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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"

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5. 8. SUPT. OF DOCUMENTS 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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VOLUME VII: Numbers 158 -183a jfCj-B/"^ ' 

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July 4-December 26, 1942 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1943 



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U. S. SUPERlNTfNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

MAR 25 1943 



Publication 1884 



INDEX 
Volume VII: Numbers 158-183a, July 4-December 26, 1942 



Academy of Political Science. New York, N. Y. r Ad- 
dress by Mr. Grew before. 915. 
Acheson, Dean G., Assistant Secretary of State: Ad- 
dress on building in war for peace, 614. 
Addresses (see also names of the individuah) : 
Books and Authors luncheon, by Mr. Grew, S65. 
Building in War for Peace, by Mr. Acheson, 614. 
Canadian Victory Loan campaign, by Mr. Grew, 800. 
China Relief, United, by Mr. Grew, 797. 
Civilian Defense audience (Omaha), by Mr. Grew, 

945. 
Columbus Day, by Mr. Berle, 836. 
Country Women in a Neighborhood of Nations, by Mr. 

Bundy, 879. 
Economic and Financial Control Systems, Inter- 
American Conference on. by Mr. Welles, 580. 
Far East, Building Our Relations With, by Mr. Han- 
son, 964. 
Foreign Policy, American, the Realist Base of, by Mr. 

Berle, 831. 
Foreign Relations, Chicago Council on, by Mr. Grew, 

919. 
Foreign Trade Conrention, 29th national- 
World Trade dinner, by Mr. Welles, 808. 
Some Economic Asijects of Our Foreign Relations, 

by Mr. Geist, 813. 
British-American Trade Relations After the War, 

by Mr. Hawkins, 818. 
Greek resistance to Axis aggression, by Mr. Welles, 

876. 
Herald Tribune Forum, New York, by Mr. WeUes, 

939 ; by Admiral Standley, 9^3. 
Iceland, anniversary of arrival of American troops 

in, by Mr. Berle. 618. 
Industries, Associated, meeting, by Mr. Grew, 871. 
Italy, The Position of, by Mr. Berle, 925. 
Manufacturers' Association, Illinois, by Mr. Grew, 992. 
Poland, third anniversary of German attack on, by 

Mr. Berle, 733. 
Political Science, Academy of, by Mr. Grew, 915. 
Red Cross Nurses' Aid rally (Rockefeller Center), by 

Mr. Grew, 777. 
Remington Arms Company, by Mr. Grew, 758. 
Republican Club, National, by Mr. Grew, S6S. 
Return from Japan (on exchange ship "Gripsholm"), 

radio address on occasion of, by Mr. Grew, 719. 
Richmond War and Community Fund meeting, by Mr. 

Grew, 851. 



Addresses — Continued. 

Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial, dedication, by Mr. 

Welles, 991. 
Student Assembly, International, by President 

Roosevelt, 729. 
Trinity College commencement, by Mr. Grew, 1018. 
The War and Human Freedom, by Secretary Hull, 

639. 
War Finance Conference, by Mr. Grew, 845. 
War-rally luncheon (Syracuse), by Mr. Grew, 763. 
Advisory committees to Department of State, 780. 
Africa. See French North Africa ; French West Africa. 
Agreements, international. See Treaties, agreements, 

etc. 
Agriculture : 

Education, advisory committee on inter-American 

cooperation, 781. 
Experiment stations In Ecuador and El Salvador, 
establishment and operation. 1013. 
Aguirre, Salvador. Honduran Foreign Minister : Cor- 
respondence, U.S. relations with Vichy govern- 
ment, 939. 
Alabama State Chamber of Commerce: Address by 

Mr. Berle before, 831. 
Albania: Resistance to Italian occupation. 998. 
Alcohol, purchase by U. S. from Mexico. 633. 
Algeria : American military operations in French North 
Africa, message from President Roosevelt to 
Governor General Chatel, 907. 
Aliens, enemy : 

Nationals of Bulgaria, Hungary, and Rumania in 

U. S., 650. 
Transportation of, general license authorizing. 634. 
Allen, Percy F., Assistant Director of Personnel of the 

Department : Retirement, 985. 
Alliance and mutual assistance, treaty between United 

Kingdom and Soviet Union (1942), text, 781. 
Allied powers. See United Nations. 
Allocations : Commodities from U.S. to other American 

republics. 5S0. 
American Gifts Committee in Great Britain : Control 

of relief contributions from U.S.. 629. 
American Hemisphere Exports, OfBce of the Depart- 
ment : Acting Assistant Chief, designation of 
Lester S. Dame. 774 ; of Frederick T. Merrill, 744. 
American republics (see also Commissions, committees, 
etc. ; Conferences, congresses, etc. ; War ; and the 
individual countries) : 
Commodities allocated by U.S. to, 580. 

1087 



1088 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



American republics — Continued. 
Counselors of Embassy for economic affairs at U.S. 

missions in, 951. 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., from Argentina, 595, 
624 ; Brazil, 634, 651 ; Chile, 595, 968 ; El Salva- 
dor, 828, 950; Honduras, 950; Mexico, 929, 951, 
985, 1010, 1011 ; Paraguay, 858 ; Peru, 840, 894 ; 
Venezuela, 651, 984. 
Cultural relations (q.v.) — 
Advisory committees to Department of State, 780. 
Agreements (1942) between Argentina and Spain, 
930; between Brazil and Venezuela, 1012. 
Exchange with Axis powers of diplomatic, consular, 

and other personnel, 579, 632, 713. 
Highway, Inter-American, plan for completion, 661. 
Mutual-aid agreements with U.S., 972. 
Oil distribution to, from U.S., 620. 
Students in U.S. from, meteorology courses, 1010. 
U.S. employees, detail to, 625. 
American Republics, Division of the Department : As- 
sistant Chief, designation of John C. Dreier, 625 ; of 
Robert F. Woodward, 596. 
Americans : 
Citizens residing in Canada, military service, ar- 
rangement with Canada regarding, 789. 
Entry into and departure from U.S., regulations. 

Repatriation from Europe, 579; from Far East, 713. 
Amity, treaty of, China and Cuba (1942), signature, 

972. 
Anglo-American Caribbean Commission, U.S. Section : 
Duties, 1011. 

Secretary (Weston), appointment, 660. 
Appeals on Visa Cases, Board of, report, 982. 
Appleby, Paul H., Under Secretary of Agriculture : 
Special Assistant to Secretary of State, in charge of 
Office of Foreign Territories, designation, 971, 
985. 
Appropriations, State Department, 1943, analysis, 670. 
Aranha, Oswaldo, Brazilian Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs : 
Correspondence with Secretary Hull — 
Anniversary of Brazilian independence, 771. 
Declaration of war on Germany and Italy by 
Brazil, 723. 
Argentina (see also American republics) : 

American military operations in Fi-ench North 
Africa, message from Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs (Guinazu) to Secretary Hull, 913. 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 595, 624. 
Death of ex-Presldent Ortiz, 634. 
Sinking of steamer (Rio Tercero), letter of appre- 
ciation for U.S. assistance to crew, 579. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Commercial, with Spain (1942), signature, 897. 
Cultural, with Spain (1942), signature, 930. 



Argentina — Continued. 

Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Trade, 
With U.S. (1941), supplementary proclamation, 

1001. 
With Venezuela (1942), signature, 1012. 
Wheat, memorandum of agreement (1942), ap- 
proval, 582; text (including draft convention), 
583. 
Armed forces, U.S. See War. 
Armies in the field (Red Cross Convention), 622. 
Armistice Day proclamation, 895. 
Arroyo del Rio, Carlos A., President of Ecuador: 
Correspondence, American military operations in 

French North Africa, 912. 
Visit to U.S., 929, 949. 
Atlantic Charter: Anniversary of signing, message 
from President Roosevelt to Prime Minister 
Churchill, 697. 
Australia : 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — ■ 

Lend-lease aid, reciprocal, to U.S. and Its armed 

forces (1942), signature, 734; text, 736. 
Wheat, memorandum of agreement (1942), ap- 
proval, 582; text (including draft convention), 
583. 
Wool, reduction In export price, 983. 
Austria, status of, statement by Secretary Hull, 660. 
Aviation : 

Training schools In Mexico, 660. 
Transportation by air, convention (1929), adherence 
by Liberia, lOOl. 
Awards : 

Legion of Merit, 895. 
Medal for Merit, 1022. 
Axis powers. See Germany ; Italy ; Japan. 

Babassu and castor oil : Purchase by U. S. from Brazil, 

725. 
Baldomir, General Alfredo, President of Uruguay: 
Correspondence, American military operations In 
French North Africa, 913. 
Balfour Declaration, 25th anniversary, 885. 
Batista, General Fulgencio, President of Cuba : 
Correspondence, American military operations in 

EYeuch North Africa, 911. 
Visit to U. S., 929, 1000. 
Belgian Congo : Adherence to international opium con- 
vention of 1912, 705. 
Berle, Adolf A., Jr., Assistant Secretary of State : 

Address on anniversary of arrival of American troops 
in Iceland, 618 ; on anniversary of German at- 
tack on Poland, 733 ; on Columbus Day, 836 ; on 
position of Italy in War, 925 ; on realist base of 
American foreign policy, 831. 
Correspondence, military service of American citizens 
residing in Canada, 790. 



INDEX 



1089 



Bevans, Charles I., Treaty Division of the Department : 
Alternate liaison officer with Office of Fishery Co- 
ordination of Interior Department, designation, 
715. 
Biddle, Anthony J. Drexel, Jr.: Confirmation of nomi- 
nation as American Ambassador to Yugoslavia and 
Greece, 792. 
Bjornsson, Sveinn, Regent of Iceland : Correspondence, 

national holiday of Iceland, 984. 
Blocked nationals. See Proclaimed List of Certain 

Blocked Nationals. 
Boards. See Commissions, committees, etc. 
Bolivia (see also American republics) : 

American military operations in French North 
Africa, message from President Penaranda to 
President Roosevelt, 908. 
Economic cooperation vrith U.S., 621, 634, 702. 
Health and Sanitation Mission, U.S., to, 662. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Military mission, with U.S. (1942), signature, 704. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 633. 
Sanitation, with U. S. (1942), signature, 703. 
Books and Authors luncheon, address by Mr. Grew, 865. 
Brazil (see also American republics) : 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 634, 651. 
Declaration of war on Germany and Italy, message 
from President Roosevelt to President Vargas, 
710; from Secretary Hull to Foreign Minister 
Aranha, 711, and reply, 723. 
Indei)endence, anniversary message from President 
Roosevelt to President Vargas, 751 ; from Secre- 
tary Hull to Foreign Minister Aranha, 752 ; and 
reply, 771. 
Sanitary Conference, Pan American, 11th, at Rio de 

Janeiro, 839. 
Sinking of vessels by Axis submarines, message from 
President Roosevelt to President Vargas, and 
reply, 710. 
Technical Mission, U.S., to, 740. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Babassu and castor oil, with U.S. (1942), 725. 
Coffee, cocoa, and Brazil nuts, with U.S. (1942), 

signature, 860. 
Cultural interchange, with Venezuela (1942), sig- 
nature, 1012. 
Stabilization of exchange, with U.S. (1037), ex- 
tension, 622. 
Sugar regulation (1937), protocol of extension 
(1942), signature, 841. 
Brazil nuts, purchase by U.S., 860. 
British Guiana : 

Rubber agreement with U.S. (1942), signature, 698. 
British Honduras: Rubber agreement with U.S. (1942), 

signature, 713. 
British Isles. See Great Britain. 



Broadcasting, judicial decision regarding contract af- 
fected by North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement (1937), 897. 

Bulgarian nationals in U.S., alien enemies, 650. 

Bundy, Vernon E., Division of Commercial Policy and 
Agreements : Address on role of country women 
in a neighborhood of nations, 879. 

Cale, Edward G., Division of Commercial Policy and 
Agreements of the Department : Alternate repre- 
sentative on Interdepartmental Sugar Policy Com- 
mittee, designation, 625. 
Canada : 
Armed forces, transfer of U.S. citizens from Canadian 

to U.S., 711. 
Great Lakes Fisheries, International Board of In- 
quiry for, report, 858. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Migratory birds, U.S. and Great Britain (1916), 

678. 
Military service of American citizens residing in 

Canada, with U.S. (1942), text, 789. 
Post-war economic settlements, with U.S. (1942), 

text, 977. 
Wheat, memorandum of agreement (1942), ap- 
proval, 582; text (including draft convention), 
583. 
Victory Loan campaign, address by Mr. Grew, 800. 
Canadian-American Military Board, action by, 711. 
Cartas Andino, General Tiburcio, President of Hondu- 
ras: Correspondence, American military opera- 
tions in French North Africa, 912. 
Caribbean Commission, Anglo-American, U.S. Section : 
Duties, 1011. 

Secretary (Weston), appointment, 660. 
Caribbean Office of the Department : 

Assistant Chief, designation of Warden McK. Wilson, 

752. 
Duties as executive agency for U. S. Section, Anglo- 
American Caribbean Commission, 1011. 
Carmona, General Antonio Oscar de Fragoso, President 
of Portugal : Correspondence, American military 
operations in French North Africa, 906. 
Carr, Robert M., Assistant Chief, Division of Commer- 
cial Policy and Agreements of the Department: 
Representative on Interdepartmental Sugar Policy 
Committee, designation, 625. 
Castor Oil and babassu : Purchase by U. S. from Brazil, 

725. 
Catudal, Honorg Marcel, Assistant Chief, Division of 
Commercial Policy and Agreements of the Depart- 
ment : Designation, 774. 
Central Translating Office of the Department : Duties, 
791. 



1090 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Chapin, Selden, Assistant Chief, Division of tlie Amer- 
ican Republics of tlie Department : Executive sec- 
retary of Committee on Political Planning, appoint- 
ment, 896. 
Chiang Kai-shek, Generalissimo of China: 
Correspondence — 

Anniversary of Japanese attacli on China, 620, 633. 
Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment by 

U.S., 839. 
Radiophoto service, U.S. and China, 1010. 
Chief Clerk and Administrative Assistant of the Depart- 
ment : 
Designation of Millard L. Ivenestrick as, 692. 
Office of, creation, 691. 
Chile {see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
messages to President Roosevelt from officials 
and organizations, 909-910. 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 595, 968. 
Independence, anniversary message from President 

Roosevelt, 771. 
Inter-American Congress on Social Planning at 

Santiago, 748. 
President RIos, proposed visit to U.S., 701, 838. 
China (see also Far East) : 
Ambassador to U.S. (Wei), credentials, 824. 
National anniver.sary, message from President Roose- 
velt, 808. 
Eadiophoto service with U.S., opening, 1009. 
Relief, United China, address by Mr. Grew for, 797. 
Resistance to Japanese aggression, correspondence of 
General Chiang, President Roosevelt, and Secre- 
tary Hull, 619, 620, 633. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Amity, with Cuba (1942), signature, 972. 
Extraterritoriality in. relinqnishmeut by U.S., 
Negotiations, 805-808. 
Comments of President Roosevelt and General 

Chiang Kai-shek, 839. 
Draft submitted to Chinese Ambassador, S54. 
Friendship, with Iraq (1942), ratification by China, 

679 ; text, 680. 
Stabilization of exchange, with U.S. (1941), exten- 
sion, 623. 
Christmas messages, 1942: 

President Roosevelt to armed forces of U.S. allies, 

1017. 
Secretary Hull to the Nation, 1023. 
Churchill, Winston S., Prime Minister of Great Britain: 
Correspondence, American contributions for British 
relief, 629. 
Civilian Defense, Office of, Omaha, Nebr., address by 

Mr. Grew, 945. 
Civilian populations in occupied countries, crimes 

against, 709, 797. 
Claim Board, establishment, 715, 



Claims convention, U.S. and Mexico (1941), payment 

under, 968. 
Cocoa, purchase by U.S. from Brazil, 860. 
Coffee : 

Inter-American agreement (1940), imports into U.S. 

from non-signatory countries, 635, 724. 
Purchase by U.S. from Brazil, agreement (1942), 
860. 
Colombia (see also American republics) : 

American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Lopez to President 
Roosevelt, 910; reply, 936. 
President Lopez — 

Inauguration, message from President Roosevelt, 

689. 
Visit to U.S., 595, 621, 661. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Rubber, with U. S. (1942), signature, 595. 
Columbus Day address by Mr. Berle, 836. 
Commerce, international (see also Foreign trade, U.S.; 
Treaties, agreements, etc.) : 
Agreement, Argentina and Spain (1942), 897. 
Coffee, imports from countries not signatories of 

inter-American coffee agreement, 635, 724. 
Foreign Trade Convention, 29th national, address by 
Under Secretary Welles, 808 ; by Mr. Geist, 813 ; 
by Mr. Hawkins, 818. 
Free movement of persons, property, and informa- 
tion into and out of U.S., 892. 
Relations between Peru and Venezuela, 1012. 
Silver, exportation by Mexico to U.S., 714. 
U.S. and— 

Dominican Republic, 952. 
Iran, 664. 
U.S.S.R., 662, 693. 
Wheat, memorandum of agreement concerning trade 

in, 582. 
Wool, Australian and New Zealand, reduction in 
export price, 983. 
Commercial Policy and Agreements, Division of the 
Department: Assistant Chief, designation of 
Honors Marcel Catudal, 774. 
Commissions, committees, etc. : 
International — 

Caribbean Commission, Anglo-American, 660, 1011. 
Food Board, Combined, U.S. and Great Britain, 791. 
Great Lakes Fisheries, Board of Inquiry for, 858. 
Military Board, Canadian-American, 711. 
Political Defense, Emergency Advisory Committee 

for, 936, 999. 
Social Security, Inter-American Committee on, 970. 
Sugar Council, 678. 

War Crimes, United Nations Commission for In- 
vestigation of, 797. 
National — 

Claim Board, 715. 

Cultural relations, advisory committees, 780. 



INDEX 



1091 



Commissions, committees, etc. — Contimied. 
National — Continued. 

Fisheries Committee, War Production Board, 715. 
Health and Sanitation Mission to Bolivia, 662. 
Liaison Committee ( U.S. ) of the Associated Coun- 
try Women of the World, 879. 
Medal for Merit Board, 1022. 
Motion Pictures, Interdivlsional Committee, 792. 
Reciprocity Information, Committee for, 725.' 
Sugar Policy Committee, Interdepartmental, 62.5. 
Technical missions, U.S. to — 
Brazil, 740. 
India, 749. 
Mexico, 954. 
Visa Cases, Board of Appeals on, 982. 
War Relief Agencies, Committee on, 657. 
War Relief Control Board, 658, 791. 
Commodities allocated by U.S. to other American re- 
publics, 580. 
Conferences, congresses, etc. : 
International — 
Country Women of the World, Associated, Inter- 
American Conference, at Kansas City, Mo., 
879. 
Economic and Financial Control, Systems of, In- 
ter-American Conference, at Washington, 580. 
Labor Conference, 624, 724. 
Sanitary Conference, 11th Pan American, at Rio 

de Janeiro, 715, 724, 839. 
Social Planning, Inter-American Congress on, at 

Santiago, 743, 970. 
Student Assembly, at Washington, 729. 
Telecommunication Union, at Bern, 652. 
Wheat Council, at Washington, 670, 688. 
Wheat Meeting, at Washington, 582. 
National — 
Associated Industries meeting, at Boston, Mass., 

871. 
Foreign Relations, Chicago Council on, 919. 
Foreign Trade Council, 29th convention, at New 

York, 808, 813, 818. 
Political Science, Academy of, at New York, N. Y., 

915. 
War Finance Conference, at New York, 845. 
Congress, U.S. See United States Congress. 
Consular and diplomatic personnel. See Diplomatic 
representatives in U.S. ; United States Foreign 
Service. 
Consular Convention, U.S. and Mexico (1942), 704. 
Conventions. See Conferences, Congresses, etc. ; 

Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Costa Rica (see also American republics) : 

Independence, anniversary message from President 

Roosevelt, 771. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Prisoners of war (1929), adherence, 653. 



Country Women of the World, Associated, Inter- 
American Conference at Kansas City, Mo., address 
by Mr. Bundy to U.S. Liaison Committee, 879. 
Credentials. See Diplomatic representatives in U.S. 
Crimes against civilians in occupied countries, 709, 797. 
Croatia: Telecommunication convention (1932), ad- 
herence, 652. 
Cuba (see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Batista to President 
Roosevelt, 911; reply, 937. 
President Batista, visit to U.S., 929, 1000. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Amity, with China (1942), signature, 972. 
Military and naval cooperation, with U.S. (1942), 

signature, 750. 
Stabilization of exchange, with U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 623. 
Cultural leaders. See American republics ; and the in- 
dividual countries. 
Cultural relations. See American republics ; Far East. 
Cultural Relations Division of the Department: Ad- 
visory committees to, 780. 
Customs : Imports from countries not signatories of 

inter-American coffee agreement, 724. 
Czechoslovakia : 
National holiday, message from President Roosevelt 

to President BeneS, 875. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 607. 

Dahlquist, General John B., Acting Military Represent- 
ative of U. S. : Correspondence, reciprocal lend- 
lease aid, U.S. and Fighting France, 740. 
Dame, Lester S., Acting Assistant Chief, American 
Hemisphere Exports Office of the Department: 
Designation, 774. 
Dario Ojeda, Carlos, Acting Vice President, Emergency 
Advisory Committee for Political Defense : Corre- 
spondence, American military operations in French 
North Africa, 936. 
Darlan, Admiral Jean F^angois : 

Assassination, statement by Secretary Hull, 1017. 
Political arrangement with, 935. 

Statement regarding support of United Nations, 10O7. 
Declaration by United Nations (1942) : Adherence by 

Ethiopia, 805. 
Declarations of war. See War; and the individual 

countries. 
Decorations : 

Legion of Merit, 895. 
Medal for Merit, 1022. 
Defense, hemispheric: Political Defense, Emergency 
Advisory Committee for, 999. 



1092 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Defeuse areas in Liberia, U.S. jurisdiction, 979. 
de Gaulle, General Charles : Corre.spondenee, appoint- 
ment of U.S. representatives to Free French Na- 
tional Committee, 614. 
Departmental orders. See State, Department of. 
Departmental Personnel, Division of: Creation, 743. 
Designs : Arrangement concerning the international de- 
posit of industrial designs and models (1934), ad- 
herence by Tunisia, 931. 
Despradel, Arturo, Dominican Minister of Foreign 
Affairs: Correspondence, commercial agreement 
with U.S., 953. 
Diamantopoulos, Cimon P., Greek Ambassador to U.S. : 

Credentials, 825. 
Dickey, John S., Special Consultant to Division of Com- 
mercial Policy and Agreements of the Department : 
Designation, 1023. 
Digest of International Law : Publication of vol. IV, 957. 
Diplomatic representatives in U.S. : 

Axis nationals, exchange for Americans, 632. 
Credentials, 824, 825, 826, 968. 
French, exchange for Americans, 939. 
Dixon, Sir Owen, Australian Minister to U.S. : Corre- 
spondence, reciprocal lend-lease aid, 736. 
Dominican Republic (see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Trujillo to President 
Roosevelt, 912 ; to Secretary Hull, 914. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Commerce, with U.S. (1942), signature, 952; text, 
953. 
Dreier, John C, Assistant Chief, Division of the Amer- 
ican Republics of the Department: Designation, 
625. 
Drottningholm (steamship) : 
Return to Goteborg, Sweden, with Axis nationals, 

632. 
Safe-conduct for future voyages, withdrawal by Ger- 
many, 579. 
Dunn, James C, Political Adviser, Department of State : 
Chairman of Committee on Political Planning of 
the Department, designation, 896. 

East Indian Services: Appointment of U.S. represen- 
tative for liaison with Netherlands officials, 660. 
Economic and Financial Control Systems, Inter-Amer- 
ican Conference at Washington : Address by Under 
Secretary Welles, 580. 
Economics (see also Finance; Lend-lease aid; Mutual- 
nid agreements) : 
American Embassy in London, Economic Warfare 

Division, 770. 
Collaboration, U.S. and Bolivia, 621, 634, 702. 
Counselors of Embassy for economic affairs at U.S. 
missions in other American republics, appoint- 
ment, 951. 



Economics — Continued. 

Foreign relations, U.S., economic aspects, address by 

Mr. Geist, 813. 
Foreign Service officers, instruction in economic war- 
fare, 887. 
French North Africa, assistance to, 713; mission to, 

1008. 
Post-war settlements, U.S. and Canada, 977. 
Ecuador (see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Arroyo to President 
Roosevelt, 912 ; reply, 937. 
National anniversary, message from President Roose- 
velt to President Arroyo, 702. 
President Arroyo, visit to U.S., 929, 949. 
Treaties, agreements, etc.— 

Agricultural experiment station in Ecuador, with 

U.S. (1942), signature, 1013. 
Rul)ber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 650. 
Stabilization of exchange, with U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 623. 
Education : 

Cultural interchange between Brazil and Venezuela, 

1012. 
Historical studies, Peru and Venezuela, 1013. 
Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 
1030. 
Egypt : 

French warships at Alexandria, U.S. proposals, 631. 
King Farouk, gift to American forces in Egypt, 1000. 
Lend-lease equipment to, 914. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Opium (1912), adherence, 597. 
Statistics of causes of death (1934), cancelation 
of application of agreement to Burdein, 693. 
Eisenhower, General Dwight D. : Political arrangement 

with Admiral Darlan, 935. 
El Salvador (see also American republics) : 
American Minister (Thurston), confirmation of nom- 
ination, 929. 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 828, 950. 
Independence, anniversary message of President 

Roosevelt, 772. 
Minister of Foreign Affairs (Araujo), death, 690. 
Treaties, agreements, etc.— 

Agricultural experiment station in El Salvador, 

with U.S. (1942), signature, 1013. 
Prisoners of war (1929), adherence, 622. 
Red Cross Convention (1929), adherence, 622. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 723. 
Emergency Advisory Committee for Political Defense, 

999. 
Employees of U.S., detail to foreign governments, 625. 
Enemy aliens. See Aliens, enemy. 
Espil, Felipe A., Argentine Ambassador In Washing- 
ton : Correspondence, U.S. assistance to crew of 
"Bio Tercero", 579. 



INDEX 



1093 



Ethiopia : 

Declaration by United Nations (1042), adlierence, 

805. 
Lend-lease aid to, 999. 

War against Axis powers, declaration, 1009. 
Europe (sec also War; and the individual countries) : 
War crimes against civilian populations, 709; in- 
vestigation by United Nations, 797. 
European Affairs, Division of the Department : 
Assistant Chief, designation of Samuel Beber, 596. 
Responsibility for non-military matters In countries 
occupied by forces of United Nations, 971. 
Executive agreements. See Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Executive orders : 

Coffee agreement, termination of quota-allocation for 

non-signatory countries, 63-1. 
Employees of U.S., detail to foreign governments, 625. 
Legion of Merit, award, 89.5. 
Medal for Merit, award, 1022. 
War Relief Control Board, establishment, 658. 
Export-Import Bank of Washington : Credit to Mexico 

to aid in construction of steel plant, 705. 
Exports. See under Commerce, international. 
Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment by U.S., 
805-808, 839, 854. 

Far East (see also the individual countries) : 
Cultural relations, address by Mr. Hanson, 964. 
Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment by U.S., 

905-808, 839, 854. 
Mukden incident, 11th anniversary. 773. 
Prisoners of war held by Japan, relief, 741, 768. 
Radiophoto service, U.S. and China, 1009. 
Repatriation of Americans from, 713. 
War against Japan, declaration by Ethiopia, 1009. 
Farouk I, King of Egypt: Gift to American forces in 

Egypt, 1000. 
Fats and oils, purchase by U.S. and United Kingdom for 

United Nations, 791. 
Fellowships and professorships between American re- 
publics : Advisory committee on, 780. 
Fighting France. See France ; Free French National 

Committee. 
Finance (see also Economics; Lend-lease aid) : 
Agreement, supplementary, U.S. and Haiti (1942), 

signature, 10O2. 
Cooperation, U.S. and Bolivia, 702. 
Credit, U.S. to Mexico, for construction of highway, 

704; of steel plant, 705. 
Mexican payment to U.S. under claims convention, 

968. 
Mission of U.S. to Iran, 984. 

Ransom payments to Germany for persons in occu- 
pied countries, violation of Treasury freezing 
regulations, 962. 
512716 — 43 2 



Finance — Continued. 

Stabilization of exchange, agreements, U.S. and — • 
Brazil (1937), extension, 622. 
China (1941), extension, 623. 
Cuba (1942). signature, 623. 
Ecuador (1942), signature, 623. 
Iceland (1942), signature, 623. 
Systems of Economic and Financial Control, Inter- 
American Conference, at Washington, .580. 
War Finance Conference, at New York, N. Y., address 
by Mr. Grew, 845. 
Finland : Consular representation between U.S. and, 

cancelation, 632. 
Fisheries : 

Great Lakes, International Board of Inquiry, U.S. 

and Canada, report, 858. 
Interior Department, Office of Fishery Coordination, 
designation of Leo D. Sturgeon as liaison officer 
of State Department and of Charles I. Bevans as 
alternate, 71.5. 
War Production Board, Committee of, designation of 
Leo D. Sturgeon as State Department repre- 
sentative, 715. 
Food Board, U.S. and Great Britain, purchase of fats 

and oils, 791. 
Foote, Walter A., U.S. representative for liaison with 

Netherlands officials : Appointment, 660. 
Foreign Activity Correlation, Division of the Depart- 
ment : Acting Assistant Chief, designation of Lloyd 
D. Yates, 692. 
Foreign Funds Control, Division of the Department: 
Assistant Chiefs, appointments and designations — 
Meltzer, Bernard D., 677. 
Miller, Edward G., Jr., 677. 
Reinstein, Jacques J., 744. 
Tannenwald, Tlieodore, Jr. (Acting), 744. 
Foreign policy, U.S. : 

Address by Mr. Berle, 831. 

Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment, 805-808, 

839, 854. 
Free French National Committee, appointment of 

U.S. representatives to consult with, 613. 
French North Africa^ 
American military operations. 
President Roosevelt's message to French people, 
891 ; to officials of France, Portugal, Spain, 
Algeria, and Tunisia, and replies, 904. 
White House statement, 891. 
Economic assistance to, 713. 

Political arrangement with Admiral Darlan, 985. 
French West Africa — 

Political arrangement with Admiral Darlan, 935. 
Madagascar, British occupation, 750. 
Vichy government, U.S. policy toward, statements 
by President Roosevelt and Secretary Hull, 903. 
Foreign Relations, Chicago Council on, address by Mr. 
Grew, 919. 



1094 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETm 



Foreign Relations of the United States : The Paris Peace 
Conference, 1919: Publication of vols. I and II, 
1024. 
Foreign Service. See United States Foreign Service. 
Foreign students in U. S. : Advisory committee, 781. 
Foreign Territories, Office of the Department : 
Establishment, 971. 
Functions, 985. 
Foreign trade, U. S. {sec also Commerce, international; 
Lend-lease aid; Treaties, agreements, etc.) : 
Address by Mr. Bundy, 879; by Mr. Geist, 813; by 
Mr. Hawkins, 818; by Under Secretary Welles, 
808. 
Agreements with — 

Mexico (19-12), signature, 1029; analysis, 1031. 
Soviet Union (1942), signature, 6(52; text, 663; 

proclamation by U. S. Pre.sident, 693. 
Uruguay (1942), signature, 653; analysis, 654c; 
proclamation by U. S. President, 929. 
Allocations to other American republics, 580. 
Coffee agreement, inter- American (1940), quota-al- 
locations for non-signatory countries, termina- 
tion, 635; imports from non-signatory countries, 
724. 
Iran, 664-669. 

Proclaimed list of blocked nationals, 650, 688, 698, 
742, 780, 835, 893, 928, 948, 1022. 
Fotitch, Constantin, Yugoslavian Ambassador to U. S. : 

Credentials, 826. 
France : 

American Ambassador (Leahy), resignation, 651. 
Bombings of Le Havre and Rouen, reply of American 

Charge (Tuck) to protest against, 750. 
Diplomatic and consular representatives in U. S., ex- 
change for Americans in Prance, 939. 
Free French National Committee, cooperation of U. S. 

with, 613, 739. 
Ijabor, conscription for use in Germany, 770. 
Madagascar, occupation by British military 

forces, 750. 
Protest to Mar.shal P^tain by French patriots, state- 
ment of Secretary Hull, 751. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Lend-lease aid, reciprocal, U. S. and Fighting 

France (1942), signature, 734; text, 739. 
Postal, universal (1939), ratification, including 
French colonies, 693 ; arrangements effective 
for French West .Africa, 888. 
Vichy government, U. S. policy — 

Honduran .support, message from Minister of For- 
eign Affairs (Aguirre) to Secretary Hull, and 
reply, 939. 
Statements by President Roosevelt and Secretary 
Hull, 903. 
Warships at Alexandria, Egypt, U. S. proposals, 631. 



Franco y Bahamonde, General Francisco, Chief of 

Spanish State : Correspondence regarding Amer- 

can military operations in French North Africa, 

907. 

Fraser, Peter, Prime Minister of New Zealand : Visit 

to U.S., 723. 
Free French National Committee : 

Lend-lease, reciprocal-aid agreement, U.S. and Fight- 
ing France (1942), 739. 
U. S. representatives to consult with, appoint- 
ment, 613. 
French North Africa ; 

American military operations — 

Congratulatory messages to President Roosevelt 
from other American republics, and replies, 908, 
936 ; from Iraq, 938 ; reply, 962. 
Messages of President Roosevelt to officials of 
France, Portugal, Spain, Algeria, and Tunisia, 
and replies, 904 ; to Sultan of Morocco ( Sidi 
Mohammed), and reply, 961. 
Radio message of President Roosevelt to French 

people, 891. 
White House statement, 891. 
Assassination of Admiral Darlan, statement of Secre- 
tary Hull at time of, 1017. 
Economic assistance by U.S., 713. 
Economic mission, U.S., to, 1008. 
Political arrangement with Admiral Darlan, 935. 
Support of United Nations by French in, 1007, 1008. 
French West Africa : 
Political arrangement with Admiral Darlan. 935. 
Postal convention, universal (1939), arrangements 
effective for, 888. 
Friendship treaty, China and Iraq (19421, 679. 

Geist, Raymond H., Chief, Division of Commercial Af- 
fairs of the Department: Address on economic as- 
pects of foreign relations of U.S., 813. 
Geneva conventions. See Prisoners of War Conven- 
tion ; Red Cross Convention. 
Geography and History, Pan American Institute of, 

1030. 
George II, King of Greece: Conference with President 

Roosevelt, joint statement, 601. 
Germany : 
Attack on Poland, 3rd anniversary, 732, 733. 
Conscription of French labor for use in, 770; of Lux- 
embourg citizens into Army of, 770. 
Crimes against civilian populations in occupied coun- 
tries, 709, 797. 
Extermination of Jewish race, policy, 1009. 
Extortion of ransom payments for persons in coun- 
tries occupied by. 962. 
Safe-conduct for S.S. "Drottningholm", withdrawal, 

579. 
Spanish officials, false reports of delivery to Spain, 
963. 



INDEX 



1095 



Germany — Continued. 

War against, declaration by Brazil, 710 ; by Ethiopia, 
1009. 
Great Britain : 
Atlantic Charter, anniversary message from Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 6!)7. 
Balfour Declaration, 25th anniversary, 885. 
Caribbean Commission, Anglo-American, 660, 1011. 
Conferences iu London between British and American 

officials regarding conduct of war, 750. 
Economic collaboration with U.S., 770. 
Madagascar, occupation by British forces, 750. 
Post-war trade relations with U.S., address by Mr. 

Hawkins, 818. 
Relief contributions from U.S., correspondence of 
Prime Minister Churchill and President Roose- 
velt, 629. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Alliance and mutual assistance, with Soviet Union 
(1942), exchange of ratifications, 781; text, 
781. 
Lend-lease aid, reciprocal, to U.S. and its armed 

forces (1942), text, 734. 
Loadline, international (1930), modifications pro- 
posed, 859. 
Migratory birds, with U.S. in respect of Canada 

(1916), amendatory regulations, 678. 
Military equipment to Soviet Union (1942), signa- 
ture, 805. 
Wheat, memorandum of agreement (1942), ap- 
proval, 582; text (including draft convention), 
583. 
Great Lakes Fisheries, International Board of Inquiry 

for, U.S. and Canada, report, 858. 
Greece : 
Ambassador to U.S. (Diamantopoulos), credentials, 

825. 
American Ambassador to (Biddle), confirmation of 

nomination, 792. 
Axis aggression, resistance, message from President 
Roosevelt to Greek Ambassador, 876 ; address by 
Under Secretary Welles, 876. 
Relief shipments of food to, 686. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), joint statement by 
President Roosevelt and King George, 001 ; 
text, 602. 
Grew, Joseph C, Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State (former American Ambassador to Japan) : 
Appointment, 780. 
Addresses — 

Books and Authors luncheon, New York, 865. 
Canadian National Victory Loan campaign, 

Toronto, 800. 
Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, 919. 
China Relief (United), New York, 797. 
Civilian Defense audience, Omaha, 945. 



Giiew, Joseph ("., Special Assistant to the Secretary of 
State — Continued. 
Addresses — Continued. 
Illinois Manufacturers' Association dinner, Chicago, 

993. 
Industries, Associated, Boston, 871. 
National Republican Club, New York, 868. 
Political Science, Academy of. New York, 915. 
Red Cross Nurses' Aid rally. New York, 777. 
Remington Arms Company, Bridgeport, 758. 
Return to U.S., radio address, 719. 
Trinity College commencement, Hartford, 1018. 
War and Community Fund meeting, Richmond, 851. 
War Finance Conference, New York, 845. 
War-rally luncheon, Syracuse, 763. 
Gripsholm (steamship) : Arrival in N. Y. with American 

and other nationals from Far East, 713. 
Guardia, Ricardo Adolfo de la, President of Panama : 
Correspondence, American military operations in 
French North Africa, 913. 
Guatemala (see also American republics) : 
American military operations iu French North Africa, 
message from President Ubico to President 
Roo.sevelt, 912; reply, 937. 
Independence, anniversary message from President 

Roosevelt, 772. . 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Lend-lease, with U.S. (1942), signature, 972. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 752. 
Visit to U.S. of Minister of Foreign Affairs (Salazar), 
949, 984. 
Guinazu, Enrique Ruiz, Argentine Minister of Foreign 
Affairs : Correspondence, American military opera- 
tions in French North Africa, 913. 

Haakon VII, King of Norway: Birthday message from 

President Roosevelt, (>91. 
Hackworth, "Digest of International Law" ; Publica- 
tion of vol. IV, 957. 
Halle Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia : Correspondence, 
adherence by Ethiopia to Declaration by United 
Nations, 805. 
Haiti (see uUo American republics) : 
American military operations iu French North Africa, 
message from President Lescot to President 
Roosevelt, 912; reply, 937. 
Minister to U.S. (Liautaud), credentials, 968. 
Telecommunication Union, International, resignation 

as member, 653. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Finance, with U.S. (1942), signature, 10O2. 
Halifax, Viscount, British Ambassador to U.S. : Corre- 
spondence, reciprocal lend-lease aid, 734. 
Hanson, Haldore, of Division of Cultural Relations of 
the Department: Address on relations with Far 
East, 964. 



1096 

Hawkins, Harry C, Chief, Division of Commercial 
Policy and Agreements of the Department : Address 
on British-American trade relations after the war, 
818. 
Health : 
Bolivia — 

Mission from U.S., 662. 
Sanitation agreement with U.S. (1942), 703. 
Statistics of causes of death, international agreement 
(1934), cancelation of application to Burdein, 
Egypt, 693. 
Herald Tribune Forum. See New York Herald Tribune 

Forum. 
Highways : 

Inter-American, plan for completion, 661. 
Mexico, U.S. credit for construction, 704. 
Hispanic-Argentine cultural relations, agreement, 

(1942), 930. 
History : 
Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 

1030. 
Studies, agreement between Venezuela and Peru, 1013. 
Honduras (see also American republics) : 

American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Carias Andino to Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 912 ; and reply, 937 ; from Min- 
ister of Foreign Affairs to Secretary Hull, and 
reply, 939. 
Cultural leader, visit to U.S., 950. 
Independence, anniversary message from President 

Roosevelt, 772. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Rubber, with U.S. (1042), signature, 690. 
Hosmer, Charles B., Foreign Service Inspector : Death, 

951. 
Hull, Cordell (see also State, Department of) : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Albanian resistance to Italian occupation, 998. 

Austria, status, 660. 

Balfour Declaration, 2r)th anniversary, 885. 

Christmas message. 1023. 

Country Women of the World, Associated, U.S. 

Liaison Committee, message to, 879. 
Darlan, assassination of, 1017. 
Death of Charles B. Hosmer, 951 ; of ex-President 
Ortiz of Argentina, 634 ; of ex-President Terra 
of Uruguay, 773. 
Emergency Advisory Committee for Political De- 

fen.se, activities, 099. 
Extraterritoriality in China, 834. 
French labor, conscription by Germany, 770. 
Mukden incident, 11th anniversary, 773. 
North African situation, 1017. 
Oil distribution to oilier American republics, C21. 
Protest by French patriots to Marshal Petain, 751. 
Turkish journalists' visit to Department, welcome, 
878. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Hull, Cordell— Continued. 

Addresses, statements, etc. — Continued. 

United Nations, support by French in North Africa, 

1008. 
United Nations offensive in Africa, appreciation of 

messages of support and encouragement, 914. 
Vichy government, U.S. policy, 903. 
War (The) and human freedom, 639. 
Correspondence — 

Allen, Percy F., Assistant Director of Personnel 

of the Department, retirement, 986. 
Anniversaries, 

Brazil, independence, 752. 
China, invasion by Japan, 620; reply, 633. 
Soviet Union, founding of, 894; reply, 969. 
Armed forces, transfer of U.S. citizens from Ca- 
nadian to U.S., 712. 
Bolivian President-elect, visit to U.S., 662. 
Brazilian declaration of war against Germany and 

Italy, 711; reply, 723. 
Commercial agreement, U.S. and Soviet Union, 663. 
Death of Charles B. Hosmer, 952; of William Ray 
Manning, 886; of Turkish Prime Minister 
(Saydam), 63.3. 
French North Africa, American military opera- 
tions in, messages from Argentina, and reply, 
913-914; from Dominican Republic, 914. 
Jewish New Year celebration, 752. 
Lend-lease aid, reciprocal, to U.S. and its armed 
forces, 
Australia, 737. 
Great Britain, 736. 
New Zealand, 739. 
Luxembourgers, conscription into German Army, 

attempt by Reich, 770. 
Nomination of Turkish Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs (Menemencioglu), 714. 
Post-war economic settlements, U.S. and Canada, 

977. 
Quigley, Stephen H., 40th anniversary in Depart- 
ment, 858. 
Vichy government, breaking of U.S. relations with, 
message from Honduras and reply, 939. 
Employees of U.S., detail to foreign governments, 
625. 
Hungarian nationals in U.S., alien enemies, 650. 

Iceland : ~ . , 

American bases, inspection by American officials, 

750. 

American Minister (Morris), confirmation of nomi- 
nation, 703. 

American troops in, speech by Mr. Berle on anniver- 
sary of their arrival, 618. 

National holiday, correspondence of President Roose- 
velt and Regent Bjornsson, 983. 



INDEX 



1097 



Iceland — Continued. 

Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Publications, excliange of, with U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 774. 
Stabilization of exchange, with U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 623. 
Illinois Manufacturers' Association : Address by Mr. 

Grew, 993. 
Immigration : 

Visa Cases, Board of Appeals on, report, 982. 
Imports. See tinder Commerce, international. 
India: 
American military forces in, orders to, 697. 
Industrial resources, final report of American tech- 
nical mission, 749. 
Representative of President Roosevelt, appointment, 
998. 
Industry : 
Associated Industries meeting, Boston, Mass., address 

by Mr. Grew, 871. 
Tunisia, adherence to convention and arrangements 
providing for protection of industrial property, 
930-931. 
Inter-American relations. See American republics ; 

and the individual countries. 
International commissions, conferences, etc. See Com- 
missions, committees, etc. ; Conferences, congresses, 
etc. 
International Law, Digest of: Publication of vol. IV, 

957. 
Iran : 

Financial mission from U.S., 984. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Trade, with U.S., intention to negotiate, 665. 
Iraq: 

American Minister Resident and Consul General, 
Acting (Wilson), confirmation of nomination, 
703. 
Message from Prime Minister (Nuri-es-Said) to Pres- 
ident Roosevelt, 938 ; reply, 962. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Friendship, with China (1942), ratification by 
China, 679 ; text, 680. 
Italian-American Labor Council, address by Mr. Berle, 

925. 
Italy : 
Americans of Italian descent, Columbus Day address 

by Mr. Berle to, 836. 
Position in war, address by Mr. Berle, 925. 
War against, declaration by Brazil, 710; by Ethiopia, 
10O9. 

Japan (see also Far East) : 
Americans in. Red Cross negotiations for relief, 741, 

768. 
Ethiopian declaration of war against, 1009. 
512716 — 13 3 



Ja pa n — Co n t i n ued . 

Grew, .Joseph C, former American Ambassador to, 
addresses, 719, 758, 763, 777, 797, 800, 845, 851, 
865, 868, 871, 915, 919, W5, 993, 1018. 
Mukden incident, 11th anniversary, 773. 
Jewi.sh New Tear: Message of Secretary Hull, 752. 
Jewish race, extermination, German policy, 1009. 

Kanangoora (motorship) : Charter by Red Cross, 741, 

768. 
Kenestrick, Millard L., Chief Clerk and Administrative 

Assistant of the Department : Designation, 692. 
King Haakon VII (warship) : Transfer to Norwegian 

Government under Lend-Lease Act, remarks of 

President Roosevelt and Crown Princess Martha, 

757. 

Labor, French, conscription for use in Germany, 770. 
Labor Conference, International : Conventions, 624, 724. 
Latin America. See American republics ; and the in- 
dividual countries. 
Leahy, Admiral William D., American Ambassador to 

France : Resignation, 651. 
Lease-lend aid. See Lend-Lease aid. 
Lebanon : American Diplomatic Agent and Consul Gen- 
eral at Beirut, 828. 
Legion of Merit, award, 895. 
Legislation. See United States Congress. 
Lehman, Herbert H., Director of Foreign Relief and 

Rehabilitation Operations : Appointment, 948. 
Lend-lease aid (see also Mutual-aid agreements) : 
Agreements with Guatemala and other American 

republics, 972. 
Countries vital to U.S. defense, 779, 999. 
Operations, 778, 914. 
Reciprocal aid to U.S. — 
Australia, 736. 
France (Fighting), 739. 
New Zealand, 738. 
United Kingdom, 734. 
Warships, transfer to Netherlands, 685 ; to Norway, 
757. 
Lescot, Elie, President of Haiti : Correspondence, 
American military operations In French North 
Africa, 912. 
Liautaud, Andr6, Haitian Minister to U.S. : Credentials, 

968. 
Liberia : 

Employees of U.S., detail to, 625. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Aerial transportation (1929), adherence, 1001. 
Defense, with U.S. (1942), text, 979. 
Loadline convention (1930), modifications proposed, 

859. 
Lockhart, Frank P., Chief, OflSce of Philippine Affairs 
of the Department : Designation, 887. 



1098 

L6pez, Dr. Alfonso, President of Colombia : 
Correspondence — • 
American military operations in French North 

Africa, 911. 
Inauguration message from President Koosevelt, 

689. 
Visit to U.S. while President-elect, 595, 621, 661. 
Luxembourgers : Conscription into German Army, mes- 
sage from Secretary Hull to Luxembourg Minister 
(Le Gallais), 770. 

Madagascar: Occupation by British military forces, 750. 
Manchuria : Mukden incident, 11th anniversary, 773. 
Manning, William Ray : Death, 886. 
Martha, Crown Princess of Norway : Acceptance of war- 
ship in behalf of Norway, 757. 
Mazzini Society, address by Mr. Berle before, 925. 
McCarthy, Leighton, Canadian Minister at Wash- 
ington : 
Correspondence — 

Military service of U.S. citizens residing in Canada, 

789. 
Post-war economic settlements, 977. 
Transfer of U.S. citizens from Canadian to U.S. 
armed forces, 712. 
Medal for Merit, award, 1022. 

Meltzer, Bernard D., Assistant Chief, Foreign Funds 
Control Division of tlie Department : Designation, 
677. 
Menemencioglu, Numan, Turkish Minister of Foreign 
Affairs: Nomination, congratulations of Mr. Hull 
and reply, 714. 
Merit, Legion of, award, 895. 
Merit, Medal for, award, 1022. 

Merriam, Gordon P., Assistant Chief, Division of Near 
Eastern Affairs of the Department : Appointment, 
677. 
Merrill, Frederick T., Acting Assistant Chief, American 
Hemisphere Exports Office of the Department: 
Designation, 744. 
Messersmith, George S., American Ambassador to 
Mexico: Bailway-rehabilitation in Mexico, note, 
956. 
Meteorology courses in U.S. for students from American 

republics, 1010. 
Mexico (see also American republics) : 
Aviation training schools, establishment by U.S., 660. 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S.. 929, 951, 985, 1010, 

1011. 
Farm-labor migration to U.S., 689. 
Silver, exportation to U.S., 714. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Alcohol, with U.S. (1942), signature, 633. 

Claims convention, with U.S. (1941), payment 

under, 968. 
Consular, with U.S. (1942), signature, 704. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Mexico — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Migratory birds and game mammals, with U.S. 

(1936), U.S. regulations, 678. 
RaUways, rehabilitation of, with U.S. (1942), text, 

954. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 752. 
Seamen, annual holidays (1936), ratification, 624. 
Statistics, wages and hours in mining and manu- 
facturing industries and In agriculture (1938), 
ratification, 724. 
Steel-plant con.struction, credit from U.S. (1942), 

signature, 705. 
Trade, with U.S. (1942), signature, 1029; analysis, 
1031. 
Migratory birds, conventions with Canada (1916) and 

Mexico (1936), 678. 
Military and naval cooperation, U.S. and Cuba, 750. 
Military missions. See Missions, U.S. 
Military operations, American, in French North Africa. 

.See French North Africa. 
Military service, American citizens residing in Canada, 

789. 
Miller, Edward G., Jr., Assistant Chief, Division of 
Foreign Funds Control of the Department: Des- 
ignation, 677. 
Miller, Hunter, "Treaties and Other International 

Acts" : Publication of vol. 7, 1026. 
Missions, U.S. : 

Economic, to French North Africa, 1008. 
Health and Sanitation, to Bolivia, 662. 
Military, to Bolivia, 704 ; to Panama, 624. 
Technical, to Brazil, 740 ; to India, 749. 
Models: Arrangement concerning the international de- 
posit of industrial designs and models (1934), 
adherence by Tunisia, 931. 
Mohammed Ben Youssef, Sultan of Morocco: Corre- 
spondence, American military operations in French 
North Africa, 961. 
Molotov, V. M., Vice President of Council of People's 
Commissars and People's Commissar for Foreign 
Affairs, U.S.S.R. : Correspondence, anniversary of 
founding of Soviet Union, 969. 
Morgenthau, Henry, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury: 
Statement regarding extension of stabilization 
agreement with Brazil (1937), 623. 
Morinigo, General Higinio, President of Paraguay: 
Correspondence, American military operations in 
French North Africa, 936. 
Morocco : American military operations in French North 
Africa, correspondence of President Roosevelt and 
Sidi Mohammed, 961. 
Morris, Leland B., American Minister to Iceland: Con- 
firmation of nomination, 703. 
Motion Pictures, Interdivisional Committee: Coopera- 
tion of Central Translating Ofiice of the Depart- 
ment, 792. 



INDEX 



1099 



Mukden incident : Anniversary statement by Secretary 

Hull, 773. 
Mutual-aid agreements (1942), with U.S. (see also 
Lend-lease aid) : 

Czechoslovakia, 607. 

Greece, 601. 

Guatemala, 972. 

Netherlands, 604. 

Norway, 609-613. 

Other American republics, 972. 

Poland, 577. 

Yugoslavia, 647. 

Nash, Walter, New Zealand Minister to U.S. : Corre- 
spondence, reciprocal lend-lease aid, 738. 
Naval and military cooperation, U.S. and Cuba, 750. 
Navigation: Leadline convention (1930), moditicatious 

proposed, 859. 
Near East (see also the hidividuiil countries) : 

Greek resistance to Axis aggression, message from 
President Roosevelt to Greek Ambassador (Dl- 
amantopoulos), 870; address by Under Secretary 
Welles, 876. 
Iran, U.S. financial mission to, 984 ; trade-agreement 
negotiation, 664. 
Near Eastern Affairs, Division of the Department : 
Assistant Chief, appointment of Gordon P. Merriam, 
677. 
Netherlands : 

Lend-lease aid, warship received from U.S., 686. 
Queen Wilhelmlna, visit to Washington, 685. 
Ransom for persons in, German extortion, 962. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 604; notes, 
606. 
Netherlands Indies : East Indian Services, U.S. liaison 

officer, 660. 
New York Herald Tribune Forum : Address by Ameri- 
can Amba.ssador to Soviet Union (Admiral Stand- 
ley), 943; by Under Secretary Welles, 939. 
New Zealaud : 

Prime Minister Fraser, visit to Washington, 723. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Lend-lease aid, reciprocal, to U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 734 ; text, 738. 
Telecommunication service for U.S. expeditionary 
forces, with U.S. (1942), signature, 981. 
Wool, reduction in export price, 983. 
Nicaragua (sec a/so: American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Somoza to President 
Roosevelt, 912; reply, 938. 
Independence, anniversary message from President 
Roosevelt, 773. 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement 
(1937) : Judicial decision, 897. 



Norway : 
King Haakon VII, birthday message from President 

Roosevelt, 691. 
Lend-lease aid, warship received from U.S., 757. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 610; notes, 
612. 
Nuri-es-Said, General, Prime Minister of Iraq: 

Correspondence, American military operations in 
French North Africa, 938. 

Oil: Distribution from U.S. to other American repub- 
lics, 620. 

Opium convention of 1912, adherence by Belgian Congo 
and Ruanda-Urundi, 705; by Egypt, 597. 

Ortiz, Dr. Roberto M., ex-President of Argentina: 
Death, 634. 

Padilla, Ezequiel, Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs: 
Correspondence, rehabilitation of railways In Mex- 
ico, 954. 
Pan America. See American republics. 
Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 

1030. 
Pan American Sanitary Conference, 11th, at Rio de 

Janeiro, 715, 724, 839. 
Panama (see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Guardia to President 
Roosevelt, 913. 
Independence, anniversary message from President 

Roosevelt, 894. 
Relations with U.S., message of President Roosevelt 

to U.S. Congress 698. 
Treaties, agieements, etc. — 

Military mission, with U.S. (1942), signature, 624. 
Rubber, with U. S. (1942), signature, 773. 
Paraguay (see also American republics) : 
American military oj^erations in French North Africa, 
message from President Morinigo to President 
Roosevelt and reply, 936. 
Cultural leader, visit to U.S., 858. 
Paris Peace Conference, 1919, publication of vols. I and 
II in "Foreign Relations of the United States", 
1024. 
Passports, requirement for travel between U.S. and 

West Indies by American nationals, 971. 
Peace : Address by Mr. Acheson, 614. 
Peilaranda del Castillo, General Enrique, President of 
Bolivia : Correspondence, American military oper- 
ations in French North Africa, 908. 
Personnel Suijervision and Management, Division of 

the Department : Abolishment, 743. 
Peru (see also American republics) : 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 840, 894. 



1100 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Peru — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Commercial relations, with Venezuela (1942), text, 

1012. 
Historical .studies, with Venezuela (1942), signa- 
ture, 101.3. 
Student-training, with U.S. (1942), signature, 950. 
Trade, with U.S. (1942), proclamations, 597. 
Pgtain, Marshal Henri Philippe, Head of French State: 
Correspondence, American military operations in 
French North Africa, 905. 
Peter II, King of Yugoslavia : 

Conference with President Roosevelt, joint statement, 

647. 
Visit to U.S., message of appreciation to President 
Roosevelt, 687 ; reply, 688. 
Petroleum: Oil distribution from U.S. to other Ameri- 
can republics, 620. 
Philippine Affairs, Office of the Department: Chief, 

designation of Frank P. Lockhart, 887. 
Philippines : 
Birthday of President Quezon, message from Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, 714. 
Employees of U.S., detail to, 625. 
Phillips, William, Representative of President Roosevelt 

near Government of India : Appointment, 998. 
Poland : 

Anniversary of attack by Germany, message from 
President Roosevelt to President Raczkiewicz, 
732 ; address by Mr. Berle, 733. 
Treaties, agreements, etc.- — 

Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), text, 577. 
Political Defense, Emergency Advisory Committee: 
Activities, 999. 

American military operations ip French North Africa, 
message to President Roosevelt, and reply, 930. 
Political Planning, Committee on. Department of State : 
Establishment, and designation of James C. Dunn 
as chairman and Selden Chapin as executive secre- 
tary, 896. 
Political Science, Academy of: Address by Mr. Grew, 

915. 
Portugal : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
correspondence of President Roosevelt and Presi- 
dent Carmona, 90.5. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Sugar regulation (1937), protocol of extension 
(1942), signature, 841. 
Post-war economic settlements, U.S. and Canada, 977. 
Postal convention (1939) : Ratification by France, in- 
cluding French colonies, 693 ; arrangements effec- 
tive for French West Africa, 888. 
President, U.S. See Roosevelt, Franklin D. 
Prisoners of war : 

Convention relating to treatment (1929), 622, 653. 
Far East, relief, 741. 768. 



Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals : 
Revision II, 

Supplement 4, 650. 
Supplement 5, 688. 
Revision III, 698, 
Supplement 1, 742. 
Supplement 2, 780. 
Supplement 3, 885. 
Supplement 4, 893. 
Revision IV, 928, 

Cumulative Supplement 1, 948. 
Cumulative Supplement 2, 1022. 
Proclamations : 

Alien enemies in U.S., nationals of Bulgaria, Hungary, 

and Rumania, 650. 
Armistice Day, 895. 
Commercial agreement with Soviet Union (1942), 

693. 
Migratory-bird conventions with Great Britain in 
respect of Canada (1916) and with Mexico 
(193G), amendatory regulations, 678. 
Trade agreements with U.S.^ 
Argentina (1941), supplementary, 1001. 
Peru, 597. 

Uruguay (1942), 929; supplementary, 988. 
Property. See under Industry. 
Publications: 

Digest of International Law (Hackworth), 957. 
Exchange between U.S. and Iceland, agreement for, 

774. 
Foreign Relations of the United States : The Paris 

Peace Conference (1919), 1024. 
Lists — 

Department of State, quarterly, 783, 1027. 
Other U.S. Government agencies, 793, 987. 
Territorial Papers of the United States (Carter), 986. 
Treaties and Other International Acts (Miller), 1026. 

Queen Wilhelmina (warship) : Transfer to Netherlands 
under Lend-Lease Act, remarks of President 
Roosevelt and Queen Wilhelmina, 686. 

Quezon, Manuel Luis, President of the Philippines: 
Birthday message from President Roosevelt, 714. 

Quigley, Stephen H., Administrative Assistant, Division 
of Protocol of the Department: Commendation by 
Secretary HuU on 40th anniversary with Depart- 
ment, 858. 

Radiophoto service, U.S. and China, opening, 1009. 
Railways: Mexican national, rehabilitation, 954. 
Ransom, German attempts at extortion in occupied 

countries, 962. 
Reber, Samuel, Assistant Chief. Division of European 

Affairs of the Department : Designation, 596. 
Reciprocity Information, Committee for : 
Special Assistant and Executive Secretary, designa- 
tion of Edward Tardley, 725. 



INDEX 



1101 



Reciprocity Information, Committee for — Continued. 
Trade-agreemeut negotiations, U.S. and Iran, public 
notice, 665. 
Red Cross: 

Convention (192E)), adherence by El Salvador, 622. 
Relief shipments of food to Greece, arrangements, 

686. 
Relief to Americans in Japan, negotiations, 741, 768. 
Regulations, U.S. : 
Alien enemies, 650. 
American nationals, entry into and departure from 

U.S., 971. 
Government agencies, 626, 793, 899. 
Migratory birds, 678. 
War relief, 659. 
Rehabilitation. See Relief. 

Reinstein, Jacques J., Assistant Chief, Division of For- 
eign Funds Control of the Department: Appoint- 
ment, 744. 
Relief : 
Americans in Japan, 741, 768. 
Belligerent countries, U.S. contributions to, 677, 896; 

revision of certain regulations, 659. 
China, address by Mr. Grew, 797. 
Coordination of activities in U.S., 657. 
Domestic war relief and welfare, organizations reg- 
istered for, 896. 
Foreign relief and rehabilitation operations, appoint- 
ment of Herbert H. Lehman as director, 948. 
Great Britain, from U.S., 629. 
Greece, food shipments to, 686. 

War Relief Control Board, issuance of tabulation of 
contributions, 791. 
Repatriation. See Americans. 

Republican Club, National, address by Mr. Grew, 868. 
Richmond War and Community Fund meeting, address 

by Mr. Grew, 851. 
Riefler, Winfield, Special Assistant to the American 

Amba.ssador in London : Appointment, 770. 
Rio Tercero (steamer) : Sinking, 579. 
Rios, Juan Antonio, President of Chile : 

Correspondence with President Roosevelt — 
American military operations in French North 

Africa, 909. 
Visit (proposed) to U.S., 701, 838. 
Roosevelt, Franljlin D. : 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Christmas message to armed forces of U.S. allies, 

1017. 
Conference with King George II of Greece, joint 
statement, 601 ; with King Peter II of Yugo- 
slavia, joint statement, 647. 
Diplomatic representatives, presentation of cre- 
dentials, remarks in reply to, 824, 826, 827, 969. 
French North Africa, 

Radio address to French people on lauding of 
U.S. armed forces in, 891. 



Roosevelt, Franklin D. — Continued. 

Addresses, statements, etc. — Continued. 
French North Africa— Continued. 
Political arrangement in, 935. 
Support of United Nations by French people, 
1007. 
French West Africa, political arrangement with 

Admiral Darlan, 935. 
Lend-lease aid. 

Shipments to Egypt, 914. 

Transfer of warship to Netherlands, 686, to Nor- 
way, 757. 
Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, toast to, 685. 
Student Assembly, International, 729. 
Vichy government, U.S. policy, 903. 
War crimes against civilians in occupied countries, 
709, 797. 
Correspondence — ■ 
Anniversaries, 

Atlantic Charter, signature, G97. 

Birthday of Haakon VII of Norway, G91 ; of 

President Quezon of Philippines, 714. 
Founding of Turkish Republic, 878 ; of Union of 

Soviet Socialist Republics, 894. 
Independence of Brazil, 751; of Chile, 771; of 
Costa Rica, 771; of El Salvador, 772; of 
Guatemala, 772; of Nicaragua, 773; of Pan- 
ama, 894 ; of Uruguay, 723. 
Invasion of China by Japan, 619; of Greece by 

Italy, 876 ; of Poland by Germany, 732. 
National, of China, 808 ; of Czechoslovakia, 875 ; 
of Ecuador, 702 ; of Iceland, 988. 
Brazilian vessels, sinking of, 710. 
Colombia, inauguration of. President Lopez, 689. 
Declaration by United Nations, adherence by Ethi- 
opia, 805. 
Declarations of war, 

Brazil, against Germany and Italy, 710. 
Ethiopia, against Axis powers, 1009. 
Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment by 

U.S., 839. 
French North Africa, American military operations 
in, 
Congratulatory messages from otlier American 

republics, 908, 936 ; from Iraq, 938, 962. 
Cooperation of Morocco, 961. 
Messages to officials of Algeria, 807; of France 
(and reply), 804-905; of Portugal (and re- 
ply), 905-906; of Spain (and reply), 90&- 
907 ; and of Tunisia, 907-908. 
Gift of King Farouk to American forces in Egypt, 

1000. 
Lend-lease aid to Etliiopia, 999. 
Radiophoto service with China, opening of, 1010. 
Relief contributions to Great Britain, 629. 



1102 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Roosevelt, Franklin D. — Continued. 
Correspondence — Continued. 
Resignation of American Ambassador to France 

(Leahy), acceptance, 651. 
Visits to U. S., 

President Rios of Cliile, 701, 838. 
King Peter of Yugoslavia, 638. 
Messages to Congress — 

Free movement of persons, property, and informa- 
tion into and out of U.S., 802. 
Panama, U.S. relations with, 698. 
Report to Congress on lend-lease operations (Septem- 
ber 11, 1W2), 778. 
Roosevelt, Sara Delano: Memorial address by Under 

Secretary Welles, 901. 
Ross, John C, Executive Officer of the Department of 
State and Chief of Division of Departmental Per- 
sonnel : Designation, 743. 
Ruanda-Urundi : Adherence to international opium 

convention of 1912, 70S. 
Rubber agreements. See Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Rumanian nationals in U.S., alien enemies, 650. 
Russell, Francis H., Acting Chief, AVorld Trade Intel- 
ligence Division of the Department: Designation, 
1024. 

Saboteurs, German : Opinion of U.S. Supreme Court 

in cases of, 947. 
Salazar, Dr. Carles, Guatemalan Minister of Foreign 

Affairs : Visit to U. S., 949, 984. 
Salvador. See El Salvador. 

Samoza, General Anastasio, President of Nicaragua : 
Correspondence, American military operations in 
French North Africa, 912. 
Sanitary Conference, Pan American, 11th, at Rio de 

Janeiro, 715, 724, 830. 
Sanitation agreement, U.S. and Bolivia (1042), signa- 
ture, 703. 
Seamen, convention concerning annual holidays (1936), 

ratiflcation by Mexico, 624. 
Secretary of State. See Hull, Cordell. 
Senate. See under United States Congress. 
Shipping: 

French warships at Alexandria, Egypt, proposals by 

U.S., 631. 
Lend-lease equipment to Egypt, 914. 
Oil, distribution from U.S. to otlier American repub- 
lics, 62tt. 
Relief supplies to Americans in Japan, 741, 768 ; to 

Greece, 686. 
Sinking of — 
Argentine steamer (Rio Tercero), U.S. assistance 

to crew, 579. 
Brazilian vessels by Axis submarines, 710. 
Silver : Exportation from Mexico to U.S., 714. 
Social Planning, Inter-American Congress, at Santiago, 
Chile, 743, 970. 



Social Security : 

Inter-American Committee on, 970. 
Inter-American Conference on, 970. 
Social Studies, National Council for: Address by Mr. 

Hanson, 964. 
South America. See American republics and the indi- 
vidual countries. 
Soviet Union. See Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 
Spain : 
American military operations in Frencli North Africa, 
correspondence of President Roosevelt and Gen- 
eral Franco, 906. 
Officials delivered to Spani.sh Government by Ger- 
many, false reports, 963. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Commercial, with Argentina (1942), 897. 
Cultural, with Argentina (1942), 930. 
Stabilization of exchange. See Finance; Treaties, 

agreements, etc. 
Standley, Admiral William H., American Ambassador 
to the Soviet Union : Address before New York 
Herald Tribune Forum, 943. 
State, Department of: 
American Hemisphere Exports Office, Acting Assist- 
ant Chiefs — 
Dame, Lester S., designation, 774. 
Merrill, Frederick T., designation. 744. 
American Republics, Division of the. Assistant 
Chiefs— 
Dreier, John C, designation, 625. 
Woodward, Robert F., designation, 596. 
Appropriations for 1943, analysis, 670. 
Caribbean Office — 

Assistant Chief, designation of Warden McK. Wil- 
son, 752. 
Duties as executive agency for U.S. Section, Anglo- 
American Caribbean Commission. 1011. 
Central Translating Office, additional duties, 791. 
Chief Clerk and Administrative Assistant — ■ 
Desigimtion of Millard L. Kenestrick as, 692. 
Oflice of, creation, 691. 
Claim Board, establishment, 715. 
Commercial Policy and Agreements, Division of — 
Assistant Chief, designation of Honore Marcel Ca- 

tudal, 774. 
Special Consultant, designation of John S. Dickey, 
1023. 
Committees, advisory, 780. 
Departmental orders, nos. — 

11K57, Division of Euroijean Affairs, 596. 
1068, Division of the American Republics, 596. 
1070, Division of the American Republics, 625. 

1073, Division of Near Eastern Affairs, 677. 

1074, Foreign Funds Control Division, 677. 

1078, Chief Clerk and Administrative Assistant, 
691. 

1079, Division of Foreign Activity Correlation, 692. 



INDEX 



1103 



State, Department of — Continued. 
Departmental orders, nos. — Continued. 

1052, Claim Board, 715. 

1053, Caribbean Office, 7.52. 

1084, Committee for Reciprocity Information, 725. 
10S6, Division of Departmental Personnel, 743. 

1087, Foreign Funds Control Division, 744. 

1088, Foreign Funds Control Division, 744. 

1089, American Hemisphere Exports Office, 744. 

1090, American Hemisphere Exports Office, 774. 

1091, Division of Commercial Policy and Agree- 
ments, 774. 

1095, Special Assistant to Secretary of State 
(Grew), 780. 

1096, Central Translating Office, 791. 
1103, Office of Philippine Affairs, 887. 
1105, Committee on Political Planning, 896. 
1110. Office of Foreign Territories, 971. 
1117, Caribbean Office, 1011. 

1120, Division of Commercial Policy and Agree- 
ments, 1023. 
European Affairs, Division of — 
Assistant Chief, designation of Samuel Beber, 596. 
Responsibility for non-military matters in coun- 
tries occupied by forces of United Nations, 971. 
Foreign Activity Correlation, Division of, designa- 
tion of Lloyd D. Yates as Acting Assistant Chief, 
692. 
Foreign Funds Control Division, Assistant Chiefs — 
Meltzer, Bernard D., designation, 677. 
Miller, Edward G., Jr., designation, 677. 
Reinstein, Jacques, J., appointment, 744. 
Tannenwald, Theodore, Jr. (Acting), designation, 
744. 
Foreign Belief and Rehabilitation Operations, Office 
of, appointment of Herbert H. Lehman as Direc- 
tor, 948. 
Foreign Territories, Office of, establishment, 971 ; 

functions, 985. 
Liaison officer of Department with Office of Fishery 
Coordination of Interior Department, designa- 
tion of Leo D. Sturgeon (alternate, Charles I. 
Bevans), 715. 
Personnel, Departmental, Division of, creation, 743. 
Personnel Supervision and Management, Division of, 

abolishment, 743. 
Philippine Affairs, Office of, designation of Frank P. 

Lockhart as Chief, 887. 
Political Planning, Committee on, establishment, 896 ; 
designation of James C. Dunn as Chairman and 
Selden Chapin as Executive Secretary, 896. 
Protocol, Division of, commendation by Secretary 
Hull of Stephen H. Quigley, Administrative 
Assistant, on 40th anniversary in Department, 
85& 
Regulations, entry into and departure from U.S. by 
American nationals, 971. 



State, Department of — Continued. 
Representatives of Department on — 

Fisheries Committee of War Production Board, 

designation of Leo D. Sturgeon, 715. 
Interdepartmental Sugar Policy Committee, desig- 
nation of Robert M. Carr, 625. 
Alternate, Edward G. Cale, 625. 
Role in wartime, 855. 
Special Assistant to the Secretary, appointment of 

Joseph C. Grew, 780. 
Trade-agreement negotiations wilh Iran, public 

notice, 665. 
Visa Cases, Board of Api^eals on, report, 982. 
World Trade Intelligence Division, designation of 
Francis H. Russell as Acting Chief, 1024. 
Statements. See under names of the individuals and the 

specific subjects. 
Statistics: 

Causes of death, international agreement (1934), 
cancelation by Egypt of application to Burdein, 
693. 
Wages and hours in mining and manufacturing in- 
dustries and in agriculture, convention (1938), 
ratification by Mexico, 724. 
Steel plant at Monclova, Mexico, construction, 705. 
Strategic materials. See War. 
Students : 

American republics, meteorology courses in U.S., 

1010. 
Assembly, international, address by President Roose- 
velt, 729. 
Peruvian, training in U.S., 950. 
Sturgeon, Leo D., Assistant to Assistant Secretary of 
State Long: Representative of Department on Fish- 
eries Committee and liaison officer with Office of 
Fishery Coordination, designation, 715. 
Sugar agreement, international (1937), protocol of ex- 
tension (1942), 678, 841. 
Sugar Council, International, 678. 
Sugar Policy Committee, Interdepartmental, 625. 
Supreme Court. See United States Supreme Court. 
Sweden: Motorship (Kanangoora), charter by Ameri- 
can Red Cross, 741, 768. 
Syria : American Diplomatic Agent and Consul General 
at Damascus, 828. 

Tannenwald, Theodore, Jr., Acting Assistant Chief, 
Foreign Funds Control Division of the Department : 
Designation, 744. 
Telecommunications : 

International convention (1932), adherence by 

Croatia, 652. 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement 

(1937), judicial decision, 897. 
Service for U.S. expeditionary forces in New Zealand, 
981. 



1104 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Telecommunications — Continued. 
Union, International, resignation of Haiti as mem- 
ber of the Bureau, 653. 
Terra, Dr. Gabriel, ex-President of Uruguay : Death, 

773. 
Territorial Papers of the United States : Publication of 

vol. X, 986. 
Thurston, Walter, American Minister to El Salvador : 

Confirmation of nomination, 929. 
Trade. See Commerce, international ; Foreign trade, 

U.S. ; Treaties, agreements, etc. 
Trade-marks : Arrangement concerning international 
registration of trade-marks and commercial names 
(1934), adherence by Tunisia, 930. 
Travel regulations, 971. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. : 
Agricultural experiment station, U.S. and— 
Ecuador (1942), signature, 1013. 
El Salvador (1942), signature, 1013. 
Alcohol, U.S. and Mexico (1942), signature, 633. 
Alliance and mutual assistance. United Kingdom and 
Soviet Union (1942), exchange of ratifications, 
781 ; text, 781. 
Amity, China and Cuba (1942), signature, 972. 
Aviation, aerial transportation (1929), adherence by 

Liberia, 1001. 
Babassu and castor oil, U.S. and Brazil (1942), 

signature, 725. 
Claims convention, U.S. and Mexico (1941), payment 

under, 968. 
Coffee, cocoa, and Brazil nuts, U.S. and Brazil (1942), 

signature, 860. 
Commercial, Argentina and Spain (1942), signature, 

897. 
Commercial, U. S. and — 

Dominican Republic (1924), reduction in customs 

duties, text, 953. 
Soviet Union (1942), text, 663; proclamation by 
U.S. President, 693. 
Commercial relations, Peru and Venezuela (1942), 

text, 1012. 
Consular, U.S. and Mexico (1942), signature, 704. 
Cultural, Argentina and Spain (1942), signature, 930. 
Cultural interchange, Brazil and Venezuela (1942), 

signature, 1012. 
Declaration by United Nations (1942), adherence 

by Ethiopia, 805. 
Defense, U.S. and Liberia (1942), text, 979. 
Economic settlements, post-war, U.S. and Canada 

(1942), text, 977. 
Exchange stabilization, U.S. and — 
Brazil (1937), extension, 622. 
China (1941), extension, 623. 
Cuba (1942), signature, 623. 
Ecuador (1942), signature, 623. 
Iceland (1942), signature, 623. 



Treaties, agreements, etc.- — Continued. 
Extraterritoriality in China, relinquishment by 
U.S.— 
Negotiations, 805-808. 
Comments of President Roosevelt and General 

Chiang Kai-shek, 839. 
Draft submitted to Chinese Ambassador, 854. 
Farm-labor migration, U.S. and Mexico (1942), 689. 
Fats and oils for United Nations, U.S. and United 

Kingdom (1942), signature, 791. 
Finance, U.S. and Haiti, supplementary (1942), 

signature, 1002. 
Friendship, China and Iraq (1942), ratification by 

China, 679 ; text, 6S0. 
Highway construction, U.S. and Mexico (1942), sig- 
nature, 704. 
Historical studies, Peru and Venezuela (1942), sig- 
nature, 1013. 
Industrial property — ■ 
Designs and models, international deposit of, 

(1934), adherence by Timisia, 931. 
Origin of goods, false indications of (1934), ad- 
herence by Tunisia, 930. 
Protection of (1934), adherence by Tunisia, 930. 
Trade-marks and commercial names, interna- 
tional registration of (1934), adherence by 
Tunisia, 930. 
Lend-lease aid. reciprocal, to U.S. and its armed 
forces (1942) — 
Australia, text, 736. 
France (Fighting), text, 739. 
Great Britain, text, 734. 
New Zealand, text, 738. 
Loadline, international (1980), modifications pro- 
posed, 859. 
Migratory birds, U.S. and Canada (1916) and U.S. 
and Mexico (1936), amendatory regulations, 678. 
Military and naval cooperation, U.S. and Cuba (1942), 

signature, 7.50. 
Military equipment to Soviet Union, Great Britain, 

U.S., and Soviet Union (1942), signature, 805. 
Military missions, U.S. to — 
Bolivia (1942), signature, 704. 
Panama (1942), signature, 624. 
Military service of American citizens residing in 

Canada, Canada and U.S. (1942), text, 789. 
Mutual aid (1942), U.S. and— 
Czechoslovakia, text, G07. 
Greece, text, 602. 
Guatemala, signature, 972. 
Netherlands, text, 604. 
Norway, text, 610. 
Poland, text, 577. 
Yugoslavia, text, 648. 
Opium (1912), adherence — 

Belgian Congo and Ruanda-Urundi, 705. 
Egypt, 597. 



INDEX 



1105 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 
resolution on establishment (1828), ratification 
by Venezuela, 1030. 
Postal, universal (1939), ratification by France, In- 
cluding French colonies, 693; arrangements ef- 
fective for French West Africa, 888. 
Prisoners of vpar (1929), adherence by Costa Rica, 

653 ; by El Salvador, 622. 
Publications, official exchange, U.S. and Iceland 

(1942), signature, 774. 
Railway-rehabilitation, U.S. and Mexico (1942), text, 

954. 
Red Cross (1929), adherence by El Salvador, 622. 
Rubber (1942), signature, U.S. and— 
Bolivia, 633. 
British Guiana, 698. 
British Honduras, 713. 
Colombia, 595. 
Ecuador, 650. 
El Salvador, 723. 
Guatemala, 752. 
Honduras, 690. 
Mexico, 752. 
Panama, 773. 
Trinidad, 698. 
Venezuela, 838. 
Sanitation, U.S. and Bolivia (1942), signature, 703. 
Seamen, annual holidays (1936), ratification by Mex- 
ico, 624. 
Statistics of causes of death (1934), cancelation by 
Egypt of application of agreement to Burdein, 
693. 
Statistics, wages and hours in mining and manufac- 
turing industries and in agriculture (1938) , rati- 
fication by Mexico, 724. 
Steel-plant construction, U.S. and Mexico (1942), 

signature, 705. 
Student-training, U.S. and Peru (1942), signature, 

950. 
Sugar regulation (1937), protocol extending dura- 
tion (1942), signature, 678, 841; text, 679. 
Telecommunications — 

Convention (1932), adherence by Croatia, 652. 
Service for U.S. expeditionary forces, U.S. and 
New Zealand (1942), signature, 981. 
Trade, Argentina and Venezuela (1942), signature, 

1012. 
Trade, U.S. and— 
Argentina (1041), supplementary proclamation, 

1001. 
Iran, intention to negotiate, 6(55 ; products on which 

U.S. will consider granting concessions, 665. 
Mexico (1942), signature, 1029; analysis, 1031. 
Peru (1942), proclamations, 597. 
Uruguay (1942), signature, 653; analysis, 654c; 
proclamations by U.S. President, 929, 988. 



Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 

Wlieat, memorandum of agreement (1942), approval 
by Argentina, Australia, Canada, United King- 
dom, and U.S., 5S2; text (including draft con- 
vention), 583. 
Wool, U.S. and Uruguay (1942), signature, 972. 
Treaties and Other International Acts: Publication of 

vol. 7, 1026. 
Trinidad: Rubber agreement with U.S. (1942), signa- 
ture, 698. 
Trinity College, Hartford, Conn. : Commencement ad- 
dress by Mr. Grew, 1018. 
Trujlllo, General Rafael L., President of Dominican 
Republic: Correspondence, American military op- 
erations in French North Africa, 912, 914. 
Tunisia : 

American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Roosevelt to Sidi Moncef 
Pacha, Bey of Tunis, 908; to Admiral Esteva, 
Resident General, 908. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Industrial property. 
Designs and models, international deposit of 

(1934), adherence, 931. 
Origin of goods, false indications of (1934), ad- 
herence, 930. 
Protection of (1934), adherence, 980. 
Trade-marks and commercial names, interna- 
tional registration of (1934), adherence, 930. 
Turkey : 
Anniversary of founding of Turkish Republic, mes- 
sage from President Roosevelt to President 
Inonu, 878. 
Minister of Foreign Affairs ( Menemeneioglu ) , nomi- 
nation, 714. 
Prime Minister (Saydam), death, 633. 
Visit of Turkish journalists to Secretary Hull, 878. 

Ubico, General Jorge, President of Guatemala : Corre- 
spondence, American military operations in French 
North Africa, 912. 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics: 

American Ambassador (Admiral Standley), address 

by, 943. 
Founding of, anniversary messages from President 
Roosevelt and Secretary Hull, 893 ; reply ot Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Foreign Affairs to Secretary 
Hull, 969. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Alliance and mutual assistance, with United King- 
dom (1942), exchange of ratifications, 781; 
text, 781. 
Commercial, with U.S. (1942), signature, 662; 

notes, 663; proclamation, U.S., 693. 
Military equipment, with U.S. and Great Britain 
(1942), signature of protocol, 805. 
United Kingdom. See Great Britain. 



1106 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United Nations (see also War; and the individual 
coiintries) : 
Declaration by, adherence by Ethiopia, 805. 
United States: 
Congress — 
Legislation, 

Alaska Highway (hearings), 681. 

Aliens (H. repts.), 958, 973. 

Appropriations: Board of Economic Warfare 
(H. doc), 793: deficiency (pnb. law), 626; 
Executive Office, independent bureaus, etc. 
(pub. law), 597: national defense (hearings; 
H. rept. ; pub. law), 598, 6S1, 828; State, 
Justice, Commerce, Federal Judiciary (pub. 
law), 626. 

Censorship (H. rept. ; S. rept.), 716, 973. 

Claims: Hannevig, of Norway (H. rept.), 987; 
Mexican Claims Act, 1942 (hearings; S. 
rept. ) , 694, 785. 

Decorations, medals, etc. ( H. doc. ; S. rept. ; H. 
rept.), 626, 958, 1003. 

Domestic stability, national defense, and prose- 
cution of the war: legislative and executive 
bacljground, 1933-42 (S. doc), 958. 

Expenditures, non-war Federal (H. doc), 861. 

Fisheries (S. rept.), 694. 

General Pulaski Memorial Day (pub. law), 793. 

Immigration Act of 1917, amendment ( S. rept. ) , 
888. 

Importation (pub. law), 597. 

Inter-American Financial and Economic Advi- 
sory Committee (H. doc), 988. 

Jefferson, Thomas : Anniversary of birth (pub. 
law), 694; election to presidency (H. rept.), 
705. 

Lend-Lease operations (H. doc), 774. 

Military personnel, detail to foreign countries 
(S. rept.; H. rept.; pub. law), 705, 753, 828. 

National defense: Migration (hearings), 745; 
program (hearings), 753. 

Nationality Act of 1940, amendments (S. repts.; 
H. repts.; pub. law), 654, 785, 841, 861, 888, 
958, 1002. 

Opium poppy, treaty obligations (H. rept.), 841. 

Political Defense, Emergency Advisory Commit- 
tee for (H. doc), 988. 

Panama, treaties with U.S. of 1903 and 1936 (H. 
rept. ; S. repts. ) , 793, 973, 1003. 

Prizes captured by U.S. (pub. law), 716. 

Red Cross emblem (hearings; H. rept.), 598, 
654. 

Refugee and war-relief programs (H. doc), 716. 

Repatriation (H. rept.), 793. 

Revenue Act, 1942 (hearings), 774. 

Salaries : American Ambassadors and Ministers 
(H. doc), 774; State Department (S. doc), 
597. 



United States — Continued. 
Congress — Continued. 
Legislation — Continued. 
State Department, supplemental estimate (S. 

doc), 626. 
Tariff and immigration laws (hearings), 988. 
Messages from President. 

Free movement of persons, property, and Infor- 
mation into and out of U.S., 892. 
Panama, relations with, 698. 
Report of President on lend-lease operations, 778. 
Senate confirmation of Foreign Service nomina- 
tions, 703, 792, 828, 929. 
Foreign Service (see also State, Department of) — 
Appointments, 596, 625, 635, 652, 678, 770, 951. 
Assignments, 596, 625, 635, 652, 677. 
Claim Board, establishment, 71.5. 
Consular convention with Mexico (1942), 704. 
Consular representation, U.S. and Finland, can- 
celation, 632. 
Death, 951. 

Economic affairs, counselors of embassy for, 951. 
Exchange with France of diplomatic and consular 

personnel, 939. 
Expansion by reason of economic aspects of foreign 

relations, address by Mr. Geist, 813. 
Great Britain, 

Fats and oils for United Nations (1942), 791. 
Migratory birds, in respect of Canada, (1916), 

678. 
Reciprocal lend-lease aid (1942), 734. 
Instruction on phases of economic warfare, 887. 
Nominations, confirmation, of Anthony J. Drexel 
Biddle, Jr., 792; of Thomas L. Hughes, 792; 
of Leland B. Morris, 703 ; of W. Garland Rich- 
ardson, 792; of Walter Thurston, 929; of 
George Wadsworth, 828 ; of Thomas M. Wilson, 
703. 
Resignations, 651. 
Wartime changes in, 855. 
Supreme Court, opinion in German saboteur cases, 

947. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. (q.v.) — 
Argentina, trade (1941), 1001. 
Australia, reciprocal lend-lease aid (1942), 736. 
Bolivia, 

Military mission from U.S. (1942), 704 
Rubber (1942), 633. 
Sanitation (1942), 703. 
Brazil, 

Babassu and castor oil (1942), 725. 
Coffee, cocoa, and Brazil nuts (1942), 860. 
Stabilization of exchange (1937), 622. 
British Guiana, rubber (1942), 698. 
British Honduras, rubber (1942), 713. 
Canada, 
Economic settlements, post-war (1942), 977. 



INDEX 



1107 



United States — Continued. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Canada — Continued. 

Military service of American citizens residing in 
Canada (1942), 789. 
China, 

Extraterritoriality in, relinquishment by U.S., 
negotiations, 805-S08 ; comments of President 
Roosevelt and General Chiang Kai-shelj, 839; 
draft submitted to Chinese Ambassador, 854. 

Stabilization of exchange (1941), 623. 
Colombia, rubber (1942), 595. 
Cuba, 

Military and naval cooperation (1942), 750. 

Stabilization of exchange (1942), 623. 
Czechoslovakia, mutual aid (1942), 607. 
Dominican Republic, commerce (1924), 952. 
Ecuador, 

Agricultural experiment station (1942), 1013. 

Rubber (1942), 650. 

Stabilization of exchange (1942), 623. 
El Salvador, 

Agricultural experiment station (1942), 1013. 

Rubber (1942), 723. 
France (Fighting), reciprocal lend-lease aid (1942), 

739. 
Greece, mutual aid (1942), 601. 
Guatemala, 

Mutual aid (1942), 972. 

Rubber (1942), 752. 
Haiti, finance, supplementary (1942), 1002. 
Honduras, rubber (1942), 690. 
Iceland, 

Publications, exchange of (1942), 774. 

Stabilization of exchange (1942), 623. 
Liberia, defense (1942), 979. 
Mexico, 

Alcohol (1942), 633. 

Claims (1941), payment under, 968. 

Consular (1942), 704. 

Farm-labor migration to U. S. (1942), 689. 

Highways, construction (1942), 704. 

Railways, rehabilitation (1942), 954. 

Rubber (1942), 752. 

Steel-plant construction (1942), 705. 

Trade (1942), 1029, 1031. 
Multilateral, 

Leadline (1930), 859. 

Military equipment to Soviet Union (1942), 805. 

Sugar regulation (1937), protocol extending 
(1942), 678, 841. 

Wheat, memorandum of agreement (1942), 582. 
Netherlands, mutual aid (1942), 604. 
New Zealand, 

Lend-lease aid, reciprocal (1942), 738. 

Telecommunication service for U.S. expedition- 
ary forces (1942), 981. 



United States — Continued. 

Treaties, agreements, etc. — Continued. 
Norway, mutual aid (1942), 609. 
Panama, 

Military mission (1942), 624. 
Rubber (1942), 773. 
Peru, 

Student-training in U.S. (1942), 950. 
Trade (1942), 597. 
Poland, mutual aid (1942), 577. 
Trinidad, rubber (1942), 698. 
U.S.S.R., commerce (1942), 662, 693. 
Uruguay, 
Trade (1942), 653, 654c, 929, 988. 
Wool (1942), 972. 
Venezuela, rubber (1942), 838. 
Yugoslavia, mutual aid (1942), 647. 
Uruguay (see also American republics) : 
American military operations in French North Africa, 
message from President Baldomir to President 
Roosevelt, 913. 
Ex-President Terra, death, 773. 
Independence, anniversary, message from President 

Roosevelt to President Baldomir, 723. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Trade, with U.S. (1912), signature, 653; analysis, 
654c ; proclamations by U.S. President, 629, 988. 
Wool, with U.S. (1942), signature, 972. 

Vargas, Getulio, President of Brazil: Correspondence, 

sinking of Brazilian vessels by Axis, 710. 
Venezuela (see also American republics) : 
Cultural leaders, visits to U.S., 651, 984. 
Gil Borges, Esteban, death, 690. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 

Commercial, with Peru (1942), text, 1012. 
Cultural interchange, with Brazil (1942), signa- 
ture, 1012. 
Historical studies, with Peru (1942), signature, 

1013. 
Pan American Institute of Geography and History, 
resolution on establishment (1928), ratitlca- 
tion, 1030. 
Rubber, with U.S. (1942), signature, 838. 
Trade, with Argentina (1942), signature, 1012. 
Vessels: Sinking of Argentine steamer (Rio Tercero), 

579 ; of Brazilian vessels, 710. 
Vichy. See France. 
Victory Loan campaign in Canada : Address by Mr. 

Grew, 800. 
Virginia, University of : Address by Mr. Acheson before 

Institute of Public Affairs, 614. 
Visa Cases, Board of Appeals on, report, 982. 

Wadsworth, George, Diplomatic Agent and Consul Gen- 
eral at Beirut and Damascus : Confirmation of 
nomination, 828. 



1108 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



War (The) {see also Addresses; Economics; Lend- 
lease aid ; Mutual-aid agreements ; Belief) : 
Albania, resistance to Italian occupation, 998. 
Alliance, United Kingdom and Soviet Union, treaty, 

781. 
Armed forces, U.S. — 

Military service of U.S. citizens residing in Canada, 

789. 
Orders to forces in India, 697. 
Telecommunication service, New Zealand, 981. 
Transfer from Canadian armed forces to, 711. 
Atlantic Charter, 1st anniversary, 697. 
Austria, status, 660. 

China, resistance to Japanese aggression, 619, 633. 
Christmas message of President Roosevelt to armed 

forces of U.S. allies, 1017. 
Conduct of, discussion by British and American 

ofBcials in London, 750. 
Cuba, military and naval cooperation with U.S., 750. 
Declaration by United Nations, adherence by Ethio- 
pia, 805. 
Declaration of war by Brazil against Germany and 
Italy, 710, 723 ; by Ethiopia against Axis powers, 
1009. 
Enemy aliens in U.S., general license for transporta- 
tion, 634. 
Exchange with Axis powers of diplomatic, consular, 
and other personnel by U.S. and other American 
republics, 579, 632, 713, 939. 
Finland, consular representation between U.S. and, 

cancelation, 632. 
France — 
Bombings in, reply of American Charg6 to protest 

against, 750. 
Labor-conscription for use in Germany, 770. 
Patriots' protest to Marshal P^tain, statement of 

Secretary Hull, 751. 
Warships, French, at Alexandria, Egypt, U.S. pro- 
posals, 631. 
Free French National Committee, U.S. cooperation 

with, 613, 739. 
French North Africa (q.v.) — 
American military operations. 
Congratulatory messages to President Roosevelt 
from other American republics, and replies, 
908, 936 ; from Iraq, 938 ; reply, 962. 
Messages of President Roosevelt to officials of 
France, Portugal, Spain, Algeria, and 
Tunisia, and replies, 904; to Sultan of 
Morocco, and reply, 961. 
Radio message of President Roosevelt to French 

people, 891. 
White House statement, 891. 
Greece, resistance to Axis aggression, 876. 
Iceland, American troops in, address by Mr. Eerie on 

anniversary of arrival, 618. 
Legion of Merit, award, 895. 



War (The)— Continued. 
Liberian defense areas, U.S. jurisdiction over, 979. 
Luxembourgers, conscription into Germany Army, 

770. 
Madagascar, occupation by British military forces, 

750. 
Medal for Merit, award, 1022. 
Military equipment to Soviet Union, delivery by U.S. 

and Great Britain, 805. 
Mukden incident, 11th anniversary, 773. 
Occupied countries, civilian populations — • 
Crimes against, 709, 797. 

Ransom payments, attempted extortion by Ger- 
many, 962. 
Poland, anniversary of attack by Germany, 732, 733. 
Prisoners of war in Far East, relief, 741, 768. 
Saboteur cases, German, opinion of U.S. Supreme 

Court, 947. 
State Department, role in wartime, 855. 
Strategic materials — 

Alcohol, purchase from Mexico, 633. 

Babassu and castor oil, purchase from Brazil, 725. 

Coffee, cocoa, Brazil nuts, purchase from Brazil, 

860. 
Fats and oils, purchase for United Nations, 791. 
Oil, distribution to other American republics, 620. 
Rubber, purchase from Bolivia, 633; British Gui- 
ana, 698; British Honduras, 713; Colombia, 
595; Ecuador, 650; El Salvador, 723; Guate- 
mala, 752; Honduras, 690; Mexico, 752; Pan- 
ama, 773 ; Trinidad, 698 ; Venezuela, 838. 
Wool, purchase from Uruguay, 972. 
Steel, plant-construction in Mexico, 705. 
Vessels, sinking of — 
Argentine steamer (Rio Tercero), 579. 
Brazilian vessels, 710. 
Warren, Avra M., American Minister at Ciudad Tru- 
jillo ; Correspondence, commercial agreement with 
Dominican Republic, 953. 
Wei Tao-ming, Chinese Ambassador to U.S. : Creden- 
tials, 824. 
Welles, Sumner: 
Addresses, statements, etc. — 

Death of Salvadoran Minister of Foreign Affairs 
(Araujo), 690; of Dr. Gil Borges of Venezuela, 
690. 
Foreign Trade Council, National, 29th convention, 

808. 
French warships at Alexandria, Egypt, proposals, 

631. 
Greek resistance to Axis aggression, 876. 
Inter-American Conference on Systems of Eco- 
nomic and Financial Control, 580. 
New York Herald Tribune Forum, 939. 
Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial, dedication, 991. 



INDEX 



1109 



West Indies, travel to and from, by American na- 
tionals, 971. 

Wheat Council, luteruatioual : 
Establishment, 670. 
First meeting, at Washington, 688. 
U. S. delegation, 670. 

Wheat Meeting, Washington, 582 ; memorandum of 
agreement and draft convention regarding inter- 
national trade, 583 ; minutes of final session, 594. 

Wilhelmina, Queen of the Netherlands : Visit to Wash- 
ington, 685. 

Wilson, Thomas M., Acting American Minister Resident 
and Consul General in Iraq : Confiimation of nom- 
ination, 70S. 

Wilson, Warden McK., Assistant Chief, Caribbean 
Office of the Department : Designation, 752. 

Woodward, Robert P., Assistant Chief, Division of the 
American Republics of the Department: Desig- 
nation, 596. 



Wool: 

Australian and New Zealand, reduction in export 

price, 983. 
Uruguayan, agreement by U. S. to purchase, 972. 

Tardley, Edward, Special Assistant and Executive Sec- 
retary to the Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion : Designation, 725. 
Yates, Lloyd D., Acting Assistant Chief, Division of For- 
eign Activity Correlation of the Department: Des- 
ignation, 692. 
Yugoslavia : 
Ambassador to U.S. (Fotitch), credentials, 826. 
American Ambassador to (Biddle), confirmation of 

nomination, 792. 
King Peter II, visit to U. S., 687. 
Treaties, agreements, etc. — 
Mutual aid, with U.S. (1942), joint statement by 
President Roosevelt and King Peter, 647 ; text, 
648. 



o 



I ->-^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULL 




nn 



riN 



JULY 4, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 158— Publication 1765 



G 



ontents 




The War Pat-e 

Mutual-aid agreement with Poland 577 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel and 
other nationals: German violation of e.xchange 

agreement 579 

Argentine appreciation for assistance to crew of Rio 

Tercero 579 

Commodities allocated to other American republics . . 580 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
Inter-American Conference on Systems of Economic 
and Financial Control: Address by the Under 
Secretary of State 580 

Commercial Policy 

Memorandum of agreement regarding international 

trade in wheat 582 

American Republics 

Rubber agreement with Colombia 595 

Visit to the United States of the President-elect of 

Colombia 595 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of distinguished Argentines . 595 
Visit to the United States of Chilean author 595 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 596 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 596 

[over] 

IJ. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF OOClJM£^: ■ 

AUG 1 1942 







ontents-coNTiNVEu 

TuEATY InfoUMATION l>aga 

Commerce: 

Trade Agreemeiit with Peru 597 

Menioraiiduiu of agreement regarding internatioual 

trade in wheat 597 

Opium: International Opium Convention, 1912 . . . 597 
Mutual guaranties: Mutual-Aid Agreement with 

Polanil 597 

Strategic materials: Agreenu'iit with Colombia . . . . 597 

Legislation 597 



The War 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH POLAND 



(Released to the press July 1] 

An agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and Poland on the principles 
applying to mutual aid in the prosecution of the 
war was signed on July 1 by the Secretary 
of State and the Polish Ambassador, Jan 
Ciechanowski. 

The provisions of the agreement are the same 
in all substantial respects as those of the agree- 
ments between tViis Government and the Gov- 
ernments of Great Britain, China, the Soviet 
Union, and Belgium ^ which likewise were ne- 
gotiated under the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 
1!M1 providing for tlie extension of aid to any 
country whose defense is determined by the 
President to be vital to the defense of the 
United States. 

This agreement provides added strength for 
tlie material and spiritual foundations of the 
lil)erty and welfare of all peoples, and it is a 
further expression of the determination of the 
United Nations to achieve ultimate victory. 

The full text of the agreement follows : - 

"Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Poland declare that they 
are engaged in a cooiierative undertaking, to- 
getlier with every other nation or people of like 
mind, to the end of laying the bases of a just and 
enduring world r>eace securing order under law 
to themselves and all nations; 



^Bulletin of February 28, 1942, p. 190; June 6, 1942, 
p. 507 ; June 13, 1942, p. 531 ; and June 20, 1942, p. 551, 
respectively. 

^The text here printed oonforms to the original. 



"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Poland, as signatories of 
the .Declaration by United Nations of Janu- 
ary 1, 1942, have subscribed to a common pro- 
gram of purposes and principles embodied in the 
Joint Declaration made on August 14, 1941 by 
the President of the United States of America 
and the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom 
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, known 
as the Atlantic Charter ; 

"And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that the 
defense of Poland against aggression is vital 
to the defense of the United States of America; 

"And whereas the United States of America 
lias extended and is continuing to extend to 
Poland aid in resisting aggression ; 

"And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of Poland receives such 
aid and of the benefits to be received by the 
United States of Ajnerica in return therefor 
should be deferred until the extent of the de- 
fense aid is known and until the progress of 
events makes clearer the final terms and condi- 
tions and benefits which will be in the mutual 
interests of the United States of America and 
Poland and will promote the establislunent and 
maintenance of world peace; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Poland are mutually de- 
sirous of concluding now a preliminary agree- 
ment in regard to the provision of defense aid 
and in regard to certain considerations which 



577 



578 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



shall be taken into account in determining such 
terms and conditions and the making of such 
an agreement has been in all respects duly 
authorized, and all acts, conditions and formali- 
ties which it may have been necessary to per- 
form, fulfill or execute prior to the making of 
such an agreement in conformity with the laws 
either of the United States of America or of 
Poland have been performed, fulfilled or exe- 
cuted as required ; 

"The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

"Article I 

"The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of Poland with such defense articles, de- 
fense services, and defense information as the 
President of the United States of America shall 
authorize to be transferred or provided. 

"Akticle II 

"The Government of Poland will continue to 
contribute to the defense of the United States 
of America and the strengthening thei-eof and 
will provide such articles, services, facilities or 
information as it may be in a position to supply. 

"Article III 

"The Government of Poland will not without 
the consent of the President of the United 
States of America transfer title to, or possession 
of, any defense article or defense information 
transferred to it under the Act of March 11, 
1941 of the Congress of the United States of 
America or permit the use thereof by anyone 
not an officer, employee, or agent of the Gov- 
ernment of Poland. 

"Article IV 

"If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of Poland of any defense article or de- 
fense information, it becomes necessary for that 
Government to take any action or make any 
payment in order fully to protect any of the 
rights of a citizen of the United States of 
America who has patent rights in and to any 
such defense article or information, the Gov- 



ernment of Poland will take such action or make 
such payment when requested to do so by the 
President of the United States of America. 

"Article V 

"The Government of Poland will return to 
the United States of America at the end of the 
present emergency, as determined by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America, such de- 
fense articles transferred under this Agreement 
as shall not have been destroyed, lost or con- 
sumed and as shall be determined by the Presi- 
dent to be useful in the defense of the United 
States of America or of the Western Hem- 
isphere or to be otherwise of use to the United 
States of America. 

"Article VI 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of Poland full cognizance shall 
be taken of all property, services, information, 
facilities, or other benefits or considerations pro- 
vided by the Government of Poland subsequent 
to March 11, 1941, and accepted or acknowledged 
by the President on behalf of the United States 
of America. 

"Article VII 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be j^rovided to the United States of America 
by the Government of Poland in return for aid 
furnished under the Act of Congress of March 
11, 1941, the terms and conditions thereof shall 
be such as not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutually advan- 
tageous economic relations between them and 
the betterment of world-wide economic rela- 
tions. To that end, they shall include provi- 
sion for agreed action by the United States of 
America and Poland, open to participation by 
all other countries of like mind, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate international and 
domestic measures, of production, employment, 
and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the lib- 
erty and welfare of all peoples ; to the elimina- 
tion of all forms of discriminatory treatment 
in international commerce, and to the reduction 



JULY 4, 1942 



579 



of tariffs and other trade barriers ; and, in gen- 
eral, to the attainment of all the economic ob- 
jectives set forth in the Joint Declaration made 
on August 14, 1941, by the President of the 
United States of America and the Prune Min- 
ister of the United Kingdom. 

"At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Govermnents. 

"Article VIII 

"This Agreement shall take effect as from 
this day's date. It shall continue in force until 
a date to be agreed upon by the two Govern- 
ments. 

"Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this first day of July, 1942. 

"For the Government of the United States 
of America: 

CoEDELL Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

"For the Government of Poland : 

Jan CiEciiANowsKi 
Ambassador of Poland 
at 'WashingtorC 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CON- 
SULAR PERSONNEL AND OTHER NA- 
TIONALS 

GERMAN VIOLATION OF EXCHANGE 
AGREEMENT 

[Released to the press July 1] 

The German Government has withdrawn the 
previously agreed safe conducts for future voy- 
ages of the S.S. Drottninghohn between New 
York and Lisbon and has thereby violated the 
exchange agreement. This Government in- 
formed the German Government through the 
Swiss Government by note "that the German 
Government, by unilateral action, has violated 



the agreement entered into between this Gov- 
ernment and the German Government for the 
exchange of their nationals in that it has with- 
drawn the safe conduct previously given for the 
several round-trip voyages of the Drottning- 
holm between New York and Lisbon. As the 
assurance of this safe conduct was an essential 
part of the Exchange Agreement between the 
two Governments, this Government must con- 
sider tlie agreement as terminated by the act of 
the German Government." 



A list of officials and other nationals of the 
United States and of the other American repub- 
lics who are returning on the second voyage of 
the S. S. Drottningholm from Lisbon has been 
issued as Department of State press release 327, 
of June 29, 1942. 



ARGENTINE APPRECIATION FOR ASSIST- 
ANCE TO CREW OF "RIO TERCERO" 

[Released to the press July 2] 

The translation of a note addressed to the 
Secretary of State by the Argentine Ambassador 
in Washington, Sefior Don Felipe A. Espil, 
follows : 

"Washington, July 1, 1942. 
"Excellency : 

"I take pleasure in informing Your Excel- 
lency that from the investigations made in con- 
nection with the sinking of the steamer Rio 
Tercero, of Argentine flag, an action that oc- 
curred under circumstances which are public 
property, the prompt and decisive cooperation 
of the naval and air forces of the United States 
in the task of saving the victims from the said 
vessel, almost all of them of Argentine nation- 
ality, stands out clearly. 

"My Government having been informed of 
the intervention mentioned, instructs me to pre- 
sent to Your Excellency its thanks for the aid 
rendered to the shipwrecked persons with such a 
cordial spirit of collaboration and friendship, 
which I take pleasure in putting on record. 

"I avail myself [etc.] Felipe A. Espil" 



580 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



COMMODITIES ALLOCATED TO 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



OTHER 



[Released to the press July 1] 

The Government of the United States, follow- 
ing a general plan pursued in the first and sec- 
ond quarters of this year and in accordance with 
the policy of close inter-American cooperation, 
has annomiced in Washington a list of com- 
modities allocated to the otlier Amei-ican re- 
publics for the third quarter of 1942. This 
announcement was made jointly by the Depart- 
ment of State, the War Production Board, and 
the Board of Economic Warfare. 

The announced list comprises the following 
inaterials : Acetic acid ; acetone ; aconite ; ammo- 
nium sulphate; anhydrous ammonia; aniline; 
ascorbic acid; bauxite; belladonna leaves; bella- 
doima root; beryl and beryllium; cadmium; 



camphor; carbon tetrachloride; castor oil; 
chlorine; citric acid; cobalt; copper; cotton 
linters; diamond dies; dibutyl phthalate; digi- 
talis; dynamite; electrodes, carbon; electi'odes, 
graphite ; ergot ; fluorspar ; formaldehyde ; glyc- 
erin; graphite, natural amorphous; insulin; 
ipecac; lead; leather; f erromanganese ; mer- 
cury; methanol; ferromolybdenum ; naphtha- 
lene; neat's-foot oil; phenol; phosphorus; 
phthalic anhydride ; platinum and allied metals ; 
pota-ssium permanganate; procaine; rayon (fil- 
ament yarcl) ; red squill; strontium chemicals; 
sulfagitanidine; sulfanilamide; sulfuric acid; 
superphosphate ; thiamin hydrochloride ; toluol ; 
ferrotungsten ; uranium salts and compounds; 
ferrovanadium ; and zinc. 

The tliird-quai-ter allocations for iron and 
steel and additional commodities will be an- 
nounced shortly. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



INTER-AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON SYSTEMS OF ECONOMIC 
AND FINANCIAL CONTROL 

ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Heleased to the press June 30] 

Delegates to the Inter- American Conference 
ON Systems of Economic and Financial 
Control, Your Excellencies, Ladies and 
Gentlemen : 

It is a source of great pleasure to me to extend 
to all of you on behalf of the Inter- American 
Financial and Economic Advisory Committee 
a cordial welcome to this Inter- American Con- 
ference on Systems of Economic and Financial 
Control. 

Once again the 21 American republics are 
meeting in conference in order still further to 
fortify their solidarity, still further to 

' Delivered liy Mr. Welles at the Pan Ameriean Union, 
June 30, 1942. 



strengthen their conmion purpose to maintain 
this hemisphere forever free from any encroach- 
ment upon the independence of the peoples of 
the Americas, and as a citadel of human liberty. 

We are confronting an attack upon the New 
World which is being waged by the Axis powers 
on every front upon which tliey can muster their 
forces of treachery and of deceit. 

For this war is not being fought today on the 
military front alone. We, the free nations of 
America, are today faced with the supreme and 
historic mission of repelling a total assault on 
our freedom and our integrity, an assault that is 
being carried on not only by pirate submarines 
and military arms but also by the colonies of 
subversive agents on the sovereign soil of each 



JULY i, 194 2 



581 



one of our countries. These human termites, 
carrying out the will of their Axis masters, have 
been gnawing for a long time, not only at the 
foundations of our inter-American system but 
also at the foundations of the economic struc- 
ture that maintains us whole. It is for the pur- 
pose of completing and integrating controls that 
have already been established to thwart and to 
stamp out their activities that this meeting of 
technical experts from our 21 American repub- 
lics is convened in Washington today. 

Even by the time that the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs met at Kio de Janeiro to consult on meas- 
ures for the common defense of our nations some 
measures had already been adopted by the Amer- 
ican republics to control the exportation or re- 
exportation of merchandise, to i-estrict and con- 
trol financial and coimnercial transactions with 
the nations signatory to the Tripartite Pact and 
the territories dominated by them, and to curb 
otlier alien economic activities prejudicial to the 
welfare of the Western Hemisphere. 

At that meeting the representatives of the 
American governments laid down, in resolution 
V, an outline of the general nature and objec- 
tive of commercial and financial controls that 
they were luianimous in believing should be 
established in order to defend the hemisphere 
against the encroachments of the sinister fifth 
columns that were operating in advance of the 
Axis military forces. At that time they recom- 
mended for immediate adoption "any additional 
measures necessary to cut off for the duration of 
the present Hemispheric emergency all com- 
mercial and financial intercourse, direct or in- 
direct, between the Western Hemisphere and the 
nations signatory to the Tripartite Pact and the 
territories dominated by them ;" and also "meas- 
ures to eliminate all other financial and com- 
mercial activities prejudicial to the welfare and 
security of the American Republics ..." 

The Ministers of Foreign Affairs at their 
meeting in Rio de Janeiro recognized, however, 
that in order to make such controls as they rec- 
ommended effective against the Axis fifth col- 
umn in the Western Hemisphere it would be nec- 
essary that the financial authorities charged 



with the administration of such controls in each 
of the American republics should meet together 
to consult with each other, in order to exchange 
information and to pool their experience. It 
would be necessary to work out the details of 
joint procedures that would altogether eliminate 
the financial and commercial maneuvers by 
which the tools of the German and Italian and 
Japanese warlords, operating in this hemi- 
sphere, seek to reduce our defenses and endeavor 
to prepare the way for our subjugation. It was 
with this in view that the Meeting in Rio de 
Janeiro recommended the convocation of this 
present Inter-American Conference on Systems 
of Economic and Financial Control. 

The historic task that now confronts the 
peoples of America, the task of defending the 
traditional freedom of the American continent 
against attack from abroad, cannot be accom- 
plished by military means alone. We must be 
no less resolute in measures to counter the eco- 
nomic assault than in the measures we are taking 
to meet the military threat. The soil of our 
own continent is one of the great battlefields of 
this war. On it we are fighting — and fighting 
with increasing success — the enemy who has 
insinuated himself in our midst. 

Delegates to this conference, the decisions that 
are made by you here at this conference and 
the actions of our governments in carrying out 
those decisions are of the utmost consequence 
in assisting in the creation of the assurance that 
the American continent shall continue to main- 
tain its liberties and its independence. It is a 
solemn mission with which this conference is 
charged. I have faith that that mission will be 
fulfilled in a manner worthy of the spirit that 
has nurtured and defended the freedom of the 
Americas throughout the term of our independ- 
ent life. 

Upon you rests a responsibility to provide 
implements for the willing hands that are fight- 
ing today the economic battles to preserve our 
solidarity. I voice the hope of millions when I 
express the firm conviction that in this critical 
moment your vision, your leadership, and your 
high devotion will not be found wanting. 



Commercial Policy 



MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT REGARDING INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN WHEAT 



[Released to the press July 1] 

The Wheat Meeting recently held in Wash- 
ington has resulted in the approval by the Gov- 
ernments of Argentina, Australia, Canada, the 
United Kingdom, and the United States of a 
Memorandum of Agreement as a first step to- 
ward the conclusion as soon as circumstances 
permit of a comprehensive international wheat 
agreement. 

The Washington Wlieat Meeting comprised 
oflBcials of five of the ten countries which par- 
ticipated in the work of the Preparatory Com- 
mittee established by the International Wheat 
Advisory Committee at London in January 1939. 
The work of the Preparatory Committee was 
near completion when war broke out in Septem- 
ber 1939. The war aggi-avated in several im- 
portant respects tlie world wheat problem, and, 
following an exchange of views between their 
Governments, officials of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United 
States met in Washington on July 10, 1941,' to 
resume the discussions which were interrupted 
by the outbreak of war. They submitted to their 
Governments a preliminary report in August 
1941,^ reconvened in October, and have met at 
frequent intervals since then to carry on their 
discussions.' 

The Memorandum of Agreement now con- 
cluded provides for the convening by the United 
States, when the time is deemed propitious, of 
a conference of all the nations having a sub- 
stantial interest in wheat, whether as consumers 
or producers ; and there is attached to it for con- 
sideration at that conference a draft convention 



'Bulletin of July 12, 1941, p. 23. 
' Ibid., August 9, 1941, p. 116. 
" Ibid., October 18, 1941, p. 302. 
582 



prepared by the Washington Wheat Meeting. 
In the meantime the Memorandum of Agreement 
requires the adoption and maintenance on the 
part of the four exporting countries of positive 
measures to control production with the object of 
minimizing the accumulation of excessive stocks 
during the war. 

The Memorandum of Agreement provides also 
for the immediate establishment of a pool of 
wheat for intergovernmental relief in war- 
strickfin and other necessitous areas as soon as 
the international situation permits. It brings 
into operation the arrangements in the draft 
convention for contributions to a pool, as they 
may be required, of 100 million bushels and addi- 
tional quantities to be determined as the extent 
of the need becomes known. 

In order to prevent disorganization and con- 
fusion immediately after the war and pending 
the conclusion of a comprehensive international 
wheat agreement, the present Memorandum pro- 
vides for bringing into operation for a limited 
period the provisions of the draft convention 
relating to the control by the four exporting 
countries of production, stocks, and exports and 
for cooperation by all five countries in stabiliz- 
ing prices. 

The approval of the five Governments was 
notified by the Government of the United States 
to the other four Governments on June 27 and, 
in accordance with the minutes of the final 
session of the Washington Wheat Meeting, the 
provisions of the Memorandum of Agreement 
came into effect on that date. 

The texts of the Memorandum of Agreement, 
including the draft convention, and of the min- 
utes of the final session of the Washington 
Wheat Meeting are printed below. 



JtTLT 4, 1942 



583 



MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT 

1. Officials of Argentina, Australia, Canada 
and the United States, wheat exporting conn- 
tries, and of the United Kingdom, a wheat im- 
porting country, met in Washington on July 10, 
1941 to I'esume the wheat discussions which 
were interrupted in London by the outbreak of 
war in September 1939 and to consider what 
steps might be taken toward a solution of the 
international wheat problem. 

2. The discussions at Washington, which ex- 
tended over a period of many months, have made 
it clear that a satisfactory solution of the prob- 
lem requires an international wheat agreement 
and that such an agreement requires a confer- 
ence of the nations willing to participate which 
have a substantial interest in international trade 
in wheat. It was also recognized that pending 
tlie holding of such a conference the situation 
should not be allowed to deteriorate. The 
Washington Wheat Meeting has recorded the 
results of its deliberations in the attached Draft 
Convention in order to facilitate further inter- 
national consideration of the subject at such 
time as may be possible and to provide a basis 
for such interim measures as may be found 
necessary. 

3. The Washington Wheat Meeting has rec- 
ognized that it is impracticable to convene at 
the present time the international wheat con- 
ference referred to above. Accordingly, the 
five countries jiresent at that Meeting have 
agreed that the United States, so soon as after 
consultation with other countries it deems the 
time f)ropitious, should convene a wheat con- 
ference of the nations having a substantial in- 
terest in international trade in wheat which are 
willing to jjarticipate, and that the Draft Con- 
vention above mentioned should be submitted 
to that conference for consideration. 

4. In the meantime there should be no delay 
in the provision of wheat for relief in war- 
stricken and other necessitous areas so soon as in 
the view of the five countries circumstances per- 
mit. Likewise it is imperative that the absence 



of control measures over the accumulation of 
stocks in the four countries now producing large 
quantities of wheat for markets no longer avail- 
able should not create insoluble problems for a 
future conference. Accordingly, the five coun- 
tries have agieed to regard as in effect among 
themselves, pending the conclusions of tlie con- 
ference referred to abo\'e, those arrangements 
described in the attached Draft Convention 
which are necessary to the administration and 
distribution of the relief pool of wheat and to 
the control of production of wheat other than 
tliose involving the control of exports. 

.5. If the conference contemplated above shall 
have met and concluded an agreement prior to 
the cessation of hostilities, no further action will 
be needed by the countries represented at the 
Washington Meeting. However, if this is not 
the case, it will be necessai-y, in order to prevent 
disorganization and confusion in inteinational 
trade in wheat, to institute temporary controls 
pending the conclusions of the conference. Ac- 
cordingly the five countries agree that in the 
l^eriod following the cessation of hostilities and 
pending the conclusion of a wheat agreement at 
the conference referred to the arrangements de- 
scribed in the attached Draft Convention which 
relate to the control of production, stocks and 
exports of wheat and to the administration 
thereof will be brought into effect among them- 
selves. Those arrangements will come into ef- 
fect on such date as may be unanimously agreed. 
Announcement of that date will be made within 
six months after the cessation of hostilities. 

6. Pending the conclusions of the conference 
contemplated above, the five countries, on the 
cessation of hostilities or such earlier date as 
they may agree, will regard as in effect among 
themselves the arrangements described in the 
attached Draft Convention for the control of 
the prices of wheat. The determination of 
prices required to be made in accordance with 
those arrangements will be made by unanimous 
consent. If no determination of prices has been 
made on the cessation of hostilities, the five 
countries will, pending such determination but 



470599—42- 



584 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



for a period not exceeding six months, main- 
tain as the export price of wheat the last price 
negotiated by the United Kingdom for a bulk 
purchase of wheat from the principal counti-y 
of supply ; equivalent f . o. b. prices will be cal- 
culated for wheats of the other exporting coun- 
tries and will be adjusted from time to time to 
meet substantial changes in freight and ex- 
change rates. 

7. In taking any decisions under this Memo- 
randum and the arrangements of the Draft Con- 
vention which it brings into operation each of 
the five coimtries will have one vote and a two- 
thii'ds majority will be required for decision 
except as otherwise provided herein. 

8. The provisions of tliis Memorandum will 
be superseded by any agreement reached at the 
proposed wheat conference or by any arrange- 
ments which the five countries and other inter- 
ested countries may make to deal with the 
period pending such a conference. In any event 
they are to terminate two years from the cessa- 
tion of hostilities. 

A. M. V. 
For Argentina 

E. kcC. 
For A'mtralia 

C. F. W. 
For Canada 

H. F. C. 
For the United Kingdom 

L. A. W. 
For the United States 

Washington, April 22, 19i2. 



DRAFT CONVENTION 
Preamble 

1. The prospects with regard to the produc- 
tion and marketing of wheat are such that ac- 
cumulation of wheat surpluses threatens to re- 
sult in grave post-war difficulties for the 
economies of the producing countries and 
hence, because of the interdependence of na- 
tions, for the economies of all countries. It is 
also to be expected that, unless appropriate 
action is taken, such accumulation will recui'. 



2. A solution of the problem thus presented 
must be regarded as an essential part of any 
program of world economic reconstruction and 
will call for cooperative action by all countries 
concerned in international trade in wheat. It 
will involve national and international meas- 
ures for the regulation of wheat production in 
both exf)orting and importing countries, for the 
orderly distribution of wheat and flour in do- 
mestic and international trade at such prices as 
are fair to consumers and provide a reasonable 
remuneration to producers and for the mainte- 
nance of world supplies which shall be at all 
times ample for the needs of consumers without 
being so excessive as to create a world burden of 
unwanted surpluses. 

3. Cooperative action is also necessary to 
meet the need for relief in the war-stricken 
areas of the world by the supply and distribu- 
tion of gifts of wheat. 

4. The benefits of abundant world supplies of 
wheat cannot be assured to consumers unless 
there is a substantial decrease in uneconomic 
incentives to high-cost production, a lowering 
of barriers to world trade and the charging of 
prices to consumers not substantially higher 
than the price of wheat in international trade. 

5. In many countries the standard of living 
would be improved by increasing the consump- 
tion of wheat through a lowering of prices. In 
all countries the standard of living would be 
improved by stimulating the consumption of 
foods rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals. 
The increased jjroduction of such foods would 
offer a more valuable use for land which has at 
times been used uneconomically for high-cost 
production of wheat. 

6. Producers of an international commodity 
such as wheat are directly affected by standards 
of living throughout the world, by international 
purchasing power and by prevailing policies 
and practices affecting international trade gen- 
erally. There can be no basic solution of the 
problem of export surpluses without a general 
reduction of import barriers and no measure 
should be taken or maintained which has the 
effect of retarding such reduction or of prevent- 
ing in any way the fullest possible development 
of international trade. 



( 



JULY 4, 1942 



585 



Accordingly the contracting Governments 
have agreed as follows: 

Article I (Expansion of Trade) 

1. The contracting Governments agree that 
an essential element of a solution of the world 
wheat problem is that consumers should have 
the opportunity and means of increasing their 
purchases of wheat from areas which are 
equipped to produce it economically. They 
agree that such opportunity and means depend 
not only on the lowering of barriers to the im- 
portation of wheat but also on making avail- 
able to wheat importing countries increased out- 
lets for the exportation of goods which they in 
turn are equipped to produce economically. 
They agree that this requires the adoption and 
pursuit of national and international policies 
aimed at a fuller and more efficient use among 
nations of human and natural resources and 
thereby a world-wide expansion of purchasing 
power. 

2. Recognizing therefore that much that is 
called for transcends the scope of a wheat agree- 
ment and requires action on a broad interna- 
tional basis, but that much also can be accom- 
l^lished by national measures and by agreements 
with each other and with other countries, the 
contracting Governments undertake to further 
in every way possible the attainment of the fore- 
going objectives. 

3. The Council shall from time to time submit 
to the contracting Governments a review of 
international trade in wheat and invite them to 
consider, in the light of the foregoing, what 
measures may be adopted for the expansion of 
such trade. 

Article II (Production Control)* 

1. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and the United States of America shall 
adopt suitable measures to ensure tliat the pro- 
duction of wheat in their territories does not 
exceed the quantity needed for domestic re- 



•Note: This Article to be expanded, when further 
international consideration of the subject is possible, 
to include provisions for production control in other 
exporting countries and in importing countries. [Foot- 
note in original.] 



quirements and the basic export quotas and 
maximum reserve stocks for which provision 
is hereinafter made. 

2. Should nevertheless production in any 
country be found to have exceeded in any crop- 
year the quantity above prescribed, the Govern- 
ment of that country shall before the end of 
that crop-year take such action as will result in 
the disappearance of the excess production 
within its territories before the end of the fol- 
lowing crop-year or shall otherwise deal with 
such excess production as the Council may di- 
rect, except that if any part of the excess pro- 
duction is shown to the satisfaction of the Coun- 
cil to be due to a yield above the average of 
the preceding 20 years the Government of the 
country concerned may carry that part as pro- 
vided in paragraph 3 (a) of Article III or deal 
with it in such other manner as may be agreed 
with the Council. 

3. Pending the coming into force of para- 
grajahs 1 and 2 of this Article, the Governments 
of Argentina, Australia, Canada and the 
United States of America shall adopt or main- 
tain positive measures to control production 
with the object of minimizing the accumulation 
of excessive stocks. 

Article III (Stocks) 

1. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and the United States of America shall, 
subject to the provisions of paragraphs 2, 3, 4 
and 5 of this Article, ensure that stocks of old 
wheat held at the end of their respective crop- 
years are not less than 35, 25, 80 and 150 mil- 
lion bushels respectively, and not more than 
130, 80, 275 and 400 million bushels respectively. 
Any stocks not in excess of the specified maxi- 
mum are hereinafter called "reserve stocks". 

2. Stocks of old wheat in any country may 
be permitted to fall below the specified mini- 
mum (a) if the new crop together with the 
carry-over from the previous crop-year is in- 
sufficient to meet domestic requirements and 
leave at the end of that crop-year the minimum 
reserve stocks specified, in which case those 
stocks may be reduced by the amount necessary 
fully to meet domestic requirements, and (b) in 
so far as the Council decides that exports from 



586 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the minimum reserve stocks of tliat country are 
required fully to meet the world demand for 
imported wheat. 

3. Stocks of old wheat may exceed the maxi- 
mum by (a) the quantity of permitted excess 
stocks ascertained under paragraph 4 of this 
Article and (b) the quantity of permitted sur- 
plus stocks ascertained under paragraph 5 of 
this Article. 

4. Such part of excess production in the first 
crop-year in which it occurs following the crop- 
year in which Article IV comes into force as 
may be shown under f)aragraph 2 of Article II 
to be clue to above average yields shall be per- 
mitted excess stocks at the end of that crop- 
year. The permitted excess stocks at the end of 
each succeeding crop-year shall be ascertained 
by the G)uncil by deducting from the permitted 
excess stocks, if any, at the end of the preceding 
crop-year any quantity by which production in 
the crop-year then ending was less than the 
maximum jDrescribed in paragraph 1 of Article 
II or by adding thereto such part of any excess 
production in that crop-year as may be shown 
under paragraph 2 of Article II to be due to 
above average yields. 

5. Stocks in excess of the maximum, as ascer- 
tained by the Council, at the end of the crop- 
year in which announcement is made of the date 
on which the provisions of Articles II, III and 
IV will come into effect shall be permitted sur- 
plus stocks, unless that announcement is made 
less than 45 days prior to the beginning of the 
seeding period for the next harvest in which 
case stocks in excess of the maxiniiun at the end 
of the succeeding crop-year shall be permitted 
surplus stocks. Permitted surplus stocks at the 
end of each succeeding crop-year shall be ascer- 
tained by the Council by deducting from the per- 
mitted surplus stocks at the end of the 
preceding crop-year (a) any secondary or sup- 
plementary export quotas allocated in the crop- 
year then ending and (b) any quantity by which 
production in that crop-year plus the permitted 
excess stocks at the end of the preceding crop- 
year was less than the maximum production 
prescribed in paragraph 1 of Article II. 



6. Should it be shown to the satisfaction of 
the Comicil that, owing to insuflficient or defec- 
tive storage facilities, any part of the permitted 
surplus stocks in any country has been destroyed 
or has been disposed of by governmental meas- 
ures in a manner clearly constituting extraor- 
dinary use such part shall nevertheless be 
counted as jjermitted surplus stocks for the pur- 
poses of paragraphs 3 and 4 of Article IV so 
long as any other permitted surplus stocks re- 
main in that country. 

7. The Council shall— 

(a) at its regular August meeting ascertain 
the permitted surplus stocks in Canada and the 
United States of America at the end of their 
preceding crop-years and estimate such stocks 
in Argentina and Australia at the end of their 
current crop-years and 

(b) at its regular January meeting ascertain 
the permitted surplus stocks in Argentina and 
Australia at the end of their preceding crop- 
years and estimate such stocks in Canada and 
the United States of America at the end of 
their current crojj-years. 

Article IV (Export Control) 

1. The contracting Government of each ex- 
porting country shall adopt the measures nec- 
essary to ensure that net exports of wheat, in- 
cluding flour expressed in terms of its wheat 
equivalent, from its territories in each quota- 
year shall not, subject to the provisions of para- 
graph 11 of this Article, exceed the basic, sec- 
ondary and supplementary export quotas for 
which 23rovision is hereinafter made. It is rec- 
ognized in principle that, within the framework 
of this Agreement, wheat from each exporting 
country should continue to find its way into its 
normal markets. 

2. The basic exjDort quotas for Argentina, 
Australia, Canada and the United States of 
America shall, subject to the provisions of para- 
graph 3 of this Article, be 25, 19, 40 and 16 
percent respectively of the Council's latest pub- 
lished estimate of the total volume of interna- 
tional trade in wheat and flour in each quota- 
year less (a) such basic export quotas for other 



JULY 4, 1942 



587 



exporting countries as may be agreed under 
Article XIV and (b) reasonable allowances, 
having due regard to exports in past years, for 
net exports from tlie territories of Governments 
not parties to the Agreement. 

3. Should the residual quantity ascertained 
under paragraph 2 of this Article exceed 500 
million bushels in any quota-year, the excess 
shall be allocated to Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and the United States of America as sec- 
ondary export quotas. Allocations made in the 
first half of the quota-year shall be in proportion 
to permitted surplus stocks as determined under 
paragrapli 7 (a) of Article III and allocations 
made in the second half of the quota-year shall 
be in proportion to permitted surplus stocks as 
iletermined under paragraph 7 (b) of Article 
111. Should there be no peimitted surplus stocks 
in any of those four countries the excess shall be 
allocated to those countries as secondary export 
quotas in proportion to their basic export quotas. 

4. If the Council is satisfied that any part of 
any country's export quota or of the allowance 
made for its exports for any quota-year will not 
be exported by that country in that quota-year, 
it shall, subject to the provisions of paragraph 
G of this Article, re-allocate that part as supple- 
mentary export quotas to the other exporting 
countries in accordance with the procedure pre- 
scribed in paragraph 3 of this Article for the 
allocation of secondary export quotas. Should 
there be no permitted surplus stocks in any of 
those countries that part shall, unless the Council 
otherwise decides, be re-allocated as supple- 
mentary export quotas to those of the other 
exjjorting countries which have percentage ex- 
port quotas in projoortion to those quotas. 

5. No decisions taken by the Council pursuant 
to paragraph 4 of this Article shall prejudice 
tlie right of any country to export its full export 
quota within the quota-year to which it relates. 

6. Should it be shown to the satisfaction of the 
Council that the failure of any country to ship 
any part of its export quota during the first 
quota-year is due to shortage of shipping, the 
amount of the supplementary export quotas 
allocated to other countries in respect of such 



part shall be deducted from the basic export 
quotas of those countries for the second quota- 
year and added to the aforementioned country's 
basic export quota for the second quota-year. 

7. No export quota or part thereof shall be 
exported in any quota-year other than that to 
which it relates, except as otherwise provided 
in this Article. Should it nevertheless be shown 
to the satisfaction of the Council that, owing to 
unavoidable delay in the arrival or departure of 
ships, part of an export quota had not been 
shipped at the end of the quota-year that part 
may be shipped in the following quota-year but 
shall be deemed to have been shipped in the 
quota-year to which it relates. 

8. No export quota or part thereof shall be 
ceded, transferred or loaned by any country 
except as provided in this Article or with the 
unanimous approval of the contracting Gov- 
ernments of exporting countries. 

9. Wlien it appears that any country is ap- 
proaching the limit of its export quota, the 
Chairman of the Council on the recommendation 
of the Executive Committee shall request the 
Govermnent of that country to control loadings 
for export during the remainder of the quota- 
year and to telegraph each week to the Council 
the gross exports and gross imports of wdieat 
and of wheat flour from and into its territories 
during the preceding week. 

10. When the Chairman of the Council after 
consultation with the Executive Committee 
finds that any country has exported its export 
quota for any quota-year he shall immediately 
make a declaration to that effect. The con- 
tracting Govermnent of the exporting country 
concerned shall thereupon announce that the 
exportation of wheat or flour from its territories 
will not be permitted after seven days from the 
date of the Chairman's declaration and the con- 
tracting Government of each importing country 
shall not permit the importation into its terri- 
tories of wheat or flour shipi^ed from that ex- 
porting country during the current quota-year 
more than seven days after the date of the Chair- 
man's declaration. 



588 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



11. Should it be found that, owing to prac- 
tical diflicultios of closely controlling shipments, 
ex[K)rts from any country have exceeded its ex- 
port (|U()(ii, that country shall not be deemed to 
have infringed the pi'ovisions of paragraph 1 
of this Article so long as the excess is not more 
(lian 5 percent of tho (luota, but the amount of 
that excess up to 15 percent of the quota and three 
times tho amount of that excess above 3 percent 
of the quota shall be deducted from that coun- 
try's export (piota for the following (piota-year. 

V2. 'J'he contracting Governments recognize 
that international trade in wheat should be dis- 
tributed on a fair and equitable basis among 
all countries which ex))oi't. wheat and they ngi'ee 
that the elfcctive operation of the Agreement 
should not be impaired by abnormal exports 
from countries that have not acceded to it. Ac- 
cordingly the contracting (Jovernments shall 
cooperate in taking, on the advice of the Council, 
such ])ractical)le measures as may be necessary 
to attain this end. 

AuTicLE V (Price Control) 

1. The Council shall fix and publish prior to 
the coming into force of Ailicle IV and there- 
al'ler at each regular August meeting a basic 
niinimiini ])rice and a basic maxinuun price of 
wheal, c.i.f. United Kingdom ports, and sched- 
ules of prices, c.i.f. and/or f.o.b., equivalent 
thi'ii'lo for tho various wheals sold in world 
markets. These prices sludl take effect on such 
date as may be determined by the Council and 
shall remain in force until the effective dale of 
the prices fixed by the Council at its next regular 
August meeting but shall bo subject to such ad- 
justments as tho Council may find necessary to 
meet substantial clianges in freight or exchange 
rates or as may bo made in accordance with tho 
provisions of paragraph 3 of tliis Article. 

2. The prices fi.xed under paragraph 1 of this 
Article shall be such as will in the opinion of 
tho Council (a) return reasonably rennmerative 
prices to producers in exporting countries, (b) 
bo fair to consumers in inqjorting countries, 
(c) be in reasonable relationship to prices of 
other commodities and (d) make ap|)roprialo 
allowance foi' exchange rates and transportation 
costs. 



3. Shoidd the Council so decide the basic 
niininunn and maximum prices of wheat and the 
schedules of prices equivalent thereto shall be 
adjusted at monthly or otiier intervals to allow 
for carrying charges. 

4. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and the United States of America shall 
not, after the coming into force of paragiaph 1 
of this Article, sell or permit the sale of wheat 
for export, or to millers for producing flour for 
exj)ort, at i)rices below the mininnnn ecpiivalents 
li.xed by tho Council under paragraph 1 or 3 of 
this Article. 

5. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and tho United States of America shall 
ensure that wheat for export is at all times on 
sale at f.o.b. prices not in excess of the maximum 
e(iuivalents fixed by the Council under para- 
graph 1 or 3 of this Article. 

Article VI (Reuef Pool) 

1. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada, the TTiiited Kingdom and tho United 
States of America .sliall establish a pool of wheat 
which will be available for intergovernmental 
relief in war-stricken countries and other neces- 
sitous areas of the world, where circmnstances 
in the view of those Governments make such re- 
lied' practicable. 

2. The Governments of Canada, the United 
Kingdom and tho United States of America 
shall give to the pool, as and when required by 
the Council, 25, 25 and 50 million bushels re- 
spectively of wheat, or its equivalent in whole 
or part in flour, f.o.b. seaboard port in the 
country of origin. 

3. The Governments of Argentina, Australia, 
Canada and tho United States of America shall, 
as and when required by the Council, give to 
tho pool in addition to tho contributions pre- 
scribed in paragraph 2 of this Article a quantity 
of wheat or its equivalent in wliole or part in 
flour, f.o.b. seaboard port, to be determined by 
them in consultation with the Council and on 
such basis as may be agreed among them. 

4. Tho Council shall bo resj)onsible for tho 
administration of tho relief jiool and shall, 
wherever possible, arrange for the distribution 
of relief wheat through such intergovernmental 



JULY 4, 1942 



589 



relief body as may bo set, up and given general 
responsibility for the distribution of relief. 
Sliould (lip Council decide to make relief wheat 
or flour a\iiilnbl(^ to any necessitous area in 
which the intergovernmental relief body has not 
tile orgiiuiziition uoccssary for the distribution 
of such wliciit or iloiir the Council shall arrange 
with the appropi-iate authorities to distribute 
such wheat or flour in that area. Any arrange- 
ments for the distribution of relief wheat shall 
be such as lo minimize, so far as the provision 
of sufficient relief permits, the reduction of the 
effective demand for wheat on sale. 

5. The United Kingdom Government may, if 
so agreed by the Council after consultation with 
the intergovernmental relief body, contribute 
transportation of relief wheat or flour in lieu 
of part or all of its contribution under para- 
grajih 2 of this Article. 

6. Any contributing Government shall, if the 
Council after consultation with the intergov- 
ernmental relief body so requests and upon 
such terms of replacement as may be agreed 
with the Council, make, pending the arrival of 
contributions by other Governments, advances 
of such wheat or flour as that Government may 
consider practicable to release for immediate 
relief. 

7. Should the Council consider or be advised 
by the intergovernmental relief body that the 
quantity of relief wheat contributed under par- 
agraphs 2, 3 and 5 of this Article appears likely 
to prove insufficient, the Council shall make 
recommendations to the contiacting Govern- 
ments regarding additional contributions. 

8. The Council shall instruct the Executive 
Committee (a) to facilitate the transfer of re- 
lief wheat and flour from the national wheat- 
handling organizations of the contributing 
Governments to the intergovernmental relief 
body, (b) to maintain effective liaison between' 
the national wheat-handling and shipping or- 
ganizations of the contributing Governments 
and international shipping and transport con- 
trols and (c) generally to consult with the 
intergovernmental relief body regarding all 
transactions relating to the relief pool. 

9. Should the Council receive, at any time 
after the completion of the relief to which the 



provisions of paragraphs 1 to 8 of this Article 
relate, an appeal for relief wheat or flour from 
any Govoniiiieiit to iclievc faiuinc in any area 
within the jurisdiction of that Government, the 
Council shall investigate the possibilities of 
meeting such an ai)])eal and rcjiort to the con- 
tracting Govei'iimcnts its findings together with 
its recommendations. 

Article VII (The Council)* 

1. This Agicciiiciit sliiill be administered by 
an Internatioiia! Wheat Council consisting of 
one or more delegates of each contracting Gov- 
ernment. 

2. The Council shall have the powers specifi- 
cally assigned to it under the Agreement and 
such other powers as are necessary for the effec- 
tive operation of the Agreement and for the 
carrying out of its provisions. 

3. The Council may, by unanimity of the 
votes cast, delegate the exercise of any of its 
powers or functions to such persons or bodies 
as it thinks fit. 

4. The Council shall elect, for such periods 
and upon such conditions as it may determine, 
a Chairman and a Vice Chairman, who need 
not be delegates of contracting Governments. 

5. The Council shall appoint a Secretary and 
such other employees as it considers necessary 
and determine their powers, duties, compensa- 
tion and duration of employment. 

C. The seat of the Council shall be in London 
unless the Council should otherwise determine. 

7. The Council shall meet in January and 
August of each year and at such other times as 
it may determine. The Chairman shall convene 
a meeting of the Council if so requested (a) by 
the Executive Committee or (b) by the dele- 
gates of five contracting Govei'iiments or (c) 
by the delegates of coiiti acting Governments 
with a total of not jess than votes. 

8. Notices of all meetings shall be (lisi)atched 
so as to ensui'e receipt by delegations of con- 
tracting Governments at least fourteen days in 
advance of the date fixed for the meeting. 



•Ni/rE: This Article to be oxpiiiidcd, when further 
inlcrii;ili()n;il coMsirtcnition of tlic sulijcct is possilile, to 
iiicliidi' provi.sioiis for voting. [Footnote In original.] 



590 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



9. Any contracting Government may desig- 
nate the delegation of any other contracting 
Government to represent it and to vote on its 
behalf at any meeting of the Council or on any 
particular question. The terms of any such 
delegation of authority shall be communicated 
ill writing by the delegating Government to the 
Chairman of the Council. 

10. The Council may take decisions, without 
holding a meeting, by correspondence between 
the Chairman and tlie delegations of the con- 
tracting Governments, unless any delegation 
objects. Any decisions so taken shall be com- 
municated forthwith to all the delegations and 
shall be recorded in the Minutes of the next 
meeting of the Council. 

11. The Council shall make at the earliest 
practicable date all possible arrangements 
with international shipping controls to facili- 
tate the exportation of wheat. 

12. The Council shall instruct the Executive 
Committee (a) to cooperate with bodies en- 
gaged in tlie task of improving human nutri- 
tion, (b) to investigate the possibilities of in- 
creasing wheat consumption and (c) to examine 
and report upon any proposals made to the 
Council by any contracting Government de- 
signed to facilitate the attainment of the objec- 
tives of the Agreement. 

13. The Council shall ascertain and make 
public the carry-over of wheat in Ai'gentina. 
Australia, Canada and the United States of 
America at the end oi each of their respective 
crop-years. 

14. The Council shall, upon the request of 
any contracting Government of an exporting 
country, investigate the possibility of meeting 
the needs of that country for wheat storage 
facilities to maintain in a good state of preser- 
vation such stocks of wheat as may accumulate 
prior to the coining into force of Article IV. 
The Council shall report to the contracting Gov- 
ernments its findings together with its recom- 
mendations. 



15. The Council shall at its regular August 
meeting make and publish, with such detail as 
it considers desirable, an estimate of the total 
volume of international trade in wheat and flour 
in the current quota-year and shall from time 
to time review that estimate and publish such 
revised estimates as it may make. 

16. The Council shall publish an annual re- 
port on the operation of the Agreement which 
shall include a summary of relevant statistics 
and such other material as the Council may 
determine. The Council may authorize the 
publication of such other reports as it considers 
appropriate. Reports shall be published in 
English and in any other languages that the 
Council may determine. 

17. Pending the establishment of the Execu- 
tive Committee under Article VIII, the Council 
shall itself perform the functions assigned by 
the Agreement to that Committee. 

18. The Council may arrange to take over 
the assets and liabilities of the Wheat Advisory 
Committee upon the dissolution of that body 
on such terms as may be agreed with it. 

Article VIII (The Executive Committee) 

1. The Council shall, when it considers it 
desirable to do so, establish an Executive Com- 
mittee which shall work under its general direc- 
tion. 

2. The Chairman of the Executive Committee 
shall be appointed by the Council for such pe- 
riod and upon such conditions as it may deter- 
mine. He need not be a delegate of a contract- 
ing Govermnent to the Council or a member of 
the Committee. 

3. The Secretary of the Council shall be the 
Secretary of the Executive Committee. 

4. In addition to the specific duties for which 
provision is made in this Agreement, the Ex- 
ecutive Committee shall be charged with the 
general duty of keeping under review the work- 
ing of the Agreement and of reporting to the 
Council from time to time on the manner in 



JULY 4, 1942 



591 



which the provisions of the Agreement are being 
carried out. 

5. The Executive Committee may be convened 
at any time by its Chairman. 

6. The decisions of the Executive Committee 
shall be taken by a simple majority of the total 
votes held by its members. 

Article IX (Reports to the Council) 

1. Each contracting Government shall make 
to the Council such reports as the Council may 
from time to time request on the action which 
that Government has taken to carry out the pro- 
visions of this Agreement. 

2. Each contracting Govermnent shall upon 
request telegraph each month to the Council 
the gross exi^orts and gross imports of wheat 
and of wheat flour from and into its territories 
in the preceding month, and shall supply such 
other information as the Council may from time 
to time request for the purposes of the Agree- 
ment. 

Article X (Finance) 

1. The contracting Governments shall share 
proportionally to the votes which they hold in 
the Council any expenses incurred by the Coun- 
cil in administering this Agreement. 

2. The Council shall at its first meeting ap- 
prove its budget for the period prior to the 
first day of the month of August after its first 
regular January meeting and assess the contri- 
bution to be paid by each contracting Govern- 
ment for that period. 

3. The Council shall at each regular January 
meeting approve its budget for the following 
August-July jjeriod and assess the contribution 
to be paid by each contracting Government for 
that period. 

4. The initial contribution of any Government 
acceding to the Agreement after the first meet- 
ing of the Council shall be assessed propor- 
tionally to the number of its votes in the Council 
and to the number of full months between its 



accession and the beginning of the first August- 
July period for which it is assessed under the 
provisions of paragraph 3 of this Article, but 
the assessments already made upon other Gov- 
ernments shall remain unaltered. 

5. The Council shall publish an audited state- 
ment of all moneys received and paid out during 
the period referred to in paragraph 2 of this 
Article and during each August-July period 
thereafter. 

6. Consideration shall be given by each con- 
tracting Government to the possibility of ac- 
cording to the funds of the Council and to the 
salaries paid by the Council to its employees 
who are nationals of other countries treatment 
in respect of taxation and of foreign exchange 
control no less favourable than that accorded 
by such Government to the funds of any other 
Government and to salaries paid by any other 
Government to any of its accredited representa- 
tives who are its nationals. 

7. The Council shall determine the dis- 
posal, on the termination of the Agreement, 
of any funds which remain after meeting its 
obligations. 

Article XI (Date Upon Which the Agree- 
ment Comes Into Force) * 

Article XII (Duration of the Agreement) 

This Agreement shall remain in force for 
four years after the last day of the month of 
July following the date upon which it comes 
into force. The Council shall inquire of the 
contracting Governments at least six months 
before the Agreement is due to expire whether 
they desire to continue it and shall report to the 
contracting Governments the results of such in- 
quiry together with its recommendations. 

♦Note : The text of this Article to be determined 
when further international consideration of the subject 
Is possible. [Footnote in original.] 



592 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Article XIII (Relation to Other 
Agreements) 

1. So long as this Agreement remains in force 
it shall prevail over any provisions inconsistent 
therewith which may be contained in any other 
agreement previously concluded between any of 
the contracting Governments. 

2. Should any contracting Government be 
party to an agreement with a non-contracting 
Government containing any provision inconsist- 
ent with this Agreement, that contracting Gov- 
ernment shall take all reasonable steps to pro- 
cure the necessary amendment of such agree- 
ment at the earliest date which it deems 
practicable. 

Article XIV (Accessions) 

This Agreement shall at any time be open to 
accession by the Government of any counti-y on 
the terms contained therein so far as they are 
applicable to that Government and on such other 
terms not inconsistent therewith as may be 
agreed with the Council. It shall accede as 
the Government either of an exporting country 
or of an importing country as may be agreed 
with the Council and if it accedes as the Gov- 
ernment of an exporting country it shall have 
such basic export quota as may be agreed with 
the Council. 

Article XV (Withdrawals) 

1. The contracting Government of any coun- 
try which considers its national security en- 
dangered as a result of hostilities may apply to 
the Council for the suspension of any of its obli- 
gations under Articles II, III, IV and V of 
this Agreement. If the application is not 
granted within 30 days after the date thereof, 
such Government may within 15 days after the 
end of that period withdraw from the Agree- 
ment on written notice to the Council. 

2. If it is shown to the satisfaction of the 
Council that the (Jovernment of Argentina, of 
Australia, of Canada or of the United States of 
America has failed to carry out its obligations 
under paragraph 1 of Article IV or paragraph 4 
of Article V, tlic contracting Government of any 



exporting country may within 90 days with- 
draw from the Agreement on 30 days' written 
notice to the Council. 

3. If tlie Government of Argentina, of Aus- 
tralia, of Canada or of the United States of 
America withdraws from the Agreement, the 
Agreement shall thereupon terminate, unless the 
Council, by three-fourths of the total votes held 
in the Council, decides to maintain the Agree- 
ment with whatever modifications it may deem 
necessary. 

Article XVI (Territories) 

1. The riglits and obligations under tliis 
Agreement of the Government of Argentina 
apply to the Customs territorj' thereof; those of 
the Government of Australia to Australia and 
her territories; those of the Government of 
Canada to the Customs territory thereof; those 
of the Government of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland to Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland; and those of the 
Government of the United States of America to 
the Customs territory thereof. 

2. In the event of the Government of any 
other country acceding to the Agreement under 
Article XIV, the Council shall agree with the 
said acceding Government as to the territories 
to which the rights and obligations of the said 
acceding Government under the Agreement shall 
apply. 

Article XVII (Definitions) 
For the purposes of this Agreement: 

1. "Bushel" means sixty pounds avoirdupois. 

2. "Carrying charges" means the costs in- 
curred for storage, interest and insurance in 
holding wheat. 

3. "Carry-over" means the aggregate of the 
stocks in any country, as ascertained by the 
Council under paragraph 13 of Article VII, of 
old wheat at the end of the crop-year held (a) 
in all elevators, warehouses and mills, (b) in 
transit or at railroad sidings and (c) on farms, 
except tliat in the case of Canada "carry-over" 
means in addition the stocks of wheat of Cana- 
dian origin held in bond in the United States 
of America. 



JULY 4, 1942 



593 



4. "Council"' means the Inteniational Wheat 
Council for which provision is made in Article 
VII. 

5. "Crop-year" means in respect of Argentina 
and Australia, the period from December 1 to 
November 30; in respect of Canada, the period 
from August 1 to July 31; and in respect of 
the United States of America, the period July 
1 to June 30. 

6. "Domestic requirements" means all use of 
wheat and flour during any crop-year within 
the territories of each contracting Government 
for human and animal consumption, for indus- 
trial purposes, and for seed, and waste. 

7. "Equivalent", with reference to the meas- 
urement of flour in terms of wheat, means a 
quantity calculated in the ratio of such number 
of pounds of flour to 100 pounds of wheat as the 
Council shall determine. 

8. "Executive Committee" means the Execu- 
tive Committee established by the International 
Wheat Council under Article VIII. 

9. "Exporting country" means Argentina, 
Australia, Canada, the United States of Amer- 
ica or any country that may accede as such to 
the Agreement under Article XIV. 

10. "Export quota" means basic export quota 
together with any secondary or supplementary 
export quota allocated under Article IV. 

11. "Extraordinary use" means use which the 
Council is satisfied would not have taken place 
but for the governmental measures referred to 
in paragraph 6 of Article III. 

12. "Gross exports" means the total quantity 
of wheat, including flour expressed in terms of 
its wheat equivalent, shipped from the terri- 
tories of any Government, except that in the 
case of Canada "gross exports" means the over- 
seas clearances of Canadian wheat from sea- 
board ports in Canada and the United States 
of America, plus imports of wheat from Canada 
into the United States of America for consump- 
tion and for milling in bond, plus flour ex- 
pressed in terms of its wheat equivalent shipped 
from Canadian territories. 



13. "Gross imports" means the total quantity 
of wheat, including flour expi'essed in terms of 
its wheat equivalent, imported into tlie terri- 
tories of any Government. 

14. "Importing country" means the United 
Kingdom or any country that may accede as 
such to the Agreement under Article XIV. 

15. "Net exports" means gross exports minus 
gross imports. 

16. "Net imports" means gross imports minus 
gross exports. 

17. "New crop" means wheat harvested not 
more than two months prior to the beginning 
of the current crop-year. 

18. "Old wheat" means wheat harvested more 
than two months prior to the beginning of the 
current croi^-year. 

19. "Quota-year" means the period ending 
July 31 following the date upon which the 
Agreement comes into force and thereafter the 
period from August 1 to July 31. 

20. "Seaboard port" means any sea or river 
port at which a sea-going ship of 6000 tons gross 
can load. 

21. "Shipped" means transported in any man- 
ner. 

22. "Territories" means territory, or group of 
territories, to which the rights and obligations 
of the Agreement apply in accordance with the 
provisions of Article XVI. 

23. "The beginning of the seeding period for 
the next harvest" means in respect of Argentina, 
May 1; in respect of Australia and Canada, 
April 1 ; and in respect of the United States of 
America, September 1. 

24. "Total volume of international trade in 
wheat and flour" means the aggregate of the net 
export from each country of the world. 

25. "Wlieat Advisory Committee" means the 
Committee established under the Final Act of 
the Conference of Wheat Exporting and Im- 
porting Countries held in London at the Offices 
of the High Commissioner for Canada, from 
August 21 to 25, 1933. 

26. "Yield" means quantity of production per 
unit of sown area. 



594 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BXn^LETTN 



MINUTES OF THE FINAL SESSION OF THE 
WASHINGTON WHEAT MEETING 

The officials of the five countries participating 
in the Washington Wheat Meeting record as 
follows their understanding regarding certain 
provisions of the Memorandum of Agreement 
entered into pursuant to that Meeting: 

1. The arrangements referred to in paragraph 

4 of the Memorandum, relating to the relief 
pool of wheat and to the control of production, 
mean the following provisions of the Draft 
Convention attached thereto : paragraph 3 of 
Article II (Production Control), Articles VI 
(Relief Pool), VII (The Council) except para- 
graph 6, X (Finance), XVII (Definitions) 
and, should the Council at any time so decide. 
Article VIII (The Executive Committee). 

2. The arrangements referred to in paragraph 

5 of the Memorandum, relating to the control 
of production, stocks and exports and to the ad- 
ministration thereof, mean the following pro- 
visions of the Draft Convention, in addition to 
Articles VII (except paragraph 6), VIII, X 
and XVII referred to aobve : paragraphs 1 and 
2 of Article II (Production Control), Article 
III (Stocks), Article IV (Export Control) ex- 
cept the provisions of paragraphs 10 and 12 
relating to the obligations of importing coun- 
tries since those jirovisions are not regarded as 
essential to the interim measures contemplated 
in the Memorandum, Article IX (Reports To 
The Council) and Article XVI (Territories). 

3. The words "cessation of hostilities" in the 
Memorandum mean the earliest date at which 
none of the five countries is engaged in sub- 
stantial belligerent operations. 

4. The words "arrangements described in the 
attached Draft Convention" in paragraph 6 of 
the Memorandum mean the provisions of Ar- 
ticle V of the Draft Convention. 

5. The words "equivalent f .o.b. prices" which 
will be calculated for wheats of the other export- 
ing countries under paragraph 6 of the Mem- 
orandum mean the prices of Argentine, Austral- 
ian and United States wheats which will be as- 



certained by the unanimous vote of the Council 
as equivalent to the last price negotiated by 
the United Kingdom for a bulk purchase of 
wheat from Canada. 

6. The seat of the Council will be in Wash- 
ington during the period in which the Memo- 
randum of Agi-eement is in force, miless the 
Council should otherwise determine. 

7. The Minutes of the Washington Wlieat 
Meeting, together with the Reports of its Com- 
mittees, will be available for the information of 
the Council during the period in which the 
Memorandum of Agreement is in force. 

8. The English texts of the Memorandum of 
Agreement and of the present Minutes have been 
initialled by Anselmo M. Viacava, Edwin 
McCarthy, Charles F. AVilson, Harold F. Car- 
lill, and Leslie A. AVlieeler, officials of Argen- 
tina, Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom 
and the United States respectively, as competent 
experts in a position to reflect the views of their 
respective Governments. The Memorandum, 
the Draft Convention and the present Minutes 
will be transmitted in English and Spanish by 
the Government of the United States to the other 
four Governments for their approval. So soon 
as the approval of the five Governments has been 
notified to each of them the provisions of the 
Memorandum of Agreement will be deemed to 
come into effect and the Memorandum of Agree- 
ment together with the Draft Convention at- 
tached thereto and the present Minutes will be 
made public. 

A. M. V. 
For Argentina 

E. McC. 
For Australia 

C. F. W. 
For Canada 

H. F. C. 
For the United Kingdom 

L. A. W. 
For the United States 

Washington, April 22, 19iS. 



JULY i, 1942 



595 



American Republics 



Cultural Relations 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH COLOMBIA 

(Released to the press July 3] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with Co- 
lombia was announced on July 3 by the Depart- 
ment of State, the Kubber Reserve Company, 
and the Board of Economic Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agreement the Rubber 
Reserve Company will purchase during the next 
five years all rubber produced in Colombia 
which is not required for essential domestic 
needs there. 

Colombia has been producing and exporting 
relatively small quantities of rubber. It is ex- 
pected that eventually, with development of 
potential resources, somewhat larger supplies 
will be available annually from Colombia. 

This agreement is the fifth under the United 
States program to secure for tlie united war 
effort the maximum possible amount of rub- 
ber produced in the Western Hemisphere. The 
other agreements, already in effect, are with 
Brazil, Peru, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. Ne- 
gotiations for similar agreements are proceed- 
ing with a number of other American rubber- 
producing countries. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PRESIDENT-ELECT OF COLOMBIA 

[Released to tbe press June 29] 

His Excellency Alfonso Lopez, President- 
elect of the Republic of Colombia, has accepted 
the invitation of the President to visit the 
United States as a guest of this Government. 
The President-elect and his party are scheduled 
to arrive in Washington on or about July 10. 

President-elect Lopez visited the United 
States in June 1934 as a guest of this Govern- 
ment, prior to his first term as President of 
Colombia. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
DISTINGUISHED ARGENTINES 

(Released to the press June 29] 

Ezequiel Martinez Estrada, the distinguished 
Argentine author, and Horacio Butler, the well- 
known Argentine painter, arrived in Washing- 
ton on June 29. Both are here at the invita- 
tion of the Department of State and will spend 
several days in Washington before beginning 
their respective visits to universities, libraries, 
and museums in this country. 

Dr. Martinez Estrada, who is on the faculty 
of the University of La Plata, has received sev- 
eral national literary awards, including the first 
prize for literature of Argentina for his book 
Humoresca. 

Senor Horacio Butler, outstanding among the 
artists of his country, is the recipient, among 
other honors, of a gold medal for one of his 
paintings, which was exhibited at the Paris Ex- 
position of 1937. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
CHILEAN AUTHOR 

[Released to the press July 3] 

Raiil Silva Castro, influential young writer 
of Chile and a member of the staff of the Na- 
tional Library at Santiago, arrived in Washing- 
ton on July 2 to visit libraries in this country at 
the invitation of the Department of State. 

Seiior Silva Castro will spend several days 
in Washington, devoting special attention to the 
Hispanic Foundation of the Library of Con- 
gress, before continuing his tour. 

He has published many bibliographical 
studies and several volumes of literary criticism 
and has edited special editions of the works of 
various authors. He has made a special study 
of the short story in Chile and has published 
an anthology and several critical volumes on the 
subject. 



596 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 4] 

The following changes have occui-red in the 
American Foreign Service since June 27, 1942 : 

Burton Y. Berry, of Fowler, Ind., formerly 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Rome, Italy, 
has been assigned as Consul at Istanbul, Turkey. 

Louis F. Blanchard, of Santa Fe, N. Mex., 
clerk at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, has been ap- 
i:)ointed Vice Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 

Earl Wilbert Eaton, of Laredo, Tex., Vice 
Consul at Durango, Mexico, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Nuevitas, Cuba. 

Frederick E. Farnsworth, of Colorado 
Springs, Colo., Consul at Montreal, Canada, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Legation 
and Consul at Ottawa, Canada, and will serve 
ill dual capacity. 

Frank Anderson Henry, of Wilmington, Del., 
Consul at Malta, has been assigned as Consul 
at Port Elizabeth, Union of South Africa. 

Julius C. Jensen, of Casper, Wyo., Vice Con- 
sul at Ziirich, Switzerland, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Basel, Switzerland. 

John D. Johnson, of Highgate, Vt., now serv- 
ing in the Department of State, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Montreal, Canada. 

Reginald S. Kazanjian, of Newport, R.I., 
Vice Consul at Florianopolis, Brazil, has been 
assigned as Consul at Florianopolis, Brazil. 

John Belfort Keogh, of New York, N.Y., 
Vice Consul at Bradford, England, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at London, England. 

Ralph Miller, of New York, N.Y., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Habana, Cuba, has 
been assigned as Consul at Mombasa, Kenya, 
where he will open a new office. 

R. Borden Reams, of Luthersburg, Pa., 
formerly Second Secretary of Legation at 
Copenhagen, Denmark, has been assigned for 
duty in the Department of State. 



Francis L. Spalding, of Brookline, Mass., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation at Cairo, Egypt, 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State. 

Charles H. Taliaferro, of Harrisonburg, Va., 
Vice Consul at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Cartagena, 
Colombia. 

Milton Patterson Thompson, of Chattanooga, 
Tenn., Vice Consul at Nuevitas, Cuba, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Durango, ]Mexico. 

Howard K. Travers, of Central Valley, N.Y., 
formerly Consul General at Budapest, Hun- 
gary, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

Fletcher AVarren, of Wolfe City, Tex., First 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Bogota, 
Colombia, has been designated Counselor of 
American Embassy at Bogota, Colombia. 

George Lybrook West, Jr., of San Francisco, 
Calif., Vice Consul at Godthaab, Greenland, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Legation at 
Stockholm, Sweden. 

Lloyd D. Yates, of Washington, D.C., for- 
merly Second Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Samuel Reber, a Foreign Service officer 
of class III, was designated an Assistant Chief 
of the Division of European Affairs, effective 
July 2, 1942 (Departmental Order 1067). 

Mr. Robert F. Woodward, a Foreign Service 
ofhcer of class VII, was designated an Assistant 
Chief of the Division of the American Repub- 
lics, effective July 2, 1942 (Departmental Order 
1068). 



JULY i, 1942 



597 



Treaty Information 



COMMERCE 
Trade Agreement with Peru 

[Released to the press June 29] 

On June 29, 1942 the President proclaimed 
the trade agreement between the United States 
and Peru, signed at Washington on May 7, 1942. 
The President of Peru also issued his proclama- 
tion of the agreement on June 29, 1942. 

Article XVI of the agreement provides that 
it shall enter into full force on the thirtieth clay 
following its proclamation by the Presidents of 
tiie two countries or, if the proclamations are 
issued on different clays, on the thirtieth day fol- 
lowing the date of the later in time of the proc- 
lamations. Accordingly, the agreement will 
enter into force on July 29, 1942. The full text 
of the agreement and related notes will shortly 
be printed in the Executive Agreement Series. 

Memorandum of Agreement Regarding Inter- 
national Trade in Wheat 

The text of a Memorandum of Agreement ap- 
proved by tlie Governments of Argentina, Aus- 
tralia, Canada, United Kingdom, and the United 
States effective June 27, 1942 in accordance with 
the provisions of the minutes of the final session 
of the Wtishington Wheat Meeting, as well as 
the text of a draft convention attached to the 
Memorandum of Agreement which is to be con- 
sidered at a future conference on wheat, ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading "Com- 
mercial Policy". 

OPIUM 
International Opium Convention, 1912 
Egypt 

By a note dated June 11, 1942 the Netherlands 
Ambassador at Washington informed the Sec- 
retary of State that the Egyptian Government 
has notified to the Netherlands Government in 



London its adherence to the International 
Opium Convention signed at The Hague on 
January 23, 1912. 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual-Aid Agreement with Poland 

The text of an agreement between the Gov- 
ernments of the United States and Poland, 
signed July 1, 1942, on the principles applying 
to mutual aid in the prosecution of the war, 
appears in this Bulletin under the heading "The 
War". 

STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Agreement with Colombia 

An announcement regarding the signature 
of an agreement with Colombia under the terms 
of which the Rubber Reserve Company will pur- 
chase during the next five years all rubber pro- 
duced in Colombia which is not required for 
essential domestic needs there, appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "American Re- 
publics". 



Legislation 



An Act Making appropriations for the Executive Office 
and sundry independent executive bureaus, boards, 
commissions, and offices, for ttie fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1943, and for other purposes. Approved 
June 27, 1942. [H. R. 6430.] Public Law 630, 
77th Cong. 34 pp. 

Joint Resolution To accord privileges of free impor- 
tation to members of the armed forces of other 
United Nations, to enemy prisoners of war and 
civilian internees and detainees, and for other 
purposes. Approved June 27, 1942. [H.J. Res. 
327.] Public Law 635, 77th Cong. 1 p. 

Salaries — Department of State : Communication from 
the President of the United States transmitting 
a draft of a proposed provision pertaining to the 
appropriation "Salaries, Department of State," ap- 
pearing in the pending Department of S'tate appro- 
priation bill for the fiscal year 1943. S. Doc. 235, 
77th Cong. 2 pp. 



598 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



First Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
BiU, 1943: 
Hearings before Subcommittee of the Committee ou 
Appropriations, House of Representatives, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess. Part 1. [Department of State, 
pp. 98-108; Office of the Coordinator of Inter- 
American Affairs, pp. 553-596.] 925 pp. 
H. Kept. 2295, 77th Cong., on H. R. 7319. [Coordi- 
nator of Inter-American Affairs, pp. 12-13; De- 
partment of State, p. 35.] 37 pp. 
Protection of the Name and Emblem of the Bed Cross: 
Hearings before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on 



H.R. 6911, and documents relating to H.R. 6911, 
a bill to implement article 28 of the convention 
signed at Geneva on July 27, 1929 ... by making 
it a criminal offense for any person to use the 
emblem and name of the Red Cross for com- 
mercial or other purposes. April 14, 22, 23, and 
May 26 and 27, 1942. [Statements by Green H. 
Hackworth, pp. 51-67, 108-109, 127->139; letter 
from the Secretary of State to the Chairman of 
the House Committee on Foreign Affairs May 23, 
pp. 198-200; and miscellaneous documents in the 
appendix.] 433 pp. 



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PUBLISHED WEEKL; WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BCBEAC OF THE BUDGET 



135-^. l-h^o 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



JULY 11, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 159— Publication 1770 



G 



ontents 




The War Page 

Mutual-aid agreements with — 
Greece: 

Joint statement by the President and the King of 

Greece 601 

Signing of the agreement 601 

Netherlands 604 

Czechoslovakia 607 

Norway 609 

Appointment of representatives to consult with the 

Free French in London 613 

Building in War for Peace: Address by Assistant Secre- 
tary Acheson . 614 

Anniversary of the arrival of American troops in 

Iceland: Address by Assistant Secretary Berle. . 618 
Five years of Chinese resistance to Japanese aggres- 
sion 619 

American Republics 

Distribution of oil to the other American republics . . . 620 
Visit to the United States of the President-elect of 

Colombia 621 

Economic cooperation with Bolivia 621 

Treaty Information 

Restriction of war: Convention for the Amehoration of 
the Condition of the Wounded and the Sick of 
Armies in the Field, and Convention Relatmg to 

the Treatment of Prisoners of War 622 

[over] 
•J. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOC'JHEf^ 

AUG 1 1942 







OJltentS-CONT^mVED 



Treaty Information — Continuotl. Page 

Finance: Stabilization Agreements 622 

Labor: Convention Concerning ^Vnnual Holidays With 

Pay for Seamen 624 

Military missions: Agreement with Panama for the 
Detail of a United States Army Oflicer As Adviser 
to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Panama . . 624 
Mutual guaranties: Mutual-aid agreements with 
Czechoslovakia, Greece, the Netherlands, and 
Norway 624 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of distinguished Argentines . 624 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 625 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 625 

General 

Detail of United States employees to foreign govern- 
ments 625 

Publications 626 

Regulations 626 

Legislation 626 



The War 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH GREECE 

JOINT STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT AND THE KING OF GREECE 



[Released to the press by the White House July 9] 

At the close of the conference between the 
President and tlie King of Greece at the Wliite 
House on July 9 the following joint comrnvwrdgue 
was issued : 

"At the meetings between the President and 
the King during His Majesty's visit to the 
United States, a full discussion of the mutual 
problems and interests of these two United 
Nations has taken place. The Greek Prime 
IVIinister, Mr. Tsouderos, has participated in 
these discussions. 

"We are in complete agreement on the simple 
objective of j)rosecuting the war to a successful 
conclusion, at the earliest possible moment, with 
all the resources at the command of the two 
nations. 

"We are firm in our determination to win the 



jDeace no less than the war, and we reassert our 
conviction that a just and lasting peace, based 
oil an honest application of the Declaration of 
the United Nations of January 1, 1942, is the 
basis on which the peace shall be won. 

'"In consequence, the Prime Minister of 
Greece and the Secretary of State will sign to- 
morrow, on behalf of their Governments, an 
agreement on the principles applying to mutual 
aid in the prosecution of the war, by which the 
American and Greek Governments pledge not 
only their mutual resources to a common victory 
but their collaboration in economic policies to 
make possible a lasting peace." 

King George and Mr. Tsouderos have been 
forced, for reasons of state, to curtail their 
visit to America and to return as early as possi- 
ble to London. 



SIGNING OF THE AGREEMENT 



[Released to the press July 10] 

An agreement between the Government of the 
United States and the Government of Greece on 
the principles applying to mutual aid in the 
prosecution of the war was signed on July 10 
by Mr. Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, and 
Mr. Emmanuel J. Tsouderos, Prime Minister 
and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Greece. 
Greece becomes the seventh country to sign such 
an agreement with the United States. 



The provisions of the agreement are the same 
in all substantial respects as those of the agree- 
ments between this Government and the Gov- 
ernments of the United Kingdom, China, the 
Soviet Union, Belgium, Poland, and the Neth- 
erlands. As in the case of the former agree- 
ments, that with Greece was negotiated under 
the provisions of the Lease-Lend Act of March 
11, 1941, which provides for extending aid to any 
country whose defense is determined by the 

601 



602 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



President to be vital to the defense of the United 
States. 

The United States and the other Governments 
which sign such agreements pledge their mate- 
rial as well as their spiritual resources to a com- 
mon victory of the United Nations. All these 
countries are signatories of the Declaration by 
United Nations. 

Text of the Agreement ' 

Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Greece declare that they 
are engaged in a cooperative undertaking, to- 
gether with every other nation or people of like 
mind, to the end of laying the bases of a just 
and enduring woi'ld peace securing order under 
law to themselves and all nations; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Greece, as signatories 
of the Declaration by United Nations of Jan- 
uary 1, 1942, have subscribed to a common pro- 
gram of purposes and principles embodied in 
the Joint Declaration made on August 14, 1941 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 
known as the Atlantic Charter; 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that the 
defense of Greece against aggression is vital to 
the defense of the United States of America; 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to 
Greece aid in resisting aggression ; 

And wliereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of Greece receives such 
aid and of the benefits to be received by the 
United States of America in return therefor 
should be deferred until the extent of the defense 
aid is known and until the progress of events 
makes clearer the final terms and conditions and 



' The text here printed conforms to the signed original. 



benefits which will be in the mutual interests 
of the United States of Aanerica and Greece 
and will promote the establishment and main- 
tenance of world peace; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Greece are mutually 
desirous of concluding now a preliminary agree- 
ment in regard to the provision of defense aid 
and in regard to certain considerations which 
shall be taken into account in determining 
such terms and conditions and the making of 
such an agreement has been in all respects duly 
authorized, and all acts, conditions and formali- 
ties which it may have been necessary to per- 
form, fulfill or execute prior to the making of 
such an agreement in conformity with the laws 
either of the United States of America or of 
Greece have been jjerformed, fulfilled or ex- 
ecuted as required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

Abticle I 

The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of Greece with such defense articles, de- 
fense services, and defense information as the 
President of the United States of America shall 
authorize to be transferred or provided. 

Akticxe II 

The Government of Greece will continue to 
contribute to the defense of the United States 
of America and the strengthening thereof and 
will provide such articles, services, facilities 
or information as it may be in a position to 
supply. 

Article III 

The Government of Greece will not without 
the consent of the President of the United States 
of America transfer title to, or possession of, 
any defense article or defense information 
transferred to it under the Act of March 11, 
1941 of the Congress of the United States of 



JULY 11, 1942 



603 



America or permit the use thereof by anyone 
not an officer, employee, or agent of the Govern- 
ment of Greece. 

Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of Greece of any defense article or defense 
information, it becomes necessary for that Gov- 
ernment to take any action or make any pay- 
ment in order fully to protect any of the rights 
of a citizen of the United States of America 
who has patent rights in and to any such defense 
article or information, the Government of 
Greece will take such action or make such pay- 
ment when requested to do so by the President 
of the United States of America. 

Article V 

The Government of Greece will return to the 
United States of America at the end of the 
present emergency, as determined by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America, such de- 
fense articles transferred under this Agreement 
as shall not have been destroyed, lost or con- 
sumed and as shall be determined by the Presi- 
ident to be useful in the defense of the United 
States of America or of the Western Hemi- 
sphere or to be otherwise of use to the United 
States of America. 

Article VI 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of Greece full cognizance shall 
be taken of all property, services, information, 
facilities, or other benefits or considerations 
provided by the Government of Greece subse- 
quent to March 11, 1941, and accepted or ac- 
knowledged by the President on behalf of the 
United States of America. 

Article VII 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of Greece in return for aid fur- 
nished under the Act of Congress of March 11, 



1941, the terms and conditions thereof shall be 
such as not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutually advan- 
tageous economic relations between them and 
the betterment of world-wide economic rela- 
tions. To that end, thej' shall include provision 
for agreed action by the United States of 
America and Greece, open to participation by 
all other countries of like mincl, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate international and 
domestic measures, of j)roduction, employment, 
and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the 
liberty and welfare of all peoples; to the elimi- 
nation of all forms of discriminatory treatment 
in international commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers ; and, in gen- 
eral, to the attainment of all the economic objec- 
tives set forth in the Joint Declaration made 
on August 14, 1941, by the President of the 
United States of America and the Prime Min- 
ister of the United Kingdom. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

Article VIII 

This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

Signed and sealed in duplicate at Washing- 
ton this tenth day of July, 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

CoEDELL Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Government of Greece : 

Emmanuel J. Tsoudercs 

Prime Minister and Minister for 

Foreign Affairs of Greece 



604 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH THE NETHERLANDS 



[Released to the press July S] 

An agreement between the Government of the 
United States and the Government of the King- 
dom of the Netherhmds on the principles apply- 
ing to mutual aid in the prosecution of the war 
was signed on July 8 by Mr. Cordell Hull, Sec- 
retary of State, and Dr. A. Loudon, the Nether- 
lands Ambassador. Tlie Netherlands becomes 
the sixth country to sign such an agreement with 
the United States. 

The provisions of the agreement are the same 
in all substantial respects as those of the agree- 
ments between this Government and the Gov- 
ernments of the United Kingdom, China, the 
Soviet Union. Belgium, and Poland. As in the 
case of the former agreements, that with the 
Netherlands Government was negotiated under 
the provisions of the Lease-Lend Act of March 
11, 1941, which provides for extending aid to 
any country whose defense is determined by the 
President to be vital to the defense of the United 
States. 

The United States and the other Govern- 
ments which sign such agreements pledge their 
material as well as their spiritual resources to a 
common victory of the United Nations. 

Tlie agreement with the Netherlands is ac- 
coinf)anied by an exchange of notes confirming 
the understanding of the two Governments that 
it replaces and renders inoperative the lend- 
lease agreement between the two Governments 
signed on August 9, 1941 and that it does not 
affect arrangements now being made for the 
transfer of certain aircraft, munitions, military 
property, and procurement contracts of the 
Netherlands Government to various agencies of 
the United States Government or the reimburse- 
ments to be made to the Netherlands Govern- 
ment in that connection. 

The texts of the agreement ' and of the ex- 
change of notes are given below. 

Text of the Agreement ' 

Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Kingdom of the Neth- 



' The text here printed conforms to the signed original. 



erlands declare that they are engaged in a co- 
operative undertaking, together with every 
other nation or people of like mind, to the end 
of laying the bases of a just and enduring world 
peace securing order under law to themselves 
and all nations; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Kingdom of the Neth- 
erlands, as signatories of the Declaration by 
United Nations of January 1, 1942, have sub- 
scribed to a common program of purposes and 
principles embodied in the Joint Declaration 
made on August 14, 1941 by the President of the 
United States of America and the Prime Min- 
ister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland, known as the Atlantic J 
Charter ; 1 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of Marcli 11, 1941, that the 
defense of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 
against aggression is vital to the defense of the 
United States of America; 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands aid in resisting 
aggression ; 

And whereas it is expedient that the final de- 
termination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands receives such aid and of the bene- 
fits to be received by the United States of Amer- 
ica in return therefor should be deferred until 
the extent of the defense aid is known and until 
the progress of events makes clearer the final 
terms and conditions and benefits which will be 
in the mutual interests of the United States of 
America and the Kingdom of the Netherlands 
and will promote the establishment and main- 
tenance of world peace ; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Kingdom of the Neth- 
erlands are mutually desirous of concluding now 
a preliminary agreement in regard to the pro- 
vision of defense aid and in regard to certain 
considerations which shall be taken into account 
in determining such terms and conditions and 



JULY 11, 1942 



605 



tlie making of such an agreement has been in 
all respects duly authorized, and all acts, con- 
ditions and formalities which it may have been 
necessarj' to perform, fulfill or execute prior to 
the making of such an agreement in conformity 
with the laws either of the United States of 
America or of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 
have been performed, fulfilled or executed as 
required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

Article I 

The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of the Kingdom of the Netherlands with 
such defense articles, defense services, and de- 
fense information as the President of the United 
States of America shall authorize to be trans- 
ferred or provided. 

Article II 

The Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands will continue to contribute to the 
defense of the United States of America and 
the strengthening thereof and will provide such 
articles, services, facilities or information as it 
may be in a iJosition to supply. 

Article III 

The Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands will not without the consent of the 
President of the United States of America 
transfer title to, or possession of, any defense 
article or defense information transferred to it 
under the Act of March 11, 1941 of the Congi-ess 
of the United States of America or permit the 
use thereof by anyone not an officer, employee, 
or agent of the Government of the Kingdom 
of the Netherlands. 

Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of the Kingdom of the Netherlands of any 
defense article or defense information, it be- 
comes necessary for that Government to take 
any action or make any payment in order fully 
to protect any of the rights of a citizen of the 



United States of America who has patent rights 
in and to any such defense article or informa- 
tion, the Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands will take such action or make such 
payment when requested to do so by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. 

Article V 

The Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands will return to the United States 
of America at the end of the present emergency, 
as determined by the President of the United 
States of America, such defense articles trans- 
ferred under this Agreement as shall not have 
been destroyed, lost or consumed and as shall 
be determined by the President to be useful in 
the defense of the United States of America or 
of the Western Hemisphere or to be otherwise of 
use to the United States of America. 

Article VI 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America 
by the Government of the Kingdom of the Neth- 
erlands full cognizance shall be taken of all 
property, services, information, facilities, or 
other benefits or considerations provided by the 
Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 
subsequent to March 11, 1941, and accepted or 
acknowledged by the President on behalf of the 
United States of America. 

Article VII 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the Kingdom of the Nether- 
lands in return for aid furnished under the 
Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, the terms 
and conditions thereof shall be such as not to 
burden commerce between the two countries, but 
to promote mutually advantageous economic 
relations between them and the betterment of 
world-wide economic relations. To that end, 
they shall include provision for agreed action 
by the United States of America and the King- 
dom of the Netherlands, open to participation 
by all other countries of like mind, directed to 
the expansion, by appropriate international and 
domestic measures, of production, employment. 



606 



DEPARTMEXT OF STATE BXTLLETTN 



and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the lib- 
erty and welfare of all peoples; to the elimi- 
nation of all forms of discriminatory treatment 
in international commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers; and, in gen- 
eral, to the attainment of all the economic ob- 
jectives set forth in the Joint Declaration made 
on August 14, 1941, by the President of the 
United States of America and the Prime Min- 
ister of the United Kingdom. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

Article VIII 

This Agreement shall take effect as from 
this day's date. It shall continue in force until 
a date to be agreed uiaon by the two Govern- 
ments. 

Signed and sealed in duplicate at Washington 
this eighth day of July, 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

CORDELL Huii 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Government of the Kingdom of the 
Netherlands : 

A. Loudon 

ArribasHodor of the Kingdom of the 

Netherlands at Washington 



The Secretary of State to the Ambassador of the 
Kingdom of the Netherlands 

Departmei^t of State, 
Washington, July 8, 1942. 
Excellency : 

In connection with the signature on this date 
of the Agreement between our two Governments 



on the Princip)les Applying to Mutual Aid in the 
Prosecution of the War Against Aggression, I 
have the honor to confirm our understanding 
that this Agreement replaces and renders in- 
operative, as from today, the prior Agreement 
between our two Governments on the same sub- 
ject, dated August 9, 1941. 

I have the honor also to confirm our under- 
standing that the signature of this Agreement 
does not affect in any way the arrangements 
now being made through the Office of Lend- 
Lease Administration for the transfer to various 
agencies of the United States Government of 
certain aircraft, munitions, military property 
and procurement contracts of the Eoyal Nether- 
lands Government in the United States, and for 
the reimbursements to be made to the Eoyal 
Netherlands Government in that connection. 

Accept [etc.] Cobdell Hull 

The Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Nether- 
lands to the Secretary of State 

Netherlands Embassy, 
Washington, July 8, 1942. 
Sir: 

In connection with the signature on this date 
of the Agreement between our two Govern- 
ments on the Principles Applying to Mutual 
Aid in the Prosecution of the War Against Ag- 
gression, I have the honor to confirm our under- 
standing that this Agreement replaces and ren- 
ders inojierative, as from today, the prior 
Agreement between our two Governments on 
the same subject, dated August 9, 1941. 

I have the honor also to confirm our under- 
standing that the signature of this Agreement 
does not affect in any way the arrangements 
now being made through the Office of Lend- 
Lease Administration for the transfer to various 
agencies of the United States Government of 
certain aircraft, munitions, military property 
and procurement contracts of the Eoyal Nether- 
lands Government in the United States, and for 
the reimbursements to be made to the Eoyal 
Netherlands Government in that connection. 

Accept [etc.] A. Loudon 



JULY 11, 1942 



607 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH CZECHOSLOVAKIA 



[Released to the press July 11] 

An agreement between the Government of the 
United Stcates and the Provisional Government 
of Czechoslovakia on the principles applying to 
mutual aid in the prosecution of the war was 
signed on July 11 by Mr. Cordell Hull, Secre- 
tary of State, and Mr. V. S. Hurban, the 
Czechoslovak Minister. Czechoslovakia be- 
comes the eighth country to sign such an agree- 
ment with the United States. 

The provisions of the agreement are the same 
in all substantial respects as those of the agree- 
ments between this Government and the Gov- 
ernments of the United Kingdom, China, the 
Soviet Union, Belgium, Poland, the Nether- 
lands, and Greece. As in the case of the former 
agreements that with Czechoslovakia was ne- 
gotiated under the provisions of the Lease-Lend 
Act of March 11, 1941, which provides for ex- 
tending aid to any country whose defense is 
determined by the President to be vital to the 
defense of the United States. 

The United States and the other Governments 
which sign such agreements pledge their ma- 
terial as well as their spiritual resources to a 
common victory of the United Nations. All 
these countries are signatories of the Declara- 
tion by United Nations. 

Text of the Agreement ' 

Whereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Provisional Govern- 
ment of Czechoslovakia declare that they are 
engaged in a cooperative undertaking, together 
with every other nation or people of like mind, 
to the end of laying the bases of a just and en- 
during world peace securing order under law 
to themselves and all nations ; 

And whereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Provisional Govern- 
ment of Czechoslovakia, as signatories of the 



' The text here printed conforms to the signed original. 



Declaration by United Nations of January 1, 
1942, have subscribed to a common program of 
purposes and principles embodied in the Joint 
Declaration made on August 14, 1941 by the 
President of the United States of America and 
the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, known as 
the Atlantic Charter ; 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that the 
defense of Czechoslovakia against aggression is 
vital to the defense of the United States of 
America ; 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to 
the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia 
aid in resisting aggression ; 

And whereas it is expedient that the final de- 
termination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia receives such aid and of the benefits 
to be received by the United States of America 
in return therefor should be deferred until the 
extent of the defense aid is known and until the 
progress of events makes clearer the final terms 
and conditions and benefits which will be in the 
mutual interests of the United States of Amer- 
ica and Czechoslovakia and will promote the 
establishment and maintenance of world peace ; 

And whereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Provisional Govern- 
ment of Czechoslovakia are mutually desirous 
of concluding now a preliminary agreement in 
regard to the provision of defense aid and in 
regard to certain considerations which shall be 
taken into account in determining such terms 
and conditions and the making of such an agree- 
ment has been in all respects duly authorized, 
and all acts, conditions and formalities which 
it may have been necessary to perform, fulfil] or 
execute prior to the making of such an agree- 



471410 — 42- 



608 



meiit in conformity with the laws either of the 
United States of America or of Czechoslovakia 
have been performed, fulfilled or executed as 
required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

Article I 

The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Provisional 
Government of Czechoslovakia with such de- 
fense articles, defense services, and defense in- 
formation as the President of the United States 
of America shall authorize to be transferred or 
provided. 

Akticle II 

The Provisional Government of Czechoslo- 
vakia will continue to contribute to the defense 
of the United States of America and the 
strengthening thereof and will provide such 
articles, services, facilities or information as it 
may be in a position to supply. 

Article III 

The Provisional Government of Czechoslo- 
vakia will not without the consent of the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America transfer 
title to, or possession of, any defense article or 
defense information transferred to it under the 
Act of March 11, 1941 of the Congress of the 
United States of America or permit the use 
thereof by anyone not an officer, employee, or 
agent of the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia. 

Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Pro- 
visional Government of Czechoslovakia of any 
defense article or defense information, it be- 
comes necessary for that Government to take 
any action or make any payment in order fully 
to protect any of the rights of a citizen of the 
United States of America who has patent rights 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

in and to any such defense article or informa- 
tion, the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia will take such action or make such 
payment when requested to do so by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. 

Article V 

The Provisional Government of Czechoslo- 
vakia will return to the United States of Amer- 
ica at the end of the present emergency, as de- 
termined by the President of the United States 
of America, such defense articles transferred 
under this Agreement as shall not have been 
destroyed, lost or consumed and as shall be de- 
termined by the President to be useful in the 
defense of the United States of America or of 
the Western Hemisphere or to be otherwise of 
use to the United States of America. 

Article VI 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia 
full cognizance shall be taken of all property, 
services, information, facilities, or other bene- 
fits or considerations provided by the Provi- 
sional Government of Czechoslovakia subse- 
quent to March 11, 1941, and accepted or ac- 
knowledged by the President on behalf of the 
United States of America. 

Article VII 

In the final determination of the benefits to be 
provided to the United States of America by 
the Provisional Government of Czechoslovakia 
in return for aid furnished under the Act of 
Congress of March 11, 1941, the terms and con- 
ditions thereof shall be such as not to burden 
commerce between the two countries, but to 
promote mutually advantageous economic rela- 
tions between them and the betterment of 
world-wide economic relations. To that end, 
they shall include provision for agreed action 
bv the United States of America and the Pro- 



JtFLY 11, 1942 



609 



visional Government of Czechoslovakia, open 
to participation by all other countries of like 
mind, directed to the expansion, by appropriate 
international and domestic measures, of produc- 
tion, employment, and the exchange and con- 
sumption of goods, which are the material 
foundations of the liberty and welfare of all 
peoples; to the elimination of all fonns of dis- 
criminatory treatment in international com- 
merce, and to the reduction of tariti's and other 
trade barriers; and, in general, to the attain- 
ment of all the economic objectives set forth in 
the Joint Declaration made on August 14, 1911, 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 



own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

Article VIII 

This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

Signed and sealed in duplicate at Washing- 
ton this eleventh day of July 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

CoRDELL Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Provisional Government of Czecho- 
slovakia : 

v. S. HUDBAN 

Minister of C sechosloval:ia 
at W ashington 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH NORWAY 



(Released to the press July 11] 

An agreement between the Government of the 
United States and the Royal Norwegian Gov- 
ernment on the principles- applying to mutual 
aid in the prosecution of the war was signed on 
July 11 by Mr. Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, 
and Mr. Wilhelm Munthe de Morgenstiernc, 
the Ambassador of Norway. Norway becomes 
the ninth country to sign such an agreement 
with the United States. 

The provisions of the agreement are the same 
in all substantial respects as those of the agree- 
ments between tliis Government and the Gov- 
ernments of the United Kingdom, China, the 
Soviet Union, Belgium, Poland, the Nether- 
lands, Greece, and Czechoslovakia. As in the 
case of the former agreements, that with Nor- 
way was negotiated under the j^rovisions of the 



Lease-Lend Act of March 11, 1941, which pro- 
vides for extending aid to any country whose 
defense is determined by the President to be 
vital to the defense of the United States. 

The United States and the other Governments 
which sign such agreements pledge their ma- 
terial as well as their spiritual resources to a 
common victory of the United Nations. All 
these countries are signatories of the Declara- 
tion by United Nations. 

The agreement with Norway is accompanied 
by an exchange of notes concerning the appli- 
cation of certain provisions of tlie convention in 
relation to the operation of the Norwegian mer- 
chant fleet for the benefit of the United Nations 
in the common war effort and consultations at 
the end of the present emergency. 



610 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The tests of the agreement ' and of the ex- 
change of notes are given below. 

Text of the Agreement 

Wliereas the Government of the United States 
of America and the Eoyal Norwegian Govern- 
ment declare that they are engaged in a coopera- 
tive undertaking, together with every other 
nation or people of like mind, to the end of lay- 
ing the bases of a just and enduring world peace 
securing order under law to themselves and 
all nations ; 

And whereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Eoyal Norwegian 
Government, as signatories of the Declaration 
by United Nations of January 1, 1942, have sub- 
scribed to a common program of purposes and 
principles embodied in the Joint Declaration 
made on August 14, 1941 by the President of 
the United States of America and the Prime 
Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Brit- 
ain and Northern Ireland, known as the Atlan- 
tic Charter ; 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of ISIarch 11, 1941, that the 
defense of the Kingdom of Norway against ag- 
gression is vital to the defense of the United 
States of America ; 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
Kingdom of Norway aid in resisting aggres- 
sion ; 

Ajid whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Royal Norwegian Government re- 
ceives such aid and of the benefits to be received 
by the United States of America in return 
therefor should be deferred until the extent of 
the defense aid is known and until the progress 
of events makes clearer the final terms and con- 
ditions and benefits which will be in the mutual 
interests of the United States of America and 
the Kingdom of Norway and will promote the 
establishment and maintenance of world peace; 



' The text here printed conforms to the signed original. 



And whereas the Govermnent of the United 
States of America and the Royal Norwegian 
Govermnent are mutually desirous of conclud- 
ing now a preliminary agreement in regard to 
the provision of defense aid and in regard to 
certain considerations which shall be taken into 
account in determining such terms and condi- 
tions and the making of such an agreement has 
been in all respects duly authorized, and all 
acts, conditions and formalities which it may 
have been necessary to perform, fulfill or exe- 
cute prior to the making of such an agreement ■ 
in conformity with the laws either of the United ■ 
States of America or of the Kingdom of Nor- 
way have been performed, fulfilled or executed 
as required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows: 

Ajjticxje I 

The Government of the United States of 
Ajnerica will continue to supply the Royal Nor- 
wegian Government with such defense articles, 
defense services, and defense information as the 
President of the United States of America 
shall authorize to be transferred or provided. 

Articxe II 
The Roj-al Norwegian Government will con- 
tinue to contribute to the defense of the United 
States of America and the strengthening there- 
of and will provide such articles, services, fa- 
cilities or information as it may be in a position 
to supply. 

Aeticle III 

The Royal Norwegian Government will not 
without the consent of the President of the 
United States of America transfer title to, or 
possession of, any defense article or defense in- 
formation transferred to it under the Act of 
March 11, 1941 of the Congress of the United 
States of America or permit the use thereof 
by anyone not an officer, employee, or agent of 
the Roval Norwegian Government. 



JULY 11, 1942 



611 



Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Royal 
Norwegian Government of any defense article 
or defense information, it becomes necessary for 
that Government to take any action or make any 
payment in order fully to protect any of the 
rights of a citizen of the United States of Amer- 
ica who has patent rights in and to any such 
defense article or information, the Royal Nor- 
wegian Government will take such action or 
make such pajmient when requested to do so by 
the President of the United States of America. 

Article V 

The Royal Norwegian Government will re- 
turn to the United States of America at the 
end of the present emergency, as determined by 
the President of the United States of America, 
such defense articles transferred under this 
Agreement as shall not have been destroyed, lost 
or consumed and as shall be determined by the 
President to be useful in the defense of the 
United States of America or of the Western 
Hemisphere or to be otherwise of use to the 
United States of America. 

Article VI 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Royal Norwegian Government full cogni- 
zance shall be taken of all property, services, 
information, facilities, or other benefits or con- 
siderations provided by the Royal Norwegian 
Government subsequent to March 11, 1941, and 
accepted or acknowledged by the President on 
behalf of the United States of America. 

Article Vll 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
lie provided to the United States of America 
by the Royal Norwegian Government in return 
for aid furnished under the Act of Congress of 
March 11, 1941, the terms and conditions thereof 
shall be such as not to burden commerce between 
the two countries, but to promote mutually ad- 



vantageous economic relations between them 
and the betterment of world-wide economic re- 
lations. To that end, they shall include pro- 
vision for agreed action by the United States 
of America and the Kingdom of Norway, open 
to participation by all other countries of like 
mind, directed to the expansion, by appropriate 
international and domestic measures, of produc- 
tion, employment, and the exchange and con- 
sumption of goods, which are the material 
foundations of the liberty and welfare of all 
peoples; to the elimination of all forms of dis- 
criminatory treatment in international com- 
merce, and to the reduction of tariffs and other 
trade barriers; and, in general, to the attain- 
ment of all the economic objectives set forth in 
the Joint Declaration made on August 14, 1941, 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

Article VIII 
This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

Signed and sealed in duplicate at Washing- 
ton this eleventh day of July 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Roj'al Norwegian Government ; 

W. MuNTHE Morgenstierne 

Amhassador of Norway 

at Washington 



471410—42- 



612 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Ambassador of Norivay to the Secretary of 
State 
Norwegian Embassy, 
Washington, July 11, 191(2. 
Excellency : 

I have the honor to refer to the conversations 
betvi'een representatives of the Royal Norwe- 
gian Government and the Government of the 
United States of America in connection with 
the negotiation of the Agreement on the Prin- 
ciples Applying to Mutual Aid in the Prosecu- 
tion of the War Against Aggression signed this 
day. 

During the course of these conversations the 
Norwegian representatives have referred to the 
fact that the Royal Norwegian Government has 
been driven from its country by Hitler, whose 
forces are in occupation of the country and are 
despoiling its resources; they have pointed out 
that the principal national asset remaining at 
the disposal of their Government is the Nor- 
wegian Merchant Fleet, which that Government 
is operating for the benefit of the United Na- 
tions in the common war effort; that for the 
protection and maintenance of that Fleet, it is 
necessary to install armaments and other pro- 
tective devices and equipment upon its vessels, 
and to repair damage and replace losses thereto 
occasioned by acts of war and operation under 
war conditions; that it will also be necessary 
for the Royal Norwegian Government, when 
the invader has been driven from its territory, 
to ensure the maintenance of reestablished 
peaceful conditions, and that, for this reason, 
the need of the Royal Norwegian Government 
for arms and equipment will not necessarily 
cease with the general cessation of hostilities. 

The conversations referred to have disclosed 
a mutual understanding on the part of the Royal 
Norwegian Government and the Government 
of the United States of America with respect 
to the application of certain provisions of the 
Agreement signed this day, as follows: 

1. Armaments and other protective devices 
and equipment installed upon Norwegian ships 
subsequent to December 7, 1941 shall, under 



the provisions of the Agreement signed this day, 
remain the property of the Government of the 
United States of America. Tlie installation of 
such armaments, protective devices, and other 
equipment shall be at the expense and for the 
account of the Government of the United States 
of America, which shall bear any risk of loss, 
or damage, and shall not be regarded as giv- 
ing rise to any financial obligation on the part 
of the Royal Norwegian Government. Such 
armaments may if found mutually desirable be 
manned by Amei'ican gun ci'ews. 

2. The repair under the Lend-Lease Act, sub- 
sequent to December 7, 1941, of damage to Nor- 
wegian ships which is caused by acts of war or 
by operation under war conditions, as well as 
repair and replacement necessitated by opera- 
tion under war conditions shall be made at the 
expense and for the account of the Government 
of the United States of America, and shall not 
be regarded as giving rise to any financial obli- 
gation on the part of the Royal Norwegian Gov- 
ernment. The repair of damage not caused by 
acts of war or not necessitated by operation un- 
der war conditions shall be made at the ex- 
pense and for the account of the Royal Nor- 
wegian Government or the appropriate agency 
designated by it. 

3. The Government of the United States of 
America recognizes that the Norwegian Mer- 
chant Fleet not only constitutes an important 
contribution to the war effort of the United 
Nations but is likewise one of the principal 
national assets of the Royal Norwegian Govern- 
ment and, accordingly, that the latter Govern- 
ment which is operating its Fleet for the 
benefit of the United Nations in the common 
war effort, should be assisted in replacing ships 
lost in the service of the United Nations. Ac- 
cordingly, the Government of the United States 
of America will continue to review the situa- 
tion with the Royal Norwegian Government 
with a view to assisting that Govenunent in a 
l^rogram of replacement as soon as conditions 
permit. The two Governments agree that nego- 
tiations to this end should be commenced with- 



JULY 11, 1942 



613 



out delay and should be pressed to a conclusion 
as promptly as possible. 

4. In the application of Article V of the 
Agreement relating to the return at the end of 
the present emergency of articles transferred 
under the Agreement, the Government of the 
United States of America will take into account 
the circumstance that when the invader has been 
driven from Norway it will be necessary for the 
Roj-al Norwegian Government to ensure the 
maintenance of reestablished peaceful condi- 
tions. Accordingly, the Government of the 
United States of America and the Royal Nor- 
wegian Government will consider, and will con- 
sult with each other with respect to the possible 
retention by the latter of such military equip- 
ment as may be considered necessary for those 
purposes. 

Accept [etc.] W. Munthe Morgenstieene 



The Secretary of State to the Ambassador of 
Norway 

Department of State, 
Washington, July 11, 19^2. 

ExCEULENOT : 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note of today's date concerning the con- 
versations between representatives of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States of America and 
the Royal Norwegian Government in connec- 
tion with the negotiation of the Agi-eement on 
the Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in the 
Prosecution of the War Against Aggression 
signed this day, and to confirm the statement 
contained therein of the understanding of the 
two Governments with respect to the applica- 
tion of certain provisions of the Agreement. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Huu^ 



APPOINTMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES TO CONSULT WITH THE 
FREE FRENCH IN LONDON 



[Released to the press July 9] 

The President of the United States, in a letter 
to the Lend-Lease Administration dated No- 
vember 11, 1941, stated that the defense of those 
French territories under the control of Free 
French forces is vital to the defense of the 
United States. In the spirit of the President's 
letter, and consistent with the policy of the 
United States Government in aiding all peoples 
who are resisting Axis aggression to maintain 
and uphold their own liberty, the Government 
of the United States and the Free French Na- 
tional Committee in London have closely main- 
tained cooperation in those areas where such co- 
operation would further the war objectives. 

To make this cooperation more effective in the 
prosecution of the war. Admiral Harold R. 
Stark and Brigadier General Charles L. Bolte 
have been designated as this Government's 
representatives to consult with the French Na- 
tional Committee in London on all matters re- 
lating to the conduct of the war. A memoran- 



dum on the subject, the text of which is printed 
below, has been handed to General de Gaulle. 
In this connection the following message has 
been received from the French National Com- 
mittee in London : 

"General de Gaulle has read the memorandum 
with pleasure. He is most gratified by its terms 
and he warmly welcomes the decision of the 
United States Government to appoint Admiral 
Stark and General Bolte as representatives of 
the United States Government to consult with 
the National Committee." 

Memorandum 

The Government of the United States is sub- 
ordinating all other questions to the one su- 
preme purpose of achieving military success in 
the war and carrying it forward to a successful 
conclusion. The French National Committee 
has the same objective and is undertaking active 
military measures for the preservation of 
French territory for the French people. 



614 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Government of the United States recog- 
nizes the contribution of General de Gaulle and 
the work of the French National Committee in 
keeping alive the spirit of French traditions and 
institutions and believes that the military aims 
necessary for an effective prosecution of the 
war, and hence the realization of our combined 
aims, are best advanced by lending all possible 
military assistance and support to the French 
National Committee as a symbol of French 
resistance in general against the Axis powers. 
The Government of the United States whole- 
heartedly agrees with the view of the British 
Government, which is also known to be the view 
of the French National Committee, that the 
destiny and political organization of France 
must, in the last analysis, be determined by free 
expression of the French people under condi- 
tions giving them freedom to express their de- 
sires unswayed by any form of coercion. 

In pursuing the common war objective, the 
Government of the United States will continue 
to deal with the local Free French officials in 
their respective territories where they are in 
effective control. Realizing the need for coor- 
dinating their common efforts the Government 
of the United States perceives every advantage 
in centralizing the discussion of those matters 
relating to the prosecution of the war with the 
French National Committee in London. An 
essential part of the policy of the Government 
of the United States for war collaboration is 



assistance to the military and naval forces of 
Free France, which is being extended under the 
terms of the President's statement of Novem- 
ber 11, 1941, that the defense of those French 
territories under the control of Free French 
forces is ^ntal to the defense of the United J 
States. 1 

In harmony with the foregoing observations 
the Government of the United States is pre- 
pared to appoint representatives in London for 
purposes of consultation. 

Defaetment of State, 
Washington. 



[Released to the press July 10] 

The translation of a telegram which has been 
received by the Secretary of State from Gen- 
eral Charles de Gaulle follows : 

"London. July 10, 19!^. 
"It is with great satisfaction that the French 
National Committee welcomes in London the 
distinguished representatives of the Govern- 
ment of the United States. I thank you for the 
])ersonal part you have taken in this decision. 
The confident collaboration which the France 
which has remained faithful to the Allies and 
to the great American democracy will thus 
establish will certainly contribute in an effec- 
tive manner to the final victory of the United 
Nations. 

C. DE Gaulle" 



BUILDING IN WAR FOR PEACE 
ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY ACHESON ' 



[Released to the press July 7] 

In a very .special sense it is a privilege to be 
here tonight. It is a privilege because in few 
places on this earth can free men and women 
meet to take stock of their position, to formulate 
and express together their opinions, to play 
their part in shaping their own course. Mr. 



'Delivered before the Institute of Public Affairs at 
the University of Virginia, July 6, 1942. 



Churchill referred to the British Parliament as 
the grand inquest of the nation. We have our 
own grand inquest in Washington as every Gov- 
ernment official is keenly aware. But it has been 
a tradition of the American people from the 
days of the New England town meeting to con- 
duct their own inquests in every part of the 
country. At no time in our history has it been 
more essential that you should meet in this uni- 
versity, created to provide the indispensable 



JULY 11, 1942 



615 



foundation of a free people, and take counsel 
together. The country will need all your 
thought and all your resolution. 

A witness before an inquest appears not to 
expound but to give testimony. It is fortunate 
that this is so, because neither by training nor 
position is this witness qualified to expound the 
strategies of the war or of the peace to follow. 
But an administrative officer knows, because he 
must participate in some of them, that hundreds 
of decisions and judgments are and must be 
made in the coui-se of every day's work. He 
knows that the cumulative effect of these de- 
cisions will determine in large measure the scope 
within which future decisions may be made and 
tuture policies determined. He kr^ows the effect 
of current opinion upon current decisions. 
AVhether we are conscious of it or not, all of us, 
whether we are public servants or private cit- 
izens, are every day formulating the aims and 
di'awing the outlines of the future. 

I wish to speak tonight of the decisions which 
have been and must be made upon one of the 
most fundamental factors in the war and the 
peace: our program for supplying the armies 
of our allies on every front to the full extent of 
our power. Today no one doubts that even the 
most elementary considerations of self-preserva- 
tion demand that this be done. No one doubts 
that every front is our front, that a weapon used 
against the enemy by any ally is well used, and 
that it is our great good fortune to have fight- 
ing with us the skilled hands and stout hearts 
to use them. No one believes today that it is 
an act of favor to furnish weapons to those who 
are fighting so gallantly beside our own men. 
That decision is made, and there is now no 
dissent. 

Indispensable as that aid is to our allies, we 
must not exaggerate its extent in relation to our 
own resources and our own war effort or in re- 
lation to the effort of our allies. Only by see- 
ing it in true perspective can we reach wise and 
just judgments on the questions it presents. In 
his report of June 11, 1942 to the Congress, the 
President stated that lend-lease aid for the 
preceding 15 months had amounted to 41/2 bil- 
lion dollars and that it was currently being pro- 
vided at a rate approximately equal to 8 billion 



dollars a year. This year lend-lease aid will 
lejjresent about 6 percent of our present national 
income and very roughly about 13 percent of 
what we are spending to fight the war. What 
we can send is limited by the ships available. 
There is no one of us who does not wish that it 
could be more. There is no one of us who does 
not understand the essential strategic function 
of this flow of weapons and materials and food 
to the fighting fronts and the people behind 
them. 

But there could be no greater mistake than 
to believe that our supplies are equipping the 
armies of the United Nations. Essential as 
they are, they form a small part of the vast 
supplies which these armies are using. With 
amazing skill, determination, and sacrifice our 
allies have converted every available resource 
of material and manpower to the purposes of 
war. We have together created a common pool 
of material with which the common war is 
being waged. Our contribution is indispensa- 
ble, but it is a part of a far larger whole. 

As our own forces take a greater part upon 
the fronts, the resources of this pool are made 
available to them. Precious shipping is saved 
by supplying them from the nearest sources, 
and in steadily increasing volume our allies are 
doing this with food and weapons. Our troops 
in Australia and Great Britain are drawing to 
the fullest extent upon the supplies available 
in those areas and so releasing shipping for 
materials which cannot be supplied except from 
overseas. 

This energetic and extensive system of mutual 
aid is more than a way of economizing in the 
use of ships. It is a symbol of the willing coop- 
eration of the United Nations. Each is now 
giving the last full measure of its strength and 
resources in a common and desperate war. Our 
thoughts about the terms on which war aid is 
given and received should be formulated with 
this in mind. They must be carried out with 
full appreciation of the contribution of each 
nation in relation to its own capacity and to 
the contribution of others. 

The basic principles governing these terms 
have been declared in the agreements entered 
into with the Governments of Great Britain, the 



616 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Soviet Union, China, Belgium, and Poland and 
under discussion with other governments. They 
express the creative statesmanship with which 
the Lend-Lease Act was conceived. They say 
both what the final settlement shall not be and 
also, in broad outline, what it shall be. It shall 
not be a settlement which will burden commerce 
between the countries. We have experienced 
such settlements before and know the full train 
of evils and misery which they bring. But it 
shall be a settlement — to use the words of the 
agreements themselves — "to promote mutually 
advantageous economic relations between them 
[the countries agreeing] and the betterment of 
world-wide economic relations." "To that end", 
the formal language of the agreements contin- 
ues, the final settlement "shall include pro- 
vision for agreed action . . . open to partici- 
pation by all other countries of like mind, 
directed to the expansion, by appropriate inter- 
national and domestic measures, of production, 
employment, and the exchange and consump- 
tion of goods, which are the material founda- 
tions of the liberty and welfare of all peoples; 
to the elimination of all forms of discriminatory 
treatment in international commerce, and to 
the reduction of tariffs and other trade bar- 
riers ;" and, in general, to the attaimiient of the 
objectives declared in the Atlantic Charter. 

These are the principles upon which aid is 
given and received. The President has stated 
the heart of the matter in his last report to the 
Congress. He said : 

"By this provision we have affirmatively de- 
clared our intention to avoid the political and 
economic mistakes of international debt experi- 
ence during the twenties. 

"A lend-lease settlement which fulfills this 
principle will be sound from the economic point 
of view. But it will have a greater merit. It 
will represent the only fair way to distribute 
the financial costs of war among the United 
Nations. 

"The real costs of the war cannot be measured, 
nor compared, nor paid for in money. They 
must and are being met in blood and toil. But 
the financial costs of the war can and should be 



met in a way which will serve the needs of last- 
ing peace and mutual economic well-being. 

"All the United Nations are seeking maxi- 
mum conversion to war production, in the light 
of their special resources. If each country de- 
^•otes roughly the same fraction of its national 
production to the war, then the financial burden 
of war is distributed equally among the United 
Nations in accordance with their ability to pay. 
And although the nations richest in resources 
are able to make larger contributions, the claim 
of war against each is i-elutively the same. 
Such a distribution of the financial costs of war 
means that no nation will grow rich from the 
war effort of its allies. The money costs of 
the war will fall according to the rule of 
equality in sacrifice, as in effort." 

Would any of you have the settlement other- 
wise? If so, this is the time to search your 
hearts and minds and speak. What do you 
wish to ask in return for the aid you give? 
That aid will probably be greater in total 
amount than the aid we shall receive, because our 
resources are greater, because the drain upon 
them has been less. 

Do you wish an accounting of benefits given 
and received on the theory that they represent 
mutual debts, to be computed in dollars, and set 
off against each other to measure a balance owed 
in money ? Do you wish to set on one side the 
value of a tank, its guns and ammunition and on 
(he other an appraisal of those who died in it 
under a desert sun? What is the equation be- 
tween the planes sent to Russia and those figures 
in the snow before Leningrad and Moscow? 
We know the value of everything which has 
gone to China. Are we to value those years in 
wliich the Chinese held the eastern front alone? 
I do not think that any of us want this account- 
ing. I doubt whether we care even to think 
about it very much. 

What is it, then, that we do want? We must 
know this before we can ask. Do we want 
money? More gold buried at Fort Knox? 
And how is it to be provided? Those nations 
which have been quickly defeated face the future 
with their foreign assets virtually intact. 



JULY 11, 1942 



617 



Those which have fought on and made the vic- 
1 ory possible have bled themselves white in the 
process, selling what they had for the means 
to continue the fight. Would anyone propose 
(hat we should ask in addition an impossible 
mortgage upon their future ? Such a proposal 
would not be a strategy of either war or peace. 
No, we do not want money, because of all settle- 
ments we know that it is the most impossible 
and the most destructive. 

Do we want the articles we sent replaced ? So 
long as the need exists, this broadly is the func- 
tion of lend-lease from our allies to us. But 
when the need ends do we wish to require the 
continuation of armament production? Or if 
we require some arms do we wish to rely upon 
others for them? This is the very opposite of 
American policy in the past which has led the 
fight for the reduction of armaments. 

Do we want goods? In the past we have 
fought any such suggestion with the fury of an 
untamed broncho. We shall have to learn bet- 
ter. But the problem will be to take goods in 
exchange for what we must continue to send if 
our allies — and our enemies — ma}' rebuild their 
lives. We must buy in order that they may buy 
from us. Our present aid cannot be repaid in 
goods. To attemjDt it would destroy us all. 

What is it, then, that we do want ? I believe 
that it is what has been provided for in the 
agreements already made. If you ask your- 
selves and your neighbors what it is that you 
want, the answer will not be money, or to get 
back the guns you have sent abroad, or to get 
goods except in the course of trade. The an- 
swer will be that you want a chance to live fully 
and in peace. You want a world in which some 
half-mad man and his bigoted crew on the other 
side of the earth will not bring down your lives 
and your houses about your ears once every 
quarter century. You want opi^ortunity, a job 
in which you can use your powers, a job which 
may not end any Saturday, one that will pro- 
vide the material and spiritual means for a life 
which is not mere existence. You want a sys- 
tem where the inevitable hazards of life do not 
fall on those least able to bear them, where 



education and a chance to use it are open to 
talent. 

The agreements open the way — and about the 
only way — in which these wants of every man 
and woman in every country can be more than 
wishes. They do not lay down a blueprint for 
the future. No man can do that now. They 
do not promise Utopia. But they chart the 
fundamental course in the field of economic pol- 
icy which, if faithfully followed and supported 
by political organization to maintain peace, can- 
not fail to take us farther along the road than 
in recent years it has seemed possible to hope. 

They provide first that the steps to be agreed 
upon between us and our allies shall be open to 
participation by all other countries of like mind. 
There are to be no exclusive arrangements, no 
excluded peoples among those who wish to work 
with us to the common goal. This is the prin- 
ciple of the Atlantic Charter embodied in the 
agreements : that there shall be equal access to 
the trade of the world and to its raw materials 
for all nations large and small, victors or van- 
quished. At the base of the whole settlement 
is to be fairness and equality, the rejection of 
special privileges and vindictive exclusions. 

The second principle calls for united action 
by all nations, correlating for this purpose in- 
ternational and domestic measures to expand 
production, employment, and the exchange and 
consumption of goods. No one, of course, can 
doubt that the opportunity for full and secure 
lives which the peoples of all countries de- 
mand — and rightly demand, and will insist upon 
having — is only possible through increased pro- 
duction, employment, and the movement and 
consumption of goods. But one can well doubt 
the possibility of achieving these goals unless 
there is unity of effort and unity in the timing 
and direction of the efforts of all nations. Too 
often in the past action in one country has been 
frustrated because at the same moment others 
have been moving in the opposite direction or 
because a powerful country has been moving in 
one direction in its international policy and in 
the opposite direction in its domestic policy. 
The second fundamental principle of the agree- 
ments is for common efforts on all fronts at the 



618 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



same time to expand production, employment, 
and consumption. 

The tliird principle is the elimination of dis- 
criminatory treatment in international com- 
merce and the reduction of tariffs and other 
trade barriers. It is plain to every one of you 
that at the end of this war there will be a need 
such as we have never known to move goods be- 
tween nations — to feed and clothe and house 
millions whose consumption has for years been 
below minimum requirements, to restore devas- 
tation, to build and rebuild all the means of pro- 
duction, and, in the years beyond, to move that 
far greater volume of goods required by the 
standards we are determined to achieve. It is 
plain, also, that any such movement is utterly 
impossible if the nations or any important 
group of them continue to put impediments in 
the way, attempt to corner markets for them- 
selves, or resort to devices of any sort to check 
the flow of goods and back it up upon its sources. 

Throughout his whole public life Secretary 
Hull has striven tirelessly to make our own and 
all other peoples see the folly and the tragic end 
of such practices. Even when -the shadow of 
war was lengthening over the world, he made 
desperate efforts to Ineak the network of restric- 
tions which were choking the production and 
the movement of goods. But peoples continued 
to believe that they could solve a world problem 
in isolation. The agreements declare as a basic 
principle that this cannot be done and will not 
again be attempted. They lay down as the 
course for agreed action that along which Mr. 
Hull has so steadfastly pointed the way. 

These are decisions which have been made in 
the course of war. I submit to you that they 
have been well and wisely made, that they bear 
within them the promise of a peace which shall 
dawn with hope. It will be a dawn long 
awaited by millions from whom hope will have 
been the only sacrifice not asked and freely 
given. But the dawn will come. Its promise is 
in your hands, in the hands of your fellow citi- 
zens, in the hands and thoughts and will of the 
people everywhere. Yours is the power and 
yours the responsibility — not at some future 
time, not in plans for the world after the war, 
but in what you think and do and want now. 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE ARRIVAL OF 
AMERICAN TROOPS IN ICELAND 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 

[ Released to the press July 7 ] 

A year ago today, at the invitation of your 
Government and by arrangement between the 
President of the United States and the Icelandic 
Prime ]\Iinister, American soldiers set foot on 
Icelandic soil. _ 

On this, the anniversary of that day, the De- ■ 
mocracy of the United States salutes Iceland, 
the oldest democracy in the world, and the pat- 
tern of all the democracies now fighting to de- 
fend freedom and free government throughout « 
the world. f 

When the United States and Iceland made 
their agreement, the method and spii'it of it was 
new in history. We were agreed that free in- 
stitutions were the most precious lieritage of 
both countries. We were agreed that a brutal 
attack on freedom had been made by the Axis 
powers and that defense against this barbaric 
wave was of vital interest to Icelanders and to 
Americans. Both of us hoped that this defense 
could be effected without war; but both of us 
knew that unless we were ready any of us might 
suffer the fate which has been inflicted on the 
men, the women, and even the children of Nor- 
way. We knew that if we were undefended 
every man's life, every woman's safety, every 
child's hope of the future was in danger. 

We knew, too, that Iceland lay squarely 
across the line of march of the Axis invaders. 
They had boasted that in good time they would 
sweep across the north, taking Iceland and 
Greenland, seizing Canada and our Canadian 
friends, and dealing at long last with the United 
States. Plainly it was our common duty not to 
wait until the bombs and tlie raiders were 
sweeping across the Norwegian sea. The de- 
fense must be prepared before the attack. 

You remember that a few months later the 
attack we had foreseen actually came. So far 
as the United States was concerned, it came from 
tlie Nazis' evil partner in the east, Japan. At 
once the United States came into action. 



' Broadcast over Station WBOS, Boston, Mass., July 
7, 1942. 



JULY 11, 1942 



619 



America is like Iceland in many respects. 
We are a peace-loving country ; and we prefer 
the life of peace to the life of arms. Like Ice- 
land, we have always felt that the true way of 
the world must be the way of reason and com- 
mon understanding. Our enemies misjudged 
this. They seem to have thought that because 
we do not thirst for war and conquest, that 
therefore we would tamely submit to seeing our 
neighbors and friends crushed into bloody sub- 
mission, or that we should be unable to swing 
into action the full strength of America's 
power. 

Our enemies know better now. In proclaim- 
ing that he would defend the Western Hemi- 
sphei'e, President Roosevelt had not made an 
idle statement. By millions Americans left 
their peaceful life. Throughout our entire 
country the factories, the mines, and transport 
were devoted to producing arms. 

Again our Axis enemies said it could not be 
done; it was fantastic to talk of building 60,000 
planes in a single year. 

Again they were wrong. The planes, the 
guns, the tanks, the cannon are rolling in increas- 
ing lines from our munitions plants. The camps 
and the air stations sprang up throughout the 
country, as if by magic. The fishermen came 
from their boats ; the farmers from the plains ; 
the southern planters joined the northern fac- 
tory workers ; the rich man's son shared a bunk 
with the day laborer. 

The convoys began to pass eastward to defend 
the great Atlantic reaches, westward to check 
the Japanese in the Pacific. Our close friend 
and neighbor to the north, Canada, which had 
long carried much of the brunt of the struggle, 
pooled her resources of materials with our grow- 
ing arms. 

Nation after nation joined in the common 
cause and formed a great union of freedom. 

The struggle may be long, but there will be 
but one outcome : the wiping out of the forces 
of barbaric and cruel conquest and the restoring 
of a world in which free men can live freely at 
peace. 

The democracy that you have had in Iceland 
for a thousand years— the freedom that we have 



had in America since its foundation — that free- 
dom Hitler would destroy in a day if the power 
were his. But he has not that power, partly 
because Iceland offered her hospitality so that 
American troops might stand on guard, and 
Gi-eenland gladly gave them the bases and the 
stations from which the Battle of the Atlantic 
might be fought. 

Our soldiers in Iceland are far from home, 
but I know they are among friends. Icelanders 
who have visited us know that they have no 
firmer friends than Americans. Together we 
share the Christian ideal of kindness, good 
neighborshiij and common solution of common 
problems. Together we work for the reestab- 
lishment of that freedom and opportunity for 
happiness and advancement which God has 
given as a heritage to all. 

To the people of Iceland and to our soldiers 
stationed in the far north, let me give a message 
of good cheer. There is no trial we cannot 
endure; for we fight at the side of the Lord, 
and the victory will be ours. 



FIVE YEARS OF CHINESE RESISTANCE 
TO JAPANESE AGGRESSION 

[Released to the press by the White House July 6] 

The following cablegram was addressed by 
the Pi'esident to General Chiang Kai-shek, Pres- 
ident of the Executive Yiian of China and Gen- 
eralissimo of the Armies, and through him to 
the people of China, on the occasion of the fifth 
anniversary of the attack on China by Japan, 
July 7: 

"In the name of the people of the United 
States, your fighting allies in this war for free- 
dom, I greet you on this anniversary of the most 
despicable attack on you in all your long and 
noble history. The people of the United States 
hail you as brothers-in-arms in the great and 
difScult tasks remaining before the free and 
freedom-loving peoples of all the earth. We 
are united as nations and peoples have never 
before been united. We are united to the end 



620 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



that the common aims of civilized men and 
women shall become actual and universal. Five 
years ago, at the ]\Iaico Polo Bi'idge, you started 
your fight against the forces of darkness which 
were hurled against your country and your 
civilization. You know, and all the world 
knows, how well you have carried on that fight, 
which is the fight of all mankind. Increasingly, 
your arms and our arms will thrust back the 
enemy. You. the people of China, and we, the 
people of the United States and the United Na- 
tions, will fight on together to victory, to the 
establishment of peace and justice and freedom 
throughout the world." 

[Released to the press July fl] 

The following telegram has been received 
from Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek in reply 
to the President's message to him on the occa- 
sion of the fifth anniversary of the attack on 
China by Japan : 

"Chungking, July 7, 19Jt2. 
"Dear President Roosevelt: 

"The Chinese Armj' and people are deeply 
moved by the insi)iring message which you were 
good enough to send us on this Fifth Anniver- 
sary of our war of resistance. Love of peace, 
justice and freedom is the traditional trait of 
our two peoples. We in concert with twenty- 
six allied nations have dedicated ourselves to 
the heroic fight in defense of civilization and 
humanity as you have truly said in your tele- 
gram. Our two armies and peoples are united 
in spirit as nations and peoples have never be- 
fore been so united. At the same time no 
greater responsibilities have devolved upon our 
two great democracies since the beginning of 
their history. Upon receipt of this message of 
greetings from one hundred and thirty million 
friends across the Pacific, our army and people 
fully realize the prime necessity of annihilating 
the forces of evil in the Pacific so as to hasten 
the day of victory in this global war against 
aggression. Will you please accept my per- 
sonal warm thanks and those of the entire 
Chinese Army and people. 

Chiang Kai-shek" 



[Released to the press July 7) 

The text of a message from the Secretary of 
State to the Chinese Acting Minister for For- 
eign Affairs for the People of China follows: 

"Five years ago today [July 7] China took up 
arms in defense of its soil against renewed Jap- 
anese aggression. Since that time the Chinese 
people have been ceaselessly and courageously 
battling for their liberty against the ruthless 
invaders. The American people have watched 
with deep sympathy and admiration the heroic 
fortitude and tenacity with which for five long 
and bitter years the Chinese people have fought 
(111 against heavy odds. 

"On the occasion of this anniversary I desire 
to convey to you and through you to the Chinese 
people an expression of the wholehearted good 
wishes of the American people who, as com- 
rades-in-arms with the Chinese people, are now 
facing common aggressors and share a common 
peril. AYe realize that the way before us is be- 
set with formidable difficulties. We shall not 
falter. China's determination to continue reso- 
lutely and valiantly as a leader in the fight for 
freedom constitutes an inspiring pai-t of the un- 
shakeable unity of purpose of the United Na- 
tions. The consciousness of those nations of 
the justness of their cause, their resolve to make 
all necessary sacrifices, and their firm purpose 
to carry home to the enemy the war which he 
has rapaciously inflicted upon humanity make 
certain final victory. 

CoRDELL Hull" 



American Republics 



DISTRIBUTION OF OIL TO THE OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

[Released to the press July 6] 

Supplementing the statement made to the 
press on June 8 on the subject of the distribution 
of oil to the other American republics, which 
is quoted below, the Secretary said, "Scarcity of 
available tanker tonnage is becoming increas- 
ingly acute and much more severe rationing 



JULY 11, 1942 

and stricter conservation measures should be in- 
stituted without dcLiy in those areas dependent 
on tanker-borne supplies." 

The Secretary's stateriient at his press con- 
ference on June 8 follows : 

"The United States, with respect to oil as with 
other vital supplies, is adhering to the principle 
(if equal and proportionate treatment for con- 
sumer needs in the other American republics. 
This principle has been applied to the sharing 
of various essential and critical materials. 

"The problem of maintaining a flow of petro- 
leum products to various areas in this hemi- 
sphere is similar to that of supplying the Atlan- 
tic and Pacific coasts in the United States. It 
is mainly an ocean-transportation problem. 

"Today millions of automobile users in areas 
(if the United States dependent upon water- 
borne transportation for fuel have reduced 
their gasoline consumption to an average of 
three gallons a week under a rationing system. 
Pleasure driving in rationed areas has been 
largely eliminated so that shipping may be con- 
centrated on the primary tasks of supplying 
the fighting forces, strategic industries, and 
essential civilian needs. 

"Hemisplieric application of the principle of 
equal treatment of consumers implies use of 
tankers for the most essential needs in the as- 
signment of vessels on inter-American routes 
too. 

"Steps have been taken in cooperation with 
the other American republics to maintain the 
flow of petroleum supplies to those countries 
on as favorable a basis as that prescribed within 
rationed areas of the United States. 

"In addition, the United States has under- 
taken to meet oil needs of certain operations in 
the other American republics contributing di- 
rectly and vitally to the war effort. It is essen- 
tial that these operations be maintained. 

"Examples of these vital operations are the 
military forces of countries fighting the Axis 
nations, merchant ships trading in the interest 
of the United Nations and friendly neutrals, 
airlines, and the mining and transportation of 
strategic materials. 



621 

"In determining how tankers should be em- 
ployed, the total supplies available to each of 
the American republics in relation to its own es- 
sential needs must be taken into account and 
the tankers sent where the unsatisfied need is 
greatest. 

"This view of the oil problem has been com- 
municated to the governments of the other 
American republics." 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PRESIDENT-ELECT OF COLOMBIA 

His Excellency Dr. Alfonso Lopez, President- 
elect of Colombia, and members of his party, 
including Senor Pedro Lopez y Michelson, the 
President-elect's son, arrived in the United 
States July 3 for a week's visit. After a few 
days in New York City, he came to Washington 
on July 7, where he was received at the White 
House by President Koosevelt. Seiior Lopez 
and his son were dinner and overnight guests 
at the Wliite House. During his stay in Wash- 
ington he visited Congress, attended a special 
session of the Governing Board of the Pan 
American Union, and was honored at several 
dinners and luncheons. 



ECONOMIC COOPERATION WITH 
BOLIVIA 

[Released to the press July 5] 

Dr. Joaquin Espada, the Bolivian Minister of 
Finance and Senor Alberto Crespo, the Bolivian 
Minister of National Economy, accompanied by 
Senora de Espada, Senor Franklin Antezana- 
paz. Adviser to the Minister of Finance, and Mr. 
Joseph A. Inslee, representative of the Export- 
Import Bank in Bolivia, will arrive in Wash- 
ington on July 5 to discuss with various agen- 
cies of the United States Government the pro- 
gram for economic cooperation between the 
LTnited States and Bolivia in the preparation of 
which the two Governments are engaged. 



622 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



A United States Economic Mission which has 
recently returned from Bolivia after making a 
five months' survey in that country has prepared 
a report making recommendations covering a 
general plan of economic development to be 
undertaken by the Bolivian Development Cor- 
poration, which is now being organized. This 
corporation will be under joint American and 



Bolivian management and will be financed par- 
tially by funds from the Export-Import Bank. 
Problems to be considered include the con- 
struction of highways and the development of 
the petroleum and agricultural resources of the 
country as well as the stimulation of production 
of such strategic materials as tin, tungsten, anti- 
mony, rubber, and quinine. 



Treaty Information 



RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention for the Amelioration of the Condi- 
tion of the Wounded and the Sick of Armies 
in the Field, and Convention Relating to the 
Treatment of Prisoners of War 

El Salvador 

By a note dated April 27, 1942 the Swiss Min- 
ister at Washington informed the Secretary of 
State that notification of the adherence by El 
Salvador to the Convention for the Ameliora- 
tion of the Condition of the Wounded and the 
Sick of Armies in the Field (Treaty Series 847) , 
and the Convention Relating to the Treatment 
of Prisoners of War (Treaty Series 846), both 
of which were signed at Geneva on July 27, 1929, 
was received by the Swiss Federal Council on 
April 22, 1942. The Minister's note adds that 
the notification of adherence states particularly 
that the Government of El Salvador considers 
itself, in accordance with the provisions of 
articles 37 and 95 respectively of the above-men- 
tioned conventions, immediately bound by them 
by reason of the state of war which now exists 
between El Salvador and Germany, Italy, and 
Japan. 



may do so by a written notification addressed 
to the Swiss Federal Council, the adherences to 
become effective sis months after the date of 
(heir receipt. Articles 37 and 95 of the con- 
ventions provide that a state of war shall give 
immediate effect to ratifications deposited and 
to adlierences notified by belligerent powers 
prior to or after the outbreak of hostilities and 
that the communication of such notices to the 
other contracting parties shall be made by the 
Swiss Federal Council by the most rapid 
method. 

FINANCE 

Stabilization Agreements 

Brazil 

On July 6, 1942 the Secretary of the Treasury, 
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and the Charge 
d'Affaires of the United States of Brazil in 
Washington, Fernando Lobo, signed an agree- 
ment extending to July 15, 1947 the Stabiliza- 
tion Agreement entered into on July 15, 1937.' 

Under this agreement, as extended, the 
United States will make dollar exchange avail- 
able to the Government of the United States 
of Brazil for the purpose of stabilizing the 
Brazilian milreis - United States dollar rate of 



Both conventions provide that non-signatory 
countries desiring to adhere to the conventions 



" See Treaty Information Bulletin, No. 94, July 1937, 
p. 17. 



JULY 11, 1942 



623 



exchange up to a total amount of $100,000,000 
and will sell gold to the United States of Brazil 
at such times and in such amounts as the Bra- 
zilian Government may request, also to a total 
amount of $100,000,000. In the agreement as 
originally drafted these two amounts were $60,- 
000,000. 

The following statement was made by the 
Secretary of the Treasury at the time of the 
signing of the agreement : 

"The extension of this Agreement between 
the Treasuries of the United States of America 
and the United States of Brazil and the increase 
in the facilities made available to Brazil under 
the Agreement, are a further evidence of the 
close and friendly relations existing between the 
two countries and constitute an assurance of 
continued cooperation between the two Treas- 
uries. 

"The friendship and understanding symbol- 
ized by this and other agreements with our great 
sister republic in South America promise much 
for both a joint attack on the problems of the 
war and a solution for our common problems 
in the peace." 

China 

The agreement of April 1, 1941 between the 
United States and China, under which the 
United States Stabilization Fund undertook to 
purchase Chinese yuan to the amount of $.50,- 
000,000 and under which the Stabilization Board 
of China was established, has been extended for 
a period of one year beyond June 30, 1942. 

The extension of the 1941 agreement is in 
accordance with the established policy of the 
Treasury of giving full financial aid to the 
Chinese Govermnent and of supporting the for- 
eign-exchange position of the Chinese yuan. 

Cuba 

On July 6, 1942 the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and the Cuban 
Ambassador, Dr. Aurelio F. Concheso, signed 
an agreement under which the Goverimient of 



the United States undertakes to sell gold to the 
Government of the Republic of Cuba from time 
to time with payment to be made within 120 
days after delivery of the gold, provided that 
the unpaid-for amount of gold shall not at any 
time exceed $5,000,000. 

The details of the agreement were worked 
out between the Cuban and United States Treas- 
uries on the occasion of a recent visit to this 
country by Dr. Oscar Garcia Montes, the Min- 
ister of Finance of Cuba. 

This agreement, evidencing the close cooper- 
ation that has existed between the Treasuries 
of the Republic of Cuba and the United States, 
will enable the Cuban Treasury to carry out 
operations designed to stabilize the Cuban peso - 
United States dollar rate of exchange. 

Ecuador 

An exchange-stabilization agreement was 
signed on February 27, 1942 by the Secretary of 
the Treasury, Henry Morgenthau, Jr., the Ecua- 
doran Ambassador, Colon Eloy Alfaro, and 
the Ecuadoran Minister Counselor, Eduardo 
Salazar. 

This agreement between the two Governments 
provides that up to $5,000,000 of the United 
States Stabilization Fund will be used for the 
purpose of stabilizing the United States dollar - 
Ecuadoran sucre rate of exchange. 

The agreement also provides for periodic con- 
ferences among representatives of the Secretary 
of the Treasury and of the Government of Ecua- 
dor to discuss monetary, financial, and economic 
problems of mutual interest. 

Iceland 

The Secretary of the Treasury, Henry Mor- 
genthau, Jr., and the Icelandic Minister, Thor 
Thors, signed on May 5, 1942 an exchange-stabi- 
lization agreement. 

Tliis agreement between the Government of 

, the United States, the Government of Iceland 

and the National Bank of Iceland, provides that 

up to $2,000,000 of the United States Stabiliza- 



624 

tion Fund will be used for the purpose of stabi- 
lizing the United States dollar-Icelandic krona 
rate of exchange. 

The agreement also provides for periodic con- 
ferences among representatives of the parties 
to the agreement to discuss monetary, financial, 
and economic problems of mutual interest. 

LABOR 

Convention Concerning Annual Holidays 
With Pay for Seamen 

Mexico 

The Acting Secretary General of the League 
of Nations informed the Secretary of State by a 
circular letter dated June 19, 1942 that the 
instrument of ratification by Mexico of the Con- 
vention Concerning Annual Holidays With Pay 
for Seamen, adopted by the International Labor 
Conference at its twenty-first session (October 
24, 1936), was registered with the Secretariat 
on June 12, 1942. 

The countries which have ratified this con- 
vention are the United States of America, Bel- 
gium, and Mexico. According to the terms of 
the convention it will enter into force six months 
after the date on which there have been regis- 
tered with the Secretary General of the League 
of Nations the ratifications of five members of 
the International Labor Organization, each of 
which has more than one million tons gross sea- 
going merchant shipping. 

MILITARY MISSIONS 

Agreement with Panama for the Detail of a 
United States Army Officer As Adviser to the 
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Panama 

[Released to the press July 7) 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Panama, there was signed on July 7 by Cor- 
dell Hull, Secretary of State, and Senor Don 
Ernesto Jaen Guardia, Ambassador of Panama 
at Washington, an agreement providing for the 
detail of an officer of the United States Army 
of the grade of colonel to serve as Adviser to 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

the Minister of Foreign Afi'airs of Panama in 
relation to matters pertaining to the defense of 
Panama. 

The agreement will continue in force for one 
year from the date of signature but may be ex- 
tended beyond one year at the request of the 
Government of Panama. 

The agreement contains provisions similar in 
general to provisions contained in agreements 
between the United States and certain other 
American republics providing for the detail of 
officers of the United States Army or Navy to 
advise the armed forces of those countries. 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual- Aid Agreements with Czechoslovakia, 
Greece, the Netherlands, and Norway 

The texts of mutual-aid agreements between 
the United States and Czechoslovakia, signed 
July 11, 1942; Greece, signed July 10, 1942; the 
Netherlands, signed July 8, 1942 ; and Norway, 
signed July 11, 1942, on the principles applying 
to mutual aid in the prosecution of the war, 
appear in this Bulletin under the heading "The 
War". 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
DISTINGUISHED ARGENTINES 

[Released to the press July 8] 

Two distinguished Argentines are in Wash- 
ington for a two-month tour of this country at 
the invitation of the Department of State. 

Dr. Teodora Becu, the well-known man of 
letters and adviser to the Lozada publishing 
firm, arrived by air on July 3; and Dr. Se- 
bastian Soler, professor of law at the University 
of Cordoba and Judge of the Court of Appeals 
of Rosario. arrived on July 4. 

Dr. Becu represented his country as official 
delegate to the International Aeroiuuitical Con- 
gress in Rome in 1922 and to the World Mone- 
tary and Economic Congress in London in 1933. 



JULY 11, 1942 



625 



He is an active member of the Society of Argen- 
tine Bibliojjhiles and a past editor of The Jurid- 
ical and Social Science Review of Buenos 
Aires. He lias published two books and several 
monograjjhs on banking. 

Dr. Soler is well known as a penalist and is an 
outstanding authoritj' on juvenile delinquency. 
While in this country he will give special atten- 
tion to juvenile courts and reform schools. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. John C. Dreier was designated an Assist- 
ant Chief of the Division of the American Re- 
publics, effective July 3, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1070) . 

Mr. Eobert M. Carr, an Assistant Chief of the 
Division of Commercial Policy and Agreements, 
has been designated to serve as the Department's 
representative on the Interdepartmental Sugar 
Policy Committee and on any other interde- 
jjartmental committee which may be established 
for the consideration of sugar problems. Mr. 
Edward G. Cale, Divisional Assistant in the 
Division of Commercial Policy and Agreements, 
will serve as Mr. Carr's alternate on such 
committees. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 11] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since July 4, 1942: 

Jolin Willard Carrigan, of San Francisco, 
Calif., Second Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 



Gerald A. Drew, of San Francisco, Calif., 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Quito, Ecuador, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Legation at Guatemala, Guatemala. 

The appointment of Charles E. Hulick, Jr., 
of Easton, Pa., as Vice Consul at London, Eng- 
land, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Hulick has been appointed Vice Consul at 
Panama, Panama. 

Sidney E. O'Donoghue, of Passaic, N. J., Sec- 
ond Secretary of Embassy at Habana, Cuba, 
has been designated Second Secretary of Em- 
bassy and Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 

David J. Pearsall, of Babylon, N.Y., has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Iquitos, Peru. 



General 



DETAIL OF UNITED STATES EMPLOYEES 
TO FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS 

The Secretary of State was authorized and 
directed by an Executive order of July 2, 1942 
(no. 9190) to achninister, in accordance with 
regulations included in the order, the act of 
May 3, 1939, which authorized the temporary de- 
tail of United States employees possessing spe- 
cial qualifications to the governments of the 
American republics and the Philippines. The 
regulations state that (1) only officers and em- 
ployees of the United States Government pos- 
sessing special scientific or other technical or 
professional qualifications shall be assigned, and 
no assignment shall be effected except at the re- 
quest of the foreign government concerned; (2) 
officers will be detailed to no other governments 
than those of the American republics, the Phil- 
ippines, and Liberia ; and (3) requests from for- 
eign governments will be submitted through 
diplomatic channels to the Secretary of State, 
who will confer with the appropriate depart- 
ment of this Government and take such other 
action as is necessary. 

The full text of the Executive order appears 
in the Federal Register for July 7, 1942, page 
5101. 



626 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BUILETIN 



Publications 




Department of State 

Reciprocal Trade: Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Haiti Relating to Waiver in 
Respect of Tariff Preferences Accorded the Domini- 
can Republic by Haiti Under a Treaty of Commerce 
Between Haiti and the Dominican Republic Signed 
August 26, 1941 — Effected by exchange of notes signed 
February 16 and 19, 1942. Executive Agreement 
Series 238. Publication 1757. 4 pp. 5<>. 



Regulations 



Export Control: Procedure To Secure Shipping Space 
to the Other American Republics ; Shipping Priority 
Ratings. July 6, 1942. (Board of Economic War- 
fare.) 7 Federal Register '52Q7. 



An Act Malving Appropriations for tlie Department of 
State, the Department of Justice, the Department of 
Commerce, and the Federal Judiciary, for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1943, and for other purposes. 
Approved July 2, 1942. [H. R. 6599.] Public Law 
644, 77th Cong. 43 pp. 

An Act Making appropriations to supply deficiencies in 
certain appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1942, and for prior fiscal years, and for other 
purposes. [Department of State, pp. 9, 17.] Ap- 
proved July 2, 1942. [H. R. 7232.] Public Law 648, 
77th Cong. 21 pp. 

List of retired officers and employees of the United 
States for whom the Department of State is holding 
decorations : Message from the President of the 
United States transmitting communication from the 
Secretary of State transmitting a list of those retired 
officers or employees of the United States for whom 
the Department of State is liolding decorations, 
orders, medals, or presents tendered them by foreign 
governments. H. Doc. 813, 77th Cong. 3 pp. 

Supplemental Estimate — Department of State. S. Doe. 
237, 7Tth Cong. 2 pp. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEi 1942 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents ... - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PDBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE AFFBOVAI, OF THB DIBECTOH OP THE BUBEAD OF THE BUDGET 



JO 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JULY 18, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 160— Publication 1772 



C 



ontents 



The War T»g» 

American contributions for British relief 629 

French ships at Alexandria, Egypt 631 

Cancelation of consular representation between Fin- 
land and the United States 632 

Exchange of diplomatic and considar representatives . 632 
Five years of Chinese resistance to Japanese aggres- 
sion 633 

The Near East 

Death of Turkish Prime Minister 633 

American Republics 

Pui'chase of Mexican surplus alcohol 633 

Rubber agreement with Bolivia 633 

Death of Ex-President Ortiz of Argentina 634 

Economic cooperation with Bolivia . 634 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Brazilian petroleum 

head 634 

General 
Transportation of certain aliens 634 

Commercial Policy \ 
Inter-American Coffee Agreement 635 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes • fi35 

[over] 








W. 3. SUPCTINTP^OENT OF D0CUMEN1>*- 
RUG 11 ^S42 



OntGTl iS— CONTINUED 



Treaty Information pbko 

Strategic materials: Agreement with Bolivia .... 635 
Commerce: 

Agreement with Mexico for the Purchase of Al- 
cohol 635 

Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Consular 

Rights with Finland 636 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement ; . 636 



I 



I 



The War 



AMERICAN CONTRIBUTIONS FOR BRITISH RELIEF 



[Released to the press July IG] 

There are given below the texts of a letter 
from the Prime Minister of Great Britain to 
the President and the President's reply thereto, 
in regard to American contributions for the 
relief of human suffering in Great Britain: 

"10, Downing Street, 
'Whitehall, June U, WJfS. 
"My Dear Mr. President, 

"For a long time I have watched with grate- 
ful admiration the vast stream of gifts which 
from the first days of the War has been flow- 
ing from iVmerica to Great Britain for the relief 
of suffering and the succour of distress, and in 
a volume which has barely lessened as a result 
of the advent of war to America, though a con- 
siderable diminution of it was well to be ex- 
pected. Tlie generosity of these gifts, each one 
of which represents a personal sacrifice by an 
individual, is overwhelming and without 
precedent. I am therefore anxious in the first 
I^Iace to express to you, Mr. President, the pro- 
found gratitude of the British people, and shall 
be glad if there is some way in which you jnay 
see fit to pass my feelings along to the American 
public. 

"My second purpose in addressing you today 
is unhappily one of informing you that we now 
feel under the necessity of asking that this 
brotherly flow of material shall be diminished. 
It is not that the gifts are not desired — indeed 
they have constantly been ingeniously devised 
to meet our real needs and the parcels from 
America have become a familiar and welcome 
feature in all the misfortunes which have over- 
taken our civilian population. The request 
which I am now compelled to make is due to 

472636 — 42 



additional demands on shipping resulting from 
the enormously increased flow of war materials 
for which ocean transport has to be provided. 
We shall have therefore to assign to goods of a 
more warlike character the shipping space 
which has hitherto been available for the relief 
of our people — a sacrifice which we will make 
here without complaint, but not without very 
great regret. 

"As to the method of procedure, we have a 
Committee here— the American Gifts Commit- 
tee — which hitherto has endeavoured to ensure 
that gifts from America shall only be of a char- 
acter that shall meet some real need. The Com- 
mittee will now have to extend its activities 
and try to control the actual volume of gifts. 
A statement will shortly be issued to the press 
indicating the lines along which it is hoped to 
proceed. 

"I cannot conclude this letter, Mr. President, 
without affirming once again our gratitude for 
the comfort in days of suffering and of trial 
that was brought to us by the people of America, 
and our desire to make known our thanks. 
"Yours sincerely, 

Winston S. Chubchujl," 



"The White House, 
''■W ashing ton, July 9, IQIfi. 
"Mx Dear Mr. Prime Minister: 

"I have received your letter of June 14, 1942 
in which you express the gratitude of the British 
■ people for the vast stream of gifts which from 
the first days of the war has been flowing from 
America to Great Britain for the relief of suf- 
fering. You ask that this expression be con- 
veyed to the American public. 

629 



630 

"You say also that this flow of material must 
be diminished due to additional demands on 
shipping and that it will be necessary to assign 
to goods of a more warlike character the ship- 
ping space which has hitherto been available 
for the relief of the British people. You state 
further that the iVmerican Gifts Committee in 
Great Britain, which hitherto has endeavored 
to ensure that gifts from America shall meet 
some real need, will now try to control the 
actual volume of gifts. 

"I am gratified by your statement that the 
relief sent from this country has given comfort 
to the British people during their days of great 
trial, and I shall give to the American people 
your expression of appreciation for the gifts 
they have provided. I am convinced that their 
action is indicative of the profound admiration 
felt in this country for the heroic stand of the 
British people against a barbarous foe. 

"You may be assured that we shall cooperate 
in every feasible way with the American Gifts 
Committee in order to meet the situation brought 
about by the increased demand for shipping. 
"Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

A statement which has been issued by the 
British Government on this subject follows: 

"The immense volume of American aid to 
Britain, which the British people will never 
forget as an expression of goodwill and bound- 
less generosity from the American people in 
the hour of need, made it necessary to set up a 
Committee in London, under the Chairmanship 
of Sir Ronald Lindsay, to exercise a general 
control over the shipment of gift supplies. 
The Committee has so far been able to arrange 
for shipment of almost all such supplies 
requii-ed to meet pressing needs. The expand- 
ing war effort of both nations, however, and 
the heavy demands on shipping which this 
involves, are now such that the amount of cargo 
space which it is possible to assign to American 
gifts has had to be very considerably reduced. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

"In order to make the most effective and eco- 
nomical use of the space available, it has been 
decided that in future, cargo space will be allo- 
cated only to direct consigimients approved by 
the American Gifts Committee in London and 
sent either through the American Red Cross to 
tlie British Red Cross and Women's Volimtary 
Services, or through the British War Relief 
Society to the Personal Service League. No 
supplies consigned to, or earmarked for, bodies 
or individuals other than the three British 
organizations named will therefore be accepted 
for shipment from now on. 

'•The Committee wishes to make it plain, 
liowever, that this decision does not signify that 
such other reputable organizations in Great 
Britain to whom generous donors and friends 
in the United States have sent gifts in the past 
through the British War Relief Society will in 
future be excluded from sharing in American 
aid. Although they will no longer be able to 
ha;e shipments addressed to themselves, the 
allocation of gift supplies shipped by the Brit- 
ish War Relief Society to the Personal Service 
League will have due regard to the volimtary 
societies, etc. which have been recipients of 
American gifts to assist their work hitherto. 
They will thus continue to share in American 
aid through an allocation which will be made as 
fairly and carefully as possible, though it must 
be understood that the total amount of gift 
supplies to be sliipped from the United States 
in future will be much less than in the past 
because of the reduced shipping space available 
for them. 

"It should however be made clear that this 
statement does not relate to monetary gifts 
since in their case shipping space is not 
involved : and that any activity at present being 
carried on in Britain under American auspices 
as a service to the nation, or any general Fund 
of national standing for the relief of air raid 
victims or the maintenance of appropriate 
charitable institutions will continue to be 
among the proper objects of deeply appreciated 
financial support from friends in America." 



JTILT 18, 1942 



631 



FRENCH SHIPS AT ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT 



In his press conference on July 14, Under 
Secretary of State Welles outlined statements 
which the United States Government has made 
to the French Government at Vichy with re- 
gard to French warships at Alexandria. He 
pointed out at the outset that these French war- 
ships at Alexandria are understood by the 
United States Government as being outside the. 
provisions of the Armistice agreement entered 
into between the French Government at Vichy 
and Germany. Mr. Welles said that these war- 
ships were in Alexandria at the time of the 
Armistice signature and were there in accord- 
ance with naval understandings between the 
French Government and its then ally, Great 
Britain. The Under Secretary said that, on 
July 3, in view of the situation which existed 
at that time in North Africa, President Roose- 
velt made the following proposal to the French 
Government at Vichy. The President made it 
clear that he hoped that the French ships at 
Alexandria could be placed in the protective 
custody of the United States, to include passage 
of the French ships through the Suez Canal, 
thence to a secure and remote part of this hemi- 
spliere for the duration of the war, either in a 
port of the United States or in some neutral 
port, with a guaranty of the return of these 
ships to France at the end of the war. The 
President said, Mr. Welles added, that he felt 
that this proposal was in the interest of France ; 
he stated further that if this offer on behalf 
of the United States was not accepted by the 
French Government, the British, knowing of 
this offer, would of course be properly and 
wholly justified in ordering the French ships 
through the Suez Canal, and, if the order was 
not obeyed, they would be wholly justified in 
destroying the ships to prevent them from fall- 
ing into the hands of the enemy. Mr. Welles 
said the offer made at that time by the Presi- 
dent was rejected by the French Government. 
On July 9, the Under Secretary continued, 
the President made a further proposal to the 
French Government. He proposed that if the 
French Government agreed that the French 
naval units now at Alexandria be withdrawn 

472636 — 42 2 



by way of the Suez Canal, the Government of 
the United States by agreement with the Brit- 
ish Government would grant safe passage to 
Martinique, where they would not be used by 
either of the two belligerent Governments, 
namely, the United States and Great Britain, 
but where they would be immobilized for the 
duration of the war on the same basis as other 
French warships now at Martinique, with the 
assurance that at the end of the war they would 
be restored to the French people. The two Gov- 
ernments would further agree, Mr. Welles said, 
to periodical relief and repatriation of the 
crews after they had reached Martinique, on 
the same basis which would have obtained had 
they remained at Alexandria. The President 
made this proposal in view of his belief that 
no matter what military situation might de- 
velop in North Africa, these French ships 
would be in inmiinent danger because of the 
possibility of enemy attack, and said specifi- 
cally that in the opinion of this Government, 
since these ships have from the beginning oc- 
cujjied a special, and are now in a precarious, 
situation, they are not within the operative 
provisions of the Armistice agreement, and 
hence the arrangement proposed by the Presi- 
dent would not violate the said agreement, Mr. 
Welles added. The Under Secretary said he 
was sorry to say that that offer of the President 
has also been refused by the French Govern- 
ment at Vichy, which is insisting that the 
French ships proceed to a nearby French port. 
In other words, Mr. Welles said, the French 
Government at Vichy is refusing the proposal 
solely on the ground that the French port sug- 
gested by the President is not nearby, and ap- 
parently not sufficiently close to German and 
Italian hands. The Under Secretary said that 
he felt certain that the French people them- 
selves will regard this offer made by the Presi- 
dent as very much in their interest, since it 
would have assured the safety of tlie crews of 
those vessels and would have assured the French 
people themselves that at the end of the war 
these French naval vessels would have been 
returned to them. 



632 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



CANCELATION OF CONSULAR REPRESENTATION BETWEEN FINLAND AND THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press July 16] 

Under the terms of article XXIII of the 
Treaty of Commerce and Consular Rights of 
February 13, 1934 between Finland and the 
United States of America,' American consular 
officers "may, within their respective consular 
districts, address the authorities. National, 
State, Provincial or Municipal, for the purpose 
of protecting their countrymen in the enjoy- 
ment of their rights accruing by treaty or other- 
wise." 

However, in a note dated July 17, 1941 the 
Finnish Foreign Ministry informed the Ajneri- 
can Legation in Helsinki that "in view of war- 
time conditions" consular matters should be 
handled entirely through the Finnish Foreign 
Ministry rather than directly with local au- 
thorities. This action of the Finnish Foreign 
Ministry had the direct eflfect of denying to 
American consular officers in Finland the spe- 
cific treaty rights mentioned above. 

Furthermore, the Finnish Foreign Ministry 
in a note dated July 9, 1942 informed the Ameri- 
can Legation that with reference to the For- 
eign Ministry's note of July 17, 1941 it was pref- 
erable to postpone to a subsequent date the 
question of an exequatur for a career officer of 
the American Foreign Service whom the Ameri- 
can Government had recently commissioned as 
a vice consul in Helsinki and for whom the 
American Legation had requested provisional 
recognition in accordance with established cus- 
tom in such cases. 

The American Legation, acting on instruc- 
tions from its Government, informed the Fin- 
nish Foreign Ministry in a note dated July 16, 
1942 that the request which the American Lega- 
tion had made for the provisional recognition 
of the consular officer referred to above was 



' Treaty Series 



withdrawn. The Legation further informed 
the Finnish Foreign Ministry that by the Mat- 
ter's action in regard to the withholding of 
recognition of the consular officer referred to 
and in denying American consular officers pres- 
ently in Finland their treaty rights in connec- 
tion with the representation of American in- 
terests in Finland the Finnish Government had 
undermined the basis upon which American 
consular representation was maintained in Fin- 
land. Accordingly, the Foreign Ministry was 
informed that the consular commissions of the 
American consular officers at present in Finland 
had been canceled and the consular section of 
the American Legation in Helsinki was being 
closed immediately, and that this action had 
been taken by the American Government to 
put an end to the present untenable situation 
involved in maintaining American consular 
representation in Finland in the face of the at- 
titude adopted by the Finnish Government in 
the matter. The Finnish Government was re- 
quested by the American Legation to close all 
Finnish consular offices in the United States 
not later than August 1, 1942. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CON- 
SULAR REPRESENTATIVES 

[Released to the press July 15] 

The S.S. Drottningholm, which was pre- 
viously used for the exchange of American and 
Axis nationals between Lisbon and New York, is 
returning to her home port of Goteborg, Swe- 
den, with approximately 800 Axis nationals 
aboard. The ship sailed on July 15. 

Most of the Axis nationals are from the other 
American republics. 



JULY 18, 1942 

FIVE YEARS OF CHINESE RESISTANCE TO 
JAPANESE AGGRESSION 

[Released to the press July 14] 

The translation of a telegram received by the 
Secretary of State from Generalissimo Chiang 
Kai-shek, of China, President of the Executive 
Yiiun and Acting Minister for Foreign Affairs, 
follows : 

July 7, 1942. 

"I wish to convey to you the appreciation of 
the Chinese Government and people for your 
telegraphic message of good wishes on the occa- 
sion of the fifth anniversary of China's war of 
resistance against aggression. 

''China and the United States are now faced 
with the same enemy and are engaged in a com- 
mon struggle in concert with other anti-aggres- 
sion nations. This constitutes a most memo- 
rable event in the long history of cordial rela- 
tions between our two countries. The Chinese 
Army and people will long remember your 
message in praise of China's war effort, and we 
will surely spur ourselves to further endeavors 
in the fulfilment of our duties in order to bring 
about the defeat of the brutal aggressors for the 
common good of our two countries and all the 
other United Nations. 

Chiang Kai-shek" 



633 



American Republics 



PURCHASE OF MEXICAN SURPLUS 
ALCOHOL 

[Released to the press July 17] 

The Department of State, the Board of Eco- 
nomic Warfare, and tlie Coimnodity Credit 
Corporation announced on July 17 the signa- 
ture of an agreement between the Commodity 
Credit Corporation and the Sociedad Nacional 
de Productores de Alcohol of Mexico under the 
terms of which the Commodity Credit Corpora- 
tion will purchase the entire exportable surplus 
of the alcohol production of Mexico up to the 
end of February 1943, at a price of 40 cents per 
gallon, f.o.b. Laredo, Tex. The negotiations 
were carried on in Washington with Senor 
Kamon Beteta, Mexican Under Secretary of 
Finance and Minister from Mexico to this 
country in charge of economic and commercial 
negotiations on behalf of the Mexican Govern- 
ment, and with Seiior Aaron Saenz, Senor 
Ramon A. Hernandez, and Seiior Josue Saenz 
representing the Sociedad Nacional de Produc- 
tores de Alcohol. 



The Near East 



DEATH OF TURKISH PRIME MINISTER 

[Released to the pre.ss July 13] 

The Secretary of State, on July 9, sent the 
following telegram to the Minister of Foreign 
Affairs of Turkey : 

''I desire to express to you personally and 
through you to the Government and people of 
Turkey my heartfelt sympathy, and that of the 
Government and people of the United States 
in the great loss which Turkey and the friends 
of Turkey have suffered in the sudden death of 
Prime Minister Saydam. 

CoRDELL Hull" 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH BOLIVIA 

[Released to the press July 15] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with Bo- 
livia was announced on July 15 by the Depart- 
ment of State, the Rubber Reserve Company, 
and the Board of Economic Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agreement the Rub- 
ber Reserve Company will purchase during the 
next five years all rubber produced in Bolivia 
other than amounts required for essential do- 
mestic needs there and except for a maximum 
, of 250 tons which is to be available annually for 
export to neighboring countries. 

The agreement provides for the expenditure 
of $2,125,000 by the Rubber Reserve Company 
in the development of rubber resources in 
Bolivia. 



634 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Bolivian agreement is the sixth under 
the United States' program to secure for the 
united war effort the maximum possible 
amount of rubber produced in the Western 
Hemisphere. The other agreements, already in 
effect, are with Brazil, Peru, Nicaragua, Costa 
Rica, and Colombia. Negotiations for similar 
agreements are proceeding with a number of 
other American rubber-producing countries. 

DEATH OF EX-PRESIDENT ORTIZ OF 
ARGENTINA 

[Released to the press July 151 

The following statement has been issued by 
the Secretary of State : 

"I have learned with the most profound sor- 
row of the death of Dr. Roberto M. Ortiz, 
until recently President of the Argentine 
Republic. 

"Every man and woman throughout the 
Americas who is today supporting the great 
cause of human liberty and every citizen of the 
Americas who believes in and recognizes the 
need for inter-American solidarity will receive 
the news of the death of Dr. Ortiz with a sense 
of personal loss. 

"Ex-President Ortiz was one of the out- 
standing statesmen of the New World. His 
high abilities and the courage and force with 
which he fought for the ideals in which he 
believed will cause his name to be always 
remembered in the Western Hemisphere with 
gratitude and with admiration. 

"His death is deeply regretted by the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States." 

ECONOMIC COOPERATION WITH BOLFVIA 

Dr. Joaquin Espada, Bolivian Minister of 
Finance, and Seiior Alberto Crespo, Bolivian 
Minister of National Economy, and members of 
their party, who have been in the United States 
discussing with various agencies of the United 
States Government the program for economic 
cooperation between the United States and 
Bolivia, will, accompanied by His Excellency 



Luis Fernando Guachalla, Bolivian Ambassa- 
dor in Washington, depart from Washington 
on July 19 for Detroit and Buffalo, where they 
will visit several large automobile and airplane 
factories. They will return to Washington on 
July 21. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
BRAZILIAN PETROLEUM HEAD 

[Released to the press July 18] 

General Horta Barbosa, President of the 
Brazilian National Petroleum Council, is now 
in the United States for a visit of approxi- 
mately three weeks as the guest of the Depart- 
ment of State. 

In his position as head of the Brazilian Na- 
tional Petroleum Council, General Horta Bar- 
bosa is responsible for supervision of the pe- 
troleum industry in his country and has come 
to the LTnited States with a particular interest 
in the present oil situation here and methods 
of rationing and distribution. 

After a few days in Washington, General 
Horta Barbosa will visit some of the leading 
oil-producing and -refining centers of the 
United States. 



General 



TRANSPORTATION OF CERTAIN ALIENS 

On July 8, 1942 the Secretary of State issued 
general license 1 authorizing, for the purpose of 
section 3(b) of the Trading-with-the- Enemy 
Act, the transportlation of certain citizens or 
subjects of an enemy, or ally-of-an-enemy, 
nation. The text of the general license is 
printed in the Federal Register for July 14, 
1942, page 5368. It was issued as Department of 
State press release 365 of July 14, 1942. 



I 



JULY 18, 1942 



635 



Commercial Policy 



INTER-AMERICAN COFFEE AGREEMENT 

[ Released to tlie press July 171 

Executive Order 8863 of August 21, 1941, 
allocating for the ijresent quota-year the quota 
provided by article VII of the Inter-American 
Coffee Agreement for countries which are not 
signatories of the agreement, terminates on Sep- 
tember 1, 1942, one month before the end of the 
quota-year. It has been decided not to allocate 
the non-signatory quota for the year begimiing 
October 1, 1942. The effect of this decision will 
be to facilitate the entry into the United States 
of coffee from non -signatory countries ■which 
are in a position to supply it under the non- 
signaiory quota. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press .Tuly IS] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since Julj' 11, 1942: 

George Cai'iiahan, of New York, N. Y., has 
been appointed Foreign Service officer, unclassi- 
fied, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and 
Vice Consul of Career, and has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Barranquilla, Colombia. 

George T. Colman, of Eacine, Wis., Senior 
Economic Analyst at Siio Paulo, Brazil, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Sao Paulo, 
Brazil. 

John L. Goshie, of New York, N. Y., for- 
merly Third Secretary of Embassy at Rome, 
Italy, has been designated Assistant Commei-- 
cial Attache at Caracas, Venezuela. 

Rudolph W. Hefti, of Ardmore, Pa., Clerk 
at Tabriz, Iran, has been appointed Vice Con- 
sul at Tabriz, Iran. 



Eugene M. Hinkle, of New York, N. Y., for- 
merly Second Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
(xermany, has been designated Second Secretary 
of Embassy at Habana, Cuba. 

Miss Elizabeth Humes, of Memphis, Tenn., 
formerly Second Secretary of Legation at Co- 
IX'uhagen, Denmark, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, Portugtil. 

Charles A. Livengood, of Dayton, Wash., 
formerly Commercial Attache at Rome, Italy, 
has been designated Commercial Attache at 
Bogota, Colombia. 



Treaty Information 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Agreement with Bolivia 

An annoimcement regarding the signature 
of an agreement with Bolivia under the terms 
of which the Rubber Reserve Company will 
purchase over the next five yeai's all rubber 
produced in Bolivia other than amomits re- 
quired for essential domestic needs and except 
for a maximum of 250 tons which is to be avail- 
able annually for export to neighboring coun- 
tries, appears in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "American Republics". 



COMMERCE 

Agreement with Mexico for the Purchase of 
Alcohol 

An announcement of the agreement between 
the Commodity Credit Corporation and the 
Sociedad Nacional de Productores de Alcohol 
of Mexico under the terms of which the Com- 
modity Credit Corporation will purchase the 
entire exportable surjjlus of the alcohol produc- 
tion of Mexico up to the end of February 1943, 
appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"American Republics". 



636 

Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and Consular 
Rights with Finland 

An announcement regarding the closing of 
tlie American consulates in Finland and the 
Finnish consulates in the United States appears 
in this Bulletin under the lieading "The War''. 
The notification was given by this Government 
to the Finnish Government in a note dated July 
16, 1942 as a result of the withholding of recog- 
nition of an American consular officer and in 
denying American consular officers in Finland 
their treaty rights under the terms of article 
XXIII of the Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and Consular Eights of February 13, 1934 
between the United States and Finland (Treaty 
Series 868). 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 

An announcement regarding the termina- 
tion of Executive Order 8863, which allocated 
for the present quota-year the quota provided 
by article VII of the Inter-American Coffee 
Agreement for the countries which are not sig- 
natories of the agreement, and the decision not 
to allocate the non-signatory quota for the year 
beginning October 1, 1942, appears in this Bul- 
letin under the heading "Commercial Policy". 



I 



U. 5. 60VERNHENT PRIHTINa OFFICE- 1941 



i 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - . - . Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PCBLISHIO WXIKI.X WITH THB IPFBOTAL Or THS OlaXCTOl Or THX BDaXAO OT THI SnOQET 



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i 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



JULY 25, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 161— Publication 1775 



C 



ontents 




The War p,^ 

The War and Human Freedom: Address by the Secre- 
tary of State 639 

Mutual-aid agreement with Yugoslavia: 
Joint statement by the President and the King of 

Yugoslavia . 647 

Signing of the agreement 647 

Natives and citizens of Hungary, Rumania, and Bul- 
garia in the United States 650 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 4 to Revision II ... . 650 

American Republics 

Rubber agreement with Ecuador 650 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Venezuelan archivist . . 651 
Visit to the United States of Brazdian historian . . . 651 

The Foreign Service 

Resignation of Ambassador Leahy 651 

Personnel changes 652 

Treaty Information 

Telecommunications: International Telecommunication 

Convention 652 

Restriction of war: Convention Relating to the Treat- 
ment of Prisoners of War 653 

Commerce: Trade Agreement with Uruguay .... 653 

Mutual guaranties: Mutual Aid Agreement with Yugo- 
slavia . ; 653 

Strategic materials: Agreement with Ecuador .... 654 

Legislation ; 654 

Publications 654 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENT* 
AUG 11 1942 



The War 



THE WAR AND HUMAN FREEDOM 



ADDRESS BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE ■ 



[Released to the press July 23] 

The conflict now raging throughout the 
earth is not a war of nation against nation. 
It is not a local or regional war or even a series 
of such wars. On the side of our enemies, led 
and driven by the most ambitious, depraved, 
and cruel leaders in history, it is an attempt 
to conquer and enslave this country and every 
country. On our side, the side of the United 
Nations, it is, for each of us, a life-and-death 
struggle for the preservation of our freedom, 
our homes, our very existence. We are united 
in our determination to destroy the world-wide 
forces of ruthless conquest and brutal enslave- 
ment. Their defeat will restore freedom or the 
opportunity for freedom alike to all countries 
and all peoples. 

I 

From Berlin and Tokyo the assault on human 
freedom has spread in ever-widening circles. 
In some cases the victim nations were lulled 
into inaction by promises or by protestations 
of peaceful intention. In other cases they 
were so intimidated that no preparation for 
resistance was made. In all cases the invaders, 
before armed attack, set into motion every con- 
ceivable device of deceit, subversion, treachery, 
and corruption within the borders of the 
intended victim. 



' Broadcast over all national radio networks July 23, 
1942. 

474052—42 



As country after country, in Europe and in 
Asia, was attacked in this way, it became clear 
that no nation anywhere was immune, that for 
none was safety to be found in more desire for 
peace, in avoidance of provocation, in neu- 
trality, or in distance from the centers of assault. 
Nation after nation learned — too late — that 
safety against such an attack lay only in more 
effective force; in superior will; in concerted 
action of all free nations directed toward re- 
sisting and defeating the common enemies; in 
applying the law of self-defense and self- 
preservation rather than in relying upon pro- 
fessions of neutrality, which, in the face of a 
world-wide movement to subjugate all nations 
and all peoples, are as absurd and as suicidal 
as are such professions on the part of a citizen 
of a peaceful community attacked by a band of 
confessed outlaws. 

Today twenty-eight United Nations are 
fighting against the would-be conquerors and 
enslavers of the human race. We know what 
is at stake. By the barbarian invaders of 
today nothing is spared — neither life, nor 
morals, nor honor, nor virtue, nor pledges, 
nor the customs, the national institutions, 
even the religion of any people. Their aim is 
to sweep away every vestige of individual and 
national rights; to substitute, the world over, 
their unspeakable tyranny for the ways of 
life developed each for itself by the various 

639 



640 



DKPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nations; to make all mankind subservient to 
their will; to convert the two billions of the 
earth's inhabitants into abject victims and 
tools of their insatiable lust for power and 
dominion. 

We have seen their work in the countries 
they have invaded — murder of defenseless 
men, women, and children; rape, torture, and 
piUage; mass terrorization; the black system 
of hostages; starvation and deprivations that 
beggar description; the most thorough-going 
bondage the world has ever seen. 

This is the so-called "New Order" of Hitler 
and the Japanese war lords — an order as old 
as slavery — new only in the calculated thor- 
oughness of its cruelty; in the depth of the 
degradation to which it subjects its victims; 
in the degree to which it has revived the worst 
practices of the darkest ages in history. 

From time immemorial attempts at con- 
quest and enslavement have checked and 
harried the great onward march of men and 
women toward greater freedom and higher 
levels of civUized existence. The methods 
employed have been the same as those which 
we witness today. Ruthless, ambitious men 
would succeed in corrupting, coercing, or de- 
ceiving into blind obedience enough servile 
followers to attack or terrify peaceful and 
law-abiding peoples, too often unprepared to 
resist. In a few instances whole civilizations 
coUapsed under the impact, and darkness de- 
scended on large portions of the world. More 
often, the attacks were — at great cost — de- 
feated, and mankind resumed its onward 
march. Yet throughout the ages two lessons 
have remained unlearned. 

The first is that man's umate striving for 
freedom cannot be extinguished. Since the 
world began too many men have fought, suf- 
fered, and died for freedom — and not in vain — 
for doubt to remain on that score. And yet, 
over and over again woidd-be conquerors and 
enslavers of mankind have sought to translate 
their mad dreams of barbarous domination 
into reality. 

The second lesson is that liberty is truly won 
only when it is guarded by the same watchful- 
ness, the same courage, the same willingness to 



fight for it which first secured it. Repeatedly 
throughout history, free men — having won the 
fight, having acquired precious rights and 
privileges which freedom brings — have dropped 
their guard, relaxed their vigUance, taken their 
freedom for granted. iThey have busied 
themselves with many things and have not 
noticed the beginnings of new tyrannies, the 
rise of new threats to liberty. They have 
become so abhorrent of force and cruelty that 
they have believed the bully and the gangster 
could be reformed by reason and justice or be 
defeated by passive resistance. And so they 
have been surprised and unprepared when the 
attacks have come again. 

It is perhaps too much to expect that tyrants 
will ever learn that man's longing for liberty 
cannot be destroyed. Dreams of conquest 
have their roots in diseased mentaUty. And 
that malady may well be ineradicable. 

But it is not too much to expect that free 
men may learn — and never forget — that lack of 
vigilance is the greatest danger to Uberty; that 
enjoyment of liberty is the fruit of willingness to 
fight, suffer, and die for it; that the right to 
freedom cannot be divorced from the duty of 
defending it. 

This latest assault on hxmian freedom is, in a 
profound sense, a searching test for nations and 
for individuals. There is no surer way for 
men and for nations to show themselves 
unworthy of liberty than, by supine submission 
and refusal to fight, to render more difficult the 
task of those who are fighting for the preserva- 
tion of human freedom — unless it be to align 
themselves, freely and volxmtarUy, with the 
destroyers of liberty. There is no surer way 
for men and for nations to show themselves 
worthy of liberty than to fight for its preserva- 
tion, in any way that is open to them, against 
those who would destroy it for all. 

In the plans of the new tyrants of the East 
and of the West, there is no freedom or hope for 
anyone. If there be some people who believe 
that they can expect from Hitler or the Japan- 
ese war lords greater measure of freedom or of 
opportunity for freedom than they now possess, 
they need only look at the firing squads in 
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Norway, France, 



JULY 25, 1942 



641 



Yugoslavia, at the concentration camps in 
Germany and Austria. They need only see 
the degradation of the forced laborers torn 
from every occupied country. They can learn 
the fraudulent quality of that brand of "free- 
dom" from the Chinese in Nanking, from the 
Filipinos in Manila, from the inhabitants of the 
East Indies. 

There is no chance for liberty for any people 
anywhere save through the victory of the free 
peoples. Never did a plainer duty to fight 
against its foes devolve upon all peoples who 
prize liberty and all who aspire to it. Never 
was there such an opportunity for every people, 
as have the people of the Philippines, to dem- 
onstrate its fitness both for the rights and the 
responsibilities of freedom — and, through proof 
given of its fitness, to create an overwhelming 
sentiment in every coimtry of the world in 
support of its striving for liberty. 

II 

We, Americans, are fighting today because 
we have been attacked. We are fighting, as I 
have said, to preserve our very existence. We 
and the other free peoples are forced into a 
desperate fight because we did not learn the 
lessons of which I have spoken. We are forced 
to fight because we ignored the simple but 
fundamental fact that the price of peace and of 
the preservation of right and freedom among 
nations is the acceptance of international re- 
sponsibilities. 

After the last war too many nations, includ- 
ing our own, tolerated, or participated in, at- 
tempts to advance their own interests at the 
expense of any system of collective security and 
of opportunity for all. Too many of us were 
blind to the evils which, thus loosed, created 
growing cancers within and among nations — 
political suspicions and hatreds; the race of 
armaments, first stealthy and then the subject 
of flagrant boasts; economic nationalism and its 
train of economic depression and misery; and 
finally the emergence from their dark places of 
the looters and thugs who found their oppor- 
timity in disorder and disaster. The shadow of 
a new war fell across the world. War began in 
1931 when Japan invaded China. 



From the time when the first signs of menace 
to the peace of the world appeared f)n the hori- 
zon, the Government of the United States 
strove increasingly to promote peace on the 
solid foundation of law, justice, non-interven- 
tion, non-aggression, and international collabo- 
ration. With growing insistence we advocated 
the principles of a broad and constructive 
world order in political, economic, social, moral, 
and intellectual relations among nations — 
principles which must constitute the foundation 
of any satisfactory futm^e world order. We 
practiced these principles in our good-neighbor 
policy, which was applicable to every part of 
the earth and which we sought to apply not 
alone in the Western Hemisphere, but in the 
Pacific area, in Europe, and everywhere else as 
well. 

When hostilities broke out and wars were 
declared, our Government made every honor- 
able and feasible eft'ort to prevent spread of the 
conflicts and to safeguard this country against 
being drawn into war. But danger increased 
aU around us. Peaceful, unoffending countries, 
one after another, were brought under the heel 
of the invader, both in Europe and in Asia. 
Hitler and the Japanese war lords, by their acts 
and their official declarations, have made it 
plain that the purpose of the Japanese is to 
conquer and dominate virtually one-half of the 
world with one-half of its population, w^hile 
Hitler's purpose is, first to conquer continental 
Europe, and then to seize the British Isles, and 
through control of the British fleet to dominate 
the seven seas. 

Events have demonstrated beyond question 
that each of the Axis powers was bent on un- 
limited conquest. As time went on it became 
manifest that the United States and the whole 
Western Hemisphere were ultimate targets. 
Conclusive proof was given by the international 
desperadoes themselves thi-ough the publication 
on September 27, 1940 of the Tripartite Pact. 
By that treaty of alliance Germany, Japan, and 
Italy in effect agreed that, if any country not 
then at war with one of them placed obstacles 
in the way of the program of conquest of any 
of them, the three would unite in political, 
military, and economic action against that 



642 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUILETIN 



country. This provision was aimed directly 
at the United States. One of the hi^'hest official 
spokesmen of the Axis powers openly pro- 
claimed that the objective of the three partners 
was a new world order to be achieved by force. 

Finalh' a realization that these plans and 
purposes created a state of imminent and acute 
danger to all remaining peaceful countries, 
especially to those of the Western Hemisphere, 
forced us to face the all-important question as 
to when and where the peaceful nations, includ- 
ing ours, should begin to resist the movements 
of military aggression in order to make such 
resistance n:ost effective. 

It was in these circumstances that our Gov- 
ernment felt the compelling importance of 
adopting the policy of aid to Great Britain and 
to other nations which resisted aggression, as 
set forth in the Lease-Lend Act, submitted to 
Congress in January 194L It is scarcely 
necessary to say that all subsequent utterances 
and acts of the leaders of Germany, Japan, and 
Italy have fullj^ confirmed the wisdom and 
timeliness of the policy of this Government in 
thus proceeding to defend the country before 
it should be too late. 

In December 1941, acting in concert, moving 
in harmony with their world-wide objective, all 
three launched their assault against us, the 
spearhead of which was at Pearl Harbor, rea- 
soning that to achieve victory they must con- 
quer us, and to conquer us they must strike 
before we were prepared to resist successfully. 

When they made this concerted attack against 
us, the war lords of Japan and Germany must 
have believed that at the root of our sincere 
and strong defire for peace lay a lack of will 
and of capacity to rise in unity of purpose and 
to pour all our strength and energy into the 
battle. They have since begun to learn better 
at Wake and at Midway; at Bataan and at 
Corregidor; in the Straits of Macassar and in 
the Coral Sea ; from the sky over Tokyo itself ; 
again at Midway; on and over every ocean of 
the world traversed by our air fleets and our 
naval and merchant vessels; on every battle- 
field of the world increasingly supplied with 
our war materials. They will have final and 



conclusive answer from our e.^anding armies, 
navies, and air forces, operating side by side 
with our valiant allies and backed by our 
nation-wide industrial power and the courage, 
the determination, and the ingenuity of our 
people. That answer is being forged in the 
fighting spirit which now pervades the people 
of this country, in the will to victory of all the 
United Nations. 

In this vast struggle, we, Americans, stand 
united with those who, like ourselves, are fight- 
ing for the preservation of their freedom; with 
those who are fighting to regain the freedom of 
which they have been brutally deprived; with 
those who are fighting for the opportunity to 
achieve freedom. 

We have always believed — and we believe 
today — that all peoples, without distinction of 
race, color, or religion, who are prepared and 
willing to accept the responsibilities of liberty, 
are entitled to its enjoyment. We have always 
sought — and we seek today — to encourage and 
aid all who aspire to freedom to establish their 
right to it by preparing themselves to assume 
its obligations. We have striven to meet 
squarely our own responsibility in this respect — 
in Cuba, in the Philippines, and wherever else 
it has devolved upon us. It has been our pur- 
pose in the past — and will remain our purpose 
in the future — to use the full measure of our 
influence to support attainment of freedom by 
all peoples who, by their acts, show themselves 
worthy of it and ready for it. 

We, who have received from the preceding 
generations the priceless fruits of the centuries- 
old struggle for liberty, freely accept today the 
sacrifices which may be needed to pass on to 
our children an even greater heritage. 

Our enemies confront us with armed might in 
every part of the globe. We cannot win this 
war by standing at our borders and limiting 
ourselves to beating off attacks. Air, sub- 
marine, and other forms of assault can be effec- 
tively defeated only if those attacked seek out 
and destroy the sources of attack. We shall 
send all the aid that we can to our gallant 
allies. And we shall seek out our enemies and 
attack them at any and every point of the globe 



JULY 25, 1942 



643 



at which the destruction of the Axis forces can 
be accomplished most effectively, most speedily, 
and most certainly. 

We know the magnitude of the task before 
us. We Ivuow that its accomplislunent will 
exact unlimited effort and unfaltering corn-age. 
However long the road we shall press on to the 
final victory. 

Temporary reverses must not and will not 
be the occasion for wealoiess and discourage- 
ment. On the contrary they are the signal for 
all true soldiers and patriots to strike back all 
the harder, with that superb resolution which 
never yields to force or tlu-eat of force. 

Fighting as we are in self-defense, in self- 
preservation, we must make certain the defeat 
and destruction of the world-invading forces of 
Hitler and the Japanese war lords. To do this 
our people and the peoples of every one of the 
twenty-eight United Nations must make up 
their minds to sacrifice time and substance and 
life itself to an extent unprecedented in past 
history. 

International desperadoes like individual ban- 
dits will not abandon outlawry voluntarily. 
They wdl only be stopped by force. 



Ill 



With victory achieved our first concern must 
be for those whose sufferings have been almost 
beyond human endurance. When the armies 
of our enemies are beaten, the people of many 
countries wdl be starving and without means 
of procuring food; homeless and without means 
of building shelter; their fields scorched; their 
cattle slaughtered; theii' tools gone; their fac- 
tories and mines destroyed; their roads and 
transport wrecked. Unknown millions will be 
far from their homes — prisoners of war, in- 
mates of concentration camps, forced laborers 
in alien lands, refugees from battle, from cruelty, 
from starvation. Disease and danger of disease 
wiU lurk everywhere. In some countries con- 
fusion and chaos will follow the cessation of 
hostilities. Victory must be followed by swift 
and effective action to meet these pressing 
human needs. 



At the same time all countries — those which 
will need relief and those more fortunate — will 
bo faced with the immediate problems of transi- 
tion from war to peace. War production must 
be transformed into production for the peace- 
time needs of mankind. In some countries the 
physical ravages of war must be repaired. In 
others, agriculture must be re-established. In 
all countries returning soldiers must find places 
in the work of peace. There wUl be enormous 
deficiencies of many kinds of goods. AH 
countries, including oure, wUl need an immense 
volume of production. There will, therefore, 
exist vast opportunities for useful employment. 
The termination' of the war effort will release, 
for use in peaceful pursuits, Stirling enthusiasms, 
the aspirations and energies of youth, technical 
experience, and — in many industries — ample 
plants and abundance of tools. The compel- 
ling demands of war are revealing how great a 
supply of goods can be produced for national 
defense. The needs of peace should be no less 
compelling, though some of the means of meet- 
ing them must be different. Toward meeting 
these needs each and every nation should in- 
tensively direct its efforts to the creation of an 
abundance for peacetime life. This can oidy 
be achieved by a combination of the efforts of 
individuals, the efforts of groups, and the 
efforts of nations. Governments can and must 
help to focus the energies by encouraging, 
coordinating, and aiding the efforts of indi- 
viduals and groups. 

During this period of transition the United 
Nations must continue to act in the spirit of 
cooperation which now underlies their war 
effort — to supplement and make more effective 
the action ot countries individually in re- 
establishing public order, in providing swift 
relief, in meeting the manifold problems of 
readjustment. 

Beyond these there will lie before all countries 
the great constructive task of building human 
freedom and Christian morality on firmer and 
broader foundations than ever before. This 
task, too, will of necessity call for both national 
and international action. 



644 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Within each nation liberty under law is an 
essential requirement of progress. The spirit 
of liberty, when deeply imbedded in the minds 
and hearts of the people, is the most powerful 
remedy for racial animosities, religious intoler- 
ance, ignorance, and all the other evUs which 
prevent men from uniting in a brotherhood of 
truly civUized existence. It inspires men to 
acquisition of knowledge and understanding. 
It is the only real foundation of political and 
social stability. 

Liberty is more than a matter of political 
rights, indispensable as those rights are. In 
our own country we have learned from bitter 
experience that to be truly free, men must have, 
as weU, economic freedom and economic secu- 
rity — the assurance for aU alike of an oppor- 
timity to work as free men in the company of 
free men; to obtain through work the material 
and spiritual means of life; to advance through 
the exercise of ability, initiative, and enterprise; 
to make provision against the hazards of human 
existence. We know that tliis is true of man- 
kind everywhere. We laiow that in all coun- 
tries there has been — and there will be increas- 
ingly in the future — demand for a forward 
movement of social justice. Each of us must 
be resolved that, once the war is won, this 
demand shall he met as speedily and as fully 
as possible. 

All these advances — in political freedom, in 
economic betterment, in social justice, in spir- 
itual values — can be achieved by each nation 
primarily through its own work and effort, 
mainly through its o^vn wise policies and ac- 
tions. They can be made only where there is 
acceptance and cultivation of the concepts and 
the spirit of human rights and human freedom. 
It is impossible for any nation or group of na- 
tions to prescribe the methods or provide the 
means by which any other nation can accom- 
plish or maintain its own political and economic 
independence, be strong, prosper, and attain 
high spiritual goals. It is possible, however, 
for all nations to give and to receive help. 

That which nations can and must do toward 
helping one another is to take, by cooperative 
action, steps for the elimination of impedunents 



and obstructions which prevent the full use by 
each — for the welfare of its people— of the 
energy and resources which are at its com- 
mand. And the nations can and must, again 
by cooperative action under common agree- 
ment, create such facilities as will enable each 
to increase the effectiveness of its own national 
efforts. 

Such cooperative action is already under way. 
Twenty-eight United Nations have proclaimed 
their adherence to a program of principles and 
purposes by which manldnd may advance 
toward higher standards of national and inter- 
national corduct. That program is embodied 
in the Declaration made on August 14, 1941, 
by President Roosevelt and Prime Minister 
Churchill, now kno\vn as the Atlantic Charter.' 

The pledge of the Atlantic Charter is of a 
system which will give eveiy nation, large or 
small, a greater assurance of stable peace, 
greater opportunity for the realization of its 
aspirations to freedom, and greater facilities 
for material advancement. But that pledge 
implies an obligation for each nation to demon- 
strate its capacity for stable and progressive _ 
government, to fulfill scrupulously its estab- m 
lished duties to other nations, to settle its 
International differences and disputes by none 
but peaceful methods, and to make its full 
contribution to the msmtenance of enduring 



peace. 



IV 



For decades all nations have lived in the 
shadow of threatened coercion or war. This 
has imposed heavy burdens of armament, 
which in the cases of many nations has ab- 
sorbed so large a part of their production effort 
as to leave the remainder of their resources 
inadequate for maintaining, let alone improv- ,. 
ing, the economic, social, and cultural stand- I 
ards of their people. Closely related to tliis 
has been a burden less obvious but of immense 
weight — the inevitable limitation that fear of 
war imposes on productive activity. Many 
men, groups of men, and even nations have 
dared not plan, create, or increase the means 

» Executive Agreement Series 236; 55 Stat. 1600. 



JULY 25, 1942 



645 



of production, fearing lest war come and their 
efforts thus be rendered vain. 

No nation can make satisfactory progress 
while its citizens are in the grip of constant 
fear of external attack or interference. It is 
plain that some international agency must be 
created which can — by force, if necessary — keep 
the peace among nations in the future. There 
must be international cooperative action to 
set up the mechanisms which can thus insure 
peace. This nmst include eventual adjustment 
of national armaments in such a mamier that 
the rule of law camiot be successfully challenged 
and that the burden of armaments may be 
reduced to a minimmn. 

In the creation of such mechanisms there 
would be a practical and purposeful application 
of sovereign powers through measures of inter- 
national cooperation for purposes of safeguard- 
ing the peace. Participation by all nations in 
such measures would be for each its contribution 
toward its own future security and safety from 
outside attack. 

Settlement of disputes by peaceful means, and 
indeed aU processes of international coopera- 
tion, presuppose respect for law and obligations. 
It is plain that one of the institutions which 
must be estabhshed and be given vitality is 
an international court of justice. It is equally 
clear that, in the process of re-establishuig 
international order, the United Nations must 
exercise surveillance over aggressor nations 
until such time as the latter demonstrate their 
willingness and ability to live at peace with 
other nations. How long such surveillance will 
need to continue must depend upon the rapidity 
with which the peoples of Germany, Japan, 
Italy, and their satellites give convincing proof 
that they have repudiated and abandoned the 
monstrous philosophy of superior race and con- 
quest by force and have embraced loyally the 
basic principles of peaceful processes. During 
the formative period of the world organization, 
interruption by these aggressors must be 
rendered impossible. 

One of the greatest of all obstacles which in 
the past have impeded human progress and af- 
forded breeding grounds for dictators has been 

474052—42 2 



extreme nationalism. AU will agree that na- 
tionalism and its spirit are essential to the 
healthy and normal political and economic life 
of a people, but when policies of nationalism — 
political, economic, social, and moral — are car- 
ried to such extremes as to exclude and prevent 
necessary poUcies of international cooperation, 
they become dangerous and deadly. Nation- 
alism, run riot between the last war and this 
war, defeated all attempts to carry out indis- 
pensable measures of international economic 
and political action, encouraged and facilitated 
the rise of dictators, and drove the world 
straight toward the present war. 

During this period narrow and short-sighted 
nationalism found its most virulent expression 
in the economic field. It prevented goods and 
services from flowing in volume at all adequate 
from nation to nation and thus severely ham- 
pered the work of production, distribution, and 
consumption and greatly retarded efforts for 
social betterment. 

No nation can make satisfactory progress 
when it is deprived, by its own action or by 
the action of others, of the immeasurable bene- 
fits of international exchange of goods and 
services. The Atlantic Charter declares the 
right of all nations to "access, on equal terms, 
to the trade and to the raw materials of the 
world which are needed for their economic 
prosperity". This is essential if the legitimate 
and growing demand for the greatest practicable 
measure of stable employment is to be met, ac- 
companied by rising standards of living. If 
the actual and potential losses resulting from 
limitations on economic activity are to be elim- 
inated, a system must be provided by which 
this can be assured. 

In order to accomplish this, and to estab- 
lish among the nations a circle of mutual 
benefit, excessive trade barriers of the many 
different kinds must be reduced, and practices 
which impose injuries on others and divert 
trade from its natural economic course must 
be avoided. Equally plain is the need for 
making national currencies once more freely 
exchangeable for each other at stable rates of 
exchange; for a system of financial relations 



646 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



SO devised that materials can be produced and 
ways may be found of moving them where 
there are markets created by human need; for 
machinery through which capital may — for 
the development of the world's resom-ces and 
for the stabilization of economic activity — 
move on equitable terms from financially 
stronger to financially weaker countries. There 
may be need for some special trade arrange- 
ment and for international agreements to 
handle difficult surplus problems and to meet 
situations in special areas. 

These are only some of the things that 
nations can attempt to do as continuous dis- 
cussion and experience instruct the judgment. 
There are bound to be many others. But the 
new policies shoidd always be guided by cau- 
tious and sound judgment lest we make new 
mistakes in place of old ones and create new 
conflicts. 

Building for the future in the economic sphere 
thus means that each nation must give sub- 
stance and reality to programs of social and 
economic progress by augmenting production 
and using the greater output for the increase of 
general welfare; but not permitting it to be 
diverted or checked by special interests, private 
or public. It also means that each nation 
must play its full part in a system of world 
relations designed to facilitate the production 
and movement of goods in response to human 
needs. 

With peace among nations reasonably as- 
sured, with political stability established, with 
economic shackles removed, a vast fimd of 
resources will be released in each nation to meet 
the needs of progress, to make possible for all 
of its citizens an advancement toward higher 
Uving standards, to invigorate the constructive 
forces of initiative and enterprise. The nations 
of the world will then be able to go forward in 
the manner of their own choosing in all avenues 
of human betterment more completely than 
they ever have been able to do in the past. 
They will do so through their own efforts and 
with complete self-respect. Continuous self- 
development of nations and individuals in a 
framework of effective cooperation with others 



is the sound and logical road to the highe 
standards of life which we all crave and seek. 

No nation wiU find this easy. Neither vic- 
tory nor any form of post-war settlement will 
of itself create a millennium. Rather we shaU 
be offered an opportunity to eliminate vast 
obstacles and wastes, to make available addi- 
tional means of advancing national and inter- 
national standards, to create new facilities 
whereby the natural resources of the earth 
and the products of human hands and brains 
can be more effectively utilized for the promo- 
tion of human welfare. 

To make full use of this opportunity, we 
must be resolved not alone to proclaim the 
blessings and benefits which we all alilce desire 
for humanity but to find the mechanisms by 
which they may be most fully and most speedily 
attained and be most effectively safeguarded. 

The manifold tasks that lie ahead will not 
be accomplished overnight. There wdl be need 
for plans, developed with careful consideration 
and carried fonvard boldly and vigorously. 
The vision, the resolution, and the skiU with 
which the conditions of peace wiU be estabhshed 
and developed after the war wiU be as much a 
measure of man's capacity for freedom and 
progress as the fervor and determination which 
men show in winning the victory. 

Without impediment to the fullest prosecu- 
tion of the wai- — indeed for its most effective 
prosecution — the United Nations should from 
time to time, as they cUd in adopting the 
Atlantic Charter, formulate and proclaim their 
common views regarding fimdamental policies 
which win chart for mankind a wise course 
based on enduring spiritual values. In support 
of such policies an informed public opinion 
must be developed. This is a task of intensive 
study, hard thinking, broad vision, and leader- 
ship — not for governments alone, but for 
parents, and teachers, and clergymen, and all 
those, within each nation, who provide spirit^ 
ual, moral, and intellectual guidance. Never 
did so great and so compelling a duty in this 
respect devolve upon those who are in positions 
of responsibility, public and private. 



JULY 25, 1942 



647 



For the immediate present the all-important 
issue is that of winning the war — winning it as 
soon as possible and winning it decisively. 
Into that we must put our utmost effort — now 
and every day until victory is won. 



A bitter armed attack on human freedom 
has aroused mankind to new heights of courage, 
determination, and moral strength. It has 
evoked a spirit of work, sacrifice, and coopera- 
tive effort. With that strength and with that 
spirit we shall win. 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH YUGOSLAVIA 
JOINT STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT AND THE KING OF YUGOSLAVIA 



[Released to the press by the White House July 24] 

The King of Yugoslavia, who expects to de- 
part shortly from the United States, called on 
the President on July 24. After this conversa- 
tion the following joint statement was issued : 

"In the discussions between the President 
and the King in the course of His Majesty's 
visit to the United States there has been a gen- 
eral review of the relations between the United 
States and Yugoslavia, and the problems of 
special concern to these two United Nations, 
with particular attention to the conduct of the 
war. 

"His Majesty's visit in this country has been 
made the occasion of a demonstration on the 
part of the American people of a very special 
friendship for the people of Yugoslavia, who 
have made such valiant sacrifice in defense of 
their cherished freedom and the liberation of 
their country. 

"We are in complete accord on the fimda- 
mental principle that all the resources of the 



two nations should be devoted to the vigorous 
prosecution of the war; that like the fine 
achievements of General Mihailovic and his 
daring men, an example of spontaneous and un- 
selfish will to victory, our common effort shall 
seek every means to defeat the enemies of all 
free nations. 

"In these discussions, in which Dr. Momtchilo 
Nintchitch, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
the Royal Yugoslav Government, has partici- 
pated, attention has been given also to the prin- 
ciples which should guide our countries in 
establishing an enduring and prosperous peace 
under a just application of the Declaration by 
the United Nations, and the principles of the 
Atlantic Charter. 

"Accordingly the Foreign Minister of Yugo- 
slavia and the Secretary of State have today 
signed, on behalf of their Govermnents, an 
agreement on the principles applying to mutual 
aid in the prosecution of the war, pledging 
their material and spiritual resources to a com- 
mon victory of the United Nations." 



SIGNING OF THE AGREEMENT 



[Released to the press July 24] 

An agreement between the Government of 
the United States and the Royal Yugoslav Gov- 
ernment on the principles applying to mutual 
aid in the prosecution of the war was signed 
on July 24, by Mr. Cordell Hull, Secretary of 
State, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
Yugoslavia, Dr. Momtchilo Nintchitch. Yugo- 
slavia becomes the tenth country to sign such 
an agi-eement with the United States. 



The provisions of the agreement with the 
Royal Yugoslav Goverimient are the same in 
all substantial respects as the provisions of the 
agreements heretofore signed between this Gov- 
ernment and the Governments of the United 
Kingdom, China, the Soviet Union, Belgium, 
Poland, the Netherlands, Greece, Czechoslo- 
vakia, and Norway. As in the case of the agree- 
ments with those countries the agreement with 
Yugoslavia was negotiated under the provisions 



648 

of the Lease-Lend Act of March 11, 1941, which 
provides for extending aid to any country 
■whose defense is determined by the President 
to be vital to the defense of the United States. 
The United States and the other govern- 
ments which sign such agreements pledge then- 
material, as well as their spiritual, resources to 
a common victory of the United Nations. All 
of these countries are signatories of the Decla- 
ration by United Nations. 

Text of the Agreement ' 

Wliereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Royal Yugoslav 
Government declare that they are engaged in 
a cooperative undertaking, together with every 
other nation or people of like mind, to the end 
of laying the bases of a just and enduring world 
peace securing order under law to themselves 
and all nations ; 

And whereas the Government of the United 
States of Ajnerica and the Royal Yugoslav Gov- 
ernment, as signatories of the Declaration by 
United Nations of January 1, 1942, have sub- 
scribed to a common program of purposes and 
principles embodied in the Joint Declaration 
made on August 14, 1941 by the President of 
the United States of America and the Prime 
Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Brit- 
ain and Northern Ireland, known as the Atlan- 
tic Charter; 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant 
to the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that 
the defense of Yugoslavia against aggression 
is vital to the defense of the United States of 
America ; 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
Royal Yugoslav Government aid in resisting 
aggression ; 

And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions up- 
on which the Royal Yugoslav Government re- 
ceives such aid and of the benefits to be 



'The text here printed conforms to the signed 
original. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

received by the United States of America in 
return therefor should be deferred until the 
extent of the defense aid is known and until 
the progress of events makes clearer the final 
terms and conditions and benefits which will be 
in the mutual interests of the United States 
of America and Yugoslavia and will promote 
the establisliment and maintenance of world 
peace ; 

And whereas the Government of the United 
States of America and the Royal Yugoslav 
Government are mutually desirous of conclud- 
ing now a preliminary agreement in regard to 
the provision of defense aid and in regard to 
certain considerations which shall be taken into 
account in determining such terms and condi- 
tions and the making of such an agreement has 
been in all respects duly authorized, and all 
acts, conditions and formalities which it may 
have been necessary to perform, fulfill or exe- 
cute prior to the making of such an agreement 
in conformity with the laws either of the 
United States of America or of Yugoslavia 
have been performed, fulfilled or executed as 
required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that pur- 
pose, have agreed as follows : 

Article I 

The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Royal 
Yugoslav Government with such defense arti- 
cles, defense services, and defense information 
as the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica shall authorize to be transferred or pro- 
vided. 

Aeticle II 

The Royal Yugoslav Government will con- 
tinue to contribute to the defense of the 
United States of America and the strengthen- 
ing thereof and will provide such articles, 
services, facilities or information as it may be 
in a position to supply. 

Akticle III 

The Royal Yugoslav Government will not 
without the consent of the President of the 



JULY 25, 1942 



649 



United States of America transfer title to, 
or possession of, any defense article or defense 
information transferred to it under the Act 
of March 11, 1941 of the Congress of the 
United States of America or permit the use 
thereof by anyone not an officer, employee, or 
agent of the Eoyal Yugoslav Government. 

Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Koyal 
Yugoslav Government of any defense article 
or defense information, it becomes necessary 
for that Government to take any action or 
make any payment in order fully to protect any 
of the rights of a citizen of the United States 
of America who has patent rights in and to 
any <mch defense article or information, the 
Koyal Yugoslav Government will take such ac- 
tion or make such payment when requested 
to do so by the President of the United States 
of America. 

Aeticle V 

The Koyal Yugoslav Government will return 
to the United States of America at the end of 
the present emergency, as determined by the 
President of the United States of America, 
such defense articles transferred under this 
Agreement as shall not have been destroyed, 
lost or consumed and as shall be determined 
by the President to be useful in the defense 
of the United States of America or of the 
Western Hemisphere or to be otherwise of use 
to the United States of America. 

Article VI 
In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America 
by the Koyal Yugoslav Government full cog- 
nizance shall be taken of all property, services, 
information, facilities, or other benefits or con- 
siderations provided by the Royal Yugoslav 
Government subsequent to March 11, 1941, and 
accepted or acknowledged by the President on 
behalf of the United States of America. 

Article VII 
In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America 
by the Eoyal Yugoslav Government in return 



for aid furnished under the Act of Congress 
of March 11, 1941, the terms and conditions 
thereof shall be such as not to burden com- 
merce between the two countries, but to pro- 
mote mutually advantageous economic relations 
between them and the betterment of world- 
wide economic relations. To that end, they 
shall include provision for agreed action by 
the United States of America and the Eoyal 
Yugoslav Government, open to participation 
by all other countries of like mind, directed to 
the expansion, by appropriate international and 
domestic measures, of production, employment, 
and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the 
liberty and welfare of all peoples; to the elimi- 
nation of all forms of discriminatory treatment 
in international commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers; and, in 
general, to the attainment of all the economic 
objectives set forth in the Joint Declaration 
made on August 14, 1941, by the President of 
the United States of America and the Prime 
Minister of the United Kingdom. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of 
governing economic conditions, the best means 
of attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

Article VTII 
This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this twenty-fourth day of July 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

CORDELL Hx^LL 

Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Royal Yugoslav Government : 

Dr. MoMTcniLO Nintchitch 
Minister of Foreign Affairs 
of Yugoslavia 



650 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



NATIVES AND CITIZENS OF HUNGARY, 
RUMANIA, AND BULGARIA IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

On July 17, 1942, the President issued a proc- 
lamation enjoining all natives, citizens, deni- 
zens, or subjects of Hungsry, Rumania, and 
Bulgaria in the United States "to preserve the 
peace towards the United States and to refrain 
from crime against the public safety, and from 
violating the laws of the United States and of 
the States and Territories thereof; and to re- 
frain from actual hostility cr giving informa- 
tion, aid, or comfort to the enemies of the 
United States or interfering by word or deed 
with the defense of the United States or the 
political processes and public opinions thei-eof ; 
and to comply strictly with the regulations 
which may be from time to time promulgated 
by the President." 

The proclamation also contains a regulation 
which prescribes that — 

"Any native, citizen, denizen, or subject of 
Hungary, Rumania, or Bulgaria, of the age of 
fourteen years and upward, and not actually 
naturalized, who, in the judgment of the At- 
torney General or the Secretary of War, as 
the case may be, is aiding, or about to aid, the 
enemy, or who may be at large to the danger of 
the public peace or safety, or who, in the judg- 
ment of the Attorney General or the Secretary 
of War, as the case may be. is violating, or is 
about to violate any regulation adopted and 
promulgated by the President, or any criminal 
law of the United States or of the States or 
Territories thereof, shall be subject to sum- 
mary arrest as an alien enemy and to confine- 
ment in a place of detention, as may be di- 
rected by the President or by any executive 
officer hereafter designated by the President 
of the United States." 

The Attorney General is charged with the 
duty of executing the above regulation within 
the continental United States, Puerto Rico, 
and the Virgin Islands; and the Secretary of 
War, in Alaska, the Canal Zone, the Hawaiian 
Islands, and the Philippine Islands. 



The full text of the proclamation (no. 2563) 
is printed in the Federal Register for July 21, 
1942, page 5535. 

PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 4 TO 
REVISION H 

[Released to the press July 20] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunc- 
tion with the Secretary of the Treasury, the 
Attorney General, the Secretary of Commerce, 
the Board of Economic Warfare, and the Co- 
ordinator of Inter-American Affairs, on July 
20 issued Supplement 4, July 17, 1942, to Re- 
vision II of the Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals, which was promulgated 
May 12, 1942.' 

Part I of this supplement contains 239 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 36 deletions; part II contains 97 additional 
listings outside the American republics and 7 
deletions. 



American Republics 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH ECUADOR 

[Released to the press July 21] 

Signing of a rubber agreement with the Re- 
public of Ecuador was announced on July 21 
by the Department of State, the Rubber Reserve 
Company, and the Board of Economic Warfare. 

Under tlie terms of the agreement, the Rub- 
ber Reserve Company will purchase during the 
next five years all rubber produced in Ecuador 
which is not required for essential domestic 
needs. 

Ecuador has been producing and exporting 
relatively small quantities of rubber. Several 
hundred tons which are now in warehouses will 
be taken over by the Rubber Reserve Company 
under the agreement. It is expected that even- 
tually, with development of potential resources, 

' 7 Federal Register 5545. 



JULY 26, 1942 



651 



somewhat larger supplies will be available an- 
nually from Ecuador. 

The Ecuador agreement is the seventh under 
the United States program to secure for the 
united war effort the maximum possible amount 
of rubber produced in the Western Hemisphere. 
The other agi-eements, already in effect, are with 
Brazil, Peru, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Colombia, 
and Bolivia. Negotiations for similar agree- 
ments are proceeding with a number of other 
American rubber-producing countries. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
VENEZUELAN ARCHIVIST 

[Released to the press July 20] 

Dr. Mariano Picon Salas, Director of the Na- 
tional Archives of Caracas, Venezuela, arrived 
in Washington on Monday, July 20, for a visit 
at the invitation of the Department of State. 
He is particularly interested in literature and 
education, and his itinerary in the United States 
will include visits to many of the country's 
leading universities and cultural centers. 

Dr. Picon Salas was educated at the Univer- 
sity of Chile and was for a number of years 
professor of the history of art in the School of 
Fine Arts and professor of general literature 
in the Pedagogical Institute of that University. 
He was also librarian in charge of the catalogue 
section of the National Library. In 1936 he 
became superintendent of education in Vene- 
zuela and in 1937 he was in charge of a dij^lo- 
matic mission to Czechoslovakia. 

Before assuming his present post Dr. Picon 
Salas was director of the Cultural Division of 
the Ministry of Education, which corresponds, 
in general, to the Division of Cultural Relations 
of the Department of State. He is the author 
of the outstanding contemporary work on Ven- 
ezuelan literary criticism. The Formation and 
Development of Venesuelati Literature, and is 
known throughout the other American repub- 
lics as an editor and critic. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
BRAZILIAN HISTORIAN 

[Released to the press July 23] 

Dr. Dante de Laytano, professor of Amer- 
ican history in the University of Porto Alegre, 
Brazil, arrived in Washington by plane on 
July 22 as a guest of the Department of State. 
Dr. de Laytano, an eminent historian, is chief 
of the historical archives of Rio Grande do Sul 
and edits the quarterly published by the His- 
torical Institute of that State. A member of 
many learned societies, he is author of a long 
list of published books, several of which deal 
with studies of Negro life and culture in Brazil. 

He has also made numerous investigations 
of linguistics in Brazil, especially among cattle- 
men and fishermen of the south coast. 



The Foreign Service 



RESIGNATION OF AMBASSADOR LEAHY 

[Released to the press by the White House July 25] 

On July 18 Admiral William D. Leahy, 
American Ambassador to France, addressed 
the following letter to the President : 

"In order that my services may be available 
at any time to the national defense, I beg to 
tender herewith my resignation as Ambassador 
to France. I beg you to accept, Mr. President, 
my appreciation of the high honor you have 
conferred upon me by appointing me to this 
important post." 

The President sent the following reply to 
Admiral Leahy on July 24: 

"In calling you to active duty as Chief of 
Staff to the Commander-in-Chief of the United 
States Army and Navy, I accept your resigna- 
tion as Ambassador to France. In so doing I 
want you to know first of all of my great satis- 
faction in the way in which you have carried 
out an extremely difficult task at an extremely 
difficult time and, second, that there has been 



652 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



such good agreement in our national policy in 
respect to France during your Ambassador- 
ship. In the words of the Navy : 'Well done'." 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press July 25] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since July 18, 1942 : 

Gilson Blake, of Portland, Oreg., formerly 
Second Secretary of Embassy at Rome, Italy, 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State. 

Kenneth A. Byrns, of Greeley, Colo., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mex- 
ico City, Mexico, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Veracruz, Mexico. 

Reginald Castleman, of Riverside, Calif., 
Consul at Bahia, Brazil, has been assigned as 
Consul at Bello Horizonte, Brazil, in order to 
open a new office. 

William E. Cole, Jr., of Fort Totten, N. Y., 
formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Rome, Italy, has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at St. John's, Newfoundland. 

John B. Faust, of Denmark, S. C, Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Santiago, 
Chile, has been designated Second Secretary 
of the Legation and Consul at Tegucigalpa, 
Honduras, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Robert F. Hale, of Portland, Oreg., Vice 
Consul at Veracruz, Mexico, has been des- 



ignated Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Mexico City, Mexico, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Edward D. McLaughlin, of Little Rock, 
Ark., Second Secretary of Embassy and Con- 
sul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been assigned 
as Consul at Para, Brazil. 

Augustus Ostertag, of Downington, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Basel, Switzerland, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Port-of-Spain, Trini- 
dad, British West Indies. 

Joseph Ramon Solana, of Asheville, N. C, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Habana, 
Cuba. 

Orray Taft, Jr., of Santa Barbara, Calif., 
Vice Consul at Mesicali, Mexico, has been as- 
signed as Consul at Mexicali, Mexico. 

The assignment of Milton Patterson Thomp- 
son, of Chattanooga, Tenn., as Vice Consul at 
Durango, Mexico, has been canceled. Mr. 
Thompson will remain as Vice Consul at 
Nuevitas, Cuba. 

Earle O. Titus, of North Miami, Fla., Clerk 
at Madrid, Spain, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at Madrid, Spain. 

Jay Walker, of Washington, D. C, consul at 
Para, Brazil, has been assigned as Consul at 
Bahia, Brazil. 

William W. Walker, of Asheville, N. C, Vice 
Consid at Colon, Panama, has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba. 



Treaty Information 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
IntemationeJ Telecommunication Convention 

Croatia 

According to notification no. 407, dated May 
16, 1942, from the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern the Lega- 
tion of Sixain at Bei'n notified the Bureau by a 
letter dated May 5, 1942' that Croatia had ad- 



hered, as of July 7, 1941, to the International 
Telecommunication Convention and the Regu- 
lations annexed thereto signed at Madrid De- 
cember 9, 1932. 

Haiti 

There is quoted below in translation a com- 
munication dated March 26, 1912 from the Sec- 
retary of State for Foreign Affairs of Haiti to 
the Bureau of the International Telecommuni- 



JULY 25, 1942 



653 



cation Union at Bern as it appears in notifi- 
cation no. 407 of May 16, 1942 from the Bureau : 

"Reptjblic of Haiti 

"Letter dated March 26, 1942 from the De- 
partment of State for Foreign Affairs at Port- 
au-Prince : 

" 'Supplementing the letter of October 15, 
1940 from the Department of State,^ I regret to 
inform you that, on account of the special cir- 
cumstances created by the present war in which, 
today, it finds itself engaged, the Republic of 
Haiti has decided to offer its resignation as a 
member of the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunications Union. 

'"In requesting that acknowledgment be 
made of this resignation, which should have full 
and entire effect in conformity with the by-laws 
of the Union, this Department of State feels 
that it must emphasize the fact that the Re- 
public of Haiti, while constrained to take such 
a decision by the turn of international events, 
is none the less happy to have for so long shared 
in the work of the International Telecommuni- 
cations Union with an ever greater desire to 
work for the establisliment of the longed-for 
era of good relations and complete solidarity 
between States.' 

"The Bureau of the Union has acknowledged 
receipt of this letter, drawing the attention of 
the Department of State for Foreign Affairs 
at Port-au-Prince to the provisions of article 
10 of the International Telecommunication 
Convention." 

Article 10 of the convention, which provides 
for the denunciation of the convention by the 
contracting parties, is as follows : 

"1. Each contracting government shall have 
the right to denounce the present Convention 

' A footnote quotes this letter in which it was stated 
that Haiti would have to suspend its payments to the 
Union until better times. The Bureau had replied 
with a telegram asking contirmation of its under- 
standing that such payments would be made later, 
with 6 percent interest according to article 17, § 3 (r«) 
of the International Telecommunication Convention of 
December 9, 1932. 



by a notification, addressed, through diplo- 
matic channels, to the government of the 
country in which was held the conference of 
plenipotentiaries that has drawn up the pres- 
ent Convention, and aimounced by this 
government to all the other contracting 
governments, likewise through diplomatic 
channels. 

"2. This denunciation shall take effect at the 
expiration of the period of one year, beginning 
with the day on which the notification was re- 
ceived by the government of the country in 
which the last conference of plenipotentiaries 
was held. This effect shall apply only to the 
author of the denunciation; the Convention 
shall remain in force for the other contracting 
governments." 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention Relating to the Treatment of 
Prisoners of War 

Costa Rica 

The American Minister at San Jose trans- 
mitted to Secretary of State with a despatch 
of July 13, 1942 a copy of a decree, published 
in La Gaceta of July 12, 1942, authorizing the 
Executive Power to declare the adherence of 
the Republic of Costa Rica to the Convention 
Relating to the Treatment of Prisoners of 
War, signed at Geneva July 27, 1929 (Treaty 
Series 846). 

COMMERCE 
Trade Agreement with Uruguay 

On July 21, 1942 a trade agreement between 
the United States and Uruguay was signed at 
Montevideo by the Uruguayan Minister of 
Foreign Affairs and the American Ambassador 
to Uruguay. It will be printed in the Execu- 
tive Agreement Series. 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual- Aid Agreement with Yugoslavia 

The text of an agreement between the Gov- 
ernments of the United States and Yugoslavia, 
signed July 24, 1942, on the principles applying 
to mutual aid in the prosecution of the war, 
appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"The War". 



654 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Agreement with Ecuador 

An announcement, regarding the signature 
of an agreement with Ecuador under the terms 
of which the Rubber Reserve Company will 
purchase rubber produced in Ecuador appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "American 
Republics". 



Legislation 



Preserving the nationality of a person born in Puerto 
Rico who resides for 5 years in a foreign state. H. 
Kept. 2373, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6165. 3 pp. 

Use of the Red Cross emblem and the coat of arms 
of the Swiss Confederatiou for commercial purposes. 
H. Rept. 2387, 77th Cong., on H.R. 7420. [Incorpo- 
rates report, dated April 1, 1942, from the Acting 
Secretary of State to the President, recommending 
enactment of legislation.] 8 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

The Department of State of the United States. Pre- 
pared by William Gerber, Division of Research and 
Publication. January 1942. 1942. Publication 
1744. vi, 91 pp., illus. 200. 

International Traffic in Arms: Regulations Issued on 
June 2, 1942 by the Secretary of State, Governing 
Registration and Licensing Under Section 12 of the 
Joint Resolution Approved November 4, 1939 and 
Related Laws. 8th ed. Publication 1759. iv, 51 pp. 
IOC. 

Exchange of Official Publications: Agreement Between 
the United States and Panama — Effected by Ex- 
change of Notes Signed November 27, 1941 and 
March 7, 1942; effective November 27, 1941. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 243. Publication 1760. 
7 pp. 5^. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 4, July 17, 1942, to Revision II of May 
12, 1942. 1942. Publication 1763. 19 pp. Free. 

Diplomatic List, July 1942. Publication 1764. ii, 101 
pp. Subsci-iption, $1 a year; single copy, 10(«. 



U. S. SOVERNMENT PRIHTtNG OFFICE, 1911 



For Bale by the Superintendent of Documents. Washington. D. C. — Price, 10 cents . - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OT THI BDREAD OF THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 
Vol. VII, No. 161a— Publication 1784 



Trade Agreement With Uruguay 

Contents Pag, 

Analysis of general provisions and reciprocal benefits: 

I. Signature of agreement 654c 

II. Summary of agreement — 

A. Concessions obtained by the United States . 654d 

B. Concessions granted by tlie United States . 654d 

C. General provisions of the agreement .... 654e 

fix. Analysis of individual concessions obtained 

on exports of United States products .... 6.546 

IV. Analysis of individual concessions on imports 

into the United States 654i 

V. General provisions and exchanges of notes . . 654p 

VI. Tables— 

A. Itemized list of tariff concessions obtained 

from Uruguay (schedide I) 6543 

B. Itemized list of tariff concessions made to 

Uruguay (schedule II) 654y 




U, 1 SUPWlNTtNbfNT OF OOCUKitN- . 
SEP 2 i&42 



NOTE 

This information lias been prepared by representatives of the Department 
of State, the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Commerce, the 
Department of the Treasury, and the Tariff Commission. These Govern- 
ment agencies, under the reciprocal-trade-agreements program, cooperate 
in the formulation, negotiation, and conclusion of all trade agreements 
entered into by the United States under the provisions of the Trade Agree- 
ments Act of 1934, as extended by joint resolutions of Congress of March 
1, 1937 and April 12, 1940. 



Trade Agreement With Uruguay 



ANA YSIS OF GENERAL PROVISIONS AND RECIPROCAL BENEFITS 



[Released to the press July 21] 

Signature of Agreement 

A reciprocal trade agreement between the 
United States and Uruguay, negotiated under 
the authority of the Trade Agreements Act, 
was signed on July 21 at Montevideo by Wil- 
liam Dawson, Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of the United States of Amer- 
ica to the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, and 
His Excellency Dr. Don Alberto Guani, Minis- 
ter of Foreign Affairs of the Oriental Republic 
of Uruguay. After formal approval of the 
agreement in Uruguay and its proclamation by 
the President of the United States, the agree- 
ment will enter into force 30 days subsequent 
to the exchange of the Uruguayan Govern- 
ment's instrument of ratification and the proc- 
lamation by the President of the United States. 
The text of the agreement will be printed in the 
Executive Agreement Series. 

The agreement is designed to facilitate trade 
between the two countries during the present 
emergency as well as to provide a basis for an 
expansion of that trade after the war. The re- 
ciprocal tariif concessions for which it provides 
cover a substantial portion of the normal trade 
between them. These concessions include tariff 
reductions on specified products; binding of 
certain tariff rates against increase; and bind- 
ings of specified commodities free of duty. The 
general provisions of the agreement provide, 
among other things, important assurances 
against discriminatory tariff, quota, or exchange 



treatment of imports from either country into 
the other. 

Trade between the United States and Uru- 
guay has increased in recent years, except for 
a setback in 1938. Total trade between the two 
countries, which amounted to $46,922,000 in 
1929, fell sharply during depression years to a 
low of $5,321,000 in 1932. Total trade had 
risen by 1937 to $27,012,000 but dropped again 
to $9,811,000 in 1938. It recovered in 1939 and 
amounted to $14,558,000., and in 1940, under the 
stimulus of the war, it reached $28,904,000. 

In the decade prior to 1931 United States 
exports to Uruguay were greater, on the aver- 
age, than its imports from Uruguay. During 
the decade 1931-1940, however, the United 
States, on the average, had an import balance 
in its trade with Uruguay. During the period 
1921-1930 United States exports to Uruguay 
averaged $20,351,000 annually, and imports 
from Uruguay averaged $14,613,000. During 
the period 1931-1940 exports to Uruguay aver- 
aged S7, 197,000 and imports from Uruguay, 
$7,915,000. 

United States exports to Uruguay consist 
primarily of manufactured and processed ar- 
ticles. Imports from Uruguay, on the other 
hand, are chiefly raw materials. Of total ex- 
ports of domestic merchandise to Uruguay in 
1940, amounting to $11,126,000, iron- and steel- 
mill products accounted for $3,473,000; agri- 
cultural machinery and implements, $859,000; 
automobiles, parts, and accessories, $813,000; 
wood and paper products, $492,000; cotton 

654c 



654d 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 2 5, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



yarn, $221,000; radio apparatus, $171,000; leaf 
tobacco, $132,000; food products, $167,000; au- 
tomatic refrigerators and parts, $105,000; office 
appliances and parts, $74,000 ; sulphur, $69,000 ; 
and aeronautical apparatus, $59,000. Total 
imports for consumption from Uruguay in 1940 
were valued at $17,009,000, of which wool ac- 
counted for $11,815,000; flaxseed, $2,294,000; 
and canned meat, $824,000. 

Stjmmary of Agreement 
a. concessions obtained by the united states 

In the agreement, Uruguayan tariff conces- 
sions are obtained on a long list of United 
States agricultural and industrial products in- 
cluded in 141 Uruguayan tariff items. Exports 
of these products from the United States to 
Uruguay in 1940 were valued at $2,715,000, or 
24.4 percent of total United States exports of 
domestic merchandise to Uruguay in that year 
which were valued at $11,126,000. 

Uruguaj'an import charges are reduced on 
81 items. United States exports to Uruguay 
in 1940 of products covered by these items were 
valued at $1,483,000, or 13.3 percent of the total. 
Existing import charges are bound on 47 items 
covering commodities of which the United 
States exports to Uruguay in 1940 were valued 
at $555,000, or 5 percent of the total. The 
agreement binds the duty-free status of 13 
items, covering products of which the United 
States exports to Uruguay in 1940 were valued 
at $677,000, or 6.1 percent of the total. 

In addition to providing for more favorable 
tariff treatment on United States exports to 
Uruguay, the provisions of the agreement sim- 
plify the procedure for determining the amount 
of duty applicable to merchandise imported 
into Uruguay upon which concessions are ob- 
tained in schedule I. Except for a relatively 
small number of items which are dutiable on 
an ad valorem basis, Uruguayan basic tariff 
rates and various surtaxes are assessed on fixed 
official customs valuations which are subject to 
periodical revision. Furthermoi-e, the Uru- 
guayan tariff law includes a requirement, in 



effect since 1931, that 25 percent of the duty 
(50 percent in the case of some items) must be 
paid in gold or its equivalent in paper currency. 
At current rates of exchange the effect of this 
requirement is to increase by 41.85 percent the 
amount of duty imposed on those items on 
which 25 percent of the duty must be paid in 
gold and by 83.7 percent the amount imposed 
on those items on which 50 percent of the duty 
must be paid in gold. 

Therefore, the actual amount of the duty im- 
posed on a given item must be determined by 
applying to the official valuation the rates of 
duty and of surtaxes and then calculating the 
effect of the gold-payment requirement in in- 
creasing the amount of the duty. On items 
listed in schedule I of the agreement, however, 
the duties are stated in terms of a "total cal- 
culated duty" in paper pesos per given unit, so 
that the computation previously required is 
no longer necessary. 

B. CONCESSIONS GRANTED BY THE UNITED STATES 

Imports from Uruguay of commodities on 
which the United States grants concessions to 
that country in schedule II of the agreement 
were valued in 1938 at $4,580,000 or 85.5 per- 
cent of the value of total imports from Uru- 
guay in that year. In 1939 such imports were 
valued at $5,042,000 or 58.7 percent of the 
total, and in 1940 at $5,376,000 or 31.6 percent 
of the total. The proportion declined in 1940 
largely because in that year the United States 
purchased from Uruguay unusually large 
quantities of wool of the finer grades, on which 
no concession is made in the agreement. Ex- 
cept for unmanufactured agates, all commodi- 
ties included in schedule II of the agreement 
with Uruguay were included in schedule II of 
the agreement with Argentina, effective No- 
vember 15, 1941, and the same rates of duty are 
provided in both agreements. 

Dutiable ite7ns. — In the present agreement the 
United States granted concessions on dutiable 
commodities, imports of wliich were valued in 
1938 at $4,305,000, or 80.4 percent of total United 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654e 



States imports from Uruguay in that year. In 
1939 such imports were valued at $4,483,000, or 
52.2 percent of the total, and in 1940 at $4,765,- 
000, or 28.0 percent of the total. 

The principal dutiable commodities, by 
value, on which concessions are given in sched- 
ule II are: Flaxseed; certain prepared or pre- 
served meats, principally canned corned beef; 
casein; bovine hides and skins; and certain 
coarse wools. Other commodities in this group 
are: Tallow; oleo oil and oleo stearin; meat 
extracts; and glycerin, crude and refined. 

Free list. — Commodities bound on the free 
list under schedule II include: Unmanufac- 
tured agates; dried blood; crude bones, steamed 
or ground; bone dust, bone meal, and bone 
ash ; animal carbon suitable only for fertilizer ; 
tankage; and sausage casings. 

C. GENEEAIi PROVISIONS OF THE AGREEMENT 

The general provisions of the agreement pro- 
vide for the carrying into effect of the tariff 
concessions listed in the schedules annexed to 
the agreement and define the territory to which 
the agreement shall apply. They also con- 
tain most-favored-nation provisions assuring 
that any tariff concession on any product ac- 
corded by either country to any third country 
will be extended immediately and without com- 
pensation to the other party to the agreement, 
exceptions being made regarding special trade 
advantages accorded by the United States to 
Cuba, and, in an exchange of notes accompany- 
ing the agreement, regarding special tariff ad- 
vantages accorded by Uruguay to contiguous 
countries, Paraguay or Bolivia, by means of 
trade agreements embodying tariff reductions 
or exemptions. 

Moreover, the agreement contains provisions 
extending the principle of non-discriminatory 
treatment generally to measures relating to 
exchange control and import restrictions 
which, in the last decade, have characterized 
Uruguay's commercial policy. These meas- 
ures have involved serious difficulties for 



American exporters to Uruguay, and the pro- 
visions of the agreement contain valuable 
assurances relating thereto. 

The exchange provisions of the agreement, 
contained in article IV, provide in general that 
henceforth imports of any article into either 
country from the other shall be accorded, in 
regard to restrictions or delays on payments, 
rates of exchange, and related charges, treat- 
ment no less favorable than that accorded im- 
ports of the like article from any third country. 
Likewise, article III, relating to quantitative 
import restrictions, contains reciprocal assur- 
ances of non-discriminatory treatment in the 
application by either country to imports from 
the other of import quotas, prohibitions, and 
other forms of restrictions on imports by pro- 
viding that the share of either country in any 
allocated quota shall be based upon the pro- 
portion of the total imports of the product 
subject to quota supplied by the other country 
in a previous representative period. However, 
because of the loss of Uruguay's markets in 
continental Europe and the blocking of the ex- 
change created by its exports to the "sterling 
area" since the outbreak of hostilities in 1939, 
two exchanges of notes in connection with the 
agreement except temporarily from the ex- 
change and quota provisions of the agreement 
special exchange or quota facilities which Uru- 
guay may accord to contiguous countries, Para- 
guay, Bolivia, or the "sterling area" covered 
by the existing pajrments arrangement in effect 
between Uruguay and the United Kingdom. 

The agreement also contains a provision 
whereby consultation between the two Govern- 
ments regarding all matters affecting the 
operation of the agreement is provided for 
through the medium of a mixed commission 
consisting of representatives of each Govern- 
ment. 

. Analysis or iNDiviDUAii Concessions Obtained 
ON Exports or United States Products 

The following paragraphs contain details of 
the concessions obtained on United States ex- 



654f 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JTJLY 25, 194 2, SUPPLEMENT 



ports to Uruguay which are included in sched- 
ule I of the trade agreement and data on trade 
in those items. 
Foodstuffs 

Because of its geographic and economic sit- 
uation Uruguay, with regard to foodstuffs, de- 
pends on other countries only for certain 
articles of food which those countries are espe- 
cially well situated to produce, and for special 
preparations and other articles of secondary 
importance either not produced in Uruguay or 
not produced there in sufficient quantity to 
meet that country's requirements. Under nor- 
mal conditions, Uruguay imports large quan- 
tities of coffee from Brazil; olives and olive oil, 
chestnuts, certain canned goods, and sardines 
from Spain; sugar, canned fish, salt, and tea 
from the United Kingdom; barley, dried milk, 
peanuts, and raisins from Argentina; and 
prunes, dietetic flours, walnuts, raisins, and 
fresh apples from the United States. In 1940 
the United States exported about $167,000 
worth of foodstuffs to Uruguay, and about 
three fourths of this trade is covered by tariff 
concessions obtained in the agreement. The 
remaining one-fourth consists of miscellaneous 
exports which are individually small. 

Finiits and nuts. — Among the most important 
United States exports of foodstuffs to Uruguay 
are prunes, fresh apples, raisins, and walnuts. 
The agreement provides for a seasonal reduc- 
tion of the import duty ^ on fresh apples by 64 
percent from September 1 of each year until 
the last day of February of the following year. 
This period covers the usual shipping season 
for fresh apples exported to Uruguay, which 
is also the best selling season there because 
few, if any, Uruguayan or Argentine apples are 
on the Uruguayan market at that time. The 
import duty on prunes is reduced by 30 percent, 
and it is believed that this reduction will con- 
siderably enlarge the Uruguayan market for 
this fruit. The import duty on seedless raisins 

' "Import duty" as used in this section of tlie analy- 
sis includes the base duty, surtaxes (except certain 
minor administrative fees), and any charges arising 
from the requirement that a portion of the import 
charges be paid in gold pesos. 



is lowered by one-half; that on fruit and vege- 
table juices, by 47 percent; those on raisins 
with seeds, shelled and unshelled walnuts and 
pecans, and canned asparagus, by 30 percent; 
and that on concentrated grape juice, by 23 per- 
cent. Present low rates of duty on hops and 
on malted milk are bound against increase. 

Canned fish.— The import duty on canned 
salmon and mackerel is reduced by 30 percent. 
Sardines have been bound at the present mod- 
erate duty, and the Uruguayan tariff descrip- 
tion has been expanded to include sardines 
packed in tomato sauce. 
Cigarettes and Tobacco 

The import duty on cigarettes is lowered by 
30 percent, and the Uruguayan market for this 
United States product is expected to increase 
as lower prices bring United States cigarettes 
within the range of a larger consuming public. 
United States exports of cigarettes to Uruguay 
during 1940 were valued at $37,000. Unmanu- 
factured tobacco will also benefit from the 
agreement through the binding of the present 
moderate import duty. Exports of United 
States tobacco to Uruguay in 1940 were valued 
at $132,000. 
Automohiles, Parts, and Accessories 

The agreement provides for reductions in 
Uruguayan duties on passenger cars and chas- 
sis, busses and bus chassis, truck chassis, drivers' 
cabs for trucks or busses, and certain automo- 
bile parts. On other automobile parts and on 
accessories the existing favorable customs treat- 
ment is bound. In the past, Uruguay has been 
an important market for United States auto- 
motive products. In recent years, however, 
the value of United States exports of these 
products to Uruguay has fluctuated widely in 
accordance with Uruguay's supply of dollar 
exchange. The exchange situation has im- 
proved recently. The substantial reductions in 
duties on important automotive items are de- 
signed to assist the United States automobile 
industry to regain its former Uruguayan 
market. 

Passenger cars and chassis. — The agreement 
provides for a reduction of over 20 percent in 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 

the duty on passenger cars and chassis. Trade 
in these items was formerly large but has de- 
clined sharply in recent years. United States 
exports of passenger cars and chassis to Uru- 
guay in 1940 were valued at $252,000. 

Busses, bus chassis, and truck chassis. — 
Busses and bus chassis were already dutiable 
at very favorable rates prior to the agreement 
and these rates are reduced in the agreement 
by 29 to 30 percent. Separate trade figures 
for busses are not available. 

There are practically no United States ex- 
ports to Uruguay of trucks complete with 
bodies. Most truck bodies used in Uruguay 
are made locally and mounted on imported 
chassis. The value of United States exports of 
busses, bus chassis, and truck chassis to Uru- 
guay in 1940 amounted to $236,000. 

Automobile parts and accessories. — The 
agreement provides for a reduction of 30 per- 
cent in the import duty on a specified list of 
engine, clutch, transmission, differential, and 
steering-gear parts. The generally favorable 
duties on the remainder of the parts-and-acces- 
sories schedule are bound against increase. 
This binding applies to parts and accessories 
for trucks, tractors, and busses as well as for 
passenger cars. United States exports of these 
products to Uruguay were valued at $324,000 
in 1940. 

Electrical Equipment and Apparatus 

Radio apparatus. — Uruguayan industry sup- 
plies a very large part of that country's re- 
quirements for radio sets. The agreement pro- 
vides for a reduction of 30 percent in the 
Uruguayan duties on apparatus, parts, tubes, 
and accessories (excluding complete sets), and 
United States exporters are assured that the 
Uruguayan duty on complete sets will not be 
increased over the present rate, which is bound 
in the agreement. 

Exports of United States radio sets to 
Uruguay were valued at $52,000 in 1940. Parts 
and accessories exported to Uruguay in 1940 
were valued at $86,000. Parts have replaced 
complete sets as the major item in the trade, 



654g 

as Uruguayan assembly operations have been 
expanding. The trade in radio tubes has been 
fairly well maintained, averaging $31,500 a 
year during the last decade and amounting to 
$20,000 in 1940. 

Automatic refrigerators. — The Uruguayan 
duty on automatic refrigerators is lowered by 
23 i^ercent, and that on separate refrigeration 
mechanisms by 30 percent. The United States 
has been the chief supplier of automatic re- 
frigerators to the Uruguayan market. There is 
some domestic assembly of refrigerators in 
Uruguay and the United States has also had 
the bulk of the market for separate refrigera- 
tion units. In 1940 Uruguay purchased from 
the United States complete refrigerators 
amounting in value to $78,000 and separate 
refrigeration mechanisms valued at $27,000. 

Other electrical equipment. — The Uruguayan 
duties on electric plants for light and power, 
including wind-driven electric-power generat- 
ing devices; on storage batteries, including 
automobile and radio storagp batteries ; and on 
standing or wall electric fans, are reduced by 
30 percent. 

The trade in storage batteries was formerly 
important but has declined. It amounted to 
$19,000 in 1940. However the various conces- 
sions in the agi-eement on automobiles, radios, 
and the batteries themselves make possible an 
increase in Uruguayan imports of storage 
batteries. 

The concessions obtained on electric plants 
for light and power and on electric fans should 
prove of advantage to United States manufac- 
turers, especially manufacturers of the wind- 
driven type of electric generating devices. 

Machinery and Appliances 

Agricultural machinery. — For many years 
agricultural machinery has been duty free in 
Uruguay and trade in these products has been 
important to the United States, which has been 
the chief supplier of a number of items. The 
duty-free status of tractors of all kinds for 
agriculture (as well as of industrial tractors) 
is bound. United States exports of tractors 



654h 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 2 5, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



to Uruguay have had an average annual value 
of $329,000 during the last 10 years, and in 
1940 these exports were valued at $479,000. 

Plows of all kinds are also bound duty-free 
for the life of the agi'eement. The value of 
plows exported from the United States to Uru- 
guay in the last decade has averaged $73,000 
a year and in 1940 these exports were valued 
at $83,000. 

Indmtrial machinery.— The United States 
has generally been the chief supplier of Uru- 
guayan imports of industrial machinery in the 
lighter- weight classification (industrial ma- 
chines, n.s.p.f., weighing up to 100 kilograms 
each), but not of heavy machinery. The gen- 
erally favorable import duties on the lighter- 
weight machines, averaging 7 to 10 percent ad 
valorem, are bound against increase. Simi- 
larly, favorable import duties on certain re- 
placement and repair parts for this type of 
machinery, of which the United States is the 
chief supplier, are bound. 

Other important concessions obtained on in- 
dustrial machinery are the bindings of the duty- 
free status of wheel and track-laying types of 
industrial tractors and of windmills and their 
accessories and parts. United States exports 
of windmills to Uruguay have been an impor- 
tant item, valued at $56,000 in 1940. 

Oflcf appliances.— A number of concessions 
have been obtained on the major items of office 
appliances and equipment, including a 30-per- 
cent reduction in duties on cash registers and 
parts, on standard and portable typewriters, 
and on calculating, adding, bookkeeping, and 
accounting machines. The duties on parts for 
all these machines (except cash registers) are 
reduced by 84 percent. The present duty on 
steel files (cabinets) and furniture of iron or 
steel is bound against increase. 

Office machines and appliances have been an 
important part of the United States export 
trade to Uruguay, although shipments of most 
of these machines and parts have declined in 
recent years. In 1940 United States exports to 
Uruguay included $19,000 worth of cash regis- 
ters and parts; $20,000 worth of calculating, add- 
ing, bookkeeping, and accomiting machines and 



parts; $24,000 worth of standard, and $3,000 
worth of portable, typewriters and parts. 

ForcM Produ^tn 

Z!//«6er.— Outstanding among the conces- 
sions obtained are those on United States hard- 
wood and softwood lumber. The agreement 
provides for a reduction of 50 percent in the 
import duty on tea or pitch-pine lumber, sugar- 
pine and California white-pine lumber, and 
Douglas fir lumber. On oak lumber the duty 
is reduced by 30 percent. Thus, lumber prod- 
ucts from the southern, the eastern, the western, 
and the northwestern portions of the United 
States will be able to enter the Uruguayan 
market at lower tariffs. 

The agi-eement also binds for its duration a 
Ui-uguayan decree of June 7, 1940, which pro- 
vides that, under certain conditions, materials 
for construction, including lumber, will receive 
a reduction of one-half the import duty. Fur- 
thermore the agreement specifically provides 
that this additional reduction of one-half the 
duty will be applied to the reduced rate speci- 
fied in schedule I for tea pine or pitch pine, 
sugar pine and California white pine, and for 
Douglas fir. Thus, lumber of these species im- 
poi-ted under the conditions specified in the 
Uruguayan decree of June 7, 1940, will enter 
at a duty 75 percent below the duty in effect 
previous to that decree. 

United States exports of lumber to Uruguay, 
particularly of tea pine or pitch pine, have been 
large in the past but have declined in recent 
years. Uruguayan concessions in this agree- 
ment on certain typical United States lumber 
will improve the position of this lumber in the 
Uruguayan market. United States exports of 
pitch-pine lumber to Uruguay were valued at 
$81,000 in 1940, those of sugar pine and Calf- 
fornia pine at $18,000. United States exports 
of Douglas fir lumber to Uruguay in 1940 were 
valued at $1,000 and those of oak lumber at 
$5,000. 

Cooperage. — The moderate duties on staves, 
shooks, and headings of all kinds of wood for 
barrels and casks of all sizes and for all pur- 
poses are bound against increase. In addition, 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



G54i 



the import duties are lowered by 30 percent on 
unassembled barrels and casks up to 500 liters 
capacity. Exports of these items from the 
United States to Uruguay in 1940 were valued 
at $48,000. 

Composition hoards. — The import duty is re- 
duced by 30 percent on cardboard of wood fiber 
for construction; on vulcanized fiber in bars, 
sheets, tubes, etc. ; and on cardboard and paper 
impregnated with other inaterials including 
pastes, chalk, sawdust, and the like. The total 
value of United States exports to Uruguay of 
these products in 1940 was $6,000. 

Paper products. — ^The agreement provides for 
a 30-percent reduction in import duties on cer- 
tain hygienic paper in rolls, squares, or other 
forms. Exports to Uruguay of these items 
amounted to $5,000 in 1940. 

Naval stores. — Present favorable import du- 
ties on gum spirits of turpentine and wood 
turpentine and on rosin, gum or wood, dark 
and clear, are bound against increase. The 
United States formerly enjoyed an extensive 
trade with Uruguay in these products but ship- 
ments have decreased in recent years, amount- 
ing in 1940 to $6,000 for turpentine and $42,000 
for rosin. 

Aeronautical Apparatus 

The present duty-free status of aviation ap- 
paratus (aircraft of all kinds), airplane motors, 
and parts for replacement and assembly of air- 
craft, is bound during the life of the agreement. 
Uruguay has not heretofore been a large im- 
porter of aeronautical apparatus. In 1940 the 
United States sold $59,000 worth of such ap- 
paratus to Uruguay. 

Chemical and Related Products 

The present moderate Uruguayan duty on 
sulphur is bound against increase in the agree- 
ment. Exports of sulphur from the United 
States to Uruguay have not been large in the 
past, but $69,000 worth was shipped in 19|0. 

The duty on nitrocellulose and pyroxylin 
lacquers, typical and important United States 
paint products, is reduced by 30 percent. These 
products are specifically included, under the 

477442 — 42 2 



agreement, in a Uruguayan tariff classification 
which covers varnish, clear or with the addition 
of any coloring matter, whether concentrated 
or not. 

A 30-percent reduction is also obtained for 
medicinal petroleum jelly; for liquid insecti- 
cides with a base of pyrethrum or of ethers 
and hydrocarbides ; and for composition- 
coated roofing paper. The existing rate on cer- 
tain liquid roofing compounds is bound against 
increase. 

The United States is generally the chief sup- 
plier of Uruguayan imports of nitrocellulose 
or pyroxylin lacquers, medicinal petroleum 
jelly, liquid insecticides, and roofing compounds 
and paper. 

Cotton Yarns 

The moderate Uruguayan duties on cotton 
yarns, both crude and colored, are bound 
against increase. The United States has, in 
the past, sold large quantities of such yarns 
in Uruguay. Exports of both kinds of 
yarn have decreased in recent years. United 
States shipments of crude yarn to Uruguay in 
1940 were valued at $54,000, and those of 
colored yarns at $150,000. 

Motion-Picture Films 

The Uruguayan import duty on exposed mo- 
tion-picture films, including positives and nega- 
tives, is reduced by 30 percent. United States 
shipments of films to Uruguay have been fairly 
well maintained and were valued at $35,000 
in 1940. The United States has long been 
Uruguay's chief supplier of motion-picture 
films. 

Analysis of iNnrvrouAL Concessions on Im- 
ports Into the United States 

Details of the concessions granted by the 
United States to Uruguay on products listed 
in schedule II of the agreement, and informa- 
tion on the trade, production, and consumption, 
and prices of these products, are given in the 
following paragraphs. Numbers in parentheses 
refer to paragraphs in the Tariff Act of 1930. 



654j 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



Casein or Lactarene at\d Mixtures of Which 
Casein or Lactarene Is the Component 
Material of Chief Value, Not Specially 
Provided for (par. 19) 
The duty on casein or lactarene under the 
Tariff Act of 1930 was 51/2 cents per pound. 
Under the act of 1922 it was 21/2 cents per 
pound. Under the trade agreement with 
Uruguay, as in that with Argentina which 
became effective November 15, 1941, the duty 
is reduced to 2% cents per pound. The ad- 
valorem equivalent of the Si/o-cent rate has 
ranged in recent years from about 80 percent 
to about 110 percent. On the basis of imports 
in 1939 the reduced rate of 2% cents per pound 
would have been equal to about -19 percent ad 
valorem. 

The volume of United States casein produc- 
tion is determined in part by the price of 
casein but more largely by total production of 
whole milk and the proportions of that produc- 
tion marketed as fluid milk and used in the 
manufacture of creamery butter, cheese, and 
condensed and evaporated milk. Casein is a 
by-product of the skim-milk derived from the 
manufacture of creamery butter and normally 
the greater portion of this skim-milk is used 
in feeding livestock rather than in producing 
casein. Moreover when a larger proportion 
of total milk production is diverted from manu- 
facture of butter into the manufacture of 
cheese and of dried and condensed milk, the 
quantity of skim-milk available for manufac- 
ture of casein is reduced. 

In the period 1931-1940 imports of casein 
into the United States ranged from 417,000 
pounds in 1938 to 24,523,000 pounds in 1940, 
with an annual average of 8 million pounds 
for the period. These impoi-ts accounted for 
less than 1 percent of consumption in 1938 and 
for about 33 percent in 1940. Uruguay was 
second to Argentina in 1940 and in the first 6 
months of 1941 as a supplier of casein imports 
into the United States. 

In the period 1929-1940 the average price 
per pound of 20-30-mesh domestic casein 
(f.o.b. plant in 5-ton lots) decreased from 



15.4 cents in 1929 to 6.2 cents in 1932 and then 
increased to 16.5 cents in 1936, the peak year 
of the period. The price was 19.8 cents on 
May 16, 1941, and 20.8 cents as of May 15, 1942. 

Glycerin, Cnide ami Refined {par. 4^) 

The duty on crude glycerin from countries 
other than Cuba was 1 cent per pound under 
the act of 1930 and was reduced to %o cent 
per pound under the trade agreement with 
France, effective June 15, 1936. The duty on 
imports from Cuba was reduced from %o cent 
to tio cent per pound in the Cuban agreement, 
effective September 3, 1934. The ad-valorem 
equivalent of the duty on crude glycerin from 
countries other than Cuba was 10 percent in 
1939. The rate of %(, cent per pound is bound 
in the agreement with Uruguay, as it is in the 
agreement with Argentina. 

Tlie duty on refined glycerin under the act 
of 1930 was 2 cents per pound and was reduced 
to 1% cents per pound in the agreement with 
the Netherlands, effective February 1, 1936. 
It was automatically reduced to iyi5 cents per 
pound by the reduction in the duty on crude 
glycerin in the agreement with France. The 
duty of V/is cents per pound is bound in the 
agreement with Uruguay, as it was in the 
agi-eement with Argentina. The ad-valorem 
equivalent of the duty on refined glycerin was 
17 percent in 1939. 

Crude glycerin is a by-product of the soap 
and fatty-acids industries and its production 
has ordinarily depended in large part upon the 
production of those commodities. It is, how- 
ever, a vital ingredient of essential war ma- 
terials and requirements for glycerin in 1942 
are expected to exceed even the record 1941 
production. Furthermore, about one-fourth 
of the United States consumption of glycerin 
was formerly obtained from coconut oil im- 
ported from the Philippine Islands. 

In the 6-year period 1935-1940 United States 
production of crude glycerin ranged between 
141 million pounds in 1935 and 197 million 
pounds in 1940; the annual average for the 
peri6d was 168 million pounds. Production of 
refined glycerin in that period ranged from a 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654k 



low of 123 million pounds in 1935 to a high of 
162 million pounds in 1940. The annual aver- 
age for tlie period was 142 million pounds. 

In 1935-1940, imports of crude glycerin 
varied from 8.2 million pounds in 1935 to 13.4 
million pounds in 1937, and averaged about 11 
million pounds per year. Imports of refined 
glycerin in the same period ranged between 
69,000 pounds in 1935 and 7.5 million iMunds 
in 1937, averaging about 2.4 million pounds. 
Entries of refined glycerin amounted to 330,000 
pounds in 1939 and 298,000 pounds in 1940. 
Exports of glycerin, reported as "alcohols: 
glycerin", consist chiefly of refined glycerin 
and, since 1937, have exceeded imports. 

Uruguay was the fourth country in impor- 
tance as a supplier of crude glycerin in 1940, 
furnishing 8.5 percent of the United States im- 
ports, and third in the first 6 months of 1941, 
furnishing 9.3 percent. 

Tallow, Oleo Oil, and Oleo Stearin {par. 701) 
Imports of tallow, oleo oil, and oleo stearin 
are dutiable under the act of 1930 and since 
1936 have also been subject to an import tax 
under the Internal Revenue Code. Reductions 
in both the tariff and the import tax are made 
in the agreements with Uruguay and with 
Argentina and may be summarized as follows: 

[In cents per pound) 





Previous to trade agree- 
ment 


Under trade agreement 


Commodity 


Tarifl 
duty 


Import 
tax 


Com- 
bined 
duty 
and tax 


Tarifl 
duty 


Import 
tai 


Com- 
bined 
duty 
and tax 


Tallow: 
EdiWe 


a 

1 
1 


3 
3 
3 
3 


3K 
3M 
4 
4 


H 
H 




1?4 


Inedible 

Oleo oil 


m 

2 


Oleo stearin 


2 



The ad-valorem equivalent of the combined 
duty and import tax on inedible tallow was 61 
percent in 1938, 120 percent in 1939, and 111 
percent in 1940. On the basis of the 1939 im- 
ports the ad-valorem equivalent of the agree- 
ment rates would have been 60 percent. Prac- 
tically all imports of tallow in the past 3 years 



have been of the indelible type. The ad-valorem 
equivalent of the combined duty and tax on 
oleo stearin was 107 percent in 1938 and 75 
percent in 1939. On the basis of the new agree- 
ment rate and the 1939 imports, the ad-valorem 
equivalent would have been 37 percent. Im- 
ports of oleo products have been chiefly of oleo 
stearin. 

Tallow. — Imports of tallow into the United 
States are very small in comparison with do- 
mestic production, consumption, and exports. 
Since 1929 imports have been exceeded by 
United States exports except in the years when 
the 19.34 and 1936 droughts drastically reduced 
domestic production of tallow, lard, and 
greases. Domestic production of tallow de- 
creased from 667 million pounds in 1934 to 466 
million in 1935. In 1940 it had risen to 790 
million pounds of which 79 million pounds was 
edible tallow. 

Imports of tallow into the United States 
averaged approximately 14 million pounds a 
year in 1927-1929, and increased to 43 million 
pounds in 1934 and to 246 million in 1935. 
These increases were due not only to the effects 
of the drought but also to the imposition by 
the United States of import taxes on certain 
other competing oils, particularly palm and 
whale oils. In 1936 importations declined to 
79 million pounds, of which 76 million entered 
before the import tax became effective in 
August. Since that time imports of all kinds 
of tallow have been very small and practically 
no edible tallow has entered since 1938. In the 
first 6 months of 1941 Uruguay, led by Argen- 
tina and Canada, ranked third as a supplier 
of imports of tallow into the United States. 

Oleo oil atid. oleo sfeann. — About two-thirds 
of the United States production of oleo prod- 
ucts usually is oleo oil. - Imports of these 
products ordinarily are small in comparison 
with domestic production. 

In 1936 domestic production of oleo oil and 
oleo stearin was 147 million pounds — the high- 
est in any year since 1930 — and imports 
amounted to 5 million pounds. In 1937 domes- 
tic production declined, largely because of the 
effects of the 1934 and 1936 droughts, but re- 



6541 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JCLT 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



covered in 1938 to reach an average of about 
127 million pounds for 1937-1938. Imports in 
1937 were 3,700,000 pounds but dropped in 1938 
to 400,000 pounds. In 1939 domestic produc- 
tion of oleo products amounted to 114 million 
pounds and in 1940 to 105 million pounds. Im- 
ports of oleo stearin since 1937 have been negli- 
gible and there have been almost no imports of 
oleo oil. The United States is on an export 
basis for oleo products. Uruguay has usually 
been second to Argentina as a supplier of oleo 
stearin. 

Extract of Meat, Including Fluid {par. 705) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1930, meat extract 
was dutiable at 15 cents per pound. This rate 
was bound in the agreement with the United 
Kingdom, effective January 1, 1939. Under 
the agreements with Uruguay and with Argen- 
tina the duty is reduced to 71/2 cents per pound. 
In the 6-year period 1935-1940 the ad-valorem 
equivalent of the duty on meat extract ranged 
from 33 percent in 1936 to 39 percent in 1939. 
At the agreement rate and on the basis of 1939 
imports, the ad-valorem equivalent would have 
been 19 percent. Domestically produced meat 
extracts are more highly processed and higher 
priced than the imported product. Total im- 
ports of meat extracts into the United States 
amounted to 1,213,000 pounds in 1939 and to 
.582,000 pounds in 1940. Uruguay and Argen- 
tina are the principal suppliers. 

Meats, Prepared or Preserved, Not Specially 
Provided for {Except Meat Pastes Other 
Than Liver Pastes Packed in Airtight Con- 
tainers Weighing With Their Contents Not 
More Than 3 Ounces Each) {par. 706) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1930, meats in this 
category (chiefly canned corned beef and 
pickled or cured beef and veal) were dutiable 
at 6 cents per pound but not less than 20 percent 
ad valorem. Under the act of 1922 such im- 
ports were dutiable at 20 percent ad valorem. 
In the agreement with Uruguay this duty is 3 
cents per pound but not less than 20 percent ad 
valorem. The same concession -was included 
in the agreement with Argentina. The ad- 
valorem equivalent of the duty on caimed beef 



was 60 percent in 1939. On the basis of 1939 
imports and the new agreement rate, it would 
have been 30 percent. The ad-valorem equiva- 
lent of the duty on pickled or cured beef and 
veal was 84 percent in 1939 and on the basis of 
the 1939 imports and the new agreement rates 
it would liave been 42 percent. 

Domestic production of heef and veal com- 
pared with imports.— In 1929, before the duty 
of 6 cents per pound was imposed, imports of all 
beef and veal, of which canned beef usually 
constitutes some 98 percent, equalled about 3.8 
percent of domestic production. In 1932 this 
percentage had declined to 1 percent. In the 
5 years 1935-1939 it averaged 2.7 percent and 
in 1940 was about 2 percent. Imports of the 
beef and veal to which the concession applies 
(converted to a dressed-weight basis) were 
equal to an annual average of about 2.6 percent 
of domestic beef and veal production during 
the years 1935-1939, and about 1.9 percent in 
1940' 

Canned heef. — Canned corned beef is the 
principal commodity included in the conces- 
sion. United States production of canned beef 
in recent years has been relatively small and is 
principally of beef specialities other than 
corned beef. Nearly all corned beef canned in 
the United States has been for Government 
contracts. Much of the domestic beef of the 
type formerly canned has been used in the 
manufacture of sausage, a more profitable out- 
let, and civilian demand for canned corned beef 
has been filled by tlie imported product. 

Imports of canned beef into the United 
States amounted to about 80 million pounds in 
1929, when a period of low cattle production 
in the United States culminated. Such im- 
ports fell sharply to 19.5 million pounds in 
1931 and increased to 88 million pounds in 
each of the years 1936 and 1937. Entries 
amounted to 78.6 million pounds in 1938, to 
85.9 million in 1939, to 61.3 million in 1940 and 
to 39.1 million pounds in the first 6 months 
of 1941. Uruguay was the j>rincipal source of 
imports of canned beef into the United States 
for many years, but since 1937 it has been 
second to Argentina. 



THADE AGHEEMEN'T WITH rBUGTAT : AXALTSIS 



654m 



B<ief and veal. jnckUd or cured. — ^Pickled or 
cured beef and veal are relatively inexpenave 
and especially adapted for use as ships' stores, 
and where refrigeration facilities are inade- 
quate. Domestic production of such meat, 
chiefly beef, is from types and grades generally 
used for sausage. 

Imports of pickled or cured beef and veal 
are very small as compared -with domestic pro- 
duction and are smaller than United .States 
exports. In 1939, the latest year for which 
figures are available, domestic production was 
68.4: million pounds. In that year exports 
amounted to 7.4 million pounds and imports 
to 2.2 million. In 1940 exports totaled 8.0 
million pounds and imports 1.4 million pounds. 

Uruguay is by far the principal source of 
imports into the United States, having supplied 
more than half of all United .States imports 
in every year since 1931, 71 percent in 1939. 68 
percent in 1940. and 90 percent in the first 6 
months of 1941. 

Car:T>A,d rrt^jiU. not ehewKere ".fecrif-ed. and 
■prefared or yreierved m^aU. not ipecially pro- 
vided for. — Imports reported tmder this classi- 
fication consist almost entirely of meat special- 
ties and have been relatively unimportant, 
amounting to 169,000 potmds in 1939 and to 
62,000 pounds in 1940. United States exports 
of products in this classification are greatly in 
excess of imports and consist chiefly of high- 
priced specialties. 

Phxieed {pen: 7€2) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1913 flaxseed was 
dutiable at 20 cents per bushel ; imder the act 
of 1921, at 30 cents; under the art of 1922, at 
40 cents: under Presidential proclamation of 
June 13, 1929, at 56 cents ; and under the Tariff 
Act of 1930, at 6.5 cents. Under the act of 1930 
the ad-valorem equivalent was 57 percent in 
1939. 

Under the trade agreement with Uruguay, as 
in that with Argentina, the rate is 32% cents 
per bushel for the duration of the existing ab- 
normal situation in the flaxseed trade. Thirty 
days after the President shall have proclaimed 
that the abnormal trade situation has termi- 
nated, the rate of duty shall become 50 cents 



per bushel. Under the agreement rate of 32^4 
cents per bushel the ad-valorem equivalent, on 
the basis of 1939 imports, would have been 28 
percent and under the 50-cent duty it would 
have been 43 percent. 

Flax-seed is used almost exclusively in the 
manufacture of linseed oil, an essential ingre- 
dient of many paints, varnishes, floor cover- 
ings, and other products. Building and indus- 
trial operations, including produrtion for mil- 
itary purposes, involving the use of linseed oil, 
are at high levels. At the same time imports 
of tung oil, perilla oil, and synthetic resins for 
which linseed oil may sometimes be substituted, 
have been interrupted. 

United States flaxseed requirements for 1942 
are estimated at record levels and dwnestic pro- 
durtion has never been equal to domestic re- 
quirements even in normal times. United 
States production of flaxseed reached a record 
low point of 5,273,000 bushels in 1936 at the 
end of a decline caused in large part by unfavor- 
able weather and disease conditions. Since 
that time such conditions have improved and 
the relation between flaxseed prices and wheat 
prices has been favorable to the former. Under 
these and other influences, flaxseed acreage in 
the United States increased and produrtion rose 
to 30,886,000 bushels in 1940, and to 31,485,000 
bushels in 194L 

Imports of flaxseed declined from 2i224J0OO 
bushels in the year beginning July 1, 1926, to 
6i!l3,000 bushels in the year beginning July 1, 
1932. They rose again to 26,096,000 bushels 
in 1936-37 and declined to 13,212,000 bushels in 
1939-40 and to 11,198,000 bushels in 1940-41. 
The percentage of United States flaxseed crush- 
ings supplied by imports averaged 55 percent 
during the 10 years 1930-39 and in 1940 amount- 
ed to 31 percent. 

The annual average price of flaxseed (Min- 
neapolis no. 1) was $1.73 a bushel in the crop 
year 1935-36, and $1.65 per bushel in the crop 
year 1939-40. In April 1941 the average price 
was S1.93 per bushel and in April 1942 it was 
$2.62 per busheL 

Uruguay has been second to Argentina as a 
supplier of flaxseed imports since 1937, supply- 



654n 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



ing 5.8 percent of United States imports in 
1938, 4.1 percent in 1939, and 15.9 percent in 
1940. Substantial quantities of flaxseed pro- 
duced in Uruguay are exported from Argen- 
tina and are credited to Argentina in United 
States statistics of imports. 

Wools Not Finer Than IfiPs {par. 1101 (a) ) : 
and Wools Not Specially Provided for Not 
Finer Than H's {par. 1102 {a) ) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1930 (par. 1101 (a) ), 
wools not finer than 40's, and not imported 
under bond for the manufacture of carpeting 
and certain other specified articles, were duti- 
able at the following rates per pound of clean 
content: washed or in the grease, 24 cents; on 
the skin, 22 cents; sorted or matchings if not 
scoured, 25 cents ; and scoured, 27 cents. Under 
the agreement with Uruguay as in that with 
Argentina, each of these rates is 11 cents be- 
low the rate provided in the Tariff Act of 
1930. The great bulk of the wools entering 
under this classification are entered in the 
grease. The ad-valorem equivalent of the duty 
was SB percent in 1939. The reduced duties 
would have been equivalent to 48 percent ad 
valorem on the basis of the 1939 imports. 

Under the act of 1930 (par. 1102 (a)), wools 
not specially provided for and not finer than 
44's, i.e. 40's/44's, were dutiable at the follow- 
ing rates per pound of clean content: washed 
or in the grease, 29 cents ; on the skin, 27 cents ; 
sorted or matchings if not scoured, 30 cents; 
and scoured, 32 cents. Under the agreement 
with Uruguay as in that with Argentina, each 
of these rates is 12 cents below the rate pro- 
vided in the Tariff Act of 1930. On the basis 
of 1939 imports the ad-valorem equivalent of 
the duties was 90 percent and the ad-valorem 
equivalent of the reduced duties would have 
been 53 percent. The great bulk of the wools 
entering under this classification also are 
entered in the grease. 

The concession in the agreement with Uru- 
guay on wools covered by paragraph 1101 (a) 
includes all types not finer than 40's, not used 
in the manufacture of carpets and certain other 
specified articles. These wools are used chiefly 
in the manufacture of tweeds or sports clothing, 



lower-priced overcoatings, blankets, and felts, 
but are sometimes blended with carpet wools 
in the manufacture of carpets. The wools cov- 
ered by paragraph 1102 (a) are apparel (cloth- 
ing and combing) wools finer than 40's but not 
finer than 44's. These wools are of higher 
grade than the non-carpet types provided for 
under paragraph 1101 (a) but are used for the 
same general purposes. 

More than 99 percent of United States wool 
production is of the finer types of wool not 
covered by the concessions. Production of even 
the finer types is generally considerably less 
than this country's requirements for domestic 
consumption, and the total United States wool 
clip is far below the usual domestic consump- 
tion when carpet wools are included. In the 
period 1930-1939 United States mill consump- 
tion of all wool averaged about 665 million 
pounds (grease basis) per year, while domestic 
production of shorn wool averaged about 366.5 
million pounds per year during the same pe- 
riod. In 1940 domestic production was 387.8 
million pounds and mill consumption 778.3 
million pounds. In 1941 domestic wool pro- 
duction amounted to 445 million pounds, or 
less than half the record mill consumption of 
977 million pounds in that year. 

The only production of true carpet wools in 
the United States is about 100,000 pounds a 
year, shorn from flocks owned by Indians in 
the Southwest. Practically the entire United 
States demand for such wools is supplied by 
imports, which have averaged nearly 96 million 
pounds a year during the years 1935-1940. 
Domestic production of wools other than carpet 
wools, but not finer than 40's, is also relatively 
small, the estimated annual average being 
about 2 million pounds as compared with aver- 
age imports of over 16 million pounds a year 
during the period 1935-1940. United States 
annual average production of 40's/44's is esti- 
mated at about 4 million pounds, while imports 
of these types averaged 4.7 million pounds in 
the 6 years 1935-1940. 

Thus less than 1 percent of United States 
wool production is of the types affected by the 
concession in the agreements with Uruguay 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654o 



and Argentina, and domestic production of Entries of wools of the types on which the 

those types has been decreasing for a number concession applies, for the years 1935-1940, 
of years. have been as follows: 



[1,000 poands—cleaD content] 





1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


1940 


Not finer than 40's -- 


11, 549 
3,821 


23, 635 
6,960 


19, 786 
7,062 


9,656 
1,799 


16, 911 

4,685 


15, 584 


40's/44's 


3,894 






Total wools ^ 


15, 370 


30, 595 


26, 848 


11, 455 


21, 596 


19, 478 







Uruguay was the principal supplier of these 
40's/44;'s wools imported into the United States 
in 1936 and New Zealand from 1937 through 
1939. Uruguay and Argentina have been im- 
portant suppliers in recent years when they 
were not the chief sources. 

Hides and Skins of Cattle of the Bovine Species 
{Except Hides and Skins of the India 
Water Buffalo Imported To Be Used in the 
Manufacture of Rawhide Articles), Raw or 
Vncured, or Dried, Salted, or Pickled {par. 
leSO (a)) 
From 1909 to 1930 United States imports of 
hides and skins of all kinds were free of duty. 
Under the act of 1930, hides and slrins of cat- 
tle of the bovine species (excepting hides and 
skins of the India water buffalo imported to 
be used in the manufacture of rawhide articles) 
were dutiable at 10 percent ad valorem. Un- 
der the agreements with Uruguay and with 
Argentina, the rate on the dutiable bovine 
hides and skins is 5 percent ad valorem. 

Bovine hides produced in the United States 
are of two main types of grades — packer hides, 
of the better quality, and country hides, of a 
poorer quality. Much of the domestic produc- 
tion is of the poorer quality, whereas the better 
grade predominates in imports. Tanners in 
this country demand the better grades of which 
the domestic supply is supplemented by im- 
ports. At the same time many domestic hides 
of the poorer quality find no domestic market 
and are normally exported from the United 
States. 



Demand for beef and veal, rather than de- 
mand for hides, regulates slaughter of cattle 
and calves in the United States, and the cor- 
responding production of hides. Hence 
changes in demand and supply of hides are 
frequently reflected in sharp changes in volume 
of imports, and in ratio of imports to domestic 
production. Quantity of domestic production, 
being governed principally by the market for 
meat, is very little affected by volume of hide 
imports. Volume of imports, on the other 
hand, is very strongly influenced by the quan- 
tity of domestic production. 

From 1935 through 1940, average annual 
production of bovine hides of all kinds in the 
United States amounted to 28.3 million hides, 
of which 12.3 million were calf and kip skins 
and the rest cattle hides. During the same 
period, annual average imports of bovine hides 
amounted to 6 million hides (pieces) of which 
3 million were calf and kip skins. Uruguay is 
an important supplier of both cattle hides and 
calf and kip skins. Annual United States ex- 
ports of domestic cattle hides averaged about 
1 million hides of which about 50 percent were 
calf and kip skins. 

Free List 

The agreement with Uruguay binds on the 
free list imports of certain commodities that 
are either not produced at all in the United 
States or not produced in quantities sufficient 
to supply domestic demand. All these com- 
modities, listed below, except unmanufactured 
agates, are also bound free in the agreement 
with Argentina. 



654p 



Article 



Sheep, lamb, and goat casings- 

Tankage (not for fertilizer) " 

Crude bones, bone dust, bone meal, etc 
Sausage casings other than sheep, lamb, 

and goat 

Dried blood 

Tanliage (for fertilizer) 

Integuments, etc., not sausage casmgB-- 
Unmanuf actured agates 



Valuft of im- 
ports in 1940 



$7, 077, 000 
1, 809, 000 
1, 481, 000 

854, 000 

429, 000 

375, 000 

12, 000 

4,000 



•Also bound on the free list in tl«"f<ie agreement with Turkey. 
'Also bound on the free list in the trade agreement with the Unitea 
Kingdom. 

General Provisions and Exchanges of Notes 

The general provisions of the agreement em- 
body the basic principle of equality of 
treatment essential to the development of in- 
ternational trade upon a sound and non-dis- 
criminatory basis. They define the nature of 
the obligations assumed by each country in 
making tariff concessions to the other, set forth 
reciprocal assurances of non-discriminatory 
treatment with respect to all forms of trade 
control, and contain provisions relating to 
various other matters affecting the trade be- 
tween the two countries. 

Provisions Relating to Treatment of Trade in 
General 
Article I provides that the United States and 
Uruguay shall in general accord to each other 
unconditional most-favored-nation treatment 
with respect to customs duties and related 
matters, including methods of levying duties 
and charges and the application of rules and 
formalities. This means that each country 
obligates itself to extend to the other, immedi- 
ately and without compensation, the lowest 
rates of customs duties which are granted to 
any other country, either by autonomous action 
or in connection with a commercial agreement 
with a third country. 

Article II of the agreement relates to the im- 
position of internal taxes or charges levied in 
either country on products imported from the 
other and provides that such taxes or charges 
shall not in general be higher than those im- 
posed on like articles of domestic or other f or- 



DEPAETMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JITLT 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 

eign origin. An exception is made in the case of 

taxes imposed by the Uruguayan Government 
on pharmaceutical specialties, toilet and per- 
fumery products, cigarettes, cigars, fortified 
wines, vermuth, champagne, matches, and 
playing cards, which, if of foreign origin, are 
taxable at a higher rate than are the domestic 
products. 

Article III applies in general the principle 
of non-discriminatory treatment to import 
quotas, prohibitions, and other forms of re- 
striction on imports. Any such restriction is 
to be based upon a pre-determined amount of 
imports of the article, i. e., a global quota. If 
either country establishes such restrictions and 
if any third country is allotted a share of the 
total amount of permitted importations of any 
article, the other country shall also be allotted a 
share which shall be based upon the proportion 
of the total imports of such article which that 
country supplied in a previous representative 
period. 

Article IV extends in general the principle 
of non-discriminatory treatment to any form 
of exchange control by either country over the 
transfer of payments for imports originating 
in the other country. Accordingly, the article 
provides that the Government of either coun- 
try shall accord to any product originating in 
the other country, in regard to restrictions or 
delays on payments, exchange rates, and taxes 
or charges on exchange transactions, treatment 
no less favorable than that accorded the like 
product originating in any third country. 

Article V extends the principle of non-dis- 
criminatory treatment to foreign purchases by 
the Government of either country or by govern- 
ment monopolies. 

Article VI provides for the prompt publi- 
cation of laws, regulations, and administrative 
and judicial decisions relating to the classifica- 
tion of articles for customs purposes or to 
rates of duty. With certain customary excep- 
tions relating to anti-dumping duties, health or 
public-safety measures, etc., the article also pro- 
vides that no administrative ruling by either 
country effecting advances in rates of duties or 
in charges applicable under an established and 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654q 



uniform practice to imports originating in the 
other country, or imposing any new require- 
ment with respect to such importations, shall 
be effective retroactively or with respect to 
articles imported prior to the expiration of 
30 days after the date of publication of notice 
of such ruling in the usual official manner. 

Provisions Relating to Concessions 

Articles VII and VIII of the agreement re- 
late to the tariff concessions granted by each 
country on products of the other and provide 
that products included in the schedules annexed 
to the agreement shall, upon importation into 
the other country, be exempt from ordinary 
customs duties higher than those specified in 
the schedules and from all other charges in con- 
nection with importation in excess of those 
imposed on the day of signature of the agree- 
ment or required to be imposed thereafter by 
laws in force on that day. 

Article IX permits either country, notwith- 
standing the provisions of articles VII and 
VIII, to impose on any product imported from 
the other country an import charge equivalent 
to an internal tax imposed on a similar do- 
mestic product or on any article from which 
the imported product has been made. 

Article X safeguards importers against ad- 
verse changes in the methods of determining 
dutiable value and of converting currencies in 
connection with products listed in the schedules 
which are or may be subject to id-valorem 
rates of duty. 

Article XI contains a general undertaking 
that no quantitative restrictions shall be im- 
posed by either country on importations from 
the other country of any of the products listed 
in the schedules annexed to the agreement, with 
a reservation that this provision does not apply 
to quantitative restrictions imposed by either 
country in conjunction with governmental 
measures which operate to regulate or control 
the production, market supply, or prices of like 
domestic articles, or which tend to increase the 
labor costs of production of such articles, or 
which are necessary to maintain the exchange 
value of the currency of the country. 



Article XII contains a provision for broad 
consultation between the Governments of the 
two countries in regard to all matters affecting 
the operation of the agreement through the 
medium of a mixed commission to be estab- 
lished under the terms of paragraph 2 of the 
article. Paragraph 1 of the article provides 
that if the Government of either country con- 
siders that an industry or the commerce of that 
country is prejudiced, or any object of the 
agreement is nullified or impaired as a result of 
any circumstance or of any measure taken by 
the other Government, the latter Government 
shall consider such representations or proposals 
as may be made by the former Government; 
and if agreement is not reached, the Govern- 
ment making the representations or proposals 
shall be free to suspend or terminate the agree- 
ment in whole or in part on 30 days' written 
notice. 

Provisions as to Application of the Agreement 
Article XIII provides that the agreement 
shall apply, on the part of the United States, 
to the continental United States and to the ter- 
ritories and possessions included in its customs 
territory, the most important of which are 
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The most- 
favored-nation provisions of the agreement 
will, however, apply also to those possessions 
of the United States which have separate 
tariffs, including the Philippines, the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, American Samoa, 
and the island of Guam. 

Article XIV excepts from the application of 
the agreement special advantages granted by 
the Government of either country to adjacent 
countries to facilitate frontier traffic, and ad- 
vantages accorded to any third country as a 
result of a customs union. There is also in- 
cluded the usual exception relating to special 
advantages accorded by the United States and 
its territories and possessions or the Panama 
Canal Zone to one another or to the Eepublic 
of Cuba. 

Furthermore, in an exchange of notes accom- 
panying the agreement the Government of the 
United States agrees not to invoke the provi- 



654r 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



sions of article I of the agreement in respect 
of any tariff preferences which Uruguay may 
accord to contiguous countries, Bolivia, or Par- 
aguay looking to tlie gradual and ultimate 
achievement of a customs union between Uru- 
guay and any such country; provided such 
tariff preferences conform to the formula rec- 
ommended by tlie Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee on Septem- 
ber 18, 1941, pursuant to resolution LXXX of 
the Seventh International Conference of Amer- 
ican States at Montevideo, approved December 
24, 1933. This formula stipulates: (1) That 
any such tariff preferences shall be made effec- 
tive through trade agreements embodying tariff 
reductions or exemptions; (2) that the parties 
to such agreements should reserve the right to 
reduce or eliminate the customs duties on like 
products imported from other countries; and 
(3) that any such tariff arrangements should 
not be an obstacle to any broad program of 
economic reconstruction involving the reduction 
of tariffs and the scaling down or elimination 
of tariff and otlier trade preferences with a view 
to the fullest possible development of interna- 
tional trade on a multilateral unconditional 
most-favored-nation basis. Tlie note also pro- 
vides, with reference to articles III and IV of 
the agreement relating to quantitative limita- 
tions on imports and exchange control, respec- 
tively, that any special quota or exchange 
facilities which Uruguaj- may accord to con- 
tiguous countries, Bolivia, or Paraguay shall 
cease upon the termination of the present world 
conflict, except as may be otherwise agreed 
upon between the two Governments. 

By a second exchange of notes, the Govern- 
ment of the United States agrees not to invoke 
the provisions of the agreement relating to non- 
discriminatory treatment in respect of special 
facilities which Uruguay may accord to im- 
ports of articles originating in the so-called 
"sterling area" covered by the existing pay- 
ments arrangement in effect between Uruguay 



and the United Kingdom. As indicated in the 
note from the Uruguayan Government, the 
reason for this exception arises primarily from 
the inability of Uruguay to convert freely into 
dollars the proceeds derived from its exports 
to the "sterling area" under the existing pay- 
ments arrangement in effect between Uruguay 
and the United Kingdom. Accordingly the 
note provides that the exception shall terminate 
as soon as it becomes possible for Uruguay to 
convert its sterling balances into free currencies. 

Article XV provides that nothing in the 
agreement shall prevent the adoption or en- 
forcement by either country of measures relat- 
ing to imports or exports of gold and silver, 
sanitary regulations and the like, or measures 
relating to public security or imposed for the 
protection of the country's essential interests 
in time of war or other national emergency. 

Article XVI provides for sympathetic con- 
sideration of representations in regard to cus- 
toms regulations and related matters and the 
application of sanitary regulations. If there 
should be disagreement between the two Gov- 
ernments with respect to sanitary laws or regu- 
lations, a committee of experts including repre- 
sentatives of both Governments may be estab- 
lished upon request of either Government. This 
committee would then study the matter and 
submit a report to both Governments. 

Article XVII provides that the agreement 
sliall enter into force 30 days after exchange of 
the Uruguayan ratification and the President's 
proclamation of the agreement. 

Article XVIII provides that the agreement is 
to remain in force for an initial term of three 
years, unless terminated earlier in accordance 
with the provisions of article XII. If neither 
Government has given the other notice of inten- 
tion to terminate the agreement on the expira- 
tion of the term of three years, it will continue 
in force thereafter, subject to termination on 
six months' notice or in accordance with the 
provisions of article XII. 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654s 



TABLE A 

Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Obtained I^om Ubcguat (Schedule I) 

Note. — Duties, other than ad-valorem percentages, given in this table include base duties and surtaxes calcu- 
lated on official customs valuations, and are expressed in terms of Uruguayan paper pesos. The current "free" 
rate of exchange of the peso is about 53 cents, n. a.= statistics not available. 

Part A. — The articles included in part A are identified by section, position, and item numbers of the revised 
"Tariff of Import Valuations". The descriptions in the table are abbreviated from the tariff nomenclature found 
in the test of the agreement. 

Itemized List op Tariff Concessions Obtained From Uruguay (Schedule I) 



Uruguayan tariff 


Description of article (abbreviated) 


tJnit 


Pre«greemeiil 
duty (pesos) 


Agreement duties 
and extent of 
concessions 


U. S. exports 
to Uruguay 
in thousands 
of dollars) 


Section 


Position 


Item 


Duty 
(pesos) 


Reduction 
(percent) 


1939 


1940 


II 


67 
57 
68 
58 
59 

62 
87 
120 

120 
133 
139 
143 

143 
143 

171 

172 
174 
207 
281 

284 
285 
294 
311 

311 
384 

384 
384 


260 
261 
267 
268 
274 

291 
399 
632 

633 

688 
704 
716 

716 
718 

860 

868 
878 
1000 
1549 

1660 

1662 

1942/44 

2032 

2033 
2480 

2482 
2486 




100 gross kilos. 

100 legal kilos.. 
lOOkUos 

100 legal kUos.. 

100 gross kilos. 
100 kilos 

100 gross kilos- 

100 kilos 

100 gross kilos. 

100 square 

meters. 
1000 gross kilos. 


11. 2628 
20.6534 
6.9365 
6. 9365 
22.9797 

11.0643 
1.792 
40.50 

57. 4492 
8.894 
84.117 
141.85 plus 
29.79% ad 
val. 
60.00 
60,00 

33.69 

366.54 
0.315 
40.0017 
100.00 

4.636 
1.35 
368. 81 
39. 15C6 

6.20 
20.7529 

18.0291 
16.8659 


7.94 
10.40 
4.89 
4.89 
8.20 

7.80 

L792 

40.60 

40.60 

8.894 

69.30 

142.00 

32.10 
32.10 

33.69 

272.60 
0.316 
28.20 
70.60 

4.536 

1.35 

260.00 

27.60 

5.20 
13.376 

9.015 
8.433 


30 
50 
30 
30 
64 

30 
Bound 
Bound 

30 

Bound 

30 

623 

47 

47 

Bound 

30 

Bound 

30 

30 

Bound 

Bound 

30 

30 

Bound 
SO 

60 
SO 


12 

39 
8 

30 
6 
3 

(•) 

4 

160 

22 

1 
11 

20 
78 
31 
11 

1 
146 

6 
M 










jj 






jl 






II 


Apples, fresh (from September 1 to the last day of 
Febraary, inclusive). 


1 
34 


II 




36 


IV 


Sardines in oil or other media, including tomato 
sauce, packed in hermetically sealed containers. 


1 
2 


rv 




11 


rv 




1 












1 


IV 
IV 


Sweetened fruit Juices, liquid, and syrups for bever- 
ages without alcohol. 

Unmanufactured tobacco of flue-cured, flre-cured, or 
hurley types. 


132 
37 


V 




69 


V 




5 


VI 
VI 


Liquid insecticide, with a base of pyrethrum or of 

ethers and hydrocarbides. 
Gum spirits of turpentine and wood turpentine 


14 

6 
42 


VI 




35 


VI 

VI 
IX 


Varnish, including nitrocellulose or pyroxylin lac- 
quers. 
Composition of asphaltio base for coating roofs 


18 

1 
81 


IX 


Sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana) and California white 
pine (Pinus monticola; P. lambertiana; and P. 
ponderosa). 


18 

1 




Note. — With respect to materials imported 
for use in construction work of the type specified 
in decree no. 722/1940 of June 7, 1940, the 50 per- 
cent reduction in duties and additional charges 
provided for in article 2 of the said decree will be 
applicable to the rates speciBed above in respect 
of items 2480, 2482 and 2485 Of position 364 ol 
section IX, it being understood that such reduc- 
tion shall apply with respect to materials im- 
ported during the life of the agreement. 





• Less than $500. 



654t 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 



TABLE A — Paet A — Continued 
Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Obtained From Urugtjat (Schedule I)- — Continued 



Uruguayan tariff 








Agreement duties 
and extent of 


U. S. exports 
to Uruguay 
(in thousands 








Description of article (abbreviated) 


Unit 


Pre-agreement 
duty (pesos) 


concc 




of dollars) 


Section 


position 


Item 


Duty 
(pesos) 


Reduction 
(percent) 


1939 


1940 


IX 


384 
386 


2490 
2499 


Oak-. '.— 


100 gross kilos. 


2.659 
0.24 


1.804 
0.24 


30 
Bound 


4 


5 


IX 


Staves, shocks, and heading Tor barrels and casks 




IX 


397 


2550 


Unassembled barrels and casks. In sets, with capacity 
up to 200 liters. 


Each 


1.6284 


1.148 


30 




















77 


48 


IX 


397 


2551 


Unassembled barrels and casks, in sets, with capacity 


" 


3.2568 


2.296 


30 








of from 201 to 500 liters. 














IX 


397 


2601 


Unassembled barrels (barricas) 


" 


0.0159 


0.011 


31 






X 


423 


3020.1 


Cardboard, of fiber of wood, for construction 


100 gross kilos. 


7. 3762 


6.20 


30 


_ 


2 


X 


425 


3024 


Vulcanized fiber, in bars, sheets, tubes, et cetera 


Adva! 


73. 762% 


52% 


30 


1 


4 


X 


426 


3026 


Roofing paper coated with composition of asphaltic 
base. 


100 gross kilos. 


7. 3762 


6.20 


30 


'• 


14 


X 


426 


3028 


Cardboard and paper impregnated with other ma- 
terials, including paste, chalk, sawdust, and 
similar. 




7.3762 


£.20 


30 


n. a. 


n. a. 


X 


428 


3031 


Hygienic paper, in rolls, not exceeding 16 centimeters 
In width. 




11.0643 


7.80 


30 






X 


426 


3035 


Hygienic paper, square or rectangular, in sheets, not 
larger than 20 centimeters to a side. 


'■ 


11.0643 


7.80 


30 


12 


6 


X 


428 


3036 


Hygienic paper, square or rectangular, in sheets, not 


100 legal kilos. 


25.8167 


18.20 


30 








larger than 46 centimeters to a side. 














X 


426 


3039 


Hygienic paper, in other forms, up to 20 centimeters 


100 gross kilos. 


11.0643 


7.80 


30 






XVI 


823 
823 


32 
38 


Airplane motors.. 




Free 


Free 


Bound 


- 


_ 


XVI 


Parts and separate pieces of Iron or steel for light 












motors, including imfiiusbed parts: 




















Pistons 


100 gross kjlos. 


43.094 


30.38 


30 












All other parts and separate pieces included in this 




43.094 


43.094 


Bound 












item. 














XVI 


823 


39 


Parts and separate pieces of other common metals for 
light motors, including unfinished parts: 


*' 


















Pistons - 


" 


106. 636 


74.40 


30 












All other parts and separate pieces included in this 


'■ 


105.636 


105. 536 


Bound 












item. 














XVI 


867 


418 


Shafts for automobiles, of iron or steel: 
Crankshafts, camshafts, and piston pins 


„ 


43.094 


30.38 


30 












All other parts included in this item.. 


,. 


43.094 


43.094 


Bound 






XVI 


857 


429 


Notched wheels and shafts, gears: for automobiles, of 
iron or steel: 
Crankshaft t iming gears and camshaft timing gears. 
All other parts included in this item 


'• 


43.094 
43. 094 


30.38 
43. 094 


30 


203 


324 


XVI 


857 


446 


Pulleys, clutches, and couplings (excluding gears), 
for automobiles, of iron or steel: 
Coimecting rods 




43.094 
43.094 


30.38 
43.094 


30 
Bound 












All other parts included in this item 


„ 






XVI 


857 


470 


Cylinders for automobiles, of iron or steel: 
















Cylinder blocks and heads _ 


<i 


43.094 


30.38 

43.094 

Free 

Free 

0.388 


30 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 

23 












All other parts included in this item... _ 


.. 


43.094 






xvn 


889 


26 


Tractors for agriculture 


Gross kilo 


Free 

Free 

0.5026 






XVII 


889 


27 


Tractors for other purposes 




264 


479 


xvu 


seo 


28 


Passenger automobiles weighing not more than 1060 


KUa 










kilos. 




















Note.— Automobiles in the foregoing class 




















weighing more than 550 kilos but not more than 




















1050 kilos each are assessed a minimum duty of 




















301.84 pesos per automobile, and automobiles 










172 


262 








weighing up to 650 kilos each are assessed a mmi- 




















mum duty of 237.17 pesos per automobile. 














xvu 


890 


29 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 1050 kilos 
and up to 1350 kilos. 


" 


0.5305 


0.410 


23 







TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 

TABLE A— L'ART A— Continued 
Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Obtained From Uruguay (Schedule I) — Continued 



654u 



Uruguayan tariff 


Description of article (abbreviated) 


Unit 


Pre-agreemect 
duty (pesos) 


Agreement duties 
and extent of 
concessions 


U.S. exports- 
to Uruguay 
in thousands 
of dollars) 


Section 


Position 


Item 


Duty 
(pesos) 


Reduction 
(percent) 


1939 


1940 


xvn- 


890 


30 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than I3JjO kilos 


Kilo 


0. .5864 


0.463 


23 












and up to 1650 kilos. 














XVII 


890 


31 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 1650 kilos 
and up to 1818 kilos. 


" 


0.7B8 


0. .593 


23 






XVII 


890 


31 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 1818 kilos 


" 


0.8(19 


0, 68.3 


21 


TriflniiAfi in 


XVII 


890 


32 


and up to 18.50 kilos. 
Passenger automobiles weighing more than 1850 kilos 
and up to 2050 kilos. 


■• 


1.106 


0. 854 


23 


figure s 
imme di- 
ately 
abo^'" 


xvn 


890 


32.1 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 2050 kilos 


" 


1.605 


1.162 


23 








and up to 2222 kilos. 














xvn 


890 


32.1 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 2222 kilos 
and up to 2777 Ulos. 


" 


1.67 


1.289 


23 






XVII 


890 


32.1 


Passenger automobiles weighing more than 2777 kilos 
and up to 3333 kilos. 

Note. — Automobiles which lack any of the fol- 
lowing parts will be classified in the immediately 
preceding group and with the minimum valua- 
tion and weight for that group: Glass, motors, 
fenders, seats, upholstery, tires and tubes, radi- 
ators, bumpers, or batteries. 




1.835 


1.404 


23 






xvn 


890 


33 


Automobile buses 


Ad val 


4. 2556% 


3% 


30 


Included in 














figures 


















for ex- 


















ports of 


















automo- 


















bile truck 


















chassis. 


XVII 


891 


37 


Chassis for passenger automobiles, weighing not more 
than 2500 gross kilos. 


Gross kilo 


0. 2792 


0.216 


23 


Included in 
flsu r e s 


XVII 


891 


38 


Chassis for passenger automobiles, weighing more 
than 2500 gross kilos and up to 2750 gross kilos. 




0.349 


0.270 


23 


for ex- 
ports of 








Note.— Minimum duty for passenger auto- 
mobile chassis regardless of weight. 


Each-. 


335. 08 


268. 74 


23 


passenger 






automo- 
bUes. 


XVII 


891 


37 


Automobile truck chassis weighing not more than 
2500 gross kilos. 


Gross kilo 


0. 1021 


0.072 


30 






xvn 


891 


38 


Automobile truck chassis weighing more than 250O 
gross kilos and up to 2750 gross kilos. 


" 


0.1277 


0.09 


30 






xvn 


S91 


39 


Automobile truck chassis weighing more than 2750 
gross kilos and up to 3000 gross kilos. 




0. 1632 


O.IOS 


30 






XVII 


891 


40 


Automobile truck chassis weighing more than 3000 
gross kilos and up to 3250 gross kilos. 




0. 1787 


0.126 


30 


f '112 


" 236 


XVII 


891 


41 


Automobile truck chassis weighing more than 3250 
gross kilos and up to 350O gross kilos. 


" 


0. 2043 


0.144 


30 






XVII 


891 


42 


Automobile truck chassis weighing more than 3500 
gross kilos. 


Gross kilo 


0. 2553 


0.18 


30 












Note. — Minimum duty for truck chassis re- 


Each 


122. 56 


86.40 


30 












gardless of weight. 














XVII 


891 


37 


Automobile bus chassis weighing not more than 
2500 gross kilos. 


Gross kilo 


0.0085 


0,006 


29 






xvn 


891 


38 


AutomobUe bus chassis weighing more than 2500 
gross kilos and up to 2750 gross kilos. 


" 


0.0106 


0.0076 


29 




I 


xvn 


891 


39 


Automobile bus chassis weighing more than 2750 
gross kilos and up to 3000 gross kilos. 




0.0128 


0.009 


30 






xvn 


891 


40 


Automobile bus chassis weighing more than 3000 
gross kilos and up to 3250 gross kilos. 




0.0149 


0.0106 


30 







• These figures include buses and motor trucks and chassis. 



654v 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 194 2, SUPPLEMENT 



TABLE A— Pabt A— Continued 
Itemized List of TARirr Concessions Obtained From Uruguay (Schedule I) — Continued 



Uruguayan tariff 



Section Position Item 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Pre-agreement 
duty (pesos) 



Agreement duties 

and extent of 

concessions 



U. S. exports 

to Urugufiy 

(in thousands 

of dollars) 



Duty 

(pesos) 



Reduction 
(percent) 



XVII 
XVU 



XVII 

xvn 

XVII 



XVII 
XVII 



XVII 
XVU 



891 
891 



893 
893 
893 



893 
893 



41 
42 



XVU 


893 


50 


XVII 


893 


61 


XVII 


893 


62 


XVII 


893 


63 


XVII 


893 


54 


XVII 


893 


55 


XVII 


893 


56 


xvn 


S93 


57 


XVII 


893 


68 


XVII 


893 


59 


XVII 


893 


60 


XVII 


893 


61 


xvn 


893 


62 


XVII 


893 


63 



64 
65 



67 
68 



Automobile bus chassis weighiug more than 3250 
gross kilos and up to 3500 gross kilos. 

Automobile bus chassis weighing more than 3500 
gross kilos. 

Note. — Minimum duty for bus chassis regard- 
less of weight. 

Drivers' cabs for trucks or buses, imported separately 
or with chassis. 

Note. — Minimum duty for drivers' cabs 
regardless of weight. 

Body Parts: 

Fans and ribs for tops. 

Seats of leather _ 

Seats of other kinds 

Tops-- - - — - 

Running boards - .-, 

Seat covers -- 

Fenders - --- 

Windshields, with iron or steel frames _ 

Windshields, with frames of other common metals. 

Lateral windshields --- 

Doors 

Glass and glassware 

Other body parts of iron or steel 

Other body parts of other common metals or other 

materials. 
Parts and pieces of the transmission and steering 
gear: 

Steering wheels of iron or steel 

Steering wheels of other materials 

Other parts of iron or steel: 
Transmission gears, transmission spline shaft, 
transmission countershaft, differential pro- 
peller shaft, differential case, differential ring 
gear and pinion, diflcrential pinion gears, 
differential pinion gear sbaft, differential side 
gear, rear axle shaft, steering gear shaft and 
worm, steering ge^ sector and shaft, clutch 
disc assembly, clutch release levers, steering 
knuckle and steering knuckle king pin. 

All other parts included in this item - 

Other parts of other common metals- 

Other parts of other materials 

Others: 

Shock absorbers - _ 

Rims and spokes for wheels 



Gross kilo.. 



Each , 

Gross kilo. 
Each 



100 gross kilos. 
Each 



100 gross kilos. 

100 legal kilos. 
Each 



Pair 

100 legal kilos.. 
100 gross kilos. 
100 legal kilos . 



Each. 



100 gross kilos. 



0.017 
0.0213 

10.21 

0.31688 

82.39 



33.419 

11. 206 

3.362 

112.061 

67.237 

336. 184 

2.023 

6.156 

13. 192 

3.957 

52. 768 

13. 192 

70. 357 

123. 125 



0.879 
3.078 



43.094 
105. 5.% 
49.25 

70.357 

11.433 



0.012 
0.015 

7.20 

0.245 

63.62 



33.419 

11.206 

3.362 

112.061 

67.237 

336. 184 

2.023 

6.156 

13. 192 

3.957 

52. 768 

13. 192 

70. 357 

123. 125 



0.879 
3.078 



43.094 
105. 536 
49.25 

70.357 

31.433 



Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 



Bound 
Bound 



Bound 
Bound 
Bound 

Bound 

Bound 



Included In 
figures 

' immedi- 
ately 
above. 



Included in 
figures for 
exports of 
articles in 

Section 
XVI, Po- 

si t ion 
823. Item 
38 to Po- 
sition 857, 
Item 470. 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 



654w 



TABLE A— Part A— Continued 
Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Obtained From Uruguay (Schedule I) — Continued 



Uruguayan tariff 



Section Position Item 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Unit 



Pre-atjreemenl 
duty (pesos) 



Agreement duties 
and extent of 
concessions 



Duty 
(pesos) 



Reductirr 
(percent) 



U. S. exports 

to Uruguay 

(in thousands 

of dollars) 



xvn 


893 


71 


XVII 


893 


72 


XVII 


893 


73 


XVII 


893 


74 


XVII 


893 


76 


XVII 


893 


76 


XVII 


893 


77 


XVII 


893 


78 


XVII 


893 


79 


XVII 


893 


80 



XVII 

xvn 



901 
902 



117 

118 



Bumpers of iron or steel _ 

Bumpers of other common rOetals 

Wheels of wood 

Wheels of other materials 

Tanks of iron or steel 

Tanks of other materials 

Hub caps of iron or steel , 

Hub caps of other materials , 

Other parts of iron or steel.. 

Other parts of other materials.. 

Note.— All the parts described under Posi- 
tion 893, when composed of more than 50 percent 
by weight of iron or steel, will be classified as iron 
or steel parts. When composed of less than 50 
percent of iron or steel, they will be classified 
according to the predominant nonferrous metal. 

Aviation apparatus, equipped with motors 

Parts for replacement and assembly of aircraft, ex- 
cluding motors. 



100 legal kilos.. 



Each , 

100 gross kilos 
100 legal kilos. 



100 gross kilos. 



35. 178 

131.92 

3.606 

35. 178 
219. 867 
307. 814 

70. 357 
105. 536 

43. 094 
105. 536 



Free 

Free 



35. 178 


Bound 


131.92 


Bound 


3.606 


Bound 


35. 178 


Bound 


219. 867 


Bound 


307. 814 


Bound 


70. 357 


Bound 


106. 536 


Bound 


43.094 


Bound 


106 536 


Bound 



Free 
Free 



Bound 
Bound 



Included in 
figures for 
exports of 
articles in 
Section 
XVI, Po- 
sition 823, 
Item 38 to 
Position 
857, Item 
470. 



Part B. — The articles included in part B are identified by section and item numbers of the unrevised sections 
of the Uruguayan tariff in force on the day of signature of the agreement. 



Uruguayan taritl 



Schedule 



Item 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Pre- 

agreement 
duty (pesos) 



Agreement duties 
and extent of 
concessions 



Duty 
(pesos) 



Reduc- 
tion (per- 
cent) 



U.S. ex- 
ports to 
Uruguay 
(in thou- 
sands of 
dollars) 



1939 



Raw materials. - 
Raw materials.. 

Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 
Raw materials.. 



Cotton, spun, crude, for the loom 

Cotton, spun, for the loom, colored, including mercer- 
ized yarn. 

Plows with handles 

Plows, sulky, with one share 

Plows, sulky, with two shares 

Plows, sulky, with three shares _ 

Plows, sulky, with more than three shares. 

Plows, sulky with discs... 

Plows with shares or discs, for tractors 



100 kilos.. 



Each.- 



Per share or 
disc. 



2.70 
5.04 

Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 



2.70 
6.04 

Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 
Free 



Bound 
Bound 

Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 
Bound 



42 
130 



54 
150 



83 



654x 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 
TABLE A— Part B — Continued 

















U.S. ex- 












Agreement duties 


ports to 
Uruguay 


Uniguayan tariff 








and extent of 










Pre- 




sands of 






Description of article (abbreviated) 


Umt 


agreemeot 
duty (pesos) 






dollars) 


Schedule 


Item 


Duty 

(pesos) 


Reduc- 
tion (per- 
cent) 


1939 


1940 


R a^r materials 


170 


Electric plants for light and power (without storage 
batteries), including wind-driven electric power 
generating devices. 


100 gross kilos. 


6. 3832 


4. .50 


30 


8 


5 


Raw materials 


248 


Industrial machinery, n. s. p. f.: machines weighing 
up to 100 kilos each. 




R-037 


8.937 


Bound 


n. a. 


n. a. 








Gross kilo. ... 


Free 


Free 




62 


56 


Raw materials 


349 


Replacement and repair parts for industrial machin- 
ery, of copper, bronze, brass, or other metal, 
n. s. p. f., whether or not combined with other 
materials. 


100 gross kilos. 


17,873 


17.873 


Bound 


n. 8. 


n. a. 


Raw materials 


350 


Replacement and repair parts for industrial machin- 
ery, of iron or steel, combined or not with other 
materials, weighing 25 kilos or less each. 




10. 213 


10. 213 


Bound 


n. a. 


n. 


Raw materials 


351 


Replacement and repair parts for industrial machin- 
ery, of iron or steel, combined or not with other 
materials, weighing more than 25 kilos but less 
than 100 kilos each. 




6.383 


6.383 


Bound 


n. a. 


D. a. 




85 




100 gross kilos. 


39.15 


39.15 


Bound 


2 


1 






or not combined with other materials. 
















872 




" 


92.20 


65,00 


30 


12 


10 




118 




100 kilos 


51.07 


36.00 


30 


8 


24 




119 






136. 18 


96.00 


30 


3 




Paper 


124 


Calculating and adding machines, including book- 
keeping and accoimting machines. 


" 


170. 22 


120.00 


30 


33 


20 
















Included in 


Paper 


2M 


Parts for standard typewriters 




221.29 


36.00 


84 




Paper 

Paper 


255 




•• 


690. 10 


96.00 


84 


exports of 
typewrit- 
ers. 


259 




u 


737. 62 


1''0 00 


84 






parts for bookkeeping and accounting machines. 










Electrical 


1 




100 gross kilos 


2(5 3841 


IS 60 


30 










teries. 










10 




Electrical 


1 


Storage batteries and parts for same: radio batteries-. 


" 


51.066 


36.00 


30 




Electrical- 


1 


Storage batteries and parts for same, except auto- 
mobile and radio batteries. 


" 


22. 1286 


16,60 


30 






Electrical 


34 






170 22 


170 22 




23 


62 




36 


Parts and accessories for radio receiving sets 


.. 












Electrical - 


]19 














Electrical -. 


120 


Automatic refrigerators: refrigeration apparatus, 


.. 


5S 72.^9 


41 40 


30 


29 


27 






separate. 
















129 






0.8511 


0.60 


30 


IS 






Note.— The existing 4 percent reduction for 










breakage of glass tubes is bound. 














Electrical ... . 


155 


Machines for washing, ironing, washing dishes, and 


100 [iross kilos 


36 HSl 




30 




3 






all machines operated by electricity not specifi- 


















cally mentioned, except industrial machines. 
















211 




■' 


66. 3858 


46.80 


30 


2 











654y 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 

TABLE B 

Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Made to Uruguay (Schedule II) 

(Compiled from oSicml statistics of the U. 8. Department of Commerce) 

note: With the exception of unmanufactured agates, all Items included In schedule II of the agreement with Uruguay are also Included In schedulo 
11 of the agreement with Argentina, effective November 15, IMl, and the rates of duty on these items are the same in both agreements. 



Para- 
graph 
num- 
ber in 
Tariff 
Act of 
1930 


Description of article 


Rate of duty 


Ad valorem 

equivalent on 

basis of imports 

in 1939 


United States imports for consumption - 
(in thousands of dollars) 


Tarifl Act of 1930 


Trade agreement 
with Uruguay 


Under 
rate 
eSec- 
tive in 
1939 
(per- 
cent) 


Under 
rate 
provided 
by trade 
agree- 
ment 
with 
Uruguay 
(per- 
cent) 


From Uruguay 


From all countries 


1938 


1939 


1940* 


1938 


1939 


1840 ' 


19 


A. DtjniBLE Items 

Casein or lactarene, and mixtures 
of which casein or lactarene is 
the component material of 
chief value, not specially pro- 
vided for. 

Glycerin, crude — _. 

niycerin, refine^ 


SHi lb 


2Ht lb 


98 

10 
17 

120 


49 

10 
17 

60 


18 


3 

27 
16 


44 
60 


28 

"1,028 
219 

/60 
3 


886 

"729 
29 

44 




42 


I* lb • 


fiat lb 




42 


2tlb • 


Viitlb 


23 


TOl 


Tallow: 

Beef and mutton tallow, ined- 
ible (include oleo stock, 
T. D. 48876). 

Beef and mutton tallow, edible 
(Include oleo stock, T. D. 
4S876). 

Total ... 


Hi Ih.+Zi lb. Im- 
port tax. 
Sec21Ul(a)I.R.C. 
.do 


M«lb.-fU«lb.lm- 

port tax. 
Sec. 2491(a) I. R.C. 
do 


43 












- 


15 


- 


/53 


44 


43 




Oleo oil and oleo stearin: 
OleooU 


H \b.+3i lb. im- 
port tax. 
See. 2491(c) I. R.C. 
do 


H< lb.-fl«i! lb. 

import tax. 
Sec. 2491(c) I. R.C. 
do 


76 


37 




701 


2 




- 


15 


(«) 


(•) 
(•) 








Total 








2 


- 


- 


16 


(•) 


(«) 




Extract of meat. Including fluid.. 

Meats, prepared or preserved, not 
specially provided for (except 
meat pastes other than liver 
pastes, packed in airtight 
containers weighing with 
their contents not more than 
3 ounces each): 
Canned beef, including corned 
beef. 

Beef and veal, pickled or cured.. 

Canned moats, not elsewhere 
specified, and prepared or 
preserved meats, not spe- 
cially provided for (includ- 
ing liver pastes). 


16^ lb ' 


7Ht lb - 


39 

•60 

<84 
25 


19 

'30 

•42 
20 


706 


92 

2,685 
60 


216 

2,609 
102 


14 

826 

93 
(') 


213 

8,399 

119 

■ 58 


469 

8,573 

154 
47 


237 


706 


6^ lb., but not less 
than 20% ad va- 
lorem. 

do 

do 


3^ lb., but not less 
than 20*^ ad va- 
lorem. 

do 

do 


6,916 

110 
20 




2,746 


2,711 


918 


( 8,676 


8,774 


7,045 































Footnotes at end of table. 



654Z DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 

TABLE B~Continued 
Itemized List op Tariff Concessions Made to Uruguay (Schedule II) — Continued 



Description of article 



Rate of duty 



Tariff Act of 1930 



Trade agreement 
with Uruguay 



Ad valorem 

equivalent on 

basis of Imports 

in 1939 



Under 
rate 
effec- 
tive in 
1939 
(per- 
cent) 



Under 
rate 
provided 
by trade 
agree- 
ment 
with 
Uruguay 
(per- 
cent) 



United States Imports for consumption** 
(in thousands of dollars) 



From Uruguay 



1940 ' 



From all countries 



Flaxseed 

Provided, That on and after 
the effective date of this 
agreement, and until the 
thirtieth day following a 
proclamation by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of 
America, after consultation 
with the Uruguayan Gov- 
ernment, that the existing 
abnormal situation in re- 
spect of the trade in flaxseed 
has terminated, the rate of 
duty under this item shall 

be -. 

Wools: Uonskoi, Smyrna, Cor- 
dova, Valparaiso, Ecuadoran, 
Syrian, Aleppo, Geurgian, 
Turkestan, Arabian, Baghdad, 
Persian, Sistan, East Indian, 
Thibetan, Chinese, Manchu- 
rian, Mongolian, Egyptian, 
Sudan, Cyprus, Sardinian, 
Pyrenean, Oportc, Iceland, 
Scotch Blackface, Black 
Spanish, Kerry, flaslock, ami 
Welsh Mountain; similar 
wools w ithout merino or 
English blood; all other wools 
of whatever blood or origin 
not finer than 40's; all the 
foregoing— 
In the grease or washed 

Scoured 

On the skin 

Sorted, or matchings, if not 
scoured. 
Wools, not specially provided for, 
not finer than 44's: 
In the grease or washed . 

Scoured 

On the skin 

Sorted, or matchings, If not 
scoured. 
Footnotes at end of table. 



65tf bushel of 561bs. 



2U lb. of clean 

content. 
27^ lb. of clean 

content. 
22f^ lb. of clean 

content. 
250 lb. of clean 

content. 



29# lb. of clean 

content. 
32/ lb. of clean 

content. 
270 lb. of clean 

content. 
300 lb. of clean 

content. 



50(i bushel of 56Ibs. 



1,095 



323.i0bushelof561bs. 



130 lb. of clean 

content. 
160 lb. of clean 

content. 
110 lb. of clean 

content. 
140 Ih. of clean 

content. 



170 lb. of clean 

content. 
200 lb. of clean 

content. 
150 Ih. of clean 

content. 
1S0 lb. of clean 

content. 



4.995 



1,495 



1.609 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH URUGUAY : ANALYSIS 

TABLE B— Continued 
Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Made to Uruguay (Schedule II) — Continued 



654aa 





Description of article 


Rate of duty 


Ad valorem 

equivalent on 

basis of imports 

m 1939 


United States Imports for consumption • 
(in thousands of dollars) 


Para- 
graph 
num- 


Tariff Act of 1930 


Trade agreement 
vrith Uruguay 


Under 
rate 
effec- 
tive in 
1939 
(per- 
cent) 


Under 

rate 
arovided 
by trade 
agree- 
ent 
with 
Uruguay 
(per- 
cent) 


From Uruguay 


From all countries 


ber in 

Tariff 

Act of 

1930 


1938 


1949 


1940 » 


1938 


1939 


1940' 


1530(a) 


Hides and skins of cattle of the 
bovine species (except hides 
and skins of the India water 
buffalo imported to be used 
in the manufacture of raw- 
hide articles) , raw or uncured, 
or dried, salted, or pickled: 


10% ad valorem.-, 
do - 


5% ad valorem 

do 


10 
10 
10 


5 
5 
6 


102 


76 
47 


299 
259 


5,179 

4,043 

34 


12,089 

4,610 

121 


»16,9I5 






2,508 




Buffalo hides, not specially pro- 
vided for. 


do 


do 


■212 




102 


122 


658 


9,256 


16.820 


19, 636 




Total dutiable items 














4,305 


4,483 


4,705 


43. 119 


52,284 


49, 466 




B. Free Items 


Free 


Bound free ■" 








1603 


1 
39 

75 
11 

34 
12 


2 

66 

69 
24 

44 
29 


3 
40 

120 
50 

101 
40 

(') 


1 
266 

838 
290 

6,525 
694 

4 


3 

678 

1,496 
442 

6,201 

792 

4 


4 


1625 


Blood, dried, not specially pro- 
vided for. 
Bones, crude, steamed, or ground; 
bone dust, bone meal, and 
bone asli; and animal carbon 
suitable only for fertilizing 
purposes. 
Tankage of a grade used chiefly 
for fertilizers, or chiefly as an 
ingredient in the manufacture 
of fertilizers. 
Sausage casings, weasands, intes- 
tines, bladders, tendons, and 
integuments, not specially 
provided for; 
Sheep, lamb, and goat sausage 

casings. 
Sausage casings, not specially 
provided for (including 
weasands, bladders, and in- 
testines). 
Integuments, tendons, and in- 
testines, not sausage casings. 

Total 


Free 


Bound free. 






429 


1627 


Free 


Bound free 






1,481 












375 


1755 




Bound free 






7,077 












851 






Bound free . 






12 
















46 


73 


141 


7,123 


6,997 


7,943 

















Footnotes at end of table. 



654bb DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN: JULY 25, 1942, SUPPLEMENT 

TABLE B— Continued 
Ttemized List of Tariff Concessions Made to Uruguay (Schedule II) — Continued 





Description of article 


Rate of duty 


Ad valorem 

equivalent on 

basis of imports 

in 1939 


United States imports for consumption » 
(in thousands of dollars) 


graph 
num- 


Tariff Act of 1930 


Trade agreement 
with Uruguay 


Under 
rate 
eSec- 

tive in 
1939 
(per- 
cent) 


Under 
rate 
provided 
by trade 
agree- 
ent 
with 
Urusuay 
(per- 
cent) 


rrom Uruguay 


From all countries 


ber in 

Tariff 

Act of 

1930 


1938 


1949 


1940 > 


193S 


1939 


1940 • 


1780 


Tankage, unfit for human con- 
sumption. 

Total free items 


Free. 


Bound free 






103 


335 


257 


936 


2,635 


1,809 














275 


559 


611 


9.453 


12.051 


12,041 




Grand total of items in Sched- 
ule II. 














4,580 


5.042 


5,376 


52. 572 


64,335 


61.507 















• Except as noted, import data do not include imports from Cuba or 
imports free of duty (products of the Philippine Islands, etc), entered 
under special provisions of the Tariff Act of 1030. Imports into the 
Virgin Islands of the United States were negligible and are included. 

» Preliminary. 

e Rate reduced to Sio^ per pound in the trade agreement with France, 
effective June 15, 1930. Rate on product of Cuba reduced to Mo0 per 
pound (net) in the trade agreement with Cuba, effective Sept. 3, 1934. 

«* Includes the following amounts: From Cuba (dutiable at Cuban 
agreement rate): 1938, $212,510; 1939, $215,712; 1940, $219,644; from the 
Philippine Islands (free): 1938, $104,509; 1939, $123,410; 1940, $111,406. 

■ Rate reduced to 1?^^ per pound in the trade agreement with the 
Netherlands effective Feb. 1, 1936: further reduced to I Jlag per pound by 
virtue of the reduction on crude glycerin in the trade agreement with 
France, effective June 15, 1936. 

'Includes Imports valued at $21,772 dutiable but exempt from tax, 
entered at the customs district of Puerto Rico. 



« Less than $500. 

* Bound in the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, effective 
Jan. 1, 1939. 

* Exclusive of duties on imports into the Virgin Islands of the United 
States. 

'■ Includes negligible imports of meat pastes (except liver pastes) pre- 
pured or preserved, n. s. p. f., packed in airtight containers weighing epch 
with contents not more than 3 ounces; not separately classified prior to 
1939. 

* Includes imports valued at $305,032, product of Cuba, dutiable at 
preferential rate. Negligible in other years. 

' Includes imports valued at i61,8S7, product of the Philippine Islands 
(free). Negligible in other years. 

"• Bound in the trade agreement with Uruguay only. 

" Sausage casmgs, weasands, intestines, bladders, tendons, and integu- 
ments produced from sheep, lambs, and goats, bound in the trade 
agreement with Turkey, effective May 5, 1939. 



U. S.aOVCRNMtHT PRINTING OFFICt ; 194t 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, DC. Price 10 centa 



1 0^ ^, 



/ ' / 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



B 




c 



ETIN 



AUGUST 1, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 162— Publication 1778 



ontents 




The War p,^ 
Coordination of relief activities: 

Report of the President's Committee on War Relief 

Agencies 6.57 

Establishment of the President's War Relief Control 

Board 058 

Status of Austria 660 

Anglo-American Caribbean Commission 660 

Liaison with Netherlands East Indian officials 660 

American Republics 

Aviation training schools in Mexico 660 

Completion of the Intei'- American Highway as a 

pioneer road 661 

Visit to the United States of the President-elect of 

Colombia 661 

Health and sanitation mission to Bolivia 662 

Commercial Policy 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 662 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Iran 664 

International Wheat Council 670 

General 

Analysis of State Department appropriations for the 

fiscal year 1943 670 

Contributionsforrelief in belligerent countries .... 677 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 677 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 677 

[over] 



AUu >-'^ •'*'*' 







on ten ?s-continued 



Treaty Infokmation pag^ 

Agriculture: 

Conventions with Canada and Mexico Kegarding 

Migratoiy Birds G78 

Protocol Extending the Duration of the Inter- 
national Agreement Regarding the Reguhxtion 
of Production and Marketuig of Sugar of May 6, 

1937 678 

Friendship: Treaty Between Chma and Iraq . ■. . . C79 
Commerce: 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 680 

Trade-Agreement Negotiations with Iran 680 

Legislation 681 

Publications 681 



The War 



COORDINATION OF RELIEF ACTIVITIES 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT'S COMMITTEE ON WAR RELIEF AGENCIES 



[Released to the press by the White House July 27] 

Joseph E. Davies, Chairman of the Presi- 
dent's Committee on War Relief Agencies, on 
Jiilj" 27 submitted to the President a report, the 
text of which follows : 

'•Your Committee on War Relief Agencies 
respectfully submits the following report. 

"In the foreign relief field, a degree of suc- 
cess has been achieved in reducing the number 
of agencies and coordinating the activities of 
those remaining. The number of active foreign 
relief agencies is now approximately 300 as com- 
pared with some 700 or more during the peak 
period in early 1941. While this is a definite 
improvement, further coordination and consoli- 
dation is desirable in the public interest. 

"Funds and contributions in kind raised by 
agencies registered with the Department of 
State from the beginning of the war to the end 
of May 1942 have totalled over $71,000,000. 
During the same period other foreign relief 
agencies raised a total estimated at $25,000,000. 
It is significant that the administrative and 
other costs of the agencies registered with and 
subject to supervision by the Department of 
State have averaged only about 10 percent of 
total receipts while those of other foreign relief 
agencies have averaged, on the basis of some- 
what incomplete information, 30 percent or 
more. It is also significant that administrative 
expenses of the latter group have shown an ap- 
preciable decrease since the President's Com- 
mittee requested periodic reports from them, 



even though the Committee has been able to 
exercise only advisory super\-ision. Tlie pres- 
ent rate of collections by foreign relief agencies, 
other tlian the Red Cross, is substantially below 
the peak, with a resulting increase in the per- 
centage of overhead costs, but this decrease in 
collections is far more than ofiFset by the in- 
crease in domestic relief solicitations. 

"In the domestic relief and welfare field, the 
entry of the United States into the war has 
quite naturally resulted in the establishment of 
a very large number of new agencies appealing 
to the public for funds and contributions for 
the relief and welfare of our own civilian pop- 
ulation and armed forces. As there is at present 
no central registration or other regulatory au- 
thority, these organizations are subject to no 
coordinated supervision or control and even 
their number can only be estimated. 

'•^Vhile actuated by the highest humanitarian 
motives, these agencies tend to duplicate each 
other's efforts causing public confusion and un- 
certainty. Undue competition among them- 
selves and between them and the foreign relief 
agencies leads to a waste of financial resources 
and manpower and thus tends to hamper the 
national war effort. There is a lack of correla- 
tion between the programs of the private agen- 
cies in both the domestic and foreign relief 
fields, and those of the Red Cross and of the 
several goverimiental agencies concerned with 
various phases of relief and welfare. 

"Certain important objectives of the Com- 
mittee have not so far been accomplished, be- 

657 



658 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bl'LLETIN 



(.■ause of lack of authority. TluTe rt'iiiaiii. as 
iiulieatcHl above, two important factors ali'ect- 
iiitj; national unity of effort in these times of 
(■mer<jency — (a) the piililir is suhjert to solici- 
tation from far too many aj.'encies jvpresentin}z; 
an excessive amount of duplication ami (b) the 
limited amcjuiit of leadership that exists lor 
charitable, welfare and Government war bond 
campaijrns is overly occupied and its effecti\e- 
ness sei'iously diminished and dissipated. 

"The Conunittee believes that these facts .-ill 
for a central auth<irity with general juris<lic- 
tion antl [lowers to brini.'' abmit coordination of 
effort and elimination of duplication and waste. 



Pursuant iheretd, tlie Secretary of State, upon 
whose reconnnendation this Committee was 
(.riuinally a))pointed. has siigovsted that, as the 
(loniesti<' iclicf H(dd is now dominant, it would 
be in the national iiitei'cst to cons(jlidale, in 
such a central authority, supervision over both 
diinir>tic ainl foreiiju relief a<j;encies. inchidin<r 
the administration of Section b (b) of the 
Ncutralily Act. \0:V.K now vested in the Secre- 
tary of State. 

"'J'lie Committee recommends, therefore, that 
ade(|U:ite powei'S be deleyated lo a central au- 
thoiity and suggests that this might be done 
bv ilie is^uance of an Executive Order." 



K.STABLISHMENT OF THE PRESIDENrS WAR liKLIEK CONTROL BOARD 



In accordance with the iccdnnuciidat ion of 
the Committee ihe Pie^idenl on July '.^4 signed 
an Executi\c older (IL'O."!) ■•EslablishinL;' the 
Pre^ident■s War Relief Contr<il r.card and De- 
fining Its Functions and Duties". The text of 
the (irdcr follows : 

"Hv xirtiie of the aiithorilv \ested in me by 
the Coiistitiit inn and .-taliitcs (if the Unitcil 
States, as Pie^ideiit of the United Slates of 
Amei'ica and Conmiander-in-Cliief of the Army 
and Navy, because of emergencies affecting the 
nationul M'curity and defense, and for the piir- 
[xi.se of controlling in the public interest chari- 
ties for foreign and domestic relief, rehabilita- 
tion, reconstriic-tion. and wtdfaie arising from 
war-ci'eated needs, it is liereby (irdeicd as fel- 
lows; 

'"1. The President's Committee nii \\'ai' IJelief 
Agencies, appoinled by me mi .March !:'>. I'.Ml, 
is hereby cdntiniied and established as the Prcs- 
idelU's War Relief ('(intrnl Hoaid. hereinafter 
referred to as the I ioa I'd. The Chaii-man of the 
Hoard shall be i-e-poiisilile to the President. 

"li. The Piiard is hereby aiillioii/.ed and em- 
poweii'd — 

"(a) lo control, in the inlei'est of the fiirther- 
aiHC (it (he war purpose, all solicitations, sales nf 
iir (ill'ei>. to ^ell meichii ndi-e or --erv ice^. ccib 



lectioiis and receijiis and distribution or disposi- 
tion of funils and contributions in kind fol' the 
direct or implied purjiose of (1) diarities for 
roreigii and domestic relief. I'ehabilitation, re- 
construction and welfare arising from war- 
created needs in the United States or in foreign 
c<iiintries. (■_') refugee relief, (:i) the relief of 
the ci\ ilian population of the United States af- 
fected by enemy aition. ol' (4) tlie relief and 
Welfare of the ai niecl forces of the Unitetl States 
or of theii- dependents; I'rociilril, that the 
powers herein conferred shall a}i]jly only to 
activitie- concerned directly with war relief and 
welfare purposes and shall not extend to local 
cha lit able acli\ ities of a normal and usual char- 
acter nor in any ca-e to intra-siate activities 
oilier than those iiumediately affecting the war 
effort; 

"(b) (1) to pid\ ide for the registration or 
licensing of [lersons or agencies engaged in 
such aciivitics and for the renewal or cancella- 
tion of such legist la I ion o|- licenses; (2) to regu- 
late and ( rdiiuite the times and amounts of 

fiind-raising ajipeals: (3) to define and pro- 
mulgate I'lhical slaiidarils id' solicitation and 
collection of funds and contributions in kind; 
I I) to rciiiiiie accounts of reci'ipls and cxpendi- 
Iiiies duly and reliably audited, and smdi other 
records and r<'ports as the Hoai'd may deem to 
be ill the public interest; (5) to eliminate or 



AUGUST 1, 194 2 



659 



niei'ge such agencies in the interests of efficiency 
and economy; and (6) to take such steps as may 
be necessary for the protection of essential local 
charities; and 

"(c) to prescribe such rules and regulations 
not inconsistent with law as the Board may 
determine to be necessai-y or desirable to carry 
out the purposes of this Order. 

"3. The provisions of section 2 of this Order 
sl)al] not apply to (a) the American National 
Red Cross or (b) established religious bodies 
which are not independently carrying out any 
of the activities specified in section 2 of this 
( )rder. 

''4. Under tlie authority given me by Sec- 
tion 13 of the Joint Resolution of Congress ap- 
proved November 4. 1939 (54 Stat. 8. 11) and 
Title I of the First War Powers Act. 1941, ap- 
proved December 18. 1941 ( Public Law No. 354, 
77th Congress), and pursuant to the suggestion 
of the Secretary of State, it is ordered that the 
administration of any and all of the p^o^^sions 
of Section 8 (b) of the said Joint Resolution 
relating to the solicitation and collection of 
funds and contributions for relief purposes, 
heretofore by me vested in the Secretary of 
State, be and it liereby is transferred to the 
said Board. All rules and regulations and 
forms which have been issued by the Secretary 
of State pursuant to the provisions of said 
Section 8 (b) and which are in effect shall con- 
tinue in effect until modified, superseded, re- 
voked or repealed by the Board. 

''5. Any and all matters within the jurisdic- 
tion of said Board which may be affected with 
a question relating to the foreign policy of the 
Government of the United States in connection 
with the administration of tlie powers vested in 
the Board by this Order shall be determined 
only after conference with the Secretary of 
State, to the end that any action with respect 
to such matters shall be consistent with the for- 
eign policy of the United States. 

"6. For the purpose of economy in adminis- 
tiation, the Board is authorized to utilize the 



services of available and appropriate person- 
nel of the Department of State and other Gov- 
(rnment departments and agencies and such 
other services, eqiupment, and facilities as may 
be made available by these departments and 
agencies. 

"7. For tile purpose of effectively carrying 
out the provisions of this Order, the Board may 
I'equire tliat all war relief and welfare policies 
l)lans. programs, procedures and methods of 
^■oluntal•y agencies be coordinated and in- 
tegrated with those of the several Federal de- 
partments, establishments and agencies and the 
American Red Cross; and all these organiza- 
tions shall furnish from time to time such in- 
formation as the Board may consider necessary 
for such purposes. 

"8. The Board shall from time to time sub- 
mit to the President such reports and recom- 
mendations regarding war charities, relief and 
v.-elfare in foreign covmtries and in the United 
States and the relationship of public and pri- 
vate organizations, resources and programs in 
these and related fields, as the public interest 
may require. 

"9. The members of the Board shall serve 
as such without compensation, but shall be en- 
titled to necessary transportation, subsistence, 
and other expen.ses incident to the performance 
of their duties. 

"10. This Order shall remain in force during 
tlie continuance of the present war and for six 
months after the termination thereof, unless re- 
voked by Presidential order." 

On July 30, 1942, the President's War Relief 
Contrf)l Board prescribed cei-tain regulations 
governing solicitation and collection of funds 
and coiitributions for war relief and welfai-e, 
which are to supersede the regulations promul- 
gated by the Secretary' of State under authority 
of sections 8 and 13 of the Neutrality Act of 
1939 relating to relief contributions. The text 
of the new regulations appears in the Federal 
Register of August 1, 1942, page 5946. 



660 



STATUS OF AUSTRIA 



[Released fo tbe press July 27] 

At the Secretary's press conference on July 
27 a correspondent stated that there appeared 
to be some confusion with respect to the view 
of this country as to the present status of Aus- 
tria and asked for clarification on this point. 
The Secretary replied: 

"It is probable that such confusion, if it ex- 
ists, has arisen from administrative steps which 
may hav^ been taken by this Government in 
pursuance of its own laws designed to afford 
adequate protection to this country's interests 
in dealing with the situation presented by the 
imposition of military control over Austria and 
residents of Austria by Germany. This Gov- 
ernment very clearly made Iniown its opinions 
as to the manner in which the seizure of Austria 
took place and the relation of that seizure to 
this Government's well-known policy toward 
the taking of territory by force. This Govern- 
ment has never taken the position that Austria 
was legally absorbed into the German Keich." 

ANGLO-AMERICAN CARIBBEAN 
COMMISSION 

[Released to the press August 1] 

Charles W. Taussig, United States chairman 
of the Anglo-American Caribbean Commission, 
announced on August 1 the appointment of S. 
Burns Weston as secretary of the American 
Section of the Commission. 

Mr. Weston is transferring from his former 
position as director of the Office of the National 
Advisory Committee of the National Youth 
Administration. He was born in Yellow 
Springs, Ohio, and is a graduate of Antioch 
College and Yale Law School. Before coming 
to Washington he was a resident of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

The Anglo-American Caribbean Commission 
was created in March 1942 and serves as a body 
to advise the British and American Govern- 
ments on social and economic problems affect- 
ing the Caribbean area. The other American 
members of the Commission are Governor Eex- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETTN 

ford Guy Tugwell, of Puerto Rico, and Mr. 
Coert duBois, Chief of the Caribbean Office of 
the Department of State. 

LIAISON WITH NETHERLANDS EAST 
INDIAN OFFICIALS 

[Released to the press July 29] 

Mr. Walter A. Foote, formerly American 
Consul General at Batavia, is on his way to 
Australia as this Government's representative 
in contact with the Netherlands officials there 
of the East Indian Services. 



American Republics 



AVIATION TRAINING SCHOOLS IN 
MEXICO 

[Released to the press July 28] 

Two pilot training schools, similar to the 600 
operated in the United States by the Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration, will be established in 
Mexico with the cooperation of the United 
States, the State Department announced on 
July 28. 

At the request of the Mexican Government, 
tlie Civil Aeronautics Administration will de- 
tail supervisors to instruct Mexican personnel 
in United States aviation training methods and 
to assist in the establishment of the schools. 

A nucleus for this purpose will soon be avail- 
able when 26 Mexican young men complete avia- 
tion courses they are taking at United States 
schools under the supervision of the Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration. Of this group, 18 are 
receiving flight training, including instructor 
courses, while the remainder will be administra- 
tive engineers, instructor mechanics, and service 
mechanics. 

Flight-instructor trainees from this latest 
addition to the United Nations are now at Hen- 
son Flying Service, Inc., Hagerstown, Md. ; Tri- 
Cities Aviation School, Inc., Endicott, N. Y.; 
Parkersburg Flying Service and Aviation 
School, Parkersburg, W. Va.; Roscoe Turner 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



661 



Aeronautical Corporation, Indianapolis, Ind. ; 
North Aviation Co., White Bear Lake. Minn. ; 
Cutter-Carr Flying Service, Albuquerque, N. 
Mex. ; Plains Airways, Inc., Cheyenne, Wj'o. ; 
Southwest Airways, Inc., Phoenix, Ariz.; Pa- 
cific Air School, Tucson, Ariz.; Cnlkins Air- 
craft Co., Spokane, Wash. ; Olympia Air Trans- 
port Corporation, Sunnyside, Wash.; Curtiss- 
Wright Technical Institute, Glendale, Calif. 

These trainees have been taking a course 
which provides from 160 to 180 hours of flight 
training and 360 hours of ground-school instruc- 
tion, upon successful completion of which they 
will meet the requirements for a Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration commercial-pilot cer- 
tificate with instructor rating. 

COMPLETION OF THE INTER-AMERICAN 
HIGHWAY AS A PIONEER ROAD 

[Keleaseil to the press July 28] 

Arrangements have been concluded with 
Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua. 
Costa Rica, and Panama for the immediate link- 
ing by a pioneer road of the already -constructed 
segments of the Inter-American Highway be- 
tween the Mexican-Guatemalan border and 
Panama City. This will permit road traffic at 
an early date from the end of the existing 
standard-guage railway in Mexico to the 
Canal Zone. The necessary surveying is al- 
ready under way, and construction work will 
shortly be started, at the expense of the United 
States Government. 

The plans which have now been approved call 
for the consti'uction of approximately 625 miles 
of new all-weather pioneer road to link about 
1,000 miles of road which have already been 
constructed in Central America and Panama. 
The proposed minimum construction standards 
for these new links provide for a roadway width 
of from 10 to 16 feet with an 8-inch gravel sur- 
face, average maximum grades of 10 percent, 
and average maximum curvature of 30 meters. 

The completion of this road will not only be 
of strategic importance, in that it will link the 
continental United States with the Canal Zone 
by a wholly overland transportation system, but 



also it will alleviate in some degree the trans- 
portation difficulties of the Central American 
countries, wliich have hitherto depended in 
large measure upon water transportation. It 
is also expected that the contemplated construc- 
tion will ease the economic difficulties which the 
Central American countries are facing as a re- 
sult of the disrupti(m of their foreign trade 
caused by the war. Arrangements have been 
made for the fullest possible use of local facili- 
ties, including labor, equipment, and materials. 
The plan to complete the Inter-American 
Higliway as a pioneer road will not modify the 
plan to construct a permanent Inter-xVmerican 
Highway contemplated by the act of Decem- 
ber 26, 1911. By this act Congress authorized 
the expenditure "of $20,000,000 toward the con- 
struction of a permanent Inter- American High- 
way in collaboration with the Central Amer- 
ican republics. The present plan will, however, 
permit through traffic at a much earlier date 
than originally contemplated and will facilitate 
the construction of the permanent highway, on 
the line of which the pioneer road is to be built. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PRESIDENT-ELECT OF COLOMBIA 

[Released to the press August 1] 

The text of a telegram addressed from Miami 
to the Secretary of State by His Excellency 
Dr. Alfonso Lopez, President-elect of Colombia, 
on July 28 follows : 

''May I take the opportunity before leaving 
for Colombia to renew my sincere gratitude 
for the friendly welcome and generous hospi- 
tality extended to me as well as my family and 
Doctors Soto Del Corral Araujo and Jaramillo 
Sanchez by your Govei'nment. We had a very 
happy sojoiu-n in the United States and I am 
glad to think that it will not only be of benefit 
to Colombia but it will also help to bring our 
two countries even closer together. It was a 
great pleasure indeed to meet you again and to 
find you, Mr. Secretary, so keenly interested in 
the progressive development of the good neigh- 
bor policy which you so ably expounded in 
Montevideo, 



662 

"Please accept my very warm pei-sonal re- 
gards and best wishes." 

The Secretary of State telegraphed the fol- 
lowing reply to the President-elect of Colombia : 

"I have received your telegram of July 28. 
It also gave me special pleasure to renew our 
old and cordial association. 

"Your friendly references to the foreign pol- 
icy of the government of the United States 
reflect in my opinion the happy relations of 
trust and cordiality between our two countries, 
to which you and President Santos have made 
such outstanding contributions. They reflect 
also the leadership of Colombia toward closer 
and better inter-American relations, a leader- 
ship which has been indispensable in reaching 
the decree of inter-American solidarity which 
now characterizes the relations between the 
American countries. 

"I send you again my sincere good wishes 
for your personal welfare and for your success 
in the high office which you will shortly 
reassimie." 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

HEALTH AND SANITATION MISSION TO 
BOLIVIA 

A health and sanitation mission to Bolivia 
has been organized as part of the inter- American 
health and sanitation program recommended at 
the Conference of American Foreign Ministers 
in Rio de Janeiro in January 1942. The mission 
will cooperate with Bolivian authorities in 
working out sanitation projects and will be 
headed by Dr. Eugene H. Payne, specialist in 
tropical medicine. He will be accompanied to 
Bolivia by Dr. Wendell H. Dove, Acting Di- 
rector of the Health and Sanitation Division, 
Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs. 

Malaria control is one of the projects under 
consideration to protect workers in Bolivian 
tropical regions. 

Among other health and sanitation missions 
organized in collaboration with the other 
American republics under the Rio program are 
those to Brazil and Peru to aid in sanitation 
projects for the great Amazon basin, which also 
extends into the eastern regions of Bolivia. 



Commercial Policy 



AGREEMENT WITH THE SOVIET UNION 



[Rt'leased to the press July 31] 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States of America and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics, which was pro- 
claimed on and became effective on August 6, 
1937 and which was renewed for successive 
periods of one year on August 5, 1938, August 
2, 1939, August 6, 1940, and August 2, 1941. was 
continued in force by an exchange of identic 
notes at Wa.shington on July 31, 1942 between 
the Secretary of State of the United States of 
America, Mr. Cordell Hull, and the Ambassador 
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mr. 
Maxim Litvinoff. The notes provide that the 
agreement shall remain in force until August 
6, 1943 and thereafter, unless superseded by a 



nu)re comprehensive connnercial agreement, 
subject to termination on six months' written 
notice by either Government. 

Although it is expected that in the coming 
year the character and amount of United States 
trade with the Soviet Union will be governed 
largely by the military requirements of the 
United States and of the Soviet Union and other 
countries struggling against the forces of armed 
aggression, rather than by the usual commercial 
considerations, the exchange of notes will in- 
sure the continuance during the emergency 
)ieriod of our established commercial relations 
witli the Soviet Union on the basis of the 1937 
connnercial agreement. 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



663 



The text of the identic notes exchanged on 
July 31 follows : 

"Washington, July 31, 194£. 

"In accordance with the conversations which 
have taken place, I have the honor to confirm on 
behalf of my Government the agreement which 
has been reached between the Governments of 
our respective countries that the agreement re- 
garding commercial relations between the 
United States of America and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics recorded in the ex- 
change of notes of August 4, 1937, which came 
into force on August 6, 1937, and which was 
renewed on August 5, 1938, August 2, 1939, Au- 
gust 6, 1940, and August 2, 1941 shall remain in 
force imtil August 6, 1943. It shall continue in 
force thereafter, unless superseded by a more 
comprehensive commercial agreement, subject 
to termination on six months' written notice by 
either Government. 

"The present agreement shall be proclaimed 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and approved by the Council of People's 
Commissars of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Eepublics. 

"Accept [etc.]" 

The following text is that of the agreement of 
August 4, 1937.1 

"With reference to recent conversations 
which have taken place in regard to commerce 
between the United States of America and the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, I have the 
honor to confirm and to make of record by this 
note the following agreement which has been 
reached between the Governments of our re- 
spective countries : 

"One. The United States of America will 
grant to the Union of Soviet Socialist Eepub- 
lics unconditional and unrestricted most- 
favored-nation treatment in all matters con- 
cerning customs duties and charges of every 
kind and in the method of levying duties, and, 
further, in all matters concerning the rules, for- 
malities and charges imposed in connection 
with the clearing of goods through the customs, 

' Executive Agreement Series 105. 
475525—42 2 



and with respect to all laws or regulations af- 
fecting the sale or use of imported goods within 
the country. 

"Accordingly, natural or manufactured prod- 
ucts having their origin in the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics shall in no case be subject, 
in regard to the matters referred to above, to 
any duties, taxes or charges other or higher, or 
to any rules or formalities other or more bur- 
densome, than those to which the like products 
having their origin in any third country are or 
may hereafter be subject. 

"Similarly, natural or manufactured prod- 
ucts exported from the territory of the United 
States of America and consigned to the terri- 
tory of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
shall in no case be subject with respect to ex- 
portation and in regard to the above-mentioned 
matters, to any duties, taxes, or charges other 
or higher, or to any rules or formalities other 
or more burdensome, than those to which the 
like products when consigned to the territory 
of any third country are or may hereafter 
be subject. 

"Any advantage, favor, privilege or im- 
munity which has been or may hereafter be 
granted by the United States of America in re- 
gard to the above-mentioned matters, to a nat- 
ural or manufactured product originating in 
any third country or consigned to the territory 
of any third country shall be accorded im- 
mediately and without compensation to the like 
product originating in or consigned to the terri- 
toi-y of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. 

"It is understood that so long as and in so 
far as existing law of the United States of 
America may otherwise require, the foregoing 
provisions, in so far as they would otherwise 
relate to duties, taxes or charges on coal, coke 
manufactured therefrom, or coal or coke bri- 
quettes, shall not ajjply to such products im- 
ported into the United States of America. If 
the law of the United States of America shall 
not permit the complete operation of the forego- 
ing provisions with respect to the above-men- 
tioned products, the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics reserves the right within fifteen days 
after January 1, 1938, to terminate this agree- 



664 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ment in its entirety on thirty days' written 
notice. 

"It is understood, furthermore, that the ad- 
vantages now accorded or which may hereafter 
be accorded by the United States of America, 
its territories or possessions, the Philippine Is- 
lands, or the Panama Canal Zone to one an- 
other or to the Eepublic of Cuba sliall be 
excepted from the operation of this agreement. 

"Nothing in tliis agreement shall be con- 
strued to prevent the adoption of measures 
prohibiting or restricting the exportation or 
importation of gold or silver, or to prevent the 
adoption of such measures as the Government 
of the United States of America may see fit 
with respect to the control of the export or 
sale for export of anus, ammunition, or imple- 
ments of war, and, in exceptional cases, all other 
military supplies. It is understood that any 
action which may be taken by the President of 
the United States of America under the au- 
thority of Section 2 (b) of the Neutrality Act 
of 1937 in regard to the passage of title to goods 
shall not be considered as contravening any of 
the provisions of this agreement relating to the 
exportation of natural or manufactured prod- 
ucts from the territory of the United States 
of America. 

"Subject to the requirement that no arbitrary 
discrimination shall be effected by the United 



States of America against importations from 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and in 
favor of those from any third country, the fore- 
going provisions shall not extend to prohibi- 
tions or resti-ictions (1) imposed on moral or 
humanitarian grounds, (2) designed to protect 
human, animal, or plant life, (3) relating to 
prison-made goods, or (4) relating to the en- 
forcement of police or revenue laws. 

"Two. On its part the Government of the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics will take 
steps to increase substantially the amount of 
purchases in the United States of America for 
export to the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics of articles the growth, produce, or manu- 
facture of the United States of America. 

"Three. This agreement shall come into 
force on the day of proclamation thereof by the 
President of the United States of America and 
of approval thereof by the Soviet of People's 
Commissars of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, which proclamation and approval 
shall take place on the same day. It shall con- 
tinue in effect for twelve months. Both par- 
ties agree that not less than thirty days prior 
to the expiration of the aforesaid period of 
twelve months they shall start negotiations re- 
garding the extension of the period during 
which the present agreement shall continue in 
force." 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH IRAN 



[Released to the press July 29] 

The Secretary of State issued on July 29 
formal notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement with_the Government of Iran. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and fixing the time and place for the opening 
of the hearings. 

There is printed below a list of products 
which will come under consideration for the pos- 
sible granting of concessions by the Government 



of the United States. Representations which 
interested persons may wish to make to the 
Committee for Reciprocity Information need 
not be confined to the articles appearing on this 
list but may cover any articles of actual or po- 
tential interest in the import or export trade of 
the United States with Iran. However, only 
the articles contained in the list issued on July 
29 or in any supplementary list issued later will 
come under consideration for the possible grant- 
ing of concessions by the Government of the 
United States. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Com- 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



665 



mittee for Reciprocity Information are included 
in a statement released by that Committee on 
December 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 
tween the United States and Iran during the 
years 1929-40 inclusive, together with the prin- 
cipal products involved in the trade between 
the two countries during 1939 and 1940, is 
printed below. 

Department of State 

trade-agreement negotiations wit'h iran 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934. entitled "An Act To 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750. of June 27, 1934, 1 
hereby give notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with the Government of Iran. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation in accordance with the announcement of 
this date issued by that Committee concerning 
the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications and the time set for 
jjublic hearings. 

CoRDELL Hull 

Secretary of State 

Washington, D.C, 
July 29, 194£. 

Committee for REcrpRociTr Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with IRAN 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, August 
27, 1942; closing date for application to be 
heard, August 27, 1942; public hearings open, 
September 9, 1942. 

The Conunittee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 



to the negotiation of a trade agreement with the 
Government of Iran, of which notice of inten- 
tion to negotiate has been issued by the Secre- 
tary of State on this date, shall be submitted to 
(he Committee for Reciprocity Information not 
later than 12 o'clock noon, August 27, 1942. 
Such communications should be addressed to 
"The Chairman. Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation, Tariff Commission Building, Eighth 
and E Streets NW., Washington, D.C." 

A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a.m. on September 9, 1942, before the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information, in the hear- 
ing room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 29th day of July 1942. 

E. G. :NLvrtin 
Acting Secretary 

Washington, D.C, 
July 39, 19J^. 

List of Products on Which the United States 
Wnxi Consider Granting Concessions to 
Iran 

Note: The rates of duty indicated are those 
now applicable to products of Iran. Wlien the 
rate is one which has been reduced pursuant 
to a previous trade agreement by 50 percent (the 
maximum permitted hy the Trade Agreements 
Act), this fact is indicated bj' the symbol mr. 
When the rate represents a reduction pursuant 
to a previous trade agreement, but less than a 
50-percent reduction, this is indicated by the 
symbol r. "When an item has been bound free 
of duty in a previous trade agreement, this is 
indicated by the symbol b. 



666 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to the paragraph numbers of the tariff 
schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930. The de- 
scriptive phraseology is, however, in a number 
of cases limited to a narrower field than that 
covered by the numbered tariff paragraph. In 
such cases only the articles covered by the de- 
scriptive phraseology of the list will come under 
consideration for the granting of concessions. 

In the event that articles which are at present 
regarded as classifiable under the descriptions 
included in the list are excluded therefrom by 
judicial decision or otherwise prior to the con- 
clusion of the agreement, the list will neverthe- 
less be considered as including such articles. 



DEPARTME]^ OF STATE BXJLLETIN 



United 
States 

Tariff Act 
of 1930 

Paragraph 



Description of article 



$3 per lb. 



Asafetida, natural and iinconi- 10% ad val. 
pounded, but advanced in 
value or condition by shred- 
ding, grinding, chipping, 
crushing, or any other process 
or treatment whatever beyond 
that essential to proper pack- 
ing and the prevention of de- 
cay or deterioration pending 
manufacture, not containing 
alcohol. 

opium containing not less than 
8.5 per centum of anhydrous 
morphine: Provided, That 
nothmg herein contained shall 
be so construed as to impair 
or affect in any manner the 
provisions of the Narcotic 
Drugs Import and Export 
Act, as amended. 

Iron-oxide and iron-hydroxide 
pigments, not specially pro- 
vided for: 

Natural 

339 Table, household, kitchen, and 

hospital utensils, and hollow or 
flatware, not specially pro- 
vided for: 
Composed wholly or in chief 
value of copper or brass, not 
platea with platinum, gold, or 
silver, and not specially pro- 
vided for. 

a In the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, effective Jan. 1, 
19:i9, the rale of duty on table, household, kitchen, and hospital utensils, 
and hollow or flatware, not .'ipecinlly provided for, composed wholly or 
in chief value of copper (including copper in alloys other thnn brass), not 
plated with platinum, gold, or silver, and not specially provided for, was 
reduced to 35% ad valorem. 



Present rate 
of duty 



20% ad val. 



."^5% or 40% ad 
val.» 



Sym- 
bol 



United 








States 
Tariff Act 


Description of article 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


of 1930 








Paragraph 








721(d) 


Caviar and other fish roe for food 
purposes: 










30% ad val. 




736 


Berries, edible, dried, desiccated, 
or evaporated. 


2H(! per lb. 








741 


Dates, fresh or dried, except when 
packed in units of any descrip- 












tion weighing (with the imme- 








diate container, if any) not 








more than ten pounds each: 










It per lb. 








it per lb. 




766 . -. 


Almonds: 


5iii per lb. 










Shelled 


liHt per lb. 




761 . 


Pistache nuts: 
Not shelled 


iHtPerlb 

2M«Perlb 






MR 




Shelled.. 


MR 






Zi per lb. 




911 (a) 


Quilts or bedspreads, wholly or in 
chief value of cotton, whether 
in the piece or otherwise, if 
block-printed by hand. 


25% ad val. 




911 (b) 


Table and bureau covers, center- 
pieces, runners, scarfs, nap- 
kins, and doilies, made of 
plain-woven cotton cloth, and 
not specially provided for, it 
block-printed by hand. 


30% ad val. 




1101 (b) 


Hair of the camel entered, or with- 


Free, subject 






drawn from warehouse, imder 


to the provi- 






bond and used in the manu- 


sions of par- 






facture of press cloth, camel's 


agraph 1101 






hair belting, knit or felt boots. 


of the Tariff 






heavy fulled lumbermen's 


Act of 1930, 






socks, rugs, carpets, or any 


as amended. 






other floor covermgs. 






1102 (b)..... 


Hair of the Cashmere goat: 










34^ per lb. of 








clean con- 








tent. 








37t per lb. of 
clean con- 














tent. 






On the skin 


32t per lb. of 
clean con- 














tent. 






Sorted, or matchings, if not 


35!! per lb. of 






scoured. 


clean con- 
tent. 




1116 (a) 


Oriental, Axminster, Savonncrie, 


30^ per sq. ft.. 


R 




Aubusson, and other carpets, 


but not less 






rugs, and mats, not made on a 


than 46% ad 






power-driven loom, plain or 


val. 






figured, whether woven as 








separate carpets, rugs, or mats, 








or In rolls of any width. 






1628 


Turquoise, cut but not set, and 
suitable for use in the manu- 
facture of Jewelry. 


10% ad val. 




1629 (a).... 


Quilts and bedspreads, wholly or 
in chief value of cotton, 
whether in the piece or other- 
wise; table and bureau covers, 


90% ad val. 





AUGUST 1, 1942 



667 



United 








Stntes 

Tariff Act 

of 1930 


I^cscriplion of arlicio 


Present rate 
of duty 


Sym- 
bol 


Paragraph 








lFi29 (a)- 


centerpiocpp. niDncrs, scarfs, 






Cont. 


napkins, and doilies, made of 
plain-woven cotton cloth; all 
the foregoinp in part of fringe 
and block-printed by hand. 






ISW 


Cigar and cigarette boxes, finished 
or unfinished and not specially 
provided for, wholly or in chiof 
value of wood or wholly or in 
chief value of silver. 


60% ad val. 




1602 


Asafetida, natural and unoom- 
pounded, and in a crude state, 
not advanced in value or con- 
dition by shredding, grinding, 
chipping, crushing, or any 
other process or treatment 
whatever beyond that essen- 
tial to proper packing and the 
prevention of decay or dete- 
rioration pending manufacture, 
not containing alcohol. 


Free. 




1637 


Bristles, crude, not sorted, 
bunched, or prepared. 


Free. 




1668 


Turquoise, rough or uncut, and 


Free. 






not advanced in condition or 








value from its natural state by 








cleaving, splitting, cutting, or 








other process, whether in its 








natural form or broken, not 








set. 






1669 


Drugs which are natural and un- 
compounded and not edible, 
and not specially provided for. 
and are in a crude state, not 
advanced in value or condition 
by shredding, grinding, chip- 
ping, crushing, or any other 
process or treatment what- 
ever beyond that essential to 
the proper packing of the 
drugs and the prevention of 
decay or deterioration pend- 
ing manufacture, not contain- 
ing alcohol: 








(Quince seed, non-germinating _ _ 


Free. 




1670 -- 


Dyeing or tanning materials: 








Saffron and madder, whether 


Free. 






crude or advanced in value 








or condition by shredding. 








grinding, chipping, crush- 








ing, or any similar process. 








not containing alcohol. 






1681.. 


Furs and fur skins, not specially 








provided for, undressed: 








Badger 


Free. 










B 




fox). 








Persian lamb and caracul 




B 




Free 


B 




Persian lamb and caracul). 












B 






Free.. 


B 




Wolf 




B 




Jackal - 


Free. 





United 








States 

Tariff Act 

nt 1930 


Description of articli; 


Present ralo 
of duty 


.Sym- 
bol 


Paragraph 








1686 __ 


Gums and resins: 








Tragacanth 


Free. 






Natural gums, natural gum 


Free. 






resins, and natural resins, 








not specially provided for. 






1688_... _ 


Hair of goats, cleaned or un- 
cleaned, drawn or undrawn, 
but unmanufactured, not 
specially provided for. 


Free. 




1700 


Iron ore containing iron oxide or 
iron hydroxide, and suitable 
for the manulacture of pig- 
ments. 


Free. 




1722 


Henna leaves, crude or unmanu- 
factured, not specially pro- 
vided for. 


Free. 




1755 


Sausage casings, weasands, intes- 


Free 


B 




tines, bladders, tendons, and 








integuments, not specially 








provided for; all the foregoing 








produced from sheep. larabs, 








and goats. 






1768 


.Spices and spice seeds: 








(2) Cumin 


Free. 




1811 _ .._ 


Works of art: 








Rugs and carpets made prior 


Free 


B 




to the year 1701. 







Trade of the United States With Iran 

(Compiled by Die Department of Commerce) 
(Values in thousands of dollars) 



Year 


Exports to 
Iran » 


General im- 
ports from 
Iran 


Merchandise 
balance * 


1929 

1930 -- 


2,430 
2,743 
1,057 
1,082 
1,409 
3,687 
4,339 
5, 103 
5, 456 
9, 119 
4,420 
6,465 


8,648 
5,797 
4, 457 

2, 764 

3, 353 
3,286 
3,635 
3,736 
5,943 
3,245 

4, 380 
8,648 


-6, 218 
- 3, 054 


1931 


-3,400 


1932 


- 1, 682 


1933 


-1,944 


1934 

1935 

1936 


+ 401 

+ 704 

+ 1,367 


1937 


-487 


1938 


+ 5,874 


1939 


+ 40 


1940 _.. 


-2, 183 







« Includes re-exports. 

'' Plus sign equals excess of U.S. exports; minus sign equals excess of 
U.S. imports. 



475525—42- 



668 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



UNITED STATES EXPORTS TO IRAN 

By Principal Commodities 

(Values in thousands of dollars) 



Commodity 



Quantity 



Exports, including re-exports, total 

Rubber tire casings, automobile, number 

Automobile inner tubes, number 

Other vegetable products, inedible 

Textile fibers and manufactures 

Wood and paper 

Lubricating oil, barrels 

Asbestos and manufactures 

Sulphur, crude, tons 

Steel ingots, blooms, billets and slabs, sheet bars and tin plate bars, 
tons. 

Iron and steel bars and rods, lbs 

Iron and steel plates, lbs 

Iron and steel sheets, galvanized, lbs 

Steel sheets, black , ungalvanized, lbs 

Strip, hoop, band and scroll, iron or steel, lbs 

Railway track material 

Tubular products and fittings, 1 ,000 lbs 

Structural iron and steel 

Wire and manufactures, lbs 

Nails and bolts (except railroads), lbs 

Tools 



Metal drums and containers for oil, gas, and other liquids 

Other iron and steel advanced manufactures 

Refined copper in cathodes, billets, ingots, bars, and other forms 
lbs. 

Other metals and manufactures 

Batteries 



Transmission and distribution apparatus and parts 

Electrical refrigerators and parts 

Electric fans, number 

Radio apparatus 

Other electrical machinery and apparatus 

Steam engines, boilers and accessories 

Construction and conveying machinery and parts 

Well and refining machinery and parts 

Pumping equipment and parts 

Self-contained air-conditioning units and parts 

Air-conditioning equipment and parts 

Cotton gins, cotton presses and parts 

Air compressors, number 

Iron or steel body valves and parts for steam, water, oil, and gas. 

Other industrial machinery 

Tracklaying tractors (carburetor type) number 

Tracklaying tractors (fuel injection type), number 

Motor trucks, busses, and chassis, new, number 

Passenger cars and chassis (new) number 



26, 900 
31, 204 



492 
5,400 



19,921 



22, 530 
116,469 



4,245 



96, 326 
111, 106 



Value 



4,420 

860 

74 

9 

8 

4 

8 

12 

127 



110,482 



611 



20 



261 
439 



198 
7 

34 
5 

16 
5 

19 

14 

5 

8 

16 

16 

7 

35 

92 

43 

129 

666 

138 

51 

237 

69 

6 

100 

37 

44 



Quantity 



22, 286 
20, 919 



4,987 



2,500 
949 

16, 899, 248 
6, 941, 929 

5, 023, 278 

6, 146, 833 
1, 043, 160 



1,407 



324, 708 
117,321 



294 
344 



2, 125,913 



196 



339 
354 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



669 



UNITED STATES EXPORTS TO IRAN — Continued 
By Principiil Cinnniodities 
(Values in tliousaiuls of dollars) 



Commodity 



Quantity 



Value 



Quantity 



Automobile parts for assembly 

Automobile parts for replacement 

Automobile accessories 

Trailers, number 

Parts for aircraft 

Other machinery and vehicles 

Chemical specialties 

Industrial chemicals 

Other chemicals and related articles 

Scientific and professional instruments, apparatus, and supplies _ 

Land planes (powered) , number 

Wagons and drays, number 

All other exports 



23 



34 
193 

4 
34 

7 
19 

141 

111 

4 

11 



126 



25 

225 



0. 1 
327 
0.7 



17 

25 
126 

45 

16 

5 

108 

25 
158.6 



UNITED STATES IMPORTS FROM IRAN 

By Principal Commodities 
(Values in thousands of dollars) 



Commodity 



General imports, total 

Sausage casings, sheep, lamb, and goat, 1,000 lbs 

Goat and kid skins, dry and dry salted, 1,000 lbs 

Undressed furs: 

Fox, other than silver or black, 1,000 

Persian lamb and caracul, 1,000 

Other lamb and sheep, 1,000 

Goat and kid skin, 1,000 

Marten, 1,000 

Dates, fresh or dried, with pits removed, 1,000 lbs 

Pistache nuts, not shelled, 1 ,000 lbs 

Cumin seed, 1,000 lbs 

Tragacanth gum, 1,000 lbs 

Quince seed, 1,000 lbs 

Donskoi, Smyrna, and similar wools without Merino or English 

blood, washed (clean content), 1,000 lbs. 
Oriental, Axminster, Savonnerie, Aubusson, and other wool car- 
pets and carpeting, mats, etc., not made on power-driven loom, 
1,000 sq. ft. 
All other imports 



Quantity 



125 



25 

103 

5 

3 

8 

1,626 

683 

22 

2, 918 

113 

20 

2, 404 



4,380 
205 
120 

45 

354 

8 

1 

72 

71 

157 

1 

1, 195 

61 

4 

2,009 



77 



Quantity 



492 
2,023 

76 

660 

31 

81 

9 

2, 146 
441 

48 

3,324 

153 

414 

3, 122 



Value 



8,648 
926 
375 

140 

1, 660 

56 

33 

104 

67 

88 

30 

1,447 

117 

158 

2,650 



797 



670 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULX.ETIN 



INTERNATIONAL WHEAT COUNCIL 

[ Released to the press August 1 1 

The Memorandum of Agreement regarding 
international trade in wheat' dechires that a 
satisfactory sohition of the wheat problem re- 
quires an International Wheat Agreement and 
that such an agreement necessitates a conference 
of the nations willing to participate whicli have 
a substantial interest in international trade in 
wheat. There is attached to the Memorandum 
of Agreement a Draft Convention designed to 
facilitate further international consideration 
of the subject at such time as may be possible 
and to provide a basis for such interim meas- 
ures as may be found necessary. 

Recognizing that it is impracticable to con- 
vene at the present time an international con- 
ference to enter into such a convention and 
realizing the necessity foi' instituting tempo- 
rary controls and for establishing without de- 



lay a pool of wheat for relief purposes, the five 
participating countries agreed to regard as in 
effect among themselves certain of the arrange- 
ments described in the Draft Convention. With 
a view to the administration of these controls 
and of the relief pool of wheat, these arrange- 
ments provide for the establishment of an In- 
ternational Wlieat Council, tlie first meeting of 
wliich will be held early in August. 

The President has approved the designation 
of the following persons as United States dele- 
gates to the International Wlieat Council : 

The Honorable Paul H. Appleby. Under Secretary of 
Agriculture, chairman 

Leslie A. Wheeler, Director of Foreign Agricultural 
Relations, Department of Agriculture 

N'orris E. Dodd. Director, Western Division, Agricul- 
tural Adjustment Administration, Department of 
Agriculture 

Robert M. Carr, Ph.D., Assistant Chief, Division of 
Commercial Policy and Agreements, Department 
of state 



General 



ANALYSIS OF STATE DEPARTMENT APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1943 



The first of the following tables shows the 
increases and decreases in the State Depart- 
ment's appropriations for the 194.3 fiscal year as 
compared with 1!>42. The second table shows 



' Bulletin of July 4, 1942, p. 582. 

° For similar comparisons in connection with the 
1942 appropriations, see the Bulletin of July 19, 1941. 



increases and decrea.ses made by Congress in the 
1943 budget estimates submitted by the Presi- 
dent. 

The Department's appropriation act for 1943 
was approved by the President on July 2, 1942 
(Public Law 644). 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



671 



RECAPITULATION OF TABLE No. I 

Comparison or Depaktment of State Appkopriations in the Regular Annual Acts tor the Fiscal Yeahs 

1942 and 1943 



Appropriation titles 


Appropriations 
for 1943 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Increase (+), de- 
crease (-) lor 1943 


Reasons for increase or decrease 


Department Proper 


$5, 583, 200 

750, 000 

14, 783, 800 

1, 500, 000 

275, 000 

4, 164, 700 


$3, 168, 440 

150, 000 

13, 681, 900 

500, 000 

450, 000 

3, 548, 900 


+ $2,414,760 

+ 600,000 

+ 1, 101,900 

+ 1, 000, 000 
-175,000 
+ 615,800 




National Defense Activities 

Foreign Service (exclusive of 
Emergency Fund). 

Emergency Fund 

Foreign Service Buildings 

International Obligations 


See statements of details printed in 
Table I below. 


Grand Total 


27, 056, 700 


21, 499, 240 


+ 5, 557, 460 









TABLE No. I 

Comparison of Department of State Appropriations in the Regxtlar Annual Acts for the Fiscal Years 

1942 AND 1943 



Appropriation titles 


Appropriations 
tor 1943 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Increase (+), de- 
crease (-) for 1943 


Reasons for Increase or decrease 


Department Proper 










Salaries, Department of 


$4, 975, 000 


$2, 724, 440 


+ $2,250,560 


The increase is to provide for con- 


State. 








tinuing during 1943 numerous addi- 
tional emergency positions which 
were authorized or filled for only a 
portion of the fiscal year 1942; for 
additional emergency personnel; for 
promotions; and for adjustments as 
required under the present emer- 
gency. 


Contingent Expenses, De- 


311,000 


166, 600 


+ 144,400 


Increase is to provide for additional 


partment of State. 








equipment and supplies for expan- 
sion of Department's work and 
personnel. 


Printing and Binding, De- 


228, 600 


210, 900 


+ 17,700 


Increased demands placed on this 


partment of State. 








appropriation for printed supplies 
and for printing the Proclaimed 
List of Blocked Nationals will be 
met in part by this increase. 



672 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE No. I— Continued 

COMPAEISON OP DbPABTMENT OF StATE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE ReGDLAK ANNUAL AcTS FOB THE FISCAL YbAHS 

1942 AND 1943 



Appropriation titles 


Appropriations 
tor 1943 


Appropriations 
(or 1942 


Increase (+), de- 
crease (-) for 1943 


Reasons for increase or decrease 


Department Proper — Cont. 










Passport Agencies, Depart- 


$54, 400 


$52, 500 


+ $1,900 


Increase for salary advancements. 


ment of State. 










Collecting and Editing Offi- 


14, 200 


14, 000 


+ 200 


Increase for salary advancements. 


cial Papers of the Terri- 










tories of the United 










States. 










Total, Department 


5, 583, 200 


3, 168, 440 


+ 2,414,760 




Proper. 










National Defense Activ- 


750, 000 


150, 000 


+ 600,000 


Appropriation for 1943 is for the 


ities. 








Auxiliary Foreign Service, while 
appropriation for 1942 was for 
export-licensing work in the Depart- 
ment. Basis not comparable. 


Foreign Service 










Salaries of Ambassadors and 


595, 000 


635, 000 


-40,000 


This decrease is due to withdrawal of 


Ministers. 








diplomatic representation from war 
areas. 


Salaries of Foreign Service 


4, 224, 000 


4, 232, 600 


-8,600 


General decrease. 


Officers. 










Transportation, Foreign 


717,000 


717, 200 


-200 


General decrease. 


Service. 










Office and Living Quarters, 


2, 080, 000 


2, 138, 000 


-58,000 


This decrease results from reduction 


Foreign Service. 








in number of diplomatic and con- 
sular offices. 


Cost of Living Allowances, 


458, 000 


338, 500 


+ 119,500 


Increase is required for supplemental 


Foreign Service. 








allowances to American officers and 
employees to maintain families in 
the United States as a result of 
the emergency. 


Representation Allowances, 


150, 000 


163, 000 


-13,000 


General decrease. 


Foreign Service. 










Foreign Service Retirement 


630, 800 


621, 700 


+ 9, 100 


This increase is required pursuant to 


and Disability Fund. 








the computation by the actuary o 
the Treasury in accordance with 
existing law. 


Salaries, Foreign Service 


2, 897, 000 


2, 867, 000 


+ 30,000 


Increase granted for continuing salary- 


clerks. 








promotion policy. 


Miscellaneous salaries and 


722, 000 


730, 000 


-8,000 


Decrease of $17,000 due to reduction 


allowances, Foreign 








in number of diplomatic and con- 


Service. 








sular offices offset by increase of 
$9,000 for continuing salary-pro- 
motion policy. 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



673 



TABLE No. I— Continued 



Comparison op Depabtmbnt of State Appbopriation8 in 

1942 AND 



THE Regular 
1943 



Annual Acts fob the Fiscal Years 



Appropriation titles 


Appropriations 
for 1943 


Appropriations 
for 1942 


Increase (+), de- 
crease (— ) for 1943 


Reasons for increase or decrease 


Foreign Service — Continued 










Contingent Expenses, For- 


$2, 310, 000 


$1,238,900 


+ $1,071, 100 


Increase required for telegraph ex- 


eign Service. 








penses. 


Total, Foreign Service 


14, 783, 800 


13,681,900 


+ 1, 101,900 




(Exclusive of Emer- 










gency Fund). 










Emergencies Arising in the 


1, 500, 000 


500, 000 


-1-1,000,000 


General increase. 


Diplomatic and Consu- 










lar Service. 










Foreign Service Buildings 


275, 000 


450, 000 


-175,000 


General decrease in construction 


Fund. 








work. 


International Obligations 










United States Contributions 


996, 500 


1,026,600 


-30, 100 


Decrease due to Department's policy 


to International Com- 








of suspending contributions to Bu- 


missions, Congresses, 








reaus located in war areas. 


and Bureaus. 










International Boundary 


239, 600 


200, 000 


-1-39,600 


Increase required for maintenance and 


Commission, United 








operation of additional completed 


States and Me.xioo (Reg- 








portion of construction projects. 


ular Commission). 










Lower Rio Grande Flood 


949, 460 


950, 000 


-540 


General decrease. 


Control. 










Rio Grande Canalization 




440, 000 


— 440,000 


Project nearing completion. 


Project. 










Douglas - Agua Prieta Sani- 
tation Project. 


90, 000 




-1-90,000 


New project. 










Cordova Island Fence Con- 




6,500 


-6, 500 


Nonrecurring. 


struction. 






Western Boundary Fence 


15, 000 


25, 000 


-10,000 


General decrease In construction. 


Construction. 










International Boundary 


43, 800 


43, 000 


-1-800 


Increase for salary advancements. 


Commission, United 










States and Canada and 










Alaska and Canada. 










Salaries and Expenses, In- 


29, 200 


27, 000 


+ 2, 200 


Increase for salary advancements and 


ternational Joint Com- 








traveling expenses. 


mission, United States 










and Great Britain. 








■ 


Special and Technical Inves- 
tigations, International 


48, 500 


48, 500 














Joint Commission, 










United States and Great 










Britain. 











674 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



TABLE No. I— Continued 
CoMPAMBON OP Department of State Appkopbiations in the Reoular Annual Acts for the Fiscal Ybarb 







1942 AND 1943 




Appropriation titles 


Appropriations 
for 1943 


Appropriations 
tor 1942 


Increase (+), de- 
crease (-) tor 1943 


Reasons for increase or decrease 


International Obligations — 
Continued 

International Fisheries Com- 
mission. 

International Pacific Salmon 
Fisheries Commission. 

Arbitration of Claim be- 


$27, 680 
39, 960 


$28, 000 
40, 000 
14, 000 

700, 300 


-$320 

-40 

-14,000 

+ 984,700 


General decrease. 
General decrease. 
Nonrecurring. 


tween United States and 
Netherlands. 
Cooperation with the Ameri- 
can repubUcs. 


1, 685, 000 


Increase is for expansion of program. 
Broad administrative authority 
given Department makes listing of 
projects here impracticable. 


Total, International 
Obligations. 


4, 164, 700 


3, 548, 900 


+ 615,800 




Grand Total 


27, 056, 700 


21, 499, 240 


+ 5,557,460 









TABLE No. I— Part 2 
Supplemental and Depicibnct Appropriations Made Subsequent to the Submission of the 1943 Budget 



Appropriation titles 



Appropriations 
for 1943 • 



Appropriations 
for 1942 



Department Proper 

Salaries, Department of State 

Contingent Expenses, Department of State. 
Passport Agencies, Department of State 



$985, 320 

290, 000 

8,245 



Total, Department Propbr- 



1, 283, 565 



Foreign Service 

Transportation, Foreign Service 

Cost of Living, Foreign Service 

Miscellaneous Salaries and Allowances, Foreign Service 

Contingent Expenses, Foreign Service 

Emergencies Arising in the Diplomatic and Consular Service. 



800, 000 

120, 000 

9,000 

1, 591, 500 

6, 000, 000 



Total, Foreign Service. 



8, 520, 500 



See footnote at end table. 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



675 



TABLE No. I— Part 2— Continued 
Supplemental and Deficiency Appropriations Made Subsequent to the Submission of the 1943 Budget 



Appropriation titles 



Appropriations 
for 1943 ' 



Appropriations 
tor 1942 



International Obligations 

United States contributions to International Commissions, Congresses, and Bureaus. 

International Boundary Commission, United States and Mexico 

International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada and Alaska and 

Canada. 
International Joint Commission, United States and Great Britain: 

Salaries and expenses 

Special and technical investigations 

Alaskan International Highway Commission 

Agrarian Claims Commission. United States and Mexico 

International Meteorological Congress 

Inter- American Travel Congress 

Fourth Pan American Highway Congress 



$18, 800 

50, 000 

577 



400 

11,600 

4,000 

15, 000 

14, 500 

3,500 

6,500 



Total, International Obligations- 



124, 877 



Certified Claims- 



3,659 



Grand Total of Supplementals and Deficiencies. 



9, 932, 601 



" Supplemental appropriations for 1943 have not yet been made but there are a number already pending and others will be considered from time 
to time. 



Appropriation for Foreign Service Pay Adjustment 
(Contained in Independent OfKces Appropriation Bill) 



Aitproprialion titles 


Approt)riations 
tor 1943 


.Appropriations 
for 1942 


Increase (-|-). de- 
crease (-) for 1943 


Rea.'^ons for increase or decrease 


Foreign Service Pay Adjust- 
ment. 


$1, 350, 000 


$975, 000 


-1- $375, 000 


Increase requested on basis of specific 
computation at time estimate was 
prepared. 



TABLE No. II 
Department op State — Fiscal Year 1943 



Title of aiiproi)riation 



.Approved by 

President for 

submission to 

Congress 



Approiiriation 

approved by 

Congress 



Increase (+) 
decrease (— ) 



Department of State 

Salaries, Department of State 

Contingent Expenses, Department of State. 
Printing and Binding, Department of State 
Passport Agencies, Department of State 



$5, 023, 500 

320, 000 

260, 000 

54, 400 



$4, 975, 000 

311,000 

228, 600 

54, 400 



-$48,500 

-9,000 

-31,400 



676 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE No. II— Continued 
Department of State— Fiscal Year 1943 



Title of appropriation 



Approved by 

Pre?ident for 

submission to 

Contn"ess 



Appropriation 

approved by 

Congress 



Increase C+) 
decrease {— ) 



Department of State — Continued. 

Collecting and Editing Official Papers of the Territories of the United 
States. 



.$14,200 



.$14, 200 



Total, Department of State. 
National Defense Activities 



5, 672, 100 



5, 583, 200 



750, 000 



750, 000 



Foreign Service 

Salaries, Ambassadors and Ministers 

Salaries, Foreign .Service Officers 

Transportation, Foreign Service 

Office and Living Quarters, Foreign Service 

Cost of Living Allowances, Foreign Service 

Representation Allowances, Foreign Service 

Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund 

Salaries, Foreign Service Clerks 

Miscellaneous Salaries and Allowances, Foreign Service 

Contingent Expenses, Foreign Service 

Emergencies Arising in the Diplomatic and Consular Service. 



635, 000 

4, 298, 700 

717, 200 

2, 100, 000 

458, 500 

150, 000 

630, 800 

2, 897, 000 

748, 000 

2, 321, 900 

1, 600, 000 



595, 000 

4, 224, 000 

717, 000 

2, 080, 000 

458, 000 

150, 000 

630, 800 

2, 897, 000 

722, 000 

2, 310, 000 

1, 500, 000 



Total, Foreign Service. 



16, 457, 100 



16, 283, 800 



Foreign Service Buildings Fund. 



233, 000 



275, 000 



International Obligations 

Contributions, Quotas, etc 

Mexican Boundary Commission: 

Regular Commission 

Lower Rio Grande Flood Control 

Douglas- Agua Prieta Sanitation Project 

Fence Construction 

International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada and 
Alaska and Canada. 

International Joint Commission, United States and Great Britain: 

Salaries and Expenses 

Special and Technical Investigations 

International Fisheries Commission 

International Pacific Salmon Fisheries Commission 

Cooperation with the American republics 



1, 027, 480 

241,800 

950, 000 

90, 000 



43, 800 



31, 200 
48, 500 
28, 000 
40, 000 
1, 819, 500 



996, 500 

239, 600 

949, 460 

90, 000 

15, 000 

43, 800 



29, 200 
48, 500 
27, 680 
39, 960 
1, 685, 000 



Total, International Obligations- 



4, 320, 280 



4, 164, 700 



Grand Total- 



27, 432, 480 



27, 056, 700 



-$88, 900 



-40,000 
-74,700 

-200 
-20,000 

-500 



-26,000 
-11,900 



- 173, 300 
-f 42, 000 



-30,980 

-2,200 
-540 



+ 15, 000 



-2,000 



-320 

-40 

134, 500 



-155,580 



-375,780 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



677 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press July 31 ] 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through June 1942, as shown in the reports sub- 
mitted by persons and organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State for the solicitation 
and collection of contributions to be used for re- 
lief in belligerent countries, in conformity with 
the regulations issued pursuant to section 3(a) 
of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effective by 
the President's proclamations of September 5, 8, 
and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4, 1939 as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date, has been re- 
leased by the Department of State in mimeo- 
graphed form and may be obtained from the 
Department upon request (press release of 
July 31, 1942, 34 pages). 

Tliis tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present 
war. 



The Foreign Service 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Gordon P. Merriam was appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Division of Near Eastern 
Affairs, effective July 16, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1073). 

Mr. Edward G. Miller, Jr., and Mr. Bernard 
D. Meltzer were designated Assistant Chiefs 
of the Foreign Funds Control Division, effec- 
tive July 16, 1942 (Departmental Order 1074). 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press August 1] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since July 25, 1942 : 

Robert A. Acly, of Stockbridge, Mass., Consul 
at Johannesburg, Transvaal, Union of South 
Africa, has been assigned as Consul at Cape- 
town, Cape Province, Union of South Africa. 

Norris B. Chipman, of Washington, D. C, 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Cairo, Egypt, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Paul F. Du Vivier, of New York, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at St. John's, Newfoundland, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Marseilles, France. 

Arthur L. Richards, of Pasadena, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Capetown, Cape Province, Union of 
South Africa, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Legation at Pretoria, Transvaal, 
Union of South Africa. 

John S. Richardson, Jr., of Boston, Mass., 
Consul at Port Elizabeth, Cape Province, Union 
of South Africa, has been assigned as Consul at 
Johannesburg, Transvaal, Union of South 
Africa. 

Benjamin Reath Riggs, of Philadelphia, Pa., 
American Consul at Port Said, Egypt, has been 
assigned as Consul at Iskenderun, Turkey, in 
order to open a new office there. 

Herbert F. N. Schmitt, of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Vice Consul at Quebec, Canada, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Bogota, Colombia. 

William W. Schott, of Leavenworth, Kans., 
formerly Second Secretary of Legation at Buda- 
pest, Hungary, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary and Consul at Tangier, Morocco, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Charles W. Smith, of Burbank, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Vancouver, British Columbia, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba. 



678 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Charles H. Taliaferro, of Harrisonburg, Va., 
Vice Consul at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, Canada. 



8am E. AVoods, of Jackson, Miss., formerly 
Commercial Attache at Berlin, Germany, has 
been assigned as Consul General at Zurich, 
Switzerland. 



Treaty Information 



AGRICULTURE 

Conventions with Canada and Mexico 
Regarding Migratory Birds 

On July 14, 1942 the President, under au- 
thority granted in the jNIigratory Bird Treaty 
Act, approved and proclaimed amendatory reg- 
ulations submitted to him by the Secretary of 
the Interior permitting and governing the hunt- 
ing, taking, capture, killing, possession, sale, 
purchase, shipment, transportation, carriage, 
exportation, and importation of migratory 
birds and parts, nests, and eggs thereof in- 
cluded in the terms of the Convention for the 
Protection of Migratory Birds between the 
United States and Great Britain, in respect of 
Canada, signed on August 16, 1916 (Treaty 
Series 628), and the Convention for the Protec- 
tion of Migratory Bii'ds and Game Mammals 
between the United States and Mexico, signed 
February 7, 1936 (Treaty Series 912). The 
regulations are printed in the Federal Register 
for July IT, 1942, page 5471. The regulations 
amend those approved by Proclamation 2345 
of August 11, 1939, as last amended by Procla- 
mation 2518 of October 16, 1941. 

Protocol Extending the Duration of the Interna- 
tional Agreement Regarding the Regulation of 
Production and Marketing of Sugar of May 
6, 1937 

The International Sugar Council by a resolu- 
tion adopted on August 29, 1941 recommended 



that steps be taken to insure the continuance 
after August 31, 1942 of the International 
Agreement Eegarding the Regulation of Pro- 
duction and Marketing of Sugar, signed at Lon- 
don on May 6, 1937. Pursuant to this resolution 
a draft protocol was drawn ujj and transmitted 
by tlie British Government to the governments 
which were signatory to the agreement of May 
6, 1937, with a request that they signify their 
willingness to sign the protocol. The British 
Ambassador at Washington by a note dated 
March 27, 1942 transmitted the draft protocol 
to this Government and under date of June 19, 
1942, the American Ambassador at London was 
autliorized to sign the protocol for the Govern- 
ment of the United States of America and to 
sign separately in respect of the Common- 
wealth of the Philippines. At the request of the 
Haitian Government the American Ambassa- 
dor was subsequently authorized to sign the 
protocol in the name of and in respect of the 
Haitian Government. 

By a telegram dated July 24, 1942 the De- 
pai'tment was informed by the Ambassador that 
the protocol had been signed on July 22. 1942 
by the following countries: United States of 
America, Australia, Belgium, Cuba, Czecho- 
slovakia, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Nether- 
lands, Peru, Commonwealth of the Philippines, 
Union of South Africa, Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, and United Kingdom. 

The text of the draft protocol as furnished 
by the British Ambassador follows: 



AUGUST 1, 1942 



'679 



"Protocol To Enforce and To Prolong After 
August 31, 1942, the International 
Agreement Kbgarding the Regulation 
of Production and Marketing of Sugar, 
Signed in London on Mat 6, 1937 

"Whereas an Agreement refrarding the Regu- 
lation of Production and Marketing of Sugar 
(hereafter referred to as the Agreement) was 
signed in London on tlie 6th May, 1937; and 

"Whereas Article 48 of the Agreement pro- 
vides as follows : 

"'(a) The present Agreement shall come 
into force on the 1st September, 1937, if at that 
date it has been ratified by all the signatory 
Governments. 

"'(b) If by the above-mentioned date the 
instruments of ratification of all the signatories 
have not been deposited, the Governments 
which have ratified the Agreement may decide 
to put it into force among themselves '; and 

"Whereas the ratifications of all the signa- 
tories were not deposited by the 1st Septem- 
ber, 1937; and 

"Whereas the Agreement has been ratified by 
the Governments of the following countries : 

Union of South Africa, 

Commonwealth of Australia, 

Brazil, 

Belgium, 

United Kingdom of Great Britain and 

Northern Ireland, 
Cuba, 

Czechoslovakia, 
Dominican Republic, 
Germany, 
Haiti, 
Hungary, 
India, 

Netherlands, 
Peru, 
Poland, 
Portugal, 

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, 
United States of America; and 



"Whereas it seems desirable that the said 
Agreement should be put in force between those 
Governments which have ratified it, the Gov- 
ernments of the Union of South Africa, the 
Connnonwealth of Australia, Brazil, Belgium, 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland, Cuba, &c. 

"Now, therefore, the undersigned being duly 
authorised by their respective Governments 
have agreed as follows : 

"Article 1 

"The Agreement shall be regarded as having 
come into force in respect of the Governments 
signatories of the present Protocol, on the 1st 
September, 1937. 

"Article 2 
"After the 31st August, 1942. the Agreement 
shall continue in force among the said Govern- 
ments for a period of two years from that 
date. 

"Article 3 

"The i^resent Protocol shall bear this day's 
date and shall remain open for signature until 
the 31st August, 1942. It shall take effect in 
respect of each signatory Government on the 
date of signature. 

"In witness whereof the undersigned, beina; 
duly authorised thereto by their respective Gov- 
ermnents, have signed the present Protocol and 
liave affixed thereto their seals. 

"Done in London on the day of , 

1942, in a single copy which shall be deposited 
in the archives of the Government of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land, and of which certified copies shall be 
furnished to the signatory Governments." 

FRIENDSHIP 
Treaty Between China and Iraq 

The American Ambassador at Chungking re- 
[lorted by a despatch dated June 17, 1942, that 
the Treaty of Friendship between China and 



680 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



Iraq signed on March 16, 1942, was ratified by 
the Executive Yiian of tlie Chinese Government 
on June 16, 1942. 

A tentative translation of the text of the 
treaty which appeared in the press, Al-Iraq, of 
May 8, 1942, as furnished by the Legation at 
Baghdad, follows: 

"His Majes'it the King of Iraq and His 
Excellency hie Peesident or the Nation^vl 

Go\'EENMENT OF THE CHINESE REPUBLIC 

"AVhereas they desire to establish and consol- 
idate the ties of sincere friendship and good 
understanding existing between their two coun- 
tries, have, for this purpose, agreed to conclude 
a Treaty of Friendship and appointed the fol- 
lowing as their Plenipotentiaries : 

"His Majesty the King or Iraq : 

"Dr. Abdullah Damaluji, Mirmter for For- 
eign A-ffairs 
"His Excellency the President of the Na- 
tional Go\'KRNment of the Chinese 
Republic : 
"Dr. Chang Peng-Chun, Envoy Extraordi- 
nary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the 
Chinese Republic to Turkey; 
"Who after having communicated their full 
powers, found in good and due form, have 
agreed as follows : 

"Article I 

"There shall prevail between the Kingdom of 
Iraq and the Chinese Republic and between the 
nationals of both countries, permanent peace 
and sincere perpetual friendship. 

"Article II 

"Each of the High Contracting Parties agrees 
to establish diplomatic relations on the bases of 
the Public International Law, and they agree 
that the diplomatic representatives of any of 
the two in the territory of the other shall enjoy, 
on the basis of reciprocity, all the rights, priv- 
ileges and immunities generally recognized by 
the Public International Law. 



"Article III 

"Each of the High Contracting Parties agrees 
to conclude a special agreement between the two 
countries at a later date to oi-ganize consular and 
commercial relations between them and also to 
stipulate the terms of residence by the nationals 
of any of the two in the territory of the other 
party. 

"Article IV 

"This Treaty shall be ratified as soon as pos- 
sible and shall be considered as effective fifteen 
days after the exchange of the instruments of 
ratification. The exchange of the instruments 
of ratification shall take place at Ankara. 

"In faith whereof the respective Plenipoten- 
tiaries have signed the present Treaty and af- 
fixed thereto their seals. 

"Done in duj)licate this 27th day of Safar 
1361 Hijra corresponding to the 16th day of 
the third month of the 31st year of the Chinese 
Republic or March 16, 1942." 

COMMERCE 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 

The commercial agreement between the 
United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, effective on August 6, 1937 (Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 105) and renewed during 
successive years, was continued in force until 
August 6, 1943 by an exchange of notes on July 
31, 1942 between the Secretary of State and the 
Soviet Ambassador. The text of the identic 
notes, together with the text of the 1937 agree- 
ment, appears in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "Commercial Policy". 

Trade-Agreement Negotiations with Iran 

An announcement regarding intention to ne- 
gotiate a trade agreement with the Government 
of Iran, together with tables showing trade be- 
tween the two countries during 1929^0, appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 



AUGUST 1, 194 2 



681 



Legislation 



First Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Act, 1943: An Act Making supplemental appropria- 
tions for tlie national defense for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1943, and for other purposes. Ap- 
proved, Jul.v 25, 1942, [H. R. 7319.1 Public Law 
678, 77th Cong. 20 pp. 

Alaska Highway : Hearings before a subcommittee of 
the Committee on Foreign Relations, U. S. Senate, 
77th Cong., 2d sess., on S. Res. 253, a resolution pro- 



viding for an Inquiiy into the location of the Alaska 
Highway on the so-called C or prairie route. June 1, 
12, and 16, 1942. iv, 91 pp. 




Department of State 

Publications of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1942. Publi- 
cation 1767. 31 pp. Free. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.76 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPBOVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OP THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



AUGUST 8, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 163— Publication 1782 



C 



ontents 




The War Paec 

Visit to Washington of the Queen of the Netherlands . . 685 

Relief ships to Greece 686 

Visit of the King of Yugoslavia to the United States . 687 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 5 to Revision II ... . 688 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
International Wheat Council 688 

American Republics 

Message from President Roosevelt to the President of 

Colombia 689 

Arrangement for migration to the United States of 

Mexican farm labor . . . . _ 689 

Death of the Foreign Minister of El Salvador .... 690 

Death of Dr. Gil Borges of Venezuela 690 

Rubber agreement with Honduras 690 

Europe 

Birthday of the King of Norway 691 

The Department 

Creation of the Office of the Chief Clerk and Adminis- 
trative Assistant 691 

Appointment of officers 692 

Treaty Information 

Postal: Universal Postal Convention, 1939 693 

Health: International Agreement Relating to Statistics 

of Causes of Death 693 

[over] 



U. S, SUPERINTENDENT OF OOCJCifN" 

SEP 2 1942 







onten f s-continued 



Treaty Information — Continued 

Commerce: Page 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 693 

Memorandum of Agreement Regarding International 

Trade in Wheat 693 

Strategic materials: Rubber Agreement with Hon- 
duras 693 

Agriculture: Farm-Labor-Migration Arrangement with 

Mexico 694 

Publications 694 

Legislation 694 



The War 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF THE QUEEN OF THE NETHERLANDS 



[Released to the press by the White Ho^se August 5] 

At a dinner at the White House on August 5 
honoring Queen Wilhehnina of the Nether- 
lands, the President made the following toast 
to the Queen: 

"I think that all of us at this table tonight 
realize the symbolism of the visit of Her Maj- 
esty to this country of ours. We know the 
great part played by the Dutch people in the 
exploration and colonization that began in the 
earliest days of American history. 

"And we remember that very soon after we 
engaged in war to gain our independence it 
■was a Dutch officer on a Dutch island in the 
West Indies who fired one of the first salutes 
to the flag of the United States carried on 
an American warship under the command of 
Captain Isaiah Robinson. 

"The friendship between our great nations 
has never ceased. It has been the friendship 
of peoples who lived for the same kind of 
human rights and the same kind of national 
independence. 

"May I add a personal note ? The people of 
this great democracy everywhere hold tlie head 
of the Netherlands Nation in respect not alone 
for her great leadership and high achievements, 
but they have in addition a deep and affec- 
tionate regard for her personality as the 
Mother of her people. 

"My wife and I will always i-emember the 
privilege we have had and are having in a 
personal friendship with her and her daughter 
and her grandchildren. That friendship will 
always endure. 

"All of us here tonight join in a toast to the 
Queen." 

476750- 



Responding to the President's toast, the 
Queen said: 

"I am greatly touched by the friendly wel- 
come you and Mrs. Roosevelt have extended to 
me at the Wliite House. 

"This visit to this capital city is to me the 
culminating point of my stay in the United 
States. 

"Great thoughts have been thought here, and 
great decisions taken, and the portraits of your 
predecessors which adorn these walls are a 
most expressive epitome of America's stirring 
history. 

"I know that when you make me feel a wel- 
come guest your thoughts are, like mine, with 
my country, where at this time, in East and 
West, oppression breeds resistance and cruelty 
increases determination to hold out. 

"These hard times will pass, and when at 
last victory will be ours my compatriots, like 
myself, will know that this will be largely 
thanks to American spiritual and material 
forces alongside thcce of the other United 
Nations. 

"I therefore raise my glass to drink the toast 
of your health, Mr. President, as the head of 
this great country, and of the success of its 
armed forces." 

[Released to the press by the White House August 6] 

At the Washington Navy Yard on August 6, 
on the occasion of the transfer of a new warship 
to the Netherlands Government under the 
Lend-Lease Act, the President spoke as follows : 

685 



686 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



Yoxm Majesty : 

From the earliest days of history, the people 
of the Netherlands — ^your people — have been 
willing to fight for their freedom and independ- 
ence. They have won out in the face of great 
odds. 

Once more they are fighting for that inde- 
pendence. Once more they will win and main- 
tain it. 

We, too, are fighting for our freedom, and it 
is natural and right that the Netherlands and 
the United States have joined hands in the com- 
mon struggle. 

The gallant exploits of your countrymen have 
won the admiration of all the other peoples of 
the world — first in the Netherlands itself and 
later in the Netherlands Indies where, in the 
face of overwhelming numbers, your sons and 
our sons went down fighting to the bitter end 
on land and sea and in the air. Their memory 
inspires us to redouble our efforts for the cause 
for which they gave their lives. 

The Netherlands Navy is today adding fresh 
laurels to those already won in battle from the 
North Sea to the Java Straits. We Americans 
can know no better cause than to assist your 
gallant Navy. 

It is, therefore, as a tangible expression of 
our admiration for all that the Netherlands 
Navy has done and is doing that I have the 
great pleasure of turning over to you, imder the 
provisions of the Lend-Lease Act, this ship. 

Built by American workers in American 
yards, she will hereafter fly the brave ensign of 
the Netherlands. 

And she will bear the name of one who has 
come to stand in the eyes of the world as a 
symbol of Netherlands' courage and Nether- 
lands' determination. 

For it is as the Queen Wilhelmlna that she 
will embark upon her new career. 

I ask Your Majesty to receive this ship as 
a symbol of the friendship and admiration of 
the people of the United States. 

The response of Her Majesty Wilhelmin'j, 
Queen of the Netherlands, follows: 



Mb. President: 

I am very happy that the transfer of this ves- 
sel under the provisions of the lend-lease agree- 
ment takes place during my presence in Wash- 
ington. This enables me to thank you per- 
sonally for your gracious initiative and for 
your continued personal interest. 

I see in this ceremony fresh evidence of the 
excellent spirit of friendship which ever since 
the days of Paul Jones has existed between our 
two Navies. 

This admirable vessel, replete with the most 
modern technical devices, is a valuable addi- 
tion to our naval forces. 

It will operate in close collaboration with 
the United States Navy against our common 
enemies. The officers and crew will do all 
they can to live up to the friendly thought to 
which we owe this new unit of our Navy. 

I have gladly accepted your suggestion to 
give it my name. 

IVIay your love of the sea and of seaman- 
ship pervade this vessel and inspire those on 
board. 

With this wish I now commission the Queen 
Wilhelmina. 



RELIEF SHIPS TO GREECE 

(Eel eased to the press August 71 

On the initiative of the Swedish Red Cross, 
negotiations were undertaken some months ago 
thiough the Swedish Govermnent regarding 
relief for the starving population of Greece. 
The Swedish Government having expressed its 
willingness that Swedish vessels lying in Swed- 
ish ports be employed for this purpose, the 
United States, British, and Canadian Govern- 
ments immediately declared themselves ready 
to authorize monthly shipments of 15,000 tons 
of wheat or flour from North America to 
Greece, subject to appropriate conditions gov- 
erning the distribution of these imports and of 
Greek native produce in the interests of the 
Greek people and on the understanding that 
a neutral commission would receive the neces- 
sary control and reporting facilities from the 



AUGUST 8, 194 2 



687 



occupying powers. Following the negotia- 
tions conducted by the Swedish Government, 
the German and Italian Governments agreed 
to this proposal. The belligerent powers have 
accordingly granted safe conducts for the voy- 
ages of the Swedish vessels which will be used. 
The first three, the Formosa, the Eros, and 
the CameJia, ha%'e already loaded and are 
scheduled to leave Montreal on August 7 for 
Greece. A Swedish-Swiss commission has been 
set up to handle the actual distribution of the 
supplies, under the general supervision of the 
existing organization of the International Red 
Cross Committee, in Greece. 

The Greek Government, the American and 
Canadian Red Cross Societies, and the Greek 
War Relief Association are actively supporting 
and cooperating in the operation of this plan. 

Reports reaching the Department of State 
from Greece have portrayed conditions of suf- 
fering from inanition and death from starva- 
tion appalling almost beyond belief. 

Information has also been received through 
American officials recently returning from Eu- 
rope confirming that the small quantities of 
foodstuffs which have been sent to Greece dur- 
ing the past year under the United Nations' 
auspices and with the cooperation of the Turk- 
ish Government have been effectively distrib- 
uted through the agency of the Internationa] 
Red Cross Committee and consumed by the 
Greek people only. The reports of these offi- 
cials indicttte, however, that although these 
supplies have unquestionably saved many per- 
sons from death they have been inadequate to 
prevent further deterioration of the general 
food-supply situation. 



VISIT OF THE KING OF YUGOSLAVIA 
TO THE UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press August 4] 

An exchange of telegrams between the Presi- 
dent of the United States and His Majesty 
King Peter II of Yugoslavia follows, 

476760—12 — ? 



"July 29, 1942. 

"At the moment of my departure from the 
United States, I wish to thank you, Mr. Presi- 
dent, for the warm welcome which you and the 
American people have extended to me during 
my visit to this great country. 

"I cannot but feel that the many tokens of 
warmth and hospitality which I gratefully 
accepted during my stay were intended not for 
me alone but for my people who have always 
had the greatest sympathy and admiration for 
their American brothers. 

"When a few weeks ago I crossed the ocean 
to come to the United States I considered my- 
self a messenger of my martyred people who 
are now living through their most trying days 
resisting the invaders and straining all their 
forces toward final victory. 

"Over a year ago the Yugoslav people gath- 
ered in the streets of Belgrade and asked me to 
be with them to protect their liberty. At that 
time we found inspiration in the hope that the 
United States would stand by all those who 
preferred to fight rather than to submit to the 
infamy of slavery. 

"Today American soldiers have become our 
comrades-in-arms on every battlefield — on 
land, in the air and on the seas — wherever the 
battle is waged. From their homes darkened 
by mourning, from their refuges in the moun- 
tains and in the forests, the people of Europe 
admired the achievements of your soldiers, 
seamen and pilots, and fervently pray for 
their continued success. 

"I was privileged to see something of the 
American war effort in your training camps, 
in your plants and factories. I saw the shining 
arms and planes ready to be sent to battle, so 
formidable and so perfect that any fighting 
man must be proud to handle them. I have 
observed the spirit of American men and 
women, I have seen the resolution and deter- 
mination written on their faces, and I am con- 
vinced that nothing can ever stop the United 
States in its onward march to victory. A de- 
mocracy which fights entirely with the clean 
weapons of democracy must needs win the war 
and the peace that will follow, 



688 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"The Yugoslavs, one of the United Nations, 
feel that they shall be linked to the United 
States as much in this present war as in the 
future peace. My people and I cherish our 
friendship with the United States and are 
deeply grateful for its help and support in 
this, the most momentous period of their his- 
tory. 

"I wish to thank you also, Mr. President, for 
the warm personal kindness you have shown me 
and I wish you and your family, and the en- 
tire American nation all strength and happiness 
today and ever. 

Peter" 



"The White House, Jxdy 31, 1942. 

"Your Majesty's visit was a personal pleasure 
which I shall long remember. It gave also to 
the American people an opportunity to do honor 
to the valiant Yugoslav People in their noble 
and unceasing fight for the liberation of their 
country. 

"I noted with pleasure the energy and thor- 
ouglmess with which you entered into the daily 
life of America at war, seeking out the men 
at work and studying the conversion of our great 
industries to the sole purpose of providing the 
armaments with which the war shall be won. 
I am glad that you carried with you the con- 
viction of America's determination to press on 
to victory with everything we have. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 5 
TO REVISION II 

[Released to the press August 3] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coordi- 
nator of Inter-American Affairs, on August 3 
issued Supplement 5 to Revision II of the Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, 
promulgated May 12, 1912.' 

' 7 Federal Register 5970. 



Part I of this supplement contains 167 ad- 
ditional listings in the other American repub- 
lics and 31 deletions. Part II contains 99 addi- 
tional listings outside the American reirablics 
and 9 deletions. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



INTERNATIONAL WHEAT COUNCIL 

[Released to the press August 6] 

The International Wheat Council, which 
met for the first time in the offices of the 
United States Department of Agriculture on 
Monday, August 3, concluded its sessions on 
Wednesday, August 5. Following the an- 
nouncement on July 2 of the approval of the 
Memorandum of Agreement regarding interna- 
tional trade in wheat between the Governments 
of Argentina, Australia, Canada, the United 
Kingdom, and the United States,^ the five Gov- 
ernments named as their delegates to the 
Council the following officials : 

Argentina: 

Sefior A. M. Viacava, Commercial Counselor, Argen- 
tine Embassy (London) 

Senor Miguel E. QuirDO-Laralle, Commercial Coun- 
selor, Argentine Embassy (Washington) 
Australia: 

Mr. E. McCarthy, Assistant Secretary, Department 
of Commerce (Canberra) 

Mr. F. L. McDougall, Economic Adviser to the 
Australian Government (London) 
Canada: 

Mr. Lester B. Pearson, Minister Counselor, Cana- 
dian Legation (Washington) 

Mr. A. M. Shaw, Director of Marketing Service, 
Department of Agriculture (Ottawa) 

Mr. C. F. Wilson, Chief, Agricultural Branch, Do- 
minion Bureau of Statistics (Ottawa) 

Mr. J. J. Deutsch, Special Wartime Assistant to 
the Department of External Affairs (Ottawa) 
United Kingdom: 

Mr. Noel Hall, British Minister to the United 
States (Washington) 



' Bulletin of August 1, 1£M2, p. 670. 



AUGUST 8, 194 2 



689 



Mr. B. Twentyman, British Food Mission to the 
United States (Washington) 
United States: 

Mr. Paul Appleby, Under Secretary of Agriculture 
(Washington) 

Mr. Leslie A. Wheeler, Director, Office of Foreign 
Agricultural Relations, Department of Agri- 
culture (Washington) 

Mr. N. B. Dodd, Director, Western Division, Agri- 
cuiltural Adjustment Administration, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture (Washington) 

Mr. K. M. Carr, Assistant Chief, Division of Com- 
mercial Policy and Agreements, Department of 
State (Washington) 

The first meeting was largely devoted to 
questions of organization. Mr. Paul Appleby 
was elected chairman of the Council. The 
Council established an Executive Committee, 
under the chairmanship of Mr. Leslie A. 
Wheeler, consisting of one delegate from each 
of the five Governments. Mr. Andrew Cairns 
was appointed secretary of the Council. 

The Council discussed the positive measures 
contemplated to control production in 1943 
with the object of minimizing the accumulation 
of excessive stocks and instructed the Secre- 
tariat to prepare, under the direction of the 
Executive CoHunittee, a comprehensive report 
on the measures being employed in each coun- 
try to control production. The Council took 
note of recent increases in yields per acre in 
several producing areas, and the Executive 
Committee was asked to consider the influences 
bearing on any trends in this connection. 

The next meeting of the Council will be held 
in January 1943. 



American Republics 



MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT 
TO THE PRESIDENT OF COLOMBIA 

[Released to the press August 7] 

The President has addressed the following 
telegram to His Excellency Dr. Alfonso Lopez 
on the occasion of his assuming the Presidency 
of Colombia: 



" The White House, August 7, 19^2. 
" I take pleasure in extending to Your Excel- 
lency my sincere and whole-hearted congratu- 
lations as you assume the Presidency of 
Colombia. 

" The unswerving devotion of the people of 
Colombia to the democratic processes is one of 
the proudest of our common heritages. I look 
forward with profound gratification to another 
period of fruitful collaboration with you as 
the chosen representative of the people of your 
great country. Now, more than ever, in the 
critical days through which we are passing, 
must there be justified the faith of our peoples 
in the ability of their governments to face 
courageously a multitude of exacting problems 
and to defeat wholly and conclusively the ene- 
mies of our Christian civilization. 

"I welcomed the opportunity, afforded me 
by your recent visit, to confirm our personal 
friendship and to reaffii-m our devotion to the 
ideals by which our coimtries are ever more 
closely bound. 

"Please accept, dear Mr. President, my fer- 
vent wishes for a successful and happy admin- 
istration and for the welfare of the people of 
the Republic of Colombia. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

ARRANGEMENT FOR MIGRATION TO THE 
UNITED STATES OF MEXICAN FARM 
LABOR 

[Released to the press August 6] 

The Department of State announced on 
August 6 that an arrangement had been made 
between the Government of the United States 
and the Government of Mexico to make pos- 
sible the temporary migration of Mexican 
agricultural workers to the United States to 
meet the increasing demand for farm labor 
caused by the war emergency. The arrange- 
ment, which demonstrates the effective coopera- 
tion between the two Governments in the war 
effort, provides guaranties as to wage rates, 
living conditions, and repatriation for the 
Mexican workers, while specifying that they 
are not to be employed to replace other workers 



690 

or for the purpose of reducing rates of pay 
previously established. 

At the request of the Department of Agri- 
culture, the War Manpower Commission, and 
other appropriate agencies of this Government, 
and after the United States Employment Serv- 
ice had certified to the existence of certain 
shortages of agricultural workers in the South- 
west, the Department of State recently pro- 
posed to the Mexican Government a plan for 
this migration. It was pointed out by the De- 
partment of Agriculture and other agencies 
that the enrolment of men in the armed serv- 
ices, the movement of farm workers into in- 
dustry, and the Government's program to 
increase agricultural production to meet war- 
time needs were causing a shortage of agri- 
cultural labor which could not be met by the 
recruiting of workers in the United States. 

The arrangement made with the Mexican 
Government is to be administered by the Farm 
Security Administration of the Department of 
Agriculture in cooperation with other inter- 
ested agencies, and it states that each worker 
is to be given a written contract, upon the 
expiration of which he is to return to Mexico. 
The arrangement also provides that as tem- 
porary residents these workers will be ex- 
empted from compulsory military service in 
the armed forces of the United States. 

Further details regarding the arrangement 
are being announced by the War Manpower 
Commission and the Department of Agricul- 
ture. 



DEATH OF THE FOREIGN MINISTER 
OF EL SALVADOR 

[Released to the press August 3] 

The Acting Secretary of State, Sumner 
Welles, has made the following statement: 

"I have learned with deep regret of the death 
of Dr. Miguel Angel Araujo, the Salvadoran 
Minister of Foreign Affairs. Respected uni- 
versally throughout the New World for his tal- 
ents and statesmanship, Dr. Araujo died a few 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

days before his eightieth birthday, after serv- 
ing his country for over ten years as Foreign 
Minister. In his policies he showed himself 
a staunch foe of totalitarianism and a true 
friend of Pan American ideals. The Govern- 
ment of the United States shares the grief of 
President Martinez, the Salvadoran people, and 
Dr. Araujo's family, at his passing." 



DEATH OF DR. GIL BORGES 
OF VENEZUELA 

(Releasea to the press August 4] 

The Acting Secretary of State has sent the 
following telegram to His Excellency Dr. Ca- 
racciolo Parra-Perez, Minister of Foreign Af- 
fairs of Venezuela, on the occasion of the death 
of Dr. Esteban Gil Borges: 

"August 4, 1942. 

"I have learned with the very deepest regret 
of the death of Doctor Esteban Gil Borges. I 
share with Your Excellency and with Dr. Gil 
Borges' many friends throughout Venezuela and 
the United States a keen sense of personal loss. 

"During the years Dr. Gil Borges was in 
Washington he endeared himself to all those 
who had the good fortune to be associated with 
him. His untiring devotion to the strengthen- 
ing of the friendship between Venezuela and 
the United States and to the great cause of 
inter-American relations, and his brilliant prac- 
tical demonstrations of that devotion during his 
two periods as Foreign Minister of your great 
country have earned him a lasting place in the 
grateful memory of the people of the United 
States. 

Sumner Welles" 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH HONDURAS 

[Released to the press August .3] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with the 
Republic of Honduras was announced on Au- 
gust 3 by the Department of State, the Rubber 
Reserve Company, and the Board of Economic 
Warfare. 



AUGUST 8;, 1942 



691 



Under the terms of the agieement the Rubber 
Reserve Company will, until December 31, 1946, 
purchase all rubber produced in Honduras which 
is not required for essential domestic needs there. 



Europe 



BIRTHDAY OF THE KING OF NORWAY 

[Released to the press August 3] 

The President has sent the following telegi'am 
to His Majesty Haakon VII, King of Norway, 
on the occasion of His Majesty's seventieth birth- 
day: 

"The White House, August 3, 19J^. 

"I am particularly happy to extend m.y heart- 
felt felicitations upon this the seventieth an- 
niversary of Your Majesty's birth. The inflexi- 
ble determination shown by the Norwegian 
people in their fight to roll back the black 
shadows of Nazism owes no little of its strength 
to the example set by Your Majesty's own 
superb courage. 

"May God gi-ant to the Norwegian people a 
long continuance of your wise leadership and 
victorious outcome of their travail. 

Fkanklin D Roosevelt" 



The Department 



CREATION OF THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF 
CLERK AND ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIST- 
ANT 

The Secretary of State, on August 6, 1942, 
issued the following Departmental order (no. 
1078) : 

"There is hereby created in the Department 
of State the Office of the Chief Clerk and Ad- 



ministrative Assistant which shall exercise 
supervision in all matters relating to the ad- 
ministration of the Department within the 
scope of the functions of this Office which 
shall embrace: 

"The administration of the appropriation 
'Contingent Expenses, Department of State', 
including the preparation and justification of 
budget estimates therefor and the responsi- 
bility for the control of expenditures there- 
luider; the allotment of office space, the cus- 
tody of the property of the Department, and 
the maintenance of a current inventory; the 
authentication of certificates under the seal of 
the Department of State, for and in the name 
of the Secretary of State or the Acting Secre- 
tary of State, and the operation of the co- 
ordinating service for translating documents 
for the Federal Government; the assembling 
for the Department of State of appropriate 
material for exhibition purposes at expositions, 
national and international, its preparation and 
installation, the care and maintenance of exhib- 
its, and responsibility for all expenditures con- 
nected therewith; supervision of the telephone 
switchboard and the telephone service of the 
Department ; the initiation and enforcement of 
such general regulations as may be required 
for the proper business management of the 
Department; the signing of such papers as 
fall within the scope of his Office; the direc- 
tion, as head of the Purchasmg and Inventory, 
Duplicating, Supply, Photographic, Telephone 
and Mail Sections of his Office, and such addi- 
tional duties as may be delegated to him by the 
Secretary of State and the Assistant Secretary 
of State and Budget Officer. 

"The Chief Clerk and Administrative Assist- 
ant is the Department's Liaison Officer with 
other Executive Departments and Agencies of 
the Government in all matters relating to the 
functions of his Office. 

"The Chief Clerk and Administrative Assist- 
ant is hereby authorized to sign contracts, upon 
the written authorization of the Assistant 



692 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Secretary of State and Budget Officer or, in his 
absence, another Assistant Secretary of State, 
for contingent expenses under tlie appropri- 
ation 'Contingent Expenses, Department of 
State', under appropriations for passport 
agencies, international commissions, confer- 
ences, congresses, conventions, meetings and 
expositions, and under miscelhaneous appro- 
priations. He shall certify vouchers covering 
expenditures coming under the appropriation 
'Contmgent Expenses, Department of State' 
and covering such other miscellaneous obliga- 
tions as he may, under written authorization 
from the Assistant Secretary of State and 
Budget Officer, or in his absence, another Assist- 
ant Secretary of State, be directed to incur. 
He may, in special cases, waive the requirement 
of advance payment for unofficial photostat 
work in accordance with the provisions of 
Departmental Order 529. He shall certify to 
the authorization of other officers to approve 
vouchers covering expenditures from miscel- 
laneous appropriations. He shall consolidate 
in his Office and shall be responsible for the 
supervision of the purchasing functions of the 
Department; he shall establish in his Office a 
centralized mail reception and distribution 
center and shall supervise the handling of 
diplomatic pouches in collaboration with the 
Division of Foreign Service Administration, 
the receipt and distribution of incoming mail 
and the dispatch of all outgoing conespondence 
by mail. 

"The Chief Clerk and Administrative Assist- 
ant is authorized and directed to certify, with- 
out seal, for and in the name of the Secretary 
of State or the Acting Secretary of State, a 
copy of each treaty or convention proclaimed 
by the President on or after January 23. 1934, 
and likewise a copy of every other international 
agreement entered into by the United States 
with a foreign country on or after January 
23, 1934, which when so certified will be for- 
warded by the Department to the xVmerican 
Minister at Bern for transmission by him to 



the Secretary General of the League of Nations 
for registration by the Secretariat of the 
League and publication in the League of Na- 
tions Treaty Series. 

"The Chief Clerk and Administrative Assist- 
ant is authorized to take appropriate adminis- 
trative action on notifications of undue delay in 
the handling of correspondence, in accordance 
with the provisions of Departmental Order 
724. 

"He shall also exercise the functions previ- 
ously delegated to the Director of Personnel 
under the following Departmental Orders : 
Departmental Order 800, relating to the report- 
ing of mail matter sent free of postage; 
Departmental Order 824, relating to the dis- 
position of records and files; and Departmental 
Order 989, relating to the preparation, produc- 
tion, and distribution of publications and in- 
formational matter. 

"Mr. Millard L. Kenestrick is hereby desig- 
nated Chief Clerk and Administrative Assist- 
ant of the Department. 

"The symbol of the Office of the Chief Clerk 
and Administrative Assistant shall be CC. 
The symbol of the Diplomatic Pouch and Mail 
Section shall continue to be MA. 

"The Director of Personnel is authorized to 
obtain the essential personnel assistance for the 
Office of the Chief Clerk and Administrative 
Assistant within the limits of appropriated 
funds. 

"The provisions of this Order shall be effec- 
tive immediately and .shall supersede the pro- 
visions of any existing Order in conflict there- 
with." 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Lloyd D. Yates, a Foreign Service officer 
of class VII, was designated an Acting Assist- 
ant Chief of the Division of Foreign Activity 
Correlation, effective August 6, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1079). 



AUGUST S, 194 2 



693 



Treaty Information 



POSTAL 
Universal Postal Convention, 1939 

France — French colonies 

The American Charge at Vichy transmitted 
to the Secretary of State with a despatch dated 
June 10, 1942 a copy of decree no. 1612 dated 
June 1, 1942, concerning the promulgation by 
the Government of France of the Universal Pos- 
tal Convention and annexed arrangements 
signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939. The 
decree states that in virtue of the deposit with 
the Government of Argentina on June 26, 1941 
of the instruments of ratification of the acts 
signed on Maj' 23, 1939, including the Univer- 
sal Postal Convention, the Arrangement Con- 
cerning Letters and Parcels of Declared Value, 
the Arrangement Concerning Parcel Post, the 
Arrangement Concerning Money Orders, the 
Arrangement Concerning Postal Transfers, 
the Arrangement Concerning Postal Collections, 
and the Arrangement Concerning Subscriptions 
to Periodicals, these acts shall be valid for 
France, Algiers, Tunisia, Morocco, and all 
French colonies, including the African terri- 
tories under French mandate of Togoland and 
Cameroons. 



HEALTH 

International Agreement Relating to Statistics 
Of Causes of Death 

Egypt 

By a note dated August 1, 1942 the British 
Charge at Washington informed the Secretary 
of State that the Egyptian Government has no- 
tified the British Government, in accordance 
with paragraph 2 of the Protocol of Signature 
to the International Agreement Relating to Sta- 
tistics of Causes of Death, signed at London 
on June 19, 1934 (Executive Agreement Series 



80), of the cancellation of the application of 
the agreement to the town of Burdein, owing 
to the suppression of the health inspectorate of 
that town. 



COMMERCE 

Agreement with the Soviet Union 

[Released to the press August .S] 

On August 1, 1942 the President proclaimed 
the agreement between the United States of 
America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics eilected by an exchange of identic notes, 
signed at Washington on July 31, 1942,^ by 
which the commercial agreement of August 4, 
1937 between the two Governments is continued 
in force until August 6, 1943 and thereafter, 
unless superseded by a more comprehensive 
commercial agreement, subject to termination 
on six months' written notice by either 
Government. 

Memorandum of Agreement Regarding 
International Trade in Wheat 

An announcement concerning the establish- 
ment of an International Wheat Council and 
the appointment of the United States delegates 
thereto appeared in the Bulletin of August 1, 
1942, page 670. 

An announcement concerning the first meet- 
ing of the International Wheat Council appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy". 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Rubber Agreement with Honduras 

An announcement concerning the signing of 
a rubber agreement with the Government of 
Honduras appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 



' Bulletin of August 1, 1942, p. 662. 



694 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



AGRICULTURE 

Farm-Labor-Migration Arrangement 
With Mexico 

All announcement concerning an arrange- 
ment between the Government of the United 
States and the Government of Mexico for the 
temporary migration of Mexican agricultural 
workers to the United States appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "American Repub- 
lics". 



Application of Selective Traiuing and Service Act of 
1940, as Amended, to Canadians in the United States, 
and Reciprocal Treatment of American Citizens In 
Canada : Agreement Between the United States of 
America and Canada — Effected by exchange of notes 
signed March 30 and April 6 and 8, 1942. Executive 
Agreement Series 249. Publication 1769. 6 pp. 50. 

The War and Human Freedom : Address by Cordell 
Hull, Secretary of State, over the National Radio 
Networks, July 23, 1942. Publication 1773. 18 pp. 
50. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 5, July 31, 1942, to Revision II of M.ny 12, 
1942. Publication 1774. 16 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Exchange of Official Publications : Agreement Between 
the United States of America and Liberia — Effected 
by exchange of notes signed January 15, 1942 ; effec- 
tive January 15, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 
239. Publication 1758. 6 pp. 50. 

Reciprocal Trade: Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Haiti Construing Certain 
Provisions of the Trade Agreement of March 28, 1935 
and Modifying the Agreement Effected by Exchange 
of Notes Signed February 16 and 19, 1942— Effected 
by exchange of notes signed April 25, 1942. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 252. Publication 1762. 4 pp. 
50. 

Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in the Prosecution 
of the War Against Aggression : Preliminary Agree- 
ment Between the United States of America and 
China — Signed at Washington June 2, 1942 ; effective 
June 2, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 251. Pul>- 
lication 1766. 3 pp. 50. 



Legislation 



Claims of American Nationals Against Mexico: Hear- 
ings before a subcommittee of the Committee on 
Foreign Relations, U.S. Senate, 77th Cong., 2d sess., 
on S. 2528, a bill to provide for the settlement of 
claims of the Government of the United States on 
behalf of American nationals against the Government 
of Mexico comprehended within the terms of agree- 
ments concluded by the United States and Mexico. 
June 30, July 1, 2, 6, 10, and 14, 1942. Iv, 230 pp. 

Conservation and Utilization of the Salmon Fisheries 
of the Pacific. S. Kept. 1570, 77th Cong., on S. 1712. 
5 pp. 

An Act To enable the United States Commission for 
the Celebration of the Two-hundredth Anniversary 
of the Birth of Thomas Jefferson to carry out and 
give effect to certain approved plans. Approved July 
:W, 1942. [S. 2330.] Public Law 688, 77th Cong. 
2 pp. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1 9 it 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, WasMngton, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.76 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLT WITH THE APPBOTAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THB BtTRKAC OP THB BCDOET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 







AUGUST 15, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 164^Publication 1785 



ontents 




The War Page 
First Anniversary of the Signing of the Atlantic 

Charter 697 

Orders to American Military Forces in India 697 

Proclaimed List: Revision III 698 

Rubber Agieements With Trinidad and British 

Guiana 698 

American Republics 

Relations With the Republic of Panama: Message 
From the President of the' United States to the 

Congress 698 

Visit of the President of Chile to the United States . . . 701 

Economic and Financial Cooperation with Bolivia . . . 702 

National Anniversary of Ecuador 702 

The Foreign Service 

Diplomatic Confirmations 703 

Treaty Information 

Health: Sanitation Agreement With Bolivia 703 

Consular: Convention With Mexico 704 

Military Missions: Agreement With Bolivia 704 

Finance: Agreement With Mexico for the Construction 

of Highways 704 

Opiimi: International Convention of 1912 705 

Strategic Materials: 

Agreement With Mexico 705 

Agreements With Trinidad and British Guiana . . . 705 

General Relations: General Treaty With Panama. . . 705 

Legislation. 705 

Publications 706 



S. SUPERINTENDENT OF 0OCUM£NT» 

SEP 2 1942 



The War 



FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE SIGNING OF THE ATLANTIC CHARTER 



[Released to the press by the White House August 14] 

The President sent the following message to 
Prime Minister Churchill, of Great Britain, on 
the occasion of the first anniversary of the sign- 
ing of the Atlantic Charter : ^ 

"A year ago today you and I, as representa- 
tives of two free nations, set down and sub- 
scribed to a declaration of principles common 
to our peoples. We based, and continue to 
base, our hopes for a better future for the world 
on the realization of these principles. This 
declaration is known as the Atlantic Chai'ter. 

"A year ago today the nations resisting a 
common, barbaric foe were units or small 
groups, fighting for their existence. 

"Now, these nations and groups of nations 
in all the continents of the earth have united. 
They have formed a great union of humanity, 
dedicated to the realization of that common pro- 
gram of purposes and principles set forth in 
the Atlantic Charter, through world wide vic- 
tory over their common enemies. Their faith 
in life, liberty, independence and religious free- 



dom, and in the preservation of human rights 
and justice in their own lands as well as in 
other lands, has been given form and substance 
and power through a great gathering of peoples 
now known as the United Nations. 

"Freedom and independence are today in 
jeopardy — the world over. If the forces of 
conquest are not successfully resisted and de- 
feated there will be no freedom and no inde- 
pendence and no opportunity for freedom for 
any nation. 

"It is, therefore, to the single and suprejne 
objective of defeating the Axis forces of ag- 
gression that the United Nations have pledged 
all their resources and efforts. 

"When victory comes, we shall stand shoulder 
to shoulder in seeking to nourish the great ideals 
for which we fight. It is a worthwhile battle. 
It will be so recognized through all the ages, 
even amid the unfortunate peoples who follow 
false gods today. 

"We reafiirm our principles. They will bring 
us to a happier world." 



ORDERS TO AMEmCAN MILITARY FORCES IN INDIA 



[Released to the press August 12] 



The following statement of tliis Govern- 
ment's policy has been made a part of the orders 
to the American military forces in India: 



'Bulletin of August 16, 1941, p. 125. 



"1. The sole purpose of the American forces 
in India is to prosecute the war of the United 
Nations against the Axis powers. In the prose- 
cution of the war in that area the primary aim 
of the Government of the United States is to 
aid China. 

697 



698 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULL^TEN 



"2. American forces are not to indulge to the 
slightest degree in activities of any other nature 
unless India should be attacked by the Axis 
powers, in which event American troops would 
aid in defending India. 

"3. American forces in India will exercise 
scrupulous care to avoid the slightest participa- 
tion in India's internal political problems, or 
even the appearance of so doing. 

"4. In event of internal disturbances Ameri- 
can forces will resort to defensive measures only 
should their own personal safety or that of 
other American citizens be endangered or for 
the necessary protection of American military 
supplies and equipment." 

PROCLAIMED LIST: REVISION m 

[Released to the press August 14] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunc- 
tion with the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, 
the Attorney General, the Secretai-y of Com- 
merce, the Board of Economic Warfare, and 
the Acting Coordinator of Inter-American Af- 
fairs, pursuant to the proclamation by the Presi- 
dent of July 17, 1941 providing for "The Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals", on 
August 14 issued Revision III ^ of the Pro- 



claimed List. Revision III supersedes and con- 
solidates Revision II, dated May 12, 1942, and 
the five supplements thereto. 

No new additions to or deletions from the 
Proclaimed List are made in this revision. Cer- 
tain minor amendments are made. 

Revision III follows the listing arrange- 
ment used in Revision II. The list is divided 
into two parts : Part I relates to listings in the 
American republics and part II to listings in 
countries other than the American republics. 
Revision III contains a total of 9,712 listings, 
of which 6,9G5 are in part I and 2,747 in part II. 

RUBBER AGREEMENTS WITH TRINIDAD 
AND BRITISH GUIANA 

[Released to the press August 12] 

The signing of rubber agreements with Trin- 
idad and British Guiana was announced on Au- 
gust 12 by the Department of State, the Rubber 
Reserve Company, and the Board of Economic 
Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agreements the Rub- 
ber Reserve Company will purchase, until De- 
cember 31, 1946, all rubber produced in Trin- 
idad and British Guiana which is not required 
for essential domestic needs there. 



American Republics 



RELATIONS WITH THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA 
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE CONGRESS 



[Released to the press by the White House August 13] 

To THE Congress of tue United States : 

The Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation 
between the United States of America and the 
Republic of Panama, effective on July 27, 1939,^ 
was a definitive step in the clarification of this 



• Printed In 7 Federal Register 6282. 
' Treaty Series 945. 



Government's relations with the Republic of 
Panama. The Panamanian Goverimient has 
demonstrated its willingness to assume 
promptly and wholeheartedly the burdens im- 
posed upon it as partner in the defense of the 
Panama Canal, a responsibility which was ac- 
cepted by that Government under the provi- 
sions of the new treaty. 



AUGUST 15, 1942 



699 



The attitude of the Panamanian Government 
in the present international crisis has been 
thoroughly cooperative. On March 5, 1941 the 
President of the Republic of Panama issued a 
manifesto making available for use by the 
United States certain defense sites in the terri- 
tory of that Republic. Pending the conclu- 
sions of final arrangements regarding the terms 
on vs'hich these sites are to be used, the Pana- 
manian Government has permitted our armed 
forces to occupy and develop them. Immedi- 
ately following the attack by the Japanese on 
Pearl Harbor Panama declared war on the three 
major Axis powers, and since has taken numer- 
ous protective steps to cooperate with the other 
American republics in the interest and security 
of the Panama Canal and the defense of this 
hemisphere. 

This attitude is tangible evidence that the 
relations between the two countries are now 
firmly based upon a recognition of mutual 
interest and a disposition to assume common 
responsibilities. 

In my opinion, the time has come for this 
Government to make certain concessions which 
have been desired by the Republic of Panama 
over a period of years, and in this manner to 
correct certain factors in the relations between 
the two countries which do not make for confi- 
dence and friendship between our two countries. 

Accordingly, I deem it advisable that this 
Government convey to Panama the water and 
sewerage systems in the cities of Panama and 
Colon ; that it relinquish its extensive real estate 
holdings in the cities of Colon and Panama, so 
far as these holdings are not essential to the 
operation and protection of the Canal ; and that 
it liquidate the credit of two and a half million 
dollars made available to the Republic of Pan- 
ama by the Export-Import Bank for the con- 
struction of Panama's share of the Chorrera - 
Rio Hato Highway, a road essential to our 
defense requirements and constructed in accord- 
ance with standards made essential by these 
requirements. 

It will be recalled that the interest of the 
United States in the sanitation of the Canal 

478750—42 2 



Zone, together with that of the cities of Panama 
and Colon, has been of outstanding importance. 
Concurrent with the construction of the 
Panama Canal, through agreement with Pan- 
ama, the United States installed water and 
sewerage systems in the cities of Panama and 
Colon, and throughout subsequent years has 
been responsible for the operation and mainte- 
nance of these systems and for the sanitation of 
the two cities. 

I now propose to the Congress, that since in 
accordance with Article VII of the Canal Con- 
vention of 1903,' the "system of sewers and 
waterworks shall revert to and become the prop- 
erties of the cities of Panama and Colon" in the 
j'ear 1957, it authorize the Government to con- 
vey all its right, title and interest in the Panama 
and Colon water and sewerage systems to the 
Republic of Panama; ■provided, however, that 
the Republic of Panama shall pay quarterly a 
rate of B/0.09 per one thousand gallons or a 
reasonable rate to be agreed upon by both Gov- 
ernments to the appropriate Canal Zone author- 
ities for water supplied at the Canal Zone 
boundary; and provided, also, that the turning 
over to the Government of the Republic of Pan- 
ama of the physical properties of the water and 
sewerage systems and the administration 
thereof, including the collection of the water 
rates, does not in any way modify the existing 
arrangement for the responsibility for the 
public health services of the cities of Panama 
and Colon as specified in the second paragraph 
of Article VII of the Convention between the 
United States of America and Panama, signed 
at Washington, November 18, 1903, which reads 
as follows : 

"The Republic of Panama agrees that the 
cities of Panama and Colon shall comply in per- 
petuity with the sanitary ordinances whether of 
a preventive or curative character prescribed by 
the United States and in case the Government of 
Panama is unable or fails in its duty to enforce 
this compliance by the cities of Panama and 
Colon with the sanitary ordinances of the 



' Treaty Series 431. 



700 

United States the Republic of Panama grants 
to the United States the right and authority to 
enforce the same." 

This Government, in continuing to maintain 
the health services in the cities of Panama and 
Colon, will ask the Government of the Republic 
of Panama to cooperate fully with the appro- 
priate Canal Zone officials in carrying out the 
proposal regarding increased participation of 
Panamanian personnel in sanitation activities 
in those cities as provided for in the exchange of 
notes 1 accompanying the General Treaty of 
March 2, 1936. 

You will recall that the Panama Railroad 
Company, a corporation whose stock is now 
wholly owned by the United States, acquired 
the Island of Manzanillo (the present site of 
the city of Colon) through concessionary con- 
tracts with the Republic of New Granada, 
signed in 1850. 1856, and 1867. The railroad's 
interest in this property was acquired for 
ninety-nine years from August 1867, or until 
August 1966. The reversionary rights to these 
lands remained originally with the Republic of 
Panama, which, however, in the Canal Conven- 
tion concluded between the United States and 
Panama in 1903, conveyed these rights to the 
ITnited States. Thus until August 1966, the 
Panama Railroad Company enjoys the usufruct 
of the lands on which the city of Colon stands, 
and thereafter the United States will acquire 
title thereto, in perpetuity. As an element of 
such ownership the railroad company has, of 
course, over a period of years rented the prop- 
erty in Colon to Panamanian citizens — mer- 
chants, business men, and residents, and is, in 
fact, the principal landlord in Colon. For ob- 
vious reasons this is unsatisfactory. 

I think, therefore, that this Government 
should promptly withdraw from the real estate 
business in the Republic of Panama and convey 
to that country its rights, title and interest, as 
well as its reversionary rights, to all the Pan- 
ama Railroad Company land in the cities of 
Panama and Colon which is not needed for the 



' Published as a corporate part of the treaty, which 
was signed on March 2, 1936 and proclaimed on July 
27, 1939 (Treaty Series 945). 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

operation of the railroad or for the operation, 
maintenance, sanitation or protection of the 

Canal. , . . 

I also wish to invite your attention to the Act 
approved July 20, 1939 (Public Numbered 200, 
Seventy-sixth Congress, Chapter 335, First Ses- 
sion) = authorizing an appropriation of not to 
exceed $1,500,000 "to meet such expenses as the 
President, in his discretion, may deem neces- 
sary to enable the United States to cooperate 
with the Republic of Panama in connection 
with the construction of a highway between 
Chorrera and Rio Hato in the Republic of 
Panama". 

I also wish to refer to the Act approved Au- 
gust 9. 1939 (Public Numbered 361, Seventy- 
s'ixth Congress, Chapter 633, First Session)^ en- 
titled ''An Act Making Appropriations to Sup- 
ply Deficiencies in Certain Appropriations for 
the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1939 and June 
30, 1840 and for Other Purposes", which con- 
tains under the heading "Corps of Engineers" 
the following appropriation : 

"Chorrera and Rio Hato road. Republic of 
Panama: To enable the United States to co- 
operate with the Republic of Panama in con- 
nection with the construction of a highway be- 
tween Chorrera and Rio Hato, in the Republic 
of Panama, as authorized by the Act approved 
July 20, 1939 (Public Numbered 200, 76th Con- 
gress), $1,500,000 fiscal year 1940, to remain 
available until expended." 

It is to be noted that, while the appropriation 
of the United States for its share of the cost of 
the highway amounted to $1,500,000, the Ex- 
port-Import Bank, in a contract signed Febru- 
ary 21, 1940 with the Banco Nacional of Pan- 
ama and the Republic of Panama agreed, under 
specific conditions, to cooperate in the financing 
of the Panamanian share of the construction 
cost to the extent of $2.-500,000. 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
aforesaid Acts of Congress and the arrange- 
ments made by Panama with the Export-Im- 
port Bank, the Ambassador of Panama in 
Washington, representatives of the War De- 

^ 53 Stat. 1071. 
" 53 Stat. 1301. 



AUGUST 15, 1942 



701 



partment, of the Export-Import Bank, and of 
the Public Roads Administration, Federal 
Works Agency, in 1940 reached a mutually ac- 
ceptable basis on which the two governments 
would cooperate in this work, and which pro- 
vided that responsibility for the construction 
of the highway would be in the hands of Pan- 
amanian authorities but with the advice of en- 
gineers of the Public Roads Administration. 

The War Department, through the Public 
Roads Administration, in 1941 stressed the ur- 
gency of rapidly completing the Rio Hato 
Highway and asked that every effort be made 
immediately to transfer the responsibility for 
this work from the Panamanian Government to 
the Public Roads Administration. 

The Panamanian Government agreed to this 
request and the transfer of responsibility was 
effected on December 29, 1941, with a request 
by the Panamanian Government that, in ac- 
cordance with conversations held between the 
Panamanian Foreign Jlinister and the Under 
Secretarj' of State in June 1941, Panama's in- 
debtedness arising out of a credit made avail- 
able by the Export-Import Bank be liquidated 
at the earliest possible date. 

With a view to effecting the proposed changes 
indicated, I recommend to the Congress its con- 
sideration of a draft Joint Resolution which is 
hereto annexed.* 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
August 13, 194B. 



VISIT OF THE PRESIDENT OF CHILE 
TO THE UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press August 15] 

An exchange of telegrams between the Presi- 
dent of the United States and His Excellency 
Juan Antonio Rios, President of the Repub- 
lic of Chile, follows : 

"The White House, August 13, 191^2. 
"It would give me the greatest pleasure 
were Your Excellency to find it possible to 



visit this country as the guest of the Govern- 
ment of the United States. In times like these 
when the Republics of the Americas need more 
than ever before to cooperate in the defense of 
tlie Western Hemisphere and in order to insure 
the preservation of the liberties of the peoples 
of the Americas, I believe that the opportunities 
afforded for personal meetings between the 
Presidents of the American Republics serve a 
singularly valuable purpose. It would give me 
the greatest satisfaction to be afforded the op- 
portunity of receiving Your Excellency as our 
guest in Washington and thus be enabled to 
confer with you with regard to problems which 
vitally affect the interests of our two countries 
and the interests of the Americas. 

"If it were possible for you to leave Chile at 
that period, I would suggest the coming month 
of October as a most agreeable time for your 
suggested visit. 

"I trust that it may be possible for you to 
honor us by the acceptance of this invitation. 

"Please accept [etc.] 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



* Not printed herein. 



[Translation] 

"Santiago, August H. 
"I deeply appreciate the high honor which 
Your Excellency has paid me in inviting me to 
make a visit to the United States as a guest of the 
Government, and I feel that the generous spon- 
taneity of that invitation is most significant 
of understanding and deference toward my 
Government and me. I share without reserva- 
tions Your Excellency's opinion that inter- 
views of Chiefs of State, in circumstances as 
highly serious as those under which the world is 
living, serve a lofty purpose of cooperation and, 
on a cordial plane of mutual respect, promote a 
frank and sincere interchange of viewpoints 
on the weighty problems which so vitally 
concern our nations and the M'hole American 
continent. With this conviction, I am very 
honored to accept the invitation which Your 
Excellency is good enough to extend to me for 
conferences in Washington during the month 
of October, and anticipating the pleasure of 
exchanging views with Your Excellency, whose 



702 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



vigorous, democratic personality is so justly ad- 
mired in Chile, I shall be very happy immedi- 
ately to seek from the National Congress the 
constitiitional authorization which will allow 
me to leave the country for so lofty a purpose. 
"I renow [etc.] Juan Antonio Kios'" 

ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL COOPERA- 
TION WITH BOLIVIA 

[Released tn the press August 14 J 

During their visit to the United States Dr. 
Joaquin Espada, Minister of Finance of Bolivia, 
and Dr. Alberto Crespo Gutierrez, Minister of 
National Economy of Bolivia, have carried on 
conversations with officials of the Government 
of the United States concerning comprehensive 
arrangements for economic and financial 
cooperation between Bolivia and the United 
States. 

The economic and financial discussions with 
the Bolivian Ministers have been based in large 
part upon the studies made during a six-month 
period in Bolivia by the United States Eco- 
nomic Mission under the leadership of Mr. Mer- 
win L. Bohan, a Foreign Service officer of the 
United States. In addition to Mr. Bohan there 
were seven other members of the Mission, in- 
cluding experts in highway construction, agri- 
culture, and mining. This Mission conducted a 
survey in Bolivia with a view to recommending 
a progi"im of economic development for Bolivia 
which would include improved communications, 
increased production of basic agricultural 
products for export, various types of develop- 
ment in the Bolivian mining industry, and the 
development of the Bolivian petroleum in- 
dustry.^ 

The discussions with Dr. Espada and Dr. 
Crespo have resulted in the formulation of a 
cooperative agreement for the financing by the 
two Governments of the first stage of a program 
of economic development through a Bolivian 
development corporation. The plan thus de- 
veloped will be submitted to the Bolivian Con- 
gress. 

' Bulletin of December 20, 1941, p. 563 ; and of July 
11, 1942, iip. 621-22. 



In accordance with the recommendations of 
the Economic Mission the Government of the 
United States has agreed to give favorable con- 
sideration at the appropriate time to the prac- 
ticability, under conditions then existing, of 
extending, through the appropriate credit in- 
stitution, credits for the financing of the second 
stage of the long-term program. 

The recent revision of the agreement by 
which the Government of the United States 
purchases a large part of Bolivian tin-produc- 
tion was an integral part of the program of 
economic and financial cooperation between 
Bolivia and the United States. Moreover, dur- 
ing the time that the Bolivian Ministers of 
Finance and National Economy have been in 
Washington arrangements have been com- 
pleted for revision of the agreement by which 
the Government of the United States purchases 
Bolivian tungsten. The Government of the 
United States has likewise recently entered into 
an agreement with the Government of Bolivia 
for the purchase of Bolivian production of raw 
rubber. 

The two Bolivian Ministers have discussed 
with the president of the Foreign Bondholders 
Protective Council, Incorporated, the possible 
inauguration of discussions with a view to serv- 
icing the Bolivian dollar debt, and the Minis- 
ters have informed the Secretai-y of State that 
they believe it may soon be possible to find a 
mutually acceptable basis for subsequent for- 
mal discussions. 

NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY OF ECUADOR 

[Released to the press August 10] 

The President has addressed the following 
telegram to His Excellency Carlos A. Arroyo 
Del Rio, President of the Republic of Ecuador, 
on the occasion of the national anniversary of 
Ecuador : 

"The White House, August 10, 191,2. 
"On this national anniversary of Ecuador I 
take the greatest pleasure in extending to Your 
Excellency the heartiest best wishes of the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States for the 



AUGUST 15, 1942 



703 



well being and prosperity of the Ecuadoran na- 
tion. These solemn occasions afford the free 
peoples of the Americas an opportunity soberly 
to consider the bases of their national liberties 
and the essential conditions of their mainte- 
nance in the future. Your Government and 
people may well feel the deepest gratification 
for the constructive, courageous steps which 
they have taken, under your leadership, to meet 
the challenge of these critical times and to 
counter the treacherous aims of the plotters of 
world conquest. I share the profound sense of 
appreciation with which the people of the 
United States have welcomed the unfailing co- 
operation in the defense of the freedom of the 
New World of the Government and people of 
Ecuador. 
"Please accept [etc.] 

Franklin D Koosevelt" 



The Foreign Service 



DIPLOMATIC CONFIRMATIONS 

On August 13, 1942 the Senate confirmed the 
following nominations : 

Leland B. Morris, of Pennsylvania, now a 
Foreign Service officer of class I and formerly 
Charge of the American Embassy in Berlin, to 
be American Minister to Iceland. 

Thomas M. Wilson, of Tennessee, now a For- 
eign Service officer of class I, to be Acting 
American Minister Resident and Consul Gen- 
eral to Iraq. 



Treaty Information 



HEALTH 

Sanitation Agreement With Bolivia 

By an exchange of notes dated July 15 and 16, 
1942 an agreement was entered into between the 
Government of the United States of America 



and the Bolivian Government for the coopera- 
tive development of a health and sanitation 
program in Bolivia. 

Under the terms of the agreement the Gov- 
ernme(nt of the United States, through the 
agency of the Coordinator of Inter- American 
Affairs, will provide an amount not to exceed 
$1,000,000 to be expended toward the develop- 
ment of the program. A group of medical and 
sanitation experts from the United States will 
work in close cooperation with the appropriate 
officers of the Bolivian Government, and tech- 
nical advice and expert assistance by medical 
and sanitation specialists will be made avail- 
able by the United States to the Bolivian Gov- 
ernment should the need for such consultation 
arise. Arrangements for the detailed execu- 
tion of each project, and the expenditure of the 
funds for the purpose, will be agreed upon by 
the Chief Medical Officer and the appropriately 
designated officer of the Bolivian Government. 
The projects include: 

1. General disease control by epidemiologi- 
cal procedures and by clinics and public 
education. 

2. Malaria control. 

3. Yellow-fever control. 

4. Care of lepers. 

5. Environmental sanitation. 

The agreement was concluded in accordance 
with resolution XXX of the Third Meeting of 
the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Ameri- 
can Republics, which met at Rio de Janeiro 
from January 15 to January 28, 1942. The 
resolution reads as follows : 

"XXX 

"Improvement of Health and Sanitary 
Conditions 
'■'■Whereas: 

"1. The American Republics are now under- 
taking measures for the development of certain 
common objectives and plans which will con- 
tribute to the reconstruction of world order; 

"2. The American Republics are now under- 
taking measures seeking to conserve and de- 
velop their resources of critical and strategic 



704 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



materials, to maintain their domestic economies 
and eliminate economic activities prejudicial 
to the welfare and security of the American 
Republics ; 

'*3. The defense of the Western Hemisphere 
requires the mobilization of the vital forces, 
human and material, of the American Repub- 
lics; and 

"4. Adequate health and sanitary measures 
constitute an essential contribution in safe- 
guardinjj the defensive powers and the ability 
to resist aggression of the peoples of the Amer- 
ican Republics, 

"The Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics 

Resolves : 

"1. To recommend that the Governments of 
the American Republics take individually, or bj' 
complementary agreements between two or 
more of them, appropriate steps to deal with 
problems of public health and sanitation, by 
providing, in accordance with ability, raw mate- 
rials, services and funds. 

"2. To reconunend that to these ends there be 
utilized the technical aid and advice of the 
national health service of each country in coop- 
eration with the Pan American Sanitary 
Bureau." 

CONSULAR 

Convention With Mexico 

[Released to the press August 13] 

A consular convention between the United 
States and Mexico was signed on August 12, 
1942 at Mexico City by Mr. George S. Messer- 
smith, American Ambassador at Mexico City, 
and Senor Liceneiado Ezequiel Padilla, Mexi- 
can Minister for Foreign Relations. 

The convention defines and establishes the 
duties, rights, privileges, exemj^tions, and im- 
munities of consular officers of each country in 
the territory of the other country. The provi- 



sions of the convention are substantially similar 
in most respects to the pro%'isions of consular 
conventions with foreign countries signed by 
the United States in recent years. 

The convention will enter into force 30 days 
from the date on which the ratifications of the 
two Governments are exchanged. It will re- 
main in force for an initial period of 5 years 
and will continue in force thereafter until 6 
months from the date on which either Govern- 
ment shall have notified the other Govermnent 
of an intention to modify or terminate the 
convention. 

MILITARY MISSIONS 

Agreement With Bolivia 

[Released to the press August 11 ] 

In response to the request of tlie Government 
of Bolivia an agreement was signed on xVugust 
11, 1942 by the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secre- 
tary of State, and Seiior Dr. Don Luis Fer- 
nando Guachalla, Ambassador of Bolivia at 
Washington, providing for the detail of a mili- 
tary mission to Bolivia. The agreement is 
effective for a period of four years beginning 
with the date of signature. The services of 
the mission may be extended beyond that period 
at the request of the Government of Bolivia. 

The agreement contains provisions similar in 
general to provisions contained in agreements 
between the United States and certain other 
American republics providing for the detail 
of officers of the United States Army or Navy 
to advise the armed forces of those countries. 

FINANCE 

Agreement With Mexico for the Construction of 
Highways 

The Secretary of Commerce and the Sub- 
Secretary of Finance and Public Credit of 
Mexico jointly announced on August 12, 19-12 



AUGUST 15, 1942 



705 



that an agreement has been i-eached whereby 
the Mexican Highway credit of $30,000,000, an- 
nounced on November 19, 1941, may be used in 
installments exceeding $10,000,000 a year in 
order to expedite the completion of roads now 
under construction, including the Inter-Ameri- 
can Highway from Mexico City to the border 
of Guatemala. 

OPIUM 
International Convention of 1912 

Belgian Ctmgo - Ruanda-TJ fundi 

By a note dated August 3, 1942 the Nether- 
land Ambassador at Washington informed the 
Secretary of State that the adlierence of the 
Belgian Congo and the mandated territory of 
Ruanda-Urundi to the International Opium 
Convention, signed at The Hague on January 
23, 1912, was notified by the Belgian Govern- 
ment to the Government of the Netherlands on 
July 29, 1942. 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 
Agreement With Mexico 

On August 12, 1942 the Secretary of Com- 
merce and the Sub-Secretary of Finance and 
Public Credit of Mexico jointly aimounced the 
signing of an agreement under which the Ex- 
port-Import Bank will extend credits up to 
$6,000,000 to pay for new and second-hand 
equipment and materials and for services in 
the United States to aid the establishment of 
the Altos Hornos steel plant at Monclova, State 
of Coahuila, Mexico. Advances under the cred- 
it will be evidenced by the direct obligations 
of Nacional Financiera, S.A., unconditionally 
guaranteed as to payment by the Govermnent 
of Mexico. Expenditures for Mexican materi- 



als, transportation, and services are being met 
with proceeds from sale of stock of Altos Hor- 
nos de Mexico, S.A., in Mexico. 

Agreements With Trinidad and British 
Guiana 

An amioimcement regarding the signature 
of agreements with Trinidad and British Gui- 
ana under the terms of which the Rubber Re- 
serve Company will purchase, until December 
31, 1946, all rubber produced in Trinidad and 
British Guiana which is not required for es- 
sential domestic needs there, appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "The War". 

GENERAL RELATIONS 
General Treaty With Panama 

A message from the President of the United 
States to the Congress relating to the General 
Treaty of Friendship and Cooperation between 
the United States and Panama, signed on March 
2, 1936 and proclaimed on July 27, 1939 (Treaty 
Series 945), appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 



Legislation 



Detail of officers and enlisted men to foreign govern- 
ments [for the pui-pose of assisting the governments 
of the other American republics in military and naval 
matters]. S. Kept. 1578, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on 
S. 2686. 2 pp. 

The vote of Matthew Lyon, of Vermont, elected Thomas 
Jefferson President in ISOl [authorizing the print- 
ing of a manuscript of an article regarding this 
event]. H. Kept. 2393, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on H. Res. 
512. 2 pp. 



706 



DEPARTMENT OP STATE BULLETIN 



Publications 



Department of State 

The American Foreign Service: General Information 
for Applicants and Sample Entrance-Examination 
Questions. Revised to June 1, 1942. Publication 
1771. iv, 150 pp. Free. 

Foreign Service List, July 1, 1942. Publication 1776. 
iv, 115 pp. Subscription, 50^ a year ; single copy, 15<(. 

Transfers of Citizens and Former Citizens Between 
Armed Forces: Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Canada — Effected by ex- 
change of notes signed March 18 and 20, 1942. 
Executive Agreement Series 245. Publication 1777. 
4 pp. 50. 



The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals: 
Revision III, August 10, 1942, Promulgated Pursuant 
to Proclamation 2497 of the President of July 17, 
1941. Publication 1779. 230 pp. Free. 

Diplomatic List, August 1942. Publication 1780. 
ii, 101 pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

Provisional Administration of Euroi)ean Colonies and 
Possessions in the Americas: Convention Between 
the United States of America and Other American 
Republics — Signed at Habana July 30, 1940; pro- 
claimed by the President February 12, 1942. Treaty 
Series 977. v, 33 pp. lOfJ. 

Inter-American Indian Institute : Convention Between 
the United States of America and Certain Other 
American Republics — Signed for the United States 
of America November 29, 1940; proclaimed by the 
President February 12, 1942. Treaty Series 978. 
46 pp. 100. 



11. S 80VERNMENT FRPKTING OFFICE 1841 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Wasblngton, D. C. — Price, 10 cents . - . - Subscription price. $2.7B a year 

PDBLISHED WEEELT WITH THE APPEOVAL OF THE DIEBCTOB OF THE BDREAD OF THB BCDGET 



[ ^ o 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



AUGUST 22, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 165— Publication 1789 



G 



ontents 




The War p»e« 
Crimes Against Civilian Populations in Occupied 

Countries: Statement by the President : . . . . 709 

Sinking of Five Brazilian Vessels 710 

Declaration of War by Brazil on Germany and Italy . . 710 
Transfer of United States Citizens From Canadian to 

United States Armed Forces 711 

Economic Assistance to French North Africa .... 713 

Rubber Agreement With British Honduras 713 

Exchange of Diplomatic and Consular Personnel and 

Other Nationals 713 

General 

Bii-thday of the President of the Philippines 714 

Commercial Policy 

Mexican Exportation of Silver to the United States . . 714 

The Near East 

Nomination of Turkish Foreign Minister 714 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Eleventh Pan American Sanitary Conference .... 715 
The Department 

Representation on Fisheries Committee of the War 

Production Board 715 

The Foreign Service 

Estabhshment of Claim Board 715 

Publications 715 

Treaty Information 

Strategic Materials: Rubber Agreement With British 

Honduras ' 7i6 

Armed Forces: Agreement With Canada Regarding 
Transfer of United States Citizens From Canadian 

to United States Armed Forces 716 

Legislation 716 



U. 8. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
SEP 8 1942 



The War 



CRIMES AGAINST CIVILIAN POPULATIONS IN OCCUPIED COUNTRIES 

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House August 21] 

The Secretary of State recently forwarded 
to me a communication signed by the Ambassa- 
dor of the Netherlands and the Ministers of 
Yugoslavia and Luxembourg on behalf of the 
Governments of Belgium, Greece, Luxembourg, 
Norway, Netherlands, Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
Yugoslavia, and the French National Commit- 
tee in London, calling attention to the barbaric 
crimes against civilian populations which are 
being committed in occupied countries, par- 
ticularly on the continent of Europe. 

Li this communication, attention was invited 
to the declaration signed in London on Jan- 
uary 13, 1942 by the representatives of nine 
governments whose countries are under Ger- 
man occupation. This declaration afiBrmed 
that acts of violence thus perpetrated against 
the civilian populations are at variance with 
accepted ideas concerning acts of war and po- 
litical oifenses as these are understood by civi- 
lized nations; stated that the punishment, 
through the channel of organized justice of 
those guilty and responsible for these crimes, is 
one of the principal war aims of the contracting 
governments; and recorded the determination 
of the contracting governments in a spirit of 
international solidarity to see to it that those 
guilty and responsible, whatever their nation- 
ality, are handed over to justice and tried and 
that the sentences pronounced are carried out. 

The communication which I have just re- 
ceived from the chiefs of mission of the Nether- 
lands, Yugoslavia, and Luxembourg states that 
these acts of oppression and terror have taken 
proportions and forms giving rise to the fear 

480116 



that as the defeat of the enemy countries ap- 
proaches, the barbaric and unrelenting charac- 
ter of the occupational regime will become 
more marked and may even lead to the exter- 
mination of certain populations. 
As I stated on October 25, 1941 : 

"The practice of executing scores of innocent 
hostages in reprisal for isolated attacks on Ger- 
mans in countries temporarily under the Nazi 
heel revolts a world already inured to suffering 
and brutality. Civilized peoples long ago 
adopted the basic principle that no man should 
be punished for the deed of another. Unable to 
apprehend the persons involved in these attacks 
the Nazis characteristically slaughter fifty or a 
hundred innocent persons. Those who would 
'collaborate' with Hitler or try to appease him 
cannot ignore this ghastly warning. 

"The Nazis might have learned from the last 
war the impossibility of breaking men's spirit 
by teri'orism. Instead they develop their 
'lebensraum' and 'new order' by depths of 
fright fulness which even they have never ap- 
proached before. These are the acts of desper- 
ate men who know in their hearts that they 
cannot win. Frightfulness can never bring 
peace to Europe. It only sows the seeds of 
hatred which will one day bring fearful 
retribution." 

The Government of the United States has 
been aware for some time of these crimes. Our 
Government is constantly receiving additional 
information from dependable sources, and it 
welcomes reports from any trustworthy source 
which would assist in keeping our growing 

709 



710 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



fund of information and evidence up to date 
and reliable. 

The United Nations are going to win this war. 
When victory has been achieved, it is the pur- 
pose of the Government of the United States, 
as I know it is the purpose of each of the United 
Nations, to make appropriate use of the in- 



formation and evidence in respect to these bar- 
baric crimes of the invaders, in Europe and in 
Asia. It seems only fair that they should have 
this warning that the time will come when they 
shall have to stand in courts of law in the very 
countries which they are now oppressing and 
answer for their acts. 



SINiaNG OF FIVE BRAZILIAN VESSELS 



tReleased to the press August 22) 

An exchange of telegrams between the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America and His 
Excellency Getulio Vargas, President of the 
United States of Brazil, follows : 

"The White House, August £0, 1942. 
"I have been outraged by the criminal sinking 
of the five Brazilian vessels. This contemptible 
action is barbaric in its utter disregard for all 
decency and civilized conduct and utterly futile 
in its desperate attempt to coerce and intimidate 
the free people of Brazil. In this moment of 
grave menace to the respect, the integrity, and 
the destiny of Brazil, I reiterate once again the 
abiding friendship of the people of the United 
States for the people of Brazil, their profound 
gratitude for the cooperation in the defense of 
the hemisphere which already has resulted in 
many sacrifices to Brazil, and their determina- 
tion to defeat those who futilely seek to domi- 
nate Brazil and all other countries that value 
their freedom and independence. 



"I want you to know that my thoughts and 
sympathy are with you in this critical hour. 
Frankun D Eoosevelt" 

[Translation] 

"Kio DE Janeiro, August 2£, 194^. 
"In the name of the people and of the Govern- 
ment of Brazil I wish to thank you and the 
noble American people for your hearty and com- 
forting message sent to me in connection with 
the brutal assault of pirate Axis submarines 
against Brazilian vessels aimed at intimidating 
us and interi-upting our maritime communica- 
tions. Such acts of vandalism can only 
strengthen the principle of continental solidar- 
ity and determined cooperation between our two 
nations. We shall answer without fear disre- 
garding any danger involved knowing that we 
can count on the sympathy and adherence of the 
American nations which are ready to defend 
their sovereignty. 

Getulio Vargas" 



DECLARATION OF WAR BY BRAZIL ON GERMANY AND ITALY 



[Released to the press by the White House August 22] 

The following cablegram was dispatched by 
President Roosevelt to His Excellency Getulio 
Vargas, President of the United States of 
Brazil : 

"I have been informed that the United States 
of Brazil has today recognized that a state of 
war exists between Brazil, on one hand, and 
Germany and Italy on the other hand. 



"On behalf of the Government and people of 
the United States I express to Your Excellency 
the profound emotion with which this coura- 
geous action has been received in this country. 
This solemn decision more firmly aligns the 
people of Brazil with the free peoples of the 
world in a relentless struggle against the law- 
less and predatory Axis powers. It adds power 
and strength, moral and material, to the armies 



ATTGUST 22, 1942 



711 



of liberty. As brothers in arms, our soldiers 
and sailors will write a new page in the history 
of friendship, confidence, and cooperation which 
has marked since the earliest days of independ- 
ence relations between your country and mine. 

"The action taken today by your Government 
has hastened the coming of the inevitable vic- 
tory of freedom over oppression, of Christian 
religion over the forces of evil and darkness. 

"I send you my warmest personal regards 
and expressions of the fullest confidence in the 
success of our common cause." 



[Released to the press August 22] 

The following telegram has been sent by the 
Secretary of State to His Excellency Oswaldo 
Aranha, Foreign Minister of Brazil : 

"August 22, 1942. 

"I have received a note from the Brazilian 
Ambassador in Washington informing me that 
the Government of Brazil recognizes that a 
state of war exists between Brazil on the one 
hand and Germany and Italy on the other hand. 

"The people of the United States welcome the 
people of Brazil as brothers in arms and salute 
their high resolve and defiant courage in taking 



a position unequivocally at the side of the em- 
battled freedom-loving nations of the world. 
Today a heavy blow has been dealt the Axis 
Powers, moral no less than military, when a 
great, peaceful and law-abiding nation is driven 
by improvoked acts of ruthless barbarity to 
take up arms in self-defense. It comes as no 
surprise to my coimtrymen that the proud Bra- 
zilian Nation has chosen the risks and hardships 
of battle when confronted with wanton attacks 
on its sovereign dignity and rights. 

"The action of the Axis Powers in attacking 
your great country and people is a further dem- 
onstration of the fact that those Powers will 
strike at any peace-loving nation as and when to 
do so will serve their purpose of world con- 
quest, regardless of considerations of humanity 
and international law. It also brings into bold 
relief the basic principle upon which the solidar- 
ity of the American republics rests, namely, 
that an attack against any one of them is an 
attack against all of them. Each of the twenty- 
one American Republics are today equally in 
danger. 

"Together our two comitries will face the fu- 
ture with serene confidence and high hearts. 

"I take pleasure [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



TRANSFER OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS FROM CANADIAN TO UNITED STATES 

ARMED FORCES 



[Released to the press August 20) 

Through an exchange of notes at Ottawa on 
March 18 and 20, 1942 the Canadian Govern- 
ment agreed to the transfer to the armed forces 
of the United States of certain United States 
citizens and former United States citizens who 
were serving in the Canadian armed forces. To 
facilitate the return of these men the Canadian- 
American Military Board, composed of mem- 
bers of the various branches of the armed serv- 
ices, was set up. Between May 5 and June 3 
the Board visited many of the principal mili- 
tary camps across Canada and effected the trans- 
fer of over 2,000 Americans. 

The texts of notes recently exchanged between 
the two Governments with respect to these 
transfers are quoted below. 

480116—42 2 



"July 10, 1942. 
"Mt Dear Mr. Secretary : 

"You may have been informed that, under the 
terms of a recent agreement concluded between 
our two Governments, approximately 2,058 
United States citizens have transferred from 
the Armed Forces of Canada to the Armed 
Forces of the United States. As these transfers 
are now virtually complete, I have been in- 
structed to communicate to the United States 
Government the gratitude of the Government 
and people of Canada which is felt to those 
United States citizens who have now left our 
Forces for those of the United States. 

"In this connection, the Prime Minister of 
Canada recently made the following statement 
in the House of Commons : 



712 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



" 'We shall be sorry to lose those United States 
citizens who transfer to their own Forces. We 
do not, however, wish to stand in their way if 
they feel that they would sooner serve under 
the flag of their own country. Whether they 
are serving under our flag or under the United 
States flag, they are serving in the Armed Forces 
of the United Nations and are contributing to 
the common victory. 

" 'The Americans in our Forces came to us 
when their country was still at peace. They 
came because they knew that Hitler was as much 
the enemy of the United States as he was the 
enemy of Canada. We were grateful to them 
for enlisting in our Forces — grateful because of 
the assistance which they freely gave us and 
grateful because they were living proofs — if 
proofs were needed — of the sympathy and sup- 
port of their country for our cause. We shall 
always remain grateful to them. These six- 
teen thousand men were forerunners of the hun- 
dreds of thousands, the millions of their fellow 
citizens who are today enlisted in the struggle 
against the Axis.' 

"Most of the United States citizens who have 
been transferred to the Armed Forces of the 
United States have come from the Eoyal Cana- 
dian Air Force. On behalf of the Royal Cana- 
dian Air Force, the Minister of National De- 
fence for Air has written to the Prime Minister 
of Canada as follows : 

" 'The Joint Canadian-American Military 
Board recently formed to repatriate American 
citizens in the Canadian Armed Forces has com- 
pleted its proceedings and to me, the time seems 
appropriate to despatch a letter of appreciation 
to the United States authorities for the services 
rendered in Canada, and to the R.C.A.F. in par- 
ticular, by those American citizens who early in 
the war came to our as.sistance and, of their own 
volition, volunteered for service in the initial 
organization and operation of the British Com- 
monwealth Air Training Plan, conducted under 
the direction of the Royal Canadian Air Force. 

" 'These young men from the United States 
came to Canada and applied themselves whole- 



heartedly to the early stages of our planning 
and training programmes and without a doubt 
their valued assistance has been greatly respon- 
sible for the successes which have far surpassed 
our original exjiectations. 

" 'We know that, on repatriation to the 
United States Armed Forces, the officers and 
men who Iiave been so valuable to the Royal 
Canadian Air Force will continue to apply 
themselves to the war effort of the United States 
of America in the same capable manner and 
thereby further the common cause of our two 
countries towards final victory. It is with sin- 
cere regret, but pride in the part that they 
played, that we part with the Americans who 
fitted into our organization and formed such a 
formidable team, with our own Canadian air- 
men. 

" 'The Royal Canadian Air Force would like 
to have conveyed to these young men their 
gratitude for past services, and sincere wishes 
for their future successful careers with the 
Armed Forces of the United States of America. 
It is also desired to express appreciation for the 
splendid and cooperative manner in which the 
American personnel of the Joint Canadian- 
American Military Board performed their du- 
ties while in Canada and for the excellent im- 
pression left, of their eagerness to complete the 
task assigned to them. Such spirit is and will be 
an inspiration to those serving under them and 
go far in furthering our joint cause.' 

"Believe me, my dear Mr. Hidl, 
Yours very sincerely, 

Leighton McCaetht" 



"August 8, 1942. 
"Mt Dear Mr. Charge d'Aitaikes : 

"Reference is made to the Minister's note of 
July 10, 1942, conmienting on the recent trans- 
fer of over two thousand United States citizens 
from the armed forces of Canada to the armed 
forces of the United States and expressing tlie 
appreciation of the Government and people of 
Canada for the services which these men ren- 
dered while serving with the Canadian forces. 



AUGUST 22, 1942 



713 



"A copy of Mr. McCarthy's note was sent to 
the Secretary of War who has requested me to 
communicate the following message to the Ca- 
nadian Government : 

" 'The War Department wishes to express to 
the Canadian Government its acknowledgment 
and appreciation of the training which the Ca- 
nadian Armed Forces, including the Royal 
Canadian Air Force, have given to those United 
States citizens who have now been transferred to 
the Armed Forces of their own country. These 
citizens return to us benefited by advantages of 
training and experience provided to them by the 
Dominion of Canada. That training and expe- 
rience will not be lost to Canada, however, for 
although the uniform worn by these men will 
henceforth be different, the cause for which they 
fight — the cause of Freedom, shared by all the 
United Nations — remains the same. To the 
Canadian Government, which gave its full co- 
operation to the Canadian-American Military 
Board in its work of arranging the transfers, 
the War Department extends its gratitude.' 

"I have also informed the Secretary of the 
Navy of Mr. McCarthy's note and am now in 
receipt of a letter from the Acting Secretary 
who has asked me to express the sincere appre- 
ciation of the Navy Department for the fine 
cooperation shown the Canadian-American 
Military Board during its trip through Canada 
and to state that without this cooperation it 
would have been impossible to have effected, in 
such a short time and with such facility, the 
transfer of American citizens fi'om the armed 
forces of Canada to the United States armed 
forces. 

"In communicating the above to your Gov- 
ernment, I should appreciate your adding my 
personal view that these young men who have 
now returned to serve in the American forces 
will constitute a group of ambassadors of good 
will to spread throughout the United States 
the story of Canada's great contribution to the 
common war effort. 

"Sincerely yours, 

CoRDELi, Hull" 



ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE TO FRENCH 
NORTH AFRICA 

The exchange of goods with French North 
Africa, under the terms of an economic accord, 
has been resumed.^ Two French ships sailed 
on August 9 from the United States for Casa- 
blanca, carrying supplies of a non-military na- 
ture for the use of the local population. These 
are supplies of which French North Africa is 
in great need and which under present condi- 
tions can only be furnished by the United States. 
American consular agents stationed in Morocco, 
Algiers, and Tunisia will supervise their distri- 
bution. 

On August 11 two other ships sailed from 
Casablanca, carrying a mixed cargo of cork, 
tartar, olive oil, and other North African prod- 
ucts for the United States. 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH BRITISH 
HONDURAS 

[Released to the press August 18] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with 
British Honduras was announced on August 
18 by the Department of State, the Rubber Re- 
serve Company, and the Board of Economic 
Warfai-e. 

Under the terms of the agreement, the Rub- 
ber Reserve Company will purchase, until De- 
cember 31, 1946, all rubber produced in British 
Honduras which is not required for essential 
domestic needs there. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CON- 
SULAR PERSONNEL AND OTHER NA- 
TIONALS 

The S.S. Grripshohn with 1,451 American and 
other nationals on board is expected to arrive 
at New York on August 25. 

' Bulletin of April 11, 1942, p. 318, and April 18, 1942, 
p. 337. 



714 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BtTLLETIN 



In order to expedite the disembarkation of 
the passengers, the governmental agencies con- 
cerned in the examination of those arriving 
have decided that no persons will be allowed 
on the pier until examination is completed. 

A list of passengers on the Gripsholm has 
been issued as Department of State press release 
416, of August 18, 1942. 



General 



BIRTHDAY OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
PHILIPPINES 

[Released to the press August 19] 

The text of a message from the President 
to His Excellency Manuel Luis Quezon on the 
occasion of his sixty-fourth birthday follows: 

"On the occasion of your birthday, I send you 
greetings of warm friendship. In the past year 
the Philipjjine people under your leadership 
have shown what heights human beings can 
reach when the love of freedom inspires and 
guides them. 

"I know that I speak for the people of the 
United States when I say that we hope for you 
today a continuance of the strength, fortitude, 
and vision which have enabled you to serve your 
people in their greatest trial and which will 
enable you in the future to play your part in 
bringing liberty and abundance to your people." 



Commercial Policy 



MEXICAN EXPORTATION OF SILVER 
TO THE UNITED STATES 

The Department of State and the Office of 
Price Administration announced on August 23 
that on the basis of discussions which have been 



conducted with the Mexican Government the 
Governments of Mexico and the United States 
have agreed in principle to an increase in the 
price at which silver may be imported into the 
United States from 35 %0 an ounce to 45{S an 
ounce, f.o.b. New York or San Francisco, to be 
effective August 31. Details are still to be 
worked out. 

An amendment to the maximum price regu- 
lation (no. 198) on imports of silver bullion will 
shortly be issued, changing the maximum price 
at which silver bullion may be imported from 
any country into the United States from 35 %^ 
an ounce to 450 an ounce. 

Mexico is the largest exporter of silver to the 
United States. Lesser amounts also come in 
from Canada, Peru, and Chile. 



The Near East 



NOMINATION OF TURKISH FOREIGN 
MINISTER 

[Released to the press August 19] 

On August 15 the Secretary of State ad- 
dressed the following message to His Excellency 
Numan Menemencioglu on the occasion of his 
nomination as Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
the Turkish Republic : 

"I send you, Mr. Minister, my warmest con- 
gratulations upon your appointment as Min- 
ister for Foreign Affairs, and felicitate the 
Turkish Government upon its good fortune in 
having so worthy a successor to your esteemed 
predecessor." 

A translation of the reply which has been 
received from Mr. Menemencioglu follows: 

"The cordial and friendly message which 
Your Excellency was kind enough to address to 
me on the occasion of my nomination to the post 
of Minister of Foreign Affairs has touched me 



AUGUST 22, 1942 



715 



deeply. I beg you to accept my warmest thanks 
and to be assured of my most friendly senti- 
ments." 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



ELEVENTH PAN AMERICAN SANITARY 
CONFERENCE 

The Eleventh Pan American Sanitary Con- 
ference will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 
September 7-18, 1942. Invitations have been 
issued to all the American republics to be repre- 
sented. National leaders in the field of public 
health and sanitation are expected to be present. 

The Conference assumes unusual significance 
at the present time because of the need for main- 
taining the health of the civilian population in 
this period of crisis and for considering health* 
problems which might have a bearing on mili- 
tary operations. One of the subjects which will 
receive most careful study will be the mainte- 
nance of an adequate supply of drugs and medi- 
cal and hospital supplies. Other matters re- 
lating to public health will also be reviewed, 
especially cooperation in problems of hemi- 
spheric scope in order to secure uniformity of 
action and avoid duplication of effort. 



The Department 



REPRESENTATION ON FISHERIES COM- 
MITTEE OF THE WAR PRODUCTION 
BOARD 

On August 15, 1942 the Department of State 
issued a notice regarding the establishment 
within the War Production Board of a Fisheries 



Committee consisting of representatives of Fed- 
eral agencies having functions to perform with 
respect to production of fishery products, par- 
ticularly as a source of food supply. Mr. Leo 
D. Sturgeon, Assistant to the Assistant Secre- 
tary of State, Mr. Breckinridge Long, has been 
designated to serve as the Department's repre- 
sentative on the Committee and as liaison ofBcer 
of the Department with the Office of Fishery Co- 
ordination of the Department of the Interior. 
Mr. Charles I. Bevans, of the Treaty Division 
of the Department of State, will serve as alter- 
nate liaison officer with the Office of Fishery 
Coordination. 



The Foreign Service 



ESTABLISHMENT OF CLAIM BOARD 

On August 20, 1942 the Secretary of State 
issued Departmental Order 1082, establishing a 
Claim Board, the members of which include 
the Assistant Secretary of State designated as 
Budget Officer, the Legal Adviser, and the 
Chief of the Division of Foreign Service Ad- 
ministration, "in order to facilitate the prepa- 
ration of claims for personal losses of officers 
and employees of the Foreign Service for such 
legislative action as may be desirable as soon 
as possible after such claims arise". 



Publications 



Depabtment of State 

Index to the Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, nos. 
132-157, January 3 - June 27, 1942. Publication 1781. 
27 pp. 



716 



Treaty Information 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Rubber Agreement With British Honduras 

An announcement concerning the signing of 
a rubber agreement with British Honduras ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading "The 
War". 

ARMED FORCES 

Agreement With Canada Regarding Transfer of 
United States Citizens From Canadian to 
United States Armed Forces 

The texts of notes exchanged between the Sec- 
retary of State and Canadian officials with re- 
gard to action taken by the Joint Canadian- 
American Military Board under the provisions 
of the agreement with Canada regarding the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

transfer of United States citizens from Cana- 
dian to United States armed forces, signed 
March 18 and 20, 1942 (Executive Agreement 
Series 245), appear in this Bulletin under the 
heading "The War". 



Legislation 



Censorship Between Territories and the United States. 
n. Kept. 2397, 77th Cong., on H. R. 7151. 3 pp. 

Refugee and Foreign War Relief Programs : Message 
From the President of the United States Transmitting 
Report to Congress on the Refugee and Foreign War 
Relief Programs for the Period Beginning July 1, 
1&40, and Ending April 30, 1942. H. Doc. 807, 77th 
Cong, viii, 61 pp. 

An Act To facilitate the disposition of prizes captured 
by the United States during the present war, and for 
other purposes. Approved August 18, 1942. [H. R 
7211.] Public Law 704, 77th Cong. 2 pp. 



U. S. (GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFlCEi 1942 



For eale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents .... Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PDBLISUSD WEEKLY WITH THB APPBOVAIj OF THE DIBBCTOR OF THE BDBEAU OF THE BUDGET 



\ o"^ ;) 



I o v^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



AUGUST 29, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 166— Publication 1792 



C 



ontents 



The War Pag* 
Radio Address by the Former American Ambassador 

to Japan 719 

Declaration of War by Brazil on Germany and Italy . 723 

Australasia 
Visit to Washington of the New Zealand Prime Min- 
ister 723 

American Republics 

Rubber Agreement With El Salvador 723 

National Anniversary of Uruguay 723 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Eleventh Pan American Sanitary Conference .... 724 

Treaty Information 

Labor: Convention Concerning Statistics of Wages 
and Hours of Work in the Principal Mining and 
Manufacturing Industries, Including Building and 

Construction, and in Agriculture 724 

Commerce : Inter- American Coffee Agreement .... 724 
Strategic Materials: 

Agreement With Brazil 725 

Rubber Agreement With El Salvador . 725 

The Department 

Appointments 725 

Publications 725 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

SEP 14 1942 



The War 



RADIO ADDRESS BY THE FORMER AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN ' 



First of all, I should like to say how deeply 
we have been moved, my associates and myself, 
who have just returned on the exchange ship 
Gripskolm, by the many greetings of friends 
and the great volume of messages of welcome 
which have come to us from all over the coun- 
try. The welcome given us has warmed our 
hearts, and it is one that we can never forget; 
nor can we ever forget the really inexpressible 
joy of coming home after the difficult months 
and moments through which we have passed in 
Ja2:)an and Japanese-occupied territories. It 
may be impossible to answer all those messages 
individually. Please let me express now to all 
who hear me our most grateful thanks for them. 

Never before has my native land looked to me 
so beautiful. Never before has a homecoming 
meant so much. I think you will realize a little 
of what it meant to us when I tell you of those 
last seven days at anchor off Yokohama before 
our evacuation vessel finally sailed from Japa- 
nese waters. We were awaiting the completion 
of the negotiations for our exchange, not know- 
ing whether those negotiations would be suc- 
cessful and whether, if they were unsuccessful, 
we might not all be returned to our imprison- 
ment in Japan. Among us were many Ameri- 
cans — missionaries, teachers, newspaper corre- 
spondents, businessmen — who had spent the 
preceding six months in solitary confinement in 
small, bitterly cold prison cells, inadequately 
clothed and inadequately fed and at times sub- 
jected to the most cruel and barbaric tortures. 
I will not go into the nature of those tortures. 



' The Honorable Joseph C. Grew. Released to the 
press and broadcast over the facilities of the Columbia 
Broadcasting Systerti, Washington, August 30, 1942. 



which were many, except to mention an incident 
on the Gripsholm when three elderly Americans, 
one of them over 70 years old, gave me a demon- 
stration of the water-cure which had repeatedly 
been inflicted uf)on them. We went up to the 
bow of the ship early in the morning where a 
friend posed as the subject of the torture. He 
was tied up with his knees drawn up to his chin, 
his neck being attached to his knees and his 
hands securely bound behind him so that the 
cords in the actual torture had penetrated deep 
under the skin. He was then rolled over with 
his face up and water was poured into his nose 
and mouth. It was a realistic performance, but 
only from the oral description of those men 
could I visualize what the actual torture must 
have been. Six large buckets of water were used 
by the Japanese police, so that the subject 
lost consciousness and then was brought back 
to consciousness merely to have the same thing 
repeated. One of those elderly missionaries 
was given the water-cure six separate times 
in order to make him divulge information 
which he was supposed to have acquired as an 
alleged spy. Nearly all the American mission- 
aries, teachers, newspaper correspondents, and 
businessmen were regarded as potential spies. 
The stupidity of those Japanese police was only 
surpassed by their utter cruelty. That same 
American told me that once while he was lying 
tied on the floor a Japanese had ground his 
boot-sole into his face and then had brutally 
kicked him, smashing a rib. When he was 
finally untied, he could barely stand and he said 
he feared that a rib had been broken. One of 
the Japanese police asked where the broken rib 
was and began to feel liis body. As the Japa- 

719 



720 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nese came to the broken bone he said, "Is that 
the place?" and when the man answered "Yes", 
the policeman hauled off with his fist and hit 
that broken rib as hard as he could. In another 
case, a well-known American has been seriously 
maimed as a result of the gangrene which was 
caused by the ill-treatment that he received in 
his prison cell. I had known him in years gone 
by and seldom have I had so great a shock as 
when I saw him on the ship, a mere shadow of 
his former self. There were many, many other 
cases. 

I had heard indirectly of the horrible atroci- 
ties perpetrated in the rape of Nanking and of 
the fearful things done in Hong Kong when 
soldiers who had been taken as prisoners of war 
were bayoneted to death. But on shipboard we 
had direct evidence, for the dying shrieks of 
those soldiers were heard by a woman, a fellow 
passenger of ours, who herself told me the ter- 
rible story. This was no second-hand evidence 
but the reports of reliable first-hand witnesses 
and, in the case of the torture, the first-hand 
evidence of those who had suffered the tortures 
themselves. 

Do you wonder that during those seven days 
of waiting in the harbor of Yokohama several 
of those people told me that if the negotiations 
for our exchange failed they would commit sui- 
cide rather than return to their imprisonment in 
Japan ? 

And then came one of the greatest of all mo- 
ments. I awoke at 1 a.m. on June 25 sensing that 
something was happening. I looked out of the 
porthole and saw a piece of wood slowly moving 
past in the water. Another piece of wood moved 
faster. We were at last under way, slowly ac- 
celerating until the ship was finally speeding at 
full steam, away from Yokohama, away from 
Japan, pointing homeward. Ah, what a mo- 
ment that was, even though we had 18,000 miles 
to cover and 70 days in all before we should pass 
the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor and 
repeat to ourselves, with tears pouring down 
many a face, 

Breathes there the man with soul so dead 
Who never to himself hath said, 
This is my own, my native land? 



I shall have something to say tonight about 
the Japanese military machine which brought 
on this war and against which we are fighting 
today. But before turning to that subject there 
is something else which I cannot leave unsaid. 
I have lived for 10 years in Japan. I have had 
many friends in Japan, some of whom I ad- 
mired, respected, and loved. They are not the 
people who brought on this war. As patriots 
they will fight for their Emperor and country, 
to the last ditch if necessary, but they did not 
want this war and it was not they who began it. 
Even during our imprisonment in Tokyo many 
of those friends used to contrive to send us 
gifts in spite of the usual obstruction of the 
Ijolice who wished to cut us off completely from 
the outside world. They were not the usual 
gifts of flowers but gifts of food, sometimes a 
piece of meat, which was the most precious gift 
they could confer because they themselves could 
seldom get meat. For 10 years I have broken 
bread in their houses and they in mine. They 
were personally loyal to me to the end. 

But there is the other side to the picture, the 
ugly side of cruelty, brutality, and utter besti- 
ality, the ruthlessness and rapaciousness of the 
Japanese military machine which brought on 
this war. That Japanese military machine and 
military caste and military system must be ut- 
terly crushed, their credit and predominance 
must be utterly broken, for the future safety 
and welfare of the United States and of the 
United Nations and for the future safety and 
welfare of civilization and humanity. Let us 
put it in a nutshell : there is not sufficient room 
in the area of the Pacific Ocean for a peaceful 
America, for any of the peace-loving United 
Nations, and a swashbuckling Japan. 

I shall come back to that subject, but first it 
may interest you to know something about the 
last hours in Tokyo preceding the dastardly 
attack on Pearl Harbor. That story is of im- 
portant interest. 

Late in the evening of December 7 I received 
a telegram from our Secretary of State, Mr. 
Hull, containing a message from the President 
which I was to communicate to the Emperor at 



AUGUST 29, 1942 



721 



the earliest possible moment. I immediately 
asked for an appointment with the Minister for 
Foreign Affairs, Mr. Togo, around midnight, 
and drove at once to the Minister's official resi- 
dence and requested an audience with the Em- 
peror in order to present the President's mes- 
sage. Mr. Togo said that he would present my 
request to the Throne, and I left him at about 
12:30 a.m. This must have been only a few 
hours — Japan time — prior to the attack on 
Pearl Hai-bor. 

At 7 a.m. on the morning of December 8 1 was 
awakened by a telephone call from the Foreign 
Minister's secretary, who asked me to come to 
the Minister's residence as soon as possible. He 
said that he had been trying to telephone to me 
ever since 5 a.m. but had been unable to get con- 
nection. I hurriedly dressed and arrived at the 
official residence at about 7 : 30. Mr. Togo en- 
tered the room grim and formal and handed to 
me the reply to the President's message to the 
Emperor, whom I was told he had seen at about 
3 a.m., presumably just after the news of the at- 
tack on Pearl Harbor. At the same time he 
handed me a long memorandum ending with the 
statement: "The Japanese Government regi'ets 
to have to notify hereby the American Govern- 
ment that in view of the attitude of the Ameri- 
can Government it cannot but consider that it is 
impossible to reach an agreement through fur- 
ther negotiations." 

I asked the Minister if he bad presented to 
the Emperor my request for an audience. The 
Minister merely replied that he had no intention 
of standing between myself and the Throne. 
He then made a little speech thanking me for 
my efforts to preserve peace and as usual came 
downstairs to see me off at the door. He said 
nothing whatever about the outbreak of war be- 
tween our countries and I returned to the Em- 
bassy in entire ignorance that developments 
more serious than the breaking off of the conver- 
sations had occurred. It was not until at least 
an hour or more later that a press bulletin was 
released announcing the attack on Hawaii and 
the outbreak of war between Japan and the 
United States and Great Britain. When the 
bulletin was handed to me I could liardly believe 
that the news was true. However, it was soon 

480691—42 2 



confirmed from other sources, and later in the 
morning an official of the Foreign Office brought 
to my secretary the official note declaring war. 
Almost immediately afterward the Embassy's 
gates were closed and locked by the police, and 
from that moment we were regarded and treated 
as prisoners. A gi'oup of Japanese radio experts 
then immediately came and went through all 
our houses with a fine-toothed comb, taking 
away all short-wave radio sets so that thereafter 
we should have no contact with the outside 
world save through the Japanese newspapers 
which were regularly delivered to us. 

I had long known of Japan's preparations for 
war and I kept my Government currently ad- 
vised of the information which came to my 
knowledge on that subject. 

And now, before closing, I should like to tell 
you something about the Japanese military ma- 
chine against which we are fighting today. 
That machine has been trained and perfected 
through many years, for it has always had in 
view, even before the invasion of Manchuria in 
1931, the prospect of eventually sweeping not 
only to the north against Russia but to the west 
and south in order to control what the Japanese 
have latterly termed "The Co-Prosperity Sphere 
of Greater East Asia including the South 
Seas". It need hardly be said that the phrase 
"Co-Prosperity Sphere" denoted in fact the in- 
tention to exert Japanese control, politically, 
economically — absolutely — over all those far- 
flung territories. 

In 1931 came their invasion of Manchuria. 
In 1937 came their invasion of China south of 
the wall, and while their Army eventually 
floundered in China, due to the magnificent 
fighting spirit of Chiang Kai-shek, his coura- 
geous armies, and his determined people, never- 
theless the warfare which then ensued proved 
a practical training for the Japanese soldiers 
and sailors, who tirelessly developed and per- 
fected the tactics which they subsequently used 
in their landings and conquests to the south. 

The idea should not for a moment be enter- 
tained that the failure of the Japanese forces in 
China has discouraged the Japanese people. It 
has instead served to steel them for still greater 



722 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



sacrifices and to prepare them better for the war 
to the death upon which they have finally em- 
barked. As the realization came home to them 
of the need for greater and greater efforts, they 
accepted the inevitable war-footing reorganiza- 
tion of the country's life with characteristic 
calmness and determination. 

Probably no other factor has contributed 
more heavily to the preliminary victories 
achieved by the Japanese in this war than the 
offensive spirit which permeates all the armed 
forces of the Empire. This spirit, recognized 
by competent military men as the most vital 
intangible factor in achieving victory, has been 
nourished and perpetuated since the foundation 
of the modern Japanese Army. The Japanese 
High Command has counted implicitly upon the 
advantages this would give them over less ag- 
gressive enemies. They have put great store in 
what they consider to be the white man's flabbi- 
ness. They look upon us Americans as consti- 
tutional weaklings, demanding our daily com- 
forts and unwilling to make the sacrifices 
demanded for victory in a war against a mili- 
tary machine which has prepared and trained 
itself in Spartan simplicity and the hardness 
and toughness demanded by war. They attach 
gi-eat importance to the former disunity in the 
United States over the war issue, and they still 
count on an appreciable interval before an 
aroused nation can find itself and develop a 
fighting spirit of its own. By that time, they 
feel, Japan will be in complete control of ail 
East Asia. When they struck they made nn 
provision for failure; they left no road open 
for retreat. They struck with all the force and 
power at their command. And they will con- 
tinue to fight in the same manner until they are 
utterly crushed. 

We shall crush that machine and caste and 
system in due course, but if we Americans think 
that, collectively and individually, we can con- 
tinue to lead our normal lives, leaving the spirit 
of self-sacrifice to our soldiers and sailors, let- 
ting the intensification of our production pro- 
gi-am take care of itself, we shall unquestion- 
ably risk the danger of a stalemate in this wax^ 
of ours with Japan. I say this in the light of 



my 10 years' experience in Japan, my knowledge 
of the power of the Japanese Army and Navy 
and of the harcbiess and fighting spirit of the 
Japanese. I feel it my bounden duty to say 
this to my fellow countrymen. I know my own 
country even better than I know Japan, and I 
have not the slightest shadow of doubt of our 
eventual victory. But I do not wish to see tha 
period of our blood, sweat, and tears indefi- 
nitely and umiecessarily prolonged. That pe- 
riod will be prolonged only if our people fail to 
realize the truth of what I have just said : that 
we are up against a powerful fighting machine, 
a people whose morale cannot and will not be 
broken even by successive defeats, who wiU cer- 
tainly not be broken by economic hardships, 'a 
people who individually and collectively will 
gladly sacrifice their lives for their Emperor 
and their nation, and who can be brought to 
earth only by physical defeat, by being ejected 
physically from the areas which they have tem- 
porarily conquered or by a progressive attrition 
of their naval power and merchant marine 
which will finally result in cutting off their 
homeland from all connection with and access 
to those outlying areas — by complete defeat in 
battle. 

I need say no more. I have told you the truth 
as I see it from long experience and observation. 
I have come home with my associates in the Far 
East to join our war effort with yours and I 
realize, perhaps better than anyone else, that 
nothing less than the exertion of our maximum 
capacities, individually and collectively, in a war 
of offense will bring our beloved country safely 
through these deep waters to the longed-for 
haven of a victorious peace. 

We are fighting this war for the preservation 
of righteousness, law, and order, but above all 
for the preservation of the freedoms wliich have 
been conferred upon us by the glorious heritage 
of our American citizenship and for these same 
freedoms in other countries of the United Na- 
tions; and while we are fighting against the 
forces of evil, lawlessness, and disorder in the 
world, we are primarily fighting to prevent the 
enslavement which actually threatens to be im- 
posed upon us if we fail. I am convinced that 



AUGUST 29, 1942 



723 



this is not an overstatement. Surely ours is a 
cause worth sacrificing for and living for and 
dying for if necessary. "Though love repine 
and reason chafe, there came a voice without 
reply ; 'tis man's perdition to be safe, when for 
the truth he ought to die." 

DECLARATION OF WAR BY BRAZIL 
ON GERMANY AND ITALY 

[Beleased to the press August 26] 

The translation of a telegram received by the 
Secretary of State from His Excellency Oswaldo 
Aranha, Minister of Foreign Relations of Bra- 
zil, follows : 

"August 25, 1942. 

"I thank Your Excellency for your telegram 
and for your generous statements.^ Once more 
our countries find themselves united as, after all, 
they invariably [and] always were, in the de- 
fense of the noble ideals which constitute the 
common moral heritage of the peoples of this 
Hemisphere. Once more our peoples gather 
their strength, their unbreakable faith in the im- 
mortal principles of right and of justice for the 
defense of the great American family and of 
human dignity itself. The people and the au- 
thorities of Brazil have serene confidence in the 
cause which together we defend and face this 
critical hour of humanity with manly courage 
and inflexible determination. I am deeply 
grateful to Your Excellency for the noble senti- 
ments which you were kind enough to express to 
me. I renew to Your Excellency the assurances 
of my deepest respect and of my great personal 
esteem. 

Oswaldo Aranha" 



Australasia 



VISIT TO WASHINGTON OF THE NEW 
ZEALAND PRIME MINISTER 

[Released to the press August 25] 

The Right Honorable Peter Eraser, Prune 
Minister of New Zealand, will arrive at the 

' Bulletin of August 22, 1942, p. 711. 



National Airport, Washington, D.C., on Au- 
gust 26 for a brief visit in the United States. 
He will be a guest of tlie President at the White 
House for the night, following which he will go 
to the Blair House, where he will reside for the 
remainder of his stay in Washington. 

The Prime Minister will be met upon arrival 
by the Secretary of State, the Honorable Walter 
Nash, Minister of New Zealand, and other offi- 
cials of the Government. 

The Honorable Patrick J. Hurley, American 
Minister to New Zealand, is accompanying the 
Prime Minister. 



American Republics 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH 
EL SALVADOR 

[Released to the press August 24] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with the 
Republic of El Salvador was annomiced on Au- 
gust 24 by the Department of State, the Rubber 
Reserve Company, and the Board of Economic 
Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agreement, the Rubber 
Reserve Company will purchase, until December 
31, 1946, all rubber produced in El Salvador 
which is not required for essential domestic 
needs. 

NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY OF URUGUAY 

[Released to the press August 25] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency General 
Alfredo Baldomir, President of the Oriental Re- 
public of Uruguay, on the occasion of the anni- 
versary of the declaration of the independence 
of Uruguay, follows : 

"The White House, August 26, 19 J^. 
"On this aimiversary of the declaration of the 
independence of Uruguay, I am afforded a wel- 
come opportunity not only of expressing to Your 
Excellency my cordial best wishes for the future 
progress and prosperity of your admirable coun- 



724 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



try, but at the same time of thanking Your Ex- 
cellency and the Government and people of 
Uruguay for the wholehearted cooperation and 
support which they have extended to the cause to 
the success of which the free nations of the world 
are pledged. During the past year particularly 
the friendship between Uruguay and the United 
States, based as it is upon similar traditions and 
ideals, has been greatly strengthened by the fact 
that our two peoples have achieved a common 
understanding of the challenge of those who 
would enslave the world and have shown a com- 
mon determination to meet that challenge. 
"Please accept [etc.] 

Franklin D Eoosevblt" 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



ELEVENTH PAN AMERICAN SANITARY 
CONFERENCE 

I Released to the press August 26] " ' 'JrK 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Brazilian Government to be represented 
oflBcially at the Eleventh Pan American Sani- 
taiy Conference, which will be held at Rio de 
Janeiro from September 7 to September 18, 1942. 
With the approval of the President, the follow- 
ing Delegation will represent the United States 
of America at the Conference : 

Surgeon General Thomas Parian. Public Health Service, 
chairma/ti 

Dr. E, h. Bishop, Director of Health, Tennessee Valley 
Authority 

Surgeon G. L. Dunahoo, Public Health Service, Chief 
of the Quarantine Office at the Port of Miami, 
Miami, Fla. 

Dr. George C. Dunham, Director, Health and Sanitation 
Division, Office of the Coordinator of Inter-Ameri- 
can Affairs; Brig. Gen., Medical Corps, United 
States Army 

Surgeon W. H. Sebrell, Jr., Public Health Service 

Capt. Charles S. Stephenson, Medical Corps, U.S.N., 
Bureau of Medicine and Surgfry, United States 
Navy 

Ur. Abel Wolman, School of Public Health, Johos Hop- 
kins University, Baltimore, Md. 



Philip P. Williams, Third Secretary, American Em- 
bassy, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ; secretary 

The periodic Pan American Sanitary Con- 
ferences have a supervisory responsibility over 
the Pan American Sanitary Bureau, which is the 
central coordinating agency for public health in 
the Western Hemisphere. The forthcoming 
Conference will consider sanitation and health 
problems affecting the 21 American republics in 
the light of war conditions. 



Treaty Information 



LABOR 

Conventiou Concerning Statistics of Wages and 
Hours of Work in the Principal Mining and 
Manufacturing Industries, Including Building 
and Construction, and in Agriculture 

Meodco 

According to a circular letter from the League 
of Xations dated July 24, 1942 the ratifica- 
tion by Mexico of the Convention Concerning 
Statistics of Wages and Hours of Work in the 
Principal Mining and Manufacturing Indus- 
tries, Including Building and Construction, and 
in Agriculture, adopted on June 20, 1938 by the 
International Labor Conference at its twenty- 
fourth session, was registered with the Secre- 
tariat on July 16, 1942. 



The convention has been ratified by the fol- 
lowing countries: Australia, Denmark, Egypt, 
Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, 
Sweden, Switzerland, and Union of South 
Africa. 

COMMERCE 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement 

An announcement regarding the termination 
of Executive Order 8863, which allocated for the 
present quota-year the quota provided by article 
VII of the Inter- American Coffee Agreement 
(signed at Washington November 28, 1940 and 



iUGUST 29, 1942 



725 



printed as Treaty Series 970) for countries not 
signatories of the agreement, and the decision 
not to allocate the non-signatory quota for the 
year beginning October 1, 1942, appeared in the 
Bulletin for July 18, 1942 on page 635. 

The Bureau of Customs has announced that 
beginning September 1, 1942 provisions will be 
made at customs ports of entry to permit im- 
porters to present entries for consumption cover- 
ing coffee produced in countries not signatories 
of the agreement. 

No order will be issued allocating the non- 
signatory quota for the year beginning October 
1, 1942. The unexhausted portion of the quota 
as of August 15, 1942 was said to be approxi- 
mately 15,000,000 pounds. 

STRATEGIC MATERIALS 
Agreement With Brazil 

According to an announcement from the 
Board of Economic Warfare an agreement has 
been entered into with Brazil for the purchase 
by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the 
entire exportable surplus of Brazilian babassu 
and castor oil. The oil stocks will replace tung 
and cocoanut oil formerly imported from the 
southwest Pacific. The agreement provides that 
if shipping is not available within 30 days 
after the stocks are offered for sale the Corpo- 
ration will pay the agreed prices and store the 
oil in warehouses. 



Rubber Agreement With El Salvador 

An announcement concerning the signing of 
a rubber agreement with the Republic of El 
Salvador appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 



The Department 



APPOINTMENTS 

Mr. Edward Yardley was designated Special 
Assistant and Executive Secretary to the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information, effective 
August 27, 1942 (Departmental Order 1084). 



Publications 



Department of State 

Military Higliway to Alaska : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Canada — Effected by 
exchange of notes signed March 17 and 18, 1942. 
Executive Agreement Series 246. Publication 1783. 
5 pp. 5<S. 

Double Taxation : Convention and Protocol Between 
the United States of America and Canada — Signed at 
Washington March 4, 1942; proclaimed June 17, 1942. 
Treaty Series 983. 13 pp. 5#. 



U S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE! 1942 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 167— Publication 1799 







ontents 




The War 

Address by tlie President to the International Student 

Assembly 729 

Third Anniversary of the German Attack on Poland : 
Message From the President of the United States 

to the President of Poland 732 

Radio Address by Assistant Secretary Berle . . . 733 
Agreements for Reciprocal Lend-Lease Aid to the 

United States and Its Armed Forces 734 

United States Technical Mission to Brazil 740 

Relief for American Prisoners of War Held by Japan . 741 
Radio Address by the Former American Ambassador 

to Japan 742 

Proclaimed List : Supplement 1 to Revision III . . . 742 

International Confeeences, Commissions, Etc. 

Inter-American Congress on Social Plamiing .... 743 

The Department 

The Division of Departmental Personnel 743 

Appointment of officers 744 

Treaty Information 

Mutual Guaranties : Agreement With the United King- 
dom, Australia, New Zealand, and the French 
National Committee 744 

Restriction of War: Convention Relating to the Treat- 
ment of Prisoners of War 745 

Publications 745 

Legislation '. 745 



U. 8. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
SEP 19 1S42 



The War 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL STUDENT 

ASSEMBLY ' 



[Released to the press by the White House September 3] 

It may interest the members of this Assembly 
of tlie International Student Service that dur- 
ing the past week the Axis radio has given un- 
usual comment to your sessions and to the speech 
which you are hearing at this moment. 

Our listening stations have picked up an in- 
creasing volume of Axis broadcasts, including 
controlled stations in France, Hungary, the 
Netlierlands, and elsewhere, referring to this 
meeting of the younger generation from all the 
United Nations in terms of growing hate and, 
of course, complete falsehood. Our listening 
stations report that they expect that at this mo- 
ment the air in all Axis-dominated nations will 
be thoroughly jammed — blacked out — in order 
that no sound of what I am saying, either in 
English or in translation, will be heard by any 
restless young people who are under Hitler's 
heel. 

The Nazi radio in Paris, for example, tells the 
youth of France that Roosevelt was solely re- 
sponsible for the defeat of France, that Roose- 
velt is not qualified to address a message to the 
youth of the world because America is a nation 
that has done nothing for youth. 

Berlin reports that four French youth organi- 
zations have protested in advance against this 
speech, since Roosevelt must be blamed for the 
death of more than 100,000 young Frenchmen. 
Incidentally, it would be interesting to know 
how many real Frenchmen there are in these, 
so-called French youth organizations. 

'Broadcast on September 3 in connection with the 
International Student Assembly, in session at Washing- 
ton, D. C, September 2-5, 1942. 



A radio in Tokyo says that I am admitting 
to you at this moment that my people are de- 
cadent — weaklings — playboys — spoiled by jazz 
music and Hollywood pictures. Of course, this 
broadcast did not originate from any of the 
Japanese who bumped into our playboys in the 
Southwest Pacific. 

The reason for this hysterically defensive at- 
titude toward this gathering is not hard to find. 
For many years they have made their hypocrit- 
ical appeal to youth ; they have tried, with all 
their blatant publicity, to represent themselves 
as the champions of youth. 

But now the world knows that the Nazis, the 
Fascists, and the militarists of Japan have noth- 
ing to offer to youth except death. 

On the other hand, the cause of the United 
Nations is the cause of youth itself. It is the 
hope of the new generation and the generations 
that are to come — hope for a new life that can 
be lived in freedom and justice and decency. 

This fact is becoming clearer every day to 
the young people of Europe, where the Nazis 
are trying to create youth organizations built 
on the Nazi pattern. It is not a pattern devised 
by youth for youth. It is a pattern devised by 
Hitler and imposed upon youth by a form of 
mental forcible feeding— a diet of false facts, 
distortions, and prohibitions — all backed up by 
the guns of the Gestapo. 

If you have any doubt as to what the decent 
youth of Europe think about the false promises 
the Axis masters make to the young people of 
the world, look to the brave young men of 
France and all the occupied countries who pre- 
fer to face the firing squads rather than a life- 
time of slavery and degradation under Hitler. 

729 



730 

In such unfortunate countries as Finland, 
Hungary, Bulgaria, Rumania, and Italy, whose 
Governments have found it necessary to submit 
to Hitler and do his bidding, the Quislings have 
organized youth movements too — but these are 
only movements of youth by the tens of thou- 
sands to the slaughter of the Eastern front, 
where the Nazis need cannon-fodder in their 
desperate attempts to shatter the stalwart Rus- 
sian Army. 

In China heroic youth has stood steadfast for 
more than five years against all of Japan's at- 
tempts to seduce and disarm them with such 
transparent lies as the promise of "Asia for the 
Asiatics". For the Chinese know that this only 
means "all of creation enslaved by the Japa- 
nese". 

We exult in the thought that it is the young, 
free men and women of the United Nations and 
not the wound-up robots of the slave states who 
will mold the shape of the new world. 

The delegates to this International Student 
Assembly represent the 29 United Nations. 
They also represent, in spirit at least, the 
younger generation of many other nations who, 
though they are not now actively at war on our 
side, are with us heart and soul in aspiration for 
a secure and peaceful world. 

Before the first World War very few people 
in any country believed that youth had the 
right to speak for itself as a group or to partici- 
pate in councils of state. 

We have learned much since then. We know 
that wisdom does not come necessarily with 
years, that old men may be foolish and young 
men may be wise. But in every war it is the 
younger generation which bears the burden of 
combat and inlierits all the ills that war leaves 
in its wake. 

In the economic crises that followed the false 
prosperity after the first World War, many 
young men and women suffered even more than 
did their elders. For they were denied the 
primary opportunities for education, for train- 
ing, for work, or even for food enough to build 
up healthy bodies. As a result, they were 
tempted to seek some simple remedy not only 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 

for their own individual problems but for all 
the problems that beset the world. Some 
listened to alien, siren voices which offered glib 
answers to all the questions. "Democracy is 
dead", said these voices. "Follow us, and we 
will teach you efficiency. We will lead you to 
world conquest. We will give you power over 
inferior races. And all that we ask you to give 
in return is your freedom." 

Other young people in the democracies 
listened to gospels of despair. They took 
refuge in cynicism and bitterness. 

However, the day finally came when all 
theory had to give way to fact — the terrible, 
tangible fact of dive bombers, panzer divisions, 
the actual threat to the security of every home 
and every family in every free country in the 
world. And when that fact became clear to 
our youth they answered the call to arms— many 
millions of them; and today they are deter- 
mined to fight until the forces of aggression 
have been utterly destroyed. 

What I am saying here in Washington is 
being heard by several million American 
soldiers, sailors, and marines, not only 
within the continental limits of the United 
States but in far-distant points: in Central 
and South America, in the islands of the At- 
lantic, in Britain and Ireland, on the coasts of 
Africa, in Egypt, in Iraq and Iran, in Russia, in 
India, in China, in Australia, in New Zealand, 
in many islands of the Pacific, and on all the 
seas of the world. There — in all those places — 
are our fighting men. 

And to them I should like to deliver a special 
message, from their Commander in Chief and 
from the very hearts of their countrymen : 

You young Americans today are conducting 
yourselves in a manner that is worthy of the 
highest, proudest traditions of our Nation. 

No pilgrims who landed on the uncharted 
New England coast, no pioneers who forced 
their way through the trackless wilderness, 
showed greater fortitude, greater determina- 
tion than you are showing now. 

Neither your own fathers, in 1918, nor your 
fathers' fathers, in 1863 or 1776, fought with 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



731 



greater gallantry or more selfless devotion to 
duty and country than you are now displaying 
on battlefields far from home. 

And what is more, you know why you are 
fighting. You know that the road which has 
led you to the Solomon Islands or to the Red 
Sea or to the coast of France is in fact an ex- 
tension of Main Street, and that when you fight, 
anywhere along that road, you are fighting in 
the defense of your own homes, your own free 
schools, your own churches, your own ideals. 

We here at home are supremely conscious of 
our obligations to you, now and in the future. 
We will not let you down. 

We know that in the minds of many of you 
are thoughts of interrupted education, inter- 
rupted careers, delayed opportunities for getting 
a job. The solution of such problems cannot 
be left, as it was last time, to mere chance. This 
Government has accepted the responsibility for 
seeing to it that, wherever possible, work has 
been provided for those who were willing and 
able but who could not find work. That re- 
sponsibility will continue after the war. And 
when you come home we do not propose to in- 
volve you, as last time, in a domestic economic 
mess of our own making. 

You are doing first things first — fighting to 
win this war. For you know that should this 
war be lost all our plans for the peace to follow 
would be meaningless. 

Victory is essential ; but victory is not enough 
for you — or for us. We must be sure that when 
you have won victory you will not have to teU 
your children that you fought in vain — that you 
were betrayed. We must be sure that in your 
homes there will not be want, that in your 
schools only the living truth will be taught, that 
in your churches there may be preached without 
fear a faith in which men may deeply believe. 

The better world for which you fight — and for 
which some of you give your lives — will not 
come merely because we shall have won the war. 
It will not come merely because we wish very 
hard that it would come. It will be made pos- 
sible only by bold vision, intelligent planning, 
and hard work. It caimot be brought about 



overnight but only by years of effort and perse- 
verance and unfaltering faith. 

You young soldiers and sailors, farmers and 
factory workers, artists and scholars, who are 
fighting our way to victory now, all of you wiU 
have to take your part in shaping that world. 
You will earn it by what you do now ; but you 
will not attain it if you leave the job for others 
to do alone. When you lay aside your gun at 
the end of the war, you cannot at the same time 
lay aside your duty to the future. 

What I have said to our American soldiers 
and sailors applies to all the young men and 
women of the United Nations who are facing our 
common enemies. There is a complete unanim- 
ity of spirit among all the youth of all kinds 
and kindreds who fight to preserve or to regain 
their freedom. 

In Norway and Holland, Belgium and France, 
Czechoslovakia and Poland, Serbia and Greece 
there is a fighting spirit that defies the harsh 
oppression, the barbarous cruelty and terrorism 
of the Nazis. Although disarmed, the imcon- 
querable people still strike at their oppressors. 
Although forbidden to know the truth, they lis- 
ten at the risk of their lives to radio broadcasts 
from afar; and, by word of mouth and by secret 
newspaper passed from one patriot to another, 
they still spread the truth. When the time 
comes for these peoples to rise. Hitler's "new 
order" will be destroyed by the hands of its own 
victims. 

Today the embattled youth of Russia and 
China are realizing a new individual dignity, 
casting off the last links of the ancient chains of 
imperial despotism which had bound them so 
long. 

This is a development of historic importance. 
It means that the old term "Western Civiliza- 
tion" no longer applies. World events and the 
common needs of all humanity are joining the 
culture of Asia with the culture of Europe and 
of the Americas to form for the first time a real 
world civilization. 

In the concept of the Four Freedoms, in the 
basic principles of the Atlantic Charter, we 



732 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETEN 



have set for ourselves high goals, unlimited 
objectives. 

These concepts and these principles are de- 
signed to form a world in which men, women, 
and children can live in freedom and in equity 
and, above all, without fear of the horrors of 
war. For no soldiers or sailors in any of our 
forces today would so willingly endure the rig- 
ors of battle if they thought that in another 20 
years their own sons would be fighting still an- 
other war on distant deserts or seas or in far- 
away jungles or skies. 

We have profited by our past mistakes. This 
time we shall know how to make full use of 
victory. This time the achievements of our 
fighting forces will not be thrown away by polit- 
ical cynicism and timidity and incompetence. 

There is still a handful of men and women in 
the United States and elsewhere who mock and 
sneer at the Four Freedoms and the Atlantic 
Charter. They are few in number, but some of 
them have the financial power to give our ene- 
mies the false impression that they have a large 
following among our citizenry. They play 
petty politics in a world crisis. They fiddle 
with many sour notes while civilization burns. 
These puny prophets decry our determination to 
implement our high concepts and sound princi- 
ples. And the words of these little men of little 
faith are quoted with gleeful approval by the 
press and radio of our enemies. 



We are deeply aware that we cannot achieve 
our goals easily. We cannot attain the fullness 
of all our ideals overnight. We know that this 
is to be a long and hard and bitter fight — and 
that there will still be an enormous job for us to 
do long after the last German, Japanese, and 
Italian bombing planes have been shot to earth. 

But we do believe that with divine guidance 
we can make — in this dark world of today and 
in the new post-war world — a steady progress 
toward the highest goals that men have ever 
imagined. 

We of the United Nations have the technical 
means, the physical resources, and, most of all, 
the adventurous courage and the vision and the 
will that are needed to build and sustain the 
kind of world order which alone can justify the 
tremendous sacrifices now being made by our 
youth. 

But we must keep at it ; we must never relax, 
never falter, never fear ; and we must keep at it 
together. 

We must maintain the offensive against evil in 
all its forms. We must work and we must fight 
to insure that our children shall have and shall 
enjoy in peace their inalienable rights to free- 
dom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom 
from want, freedom from fear. 

Only on those bold terms can this total war 
result in total victory. 



THIRD ANNIVERSARY OF THE GERJMAN ATTACK ON POLAND 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO THE PRESIDENT OF POLAND 



[Released to the press August 31] 

The American Ambassador to the Polish 
Government in London has been instructed to 
deliver the following message from the Presi- 
dent of the United States to the President of 
Poland on August 31, 1942, the anniversary of 
the German attack on Poland : 

"On this the Third Anniversary of the unpro- 
voked and wanton attack by the Nazi hordes on 
your country I express to you on behalf of the 
American people and myself the deep admira- 



tion felt by freedom-loving peoples for the 
courage, fortitude and indomitable spirit shown 
by your countrymen during this trying period. 
"The forces of ruthless aggression unleashed 
by Hitler three years ago are now opposed by 
the overwhelming might of all the United Na- 
tions. Their combined efforts in the common 
cause to which Poland is making such contribu- 
tions assui'e victory and the liberation of all op- 
pressed peoples under a just and enduring 
peace." 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



733 



RADIO ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ' 



[Released to the press September 2] 

Before dawn on the first of September 1939 the 
German divisions crossed the Polish frontier. 
At that moment the war fires which had been 
kindled by the Axis throughout the world burst 
into flame. 

The attack was well prepared. Lies about Po- 
land, and particularly about Polish treatment 
of Germans, had been prepared in all forms and 
were being systematically circulated not only in 
Europe but in North and South America as well. 
The German General Staff had advised Hitler 
that the Polish campaign would be only "a 
bloody promenade". Arrangements were made 
for a campaign of killing and torture, and these 
were to be put into pictures so that the pictures, 
circulated also in North and South America, 
might strike fear into the hearts of any people 
which thought of resisting the German arms. 
Three years ago, this day, the plan was put into 
execution. 

It is true that Hitler had given his solemn 
pledge that the Polish frontier should be invio- 
late. It is true he had promised to Poland ever- 
lasting friendship. It is true that he had as- 
sured the world that he had no intention or de- 
sign to make war or to seize territory. He had 
made these false pledges and these promises at 
the very moment that his agents were planning 
to seize and to enslave the entire Polish people. 

More than that : the Nazis included and now 
include a list of peoples throughout the world 
who were to be slaves or servants of Nazi mas- 
ters. In that list were not only European peo- 
ples but peoples of North and South America. 
To the free citizens of free countries, European 
and American, the Nazi rule assigned particular 
badges of slavery. For instance, South Ameri- 
cans were supposed to be fit for field labor and 
for house servants. This was, and still is, a part 
of the Nazi doctrine and the Nazi plan. Poland 
was the first great example. 

But this plan failed to reckon with one great 



' Broadcast in Spanish over the short-wave facilities 
of the National Broadcasting Company September 1, 
1942. 



human fact. A nation is undefeated as long as 
the soul of its people survives. 

At the very moment when the German legions 
were reaping a bloody harvest on the Polish 
plain, the mills of the gods began to grind. 

They ground courage in a people faced with 
impossible odds. 

They ground hope out of despair. They 
ground out an iron resolve that these murder- 
ing oppressors should find no inch of Polish soil 
on which they could be safe. 

The mills of the gods ground out the seed of 
a world-wide resistance and the resentment of 
a world-wide horror. Fii'st England, then 
other nations, took up arms. They ground the 
slow accumulation of a terrible force which has 
grown in three j'ears to a great army of nations. 
They have ground out a unity among free peo- 
ples, as each realizes that the freedom of one is 
essential to the safety of all. 

They have begun to grind the great plan of 
restitution. They have begun to make a design 
for a stronger world, in which there shall be 
freedom from fear and freedom from want. 

On the Polish plain there is no defeat. It is 
sown with armed men who wait their time. 
It is sown with German dead and wounded 
from the Eussian campaign. The work of 
justice is already begun. 

This is not the first time in history that 
nations have attempted to bring about the 
death of Poland. Indomitable, she has risen 
again, stronger than before. From her example 
we who are also engaged in that common strug- 
gle must draw an iron determination to wif)e 
tyranny out of the earth. 

Our ancestors in the New World challenged 
the mightiest empires and made themselves 
free. To deserve that freedom, as to make 
ourselves safe, we must now make freedom 
universal. 

An emblem of our certain victory must be the 
restitution of freedom to the deathless Poland — 
the Poland of history, the Poland of arts, the 
Poland of Chopin's music, tlie Poland of un- 
conquerable soul. 



734 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

AGREEMENTS FOR RECIPROCAL LEND-LEASE AID TO THE UNITED STATES 

AND ITS ARMED FORCES 



IKeleased to the press September 3) 

Agreements specifying the principles and 
procedures applicable to the provision of aid to 
the United States and its armed forces by the 
Governments of the United Kingdom, Aus- 
tralia, and New Zealand were concluded on 
September 3 by exchanges of notes between the 
Secretary of State and the British Ambassador, 
Lord Halifax; the Australian Minister, Sir 
Owen Dixon; and the New Zealand Minister, 
Mr. Walter Nash. A similar agreement con- 
cerning the provision of aid by Fighting France 
was concluded in London on September 3 by an 
exchange of notes between Brig. Gen. John E. 
Dahlquist, Acting Military Representative of 
the United States of America, and M. Maurice 
de Jean, representing the French National Com- 
mittee. The texts of these documents are 
printed below. 

These agreements formalize the principles 
and procedures applicable to the provision of 
aid to the armed forces of the United States by 
the other parties on the same terms as those 
under which the United States supplies aid to 
them in accordance with the provisions of the 
Lend-Lease Act. Each of them, without await- 
ing conclusion of a formal agreement, has been 
providing such aid on these terms as occasion 
required since the passage of the Lend-Lease 
Act. This aid is rapidly increasing in impor- 
tance as the intensity of the American war 
effort increases in the various theaters of opera- 
tions concerned. 

Each of these agreements specifies that the 
general principle governing the provision of 
mutual aid is that the war production and war 
resources of each contracting party should be 
used in ways which most effectively utilize the 
available materials, manpower, production fa- 
cilities, and shipping space. The agreements 
further specify that a maximum of the articles 
and services provided by each party to the other 
shall be in the form of reciprocal aid so that 
the need of each for the currency of the other 
may be reduced to a minimum. Each of the 
other parties agrees to provide the armed forces 



of the United States with military equipment, 
munitions, military and naval stores, other sup- 
plies, materials, facilities, and services when 
they can most effectively be procured in their 
respective countries. 

The agreements with the Governments of 
Australia and New Zealand also make applica- 
ble to their relations with this Government the 
principles of the agreement between the Gov- 
ernments of tlie United States and the United 
Kingdom on the principles applying to mu- 
tual aid, signed in Washington on February 
23, 1942.^ 

Note From the British, Amhassador to the 
Secretary of State 
Sir: 

In the United Nations declaration of January 
1, 1942, the contracting governments pledged 
themselves to employ their full resources, mili- 
tary or economic, against those nations with 
which they are at war and in the Agreement of 
February 23, 1942, each contracting government 
undertook to provide the other with such ar- 
ticles, services, facilities or information useful 
in the prosecution of their common war under- 
taking as each may be in a position to supply. 
It is further the understanding of the Govern- 
ment of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland that the general principle 
to be followed in providing mutual aid as set 
forth in the said Agreement of February 23, 
1942, is that the war production and the war 
resources of both Nations should be used by the 
armed forces of each and of the other United 
Nations in ways which most effectively utilize 
the available materials, manpower, production 
facilities and shipping space. 

With a view, therefore, to supplementing 
Article 2 and Article 6 of the Agreement of Feb- 
ruary 23, 1942, between our two Governments for 
the provision of reciprocal aid, I have the honour 
to set forth below the understanding of the Gov- 



' Bulletin o£ February 28. 1042, p. 190. Also printed 
as Executive Agreement Series 241. 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



735 



ernment of the United Kangdom of Great Brit- 
ain and Northern Ireland of the principles and 
procedures applicable to the provision of aid by 
the Government of the United Kangdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the 
armed forces of the United States and the man- 
ner in which such aid will be correlated with 
the maintenance of those forces by the United 
States Government. 

1. While each Government retains the right 
of final decision, in the light of its own poten- 
tialities and responsibilities, decisions as to the 
most effective use of resources shall, so far as 
possible, be made in common, pursuant to com- 
mon plans for winning the war. 

2. As to financing the provision of such aid, 
within the fields mentioned below, it is the un- 
derstanding of the Government of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land that the general principle to be applied, 
to the point at which the common war effort is 
most effective, is that as large a portion as pos- 
sible of the articles and services which each 
Government may authorize to be provided to 
the other shall be in the form of reciprocal aid 
so that the need of each Government for the 
currency of the other may be reduced to a 
minimum. 

It is accordingly the understanding of the 
Government of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Northern Ireland that the United 
States Government will provide, in accordance 
with the provisions of, and to the extent author- 
ized under, the Act of March 11, 1941, the share 
of its war production made available to the 
United Kangdom. The Government of the 
United Kingdom will provide on the same terms 
and as reciprocal aid so much of its war produc- 
tion made available to the United States as it 
authorizes in accordance with the Agi'eement of 
February 23, 1942. 

3. The Government of the United Kingdom 
will provide the United States or its armed 
forces with the following types of assistance as 
such reciprocal aid, when it is found that they 
can most effectively be procured in the United 
Kingdom or in the British Colonial Empire : 



(a) Military equipment, munitions and mili- 
tary and naval stores. 

(b) Other supplies, materials, facilities and 
services for the United States forces, except for 
the pay and allowances of such forces, adminis- 
trative expenses, and such local purchases as its 
official establishments may make other than 
through the official establishments of the Gov- 
ernment of the United Kingdom as specified in 
paragraph 4. 

(c) Supplies, materials and services needed in 
the construction of military projects, tasks and 
similar capital works required for the common 
war effort in the United Kingdom or in the 
British Colonial Empire, except for the wages 
and salaries of United States citizens. 

( d ) Supplies, materials and services needed in 
the construction of such military projects, tasks 
and capital works in territory other than the 
United Kingdom or the British Colonial Empire 
or territory of the United States to the extent 
that the United Kingdom or the British 
Colonial Empire is a more practicable source of 
supply than the United States or another of the 
United Nations. 

4. The practical application of the principles 
formulated in this note, including the procedure 
by which requests for aid by either Government 
are made and acted upon, shall be worked out as 
occasion may require by agreement between the 
two Governments, acting when possible through 
their appropriate military or civilian adminis- 
trative authorities. Bequests by the United 
States Government for such aid will be presented 
by duly authorized authorities of the United 
States to official agencies of the United Kingdom 
which will be designated or established in Lon- 
don and in the areas where United States forces 
are located for the purpose of facilitating the 
provision of reciprocal aid. 

5. It is the understanding of the Government 
of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland that all such aid, as well as 
other aid, including information, received 
under Article 6 of the Agreement of February 
23, 1942, accepted by the President of the 
United States or his authorized representa- 



481928 — 42- 



736 



DEPAHTMENT OF STATE BTTTiTiKTIN 



tives from the Goveniment of the United 
Kingdom will be received as a benefit to the 
United States under the Act of March 11, 1941. 
In so far as circumstances will permit, appro- 
priate record of aid received under this ar- 
rangement, except for miscellaneous facilities 
and services, will be kept by each Government. 

If the Government of the United States con- 
curs in the foregoing, I would suggest that the 
present note and your reply to that eileet be 
regarded as placing on record the understand- 
ing of our two Governments in this matter. 

I have [etc.] Halifax 

Note From, the Secretary of State to fhe British 
Arribassador 

Excellency : 

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note of today's date concerning the 
principles and procedures applicable to the pro- 
vision of aid by the Government of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land to the armed forces of the United States 
of America. 

In reply I wish to inform you that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States agrees with the 
understanding of the Government of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land as expressed in that note. In accordance 
with the suggestion contained therein, your 
note and this I'eply will be regarded as placing 
on record the imderstanding between our two 
Governments in this matter. 

This further integration and strengthening 
of our common war effort gives me great satis- 
faction. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 

Note From the AustrnJian Minister to tlie 
Secretary of State 

Sih: 

As contracting parties to the United Nations 
Declaration of January 1, 1942, the Governments 
of the United States of America and the Com- 
monwealth of Australia pledged themselves to 
employ their full resources, military and eco- 



nomic, against those nations with which they 
are at war. 

AVith regard to the arrangements for mutual 
aid between our two governments, I refer to the 
agreement signed at Washington on February 
23, 1942 between the Governments of the United 
States of America and the United Kingdom on 
principles applying to mutual aid in the present 
war authorized and provided for by the Act of 
Congress of March 11, 1941, and have the honour 
to inform you that the Government of the Com- 
monwealth of Australia accepts the principles 
therein contained as governing the provision of 
mutual aid between itself and the Government 
of the United States of America. 

It is the understanding of the Government of 
the Commonwealth of Australia that the general 
principle to be followed in providing such aid is 
that the war production and war resources of 
both nations should be used by the armed forces 
of each, in the ways which most effectively uti- 
lize available materials, manpower, production 
facilities and shipping space. 

I now set forth the unilerstanding of the Gov- 
ernment of the Commonwealth of Australia of 
the principles and proceduie applicable to the 
provision of aid by the Government of the Com- 
monwealth of Australia to the armed forces of 
the United States and the manner in which such 
aid will be correlated with the maintenance of 
those forces by the United States Government. 

1. AVhile each Government retains the right 
of final decision, in the light of its own poten- 
tialities and I'esponsibilities, decisions as to the 
most effective use of resources shall, so far as 
possible, be made in common, pursuant to com- 
mon plans for winning the war. 

2. As to financing the provision of such aid, 
within the fields mentioned below, it is my un- 
derstanding that the general principles to be ap- 
plied to the point at which the common war ef- 
fort is most effective, is that as large a portion 
as possible of the articles and services which 
each Govermiient may authorize to be provided 
to the other shall be in the form of reciprocal aid 
so that tlie need of each Government for the cur- 
rency of the other- may be reduced to a minimum. 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



737 



It is accordingly my understanding that the 
United States Government will provide, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of, and to the ex- 
tent authorized under, the Act of March 11, 
1941, the share of its war production made 
available to Australia. Ihe Government of 
Australia will provide on the same terms and 
as reciprocal aid so much of its war production 
made available to the United States as it au- 
thorizes in accordance with the principles enun- 
ciated in this note. 

3. The Government of Australia will provide 
as reciprocal aid the following types of assist- 
ance to the armed forces of the United States in 
Australia or its territories and in such other 
cases as may be determined by common agree- 
ment in the light of the development of the 
war: — 

(a) Military equipment, ammunition and 
military and naval stores; 

(b) Other supplies, material, facilities and 
services for the United States forces except for 
the pay and allowances of such forces, adminis- 
trative expenses, and such local purchases as its 
official establishments may make other than 
through the official establishments of the Aus- 
tralian Government as specified in paragraph 4. 

(c) Supplies, materials and services needed 
in the construction of military projects, tasks 
and similar capital works required for the com- 
mon war effort in Australia and in such other 
places as may be determined, except for the 
wages and salaries of United States citizens. 

4. The practical application of the principles 
formulated in this note, including the proce- 
dure by which requests for aid by either Gov- 
ernment are made and acted upon, shall be 
worked out as occasion may require by agree- 
ment between the two Governments, acting 
when possible through their appropriate mili- 
tary or civilian administrative authorities. Re- 
quests by the United States Government for 
such aid will be presented by duly authorized 
authorities of the United States to official agen- 
cies of the Commonwealth of Australia which 
will be designated or established in Canberra 
and in the areas where United States forces are 



located for the purpose of facilitating the pro- 
vision of i-eciprocal aid. 

5. It is my understanding that all such aid 
accepted by the President of the United States 
or his authorized representatives from the Gov- 
ernment of Australia will be received as a bene- 
fit to the United States under the Act of March 
11, 1941. Insofar as circumstances will permit 
appropriate record of aid received under this 
arrangement, except for miscellaneous facilities 
and services, will be kept by each Government. 

If the Government of the United States con- 
curs in the foregoing, I would suggest that the 
present note and your reply to that effect be re- 
garded as placing on record the understanding 
of our two Governments in this matter. 

I have [etc.] Owen Dixon 

Note From the Secretary of State to the 
Ausfraliam, Minister 
Sir: 

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of 
your note of today's date concerning the princi- 
ples and procedures applicable to the provision 
of aid by the Government of the Commonwealth 
of Australia to the armed forces of the United 
States of America. 

In reply I have the honor to inform you that 
the Government of the United States of Amer- 
ica likewise accepts the principles contained 
in the agreement of February 23, 1942 between 
it and the Government oi the United Kingdom 
as governing the provision of mutual aid be- 
tween the Governments of the United States 
and of the Commonwealth of Australia. My 
Government agrees with the understanding of 
the Government of the Commonwealth of Aus- 
tralia as expressed in your note of today's date, 
and, in accordance with the suggestion con- 
tained therein, your note and tliis reply will be 
regarded as placing on record the understand- 
ing between our two Governments in this 
matter. 

This further integration and strengthening 
of our common war effort gives me great 
satisfaction. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hwl 



738 

Note From the New Zealand Minister to the 
Secretary of State 

Sir: 

As contracting parties to the United Nations 
Declaration of January 1, 1942, the Govern- 
ments of the United States of America and New 
Zealand pledged themselves to employ their 
full resources, military and economic, against 
those nations with which they are at war. 

In the Agreement of February 23, 1942, be- 
tween the Governments of the United Kingdom 
and of the United States of America, the pro- 
visions and principles of which the Govern- 
ment of New Zealand considers applicable to 
its relations with the 'Government of the United 
States, each contracting Government under- 
took to provide the other with such articles, 
services, facilities or information useful in the 
prosecution of their common war undertaking 
as each may be in a position to supply. 

It is the understanding of the Government 
of New Zealand that the general principle to 
be followed in providing such aid is that the 
war production and war resources of both na- 
tions should be used by each, in the ways which 
most effectively utilize available materials, 
manpower, production facilities and shipping 
space. 

I now set forth the understanding of the 
Government of New Zealand of the principles 
and procedure applicable to the provision of aid 
by the Government of New Zealand to the 
armed forces of the United States and the man- 
ner in which such aid will be correlated with 
the maintenance of those forces by the United 
States Government. 

1. Wliile each Government retains the right 
of final decision, in the light of its own poten- 
tialities and responsibilities, decisions as to the 
most effective use of resources shall, so far as 
possible, be made in common, pursuant to com- 
mon plans for winning the war. 

2. As to financing the provision of such aid, 
within the fields mentioned below, it is my lui- 
derstanding that the general principle to be 
applied, to the point at which the common war 
effort is most effective, is that as large a portion 
as possible of the articles and services to be pro- 



DEPARTMKNT OF STATE BULI<E>TIN 

vided by each Government to the other shall 
be in the form of reciprocal aid so that the need 
of each Government for the currency of the 
other may be reduced to a minimum. 

It is accordingly my understanding that the 
United States Government will provide, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of, and to the ex- 
tent authorized under, the Act of March 11, 
1941, the share of its production made available 
to New Zealand. The Government of New 
Zealand will provide on the same terms and as 
i-eciprocal aid so much of its production made 
available to the United States as it authorizes 
in accordance with the principles enunciated in 
this note. 

3. The Government of New Zealand will pro- 
vide the United States or its armed forces with 
the following types of assistance, as such recip- 
rocal aid, when it is found that they can most 
effectively be procured in New Zealand. 

(a) Military equipment, munitions and mili- 
■ tary and naval stores ; 

(b) Other supplies, materials, facilities and 
services for the United States forces, except for 
the pay and allowance of such forces, admin- 
istrative expenses, and such local purchases as 
its official establisliments may make other than 
through the official establishments of the Gov- 
ernment of New Zealand as specified in Para- 
graph 4. 

(c) Supplies, materials and services needed 
in the construction of military projects, tasks 
and similar capital works required for the com- 
mon war effort in New Zealand, except for the 
wages and salaries of United States citizens. 

(d) Supplies, materials and services needed 
in the construction of such military projects, 
tasks and capital works in territory other than 
New Zealand or territory of the United States 
to the extent that New Zealand is a more prac- 
ticable source of supply than the United States 
or another of the United Nations. 

4. The practical application of the prin- 
ciples formulated in this note, including the 
procedure by which requests for aid by either 
Government ai-e made and acted upon, shall be 
worked out as occasion may require by agree- 
ment between the two Governments, acting 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1942 



739 



when possible through their appropriate mili- 
tary or civilian administrative authorities. 

5. It is my understanding that all such aid 
accepted by the President of the United States 
or his authorized representatives from the Gov- 
ernment of New Zealand will be received as 
a benefit to the United States under the Act 
of March 11, 1941. In so far as circumstances 
will permit, appropriate record of aid received 
under this arrangement, except for miscellane- 
ous facilities and services, will be kept by each 
Government. 

If the Government of the United States con- 
curs in the foregoing, I would suggest that the 
present note and your reply to that effect be 
regarded as placing on record the understand- 
ing of our two Governments in this matter. 

I have [etc.] Walter Nash 

Note From the Secretary of State to the New 
Zealand Minister 

Sik: 

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of 
your note of today's date concerning the prin- 
ciples and procedures applicable to the provi- 
sion of aid by the Government of New Zealand 
to the armed forces of the United States of 
America. 

In reply I have the honor to inform you that 
the Government of the United States of Amer- 
ica likewise considers the provisions and prin- 
ciples contained in the agreement of February 
23, 1942 between it and the Government of the 
United Kingdom as applicable to its relations 
with the Government of New Zealand. My 
Government agrees with the understanding of 
the Government of New Zealand as expressed in 
your note of today's date, and, in accordance 
with the suggestion contained therein, your note 
and this reply will be regarded as placing on 
record the understanding between our two Gov- 
ernments in this matter. 

This further integration and strengthening 
of our common war effort gives me great 
satisfaction. 

Accept [etc.] CordellHuli. 



Note From the French National Committee to 
the Acting Military Representative of the 
United States 

The French National Committee sets forth 
below its understanding of the principles gov- 
erning the provision of reciprocal aid by the 
United States of America to Fighting France 
and by Fighting France to the United States : 

1. The United States of America will con- 
tinue to supply Fighting France with such de- 
fense articles, defense services, and defense in- 
formation as the President shall authorize to 
be transferred or provided. 

2. Fighting France will continue to contrib- 
ute to the defense of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the strengthening thereof and will pro- 
vide such articles, services, facilities or infor- 
mation as it may be in a position to supply. 

3. The fundamental principle to be followed 
in providing such aid is that the war produc- 
tion and war resources of Fighting France and 
of the United States of America should be used 
by the armed forces of each in the ways which 
most effectively utilize available materials, 
manpower, production facilities and shipping 
space. While each retains the right of final de- 
cision, in the light of its own potentialities and 
responsibilities, decisions as to the most effec- 
tive use of resources shall, so far as possible, be 
made in common, pursuant to common plans for 
winning the war. 

4. As to financing the provision of such aid, 
within the fields mentioned below, it is the Com- 
mittee's understanding that the general prin- 
ciple to be applied, to the point at which the 
common war effort is most effective, is that as 
large a portion as possible of the articles and 
services to be provided by each to the other 
shall be in the form of reciprocal aid. 

It is accordingly the Committee's under- 
standing that the United States Government 
will provide, in accordance with tlie provisions 
of, and to the extent authorized under, the Act 
of March 11, 1941, the share of its war produc- 
tion made available to Fighting France. Fight- 
ing France will provide on the same terms and 
as reciprocal aid so much of its war production 



740 

made available to the United States as it author- 
izes in accordance with the principles enunci- 
ated in this note. 

5. Within the territories under the control of 
Fighting France, or within the same theater 
of operations, the National Committee will pro- 
vide the United States or its armed forces 
with the following types of assistance, as such 
reciprocal aid, when it is found that they can 
most effectively be procured in territory under 
the control of Fighting France : 

(a) Military equipment, munitions and mili- 
tary and naval stores; 

(b) Other supplies, materials, facilities and 
services for the United States forces, except for 
the pay and allowances of such forces, adminis- 
trative expenses, and such local purchases as its 
official establishments may make other than 
through the official establishments of Fighting 
France as specified in paragraph 6. 

(c) Supplies, materials and services, except 
for the wages and salaries of United States citi- 
zens, needed in the construction of military 
projects, tasks and similar capital works re- 
quired for the common war effort in territory 
under the control of Fighting France, or in the 
same theater of operations, to the extent that 
such territory is the most practicable source of 
supply. 

6. The practical application of the principles 
formulated in this note, including the procedure 
by which requests for aid are made and acted 
upon, shall be worked out by agreement as occa- 
sion may require through the appropriate mili- 
tary or civilian administrative authorities. Be- 
quests by the United States forces for such aid 
will be presented by their duly authorized 
authorities to official agencies of Fighting 
France which will be designated or established 
in the areas where United States forces are 
located for the purpose of facilitating the pro- 
vision of reciprocal aid. 

7. It is the Committee's understanding that 
all such aid accepted by the President of the 
United States or his authorized representatives 
from Fighting France will be received as a 
benefit to the United States under the Act of 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

March 11, 1941. In so far as circumstances will 
permit, appropriate record of aid received 
under this arrangement, except for miscel- 
laneous facilities and services, will be kept by 
each. 

If the Government of the United States con- 
curs in the foregoing, the present note and a 
reply to that effect will be regarded as placing 
on record the understanding in this matter. 

Note From the Acting Military Representative 
of the United States to the French National 
Committee 

The Govermnent of the United States of 
America agrees with the understanding of the 
National Committee, as expressed in the Eng- 
lish text of the Committee's note of today's 
date, concerning the principles and procedures 
applicable to the provision of aid by Fighting 
France to the armed forces of the United States 
of America and, in accordance with the sugges- 
tion contained therein, that note and this reply 
will be regarded as placing on record the under- 
standing in this matter. 



UNITED STATES TECHNICAL MISSION 
TO BRAZIL 

[Released to the press by the White House September 2] 

The President announced on September 2 that 
a special United States technical mission of in- 
dustrial engineers, headed by Morris Llewellyn 
Cooke, will leave soon for Brazil to cooperate 
with experts of that country in developing 
Brazilian industi-y and war production. 

At the request of the Brazilian Government 
the mission has been organized by the Board of 
Economic Warfare, the Department of State, 
and the War Production Board. The general 
plan of the cooperative mission was agreed upon 
several weeks ago, and a group of Brazilian in- 
dustrial experts has already been selected to 
work with the United States technicians. The 
scope and urgency of their work have been con- 
siderably increased as a result of Brazil's decla- 
ration of war against Germany and Italy. 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



741 



The basic objectives of the mission are : (a) to 
increase local production of essential products, 
especially those which formerly were imported 
from the United States, in order to save ship- 
ping space; (b) to convert local industries to 
the use of substitute raw materials, replacing 
supplies ordinarily imported; (c) to maintain 
and improve transportation facilities; and (d) 
to lay the foundation for a long-range strength- 
ening of Brazil's whole industrial economy. 
The program will be directed toward a further 
increase in Brazil's already important contribu- 
tion of vital materials for her own and the 
United Nations' joint war effort. 

Large shipments of machinery and plant 
equipment will not be involved in the develop- 
ment program. It will be based largely on prac- 
tical recommendations for the application of 
mass-production methods and modern indus- 
trial techniques, in addition to adjustment and 
conversion measures. 

Fuel and power are primary problems in the 
Brazilian industrialization program. The mis- 
sion will consider measures to increase Brazil's 
power production or to convert its plants to 
alternative fuels. Expansion of existing ore- 



reduction plants in Brazil will be studied, with 
the purpose of releasing considerable equipment 
in the United Nations and at the same time sav- 
ing thousands of tons of vital shipping space. 
Textile and other general manufacturing plants 
will be surveyed in an effort to use Brazil's sur- 
plus textile fibers and to increase production of 
essential consumer goods. These and many 
other specific problems will be considered in the 
general program. 

Mon-is Llewellyn Cooke, who will direct the 
United States mission, is an outstanding indus- 
trial engineer with an unusually wide range of 
practical experience. He has served as chair- 
man of the Mississippi Valley Commission and 
of the Great Plains Commission. He was Ad- 
ministrator of the Rural Electrification Admin- 
istration from 1935 to 1937. In 1941 Mr. Cooke 
was named by the President as expert for the 
evaluation of the United States petroleum prop- 
erties expropriated by Mexico. 

Through the facilities of the Brazilian Inter- 
American Development Commission, the Of- 
fice of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs will cooperate in the development of an 
enlarged force of trained workers to man Bra- 
zil's expanding war production program. 



RELIEF FOR AMERICAN PRISONERS OF WAR HELD BY JAPAN 



[Eeleaaed to the press August 31] 

The following message concerning relief for 
prisoners of war held by Japan has been trans- 
mitted by the Acting Secretary of State to the 
Japanese Government through the Swiss au- 
thorities : 

"1. The Japanese Government has agreed to 
apply the provisions of the Geneva Prisoners 
of War Convention of 1929 to American pri- 
soners of war and civilian internees. Article 
37 of that Convention provides for the receipt 
by prisoners of supplies of food and clothing 
supplemental to those which it is the duty of 
the detaining power to furnish, in as much as 
it states that prisoners shall be allowed to re- 



ceive parcels intended to supply them with food 
or clothing. It further states that such parcels 
shall be delivered to the prisoners. 

"2. The American Red Cross assumed that 
the Japanese Government would grant safe 
conduct for a Red Cross ship to transport sup- 
plemental supplies of food and clothing des- 
tined to American and other prisoners of war 
and civilian internees in Japanese custody as 
German and Italian Governments have done 
and are continuing to do for supplies being 
sent for prisoners and internees in their cus- 
tody. Accordingly, the American Red Cross 
chartered the neutral Swedish motorship Kan- 
angoora to carry such supplies and the ship 



742 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



is now ready to sail from San Francisco 'with 
the supplies. It is to be operated by the Inter- 
national Red Cross Committee, a representative 
of which, who will be a citizen of a neutral 
country, will be the only person on board be- 
sides the Swedish citizens composing the crew. 

"3. The American Red Cross has requested, 
through the channels of the International Red 
Cross Committee, the consent of the Japanese 
Government for the voyage of the ship to Man- 
ila via Kobe, Shanghai and Hong Kong, with 
the supplies. The United States Government 
also has officially asked for that consent through 
the channels of the Swiss Government repre- 
senting the interests of the United States in 
Japan. Through both channels the Japanese 
Government has now replied refusing such con- 
sent. It states that it does not object, however, 
to such shipments on vessels exchanging Jap- 
anese and United States nationals at Louren^o 
Marques. 

"4. The motorship Oripsholm used by the 
United States Government in the exchange of 
Japanese and Americans at Lourengo Marques 
does not have sufficient cargo carrying capacity 
to transport the amount of supplies which it is 
desired to send to prisoners and internees in 
the Far East. Moreover, the exchange ship 
does not provide a means of continued trans- 
portation of such supplies. Additional ship- 
ping must therefore be employed if the prison- 
ers and internees are to receive supplementary 
supplies as provided for by the Convention. 

"5. If the Japanese Government will not per- 
mit the Kariangoora to proceed on its proposed 
voyage to the Far East with the supplies in 
question, then the United States Government 
proposes that the Japanese Government agree 
that the Kanangoora or other Red Cross ship 
shall proceed from the United States with the 
supplies to Macau or to LourenQo Marques, to 
which port the Japanese Government will sim- 
ilarly send a Red Cross ship to receive the sup- 
plies and transport them for delivery to the 
prisoners and internees. The United States 
Government desires to point out in this con- 



nection that it is incumbent upon the Japanese 
Government to facilitate by whatever means 
may be available, the delivery of parcels in- 
tended for prisoners in fulfillment of the obli- 
gation of the detaining power to allow prisoners 
to receive parcels and to deliver the parcels to 
them as provided by Article 37 of the Geneva 
Prisoners of War Convention. The United 
States Government, while looking to the Japa- 
nese Government to fulfill its obligations under 
the Convention in this matter, is fully conscious 
of its own obligations thereunder." 



RADIO ADDRESS BY THE FORMER 
AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN 

The Department of State, on August 31, 1942, 
issued as press release no. 430 the text of an 
address by the Honorable Joseph C. Grew, 
former American Ambassador to Japan, which 
was broadcast on August 30, 1942. As the text 
of this address was available before last week's 
issue of the Bulletin went to press, it was in- 
cluded in that issue, beginning on page 719. 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 1 
TO REVISION III 

[Released to the press Angiiet 31] 

The Secretary' of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coordi- 
nator of Inter-American Affairs, on August 31 
issued Supplement 1 to Revision III of the 
Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, 
promulgated August 10. 1942.' 

Part I of this supplement contains 296 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 45 deletions. Part II contains 216 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 27 deletions. 

With the issuance of this supplement the 
Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals 



' 7 Federal Register 6847. 



SEPTEMBER 6, 1942 



743 



has been extended to include certain cases in 
Spanish Morocco and Tangier International 
Zone. 



The Department 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



INTER-AMERICAN CONGRESS ON SOCIAL 
PLANNING 

[Released to the press September 1] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Chilean Government to be represented 
at the Inter-American Congress on Social Plan- 
ning, which will be held at Santiago, Chile, 
September 10-16, 1942. The President has ap- 
proved the designation of the following delega- 
tion to represent the United States at the 
Congress : 

Delegates: 

Arthur J. Altmeyer, Ph.D., Chairman, Social Security 
Board, Federal Security Agency; chairman of 
the delegation 

A. Ford Hinrichs, Ph.D., Acting Commissioner, Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics, Department of Labor 

George St. J. Perrott, Chief, Division of Public Health 
Methods, National Institute of Health, Public 
Health Service 

Emile Rieve, President of the Textile Workers of 
America, and Vice President of the Congress 
of Industrial Organizations, Washington, D. C. 

Technical Adviser: 
Wilbur Cohen, Technical Adviser to the Social 
Security Board, Federal Security Agency 

Secretaries: 

John M. Clark, Ph.D., Director, Emergency Rehabili- 
tation Division, Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter-American Affairs 
Sheldon T. Mills, Second Secretary, American Em- 
bassy, Santiago, Chile 

The forthcoming Congress will give attention 
to broad questions of social planning, particu- 
larly the organization and admipistration of 
social-security systems and a review of desir- 
able facilities to be made available to bene- 
ficiaries. 



THE DIVISION OF DEPARTMENTAL 
PERSONNEL 

On August 31, 1942 the Secretary of State 
issued Departmental Order 1086, the provisions 
of which were to become effective September 
1, 1942. The text of the order follows : 

"The Division of Personnel Supervision and 
Management is hereby abolished and its func- 
tions transferred to a newly created Division of 
Departmental Personnel. 

"Mr. John C. Ross is hereby designated Exec- 
utive Officer of the Department of State and 
Chief of the Division of Departmental Per- 
sonnel. Under the general direction of the 
Assistant Secretary of State and Budget Officer 
or, in his absence, under the Secretary of State, 
he shall plan, direct, control, and have responsi- 
bility for all administrative aspects of the 
formulation and execution of policy, and shall 
serve as principal adviser and coordinator of 
the Department in such matters. 

"As the Executive Officer of the Department, 
Mr. Ross shall have responsibility : 

"(1) for appraising existing policy making, 
policy executing, and administrative functions 
of the Department of State and the interrela- 
tionships of such functions with the policy mak- 
ing, policy executing, and administrative func- 
tions of other departments and agencies and of 
interdepartmental and intergovernmental agen- 
cies; 

"(2) for developing sound principles of au- 
thority, responsibility, organization, and ad- 
ministration which will insure effective coordi- 
nation of policy and action ; he shall have final 
authority in carrying out such principles after 
approval by the Assistant Secretary of State 
and Budget Officer or, in his absence, the Sec- 
retary of State ; 

"(3) for defining the functions, responsibili- 
ties, and authority of the divisions and offices 
of the Department ; and 



744 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"(4) for maintaining surveillance over 
trends in foreign and domestic policy, in so far 
as they affect or have a hearing on the functions 
of the Department of State, with a view to fore- 
seeing the need for new or revised policies and 
to planning, initiating, and coordinating ad- 
ministrative action to give effect to such policies 
concurrently with their adoption. 

"In carrying out these functions, he shall con- 
sult with and advise the Secretary, Under Secre- 
tary and Assistant Seci-etaries of State, the 
Special Assistants to the Secretary, the Advisers 
on Political Relations, the Adviser on Inter- 
national Economic Affairs, and the Chiefs of 
the divisions and offices ; work in close collabora- 
tion with the Chiefs of the Division of Foreign 
Service Personnel and of the Division of For- 
eign Service Administration in the coordination 
of Departmental and Foreign Service adminis- 
tration ; and particiioate, as consultant and 
adviser, in meetings of intradepartmental and 
interdepartmental groups and intergovern- 
mental agencies whenever problems of au- 
thority, responsibility, organization or adminis- 
tration in the formulation and execution of 
policy are under consideration. 

"As Chief of the Division of Departmental 
Personnel, Mr. Ross shall direct and have gen- 
eral supervision over its functions embracing 
organizational; procedural; fiscal and budg- 
etary, including the administration of the Ap- 
propriation, 'Salaries, Department of State'; 
classification; recruitment; appointment; effi- 
ciency rating; leave; retirement; personnel 
relations; training; and related personnel func- 
tions involved in the administration of the 
Departmental Service ; and the preparation of 
nominations and commissions. 

"The Executive Officer and Chief of the Divi- 
sion of Departmental Personnel shall serve as 
a member of the Council of Personnel Adminis- 
tration, and as liaison officer with the Civil 
Service Conunission, the Central Statistical 
Board, with military and Selective Service 
officials in matters relating to deferments of 
Departmental personnel from military training 
or service, and with other executive departments 



and agencies of this Government in all matters 
relating to his functions. He shall have cus- 
tody of the Seal of the United States. He shall 
certify payrolls and vouchers covering expendi- 
tures for salaries for the Department proper 
and other expenditures of appropriated funds 
where certifying authority has not otherwise 
been specifically delegated, as directed imder 
the written authorization of the Assistant 
Secretary of State and Budget Officer or, in his 
absence, another Assistant Secretary of State. 
He shall certify to the correctness of emploj'ees' 
service records and to the amounts credited to 
the Civil Service Retirement Fund in accord- 
ance therewith ; and he shall sign and certify 
such other papers as may be necessary in the 
performance of his functions in so far as not in 
conflict with existing laws and regulations. 

"The symbol designation of the Division of 
Departmental Personnel shall be DP. . . ." 

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Jacques J. Reinstein was appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Foreign Funds Control 
Division, effective September 1, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1087). 

Mr. Theodore Tannenwald, Jr., was desig- 
nated an Acting Assistant Chief of the Foreign 
Funds Control Division, effective September 2, 
1942 (Departmental Order 1088). 

Mr. Frederick T. Merrill was designated an 
Acting Assistant Chief of the American Hemi- 
sphere Exports Office, effective September 3, 
1942 (Departmental Order 1089). 



Treaty Information 



MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Agreements With the United Kingdom, Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand, and the French National 
Conimittee 

A statement regarding the agreements con- 
cluded on September 3, 1942 between the United 



SEPTEMBER 5, 1942 



745 



States of Amei'ica and the United Kingdom, 
Australia, New Zealand, and the French Na- 
tional Committee specifying the principles and 
procedures applicable to the provision of aid to 
the United States and its armed forces; the 
texts of the notes exchanged at Washington be- 
tween the Secretary of State and the British 
Ambassador, the Australian Minister, and the 
New Zealand Minister ; and the texts of the notes 
exchanged at London between Brig. Gen. John 
E. Dahlquist, Acting Military Representative 
of the United States of America, and M. Maur- 
ice de Jean, representing the French National 
Committee, appear in this Bulletin under the 
heading "The War". 

RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Convention Relating to the Treatment of 
Prisoners of War 

The text of a message concerning relief for 
prisoners of war held by Japan, which was 
transmitted by the Acting Secretary of State 
to the Japanese Government through the Swiss 
authorities, appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "The AVar". 



Publications 



Department of State 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 1, August 28, 1942, to Revision III of 
August 10, 1942. Publication 17S8. 23 pp. Free. 



Legislation 



National Defense Migration: Hearings Before the Se- 
lect Committee Investigating National Defense Migra- 
tion, House of Representatives, 77th Cong., 2cl sess., 
pursuant to H. Res. 113, a resolution to inquire fur- 
ther into the interstate migration of citizens, empha- 
sizing the present and potential consequences of the 
migration caused by the national defense program. 
Part 33. Washington hearings. May 22, June 11, 19, 
1942. [Testimony of George H. Winters, Assistant 
Chief, Division of the American Republics, Depart- 
ment of State, p. 12440 ; symposium ou the question of 
need for importation of Mexican labor: statement by 
Laurence Duggan, Adviser on Political Relations, 
Department of State, p. 12455.] pp. x, 12413-13053. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 



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^ 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULI 



ETIN 

SEPTEMBER 12, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 168— Publication 1801 



C< 



ontents 



The War' 

Advisory Technical Mission to India 

Staff Conferences at London 

British Military Operations in Madagascar .... 
Reply to French Protest Against Bombiags in France 
Military and Naval Cooperation With Cuba .... 
Protest to Marshal Petain by Two French Patriots . 

American Republics 

Anniversary of Brazilian Independence 

Rubber Agreements With Guatemala and Mexico . 

General 

Celebration of the Jewish New Year . 



Page 

749 
750 
750 
750 
750 
751 

751 
752 

752 



The Department 
Appointment of Officers 752 

Treaty Information 

Military and Naval Cooperation: Agreement With 

Cuba .• • • • "^^^ 

Strategic Materials: Rubber Agreements With Gua- 
temala and Mexico ■ 753 

Legislation 753 

Publications 753 




iipp ^.K '-A'' 



The War 



ADVISORY TECHNICAL MISSION TO INDIA 



[Released to the press September 12] 

A joint statement by the Governments of the 
United States and India regarding the submis- 
sion of the final report of the Technical Mission 
to India ^ follows : 

"The final report of the American Technical 
Mission has been submitted by its Chairman, 
Dr. Henry F. Grady, to the Governments of 
India and the United States. The report con- 
tains much factual data concei-ning the produc- 
tion in India of essential war materials and the 
recommendations of the Mission for the expan- 
sion of such production. The two Goverimients 
are now engaged in studying the Mission's re- 
port and the manner m which its various recom- 
mendations may be implemented. 

"The function of the Mission was to investi- 
gate the industrial resources of India and to 
recommend ways and means by which these re- 
sources could be developed to augment produc- 
tion for war purposes. The work of the Mission, 
therefore, was directly related to the common 
war effort of the United Nations and was not 
connected with the post-war mdustrial and com- 
mercial problems of India. The report of the 
Mission contains a survey of the principal indus- 
tries of India ancillary to the war effort and its 
principal industrial requirements. For each of 
these, the Mission made recommendations sug- 
gesting action by either the Government of 
India or the Government of the United States. 
In those instances in which additional output 
was shown to be required, the Mission recom-. 

'Bulletin of March 7, 1942, p. 209; March 14, 1942, 
p. 230 ; and March 28, 1942, p. 260. 
483388—42 



mended the erection of new plants or the instal- 
lation of additional machinery in existing 
plants. It also suggested the rearrangement of 
existing machinery in order that maximum effi- 
ciency in production might be attained. The 
congestion at certain Indian ports i-eceived the 
attention of the Mission, which made various 
recormnendations designed to expedite the load- 
ing, unloading, and i-epair of ships. In addi- 
tion, it called attention 1 o the overburdened con- 
dition of the railways and suggested measures 
for its alleviation. Vigorous steps have already 
been taken by the Government of India to im- 
plement some of the recommendations contained 
in the preliminary report of the Mission ; and in 
this program it is being assisted by equipment 
and material from the United States and the 
United Kingdom. 

"With the full approval of the Government 
of India, the Mission recommended that a num- 
ber of production engineers and technicians be 
sent fi'om the United States to advise and assist 
in increasing the industrial production in India. 
Steps have already been taken to secure the 
services of these experts and a number of them 
will soon be departing to undertake their new 
and imi^ortant assignments. 

"The Governments of India and the United 
States have been impressed with the compre- 
hensive character of the Mission's report. Its 
recormnendations appear to be both constructive 
and timely. The Governments concerned will 
determine the extent to which the Mission's pro- 
gram is to be implemented and will seek 
promptly to execute their decision." 

749 



750 

STAFF CONFERENCES AT LONDON 

[Released to the press by the White House September 8) 

Announcement was made at the White House 
on September 8 of a conference held in London 
in July between British and American officials. 
The representatives of the United States Gov- 
ernment were Harry L. Hopkins, Personal Rep- 
resentative of the President; General George C. 
MarshaU, Chief of Staff of the Army ; and Ad- 
miral Ernest J. King, Chief of Naval Opera- 
tions. The American Chiefs of Staff and Mr. 
Hopkins held important meetings covering a 
period of 10 days with the British Chiefs of 
Staff and the British Prime Minister. At these 
conferences the whole conduct of the war was 
thoroughly canvassed and, with the approval of 
the President, the necessary decisions regarding 
military operations were made. 

Stephen Early, Secretary to the President, 
was in London at the same tune for conferences 
with Brendon Bracken, British Minister of 
Public Information. 

On the return trip from London the American 
conferees visited Iceland and inspected the 
American bases there. 

BRITISH MILITARY OPERATIONS 
IN MADAGASCAR 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The Government of the United States has 
been informed by the Government of the United 
Kingdom that developments in Madagascar sub- 
sequent to the occupation of Diego-Suarez have 
not resulted in adequate safeguards against 
Axis penetration in other parts of the island. 
In the circumstances the British Govermnent, 
with the approval of the Government of the 
United States, has deemed it absolutely neces- 
sary to undertake further military operations 
in that area. 

The Government of the United States recog- 
nizes that military considerations must be para- 
mount in reaching such a decision. The pene- 
tration or occupation of any part of Mada- 
gascar by the Axis powers would constitute a 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

definite and a serious danger to the United Na- 
tions. The full military occupation of the 
island by British forces will therefore not only 
contribute to the successful conduct of the war 
against the Axis forces but will be in the in- 
terest of the United Nations. 

As stated in the State Department's an- 
nouncement of May 4, 1942 ^ the Governments 
of the United States and the United Kingdom 
are in accord that Madagascar will be restored 
to France after the war or at any time that the 
occupation of the island is no longer essential 
to the common cause of the United Nations. 

REPLY TO FRENCH PROTEST AGAINST 
BOMBINGS IN FRANCE 

[Released to the press September 8] 

The American Charge in Vichy, Mr. S. Pink- 
ney Tuck, on September 7 was called in by Mon- 
sieur Laval who said that in recent bombings of 
Le Havre and Rouen by combined military 
forces of the United Nations a number of people 
were killed and others wounded and that he, M. 
Laval, desired to enter a protest to the American 
Government since it was reported some Ajneri- 
can flyers participated. Mr. Tuck's immediate 
reply was that these air forces were bombing 
military plants in the employ of Germany and 
that, of course, the Americans do not desire to 
see the French people suffer any more than can 
be avoided since they have already suffered to 
an incalculable extent under German occupation 
but that M. Laval must be assured that the 
military plants operated by or for Germany and 
other German military properties in France wiU 
be bombed at every opportunity in the future. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL COOPERATION 
WITH CUBA 

[Released to the press September 7] 

Word has been received from the Honorable 
Spruille Braden, American Ambassador to 
Cuba, of the signature on September 7 by the 

' Bulletin of May 9, 1942, p. 391. 



SEPTEMBER 12, 1942 



751 



Minister of State of Cuba and by the Ambassa- 
dor in behalf of the United States, of an agree- 
ment on military and naval cooperation between 
the two Governments. 

This agreement, which was negotiated on the 
part of the United States by representatives of 
the Departments of State, War, and Navy and 
by the highest civilian and military authorities 
of the Cuban Govermnent, coordinates all the 
special military and naval measures between 
Cuba and the United States which have been 
taken since the beginning of the war and facili- 
tates the taking of new measures, for the dura- 
tion of the war, of military and naval security 
by the appropriate authorities of the respective 
armed forces as the necessity arises and without 
the need for individual negotiations in each 
case. 

The rapidity with which United States and 
Cuban authorities negotiated and concluded 
the agreement is conclusive evidence of the 
unanimity of views of the two Governments. 

Although details of the agreement cannot be 
released for reasons of military security, it may 
be stated that the agreement outlines the re- 
spective responsibilities of the armed forces of 
the two countries in the zone affected and pro- 
vides for coordination of their efforts and com- 
plete cooperation on the basis of reciprocity. 

PROTEST TO MARSHAL PfiTAIN BY TWO 
FRENCH PATRIOTS 

At the press conference of the Secretary of 
State on September 11, 1942 a correspondent 
remarked that from an undisclosed place prob- 
ably near Lyon, France, the Mayor of Lyon and 
former Premier, Edouard Herriot, and another 
French patriot, Jules Jeanneney, former Presi- 
dent of the French Senate, addressed a letter to 
Marshal Petain in which they accused him of 
going beyond the powers vested in him by the 
French people and, in effect, of betraying his 
trust. 

In reply to a request for comment, the Secre- 
tary of State said that to us and to the French 
people generally, there is a tremendous signifi- 
cance in the utterances of those two noted 



Frenchmen, one of whom he thought belonged 
to what they call the Right and the other per- 
haps to the Left Center. With rare courage, the 
Secretary continued, they were proclaiming 
what this Government has joined with all lovers 
of liberty and human rights and popular insti- 
tutions in France in proclaiming for some time. 
The Secretary added that their words will al- 
ways live in history and that this Government is 
naturally gratified to be associated with patri- 
otic Frenchmen who have the courage again to 
proclaim all the rights and liberties and the 
popular institutions that made the great French 
Republic forever historic. 



American Republics 



ANNIVERSARY OF BRAZILIAN 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press September 7] 

The texts of telegrams transmitted by the 
President of the United States to His Excel- 
lency Getulio Vargas, President of Brazil, and 
by the Secretary of State to His Excellency Os- 
waldo Aranha, Minister of Foreign Affairs, on 
the occasion of the aimiversary of the inde- 
pendence of Brazil, follow : 

"September 7, 1942. 

"On this anniversary of the independence of 
the Brazilian nation the historic words pro- 
claimed at Ypiranga one hundred and twenty 
years ago assume a special significance. I and 
my fellow citizens in sending you these greetings 
of courage and friendship today derive deep 
satisfaction from the knowledge that the people 
of your country and mine are joined in the com- 
radeship of arms as free citizens of the Amer- 
icas fighting our common enemy. 

"I am happy to send Your Excellency my 
sincere good wishes for your personal welfare 
to lead the great Brazilian nation to a victorious 
and lasting peace. 

Fbanklin D Roosevelt" 



752 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"September 7, 1942. 

"I take very special pleasure in sending Your 
Excellency and through you to your Govern- 
ment my good wishes on this anniversary of the 
independence of the Brazilian nation. I know 
that I express the feeling of the peojjle of the 
United States who have so long been joined with 
the people of Brazil in ties of friendship when I 
say that our joint efforts in the war are the best 
assurance for the attainment of the high objec- 
tives for which the free peoples of the continent 
have always striven. 

"Please accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 

RUBBER AGREEMENTS WITH GUATE- 
MALA AND MEXICO 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with 
Guatemala was announced on September 10 by 
the Department of State, the Rubber Reserve 
Company, and the Board of Economic Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agreement the Rubber 
Reserve Company will purchase, imtil December 
31, 1946, all rubber produced in Guatemala 
which is not required for essential domestic 
needs. 

[Released to the press September 11] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with 
Mexico was announced on September 11 by the 
Department of State, tlie Rubber Reserve Com- 
pany, and the Board of Economic AVarfare. 

Under the terms of the agreement the Rubber 
Reserve Company will purchase, until December 
31, 1946, any exportable surplus of tree rubber 
and all guayule and other plant rubber produced 
in Mexico during that period. The agreement 
also contains provisions with respect to the limi- 
tation of the use of rubber products in Mexico. 
Under the terms of the agreement a substantial 
development fund is to be established by the 
Rubber Reserve Company for the purpose of 
obtaining the maximum production of wild rub- 
ber in Mexico. 



General 



CELEBRATION OF THE JEWISH NEW 
YEAR 

[Released to the press September 11] 

The Secretary of State has issued the foUow- 
mg message on the occasion of the celebration 
of the Jewish New Year : 

"On the occasion of the observance of the 
Jewish New Year, I take particular pleasure in 
extending my greetings to all Americans of the 
Jewish faith. At this period of anguish for so 
many of their co-religionists, it is inspiring to 
see how this esteemed and loyal group of our 
fellow citizens are united in their determination 
to contribute in every possible waj' to the victory 
against our enemies which will come as a result 
of a complete defeat of the Axis powers." 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Warden McK. Wilson, a Foreign Service 
officer of class III, was designated an Assistant 
Chief of the Caribbean Office, and Acting Chief 
during the temporary absence from the Depart- 
ment of Mr. Coert duBois, effective from 
August 14, 1942 (Departmental Order 1083). 



Treaty Information 



MILITARY AND NAVAL COOPERATION 

Agreement With Cuba 

An announcement regarding the conclusion 
of an agreement on military and naval coopera- 
tion with the Government of Cuba appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "The War". 



SEPTEMBER 12, 1942 

STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Rubber Agreements With Guatemala and 
Mexico 

Announcements regarding the signing of 
agreements with the Governments of Guatemala 
and Mexico for the purchase of rubber appear 
in this BulUthi under the heading "American 
Republics". 



Legislation 



Investigation of the National Defense Program : Hear- 
ings Before a Special Committee Investigating the 
National Defense Program, U. S. Senate, 77th Cong., 
pursuant to S. Res. 71. Part 11. March 5, 24, 26, 27, 
31 and April 1, 2, 3, 7, 1942. Rubber. [Testimony of 
Assistant Secretary Berle, pp. 4.506-4515.] pp. xlv, 
4261-4955. 



753 

Amending Law Detailing Military Personnel to South 
American Countries [so as to include, during wartime, 
other countries outside the Western Hemisphere if 
the President deems such details to be in the public 
interest]. H. Rept. 2439, 77th Cong., on S. 2686. 3 pp. 



Publications 



Department or State 

Exchange of Official Publications : Agreement Between 
the United States of America and Bolivia — Effected 
by exchange of notes signed January 26 and 31, 1942 ; 
effective January 31, 1942. Executive Agreement 
Series 242. Publication 17S6. 9 pp. 5«f. 

Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in the Prosecution of 
the War Against Aggression : Preliminary Agreement 
Between the United States of America and the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland — 
Signed at Washington February 23, 1942 ; effective 
February 23, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 241. 
Publication 1790. 3 pp. 50. 



U. 3. eOVERNMENT PR1NTIN6 OFFICE: 1942 



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BULL 



H 






riN 



SEPTEMBER 19, 1942 



Vol. VII, No. 169— Publication 1804 







ontents 




The War 

Transfer of a Warship to Norway Under the Lend-Lease 

Act 

Address by the Former American Ambassador to Japan, 

September 14 

Address by the Former American* Ambassador to Japan, 

September 18 

Negotiations for Relief to American Prisoners of War 

Held by Japan 

Reported Plans for Conscription of French Labor for 

Use in Germany 

Attempt to Conscript Citizens of Luxembourg for the 

German Army 

Appointment of Special Assistant in London in Charge 

of Economic- Warfare Activities 

American Republics 

Anniversaries of Independence: 

Brazil 

ChUe 

Costa Rica 

El Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Rubber Agreement With Panama 

Death of Ex-President Terra of Uruguay 

The Far East 

Anniversary of the Mukden Incident 



Page 

757 
758 
763 
768 
770 
770 
770 



771 
771 
771 
772 
772 
772 
773 
773 
773 

773 



[over] 



OCT 3 '»« 



6 



ontents 



-CONTINUED 



The Department Page 

Appointment of Officers 774 

Treaty Information 

Publications: Agreement With Iceland 774 

Strategic Materials: Rubber Agreement With Pan- 
ama 774 

Legislation 774 

Publications 774 



The War 



TRANSFER OF A WARSHIP TO NORWAY UNDER THE LEND-LEASE ACT 



[Released to the press by the White House September 16] 

At the Washington Navy Yard on September 
16, upon the occasion of the transfer of a ship 
to tlie Norwegian Government under the Lend- 
Lease Act, the President and Her Royal High- 
ness the Crown Princess Martha of Norway 
spoke as follows: 

YouK Royal Highness, Mk. Ambassador: 

If there is anyone who still wonders why 
this war is being fought, let him look to Nor- 
way. If there is anyone who has any delusions 
that this war could have been averted, let him 
look to Norway. And if there is anyone who 
doubts the democratic will to win, again I say, 
let him look to Norway. 

He will find in Norway, at once conquered and 
unconquerable, the answer to liis questioning. 

We all know how this most peaceful and inno- 
cent of countries was ruthlessly violated. The 
combination of treachery and brute force which 
conquered Norway will live in history as the 
blackest deed of a black era. Norway fought 
valiantly with what few weapons thei"e were at 
hand — and fell. 

And with Norway fell the concept that either 
remoteness from political controversy or use- 
fulness to mankind could give any nation im- 
munity from attack in a world where aggression 
spread unchecked. 

But the story of Norway since the conquest 
shows that while a free democracy may be 
slow to realize its danger, it can be heroic 
when aroused. At home, the Norwegian peo- 
ple have silently resisted the invader's will 
with grim endurance. Abroad, Norwegian 
ships and Norwegian men have rallied to the 



cause of the United Nations. And their assist- 
ance to that cause has been out of all propor- 
tion to their small numbers. The Norwegian 
merchant marine has lost some 200 ships and 
1,300 seamen in carrying the supplies vital to 
our own and Allied forces overseas. Nor has 
the Norwegian Navy been less active. Norse 
fighting ships battled valiantly but vainly 
against the invader, destroying one third of 
the German invasion fleet before they were 
overwhelmed by superior forces. Right now 
the blue cross of Norway flies on the fourth 
largest Navy of the United Nations — a Navy 
whose operations extend from the North Sea 
to the Indian Ocean. 

It is today the privilege of the people of the 
United States, through the mechanism of the 
lend-lease law, to assist this gallant Navy in 
carrying out its present heavy duties. 

Your Royal Highness, as a token of the 
admiration and friendship of the American 
people toward your country and her Navy, I 
ask you to receive this ship. We Americans, 
together with the millions of loyal Norwegians, 
are glad that this ship is being given today 
the name of the King of Norway — a leader 
well versed in the ways of the sea, a true 
leader who, with his people, has always stood 
for the freedom of the seas for all nations. 
May this ship long keep the seas in the battle 
for liberty. May the day come when she will 
carry the Norwegian flag into a home port in 
a free Norway ! 

Mr. President: 

On behalf of the King and the Government 
of Norway I am very happy to accept this ship 

757 



. o6 

of war. which under the provisions of the Lend- 
Lease Act vou have today transferred to mv 
countTT. Having jtisi returned from London. 
I am in a position to bear personal witness 
to the deep appreciation with which your 
friendly and generous action is being received 
by those who lead the Norwegian people in its 
fight for freedom. 

But not only the leaders — also Norwegian 
men and women everywhere, on sea and on land, 
on the home front, and on the external front — 
are stirred at what is taking place here today. 
It is not alone what this admirable, technically 
complete submarine chaser means as an addition 
to our fighting Navy but also, and not the least, 
what it signifies as an expression of the friend- 
ship and common purpose of our great comrade 
in arms, the American people. 

The beautiful and generous words just ex- 
pres^d by you, ^Ir. President, about the Nor- 
wegian people and its contribution to oiu- com- 
mon catise. will ultimately find their way to 
everv Norwegian home, every Norwegian ship 



DEPABTMEXT OF ST.iTE BULLETIN- 

on the seven seas — yes, everywhere on this globe 
where Norwegian men and women are praying 
and working and fighting to regain the free and 
happy Norway of our deepest longing. 

Especially coming from one whose clear 
vision and imfalterrng courage has contributed 
immeasurably to rally the forces of freedom, 
vour words will bring hope and renewed faith 
in deliverance from the yoke of the barbarians. 

The tidings of America's rapidly increasing 
mobilized manpower and war production, of 
the flaming spirit of America's fighting forces 
already manifested in engagements on land, sea, 
and in the air are every day telling otrr hard- 
tried people that with such an ally we cannot 
fail 

The Koyal Norwegian Navy is proud and 
happv to call their own this ship, named after 
our beloved leader. King Haakon \ ii. Those 
who are going to take her into the thick of our 
common battle tell me that their greatest ambi- 
tion shall be to show themselves worthy of their 
flag and of the trust and friendship of the Presi- 
dent and the people of the United States. 



ADDRESS BY THE FOKNIER AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN. SEPTEMBER 14 



;Reies.5eC tu tte press S*jte=;:.e-r 15; 

Mb. Chaibmax A2fD Gevtleacex : - 

Yours is the first large group of fellow coun- 
trymen that I have had the privilege and pleas- 
ure of meeting face to face since returning from 
Japan. For me it is therefore a thoroughly 
memorable occasion. But the real inspiration of 
this meeting springs from what you are, what 
von have done, and what you are doing. You 
symbolize the backbone of the civilian partici- 
pation in the war effort of our country, and in 
yotir contribution to that effort you have 
achieved outstanding success. Permit me to ex- 
press my sincere and hearty congratulations to 
the workers and the management of the Reming- 
ton Armg Company on your having won the 
thanks of our Government and counirv sis ex- 



'DeUvered by the Honorable Joseph C. Grew at the 
BemingtOD Anns Companr. Bridgeport. Conn., and 
broadcast bj the Xational Broadcasting Company. 



pressed in the award of the five "E's" which you 
receive today. Effort, efficiency, and effective- 
ness. Whatever those "E's" may officially and 
specifically stand for. those three words seem to 
me accurately and appropriately to represent 
your record and your achievement up to date. 
There is still a long road, probably a very long 
and difficult road, ahead. You have given con- 
crete evidence that you can, and clear indication 
that you will — to the end — meet the test. 

Other speakers will have dealt with the statis- 
tics of the expansion and production achieved by 
vou in this time of war. I confine myself to the 
simple statement that this well-merited honor 
stands as a splendid example to our country and, 
more than that, it stands as a ringing plea, a plea 
that this great record of yours, this record of 
strikeless effort, efficiency, and effectiveness, this 
record of almost unexcelled expansion and pro- 
gressive intensiveness in production be emulated 



SEPTEMBER 19, 1942 



759 



from end to end of our embattled but still grop- 
ing land. 

Our still groping land. Groping for what ? 
Well, I will try to tell vou of my impressions on 
returning home after long and difficult years 
abroad. From many talks with many different 
elements of our people I sense the most earnest 
desire of all to contribute, individually and col- 
lectively, their mayimum potentialities of serv- 
ice to our national effort toward winning this 
war. But many of those with whom I have 
talked seem to have no real comprehension of 
what we are up against, no real comprehension 
that we are not fighting distant enemies merely 
to preserve our national "interests" but, in fact, 
to preserve our national life — our existence as a 
free and sovereign people. Make no mistake 
about this. I know at least one of our enemies 
intimately, the Japanese, and I know beyond 
peradventure that the dearest wish and inten- 
tion of that enemy is so to extend their victories 
and conquests and power that ultimately they 
will be in a position to subject us also to the 
status of the people of the lands already con- 
quered. That means just one thing. Our free- 
dom, the freedom of our priceless American 
heritage, disappears. Yes. that is their dearest 
wish : to control not only their Oriental neigh- 
bors but Occidental peoples, esjjecially those of 
America. Megalomania — ^if you will — ^but it's 
true. Hitler suffers from the same diseaa. and 
it needs no doctor to diagnose the symptoms. "It 
can't happen here." But. alas, it can. Pearl 
Harbor couldn't happen. But it did. And all 
the rest of it will happen if some of our coimtry- 
men continue to grope — ^to grope blindfold for 
the facts which are clear before them if they wUl 
only remove the bandage from their eyes. Little 
by little I hope to bring before my fellow coun- 
trymen the salient facts concerning the widely 
misunderstood effectiveness and power and the 
all-out. do-or-die. fanatical spirit of the Japanese 
military machine against which we are fighting 
today. Unless that effectiveness and power and 
spirit are correctly assessed by the American peo- 
ple as a whole, our road to victory will be doubly 
long and hard and bloody. 

And now, another side of the picture. Many 
have said to me that the American people are 



ready but that our leaders must show us the way. 
.Show the way ? If anyone feels that our leaders 
have not pointed out the way, let him read 
again and again the statements and declarations 
of our President, of our Secretary of State and 
others of our high officials, with the fullest sup- 
port and cooperation of many other leaders of 
public thought. Haven't our leaders month in 
and month out given us our bearings, charted 
our course, told us what lay ahead, what we now 
are fighting for. and what we may expect if we 
f aU in that fight ? Haven't they asked for our 
maximum efforts in production, for our indi- 
vidual and collective self-sacrifice of the non- 
essentials of life, for hard thinking and resolute 
action on our part, not in terms of our daily 
convenience but of our daily contribution ? 
Why waste invaluable time and energy in bick- 
ering about details, about non-essentials ? Why 
not let come to the fore and give full play to our 
American initiative and resourcefulness and the 
inherent toughness of earlier difficult days ? A 
very great ntimber of our feUow countrymen are 
imbued with the finest spirit of self-sacrifice and 
determination to go aU out in their war effort. 
They are wide-awake and functioning to their 
full capacities. Others among our fellow coun- 
trymen are s imil arly eager to serve but are not 
yet fully awake to the realities of the situation. 
They have failed to analyze the dangers which 
confront us or to realize the full grimness and 
potential desperate demands of this war which 
we are waging actually to preserve our liberty — 
waging to preserve the very principle of liberty. 
Others among our fellow countrymen are quite 
simply still asleep. 

Let me merely say to you this. Since coming 
to Washington I have seen at close hand, per- 
sonally and intimately, the grim determination 
and decisiveness of those leaders of ours. The 
problems which they have to face are among the 
greatest and most difficult in the history of our 
Nation. But those problems, one by one. are 
being faced and dealt with in that very spirit 
of determination and decisiveness which fills me 
with patriotic pride. I was in Washington in 
1917. The war effort of our country then was 
amateurish compared with our war effort now. 
I have talked directlv with the officers of our 



760 

joint Chiefs of Staff, with large groups of our 
Army and Navy officers, with the production 
management, with the members of our strategic 
services, and with many others from the Presi- 
dent down. Some of their problems seem almost 
insuperable, but the spirit of their determination 
to solve those problems is absolutely invincible, 
and they are solving them, hour by hour and day 
by day. If only our people, our people as a 
whole, will realize the dangers which we are up 
against, what we stand to lose by failure, what 
we must and will gain by victory — if only our 
people as a whole will get in and push to the 
maximum of their several capacities ! 

Do you know what use the foreign propa- 
ganda radio stations are making of this groping 
of the American people? They constantly 
broadcast our disunity, our domestic bickerings, 
our strikes and political schisms. Every in- 
stance of such disunity that appears in our press 
is avidly seized upon and amplified and flaunted 
throughout the enemy countries. They believe 
or pretend to believe — those enemies of ours — 
that we are an effete nation, reared in the lap 
of personal comfort, vitiated by luxury, unable 
to meet the supreme test of war. 

You, the employers and managers and work- 
ers of this company, are proving the utter fu- 
tility and falsity of that propaganda. Your 
record and accomplishments stand forth for all 
to see. May your example inspire others from 
end to end of our beloved land. 

And now a woi-d about the Japanese, espe- 
cially the Japanese workers. To you, I am 
sure there is nothing unusual about free woi'k- 
ers and free management assembling in a free 
country. Benjamin Franklin once said that 
we never miss the water until the well runs dry. 
I have spent the last 10 years in a country where 
the well of liberty has always been dry. A 
meeting such as this in Tokyo or Osaka or 
Nagoya would be unthinkable. Neither in those 
cities nor anywhere else in Japan is the worker 
more than an unresisting pawn of the militarists 
who are driving his country to destruction. 

Indeed, I can picture the worker of Japan 
only in his working clothes, bearing upon his 
back a huge Japanese character, the name of 
his employer. Each man bears upon his back 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

this rubber stamp, a symbol of his servitude, a 
symbol of the fact that he is merely an im- 
personal tool in the hands of those who rule 
his country's destiny— a tool to be used indis- 
criminately and without regard for his personal 
and individual well-being. 

The Japanese worker has nothing to say about 
his wages, which before the war were barely 
enough for his subsistence and still undoubtedly 
are. He has nothing to say about his hours, 
which are long and back-breaking. If he has 
any union at all, it dare not lift its voice. It 
has been driven underground by the brutal 
methods of the "thought control" police. In 
fact, there is almost nothing that he has any 
say about, from the moment that he comes into 
the world until the moment when, worn out by 
unhealthful working conditions, long hours, and 
poor diet, he takes his leave of it forever. 

This is what it means to be a worker in Japan. 
This, or far worse, is what it means to be a 
worker in any country which falls before Japan's 
armed forces. 

Yet we must not be misled by the abject pov- 
erty and regimentation of our enemies. The 
conditions I have described would lead free 
Americans to revolt. But Japan is a country 
far different from our own in every conceivable 
way. Under these conditions the Japanese 
workers have docilely toiled to build a military 
machine which has swept across eastern Asia 
like a tidal wave and will sweep still farther 
if allowed to do so. 

The Jai^anese people have been accustomed to 
regimentation since the very birth of their 
nation. There are Japanese living today who 
were born when their country was still a feudal 
land, when every feudal lord held the power of 
life and death over his so-called common people. 
We in the West shook off feudalism many cen- 
turies ago. In Japan it existed so recently that 
it has left a vast heritage of almost prostrate 
subservience to birth and authority. 

The men who rule Japan today have taken 
full advantage of the docility of the Japanese 
people to create a formidable military and eco- 
nomic machine. If a man will yield himself 
to hypnotism, it is as easy to convince him that 
lie is a roaring tiger as to make him believe 



SEPTEMBER 19, 194 2 



761 



he is a gentle lamb. The Japanese militarists 
have hypnotized their fellow countrymen into 
believing they are roaring tigers, and they will 
continue to try to act like tigers until the black 
spell has been broken. 

These ruthless architects of aggi-ession have 
carried out their plans with diabolical clever- 
ness. Their campaign of propaganda has been 
long and incessant. Even Japan's handicaps 
have been used to strengthen her for war. The 
low standard of living of the Japanese people, 
for example, has been used to inure them to a 
Spartan life. Today the Japanese soldier on 
the fighting front, the Jajjanese sailor in his 
cramped ship, and the Japanese worker in his 
gloomy factory can alike live on a diet so meager 
that any American on the same diet would soon 
collapse. The traditional subservience to au- 
thority has been used to lead the Japanese work- 
ers to accept a degree of regimentation which 
in some respects exceeds that of better known 
Nazi Germany. And this regimented industrial 
machine has been turned to one purpose: the 
production of the tools of war. The very fail- 
ure of Jaj^an's war against China has been used 
to induce the Japanese people to accept placidly 
severe measures of control and rationing — meas- 
ures of such severity that without the psychol- 
ogy of war they would surely lead to revolt. 

Above all, the men who rule Japan have used 
their efficient propaganda machine to instil in 
every Japanese a fanatical devotion to his coun- 
try. Even those who hate their nation's entry 
into this present war have buried their personal 
feelings. Even they have come to accept the 
belief that the future of their country depends 
upon the outcome. We would be deluding our- 
selves if we believed that any personal sacri- 
fices which the Japanese people might be called 
upon to make would lead to any cracking of 
their morale. Yamato Damashi, the spirit of 
Japan, has been stronger during recent months 
than ever before. The undeniable successes of 
their Armies, sweeping across Malaya, Burma, 
the Philippines, the Netherlands East Indies, 
and many of the islands of the southwest Pacific, 
have given them tremendous confidence in their 
ability to win. They know that they have a 



long and difficult fight before them. They be- 
lieve that by grim endurance they will grasp 
victory. 

This confidence is based not only on the suc- 
cesses of their own forces but on false contempt 
for the fighting ability of their enemies. The 
Japanese are well aware of the technical achieve- 
ments of the Western powers — so well aware, 
indeed, that they have taken many of these 
achievements and adapted them to their own 
use. They are well aware of the high standard 
of living of Western peoples. But they be- 
lieve that this high standard has brought a 
softness — even a degeneracy — to Western civili- 
zation. They believe that we Americans and 
our allies are too complacent, too well fed to be 
willing to make the sacrifices necessary for 
victory. 

This is the real challenge to America — the 
challenge of a people who have been hypnotized 
into believing that democracy weakens those 
who possess it, that a high standard of living 
weakens those who enjoy it, that peace and the 
love of peace weaken those who cherish them. 
It may come as a shock to some of us to realize 
how scornful of us are those with whom our 
relations have been too often governed by a 
careless sense of superiority. Too long have we 
nurtured the illusion that the Japanese is an 
insignificant person whose achievements are 
poor imitations of our own achievements. The 
Japanese is physically small, but he is sturdy. 
We might say that he is half starved, but he is 
Spartan. He is imitative, but he is also capable 
of adapting himself easily and quickly to new 
conditions and new weapons. He is subservient, 
but his very subserviency is the expression of a 
fanatical loyalty toward his country and his 
Emperor. He is a clever and dangerous 
enemy — one who will compel us to use all the 
intelligence and all the strength of which we are 
capable in order to bring about his defeat. 

And as for us, what is our answer to this 
cliallenge from across the Pacific? What is 
our reply to these little islanders who believe 
that we are weak and of divided mind in our 
hour of peril ? 



762 

I do not know that I have been back in the 
United States long enough to have a final answer 
to this question. But I do believe that I have 
seen enough and talked to enough people to get 
something of the feel of my native country in 
this year of crisis. Perhaps the very fact that 
I have been away from America for some time 
may enable me to see somewhat more clearly 
the changes which have taken place in the 
transition from peace to war than if I had been 
here to live through them from day to day. 

No one rettirning to this country after a long 
absence can fail to be impressed by the way our 
great industrial capacity has been converted to 
the production of munitions. No one can fail 
to be impressed by the vast armies which are 
being mustered around us and the great fleets 
which are being hammered into shape. But we 
have by no means neared the limits of achieve- 
ment. WHiat we have done to date we have 
accomplished through the comparatively easy, 
first stages of transformation of our industrial 
machinery and our vast store of manpower from 
the purposes of peace to those of war. We are 
like a football team running through its practice 
plays against the scrubs. The players cany out 
their assignments; but the punch, the deter- 
mined plunge which brings victory in the big 
game, is lacking. We must pull ourselves up 
short. We must stop groping. Let us make 
no mistake. This is the real thing, played for 
keejjs. An easy-going transformation is not 
enough. Our effort must be an extraordinary 
one — one which exceeds anything that we have 
undertaken heretofore. In winning this broad 
continent which is our heritage, in preserving 
it from attack within and without, the American 
people in the past have performed the tasks of 
giants. Today we face the greatest task in our 
history. 

A friend of mine recently wrote me: "You 
will find this country sound in feeling, but still 
unable to realize that we are involved in a 
desperate war." 

I understand very well how difficult it is for 
the people of this country, many thousands of 
miles from the fronts where the actual fighting 
is taking place, to realize fully just what this 
war means. I myself sometimes find it difficult 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

to believe that but a few short weeks ago I was, 
for all practical purposes, a prisoner in a coun- 
try ruled by fanatics determined to destroy the 
United States and all that she stands for. But 
we must not allow this remoteness from the 
battle front to lull us into a sense of false secu- 
rity. This is war to the finish. The Japanese 
understand this — peasants as well as admirals 
and generals. They have gambled everything 
on their belief that we are too soft, too divided 
among ourselves, to stand before the fury of 
their attack — indeed a furious attack. This war 
was bred by fanatical militarism. That fanati- 
cism is being met now by the heroism and the 
righteous fury of our own air forces, by daunt- 
less frontal attack by our marines, by the ships, 
the guns, and the heroic men of our Navies and 
our Armies. I need not recount for you how 
our men on the firing lines face to face with the 
enemy, and our women behind those lines — with 
their spirit, determination, effectiveness, and 
sacrifice — are beating back the enemy's ambi- 
tious will to conquer. They at the fighting 
fronts can handle anything the Japanese can 
send against them if, and it is an important 
"if", each and every one of us — you and I — 
gives them his utmost support. The ruthless 
will which is driving the Japanese Nation 
toward conquest knows neither gentleness nor 
mercy. It is utterly ruthless, utterly cruel, and 
utterly blind to any of the values which make 
up our civilization. The only way to stop that 
will is to destroy it. 

It is up to each one of us, to every American, 
to see the picture as a whole, to realize that we 
are fighting for our individual and national 
existence and for everything that each one of us 
holds dear, to gain from that realization in- 
spiration, zeal, courage, and determination to 
harness all our energies into a tremendous effort, 
an epochal effort that will make our victory sure. 
Each individual must pour out everything 
which he has to accomplish his individual task 
at hand and to make the most of every oppor- 
tunity for service. Each and every one of us 
must realize that through his individual and col- 
lective efforts new and broader and more effec- 
tive avenues of service will steadily be opened 
up, and thus each and all of us will gain the 



SEPTEMBER 19. 194 2 



763 



opportunity to contribute in ever-increasing 
measure to getting the job done with maximum 
speed and with maximum effectiveness. 

This is our task — the task of our own great 
country and of our Allies of the United Nations. 
Let us stop groping. It is a task in which you, 
employers and workers of America, have an im- 
mense part, a vital part to play. Play it well. 
If you fail — please mark my words — you pass 



into slavery and all America passes into slavery 
witli you. But you will not fail ; we will not 
fail, because we are free men living in a free 
country, able and determined that we, our coun- . 
try, shall remain free, that our homes, our tra- 
ditions, our civilization, our principles, our 
standards, our humanity shall remain free, and 
that henceforth we shall also be and shall re- 
main secure. 



ADDRESS BY THE FORMER AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN, SEPTEMBER 18 



[Released to the press September 18] 

Mr. Mayor, Ladies and Gentlemen : ^ 

The privilege of attending this important 
gathering is highly appreciated, and I wish at 
once to express my hearty thanks for the wel- 
come that you have so kindly and generously ac- 
corded me. If the fighting spirit of our Nation 
is typified by the spirit of this great meeting in 
your progressive city of Syracuse, we need not 
fear for the eventual outcome of the war. 

In November 1939, at a time when the Japa- 
nese Army was floundering unsuccessfully in 
China, I wrote in my diary : 

"To await the hoped-for discrediting in Japan 
of the Japanese Army and the Japanese military 
system is to await the millenium. The Japanese 
Army is no protuberance like the tail of a dog, 
which might be cut off to prevent the tail from 
wagging the dog. It is inextricably bound up 
with the fabric of the entire nation. Certainly 
there are plenty of Japanese who dislike the 
Army's methods; there is plenty of restiveness 
at the wholesale impressment of young men to 
fight in China, at the death and crippling of 
many, and at the restrictions and handicaps in 
everyday life entailed by the expenses of the 
China campaign. But that the Army can be 
discredited in the eyes of the people to a degree 
where its power and prestige will become so 
effectively undermined as to deprive it of con- 
trol, or at least of its preponderant influence in 
shaping national policy, is an hypothesis which 
I believe no one conversant with Japan and the 
Japanese would for a moment entertain. 



' Delivered by the Honorable Joseph C. Grew at a 
war-rally luncheon at the Hotel Syracuse, Syracuse, 
N. Y., and broadcast over the red network of the 
National Broadcasting Company. 
484597—42 2 



Should a coup d^etat occur in Japan through 
social upheaval, there is little doubt that it 
would lead immediately to a ruthless military 
dictatorship." 

That entry in my diary was almost three years 
ago. A good deal of water has run under the 
mill since then, but those comments are just as 
true today as they were then — except in one 
fundamental respect. I then wrote that the 
Japanese Army was inextricably bound up with 
the life of the people, and when I wrote of the 
Army I alluded to the whole great military ma- 
chine which includes the Navy too. So it is 
today. From every village and farm and fac- 
tory and home, sons and brothers and fellow 
workers have been taken for military or naval 
service throughout the nation. That whole ma- 
chine is closely integrated with every phase of 
the national life. But I also wrote at that time 
that that military machine could not be dis- 
credited in the eyes of the people. Today I 
amend that statement. The Japanese military 
machine can and will be discredited in the eyes 
of the Japanese people, and we, the United States 
of America, will bring that about. 

Two questions. First, why? Answer: be- 
cause until it is so discredited, permanent peace 
never can and never will be restored in the Pa- 
cific area. Second, how ? Answer : by utter and 
complete defeat by the armed forces of the 
United States of America and of the other 
United Nations. Only when that Japanese mili- 
tary machine is rendered physically impotent, 
physically incapable of carrying on its far-flung 
campaign of crushing and conquering and en- 
slaving — yes, literally enslaving — those who fall 
beneath the wheels of its ruthless and utterly 
pitiless car of juggernaut, only then will the 



764 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Japanese people as a whole come to the realiza- 
tion that crime does not pay, that they have been 
forced to follow false gods, and that the ways of 
j^eace are in all respects preferable to the ways 
of war. And when that time comes — as it as- 
suredly will come in due course— many a Japa- 
nese, many a patriotic and loyal Japanese, loyal 
to his Emperor, loyal to the spirits of his ances- 
tors, and loyal to his nation, j'et who did not 
want this war, wlio had nothing whatever to do 
with the bringing on of this war, will sigh with 
profoundest relief. And this I say with 10 long 
years of intimate knowledge and experience of 
Japan and all her works. 

Now how is that defeat to be brought about? 
Our strategists and tacticians will take care of 
that. As a layman in military and naval mat- 
ters, I should say that two main courses will 
have to be followed simultaneously. First, the 
gradual but progressive dislodgement of the 
Japanese forces from the bases and areas that 
they have temporarily occupied. You know 
from the published reports what our marines, 
our sailors, our soldiers, our ships, and our 
planes are doing in the South Seas today. They 
have a tough job ahead, but they themselves are 
made of iron. They will not fail. Second, the 
gradual but progressive destruction of the Japa- 
nese Navy, merchant marine, and air force — 
])roducing an attrition which must finally so 
reduce and weaken their combatant power and 
their attenuated lines of supply that the home- 
lajid will be isolated from every area which they 
have occupied. This will not be the end, but it 
will be the beginning of the end. Let us leave 
tlip roup dc grace to our tacticians. They will 
not fail. 

And how about the rest of us? Shall we fail? 
Shall we fail so to integrate our war effort into 
the life of the Nation that our men and boys, 
valiantly fighting overseas against that all- 
powerful and equally valiant enemy, shall be 
depri\ed of a single ship or plane or gun or 
shell which might have reached them but did 
not reach them because in some respects our 
efforts at home had been geared to our creditable 
but not our maximum capacity? Aye, there's 
the rub. To attain our maximum capacity — our 
maximum collective capacity to be attained only 



if and when every one of us, hour by hour and 
day by day, exerts his maximum individual 
capacity. 

Burns once wrote : "And if I seek oblivion of 
a day, so shorten I the stature of my soul." Let 
us readjust those lines : "And if I seek oblivion 
of a day, so lengthen I the travail of my land." 
Can there be any man or woman in our great 
embattled Nation who seeks even a day's oblivion 
when his country is in dire peril, as it surely is 
today ? 

The other day a friend, an intelligent Ameri- 
can, said to me : "Of course there must be ups 
and downs in this war; we can't expect victories 
every day. But it's merely a question of time 
before Hitler will go down to defeat before the 
steadily growing power of the combined air and 
naval and militiarj-* forces of the United 
Nations — and then we'll mop up the Japs." 
Mark well those words, please : "And then we'll 
mop up the Japs." 

My friends, let's get down to brass tacks. I 
know Germany ; I lived there for nearly 10 years. 
I came out on the last train with my chief, Am- 
bassador Gerard, when in 1917 we broke rela- 
tions with Germany and shortly afterwards 
were forced to declare war on that aggressor. I 
know the Germans well : truculent and bullying 
and domineering when on the crest of the wave; 
demoralized in defeat. The Germans cracked 
in 1918. I have steadfastly believed and I be- 
lieve today that when the tide of battle turns 
against them, as it assuredly will turn, they will 
crack again. 

I know Japan; I lived there for 10 years. I 
know the Japanese intimately. The Japanese 
will not crack. They will not crack morally or 
psycliolugically or economically, even when 
eventual defeat stares them in the face. They 
will pull in their belts another notch, reduce 
their rations from a bowl to a half-bowl of rice, 
and fight to the bitter end. Only by utter 
physical destruction or utter exhaustion of their 
men and materials can they be defeated. That 
is the difference between the Germans and the 
Japanese. That is what we are up against in 
fighting Japan. 

That gives food for thought, doesn't it ? You 
who have never lived in Japan can have no con- 



SEPTEMBER 19, 194 2 



765 



ceptioii of tlie overweening confidence of the 
Japanese Army and Navy, their overweening 
ambition, and their determination to conquer 
and subjugate portions of the Occident just as 
tliey ah'eady have temporarily possessed them- 
selves of lai-ge sections of the Orient. You real- 
ize that the Japanese are already in the Aleutian 
Islands, don't you ? Not far from Alaska. Not 
so far from other parts of our country. Our 
own armed forces are dealing with that situa- 
tion. I mention it merely as a concrete indica- 
tion of what the armed forces of Japan hope to 
do and what they intend to do — and what they 
will do if they can : first to bomb impoitant 
American centers and then, eventually, invade 
America. 

And let us not allow ourselves to be deluded 
into thinking that these hopes are merely pipe 
dreams, impo.ssible of fulfilment. The Japanese 
may seem to us fanatics and, at times, barbar- 
ians. But in building their Army they have 
been extremely practical and level-headed, 
forging a military nation which today must be 
recognized as one of the most formidable in the 
world. 

Let me tell you a little stoiy which throws 
light upon the spirit which animates these grim 
warriors. Last year when our country and 
Japan were .still at peace I received from the 
Chinese Government the name of a Japanese 
who had been taken prisoner in China and who 
wished his family at home in Japan to know 
that he was alive and well. I communicated 
the information to the Government in Tokyo 
and received, in due course, the official reply. 
It was brief and to the point. The Japanese 
Government was not interested in receiving such 
information. So far as they, the Government, 
were concerned, and also so far as his own fam- 
ily was concerned, that man was officially dead. 
Were he to be recognized as a prisoner of war, 
shame would be brought upon not only his own 
family but his government and his nation. 
"Victory or death" is no mere slogan for these 
soldiers. It is a plain, matter-of-fact descrip- 
tion of the military policy which controls their 
forces from the highest generals to the newest 
recruit. The man who allows himself to be 
captured has disgraced himself and his country. 



Let us take a somewhat more intimate and 
extensive look at this Army which today is hop- 
ing to bivouac on the Wliite House lawn. One 
of the best and most accurate assessments of that . 
Army as it exists today was prepared by our 
assistant military attache in Tokyo, Lieutenant 
Colonel C. Stanton Babcock, and I believe that 
no better conception of that Army can be con- 
veyed to you than by my presenting, sometimes 
A'erbatim, some of the facts and comments set 
forth in that report. 

The Japanese Army has one great advantage 
over her enemies in the Far East : the advan- 
tage of five years of hard fighting in the China 
War. They have paid dearly for it. Estimates 
of their casualties run as high as a million men. 
But for this grim price in blood they obtained a 
proving gi-ound where they could build a tough, 
veteran army trained in that greatest of all mili- 
tary schools, war itself. 

But the Japanese were not content witli this. 
They gave their men further training in special 
areas where the terrain and climatic conditions 
approximate those in the regions where thej' 
were to fight. The units and commanders for 
the various sectors were selected months in ad- 
vance and put to work. The Malayan Army 
trained in Haman and Indochina, the Philip- 
pine force in Formosa, and both units practiced 
landing operations during the late summer and 
fall of 1941 along the south China coast. Even 
the divisions chosen to attack Hong Kong were 
given rigorous training in night fighting and 
in storming pillboxes in the hills near Canton. 
So realistic were these maneuvers that the troops 
are reported to have sutfered "a number of 
casualties". 

The Japanese High Command was able to 
make these careful preparations because of years 
of study of the areas where they expected to 
wage future campaigns. This study was based 
on a first-class espionage system. Japanese com- 
mentators have not even attempted to hide the 
fact that the High Command was fully informed 
for a year before the war of the strength, dis- 
positions, and likely plans of their potential en- 
emies. A good deal of this information is said 
to have been obtained by "observing" maneuvers 
in the Philippines and in Malaya. We can seri- 



766 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ously question ■whether much of this informa- 
tion was gathered by official observers. The 
eyes of the High Command were probably re- 
serve officers, disguised as humble members of 
the Japanese community scattered throughout 
the world. 

In making use of this highly valuable infor- 
mation the various branches of the Japanese 
armed forces — land, sea, and air — worked to- 
gether in complete unity. This was the more 
surprising, in as mucli as the great political ac- 
tivity of both ai-med services in Tokyo had led 
to a considerable amount of suspicion and jeal- 
ousy on the home front. Apparently none of it 
carried over to the fighting front, for Japanese 
Army-Navy teamwork left nothing to be de- 
sired. "Task forces" organized during the sum- 
mer of 1941 trained and worked together con- 
tinuously. Details of command, supply, and 
other matters which might have given rise to 
controversy were carefully worked out in ad- 
vance and clearly understood by all concerned. 

In developing these task forces gi-eat impor- 
tance was laid upon the attainment of air supe- 
riority. Admitting frankly their enemies' 
greater potential air power, the Japanese never- 
theless believed that they could seize, and main- 
tain for a long time, command of the air in east 
Asia. Once again events proved them right. 
Air-force units, both of the Army and of the 
Navy, concentrated their strength against en- 
emy air fields, and not imtil the opposing air 
strength was thoroughly crushed was any con- 
siderable part of the available Japanese forces 
diverted to other missions. 

The use of dive and light bombers as a kind 
of long-range artillery was closely patterned on 
German tactics, as the Japanese themselves ad- 
mit. This flying artillery was especially eflPec- 
tive in the early stages of the Malayan cam- 
paign, where the terrain made observation diffi- 
cult and the emplacement of large numbers of 
ground batteries was virtually impossible. 

The Japanese have borrowed more from the 
Germans than their tactics in the use of dive and 
light bombers. Like the Nazi High Command, 
they refuse to achnit tliat there are any natural 
obstacles which their forces cannot cross. How 



often have the German Armies shown how the 
Allied commanders had made the mistaken as- 
sumption that terrain which is merely difficult 
is impassable! In their lightning campaigns 
of last winter the Japanese made the same point 
over and over again. Indeed, the Japanese 
themselves have said that their tactics have fre- 
quently been based on the principle of attacking 
through a particular area in the knowledge that 
their enemies have been lulled into a false sense 
of security and complacency by the very assump- 
tion of its impassability. And the Japanese 
emphasize the disastrous effect on the defenders' 
morale once a so-called impregnable area has 
been pierced. 

But above all, according to both the Japanese 
themselves and outside observers, the most im- 
portant factor contributing to Japanese vic- 
tories is the spirit which permeates all the armed 
forces of the Empire. This spirit, recognized 
by competent military men as the most vital 
intangible factor in achieving victory, has been 
nourished and joerpetuated since the foundation 
of the modern Japanese Army. The High Com- 
mand have counted heavily on the advantages 
that this would give Japan over her less aggres- 
sive enemies. They were well aware of the psy- 
chological effect produced on the British, the 
Dutch, and the Americans by reliance on de- 
fense. They put great store in the flabbiness 
produced in the white man after nearly a cen- 
tury of easy and luxurious life in the Far East. 
They attached great importance to the disunity 
in tlie United States over the war issue and 
counted on an appreciable interval before an 
aroused nation could find itself and develop a 
figlitiug spirit of its own. By that time, they 
still feel, Japan will be in complete control of 
all east Asia. 

The Japanese themselves have developed a 
tremendous fighting spirit in their armed serv- 
ices and people alike. Indeed, the Japanese 
armed services and the Japanese Nation have 
become so closely identified that it is difficult to 
tell wliere one stops and the other begins. Every 
Japanese male, of course, must perform military 
service under a system of universal conscrip- 
tion. Thus, in every family the father or son or 



SEPTEMBER 19, 194 2 



767 



brother has served or is serving in the Army or 
Navy. Every house in Japan, down to the low- 
liest hovel, proudly flies the Japanese flag at its 
front door when one of its men is in military 
service. 

The people of Japan are wholly united in 
their support of their armed forces and of this 
war simply because it is declared to be the will 
of the Emperor. To oppose the will of the 
Throne, the will of the Son of Heaven, is un- 
thinkable in Jaj^an. Disloyalty to the Em- 
peror, too, would shame their own ancestors; 
and ancestor worship, the patriotic faith called 
Shintoism, is the fundamental faith of the 
entire country. 

Not, I hasten to add, that the Japanese Gov- 
ernment has ever succeeded in obtaining univer- 
sal conformity among its subjects. Even among 
the Japanese there are a few bold spirits who 
are unwilling to accept dictation from above and 
who insist on thinking for themselves. There 
could be no attitude more dangerous to an au- 
tocracy, and all such thoughts are labeled by the 
Japanese police as "dangerous thoughts". Many 
a Japanese finds himself in a solitary prison 
cell, undergoing long months of intensive inves- 
tigation, on the basis of a mere indiscreet word 
uttered in the hearing of some stranger or even 
friend. 

We may well ask ourselves how so many of 
our people came to pay so little attention to this 
formidable military machine, a machine which 
dominated the lives of the Japanese people long 
before Pearl Harbor. Partly, of course, we can 
lay it to our remoteness as a nation from the 
place where this machine was in action. This 
remoteness served not only to keep us from ob- 
taining first-hand impressions of the activities 
of the Japanese Army but also to lull us into a 
false sense of security. Many believed that be- 
cause the Pacific was between us and Japan we 
were safe. That thought was relentlessly ham- 
mered home here in America by the head-in- 
the-sand school of political leaders. I may add 
that it was with considerable joy that the 
leaders of Japan observed what I am sure was 
the unintentional cooperation of the American 
isolationists in Japan's plans to fool us. Often 



have I seen the public speeches of those isola- 
tionists flaunted under big headlines in the Jap- 
anese press. 

Nevertheless, the Japanese ability in decep- 
tion and concealment played a very considerable 
part in keeping our j)eople ignorant of the true 
meaning of what was going on in eastern Asia. 
Many, for example, took the apparent failure of 
the Japanese Army to drive to victory in the 
four years of the China War as evidence of the 
weakness and inefficiency of the Japanese mili- 
tary forces. It has become more and more ap- 
parent since Pearl Harbor that, however much 
we hoped for peace in Asia, the Japanese them- 
selves throughout the China War were husband- 
ing their resources for the greater struggle 
which they felt lay beyond. In this connection, 
tlie Japanese budget figures released to the press 
are extremely interesting. They indicate that 
only 40 percent of the appropriation voted to 
the defense forces was expended for the conduct 
of the so-called China Incident. Sixty per- 
cent — nearly two thirds of the total appropria- 
tion — was used to prepare the services and the 
industrial plants for the greater emergency yet 
to come. Similarly, of the materials and weap- 
ons furnished the services, only one fifth was 
sent to China — the rest being used to expand 
and modernize the armies and fleets which were 
to be called upon when the super-war really 
broke. 

Oversimplified and inconclusive though these 
figures are, the Japanese themselves neverthe- 
less use them to suppoi't their promise that the 
war in China has left Japan stronger rather 
than weaker and in a better position than ever 
before to strike at her enemies. 

Nevertheless, despite its strength Japan's new 
empire should certainly not be considered in- 
vulnerable. It has definite weaknesses which, 
if we take full advantage of them, will lead ulti- 
mately to the collapse of her whole position. 

Japan, despite an unparalleled expansion 
over an area of many thousands of square miles 
in the campaigns of the past winter, has not 
succeeded in removing strong Allied positions 
on the flanks of her defensive chain. It is, of 
course, an axiom of conquest that each time you 



768 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



advance you are creating a future need for a 
further advance to protect your new position. 
Nevertheless, Japan hoped that by lier concerted 
campaigns she could drive her enemies back to 
such a distance that she would be able to halt 
her forces on natural defensive lines. 

This she has not been able to do. The United 
Nations still hold bases on and from which it is 
possible for them to organize and launch strik- 
ing forces to attack the Japanese positions, both 
new and old. These will be used amply and 
effectively as the war progresses. 

And finally, it must be considered a weakness 
of the Japanese defensive ring that communica- 
tions and transport must be carried on very 
largely by water. As we have seen only too 
clearly here at home, sea-borne communications 
are extremely vulnerable to attack. At worstr 
they may be cut; at best they compel the de- 
fensive country to divert much of her naval 
strengtii to convoy and anti-submarine patrol. 
Japan is not a country which can replace her 
shipping losses easily, and it may well turn out 
that the steady attrition of her shipping, both 
mercantile and naval, may play a considerable 
part in her ultimate defeat. 

But let me emj^hasize once again that these 
weaknesses will certainly not of themselves 
cause Japan to be defeated. They must be ex- 



ploited — taken advantage of — by determined 
aggressive action by the United Nations. And 
that in turn can come about only if our Govern- 
ment has the determined and aggi-essive support 
of every one of us here at home. For in the 
ultimate analysis victory or defeat does not rest 
in tlie hands of fighting men thousands of miles 
away. It does not rest with the generals and 
the admirals. It does not depend upon the 
Government in Washington. Victory depends 
upon us who are gathered here — ourselves and 
our millions of fellow countrymen who make 
up the American people. 

The strength of the Japanese people lies in 
their fanatical obedience to authority. The 
great strength of the American people lies in 
their ability to think and act for themselves 
without waiting for orders from above. Our 
fathers tamed a continent without waiting for 
someone to tell them how to do it. It took no 
directive from the High Command to call the 
Minute Men from their plows to battle. We 
ourselves can do no less. Let us not wait for 
our Government to do all our thinking for us. 
Our leaders in Washington already bear an im- 
mense burden. Let us not add to it by expecting 
them to lead us by the hand every step of the 
road to victory. 

Let us remember one thing: it is our war. 



NEGOTIATIONS FOR RELIEF TO AMERICAN PRISONERS OF WAR HELD BY JAPAN 



[Released to the press September 18] 

Immediately following the Japanese occupa- 
tion of the Philippine Islands, efforts were made 
by the American Red Cross to locate a neutral 
ship of sufficient cargo capacity and cruising 
radius for the carriage of prisoner-of-war sup- 
plies to the Far East, including the Philippine 
Islands. 

In the spring a suitable vessel was located, the 
Swedish ship Vasaland, then at Gothenburg. 
Efforts made by the American Red Cross 
through the International Red Cross to secure 
the assent of the German authorities to the 
departure of this ship from the Baltic proved 



fruitless, following which the Kanangoora, a 
Swedish vessel now on the Pacific coast, was 
chartered with the expectation that it could be 
used for this purpose. 

Supplementing the repeated efforts of the 
American Red Cross, made through the inter- 
mediary of the International Red Cross, to 
obtain from the Japanese Government a guar- 
anty of safe conduct for this ship to carry relief 
supplies for American prisoners of war and 
civilian internees in Japanese custody, messages 
dated July 30, August 29, and September 18, 
1942, respectively, were sent by the Secretary of 
State to the Japanese Government through the 



SEPTEMBER 19, 194 2 



769 



Swiss Government representing American inter- 
ests in Japan. The message dated August 29 
was printed in the BuUetin of September 5, 
1942, page 741. Tlie texts of the other messages 
read as follows : 

"July 30, 1942. 
"Please request that Swiss Minister Tokyo 
he instructed to press for consent of Japanese 
Government to voyage from San Francisco to 
Manila via Kobe, Shanghai and Hong Kong of 
Swedish motorship Kanangoor-a which is being 
chartered by American Red Cross and operated 
by the International Red Cross to carry supplies 
for prisoners of war and civilian internees in the 
Far East. Please expedite report." 

"September 18, 1942. 

"The Government of the United States has 
noted the Japanese Government's statement that 
it has never refused and will not refuse in the 
future to accept and to deliver parcels contain- 
ing foodstuffs and clothing as provided for 
under Article 37 of the Geneva Prisoners of 
War Convention and is gratified to have official 
confirmation that supplies sent by the American 
Red Cross on the exchange ships will be distrib- 
uted to American prisoners of war and civilian 
internees in Japan, in the Philippines, and in 
other areas under Japanese occupation. 

"The Government of the United States also 
has noted the statement of the Japanese Gov- 
ernment that it must maintain for the moment 
its refusal to allow, for strategic reasons, any 
vessel to cross the western Pacific and that the 
Japanese Government has no intention of send- 
ing to LoureiiQO Marques Japanese ships other 
than the exchange vessels. 

"The Government of the United States desires, 
however, to point out that the supplies already 
sent to the Philippine Islands are insufficient in 
quantity adequately to satisfy the continuing 
needs of American prisoners of war and civilian 
internees detained by the Japanese authorities 
there. Furthermore, sufficient cargo space is 
not available on the exchange vessels to permit 
the shipment of sufficient supplementai-y sup- 



plies to serve the continuing needs of American 
nationals detained by the Japanese authorities 
in the Philippine Islands and in other areas 
under Japanese occupation. 

"The Government of the United States, there- 
fore, proposes again that the Japanese Govern- 
ment consent to the appointment of a neutral 
International Red Cross Committee delegate in 
the Philippine Islands to whom funds might be 
sent from the United States to be used in the 
purchase of local produce for distribution 
among American nationals in Japanese custody 
there. This Government confidently expects 
that as soon as the strategic reasons which the 
Japanese Government states are at present in- 
fluencing it in refusing to permit neutral vessels 
to cross the western Pacific are no longer con- 
trolling, the Japanese Government will give safe 
conduct for the shipment of supplementary sup- 
plies fi'om this country. Until that time, how- 
ever, it is only by opening a means whereby 
funds may be provided to and used by a neutral 
Red Cross representative in the Philippine Is- 
lands that American nationals in Japanese cus- 
tody in the Philippines may be furnished on a 
continuing basis the supplementary supplies 
which prisoners of war are entitled to receive 
under the Convention, which both Governments 
have agreed reciprocally to apply and to extend 
to civilian internees. In this connection, this 
Government desires to point out that the dietary 
habits of Americans are different from those of 
the Japanese people and that this Government 
is accordingly anxious to supplement the basic 
Japanese I'ations by supplies of a type more 
characteristic of the usual American diet. 

"The attention of the Japanese Government is 
drawn to the fact that International Red Cross 
Committee delegates are permitted to function 
freely in the continental United States and the 
Territory of Hawaii in the distribution of relief 
among persons of Japanese nationality detained 
in the United States and Hawaii. 

"The Govermiient of the United States desires 
to know urgently whether or not the Japanese 
Government will henceforth grant full reciproc- 
ity in these respects." 



770 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



REPORTED PLANS FOR CONSCRIPTION 
OF FRENCH LABOR FOR USE IN GER- 
MANY 

A correspondent at the press conference of 
the Secretary of State on September 15 asked 
the Secretary whether he had any comment on 
the policy of the Vichy Government to con- 
script labor for possible use in Germany. In 
reply the Secretary said: 

"Naturally this Government has been observ- 
ing with special interest the recent reports about 
plans of the French Government at Vichy to 
send many thousands of French laborers into 
Germany for the purpose of furnishing labor 
to the German Government. This action, if car- 
ried out, would be of such aid to one of our 
enemies as to be wholly inconsistent with 
France's obligations under international law. 
The Govei-nment here is naturally observing 
closely this more recent announcement about 
the conscription of French labor, with a view to 
seeing whether it is part of the plan oi' purpose 
of the original undertaking which seems to have 
failed, according to reports, of getting great 
numbers of French laborers into Germany. 
This Govenmient is accordingly observing, as I 
say, the developments with the same special in- 
terest as the first reports to which I have 
referred. 

"I think today too is the deadline as it is 
called in relation to another policy which itself 
is astonishing and that relates to measures taken 
during recent weeks by the same governmental 
authorities against a large number of unfortu- 
nate people who sought to obtain refuge in 
France in accordance with its traditional hos- 
pitality. These policies include the delivery of 
these unhappy people to enemies who have an- 
nounced and in considerable measure executed 
their intention to enslave, maltreat, and eventu- 
ally exterminate them under conditions of the 
most extreme cruelty. The details of the meas- 
ures taken are so revolting and so fiendish in 
their nature that they defy adequate descrip- 
tion." 



ATTEMPT TO CONSCRIPT CITIZENS OF 
LUXEMBOURG FOR THE GERMAN 
ARMY 

[Released to the press September 13] 

The Secretary of State, having been informed 
by the Minister of Luxembourg that Hitler is 
attempting to incorporate the Grand Duchy of 
Luxembourg into the Reich and to impose con- 
scription into the German Army of the people 
of the Grand Duchy, an action which has 
brought about a general strike in Luxembourg, 
has sent the following note to Minister Hugues 
Le Gallais: 

"Sir: 

''The American people have followed with 
deep concern the attempt of the German Reich 
not only to force servitude upon the proud peo- 
ple of Luxembourg but in this, the latest effort, 
to compel the youth of that country to serve in 
the German armed forces. The answer of the 
people of Luxembourg to this was a general 
strike. German force and cruelty may crush 
this strike, but it can never crush the indomita- 
ble spirit of the people of Luxembourg. Wliat- 
ever badge of servitude Hitler may attempt to 
force upon the youth of that country, the Amer- 
ican people are confident their spirit will always 
remain that of free men striving for their coun- 
try's independence. 

"Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 

APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL ASSISTANT 
IN LONDON IN CHARGE OF ECONOMIC- 
WARFARE ACTIVITIES 

[Released to the press September 14] 

Mr. Winfield Riefler, of the Board of Eco- 
nomic Warfare, has been appointed Special As- 
sistant to the American Ambassador in London, 
with tlie rank of Minister, and has arrived in 
London. 

Mr. Riefler will supervise the activities of the 
Economic Warfare Division of the Embassy, 
the channel for communication between the 
Department of State, the Board of Economic 



SEPTEMBER 19, 194 2 



771 



Warfare, and other United States Government 
agencies (except the armed forces) and the 
Britisli Ministry of Economic Warfare. 

Mr. Riefler spent several months in London 
earlier this year as a special representative of 
tlie Board of Economic Warfare, attached to the 
staff of the American Embassy. He has re- 
turned to London to assume the duties of his 
new assignment which, among others, will be to 
analyze, report on, and maintain representation 
on committees concerned with economic-warfare 
activities in which the United States and Great 
Britain are jointly engaged. 



American Republics 



ANNIVERSARIES OF INDEPENDENCE 
BRAZIL 

[Released to the press September 16] 

The following telegram has been received by 
the Secretary of State from the Minister of 
Foreign Affairs of Brazil in reply to the for- 
mer's telegram upon the occasion of the anni- 
versary of the independence of Brazil : ' 

"September 14, 1942. 
"At this time when the Brazilian people, 
together with the people of the American States 
and those of the other free and civilized nations, 
is fighting against aggression in defense of the 
ideals of justice and freedom, it was a special 
pleasure to me to receive the congratulations 
which Your Excellency was so good as to send 
to my Government and to me personally on the 
occasion of the anniversary of Brazil's inde- 
pendence. Thanking you once more for your 
demonstration of solidarity, I beg you to accept 
the wishes which I express for Your Excellency's 
(personal happiness. 

OswALDO Aranha" 



' Bulletin of September 12, 1942, p. 752. 



CHILE 

[Released to the press September 18] 

The following telegram was sent by the Presi- 
dent of the United States to His Excellency 
Juan Antonio Rios, President of the Republic 
of Chile, upon the occasion of the anniversary 
of the declaration of independence of Chile : 

"September 18, 1942. 

"Upon this anniversary of the declaration of 
the independence of Chile it gives me pleasure 
to send to Your Excellency my most cordial 
greetings and sincere wishes for the progress 
and prosperity of your great country. The 
people of the United States share with the people 
of Chile and with the other free peoples of the 
world a common responsibility to uphold the 
principles of democracy and those individual 
fieedoms which are the essence of a progressive 
civilization. 

"I look forward with pleasure to Your Excel- 
lency's approaching visit and feel confident that 
it will serve to strengthen still further the ties 
of friendship already uniting our countries. 

"Accept [etc.] Franklin D Roosevelt" 

COSTA RICA 

[Released to the press September 16] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency Dr. Don 
Rafael Angel Calderon Guardia, President of 
the Republic of Costa Rica, upon the occasion 
of the anniversary of the independence of Costa 
Rica, follows: 

"September 15, 1942. 
"In the year that has passed since the last 
celebration of this memorable day, our two 
countries have taken up arms to uphold with 
other free countries in this hemisphere, and 
tlirougliout the world, the sacred principles 
and the priceless human heritage which our 
two peoples are proud to shaie. In a spirit of 
more than usual solemnity I send to you and 
to the Costa Rican people my warm greetings 
and good wishes and those of the people of the 



772 

United States on this anniversary of the 
independence of Costa Eica. 

"The United States has noted with admira- 
tion the vigor with which Costa Rica has an- 
swered the cliallenge of aggression and contrib- 
uted to the struggle which can only end in our 
common victory. 

"With most cordial personal remembrances 
and good wishes for your health and prosperity. 
Franklin D Roosevelt" 

EL SALVADOR 

[Released to the press September 16] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency General 
Maximiliano Hernandez Martinez, President of 
the Republic of El Salvador, upon the occasion 
of the anniversary of the independence of El 
Salvador, follows: 

"September 15. 1942. 

"On the anniversary of the independence of 
El Salvador, I am glad to extend to you and 
your people my warmest gi-eetings and felicita- 
tions. 

"Today, our two countries together with 
other free nations throughout the world are 
allied in the cause of freedom, which has been 
everywhere challenged by barbarous enemies 
who seek to destroy it. On this day of Salva- 
doran independence, I assure you that the signifi- 
cant contribution of your government and of 
the people of El Salvador toward this great 
cause will hasten the day, when, through our 
united efforts, we shall achieve the final victory 
and restore to their rightful place those prin- 
ciples for which we are fighting. 

"I take [etc.] Franklin D Roosevelt" 

GUATEMALA 

[Released to the press September 16] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency General 
Jorge Ubico, President of the Republic of 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETEN 

Guatemala, upon the occasion of the anniver- 
sary of the independence of Guatemala, follows: 
"September 15, 1942. 

"On the occasion of the 121st anniversary of 
the independence of Guatemala, I am especially 
happy to send to you and to the people of Guate- 
mala heartiest congratulations and best wishes 
for myself and for the people of the United 
States. Guatemala and the United States, to- 
gether with the free nations of the whole world, 
are united in a bitter struggle against barbarous 
enemies seeking to destroy the very freedoms 
which we celebrate with you today. We are 
confident of victory, since truth is invincible. 

"The spirit and ideals which motivated the 
Guatemalan people to assert their independence 
more than a century ago, find new expression ill 
the notable contributions of Guatemala to the 
common war effort of the United Nations. 

"Ideals to which we reconsecrate ourselves on 
these national holidays are the surest guarantee 
of our conmion triumph. 

"I take [etc.] Frankon D Roosevelt" 

HONDURAS 

[Released to the press September 16] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency General 
Tiburcio Carias Andino, President of the Re- 
public of Honduras, upon the occasion of the 
anniversary of the independence of Honduras, 
follows : 

"September 15, 1942. 

"On this memorable anniversary, I am glad to 
send to you, and to the Honduran people, my 
cordial greetings and good wishes and those of 
the people of the United States. 

"The celebration of the day of the independ- 
ence of Honduras exalts principles and ideals 
held in common by our two countries. In their 
defense they have now joined with other free 
countries in the American hemisphere and 
throughout the world. 



SEPTEMBER 19, 1942 



773 



"In the noble spirit of this day, Honduras is 
contributing valiantly to the steadily growing 
answer that free peoples must make and ai'e 
making to the brutal challenge of aggression. 
Animated by this spirit, we shall go forward to 
victory. 

"I take [etc.] Franklin D Roosevelt" 

NICARAGUA 

[Released to the press September 16] 

Tlie text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to His Excellency General 
Anastasio Somoza, President of the Republic of 
Nicaragua upon the occasion of tlie anniversary 
of the independence of Nicaragua, follows: 

"September 15, 1942. 

"On this anniversary of the independence of 
Nicaragua our two countries are joined with 
other free countries in this hemisphere, and 
throughout the world, in armed resistance to a 
mighty attempt to stamp out the very spirit 
that animates the celebration of such a day. 
With a solemn sense of the significance of this 
anniversary, and with a deep sentiment of 
friendship, I send to you and to the Nicaraguan 
people my warm greetings and felicitations and 
those of the people of the United States. 

"Under the inspiration of the ideals exalted 
by this celebration, Nicaragua has made vigor- 
ous reply to the challenge of aggression. I am 
confident that, under the same noble inspiration, 
our countries will press on to final victory. 

"I take fete] Franklin D Roosevelt" 

RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH PANAMA 

[Released to the press September 14] 

The signing of a rubber agreement with Pan- 
ama was announced on September 14 by the De- 
partment of State, the Rubber Reserve Com- 
pany, and the Board of Economic Warfare. 

Under the terms of the agi-eement the Rubber 
Reserve Company will purchase, until Decem- 
ber 31, 1946, all rubber produced in Panama 
which is not required for essential domestic 
needs. 



DEATH OF EX-PRESIDENT TERRA 
OF URUGUAY 

[Released to the press September 10] 

The Secretary of State, when asked for com- 
ment regarding the death of the ex-President 
of Uruguay, Dr. Gabriel Terra ( 1931-38) , which 
occurred on September 15, said : 

"He was a great and good man. He had a 
passion for serving the masses of the people. 
He did serve them faithfully and well. His 
record of efficient service will long stand out in 
the history of his country." 



The Far East 



ANNIVERSARY OF THE MUKDEN 
INCIDENT 

[Rele.ised to the press September 17] 

In response to inquiries by press correspond- 
ents as to whether he wished to comment on the 
anniversary of the Mukden incident, the Secre- 
tary of State made the following statement : 

"September 18, as the whole world knows, 
marks the eleventh anniversary of a fateful 
stejj of aggression in Manchuria by the Japa- 
nese warlords. The course of aggression there 
embarked uf)on was followed by successive ag- 
gressions in Asia, Africa, and Europe and has 
led step by step to the present world conflict. 

"The American Government and people ad- 
mire sincerely the gallant resistance offered by 
the Government and people of China to the 
ruthless and lawless Japanese aggressor. We 
are confident that the military efforts of free 
peoples, which have been the inevitable answer 
to brutal and predatory Japanese attacks upon 
peaceful populations, will defeat and destroy 
the military caste that controls Japan. 



774 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUI>L<ETIN 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Lester S. Dame was designated an Acting 
Assistant Chief of the American Hemisphere 
Exports Office, effective September 15, 1942 (De- 
partmental Order 1090). 

Mr. Honore Marcel Catudal was designati'd 
an Assistant Chief of the Division of Commer- 
cial Policy and Agreements, effective September 
16, 1942 (Departmental Order 1091) . 



Treaty Information 



PUBLICATIONS 
Agreement With Iceland 

An agreement for the exchange of official pub- 
lications between the Government of the United 
States of America and the Government of Ice- 
land was entered into by an exchange of notes 
dated August 17, 1942. 

The agreement, which entered into effect on 
August 17, 1942, provides that the exchange 
offices for the transmission of publications shall 
be, on the part of the United States of America, 
the Smithsonian Institution, and, on the part of 
Iceland, the National Library of Iceland 
( Landsbokasaf n Islands ) . The Library of Con- 
gress shall receive, on behalf of the United 
States, the publications to be exchanged, and 
the National Library of Iceland shall receive the 
publications on behalf of Iceland. Each Gov- 
ernment furnished to the other a list of the pub- 
lications which it agi'eed to remit, and each 
Government agreed to bear the postal, railroad, 
steamship, and other charges arising in its own 
country and to expedite the shipments as far as 
possible. The agreement will shortly be printed 
in the Executive Agreement Series. 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Rubber Agreement With Panama 

A statement regarding the signing of a rub- 
ber agi-eement between the United States of 
America and the Government of Panama ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading "Amer- 
ican Republics". 



Legislation 



Draft of proposed pi-ovision pertaining to appropriation 
"Salaries of Ambassadors and Ministers" : Commu- 
nication from ttie President of tlie United States 
transmitting a draft of a proposed provision pertain- 
ing to tlie appropriation "Salaries of Ambassadors 
and Ministers" contained in tbe Department of State 
Appropriation Act for the Fiscal Year 1943. [Pro- 
vides funds for salary of Mr. Joseph C. Grew, until 
recently Ambassador to Japan.] H. Doc. 838, 77th 
Cong. 2 pp. 

Sixth Report to Congress on Lend-Lease Operations: 
Message from the President of the United States. 
H. Doc. 839, 77th Cong. 30 pp. 

Revenue Act of 1942: Hearings before the Committee 
on Finance, U. S. Senate, 77th Cong., 2d sess., on 
H. R. 7378, an act to provide revenue, and for other 
purposes. (Revised.) August 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14, 
1942. Vol. 2. [Includes letters from the Secretary 
of State regarding tax increases on cigars and In 
connection with the proposed tax on imported bitters, 
pp. 1462 and ISll, respectively.] pp. xil, 1309-2376. 



Publications 



Department or State 

Reciprocal Trade : Agreement Between the United 
States of Ameiica and the Republic of Cuba Signed 
at Washington August 24, 1934 As Amended by 
Supplementary Agreements Signed at Washington 
December IS, 1939 and at Habana December 23, 
1941, and Protocol and Exchanges of Notes. Publi- 
cation 1787. vl, 56 pp. 100. 

Diplomatic List, September 1942. Publication 1795. 
li, 101 pp. Subscription, $1 a year; single copy, 100. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington. D. C. — Price. 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, J2.75 a year 

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SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 
Vol. VII, No. 170— Publication 1812 



fontents 

The War Page 
Address by the Former American Ambassador to 

Japan 777 

Lend-Lease Operations 778 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 2 to Revision III . . . 780 

The Department 

Appointment of OfEcers 780 

Cultural Relations 

Advisory Committees to the Department of State . . 780 
Treaty Information 

Alliance and Mutual Assistance: Treaty Between the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics . . 781 

Publications 733 

Legislation 735 




2V61 61 iOO 
^mwnnoaioiN3aM3iHia3dns'st 



The War 



ADDRESS BY THE FORMER AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN ' 



[Kclensed to the press September 22] 

"Don't let it happen here." It must and shall 
not happen here. There is a ring of determina- 
tion in tliose words that inevitably reminds one 
of the old spirit of Verdun: "They shall not 
pass." Surely every American, every red- 
blooded American — and we are a red-blooded 
people — from ocean to ocean and from frontier 
to frontier of our great land cannot fail to thrill 
at those decisive words. Already we are 
"trampling out the vintage where the grapes 
of wrath are stored" ; we have "loosed the fate- 
ful lightning of our terrible swift sword" ; and 
month by month and day by day that stalwart 
light arm of ours that holds the sword grows 
steadily stronger and stronger and stronger. 
"They shall not pass!" "It must not happen 
here !" 

I have recently returned from Japan. I have 
lived in Japan for the past 10 years. I know 
the Japanese people, and I know something 
about the Japanese military machine, which 
means their Army and their Navy, their air 
force, their merchant marine, now almost en- 
tirely converted to transports and to carriers 
of supplies. I know the fighting spirit of the 
Japanese soldier and sailor and airman, their 
almost fanatical determination to serve their 
Emperor and their nation to the death, and the 
intensive training which they have undergone 
through many years — at least a generation. 
They called their campaign in China theii- 
"Holy War". I do not know what slogan they 

' Delivered by the Honorable Joseph C. Grew at the 
Red Cross Nurses' Aid Rally at Rockefeller Center, 
New York, N. Y., on September 22, 1942, and broadcast 
over Station WJZ. 



have attached to this total war, but it cannot 
be less strong. Their decisiveness and determi- 
nation are in no way less than ours ; their whole 
country and every man and woman in their 
country are geared to total war. That military 
system of theirs has developed a formidable 
and grim machine; their men on many fronts 
are fighting and will continue to fight like 
veritable tigers; their factories at home are 
steadily turning out the implements of war; 
their ships are steadily carrying those imple- 
ments of war and the supplies needed both 
abroad and at home ; and their women, both at 
home and in the field, are supporting their men 
with that same fanatical loyalty and valor, 
for their women too are made of strong stuff. 
The issue is joined. I know and you know 
what they are saying, tliose men and women of 
Japan: "It shall happen there!" — in these our 
United States. 

To us who have recently returned from that 
land of fanatical unity and determination and 
utter devotion to a cause which ihey themselves 
have been told is a just cause and which not all 
of them but most of them believe to be a just 
cause, it is inconceivable that any of our fellow 
countrymen whose eyes are open to the facts, 
who understand that this great land of ours, 
the priceless heritage of our American citizen- 
ship, and the freedom and the duties that are 
part and parcel of that citizenship are in peril — 
it is inconceivable that any American can con- 
tinue to follow his or her accustomed rounds 
as in times of peace. I say in peril and I mean 
\n peril. We who lived in the Far East do not 
easily forget the rape of Nanking, the details 
of which are far too revolting to mention here; 

777 



778 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



we do not easily forget the Panay or the bomb- 
ing of two or three hundred of our religious 
missions throughout China, unquestionably a 
definite, concerted program to drive all Ameri- 
can interests out of China. When I protested, 
the Japanese authorities used to say that these 
bombings were accidental. I replied that two 
or three accidents might happen but not two 
or three hundred accidents. The Chinese used 
to say that when a bombing attack occurred the 
most dangerous sjiot in the town and the one to 
get farthest away from was the American mis- 
sion. Nor can we forget many of those old per- 
sonal friends who appeared on the evacuation 
ships — shadows of their former selves after the 
long months of solitary confinement and the 
tortures they had suffered. These things we 
cannot forget. They who have suffered can 



never forget. That is the soi't of peril that con- 
fronts our own beloved land today. 

Women of America, the Red Cross needs you. 
Here is your opportunity to serve. You should, 
and I believe you will, welcome this opportunity 
with joy. It is only through the maximum ef- 
fort of the individual that the maximum effoil 
of our country can be welded into form. Your 
service will support and strengthen and encour- 
age the valor and fighting spirit of our boys at 
the front. Will you leave them to do the job 
alone ? You, also, may trample out the vintage 
where the grapes of wrath are stored. You, 
also, with our fighting men, may say: "They 
shall not pass." You, also, may say : "It shall 
not happen here!" — if only you will volunteer 
and serve our Nation in its hour of peril. 



LEND-LEASE OPERATIONS 



The President, on September 11, 1942, trans- 
mitted to the Congress the sixth quarterly report 
on operations under the Lend-Lease Act of 
March 11, 1941. In his letter of transmittal, 
the President said: 

"As our men move overseas to battle they must 
and will have sufficient quantities of the best 
equipment the United States can produce. At 
the same time we must provide more weapons 
to the armies of our allies already in the fight- 
ing lines. Britain has been fighting the Nazis 
for three years, China is in her sixtli year of 
wai', and in Russia the war's greatest land front 
is more than a year old. From the beginning 
they have carried on without enough guns or 
tanks or planes. It is through their uphill fight 
that the war has not been lost. Only by 
strengthening our allies and combining their 
strength with ours can we surely win. 

"Deliveries of lend-lease supplies, which have 
been growing, will have to grow much larger 
still. We and the other United Nations need 
all tlie weapons that all of us can produce and 
all the men that all of us can muster. In rela- 
tion to their available resources Britain and 
Russia have up to now produced more weapons 
than we have. And they are continuing to pro- 



duce to the limit, in spite of the fact that Russia 
is a battlefield and Britain an offensive base. 
So far the United States has little more than 
passed the halfway mark towards maximum 
possible war production. Not until we have 
reached the maximum — and we can do this only 
by stripping our civilian economy to the bone — 
can our fighting men and those of our allies be 
assured of the vastly greater quantities of weap- 
ons required to turn the tide. Not until then 
can the United Nations march forward together 
to certain victory." 

The report stated that the total amount of 
lend-lease aid from March 1941 through Au- 
gust 1942 was $6,489,000,000. Of this amount, 
$5,129,000,000 comprises the value of goods 
transferred and of services rendered; the re- 
mainder, $1,360,000,000, represents the value of 
lend-lease goods in process on August 31, 1942. 
Currently, aid is being provided at the rate of 
approximately ^8,000,000,000 annually. 

Goods transferred consist of military items, 
such as planes, tanks, guns, and other muni- 
tions ; industrial products, such as steel, machine 
tools, and petroleum products; and agricultural 
commodities, chiefly foodstuffs. Of the goods 
transferred, approximately 90 percent have been 



SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 

exported and the remainder are at docks and 
warehouses awaiting exportation. 

Services rendered include repairs in the 
United States to United Nations' shipping; new 
factory and shipyard facilities in the United 
States for production of lend-lease goods ; neces- 
sary shipping for transporting materials to 
lend-lease countries ; supply services performed 
in base areas abroad; and training of United 
Nations' air forces in the United States. 

The value of goods in process represents the 
value of articles ready to be transferred or arti- 
cles for use in the assembly of other articles 
which will shortly be transferred. This should 
not be confused with goods "on order" but rep- 
resents completed work for which expenditures 
have been made. 

Lend-lease exports have gone to the regions 
where the needs have been greatest. At first, 
when the battle of Britain was raging, they 
went primarily to the United Kingdom. As 
the war spread to Africa, the Middle East, Aus- 
tralia, and the Soviet Union, aid went to those 
areas. Aid to Cliina has been hampered by 
transportation difficulties, but this situation 
will be solved by the development of other 
means of transportation. Currently, the United 
Kingdom and the Soviet Union are each re- 
ceiving about 35 percent of lend-lease mate- 
rials, and the Middle East, Australia, and other 
points are receiving the remaining 30 percent. 

Before the Lend-Lease Act was passed our 
allies made contracts with American manufac- 
turers for production of planes, tanks, and 
other munitions. These are still coming off the 
assembly lines and are being exported simul- 
taneously with items obtained under lend-lease. 
From March 1941 through August 1942, the re- 
port states, the value of goods actually exported 
under lend-lease was $3,525,000,000 ; in the same 
period the value of goods purchased directly by 
lend-lease countries approximated $5,800,000,- 
000. 

Within the Lend-Lease Act and with lend- 
lease funds there is opportunity for testing and 
developing new ideas and special projects that 
may help to win the war. To facilitate effective 
delivery of lend-lease aid under frequently dif- 
ficult conditions, a program is under way with 

486245 — 42 2 



779 

lend-lease funds to construct various types of 
small craft, including harbor tugs, coastal 
tankers, light-draft tow boats and cargo ves- 
sels, and small wood barges for use in shallow 
rivers and harbors with no modern cargo-han- 
dling facilities. Some of these craft are already 
in service; others will go into commission 
shortly. 

The Lend-Lease Act provided that aid may 
be extended to the government of any country 
whose defense the President should deem vital 
to the defense of the United States. Those 
countries now include Argentina, Belgium,^ 
Bolivia,^ Brazil,^ British Commonwealth of 
Nations,^ Chile, China,' Colombia,^ Costa Kica,^ 
Cuba,^ Czechoslovakia,^ Dominican Republic,^ 
Ecuador,^ Egypt, El Salvador,^ France (Fight- 
ing),^ Greece,^ Guatemala, Haiti,' Honduras,' 
Iceland,' Iran, Iraq, Mexico,' Netherlands,' Nic- 
aragua,' Norway,' Panama, Paraguay,' Peru,' 
Poland,' Turkey, U. S. S. R.,' Uruguay,' Vene- 
zuela,' and Yugoslavia.' 

The program of reciprocal lend-lease aid has 
become a very important aspect of the prose- 
cution of the war. Formal reciprocal-aid 
agreements, signed September 3, 1942 with the 
United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and 
Fighting France,^ specify the kinds of articles, 
services, facilities, and information which these 
countries undertake to supply to the United 
States for the joint prosecution of the war. The 
report points out that this represents more than - 
a gracious gesture of good-will ; it means using 
the war resources of the United Nations in the 
most economical way. It means a saving in 
time and an aid in solving our supply problems 
by application of the principle tliat "the war 
production and war resources of each nation 
should be used by all United Nations' forces in 
ways which most effectively utilize the available 
materials, manpower, production facilities, and 
shipping space". 



1 Countries with which agreements for lend-lease aid 
have been signed. 

- A lend-lease agreement has been signed with the 
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land, the principles of which were accepted by the 
Governments of Australia and New Zealand. 

8 Bulletin of September 5, 1942, p. 734. 



780 

PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 2 
TO REVISION III 

[Released to the press September 21] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Acting Secretary of the Treasury, the 
Attorney General, the Secretary of Commerce, 
the Board of Economic Warfare, and the Act- 
ing Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, on 
September 21 issued Supplement 2 to Revision 
III of the Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked 
Nationals, promulgated August 10, 1942.^ 

Part I of this supplement contains 227 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 16 deletions. Part II contains 137 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 5 deletions. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Joseph C. Grew, on September 1, 1942, 
was appointed a Special Assistant to the Sec- 
retary of State and will perform such duties 
as may from time to time be assigned to him in 
this capacity by the Secretary (Departmental 
Order 1095). 



Cultural Relations 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES TO THE 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

On September 25, 1942 the Department of 
State released to the press the membership for 
1942-43 of the General Advisory Committee on 
Cultural Relations; the Advisory Committee on 
Exchange Fellowships and Professorships; the 
Advisory Committee on the Adjustment of For- 
eign Students in the United States; and the 
Advisory Committee on Inter-American Co- 
operation in Agricultural Education. These 

' 7 Federal Register 7422. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Committees, created under authority of the act 
of August 9, 1939, entitled "An Act to authorize 
the President to render closer and more effec- 
tive the relationship between the American re- 
publics", advise the Department, through the 
Division of Cultural Relations, on specific 
phases of the cultural-relations program.^ It 
has been agreed that these Committees will 
serve jointly the Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter- American Affairs and the Department of 
State. 

The members of each Committee for 1942-43 
are as follows : 
General Advisory Committee on Cultural Relations 

The Honorable Henry A. Wallace, Vice President of 
the United States of America, Washington, 
D.C. 

Robert G. Caldwell, Ph.D., Dean of Humanities, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Ben M. Cherrington, Ph.D., Director of the Founda- 
tion for the Advancement of the Social Sciences, 
University of Denver, Denver, Colo. 

Stephen P. Duggan, Ph.D., Director, Institute of 
International Education, 2 West Forty-fifth 
Street, New York, N.T. 

Waldo G. Leland, Litt.D., Director, American 
Council of Learned Societies, 1219 Sixteenth 
Street NW., Washington, D.C. 

The Honorable Archibald MacLeish, Librarian of 
Congress, Washington, D.C. 

Mr. Carl H. Milam, Executive Secretary, American 
Library Association, 520 North Michigan Ave- 
nue, Chicago, 111. 

Beardsley Ruml, Ph.D., Treasurer, R. H. Macy and 
Company, New York, N.Y. 

James T. Shotwell, Ph.D., Chairman, National Com- 
mittee of the United States of America on 
International Intellectual Cooperation, 405 West 
One Hundred and Seventeenth Street, New 
York, N.Y. 

George N. Shuster, Ph.D., President, Hunter Col- 
lege, New York, N.Y. 

John W. Studebaker, LL.D., Commissioner of Edu- 
cation, Federal Security Agency, Washington, 
D.C. 

Advisory Committee on Exchange Fellowships and 
Professorships 
Stephen P. Duggan, Ph.D., Director, Institute of 
International Education, 2 West Forty-fifth 
Street, New York, N.Y. 



" Bulletin of May 17, 1941, p. 603. 



SEPTEMBER 2 6, 1942 



781 



Albert L. Barrows, Ph.D., Executive Secretary, 
National Researcli Council, 2101 Constitution 
Avenue NW., Washington, D.C. 

Martin McGuire, Ph.D., Dean, Graduate Schools of 
Arts and Sciences, Catholic University of Amer- 
ica, Washington, D.C. 

Waldo G. Leland, Litt.D., Director, American Coun- 
cil of Learned Societies, 1219 Sixteenth Street 
NW., Washington, D.C. 

W. Rex Crawford, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology, 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Donald Young, Research Secretary, Social Science 
Research Council, 230 Park Avenue, New Yorlv, 
N.T. 

Advisory Committee on the Adjustment of Foreign 
Students 

Edgar J. Fisher, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Institute 
of International Education, 2 West Forty-fifth 
Street, New York, N.Y. 

Thomas E. Jones, President, Fisk University, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

Professor Gladys Bryson, Smith College, Northamp- 
ton, Mass. 

Ben M. Cherrlngton, Ph.D., Director of the Founda- 
tion for the Advancement of the Social Sciences, 
University of Denver, Denver, Colo. 

Charles W. Hackett, Ph.D., Professor of Latin- 
American History, University of Texas, Austin, 
Tex. 



Allan Blaisdell, Director, International House, 
Berkeley, Calif. 

Father George B. Ford, Columbia University, New 
York, N.Y. 

J. Raleigh Nelson, Ph.D., Director of the Interna- 
tional Center, University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, Mich. 

Advisory Committee on Inter-American Cooperation in 
Agricultural Education 

Thomas Barbour, Ph.D., Sc.D., Director, Museum 
of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Earl N. Bressman, Ph.D., Chief, Agricultural Divi- 
sion, Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American 
Affairs, Washington, D.C. 

Homer J. Henney, Ph.D., Dean of Agriculture, Colo- 
rado State College, Fort Collins, Colo. 

H. Harold Hume, Dean, College of Agriculture, 
University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 

John C. Patterson, Ph.D., Chief, Division of Inter- 
American Educational Relations, United States 
Offlce of Education, Federal Security Agency, 
Washington, D.C. 

Knowles A. Ryerson, M.S., Dean, College of Agri- 
culture, University of California, Davis, Calif. 

T. W. Schultz, Ph.D., Iowa State College, Ames, 
Iowa. 

J. G. Lee, Jr., Dean, College of Agriculture, Louisi- 
ana State University, University, La. 



Treaty Information 



ALLIANCE AND MUTUAL ASSISTANCE 

Treaty Between the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Nortliern Ireland and the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Repuhlics 

There is printed below the text of the treaty 
of alliance in the war against Hitlerite Ger- 
many and her associates in Europe and of col- 
laboration and mutual assistance thereafter, 
signed at London between the United Kingdom 
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on May 26. 
1942. The text of the treaty, with the omission 



of footnotes, is printed from British Treaty 
Series No. 2 (1942), Cmd. 6376. Eatifications 
of the treaty were exchanged at Moscow on 
July 4, 1942. 

"His Majesty The King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land, and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, and the Presidium of 
the Supreme Council of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics; 

"Desiring to confirm the stipulations of the 
Agreement between His Majesty's Government 
in the United Kingdom and the Government of 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for joint 



782 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



action in the war against Germany, signed at 
Moscow on the 12th July, 1941,^ and to replace 
them by a formal treaty ; 

"Desiring to contribute after the war to the 
maintenance of peace and to the prevention of 
further aggi-ession by Germany or the States 
associated with her in acts of aggression in 
Europe ; 

"Desiring, moreover, to give expression to 
their intention to collaborate closely with one 
another as well as with the other United Nations 
at the peace settlement and during the ensuing 
period of reconstruction on the basis of the 
principles enunciated in the declaration made 
on the 14th August, 1941 by the President of 
the United States of America and the Prime 
Minister of Great Britain - to which the Gov- 
ernment of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Eepublics has adhered ; 

"Desiring, finally, to provide for mutual 
assistance in the event of an attack upon either 
High Contracting Party by Germany or any 
of the States associated with her in acts of 
aggression in Europe. 

"Have decided to conclude a treaty for that 
purpose and have appointed as their Plenipo- 
tentiaries : — 

"His Majesty The King of Great Britain, Ire- 
land, and the British Dominions beyond the 
Seas, Emperor of India, 

"For the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
and Northern Ireland: The Eight Honourable 
Anthony Eden, M.P., His Majesty's Principal 
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs; 

"The Presidium of the Supreme Council of 
the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics : 

"M. Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov, Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Foreign Affairs, 

"Wlio, having communicated their Full Pow- 
ers, found in good and due form, have agreed 
as follows: — 

"PAET I. 
"Article I. 

"In virtue of the alliance established between 
the United Kingdom and the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Eepublics the High Contracting Par- 



' Bulletin of September 27, 1941, p. 240. 
' Bulletin of August 6, 1941, p. 125. 



ties mutually undertake to afford one another 
military and other assistance and support of all 
kinds in the war against Germany and all those 
States which are associated with her in acts of 
aggression in Europe. 

"Article II. 
"The High Contracting Parties imdertake not 
to enter into any negotiations with the Hitlerite 
Government or any other Government in Ger- 
many that does not clearly renounce all aggres- 
sive intentions, and not to negotiate or conclude 
except by mutual consent any armistice or peace 
treaty with Germany or any other State associr 
ated with her in acts of aggression in Europe. 

"PAET II. 
"Article HI. 

"(1) The High Contracting Parties declare 
their desire to unite with other like-minded 
States in adoptuig proposals for common action 
to preserve peace and resist aggression in the 
post-war period. 

"(2) Pending the adoption of such proposals, 
they will after the termination of hostilities 
take all the measures in their power to render 
impossible a repetition of aggression and viola- 
tion of the peace by Germany or any of the 
States associated with her in acts of aggression 
in Europe. 

"Article IV. 

"Should one of the High Contracting Parties 
during the post-war period become involved in 
hostilities with Germany or any of the States 
mentioned in Article III (2) in consequence of 
an attack by that State against that Party, the 
other High Contracting Party will at once give 
to the Contracting Party so involved in hos- 
tilities all the military and other support and 
assistance in his power. 

"This Article shall remain in force until the 
High Contracting Parties, by mutual agree- 
ment, shall recognise that it is superseded by 
the- adoption of the proposals contemplated in 
Article III (1). In default of the adoption of 
such proposals, it shall remain in force for a 
period of twenty years, and thereafter until 
terminated by either High Contracting Party, 
as provided in Article VIII. 



SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 



783 



"Article V. 
"The High Contracting Parties, having re- 
gard to the intei'ests of the security of each of 
them, agree to work together in close and 
friendly collaboration after the re-establish- 
ment of peace for the organisation of security 
and economic prosperity in Europe. They will 
take into account the interests of the United 
Nations in these objects, and they will act in 
accordance with the two principles of not seek- 
ing territorial aggrandisement for themselves 
and of non-interference in the internal affairs 
of other States. 

"Article VI. 

"The High Contracting Parties agree to ren- 
der one another all possible economic assistance 
after the war. 

'•Article VII. 

"Each High Contracting Party undertakes 
not to conclude any alliance and not to take 
part in any coalition directed against the other 
High Contracting Party. 

"Ajjticle VIII. 

"The present Treaty is subject to ratification 
in the shortest possible time and the instru- 
ments of ratification shall be exchanged in Mos- 
cow as soon as possible. 



"It comes into force immediately on the ex- 
change of the in.struments of ratification and 
shall thereupon replace the Agreement between 
the Government of the Union of Soviet Social- 
ist Kepublics and His Majesty's Government 
in the United Kingdom, signed at Moscow on 
the 12th July, 1941. 

"I'art I of the present Treaty shall remain 
in force until the re-establishment of peace be- 
tween the High Contracting Parties and Ger- 
many and the Powers associated with her in 
acts of aggression in Europe. 

"Part II of the presejit Treaty shall remain 
in force for a period of twenty years. There- 
after, unless twelve months' notice has been 
given by either Party to terminate the Treaty 
at the end of the said period of twenty years, 
it shall continue in force until twelve months 
after either High Contracting Party shall have 
given notice to the other in writing of his in- 
tention to terminate it. 

"In witness whereof the above-named Pleni- 
potentiaries have signed the present Treaty and 
have affixed thereto their seals. 

"Done in duplicate in London on the 26th 
day of May, 1942, in the English and Kussian 
languages, both texts being equally authentic. 

Anthony Eden. V. Molotov." 



Publications 



Department of State 

During the quarter beginning July 1, 1942 
the following publications have been released by 
the Department:^ 

17-14. The Department of f^tate of the United States. 
Prepared by William Gerber, Division of Research 
and Publication. January 1942. vi, 91 pp., illus. 
200. 

1757. Reciprocal Trade : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Haiti Relating to Waiver in 
Respect of Tariff Preferences Accorded the Dominican 



' Serial numbers which do not appear lu this list have 
u|ipeared pre\iousIy or will appear in subsequent lists. 



Itepublic by Haiti Under a Treaty of Commerce Be- 
tween Haiti and the Dominican Republic Signed 
August 2tj, 1941 — Effected by exchange of notes signed 
February 16 and 19. 1942. Executive Agreement 
Series 238. 4 pp. 50. 

175S. Exchange of OfiBcial Publications : Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Liberia — ■ 
Effected by exchange of notes signed .lanuary 15, 
1942; effective January 15, 1942. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 239. 6 pp. 50. 

17159. International Traffic in Arms : Regulations Is- 
sued on June 2, 1942 by the Secretary of State, Gov- 
erning Registration and Licensing Under Section 12 
of the Joint Resolution Approved November 4, 1939 
and Related Laws. 8th ed. 51 pp. 10^. 



784 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1760. Exchange of Official Publicatious : Agreement Be- 
tween the United States and Panama — Effected by 
exchange of notes signed November 27. 1941 and 
March 7, 1942 ; effective November 27, 1941. Execu- 
tive Agreement Series 243. 7 pp. 5*'. 

1761. Tlie Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI. no. 157, 
June 27, 1942. 15 pp. lOff." 

1762. Reciprocal Trade: Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Haiti Construing Certain 
Provisions of the Trade Agreement of March 28, 
1935 and Modifying the Agreement Effected by Ex- 
change of Notes Signed February 16 ami 19. 1942 — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed April 25, 1942. 
Executive Agreement Series 252. 4 pp. 5^. 

1763. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 4, July 17, 1942, to Revision II 
of May 12, 1942. 19 pp. Free. 

1764. Diplomatic List, July 1942. ii, 101 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 10^. 

1765. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII. no. 

158, July 4, 1942. 24 pp. 10(#. 

1766. Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in the Pro.se- 
cution of the War Against Aggression: Preliminary 
Agreement Between the United States of America and 
China — Signed at Washington June 2, 1942 ; effective 
June 2, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 251. 3 pp. 
50. 

1767. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). July 1, 1942. 
31 pp. Free. 

1769. Application of Selective Training and Service 
Act of H>40, As Ajnended, to Canadians in the United 
States, and Reciprocal Treatment of American Citi- 
zens in Canada : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Canada — Effected by exchange 
of notes signed March 30 .'ind April 6 and 8, 1942. 
Executive Agreement Series 249. 6 pp. 5^. 

1770. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

159, July 11, 1942. 28 pp. 10^. 

1771. The American Foreign Service: General Informa- 
tion for Applicants and Sample Entrance-l^xamina- 
tion Questions. Revised to June 1, 1942. iv. 150 pp. 
Free. 

1772. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII. uo. 
163, July 18, 1942. 10 pp. 10«*. 

1773. The War and Human Freedom : Address by Cor- 
dell Hull, Secretary of State, over the National Radio 
Networks, July 23, 1942. 18 pp. 50. 

1774. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 5. July 31, 1942, to Revision II 
of May 12, 1942. 16 pp. Free. 

1775. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 
161, July 2.5, 1942. 18 pp. 100. 

1776. Foreign Service List, July 1, 1942. iv, 115 pp. 
Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 150. 



' Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



1777. Transfers of Citizens and Former Citizens Be- 
tween Armed Forces : Agreement Between the United 
.States of America and Canada — Effected by exchange 
of notes signed March 18 and 20, 1942. Executive 
Agreement Series 245. 4 pp. 50. 

1778. The L>epartment of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

162, August 1, 1942. 27 pp. 100. 

1779. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nation- 
als : Revision III, August 10, 1942, Promulgated Pur- 
suant to Proclanuition 2497 of the President of July 
17, 1941. 230 pp. Free. 

1780. Diplomatic List, August 1942. ii, 101 pp. Sub- 
scription, .$1 a year; single copy, 100. 

1781. Index to the Department of State Bulletin, vol. 
VI, nos. 1:J2-157, January 3 - June 27. 1942. 27 pp. 

1782. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

163, August 8, 1942. 12 pp. 100. 

1783. Military Highway to Alaska : Agreement Between 
the I'nited States of America and Canada — Effected 
by exchange of notes signed March 17 and 18, 1942. 
Executive Agreement Series 246. 5 pp. 50. 

1784. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 
161A, July 25, 1942, Supplement : Trade Agreement 
With Uruguay. 28 pp. 100. 

1785. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

164, August 15, 1942. 12 pp. 100. 

1786. Exchange of Ollicial Publications: Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Bolivia — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed January 26 and 
31, 1942; effective January 31. 1942. Executive 
Agreement Series 242. 9 pp. 50. 

1787. Reciprocal Trade: Agreement Between the 
United States of America and the Republic of Cuba 
Signed at Washington August 24, 1934 as Amended 
by Supplementary Agreements Signed at Washington 
December 18, 1939 and at Habana December 23, 1941, 
and Protocol and Exchanges of Notes, vi, 56 pp. 100. 

1788. The I'roclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 1, August 28, 19-t2, to Revision 
III of August 10, 1942. 23 pp. Free. 

17S9. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

165, August 22, 1942. 10 pp. 100. 

17!)0. Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in the Prose- 
cution of the War Against Aggression: Preliminary 
Agreement Between the United States of America 
and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and North- 
ern Ireland — Signed at Wa.shington February 23. 
1942 ; effective February 23, 1942. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 241. 3 pp. 50. 

1792. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

166, August 29. 1942. 10 pp. 100. 

1793. Unemployment Insurance Benefits: Agreement 
Between the United States of America and Canada — 
Effecteil by exchange of notes signed March 6 and 
12, 1942; effective April 12, 1942. Executive Agree- 
ment Series 244. 4 pp. 50. 



SEPTEMBER 26, 1942 



785 



1794. Naval Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Brazil — Signed May 7, 1942 ; 
effective May 7, 1942. Execntive Agreement Series 
247. 12 pp. 50. 

1795. Diplomatic List, September 1942. ii, 101 pp. 
Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1799. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII. no. 

167, September 5, 1942. 20 pp. lO^'. 

ISOO. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 2, September 18, 1942, to Re- 
vision III of August 10, 1942. 17 pp. Free. 

1801. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VII, no. 

168, September 12, 1942. 8 pp. 100. 

1803. Interchange of Patent Rights, Information, In- 
ventions, Designs, or Processes: Agreement Between 
the United States of America and Great Britain — 
Signed at Washington Augiist 24, 1942; effective 
January 1, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 268. 
6 pp. 

Conference Series : 

[50n.] Proceedings of the Eighth American Scientific 
Congress, Held in Washington May 10-18, 1940. 
Washington, 1941-. Limited distribution by the 
Department of State to participating individuals 
and organizations and to certain depository li- 
braries and institutions. 

Vol. I. Organization, Activities, Resolutions, and 
Delegations. 1941. .539 pp. 

Vol. II. Anthropological Sciences. 1942. 340 pp. 

Vol. III. Biological Sciences. 1942. 530 pp. 

Vol. (V. Geological Sciences. 1942. 764 pp. 



Teeatt Series: 

977. Provisional Administration of European Colonies 
and Possessions in the Americas : Convention Between 
the United States of America and Other American 
Republics — Signed at Habana July 30, 1940; pro- 
claimed by the President of the United States Febru- 
ary 12, 1942. 33 pp. 10?*. 

978. Inter-American Indian Institute' Convention be- 
tween the United States of America and Certain 
Other American Republics — Opened for slgnatiire at 
Mexico City from November 1 to December 31, 1940; 
signed for the United States of America November 
29, 1940: proclaimed by the President of the United 
States February 12, 1942. 46 pp. 100. 

98;3. Double Taxation : Convention and Protocol Be- 
tween the United States of America and Canada — 
Signed at Washington March 4, 1942; proclaimed by 
the President of the United State.s June 17, 1942. 
13 pp. 5t 



Legislation 



Settlement of Mexican Claims Act of 1942. S. Rept. 

1615, 77th Cong., on S. 2.128. 3 pp. 

Amending the Nationality Act of 1940 To Preserve the 
Nationality of Citizens Residing Abroad. S. Rept. 

1616, 77th Cong., on H.R. 7152. [Includes letter from 
Secretary of State favoring legislation.] 2 pp. 



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