April 1942, 

428. 
Combined British-American raw-material, muni- 
tions, and shipping boards, 87. 
Conferences of President Roosevelt and Prime Min- 
ister Churchill at Washington, joint statements, 
561. 
Conversations between President Roosevelt and So- 
viet People's Foreign Commissar Molotov, 531. 
Corregidor, fall of, statement by Secretary Hull and 
message from New Zealand Prime Minister Fra- 
ser, 392. 
Cultural exchange in wartime, address by Mr. Thom- 
son, 29. 
Declaration by United Nations, text, 3; adherence, 
by Mexico and the Philippines, 545, U.S. as de- 
pository for statements of, 44. 
Declarations of war — 
Table, 143. 

Mexico against Germany, Italy, and Japan, 505. 
U.S. against Bulgaria, Hungary, and Rumania, 
609-510. 
Defense of Aruba and Curacao, U.S. assistance to 

Netherlands armed forces in, 153. 
Defense sites in Panama, lease by U.S., 448. 
Demands for surrender of General Mihajlovic of 
Yugoslavia, recording of protest by Royal Yugo- 
slav Government, 364. 
Developments in Martinique, 391. 
Economics — 
Assistance of U.S. to French North Africa, 318, 
337. 



The War — Continued. 
Economics — Continued. 
Collaboration to further the war effort, between 
U.S. and Brazil, 205; Haiti, 353; Mexico, 325; 
Nicaragua, 368; Peru. 365. 
Conflict, international, address by Mr. Geist, 14. 
Peace after, address by Mr. Pasvolsky, 210. 
Warfare procedures, coordination of U.S. and Brit- 
ish, 153. 
Employment of seamen, rules adopted by War Ship- 
ping Administrator, 321. 
Exchanges of diplomatic and consular personnel and 
other nationals between Axis countries and — 
U.S., 6, 66, 79, 141, 273, 363, 392, 491, 522, 536, 553. 

563. 
Other American republics, 363, 383, 392, 491, 553. 
Food Board, Combined, U.S. and Great Britain, 535. 
Greece, address by Mr. Berle on occasion of Greek 

Independence Day, 257. 
Hitler, speech by, comment by Acting Secretary 
Welles, 239; visit to Finland, statement by Sec- 
retary Hull, 522. 
India, industrial resources of. U.S. Advisory Mission 

to, 209, 230, 260, 433. 
Italy and Italians, address by Mr. Acheson, 510. 
Lawsuits in U.S. by enemy plaintiffs, suspension dur- 
ing wartime, 147. 
Lend-lease — 
Aid to Brazil, 206 ; to Czechoslovakia, 44 ; to IraQ 

and Iran, 383. 
Operations, 81, 242, 865, 434. 
Mass-terrorization in Czechoslovakia, 536. 
Military collaboration between Cuba and U.S., 553. 
Military highway to Alaska, agreement between U.S. 

and Canada, 237. 
Mutual-aid agreements between U.S. and Belgium, 
551; China, 507; Great Britain, 190; Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, 531. 
New Zealand postal concessions to .\llied forces in, 

404. 
Norway, invasion by Germany, message of President 
Roosevelt to King Haakon VII on second anni- 
versary, 323. 
Occupation of Madagascar by the British, 391. 
Pacific area, Allied supreme commands in, 4. 
Poisonous gases, warning to Japan by President 

Roosevelt against use of, 506. 
Prisoners of war and civilian enemy aliens, treat- 
ment of, 445. 
Production and Resources Board, Combined, U.S. and 

Great Britain, 635. 
Relief- 
Coordination of activities in the U.S., 80. 



rNDEX 



574aa 



The War — Continued. 
Belief— Continued. 

To belligerents, U.S. coutributlons, 
Revision of rules and regulations, 495. 
Tabulation of funds, 32, 95, 226, 261, 292, 885, 
495, 564. 
To Greece, Joint British-American, 93, 208. 
Rubber-production In Costa Rica, agreement with 

U.S. for purchase, 554. 
Severances of diplomatic relations, 338. 
Sinking of Colombian schooner "Resolute", statement 
by Secretary Hull, 562 ; Uruguayan vessel "Mon- 
tevideo", 240. 
Soviet Union's successful resistance to Nazi aggres- 
sion, congratulations from Secretary Hull, 562. 
U.S. policy toward France and French people, 335. 
Yugoslavia, anniversary of accession of King Peter 
II, 260. 
War Information, OflSce of: Liaison with State Depart- 
ment, 566. 
Warren, Avra M., American Minister to Dominican Re- 
public : U.S. Senate confirmation of nomination, 232. 
Washington's Birthday : Address by President Roose- 
velt on occasion of, 183. 
Weddell, Alexander W., American Ambassador to 
Spain : Resignation, exchange of correspondence 
with President Roosevelt, 30a 
Welles, Sumner: 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 
Cuban Chamber of Commerce in the United States, 

164. 
Death of former Argentine Ambassador to the U.S. 

(Naon), 13. 
Economic collaboration with Brazil, statement on 
occasion of signing of agreement, 208 ; with 
Mexico, joint statement with Foreign Minister 
Padilla, 325. 
Exhibition of Chilean art, 262. 
Hitler speech, comment on, 239. 
Memorial Day address, 485. 
"Network of the Americas" program, inauguration, 

473. 
Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dispute, settlement, 

194. 
Relations with French Government, 189. 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics, 77; opening session, 
B5. 
United Nations Rally, 548. 
Correspondence — 
Acknowledgment of recording of protest by Royal 
Yugoslav Government regarding demands for 
surrender of General Mihajlovic, 364. 
Application of Selective Training and Service Act 
to Canadian nationals residing in the U.S., 
with Canadian Minister and Charg6 d' Affaires, 
315, 31& 



Welles, Sumner — Continued. 
Correspondence — Continued. 
Argentine expression of appreciation for U.S. as- 
sistance to crew of torpedoed tanker "Vic- 
toria", reply, 394. 
Dispatch of missions abroad, procedure regarding, 

with various Government agencies, 477. 
Economic collaboration agreements with Brazil, 
exchange of notes with Brazilian Minister of 
Finance Souza Costa, 207. 
Peruvian-Ecuadoran boundary dispute, reply to 
resolution of appreciation by Peruvian Con- 
gress, 194. 
Sinking of Uruguayan vessel "Montevideo", with 

Foreign Minister Guani, 240. 
U.S. policy toward France and French people, 335. 
Departmental orders (see also under Hull, Cordell) — 
Appointment of officers, 223, 252, 310, 329, 358. 
Dispatch of missions abroad, procedure with re- 
gard to, 476. 
Transfer of certain duties to Cultural Relations 
Division, 357. 
Wheat and wheat flour: Suspension of import quotas 

on, 358. 
White Paper, British, of Sept. 10, 1941: Procedure for 
handling problems arising in connection with, 81. 
Wildlife preservation and nature protection in the 
Western Hemisphere, convention (1940), 159, 178, 
198, 233, 248, 330, 387. 
Wilhelmlna, Queen of the Netherlands: Letter of 
credence for presentation by Dr. Loudon as first 
Netherlands Ambassador to U.S., 403. 
Willard, Clarke L., Assistant Chief, Division of Interna- 
tional Conferences of the Department: Appoint- 
ment, 358. 
Wood-Oil Loan (1939), U.S. to China: Repayment, 260. 
World Trade Intelligence Division of the Department : 
Appointment of Francis H. Russell as an Assis- 
tant Chief, 358. 
Wrong, Hume H., Canadian Charge d'Affaires: Note 
to Acting Secretary Welles regarding application 
of Selective Training and Service Act to Canadian 
nationals residing in the U.S., 316. 

Yost, Charles W., Assistant Chief, Division of Special 
Research of the Department: Appointment, 566. 
Yugoslavia : 
Anniversary of accession of King Peter 11, messages 
to the King from President Roosevelt and former 
American Minister Lane, 260. 
Demands for surrender of General Mihajlovic, 
recording of protest by Royal Yugoslav Govern- 
ment regarding, 364. 
Visit to U.S. of King Peter U, 554. 



9 3-i'3. IfiiO 
THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



JANUARY 3, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 132— Publication 1676 







ontents 



The War 

Cooperative war effort of the democracies: paca 

Joint Declaration by United Nations 3 

Statement by the Secretary of State 4 

Supreme commands in the southwest Pacific area. . 4 

Radio message of the President to the people of the 

Philippines 5 

Japanese allegations regarding killing of nationals . . 5 

Severance of relations by Venezuela with Germany, 

Italy, and Japan 6 

Protection of officials and nationals of countries at war: 
Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel with 

Hungary and Rumania 6 

Americans in the Far East 7 

Japanese Embassy staff and press correspondents in 

the United States 7 

Acquisition of Swedish ship Kungsholm 7 

American Republics 

Foundations of Inter- American Solidarity: Address by 

Laurence Duggan 8 

Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affau's of the 
American RepubUcs at Rio de Janeiro: United 

States delegation 12 

Compensation for petroleum properties expropriated 

in Mexico 12 

Payment by Mexico under Special Claims Convention 

of 1934 13 

[over] 








OTlie /li5-CONTINUED 

American Republics — Continued page 
Death of former Argentine Ambassador to the United 

States 13 

Inter- American highway 13 

Anniversary of Haitian independence 14 

Commercial Policy 

The International Economic Confiict: Address by 

Raymond H. Geist 14 

Supplementary trade agreement with Cuba 22 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Peru 22 

Cultural Relations 

The Role of Cultural Exchange in Wartime: Address 

by Charles A. Thomson 29 

General 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 32 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 32 

Executive order excepting certain positions from Civil 

Service Rules 33 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 33 

Treaty Information 

Conciliation: Treaty With Liberia 34 

Commerce: 

Supplementary Trade Agreement With Cuba ... 34 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Peru 34 

Clauns: Special Convention of 1934 With Mexico . . 34 

Publications 34 

Regulations 34 

Legislation 35 



l^'S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMf NTS 
JAN 28 1942 



The War 



COOPERATIVE WAR EFFORT OF THE DEMOCRACIES 



JOINT DECLARATION BY UNITED NATIONS 



[Released to the press by the White House January 2) 

Declaration by United Nations: 

A Joint Declaration by The United States 
of America, The United Kingdom, of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, The 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
China, Australia, Belgium, Canada, Costa 
Rica, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Dominican 
Republic, El Salvador, Greece, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Honduras, India, Luxembourg, 
NetherlaTids, New Zealand, Nicaragua, 
Norway, Panama, Poland, South Africa, 
Yugoslavia. 

The Governments signatory hereto, 
Having subscribed to a common program of 
purposes and principles embodied in the Joint 
Declaration of the President of the United 
States of America and the Prime Minister of 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland dated August 14, 1941, 
known as the Atlantic Charter,^ 

Being convinced that complete victory over 
their enemies is essential to defend life, liberty, 
independence and religious freedom, and to 
preserve human rights and justice in their own 
lands as well as in other lands, and that they 
are now engaged in a common struggle against 
savage and brutal forces seeking to subjugate 
the world. Declare: 

(1) Each Government pledges itself to em- 
ploy its full resources, military or economic. 



against those members of the Tripartite Pact 
and its adherents with which such government 
is at war. 

(2) Each Government pledges itself to co- 
ojjerate with the Governments signatory hereto 
and not to make a separate armistice or peace 
with the enemies. 

The foregoing declaration may be adhered 
to by other nations which are, or which may 
be, rendering material assistance and contri- 
butions in the struggle for victory over 
Hitlerism. 

Done at Washington, 
January First, 19Ji2. 

The United States of America 
by Franklin D Eoosevelt 

The United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland 
by Winston Churchill 

On behalf of the Government of the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
Maxim Lixvinoff 



'Bulletin of August 16, 1941, p. 125. 



National Government of the Republic 
of China 

TSE VUNG SOONG 

Minister for Foreign Affairs 

The Commonwealth of Australia 
by R. G. Casey 

The Kingdom of Belgium 

by C" R. V. D. Straten 
Canada 

by Leighton McCarthy 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Republic of Costa Rica 
by Luis Fernandez 

The Republic of Cuba 

by AUKELIO F. CONCHESO 

Czechoslovak Republic 
by V. S. HuRBAN 

The Dominican Republic 
by J. M. Tegncoso 

The Repubhc of El Salvador 
by C. A. AxFAKO 

The Kingdom of Greece 

by CiMON P. DiAMANTOPOULOS 

The Republic of Guatemala 
by Enbique Lopez-Herbarte 

La Republique d'Haiti 
par Fernand Dennis 

The Republic of Honduras 
by Julian R. Caceres 

India 
GiRjA Shankar Bajpai 



The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 
by HuGUEs Le Gaixais 

The Kingdom of the Netherlands 
A. Loudon 

Signed on behalf of the Government of the 
Dominion of New Zealand 
by Frank Langstone 

The Republic of Nicaragua 
by Leon DeBatle 

The Kingdom of Norway 
by W. Munthe de !Morgenstierne 

The Republic of Panama 
by Jaen Guardia 

The Republic of Poland 
by Jan Ciechanowski 

The Union of South Africa 
by Ralph W. Close 

The Kingdom of Yugoslavia 
by Constantin A. Fotitch 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press January 2) 

The Declaration by the United Nations joins 
together, in the greatest common war effort 
in history, the purpose and will of 26 free na- 
tions, representing the overwhelming majority 
of the inhabitants of all 6 continents. This is 
a living proof that law-abiding and peace- 



loving nations can unite in using the sword 
when necessary to preserve liberty and justice 
and the fundamental values of mankind. 
Against this host we can be sure that the forces 
of barbaric savagery and organized wicked- 
ness cannot and will not prevail. 



SUPREME COMMANDS IN THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC AREA 



[Released to the press by the White House January 3] 

1. As a result of proposals put forward by 
the United States and British Chiefs of Staff, 
and of their recommendations to President 
Roosevelt and to the Prime Minister, Mr. 
Churchill, it is announced that, with the con- 
currence of the Netherlands Government and 
of the Dominion Governments concerned, a 
system of unified command will be established 
in the southwest Pacific area. 



2. All the forces in this area — sea, land, and 
air — will operate under one Supreme Com- 
mander. At the suggestion of the President, 
in which all concerned have agreed. General Sir 
A. Wavell has been appointed to this command. 

3. Major General George H. Brett, Chief of 
the Air Corps of the U.S. Army, will be ap- 
pointed Deputy Supreme Commander. He is 
now in the Far East. Under the direction of 
General Wavell, Admiral Thomas C. Hart, U.S. 



JANtTAHY 3, 1942 



Navy, will assume command of all naval forces 
in the area. General Sir Henry Pownall will 
be Chief of Staff to General Wavell. 

4. General Wavell will assume his command 
in the near future. 

5. At the same time, His Excellency General- 
issimo Chiang Kai-shek has accepted the 
Supreme Command over all land and air forces 



of the United Nations which are now or may 
in the future be operating in the Chinese the- 
ater, including initially such portions of Indo- 
china and Thailand as may become available to 
troops of the United Nations. United States 
and British representatives will serve on his 
joint headquarters planning staflp. 



RADIO MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE PEOPLE OF THE 
PHILIPPINES 



[Released to the press by the White House December 28] 

On December 28 the President sent a message 
to the people of the Philippine Islands. It was 
broadcast by short-wave radio direct to Manila 
where it was re-broadcast and given to the press. 
The text of the message follows : 

"The People of the Philippines : 

"News of your gallant struggle against the 
Japanese aggressor has elicited the profound 
admiration of every American. As President of 
the United States, I know that I speak for all 
our people on this solemn occasion. 

''The resources of the United States, of the 
British Empire, of the Netherlands East Indies, 
and of the Chinese Republic have been dedicated 
by their people to the utter and complete defeat 
of the Japanese war-lords. In this great strug- 
gle of the Pacific the loyal Americans of the 
Philippine Islands are called upon to play a 
crucial role. 

''They have played, and they are playing to- 
night, their part with the greatest gallantry. 

"As President I wish to express to them my 
feeling of sincere admiration for the fight they 
are now making. 

"The people of the United States will never 
forget what the people of the Philippine Islands 
are doing this day and will do in the days to 
come. I give to the peojale of the Philippines 
my solemn pledge that their freedom will be 
redeemed and their independence established 
and protected. The entire resources, in men 
and in material, of the United States stand 
behind that pledge. 



"It is not for me or for the people of this 
country to tell you where your duty lies. We 
are engaged in a great and common cause. I 
count on every Pliilii^pine man, woman, and 
child to do his duty. We will do ours." 



JAPANESE ALLEGATIONS REGARDING 
KILLING OF NATIONALS 

[Released to the press December 29] 

The Department of State has received 
through the Swiss Legation, representing Jap- 
anese interests in the Philippines, a communi- 
cation from the Japanese Government in which 
it protests the alleged killing of 10 Japanese 
nationals at the time of the assault by the Jap- 
anese forces against the city of Davao on the 
Island of Mindanao. 

This Government had not previously heard 
of the alleged incident and has no reports what- 
soever which would substantiate in the slight- 
est degree the incident complained of by the 
Japanese Government. 

For days previous to the delivery of this 
note, the Japanese not only had been continuing 
their unprovoked aggression against the Phil- 
ippine Islands but they had also ruthlessly, 
wantonly, and with a complete lack of humanity 
bombed the defenseless civilian population of a 
declared open city, killed scores of civilians, 
and wounded hundreds more. 

While the United States would not condone 



6 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the acts of any of its officials or of any persons 
under its authority which contravene accei:)tecl 
rules of international law, and will always in- 
vestigate complaints and take such proper stejjs 
as may be warranted under the facts, the rec- 
ord established by Japan over a number of 
years and in her recent activities in the Phil- 
ippines clearly shows a wholly wanton disre- 
gard by Japan of international law and of prin- 
ciples of humanity and even of the elemental 
rules of decency designed to avoid needless in- 
jury to defenseless civilian populations. The 
objective of the Japanese in making this pro- 
test is clear, that is, to attempt to divert atten- 
tion from their iniquities by making accusations 
against others. 



SEVERANCE OF RELATIONS BY VENE- 
ZUELA WITH GERMANY, ITALY, AND 
JAPAN 

[Released to the press December 31] 

The Venezuelan Ambassador called to see the 
Under Secretary of State, the Honorable Sum- 
ner Welles, on the morning of December 31 and 
by instruction of his Government delivered a 
note in which the Government of Venezuela 
stated that it had that day broken off diplo- 
matic relations with Germany, Italy and Japan. 

Mr. AVelles replied that this action taken by 
the Government of Venezuela was profoundly 
appreciated by the United States and was one 
more outstanding demonstration of the unfail- 
ing solidarity of Venezuela with all of the other 
American republics in the taking of all meas- 
ures necessary for the defense and security of 
this hemisphere. 



December 8, 1941 is the correct date for the 
declaration of war by Costa Rica against Japan, 
and page 599 of the Bulletin of December 27, 
1941 should be corrected accordingly. 



PROTECTION OF OFFICIALS AND NA- 
TIONALS OF COUNTRIES AT WAR 

EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR 
PERSONNEL WITH HUNGARY AND RUMANIA 

[Released to the press January 1] 

The Department of State has been informed 
through the Swiss Government that the Hun- 
garian Government accepts proposals of the 
American Government concerning exchange of 
diplomatic personnel. The Hungarian Govern- 
ment proposes to place as soon as possible a spe- 
cial train at the disposal of the members of the 
American Legation leaving Hungary which will 
take them to the Spanish border, the train not 
being able to proceed past that point because of 
different railway track gauge. In this train 
there will be the members of the American 
Legation and Consulate in Budapest, their per- 
sonnel, and a certain number of persons in- 
dicated by the Legation. 

The train will also carry effects of official per- 
sonnel. The transportation fares of the official 
personnel to the Portuguese frontier will be paid 
by the Hungarian Government. Persons who 
are not officials will be required to pay for their 
sleeping accommodations aboard the train and 
may carry only hand baggage with them. A 
dining-car will be placed at the disposal of the 
travelers. The Hungarian Government will ac- 
cept the promise of the American Minister to 
Hungary, Mr. Herbert C. Pell, that neither he 
nor the official personnel coming out of Hun- 
gary will leave the European Continent before 
the members of the Hungarian diplomatic and 
consular missions coming from the United 
States shall have arrived in Lisbon. 

Regarding this latter fact the American Min- 
ister will be informed through the Hungarian 
Minister at Lisbon. 

The Hungarian Government hopes by the ar- 
rangements set forth above to avoid any useless 
delay at the Portuguese frontier, in view of the 
fact that the exchange of the missions con- 
cei-ned will be effected at Lisbon. 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



Two officials of the Hungarian Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs will nccrjnipany this party to 
Lishon. 

The State Department has also learned 
through Swiss official sources that the Ruma- 
nian Government accepts in principle the 
American Government's proposition relating to 
the exchange of diplomats, consuls, and other 
official persons and supposes that the American 
Government will take care of the necessary 
details of arrangement. 

AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press December 29] 

In a telegram dated December 29, 1941 Mr. 
Paul P. Steintorf, American Consul at Manila, 
reported that the consular premises remained 
undamaged and that the entire staff were safe 
and well. 



dents of Medan were all safe. (Medan was re- 
ported by the press to have been bombed on 
December 28.) 

[Released to the press December 31] 

In a telegram dated December 27, 1941 from 
Mr. C. E. Gauss, the American Ambassador at 
Chungking, it was stated that it had been re- 
ported indirectly that Americans remaining in 
Hong Kong were unharmed and that they were 
being housed in the Hong Kong and Shanghai 
Bank Building. The offices of the American 
Consulate General at Hong Kong are located in 
this building. 

Mr. Kenneth S. Patton, the American Consul 
General at Singapore, telegraphed on Decem- 
ber 30, 1941 that up to that time no American 
residents of Malaya had been injured. 



[Released to the press December 30] 

According to information received in the 
Department through the courtesy of the Swiss 
authorities, American officials in Shanghai, 
Canton, Hankow, Tientsin, and Peiping are 
confined to their hotels or to their embassy or 
consular compounds and are well treated. It 
was indicated that private American nationals 
were not being interned and that the general 
situation was satisfactory although public utili- 
ties were functioning on a restricted basis. 
Foreign banks were said to remain open but 
withdrawals of American depositors were re- 
stricted to 2,000 Chinese dollars (approximately 
U.S. $80) per month. 

It was reported that the authorities of the 
French Concession and the International Settle- 
ment at Shanghai were cooperating witli the 
Japanese to maintain order and to insure food 
supplies and other essentials. 

In a telegram dated December 29, 1941 from 
Mr. Walter A. Foote, American Consul General 
at Batavia, it was stated that American resi- 



JAPANESE EMBASSY STAFF AND PRESS CORRE- 
SPONDENTS IN THE UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press December 29] 

The Japanese Embassy staff are being con- 
centrated, pending their departure from the 
United States, at The Homestead, Hot 
Springs, Va. 

Japanese correspondents will also be as- 
sembled in a few days and concentrated with 
the Embassy staff at Hot Springs, Va. 



ACQUISITION OF SWEDISH SHIP 
"KUNGSnOLM" 

[Released to the press January 2] 

The American Government has arranged 
to acquire the Swedish ship Kungsholm by 
purchase from its private owners instead of 
exercising the right of angary. 

The title to the vessel is now vested in the 
United States Maritime Commission. 



American Republics 



FOUNDATIONS OF mXER-AMERICAN SOLIDARITY 
ADDRESS BY LAURENCE DUGGAN ' 



[Released to the press December 29] 

There has been a drastic change in the inter- 
national situation since I was requested last 
June to address the American Political Science 
Association. At that time the American re- 
publics were at peace with the i-est of the world. 
Today, some are in war, others have broken 
off diplomatic relations, and the remaining 
have declared their continental solidarity with 
those republics now actively combating Axis 
aggression. 

Even from the point of view of the probable 
course of future inter-American relationships, 
the original title of my remarks, "Political and 
Economic Developments in Inter-American 
Relations", is not so far-fetched as might first 
appear to be the case. The nature of inter- 
American developments during the past eight 
years can be considered a gauge of the scope 
and content of what may well take place in the 
coming years. I say this for the reason that 
inter- American relations have been built on 
firm bedrock during the last few years. No 
matter what wind may blow, no matter what 
storm may dash against the shores of the New 
World, a foundation of inter-American soli- 
darity has been laid so strong that overseas tem- 
pests will only lose their force against it. How 
fortunate, indeed, for the nations of the New 
World that these foundations were laid years 
ago on the bedrock of respect for sovereignty 
and cooperation for common benefit rather than 
on a shifting sand of momentary expediency. 

I believe it desirable to underline, at this 
juncture when short cuts and quick action are 
bywords, that the strength of the inter-Ameri- 



' Delivered before the American Political Science 
Association, New York. N. Y., December 29, 1941. Mr. 
Duggan is Adviser i^n Political Relations, Depai'tment 
of State. 



can structure results from strict abstinence from 
intermeddling or interference in the internal 
or external concerns of the other countries. The 
adoption and application of this policy by the 
United States in 1933 necessitated the relin- 
quishment of many "rights" of an intervention- 
ist character. The right to intervene in Cuba, 
under the Piatt Amendment, and in Panama, 
under the Treaty of 1903, were among the rights 
given up, to say nothing of the withdrawal of 
our Marines from countries to which they had 
been sent during the last war. The most pre- 
cious asset that the United States now has in 
the Western Hemisphere is the confidence and 
respect that one man of good-will has in an- 
other. This could be lost overnight by a hasty, 
ill-considered step of apparent urgent necessity. 
The value of this new confidence in the mo- 
tives of this country was demonstrated by the 
immediate and enthusiastic response to the call 
of the President of the United States in 1936 
for a special conference for the maintenance 
of peace in Buenos Aires. This conference 
marked a turning point in inter- American re- 
lations. Heretofore, the American republics 
had been concerned almost exclusively in ques- 
tions concerning relations among themselve,s. 
In Buenos Aires, they gave important consid- 
eration for the first time to the relations between 
the Western Hemisphere and the rest of the 
world. It was already evident then that certam 
countries, employing specious theories of race, 
of culture, of political economy, and of religion, 
were becoming a threat to the independence 
and security of peace-loving nations every- 
where. The American republics at this meeting 
proclaimed certain principles for the orderly 
and peaceful conduct of nations. They like- 
wise agreed to consult together in the face of 
a positive menace to the peace of the hemisphere. 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



9 



As mutual confidence gi'ew, as it became 
more and more apparent that the destiny of 
the hemisphere depended upon a solidary atti- 
tude, the American republics perfected inter- 
governmental measures for collaboration. At 
Lima in 1938, after the debacle of the Euro- 
pean democracies at Munich, the American re- 
publics proclaimed their conmion concern and 
their determination to make effective their soli- 
darity in case the peace, security, or territorial 
integrity of any American repiiblic was 
threatened. 

The considtative procedure was immediately 
invoked at the outbreak of war in 1939. An- 
other meeting of Foreign Ministers was held 
in midsummer of 1940, a few weeks after the 
collapse of France had magnified the Nazi 
menace to the AVestern Hemispliere. Both 
meetings, in record time for international de- 
liberations of this character, adopted measures 
of the highest importance, utility, and 
effectiveness. 

Tliose meetings were held during times of 
peace between the independent nations of the 
New World and those of the Old. Now, an- 
other meeting is to be held in Rio de Janeiro, 
capital of Brazil, at a time of war — the first 
meeting of representatives of all the Ameri- 
can republics ever to convene during a period 
of inter-continental war in which nations of 
the Western Hemisphere were joined. 

This meeting, of profound significance for 
the future welfare and well-being of every 
human being in the New World, will find the 
Ajnerican republics united in their continental 
solidarity. Wliether they have declared war 
on the members of the Tripartite Pact, whether 
they have broken off diplomatic relations, or 
whether they have extended the rights of a 
non-belligerent to the American countries at 
war, they have all reaffirmed their solidarity 
in accordance with inter- American agreements. 
In this connection it is pertinent to recall that 
resolution XV adopted at the meeting in 
Habana declares tliat any attempt on the part 
of a non-American state against the integrity 
or inviolability of the territory, the sover- 
eignty, or the political independence of an 



American state shall be considered as an act 
of aggression against all the others. Thus, 
the treacherous and unprovoked attack com- 
mitted by Japan against the United States, 
and the subsequent declarations of war by Ger- 
many and Italy, have been recognized by the 
American republics as attacks as well against 
them. In other words, the members of the 
Tripartite Pact have attacked not only the 
United States but are regarded by the other 
American republics as luiving attacked them 
also. 

In this situation, the Foreign Ministers of 
the American republics are meeting to consider 
and determine the measures to be taken with 
a view to the preservation of the sovereignty 
and territorial integrity of the Ameincan re- 
publics as well as to fortifying their economic 
solidarity. 

It would be inappropriate for me to at- 
tempt to speculate upon the measures that 
may be adopted. A brief review may be use- 
ful, however, of the various kinds of steps 
that have been taken by the American repub- 
lics since the last meeting of Foreign Minis- 
ters in July 1940 in order to cope with the new 
problems that have confronted them. 

First: Througliout the Americas there has 
been a progressively greater public and gov- 
ernmental inquirj^ into the extent and scope of 
alien activities that endanger the peace and 
security of any American republic. As a 
result of the knowledge gained by these in- 
vestigations, controls of various types have 
been adopted. It is fair to assume that the 
meeting in Rio will discuss the strengthening 
and extension of these controls, particularly 
since Axis alien activities today are really 
nothing but a part of a vast military opera- 
tion. 

Second: In the late summer of 1941 the Gov- 
ernment of Uruguay approached all the Amer- 
ican nations with respect to a proposal to 
accord non-belligerent rights to any American 
nation resisting overseas aggression. Uru- 
guay recalled that it had in fact done this 
during World War I when it offered to put 
its naval facilities at the disposal of the 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United States. The reply to the inquiry last 
summer was in the overwhelming affirmative, 
and it is interesting to obsei've that some of 
the countries that questioned the desirability 
of raising the issue have now accorded non- 
belligerent status to their sister republics at 
war with the members of the Tripartite Pact. 

Third: The maintenance of adequate ship- 
ping has been a principal preoccupation of the 
American republics during the last year. The 
withdrawal first of many foreign-flag vessels 
and later of many ships of United States reg- 
istry accentuated the importance of putting 
into service in inter-American trade foreign- 
registry ships that had taken refuge in the 
harbors of the American republics. During 
the last year, the Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee adopted 
a plan that has been accepted by the British 
Government for the taking over and opera- 
tion of the immobilized ships in this hemi- 
sphere. Many of these ships are already in 
service. Negotiations with respect to the 
others are, in general, well advanced. When 
all of these vessels are in operation, a total 
of approximately 546 thousand gross tons of 
shipping will have been added to the inter- 
American carrying trade. 

Fourth: The progressive curtailment of 
European markets has caused the piling up 
of surpluses of some raw materials in the other 
American republics. The Inter-American 
Committee in Washington gave preferential 
consideration to coffee. In more than a dozen 
of the other American republics, coffee is 
either the principal crop or the second in im- 
portance. As the war extended in Europe, 
coffee markets became restricted. Stocks piled 
up in the coffee-producing countries, prices 
sank to new lows, coffee producers were 
obliged to cut wages and discharge workers. 
The economies of several countries were 
stagnating. 

In this situation, the Inter-American Com- 
mittee formulated a plan that was adopted by 
the coffee-producing countries for putting cof- 
fee imports into the United States on a quota 



basis. The operation of this plan has proved 
highly advantageous. An adequate and con- 
tinuous supply of coffee has been assured the 
consumer in this country at a fair and reason- 
able price. Producers are now receiving a 
return that enables them to continue produc- 
tion. The inter-American coffee arrangement 
is one of the most constructive applications of 
the good-neighbor policy in the field of trade 
and economics, and its importance in salvag- 
ing the languishing economies of many coun- 
tries will not soon be forgotten in those 
countries. 

Fifth : The development of the defense pro- 
gram of the United States created a heavy 
demand for the basic and strategic materials 
necessary for the production of implements of 
war. This demand has been accentuated by 
the outbreak of war in the Pacific. Communi- 
cations with some of the most important 
sources of supply have been interrupted. The 
other American republics are already supplying 
an important share of our requirements of 
these critical materials. For instance, from our 
southern neighbors we have been obtaining a 
minimum of 35 percent of our copper require- 
ments ; 20 percent of our tungsten requirements ; 
25 pei'cent of our zinc requirements; 20 percent 
of our lead requirements; and 33 percent of our 
antimony requirements. Much of this has been 
purchased directly by our Government. There 
are, however, many untapped sources of supply 
in the other American republics. In order to 
furnish the sinews for the defense of the 
Western Hemisphere these undeveloped mining 
and agricultural possibilities should be de- 
veloped cooperatively. 

Sixth : Just as the other American republics 
are generously making available strategic raw 
materials to the United States for fabrication 
into the weapons of war, so, in the same meas- 
ure, it is incumbent upon us to provide them 
with the materials that they need to maintain 
their economies in a healthy condition. The 
gradual curtailment and now almost complete 
elimination of Europe and the Far East as 
suppliers of manufactured articles and certain 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



11 



basic raw matei'ials has left the United States 
as practically the only source of supply. Every 
effort, consistent with our defense effort, has 
been made to furnish the essential import re- 
quirements of the American republics. Our 
1940 exports to the other American republics 
reached an all-time high of $720,776,000. 
Nevertheless, there are civilian needs in these 
countries that it has been impossible to fill, just 
as it has not been jiossible to meet all the civilian 
needs of this country. It is the policy of the 
Government to treat these civilian needs on an 
equal and proportional basis to that accorded 
to our own civilian needs. 

There have been some voices heard since 
December 7 recommending that all our re- 
sources be conserved for our own use. These 
are the same voices that urge greater production 
of raw materials by our neighbors and who re- 
quest cooperation from them of many sorts. 
The incongruity of asking all and giving 
nothing is so apparent to all that scant attention 
has been paid to this narrow talk. I mention 
it, however, because it serves to bring out that 
the defense of the Western Hemisphere is a 
cooperative job in which each country must 
give as well as receive. 

These, then, are some of the questions that 
have had the attention of the American repub- 
lics during the last year. Since they are all of 
equal if not greater importance today, it is a 
fair guess that the American republics will be 
concerned with them at the forthcoming meet- 
ing in Rio and throughout the coming year. 

This brief canvass may also have served to 
bring out that today the problems of the Amer- 
ican Republics are tackled jointly in order to 
seek solutions in procedures of a cooperative 
character. There is no parallel in history of a 
group of nations collaborating together so com- 
pletely for the attainment of their principal 
national problems. There must be and, of 
course, there is a reason for this since similar 
efforts have been made elsewhere and failed. 
The reason is simply that underneath differences 
of language and race, of tradition and political 
and economic development, there exists the 



same desire for a society in which free men at 
peace with one another can live and work and 
develop their individual talents in the way they 
see fit. This ideal is real and vital and living 
in the New World. It is not a new ideal since 
the origin is in the civilization of Western 
Europe that emerged from the Renaissance. 
Large parts of Europe, however, tired from the 
struggle for an ideal that requires sacrifice and 
mutual accommodation, have slipped back into 
forms of society that aim utterly to crush the 
freedom of the human spirit. It is because to- 
day in the Americas this democratic ideal is 
burning brighter than ever that the 21 Ameri- 
can republics, with all of their distinctiveness 
and difference, are pledged to help one another 
in case of aggression from without this hemi- 
sphere. 

The New World can learn a lesson from the 
dark pages of contemporary European history. 
Democracy was tossed overboard in many 
European countries because it failed to solve 
urgent domestic and international questions. 
The 20 years after World War I, despite what 
appeared on the surface to be recovery, were 
years of retrogression. The standard of living 
fell, opportunities for the individual became 
less and less, and international tension and dif- 
ficulties mounted. It was for these reasons that 
people began to listen to the will-o'-the-wisp 
promises of Fascist dictatorships. 

The New World also has problems that go 
to the vei'y roots of the social structure. There 
are problems of race, of the exploitation of one 
man by another, of land and industrial monop- 
oly, of disease and malnutrition and intoler- 
ance. Until these problems at least are tackled 
and solved, democracy will still be to many 
millions devoid of content and substance. 

Our first duty is to render the hemisphere 
impregnable from attack from without. Our 
next duty is to render it impregnable to attack 
from within by exploitation of social malad- 
justments. Only when both duties have been 
performed will the destiny of the New World 
have been realized. 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



THIRD MEETING OF MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE AMERICAN 
REPUBLICS AT RIO DE JANEIRO 

UNITED STATES DELEGATION 



The delegation from the United States which 
will attend the Meeting on January 15, 1942 
is constituted as follows: 

Representative of the United States of America: 
The Honorable Sumner Welles, Under Secretary of 

State 

Advisers: 

The Honorable Wayne C. Taylor, Under Secretary 
of Commerce 

Mr. Warren Lee Pierson, President of Export- 
Import Bank of Washington; Federal Loan 
Agency 

Mr. Carl Spaeth, Assistant Coordinator of Inter- 
American Affairs and Chief of American Hemi- 
sphere Division, Board of Economic Warfare 

Dr. Harry D. White, Assistant to the Secretary of 
the Ti-easury 

Mr. Lawrence M. C. Smith, Chief of Special Defense 
Unit, Department of Justice 

Mr. Leslie A. Wheeler, Director of Office of Foreign 
Agricultural Relations, Department of Agricul- 
ture 

Mr. William Creighton Peet, Jr., Secretary of the 
Maritime Commission 

Dr. Emilio G. Collado, Special Assistant to the 
Under Secretary of State, Department of State 

Dr. Marjorie M. Whiteman, Assistant to the Legal 
Adviser, Department of State 

Secretary Oeneral: 
Dr. Warren Kelchner, Chief of Division of Inter- 
national Conferences, Department of State 

Secretary to the United States Representative: 
Mr. Paul C. Daniels, Assistant Chief of Division of 
the American Republics, Department of State 



Assistant Adviser: 

Mr. Howard J. Trueblood, Divisional Assistant, De- 
partment of State 

Press Officer: 

Mr. Sheldon Thomas, Second Secretary, American 
Embassy, Buenos Aires. Argentina 

Assistant Press Officer: 

Mr. William A. Wieland, Press Relations Officer, 
American Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Assistant to the United States Representative: 
Miss Anna L. Clarkson, Assistant to the Under Secre- 
tary of State, Department of State 

Secretaries: 

Mr. Giiillermo Suro, Chief, Central Translating Office, 

Department of State 
Mr. Philip P. Williams, Third Secretary, American 
Embassy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Assistant Secretaries: 

Mr. Edward R. Pierce, Divisional Assistant, Depart- 
ment of State 
Miss Inez Johnston, Administrative Assistant, De- 
partment of State 

Assistant to the Secretary General: 

Miss Frances E. Pringle, Executive Clerk, Depart- 
ment of State 

Clerical Staff: 
Miss Dorothy F. Berglund 
Miss Edelen Fogarty 
Mr. Neal E. Kimm 
Mrs. Agnes A. La Barr 
Mr. H. Spencer May 
Miss Gladys E. Schukraft 
Miss Amy Margaret Watts 



COMPENSATION FOR PETROLEUM PROPERTIES EXPROPRIATED IN MEXICO 



[Released to the press December 31] 

Conversations directed toward determining 
the just compensation to be paid the nationals 
of the United States of America whose prop- 
erties, rights, or interests in the petroleum in- 
dustry in Mexico were affected to their detri- 
ment by acts of the Govermnent of Mexico sub- 



sequent to March 17, 1938 will begin in Mexico 
City on Monday, January 5, 1942, as provided 
for in the exchange of notes of November 19, 
1941. 

Morris Llewellyn Cooke will represent the 
United States,^ and Manuel J. Zevada, an en- 



' Bulletin of December 20, 1941, p. 563. 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



13 



gineer, wlio is Under Secretary in the Depart- 
ment of National Economy, will represent 
Mexico. 

The staff accompanying Mr. Cooke to Mexico 
includes : 

Dr. Harlow S. Person, Consulting Economist, formerly 
Dean of the Tuck School of Business Administration 
at Dartmouth College; later managing director of 
the Taylor Society, editor of Scientific Management 
in American Industry, and member of the Mississippi 
Valley Committee; at present on the staff of the 
Administrator of Rural Elect ritieatiou 

O. C. Merrill, Engineer Economist, formerly Executive 
Secretary of the Federal Power Commission and 
Director of the 1936 World Power Conference 

Judson C. Dickerman, Engineer Economist of the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission, formerly with the Virginia 
Railroad Commission, Chief of the Bureau of Gas, 
City of Philadelphia, and -■Associate Director of the 
Giant Power Survey, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Henry M. Oliver, Junior Economist, with the Division 
of Monetary Research, United States Treasury 

Mr. Cooke made the following statement : 

"Factual studies such as Engineer Zevada and 
I are instructed to conduct in this oil valuation 
usually yield a large part of the answer even to 
complicated technical problems. 

"Be<?ause of many different and impelling 
considerations, it is highly important both for 
our own country and for Mexico, our nearest 
neighbor to the South, that this long-standing 
question should be promptly settled, and settled 
equitably. 

"Both my friendly feelings for Mexico and its 
people and a keen recognition of the public and 
private interests at stake make me eager to co- 
operate effectively with my colleague over the 
border." 

PAYMENT BY MEXICO UNDER SPECIAL 
CLAIMS CONVENTION OF 1934 

[Released to the press January 2] 

The Ambassador of Mexico formally jire- 
sented to the Under Secretary of State on Jan- 
uary 2 his Government's check for $500,000 in 
payment of the eighth annual instalment, due 
January 1, 1942, in accordance with article II 
of the Convention between the United States 



of America and the United Mexican States, 
signed at Mexico City on April 24, 1934, pro- 
viding for the en-bloc settlement of the claims 
presented by the Government of the United 
States to the Commission established by the 
Special Claims Convention, concluded Septem- 
ber 10, 1923. 

The Ambassador of Mexico also presented a 
check covering interest due under article III 
of the convention of April 24, 1934. 

The Under Secretary of State requested the 
Ambassador of Mexico to convey to his Gov- 
ernment an expression of this Government's 
appreciation. 



DEATH OF FORMER ARGENTINE AM- 
BASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press December 31] 

The Under Secretary of State, the Honorable 
Sumner Welles, issued the following statement 
on December 31 : 

"I have learned with the utmost regret of the 
death of Dr. Romulo S. Naon, former Ambas- 
sador of the Argentine Republic in Washington. 

"I had the privilege of knoM'ing Dr. Naon for 
25 years. He rendered very great service in 
the promotion of close and friendly relations 
between Argentina and the United States. He 
was a man of outstanding ability and a states- 
man of proved worth. His loss will be felt by 
all of us who have worked in the cause of closer 
inter-American relations, for his assistance and 
wise counsel have been of incalculable value." 



INTER-AJVIERICAN HIGHWAY 

An act authorizing the appropriation of a 
sum not to exceed 20 million dollars to enable 
the United States to cooperate with the govern- 
ments of the American republics situated in 
Central America — that is with the Governments 
of the Republics of Costa Rica, El Salvador, 
Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Pana- 
ma — in the survey and construction of the pro- 
posed inter-American highway within the 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETEN 



borders of those republics, was approved by the 
President on December 26, 1941.^ 

The act provides that "expenditures of such 
sums in any such country shall be subject to the 
receipt of a request therefor and of satisfactory 
assurances from the government of that country 
that appropriate commitments have been made 
by such government to assume at least one third 
of the expenditures proposed to be incurred 
henceforth by that country and by the United 
States in the survey and construction of such 
highway within the borders of such country." 
It further provides that "all expenditures by 
the United States under the provisions of this 
Act for material, equipment, and supplies shall, 
whenever practicable, be made for products of 
the United States or of the country in which 
such survey or construction work is being 
carried on." 

Keasons for direct United States participa- 
tion in the highway construction, together with 
a short resume of the history of the inter- 
American highway project since 1923 when the 
first steps toward cooperative action were taken, 
appear in the BuUetin of May 10, 1941, page 557. 



ANNIVERSARY OF HAITIAN 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press January 1] 

The text of a telegram from the President 
of the United States to the President of Haiti, 
His Excellency Elie Lescot, follows : 

"Januabt 1, 1942. 

"On this anniversary of Haitian independ- 
ence, I am glad to extend to Your Excellency 
and to the Haitian people, who have without 
hesitation pledged themselves under your lead- 
ership to the cause of liberty and civilization, 
my most hearty good wishes and sincere 
congratulations. 

"Your repeated demonstrations of the inten- 
tion of the Government and people of Haiti 
to take an active part in the struggle in which 
the free nations of the world are now engaged 
has been most heartening to me and to the 
people of the United States. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



Commercial Policy 



THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC CONFLICT 
ADDRESS BY RAYMOND H. GEIST ' 



[Released to the press December 30] 

Mr. President and Members of the Nebraska 
State Bar Association: 
Wlren I accepted your invitation to address 
this gathering the horrors of war, which had 
been steadily spreading throughout the world, 
had not yet engulfed our own country. The 
convulsions which now threaten the whole of 
mankind had their origins in causes which ex- 
isted years ago, of which those of an economic 
nature were not the least in importance. Wlien 



the totalitarian leaders, with their vast program 
of aggression and depredation, made their ap- 
pearance, they succeeded in accomplishing the 
first steps of their rise to power under the guise 
of legal forms and processes, which at once 
deceived millions of those destined to be their 
victims. Chief among these victims were the 
fellow citizens who allowed their unscrupulous 
leaders to gain the mastery of the state; and 



' Public Law 375, 77th Cong. 



' Delivered at the annual dinner of the Nebraska 
State Bar Association, Lincoln, Nebr., December 29, 
1941. Mr. Geist is Chief of the Division of Commercial 
Affairs, Department of State. 



JANUARY 3, 194 2 



15 



now the rest of the world is engaged in a gigan- 
tic struggle to overcome the destructive forces 
which have become the common enemy of 
mankind. 

It will remain for the historians and the psy- 
chologists of the future to penetrate the cryptic 
insidiousness which motivated a small group of 
political instigators to impel nations and vast 
armaments of men to hurl themselves against 
the peace and freedom of their neighbors. We 
Americans also witnessed those first tiltings in 
the arenas nearly 20 years ago, when liberty, in 
the very cradle of western civilization, was over- 
thrown in the first Fascist state. Likewise we 
were present when the bloody and devouring 
specter of war first appeared above the horizons 
of Europe and Asia. We have heard the rum- 
blings and have seen the destruction of war 
slowly approaching our own shores. For a 
whole decade the security and well-being of 
mankind has been increasingly threatened, and 
during the last three years, blow after blow 
has been struck, destroying one nation after 
another. At last with a tremendously powerful 
dagger-thrust in the back, an unsuccessful at- 
tempt was made to lay us low. We were not 
confronted by an adversary who challenged us 
openly to battle but waylaid by a cowardly as- 
sassin who struck in the dark. In this the role 
of the assailant was true to form; for the as- 
sassin is always hired to level the blow which 
the instigators are too fearful to attempt them- 
selves. It is now our task to punish the assassin 
and bring the instigators to their certain end. 

It is not my purpose to go into the political 
phases of the present conflict, which assuredly 
present aspects which transcend all others, but 
to stress rather the economic measures which 
have been invoked in the totalitarian cause, and 
over against these to emphasize those concep- 
tions of economic justice to which we are com- 
mitted, and for the ultimate triumph of which 
we have been forced to take up arms. 

No economic justice can prevail in a world 
in which the enlightened principles, which gov- 
ern the conduct of nations, are overthrown and 
obliterated from the face of the earth. Men 
must be free to be just ! If the great mass of 



human beings, which compose the various na- 
tions, are enthralled under arbitrary authority, 
only injustice and exploitation can be the fate 
of the victims, while the masters sink deeper 
in cruelty and crime. Above all, the freedom of 
the individual must be preserved if the body 
politic of any nation is to be healthy and if 
that nation is to be a cooperative member of 
the family of nations. Only such a nation will 
uphold the principle of the inviolability of ter- 
ritorial integrity and respect the sovei'eignty of 
other states. Only such a nation will be gov- 
erned by the principle of non-interference in 
the internal affairs of other countries. Only a 
nation of free men will voluntarily respect the 
principle of equality among states, including 
equality of commercial opportunity and treat- 
ment. Such men will rely upon international 
cooperation and subscribe to methods of con- 
ciliation in adjusting international disputes. 
They will desire pacific settlements of contro- 
versies and strive for the improvement of in- 
ternational conditions by peaceful methods and 
processes. 

The political status of freedom which men 
and states enjoy is the primary safeguard of 
their material as well as their spiritual well- 
being. 

The struggle which the despot waged to en- 
thrall, first of all his own fellow citizens, and 
then the men and women of other countries 
had the direct object of seizing their material 
wealth, the fruits of their toil, and the inherit- 
ances they created for their children. The 
record of this systematic plundering on the 
part of the totalitarian rulers is one of the 
most gloomy and sinister chapters in modern 
history. An examination of this process is 
important, for its authors and adherents do 
not acknowledge their acts to be plundering 
and robbery but claim that it is a new order 
of economy upon which general contentment 
and world peace will be based. 

The authors of this new economy with their 
lust for confiscation and repression seized at 
once the productive capacity of the nation. In 
those European states where the totalitarian 
masters got control, the great mass of artisans 



16 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and workers of all trades and skill were placed 
under the most severe yoke of bondage. The 
leaders of the trade unions were arrested, and 
their organizations were dissolved and forbid- 
den. Their property was confiscated. Their 
funds were seized. They were forbidden to 
think any longer as free men who had a right 
to raise their voices in defense of their own in- 
terests. It was their allotted task to obey the 
commands which those placed over them saw 
fit to enforce. It was, however, not enough to 
rob men of their freedom and to reduce them 
to the status of robots. They were paraded in 
the marketplaces under slogans and banners, 
which they had learned to abhor, and forced 
to cheer lustily the very authors of their 
slavery. The millions of workers were or- 
ganized in one great body controlled by the 
state. Their hours of labor wei-e fixed at a 
higher level; but their wages remained the 
same. 

These workers had no right to dispose of 
their labor to the highest bidder or to seek 
amelioration of their economic status by en- 
gaging in more gainful pursuits. All doors 
were closed to advancement, while the stand- 
ard of living was fixed at a meager level. 
Millions of workers thus became the living 
property of the state. They were regimented 
in producing vast quantities of goods and ma- 
terials, over the disposition of which they had 
no control. In order to prevent the cost of 
living soaring so high that under the existing 
wage scales the mass of workers could not even 
eke out a bare existence, prices were fixed for 
all the necessities of life, except for those lux- 
uries which the leaders themselves and the pre- 
ferred few of the chosen hierarchy alone could 
obtain. 

In order to accomplish this program the 
greatest hoax of modern times was devised. 
The mass of farmers and landowners were 
brought under the yoke. A fiction was in- 
vented that proclaimed that the soil of the 
country was sacred and related to the blood of 
those who tilled it. It was claimed on the 
false theory of race that blood and soil were 
inseparable and could not be considered apart. 



By law every farmer was chained to his land. 
Under no circumstances could he dispose of 
his property, which passed at his death to his 
eldest male heir. This is the old feudal law 
of primogeniture, which, with the rest of the 
serfdom of the Middle Ages, was slowly abol- 
ished in Western Europe or greatly modified 
with the advent of modern times. Thus the 
conditions of agricultural life were fixed once 
and for all by the statutes and decrees of the 
state. There was no longer any freedom of 
choice for the first-born male in any rural 
family which possessed an estate. No matter 
what his predilections or capacities for other 
work might be, his destiny and that of his son 
and his grandson and his great-grandson had 
been predetermined. The fruits of a lifetime 
of work were already bequeathed at birth. 
The disinherited status of the rest of the chil- 
dren was established before they were born. 
The family life from the cradle to the grave 
revolved around these realities. This was the 
second great step in establishing economic 
thralldom in the totalitarian state. Not only 
were the farmers bound to the land, but their 
agricultural operations were controlled and 
prices wei'e fixed. For a time they were fa- 
vored at the expense of the workers in the 
cities, who were more easily bludgeoned into 
submission on account of their being accessible 
and grouped in larger numbers. Besides, the 
farmer, accustomed by the nature of his en- 
vironment to a larger measure of freedom, bent 
his neck more slowly under the totalitarian 
yoke. But in the course of time controls be- 
came more rigid in the agricultural connnuni- 
ties and prices of farm commodities were 
screwed down to suit the generally lower 
standard of living in the industrial centers. 

It was in the agricultural life of the totali- 
tarian states where the gi-eatest effects of 
the drive for self-sufficiency were felt. The 
whole farming industry was incorporated 
into an autonomous public body managed by 
the state, with absolute power over all the 
persons and property involved. Everything 
to do with agriculture came under the control 
of this organization. It could fix prices at 



JANTJART 3, 1942 



17 



will and determine what crops could be 
planted. Questions of distribution were oflS- 
cially regulated. Kates of interest on mort- 
gages and all other questions pertaining to the 
financial status of the farm were determined 
by the public authorities. Agriculture: was 
bodily lifted out of the realm of free compe- 
tition. The process of price adjustment 
placed the industry entirely out of line with 
prices prevailing for agricultural products in 
the world market. At first, prices were fixed 
on a remunerative basis; but this was slowly 
modified while the state was extending control 
over every individual farm. Those who pro- 
duced more grain than was required for their 
own needs were compelled to deliver the bal- 
ance to the official organizations at a fixed 
price. In the end every farmer received his 
orders as though he were a private in the 
army. Likewise the foundations for an even- 
tual economic conflict with the rest of the 
world were laid further in establishing author- 
itative control over industrial private enter- 
prises. The most far-reaching devices were 
set up by the totalitarian state with the aim of 
incorporating every business organization 
from the greatest industrial establishments to 
the smallest retail shops in the official organi- 
zation. On this one writer commented: "In 
the last analysis it can be stated that every en- 
trepreneur could consider himself a govern- 
mental employee executing the commands he 
receives". 

Setting up of controls governing the alloca- 
tion of raw materials, even the fixing of prices, 
hours of labor, production of finished products, 
and other measures are necessary in times of 
gi'eat emergency, such as that in which we find 
ourselves today. But the powers under which 
our Government acts have been authorized by 
the people's representatives in Congress. These, 
therefore, are controls which the Nation has de- 
cided to impose upon itself during a time of 
great national stress. 

In the totalitarian states these systems were 
built up ostensibly with the direct object of cre- 
ating a great war machine ; but the changes that 
were made with respect to labor, agriculture, 

436362 — 42 3 



and private enterprise were permanent in 
character, being the direct result of revolution- 
ary changes according to which the reorganiza- 
tion of society on the authoritarian principle 
was effected. 

It is important to remember that the au- 
thoritarian system demands not only unqualified 
obedience to the established authority but a 
rigorous discipline in carrying out the com- 
mands of the state. These are totally applied, 
and the enforcement afPects every phase of 
human activity. 

Even those administering justice, hearing 
and pleading causes, may only do so by virtue of 
their obligatory membership in an organiza- 
tion controlled by the totalitarian masters and 
which organization accepts and endorses the 
whole doctrine of oppression and force. Here 
has arisen an established system by which the 
scales of justice have been deliberately unbal- 
anced, where political prejudice and blind 
bigotry are substituted for reason and conclu- 
sions based on facts. Here cases are lost before 
they are heard ; and the innocent are convicted 
before they face their accusers. 

So in the midst of a universal inquisition, of 
which the agents are a ubiquitous police, the 
economic life of the nation is regimented and 
controlled for the supreme purpose of achieving 
world conquest and trade monopoly as far as 
the totalitarian arm of aggression can reach. 

As in military science, operations can only be 
extended from strategic bases, so in the interna- 
tional field, economic warfare against other na- 
tions can only be successfully waged if the 
strategy of position and movement is firmly in 
hand. In the totalitarian state all the economic 
agencies, particularly capital and industrial and 
agricultural labor and the production of ma- 
terials, commodities, and foods are totally with- 
in the control of the supreme authority. Thus 
a potential of vast proportions and influence is 
created, capable of entering and maintaining 
itself in the international fleld to the disadvan- 
tage, if not the destruction, of the economic 
stability of other countries. 

The steady effort toward total conquest and 
the investment of every national resource in the 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



grim relentless game of war is calculated to 
fasten upon other countries the same system 
of exjjloitation and repression which has been 
built up at home. The prize is enormous and 
worth the pains. At Armageddon the ruthless 
conquerors aim to sweep into their maws the 
far-flung wealth of the earth. A true perspec- 
tive of the economic purposes back of the 
aggressive moves which the totalitarian states 
have been carrying out during the last decade, 
reveals that the objectives are not the same as 
those which impelled the Central Powers in 
Europe to attack their neighbors in 1914. The 
Central Powers entered the Great War pri- 
marily to increase and fortify their hold upon 
world markets and to establish and maintain 
political and economic prestige both on sea and 
land. There was not the complete divergence 
in general outlook upon all phases of life ; nor 
had our former enemies turned their backs upon 
civilization. Freedom of the individual had 
not been turned into slavery ; nor had the state 
overthrown religion to make way for paganism. 
The courts and halls of justice were still gov- 
erned by legal codes and processes of law equal 
to those existing in enRghtened countries. The 
arts and sciences and above all education had 
not been debased and made to serve violent 
political ends. Nor had the youth of the nation 
been turned into rabid zealots. These violent 
changes subjugated the souls of men from the 
highest to the lowest and prepared them to en- 
list themselves blindly in an unholy cause of 
ruthless aggression against their innocent 
neighbors. 

The struggle of 1914 was destined, no matter 
■what might have been its outcome, to change 
the balance of power in Europe. The totali- 
tarian object in the present struggle is to anni- 
hilate civilization. These states are now 
waging war for the acquisition and control of 
the world's material wealth. Their aims in the 
raging conflict are to perpetuate their military 
power. They are endeavoring to seize the raw 
materials of the world, not to make an adjust- 
ment in the distribution of wealth among na- 
tions but to strengthen and fortify their 
aggressive striking-power, that they may be 
able to deliver the final blow. 



The economic system which has been imposed 
in the totalitarian states through the enslave- 
ment of the workers, farmers, and industrial 
producers, has laid the pattern for its extension 
in all countries whose independence has been 
destroyed. Wherever this juggernaut of power 
has established his rule the same economic sys- 
tem is introduced. The workers are robbed of 
their rights and compelled under pain of tor- 
ture and even death to produce as they are 
directed and for wages which are fixed by the 
conquerors. They are moved from one country 
to another and assigned to any task under con- 
ditions which the occupying authorities con- 
sider expedient. Industrial enterprises are co- 
ordinated in the general scheme of totalitarian 
production for whatever purpose may be essen- 
tial in maintaining and extending the potential 
of the military machine. The farms are plun- 
dered. The warehouses are emptied. Endless 
caravans loaded with booty move along with 
the marching hosts toward military objectives. 
Plants and factories are seized by agents of 
the occupying forces. Administration of the 
economic and financial apparatus in the con- 
quered countries is geared to the totalitarian 
system. In this process of despoliation the same 
arbitrary authority is exercised. The details 
of the plans are a minor part of the vast scheme 
of world political, economic, and military domi- 
nation. The reorganization along totalitarian 
lines in every occupied country is carried out 
with the utmost despatch and efficiency. The 
schemes of coordinating industrial production 
in such countries have been carefully worked 
out, not with the object of establishing an eco- 
nomic system which would preserve the inter- 
ests of the human beings, whose lives and prop- 
erty are at stake, but with the sole aim of 
increasing the total potential of the war ma- 
chine through which the conquest has been 
made. 

With the advent of the totalitarian agents the 
industrial and agricultural productive capacity 
of the subjected country is severely curtailed 
by the general distress of the inhabitants and 
their unwillingness to cooperate in forging the 
chains of their own slavery. This dislocation 
becomes more severe where passive and open 



JANUARY 3, 194 2 

resistance results in acts of sabotag:e and de- 
struction. Pitiless repressive measures persuade 
the majority to obey, who elect to preserve their 
own lives and perhaps the lives of their children, 
wliile cherishing- the hope that the conqueror 
■will either relent or in the end be overthrown. 
The net result is a complete reorganization of 
the industrial jaroductivity of the nation, car- 
ried out under the authority of totalitarian 
agents whose single aim is to augment the re- 
sources of the master state. While the war is 
in progi'ess these aims will be confined to in- 
creasing the military potential and to augment- 
ing the striking-power of the armed forces. 

We are, however, vitally concerned with the 
aims which affect the ultimate status of the 
world, economically and politically, over a long 
period of time. Our own progress and way of 
life will be determined by the kind of world 
in which we shall have to live thi'ough the 
decades and generations ahead. It is clear that 
the system which the would-be conquerors are 
determined to impose upon the world would 
not only destroy liberty and all the amenities 
of civilization and culture, overturn the rule 
of law wherever they have the power to do so, 
but would perpetuate an economic conflict so 
far reaching that the most isolated community 
on the earth would suffer the deteriorating ef- 
fects. This country will not accept such a sys- 
tem. It presupposes, first of all, a master state 
which, over and above its prerogatives of sov- 
ereignty, imposes upon all less powerful mem- 
bers a subordinate role, whicli members are 
compelled, in fact ordered, to adjust their na- 
tional economies and productive processes to 
the needs of the other. This means permanent 
isolation of such countries from the general sys- 
tem of world economy, a denial of their own 
progress in the search after higher living stand- 
ards, and the danger that their common eco- 
nomic status will progressively deteriorate as 
victims of foreign exploitation. The system 
which our totalitarian enemies mean to estab- 
lish negates all the historical {jrogress which has 
been made by the family of nations in an effort 
to realize ultimate cooperation between states 
and peoijles. 



19 

Never in the history of the world has state- 
craft been more ingenious and inventive in 
devising means of gaining control, not oidy 
of domestic economy but particularly of foreign 
trade for the purpose of attaining self-suffi- 
ciency, military and political predominance in 
tlie international field. Few of the devices used 
by the totalitarian states failed to have imme- 
diate and far-reaching effect upon the trade of 
most countries, including the United States. 
Foreign-excliange control reduced the volume 
of American exports in the earliest stages of 
the process when the totalitarian states began 
to mass material and supplies for their attack 
upon free countries; quantitative regulations in 
the form of import quotas soon affected the 
major exports from this country. The situa- 
tion was further aggravated by the use of multi- 
ple currencies, trading monopolies, exclusive 
trade arrangements with other states, the bilat- 
eral balancing of trade, and the consummation 
of barter-deals. It became clear to those who 
closely observed the M'orking of these devices 
that the aims were not economic but part of a 
vast scheme to pile up armaments and strategic 
materials for an eventual world conflict. In 
fact, all of these measures adopted in the totali- 
tarian countries were the first acts of aggression 
against the security and well-being of the civ- 
ilized world. The deliberate encroachments 
upon our commercial rights in international 
commerce, the interference with our trade with 
other nations, the discrimination practiced 
against our shipping, and the flouting of treaty 
provisions and international accords over a 
period of years presaged the more deadly on- 
slaughts which are now being waged against us. 
At no time in the world's history has there 
developed so startling a retrogression in human 
ideals. During the last decade millions of peo- 
ple in the Fascist and totalitarian states of 
Western Europe have been successfully led in 
revolt against their own freedom. They have 
aided in the overthrow of laws and consti- 
tutional rights on which their well-being 
depended. They have assisted in the enthrone- 
ment of masters who have destroyed their eco- 
nomic security and taken control of their 



20 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXILLETEST 



property and wealth. They have abandoned 
the inviolability of their homes and surrendered 
their children to the Molochs of corruption and 
false doctrine. They have hurled themselves 
with fire and sword against their peaceful 
neighbors, plundering and enslaving the inhabi- 
tants with cruel, relentless fury. 

While the fateful events have been in the 
making which came to a climax with the assault 
upon our territory and with our entrance into 
the war, our Government has steadily endeav- 
ored to advance those principles upon which 
international prosperity is based. We have 
constantly adhered to our treaty obligations and 
broken no covenants to wliich we have sub- 
scribed. Over against the totalitarian princi- 
ple of exploitation we have unremittingly 
worked for international cooperation and the 
reign of international law. The program 
which the United States has followed in its 
trade relations with other countries during the 
last eight years has accelerated economic coop- 
eration among those nations who are either now 
our allies in the present conflict or are counted 
among our friends. 

The most constructive effort which this Gov- 
ernment has made in the field of intemational 
economic relations has been embodied in the 
trade-agreements program which was inaugu- 
rated in 1934 with the enactment by the Con- 
gress of the Trade Agreements Act. It has 
been the object of the Government on behalf 
of the manufacturing and agricultural inter- 
ests of this country, as well as on behalf of 
peoples everywhere, to make the exchange of 
goods throughout the world a means of promot- 
ing common prosperity. It was an effort to 
give effect to the principle of non-discrimination 
in international commercial relations. It was 
the antithesis of the discriminatory policy 
adopted and promoted by the totalitarian states. 
It was an effort to give effect to the obvious 
truth that a nation cannot continue to seU if 
it does not buy. In every case where agree- 
ments were reached trade was stimulated and 
closer economic relations were established. The 
cornerstone of the Government's policy in pro- 
moting sound economic relations among nations 
rests upon the principle of "non-discrimina- 



tion", that is, upon the legal concept of equality 
of treatment which is expressed in the "most- 
favored-nation clause", which in every case has 
been embodied in the trade agreements made 
with other countries. It is the role of govern- 
m,ent to carry out negotiations with foreign 
states so that a mutually profitable interchange 
of goods becomes possible; it is the role of busi- 
ness to buy and sell. But business cannot func- 
tion in a world whei-e every nation is playing 
a lone hand and stacking the cards against the 
other. There are certain fundamental princi- 
ples which all nations must adopt and adhere 
to if international economic relations are finally 
to rest upon a solid basis. It may not be pos- 
sible in a world made up of so many peoples 
of divergent race and traditions to attain any 
degree of political and cultural homogeneity: 
but in the international economic sphere, where 
the distribution of essential raw materials and 
the interchange of goods must continue for the 
general good of mankind, a common standard 
of enlightened conduct must be assured, based 
upon legal conceptions just and equitable to all. 

With the entrance into the war the country 
has not only consecrated all the resources and 
manpower of the Nation to the sM'ift and com- 
plete attainment of victory but also to the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of a just world-order, 
in which the rapine and plunder of our ad- 
versaries cannot again menace the security and 
peace of all men. Upon the great world's stage 
all the forces of civilization are arrayed in a 
mighty conflict to preserve by deeds of arms 
those principles and institutions essential to hu- 
man progress. The aims were clearly set forth 
by the President of the United States and the 
Prime Minister of Great Britain in a joint dec- 
laration now known as the "Atlantic Charter" 
released by the T\Tiite House on August 14, 
wherein the following statements were made 
with reference (o international economic rela- 
tions : 

"Fourth, thej' will endeavor, with due respect 
for existing obligations, to further the enjoy- 
ment by all States, gi-eat or small, victor or van- 
quished, of access, on equal terms, to tlie trade 
and to the raw materials of the world which are 
needed for their economic prosperity ; 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



21 



"Fifth, they desire to bring about the fullest 
collaboration between all nations in the eco- 
nomic field with the object of securing, for all, 
improved labor standards, economic advance- 
ment, and social security". 

The Under Secretary of State in a recent ad- 
dress emphasized tlie significance of the declara- 
tion as follows: 

"This categorical statement of the essentials 
of post-war commercial policy reciuires no in- 
terpretation. I should, however, like to em- 
phasize its meaning and significance. 

"The basic conception is that your Govern- 
ment is determined to move towards the crea- 
tion of conditions under which restrictive and 
unconscionable tariffs, preferences, and discrim- 
inations are things of the past; under which 
no nation should seek to benefit itself at the 
expense of another; and under which destruc- 
tive trade warfare shall be replaced by coopera- 
tion for the welfare of all nations. 

"The Atlantic Declaration means that every 
nation has a right to expect that its legitimate 
trade will not be diverted and throttled by 
towering tariffs, preferences, discriminations, or 
narrow bilateral practices. Most fortunately 
we have already done much to put our own 
commercial policy in order. So long as we 
adhere and persistently implement the prin- 
ciples and policies which made possible the 
enactment of the Trade Agreements Act, the 
United States will not furnish, as it did after 
the last war, an excuse for trade-destroying and 
trade-diverting practices. 

"The purpose so simply set forth in the At- 
lantic Declaration is to promote the economic 
prosperity of all nations 'great or small, victor 
or vanquished'. Given this purpose and the 
determination to act in accordance with it, the 
means of attaining this objective will always be 
found. It is a purpose which does not have its 
origin primai'ily in altruistic conceptions. It is 
inspired by the realization, so painfully forced 
on us by the experiences of the past and of the 
present, that in the long run no nation can 
prosper by itself or at the expense of others and 
that no nation can live unto itself alone." 



There can be only one end to this war; and 
that is the end which the United States and the 
countries allied in the same cause have set out 
to reach. 

The world is no longer waiting in perplexity 
and fear of the issues of the future. The period 
of uncertainty and vacillation is passed. The 
momentum of the march toward victory will 
increase with every passing day until the forces 
arraj'ed against us will be overwhelmed and 
destroyed and the revolution of nihilism dis- 
appears from the earth. 

When that day comes this great world of 
human beings will grow hoarse with the frenzy 
and jubilation of thanksgiving. They will 
realize that they have had a rendezvous with 
destiny; a narrow escape, where everything 
which makes human life worth while was at 
stake, not only for them but also for their chil- 
dren. When that day comes the hundreds of 
millions who are now threatened with slavery 
will turn to the leaders of the world's affairs 
and demand assurance that their liberties never 
again be placed in jeopardy. We shall have a 
major part in determining the giurranties upon 
which that assurance will be based. Our place 
in world affairs is now fixed; our own interest 
demands that we never again retreat from bear- 
ing our full responsibility in safeguarding the 
lot of the human race. 

In the declaration of the Atlantic Charter the 
future of the world is presaged. A universal 
order must be established that will embody the 
aspirations of all and give every nation an equal 
opportunity to develop its national life in har- 
mony with its neighbors and in consonance with 
the general course of enlightened civilization. 
Each nation must recognize its opportunity as 
well as its responsibility in international affairs; 
and this responsibility cannot be exercised more 
vitally than in the task of rearing an interna- 
tional economic order in which the prosperity 
of all will be guaranteed. There can be no bet- 
ter start in that new day when a war-wearied 
world will look to us for guidance than to make 
those principles universal which the Secretary 
of State has unceasingly fostered and advanced 
in international conunercial relations. 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETrN 



SUPPLEMENTARY TRADE AGREEMENT WITH CUBA 



[Released to the press December 29] 

On December 29, 1941 the President pro- 
claimed the second supplementary trade agree- 
ment between the United States and Cuba 
which was signed at Habana on December 23, 
1941. The publication of the new agreement in 
the Gaceta Of,cml of the Republic of Cuba took 
place on the same day that it was proclaimed in 
the United States. 



In accordance with the provisions of article 
IX, the new agreement will enter into force on 
January 5, 1942. 

An analysis of the general provisions of the 
new agreement was printed in the BuUetin of 
December 27, 1941, page 603. The text of the 
agreement will be printed shortly in the Execu- 
tive Agreement Series. 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH PERU 



[Released to the press December 29] 

On December 29, 1941 the Secretary of State 
issued formal notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with the Government of 
Peru. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and fixing the time and place for the opening of 
the hearings. 

There is printed below a list of products 
which will come under consideration for the 
possible granting of concessions by the Govern- 
ment of the United States. Representations 
which interested persons may wish to make to 
the Committee for Reciprocity Information 
need not be confined to the articles appearing in 
this list but may cover any articles of actual or 
potential interest in the import or export trade 
of the United States with Peru. However, only 
the articles contained in the list issued on De- 
cember 29 or in any supplementary list issued 
later will come under consideration for the pos- 
sible granting of concessions by the Government 
of the United States. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information are included 
in a statement released by that Committee on 
December 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 



tween the United States and Peru during the 
years 1929-40 inclusive, together with the prin- 
cipal products involved in the trade between the 
two countries during the years 1939 and 1940, 
has been prepared by the Department of Com- 
merce, and is printed below. 

Department of State 

trade-agreement negotiations with peru 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended 
by Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 
1940, and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 
1934, 1 hereby give notice of intention to nego- 
tiate a trade agreement with the Government 
of Peru. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation in accordance with the announcement 
of this date issued by that Committee concern- 
ing the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearings. 

CoRDELL Hull 
Secretary of State 

Washington, D.C, 
December 29, 19kl. 



JANUARY 3, 1942 

Committee for Keciprocitt Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with peru 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, January 
24, 1942; closing date for application to be 
heard, January 24, 1942; public hearings 
open, February 2, 1941. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
liereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with 
the Government of Peru, of which notice of 
intention to negotiate has been issued by the 
Secretary of State on this date, shall be submit- 
ted to the Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion not later than 12 o'clock noon, January 24, 
1942. Such communications should be ad- 
dressed to "The Chairman, Committee for Reci- 
procity Information, Tariff Commission Build- 
ing, Eighth and E Streets NW., Washington, 
D. C." 

A public hearing will be held beginning at 
10 a. m. on February 2, 1942, before the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information, in Room 
105 (Conference Room), the National Archives 
Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between Sev- 
enth and Ninth Streets NW., where supple- 
mental oral statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 29th day of December 
1941. 

Felton M. Johnston 

Secretary 
Washington, D. C, 

December £9, 194J. 



23 



List of Products on Which the United 
States Will Consider Granting Conces- 
sions to Peru 

The rates of duty or import tax indicated 
are those now applicable to products of Peru. 
Where the rate is one which has been reduced 
pursuant to a previous trade agreement by 50 
percent (the maximum permitted by the Trade 
Agreements Act) it is indicated by the symbol 
MR. Where a rate has been bound free of 
duty in a previous trade agreement, it is indi- 
cated by the symbol B. 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to the paragraph numbers of the tariff 
schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930, or, as the 
case may be, to the appropriate sections of the 
Internal Revenue Code. The descriptive 
phraseology is, however, in many cases limited 
to a narrower field than that covered by the 
numbered tariff paragraph or section in the 
Internal Revenue Code. In such cases only 
the articles covered by the descriptive 
phraseology of the list will come under con- 
sideration for the granting of concessions. 

In the event that articles which are at 
present regarded as classifiable under the de- 
scriptions included in the list are excluded 
therefrom by judicial decision or otherwise 
prior to the conclusion of the agreement, the 
list will nevertheless be considered as includ- 
ing such articles. 



United 
States 
Tarifl 
Act of 
1930 Para- 



Description of article 



Pyrettirum or insect flowers, 
and dcrris, tube, or tuba 
root, all the foregoing which 
are natural and uncom- 
pounded, but advanced in 
value or condition by shred- 
ding, grinding, chipping, 
crushing, or any other proc- 
ess or treatment whatever 
beyond that essential to 
proper packing and the pre- 
vention of decay or dete- 
rioration pending manufac- 
ture, not containing alcohol. 



Present rate 
of duty 



24 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 








States 








Tariff 
Act of 


Description of article 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1930 Para- 








graph 








36 


Barbasco or cube root, natural 
anduncompounded, but ad- 


5 or 10% ad val. 
(6% rate ap- 


MR." 








vanced in value or condition 


plies to ground 






by shredding, grinding, chip- 


root only). 






ping, crushing, or any other 








process or treatment what- 








ever beyond that essential 








to proper packing and the 








prevention of decay or de- 








terioration pending manu- 








facture, and not containing 








alcohol. 










10( per lb. 

500 per lb. on 




302(c) 


Tungsten ore or concentrates 








the metallic 








tungsten con- 








tained therein. 








7H% ad val. 
15% ad val. (plus 
a tax of $3 per 




404 


Cedar commercially known as 
Spanish cedar, granadilla. 










mahogany, rosewood, and 


thousand feet. 






satinwood: In the form of 


board meas- 






sawed boards, planks, deals, 


ure, under 






and all other forms not 


sec. 3424, 






further manufactured than 


Internal Rev- 






sawed, and flooring. 


enue Code; see 
below). 




501 


Sugars, tank bottoms, sirups of 
cane juice, melada. concen- 


1.281375t per lb. 










trated raelada, concrete and 








concentrated molasses, test- 








ing by the polariscope not 








above 75 sugar degrees, and 








all mixtures containing 








sugar and water, testing by 








the polariscope above fiO 








sugar degrees and not above 








75 sugar degrees. 








and for each additional sugar 


0.028126t per lb. 






degree shown by the polar- 


additional. 






iscopic test. 


and fractions 
of a degree in 
proportion. 








20% ad val. 






wise prepared or preserved. 






781 


Spices and spice seeds: 








Ginger root, not preserved or 


5t per lb. 






candied, ground. 






783 




7i per lb. 






and one-eighth inches or 








more in length. 










$1.50 per ton 


MR. 






MR. 


1001 


Flax, hackled, including 
"dressed line". 


mtperlb 


MR. 


1001 


Flax tow and flax noils 


W per lb- 


MR. 






2t per lb. 




1001 


Hackled hemp 


2m per lb. 





" The rate of duty on natural and uncompounded barbasco or cube 
root, advanced in value by grinding, was reduced from 10% to 5% ad 
val. in the trade agreement with Venezuela, effective December 16, 1939. 



United 








States 








Tariff 
Act of 


Description of art iele 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1930 Para- 








graph 








1102(b) 


Hair of the alpaca, llama, and 
vicuna: 








In the grease or washed 


Sit per lb. of 
clean content. 








37t per lb. of 
clean content. 














32(! per lb. of 
clean content. 












Sorted, or matchings, if not 


3H per lb. of 






scoured. 


clean content. 




1504(b)(1) .. 


Hats and hoods, composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
the fiber of the carludovica 
palmata, commercially 
known as toquilla fiber or 
straw; and not blocked or 
trimmed, and not bleached, 
dyed, colored, or stained. 


12M% ad val... 


MR. 


1602 


Pyrethrum or insect flowers, 
natural and uncompounded 
and in a crude state, not ad- 
vanced in value or condi- 
tion by shredding, grinding, 
chipping, crushing, or any 
other process or treatment 
whatever, beyond that es- 
sential to proper packing 
and the prevention of decay 
or deterioration pending 
manufacture, not containing 
alcohol. 


Free. 




1609 


Cochineal, and extracts thereof, 
not containing alcohol. 


Free. 










B. 




which quinine may be ex- 








tracted. 








Coffee, except coffee imported 
into Puerto Rico and upon 




B. 










which a duty is imposed 








imder the authority of sec- 








tion 319. 






1670 --- 


Dyeing or tanning materials, 
whether crude or advanced 
in value or condition by 
shredding, grinding, chip- 
ping, crushing, or any simi- 
lar process, and not con- 
taining alcohol: 


Free. 








Free. 




1681 


Furs and fur skins, not specially 






provided for, undressed: 










Free 


B. 


1685 - - 




Free. 




1686 


Gums and resins: 










Free. 










B. 




jelutong or pontianak. 












B. 


1719 


Minerals, crude, or not advanced 
in value or condition by re- 
fining or grinding, or by 
other process of manufac- 
ture, not specially provided 
for: 










Free. 





JANT7ARY 3, 1942 



25 



United 








States 








Tariir 
Act of 


Description of article 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1930 Para- 








graph 








1722 


Barbaseo or cube root, crude or 
unmanufactured, not speci- 




B. 










ally provided for. 






1732 


Oils, expressed or extracted; 










Free. 




1748 




B. 




loids and salts of alkaloids 








derived from cinchona bark. 






1765 


Goat and kidskins, raw 


Free. 










B, 


1768(1) 


Spices and spice seeds: 












B. 




candied, if unground. 












B. 








B. 


1803 (1) 




Free- 


B. 




not further manufactured 


(Subject to a 






than planed, and tongued 


tax of $1.50 per 






and grooved, not specially 


thousand feet, 






provided for. 


board meas- 
ure, under sec. 
3424, Internal 
Revenue 
Code: see be- 
low). 





United 
States 
Tarill 
Act of 
1930 Para- 
graph 


Description of article 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1803(2) 


Balsa, cedar commercially 
known as Spanish cedar, 
granadilla, mahogany, rose- 
wood, and satinwood, in the 
log. 




B. 









Internal 

Revenue 

Code 

Section 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
import tax 


Sym- 
bol 


3424 


Cedar commercially known as 


$3 per thousand 






Spanish cedar, granadilla, 


feet, board 






mahogany, rosewood, and 


measure. 






satinwood lumber, rough, 








or planed or dressed on one 








or more sides. 






3424 


Balsa lumber, rough, or planed 


$1.50 per thou- 


MR. 




or dressed on one or more 


sand feet. 






sides. 


board meas- 
ure. 





Trade of the United States With Peru 
(Compiled by the Department of Commerce) 
UNITED STATES MERCHANDISE TRADE WITH PERU 
(Values in thou,sands of dollars) 





Experts to Peru - 


General unports from Peru 


Yearly average or year 


Value 


Percent of total 

United States 

exports 


Value 


Percent of total 

United States 

imports 


1911-15 - - - -. 


6,662 
26, 339 
20, 942 
23, 906 

7,789 
18,340 
26, 176 

15, 720 
7,935 
3,962 
4,985 
9,891 

12, 174 

13, 439 
19,001 

16, 892 
19, 246 
23, 123 


.3 

. 4 
.5 
.5 
. 4 
. 6 
.5 
. 4 
.3 
.2 
.3 
. 5 
.5 
.5 
.6 
.6 
. 6 
.6 


11,491 

41, 153 

19,015 

22, 819 

6,357 

14, 053 

30, 167 

21, 284 

8,973 

3,685 

5,472 

6, 191 

7,462 

9,023 

16, 525 
12,813 
13, 959 

17, 943 


. 7 


1916-20 - .._..-..-- 


1. 2 


1921-25 -- 


. 6 


1926-30 


. 6 


1931-35 . 


. 4 


1936-40'' . 


. 6 


1929 


. 7 


1930 - 


. 7 


1931 


. 4 


1932 - _- . 


.3 


1933 - 


. 4 


1934 - 


.4 


1935 - 


.4 


1936 - -- --- 


. 4 


1937 -- 


. 5 


1938 -- 


.7 


1939 


. 6 


1940' . 


.7 







• Includes re-exports. 

' Trade figures for 1940 are preliminary. 



26 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

UNITED STATES EXPORTS TO PERU 
(By Groups and Principal Commodities; data for individual items include only U.S. products) 



Commodity and group 



Quantity 



Value ($1,000) 



Exports of U.S. merchandise, total 

Animal products and animals, edible, total 

Dairy products 

Animal products and animals, inedible, total 

Upper leather (except lining and patent) 

Vegetable food products and beverages, total 

Grains and preparations 

Wheat flour 1,000 bbl.. 

Vegetables and preparations 

Yeast 1,000 1b.. 

Other vegetable food products and beverages 

Vegetable products, inedible, except fibers and wood, total 

Rubber and manufactures 

Automobile tire casings Number. . 

Cigarettes M.. 

Textile fibers and manufactures, total 

Cotton manufactures 

Cotton cloth, duck and tire fabric 1,000 sq.yd.. 

Bags of jute 1,000 lb_. 

Absorbent cotton gauze and sterilized bandages 1,000 Ib.. 

Wood and paper, total 

Douglas fir, sawed M. bd. ft-_ 

Boards, planks and scantlings: Douglas fir M. bd. ft^- 

Paper and manufactures 

Other products 

Nonmetallic minerals, total 

Petroleum and products 

Motor fuel and gasoline barrels.. 

Lubricating oil 1,000 bbl.. 

Paraffin wax 1,000 lb.. 

Glass and glass products 

Pottery 

Other product's 

Metals and manufactures, except machinery and vehicles, total 

Iron and steel-mill products 

Iron and steel bars and rods 1,000 lb.. 

Iron and steel plates, sheets and skelp 1,000 lb.. 

Tin plate and taggers' tin 1,000 lb._ 

Structural shapes Tons (2,240 Ib.).. 

Sheet piling 1,000 lb.. 

Tubular products and fittings 1,000 lb_- 

Wire and manufactures 1,000 lb.. 

Iron and steel advanced manufactures 

Other products 

Machinery and vehicles, total 

Electrical machinery and apparatus 

Radio apparatus 



20 



570 



18, 640 
17, 805 



564 

1,024 

102 



4, 109 
38, 304 



13, 491 

25 

3,920 



13, 825 

16, 405 
6,216 
5, 110 
3, 122 

10, 838 
3,860 



532 



23, 454 
26,511 



1, 144 

774 



8,469 
33, 114 



190 
23 

4,958 



19, 836 

14, 396 
11,681 

3,248 

570 

17, 862 

6,429 



18,841 
233 
142 
109 



436 
127 

76 
123 

86 
186 
722 
511 
280 

48 
616 
154 

57 
114 

61 
1, 137 

70 
699 
170 
200 
1, 175 
747 
145 
402 
150 

67 

58 
303 
3,558 
2,617 
333 
439 
280 
318 

95 
476 
218 
601 
340 
7,870 
841 
216 



JANUARY 3, 1042 27 

UNITED STATES EXPORTS TO PERU — Continued 
(By Groups and Principal Commodities; data for individual items include only U.S. products) 



Commodity and group 



Quantity 



Value ($1,000) 



Machinery and vehicles — Continued. 

Indust rial machinery 

Construction and conveying machinery 

Mining, well, and pumping machinery 

Textile machinery 

Office appliances 

Typewriters Number. . 

Agricultural machinery and implements 

Tracklay ing tractors Number, . 

Automobiles, parts and accessories 

Motor trucks and busses Number. - 

Pas.senger cars Number. _ 

Aircraft and parts 

Landplanes (powered) Number. . 

Other machinery and vehicles 

Chemicals and related products, total 

Coal-tar products 

Chemical specialties 

Calcium arsenate 1,000 lb. _ 

Pigments, paints, and varnishes 

Explosives, fuses, etc 

Dynamite 1,000 lb__ 

Soap and toilet preparations 

Other products 

Miscellaneous domestic articles, total 

Photographic and projection goods 

Scientific and professional instruments 

Re-exports of foreign merchandise, total 

Exports, including re-exports, total 



4,820 



2,461 



1,328 
1,202 



1,432 
1,807 



3,702 



2,942 



3,957 



2,270 
277 
958 
62 
247 
156 
530 
228 

2,353 
935 
898 

1,311 
989 
318 

2, 157 
68 
588 
200 
164 
538 
364 
156 
643 
827 
160 
168 

405 

19, 246 



3,070 
185 

1,228 
327 
235 
111 
318 
81 

2,753 
954 

1,301 
685 
387 
321 

2,563 
170 
466 
153 
207 
626 
479 
165 
939 

1,038 
170 
196 

627 

23, 123 



UNITED STATES IMPORTS FROM PERU 
(By Groups and Principal Commodities) 







Quantity 


Value ($1,000) 




1939 


1940 


1939 


1940 








13, 827 

523 

509 

336 

17 

14 


15, 364 








680 








562 




-.1,000 1b-. 


1, 197 
139 


1, 130 
786 


273 




1.000 1b-- 


84 


Other animal products, inedible 


18 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

UNITED STATES IMPORTS FROM PERU COntmued 

(By Groups and Principal Commodities) 



Commodity and group 



Quantity 



Value ($1,000) 



Vegetable food products and beverages, total 

Coffee 1,000 lb_ 

Cane sugar Million lb_ 

Molasses, not for human consumption 1,000 gal- 
Other vegetable food products 

Vegetable products, inedible, except fibers and wood, total 

Rubber, crude 1,000 lb_ 

Gutta balata 1,000 lb- 
Cube (Timbo or barbasco) root 1,000 lb_ 

Coca leaves 1,000 lb_ 

Other vegetable products, inedible 

Textile fibers and manufactures, total 

Cotton, raw 1,000 lb. (clean content). 

Cotton linters Do 

Flax, unmanufactured Tons (2,240 lb.). 

Clothing wool 1,000 lb. (clean content). 

Combing wool Do 

Hair of the cashmere goat, alpaca, etc Do 

Other textiles 

Wood, total 

Metals and manufactures, except machinery and vehicles, total 

Tungsten ore: 

For smelting, refining and export 1,0001b. (tungsten content) . 

Other tungsten ore Do 

Vanadium ore 1,000 lb. (vanadium content). 

Copper: 

For smelting, refining and export 1,000 lb. (copper content). 

Other copper Do 

Lead ore and bullion: 

For smelting, refining and export 1,000 lb. (lead content). 

Other lead ore and bullion Do 

Lead pigs and bars Do 

Zinc ore: 

For smelting, refining and export 1,000 lb. (zinc content). 

Other zinc ore (except pyrites) 1,000 lb. (zinc content). 

Antimony ore 1,000 lb. (antimony content). 

Bi.smuth 1,000 1b. 

Other metals and manufactures ^ 

Guano Tons (2,240 lb.) . 

Miscellaneous articles, total 



362 

78 
747 



44 

102 

1,730 

468 



394 
1,041 



260 

52 

2, 102 



71,514 
449 

15, 665 
3,300 

7, 166 

4,358 

36, 993 

861 

183 



4,700 



1,295 
60 

1,427 



294 

225 

2,225 

658 



840 

1,466 

147 

824 

1,342 

2,088 



117 

175 

4, 598 

67, 129 
3,615 

1,084 
26, 077 

17,517 

17, 259 

11,254 

1, 195 

124 



1, 134 

32 

1,085 

11 

6 

286 

4 

16 

135 

80 

51 

1,090 

47 

33 



112 

23 

871 

4 

145 

10, 346 

44 

19 

992 

7,284 
47 

363 
119 

112 

119 
941 

63 
154 

89 
205 



Cultural Relations 



THE ROLE OF CULTURAL EXCHANGE m WARTIME 
ADDRESS BY CHARLES A. THOMSON' 



[Released to the press December 31] 

The original subject of this talk, "The Eole 
of Cultural Exchange in the Present and Fu- 
ture Relations of the Americas", was assigned 
and accepted when our country was at peace — 
albeit an uneasy peace — with all the world. 
Now that we are at war in the Atlantic and 
in the Pacific, on land, on sea, and in the air, 
there is an arresting timeliness in the question : 
What is the role of cultural exchange in war- 
time? 

We are not tlie fii-st nation to be faced with 
this question. Great Britain and Germany 
have been answering it in the other American 
republics, while their battles raged in Europe, 
and their responses have borne what may ap- 
pear to some a surprising degree of resem- 
blance. Each in its own way has not di- 
minished but has rather intensified cultural 
activities as an essential basis for relations dur- 
ing and after the conflict. Japan has answered 
similarly : at the very hour that Japanese 
planes were attacking Pearl Harbor, Japanese 
representatives were promoting a cultural 
agreement with Brazil. China, too, has an- 
swered. Under invasion and bombardment, 
China has never slackened her supj)ort of Chi- 
nese-American cultural agencies. This ima- 
nimity of response from our enemies as well 
as from our allies is the most convincing testi- 
mony possible to the immense importance of 
fostering and furthering cultural relations 
now. 

As for us, our own Government has accepted 
for many years the solidarity of the American 
republics as basic in our international relations. 
The cultural factor is a primary contributor 



'Delivered before the American Political Science 
Association, New York, N.Y., December 31, 1941. Mr. 
Thomson is Chief of the Division of Cultural Re- 
lations, Department of State. 



toward that solidarity. Obviously it would 
be detrimental, even disastrous, to lose sight of 
this factor under pressure of war conditions. 

In short, cultural relations — which have been 
happily defined as "a better muttial comprehen- 
sion of one another's ways"— serve to provide 
that underlying basic understanding and com- 
munity of interest and eflPort essential to con- 
tinuing an effective cooperation among the 
American nations. Konrad Bercovici declared 
recently "We in the United States have recog- 
nized at long last that to protect ourselves we 
nuist protect the other Americas. But Me have 
not yet convinced our neighbors that our pro- 
posed cooperation is of mutual interest. It is. 
We have not told them, not really told them, 
not so that our words would sink in, that if we 
do not frustrate the aggi'essors or would-be 
aggressors now — together — -they, the Mexicans 
and the Central and South Aanericans, will all 
be in grave danger. That is the language they 
would understand, if properly uttered not only 
by our political leaders, but by ourselves, the 
])eople." 

Now it is more than ever important that our 
country strengthen the bonds of friendship with 
the other American republics, demonstrate to 
them that the cause of our freedom is the cause 
of their freedom, of all freedom; and it is 
ui'gently necessary that the channels of travel 
and information be kept open. The immediate 
agencies to effect this are the agencies already 
fruitfully at work: The interchange between 
the Americas of leaders of thought and opinion, 
of research workers, technicians, and professors 
and students; translation back and forth of 
significant and revealing writings whether for 
their timeliness or for their enduring literary 
values; the showing in our sister countries of 
motion pictures that reveal life in the United 
States — and now, most particularly, life as lived 

29 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



with undimmed vitality and unclouded faith in 
wartime — and similarly, the showing of pic- 
tures here that tell of the life and purposes of 
the peoples to the South; and the transmission 
of radio progi'ams to the same end. 

We are accustomed to link propaganda and 
war in our thinking. But what is the role of 
cultural relations in wartime, as distinct from 
propaganda? In answer, we may note that 
there are three major ways of influencing the 
ideas of other peoples. One is the way the 
Nazis have brought to perfection a subversive, 
insidious system which they employ as an im- 
plement of aggression, as the psychological 
arm of their pattern of conquest. It is used 
as the prelude to military subjection. It is 
designed to create a pathological condition in 
the mind of another people, to bring about 
emotional confusion in a nation in order to 
"soften" its will and render it powerless to 
take action for its own preservation. It rep- 
resents the now familiar technique of the "war 
of nerves". Those who administer this type 
of propaganda do not consider the objects of 
its pressure as equals whose opinions are to 
be respected, but as victims to be despised and 
overcome. 

But there is a second type of propaganda, 
of which the Nazi form is a corruption or dis- 
tortion. Propaganda in its original — and 
correct — sense moans simply an effort to urge 
other people to think as one thinks. It recalls 
the figure of the farmer or the gardener who 
puts slips into the ground in the hope of prop- 
agating some desirable plant. For as "cul- 
ture" and "cultivation" had the same origin 
in the tilling of the soil, so did "propagation" 
and "propaganda". It is by such methods that 
missionaries spread their faith, communities 
attract new i-esidents, or an association gains 
members. 

The program of cultural relations, in some 
of its phases, may border closely on this sec- 
ond or "instructive" type of propaganda, as 
distinguished from the "destructive" Nazi 
form. Yet it has a distinct field of its own. 
Both types of propaganda just mentioned are 
essentially unilateral; cultural relations are 



fundamentally and necessarily reciprocal. 
The technique of propaganda is generally 
similar to that of advertising; it seeks to im- 
press, to press in. The technique of cultural 
relations is that of education in the root sense 
of the word, to "lead out". Pi'opaganda en- 
deavors to develop a receptive or favorable at- 
titude — that state of mind which is sometimes 
called "good-will". The goal of cultural re- 
lations is something deeper and more lasting, 
the creation of a state of mind properly called 
"understanding". Good-will may be largely 
emotional ; it may evaporate quickly. Un- 
derstanding endures. It is a thing of the 
mind, rooted in knowledge and the conviction 
that is born of knowledge rather than in emo- 
tion or sentimentality. When occasions of 
friction arise, the good- will fostered by propa- 
ganda may soon be forgotten. But if effective 
understanding has developed between two peo- 
ples, each will better comprehend the position 
of the other, even if they differ; irritation is 
lessened, and the way paved for adjustment 
and eventual solution. 

The American nations face a long pull to- 
gether, both during this war and after. Only 
the strongest possible bonds will be adequate 
to assure that cooperation which is essential 
to victory and a stable peace. The member 
nations of the New World partnership must 
have that nuitual respect and trust which re- 
sults from true confidence and understanding. 
To build that understanding is in considerable 
part the job of cultural relations. 

The Department of State in cooperation with 
Nelson Rockefeller, Coordinator of Inter- 
American Affairs, has been working with the 
colleges and universities and other private agen- 
cies toward this end. Among other activities, 
the Department during the past year has in- 
vited to the United States for individual visits 
40 or more outstanding leaders of thought and 
opinion from the other American republics — 
social and natural scientists, journalists, novel- 
ists and other writers, historians, educators, 
artists, and musicians. They have traveled 
widely in this country and have received gen- 
erous hospitality from many of the institutions 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



ai 



which you represent. They have gone back to 
their own countries to report the existence of 
a real basis for inter-American understanding 
and cooperation. Let me cite the words of only 
two of these visitors: 

Sergio Buarque de Ilollanda of the Brazilian 
Ministry of Education wrote in one of Rio de 
Janeiro's leading newspapers: "In our Amer- 
icas, in spite of all ethical and cultural differ- 
ences, there are to be found, from North to 
South, certain social features with identical 
origins, which were developed by applying old 
institutions and old ideas to a new free land". 

Dr. Josue Gollan, distinguished Argentine 
scientist and Eector of the Universidad del 
Literal, stated in a public address that of all 
his travels none had impressed him more deeply 
than the visit to this Nation, "considering the 
similarity of the United States and our country 
with regard to origin, aspirations, and political 
system". He went on to make this striking 
comment concerning the United States, "its 
charm does not lie in the expressions of its 
sciences and arts, as is the case with regard to 
European culture; its charm lies in the organi- 
zation of its collective life, in the spirit and 
action of a powerful democi'acy". 

The bases exist for inter-American under- 
standing. But the solidity of our New World 
partnership will depend also on the degree to 
which the American peoples share a common 
social goal. As Ernesto Galarza has written in 
the November 1941 issue of the Free WorM, 
"the Americas must forge ahead on the premise 
that common defense and joint war, if neces- 
sary, must produce after the victory a system 
for the use and enjoyment of the continent's 
resources by the people who live on it, on the 
basis of their industry, their enterprise, and 
their common human needs." Peoples who 
live in misery and ignorance, without knowl- 
edge and without hope, cannot be expected to 
feel a stake in a victory of so-called "democ- 
racy", or to struggle and sacrifice for such a 
goal. 

Solidarity must rest on an economic and 
social, as well as on an intellectual or ideological 
base. To this end there must be a joint inter- 



American program which will seek to raise 
living standards and increase consumption 
capacity through progressively wider possession 
and use of land, the better development of sub- 
sistence agriculture, the cooperative adjustment 
of surplus crops, the formulation of a sound 
plan for financing needed industrial develop- 
ment and other purposes, the elevation of labor 
standards, and the improvement of education 
and public health. The construction of high- 
ways will play an important role ; and the Pan 
American Highway, on which work goes stead- 
ily forward, should be rapidly advanced as a 
great potential force for bringing the American 
countries closer together in common under- 
standing through closer contact of all our 
peoples. 

Here it becomes evident that cultural rela- 
tions have a wider field than that usually cov- 
ered by the term "intellectual cooperation". 
They should contribute not only to that under- 
standing which comes from interchange in edu- 
cation, scholarship, and the arts, but also pro- 
vide effective cooperation for the achievement 
of economic advance and social welfare. 
Through exchange fellowships and professor- 
ships, the loan of experts, special training op- 
portunities for technicians and interns, the 
cultural-relations program should facilitate co- 
operative action in the economic and social field. 
Social-security legislation may be made more 
effective, programs of social welfare may be for- 
warded by assistance in the training of adequate 
personnel, and the exchange of ideas and sci- 
entific information in books and other publica- 
tions may be greatly extended. 

A major responsibility for leadership and 
effort to create a healthy, better, peaceable world 
has now come to this hemisphei'e. It has come 
especially to the United States of America. 
But the United States will always share that 
responsibility with the other American repub- 
lics and with Canada. The New World can 
hope to be more successful in meeting its vital 
responsibility than the Old only if it has 
achieved within itself the cooperative order and 
the common fabric of morality, law, and human 
aspiration for a better life free from want and 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



fear, which it would seek to realize in the post- 
war settlement. If the Americas are to provide 
leadership in the task of building the better 
world of peace and economic advancement, a 
world whose foundations will not soon tremble 
again, whose walls cannot be toppled down, the 
time is already here for the scholars and think- 
ers to start to work on the contribution which 
the American system of cooperative peace de- 
veloped in this hemisphere can make to the 
problem of world stability after the struggle. 

In an address delivered just a few days be- 
fore we were attacked by Japan, Assistant Sec- 
retary Berle said in words that have tremen- 
dously added significance in the light of today's 
events : 

"The American system is now preserving in 
the New World the values of civilization which 
much of the Old World is destroying. It has 
shown the way to a unity between free nations. 
It has shown that without sacrifice of a jot of 
proud independence great nations can join in 
a common cause. They can do the work of in- 
ternal improvement. They can carry on the 
peaceful fabric of conunerce. They can create 
the power which is needed to repel an enemy. 
If force is needed, they have and can use force. 
They are a standing answer to the defeatists 
who say that unity can come only from 
conquest. 

"On November 25 Berlin attempted to set up 
a fraudulent order based on terror. It went 
almost unnoticed in the New World ; for in the 
New World there is already a free order which 
has, in itself, strength of arms and strength of 
will; strength of justice and strength of 
economics." 

The union of free men in the United States 
of America made a home for freedom in the 
world. The union of free countries in the united 
republics of America — united less by political 
bond than by the concept and ideology of lib- 
erty itself, in the fullest and deepest sense of the 
term by a cultural relationship — is today the 
world's assurance that freedom shall not fail. 



General 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through November 1941, as shown in the reports 
submitted bj' persons and organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State for the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions to be used 
for relief in belligerent countries, in conformity 
with the regulations issued pursuant to section 
3 (a) of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effective 
by the Pi'esident's proclamations of September 
5, 8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of 
November 4, 1939 as made effective by the Presi- 
dent's ijroclamution of the same date, has been 
released by the Department of State in mimeo- 
graphed form and may be obtained from the 
Department upon request (press release of De- 
cember 29, 1941, 51 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom. India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Henry R. Labouisse, Jr., has been ap- 
pointed an Assistant Chief of the Division of 
Defense Materials, effective as of December 2, 
1941 (Departmental Order 1016). 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



33 



EXECUTIVE ORDER EXCEPTING CER- 
TAIN POSITIONS FROM CIVIL SERVICE 
RULES 

An Executive order (no. 9004) signed Decem- 
ber 30, 1941, amends the Civil Service Rules by 
excepting certain positions from examination 
under section 3, Civil Service Rule II. Posi- 
tions in the Department of State affected are 
listed in the order as follows: 

"1. Five special assistants to the Secretary of 
State. 

"2. All employees of international commis- 
sions, congresses, conferences, and boards, ex- 
cept the International Joint Commission; the 
International Boundary Commission, United 
States and Mexico; and the International 
Boundary Commission, United States, Alaska, 
and Canada. 

"3. Chief and two assistant chiefs of the 
foreign service buildings office. 

"4. Two private secretaries or confidential 
assistants to the Secretary of State, and one to 
each Assistant Secretary of State. 

"5. One private secretary or confidential 
assistant to the head of each bureau in the State 
Department appointed by the President. 

"6. One chauffeur for the Secretary of State. 

"7. Gage readers employed part-time or inter- 
mittently by the International Boundary Com- 
mission, United States and Mexico, at such 
isolated localities that in the opinion of the 
Commission the establishment of registers is 
impracticable." 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press January 3] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since December 27, 
1941: 

Stephen C. Brown, of Herndon, Va., formerly 
Vice Consul at Kunming, Yunnan, China, has 



been designated Third Secretary of Embassy 
and Vice Consul at London, England, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Harry E. Carlson, of Joliet, 111., First Secre- 
tary of Legation and Consul at Helsinki, Fin- 
land, has been designated First Secretary of 
Legation and Consul at Stockholm, Sweden, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Richard Ford, of Oklahoma City, Okla., Con- 
sul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has been desig- 
nated First Secretary of Embassy and Consul 
at Buenos Aires, Argentina, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Landreth M. Harrison, of Minneapolis, 
Minn., formerly Second Secretary of Embassy 
at Berlin, Germany, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Legation at Bern, Switzerland. 

Thomas A. Hickok, of Aurora, N. Y., Consul 
at Manila, Philippine Islands, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Legation at Dublin, 
Ireland. 

Miss Elizabeth Humes, of Memphis, Tenn., 
Second Secretary of Legation at Copenhagen, 
Denmark, has been designated Second Secretary 
of Legation at Bern, Switzerland. 

John D. Johnson, of Highgate, Vt., formerly 
Consul at Salonika, Greece, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

David McK. Key, of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
formerly Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Rome, Italy, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

David H. McKillop, of Chestnut Hill, Mass., 
formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at Ber- 
lin, Germany, has been designated Third Sec- 
retary of Legation and Vice Consul at Stock- 
holm, Sweden, and will serve in dual capacity. 

The assignment of Harvey Lee Milbourne, of 
Charles Town, W. Va., as Consul at Calcutta, 
India, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Milbourne has been assigned as Consul at St. 
Lucia, British West Indies, where an American 
Consulate will be established. 

James B. Pilcher, of Cordele, Ga., formerly 
Consul at Amoy, Fukien, China, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



K. Borden Beams, of Luthersburg, Pa., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation at Copenhagen, Den- 
mark, has been designated Second Secretary of 
Legation at Bern, Switzerland. 

Frank A. Schuler, Jr., of North Muskegon, 
Mich., Vice Consul at Antigua, Leeward Is- 
lands, British West Indies, has been assigned as 
Consul at Antigua, Leeward Islands, British 
West Indies. 

Philip D. Sprouse, of Springfield, Tenn., for- 
merly Vice Consul at Hankow, Hupeh, Qiina, 
has been designated Third Secretary of Em- 
bassy at Chungking, China. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

CONCILIATION 

Treaty With Liberia 

[Released to the press December 30] 

The Conciliation Treaty between the United 
States and Liberia, signed on August 21, 1939, 
provided for the establishment of a Permanent 
International Commission to which disputes be- 
tween the two Governments may be submitted 
for investigation and report. The Commission 
is to be composed of five members, consisting of 
one national member chosen by each of the par- 
ticipating Governments and one non-national 
member chosen by each Government from some 
third country. The fifth member or joint com- 
missioner will be chosen by agreement between 
the Government of the United States and the 
Government of Liberia, it being understood that 
he shall not be a citizen of either country. 

The President has designated the following 
persons to serve on behalf of this Government 
on the Permanent International Commission : 

National Memlier: 

Mr. Harry A. McBride, of Michigan, Administrator, 
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C. 
Non-national Member: 

His Excellency Seuor Dr. Don Francisco Castillo 
Najera, Ambassador of Mexico, Washington, D. C. 



COMMERCE 

Supplementary Trade Agreement With Cuba 

Announcement of the proclamation by the 
President of the suiDplementary trade agreement 
with Cuba, signed at Habana December 23, 
1941, appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Commercial Policy". 

Trade-Agreement Negotiations With Peru 

Announcement regarding the intention to 
negotiate a trade agreement with Peru appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 

CLAIMS 

Special Convention of 1934 With Mexico 

Announcement regarding the payment on 
January 1, 1942 by Mexico of the eighth annual 
instalment in accordance with article II of the 
Convention with Mexico signed April 24, 1934, 
appeal's in this Bulletin under the heading 
"American Republics". 



Publications 



Department of State 

Trail Smelter Arbitration Between the United States 
and Canada Under Convention of April 15, 1935: 
Decision of the Tribunal Reported March 11, 1941. 
Arbitration Series 8. Publication 1649. Iv, 61 pp. 



Regulations 



Chinese Regulations: The Admissible Classes of Chi- 
nese. December 30, 1941. (Department of Justice, 
Immigration and Naturalization Service.) 7 Federal 
Register 10. 

International traflic in arms, ammunition, etc. [certifi- 
cate of registration as receipt]. December 23, 1941. 
(Department of State.) 6 Federal Register 6791. 



JANUARY 3, 1942 



35 



Legislation 



An Act To suspend the export tax and the reduction 
of the quota prescribed by section 6 of the Act of 
March 24. 1934 (48 Stat. 456), as amended, for a fixed 
period, and for other purposes. IS. 1G23] (Public 
Law 367, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) Approved, Decemljer 
22, 1941. 1 p. 

An Act To provide for cooperation with Central Amer- 
ican republics in the construction of the Inter- 
American Highway. [S. 1544] (Public Law 875, 
77th Cong., 1st sess.) Approved, December 26, 1941. 
2 pp. 

An Act To amend the Sugar Act of 1937, as amended, 
and for other purposes. [H.R. 59S8] (Public Law 
386, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) Approved, December 26, 
1941. 2 pp. 



To Amend the Sugar Act of 1937, as Amended : Hearing 
before the Committee on Finance, U. S. Senate, 77th 
Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. .^)98S, an act to amend the 
Sugar Act of 1937, as amended, and for other pur- 
poses. [Revised.] December 9, 1941. iv, 82 pp. 

Amending Act Requiring Registration of Foreign 
Agents: Hearings before Subcommittee No. 4 of the 
Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representa- 
tives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on H.R. 6045, a bill to 
amend the act entitled "An Act To require the regis- 
tration of certain persons emplo.ved by agencies to 
disseminate propaganda in the United States, and for 
other purposes", approved June 8, 1938, as amended. 
November 28 and December 1, 1941. [Serial No. 9.] 
[Statement of Assistant Secretary Berle, pp. 28-.32 ; 
letters of Secretary Hull and Under Secretary 
Welles supporting legislation, p. 55.] iv, 56 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THB APPBOVAt OF THE DIEECTOB OF THE BnBBAn OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JANUARY 10, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 133— Publication 1680 



C 



ontents 




The War Page 

Annual message of the President to the Congress 39 

Lend-Lcase aid: Czechoslovakia 44 

Adherences to declaration by United Nations 44 

Protection of officials and nationals of countries at war: 

Americans in the Far East 44 

Message of solidarity from Northern Ireland 45 

Severance of relations by Venezuela with Germany, Italy, 

and Japan 45 

General 

Budget recommendations for the Department of State, 
1943 46 

American Republics 

Elevation of Legations to rank of Embassy: 

Bohvia 47 

Ecuador 47 

Paraguay 48 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
First Pan American Congress of Mining Engineering and 
Geology 48 

The Foreign Service 

Resignation of John Van A. MacMurray 48 

Personnel changes 48 

Treaty Information 
Sovereignty: 

Convention on the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the Americas. 51 

Regulations 51 

Publications 51 

Legislation 51 



0. S, SUPFRINTFNnENT OF DOCUMENTS 
FEB 19 1942 



The War 



ANNUAL MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE CONGRESS' 



[Released to the press by the White House January 6] 

Me. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Members of 
THE Senate and of the House of Repre- 
sentatives : 

In fulfilling my duty to report upon the state 
of the Union, I am proud to say to you that the 
spirit of the American people was never higher 
than it is today — the Union was never more 
closely knit together — this country was never 
more deeply determined to face the solenrn 
tasks before it. 

The response of the American people has 
been instantaneous. It will be sustained until 
our security is assured. 

Exactly one year ago today I said to this 
Congress: "When the dictators are ready to 
make war upon us, they will not wait for an 
act of war on our part . . . They — not we — 
will choose the time and the place and the 
method of their attack". 

We now know their choice of the time: a 
peaceful Sunday morning — December 7th, 1941. 

We know their choice of the place : an Amer- 
ican outpost in the Pacific. 

We know their choice of the method : the 
method of Hitler himself. 

Japan's scheme of conquest goes back half a 
century. It was not merely a policy of seeking 
living room : it was a plan which included the 
subjugation of all the peoples in the Far East 
and in the islands of the Pacific, and the domi- 
nation of that ocean by Japanese military and 
naval control of the western coasts of North, 
Central, and South America. 



' Delivered before a joint session of the two Houses 
of Congress January 6, 1942. 



The development of this ambitious con- 
spiracy was marked by the war against China 
in 1894; the subsequent occupation of Korea; 
the war against Russia in 1904 ; the illegal for- 
tification of the mandated Pacific Islands fol- 
lowing 1920; the seizure of Manchuria in 1931; 
and the invasion of China in 1937. 

A similar policy of criminal conquest was 
adopted by Italy. The Fascists first revealed 
their imperial designs in Libya and Tripoli. 
In 1935 they seized Abyssinia. Their goal 
was the domination of all North Africa, Egypt, 
parts of France, and the entire Mediterranean 
world. 

But the dreams of empire of the Japanese 
and Fascist leaders were modest in compari- 
son with the Gargantuan aspirations of Hitler 
and his Nazis. Even before they came to 
power in 1933, their plans for conquest had been 
drawn. Those plans provided for ultimate 
domination, not of any one section of the world 
but of the whole earth and all the oceans on it. 

With Hitler's formation of the Berlin-Rome- 
Tokyo alliance, all these plans of conquest be- 
came a single plan. Under this, in addition to 
her own schemes of conquest, Japan's role was 
to cut off our supply of weapons of war to Brit- 
ain, Russia, and China — weapons which increas- 
ingly were speeding the day of Hitler's doom. 
The act of Japan at Pearl Harbor was intended 
to stun us — to terrify us to such an extent that 
we would divert our industrial and military 
strength to the Pacific area or even to our own 
continental defense. 

The plan failed in its purpose. We have not 
been stunned. We have not been terrified or 
confused. This reassembling of the Seventy- 
seventh Congress is proof of that ; for the mood 

39 



40 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of quiet, grim resolution which here prevails 
bodes ill for those who conspired and collabo- 
rated to murder world-peace. 

That mood is stronger than any mere desire 
for revenge. It expresses the will of the Amer- 
ican people to make very certain that the 
world will never so suffer again. 

Admittedly, we have been faced with hard 
choices. It was bitter, for example, not to be 
able to relieve the heroic and historic defenders 
of Wake Island. It was bitter for us not to 
be able to land a million men and a thousand 
ships in the Philippine Islands. 

But this adds only to our determination to 
see to it that the Stars and Stripes will fly again 
over Wake and Guam; and that the brave peo- 
ple of the Philippines will be rid of Japanese 
imperialism, and will live in freedom, security, 
and independence. 

Powerful and offensive actions must and will 
be taken in proper time. The consolidation of 
the United Nations' total war effort against our 
common enemies is being achieved. 

That is the purpose of conferences which have 
been held during the past two weeks in AVash- 
ington, in Moscow, and in Chungking. That is 
the primary objective of the declaration of sol- 
idarity signed in Washington on January 1, 
1942 by 26 nations united against the Axis 
powers. 

Difficult choices may have to be made in the 
months to come. We will not shrink from such 
decisions. We and those united with us will 
make those ' decisions with courage and 
determination. 

Plans have been laid here and in the other 
capitals for coordinated and cooperative action 
by all the United Nations — military action and 
economic action. Already we have established 
unified command of land, sea, and air forces 
in the southwestern Pacific theater of war. 
There will be a continuation of conferences and 
consultations among military staffs, so that the 
plans and operations of each will fit into a gen- 
eral strategy designed to crush the enemy. We 
shall not fight isolated wars — each nation going 
its own way. These 26 nations are united — not 
in spirit and determination alone but in the 
broad conduct of the war in all its phases. 



For the first time since the Japanese and the 
Fascists and the Nazis started along their blood- 
stained course of conquest they now face the fact 
that superior forces are assembling against 
them. Gone forever are the days when the 
aggressors could attack and destroy their vic- 
tims one by one without unity of resistance. 
We of the United Nations will so dispose our 
forces that we can strike at the common enemy 
wherever the gi'eatest damage can be done. 

The militarists in Berlin and Tokyo started 
this war. But the massed, angered forces of 
common humanity will finish it. 

Destruction of the material and spiritual cen- 
ters of civilization — this has been and still is 
the purpose of Hitler and his Italian and Japa- 
nese chessmen. They would wreck the power of 
the British Commonwealth and Russia and 
China and the Nethei-lands — and then combine 
all their forces to achieve their ultimate goal, 
the conquest of the United States. 

They know that victory for us means victory 
for freedom. 

They know that victory for us means victory 
for the institution of democracy — the ideal of 
the family, the simple principles of common 
decency and humanity. 

They know that victory for us means victory 
for religion. 

And they could not tolerate that. The world 
is too small to provide adequate "living room" 
for both Hitler and God. In proof of that, the 
Nazis have now announced their plan for en- 
forcing their new German, pagan religion 
throughout the world — the plan by which the 
Holy Bible and the Cross of Mercy would be 
displaced by MeinKampf and the swastika and 
the naked sword. 

Our own objectives are clear; the objective 
of smashing the militarism imposed by war- 
lords upon their enslaved peoples — -the objec- 
tive of liberating the subjugated nations — the 
objective of establishing and securing freedom 
of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from 
want, and freedom from fear everywhere in the 
world. 

We shall not stop short of those objectives — 
nor shall we be satisfied merely to gain them 
and then call it a day. I know that I speak 
for the American people — and I have good rea- 



JANUARY 10, 1942 



41 



son to believe I speak also for all the other 
peoples who fight with us — when I say that this 
time we are determined not only to win the 
war but also to maintain the security of the 
peace which will follow. 

But modern methods of warfare make it a 
task not only of shooting and fighting, but an 
even more urgent one of working and producing. 

Victory requires the actual weapons of war 
and the means of transporting them to a dozen 
points of combat. 

It will not be sufficient for us and the other 
United Nations to produce a slightly superior 
supply of munitions to that of Germany, Japan, 
Italy, and the stolen industries in the countries 
which they have overrun. 

The superiority of the United Nations in 
munitions and ships must be overwhelming — 
so overwhelming that the Axis nations can 
never hope to catch up with it. In order to 
attain this overwhelming superiority the United 
States must build planes and tanks and guns 
and ships to the utmost limit of our national 
capacity. We have the ability and capacity to 
produce arms not only for our own forces but 
also for the armies, navies, and air forces fight- 
ing on our side. 

And our overwhelming superiority of arma- 
ment must be adequate to put weapons of war 
at the proper time into the hands of those men 
in the conquered nations, who stand ready to 
seize the first opportunity to revolt against their 
German and Japanese oppressors, and against 
the traitors in their own ranks, known by the 
already infamous name of "Quislings". As we 
get guns to the patriots in those lands, they 
too will fire shots heard 'round the world. 

This production of ours in the United States 
must be raised far above its present levels, even 
though it will mean the dislocation of the lives 
and occupations of millions of our own people. 
We must raise our sights all along the produc- 
tion-line. Let no man say it cannot be done. 
It must be done — and we have undertaken to 
do it. 

I have just sent a letter of directive to the 
appropriate departments and agencies of our 
Government, ordering that immediate steps be 
taken : 



1. To increase our production rate of air- 
planes so rapidly that in this year, 1942, we 
shall produce 60,000 planes, 10,000 more than 
the goal set a year and a half ago. This in- 
cludes 45,000 combat planes — bombers, dive- 
bombers, pursuit planes. The rate of increase 
will be continued, so that next year, 1943, we 
shall produce 125,000 airplanes, including 
100,000 combat planes. 

2. To increase our production rate of tanks 
so rapidly that in this year, 1942, we shall pro- 
duce 45,000 tanks; and to continue that increase 
so that next year, 1943, we shall produce 75,000 
tanks. 

8. To increase our production rate of anti- 
aircraft guns so rapidly that in this year, 1942, 
we shall produce 20,000 of them; and to con- 
tinue that increase so that next year, 1943, we 
shall produce 35,000 anti-aircraft guns. 

4. To increase our production rate of mer- 
chant ships so rapidly that in this year, 1942, 
we shall build 8,000,000 deadweight tons as 
compared with a 1941 production of 1,100,000. 
We shall continue that increase so that next 
year, 1943, we shall build 10,000,000 tons. 

These figures and similar figures for a mul- 
titude of other implements of war will give 
the Japanese and Nazis a little idea of just what 
they accomplished in the attack on Pearl 
Harbor. 

Our task is hard — our task is unprecedented — 
and the time is shoi't. We must strain every 
existing armament-producing facility to the 
utmost. We must convert every available plant 
and tool to war production. That goes all the 
way from the greatest plants to the smallest — 
from the huge automobile industry to tlie vil- 
lage machine shop. 

Production for war is based on men and 
women — the human hands and brains which 
collectively we call labor. Our workers stand 
ready to work long hours; to turn out more in 
a day's work; to keep the wheels turning and 
the fires burning 24 hours a day and 7 days a 
week. They realize well that on the speed and 
efficiency of their work depend the lives of their 
sons and their brothers on the fighting fronts. 

Production for war is based on metals and 
raw materials — steel, copper, rubber, aluminum, 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



zinc, tin. Greater and greater quantities of 
them will have to be diverted to war purposes. 
Civilian use of them will have to be cut further 
and still further — and, in many cases, com- 
pletely eliminated. 

War costs money. So far, we have hardly 
even begun to pay for it. We have devoted 
only 15 percent of our national income to na- 
tional defense. As will appear in my budget 
message tomorrow, our war program for the 
coming fiscal year will cost 56 billion dollars or, 
in other words, more than one half of the esti- 
mated annual national income. This means 
taxes and bonds, and bonds and taxes. It 
means cutting luxuries and other non-essentials. 
In a word, it means an "all-out" war by indi- 
vidual effort and family effort in a united 
country. 

Only this all-out scale of production will has- 
ten the ultimate all-out victory. Speed will 
count. Lost ground can always be regained — 
lost time never. Speed will save lives; speed 
will save this Nation which is in peril ; speed 
will save our freedom and civilization — and 
slowness has never been an American charac- 
teristic. 

As the United States goes into its full stride, 
we must always be on guard against misconcep- 
tions which will arise naturally or which will 
be planted among us by our enemies. 

We must guard against complacency. Wq 
must not underrate the enemy. He is powerful 
and cunning — and cruel and ruthless. He will 
stop at nothing which gives him a chance to kill 
and to destroy. He has trained his people to 
believe that their highest perfection is achieved 
by waging war. For many years he has pre- 
pared for this very conflict — planning, plotting, 
training, arming, fighting. We have already 
tasted defeat. We may suffer further setbacks. 
We must face the fact of a hard war, a long war, 
a bloody war, a costly war. 

We must, on the other hand, guard against 
defeatism. That has been one of the chief 
weapons of Hitler's propaganda machine — used 
time and again with deadly results. It will not 
be used successfully on the American people. 

We must guard against divisions among our- 
selves and among all the other United Nations. 



We must be particularly vigilant against racial 
discrimination in any of its ugly forms. Hitler 
will try again to breed mistrust and suspicion 
between one individual and another, one group 
and another, one race and another, one govern- 
ment and another. He will try to use the same 
technique of falsehood and rumor-mongering 
with which he divided France from Britain. 
He is trying to do this with us even now. But 
he will find a unity of will and purpose against 
him, which will persevere until the destruction 
of all his black designs upon the freedom and 
safety of the people of the world. 

We cannot wage this war in a defensive spirit. 
As our power and our resources are fully mobi- 
lized, we shall carry the attack against the en- 
emy — we shall hit him and hit him again wher- 
ever and whenever we can reach him. 

We must keep him far from our shores, for 
we intend to bring this battle to him on his own 
home grounds. 

American armed forces must be used at any 
place in all the world where it seems advisable 
to engage the forces of the enemy. In some 
cases these operations will be defensive, in order 
to protect key positions. In other cases, these 
oiDerations will be offensive, in order to strike 
at the common enemy, with a view to his com- 
plete encirclement and eventual total defeat. 

American armed forces will operate at many 
points in the Far East. 

American armed forces will be on all the 
oceans — helping to guard the essential communi- 
cations which are vital to the United Nations. 

American land and air and sea forces will take 
stations in the British Isles — which constitute 
an essential fortress in this world struggle. 

American armed forces will help to protect 
this hemisphere — and also bases outside this 
hemisphere which could be used for an attack 
on the Americas. 

If any of our enemies, from Europe or from 
Asia, attempt long-range raids by "suicide" 
squadrons of bombing planes, they will do so 
only in the hope of terrorizing our people and 
disrupting our morale. Our people are not 
afraid of that. We know that we may have 
to pay a heavy price for freedom. We will pay 
this price with a will. Whatever the price, it 



JANUARY 10, 1942 



43 



is a thousand times worth it. No matter what 
our enemies in their desperation may attempt 
to do to us — we will say, as the people of Lon- 
don have said, "We can fake it." And what's 
more, we can give it back — and we will give it 
back — with compound interest. 

When our enemies challenged our country to 
stand up and fight, they challenged each and 
every one of us. And each and every one of 
us has accepted the challenge — for himself and 
for the Nation. 

There were only some four hundred United 
States Marines who in the heroic and historic 
defense of Wake Island inflicted such great 
losses on the enemy. Some of those men were 
killed in action; and others are now prisoners 
of war. When the survivors of that great fight 
are liberated and restored to their homes, they 
will learn that a hundred and thirty million 
of their fellow citizens have been inspired to 
render their own full share of service and 
sacrifice. 

Our men on the fighting fronts have already 
proved that Americans today are just as rugged 
and just as tough as any of the heroes whose 
exploits we celebrate on the Fourth of July. 

Many people ask, "When will this war end" 1 
There is only one answer to that. It will end 
just as soon as we make it end, by our combined 
efforts, our combined strength, our combined 
determination to fight through and «vork 
through until the end — the end of militarism 
in Germany and Italy and Japan. Most cer- 
tainly we shall not settle for less. 

That is the spirit in which discussions have 
been conducted during the visit of the British 
Prime Minister to Washington. Mr. Churchill 
and I understand each other, our motives and 
our purposes. Together, during the past two 
weeks, we have faced squarely the major mili- 
tary and economic problems of this greatest 
world war. 

All in our Nation have been cheered by Mr. 
Churchill's visit. We have been deeply stirred 
by his great message to us. We wish him a safe 
return to his home. He is welcome in our midst, 
now and in days to come. 

We are fighting on the same side with the 
British people, who fought alone for long, terri- 



ble months and withstood the enemy with forti- 
tude and tenacity and skill. 

We are fighting on the same side with the 
Russian people who have seen the Nazi hordes 
swarm up to the very gates of Moscow and who, 
with almost superhuman will and courage, have 
forced the invaders back into retreat. 

We are fighting on the same side as the brave 
people of China who for four and a half long 
years have withstood bombs and starvation and 
have whipped the invaders time and again in 
spite of superior Japanese equipment and arms. 

We are fighting on the same side as the in- 
domitable Dutch. 

We are fighting on the same side as all the 
other governments in exile, whom Hitler and all 
his armies and all his Gestapo have not been 
able to conquer. 

But we of the United Nations are not making 
all this sacrifice of human effort and human 
lives to return to the kind of world we had after 
the last world war. 

We are fighting today for security, for prog- 
ress, and for peace, not only for ourselves but 
for all men, not only for one generation but for 
all generations. We are fighting to cleanse the 
world of ancient evils, ancient ills. 

Our enemies are guided by brutal cynicism, by 
unholy contempt for the human race. We are 
inspired by a faith which goes back through all 
the years to the first chapter of the Book of 
Genesis : "God created man in His own image". 

We on our side are striving to be true to that 
divine heritage. We are fighting, as our fa- 
thers have fought, to uphold the doctrine that 
all men are equal in the sight of God. Those on 
the other side are striving to destroy this deep 
belief and to create a world in their own image — 
a world of tyranny and cruelty and serfdom. 

That is the conflict that day and night now 
pervades our lives. No compromise can end 
that conflict. There never has been — there 
never can be — successful compromise between 
good and evil. Only total victory can reward 
the champions of tolerance and decency and 
freedom and faith. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
Jatmary 6, 19^. 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



LEND-LEASE AID: CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

[Released to the press January 5] 

The President today addressed to the Honor- 
able E. E. Stettinius, Jr., Administrator, Office 
of Lend-Lease Administration, a letter, the 
test of which follows: 

"For purposes of implementing the authority 
conferred upon you as Lend-Lease Adminis- 
trator by Executive Order No. 8926, dated Oc- 
tober 28, 1941, and in order to enable you to 
arrange for Lend-Lease aid to the Provisional 
Government of Czechoslovakia, I hereby find 
that the defense of the Provisional Govern- 



ment of Czechoslovakia is vital to the defense 
of the United States." 

ADHERENCES TO DECLARATION BY 
UNITED NATIONS 

[Released to the press January 5] 

In order that liberty-loving peoples silenced 
by military force may have an opportunity to 
support the principles of the Declaration by 
United Nations, the Government of the United 
States, as the depository for that Declaration, 
will receive statements of adherence to its prin- 
ciples from appropriate authorities which are 
not governments. 



PROTECTION OF OFFICIALS AND NATIONALS OF COUNTRIES AT WAR 

AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 



[Released to the press January 7] 

The American Consul at Foochow, Mr. Ed- 
ward E. Rice, reported on January 3, 1941 to 
the Embassy at Chungking that he had received 
information, believed to be reliable, to the 
effect that on December 8, 1941 the Japanese 
landed on the island of Kulangsu, where most 
of the foreign residents of Amoy have their 
homes, and placed American and British na- 
tionals under custody for several days in the 
Japanese Poai Hospital; that on their release 
they were given distinguishing armbands to 
wear and were permitted to move about on 
the island, but not to leave it; that Chinese 
and British banks, some of which were re- 
ported to have sent most of their cash to Hong 
Kong, were allowed to open for limited busi- 
ness; and that the Municipal Council of the 
International Settlement on Kulangsu was con- 
tinuing to function under Japanese control. 

The Swiss Legation at Tokyo, in a telegram 
to the Swiss Foreign Office, dated December 31, 
1941, reported that it had established contact 
with the former American consular offices at 
Tokyo, Yokohama, Kobe, and Osaka; that the 
personnel of those offices are under police con- 
trol ; and that they are in good health and have 
no complaints to make as to their living 
conditions. 



[Released to the press January 8] 

The following information concerning the 
status of American nationals in Indochina has 
just been made available to the Department 
through the French authorities at Vichy. 

The former American Consul at Saigon, Mr. 
Sidney H. Browne, is confined to his residence 
in Saigon. Mr. Oliver Edmund Clubb, of 
South St. Paul, Minn., former American Con- 
sul detailed to Hanoi, is still in that city, where 
he is confined in a villa which has been espe- 
cially rented for him by the Governor-General 
of Indochina. 

Mr. Relman Morin, of Los Ajigeles, Calif., 
correspondent of the Associated Press, is con- 
fined to the residence of the British Consul 
Genera] at Saigon. 

All other American nationals, including Fili- 
pinos, who have resided in Indochina for 15 
years are at liberty. Among such Americans 
are a number of missionaries and Miss Iris 
Johnston, of Ritzville, Wash., secretary at the 
American Consulate at Saigon, and Miss Caro- 
lyn C. Jacobs, of Kansas City, Mo., also secre- 
tary at the American Consulate at Saigon, 
temporarily detailed to Hanoi. 



JANUARY 10, 19 42 

MESSAGE OF SOLIDARITY FROM 
NORTHERN IRELAND 

(Released to the press January 9] 

The Department has been informed by the 
American Ambassador at London that he has 
received the following communication dated 
January 4, 1942, from the Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs of Great Britain : 

"My dear Ambassador : 

"The Speaker of the House of Commons of 
Northern Ireland has asked me to forward to 
you the following message from the House of 
Commons of Northern Ireland to the Govern- 
ment of the United States: 

" 'This House, on behalf of the people of 
Ulster, tenders its sincere sympathy to the Pres- 
ident, Government, and people of the United 
States of America in connection with the vicious 
and treacherous attack made on them by Japan, 
and pledges itself to support, by every means 
in its power, the war effort until Japan and her 
allies are overthrown. The House also thanks 
the United States of America for their great 
assistance in the past, and feels proud and hon- 
oured that among the citizens of the United 
States of America there are millions of our 
kinsmen who helped in no small way to shape 
the destinies of the great republic' 

"The Speaker has asked me to say that the 
message will be entered on the records of the 
House in the form, 'the House agreed to the 
message nemine contradicente' . 
"Yours sincerely, 

Anthont Eden." 

On January 8, 1942, the Secretary of State 
instructed Mr. Winant to request Mr. Eden to 
transmit the following message to the Speaker 
of the House of Commons of Northern Ireland : 

"My Government deeply appreciates the mes- 
sage of solidarity which you have kindly for- 
warded. The American people will be encour- 
aged in the effort which they have now 
wholeheartedly undertaken by the example of 



45 



those who have fought so valiantly, as have 
the people of Northern Ireland, for twenty- 
eight months against our common enemy. 

CoRDELL Hull" 

SEVERANCE OF RELATIONS BY VENE- 
ZUELA WITH GERMANY, ITALY, AND 
JAPAN 

[Released to the press January 5] 

The text of a telegram dated January 3, 1942, 
from the President of the United States to the 
President of Venezuela, His Excellency Gen- 
eral IsAiAs Medina Angarita, follows: 

"The action of your Government in breaking 
off diplomatic relations with Germany, Italy 
and Japan has been warmly appreciated by the 
people of the United States as a convincing and 
welcome demonstration of the position of 
Venezuela in the conflict with which free peo- 
ples the world over are confronted. Under your 
leadership, the Venezuelan nation has again 
taken its stand in support of those principles 
of continental solidarity so eloquently set forth 
by Simon Bolivar over a century ago. 

"I take this opportunity of extending to you 
my cordial wishes for the coming year. 

Franklin I) Roosevelt" 

On January 3, 1942 the Secretary of State 
also sent the following message to the Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of Venezuela, His Excel- 
lency Dr. Caracciolo Parra Perez : 

"The Venezuelan Ambassador in Washing- 
ton, Dr. Diogenes Escalante, has informed me 
of the action of your Government in severing 
relations with Germany, Italy and Japan. This 
further indication of Venezuela's firm adher- 
ence to those principles of inter-American soli- 
darity in the formulation of whicli you played 
so prominent a part at Buenos Aires in 1936 
is most heartening to me and to my Govern- 
ment. I am delighted to know that you will 
attend the Meeting of Foreign Ministers at Rio 
and that Mr. Welles will have the privilege of 
again working with you. 

Cordell Hull." 



General 



BUDGET RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 1943 



The budget for 1943,^ sent by the President 
to the Congress on January 5, 1942, describes 
the recommendations for the Department of 
State as follows: 

"Department of State 

"The estimates of the Department of State 
for the fiscal year 1943, exclusive of construc- 
tion projects and trust accounts, amount to 
$26,159,480, a net increase of $3,229,798 over the 
comparable appropriations for the fiscal year 
1942. This net increase is made up as follows : 
$1,497,095 for the Office of the Secretary of 
State; $600,000 for national defense activities; 
$54,700 for the Foreign Service ; and $1,078,003 
for international obligations, coiimiissions, 
bureaus, etc. 

"The net increase of $1,497,095 in the esti- 
mates for the Office of the Secretary of State 
consists of $1,133,740 for personal services, 
$13,400 for contingent expenses, $49,100 for 
printing and binding, $655 for passport agen- 
cies, and $200 for collecting and editing official 
papers of territories of the United States. 

"The $600,000 net increase in national defense 
activities is to provide funds for an increased 
number of specialists and technical assistants 
in the Foreign Service necessary in connection 
with emergency problems caused by the war. 

"The net increase of $54,700 for the Foreign 
Service consists of increases in certain appro- 
priations amounting to $114,200, which amount 
is offset by decreases in other appropriations 
amounting to $59,500. The principal items of 
increase are $66,100 for automatic promotions 
of Foreign Service officers as authorized by 

'^ The Budget of the United States' Oovernment tor 
the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1943. H.Doc. 528, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess. 1172 pp. 
46 



law ; $30,000 for promotions of Foreign Service 
clerks; $9,000 to adjust salaries of certain mis- 
cellaneous employees more nearly in line with 
local wage standards; and $9,100 for the For- 
eign Service retirement and disability appro- 
priated fund. The principal items of decrease 
are $38,000 and $13,000 for office and living 
quarters allowances and representation allow- 
ances, respectively. These decreases are made 
possible largely because several embassies and 
a large number of consulates in Axis-controlled 
countries have been closed. 

"The net increase of $1,078,003 in interna- 
tional obligations, commissions, bureaus, etc., 
is composed of increases in certain appropria- 
tions amounting to $1,165,023, offset by de- 
creases in other appropriations amounting to 
$87,020. The principal items of increase are 
$41,800 for the International Boundary Com- 
mission, United States and Mexico, to provide 
largely for operation and maintenance of the 
Mesilla Valley Division of the Rio Grande 
Canalization project; and $1,119,200 for Co- 
operation With the American Republics to 
provide for rubber investigations and surveys 
of other noncompetitive plant resources, the 
development of vital statistics of the Western 
Hemisphere, radiosonde observation stations in 
Mexico, investigation of strategic and deficient 
minerals, translating and disseminating Gov- 
ernment publications to the other American 
Republics, and travel grants for students, pro- 
fessors, and educational and artistic leaders 
who are citizens of the United States and the 
other American Republics. The principal 
items of decrease are $17,920 in contributions 
to international organizations located in Axis- 
controlled areas from whom satisfactory re- 
ports of activity are not being received; $11,600 
for special and technical investigations by the 



JANUARY 10, 1942 



47 



International Joint Commission in the use of 
boundary waters between the United States and 
Canada; and $57,500 in appropriations for 
various international commissions, conferences, 
and miscellaneous items, which will not be 
required for the fiscal year 1943. 

"The expenditures from trust accounts for 
the fiscal year 1943 are estimated at $2,820,980, 
an increase of $4,100 over the fiscal year 1942." 

^'■Foreign Service Pay Adjustment 

"The estimate for the fiscal year 1943 of 
$1,350,000 is an increase of $375,000 over the 
appropriation for the fiscal year 1942. This is 
brought about by reason of increases in the as- 
signment of personnel to foreign countries 
whose currency has appreciated in relation to 
the American dollar." 



'•'■Department of State, Public Works 

"The estimates of public works appropria- 
tions of the Department of State for the fiscal 
year 1943 amount to $1,273,000, a decrease of 
$598,500 from the 1942 appropriations. 

"The 1943 estimates provide $233,000 for pub- 
lic buildings for diplomatic and consular estab- 
lishments abroad, a decrease of $217,000. The 
principal building projects to be constructed in 
1943 will be located in the other American re- 
publics and Australia. The estimates provide 
$950,000 for continuing construction of the 
Lower Rio Grande flood-control project, the 
same amount that was appropriated for 1942. 
An estimate of $90,000 is included for the con- 
struction of the United States portion of the 
Douglas -Agua Prieta sanitation project at 
Douglas, Ariz." 



American Republics 



ELEVATION OF LEGATIONS TO RANK OF EMBASSY 



BOLIVIA 

[Released to the press January 4] 

The Government of Bolivia and the Govern- 
ment of the United States announced on Jan- 
uary 4 that arrangements have been made to 
i-aise the Legation of Bolivia in the United 
States and the Legation of the United States in 
Bolivia to the rank of Embassy. The change 
in status will become effective in each country 
upon the presentation there of the letters of 
credence of the first Ambassador from the other 
country. 

The exchange of Ambassadors by Bolivia and 
the United States gives formal recognition to 
the steady strengthening of the bonds of friend- 
ship, culture, and commerce between the two 
countries and the increasing significance of their 
traditionally cordial relations. 



ECUADOR 

[Released to the press January 4] 

The Government of Ecuador and the Govern- 
ment of the United States announced on Jan- 
uary 4 that arrangements have been made to 
raise the Legation of the United States in 
Ecuador to the rank of Embassy and to main- 
tain the Embassy of Ecuador in the United 
States permanently as an Embassy. 

The exchange of Ambassadors by Ecuador 
and the United States gives formal recognition 
to the inci'eased importance of the very coop- 
erative relations and the steady growth of the 
cordial bonds of culture and commerce that 
have long linked the two countries. 

His Excellency Capt. Colon Eloy Alfaro has 
been accredited to the Government of the 
United States as Ambassador Extraordinary 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and Plenipotentiary of Ecuador since Septem- 
ber 17, 1936, at which time he was given ambas- 
sadorial rank for the duration of boundary 
negotiations between the Governments of Ecua- 
dor and Peru. 

PARAGUAY 

[Released to the press January 4] 

The Government of Paraguay and the Gov- 
ernment of the United States announced on 
January 4 that arrangements have been made 
to raise the Legation of Paraguay in the 
United States and the Legation of the United 
States in Paraguay to the rank of Embassy. 
The change in status will become effective in 
each country upon the presentation there of 
the letters of credence of the first Ambassador 
from the other country. 

The traditionally friendly relations between 
Paraguay and the United States and the com- 
mercial and cultural relations between the two 
countries have become increasingly significant 
in recent years, and it has now become desirable 
to give formal recognition to the importance 
of these developments by the exchange of 
Ambassadors. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



FIRST PAN AMERICAN CONGRESS OF 
MINING ENGINEERING AND GEOLOGY 

[Released to the press January 8] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Chilean Government to be I'epresented 
at the First Pan American Congress of Mining 
Engineering and Geology, which will hold its 
business sessions fi-om January 14 to January 
25, 1942, at Santiago, Chile, and the President 
has approved the designation of the following 
persons as official delegates of the United States 
of America : 

D. F. Hewett, Geologist In Charge, Section of Metal- 
liferous Deposits, Geological Survey, Department 
of the Interior 



Elmer W. Pehrson, Chief, Economics and Statistics 

Branch, Bureau of Mines, Department of the 

Interior 
C. W. Wright, Director, Minerals Division, Office of 

the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, Office 

for Emergency Management 

The principal topics on the agenda of the 
meeting are: Mining; geology; fuels; ore dress- 
ing and ore concentration; metallurgy; nitrate; 
mining policy, legislation, and economy; and 
mining education. 



The Foreign Service 



RESIGNATION 
OF JOHN VAN A. MACMURRAY 

[Released to the press January 7] 

The following statement has been made by 
the Secretary of State: 

"In view of Mr. MacMurray's long experience 
in both the Far East and Near East, the Presi- 
dent is accepting his resignation as American 
Ambassador to Turkey in order to avail him- 
self of Mr. MacMurray's services here in Wash- 
ington upon the expiration of his present leave 
of absence." 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press January 10] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Foreign Service since January 3, 1942 : 

Charles W. Adair, Jr., of Xenia, Ohio, who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 
since November 3, 1941, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Bombay, India. 

Daniel V. Anderson, of Dover, Del., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Bo- 
gota, Colombia, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Bo- 
gota, Colombia, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Walworth Barbour, of Lexington, Mass., for- 
merly Second Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Sofia, Bulgaria, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 



JANUARY 10, 1942 

Jacob D. Beam, of Princeton, N. J., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Vice Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Donald F. Bigelow, of St. Paul, Minn., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation at Bern, Switzerland, 
has been designated First Secretary of Lega- 
tion at Bern, Switzerland. 

William L. Brewster, of Brownsville, Tex., 
Vice Consul at Torreon, Coahuila, Mexico, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at La Paz, Baja 
California, Mexico. 

Kobert L. Buell, of Rochester, N. Y., Consul 
at Singapore, Straits Settlements, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Rangoon, Burma. 

John Willard Carrigan, of San Francisco, 
Calif., Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, has been des- 
ignated Second Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Selden Chapin, of Erie, Pa., First Secretary 
of Embassy and Consul at Montevideo, Uru- 
guay, has been assigned for duty in the De- 
partment of State. 

Bernard C. Connelly, of Rock Island, 111., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Lima, Peru, has been designated Second Secre- 
tary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Albert John Cope, Jr., of Salt Lake City, 
Utah, Vice Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Tijuana, Baja Cali- 
fornia, Mexico. 

William H. Cordell, of Ward, Ark., Vice 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Madrid, Spain, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Earl T. Crain, of Huntsville, 111., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Madrid, Spain, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Madrid, Spain, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Allan Dawson, of Des Moines, Iowa, Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at La Paz, 
Bolivia, has been designated First Secretary of 



49 



Legation and Consul at La Paz, Bolivia, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Andrew E. Donovan, 2d, of San Francisco, 
Calif., Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Bogota, Colombia, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Bogota, Colombia, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

W. William Duff, of New Castle, Pa., who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 
since November 3, 1941, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Calcutta, India. 

Dudley G. Dwyre, of Fort Collins, Colo., First 
Secretary of Legation at Guatemala, Guate- 
mala, has been designated First Secretary of 
Embassy and Consul General at Montevideo, 
Uruguay, and will serve in dual capacity. 

C. Burke Elbrick, of Louisville, Ky., Third 
Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
at Lisbon, Portugal. 

John A. Embry, of Dade City, Fla., Assistant 
Commercial Attache at Cairo, Egypt, has been 
designated Commercial Attache at La Paz, 
Bolivia. 

C. Vaughan Ferguson, Jr., of Schenectady, 
N. Y., who has been assigned to the Foreign 
Service School since November 3, 1941, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Tehran, Iran, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

John C. Fuess, of Andover, Mass., now serving 
in the Department of State, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Belfast, Northern Ireland. 

The assignment of Paul S. Guinn, of Cata- 
wissa, Pa., as Consul at Batavia, Java, Nether- 
lands Indies, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, 
Mr. Guinn has been assigned as Consul at 
Caracas, Venezuela. 

J. Brock Havron, of Wliitwell, Tenn., Vice 
Consul at Acapulco de Juarez, Guerrero, Mex- 
ico, has been appointed Vice Consul at St. 
John's, Newfoundland. 

Theodore J. Hohenthal, of Bex'keley, Calif., 
formerly Vice Consul at Vienna, Germany, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 

Douglas Jenkins, Jr., of Charleston, S. C, 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 



50 

at Stockholm, Sweden, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Stockholm, Sweden, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Henry P. Leverich, of Montclair, N. J., Third 
Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
at Lisbon, Portugal. 

E. Allan Lightner, Jr., of Mountain Lakes, 
N. J., Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Moscow, U.S.S.R., has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Stockholm, Sweden, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

John G. Oliver, of Laredo, Tex., Vice Consul 
at Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Guaymas, Sonora, 
Mexico. 

John Peabody Palmer, of Seattle, "Wash., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at London, England, has been designated Sec- 
ond Seci-etary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Londcm, England, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Paul J. Eeveley, of East Haven, Conn., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lon- 
don, England, and will serve in dual capacity. 
Harry H. Schwartz, of Los Angeles, Calif., 
who has been assigned to the Foreign Service 
School since November 3, 1941, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Tangier, Morocco, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Bromley K. Smith, of San Diego, Calif., who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 
since November 3, 1941, has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at La Paz, Bolivia, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

E. Talbot Smith, of Hartford, Conn., Consul 
at Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa, has been as- 
signed Consul at Asmara, Eritrea, where an 
American Consulate will be established. 

Byron B. Snyder, of Los Angeles, Calif., who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

since November 3, 1941, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

Francis L. Spalding, of Brookline, Mass., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Cairo, Egypt, has been designated Second I 

Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at Cairo, ' 

Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Henry E. Stebbins, of Milton, Mass., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second Sec- 
retar}' of Embassy and Vice Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Robert B. Streeper, of Columbus, Ohio, Con- 
sul at Penang, Straits Settlements, has been 
assigned Consul at Rangoon, Burma. 

William C. Trimble, of Baltimore, Md., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mex- 
ico, D.F., Mexico, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at 
Mexico, D.F., Mexico, and will, serve in dual 
capacity. 

Eugene T. Turley, of McNary, Arizona, Vice 
Consul of La Paz. Baja California, Mexico, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Torreon, Coa- 
huila, Mexico. 

John W. Tuthill, of Cambridge, IMass., who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 
since November 3, 1941, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico. 

J. Kittredge Vinson, of Houston, Tex., who 
has been assigned to the Foreign Service School 
since November 3, 1911, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Rangoon, Burma. 

Andrew B. Wardlaw, of Greenville, S. C, 
who has been assigned to the Foreign Service 
School since November 3, 1941, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Barranquilla, 
Colombia. 

Harold L. Williamson, of Chicago, 111., Con- 
sul General at Guatemala, Guatemala, has been 
designated First Secretary of Legation at 
Guatemala, Guatemala. 

Evan M. Wilson, of Haverford, Pa., Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Cairo, Egypt, has been designated Third Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mexico, 
D.F., Mexico, and will serve in dual capacity. 



JANUARY 10, 1942 



51 



Francis M. Withey, of Reed City, Mich., Vice 
Consul at Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Salina Cruz, 
Oaxaca, Mexico, where an American Vice Con- 
sulate will be established. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 

Ecitador 

By a letter dated January 5, 1942 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Ecuador of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, 
signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, was depos- 
ited with the Union on December 27, 1941. The 
instrument of ratification is dated October 23, 
1941. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule 27 [covering, effective January 
2, 1942, the forms, conversions, and derivatives of 
petroleum products (item 1, Proclamation 2417) as 
listed in Export Control Schedule 15]. January 3, 
1942. (Board of Economic Warfare.) 7 Federal 
Register 113. 

[Export Control :] delegation of authority regarding 
requisitioning and disposal of property. January 3, 
1W2. (Board of Economic Warfare.) 7 Federal 
Register 148. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Relief From Douhle Income Tax on Shipping Profits: 
Arrangement Between the United States of America 
and Panama — Effected by exchanges of notes signed 
January 15, February 8, and March 28, 1941. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 221. Publication 1673. 5 pp. 

Other Gov-ernment Agencies 

Revision of prorations of quota for foreign countries 
other than Cuba. Sept. 20, 1941. 1 p. (Agricul- 
ture Department, Agricultural Adjustment Admin- 
istration, Sugar Division.) Free. 

Economic conditions in Venezuela in 1940. 6 pp. 
[International reference service, vol. I, no. 63, Octo- 
ber 1941.] (Commerce Department, Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce.) 50. 

Development of "good neighbor" policy, March 1933- 
April 1941. 97 pp., processed. [Bulletin 7; public- 
affairs bulletins prepared for use of Congress.] 
(Library of Congress, Legislative Reference Service.) 
Free. 

Bolivia [foreign trade of Bolivia for 1938 aud 1939]. 
13 pp. [Foreign trade series no. 192.] (Pan Ameri- 
can Union.) 50. 



Legislation 



An Act To provide for the prompt settlement of claims 
for damages occasioned by Army, Navy, and Marine 
Corps forces in foreign countries. [S. 1904] (Public 
Law 393, 77th Cong., 1st sess.) Approved January 
2, 1942. 1 p. 

Relief of Certain Basque Aliens. (H. Rept. 1558, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess., on S. 314.) 3 pp. 

Inter American Statistical Institute. (H. Rept. 1572, 
77th Cong., 2d sess., on H.J. Res. 219.) 4 pp. 

Inter-American Statistical Institute. (S. Rept. 946, 
77th Cong., 2d sess., on S.J. Res. 96.) 4 pp. 

To Amend the Nationality Act of 1940 : Hearings before 
the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, 
House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., and 
supplementary hearing, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 
6250, a bill to amend the Nationality Act of 1940. 
January 7, 1042. iv, 37 pp. 



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PDBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OP THE DIEECTOE OF THE BCEEAD OF THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



c 



ontents 



JANUARY 17, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 134— Publication 1685 




The War 

Page 

Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics: Address by the Under Sec- 
retary of State .55 

Busmess Works To Wm the War: Address by Assistant 

Secretary Berle 63 

Americans in the Far East 66 

Itahan, Rumanian, and Bulgarian officials in the 

United States 66 

Alien enemies 66 

Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, Sup- 
plement 7 67 

American Republics 

Joint Mexican - United States Defense Commission . 67 
Inter- American Development Commission: Cuba, Do- 
minican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico 68 

Cultural Relations 

Gift of books to English Center in Ecuador 69 

Roosevelt Fellowship program 69 

Visit of distinguished educator from Chile 70 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 70 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes ,^ 70 

Treaty Information 

Commerce: Inter- American Coffee Agreement .... 71 

Sovereignty: Convention on Provisional Admmistra- 
tion of Em'opean Colonies and Possessions m the 

Americas 72 

Transit: Exchange of Notes With Costa Rica Regarding 

Inter-American Highway 72 

Legislation 74 

Publications 74 



": S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
JAN 30 1942 



The War 



THIRD MEETING OF MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



I Released to the press January 15] 

The peoples of the Americas face today the 
greatest danger which they have ever confronted 
since they won their independence. 

We are meeting together under the terms, and 
in the spirit, of inter- American agreements to 
take counsel as to the course which our govern- 
ments should take mider the shadow of this dire 
threat to our continued existence as free peoples. 

"We meet as the representatives of nations 
whfch in former times have had their differences 
and controversies. But I believe that I may 
speak for all of us, and not least in the name of 
mj' own Government, when I say that we all of 
us have learned by our past errors of omission 
and of commission. We are assembled as rep- 
resentatives of the 21 sovereign and independent 
republics of the American Continent, now 
welded together as no continent has ever before 
been united in history, by our faith in the ties 
of mutual trust and of reciprocal interdepen- 
dence which bind us and, most of all, by our 
common devotion to the great cause of democ- 
racy and of human liberty to which our New 
World is dedicated. 

The calamity which has now engulfed hu- 
manity was not unforeseen by any of us. 

Just five years ago, at the Inter-American 
Conference for the Maintenance of Peace, of 
Buenos Aires, we met because of the clear signs 
that the earth would be engulfed by the tidal 



' Delivered by Mr. Welles, who is United States repre- 
sentative, on January 15, 1942 at the opening session of 
the Meeting at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 



wave of a world-wide war. By common accord 
we determined upon measures indispensable to 
our common security. At the Inter-American 
Conference at Lima further measures were 
taken. After the war broke out, at the meet- 
ings of the Foreign Ministers at Panama and 
Habana, the American republics adopted addi- 
tional far-reaching measures of protection and 
of cooperation for their common safety. 

We were thus in many ways prepared for that 
eventuality from which we then still hoped we 
might be spared — the involvement of the Amer- 
icas in the war which has been forced upon man- 
kind by Hitlerism. 

I regard it as my obligation here on behalf 
of my Government to inform you with complete 
frankness of the course which it had pursued 
up to the time when, on Sunday, December 7, 
my country was suddenly attacked by means 
of an act of treachery that will never be for- 
gotten by the people of the United States, nor, 
I believe, by the people of any of the other 
American republics. 

My Government was never blind to the ulti- 
mate purposes and objectives of Hitlerism. It 
long since realized that Hitler had formulated 
his plans to conquer the entire world. These 
plans, the plans of a criminal paranoiac, were 
conceived before he had even seized power in 
Germany. They have been carried out step 
by step, first through guile and deceit, later by 
fire and sword. No evil has been too monstrous 
for him. No infamy has been too vile for him 
to perpetrate. 

55 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Time and again, as you all know, the Presi- 
dent of the United States, with your knowledge 
and with your approval, made every effort in 
earlier years by fervent appeal and by con- 
structive and just proposal to avert the final 
holocaust. 

All of us learned a bitter lesson in those years 
between 1936 and 1941. 

We learned by the tragic experience of others, 
that all of those standards of international de- 
cency and of international law, upon which the 
hopes of a law-abiding and a peaceful world 
were based, were utterly disregarded by Hitler 
and by his ignominious satellites. 

Those free nations who sought ingenuously, 
by the very imiocence of their conduct and by 
the very completeness of their neutrality, to 
maintain at least the shadow of their indepen- 
dence were occupied more promptly and rav- 
aged more cruelly than those who resisted the 
attack of Hitler's armies. 

We have been taught this lesson, which it took 
all of us a long time to learn, that in the world 
of today, confronted by Hitlerism and all of the 
black reversion to barbarism which that evil 
word implies, no nation can hope to maintain its 
own independence and no people can hope to 
maintain its liberty, except through the power 
of armed might and through the courage and 
devotion of men and women in many lands and 
of many races, but wdio all of them love liberty 
more than life itself. 

The people of the United States learned that 
lesson. 

And for that reason, because of their deter- 
mination to defend their country and to safe- 
guard the security of our common continent, 
they determined to lend every form of assist- 
ance to that gallant band of nations who against 
great odds continued nevertheless to defend 
their own liberties. 

We had learned our lesson so clearly that we 
saw that the defense by these peoples of their 
independence constituted likewise the defense of 
our own independence and of that of the West- 
ern Hemisphere. 

Then suddenly, last June, Hitler, distraught 
by the realization that he could no longer at- 



tempt successfully to invade Great Britain, bub 
intoxicated by the easy victories which he had 
achieved in other parts of Europe, perfidiously 
attacked the Soviet Union with which he had 
only recently entered into a pact of non- 
aggression. 

"Whom the gods would destroy, they first 
make mad." 

Many months ago Japan entered into the Tri- 
partite Pact with Germany and Italy. My Gov- 
ernment learned that this arrangement, which 
made of Japan the submissive tool of Hitler, for 
the primary purpose of j^reventing the United 
States from continuing to give assistance to 
Great Britain, was not supported by certain 
elements in Japan. These elements clearly fore- 
saw the ultimate destruction of Japan if the 
Japanese Government dared to embark upon an 
adventure which would ultimately bring Japan 
into conflict with all of the other powers which 
had direct interests in the western Pacific. 

These elements in Japan also realized that, 
while Hitler had been able to inveigle the war 
lords in control of the Japanese Government 
into believing that should Japan carry out Ger- 
man orders, and were the Western democracies 
defeated, Germany would permit Japan to con- 
trol the Far East, Hitler would of course take 
her spoils from Japan whenever he saw fit. 

My Government sought over a period of more 
than ten months to negotiate with Japan a 
peaceful and equitable adjustment of differ- 
ences between the two countries so as to prevent 
the outbreak of war in the Pacific. 

The United States, however, utterly refused 
to agree to any settlement which would infringe 
upon the independence or the legitimate rights 
of the people of China, who for four and a half 
years had been bravely and successfully resist- 
ing every effort on the part of Japan to conquer 
their ancient land. Nor would the United 
States agree to any proposal offered by the Jap- 
anese Government which would contravene 
those basic principles of right and justice for 
which, I am proud to say, my country stands. 

We now know that at the very time that the 
present Japanese Government was carrying on, 
at its own urgent request, the pretense of con- 



JANUARY 17, 194 2 

ducting peaceful negotiations with the United 
States for the purpose of reaching a settlement 
which would have averted war, every plan in 
its uttermost detail had already been made to 
attack my country's territory. 

During those last two weeks before December 
7, when Japan's notorious peace emissary was 
protesting to my Government that his country 
desired nothing except peace and profitable com- 
mercial relations with the United States, the 
airplane carriers were already on their way to 
Pearl Harbor to launch their dastardly attack 
upon the United States Navy. 

The Japanese war lords, under the orders of 
their German masters, adopting the same meth- 
ods of deceit and treachery which Hitler has 
made a stench in the nostrils of civilized man- 
kind, while peace negotiations were actually 
still in progress in Washington, suddenly at- 
tacked a country which had been Japan's friend 
and which had made every honorable effort to 
find a basis for a just and lasting peace in the 
Pacific. 

A few days later Germany and her satellites 
declared war upon the United States. 

And so war has been forced upon some of us 
in the American Continent. 

The greatest assurance that our great asso- 
ciation of sovereign and independent peoples, 
the American family of nations, can survive 
this world upheaval safely lies in the unity with 
which we face the common peril. 

Some of us by our own power, by our own re- 
soui'ces, by the extent of our population, are able 
successfully beyond the shadow of a doubt to 
defend ourselves. Others of us who do not pos- 
sess these material advantages, equal though 
they be in their courage and in their determina- 
tion to resist aggression, must depend for their 
continued security upon the cooperption which 
other members of the American family may give 
them. The only assured safety which this con- 
tinent possesses lies in full cooperation between 
us all in the common defense; equal and sov- 
ereign partners in times of aggression as in 
times of peace. 

The record of the past two years is ever be- 
fore us. You and I know that had there ex- 



57 

isted during the past decade an international 
order based upon law, and with the capacity to 
enforce such law, the earth today would not be 
subjected to the cruel scourge which is now 
ravaging the entire globe. Had the law-abid- 
ing and peaceful nations of Europe been willing 
to stand together when the menace of Hitlerism 
first began to become manifest. Hitler would 
never have dared to embark upon his evil co-.u-se. 
It was solely because of the fact t!iat these na- 
tions, instead of standing together, permitted 
themselves to hold aloof one from the other and 
placed their hope of salvation in their own neu- 
trality, that Hitler was enabled to overrun them 
one by one as time and circumstances made it 
expedient for him. 

The security of the three hundred millions of 
people who inhabit the Western Hemisphere 
and the independence of each of the countries 
here represented will be determined by whether 
the American nations stand together in this 
hour of peril, or whether they stand apart one 
from the other. 

I am fully aware of what the representa- 
tives of the Axis Powers have been stating to 
some of you, day in and day out during the 
past months. I know that Hitler's representa- 
tives have said to some of you that Germany 
has not the slightest thought of dominating 
the Western Hemisphere. All that Germany 
wants, they have told you, is complete domina- 
tion over every part of Europe, of Africa, and 
of the Near East, the destruction of the British 
Empire, the enslavement of the Eussian people, 
the overlordship of the Far East, and when this 
is accomplished, only friendship and peaceful 
trade with the Americas. 

But Hitler's representatives have omitted to 
mention that in such a fateful contingency we 
would all of us then also be living in a Hitler- 
dominated world. 

You may remember that a few days ago 
Hitler publicly denounced President Roosevelt 
as the greatest war-monger of all times, because 
the President had declared that the people of 
the United States "did not want to live in the 
type of world" that Hitler wished for. 

In a Hitler-dominated universe not one of 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



US could trade except on Hitler's terms. Not 
one of us could live except under a gauleiter ap- 
pointed for us by Hitler. Not one of us could 
educate our children except as Hitler dictated. 
Not one of us could enjoy our God-given rights 
to think and to speak freely and to worship the 
Deity as our conscience may dictate. 

Can even Hitler wonder that we are not 
willing to live in such a world as that? 

I know what representatives of Japan have 
been saying to some of you. They are telling 
you that the Japanese Government is sui-e that 
the governments and peoples of the American 
republics will certainly not be influenced by 
any thought that Japan may harbor ulterior 
motives towai'ds them. They are telling you 
that Japan desires nothing but peace with you 
and the maintenance of profitable commercial 
relations. 

You will remember that they told us that 
also! 

The Japanese Government is even telling 
you that they are soon going to send ships to the 
Pacific ports of South America to take cargoes 
of your goods. 

But they did not add that were some Japanese 
ship to be foolhardy enough to attempt to make 
such a trip, it would not be able to travel many 
miles after leaving the port of the Americas to 
which it had gone, except under the naval 
custody of Japan's adversaries. 

But there is no useful purpose to be served 
by our dwelling on the lies with which the Axis 
Governments still attempt to deceive us. We all 
of us know that no sane man can place the 
slightest shred of credence in any solemn or 
sworn assurance which the Axis Governments 
give. 

We likewise know full well that the sole aim, 
the ultimate objective of these partners in crime, 
is conquest of the surface of the entire earth, the 
loot of the possessions of every one of us, and 
the subjugation of free men and women every- 
where to the level of serfs. 

Twelve months ago Hitler solemnly assured 
the German people that before the end of the 
year 1941, Germany would complete the defeat 
of all her enemies in the greatest victory of all 
time. 



On October third last Hitler swore to his 
people that before the first of the New Year of 
1942 Russia would be crushed, "never to rise 
again". 

What are the facts? Today the German 
armies are retreating from Russian territory, 
routed and dispersed by the magnificent offen- 
sive of the Russian armies. Hitler has lost over 
one third of his air force, over one half of his 
tank force, and more than thi-ee million men. 
But more than that, the German people now see 
for themselves the utter falsity of the promises 
held out to them by the evil charlatan who rules 
them. Their morale is running low. 

In North Africa the British armies have 
utterly destroyed the Axis forces in Libya and 
are clearing the Southern Mediterranean lit- 
toral of Axis threats. 

In the Atlantic the British and United 
States convoys are moving ever more safely to 
their destinations, and the loss of merchant ship- 
ping through German submarine action has 
steadily diminished during the past six months. 
In the Far East the United States and Great 
Britain have met with initial reverses. 

We all remember that as a result of the AVash- 
ington Limitation of Armaments Conference 
of 1922 the powers directly interested in the Far 
East, in order to assure the basis for peaceful 
relations between them, pledged themselves not 
to increase the fortifications of their possessions 
in that area. During all of the years that the 
treaties agreed upon at that Conference re- 
mained in effect the United States consequently 
took no steps to fortify the Philippines. But 
we also now know that, counter to her sworn 
obligations, Japan during these same years was 
creating naval bases and feverishly constructing 
fortifications throughout the islands of the 
South Seas which she had received as a mandate 
from the League of Nations. 

Furthermore, at the request of the Philippine 
people the Government of the United States had 
pledged itself to grant full independence to them 
in the year 1946. 

The infamous attack by Japan upon the 
United States consequently found the Philip- 
pine Islands largely unfortified, and protected 
solely by a modest army of brave Filipino sol- 



JANUARY 17, 194 2 



59 



diers, supixirteJ by only two divisions of United 
States troops, with a small air force utterly in- 
adequate to withstand the concentrated strength 
of tile Japanese. 

But the control of the Pacific Ocean itself 
rests with the Allied fleets. Japan, after suf- 
fering disastrously in her four-year-long war 
with China, is surrounded on all sides. She pos- 
sesses no resources. Once the materiel which 
she is now using is destroyed it can only be 
replaced by what Japan herself can produce. 
And that replacement will be inferior in qualitj', 
and small in quantity without the raw materials 
which Japan will now be largely unable to 
secure. 

The commencement of the year 1942 has 
marked the turn of the tide. 

The United States is now in the war. Our 
industrial production, the greatest in the world, 
is fast mounting towards the maximum. Dur- 
ing the coming year we will produce some 60,000 
airplanes, including 45,000 military airplanes, 
some 45,000 tanks, some 300 new combatant 
ships, from the mightiest battleships to coastal 
patrol craft, and some 600 new merchant ships. 
We will attain a rate of 70,000 per year in the 
training of combat airplane pilots. We have 
drafted for military service all of our men be- 
tween the ages of 20 and 44 yeai'S, and of this 
great total we will soon have an initial army of 
three million men fully trained and fully 
equipped. We will spend 50 billions of dollars, 
or half of our total national income, in the year 
thereafter in order to secure the use of every 
ounce of our national resources in our war effort. 
Every weapon that we produce will be used 
wherever it is determined that it may be of the 
most service in the common cause, whether that 
be here in the Western Hemisphere, on the des- 
erts of Libya, on the steppes of Russia, or in the 
territory of the brave people of China. 

Those of us who have joined in this holy war 
face a ruthless and barbarous foe. The road 
before us will be hard and perhaps long. We 
will meet unquestionably with serious reverses 
from time to time. But the tide has turned and 
will run swiftly and ever more swiftly until it 
ends in the flood of victory. 



As each one of you knows, my Government 
has made no suggestion, and no request, as to 
the course which any of the governments of the 
other American republics should pursue subse- 
quent to the Japanese attack upon the United 
States, and the declaration of war upon it by 
the other Axis Powers. 

We do not function in that way in the Ameri- 
can family of nations. 

But may I assure you from my heart today 
th.at the spontaneous declaration of war upon 
the enemies of mankind of nine of the other 
American republics; the severance of all rela- 
tions with Germany, Italy, and Japan by Mex- 
ico, Colombia, and Venezuela; and the official 
declarations of solidarity and support by all of 
the other American republics, including our tra- 
ditional and unfailing friend, in evil days as 
well as good, the gi-eat Republic of Brazil, 
whose guests we all are today, represents to my 
Government and to my fellow citizens a meas- 
ure of support, of strength, and of spiritual 
encouragement which no words of mine would 
be adequate to express. 

May I merely say that these acts of faith in 
our common destiny, so generously realized, will 
never be forgotten by the people of the United 
States. They have heartened us all. They have 
made us all, all the more anxious to be worthy, 
not in words but in deeds, of your confidence. 
They have made us all the more desirous of 
showing our gratitude through the extent of 
the cooperative strength which we can furnish 
to insure the ultimate triumph of the cause to 
which we are dedicated. 

Each one of the American governments has 
determined, and will continue to determine, in 
its own wisdom, the course which it will pur- 
sue to the best interest of its people in this world 
struggle. But of one thing I feel sure we are 
all convinced. In accordance with the obliga- 
tions we have all undertaken under the provi- 
sions of our inter-American agreements and 
in accordance with the spirit of that continental 
solidarity unanimously proclaimed, those na- 
tions of the Americas which are not engaged in 
war will never permit their territory to be used 
by agents of the Axis Powers in order that these 



60 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



may conspire against, or prepare attacks upon, 
tliose republics wliich are fighting for their own 
liberties and for those of the entire continent. 

We all of us are fully aware of the record of 
the activities of Axis agents in our several coun- 
tries which the past two years have brought to 
light. We know how the Axis diplomatic rep- 
resentatives, taking advantage of the immunity 
which international custom has granted them 
for their legitimate functions, have been doing 
their utmost to poison inter-American rela- 
tions; to create internal discord; and to engen- 
der domestic strife, so as to try and pave the 
way for subversive movements financed with 
funds obtained through extortion from resi- 
dents in our midst, or transferred from the loot 
they have procured in the occupied countries of 
Europe. We know that their so-called consular 
officials have in reality been the directing heads 
of espionage rings in every part of this hemi- 
sphere. The full history of this record will 
some day be published in full detail, when the 
divulging of this information will no longer be 
of assistance to the enemy. 

So long as this hemisphere remained out of 
the war all of our governments dealt with this 
ever-increasing danger in the manner which 
they believed most effective, exchanging intelli- 
gence one with the other, as existing agreements 
between them provide, whenever such exchange 
was mutually helpful. 

But today the situation has changed. Ten of 
the American republics are at war and three 
others have severed all relations with the Axis 
Powers. The continued presence of these Axis 
agents within the Western Hemisphere consti- 
tutes a direct danger to the national defense of 
the republics engaged in war. There is not a 
Japanese nor a German consul, nor a consul of 
Hitler's satellite countries, in the New World 
at this moment who is not reporting to his su- 
periors every time a ship leaves the ports of the 
country where he is stationed, for the purpose 
of having that ship sunk by an Axis submarine. 
There is not a diplomatic representative of the 
Axis Powers anywhere in the Americas who is 
not seeking to get for his masters information 
regarding the defense preparations of the 



American nations now at war; who is not con- 
spiring against the internal security of every 
one of us; who is not doing his utmost, through 
every means available to him, to hinder our ca- 
pacity to insure the integrity of our freedom 
and our independence. 

Surely this danger must be of paramount con- 
cern to all of us. The preeminent issue pre- 
sented is solely that those republics engaged in 
war shall not be dealt a deadly thrust by the 
agents of the Axis ensconced upon the soil 
and enjoying the hospitality of others of the 
American republics. 

The shibboleth of classic neutrality in its nar- 
row sense can, in this tragic modern world, no 
longer be the ideal of any freedom-loving people 
of the Americas. 

There can no longer be any real neutrality as 
between the powers of evil and the forces that 
are struggling to preserve the rights and the 
independence of free peoples. 

It is far better for any people to strive glori- 
ously to safeguard its independence; it is far 
better for any people to die, if need be, in the 
battle to save its liberties, than by clinging to 
the tattered fiction of an illusory neutrality, to 
succeed only by so doing in committing suicide. 

Our devotion to the common cause of defend- 
ing the New World against aggression does not 
imply necessarily engagement in war. But it 
does imply, I confidently believe, the taking of 
all measures of cooperation between us which 
redound to the great objective of keeping the 
Americas free. 

Of equal importance with measures of po- 
litical solidarity, defense cooperation, and the 
repression of subversive activity are economic 
measures related to the conduct of war against 
the aggressor nations and the defense of the 
Western Hemisphere. 

All of the American republics have already 
taken some form of measures breaking off finan- 
cial and coinmercial intercourse between them 
and the non-American aggressor states and to 
eliminate other alien economic activities preju- 
dicial to the welfare of the American republics. 
It is of the utmost importance that these meas- 
ures be expanded in order that they may pre- 



JANtTARY 17, 194 2 

vent all business, financial, and trade transac- 
tions between the Western Hemisphere and the 
aggressor states, and all transactions within the 
Western Hemisphere which directly or indi- 
rectly redound to the benefit of the aggressor 
nations or are in any way inimical to the de- 
fense of the hemisphere. 

The conduct of war and the defense of the 
hemisphere will require an ever-increasing pro- 
duction of the implements of war and an ever- 
increasing supply of the basic and strategic 
materials necessary for their production. The 
spread of the war has cut off many of the most 
important sources of strategic materials, and it 
is essential that the American republics con- 
serve their stocks of such commodities and, by 
every possible means, encourage the production 
and the free flow within the hemisphere of the 
greatest possible quantity of these materials. 

The universal character of the war is placing 
increasing demands upon the merchant-ship- 
ping facilities of all of us. The increased pro- 
duction of strategic materials will be of no avail 
unless adequate transportation can be provided, 
and it is consequently of vital importance that 
all of the shipping facilities of the Americas 
be mobilized to this essential end. 

The Government of the United States is pre- 
pared to cooperate whole-heartedly with the 
other American republics in handling the prob- 
lems arising out of these economic warfare 
measures. It stands prepared to render finan- 
cial and technical assistance, where needed, to 
alleviate injury to the domestic economy of any 
of the American republics which results from 
the control and curbing of alien economic ac- 
tivities inimical to our common defense. 

It is ready to enter into broad arrangements 
for the acquisition of supplies of basic and stra- 
tegic materials, and to cooperate with each of 
the other American republics in order to in- 
crease rapidly and efficiently their production 
for emergency needs. Finally, it stands ready 
through the United States Maritime Commis- 
sion to render every assistance in the efficient 
operation of merchant vessels in accordance 
with the plan of August 28, 1941 of the Inter- 

438598 — 42 2 



61 



American Financial and Economic Advisory 
Committee.^ 

My Government is also fully aware of the im- 
portant role which imported materials and arti- 
cles play in the maintenance of the economies of 
your nations. On December 5, 1911 I advised 
the Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee in Washington that the 
United States was making every effort consist- 
ent with the defense program to maintain a flow 
to the other American republics of materials 
to satisfy the minimum essential import require- 
ments of your economics. I added that the pol- 
icy of my Government was being interpreted by 
all of the appropriate agencies as calling for 
recognition of and provision for the essential 
needs of the American republics equal to the 
treatment accorded United States civilian needs. 

The attack by Japan and the declarations of 
war by the other membei'S of the Tripartite Pact 
have resulted in greater and unprecedented de- 
mands upon our production facilities. But I am 
able to state today, as I did on the fifth of De- 
cember, that the policy of the United States to- 
ward the satisfaction of your essential require- 
ments remains firm. 

On December 26, 1941 after the outbreak of 
war, the Board of Economic Warfare of my 
Government resolved unanimously : 

"It is the policy of the Government of the 
United States to aid in maintaining the eco- 
nomic stability of the other American Republics 
by recognizing and providing for their essential 
civilian needs on the basis of equal and propor- 
tionate consideration with our own." 

Pursuant to this declaration of policy our 
allocation of 218,600 tons of tin-plate for your 
needs during this year has been followed by fur- 
ther allocations, which I am privileged to an- 
nounce today. The Office of Production Man- 
agement has advised me that allocations have 
been made to you for the next quarter in 
amounts adequate to meet your needs for rayon ; 
for twenty essential agricultural and industrial 
chemicals, including copper sulphate, am- 



' Bulletin of August 30, 1941, p. 16.5. 



62 

monium sulphate, soda ash, and caustic soda; 
for farm equipment; and for iron and steel 
products. 

In addition, I am able to announce that a spe- 
cial mechanism has been organized within the 
Office of Production Management which is now 
facilitating the clearance of your individual 
priority applications. 

In the light of this action, it seems appro- 
priate to recognize that the arsenal of democracy 
continues mindful of its hemisphere responsi- 
bilities. 

I am confident that your people will join the 
people of the United States, who are sharing 
their civilian supplies with you, in recognizing 
that military and other defense needs must con- 
tinue to be given precedence over civilian 
demands. 

All of these economic measures relate directly 
to the conduct of war. the defense of the hemi- 
sphere, and the maintenance of the economies 
of our several nations during the war emer- 
gency. Obviously our greatest efforts must be 
extended towards victory. Nevertheless, the 
full consummation of victory must include the 
building of an economic and social order in 
which all of our citizens may subsequently enjoy 
the blessings of peace. 

My Government believes that we must begin 
now to execute plans, vital to the human defense 
of the hemisphere, for the improvement of 
health and sanitary conditions, the provision 
and maintenance of adequate supplies of food, 
milk, and ^yater, and the effective control of 
insect-borne and other comnnmicable diseases. 
The United States is prepared to participate in 
and to encourage complementary agreements 
among the American republics for dealing with 
these problems of health and sanitation by pro- 
vision, according to the abilities of the countries 
involved, of funds, raw materials, and services. 

The responsibility with which we are all 
charged requires that we plan for broad eco- 
nomic and social development, for increased 
production of the necessities of the world, and 
for their equitable distribution among the 
people. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

If this economic rehabilitation of the world 
is to take place it is indispensable that there be a 
resurgence of international trade — interna- 
tional trade, as was declared by the Second 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs at 
Habana. "conducted with peaceful motives and 
based upon equality of treatment and fair and 
equitable practices". 

I urge upon you all the imperative need for 
unity between us, not only in the measures which 
must presently be taken in the defense of our 
Western World, but also in order that the 
American i-epublics, joined as one, may prove to 
be the potent factor which they should be of 
right in the determination of the nature of the 
world of the future, after the victory is won. 

We. the American nations, are trustees for 
Christian civilization. In our own relation- 
ships we have wished to .show scrupulous re- 
spect for the sovereign rights of all states; we 
have sought to undertake only peaceful proc- 
esses in the solution of controversies which may 
have arisen between us; and we have wished to 
follow the course of decency and of justice in 
our dealings with others. 

When peace is restored it is to the interest of 
the whole world that the American republics 
present a united front and be able to speak and 
act with tlie moral authority to which, by reason 
of their own enlightened standards as much as 
by reason of their number and their powei', they 
are entitled. 

The prayer of peoples throughout the world 
is that when the task of peacemaking is once 
more undertaken it will be better done than it 
was in 1919. And we cannot forget that the 
task this time will be infinitely more difficult 
than it was the last time. 

In the determination of how these stupendous 
problems may best be solved, the united voice of 
the free peoples of the Americas must be heard. 
The ideals which men have cherished have al- 
ways throughout the course of history proved 
themselves to be more potent than any other 
factor. Nor conquest, nor migrations ; nor eco- 
nomic pressure, nor pestilence; nor revolt, nor 
assassinations have ever yet been able to tri- 



JANUARY 17, 194 2 



63 



iiniph over tlie ideals which have sprung from 
men's hearts and men's minds. 

Notwithstandiiifj the hideous blunders of the 
past generation ; notwithstanding the holocaust 
of the present moment, that great ideal of "a 
universal dominion of right by such a concert 
of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety 
to all nations and make the world itself at last 
free" still stands untarnished as the supreme 
objective of a suffering hiunanity. 

That ideal will yet triumph. 

AVe, the free peoples of the Americas, must 
play our full part in its realization so that we 
may hasten the day when we can thus insure 
the maintenance of a peaceful world in which 
we, and our children, and our children's chil- 
dren, can safely live. 



At this time the issue is clearly drawn. 
There can be no peace until Hitlerism and its 
monstrous parasites are utterly obliterated, and 
until the Prussian and Japanese militarists have 
been taught in the only language they can im- 
derstand that they will never again be afforded 
the opportunity of wrecking the lives of gen- 
eration upon generation of men and women in 
every quarter of the globe. 

When that time comes men of good-will must 
be prepared and ready to build with vision 
afresh upon new and lasting foundations of 
liberty, of morality, of justice, and, by no means 
least perhaps, of intelligence. 

In the attainment of that great achievement 
the measure of our devotion will be the measure 
of the world's regeneration. 



BUSINESS WORKS TO WIN THE WAR 
ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[ Ileleased to tbe press January 15] 

Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Any great gathering of Americans today is 
mainly interested in a single question : What 
can each of us do toward winning the war, and 
toward winning the peace after the war? This 
Association is a great group of merchants. But 
today you meet as servants of America and as 
soldiers for the ideals America represents. 

When merchants met in peacetimes they could 
think chiefly of their interests as merchants. 
But in time of war you have stopjjed being 
merchants. You are part of the service of 
supply of the Nation. A store is no longer 
merely a commercial enterprise. It is part of 
the machinery on which the country must rely 
and does rely in seeing to it that its people get 
t he goods they need. 

A modern war means that even a counti-y as 
powerful and rich as our own must devote every 
possible fragment of its economic strength to 
production of war supplies. Necessarily this 
means that civilians will not have as many 



' Delivered before the National Dry Goods Assooia- 
tion, New York, N. Y., January 15, 1942. 



things as they are ordinarily used to having. 
This means that arrangements have to be made 
so that every one gets his fair share and not 
more than his fair share. We call this "ration- 
ing". In great measure this has to be done 
by enlisting the services of merchants and stores, 
Ijig and little. 

We have not been used to this sort of thing 
in the United States. We have been accus- 
tomed to let every one buy anything he wanted 
and as much as he wanted. We have been ac- 
customed to encourage merchants to sell as much 
as they could, and the more the better. In 
recent history we have never known a time 
when the factories behind the stores, when the 
mines and farms behind the factories, could not 
produce more than the country was able to con- 
sume. Now we have to change all that, because 
the farm and the mine and the factory will be 
turning a great part of their production toward 
equipping fleets and armies and airfields and 
battleplanes. They will continue to work until 
the last shred of Axis militarism is wiped off 
the face of the earth. During that time you 
and I will be steadily cutting down our wants 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



by finding ways of making life more simple. 
We shall find it hard to do; but we shall take 
it and we shall like it, because all of us know 
that the life of our country and the life of each 
of us as individuals is at stake. 

For we have reached one of those periods in 
history in which there can be no compromise. 
Some of us have known this for a long time. 
The last doubt in anyone's mind vanished about 
noon on December 7, 1941, when the news of 
the unforgettable treachery at Pearl Harbor 
came. 

But we are compelled to do something more 
than defend our own nation and our own lives. 
We are also compelled to fight for and maintain 
an international life in which nations do not 
and cannot act as gangsters. Every one of us 
knows now that we cannot be safe in a world 
which does not recognize rules of justice and 
law. We shall never be safe or quiet or at peace 
until nations no longer find it healthy to try to 
get what they want by dive-bombing and mur- 
der, usually without warning. 

We are already taking our part in construct- 
ing the new international fabric. That struc- 
ture came into being on another historic date — 
January 1, 1942 — with the signature by 26 coun- 
tries of the Declaration by United Nations. In 
that moment the greatest union of nations 
known to history was brought together in a 
common cause. 

The Declaration by United Nations, it is true, 
united these many peoples in a common struggle 
against savage and brutal forces seeking to en- 
slave the world. These countries intend and 
propose the final defeat of Hitler and his imi- 
tators in Japan. They propose to do more than 
merely to defeat their common enemies. They 
have announced that they will set up a state 
of affairs in which those who follow us will 
have less to fear and more to hope. They have 
outlined a plan in which men and women will 
once more be equipped to make their own way 
in the world and to stand unafraid in God's 
good sunlight. 

The 26 United Nations and othei's who may 
join them agreed to the program known as the 
Atlantic Charter — forged on a warship in the 



Atlantic last summer. That charter is, in sub- 
stance, an international Bill of Rights. 

It outlaws imperialism. The era of attempted 
domination must end. 

It abandons territorial changes, except as 
these accord with the freely expressed wishes 
of the people concerned. 

It requires respect for the right of all peoples 
to choose the form of government under which 
they will live, and it proposes restoration of 
sovereign rights and self-government to those 
who have been forcibly deprived of them. 

The Atlantic Charter likewise sets forth that 
these nations propose to further the enjoyment 
by all states, great or small, victor or vanquished, 
of access on equal terms to necessary trade and 
raw materials. 

It proposes collaboration between all nations 
to secure improved labor standards, economic 
advancement, and social security. 

And, when final victory shall have been 
achieved, it proposes that the resulting peace 
shall afford assurance that all men in all lands 
may live out their lives in freedom from fear 
and want. Finally, it proposes disarmament of 
nations which have threatened or may threaten 
aggression, and a lightening of the crushing 
burden of armaments. 

The Declaration by United Nations thus is 
more than a necessary agreement to pool efl'orts 
for war. It is an agreement — the widest ever 
achieved in history — in a common struggle, for 
a common plan, based on a common ideal. 

It is appropriate to observe that this is a 
wider application of the same principles which 
have been the foundation of the great American 
family of nations for many years. As long ago 
as 1933 Seci'etary Hull, at Montevideo, outlined 
a similar set of ideals and purposes as the basis 
on which 21 American republics could live in 
peace, could work without fear, and could helj^ 
each other in the age-long struggle of men to 
improve their position. Through the years the 
American family of nations has made, on this 
firm base, steady progress toward the common 
end. 

I like to think that a similar agreement on 
ideals and purposes has united that other great 



JANUARY 17, 1942 

family of nations -which we know as the British 
Commonwealth — Great Britain, Canada, Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, and South Africa. 

And I am glad to remember that more than 
a century ago a famous Spanish-American 
statesman, Bolivar, dreamed of a time when 
agreement between an American family of na- 
tions and the British group, together with the 
countries of Europe, would give at last the basis 
of a firm and enduring peace. Were he alive 
today he would include, without doubt, the 
great protagonist of democracy in the Far East, 
China, whose indomitable will and whose moral 
strength have made her a fortress of freedom. 

But these great ideals will not be realized 
by agreements of statesmen. They become real 
only as you and I in our daily lives can make 
them real by the work of our hands. 

All of this is based on a single simple idea. 
Civilization as we see it is based on individual 
men and women, hundreds of millions of them, 
who seek in freedom to attain the best of them- 
selves. Our fathers stated this in religious 
terms. They said that all men were children 
of God; that therefore all men were brothers; 
and that because of this every man was obliged 
to use his life so that the men and women with 
whom he came into contact were freer and hap- 
pier. The political terms of today do not 
change the essential idealism. 

This places on each of us a heavy obligation. 
It is required tliat each of us examine the daily 
work that we do; that we try to see that the 
moves we make cause people to be more free, 
moi-e healthy, less afraid, and more able to make 
a contribution to the common cause, in war or 
in peace. 

It means that we must put aside individual 
ambitions, individual desires for power, indi- 
vidual desire to dominate. Every act and pur- 
pose must be tested by whether it increases the 
abilities and stature of the people around us to- 
ward a common ideal and aim. This is a great 
responsibility. 

All of us have the natural human desire to 
get ahead of the game. If there is not enough 
to go around, save in small amounts, all of us 
have a natural human wish to hoard goods ahead 



66 



and come out better than our neighbors. This 
we cannot do. The hoarder is merely depriving 
someone else of his fair share. 

Wherever there is a chance to assure that 
small business can continue in existence, we are 
under obligation to try to handle our policies so 
that the small business can continue to exist. 
We need the small free businesses and the small 
free businessmen. 

Wherever the policies either of business or of 
labor prevent labor from making a full contri- 
bution to the common effort, those policies are 
not compatible with the ideals for which we are 
bound to fight and by which we can and will 
achieve victory. 

We cannot accept methods either of finance 
or business organization which restrict produc- 
tion or employment, or which withhold either 
from the country in war or from the people in 
civil life the goods necessary to win a war or to 
live at peace. 

The Government can assist by wise law and 
regulation. But the greatest reliance must be 
placed on the knowledge which individual men 
have of the problems in their own communities, 
and their willingness to keep every wheel mov- 
ing by generous assistance to their fellows. 
Every businessman knows that there are end- 
less ways in which he can help his neighbor and 
endless ways in which he can make trouble for 
his neighbor. Today the choice is already 
made; and that choice will win the war, as it 
will win the peace. At the beginning of each 
day everyone ought to say to himself, "Wliat can 
I do to increase production, to help equitable 
distribution, and to assist my neighbors and col- 
leagues to do the same?" And at the end of 
each day each of us ought to ask himself, "What 
have I done in the common cause?" 

The value of freedom is that it never dies. 
We have seen great military machines built up 
on.despotism. We have seen them achieve tem- 
jjorary success, and they may have further tem- 
porary success. But we know that they are 
headed for disaster. This war is a M-ar of peo- 
ples who insist on their freedom — not only free- 
dom as nations, but also freedom as men — free- 
dom in spirit, freedom in economic life. The 



66 



DEPARTilENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



time to make those freedoms real is now, and not 
later. 

The Axis dictators in a great counterrevolu- 
tion have endeavored to assault the foundations 
not only of civilization and nationhood but even 
of manhood. They have regarded as their 
enemy every human being who has not ceased to 
have a heart and a head. There can be no com- 
promise. There will be but one outcome — our 
complete victory and a realization of the ideals 
of that victory. In justice we can accept no 
less. 

We are all fellow workers in that common 
cause, whatever we do or wherever we are. We 
have the high piivilege of bearing a part of the 
great tradition of the history of America, and 
with it a great part of the fate of the coming 
world. I am glad of the sacrifices we shall have 
to make. We are not beggars asking for a share 
of the world's goods. We are a great company 
of free men taking the part of men in a time 
which calls for men to make a world in which 
men may freely live. 



AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press January 13] 

According to a telegram received in the De- 
partment through the Swiss authorities, the 
members of the staff of the American Consulate 
General at Seoul, including Consul General 
Harold B. Quart on, of Algona, Iowa, Vice Con- 
sul Arthur B.- Emmons, 3d, of Boston. Mass., 
and Interpreter William R. Mayers, of Lebanon, 
Pa., are in good health. 

The following information concerning the 
status of American nationals in Indochina and 
Thailand has just been made available to the 
Department through the French authorities at 
Vichy : 

Mr. O. Edmund Clubb, of South St. Paul, 
Minn., former American Consul detailed to 
Hanoi, has been transferred from Hanoi to 
Haiphong and is now confined in a building be- 
longing to the Standard-Vacuum Oil Co. He 
will soon be more comfortably housed in the 



premises of the Chartered Bank of India, which 
is situated in the center of the town. 

At Saigon, former American Consul Sydney 
H. Browne, of Baltimore. Md., who had pre- 
viously been confined to his residence, and for- 
mer American Vice Consul Kingsley W. Hamil- 
ton, of Wooster, Ohio, are now confined in the 
residence of the British Consul General. Cer- 
tain Asiatic employees of the American Consu- 
late have been authorized to keep in touch with 
their emploj'ers. 

Japanese troops occupied the premises of the 
former American Legation and Consulate Gen- 
eral at Bangkok on the morning of December 9, 
194L Since that date telephone communica- 
tions have been cut and radio sets confiscated, 
and the former American Minister, Mr. Willys 
R. Peck, and his staff have been confined to the 
Legation. All American citizens, with tlie ex- 
ception of the staff's of the Legation and Con- 
sulate General, have been concentrated by the 
Thai authorities in the School of Political 
Science, where living conditions are said to be 
primitive but fairly comfortable and where they 
may receive visitors. The Thai authorities 
have sequestrated American firms, and the Thai 
Ministry of Economy has taken over the direc- 
tion of their administration. 



ITALIAN, RUMANIAN, AND BULGARIAN 
OFFICIALS IN THE UNITED STATES 

fReleaeed to the press January 14] 

The Italian Embassy staff and the staffs of 
the Rumanian and Bulgarian Legations are be- 
ing concentrated, preparatory to their departure 
from the United States, at White Sulphur 
Springs. Bulgarian consular officials are also 
being concentrated at Wliite Sulphur Springs. 



ALIEN ENEMIES 

A proclamation prescribing additional rules 
and regulations governing the conduct of na- 
tives, citizens, denizens, or subjects, 14 years 



JANUARY 17, 1942 



67 



old or more, of countries at war with tlie United 
States was signed by tiie President on January 
14, 1942. The proclamation orders all such 
alien enemies within the continental United 
States, Puerto Eico, and the Virgin Islands to 
iipply for and acquire a certificate of identi- 
fication at times and places to be fixed by tlie 
Attorney General. The Attorney General is 
authorized and directed to provide for receiv- 
ing such applications, for issuing the certifi- 
cates, and for making the necessary rules and 
regulations. After the date or dates fixed by 
the Attorney General for the completion of such 
registration, enemy aliens will be required to 
carry the identification cards at all times. The 
full text of the proclamation (no. 2537) is 
printed in the Federal Register for January 17, 
1942, page 329. 



PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED 
NATIONALS, SUPPLEMENT 7 

[Released to the press January 1.5] 

The Secretary of State acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coordi- 
nator of Inter- American Affairs, i.ssued on Jan- 
uary 15 Supplement 7 to tlie Proclaimed List of 
Certain Blocked Nationals. 

This supplement covers the addition of ap- 
proximately 1,800 names for Portugal and pos- 
sessions, Spain and possessions, Sweden, Switz- 
erland, and Turkey. With tlie exception of one 
case no names are added in tliis supplement for 
the other American republics. Seventeen dele- 
tions from the Proclaimed List are made in this 
supplement in the other American republics. 



American Republics 



JOINT MEXICAN - UNITED STATES DEFENSE COMMISSION 



[Eeleased to the press January 12] 

The Governments of Mexico and the United 
States, in identical statements handed to 
the press on March 4, 1941, announced that con- 
versations were being held in Washington be- 
tween the military, naval, and aeronautical at- 
taches assigned to the Mexican Embassy and 
representatives of the Government of the United 
States, to discuss the aid that the two countries 
would extend to each other in case of aggression 
against either of them. 

Unfortunately this case has now arisen, and 
in view of the existing situation the two Gov- 
ernments have found it expedient to establish 
a mixed defense commission to study the prob- 
lems relating to the defense of the two countries 
and to propose to the respective Governments 
the measures which should be adopted. 



This commission, which will be called the 
Joint Mexican - United States Defense Coin- 
mission, will be composed of Brig. Gen. Miguel 
S. Gonzalez Cadena and Brig. Gen. Tomtis 
Sanchez Hernandez, of the Mexican General 
StaflF, as representatives of Mexico; Lt. Gen. 
Stanley Dunbar Embick and Vice Admiral Al- 
fred Wilkinson Johnson as representatives of 
the United States. 

The Commission will meet in Washington as 
soon as General Sanchez Hernandez completes 
his mission as a member of the Mexican delega- 
tion to the Third Meeting of Minister of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics at Rio 
de Janeiro. 

At their first meeting the members will for- 
mulate a program and procedure for their activ- 
ities and will decide where succeeding meetings 
will be held. 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION: CUBA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, 

HAITI, AND MEXICO 



Formation of National Commissions in Cuba, 
the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico 
brings to 20 the number of commissions estab- 
lished by the Inter-American Development 
Commission in its program for the stimulation 
of Western Hemisphere trade and the develop- 
ment of resources. Outstanding business, pro- 
fessional, and technical men are appointed to 
these commissions, the membership of the four 
most recently formed being as follows : 

Cu6o 

Jos6 Manuel Casanova, Senator of the Republic ; 

President of the Asociacifin de Hacendados de 

Cuba ; Chairman 
RamOn CrusoUas, industrialist: Vice Chairninn 
Dr. Jos4 Ignacio de la C.'imara, Director of the Banco 

del Comercio 
Le6n Aisenstein, industrialist 
Teodoro Santiesteban, Secretary General of the Aso- 

ciaci6n de Colonos de Cuba, sugar producers 
Eduardo Montoulieu, former Minister of Finance ; at 

present Director General of Funds for Public 

Works ; Secretary 

Dominican Republic 

Marino E. Ciiceres, Minister of ,\griculture and In- 
dustries; Chairman 
Agustln Aristy, official in the Department of Public 

Worlis ; Vice Chairman 
Eduardo Soler, Jr., Government official 
Ernesto B. Freites, prominent businessman 
Francisco Martinez Alba, prominent businessman 
Frank Parra, Chief of the Commercial Division of tne 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs ; Secretary 

Baiti 

Abel Lacroix, Minister of Finance ; member of the 
Board of the Banque Nationale d'Haiti; Chairman 

Joseph Nadal, merchant and agriculturist; Vi<-e 
Chairman 

Edouard Esteve, member of the Board of the Banque 
Nationale d'Haiti 

Alfred Vieux, Senator of the Republic ; industrialist 

Serge Defiy, former Minister to Great Britain ; busi- 
nessman 

Clovls Kernizan, Solicitor of the Ministry of Foreign 
affairs ; delegate to the Economic Conference 
in London, 1933, and to the Pan American Confer- 
ences at Buenos Aires and Lima ; Secretary 



Andr6 Lioutoud, member of the Board of the Soci^tS 
Haitianau-Americaine de Di^veloppement Agricole 
(the agricultural corporation organized with the 
assistance of the Export-Import Bank) ; General 
Adviser 

Mexico 

Eduardo Villasenor, Director General of the Bank of 
Mexico ; Chairman 

Evaristo Araiza, General Manager of Compania 
Fundidora de Fierro y Acero de Monterrey ; Direc- 
tor of the Bank of Mexico; industrialist; Vice 
Chairman 

Aaron SSenz, former Minister of Foreign Affairs; 
former Ambassador ; Presidente of Azucar, S.A., a 
large sugar mill 

Carlos SAnchez Jlejorada, general representative of 
Compaiila de Real del Monte y Pachuca, important 
mining enterprise ; Director of Credito Minero 

Jorge Gaxiola, general representative of Compania 
Pesquera de Tepolobambo, a large fishing industry, 
and of Compaiila Financiera del Golfo de Cortes, 
an industrial company 

Manuel Telle, consultant in Mexican Foreign Service ; 
Secretary 

The Inter-American Development Commis- 
sion organized by the Inter-Ajnerican Finan- 
cial and Economic Advisory Committee, is 
seeking to stimulate the importation of non- 
competitive goods from the other American 
republics to the United States, increase trade 
among the other Americas, and encourage the 
development of industry in Central and South 
America and the Caribbean area, with particu- 
lar regard to the production of consumer goods. 
Members of the Inter-j\jnerican Development 
Commission are as follows : 

Nelson A. Rockefeller, Chairman 

J. Rafael Oreamuno, Vice Chairmnn 

Renato de Azevedo 

G. Av Magalhaes 

Anibal Jara 

John C. McClintock, 5417 Department of Commerce 

Building, Washington, D.C., Executive Secretary 
William F. Machold, 7203 Department of Commerce 

BuUding, Washington, D.C., Projects Director 



Cultural Relations 



GIFT OF BOOKS TO ENGLISH CENTER IN ECUADOR 



An Eiiglisli-liuiguage library recently estab- 
lished by the English Center in Quito, Ecuador, 
will shortly receive through the American Le- 
gation there a gift of reference boolis and peri- 
odicals from the Department of State. 

The English Center was founded by Ecuador- 
ans and by American citizens i-esident in that 
Republic in order to promote mutual friendship 
and understanding between the two countries. 
It conducts classes in English, sponsors Eng- 
lish-language lectures and programs, promotes 
the interchange of letters between students in 
Ecuador and in this country, and establishes 
contacts between students in Ecuador and 
American citizens resident there. Much of the 
support of the Center comes from the working- 



people in Quito, who are eager to learn the Eng- 
lish language and acquire a knowledge of life 
and thought in the United States. 

The books made available to the new library 
by the Division of Cultural Relations of the 
Department of State include dictionaries, an 
encyclopedia, books on learning English, a map 
of the United States, the World Almanac, and 
such works as the complete writings of George 
Washington, Morison and Commager's two- 
volume work on The Growth of the American 
RepuhJlc, H. E. Stearns' America Now, the Fed- 
eral Writers Project's U. S. One, R. & H. Lynd's 
Middletown, The Oxford Booh of American 
Verse, Foley & Gentles' America in Story, and 
C. K. Ogden's tSystem of Basic English. 



ROOSEVELT FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM 



Ten United States students soon will be se- 
lected for one-year scholarships in colleges of 
the other American republics, under the "Roose- 
velt Fellowship'' program. The fellowship 
project, sponsored and financed by the Office of 
the Coordinator of Inter- American Affairs, 
provides for an annual exchange of students, 
10 going from the LTnited States to the other 
American republics and 20 coming to the LTnited 
States — one from each of the republics. 

The Institute of International Education, in 
New York, of which Dr. Stephen Duggan is 
Director, administers the 30 fellowships, nam- 
ing selection committees to appoint the fellows. 
The project has been named in honor of Presi- 
dent Franklin D. Roosevelt. The exchanges 
are designed to spread in the other American 
nations a sympathetic understanding of the 
activities and culture of the United States, and, 



in the United States, an understanding of the 
culture of the other Americas. 

In addition to the 30 full scholarships, which 
range from $1,200 to $1,800, depending on the 
distance of travel, 41 maintenance grants have 
been allotted for students from the other Amer- 
icas. These are awards of from $300 to $500 
to students on partial scholarships. 

Exchange candidates from the other republics 
must have been graduated from a Jicro or a more 
advanced course. United States candidates 
must have bachelors degrees. All must show 
evidences of outstanding scholarship and char- 
acter and must be able to speak, read, and write 
the language of the country to which they are to 
go. They may be of either sex. 

The fellows have full freedom of choice of 
the courses they will take and, subject to veto 
of the Committee on Selections, of the place 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



where they will study. They will live in col- 
lege dormitories and are expected to take part 
in extracurricular activities. They are assured 
of invitations to homes in the areas where they 
study, to bring them into as close contact as pos- 
sible with the national life. All appointees sign 
contracts to return to their native countries on 
expiration of the scholarships. 

Nineteen students from the other American 
countries already are enrolled in colleges and 
universities in this country under the program. 
Appointees from the United States will leave 
for their places of study in time for the begin- 
ning of the academic year in the other Americas 
next March. 



VISIT OF DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR 
FROM CHILE 

[Released to the press January 15] 

Monsignor Francisco Vives, Vice Rector of 
the Catholic University of Chile, arrived in 
Washington by plane on the afternoon of Jan- 
uary 14. He is spending several weeks in this 
country at the invitation of the Department of 
State and will visit university centers in and 
near Washington and New York, as well as 
Harvard and Notre Dame. 

The Catholic University of Chile, at San- 
tiago, is one of the leading institutions of higher 
learning in South America, and many students 
attend it from the other American republics. 
As Vice Rector, Monsignor Vives has estab- 
lished there a Center of Foreign Relations to 
promote better inter-American understanding 
and friendship. 

Two years ago he brought a group of Chilean 
students to Washington to attend the Congress 
of Pax Romana in the National Capital. 

IMonsignor Vives is author of a biography 
of Pope Pius XII and a recent work on the 
philosophy of law, his special field of interest. 



The Departmeat 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. George F. Luthringer was designated an 
Assistant Chief of the Financial Division, effec- 
tive December 9, 1941 (Departmental Order 
1009). 

Mr. Laurence E. Salisbury, a Foreign Service 
officer of class III, was designated an Assistant 
Ciiief of the Division of Far Eastern Affairs, 
effective December 20, 1941 (Departmental 
Order 1013). 

Mr. David McK. Key, a Foreign Service 
officer of class IV, was designated Assistant 
Liaison Officer in the Liaison Office, Office of 
the Under Secretary, effective December 29, 
1941 (Departmental'Order 1017). 

Mr. Robert T. Pell was appointed an Assist- 
ant Chief of the Division of Current Informa- 
tion, effective January 1, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1018). 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The nomination of Laurence A. Steinhardt, 
of New York, now Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary of the LTnited States to 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, to be 
Ambassador to Turkey to replace John Van 
A. MacMurray, who has resigned, was con- 
firmed by the Senate on January 12, 1942. 

(Released to the press January 17] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since January 10, 
1942: 



JANTJAEY 17, 1942 



71 



The assignment of M. Williams Blake, of 
Columbus, Ohio, as Vice Consul at Rangoon, 
Burma, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Blake has been assigned as Vice Consul at Tam- 
pico, Mexico. 

James E. Brown, Jr., of Sewickley, Pa., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Leo J. Callanan, of Dorchester, Mass., Consul 
at Oporto, Portugal, has been assigned as Con- 
sul at Pernambuco, Brazil. 

DuWayne G. Clark, of Fresno, Calif., Assist- 
ant Commercial Attache at Madrid, Spain, has 
been designated Commercial Attache at Asun- 
cion, Paraguay. 

Bernard Gufler, of Tacoma, Wash., formerly 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Ger- 
many, has been a.^-signed for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

The assignment of Edmund A. Gullion, of 
Lexington, Ky., as Vice Consul at Calcutta, 
India, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Gullion has been designated Third Secretary of 
Embassy and Vice Consul at London, England, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 



The assignment of Frederick P. Latimer, Jr., 
of New London, Conn., as Consul at Johannes- 
burg, Transvaal, Union of South Africa, has 
been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Latimer has 
been designated Second Secretary of Legation 
and Consul at Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Walter J. Linthicum, of Baltimore, Md., Con- 
sul at Pernambuco, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Consul at Oporto, Portugal. 

The assignment of Myles Standish, of New 
York, N. Y., as Vice Consul at Karachi, India, 
has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Stan- 
dish has been assigned as Vice Consul at Aruba, 
Dutch West Indies, where an American Vice 
Consulate is to be opened. 

The assignment of Marshall M. Vance, of 
Dayton, Ohio, as Second Secretary of Legation 
at Bern, Switzerland; has been canceled. 

Walter W. Wiley, of Salisbury, N. C, Vice 
Consul at Marseille, France, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Antofagasta, Chile. 

The assignment of Archer Woodford, of 
Paris, Ky., as Consul at Bombay, India, has been 
canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Woodford has 
been assigned as Consul at Guatemala, Guate- 
mala. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



COMMERCE 



Inter-American Coffee Agreement 

Cuba 

By a letter dated January 7, 1942 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Cuba of the Inter-American 
Coffee Agreement, signed on November 28, 1940, 
was deposited with the Union on December 31, 
1941. 

As all the governments signatory to the 
agreement have now deposited their respective 



instruments of ratification with the Pan Ameri- 
can Union the agreement entered into force, 
under the terms of article XX, as of the date of 
the deposit of the Cuban ratification, i.e., De- 
cember 31, 1941. 

Article XX of the agreement provides that 
the agreement shall be ratified or approved by 
each of the signatory governments in accord- 
ance with its legal requirements and shall come 
into force when the instruments of ratification 
or approval of all the signatory governments 
have been deposited with the Pan American 
Union, but that if within 90 days from the date 



72 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of signature of the agreement the instruments 
of ratification or approval of all the signatory 
governments have not been deposited, the gov- 
ernments vrhich have deposited their instru- 
ments of ratification or approval may put the 
agreement into force among themselves by 
means of a protocol. As all the signatory gov- 
ernments had not deposited their instruments of 
ratification or approval within the 90-day pe- 
riod a protocol was signed on April 15, 1941 by 
those countries which had ratified the agree- 
ment, namely, the United States of America, 
Brazil, Colombia. Costa Rica, El Salvador, 
Guatemala. Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru. 
The protocol brought the agreement into force 
among these states on April 16, 1941 pending the 
ratification or approval by all of the other signa- 
tory governments. The agreement and the 
protocol were subsequently ratified and signed 
by the Dominican Republic on April 30, 1941, 
by Ecuador on April 29, 1941, and by Nica- 
ragua on May 13, 1941. Venezuela deposited its 
ratification of the agreement on July 22, 1941, 
and signed the protocol on August 14, 1941. 
The protocol was signed by Cuba on December 
31, 1941, at the time of the deposit of the instru- 
ment of ratification. 

The agreement will shortly be printed as 
Treaty Series 970. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas ' 

Honduras 

Tlie Acting Director General of the Pan 
American Union informed the Secretary of 
State by a letter dated January 9, 1942 that the 
instrument of ratification by Honduras of the 
Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, 
was deposited with the Union on January 8, 
1942. 

Article XIX of the convention stipulates that 
the convention "shall enter into force when 
two-thirds of the American Republics have de- 



posited their respective instruments of ratifica- 
tion". Tlie instrument deposited by the Gov- 
ernment of Honduras is the fourteenth ratifica- 
tion of the convention deposited with the Pan 
American Union, thereby completing the "two- 
thirds" provision and bringing the convention 
into force as of January 8, 1942. 

The countries which have ratified the conven- 
tion are the United States of America, October 
24, 1940; Argentina, October 1, 1941, subject to 
the reservation made at tlie time of signature; 
Brazil, January 14, 1941; Colombi;i, November 
5, 1941 ; Costa Rica, December 17, 1940; Domini- 
can Republic. November 28, 1940 ; Ecuador, De- 
cember 27, 1941; El Salvador, July 9, 1941; 
Guatemala, August 14, 1941; Haiti, August 13, 
1941 ; Honduras, January 8, 1942; Panama, May 
13, 1941; Peru, April 4, 1941; and Venezuela, 
October 22, 1941. 

TRANSIT 

Exchange of Notes With Costa Rica Regarding 
Inter-American Highway 

[Released to the press January 16] 

Through an exchange of notes signed on Jan- 
uary 16, 1942 by the Secretary of State of the 
United States and the Costa Rican Minister of 
Public Works and Agriculture, the cooperation 
of the United States in the construction of the 
Inter-American Highway through Costa Rica 
was provided for. This is the first exchange of 
notes which has occurred under the provisions 
of Public Law 375 of December 26, 1941, author- 
izing the exj^enditure of 20 million dollars in 
cooperation with the five Central American re- 
publics and Panama in the construction of the 
Inter- American Highway. In accordance with 
the exchange of notes signed on January 16 
Costa Rica will assume at least one third of the 
cost of the construction of the highway in Costa 
Rica. The remainder, not to exceed two thirds, 
will be borne by the United States. 

The Costa Rican Minister of Public Works 
and Agriculture came to Washington primarily 
to negoti.ite this exchange of notes and the sub- 
sidiary agreement which he will sign with the 
Public Roads Administration in fulfilment of 
the provisions of the law. 



JANUARY 17, 1942 



73 



The assurances envisaged by the law are be- 
ing sought from the five other republics named 
in it in order that cooperation may be extended 
to all of them. It is expected, once these as- 
surances have been secured and the necessary 
appropriations provided by Congress, that the 
work on the highway will be greatly accelerated. 

An all-weather highway has already been 
completed across Guatemala. During the past 
year substantial progress has been made in El 
Salvador, where a surfaced highway has been 
completed over a large part of the route; in 
Nicaragua, where the route from Sebaco to 
Diriamba via Managua will soon be finished; in 
Costa Rica ; and in Panama, where the Rio Hato 
road should be completed this summer. 

The texts of the notes exchanged follow : 

Xote jrom the Costa Rlcan Minister of Public 
Works to the Secretary of State, Cordell Hull 

Sir Dear Mr. Secretary : 

In accordance with the provisions of Public 
Law 375 of December 20, 1941, which provides 
for the cooperation of the United States with 
the Central American republics in the construc- 
tion of the Inter- American Highway, I hereby, 
fully authorized by my Government, beg to 
make formal request to participate in the coop- 
erative plan of said construction. In this con- 
nection I wish on behalf of my Government to 
offer the assurances inquired by the Law that, 
with a view to receiving the cooperation en- 
visaged in the Law, it has made commitments 
to assume at least one-third of the expenditures 
to be incurred henceforth by it and by the 
United States in the survey and construction of 
the Highway within the borders of Costa Rica. 
To this end it has already concluded arrange- 
ments with the Export-Import Bank of Wash- 
ington by which it has received a credit now 
amounting to $2,200,000 which, under its con- 
tract with the Bank, may not be expended, with- 
out the Bank's assent, for any purpose other 
than the construction of the Inter- American 
Highway. In addition, my Government owns 
road building equipment valued at several hun- 
dred thousand dollars which is being made 
available for the construction of the Inter- 
American Highway and which will substan- 



tially increase the contribution of my Govern- 
ment to the construction of the Highway. I 
trust that these facts will constitute ample as- 
surance that my Government has made the com- 
mitments envisaged in the law to assume at least 
one-third of the expenditures whicli are pro- 
posed to be incurred henceforth by Costa Rica 
and by the United States in the completion of 
the survey and construction of the Inter- Ameri- 
can Highway in Costa Rica in accordance with 
present projjosals. 

I take pleasure in enclosing herewith the 
proper credentials. 

With my highest regard, I beg [etc.] 

Note from the Secretary of State to the Costa 
Rican Minister of Public Works, Alfredo 
Volio 

My Dear Mr. Minister : 

I wish to acknowledge receipt of your kind 
note of January 16, 1942, in which, duly au- 
thorized by your Government, you request the 
cooperation of the Government of the United 
States in the construction of the Inter-Ameri- 
can Highway in Costa Rica, and in which you 
offer the assurances required by Public Law 
375 of December 26, 1941, in connection with 
such cooperation. 

I take pleasure in informing you that the 
assurances which you offer are satisfactory to 
this Government. It is consequently the in- 
tention of this Government to extend to the 
Costa Rican Government the cooperation en- 
visaged in the Law, subject to the appropria- 
tion of the necessary funds by the Congress of 
the United States and to the receipt of the nec- 
essary assurances from the other Republics 
mentioned in the Law. 

You are, of course, aware that by the terms 
of the Law the survey and construction work 
it authorizes shall be under the administration 
of the Public Roads Administration, Federal 
Works Agency. It is understood that you are 
now making a subsidiary agreement with the 
Administration to carry out this provision of 
the Law. 

I wish to thank you for your courtesy in 
forwarding your credentials to me. 

I am [etc.] 



74 



Legislation 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

partment of State, for the Fiscal Year 1942, Amount- 
ing to $5,000,000 [for emergencies arising in tlie 
Diplomatic and Consular Service, 1942]. (H.Doc. 
556 77tti Cong., 2d sess.) 2 pp. 



Report of the Secretary of State, Showing Receipts and 
Disbursements on Account of Refunds, Allowances, 
and Annuities: Message From the President of tie 
United States Transmitting a Report by the Secre- 
tary of State Showing All Receipts and Disburse- 
ments on Account of Refunds, Allowances, and An- 
nuities for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1941. ( H. 
Doc. 563, 77th Cong., 2d sess.) 6 pp. 

Supplemental Estimate of Appropriations for tiie 
Department of State: Communication From the 
President of the United States Transmitting Sup- 
plemental Estimate of Appropriations for the De- 



Publications 



Military Mission : Agreement Between the United 

States of America and Haiti — Signed May 23, 1941 ; 

effective May 23, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 

213. Publication 1658. 11 pp. 50. 
Diplomatic List, January 1942. Publication 1677. 

Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PDBLISHED WEEKLr WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



c 



JANUARY 24, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 135— Publication 1689 



ontents 



The War Pae^ 

Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics: 

Address by the Under Secretary of State 77 

Views of the President of Brazil on hemispheric 

solidarity 79 

Comment of the Secretary of State on Senator Con- 

nally's press conference 79 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel ... 79 

Americans in the Far East 79 

Aid to Americans stranded abroad 80 

Coordination of relief activities 80 

Lend-lease operations: Procedure for handling prob- 
lems arising in connection with the British White 
Paper of September 10, 1941 81 

Cultural Relations 
Visit of eminent composer from Brazil 83 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 83 

Treaty Information 
Promotion of peace: Treaty With the Union of South 
Africa Amending the Treaty for the Advancement 
of Peace With Great Britain, Signed September 15, 

1914 83 

Legislation 84 

Regulations 84 

Publications 84 




The War 



THIRD MEETING OF MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press January 24] 

At a time of the gi-eatest crisis which has ever 
confronted the American republics the Amer- 
ican Foreign Ministers have been meeting here 
in this great Capital of Brazil during the past 
10 days. As you all know the purpose of the 
meeting has been to determine what steps 
should be taken for the common defense and 
for the safeguarding of the best interest of the 
peoples of the 21 nations. 

The closing session of our meeting will take 
place on Monday next. I can now say, how- 
ever, without a shadow of doubt that every one 
of my associates will agree with me when I 
state that we have met with the utmost measure 
of success in attaining the objectives which we 
sought. As our gi-eat chairman, Oswaldo 
Aranha, the Foreign Minister of Brazil, has 
said "this is a meeting of deeds and not of 
words". 

Yesterday the govermnents of 21 American 
republics ofiBcially and unanimously pro- 
claimed that they jointly recommended the 
severance of diplomatic relations between all 
of the American republics and the Govern- 
ments of Japan, Germany, and Italy because of 
the aggi-ession committed by a member of the 
Tripartite Pact against one of the American 
family of nations, namely, the United States. 
This means that the diplomatic and consular 



' Delivered by Mr. Welles, who is United States rep- 
resentative at the Meeting, on January 24, 1942, and 
broadcast from Rio de Janeiro over the facilities of 
the National Broadcasting Co. 



agents of the Axis Powers within the American 
republics will no longer be able to use territory 
within the Western Hemisphere as their basis 
of activities against us and our allies. 

For the first time in the history of our hemi- 
sphere joint action of the highest political 
character has been taken by all of the American 
nations acting together without dissent and 
without reservation. 

It is true that we have not all seen eye to eye 
as to the exact details of the agreement which 
has been reached, but the objectives which all 
of us had in mind have been completely at- 
tained and, what is everlastingly important, the 
complete unity and solidarity of the 21 Amer- 
ican rejjublics has been preserved. 

The economic resolutions of the meeting have 
reached a degree of importance and immedi- 
acy not attained by those of earlier conferences. 
Most significant, of course, is the resolution 
calling for the immediate breaking off of all 
commercial and financial intercourse direct or 
indirect with the Axis Nations and the suspen- 
sion of any other commercial and financial ac- 
tivities prejudicial to the welfare and security 
of the American republics. In accordance with 
this resolution not only will all direct economic 
relations with the Axis be terminated but Axis 
nationals and other persons inimical to the 
Americas will not be permitted, through control 
of corporations and other enterprises or by 
means of the profits arising out of business ac- 
tivity with or within the American republics, to 

77 



QiiPFRiNTFWnENT OF DOCUMENTS 



78 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtJLLETrN 



enter into any activities subversive to the wel- 
fare and defense of the continent. 

The resokition also provides for the control, 
supervision, reorganization, or seizure of such 
enterprises in order that they may be operated 
under governm.ent auspices or otlierwise in tlie 
interests of the economy of the particular Amer- 
ican republic involved. Measures are also to be 
taken to alleviate any injuries to the economies 
of the American republics which may arise out 
of the application of these measures of restric- 
tion and control. 

The meeting has also adopted other measures 
of great significance to our war and defense ef- 
fort. Among these is a strong resolution call- 
ing for the most complete cooperation of all the 
nations of the hemisphere in increasing by all 
l^ossible means the production of the strategic 
materials essential for the conduct of the war 
and the defense of our country and recommend- 
ing mechanisms and measures for attaining this 
objective. Recognizing tliat tlie production of 
materials is of little avail unless adequate trans- 
portation is provided, the meeting has also 
recommended the most rapid development of 
essential means of transportation, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the closest coordination of 
shijjping services in order to give preference to 
the speedy delivery of those strategic materials 
without which war cannot be waged, adequate 
defenses prepared, and the economies of our 
nations maintained. In accordance with this 
resolution the Axis merchant vessels immobil- 
ized in ports of the hemisphere which have al- 
ready been acquired by the governments of the 
resjaective nations will now be placed immedi- 
ately into efficient and closely coordinated serv- 
ice along with the merchant fleets of all of the 
American nations. To this end the maritime 
authorities of all of the republics will work 
closely together in scheduling and routing the 
vessels under their control. 

In preparing these measures of economic soli- 
darity looking towards the defense of the con- 
tinent and resistance against the aggressor 
nations the meeting has not overlooked the 
necessity of assuring full consideration by the 
exporting nations of the minimum import re- 



quirements of commodities essential to the 
maintenance of the economic life of all of them. 
In accordance with this resolution appropriate 
mechanisms will be set up in each country to 
present accurate statements of the import re- 
quirements of each, export quotas will be deter- 
mined wherever possible and in a measure 
consistent with exigencies of war and defense, 
and mechanisms for equitable distribution will 
be established in the importing countries. All 
of these measures will tie in closely with the 
priority and allocations procedures already 
established in the United States, and on its part 
tlie United States has already announced that 
it would give to tlie civilian needs of the other 
American republics considei-ation equal and 
proportionate to that given to its own civilian 
needs. 

In connection with these problems of supply 
of commodities essential to the maintenance of 
economic activity the meeting has also consid- 
ered questions of fair and equitable prices both 
for imported and exported products. In this 
field it has recommended that undue price in- 
crease be avoided ; that domestic price ceilings 
be extended to cover exports with due regard 
to the additional costs involved in exporting; 
that importing countries prevent any runaway 
price increases in scarce imported commodities ; 
and tliat every effort be made to assure a fair 
relationship between the prices of exports and 
imports, of agricultural and mineral raw ma- 
terials and manufactured products. 

In addition to the financial and economic 
measures of control to which I have just re- 
ferred, the foreign ministers of the American 
republics have reached unanimous agreement on 
a number of other practical measures for assur- 
ing the security of the hemisphere. 

All subversive activities directed by the Axis 
Powers or states subservient to them are brought 
under rigid control ; telecommunications — 
whether by telephone, telegraph, or radio — are 
likewise brought under strict control in order 
that they may not be used by or for the benefit 
of the aggressor nations ; nationals or compa- 
nies of the Axis Powers ai'e prevented from 
operating civilian or commercial aircraft ; and 



JANtTARY 24, 1942 



79 



procedures have been established for coordinat- 
ing the activities of all the American republics 
in all matters relating to their national security. 
As all of the delegates of the 21 governments 
leave the closing session of our meeting Monday 
I think we will all of us leave with the convic- 
tion deep in our hearts that there exists today a 
more practical, a more solid, and a more real Pan 
Americanism than has ever existed in the history 
of the world. 

VIEWS OF THE PRESIDENT OF BRAZIL ON 
HEMISPHERIC SOLIDARITY 

[Released to the press January 19] 

The Secretary of State made the following 
statement : 

"The words of President Vargas before the 
Brazilian Press Association are a further indi- 
cation of his comprehensive and clear-sighted 
understanding of the meaning of hemisphere 
solidarity. In a few words the President has 
simply stated the fundamental truth that the 
independence and security and welfare of all 
of us is today contingent upon the closest col- 
laboration now that war, through no act of our 
own, has come to the Western Hemisjohere. 
TJie President's words have given us all great 
encouragement." 

COMMENT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE 
ON SENATOR CONNALLY'S PRESS CON- 
FERENCE 

[Released to the press January 21] 

The Secretary of State was asked whether the 
questions taken up in Senator Comially's press 
conference on January 21 had been discussed 
with the Secretary by the Senator. He replied 
that they had not and added that members of 
the legislative department of the Government 
are accustomed to express their indi\'idual views 
relating to public questions. Their views and 
attitude so expressed, as in the present case, are, 
of course, not to be construed as representing 
the views of the executive branch of the Gov- 
ernment and they are not the views of this Gov- 
ernment. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

(Released to the press January 20] 

The Bulgarian Government has permitted the 
American representatives in Bulgaria to depart 
on the understanding that the American Gov- 
ernment guarantee that the former Bulgarian 
representatives in the United States would be 
delivered safely to Europe. Such Bulgarian 
representatives will be repatriated along with 
the former representatives of other European 
governments. 

The Hungarian Government has permitted 
the departure of the American diplomatic and 
consular personnel to proceed to Portugal on 
the understanding with the Portuguese Govern- 
ment that that Government would allow such 
representatives to remain in Portugal, not to 
depart until the arrival there of the members of 
the former Hungarian diplomatic and consular 
establishments from the United States. 

Negotiations looking to the exchange of 
American diplomatic and consular officials for 
the former representatives in the United States 
of the governments with whicli we are now at 
war are proceeding. The proposals of the 
American Government in this connection have 
been accepted in principle and in some particu- 
lars by Germany, Japan, Italy, and Rumania, 
but other essential particulars are still the sub- 
ject of negotiation. 

AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press January 23] 

According to a telegram under date of Janu- 
ary 21 from the American Consulate General at 
Singapore, there are at present 193 American 
nationals in Malaya; of these, 8 are believed to 
be in territoiy now occupied by the Japanese 
military, namely: Robert Parrott, Pearl Moy 
Wong and child, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ho and 
their two children, and Burr Baughman. The 
remaining 185 Americans are all reported to be 
on the Island of Singapore; of this group, 87 
are women and children. The telegram stated 
that no casualties have been reported among the 
American community in Malaya. ... 



80 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



AID TO AMERICANS STRANDED 
ABROAD 

[Released to the press January 20] 

In line with the Department's efforts ever 
since international conditions became disturbed 
to assist, as far as possible, Americans stranded 
abroad in dangerous areas to return to the 
United States, the Department has recently ar- 
ranged with the Department of Commerce and 
the United States Maritime Commission for an 
extension of the arrangements by which Ameri- 
can-flag vessels, wherever available in the Far 
and Middle East, may carry from dangerous 
areas there as many passengers as possible with- 
in the limits of safety beyond the normal carry- 
ing capacity of such vessels. The Department 
has also made funds available to this Govern- 
ment's representatives at dangerous places in 
those areas from which advances may be made 
as loans to needy Americans unable to finance 
their return transportation to the United States, 
or where such return transportation is not im- 
mediately available, to places of greater safety 
than the dangerous areas in which they find 
themselves stranded. 

The Department has also been giving careful 
consideration to the problem of providing some 
form of financial assistance to those Americans 
who, due to the war, have been unable to return 
to the United States from enemy and enemy- 
occupied countries and who find themselves 
stranded without financial resources. 

Sometime ago the Department requested the 
Swiss Government, which is representing Amer- 
ican interests in enemy areas, to furnish the 
Department, as soon as possible, a statement of 
the financial situation of Americans in the va- 
rious areas where this Government's interests 
are under the protection of Switzerland and an 
estimate of the amount of funds immediately 
needed to relieve their situation. The Swiss 
Government was likewise requested to furnish 
the Department, in behalf of Americans in en- 
emy areas having resources in the United States 
upon which they can draw, the names and ad- 
dresses of persons in this coimtry to be ap- 
proached, the amount needed, and purposes for 



which desired. Upon receipt of this informa- 
tion the Department hopes to put into effect a 
satisfactory procedure for transmitting funds 
from private sources in the United States to 
needy Americans in enemy or enemy-occupied 
areas, as well as for providing temporary finan- 
cial assistance to needy Americans in those areas 
who may be without private resources. In the 
meantime, the Swiss Government has been re- 
quested to authorize its representatives in enemy 
territory wherever the need is determined to be 
urgent to make small relief payments to those 
Americans having need of immediate financial 
assistance. 

COORDINATION OF RELIEF ACTIVITIES 

[Released to the press by the President's Committee on War 
Relief Agencies January 22] 

The President's Committee on War Relief j 
Agencies,' through Mr. Joseph E. Davies, Chair- I 
man, issued the following statement on Janu- 
ary 22: 

The Committee has already suggested to for- 
eign war-relief agencies in the United States the 
desirability of continuing their efforts for ur- 
gent foreign-relief needs, for morale as well as 
material considerations but to slow down and 
give the right-of-way to the Red Cross and 
other domestic agencies since the United States 
is now in the war. The Committee has, more- 
over, definitely recommended to all that these J 
foreign relief agencies do not embark as such ^ 
in the domestic field and tliat they do not under- 
take any new activities without first clearing 
through the Committee in order to assure that 
there is no duplication with already existing 
agencies. For all of these various foreign agen- 
cies to enter the domestic field would, in the 
Committee's opinion, only make confusion worse 
confounded. 

It is recalled that the purposes of the Com- 
mittee, as recommended by the Secretary of 
State to the President and approved by him, are 
to suggest the appropriate steps which might 
be taken to presence local and essential welfare 
services and to maintain a balance between the 



' See the Bulletin of March 15, 1941, p. 281, and 
March 22, 1941, p. 336. 



JANUARY 2 4, 19 42 



81 



facilities and resources available for foreign 
war relief, with particular regard to the financ- 
ing of new welfare activities in connection with 
national-defense measures and so avoid the dan- 
ger tliat all of these efforts, while inspired by 
the finest human instincts, might be frustrated 
if conducted without regard to one another and 
without proper coordination. 

While the earlier activities of the Committee 
have had to do primarily with the coordination 



of foreign relief, the United States declaration 
of war has changed the situation, and at pres- 
ent its main interests and responsibilities have 
to do with the coordination of those services to 
the armed forces of the United States toward 
which the American public has been asked to 
contribute and for which there will be further 
appeals to the public. 



LEND-LEASE OPERATIONS 

PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING PROBLEMS ARISING IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
BRITISH WHITE PAPER OF SEPTEMBER 10, 1941 



On September 10, 1941 Mr. Anthony Eden, 
British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, 
communicated to the Department, through the 
American Ambassador, Mr. John G. Winant, a 
memorandum with respect to "the policy of 
His Majesty's Government in the United King- 
dom in connexion with the use of materials re- 
ceived under the Lend-Lease Act". This mem- 
orandum was issued as the British White 
Paper of September 10, 1941, and is sometimes 
informally referred to as "the Eden Memoran- 
dum".^ 

It was clear from the outset that many prob- 
lems would arise in the course of the adminis- 
trative application of the White Paper which 
would involve either questions of interpreta- 
tion of its provisions or the recognition, in par- 
ticular cases, of exceptional circumstances war- 
ranting deviation from the principles incor- 
porated in it. After informal discussion by 
officials of both Governments, it was agi'eed 
that a regular procedure should be established 
for consultation on questions of interpretation 
and for clearing with the Government of the 
United States requests for export licenses in 
the United Kingdom involving possible devia- 
tion from or exception to the terms of the 
Wliite Paper where necessary for the war effort 
or otherwise essential for United States in- 



' Bulletin of September 13, 1941, p. 204. 



terests. It was likewise agreed that such re- 
quests should be directed to and handled by the 
Office of Lend-Lease Administration as the 
agency directly responsible for the administra- 
tion of the Lend-Lease Act, and not to other 
agencies of the Government. 

In order, however, to assist the Office of Lend- 
Lease Administration in passing on such re- 
cjuests, particularly with respect to their broader 
implications from the standpoint of foreign 
trade and commercial policy, informal arrange- 
ments were established for furnishing to the 
Office of Lend-Lease Administration, in an 
orderly manner, advice and assistance from 
other interested agencies of the Government. It 
was recognized in this connection that the ap- 
plication of the terms of the White Paper would 
have policy implications extending beyond the 
immediate range of the Lend-Lease Act as such. 
Accordingly, there was set up, quite informally, 
a committee known as the Interdepartmental 
Advisory Committee on the Eden Memorandum, 
under the chairmanship of Mr. Lynn R. Ed- 
minster, of the Department of State; and this 
committee has been functioning in this informal 
way for a considerable number of weeks. 

A particularly pressing problem arising out 
of the application of the White Paper, involv- 
ing, in turn, a further problem of administra- 
tive procedure, arose in connection with the ap- 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETEN 



plication of paragraph 4, section (I), of the 
White Paper. This provision relates to the use 
in exports from the United Kingdom of mate- 
rials similar to those provided under lend-lease 
which are in short supply in the United States. 
The British Government needed from the 
United States Government a list of materials 
"the use of which is being restricted in the 
United States on grounds of short supply". 
This list, which has from time to time been a 
subject of discussion by the Interdepartmental 
Committee, has been furnished to the British 
Government by the Office of Lend-Lease Admin- 
istration. It is, of course, subject to change at 
the instance of the Office of Lend-Lease Admin- 
istration. 

As an outgrowth of this arrangement, it be- 
came necessary to establish a method whereby, 
in exceptional circumstances, this provision of 
the Wliite Paper can be waived with respect to 
particular oports containing materials similar 
to an item on the list, and this has been done. 

The essential feature of this procedure is the 
maintenance of a routine by which the British 
Board of Trade is apprised of the fact that the 
United States Government does not object to — 
]3erhaps even desires — the approval by the 
Board of an export permit for the goods in 
question. The actual initiation and routing of 
the process may vary. If the desired permit is 
for shipment to the United States, the Ameri- 
can importer may have communicated his de- 
sires directly to the United Kingdom supplier 
or his agent, who then makes application to 
the Board of Trade, in which case the Board 
requests the British Embassy to ascertain 
from the Office of Lend-Lease Administration 
whether there is objection to the granting of the 
permit. 

In a great many cases, however, the process 
is just the reverse. That is to say, the United 
States firm which desires to import the par- 
ticular goods in question communicates directly 
either with the Office of Lend-Lease Adminis- 
tration or with another agency of the Govern- 
ment, which promptly refers the matter to the 
Lend-Lease Office. If, after careful considera- 
tion of the matter, including consultation with 



other Government agencies concerned (includ- 
ing the Department of State), the Office of 
Lend-Lease Administration decides that such 
importation is desirable or even essential to the 
national interest, it takes the matter up with 
the British Embassy, stating that it has no ob- 
jection to the granting of an export waiver for 
the goods in question. This advance approval 
given by the Office of Lend-Lease Administra- 
tion does not necessarily imply, however, that 
the Board of Trade will in fact be able to grant 
the export license, since there may be other 
reasons why this cannot be done. 

If the proposed shipment is to a country other 
than the United States, the basis upon which the 
British Board of Trade decides to initiate a 
request will presumably be more or less similar 
to the foregoing. 

By agreement, a copy of each communication 
addressed by the British Embassy to the Office 
of Lend-Lease Administration is sent by the 
Commercial Counselor of the Embassy to Mr. 
Lynn R. Edminster, of the State Department, 
who, as Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State, is assigned to this and related tasks by 
Departmental Order 1006.' The purpose of this 
is to give the State Department an opportunity 
at the inception of each case to consider whether 
any international aspects of direct interest to the 
Department are involved. Whenever, in the 
premises, any such aspect appears to be involved, 
Mr. Edmin.ster clears the matter with appropri- 
ate officials within the Department and infor- 
mally communicates to the Office of Lend-Lease 
Administration whatever observations may be 
pertinent from the point of view of the Depart- 
ment. Similarly, with respect to requests com- 
municated directly to the Office of Lend-Lease 
Administration by United States importers or 
other domestic interests, it is imderstood that 
any of these which involve, or appear to involve, 
international aspects of concern to the State 
Department will be brought to the attention of 
the Department for further processing, as indi- 
cated. 



' Bulletin of December 6, 1941, p. 454. 



JANUARY 24, 1942 



83 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT OF EMINENT COMPOSER FROM 
BRAZIL 

Francisco Mignone, eminent Brazilian com- 
poser, conductor, and educator, will arrive in the 
United States February 4 from Rio de Janeiro 
to visit music centers in this country at the in- 
vitation of the Department of State. 

Senhor Mignone is professor of conducting at 
the National Scliool of Music of Brazil. He is 
one of the most prolific of modern composers, 
and his works include a wide range of genre: 
symphonic poems, chamber music, ballet and 
folk-dance, etc. The Brazilian exhibition at 
the New York World's Fair contained a library 
of records of Brazilian music produced under 
his direction. The series included several of 
Mignone's own compositions, especially note- 
worthy among these being Congada, a vigor- 
ous Afro-Brazilian dance from his opera 
Contratador de Diamanten. One of his out- 
standing productions is the ballet Maracatu 
de Chico Rei, based on an interesting legend, 
fictionized by Mario de Andrade, concerning a 
tribe of slaves in the State of Minas Geraes. 
The ballet features Afro-Brazilian music and 
dances. His Italian opera, LTnnocente, was 
presented in Rio in 1928. 

Mignone's themes have often been inspired by 
the music of the caipiras, Sao Paulo country- 
folk of European ancestry, whose melodies he 
frequently weaves into his most successful 
compositions. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press January 24] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
Ajiierican Foreign Service since January 17, 
1942: 

Walworth Barbour, of Lexington, Mass., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 



at Cairo, Egypt, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Richard" D. Gatewood, of New York, N. Y., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Tegucigalpa, Honduras, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, 
British West Indies. 

Robert W. Heingartner, of Canton, Ohio, 
Consul at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, is 
retiring from the Foreign Service, effective on 
October 1, 1942. 

The assignment of Thomas McEnelly, of 
New York, N. Y., as Consul at Barcelona, 
Spain, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
McEnelly has been assigned as Consul at Tam- 
pico, Tamaulipas, Mexico. 

Edward J. Sparks, of New York, N. Y., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Montevideo, Uruguay, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Harold S. Tewell, of Portal, N. Dak., Consul 
at Habana, Cuba, has been assigned as Consul 
General at Habana, Cuba. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

PROMOTION OF PEACE 

Treaty With the Union of South Africa Amend- 
ing the Treaty for the Advancement of Peace 
With Great Britain, Signed September 15, 
1914 

The Treaty With the Union of South Africa 
Amending the Treaty for the Advancement of 
Peace With Great Britain, Signed September 
15, 1914 (Treaty Series 602), which was signed 
April 2, 1940 (Treaty Series 966), provides for 
the establishment of an international commis- 
sion to be appointed within six months of the 
date of the exchange of ratifications. The com- 
mission is composed of five members, consisting 



84 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of one national member chosen by each partici- 
pating government and one non-national mem- 
ber chosen by each government from some third 
country. The fifth member, or joint commis- 
sioner, is chosen by agreement between the Gov- 
ernment of the United States and the Govern- 
ment of the Union of South Africa, it being 
understood that he shall be a citizen of some 
country of which no other member of the com- 
mission is a citizen. 

The Honorable Charalambos Simopoulos, 
Greek Minister at London, has accepted the 
joint invitation of the two Governments to serve 
as Joint Commissioner on the commission. 

The other members of the commission are as 
follows : 

American Commissioners: 
National : Elbert Duncan Thomas, United States 

Senate 
Non-national: Sao-Ke Alfred Sze, former Chinese 
Ambassador to the United States 
Union Commissioners: 
National: Ralph William Close, K.C., Minister of 

the Union of South Africa at Washington 
Non-national : Jonkheer F. Beelaerts van Blokland, 
Vice President of the Netherlands Council of 
State 
Joint Commissioner: 

Charalambos Simopoulos, Greek Minister at London 



Legislation 



Official Trip of Examination of Federal Activities in 
South and Central America : Report of a subcommit- 
tee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of 
Representatives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., relative to 
a trip taken by the subcommittee to South and 
Central America. December 4, 1941. (Printed for 
the use of the Committee on Appropriations.) 
[Covers organization and activities of Foreign Serv- 
ice establishments of the United States in the other 
American republics and miscellaneous projects of 
State Department and other Government agencies 
designed to promote mutual understanding and good- 
wiU.] 42 pp. 

Expressing thanks for the cordial hospitality and 
reception extended to a delegation of Members of 



the House of Representatives of the United States 
by high officials of the Governments of Argentina, 
Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, 
El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, 
Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. 
H. Repts. 1615 to 1631, inclusive, 77th Cong., 2d sess., 
on H. Res. 351 to 367, inclusive. 1 p. each. 

Amending the Nationality Act of 1940. H. Rept. 1632, 
77th Cong., 2d sess., on H. R. 4743. 4 pp. 

Independent Offices Appropriation Bill, 1943. H. Rept. 
1643, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H. R. 6430. 31 pp. 

Amending the Foreign Agents Registration Act. H. 
Rept. 1662, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H. R. 6269. 3 pp. 

Treasury Foreign Service Officers and Employees. S. 
Rept. 965, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on S. 2075. 2 pp. 

Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the De- 
partment of State: Communication from the Presi- 
dent of the United States transmitting two supple- 
mental estimates of appropriations for the Depart- 
ment of State, for the fiscal year 1942, amounting to 
$950,000 [transportation. Foreign Service, 1942, $800,- 
000, and contingent expenses. Department of State, 
1942, $150,000]. 2 pp. 

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin : Hearings before the 
Committee on Rivers and Harbors, House of Repre- 
sentatives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on the subject of the 
improvement of the Great Lakes -St. Lawrence sea- 
way and power project. Part 1, June 17 to July 9, 
1941. (Revised.) [Statement by Assistant Secretary 
of State Berle, pp. 19-94.] iv, 1104 pp., index. 



Regulations 



Control of Persons Entering and Leaving the United 
States Pursuant to the Act of May 22, 1918, as 
Amended: Aliens Entering. (Department of State 
and Department of Justice.) 7 Federal Register 
381 and 376. 



Publications 



Other Go\'ebnment Agencies 
Progress of the Defense Program : Report of the Direc- 
tor, Office of Facts and Figures, to the President of 
the United States on the Progress of the Defense 
Effort of the Federal Government as of December 
31, 1941. S. Doe. 157, 77th Cong., 2d sess. 62 pp. 
[Also issued as a pamphlet entitled "Report to the 
Nation", 62 pp.] 



For sale by the Superintendent ot Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents . - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEGKLt WITH THB APPEOVAL OF THE OIBECTOB OF THE BUREAC OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



JANUARY 31, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 136— Publication 1693 



(^ontents 




The War Paee 

Combined British- American raw materials, munitions, 

and shipping boards 87 

Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American RepubUcs: 
Exchange of telegrams between the Secretary of 
State and the Brazilian Minister of Foreign 

Affairs 88 

Severance of relations by American republics with 

the Axis Powers 89 

Americans in the Far East 91 

American prisoners of war 92 

American property in enemy or enemy-occupied terri- 
tory 93 

Joint British-American relief to Greece 93 

American Republics 

Settlement of Peru-Ecuador boundary dispute .... 94 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Peruvian critic and edu- 
cator 94 

General 

Passport agency at Miami 95 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 95 

Treaty Information 

Indian affairs: Convention Providing for the Creation 

of an Inter- American Indian Institute 110 

Postal: Universal Postal Convention, 1939 110 

Regulations 112 

Publications 112 

Legislation 112 



The War 



COMBINED BRITISH-AMERICAN RAW MATERIALS, MUNITIONS, AND 
SHIPPING BOARDS 



[Released to the press by tbe White House January 26] 

To further coordination of the United Nations 
■war effort, the President and Prime Minister 
Churchill have set up three boards to deal with 
munition assignments, shipping adjustment, 
and raw materials. The functions of these 
boards are outlined in the following statements. 

Members of the boards will confer with rep- 
resentatives of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, China, and such other of the United 
Nations as are necessary to attain common pur- 
poses and provide for the most effective utiliza- 
tion of the joint resources of the United Nations. 

Combined Kaw Materials Board 

A planned and expeditious utilization of the 
raw material resources of the United Nations 
is necessary in the prosecution of the war. To 
obtain such a utilization of our raw material 
resources in the most efficient and speediest pos- 
sible manner, we hereby create the "Combined 
Raw Materials Board". 

This Board will : 

(a) Be composed of a representative of the 
British Government and a representative of 
the United States Government. The Brit- 
ish member will represent and act under the 
instruction of the Minister of Supply. The 
Board shall have power to appoint the staff 
necessary to carry out its responsibilities. 

(b) Plan the best and speediest development, 
expansion and use of the raw material re- 
sources, under the jurisdiction or control 
of the two Governments, and make the rec- 
ommendations necessary to execute such 



plans. Such recommendations shall be car- 
ried out by all parts of the respective Gov- 
ernments, 
(c) In collaboration with others of the United 
Nations work toward the best utilization of 
their raw material resources, and, in col- 
laboration with the interested nation or na- 
tions, formulate plans and recommendations 
for the development, expansion, purchase, 
or other effective use of their raw materials. 

Munitions Assignments Boabd 

1. The entire munition resources of Great 
Britain and the United States will be deemed 
to be in a common pool, about which the fullest 
information will be interchanged. 

2. Committees will be formed in Washington 
and London under the Combined Chiefs of Staff 
in a manner similar to the South-West Pacific 
Agreement. These Committees will advise on 
all assignments both in quantity and priority, 
whether to Great Britain and the United States 
or other of the United Nations in accordance 
with strategic needs. 

3. In order that these Committees may be 
fully apprised of the policy of their respective 
Governments, the President will nominate a 
civil Chairman who will preside over the Com- 
mittee in Washington, and the Prime Minister 
of Great Britain will make a similar nomination 
in respect of the Committee in London. In each 
case the Committee will be assisted by a Secre- 
tariat capable of surveying every branch and 
keeping in touch with the work of every sub- 
committee as may be necessary. 

87 



«,s. 



rtro 19 iy4Z 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



4. The Civilian Chairmen in Washington and 
London may invite representatives of the State 
Department, the Foreign Office or production 
ministries or agencies to attend meetings. 

Combined Shipping Adjttstment BOiVKD 

1. In principle, the shipping resources of the 
two countries will be deemed to be pooled. The 
fullest information will be interchanged. 

2. Owing to the military and physical facts 
of the situation around the British Isles, the 
entire movement of shipping now under the 
control of Great Britain will continue to be 
directed by the Ministry of War Transport. 

3. Similarly, the appropriate Authority in 
the United States will continue to direct the 
movements and allocations of United States 
shipping, or shipping of other Powers under 
United States control. 



4. In order to adjust and concert in one har- 
monious policy the work of the British Ministry 
of War Transport and the shipping authorities 
of the United States Government, there will be 
established forthwith in Washington a com- 
bined shipping adjustment board, consisting of 
a representative of the United States and a 
representative of the British Government, who 
will represent and act under the instructions 
of the British Minister of War Transport. 

5. A similar adjustment board will be set up 
in London consisting of the Minister of War 
Transport and a representative of the United 
States Government. 

6. In both cases the executive power will be 
exercised solely by the appropriate shipping 
agency in Washington and by the Minister of 
War Transport in London. 



THIRD MEETING OF MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE AMERICAN 

REPUBLICS 

EXCHANGE OF TELEGRAMS BETWEEN THE SECRETARY OF STATE AND THE 
BRAZILIAN MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS 



[Released to the press January 28) 

The texts of an exchange of telegi-ams be- 
tween the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Brazil. 
His Excellency Dr. Oswaldo Aranha, and the 
Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, 
follow : 

"Kio DE Janeied, 
'■'January 2Jf, 19i2. 

"I profoundly regretted that my eminent 
friend and colleague was not present at the 
memorable session yestei'day to witness the con- 
secration of the Pan American ideal which he 
has served with such devotion. It deeply 
stirred me to hear from our colleagues, the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of America, the 
noble and firm woi-ds of cohesion and decision 
of the American peoples and the assurance that 
each one and all of the countries today more 
than ever before are disposed to transform into 
reality the ideal of American solidarity, adopt- 



ing immediately those measures that are 
important for common action against the 
aggressors attacking our continent. 

OsWALDO AkANHA" 



"January 27, 1942. 

"I am deeply appreciative of your kindness 
in informing me of the inspiring harmony of 
the American peoples as expressed by their 
representatives at the Meeting of Foreign 
Ministers, over which Your Excellency has so 
ably presided, and particularly for your very 
generous words regarding my participation in 
the building, over the years, of the unprec- 
edented unity of the Americas. 

"I wish to extend to you and, through you, to 
our colleagues, the Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of America, my warm congratulations upon the 
notable contribution which the Meeting has 
made to the progressive development of inter- 



JANTJARY 31, 1942 



89 



American cooperation and solidarity. Step by 
step, beginning with the Inter-American Con- 
ference of Montevideo and continuing through 
the meetings at Buenos Aires, Lima, Panama, 
and Habana, the American Republics have 
collaborated to make the Americas a secure and 
impregnable stronghold of free and liberty 
lovine nations. 



"Please accept this expression of my personal 
best wishes and my profound admiration for 
your leadership and the outstanding statesman- 
ship of our colleagues to whom I beg that you 
will convey the sentiments of my personal 
esteem and lasting friendship. 

CoRDELL Hull" 



SEVERANCE OF RELATIONS BY AMERICAN REPUBLICS WITH THE AXIS POWERS 



Brazil 

[Released to the press January 28] 

The texts of an exchange of telegrams be- 
tween the President of the United States of 
Brazil, Dr. Getulio Vargas, and the President 
of the United States follow: 

"Rio de Janeiro, 

^^ January 15, 19It2. 
"I have the honor to advise Your Excellency 
that I have just declared open the third meet- 
ing for consultation of the Ministers of Foreign 
Relations of the American republics. I con- 
gratulate myself as well as Your Excellency on 
this very important event which will mark, I 
am certain, an auspicious date in the annals of 
the history of the American peoples. I am con- 
vinced that by this meeting in Rio de Janeiro 
the common defense of the continent and po- 
litical unity of America will be strengthened. 
Getulio Vargas" 



"January 28, 1942. 

"The announcement that Brazil has severed 
relations with Germany, Japan and Italy has 
just reached me. It assures me once more of the 
support of your great country at a time of bitter 
struggle against forces whose actions and poli- 
cies have been unanimously condemned by the 
twenty-one American reijublics. 

"The achievements of the past ten days have 
indeed fully and brilliantly borne out the 
prophetic remarks contained in your welcome 



telegram of January 15 advising me of the in- 
auguration of the Third Consultative Meeting 
of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics at Rio de Janeiro. 

"I know, as do the people of the entire conti- 
nent, the great debt of gratitude which we all 
owe to your clear-sighted leadership. Conti- 
nental solidarity, as defined by you in your ad- 
dress of greeting to the Foreign Ministers, has 
been greatly strengthened. The American Re- 
publics have won a magnificent triumph over 
those who have endeavored to sow disunity 
among them and to prevent them from taking 
action essential for the preservation of their 
liberties. That triumph has been sealed by the 
prompt and forthright decision of your Gov- 
ernment and of the other American Govern- 
ments which have reached similar decisions. 

"Your personal friendship in these critical 
times is a source of constant inspiration to me. 
The determination and vision with which you 
are meeting the emergency which confronts free 
peoples everywhere have greatly heartened the 
people of the United States. 

FR.\NiiLiN D Roosevelt" 

Peru 

[Released to the press January 29] 

The President of the United States addressed 
the following telegram to the President of the 
Republic of Peru, His Excellency Manuel Prado 
y Ugarteche, on January 28, 1942 : 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETm 



"Your Excellency's Ambassador in Washing- 
ton has officially conveyed the information that 
your Government has severed relations with 
Germany, Japan and Italy. 

"It is a source of the greatest satisfaction to 
me and to the people of the United States to 
learn that the Government and people of Peru 
have by this action reaffirmed in an unequivocal 
and practical manner their position in the 
struggle against the forces which are endeavor- 
ing to execute a long-planned program of world 
conquest. 

"It gives me pleasure at this time to express 
to you my profound appreciation for the out- 
standing part which you and your Government 
have played in the development and strengthen- 
ing of the concept of practical and effective in- 
ter-American solidarity which has found its 
highest expression in the achievements of the 
Meeting at Rio de Janeiro. I am also glad to 
reiterate my finn confidence that our two Gov- 
ernments, particularly during this period of 
emergency, will continue in every way to co- 
operate together in measures designed to fur- 
ther the economic and political defense of the 
Americas. Please accept my best wishes for 
Your Excellency's personal well being. 

Franklin D RoosimxT" 



Bolivia 

[Released to the press January 30] 

The President sent the following telegram 
to the President of the Republic of Bolivia, 
General Enrique Penaranda, on January 29, 
1942: 

"The Charge d'Affaires of Bolivia in Wash- 
ington has officially informed this Government 
that Your Excellency's Government has sev- 
ered diplomatic relations with Germany, Italy 
and Japan. 

"This action by the Government of Bolivia 
reaffirms again in a very practical manner the 
attitude of the people and Government of 



Bolivia toward the aggressor nations which 
threaten the safety of the institutions and prin- 
ciples of this hemisphere. 

"The firm stand taken by Your Excellency 
and Your Excellency's Government in support 
of practical and effective inter-American soli- 
darity, and the very real contribution made by 
Your Excellency's Minister of Foreign Affairs 
at the Consultative Meeting in Rio de Janeiro, 
have greatly strengthened the spirit of collab- 
oration which now exists between the Republics 
of this Hemisphere. 

"Permit me, Excellency, in sending you my 
own best wishes, to express my confidence in the 
continued effectiveness of cooperation between 
our two Governments in the defense of the 
Hemisphere. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



Uruguay 

The following telegram was sent to the J 
President of the Republic of Uruguay, His " 
Excellency General Alfredo Baldomir, by the 
President of the United States on January 30, 
1942: 

"I have learned from Your Excellency's Am- 
bassador in Washington that the Government 
of Uruguay has severed diplomatic, commercial j 
and financial relations with Japan, Germany I 
and Italy. 

"This action is a further decisive manifesta- 
tion of the determined will of the Uruguayan 
Government and people to collaborate to the 
utmost in the defense of the Hemisphere. The 
people of the United States, who are proud to 
share with the people of Uruguay a devotion to 
democratic institutions, welcome so significant 
a reaffirmation of the common ideals of the two 
peoples. 

"The vigorous and effective contribution made 
by Dr. Alberto Guani to the notable achieve- 
ments of the Consultative Meeting at Rio de 
Janeiro has earned renewed applause for the 
forthright and courageous position of your 
Government in the world struggle. The tri- 



JANUARY 31, 1942 

umph of the principles of international justice 
is inevitable and has, I am confident, been 
hastened b_y reason of the demonstration of 
imity which we have just witnessed on the part 
of the twenty-one free republics of the Western 
Hemisphere. 

"Permit me to give you my renewed assur- 
ances of my personal desire to collaborate in 
every practicable way with you and your Gov- 
ernment. With very best wishes. 

Franklin D Koosevelt" 

Paraguay 

The President sent the following telegram on 
January 31, 1942 to the President of the Re- 
public of Paraguay, General Higinio Morinigo : 

"I have learned of the action of Your Ex- 
cellency's Government severing diplomatic 
relations with Japan, Germany, and Italy. 

"This decisive stand by your Government is 
to me a deeply gratifying reaffirmation of the 
determination of the people of Paraguay to 
cooperate in full measure in the united en- 
deavors of the American republics to preserve 
their free institutions. I join my countrymen 
in welcoming this prompt response by Paraguay 
to the unanimous recommendation of the Meet- 
ing of Foreign Ministers at Rio de Janeiro and 
in expressing admiration of the firm action of 
the Paraguayan Delegation at Rio de Janeiro. 

"It is my conviction that the spirit of inter- 
American cooperation, which has been given 
new significance by the practical measures 
adopted after consultation among the Govern- 
ments of the American republics, will prove to 
be an unshakeable bulwark of the principles of 
international justice. 

"Please accept my most cordial wishes for 
your personal well-being. 

Franklin D Roosevelt*' 



91 

Ambassador in Washington that the Govern- 
ment of Ecuador has severed diplomatic and 
consular relations with Germany, Italy and 
Japan. 

"This decisive step by your Government con- 
clusively demonstrates the earnest determina- 
tion of the people of Ecuador to cooperate 
wholeheartedly in every practicable way to 
guarantee the continued independence of the 
free peoples of this Hemisphere. The people 
of the United States share with me a cordial 
satisfaction in welcoming Ecuador among the 
nations which have taken their stand in accord- 
ance with the unanimous recommendation of 
the recent Meeting at Rio de Janeiro. 

"I also welcome this occasion to congratulate 
Your Excellency on the able manner in which 
Your Excellency's Minister of Foreign Affairs 
contributed to the memorable achievements of 
the Consultative Meeting at Rio de Janeiro. 

"Please accept my cordial personal wishes for 
3'our own welfare and the expression of my 
sincere faith that our two Governments will 
continue in friendly and effective cooperation 
for the furtherance of the common objectives 
of the American republics. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



American republics which have declared war 
on Japan, Germany, and Italy are Costa Rica, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guate- 
mala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. 
Nicaragua has, in addition, declared war on 
Rumania, Hungary, and Bulgaria. Those re- 
publics which have severed relations with 
Japan, Germany, and Italy are Bolivia, Brazil, 
Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, 
Uruguay, and Venezuela. Mexico has also 
severed relations with Bulgaria, Hungary, and 
Rumania. 



Ecuador 

The President sent the following telegram 
on January 31, 1942 to the President of the 
Republic of Ecuador, Carlos Arroyo Del Rio: 

"I have been informed by Your Excellency's 



AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press January 28] 

According to information received from Brit- 
ish authorities in Lisbon, all American na- 
tionals in Hong Kong are well, 



92 

[Released to the press January 26) 

The Swiss ]\Iinister at Tokyo has reported the. 
following information through his Foreign 
OflBce at Bern in regard to the welfare of those 
American citizens wlio have been placed in de- 
tention by the Japanese authorities : 13 Ameri- 
cans are housed in an old convent at Tokyo, 2 
in a school at Kobe, 16 in the Race Course 
Buildings and 8 in the Swimming Club in 
Yokohama. They are strictly guarded and 
cannot leave the buildings; however, they re- 
ceive visitors, food, and laundry. They have 
a weekly medical examination and are all in 
good health. Conditions are sanitary but prim- 
itive and equipment only temporary. Only 
men have been detained; their wives are fi-ee. 
The Swiss Minister is doing everything in his 
power to ameliorate the situation. 

The Department's records indicate that as of 
October 1, American nationals in the Japanese 
Empire numbered 363. 

AMERICAN PRISONERS OF WAR 

[Released to the press by the American Red Cross January 30] 

Information on the welfare of American pris- 
oners taken by the Japanese from Wake Island, 
Guam, the Philippine Islands, and other points 
in the Pacific soon may be available to their rela- 
tives here, Chairman Norman H. Davis of the 
American Red Cross announced on January 30. 

The announcement followed receipt by Mr. 
Davis of official notification from the Interna- 
tional Red Cross in Geneva that the Japanese 
Government accepted appointment of a delegate 
from the International Red Cross and agreed 
to "transmit through the Central Agency, 
Geneva, information concerning prisoners of 
war on the basis of reciprocity". The Japanese 
Government also stated that it was ready to 
exchange information concerning interned non- 
combatants "as far as possible". The Japanese 
Government, by decree of December 27, 1941, 
established a Prisoners of War Information 
Bureau in Tokyo. 

OflBcial advices received by Mr. Davis stated 
that Dr. Paravicini, a Swiss citizen, had been 
appointed International Red Cross delegate in 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Tokyo. Mr. Marc Peter, former Swiss Minis- 
ter to the United States, occupies a similar post 
with headquarters in Washington. At Mr. 
Peter's headquarters it was stated that Dr. Para- 
vicini probably is a physician, long resident in 
Tokyo. 

While the official advices received January 
30 refer only to the readiness of the Japanese 
Government to transmit information concerning 
prisoners of war, the American Red Cross antici- 
pates consent for shipment from the United 
States and other points, and distribution by the 
International Red Cross Committee, of food, 
some types of clothing, and other comforts. 

Plans now under way by the American Red 
Cross, in cooperation with the Red Cross so- 
cieties of Great Britain, Australia, and Can- 
ada, include, first, a shipment of foodstuffs from 
Australia for their respective imprisoned na- 
tionals. This shipload of food will go from 
Australia because of its proximity to Japan in 
order that aid to the American prisoners may 
be expedited. Second, one or more ships will 
be chartered to carry prisoners-of-war boxes as 
well as clothing supplies to American prisoners 
in the Far East. 

Chairman Davis stated that the first action 
under the agreement announced January 30 
would bo exchange between the United States 
and Japan of names of prisoners of war and 
non-combatants or interned nationals. 

The next of kin in the United States will 
receive word from the Prisoners of War Infor- 
mation Bureau in the office of the Provost 
Marshal of the United States Army as soon as 
these lists are received in Washington. In- 
quiries received through Red Cross chapters 
will be cleared through this Bureau and, if 
necessary, through the International Red Cross 
Committee in Geneva. 

Letters to American prisoners of war may be 
mailed free of charge through the regular post- 
office channels, provided the next of kin has 
been informed of prison-camp number and ad- 
dress where the prisoner is held. Freedom from 
postal charges is guaranteed by the convention 
of Geneva of 1929 regarding prisoners of war. 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



93 



Mr. Davis pointed out that, while under the 
treaty of Geneva the detaining power agrees to 
furnish food and clothing to prisoners of war, 
the American Ked Cross plans to meet certain 
supplementary necessities. Shipments of the 
regular prisoners-of-war packages, standard 
with the American Red Cross, containing sup- 
plementary foodstuffs and cigarettes, will be 
sent. Prisoners must wear regulation outer 
clothing, usually that of the military-service 
branch to which they are attached, but supple- 
mentary clothing, such as underwear, knitted 
garments, socks, and shoes may be furnished 
by the American Red Cross, upon request from 
the International Red Cross delegate. 

AMERICAN PROPERTY IN ENEMY OR 
ENEMY-OCCUPIED TERRITORY 

Since the outbreak of war many inquiries 
have been received with regard to what action, 
if any, the Department is in a position to 
take for the protection or recovery of property 
abroad owned by American citizens. While 
there is no requirement that American owners 
of properties located in enemy, or ally of enemy, 
territory, or in territory occuijied by their forces, 
shall furnish the Department with information 
concerning such properties, and while the De- 
partment, in view of the existing state of war, 
is not in a position at this time to take any 
action regarding such properties, it is prepared 
to receive, for its information, statements in 
relation to such properties. The statements 
should include all available information on the 
following points: 

1. The nature of the property, its estimated 
value, and its exact location. 

2. When, how, and from whom the property 
was acquired and, if by purchase, the consid- 
eration paid therefor. 

3. Whether the property is entirely or partly 
owned by an American citizen, or by an Ameri- 
can organization, or by a foreign organization 
in which American citizens possess a financial 
interest. 

4. The date and manner of the acquisition of 
American citizenship. 

441156 — 42 2 



5. If there is any alien interest in the prop- 
erty, or in the American or foreign organiza- 
tion in which title to the property is vested, 
the nature and extent of such interest and the 
name and nationality of the alien possessing 
the interest. 

6. If the property has been seized, seques- 
trated, damaged, lost, or destroyed, the known 
facts in relation thereto. 

JOINT BRITISH- AMERICAN RELIEF TO 
GREECE 

[Released to the press January 27] 

The following statement was made on Jan- 
uary 27, with the approval of the American 
Government, by Dr. Hugh Dalton, British Min- 
ister of Economic Warfare, in the British 
House of Commons : 

"The United Kingdom and United States 
Governments have viewed with increasing dis- 
may the appalling conditions obtaining in 
Greece. Despite their undoubted ability to do 
so, the German Government have done prac- 
tically nothing to meet the situation created by 
the pillage and extortion of their Armies in the 
spring of 1941. They have indeed shown them- 
selves quite indifferent to the fate of the Greek 
population, no doubt because the industrial re- 
sources of Greece are too small to be of any 
value to the German war machine. 

"His Majesty's Government and the United 
States Government have accordingly author- 
ized a single shipment of eight thousand tons 
of wheat to Greece to be applied under the 
auspices of the International Red Cross in relief 
of the present emergency. This is an addition 
to the existing relief schemes, namely shipments 
of foodstuff from Turkey (which is inside the 
blockade area), and the proposed evacuation 
of Greek children and nursing mothers. 

"The two Governments, nevertheless, continue 
to maintain in the most categorical manner 
that it is incumbent upon the enemy to feed 
the countries occupied by him and their policy 
in this respect remains unaffected by the ex- 
ception which it has been found necessary to 
make in the special circumstances obtaining in 
Greece." 



American Republics 



SETTLEMENT OF PERU-ECUADOR BOUNDARY DISPUTE 



[Released to the press January 30] 

The Secretary of State, referring to the re- 
ported settlement of the Peru-Ecuador bound- 
ary dispute, said that this was a peaceful 
settlement in accordance with one of the ear- 
liest policies of the good neighbor stemming 
from Montevideo through all subsequent con- 
ferences for peaceful settlement of disputes. 
The Rio decision carries this out and makes it 
all the more permanent in the policies of Pan 
Americanism. 

[Released to the press January 31] 

The President sent the following telegram to 
the President of the Republic of Ecuador, 
Carlos Arroyo Del Rio, on January 31, 1942: 

"I was profoundly gratified to learn of the 
signature of the agreement at Rio de Janeiro by 
Your Excellency's Government and the Peru- 
vian Government. The spirit of cooperation 
and cordial collaboration which resulted in this 
act is a splendid expression of the high resolve 
of the American republics that differences be- 
tween them can and must be settled through 
amicable discussion and just conciliation of op- 
posing views. The willmgness of Ecuador and 
Peru to reach a harmonious underetanding is 
2)articularly gratifying at a time when the 
danger to their liberties demands that the 
American republics demonstrate to the world 
their unanimous determination to devote them- 
selves to the preservation of those ideals of 
liberty and equity upon which their political 
institutions are founded. The peoples of all 
the American republics are deeply indebted to 
Your Excellency for the part which you and 
your distinguished Foreign Minister have 
played in the achievement of this happy result. 

"I congratulate Your Excellency and your 
Minister of Foreign Affairs on this achieve- 
ment. 

Feanklin D Roosevelt" 
94 



The following telegram was also sent on 
January 31 by the President to the President 
of the Republic of Peru, Manuel Prado y 
Ugarteche : 

"The signature at Rio de Janeiro of the agree- 
ment between Your Excellency's Government 
and the Government of Ecuador with regard to 
the boundary between the two comitries was 
most welcome to me as I am sure it was not 
only to the peoples of the two countries directly 
concerned but to all those men of good will 
throughout the Americas upon whom our con- 
tinental solidarity, in the last analysis, depends. 
Once more, and in a matter which for over a 
century has threatened the peace of the conti- 
nent, the American republics have demonstrated 
their determination to settle their differences 
through friendly consultation and mutual ad- 
justment. This convincing application of the 
doctrine of the Americas can not but hearten 
us all in our struggle against those who recog- 
nize only the rule of force in the relations 
between nations. 

"It gives me great pleasure to extend to you 
and to your Foreign Minister my most hearty 
congratulations. 

Franklin D Roosev'elt" 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
PERUVIAN CRITIC AND EDUCATOR 

(Released to the press January 30] 

Estuardo Nuiiez, professor of literature in the 
University of San Marcos, Lima, Pera, has ar- 
rived in New York for a visit to educational 
centers in the United States at the invitation 
of the Department of State. Sefior Nunez, one 
of the leading literary figui'es in the intellectual 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



95 



life of his country, is president of the Insula 
literary group. Ho was secretary of the Com- 
mittee on Intellectual Cooperation at the Eighth 
Conference of American States at Lima. Seiior 
Nunez' authoritative and brilliant volume, The 
Present Panorama of Peruvian Poetry, pub- 
lished in 1938 and dedicated "To the poets of 
my generation", is an important contribution 
to i\\^ literary history of the Americas. His 
other works include studies of the poetry of 
Eguren, of expressionism in the indigenous po- 
etry of Peru, and of Teutonic influence on 
Peruvian jurisprudence. 

A member of the bar, Seiior Nunez writes with 
equal acuteness on both legal and literary ques- 
tions; and both the law and literature will share 
his interest during his stay in the United States. 



He plans to examine our copyright legislation, 
with a view to making recommendations to the 
legislators of his own country, and to carry 
out a study of United States labor laws in con- 
nection with some specific "growing or unde- 
veloped industry". He is also interested in mak- 
ing a comparison of common law as the basis 
of our State codes with the codes of the other 
American republics. 

As a member of the Ibero-American Institute 
of Literature, Seiior Nunez plans to visit classes 
on contemporary Spanisii-American literature 
in various universities, and he has been given 
a special mission from the Peruvian Ministry 
of Education to examine and report upon United 
States methods in university extension teaching. 



General 



PASSPORT AGENCY AT MIAMI 



[Released to the press January 28] 

In view of the critical circumstances of the 
present time, the necessity of affording passport 
facilities to citizens of the United States who 
frequently travel between the United States 
and the other American republics on important 
official business, often in connection with pur- 
poses vital to the war effort, and the respon- 
sibility of the Department for the administra- 
tion of the rules and regulations prescribed on 
November 25, 1941, concerning the supervision 
and control over the departure from and entry 
into the United States of citizens of this coun- 



try, the Department is establishing in Miami, 
Fla., a passport agency, which Mill be open for 
official business on February 2, 1942, or as near 
that date as may be practicable. The agency 
will, among its other duties, assist in the prep- 
aration and execution of applications for pass- 
ports and in the issuance, extension, renewal, 
amendment, and validation of such documents. 
Mr. Clifford O. Barker, an attorney, who has 
been employed in the Department for many 
years and has expert knowledge of passport 
and citizenship matters, has been appointed 
passport agent in Miami. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press January 29] 

The following tabulation shows contribu- 
tions collected and disbursed during the period 
September 6, 1939 through December 31, 1941, 
as shown in the reports submitted by persons 
and organizations registered with the Secretary 



of State for the solicitation and collection of 
contributions to be used for relief in belligerent 
countries, in conformity with the regulations 
issued pursuant to section 3 (a) of the act of 
May 1, 1937 as made effective by the President's 
proclamations of September 5, 8, and 10, 1939, 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



and section 8 of the act of November 4, 1939 
as made effective by the President's proclama- 
tion of the same date. 

This tabulation has reference only to con- 
tributions solicited and collected for relief in 
belligerent countries (France; Germany; Po- 
land; the United Kingdom, India, Australia, 
Canada, New Zealand, and the Union of South 
Africa ; Norway ; Belgium ; Luxembourg ; Neth- 
erlands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 
The statistics set forth in the tabulation do not 
include information regarding relief activities 
which a number of organizations registered with 



the Secretary of State may be carrying on in 
non-belligerent countries, but for which regis- 
tration is not required under the Neutrality Act 
of 1939. 

The American National Red Cross is required 
by law to submit to the Secretary of War for 
audit "a full, complete, and itemized report of 
receipts and expenditures of whatever kind". 
In order to avoid an unnecessary duplication of 
work, this organization is not required to con- 
form to the provisions of the regulations govern- 
ing the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions for relief in belligerent countries, and the 
tabulation does not, therefore, include informa- 
tion in regard to its activities. 



Contributions for Relief in Belligerent Codntries 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
band 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Adopt A Town Committee, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Jan. 6, 1941. England _. 

Agudas Israel of America. New York, N.Y., Aug. 14, 
1941.* All belligerent countries 

Aid to Britain, New York, N.Y., Aug. 14, 1941. 
Great Britain and Germany 

Aid to British Pharmacists, Washington, D.C., 
June 14, 1941. Great Britain 

Aid for the Cote-Basque, New York, N.Y., Sept. 16, 
1941. France 

Albanian Relief Fund, Jamaica Plain, Me^., Mar. 21, 
1941. Albania - 

American Aid for .German War Prisoners, Buffalo, 
N. Y., Sept. 27, 1940. Canada, Australia, New 
Zealand, Great Britain, the Netherlands, and India. . 

.\merican Association for Assistance to French Artists, 
IncNew York, N.Y.,Jan.3, 1940. France 

American Association of University Women, Wash- 
ington, D.C., May 23, 1940, France, Great Britain, 
and Canada.. 

American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., Brook- 
lyn, N.Y., July 5, 1940. France, Belgium, Ger- 
many, and Poland 

The .\merican British Art Center, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., June 26, 1941. t Great Britain and Canada.... 

American Cameronian Aid, Brooklyn, N.Y., Jan. 17, 
1941. Scotland 

American Chapter, Religious Emergency Council of 
the Chief Rabbi of Great Britain, New York, N.Y., 
Aug. 30, 1941. Great Britain. _. 



1, 208. 57 

60.00 

None 

423.00 

1,094.60 

■,044.95 



1, 454. 40 
None 
291.10 



$9, 224. 79 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

17, 142. 84 
16, 276. 82 

21, 454. 00 

14,173.67 
None 
161.23 

2,000.00 



$2. 397. 48 

50.00 

None 

423. 00 

4, 094. 50 

6, 393. 29 

2, 164. 93 
879. 67 



None 
None 
65.32 



523. 76 



$4, 195. 82 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

7, 767. 25 
1,680.16 

None 

None 
None 
47.50 

None 



$100.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

447. 00 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 

None 



$1,586.30 
None 
None 
None 
None 
061.66 

1,817.92 
6, 740. 10 



None 
74.66 



•No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

tNo reports for the months of November and December have been received! rom this organization. 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



97 



CoNTErauTTONS FOB REr-iEF IN Beixigekent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 


Funds re- 
ceived 


Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 


Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 


Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 


Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 


American Committee for British Catholic Relief, 
Washington, D.C., Mar. 4, 1941. Great Britain. ... 

American Committee for Christian Refugees, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Germany, France, 


$19,997.37 
18, 467. 76 

73,627.34 
4, 873. 72 

36, 155. 03 
15,081.66 

5, 122. ,50 

6. 244. 30 
548,763.36 

20, 282. 64 
91,955.69 
15, 531. 78 

48, 159. 64 

5, 149. 14 
361,254.45 

4,782.84 
2, 566. 92 

474. 348. 15 
25, 417. 70 
29, 166. 66 

7, 609. 76 
8,615.00 

6,117,458.96 


$10,043.28 
18, 457. 76 

66, 862. 15 
850.00 

32,581.90 
8,284.79 

None 

6, 020. 76 

428, 760. 37 

14,210.46 
67,609.87 
9, 923. 23 

39, 875. 74 

4, 367. 00 
263, 616. 80 

1.927.02 
428.77 

435, 187. 67 

6, 790. 16 

24, 783. 67 

6, 673. 70 

635. 41 

4,588,696.93 


$3, 589. 14 
None 

2, 477. 14 
3, 198. 33 

908.93 
2, 335. 17 

218. 82 

847.41 

86, 737. 96 

1,751.71 

12, 660. 75 

349.86 

447.01 

760.64 
56, 459. 43 

None 
549.24 

202. 7S 
9. 579. 23 
2, 644. 91 

319. 76 
7,979.59 

None 


None 
None 

$24. 00 
None 

471.00 
None 

None 

7, 651. 43 

None 

None 

62,039.35 

None 

19,240.00 

None 
19, 904. 96 

None 
None 

106, 737. 88 

None 

28, 307. 65 

None 

None 

SI. 00 


None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
$1, 229. 50 

None 
None 
None 

None 
760.10 
None 

None 

None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
590.94 
None 
1.500.00 

None 


$6,364.95 


American Committee for the German Relief Fund, 
Inc., New York, N.Y., Mar. 27, 1940. Germany, 
Poland, Canada, Dutch Oulana, British West 
Indies, Jamaica, New Zealand, and Australia 

American Committee for Luxembourg Relief, Inc., 
Chicago, III,, May 8, 1941. France and England.. 

American Committee for the Polish Ambulance Fund, 
Chicago, 111., Feb. 12, 1940. France, Poland, Eng- 


14,288.06 
827. 39 

2,664.20 


American Committee to Save Refugees, New York, 
N.Y., Jan. 3. 1941. France 


4,461.60 


American Employment for General Relief, Inc., New 
York, N.Y., May 1, 1940. { England. France. Nor- 
way, Poland, Belgium, Luxembourg, and the Neth- 


4,903.68 


American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Sept. 14, 1939. Poland . 


376. 14 


American Field Service, New Y'ork, N.Y., Sept. 27, 
1939. France, Great Britain, and Greece 


33,265.03 


American and French Students' Correspondence Ex- 
change, New Y'ork, N.Y., Dec. 20, 1939. France 


4, 320. 47 


American- French War Relief, Inc., New York, N.Y., 


11, 786. 07 


American Friends of Britain, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Aug. 30, 1940. Great Britain 


5,258.69 


American Friends of Czechoslovakia, New York, 
N.Y., Nov. 2, 1939. Great Britain, France, and 


7,836.89 


American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Relief 
Fund. New York, N.Y., Dec. 1, 1939. Great 


31.50 


American Friends of France, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France, Germany, and England 

American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., New 
York, N.Y., May 9, 1940. Germany, Poland, 


41, 278. 22 
2,855.82 


American Friends of Norway, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Oct. 17, 1941. t Canada, England, and Norway 

Pa., Nov. 9, 19.39. United Kingdom, Poland, Ger- 
many, France, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, 


1,588.91 
38.957.83 


American Friends of Yugoslavia, New York, N.Y., 


9,048.32 


American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., Boston, 


1,838.08 


American-German Aid Society, Los Angeles, Calif., 


1,616.30 


The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, New 
York, N Y., July 24, 1940. Great Britain 


None 


Inc., New York, N.Y,, Sept. 29, 1939. United 
Kingdom, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, 
Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Italy, 
Greece, Himgary, and Yugoslavia 


628,762.03 



JNo report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



98 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETm 
CoNTEiBUTiONs FOB Reuef IN Belugerent Countkies — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



American McAU Association, New York, N.Y., 
Jan. 3. 1940. England 

American-Polish National Council, Chicago, 111., 

Aug. 14, 1940. Poland 

American Red Mogen Dovid tor Palestine, Inc., 

New York, N.Y., May 26, 1941. Palestine 

American School Committee for Aid to Greece, Inc., 

Princeton, N.J., Dec. 16, 1940. Qreece..- 

American War Godmothers, Pittsburgh, Pa., Mar. 

6, 1940.11 France 

American Women's Hospitals, New York, N.Y., 

Sept. 14, 1939. France, England, and Greece 

American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., New 

York, N.Y., Jan. 15, 1940. France and Great 

Britain 

American Yugoslav Defense League, San Jos6, Calif., 

May 12.1941.1 Yugoslavia^ 

Anglo-American Lodge No. 78 of the American Order 

Sons of St. George, New York, N.Y., May 24, 1941. 

Great Britain- 

.\nthracite Relief Committee, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 

Sept. 8, 1939.11 Poland.-- 

Anzac War Relief Fund. New York, N.Y., May 23, 

1940. Australia and Now Zealand _ 

Armenian General Benevolent Union, New York, 

N.Y., July 24, 1941. Syria. Palestine, Cyprus, 

Qreece, and Bulgaria. 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of 

Worcester, Massachusetts, Worcester, Mass., Sept. 

14, 1939. Poland 

Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith 

College, New York. N.Y., Dec. 18. 1939.[ France. 
.\ssociation of Former Russian Naval Officers in 

America, Long Island City, N.Y., Feb. 21. 1940. 

France 

Association of Joint Polish-American Societies of 

Chelsea. Massachusetts, Chelsea, Mass., Sept. 15, 

1939. Poland - 

Mrs. Mark Baldwin, New York, N.Y., Mar. 4, 1940. 

France..- - - - 

Bay Ridge Allied Relief, Brooklyn, N.Y., July 22. 

1941. Great Britain - .- 

Belgian Relief of Southern California, Los Angeles. 

Calif., May 27, 1940. Belgium, France, and Great 
Britain - 

Belgian War Relief Fund, Manila, P.I., June 7, 1940.* 
Belgium 

Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, Washington, 
D.C., Dec. 19, 1939.t Poland, England, France, 
Italy, and Hungary - 

Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States of America, New 
York, N.Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Great Britain, France, 
and Germany 

Bristol Whittaker Fund, Elizabeth, N.J., June 5, 
1941. Great Britain 



$6,801.41 
10, 936. 00 

6, 074. 18 
27, 482. 96 

1. 087. 22 
23, 562. 84 

6, 243. 29 

1, 424. 35 

5. 184. 18 
11,427.14 
35, 299. 8« 

9. 27'2. 81 

13. 113.06 
303. 50 

492. 46 

3. 870. 79 
1,761.74 

564. 86 

8. 133. 77 

2, 204. 17 



$6, 717. 60 
8, 948. 50 
1,460.00 

24, 078. 45 
287.05 

23, 209. 39 

3,884.91 
None 

2, 100. 00 
11,127.15 
25, 417. 70 

5,000.00 

9, 266. 45 
225.00 

429. .30 

1, 756. 10 

1,647.00 

385. 2U 

5, 966. 57 



6, 139. 01 

INo report for the month of December has been received from this 
||The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 
•No refwrts for the months of November and December have been 
tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1941 



3, 975. 54 



$83.91 
1,221.63 

2, 276. 78 
2,764.68 

517. 56 
None 

1. 499. 20 
1, 247. 16 

1, 472. 07 

None 

6. 709. 55 

3. 2.1.8. 47 

3.393.51 

78. .50 



2, 372. 50 
2, 125. 14 



$7, 325. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
50.00 

5. 453. 85 
None 

None 
None 
None 

None 

1.430.00 
None 



,799.33 




725. no 


17.58 




30.00 


85.85 




None 


in. 00 


33 


182. .=.0 


131.87 




350.00 



None 
None 



$250.00 
None 
None 
None 
2.45 
N one 

70.00 
None 

None 
None 



None 

None 
None 
None 

None 
None 



None 
None 



organization. 

at the request of registrant, 
received from this organization, 
at the request of registrant. 



JANTTART 31, 1942 



99 



CoNTRinuTiONS FOB Reuep IN Beixiqixent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions In 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



tralion, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Britain-at-Bay Aid Society, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., 
June 25, 1941. t England 

British Aid Committee, Balboa, C.Z., Apr. 28, 1941. 
Great Britain .,. __ _ 

British-American Ambulance Corps, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., June U, 1940. Greece, England, and France. . 

British-American Comfort League, Quincy, IVIass., 
Feb. 21, 194U. England 

British-American War Relief Association, Seattle, 
Wash., Nov. 17, 1939. || United Kingdom and Greece 

British Civil Defense Emergency Fund, New York, 
N.Y., Oct. 8, 1941. Great Britain. ._ 

British Distressed Areas Fund, Inc., Los Angeles, 
Calif., May 13, 1941. England^ 

The British Legion, Inc., Detroit, Mich., Feb. 26, 
1941.11 Great Britain.... 

British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, New York, 
N.Y., May 2, 1940. Bermuda, Canada, and the 
British West Indies 

British War Relief Association of Northern California, 
San Francisco, Calif., Oct. 20, 1939. Great Britain 
and France 

The British War Relief Association of the Philippines, 
Manila, P. I., Apr. 11, 1940.1 France, Germany, 
Poland, United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Unionof South Africa. __ 

The British War Relief Association of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Los Angeles, Calif., Dec. 8, 1939. Great 
Britain, Greece, and Germany 

British War Relief Fund, Dayton, Ohio, Sept. 12, 
1940.' Groat Britain 

The British War Relief Society, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Dec. 4, 1939. France, Belgium, the Nether- 
lands, United Kingdom, Norway, Canada, and 
Greece _ 

Brooke Coimty Allied War Relief, FoUansbeo, W.Va., 
May 26, 1941 .• Great Britain and Greece 

Bundles for Britain, Inc., New York, N.Y., Dec. 28, 
1939. Great Britain 

Caledonian Pipe Bands Scottish Relief Fund, Grosse 
Point, Mich., May 2, 194L Scotland 

California Denmark Fund, San Francisco, Calif., 
Nov. 20, 1940. Denmark 

Camp Little Norway Association, Minneapolis, 
Minn., Oct. 1. 1941. Norway and Canada 

Alfred S. Campbell, Lambertville, N. J., July 17, 
1941. England 

The Canadian-American Council, Westwood, N. J., 
May9, 1941. Canada. 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., Oct. 23, 1940. Great Britain and 
Canada 



$533.11 

1, 635. 19 

1,950,849.11 

6, 303. 38 

111,873.02 

1, 766. 39 

2, 238. 89 

206.23 

a, 706. 62 



6.50. 788. OS 
742. 40 

12,285,081.25 

16.00 

2, 809, 102. 13 

2, 464. 76 

1, 602. 21 

6,351.41 

953.52 

335. 60 

8, 924. 91 



$467. 06 

1,270.00 

1, 128,981.57 

5, 234. 46 

100, 885. 30 

1,032.04 

1,012.50 

100. OO 

208.20 



484, 170. 89 
733.20 

10, 039, 692. 36 

16.00 

1.689,269.01 

1, 517. 00 

None 

5, 350. 26 

146.00 

None 

5, 636. 24 



$46.80 
42.70 
470, 869. 03 
580. 24 
5, 857. 93 
562. 72 
353.99 
100.49 

666. 05 



79, 179. 21 
None 

928, 186. 27 
None 
462, 381. 08 
947.76 
1, 421. 39 
865. 91 
11.25 
None 

1,288.66 



$.500. 00 
None 

60, 223. 70 
None 

18,943.00 
None 
None 
None 

33, 603. 72 



371, 529. 22 
None 

4, 644, 313. 56 
None 
2,911,193.07 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 



2, 815. 15 



tNo reports for the months of October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 

II No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

INo reports for the months of November and December have been received from this organization. 

•The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 



None 

None 

$1, 609. 10 



None 
None 

178,000.00 
None 
27,116.08 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

592. 31 



$20. 25 
322. 49 

344, 998. 51 



102. 65 


5,129.79 


None 


170. 63 


None 


872. 40 


None 


5.74 


50.00 


5, 842. 37 


367. 64 


10,077.86 



87, 437. 98 
9.20 

1,317,202.62 
None 
657, 452. 04 
None 
80.82 
135. 24 
797.27 
466. 81 



100 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETtN 

CONTBIBUTIONS FOB RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unejpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31. 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 



Funds .'!pent 
for adminis- 
trntion, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Catholic Medical Mission Board. Inc., New York. 
N.y., Jan. 17, 1940. India. Australia. Canada, New 
Zealand, and the Unionof South Africa 

Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical Churches 
of Europe, New York, N.Y., May 14, 1940.t All 
belligerent countries - 

Central Committee Knesseth Israel, New York, N.Y., 
Oct. 27, 1939. Palestine 

Central Council of Polish Organizations, New Castle, 
Pa., Nov. 7, 1939. France, Poland, and England 

Cercle Fran^als de Seattle, Seattle, Wash., Nov. 2, 

1939. Great Britain and France 

Club Ukraine, Brookl>Ti, N.Y. . May 1, 1941.t Great 

Britain, Germany. Poland. Italy, and France - 

Le Colis de Trianon-Versailles, New York, N.Y., 

Nov. 25, 1939. France and England 

Comit6 de Franceses Libres de Puerto Rico, Mayagues, 

P.R., Apr. 4, 1941. t British Empire.,. 

ComitS Pro Francia Libre, San Juan, P.R., Dec. 19, 

1940. England and France 

Commission for Poli.'^h Relief. Inc., New York, N.Y., 

Sept. 12, 1939.J Poland, England, and Hungary.... 

The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., New 
York, N.Y., May 21. 1940. Belgium, Luxembourg, 
France, and England 

Committee for Emergency Aid to Refugees, New 
York, N.Y., Aug. S, 1941. Norway, France, United 
Kingdom, and Germany 

Committee of French-American Wives, New York, 
N.Y., Nov. 15, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., New York, N.Y., Sept. 
16, 1939. France, Great Britain, Norway, Belgium, 
and the Netherlands 

Committee for the Relief for Poland, Seattle, Wash., 
Nov. 24. 1939.11 Poland and Canada 

Committee for Yugoslav War Relief, San Francisco, 
Calif., July 3, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., May 12, 1941.1 France 

The Croatian Fraternal Union of America, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., .lime 20. 1941. Yugoslavia , 

Ciechoslovak Relief. Chicago. 111.. July 25, 1940. 
Crechoslovakia. Belgium, Great Britain, and France. 

Danish-American Knitting and Sewing Groups, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., Sept. 22, 1941.* All belligerent 
countries. 

Detroit Harrovian War Relief Association, Detroit, 
Mich., Nov. 10, 1941. Great Britain 

Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Dec. 16,1940. Greece 



$904. 47 

100, 303. 81 
72, 347. 55 

3. 773. 40 
8, 460. 70 

91.36 

25,671.63 

1, 239. 62 

16, 681. 14 

800, 492. 16 

13,815.92 

115.81 
40. 247. 12 

109, 560. 17 
2,441.83 

4, 466. 46 
170, 155. 70 

13. 443. 13 
110.362.61 

1, 236. 39 
288.48 

16,079.02 



$206. 72 

83. 757. 75 
fO. 618. 70 
3.250.80 
6. 231. 64 
None 
18. 344. 12 
1. 200. 00 
10, 683. 03 
724. 069. 69 

9, 165. 00 

107.26 
33, 007. 45 

79. 634. 36 
2, 184. 12 

None 
64. 164. 07 

None 
01. R9«. 66 

Nine 

205.15 

13. 225. 60 



None 

$2, 872. 76 
None 
460.65 
360.34 
91.36 
974. 06 
39.62 
4.792.31 
3, 997. 36 

1,822.33 

None 
1, 629. 26 

10, 134. 98 
None 
4,380.68 
96, 840. 88 
13, 369. 63 
16. 478. 40 

901.31 
15.12 
826.00 



$6. 680. 00 

None 

None 

None 

3, 036. 73 

None 

11, 850. 76 

None 

403.20 

1, 600. 00 

None 

None 
6. 881. 64 

24, 199. 77 

None 

None 

4. 957. 00 

None 

61,416 60 

680.50 
None 
None 



None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
$369. 15 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
274.95 

160.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

497. 60 
None 
None 



$697. 75 

13, 673. 31 

21,728.85 

62.05 

1, 868. 82 

None 

6, 363. 36 

None 

1, 306. 80 

72, 425. 21 

2. 828. 59 

8.66 
5.710.41 

19, 790. 83 
257. 71 

84.78 

20, 160. 76 

83.60 
1. 984 46 

334.08 

68. 19 

1. 027. 63 



tNo report for the month of December has been received from this organltatlon. 

JThte registrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions received from other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements are not included in the figures here given, since they are shown Slsewbere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 

n The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 

1 The amounts shown above indicate registrant's direct receipts only but Its total expenses Include administration of the activities of 12 member 
societies with respect to certain collections, promotions, purchasing, receiving, warehousing, packing, and shipping of food and clothing, financial trans- 
fers, etc. The Council has received for these collective functions, both indirectly and directly, a total to date of $282,723.46, has distributed for relief 
$140,362.68, and has $122,210.02 on hand in kind and In cash. 

•No complete report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



JANUART 31, 1942 



101 



CoNTBiBUTiONs roR Eeuef IN Beluoeebnt Ootjntbies — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of poods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, ete. 



The Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Oct. 13, 1939. Oreat Britain, France, Norway, 
Belgium, Lu.xembourg, the Netherlands, and Greece. 

Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, New 
York, N.Y., Mar. 13, 1940. Poland 

Emergency Rescue Committee, New York, N.Y., 
Aug. 3, 1940. France, United Kingdom, Belgium, 
Norway, and the Netherlands __ _.. 

English-Speaking Union of the United States, New 
York, N.Y., Dec. 26,1939. Oreat Britain, Canada, 
France, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, the Neth- 
erlands. Germany, and Union of South Africa 

Esco Fund Committee, Inc., New York, N.Y., Feb. 
13, 1941. Great Britain. __ 

Estonian Relief Committee, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Nov. 28, 1941. Estonia __ 

Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Dec. 21, 1940. Ethiopia and Great Britain 

The Fall River British War Relief Society, Fall River, 
Mass., Sept. 26, 1940. Oreat Britain 

Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 15, 1939.t 
Poland - 

Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode Island, 
Woonsocket, R.I., Nov. 15, 1939. France and 
England 

Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., Oct. 11, 1939. France and 
Germany _ 

Fellowship of Reconciliation, New York, N.Y., Jan. 
20, 1910. France, England, and Germany 

The Fields, Inc., New York, N.Y., Aug. 5, 1941. 
Great Britain 

Les Fllles de France, Chicago, HI., Aug. 20, 1941. 
France 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., New 
York, N.Y., Sept. 21, 1939. France and England... 

France Forever War Relief Association, Manila, P. I., 
Oct. 22, 1941.} United Kingdom 

Franco-American Committee for the Relief of War 
Victims, New York, N.Y., Mar. 27, 1941. France.. 

Franco-British Relief, Baltimore, Md., Mar. 15. 
1941. t Oreat Britain. 

Free French Relief Committee, New York, N.Y.. 
Feb. 3, 1941. England, French Cameroons, Belgian 
Congo, Nigeria, and SjTia 

Free Italian Women's Association for Assistance to 
Prisoners of War, New York, N.Y., Nov. 26, 1941.1 
India. Egypt, Australia, and Union of South Africa. 

French Colonies War Relief Committee, New York, 
N.Y., Aug. 20, 1940. France .. 

French Committee for Relief In France, Detroit. 
Mich., Oct. 17, 1939. France and Oreat Britain 

French Relief Association. Kansas City, Mo., Feb. 
3, 1940.t France- 

French War Relief. Inc., Los Angeles, Calif., Nov. 
16, 1939. France and England. 



$168,481.27 
7. 451. 27 



251, 117. 76 

17, 403. 90 

1,318.00 

613.22 

10, 393. 34 

11,408.78 

9, 132. 32 

17, 872. 50 

3. 867. 94 

464.98 

2, 864. 16 

334, 406. 42 



$128,708.61 
100.00 



202, 088. 87 

15, 186. 66 

None 

None 

9,727.11 

7, 933. 63 

6. 898. 55 

16, 389. 22 

3.471.21 

464. 98 

2.113.20 

239. 986. 64 



$11,844.00 
4, 303. 41 



30, 079. 64 
518. 59 

1. 283. 72 
463.22 

87.94 

2, 348. 40 

1, 776. 67 

67.27 
210. 21 
None 
436. 96 
5, 771. 65 



$91,608.47 
None 



254, 258. 48 
None 
None 
None 
None 

3, 300. 00 

2,112.59 

2, 202. 75 
None 
None 
75.00 

7, 628. 99 



fi. 129. 60 
7. 763. 90 

93. 358. 31 

None 

467. 12 

6. 156. 91 

1,666.25 

68,941.27 



3, 862. 00 
3. 925. .52 

31. 4*3, 14 

None 

None 

3, 780. 21 

667. 27 

49, 725. 28 



539.20 
3. 492. 74 

39. 284. 73 

None 
233.79 
868.18 
701. 41 

R, 243. 00 



2. 130. 00 
12.618.92 

25. 327. 81 

None 

None 

34, 702. 26 

,^667. 17 

394. 64 



None 
None 



$736. 44 
None 
None 
60.00 
None 

25.00 



None 
296.00 



None 
None 
None 
495. 83 
None 



$27, 928. 66 
3. 047. 86 



18,919.25 

1.698.65 

34.28 

150. 00 

578.29 

1, 126. 76 



None 


1,416.01 


None 


186. 62 


None 


None 


None 


314.00 


None 


88. 648. 13 



1. 728. 30 
346, fi4 

10. 670, 44 

None 
233. 33 
518. 52 
307. 57 
11,972.99 



tNo report for the month of December has been received from this organltatlon. 

tNo report has been received from this organization. 

IThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 



102 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CoNTEiBTmoNS FoK Reuef IN Beixiqebent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
lor adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



French War Relief Fund of San Francisco, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif., Oct. 26, 1939. France 

French War Veterans Association of Illinois, Chicago, 
111., Oct. 25, 1941. France and Germany. 

Friends of Children, Inc., New York, N.Y., June 13. 

1940. Great Britain, France, Belgium, and the 
Netherlands.- 

The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, In- 
corporated, Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 23, 1939. Can- 
ada, France, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Nor- 
way, Hungary, Poland, Greece, and Yugoslavia 

Friends of Little Norway, Cleveland, Ohio, Nov. 21, 

1941. Canada 

Friends of Poland, Chicago, 111., Dec. 6, 1939. Poland 
Friends of the RAF Comforts Committee, Chicago, 

111., Dec. 9, 1941. t England 

Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scientists of 

Russia, New York, N. Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France 

and Poland 

Garden City rtiWishing Co., Garden City, N. Y., 

Nov. 8, 1941. Great Britain 

German-American Conference, New York, N.Y., 

Mar. 11, 1941. Canada and the British West Indies. 
Golden Rule Foimdation, New York, N.Y., Nov. 2, 

1939. Poland and Palestine 

Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund .\ssociation. 

New York, N.V., Jan. 8, 1940. France 

Grand Lodge, Daughters of Scotia, Hartford, Conn., 

Feb. 16, 1940. Scotland 

Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, State of 

New York, New York, N.Y., Apr. 15, 1941. Great 

Britain 

Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the 

British Empire Service League, Detroit, Mich., 

July 5, 1940. Great Britain and Canada — 

The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, New York, 

N.Y.. Dec. 21. 1940. Greece 

Greek War Relief .Association, Inc., New York, N.Y., 

Nov. 18, 1940. Greece 

Hadassah, Inc., New York, N.Y., Nov. 15, 1939. 

Palestine - 

Hands Across the Sea Helpers Association, Brooklyn, 

N.Y., Mar. II, 1941. United Kingdom 

Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass., Aug. 30, 1940. 

Great Britain 

Hebrew-Christian Alliance of America, Chicago, HI., 

Jan. 3, 1940. t England, Germany, Poland, France, 

and Italy 

A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al., New York, N.Y., 

Nov. 27, 1939. France 

Houston War Fund, Inc., Houston, Tex., May 27, 

1941. Great Britain 

Humanitarian Work Committee, Glen Cove, N.Y., 

Sept. 30. 1939. Poland 

Independent British War Relief Society of Rhode 

Island, Greenwood, R.I., June 14, 1940. Great 

Britain - - 



$38, 314. 23 
1,467.71 



2. 584. 35 
1, 266. 60 



7, 923. 03 

32, 984. 99 

12,371.10 

5, 373, 245. 25 

1,695,162.37 

1,305.40 

160, 505, 97 

13, 735. 31 
23, 292. 99 
59, 898. 31 
4, 038. 60 

9, 106. 18 



$34. 732. 18 
220.76 



2, 150. 00 
880.00 



4,343.83 


1,376.70 


8.50 


Nona 


2.027.25 


1,196.68 


2,997.00 


2.997.00 


555. 38 


370.79 


31,352.12 


31,135.80 



7, 167. 20 

27,850.69 
9,600.00 
4,097,056.55 
1, 419, 757. 65 
1,016.45 
70, 028. 68 

10, 420. 52 
17, 898. 46 
43, 303. 02 
3,661.00 

7,047.87 



$1,011.29 
482.38 



272.73 
228.56 

None 

1,626.31 
8. EG 
73.33 

None 
148. 14 
216.32 

765.83 

1.438.97 

2,818.27 

916, 367. 31 

185, 776. 30 

78.24 

83,841.46 

None 

8, 137. 01 

14,687.93 

362. 49 

1.951.73 



$3, 295. 31 
None 



None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
392, 697. 40 
129, 587. 02 
None 
None 

None 
804.15 
None 
220.00 



None 
None 



None 
None 



80.00 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
500.00 
4,761.27 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 



tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 
tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Nov. 30, 1941 at the request of registrant. 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



103 



CoNTEiBCTiONS FOB Reuef IN Beixiqeeent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Independent Kinsker Aid Association, New York, 
N.Y., Jan. 3, 1910. Poland. _ 

International Committee of Young Men's Christian 
Associations, New York, N.Y., Sept. 22, 1939. 
France, Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the Union 
of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, 
the Netherlands, Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia, and 
Bulgaria 

The International Hebrew-Christian Alliance, Chi- 
cago, 111., Dec. 2, 1941. England, Hungary, and 
Poland 

International Relief Association, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Sept. 25, 1939. France, England, Germany, 
Belgium, and Norway.. 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Ancon, C.Z., 
Sept. 20, 1940. England 

Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of 
Greater New York and New Jersey, Brooklyn, 
N.Y., Jan. 30, 1940. Scotland 

Jugoslav Relief Fund Association, Chicago, Hi., June 
23, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Jugoslav War Relief Association of Southern Califor- 
nia, Los Angeles, Calif., May 26, 1941. Yugoslavia. 

Marthe Th. Kahn, New York, N.Y., Apr. 16, 1940. 
France 

The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
May 24, 1940. Poland. 

The Kyflhaeuser, League of German War Veterans in 
U.S.A., Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 27, 1939.0 Canada, 
Jamaica, and British Empire 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland 

LaFayelte Preventorium, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Sept. 21, 1939. France 

Latvian Relief, Inc., New York, N.Y., Sept. 26, 1941. 
Latvia 

League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, Arnold, 
and Vicinity, New Kensington, Pa., Nov. 17, 1939. 
Poland 

Robert E. Lee Memorial Foundation, Inc., New 
York, N.Y., Apr. 15, 1941. Great Britain 

Legion of Young Polish Women, Chicago, 111., Oct, 2, 

1939. Poland, France, Great Britain, and Germany. 
Liberty Link Afghan Society, Detroit, Mich., Dec. 17, 

1940. Great Britain 

Lithuanian Charities Institute, Inc., Chicago, 111., 

Aug. 20, 1941. Lithuania, England, Germany, and 
Italy 

Lithuanian National Fund, Brooklyn, N.Y., Dec. 14, 
1940. Lithuania 

Lithuanian National Relief Fund, Chicago, Dl., Jime 
19, 1941.1 Germany. 

The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, Philadelphia, 
Pa., Sept.30,1939. France and England 

The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., New York, N.Y., Apr. 
19, 1940. Canada, United Kingdom, and France 

Medical and Surgical Relief Committee of America, 
New York, N.Y., .\ug. 6, 1940. Poland, Great 
Britain, France, Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, 
Luxembourg, Greece, and Yugoslavia 



13, 366. 62 
425. 05 

16, 267. 68 
1, 684. 19 
13, 710. 45 
238.45 
10,421.63 

140, 567. 43 
9, 691. 24 
28. 367. 72 
1, 774. 00 

3, 046. 60 

835.63 

20, 789. 84 

4,813.92 

None 

452. 84 

None 

51, 527. 02 

283, 718. 63 



9, 022. 29 
376. 10 

12,973.75 

650.00 

None 

180. 26 

9, 872. 50 

103, 024. 06 

7, 226. 66 

10, 135. 55 

None 

1, 702. 20 

None 

15, 070. 35 

4. 200. 00 

None 

200.00 

None 

43, 613. 60 

141, 392. 04 



None 
None 

871.47 

1, 063. 41 

13, 072. 44 

47.64 

None 

17, 662. 76 
1, 533. 88 

12, 713. 99 
1, 724. 15 

886.62 

829.28 

1,831.59 

613. 92 

None 

231. 84 

None 

7, 817. 86 

64, 997. 17 



2, 020. 00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

26, 004. 23 
None 
None 
None 

2, 400. 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 

None 

42, 233. 44 

681,404.02 



None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
$264. 50 
None 



4, 344. 33 

48.95 

2, 422. 46 
70.78 

638. 01 
10.66 
908. 64 

19, 880. 61 
831.80 

5, S18. 18 

49.85 

457. 78 

6.26 

3, 887. 90 

None 

None 
21.00 
894. 99 
95.66 
77, 329. 42 



|No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

TNo reports for the months of September, October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 



104 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CoNTBiBunoNS TOR Reliht IN Beixigerent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Mennonite Central Committee, Akron, Pa., Feb. 13, 
1940. Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, 
Canada, and the Netherlands 

Merchant Sailors League, Inc., Buffalo, N.Y., June 
6, 1941. Canada and British Empire 

Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, New York, 
N.Y., Sept. 4, 1940. France, Poland, Norway, Bel- 
gium, the Netherlands, United Kingdom, India, 
Australia, Canada. Germany, Greece, Italy, Yugo- 
slavia, and Bulgaria _ 

Milford, Connecticut, Polish Relief Fund Committee, 
Milford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1939. Poland 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy 
Hospital Comforts Fund, Mobile, Ala., Sept. 18, 
1940.* British Isles 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N.J., Sept. 12, 
1940.t England, France, and Greece 

Montagu Club of London, New York, N.Y., Mar. 3, 
1641.1 Great Britain 

The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, 
Scientist, in Boston, LT.s.A., Boston, Mass., Apr. 
25, 1940. Canada, France, and the United Kingdom. 

National America Denmark Association, Chicago, 111., 
Aug. I, 1941. Denmark and England 

National Catholic Welfare Conference Bishops' Relief 
Committee, Washington, D.C., Jime 3, 1941. t AH 
belligerent countries — 

National Legion Greek-American War Veterans In 
America, Inc., New York, N.Y., Jan. 3, 1941. 
Greece- --- - --- 

Near East Foundation, Inc., New York, N.Y., Nov. 
28, 1940. Greece -- 

Netherlands War Relief Committee, Manila, P. I., 
May 27, 1940.t Netherlands 

The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn., 
July 1, 1940. British Empire 

Newtown Committee for Child Refugees, Inc., Sandy 
Hook, Conn., Apr. 15, 1941. Great Britain 

North Side Polish Council Relief Committee of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 5, 1939. 
Poland - 

Norwegian Relief, Inc., Chicago, lU., May 1, 1940. 
Norway 

Norwegian Seamen's Christmas and Relief, Inc., New 
York, N. Y., Oct. 17, 1941. Canada and West 
Indies — - 

Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., Milwaukee, 
Wis., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland 

Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Association, 
NewYork,N.Y., Dec. 20, 1940.1 Poland 

Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Sept. 11, 1939. t Poland, France, Great Britain, and 
Italy 



$83, 849. 92 
None 

101, 020. 50 
575. 54 

7, 526. 59 

11,965.94 

677.78 

367, 052. 15 
14. 806. 25 

257, 230. 00 

1,163.00 
229, 382. 06 
6, 023. 77 
17,995.89 
2, 458. 80 

3, 058. 99 
635,651.24 

32. 340. 74 
5,660.41 
2. 677, 13 

28, 956. 63 



$71,341.31 

None 

94, 338. 84 
250.20 

5, 708. 11 

9, 018. 14 

577.78 

131.918.10 
4, 767. 05 

248, 000. 00 

None 

106,303.85 

2, 482. 27 

14, 444. 81 

916. 89 

2, 838. 16 
71,600.00 



28, 486. 55 



None 
None 

None 
$213. 47 

1,624.76 

2. 162. 32 

None 

192, 296. 65 
9,128.48 

7, 100. 00 

664.39 
81,072.27 
3, 601. 80 
1,631.09 
1,037.74 

176. 65 
637,170.92 

24,311.02 

1.070.88 

315. 94 

367. 69 



$36, 633. 02 
None 

None 
None 

2, 334. 49 
896. 00 
None 

901,526.86 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
8, 276. 00 
618. 38 

1, 300. OO 

None 

238.00 
None 
None 

None 



None 
None 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 

$113,181.68 
None 

None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 

350.00 
None 
None 

None 



•No complete report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

tNo reports for the months of November and December have been received from this organization. 

}No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

INo reports for the months of September, October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 



JAJSTDARY 31, 1942 



105 



CoNTBinuTiONS FOR RExiBa" IN Beijjgeeent Cocnteies — Continued 



The Order or Ahepa, Washington, D.C., Jan. 1, 1941. 

Greece 

Order of Scottish Clans, Boston, Mass., Jan. 25, 1940. 

Scotland _ - 

Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, New Yorlt, N.Y., 
Aug. 19, 1940. British Empire -_ 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Crist6bal, 
C.Z., Oct. 16. 1940. England-- 

Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief. Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Feb. 23, 1940.11 Poland and Great Britain 

Paderewski Testimonial Fund, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Mar. 10, 1941. Great Britain and France.. 

Paisley Buddies War Relief Society, Detroit, Mich., 
July 11, 1941.» Scotland ---- 

Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, Washington, D.C., 
Nov. 12, 1940. Germany 

The ParyskI Publishing Co., Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 16, 
1939. Poland and Great Britain.. ._ 

Mrs. Eveline Mary Paterson, Warren, N.H., July 28, 
1941.* Germany and Great Britain 

The Pawtucket and Blackstone Valley British Relief 
Society of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R. I., Feb. 
26, 1940. Great Britain and Germany 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, Pelham, N. Y., 
Oct. 17, 1940. Scotland 

Penny-A-Plane, New York, N.Y., Apr. 1, 1941. t 
Great Britain 

Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., Chicago, 
111., Jan. 3, 1941. Greece 

Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of Eliza- 
beth Polish Organizations, Elizabeth, N.J., Sept., 
23. 1939. Poland and England 

Polish-American Council, Chicago, 111., Sept. 15, 1939. 
Poland 

Pohsh-American Volunteer Ambulance Section, Inc., 
New York, N.Y., Feb. 13, 1940. France and Eng- 
land 

Polish Broadcasting Corporation, New York, N.Y., 
Sept. 23, 1939. Poland and England 

Polish Central Committee of New London. Connecti- 
cut, New London, Conn., Oct. 13, 1939.t Poland... 

Polish Central Council of New Haven, New Haven, 
Conn.. Sept. 29. 1939. Poland and Germany 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, Trenton, 
N. J., Sept. 19, 1939.11 Poland 

Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Waterbury, 
Waterbury, Conn., Feb. 28, 1940. Poland 

Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Connecticut, 
New Britain, Conn., Sept. 21, 1939. Poland 

Polish National Alliance of the United States of North 
America, Chicago, 111., Sept. 27, 1939. Poland, Eng- 
land, and Canada 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, 
Amsterdam, N.Y., Oct. 12, 1939.1 Poland 



$132, 894. 89 
25, 684. 94 
171,958.88 

1, 703. 40 
137, 598. 52 

62, 419. 24 
2, 835. 37 

27, 724. 89 

9, 632. 46 

246. 18 

31, 041. 00 

3, 346. 45 

417. 56 

9. 448. 21 

9, 693. 02 
804, 919. 56 

35, 287. 11 

2, 712. 83 
2,063.60 
6, 562. 88 

10, 860. 37 
1, 035. 61 

3, 584. 63 

359, 126. 04 
5, 881. 18 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



$92,911.84 
21, 077. 00 
130, 488. 38 
1, 6H2. 95 
85, COO. 00 
42, 835. 00 
2, 034. 00 
9, 132. 19 

9, 271. 73 
206. 74 

23, 947. 72 

1, 627. 60 

300.00 

5, 027. 18 

8, 946. 85 
650,407.66 

25, 312. 52 
2,000.00 
1,M1.64 
4, 635. 75 

10, 392. 86 
867. 76 

2, 000. 00 

285, 085. 40 
3,293.03 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$35, 368. 92 

4, 607. 94 

None 

None 

12. 554. 28 

5, 020. 14 

384. 89 

18, 290. 67 

260.73 

None 

4, 697. 30 

1, 307. 45 

79.66 

4, 021. 55 

718. 17 
122, 761. 59 

9,711.01 
671.03 
230.32 
875. 87 
463. 97 
146. 75 

1, 571. 63 

70, 380. 24 
2, 430. 16 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 
None 
None 
$1,446.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

1,911.19 

None 

None 

1, 600. 00 
118,500.00 

360.65 
None 
75.00 
2, 000. 00 
4, 000. 00 
None 
None 

None 
8,000.00 



None 
None 
None 
$10.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
63.00 
Nonb 
None 

None 
None 

135.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 
None 



$4,614. 13 

None 

41, 470. 60 

20.46 

40, 044. 24 

4. 564. 10 

416. 48 

302.03 

None 

38.44 

2, 395. 98 
411.40 
37.90 



28.00 
31, 760. 41 

263. 58 
41.80 

291.64 
51.26 
3.54 
32.00 
13.00 

3, 660. 40 
157.99 



[No reports for the months of November and December have been received from this organization. 

•The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 

tNo report for the month of December ha^ been received from this organization. 

INo reports for the months of October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 



106 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
CoNTBiBTJTiONS FOB RELIEF IN Beixigeeent CottNtbtes — Continued 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31. 1941. 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Polish National Coimcil of New Yorlt, New York, 
N. Y., Sept. 14, 1939. France, Poland, England, and 
Germany _ _ 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, Wor- 
cester, Mass., Sept, 20, 1939. Poland and England.. 

Polish Relief of Carteret, New Jersey, Carteret, 
N.J., Oct. 11, 1939. Poland.. 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Boston, Ma.<^s., 
Sept. 14, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Massachusetts, 
Brockton, Mass., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, Cambridge, Mass., Sept. 16, 1939. Poland... 

Polish Relief Committee of Chester and Delaware 
County, Chester, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939, England 

Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, Wilmington, 
Del., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland. 

Polish Relief Committee, Detroit, Mich., Sept. II, 
1939. Poland, Germany, Scotland, and Hungary.. 

Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, Fitchburg, 
Mass., Mar. 29, 1940. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, Flint, Mich., Sept. 18, 1939. 
Poland and England 

Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
Holyoke, Mass., Nov. 4, 1939. Poland... 

Pohsb Relief Committee of Jackson, Michigan, Jack- 
son, Mich., Nov. 9, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee, New Bedford, Mass., 
Oct. 31, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and Vicinity, 
Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 12, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National Home 
Association, Lowell, Mass., Nov. 27, 1939. Poland. . 

Polish Relief Committee, Taunton, Mass., Dec. 13, 
1939. Poland. 

Polish Relief Fund, Jersey City, N. J., Sept. 12, 1939.1 
Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Jewett City, Conn., Oct. 3, 1939. 
Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Middletown, Conn., Sept. 23, 
1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund, Niagara Falls, N.Y., Oct. 26, 
1S39. Poland... 

Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Massachusetts, Three 
Rivers, Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, New York, and Vicin- 
ity, Syracuse, N.Y., Oct. 31, 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Dec. 13. 1939. Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, Wis., 
Sept. 26, 1939.' Poland 

Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and Bergen 
Counties, Inc., Passaic, N.J., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland. 

Polish Union of the United States of North America, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Sept. 8, 1939. Poland 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, Low- 
ell, Mass., Sept. 20, 1939. Poland 



$132, 933. 37 
7, 940. 96 
2. 418. 75 
13. 450. 07 

2, OSS. 31 
4, 345. 22 

10, 392. 05 
12, 025. 65 
177, 575. 14 
913. 33 
12, 281. 45 
10. M3. 47 
2, 456. 86 
14,441.66 
69, 383. 85 

3. 380. 50 
3, 610. 67 

86, 638. 53 
2, 144. 30 
6, 216. 56 
4,081.00 
2, 685. 79 

13, 884. 27 
4,967.91 

29. 298. 69 

18, 098. 67 



$111,620.83 
6, 627. 00 
1,200.00 
11,093.19 

1, 386. 27 

2. 545. 40 
8, 512. 52 

10, 079. 31 

140, 955. 46 

660.40 

9, 106. 22 

9,463.83 

999.60 

10.094.25 

54,713.14 
2, 087. 00 
3. 657. 00 

56. 010. 95 
1,896.90 
4,368.82 
2, 839. 32 
1,148.46 
8, 991. 69 

3, 893. 11 
23, 782. 72 
15,064.36 

2.500.00 

4. 216. 31 



$1, 320. 93 

320.47 

1,190.00 

1, 445. 37 

419. 37 

1, 264. 59 

621. 92 

1, 693. 30 

27, 709. 71 

211.84 

265.05 

749.82 

907.37 

3, 187. 13 

3, 540. 92 

675. 86 

28.00 

8, 532. 74 

.03 

1.839.54 

1,118.31 

1, 308. 64 

2, 379. 69 

69.86 

3, 569. 03 

583.90 

301. 98 

480.43 



$601. 637. 40 

None 

45.00 

2, 620. 00 

360.00 

825.20 

2, 414. 70 

6, 500. 00 

73,374.00 

130.00 

2,278.85 

1, 199. 10 

750.00 

5, 460. 00 

None 

None 

1.375.00 

1,575.00 

900.00 

None 

None 

4, 404. 95 

1, 860. 00 

450.00 

11,607.40 

4. 695. 61 

None 



1, 240. 00 



$142, 417. 90 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
50.00 
None 
None 
303. 40 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
500.00 
None 
None 
None 



INo reports for the months of October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 
•No report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



107 



CONTKIBUTIONS FOB REUET IN BeIXIGEBEINT COTINTRIES — CuntilUled 



Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth 
Ward), Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 21, 1939. Poland and 
Germany _ 

Polish Welfare Council, Schenectady, N.Y., Sept. 
22, 1939. Poland _.. 

Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, Lawrence, 
Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland 

Polish Women's Relief Committee, New York, N.Y., 
Nov. 24, 1939. Poland, France, and Germany 

Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 
Binghamton, N. Y., Sept. 26, 1939. Poland and 
England.. 

Oeneroso Pope, New York, N.Y., Nov. 17, 1941. t 
All belligerent countries, 

Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, New 
Jersey, Perth Amboy, N.J., Sept. 30, 1939. Poland 
and Canada 

Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc., Jamaica, 
N.Y., Oct. 21, 1939. Poland 

The Queen Elizabeth Fund, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
May20, 1941. t Great Britain.. , 

Queen T\ iihelmina Fund, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
May 17, 1940. Netherlands, Fr.ince, Poland, United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, 
Union of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, and Germany , 

Refugees of England, Inc., New York, N.Y., July 
12, 1940.11 Great Britain 

Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Willimantic, 
Conn., Sept. 29, 1939. Poland 

Relief Committee of the United Polish Societies, 
Chicopce, Ma,ss.. Oct. 21, 1939. t Poland 

Relief for French Refugees in England, Washington, 
D.C., Dec. 26, 1939. France and Great Britain 

Relief Fund of the Federation of the Belgian-Ameri- 
can Societies of North America, Detroit, Mich., 
Dec. 11. 1941. Belgium 

Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, 
Kenosha, Wis., Sept. 25, 1939. Poland 

Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, Los Angeles, Calif., 
Dec. 13, 1939. Poland -. 

Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U.S.A., Inc., 
New York, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1940. Great Britain.... 

Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., New York, 
N.Y., Sept. 29, 1939. Germany, France, and 
Poland .- 

St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, D.C., 
June 18, 1940. Scotland.... 

St. Stephens Po'isli Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, 
New [Jersey, Perth Amboy, N.J., Sept. 27, 1939. 
Poland 

Saints Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox 
Church, Washington, D.C., Dec. 23, 1940. Greece. 

The Salvation Army, New York, N.Y., May 23, 1940. 
England, Franco, Norway, Belgium, and the Neth- 
erlands -- 



$8, 156. 92 
7, 434. 01 
9, 374. 40 

17, 402. 22 

8, 800. 12 
13, 3C6. 63 

1,992.67 

7, 862. 56 

125. 00 

395, 954. 05 
165, 689. 64 
3, 759. 27 
12, 246. 07 
27,611.60 

None 

6, 724. 13 

968.02 

99,965.91 

31,422.99 
3, 045. 96 



216, 543. 74 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



4,627.02 
11,088.28 

5. 189. 28 
9, 000. 00 

1,821.33 

7,400.00 

None 

258, 636. 06 
134, 302. 44 
2, .511. 93 
11, 552. 36 
24, 869. 07 

None 

6, 030. 16 

225.00 

83, 730. 29 

20, 646. 03 
2.331.31 

None 
5,000.00 

190, 739. 86 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on hand 



$252. 90 
1,046.64 
3, 591. 14 
2, 909. 20 

2, 679. 93 
3, 704. 64 



101, 648. 59 
71. 25 



None 

15.01 

429.14 

9, 774. 86 

5, 109. 43 



2, 992. 66 
1,653.43 

23, 583. 04 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 
countries 
named 



$970. 00 
6,150.00 
3, 505. GO 
3,073.28 

1,300.00 
None 



964.74 
21,682.39 



1,878.08 

None 

1, 817. 60 

None 

None 

1, 166, 20 
None 

None 
None 

200, 859. 80 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



None 

None 

$100. 00 

57.82 

None 
None 

None 
None 
None 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



None 
None 

None 



$153. 19 
69.32 



5, 667. 53 
467. 96 

Noue 
7.U0 

2, 220. 84 



tThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 

{The registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 22, 1941 at the request of registrant. 

UThis registrant serves primarily as a clearing-house for the distribution abroad of contributions collected by other registrants; these receipts and 
disbursements arc not included in the figures here given, since they are shown elsewhere in this tabulation following the names of the original collecting 
registrants. 



108 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 
CoNTKiBUTiONS FOR Rexjef IN Beixioebent COUNTRIES — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dec. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 

still on hand 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



The San Francisco Committee for the Aid of the 
Russian Disabled Veterans of the World War, San 
Francisco, Calif., Oct. 30, 1941.* Bulgaria, Yugo- 
slavia, and France 

Save the Children Federation, Incorporated, New 
York. N.Y., Sept. 8, 1939. England, Poland, Bel- 
gium, and the Netherlands.. 

Scandinavian-American Business Association, Inc., 
Brooklyn, N.Y., Oct. 30, 1941.' Norway and 
United Kingdom 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee 
for Poland, Frackville, Pa., Sept. 15, 1939. Poland. . 

Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, Washington, D.C., 
Nov. 19, 1940. Great Britain 

Le Secours Franpais, New York, N.Y., Sept. II, 1940. 
France 

Secours Franco-Americain— War Relief, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., Nov. 20. 1939. Great Britain 

Secours Franco-Beige, New Bedlord, Mass., May 8, 
1941. England, France, and Belgium 

Serb National Federation, Pittsburgh, Pa., Apr. 29, 
1941. Yugoslavia. 

The Seventh Column, West Fairlee, Vt., June 12, 
1940. France and England , 

The Silver Thimble Fund of America, New Orleans, 
La., Feb. 18, 1941. Great Britain 

Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, Brooklyn, N.Y., 
Jan. 22, 1940.t France 

Socif t6 Israelite Francaise de Secours Mutuels de New 
York, New York, N.Y., June 4, 1940. France 

Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., New York, 
N.Y. Dec. 18, 1939.t Palestine 

The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, N. J., Apr. 25, 
1940. t France and Great Britain 

Le Souvenir Frangais, Detroit, Mich., May 1, 1940. t 
France and Belgium 

Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Com- 
mittee, Springfield, Mass., Sept. 23, 1939. Poland.. 

State Industrial Employees-Aid to Britain Fund, 
Millers Falls, Mass., Sept. 22, 1941.} Great Britain. 

Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 
New York, N.Y., Apr. 5, 1940. France 

Miss Heather Thatcher, Hollywood, Calif., Nov. 19, 
1940. Great Britain 

Toledo Committee for Relief ol War Victims, Toledo, 
Ohio, Sept. 19. 1939. Poland and Canada... 

Tolstoy Foundation. Inc., New York, N.Y., Oct. 17, 
1939. France. Poland, and England 

Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Bethesda, Md., Nov. 24, 
1939. Great Britain and Greece 

Edmund Tyszka, Hamtramck, Mich., Sept. 19, 1939. 
Poland 

Ukrainian Gold Cross, Inc., New York, N.Y., May 
8, 1941. France, Poland, Germany, Great Britain, 
and Italy... 

L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., New York, N.Y., Oct. 28, 
1939. France 

Union for the Protection of the Human Person, New 
York, N.Y., May 6, 1941. France 



8,438.13 
25, 373. 69 
52,949.89 

2, 707. 66 

626.88 

43, 637. 28 

None 

2, 312. 02 
31, 199. 12 

6, 703. 32 

26, 253. 19 

25, 246. 70 

326.60 

1, 926. 27 

1,045.13 
310 00 

9. 465. 19 

9. 260. 70 
44, 186. 29 

4, 429. 23 

3,111.46 

1,023.31 



8, 206. 24 
23, 015. 90 
31. 344. 74 

2. 019. 68 

100.00 

16, 000. 00 

None 

2,000.00 

30,240.87 

2,682.34 

16, 400. 00 

22, 858. 75 

266.50 

1,100.00 

641.35 

310.00 

9, 361. 66 
7, 792. 82 

22, 754. 34 
4,419.76 
3, 073. 96 

542.84 

1,560.27 

None 



651.64 

2, 777. 63 

640.73 

393.28 

28, 588. 98 

None 

214. 98 

None 

3, 265. 02 

444.81 

None 

None 

755. 07 

None 

None 

1. 00 

609.70 

9,819.90 

6.53 

37.60 

186.64 
639.14 
None 



None 
None 
667. 17 
3,690.60 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
14, 858. 65 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

350.00 
316.00 
None 



None 
None 
$1, 180. 44 
None 
None 
None 
None 

220.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

600.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

250.00 
None 
None 



•No report has been received from this organization. 

tNo report for the month of December has been received from this organization. 

JThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



109 



CoNTBiBtiTiONS TOE Rfxief IN Beixigeeent Countbies — Continued 



Name of registrant, location, date of registration, and 
destination of contributions 



Funds spent 

for relief in 

countries 

named 



Unexpended 
balance as of 
Dee. 31, 1941, 
including cost 
of goods pur- 
chased and 
still on band 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind sent to 

countries 
named 



Estimated 
value of con- 
tributions in 
kind now on 
hand 



Funds spent 
for adminis- 
tration, pub- 
licity, af- 
fairs, cam- 
paigns, etc. 



Unitarian Service Committee of the American Uni- 
tarian Association, Boston, Ma&s., May 23, 1940. 
France, British Isles, and the Netherlands 

United American Polish Organizations, South River, 
N.J.. South River, N. J., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United American Spanish Aid Committee, New 
York, N.Y., Apr. 29, 1940. France and the United 
Kingdom , 

United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., New York, N.Y., 
Mar. 21, 1940. Poland 

United British Societiesof Minneapolis, Minneapolis, 
Minn., Jan. 21, 19411 Great Britain 

United British War Relief Association, Somerville, 
Mass., Jun» 14, 1910.' Great Britain 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, New York, 
N.Y., Oct. 13, 1939. Palestine , 

United Free France, New York, N.Y., May 16, 1941. 
France 

United Polish Committees In Racine, Wisconsin, 
Racine, Wis., Nov. 2, 1939. Poland.. 

United Polish Organizations of Salem, Massachusetts, 
Salem, Mass., Oct. 20, 1939. Poland 

United Polish Societies of Los Angeles, Calif., Oct. 

21, 1939. Poland.. 

United Reading Appeal for Polish War S^iflerers, 

Reading, Pa., Sept. 22, 1939. Poland and England 
Universallst General Convention, Boston, Mass., 

May 23, 1941. England and France.. 

Mrs. Paul Verdier Fund, San Francisco, Calil., Oct. 

11, 1939.t France. 

Vitamins for Britain, Inc., New York, N. Y., Mar. 

22, 1941. Great Britain 

Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Wellesley, 

Mass., Jan. 31, 1941.1 Great Britain _ 

White and Manning Dance Relief, Highland Park, 
Mich., July 25, 1941.1 Great Britain.. 

Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Charitable 
Society, Inc., Everett, Mass., Feb. 28, 1940. Scot- 
land 



Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. Louis, 
Clayton, Mo., Dec. 18, 1939. Great Britain and 
France.. 

Young Friends of French Prisoners and Babies, New 
York, N.Y., Feb. 28, 1941.' France. 

Yugoslav-American Relief Committee, Inc., Chicago, 
111., June 19, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Yugoslav Relief Committee of America, Chicago, 111., 
May 27, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Yugoslav War Relief, Kenosha, Wis., Aug. 14, 1941. 
Yugoslavia 

Yugoslav War Relief Association of State of Washing- 
ton, Seattle, Wash., July 5, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Yugoslavic-American Association, Washington, D. C, 
Nov. 13, 1941. Yugoslavia 

Registrants whose registrations were revoked prior to 
Dec. 1, 1941 



$140, 196. 03 
4, 196. 06 

16, 496. 32 
2, 210. 98 

2, 615. 00 
16, 457. 96 

124,286.05 
6, 954. 83 
2, 955. 66 

3, 813. 08 

4, 633. 33 
10, 086. 63 

6, 869. 31 

4, 207. 41 

6, 008. 24 

141. 16 

637. 51 

8, 606. 49 

29, 796. 29 

720.03 

3, 267. 45 

13, 307. 74 

166. 65 

877. 97 

204.30 

4, 295, 203. 87 



$100,047.72 
4, 069. 12 

12, 610. 16 
200. 00 

1, 829. 28 
13, 942. 55 
71,059.41 

637. 00 

2, 510. 32 
3, 095. 32 
4, 142. 10 
7,931.29 
1, 272. 67 
3,897.31 
1,620.00 

71.00 
209. 49 

8,341.45 

25. 878. 04 
394. 00 
None 
None 
148. 65 
None 
38.00 
3, 427, 089. 73 



$6, 065. 63 
None 

None 

1, 420. 69 

None 

1,077.77 

138.33 

4, 887. 87 

160.06 

279. 85 

28.27 

2, 004. 20 

4, 130. 82 

None 

2, 906. 32 

None 

None 

48.73 



3, 231. 03 

13, 295. 24 

10.00 

669. 05 

None 

103, 493. 93 



$1,100.00 
None 

None 
None 
None 
725. 00 
None 
None 
200.00 
695. 00 
None 
22.00 
None 
3, 282. 00 
None 
None 
None 

None 

63, 961. 00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
1, 468, 605. 60 



None 
None 

None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 
None 

None 

None 
None 
$50.00 
None 
None 
None 
None 
2, 867. 15 



$34, 082. 68 
136. 94 

3,886.17 
690.29 
685. 72 

1,437.64 
53, 088. 31 

1,429.96 
295.27 
437. 91 
462. 96 
151. 14 
455. 82 
310. 10 
481. 92 
70.16 
428.02 

216.31 

1, 737 02 
226.23 
36.42 
12.50 
8.00 
208.92 
166. 30 
764, 620. 21 



TotalJ. 



48, 399, 563. 44 



37,093,682.22 



14, 201, 362. 31 



IThe registration of this organization was revoked on Dec. 31, 1941 at the request of registrant. 
•No report for the month of December has been received irom this organization. 

tNo reports for the months of October, November, and December have been received from this organization. 

t It is not possible to strike an e-xact balance in these published totals, since some registrants have included in their expenditures moneys available 
from loans or advances, which are not considered by the Department to be "funds received" and hence are not reported as such. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an 
Inter-American Indian Institute 

Ecuador 

The Mexican Ambassador at Washington in- 
formed the Secretary of State by a note dated 
January 7, 1942 that the instrument of ratifica- 
tion by Ecuador of the Convention Providing 
for the Creation of an Inter-American Indian 
Institute, which was opened for signature at 
Mexico City on November 1, 1940, was deposited 
with the Mexican Government on December 13, 
1941. 

The convention has now been ratified by five 
countries— the United States of America, Ecua- 
dor, El Salvador, Honduras, and Mexico. 

POSTAL 
Universal Postal Convention, 1939 

Great Britain, and Dependencies 

By a note dated November 27, 1941 the Swiss 
Minister at "Washington transmitted to the Sec- 
retary of State a copy of a note from the British 
Legation at Bern to the Swiss Confederation 
dated November 12, 1941, regarding the deposit 
of the instrument of ratification by Great Brit- 
ain on October 21, 1941 of the Universal Postal 
Convention and of the Arrangement Concern- 
ing Letters and Parcels of Declared Value, both 
signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939, and of 
the adherence of certain colonies, overseas ter- 
ritories, protectorates, and territories under 
suzerainty or mandate to the convention and the 
arrangement. 

The texts of the note and of the two lists 
attached thereto are printed below : 
110 



"BRmsH Legation, 

"Berne, 12th November, 19^1. 
"Monsieur le Conseiller Fedicral, 

"In compliance with instructions from His 
Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for For- 
eign Affairs, I have the honour to inform Your 
Excellency, that the ratification by the Govern- 
ment of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland of the Universal Postal 
Convention and of the Agreement concerning 
Insured Letters and Boxes, signed at Buenos 
Aires on the 23rd May, 1939, was deposited at 
that capital on the 21st October, 1941, and to 
declare, in accordance with paragraph 1 of 
Article 9 of the Convention that acceptance of 
the said Convention and Agreement by the Gov- 
ernment of the United Kingdom respectively 
includes the Colonies, Overseas Territories, Pro- 
tectorates and Territories under suzerainty or 
mandate named in the annexed lists A and B. 

"2. Lest there should appear to be some in- 
consistency between the making of this declara- 
tion and the provisions of the last paragraph of 
Article 9 of the Convention, I have the honour 
to inform you that on the deposit of the United 
Kingdom ratification, a statement was made to 
the Argentine Government to the effect that, as 
the Convention was not actually signed on be- 
half of the British territories referred to in the 
preamble as "I'ensemble des Colonies britan- 
niques, y compris les territoires d'outre-mer, 
les Protectorats et les Territoires sous suze- 
rainete ou mandat" these territories are to be 
regarded as capable of participating in the 
Convention by virtue of the first paragraph of 
Article 9, notwithstanding the provisions of 
paragraph 5 of that Article. 

"3. The territories named in list A are to be 
regarded as together forming a single Admin- 



JANUARY 31, 1942 



111 



istration of the Union, in virtue of Article 8 
of the Convention. 

"4. I liave the honour to request that you will 
be so good as to acknowledge the receipt of this 
communication in due course. 

"I avail [etc.] David Victor I^ellt" 



UNIVEBSAL POSTAL CONVENTION 

Territories deemed to participate in the convention 

Burma 

Newfoundland 

Southern Rhodesia 

Bechuanaland Protectorate 

Aden (Col. and Prot.) 

Bahamas 

Barbados 

Bermuda 

British Guiana 

British Honduras 

Ceylon 

Cyprus 

Falliland Islands and Dependencies 

Fiji 

Gambia (Col. and Prot.) 

Gibraltar 

Gold Coast: 

(a) Colony 

(b) Ashanti 

(c) Nortliern Territories 

(d) Togoland (under British Mandate) 
Hong Kong 

Jamaica (Including the Turks and Calces Islands and 

the Cayman Islands) 
Kenya (Col. and Prot.) 
Leeward Islands : 

Antigua 

Montserrat 

St. Kitts-Nevis 

Virgin Islands 
Malay States : 

(a) Federated Malay States: 

Negri Sembilan 
Pahang 
Perak 
Selangor 

(b) Unfederated Malay States: 

Johore 

Kedah 

Kelantan 

Perils 

Trangganu 

Brunei 
Malta 
Mauritius 



Nigeria : 

(a) Colony 

(b) Protectorate 

(c) Cameroons (under British Mandate) 
North Borneo, State of 

Northern Rhodesia 

Nyasaland Protectorate 

Palestine (including Transjordan) 

St. Helena and Ascension 

Sarawak 

Seychelles 

Sierra Leone (Col. and Prot.) 

Somaliland Protectorate 

Straits Settlements 

Tanganyika Territory 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Uganda Protectorate 

Western Pacific Islands: 

Pitcairn Islands 

Salomon Is. Prot. 

Gilbert and Ellice Is. Col. 

Tonga 
Windward Islands: 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 
Zanzibar Protectorate. 

"B" 

INSUEED LETTBX8 AND BOXES AGBEEMENT 

List Of territories covered hy signature on behalf of 

His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom 
Burma 

Newfoundland 
Aden (Col. and Prot.) 
Barbados 
Bermuda 
British Guiana 
British Honduras 
Ceylon 
Cyprus 

Falkland Islands and Dependencies 
Fiji 

Gambia (Col. and Prot.) 
Gibraltar 
Gold Coast: 

(a) Colony 

(b) Ashanti 

(c) Northern Territories 

(d) Togoland (under British Mandate) 
Hong, Kong 

Jamaica (including the Cayman Islands) 
Kenya (Col. and Prot.) 



112 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETm 



Leeward Islands: 

Antigua 

Montserrat 

St. Kitts-Nevis 

Virgin Islands 
Malay States: 

(a) Federated M. S. 

Negri Sembilan 
Pahang 
Perak 
Selangor 

(b) UnfederatBd M. S. 

Johore 

Kedah 

Kelantan 

Perils 

Trangganu 

Brunei 
Malta 
Mauritius 
Nigeria : 

(a) Colony 

(b) Protectorate 

(c) Cameroons (under British Mandate) 
North Borneo, State of 

Palestine 

St. Helena 

Sarawak 

Seychelles 

Sierra Leone (Col. and Prot.) 

Somaliland Prot. 

Straits Settlements 

Tanganyika Territory 

Trinidad and Tobago 

Uganda Prot. 

W. Pacific Islands 

Tonga 
Windward Islands 

Dominica 

Grenada 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent 
Zanzibar Protectorate. 



Publications 



Regulations 



Control of Persons Entering and Leaving the United 
States Pursuant to the Act of May 22, 1918, as 
Amended : Rules and Regulations of the Interde- 
partmental Visa Review Committee, Adopted at 
Washington, January 26, 1942, Eifective January 27, 
1942. (Department of State.) 7 Federal Register 
576. 



Department of State 

Publications of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). January 1, 1942. Pub- 
lication 1679. 29 pp. Free. 

Other Government Agencies 

Fifth Annual Report of the President of the Philip- 
pines to the President and the Congress of the United 
States, Covering the Period July 1, 1939, to June 30, 
1940. H. Doc. 440, 77th Cong, vi, 41 pp. 

United States Maritime Commission : Report to Con- 
gress for the Period Ended October 25, 1941. H. Doc. 
554, 77th Cong. vi. 62 pp. 10«f. 



Legislation 



Independent Offices Appropriation Bill for 1943 : Hear- 
ings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on 
Appropriations, House of Representatives, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess.. Part 1. [Foreign Service pay adjust- 
ment, pp. 51-58; foreign ships taken over by United 
States and transfer of ships to foreign registry, pp. 
297-298 ; Export-Import Bank, pp. 673-678.] 1177 pp. 

Great Lakes - St. Lawrence Basin : Hearings Before 
the Committee on Rivers and Harbors, House of 
Representatives, 77th Cong., 1st sess., on the subject 
of the improvement of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence 
Seaway and Power Project. Part 2, July 14 to August 
6, 1941. (Revised.) iv, 1105-2284, and xxiv pp. 

Fourth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Bill, 1942. S. Rept. 994, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6448. 
[Includes $800,000 for "Transportation, Foreign 
Service".] 3 pp. 

Attack Upon Pearl Harbor by Japanese Armed Forces : 
Report of the Commission Appointed by the President 
of the United States To Investigate and Report the 
Facts Relating to the Attack Made by Japanese 
Armed Forces Upon Pearl Harbor in the Territory 
of Hawaii on December 7, 1941. S. Doc. 159, 77th 
Cong. 21 pp. 

Regulating Water-Borne Foreign Commerce of the 
United States. H. Rept. 1682, 77th Cong., on H.R. 
6291. 18 pp. 

Amending tbe Nationality Act of 1940 [to expedite the 
naturalization of persons who are not citizens, who 
have served or who may hereafter serve honorably 
in the military or naval forces of the United States 



JANUARY 31, 1942 113 

during the present war]. H. Kept. 1710, 77th Cong., An Act Authorizing vessels of Canadian registry to 

on H.R. CA3i). 6 pp. transport iron ore on the Great Laljes during 1942. 

Joint Kcsolution to Maintain the Secrecy of Military Approved January 27, 1942. [S. 2204.] Public Law 

Information [by amending sec. 12 (h) of the Neu- 416, 77th Cong. 1 p. 

trality Act of 1939 to dispense with certain reports Joint Resolution To enable the United States to become 

in the discretion of the Secretary of State]. Ap- an adhering member of the Inter-American Statis- 

proved January 26, 1942. [S. J. Res. 124.] Public tical Institute. Approved January 27, 1942. [S. J. 

Law 414, 77th Cong. 1 p. Res. 96.] Public Law 417, 77th Cong. 1 p. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHED WEEKLT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE OIBECTOB OF THE BUREAU OP THE BUDGET 



"fbsd./ n 30 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BUL 



c 



ontents 



J 



H 



■^ rm 



J 



Tin 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 137— Publication 1696 



The War p^^^ 
Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American RepubHcs: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 117 

Fmal act 117 

Exchange of official representatives of countries at war . 141 

Financial aid to China 142 

American officials and nationals m the Far East . . . . 143 

Declarationsof war by beUigerent countries 143 

American Republics 

Visit to the United States of BraziHan Minister of 

Finance 145 

General 

Supremacy of federal pohcy over state policy in 

matter of recognition of foreign government . . . 146 

Suits by enemy plaintiffs 147 

The Foreign Service 

Death of American Minister Resident in Iraq 147 

Personnel changes 148 

Legislation 148 

Publications 149 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT QF DOCd-yiFNT? 

FEB 20 1912 



The War 



THIRD MEETING OF MINISTERS OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press February 2] 

Upon return of tlie American delegation to 
the Rio conference to this country, lieaded by 
Mr. Welles, I desire to welcome them home and 
to felicitate with them upon the splendid suc- 
cess which has attended their unremitting ef- 



forts at the Eio conference — efforts which were 
directed toward the common objective of hemi- 
spheric solidarity and mutual defense. I am 
sure that the fine results already achieved at 
Rio will be translated rapidly into effective ac- 
tion throughout all of the American nations. 



FINAL ACT 

[The certified copy of the final act has not yet been received in the Department. The following text, however, 
printed herein for the convenience of the readers of the Bulletin, is believed to be substantially correct.] 



[Released to the press February 2] 

The Governments of the American Republics, 
desirous that their Ministers, of Foreign Affairs 
or their respective representatives meet for pur- 
poses of consultation, in accordance with agree- 
ments adopted at previous inter-American con- 
ferences, designated for this purpose the repre- 
sentatives listed below in the order determined 
by lot, who met in the City of Rio de Janeiro 
from January 15th to January 28th, 1942 : 

Costa Rica : — His Excellency Alberto Echandi, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Colombia: — His Excellency Gabriel Turbat, 

representative of the Minister of Foreign 

Affairs 
Cuba : — His Excellency Aurelio Fekn.\ndez 

CoNCHESO, representative of the Minister of 

State 



Dominican Republic : — His Excellency Artueo 

Despradel, Secretary of State for Foreign 

Affairs 
Honduras: — His Excellency Juli.4N R. 

Caceres, representative of the Minister of 

Foreign Affairs 
El Salvador: — His Excellency Hector David 

Castro, representative of the Minister of 

Foreign Affairs 
Paraguay: — His Excellency Luis A. Argaxa, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Uruguay: — His Excellency Alberto Guani, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Argentina: — His Excellency Enrique Ruiz- 

GuiNAZu, Minister of Foreign Affairs and 

Worship 
Chile: — His Excellency Juan Bautista Ros- 

SETTi, Minister of Foreign Affairs 

117 



118 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Bolivia: — His Excellency Edtjardo Anza Ma- 

TiENzo, Minister of Foreign Affairs and 

Worship 
Panama: — His Excellency Octavio Fabrega, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Venezuela : — His Excellency CAKAccifiLO 

Pakra Perez, Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Ecuador: — His Excellency Julio Tobar Do- 

Noso, Mhiister of Foreign Affairs 
Guatemala : — His Excellency Manuel Arroyo, 

representative of the Minister of Foreign 

Affairs 
Mexico: — His Excellency Ezequtel Padilla, 

Secretary of Foreign Affairs 
United States of America: — The Honorable 

Sumner Welles, representative of the Sec- 
retary of State 
Peru: — His Excellency Alfredo Sole t Muro, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Haiti: — His Excellency Charles Fombrun, 

Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs 
Nicaragua : — His Excellency Mariano Argu- 

ELLo Vargas, Minister of Foreign Affaii's 
Brazil: — His Excellency Oswaldo Aranha, 

Minister of Foreign Affairs 

His Excellency Getulio Vargas, President of 
Brazil, delivered an address at the Inaugural 
Session held in the Tiradentes Palace on Janu- 
ary 15th, under the provisional presidency of 
His Excellency Oswaldo Aranha, Minister of 
Foreign Affairs of Brazil. The response on 
behalf of the delegates was delivered by His 
Excellency Juan B. Rossetti, Minister of For- 
eign Affairs of Chile. 

At a Plenary Session held immediately after 
the Inaugural Session, His Excellency Oswaldo 
Aranha was elected by acclamation Permanent 
President of the Meeting In accordance with 
the Regulations, the Government of Brazil des- 
ignated His Excellency Jose de Paula Rodri- 
gues Alves, Secretary General of the Meeting. 

The program of the Meeting was approved by 
the Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union on December 17, 1941. 

The regulations had been previously formu- 
lated by the Governing Board in accordance 
with a resolution of the Second Meeting of For- 
eign Ministers. 



As provided for in the regulations a Com- 
mittee on Credentials was appointed, composed 
of His Excellency Dr. Ezequiel Padilla, Secre- 
tary of Foreign Affairs of Mexico ; His Excel- 
lency Dr. Alberto Echandi Montero, Minister 
of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica ; and His Ex- 
cellency Dr. Luis A. Argafia, Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Paraguay. 

In order to coordinate the texts of the conclu- 
sions in the four official languages of the Meet- 
ing, a Committee on Coordination was ap- 
pointed, composed of L. A. Podesta Costa 
(Argentina), Camillo de Oliveira (Brazil), 
Warren Kelchner (United States of America) , 
and Dantes Bellegarde (Haiti). 

The fleeting further agreed that there should 
be two committees to consider the topics in- 
cluded in the Agenda, each Committee to be 
composed of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs, 
or their representatives, of all the countries, with 
the right to appoint another member of their 
respective Delegations in the event they were 
unable to attend a session in person. 

As a result of its deliberations the Third 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics approved the following 
conclusions: 

I 
Breaking of Diplomatic Relations 



The American Republics reaffirm their decla- 
ration to consider any act of aggression on the 
part of a non-American State against one of 
them as an act of aggression against all of them, 
constituting as it does an immediate threat to 
the liberty and independence of America. 



The American Republics reaffirm their com- 
plete solidarity and their determination to co- 
operate jointly for their mutual protection until 
the effects of the present aggression against the 
Continent have disappeared. 



The American Republics, in accordance with 
the procedures established by their own laws 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



119 



and in conformity with the position and cir- 
cumstances obtaining in each country in the 
existing continental conflict, recommend the 
breaking of their diplomatic relations with 
Japan, Germany and Italy, since the first-men- 
tioned State attacked and the other two declared 
war on an American country. 

IV 

Finally, the American Republics declare that, 
prior to the reestablishment of the relations re- 
ferred to in the preceding paragraph, they will 
consult among themselves iii order that their 
action may have a solidary character. 

II 

Production of Strategic Materials 

Whereas: 

1. Continental solidarity must be translated 
into positive and efficient action of the highest 
significance, which action can be no other than 
an economic mobilization of the American Re- 
publics capable of rapidly and fully guarantee- 
ing the supply of strategic and basic materials 
necessary to the defense of the Hemisphere; 

2. This mobilization should include all activi- 
ties which will advance the desired end, and 
must have the preferential character which its 
nature and purpose require ; 

3. In order to ensure the smooth carrying out 
of the suggested plan, every positive action 
must be taken; all existing obstacles or those 
which may in the future appear should be elim- 
inated or minimized ; and all contributory fac- 
tors should be strengthened; 

4. Commercial speculation should be pre- 
vented from taking unfair advantage of the 
situation ; 

5. Guarantees should be given for the contin- 
uance of long-term contracts and for the main- 
tenance of prices, equitable both for the con- 
sumer and profitable to the producer, to permit 
the attahiment and maintenance of a fair wage 
level ; 

6. Consideration must be given to measures 
providing for transition to the post-war period 
and the resulting readjustment with a minimum 
of disturbance to production and commerce; 
taking steps to protect, at the opf)ortune time, 



producers against competition from goods pro- 
duced in countries with a low standard of 
living; 

7. Credit operations should have, as far as 
possible, an economic character, and should 
take into account the real ability of the debtors 
to repay; 

8. There should exist in each country of the 
Americas special organizations to formulate 
promptly the respective national plans for eco- 
nomic mobilization; 

9. A Pan American organization should 
formulate coordinated general plans of mobili- 
zation on the basis of the national plans above 
indicated; and 

10. The Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee can efficiently carry 
out these functions if its authority and powers 
are enlarged. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

1. That, as a practical expression of continen- 
tal solidarity, an economic mobilization of the 
American Republics be effected, with a view to 
assuring to the countries of this Hemisphere, 
and particularly to those at war, an adequate 
supply of basic and strategic materials m the 
shortest possible time. 

2. That such mobilization include mining, ag- 
ricultural, industrial and commercial activities 
related to the supply not only of materials for 
strictly military use but also of products essen- 
tial for civilian needs. 

3. That full recognition be given to the im- 
perative character and extreme urgency of the 
existing situation when formulating measures 
necessary to effect economic mobilization. 

4. That the mobilization include measures to 
stimulate production and other measures de- 
signed to eliminate or minimize administrative 
formalities and the regulations and restrictions 
which impede the production and free flow of 
basic and strategic materials. 

5. That, in addition, measures be adopted to 
strengthen the finances of the producing coim- 
tries. 



120 

6. That the American nations take measures 
to prevent commercial speculation from increas- 
ing export prices of basic and strategic prod- 
ucts above the limits fixed for the respective 
domestic markets. 

7. That, in so far as possible, the increase of 
jjroduction be assured by bilateral or multi- 
lateral agreements or contracts which provide 
for purchases during long periods at prices 
■which are equitable for the consumer, remunera- 
tive to the producer and which provide a fair 
standard of wages for the workers of the Amer- 
icas, in which producers are protected against 
competition from products originating in areas 
wherein real wages are unduly low ; and wliich 
make provision for the period of transition after 
the war and the readjustments which will follow 
in a manner guaranteeing the continuance of 
adequate production and permitting the ex- 
istence of trade under conditions equitable to 
producers. 

8. That the service of financial obligations 
incurred to maintain and stimulate production 
in each country be made conditional, in so far 
as possible, upon the proceeds of its exports. 

9. That the American nations which do not 
possess appropriate agencies organize special 
commissions prior to April 30, 1942 to formu- 
late national plans for economic mobilization. 

10. Tliat tlie said commissions provide the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee with the necessary material 
so that it may formulate a coordinated general 
plan for economic mobilization. 

11. That tlie Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee be further 
charged with preparing a list, to be periodically 
revised, of the basic and strategic materials con- 
sidered by each country as necessary for the 
defense of the Hemisphere ; and 

Resolves : 

12. That, in order to enable the Inter- Ameri- 
can Financial and Economic Advisory Conunit- 
tee to carry out the new duties entrusted to it, 
its means of operation be expanded immediately, 
and that it be empowered to request the Ameri- 
can Governments to execute the inter- American 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 

economic agreements which they have previously I 
approved. * 



III 



Maintenance of the Internal Economy or 
THE American Countries 

Whereas : 

1. The First and Second Meetings of the Min- 
isters of Foreign Affairs of the American Re- 
publics recommended that there be established, 
among them, a close and sincere cooperation in 
order to protect tlieir economic and financial 
structure, maintain their fiscal equilibrium, safe- 
guard the stability of their currencies, promote 
and expand their commerce and, in addition, 
declared that the American nations continue to 
adliere to the liberal principles of international 
trade, conducted with peaceful motives and 
based upon equality of treatment and fair and 
equitable trade practices, and that they do every- 
tliing in their power to strengthen their economic 
position, to improve further the trade and other 
economic relations among themselves, by devis- 
ing and applying appropriate measures to 
lessen the diiBculties, disadvantages and dangers 
arising from disturbed and dislocated world I 
conditions; I 

2. The dislocations of the economy of the 
American nations caused by the war demand, 
more than ever before, common and coordinated 
action, in order that their trade may be inten- 
sified in accordance with their mutual needs and 
upon the basis of the greatest possible equality ; 

3. The establishment of adequate facilities 
for commercial credit, on the part of nations 
which produce raw materials, industrial ma- 
chinery or manufactured articles, is an indis- 
pensable requirement for the maintenance of a 
sound economy in the consuming countries ; 

4. The fixing of prices and ceilings on raw 
materials and foodstuffs should be based upon 
a fair correlation, which takes into account not 
only costs of production, transportation, insur- 
ance and a reasonable profit, but also the general 
price level of products exported by the country 
which imports such raw materials and food- 
stuffs ; 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



121 



5. The systems of priority and licenses estab- 
lished by some countries with respect to the 
exportation of materials, which are related to 
their defense requirements, have brought about 
consequences affecting commercial interchange 
and it is therefore necessary to recommend ade- 
quate systems and measures to alleviate said 
consequences, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

1. To recommend to the nations which pro- 
duce raw materials, industrial machinery and 
other articles essential for the maintenance of 
the domestic economies of the consuming coun- 
tries that they do everything possible to supply 
such articles and products in quantities suffi- 
cient to prevent a scarcity thereof, which might 
bring about consequences detrimental to the eco- 
nomic life of the American peoples. The ap- 
plication of this recommendation is subject to 
the practical limitations of the existing emer- 
gency and shall not endanger the security or 
the defense of the exporting nations. 

2. To recommend that all the nations of this 
continent have access, with the greatest possible 
degree of equality, to inter-American commerce 
and to the raw materials which they require for 
the satisfactory and prosperous development of 
their respective economies, provided, however, 
that they shall give preferential treatment to 
the nations at war for equal access to materials 
essential to their defense; and that, in agree- 
ments which may be concluded, the essential 
needs of other American countries be considered 
with a view to preventing dislocations in their 
domestic economies. 

3. To recommend to the countries which ex- 
port industrial raw materials, foodstuffs, man- 
ufactured products or industrial machinery, 
that they establish adequate, ample, liberal and 
effective systems of credit which will facilitate 
the acquisition of such of these products as may 
be required by the industry and commerce of 
the consumer nations to maintain their econ- 
omy upon firm foundations, and that this be 
done in such a way as to lessen and alleviate 



the adverse effects upon the consumer nations 
of the extension of the war and the closing down 
of non-American markets. 

4. To urge the Governments of America to 
adopt necessary measures to harmonize prices 
on the following bases: 

(a) That sharp increases in the prices of ex- 
port products shall not be permitted ; 

(b) That the distributors or processors of im- 
ported goods shall likewise not be permitted to 
increase unduly the prices to be paid by the 
consumer ; 

(c) That the maximum purchase price fixed 
by an American Republic for any product or 
article which it imports from another American 
Republic shall be submitted to consultation, if 
deemed advisable, by the Governments of the 
interested countries ; 

(d) That in their price policies the American 
Republics endeavor to establish a fair relation 
between the prices of foodstuffs, raw materials 
and manufactured articles. 

5. Finally to recommend to the American 
Governments the following standards for the 
purpose of improving their economic relations : 

(a) The establishment, for the control of ex- 
ports, of simple administrative systems of the 
greatest possible autonomy based upon rapid 
and efficient methods which will satisfy essential 
requirements promptly, especially for the main- 
tenance of the basic industries of each country; 

(b) The adoption by the governments of ex- 
porting countries of a system of allocation to 
each country of products and articles subject to 
priorities and licenses which are essential to the 
domestic economy of the importing countries; 

(c) The appointment by exporting countries 
which maintain systems of priorities, licenses or 
allocations of representatives in the capitals of 
the importing countries to cooperate with the 
appropriate organizations of the latter in the 
study of questions arising in connection with the 
export and import of products and articles sub- 
ject to allocations or special controls, so as to 
accelerate procedure and to diminish, as much 
as possible, other difficulties involved in the in- 
terchange of such products and articles. The 
recommendation or opinion of guch representa- 



122 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tives shall constitute, in principle, a recognition 
on their part of the need and desirability of such 
imports; 

(d) The prompt exchange of statistics relat- 
ing to consumer needs and to the production of 
raw materials, foodstuffs and manufactured 
products, utilizing, whenever appropriate, such 
organizations as the Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee or others 
which appropriately may facilitate and stimu- 
late commercial interchange among the nations 
of the Americas. 

IV 
Mobilization or Transportation Facilities 

Whereas : 

1. The problem of increasing to the highest 
degree the efficiency of transportation facilities 
among the Republics of tlie Western Hemisphere 
is of great importance in view of the difficulties 
arising from the existing emergency ; 

2. The establishment of the greatest possible 
coordination of the various inland waterway, 
land, maritime and air services of the American 
Republics is indispensable for their most effec- 
tive use ; 

3. The difficulties of transporting essential 
articles and materials normally exported and 
imported by each nation could provoke economic 
and social dislocation and diminish or paralyze 
its industrial activities, a particularly serious 
situation when such activities are devoted pri- 
marily to the production of articles or materials 
necessary for the defense of the Continent ; and 

4. In order properly to provide for defense 
and to develop inter-American conamerce it is 
indispensable to improve and expand the sys- 
tems of communication among the countries of 
the Continent, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To recommend to the Governments of the 
American Republics : 

(a) That they adopt immediately, in so far 
as possible, adequate measures to expand and 



improve all the communications systems of im- 
portance to continental defense and to the 
development of commerce between the Ameri- 
can nations ; 

(b) That they make every effort consistent 
with national or continental defense fully to 
utilize and develop their respective internal 
transportation facilities in order to assure the 
rapid delivery of those goods which are essential 
to the maintenance of tlieir respective econo- 
mies; 

(c) That through their national authorities, 
the Inter-American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee, and all other instruments 
of inter- American economic cooperation which 
may have been established, they take every ap- 
propriate measure individually and jointly to 
improve and supplement inter-American com- 
munication facilities — air, maritime, land, in- 
land waterway — related to the economy and 
defense of the Western Hemisphere and to the 
other objectives set forth in this resolution; 

(d) That they adopt measures to insure the 
allocation of sufficient shipping tonnage for 
general trade and cooperate in creating and 
facilitating, by every means in their power, the 
maintenance of adequate maritime services, 
utilizing especially all the vessels that are im- 
mobilized in their ports, belonging to countries 
at war with any American nation ; 

(e) That those with merchant fleets consider 
the necessity of maintaining in service sufficient 
vessels to guarantee maritime transportation 
which will permit the nations of the Continent 
to import and export products essential to their 
respective economies and that, in cooperation 
with the Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee, maritime organi- 
zations functioning in various American na- 
tions and the Inter-American Maritime Tech- 
nical Commission, they endeavor to coordinate 
shipping between the American Republics so 
that the vessels now in continental service, 
without omitting or changing existing steps, 
may make such calls at ports of nations, which 
are most affected in certain regions of the Hemi- 
sphere, as are necessary in order to assure them 
regular and suitable transportation ; 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



123 



(f) That they take, in so far as possible, 
measures necessary to minimize expenses at 
ports of call, such as port dues and lighthouse 
charges, etc. ; 

(g) That they endeavor to expand port fa- 
cilities and provide means necessary for the 
rapid repair of damaged vessels and for their 
normal maintenance ; 

(li) That they undertake to speed up internal 
transportation and increase the carrying capac- 
ity of railway systems, taking steps rapidly to 
complete routes important for continental de- 
fense which are under construction or recon- 
struction; 

(i) That they study the desirability of recog- 
nizing the right of each State to full participa- 
tion in international trade under a system of 
free access to transportation for all classes of 
cargo in conformity with the provisions of ex- 
isting international agreements and consistent 
with the legislation of each country; 

( j ) That they undertake to imjjrove and en- 
large existing airports and to construct new 
airports equipped with necessary installations 
and repair shops, so as to create a system of air 
transportation, with terminals in the Americas, 
which fully meets the requirements of inter- 
American and domestic air services ; 

(k) That they speed up the construction of 
the unfinished sections of the Pan American 
Highway and the improvement of the sections 
already constructed so as to provide efficient 
transportation in the Hemisphere and permit 
the development of inter- American and domes- 
tic commerce, connecting centers of production 
with centers of consumption. To this end, there 
are expressly reiterated the conclusions ap- 
proved in recommendation number LII of the 
Lima Conference of 1938 and in resolution 
number XXIII of the Habana Meeting of 1940; 
and 

(1) That they give full support and render 
the fullest practicable measure of cooperation to 
the work of the Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee and of its 
Inter-American Maritime Tecluiical Commis- 
sion in all their problems and, particularly, in 



the field of merchant sliijjping, taking joint 
steps necessary to enable the Goverimients of 
the American Republics to mobilize, in the full- 
est and m,ost effective manner, all the ships avail- 
able in the Western Hemisphere, so as to give 
priority to the transportation of strategic and 
basic materials essential for the defense of the 
Continent and for the maintenance of the eco- 
nomic welfare of the American Republics. 

2. To recommend to the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
and the Inter-American Maritime Technical 
Commission : 

(a) That they suggest to the Governments 
measures necessary in order, by pi'evious agree- 
ment between administrative agencies of such 
Governments, aviation and shipping concerns, 
and public or private railway companies oper- 
ating in the American Republics, to promote and 
improve the entire system of inter-Amei'ican 
transportation, endeavoring to guarantee reg- 
ular and coordinated mobilization and provi- 
sion of means necessary for the transportation 
both of products which are imported and ex- 
ported by each of the countries as well as for 
the effective and comfortable travel of their 
peoples ; 

(b) That they encourage the conclusion of 
agreements regarding the matters set forth in 
the preceding paragraph between countries that 
wish to enter into them, and study ways of re- 
placing existing means of transportation should 
they become inadequate ; 

(c) That they study the possibility of allocat- 
ing adequate and sufficient transportation to 
each country, taking into account not only ton- 
nage but also the speed of and the facilities for 
loading and discharging vessels which carry 
essential raw materials, and that, moreover, they 
encourage the fixing, from time to time, of maxi- 
mum freight rates ; 

(d) That they study a general plan of inter- 
Am,erican maritime transportation, taking into 
account the availability of vessels and the mini- 
mum requirements of each of the Republics of 
the Continent, so that they will all be linked, by 



124 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETESf 



regular and adequate services, with their prin- 
cipal import and export markets; 

(e) That they examine the desirability of ap- 
plying the "Cash and Carry System" to the 
transportation of commodities. 



Se\'erance of Commercial and Financial 
Relations 
Whereas: 

1. At the Second Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics, held at 
Habana in July 1940, it was declared that any 
attempt on the part of a non-American State 
against the integrity or inviolability of the ter- 
ritory, the sovereignty or the political independ- 
ence of an American State should be considered 
as an act of aggression against all of the Amer- 
ican States; 

2. As a result of the aggression committed 
against the Western Hemisphere a state of war 
exists between American Republics and non- 
American States, which affects the political and 
economic interests of the whole Continent and 
demands the adoption of measures for the de- 
fense and security of all of the American Re- 
publics; 

3. All of the American Republics have already 
adopted measures which subject to some control 
the exportation or re-exportation of merchan- 
dise; most of the American Republics have in- 
stituted systems of restriction and control of 
financial and commercial transactions with the 
nations signatory to the Tripartite Pact and 
the territories dominated by them, and others 
have adopted measures to curb other alien eco- 
nomic activities prejudicial to their welfare; 
and all the American Republics have approved 
the recommendations of the Inter- American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
regarding the immediate placing into service of 
tlie merchant vessels of non-American registry 
lying immobilized in American ports, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 
1. That the Governments of the American 
Republics, in a manner consistent with the 



usual practices and the legislation of the respec- 
tive countries, adopt immediately : 

(a) Any additional measures necessary to cut 
off for the duration of the present Hemispheric 
emergency all commercial and financial inter- 
course, direct or indirect, between the Western 
Hemisphere and the nations signatory to the 
Tripartite Pact and the territories dominated 
by them ; 

(b) Measures to eliminate all other financial 
and commercial activities prejudicial to the wel- 
fare and security of the American Republics, 
measures wliich shall have, among others, the 
following purposes: 

(i) To prevent, within the American Re- 
publics, all commercial and financial transac- 
tions inimical to the security of the Western 
Hemisphere, which are entered into directly 
or indirectly, by or for the benefit of the 
members of the Tripartite Pact, the terri- 
tories dominated by them, as well as the na- 
tionals of any of them, whether real or juridi- 
cal persons, it being undei-stood that real per- 
sons may be excepted if they are resident 
within an American Republic and on condi- 
tion that they are controlled according to the 
following paragraph ; 

(ii) To supervise and control all commer- 
cial and financial transactions within the 
American Republics by nationals of the states 
signatory to the Tripartite Pact, or of the 
territories dominated by them, who are resi- 
dent within the American Republics, and to 
prevent all transactions of whatsoever nature 
which are inimical to the security of the 
Western Hemisphere. 

Wlienever a govei-nment of an American Re- 
public considers it desirable and in accordance 
with its national interest and its own legisla- 
tion, and especially if any of the aforesaid 
measures, wlien applied to concrete cases, should 
be prejudicial to its national economy, the prop- 
erties, interests, and enterprises of sucli states 
and nationals which exist within its jurisdic- 
tion, may be placed in trust or subjected to per- 
manent administrative intervention for pur- 
poses of control ; moreover, such government of 
an American Republic may resort to sales to its 



FEBRUAKY 7, 194 2 



125 



nationals, provided that the proceeds thereof 
be subject to the same control and to similar 
regulations as those applicable to the funds of 
the above-mentioned aliens. 

2. That the Governments of the American 
Republics adopt, severally or jointly, measures 
to counteract any adverse effects upon their re- 
spective economies which may result from the 
application of this recommendation. Special 
consideration should be given to measures to 
avoid the problems of partial or total unem- 
ployment which might arise in the American 
countries as a result of the application of the 
measures of control and restriction of the 
activities of aliens. 

VI 

Confeeen'ce To Standardize Procedure in 
Banking Operations Relating to Nationals 
OF Aggressor Countries 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends: 

That the Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee convoke, when it 
believes it opportune, a conference of repre- 
sentatives of the central banks or equivalent or 
analogous institutions of the American Repub- 
lics for the purpose of drafting standards of 
procedure for the uniform handling of bank 
credits, collections, contracts of lease and con- 
signments of merchandise, involving real or 
juridical persons who are nationals of a State 
which has committed an act of aggression 
against the American Continent. 

VII 

DEi-ELOPMENT OF COMMERCIAL INTERCHANGE 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

That the Governments of the American Re- 
publics, as a means of promoting the develop- 
ment of commercial interchange among them, 
study the desirability of making an exception 
in the commercial agreements which they con- 



clude with nations outside the Western Hemi- 
sphere of the treatment which they extend in 
commercial and customs matters to all of the 
other American Republics. 

VIII 

Inter-Ameeican Development Commission 

Whereas: 

1. The Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics re- 
affirmed Resolution XIII of the Inter- American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
by which the Inter-American Development 
Commission was created, and made recommen- 
dations for the promotion of the economic forces 
of the American nations in accordance with the 
program of the Inter-American Development 
Commission ; 

2. The Inter- American Development Commis- 
sion, in order to carry out specific provisions of 
said Resolution XIII, as well as the recom- 
mendations of the Second Meeting of Foreign 
Ministers, sent from Washington a mission to 
the other twenty American Republics to estab- 
lish national commissions affiliated with it; 

3. The work accomplished during 1941 by the 
Inter-American Development Commission in 
creating an inter-American system of twenty- 
one national commissions affiliated with it and 
functioning with the collaboration of their re- 
spective governments has been completely 
satisfactory ; 

4. The time has come to stimulate, intensify 
and coordinate the work of such national com- 
missions and of the Inter-American Develop- 
ment Commission in Washington in order to 
promote, or maintain, the economic forces of 
the American nations, using for this purpose 
to the fullest extent possible the advantages 
offered by the existence of such system of inter- 
American commissions, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To recommend that the Governments of the 
American Republics continue to lend to the na- 



126 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tional commissions and to the Inter- American 
Development Commission in Washington all the 
assistance and support they may need to carry 
out the objectives for which they were created. 

2. To recommend that the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
entrust, when deemed appropriate by the Com- 
mittee, to the Commission such further matters 
and problems as the Connnittee may wish to 
have studied, surveyed or carried out for the 
benefit of inter-American economic develop- 
ment. 

3. To instruct the Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee to create, 
under the auspices of the Inter- American De- 
velopment Commission, a permanent body of 
technical experts to study the natural resources 
of each country when so requested by its gov- 
ernment. 

IX 

Development of Basic Production 

Whereas: 

1. The war situation has impelled certain 
American nations to create, in special cases, 
emergency industries which under normal cir- 
cumstances would be considered as uneconomic 
or prejudicial to the economic solidarity of the 
Americas ; and 

2. It is imperative that there be avoided, in 
so far as is possible, the prejudicial effects on 
the economies of the American Republics of 
such action, 

The Third IVIeeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

That the nations of the Americas stimulate 
the development of the basic production of each 
of them, avoiding in so far as possible the 
establishment or expansion of production of 
substitute or synthetic commodities which is 
economically artificial and might displace the 
consumption of natural products available in 
other American nations, there being excepted 
only those industries which are indispensable 



for national defense provided that such defense 
needs cannot be effectively met with natural 
products. 

X 

Inter-American Bank 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

That the Governments of the American Re- 
publics which have not already adhered to the 
Convention for the Establishment of an Inter- 
American Bank study the proposal in accord- 
ance with their respective situations and make 
their decision in the matter known, as soon as 
possible, to the Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee. 

XI 

Investment of Capital in the American 
Republics 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommeixds: 

That the Inter- American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee take steps to en- 
courage capital investments by any of the 
American Republics in any one of the others, 
requesting the various governments to adopt the 
measures necessary to facilitate the flow and 
protection of such investments within the 
Continent. 

XII 

Inter-American Statistical Institute 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 



1. To request the American Governments to 
participate in and support the Inter-American 
Statistical Institute of Washington in order to 
establish, as soon as possible, a service for the 
interchange of statistical information and 
standards among the American nations ; and 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



127 



2. To recommend to the Pan American Union 
that it organize periodic meetings of representa- 
tives of the national statistical services of the 
American Republics for the coordination of 
their work. 

XIII 

Utilization of Raw Materials 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of tlie American Republics 

Declares: 

1. That to raise the standard of living of the 
people, the economic policy of the American 
nations must be founded upon a broad and com- 
plete utilization of their natural resources and 
directed toward a greater industrialization of 
those raw materials which present favorable and 
permanent economic possibilities both as to pro- 
duction and markets; and at the same time it 
shall be the policy to seek to improve conti- 
nental coordination through international 
agreements. 

2. That it is the desire of the Third Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs that the 
Inter-American Development Commission and 
the respective National Commissions endeavor 
to put into practice the economic policy re- 
ferred to in this declaration. 

XIV 

COMMEKCIAL FACILITIES FOR THE IxLAND COUN- 
TRIES OF THE Americas 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends: 

That the American Republics study promptly 
the possibility of concluding a multilateral con- 
vention binding themselves not to claim., by vir- 
tue of the most-favored-nation clause, conces- 
sions and facilities which each of them may 
grant or may have granted to the commerce of 
the inland countries of the Americas in order to 
eliminate or minimize the disadvantages inher- 
ent in the geographical position of such 
countries. 



XV 

International Stabilization Fund 
Whereas: 

1. A more effective mobilization and utiliza- 
tion of foreign exchange resources would be of 
assistance in the struggle against aggression and 
would contribute to the realization of the eco- 
nomic objectives set forth at the First and Sec- 
ond Meetings of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics at Panama and 
Habana; and 

2. The American Republics which are com- 
bined in a common effort to maintain their 
political and economic indei^endence can 
cooperate in the creation of an organization to 
promote stability of foreign exchange rates, en- 
courage the international movement of produc- 
tive capital, facilitate the reduction of artificial 
and discriminatory barriers to the movement 
of goods, assist in the correction of the maldis- 
tribution of gold, strengthen monetary systems, 
and facilitate the maintenance of monetary 
jjolicies that avoid serious inflation or deflation. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

1. That the Governments of the American 
Republics participate in a special conference of 
Ministers of Finance or their representatives to 
be called for the purpose of considering the 
establishment of an international stabilization 
fund; 

2. That the conference in considering the es- 
tablishment of such a fund shall formulate the 
plan of organization, powers and resources nec- 
essary to the proper functioning of the fund, 
shall determine the conditions requisite to par- 
ticipation in the fund, and shall propose 
principles to guide the fund in its operation. 

XVI 

Economic Collaboration 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 



128 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Declares: 

1. That since the best interests of the Conti- 
nent require the proper utilization of the natu- 
ral resources of each country, including those of 
the subsoil, the American Republics should en- 
deavor, within their own economic systems, to 
develop such resources. 

2. That in keeping with the spirit of solidar- 
ity and collaboration inspired by the doctrine of 
Pan Americanism, plans for cooperation should 
be made through the Inter-American Develop- 
ment Commission and its National Commis- 
sions in order to facilitate the financing of such 
development projects, with due regard to the 
economic possibilities of each country. 

XVII 

SUB^-ERSrVE ACTn'ITIES 

'Whereas : 

1. Acts of aggression of the nature contem- 
plated in Resolution XV adopted by the Second 
Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics at Habana have now 
taken place against the integrity and inviolabil- 
ity of the territory of an American Republic ; 

2. Acts of aggression of a non-military char- 
acter, including systematic espionage, sabotage, 
and subversive propaganda are being com- 
mitted on this Continent, inspired by and under 
the direction of member states of the Tripartite 
Pact and states subservient to them, and the 
fate of numbers of the formerly free nations 
of Europe has shown them to be both pre- 
liminary to and an integral part of a program 
of military aggression; 

3. The American Republics are determined 
to maintain their integrity and solidarity, in 
the emergency created by aggression by non- 
American States, and to give the fullest co- 
operation in the establishment and enforce- 
ment of extraordinary measures of continental 
defense ; 

4. The Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 
recommended that the necessary steps be taken 
to prevent the carrying on of such subversive 
activities in the resolutions entitled: 



"II. Norms Concerning Diplomatio and 

Consular Functions". 

"III. Coordination of Police and Judicial 
^Ieasures for the Defense of Socdett 
and Institutions of Each American 
State". 

"V. Precautionary Measures With Refer- 
ence to the Issuance of Passports". 

"VI. AcrmTiES Directed From Abroad 
Against Domestic Institutions". 

"VII. Diffusion of Doctrines Tending To 
Pl.\ce in Jeopardy the Common Inter- 
American Democratic Ideal or To 
Threaten the Security and Neutral- 
ity OF THE American Republics". 

5. The gravitj' of the present emergency re- 
quires that the American states, individually 
and in concert, take additional and more strin- 
gent measures to protect themselves against 
groups and individuals that seek to weaken 
their defenses from within, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

1. To reaffirm the determination of the 
American Republics to prevent individuals or 
groups within their respective jurisdictions from 
engaging in activities detrimental to the indi- 
vidual or collective security and welfare of the 
American Republics as expressed in Resolutions 
II, III, V, VI, and VII of the Second Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics. 

2. To recommend to the Governments of the 
American Republics the adoption of similar 
legislative measures tending to prevent or pun- 
ish as crimes, acts against the democratic insti- 
tutions of the States of the Continent in the 
same manner as attempts against the integrity, 
independence or sovereignty of any one of them ; 
and that the Governments of the American Re- 
publics maintain and expand their systems of 
surveillance designed to prevent subversive ac- 
tivities of nationals of non-American countries, 
as individuals or groups of individuals, that 
originate in or are directed from a foreign coun- 



FEBRUARY 7, 194 2 

try and are intended to interfere with or limit 
the efforts of the American Republics individ- 
ually or collectively to preserve their integrity 
and independence, and the integrity and soli- 
darity of the American Continent. 

3. To recommend to the American Eepublics 
that they adopt in conformance with their con- 
stitutions and laws, regulatory provisions that 
are, as far as possible, in keeping with the 
memorandum which is attached to this Resolu- 
tion for purposes of information. 

4. To recommend, according to Resolution 
VII of the Habana Meeting on the subject of 
anti-democratic propaganda, that the Govern- 
ments of the American Republics control, with- 
in their respective national jurisdictions, the 
existence of organizations directed or supported 
by elements of non-American States which are 
now or may in the future be at war with 
American countries, whose activities are harm- 
ful to American security ; and proceed to termi- 
nate their existence if it is established that they 
are centers of totalitarian propaganda. 

5. That, to study and coordinate the measures 
recommended in this Resolution, the Governing 
Board of the Pan American Union shall elect, 
prior to March 1, 1942, a committee of seven 
members to be known as "The Emergency Ad- 
visory Committee for Political Defense". 

6. The Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union, after consulting the Governments of 
the American Republics, shall determine the 
functions of this committee, prepare the regula- 
tions which shall govern its activities, and fix 
its budget of expenditures. 

Attachment to Resolution XVTI 

Memorandum on the Regulation of Subveesfve 
Activities 

It is recommended to the American Republics 
that, as far as practicable in view of present 
conditions and those which may be foreseen, 
they take comprehensive regidatory measures, 
that are not in conflict with their respective con- 
stitutional provisions, and that these measures 
include the following, it being recognized that 
many of them are already in force: 



129 

(A) To control dangerous aliens by: 

1. Requiring that all aliens register and 
periodically report in person to the proper 
authorities and exercising a strict supervision 
over the activities and conduct of all nationals 
of member states of the Tripartite Pact and 
states subservient to them; communicating 
immediately to other Am,erican Republics 
information that may be obtained relative to 
the presence of foreigners suspect with rela- 
tion to the peace and security of such other 
Republics ; 

2. Establishing procedures whereby such 
nationals of the aforesaid states as are deemed 
dangerous to the country of their residence 
shall during their stay therein remain in de- 
tention or be restricted in their freedom of 
movement ; 

3. Preventing such nationals from possess- 
ing, trading in or making use of aircraft, lire- 
arms, explosives, radio transmitting instru- 
ments, or other implements of warfare, propa- 
ganda, espionage, or sabotage ; 

4. Limiting internal travel and change of 
residence of those aliens deemed dangerous 
in so far as such travel may be incompatible 
with national security; 

5. Forbidding the participation by such na- 
tionals in organizations controlled by or act- 
ing in the interest of member states of the 
Tripartite Pact or states subservient to them; 

6. Protecting all aliens not deemed d anger- 
ous from being deprived of adequate means 
of livelihood, unfairly discriminated against, 
or otherwise interfered with in the conduct 
of their normal social and business activities. 

(B) To prevent the abuse of citizenship by : 

1. Exercising that redoubled vigilance 
which the circumstances demand in the natu- 
ralization of aliens, with particular reference 
to denying citizenship to those who continue 
in any way to retain allegiance to, or to recog- 
nize citizenship in the member states of the 
Tripartite Pact or states subservient to them ; 

2. Causing the status of citizenship and the 
inherent rights with respect thereto of those 
citizens of non-American origin who have 



130 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



been granted the privilege of becoming citi- 
zens of an American state to be forfeited if, 
by acts detrimental to the security or inde- 
pendence of that state or otherwise, they dem- 
onstrate allegiance to a member state of the 
Tripartite Pact or any state subservient to 
them, including the termination of the status 
of citizenship of such persons recognizing 
or attempting to exercise dual rights of citi- 
zenship. 

(C) To regulate transit across national 
boundaries by: 

1. Exercising strict surveillance over all 
persons seeking to enter or depart from the 
country, particularly those persons engaged 
in the interests of member states of the Tri- 
partite Pact or subservient to them, or whose 
point of departure or destination is such a 
state, without prejudice, however, to the main- 
tenance of the most liberal practices consistent 
with local conditions for the granting of safe 
refuge to those persons who. as victims of ag- 
gression, are fleeing from oppression by for- 
eign powers, and by cooperating fully in the 
exchange of information on the transit of per- 
sons from one state to another; 

2. Strictly regulating and controlling the 
entry and departure of all persons as to whom 
there are well-founded and suflBcient grounds 
to believe that they are engaged in political 
activities as agents or in the interest of mem- 
ber states of the Tripartite Pact or states 
subservient to them ; 

(D) To prevent acts of political aggi-ession 
by: 

1. Establishing penalties for acts designed 
to obstruct the war or defense efforts of the 
country concerned or its cooperation with 
other American Republics in matters of 
mutual defense; 

2. Preventing the dissemination by any 
agent or national of or by any political party 
organized in any member state of the Tri- 
partite Pact or any state subservient to them, 
or by any other person or organization acting 
at the behest or under the direction thereof. 



of propaganda designed to imjDair the security 
of any of the American Republics or the re- 
lations between them, to create political or 
social dissension, to intimidate the nationals 
of any American Republic, or to influence the 
policies of any American state ; 

3. Requiring the registration with an ap- 
propriate agency of Government of or other- 
wise regulating any persons or organizations 
seeking to act in any way on behalf of, or in 
the political interest of, any non-American 
state which is not engaged at war on the side 
of an American Republic; or of a political 
party thereof, including clubs, societies and 
institutions, whether of a social, humanita- 
rian, sporting, educational, technical or char- 
itable nature, which are directed or supported 
by nationals of any such states; requiring the 
full and constant public disclosure to the peo- 
ple of the country in which they are carried 
on, of the identity and nature of all activities 
of such pei-sons and organizations, and main- 
taining constant surveillance of all such per- 
sons and members of such organizations, 
whether citizens or aliens; 

4. Punishing acts of sabotage, injury to and 
destruction of essential defense materials, fac- 
tories, buildings, areas and utilities for manu- 
facture and storage, public services, means 
of transportation and communication, and 
water front areas and facilities; punishing 
acts of espionage and the collection and com- 
munication of vital defense infoi'mation for 
hostile purposes; and anticipating and fore- 
stalling acts of sabotage and espionage by 
measures to protect and safeguard vital docu- 
ments, installations, and operations; 

5. Supervising all communications to and 
from states subservient to or in communica- 
tion with member states of the Tripartite 
Pact, in order to censor any information or 
intelligence of use to any such state in the 
execution of hostile designs against any of 
the American Republics, or in activities oth- 
erwise detrimental to the security of any or 
all of the American Republics. 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



131 



XVIII 

Inter-Amekican Conference on Coordination 
OF Police and Judicial Measures 

Whereas: 

1. The Second Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics ap- 
proved a resolution providing for the convoca- 
tion, by the Governing Board of the Pan Amer- 
ican Union, of the States members thereof, to 
an international conference at such place and 
date as it would determine, to draft interna- 
tional conventions and recommendations deemed 
necessary to assure, through the action of the 
proper authorities in each State, and through 
the coordination of such action with that of 
other States in the Continent, the most com- 
plete and effective defense against acts of an 
unlawful character, as well as against any other 
unlawful activities likely to affect the institu- 
tions of American States. The resolution also 
stated that each State would be represented at 
the Conference by a jurist with plenipotentiary 
powers accompanied, if deemed desirable, by 
experts on police and judicial matters. It was 
likewise resolved that prior to the Conference, 
the Pan American Union would undertake the 
preparatory work by means of an inquiry 
among the Governments of the Continent, with 
regard to existing legislation, as well as with 
respect to their opinions on the various topics 
which it might be thought advisable to consider ; 

2. In accordance with this resolution, the 
Governing Board of the Pan American Union, 
aft«r consulting with the Government of the 
Argentine Republic, decided that the Confer- 
ence should be held in Buenos Aires in Septem- 
ber 1942, the Governing Board having prepared 
the agenda and the regulations of the Confer- 
ence, which after being submitted to the consid- 
eration of the respective Governments were 
approved at the meeting of November 5, 1941. 
Inquiries having been made of all the Govern- 
ments of the Continent by the Pan American 
Union, and several countries having replied, 
the compiled material is available for use ; and 

3. The unjustified aggression of which the 



United States of America has been the victim 
and the war which has followed as a conse- 
quence, make it necessary to hold the projected 
Conference because the measures for the coor- 
dination of national defense against espionage, 
sabotage, treason, sedition and other unlawful 
or subversive activities, as well as inter-Amer- 
ican cooperation for the coordination of the 
systems adopted in each State for the identi- 
fication and registration of persons and the 
recording of data for the preparation of rules 
and procedures concerning the communication 
of judicial decisions and for the fulfillment of 
requests for extradition, the presentation of 
evidence and the expulsion of foreigners, in 
accordance with the program approved by the 
Pan American Union, require its immediate 
execution. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

1. That the Inter-American Conference on 
the Coordination of Police and Judicial Meas- 
ures shall convene in Buenos Aires next May, 
the date for the opening of the Conference to 
be determined by the Argentine Government 
and the corresponding invitations to be sent 
by it. 

2. To recommend that the Conference study 
the possibility of broadening the South Amer- 
ican Police Convention, signed at Buenos Aires 
on February 29, 1920, so that its provisions may 
be applicable to all the countries of the Conti- 
nent, and that it incorporate in this Convention 
the establishment of an "Inter-American Reg- 
istry of Police Records", which will permit 
identification in the American Republics of 
persons indicted or condemned for international 
offenses and subversive activities directed 
against the American Republics, individually 
or collectively. 

3. To request the Governments of the Amer- 
ican Republics which have not yet answered 
the questionnaire prepared by the Pan American 
Union, to do so as soon as possible. 



132 

XIX 

Coordination of the Systems of In\-estigation 

Whereas : 

1. Ten of the American Eepublics are pres- 
ently at war as a result of the aggression per- 
petrated by the Empire of Japan on December 
7, 1941, against the United States of America 
and consequently against all the American 
States ; 

2. The evidence establishes that for the de- 
velopment of their activities against the safety 
and integrity of the American Continent the 
aggressors have resorted to methods of espio- 
nage, sabotage and subversive incitement which 
they have organized and coordinated through- 
out the entire Western Hemisphere, the repres- 
sion of which requires an equally effective coor- 
dination on the part of the intelligence and in- 
vestigation services of the American Republics, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

That the Governments of the American Re- 
publics shall coordinate their national intel- 
ligence and investigation services, providing 
adequate personnel for the inter-American 
interchange of information, investigations and 
suggestions for the prevention, repression, pun- 
ishment and elimination of such activities as 
espionage, sabotage and subversive incitement 
vs-hich endanger the safety of the American 
Nations. 

XX 

Reiteration of a Principle of American Law 

Whereas: 

1. In accordance with its historical, racial, 
political and juridical tradition, there is and 
can be no room in America for the so-called 
racial, linguistic or religious "minorities"; and 

2. In accordance with this concept. Resolu- 
tions XXVII and XXVIII, approved at the 
Pan American Conference in Lima in 1938, con- 
firm the principle that "residents who, accord- 
ing to domestic law, are considered aliens, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

cannot claim collectively the condition of 
minorities; individually, however, they will 
continue to enjoy the rights to which they are 
entitled". 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declares: 

That it reiterates the principle of American 
Public Law, according to which aliens residing 
in an American State are subject to the juris- 
diction of that State, and the Governments and 
agencies of the countries of wliich such aliens 
are nationals cannot lawfully interfere, directly 
or indirectly, in domestic affairs for the purpose 
of controlling the status or activities of such 
aliens. 

XXI 

Continental Solidaritt in Observance of 
Treaties 

Whereas: 

1. The concept of solidarity, in addition to 
embodying altruistic sentiments held in com- 
mon, includes that of cooperation so necessary 
to forestall obstacles which may prejudice the 
maintenance of that principle, or the reestab- 
lishment of harmony when weakened or dis- 
rupted by the adoption of measures contrary 
to the dictates of international law and 
morality ; 

2. This solidarity must be translated into facts 
in order to become a living reality ; since from 
a philosophical concept it has developed into 
an historic affirmation through repeated and 
frequent reaffirmations in international agree- 
ments freely agreed upon ; 

3. Respect for the pledged word in interna- 
tional treaties rests upon incontestable juridical 
principles as well as on precepts of morality 
in accordance with the maxim of canon law: 
Pacta sunt servanda; 

4. Such agreements, whether bilateral or mul- 
tilateral, must not be modified or nullified uni- 
laterally, except as otherwise provided, as in 
the case of "denunciation" clearly authorized by 
the parties ; 



FEBRUAEY 7, 1942 



133 



5. Only thus can peace, inspired by the com- 
mon welfare of the peoples, be founded on an 
enduring basis, as proclaimed at the Meeting 
in Habana ; and 

6. All peaceful relations among peoples would 
be practically impossible in the absence of strict 
observance of all pacts solemnly celebrated 
which have met all the formalities provided 
for in the laws of the High Contracting Parties 
in order to render them juridically effective. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Declares: 

1. That should the Government of an Ameri- 
can nation violate an agreement or a treaty 
duly perfected by two or m,ore American Re- 
publics or should there be reason to believe that 
a violation which might disturb the peace or 
solidarity of the Americas is being contem- 
plated, any American State may initiate the 
consultation contemplated in Resolution XVII 
of Habana with the object of agreeing upon the 
measures to be taken. 

2. That the Government desiring to initiate 
the consultation and propose a Meeting of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics, or their representatives, shall com- 
municate with the Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union specifying in detail the sub- 
jects to be considered as well as the approximate 
date on which the meeting should take place. 

XXII 

The Good Neighbor Policy 

Whereas : 

1. Relations among nations, if they are to 
have foundations which will assure an inter- 
national order under law, must be based on 
the essential and universal principle of justice; 

2. The standard proclaimed and observed by 
the United States of America to the effect that 
its international policy must be founded on that 
of the "good neighbor" is a general criterion 
of right and a source of guidance in the rela- 
tions between States; and this well-conceived 



policy prescribes respect for the fundamental 
rights of States as well as cooperation between 
them for the welfare of international society; 
and 

3. This policy has been one of the elements 
contributing to the present solidarity of the 
Americas and their joint cooperation in the 
solution of outstanding problems of the 
Continent, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Decla/res : 

That the principle that international conduct 
must be inspired by the policy of the good 
neighbor is a norm of international law of the 
American Continent. 

XXIII 

Condemnation of Inter- Amebican Conflicts 

Whereas: 

1. A state of war exists between the United 
States of America and the Axis Powers ; 

2. The other American Republics, in con- 
formity with inter-American agreements, have 
declared themselves to be in solidarity with the 
United States of America; and 

3. This consequently implies that all the 
countries of the Hemisphere should closely 
unite for the defense of the Continent, which 
is the defense of each and all the American 
Republics, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

To appeal to the spirit of conciliation of the 
various Governments to settle their conflicts 
by recourse to the inter- American peace agree- 
ments formulated during the course of the re- 
cent Pan American conferences, or to any other 
juridical machinery, and to recognize the mer- 
itorious work of the countries which have lent 
and are lending their collaboration with a view 
to reaching a pacific solution of the differences 
existing between American countries and to urge 



134 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



them to continue intensifying their efforts in 
favor of the noble cause of continental harmony 
and solidarity. 

XXIV 

Condemnation of Japanese Aggression 

Whereas: 

1. On December 7, 1941, the armed forces of 
Japan attacked, without previous warning or 
without a declaration of war, certain posses- 
sions of the United States of America in the 
Pacific Ocean; 

2. These unforeseen and hostile acts were per- 
petrated by Japan while diplomatic conversa- 
tions were in progress between the two States 
looking toward the pacific solution of their 
international differences ; 

3. The aforementioned nature and circmu- 
stances of these acts characterizes them as armed 
aggression in flagrant violation of all the stand- 
ards of international law which proscribe and 
condemn the use of force in the solution of in- 
ternational controversies, and particularly those 
of American international law; 

4. Several instruments signed by the Amer- 
ican Republics at recent international confer- 
ences and meetings impose the unlimited duty 
of solidarity upon the signatory Governments 
for the defense of their sovereignty, independ- 
ence, and territorial integrity ; and 

6. Resolution XV on Reciprocal Assistance 
and Cooperation for the Defense of the Nations 
of the Americas, signed at the Second Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Amer- 
ican Republics, held at Habana, established the 
principle "That any attempt on the part of a 
non-American State against the integrity or in- 
violability of the territory, the sovereignty, or 
the political independence of an American Slate 
shall be considered as an act of aggression 
against the States which sign this declaration", 

The Third IMeeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To make it of record that Japan by perpe- 
trating armed aggression against the United 



States of America has violated the fundamental 
principles and standards of international law. 

2. To condemn such aggression and protest 
against it to the civilized world and extend this 
condemnation and protest to the powers which 
have associated themselves with Japan. 

XXV 

Post- War Problems 

'Whereas : 

1. World peace must be based on the prin- 
ciples of respect for law, of justice and of 
cooperation which inspire the Nations of Amer- 
ica and which have been expressed at Inter- 
American Meetings Iield from 1889 to date; 

2. A new order of peace must be supported 
by economic pi'inciples which will insure equi- 
table and lasting international trade with equal 
opportunities for all Nations; 

3. Collective security must be founded not 
only on political institutions but also on just, 
effective, and liberal economic systems; 

4. Jt is indispensable to undertake the 
innnediate study of the bases for this new 
economic and political order; and 

5. It is an imperative necessity for the 
countries of America to increase their produc- 
tive capacity; to secure, from their interna- 
tional trade, returns which will permit them 
adequately to remunerate labor and improve 
the standard of living of workers; to protect 
and preserve the health of their peoples and 
develop their civilization and culture. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To request the Governing Board of the 
Pan American Union to convoke an Inter- 
American Technical Economic Conference 
charged with the study of present and post-war 
economic problems. 

2. To entrust the Inter-American Juridical 
Committee with the formulation of specific 
recommendations relative to the international ■ 
organization in the juridical and political fl 
fields, and in the field of international security. 



FEBRUARY 7, 194 2 



135 



3. To entrust the Inter- American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee with a 
similar function in the economic field, to make 
the necessary preparations for the Inter- 
American Technical Economic Conference, 
referred to in the first paragraph of this 
Resolution. 

4. To request the Pan American Union to 
appoint an Executive Committee to receive 
such projects as the American nations may 
present, and to submit said projects, respec- 
tively, to the Inter- American Juridical Com- 
mittee and to the Inter-American Financial and 
Economic Advisory Committee. 

5. To request the Pan American Union to di- 
rect this Executive Committee to submit the 
recommendations of the Inter- American Juridi- 
cal Committee to the Governments of the Ameri- 
can Republics so that the conclusions reached 
may be adopted at a subsequent Meeting of 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs. 

6. To request the Pan American Union to de- 
termine, in agreement with the Governments of 
the American Republics, the date and place of 
meeting of the Inter- American Technical Eco- 
nomic Conference, referred to in the first 
paragraph of this Resolution. 

XXVI 

Intek-Ameeican Jukidical Committee 
Wkei'eas: 

1. In the General Declaration of Neutrality 
of the American Rejjublics, signed in Panama, 
the Inter-American Neutrality Committee was 
created for the purpose of studying and formu- 
lating recommendations with respect to the 
problems of neutrality; and 

2. The profound alteration in the interna- 
tional situation in America demands a sub- 
stantial expansion of the scope of said 
Committee, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To pay tribut* and to congratulate His 
Excellency Afranio de Mello Franco, Chairman 



of the Inter-American Neutrality Committee 
and its members: Their Excellencies Luis A. 
Podesta Costa, Mariano Fontecilla, A. Aguilar 
Machado, Charles G. Fenwick, Gustavo Her- 
rera, Roberto Cordoba, Manuel Francisco 
Jimenez Ortiz, Salvador Martinez Mercado, 
Eduardo Labougle, Carlos Eduardo Stolk and 
Fernando Lagarde y Vigil, who have been mem- 
bers or are at present members of this Commit- 
tee, for the valuable services they have rendered 
to the American Republics and in the develop- 
ment of international law. 

2. That the Inter-American Neutrality Com- 
mittee at present existing will continue to func- 
tion in its present form under the name of 
"Inter-American Juridical Committee", will 
have its seat at Rio de Janeiro and may meet 
temporarily, if it deems it necessary, in other 
American capitals. 

3. That the members of the Inter-American 
Juridical Committee will be the jurists espe- 
cially appointed by their respective Govern- 
ments, and that they will have no other duties 
than those pertaining to the Committee. 

4. The Inter-Am.erican Juridical Committee, 
in exceptional cases, may have recourse to the 
services of technical experts which it considers 
indispensable for the most efficient performance 
of its duties, and the salaries of these experts 
will be met by the American States through the 
intermediary of the Pan American Union. 

5. The Committee may also invite American 
jurists, whom they consider to be specialists on 
specific subjects, to take part in their delibera- 
tions on special juridical matters. 

6. The Committee will have as its object : 

(a) To study, in accordance with experi- 
ence and the development of events, the juridi- 
cal problems created for the American Re- 
publics by the world war and those which are 
submitted to it in accordance with the reso- 
lutions approved at the Meetings of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs or at the Inter- 
national Conferences of American States; 

(b) To continue the studies on the subject 
of contraband of war and on the project of 
a code relative to the principles and rules 
of neutrality ; 



136 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETm 



(c) To report on possible claims arising 
from the requisition or use of immobilized 
merchant vessels or those under the flag of 
a non-American enemy, or belonging to states 
whose territories are occupied by a non- 
American enemy ; as well as on possible claims 
by any American Republic against a non- 
American enemy state for unlawful acts com- 
mitted to the detriment of such Republic, its 
nationals or their property ; 

(d) To develop and coordinate the work of 
codifying international law, without preju- 
dice to the duties entrusted to other existing 
organizations ; 

(e) To formulate recommendations with 
regard to the manner of solving the problems 
mentioned under sub-paragraph (a), trans- 
mitting the same to the Governments through 
the Pan American Union, or directly when 
it considers it necessary, on condition that the 
Union be duly informed. 

XXVII 

Coordination of the Resolutions of the 
Meetings of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics 

Whereas : 

In view of the continual changes which 
characterize the present period of emergency, 
it is necessary to coordinate the resolutions, 
declarations and other acts of the Meetings 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics, by incorporating the 
changes which circumstances require, 

The Tliird Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

1. To recommend to the Governing Board of 
the Pan American Union that the agenda of 
future Meetings of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics shall always 
include the following topic : 

"Coordination of the resolutions, declara- 
tions and other acts of previous Meetings of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs". 



2. To recommend to the Inter-American 
Juridical Committee the study and coordina- 
tion referred to in the preceding paragraph, 
entrusting it to transmit its conclusions to the 
i\Ieetings of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
through the Pan American Union. 

xxvrn 

Affirmation or the Traditional Theory of 
Law 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Agrees : 

To refer to the Inter-American Juridical 
Committee the project of the Delegation of 
Bolivia entitled "Affirmation of the traditional 
theory of law in face of a deliberate disregard 
of international justice and morality." 

XXIX 

Red Cross 
"Whereas: 

1. The continuation and extension of hostili- 
ties have brought, and will continue to bring, 
great distress to millions of civilians as a result 
of invasion, indiscriminate bombing from the 
air, and other ravages of war; 

2. The voluntary organizations functioning 
under the Convention of Geneva can cooperate 
in the treatment of the sick and wounded of 
the military forces; 

3. The threat of hostilities in the Western 
Hemisphere requires preparation and training 
in first aid, nursing, disaster relief, and related 
activities; 

4. These needs and opportunities for service 
domestically and internationally can best be 
met by taking advantage of the humanitarian 
services of strong Red Cross Societies; 

6. It is desirable to take advantage of the 
valuable services which Red Cross Societies may 
render as consultative and cooperative agencies 
in social welfare problems ; 

6. The Second Meeting of Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics held 
at Habana declared that it was desirable to 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



137 



organize an Inter-American League of National 
Red Cross Societies and this organization has 
not yet been created; 

7. In the present circumstances the existence 
of such a League is now even more necessary, 
and its work should be extended to the civilians 
of the American Republics suffering from the 
consequences of the present war ; 

8. The important part which women have 
played in the noble work of the Red Cross 
deserves express recognition of their special 
position with reference to these services. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

To recommend to the Governments of the 
American Republics: 

1. That they lend all possible support toward 
the greatest development and strengthening of 
their respective Red Cross Societies. 

2. That they study the desirability of using 
these Societies as consultative agencies. 

3. That they consult among themselves as 
soon as possible with regard to the available 
m.eans for putting into effect Recommendation 
IV approved at the Habana Meeting. 

4. That, when they deem it desirable, they 
consider whether the sei-vices rendered by 
women to the Red Cross in times of peace or 
war can be given equal weight within the frame- 
work of their respective domestic legislation to 
those of a military nature rendered by men. 

XXX 

Improvement of Health and Sanftakt 
Conditions 

Whereas : 

1. The American Republics are now under- 
taking measures for the development of certain 
common objectives and plans which will con- 
tribute to the reconstruction of world order; 

2. The American Republics are now under- 
taking measures seeking to conserve and de- 
velop their resources of critical and strategic 
materials, to maintain their domestic economies 
and eliminate economic activities prejudicial 



to the welfare and security of the American 
Republics; 

3. The defense of the Western Hemisphere 
requires the mobilization of the vital forces, 
human and material, of the American Re- 
publics; and 

4. Adequate health and sanitary measures 
constitute an essential contribution in safe- 
guarding the defensive powers and the ability 
to resist aggression of the peoples of the 
American Republics, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To recommend that the Governments of 
the American Republics take individually, or 
by complementary agreements between two or 
more of them, appropriate steps to deal with 
problems of public health and sanitation, by 
providing, in accordance with ability, raw ma- 
terials, services and funds. 

2. To recommend that to these ends there 
be utilized the technical aid and advice of the 
national health service of each country in co- 
operation with the Pan American Sanitary 
Bureau. 

XXXI 

Civil and Commercial Avlvtion 

Whereas: 

1. The American Republics by mutual under- 
standing have agreed to unite in a common 
effort to resist the attempts of any foreign 
power through force or subversion to destroy 
their individual or collective freedom; 

2. The peaceful pursuit of such a course is 
presently threatened by the non-American 
countries at war with American Republics 
whose resort to subversive methods and force 
is inimical to our common integrity; and 

3. It has been amply demonstrated that the 
operation or use of aircraft in the American 
Republics by nationals of non-American coun- 
tries at war with American Republics and the 
use of airfields and aviation facilities in these 
Republics by such nationals constitute a serious 
threat to hemispheric defense, 



138 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

To recommend to each American Republic 
that in harmony with its national laws, immedi- 
ate steps be taken to restrict the operation or 
use of civil or commercial aircraft and the 
use of aviation facilities to bona fide citizens 
and enterprises of the American Republics or 
to citizens or enterprises of such other coun- 
tries as have shown themselves, in the judgment 
of the respective Governments, to be in full 
sympathy with the principles of the Declara- 
tion of Lima. 

XXXII 

Penal Colonies of NoN-AirEEiCAN Nations on 
American Terbitort 

Whereas: 

1. Certain non-American States reserve cer- 
tain territoiies in the American Continent for 
the establishment of penal colonies; 

2. The use of American territories for penal 
colonies of non-American States infringes on 
the fundamental principles of the Pan American 
ideal, 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

To request the Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union to approach those States which 
ix)ssess territories in America used as penal 
colonies in order to eliminate the future use of 
such American territories for this purpose. 

XXXIII 

HtlMANIZATION OF War 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

To reaffirm the principles contained in Reso- 
lution VT of Panama, on humanization of war, 
and in Resolution X of that Meeting on the 
maintenance of international activities in ac- 



cordance with Christian morality; and con- 
demns the practice of holding prisoners as 
hostages and taking reprisals on them as con- 
trary to the principles of law and the humani- 
tarian sentiments which states must observe 
during the course of hostilities. 

XXXIV 

Regulations of the Meetings of the Ministers 
OF Foreign Affairs of the American 
Repitblics 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. To recommend to the Governing Board 
of the Pan American Union to revise articles 5 
and 6 of the Regulations of Meetings of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics to read as follows : 

^'■Aiiicle S. The members of such meetings 
shall be the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of 
the American Republics or the representative 
which each Government may designate as a sub- 
stitute, who shall meet in accordance with the 
international agreements of the Conferences of 
Buenos Aires and Lima. 

"These members shall be invested with due 
powers by means of credentials issued by their 
Governments or by official communications of 
their Ministries of Foreign Affairs to the 
country in which the meeting is held. 

"Article 6. The delegates and technical ad- 
visers who may accompany the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs or the representatives of the 
Governments m^y attend, with the Ministers or 
their representatives, the plenary or committee 
sessions of the Meeting but they shall not have 
the right to vote." 

Should it be impossible for a Minister of 
Foreign Affairs or the representative of a Gov- 
crimient to attend a particular session, either 
of a committee or a plenary session, that Min- 
ister or representative may designate a member 
of his delegation to substitute for him. In such 
case the one so designated shall have the right 
to voice and vote in the name of his Govern- 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



139 



ment. Notification of such appointment shall 
be conim,unicated in advance to the Secretary 
General of the Meeting. 

2. To recommend to the Governing Board 
that the text of the regulations be altered as 
necessary to conform with the two articles 
hereby proposed. 

XXXV 

Support and Adherence to the Principles of 
THE "Atlantic Charter" 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Kepublics 

Resolves : 

To take note of the contents of the "Atlantic 
Charter" and to express to the President of the 
United States of America its satisfaction with 
the inclusion in that document of principles 
which constitute a part of the juridical heritage 
of America in accordance with the Convention 
on Rights and Duties of States approved at the 
Seventh International Conference of American 
States, held at Montevideo in 1933. 

XXXVI 

Interests or Non-American Countries 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

That no American State shall authorize an- 
other American State to assume before its Gov- 
ernment the representation of the interests of 
a non-American State with which it has no dip- 
lomatic relations or which is at war with na- 
tions of this Hemisphere. 

XXXVII 

Treatment of Non-Belligerents 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves: 

1. That in conformity with the principles of 
American solidarity, the Republics of this Con- 



tinent shall not consider as a belligerent any 
American State which is now at war or may 
become involved in a state of war with another 
non-American State. 

2. To recommend that special facilities be 
granted to those countries which, in the opinion 
of each Government, contribute to the defense 
of the interests of this Hemisphere during this 
emergency. 

XXXVIII 

RELiiTioNS With the Governments of Occupied 
Countries 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recommends : 

That the Governments of the American Re- 
publics continue their relations with the Gov- 
ernments of those occupied countries which are 
fighting for their national sovereignty and are 
not collaborating with the aggressors, and ex- 
press the fervent hope that they may recover 
their sovereignty and independence. 

XXXIX 

Inter-American Defense Board 
Whereas: 

1. In accordance with the action taken at 
the Conference for the Maintenance of Peace 
and in conformity with the Declaration of 
Lima, a system of coordination exists between 
the American Republics which fortmiately re- 
sponds to the spirit of sincere collaboration 
animating the peoples of our Continent; and 

2. This system, the results of which have 
heretofore been satisfactory, is, from every 
point of view, the most effective means on the 
part of the Western Hemisphere for meeting 
the present grave emergency in a coordinated 
and solidary manner. 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Recom/mends : 

The immediate meeting in Washington of 
a commission composed of military and naval 



140 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



technicians appointed by each of the Govern- 
ments to study and to recommend to them the 
measures necessary for the defense of tlie 
Continent. 

XL 

Telecommunications 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

1. To recommend that each American Repub- 
lic adopt the necessary and immediate measures 
to close all radiotelephone and radiotelegraph 
communication between the American Repub- 
lics and the aggressor States and all territories 
subservient to them, except in so far as official 
communications of the American Goverimients 
are concerned. 

2. To I'ecommend the establishment and 
maintenance, through a system of licenses, or 
other adequate means, of an effective control 
of the transmission and reception of messages 
whatever might be the telecommunication sys- 
tem used; and that telecommunications which 
might endanger the security of each American 
State and of the Continent in general be 
prohibited. 

3. To recommend the adoption of immediate 
measures to eliminate clandestine telecommu- 
nication stations and that bilateral or multi- 
lateral agreements be concluded by the inter- 
ested Governments to facilitate the fulfillment 
of the technical requirements of this Resolution. 

XLI 

Vote of Thanks 

The Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics 
Resolves: 

1. To express to His Excellency the Presi- 
dent of Brazil, Dr. Getulio Vargas, its gratitude 
for the generous hospitality of the Government 
and the people of Brazil, and for all the cour- 
tesies extended to the delegations which have 
participated in this Meeting. 



2. To extend its most cordial congratulations 
to His Excellency the Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs of Brazil, Dr. Oswaldo Aranha, for the 
capable manner in which he has directed the 
deliberations of the Meeting. 

3. To record its gratitude to the Secretary 
General, His Excellency, Dr. Jose de Paula 
Rodrigues Alves, for the efficient manner in 
which he and his assistants have performed the 
work of the Secretariat of the Meeting. 

In witness whereof, The Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics or 
their personal representatives sign and seal the 
present Final Act. 

Done in the city of Rio de Janeiro, this 28th 
day of January, 1942, in the English. French, 
Portuguese and Spanish languages. The Secre- 
tary General shall deposit the original of the 
Final Act in the archives of the Pan American 
Union through the intermediary of the Min- 
istry of Foreign Affairs of Brazil, and shall 
send certified copies thereof to the Governments 
of the American Republics. 

Reservations : 
reservation of the delegation of the argentine 

REPUBUC : 

1. As to Resolution V on the Severance of 
Commercial and Financial Relations: 

"The Argentine Delegation requests that it 
be recorded in the minutes, as well as at the 
end of this draft resolution, that the Argentina 
Republic agrees with the necessity of adopting 
economic and financial control measures with 
regard to all foreign and domestic activities of 
firms or enterprises which may, in one way or 
another, affect the welfare of the republics of 
America or the solidarity or defense of the 
Continent. It has adopted and is prepared to 
adopt further measures in this respect, in ac- 
cordance with the present resolution, extending 
them, however, to firms or enterprises managed 
or controlled by aliens or from foreign bellig- 
erent countries not in the American Continent". 



FEBRUARY 



1942 



141 



KESEKVATION OF THE DELEGATION OF CHILE: 

2. "The Minister of Foreign Affairs of Chile 
gives his approval to these agreements insofar 
as they do not conflict with the provisions of 
the Political Constitution of Chile, declaring 
further that such agreements will only be valid, 
with respect to his country, when approved by 
the National Congress and ratified by its 
constitutional agencies." 

RESERVATION OF THE DELEGATION OF THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA : 

3. As to Resolutions VII and XIV on the 
Development of Commercial Interchange and 
Commercial Facilities for the Inland Coun- 
tries of America : 

"The Government of the United States of 
America desires to have recorded in the Final 
Act its reservation to Resolution VII (Develop- 
ment of Commercial Interchange) and Reso- 
lution XIV (Commercial Facilities for the 
Inland Countries of the Americas), since the 
terms of these Resolutions are inconsistent 
with the traditional i^olicy of liberal principles 
of international trade maintained by the United 
States of America and as enunciated and re- 
affirmed at the recent International Confer- 
ences of American States and the First and 
Second Meetings of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics". 

RESERVATION OF THE DELEGATION OF GUATEMALA : 

4. The Representative of the Secretary of 
Foreign Affairs of Guatemala agrees fully to 
the adherence and support of the principles of 
the Atlantic Charter; and, in so far as these 
IJrinciples may affect the rights of Guatemala 
to Belize, it makes an express declaration and 
reservation in the same terms as the reserva- 
tion made by Guatemala at the First Meeting 
of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics, held at Panama, which 
it maintains in its entirety while bearing in 
mind the resolutions and Convention on this 
question approved at the Second Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Amer- 
ican Republics held at Havana. 



RESERVATION OF THE DELEGATION OF THE 
REPUBLIC OF PERU: 

5. As to Resolution XXI on Continental 
Solidarity in Observance of Treaties: 

"The project voted upon does not refer to 
the defense of the American Hemisphere 
against dangers from without the continent 
and, consequently, it is outside the agenda of 
this Meeting, the regulations for which, ap- 
proved by all the Governments, require the 
unanimous consent of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics. 

"In any case, the project voted upon cannot 
be applied to incidents occurring in connection 
with conflicts or differences which the inter- 
ested parties have submitted to a special juris- 
diction for settlement or solution." 

RESERVATION OF THE DELEGATION OF THE 
REPUBLIC OF PERU: 

6. As to Resolution XXVI on the Inter- 
American Juridical Committee : 

"Peru votes in favor of this project with 
the reservation that, in accordance with the 
express purpose of this meeting, the enemy 
State referred to in paragraph 'c' must be a 
non-American State. 

"Furthermore, it places on record the fact 
that the Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs gave it this true interpreta- 
tion." 



EXCHANGE OF OFFICIAL REPRESENTA- 
TIVES OF COUNTRIES AT WAR 

[Released to the press February 2] 

The Department of State announces that the 
arrangements for the exchange of the official 
representatives of the United States for those 
of the governments with which we are at war 
have proceeded to the point where an agreement 
has been reached in principle and in many 
details. 

The American representatives from Bulgaria 
have left that country. The American repre- 



142 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETrN 



seiitatives in Hungary and Rumania have been 
allowed to depart and are now in Portugal wait- 
ing to be exclianged from that point. 

American representatives in Germany are all 
in Bad Nauheim, and the American representa- 
tives in Italy are all in Rome, awaiting transfer. 
Conversely, the German and Italian representa- 
tives are at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., 
along with the representatives of Hungary, 
Rumania, and Bulgaria. 

The Japanese representatives in the United 
States are in Hot Springs, Va. The American 
representatives in Japan, China, and occupied 
territories have not been assembled in any one 
place. They are understood to be well and to 
be receiving sufficient food and adequate accom- 
modations. 

Various important details remain to be agreed 
upon, and negotiations are being pushed as rap- 
idly as possible under the circumstances. These 
circumstances include indirect communication 
with the governments concerned through the 
intermediation of different protecting powers, 
delays in transmission of messages, translations 
into and out of various languages, and limita- 
tions which are placed upon the rapid conclusion 
of negotiations by wartime conditions. 

Lisbon has been agreed upon as the point of 
exchange for the representatives of European 



powers. Axis representatives will be trans- 
ported to Lisbon by a United States vessel which 
will return with our own representatives. The 
vessel will travel both ways under a safe conduct 
of all belligerents. Portugal has been asked by 
the various powers to guarantee the exchange. 

The exchange with the Japanese will take 
place at Lourengo Marques in Portuguese East 
Africa. The Portuguese Government is being 
asked to guarantee the exchange there. The rep- 
resentatives of Japan will be carried to Lou- 
ren(;o Marques on an American vessel, and the 
United States representatives will be brought 
from there to the United States on that vessel 
and will be transported to that point by Japan. 
Both vessels will travel under a safe conduct by 
all belligerents. 

Contemporaneously the representatives of the 
enemy governments who were stationed in the 
American republics may be assembled in the 
United States and exchanged at the same time 
for the representatives in the Axis countries of 
the Central and South American republics 
which have declared war against or broken re- 
lations with those countries. Some of the Axis 
representatives have arrived in the United 
States and are assembled with their colleagues 
at Wliite Sulphur Springs or Hot Springs. 
Others are expected to arrive. 



FINANCIAL AID TO CHINA 



[Released to the press by the White House February 7] 

The text of a message sent by the President 
to General Chiang Kai-Shek, President of the 
Executive Yuan and Chairman of the Military 
Affairs Committee, Chungking, China, follows : 

"It is a source of great gratification to me 
and to the Government and people of the United 
States that the proposal which I made to the 
Congress that there be authorized for the pur- 
pose of rendering financial aid to China in the 
sum of $500,000,000 was passed unanimously by 



both the Senate and the House of Representa- 
tives and has now become law. 

"The unusual speed and unanimity with 
which this measure was acted upon by the Con- 
gress and the enthusiastic support which it re- 
ceived tlu'oughout the United States testify to 
the wholehearted respect and admiration which 
the Government and people of this country have 
for China. They testify also to our earnest de- 
sire and determination to be concretely helpful 
to our partners in the great battle for freedom. 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



143 



The gallant resistance of the Cliinese armies 
against the ruthless invaders of your country 
has called forth the highest praise from the 
American and all other freedom loving peoples. 
The tenacity of the Chinese people, both armed 
and unarmed, in the face of tremendous odds 
in carrying on for almost five years a resolute 
defense against an enemy far superior in equip- 
ment is an inspiration to the fighting men and 
all the peoples of the other United Nations. The 
great sacrifices of the Chinese people in destroy- 
ing the fruits of their toil so that they could not 
be used by the predatory armies of Japan exem- 
plify in high degree the spirit of sacrifice which 
is necessary on the part of all to gain the victory 
toward which, we are confidently striving. It is 
my hope and belief that use which will be made 
of the funds now authorized by the Congress 
of the United States will contribute substan- 
tially toward facilitating the efforts of the Chi- 
nese Government and people to meet the eco- 
nomic and financial burdens which have been 
thrust upon them by an armed invasion and 
toward solution of problems of production and 
procurement which are essential for the success 
of their armed resistance to what are now our 
common enemies. 



"I send you my personal greetings and best 
wishes. I extend to you across land and sea the 
hand of comradeship for the common good, the 
common goal, the common victory that shall be 
ours." 



AMERICAN OFFICIALS AND NATIONALS 
IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press February 4] 

According to the French authorities, the 
American, British, and Dutch consular repre- 
sentatives in Shanghai, together with their 
families, have been moved to the Cathay Man- 
sions in the French Concession of Shanghai. 
They number about 130 persons and occupy four 
floors of this apartment hotel. They are to be 
free to move about in accordance with restric- 
tions to be imposed by the French and Japanese 
police. 

[Released to the press February 2] 

According to the Swiss Consul in Bangkok, 
he has seen the 36 American men, 24 women, and 
15 children under 19 years of age, who are under 
surveillance in that city, and they are all well. 



DECLARATIONS OF WAR BY BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press February 7] 

The following tabulation is supplementary to the list of declarations of war printed in the 
Bulletin of December 20, 1941, pages 551-561: 



Nicaragua and Bulgaria, Hungary, 
and Rumania. 



Belgium and Japan, Gennany, and 
Italy. 



"I have been officially informed 
this morning (December 20, 1941] 
that Nicaragua has declared war on 
Rumania, Hungary, Bulgaria." 

"... the Belgian Government 
. . . has proclaimed that a state 
of war exists between Belgium and 
Japan, as it already exists with Ger- 
many and Italy." 



Telegram of December 20, 1941, 
from the American Minister at 
Managua. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 

Note of December 20, 1941, from 
the Belgian Ambassador at Washing- 
ton to the Secretary of State. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



144 



DEPARTTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Haiti and Bulgaria, Hungary, and 
Rumania. 



Great Britain and Bulgaria. 



Netherlands and Italy. 



Union of South Africa and Bulgaria. 



Yugoslavia and Japan. 



Thailand, and Great Britain and 
United States. 



". . . the Republic of Haiti has 
declared war on Hungary, Bulgaria 
and Rumania this morning [Decem- 
ber 24, 1941] at 11:30." 

". . . state of war exists with 
Bulgaria as from the 13th December 
1941." 



"Acting upon instructions received 
from the Netherlands Minister for 
Foreign Affairs, I have the honor to 
inform you that . . . the Nether- 
lands Government considers herself 
at war with Italy as per December 
11, 1941." 

"On instructions from my Gov- 
ernment I have the honour to inform 
you that, as from 13th December, 
1941, a state of war exists between 
the Union of South Africa and 
Bulgaria, ..." 

"I have been instructed by my 
Government to inform Your Excel- 
lency that the Royal Yugoslav Gov- 
ernment has decided the following 
on January 13, 1942: 

" 'The Kingdom of Yugoslavia 
breaks all her relations with Japan 
and proclaims that she is in a state 
of war with that power from Decem- 
ber 7, 1941, when Japan has attacked 
the United States of America and 
Great Britain.' " 

"Ministry [of] Foreign Affairs [of 
Thailand] notified Consulate by 
letter twenty-fifth January 'by royal 
command a declaration of war on 
Great Britain and the United States 
of America has been made as from 
noon of Twenty-fifth January 2485 
B E.' " 



Note of December 24, 1941, from 
the Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
Haiti to the .\merican Minister at 
Port-au-Prince. (Files of the De- 
partment of State.) 

British Foreign Office circular note 
of December 27, 1941, as quoted in 
part in a telegram of December 29 
from the .American Embassy at 
London to the Secretary of State. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Note of December 30, 1941, from 
the Minister of the Netherlands at 
Washington to the Secretary of State. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Note of December 31, 1941, from 
the Minister of the Union of South 
Africa at Washington to the Secre- 
tary of State. (Files of the Depart- 
ment of State.) 

Note of January 19, 1942, from the 
Minister of Yugoslavia at Washing- 
ton to the Secretary of State. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram from the Swiss Consul at 
Bangkok, as quoted in a Swiss For- 
eign Office note of January 31, 1942, 
to the American Legation at Bern 
and reported in a telegram of Feb- 
ruary 2, 1942 from the Legation to 
the Department. (Files of the De- 
partment of State.) 



The following items supersede certain of the entries in the list of declarations of war printed 
in the Bulletin of December 20, 1941, pages 551-561 : 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



145 



New Zealand and Finland. 



New Zealand and Hungary. 



New Zealand and Rumania- 



El Salvador, and Germany and 
Italy. 



"His Excellency the Governor 
General has it in command from His 
Majesty the King to declare that a 
state of war exists between His 
Majesty and the Government of the 
Republic of Finland, and that such 
state of war has existed from one 
minute past noon, New Zealand 
summer time, on the 7th day of 
December, 1941." 

"His Excellency the Governor- 
General has it in command from His 
Majesty the King to declare that a 
state of war exists between His 
Majesty and the Regent and Gov- 
ernment of Hungary, and that such 
state of war has existed from one 
minute past noon. New Zealand 
summer time, on the 7th day of 
December, 1941." 

"His Excellency the Governor- 
General has it in command from His 
Majesty the King to declare that a 
state of war exists between His 
Majesty and the King of Roumania, 
and that such state of war has 
existed from one minute past noon. 
New Zealand summer time, on the 
7th day of December, 1941." 

". . . the National Legislative 
Assembly at the request of the 
Executive power today (December 
12, 1941] declared the Republic of 
El Salvador in a state of war with 
Germany and Italy. . . ." 



Proclamation issued by the Gov- 
ernor-General of New Zealand. 
Printed in The New Zealand Gazette 
Extraordinary, December 8, 1941. 



Proclamation issued by the Gov- 
ernor-General of New Zealand. 
Printed in The New Zealand Gazette 
Extraordinary, December 8, 1941. 



Proclamation issued by the Gov- 
ernor-General of New Zealand. 
Printed in The New Zealand Gazette 
Extraordinary, December 8, 1941. 



Telegram of December 12, 1941 
from the Salvadoran Minister of 
Foreign Affairs to the Secretary of 
State. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 



American Republics 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF BRAZILIAN MINISTER OF FINANCE 



[Released to the press February 3] 

The Brazilian Minister of Finance, Dr. 
Arthin- de Souza Costa, left Rio de Janeiro 
February 2 by air for Miami, where he should 
arrive Wednesday, February 4. 



He will spend about three weeks in the 
United States discussing with officials of this 
Government important phases of Brazil's co- 
operation with the United States, thus giving 
immediate effect to the program of inter- 



146 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American economic and financial cooperation 
agreed upon at the Rio Conference. 

He will be accompanied by Sr. Claudio de 
Souza Lemos, of his stafi'; Sr. Valentim 
Bougas, of the Technical Council on Economy 
and Finance; Sr. Joao Daudt de Oliveira, im- 
portant Brazilian industrialist ; Dr. Jose Gari- 
baldi Dantas, of the Commodities Exchange 
of the State of Sao Paulo ; Sr. Decio Honorato 
de Moura, First Secretary of Legation as- 
signed to the Brazilian Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs; and a private secretary. 

The Minister will probably spend about 10 
days in Washington and 10 days in New York. 
Wliile here he will no doubt devote attention 
to the delivery of equipment for essential in- 
dustries in Brazil and the increased production 
of rubber in Brazil to supply the United States, 
as well as to the procurement of strategic ma- 
terials and other products, and the general 



economic relations between Brazil and the 
United States. 

Dr. Arthur de Souza Costa has been widely 
recognized as a brilliant administrator of the 
important Ministry of Finance, and one who 
has kept Brazil's national economy on a re- 
markably sound and productive basis, in spite 
of the dislocations caused by the war. Under 
his administration Brazil resumed partial 
service on its foreign debt on April 1, 1940 
under a four-year plan, now being carried out, 
envisaging payments of some $25,000,000 to 
American holders of Brazilian Government 
bonds. His able cooperation has also enabled 
the United States to acquire large quantities 
of strategic materials from Brazil. 

The Secretary of State is sending Mr. W. N. 
Walmsley, Jr., of the State Department, to 
Miami to meet the Minister and his party. 



General 



SUPREMACY OF FEDERAL POLICY OVER STATE POLICY IN MATTER OF 
RECOGNITION OF FOREIGN GOVERNMENT 



The United States of America, 
Petitioner, 



Louis H. Pink, Superintendent of Insurance of 
the State of New York, et al. 

By laws, decrees, enactments and orders in 
1918 and 1919 the Government in Russia na- 
tionalized the business of insurance and all the 
property, wherever situated, of Russian insur- 
ance companies. The New York branch of the 
First Russian Insurance Company continued to 
do business in New York until 1925, at which 
time the Superintendent of Insurance, pursuant 
to an order of the Supreme Court of New York, 
took possession of the company's assets. There- 
after all claims of domestic creditors arising out 
of the business of the New York branch were 



paid by the Superintendent, leaving a balance 
in his hands of more than $1,000,000. In 1931 
the New York Court of Appeals directed the 
Superintendent to dispose of the balance of the 
fund in a certain manner. Some payments were 
made pursuant to the order but the major por- 
tion of the claims remained unpaid at the time 
of the recognition by the United States on 
November 16, 1933, of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics as the de jure Government 
of Russia. In connection with that recognition 
the Soviet Government assigned to the United 
States amounts admitted to be due or that might 
thereafter be found to be due it as the successor 
of prior Governments of Russia, or otherwise, 
from American nationals, including corpora- 
tions, companies, partnerships, or associations. 
Thereafter the United States took steps to ob- 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 



147 



tain possession of the funds remaining in the 
hands of the Superintendent of Insurance. The 
order dismissing the complaint of tlie United 
States was afSrmed by the Appellate Division of 
the Supreme Court of New York and, in turn, 
by the Court of Appeals. On certiorari the 
Supreme Court of the United States held, in a 
decision of February 2, 1942, delivered by Mr. 
Justice Douglas, that the action of the New 
York courts amounted in substance to a rejection 
of "a part of the policy underlying recognition 
by this nation of Soviet Russia"; that "Such 
power is not accorded a State in our constitu- 
tional system"; and that "To permit it would 
be to sanction a dangerous invasion of Federal 
authority." It concluded "that the right to the 
funds or property in question became vested in 
the Soviet Government as the successor to the 
First Russian Insurance Co. ; that this right has 
passed to the United States under the Litvinov 
Assignment ; and that the United States is en- 
titled to the property as against the corporation 
and the foreign creditors." It reversed the 
judgment and remanded the cause to the Su- 
preme Court of New York for "proceedings not 
inconsistent with this opinion". 

Mr. Justice Frankfurter gave a concurring 
opinion and Mr. Chief Justice Stone gave a dis- 
senting opinion in which Mr. Justice Roberts 
joined. Mr. Justice Reed and Mr. Justice 
Jackson did not participate in the consideration 
or decision of the case. 

SUITS BY ENEMY PLAINTIFFS 

Ex Parte Don Ascanio Colonna 

Petitioner, the Royal Italian Ambassador — 
alleging that a vessel and its cargo of oil, the 
subject of litigation in the District Court for 
the District of New Jersey, were the property 
of the Italian Government and entitled to the 
benefit of Italy's sovereign immunity from 
suit — sought to file in the Supreme Court of 
the United States a petition for writs of pro- 
hibition and mandamus directed to the District 
Court. Subsequent to the filing of the motion, 
there occurred on December 11, 1941 the declara- 
tion of a state of war between the United States 



and Italy. The Supreme Court, in a per curiam 
opinion, declined to entertain the application 
on the ground that section 7 (b) of the Trading 
With the Enemy Act, 40 Stat. 417, contains the 
following provision : 

"Nothing in this Act shall be deemed to au- 
thorize the prosecution of any suit or action 
at law or in equity in any court within the 
United States by an enemy or ally of enemy 
prior to the end of the war, except as provided 
in section ten hereof [which relates to patent, 
trademark and copyright suits] . . ." 

The Court stated that "war suspends the right 
of enemy plaintiffs to prosecute actions in our 
courts". 



The Foreign Service 



DEATH OF AMERICAN MINISTER 
RESIDENT IN IRAQ 

[Released to the press February 2] 

The Secretary of State made the following 
statement: 

"I have learned with profound regret of the 
death, at Baghdad, of Mr. Paul Knabenshue, 
the American Minister Resident. Mr. Knaben- 
shue was one of the Department's outstanding 
experts on the Near East, having served in that 
area for more than 30 years. During that pe- 
riod, he passed through many political crises, 
the most recent of which was in May of last year 
when he and nearly 200 American and other 
nationals were besieged in the American Lega- 
tion at Baghdad for over a month. His cool- 
ness and courage on that occasion undoubtedly 
saved the lives of many of the persons who took 
refuge at his Legation. For this action he re- 
ceived the official commendation of this Govern- 
ment and the thanks of the British Government. 
Mr. Knabenshue's death is a great loss to the 
Department which he faithfully served for more 
than 35 years." 



148 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



[Released to the press February 3] 

The Secretary of State on February 2 ad- 
dressed the following telegram to Mrs. Paul 
Knabenshue, the widow of the American Min- 
ister Resident in Baghdad, recently deceased: 

"I extend my profound sympathy on your 
great loss. You may be proud in the knowl- 
edge that your husband gave his life for his 
country, which he had served so faithfully for 
more than thirty-five years." 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press February 7] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since January 24, 
1942: 

Clayson W. Aklridge, of Rome, N. Y., Consul 
at Singapore, Straits Settlements, has been 
assigned as Consul at Sydney, Australia. 

Harold M. Collins, of Marion, Va., Consul 
at Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

Perry Ellis, of Riverside, Calif., Vice Consul 
at Singapore, Straits Settlements, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Darwin, Northern 
Territory, Australia, where an American Con- 
sulate is to be established. 

Robert Grinnell, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Singapore, Straits Settlements, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Darwin, North- 
ern Territory, Australia, where an American 
Consulate is to be established. 

The assignment of Paul S. Guinn, of Cata- 
wissa, Pa., as Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has 
been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Guinn has 
been designated Assistant Commercial Attache 
at Caracas, Venezuela. 



Joel C. Hudson, of St. Louis, Mo., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been des- 
ignated Assistant Conamercial Attache at 
Montevideo, Uruguay. 

Dale W. Maher, of Joplin, Mo., Consul at 
Lyon, France, has been designated Second 
Secretary of the American Legation at Bern, 
Switzerland. 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution Authorizing the President To Render 

Aid to China : Communication from the President 

of the United States. H. Doc. 606, 77th Cong. 2 pp. 

Authorizing Financial Aid to China. S. Kept. 1016, 

77th Cong., on H. J. Res. 276. 2 pp. 
Treasury and Post Office Departments Appropriation 
Bill, Fiscal Year 1943. [Foreign-owned property 
control, pp. 4-5 ; foreign air-mail transportation, pp. 
14-15.] H. Kept. 1732, 77th Cong, on H. R. 6511. 
31pp. 
Amending Subsection (c) of Section 19 of the Immigra- 
tion Act of February 5, 1917 (39 Stat. 889 ; U. S. C, 
Title 8, Sec. 155), as Amended. H. Rept. 1744, 77th 
Cong, on H. R. 6450. 3 pp. 
An Act Making supplemental appropriations for the 
national defense for the fiscal years ending June 30, 
1942, and June 30, 1943, and for other purposes. Ap- 
proved January 30, 1942. [H. R. 6448.] Public Law 
422, 77th Cong. 3 pp. 
First Deficiency Appropriation Bill, Fiscal Year 1042 : 
Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess. [Department of State, pp. 171-180: 
emergencies arising in the Diplomatic and Con- 
sular Service, 1942; contingent expenses, 1942; 
transportation. Foreign Service, 1942 ; expense of 
maintaining enemy-country diplomatic officers.] 
353 pp. 
H. Rept. 1750, 77th Cong., on H. R. 6548 [Department 
of State, p. 11.] 27 pp. 



FEBRUARY 7, 1942 149 



Publications 



other American republics, and joint resolution ap- 
proved April 11, 1941 — Agreement signed at Wash- 
ington November 28, 1940; agreement and protocol 
proclaimed by the President of the United States 
April 15, 1941. Treaty Series 970. Iv, 53 pp. 10^. 
Dep.\rtment of State Mixed Claims Commission, United States and Ger- 

many : Report of American Commissioner of July 26, 
Control of American Citizens and Nationals Entering ^^^ ^^^^ Fee-Fixing Decision of June 28, 1941. vl. 



72 pp. 



and Leaving Territory Under Jurisdiction of the 

United States. December 3, 1941. Passport Series 

4. Publication 1682. 7 pp. 
Foreign Service List, January 1, 1942. Publication Other Government Agencies 

1686. Iv, 109 pp. Subscription, 50^ a year; single 

copy, 15((. Inter-American Friendship Through the Schools. (Of- 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement: Agreement and fice of Education.) Bulletin No. 10. 61 pp., illus. 

protocol between the United States of America and 15^. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, ?2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLI WITH THE APPBOVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BDBEAD OF THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



FEBRUARY 14, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 138— Publication 1697 



C 



ontents 



The War Fas* 

Coordination of British and American economic warfare 

procedm-es 153 

U.S. assistance to Netherlands armed forces in defense 

of Curagao and Aruba 153 

Americans in the Far East 154 

Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, Re- 
vision I 154 

Cultural Relations 
Visits to the United States of Chilean critic and Guate- 
malan anthropologist 154 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 155 

Examinations 156 

Treaty Information 

Sovereignty: Convention on Provisional Administra- 
tion of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 158 

Indian affairs: Convention Providing for the Creation 

of an Inter- American Indian Institute 158 

Consultation: Final Act of the Third Meeting of 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics 159 

Claims: Convention with Mexico 159 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection and 

Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemisphere . 159 

Publications 160 

Legislation 160 




(J. S. SUPEPtNTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
MAR 3 1942 



The War 



COORDINATION OF BRITISH AND AMERICAN ECONOMIC WARFARE 

PROCEDURES 



[Released to the press February 13] 

Arrangements have been made between the 
Govermnents of the United States and the 
United Kingdom for the coordination and sim- 
plification of their resi^ective economic warfare 
procedures. 

Heretofore it has been necessary for exporters 
sending goods from the United States to certain 
countries in Europe, Africa, and the Near East, 
or to their colonial possessions, to obtain two 
documents — an American export license and a 
British navicert. On April 1, 1942 a new ar- 
rangement will come into effect under which 
only one document, the American export license, 
need be obtained. British consuls in the United 
States will not issue navicerts for exports to be 
shipped from this country after April 1. 

Export licenses issued by the Board of Eco- 
nomic Warfare before March 1 will be invalid 
after April 10, whether shipment is by freight, 
parcel post, or mail, to the following destina- 



tions: French West Africa, French North 
Africa, Iran, Iraq, Eire, Liberia, Madagascar, 
Portugal, Portuguese Atlantic islands, Portu- 
guese Guinea, Reunion, Spain, Syria, Spanish 
Atlantic islands, Spanish Morocco and Tangier, 
Sweden, Switzerland, and Turkey. 

Applications for export licenses for goods to 
be exported to these destinations after April 1 
will be received by the Board of Economic War- 
fare on and after March 1. Under the new pro- 
cedure export licenses for these destinations 
will be issued on a quarterly basis. Detailed 
regulations are being issued by the Board of 
Economic Warfare to which all inquiries should 
be addressed. 

Beginning April 1 certificates fulfilling the 
purpose iiow fulfilled by ship navicerts will be 
issued by United States collectors of customs 
to vessels leaving United States ports. Issuance 
of ship navicerts by British consular officers 
will accordingly be discontinued as of that date. 



U. S. ASSISTANCE TO NETHERLANDS ARMED FORCES IN DEFENSE OF CURAgAO 

AND ARUBA 



[Released to the press February 7] 

The United States Government at the re- 
quest of the Netherlands Government has sent a 
contingent of the United States Army to Cura- 
sao and Aruba to assist the Dutch armed forces 
in the defense of these islands and the oil re- 
fineries thereon, which are vital to the war 
effort of the United Nations and to the defense 
of the Western Hemisphere. 

The United States forces will operate under 
the general supervision of the Governor of 
Curagao and will be withdrawn upon the ter- 
mination of the emergency. 



It is understood furthermore that the Vene- 
zuelan and the Netherlands Governments have 
reached an agreement whereby the former will 
cooperate in this defense measure in a manner 
similar to that agreed upon between the Gov- 
ernments of Brazil and the Netherlands in the 
case of Surinam. 

The Government of Venezuela has indicated 
its whole-hearted approval of these emergency 
measures. 

The governments of the American republics 
are being notified of the foregoing arrange- 
ments, which have been reached in the interests 
of all. 

153 



154 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN" 



AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press February 9] 

In a telegram dated February 8, 1942, Mr. 
Kenneth S. Patton, American Consul General 
at Singapore, reported to the Department that 
ample opportunity has been given all American 
residents of Singapore to withdraw from that 
city to places of safety, and that the 24 Ameri- 
cans who remain in Singapore are fully awai-e 
of the gravity of the military situation and 
have decided to stay there on their own respon- 
sibility. The telegram indicated that no in- 
juries have been reported among the American 
colony, although the consular premises have 
been damaged by a bomb. 

PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED 
NATIONALS, REVISION I 

[Released to the press February 7] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coordi- 
nator of Inter- American Affairs, on February 
7 issued Revision I, dated February 7. 1942, of 
the Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. 

Revision I of the Proclaimed List consoli- 
dates the original list issued July 17. 1941 and 
the seven supplements thereto which have been 
issued to date. This Revision contains the com- 
plete Proclaimed List as in effect February 7, 
1942 and supersedes all previous issues of the 
list. Revision I is divided into two parts : Part 
I contains the listings in the other American re- 
publics, and part II relates to listings outside 
the American republics. The list as revised 
contains 3,650 listings in part I, and 1,813 list- 
ings in part II. Forty-two new deletions in the 
other American republics and nine deletions in 
countries outside the American republics are 
reflected in Revision I. These deletions are in- 
dicated by footnotes to the respective country 
headings under which the deletions appear. 



No new additions to the Proclaimed List are 
included in Revision I. However, numerous 
changes are made in the arrangement of list- 
ings, form of firm titles, spelling, and addresses. 
The arrangement of listings has been changed in 
part I so that firm titles are now generally listed 
in their letter-address form, word for word, as 
written in that form. Cross references previ- 
ouslj^ contained in pai-entheses are eliminated 
and given individual alphabetical listings. 
Cross indexing has been eliminated except for a 
few special situations. 

It is anticipated that this revision and con- 
solidation of the Proclaimed List will greatly 
facilitate the use of the list by interested per- 
sons. It is contemplated that regular supple- 
ments to this Revision, containing new addi- 
tions, deletions, and amendments, will be is- 
sued from time to time. 



Cultural Relations 



VISITS TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
CHILEAN CRITIC AND GUATEMALAN 
ANTHROPOLOGIST 

[Released to the press February 12] 

Francisco Walker-Linares, of Santiago, Chile, 
well-known man of letters, arrived in AVashing- 
ton by train Thursday morning, February 12. 
Senor Walker-Linares, an extremely active 
member of the National Commission on Intel- 
lectual Cooperation in Chile, has come to this 
countiy at the invitation of the Department of 
State to establish contacts with cultural centers 
here. His special field is the scientific organiza- 
tion of labor, and he is author of a book on labor 
legislation. He was formerly Geneva corre- 
spondent of El Mercurio, one of Chile's impor- 
tant newspapers. Professor Walker-Linares 
holds the chair of sociology in the University 
of Chile and is also a counselor of that 
institution. 



FEBRUARY 14, 1942 



155 



A frequent lecturer on topics of international 
literary criticism, he is author of numerous crit- 
ical studies. He has been decorated by the Gov- 
ernment of Ecuador with the Grand Cross of the 
Order of Merit of that republic. 

Professor Walker-Linares, who first visited 
the United States briefly in 1938, will make a 
special study of labor laws of this country dur- 
ing his present trip. 

[Released to the press February 14] 

Prof. David Vela, of the University of 
Guatemala law faculty, who arrived in Wash- 
ington by plane February 14, is visiting this 



country at the invitation of the Department of 
State. A frequent commentator in the Guate- 
malan press on international affairs, he has re- 
cently published an important series of articles 
on the necessity of whole-hearted cooperation 
among the Americas in defense of democracy. 
Professor Vela has also devoted considerable 
attention to the customs and history of the Cen- 
tral American Indian. He has expressed inter- 
est in making a tour of the Southwest while in 
the United States and is also planning to visit 
the Office of Indian Affairs, as well as many of 
our universities and numerous museums. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

On February 13, 1942, the Senate confirmed 
the nominations of William H. Standley, of 
California, to be American Ambassador to the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics ; and Pat- 
rick J. Hurley, of Oklahoma, to be American 
Minister to New Zealand. 

[Released to the press February 14] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 7, 
1942: 

Maurice M. Bernbaum, of Chicago, 111., Vice 
Consul at Singapore, Straits Settlements, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Caracas, Vene- 
zuela. 

Ellis O. Briggs, of Topsfield, Maine, First 
Secretary of Embassy at Habana, Cuba, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at Ha- 
bana, Cuba. 

Thaddeus H. Chylinski, of Bridgeport, Conn., 
formerly Vice Consul at Warsaw, Poland, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Ottawa, Ontario, 
Canada. 

John K. Emmerson, of Canon City, Colo., 
formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at Tokyo, 



Japan, has been designated Third Secretary of 
Embassy and Vice Consul at Lima, Peru, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Leys A. France, of Shaker Heights, Ohio, 
Consul at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, will re- 
tire from the Foreign Service effective on 
March 1, 1942. 

The assignment of Ralph C. Getsinger, of De- 
troit, Mich., as Vice Consul at Singapore, 
Straits Settlements, has been canceled. In lieu 
thereof, Mr. Getsinger has been designated 
Third Secretary of Legation at Bern, Switzer- 
land. 

Parker T. Hart, of Medford, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Para, Brazil, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Manaos, Brazil. 

G. Wallace La Rue, of Columbia, Mo., Vice 
Consul at Bombay, India, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Algiers, Algeria. 

The assignment of Hugh Millard, of Omaha, 
Nebr., as First Secretary of Legation at Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, has been canceled. In lieu 
thereof, Mr. Millard has been designated First 
Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Paul H. Pearson, of Des Moines, Iowa, for- 
merly Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 



156 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Germany, has been designated Third Secretary 
of Legation and Vice Consul at Stockholm, 
Sweden, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Edward E. Kice, of Milwaukee, Wis., for- 
merly Consul at Foochow, Fukien, China, has 
been assigned as Consul at Kunming, Yunnan, 
China. 

Winfield H. Scott, of Washington, D, C, now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
assigned as Consul at Bombay, India. 

John C. Shillock, Jr., of Portland, Oreg., 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Tangier, Morocco, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Lima, 
Peru, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Charles W. Thayer, of Villa Nova, Pa., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mos- 
cow, U. S. S. R., has been designated Third Sec- 
retary of Legation and Vice Consul at Kabul, 
Afghanistan, and will serve in dual capacity. 

The assignment of Alfred R. Thomson, of 
Silver Spring, Md., as Consul General at Glas- 
gow, Scotland, has been canceled. 

Stephen B. Vaughan, of Hasbrouck Heights, 
N. J., formerly Clerk at Berlin, Germany, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Montreal, 
Quebec, Canada. 

The assignment of Hugh H. Watson, of Mont- 
pelier, Vt., as Consul General at Capetown, 
Union of South Africa, has been canceled. In 
lieu thereof, Mr. Watson has been assigned as 
Consul General at Glasgow, Scotland. 

Aubrey Lee Welch, Jr., of Charleston, S. C, 
Vice Consul at Port Limon, Costa Rica, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at San Jose, Costa 
Rica. 

EXAMINATIONS 

[Released to the press February 13] 

The Department of State has announced that 
because of present war conditions it has been 
found impracticable to hold a written examina- 
tion this year for commission to the Foreign 
Service. The Board of Examiners for the For- 
eign Service has not set the date of a later exam- 



ination, and it is impossible to forecast when one 
will be held. 

[Released to the press February 9] 

The following candidates were successful in 
the Foreign Service examination, which was 
recently completed : 

Alvin M. Bentley, of Owosso, Mich. ; born in 
Portland, Maine, Aug. 30, 1918; University of 
Michigan 1936-40 (A.B.), Graduate School 
1940^1. 

Byron E. Blankinship, of New York, N.Y.; 
born in Portland, Oreg., June 2, 1913; Pacific 
University 1931-35 (A.B.) ; University of Cali- 
fornia, at Berkeley, 1935-37 (M.A.) ; Colmnbia 
University, Graduate Faculty of Political Sci- 
ence, History, and Economics, 1938-39 ; Colum- 
bia University School of Law 1939-40. 

D. Chadwick Braggiotti, of New York, N. Y. ; 
born in Florence, Italy, of American parents, 
June 19, 1913; Harvard University 1931-35 
(A.B.) 

Robert M. Brandin, of Rockville Centre, 
N.Y.; born in New York, N.Y., Mar. 2, 1919; 
Princeton University 1936-40 (A. B.) 

Howard Brandon, of Annapolis, Md. ; born in 
St. Marys, Ga., Apr. 17, 1914; University of 
Georgia 1933-35 (A.B.) ; Emory University 
1932-33; University of Grenoble, summer of 
1935 ; University of Bordeaux 1935-36. 

William C. Burdett, Jr., of Macon, Ga. ; born 
in Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 25, 1918; Princeton 
University 1937^1 (A.B.) 

Findley Burns, Jr., of Baltimore, Md. ; born 
in Baltimore May 4, 1917; Princeton Univer- 
sity 1935-39 (A. B.) 

Robert E. Cashin, of University City, Mo.; 
born in Dierks, Ark., July 26, 1918 ; Principia 
College (B.A. 1940). 

Forrest N. Daggett, of South Pasadena, 
Calif.; born in Pasadena, July 16, 1917; Cali- 
fornia Institute of Technology 1934-35; Occi- 
dental College, fall of 1935; Pasadena Junior 
College, spring of 1936; University of Cali- 
fornia, at Berkeley, 1936-39 (A.B.) ; Boalt 



FEBEUARY 14, 1942 



157 



School of Jurisprudence 1939-40; Stanford 
Business School 1940-41. 

Frederick W. Eyssell, of Kansas City, Mo.; 
born in Kansas City Nov. 28, 1917; University 
of Missouri 1935-37; University of Freiburg 
1937-38 ; University of Missouri 1938-41. 

Douglas N. Forman, Jr., of Somerville, Mass. ; 
born in Wooster, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1918; College 
of Wooster 1935-39 (B.A.) ; Fletcher School of 
Law and Diplomacy 1939-41 (M.A. 1940). 

Michael E. Gannett, of New York, N. Y. ; born 
in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, of American par- 
ents, July 13, 1919 ; Harvard University 1937- 
41 (S.B.) 

Joseph N. Greene, Jr., of North Andover, 
Mass.; born in New York, N. Y., Apr. 9, 1920; 
Yale University 1937-41 (B.A.) 

Henry Hanson, Jr., of Middletown, Conn.; 
born in Middletown Nov. 6, 1918; Wesleyan 
University 1936-40 (B.A.) ; Harvard Univer- 
sity 1940-41 (A.M.) 

Douglas Henderson, of Weston, Mass.; born 
in Newton, Mass., Oct. 15, 1914; Boston Univer- 
sity 1936-40 (B.S.) ; Fletcher School of Law 
and Diplomacy 1940-41 (M.A.) 

Spencer M. King, of Belfast, Me.; born in 
San Juan, Puerto Rico, Aug. 11, 1917; Yale 
University 1936-40 (B.A.) ; Georgetown Uni- 
versity, School of Foreign Service, summer ses- 
sion, 1940. 

Armistead M. Lee, of Chatham, Va. ; born in 
Anking, China, of American parents, Apr. 2, 
1916; Yale University (B.A. 1938); Oxford 
University 1938-39 ; Yale University Graduate 
School 1939-41 (M.A.) 

Duane B. Lueders, of Henning, Minn. ; born 
in Henning Sept. 21, 1919 ; Harvard University 
1937-41 (S.B.) ; University of Minnesota, sum- 
mer of 1940. 

LaRue R. Lutkins, of Rye, N. Y. ; born in Port 
Chester, N. Y., June 27, 1919 ; Yale University 
1937-41 (B.A.) 

Oliver M. Marcy, of Newton Highlands, 
Mass.; born in Newton, Mass., Apr. 30, 1919; 
Amherst College 1936-40 (B.A.) 

James V. Martin, Jr., of Boston, Mass. ; bom 
in Tokyo, Japan, of American parents, Nov. 15, 



1916; DePauw University 1934-38 (A.B.) ; 
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy 1938- 
40 (M.A. 1939). 

James L. O'Sullivan, of Orange, Conn. ; bom 
in Derby, Conn., Oct. 23, 1916; Williams Col- 
lege 1934-38 (A.B.) 

Albert E. Pappano, of St. Louis, Mo.; bom 
in Cleveland, Ohio, Apr. 21, 1910; Kenyon Col- 
lege 1928-29; Western Reserve University 
1930-33 (A.B.), 1933-34 (A.M.); Washington 
University, St. Louis, 1934-37 (Ph.D.) 

Henry L. Pitts, Jr., of New York, N. Y. ; born 
in Los Angeles, Calif., June 18, 1920 ; Princeton 
University 1937-41 (A.B.) 

William S. Rosenberg, of Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
bom in New York, N. Y., Sept. 15, 1918 ; Brook- 
lyn College 1936-40 (B.A.) 

Joseph S. Sparks, of Glendale, Calif. ; bom in 
Indianapolis, Ind., Aug. 25, 1916; DePauw Uni- 
versity 1933-37 (A.B.) ; University of Southern 
California 1938-41 (A.M. 1939). 

Leslie Albion Squires, of Palo Alto, Calif.; 
born in Stockton, Calif., Nov. 13, 1912; Duke 
University 1931-33 ; University of Pennsylvania 
1934; Stanford University 1934-36 (B.A.), 
1939-41. 

Walter J. Stoessel, Jr., of Beverly Hills, 
Calif. ; born in Manliattan, Kans., Jan. 24, 1920; 
Stanford University 1937-41 (A.B.) ; Univer- 
sity of Lausanne 1939-40. 

Jewell Truex, of Stockton, Calif.; born in 
Pueblo, Colo., Apr. 9, 1916; Long Beach Junior 
College 1933-34 ; Modesto Junior College 1934- 
36 (A. A.) ; University of California, at Berke- 
ley (A. B. 1938, M. A. 1939, Ph.D. 1941). 

Richard E. Usher, of Madison, Wis. ; born in 
Madison Apr. 15, 1919 ; University of Wiscon- 
sin 1937-41. 

Theodore C. Weber, of Medford, Mass. ; born 
in Rochester, N.Y., Sept. 23, 1918 ; Yale Univer- 
sity 1936^0 (B.A.) ; Fletcher School of Law 
and Diplomacy 1940-41. 

William L. S. Williams, of Racine, Wis. ; born 
in Racine June 8, 1919 ; University of Wisconsin 
1936-40 (B.A.) ; Fletcher School of Law and 
Diplomacy 1940-41 (M.A.) 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 

[Released to the press February 12] 

On February 12, 1942 the President pro- 
claimed the Convention between the American 
Kepublics on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, 
the instruments of ratification of 14 of the 
American republics (the t\Yo-thirds required by 
the terms of the convention to bring it into 
force) having been deposited with the Pan 
American Union. 

The 14 governments which have deposited 
their instruments of ratification are the United 
States of America, the Dominican Republic, 
Costa Rica, Brazil, Peru, Panama, El Salvador, 
Haiti, Guatemala, Argentina, Venezuela, Co- 
lombia, Ecuador, and Honduras. The ratifica- 
tion of Honduras was deposited on January 8, 
1942, on which date the convention came into 
force. 

The convention is the result of consultation 
at the Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics held 
at Habana in July 1940. Its purpose is to pro- 
vide for the provisional administration by the 
American republics of European colonies and 
possessions in the Americas in the event that 
any non-American state should attempt to re- 
place another non-American state in the sov- 
ereignty or control which it exercises over any 
territory located in this hemisphere. 

158 



INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an 
Inter-American Indian Institute 

(Released to the press February 12] 

On February 12, 1942 the President pro- 
claimed the Convention Providing for the Cre- 
ation of an Inter-American Indian Institute, 
which was opened for signature at Mexico City 
on November 1, 1940. 

The convention was signed on behalf of the 
United States of America by the American Am- 
bassador at Mexico City on November 29, 1940. 
On the same day the convention was signed by 
the plenipotentiaries of Costa Rica, Cuba, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, and 
Peru, and on December 18, 1940 it was signed 
by the plenipotentiary of Bolivia. Notifications 
of adherence to the convention were given to 
the Mexican Government by Nicaragua on 
April 18, 1941, by Panama on May 26, 1941, and 
by Paraguay on June 17, 1941. 

The Convention Providing for the Creation 
of an Inter- American Indian Institute was for- 
mulated by a committee appointed at the First 
Inter-American Congress on Indian Life, held 
in April 1940 at Patzcuaro, Mexico. This Con- 
gress was convened pursuant to resolutions of 
the Seventh International Conference of Ameri- 
can States, held at Montevideo 1933, and of the 
Eighth International Conference of American 
States, held at Lima 1938. 

The Institute created in pursuance of the 
convention will study Indian problems in the 
American republics and legislation relating to 
Indians. In fulfilling its functions in this re- 



FEBRUARY 14, 1942 



159 



spect, it will also cooperate with bureaus of In- 
dian aflPairs of the several American republics. 

The instruments of ratification of the conven- 
tion, in accordance with article XVI, were de- 
posited with the Mexican Government by Mex- 
ico, Honduras, El Salvador, the United States 
of America, and Ecuador on May 2, July 29, 
July 30, August 1, and December 13, 1941, re- 
spectively. The convention came into force in 
respect of these five countries on December 13, 
1941, the date of the deposit of the fifth ratifica- 
tion, that of Ecuador. 

It is provided in article X of the convention 
that the nations which subscribe to the conven- 
tion shall, on such date as they may deem ad- 
visable, and within their respective jurisdic- 
tions, organize national Indian institutes which 
shall be affiliated to the Inter-American Indian 
Institute. By Executive Order 8930 of Novem- 
ber 1, 1941 the President established in the De- 
partment of the Interior a National Indian In- 
stitute for the United States of America.^ By 
the Executive order, a policy board is estab- 
lished within tlie National Indian Institute for 
the purpose of recommending policies to be fol- 
lowed by the Institute. 



CONSULTATION 

Final Act of the Third Meeting of Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American RepubUcs 

The text of the Final Act of the Third Meet- 
ing of Ministers of Foreign Aifairs of the 
American Republics, which met at Rio de 
Janeiro January 15-28, 1942, appears in the 
Bulletin of February 7, 1942, under the heading 
"The War". 



' Bulletin of November 8, 1941, p. 373. 



CLAIMS 

Convention Witli Mexico 

On February 10, 1942 the President ratified 
the Convention for the Adjustment and Settle- 
ment of Certain Outstanding Claims between 
the United States and Mexico, which was signed 
at Washington on November 19, 1941. See the 
Bulletin of November 22, 1941, pages 399-403, 
for a statement regarding the outlines of the 
several agreements covering claims and finan- 
cial problems between the two Governments 
signed on November 19, 1941. 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

Haiti 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a let- 
ter dated February 11, 1942 that the instrument 
of ratification by Haiti of the Convention on 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation 
in the Western Hemisphere, which was opened 
for signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940, was deposited with the Union 
on January 31, 1942. The instrument of rati- 
fication is dated December 30, 1941. 

Paragraph 3 of article XI of the convention 
provides that the convention "shall come into 
force three months after the deposit of not less 
than five ratifications with the Pan American 
Union". The instrument deposited by the Gov- 
ernment of Haiti is the fifth ratification of the 
convention deposited with the Union. Tlie 
other governments which have also deposited 
their ratifications are the United States of 
America, April 28, 1941 ; El Salvador, Decem- 
ber 2, 1941; Guatemala, August 14, 1941; and 
Venezuela, December 2, 1941. The convention 
will enter into force three months after the de- 
posit of the instrument of ratification by Haiti, 
namely, May 1, 1942. 



160 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 




Legislation 



Department of State 

Allocation of Tariff Quota on Crude Petroleum and Fuel 
Oil: Proclamation by the President of the United 
States of America Issued December 26, IWI Pursuant 
to Article VII of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Venezuela 
Signed November 6, 1939. Executive Agreement 
Series 226. Publication 1688. 5 pp. 50. 

Diplomatic List, February 1942. Publication 1695. ii, 
94 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

North American Regional Broadcasting: Agreement 
Between the United States of America, Canada, Cuba, 
Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico— Signed at 
Habana December 13, 1937 ; proclaimed by the Presi- 
dent January 23, 1941. Treaty Series 962. iv, 101 
pp. 150. 

Other Government Agencies 

Balance of International Payments of United States in 
1940. (Department of Commerce, Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce, Economic Series 17. ) vi, 93 
pp. 200 (paper). 
Neutrality and Freedom of Seas. [List of recent refer- 
ences on neutrality, with section on maritime neu- 
trality and freedom of seas.] (Library of Congress, 
Bibliography Division.) 27 pp., processed. 
Foreign Trade of Latin America : Report on trade of 
Latin America with special reference to trade with 
United States, under general provisions of see. 332, 
pt. 2, title 3, Tariff Act of 1930. (Tariff Commis- 
sion.) 
Part 2, Commercial policies and trade relations of 
individual Latin American countries- 
Sec. 12, El Salvador, viii, 53 pp., illus., processed. 



Free. 
Sec. 13, Guatemala. 

Free. 
Sec. 14, Honduras. 

Free. 
Sec. 15, Nicaragua. 

Free. 



viii, 58 pp., illus., processed, 
viii, 49 pp., illus., processed, 
viii, .59 pp., illus., processed. 



Joint Resolution To authorize the President of the 
United States to render finSincial aid to China, and 
for other purposes. [H.J. Res. 276] Public Law 442, 
77th Cong. Approved, February 7, 1942. 1 p. 

Appropriation for tinancial aid to China. H. Rept. 
1759, 77th Cong., on H.J. Res. 278. 1 p. 

Amending the act requiring registration of certain per- 
sons employed by agencies to disseminate propaganda 
in the United States : Message from the President of 
the United States transmitting without approval, 
H.R. 6269, a bill to amend the act entitled "An Act 
To Require the Registration of Certain Persons Em- 
ployed by Agencies To Disseminate Propaganda in 
the United States, and for Other Purposes," ap- 
proved Jiuie 8, 1938, as amended. H. Doc. 611, 77th 
Cong. 9 pp. 

Draft of a resolution to amend the Neutrality Act of 
1939 : Message from the President of the United 
States transmitting a draft of a resolution to amend 
the Neutrality Act of 1939. H. Doc. 617, 77th Cong. 
Ip. 

Supplemental estimate of appropriation for defense 
aid : Communication from the President of the United 
States transmitting supplemental estimate of appro- 
priation, totaling $5,430,000,000 for defense aid (lend- 
lease) to carry out the provisions of the act entitled 
"An Act To Promote the Defense of the United 
States," approved March 11, 1941. H. Doc. 618, 77th 
Cong. 2 pp. 

First Deficiency Appropriation Bill for 1942 : Hearings 
before the subcommittee of the Committee on Appro- 
priations, House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 2d 
sess. [State Department, pp. 171-180.] ii, 353 pp. 

Amending section 7 of the Neutrality Act of 1939. 
S. Rept. 1057, 77th Cong., on S. J. Res. 133. 2 pp. 

H. Res. 351 to 367, inclusive, 77th Cong., 1st sess., ex- 
pressing thanlis for the cordial reception extended to 
a delegation of Members of the House of Representa- 
tives of the United States by high oflBcials of the 
Governments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, 
Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, 
Uruguay, and Venezuela. Agreetl to February 2, 
1942. 1 p. each. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price. $2.75 a year 

PUBLISBED WEEKLY WITH THE APPBOVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BOEBAO OP THE BUDGET 



■^9'S-S"3. / n-30 

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



c 



FEBRUARY 21, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 139— Publication 1699 



ontents 




The War Page 

Address to Canada by the President of the United 

States 163 

Address by the Under Secretary of State before the 
Cuban Chamber of Commerce in the United 

States 164 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle before the 

National Farm Institute 168 

American Republics 

Agreement between Bohvian Government and Standard 

Oil Company 172 

Australasia 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

New Zealand 173 

Commercial Policy 

Exchange of notes regarding trade agreement with 

Haiti 174 

Regulations 175 

The Foreign Service 

Promotions 176 

Treaty Information 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection 
and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 178 

Diplomatic officers: Pan American convention .... 178 

Claims: Convention with Mexico 178 

Petroleum properties: Agreement with Mexico regard- 
ing compensation for expropriated petroleum 

properties 178 

Opium and other dangerous drugs: International con- 
ventions of 1925 and 1931 178 

Commerce: Trade agreement with Haiti 179 

Legislation 179 

Publications 179 



^, s, SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

MAR 12 1942 



The War 



ADDRESS TO CANADA BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES* 



[Released to the press by the White House February 14] 

I am sjjeaking to my neighbors of Canada this 
evening — in regard to something tliat is a Ca- 
nadian matter — only because of a personal rela- 
tionship, which goes back 58 long years, when 
my family began taking me every summer to 
spend several months on a delightful island off 
the coast of New Brunswick. I hope that my 
privilege of free and intimate discourse across 
our border will always continue. I trust that 
it will always be appreciated as sincerely as I 
appreciate it tonight. 

It is not merely as good neighbors that we 
speak to each other in these eventful days, but 
as partners in a great enterprise which concerns 
us equally and in which we are equally pledged 
to the uttermost sacrifice and effort. 

In an atmosphere of peace, four years ago, I 
offered you the assurance that the people of this 
country would not stand idly by if domination 
of Canadian soil were ever threatened by an ag- 
gressor. Your Prime Minister responded with 
an intimation that Canada, whose vast terri- 
tories flank our entire northern border, would 
man that border against any attack upon us. 
These mutual pledges are now being imple- 
mented. Instead of defending merely our 
shores and our territories we now are joined 
with the other free peoples of the world against 
an armed conspiracy to wipe out free institu- 
tions wherever they exist. 

Freedom — our freedom and yours — is under 



'- Broadcast February 15, 1942 in connection with the 
Dominion's Victory Loan drive. 



attack on many fronts. You and we together 
are engaged to resist the attack on any front 
where our strength can best be brought to bear. 

The part that Canada is playing in this fight 
for the liberty of man is worthy of your tradi- 
tions and ours. We, your neighbors, have been 
profoundly impressed by reports that have 
come to us setting forth the magnitude and 
nature of your effort as well as the valiant spirit 
which supports it. If that effort is to be meas- 
ured in dollars, then you already have paid out, 
in two years, more than twice as much as you 
spent in the whole four years of the last war. 

Moreover, these reports show that one Ca- 
nadian in eA'ery 21 of your entire population is 
now in the fighting forces and that one in every 
29 is a volunteer for service anywhere in the 
world. It should give us all new strength and 
new courage to learn that in the swift mobiliza- 
tion your Army has increased nearly 10-fold, 
your Navj' 15-fold, your Air Force 25-fold. We 
rejoice to know that the air-training plan which 
you commenced to organize two years ago is 
now the main source of reinforcements for Brit- 
ain's Air Force and that its graduates are fight- 
ing on almost every front in the world. Other 
reports disclose in equally impressive terms an 
all-out effort which Canada is making in the 
common cause of liberty. 

Yours are the achievements of a great nation. 
They require no praise from me — but they get 
that praise from me nevertheless. I understate 
the case when I say that we, in this country, 
contemplating what you have done, and the 

163 



164 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



spirit in which you have done it, are proud to be 
your neighbors. 

From the outset you have had our friendship 
and understanding, and our collaboration on an 
increasing scale. We have gone forward to- 
gether with increasing understanding and mu- 
tual sympathy and good-will. 

More recent events have brought us into even 
closer alignment; and at Washington a few 
weeks ago, with the assistance of Britain's Prime 
Minister and your own, we arrived at under- 
standings which mean that the United Nations 
will fight and work and endure together until 



our common purpose is accomplished and the 
sun shines down once more upon a world where 
the weak will be safe and the strong will be just. 
There is peril ahead for us all, and sorrow for 
many. But our cause is right, our goal is 
worthy, our strength is great and growing. Let 
us then march forward together, facing danger, 
bearing sacrifice, competing only in the effort to 
share even more fully in the great task laid 
upon us all. Let us, remembering the price that 
some have paid for our survival, make our own 
contribution worthy to lie beside theirs upon the 
altar of man's faith. 



ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE BEFORE THE CUBAN 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN THE UNITED STATES ' 



[Released to tbe press February 15] 

May I express first of all my deep gratifica- 
tion at being afforded once again the privilege 
of being the guest of the Cuban Chamber of 
Commerce in the United States. For I am 
given in this way the satisfaction of meeting 
many of my Cuban friends, and of feeling, dur- 
ing the hours I am with them, that I am closer 
to that great Nation where I had the honor of 
representing this Government nine years ago. 

It is all the more appropriate, therefore, for 
me tonight to render a deeply felt tribute of 
admiration and of gratitude to the people of 
Cuba and to their present Government. Cuba, 
as always, has proved loyal to her friendship 
and to her traditional ties with the United 
States. Those ties were consecrated in 1898. 
When this country was forced into war in 1917, 
Cuba again stood at her side. And now that 
the United States, through an act of cowardly 
aggression which will never be forgotten by 
the people of the United States, nor, I believe. 



' Delivered by Mr. Welles before the Cuban Chamber 
of Commerce in the United States, in New York, N.Y., 
February 16, 1942, and broadcast over the facilities of 
the blue network of the National Broadcasting Co. and 
the shortwave facilities of the National Broadcasting 
Co. and the Columbia Broadcasting Co. 



by the peoples of any of the American republics, 
has been forced into the gi'eatest war of all 
times against the enemies of all that civilized 
man holds most dear, the Cuban people again, 
without liesitation or delay, have risen as one 
man to defend their own independence and the 
integrity of the Western Hemisphere, and by so 
doing, to come to the support of the United 
States. 

Friendship of that magnitude is beyond 
praise. But I know that I speak for all of the 
American people when I say that their grateful 
recognition will be enduring. 

During the brief period between January 15 
and January 28, the world witnessed in the city 
of Rio de Janeiro the ending of an epoch in 
the Western Hemisphere and the beginning of 
a new era. 

It witnessed the termination of the period in 
the history of the Americas in which the phrase 
"the solidarity of the American republics" had 
been an aspiration — a collection of mere words. 
There has now commenced a period of New 
World history in which inter-American soli- 
darity has become a real, a living, and a vital 
truth. 

The American foreign ministers met scarcely 
more than a month after Pearl Harbor. 

The war had been brought to America. 



FEBRUARY 21, 1942 

They met fully conscious in many instances 
of the relatively undefended state of their own 
countries. They met under no illusions as to 
the nature of the struggle into which the world 
has now been plunged and well aware of the 
cruelty, the power, and the unlimited ambitions 
for conquest of the Axis powers. 

But to them all, the fundamental issues were 
clear. They realized that in the coui'se which 
destiny has traced for our New World there 
now existed for us all but two alternatives: 
either supine acquiescence in the plans which 
Hitler has charted for the enslavement of the 
freedom-loving peoples of the Americas, or else 
an immediate and resolute defiance of the would- 
be conqueror, and the prompt taking of drastic 
and concerted measures for the common safety 
of all of the American republics. They knew 
that the latter alternative meant victory and 
future security. 

Unanimously the 21 American republics de- 
termined upon their course. And the nature of 
their course was forthright and categorical. 1 
can assure you that if the spirit of appease- 
ment lingers anywhei-e on the American con- 
tinent, it was not much in evidence at Rio de 
Janeiro. I shall read you the text of the first 
resolution agreed upon by the conference, en- 
titled ''Breaking of Diplomatic Relations" : 

"I 

"The American Republics reajBBrm their dec- 
laration to consider any act of aggression on 
the part of a non-American State against one of 
them as an act of aggression against all of them, 
constituting as it does an immediate threat to 
the liberty and independence of America. 

"II 

"The American Republics reafl&rm their com- 
plete solidarity and their determination to coop- 
erate jointly for their mutual protection until 
the effects of the present aggression against the 
Continent have disappeared. 

"Ill 

"The American Republics, in accordance with 
the procedures established by their own laws 
and in conformity with the position and circum- 
stances obtaining in each country in the existing 



165 

continental conflict, recommend the breaking 
of their diplomatic relations with Japan, Ger- 
many and Italy, since the first-mentioned State 
attacked and the other two declaimed war on an 
American country. 

"IV 

"Finally, the American Republics declare 
that, prior to the reestablishment of the relations 
referred to in the preceding paragraph, they 
will consult among themselves in order that 
their action may have a solidary character." 

Before the holding of the conference at Rio de 
Janeiro, 10 of the American republics had de- 
clared war upon the Axis powers, and three 
others, the Governments of Mexico, Colombia, 
and Venezuela, had already severed diplomatic 
relations with the enemy. Before the termina- 
tion of the conference and as soon as the resolu- 
tion I have just read to you had been adopted, 
the Governments of Peru, of Uruguay, of Bo- 
livia, of Paraguay, of Ecuador, and of Brazil 
likewise severed their diplomatic relations. It 
is true that as yet the Governments of Chile and 
of Argentina have not acted upon the recom- 
mendation in which they themselves joined, but, 
to paraphrase the eloquent metaphor of that 
great orator and statesman, the Foreign Minis- 
ter of Mexico, Dr. Ezequiel Padilla, which he 
employed in the closing session of the conference 
at Rio de Janeiro, in the firmament over the 
Western Hemisphere the stars of Argentina and 
Chile will surely soon be shining at the side of 
the stars of the other 19 American republics. 

The conference was in every sense a confer- 
ence of acts and not a conference of words. 

The American governments there agreed, like- 
wise unanimously, upon the severance of all 
commercial and financial relations between the 
American republics and the Axis powers; they 
agreed upon far-reaching measures of coopera- 
tion for mutual defense; for the maintenance 
through mutual assistance of the internal econ- 
omy of the American republics ; for the stimula- 
tion and expansion of the production of strategic 
materials; for the mobilization of inter-Amer- 
ican transportation facilities; for joint action 
in the most effective and detailed manner so 
as to eliminate subversive activities within the 



166 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Americas; for the elimination of all Axis in- 
fluence, direct or indirect, in the realm of radio 
and telephone, and in the field of aviation ; and 
finally, to take joint action in preparation for 
the time when the victory shall have been won, 
so that the enlightened principles of decency, of 
humanity, of tolerance, and of understanding, 
which have made our New World what it is to- 
day, shall likewise be the determining principles 
in the shaping of the world of the future. 

The negotiations at the conference were under- 
taken in the true sj^irit of democracy. Some of 
us would have preferred in one or two instances 
the adoption of diflFerent methods of approach to 
the problems we had before us. But in every 
case an harmonious and unanimous agreement 
was had, which in no wise weakened the practi- 
cal results we all sought. And thereby the great 
objective, the maintenance of the unity of the 
Americas, was preserved and strengthened. 

I cannot fail tonight to express once more the 
gi-atitude all of us who attended the meeting 
had reason to feel because of the unfailing sup- 
port given to the delegates in the achievement of 
their purposes by that wise and courageous 
statesman, the President of Brazil, and by his 
great Minister for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Aranha, 
who served as our Chairman. 

Nor can I fail to emphasize the conspicuous 
and constructive part played in our delibera- 
tions by the representative of Cuba. Ambassador 
Concheso. Cuba was represented in her own 
best tradition. I can offer no higher tribute. 

While technically it did not come within the 
scope of the agenda before the conference, the 
agreement reached at Rio de Janeiro between 
the Governments of Ecuador and of Peru, for 
the final settlement of their century-and-a- 
quarter-old dispute, will always be regarded as 
a direct result of the spirit engendered at that 
meeting. As you all know, that long-standing 
controversy had time and again given rise to the 
most serious difficulties between those two neigh- 
boring republics. Tragically enough, it had 
even resulted in actual hostilities last year. It 
had for generations thwarted and handicapped 
the prosperous development and the peaceful 
stability of the two nations involved. Its con- 



tinuation had jeopardized the well-being of the 
entire hemisphere. I am happy to say that since 
the signing of the agreement the arrangements 
provided therein have been scrupulously carried 
out by both parties thereto, and it is the hope of 
all of us that the remaining and final steps will 
be taken in the immediate future, so that this 
last remaining important controversy in our 
hemisphere may be regarded as finally liqui- 
dated. 

I sometimes wonder if the people of the 
United States fully appreciate in the bitter 
struggle in which they are now engaged the 
significance to their own security of the striking 
demonstration of friendship and of support for 
them and for their cause which they have now 
been offered by their neighbors in the New 
World. 

How different would be our situation today 
if on our southern border there lay a Republic 
of Mexico filled with resentment and with an- 
tagonism against the United States, instead of a 
truly friendly and cooperative Mexican people 
seeking the same objectives as ours, guided by 
the same policies, and inspired by the same mo- 
tives in their determination to safeguard their 
independence and the security of the hemisphere, 
as those which we ourselves possess; or if in 
those republics more nearly adjacent to the 
Panama Canal there still burned a flaming hos- 
tility towards our Government because of acts 
of unjustifiable and vmjustified intervention and 
of military occupation ; or if the gi-eat republics 
to the south were still deeply suspicious of our 
ultimate aims and outraged because of our un- 
willingness to concede their sovereign equality. 

But if we look back a short decade ago, the 
picture I have just drawn will indicate the situ- 
ation as it then existed. 

In this new gigantic war, were we confronted 
by conditions within the hemisphere as they then 
obtained, we would today be indeed gravely in 
danger. 

But fortunately, and we can never afford to 
forget it, there lives today throughout the 
length and breadth of the hemisphere a realiza- 
tion of community of interest, a recognition of 
American interdependence, which will prove to 



FEBRUARY 21, 1942 



167 



be the salvation of the New World and which 
renders full assurance that the liberties and the 
independence of the free peoples of the Amer- 
icas will be maintained against all hazards and 
against all odds. 

The bedrock upon which this new epoch of in- 
ter-American understanding is founded is the 
recognition in fact, as well as in word, that every 
one of the 21 American republics is the sov- 
ereign equal of the others. That implies that 
interference by any one of them, in the internal 
affairs of the others is inconceivable. Destroy 
or change that foundation and the inter- Amer- 
ican federation which now exists will crash into 
ruins. 

During recent months a strangely paradox- 
ical situation has been increasingly frequently 
brought to my attention. Certain individuals 
and gi'oups in the United States — who allege 
that they are representative of extreme liberal 
thought — have been publicly complaining that 
the policy of the Government of the United 
States in its dealings during these latter years 
with the other American republics should have 
been a policy of open condemnation of existing 
governments in the other American nations, of 
a refusal of all forms of cooperation with those 
governments, and of open support of indi- 
viduals or groups in those countries who hap- 
pen to hold political views or beliefs which 
these critics regard as desirable. One of these 
gentlemen, a professor, in fact, in a book which 
he has recently published, has even gone so far 
as to maintain in the most portentous manner 
that this Government has been gravely derelict 
because it has not pursued in the Western Hemi- 
sphere what he terms a policy of "revolutionary 
democracy". 

It is clear that what is here proposed is that 
the Government of the United States, by pres- 
sure, by bribery, by corruption, presumably even 
by open intervention, should have assisted in 
the overthrow of the established governments 
of the other American republics in every case 
where they did not meet the requirements of this 
group of alleged liberals, so that they might be 
replaced with hand-picked governments of a 
different color. And I have no doubt that this 



group of alleged liberals would have been glad 
to do the picking for our Government I 

The paradox lies in the fact that som,e of these 
persons are the very same individuals who only 
a generation ago were leading the fight with 
courage and with determination and with ulti- 
mate success to obtain from the Government of 
the United States the pursuit of a policy of non- 
intervention. 

I wonder if this group of alleged liberals to 
whom I refer has ever realized that what they 
are now proposing is the pursuit by their Gov- 
ernment of a policy which is identical with that 
which has been pursued during the past five 
years by Hitler. 

What they are demanding in fact is the exer- 
cise by the United States of its power and of its 
influence in order to create puppet governments 
in the sovereign nations of the Western Hemi- 
sphere because of the belief by these people that 
these pupi^et governments would be more re- 
sponsive to the political theories which they 
themselves hold. 

But whether these misguided citizens of ours 
realize this truth or not, of one thing I am ever- 
lastingly sure, and that is that if the Govern- 
ment of the United States ever again under- 
takes within the New World a policy which con- 
stitutes interference, direct or indirect, in the 
domestic political concerns of our neighbors, the 
day when that policy is undertaken marks tlie 
end of all friendship and understanding be- 
tween the American peoples. 

It would signalize the termination of the new 
epoch which commenced at Rio de Janeiro. It 
would mark the collapse of the finest and most 
practical form of international cooperation — 
the system of the Western Hemisphere — which 
in my judgment modern civilization has yet 
produced. 

As between the two forces battling in this 
world upheaval which is now in process, and of 
which the gravity is increasing day by day, there 
is no longer any neutrality known to our New 
World. 

There is no government in the Americas 
which is neutral in its acts or in its policies. 



168 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtlLLETrN 



There are no peoples of the Americas who are 
neutral in thought or in sympathy. 

The Americas have unanimously cast their lot 
on the side of those ■who are fighting to save 
mankind from having to endure the darkness 
which would engulf it were Hitlerism to 
triumph. 

All through the world, in every continent, in 
every quarter of the globe, men and women ai'e 
laying down their lives in order to save the inde- 
pendence of their nations. To them the gi-eatest 
sacrifice is not too great if, by the making of it, 
they can ensure that their children and their 
fellows can be free — free to worship God, free to 
think and to speak, and free to live out their 
lives in safety and in peace. 

Thirty-seven governments, and 37 peoples, 
today, in one form or another, have taken their 
stand in opposition to the Axis powers and in 
detestation of the cruel barbarism which these 
evil forces represent. 

They are joined in a common cause. Differing 
as they do in race, in color, in creed, in language, 
and in form of government, they are yet as one 
in their prayer for the victory of the principles 
of Christian civilization. 

For they realize that without a complete and 
crushing and permanent defeat of Hitlerism, 
not one nation, not one government, not one in- 
dividual, can have any hope for the future. 

Every foot of ground that the gallant Soviet 
armies regain from Hitler's troops constitutes a 



gain for us all. Every defeat inflicted upon the 
assassins of Japan by the brave forces of China 
is a blow at the tyraimy which we are all deter- 
mined must be defeated. Every set-back suf- 
fered by Hitler's satellites at the hands of the 
United Nations is that much new advantage to 
the cause which the peoples of these 37 nations 
uphold. 

Prejudices and antagonisms between us — stale 
but festering grievances of the past — wherever 
they still exist among these companions in this 
New Crusade, must go by the board. There is 
no place any longer for any factor which hinders 
our common effort. 

There is only one issue today — it is to win the 
war. 

Upon us, the people of the United States, are 
fixed the eyes of millions upon millions who 
have for long past been suffering the burden 
and heat of the battle. For many weary months 
they have been waging our fight for us. They 
now look to us to make good the faith they 
have in us. We cannot fail. 

But we must immediately become fully con- 
scious of our responsibility. We must at once 
attain the full measure of that achievement 
which is imperative to gain the victory. 

We shall not fail. 

We shall not fail because the end for which we 
strive, and which we seek, is that goal which 
to all the Americas — from Tierra del Fuego to 
Hudson's Bay — implies the one supreme value 
in life — Liberty. 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE BEFORE THE NATIONAL 
FARM INSTITUTE ' 



[Released to the press February 20] 

You have asked me to give today an account 
of America's determination to meet the great- 
est challenge in American history. For the 
first time since the days of the Revolution 
America's right to exist and the right of Ameri- 
cans to be Americans have been attacked. The 
situation is grave, and for some time its gravity 
will increase. With the utmost frankness I pro- 



^ Delivered at Des Jloines, Iowa, February 20, 1942. 



pose to tell you today what we have done, and 
some of the things we hope to do. 

For some years we in the State Department 
were convinced of two main facts. We were 
sure that a trio of nations — Germany, Japan, 
and the puppet nation of Italy — planned to risk 
a major war for the purpose of seizing anything 
and everything they desired. In this they 
acknowledged no law, knew no mercy, and pro- 
posed to follow the lines of the barbarians who 
had ravaged civilization centuries ago. Second, 



FEBRUARY 21, 194 2 



169 



we were clear that the war they then planned 
included an attack on the United States, since 
their plans contemplated the conquest of the 
entire world. 

All of us, and more particularly a very great 
American, Secretary Cordell Hull, of Tennessee, 
said this to the American Nation on many occa- 
sions. We were not always listened to. The 
idea of world-conquest to the average American 
seems like an insanity. Actually, it is insane. 
But, particularly in Germany and Japan, crimi- 
nal insanity was the order of the day. For years 
Nazi and Japanese militarists had matured 
plans to undermine, infilti'ate, and eventually to 
break every free country in the world. They at- 
tempted to create and did create the most power- 
ful military machines in history. During this 
period they lied, of course, to their own people. 
Hitler promised to all Germany that he would 
not involve them in a major war, though he and 
the people around them knew that they planned 
wars in all directions. The Japanese insisted 
that they wanted merely peace and prosperity in 
Asia, though they were perfecting schemes to 
conquer and enslave everyone within their reach. 

It was likewise the conception of the State De- 
partment that in the face of this sort of thing no 
nation could go it alone. So far as we knew, the 
plans of the so-called Axis called for conquering 
countries one by one, under the often-repeated 
lie that each conquest would be the last and that 
other nations need not make the sacrifices re- 
quired for all-out defense. On the continent of 
Europe they were successful in doing this. They 
did conquer, one by one, Austria, Czechoslovakia, 
Albania, and Abyssinia. 

It is to the everlasting credit of Great Britain 
that when in 1939 Hitler attacked Poland, she, 
with her then ally, France, refused to stand 
idly by while this process went forward. I am 
glad to say this now. In time of military re- 
verse it is easy to criticize, and some have criti- 
cized. Great Britain. But those who now criti- 
cise had best remember that Great Britain saw 
the situation more than two years ago and met 
it at the risk of her national life. She entered 
the war voluntarily and of her own accord, 
having learned what an Axis victory would 

445361 — 42 2 



mean. During that time many in the United 
States were saying that this was no concern of 
ours, that we could sit quietly behind our ocean 
screens and watch the war burn itself out on 
European and Asiatic shores. In Washington 
we had no such conviction. We thought that 
the war was coming to us as rapidly as the 
armed forces of the Axis could break through 
the obstacles of British, French, and Chinese 
resistance, and as soon as they could develop 
combined air and sea power which would per- 
mit them to use the oceans as highways leading 
toward our own coasts. 

We did not on that account abandon any pos- 
sible road to a peaceful solutiorj. At every 
step of the way we used all of the tools at our 
command, seeking to avoid the catastrophe of 
war. We were not hopeful of results. You 
do not get very far talking righteousness to 
rattlesnakes. But we knew, as we know now, 
that even in Axis countries there are great 
bodies of men and women who detest the works 
of their own rulers and who, if left to them- 
selves, would seek and undoubtedly find just 
solutions. The attempt to make these voices 
heard was worth making, and I for one am glad 
that no stone was left unturned to seek solu- 
tions through the avenues of peace. 

In January 1940 some of us initiated a pro- 
gram for the prompt rearmament of the United 
States in modern terms. I am proud to have 
been one of those who took part in that move- 
ment. We had no illusions as to what we needed. 
We knew that an armament progi'am capable of 
resisting the Axis meant the progressive turning 
of a huge part of our national life to production 
of munitions and the turning of millions of 
Americans from peaceful pursuit to ways of war. 
We did not enjoy the prospect. But we consid- 
ered that American civilization, which our fath- 
ers and mothers had built with infinite toil and 
which they had defended with their lives, was a 
precious gift and that its defense in our time was 
not a duty but a priceless privilege. 

Whatever sacrifices were made to arm the 
United States and, if occasion required, to con- 
quer in the name of the United States, were not 
to be counted as unhappiness. Rather, if Ameri- 



170 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



cans were called upon to do this, we were merely 
keeping faith with our fathers before us and the 
children who come after us. 

During this period we endeavored to make 
available to the peace-loving nations who fought 
against world-conquest the arms and munitions 
which might safeguard their existence. To this 
end we made American materials available to 
China, and American arms available to Great 
Britain. 

To this end we worked to strengthen the soli- 
darity of the American Hemisphere — a great 
family of nations which, more than any other 
group of nations, with the possible exception of 
the British Commonwealth, has recognized that 
the welfare and defense of each is essential to 
the welfare and defense of all. 

When the staggering news of the fall of 
France broke upon this counti-y in June of 1940, 
most of the United States became at length 
aware of the danger in which it stood. There 
were still some who thought it was not our 
affair. But in the main, the solid coimnon sense 
of the United States saw clearly the issues in- 
volved. The result was the immediate arming 
of Britain, so that she could prevent the Nazi 
tide from rolling into the Atlantic without let 
or hindrance. In July of 1940, at the Confer- 
ence of Habana, 21 American nations authorized 
a full measure of American defense, should the 
war affect tlie Western Hemisphere. 

Meantime the armament effort had passed 
through the blueprint stage, and throughout the 
United States factories for the construction of 
airplanes and ' tanks, of guns and electrical 
equipment, of ships and ordnance, had been 
springing up. The building of an American 
aj-my was planned, and the plans were begin- 
ning to be carried out. The successful defense 
of Britain, which kept the Nazi menace from 
our own shores, bought us a year's time in which 
to work — an inestimable gift. I believe history 
will record that we made good use of that time. 
The continued resistance of China to Japanese 
aggression, in which we were able to help, gave 
check to the ambitions of the Japanese to become 
partners in crime with the German invasion. 

In the summer of 1940 there was laid on the 



shoulders of two men. President Roosevelt and 
Mr. Cordell Hull, one of the greatest burdens of 
wliich history has record. We had still to 
build — and still have to build — the embattled 
might of the United States. We had to do this 
in conjunction with the effort of a multitude of 
free peoples to resist the most ruthless attacks 
on their countries and their homes. We had to 
supply the hope and the arms, and we had, mean- 
while, to make America conscious of her huge 
task in the history of the times, and to equip her 
for the great but terrible work of reestablishing 
a humane world. 

Specifically, thei-e was assigned to Mr. Hull 
the task of holding, in time of peace, not merely 
the American Hemisphere but also all that was 
left of France and of French Africa, of holding 
at bay the Japanese ambition, and of providing 
uninterrupted supply lines for Great Britain. 
Presently, in tlie spring of 1941. this country was 
called upon to assist in the supplying of Russia. 

We had no doubts as to the task. We had 
reason to believe early in 1941 that the Germans 
planned the conquest of Russia, and we gave the 
Russians warning of this fact. We had reason 
to believe that Japan planned war and that she 
would engage in it against us whenever the 
United States ceased to supply her with certain 
materials. And we had no doubt whatever that 
as soon as Japan declared war on the United 
States, war with Germany followed as a matter 
of course. 

During the anxious months of 1940 and 1941, 
we spent an inordinate amount of time endeav- 
oring to convince the American people of the 
grave and imminent danger. Opinion in the 
country was divided. Some were blind and 
could not see; some were prejudiced and would 
not see. A small group drank at the poisoned 
well of enemy propaganda. Meanwhile, some of 
us were engaged in the most difficult calculations 
as to the best use of time. It was in the nature 
of a race between our armament program, which 
happily in the year 1941 was making great 
strides, and the necessity of meeting an issue, 
which meant in cold fact joining the British, the 
Chinese, and the other free nations in defense of 
civilization and world-order. 



FEBRUARY 21, 194 2 



171 



With consummate skill Secretary Hull suc- 
ceeded in maintaining every position for which 
America stood, from the crucial and critical 
days of the fall of France in 1940, when we had 
not an atom of defense, to the day of infamy in 
December of 1941, when the Japanese with un- 
rivalled treachery attacked Pearl Harbor, a 
short time after Mr. Hull had given notice that 
war was imminent and might be expected at any 
time. During that period he had completed his 
great assignment. The remainder of France 
and Africa was kept out of Axis hands. The 
great sea lanes had been kept open. Effective 
aid had been dispatched to China. The Western 
Hemisphere had been knit together. Tlie outer 
fortresses of Iceland, Greenland, the Atlantic 
islands, had been fortified. The British had 
been assisted with munitions which enabled 
them to hold the great Mediteiranean gateway 
of Suez and to maintain a free and unconquered 
Arabia. Eussia had pi-ovided so magnificent a 
defense that the German plan for the conquest 
of Europe had failed before Moscow in Novem- 
ber of 1941, and our own supplies were on the 
way to Russian ports. Most important of all, 
America was awake and was reaching for her 
arms. 

With the attack on Pearl Harbor, the war 
became world-wide. 

Had we been given the inestimable gift of 
another year to bring the United States to full 
war strength, we might have been spared the 
dangerous and difficult days through which we 
are passing now and which we must expect will 
continue for a considerable jseriod of time. Yet 
it is possible that had America's entry into the 
war been delayed, the American people might 
have been dulled or drugged by propaganda into 
quiescence and might have found themselves 
alone with their backs to the wall in a world of 
enemies. We shall never know as to that, and 
perhaps the knowledge is not important. Ac- 
tually, the attack in the east and in the west 
has roused the country to a point where it is 
prepared to accept every effort and every sacri- 
fice. 

This is not a war in which we jiropose merely 
to defend. It is a war in which we propose to 
conquer. 



The frame of the victory we propose to win is 
already made by the great association of peoples 
comprehended within the United Nations. Vic- 
tory, when it comes, will be a people's victory. 
The fruits of the victory will be available to 
every free people throughout the world. 

The process of preparing the great movement 
to reestablish civilized life must be the forging 
of a unified effort by the 26 nations already mem- 
bers of the Declaration by United Nations with 
those other nations and peoples which take their 
place beside them. Never in history have so 
many great peoples spoken a common tongue. 
There are now associated in active war effort 
the gi-eat masses of Asia, represented by China 
and by India ; the great peoples of Europe, rep- 
resented by Russia and by Britain ; the far-flung 
brotherhood of the British Commonwealth of 
Nations; and already many members of the 
American family of nations. Even the popula- 
tions of our enemies know in their hearts that 
they have moi'e to hope from a victory by the 
United Nations than from success of their own 
rapacious and barbaric masters. Truly, we can 
say that the United States has become a stand- 
ard-bearer for the peoples of the world. The 
great combination has taken form. No tem- 
porary military success can obscure the great 
reality. The free peoples are one in a common 
effort. 

For us, the United States, these events have a 
profound meaning. We can no longer think of 
ourselves as a supply base. Our task is not con- 
fined to supplying tools. Our work is more 
than that of making guns and planes and tanks. 
Winning the war is now America's job. 

The peace-loving nations are thus well along 
the road to the vast organization of war. 
Equally, the ideas which will dominate the 
vaster and more permanent organization of 
peace are already appearing. 

We are not captives of outworn ideas. We 
early solved the question of becoming inde- 
pendent of commercial notions. The lease- 
lend policy was a blunt recognition of the fact 
that money and finance are servants and not 
masters. We are learning the technique of put- 
ting goods where they are needed, for the simple 
reason that need overrides economic prejudice. 



172 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We are already pledged to supply initial relief 
and eventual reconstruction when arms are 
finally laid down and submerged nations are 
liberated. In the Western Hemisphere and 
within the United Nations we are gaining the 
experience by which good neighbors can assure 
to each other a fuller and safer life. We have 
learned these principles and are practicing them 
not only in great tilings but in smaller and 
individual situations. 

As the vast tide of history pushes forward, 
all of us are finding our place in it. History 
is not made at great capitals. It is made at 
every place in the world where the strong, new 
spirit brings added vision, and men think and 
act accordingly. 

The smallest community which gets together 
a committee, works out plans for meeting its 
own problems, and is making its own contri- 
bution, may show the way to the country and 
to the world. 

An individual businessman adapting his plant 
to wartime needs, and making plans to turn it 
again to peaceful use when the war is over, is 
making history on the spot. 

Tlie men who abandon the little privileges 
and the petty ambitions to show the way in a 
more powerful effort have as secure a place in 
the chronicle as the men in khaki or in navy 
blue. 

In a struggle as vast as this, the close organi- 
zation of each community by itself, for itself, 
and for the entire effort is essential. Com- 
munity effort gives standing proof that all 
America contributes its part. It is the great 
guaranty that free men are masters of the war — 
and that war does not become the master of free 
men. 

We have been challenged on all fronts. We 
have been told that our civilization is weak; we 
are proving that it is the strongest ever built. 
We have been told that free men cannot unite, 
but we are speaking with one mighty voice. 
Our enemies tell us that the free mind is selfish 
and worthless. We are proving that free men, 
looking upward, can do more, endure more, fight 
harder, last longer, and come through trium- 
phant long after the slave armies have dis- 
appeared. 



It is not unlikely that we shall go through 
dark hours. You are to remember that the 
enemy was many years building an offensive, 
while we were talking the language of justice 
and honor. His offensive is not yet spent. It 
has been wounded somewhat, but every signal 
points to the opening of a campaign in the 
spring inspired by the desperate knowledge that 
our enemies, if they do not swiftly win, will 
spend themselves and drag out a ghastly period 
while the rising force of free nations engulfs 
them. We shall need steady nerves and stout 
hearts as the full tide of battle develops itself 
in the coming months. We shall have to fight in 
many areas and on many fronts. 

We shall have to work as we never worked 
before. We shall have to drive ourselves 
through every task, knowing that men's lives 
depend on its swift fulfilment. No doubt we 
shall make mistakes and we shall have to cor- 
rect those mistakes. We shall harden our 
muscles and strengthen our minds, and above all, 
be brave in our spirits, knowing that after the 
darkness there comes, at length, the great light. 



American Republics 



AGREEMENT BETWEEN BOLIVIAN GOV- 
ERNMENT AND STANDARD OIL COM- 
PANY 

[Released to the press February 16] 

The Bolivian Govenmient has announced that 
it reached an agreement on January 27, 1942 with 
the Standard Oil Company of Bolivia and the 
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey), which 
settled the long-standing dispute concerning oil 
properties and related matters in Bolivia. The 
text of the agreement, signed by Anze Matienzo, 
Bolivian Minister of Foreign Relations, and 
H. A. Metzger, President of the Standard Oil 
Company of Bolivia and representative of the 
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) follows: 

"The Government of Bolivia will pay to the 
Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) the sum 
of $1,500,000, United States Currency, at the 
State Department in Washington, for the sale of 



FEBRUARY 21, 1942 

all of its rights, interests and properties in 
Bolivia and those of its subsidiary, Standard Oil 
Company of Bolivia, as they existed immedi- 
ately prior to March 13, 1937 and likewise for the 
sale of its existing maps and geological studies 
which are the result of its explorations in Bo- 
livia. This payment will be made with interest 
at the rate of three percent per annum, from 
March 13, 1937, within ninety days from the 
date of the Supreme Resolution of the Republic 
of Bolivia putting this Agreement into effect. 

"The Government of Bolivia, the Standard Oil 
Company (New Jersey), and the Standard Oil 
Company of Bolivia declare that upon the pay- 
ment of the amounts referred to immediately 
above, no issue will remain pending between 
them and that tliere will be no occasion for any 
claims or counter-claims of whatsoever charac- 
ter, since the fulfillment of the present agree- 
ment, which has been freely entered into, shall be 
regarded as having terminated satisfactorily 
and amicably all the differences between the 
Bolivian Govermnent and the companies. 

"Signed in duplicate in Spanish and English 
at Eio de Janeiro, Brazil, on January 27, 1942." 



Australasia 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CRE- 
DENCE BY THE MINISTER OF NEW 
ZEALAND 

[Released to the press February 16) 

The remarks of the newly appointed Minister 
of New Zealand, Mr. Walter Nash, upon the oc- 
casion of the presentation of his letters of 
credence, follow : 

"Mr. President: 

"I have the honour in presenting to you to- 
day letters by which the King, my Sovereign, 
accredits me to be His Majesty's Envoy Ex- 
traordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary with 
the special object of representing in the United 



173 

States the interests of the Dominion of New 
Zealand. In doing so, I am commanded by His 
Majesty to convey to you his hope that the ap- 
pointment of a Minister especially charged with 
representing New Zealand affairs, will result in 
strengthening the friendly relations between the 
United States, the Dominion of New Zealand, 
and the British Commonwealth of Nations. 

"On belialf of His Majesty's Government in 
the Dominion of New Zealand and of the people 
of New Zsaland, I desire to convey to you their 
fraternal greetings for your personal happiness 
and for the prosperity and well-being of the 
nation over whose destinies you preside. 

"We are grateful to you and your people for 
the splendid assistance and cooperation which 
has been and is being given in the fight for the 
freedom of the democracies. 

"The New Zealand Government also feels that 
the establishment of a Legation in Washington 
will tend towards the strengthening of the good- 
will which already exists between our two coun- 
tries, and no effort on my part will be spared in 
fostering this objective — and I may assure you 
that the Government and the people of New 
Zealand, who so enthusiastically welcomed the 
appointment of a Minister in the Dominion, are 
looking forward to his safe arrival and sojourn 
in New Zealand which we feel will not only be 
a happy one but of immense value and help in 
these critical days. 

"I look forward to meeting your people in the 
United States and the establishment of friendly 
and cordial relations to the mutual benefit of 
our two countries and the Commonwealth of 
Nations as a whole." 



The President's reply to the remarks of Mr. 
Walter Nash follows : 

"Mr. Minister : 

"I am very happy to welcome you to Wash- 
ington and to accept from your hands the let- 
ters which accredit you as His Majesty's Envoy 
Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 
with the special object of representing in the 
United States the interests of the Dominion of 
New Zealand. 



174 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"I greatly appreciate the friendly personal 
greetings and the expression of good wishes for 
the iJeople of the United States which you have 
just conveyed to me from your Government. 
May I in turn take this occasion to reaflSrm the 
warm friendly feeling of myself and the Ameri- 
can people for the people of New Zealand and 
of the whole British Commonwealth of Nations. 
1 share to the utmost your confident hope that 
your presence in the United States and the 
presence of an American Minister in New Zea- 
land will further strengthen the good-will which 
already exists between our two countries and 
between the United States and the British Com- 
monwealth as a whole. 

"Both the United States and New Zealand 
are Pacific Powers and the interests of our two 



countries are inextricably woven together. The 
spread of wanton Axis aggression has only 
drawn our countries closer together and made 
us more conscious of our interdependence. Our 
countries have pledged themselves, along with 
all other United Nations, to employ our full re- 
sources in the defeat of Axis aggressors. We 
shall not falter until the task is complete and 
our freedom made secure. 

"You are no stranger in Washington and I 
welcome this opportunity of renewing our ac- 
quaintance. Let me assure you that in all your 
work here you may always count upon my full 
cooperation and the cooperation of the State 
Department and other agencies of tliis Govern- 
ment." 



Commercial Policy 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES REGARDING TRADE AGREEMENT WITH HAITI 



[Released to the press February 20] 

In a note dated February 19 from the Ameri- 
can Minister at Port-au-Prince to the Haitian 
Minister of Foreign Affairs, in reply to a note 
from the latter dated February 16, the Govern- 
m.ent of the United States has agreed not to 
invoke the pertinent provisions of the trade 
agreement with Haiti, signed on March 28, 1935, 
for the purpose of claiming the benefit of reduc- 
tions in customs duties which may be accorded 
by Haiti to the Dominican Republic in respect 
of a restricted number of products specifically 
provided for in the Treaty of Commerce be- 
tween Haiti and the Dominican Republic signed 
on August 26, 1941, which has not yet entered 
into force. 

The products concerned are as follows : Leaf 
tobacco and cigars; live cattle, horses, and 
mules; animals for slaughter; corn; toilet and 
laundry soap; perfumery and toilet articles; 
lard; peanuts and peanut oil; butter; cheese; 
rice, up to 3,000 quintals (300,000 pounds) an- 
nually ; straw hats ; preserved and refrigerated 



meats; matches; beer; ungimaed cotton; fight- 
ing cocks ; skins ; and curried hides. Imports of 
these products into Haiti from the United 
States accounted in the year 1939/40 (October 
1-September 30) for only about 8 percent of 
Haiti's total imports from the United States in 
that year. 

The texts of the notes exchanged are as fol- 
lows: 

Translation of note from the Miiiister of For- 
eign Affairs of Haiti to the American Minister 
to Haiti 

I have the honor to refer to the trade agree- 
ment entered into between Haiti and the United 
States of March 28, 1935, and particularly to the 
provisions thereof setting forth the principle of 
unconditional most-favored-nation treatment as 
the basis of commercial relations between our 
two countries. 

The Goverimient of Haiti adheres firmly to 
the principle of promoting the multilateral de- 
velopment of international trade on the uncon- 



FEBRUARY 21, 194 2 



175 



ditional most-favored-nation basis. However, 
as the Government of the United States is aware, 
tliere are special and unusual conditions affect- 
ing trade between Haiti and the Dominican Ke- 
public which arise out of their exceptional geo- 
graphic situation. With a view to fostering 
closer economic relations between these two 
contiguous countries, a Treaty of Commerce be- 
tween Haiti and the Dominican Republic was 
signed on August 26, 1941. This treaty pro- 
vides among other things for reductions in 
Haitian customs duties on a specified list of 
products imported from the Dominican Repub- 
lic, which reductions are intended to be ap- 
plicable exclusively to the latter country. 

In this connection, I have the honor to refer 
to the contractual formula for tariff preferences 
to contiguous countries recommended by the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee. On September 18, 1941, the 
Committee recommended that any such tariff 
preferences, in order to be an instrument for 
sound promotion of trade, should be made ef- 
fective through trade agreements embodying 
tariff reductions or exemptions; that the parties 
to such agi'eements should reserve the right to 
reduce or eliminate the customs duties on like 
imports from other countries ; and that any such 
regional tariff preferences should not be per- 
mitted to stand in the way of any broad program 
of economic reconstruction involving the reduc- 
tion of tariffs and the scaling down or elimina- 
tion of tariff and other trade preferences with a 
view to the fullest possible development of in- 
ternational trade on a multilateral, uncondi- 
tional most-favored-nation basis. 

I have the honor to inquire whether the Gov- 
ernment of the United States, in the light of the 
foregoing considerations, will agi-ee not to in- 
voke the provisions of the first paragi-aph of 
Article VII of the trade agreement of March 28, 
1935 for the purpose of claiming the benefit of 
the tariff preferences to the Dominican Republic 
specificallj' provided for in the Treaty of Com- 
merce signed on August 26, 1941, which tariff 
preferences are considered by my Government 
to meet the requirements of the aforementioned 



formula recommended by the Inter-American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee. 
Accejit [etc.] 

Note of re-ply from the American Minister to 
Haiti to the Minuter of Foreign Affairs of 
Haiti 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of Your Excellency's note of today's date in 
which you reiterate the adherence of your Gov- 
ernment to the principle of promoting the multi- 
lateral development of international trade on 
the unconditional most-favored-nation basis and 
refer to the exclusive tariff reductions to the 
Dominican Republic specifically jarovided for in 
the Treaty of Commerce between Haiti and that 
country signed on August 26, 1941. In this con- 
nection you mention the contractual formula for 
tariff preferences to contiguous countries recom- 
mended on September 18, 1941 by the Inter- 
American Financial and Economic Advisory 
Committee, and inquire whether, in view of the 
Committee's recommendation and considering 
the special and unusual conditions affecting 
trade between Haiti and the Dominican Repub- 
lic, my Government would be willing to refrain 
from claiming, under the provisions of the trade 
agreement between our two countries of March 
28, 1935, the benefit of the tariff preferences to 
the Dominican Republic specifically provided 
for in the Treaty of Commerce. 

I have the honor to inform Your Excellency 
that my Government, in view of the considera- 
tions set forth, agrees not to invoke the pertinent 
j^rovisions of the trade agreement for the pur- 
pose of claiming the benefit of such tariff 
preferences. 

Accept [etc.] 



Regulations 



Regulations Relating to Property Vested in the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury Pursuant to Section 5 (b) of the 
Trading With the Enemy Act, as Amended. Febru- 
ary 16, 1942. (Treasury Department.) 7 Federal 
Register 1021. 



The Foreign Service 



PROMOTIONS 



[Released to the press February 17] 

The following Foreign Service officers have 
been promoted in the Foreign Service : 

From class II to class I: 

George L. Brandt, of the District of Columbia 

From class III to class II: 

Ralph H. Ackerman, of California 

J. Webb Benton, of Pennsylvania 

Edward M. Groth, of New York 

H. Lawrence Groves, of Pennsylvania 

Donald R. Heath, of Kansas 

James Hugh Keeley, Jr., of California 

Alfred W. Klieforth, of Pennsylvania 

Thomas H. Lockett, of Kentucky 

Robert B. Macatee, of Virginia 

Hugh Millard, of Nebraska 

Orsen N. Nielsen, of Wisconsin 

Daniel J. Reagan, of the District of Columbia 

Harold S. Tewell, of North Dakota 

From class IV to class III: 

George Atcheson, Jr., of California 

Merwin L. Bohan, of Texas 

J. Rives Childs, of Virginia 

Charles E. Dickerson, Jr., of New Jersey 

Julian B. Foster, of Alabama 

Clayton Lane, of California 

James E. lIcKenna, of Massachusetts 

Paul G. Minneman, of Ohio 

Paul O. Nyhus, of Wisconsin 

Karl L. Rankin, of Maine 

Leo D. Sturgeon, of Illinois 

Clifford C. Taylor, of Colorado 

John Carter Vincent, of Georgia 

From class V to class IV: 

George R. Canty, of Massachusetts 
Robert G. Glover, of Florida 
Julian C. Greenup, of California 
George J. Haering, of New York 
Joel C. Hudson, of Missouri 
Charles W. Lewis, Jr., of Michigan 
Lester De Witt Mallory, of California 
Quincy F. Roberts, of Texas 
James Somerville, of Mississippi 

176 



Paul P. Steintorf, of Virginia 

Howard H. Tewksbury, of Massachusetts 

S. Walter Washington, of West Virginia 

From class VI to class V: 

Richard M. de Lambert, of New Mexico 
Samuel G. Ebling, of Ohio 
George R. Hukill, of Delaware 
Benjamin M. Hulley, of Florida 
Paul W. Meyer, of Colorado 
Sheldon T. Mills, of Oregon 
Sidney E. O'Douoghue, of New Jersey 
James B. Pilcher, of Georgia 
Robert B. Streeper, of Ohio 

From class VII to class VI: 

Stuart Allen, of Minnesota 

John M. Allison, of Nebraska 

Cavendish W. Cannon, of Utah 

William P. Cochran, Jr., of Pennsylvania 

Edmund J. Dorsz, of Michigan 

Dorsey Gassaway Fisher, of Maryland 

Frederic C. Fornes, Jr., of New York 

Archibald E. Gray, of Pennsylvania 

Bernard Gufler, of Washington 

Monroe B. Hall, of New York 

Thomas A. Hickok, of New York 

Perry N. Jester, of Virginia 

George D. LaMont, of New York 

Edward S. Maney, of Texas 

Ralph Miller, of New York 

Gerald A. Mokma, of Iowa 

Guy W. Ray, of Alabama 

Willard Quincy Stanton, of Montana 

Walter N. Walmsley, Jr., of Maryland 

From class VIII to class VII: 

Mulford A. Colebrook, of New York 

Charles A. Cooper, of Nebraska 

Frederick J. Cunningham, of Massachusetts 

Overton G. Ellis, Jr., of Washington 

Howard Elting, Jr., of Illinois 

Frederick E. Farnsworth, of Colorado 

L. Randolph Hlggs, of Mississippi 

Beppo R. Johansen, of Florida 

George Lewis Jones, Jr., of Maryland 

Charles F. Knox, Jr., of New Jersey 

E. Allan Lightner, Jr., of New Jersey 



FEBRUARY 21, 194 2 



177 



Walter J. Linthlcum, of Maryland 
Aubrey E. Lippincott, of Arizona 
Odin G. Loren, of Washington 
Robert Mills McClintock, of California 
Carniel Offie, of Pennsylvania 
Walter W. Orebaugli, of Kansas 
W. Leonard Parker, of New York 
Max W. Schmidt, of Iowa 

From unclassified to class VIII: 

John L. Bankhead, of Florida 

M. Williams Blake, of Ohio 

Thomas S. Campen, of North Carolina 

David M. Clark, of Pennsylvania 

Perry Ellis, of California 

James Espy, of Ohio 

Richard D. Gatewood, of New York 

John L. Goshle, of New York 

John Hubner, 2d, of Maryland 

John D. Jernegau, of California 

Hartwell Johnson, of South Carolina 

Robert B. Memminger, of South Carolina 

Charles S. Millet, of New Hampshire 

Miss Kathleen Molesworth, of Texas 

Bolard More, of Ohio 

Brewster H. Morris, of Pennsylvania 

Jack B. Neathery, of Texas 

Miss Katherine E. O'Connor, of Indiana 

B. Edward Schefer, of New York 

Charles O. Thompson, of Alaska 

S. Roger Tyler, Jr., of West Virginia 

Philip P. Williams, of California 

Robert E. Wilson, of Arizona 

To be Foreign Service officers, unclassified, vice consuls 
of career, and secretaries in the Diplomatic Service 
of the United States: 

Alvin M. Bentley, of Michigan 
Byron E. Blankinshlp, of New York 
D. Chadwick Braggiotti, of New York 
Robert M. Brandin, of New York 
William C. Burdett, Jr., of Georgia 
Findley Burns, Jr., of Maryland 
Robert E. Cashin, of Missouri 
Forrest N. Daggett, of California 
Frederick W. Eyssell, of Missouri 
Douglas N. Forman, Jr., of Massachusetts 
Michael R. Gannett, of New York 
Joseph N. Greene, Jr., of Massachusetts 
Henry Hanson, Jr., of Connecticut 
Douglas Henderson, of Massachusetts 
Armistead M. Lee, of Virginia 
Duane B. Lueders, of Minnesota 
LaRue E. Lutkins, of New York 



Oliver M. Marey, of Massachusetts 
James L. O'Sullivan, of Connecticut 
Albert E. Pappano, of Missouri 
Henry L. Pitts, Jr., of New York 
William S. Rosenberg, of New York 
Joseph S. Sparks, of California 
Leslie Albion Squires, of California 
Walter J. Stoessel, Jr., of California 
Jewell Truex, of California 
Richard E. Usher, of Wisconsin 
Theodore C. Weber, of Massachusetts 
William L. S. Williams, of Wisconsin 

From unclassified B to unclassified A 

Niles W. Bond 
William O. Boswell 
Charles R. Burrows 
V. Lan.sing Collins. 2d 
Arthur B. Emmons, 3d 
Nicholas Feld 
William N. Fraleigh 
Fulton Freeman 
John C. Fuess 
Boies C. Hart, Jr. 
Richard H. Hawkins, Jr. 
Roger L. Heacock 
Martin J. Hillenbrand 
Hungerford B. Howard 
Delano McKelvey 
Robert C. Strong 

From unclassified C to unclassified li 

Charles W. Adair, Jr. 

H. Gardner Ainsworth 

Stewart G. Anderson 

Leonard J. Cromie 

W. William Duff 

Irven M. Eitreim 

C. Vaughan Ferguson, Jr. 

Richard E. Gnade 

Bartloy P. Gordon 

Scott Lyon 

John M. McSweeney 

Claude G. Ross 

Robert Rossow, Jr. 

W. Horton Schoellkopf, Jr. 

Harry H. Schwartz 

Bromley K. Smith 

Henry T. Smith 

John L. Topping 

John W. TuthiU 

Fred E. Waller 

Andrew B. Wardlaw 

Livingston D. Watrous 

Fraser Wilkins 



Treaty Information 



FLORA AND FAUNA 



Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

Dominican Republic 

The American Minister at Ciudad Trujillo 
reported by a despatch dated January 22, 1942 
that the Dominican Government had approved 
the Convention on Nature Protection and Wild- 
life Preservation in the Western Hemisphere, 
which was opened for signature at the Pan 
American Union on October 12, 1940. The 
resolution of the Dominican Congress approv- 
ing the convention was published in the Gaceta 
Oficial 5693 for January 12, 1942. 

DIPLOMATIC OFFICERS 
Pan American Convention 

Haiti 

By a letter dated February 13, 1942 the Direc- 
tor General of the Pan American Union in- 
formed the Secretary of State that the instru- 
ment of ratification by Haiti of the Convention 
on Diijlomatic Officers, signed at the Sixth In- 
ternational Conference of American States in 
Habana, February 20, 1928, was deposited with 
the Union on January 31, 1942. The instrument 
of ratification is dated December 30, 1941. 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

Adjustment and Settlement of Certain Out- 
standing Claims between the United States and 
Mexico, which was signed at Washington on 
November 19, 1941. The decree was published 
in the Diario Oficial for January 30, 1942. 



The countries which have deposited ratifica- 
tions of this convention are Brazil, Chile, Co- 
lombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, 
Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. 

CLAIMS 
Convention With Mexico 

Tlie Ajnerican Embassy at Mexico City trans- 
mitted to the Department with a despatch dated 
February 2, 1942 a copy and translation of a de- 
cree signed by the President of Mexico on Jan- 
uary 7, 1942, approving the Convention for the 
178 



PETROLEUM PROPERTIES 

Agreement With Mexico Regarding Compensa- 
tion for Expropriated Petroleum Properties 

The American Embassy at Mexico City trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated February 2, 1942 a copy and translation 
of a decree signed by the President of Mexico 
on January 7, 1942 approving the agreement 
effected by an exchange of notes dated Novem- 
ber 19, 1941, with reference to compensating the 
nationals of the United States of America whose 
properties, rights, or interests in the petroleum 
industry in the United Mexican States were af- 
fected by acts of expropriation or otherwise by 
the Government of Mexico subsequent to March 
17, 1938. The decree was published in the 
Diario Oficial for January 28, 1942. 

The agreement M-ill shortly be printed as Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series 234. 

OPIUM AND OTHER DANGEROUS DRUGS 
International Conventions of 1925 and 1931 

Belgian Congo; Ruanda-Urundi 

By two circular letters, each dated January 
8, 1942, the Acting Secretary General of the 
League of Nations informed the Secretary of 
State that the notifications of adherence by the 
Belgian Government in respect of the Belgian 
Congo and the Mandated Territory of Ruanda- 
Urundi to the International Opium Convention 
signed February 19, 1925, and to the Conven- 
tion for Limiting the Manufacture and Regu- 
lating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs, 
signed July 13, 1931, were registered with the 
Secretariat on December 17, 1941. 



FEBRUARY 21, 1942 



179 



COMMERCE 

Trade Agreement With Haiti 

The texts of an exchange of notes between the 
American Minister to Haiti and the Haitian 
Minister of Foreign Affairs regarding the appli- 
cation of certain provisions of the trade agrt^e- 
nient signed by the United States and Haiti on 
March 28, 1935 (Executive Agreement Series 
78), appear in this Bulletin under tlie heading 
"Commercial Policy". 



Legislation 



Joint Resolution making an appropriation to provide 
financial aid to China. Approved February 12, 1942. 
[H. J. Res. 278.] Public Law 452, 77th Cong. 1 p. 

Department of State Appropriation Bill for 1943: Hear- 
ings Before the Subcommittee of the Committee on 
Appropriations, House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 
2d sess. 543 pp. 

State, Justice, Commerce, and the Judiciary Appropria- 
tion Bill, Fiscal Year 1943. H. Rept. 1771, 77th Cong., 
on H.R. 6599. 65 pp. 

Amending Section 7 of the Neutrality Act of 1939. H. 
Rept. 1776, 77th Cong., on S.J. Res. 133. 3 pp. 

Fifth Supplemental National Defense Ajipropriation 
Bill for 1942 : 

Hearings Before Subcommittees of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 
77th Cong., 2d sess. [lend-lease, pp. 123-199]. 
204 pp. 

H. Rept. 1790, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6611. 18 pp. 



Planting of Guayule and Other Rubber-Bearing Plants — 
Veto Message [returning, without approval, S. 2152 
and recommending that action be taken on a similar 
bill not limited to U. S. but applicable to all American 
republics.] S. Doc. 182, 77th Cong. 3 pp. 

Guayule Rubber. S. Rept. 1099 on S. 2282 [providing 
for planting of rubber-bearing plants in the Western 
Hemisphere]. 8 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Additional Temporary Diversion for Power Purposes 
of Waters of the Niagara River Above the Falls: 
Supplementary Arrangement Between the United 
States and Canada — Effected by exchanges of notes 
signed at Washington October 27 and November 27, 
1941 ; approved by the President November 27, 1941. 
Executive Agreement Series 223. Publication 1678. 
5 pp. 5^. 

Cooperative Rubber Investigations in Costa Rica : 
Agreement Between the United States of America 
and Costa Rica, and Additional Note — Agreement ef- 
fected by exchange of notes signed April 19 and June 
16, 1941 ; effective June 16, 1941. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 222. Publication 1690. 14 pp. 5«!. 

Other Government Agencies 

The St. Lawrence Survey, Part VII : Summary Report 
of the St. Lawrence Survey Including the National 
Defense Aspects of the St. Lawrence Project. (De- 
partment of Commerce.) viii, 147 pp., maps. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLT WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIRECTOK OF THE BUBBAU OF THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULL 



H 



■^ nn 



riN 



FEBRUARY 28, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 140— Publication 1700 



G 



ontents 




The War p^^^ 
Radio address by the President of the United States on 

Washington's birthday 183 

Relations with the French Government at Vichy . . . 189 

Mutual-aid agreement with Great Britain 190 

Americans in the Far East 192 

Rescue of personnel of United States ships by people 

of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland 193 

Joint Mexican - United States Defense Commission . . 193 

American Republics 

Settlement of Peru- Ecuador boundary dispute; 

Resolution of Peruvian Congress 194 

Statement by the Acting Secretary of State .... 194 
Protocol of Peace, Friendship, and Boundaries . . . 195 

Australasia 

Opening of direct radiotelegraph circuit with New Zea- 
land 196 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 197 

Publications 198 

Treaty Information 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection 
and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 198 

Mutual guaranties: Mutual- Aid Agreement With Great 

Britain 198 

Boundaries: Protocol of Peace, Friendship, and Bound- 
aries Between Ecuador and Peru 199 

Legislation 199 

Regulations 199 



U;S.SUPERINTFNDENTOFDOCW«ENT» 

MAR 21 1942 



The War 



RADIO ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 
ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY ' 



[Released to the press by the White House February 23] 

Washington's Birthday is a most appropri- 
ate occasion for us to talk with each other 
about things as they are today and things as 
we know they shall be in the future. 

For eight years General Washington and his 
Continental Army were faced continually with 
formidable odds and recurring defeats. Sup- 
plies and equipment were lacking. In a sense, 
every winter was a Valley Forge. Throughout 
the 13 States there existed fifth columnists — 
selfish men, jealous men, fearful men, who pro- 
claimed that Washington's cause was hopeless, 
that he should ask for a negotiated peace. 

Washington's conduct in those hard times 
has provided the model for all Americans ever 
since — a model of moral stamina. He held to 
his course as it had been charted in the Declara- 
tion of Independence. He and the brave men 
who served with him knew that no man's life 
or fortune was secure without freedom and free 
institutions. 

The present great struggle has taught us 
increasingly that freedom of person and secu- 
rity of property anywhere in the world depend 
upon the security of the rights and obligations 
of liberty and justice everywhere in the world. 

This war is a new kind of war. It is different 
from all other wars of the past, not only in its 
methods and weapons but also in its geography. 
It is warfare in terms of every continent, every 
island, every sea, every air-lane in the world. 

That is the reason why I have asked you to 
take out and spread before you the map of the 
whole earth and to follow with me the refer- 
ences which I shall make to the world-encircling 



' Delivered February 23, 1942. 



battle lines of this war. Many questions will, 
I fear, remain unanswered, but I know you will 
realize I cannot cover everything in any one 
report to the peojDle. 

The broad oceans which have been heralded 
in the past as our protection from attack have 
become endless battlefields on which we are 
constantly being challenged by our enemies. 

We must all understand and face the hard 
fact that our job now is to fight at distances 
which extend all the way around the globe. 

We fight at these vast distances because that 
is where our enemies are. Until our flow of 
supplies gives us clear superiority we must 
keep on striking our enemies wherever and 
whenever we can meet them, even if, for a 
while, we have to yield ground. Actually we 
are taking a heavy toll of the enemy every day 
that goes by. 

We must fight at these vast distances to 
protect our supply lines and our lines of com- 
munication with our allies — protect these lines 
from the enemies who are bending every ounce 
of their strength, striving against time, to cut 
them. The object of the Nazis and the Japa- 
nese is to separate the United States, Britain, 
China, and Russia, and to isolate them one 
from another, so that each will be surrounded 
and cut off from sources of supplies and rein- 
forcements. It is the old familiar Axis policy 
of "divide and conquer". 

There are those who still think in terms of 
the days of sailing ships. They advise us to 
pull our warships and our planes and our mer- 
chant-ships into our own home waters and con- 
centrate solely on last-ditch defense. But let me 
illustrate what would happen if we followed 
such foolish advice. 

183 



184 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Look at your map. Look at the vast area 
of China, with its millions of fighting men. 
Look at the vast area of Russia, with its pow- 
erful armies and proven military might. Look 
at the British Isles, Australia, New Zealand, 
the Dutch Indies, India, the Near East, and 
the Continent of Africa, with their resources 
of raw materials and of peoples determined 
to resist Axis domination. Look at North 
America, Central America, and South America. 

It is obvious what would happen if all these 
great reservoirs of power were cut off from 
each other either by enemy action or by self- 
imposed isolation: 

1. We could no longer send aid of any kind 
to China— to the brave people who, for nearly 
five years, have withstood Japanese assault, de- 
stroyed hundreds of thousands of Japanese sol- 
diers and vast quantities of Japanese war muni- 
tions. It is essential that we help China in her 
magnificent defense and in her inevitable 
counter-offensive— for that is one important 
element in the ultimate defeat of Japan. 

2. If we lost communication with the south- 
west Pacific, all of that area, including Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand, would fall under Jap- 
anese domination. Japan could then release 
great numbers of ships and men to launch at- 
tacks on a large scale against the coasts of the 
Western Hemisphere, including Alaska. At the 
same time, she could immediately extend her 
conquests to India, and through the Indian 
Ocean, to Africa and the Near East. 

3. If we were to stop sending munitions to 
the British and the Russians in the Mediter- 
ranean and Persian Gulf areas, we would help 
the Nazis to overrun Turkey, Syria, Iraq, Per- 
sia, Egypt and the Suez Canal, the whole coast 
of North Africa, and the whole coast of West 
Africa — putting Germany within easy striking 
distance of South America. 

4. If, by such a fatuous policy, we ceased to 
protect the North Atlantic supply line to Britain 
and to Russia, we would help to cripple the 
splendid counter-offensive by Russia against the 
Nazis, and we would help to deprive Britain of 
essential food supplies and munitions. 



Those Americans who believed that we could 
live under the illusion of isolationism wanted 
the American eagle to imitate the tactics of the 
ostrich. Now, many of those same people, 
afraid that we may be sticking our necks out, 
want our national bird to be turned into a 
turtle. But we prefer to retain the eagle as it 
is — flying high and striking hard. 

I know that I speak for the mass of the Amer- 
ican people when I say that we reject the turtle 
policy and will continue increasingly the policy 
of carrying the war to the enemy in distant 
lands and distant waters — as far as possible 
from our own home grounds. 

There are four m^in lines of communication 
now being traveled by our ships : The North At- 
lantic, the South Atlantic, the Indian Ocean, 
and the South Pacific. These routes are not one- 
way streets — for the ships which carry our 
troops and munitions out-bound bring back es- 
sential raw materials which we require for our 
own use. 

The maintenance of these vital lines is a very 
tough job. It is a job which requires tremen- 
dous daring, tremendous resourcefulness, and, 
above all, tremendous production of planes and 
tanks and giins and of the ships to carry them. 
And I speak again for the American people 
when I say that we can and will do that job. 

The defense of the world-wide lines of com- 
munication demands relatively safe use by us 
of the sea and of the air along the various 
routes ; and this, in turn, depends upon control 
by the United Nations of the strategic bases 
along those routes. 

Control of the air involves the simultaneous 
use of two types of planes— first, the long-range 
heavy bombers ; and, second, light bombers, dive 
bombers, torpedo planes, and short-range pur- 
suit planes, which are essential to the protec- 
tion of the bases and of the bombers them- 
selves. 

Hea\'7 bombers can fly under their own power 
from here to the southwest Pacific, but the 
smaller planes cannot. Therefore, these lighter 
planes have to be packed in crates and sent on 
board cargo ships. Look at your map again, and 
you will see that the route is long — and at many 



FEBRUARY 2 8, 1942 



185 



places perilous — either across the South Atlantic 
around south Africa or from California to the 
East Indies direct. A vessel can make a round 
trip by eitlier route in about four months, or only 
three round trips in a whole year. 

In spite of the length and difficulties of this 
transportation, I can tell you that we already 
have a large number of bombers and pursuit 
planes, manned by American pilots, which are 
now in daily contact with the enemy in the south- 
west Pacific. And thousands of American troops 
are today in that area engaged in operations not 
only in the air but on the ground as well. 

In this battle area Japan has had an obvious 
initial advantage. For she could fly even her 
short-range planes to the points of attack by us- 
ing many stepping-stones open to her — bases in 
a nudtitude of Pacific islands and also bases on 
the China, Indochina, Thailand, and Malay 
coasts. Japanese troop transports could go south 
from Japan and China through the narrow 
China Sea, wliich can be protected by Japanese 
planes throughout its whole length. 

I ask you to look at your maps again, particu- 
larly at that portion of the Pacific Ocean lying 
west of Hawaii. Before this war even started, 
the Philippine Islands were already surrounded 
on three sides by Japanese power. On the west 
the Japanese were in possession of the coast of 
China and the coast of Indochina, which had 
been yielded to them by the Vichy French. On 
the north are the islands of Japan themselves, 
reaching down almost to northern Luzon. On 
the east are the mandated islands, which Japan 
had occupied exclusively and had fortified in 
absolute violation of her written word. 

These islands, hundreds of them, appear only 
as small dots on most maps, but they cover a 
large strategic area. Guam lies in the middle 
of them — a lone outpost which we never 
fortified. 

Under the Washington Treaty of 1921 we 
had solemnly agreed not to add to the fortifica- 
tion of the Philippine Islands. We had no safe 
naval base there, so we could not use the islands 
for extensive naval operations. 

Immediately after this war started, the Japa- 
nese forces moved down on either side of the 



Philippines to numerous points south of them — 
thereby completely encircling the Islands from 
north, south, east, and west. 

It is that complete encirclement, with control 
of the air by Japanese land-based aircraft, 
M-hich has prevented us from sending substan- 
tial reinforcements of men and material to the 
gallant defenders of the Philippines. For 40 
years it has always been our strategj- — a strategy 
born of necessity — that in the event of a full- 
scale attack on the Islands by Japan, we should 
fight a delaying action, attempting to retire 
slowly into Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. 

We knew that the war as a whole would have 
to be fought and won by a process of attrition 
against Japan itself. We knew all along that 
with our gi'eater resources we could outbuild 
Japan and ultimately overwhelm her on sea, on 
land, and in the air. We knew that to obtain 
our objective many varieties of operations 
would be necessary in areas other than the 
Philippines. 

Nothing that has occurred in the past two 
months has caused us to revise this basic 
strategy — except that the defense put up by 
General MacArthur has magnificently exceeded 
the previous estimates, and he and his men are 
gaining eternal glory therefor. 

MacArthur's army of Filipinos and Ameri- 
cans, and the forces of the United Nations in 
China, in Burma, and in the Netherlands East 
Indies, are all together fulfilling the same essen- 
tial task. They are making Japan pay an in- 
creasingly terrible price for her ambitious at- 
tempts to seize control of the whole Asiatic 
world. Every Japanese transport sunk off 
Java is one less transport that they can use to 
carry reinforcements to their army opposing 
General MacArthur in Luzon. 

It has been said that Japanese gains in the 
Philippines were made possible only by the 
success of their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. 
I tell you that this is not so. 

Even if the attack had not been made, your 
map will show that it would have been a hope- 
less operation for us to send the Fleet to the 
Philippines through thousands of miles of 
ocean while all those island bases were under 
the sole control of the Japanese. 



186 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The consequences of the attack on Pearl Har- 
bor — serious as they -were — have been wildly ex- 
aggerated in other ways. These exaggerations 
come originally from Axis propagandists, but 
they have been repeated, I regret to say. by 
Americans in and out of public life. 

You and I have the utmost contempt for 
Americans who, since Pearl Harbor, have whis- 
pered or announced "off the record" that there 
was no longer any Pacific Fleet — that the Fleet 
was all sunk or destroyed on December sev- 
enth—that more than 1,000 of our planes were 
destroyed on the ground. They have suggested 
slyly that the Government has withheld the 
truth about casualties— that eleven or twelve 
thousand men were killed at Pearl Harbor, in- 
stead of the figures as officially announced. 
They have even served the enemy propagandists 
by spreading the incredible story that shiploads 
of bodies of our honored American dead were 
about to arrive in New York harbor to be put 
in a common grave. 

Almost every Axis broadcast directly quotes 
Americans who, by speech or in the press, make 
damnable misetatements such as these. 

The American people realize that in many 
cases details of military operations cannot be 
disclosed until we are absolutely certain that the 
announcement will not give to the enemy mili- 
tary information which he does not already 
possess. 

Your Government has unmistakable confi- 
dence in your ability to hear the worst without 
flinching or losing heart. You must, in turn, 
have complete confidence that your Government 
is keeping nothing from you except information 
that will help the enemy in his attempt to de- 
stroy us. In a democracy there is always a 
solemn pact of truth between government and 
the people, but there must also always be a full 
use of discretion — and that word "discretion" 
applies to the critics of government as well. 

This is war. The American people want to 
know, and will be told, the general trend of how 
the war is going. But they do not wish to help 
the enemy anj^ more than our fighting forces do, 
and they will pay little attention to the rumor- 
mongers and poison-peddlers in our midst. 



To pass from the realm of rumor and poison 
to the field of facts: the number of our officers 
and men killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor 
on December seventh was 2,340, and the number 
wounded was 946. Of all the combatant ships 
based on Pearl Harbor — battleships, heavy 
cruisers, light cruisers, aircraft carriers, de- 
stroyers, and submarines — only three were per- 
manently put out of commission. 

Very many of the ships of the Pacific Fleet 
were not even in Pearl Harbor. Some of those 
that were there were hit very slightly, and 
others that were damaged have either rejoined 
the Fleet by now or are still undergoing repairs. 
When those repairs are completed, the ships will 
be more efficient fighting machines than they 
were before. 

The report that we lost more than a thousand 
airplanes at Pearl Harbor is as baseless as the 
other weird rumors. The Japanese do not know 
just how many planes they destroyed that day, 
and I am not going to tell them. But I can say 
that to date — and including Pearl Harbor — we 
have destroyed considerably more Japanese 
planes tlian they have destroyed of ours. 

We liave most certainly suffered losses — from 
Hitler's U-boats in the Atlantic as well as from 
the Japanese in the Pacific — and we shall suffer 
more of them before the turn of the tide. But 
speaking for the United States of America, let 
me say once and for all to the people of the 
world : We Americans have been compelled to 
yield ground, but we will regain it. We and 
the other United Nations are committed to the 
destruction of the militarism of Japan and Ger- 
many. We are daily increasing our strength. 
Soon we, and not our enemies, will have the 
offensive ; we, not they, will win the final bat- 
tles; and we, not they, will make the final peace. 
Conquered nations in Europe know what the 
yoke of the Nazis is like. Ajid the people of 
Korea and of Manchuria know in their flesh 
the harsh despotism of Japan. All of the peo- 
ple of Asia know that if there is to be an hon- 
orable and decent future for any of them or 
for us, that future depends on victory by the 
United Nations over the forces of Axis enslave- 
ment. 



FEBRUARY 2 8, 1942 

If a just and durable peace is to be attained, 
or even if all of us are merely to save our own 
skins, there is one thought for us here at home 
to keep uppermost — the fulfilment of our spe- 
cial task of production. 

Germany, Italy, and Japan are very close to 
their maximum output of planes, guns, tanks, 
and sliips. The United Nations are not — espe- 
cially the United States of America. 

Our first job then is to build up production so 
that the United Nations can maintain control 
of the seas and attain control of the air — not 
merely a slight superiority but an overwhelm- 
ing superiority. 

On January sixth of this year I set certain 
definite goals of production for airplanes, tanks, 
giuis, and ships. Tlie Axis propagandists 
called them fantastic. Tonight, nearly two 
months later, and after a careful survey of 
progress b}' Donald Nelson and others charged 
with responsibility for our production, I can 
tell you that those goals will be attained. 

In every part of the country, experts in pro- 
duction and the men and women at work in the 
plants are giving loyal service. With few ex- 
ceptions, labor, capital, and farming realize 
that this is no time either to make undue profits 
or to gain special advantages, one over the 
other. 

We are calling for new plants and additions 
to old plants and for plant conversion to war 
needs. We are seeking more men and more 
women to run them. AVe are working longer 
hours. We are coming to realize that one extra 
plane or extra tank or extra gun or extra ship 
completed tomorrow may, in a few months, 
turn the tide on some distant battlefield ; it may 
make the difference between life and death for 
some of our fighting men. We know now that 
if we lose this war it will be generations or 
even centuries before our conception of democ- 
racy can live again. And we can lose this war 
only if we slow up our efi'ort or if we waste our 
ammunition sniping at each other. 

Here are three high purposes for every 
American : 



187 

1. We shall not stop work for a single day. 
If any dispute arises we shall keep on working 
while the dispute is solved by mediation, con- 
ciliation, or arbitration — until the war is won. 

2. We shall not demand special gains or spe- 
cial privileges or advantages for any one group 
or occupation. 

3. We shall give up conveniences and modify 
the routine of our lives if our country asks us to 
do so. We will do it cheerfully, remembering 
that the common enemy seeks to destroy every 
home and every freedom in every part of our 
land. 

This generation of Americans has come to 
realize, with a present and personal realization, 
that there is something larger and more impor- 
tant than the life of any individual or of any 
individual group — something for which a man 
will sacrifice, and gladly sacrifice, not only his 
pleasures, not only his goods, not only his asso- 
ciations with those he loves, but his life itself. 
In time of crisis when the future is in the bal- 
ance, we come to understand, with full recogni- 
tion and devotion, what this Nation is and what 
we owe to it. 

The Axis propagandists have tried in various 
evil ways to destroy our determination and our 
morale. Failing in that, they are now trying 
to destroy our confidence in our own allies. 
They say that the British are finished — that the 
Russians and the Chinese are about to quit. Pa- 
triotic and sensible Americans will reject these 
absurdities. And instead of listening to any of 
this crude propaganda, they will recall some of 
the things that Nazis and Japanese have said 
and are still saying about us. 

Ever since this Nation became the arsenal of 
democracy — ever since enactment of Lend- 
Lease — there has been one persistent theme 
through all Axis propaganda. 

This theme has been that Americans are ad- 
mittedly rich and that Americans have consid- 
erable industrial power — but that Americans 
are soft and decadent, that they cannot and will 
not unite and work and fight. 



188 

From Berlin, Rome, and Tokyo we have been 
described as a nation of weaklings — "play- 
boys" — who would hire British soldiers or Rus- 
sian soldiers or Chinese soldiers to do our fight- 
ing for us. 
Let them repeat that now ! 
Let them tell that to General MacArthur and 
his men. 

Let them tell that to the sailors who today are 
hitting hard in the far waters of the Pacific. 

Let them tell that to the boys in the flying 
fortresses. 

Let them tell that to the Marines ! 
The United Nations constitute an association 
of independent peoples of equal dignity and im- 
portance. The United Nations are dedicated to 
a common cause. We share equally and with 
equal zeal the anguish and awful sacrifices of 
war. In the partnership of our common enter- 
prise we must share in a unified plan in which 
all of us must play our several parts, each of us 
being equally indispensable and dependent one 
on the other. 

We have unified command and cooperation 
and comradeship. 

We Americans will contribute unified produc- 
tion and unified acceptance of sacrifice and of 
effort. That means a national unity that can 
know no limitations of race or creed or selfish 
politics. The American people expect that 
much from themselves. And the American 
people will find ways and means of expressing 
their determination to their enemies, including 
the Japanese admiral who has said that he will 
dictate the terms of peace here in the Wliite 
House. 

We of the United Nations are agreed on cer- 
tain broad principles in the kind of peace we 
seek. The Atlantic Charter applies not only to 
the parts of the world that border the Atlantic 
but to the whole world : disarmament of aggres- 
sors, self-determination of nations and peoples, 
and the four freedoms — freedom of speech, free- 
dom of religion, freedom from want, and free- 
dom from fear, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETIN 

The British and the Russian people have 
loiown the full fury of Nazi onslaught. There 
have been times when the fate of London and 
Moscow was in serious doubt. But there was 
never the slightest question that either the Brit- 
ish or the Russians would yield. And today all 
the United Nations salute the superb Russian 
Army as it celebrates the twenty-fourth anni- 
versary of its first assembly. 

Though their homeland was overrun, the 
Dutch people are still fighting stubbornly and 
powerfully overseas. 

The great Chinese people have suffered griev- 
ous losses; Chungking has been almost wiped 
out of existence, yet it remains the capital of an 
unbeatable China. 

That is the conquering spirit which prevails 
throughout the United Nations in this war. 

The task that we Americans now face will test 
us to the uttermost. 

Never before have we been called upon for 
sucli a prodigious effort. Never before have we 
had so little time in which to do so much. 
"These are the times that try men's souls." 
Tom Paine wrote those words on a drumhead 
by the light of a campfire. That was when 
Washington's little army of ragged, rugged men 
was retreating across New Jersey, having tasted 
nothing but defeat. 

And General Washington ordered that these 
great words written by Tom Paine be read to the 
men of every regiment in the Continental Army, 
and this was the assurance given to the first 
American armed forces : 

"The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot 
will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of 
their country ; but he that stands it now, deserves 
the love and thanks of man and woman. 
Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered ; yet 
we have this consolation with us, that the harder 
the sacrifice, the more glorious the triumph." 

So spoke Americans in the year 1776. 
So speak Americans today ! 



FEBRUARY 28, 1942 

RELATIONS WITH THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT AT VICHY 



189 



[Released to the press February 27] 

At the press conference on February 27 the 
Acting Secretary of State, Sumner Welles, 
said: 

"The relations between the Government of the 
United States and the French Government of 
Vichy have been predicated upon the formal 
assurances given to this Government by the 
French Government upon repeated occasions 
that the French Government in its relations with 
the Axis powers will not exceed the terms of its 
armistice agreements with those powers, and in 
particular, that the French Government will in 
no wise relinquish to those powers any control 
over or use of French territorial possessions nor 
any control over nor use of the French fleet. 
The assurances received by the United States 
Government in this regard likewise include the 
assurance that the French Government will give 
no military assistance to the Axis powers. 

"On February 10 the President sent a personal 
message to Marshal Petain informing him that 
the Government of the United States had been 
advised that supplies had been shipped from 
Metropolitan France to North Africa for the use 
of the Axis forces in Libya. The President made 
it clear that the position of France and the 
limitations placed upon France through the 
armistice agreements which had been signed 
with Germany and Italy are fully recognized 
and understood by the Government and the peo- 
ple of the United States. He stated further, 
however, that in the opinion of the Government 
of the United States, if France were to ship war 
materials or supplies to the Axis powers and to 
render assistance to these powers, or to take any 
action in that regard which France was not obli- 
gated to take under the terms of her armistice 
agreements, the French Government would place 
itself in the categorj' of governments which ai'e 



directly assisting the declared enemies of the 
people of the United States. The President 
further stated that he was confident that any 
such action would be contrary to the wishes of 
the people of France and disastrous to their 
aspirations and to their final destiny. 

"Since that time several additional communi- 
cations have been exchanged between the two 
Governments. 

"On February 24 the American Ambassador 
in Vichj' received in writing a communication 
from the French Government. 

"In the course of this communication the 
French Government stated that it affirmed once 
again its will to abstain from any action, under 
reservation of the obligations resulting to it 
from the armistice agreements, which would not 
be in conformity with the position of neutrality 
in which it had been placed since June 1940 and 
which it intended to maintain. The French 
Government further stated that it would not, 
therefore, lend any military aid to one of the 
belligerents in any place in the theater of oper- 
ations, particularly the use of French vessels 
for the purposes of war, nor all the more, adopt 
a policy of assistance to the Axis powers beyond 
the terms of the armistice agreements. 

"The British Government has been kept fully 
informed of the exchange of communications 
which has taken place between the French Gov- 
ernment and the Government of the United 
States. 

"While this statement of French policy as 
above set forth is of value in estimating the 
relations between this Government and the 
French Government at Vichy, further clarifica- 
tions with regard to other important questions 
are awaited by this Government before it will 
be enabled to complete its examination of the 
present situation." 



190 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH GREAT BRITAIN 



[Released to the press by the White House February 24] 

An agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and Great Britain on the prin- 
ciples applying to mutual aid in the prosecution 
of the war was signed on February 23 by the 
Acting Secretary of State and the British 
Ambassador. 

The agreement was made under the provi- 
sions of the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 1941. 
By this act of the Congress, and the great 
appropriations by which it has been supported, 
this Nation is able to provide arms, equipment, 
and supplies to any country whose defense is 
vital to our own defense. 

On December 7, 1941 we were attacked. We 
are now one of the 26 United Nations devoting 
all of their united strength to the winning of 
this war and to the establishment of a just and 
lasting peace. The vast resources which Provi- 
dence has given us enable us to insure that our 
comrades in arms shall not lack arms. Congress 
has granted the authority and the means. 
United and equipped by the overwhelming pro- 
ductive power of their resources and ours, we 
shall fight together to the final victoi'y. 

Recent developments in the war have shown, 
if proof was required, the wisdom and necessity 
of the policy of lend-lease supplies to the United 
Nations. That policy continues and is expand- 
ing to meet the expanding needs of the fighting 
fronts. The agreement signed on February 23 
reaffirms our purpose to supply aid to Great 
Britain. The British Government will supply 
this country with such reciprocal aid as it is in 
a position to give. 

As to the terms of settlement between the two 
countries, the agreement states that it is too 
early in this struggle to foresee or define the 
precise and detailed terms. Instead the agree- 
ment lays down certain of the principles which 
are to prevail. These principles are broadly 
conceived, for the scale of aid is so vast that 
narrow conceptions of the terms of settlement 
would be as disastrous to our economy and to 
the welfare of our people as to the welfare of 



the British people. Articles which at the end 
of tlie war can be returned to us and which we 
wish to have back, will be returned. Full ac- 
count will be taken of all reciprocal aid. 

The fundamental framework of the final set- 
tlement which shall be sought on the economic 
side is given in article VII. It shall be a settle- 
ment by agreement open to participation by all 
other nations of like mind. Its purpose shall be 
not to burden but to improve world-wide eco- 
nomic relations. Its aims will be to provide 
appropriate national and international meas- 
ures to expand production, employment, and the 
exchange and consumption of goods, which, the 
agreement states, are the material foundations 
of the liberty and welfare of all peoples, to elim- 
inate all forms of discriminatory treatment in 
international commerce, to reduce tariffs and 
other trade barriers, and, generally, to attain 
the economic objectives of the Atlantic Charter. 

To that end article VII provides for the early 
commencement of conversations, within the 
framework which it outlines, with a view to 
establishing now the foundations upon which 
we may create after the war a system of enlarged 
production, exchange, and consumption of goods 
for the satisfaction of human needs in our 
country, in the British Commonwealth, and in 
all other countries which are willing to join in 
this great effort. 

The text of the agreement follows : 

"Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland declare 
that they are engaged in a cooperative under- 
taking, together with every other nation or peo- 
ple of like mind, to the end of laying the bases 
of a just and enduring world peace securing 
order under law to themselves and all nations; 

"And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that the 
defense of the United Kingdom against ag- 
gression is vital to the defense of the United 
States of America; 



FEBRUARY 28, 1942 

"And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
United Kingdom aid in resisting aggression ; 

"And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of the United King- 
dom receives such aid and of the benefits to be 
received by the United States of America in 
return therefor should be deferred until the 
extent of the defense aid is known and until the 
progress of events makes clearer the final terms 
and conditions and benefits which will be in the 
mutual interests of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the United Kingdom and will promote 
the establishment and maintenance of world 
peace ; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the United Kingdom are 
nmtually desirous of concluding now a prelim- 
inary agreement in regard to the provision of 
defense aid and in regard to certain considera- 
tions which shall be taken into account in de- 
termining such terms and conditions and the 
making of such an agreement has been in all 
respects duly authorized, and all acts, condi- 
tions and formalities which it may have been 
necessary to perform, fulfil or execute prior to 
the making of such an agreement in conformity 
with the laws either of the United States of 
America or of the United Kingdom have been 
performed, fulfilled or executed as required ; 

"The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Govenmients for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

"Article I 

"The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of the United Kingdom witli such defense 
articles, defense services, and defense informa- 
tion as the President shall authorize to be trans- 
ferred or provided. 

"Article II 

"The Government of the United Kingdom 
will continue to contribute to the defense of the 
United States of America and the strengthening 
thereof and will provide such articles, services, 



191 

facilities or information as it may be in a 
position to supply. 

"Article III 

"The Government of the United Kingdom 
will not without the consent of the President of 
the United States of America transfer title to, 
or possession of, any defense article or defense 
information transferred to it under the Act or 
permit the use thereof by anyone not an officer, 
employee, or agent of the Government of the 
United Kingdom. 

"Article IV 

"If, as a result of the transfer to the Gov- 
ernment of the United Kingdom of any defense 
article or defense information, it becomes neces- 
sary for that Government to take any action or 
make any payment in order fully to protect any 
of the rights of a citizen of the United States 
of America wlio has patent rights in and to any 
such defense article or information, the Govern- 
ment of the United Kingdom will take such 
action or make such payment when requested 
to do so by the President of the United States 
of America. 

"Article V 
"The Government of the United Kingdom 
will return to the United States of America at 
(he end of the present emergency, as determined 
by the President, such defense articles trans- 
ferred under this Agi'eement as shall not have 
been destroyed, lost or consumed and as shall be 
determined by the President to be useful in the 
defense of the United States of America or of 
the Western Hemisphere or to be otherwise of 
use to the United States of America. 

"Article VI 
"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the United Kingdom full 
cognizance shall be taken of all property, serv- 
ices, information, facilities, or other benefits or 
considerations provided by the Government of 
the United Kingdom subsequent to March 11, 
1941, and accepted or acknowledged by the 
President on behalf of the United States of 
America. 



192 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



"Article VII 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the United Kingdom in 
return for aid furnished under the Act of 
Congi-ess of March 11, 1941, the terms and condi- 
tions theieof shall be such as not to burden 
commerce between the two countries, but to pro- 
mote mutually advantageous economic relations 
between them and the betterment of world- 
wide economic relations. To that end, they 
shall include provision for agreed action by the 
United States of America and the United King- 
dom, ojjen to participation by all other coun- 
tries of like mind, directed to the expansion, by 
appropriate international and domestic meas- 
ures, of pi'oduction. employment, and the ex- 
change and consumption of goods, which are 
the material foundations of (he liberty and wel- 
fare of all peoples; to the elimination of all 
forms of discriminatory treatment in interna- 



tional commerce, and to the reduction of tariffs 
and other trade barriers ; and, in general, to the 
attainment of all the economic objectives set 
forth in the Joint Declaration made on August 
12, 1941, by the President of the United States 
of America and the Prime Minister of the 
United Kingdom. 

"At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed ac- 
tion of other like-minded Governments. 

"Article VIII 

"This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

"Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this 23rd day of February, 1942." 



AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 



[Released to the press February 26] 

The Swiss authorities have informed the 
American Legation at Born that according to a 
telegram dated February 18. 1942 from the Swiss 
Consul at Shanghai, the entire personnel of the 
American Embassy at Peiping are safe. 

The office of the American Consulate at Me- 
dan, Sumatra. Netherlands East Indies, was 
closed on February 16, 1942, and the American 
Consul there, Mr. John B. Ketcham, of Bay- 
shore, N. Y., is now awaiting transportation 
from the island. Mrs. Ketcham is en route to 
the United States. 

The entire staff of the former Ameiican Con- 
sulate General at Singapore was able to with- 
draw from that city before its occupation by the 
Japanese. Consul General Kenneth S. Patton, 
of Salem, Va., Consul Harold D. Robison, of 
Pleasant Grove, Utah. Vice Consul Charles O. 
Thompson, of Kalispell, Mont., have all arrived 
safely in Perth, Australia. Mmes. Patton, Rob- 
ison, and Thompson are now en route to the 
United States. Consul Clayson W. Aldridge, 



of Rome, N. Y., formerly of the Consulate Gen- 
eral at Singapore, has been temporarily de- 
tailed to the American Consulate General at 
Batavia, Java. Mrs. Aldridge is in Australia. 
Mrs. Eileen Niven, of Seattle, Wash., also for- 
merly with the Coni^ulate General at Singapore, 
is also detailed temporarily to the Consulate 
General at Batavia. Vice Consul Robert Grin- 
nell, of Dover, Mass., and Vice Consul Perry 
Ellis, of Andarko, Okla., formerly attached to 
the Consulate General at Singapore, and who 
were temporarily detailed to Darwin, Australia, 
have left for the interior. An attempt is being 
made to arrange air transportation for them to 
Brisbane or Adelaide en route to Sydney. Mr. 
Grinnell and Mr. Ellis are unmarried. 

The members of the staflF of the former Consu- 
late General at Rangoon, Burma, have also been 
able to leave their post in safety. Consul Gen- 
eral Lester L. Schnare, of Mondovi, Wis., and 
Vice Consul Martin J. Hillenbrand, of Youngs- 
town, Ohio, have accompanied the Burma Gov- 
ernment, wliich has withdrawn northward. Mrs. 



FEBRUARY 2 8, 1942 



193 



Schnare is in the United States, and Mrs. Hillen- 
brand is en route to this country. Consul Rob- 
ert B. Streeper, of Columbus, Ohio, is en route to 
his new post at Chungking via the Burma Road. 
Mrs. Streeper is in the United States. Consul 
Robert Buell, of Rochester, N. Y., has arrived 
at his new post at Calcutta. He is unmarried. 

Consul Jesse F. Van Wickel, of Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and Vice Consul V. Lansing Collins, of 
Princeton, N. J., formerly of the staff of the 
American Consulate General at Batavia, have 
left for Wellington, New Zealand. The remain- 
ing members of the staff of the Consulate Gen- 
eral at Batavia are still at their post. Mrs. 
Walter Foote, wife of the American Consul 
General at Batavia, and Mrs. Collins have left 
Batavia for the United States. 

Mr. Owen L. Dawson, of Frost, Mich., former 
American Consul at Shanghai, who was re- 
cently on a business trip to the Netherlands 
East Indies, has left Surabaya by boat for New 
Zealand. Mrs. Dawson is in this country. 

[Released to the press February 27] 

The French authorities have made available 
to the American Embassy at Vichy a report 
received from the French Consul General at 
Shanghai reading in part substantially as 
follows : 

"Following the outbreak of hostilities, Ameri- 
can diplomatic and consular representatives, 
twenty in number, who had been lodged in 
several hotels in the International Settlement 
were taken to the French Concession where they 
are now residing in a hotel with their wives and 
children. 

"Other Americans holding official positions, 
fortj^-four in number, have received permission 
to remain either in their homes in the Interna- 
tional Settlement or the French Concession. 
These persons 'enjoy perfect freedom'. 

"The American consular officers are satisfied 
with their treatment. All concerned are in ex- 
cellent health — in particular Mr. Frank P. Lock- 
hart, the American Consul General, who has 
entirely recovered from typhus. Mr. Lockliart's 
home is in Pittsburg, Texas." 



RESCUE OF PERSONNEL OF UNITED 
STATES SHIPS BY PEOPLE OF ST. LAW- 
RENCE, NEWFOUNDLAND 

[Released to the press by the White House February 25] 

The President through the Navy Department 
sent a message to the people of St. Lawrence, 
Newfoundland, in appreciation of their work 
in aiding personnel of the US.S. Ti^xton and 
the U.S.S. Pollux. The text follows: 

"I have just learned of the magnificent and 
courageous work you rendered and of the sacri- 
fices you made in rescuing and caring for the 
personnel of the United States ships which 
gi'ounded on your shores. As Commander-in- 
Chief and on behalf of the Navy and as Presi- 
dent of the United States on behalf of our cit- 
izens I wish to express my most grateful ap- 
preciation of your heroic action which is typical 
of the history of your proud seafaring com- 
munity." 



JOINT MEXICAN - UNITED STATES 
DEFENSE COMMISSION 

An Executive order authorizing the creation 
of a joint commission to be known as the Joint 
Mexican - United States Defense Commission 
was signed by the President on February 27, 
1942.^ According to the Executive order the 
"purposes of the Commission shall be to study 
problems relating to the common defense of 
the United States and Mexico, to consider broad 
plans for the defense of Mexico and adjacent 
areas of the United States, and to propose to 
the respective governments the cooperative 
measures which, in its opinion, should be 
adopted." Provisions are made in the order 
for professional and clerical assistance and for 
the necessary office and travel expenses. The 
full text of the order is printed in the Federal 
Register of March 3, 1942, page 1607. 



• Bulletin of January 17, 1942, p. 67. 



American Republics 



SETTLEMENT OF PERU - ECUADOR BOUNDARY DISPUTE 

RESOLUTION OF PERUVIAN CONGRESS 



[Released to the press February 28] 

The text of a telegram received on February 
27 by the Acting Secretary of State, Sumner 
Welles, from Gerardo Balbuena, President of 
the Congress of Peru, follows : 

"In session today full Congress unanimously 
approved following motion : The Congi-ess of 
Peru, taking into consideration the lofty Amer- 
icanist labor achieved by the representatives of 
the friendly countries who, together with the 
Foreign Ministers of Peru and Ecuador, signed 
the Rio de Janeiro agreement which has just 
been approved, declares that the Foreign Min- 
isters of the United States of Brazil, Mr. Os- 
waldo Aranha, of the Argentine Republic, Mr. 
Enrique Ruiz-Guinazu, of the Republic of 
Chile, Mr. Juan B. Rossetti, and the Under 
Secretary of State of the United States of 
America, Mr. Sumner Welles, are deserving of 
the approbation and gratitude of Peru. Lima, 
February 26, 1942. E. Diez Canseco D., F. 
Dasso, Roberto MacLean y Estenos, Manuel B. 
Llosa. 

"In transmitting to Your Excellency the 
resolution of the Peruvian Congress, I have the 
honor to offer you, with my most cordial greet- 



ings, the assurance of my high and distin- 
guished consideration." 

The following note was sent by Mr. Welles in 
reply : 

"I am profoundly gi-ateful for Your Excel- 
lency's telegram of February 26, 1942 which 
quoted the text of a resolution approved by the 
Congress of Peru expressing the approbation 
and gratitude of Peru toward the representa- 
tives of the friendly powers who, in conjunction 
with the Foreign Ministers of Peru and 
Ecuador, signed the historic agi-eement at Rio 
de Janeiro for the termination of the boundary 
controversy. The Government of the United 
States has considered it a great honor to have 
been associated with the Governments of Ar- 
gentina, Brazil, and Chile in the friendly con- 
ver.sations leading up to this historic event 
which represents a significant milestone in the 
establishment of amicable discussion as a means 
of settling differences between these American 
republics. 

"I wish to take the opportunity to extend to 
you the assurance of my personal regard and of 
my highest consideration." 



STATEMENT BY THE ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press February 28] 

This Government has now been informed offi- 
cially by the Government of Ecuador that the 
Congress of Ecuador has ratified the protocol 
of Rio de Janeiro which provides for the defini- 
tive settlement of the boundary controversy be- 
tween Ecuador and Peru. As is known, the pro- 
tocol of Rio de Janeiro was ratified by the Con- 
gress of Peru on February 26, 1942. 

The final solution of this long-pending con- 
194 



troversy is a matter of the deepest satisfaction 
to the Government of the United States. It 
affords a further proof of the ability and deter- 
mination of the American republics to settle all 
disjDutes between them by pacific methods. It 
has been a privilege for this Government to have 
been able, in association with the Governments 
of Argentina, Brazil, and Chile, to participate in 
the extension of its good offices in furthering this 
final settlement. 



FEBRUARY 2 8, 194 2 



195 



PROTOCOL OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND BOUNDARIES 

[Translation] 



The Governments of Ecuador and Peru, desir- 
ing to find a solution to tlie question of bound- 
aries wliicli for a long period of time has sepa- 
rated them, and taking into consideration the 
oflFer which was made to them by the Govern- 
ments of the United States of America, of tlie 
Argentine Republic, of the United States of 
Brazil, and of Chile, of their friendly services to 
find a prompt and honorable solution to the 
problem, and moved by the American spirit 
which prevails in the Third Consultative Meet- 
ing of the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics, have resolved to celebrate 
a Protocol of peace, friendship and boundaries 
in the presence of the representatives of these 
four friendly Governments. To this end the 
following plenipotentiaries intei'vene : 

For the Republic of Ecuador, Doctor Jtnjo 
ToBAR DoNoso, Minister of For'eign Affairs ; and 

For the Republic of Peru, Doctor Alfredo 
SoLF T MuBO, Minister of Foreign Affairs; 

Wlio, after having exhibited their full and 
respective powers on this subject and having 
found them in good and due form, agree to the 
signing of the following protocol ; 

Article One 

The Governments of Ecuador and Peru sol- 
emnly affirm their decided proposal to maintain 
between the two peoples relations of peace and 
friendship, of understanding and of good faith 
and to abstain the one with respect to the other 
from any action capable of disturbing these 
relations. 

Article Two 

The Government of Peru will retire within a 
period of fifteen days from this date its military 
forces to the line described in Article Eight of 
this Protocol. 

Article Three 

The United States of America, Argentina, 
Brazil and Chile will cooperate, by means of 
military observers, in adjusting the circum- 
stances of this occupation, the retirement of 



troops, according to terms of the preceding 
Article. 

Article Four 

The military forces of the two countries will 
remain in their new positions until the definitive 
demarcation of the frontier line. In the in- 
terim, Ecuador will have only civil jurisdiction 
in the zones disoccupied by Peru which will be 
in the same condition as the demilitarized zone 
of Act Talara. 

Article Five 

The activity of the United States, Argentina, 
Brazil and Chile will continue until the defini- 
tive demarcation of frontiers between Ecuador 
and Peru has been completed. This Protocol 
and its execution will be under the guarantee 
of the four countries mentioned at the begin- 
ning of this Article. 

Article Six 

Ecuador will enjoy for the purposes of navi- 
gation on the Amazon and its northern tribu- 
taries the same concessions which Brazil and 
Colombia enjoy, in addition to those which 
W'cre agreed upon in the Treaty of Commerce 
and Navigation designed to facilitate free and 
gi-atuitous navigation on the rivers referred to. 

Article Seven 

Any doubt or disagreement which shall arise 
in the execution of this Protocol shall be re- 
solved by the parties concerned with the assist- 
ance of the representatives of the United States, 
Argentina, Brazil and Chile in as short a period 
of time as may be possible. 

Article Eight 

The boundary line shall be marked by the 
following points : 
A)- In the west sector: 

1)- Boca de Capones to the Pacific Ocean; 
2)- The Zarumilla River and the Quebrada 
Balsamal or Lajas; 



196 



DEPARTTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



3)- The Pnyango River or Tumbes to the 

Quebrada de Cazaderos; 
4)- The Cazaderos; 
6)- The Quebrada de Pilares and the Ala- 

mor to the Chira River ; 
6)- Tlie Cliira River upstream; 
7)- The Macara, Calvas and Espindola 

Rivers upstream to the sources of the 

last mentioned in the Nudo de Saba- 

nillas ; 
8)- From the Nudo de SabaniUas to the 

Canchis River; 
9)- Along the Canchis downstream; 
10)- The Chinchipe River, downstream to 

the point at which it receives the San 

Francisco River. 
B)-In the Oriente: 

1)- From the Quebrada de San Francisco, 
the "divertium aquarum" between the 
Zamora and Santiago Rivers, conflu- 
ence of the Santiago with the Yaupi. 

2)- A line to the mouth of the Bobonaza 
at the Pastaza. The confluence of the 
Cunambo River with the Pintoyacu 
on the Tigre River. 

3)- Mouth of the Cononaco on the Cura- 
ray, downstream to Bellavista. 

4)- A line to the mouth of the Yasuni on 
the Napo River. Along the Napo 
downstream to the mouth of the Agua- 
rico. 

5)- Along this upstream to the confluence 
of the Lagartococha or Zancudo with 
the Aguarico. 

6)- The Lagartococha River or Zancudo, 
upstream to its sources and from there 
a straight line which will meet the 
Guepi River and along this river to its 
mouth on the Putumayo, and along the 
Putumayo upstream to the boundary 
of Ecuador and Colombia. 

Article Nine 

It is understood that the line previously de- 
scribed will be accepted by Ecuador and Peru 
for the demarcation of the frontier between the 
two countries by technical experts on the 



grounds. The parties can, however, in tracing 
the line on the ground, consent to reciprocal 
concessions which they may consider convenient 
in order to adjust the line to geographical reali- 
ties. These rectifications shall be efl'ectuated 
with the collaboration of the representatives of 
the United States of America, the Argentine 
Republic, Brazil and Chile. 

The Governments of Ecuador and Peru will 
submit this Protocol to their respective Con- 
gresses and should obtain approval thereof 
within a period of not more than thirty days. 

In witness whereof, the plenipotentiaries 
above-mentioned sign and seal, in two copies, in 
Spanish in the city of Rio de Janeiro at one 
a. m. on the twenty-nintli day of January, for 
the year nineteen hundred and forty-two, the 
present Protocol, under the auspices of His Ex- 
cellency the President of Brazil and in tlie pres- 
ence of the Ministers of Foreign AflPairs of the 
Argentine Republic, Brazil and Chile and the 
Under Secretarj' of State of the United States 
of America. 

j. tobae donoso 
Alfredo Solf y Muko 
SuiuNER Welles 
E. Ruiz Gotxazu 
Juan B. Rossetti 

OSWALDO AraNHA 



Australasia 



OPENING OF DIRECT RADIOTELEGRAPH 
CIRCUIT WITH NEW ZEALAND 

[Released to the press by the White House February 23] 

In connection with the opening on February 
23 of a direct radiotelegraph circuit between the 
United States and New Zealand, the President 
sent the following message to the Right Honor- 
able Peter Eraser, Prime Minister of New 
Zealand, in Wellington : 

"The establishment at this time of a direct 
radiotelegraph circuit between the United States 



FEBRUARY 28, 1942 

and New Zealand is another link in the ever 
tightening bonds between our two countries. It 
gives me great pleasure to make use of this new 
and rapid channel of communications to convey 
to you personally and through you to the people 
of New Zealand the warm and fraternal gi-eet- 
ings of the American people and to assure you 
that we shall leave nothing undone to achieve 
our common objective of freeing our world once 
and for all of the forces of aggression." 

The Prime Minister of New Zealand sent a 
message to the President, the text of which 
follows : 

"The inauguration of direct radio communi- 
cation today between New Zealand and the 
United States enables mo to send you a cordial 
message of greetings and goodwill from the gov- 
ernment and people of New Zealand and to wish 
you all good fortune in the days of stress that lie 
ahead. This further link will I trust serve to 
bind still closer the warm ties of longstanding 
friendship between the American and New Zea- 
land peoples and it will undoubtedly provide a 
most valuable means of practical cooperation in 
the i^rosecution of the common task to which 
both peoples have set their hand — the achieve- 
ment of complete and lasting victory over the 
enemies of freedom and democracy." 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press February 28] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 14, 
1942: 

Charles B. Beylard, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
Vice Consul at Nice, France, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Lyon, France. 

Ellis A. Bonnet, of Eagle Pass, Tex., for- 
merly Consul at Amsterdam, Netherlands, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Embassy 
and Consul at Panama, Panama, and will sei"ve 
in dual capacity. 



197 

Robert L. Buell, of Rochester, N. Y., formerly 
Consul at Rangoon, Burma, has been assigned 
as Consul at Calcutta, India. 

William C. Burdett, Jr., of Macon, Ga., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Guayaquil, 
Ecuador. 

Robert E. Cashin, of University City, Mo., 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Iquitos, Peru, 
where an American Vice Consulate will be 
established. 

Clifton P. English, of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has 
been apjDointed Foreign Seiwice Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career, and has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina. 

Frederick W. Eyssell, of Kansas City, Mo., 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Cartagena, 
Colombia. 

C. Paul Fletcher, of Hickory Valley, Tenn., 
Consul at Alexandria, Egypt, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

Peter H. A. Flood, of Nashua, N. H., has been 
assigned as Foreign Service Officer to assist in 
Mexican claims work, with headquarters at the 
Consulate at Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, 
Mexico. 

The assignment of Julian B. Foster, of 
Tuscaloosa, Ala., as Commercial Attache at 
Stockholm, Sweden, has been canceled. 

Harry F. Hawley, of New York, N. Y., for- 
merly Consul at Gibraltar, has been assigned as 
Consul at Marseille, France. 

Charles H. Heisler, of Milford, Del., Consul 
at Tunis, Tunisia, has been assigned as Consul 
at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. 

Heyward G. Hill, of Hammond, La., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Panama, 
Panama, has been designated Second Secretary 
of Embassy and Consul at Madrid, Spain, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Martin J. Hillenbrand, of Chicago, 111., for- 
merly Vice Consul at Rangoon, Burma, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Bombay, India. 

Charles F. Knox, Jr., of Maplewood, N. J., 
Assistant Commercial Attache at Santiago, 
Chile, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 



198 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Sidney K. Lafoon, of Danieltown, Va., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Unclas- 
sified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and 
Vice Consul of Career, and has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

George D. LaMont, of Albion, N. Y., formerly 
Consul at Canton, China, has been assigiied as 
Consul at Cayenne, French Guiana, where an 
American Consulate will be established. 

William Frank Lebus, Jr., of Cynthiana, Ky., 
Vice Consul at Puerto Cortes, Honduras, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Aruba, Dutch 
West Indies. 

Oliver M. Marcy, of Newton Highlands, Mass., 
has been a^jpointed Vice Consul at La Paz, 
Bolivia. 

Allen W. Pattee, of Monmouth, 111., has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Valparaiso, Chile. 

Arthur E. Eingwalt, of Omaha, Nebr., for- 
merly Second Secretary of Embassy at Peiping, 
China, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

The assignment of Wells Stabler, of New 
York, N. Y., as Vice Consul at Bogota, Colom- 
bia, has been canceled. 

Robert M. Taylor, of Seattle, Wash., formerly 
Vice Consul at Tientsin, China, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

The assignment of J. Kittredge Vinson, of 
Houston, Tex., as Vice Consul at Rangoon, 
Burma, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Vinson has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Karachi, India. 

Woodruff Wallner, of New York, N. Y., Third 
Secretary of Embassy at Vichy, France, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Tunis, Tunisia. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle During the 
Calendar Year 1942: Proclamation by the President 
of the United States of America Issued December 22, 
1941 Pursuant to the Reciprocal Trade Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Canada 
Signed November 17, 193S, and Related Notes. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series 225. Publication 1691. 
7 pp. 50. 



Recommendations of the North American Regional 
Radio-Engineering Meeting: Arrangement Between 
the United States of America, Canada, Cuba, the Do- 
minican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico — Signed at 
Washington January 30, 1941 ; effective March 29, 
1941. (Supplemental to North American Regional 
Broadcasting Agreement, Habana, 1937.) Executive 
Agreement Series 227. Publication 16S1. iv, 52 pp. 

100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

Ve^iezuela 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union transmitted to the Secretary of State with 
a letter dated February 18, 1942 a copy of the 
list of species of Venezuelan flora and fauna 
which was furnished to the Union by the Gov- 
ernment of Venezuela for inclusion in the annex 
to the Convention on Nature Protection and 
Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere, which was opened for signature at the 
Pan American Union on October 12, 1940. 



Erratum: The statement appearing on page 
159 of the Bulletin for February 14, 1942 re- 
garding the date of the deposit of the instru- 
ment of ratification by Venezuela of this con- 
vention should read November 3, 1941, not De- 
cember 2, 1941 as stated. 



MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual-Aid Agreement With Great Britain 

The text of an agreement between the Gov- 
ernments of the United States and Great Brit- 
ain, signed February 23, 1942, on the principles 
applying to mutual aid in the prosecution of the 
war, appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"The War". 



FEBRUARY 2 8, 1942 

BOUNDARIES 

Protocol of Peace, Friendsliip, and Boundaries 
Between Ecuador and Peru 

A translation of the text of the protocol of 
peace, friendship, and boundaries, signed by 
Ecuador and Peru at Rio de Janeiro January 29, 
1942, ajopears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"American Republics". 



Legislation 



Fifth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Bill for 1942 : 

Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Aijpropriations, United States Senate, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 6611 [lend-lease, pp. 30- 
3.5]. 51 pp. 

S. Kept. 1113, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6611. 4 pp. 

Regulating Water-Borne Commerce of the United 
States. S. Rept. 1117, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6291. S) 
pp. 



199 

Joint Resolution Amending section 7 of the Neutrality 
Act of 1939. Approved February 21, 1942. [S.J.Res. 
133.] Public Law 459, 77th Cong. 1 p. 

An Act Making appropriations to supply deficiencies in 
certain appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
30, 1942, and for prior fiscal years, to provide sup- 
plemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1942, and for other purposes [including 
$150,000 for contingent expenses, Department of 
State, and $5,000,000 for emergencies arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service]. Approved Feb- 
ruary 21, 1942. [H.R. 6548]. Public Law 463, 77th 
Cong. 26 pp. 

An Act For the relief of certain Basque aliens. Ap- 
proved February 19, 1942. [S. 314.] Private Law 
286, 77th Cong. 1 p. 



Regulations 



Export Control Schedule C. February 20, 1942. (Board 
of Economic Warfare.) 7 Federal Register 1492. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIBECIOK OF THE BCBEAO OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



c 



MARCH 7, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 141— Publication 1707 



ontents 



The War p^^. 

United Nations and United Peoples: Radio address by 

Assistant Secretary Berle 203 

Agreements with Brazil 205 

French island possessions in the Pacific 208 

Joint British- American relief to Greece 208 

Advisoi-y Mission to India 209 

Americans in the Far East 209 

The Problem of Economic Peace After the War : Address 

by Leo Pasvolsky 210 

Pi-oclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, Supple- 
ment 1 to Revision I 220 

Commercial Policy 

Exchange of notes with Ecuador regarding trade 
agreement 221 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Eighth Pan American Child Congress 222 

The Department 
Appointment of officers 223 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 223 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to United States of Brazilian educator 224 

Legislation 224 

[OVEE] 




V,. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF O0CLt«ENT» 
^flAR 21 1942 



a 



ontents-coNTifiVED 



Treaty Information 

Finance : Page 

Double Income Taxation Convention With Canada . . . 225 

Agreements with Brazil 225 

Commerce : 

Inter- American Coffee Agi'eement 225 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement With Ecuador 225 

Publications: Agreement With El Salvador for the Ex- 
change of Official Publications 226 

General, 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries 226 



The War 



UNITED NATIONS AND UNITED PEOPLES 

RADIO ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[Released to the press March 1] 
I 

Oil every continent of the world, and in every 
corner of the seas, soldiers, sailors, armies, and 
ships of the United Nations now are engaged 
in a titanic struggle for freedom of thought, 
religious freedom, freedom from want, freedom 
from fear. 

At the opening of this year, 1942, the greatest 
group of nations ever joined in history assem- 
bled in Washington. President Koosevelt gave 
the company a name : The United Nations. 
They declared their common purpose and put 
the articles of their union into a few simple 
words : 

"Having subscribed to a common program of 
purposes and principles embodied in . . . the 
Atlantic Charter, 

"Being convinced that complete victory over 
their enemies is essential to defend life, liberty, 
independence and religious freedom, and to pre- 
serve human rights and justice in their own 
lands as well as in other lands, and that they are 
now engaged in a common struggle against sav- 
age and brutal forces seeking to subjugate the 
world, . . . 

"1. Each Government pledges itself to employ 
its full resources, military or economic, against 
those members of the Tripartite Pact and its 
adherents with which such government is at 
war. 

"2. Each Government pledges itself to coop- 
erate with the Governments signatory hereto 



' Delivered over the Mutual Broadcasting System, 
March 1, 1942. 



and not to make a separate armistice or peace 
with the enemies. 

"The foregoing declaration may be adhered 
to by other nations which are, or which may be, 
rendering material assistance and contributions 
in the struggle for victory over Hitlerism." 

This is the Declaration by United Nations. 

By these words a vast revolution in world 
affairs was recognized. It accomplished a huge 
union of fighting forces in a common struggle. 
It did far more. It dedicated that struggle to 
the high purpose of giving to the peoples of the 
world — and to each individual of those peo- 
ples — the material and spiritual requirements 
for a fuller life. 

The Atlantic Charter, which is included in the 
Pact of the United Nations, had set out for the 
United Nations these elementary human rights 
with directness and simplicity : 

"They respect the right of all peoples to choose 
the form of government under which they will 
live ; and they wish to see sovereign rights and 
self-government restored to those who have been 
forcibly deprived of them ; 

"They will endeavor, with due respect for 
their existing obligations, to further the enjoy- 
ment by all States, great or small, victor or van- 
quished, of access, on equal terms, to the trade 
and to the raw materials of the world which 
are needed for their economic prosperity ; 

"They desire to bring about the fullest col- 
laboration between all nations in the economic 
field with the object of securing, for all, im- 
proved labor standards, economic advancement, 
and social security ; 

203 



204 



depaetment of state bulletin 



"After the final destruction of the Nazi tyr- 
anny, they hope to see establislied a peace which 
will afford to all nations the means of dwelling 
in safety within their own boundaries, and 
which will afford assurance that all the men in 
all the lands may live out their lives in freedom 
from fear and want." 

II 

The war of the United Nations is a people's 
war. 

Free peoples rarely commence war; this 
war was in fact begun by three dictatorships. 
But wars are almost invariably won and peace 
is finally reestablished by the victory of free 
peoples. So it will be with the present war. 

In waging and winning the war, and in mak- 
ing and holding the peace, the United Nations 
rightly rely on peoples : The people of Britain 
in their classic defense of their homeland; the 
people of Russia in rising up to crush an in- 
vader with unparalleled sacrifice ; the vast peo- 
ple of China, first to resist and longest to endure ; 
the people of the United States, turning their 
plows into swords; the Dutch making a stand 
of unparalleled gallantry in the western Pacific. 
With them are the hundreds and millions of the 
people of India; and the millions within the 
areas pillaged by barbarian arms : The Belgians, 
the Greeks, tlie Yugoslavs, the Czechs, the Nor- 
wegians, the Poles, even the tiny people of Lux- 
embourg. 

With these again are the peoples of the great 
members of the British Commonwealth of Na- 
tions : Our neighbors of Canada, our friends in 
Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. 
And with them too are the representatives of 
the great American family of nations: Costa 
Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salva- 
dor, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Nicaragua, 
and Panama. It is a roll call of great nations. 

The voiceless peoples whose governments 
have been submerged are not forgotten ; a place 
is ready for them. We know from endless 
sources now that even the peoples of our ene- 
mies pray in their hearts that the United Na- 
tions shall succeed. 



Ill 

A people's war is vastly different from a 
war of politicians or governments. Rather, 
it is a kind of revolution — in this case, a kindly 
revolution — fighting to crush a cruel revolu- 
tion. It is a war of men to preserve their 
right to be men, fought against slave armies 
led by masters who propose to wipe out even 
the right to manhood. The Declaration by 
United Nations, like the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, speaks not of desire to seize terri- 
tory or plunder or power. It speaks of the 
rights of men by which you and I live: The 
right to be free to worship God; the right to 
be free from fear of foreign bombs or bayo- 
nets; the right to think; the right to be fed 
and clothed and housed in a modern world 
which can give food and shelter and clothing 
for every child, woman, and man in this teem- 
ing earth. As these rights are made valid by 
victorious arms, they mean, and were intended 
to mean, tlie beginning of a new world era. 

They mean freedom for the gi'eat masses in 
Asia. They mean release for the slaves of 
Nazi-occupied Europe. They mean that the 
materials and resources of the world will be 
administered so as to be accessible to all na- 
tions. They mean that a measure of security 
will be provided for individual men and 
women. They mean that the highways of land 
and sea are open to everyone who will trade 
or travel in peace. 

For these, the peoples are on the march by 
hundreds of millions upon hundreds of mil- 
lions; and you and I are among them. 

As these united peoples join ranks there is 
no distinction or discrimination of race or 
color or class or creed. There is no master 
race. The common bond is that of common, 
decent, kindly humanity. In worthiness, the 
bond could be no less. 

Within this gi-eat frame the methods of 
making the ultimate peace are already appear- 
ing. The American family of nations com- 
prises an entire hemisphere and has learned to 
live together in peace and in friendship and in 



MARCH 7, 1942 



205 



mutual help. The British Commonwealth of 
Nations, another great family working like- 
wise toward a common helpfulness, is a second 
great group. In Europe, nation after nation 
is joining hands with its neighbors and friends, 
as Russia and Poland did only the other day. 
In Asia, the leader of a Free China talks to 
India, and Filipinos fight shoulder to shoul- 
der with MacArthur. These nations fight to- 
gether in war, which is great; but they will 
work together when they have conquered 
cruelty and won the peace, which is greater 
still. 

Even as they forge the great organizations of 
war they plan the use of these organizations to 
relieve the distress of the world when war is 
done and to bring again peace, order, and fruit- 
fulness to a devastated world, under law which 
will protect freedom and render an economic 
system which gives opportunity and life. 

IV 

The measures for doing this are already in 
existence. 

We are free from the bonds of outworn 
finance. You have noticed that no war effort is 
limited on financial grounds. Food, arms, and 
materials go from those who have them to those 
who need them. We call this in America "lend- 
lease", and under that system the needs of peo- 
ples will be met from China to the English 
Channel. As more peoples are freed to join the 
United Nations, they receive their share. 

By means of the joint supply and transport 
authorities, a vast transport system is coming 
into existence which will be able in time to 
serve all parts of the earth by sea and air. 



Already the system of communication and 
the press has given a common language and a 
common thought which has brought nations 
closer together. Uruguay knows the opinion of 
Ottawa ; Chicago knows the thinking of Chung- 
king. 

The forces of the United Nations by sea and 
land and air are great instruments of law. They 
are engaged in crushing international criminals 
who have sought to rob and murder and op- 
press. They act by common counsel and they 
work under united conamands. They are friends 
among themselves, and friends and givers of 
freedom in the nations to which they come. 

In such a war and with such a group there can 
be no end but victory. No other result is worth 
having. Freedom is indivisible. 

The United Nations have soberly estimated 
the great burden which history has given them 
and which they have proudly assumed. But 
they have the strength, the resources, and the 
ability to win. The stupendous program of the 
United States is already under way and on 
schedule. The avalanche of force is steadily 
building. The task is great. The time may be 
long. But there can be only one end — the de- 
struction of evil forces and the reestablishment 
of a kindly world. 

According to President Roosevelt's prophecy, 
the United States has met its rendezvous with 
destiny. At the meeting-place there are the 
peoples of the earth, free and seeking freedom, 
joining forces to make a tide of irresistible 
strength. Their line has gone out through all 
the earth. Their victory will be to the ends 
of it. 



AGREEMENTS WITH BRAZIL 



[Released to the press March 3] 

To implement the resolutions of the recent 
meeting of the foreign ministers in Rio de 
Janeiro, His Excellency Dr. Arthur de Souza 
Costa, Minister of Finance of Brazil, and offi- 
cials of this Government have concluded a 
series of important agreements designed to 



fortify the security of the American republics. 
These agreements are as follows : 

1. The Finance Minister of Brazil and the 
Acting Secretary of State signed an exchange of 
notes providing for a program for the mobiliza- 
tion of the productive resources of Brazil, and 
for a line of credit of $100,000,000 to be made 



206 

available through the Export-Import Bank. 
The texts of the notes exchanged are given 
below. 

2. Officials of the Export-Import Bank and 
the Metals Reserve Company signed agreements 
with the Minister of Finance of Brazil and the 
British Ambassador for the development of the 
Itabira mining properties and the Victoria- 
Minas Railroad, with accompanying arrange- 
ments for the procurement by the United States 
and Great Britain of the high-grade iron ores 
to be produced in these properties. Details 
with regard to these arrangements are available 
at the Export-Import Bank. 

3. The Ambassador of Brazil and the Acting 
Secretary of State signed an agreement provid- 
ing for expanded assistance to Brazil under the 
provisions of the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 
1941. 

4. The Brazilian Minister of Finance and the 
Acting Secretary of State signed and exchanged 
notes providing for the establishment of a five- 
million-dollar fund by the Rubber Reserve 
Company to be used in collaboration with the 
Brazilian Government in developing the raw- 
rubber production of the Amazon "Valley and 
adjacent regions. The notes were accompanied 
by an agreement whereby the Rubber Reserve 
Company agreed to purchase Brazilian raw rub- 
ber for a period of five years. 

The text of a note to the Acting Secretary of 
State, Mr. Sumner Welles, dated March 3, from 
His Excellency, Dr. Arthur de Souza Costa, 
Minister of Finance of Brazil, follows : 

"In Resolution II of the Third Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Republics at Rio de Janeiro the Govern- 
ment of Brazil undertook to cooperate with the 
other American republics to the utmost possible 
degree in the mobilization of its economic re- 
sources with the special objective of increasing 
the production of those strategic materials 
essential for the defense of the Hemisphere and 
for the maintenance of the economies of Brazil 
and the other American republics. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXJLLETTN 

"The Government of Brazil, through the 
Brazilian Economic Mission which I have the 
honor to head, proposes at once to take meas- 
ures effectively to carry out this undertaking 
and to further the program of developing the 
production of such materials, upon which it has 
been engaged for some time. 

"The Government of Brazil believes that the 
most effective manner to carry out its broad pur- 
poses will be the establishment of a new gov- 
ernment organization to investigate and pro- 
mote the development of strategic materials and 
other natural resources of Brazil. The new or- 
ganization, wliich might be a new department 
of the Brazilian Government or a government- 
controlled corpoi'ation, would examine all fea- 
sible projects for such development and would 
see that those recommended be effected, either 
by existing enterprises in Brazil, or, where suit- 
able entities do not already exist, by new de- 
partments, independent organizations or private 
enterprises which would be established for the 
purpose. 

"In either case the new organization would 
function as a dependency of the Government of 
Brazil not primarily for profit, but rather for 
carrying out to the fullest degree possible in the 
interests of Brazil and the other American re- 
publics, the development of the country's natural 
resources. 

"The new Brazilian organization would be 
aided in its work if it were able to rely to a very 
considerable degree on United States expert as- 
sistance. Moreover, to carry out its program 
the Brazilian Government would require, in 
addition to funds for local expenditures to be 
supplied by Brazil, a line of dollar credits, in 
an amount of about $100,000,000, to be drawn 
against as needed for dollar expenditures in con- 
nection with specific projects. 

"Such credits would be utilized in projects 
undertaken directly by the Brazilian Govern- 
ment or by private individuals approved by it. 

"On behalf of the Government of Brazil and 
in accordance with understandings which the 



MARCH 7, 1942 

Brazilian Economic Mission, which I have the 
honor to head, has had with officials of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States, I should greatly 
appreciate it if Your Excellency's Government 
studied sympathetically the present program of 
financial and expert cooperation. 

"It is my firm conviction that a cooperative 
program such as that outlined above can be of 
the greatest value to both of our nations in 
carrying out the intent of the resolutions of Rio 
de Janeiro to mobilize the economic potentiali- 
ties of the Hemisphere in our common defense. 

"I avail [etc.]" 

Mr. Welles sent the following reply to the 
Brazilian Minister of Finance on March 3 : 

"I acknowledge the receipt of your note of 
March 3, 1942, outlining a program for further 
economic cooperation between the United States 
and Brazil in furtherance of Eesolution II of 
the Third Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics at Rio de 
Janeiro, calling for the mobilization of the pro- 
ductive resources of the American republics. 

"I have the honor to inform you that the 
appropriate agencies of the Government of the 
United States have considered carefully this 
program and are prepared to extend the finan- 
cial and expert cooperation essential to its suc- 
cess. I have been informed by the Secretary of 
Commerce that he is agreeable to the opening 
of a line of credit of up to $100,000,000 for the 
purpose of financing dollar expenditures in con- 
nection with specific projects to be undertaken 
by the Brazilian Government through the 
agency of the proposed new organization. It is 
contemplated that such projects shall be under- 
taken after agreement between the Brazilian 
Government, acting through the new organiza- 
tion, and the Government of the United States, 
acting through the Department of Commerce, 
and that appropriate United States technical 
and expert assistance shall be made available 
as necessary and desirable. The Secretary of 
Commerce will consider and act upon such 
projects within the period in which the Export- 



207 

Import Bank of Washington is in a position to 
provide these credits, and to the extent that its 
funds may be available for this purpose. De- 
tails of the arrangements may be worked out 
between representatives of the Government of 
Brazil and the Secretary of Commerce. 

"It is of course understood that although the 
United States is desirous of cooperating to the 
fullest extent in the general development of the 
Brazilian economy, the carrying out of specific 
projects which require important amounts of 
machinery, equipment or other materials pro- 
duced in the United States must be conditioned 
upon careful investigation and determination 
that the particular project will contribute in an 
important manner to the progress of our war 
effort and to the security of the Hemisphere, and 
has accordingly been granted the appropriate 
priority ratings. 

"I believe that the cooperative program which 
the Governments of Brazil and the United States 
of America are undertaking will constitute a 
further great step forward in mutually bene- 
ficial economic relationships between our two 
countries and in the mobilization of the eco- 
nomic resources of the Western Hemisphere. 

"Accept [etc.]" 

[Released to the press March 3] 

The following statements were made on March 
3 by the Brazilian Minister of Finance, His Ex- 
cellency Dr. Arthur de Souza Costa; the Brazil- 
ian Ambassador to the United States, His Ex- 
cellency Carlos Martins; and the Acting Sec- 
retary of State, the Honorable Sumner Welles, 
on the occasion of the signing of the agreements 
between this Government and Brazil : 

Statement by Dr. Souza Costa 

The agreements which we have just signed are 
significant not only because of their concrete 
objectives of increasing the capacity for produc- 
tion in order to overcome present difficulties but 
principally in the sense of countervailing the 
idealogies of hate and disunity by the spirit of 
solidarity which inspires the governments of 
America. 



208 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETEST 



Statement hy Ambassador Martins 

Now that we have found the way to solve 
these problems, it is with a feeling of deepest 
pleasure that I sign these agreements as Am- 
bassador of Brazil. 

They are as a shining light marking the al- 
ready bright path of political relations between 
our two countries, and they unveil before our 
eyes the vast horizons of further economic 
progress. 

Statement hy Mr. Welles 

Our Government has just signed a new Lend- 
Lease Agreement with Brazil in order that the 
Brazilian Government may be able to speed up 
Brazilian armament for self-defense and thus 
enhance the security of the entire hemisphere. 

Our two Goverimients have also signed an 
additional agreement whereby Brazil will co- 
operate with the United States by producing 
and supplying vitally important strategic ma- 
terials required in our national-defense pro- 
gram. 

Thig is one of the concrete answers of Brazil 
and of the United States to Hitlerism and the 
other declared enemies of the liberties of the 
Americas, of Christian civilization, and of man- 
kind itself. 

FRENCH ISLAND POSSESSIONS 
IN THE PACIFIC 

[Released to the press March 2] 

The text of a statement made by the Ameri- 
can Vice Consul at Noumea to the High Com- 
missioner of New Caledonia and made public 
by the latter on February 28, 1942 follows: 

"The policy of the Government of the United 
States as regards France and French territory 
has been based upon the maintenance of the in- 
tegrity of France and of the French Empire 
and of the eventual restoration of the complete 
independence of all French territories. Mind- 
ful of its traditional friendship for France, 
this Government deeply sympatliizes not only 
with the desire of the French people to maintain 
their territories intact but with the efforts of 



the French people to continue to resist the forces 
of aggression. In its relations with the local 
French authorities in French territories the 
United States has been and will continue to be 
governed by the manifest effectiveness with 
which those authorities endeavor to protect 
their territories from domination and control by 
the common enemy. 

"With the French authorities in effective con- 
trol of French territories in the Pacific this 
Government has treated and will continue to 
treat on the basis of their actual administration 
of the territories involved. This Government 
recognizes, in particular, that French island 
possessions in that area are under the effective 
control of the French National Committee 
established in London and the United States au- 
thorities are cooperating for the defense of these 
islands with the authorities established by the 
French National Committee and with no other 
French authority. This Government appre- 
ciates the importance of New Caledonia in the 
defense of the Pacific area." 

JOINT BRITISH- AMERICAN RELIEF TO 
GREECE 

[Released to the press March 6] 

The United States and British Governments 
have agreed to a request by the Greek War Re- 
lief Association of New York for permission 
immediately to charter a vessel to transport 
2,300 long tons of flour from the United States 
to Greece, provided adequate guaranties are ob- 
tained from the Axis governments and satisfac- 
tory arrangements can be made for the distribu- 
tion of the flour to the suffering Greek popu- 
lation. 

The program of aid to Greece through ship- 
ments from Turkey is also going forward to the 
extent that food is available. Permission, fur- 
thermore, has recently been gi-anted to the Greek 
Government to transfer to Switzerland the 
equivalent of one million Swiss francs from 
funds of the Greek Government in the United 
States, to purchase condensed milk in Switzer- 
land for the relief of children in Greece. 



MARCH 1, 1942 



209 



In considering plans for the relief of Greece, 
particular attention is paid to the provisions for 
the distribution of the food to the Greek peoples 
themselves and for preventing the Axis powers, 
who have created the appalling conditions of 
famine which exist in that counti-y, from being 
aided by the relief measures employed. It is 
realized that no measures for the adequate relief 
of Greece will be possible until the final defeat 
of the Axis. The necessity, however, for the 
prompt use of any feasible means for assisting 
Greece is fully realized. 

ADVISORY MISSION TO INDIA 

[Released to the press March 6] 

The military situation in southeastern Asia 
emphasizes the need to develop fully, and as 
rapidly as feasible, the industrial resources of 
India as a supply base for the armed forces of 
the United Nations in the Near East and the 
Far East. The Government of the United 
States, accordingly, inquired whether the Gov- 
erimient of India would agi'ee to the despatch 
to India of a technical mission whicli could ex- 
amine and report on the possibilities of Ameri- 
can assistance in such development. The Gov- 
ernment of India has expressed its readiness to 
receive sucli a mission and lias invited it to be 
its guests during the mission's stay in India. 
Accordingly, it has been decided that the mis- 
sion should proceed to India as soon as possible. 

It is hoped that the jjersonnel of the mission 
may be announced shortly. The Government 
of the United States and the Government of 
India earnestly hope that this step in American- 
Indian collaboration may serve to make an effec- 
tive contribution to the success of the United 
Nations in the war against aggression. 

AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press March 5] 

The Swiss Government has made available to 
this Government the following message, of Feb- 
ruary 25, from the Swiss Minister at Tokyo, re- 
porting the substance of information received 
from the Japanese Foreign Office in regard to 

44S141 — 42 2 



the welfare of the personnel of the American 
Consular Offices in Harbin and Mukden : 

On December 8, 1941 the personnel of the 
offices of the American Consulates General at 
Harbin and Mukden were placed under surveil- 
lance in their respective consular premises; 
they were deprived of short-wave radios, and 
telephone communication with the exterior was 
authorized in principle only through guards or 
interpreters; for exceptional reasons they can 
leave the premises under surveillance. With re- 
gard to food, all measui'es have been taken to 
avoid privation, Chinese employees being per- 
mitted to go to tlie market daily foi' provisions. 
With regard to health, there is nothing to note 
with the exception of Mr. Jay Dixon Edwards, 
American Vice Consul at Harbin who, suffering 
from throat trouble in December, underwent 
hospital treatment. 

Mr. Jay Dixon Edwards is a native of Wau- 
sau, Wis. 

The American Consulate at Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, has reported the safe arrival in that port 
of Mr. Jesse Frederick Van Wickel, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., former American Consul at Batavia ; 
Mr. V. Lansing Collins, of Princeton, N. J., 
former American Vice Consul at Batavia, and 
his wife and baby ; Mrs. Kenneth S. Patton, wife 
of the former Amei'ican Consul General at 
Singaj^ore; Mrs. Walter A. Foote, wife of the 
former American Consul General at Batavia; 
Mrs. Harold D. Robison, wife of the former 
American Consul at Singapore; and Mrs. 
Charles O. Thompson, wife of the former Amer- 
ican Vice Consul at Singapore, and her two 
sons. 

[Released to the press March 7] 

The Department of State has been informed 
officially that as of February 27, 1942 Mr. Victor 
Keen, representative of tlie New York IJerald- 
Tribune in Shanghai, and Mr. J. B. Powell, 
editor of the C'hinn Weekly Review, had been 
arrested and detained in Shanghai under charges 
of espionage. The information continued that 
both Messrs. Keen and Powell are in good 
health. 



210 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 

THE PROBLEM OF ECONOMIC PEACE AFTER THE WAR 

ADDRESS BY LEO PASVOLSKY' 



[Released to the press March 4] 
I 

For the second time in the lifetime of many 
of us, mankind will some day be confronted 
with the Herculean task of rebuilding the fabric 
of international relationships shattered by a 
world war. Our country and all nations associ- 
ated with us in the present conflict are resolved 
that the brutal forces of conquest and domina- 
tion will be utterly destroyed. We must be 
equally determined that, once the earth is freed 
from the menace of these sinister forces, inter- 
national relations must and will be so organized 
as to be an open and unobstructed highway of 
human progress toward an enduring peace 
among nations, based on justice and on order 
under law, and toward an increasing measure 
of economic and social welfare for the individ- 
ual everywhere. 

The winning of the war is but the first stage 
in the winning of the peace. Wars are not 
fought for their own sake, but for the sake of 
determining which of the jirotagonists will 
shape the peace that follows. 

In the last post-war period, the nations which, 
through untold sacrifice of life and treasure, 
established their right to shape the peace failed 
to take positive action necessary for fulfilling 
the vast responsibility which thus devolved upon 
them. The two unhappy and uneasy decades 
which elapsed between 1919 and 1939 were 
characterized by a fatal drift toward a new and 
greater disaster — a drift which went on in spite 
of many efforts to arrest it and to reverse it. 

After this second world war, the central 
problem confronting mankind will be exactly 
the same as that which confronted us after the 
last war. That problem is dual in character. 



^ Delivered at the National Study Conference of the 
Comniission To Study the Bases of a .lust and Durable 
Peace of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ 
in America, Delaware, Ohio, March 4, 1942. Mr. Pas- 
volsky is Special Assistant to the Secretary of State. 



First, to create a system of international po- 
litical relationships which would offer a reason- 
able hope for the preservation of a just peace 
among nations with the least practicable diver- 
sion of economic effort to the maintenance of 
armed forces; and 

Second, to create, domestically and interna- 
tionally, economic conditions which would make 
possible a progressive movement toward an 
efficient utilization of the human and material 
resources of the world on a scale adequate to 
insure the greatest practicable measure of full 
and stable emplojmient accompanied by rising 
standards of living everywhere. 

These basic objectives were stated clearly in 
the Atlantic Declaration of last August. They 
were i-e-endorsed in the Joint Declaration of the 
United Nations of two months ago. 

The two objectives are closely interrelated. 
Sound economic policies will be impossible with- 
out confidence that peace will prevail and with- 
out assurance that the burden of armaments will 
be reduced to manageable proportions. But 
peace will be precarious at best, unless there 
exists for it a sound economic foundation. 
Both objectives, therefore, must be pursued 
simultaneously. 

The full attainment of both of these objec- 
tives will necessarily be a long process, pro- 
ceeding in a series of stages. What is important 
is that progress in each field be such as to re- 
inforce progress in the other. And progress will 
have to be measured in terms of the speed and 
effectiveness with which appropriate machinery 
is set up in each field. 

I shall not deal in this address with the ma- 
chinery which will be necessary for the attain- 
ment of the political peace objective. On the 
assumption that such machinery will be cre- 
ated, I shall focus my attention on the types of 
action which will be involved in the creation of 
the necessary economic machinery, especially in 
the international field. 



MARCH 7, 1942 



211 



n 

At the risk of giving you a rather dull quar- 
ter of an hour, I shall recite at the outset some 
of the basic economic considerations involved. 

International economic relationships ai'S 
numerous and varied in character. Nations ex- 
change physical commodities, either as raw ma- 
terials or as processed goods. They render 
each other a large variety of services. Some 
nations make loans to others, and the bori-ow- 
ing countries discharge their obligations. 

The importance of all these relationships 
arises from the fact that we live in a world in 
which natural wealth, technical skills, and fi- 
nancial strength are so distributed over the sur- 
face of the earth that each nation possesses a 
surplus of some of the things which some other 
nations lack, and no nation, however large, pos- 
sesses in adequate measure all of the elements 
that constitute the material foundations of 
economic well-being. No nation can hope to 
provide for its population even the necessities 
of modern life if it has access solely to its own 
resources. Nor can any group of nations — 
unless, indeed, it comprises almost the entire 
globe — hope to attain in isolation nearly as 
high a level of well-being as it can when the eco- 
nomic interdependence of nations is translated 
into a world-wide system of peaceful and mu- 
tually beneficial exchange of goods and services, 
through which alone each nation can have as 
satisfactory an access as may be practicable to 
the resources of the entire world. 

International trade is the process by which 
nations exchange physical commodities. Apart 
from the exchange of services which are of 
relatively lesser importance, it is the instrument 
by means of which nations with undeveloped 
natural resources or insufficient financial 
strength secure capital from wealthier nations 
and by means of which they eventually repay 
their obligations. Hence, trade is by far the 
most important of international economic re- 
lationships and is, in fact, basic to all the others. 

When nations deliberately move in the direc- 
tion of national or group self-sufficiency, or 
when they, for any other reason, adopt policies 
which obstruct international trade or impair 



its efficacy, they find themselves correspond- 
ingly compelled to curtail or leave undeveloped 
some of their relatively most efficient branches 
of production, to expand, if they can, some of 
their relatively less efficient ones ; and to create, 
again if they can, branches of production for 
which their conditions are not as well adapted 
as are conditions in some other areas. By doing 
this, they not only deprive themselves of the 
benefits of international exchange but neces- 
sarily force other nations to do likewise. The 
net result is reduced productivity all around 
and an inexorable lowering of the standards 
of life everywhere. 

International trade, moving as nearly as may 
be practicable along the channels of natural ad- 
vantage and of mutual benefit to the parties 
concerned, is the foundation of economic peace 
and an indisi^ensable element in the promotion 
of human welfare. International trade, ob- 
structed by excessive barriers and forced into 
artificial channels, is the most potent instrument 
of economic war, which serves inexorably as a 
depressant of human welfare. 

Thus international economic relations are not 
an end in themselves. They are rather an in- 
tegral part of the whole complex of economic 
activity whereby the material wants of man are 
satisfied, and in the efficacy of which interna- 
tional economic relations are a determining 
economic factor. 

In a world organized along national lines, 
much of that activity is necessarily domestic, 
and economic progress is obviously impossible 
without appropriate domestic policies and meas- 
ures, but it is equally impossible in conditions 
of economic war. Its mainsprings lie solely 
neither in the field of domestic action nor in the 
field of international action but in a proper 
combination of the two. 

The basic requirements of economic progress 
are expansion and improvement of production 
and increase of international trade, which are 
primary prerequisites of increased consumption. 
Increased production and increased trade are 
themselves inescapably interdependent factors. 
In the long run, neither is possible without the 
other, but neither flows automatically from the 
other. 



212 



DEPAETIMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The expansion and improvement of each 
country's productive facilities and the creation 
of other conditions conchicive to increased con- 
sumption require many domestic policies and 
measures. To the extent to which such policies 
and measures are successful, they of course 
stimulate international commerce. But domes- 
tic action cannot be fully successful unless it 
takes i^lace in conditions in which the trade 
process itself is not prevented, by inappropriate 
international policies, from making its indis- 
pensable contribution to growing production 
and growing consumption. The creation of 
these conditions is a task of international collab- 
oration in a number of fields of international 
economic relationships. 

Ill 

Both theory and experience lead to the con- 
clusion that international trade increases in 
its economic usefulness in proportion as the 
policies and arrangements under which it func- 
tions are such as to enable each nation, as 
nearly as may be practicable, to sell its sur- 
plus production and to obtain the surplus prod- 
ucts of other nations wherever this can be done 
most advantageously. This does not and need 
not mean completely free trade, in the sense of 
a total absence of trade regulation. That con- 
cept requires, for its realization in the inter- 
national field, the existence of many complex 
conditions which do not obtain today and are 
not likely to obtain in any discernible future. 
Moreover, practical experience indicates that 
the attainment of a relatively high degree of 
expanding economic prosperity for all coun- 
tries, so far as it is determined by international 
commerce, does not require completely free 
trade as one of its indispensable prerequisites. 
What it does require is a large measure of 
flexibility in trade movements. This is pos- 
sible only through a trade process which is 
regulated, if at all, predominantly by such 
methods as reasonable tariffs and not by quan- 
titative controls and other devices that cause 
an artificial channelization of trade move- 
ments and which functions on the basis of a 
system of multilateral rather than bilateral 



balancing of the international accounts of in- 
dividual countries. 

A bilateral system is one under which a coun- 
try pays for its imports with currency which 
is good only for purchases from it or for the 
discharging of other obligations to it alone. A 
multilateral system is one under which a coun- 
try's proceeds of sales to another country be- 
come available for purchases from, or the dis- 
charging of other obligations to, any country. 
Since trade and all other international trans- 
actions — the results of which comprise for each 
country its balance of international pay- 
ments — are expressed in terms of money, and 
since each country has its own monetary sys- 
tem, multilateral balancing of international 
accounts is possible only when national cur- 
rencies are freely interchangeable at stable 
exchange rates. 

Interchangeability of currencies and stabil- 
ity of foreign-exchange rates can be maintained 
only between countries, each of which possesses 
at all times either a sufficient supply of for- 
eign currencies to meet demands for such cur- 
rencies or the ability readily to obtain foreign 
currencies. The supply arises out of export 
of goods, rendering of services, earnings on 
loans and investments in other countries, and 
borrowing. The demands arise out of imports 
of goods, payments for services rendered by 
other countries, debt payments, and lending. 

In order that the foreign-exchange process — 
that is, the purchase and sale of foreign curren- 
cies — may function smoothly, each country 
needs reserves of foreign currencies or ability to 
replenish its I'eserves when necessary. Such re- 
plenishment is accomplished by borrowing or 
by liquidation of foreign investments, where 
there are any ; under the gold-standard system, 
exports of gold provide an additional and very 
convenient method of replenishing reserves of 
foreign currencies. The reserves serve the role 
of a revolving fund to provide for temporary 
lack of balance between the supply of and the 
demand for foreign currencies. The stability 
and interchangeability of a country's currency 
is endangered or destroyed when its total inter- 
national outgo tends to exceed its total interna- 



MARCH 7, 19 42 



213 



tional income and thus to deplete its available 
reserves. 

This situation may result from that country's 
own action or from the actions of other coun- 
tries, or both. It may arise as a consequence of 
domestic policies or of international policies. 
And the factors involved in the maintenance of 
currency stability and interchangeability are so 
closely interdependent that they affect each 
other immediately and therefore retard or pro- 
mote the functioning of the multilateral system. 

Inability to compete internationally, or un- 
willingness to make the adjustments necessary 
for that purpose, has been a frequent cause of 
trade restrictions, while trade practices which 
obstruct commerce or which cause artificial 
diversion of trade have often been responsible 
for foreign -exchange controls or unstable for- 
eign-exchange rates. Delibei-ate alterations of 
exchange rates have been resorted to as a means 
of improving a country's international competi- 
tive position or as an instrument of domestic 
policy. Foreign-exchange controls have been 
imposed as a method of equilibrating the bal- 
ances of payments, especially by debtor coun- 
tries. Commercial and monetary policies of this 
type have obstructed useful movements of capi- 
tal, while unsound investment and credit policies 
have often led to trade restrictions and monetary 
instability. Unsound fiscal policies have fre- 
quently caused flights of capital and thus re- 
sulted in break-downs of monetary stability. 

Singly or in combination, these and many 
other factors, too numerous to be treated within 
the scope of this address, inevitably weaken the 
multilateral system, create a tendency toward 
bilateralism, and in extreme cases, result in at- 
tempts to turn deliberately to a system of bi- 
lateral balancing. Their most important result 
is that they impair international trade and, 
therefore, have adverse effects on production and 
consumption everywhere. Under multilater- 
alism, trade trends to be flexible and, therefore, 
to flow along the channels of natural advantage. 
Under bilateralism, trade tends to be rigidly and 
artificially channelized. Multilateral balanc- 
ing, therefore, allows a broad scope for free 
enterprise and a widening of economic oppor- 

448141—42 3 



tunity, and thus provides a foundation for 
policies and measures designed to promote eco- 
nomic stability accompanied by rising living 
standards. Bilateral balancing imposes trade 
regimentation, narrows economic opportunity, 
and makes economic stability possible only on 
tlie basis of lowered living standards, if at all. 
The creation after the war — as rapidly as pos- 
sible and as fully as possible — of conditions in- 
dispensable to a system of world trade operating 
on the basis of a substantial freedom from ob- 
structive regulation and on the basis of multi- 
lateral balancing of international accounts will 
be an urgent requirement for all countries, in- 
cluding our own. Unless that need is met, pro- 
duction and trade will stagnate everywhere, no 
matter what other measures are taken, and liv- 
ing standards will suffer in consequence. 

In this fundamental respect the situation after 
the present war will be no different in charac- 
ter but far more difficult than was that which 
existed after the last war. And there will be one 
new factor of the utmost importance. After 
this war more will be expected of the reconstruc- 
tion process than was the case after the last one. 
A greater emphasis than ever before is being 
placed on the so-called "social objective". Gov- 
ernments everywhere will have to make good 
their present promises to create conditions of 
economic security and higher levels of indi- 
vidual well-being. 

These are, unquestionably, attainable objec- 
tives, in terms of the availability of basic re- 
sources and the possibilities of a proper utiliza- 
tion of these resources. But their actual attain- 
ment will depend on the type of basic policies 
which are adopted and resolutely pursued. 

It was in the field of these policies that lay 
the principal mistakes and failures of the last 
post-war reconstruction effort. The dangers 
inherent in a repetition of these failures will be 
far greater than they were then. After this 
war mankind will be even less able to afford the 
mistakes made after the last war. 

It is well, therefore, to recall briefly what 
happened during the last post-war reconstruc- 
tion effort and the whole interval between the 
two ware. 



214 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



IV 

The world emerged from the war of 1914-18 
in a sorry economic state. National currencies 
were in a disordered condition. International 
trade was fettered by restrictions carried over 
from the war period and by new barriers rising 
on all sides with the rapidity of mushroom 
growth. Production was disorganized in many 
areas. Many countries were in gi-eat need of 
imports, for which they had no way of paying. 
Chaotic public finance prevailed in most parts 
of Europe. A greatly increased load of inter- 
national debt weighed on many countries, and 
astronomical sums were being assessed on the 
reparation account. 

The post-war reconstruction effort required 
action in all these fields. It was successfully 
undertaken only in some. 

Imports were provided where they were 
urgently needed, partly on the basis of relief 
but mostly on credit; the necessary financing 
was done largely by the United States and Great 
Britain, but also to some extent by France, the 
Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, and Canada. 
Over a period of a few years the stability and 
interchangeability of national curi-encies were 
reestablished. Fiscal conditions were greatly 
improved in most countries. After the initial 
post-war difficulties of internal organization 
were overcome, production began to recover in 
most areas where it had been badly disorgan- 
ized. 

All these were indispensable both for immedi- 
ate reconstruction and as foundations for fur- 
ther economic advancement. But they obvi- 
ously were not enough. Action was also needed 
in several other essential phases of the recon- 
struction process, and these, unfortmiately, were 
almost completely neglected or worse. 

In the all important field of international 
trade relations the dominant note was a steady 
growth of exaggerated j^i'otectionism. In the 
early post-war years the United States led the 
way through the enactment of the McCumber- 
Fordney tariff. In the middle twenties the 
jjrotectionist impetus came largely from Europe, 
especially from Germany. In 1928 we again 
took the lead by inaugurating our preparations 



for what became the Hawley-Smoot tariff. 
Greater and greater obstacles were placed in 
the way of imports, and, since one nation's 
imports are the exports of another or other 
nations, the total volume of international com- 
merce was prevented from undergoing an ade- 
quate expansion. 

The inadequate volume of world trade and 
the commercial policies pursued in the post-war 
period rendered illusory any hope that a stable 
international financial structure could be 
created. Debtor nations could not develop a 
sufficient volume of international income out of 
which to meet their debt pajanents because they 
found their sales opportunities limited by the 
restrictions which creditor nations were plac- 
ing on imports. 

The existence of a vast body of international 
indebtedness bequeathed by the war, which in- 
cluded enormous reparation payments, was in 
itself a source of acute maladjustment. We shut 
our eyes to the simple but crucial fact that war- 
time lending is always governed by a variety of 
considerations, peculiar to the abnormal con- 
ditions of war, which no longer apply in time 
of peace and which should be given due weight 
in determining the liquidation of the resulting 
obligations. Even if sound economic policies 
prevailed in the world at the end of the last war, 
the volume of international trade coidd scarcely 
have risen fast enough to provide a vehicle for 
a satisfactory liquidation of war debts, super- 
unposed as they were on the already existing 
and currently ci'eated debt obligations. It is 
far more likely that, under the most favorable 
conditions, attempts to collect the war debts, 
because of their magnitude and because they 
had been incurred in the process of destruction, 
would have been a seriously retarding factor. 
As it was, they proved to be a strangling dead 
hand. 

In many countries, especially of Europe, a 
greater and greater share of economic effort was 
directed into the field of armaments. In many 
countries much economic effort was wasted in 
unproductive enterprise. Technological prog- 
ress was going on rapidly in some countries and 
slowly in others, and this fact made it difficult 
for the lagging countries to maintain their 



MARCH 7, 1942 



215 



internatioiiiil competitive position. Little 
attention was given to the development of eco- 
nomically backward areas. Inadequate atten- 
tion was given to the distribution of national 
income. The volume of useful production and 
the volume of consumption, retarded by the 
commercial policies which were being pursued, 
were still further held back by these and other 
domestic factors. 

Each nation pursued its economic policies, 
both domestic and international, in jealously 
guarded independence from the rest of the 
world. International economic conferences 
were conspicuous for an almost complete non- 
existence of cooperative effort and a resulting 
absence of constructive achievements. 

Into this world of contradictory and discord- 
ant policies, several countries — most of all, the 
United States — poured capital funds on a vast 
scale. During the first post-war decade we ex- 
ported huge amounts of capital to A^arious parts 
of the world in the form of loans and invest- 
ments. Great Britain was also an exporter of 
capital on a large scale. France sent abroad 
large amounts of capital in the form of short- 
term investments. To a lesser extent capital was 
exported by Holland, Switzerland, and Sweden. 

All these movements of funds created an arti- 
ficial prosperity in both the lending and the bor- 
rowing countries and enabled the latter to main- 
tain a precarious solvency. In fact, a large part 
of the movements of capital merely made it pos- 
sible for the debtor countries to meet their cur- 
rent debt payments, which, of course, constantly 
increased the volume of their total obligations. 

In our case, foreign lending enabled us to 
maintain our exports at a relatively high level, 
while we put formidable obstacles in the way of 
our imports. In these circumstances — since we 
insisted at the same time upon collecting inter- 
est, dividend, and amortization payments owing 
us on both the war and the non-war debt ac- 
counts — a substantial part of our foreign loans 
served solely to provide the rest of the world 
with dollars for meeting a large portion of its 
debt payments to us. 

Our foreign lending was utterly haphazard. 
Little or no attention was given to the economic 



implications of the export of capital. The lend- 
ing process was unrelated either to our other 
international economic policies or to the policies 
pursued by other nations. Only by continued 
lending could we, for a time at least, disguise 
the contradictory and inherently unsound na- 
ture of our commercial and debt-collection pol- 
icies, and postpone, both for ourselves and for 
the rest of the world, the inevitable day of 
reckoning. 

Foreign lending by other countries was on no 
healthier basis than ours. Moreover, much of 
the movement of funds was in the form of short- 
term loans, subject to sudden demands for re- 
payment, thus introducing another factor of in- 
stability into an already unstable situation. 

Had international lending, on a scale on 
which it actually took place, occurred at a time 
when sound rather than unsound policies pre- 
vailed in the world, and on a healthy basis, it 
would have, undoubtedly, resulted in a vast and 
immensely beneficial expansion of production 
and trade and in a general increase of national 
and individual welfare. It would also have 
contributed greatly to economic stability every- 
where. As it was, much of it was wasted as a 
mere unproductive channel for the transfer of 
debt payments, and the rest served as an arti- 
ficial and necessarily temporary stimulus, under 
the influence of which world production and 
world trade did rise, but at an inadequate rate 
and, in too many instances, in undesirable 
directions. 

A situation was created in which the debtor 
nations of the world found themselves in the 
jiosition of a person whose debts grow faster 
than his income, forced — in part by his own 
actions and in part by the actions of his cred- 
itors — either to devote a larger and larger share 
of his income to debt payments, or to borrow 
more and still more in order to maintain an 
artificial prosperity and a precarious solvency, 
fuially going banki*upt when the stream of lend- 
ing begins to dry up while at the same time 
demands for repayment grow more insistent, 
and dragging down to disaster not only himself 
but his imprudent creditors as well. 

This was precisely what happened to the 
world at the end of the first post-war decade and 



216 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtJLLETIN 



was one of the decisive factors responsible for 
the oncoming of the great depression, and espe- 
cially for its depth and duration. Thereafter, 
for nearly another decade, the world lived 
through a period of economic stagnation, high- 
lighted by savage and disastrous economic 
warfare. 

V 

During the thirties some nations, in an effort 
to preserve monetary stability and financial sol- 
vency, subjected their imports to rigid and far- 
reaching regulation and devised means of forc- 
ing their exjjorts. This was accomplished 
through such devices as heightened tariffs, em- 
bargoes, quotas, exchange controls, multiple 
currencies, subsidies, and a whole arsenal of 
other weapons of economic warfare. Since — to 
repeat — one nation's imports are the exports of 
another or other nations, the latter naturally 
reacted by augmenting their own trade barriers. 
A vicious spiral of retaliation and counter- 
retaliation was set into motion. International 
trade was rapidly dwindling, and what re- 
mained was bemg strait-jacketed more and more 
into a system of narrow bilateral relationships. 

One commercially important nation, Nazi 
Germany, adopted trade regimentation and 
narrow bilateralism, not for economic reasons 
but as an adjunct of political action — as an im- 
portant part of her machinery for carrying out 
a program of reaimament on a vast scale. This 
required a high degree of selection as regards 
imports to make sure that materials necessary 
for armaments were procured. It required the 
forcing of exports to pay for the imports. 
Since, however, a disproportionate share of both 
the productive equipment and the imported raw 
materials was diverted to armament production, 
the volume of available exports tended to fall 
short of the amounts required to pay for im- 
ports. The difference was made up through the 
operation of the bilateral balancing system — 
that is, through the use of blocked marks which 
represented enforced loans to Germany by the 
countries from which she made her purchases. 

By all these devices and because of the more 
or less complacent acquiescence on the part of 
other countries, Germany succeeded in obtaining 



the imports necessary for building up a power- 
ful war machine but not for avoiding, at the 
same time, the necessity for sacrificing butter 
for guns. Even so, as time went on, Germany 
encountered great and increasing difficulties in 
the operation of her trade system. This was the 
result of a growing unwillingness on the part 
of other countries both to limit the utilization of 
the proceeds of their sales to Germany to the 
range of commodities which Germany was in a 
position to furnish and to supply Germany with 
substantial amounts of commodities on the basis 
of enforced credit — these conditions necessarily 
arising out of the operation of the bilateral bal- 
ancing system. It is not devoid of significance 
that in 1938, despite Hitler's desperate an- 
nouncement that Germany "must expoi't or die", 
her volume of exports was only 59 percent of the 
1929 level, whereas the figure for Great Britain 
was 74 percent, and for the United States, 79 
pei'cent. 

It is arguable that the war came just in time 
to save Germany from a really embarrassing 
economic situation. It is even arguable that 
Germany began the war when she did in part, 
at least, for that very reason. 

The German leaders themselves, in the end, 
had no illusions as to the real effectiveness of 
their trade system. Some of them finally came 
to regard it as, at best, a temporary expedient 
and hoped fervently for an eventual return to 
more or less normal international economic re- 
lations. Others — perhaps most — looked upon 
it from the start as merely an instrument of 
preparation for war, to be replaced after an 
armed victory by a system of exploitation of 
conquered territories on the basis of permanent 
military controls. In the meantime Germany's 
trade policies and measures wei'e a powerful 
factor in the continuing disruption of interna- 
tional trade relations. 

Olher countries employing the same methods, 
even though they did not use them as did Ger- 
many primarily for preparation for war, not 
only invariably found their foreign commerce — 
both exports and imports — leduced and their 
living standards depressed but did not even suc- 
ceed in preserving either their monetary sta- 



MARCH 7, 1942 



217 



bility or (lieir financial solvency. This was 
inevitable because drastic trade controls and 
artificial diversion of trade, through wholesale 
discrimination and through the forcing of trade 
balancing into bilateral channels, inescapably 
reduced both the volume and the economic use- 
fulness of international commerce. 

Whatever was the official justification for the 
use of these methods, the real underlying 
thought in many cases was that it was possible 
for individual nations, confronted with grave 
financial difficulties resulting largely from a 
break-down of international economic coopera- 
tion, to achieve economic salvation or to attain 
other national objectives through independent 
national action necessarily involving varying 
degrees of acute international economic war- 
fare. In some instances, elaborate theories were 
advanced to prove that such independence of 
national action was inherently preferable. In 
practice, apart from Germany's success in the 
armament field, the only result was a continued 
stagnation of world trade, which brought im- 
mense injury to all nations and, most of all, to 
those very nations which sought the greatest 
measure of independent national action and 
employed, therefore, the strongest weapons of 
economic warfare. 

The I'esulting and ever-growing economic dis- 
location was intensified by — and, in turn, served 
to intensifj' — a rapid deterioration of interna- 
tional political relationships. All this finally 
culminated in the supreme catastrophe of a new 
world war. 

In this tragic situation, the most significant 
factor oi:)erating toward arresting and reversing 
the fatal trend was this country's trade-agree- 
ments program, which was vigorously pursued 
under the inspiring leadership of Cordell Hull. 
By means of reciprocal trade agreements we 
sought to bring about an elimination or at least 
a progressive reduction of quotas, prohibitive 
tariffs, and other exaggerated import restric- 
tions, which were directly and drastically cur- 
tailing the volume of trade. By basing our 
policy on the widest possible application of the 
unconditional most-favored-nation principle, 
we sought the elimination of the various devices 



for discriminatory commercial treatment and 
trade diversion which were forcing much of the 
diminished world commerce into artificial chan- 
nels, and thereby were reducing still further 
both the volume and the usefulness of interna- 
tional trade. At the same time, this country 
repeatedly expressed its willingness to enter 
into api^ropriate arrangements for the stabili- 
zation of international currency relationships. 
All these were clearly indispensable steps in the 
direction of ridding the world of conditions of 
economic warfare, which had such disastrous 
effects both on the economic well-being and the 
political stability of the world. 

The substantial progress made in this direc- 
tion during the years immediately preceding 
the war was interrupted by the outbreak of hos- 
tilities. Under war conditions all the aspects 
of pre-war economic warfare have become 
greatly intensified, and, in addition, new weap- 
ons of this type have been and are being con- 
stantly forged. This is inevitable, since, under 
modern conditions, economic warfare is an inte- 
gral part of military effort. But when the war 
is over, mankind will inevitably find itself in an 
even sorrier economic plight than was the case 
after the last war, unless vigorous and deter- 
mined action is taken toward as rapid as possible 
elimination of conditions of economic warfare 
and toward the creation of conditions of eco- 
nomic peace. 

VI 

After this conflict, as after the last, the transi- 
tion from war to peace will involve two princi- 
pal stages: demobilization and reconstruction. 
The two stages will, of course, overlap. 

Some of the problems of the immediate post- 
war or demobilization period are obvious. 
Many areas of the world will be in desperate 
need of food, clothing, medical .supplies, and 
other necessities of which, their larders will have 
been swept bare by the war and the looting tac- 
tics of the invaders. These urgent needs will 
have to be met quickly, both for humanitarian 
reasons and for the purpose of minimizing the 
chances of social upheavals. 

The task of putting into effect the necessary 
arrangements will, in any event, be gi'eatly com- 



218 

plicated by the difficulties which will, unques- 
tionably, be involved in setting up effective 
administrations in many of what are now 
belligerent or invaded countries. The speed 
with which relief is provided may be a decisive 
factor in easing or even obviating some of these 
difficulties. 

The measures of relief will, of course, be only 
a part of the immediate post-war problem. No 
nation will want to remain long an object of 
charity, nor will any nation, even the United 
States, be able to provide such charity indefi- 
nitely. The real demobilization process — re- 
turn to peaceful employment of millions of men 
comprising the fighting forces or working in 
war production, and re-orientation of agricul- 
tural and especially industrial plants and 
equipment from military to peaceful pui'suits — 
will have to begin very soon after the war. 

This will require, among other things, for a 
number of countries the re-constitution, largely 
through importation, of stocks of many i-aw 
materials and basic foodstuffs, which will un- 
questionably be at a low point everywhere, and 
the acquisition of necessary machinery and 
other equipment. All this will call for a larger 
volume of means of foreign payment than prac- 
tically any country of Europe and Asia will pos- 
sess for some time. 

The meeting of these needs will also involve 
many complex and difficult problems for our 
country and for those other areas which will 
be in a position to supply the necessary re- 
sources. The task of aiding in the reconstruc- 
tion of other countries will be superimposed 
upon the task of these countries' own demobili- 
zation and of re-conversion of their own produc- 
tion from military to peaceful ends. 

These phases of the demobilization process 
will naturally extend over periods which will 
vary from country to country. But they will, 
in all cases, be also the initial phases of the 
longer-range reconstruction process. The poli- 
cies pursued in connection with both processes 
should, therefore, be carefully and closely inte- 
grated from the point of view of basic objectives 



DEPARTMEJfT OF STATE BTJLLETEN 

and of the best means of attaining those objec- 
tives. If we want to make sure, this time, that 
post-war reconstruction policies will really be 
directed toward winning the peace, we must 
make sure that the cessation of armed hostili- 
ties will not be followed by a continuation of 
economic warfare. 

Lack of determination to abandon the policies 
and practices of economic warfare will be the 
greatest danger that can confront us after the 
war. Plenty of reasons for continuing such 
policies and practices will be advanced, as they 
were after the last war. Yet it will not mat- 
ter whether economic warfare will be employed 
in the post-war era for selfish and predatory 
reasons; or as an instrument of other policies; 
or on the basis of a defeatist acceptance of what 
appears to be the line of least resistance; or as 
an inevitable consequence of action based on 
the theory that the solution of the problems 
of economic stability, full employment and ris- 
ing living standards can and should be sought 
predominantly, or even solely, in terms of na- 
tional economies and of domestic measures and 
controls, and that the resultant sacrifice of for- 
eign trade should be accepted as inconsequen- 
tial. In all cases, it will lead only to economic 
stagnation or worse. 

Hence, while doing everything that is neces- 
sary to win the war, no effort should be spared 
to develop, in our country and in all countries 
which are now embattled against the forces of 
conquest, a firm determination to follow reso- 
lutely a course which would bring us to eco- 
nomic peace, and to chart that course well ahead 
of the time when we shall have to face the 
problems of post-war reconstruction. 

There is no mystery as to the nature of the 
economic problems which will confront us after 
the war. In the international field, apart from 
making adequate preparation for handling the 
immediate problems of relief and demobiliza- 
tion, some of the more important ones will be 
as follows : 

1. To rebuild the machinery of sound inter- 
national commercial relations by dealing with 



MARCH 7, 1942 



219 



such problems as import restrictions, non-dis- 
criminatory treatment, access to raw materials, 
commodity agreements, export subsidies, in- 
direct protectionism, shipping, etc. 

2. To create appropriate arrangements for 
the stabilization of foreign-exchange rates and 
for encouraging freedom of foreign-exchange 
transactions, including such problems as the 
role of gold and the use of other monetary 
techniques. 

3. To create eflFective machinery of interna- 
tional credit and investment, designed to pro- 
mote the functioning of international trade, 
the establishment and maintenance of monetary 
stability, the development of the world's re- 
sources, and the assurance of a timely and ade- 
quate flow of funds from financially stronger 
to financially weaker countries for the purpose 
of assisting them in reducing the amplitude of 
economic fluctuations, and thereby contributing 
to general economic stability, and to bring 
about, where necessary, adjustment of existing 
intei-national obligations. 

4. To set up other necessary mechanisms for 
implementing the various phases of economic 
collaboration among nations, as regards both in- 
ternational policies and measures and appro- 
priate international coordination of domestic 
policies and measures, without agreement on 
both of which no satisfactory solution is pos- 
sible for the crucial problems of economic sta- 
bility, full employment, and rising living 
standards. 

Action in all these fields must be initiated as 
speedily as possible after the termination of 
hostilities. It obviously cannot be completed 
overnight. It must be of a continuing and 
progressive character and must necessarily pro- 
ceed through a series of step-by-step adjust- 
ments. What is clearly needed, therefore, is 
agreement among the nations on broad objec- 
tives, and utmost care in choosing transitional 
policies in such a way that they will facilitate 
rather than retard or even render impossible 
the attainment of these objectives. 



vn 

Important steps have already been taken to 
this end. 

For several months an Allied Committee has 
been at work in London on the problem of 
post-war relief requirements. Many countries, 
including ours, are represented on that Com- 
mittee. 

In November the International Labor Con- 
ference in New York decided to create an inter- 
national committee for the study of post-war 
economic problems. Like the International 
Labor Organization itself, the committee has 
tripartite representation — government, labor, 
and employers. 

The Rio de Janeiro Meeting of the Ministers 
of Foreign Affairs of the American Republics, 
in January, decided to convoke an Inter- Ameri- 
can Technical Economic Conference to consider 
programs for post-war reconstruction. Prepa- 
ration for this conference has been entrusted to 
the Inter-American Economic and Financial 
Advisory Committee, which has been in con- 
tinuous session in Washington for over two 
years. 

Last week a far-reaching agreement was 
signed in Washington between Great Britain 
and ourselves, setting forth the principles which 
are to govern the final settlement of obligations 
resulting from our Lend-Lease aid to Britain. 
That agreement contains, in its article VII, the 
following provision which is of enormous sig- 
nificance for the post-war period: 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the United Kingdom in re- 
turn for aid furnished under the Act of Con- 
gress of March 11, 1941, the terms and condi- 
tions thereof shall be such as not to burden com- 
merce between the two countries, but to promote 
mutually advantageous economic relations be- 
tween them and the betterment of world-wide 
economic relations. To that end, they shall in- 
clude provision for agreed action by the United 
States of America and the United Kingdom, 



220 



DEPARTMEISTT OF STATE BULLETIN 



open to particijoation by all other countries of 
like mind, directed to the expansion, by appro- 
priate international and domestic measures, of 
production, employment, and the exchange and 
consumption of goods, which are the material 
foundations of the liberty and welfare of all Tpeo- 
ples ; to the elimination of all forms of discrimi- 
natory treatment in international commerce, 
and to the reduction of tariffs and other trade 
barriers; and, in general, to the attainment of 
all the economic objectives set forth in the Joint 
Declaration made on August 12, 1941, by the 
President of the United States of America and 
the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. 

"At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments." 

The decision of the two Governments to en- 
gage in consultations along the lines of the first 
paragraph of this provision and to seek agree- 
ment on these matters with the govermnents of 
all other like-minded nations marks tremendous 
progress toward effective implementation of the 
economic objectives and the high social aims of 
the Atlantic Declaration. 

All appropriate departments and agencies of 
our Government are hard at work in their re- 
spective fields on problems of the future as well 



as of the present. Throughout the war we have 
continued, wherever possible, to negotiate mu- 
tually beneficial reciprocal trade agreements and 
thus to keep alive, as a powerful instrument of 
post-war action, a policy which has proved in 
the past so important a factor in the promotion 
of economic peace. The International Wlicat 
Meeting, which has been at work in Washington 
for several months, is attempting to find a solu- 
tion for one of the most troublesome commodity 
problems. Many private groups in the country 
are giving hard thought to the problems of the 
future and are cooperating splendidly with the 
Government. 

All these are significant steps toward laying a 
foundation of economic peace for the post-war 
period. As time goes on, others undoubtedly 
will be undertaken. There is more than a good 
chance that we shall emerge from this war with 
the techniques for economic peace reasonably 
well worked out and ready to be applied. 
TVliether or not these techniques will actually be 
translated into a functioning machinery of eco- 
nomic peace will depend overwhelmingly upon 
whether or not the people of our country and of 
other countries will have a clear understanding 
of the issues at stake and the necessary resolu- 
tion to act on that understanding. So far as 
our covmtry is concerned, an organization like 
yours has an unrivaled opportunity to help our 
people to that understanding and to help 
strengthen that resolution. 



PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED NATIONALS, 
SUPPLEMENT 1 TO REVISION I 



[Released to the press M.irch 1] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attorney 
General, the Secretary of Commerce, the Board 
of Economic Warfare, and the Coordinator of 
Inter-American Affairs, on March 1 issued Sup- 
plement 1 to Revision I of the Proclaimed List 
of Certain Blocked Nationals, promulgated Feb- 
ruary 7, 1942. 

Part I of this supplement contains 844 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 29 deletions. Part II contains 81 additional 



listings outside the American republics and 3 
deletions. 

The Banco Aleman Antioqueno in Colombia 
is deleted in this supplement in connection 
with a contemporaneous reorganization elimi- 
nating German influence, placing the manage- 
ment and control of the bank in Colombian 
hands, and changing the name of the.bank. The 
new name, to be determined by the new board of 
directors at a meeting to be held on March 1, 
will probably be Banco Commercial Antioqueno. 



Commercial Policy 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH ECUADOR REGARDING TRADE AGREEMENT 



[Released to the press March 6] 

In notes dated March 2, 1942, which were ex- 
changed at Quito by Mr. Boaz Long, the Ameri- 
can Minister at Quito, and Dr. Julio Tobar 
Donoso, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
Ecuador, the Governments of the United States 
and Ecuador have entered into an understand- 
ing with regard to certain provisions of the 
trade agreement signed on August 6, 1938, as 
amended (Executive Agreement Series 133). 

The notes refer to the difficult financial situ- 
ation confronting Ecuador and the necessity, 
as an emergency revenue measure, of increasing 
customs charges on dutiable imports from all 
sources. The notes record the understanding 
that, in these circumstances, the Government of 
the United States agrees not to invoke the perti- 
nent provisions of the trade agreement in re- 
spect of the application of such increased 
charges to products imported from the United 
States for which a rate of duty is specified in 
schedule I of the agreement. 

The increased charges will not become effec- 
tive prior to April 1, 1942, and it is miderstood 
that they will be reduced and ultimately re- 
moved when Ecuador's financial position has 
suflBciently improved to warrant such action. 

The notes also contain provisions relating to 
foreign -exchange control and, in addition, make 
clear that nothing in the notes or in the trade 
agreement shall prevent the adoption or enforce- 
ment by either country of measures relating to 
public security, or imposed for the protection of 
the country's essential interests in time of war 
or other national emergency. 

A translation of the text of the note from Dr. 
Julio Tobar Donoso, Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs of Ecuador, to Mr. Boaz Long, American 
Minister at Quito, is printed below. The reply 
to this note was confirmatory. 



"Excellency : 

"I have the honor to refer to recent conversa- 
tions which have taken place with regard to the 
financial emergency with which the Government 
of the Republic of Ecuador is confronted and, 
in that connection, to certain provisions of the 
trade agreement between the Republic of Ecua- 
dor and the United States of America signed at 
Quito on August 6, 1938, as amended by notes 
exchanged at Quito on August 6, 1938, Septem- 
ber 9, 1938, and September 13, 1938. 

"In the course of these conversations, it has 
been pointed out that the Government of the 
Republic of Ecuador finds it necessary, as a 
fiscal measure designed solely to meet the exist- 
ing financial emergency, to augment customs 
revenues, which make up such a large percent- 
age of total revenues, to an extent deemed neces- 
sary to safeguard vital interests of the nation. 

"Consideration was given to the possibility of 
terminating both schedules of the trade agree- 
ment as a way out of the difficulty ; but neither 
Government desired to adopt this course if it 
could be avoided. Therefore, the conversations 
to which I have referred have disclosed a mutual 
understanding which is as follows : 

"In view of the existing circumstances, the 
Government of the United States of America 
will not invoke the provisions of Article I of 
the trade agreement in respect of the applica- 
tion of the proposed increase in customs charges 
to articles imported into Ecuador from the 
United States which are included in Schedule I 
of the agreement. It is understood that such 
increase will be applied generally to all dutiable 
imports from all foreign countries, and will not 
become effective, with regard to imports from 
the United States, prior to the expiration of 
thirty days from the date of this note. It is 
understood, further, that such increase will be 



221 



222 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



reduced and ultimately removed as soon as 
Ecuador's fiscal situation improves sufficiently 
to warrant such action. 

"I also desire to take this occasion to confirm 
the understanding which has been reached be- 
tween the Government of the Republic of 
Ecuador and the Government of the United 
States of America that, notwithstanding the 
provisions of Article X of the trade agreement, 
concerning the control of foreign exchange 
transactions relating to trade between the two 
countries, the Governments of the two coun- 
tries agree to apply and administer any such 
control as follows: 

"1. If the Government of either country 
establishes or maintains any foi-ra of control 
of the means of international payment, it shall 
accord unconditional most - favored - nation 
treatment to the commerce of the other coun- 
try with respect to all aspects of such control. 

"2. The Government establishing or main- 
taining such control shall impose no prohibi- 
tion, restriction or delay on the transfer of pay- 
ment for any article the gi-owth, produce or 
manufacture of the other country which is not 
imposed on the transfer of payment for the 
like article the growth, produce or manufac- 
ture of any third country. With respect to 
rates of exchange and with respect to taxes or 
charges on exchange transactions, articles the 
growth, produce or manufacture of the other 
country shall be accorded unconditionally 
treatment no less favorable than that accorded 
to the like articles the growth, produce or man- 
ufacture of any third country. The forego- 
ing provisions shall also extend to the appli- 
cation of such control to payments necessary 
for or incidental to the importation of articles 
the growth, produce or manufacture of the 
other country. In general, the control shall be 
administered so as not to influence to the dis- 
advantage of the other country the competitive 
relationships between articles the growth, prod- 
uce or manufacture of that country and like 
articles the growth, produce or manufacture of 
third countries. 



"It is further understood that nothing in the 
provisions of paragraphs 1 or 2, above, or in 
the trade agreement of August 6, 1938, as 
amended, shall prevent the adoption or en- 
forcement by either country of measures re- 
lating to public security, or imposed for the 
pi'otection of the country's essential interests 
in time of war or other national emergency. 

"I avail [etc.]" 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



EIGHTH PAN AMERICAN 
CHILD CONGRESS 

[Released to the press March 5] 

The Eighth Pan American Child Congress 
will be held in Washington, D.C., May 2-9, 
1942. The Organizing Committee appointed 
by the Secretary of State to develop plans for 
the Congress has held its fourth meeting and 
has approved suggestions received from some of 
the other American republics that it is more 
necessary than ever to review the problems of 
maternal and child welfare in the light of the 
war situation and that the agenda originally 
adopted should be modified to provide for the 
study of problems which have arisen or which 
may arise in the future in connection with serv- 
ices for the protection of mothers and children. 

The Congress will deal with: Health protec- 
tion and medical care; education and recre- 
ation ; economic and social services for families 
and children ; and with inter- American coopera- 
tion in these fields. Progress made since the 
last Congress, which was held in Mexico City 
in 1935, will be reviewed. Special attention 
will be given to the discussion of measures for 
maintaining and strengthening essential serv- 
ices for mothers and children to meet wartime 
needs, as well as to special measures for the 
protection of children in wartime and to recom- 
mendations as to general standards for child 



MARCH 7, 1942 



223 



welfare and inter-American cooperation for the 
protection of childhood in the post-war world. 

Accordin<>ly, the Organizing Committee has 
revised the previously distributed regulations 
and agenda of the Congress to conform with the 
scope and concept of the meeting as amended 
in the light of war conditions. The revised 
regulations and agenda replacing the earlier 
documents are being forwarded to the invited 
governments and to the interested individuals 
and organizations in all the American republics. 

Miss Katharine F. Lenroot, Chief of the Chil- 
dren's Bureau, Department of Labor, and 
United States member of the International 
Council of the American International Insti- 
tute for the Protection of Childhood of Monte- 
video, is Chairman of the Organizing Commit- 
tee of the Congress. The other members are: 
William G. Carr, Ph.D., Associate Secretary, 
National Education Association, Washington. 
D.C. ; Henry F. Hehnholz, M.D., Professor of 
Pediatrics, Mayo Foundation of the University 
of Miimesota, Rochester, Minn.; Warren 
Kelchner, Ph.D., Chief, Division of Interna- 
tional Conferences, Department of State, Wash- 
ington, D.C; The Right Reverend Monsignor 
Bryan J. McEntegart, President, National Con- 
ference of Catholic Charities, New York, N.Y. ; 
Thomas Parran, M. D., Surgeon General, United 
States Public Health Service, Federal Security 
Agency ; and John W. Studebaker, LL.D., Com- 
missioner, United States Office of Education, 
Federal Security Agency. Mrs. Elisabeth 
Shirley Enochs, Office of the Chief, Children's 
Bureau, Department of Labor, Washington, 
D.C, is Secretary of the Committee. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Selden Chapin, a Foreign Service officer 
of class IV, has been designated an Assistant 
Chief of the Division of the American Repub- 
lics, effective as of Januaiy 20, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1032). 



]Mr. Hugh S. Cumniing, Jr., has been ap- 
pointed an Assistant Chief of the Division of 
European Affairs, effective as of February 16, 
1942 (Departmental Order 1030). 

Mr. Donald C Blaisdell has been appointed 
an Assistant Chief of the Division of Studies 
and Statistics, effective as of February 16, 1942 
(Departmental Order 1031). 

Mr. William L. Scliurz has been appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Division of Cultural Re- 
lations, effective as of February 16, 1942 (De- 
partmental Order 1034). 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press March 7] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since February 28, 
1942: 

Stuart Allen, of St. Paul, Minn., Consul at 
Georgetown, British Guiana, has been assigned 
as Consul at Vancouver, British Columbia, 
Canada. 

D. Chadwick Braggiotti, of New York, N. Y., 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Riohacha, 
Colombia. 

F. Willard Calder, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at London, England, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Belfast, Northern Ireland. 

Juan de Zengotita, of Philadelphia, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Habana, Cuba, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Ciicuta, Colombia, where an 
American Consulate will be established. 

Jack G. Dwyre, of Boulder, Colo., Vice Consul 
at Guayaquil, Ecuador, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Arequipa, Peru, where an American 
Vice Consulate will be established. 

Samuel G. Ebling, of Bellefontaine, Ohio, 
Consul at Izmir, Turkey, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Tehran, Iran, and will serve in dual capacity. 



224 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Hugh S. Fullerton, of Springfield, Ohio, Con- 
sul General at Marseille, France, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

Randolph Harrison, Jr., of Lynchburg, Va., 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 

Alden M. Haupt, of Chicago, 111., Vice Consul 
at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Embassy 
and Vice Consul at Moscow, U. S. S. E., and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Frederick P. Hibbard, of Denison, Tex., Coun- 
selor of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, has been 
designated Counselor of Legation at Monrovia, 
Liberia. 

Ellis A. Johnson, of Springfield, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Istanbul, Turkey, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Izmir, Turkey. 

Hugh Millard, of Omaha, Nebr., First Secre- 
tary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugal, has been 
designated Counselor of Legation at Lisbon, 
Portugal. 

James S. Moose, Jr., of Morrillton, Ark., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Tehi-an, Iran, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Jidda, 
Saudi Arabia, where an American Legation will 
be established. Mr. Moose will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Edward Page, Jr., of West Newton, Mass., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated Second Secretaiy of Embassy 
and Consul at Moscow, U.S.S.R., and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Kenneth S. Patton, of Charlottesville, Va., 
formerly Consul General at Singapore, Straits 
Settlements, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Thomas H. Robinson, of Princeton, N. J., 
Consul at Vancouver, British Columbia, Can- 
ada, has been assigned as Consul at Barran- 
quilla, Colombia. 

John M. Slaughter, of South Bend, Ind., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Guayaquil, 
Ecuador. 



The assignment of Woodruff Wallner, of New 
York, N. Y., as Vice Consul at Tunis, Tunisia, 
has been canceled. 

William L. S. Williams, of Racine, Wis., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Caripito, Vene- 
zuela, where an American Vice Consulate will 
be established. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO UNITED STATES OF 
BRAZILIAN EDUCATOR 

Dr. Hernane Tavares Nuner de Sa, eminent 
Brazilian educator, arrived in this country in 
January for six weeks' research at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina under the auspices of 
the Institute of International Education. Dr. 
Tavares is well known as a newspaper writer 
and radio commentator and is professor of edu- 
cational biology at the University of Sao Paulo. 
In addition to his scientific investigations, he is 
especially interested in the history and litera- 
ture of the United States. 



Legislation 



To Amend the Nationality Act of 1940 : Hearings Before 
a subcommittee of the Committee on Immigration, 
United States Senate, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 
6250, an Act To Amend the Nationality Act of 1940, 
February 17, 18, and 19, 1942. iv, 81 pp. 

An Act Making additional appropriations for the na- 
tional defense for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1942, 
and for other purposes. Approved March 5, 1942. 
[H.R. 6611.] Public Law 474, 77th COng. 5 pp. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



FINANCE 

Double Income Taxation Convention 
With Canada 

[Released to the press March 4] 

A convention between the United States and 
Canada for the avoidance of double income tax- 
ation and an accompanying protocol were signed 
at 4 p.m. on March 4, 1942 by Mr. Sumner 
Welles, Acting Secretary of State, and Mr. 
Leighton McCarthy, K.C., Minister of Canada 
at Washington. 

The convention, concluded with a view to re- 
moving an important impediment to interna- 
tional trade, jirovides for the avoidance of 
double income taxation in certain cases, the mod- 
ification of certain conflicting principles of tax- 
ation, reductions of certain rates of taxation, 
and the establishment of an exchange of infor- 
mation between the United States and Canada 
in the field of income taxation. The convention 
is in many respects similar to a convention for 
the avoidance of double taxation which has 
been in force between the United States and 
Sweden since January 1, 1940 (Treaty Series 
958). 

The protocol which accompanies the conven- 
tion contains definitions of terms used in the 
convention and provisions affecting certain 
matters incident to the administration of the 
convention. 

Upon the exchange of ratifications of the con- 
vention and protocol, they will become effective 
as of January 1, 1941, to continue in force for a 
period of three years thereafter, terminable at 
the end of the three-year period or on the first 
day of January of any year thereafter following 
the expiration of a six-month notice given by 
either Government. 



Agreements With Brazil 

An announcement regarding the conclusion 
between Brazil and the United States of a series 
of important agreements designed to fortify the 
security of the American republics, together 
with the exchange of notes between the Brazil- 
ian Minister of Finance and the Acting Secre- 
tary of State providing for a program of mo- 
bilization of the productive resources of Brazil, 
appears in this Bulletin under the heading "The 
War". 

COMMERCE 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 

[Released to the press March 2] 

The President signed on February 27, 1942 
a supplementary proclamation declaring that 
the Inter-American Coffee Agreement (Treaty 
Series 970), in accordance with the provisions 
of article XX of the agreement, entered into full 
force among all the signatory governments on 
December 31, 1941, the date on which the last 
of the instruments of ratification or approval by 
such signatory governments was deposited with 
the Pan American Union.^ 

Reciprocal Trade Agreement With Ecuador 

In an exchange of notes dated March 2, 1942 
between the American Minister to Ecuador and 
the Ecuadoran Foreign Minister, the Govern- 
ments of Ecuador and the United States entered 
into an understanding with regard to certain 
provisions of the trade agreement signed on 
August 6, 1938, as amended (Executive Agree- 
ment Series 133) . The texts of the notes appear 
in this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 



^ See the Bulletin of January 17, 1942, p. 71. 

225 



226 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PUBLICATIONS 

Agreement With El Salvador for the Exchange 
of Official Publications 

An agreement for the exchange of official pub- 
lications was entered into between the United 
States and EI Salvador by an exchange of notes 
dated November 21 and 27, 1941. 

Each Government has agreed to furnish to 
the other Government two partial sets of its 
official publications. The Library of Congress, 
Washington, D. C, will receive the Salvadoran 
publications and the Ministry for Foreign 
Affairs and the Biblioteca Nacional at San Sal- 
vador will receive the publications of the United 
States Government. The agreement, which be- 
came effective on November 27, 1941, will be 
published as Executive Agreement Series 230. 



General 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 



through January 1912, as shown in the re- 
ports submitted by persons and organizations 
registered with the Secretary of State for the 
solicitation and collection of contributions to 
be used for relief in belligerent countries, in 
conformity with the regulations issued pursu- 
ant to section 3 (a) of tlie act of May 1, 1937 
as made effective by the President's proclama- 
tions of September 5, 8, and 10, 1939, and sec- 
tion 8 of the act of November 4, 1939 as made 
effective by the President's proclamation of the 
the same date, has been released by the Depart- 
ment of State in mimeographed form and may 
be obtained from the Department upon request 
(press release of March 6, 1942, 45 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PnBLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIKECTOB OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



c 



MARCH 14, 1942 
Vol. VI, No, 142— Publication 1711 



ontents 



The War Page 

Anglo-American Caribbean Commission 229 

Bases leased from Great Britain in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 230 

Financial aid to Americans in enemy and enemy- 
occupied territory 230 

Advisory Mission to India 230 

General 

Passports for American seamen 231 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 231 

Treaty Information 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection 
and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 233 

Restriction of war: Convention for the Amelioration of 
the Condition of the Wounded and the Sick of 
Armies in the Field and Convention Relating to the 
Treatment of Prisoners of War 233 

Military mission: Detail of Assistant to the Adviser of 

the Remount Service of the Peruvian Army . . . 234 

Publications 234 

Legislation 234 




=a 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
APR 6 1942 



The War 



ANGLO-AMERICAN CARIBBEAN COMMISSION 



[Released to the press by the White House March 9] 

The following joint communique was released 
simultaneously in London and in Washington : 

"For the purpose of encouraging and 
strengthening social and economic cooperation 
between the United States of America and its 
possessions and bases in the area known geo- 
graphically and politically as the Caribbean, 
and the United Kingdom and the British colo- 
nies in the same area, and to avoid unnecessary 
duplication of research in these fields, a com- 
mission, to be known as the Anglo-American 
Caribbean Commission, has been jointly created 
by the two Governments. The Commission will 
consist of six members, three from each country, 
to be appointed respectively by the President of 
the United States and His Majesty's Govern- 
ment in the United Kingdom — who will desig- 
nate one member from each country as a 
co-chairman. 

"Members of the Commission will concern 
themselves primarily with matters pertaining to 
labor, agriculture, housing, health, education, 
social welfare, finance, economics, and related 
subjects in the territories under the British and 
United States flags within this territory, and 
on these matters will advise their respective 
Governments. 

"The Anglo-American Caribbean Commission 
in its studies and in the formulation of its rec- 
ommendations will necessarily bear in mind the 
desirability of close cooperation in social and 
economic matters between all regions adjacent 
to the Caribbean. 



"The following appointments of co-chairmen 
have been made : 

^'■For Great Britain: 

"Sir Frank Stockdale 
'■'■For the United States: 

"Charles W. Taussig 

"The remaining members of the Commission 
will be named later by the Govermnents con- 
cerned." 

In addition to naming Mr. Charles W. Taus- 
sig, of New York, as co-chairman for the United 
States of the Anglo-American Caribbean Com- 
mission, the President has selected as the other 
two American members of the Commission the 
Honorable Kexford G. Tugwell, Governor of 
Puerto Rico, and Mr. Coert du Bois, Chief of 
the Caribbean Office of the Department of State. 

He has also named as a Caribbean Advisory 
Committee Governor Tugwell and the Honor- 
able Martin Travieso, Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Puerto Rico; Judge William H. 
Hastie, Civilian Aide to the Secretary of War ; 
and Mr. Carl Robins, of California, formerly 
President of the Commodity Credit Corpora- 
tion, together with Mr. Charles W. Taussig, 
who is also chairman of this Committee. 

The study to be undertaken by the Caribbean 
Advisory Committee relates to the economic and 
social problems of the very large number of 
human beings in the British and American 
islands. The study is intended to improve the 
standards of living in all of the islands con- 
cerned. 

229 



230 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



It is, of course, clear that neither the Anglo- 
American Caribbean Commission nor the Presi- 
dent's Caribbean Advisory Committee has any 
authority other than the formulation of recom- 
mendations to be submitted, in the first instance, 
to the American and British Governments, and, 
in the second instance, to the President. 



BASES LEASED FROM GREAT BRITAIN 
IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

[Released to the press by the White House March 9] 

The President said on March 9 that reports 
have been brought to his attention that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States was considering 
requesting of the British Government an in- 
definite prolongation of the 99-year lease 
granted by the British Govermnent to the 
United States for the bases acquired in certain 
of the British colonies in the Western Hemi- 
sphere.^ The President made it clear that these 
reports were entirely untrue. 

He said that this Government had no inten- 
tion of requesting any modification of the agree- 
ments already reached; that the acquisition of 
the bases granted to the United States would be 
for the term of 99 years as fixed in those agree- 
ments ; and that the United States does not seek 
sovereignty over the islands or colonies on which 
the bases are located. 



friends, business associates, or other representa- 
tives in the United States. 

Private deposits to reimburse the Govern- 
ment for sums advanced should be made with 
the Department of State. Persons wishing to 
make such deposits should indicate the names 
of the beneficiaries and should remit by postal 
money orders or certified checks payable to the 
"Secretary of State of the United States". In 
the event it should be necessary, it is expected 
that small additional advances for medical and 
other necessary expenses will be made. 

Aliens, including alien spouses and alien 
children of American nationals, cannot qualify 
for payments from funds of the United States 
Government. 

However, in the cases of prisoners of war 
and interned civilians who are supported by 
the detaining power, it is expected that pay- 
ments made to them will generally not exceed 
a small sum sufficient to provide spending 
money for miscellaneous personal needs not sup- 
plied by the detaining power. No payments 
will be made to officers or to persons of equiva- 
lent status held as prisoners of war, who receive 
pay under the convention relating to the treat- 
ment of prisoners of war, signed at Geneva on 
July 27, 1929. 

Sums advanced will in all cases be limited as 
far as possible in order to prevent foreign ex- 
change becoming available to the enemy. 



FINANCIAL AID TO AMERICANS IN ENEMY 
AND ENEMY- OCCUPIED TERRITORY 

[Released to the press March 12] 

Arrangements have been completed to ad- 
vance small amounts of United States Govern- 
ment funds to American nationals remaining in 
enemy and enemy-occupied territories except 
the Philippine Islands, sufficient to meet the 
ordinary needs of existence. 

It is expected that sums advanced will be 
repaid either by the recipients or by relatives, 



' See the Bulletin of September 7, 1940, p. 201, an(} 
March 29, 1941, p. 387. 



ADVISORY MISSION TO INDIA 

[Released to the press March 9] 

The Department of State announced on 
March 9 the personnel of the Advisory Mission 
of the United States to assist the war effort in 
India. The personnel of the Mission follows : 

Col. Louis Johnson, former Assistant Secretary 
of War, chairman 

Honorable Henry F. Grady, former Assistant 
Secretary of State — general economic 
surveys 

Honorable Arthur W. Herrington, President, 
Society of Automotive Engineers — produc- 
tion of armored vehicles and automotive 
equipment 



MARCH 14, 1942 



231 



Honorable Harry E. Bcyster, President, Beys- 
ter Engineering Company — organization of 
plants for production 
Honorable Dirlv Dekker, Director of Personnel 
and Training, Illinois Steel Corporation — 
specialist in training unskilled workers into 
semiskilled and skilled workers 
It is understood that, should it appear advan- 
tageous, additional members may be added to 
the Mission to assist in solving specific technical 
problems. 



General 



PASSPORTS FOR AMERICAN SEAMEN 

[Released to the press March 10] 

Under the provisions of the rules and regula- 
tions prescribed by the Secretary of State on 
November 25, 1941 ^ pursuant to the authority 
gi-anted by the President's proclamation of 
November 14, 1941 and effective for the dura- 
tion of the emergency, American nationals fol- 
lowing the vocation of seaman were required 
to be in possession of valid passports in order 



to depart from the United States on or after 
January 15, 1942. This date was subsequently 
extended to March 15, 1942 and has now been 
extended until a further notice is given setting 
forth a definitive date. 

The Secretary of State has authorized col- 
lectors of customs at the various ports to accept 
the usual documents carried by American-citi- 
zen seamen in lieu of passports, in order that 
they may enter and depart from the United 
States prior to the establishment of a definitive 
date upon which passports will be required for 
this purpose. The collectors will also, of course, 
honor the passports which are now being issued 
to American-citizen seamen. 

Seamen should execute applications for their 
passports before the clerk of any Federal court 
or State court authorized by law to naturalize 
aliens, or before an agent of the Department of 
State. Passport agents of the Department are 
located in Boston (United States Post Office and 
Courthouse) ; Chicago (United States Court- 
house) ; San Francisco (Federal Office Build- 
ing) ; and Miami (Post Office Building). 

Because of the large number of seamen in the 
port of New York special arrangements are 
being made to handle their applications in the 
most expeditious manner. A notice regarding 
these arrangements will be made at a later date. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



On March 5, 1942 the Senate confirmed the 
nominations of the following officers as Am- 
bassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary or 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- 
tentiary of the United States of America to the 
countries listed: 

Pierre de L. Boal, of Pennsylvania, now E. E. 
and M. P. to Nicaragua, to be A. E. and P. to 
Bolivia. 



' Bulletin of November 29, 1941, p. 431. 



Arthur Bliss Lane, of New York, now E. E. 
and M. P. to Costa Eica, to be A. E. and P. to 
Colombia. 

Boaz Long, of New Mexico, now E. E. and 
M. P. to Ecuador, to be A. E. and P. to Ecuador. 

Wesley Frost, of Kentucky, now E. E. and 
M. P. to Paraguay, to be A. E. and P. to 
Paraguay. 

Robert M. Scotten, of Michigan, now E. E. 
and M. P. to the Dominican Republic, to b^ 
E. E. and M. P. to Costa Rica. 



232 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Avra M. Warren, of Maryland, now a Foreign 
Service officer of class I assigned to the De- 
partment of State as Chief of the Visa Division, 
to be E. E. and M. P. to the Dominican Kepublic. 

James B. Stewart, of New Mexico, now a 
Foreign Service officer of class I assigned as 
Consul General at Ziirich, to be E. E. and M. P. 
to Nicaragua. 

[Released to the press March 14] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since March 7, 1942 : 

Courtland Christiani, of Washington, D. C, 
formerly Vice Consul at Surabaya, Java, Neth- 
erlands Indies, has been appointed Vice Consul 
at Adelaide, South Australia. 

Mulford A. Colebrook, of New York, N. Y., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at London, England, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at London, England, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

V. Lansing Collins, 2d, of New York, N. Y., 
formerly Vice Consul at Batavia, Java, Nether- 
lands Indies, has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. 

Frederick J. Cunningham, of Boston, Mass., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Andrew W. Edson, of Meriden, Conn., for- 
merly Second Secretary of Legation at Bucha- 
rest, Rumania, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Overton G. Ellis, Jr., of Tacoma, Wash., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at San Salvador, El Salvador, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at San Salvador, El Salvador, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Perry Ellis, of Riverside, Calif., Vice Consul 
at Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Noumea, New 
Caledonia. 



T. Muldrup Forsyth, of Esmont, Va., for- 
merly Third Secretary of Legation at Bucha- 
rest, Rumania, has been assigned as Consul at 
Barcelona, Spain. 

Charles C. Gidney, Jr., of Plainview, Tex., 
Vice Consul at Maracaibo, Venezuela, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Lima, Peru. 

Robert Grinnell, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Darwin, Northern Territory, Aus- 
tralia, has been assigned as Vice Consul at Syd- 
ney, New South Wales, Australia. 

Donald R. Heath, of Topeka, Kans., First 
Secretary of Embassy at Santiago, Chile, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at San- 
tiago, Chile. 

Thomas S. Horn, of St. Louis, Mo., formerly 
Consul at Surabaya, Java, Netherlands Indies, 
has been assigned as Consul at Wellington, New 
Zealand. 

George C. Howard, of Washington, D. C, 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Bogota, Colombia, has been designated Com- 
mercial Attaclie at Bogota, Colombia. 

Charles E. Hulick, of Easton, Pa., formerly 
Clerk at Bucharest, Rumania, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at London, England. 

George Lewis Jones, Jr., of Parkton, Md., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Cairo, Egypt, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at Cairo, 
Egypt, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Herve J. L'Heureux, of Manchester, N. H., 
Consul at Lisbon, Portugal, has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

E. Allan Lightner, Jr., of Mountain Lakes, 
N. J., Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Stockholm, Sweden, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Stockholm, Sweden, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Robert Mills McClintock, of Altadena, Calif., 
Third Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Helsinki, Finland, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Helsinki, Finland, and will serve in dual ca- 
pacity. 



MARCH 14, 1942 

John H. Morgan, of Watertown, Mass., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Madrid, 
Spain, has been assigned for duty in the De- 
partment of State. 

WaUer S. Reineck, of Fremont, Ohio, Consul 
at Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, has 
been assigned as Consul at Regina, Saskatche- 
wan, Canada. 

William E. Scotten, of Pasadena, Calif., 
formerly Second Secretary of Legation at 
Bucharest, Rumania, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation and Consul at Tan- 
gier, Morocco, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Jesse F. Van Wickel, of Brooklyn, N.Y., 
formerly Consul at Batavia, Java, Netherlands 
Indies, has been assigned as Consul at Sydney, 
New South Wales, Australia. 

S. Walter Washington, of Charles Town, 
W. Va., Second Secretary of Legation and Con- 
sul at Stockholm, Sweden, has been designated 
First Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Stockliolm, Sweden, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 



233 

The following persons have been appointed 
Foreign Service Officers, Unclassified; Vice 
Consuls of Career ; and Secretaries in the Diplo- 
matic Service of the United States, and they 
have now been assigned as Vice Consuls at the 
posts indicated : 

Joseph N. Greene, Jr., of North An- 

dover, Mass Montreal 

Henry Hanson, Jr., of Middletown, 

Conn _( Vancouver 

Douglas Henderson, of Weston, 

Mass Col6n 

Armistead M. Lee, of Chatham, Va Toronto 

LaRue R. Lutkins, of Rye, N. Y Habana 

James L. O'SuUivan, of Orange, 

Conn Montreal 

Albert E. Pappano, of St. Louis, Mo_ Mexico, D.F. 
Henry L. Pitts, Jr., of New York, 

N. Y Mexico, D.F. 

Leslie Albion Squires, of Palo Alto, 

Calif Monterrey 

Walter J. Stoessel, Jr., of Beverly 

Hills, Calif , Windsor 

Jewell Truex, of Stockton, Calif Nuevo Laredo 

Richard E. Usher, of Madison, Wis Winnipeg 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation ia the Western Hemisphere 

Haiti 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union transmitted to the Secretary of State 
with a letter dated March 10, 1942 a certified 
copy of the partial list of the species of Haitian 
flora and fauna transmitted to the Pan Amer- 
ican Union by the Government of Haiti for in- 
clusion in the Amiex to the Convention on Na- 
ture Protection and Wildlife Preservation in the 
Western Hemisphere, which was opened for 
signature at the Pan American Union on Octo- 
ber 12, 1940. 



RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condi- 
tion of the Wounded and the Sick of Armies 
in the Field and Convention Relating to the 
Treatment of Prisoners of War 

El Salvador 

The American Minister at San Salvador trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a despatch 
dated March 5, 1942, a copy of a decree, with 
translation, published in the Diario Latino of 
March 5, 1942, whereby the National Legisla- 
tive Assembly approved the adherence of El 
Salvador to the Convention for the Ameliora- 
tion of the Condition of the Wounded and the 



234 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Sick of Armies in the Field and to the Conven- 
tion Kelating to the Treatment of Prisoners of 
War, both signed at Geneva July 27, 1929. 



MILITARY MISSION 

Detail of Assistant to the Adviser of the Remount 
Service of the Peruvian Army 

[Released to the press March 11] 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Peru, there was signed on March 11, 1942 by 
the Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Sumner 
Welles, and Seiior Don Manuel de Freyre y 
Santander, Ambassador of Peru at Washington, 
an agreement providing for the detail of an of- 
ficer of the United States Army of the grade of 
captain to serve as Assistant to the Adviser of 
the Remount Service of the Peruvian Army, 
provided for by the agreement for the appoint- 
ment of an Adviser of the grade of colonel, 
signed on April 15, 1941 (Executive Agreement 
Series 205). The agreement will continue in 
force for a period of three years. 



Publications 



Department of State 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals: 
Supplement 1, February 28, 1942, to Revision I of 
February 7, 1942. Publication 16'J8. 27 pp. Free. 

Diplomatic List, March 1942. Publication 1701. ii, 95 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 



Legislation 



Supplemental estimate of appropriation [$7,000 for 
passport agencies] and draft of proposed provision 
[pertaining to salaries of ambassadors and minis- 
ters]. Department of State. H. Doc. 656, 77th Cong. 
2 pp. 

Report [to Congress] on the first year of lend-lease 
operations. March 11, 1942. H. Doc. 661, 77th Cong. 
55 pp. 

An Act To provide for the planting of guayule and 
other rubber-bearing plants and to malie available 
a source of crude rubber for emergency and defense 
uses. Approved Marcli 5, 1942. [S. 2282.] Public 
Law 473, 77th Cong. 2 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C— Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 
FDBLI3HE0 WBUKLT WITH THB APPBOVAl. OP THB DtBECTOB OF THE BDBEAD Or THE BUDQET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



c 



MARCH 21, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 143— Publication 1712 



ontents 



The War Page 

Military highway to Alaska 237 

Chilean merchant marine 239 

Statement by the Acting Secretary of State 239 

Sulking of the Uruguayan vessel Montevideo 240 

Termination of coordination agreement with Costa 

Rica 240 

Preservation of assets by the Netherlands Government . 241 

Lend-lease operations 242 

Transfer of United States citizens from Canadian to 

United States armed forces 244 

Americans in the Far East 246 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 246 

Cultural Relations 

Cultural institutes in the other American republics . . 246 

Visit to the United States of educator from Panama . . 247 

Cultural relations officers 247 

Visit to the United States of Honduran artist and 

educator 247 

American Republics 

Inauguration of President of Chile 248 

[over] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMEI1I75 

APR 6 1942 







O /I t6 Al iS— CONTINUED 

Treaty Information page 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection and 

Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemisphere . 248 
Publications: Agreement With Liberia for the Ex- 
change of Official Publications 248 

Friendship: Treaty Between China and Iraq .... 249 
Alliance: Treaty of Alliance Between the United 

Kingdom and the Soviet Union, and Iran .... 249 
Transit: Exchange of Notes With Canada Regarding 

Construction of Military Highway to Alaska . . . 252 
Ai'med forces: Exchange of Notes With Canada Re- 
garding Transfer of United States Citizens From 
Canadian to United States Armed Forces .... 252 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 252 

Legislation 253 

Publications 253 



The War 



MILITARY HIGHWAY TO ALASKA 



[Released to the press March 18] 

The Acting Secretai-y of State released to the 
press on March 18 the texts of notes exchanged 
liy the Honorable Jay Pierrepont Moffat, Amer- 
ican Minister to Canada, and the Right Honor- 
able W. L. Mackenzie King, Prime Minister and 
Secretary of State for External Affairs of Can- 
ada, in regard to the detailed arriingements for 
the construction f)f a military highway to 
Alaska. 

The proposed construction of this military 
highway was taken up with the Canadian Gov- 
ernment on February 13, 1942. The Canadian 
Govermnent acquiesced immediately in the pro- 
jjosed surveys by the United States Amiy Engi- 
neers, and the first United States Army Engi- 
neers' officer arrived in Ottawa to discuss the 
detailed arrangements for these surveys on Feb- 
ruary 16. 

The Canadian Government suggested that the 
question of the construction of this military 
highway be referred to the Permanent Joint 
Board on Defense, United States and Canada, 
and that Board submitted a recommendation to 
the two Governments on February 26. On 
March 6 the Canadian Government announced 
its appi'oval of the recommendation of the Per- 
manent Joint Board on Defense and its accept- 
ance of the offer of the Government of the United 
States to construct this military highway. 

The detailed surveys which are being con- 
ducted by the United States Army Engineers' 
trooj^s are actively under way. 



The texts of the notes exchanged follow : 

The American Minkter to Canada to the 
Secretary of State for Exterrx^il Ajfairft of 
Canada 

"Ottawa, March 17, 191(2. 

"Sir: 

"1. As you are aware, on February 26, 1942, 
the Permanent Joint Board on Defense ap- 
proved a recommendation as a result of which 
the two Sections proposed to their respective 
Governments : 

" 'The construction of a highway along the 
route that follows the general line of airports. 
Fort St. John — Fort Nelson — Watson Lake — 
Whitehorse — Boundary — Big Delta, the respec- 
tive termini connecting with existing roads in 
Canada and Alaska.' 

"This recommendation, based as it was on 
military considerations and military consider- 
ations only, and having the endorsement of the 
Service Departments of the two countries, has 
been approved by both Governments. 

"2. My Government, being convinced of the 
urgent necessity for the construction of this 
highway and appreciating the burden of war 
expenditure already incurred by Canada, in 
particular on the construction of the air route 
to Alaska, is prepared to undertake the build- 
ing and wartime maintenance of the highway. 
Subject to the provision by Canada of the facil- 
ities set forth in paragrajDh 3 of this note, the 

237 



238 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



GoA'ernment of the United States is prepared 
to: 

"(A) carry out the necessary surveys for 
which preliminary arrangements have ah-eady 
been made, and construct a pioneer road by the 
use of United States Engineer troops for sur- 
veys and initial construction. 

"(B) Arrange for the highway's completion 
under contracts made by the United States 
Public Koads Administration and awarded 
with a view to insuring the execution of all con- 
tracts in the shortest possible time without re- 
gard to whether the contractors are Canadian 
or American ; 

"(C) maintain the highway until the ter- 
mination of the present war and for six months 
thereafter unless the Government of Canada 
prefers to assume responsibility at an earlier 
date for the maintenance of so much of it as lies 
in Canada; 

"(D) agree that at the conclusion of the war 
that part of the highway which lies in Canada 
shall become in all respects an integral part of 
the Canadian highway system, subject to the 
understanding that there shall at no time be 
imposed any discriminatory conditions in rela- 
tion to the use of the road as between Canadian 
and United States civilian traffic. 

"3. For its part, my Government will ask the 
Canadian Govermnent to agree : 

" ( A) to acquire rights-of-way for the road in 
Canada (including the settlement of all local 
claims in this connection), the title to remain 
in the Crown in the right of Canada or of the 
Province of British Columbia as appeal's more 
convenient ; 

" (B) to waive import duties, transit or simi- 
lar charges on shipments originating in the 
United States and to be transported over the 
highway to Alaska, or originating in Alaska 
and to be transported over the highway to the 
United States; 

"(C) to waive import duties, sales taxes, 
license fees or other similar charges on all equip- 
ment and supi^lies to be used in the construction 



or maintenance of the road by the United States 
and on personal effects of the construction per- 
sonnel ; 

"(D) to remit income tax on the income of 
persons (including corporations) resident in 
the United States who are employed on the con- 
struction or maintenance of the highway; 

"(E) to take the necessary steps to facilitate 
the admission into Canada of such United States 
citizens as may be employed on the construction 
or maintenance of the highway, it being under- 
stood that the United States will undertake to 
repatriate at its expense any such persons if the 
contractors fail to do so; 

"(F) to permit those in charge of the con- 
struction of the road to obtain timber, gravel 
and rock where such occurs on Crown lands in 
the neighborhood of the right-of-way, provid- 
ing that the timber required shall be cut in ac- 
cordance with the directions of the appropriate 
Department of the Government of the Province 
in which it is located, or, in the case of Domin- 
ion lands, in accoi'dance with the directions of 
the appropriate Department of the Canadian 
Government. 

"4. If the Government of Canada agrees to 
this proposal, it is suggested that the practical 
details involved in its execution be arranged 
directly between the appropriate Governmental 
agencies, subject, when desirable, to confirma- 
tion by subsequent exchange of notes. 
"5. Accept [etc.] 

PiEREEPONT Moffat, 
American Minister.''^ 



The Secretary of State for External Affairs of 
Canada to the American Minister to Canada 

"Ottaava, March 18, 194^. 
"Sir: 

"1. I have the honor to acknowledge the 
receipt of your note of March 17, 1942, in which 
you referred to the reconamendation approved 
by the Permanent Joint Board on Defense, as a 
result of which the two Sections of the Board 
proposed to their respective Governments : 



MARCH 21, 1942 

" 'The construction of a highway along the 
route that follows the general line of airports, 
Fort St. John — Fort Nelson — Watson Lake — 
Whitehorse — Boundary — Big Delta, the respec- 
tive termini connecting with existing roads in 
Canada and Alaska.' 

"2. As announced on March 6, 1942, the 
Canadian Government has approved this rec- 
ommendation and has accepted the offer of the 
United States Government to undertake the 
building and war time maintenance of the high- 
way which will connect the airports already 
constructed by Canada. 

"3. It is understood that the United States 
Government will : 

[Here follow items A to D under paragraph 2 
in the U. S. note.] 

"4. The Canadian Government agrees : 

[Here follow items A to F under paragraph 3 
in the U. S. note.] 

''5. The Canadian Government agrees to the 
suggestion that the practical details of the ar- 
rangement be worked out by direct contact be- 
tween the appropriate Governmental agencies 
subject, when desirable, to confirmation by sub- 
sequent exchange of notes. 
"Accept [etc.] 

W. L. Mackenzie King, 
Secretary of State for External Affairs.'''' 



CHILEAN MERCHANT MARINE 

[Released to the press March 20] 

The following note has been received by the 
Acting Secretary of State from the Chilean 
Ambassador, Senor Don Rodolfo Michels: 

"March 19, 1942. 
"The Honorable 

The Secretary of State. 
"Excellency : 

"Under instruction of my Government, I 
have the honor to bring to Your Excellency's 
knowledge that the naval authorities of Chile 



239 

have issued rules to be followed by vessels of 
Chilean registry which are as follows : 

"1. Chilean vessels of the Merchant Marine 
must, when on the high seas din-ing the hours 
of darkness, have all lights showing and carry 
;.n especially illuminated national flag. 

"2. They may only navigate the territorial 
waters of any American country in a state of 
war, or enter and depart from such country's 
ports, during the hours of daylight. 

"These measures have been adopted in an en- 
deavor to assure the safety of our Merchant 
Marine which is so valuable to the economic life 
of the country and the principal means of trans- 
portation for our commerce with the United 
States. 

"I beg leave to request that Your Excellency 
be good enough to bring the above rules to the 
attention of the competent authorities of the 
United States. 

Michels" 



STATEMENT BY THE ACTING 
SECRETARY OF STATE 

[Released to the press March 16] 

The technique of the "monstrous lie", which 
Hitler has made his own, unfortunately deluded 
many peoples during the earlier years of Hitler- 
ism. Today, however, throughout the world 
Hitler's declarations and promises are recog- 
nized everywhere as being but a tissue of lies 
offered solely for purposes of deceit. 

There is increasing evidence at hand that the 
German peoj^le themselves, like the people of 
Italy, fidly recognize this fact. 

For this reason it is doubtful whether any 
useful purpose would be served by making any 
extended conament on Hitler's latest speech. 
There is no man or woman among the united 
peoples who cannot clearly estimate its true sig- 
nificance. 

For it is not in its boasts and promises that 
the significance of the speech lies, but on the 
contrary be<:ause of the fact that there is im- 
plicit in every word and every phrase Hitler's 



240 



DKPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



own recognition of his impending downfall and 
of the inevitable conquest of the German armies. 

The magnificent resistance of the Russian 
ai'mies and the defeats which they have inflicted 
upon the forces of Hitlerism have in gi'eat part 
been responsible for bringing this to i^ass. 
These are the very armies whose annihilation 
Hitler announced many months ago. 

It is only natural that the kind of world in 
which President Roosevelt and the American 
people wish to live should be termed "a new, de- 
testable, alien world" by Hitler. 

The kind of world for which the American 
people and their Government stand is a world 
of international decency and of justice, in which 
men and women will be free to worship, free to 
tliink and speak, and in which they will be fi'ee 
from fear. That is the only kind of world in 
which permanent peace can be established, and 
the German and the Italian people, like the peo- 
ples of the United Nations, know that no such 
world can rise into being until Hitlerism and 
tlie gangsters who compose it are finally crushed 
and defeated. 



SINKING OF THE URUGUAYAN VESSEL 
"MONTEVIDEO" 

[Released to the press March 19] 

The following telegrams were exchanged be- 
tween the Minister of Foieign Atfairs of Uru- 
guay, Alberto Guuni, and the Acting Secretary 
of State, Sumner Welles : 

[Translation] 

"Montevideo, 
''March 18, 194^. 
"I regret to inform Your Excellency that 
tlie merchant vessel Montevideo of the Uru- 
guayan flag was sunk by a submarine of the Axis 
on March 9 in the vicinity of Bermuda, there 
liaving thus been violated all of the essential 
rules of law and of humanity. As soon as all of 
the data is assembled concerning this hateful at- 



tack, Uruguay will present its considered pro- 
test to the Pan American Union for appropri- 
ate action. I send greetings to Your Excellency 
with my highest consideration. 

Alberto Guani" 



"March 19, 1942. 

''Please accept my heartfelt sympathy for the 
loss of the lives of Uruguayan citizens upon the 
Uruguayan vessel Montevideo. I share fullj' 
Your Excellency's indignation at this unscrupu- 
lous and inhuman destruction of non-belligerent 
shipping by the Axis Powers. Once again there 
is empliasized the fundamental conflict be- 
tween the forces of civilization and barbarism. 

"I send Your Excellency my warm personal 
greetings and the expression of my highest con- 
sideration. 

Sumner "Welles'" 



TERJMINATION OF COORDINATION 
AGREEMENT WITH COSTA RICA 

[Released to the press March 18] 

The Coordination Agreement between the 
(xovernment of the United States of America 
and the (lovemment of Costa Rica Avhich be- 
came effective in September 1941, in order to 
permit the movement of goods to and from 
those Proclaimed List nationals in Costa Rica 
wlio had been subjected to close supervision and 
control by the Government of Costa Rica so 
as to prevent any profits accruing to any such 
Proclaimed List nationals, will be terminated 
as of midnight March 31, 1942. Events which 
have intervened since the date of the agree- 
ment, including the declaration of war by both 
the United States and Costa Rica, have made 
it necessary to subject to even more rigid con- 
trol the firms and individuals whose names are 
included in the Proclaimed List, with the result 
that the agreement no longer serves the objec- 
tives at which it was aimed. 



MARCH 21, 1942 

PRESERVATION OF ASSETS BY THE NETHERLANDS GOVERNMENT 



241 



The following memor:indiim concerning ac- 
tions taken by tlie Netherlands authorities pre- 
vious to and during the time of the invasion of 
the Netherlands bj' Germany for the i)urpose of 
keeping assets out of the hands of Germans, 
was enclosed in a note of March 5, 1942 from 
the Netherlands Minister in Washington to the 
Secretary of State. 

"Memorandum 

"The Netherlands authorities took active 
measures reasonably calculated to keep United 
States bearer securities and other valuable as- 
sets located within the European territory of 
the Netherlands out of the hands of the invad- 
ing Germans. 

"Even before the treacherous attack by the 
Germans, the Government of the Netherlands 
had already passed an act making it possible for 
corporations within the Netherlands European 
territory to transfer their head offices to other 
parts of the Netherlands territories so that their 
affairs might be conducted free from duress in 
case of an invasion. Moreover, the Netherlands 
authorities, foreseeing the possibility of inva- 
sion, had taken steps to transfer a very large 
quantity of the liquid assets held in the Nether- 
lands to a safe place. Various ingenious meth- 
ods had been developed to put these transfers 
into effect at once in case of an invasion. 

"Directly after the invasion the Netherlands 
Minister got into communication with the State 
and Treasury Departments. A procedure was 
speedily adopted at a special emergency con- 
ference as soon as it became clear that action 
had to be taken. It was decided that securities 
could be destroyed and certificates of destruc- 
tion given by American consuls for transmission 
to the United States as a basis for a claim for 
new securities. It should be recalled that the 
ordinary legal procedure to be followed in such 
a case requires the presence of the A,merican reg- 
istrar, and that, this being impossible, the 



United States Government could not assume re- 
sponsibility that new certificates would be issued 
upon presentation of the certificates of de- 
struction. 

"The procedure was immediately transmitted 
to The Hague by the Netherlands Minister by 
telephone and wired by the State Department 
to the American authorities and consuls in The 
Hague. 

"Provision was also made for its announce- 
ment over the British radio. Unfortunately, 
however, the secm-ities were spread all over the 
territory of the Netherlands and were held by 
thousands of private individuals and banks. 
The attack was so sudden and the enemy forces 
were so overwhehning that no time was afforded 
to put the procedure into effect. Moreover there 
were comparatively few American consuls avail- 
able in the territory and these were kept ex- 
tremely busy. Even if these officials had been 
in a position to help, the means of communica- 
tion with them were largely cut off. As a result 
of these unfortunate circumstances, for which 
the Netherlands Government was not to blame, 
some American bearer certificates did fall into 
the hands of the Germans. 

"It should be pointed out, however, that the 
Netherlands Government in spite of the emer- 
gency situation did succeed in keeping all their 
gold out of reach of the Germans. 

"Moreover, the Netherlands Government was 
successful in keeping out of enemy hands the 
balances held abroad by Netherlands corpora- 
tions enabled by the above mentioned legislation 
to remove their domicile to free tenitory. 

"Immediately continuing its struggle for free- 
dom on the friendly British shore, the Govern- 
ment of the Netherlands lost no time in claiming 
title for the duration of the war to all balances 
and other property held abroad by its nationals 
and corporations exposed to enemy duress. The 
enforcement of this particular legislation in the 
United States which is being sought through the 
action of the courts in this country, and which 



242 



DEPARTMEJsT OF STATE BULLETIN 



has been requested from the United States Gov- 
ermnent upon its entering into the war, will 
actually prevent the Germans ever to reap any 
benefit of claims originally held by Nether- 
landers on property in the United States. 

"It may be brought to mind, finally, that the 
Netherlands public always used to place a sub- 
stantial part of its savings in bonds and shares 
of United States enterprises and that the Neth- 
erlands Government always allowed the free 



flow oi funds towai'd this country, thus enabling 
its nationals to place this part of their savings 
in safety, should the Netherlands territory in 
Europe be temporarily oveii-ini. 

''The Netherlands Government feels that in 
the circumstances it did everything possible to 
block the ruthless attempts of the enemy and it 
feels confident that the Government of the 
Ignited States will concur in the above -views." 



LEND-LEASE OPERATIONS 



The President, on March 11, transmitted to 
the Congress a report on lend-lease operations 
for the year ended March 11, 1942. In his 
letter of transmittal he says: 

"One year ago, in passing the Lend-Lease 
Act, the American people dedicated their ma- 
terial resources to the defeat of the Axis. We 
knew tlien that to strengthen those who were 
fighting the Axis was to strengthen the United 
States. . . . 

"Now that we have had to dedicate our man- 
power as well as our material resources to the 
defeat of the Axis, the American people know 
the wisdom of the step they took one year ago 
today. Had not the nations fighting aggres- 
sion been strengthened and sustained — their 
armed forces with weapons, their factories with 
materials, their people with food — our presently 
grave position might indeed be desperate. . . . 

"Lend-lease ■ has given us experience with 
which to fight the aggressor. Lend-lease has 
expanded our productive capacity for the build- 
ing of guns and tanks and planes and ships. 
The weapons we made and shipped have been 
tested in actual combat on a dozen battlefields, 
teaching lessons of untold value. 

"Lend-lease is now a prime mechanism 
through which the L^nited Nations are pooling 
their entire resources. Under the Lend-Lease 
Act, we send our arms and materials to the places 
where they can best be used in the battle against 
the Axis. Through reciprocal lend-lease provi- 
sions we receive arms and materials from the 



other United Nations when they can best be used 
by us. 

"... The offensive that the United Nations 
nnist and will drive into the heart of the Axis 
will take the entire strength that we possess. 

"... With that combined strength we go 
forward along the steep road to victory." 

The total value of lend-lease aid to February 
28, 1942 was $2,570,452,441, most of which came 
from the $18,410,000,000 appropriated diiectly 
to the President for lend-lesise. In addition, out 
of the fxmds appropriated to the War and Navy 
Departments and the Maritime Commission, the 
President is empowered to transfer not to exceed 
ii total of $29,596,650,000 for defense aid, as the 
need arises. The distribution of lend-lease aid 
provided through February 28 is set forth in the 
following table : 

Total Lend-Lease Aid 
(In millions of dollars) 



Defense articles transferred 

Articles awaiting transfer or use._ 
Articles in process of manufacture 
Servicing and repair of ships, etc. 

Rental and charter of ships, etc 

Production facilities in the U. S-- 
Miscellaneous expenses 

Total 



Cumula- 
tive to 

February 
28, 1942 



1,411 

488 
128 
126 
243 
170 
4 



2,570 



MARCH 21, 1942 



243 



In the iimoimt of lend-lease aid extended, each 
month has sliown an increase over the preceding 
month, with the aid for February 1942 amount- 
ing to 569 million dollars, an increase of more 
than 100 million dollars over that for January 
1942. 

Military items supplied to the armies of the 
United Nations include airplanes, airplane 
parts, tanks, ordnance, ammunition, field-com- 
munications equipment, trucks, and petroleum. 
Small ships, naval aircraft and ordnance, pe- 
troleum, and many varieties of ship and air- 
plane stores and equipment have strengthened 
their navies, and British naval vessels have 
been repaired and remodeled in our yards. 
Lend-lease funds have been used to construct 
naval bases and airplane-supply depots all over 
the world. 

Industrial aid already transferred includes 
materials to help our allies manufacture their 
own munitions of war — steel, copper, zinc, and 
aluminum; alcohol, acids, and other chemicals; 
raw airjDlane woods; and machine tools, bear- 
ings, and abrasives. Lend-lease machinery is 
fortifying their heavy industries and agricul- 
ture. Textiles, leathers, and medical supplies 
have also been delivered. 

"Food has been and will continue to be one 
of our most important contributions to the 
United Nations pool of resources", the report 
states. "Concentrated foods such as dairy, 
meat, and poultry products and canned fish, to- 
gether with fats and oils, have comprised a 
large proportion of food shipments to Great 
Britain." Wheat, flour, sugar, meat products, 
and vegetable oils have been supplied to the 
Soviet Union. Canned goods, such as canned 
fish, bacon, cheese, milk, and vegetables have 
been found suitable for export to the Middle 
East. 

United Nations shipping comes within the 
same pooling principle as other major war re- 
sources of the allies. Large amounts of lend- 
lease funds have already been obligated for the 
building of vessels, and billions more have been 
appropriated for that purpose. Some vessels 
have already been delivered. But lend-lease 
has made its most immediate shipping contri- 

450557 — 12 2 



bution in servicing the ships now plying the 
oceans. More than 1,000 foreign-flag cargo car- 
riers have been repaired and refitted in Ameri- 
can yards out of lend-lease funds, and, con- 
versely, as part of the pooling policy, repairs 
for American merchant ships have been under- 
taken in allied ports, the expenses being met 
with foreign funds. Lend-lease funds have 
been used to construct new shipways, expand 
aircraft and tank capacity, enlarge food-proc- 
essing plants, and erect storage warehouses. 

American air ferries have been established to 
the British Isles, North Africa, the Middle East, 
and Australia. Although the majority of the 
planes ferried over these routes to date have 
been United States Army planes or part of those 
purchased by the British before lend-lease, many 
of the airfields, storage depots, and hangars 
used by them have been built with lend-lease 
funds. Pilot training for students from the 
United Nations is one of the important phases 
of the lend-lease program. 

Military missions in the Soviet Union, China, 
North Africa, and Iran assist in the develop- 
ment of lend-lease aid in these areas by seeing 
that material delivered is properly serviced and 
maintained after arrival. They instruct for- 
eign personnel in con-ect operation of equip- 
ment, report on its effectiveness in actual battle, 
and help to rebuild the transportation systems 
between foreign ports and battlefronts, where 
necessary. 

When the President declares the defense of 
any country vital to the defense of the United 
States, that nation becomes eligible for lend- 
lease aid. The defense of the British Common- 
wealth of Nations and 33 other countries has 
thus far been declared vital to our defense. The 
list follows : 



Argentina 
Belgium (Free) 
Bolivia 
Brazil 



Costa Rica 
Cuba 

Czechoslovakia 
Dominican Republic 



British Commonwealth Ecuador 

of Nations Egypt 

Chile El Salvador 

China Prance (Free) 

Colombia Greece 



244 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Guatemala 


Paraguay 


Haiti 


Peru 


Honduras 


Poland 


Iceland 


Turkey 


Mexico 


U.S.S.R. 


Netherlands 


Uruguay 


Nicaragua 


Venezuela 


Norway 


Yugoslavia 


Panama 





Nations with whom master compacts have al- 
ready been executed are Bolivia, Brazil, Colom- 
bia, Costa Kica, Cuba, Dominican Eepublic, El 



Salvador, Great Britain, Haiti, Honduras, Ice- 
land, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, 
Uruguay, and Venezuela. Aid is provided to 
the Soviet Union in accordance with an ex- 
change of communications, dated October 30 
and November 4, 1941. Active negotiations for 
lend-lease master compacts are either proceed- 
ing or about to begin with 17 countries — Bel- 
gium, Chile, China, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, 
Free France, Greece, Guatemala, Mexico, Nor- 
way, Poland, Soviet Union, Turkey, and 
Yugoslavia. 



TRANSFER OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS FROM CANADIAN TO 
UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 



[Released to the press March 20] 

The Acting Secretary of State released to the 
press on March 20 the texts of notes exchanged 
between the Honorable Jay Pierrepont Moffat, 
American Minister to Canada, and the Righi 
Honorable W. L. Mackenzie King, Prime Min- 
ister and Secretary of State for External 
Affairs of Canada, in regard to the transfer to 
the armed forces of the United States of cer- 
tain United States citizens and former United 
States citizens now serving in the naval, mili- 
tary, or air forces of Canada. The texts of the 
notes follow : 

The American Minister to Canada to the 
Secretary of State for External Affairs of 
Canada 

"Ottawa, March 18, 1942. 

"Sir: 

"With reference to conversations that have 
recently taken place among the competent offi- 
cials of the United States and Canadian Gov- 
ernments concerning the proposed transfer to 
the armed forces of the United States of certain 
American citizens now serving in the naval, 
military or air forces of Canada, I have the 



honor to propose that an agreement be entered 
into between the two Governments as follows : 

"I. Forces AVithin Canada 

"1. The appropriate Canadian and United 
States authorities shall prepare a statement of 
the conditions of transfer and thereafter, as soon 
as possible, but not later than April 6, 1942, the 
appropriate Canadian authorities shall inform 
all United States citizens and former United 
States citizens who have lost their citizenship as 
a result of having taken an oath of allegiance 
on enlistment in the Naval, Military or Air 
Forces of Canada, and who are now serving in 
these forces in Canada, that they have an oppor- 
tunity prior to and not after April 20, 1942, to 
apply for appointment or enlistment in the 
United States Armed Forces. Personnel mak- 
ing such applications may withdraw them at 
any time prior to appointment or enlistment in 
the United States armed forces. 

"2. The United States War and Navy De- 
partments .shall furnish National Defense 
Headquarters, Ottawa, information governing 
the conditions of service in the United States 
armed forces, which information shall be com- 
municated by National Defense Headquarters 
to all concerned. 



MARCH 21, 1942 



245 



"3. National Defense Headquarters, Ottawa, 
shall send nominal rolls of tlie applicants to the 
War or Navy Departments of the United 
States. 

"4. The United States War and Navy De- 
partments shall appoint Boards to come to 
Canada to interview applicants, with full power 
to appoint or to enlist them in the United States 
Forces. 

"5. The Naval, Military and Air Forces of 
Canada shall set up Boards empowered to 
authorize resignations and discharge of the ap- 
plicants accepted by the United States Forces. 

"6. The Canadian Board shall be empowered 
to postpone transfers, if in their opinion im- 
mediate transfer would prejudicially affect the 
common war effort. 

"7. Medical examinations, resignations and 
discharges from the Naval, Military or Air 
Forces of Canada, and immediate appointment 
or enlistment in the United States forces, sliall 
take place at joint meetings of the United 
States and Canadian Boards. 

"8. The United States Board will issue the 
necessary travel and meal vouchers to the ap- 
pi'opriate assembly points in the United States 
to the accepted applicants. Accepted ap- 
plicants shall be permitted to wear Canadian 
badges and uniform until such time as they 
arrive at the assembly point in the United States 
and are equipped with United States uniform. 
The United States armed forces will return all 
Public clothing, arms and equipment of such 
accepted applicants to poiTits in Canada to be 
designated. 

"9. Sentences of detention of selected ap- 
plicants will be remitted at the request of the 
United States board. 

"10. Except with the authority of National 
Defense Headquarters applicants for appoint- 
ment or enlistment in the United States armed 
forces shall not be discharged from the Naval, 
Military, or Air Forces of Canada until their 
application has been heard by the United States 
Board in accordance with the proposed plan. 

"II. Forces Outside Canada 

"1. The rules which apply to the above men- 



tioned persons .serving within Canada will ap- 
ply without change to those serving in the 
Canadian forces in Newfoundland and Ja- 
maica. If despite all efforts notifications to 
United States citizens and former United 
States citizens serving in Newfoundland or Ja- 
maica are not deliverable before April 6, 1942, 
the option to apply for transfer will be exer- 
cisable for 15 days after the receipt of the 
notification. 

"2. The rules whicii apply to the above men- 
tioned persons serving within Canada will ap- 
ply without change to those serving outside of 
Canada, Newfoundland, and Jamaica except 
that: 

"(a) The transfer will not ordinarily be 
made until the individual can be trans- 
ferred to a United States unit serving 
in the area in which he is located, and 

"(b) The option to apply for transfer will 
be exercisable within fifteen (15) days 
after notice of the right to exercise it 
has appeared in the orders of the unit 
with which he is serving. 

"3. Representatives of Canada and of the 
United States will discuss with the authorities 
of Great Britain the transfer to the United 
States forces of Royal Canadian Air Force 
personnel now serving in the Royal Air Force 
whose transfer might affect the efficiency of the 
Royal Air Force. 

"III. United States Forces 

"The United States will accord the same right 
of transfer to Canadian citizens now serving in 
the United States forces as is accorded United 
States citizens serving in Canadian forces. 

"In submitting the foregoing proposal I may 
add that if an agreement in this sense is accept- 
able to the Canadian Government, this note and 
your reply thereto accepting the terms outlined 
shall be regarded as placing on record the 
understanding arrived at between the two Gov- 
ernments concerning this matter. 

"Accept [etc.] 

PiERREPONT Moffat, 
American Minister.^ 



246 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Secretary of State for External Affairs of 
Canada to the American Minister to Canada 

"Ottawa, March 20, 1942. 

"Sir: 

"I have the honor to refei" to your note of 
March 18, 1942, no. 629, proposing an agree- 
ment between the Governments of Canada and 
of the United States concerning the transfer 
to the armed forces of the United States of cer- 
tain United States citizens and former United 
States citizens now serving in the Naval, Mili- 
tary or Air Forces of Canada. 

"I am glad to inform you in reply that the 
Canadian Government undertakes to give effect 
to the agreement set forth in your note. 

"Accept [etc.] 

W. L. Mackenzie Ivjng, 
Seeretary of State for External Affairs.''' 



AMERICANS IN THE FAR EAST 

[Released to the press March 21] 

The Department has received from American 
official sources in the Far East reports which, 
on the basis of information received by the re- 
porting officers from a number of persons who 
have recently escaped from Hong Kong, confirm 
the statement made by the British Secretary 
of State for Foreign Affairs, Anthony Eden, 
in the House of Commons on Marcli 10 in regard 
to the outrageous treatment by the Japanese of 
the captured population of Hong Kong. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press March 21] 



The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since March 14, 1942 : 

Lubert O. Sanderhoff, of Pasadena, Calif., 
Vice Consul at Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, 



Mexico, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico. 

John W. Tuthill, of Cambridge, Mass., Vice 
Consul at Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

John Carter Vincent, of Macon, Ga., First 
Secretary of Embassj' at Chungking, China, has 
been designated Counselor of Embassy at 
Chungking, China. 



Cultural Relations 



CULTURAL INSTITUTES IN THE OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

The spontaneous development in many of the 
other American republics of cultural centers or 
institutes, with the purpose of increasing a 
knowledge of the United States and its people, 
is an effective contribution to inter-American 
solidarity. Although the United States Gov- 
ermnent, as well as private agencies in this coun- 
try, is cooperating in the development of the 
institutes, these have been inaugurated for the 
most part by nationals of the countries in which 
they are established, a fact which in itself is 
proof of the sincerity of the wide-spread desire 
to become more fully acquainted with the lan- 
guage, life, and literature of the United States. 

Probably language-teaching is the most im- 
portant phase of the work of the cultural insti- 
tutes, all of which conduct classes in English, 
usually well attended and highly successful. 
English classes at the icana — the Institute 
Cultural Argentino-Norteamericano — in Buenos 
Aires, for instance, have more than 3,600 stu- 
dents. The Division of Cultural Relations of the 
Department of State and the Office of the Coor- 
dinator of Inter-American Affairs are cooperat- 
ing with the leading cultural institutes for the 
purpose of procuring teachers of English from 
the United States for carrying out this impor- 
tant service. Several of the institutes also offer 



MARCH 2 1, 1942 



247 



classes in Spanish or Portuguese for the benefit 
of resident citizens of the United States. 

The institutes are also most helpful in estab- 
lishing contacts for distinguislied visitors from 
the United States, for whom lectures, concerts, 
and similar programs are often arranged. Some 
institutes promote travel between their coun- 
tries and the United States and sometimes aid 
in the selection of students for travel grants in 
the United States. Other outstanding activities 
of most of these cultural centers inchide moticm- 
picture and radio programs, publication of bul- 
letins, sponsorship of exhibits, arrangements for 
celebrating the principal patriotic anniversaries 
of the United States, and maintenance of a rep- 
resentative library and reading room stocked 
with books by our leading authors. 

So far, 15 of these cultural institutes have 
been established : at Buenos Aires and Cordoba 
in Argentina; at Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, 
Porto Alegre, Florianopolis, and Curitiba in 
Brazil; and at Santiago, Chile; Habana, Cuba; 
Quito. Ecuador; Tegucigalpa, Honduras; Lima, 
Peru; Montevideo, Uruguay; and Caracas, 
Venezuela. Of these the oldest is the icana 
in Buenos Aires, inaugurated on May 9, 1928. 
The second oldest, which is also called the 
Instituto Cultural Argentino-Norteamericano, 
was founded in Cordoba in December 1931. 
The most recent is the Uniao Cultural Brasil - 
Estados Unidos, established at Curitiba on De- 
cember 28, 1941. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
EDUCATOR FROM PANAMA 

[Released to the press March 20] 

Dr. Catalino Arrocha Graell, president of the 
National Institute of Panama, a large prepara- 
tory school for boys, arrived in Washington on 
March 20 at the invitation of the Department 
of State. Dr. Arrocha Graell is interested in 
visiting representative high schools and junior 
colleges in this countiy. His present plans are 
to spend several weeks in the West, principally 
in California, and one month in the eastern 
States. He himself was educated in the schools 



of his own country and a})road. He is a grad- 
uate of the University of Chile. 

The National Institute, which Dr. Arrocha 
Gi'aell heads, has an enrolment of about one 
thousand students, with students from the other 
Central American republics as well as from 
Panama. Most of its graduates enter the Uni- 
veisity of Panama. 

CULTURAL RELATIONS OFFICERS 

Cultural relations officers assigned to Amer- 
ican missions in the other American republics 
are listed below: 

Buenos Aires, Argentina — John Griffiths 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil — Jo.seph Piazza 
Bogota, Colombia — Herschel Brickell 
Santiago, Chile — Laurence Kinnaird 
San Jos§, Costa Rica — Albert H. Gerberich 
Quito, Ecuador — Francis Colligan 
Guatemala, Guatemala — Robert Chamberlain 
Port-au-Prince, Haiti — Horace Ashton 
Mexico, D. F., Mexico — Charles H. Stevens 
Managua, Nicaragua — William Marvel 
Ascunci6n, Paraguay — Morrell Cody 
Montevideo, Uruguay — Charles A. Page 

Glenn R. Barr is a junior cultural relations 
officer at Buenos Aires, and Gretchen Ahlswede 
is a junior cultural relations officer at Santiago. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
HONDURAN ARTIST AND EDUCATOR 

[Released to the press March 20] 

Arturo Lopez Rodezno, director of the School 
of Fine Arts in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, arrived 
in Washington on March 21 by Pan American 
Airways to visit museums and art schools in 
the United States. He is especially interested 
in seeing schools and factories engaged in mak- 
ing ceramics, a branch of art which he is help- 
ing to develop advantageously in Honduras 
from both the cultural and the economic point 
of view. Students in his School of Fine Arts, 
many of them from the homes of farm laborers 
and from underijrivileged urban sectors, are 
already designing and constructing artistic 
glazed-pottery articles for household use by the 



248 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



great bulk of the population for whom laigh- 
priced imported goods are out of reach. 

Senor Lopez Rodezno, who has come to this 
country at the invitation of the Department of 
State, is himself an artist of talent, as well as 
in educator. This month his school is conduct- 
ing an exhibition covering the work done there 
since its foundation two years ago. Students 
with no previous artistic training are showing 
work of real merit in woodcarving, ceramics, 
drawing, painting, and sculpture. Credit for 
the school's progress is generally attributed to 
the energy and ability of the director and to 
the personal interest in its work of President 
Carias of Honduras. 



American Republics 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT OF 
CHILE 

[Released to the press March 21] 

The Honorable Claude G. Bowers, American 
Ambassador to Chile, has been named by the 
President as his special representative with the 
rank of Ambassador at the inauguration of Dr. 
Juan Antonio Rios Morales, President-elect of 
the Republic of Chile. The inauguration will 
take place April 2. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

Dominican Republic 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union uiformed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated March 11, 1942, that the instrument 
of ratification by the Dominican Republic of 
the Convention on Nature Protection and Wild- 
life Preservation in the Western Hemisphere, 
which was opened for signature at the Pan 
American Union on October 12, 1940, was de- 
posited with the Union on March 3, 1942. The 
instrument of ratification is dated January 
28, 1942. 

Pern. 

The American Embassy at Lima reported by 
a despatch dated March 11, 1942 that the Official 
Gazette for that day publishes a Supreme Reso- 
lution dated December 31, 1941, ratifying on 
behalf of Peru the Convention on Nature Pro- 
tection and Wildlife Preservation in the 



Western Hemisphere, which was opened for 
signature at the Pan American Union on 
October 12, 1940. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Agreement With Liberia for the Exchange of 
Official Publications 

The American Minister to Liberia trans- 
mitted to the Secretary of State with a des- 
patch dated January 16, 1942 copies of an ex- 
change of notes dated January 15, 1942 effect- 
ing an agreement between the United States of 
America and the Republic of Liberia for the 
exchange of official publications. 

The official exchange office for the transmis- 
sion of the publications on the part of the 
United States is the Smithsonian Institution, 
and on the part of Liberia it is the Department 
of State of Liberia. Each Government fur- 
nished to the other Government a list of the 
official publications to be regularly exchanged. 
On behalf of the United States the publications 
shall be received by the Library of Congress 
and on behalf of the Liberian Government they 



MARCH 21, 1942 



249 



shall bo received by the Department of State. 
Each party to the agreement agrees to bear the 
postal, railroad, steamship, and other charges 
arising in its own country. The agreement 
entered into force on January 15, 194:2. It will 
shortly be printed in the Executive Agreement 
Series. 

FRIENDSHIP 

Treaty Between China and Iraq 

The American Legation at Baghdad leported 
by a telegram dated March 19, 1942, that the 
Iraqi Foreign Office announced on that day the 
signature of a Treaty of Friendship between 
the Kingdom of Iraq and the Republic of 
China. 

ALLIANCE 

Treaty of Alliance Between the United Kingdom 
and the Soviet Union, and Iran 

There is printed below the text of the Treaty 
of Alliance between the United Kingdom and 
the Soviet Union, and Iran (with notes) , which 
was signed at Tehran on January 29, 1942 : ^ 

"His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, and the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, on the one hand, and His 
Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah of Iran, on the 
other; ^^1 

"Having in view the principles of the Atlan- 
tic Charter ^ jointly agreed upon and announced 
to the world by the President of the United 
States of America and the Prime Minister of the 
United Kingdom on the 14th August, 1941, and 
endorsed by the Government of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics on the 24th Septem- 
ber, 1941, with which His Imperial Majesty the 
Shahinshah declares his complete agreement 
and from which he wishes to benefit on an equal 
basis with other nations of the world ; and 



' The text printed here is taken from the British 
print (Cmd. 6335). 

'BuUetin of August 16, 1941, p. 125. 



"Being anxious to strengthen the bonds of 
friendship and mutual understanding between 
them; and 

"Considering that these objects will best be 
achieved by the conclusion of a Treaty of Alli- 
ance ; 

"Have agreed to conclude a treaty for this 
purpose and have appointed as their plenipo- 
tentiaries ; 

"His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, 

"For the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland, 

"His Excellency Sir Reader William Bul- 
LAED, K.C.M.G., CLE., His Majesty's 
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary in Iran. 
"Tlie Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
"His Excellency M. Andre Andreewich 
Smienov, Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary of the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 
Iran. 
"His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah of 
Iran, 

"His Excellency M. Ali Soheily, Minister 
for Foreign Affairs. 
"Who, having communicated their full pow- 
ers, found in good and due form, have agreed as 
follows : 

"Article 1. 

"His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, and the LTnion of 
Soviet Socialist Republics (hereinafter referred 
to as the Allied Powers) jointly and severally 
undertake to respect the territorial integrity, 
.sovereignty, and political independence of Iran. 

"Article 2. 

"An alliance is established between the Allied 
Powers on the one hand and His Imperial 
Majesty the Shahinshah of Iran on the other. 

"Abticle 3. 

"(i) The Allied Powers jointly and severally 
undertake to defend Iran by all means at their 



250 

command from all aggression on the part of 
Germany or any other Power. 

"(ii) His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah 
undertakes — 

"(a) to cooperate with the Allied Powers with 
all the means at his command and in 
every way possible, in order that they may 
be able to fulfil the above undertaking. 
The assistance of the Iranian forces shall, 
however, be limited to the maintenance of 
internal security on Iranian territoiy ; 

"(6) to secure to the Allied Powers, for the 
passage of troops or supplies from one 
Allied Power to the other or for other 
similar purposes, the unrestricted right 
to use, maintain, guard, and, in case of 
military necessity, control in any way 
that they may require all means of com- 
munication throughout Iran, including 
railways, roads, rivers, aerodromes, ports, 
pipelines and telephone, telegraph and 
wireless installations; 

"(<?) to furnish all possible assistance and fa- 
cilities in obtaining material and recruit- 
ing labor for the pui-pose of the mainte- 
nance and improvement of the means of 
communication referred to in paragraph 

(&); 

"((?) to establish and maintain, in collabora- 
tion with the Allied Powers, such meas- 
ures of censorship control as they may 
require for all the means of communica- 
tion referred to in paragraph (b). 

" (iii) It is clearly understood that in the ap- 
plication of paragraph (ii) (b) (c) and (d) of 
the present article the Allied Powers will give 
full consideration to the essential needs of Iran. 

"Article 4. 

"(i) The Allied Powers may maintain in 
Iranian territory, land, sea, and air forces in such 
number as they consider necessary. The location 
of such forces shall be decided in agreement with 
the Iranian Goverimient so long as the strategic 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 

situation allows. All questions concerning the 
relations between the forces of the Allied Powers 
and the Iranian authorities shall be settled so far 
as possible in cooperation with the Iranian au- 
thorities in such a way as to safeguard the secu- 
rity of the said forces. It is understood that the 
presence of these forces on Iranian territory does 
not constitute a military occupation and will 
disturb as little as possible the administration 
and the security forces of Iran, the economic life 
of the country, the normal movements of the 
population, and the application of Iranian laws 
and regulations. 

"(ii) A separate agreement or agreements 
shall be concluded as soon as possible after the 
entry into force of the present Treaty regarding 
any financial obligations to be borne by the 
Allied Powers under the provisions of the pres- 
ent article and of paragraphs (ii) (b), (c) and 
(d) of Article 3 above in such matters as local 
purchases, the hiring of buildings and plant, the 
employment of labor, transport charges, etc. A 
special agreement shall be concluded between the 
Allied Govermnents and the Iranian Govern- 
ment defining the conditions for any transfers to 
the Iranian Government after the war of build- 
ings and other improvements effected by the 
Allied Powers on Iranian territory. These 
agreements shall also settle the immunities to be 
enjoyed by the forces of the Allied Powers in 
Iran. 

"Article 5. 

"The forces of the Allied Powers shall be 
withdrawn from Iranian territory not later than 
six months after all hostilities between the 
Allied Powers and Germany and her associates 
have been suspended by the conclusion of an 
armistice or armistices, or on the conclusion of 
l^eace between them, whichever date is the 
earlier. The expression 'associates' of Ger- 
many means all other Powers which have en- 
gaged or may in the future engage in hostilities 
against either of the Allied Powers. 



MARCH 2 1, 1942 



251 



"Article 6. 

"(i) The Allied Powers undertake in their 
relations with foreio^n countries not to adoi^t an 
attitude which is prejudicial to the territorial 
integrity, sovereignty, or political independence 
of Iran, nor to conclude treaties inconsistent 
with the provisions of the present Treaty. 
Tliey undertake to consult the Government of 
His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah in all 
matters affecting the direct interests of Iran. 

"(ii) His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah 
undertakes not to adopt in his relations with 
foreign countries an attitude which is inconsist- 
ent with the alliance, nor to conclude treaties 
inconsistent with the provisions of the present 
Treaty. 

"Article 7. 

"The Allied Powers jointly undertake to use 
their best endeavours to safeguard the economic 
existence of the Iranian people against the jDri- 
vations and difficulties arising as a result of the 
present war. On the entry into force of the 
present Treaty, discussions shall be opened be- 
tween the Government of Iran and the Govern- 
ments of the Allied Powers as to the best possi- 
ble methods of carrying out the above under- 
taking. 

"Article 8. 

"The provisions of the present Treaty are 
equally binding as bilateral obligations between 
His Imperial Majesty the Shahinshah and each 
of the two other High Contracting Parties. 

"Article 9. 

"The present Treaty shall come into force on 
signature and shall remain in force until the 
date fixed for the withdrawal of the forces of 
the Allied Powers from Iranian territory in 
accordance with Article 5. 

"In witness whereof, the above-named pleni- 
potentiaries have signed the present Treaty and 
have affixed thereto their seals. 



"Done at Tehran in triplicate in English, 
Russian, and Persian, all being equally authen- 
tic, on the 29th day of January, 1942. 

[L.S.] R. W. BULLARD 

[L.S.] A. A. Smirnov 
[L.S.] Ali Soheilt" 

"Annex 1. 

'''Identic notes addressed to the Iranian Minister 
for Foreign Affairs hy His Majesty''s Minister 
and the Soviet Amiassadar 

"With reference to Article 6, paragraph (i), 
of the Treaty of Alliance signed to-day, I have 
the honor, on behalf of His Majesty's Govern- 
ment in the United Kingdom [the Government 
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics] to 
assure Your Excellency that my Government 
intei'pret the j^rovisions of this clause as being 
applicable to any peace conference or confer- 
ences held at the conclusion of the present war, 
or other general international conferences. 
Consequently they consider themselves bound 
not to approve anything at any such conference 
which is prejudicial to the territorial integrity, 
sovereignty, or political independence of Iran, 
and not to discuss at any such conference any- 
thing affecting the direct interests of Iran with- 
out consultation with the Government of Iran. 

"His Majesty's Government [the Government 
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics] 
will further do their best to secure that Iran will 
be represented on a footing of equality in any 
peace negotiations directly affecting her in- 
terests." 

"Annex 2. 

''■Identic notes addressed to His Majesty''s 
Minister and the Soviet Ambassador iy the 
Iranian Minister for Foreign Affairs 

"With reference to Ai-ticle 6, paragraph (ii), 
of the Treaty of Alliance signed this day, I have 
the honor, on behalf of the Iranian Govern- 



252 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ment, to assure Your Excellency that the Iran- 
ian Government would consider it contrary to 
their obligations under this clause to maintain 
diplomatic relations with any State which is in 
diplomatic relations with neither of the Allied 
Powers. 

"Annex 3. 

^'■Identic notes addressed to the Iranwn Minuter 
for Foreign Affairs hy His Majesty's Minister 
and the Soviet Ambassador 

"I have the honor, on behalf of His Majesty's 
Government in the United Kingdom [the Gov- 
ernment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics] to convey to Your Excellency the fol- 
lowing assurances: — 

"(1) With reference to Article 3 (ii) {a) of 
the Treaty of Alliance which has been signed 
to-day, the Allied Powers Mill not require of 
Iran the participation of her armed forces in 
any war or military operations against anj' For- 
eign Power or Powers. 

"(2) With reference to Article 4 (ii), it is 
understood that there is no provision in the 
Treaty which requires that the Iranian Govern- 
ment shall bear the cost of any works which the 
Allied Powers carry out for their own military 
ends and which are not necessary for the needs 
of Iran. 

"(3) It is understood that Annex 1 will re- 
main in force even if the Treaty ceases to be 
valid, in accordance with the provisions of 
Article 9, before peace has been concluded." 

TRANSIT 

Exchange of Notes With Canada Regarding 
Construction of Military Highway to Alaska 

The texts of notes exchanged between the 
American Minister to Canada and the Prime 
Minister and Seci-etary of State for External 
Affairs of Canada pertaining to detailed ar- 
rangements for the construction of a military 
highway to Alaska, appear in this Bulletin 
under the heading "The War". 



ARMED FORCES 

Exchange of Notes With Canada Regarding 
Transfer of United States Citizens From Ca- 
nadian to United States Armed Forces 

The texts of notes exchanged between the 
American Minister to Canada and the Prime 
Minister and Secretary of State for External 
Affairs of Canada in regard to the transfer to 
the armed forces of the United States certain 
United States citizens now serving in the naval, 
military, or air foi-ces of Canada, appear in this 
Bulletin under the heading "The War". 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Wallace S. Murray was appointed an 
Adviser on Political Relations, effective March 
13, 1942 (Departmental Order 1035). Effective 
the same date, Mr. Paul H. Ailing was ap- 
pointed Chief of the Division of Near Eastern 
Affairs (Departmental Order 1036). 

Mr. Philip W. Bonsai was appointed Chief 
of the Division of the American Republics, ef- 
fective March 13 (Departmental Order 1037). 

Mr. Knowlton V. Hicks, a Foreign Service 
officer of class VI, and Mr. Herve J. L'Heureux, 
a Foreign Service officer of class VI, were desig- 
nated, effective March 13, Assistant Chiefs of 
the Visa Division (Departmental Order 1038). 

Effective March 17, Mr. Harley A. Notter was 
designated an Assistant Chief of the Division 
of Special Research (Departmental Order 
1039). 

Mr. Hallett Johnson, a Foreign Service officer 
of class II, was designated as Assistant Chief 
of the Division of Defense Materials, effective 
March 18 (Departmental Order 1040). 



MARCH 21, 1942 



253 



Legislation 



Documentary Evidence of Citizenship : Hearings Before 
the Comnjittee on Immigration and Naturalization, 
House of Repesentatives, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 
6138, H.R. 6441, H.R. 6534, February 11 and 12, 1942, 
[and] on H.R. 6600, February 17, 1942, bills providing 
for the issuance of documentary evidence of United 
States citizenship, iv, 64 pp. 

Expeditious Naturalization of Former Citizens of the 
United States Who Have Lost United States Citizen- 
ship Through Service With the Allied Forces of the 
United States During the First or Second World War. 
H. Rept. 1!)()3, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6633. 2 pp. 

An Act To suspend the effectiveness during the existing 
national emergency of tariff duties on scrap iron, 
scrap steel, and nonferrous-metal scrap. Approved 



March 13, 1942. [H.U. 6531.] Public Law 497, 77th 
Cong. 1 p. 
An Act To amend the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as 
amended, to provide for the coordination of the for- 
warding and similar servicing of water-borne export 
and import foreign commerce of the United States. 
Approved March 14, 1942. [H.R. 6291.] Public Law 
498, 77th Cong. 1 p. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, March 1942. Publication 1701. ii, 95 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 10^. 

Register of the Department of State, November 1, 1941. 
Publication 1687. viii, 283 pp. 40<!'. 



For sale by the Superintendent o( Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHBD WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BTIKEAU OF THE BODOBT 



*■ Q^ c-s, if) =, 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 







MARCH 28, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 144 — Publication 1717 



ontents 




The War Page 

Greek Independence Day: Address by Assistant Secre- 
tary Barle 257 

Anniversary of accession of King Peter II of Yugo- 
slavia 260 

Inter-American Defense Board 260 

Advisory Mission to India 260 

The Far East 

Repajonent of Chinese loan 260 

The Near East 

Agricultural Mission to Saudi Arabia 261 

General 

Churchill-Roosevelt Highway in Trinidad 261 

Verification of passports of American citizens .... 261 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 261 

Cultural Relations 

Exhibition of Chilean Art: Message from the Acting 

Secretary of State 262 

Certification of educational films 263 

Treaty Information 

Finance: Agreement With China 263 

Health: International Sanitary Convention, 1926. . . 265 
Legal Assistance: Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of 

Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad . . . 266 
Indian Affairs: Convention Providing for the Creation 

of an Inter-American Indian Institute 267 

Legislation 267 

Regulations 267 

Publications 267 



u, s, suf'Ek:, 



The War 



GREEK INDEPENDENCE DAY 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[Released to the press March 26] 

Mr. Toastmaster, Mr. Minister, President 
Butler: 

Like every American, I am proud to recog- 
nize the anniversary of the independence of 
Greece as a day worthy of honor in the annals of 
every country. 

Greece is no less independent today than she 
was before the German invaders entered her 
soil, plundered her cities, and now attempt to 
starve a valiant people into submission. We re- 
fuse to accept that invasion. We have no faith 
in that conquest. With the help of God, we will 
redeem the pledge of the Atlantic Charter — that 
the nations submerged by Nazi cruelty shall be 
restored in freedom and strength. 

This is the record which will never be for- 
gotten : 

In October of 1940 Greece resisted a treacher- 
ous attack by the then boastful Fascist Empire 
of Italy. In a brilliant campaign she crushed 
that attack — both with her ideas and with her 
arms. Italian troops and the Italian people 
suddenly were made to see their shoddy rulers as 
the braggarts, the betrayers, and the oppressors 
which they were. Thousands of Italian soldiers 
simply declined to join in the fighting against 
the free Greek people, whom they knew as 
friends and neighbors. 



^ Delivered at the Greek Independence Day dinner of 
the American Ftlends of Greece at the Columbia Uni- 
versity Club, New York, N. Y., March 25, 1942. 



Five months later, Greek leadership, backed 
to the limit by the heroism of Greek soldiers 
and civilians, had brought the Italian Empire 
literally to its knees. 

From that defeat the Fascist and Nazi legions 
have never recovered. 

Mussolini has never recovered because he has 
never again been able to reconstitute an army 
which could or would fight. He had made it 
plain to his people that he had nothing but dis- 
honor to offer them. In March 1941, to keep 
afloat the wreck of his government, he was 
forced virtually to turn over the Italian people 
in bondage to their ancient oppressors, the Ger- 
man invaders. To save himself from the victory 
of Greek soldiers he committed a crime against 
Italy and against Italian history. He called 
back the foreigner. He gave his police to the 
Gestapo. He undid the work of Garibaldi and 
Cavour. He betrayed his people and his civili- 
zation. At that moment the boast of Mussolini's 
empire was at an end. It has never emerged 
since. 

In April of 1941 Greece met a second assault, 
the furious attack of the Nazi army. She, with 
British assistance, held that army at bay long 
enough to do two things. She made possible 
the reinforcement of the eastern Mediterranean, 
and she delayed the German attack on Soviet 
Russia for several weeks. 

Those weeks were precious, and the delay was 
decisive. They spelled, in the end, the failure 

257 



258 



DEPABTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of last summer's attack on Kussia. They made 
it impossible for the German divisions to finish 
their Russian campaign in the summer of 1941, 
and the German armies were not prepared for 
a winter campaign. I believe that the summer 
of 1942 will make it plain that thereby the Nazi 
rulers of Germany have lost the war and have 
decreed their own ruin. 

We now have information from sources in- 
side of Germany making it clear that the Ger- 
mans themselves know that there can be but 
one end. The German people know, as we know, 
that no provision has been made by the Nazi 
government for the year 1943. They know that 
the machines they need to produce the tools of 
war are no longer repaired. They know that 
the skilled workmen and the young engineers 
who must do the production of tomorrow have 
been and are being sent, half trained, to slaugh- 
ter on the fighting fronts in Russia. They know 
that the battalions which go out do not come 
back, save as a collection of shattered wrecks. 
They know, indeed, that the men who have gone 
to the Russian front are frequently not allowed 
to come back to Germany, lest the German 
people learn what has befallen. 

Without the glorious weeks of Greek resist- 
ance I believe this would not have been possible. 
And so I say that to the spirit of freedom in 
Greece every people in the world owes a debt 
of gratitude. 

It is not the first time in the world's history 
that Greece has saved the honor, the culture, 
and the soul of the Western World : We are, all 
of us, the heirs of Marathon and Thermopylae. 

I know, of course, that in the present agony 
of Greece there must be those who will ask 
whether it is all worthwhile. To them we must 
answer that Greece, throughout two thousand 
five hundred years of history, has always given 
the same response : There is no life worth hav- 
ing save the life of freedom, as free people, with 
free minds, free hearts — and free children. 

Indeed, we know why that is true because we 
know what is now happening in certain coun- 
tries not far from Greece which did not resist. 



We saw a frightened Hungarian government 
grant the right of passage to German arms. We 
saw a weak and corrupt Rumanian goverimaent 
invite the Nazi hordes within their country. 
Both Hungary and Rumania were trying to buy 
their peace, on evil terms. 

Today a German agent in Budapest is insist- 
ing that the Nazis shall take the flower of Hun- 
garian youth and send them as soldiers under 
German command to fight on the plains of Rus- 
sia. This is not to defend the freedom of Hun- 
gary, for as soon as these divisions have gone 
to Russia the Germans propose to take over 
Hungary. Their plans are already laid. 

This is to give Hitler a chance to bribe 
Rumania. The bribe wUl be an offer to let 
Rumanians take back Transylvania from Hun- 
gary. For this price the Rumanians are also 
asked to send the bulk of their army to fight 
once more in Russia. Hitler is already short 
of men, and the German people now fear what 
further slaughter may do to their race. It is 
therefore proposed that Hungarians and Ruma- 
nians shall be sacrificed instead. This will leave 
to the Nazi Gestapo and S.S. troojjs the easier 
task of sucking the last ounce of food, of prop- 
erty, and of self-respect from the Hungarian 
and Rumanian peoples who are, as you know, 
classified by the Nazis as second- and third-class 
peoples, fit only to make good servants for good 
Nazis. 

This plan is now under negotiation in Buda- 
pest and in the Rumanian Capital. Should it 
slip up, a second plan is to offer Transylvania 
as a bribe to Hungary, if her divisions will go 
out to fight Russia. Indeed, it is not clear that 
Transylvania has not already been promised to 
both parties. 

Meanwhile, German troops have occupied the 
important points in both countries ; the Gestapo 
and the S.S. have been systematically entering 
and wrecking every Rumanian and Hungarian 
institution. Through force and fear these two 
countries are already being brought within sight 
of hunger this year and starvation a year hence. 

These are the govenmients which, milike 
Greece, did not resist. They tried to buy 



MARCH 28, 1942 



259 



peace — with dishonor. They found, that the 
part of the bargain which the Nazis kept was 
to give them dishonor. 

They sought peace and quiet at the hands of 
the Nazis. They were given hatreds, riots, and 
suppressed civil war. 

They sought, by giving up their countries, to 
keep their harvests for food and their manufac- 
tures to supply their homes. They have been 
given economic serfdom at the hands of Nazi 
masters. Their people, even their children, are 
compelled to work in the fields — for foreign 
invaders. The products of their land and their 
toil are shipped to Berlin. Corrupt Nazi offi- 
cials make fortunes from bribes or blackmail 
extorted from the peasants and manufacturers 
of Hungary, of Transylvania, of the Banat, of 
the Danube Valley. 

Worst among the lies was the tale that Nazi 
arms would defend them from all enemies. But 
in fact, the Nazi diplomats and statesmen were 
building enemies for them and are plotting 
now to leave these countries defenseless. 

"We do not for one moment lose sight of the 
fact that resistance is hard and even terrible. 
It is true that we have not thus far felt here the 
privations of war, though that will come soon 
enough. But we watch with horror and rising 
anger the cold-blooded policy of starvation 
which the Nazi gang has imposed on occupied 
Greece. They have not even the code which 
first-rate soldiers observe towards a brave 
enemy. 

As we sit here tonight men, women, and chil- 
dren are dying of hunger in Crete, in the Pelo- 
ponnesus, in Epirus, in Athens, in Thrace. 
They are dying for an ideal which has main- 
tained the glory of Greece and the culture of 
the world since the dawn of history. Let it be 
resolved that not even the humblest of these 
dead shall be forgotten. Let it be determined 
that the men who are responsible for these hor- 
rors shall meet at long last the justice and the 
judgment they have deserved at the hands of 
the free peoples. 

But justice requires more than dealing with 
the guilty. It must include relief, assistance. 



and reconstruction of the life of Greece. In 
honor and in humanity we can do no less. 

Greece will not die. She could not, indeed, 
for there is more of western life and western 
hope in a handful of dust on the Acropolis than 
in all the makeshift religions, philosophies, and 
new orders that have come from the diseased 
brains in Berlin. From the example of Greece 
the United Nations must draw increased devo- 
tion to their declared ideal of preserving liberty, 
independence, and religious freedom, and of set- 
ting up once more a world in which human 
rights and justice are the foundation of the law 
of the earth. 

For many of us this has been a long road. 
As sometimes happens in history, the struggle 
for eternal values has occupied an entire life 
span. You and I belong to a generation which 
has had to meet a world war twice in a life- 
time. We came to maturity in the shadow of 
the first world conflict. We have struggled with 
the after effects of that war until the new strug- 
gle began to appear. We must live and sweat 
and toil through this second cataclysm, greater 
even than the first. We shall have spent most 
of our lives without knowing what peace really 
means. 

We have dreamed dreams, and have never 
surrendered them. We have sought a city whose 
builder and maker was God. We shall continue 
that search, though we may have to go from 
camp to camp; though, having fought, we can 
only rest and take the field again. But we will 
not in this life relinquish a ray of splendor of 
our dreams or a fragment of faith that has 
brought us, with clear eyes, through a lifetime 
of conflict. 

We are resolved that there shall be no com- 
promise in this present struggle. Wliat Greece 
could do, we all must do. If we never know 
what peace is in our lifetime, we propose never- 
theless that the light which came into Europe, 
and from Europe to the Americas, from the 
lamps of the Acropolis, from the tragedies of 
Euripides, from the songs of Menander, from 
the thought of Aristotle, from the science of 
Archimedes — that light will not go out. 



260 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BTJLLETtN 



ANNIVERSARY OF ACCESSION OF KING 
PETER n OF YUGOSLAVIA 

f Released to the press March 27] 

The President, on March 27, sent a telegram 
to the King of Yugoslavia, now resident in 
London, on the anniversary of the events in the 
course of which the regency was dissolved, King 
Peter II assumed power, and a new government, 
representative of the country at large, was con- 
stituted. These events preceded by just 10 days 
the invasion of Yugoslavia by the Axis powers. 
The telegram follows : 

"On this anniversary of the memorable day 
when the Yugoslav people boldly resolved to 
face the dangers threatening their liberty and 
honor, and entrusted their destiny to your 
leadership, I send this message of friendship. 

"The people of the United States join with me 
in this greeting to the people of Yugoslavia. 
We are sure of their victory in the valiant strug- 
gle for the restoration of their freedom. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

[Released to the press March 27] 

The following telegram has been sent to the 
King of Yugoslavia by the Honorable Arthur 
Bliss Lane, former American Minister to Yugo- 
slavia : 

"Having been privileged as Minister of the 
United States to witness in person the historic 
events of a year ago, and the heroic resistance of 
your people following the unprovoked attack 
on Yugoslavia, I venture to extend to Your 
Majesty my congratulations on the anniversary 
of your accession and my cordial good wishes for 
your personal welfare and for the restoration of 
the independence of Yugoslavia. 

Arthur Bliss Lane" 

INTER - AMERICAN DEFENSE BOARD 

Lt. Gen. Stanley D. Embick and Vice Admiral 
Alfred W. Johnson have been designated to rep- 
resent the United States on the Inter- American 
Defense Board, which will hold its first meeting 
in Washington on March 30. The Board is an 



outgrowth of a recommendation by the Third 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics that a commission com- 
posed of military and naval technicians be ap- 
pointed by each government of the American 
republics to study and recommend measures for 
the defense of the continent.^ 

ADVISORY MISSION TO INDIA 

[Released to the press March 24] 

In view of the appointment of Col. Louis 
Johnson as Personal Representative of the Presi- 
dent in India it will be necessary for him to 
devote his full time to his duties near the Gov- 
ernment of India at New Delhi. It has there- 
fore been decided that Dr. Henry F. Grady, 
former Assistant Secretary of State and a mem- 
ber of the Advisory Mission to India, will 
assume the active chairmanship of that Mission. 

The function of the Advisory Mission will be 
to investigate on the spot and make recom- 
mendations as to ways and means by which the 
United States Government can assist in aug- 
menting India's war potentialities. The work 
of the Mission is therefore directly related to the 
common war effort of the United Nations and in 
no way has to do with post-war industrial and 
commercial questions. 



The Far East 



REPAYMENT OF CHINESE LOAN 

The Chinese Ambassador in Washington has 
informed the Department of State that the 
Chinese Government has made arrangements to 
complete the repayment of the 25-million-dollar 
Wood-Oil Loan made by the United States to 
China on February 8, 1939 and that full pay- 
ment of the loan had accrued solely from the 
transactions which had been involved in the 
tung-oil shipments from China. 



'Bulletin of February 7, 1942, p. 139. 



MARCH 28, 1942 



261 



The Near East 



AGRICULTURAL MISSION TO 
SAUDI ARABIA 

[Beleased to the press March 25] 

In response to an inquiry by the Government 
of Saudi Arabia as to whether the services of 
two American experts in irrigation and agri- 
cultural matters could be made available, this 
Government has organized an Agricultural 
Mission to Saudi Arabia. The Mission will 
examine and report to the Government of Saudi 
Arabia upon the water and agricultural re- 
sources of that country and the possibilities of 
their development. It will also conduct experi- 
mental plantings. The personnel of the Mis- 
sion, which has already departed, follows: 

Mr. K. S. Twitchell, Chief 

Mr. Albert L. Wathen, Acting Chief, Engineering 
Brancli, Office of Indian Affairs, United States 
Department of tlie Interior 

Mr. James G. Hamilton, Regional Agronomist at Albu- 
querque, N. Mex., Soil Conservation Service, United 
States Department of Agriculture 

Mr. Twitchell has had extensive technical ex- 
perience in Saudi Arabia. The other members 
of the Mission are, as indicated, government ex- 
perts familiar with conditions in a section of 
this country which are similar to those prevail- 
ing in Saudi Arabia. 

This Government is pleased to have been able 
to respond in this way to the inquiry of the 
Saudi Arabian Government. 



General 



CHURCHILL - ROOSEVELT HIGHWAY IN 
TRINIDAD 

[Released to the press March 20] 

It is announced that the new highway being 
constructed in Trinidad, British West Indies, 



from Port-of-Spain, the Capital, to Fort Read, 
the United States Army base, will be named the 
Churchill - Roosevelt Highway. 

This important road, as well as many other 
projects in the colony, is being built expedi- 
tiously and efficiently through the close cooper- 
ation of the governments concerned, and such 
cooperation is, it is felt, well indicated by the 
road's official name. 

VERIFICATION OF PASSPORTS OF 
AMEIUCAN CITIZENS 

No verification of the passport of a citizen of 
the United States, or a person who owes alle- 
giance to the United States, shall be required for 
entry into the continental United States, the 
Canal Zone, the Commonwealth of the Philip- 
pines, or territories continental or insular sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction of the United States 
when the person is returning from a foreign 
country where he had gone in pursuance of the 
provisions of a contract with the War or Navy 
Departments on a matter vital to the war effort 
and when in possession of a valid passport and 
of evidence of having been so engaged, accord- 
ing to regulations issued by the Acting Secre- 
tary of State on March 17, 1942.2 

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through February 1942, as shown in the reports 
submitted by persons and organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State for the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions to be used 
for relief in belligerent countries, in conformity 
with the regulations issued pursuant to section 3 
(a) of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effective 
by the President's proclamations of September 5, 
8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of No- 
vember 4, 1939 as made effective by the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of the same date, has been 
released by the Department of State in mimeo- 



' 7 F.R. 2214. 



262 



DEPARTMEKT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 



graphed form and may be obtained from the 
Department upon request (press release of 
March 26, 1942, 44 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France ; Germany ; Poland ; 



the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



Cultural Relations 



EXHIBITION OF CHILEAN ART 
MESSAGE FROM THE ACTING SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press March 26] 

The Exhibition of Contemporary Chilean Art 
opening today in the Toledo Museum is a mile- 
stone in both the history of American art and 
the progress of inter-American friendship. The 
very presence in our country of this magnifi- 
cently representative collection is heartening, in- 
controvertible proof of the validity of that 
friendship. Not even the perils and hindrances 
of war at sea have prevented the generous ces- 
sion to us for a time by the Chilean people, from 
the treasure-house of their culture, of the can- 
vases, water colors, sculptures, poster designs, 
and etchings through which threescore of their 
leading artists portray the multiple shapes and 
colors of the national life. Viewing this art, we 
feel that vision is lengthened and distance is 
shortened. These Chilean landscapes, so like 
our own West and Midwest in river and moun- 
tain and fertile valley, so like Ohio in its harvest 
fields and California in its vineyards, cannot 
seem very strange to our eyes, nor do we feel un- 
familiarity so much as recognition in ai-t's por- 
trayal here of a people who have sprung like us 
from free American soil and know as we do 
democracy's way of life. 



" Read for Mr. Welles W Mr. Charles A. Thomson, 
Chief of the Division of Cultural Relations, Depart- 
ment of State, at the inauguration of the Exhibition 
in Toledo, Ohio, on March 25, 1942. 



The Department of State is deeply aware of 
the importance of art in all its various expres- 
sions as an interpreter of one people to another. 
For that reason, it encourages not only the inter- 
change of visits by creative artists and by stu- 
dents of the arts between our country and the 
other American republics but also the inter- 
change of books and music and sculptures and 
pictures. The President of the United States, 
proclaiming in 1933 the good-neighbor policy, 
emphasized the intention of this country to con- 
tribute by ever-widening interchange to mutual 
understanding and good-will among the coun- 
tries of the Western Hemisphere. Year by year 
since that proclamation, we have become in- 
creasingly aware of the significance and variety 
of the artistic expression in the other American 
republics, and they have become better and 
better acquainted with ours. 

One of the things that this interchange is 
showing us is that there is a common basis to 
our endeavor. We are all, in our 21 republics, 
rooted in American soil where, since the period 
of early colonization, our own art and our own 
institutions have been developing in our own 
democratic lands. Our art as well as our law 
codes and our systems of government makes this 
manifest. In the pictures and the sculptures 
here today, Chile speaks a language that all 
Americans understand. 



MARCH 28, 1942 



263 



CERTIFICATION OF EDUCATIONAL FILMS 



As a part of its program for improving and 
expanding cultural relations with other coun- 
tries, the Department of State now undertakes 
to certify films of an international educational 
character produced in the United States. 

An important objective of this program is to 
promote through motion pictures a better 
mutual understanding of the ways of life of 
the peoples of the various countries. Films are 
especially effective for this purpose since, to ai 
large degree, they cut across language barriers. 
An increasing number of films on medicine, 
engineering, agriculture, and modern industrial 
processes are being made to instruct students 
and to record industrial progress. The ex- 
change of such films should make an effective 
contribution to international intellectual coop- 
eration. 

It is hoped that attestation by the Depart- 
ment as to the educational character thereof 
will make it possible for films produced in the 
United States to receive the same preferential 



customs treatment that has for years been ex- 
tended to those produced in countries which are 
signatories to the League of Nations Convention 
for Facilitating the International Circulation of 
Films of an Educational Character, and of the 
Buenos Aires Convention Concerning Facilita- 
tion for Educational and Publicity Films. The 
United States is not a party to either of these 
conventions. 

In order that a film may receive a certificate 
of attestation it must be on a topic of interna- 
tional interest, and its purpose must be to in- 
struct in respect to established facts, conditions, 
and processes. Propaganda, news reels, amuse- 
ment films, and films dealing with purely 
national issues are not eligible for attestation. 

Application for attestation must be accom- 
panied by full information concerning the pic- 
ture for which certification is sought. A cer- 
tificate will be granted only upon request and 
only to the person or organization having the 
right to reproduce the film. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



FINANCE 



Agreement With China 

The following joint statement was issued on 
March 21, 1942 by the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury, Mr. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and His Ex- 
cellency T. V. Soong, Minister for Foreign 
Affairs of the Republic of China : 

"The United States and China have today 
entered into an Agreement giving effect to the 
Act of Congress unanimously passed by the 
Senate and House of Representatives authoriz- 
ing $500,000,000 of financial aid to China. The 
Agreement, approved by the President and by 



Greneralissimo Chiang Kai-shek, was signed by 
Secretary Morgenthau on behalf of the United 
States and by Dr. Soong on behalf of China. 

"This financial aid will contribute substan- 
tially towards facilitating the great efforts of 
the Chinese people and their government to 
meet the financial and economic burdens which 
have been imposed upon them by almost five 
years of continuous attack by Japan. 

"This Agreement is a concrete manifestation 
of the desire and determination of the United 
States, without stint, to aid China in our 
common battle for freedom. 



264 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtrLLETDT 



"The final determination of the terms upon 
which this $500,000,000 financial aid is given to 
China, including the benefits to be rendered the 
United States in return, is deferred until the 
progress of events after the war makes clearer 
the final terms and benefits which will be in the 
mutual interest of the United States and China 
and will promote the establishment of lasting 
world peace and security." 

The text of the agreement, signed on behalf 
of the United States by Mr. Morgenthau, and 
on behalf of Cliina by Mr. Soong, follows : 

"Whereas, The Governments of the United 
States of America and of the Kepublic of China 
are engaged, together with other nations and 
peoples of like mind, in a cooperative under- 
taking against common enemies, to the end of 
laying the bases of a just and enduring world 
peace securing order under law to themselves 
and all nations, and 

"Whereas, The United States and Cliina are 
signatories to the Declaration of United Nations 
of January 1, 1942, which declares that 'Each 
government pledges itself to employ its full re- 
sources, military or economic, against those 
members of the Tripartite Pact and its adlier- 
ents with which such government is at war' ; and 

"Whereas, the Congress of the United States, 
in unanimously passing Public Law No. 442, 
approved February 7, 1942, has declared that 
financial and economic aid to China will increase 
China's ability to oppose the forces of aggres- 
sion and that the defense of China is of the 
greatest possible importance, and has author- 
ized the Secretary of the Treasury of the United 
States, with the approval of the President, to 
give financial aid to China, and 

"Whereas, such financial aid will enable 
China to strengthen greatly its war efforts 
against the common enemies by helping China 
to 

" ( 1 ) strengthen its currency, monetary, bank- 
ing and economic system ; 

"(2) finance and promote increased produc- 
tion, acquisition and distribution of necessary 
goods ; 



"(3) retard the rise of prices, promote sta- 
bility of economic relationships, and otherwise 
check inflation ; 

"(4) prevent hoarding of foods and other 
materials ; 

"(5) improve means of transportation and 
communication ; 

"(6) effect further social and economic meas- 
ures which promote the welfare of the Cliinese 
people ; and 

"(7) meet military needs other than those 
supplied under the Lend-Lease Act and take 
other appropriate measures in its war effort. 

"In order to achieve these purposes, the under- 
signed, being duly authorized by their respec- 
tive Governments for that purpose, have agreed 
as follows : 

"Article I 

"The Secretary of the Treasury of the United 
States agrees to establish forthwith on the books 
of the United States Treasury a credit in the 
name of the Government of the Eepublic of 
China in the amount of 500,000,000 U. S. dollars. 
The Secretary of the Treasury shall make trans- 
fers from this credit, in such amounts and at 
such times as the Government of the Republic 
of China shall request, through the Minister of 
Finance, to an account or accounts in the Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank of New York in the name of 
the Government of the Republic of China or any 
agencies designated by the Minister of Finance. 
Such transfers may be requested by and such 
accounts at the Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York may be drawn upon by the Government of 
the Republic of China either directly or through 
such persons or agencies as the Minister of 
Finance shall authorize. 

"Article II 

"The final determination of the terms upon 
which this financial aid is given, including the 
benefits to be rendered the United States in re- 
turn, is deferred by the two contracting parties 
until the progress of events after the war makes 
clearer the final terms and benefits which will 
be in the mutual interest of the United States 



MARCH 28, 1042 

and China and will promote the establishment 
of lasting world peace and security. In deter- 
mining the final terms and benefits full cog- 
nizance shall be given to the desirability of 
maintaining a healthy and stable economic and 
financial situation in China in the post-war pe- 
riod as well as during the war and to the desir- 
ability of promoting mutually advantageous 
economic and financial relations between the 
United States and China and the betterment of 
world-wide economic and financial relations. 

"Abticu: m 

"This Agreement shall take eflfect as from this 
day's date. 

"Signed and sealed at Washington, District 
of Columbia, in duplicate this 21st day of March, 
1942." 



The text of the joint resolution to authorize 
the President of the United States to render 
financial aid to China, and for other purposes 
( Public Law 442, 77th Cong., 2d sess. ) , approved 
February 7, 1942, is printed below : 

"Whereas China has for more than four years 
valiantly resisted the forces of Japanese 
aggression; and 
"Whereas financial and economic aid to China 
will increase her ability to oppose the forces 
of aggression ; and 
"Whereas the defense of China is of the great- 
est possible importance: 
"Therefore be it 

^'■Resolved hy the Senate and Rouse of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the 
Treasury, with the approval of the President, 
is hereby authorized, on behalf of the United 
States, to loan or extend credit or give other 
financial aid to China in an amount not to exceed 
in the aggregate $500,000,000 at such time or 
times and upon such terms and conditions as the 
Secretary of the Treasury with the approval of 
the President shall deem in the interest of the 
United States. 
"Seo. 2. The authority herein granted shall 



265 

be in addition to any other authority provided 
by law. 

"Seo. 3. There is hereby authorized to be 
appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, such sum or sums 
not to exceed $500,000,000 as may be necessary 
to carry out the provisions of this joint 
resolution." 

HEALTH 
International Sanitary Convention, 1926 
Turkey 

The American Embassy at Vichy, France, 
transmitted to the Secretary of State with a 
despatch dated February 3, 1942, a certified 
copy of the proces-verbal of the deposit of the 
instrument of ratification by Turkey of the 
International Sanitary Convention signed at 
Paris June 21, 1926 (Treaty Series 762). A 
translation of the proces-verbal is printed 
below : 

"In execution of the clause of Article 170 of 
the International Sanitary Convention signed 
at Paris June 21, 1926, His Excellency Behic 
Erkin, Ambassador of Turkey in France, ap- 
peared today at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
of the French State and proceeded to the 
deposit of the instrument of ratification of His 
Excellency Ismet Inonu, President of the Turk- 
ish Kepublic, to that international act. This 
instrument, which states that the ratification is 
made with the reservation of the provisions 
stipulated for vessels in transit in the Conven- 
tion regarding the regime of the Straits, signed 
at Montreux on July 20, 1936, having been 
found after examination to be in good and due 
form, was delivered to the French Government 
for deposit in its archives. In accordance with 
the provisions of the Agreement referred to 
above, a certified true copy of the said proces- 
verbal will be addressed to the contracting 
Powers. 

"In faith whereof, this proces-verbal has 
been drawn up. 

"Done at Vichy, January 6, 1942. 

F. Darlan 
B. Eekin" 



266 



DEPAETMElSrr OF STATE BTTLLETTN 



Articles 1, 2, and 3 of the Convention Regard- 
ing the Regime of the Straits, signed at Mon- 
treux on July 20, 1936, provide in part as 
follows : 

"Article 1 

"The High Contracting Parties recognise and 
aflSrm the principle of freedom of transit and 
navigation by sea in the Straits. 

"The exercise of this freedom shall henceforth 
be regulated by the provisions of the present 
Convention. 

^'Section I 

"merchant vessels 

"Article 2 

"In time of peace, merchant vessels shall en- 
joy complete freedom of transit and navigation 
in the Straits, by day and by night, under any 
flag and with any kind of cargo, without any 
formalities, except as provided in Article 3 be- 
low. . . . 

"Article 3 

"All ships entering the Straits by the Aegean 
Sea or by the Black Sea shall stop at a sanitary 
station near the entrance to the Straits for the 
purposes of the sanitary control prescribed by 
Turkish law within the framework of interna- 
tional sanitary regulations. This control, in the 
case of ships possessing a clean bill of health or 
presenting a declaration of health testifying 
that they do not fall within the scope of the pro- 
visions of the second paragraph of the present 
Article, shall be carried out by day and by night 
with all possible speed, and the vessels in ques- 
tion shall not be required to make any other stop 
during their passage through the Straits. 

"Vessels which have on board cases of plague, 
cholera, yellow fever, exanthematic typhus or 
smallpox, or which have had such cases on board 
during the previous seven days, and vessels 
which have left an infected port within less than 
five times twenty-four hours shall stop at the 
sanitary stations indicated in the preceding 
paragraph in order to embark such sanitary 
guards as the Turkish authorities may direct. 



No tax or charge shall be levied in respect of 
these sanitary guards and they shall be disem- 
barked at a sanitary station on departure from 
the Straits." 

The United States of America is not a party 
to this convention. 



The countries in respect of which the Inter- 
national Sanitary Convention is in force as a 
result of ratification or adherence are the United 
States of America, Afghanistan, Australia, Bel- 
gium (including Belgian Congo and Ruanda- 
Urundi), Brazil, Qiile, Czechoslovakia, Free 
City of Danzig, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, 
France, Germany, Great Britain (including 
Bahamas, Basutoland Protectorate, Bermuda, 
British Guiana, British Honduras, Brunei, 
Ceylon, Cyprus, Ellice and Gilbert Islands, 
Falkland Islands, Federated Malay States, Fiji, 
Gambia, Gibraltar, Gold Coast, Hong Kong, 
Johore, Kedah, Kenya, Kelantan, New Guinea, 
North Borneo, Northern Rhodesia, Nigeria, 
Nyasaland, Palestine and Trans-Jordan, Papua, 
St. Helena, Sarawak, Seychelles, Solomon 
Islands, Southern Rhodesia, Sierra Leone, 
Straits Settlements, Swaziland, the Sudan, 
Tonga, Tanganyika, Trengganu, Trinidad, 
Uganda, Weihaiwei, and Zanzibar), Greece, 
Hungary, Italy, Iraq, Japan, Mexico, Monaco, 
Morocco, Netherlands, Newfoundland, Poland, 
Rumania, Spain, Sweden, Tunis, Turkey, Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics, and Yugoslavia. 

LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

United States 

On March 24, 1942, the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the President 
of the Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of 
Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad, 
which was opened for signature at the Pan 
American Union on February 17, 1940 and was 
signed ad referendum on behalf of the United 
States on October 3. 1941. 



MAKCH 28, 1942 



267 



The protocol has been signed by the United 
States of America ad referendum; Bolivia ad 
refereiidum,; Brazil; Colombia ad referendum; 
El Salvador ad referendum; Nicaragua ad ref- 
erendum; Panama ad referendum; and Vene- 
zuela, •with a modification. 

The countries which have deposited instru- 
ments of ratification of the protocol are El 
Salvador, with a reservation, and Venezuela, 
with a modification. Under the terms of article 
XII of the protocol it is now effective between 
Brazil, El Salvador, and Venezuela. 

INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Convention Providing for the Creation of an 
Inter-American Indian Institute 

Nicaragua 

By a note dated March 20, 1942 the Mexican 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Secre- 
tary of State that the instrument of ratification 
by Nicaragua of the Convention Providing for 



the Creation of an Inter- American Indian Insti- 
tute, which was opened for signature at Mexico 
City by the American Governments from No- 
vember 1 to December 31, 1940, was deposited 
with the Mexican Government on March 10, 
1942. 



Legislation 



Amendments to the Act of June 8, 1938, as Amended, 
Requiring the Registration of Agents of Foreign Prin- 
cipals. S. Rept. 1227, 77th Cong., on S. 2399. 3 pp. 



Regulations 



Claims Against the United States [for damages occa- 
sioned by Army forces in foreign countries]. [Filed 
March 25, 1942.] (Army: War Department.) 7 
Federal Register 2331. 



Publications 



Depaetment of State 

During the quarter beginning January 1, 1942 
the following publications have been released by 
the Department : * 

1649. Trail Smelter Arbitration Between the United 
States and Canada Under Convention of April 15, 
1935: Decision of the Tribunal Reported Alarch 11, 
1941. Arbitration Series 8. iv, 61 pp. 10«. 

1658. Military Mission : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Haiti — Signed May 
23, 1941; effective May 23, 1941. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 213. 11 pp. 5(^. 

1673. Relief From Double Income Tax on Shipping 
Profits: Arrangement Between the United States of 
America and Panama — Effected by exchanges of 
notes signed January 15, February 8, and March 28, 
1941. Executive Agreement Series 221. 5 pp. 5<}. 

1674. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 130, 



' Serial numbers which do not appear in this list have 
appeared previously or will appear in subsequent lists. 



December 20, 1941. 44 pp. 10^." 

1675. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. V, no. 131, 
December 27, 1941. 51 pp. 10^. 

1676. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

132, January 3, 1942. 35 pp. 100. 

1677. Diplomatic List, January 1942. ii, 94 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year; single copy, 10^. 

1678. Additional Temporary Diversion for Power Pur- 
poses of Waters of the Niagara River Above the 
Falls: Supplementary Arrangement Between the 
United States of America and Canada — Effected by 
exchanges of notes signed at Washington October 27 
and November 27, 1941 ; approved by the President 
November 27, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 223. 
5 pp. 54. 

1679. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). January 1, 1942. 
29 pp. Free. 

1680. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

133, January 10, 1942. 15 pp. 10(t. 



' Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



268 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



1681. Recommendations of the North American Re- 
gional Radio-Engineering Meeting: Arrangement 
Between the United States of America, Canada, Cuba, 
the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico — Signed 
at Washington January 30, 1942 ; effective March 29, 
1941 (Supplemental to North American Regional 
Broadcasting Agreement, Habana, 1937). Executive 
Agreement Series 227. iv, 52 pp. 10^. 

1682. Control of American Citizens and Nationals En- 
tering and Leaving Territory Under Jurisdiction of 
the United States. December 3, 1941. Passport 
Series 4. 7 pp. Free. 

1683. Haitian Finances: Supplementary Financial 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Haiti— Signed September 30, 1941. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 224. 2 pp. 5^. 

1684. Haitian Finances : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Haiti To Replace the Agree- 
ment of August 7, 1933, and Exchanges of Notes — 
Agreement signed September 13, 1941 ; effective 
October 1, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 220. 
17 pp. 54. 

1685. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 134, 
Janu.iry 17, 1942. 21 pp. 10(t. 

1680. Foreign Service List, January 1, 1942. Iv, 109 pp. 
Subscription 500 a year ; single copy, 150. 

1687. Register of the Department of State, November 1, 
1941. vili, 283 pp. 400 (paper). 

1688. Allocation of Tariff Quota on Crude Petroleum 
and Fuel Oil : Proclamation by the President of the 
United States of America Issued December 26, 1941 
Pursuant to Article VII of the Reciprocal Trade 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Venezuela Signed November 6, 1939. Executive 
Agreement Series 226. 5 pp. 50. 

1689. The Department of State Bulletin, voL VI, no. 135, 
January 24, 1942. 10 pp. 100. 

1690. Cooperative Rubber Investigations In Costa Rica : 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Costa Rica,, and Additional Note — Agreement ef- 
fected by exchange of notes signed April 19 and June 
16, 1941; effective June 16, 1941. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 222. 14 pp. 50. 

1691. Allocation of Tariff Quota on Heavy Cattle Dur- 
ing the Calendar Year 1942: Proclamation by the 
President of the United States of America Issued 
December 22, 1941 Pursuant to the Reciprocal Trade 
Agreement Between the United States of America 
and Canada Signed November 16, 1938, and Related 
Notes. Executive Agreement Series 225. 7 pp. 50. 

1692. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Revision I, February 7, 1942, Promulgated 
Pursuant to Proclamation 2497 of the President of 
July 17, 1941. 163 pp. Free. 

1693. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 
136, January 31, 1942. 29 pp. 10#. 



1694. Joint Committees on Economic Cooperation: Ar- 
rangement Between the United States of America 
and Canada — Effected by aide-memoire dated March 
17 and June 6 and 17, 1941. Executive Agreement 
Series 228. 6 pp. 50. 

1695. Diplomatic List, February 1942. ii, 94 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1696. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

137, February 7, 1942. 35 pp. 100. 

1697. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

138, February 14, 1942. 10 pp. 100. 

1698. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 1, February 28, 1942, to Revi- 
sion I of February 7, 1942. 27 pp. Free. 

1699. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 139, 
February 21, 1942. 19 pp. 100. 

1700. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 140, 
February 28, 1942. 19 pp. 100. 

1701. Diplomatic List, March 1942. 11, 95 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1703. Defense of Iceland by United States Forces: 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
Iceland— Effected July 1, 1941; ratified by the Ice- 
landic Regent in Council July 10, 1941. Executive 
Agreement Series 232. 4 pp. 50. 

1704. Exchangeof Official Publications: Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and El Salva- 
dor — Effected by exchange of notes signed Novem- 
ber 21 and 27, 1941; effective November 27, 1941. 
Executive Agreement Series 230. 4 pp. 50. 

1705. Visits in Uniform by Members of Defense Forces: 
Arrangement Between the United States of America 
and Canada and Exchange of Notes Dated May 17 
and 29, 1940 — Arrangement effected by exchange of 
notes signed August 28 and September 4, 1941, effec- 
tive September 11, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 
233. 4 pp. 50. 

1708. Reciprocal Trade : Second Supplementary Agree- 
ment and Exchange of Notes Between the United 
States of America and Cuba — Signed at Habana 
December 23, 1941 ; effective January 5, 1942. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 229. 33 pp. 100. 

1707. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 141. 
March 7, 1942. 25 pp. 100. 

1711. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 142, 
March 14, 1942. 8 pp. 100. 

1712. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 143, 
March 21, 1942. 18 pp. 100. 

1713. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nation- 
als. Supplement 2, March 27, 1942, to Revision I 
of February 7, 1942. 33 pp. Free. 

Teeatt Sebieb : 

962. North American Regional Broadcasting: Agree- 
ment Between the United States of America, Canada, 
Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico — Signed 



MAECH 28, 1042 

at Habana December 13, 1937; proclaimed by the 
President January 23, 1941. iv, 101 pp. 15^. 
970. Inter-American Coffee Agreement : Agreement and 
Protocol Between the United States of America 
and Other American Republics, and Joint Resolution 
Approved April 11, 1941 — Agreement signed at Wash- 
ington November 28, 1940 ; agreement and protocol 
proclaimed by the President of the United States 
April 15, 1941. iv, 53 pp. 10(J. 

The Department of State also publishes the 
slip laws and Statutes at Large. Laws are 
issued in separate series and are numbered in 
the order in which they are signed. Treaties 
are also issued in a separate series and are num- 
bered in the order in which they are proclaimed. 
All other publications of the Department since 
October 1, 1929, are numbered consecutively in 
the order in which they are sent to press, and, 
in addition, are subdivided into series accord- 
ing to general subject. 

To avoid delay, requests for publications of 
the Department of State should be addressed 
direct to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 



269 

except in the case of free publications, which 
may be obtained from the Department. The 
Superintendent of Documents will accept de- 
posits against which the cost of publications 
ordered may be charged and will notify the 
depositor when the deposit is exhausted. The 
cost to depositors of a complete set of the pub- 
lications of the Department for a year will 
probably be somewhat in excess of $15. Orders 
may be placed, however, with the Superintend- 
ent of Documents for single publications or for 
one or more series. 

The Superintendent of Documents also has, 
for free distribution, the following price lists 
which may be of interest : Foreign Relations of 
the United States; American History and Bi- 
ography; Tariff; Immigration; Alaska and 
Hawaii ; Insular Possessions ; Laws ; Conamerce 
and Manufactures ; Political Science ; and Maps. 
A list of publications of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce may be obtained from 
the Department of Conamerce. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.76 a year 

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