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Full text of "Department of State bulletin"



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Given By 
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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



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APRIL 4, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 145— Publication 1721 



ontents 



The War Pa ge 

Cooperation with French National Committee regarding 

territories in Africa 273 

Diplomatic and consular officials of enemy countries in 

the United States 273 

Commodities allocated to other American republics. . 274 
Proclaimed list of certain blocked nationals, supplement 

2 to Revision 1 274 

American Republics 

Payment by Mexico under Claims Convention of 1941. 274 

Inauguration of President of Chile 275 

Presentation of letters of credence: 

Ambassador of Bolivia 275 

Ambassador of Paraguay 277 

Commercial Policy 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Mexico 278 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Bolivia 287 

General 

Fellowships in fishery science 291 

Passports for American seamen 292 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 292 

The Foreign Service 

Resignation of Ambassador Weddell 306 

Personnel changes 307 

[over] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

APR 28 1942 







ontents-coNTiNVED 



Cultural Relations r»ge 

Visit to the United States of educator from Nicaragua. 308 

Treaty Information 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in 

the Americas 309 

Claims: Agreement With Mexico 309 

Commerce: 

Trade- Agreement Negotiations With Mexico. . . . 309 
Trade-Agreement Negotiations With Bolivia. . . . 309 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 310 

Legislation 310 



The War 



COOPERATION WITH FRENCH NATIONAL COMMITTEE REGARDING 
TERRITORIES IN AFRICA 



[Released to the press April 4] 

In view of the importance of French Equa- 
torial Africa in the united war effort, the deci- 
sion has been taken to establish an American 
Consulate General at Brazzaville, the capital of 
French Equatorial Africa. Arrangements are 
under way with the appropriate authorities 
looking to the establishment of this office and 
to the appointment of Mr. Maynard Barnes, 
American Foreign Service officer, as Consul 
General. Mr. Barnes will proceed to Brazza- 
ville at the expiration of leave of absence in 
the United States. In the meanwhile, Mr. 
Laurence Taylor, who has recently returned 



from French Equatorial Africa, will proceed to 
Brazzaville to establish the office. 

As has been previously stated, this Govern- 
ment has treated with the French authorities 
in effective control of French territories in 
Africa and will continue to treat with them 
on the basis of their actual administration of 
the territories involved. The French territories 
of Equatorial Africa and the French Cameroons 
are under the effective control of the French 
National Committee established in London, and 
the United States authorities are cooperating 
on matters relating to these territories with the 
authorities established by the French National 
Committee. 



DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR OFFICIALS OF ENEMY COUNTRIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press April 3] 

The members of the former Italian, Hun- 
garian, and Bulgarian diplomatic and consular 
staffs, with all members of their families, have 
been transferred from White Sulphur Springs, 
W. Va., to Asheville, N. C, and will be assembled 
at the Grove Park Inn. The move includes 
176 Italians, 52 Hungarians, and 9 Bulgarians 
who are awaiting sailing in exchange for the 
American Foreign Service staffs from Italy, 
Hungary, and Bulgaria. 

The changes were necessitated because of the 
expected arrival of additional Axis diplomats 



from Central and South America as a part of 
the exchange movement. The transfer of sev- 
eral national groups is involved. 

[Released to the press April 41 

The members of the former Japanese diplo- 
matic and consular staffs with their families 
have been transferred from Hot Springs, Va., 
to White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., and will be 
assembled at the Greenbrier Hotel. The move 
includes about 300 Japanese officials who are 
awaiting repatriation. 

273 



274 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Arrangements are nearing completion for the 
exchange of this group for the American For- 
eign Service personnel still in Japanese-con- 
trolled territory abroad. 

The Japanese will join the German official 
group already at White Sulphur Springs. 

COMMODITIES ALLOCATED TO OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

[Released to the press April 4] 

The Government of the United States in 
accordance with the policy of close inter- 
American cooperation has announced in Wash- 
ington a list of commodities allocated to the 
other American republics for the second quarter 
of 1942. This announcement was made jointly 
by the Department of State, the War Produc- 
tion Board, and the Board of Economic 
Warfare. 

Machinery has been established in the inter- 
ested government agencies to carry out the al- 
locations program,, and announcements dealing 
with special procedures to be followed in con- 
nection with the various commodities will be 
made later. 

The announced list comprises the following 
materials: Acetic acid, acetone, aconite, ammo- 
nium sulphate, anhydrous ammonia, aniline, 
camphor, carbon tetrachloride, castor oil, caus- 
tic soda, chlorine, copper, cotton linters, dibutyl 
phthalate, electrodes, farm equipment, formal- 
dehyde, glycerin, leather, ferro-manganese, 



methanol, molybdenum, neat's-foot oil, phenol, 
phosphorus, pthalic anhydride, plastics, potash 
salts, potassium permanganate, rayon, red 
squill, household electric refrigerators, soda ash, 
strontium chemicals, sulphuric acid, superphos- 
phate, tanning materials, toluol, tricresyl phos- 
phate, light trucks, tungsten and ferro-tung- 
sten, ferro-vanadium, and wood pulp. 

A number of new materials not previously 
under export allocation are included in the list 
for the second calendar quarter. It is antici- 
pated that there may be further announcements 
of additional materials to be made available 
during this quarter. 

PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED 
NATIONALS, SUPPLEMENT 2 TO REVI- 
SION I 

[Released to the press March 30] 

The Acting Secretary of State, acting in con- 
junction with the Acting Secretary of the 
Treasury, the Attorney General, the Secretary 
of Commerce, the Board of Economic Warfare, 
and the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, 
issued on March 30 Supplement 2 to Revision I 
of the Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked 
Nationals, promulgated February 7, 1942. 

Part I of this supplement contains 871 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 41 deletions. Part II contains 179 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 7 deletions. 



American Republics 



PAYMENT BY MEXICO UNDER CLAIMS CONVENTION OF 1941 



[Released to the press April 2] 

The Minister for Foreign Affairs of Mexico, 
Dr. Ezequiel Padilla, on April 2 delivered to 
the Honorable Sumner Welles, Acting Secre- 
tary of State, the Mexican Government's check 
for $3,000,000 (United States currency) repre- 
senting the payment due the United States upon 
the exchange of ratifications of the Claims Con- 



vention between the United States and Mexico, 
signed November 19, 1941. 

The Ambassador of Mexico, Sehor Dr. Don 
Francisco Castillo Najera, and the Acting Sec- 
retary of State exchanged ratifications of this 
convention on April 2, 1942. 

A short summary of the provisions of the 
convention appears in the Bulletin of November 
22, 1941, page 400. 



APRIL 4, 1942 



275 



INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT OF CHILE 



[Released to the press April 2] 

The President sent the following telegram 
to His Excellency Juan Antonio Rios, President 
of the Republic of Chile, whose inauguration 
occurred on April 2 : 

"It gives me great pleasure to convey to Your 
Excellency my heartiest congratulations and 
good wishes upon your inauguration as Chief 
Executive of the Republic of Chile. The whole 
course of the relations between our two coun- 
tries has been one of common devotion to those 
democratic ideals and processes which the peo- 
ple of Chile and the United States so fervently 
cherish. I am confident, therefore, that under 
your administration Chile will continue in the 
vanguard of those nations upon the decisions 
and actions of which at this critical time in 
world history the future of free men and of 
men who would regain their freedom so defi- 
nitely depends. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



[Released to the press April 4] 

A translation of a telegram received by the 
President from the President of the Republic of 
Chile follows: 

"I deeply appreciate the good wishes and 
congratulations which Your Excellency has 
been pleased to convey to me on the occasion of 
my inauguration as President of the Republic, 
and I see in them a further proof of the cordial 
orientation which Your Excellency has stamped 
upon the relations of the United States with 
the other countries of America. Upon assum- 
ing the presidency of the Republic of Chile, it 
is a pleasure for me to indicate to Your Ex- 
cellency the great admiration existing in this 
country for the illustrious President of the 
United States, whose democratic convictions I 
share fully, and to assure you that Chile will 
remain during my government as up to the 
present time faithful to the noble policy of 
American solidarity and cooperation which has 
in Your Excellency so high and renowned an 
interpreter. 

Juan Antonio Rios" 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE 
AMBASSADOR OF BOLIVIA 



[Released to the press March 31] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly 
appointed Ambassador of Bolivia, Sefior Dr. 
Don Luis Fernando Guachalla, upon the occa- 
sion of the presentation of his letters of credence, 
follows : 
"Excellency : 

"Since our Governments have agreed upon 
the elevation to the rank of Embassy of our 
respective diplomatic missions, as a proof of 
the growing friendship and the renewed im- 
portance of the moral and material bonds which 
exist between Bolivia and the United States, I 



have the high honor to place in the hands of 
Your Excellency the autographed letters which 
accredit me as Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of Bolivia near the illustrious 
Government of Your Excellency. In doing 
this I cannot but feel deeply encouraged, con- 
sidering that the confidence thus reposed in me 
implies that perhaps my five years as Plenipo- 
tentiary in Washington had some recognizable 
effect in arriving at a better reciprocal knowl- 
edge and understanding of our problems, needs, 
and just aspirations. I must take this oppor- 
tunity to state, Excellency, that the labor of 
strengthening relations which it was my duty 



276 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to carry out, following closely the instructions 
of my Government, would not have been possi- 
ble or effective if I had not been able to count at 
all times on the frank assistance and sincere co- 
operation of the distinguished officials of your 
Government. 

"In the vast field of present and future rela- 
tions between Bolivia and the United States 
there is one feature which by itself stands out 
transcendentally — and today more than in any 
other epoch of the history of the two countries. 
Without stinting its energy, and in a loyal man- 
ner, Bolivia supplies the United States with 
various vital strategic materials for its de- 
fense. It is sufficient to underline the fact that 
my country is, at the present moment, prac- 
tically the only source from which tin may be 
obtained. In the realm of facts, that feature of 
our relations has the significance of the great 
results of international solidarity, since beyond 
the economic value of such interchange there 
stands out the joint determination of our peo- 
ples to vanquish, each with the contribution that 
destiny has indicated for him, the totalitarian 
aggression which threatens to darken the world. 
Our respective Governments have given pre- 
ferred attention to this problem and must con- 
tinue to do so. It is necessary to intensify our 
efforts to increase the production of tin and of 
other strategic minerals, and for the purpose 
of avoiding all difficulties inherent in this type 
of exploitation — fortuitous and uncertain diffi- 
culties — it is necessary to preserve by standards 
a constant equitable relation between costs and 
prices. With respect to this same subject it is 
also useful to point out that Bolivia offers the 
United States interesting possibilities for sup- 
plying its requirements of rubber and quinine. 

"My Government is not forgetting, neverthe- 
less, that permanent interests oblige it to di- 
versify the Bolivian economy, and it is for this 
purpose that it has requested and obtained the 
financial and technical assistance of your Gov- 
ernment. My Government does not doubt, sub- 
sequently, that this high cooperation for a long 
period will give desirous results throughout the 
years, making Bolivia a prosperous country, 
which should be agreeable to the United States 



since it will find in Bolivia a better and safer 
source, at present and in the future, of the 
strategic and industrial minerals which it re- 
quires in large quantities. 

"In these hours of profound disturbances and 
cruel uncertainties for those who are in doubt, 
my Government and my people cherish the con- 
viction that the sacred cause of liberty and of 
human dignity to which you, Excellency, have 
devoted j r our entire life and of which you are 
now the most distinguished champion, will con- 
quer. Bolivia has proclaimed in Rio de Ja- 
neiro its definitive adherence to this cause and 
it stands at the side of your country without 
vacillation and with the great faith of peoples 
who are fervently devoted to law and justice. 

"Permit me, Excellency, to terminate these 
brief words with the honorable duty of present- 
ing on behalf of His Excellency, the President 
of Bolivia, in his name and in that of the Bo- 
livian people, his sincere wishes for the perma- 
nent greatness and prosperity of your noble 
country and for the personal well-being of its 
very illustrious President." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Seiior 
Dr. Don Luis Fernando Guachalla follows : 

"Mr. Ambassador: 

"It gives me great pleasure to receive the let- 
ters with which His Excellency, the President 
of the Republic of Bolivia, has accredited you 
as Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary of Bolivia near the Government of the 
United States of America. 

"The act of Your Excellency's Government 
in raising the rank of its diplomatic representa- 
tion in the United States is a very friendly 
recognition of the growing importance in the 
relations between our two countries, an im- 
portance which has prompted the Government 
of the United States to take similar action. I 
am particularly pleased to greet as the first Bo- 
livian Ambassador to the United States a friend 
who as the Minister of Bolivia in Washington 
has for more than five years sincerely inter- 
preted the people of Bolivia and the United 
States to each other and who has so ably con- 
ducted the relations between our Governments. 



APRIL 4. 1942 



277 



"As Your Excellency states in your remarks 
on this occasion, the relations between Bolivia 
and the United States have assumed an even 
greater importance because of the emergency 
needs of the nations engaged in the combat 
against the treacherous forces of aggression. 
You may be sure that the Government and peo- 
ple of the United States are fully appreciative 
of the contribution being made by Bolivia to 
the defense of the institutions of freedom and 
justice. 

"It will, of course, be the constant desire of 
the officials of the Government of the United 
States to work with you in every possible way 
to strengthen the spiritual and material bonds 
which unite our two countries. You have men- 
tioned certain of the specific measures of coop- 
eration which are at present being developed 
and which may in the future be developed be- 



tween Bolivia and the United States. I have 
every confidence that the systematic develop- 
ments in which our two countries are joined will 
redound substantially to our mutual benefit. 

"In expressing the heartfelt gratitude of the 
Government and people of the United States 
for the close collaboration of the Bolivian Gov- 
ernment and people during the present crisis, 
I give Your Excellency my personal assurances 
that I shall endeavor to express this apprecia- 
tion in my efforts to assist you in carrying out 
the functions of your high position. 

"Please thank your distinguished President, 
General Enrique Peiiaranda, for the friendly 
greetings which he has sent on behalf of the 
Bolivian people and in his own name. I will 
appreciate your sending to His Excellency my 
own best wishes for the increasing welfare of 
Bolivia and for his own well-being." 



AMBASSADOR OF PARAGUAY 



[Released to the press March 31] 

A translation of the remarks of the newly ap- 
pointed Ambassador of Paraguay, Sefior Dr. 
Don Celso R. Velazquez, upon the occasion of 
the presentation of his letters of credence, 
follows : 

"Mr. President: 

"I have the high honor to place in the hands 
of Your Excellency the letters of credence by 
which His Excellency the President of the Re- 
public of Paraguay has been pleased to accredit 
me as Ambassador Extraordinary and Pleni- 
potentiary of Paraguay before the Government 
of Your Excellency, and the letters of recall of 
the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary. 

"My Government, by a spontaneous act, and 
wishing to give one more proof of the interest 
and great sympathy which inspire mutually the 
United States and Paraguay, has raised the 
rank of its diplomatic representation, granting 
me the honor of being its first Ambassador near 
the Government of Your Excellency and its 



spokesman in the difficult period of history 
which obstructs humanity. 

"The sentiments that animate the Government 
are those of the Paraguayan people. 

"The high mission that has been entrusted to 
me near Your Excellency constitutes for me a 
cause for profound and singular satisfaction, be- 
cause the strengthening of the spirit of collabora- 
tion and of the bonds that unite our countries — 
manifested once more by the resolutions to which 
my Government has subscribed in the circum- 
stances of the present war — will be for me a 
pleasing and honorable endeavor which I shall 
carry out with my best wishes and all my 
enthusiasm. 

"Undoubtedly, nevertheless, my personal ef- 
forts and good will will be insufficient for the 
attainment of such objectives without the valu- 
able aid and collaboration of Your Excellency 
and of your Government, which I confidently 
expect. 

"Excellency, please accept the greetings which, 
in the name of His Excellency the President of 



278 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Republic of Paraguay, the Government and 
people of Paraguay, and in my own name, I pre- 
sent for the prosperity of the United States and 
for the personal well-being of Your Excellency." 

The President's reply to the remarks of Sefior 
Dr. Don Celso R. Velazquez follows: 

"Mr. Ambassador: 

"It is most gratifying to me to receive from 
you the letters with which His Excellency, the 
President of the Republic of Paraguay, has 
accredited you as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary of Paraguay near the Gov- 
ernment of the United States of America. I 
also accept the letters of recall of your prede- 
cessor. 

"It is an especial pleasure for me to greet you 
as the first Paraguayan Ambassador to the 
United States. The raising of our respective 
diplomatic missions in Asuncion and Washing- 
ton to the grade of Embassy reflects the growth 
in the cooperative relations between our two 
countries. I am particularly appreciative of the 
friendly recognition of this increased importance 
in our relations which is implicit in the act of 
Your Excellency's Government in raising the 
rank of its diplomatic representation in the 
United States. 

"The friendly good-will which governs the 
relations between Paraguay and the United 



States is the result of the firm determination on 
the part of the people of Paraguay and 
the United States to support the principles of 
mutual respect and equitable dealing. The un- 
equivocal position of the Republic of Paraguay 
in the common endeavor of the American repub- 
lics to defend themselves against the treach- 
erous forces which today threaten the free 
institutions of the Americas has been a high 
testimony to the devotion of Your Excel- 
lency's Government to the cause of justice and 
democracy. 

"Your Excellency may be sure that it will be 
a source of personal pleasure to me to collabo- 
rate with you in carrying out the functions of 
your high position. I am, moreover, confident 
that it will be the constant desire of the officials 
of the Government of the United States to 
assist you in every possible way in strengthen- 
ing the bonds between the Governments and 
peoples of Paraguay and the United States. 

"I appreciate deeply your friendly greetings 
on behalf of His Excellency, President Higinio 
Morinigo, the Government and people of Para- 
guay, and in your own name. Please transmit 
to your distinguished President my own best 
wishes for the increasing prosperity of Para- 
guay and for His Excellency's personal well- 
being." 



Commercial Policy 



TRADEAGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH MEXICO 



[Released to the press April 4] 

The Acting Secretary of State on April 4 
issued formal notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with the Government of 
Mexico. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 



and fixing the time and place for the opening 
of the hearings. These dates, time, and place 
are the same as those fixed in the notice issued 
by the Committee in connection with the notice 
of intention to negotiate a trade agreement with 
Bolivia also issued on April 4 by the Acting 
Secretary of State. 

There is printed below a list of products 
which will come under consideration for the 
possible granting of concessions by the Gov- 



APRIL 4, 1942 



279 



eminent of the United States. Representations 
which interested persons may wish to make to 
the Committee for Reciprocity Information 
need not be confined to the articles appearing 
on this list but may cover any articles of actual 
or potential interest in the import or export 
trade of the United States with Mexico. How- 
ever, only the articles contained in the list issued 
on April 4 or in any supplementary list issued 
later will come inn lev consideration for the pos- 
sible granting of concessions by the Govern- 
ment of the United States. 

With respect to products appearing on both 
the following list and the list issued in connec- 
tion with the notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with Bolivia, it will not be 
necessary to submit separate written or oral 
statements to the Committee. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Commit- 
tee for Reciprocity Information are included in 
a statement released by that Committee on De- 
cember 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 
tween the United States and Mexico during 
the years 1929^40 inclusive, together with the 
principal products involved in the trade be- 
tween the two countries during the years 1938, 
1939, and 1940 has been prepared by the De- 
partment of Commerce, and may be obtained, 
upon request, from the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce in Washington or from 
any district or cooperative office. 

Department of State 

trade-agreement negotiations with mexico 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930'', as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and t<> Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 1 
hereby give notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with the Government of 
Mexico. 

452714—42 2 



All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity In- 
formation in accordance with the announcement 
of this date issued by that Committee concern- 
ing the manner and dates for the submission of 
briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearings. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary of State 
Washington, D.C., 
April 4, 19^2. 

Committee for Reciprocity Information 
trade- agreement negotiations with mexico 
Public Notice 
Closing date for submission of briefs, May 4, 
1942; closing date for application to be heard, 
May 4, 1942; public hearings open, May 18, 
1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with 
the Government of Mexico, of which notice of 
intention to negotiate has been issued by the 
Acting Secretary of State on this date, shall be 
submitted to the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information not later than 12 o'clock noon, May 
4, 1942. Such communications should be ad- 
dressed to "The Chairman, Committee for Reci- 
procity Information, Tariff Commission Build- 
ing, Eighth and E Streets NW., Washington, 
D. C." 

A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a. m. on May 18, 1942, before the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information, in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 



2S0 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information this 4th day of April 1942. 
E. M. Weqtcomb 
Acting Secretary 
Washington, D.C., 
April k, 1942. 

List of Products on Which the United States 
Will Consider Granting Concessions to 
Mexico 

Note: The rates of duty or import tax indi- 
cated are those now applicable to products of 
Mexico. Where the rate is one which has been 
reduced pursuant to a previous trade agreement 
by 50 percent (the maximum permitted by the 
Trade Agreements Act) it is indicated by the 
symbol MR. Where the rate represents a reduc- 
tion pursuant to a previous trade agreement, 
but less than a 50-percent reduction, it is indi- 
cated by the symbol B. Where an item has been 
bound free of duty in a previous trade agree- 
ment, it is indicated by the symbol R. 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the list 
to the paragraph numbers of the tariff schedules 
in the Tariff Act of 1930, or, as the case may be, 
to the appropriate sections of the Internal Rev- 
enue Code. The descriptive phraseology is, 
however, in some cases limited to a narrower field 
than that covered by the numbered tariff para- 
graph or section in the Internal Revenue Code. 
In such cases only the articles covered by the 
descriptive phraseology of the list will come 
under consideration for the granting of conces- 
sions. In other cases, where the full descriptive 
phraseology is used, it may be that only a part 
of the classification as set forth in the list will 
come under consideration. 

In the event that articles which are at present 
regarded as class'fiable under the descriptions 
included in the list are excluded therefrom by 



judicial decision or otherwise prior to the con- 
clusion of the agreement, the list will neverthe- 
less be considered as including such articles. 

The rates of duty and import tax shown in 
the list are without reference to the act of March 
13, 1942 (Public Law 497, 77th Cong., 2d sess.), 
suspending the effectiveness during the existing 
national emergency of customs duties and im- 
port taxes on scrap iron, scrap steel, and non- 
ferrous-metal scrap. 



United 

States Tariff 
Act of 

1930 Para- 
graph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 




Acids and acid anhydrides, not 
specially provided for. 

Juice of lemons, limes, oranges, 
or other citrous fruits, unfit 


25% ad val 

« par lb_... .. 














for beverage purposes. 
Zinc oxide and leaded zinc 
oxides containing not more 
than 25 per centum of lead: 

In any form of dry powder 

Ground in or mixed with oil 
or water. 


IHi per lb 

2iii per lb 










Turpentine, gum and spirits of, 
and rosin. 


5% ad val 

I6t per lb 

Ht per lb 






MR 








202(a) 


Earthen floor and wall tiles, 
glazed or unglazed. however 
provided for in paragraph 
202 (a) of the Tariff Act 






of 1930 (except ceramic mo- 
saic tiles and except quarries 
or quarry tiles): 
Valued at not more than 40 
cents per square foot. 

Valued at more than 40 cents 


1W per sq. ft., 
but not less 
than 50% nor 
more than 70% 
ad val. 






per square foot: 


26V per sq. ft., 
but not less 


R 












than 30% nor 








more than 60% 
ad val. 








60% ad val 

50% ad val 

$4.20 per ton 

$8.40 per ton 




202(b) 


Mantels, friezes, and articles of 
every description or parts 
thereof, composed wholly or 
in chief value of earthen tiles 
or tiling, except pill tiles. 
Fluorspar: 
Containing more than 97 per 
centum of calcium fluo- 
ride. 
Containing not more than 97 
per centum of calcium 
fluoride. 






R 



APRIL i, 1942 



281 



United 
States Tariff 

Act of 

1930 Par 

graph 




Common yellow, brown, red, or 
gray earthenware, plain or 
embossed, composed of a 
body wholly of clay which 
is unwashed, unmixed, and 
not artificially colored; 
common salt-glazed stone- 
ware; stoneware and earth- 
enware crucibles; all the 
foregoing: 
Not ornamented, incised, or 
decorated in any manner, 
and manufactures wholly 
or in chief value of such 
ware, not specially pro- 
vided fur. 
Ornamented, incised, or deco- 
rated in any manner, and 
manufactures wholly or in 
chief value of such ware, 
not specially provided for. 
Earthenware and crockery ware 
composed of a nonvitrifled 
absorbent body, including 
white granite and semipor- 
celain earthenware, and 
cream-colored ware, terra 
cotta, and stoneware, in- 
cluding clock cases with or 
without movements, pill 
tiles, plafjues, ornaments, 
charms, vases, statues, 
statuettes, mugs, cups, 
steins, lamps, and all other 
articles composed wholly or 
in chief value of such ware: 
Plain white, plain yellow, 
plain brown, plain red, or 
plain black, not painted, 
colored, tinted, stained, 
enameled, gilded, printed, 
ornamented, or decorated 
in any manner, and manu- 
factures in chief value of 
such ware, not specially 
provided for. 
Painted, colored, tinted, 
stained, enameled, gilded, 
printed, ornamented, or 
decorated in any manner, 
and manufactures in chief 
value of such ware, not 
specially provided for. 
Graphite or plumoago, crude or 
refined: 
Amorphous 



Oft per doz. 
pieces and 45% 
ad val. 



0£ per doz. 
pieces and 
30% or 50% 
ad val." 



5% ad val. 



MR I 

■ In the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, effective January 
1, 1939, the rate of duty on plates of certain sizes and values and cups and 
saucers of certain values, classified under this subparagraph, was reduced 
from 10 cents per dozen pieces and 50 percent ad valorem to 10 cents per 
dozen pieces and 30 percent ad valorem. 



United 
States Tariff 

Act of 
1930 Para- 
graph 



232(a).. 
302(b), 



Description of article 



Bottles, vials, Jars, ampoules, 
and covered or uncovered 
demijohns, and carboys, 
any of the foregoing, wholly 
or in chief value of glass, un- 
filled, not specially provided 
for: Pmvided, That the 
terms "bottles", "vials", 
"jars", "ampoules", "demi- 
johns", and "carboys", as 
used herein, shall be re- 
stricted to such articles 
when suitable for use and 
of the character ordinarily 
employed for the holding or 
transportation of merchan- 
dise, and not as appliances 
or implements in chemical 
or other operations, and 
shall not include bottles for 
table service and thermo- 
static bottles. 
If holding more than 1 pint. . . 
If holding not more than 1 pint 
and not less than one- 
fourth of 1 pint. 
If holding less than one- 
fourth of 1 pint. 

Table and kitchen articles and 
utensils, and all articles uf 
every description not spe- 
cially provided for, composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
glass, blown or partly blown 
in the mold or otherwise, 
or colored, cut, engraved, 
etched, frosted, gilded, 
ground (except such grind- 
ing as is necessary for fitting 
stoppers or for purposes 
other than ornamentation), 
painted, printed in any 
manner, sand-blasted, sil- 
vered, stained, or decorated 
or ornamented in any man- 
ner, whether filled or un- 
filled, or whether their con- 
tents be dutiable or free (ex- 
cept articles, if cut or en- 
graved, valued at not less 
than$l each). 

Onyx, in block, rough or squared 
only. 

Molybdenum ore or concen- 
trates. 



H per lb. __ 
IM6 per lb . 



50£ per gross 
60% ad val . . . 



32Htf percu.ft... 

35* per lb. on 

the metallic 
molybdenum 
contained 
therein. 



282 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 

States Tariff 

Act of 

1930 Para 

graph 



Description of article 



Table, household, kitchen, and 
hospital utensils, and hollow 
or fiat ware, not specially 
provided for, composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
tin or tin-plate, not plated 
with platinum, gold, or 
silver, and not specially 
provided for. 

Antimony, as regulus or metal .. 

Quicksilver.. 



Lead-bearing ores, flue dust, and 
mattes of all kinds. 

Lead bullion or base bullion, 
load in pigs and bars, lead 
dross, reclaimed lead, scrap 
lead, antimonial lead, anti- 
monial scrap lead, type 
metal, Babbitt metal, solder, 
all alloys and combinations 
of lead, not specially pro- 
vided for. 
Zinc-bearing ores of all kinds, 
except pyrites containing 
not more than 3 per centum 
zinc. 
Zinc: 
In blocks, pigs, or slabs, and 
zinc dust. 

In sheets 

In sheets coated or plated with 
nickel or other metal (ex- 
cept gold, silver, or plati- 
num), or solutions. 
Old and worn-out zinc, fit 
only to be remanufactured, 
zinc dross, and zinc skim- 
mings. 
Articles or wares not specially 
provided for, if composed 
wholly or in chief value of 
tin or tin-plate, but not 
plated with platinum, gold, 
or silver, or colored with 
gold lacquer, whether part- 
ly or wholly manufactured. 

<>The rate of duty on certain tin-plate containers was reduced to 22^6 
percent ad valorem in the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, 
effective January 1, 1939. 



2(* per lb 

25** per lb., Pro- 
vided, That 
the flasks, bot- 
tles, or other 
vessels in 
which quick- 
silver is im- 
ported shall 
be subject to 
the same rate 
of duty as they 
would be sub- 
jected to if im- 
ported empty. 

l 1 v per lb. on 
the lead con- 
tained therein. 

2Hc per lb. on 
the lead con- 
tained therein. 



llrY per lb. on 
the zinc con- 
tained therein. 



l-V per lb 

2c perlb__ 

2' a* per lb 

l 1 j0 per lb 
45% ad val 



United 








States Tariff 

Act of 

1930 Para- 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


graph 








397 


Articles or wares not specially 
provided for, if composed 


50% ad val 










wholly or in chief value of 








silver, whether partly or 








wholly manufactured. 






401 


Sawed lumber and timber not 
specially provided for: 














50£ per thousand 
feet board 














measure (plus 








$1.60 per thou- 








sand feet board 








measure under 








Sec. 3424 (a), 








Internal Reve- 








nue Code; see 








below). 




404 




15% ad val. (plus 
$3 per thou- 






sawed boards, planks, deals, 






and all other forms not 


sand feet board 






further manufactured than 


measure under 






sawed, and flooring. 


Sec. 3424 (a), 
Internal Rev- 
enue Code; see 
below). 




407 


Packing boxes (empty), and 
packing-box shocks, of wood , 
not specially provided for. 


)-■", ad val 




m 


Boxes, barrels, and other articles 
containing oranges, lemons, 
limes, grapefruit, shaddocks 
or pomelos. 


25% ad val. 




■in 


Baskets and bags, wholly or in 
chief value of bamboo, wood, 
straw, papier-mache, palm 
leaf, or compositions of wood, 
not specially provided for. 


60% ad val. 




412 


Bent-wood furniture, wholly or 
partly finished, and parts 
thereof. 


42H%ad val.... 


R 


412 






R 


701 


Cattle: 








Weighing less than 200 pounds 


liii or 2Ht per 


R 




each. 


lb.' 






Weighing less than 700 pounds 


2' jf per lb. 






but not less than 200 








pounds each. 








Weighing 700 pounds or more 


lMft or 3t per 


R 




each (except cows im- 


lb. J 






ported specially for dairy 








purposes). 






701 


Dried blood albumen, light 


12t per lb. 




702 


Sheep and lambs 


$3 per head. 





c In the trade agreement with Canada, effective January 1, 1939, the 
rate of duty on cattle weighing less than 200 pounds each was reduced to 
1\H per pound on imports not in excess of 100,000 head per year, and the 
rate of duty on imports in excess of that amount was bound against 
increase at 2 x At per pound. 

d In the trade agreement with Canada, effective January 1, 1939, the 
rate of duty on cattle weighing 700 pounds or more each was reduced to 
IVit per pound on imports not in excess of 225,000 head per year, and the 
rate of duty on imports in excess of that amount was bound against 
increase at 3£ per pound. 



APRIL 4, 194 2 



283 



United 








States Tariff 
Act of 

l".;n I'ara 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


graph 








711 


Live birds, not specially pro- 
vided for, valued at $5 or 
less each: 














714. 


Horses, unless imported for 
immediate slaughter, valued 
at not more than $150 per 
head. 


,$15 per head 


MR 


714 




$30 per hcnd_.__ 






immediate slaughter, valued 








at not more than $150 per 








head. 






715. _ 


Live asses and burros, not 
specially provided for. 


15% ad val 










Itet per lb 


MR 


717(a) 


Fish, fresh or frozen (whether or 




not packed in ice), whole, or 








beheaded or eviscerated or 








both, but not further ad- 








vanced (except that the fins 








may be removed): 








White sea bass or totoaba 


H per lb 




717(c) 


Fish, dried and unsalted: 










lM^perlb- .. 




71S (a) 


Fish, prepared or preserved in 
any manner, when packed in 
oil or in oil and other sub- 
stances: 








Tuna. 


45% ad val 




718 (5) 


Fish, pickled or salted (except 
fish packed in oil or in oil 
and other substances and 
except fish packed in air- 
tight containers weighing 
with their contents not more 
than fifteen pounds each): 








Other fish, in bulk or in imme- 


1J4* per lb. net 






diate containers weighing 


weight. 






with their contents more 








than fifteen pounds each 








(except ale wives). 










5% ad val 






admixture of grains or grain 








products with oil cake, oil- 








cake meal, molasses, or other 








feedstuffs. 
















meal, not specially provided 








for: 
































oil-cake meal. 










35% ad val 






served, but not frozen and 








not in brine and not dried, 








dessicated, or evaporated 








(except blueberries). 






743.... 


Limes, in their natural state, 


lHfS per lb 


R 




or in brine. 






746 


Mangoes 


15* per lb 





United 








States Tariff 

Act of 

1930 Para- 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


graph 








747 


Pineapples: 








In bulk 




R 




Not in bulk 




P. 






2.45 cu. ft. 






Prepared or preserved, and 


lH^perlb 


R 




not specially provided for. 






752... 


Fruits in their natural state, 
not specially provided for: 












Watermelons and other melons 


.35% ad val 




752 










and not specially provided 








for. 






765 










for: 










3\it per lb.... 




765 










brine. 






769 






R • 


769 


Chickpeas or garbanzos, dried... 


IHt per lb 




770 


Garlic .. __ 


Hit per lb 




772 


Tomatoes in their natural state.. 
Peppers in their natural state... 


St per lb 

2}S(!perlb 




774. 




774 


Eggplant in its natural state 


Hit per lb 




774 


Cucumbers in their natural 
state. 


3e per lb 




774 


Squash in its natural state 


2(iperlb. 




775 


Pimientos, packed in brine or in 
oil, or prepared or preserved 
in any manner. 


6t per lb 




781 


Spices and spice seeds: 








Capsicum or red pepper or 


5t per lb 






cayenne pepper, unground. 






802 


Compounds and preparations 
of which distilled spirits are 
the component material of 
chief value and not specially 
provided for. 


$5 per proof gal.. 




805 


Ale, porter, stout, and beer.. ... 


50< per gal 




1005(a)(1). 


Cordage, including cables, tarred 
or untarred, composed of 
three or more strands, 
each strand composed of 
two or more yarns, wholly 
or in chief value of 
sisal, henequen, or other 
hard fiber, except manila 
(abaca): 
Sisal: 








Not smaller than three- 


10 per lb . 


MR 




fourths of one inch in 








diameter. 








Smaller than three-fourths 


It per lb. and 


MR 




of one inch in diameter. 


7M% ad val. 






Henequen, or other hard fiber: 








Not smaller than three- 


2t per lb 






fourths of one inch in di- 








ameter. 








Smaller than three-fourths 


2t per lb. and 






of one inch in diameter. 


15% ad val. 





• In the trade agreement with Canada, effective January 1, 1939, the 
rate of duty on peas, green or unripe, was reduced from 39<o< to 2£ per 
pound when imported and entered for consumption during the period 
from July 1 to September 30, inclusive, in any year. 



284 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Act of 
1930 Para- 
graph 



Description of article 




Cords and twines (whether or 
not composed of three or 
more strands, each strand 
composed of two or more 
yarns), tarred or un tarred, 
single or plied, wholly or in 
chief value of manila (abaca) , 
sisal, henequen, or other 
hard fiber. 
Blankets, and similar articles 
(including carriage and auto- 
mobile robes and steamer 
rugs), made as units or in 
the piece, finished or un- 
finished, wholly or in chief 
value of wool, not exceeding 
three yards in length, any 
of the foregoing if hand- 
Valued at not more than $1 per 

pound. 
Valued at more than $1 but 
not more than $1.50 per 
pound. 
Valued at more than $1.50 per 
pound. 
Bound books of all kinds (other 
than diaries and prayer 
books), except those bound 
wholly or in part in leather, 
not specially provided for, 
and if of bona fide foreign 
authorship. 
Braids, plaits, and laces, com- 
posed wholly or in chief 
value of chip, paper, grass, 
palm leaf, willow, osier, 
rattan, real horsehair, or 
cuba bark, and braids or 
plaits, wholly or in chief 
value of ramie, all the fore- 
going suitable for making 
or ornamenting hats, bon- 
nets, or hoods: 
Not bleached, dyed, colored, 
or stained, and not con- 
taining a substantial part 
of rayon or other synthetic 
textile. 
Hats provided for in paragraph 
1504 (b) of the Tariff Act of 
1930, if known as harvest 
hats, and valued at less than 
$3 per dozen. 
Dolls and doll clothing, com- 
posed in any part, however 
small, of any of the laces, 
fabrics, embroideries, or 
other materials or articles 
provided for in paragraph 
1529 (a) of fhc Tariff Act of 
1930. 



3ty l"' r lh an '" i 
36% ad val. 

33£ per lb. and 
36% ad val. 

40£ per lb. and 

36% ad val. 
7h%ad val — 




Description cf article 



Dolls, parts of dolls (including 
clothing), and doll heads, of 
whatever materials com- 
posed (other than dolls, 
parts of dolls including 
clothing, and doll heads, 
composed wholly or in chief 
value of any product pro- 
vided for in paragraph 31 of 
the Tariff Act of 1930). 

All other toys, and parts of toys, 
not specially provided for, 
wholly or in chief value of 
china, porcelain, parian, 
bisque, earthenware, or 
stoneware. 

Wax matches, wind matches, 
and all matches in books or 
folders. 

Jewelry, commonly or commer- 
cially so known, finished or 
unfinished (including parts 
thereof), of whatever mate- 
rial composed (except jewel- 
ry composed wholly or in 
chief value of gold or plati- 
num, or of which the metal 
part is wholly or in chief 
value of gold or platinum): 
Provided, That none of the 
foregoing shall he subject to a 
less amount of duty than 
would be payable if the 
article were not dutiable 
under this paragraph: 
Valued above 20 cents but not 
above $5 per dozen pieces. 



Valued above $5 per dozen 
pieces. 



Boots, shoes, or other footwear 
(including athletic or sport- 
ing boots and shoes), made 
wholly or in chief value of 
leather, Dot specially pro- 
vided for: 

ITuaraches - 

Slippers (for housewear) 



1* each plus 3/5* 
per doz. for 
each H the 
value exceeds 
20* per doz., 
and 50% ad 
val. 

2/3* each plus 
2/5* per doz. 
for each 1* the 
value exceeds 
20* per doz., 
and 25% ad 
val. 



20% ad val. 
20% ad val. 



APRIL 4, 194 2 



285 



United 
States Tariff 

Act of 
1930 Para- 
graph 



Description of article 



Men's, youths' and boys' boots, 
shoes, or other footwear (in- 
cluding athletic or sporting 
boots and shoes), made 
wholly or in chief value of 
leather, not specially pro- 
vided for (except turn or 
turned, or sewed or stitched 
by the process or method 
known as McKay, or made 
by the process or method 
known as welt). 
Photographic-film negatives, 
imported in any form, for 
use in any way in connection 
with moving-picture exhib- 
its, or for making or repro- 
ducing pictures for such ex- 
hibits, except undeveloped 
negative moving-picture 
film of American manufac- 
ture exposed abroad for 
silent or sound news reel: 
With sound tracks in the 
Spanish or Portuguese 
languages: 
Exposed but not developed. . 

Exposed and developed 

Photographic-film positives, im- 
ported in any form, for use in 
any way In connection with 
moving-picture exhibits, in- 
cluding herein all moving, 
motion, motophotography, 
or cinematography film pic- 
tures, prints, positives, or 
duplicates of every kind and 
nature, and of whatever 
substance made: 
With sound tracks in the 
Spanish or Portuguese 
languages. 
Waste, not specially provided 

for. 
Articles manufactured, in whole 
or in part, not specially pro- 
vided for: 
Dressed istle or Tampico fiber. 

Sulphuric acid or oil of vitriol 

Jalap, natural and uncompound- 
ed and in a crude state, 
not advanced in value or 
condition by shredding, 
grinding, chipping, crushing, 
or any other process or treat- 
ment whatever beyond that 
essential to proper packing 
and the prevention of decay 
or deterioration pending 
manufacture, not containing 
alcohol. 



2(f per lin. ft. 
3f per lin. ft. 



H per lin. ft. 
H% ad val. 



20% ad val. 

Free 

Free. 



United 








States Tariff 
Act of 


Description of article 


Present rate of 


Sym- 


1930 Para- 








graph 
1606 (a) 








Animals imported by a citizen of 








the United States specially 








for breeding purposes: 




















1614 


Arsenious acid or white arsenic. 


Free. 










B 


1622. 


All binding twine manufactured 






from New Zealand hemp, 








henequen, manila, istle or 








Tampico fiber, sisal grass. 








or sunn, or a mixture of any 








two or more of them, of single 








ply and measuring not ex- 








ceeding seven hundred and 








fifty feet to the pound. 


Free. 




1624.. 








1654-_ 


Coffee, except coffee imported 
into Puerto Rico and upon 
which a duty is imposed 
under the authority of sec- 
tion 319 of the Tariff Act of 
1930. 


Free . 


B 


1664 


Metallic mineral substances in a 
crude state, such as drosses, 
skimmings, residues, brass 
foundry ash, and flue dust, 
not specially provided for. 


Free. 




1669 


Drugs of animal origin which are 
natural and uncompounded 
and not edible, and not 
specially provided for, and 
are in a crude state, not ad- 
vanced in value or condition 
by shredding, grinding, 
chipping, crushing, or any 
other process or treatment 
whatever beyond that es- 
sential to the proper packing 
of the drugs and the pre- 
vention of decay or deterio- 
ration pending manufacture, 
and not containing alcohol: 






1678.. 




Free 

Free. 




Sharkskins, raw or salted 




1682 


Live game animals and birds, 
imported for stocking pur- 
poses. 


Free. 




1684. _ 


Grasses and fibers, not dressed 
or manufactured in any 
manner, and not specially 
provided for: 








Henequen, istle or Tampico 


Free. 






fiber, and broom root. 






1685___ 

1685 




Free. 






B 


1685 


Fish scrap and fish meal of a 
grade used chiefly for fertil- 
izers, or chiefly as an in- 
gredient in the manufacture 
of fertilizers. 


Free. 





286 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United 








States Tariff 
Act of 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 


r.i:;n ram- 






graph 








1686 


Gums and resins: 














1695. _ 


Horses or mules imported for 
immediate slaughter. 


Free. 












1710 


Liquid petroleum asphaltum, 


Free (subject to 


B 




including cutbacks and road 


tax of lit per 






oil. 


gal. under Sec. 
3422, Internal 
Revenue 
Code; see be- 
low). 






Moss, seaweeds, and vegetable 
substances, crude or unman- 


Free. 








ufactured, not specially pro- 








vided fur. 












B 


1731 


Distilled or essential oils, not 
containing alcohol: 












B 




Lignaloe or bois de rose. 


Free. 




1733 


Oils, mineral: 








Petroleum, crude, and fuel oil 


Free (sub 


B 




derived from petroleum. 


tax of iit or 
Hi per gal. 
under Sec. 
3422, Internal 
Revenue 
Code; see be- 
low). 








Free (subject to 
tax of Hi per 














gal. under Sec, 








3422, Internal 








Revenue 








Code: see be- 








low). 




1743 


Plaster rock (including anhy- 
drite) and gypsum, crude. 


Free 


B/ 


1761 


Spiny lobsters, fresh or frozen 
(whether or not packed in 
ice). 


Free. 




1761 


Shrimps and prawns, fresh or 
frozen (whether or not 
packed in ice). 


Free. 




1761 


Shellfish, fresh or frozen 
(whether or not packed in 
ice), or prepared or pre- 
served in any manner (in- 
cluding pastes and sauces), 
and not specially provided 
for: 






















1768(1) 


Spices and spice seeds, unground: 












B 


1768 (2) 


Spices and spice seeds: 








Anise 


Free. 





' Bound duty-free in the trade agreement with Canada, effective 
January 1, 1939, which provided that during its effective period the 
existing customs classification treatment of gypsum which has been bro- 
ken merely for the purpose of facilitating its shipment to the United 
States, as "crude" in accordance with the decision of the United States 
Court of Customs and Patent Appeal published as Treasury Decision 
45725, shall be continued. 



United 

States TariS 
\. 1 ol 
1930 Para- 
graph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1775 






B 




tripoli, and sand, crude or 








manufactured. 






1796 

1802 




Free. 


















known as Spanish cedar, and 








primavera, in the log. 






• Duty-free entry of mahogany in the log was 


bound in the trade agree- 


ment with the United Kingdom, effective January 1, 1939. 


Internal 

Revenue 

Code 

Section 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
import tax 


Sym- 
bol 


3422 


Crude petroleum, topped crude 


Yit or Hi per 


R 




petroleum, and fuel oil de- 


gal.» 






rived from petroleum in- 








cluding fuel oil known as 








gas oil. 










Hi per gal. 
Hi per gal. 




3422 


Liquid petroleum, asphaltum, 






including cutbacks and road 








oil. 






3424 


Lumber, including sawed tim- 
lur: 








Pine, other than Northern 


$1.50 per thou- 


MR 




white (pinus strobus), and 


sand feet, board 






Norway (pinus resinosa), 


measure. 






rough, or planed, or 








dressed on one or more 








sides. 








Mahogany, rough, or planed, 


$3 per thousand 






or dressed on one or more 


feet board 






sides. 


measure. 




3451 


Crude petroleum, topped crude 


Exempt from 


B ' 




petroleum, fuel oil derived 


taxes imposed 






from petroleum including 


by Sees. 3420 






fuel oil known as gas oil, and 


and 3422 of the 






kerosene; any of the fore- 


Internal Rev- 






going sold for use as fuel sup- 


enue Code. 






plies, ships' stores, sea stores. 








or legitimate equipment on 








vessels of war of the United 








States or any foreign nation, 








or vessels employed in the 








fisheries or in the whaling 








business or actually engaged 








in foreign trade or trade be- 








tween the Atlantic and Pa- 








cific ports of the United 








States or between the United 








States and any of its posses- 








sions under regulations pre- 








scribed with the approval 








of the Secretary of the 








Treasury. 







« In the trade agreement with Venezuela, effective December 16, 1939, 
the import tax of one-half cent per gallon under Sec. 3422 of the Internal 
Revenue Code on crude petroleum, topped crude petroleum, fuel oil, 
and gas oil was reduced to one-fourth cent on imports not in excess of 5 
percent of the total quantity of crude petroleum processed in refineries in 
continental United States during the preceding calendar year. 

6 Kerosene has not heretofore been bound. 



APRIL i, 1942 



287 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH BOLIVIA 



[Released to the press April 4] 

The Acting Secretary of State on April 4 
issued formal notice of intention to negotiate a 
trade agreement with the Government of 
Bolivia. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
issued simultaneously a notice setting the dates 
for the submission to it of information and 
views in writing and of applications to appear 
at public hearings to be held by the Committee, 
and fixing the time and place for the opening 
of the hearings. These dates, time, and place 
are the same as those fixed in the notice issued 
by the Committee in connection with the notice 
of intention to negotiate a trade agreement with 
Mexico also issued on April 4 by the Acting 
Secretary of State. 

There is printed below a list of products which 
will come under consideration for the possible 
granting of concessions by the Government of 
the United States. Representations which in- 
terested persons may wish to make to the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information need not 
be confined to the articles appearing on this 
list, but may cover any articles of actual or 
potential interest in the import or export trade 
of the United States with Bolivia. However, 
only the articles contained in the list issued on 
April 4 or in any supplementary list issued later 
will come under consideration for the possible 
granting of concessions by the Government of 
the United States. 

With respect to products appearing on both 
the following list and the list issued in connec- 
tion with the notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with Mexico, it will not be 
necessary to submit separate written or oral 
statements to the Committee. 

All information and views concerning tung- 
sten ore and concentrates which were presented 
to the Committee for Reciprocity Information 
pursuant to the notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with Peru, issued on Decem- 
ber 29, 1941, will be considered by the trade- 
asTeements organization in connection with the 



proposed negotiations with Bolivia. Conse- 
quently, interested persons need not resubmit 
the information and views presented on tung- 
sten ore and concentrates pursuant to that 
notice unless they desire to do so. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information are included in a 
statement released by that Committee on De- 
cember 13, 1937. 

A compilation showing the total trade be- 
tween the United States and Bolivia during the 
years 1911-40 inclusive, together with the prin- 
cipal products involved in the trade between 
the two countries during the years 1939 and 
1940 has been prepared by the Department of 
Commerce, and is printed below. 

Department of State 

trade-agreement negotiations with boltvia 

Public Notice 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "an Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 
I hereby give notice of intention to negotiate 
a trade agreement with the Government of 
Bolivia. 

All presentations of information and views 
in writing and applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views with respect to the 
negotiation of such agreement should be sub- 
mitted to the Committee for Reciprocity Infor- 
mation in accordance with the announcement 
of this date issued by that Committee concern- 
ing the manner and dates for the submission 
of briefs and applications, and the time set for 
public hearing. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary of State 

Washington, D.C., 
April 4, 1942. 



288 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Committee for Reciprocity Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with bolivia 

Public Notice 

Closing date for submission of briefs, May 4, 
1942 ; closing date for application to be heard, 
May 4, 1942; public hearings open, May 18, 
1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, in regard 
to the negotiation of a trade agreement with 
the Government of Bolivia, of which notice of 
intention to negotiate has been issued by the 
Acting Secretary of State on this date, shall 
be submitted to the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information not later than 12 o'clock noon, 
May 4, 1942. Such communications should be 
addressed to "The Chairman, Committee for 
Reciprocity Information, Tariff Commission 
Building, Eighth and E Streets NW., Wash- 
ington, D.C." 

A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a. m. on May 18, 1942, before the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information, in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, where supplemental oral 
statements will be heard. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hear- 
ing, and statements made at such hearings shall 
be under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciproc- 
ity Information this 4th day of April 1942. 
E. M. Whitcomb 
Acting Secretary 

Washington, D.C, 
April 4, 19Jf2. 



List of Products on Which the United States 
Will Consider Granting Concessions to 
Bolivia 

Note: The rates of duty indicated are those 
now applicable to products of Bolivia. Where 
the rate is one which has been reduced pursuant 
to a previous trade agreement by 50 percent (the 
maximum permitted by the Trade Agreements 
Act) it is indicated by the symbol MR- Where 
the rate represents a reduction pursuant to a 
previous trade agreement, but less than a 50- 
percent reduction, it is indicated by the symbol 
R. Where an item has been bound free of duty 
in a previous trade agreement, it is indicated 
by the symbol B. 

For the purpose of facilitating identification 
of the articles listed, reference is made in the 
list to the paragraph numbers of the tariff 
schedules in the Tariff Act of 1930. The de- 
scriptive phraseology is, however, in several 
cases limited to a narrower field than that 
covered by the numbered tariff paragraph. In 
such cases only the articles covered by the de- 
scriptive phraseology of the list will come under 
consideration for the granting of concessions. 

In the event that articles which are at present 
regarded as classifiable under the descriptions 
included in the list are excluded therefrom by 
judicial decision or otherwise prior to the con- 
clusion of the agreement, the list will neverthe- 
less be considered as including such articles. 



United 
States 

TariiT Act 
of 1930 

Paragraph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


302 (c) 


Tungsten ore or concentrates 

Lead-bearing ores, flue dust, and 
mattes of all kinds. 

Zinc-bearing ores of all kinds, 
except pyrites containing 
not more tban 3 per centum 
line. 

Cream or Brazil nuts: 
Shelled.... 


50( per lb. on 
the metallic 
tungsten con- 
tained there- 
in. 

Hit P" lb. on 
the lead con- 
tained there- 
in. 

Hit per lb. on 
the zinc con- 
tained there- 
in. 

2M«perlb 






R 


757 






MR 



APRIL 4, 1942 



289 



United 
States 

Tariff Act 
of 1930 

Paragraph 


Description of article 


Present rato of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1530 (a) 
1608- 


Hides and skins of cattle of the 
bovine species (except hides 
and skins of the India water 
buffalo Imported to be used 
In the manufacture of raw- 
hide articles), raw or un- 
cured, or dried, salted, or 
pickled: 
Dry or dry salted, weighing 
over 12 pounds each. 


5% ad val 

Free. 


MR 


1669 


Drugs of vegetable origin which 
are natural and uncom- 
pounded drugs and not 
edible, and not specially 
provided for, and are In a 
crude state, not advanced 



United 
States Tariff 
Act of 
1930 Para- 
graph 


Description of article 


Present rate of 
duty 


Sym- 
bol 


1669 (cont.). 


in value or condition by 
shredding, grinding, chip- 
ping, crushing, or any other 
process or treatment what- 
ever beyond that essential 
to the proper packing of the 
drugs and the prevention of 
decay or deterioration pend- 
ing manufacture, not con- 
taining alcohol: 














1697... 








1765 

1785 








Tin ore or cassiterite, and black 


Free, subject to 






oxide of tin. 


the provisions 
of par. 1785. 





Trade of the United States With Bolivia 

(Compiled by Coordination of International Statistics Unit, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce) 

united states merchandise trade WITH BOLIVIA 



Yearly average or year 


Exports to 
Bolivia ' 
($1,000) 


General imports 

from Bolivia 

($1,000) 


Year 


Exports to 
Bolivia • 
($1,000) 


General Imports 

from Bolivia 

($1,000) 


1911-1915... 


951 
4,004 
3,649 
5,052 
2,903 
5,419 
5,985 
4,219 
1,775 


9 

2,729 

1,082 

241 

135 

2, 129 

379 

152 

43 


1932 


2, 163 

2,629 
5, 118 
2, 829 
3,564 
5,863 
5,395 
4,512 
7,763 


6 


1916-1920 


1933 . 


105 


1921-1925.. 


1934 .. 


152 


1926-1930 


1935 


370 


1931-1935... 


1936 


567 


1936-1940.. 


1937 


1, 363 


1929 


1938 


865 


1930 


1939 . 


2, 184 


1931 


1940 


5, 668 









• Includes reexports. 



UNITED STATES EXPORTS TO BOLIVIA 

(By groups and principal commodities) 



Commodity and group 



Exports of United States merchandise, total. 

Animals and animal products, edible, total. .. 

Dairy products 

Fish (1,000 lbs.) 

Animals and animal products, inedible, total. 
Leather and leather manufactures 



288 



1,396 



4,496 
72 
47 
23 
23 
19 



687 
214 
113 
96 
51 
48 



290 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
united states expokts to Bolivia — continued 



Commodity and froup 



Vegetable food products and beverages, total 

Grains and preparations 

Vegetable products, inedible, except fibers and wood, total 

Rubber and manufactures 

Vegetable oils (1,000 lbs.) 

Tobacco and man uf act ures 

Textile fibers and manufactures, total 

Raw cotton, except linters (bales) 

Cotton manufactures 

Cloth, duck, and tire fabric (1,000 sq. yds.) 

Rayon, nylon, and other synthetic textiles 

Wood and paper, total 

Sawmill products (M bd. ft.) 

Paper and manufactures 

Nonmetallic minerals, total 

Bituminous coal (long tons) 

Petroleum and products 

Lubricating oil (42-gal. barrels) - 

Metals and manufactures, total 

Iron and steel semimanufactures 

Bars and rods (1,000 lbs.) 

Steel-mill manufactures 

Railway rails (long tons) 

Tubular products and fittings (1,000 lbs.) 

Wire and manufactures (1,000 lbs.) 

Iron and steel advanced manufactures 

Machinery and vehicles, total 

Electrical machinery and apparatus 

Radio apparatus , 

Industrial machinery ^ 

Mining, well, and pumping machinery 

Office appliances 

Agricultural machinery and implements 

Automobiles, parts, and accessories 

Motortrucks, busses, and chassis, new (number) 

Passenger cars and chassis, new (number) 

Aircraft and parts 

Chemicals and related products, total 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations 

Industrial chemicals 

Explosives, fuses, etc 

Miscellaneous, total 

Scientific and professional apparatus, instruments, and supplies. 

Reexports of foreign merchandise, total 

Exports, including reexports, total 



Quantity 



3,200 



53 



8,010 



1,907 
7,734 



1,352 



304 

1,669 

394 



Value ($1,000) 



443 



2,400 



7,836 



11,517 



6,689 



6,006 
3,373 
1, 355 



550 
260 



500 
236 



86 

29 
148 

95 
5 

31 
309 
181 

51 

7 

3 

176 

144 

17 
303 

10 
257 
113 
554 
113 

37 

198 

12 

81 

35 

123 

2,324 

423 

149 



728 


1,236 


503 


541 


72 


94 


83 


82 


851 


787 


495 


445 


216 


187 


68 


121 


295 


627 


57 


93 


88 


207 


51 


133 


206 


335 


29 


52 


16 


76 


4,512 


7,763 



APRIL 4, 1942 



291 



UNITED STATES IMPORTS FROM BOLIVIA 

{By principal commodities) 



Imports for consumption, total 

Hides and skins, except furs 

Nuts, Brazil or cream, shelled (1,000 lbs.) 

Rubber, crude, other than latex (1,000 lbs.) 

Tungsten ore and concentrates (1,000 lbs.) b 

Copper concentrates, except for smelting and refining and export (1,000 
lbs. 



188 
543 
319 



s.)« 



Lead ores, flue dust, and mattes (1,000 lbs.) « 

Tin ore, cassiterite, and black oxide of tin (long tons) t_ 

Zinc ores, except pyrites (1,000 lbs.) 

Antimony ore (1,000 lbs.)* 

Total value of listed imports 

All other imports 



4 

20 

12 

4,909 



207 

484 

1,811 

1 
3, 567 

2,285 



11,094 



804 
16 
32 
67 

224 



m 

25 
(*) 

371 

735 

69 



4,614 
38 
24 
71 

1,414 

« 

130 
2,029 



861 

4,567 

47 



6 Tungsten content. • Copper content. 



• Lead content. / Tin content. « Zinc content. * Antimony content. 



General 



FELLOWSHIPS IN FISHERY SCIENCE 



Fellowships in one or more branches of fishery 
science in the Fish and Wildlife Service of the 
United States Department of the Interior will 
be awarded to qualified applicants from the 
other American republics. 

Fellowships will be of the training-in-research 
type and will include instruction or practical 
training in one or more of the following 
branches of fishery science: Fish culture, aqui- 
culture, fishery biology, fishery economics, and 
fishery technology. Fellows will be assigned 
to work in fish hatcheries, fishery laboratories, 
or offices of the Fish and Wildlife Service on 
either a full-time or a part-time basis and will 
also be afforded opportunities for either full- 
time or part-time instruction and research at 
colleges or universities selected by the Fish and 
Wildlife Service. Fellowships will be awarded 



for periods of varying length, not exceeding 1 
school year or 12 months of actual studies and 
research, and may be extended for not exceed- 
ing the same periods. They will be awarded 
by the Director of the Fish and Wildlife Serv- 
ice with the approval of the Secretary of the 
Interior and the Secretary of State. Applica- 
tions shall be transmitted to the Secretary of 
State by the government of the American re- 
public of which the applicant is a citizen 
through the American diplomatic mission ac- 
credited to that government. 

Each applicant selected for a fellowship shall 
be (a) a citizen of an American republic other 
than the United States; (b) in possession of a 
certificate of medical examination issued by a 
licensed physician within 60 days of the date 
of application, describing the applicant's physi- 
cal condition and stating that he is free from 



292 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



any communicable disease, physical deformity, 
or disability that would interfere with the 
proper pursuit of studies, research, or any other 
activity or work incident to the fellowship; (c) 
able to speak, read, write, and understand the 
English language; (d) of good moral character 
and possess intellectual ability and suitable per- 
sonal qualities; and (e) shall have attained cer- 
tain specified educational qualifications. 

Applicants awarded fellowships will receive 
an allowance of not to exceed $150 per month, 
transportation expenses, and tuition and other 
fees incidental to the courses of study. 

Detailed regulations regarding the issuance 
of these fellowships appear in the Federal Reg- 
ister of April 1, 1942, page 2517. 



PASSPORTS FOR AMERICAN SEAMEN 

No American national following the vocation 
of seaman shall, prior to July 1, 1942, be re- 
quired to bear a passport when traveling in the 
pursuit of his vocation between the continental 
United States, the Canal Zone, and all terri- 
tories, continental or insular, subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States, and any for- 
eign country or territory for which a valid 
passport is required under these rules and regu- 
lations, provided he is in possession of a 
continuous discharge book, a certificate of 
identification, or a license or other document 
qualifying him to serve as an officer or seaman 
on vessels of the United States, issued pursuant 
to the law of the United States. 1 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



[Released to the press April 1] 

The following persons and organizations are 
now registered with the Secretary of State, pur- 
suant to section 8 of the Neutrality Act of 1939, 
for the solicitation and collection of contribu- 
tions to be used in belligerent countries for med- 
ical aid and assistance or for food and clothing 
to relieve human suffering. The countries to 
which contributions are being sent are given in 
parentheses. 

*1. Polsko Narodowy Komitet w Ameryce, 1002 

Pittston- Avenue, Scranton, Pa. (Poland) 
2. Save the Children Federation, Inc., One Madison 
Avenue, New York, N. T. (Great Britain, Po- 
land, Belgium, and Netherlands) 

*3. Anthracite Relief Committee, 53-59 North Main 
Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (Poland) 

*4. Polish Union of the United States of North 
America, 53-59 North Main Street, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa. (Poland) 

*5. Polish Relief Committee, 22S1 East Forest Ave- 
nue, Detroit, Mich. (Poland, Germany, Scot- 
land, and Hungary) 
6. Nowy Swiat Publishing Co., Inc., 380 Second 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland, France, 
Great Britain, and Italy) 



7. Polish Relief Committee of Philadelphia and 
Vicinity, 3111 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Poland) 

•8. Walter Golanski and Edmund P. Krotkiewicz, co- 
partners of Polish Radio Programs Bureau, 
11301 Joseph Campau Avenue, Hamtramck, 
Mich. (Poland) 

19. Polish Relief Fund, Hotel Plaza, Jersey City, 
N. J. (Poland) 

10. Commission for Polish Relief, Inc., 420 Lexing- 
ton Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland, Eng- 
land, and Hungary) 
*11. New Jersey Broadcasting Corporation, 2866 Hud- 
son Boulevard, Jersey City, N. J. (Poland) 

12. American Federation for Polish Jews, Inc., 225 
West Thirty-fourth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 
*13. Rekord Printing and Publishing Company, 603- 
605 North Shamokin Street, Shamokin, Pa. 
(Poland) 
•14. Central Council of Polish Organizations in Pitts- 
burgh, 3509 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
(Poland) 

15. American Women's Hospitals, 50 West Fiftieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France, Great 
Britain, and Greece) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

fRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



1 According to regulations issued by the Acting Secretary 
of State on April 2, 1042. See also Bulletin of November 29, 
1941, p. 431, and of March 14, 1942, p. 231. 



APRIL 4, 1942 



293 



•19. 



23. 

*24. 

25. 

26. 

*27. 

28. 

29. 

30. 
*31. 

•32. 

»33. 

34. 

*35. 



American Committee for Civilian Relief in Po- 
land, 401 Broadway, New York, N. Y. ( Poland ) 

Polish Club of Washington, Stansbury Hall, 5832 
Georgia Avenue NW., Washington, D. C. 
(Poland) 

American French War Relief, Inc., 119 West 
Fifty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (Fiance 
and Great Britain) 

Polish Emergency Council of Essex County, N. J., 
Room 619, 790 Broad Street, Newark, N. J. 
(Poland) 

Central Committee of the United Polish Societies, 
405 Barnum Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. 
(Poland) 

Associated Polish Societies' Relief Committee of 
Worcester, Massachusetts, 15 Richland Street, 
Worcester, Mass. (Poland) 

Polish National Council of New York, 25 St. 
Marks Place, New York, N. Y. (Poland, 
France, England, and Germany) 

Polish Relief Committee of Boston, Room 303, 
11 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Poland) 

Central Citizens Committee, Room 3, Edwin 
Building, 9701 Joseph Campau Avenue, Detroit, 
Mich. (Poland) 

Lackawanna County Committee for Polish Relief, 
1213 Prospect Avenue, Scranton, Pa. (Poland) 

Polish American Council, 1018 Noble Street, Chi- 
cago, 111. (Poland) 

James F. Hopkins, Inc., 6559 Hamilton Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. (Poland) 

Polish Relief Committee of Chester and Dela- 
ware Counry, 2718 West Third Street, Chester, 
Pa. (England) 

Federated Council of Polish Societies of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, in care of Mr. Sigmund 3. 
Zamierowski, 908 G R. Trust Building, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. (Poland) 

The Paryski Publishing Co., 1154 Nebraska Ave- 
nue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland and Great Britain) 

Modjeska Educational League Welfare Club at 
The International Institute, 303 Condley Drive, 
Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

Schuylkill and Carbon Counties Relief Committee 
for Poland, Spring and Line Streets, Frack- 
ville, Pa. (Poland) 

Holy Rosary Polish R. Catholic Church, 6 Wall 
Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 

Association of Joint Polish-American Societiea 
of Chelsea, Massachusetts, in care of St. Stanis- 
laus R. C. Rectory, 163 Chestnut Street, Chel- 
sea, Mass. (Poland) 

Club Amical Franeais, International Center of 
the Y.W.C.A., 2431 East Grand Boulevard, De- 
troit, Mich. (Fiance, Poland, and Great Brit- 
ain) 



*38. 

•39. 

40. 

*41. 

*42. 

43. 

•44. 

45. 
*46. 



48. 
49. 

*50. 
•51. 

*52. 
53. 
54. 

t55. 

*56. 



Polish National Catholic of the Holy Saviour 
Church, 500 North Main Street, Union City, 
Conn. (Poland) 

Committee of Mercy, Inc., 254 Fourth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. ( France, Great Britain, Nor- 
way, Belgium, and Netherlands) 

Kuryer Publishing Company, 747 North Broad- 
way, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

Polish Falcons of America, First District, Inc., 
188 Grand Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

Polish Relief Committee of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, 28 Sixth Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
(Poland) 

Poland War Sufferers Aid Committee, 6968 
Broadway, Cleveland, Ohio. (Poland) 

Polish Welfare Association, 1450 River Street, 
Hyde Park, Mass. (Poland) 

Polish Relief Committee, 3S09 Industrial Avenue, 
Flint, Mich. (Poland and England) 

The Polish National Alliance of Brooklyn, United 
States of America, 142 Grand Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

Polish Civic League of Mercer County, 830 Penn- 
sylvania Avenue, Trenton, N. J. (Poland) 

Polish American Central Civic Committee of 
South Bend, Indiana, 1101-07 Western Avenue, 
South Bend, Ind. (Poland) 

Toledo Committee for Relief of War Victims, In 
care of Mr. Anthony A. Pawlowski, SOS Detroit 
Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland and Canada) 

Edmund Tyszka, 11403 Joseph Campau Avenue, 
Hamtramck, Mich. (Poland) 

The Polish Naturalization Independent Club, 45 
Millbury Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland 
and England) 

Polish Falcons Alliance of America, 97-99 South 
Eighteenth Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Poland) 

Circle of Poles of St. Hedwig, Polish American 
Citizen's Committee, 17 Orange Street, New 
Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

Spanish Refugee Relief Campaign, 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

Polish United Societies of Holy Trinity Parish, 
340 High Street, Lowell, Mass. (Poland) 

American Friends of France, Inc., 5 East Forty- 
seventh Street, New York, N. Y. ( France, Ger- 
many, and England) 

American Committee for Aid to British Medical 
Societies, Empire State Building, New York, 
N. Y. (Great Britain) 

Associated Polish Societies Relief Committee of 
Webster, Massachusetts, 51 Whitcomb Street, 
Webster, Mass. (Poland) 

Foster Parents' Plan for War Children, Inc., 55 
West Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France and England) 



•Revoked nt request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



294 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



5S. LaFayette Preventorium, Inc., 254 Fourth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

t59. United Fund for Refugee Children, Inc., 233 West 
Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. (Po- 
land, France, and England) 
60. Polish War Sufferers Relief Committee (Fourth 
Ward, Toledo, Ohio), 348 East Hudson Street, 
Toledo, Ohio. (Poland and Germany) 

*61. Central Spanish Committee foii Relief of Refu- 
gees, 647 Eurle Building, Washington, D. C. 
(France) 

62. Polish Literary Guild of New Britain, Connecti- 

cut, in care of Mrs. Helen E. Bloch, 69 Biruta 
Street, New Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

63. Polish Relief Fund Committee of Passaic and 

Bergen Counties, in care of Mr. Stanley J. 
Polack, 145 Passaic Street, Passaic, N. J. 
(Poland) 

64. United Reading Appeal for Polish War Sufferers, 

904 Chestnut Street, Reading, Pa. (Poland and 
England) 

65. International Committee of Young Men's Chris- 

tian Associations, 347 Madison Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 
*66. Medem Committee, Inc., 175 East Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

67. Polish Welfare Council, 910 Bridge Street, 

Schenectady, N. Y. (Poland) 

68. Polish Relief Committee of Delaware, In care 

of Mrs. Angela C. Turoczy, 302 Matthes Ave- 
nue, Elmhurst, Wilmington, Del. (Poland) 

69. Polish Women's Fund to Fatherland, 31 Bass- 

wood Street, Lawrence, Mass. (Poland) 
•70. Polish Relief Fund, 164 Court Street, Middle- 
town, Conn. (Poland) 

71. Polish Broadcasting Corporation, 260 East 161st 

Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and Eng- 
land) 

72. Polish Aid Fund Committee of Federation of 

Elizabeth Polish Organizations, In care of Mr. 
Leo B. Wojcik, 5 Broad Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 
(Poland) 

73. Springfield and Vicinity Polish Relief Fund Com- 

mittee, 91 Charles Street, Springfield, Mass. 
(Poland) 

74. International Relief Association, Inc. (formerly 

International Relief Association for Victims of 
Fascism), 2 West Forty-third Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, Germany, 
Belgium, and Norway) 

*75. Polish Medical Relief Fund of Mt. Desert Island, 
Maine, Bar Harbor, Maine. (Poland) 
76. Polish Relief Committee of Brockton, Massa- 
chusetts, 40 Emerson Avenue, Brockton, Mass. 
(Poland) 

*77. Polish Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Penn- 
sylvania, 2901 Richmond Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Poland) 



*7S. The Catholic Leader, 480 Burritt Street, New 
Britain, Conn. (Poland) 

•79. Relief Fund for Sufferers in Poland Committee, 
7603 Fourteenth Avenue, Kenosha, Wis. 
(Poland) 
80. Polski Komitet Ratunkowy (Polish Relief Fund), 
In care of Mr. Peter Majka, 25 Miles Street, 
Binghamton, N. Y. (Poland and England) 

*S1. Scott Park Mothers and Daughters Club, 712 
Detroit Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. (Poland) 

*S2. California State Committee for Polish Relief, 
10202 Washington Boulevard, Culver City, 
Calif. (Poland) 
83. Polish Relief Fund Committee of Milwaukee, In 
care of Mr. J. P. Michalski, 703 West Mitchell 
Street, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

*S4. Ruth Stanley de Luze (Baroness de Luze), 
"Luthany", Pleasantville Road, Briarcliff 
Manor, N. Y. (France) 

*85. Polish Relief Committee of Gardner, Massachu- 
setts, 227 Pine Street, Gardner, Mass. (Po- 
land) 

86. Board of National Missions of the Presbyterian 

Church in the United States of America, 156 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, 
France, and Germany) 

87. American Committee for Christian Refugees, 

Inc., 139 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. (Ger- 
many, Fiance, and Netherlands) 

88. Nowiny Publishing Apostolate, Inc., 1226 West 

.Mitchell S'lreet, Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 
*89. Polish Relief Fund of Irvington, New Jersey, 

415 Sixteenth Avenue, Irvington, N. J. (Po- 
land) 
90. St. Stephens Polish Relief Fund of Perth Amboy, 

New Jersey, 490 State Street, Perth Amboy, 

N. J. (Poland) 
*91. Polish Army Veterans Association of America, 

Inc., 56 St. Marks Place, New York, N. Y. 

(Poland) 
•92. Holy Cross Relief Fund Association of New 

Britain, Connecticut, Holy Cross Rectory, 

Biruta Street, New Britain, Conn. (Poland) 
*93. United Polish Societies of Hartford, Connecticut, 

Polish National Home, 100 Governor Street, 

Hartford, Conn. (Poland) 

94. American Field Service, 60 Beaver Street, New 

York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, and 
Greece) 

95. Polish National Alliance of the United States of 

North America, 1514-20 West Division Street, 

Chicago, 111. (Poland, Canada, and England) 
*96. Reverend John Wieloch, 5 Church Street, Millers 

Fall, Mass. (Poland) 
*97. Orrin S. Good, 1410 Old National Bank Building, 

Spokane, Wash. (Great Britain) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



APRIL 4, 1942 



295 



•98. United Polish Societies of r.rislol, Connecticut 
402 North Main Street, Bristol, Conn. (Po- 
land) 
99. Russian Children's Welfare Society, Inc., 51 
East 121st Street, New York, N. Y. (Germany, 
France, and Poland) 

100. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Com- 
mittee. Inc., 100 East Forty-second Street, New 
York, N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 
*101. Polish Central Council of New Haven, St. Stan- 
islaus School Building, 9 Eld Street, New 
Haven, Conn. (Poland and Germany) 

102. Relief Agency for Polish War Sufferers, Polish 

National Home, Ives Street, Willimantic, Conn. 
(Poland) 

103. The Little House of Saint Pantaleon, 2201 De 

Lancey Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (France and 
England ) 
tl04. Connecticut Radio Bureau, 185 Sherman Ave- 
nue, Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

105. Pulaski Civic League of Middlesex County, New 

Jersey, In care of Mr. Frank Siwiec, 197 Hall 
Avenue, Perth Amboy, N. J. (Poland and 
Canada) 

106. Humanitarian Work Committee, Polish National 

Home, 10 Hendrick Avenue and Paderewski 

Place, Glen Cove, N. Y. (Poland) 
*107. Mrs. W. Forbes Morgan, 320 Park Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Poland) 
fl08. Association Franco-Americaine des Parrains et 

Marraiues de Guerre des U. S. A., Raleigh Hotel, 

Washington, D. C. (France) 

109. Legion of Young Polish Women, 116C Milwaukee 

Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Poland, France, Great 
Britain, and Germany) 

110. Polish Relief Fund, 10 Main Street, Jewett City, 

Conn. (Poland) 

*111. The Kindergarten Unit, Inc., 128 East Avenue, 
Norwalk, Conn. (France, Poland, Great Brit- 
ain, India, Australia, and New Zealand) 
112. Le S'ecours Francais, 745 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (France) 

*113. International Artists' Community Club, 701 Barr 
Building, Washington, D. C. (Poland) 

*114. The Federation of Polish Societies, 45 Furnace 
Street, Little Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 

*115. Polish Interorganization Council, 5090 Lonyo Ave- 
nue, Detroit Mich. (Poland) 

*116. Mrs. Bradford Norman, Jr.. In care of Mr. Brad- 
ford Norman, Jr., Commercial National Bank 
and Trust Company. 56 Wall Street, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

117. Polish Relief of Carteret, N. J., 42 Hudson Street, 

Carteret, N. J. (Poland) 

118. Federation of French Veterans of the Great War, 

Inc., 11 West Forty-second Street, New York, 
N. Y. (France and Germany) 



tll9. 

1120. 
*121. 
*122. 
123. 
*124. 



*12S. 



*132. 
133. 



*135. 



Mrs, Paul Verdier Fund. 199 Geary Street, City 
of Paris Dry Goods Stores Company, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. (France) 

Polish National Council of Montgomery County, 
243 Church Street, Amsterdam, N. Y. (Poland I 

Ceutrala, 1-3 Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. 
(Poland) 

Polish Relief Fund of Meriden, 9 West Main 
Street, Meriden, Conn. (Poland) 

United Charity Institutions of Jerusalem, 207 
East Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 

United Polish Societies of Immaculate Concep- 
tion Church, In care of Mr. Klemens Markow- 
ski, 36 Hill Street, Southington, Conn. (Po- 
land) 

Allied Relief Fund, 57 William Street, New York, 
N. Y. (United Kingdom, France, Belgium, 
Netherlands, and Norway) 

Polish Welfare Association of the Archdiocese of 
Chicago, 203 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 
111. (Poland) 

Polish Central Committee of New London, Con- 
necticut, 302 Main Street, New London, Conn. 
(Poland) 

Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania, 1521 Walnut 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Great Britain, 
France, Greece, Norway, Belgium, Luxembourg, 
and Netherlands) 

United Polish Roman Catholic Parish Societies of 
Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York, St. Stanis- 
laus Kostka R. C. Church, 607 Humboldt Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

East Chicago Citizens' Committee for Polish War 
Sufferers and Refugees, 4902 Indianapolis Bou- 
levard, East Chicago, Ind. (Poland) 

Committee for the Relief of War Sufferers in 
Poland, 1505 Cass Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
(Poland) 

United Polish Central Council of Connecticut, 471 
Park Avenue, Bridgeport, Conn. (Poland) 

French Committee for Relief in France, 2970 Sec- 
ond Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. (France and 
Great Britain) 

Tolstoy Foundation, Inc., Room 54, 289 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Poland, 
Czechoslovakia, and England) 

Polish Relief Association, Town of North Hemp- 
stead, 120 Jericho Turnpike, Mineola, Long 
Island, N. Y. (Poland) 

American Society for British Medical and Civilian 
Aid, Incorporated, 46 Cedar Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Great Britain and France) 

United American Polish Organizations, 13 Jack- 
son Street, South River, N. J. (Poland) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



296 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



138. United Polish Organizations of Salem, Massachu- 

setts, In care of Mr. Szczapan WOderczyk, 32 
Boardman Street, Salem, Mass. (Poland) 

139. British War Relief Association of Northern Cali- 

fornia, 316-322 Shell Building, San Francisco, 
Calif. (Great Britain, France, New Zealand, 
and Australia) 
Hit. Polish Relief Fund of Palmer, Massachusetts, 20 
Oak Street, Three Rivers. Mass. I Poland) 

*141. Polish White Cross Club of West I'tica. 1416 
Martin Street, Utica, N. Y. (Poland and Eng- 
land) 

*142. Fund for the Relief of Scientists. Men of Letters 
and Artists of Moscow, In care of Eitingon 
Schild Co., Inc.. 224 West Thirtieth Street, 
New York. N. Y. (France and Great Britain) 

•143. St. Michael's Roman Catholic Parish, 75 Derby 
Avenue, Derby, Conn. (Poland! 

*144. The Polish Relief Committee, 11 East Lexington 
Street, Baltimore, Md. (Poland) 

*14"i. The Maryland Committee for the Relief of Po- 
land's War Victims, n Past Lexington Street, 
Baltimore, Md. (Poland) 

*146. Pulaski League of Queens County, Inc.. 108-13 
Sutphin Boulevard. Jamaica, Queens County, 
N. Y. (Poland) 

*147. Relief Committee of United Polish Societies, 142 
Cabot Street, Chicopee, Mass. (Poland) 
148. United Polish Societies of Los Angeles. 42CO 
Avalon Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Po- 
land) 

•149. Committee Representing Polish Organizations and 
Polish People in Perry, New York, 20 Elm 
Street, Perry, N. Y. (Poland) 
150. The Friends of Israel Refugee Relief Committee, 
Inc., 710 Witherspoon Building, Philadelphia, 
Pa. (Canada, France, Great Britain, Nether- 
lands, Norway, Hungary. Poland, Greece, and 
Yugoslavia ) 

•151. Nowe-Dworer Ladies Benevolent Association, Inc., 
In care of Miss Beatrice Stone, 203-Ori Lafay- 
ette Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

152. French War Relief Fund of San Francisco. 

French Library, 414 Mason Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. (France) 

153. Polish Relief Fund, Echo Club, 341 Portage Road, 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 
*ir>4. United Committee for French Relief, Inc., Peat, 

Marwick, Mitchell and Company, Attention Mr. 

E. M. Field, 70 Pine Street, New York, N. Y. 

(France. England, and Germany) 
"■'155. Polish Civilian Relief Fund, St. Joseph's School 

Hall, Monroe Street, Passaic, N. J. (Poland) 
•156. Polish Aid Association of the Sixth Congressional 

District, including Perham and Browerville, 

Minn., Little Falls, Minn. (Poland) 
157. Central Committee Knesseth Israel, 214 East 

Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Palestine) 



'158. Polish Relief Committee of Nassau County, New 
York, 450 Front Street, Hempstead, N. Y. 
(Poland) 
159. L'Union Alsacienne, Inc., 45 West Fifty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

»160. The American Fund for Breton Relief. Mr. John 
L. Swasey, Bankers Trust Company, 16 Wall 
Street. N'ew York, N. Y. (France and England I 
161. Polish Relief Fund of Syracuse, New York, and 
Vicinity, 800 Park Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 
(Poland) 
1(12. Polish Relief Committee, 16S0 Acushnet Avenue, 

New Bedford, Mass. (Poland) 
163. American Friends of Czechoslovakia, Room 
2213, 8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain, France, and Bohemia- 
Moravia) 

*1G4. The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Sa- 
cred Heart Rectory, Furnace Street, Little 
Falls, N. Y. (Poland) 
165 Golden Rule Foundation, 60 East Forty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and Pales- 
tine) 

•Kin. United Polish Committees in Racine, Wisconsin, 
1809 Howe Street, Racine, Wis. (Poland) 

*167. Saint Adalbert's Polish Relief Association, Polish 

National Home, Thompsonville, Conn. (Poland) 

168. Cercle Frnneais de Seattle, 308 Marion Street, 

Seattle, Wash. (France and Great Britain I 

*1(19. General Gustav Orlicz Dreszer Foundation for 
Aid to Polish Children, Kennedy-Warren, 
Washington, D. C. (Poland) 
170. Polish Relief Committee of Holyoke, Massa- 
chusetts, 200 Main Street, Holyoke, Mass. 
(Poland) 

•171. Ware Polish Relief Fund, Pulaski Street, Ware, 
Mass. (Poland) 

172. Milford, Connecticut. Polish Relief Fund Com- 

mittee, 61 Lafayette Street, Milford, Conn. 
(Poland) 

173. Central Council of Polish Organizations, 103 West 

Miller Street, New Castle, Pa. (Great Britain, 

Poland, and France) 
*174. Polish Relief Committee, 138 Bernard Street, 

Rochester, N. Y. (Poland) 
*175. Polish Relief Fund of Fall River, Massachusetts, 

872 Globe Street, Fall River, Mass. (Poland) 
•176. American Auxiliary Committee de 1'Union des 

Femmes de France, In care of Mr. W. Rodman 

Parvin, 524 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

(France, Great Britain, and Germany) 
*177. Massachusetts Relief Committee for Poland, 340 

Main Street, Worcester, Mass. (Poland) 
♦178. Southbridge Allied Committee for Relief in Po- 
land, 10 Old Sturbridge Road, Southbridge, 

Mass. (Poland) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 



APRIL 4, 194 2 



297 



179. American Friends Service Committee, 20 South 
Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. (Great 
Britain, Poland, Germany, France, Norway, 
Belgium, Netherlands, and Italy) 

*t80. Refugies d'Alsace-Lorraine en Dordogne, 486 
California Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
(France) 

*1S1. United Polish Societies of Manchester, 158 El- 
dridge Street. Manchester, Conn. (Poland) 

182. Polish Relief Committee of Jackson, Michigan, 
1425 Joy Avenue, Jackson, Mich. (Poland) 

*183. Share A Smoke Club, Inc., 504 Stewart Avenue, 
Ithaca, N. \". (Great Britain, France, Norway, 
Belgium, and Netherlands) 

184. Committee of French-American Wives, IS East 

Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (France 
and Great Britain) 

185. Hadassah, Inc., 1819 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

(Palestine) 

186. Federation of Franco-Belgian Clubs of Rhode 

Island, In care of Mr. J. O. Oury, Post Office 
Box 950, Woonsocket, R. I. (France and 
England) 

♦187. Soei6t6 Franchise de St. Louis, Inc., In care of 
Miss Irma Ponsearme, 5630 Pershing Avenue, 
St. Louis, Mo. (France) 

•188. American German Aid Society, 2206 West Twenty- 
first Street, Los Angeles, Calif. (Germany) 
189. French War Relief, Inc., 3511 West Sixth Street, 
Los Angeles. Calif. (France and England) 

•190. General Taufflieb Memorial Relief Committee for 
France, 205 Miramar Avenue, Santa Barbara, 
Calif. (France and Great Britain) 

*191. Polish Business and Professional Men's Club, 
Inc., 138 West Sixty-fourth Street, Los An- 
geles, Calif. (Poland) 

192. League of Polish Societies of New Kensington, 

Arnold and Vicinity, In care of Mr. Andrew 
Surowski, 726 Fifth Avenue, New Kensington, 
Pa. (Poland) 

193. British-American War Relief Association, Room 

1819, Exchange Building, Seattle, Wash. 

(Great Britain and Greece) 
*194. The Fashion Group, Inc., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 

New York, N. Y. (France) 
195. Secours Franco-Americain — War Relief, 2555 

Woodward Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Great 

Britain) 
*196. Mrs. Carroll Greenough, 1408 Thirty-first Street, 

NW„ Washington, D. C. (France) 
•197. The United Polish Societies of Bronx County, 

705-09 Courtlandt Avenue, Bronx, New York, 

N. Y. (Poland) 
*198. Committee for the Relief of Poland, In care of 

Mr. Stephen F. Kluck, 946 Twentieth North, 

Seattle, Wash. (Poland and Canada) 
199. Polish Women's Relief Committee, 149 East Sixty- 



seventh Street, New York, N. Y. (France, 
Poland, and Germany) 
200. Mrs. Walter R. Tuckerman, Edgemoor, Bethesda, 
Md. (Great Britain) 

•201. Le Colis de Trianon-Versailles, 17 East Ninetieth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (formerly Fernanda 
Wanamaker Munn) (France and England) 

f 202. The Kyfthaeuser, League of German War Vet- 
erans in U. S. A., In care of Mr. Gordon Putter- 
worth, 1500 Walnut Street Building, Philadel- 
phia. Pa. (Canada, Jamaica, and British 
Empire) 

f203. Bethel Mission of Eastern Europe, 2316 West 
Fifty-fourth Street, Minneapolis, Minn. (Po- 
land) 

204. Polish Relief Committee of the Polish National 

Home Association, 10 Coburn Street, Lowell, 
Mass. (Poland) 

205. A. Seymour Houghton, Jr., et al., 30 Broad Street, 

New York, N. Y. (France) 

*206. The Benedict Bureau Unit, Inc., In care of Mr. 
J. Henry Harper, 30 Broad Street, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

•207. American Friends of the Daily Sketch War Re- 
lief Fund, 100 Grand Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 
208. The British War Relief Society, Inc., 730 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (United Kingdom, 
Canada, France, Belgium, Netherlands, Nor- 
way, and Greece) 

*209. French War Veterans, 5722 Benner Street, Los 
Angeles, Calif. (France) 

210. North Side Polish Council, Relief Committee of 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1327 East Kane Place, 
Milwaukee, Wis. (Poland) 

211. Friends of Poland, 5558 South Fairfield Avenue, 

Chicago, 111. (Poland) 

*212. British War Relief Association of Southern Cal- 
ifornia, 3576 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 
Calif. (Great Britain, Greece, and Germany) 

•213. United Opoler Relief of New York, In care of 
Mr. Joe Grossman, 984 East 178th Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

*214. American Field Hospital Corps, 610 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (United Kingdom, 
Greece, Albania, France, Belgium, Holland, and 
Ethiopia) 

*215. Mrs. Larz Anderson, 19 Congress Street, Boston, 
Mass. (France) 

♦216. The Catholic Student War Relief of Pax Romana, 
Pax Romana Office, Catholic University of 
America, Washington, D. C. (Poland, France, 
Germany, and Great Britain) 
217. Polish Relief Fund Committee, in care of Mrs. 
K. Troy, 4351-% Avalon Boulevard, Los An- 
geles, Calif. (Poland) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



298 



department: of state bulletin 



218. Polish Relief Committee, 63 Clifford Street, 

Taunton, Mass. (Poland) 

219. Relief Society for Jews in Lublin, 1206 South 

Lacienega Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Po- 
land) 

*220. American Fund for Wounded in France, Inc., 72 
Pearl Street, Worcester, Mas.*. (France) 

*221. Polish American Citizens Relief Fund Committee, 
R. F. D. Box No. 42A. Shirley, Mass. (Poland) 

222. Irvin McD. Garfield, 30 Stale Street. Boston. 

Mass. (Great Britain) 

223. Society of the Devotees of Jerusalem, Inc., 400 

East Houston Street. New York, N. Y. (Pal- 
estine I 

*224. Association of Former Juniors in France of Smith 
College, In care of Smith College Club, 40 East 
Fifty -fourth Street, New York, N. Y. ( Frame I 

*225. The Friends of Normandy. !>03 Park Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (France) 
226. Women's Allied War Relief Association of St. 
Louis, 21 Dartford Avenue. Clayton. Mo. 
(France and Great Britain) 

'227. Basque Delegation in the United States of Amer- 
ica, 30 Fifth Avenue. New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

*228. Greater New Bedford British War Relief Corps, 
74 Penniman Street, New Bedford, Mass. 
(Great Britain I 

*229. Les Amities Feminities de la France, In care of 
Mrs. B. A. Weill, 315 Bast Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France and England) 

*230. Bishops' Committee for Polish Relief, 1312 Massa- 
chusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, D. C. 
(Poland, England. Hungary. France, and 
Italy) 

f231. American and French Students' Correspondence 
Exchange, In care of Prof. H. C. Olinger, 
School of Education. New York University, 
Washington Square, New York, N. Y. 
(France and England) 

•232. Les Amis de la Franee a Puerto Rico, Ponce de 
Leon Avenue and Cuervillas Street, San Juan, 
P. R. (France) 

233. English Speaking Union of the United States. 30 

Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (France, 
Great Britain, Union of South Africa, Ger- 
many, Canada, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, and Netherlands) 

234. Relief for French Refugees in England, In care 

of Mrs. A. G. Pinckney, Riggs National Bank, 
1503 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, 
D. C. (France and Great Britain) 

235. Bundles for Britain, In care of Mr. John Dela- 

field, 20 Exchange Place, New York, N Y. 
(Great Britain and Dominions) 



236. American Fund for French Wounded, Inc., 100 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (France and 
England) 
*237. Hebrew Christian Alliance of America, 3508 
Ogden Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Poland, Ger- 
many, and Great Britain) 
*23S. United Nowy Dworer Relief Committee, In care 
of Mr. Louis Kirstein, 2528 Cruger Avenue, 
Bronx, New York. N. Y. (Poland I 

239. American Association for Assistance to French 
Artists, Inc.. In care of Mrs. David Randall- 
Maclver. 1075 Park Avenue. New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

24(1. Independent Kinsker Aid Association, In care 
of Mr. Benj. W. Salzman, Secretary. 51 West 
Mosholu Parkway. New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

2-11. American MeAll Association, 21)7 Fourth Avenue, 

New York. N. Y. (England) 
'212. Lafayette Fund, In care of Miss Susan W. Street, 
.:::i East Seventy-third Street, New York, N. Y. 
( France i 

243. The Grand Duke Vladimir Benevolent Fund As- 
-uci.it ion, 562 West 144th Street (Apartment 
63), New York. N. Y. (France) 
*244. United German Societies, Inc., 310 Southwest 

Ninth Avenue, Portland, Oreg. (Germany) 
•245. Mobile Surgical Unit. Inc., 2!> East Sixty-ninth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

246. American Women's Unit for War Relief, Inc., In 
care of Mrs. Porter Chandler, 320 East Seventy- 
second Street, New York, N. Y. (France and 
Great Britain) 

I' 17. Committee for Aid to Children of Mobilized Men 
of the XX" Arrondissement of Paris, In care 
of Mr. Bernard Douglas, 35 W T est Thirty-fourth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

24S. Catholic Medical Mission Board, Inc., 8 West 
Seventeenth Street, New York, N. Y. (India, 
Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and Union 
of South Africa) 
*240. Polish Young Men's Club. Danielson, Conn. (Po- 
land) 

250. Fellowship of Reconciliation, 2929 Broadway, 

New York, N. Y. (France, England, and Ger- 
many) 

251. Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas, 59-61 Henry 

Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France) 
*252. Polish American Associations of Middlesex 
County, New Jersey, St. Stanislaus Kostka 
Rectory, Sandfield Road, Sayreville, N. J. 
(Poland) 
t253. Polish Aid Fund Committee of St. Casimir's R. C. 
Church in the City of Albany, New York, In 
care of Miss Valeria C. Sowek, 111 Central Ave- 
nue, Albany, N. Y. (Poland) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

f Revoked for failure to observe rules and regulations. 



APRIL 4, 1942 



299 



*254. American Emergency Volunteer Ambulance Corps, 
Inc., 60 Wall Tower, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain and France) 

•255. Polish Roman Catholic Priests Union, Group No. 
3, of New York Archdiocese, In care of The 
Reverend Felix F. Burant, 101 East Seventh 
Street, New York, N. Y, (Poland and France) 

•256. Caledonian Club of Idaho, 418 North Fifth Street, 

Boise, Idaho. (Scotland) 
257. Order of Scottish Clans, 150 Causeway Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Scotland) 

*258. L'Atelier, Room 806, DeYoung Building, San 

Francisco, Calif. (France) 
259. Joint Committee of the United Scottish Clans of 
Greater New York and New Jersey, In care of 
Mr. John Calder, 40-18 Sixty-seventh Street, 
Woodside, Long Island, N. Y. (Scotland) 

*260. Mrs. Nancy Bartlett Laughlin, 139 East Sixty- 
sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

*261. Relief Coordination Service, 315 Lexington Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

*262. Committee for Relief in Allied Countries, Dum- 
barton Oaks, Georgetown, Washington, D. C. 
(France, Great Britain, Poland, Luxembourg, 
Belgium, Netherlands, and Norway) 

*2B3. Children's Crusade for Children, In care of Mr. 
Harry Scherman, Treasurer, 3S5 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France and Polaud) 
264. French Relief Association, In care of Miss Lucille 
Wakefield, 210 West Fifty-first Street Terrace, 
Kansas City, Mo. (France) 

*265. La France Post American Legion, 610 Fifth Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (France, Great Britain, 
and Greece) 

266. American Committee for the Polish Ambulance 

Fund, In care of Dr. Peter F. Czwalinski, 
Wicker Park Medical Center, 1530 North 
Damen Avenue, Chicago, 111. (France, Poland, 
England, and Canada) 

267. Polish-American Volunteer Ambulance Section 

(Pavas), Inc., 597 Madison Avenue, New York, 
N. Y. (France and England) 
*268. American Women's Voluntary Services, Inc., 
1 East Fifty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. 
(England) 

269. Mennouite Central Committee, Akron, Pa. 

(Great Britain, Poland, Germany, France, Can- 
ada, and Netherlands) 

270. Grand Lodge Daughters of Scotia, 71 Cabot 

Street, Hartford, Conn. (Scotland) 
*271. Kate R. Miller, 277 Park Avenue, Apartment S-K, 

New York, N. Y. (France) 
*272. Spanish Committee Pro-Masonic Refugees, 95 

Roosevelt Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 
*273. Association of Former Russian Naval Officers in 

America, 44—44 Twenty-first Street, Long 

Island City, N. Y. (France) 



274. British American Comfort League, Post Office 

Box 284, Quincy, Mass. (England I 

275. Paderewski Fund for Polish Relief, Inc., In care 

of Hodges, Reavis, Pantaieoni & Downey, 20 
Pine Street, New York, N. Y. (Poland and 
Great Britain) 

276. The Pawtueket and Blackstone Valley British 

Relief Society of Rhode Island, Post Office Box 
No. 1094, Pawtueket, R. I. (Great Britain and 
Germany) 

*277. Five for France, Box 267, Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Ga. (France) 
27S. Woman's Auxiliary Board of the Scots' Chari- 
table Society, Inc., 170 Bell Rock Street, Ev- 
erett, Mass. (Scotland) 
279. Polish Inter-Organization "Centrala" of Water- 
bury, 87 Oak Street, Waterbury, Conn. 
(Poland) 

*2S0. Central Committee for Polish Relief, In care of 
Mr. A. A. Pawlowski, 908 Detroit Avenue, To- 
ledo. Ohio. (Poland) 

*281. Helena Rubinstein-Titus, 300 Park Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (Poland) 

*282. Foyers du Soldat, Savoy Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

(France) 
283. Mrs. Mark Baldwin, 25 Claremont Avenue, 
Apartment 5A, New York, N. Y. (France) 

•284. American War Godmothers, 601 Clyde Street, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. (France) 

*2S5. Fortra, Incorporated, Suite 312, 61 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany and Poland) 

*286. American Dental Ambulance Committee, In care 
of Mr. Benjamin L. Barringer, 32 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. (United Kingdom) 
287. Emergency Relief Committee for Kolbuszowa, In 
care of Mr. Irving Jackman, 276 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

*288. Polish Relief Committee of Columbia County, 
Sacred Heart Church Rectory, 75 North Second 
Street, Hudson, N. Y. (Poland) 

*289. Hamburg-Bremen Steamship Agency, Inc., 218 
East Eighty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Germany, Poland, France, Belgium, Norway, 
Luxembourg, Netherlands, and Italy) 

290. United Bilgorayer Relief, Inc., In care of Mr. 

Sam Leifer, 79 Ludlow Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

291. American Committee for the German Relief 

Fund, Inc., Post Office Box 736, Grand Central 
Annex, New York, N. Y. (Canada. Jamaica, 
British West Indies, Dutch Guiana. Australia, 
New 'Zealand, Germany, and Poland) 
*292. Polish-American Forwarding Committee, Inc., 542 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland and 
Germany) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 



300 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



293. Polish Relief Committee of Fitchburg, 167 Sum- 
mer Street, Fitchburg, Mass. (Poland) 

•294. Aecion Democrata Espauola, 831 Broadway, San 
Francisco, Calif. (France) 

•295. Sociedades Hispanas Aliadas, 831 Broadway, San 
Francisco, Calif. (France) 

•296. Allied Relief Ball, Inc., In care of Mr. Alfred C. 
Howell, 524 Fifth Avenue, New York. N. Y. 
(Great Britain and France) 

•297. Greater New York Committee to Save Spanish 
Refugees, Room 1004, 55 West Forty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France and United 
Kingdom) 
29S. Superior Council of the Society of St. Vincent de 
Paul, 2S9 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

299. The British War Relief Association of the Philip- 

pines, In care of Fleming and Williamson, 
Post Office Box 214, Manila, P. 1. (All bel- 
ligerent countries) 

300. Marthe Th. Kahn, 390 Riverside Drive, New 

York, N. Y. (France) 

*301. Club des Femmes de France, 190 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. (France) 

*302. German American Relief Committee for Victims 
of Fascism, 3S1 Fourth Avenue. New York, 
N. Y. (France and Great Britain) 
303. The Maple Leaf Fund, Inc., 601 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Canada, United Kingdom, 
and France) 

*304. Erste Pinchover Kranken Unterstuzungs Verein, 
Inc., In care of Mr. Alexander Kekoler, 110 
Maujer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Poland) 

•305 American Association of Teachers of French, 
Washington Chapter. In care of Mrs. Corrington 
Gill, 2630 Adams Mill Road, NW., Washing- 
ton, D. C. (France) 

»?06. The Somerset Workroom, Far Hills, X. .1. (Great 
Britain and France) 

307. The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, 

Scientist, in Boston, U. S. A., 107 Falmouth 
Street, Boston, Mass. (Canada, France, and 
United Kingdom) 

308. Fund for the Relief of Men of Letters and Scien- 

tists of Russia, 310 West Ninety-ninth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (France, Czechoslovakia, and 
Poland ) 

•309. United American Spanish Aid Committee, 200 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Franco and 
United Kingdom) 

•310. Le Souvenir Franoais, International Center, 2431 
Bast Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Mich. ( France 
and Belgium) 
311. American Employment for General Relief, Inc., 
383 Madison Avenue, Room 1201, New York, 
N. Y. (England, France. Norway, Poland, Bel- 
gium, Luxembourg, and Netherlands) 



•312. French War Relief Fund of the Philippines, Post 
Office Box 597, 46 Escolta, Manila, P. 1. 
(France) 

313. Norwegian Relief, Inc., 135 South LaSalle Street, 

Chicago, 111. (Norway) 

314. British Sailors' Book and Relief Society, In care 

of Mr. Donald Neville-Willing, 18 East Seven- 
tieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Bermuda, 
Canada, British West Indies, and Newfound- 
land) 

•315. League of American Writers, Inc., 381 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, England, 
Poland, and Norway) 

*316. Scots' Charitable Society, 355 Newbury Street, 
Boston, Mass. (Scotland) 

317. American Friends of a Jewish Palestine, Inc., 285 

Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Palestine, 
Germany, Poland, France, and United King- 
dom) 

318. Central Bureau for Relief of the Evangelical 

Churches of Europe, 297 Fourth Avenue, New 
York, N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

319. Queen Wilhelmina Fund. Inc., Holland House, 

10 Rockefeller Plaza. New York, N. Y. (Neth- 
erlands, France, Poland, United Kingdom, 
India, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Union 
of South Africa, Norway, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, and Germany) 

*320. The Commission for Relief in Belgium, Inc., 
4'J0 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France, England, Belgium, and Luxembourg) 

►321. National Christian Action, Inc., 70 Third Avenue, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Norway) 

822, Unitarian Service Committee of the American 
Unitarian Association, 25 Beacon Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. ( France, British Isles, Nether- 
lands, and Hungary) 

323. The Salvation Army, Inc., 122 West Fourteenth 

Street, New York, N. Y. (England, France, 
Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway) 

324. American Association of University Women, 1034 

Eye Street, Washington, D. C. (France, Great 
Britain, and Canada) 
*325. Anzac War Relief Fund, 405 Lexington Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (Australia and New Zealand) 

326. The Kosciuszko Foundation, Inc., 149-151 East 

Sixty-seventh Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Poland) 

327. Belgian Relief of Southern California, 3511 West 

Olympic Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. (Bel- 
gium, France, and Great Britain) 
*328. American Civilian Volunteers, In care of Mr. 
Gerard Richardson, Hotel Peter Cooper, Lex- 
ington Avenue and Thirty-ninth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (France) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 



APRIL A, 1942 



301 



329. Netherlands War Relief Committee, In care of 
Mr. J. M. E. Nikkels, Netherlands India Com- 
mercial Bank, 21 Plaza Moraga, Manila, P. I. 
(Netherlands) 

•330. Junior Relief Group of Texas, 1111 Main Street, 
Houston, Tex. (United Kingdom, France, 
Netherlands, Belgium, and Norway) 

"331. Vincennes, France Committee of Vincennes, In- 
diana, 112 North Seventh Street, Vincennes, 
Ind. ( France ) 

332. Society Israelite Franchise de Secours Mutuels 

de New York, In care of Mr. Gaston Meyer, 
Secretary, 2305 Grand Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

333. Belgian War Relief Fund. In care of Mr. L. V. 

Casteleyn, 344 Regina Building, Manila, P. I. 
(Belgium) 

334. British American Ambulance Corps, Inc., 420 

Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 

Britain and France) 
*335. Allied Food Relief Committee, 46 Cedar Street, 

New York, N. Y. (England and France) 
336. The Seventh Column, Inc., West Fairlee, Vt. 

(France and England) 
•337. Friends of Children, Inc., 36 West Forty-fourth 

Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, 

France, Belgium, and Netherlands) 
•338. Belgian Relief Fund, Inc., Room 426, Graybar 

Building, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, 

N. Y. (Belgium, France, and England) 

339. United British War Relief Association, 16 Sar- 

gent Avenue, Somerville, Mass. (Great Brit- 
ain) 

340. Independent British American War Relief Society 

of Rhode Island, In care of Mrs. Agnes S. 
Hutcheon, Main Avenue, Greenwood, R. I. 
(Great Britain) 

*341. St. Andrews (Scottish) Society of Washington, 
D. C, In care of Robert A. Grahame, Inc., 
1524 K Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. ( Scot- 
land) 

*342. French War Relief Fund of Nevada, 210 South 
Center Street, Reno, Nev. (France) 

*343. Ukrainian Relief Committee, 78 St. Marks Place, 
New York, N. Y. (Germany, France, England, 
and Italy) 
344. The New Canaan Workshop, New Canaan, Conn. 
(British Empire) 

•345. Nicole de Paris Relief Fund, 23 East Fifty-fifth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

•346. International Federation of Business and Pro- 
fessional Women, In care of Miss Isabelle 
Claridge, Valley Camp Coal Company, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. (Poland, Norway, Belgium, Hol- 
land, and France) 
347. American Board of Missions to the Jews, Inc., 
27 Throop Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (France, 
Belgium, Germany, and Poland) 



348. Great Lakes Command, Canadian Legion of the 
British Empire Service League, In care of 
Mr. Thomas H. Bussell, 5040 Maplewood Ave- 
nue, Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain and Can- 
ada) 

•349. Scottish Games of New Jersey Association, Box 
23, Fairhaveu, N. J. (Great Britain) 

•350. Franco-American Federation, In care of Mr. Philip 
L. Morency, Secretary, 11 Elm Avenue, Salem, 
Mass. (France) 
351. Refugees of England, Inc., Room 607, 511 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*352. American Friends of German Freedom, 342 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York, N. Y. (England and 
France) 

-353. The Louisiana Guild for British Relief, 4534 St. 
Charles Avenue, New Orleans, La. (British 
Empire) 

354. The American Hospital in Britain, Limited, 321 

East Forty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

355. Czechoslovak Relief, 4049 West Twenty-sixth 

Street, Chicago, 111. (Czechoslovakia, Great 
Britain and Dominions, France, and Belgium) 
350. Emergency Rescue Committee, 2 West Forty-third 
Street, New York, N. Y. (France, United King- 
dom, Belgium, Norway, and Netherlands) 
357. Medical and Surgical Relief Committee of Amer- 
ica, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain, France, Netherlands, Norway, 
Poland, Luxembourg, Belgium, Greece, and 
Yugoslavia ) 

*358. Mrs. George Gilliland. 530 East Eighty-fifth Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Northern Ireland) 

•359. District of Columbia Federation of Women's 
Clubs, Broad Branch and Grant Roads, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (Great Britain) 
360. American-Polish National Council, 4055 West 
Melrose Street, Chicago, 111. (Poland) 

*361. Funds for France, Inc., 32 East Fifty-seventh 

Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 
362. Over-Seas League Tobacco Fund, In care of Lam- 
bert and Feasley, 9 Rockefeller Plaza, New 
York, N. Y. (British Empire) 

•363. French Colonies War Relief Committee, 225 West 
116th Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 

•364. The Canadian Society of New York, Room 500, 
2 Wall Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada and 
Great Britain) 

365. American Friends of Britain, Inc., 502 Park Ave- 

nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

366. Harvard University, In care of Mr. John M. Rus- 

sell, 20 University Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 
(Great Britain) 

367. Methodist Committee for Overseas Relief, 150 

Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Po- 



•Eevoked at request of registrant. 



302 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



•368. 
*369. 
*370. 
*371. 

372. 
373. 

374. 

f375. 

■f376. 

*377. 
*37S. 
379. 
t3S0. 

381. 
*382. 

*3S3. 



*385. 
*3S6. 

•387. 



land, Norway, Belgium, Netherlands, United 
Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, Germany, 
Greece, Italy, Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria) 

British War Relief Fund, 37 East Hudson Ave- 
nue, Dayton, Ohio. (Great Britain) 

Monmouth War Relief, Red Bank, N. J. (Eng- 
land, France, and Greece) 

Polish Prisoner's of War Relief Committee, Bos 
20, Station W, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany) 

The Mobile Circle for Benefit of the Royal Navy 
Hospital Comforts Fund, In care of Miss Hilda 
Broadwood, Chairman, Route 2, Mobile, Ala. 
(British Isles) 

Isthmian Pro-British Aid Committee, Post Office 
Box 621, Ancon, C. Z. (England) 

The Fall River British War Relief Society, 79 
Campbell Street, Fall River, Mass. (Great 
Britain) 

American Aid for War Prisoners, 16 Duerstein 
Street, Buffalo, N. Y. (Formerly American 
Aid for German War Prisoners) (Canada, 
Australia, Great Britain. Netherlands, India. 
New Zealand, and British West Indies) 

Ladies Auxiliary of the Providence Branch of the 
Federation of the Italian World War Veterans 
in the United States, L'ilG Atwells Avenue, 
Providence, R. I. (Italy) 

International Children's Relief Association. In 
care of Mr. John W. D'Arey. 312 Madison Ave- 
nue. Suite 905, New York, N. Y. (Croat 
Britain ) 

Parcels for the Forces, Inc., 45 Rockefeller Plaza. 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

William Henry Mooring, 272 South La Peer Drive, 
Beverly Hills, Calif. (England) 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, Cristo- 
bal, C. Z. (England) 

Universal Committee for the Defense of Democ 
racy, 357 West Fifty-fifth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (.England and France I 

Pelham Overseas Knitting Circle, 252 Irving 
Place, Pelham, N. Y. (Scotland) 

Solidaridad Internacional Antifascists, Post 
Office Box 81, Station D, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

Elizabeth Arden Employees Association, 681 
Fifth Avenue, New York. X. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

Canadian Women's Club of New York City, Inc., 
Savoy Plaza Hotel, Fifth Avenue at Fifty-eighth 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain, Can- 
ada, and Newfoundland) 

Friends of Dover England Fund. 158 Washington 
Street, Dover, N. H. (England) 

San Angelo Standard, Inc., 17 South Chadbourne, 
San Angelo, Tex. (England) 

Church of the Pilgrimage, Town Square, Plym- 
outh, Mass. (England) 



*388. Lord Mayor of Plymouth's Services Welfare Fund, 
Plymouth, Mass. (England) 

389. Parcels for Belgian Prisoners, 1718 Massachusetts 

Avenue, NW„ Washington, D. C. (Germany) 

390. Greek War Relief Association, Inc., 730 Fifth 

Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Greece) 

391. Miss Heather Thatcher, 1334V 2 Miller Drive, Sun- 

set Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (Great 
Britain) 

392. Scottish Clans Evacuation Plan, In care of Mr. 

Corcoran Thorn, President, American Security 
and Trust Company, Washington, D. C. (Great 
Britain) 
"393. California Denmark Fund, 318 Jules Avenue, San 
Francisco, Calif. (Denmark) 

394. Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund of U. S. A., 

Inc., 515 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
(Great Britain) 

395. Near East Foundation. Inc., 17 West Forty-sixth 

Street. New York, N. Y. (Greece) 
'390. Wellesley Club of Washington, In care of Mrs. 
Ernest J. McCormick, Apartment 743, Arlington 
Village, Arlington, Va. (Great Britain) 
*:;!)7. American Committee for the Syrian Orphanage 
in Jerusalem, 5106 Sixty-third Street, Wood- 
side. Long Island, N. Y. (Palestine, Germany, 
and British East Africa) 

398. Lithuanian National Fund, 359 Union Avenue, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (Lithuania) 
•399. The American School Committee for Aid to 
Greece, Inc.. Fuld Hall, Institute for Advanced 
sillily. Princeton, N. J. (Greece) 

4i«). Dodecanesian League of America, Inc., 211 West 
Thirty-third Street, New York. x. Y. (Greece) 

401. Liberty Link Afghan Society, The Whittier, 415 

Burns Drive, Detroit. Mich. (Great Britain) 

|402. Federation of the Italian World War Veterans 

in the U. S. A., Inc., 626 Fifth Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Italy) 

403. t'oniite Pro Francia Libre, Post Office Box 7S3, 

Kan Juan, P. R. (England and France) 
.4^1. Nowy-Dworer Ladies and United Relief Associa- 
tion. In care of Mr. J. Gertner, 1021 Bryant 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Poland) 

405. The Greek Fur Workers Union, Local 70, 253 

West Twenty-eighth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Greece) 

406. Ethiopian World Federation, Inc., 200 West 135th 

Street. New York. N. Y. (Ethiopia and Great 
Britain I 
*407. Saints Constant ine and Helen Greek Orthodox 
Church, In care of Mr. Soterios Xicholson, 
Burlington Hotel, Washington, D. C. (Greece) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

^Revoked for failure to observe rules aud regulations. 



APRIL 4, 1942 



303 



*408. The Allied Civilian War Relief Society, Inc., In 
care of Mr. Robert C. Flack, 36 West Forty- 
fourth Street, New York, N. T. (Great 
Britain) 
409. The Order of Ahepa, Investment Building, Wash- 
ington, D. C. (Greece) 

•410. The American Committee for the Relief of Greece, 
Inc., 205 West Fifty-fourth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Greece) 
411. National Legion Greek-American War Veterans 
in America, Inc., 550 West 157th Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Greece) 

•412. American Committee to Save Refugees, 156 Fifth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France) 

413. Phalanx of Greek Veterans of America, Inc., 810 

West Harrison Street, Chicago, 111. (Greece) 

414. Adopt A Town Committee, Inc., 527 Fifth Ave- 

nue, New York, N. Y. (England) 

415. American Cameronian Aid, 159 Eastern Parkway, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (Scotland) 
*416. United British Societies of Minneapolis, 508 

Hodgson Building, Minneapolis, Minn. (Great 

Britain and Dominions) 
"417. Mid-European Food Package Service, Inc., 400 

Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Germany, 

Poland, and Luxembourg) 
'418. Wellesley College Alumnae Association, Wellesley 

College, Wellesley, Mass. (Great Britain) 
*419. The American Fund for British War Aid, In care 

of Mr. L. Stewart Gatter, 36 West Forty-fourth 

Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 
420. Free French Relief Committee, 444 Madison Ave- 
nue, Room 411, New York, N. Y. (England, 

French Cameroons, Belgian Congo, Nigeria, and 

Syria) 
*421. Relief for Children of Britain by Children of 

America, In care of Mr. Samuel Schaefer, Eisele 

& King, 39 Broadway, New York, N. Y. (Great 

Britain) 
*422. Democracies Allied Relief, 420 Lexington Avenue, 

Suite 1419, New York, N. Y. (All belligerent 

countries) 
*423. U. S. Friends of Greece, 565 Fifth Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Greece) 
♦424. War Relief Association of American Youth, Inc., 

565 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 

Britain) 
*425. Hellenic World Newspaper Co., 214 Huntington 

Avenue, Boston, Mass. (Greece) 
*426. Hias Immigrant Bank, 425 Lafayette Street, New 

York, N. Y. (Poland, Netherlands, Belgium, 

France, and Germany) 
427. Esco Fund Committee, Inc., 88 Central Park West, 

New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 
*428. American Labor Committee to Aid British Labor, 

9 East Forty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Great Britain) 



429. The Silver Thimble Fund of America, 2G Audubon 

Place, New Orleans, La. (Great Britain) 
*430. Lithuanian Relief Committee for the Aid of 
Lithuanian Victims of Tyranny and War, In 
care of Mr. K. Strumskis, 415 Keap Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. (Germany, France, Italy, and 
Great Britain) 

431. The British Legion, Inc., 13123 Indiana Avenue, 

Detroit, Mich. (Great Britain) 

432. Young Friends of French Prisoners and Babies, 

67 East Eighty-second Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 

433. Montagu Club of London, In care of Miss Elsie 

Burakoff, 1485 Nelson Avenue, The Bronx, New 
York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

434. American Committee for British Catholic Relief, 

In care of Mr. William E. Schooley, American 
Security and Trust Company, Washington, D. C. 
(British Isles) 
♦435. Friends of British Relief, Inc., 217 North Cal- 
vert Street, Baltimore,- Md. (Great Britain) 

436. Paderewski Testimonial Fund, Inc., 37 East 

Thirty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

437. Hands Across the Sea Helpers Association, 505 

Ovington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (United 
Kingdom) 

438. German-American Conference, New York, 109 

East Twenty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Canada and British West Indies) 

t439. International Home for Refugees, 16 East Forty- 
first Street, New York, N. Y. (England, Po- 
land, and France) 

•440. Gamma Phi Beta International Sorority, In care 
of Miss Edna Buhrer, 5612 Fourteenth Street, 
NW., Washington, D. O. (England) 

f441. Ethiopian Redemption Committee, Incorporated, 
120 South LaSalle Street, Suite 1763, Chicago, 
111. (Ethiopia) 

t442. Callard of London, 536 South Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago, 111. (England) 

443. Franco-British Relief, 525 North Howard Street, 

Baltimore, Md. (Great Britain) 

444. Albanian Relief Fund, 431 South Huntington Ave- 

nue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. (Albania) 
•445. Vitamins for Britain, Inc., 8S Central Park West, 

New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 
♦446. American-Lithuanian Society of Washington, 

D. C, In care of Mr. Albert W. Shupienis, 1733 

Twentieth Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

(Germany) 
447. Franco-American Committee for the Relief of 

War Victims, Hotel Plaza, Fifth Avenue and 

Fifty-ninth Street, New York, N. Y. (France) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

fRevoked for failure to observe the rules and regulations. 



304 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



*448. Penny-A Plane, Suite 807, 386 Fourth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. (United Kingdom) 

449. Comity de Franceses Libres de Puerto Rico, Box 

522, Mayagues, P. R. (British Empire) 

450. Newtown Committee for Child Refugees, Inc., In 

care of Mrs. Jerome P. Jackson, Chairman, 
Sandy Hook, Conn. (England) 

451. Robert E. Lee Memorial Foundation, Inc., In 

care of Miss Helen Knox, 422 Lexington Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

452. Grand Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, State 

of New York, 71 West Twenty-third Street, 
New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

*453. British Aid Committee, In care of Captain Clif- 
ford Payne, Post Office Box 2007, Balboa, C. Z. 
(Great Britain) 
454. Serb National Federation, 3414 Fifth Avenue, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. (Yugoslavia) 

*455. Club Ukraine, 216-218 Grand Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. (Great Britain, Germany, Poland, Italy, 
and France) 

456. Caledonian Pipe Bands Scottish Relief Fund, 

1630 Newcastle Road, Grosse Point, Mich. 
(Scotland) 

457. Union for the Protection of the Human Person, 

12 West Seventy-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(France) 
•458. Secours Franco-Beige, 150 David Street, New 
Bedford, Mass. (England, France, and Bel- 
gium) 

459. Ukrainian Gold Cross, Inc., 149 Second Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. (France, Poland, Germany, 
Great Britain, and Italy) 

460. American Committee for Luxembourg Relief, 

Inc., Room 508, 109 North Dearborn Street, 
Chicago, 111. (France and England) 

•461. American Friends of Canada, In care of Blake, 
Stim & Curran, 29 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
(Canada and Great Britain) 

*462. La Prevoyance, In care of Mr. Gaston Thierry, 

8 Garrison Street, Boston, Mass. (France) 
463. The American-Canadian War Council, 72 First 
Avenue, Westwood, N. J. (formerly The Cana- 
dian American Council) (Canada) 

*464. Albanian War Victims Relief Association, Room 
1117, 205 West Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111. 
(Albania) 

465. American Yugoslav Defense League, In care of 

Mr. Matt Genero, Box 1046, Cupertino, Calif. 
(Yugoslavia) 

466. Coordinating Council of French Relief Societies, 

Inc., 4 West Fifty-eighth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (France) 

467. British Distressed Areas Fund, Inc., In care of 

Miss Constance Bennett, 280 Carolwood Drive, 
Holmby Hills, Los Angeles, Calif. (England) 



*46S. War Relief and Bundles for Scotland, 1606 North 
Cahuenga Boulevard, Hollywood, Calif. (Scot- 
land) 

469. United Free France, 465 Lexington Avenue, New 

York, N. Y. (Free France) 

470. American Friends of Yugoslavia, Inc., Room 808, 

8 West Fortieth Street, New York, N. Y. 
(Yugoslavia) 
*471. The Queen Elizabeth Fund, Inc., Suite 1921, 521 
Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 

472. The I'niversalist Church of America, 6 Beacon 

Street, Boston, Mass. (formerly Universalist 
General Convention) (England and France) 

473. Anglo-American Lodge No. 78 of the American 

Order Sons of St. George, 17 East Forty-second 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

474. Jugoslav War Relief Association of Southern 

California, In care of Mr. Ivo H. Lopizich, 111 
West Seventh Street, Los Angeles, Calif. (Yu- 
goslavia) 
•475. Brooke County Allied War Relief, Follansbee, 
W. Va. (Great Britain and Greece) 

476. American Red Mogen Dovid for Palestine, Inc., 

220 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Pales- 
tine) 

477. Houston War Fund, Inc., In care of Mr. T. J. 

Caldwell, Union National Bank, Houston, Tex. 
(Great Britain) 

478. Yugoslav Relief Committee of America, 2659 

South Lawndale Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Yugo- 
slavia ) 
*479. Bandwagon Ball, Inc., In care of Mrs. William 
Astor Chanler, 141 East Nineteenth Street, New 
York, N. Y. (England and Greece) 

480. National Catholic Welfare Conference, Bishops' 

Relief Committee, 1312 Massachusetts Avenue, 
NW., Washington, D. C. (All belligerent coun- 
tries) 

481. Bristol Whittaker Fund, In care of Mr. Gordon D. 

Donald, 500 North Broad Street, Elizabeth, N. J. 
(Great Britain) 

482. Merchant Sailors League, Inc., 284 Main Street, 

Buffalo, N. Y. (Canada and British Empire) 

483. Aid to British Pharmacists, In care of Mr. S. L. 

Hilton, 1033 Twenty-second Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. (England) 

•4S4. Walter Heidmann Company, 80 Wall Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Germany, Poland, and Nether- 
lands ) 

'485. Tadeusz Stefan Wolkowski, 2 East Twenty-third 
Street, New York, N. Y. (Belgium, Nether- 
lands, France, and Poland) 
486. Lithuanian National Relief Fund, Suite 1212, 134 
North LaSalle Street, Chicago, 111. (Germany) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 



APRIL 4, 1942 

487. Yugoslav-American Relief Committee, Inc., In 

care of George A. Palandech, Secretary, 536 
South Clark Street, Chicago, 111. (Yugoslavia) 

488. The Croatian Fraternal Union of America, 3411 

Forbes Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. (Yugoslavia) 

489. Jugoslav Relief Fund Association, In care of 

Mr. John A. Zvetina, 135 South LaSalle Street, 
Chicago, 111. (Yugoslavia) 
t490. Britain -at Bay Aid Society, 41 Magnolia Drive, 
Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. (England) 

491. The American British Art Center, Inc., 44 West 

Fifty-sixth Street, New York, N. Y. (United 
Kingdom and Canada) 

492. Committee for Yugoslav War Relief, Suite 750, 

Russ Building, San Francisco, Calif. (Yugo- 
slavia) 

493. Yugoslav War Relief Association of State of 

Washington, 2411 Bigelow Avenue North, Seat- 
tle, Wash. (Yugoslavia) 
'494. Paisley Buddies War Relief Society, 598 Engle- 

wood Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Scotland) 
*495. Mr. Alfred S. Campbell, Sevenoaks Farm, Lam- 

bertville, N. J. (England) 
♦496. Bay Ridge Allied Relief, 370 Seventy-fifth Street, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (Great Britain) 
497. Armenian General Benevolent Union, 432 Fourth 

Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Syria, Palestine, 

Cyprus, Greece, and Bulgaria) 
*498. White and Manning Dance Relief, 9S California 

Avenue, Highland Park, Mich. (Great Britain) 
*49'.>. Mrs. Eveline Mary Paterson, In care of The 

Honorable I. H. Morse, Warren, N. H. (Great 

Britain and Germany) 

500. National America Denmark Association, 2452 

West Addison Street, Chicago, 111. (Denmark 
and England) 

501. The Fields, Inc., 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 

(Great Britain) 

*502. Committee for Emergency Aid to Refugees, Post 
Office Box 268, Station D, New York, N. Y. 
(Norway, France, United Kingdom, and Ger- 
many) 
503. Yugoslav War Relief, 2428-30 Washington Road, 
Kenosha, Wis. (Yugoslavia) 

*504. Agudas Israel of America, 673 Broadway, New 
York, N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 

505. Aid to Britain, In care of Mrs. Hubert Martineau, 

Apartment 1702, Pierre Hotel, Sixtieth Street 
and Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain and Germany) 

506. Lithuanian Charities Institute, Inc., in the U. S. A., 

1844 West Twenty-first Street, Chicago, 111. 
(Lithuania, England, Germany, and Italy) 

507. Les Filles de France. 453 Fullerton Parkway, Chi- 

cago, 111. (France) 



305 

508. American Chapter, Emergency Council of Chief 

Rabbi of Great Britain, 55 Leonard Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

509. Aid for the Cote-Basque, In care of Mrs. Cooper 

Howell, Bluebell, Montgomery County, Pa. 
(France) 

510. Danish American Knitting and Sewing Groups, 

88 Eighty-first Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (All 
belligerent countries) 
♦511. State Industrial Employes-Aid to Britain Fund, 
7 Winthrop Street, Millers Falls, Mass. (Eng- 
land) 

512. Latvian Relief, Inc., 92 Liberty Street, New York, 

N. Y. (Latvia) 

513. Camp Little Norway Association, 4833 Thirteenth 

Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. (Norway 
and Canada) 

*514. British Civil Defense Emergency Fund, 570 Lex- 
ington Avenue, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain) 
515. American Friends of Norway, Inc., 8 West For- 
tieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Canada, Eng- 
land, and Norway) 

•516. Contact Service Company, 122 East Forty-second 
Street, Room 533, New York, N. Y. (Great 
Britain, Poland, France, and Belgium) 

517. Norwegian Seamen's Christmas and Relief, In- 

corporated, Room 1306, 80 Broad Street, New 
York, N. Y. (Canada and the West Indies) 

518. France Forever War Relief Association, 1199 Car- 

olina Street, Manila, P. I. (United Kingdom) 

519. French War Veterans Association of Illinois, In 

care of Mr. Marcel Garancher, 2306 Grace 
Street, Chicago, 111. (France and Germany) 

520. The San Francisco Committee for the Aid of the 

Russian Disabled Veterans of the World War, 
2041 Lyon Street, San Francisco, Calif. (Bul- 
garia, Yugoslavia, and France) 
1521. Scandinavian-American Business Association, 
Inc., 4919 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Nor- 
way and United Kingdom) 

522. Garden City Publishing Company, Inc., Garden 

City, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

523. Detroit Barrovian War Relief Association, 12035 

Woodward Avenue, Highland Park, Detroit, 

Mich. (Great Britain) 
*524. Yugoslavic American Association, 1432 Girard 

Street, NW., Washington, D. C. (Yugoslavia) 
*525. Mr. Generoso Pope, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New 

York, N. Y. (All belligerent countries) 
526. Friends of Little Norway, 900 Union Commerce 

Building, Cleveland, Ohio. (Canada) 



•Revoked at request of registrant. 

tRevoked (or failure to observe rules and regulations. 



306 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



*527. Free Italian Women's Association for Assistance 
to Prisoners of War, 570 Lexington Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. ( India, Egypt, Australia, and 535. 

Union of South Africa) 

528. Estonian Relief Committee, Inc., 15 East 125th 536. 

Street, New York, N. Y. (Estonia) 

529. The International Hebrew Christian Alliance, 

4919 North Albany Avenue, Chicago, 111. (Eng- 
land, Hungary, and Poland) 537. 

*530. Friends of the RAF Comforts Committee, 5514 

Blackstone Avenue, Chicago, 111. ( England ) 538. 

531. Relief Fund of the Federation of the Belgian 
American Societies of North America, 15046 
Mack Avenue, Detroit, Mich. (Belgium) 539. 

*532. The Swiss Society of New York, 444 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

533. Committee on Foreign Relief Appeals in the 540. 

Churches, 297 Fourth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

(All belligerent countries) 541. 

534. American Committee for the Relief and Resettle- 

ment of Yemenite Jews, 225 LaFayette Street, 



New York, N. Y. (Palestine, Aden, and 
Yemen) 

American Seeds for British Soil, 18 East Seven- 
tieth Street, New York, N. Y. (Great Britain) 

War Relief Committee of the Furrier's Joint Coun- 
cil, 250 West Twenty-sixth Street, New York, 
N. Y. (Great Britain, France, Poland, Greece, 
Belgium, Yugoslavia, Holland, and Norway) 

Allied Defense Association, 212 Quincy Avenue, 
Long Beach, Calif. (England) 

The Netherlands Aid Society, Inc., 10 Rockefeller 
Plaza, New York, N. Y. (Netherlands East 
Indies, Great Britain, and Germany) 

Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, 425 Fourth 
Avenue, New York, N. Y. (France, Great Brit- 
ain, and Canada) 

American Friends of Polish Jews, 22 East Seven- 
teenth Street, New York, N. Y. (Germany) 

America-Netherlands Indies War Relief Fund, 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. (Neth- 
erlands East Indies) 



The Foreign Service 



RESIGNATION OF AMBASSADOR WEDDELL 



[Released to the press by the White House April 2] 

The President has received the following let- 
ter from the Honorable Alexander W. Weddell, 
American Ambassador to Spain : 

"My Dear Mr. Presiuent : 

"Upon the advice of my physicians I am about 
to enter hospital to undergo an operation of 
some gravity, which, they tell me further, even 
if successful, would be followed by a longish 
period of convalescence and observation. My 
return to Spain could not, therefore, under most 
favorable circumstances, take place for some 
months. 

"In these circumstances, and in the public in- 
terest, I am constrained to ask for permission to 
apply for retirement to take effect at the expira- 
tion of my leave. 



"My deep regret in relinquishing my post is 
tempered by the hope that you may later make 
use of my services. 
"I am, My dear Mr. President, 
"Loyally yours, 

Alexander W Weddell" 

Approving Ambassador WeddelFs request for 
retirement, the President wrote under date of 
April first : 

"Dear Alex : 

"I have received your letter of March twenty- 
eighth with the deepest regret. In view of what 
you tell me that your physicians believe that 
you should have a long period of convalescence 
after your operation and that you could conse- 
quently not return to Spain for some time to 
come, I feel it necessary to accept, as you ask, 



APRIL 4, 1942 



307 



your application for retirement as Ambassador 
to Spain. 

"You have served this Government with great 
distinction for many years as a Foreign Service 
officer and, more recently, as Ambassador to 
Argentina and as Ambassador to Spain. I am 
particularly sorry that your illness should make 
it necessary for you to retire at this time, but 



I hope that your health will soon be completely 
restored and I shall call upon you for service 
once more when you are well again. 

"With my best wishes for a speedy recovery 
and with my kindest personal regards, believe 
me 

"Yours very sincerely, 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



[Released to the press April 4] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since March 21, 1942: 

Walter W. Birge, Jr., of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, 
Mexico, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Istanbul, Turkey. 

The assignment of Ellis A. Bonnet, of Eagle 
Pass, Tex., as Second Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Panama, Panama, has been canceled. 
In lieu thereof, Mr. Bonnet has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Quito, Ecuador, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Ralph N. Clough, of Seattle, Wash., Vice Con- 
sul at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, has been des- 
ignated Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Tegucigalpa, Honduras, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

George C. Cobb, of Americus, Ga., Vice Con- 
sul at Tahiti, Society Islands, Oceania, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Windsor, Ontario, 
Canada. 

Raymond E. Cox, of New York, N. Y., Con- 
sul General at Wellington, New Zealand, has 
been designated Counselor of Legation and Con- 
sul General at Wellington, New Zealand, and 
will serve in dual capacity. 

Basil D. Dahl, of Blair, Wis., Consul at Wel- 
lington, New Zealand, has been designated Com- 
mercial Attache at Wellington, New Zsaland. 

Dudley G. Dwyre, of Fort Collins, Colo., First 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul General at 
Montevideo, Uruguay, has been designated 
Counselor of Embassy and Consul General at 



Montevideo, Uruguay, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Robert English, of Hancock, N. H., Consul at 
Wellington, New Zealand, has been designated 
Second Secretary of Legation and Consul at 
Wellington, New Zealand, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Elias G. Garza, of Eagle Pass, Tex., Vice Con- 
sul at Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Veracruz, Vera- 
cruz, Mexico. 

Julian F. Harrington, of Framingham, Mass., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been designated First Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Madrid, Spain, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

David H. Henry, 2d, of Geneva, N. Y., Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Beirut, Lebanon. 

The assignment of Heyward G. Hill, of Ham- 
mond, La., as Second Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Madrid, Spain, has been canceled. 

Roy Barclay Hodges, of Eagle Pass, Tex., 
Clerk at Puerto Cortes, Honduras, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Puerto Cortes, Honduras. 

Oscar C. Holder, of New Orleans, La., Vice 
Consul at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

John Evarts Horner, of Denver, Colo., Vice 
Consul at Wellington, New Zealand, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Wellington, New Zealand. 



308 

J. Jefferson Jones, 3d, of Newbern, Tenn., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Puerto de la Cruz, Venezuela. 

Curtis C. Jordan, of Eagle Rock, Calif., Con- 
sul at Madras, India, has been assigned as Con- 
sul at San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

Gerald Keith, of Evanston, 111., Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Consul at Bogota, Colom- 
bia, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

John B. Ketcham, of Brooklyn, N.Y., for- 
merly Consul at Medan, Sumatra, Netherlands 
Indies, has been assigned as Consul at Madras, 
India. 

Randolph A. Kidder, of Beverly Farms, 
Mass., Vice Consul at Sydney, New South 
Wales, Australia, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Legation at Canberra, Australia. 

David LeBreton, Jr., of Washington, D. C, 
Vice Consul at Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, 
has been designated Third Secretary of Lega- 
tion and Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

The assignment of Walter J. Linthicum, of 
Baltimore, Md., as Consul at Oporto, Portugal, 
has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Linthi- 
cum has been assigned as Consul at Lisbon, 
Portugal \ 

Wilfred V. MacDonald, of St. Louis, Mo., 
Vice Consul at Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, 
has been designated Third Secretary of Legation 
and Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

Samuel A. Mcllhenny, Jr., of Dalworth Park, 
Tex., Vice Consul at Valdivia, Chile, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Antofagasta, Chile. 

George R. Merrell, of St. Louis, Mo., Consul 
General at Calcutta, India, has been designated 
Secretary to the Personal Representative of the 
President of the United States of America at 
New Delhi, India. 

Paul Paddock, of Marshalltown, Iowa, for- 
merly Vice Consul at Batavia, Java, Nether- 
lands Indies, has been assigned as Vice Consul 
at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. 

Avery F. Peterson, of Boise, Idaho, Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Ottawa, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Ontario, Canada, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

James R. Riddle, of Talladega, Ala., Vice 
Consul at Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Nuevo Laredo, 
Tamaulipas, Mexico. 

Lester L. Schnare, of Macon, Ga., formerly 
Consul General at Rangoon, Burma, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Calcutta, India. 

Harold Shullaw, of Wyoming, 111., Vice Con- 
sul at Windsor, Ontario, Canada, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Walter Smith, of Oak Park, 111., formerly 
Vice Consul at Canton, Kwangtung, China, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 

Walter L. Smith, of Harrisburg. Pa., Vice 
Consul at Agua Prieta, Sonora, Mexico, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Maracaibo, 
Venezuela. 

Fletcher Warren, of Wolfe City, Tex., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated First Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Bogota, Colombia, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 

Byron White, of Fayetteville, N. C, Vice 
Consul at Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Asuncion, Paraguay, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Lacey C. Zapf, of Nashville, Tenn., Consul at 
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, has been 
designated Commercial Attache at Canberra, 
Australia. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
EDUCATOR FROM NICARAGUA 

[Released to the press April 4] 

Dr. Salvador Mendieta, president of the Cen- 
tral University of Nicaragua in the capital 
city, Managua, arrived in Washington by plane 



APRIL 4, 1942 

April 4. He will spend two months in this 
country at the invitation of the Department of 
State. After conferring with officers of the 
Department of State and the Legation of Nica- 
ragua in Washington, and visiting the Pan 
American Union and universities and libraries 
here, Dr. Mendieta will make a several weeks' 
tour of educational centers in the East, the 
South, and on the West Coast. 

In addition to being one of the leading edu- 
cators of Central America, Dr. Mendieta is an 
author of distinguished works on national and 
international themes. His book, La Enferme- 
dad de Centro America, is an often quoted, 
acute, and frequently unsparing diagnosis of 
what he terms the "disease of Central America". 
His later works develop the same general theme, 
the necessity of cooperation and union among 
peoples. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 
SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 

Mexico 

By a letter dated March 27, 1942, the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Mexico of the Convention on the 
Provisional Administration of European Colo- 
nies and Possessions in the Americas, signed at 
the Second Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics at Habana, 
July 30, 1940 (Treaty Series 977), was deposited 
with the Union on March 21 , 1942. The instru- 
ment of ratification is dated February 19, 1942. 

Uruguay 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated March 30, 1942, that the instrument 



309 

of ratification by Uruguay of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, 
signed July 30, 1940, was deposited with the 
Union on March 26, 1942. The instrument of 
ratification is dated February 5, 1942. 



The countries which have deposited instru- 
ments of ratification of this convention, which 
entered into force on January 8, 1942, are the 
United States of America, Argentina, Brazil, 
Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, 
Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Hon- 
duras, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Uruguay, and 
Venezuela. 

CLAIMS 

Agreement With Mexico 

On April 2, 1942 the Mexican Ambassador, 
Senor Dr. Don Francisco Castillo Najera, and 
the Acting Secretary of State, the Honorable 
Sumner Welles, exchanged ratifications of the 
Claims Convention between the two countries, 
signed November 19, 1941. 1 See also release 
which appears in this Bulletin under the head- 
ing "American Republics". 

COMMERCE 

Trade-Agreement Negotiations With Mexico 

Announcement regarding the intention to ne- 
gotiate a trade agreement with Mexico, together 
with a list of products on which the United 
States will consider granting concessions to Mex- 
ico, appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Commercial Policy". 

Trade-Agreement Negotiations With Bolivia 

Announcement regarding the intention to ne- 
gotiate a trade agreement with Bolivia, together 
with a list of products on which the United 
States will consider granting concessions to Bo- 
livia, appears in this Bulletin under the heading 
"Commercial Policy". 



1 Bulletin of November 22, 1941, p. 400. 



310 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



Legislation 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Edwin A. Plitt, a Foreign Service officer 
of class IV; Mr. Frederik van den Arend, a 
Foreign Service officer of class V; Mr. Bernard 
Gufler, a Foreign Service officer of class VI; 
Mr. Eldred D. Knppinger; and Mr. Albert E. 
Clattenburg, Jr., a Foreign Service officer of 
class VII have been designated Assistant 
Chiefs of the Special Division, effective March 
28, 1942 (Departmental Order 1041). 



An Act To provide for the expeditious naturalization 
of former citizens of the United States who have lost 
United States citizenship through service with the 
Allied forces of the United States during the first or 
second World War. Approved April 2, 1942. [S. 
2339.] Public Law 513, 77th Cong. 1 p. 

Sixth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Bill for 1942: 

Hearings before subcommittees of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 
77th Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 686S : Part I, Navy 
Department (Title II) and General Appropria- 
tions (Title III) [passport agencies, pp. 287-289 
salaries, ambassadors and ministers, 1942, p. 289 
foreign-owned property control, pp. 290-30S] 
Part II, Military Activities of the War Depart- 
ment (Title I) [defense aid, pp. 11, 42]. Part 
I. 528 pp.; Part II, 210 pp. 

H. Rept. 1956, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6868. 39 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLT WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



o 



APRIL 11, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 146 — Publication 1725 



ontents 




The War Page 

Joint agricultural arrangements with Canada .... 313 
Application of Selective Service Act to Canadian 

nationals in the United States 315 

Economic assistance to North Africa 318 

Address by the American Ambassador to Cuba to the 

Cuban Chamber of Commerce in the United 

States 319 

Rules governing employment of seamen 321 

Emergency Advisory Committee for Political Defense . 322 
Arrest by Japanese of American officers in French 

Indochina 323 

Message from the President to the King of Norway . 323 
Enumeration of arms, ammunition, and implements of 

war : Proclamation by the President 323 

American Republics 

Economic collaboration with Mexico: Joint statement 
by Under Secretary Welles and Foreign Minister 
Padilla 325 

Burial of Chilean student aviator 326 

Commercial Policy 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Mexico 327 

General 

Chinese students in the United States 328 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 329 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 329 

Iovkb] 



U ' S ' s F DOCUMENTl 

28 1942 



C 



ontents-coNTimED 



Page 

Publications 329 

Treaty Information 

Claims: Convention With Mexico 330 

Legal assistance : Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of 

Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad ... 330 

Telecommunications : International Telecommunica- 
tion Convention, Revisions of Cairo, 1938 .... 330 

Extradition: Treaty With Great Britain 330 

Armed forces: Exchange of Notes With Canada Re- 
garding Application of Selective Service Act to 
Canadian Nationals in the United States .... 330 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection 
and Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemi- 
sphere 330 

Agriculture: Joint Agricultural Arrangements With 

Canada 331 

Legislation 331 

Regulations 331 



The War 



JOINT AGRICULTURAL ARRANGEMENTS WITH CANADA 



[Released to the press by the White House April 10] 

The White House announced on April 10 the 
approval by the President of two joint arrange- 
ments affecting agriculture, which were recom- 
mended by the Joint Economic Committees of 
Canada and the United States. The arrange- 
ments have also met the approval of the Prime 
Minister of Canada. The first arrangement 
provides for increasing the production of oil- 
bearing crops in the United States and of oats, 
barley, and flax in Canada, to meet wartime 
needs of both countries. The second arrange- 
ment provides for facilitating the seasonal 
movement of farm labor and machinery across 
the common boundary. 

The approval of these joint arrangements 
marks one of the first positive actions on the 
agricultural front to further closer economic 
collaboration between the two Nations in the 
common war effort. Without changing the ex- 
isting tariff structure, these arrangements pro- 
vide for more effective utilization of the joint 
agricultural resources of the two countries for 
the production of certain farm products needed 
in the war effort. 

Both Nations are confronted by a shortage of 
fats and oils due to the loss of imported supplies, 
increased wartime requirements, and the neces- 
sity of supplying substantial quantities of these 
products to our allies. The increase in the acre- 
age of oats and barley in Canada will not 
only provide more adequate feed supplies for the 
expanding livestock program of Canada but 
will make possible a greater expansion this sea- 
son of soybean production in the corn belt by 
permitting crop acreage that would otherwise be 



used for feed-grain production to be shifted 
without impairing feed resources. 

In order to bring about the desired increases 
in production, the Canadian Government has 
adopted a definite program to encourage wheat 
growers to shift surplus wheat land into oats, 
barley, and flax. The arrangement further 
strengthens the oil-crop-production-goal pro- 
gram already set up in the United States and 
will aid in the attainment of the goals. 

The joint arrangement for facilitating the 
movement of seasonal labor and used agricul- 
tural machines across the border will assist in 
lessening seasonal shortages of both labor and 
equipment which threaten to impede the war- 
time agricultural programs in both countries. 

The full texts of the approved recommenda- 
tions and arrangements are printed below. The 
President has directed the affected depart- 
ments and agencies of the Government to take 
all possible action to give effect to the joint 
arrangements. 

"Joint Economic Committees, 
Canada - United States 

"Whereas, The United States and Canada 
are confronted by a serious shortage of fats and 
oils due to inability to obtain customary imports 
owing to war operations and the shortage of 
shipping, increased wartime requirements, and 
the necessity of supjjlying substantial quanti- 
ties of these products to the United Nations, 
chiefly the United Kingdom and the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics; and 

"Whereas, The United States and Canada, in 
addition to meeting their own expanded re- 
quirements, have each undertaken to supply the 

313 



314 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



United Kingdom with extensive quantities of 
livestock products involving the necessity of 
increasing the supplies of feed grains ; and 

"Whereas, An increased supply of oil can be 
obtained by expanding the acreage of soybeans 
in the United States and of flaxseed in Canada ; 
and 

"Whereas, A material increase in feed sup- 
plies can be obtained by expanding the acreage 
of oats and barley in Canada ; and 

"Whereas, The facilitating of such a pro- 
gram of expansion would contribute to the joint 
war effort of the two countries, and at the same 
time encourage a more effective use of their 
respective resources ; 

"Therefore, The Joint Economic Committees 
of Canada and the United States recommend : 

"A. That the Governments of the two coun- 
tries, through their appropriate departments or 
agencies, undertake the following: 

"(1) The United States to increase its acre- 
age of oil-producing crops with the ob- 
ject of alleviating the impending short- 
age of oils in both the United States and 
Canada. 

"(2) Canada to increase its acreage of flax- 
seed to provide as large a volume as 
possible for domestic needs and an excess 
to offset in part the reduction in North 
American imports of vegetable oil and 
oil seeds. 

"(3) Canada to increase its acreage of oats 
and barley with the object of obtaining 
adequate supplies of feed grains for the 
expanded livestock program of Canada 
and supplementary supplies for the 
United States. 

"B. That in order to encourage such a pro- 
gram, while at the same time providing neces- 
sary assurances in the matter of market outlets, 
the respective Governments agree, effective from 
next autumn, that : 

"(1) Canada shall facilitate the delivery in 
the United States, at the then current 
United States prices, of whatever quan- 
tity of flaxseed, oats, and barley Canada 
may be in a position to supply; 



" (2) The United States shall not impose addi- 
tional restrictions on the importation of 
flaxseed, oats and barley moving from 
Canada to the United States ; 
"(3) The United States shall facilitate the 
sale to Canada, at the then current United 
States prices, of whatever quantity of 
vegetable oils or vegetable oil seeds the 
United States may be in a position to 
supply; 
"(4) Canada shall not impose additional re- 
strictions on the importation of vegetable 
oils or vegetable oil seeds moving from 
the United States to Canada. 
"February 27, 1942. 

W. A. Mackintosh 
Chairman, Canadian Committee 
Alvin H. Hansen 
Chairman, United States Committee* 



"The Joint Economic Committees of Canada 
and the United States recommend that the Gov- 
ernments of the two countries take suitable 
action : 
"(1) To permit used agricultural machines 
and their operators or normal crews, to 
move across the border without payment 
of duty, with a minimum of restrictions, 
and with such regulations as either 
country may consider necessary to in- 
sure that the machines or members of 
the crews return wil bin a specified time 
to the country from which they came. 
"(2) To facilitate the seasonal movement of 
farm labor across the common boundary 
under such rules and regulations as will 
further the efficient distribution of labor 
for peak requirements. 

"The reasons for these recommendations are : 

"Shortages of agricultural machines and of 
farm labor skilled in their use impede the war- 
time agricultural programs both in Canada and 
in the United States; and scarcities of steel and 
other metals limit the current output of labor- 
saving machinery. The movement of machines 



APRIL 11, 1942 

within each country has contributed to econo- 
mies in the use of machines and labor and 
achieved greater efficiency of agricultural out- 
put. The removal of such regulations and re- 
strictions as now impede the movements across 
the common boundary of both farm machines 
and the labor associated with them, would fur- 
ther increase their efficient use, thereby contrib- 
uting to the common war effort. 

"Seasonal requirements for farm labor espe- 
cially in adjacent areas of Canada and the 



315 

United States ordinarily occur in a time se- 
quence that gives opportunity for the move- 
ment of such labor, especially at planting and 
harvest time when labor shortage caused by the 
war might have serious effects on farm produc- 
tion in many localities on both sides of the 
border. 

"February 27, 1942. 

W. A. Mackintosh 
Chairman, Canadian Committee 
Alvin H. Hansen 
Chairman, United States Committee'''' 



APPLICATION OF SELECTIVE SERVICE ACT TO CANADIAN NATIONALS IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



[Released to the press April 10] 

The Acting Secretary of State released to the 
press the following exchange of notes between 
the Government of the United States and the 
Government of Canada in regard to the appli- 
cation of the United States Selective Training 
and Service Act of 1940, as amended, to Ca- 
nadian nationals residing in the United States. 

Under the procedure provided for in the 
agreement, Canadian nationals who have reg- 
istered under the act and who have not declared 
their intention of becoming American citizens 
may elect to serve in the Canadian armed forces. 
The detailed procedure to be followed in such 
cases is now being worked out by the Selective 
Service System and the War Department. 

The texts of the notes follow : 

The Acting Secretary of State to the Canadian 
Minister 

"March 30, 1942. 
"Sm: 

"I have the honor to refer to conversations 
which have taken place between officers of the 
Canadian Legation and of the Department with 
respect to the application of the United States 
Salective Training and Service Act of 1940, as 
amended, to Canadian nationals residing in the 
United States. 

"As you are aware the Act provides that with 
certain exceptions every male citizen of the 



United States and every other male person re- 
siding in the United States between the ages of 
18 and 65 shall register. The Act further pro- 
vides that, with certain exceptions, registrants 
within specified age limits are liable for active 
military service in the United States armed 
forces. 

"This Government recognizes that from the 
standpoint of morale of the individuals con- 
cerned and the over-all military effort of the 
countries at war with the Axis Powers, it would 
be desirable to permit certain classes of individ- 
uals who have registered or who may register 
under the Selective Training and Service Act of 
1940, as amended, to enlist in the armed forces 
of a co-belligerent country, should they desire to 
do so. It will be recalled that during the World 
War this Government signed conventions with 
certain associated powers on this subject. The 
United States Government believes, however, 
that under existing circumstances the same ends 
may now be accomplished through administra- 
tive action, thus obviating the delays incident to 
the signing and ratification of conventions. 

"This Government is prepared, therefore, to 
initiate a procedure which will permit aliens who 
have registered under the Selective Training and 
Service Act of 1940, as amended, who are na- 
tionals of co-belligerent countries and who have 
not declared their intention of becoming Amer- 



316 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ican citizens to elect to serve in the forces of 
their respective countries, in lieu of service in 
the armed forces of the United States, at any 
time prior to their induction into the armed 
forces of this country. Individuals who so elect 
will be physically examined by the armed forces 
of the United States, and if found physically 
qualified, the results of such examinations will be 
forwarded to the proper authorities of the co- 
belligerent nation for determination of accept- 
ability. Upon receipt of notification that an 
individual is acceptable and also receipt of the 
necessary travel and meal vouchers from the co- 
belligerent government involved, the appro- 
priate State Director of the Selective Service 
System will direct the local Selective Service 
Board having jurisdiction in the case to send the 
individual to a designated reception point for 
induction into active service in the armed forces 
of the co-belligerent country. If upon arrival 
it is found that the individual is not acceptable 
to the armed forces of the co-belligerent coun- 
try, he shall be liable for immediate induction 
into the armed forces of the United States. 

"Before the above-mentioned procedure will 
be made effective with respect to a co-belligerent 
country, this Department wishes to receive from 
the diplomatic representative in Washington of 
that country a note stating that his government 
desires to avail itself of the procedure and in so 
doing agrees that : 

"(a) No threat or compulsion of any nature 
will be exercised by his government to induce 
any person in the United States to enlist in 
the forces of any foreign government; 

"(b) Reciprocal treatment will be granted 
to American citizens by his government ; that 
is, prior to induction in the armed forces of 
his government they will be granted the op- 
portunity of electing to serve in the armed 
forces of the United States in substantially 
the same manner as outlined above. 

"(c) No enlistments will be accepted in the 
United States by his government of American 
citizens subject to registration or of aliens of 
any nationality who have declared their inten- 
tion of becoming American citizens and are 
subject to registration, 



"This Government is prepared to make the 
proposed regime effective immediately with re- 
spect to Canada upon the receipt from you of a 
note stating that your government desires to 
participate in it and agrees to the stipulations 
set forth in lettered paragraphs (a), (b), and 
(c) above. 

"Accept [etc.] Sumner Welles" 

The Canadian Charge d? Affaires ad interim to 
the Acting Secretary of State 

"Canadian Legation, 
"Washington, April 6, 191$. 

"Sir: 

"I have the honour to refer to your Note of 
March 30, 1942, concerning the application of 
the United States Selective Training and Serv- 
ice Act of 1940, as amended, to Canadian 
nationals residing in the United States. 

"2. In your note you make certain proposals 
which, so far as they affect Canada, may be set 
forth as follows: — 

"(1) The Government of the United 
States is prepared to initiate a procedure 
which will permit non-declarant Canadian 
nationals who register under the United 
States Selective Training and Service Act of 
1940, as amended, to elect, at any time prior 
to their induction into the Armed Forces of 
the United States, to serve in the Naval, Mili- 
tary or Air Forces of Canada in lieu of serv- 
ice in the Armed Forces of the United States. 
Individuals who elect for service with the 
Canadian Forces will be physically examined 
by the Armed Forces of the United States; 
if they are found to be physically qualified, 
the results of the examinations will be for- 
warded to the proper authorities of Canada. 
On receipt from the Canadian Government of 
notification that an individual is acceptable 
and also receipt of the necessary travel and 
meal vouchers, the appropriate State Direc- 
tor of the Selective Service System will di- 
rect the local Selective Service Board con- 
cerned to send the individual to a designated 
reception point for induction into the Naval, 



APRIL 11, 1942 



317 



Military or Air Forces of Canada. If, on ar- 
rival at the reception point, the individual is 
found to be not acceptable to the Naval, Mili- 
tary or Air Forces of Canada, he shall be 
liable for immediate induction into the 
Armed Forces of the United States. 

"(2) The Government of the United States 
is prepared to make the proposed regime ef- 
fective immediately with respect to Canada on 
receipt of a note stating that the Canadian 
Government desires to participate in the re- 
gime and agrees to the following stipula- 
tions : — 

"(a) The Canadian Government shall not 
exercise any threat or compulsion of any 
nature to induce any person in the United 
States to enlist in the Naval, Military or 
Air Forces of Canada or of any other for- 
eign Government; 

"(b) The Canadian Government shall 
grant reciprocal treatment to United States 
citizens, that is, United States citizens sub- 
ject to compulsory military service in Can- 
ada shall, prior to induction into the Naval, 
Military or Air Forces of Canada, be grant- 
ed the opportunity of electing to serve in 
the Armed Forces of the United States in 
substantially the same manner as that out- 
lined above; 

"(c) The Canadian Government shall not 
accept enlistments in the United States from 
United States citizens subject to registra- 
tion or from aliens of any nationality who 
have declared their intention of becoming 
United States citizens and are subject to 
registration. 

"3. The policy of the Canadian Government 
and Canadian legislation have been based on the 
assumption that measures applying compulsory 
military service to aliens should be founded 
upon agreement with the interested Govern- 
ments. The Canadian Government is of the 
opinion that difficulties might arise if there were 
general recognition of a right to conscript aliens, 
implying corresponding rights in other coun- 
tries to conscript Canadian nationals. The Ca- 
nadian Government, however, does not wish to 



raise a legal objection at the present time. In 
view of the close cooperation between Canada 
and the United States in the prosecution of the 
war, and in view of the time that will be saved 
and of the other undoubted, practical advantages 
to be derived from the acceptance of these 
United States proposals, the Canadian Govern- 
ment is prepared to cooperate with the Govern- 
ment of the United States by participating in 
the regime set forth above, full reciprocity on all 
points being assured by the United States 
Government. 

"4. The Canadian Government agrees to stip- 
ulation (a) on the understanding that the United 
States Government is willing, if requested, to 
make a reciprocal promise. It is understood, of 
course, that the engagement set out in stipula- 
tion (a) is limited to the present case and, fur- 
thermore, that it is not intended to prevent the 
Canadian Government from declaring the legal 
liability of Canadians everywhere, including the 
United States, to serve in the Canadian Forces, 
so long as nothing is said or done by the Cana- 
dian Government in the United States by way 
of threat or compulsion. The reason for this 
reservation is that Canada may decide in the 
future to create a general legal liability of Cana- 
dians abroad to serve in the Canadian Forces 
similar to the existing provision in the United 
States Selective Training and Service Act im- 
posing a liability on United States citizens every- 
where. If Canada creates such a liability, the 
Canadian Government would not wish to exclude 
any part of the globe. 

"5. The Canadian Government agrees to stip- 
ulation (b) on the understanding, firstly, that 
the United States Government is agreeable to 
the Canadian Government imposing a liability 
to compulsory military service on United States 
citizens residing in Canada, and secondly, that 
declarant United States citizens in Canada, like 
declarant Canadian nationals in the United 
States, will not be granted an opportunity of 
electing to serve in the armed forces of the 
country of which they are nationals. 

"6. The Canadian Government agrees to stip- 
ulation (c) on a basis of reciprocity, that is, that 
the United States will not accept enlistments in 



318 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Canada from Canadian nationals or from de- 
clarant aliens of any nationality who may be 
subject to liability to compulsory military 
service under Canadian law. 

"7. The Canadian Government assumes that 
the words 'active service in the armed forces of 
the co-belligerent country' in paragraph four 
of your Note mean, so far as Canada is con- 
cerned, full time duty in the Naval, Military or 
Air Forces of Canada. 

"8. The Canadian Government understands 
that nothing in this exchange of notes will be 
construed as imposing any obligation on the 
Canadian Government to return to the United 
States Canadian nationals who may be deemed 
to be draft delinquents under United States law. 

"9. In order that non-declarant Canadian na- 
tionals in the United States may be informed 
of the conditions of service in the Naval, Mili- 
tary and Air Forces of Canada, National De- 
fense Headquarters in Ottawa will give the 
Selective Service System of the United States 
copies of a pamphlet setting forth the condi- 
tions of service, on the understanding that the 
Selective Service System will make the pam- 
phlets available to non-declarant Canadian na- 
tionals who are called up for induction into the 
Armed Forces of the United States. 

"10. The Canadian Government trusts that 
Canadian nationals who are permanent resi- 
dents of the United States and who elect for 
service in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of 
Canada and are accepted by one of those Forces 
will be permitted to return to the United States 
at any time within six months after the termina- 
tion of their service with the Canadian Forces. 

"I have [etc.] 

H. H. Wrong 
For the Minister" 

The Acting Secretary of State to the Canadian 
Charge d' Affaires ad interim 

"April 8, 1942. 
"Sib: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note no. 222 of April 6, 1942, referring 
to my note of March 30 concerning the applica- 



tion of the United States Selective Training and 
Service Act of 1940', as amended, to Canadian 
nationals residing in the United States and stat- 
ing that the Canadian Government is prepared 
to cooperate with the Government of the United 
States by participating in the regime outlined in 
my note of March 30, on the understanding that 
full reciprocity on all points contained therein 
will be accorded by the Government of the 
United States. 

"I am pleased to inform you that the Govern- 
ment of the United States hereby assures the 
Government of Canada full reciprocity with re- 
spect to the regime in question and likewise 
agrees to the understandings, limitations, and 
assumptions set forth in numbered paragraphs 4 
through 9 inclusive of your note under acknowl- 
edgment. 

''With respect to numbered paragraph 10 of 
your note relating to the return to the United 
States of Canadian nationals who elect to serve 
in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada 
and are accepted by one of those forces, you are 
informed that the Department of State is re- 
questing the Department of Justice to recom- 
mend to the Congress of the United States the 
adoption of appropriate legislation with a view 
to simplifying to the fullest extent possible the 
reentry to the United States of the individuals 
in question at any time within six months after 
the termination of their service with the Cana- 
dian forces. 

"Accept [etc.] Sumner Welles" 

ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE TO 
NORTH AFRICA 

[Released to the press April 7] 

As a result of conversations with the French 
Government relating to a resumption of the 
program of economic assistance under the North 
African agreement, 1 satisfactory assurances 
with regard to the issues involved have been 
received from the French Government, which 
will permit the agreed departure of two French 



1 Bulletin of Nov. 22, 1941, p. 407. 



APRIL 11, 1942 



319 



vessels now in New York with cargoes of limited 
supplies for North Africa. 

Conditions governing previous shipments 
with the undertaking that the supplies thus re- 
ceived or their equivalent shall not in any way 
serve to further Axis ends will likewise regu- 
late these shipments and their distribution to 



the local populations under the direct supervi- 
sion of American control officers. No military 
supplies of any character are to be included in 
the shipments. 

It is also agreed that a simultaneous departure 
of two ships carrying materials from North 
Africa to the United States will take place. 



ADDRESS BY THE AMERICAN AMBASSADOR TO CUBA TO THE CUBAN CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE IN THE UNITED STATES 2 



[Released to the press April !)] 

Mr. Chairman, Excellency, Gentlemen : 

To be received with such cheering hospitality 
by this distinguished company, under the 
auspices of the Cuban Chamber of Commerce, is 
an honor which I shall always cherish with 
pride and satisfaction. To each of you I ex- 
press my sincerest thanks for your courtesy to 
me here today. 

Your cordial welcome makes it appropriate 
and timely that I confide in you, and through 
you in our Cuban friends, at least a few of the 
many and varied emotions which stir me on this 
fine occasion. 

To the high privilege of serving in Cuba as 
the Ambassador of the United States and of our 
great President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, 
there must be added the exhilarating pleasure 
with which I anticipate residing in that isle of 
enchantment. 

That I follow in Habana a line of our ablest 
diplomats, such as Sumner Welles, George Mes- 
sersmith, and others, impresses upon me the high 
standards of representation which have been set 
there and inspires me with ambition to approach 
those standards so far as my talents permit. 

That the friendly and cooperative relations 
which bind Cuba and the United States must en- 
dure, be fortified, and augmented is imperative. 
It places upon my illustrious colleague, His Ex- 
cellency Ambassador Concheso, 3 and me a 



' Delivered by the Honorable Spruille Braden April 
9, 1942. 
s Cuban Ambassador to the United States. 

454227—42 2 



measure of responsibility to which we are fully 
alert. Moreover, especially in these grave times, 
it exacts from all of us — Cubans or Americans — 
our utmost effort. 

To the attainment of these and related ends I 
shall unremittingly dedicate my every thought 
and action. 

Never have falsehood, treachery, and murder 
been so exalted as principles of government as by 
Hitler, Tojo, and their accomplices. Never have 
whole nations been so morally debauched as are 
the followers of those perfidious gangsters. 

Never has liberty been so imperiled. Even 
had the American republics failed to win their 
independence, life for them would have been 
incomparably more endurable than it possibly 
could be under the heel of our present enemies. 

As one peace-loving nation after another has 
tragically learned, no people is safe from unpro- 
voked and cruel aggression. Never, never before 
have the American republics been so menaced as 
they are now by those ruthless fanatics who, in 
order to dominate all that is on the earth, would 
destroy civilization and, if needs be, even hu- 
manity itself. To compromise with such is un- 
thinkable. The issue is clearly defined: if we 
are to survive, they must perish ; our system and 
theirs cannot exist in the same world. 

For years the preparations by these would-be 
conquerors for the impending conflict distorted 
commerce, industry, and finance, until finally 
actual hostilities have destroyed trade and tran- 
quillity over vast areas. It is therefore perti- 



320 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



nent to recollect that clue solely to the efficient 
functioning of our prescient inter-American 
system, the evil consequences of these develop- 
ments have so far been largely minimized on 
this hemisphere. 

The United States will continue by all appro- 
priate means to assist its neighbors; it will pur- 
chase liberally from them; it will aid their pub- 
lic works ; it will help their industries, especially 
in the production of strategic materials; it will 
seek to supply their needs with at least as favor- 
able treatment as we accord our own civilian 
requirements; and it will make secure our inter- 
American transportation media. 

Nevertheless, I would be less than candid did 
I not emphasize that despite all our combined 
exertions every country and every citizen of 
North, Central, and South America will have 
to undergo hardship and privation. This all- 
embracing conflict in which we are engaged is 
a veritable cataclysm. Its repercussions — eco- 
nomic, political, and social — cannot be other- 
wise than brutally devastal ing. To win the war 
may involve a fabulous expenditure of life and 
property, but if thereby we preserve the funda- 
mentals of our Christian moralit} 7 and of our 
democratic systems of government, we will reso- 
lutely pay the price. 

To win the war will require the unreserved 
dedication and concerted effort of the Amer- 
ican republics. In this endeavor Cuba and the 
United States will be in the forefront. By geo- 
graphical propinquity and for their common 
weal they are in all ways inextricably inter- 
dependent. I use the word "interdependent" 
not in the selfish sense of what either one may 
acquire from the other but in the sense of the 
good-neighbor policy of self-respect and respect 
for the other and for the other's rights. Finally 
and most important, there is interdependence in 
our ideals and traditions: ideals of liberty and 
of equality before the law both between indi- 
viduals and between nations, and a tradition of 
willingness to give all that we have and all that 
we are for these ideals. 

It is well to restate those truths today, when 
the democracies, precisely because they loved 
peace so ardently, were blind to the gathering 



clouds of war and are suffering because they 
did not prepare for it opportunely or adequate- 
ly. However, it is encouraging to recall how 
Cuban patriots throughout the nineteenth cen- 
tury met setback after setback; how, to defeat 
the toe. they freed their slaves and burned their 
properties; how Marti, the apostle of independ- 
ence, gave his life at Dos Rios; and how ulti- 
mately these heroes, never discouraged by 
adversity, struggled on to found a sovereign 
nation. 

Similarly, our forefathers stoically accepted 
defeat upon defeat — Lexington, the evacuation 
of Boston, Long Island, New York, the retreat 
through New Jersey, and the agonies at Valley 
Forge — until they too founded a sovereign 
nation. 

Peoples nurtured in these traditions of inde- 
fatigable consecration and determination will 
not lie discouraged by reverses. They will face 
disappointments and temporary defeats, learn 
lessons therefrom, and come back to win. De- 
spite all the complicated readjustments in the 
methods and quality of our living conditions 
and the mistakes made in learning a new job, 
we will have more and better arms, more and 
better materiel, and more and better fighting 
men than our opponents. But, what will be far 
more decisive, we will be inspired by ideals of 
liberty and decency. Cuba and the United 
States, shoulder to shoulder, spiritually and 
physically, will go forward to victory. The 
triumph will be ours! 

When that day of rejoicing comes, there will 
be no rest since only half the task will be done. 
We will have to exert ourselves no less than 
now, not merely to heal our wounds, but with 
other independent countries to build for pos- 
terity a new world of security, of honesty, and 
of progress. 

We shall have to proceed so that all men, 
freely and without fear, may elect the govern- 
ments they desire and so live in dignity and 
confidence. There will have to be equality of 
opportunity in economic and social matters. 
Justice must become a reality for nations and 
individuals. There must be genuine freedom of 
the seas and an opening of trade channels every- 



APRIL 11, 1942 



321 



where, with equality of access to raw materials. 
There should be intellectual collaboration and 
the most complete interchange of ideas and of 
works of art and of science. Force and threats 
thereof must be eliminated from international 
relations. Instead, under a system of law and 
consultation, there must be a strict observance of 
treaties, of non-intervention, and of mutual con- 
sideration. There must be progressive disarma- 
ment and firm security for large and small, for 
strong and weak. 

These are among the main objectives sought 
by the American governments. Their attain- 
ment is no Utopian dream. On the contrary, the 
ideals of today will be the practical necessities 
of tomorrow. Just as cannibalism, human sac- 
rifice, slavery, and other evils have been eradi- 
cated through the ages, so shall war, deception, 
and injustice be removed from dealings between 



nations. Great strides toward the fulfilment of 
these aspirations have already been made in the 
Western Hemisphere, thus proving that ideals 
can be made to work in benefit of all concerned. 
That is a basic accomplishment of the good- 
neighbor policy. The many measures of an eco- 
nomic or cultural character now under way are 
valuable implements of our foreign policy ; but 
its fundamental achievements are the peace, tol- 
erance, and frank confidence which prevail be- 
tween the 21 American republics and which are 
so conspicuously demonstrated by the relation- 
ship of Cuba and the United States. They are 
friends — intimate friends — attached each to the 
other by sentiments of affection, esteem, and 
trust. As in 1898 they were allied to gain lib- 
erty, now they are allies to preserve liberty. 

It is in that spirit I assume the pleasurable 
duties which lie before me in Cuba. 



RULES GOVERNING EMPLOYMENT OF SEAMEN 



[Released to the press April 9] 

The Special Interdepartmental Committee on 
Maritime Labor set up by the Department of 
State, the Department of Justice, and the War 
Shipping Administrator on February 14, 1942 
reported on April 9 to the Acting Secretary of 
State, the Attorney General, and the War Ship- 
ping Administrator. 

Its report dealt with the problems resulting 
from the fact that seamen on United Nations 
ships, under American law, could freely leave 
their ships and transfer to other United Nations 
ships. The practice of "floating" from ships of 
one flag to ships of other flags has occasioned 
delay in prompt turn-around of vessels engaged 
in the war effort. 

The Committee reported that it had secured 
adoption by the War Shipping Administrator 
of rules having the following results : 1 

(1) Employment on Panamanian and Hon- 
duran ships has in substance been closed to all 
United Nations sailors (other than Americans, 
Hondurans, and Panamanians) not heretofore 



1 7 Federal Register 2761. 



or presently employed on such ships. The 
Panamanian and Honduran fleets are thus elim- 
inated as competitors for LTnited Nations sea- 
men. 

(2) That ships flying the United States flag 
be permitted to employ no seamen of the United 
Nations (other than Americans) except: 

(a) Alien seamen employed on American 
ships on or prior to April 8, 1942; 

(b) Alien seamen of the United Nations, 
other than Canada, situated in the West- 
ern Hemisphere ; 

(c) Alien seamen presently in the United 
States who have not been at sea or on 
ships (other than American) subsequent 
to September 1, 1939. 

In addition to the foregoing: 

(1) The Committee has recommended, and 
the Department of Justice has instituted, en- 
forcement of the laws against inducing illegal 
entries of seamen into the United States. 

(2) Through the Immigration Service and 
with the assistance of the Bureau of Marine 



322 

Inspection and Navigation, the Committee has 
instituted an informal spot conciliation and in- 
spection service so that disputes which can be 
settled on the ship can be heard and disposed 
of immediately and without delay, and so that 
in respect of conditions such remedial action 
as is practicable can, where required, be 
promptly secured. 

(3) On recommendation of the Committee, 
the Department of Justice has made certain var- 
iations in its immigration practice. Shore leave 
has been substituted for the presumption that a 
seaman has a right to enter the United States 
seeking other maritime employment. The rule 
with regard to holding on board mala-fide sea- 
men has been strengthened. 

(4) "With the cooperation of the Federal Se- 
curity Administration and of the Coast Guard, 
the Committee is presently working on measures 
which it is hoped will improve the morale of sea- 
men. Included in this program are : (a) a better 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

patrolling of port areas; (b) better provisions 
for sailors ashore; (c) provision for clubs and 
facilities for sailors who are either on furlough 
or awaiting ships. 

The results of the measures taken have already 
substantially reduced the difficulty. More 
United Nations seamen have presented them- 
selves as willing to ship out, and the number of 
seamen who have been "floating" has been ma- 
terially reduced. 

The measures taken were made possible 
through the cooperation of Admiral E. S. Land, 
War Shipping Administrator; Attorney Gen- 
eral Francis Biddle; the Federal Security Ad- 
ministration ; and the Coast Guard. 

The Committee is composed of A. A. Berle, 
Jr., Assistant Secretary of State, Chairman; 
Marshall E. Dimock, Associate Commissioner, 
Immigration and Naturalization Service; and 
Commissioner Edward Macauley and Robert G. 
Hooker, Jr., representing the War Shipping 
Administrator. 



EMERGENCY ADVISORY COMMITTEE FOR POLITICAL DEFENSE 



[Released to the press April 0] 

The Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union has invited the Government of the United 
States to designate one of the seven members of 
the Emergency Advisory Committee for Po- 
litical Defense, which is being constituted pur- 
suant to a resolution of the Third Meeting of the 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the American 
Republics, held in Rio de Janeiro in January 
1942. 

With the approval of the President, Mr. Carl 
Spaeth, former Director of the American Hem- 
isphere Office of the Board of Economic War- 
fare, and former Assistant Coordinator of 
Inter- American Affairs, has been designated a 
member of the Committee. 

The Emergency Advisory Committee for Po- 
litical Defense will study and recommend to each 



of the American governments members of the 
Pan American Union appropriate measures for 
the control of sabotage and all other types of 
subversive activities directed by extracontinen- 
tal forces against the ideals and security of the 
Western Hemisphere. The members of the 
Committee will serve not only as spokesmen for 
their respective governments but also as the rep- 
resentatives of all the American republics in a 
collective sense. 

The Committee will establish headquarters at 
Montevideo upon the invitation of the Govern- 
ment of Uruguay and it is anticipated that it 
will continue its activities for the duration of 
the present emergency. The inaugural meet- 
ing of the Committee is scheduled to be held on 
April 15. 



APRIL 11, 1942 



323 



ARREST BY JAPANESE OF AMERICAN 
OFFICERS IN FRENCH INDOCHINA 

[Released to the press April 10] 

The French Foreign Office on about March 
28 informed the American Ambassador at 
Vichy, Admiral William D. Leahy, that the fol- 
lowing information had been received from the 
Governor General of Indochina. 

A captain, an aviation lieutenant, and three 
aviation sergeant mechanics of the American 
Army in a large American launch (15 by 3 
meters) on March 22 arrived at a point close 
to a lighthouse in Tourane Bay. The captain 
remained in the launch, but the other four were 
arrested by Japanese troops and sent to Japanese 
barracks nearby. The Governor General in- 
structed the French Resident to take possession 
of the launch and to intern the commanding 
officer. At the same time the Governor General 
requested the Japanese mission to turn over the 
four Americans to French authorities. The 
Japanese, over French protest, seized the 
launch and arrested the captain. The Governor 
General has made numerous demarches to the 
Japanese authorities but up to the time of re- 
porting had been unable to obtain the release 



of the captured Americans to French jurisdic- 
tion. He was continuing his efforts. 

The Department of State has instructed Am- 
bassador Leahy to urge the French Govern- 
ment to continue its efforts to cause the sur- 
render of the five Americans to the French 
authorities. 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT TO THE 
KING OF NORWAY 

[Released to the press April 9] 

The President addressed the following tele- 
gram on April 9, 1942, to His Majesty King 
Haakon VII of Norway : 

"On April 9 two years ago Nazi hordes 
shocked the civilized world by invading with- 
out any provocation your peaceful and law- 
abiding country. 

"Your Majesty's faith and the faith of the 
Norwegian people in the cause of democracy and 
the ultimate victory of the forces resisting ag- 
gression has been and continues to be an inspira- 
tion to the peoples of the United Nations. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



ENUMERATION OF ARMS, AMMUNITION, AND IMPLEMENTS OF WAR 
PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press April 9] 

On April 9 the President issued the following 
proclamation (no. 2549) on "Enumeration of 
Arms, Ammunition, and Implements of War" : 

"Whereas section 12 (i) of the joint resolu- 
tion of Congress approved November 4, 1939, 
entitled 'Joint resolution to preserve the neu- 
trality and the peace of the United States and 
to secure the safety of its citizens and their 
interests', provides in part as follows (54 Stat. 
11 ; 22 U. S. C. 452 (i)): 

" 'The President is hereby authorized to pro- 
claim upon recommendation of the Board from 
time to time a list of articles which shall be 



considered arms, ammunition, and implements 
of war for the purposes of this section . . .' 

"Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, 
President of the United States of America, act- 
ing under and by virtue of the authority con- 
ferred upon me by the said joint resolution of 
Congress, and pursuant to the recommendation 
of the National Munitions Control Board, de- 
clare and proclaim that the articles listed below 
shall, on and after April 15, 1942, be considered 
arms, ammunition, and implements of war for 
the purposes of section 12 (i) of the said joint 
resolution of Congress : 



324 

"Category I 

"(1) Rifles and carbines using ammunition 
in excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons ; 

"(2) Machine guns, automatic or autoloading 
rifles, and machine pistols using ammunition in 
excess of caliber .22, and barrels for those 
weapons; machine-gun mounts; 

"(3) Guns, howitzers, and mortars of all cali- 
bers, their mountings and barrels; 

" (4) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1), (2), and (3) 
above, and cartridge cases or bullets for such 
ammunition ; shells and projectiles, filled or un- 
filled, for the arms enumerated under (3) 
above ; 

"(5) Grenades, bombs, torpedoes, mines and 
depth charges, filled or unfilled, and apparatus 
for their use or discharge ; 

"(6) Tanks, military armored vehicles, and 
armored trains; armor plate and turrets for 
such vehicles. 
"Category II 

"Vessels of war of all kinds, including aircraft 
carriers and submarines, and armor plate and 
turrets for such vessels. 
"Category HI 

"(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled, or 
dismantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
which are designed, adapted, and intended for 
aerial combat by the use of machine guns or of 
artillery or for the carrying and dropping of 
bombs, or which are equipped with, or which by 
reason of design or construction are prepared 
for, any of the appliances referred to in para- 
graph (2)T)elow; 

"(2) Aerial gun mounts and frames, bomb 
racks, torpedo carriers, and bomb-release or tor- 
pedo-release mechanisms; armor plate and tur- 
rets for military aircraft. 

"Category IV 

"(1) Revolvers and automatic pistols using 
ammunition in excess of caliber .22 ; 

" (2) Ammunition in excess of caliber .22 for 
the arms enumerated under (1) above, and car- 
tridge cases or bullets for such ammunition. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

"Category V 

"(1) Aircraft, unassembled, assembled or 
dismantled, both heavier and lighter than air, 
other than those included in category III ; 

"(2) Propellers or air-screws, fuselages, 
hulls, wings, tail units, and under-carriage 
units; 

"(3) Aircraft engines, unassembled, assem- 
bled, or dismantled. 
"Category VI 

"(1) Livens projectors, flame throwers, and 
fire-barrage projectors; 

"(2) a. Mustard gas, (dichlorethyl sul- 
phide) ; 

b. Lewisite (chlorvinyldichlorarsine 

and dichlordivinylchlorarsine) ; 

c. Methyldichlorarsine ; 

d. Diphenylchlorarsine ; 

e. Diphenylcyanarsine; 

f . Dipheny laminechlorarsine ; 

g. Phenyldichlorarsine; 
h. Ethyldichlorarsine ; 

i. Phenyldibromarsine ; 

j. Ethyldibromarsine; 

k. Phosgene ; 

1. Monochlormethylchlorf ormate ; 
m. Trichlormethylchlorformate (di- 
phosgene) ; 

n. Dichlordimethyl ether; 

o. Dibromdimethyl ether ; 

p. Cyanogen chloride; 

q. Ethylbromacetate ; 

r. Ethyliodoacetate; 

s. Brombenzylcyanide ; 

t. Bromacetone ; 

u. Biommethylethyl ketone. 
"Category VII 

"(1) Propellant powders; 
"(2) High explosives as follows: 

a. Nitrocellulose having a nitrogen con- 

tent of more than 12%; 

b. Trinitrotoluene; 

c. Trinitroxylene; 

d. Tetryl (trinitrophenol methyl nitra- 

mine or 'tetranitro methylani- 
line') ; 

e. Picric acid; 



APRIL U, 1942 



325 



f. Ammonium picrate; 

g. Trinitroanisol; 

h. Trinitronaphthalene ; 
i. Tetranitronaphthalene ; 

j. Hexanitrodiphenylamine ; 

k. Pentaerythritetetranitrate (penthrite 
or pentrite) ; 

1. Trimethylenetrinitramine (hexogen 
orT 4 ); 

m. Potassium nitrate powders (black 
saltpeter powder) ; 

n. Sodium nitrate powders (black soda 
powder) ; 

o. Amatol (mixture of ammonium ni- 
trate and trinitrotoluene) ; 

p. Ammonal (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate, trinitrotoluene, and pow- 
dered aluminum, with or without 
other ingredients) ; 



q. Schneiderite (mixture of ammonium 
nitrate and dinitronaphthalene, 
with or without other ingredients). 

"Effective April 15, 1942, this proclamation 
shall supersede Proclamation 2237, dated May 
1, 1937, entitled 'Enumeration of Arms, Am- 
munition, and Implements of War'. 

"In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand and caused the Seal of the United States 
of America to be affixed. 

"Done at the city of Washington this 9th 
day of April in the year of our Lord nineteen 
hundred and forty-two, and of the Independence 
of the United States of America the one hun- 
dred and sixty-sixth." 



American Republics 



ECONOMIC COLLABORATION WITH MEXICO 
JOINT STATEMENT BY UNDER SECRETARY WELLES AND FOREIGN MINISTER PADILLA 



[Released to the press April 8] 

It has been not only a pleasure for us to 
renew our friendship formed at the meeting 
of Foreign Ministers at Rio de Janeiro but also 
a very real opportunity for exchanging views 
and reaching agreements regarding matters of 
the first magnitude to the two countries. 

In the short space of a few days we have 
agreed on a number of arrangements that not 
only will develop the economic life of Mexico 
and the United States but will greatly speed the 
war effort of the United States. 

(1) Trade agreennent. 

Last fall our two Governments agreed to 
study the possibilities of negotiating a trade 
agreement to expand commerce between the two 
countries. The preliminary studies having in- 
dicated that a satisfactory basis for a trade 
agreement exists, our two Governments made 
formal announcement on April 4 of their 



intention to negotiate a trade agreement. Nego- 
tiations will begin immediately after the com- 
pletion of the public hearings required by United 
States procedure, which will be held beginning 
May 18. 

{2) Industrial enterprises. 

Continuing the program of cooperation in the 
development of industries in Mexico which was 
undertaken last fall, we have agreed that our 
two Governments shall collaborate in the estab- 
lishment in Mexico of a series of basic indus- 
tries to meet Mexican consumption needs and 
to supply goods required by the war effort of 
the United States. These industries will be 
established in Mexico through cooperation be- 
tween private investors and the Mexican Gov- 
ernment, and the Export -Import Bank will give 
careful consideration to the possibility of pro- 
viding through the Nacional Financiera, S.A., 
credits for the acquisition in individual cases in 



326 

the United States of materials and equipment 
that cannot be provided in Mexico. The obliga- 
tions thus acquired by the Export-Import 
Bank will bear the guaranty of the Mexican 
Government. 

Several important specific projects are under 
consideration, including a steel- and tin-plate 
rolling mill. In the granting of priority rating 
for the machinery, equipment, or other material 
produced in the United States, the paramount 
criterion will be the degree to which each spe- 
cific project contributes to the war effort of the 
United States and the security of the hemi- 
sphere. 

(3) Priorities and allocations. 

"We have had mutually beneficial conversa- 
tions regarding the organization and procedure 
for handling priorities and allocations matters, 
and arrangements have been concluded for the 
Mexican Under Secretary of Finance, Licen- 
ciado Kampn Beteta, to establish a special office 
and organization in Washington for purposes 
of insuring the closest collaboration with the 
appropriate authorities of the United States. 
The allocation for the second quarter of 1942 by 
the Government of the United States of specific 
quantities of 45 major export articles, which was 
announced on April 4, provides a definite work- 
ing basis for export commerce between the 
United States and Mexico based on careful ex- 
amination of Mexico's needs in relation to the 
war production effort of the United States. 

(4) Mexican railways. 

"We have agreed that an immediate survey of 
the needs of the Mexican railway-transporta- 
tion system is highly desirable in order to deter- 
mine the materials that are required to enable 
this system to function properly in the support 
of Mexico's economy in order to permit it to 
transport to the United States the strategic war 
materials being produced in ever-increasing 
quantities in Mexico. A United States expert 
has been sent to Mexico to make this study 
jointly with an expert appointed by the Mexi- 
can Government. They have been requested 
to present their report within 30 days. In 
anticipation of the report of these experts, the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

War Production Board is taking into con- 
sideration Mexico's needs of rolling stock in 
formulating the United States manufacturing 
program of such materiel for the coming year. 

(5) Shipyai'ds. 

In view of the urgent need for cargo vessels 
and of the existence of certain shipbuilding 
facilities in Mexico, we have agreed that experts 
from our two Governments should immediately 
determine what construction of small cargo ves- 
sels in Mexico is feasible. On the basis of this 
study the United States Government will en- 
deavor, taking into account the demand in the 
United States for shipbuilding, to make avail- 
able to Mexico the materiel and the tools 
required. 

(6) Iligh-octane gasoline plant. 

In view of the desirability of establishing a 
high-octane gasoline plant in Mexico, we have 
agreed that a plant should be constructed as 
soon as the necessary equipment can be spared. 

BURIAL OF CHILEAN STUDENT 
AVIATOR 

[Released to the press April 6] 

Epifanio J. Sobrino, a Chilean student en- 
gaged in aviation training under the inter- 
American program of the United States 
Government, crashed on March 28, 1942 while 
on a routine training flight at Garner Field, 
Uvalde, Tex. He was buried at Arlington Na- 
tional Cemetery on April 6 following requiem 
services which took place at Arlington Chapel. 
The staff of the Chilean Embassy and repre- 
sentatives of the Civil Aeronautics Administra- 
tion, the Defense Supplies Corporation, the 
War Department, and the State Department 
were present. 

His brother, Seiior Ernesto Sobrino, a pilot 
trainee under the same program at Plains Air- 
ways, Cheyenne, "Wyo., accompanied the body 
from Texas. Senorita Felise Sobrino, a sister, 
resides at Glendale, Calif. 



Commercial Policy 



TRADE - AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS WITH MEXICO 



[Released to the press April 11 ] 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act to 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 
public notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement with the Government of Mexico was 
issued on April 4, 1942. In connection with 
that notice, the Acting Secretary of State pub- 
lished a list of products on which the United 
States will consider the granting of concessions 
to Mexico, and announced that concessions on 
products not included in the list would not be 
considered unless supplementary announcement 
were made. 

The Acting Secretary of State now announces 
that the products described below have been 
added to the list issued on April 4, 1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
has prescribed that all information and views 
in writing and all applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views relating to products 
included in this supplementary list shall be 
submitted to it not later than 12 o'clock noon, 
May 4, 1942. They should be addressed to "The 
Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity Informa- 
tion, Tariff Commission Building, Eighth and 
E Streets NW., Washington, D. C." Supple- 
mental oral statements with regard to any prod- 
uct contained in the supplementary list will be 
heard at the public hearing beginning at 10 a.m. 
on May 18, 1942, before the Committee for 
Reciprocity Information, in the hearing room 
of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff Commis- 
sion Building, unless persons interested in these 
products request that they be heard at a later 
date acceptable to the Committee. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and con- 
tent of presentations addressed to the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information are included in a 
statement released by that Committee on 
December 13, 1937. 



Committee tor Reciprocity Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with mexico 

Public Notice 

Supplementary List of Products 

Closing date for submission of briefs, May 4. 
1942 ; closing date for application to be heard, 
May 4, 1942; public hearings open, May 18, 
1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, with re- 
gard to the supplementary list of products 
announced by the Acting Secretary of State on 
this date in connection with the negotiation of a 
trade agreement with the Government of 
Mexico, shall be submitted to the Committee for 
Reciprocity Information not later than 12 
o'clock noon, May 4, 1942. Such communica- 
tions should be addressed to "The Chairman, 
Committee for Reciprocity Information, Tariff 
Commission Building, Eighth and E Streets 
NW., Washington, D. C." 

A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a. m. on May 18, 1942, before the Committee 
for [Reciprocity Information, in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, when supplemental oral 
statements will be heard with regard to the 
products contained in the supplementary list, 
unless persons interested in these products re- 
quest that they be heard at a later date accept- 
able to the Committee. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 

827 



328 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Keci- 
procity Information this 11th day of April 
1942. 

E. M. Whitcomb 
Acting Secretary 
Washington, D.C., 
April 11, 1942. 

In the event that articles which are at present 
regarded as classifiable under the descriptions 
included in the following list are excluded there- 
from by judicial decision or otherwise prior to 
the conclusion of the agreement, the list will 
nevertheless be considered as including such 
articles. 



United 
States 

Tariff Act 
of 1930 

Paragraph 



Description of article 



Distilled spirits, not specially provided 

for. 
Leather (except leather provided for 
in subparagraph (d) of paragraph 
1530 of the Tariff Act of 1930), 
made from hides or skins of cattle 
of the bovine species: 
(1) Sole or belting leather (including 
offal), rough, partly finished, 
finished, curried, or cut or 
wholly or partly manufactured 
into outer or inner soles, blocks, 
strips, counters, taps, box toes, 
or any forms or shapes suitable 
for conversion into boots, shoes, 
footwear, or belting. 
Photographic-film negatives, imported 
in any form, for use in any way in 
connection with moving-picture 
exhibits, or for making or repro- 
ducing pictures for such exhibits, 
except undeveloped negative 
moving-picture film of American 
manufacture exposed abroad for 
silent or sound news reel: 

Exposed but not developed 

Exposed and developed _. 

Photographic-film positives, imported 
in any form, for use in any way in 
connection with moving-picture 
exhibits, including berein all mov- 
ing, motion, motophotography, 
or cinematography film pictures, 
prints, positives, or duplicates of 
every kind and nature, and of 
whatever substance made. 



Present rate of 
duty 



15 per proof gal- 
lon. 



1i per lin. ft. 
3( per lin. ft. 
It per lin. ft. 



General 



"In the trade agreement with the United Kingdom, effective January 
1, 1939, the rate ot duty on articles classified under this subparagraph was 
reduced from 12H percent ad valorem to 10 percent ad valorem. 



CHINESE STUDENTS IN THE 
UNITED STATES 

[Released to the press April 9] 

As a result of abnormal conditions arising out 
of the war, a number of the approximately 950 
Chinese students now in the United States are 
unable to continue their studies or to return to 
China. In view of this situation, arrangements 
have been made with the Department of Justice 
to permit such students, in case of need, to 
accept employment in this country. 

A few Chinese scientific and technical stu- 
dents have already been employed by American 
industrial, transportation, and scientific organ- 
izations. It is hoped that additional students 
may be placed in American industry and that 
other Chinese students may find employment in 
educational institutions, libraries, foundations, 
hospitals, publishing houses, etc. 

Organizations and individuals interested in 
obtaining information in regard to the quali- 
fications of Chinese students should communi- 
cate with the Director of the China Institute in 
America, an agent of the Chinese Government, 
at 119 West Fifty-seventh Street, New York, 
N.Y. In cases where employment would in- 
volve work under "classified" war contracts, the 
organization concerned should also communi- 
cate with the War Department or the Navy 
Department, which will furnish the alien- 
questionnaire forms whereby necessary per- 
mission is obtained for non-American employees 
to work in certain restricted plants. The War 
Department and the Navy Department state 
that a number of Chinese students have already 
been approved for work on such war production 
and that immediate attention will be given to 
applications. 

The Department of State is confident that 
American industrial, educational, and other 
organizations and individuals will respond to 
the opportunity which is offered to assist Chi- 
nese students in this emergency. Such response 



APRIL 11, 1942 



329 



would not only help to solve financial problems 
which confront the students thus affected but 
would be of assistance to China in the prosecu- 
tion of her war effort by enabling additional 
numbers of her young men to acquire practical 
training along lines which would make them 
immediately available for useful service to 
their country upon their return to China. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press April 11] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 4, 1942 : 

Austin C. Brady, of Santa Fe, N. Mex., for- 
merly Consul General at Rangoon, Burma, is 
retiring from the Foreign Service effective 
June 1, 1942. 

Theodore J. Hadraba, of Omaha, Nebr., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation at 
Bern, Switzerland. 

George J. Haering, of Huntington Station, 
N. Y., Consul at Vigo, Spain, has been desig- 
nated Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul 
at Madrid, Spain, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

The assignment of Douglas Henderson, of 
Weston, Mass., as Vice Consul at Colon, Pan- 
ama, has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 
Henderson has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Nogales, Sonora, Mexico. 

Philip Holland, of Jackson, Tenn., Consul 
General at Liverpool, England, is retiring from 
the Foreign Service effective September 1, 1942. 

J. Winsor Ives, of Champaigne, 111., Consul 
at Lisbon, Portugal, has been designated Com- 
mercial Attache at Lisbon, Portugal. 

Stuart W. Rockwell, of Radnor, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Panama, Panama, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice 
Consul at Panama, Panama, and will serve in 
dual capacity. 



James P. Speer, 2d, of Comanche, Okla,, 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Mexico, D.F., Mexico, has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Valdivia, Chile. 

Laurence W. Taylor, of Bakersfield, Calif., 
formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at Paris, 
France, has been assigned as Consul at Brazza- 
ville, French Equatorial Africa, where an 
American Consulate General will be established. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Felton M. Johnston was appointed 
Assistant to Assistant Secretary of State (Mr. 
Long) on legislative matters, effective on 
April 1, 1942 (Departmental Order 1042). 



Publications 



Department of State 

The Program of the Department of State in Cultural 
Relations. Reprinted from the "Department of State 
Appropriation Bill for 1943: Hearings Before the 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, 
House of Representatives, Seventy-seventh Congress, 
Second Session, on the Department of State Appro- 
priation Bill for 1943." Inter-American Series 21. 
Publication 1702. 32 pp. 50. 

Laws and Regulations Affecting the Control of Persons 
Entering and Leaving the United States. February 
1, 1942. Publication 1709. iv, 43 pp. 100. 

Expropriation of Petroleum Properties : Agreement Be- 
tween the United States of America and Mexico — 
Effected by exchange of notes signed November 19, 
1941. Executive Agreement Series 234. Publication 
1710. 7 pp. 50. 

Foreign Consular Offices in the United States. Febru- 
ary 1, 1942. Publication 1715. iv, 49 pp. 150. 

Other Government Agencies 

Foreign Trade of the United States in Agricultural 
Products [statistics for year 1941]. 1942. (Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 53 pp. 100. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



CLAIMS 

Convention With Mexico 

On April 9, 1942 the President proclaimed 
the Convention for the Adjustment and Settle- 
ment of Certain Outstanding Claims between 
the United States and Mexico, which was 
signed at Washington on November 19, 1941. 

LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

United States 

On April 3, 1942 the President ratified the 
Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad, which was 
opened for signature at the Pan American 
Union on February 17, 1940 and was signed ad 
referendum on behalf of the United States on 
October 3, 1941. 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Convention, 
Revisions of Cairo, 1938 

French Colonies 

According to information contained in notifi- 
cation 395, dated November 16, 1941, from the 
International ' Telecommunication Union at 
Bern the Bureau received on October 23, 1941 
a letter from the Secretary of State of the 
Colonies at Vichy stating that the French Gov- 
ernment had approved for the French Colonies 
the following revisions of the Regulations an- 
nexed to the International Telecommunication 
Convention of 1932, as adopted at Cairo on 
April 8, 1938 : The Telegraph Regulations and 
Final Protocol, the General Radio Regulations 
and Final Protocol, and the Additional Radio 
Regulations and Additional Protocol. 
330 



EXTRADITION 



Treaty With Great Britain 

India 

By a note dated March 29, 1942 the British 
Ambassador at Washington gave notice to the 
Secretary of State of the accession of His 
Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ireland and 
the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Em- 
peror of India, on behalf of India to the Extradi- 
tion Treaty between the United States and 
Great Britain signed on December 22, 1931. 
The notice is given under the terms of article 
14 of the treaty and states that according to the 
Order in Council dated February 23, 1942, the 
accession should have effect as from the ninth 
of March 1942. 

ARMED FORCES 

Exchange of Notes With Canada Regarding Ap- 
plication of Selective Service Act to Canadian 
Nationals in the United States 

The texts of notes exchanged between the 
Acting Secretary of State, Sumner Welles, and 
the Canadian Charge d'Affaires ad interim, 
Hume H. Wrong, in regard to the application 
of the United States Selective Training and 
Service Act of 1940, as amended, to Canadian 
nationals residing in the United States, appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "The War". 

FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

Mexico 

The Director General of the Pan American 
Union informed the Secretary of State by a 
letter dated April 7, 1942 that the instrument of 



APRIL 11, 1942 



331 



ratification by Mexico of the Convention on 
Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation in 
the Western Hemisphere, which was opened for 
signature at the Pan American Union on Octo- 
ber 12, 1940, was deposited with the Union on 
March 27, 1942. The instrument of ratification 
is dated February 26, 1942. 

AGRICULTURE 
Joint Agricultural Arrangements With Canada 

An announcement regarding the approval by 
the President of two joint arrangements affect- 
ing agriculture, which were recommended by 
the Joint Economic Committees of Canada and 
the United States, together with the texts of 
the recommendations, appears in this Bulletin 
under the heading "The War". 



Legislation 



Development of United States Foreign Policy: Ad- 
dresses and Messages of Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
Compiled from official sources, intended to present 
the chronological development of the foreign policy 
of the United States from the announcement of the 
good-neighbor policy in 1933, including the war decla- 
rations. S. Doc. 188, 77th Cong. 150 pp. 
Sixth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Bill for 1942 : 
Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Commit- 
tee on Appropriations, United States Senate, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 6868. 219 pp. 
S. Rept. 1257, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6868. 8 pp. 
Red Cross Convention of 1929 : Message from the Presi- 
dent of the United States transmitting a report from 
the Acting Secretary of State with an accompany- 
ing draft bill, designed the more effectively to carry 
out our obligations under the Red Cross Convention 
of 1929. H. Doc. 693, 77th Cong. 3 pp. 



Regulations 



Restriction of Employment of Certain Foreign Nationals 
on Vessels. April 9, 1942. (War Shipping Adminis- 
tration.) 7 Federal Register 2761. 



f PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — IMce 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOn OP THE BTJBEAU Off THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 

APRIL 18, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 147 — Publication 1731 

(^ ontents 

The War p age 

United States policy toward France and the French 

people 335 

Coordination of air training programs of the United Na- 
tions: Joint statement by the President of the United 

States and the Prime Minister of Canada 336 

Economic assistance to North Africa 337 

Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, Supple- 
ment 3 to Revision I 337 

Additional duties of the Board of Economic Warfare . . . 337 
Severances of diplomatic relations 338 

American Republics 

Compensation for petroleum properties expropriated in 
Mexico : 

Agreement with Mexico 351 

Exchange of telegrams between the President of the 

United States and the President of Mexico 352 

Agreements with Haiti 353 

Pan American Day : Informal remarks of the President to 
Members of the Governing Board of the Pan Ameri- 
can Union 355 

Visit to the United States of the President of Peru .... 356 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 356 

The Department 

Transfer of duties to the Division of Cultural Relations . 357 

Appointment of officers 358 

[over] 




«■ 8. SUPERINTENDENT <£ ftPHKjfft 

MAY 6 mi 



Qontents- 



-CONTINUED 



Commercial Policy Pa % e 

Suspension of import quotas on certain wheat and wheat 

flour 358 

Suspension of title II of the Sugar Act of 1937 358 

Treaty Information 

Fisheries: Convention With Canada for the Preservation 
of the Halibut Fishery of the Northern Pacific Ocean 
and Bering Sea 358 

Commerce : Trade- Agreement Negotiations With Mexico . 358 

Agriculture and finance : Agreements With Haiti 358 

Petroleum properties : Agreement With Mexico 359 

Publications 359 

Regulations 359 

Legislation 359 



The War 



UNITED STATES POLICY TOWARD FRANCE AND THE FRENCH PEOPLE 



[Released to the press April 14] 

The text of a note dated April 13, 1942 from 
the Acting Secretary of State to His Excellency 
Gaston Henry-Haye, Ambassador of the French 
Republic, follows : 

"Excellency: 

"I have received Your Excellency's communi- 
cation of April 9, 1942, containing certain ob- 
servations of the French Government at Vichy 
with regard to the announcement of the estab- 
lishment of a Consulate General of the United 
States at Brazzaville. 

"In this connection Your Excellency informs 
me that your Government trusts that the Gov- 
ernment of the United States will make it known 
publicly that this step on the part of the United 
States should not be interpreted as having any 
political implications, and that it should like- 
wise not be interpreted as being a step in de- 
rogation of the "exclusive rights of the French 
Government over the territory in question". 

"The considerations advanced in the com- 
munication addressed to me by Your Excel- 
lency provide an appropriate and welcome op- 
portunity for the Government of the United 
States to reiterate with the utmost clarity its 
policy with regard to France and with regard 
to the French people. 

"From the earliest days of the independence 
of the United States of America the relations 
between the people of France and the people of 
the United States have been founded upon 
ties of more than ordinary friendship and con- 
fidence. The Government of France, and many 
citizens of France, assisted the people of the 
United States in achieving their freedom. The 



great principles of liberty, equality and fra- 
ternity proclaimed by the French revolution 
have been an inspiration to the American people 
throughout their national existence, and the 
traditional understanding between our two na- 
tions has in no small part been due to their com- 
mon faith in democratic institutions and in their 
like devotion to the cause of human freedom. 

"Only twenty-five years ago the armies of 
France and of the United States were fighting 
side by side against the same ruthless aggres- 
sor who has now once more invaded France. 

"As this Government has informed Your 
Excellency's Government upon several occa- 
sions, the Government of the United States 
recognizes the sovereign jurisdiction of the 
people of France over the territory of France 
and over French possessions overseas. 

"The Government of the United States fer- 
vently hopes that it may see the reestablish- 
ment of the independence of France and of the 
integrity of French territory. 

"But only by the total destruction of the 
present criminal regime in Germany, and by 
the complete defeat of the armies of Germany 
and of the dictatorships which have aligned 
themselves with Germany, can that hope be 
realized. That is a fact well known to all of 
the people of France, including even that 
handful of Frenchmen who, in contempt for 
the high tradition of liberty and individual 
freedom which has made France great, have 
sordidly and abjectly, under the guise of 'col- 
laboration', attempted to prostitute their coun- 
try to that very regime in Germany which is 
bent upon nothing less than the permanent 
enslavement of France. 

335 



336 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"At the present moment continental France 
is in great part occupied by German armies. 
Your Excellency's Government is bound by the 
terms of the armistice agreement into which it 
entered with Germany in June 1940. 

"Marshal Petain has had occasion to appre- 
ciate the full understanding of the Govern- 
ment of the United States of the difficulties 
under which he and his Government have been 
suffering because of these reasons, and the 
sympathy of the Government and people of 
the United States for the people of France 
in the tragic situation in which they have been 
placed. 

"A part of France's territories overseas re- 
mains under the effective jurisdiction of Your 
Excellency's Government. Still other terri- 
tories of France are under the effective control 
of French authorities who do not recognize the 
jurisdiction of the French Government at 
Vichy, but who are fighting actively on the 
side of the forces of freedom. 

"This latter situation is the case in French 
Equatorial Africa and the Cameroons where 
the Government of the United States has re- 
cently appointed a Consul General at Brazza- 
ville. This is the step to which Your Excel- 
lency's communication under acknowledgment 
refers. 

"Were the French Government at Vichy in 
effective control of the territory in question, the 
Government of the United States would neces- 
sarily have communicated with Your Excel- 
lency's Government prior to the establishment 



of this Consulate General of the United States, 
in accordance with the convention between our 
two countries of February 23, 1853 to which 
reference is made in Your Excellency's com- 
munication. 

"The French Government at Vichy, however, 
is not in control of that territory. 

"Consequently, until the final victory of the 
United Nations is won, and the people of France 
are once more in full and sovereign control of 
their own destinies, the Government of the 
United States, in accordance with the policy 
above set forth, will continue, with regard to 
French territories in Africa or in the Pacific 
areas, to maintain, or to enter into, relations 
with those French citizens who are in actual 
control of such territories. 

"The German invaders by deceit, and by their 
habitual propaganda of falsehood, are daily 
seeking to sow doubt and mistrust of their tra- 
ditional and proven friends among the minds of 
the French people. That effort has failed, and 
will continue to fail. The people of France 
have never doubted the sincerity of the friend- 
ship of the people of the United States. 

"The French people may rest assured that the 
Government and people of the United States 
will continue to maintain unimpaired their full 
respect for the sovereign rights of the people of 
France. They may continue to be confident that 
by the victory of the United Nations those 
rights will be restored intact to them. 

"Accept [etc.] Sumner Welles" 



COORDINATION OF AIR TRAINING PROGRAMS OF THE UNITED NATIONS 

JOINT STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT'OF THF UNITED STATES 
AND THE PRIME MINISTER OF CANADA 

[Released to the press by the White House April 17] 



The Prime Minister of Canada and the Presi- 
dent announced on April 17 that, at the invita- 
tion of the Prime Minister, a conference in 
which all the United Nations with air training 
programs under way either in the United States 
or in Canada would be invited to participate 
would be held in Ottawa early in May. 



The purpose of the meeting lies along the 
lines of further united military efforts. The 
meeting in Ottawa would extend the air pro- 
grams to take in the training of personnel to 
operate the military aircraft to the end that 
the most effective use will be made of all re- 
sources of personnel. 



APRIL 18, 1942 



337 



Great progress has already been made in pool- 
ing the airplane production of the United 
Nations. 

Plans for the conference developed out of the 
recognition of the desirability of more closely 
coordinating the British Commonwealth (in- 
cluding Britain, Canada, Australia, and New 
Zealand) air training plan with the greatly ex- 
tended air training program undertaken by the 
United States and others of the United Nations. 
In addition this would include China, Norway, 
the Netherlands, and several others which are 
already at war with the Axis. 

ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE TO 
NORTH AFRICA 

The Acting Secretary of State, Sumner 
Welles, in answer to a question, told a recent 
press conference that the two French vessels 
now in New York scheduled to carry supplies 
to North Africa had not sailed — nor had the 
Red Cross ship with milk and clothing for the 
children of France. He added that all these 
plans which the Department was carrying out a 
few days ago are once more held in abeyance. 1 

PROCLAIMED LIST OF CERTAIN BLOCKED 
NATIONALS, SUPPLEMENT 3 TO REVI- 
SION I 

[Released to the press April 13] 

The Acting Secretary of State, acting in con- 
junction with the Secretary of the Treasury, 
the Attorney General, the Secretary of Com- 
merce, the Board of Economic Warfare, and 
the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, 
issued on April 13 Supplement 3 to Revision I 
of the Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals, promulgated February 7, 1942. 

Part I of this supplement contains 342 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 27 deletions. Part II contains 110 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 3 deletions. 



1 Bulletin of April 11, 1942, p. 318. 



ADDITIONAL DUTIES OF THE BOARD OF 
ECONOMIC WARFARE 

In an Executive order of April 13, 1942, the 
Board of Economic Warfare is authorized and 
directed to "1. . . . (a) Receive and be respon- 
sible for executing directives from the Chair- 
man of the War Production Board as to 
quantities, specifications, delivery time sched- 
ules, and priorities of materials and commodi- 
ties (other than arms, munitions, or weapons of 
war as defined in the President's Proclamation 
of May 1, 1937, as amended) required to be 
imported for the war production effort and the 
civilian economy; and determine the policies, 
plans, procedures, and methods of the several 
Federal departments, establishments, and agen- 
cies with respect to the procurement and pro- 
duction of such materials and commodities, 
including the financing thereof. ...(b) Di- 
rect, with the approval of the President, the 
creation, organization, and financing of a cor- 
poration or corporations, pursuant to . . . the 
Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act, as 
amended, the objects and purposes of which 
shall be: (1) To obtain from foreign sources 
such materials, supplies, and commodities 
(other than arms, munitions, or weapons of 
war . . .) as are necessary for the successful 
prosecution of the war, and provide for the pro- 
duction, delivery, sale, or other disposition 
thereof; and (2) to take such other action as 
may be deemed necessary to facilitate the war 
effort and strengthen the international economic 
relations of the United States, (c) Advise the 
State Department with respect to the terms and 
conditions to be included in the master agree- 
ment with each nation receiving lend-lease 
aid . . . . (d) Provide and arrange for the re- 
ceipt by the United States of reciprocal aid and 
benefits (other than arms, munitions, or weap- 
ons of war . . .) from the government of any 
country whose defense shall have been deter- 
mined by the President to be vital to the defense 
of the United States . . . and determine the 
terms upon which such aid and benefits shall be 



338 

received, including the authorization of other 
governmental agencies to receive such aid and 
benefits, (e) Kepresent the United States Gov- 
ernment in dealing with the economic warfare 
agencies of the United Nations for the purpose 
of relating the Government's economic warfare 
program and facilities to those of such nations. 
"2. For the purpose of carrying out its re- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTTLLETIN 

sponsibilities, the Board of Economic Warfare 
may arrange through the Department of State 
to send abroad such technical, engineering, and 
economic representatives responsible to the 
Board as the Board may deem necessary." 

The full text of the Executive order (no. 
9128) appears in the Federal Register of April 
15, 1942, page 2809. 



SEVERANCES OF DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS 



[Released to the press April 18] 

The following table sets forth statements 
with respect to severances of diplomatic rela- 
tions, or actions which appear to be in the na- 
ture of severances of diplomatic relations 
between states, effected by any means short of a 
declaration of war or the actual beginning of 
hostilities. For tabulations of declarations of 
war and statements with respect to the outbreak 
of hostilities, reference is made to the December 
20, 1941 and February 7, 1942 issues of The 
Department of State Bulletin, pages 551-561 
and 143-145, respectively. Two declarations of 



war which do not appear in the above-men- 
tioned tabulations are those by Great Britain 
and the Union of South Africa against Thai- 
land, which declare that a state of war is in 
effect between the countries named as from 5 
a.m., Greenwich Mean Time, January 25, 1942. 
Information is not yet available in the De- 
partment of State to confirm all the reported 
severances of diplomatic relations which have 
been mentioned in the press, and this table does 
not include any severances of diplomatic rela- 
tions between any two countries which some 
time after taking such action reestablished 
normal diplomatic relations. 



Belgium — Finland. 



Belgium — Hungary. 



Belgium — Japan . 



"I have been charged and I have the 
honor to bring to Your Excellency's knowl- 
edge that the Belgian Government, having 
taken into consideration the recent develop- 
ment of the present situation involving the 
fact that I am no longer able to carry out 
my functions in a satisfactory manner, has 
sent me instructions terminating my mis- 
sion in Finland." [June 29, 1941.] 

No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

The American Minister at Budapest re- 
ported in telegrams of April 8 and 11, 1941, 
respectively, to the Department of State 
that the Belgian Minister had received 
orders from his Government to leave Hun- 
gary and had departed on April 11, 1941. 

"I have the honor to inform Your Excel- 
lency that my Government has instructed 
the Belgian Ambassador in Tokio to leave 
his post at the same time as his American 
and British Colleagues, ..." 



Translation of a note of June 29, 
1941 from the Belgian Minister at 
Helsinki to the Finnish Minister of 
Foreign Affairs, as reported in a des- 
patch of June 30, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Helsinki. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Telegrams of Apr. 8 and 11, 1941 
from the American Legation at Buda- 
pest. (Files of the Department of 

State.) 



Note of Dec. 10, 1941 from the Bel- 
gian Ambassador at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



APRIL 18, 1942 



339 



Belgium — Rumania . 



Bolivia — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Brazil — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Bulgaria — Belgium, Nether- 
lands, Poland. 



China — Germany, Italy. 



Colombia — Germany, Italy.. 



No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

The American Minister at Bucharest re- 
ported in a telegram of February 15, 1941 
to the Department of State that the Belgian 
Minister left Bucharest on February 14, 
1941. 

"In compliance with the Resolution sub- 
scribed to at the Third Consultative Meet- 
ing of Foreign Ministers and as an act of 
solidarity with the nations of America, the 
diplomatic relations of the Republic of 
Bolivia with the Japanese Empire, the Ger- 
man Reich and the Kingdom of Italy are de- 
clared broken from this date. . . . Given 
in the Palace of Government of the city of 
La Paz on the twenty-eighth day of Janu- 
ary, nineteen hundred and forty-two." 

". . . the Brazilian Government has 
today resolved to break off, today [January 
28, 1942], its diplomatic and commercial 
relations with Japan, Germany and 
Italy, ..." 

"The Secretary General of the Foreign 
Office . . . informed [on March 4, 1941] 
the Belgian Minister and the Dutch Charge 
d'Affaires that the Bulgarian Government 
would like them to leave this country. 
. . . [The Polish Minister was also re- 
quested to depart] as soon as possible, cer- 
tainly not later than this week . . . The 
three chiefs of mission then informed the 
Secretary General that their countries would 
break off relations with Bulgaria when their 
ally, Great Britain, did, namely, tomorrow 
morning [March 5, 1941]." 

The Chinese Embassy at Washington 
informed the Department of State on July 2, 
1941 of the receipt of a telegram of July 2, 
1941 from the Chinese Foreign Office 
stating that the Chinese Government had 
decided to sever diplomatic relations with 
Germany and Italy. 

"In accordance with instructions re- 
ceived from my Government, I have the 
honor to inform Your Excellency that, in 
view of the declaration of war on the United 
States by Germany and Italy and in ac- 
cordance with the engagements of con- 
tinental solidarity, the Colombian Govern- 
ment has declared diplomatic and consular 
relations between the Government of 



Telegram of Feb. 15, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Translation of a supreme decree of 
Jan. 28, 1942 of the President of 
Bolivia, as reported in a despatch of 
Jan. 29, 1942 from the American Lega- 
tion at La Paz. (Files of the Depart- 
ment of State.) 



Translation of a note of Jan. 28, 
1942 from the Brazilian Ambassador 
at Washington to the Secretary of 
State. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 

Telegram of'Mar. 4, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Sofia. (Files of 
the Department of State.) 



Files of the Department of State. 



Translation of a note of Dec. 20, 
1941 from the Colombian Ambas- 
sador at Washington to the Secretary 
of State. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 



340 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Colombia — Germany, Italy- 
(Continued). 

Colombia — Japan 



Denmark — Belgium, Nether- 
lands, Norway. 



Denmark — Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 



Ecuador — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Colombia and the Governments of Ger- 
many and Italy broken." [December 19, 
1941.]* 

". . . the Council of Ministers approved 
unanimously the following conclusions 
presented for its consideration by the Presi- 
dent of the Republic and by the Minister of 
Foreign Relations: 'The aggression which 
took place yesterday by the armed forces 
of the Japanese Empire against the United 
States constitutes the case clearly foreseen 
in Resolution Number Fifteen approved at 
the Second Meeting of Foreign Ministers at 
Habana on "reciprocal assistance and de- 
fensive cooperation of the American na- 
tions" by which it is declared that "every 
attempt of a non-American State against 
the integrity or inviolability of territory, 
against the sovereignty or political inde- 
pendence of an American State will be con- 
sidered as an act of aggression against the 
States which sign this declaration." ' This 
declaration signed by the Government of 
Colombia and approved by Law No. 20 of 
1941 creates for Colombia obligations to 
which the nation will be entirely faithful. 
As a consequence the Government resolves 
to declare broken its diplomatic relations 
with the Empire of Japan . . ." 

"Senate last night [December 9, 1941] 
heartily endorsed and voted absolute con- 
formity with action taken by Government 
in breaking relations with Japan." 

"Foreign Office confirms press reports 
[of] this morning that Danish diplomatic 
representatives [have been] recalled from 
Belgium, Holland, and Norway. [Their] 
Activities ceased as of July 15th [1940]." 

". . . the Danish Legation at Moscow 
has been recalled and relations between 
Denmark and the Soviet Union have been 
broken off." 



". . . the Government of Ecuador . . . 
determined yesterday, January 29 [1942], 
to break its diplomatic and consular rela- 
tions with the Governments of Germany, 
Italy and Japan." 



Statement handed to the American 
Ambassador at Bogota by the Presi- 
dent of Colombia on Dec. 8, 1941. 
Printed in the Bulletin of Dec. 13, 
1941, p. 489. 



Telegram of Dec. 10, 1941 from 
the American Embassy at Bogotd. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Telegram of July 17, 1940 from the 
American Legation at Copenhagen. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Statement issued by the Danish 
Government on June 26, 1941, as 
reported in a telegram of June 28, 

1941 from the American Legation at 
Copenhagen. (Files of the Depart- 
ment of State.) 

Translation of a note of Jan. 30, 

1942 from the Acting Minister of 
Foreign Affairs of Ecuador to the 
American Minister at Quito, as re- 
ported in a despatch of Feb. 3, 1942 
from the American Legation at 
Quito. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 



"The American Embassy at Bogota reported in a telegram ot December 19, 1941 that "At eleven o'clock today Foreign Mh 
German and Italian Ministers that diplomatic and consular relations were severed at that time." 



ster officially notified 



APRIL 18, 1942 



341 



Egypt — Bulgaria, Finland. 



Egypt — France. 



Egypt — Germany. 



Egypt — Hungary, Rumania. 



Egypt— Italy. 



Egypt — Japan. 



"The Foreign Office has transmitted a 
note to the Legation stating that Egypt 
ruptured diplomatic relations with Bulgaria 
and Finland as of January 5 [1942]." 

"The termination of official relations be- 
tween Vichy and Egypt has been announced 
in the local press and today's Pr ogres 
Egyptien carries an editorial . . . which 
contains a statement by the Under Secre- 
tary of the Foreign Office who is quoted as 
follows: 'Strictly speaking a rupture of 
diplomatic relations between the Egyptian 
Government and the Government of Vichy 
has not taken place. It is simply an inter- 
ruption or cessation of these relations. 
This measure aims only at the official 
representation of the Government of Vichy, 
it does not imply any modification of the 
status of French nationals.' " 

"At the request of my Government, I 
have the honour to advise you that diplo- 
matic relations with Germany have been 
severed by the Egyptian Govern- 
ment, . . ."* 

"Foreign Office has addressed [a] note [to 
the] Legation stating [that the] Egyptian 
Government broke off diplomatic relations 
with Hungary and Rumania as of December 
15 [1941]." 

"The Under Secretary of State of the 
Egyptian Foreign Office . . . [today re- 
ferred to] the severance of relations with 
Italy yesterday [June 12, 1940] . . ." 

"... the Royal Egyptian Government 
has decided to sever its diplomatic relations 
with the Imperial Government of Japan as 
of December 9, 1941." 



Egypt Thailand. 



"Egypt having broken off diplomatic re- 
lations with Thailand, Proclamation No. 
234 issued by the Military Governor of 
Egypt under date of March 5, 1942 estab- 
lishes the treatment to be accorded Thai- 
land nationals, their property in Egypt and 
trade with Thailand." 

On July 28, 1941 the Finnish Minister of 
Foreign Affairs handed to the British Min- 
ister at Helsinki an aide-mtmoire which con- 
tains the statement that ". . . the Finnish 
Government have come to the conclusion 
•A telegram ot September 4, 1939 from the American Legation at Alexandria reports that "As a 
night [September 3, 1939] diplomatic relations with Germany have been broken off and the German 
on September 4, 1939]." 

455622 — 42 2 



Finland — Great Britain. 



Telegram of Jan. 9, 1942 from the 
American Legation at Cairo. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 

Telegram of Jan. 7, 1942 from the 
American Legation at Cairo. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Note of Sept. 6, 1939 from the 
Egyptian Minister at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 

Telegram of Dec. 17, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Cairo. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of June 13, 1940 from the 
American Legation at Cairo. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 

Translation of a note of Dec. 13, 
1941 from the Egyptian Foreign Of- 
fice to the American Legation at 
Cairo, as reported in a despatch of 
Dec. 18, 1941 from the Legation. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Despatch of Mar. 14, 1942 from 
the American Legation at Cairo. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Copy of aide-mtmoire enclosed 
with a despatch of July 30, 1941 from 
the American Legation at Helsinki. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

result of a decision of the Council of Ministers last 
Charge d' Affaires handed his passport [presumably 



342 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Finland — Great Britain 
(Continued). 



Finland — Poland . 



France — Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg, Netherlands, Nor- 
way. 



France — Great Britain... 



that . . . the Finnish Legation in London 
should suspend its functions for the time 
being." 

The British Minister informed the 
Finnish Minister of Foreign Affairs on 
August 1, 1941 that Great Britain was not 
contemplating any action to sever its rela- 
tions with Finland but that if relations 
were severed by Finland the break would 
not be in the nature of a "temporary sus- 
pension". 

On August 2, 1941 an official Finnish 
communique which was printed in the 
Finnish newspapers stated that diplomatic 
relations with Great Britain had been 
broken off. 

"Since the Government of Finland con- 
siders that . . . your diplomatic mission 
in Helsinki as well as the activity of your 
Legation [i.e., the Polish Legation] is now 
without foundation and without practical 
purpose, I have the honor to inform you 
that beginning the twenty-fourth instant 
[June 24, 1941] the Government of Finland 
will no longer be able to recognize you in 
the quality of Envoy Extraordinary and 
Minister Plenipotentiary and that con- 
sequently your Legation will no longer be 
recognized as a diplomatic representation." 

"Foreign Minister Baudoin has orally 
informed within the past few days the 
diplomatic representatives at Vichy of the 
'occupied countries' of Belgium, the Nether- 
lands, Norway and Luxemburg that to its 
great regret the French Government felt 
compelled 'temporarily to break off diplo- 
matic relations' with the Governments con- 
cerned. . . . the effective date of the 
simultaneous rupture of relations with the 
four countries concerned . . . was finally 
fixed as of September 5 [1940] midnight." 

"Orders have been sent recalling the 
French Charge d'Affaires in London." 

"The French Charge d'Affaires . . . 
received today [July 7, 1940] by telegram* 
instructions from his Government to inform 
Lord Halifax that formal relations between 
France and Great Britain are severed. 
. . . [The French Charge d'Affaires] ad- 
vised the Foreign Office of the foregoing 
informally this afternoon and will deliver 
a formal note to Lord Halifax personally 
tomorrow [July 8, 1940]." 

•According to the final paragraph of the telegram here quoted, the telegram received by the French Charge d' Aflaires was "despatched from Vich y 
on July 4th." 



Telegram of Aug. 1, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Helsinki. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of Aug. 2, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Helsinki. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Translation of a note of June 23, 
1941 from the Finnish Foreign Office 
to the Polish Minister at Helsinki, as 
reported in a despatch of June 25, 
1941 from the American Legation at 
Helsinki. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 



Telegram of Sept. 2, 1940 from the 
American Embassy at Vichy. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of July 5, 1940 from the 
American Embassy in France. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 

Telegram of July 7, 1940 from the 
American Embassy at London. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



APRIL 18, 1942 



343 



France — Poland- 



France — Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics. 



France — Yugoslavia. 



Great Britain — Bulgaria- 



Great Britain — Hungary _ 



Great Britain — Rumania. 



". . . the French Government had 
given notice that Polish diplomatic repre- 
sentation should be withdrawn on Septem- 
ber 23 [1940]." 



"The French Government, . . . has 
decided k> break off diplomatic relations 
with the U.S.S.R. 

"The French Ambassador at Moscow 
has been instructed to bring this decision to 
the knowledge of the Soviet Government 
while the Soviet Ambassador at Vichy has 
been informed thereof this morning, June 
30 [1941] by Admiral Darlan, Vice President 
of the Council, Ministry Secretary of State 
for Foreign Affairs." 

". . . the French Government in Vichy 
has [on August 15, 1941]* informed the 
Royal Yugoslav Minister there that begin- 
ning August 22nd [1941] the Royal Yugoslav 
Diplomatic and Consular representatives 
have to cease their functions on French 
territory." 

". . . the presence, in ever-increasing 
force, of German troops on Bulgarian terri- 
tory . . . combined with the growing sub- 
servience of the Bulgarian Government to 
German policy, is, in the opinion of His 
Majesty's Government, incompatible with 
the maintenance of British diplomatic 
representation in Bulgaria. 

"I have accordingly been instructed to 
withdraw His Majesty's diplomatic Mis- 
sion from Sofia and I request that I may be 
furnished with the necessary facilities for 
myself and my staff to leave the county." 

"The British Minister tonight [April 7, 
1941] asked the Foreign Minister for his 
passport . . ." 

". . . His Majesty's Government in the 
United Kingdom have decided to recall me 
and to withdraw the diplomatic mission and 
Consular officers under my control. I 
therefore propose to leave this country on 
February 15th, 1941 . . ." ** 



Telegram of Apr. 7, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Budapest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Note of Feb. 10, 1941 from the 
British Minister at Bucharest to the 
Rumanian Conducator and Minister 
of Foreign Affairs, as reported in a 
despatch of Feb. 28, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

•According to a telegram of August 16, 1941 from the American Embassy at Vichy to the Department of State, "M. Pouritch, Minister from 
Yugoslavia, informs me today that on August 15 he was informed by Rochat that through Qerman pressure the Yugoslav Legation and Consulates in 
France must close and cease all official functions by August 22." 

••According to a despatch of July 14, 1941 from the American Embassy at London to the Department of State the British Secretary of State for 
Foreign Affairs declared in the House of Commons on July 2, 1941 that "As regards Rumania, diplomatic relations with that country were broken off 
on 10th February, 1941, . . ." 



Report in a despatch of Sept. 2 1 

1940 from the American Ambassador 
near the Government of Poland 
established in England regarding a 
statement made by the Polish Foreign 
Minister on Sept. 21, 1940. (Files of 
the Department of State.) 

Translation of an official French 
communiqui of June 30, 1941, as 
reported in a telegram of June 30, 

1941 from the American Embassy at 
Vichy. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 



Note of Aug. 21, 1941 from the 
Yugoslav Minister at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



Note of Mar. 5, 1941 from the 
British Minister at Sofia to the Bul- 
garian Minister of Foreign Affairs, as 
reported in a despatch of March 7, 
1941 from the American Legation at 
Sofia. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 



344 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Greece — Japan. 



Hungary — Greece. 



Hungary — Poland. 



". . , Greece has broken off diplomatie 
relations with Japan and instructed her 
Minister to Tokio to notify the Japanese 
Government that from the moment Japan 
declared war against Great Britain and the 
United States [December 7, 1941, London 
and Washington time; December 8, 1941, 
Tokyo time] Greece decided to sever rela- 
tions with Japan." 

"The Greek Minister called . . . last 
evening [June 24, 1941] and informed me 
that he had been called to the Foreign Office 
and asked by the Under Secretary what 
Greek Government he represented. He re- 
plied that he represented the legal govern- 
ment whereupon . . . [the Under Secretary] 
requested him to close the Legation ..." 
"The Royal Government [of Hungary] 
felt obliged to ask me by note of the Royal 
Ministry for Foreign Affairs . . . dated 
December 7, 1940, to take the necessary 
measures to end all activities of the Polish 
Legation at Budapest. After having re- 
ferred this to My Government and having 
received instructions relative thereto, I have 
the honor to bring to the knowledge of Your 
Excellency that the Polish Legation will 
cease its activities on the date of January 1, 
1941 ..." 

"Hungarian Telegraph Bureau last night 
[June 23, 1941] laconically announced Hun- 
gary's rupture of diplomatic relations with 
Russia 'with regard to the state of war en- 
tered into between the German Reich and 
Soviet Russia' . . . ". 

"The Hungarian Prime Minister at 8 
p. m. the evening of December 11 informed 
the American Minister that . . . Hungary 
was obliged to break diplomatic relations 
with the United States." 

"The terms put forward by His Majesty's 
Government and the Soviet Government, 
and now accepted by the Iranian Govern- 
ment,* provide that the German Minister 
and his staff must leave Teheran at once 
and that the German Legation must be 
closed. This also applies to the Italian, 
Hungarian and Roumanian Legations. 
The Iranian Government state that the 
four Legations have been informed of this 
decision and requested to comply forth- 
with." 

'According to a telegram of September 9, 1941 from the American Legation at Tehran to the Department of State, "The Foreign Minister this 
morning on behalf of the Prime Minister who was present but very ill read to the Medjliss the texts of the notes exchanged with the British and 
Russian Governments. He disclosed that the Iranian Government has acceded perforce to the demands made and has already taken steps to require 
the withdrawal of the German, Italian, Hungarian, and Rumanian Legations and nationals. . ." 



Hungary — Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics. 



Hungary — United States. 



Iran — Germany, Hungary, 
Italy, Rumania. 



Note of Dec. 10, 1941 from the 
Greek Foreign Minister to the Ameri- 
can Minister near the Government of 
Greece established in England, as re- 
ported in a dsepatch of Dec. 12, 1941 
from the American Minister. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of June 25, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Budapest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Translation of a note of Dec. 24, 
1940 from the Polish Minister at 
Budapest to the President of the 
Royal Hungarian Council of Minis- 
ters, as reported in a despatch of Dec. 
31, 1940 from the American Legation 
at Budapest. (Files of the Depart- 
ment of State.) 



Telegram of June 24, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Budapest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Department of State press release 
of Dec. 11, 1941. Printed in the 
Bulletin of Dec. 13, 1941, p. 482. 



Statement made by the British 
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs 
in the House of Commons on Sept. 10, 
1941. Printed in Parliamentary De- 
bates, House of Commons, vol. 374, 
no. 98, col. 159. 



APRIL 18, 194 2 



345 



Iran — Japan . 



Iraq — France, Japan _ 



Iraq — Germany . 



Italy — Belgium . 



Italy — Norway, Netherlands, 
Poland. 



Japan — Poland. 



Mexico — Bulgaria. 



"Prime Minister last evening [April 12, 
1942] informed Japanese Minister that his 
Legation must depart from Iran within a 
week." 

"... notes from Ministry Foreign 
Affairs dated yesterday [November 16, 1941] 
notify that Iraq has broken off relations 
with Vichy France and Japan on grounds 
of unfriendly acts of those countries against 
the Crown and country . . ." 

"The Iraqi Council of Ministers decided 
yesterday [September 5, 1939] to sever 
diplomatic relations with Germany . . ." 

"The Iraq Charge d'Affaires is under- 
stood officially to have notified the German 
Government that Iraq was breaking off rela- 
tions with Germany yesterday [September 
11, 1939] and later in the day the Charge 
d'Affaires and his staff were permitted to 
leave Berlin." 

"The Belgian Ambassador informs me 
that he was called to the Foreign Office this 
morning [June 11, 1940] and informed that 
he and his staff would be required to leave 
Rome. . . . the 15th was discussed as a 
possible date." 

No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

On June 13, 1940 the diplomatic and con- 
sular representatives of Norway, the Nether- 
lands, and Poland left Rome. 

"The Imperial [Japanese] Government 
decided to close its Embassy in Poland . . . 
The Government simultaneously regards 
the Polish Embassy in Tokyo as having 
ceased functioning and notification to that 
effect has been made to the Polish Ambas- 
sador." 



"Pursuant to telegraphic instructions 
from the Secretary of Foreign Relations of 
Mexico, I have to inform you that my Gov- 
ernment deems that the declaration of war 
by Bulgaria on the United States of America 
. . . is incompatible with the existence of 
its diplomatic relations with the Bulgarian 
Government, to which Article 2, of the 
Treaty of Amity signed in Washington, 
D.C., on November 5, 1936, refers. There- 



Telegram of Apr. 13, 1942 from the 
American Legation at Tehran. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 

Telegram of Nov. 17, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Baghdad. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of Sept. 6, 1939 from the 
American Legation at Baghdad. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Telegram of Sept. 12, 1939 from the 
American Embassy at Berlin. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of June 11, 1940 from the 
American Embassy at Rome. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of June 14, 1940 from the 
American Embassy at Rome. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 

Translation of an official Japanese 
announcement concerning a decision 
reportedly conveyed on Oct. 4, 1941 
to the Polish Ambassador at Tokyo 
by the Japanese Foreign Office; 
translation quoted in a telegram of 
Oct. 5, 1941 from the American 
Embassy at Tokyo. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 

Translation of a note of Dec. 20, 
1941 from the Mexican Ambassador 
at Washington to the former Bul- 
garian Minister at Washington. A 
copy of this note was enclosed with a 
note of Dec. 20, 1941 from the Mexi- 
can Ambassador at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



•According to the Mexico, D.F., Excelsior, Dec. 24, 1941, p. 1, the Mexican Department of Foreign Affairs issued a statement to the press on Dec. 23, 1941 
which declared (translation), "With respect to Bulgaria, a country with which Mexico concluded a Treaty of Friendship in November 1936, though 
diplomatic relations between the two countries have not been established to date, instructions were also given to our Ambassador in Washington to 
advise the representative of Bulgaria in the said city that the Government of Mexico considers that the declaration of war which his country has made 
against the United States is incompatible— for reasons of continental solidarity— with the diplomatic relations referred to in Article 2 of the above- 
mentioned Treaty of Friendship." 

455662—42 3 



346 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Mexico — Bulgaria 
tinued). 



(Con- 



Mexico — Germany, Italy. 



Mexico — Hungary _ 



Mexico — Japan _ 



Translation of a statement issued 
on Dec. 11, 1941 by the Mexican 
Minister of Foreign Affairs, as re- 
ported in a despatch of Dec. 12, 1941 
from the American Embassy at 
Mexico, D.F. (Files of the Depart- 
ment of State.) 



fore, the Mexican Government has decided 
to sever such relations as of this date [De- 
cember 20, 1941]."* 

"Faithful to the commitments under- 
taken by our country at the meeting of 
Foreign Ministers in Havana and animated 
by the same spirit of strong continental 
solidarity which guided her conduct in the 
case of the attack made by forces of the 
Japanese Empire upon the United States, 
the Government of Mexico has decided 
forthwith to break off diplomatic relations 
with those two powers [Germany and 
Italy]. 

"The Ministry for Foreign Affairs today 
[December 11, 1941] officially communi- 
cated this decision to the Ministers Pleni- 
potentiary of Germany and Italy and gave 
instructions by cable to General Ascarate, 
Minister of Mexico in Berlin, and Sefior 
Maples Arce, Charg6 d'Affaires ad interim 
in Rome, to notify the respective Chancel- 
leries of the foregoing." 

"On telegraphic instructions from the 
Secretary of Foreign Affairs of Mexico, I 
have the honor to advise }'ou that my Gov- 
ernment considers that the declaration of 
war made against the United States of 
America by Hungary ... is incompatible 
with the maintenance of its diplomatic rela- 
tions with the Hungarian Government; for 
which reason the Government of Mexico 
has decided to break off such relations, as 
of this date [December 19, 1941], . . ." * 

"The Government of Mexico . . . can- 
not fail to consider . . . that the mainte- 
nance of its diplomatic relations with 
Japan is incompatible with the act of ag- 
gression which the latter has committed 
against the United States of America. 

"Accordingly, instructions have been 
given to our Minister in Tokyo that, after 
notification of the foregoing to the authori- 
ties near which he is accredited, he shall 
proceed to close the Legation and Con- 
sulate in Yokohama. 

"The above decision has been communi- 
cated to the Minister of Japan in this capi- 
tal for similar effects, there having been 
cancelled, from this date [December 8, 
1941], the provisional authorization granted 
to Consular Agents of the said Empire in 
the Mexican Republic." 

• The statement quoted in the preceding footnote declared (translation), "As the Hungarian representative accredited in Mexico resides in the 
capital of the United States, instructions were duly given to our Ambassador in Washington to the effect that he should communicate the decision 
adopted by our Government." 



Translation of a note of Dec. 19, 
1941 from the Mexican Ambassador 
at Washington to the former Hun- 
garian Minister at Washington. A 
copy of this note was enclosed with a 
note of Dec. 19, 1941 from the Mexi- 
can Ambassador at Washington to the 
Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



Translation of a declaration made 
by the Mexican Foreign Office on 
Dec. 8, 1941, as reported in a note 
of Dec. 8, 1941 from the Mexican 
Chargg d'Affaires at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



APRIL 18, 1942 



347 



Mexico — Rumania. 



Netherlands — Finland . 



Netherlands — Rumania. 



Norway — Finland. 



Norway — Japan . 



"The declarations of war made by Bul- 
garia, Hungary and Rumania on the United 
States of America brings the said coun- 
tries — so far as our own is concerned — into 
the same category as Germany, Italy and 
Japan. In consequence, the Government 
of Mexico has resolved to declare its diplo- 
matic relations with those nations to be 
severed. ... As regards Rumania, it may 
be said that Mexico has no Treaty of 
Friendship with that country nor do diplo- 
matic relations with it exist." 

No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

"Netherlands Charge 1 d'Affaires has re- 
ceived instructions from his Government 
and expects today [June 29, 19411 to ad- 
dress note to Finnish Government to the 
effect that in view of political and military 
developments in Finland he is unable satis- 
factorily to carry out his duties here and is 
therefore leaving for Stockholm. . . . 
Netherlands Government has taken this 
action in anticipation of action by Finnish 
Government at the instance of the Germans 
to terminate Dutch diplomatic representa- 
tion here." 

No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

The Minister of the Netherlands, who 
was also accredited to Yugoslavia, left 
Bucharest on February 17, 1941 to take up 
his residence at Belgrade. 

"... I have the honor to advise Your 
Excellency that . . . the Royal Norwegian 
Minister in Helsingfors has been instructed 
to inform the Finnish Foreign Minister as 
follows: '. . . Considering . . . that Fin- 
land now is at war on Germany's side, not 
only with Russia but also with England, 
which both fight together with Norway 
against the common enemy Germany, the 
Norwegian Government . . . feel them- 
selves obliged to withdraw their diplomatic 
representation in Helsingfors.' "* 

"Foreign Office states Norwegian Gov- 
ernment [established in England) is severing 
diplomatic relations with Japan and its 
Legation at Tokyo has been instructed to 
leave with American and British Embas- 
sies." 



Translation of a statement which 
was issued to the press on Dec. 23, 
1941 by the Mexican Department of 
Foreign Affairs. Printed in the Dec. 
24, 1941 edition of Excelsior, p. 1. 



Telegram of June 29, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Helsinki. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Despatch of Feb. 28, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Note of Dec. 8, 1941, from the 
Norwegian Counsellor of Legation at 
Washington to the Secretary of State. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of Dec. 9, 1941 from the 
American Minister near the Govern- 
ment of Norway established in Eng- 
land. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 



•According to a despatch of December 10. 1941 from the American Minister near the Government of Norway established in England to the Depart- 
ment of State, a note regarding the withdrawal of Norwegian diplomatic representation from Finland was sent to the Finnish Foreign Minister by the 
Norwegian Minister at Helsinki on December 7, 1941. 



348 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Norway — Rumania. 



Paraguay — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Peru — Germany, Italy, Japan. 



Rumania — Brazil _ 



Rumania — Greece. 



Rumania — Poland- 



No record of a formal severance of diplo- 
matic relations has been found. 

The Norwegian Minister, who was also 
accredited to Yugoslavia, left Bucharest on 
February 21, 1941 to take up his residence at 
Belgrade. 

"The President of the Republic of Para- 
guay decrees, with force of law: 

" 'Art. 1°. The political, commercial 
and financial relations between the Govern- 
ment of the Republic of Paraguay and those 
of Japan, Germany and Italy be declared 
ruptured. . . .' " [January 28, 1942.] 

"Acting on instructions from my Govern- 
ment, I have the honour to inform Your 
Excellency that Peru, in accordance with 
the expression of solidarity with the United 
States voted at Rio de Janiero by the For- 
eign Ministers of the American Republics — 
as a consequence of Japan's aggression and 
Germany and Italy's declaration of war on 
the United State9 of America — has broken 
relations with the three afore-mentioned 
nations, as from 6 p.m., January the 24th., 
1942." 

"I have the honor to advise Your Excel- 
lency, in accordance with instructions which 
I have just received from my Government, 
that, from the 6th of March current 
[March 6, 1942], diplomatic and commer- 
cial relations between Brazil and Rumania 
ceased, as the Rumanian Government in- 
formed the Legation of Brazil atjBucharest 
on that date, that, because of the obliga- 
tions of solidarity with the countries of the 
Axis, it saw itself obliged to interrupt its 
diplomatic relations with Brazil." 

"The Greek Charg<§ d'Affaires has just 
called to say that yesterday evening [June 
24, 1941] the Secretary General of the For- 
eign Office informed him that 'inasmuch as 
Rumania is now at war and has a military 
alliance with Germany,' the Rumanian 
Government regrets not being in a position 
to permit the continued functioning of 
Greek diplomatic and consular^officers in 
Rumania, ..." 

"The departure [on November 5, 1940] of 
the Polish diplomatic and consular repre- 
sentatives in Rumania is characterized in 
the [Polish] Embassy's note to the Foreign 
Office ... as a 'suspension' of j Polish Ru- 
manian relations." 



Despatch of Feb. 28, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 

Translation of Paraguayan De- 
cree-Law No. 10.793 of Jan. 28, 
1942, as reported in a despatch of 
Jan. 31, 1942 from'the American Le- 
gation at Asunci6n. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 

Note of Jan. 26, 1942 from the 
Peruvian Ambassador at Washington 
to the Secretary of State. (Files of 
the Department of State.) 



Translation of a note of Mar. 12, 
1942 from the Brazilian Ambassador 
at Washington to the Secretary of 
State. (Files of the Department of 
State.) 



Telegram of June 25, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



Telegram of Nov. 5, 1940 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



APRIL 18, 1942 



349 



Saudi Arabia — Italy- 



Union of South Africa — 
France. 



Uruguay — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Venezuela — Germany, Italy, 
Japan. 



Yugoslavia — Finland _ 



Yugoslavia — Rumania. 



". . . in December [1941] he [King Ibn 
Saud] . . . advised the Italian Minister 
that in view of the friendly relations exist- 
ing between his Government and the British 
... it was of vital importance to him to do 
nothing to impair those relations. The 
maintenance of diplomatic representation 
by Italy in Saudi Arabia did constitute a 
source of difficulty in this respect and in the 
circumstances he felt impelled to ask the 
Italian Minister to close down his Legation 
and leave. . . . According to the most re- 
cent information available the Italians left 
Riad February 17 [1942] . . ." 

According to a note of April 23, 1942 
from the Minister of the Union of South 
Africa at Washington to the Secretary of 
State, the Legation of the Union of South 
Africa at Washington had received tele- 
graphic information from the Government 
of the Union of South Africa to the effect 
that the Union Government would sever 
relations with France on April 23, 1942. 

". . . on January 25, 1942 the Govern- 
ment of the Republic of Uruguay decreed 
the severance of diplomatic, commercial and 
financial relations with the Japanese Em- 
pire, the German Reich and the Kingdom of 
Italy." 

"I have the honor to inform Your Ex- 
cellency that the President of Venezuela, 
General Isafas Medina A., yesterday [De- 
cember 30, 1941], in a meeting with the 
Cabinet, decided upon the rupture of diplo- 
matic relations with Germany, Italy and 
Japan. The pertinent communication will 
be made today [December 31, 1941] to the 
diplomatic representatives of the three 
countries, who will be given their passports 
to leave Venezuelan territory." 

"The Yugoslav Minister presents his 
compliments to the Honorable the Secre- 
tary of State and has the honor to inform 
[him] that the Royal Yugoslav Government 
has severed diplomatic relations with the 
Finnish Government in view of the recogni- 
tion of the so-called independent state of 
Croatia by the Finnish Government and 
due to the fact that Finland is fighting on 
the side of our enemies." 

"The Yugoslav Minister has informed me 
that late yesterday evening [May 9, 1941] 
he handed a note to the Foreign Office offi- 
cially breaking off relations between his 
country and Rumania." 



Telegram of Feb. 24, 1942 from the 
American Minister accredited to Saudi 
Arabia and resident at Cairo. (Files 
of the Department of State.) 



Files of the Department of State. 



Translation of a note of Jan. 29, 
1942 from the Uruguayan Ambassa- 
dor at Washington to the Secretary 
of State. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 

Translation of a note of Dec. 31, 
1941 from the Venezuelan Ambassa- 
dor at Washington to the Secretary 
of State. (Files of the Department 
of State.) 



Note of Aug. 22, 1941 from the 
Yugoslav Minister at Washington to 
the Secretary of State. (Files of the 
Department of State.) 



Telegram of May 10, 1941 from the 
American Legation at Bucharest. 
(Files of the Department of State.) 



350 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Severances of Diplomatic Relations and 
Actions Which Appear To Be in the Na- 
ture of Severances of ' Diplomatic Rela- 
tions, as Noted in the Preceding Tabula- 
tion 

"L" indicates that the country named in the 
left-hand column severed diplomatic relations 
(or took action which appears to be in the na- 
ture of a severance of diplomatic relations) 
with the country named in the upper row. 

"B" indicates that steps were taken to sever 
diplomatic relations (or action was taken 



which appears to be in the nature of a sev- 
erance of diplomatic relations) by both the 
country named in the left-hand column and 
the country named in the upper row. 

"N" indicates that, while diplomatic rela- 
tions have been severed (or action has been 
taken which appears to be in the nature of a 
severance of diplomatic relations), it is not 
clear at present whether the country named in 
the left-hand column or the country named in 
the upper row severed the relations (or took 
the action which appears to be in the nature 
of a severance of relations). 







2 
n 


i 


1 

s 


£ 


g 


a 

a 
o 


o 


W 


>. 




5 
S 

i 


43 


1 




« 


•o 
6- 


■- 




£ 










L 










L 


L 
L 


L 

L 
L 










N 




















L 
L 




























































B 


















B 


— 


n 






















L 
L 








L 
L 


































L 






















L 


















L 


L 








L 
















L 
L 








L 
L 


L 




















L 


L 


L 






L 










L 


L 














B 
L 










L 
L 










L 




















L 


L 


L 






L 


— 


T, 






L 










L 






L 
























L 


































L 












L 






L 


L 
















L 
L 




L 


L 


L 
L 








L 
















L 






















Italy 


L 


















N 


N 


N 
L 




















































L 






L 






L 


L 


L 








L 

N 

N 
















L 
L 












































L 
L 

I, 




























L 
L 








L 
L 


















Peru . 






























































N 














L 












L 








































L 
































L 








































L 
L 








L 
L 


L 
L 
































































L 


















L 

















































American Republics 



COMPENSATION FOR PETROLEUM PROPERTIES EXPROPRIATED IN MEXICO 

AGREEMENT WITH MEXICO 



[Released to the press April 19] 

The text of the agreement reached by the two 
experts appointed in accordance with the agree- 
ment of November 19, 1941 between the United 
States and Mexico, as received by telephone 
from the American Embassy at Mexico City, 
follows : 

"Franklin Delano Roosevelt 

"President of the United States of America 
"Manuel Avila Camacho 

"President of the United Mexican States 
"Sms: 

"As provided in the exchange of notes dated 
November 19, 1941, 1 between His Excellency 
Cordell Hull, Secretary of State of the United 
States, and His Excellency Francisco Castillo 
Najera, Mexican Ambassador to the United 
States, the undersigned were appointed by our 
respective Governments as experts authorized 
to determine according to 'equity and justice' 
for purposes of indemnification the compensa- 
tion to be paid the nationals of the United 
States of America whose properties, rights or 
interests in the petroleum industry were af- 
fected to their detriment by acts of the Govern- 
ment of Mexico subsequent to March 17, 193S, 
and in respect of which no settlement has here- 
tofore been effected. 

"Expropriation, and the exercise of the right 
of eminent domain, under the respective consti- 
tutions and laws of Mexico and the United 
States, are a recognized feature of the sover- 
eignty of all modern States. 

"We have surveyed the works and lands in- 
volved and studied the records of the proper- 
ties, rights and interests appertaining thereto 



* Bulletin of November 22, 1941, p. 401. 



and have mutually agreed that their value, as 
of March 18, 1938 should be fixed, in the sum 
of $23,995,991, covering all elements of tangible 
and intangible value, allocated as follows : 

"Standard Oil of New Jersey group, $18,391,- 
641: 
"1. Huasteca Pejtroleum Company; 
"2. Mexican Petroleum Company ; 
"3. Tuxpam Petroleum Company ; 
"4. Pamiahua Petroleum Company; 
"5. Compania Petrolera Ulises S.A. ; 
"6. Compania Transcontinental de Petroleo 

S.A.; 
"7. Compania Petrolera Minerva S.A. 

"Standard Oil of California group, $3,589,158 : 
"1. California Standard Oil Company of 

Mexico S.A. ; 
"2. Richmond Petroleum Company. 

"Consolidated Oil Company, $630,151 : 
"1. Consolidated Oil Company of Mexico 

S.A.; 
"2. Compania Franco Espanola S.A. ; 
"3. Compania Petrolera Aldamas y Brava 

S.A. 

"Sabalo group, $897,671 : 

"1. Sabalo Transportation Company ; 
"2. Compania Petrolera 'Claripa' S.A. ; 
"3. Compania Petrolera Cacalilao S.A. 

"Seaboard group, $487,370: 

"1. International Petroleum Company; 
"2. Compania International de Petroleo y 
Oleo Ductos S.A. 

"Therefore, according to the said Oil Agree- 
ment of November 19, 1941, it is our joint judg- 
ment that: 

351 



352 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"l.-The Government of the United Mexican 
States shall pay to the Government of the 
United States of America, on behalf of the 
above-mentioned claimants, the amount of 
$23,995,991, in accordance with schedule of pay- 
ments finally approved by the two Governments. 

"2.-Before any payment is made on account 
of these awards the corporations affected shall 
deposit in escrow and, when final payment has 
been made, shall deliver to the Government of 
Mexico all documents and instruments of title 
pertaining to the expropriated properties. 

"3.-The Government of Mexico and each of 
the said claimants shall release each other re- 
spectively of all reciprocal claims that may still 
be pending against one another, with the excep- 
tion of those of the Mexican Government 
against the companies for unpaid taxes and 
duties, as well as those based on payments le- 
gally made by the Mexican Government for the 
account of the said companies. 

"The Mexican Government will assume lia- 
bility for all private claims which may be in- 



stituted after this date by private individuals 
against these companies as a result of expro- 
priation, but not for the private claims against 
these companies now pending before the Mexi- 
can courts. 

"4.-Recommendation is hereby made that the 
amount determined be paid as follows: One- 
third on July 1, 1942, and the balance in five (5) 
equal annual installments, payable on July 1 
of each subsequent year. 

"5.-A11 balances as shown to be due these said 
claimants on the several dates prescribed shall 
bear interest at the rate of 3% per year dating 
from March 18, 1938. 

"Done in duplicate, in both Spanish and 
English, on this date April 17, 1942. 

Morris L. Cooke 
Representing the United States 
of America 

Manuel J. Zevada • 
Representing the Republic af 
Mexico" 



EXCHANGE OF TELEGRAMS BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE 

PRESIDENT OF MEXICO 



[Released to the press April 18] 

The texts of telegrams exchanged between 
the President' of Mexico and the President of 
the United States follow : 

[Translation] 

"Mexico, D.F., April 18, 191,2. 
"Excellency : 

"In accord with the bases established be- 
tween our respective Governments, engineers 
Manuel J. Zevada and M. L. Cooke, State ex- 
perts to determine the compensation of Mexico 
to nationals of the United States affected by 
the measures of expropriations made by my 
country as of March 18, 1938, have been able 
to achieve the formulation of a joint agree- 



ment which carries with it a definite settle- 
ment of the so-called 'petroleum question.' 

"On this pleasing occasion, I wish to express 
to Your Excellency that it is a positive satis- 
faction for my Government and for the peo- 
ple of Mexico and for me personally that 
through a loyal endeavor of reciprocal and 
effective comprehension, it has been possible to 
arrive at the solution of a problem, which is 
not sufficient ever to separate our two nations 
nor could be considered at any certain moment 
as a motive of doubt or of controversy. 

"I have the certainty that so significant an 
act must be considered, because of the spirit 
of conciliation which it shows, as a confirma- 
tion of the attitude of my Government in its 



APRIL 18, 1942 



353 



desire to grant ample guarantees to the par- 
ticipation of private capital, national or for- 
eign, in the exploitation and development of 
the material resources of this Republic. 

"Such a policy, clearly defined and properly 
supported, has already been made felt with 
useful results in various fields of activity, 
among which may be cited as an example that 
of the mineral industry, which is called upon 
to reach given necessities of the actual epoch, 
development without precedent. 

"Having been happily settled, this question 
of the compensation which Mexico is disposed 
to pay, within the general terms fixed in the 
Convention of November 19, 1941, the path 
remains open, so that in close collaboration we 
may go forward, redoubling our effort in the 
struggle for the common cause which we have 
embraced, the triumph of democracy and the 
defense of continental solidarity. 

"I reiterate to Your Excellency, with the 
greatest cordiality, the assurances of my high- 
est consideration. 

Manuel Avtla Camacho" 



"April 18, 1942. 
"I wish to acknowledge the gracious message 
of Your Excellency with regard to the agree- 
ment reached by the experts representing our 
two Governments with respect to the amount of 



compensation to be paid to the citizens of the 
United States in compensation for certain oil 
properties expropriated by Mexico subsequent 
to March 17, 1938. 

"From the moment that our two Governments 
agreed upon a procedure for settling the so- 
called 'petroleum question' I have had every 
confidence that a settlement would be reached 
and I was happy therefore to learn that this 
confidence has been justified by the agreement 
arrived at as the outcome of the joint delibera- 
tions of our two experts. Mexico and the 
United States once again have given a demon- 
stration to the world that the most difficult in- 
ternational problems can be satisfactorily solved 
when approached with good-will and in a spirit 
of fair play. 

"I welcome this opportunity to express to you 
and to the people of Mexico the very deep appre- 
ciation of my country for the active and con- 
structive collaboration and assistance of Mexico 
in the cause of freedom and democracy. Our 
two nations are joined together in unity of pur- 
pose, determination, and effective cooperation, 
and the triumph of our cause is certain. 

"I extend to Your Excellency my deep ap- 
preciation for your friendly communication 
and I send my warm personal greetings and the 
assurance of my highest regard. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



AGREEMENTS WITH HAITI 



[Released to the press April 13] 

Upon the occasion of the visit of His Excel- 
lency President Elie Lescot of the Republic of 
Haiti to Washington, a series of conferences 
was held with representatives of several agencies 
of the United States Government. These meet- 
ings were held with a view to strengthening and 
implementing the resolutions adopted at the re- 
cent meeting of the foreign ministers of the 
American republics held at Rio de Janeiro and 
to making more effective, under present interna- 
tional conditions, the Declaration of the United 
Nations signed at Washington on January 2, 
1942 and the Lend-Lease agreement between the 



United States of America and the Republic of 
Haiti signed at Washington September 16, 1941. 

As a consequence of these meetings, which 
were also attended by His Excellency M. Mau- 
rice Dartigue, the Haitian Minister of Agri- 
culture, and by His Excellency Fernand Dennis, 
Minister of Haiti at Washington, several agree- 
ments were reached. These agreements were 
covered in an omnibus memorandum initialed 
at Washington on April 6, 1942 by President 
Lescot and the Acting Secretary of State, Sum- 
ner Welles. 

The text of the memorandum follows : 



354 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"I. There will be an exchange of notes 
whereby the two Governments will give their 
formal approval to a Memorandum of Under- 
standing signed on March 28, 1942 by the 
Haitian and United States Secretaries of Agri- 
culture, regarding the purchase by the Com- 
modity Credit Corporation of the United States 
of the surplus cotton production of Haiti. Ac- 
cording to the understanding the Commodity 
Credit Corporation will take over, at an agreed 
price, the carry-over of cotton from last year's 
crop as well as all of the surplus of the crop of 
1942. The United States Government agrees to 
purchase, subject to an agreed price and within 
specified limitations of amount, the 1943 cotton 
crop and all subsequent cotton crops produced in 
Haiti during the present war. The Haitian 
Government on its part will take steps to re- 
strict the production of cotton and to bring 
about an improvement in quality and an in- 
crease in the staple length of cotton produced in 
future years. The United States Department 
of Agriculture will be pleased to lend its assist- 
ance in the carrying out of the cotton improve- 
ment program. 

"II. The Export-Import Bank of Washing- 
ton has extended a line of credit to the National 
Bank of the Republic of Haiti in amounts which 
may be agreed upon as necessary for the pur- 
pose of strengthening the Haitian Gourde - 
United States dollar exchange relationship 
which is peculiarly affected by the influence of 
shipping availability on exports and imports 
into the Republic. The Government of Haiti 
has agreed, on its part, to take all feasible meas- 
ures to improve its budgetary position. 

"The two Governments will continue to ex- 
plore the possibilities of extending assistance to 
the Republic of Haiti in handling the surpluses 
of its agricultural products. 

"III. In view of the pledge of the two Gov- 
ernments to employ their full resources against 
the common enemy, and the need for an imme- 
diate increase in the production of sisal in order 
to prosecute the common war effort, the two 
Governments agreed in principle to arrange- 
ments providing for the planting of approxi- 
mately 24,000 additional acres of sisal in Haiti. 



"As much land as can be planted within one 
year's time from the present date, up to a max- 
imum of 12,000 acres will be undertaken through 
the Societe Haitiano-Americaine de Developpe- 
ment Agrieole ; and as much additional acreage 
as practicable will be planted by private inter- 
ests within one year's time from today's date, 
up to a maximum of 12,000 acres. The details 
of the financial arrangements necessary for the 
planting of the additional acreage are to be 
worked out with the appropriate agencies of the 
two Governments. 

"The Haitian Government agrees to grant 
every facility to the Societe Haitiano-Ameri- 
caine de Developpement Agrieole and to the 
private interests concerned in order that they 
may obtain possession of the necessary lands, 
whether government or privately owned, and 
to facilitate the employment of such United 
States technical personnel as may be necessary. 
In so far as practicable, the areas operated by 
the Societe Haitiano-Americaine de Developpe- 
ment Agrieole will be developed through a sys- 
tem of small holdings within short transporta- 
tion distance of the decorticating machinery of 
the Societe Haitiano-Americaine de Developpe- 
ment Agrieole. 

"If the planting of any additional acreage ap- 
pears to be necessary to the successful prosecu- 
tion of the joint war effort, the two Governments 
will consult together as to the method to be fol- 
lowed in any further sisal development. 

"P7. In order to assist the Government of 
Haiti to defend its own territory and to par- 
ticipate in the defense of the Hemisphere, the 
Government of the United States, through its 
appropriate military and naval agencies is 
taking steps: 

"a. To grant assistance in the construction 
of a marine railway at Port-au-Prince. 

"b. To station vessels suitable for coast 
guard and patrol purposes in Haitian waters. 
Provision will be made to train Haitian cadets 
on these vessels. 

"c. To make available a number of units of 
artillery for coast defense and other purposes. 

"d. To make available a number of military 
aircraft with mechanics and instructors who 



APRIL 18, 1942 

will give training to members of the Garde 
d'Haiti. 

"e. To construct a new patrol boat to be used 
in the defense of Haitian coastal waters. 

"f. To undertake the overhaul and repair 
of additional shipping of Haitian registry to 
be used for coastal and patrol duties." 

Furthermore, communications were ex- 
changed on April 7, 1942 by President Lescot 
and the Acting Secretary of State, providing 
for the active collaboration of the two Gov- 



355 

ernments in carrying out a number of health 
and sanitation projects within the Republic of 
Haiti, to be undertaken in accordance with 
resolution XXX regarding health and sani- 
tary conditions adopted at the recent confer- 
ence at Rio de Janeiro. The United States 
Government will send a small group of experts 
to Haiti to cooperate in the development of 
the specific program which will be decided 
upon in agreement with the appropriate 
Haitian officials. 



PAN AMERICAN DAY 

INFORMAL REMARKS OF THE PRESIDENT TO MEMBERS OF THE GOVERNING BOARD 
OF THE PAN AMERICAN UNION » 



[Released to the press by the White House April 14] 

Do not let us be formal. We are not hav- 
ing any formalities today because whenever 
I make a speech it takes me one week to prepare 
it, and I have no spare weeks at the present 
time. 

I think it is a fine thing that again we are 
celebrating Pan American Day. I hope that 
we are celebrating it in every republic, because 
I think it has more significance this year than 
at any previous time in the history of the hemi- 
sphere. I know that some of you have — one or 
two of you have — certain problems back home. 
And I do think that the idea is being under- 
stood more than ever before what would happen 
if any part of any of the hemisphere were dom- 
inated by a successful Germany. We wouldn't 
live the same kind of lives — that is the easiest 
way of putting it. Because that new — not the 
old German civilization — that new German civ- 
ilization is so totally different from what all 
of us have been accustomed to since we were 
born. I shudder to think of what would happen 
to any part of the hemisphere that came under 
German domination. 

So I am looking for a word — as I said to 
the newspapermen a little while ago — I want 
a name for the war. I haven't had any very 
good suggestions. Most of them are too long. 



1 Delivered on April 14, 1942. 



My own thought is that perhaps there is one 
word that we could use for this war, the word 
"survival". The Survival War. That is what 
it comes pretty close to being: the survival of 
our civilization, the survival of democracy, the 
survival of a hemisphere — the newest hemi- 
sphere of all of them — which has developed in 
its own ways. On the surface these ways may 
be a bit different, but down at the bottom there 
is the same kind of civilization that has come 
from a love of liberty and the willingness to 
pioneer. So I think that survival is what our 
problem is, survival of what we have all lived 
for for a great many generations. I think in 
all of the republics we have, relatively speak- 
ing, quite an ancient civilization — reckoned 
since we have had independence and even for 
a good many years before that. That is why 
I hope that continental hemispheric solidarity 
and unanimity are going to continue. At the 
last Pan American conference of the hemisphere 
down at Rio — while some people felt it had not 
gone so far as it would like to go — we did man- 
age to retain the objective of unanimity. 

There may be other problems after the war 
that we will have to work out among our- 
selves, sitting around the table, but at the pres- 
ent time we have substantial unanimity. That 
is a great thorn in the flesh of Herr Hitler. He 
felt that the success of the Rio Conference was 



356 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



a very serious blow to the Axis efforts to dom- 
inate the world. 

And so I hope that we will go on as we have 
in the past. A few of you were here at the 
time — in the summer of 1933, after I had been 
in here for a few months — we had a bit of 
trouble in the Republic of Cuba. I asked all 
the ambassadors and ministers of the hemi- 
sphere to come in and sit around the table in an 
informal way. And I told them that I didn't 
want the United States to do anything with- 
out everybody's knowing all about it, and that 
my thought was that it was a problem for 
Cuba to decide for herself. Cuba did, and 
many old-fashioned commentators in this 
country said it was a terrible thing to let Cuba 
handle the affairs of Cuba. 

So I hope we will continue to have the una- 
nimity of the past. And when it comes to 
cleaning up the mess at the end of this war, 
after the Axis is defeated, we will have again 
a hemispheric council around here to see what 
we are going to do all over the world, because 
we will have a very great voice in preventing 
in the future an attack on our American 
civilization. 

I haven't prepared any speech. These are 
just some thoughts that come to me every day — 
day and night. 

We are going places. We will get some- 
where. And we are going to have a couple of 
years, perhaps three years, before we can make 
sure that our' type of civilization is going to 
survive. I am perfectly confident of it my- 
self. We have all got to sacrifice. But we are 
going to come out the winner in the long run. 

It is good to see you all, and I hope that 
next year we will be in an even better state 
than we are in 1942. Good luck to you. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PRESIDENT OF PERU 

[Released to the press April 12] 

His Excellency Manuel Prado, President of 
Peru, will visit the United States as the guest 
of this Government on the invitation of Presi- 



dent Roosevelt, arriving at Miami on May 3. 
From Miami he will go directly to Washington, 
where he will be the guest of the President at 
the White House. Following his visit to the 
Capital, President Prado will visit other Ameri- 
can cities, including New York, Boston, and 
Detroit. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press April 18] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 11, 1942 : 

J. Webb Benton, of Pen Ryn, Cornwells 
Heights, Pa., formerly First Secretary of Lega- 
tion at Bucharest, Rumania, has been assigned 
as Consul at Marseille, France. 

The assignment of Henry Hanson, Jr., of 
Middletown, Conn., as Vice Consul at Van- 
couver, British Columbia, Canada, has been 
canceled. In lieu thereof Mr. Hanson has been 
designated Third Secretary of Legation and 
Vice Consul at Stockholm, Sweden, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 

Parker T. Hart, of Medford, Mass., Vice Con- 
sul at Manaos, Brazil, has been assigned as Vice 
Consul at Para, Brazil. 

The assignment of Martin J. Hillenbrand, of 
Chicago, 111., as Vice Consul at Bombay, India, 
has been canceled. In lieu thereof Mr. Hillen- 
brand has been assigned as Vice Consul at Cal- 
cutta, India. 

Marcel E. Malige, of Lakwai, Idaho, Consul 
at Martinique, French West Indies, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Martinique, 
French West Indies. 

Guy W. Ray, of Wilsonville, Ala., Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mex- 
ico, D.F., Mexico, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Mexico, 
D.F., Mexico, and will serve in dual capacity. 



APRIL 18, 1942 

Harold D. Robison, of Pleasant Grove, 
Utah, formerly Consul at Singapore, Straits 
Settlements, has been assigned as Consul at 
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. 

Harold Shantz, of Rochester, N.Y., First 
Secretary of Embassy at London, England, has 
been assigned as Consul General at Lagos, 
Nigeria, West Africa. 

The assignment of Walter J. Stoessel, Jr., of 
Beverly Hills, Calif., as Vice Consul at Wind- 
sor, Ontario, Canada, has been canceled. In 
lieu thereof Mr. Stoessel has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela. 

George Tait, of Monroe, Va., Consul at Mont- 



357 

real, Quebec, Canada, has been designated First 
Secretary of Legation at Bern, Switzerland. 

Charles O. Thompson, of Fairbanks, Alaska, 
formerly Vice Consul at Singapore, Straits Set- 
tlements, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Perth, Western Australia. 

Carlos J. Warner, of Chagrin Falls, Ohio, 
formerly Second Secretary of Embassy at Ber- 
lin, Germany, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Legation and Consul at Reykjavik, 
Iceland, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Clifton R. Wharton, of Boston, Mass., Second 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Monrovia, 
Liberia, has been assigned as Consul at Tana- 
narive, Madagascar. 



The Department 



TRANSFER OF DUTIES TO THE DIVISION OF CULTURAL RELATIONS 



Departmental Order 1047, issued by the Act- 
ing Secretary of State on April 15, 1942, trans- 
fers certain duties from the Division of the 
American Republics to the Division of Cul- 
tural Relations. The text of the order reads 
as follows: 

"In order to provide maximum concentra- 
tion of responsibility and administration in 
matters involving cultural cooperative rela- 
tions with the other American republics, there 
is hereby transferred from the Division of the 
American Republics to the Division of Cul- 
tural Relations responsibility for the conduct 
of the Department's participation in the work 
of the Interdepartmental Committee on Co- 
operation with the American Republics, which 
was established at the instance of the Presi- 
dent in May 1938, and under the provisions of 
Public No. 355, 76th Congress, entitled 'An Act 
to authorize the President to render closer and 
more effective the relationship between the 
American republics,' approved August 9, 
1939; and responsibility for matters involved 
in the administration of Public No. 63, 76th 



Congress, approved May 3, 1939, and entitled 
'An Act to amend the Act entitled "An Act 
authorizing the temporary detail of United 
States employees, possessing special qualifica- 
tions, to governments of American republics 
and the Philippines, and for other purposes," 
approved May 25, 1938,' in so far as the ad- 
ministration of that Act is vested in the De- 
partment of State. 

"In carrying out these functions, the Divi- 
sion of Cultural Relations shall have 
responsibility for enlisting the approval of 
the Division of the American Republics of all 
cooperative projects and personnel assign- 
ments, and for enlisting the collaboration of 
other interested divisions and offices of the De- 
partment, and it shall maintain effective liai- 
son with other interested departments and 
agencies of the Government. 

"Upon the written authorization of the As- 
sistant Secretary of State and Budget Officer, 
or in his absence another Assistant Secretary 
of State, the Chief of the Division of Cultural 
Relations, or in his absence the Acting Chief, 



358 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



is hereby authorized to certify vouchers and 
to sign contracts involving obligations and ex- 
penditures, other than printing and binding, 
under the Department of State allotment from 
the appropriation 'Cooperation with the 
American Eepublics'. 

"The provisions of this Order are effective 
as of this date and supersede and cancel the 
provisions of any existing Orders in conflict 
therewith." 

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Clarke L. Willard has been appointed 
an Assistant Chief of the Division of Inter- 
national Conferences, effective as of January 
1, 1942 (Departmental Order 1046). 

Mr. Francis H. Eussell has been appointed 
an Assistant Chief of the Division of World 
Trade Intelligence, effective as of October 1, 
1941 (Departmental Order 1048). 

Mr. T. Ross Cissel, Jr., and Mr. Livingston 
T. Merchant have been appointed Assistant 
Chiefs of the Division of Defense Materials, 
effective as of February 17 and March 30, 1942, 
respectively (Departmental Order 1050). 



Commercial Policy 



SUSPENSION OF IMPORT QUOTAS ON CER- 
TAIN WHEAT AND WHEAT FLOUR 

The President, on April 13, 1942, on the basis 
of a supplemental investigation and report by 
the Tariff Commission with respect to certain 
wheat and wheat flour, proclaimed that the pro- 
visions of Proclamation 2489, of May 28, 1941, 1 
are suspended effective immediately, so far as 
they apply to (1) wheat and wheat flour for 
experimental purposes, (2) seed wheat, and (3) 
distress diversions of wheat and wheat flour. 
The text of the proclamation of April 13, 1942 
(no. 2550) appears in the Federal Register of 
April 16, 1942, page 2825. 



SUSPENSION OF TITLE II OF THE SUGAR 
ACT OF 1937 

The operation of title II (quota provisions) 
of the Sugar Act of 1937 (50 Stat. 903) was sus- 
pended by proclamation of April 13, 1942 (no. 
2551) upon the finding by the President that "a 
national economic emergency exists with respect 
to sugar". For the full text of the proclama- 
tion, see the Federal Register of April 16, 1942, 
page 2826. 



Treaty Information 



1 Bulletin of May 31, 1941, p. 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

FISHERIES 

Convention With Canada for the Preservation 
of the Halibut Fishery of the Northern Pacific 
Ocean and Bering Sea 

The Federal Register for April 16, 1942 
(vol. 7, no. 74) publishes on pages 2849-2852 
regulations adopted by the International 
Fisheries Commission pursuant to the Conven- 
tion for the Preservation of the Halibut Fish- 
ery of the Northern Pacific Ocean and Bering 
Sea between the United States and Canada 
signed January 29, 1937 (Treaty Series 917). 

COMMERCE 
Trade-Agreement Negotiations With Mexico 
Announcement of a supplementary list of 
products on which the United States will con- 
sider granting concessions to Mexico, in addi- 
tion to those products listed on April 4, 1942 
at the time of public notice of intention to 
negotiate a trade agreement with Mexico, ap- 
peared in the Bulletin of April 11, 1942, page 
328. 

AGRICULTURE AND FINANCE 
Agreements With Haiti 
A memorandum covering several agreements 
dealing with agriculture, finance, and defense 



APRIL 18, 1942 



359 



which were reached by the Government of 
Haiti and the Government of the United 
States during the occasion of the visit to the 
United States of President Elie Lescot of 
Haiti, appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 

PETROLEUM PROPERTIES 
Agreement With Mexico 

The text of an agreement reached by the 
United States and Mexican experts assigned 
to determine just compensation for expropri- 
ated petroleum properties in Mexico, together 
with an exchange of notes between President 
Roosevelt and President Avila Camacho of 
Mexico regarding the agreement, appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "American 
Republics". 



Publications 



Department of State 

Cultural Relations Among the Democracies. Inter- 
American Series 22. Publication 1714. vi, 20 pp. 

100. 

Radiocommunications : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Other American Republics 
(Revision of Habana Radiocommunications Ar- 
rangement of 1937) — Signed at Santiago, Chile-. 
January 26, 1940; notification of approval by the 



United States of America communicated to the 
Government of Chile June 26, 1941. Executive 
Agreement Series 231. Publication 1716. iv, 69 pp. 
150. 
The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 3, April 11, 1942, to Revision I of Feb- 
ruary 7, 1942. Publication 1722. 19 pp. 



Regulations 



Postal Censorship Regulations : Mail to Foreign Coun- 
tries, Etc. April 15, 1942. (Office of Censorship.) 
[Regulation No. II.] 7 Federal Register 2905. 



Legislation 



Amending the Nationality Act of 1940 to furnish 
copies of any part of the records or information 
therefrom to agencies or officials of a State without 
charge. H. Rept. 2019, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6529. 
2 pp. 

Message from the President of the United States 
transmitting a brief resume' of the third report of 
the United States High Commissioner to the Philip- 
pine Islands covering the calendar year 1938 and 
the first six months of 1939. H. Doc. 706, 77th 
Cong. 4 pp. 

Message from the President of the United States 
transmitting a brief resumed of the fourth report 
of the United States High Commissioner to the 
Philippine Islands covering the fiscal year begin- 
ning July 1, 1939, and ending June 30, 1940. H. 
Doc. 707, 77th Cong. 6 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



7<r, 



n 

THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



APRIL 25, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 148— Publication 1735 



C 



ontents 



The War page 

Statement by the Secretary of State 363 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel . . . 363 
Demands for surrender of General Mihajlovic of Yugo- 
slavia 364 

Lend-Lease operations 365 

American Republics 

Economic collaboration with Peru 365 

Economic collaboration with Nicaragua 368 

Radio address by Philip W. Bonsai on inter-American 

relationships 369 

Payment by Bolivian Government to Standard Oil 

Company 372 

Mixed commission, United States and Argentina . . . 373 

Commercial Policy 

Trade-agreement negotiations with Mexico 373 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Peruvian congressman . . 374 

Visit to the United States of Peruvian engineer. . . . 375 

Visit to the United States of Paraguayan official. . . . 375 

The Foreign Service 

Death of wife of Ambassador Leahy 375 

Personnel changes 375 

[over] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF 00CUMENT3 
MAY 14 1942 







OlltentS-CONTWVED 



Treaty Information Page 
Labor: Agreement with Canada Regarding Unemploy- 
ment Insurance 376 

Publications: Agreement for the Exchange of Official 

Publications with Panama 376 

Strategic materials and finance: 

Agreements with Peru 377 

Agreement with Nicaragua 377 

Commerce: Trade Agreement with Argentina .... 377 

Regulations 377 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 377 

Legislation 377 

Publications 377 



The War 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press April 20] 

The following statement has been made by the 
Secretary of State : 

"I have observed with keen satisfaction the 
splendid showing made in the whole war effort 
of the country during recent months, and par- 
ticularly in the production of war supplies for 
the fighting fronts. The greatly expanded vol- 
ume of output is far larger than was even hoped 
for the first of the year. This increased pro- 
duction placed in the hands of our fighting 
forces will both hasten and make certain the 
utter defeat of our enemies. 

"The United Nations, of which we are one, 
will win this war. 

"Victory will come sooner and with a vast 
saving in suffering, in life, and in property in 
proportion as every man and woman in this 



country and in each of the United Nations real- 
izes the extreme danger from the purposes of the 
worst barbarian leaders in all history, who plan 
to conquer and brutally subjugate the world by 
methods of unparalleled savagery. Victory will 
be hastened by every additional ounce of effort 
which each one of us puts forth in a situation 
that is as threatening as if his own house were 
on fire. It will be delayed and will involve an 
incalculable and unnecessary increase in suffer- 
ing and in losses with any weakening of such 
realization and with any lagging in effort and 
exertion. 

"I am confident that our Nation and all those 
who are with us have only one watchword: to 
move forward today and not tomorrow. With 
this will to victory, free men the world over will 
triumph over the forces of barbarism." 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PERSONNEL 



[Released to the press April 20] 

The Swedish steamship Drottningholm under 
charter to the American Government sailed from 
Goteborg, Sweden, on April 19. It has on board 
114 American citizens who have been stranded 
in Sweden since 1940. The vessel is traveling 
under the safe conduct of all the belligerent 
governments, who are pledged not to stop it 
nor to detain or search any of its passengers. 



A number of Axis nationals, some of them 
diplomatic and consular officers, are on the way 



to the United States from South American 
countries which have broken relations with the 
Axis. The American vessels on which they are 
traveling are proceeding under the safe conduct 
of all the belligerent nations. En route from 
their port of arrival in this country to New 
York for embarkation on the S.S. Drottning- 
holm, these persons will be accommodated some- 
where for a few days. Because of the crowded 
condition at White Sulphur Springs they will 
not be taken there. A large number of these 



364 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



persons will be placed on board the S.S. Drott- 
ningholm, which is to leave New York on or 
about May 5 with a capacity passenger list of 
Axis officials and certain non-official Axis na- 
tionals expelled from this hemisphere. As the 
number of Axis officials and other Axis nationals 
to be repatriated to Europe is far greater than 
the capacity of the S.S. Drottningholm, this 
vessel, on returning from Lisbon with Ameri- 



can citizens and nationals of the American re- 
publics being evacuated from Europe, will make 
at least one other trip to Lisbon. It will prob- 
ably be required for additional trips thereafter 
until the number of persons being repatriated 
from Europe and this hemisphere is reduced to a 
point where existing commercial means will be 
sufficient to accommodate the persons left 
behind. 



DEMANDS FOR SURRENDER OF GENERAL MIHAJLOVIC OF YUGOSLAVIA 



[Released to the press April 23] 

The following note has been sent by the 
Secretary of State to His Excellency Constantin 
Fotitch, the Yugoslav Minister at Washington, 
in the matter of the order recently issued at 
Belgrade demanding the surrender of General 
Mihajlovic and his staff. 

It is in reply to a note from the Yugoslav 
Minister, the substance of which, together with 
the list of officers to whom the order referred, 
has already appeared in the press. 

"April 22, 1942. 
"Sir: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt 
of your note of April 13 1 in which you place on 
record the protest of the Royal Yugoslav Gov- 
ernment with respect to the order of the au- 
thorities now in control at Belgrade, demanding 
the surrender of General Draza Mihajlovic and 
his staff, and announcing, in the event of non- 
compliance, that their families will be taken as 
hostages, and further that the families of other 
persons having contact with, or rendering as- 
sistance to the campaign of General Mihajlovic 
will be held in reprisal, and their property held 
subject to confiscation. 



1 Not printed. 



"The position of this Government with re- 
spect to the taking of hostages has already been 
made known. This barbarous practice as a Ger- 
man method of warfare was stigmatized in a 
declaration made public by the President of the 
United States on October 25, 1941, which in turn 
was cited, as your Government is aware, in the 
joint declaration recently signed at London by 
the representatives of nations whose territory is 
now under German tyranny, proclaiming to the 
world the resolve of outraged peoples that 
retribution would be exacted. 

"The Government and people of the United 
States have watched with admiration the re- 
sourceful and heroic operations of General Mi- 
hajlovic and his men and are proud to acknowl- 
edge the contribution of Yugoslav patriots 
in the common struggle against the forces bent 
(in the destruction of free nations throughout 
the world. The shocking proclamation to which 
your note has reference is but another of a series 
of savage and ruthless measures whereby Ger- 
man terrorism has sought to break the spirit 
of brave men. 

"Accept [etc.] 

"For the Secretary of State : 

Sumner Welles" 



APRIL 25, 1942 



365 



LEND-LEASE OPERATIONS 

[Released to the press by the White House April IS] 

Thomas B. McCabe, Acting Lcnd-Lease Ad- 
ministrator, has given the President a brief sum- 
mary of lend-lease operations as of March 31, 
1942. The summary says, in part : 

1. Lend-lease aid has increased every month 
since (he inauguration of the program. Aid in 



the month of March amounted to nearly 600 mil- 
lion dollars. 

2. Total lend-lease aid to the end of January 
amounted to 2 billion dollars. At the end of 
March it amounted to more than 3 billion dol- 
lars, an increase of a billion dollars in two 
months. 

3. The amount of aid sent to Russia in March 
was 2~y 2 times as great as that sent in February. 



American Republics 



ECONOMIC COLLABORATION WITH PERU 



I Released to the press April 23] 

The visit to Washington of His Excellency 
Senor David Dasso, Minister of Finance and 
Commerce of Peru, was brought to a close on 
April 23 with the exchange with the Secretary 
of State of notes incorporating a series of im- 
portant decisions on matters of collaboration 
between Peru and the United States in attain- 
ing a number of the objectives of the resolutions 
of the Third Meeting of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics at Rio de 
Janeiro. These matters include: (1) measures 
for the mobilization of the resources of Peru 
for the production of strategic materials es- 
sential for the security of the hemisphere, in- 
volving especially (a) the establishment by 
Peru of a Peruvian Amazon Corporation and 
(b) arrangements for the acquisition by the 
Rubber Reserve Company over a period of five 
years of all rubber produced in Peru other 
than a specified amount required for essential 
uses in Peru; (2) establishment by the Export- 
Import Bank of a credit in favor of Banco 
Central de Reserva del Peru in the sum of 
$25,000,000 to assist in financing purchases in 
the United States of materials and equipment 
required in connection with the construction 



and development in Peru of useful public works 
and of agricultural, mining, and industrial pro- 
jects; (3) agreement with the Secretary of Ag- 
riculture for the establishment of an agricul- 
tural experiment station at Tingo Maria and 
arrangements for the loan to the Government 
of Peru of the services of experts of appro- 
priate agencies of the United States in high- 
way engineering, erosion control, coal mining, 
and tea processing; and (4) agreement for the 
purchase by the Department of Agriculture, 
through the Commodity Credit Corporation, 
for the duration of the war, of that portion 
of the Peruvian cotton production which is in 
excess of sales for Peruvian consumption and 
for export to other purchasers. 

In addition, the Minister of Finance and 
Commerce has announced the recent adoption 
by his Government of further measures to con- 
trol the commercial and financial operations of 
firms and persons whose activities are deemed 
inimical to the security of the hemisphere, and 
the readiness of his Government to consult with 
the Government of the United States regarding 
any measures which may be necessary to pre- 
vent persons whose activities are thus deemed 
inimical from benefiting in the agreements 



366 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



reached between the two Governments. He has 
also stated that he is engaged in discussions 
with the Foreign Bondholders Protective Coun- 
cil, Incorporated, looking toward a resumption 
of payments on the Peruvian dollar debt. 

While in Washington the Minister also dis- 
cussed a number of other matters of mutual in- 
terest to the two Governments, including de- 
tails of arrangements under the Lend-Lease 
agreement signed on March 11, 1912 and ex- 
port control, priorities, and allocations ques- 
tions relating to the importations by Peru from 
the United States of materials and equipment 
needed for the maintenance of Peruvian min- 
ing production, transportation, and essential 
civilian needs. 

The texts of the notes follow : 

The Peruvian Minister of Finance and Com- 
merce to the Secretary of State 

Peruvian Embassy, 
Washington, April 23, 19J$. 
Mr. Secretary: 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation for 
the courtesies which have been extended to me 
and to my companions during our visit to Your 
Excellency's country. During my stay, I have 
had the opportunity to discuss with officials of 
a number of agencies of Your Excellency's Gov- 
ernment a program of close collaboration to at- 
tain many of the objectives of the Resolutions 
of the Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics at Rio 
de Janeiro, and a series of important decisions 
have been reached on several points of this 
program. 

In order to carry out its undertaking in ac- 
cordance with Resolution II on the Production 
of Strategic Materials, the Government of 
Peru is establishing a Peruvian Amazon Cor- 
poration to develop the production and en- 
courage the collection of wild rubber and other 
tropical products. Moreover, I have today 
transmitted to Your Excellency a note 1 contain- 
ing a proposal of the Government of Peru, in 



1 Not printed. 



furtherance of the provisions relating to the 
production of strategic materials in Resolution 
II of the Third Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics at Rio 
de Janeiro, for developing the production of 
rubber in Peru and for making available to the 
United States all rubber produced in Peru other 
than a specified amount required for essential 
uses in Peru. This proposal provides for the 
purchase of such rubber by Rubber Reserve 
Company over a five-year period. The pro- 
posal also contemplates the establishment of a 
fund of $1,125,000 to be made available to Peru 
for the purpose of increasing the production of 
wild rubber in Peru. 

I have taken up with the Export-Import Bank 
of Washington the question of obtaining an ap- 
propriate credit to assist in financing purchases 
in the United States of materials and equipment 
required in connection with the construction and 
development in Peru of useful public works and 
of agricultural, mining and industrial projects. 

In order to provide the fullest technical fa- 
cilities and cooperation necessary to the success- 
ful development in Peru of production of rubber 
and other important and strategic tropical 
products, discussions were begun with members 
of the United States Delegation at the Rio de 
Janeiro Meeting looking towards the establish- 
ment of an agricultural experiment station in 
the Amazon region of Peru. These discussions 
have culminated in an agreement with the Sec- 
retary of Agriculture of the United States, a 
copy of which is enclosed, 1 for the immediate 
establishment of such an experiment station at 
Tingo Maria. During my visit to Washington 
I have also taken up with appropriate officials of 
Your Excellency's Government the desire of 
the Government of Peru to obtain the services 
of experts in highway engineering, erosion con- 
trol, coal mining, and tea processing. 

Discussions have also taken place with the 
Secretary of Agriculture and officials of the 
Commodity Credit Corporation regarding pro- 
posals for the purchase through the latter Cor- 
poration, for the duration of the war, of that 



APRIL 25, 1942 



367 



portion of the Peruvian cotton production 
which is in excess of sales for Peruvian con- 
sumption and for export to other purchasers. 
These discussions have resulted in the conclu- 
sion with the Secretary of Agriculture of an 
agreement, a copy of which is attached, 1 which 
should contribute in large measure to the main- 
tenance of the Peruvian agricultural economy 
and the orderly handling of cotton crops in the 
face of dislocations of trade occasioned by the 
war. 

As Your Excellency is aware, the Govern- 
ment of Peru has just adopted measures 
implementing further the recommendations con- 
tained in Resolution V on Severance of Com- 
mercial and Financial Relations adopted at the 
Third Meeting of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs at Rio de Janerio. By these measures the 
Government of Peru will control the commer- 
cial and financial operations of firms and per- 
sons whose activities are deemed inimical to 
the security of the hemisphere. In this con- 
nection, the Government of Peru will consult 
with the Government of the United States re- 
garding any measures which may be necessary 
to prevent such persons and firms from benefit- 
ing from the agreements which have been 
reached between our two Governments. 

The Peruvian Government wishes to inform 
Your Excellency's Government that it has en- 
tered into discussions with the Foreign Bond- 
holders Protective Council, Incorporated, 
looking toward the early resumption of pay- 
ments on the Peruvian dollar debt. These 
discussions with regard to the scale and amount 
of payments will be continued after my return 
to Lima and subsequent announcement will be 
made by my Government. 

In conclusion I wish to express to Your Ex- 
cellency my firm conviction that the program 
of further collaboration between our Govern- 
ments developed during my visit will contribute 
greatly to the realization of our common aim of 
hemisphere security. 

I avail myself [etc.] David Dasso 



1 Not printed. 



The Secretary of State to the Peruvian Minister 
of Finance and Commerce 

Department of State, 
Washington, April 23, 191$. 
Excellency : 

I have received with deep gratification Your 
Excellency's cordial note of April 23, 1942 with 
reference to the matters which I and other offi- 
cials of the Government of the United States 
have had the privilege of discussing with you 
during your visit to Washington. I need not 
assure you of the personal satisfaction which it 
has been for me to collaborate with you in the 
establislunent of a program to attain certain of 
the objectives of the Resolutions of the Third 
Meeting of Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
American Republics at Rio de Janeiro, and I 
am convinced that the decisions taken will con- 
tribute in important degree to the security of 
the hemisphere. 

My Government is pleased to note that, in fur- 
therance of Resolution II on the Production of 
Strategic Materials, Your Excellency's Govern- 
ment is creating a Peruvian Amazon Corpora- 
tion to undertake and stimulate the production 
of strategic tropical products. In this connec- 
tion I have today transmitted to Your Excel- 
lency a note ' accepting the proposal of the Gov- 
ernment of Peru with respect to the acquisition 
by the Rubber Reserve Company over a period 
of five years of all rubber produced in Peru 
other than the specified amount required for 
essential uses in Peru. This agreement marks 
an important step in the carrying out of the 
broad program for the mobilization of strategic 
material resources for the security of the hemi- 
sphere which was undertaken at the recent Rio 
de Janeiro Meeting. 

I am informed by the Secretary of Commerce 
that the Export-Import Bank finds itself heart- 
ily in sympathy with the objectives of the pro- 
gram of the Government of Peru and is prepared 
to establish a credit in favor of Banco Central 
de Reserva del Peru in the sum of $25,000,000 



368 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



to assist in financing purchases in the United 
States of materials and equipment required in 
connection with the construction and develop- 
ment in Peru of useful public works, and of agi'i- 
cultural, mining and industrial projects. It is 
recognized that the United States cannot under- 
take to furnish machinery and equipment in 
short supply due to the exigencies of war, and 
that priorities necessary to acquire such items 
in the United States will be granted only after 
careful study and determination that the estab- 
lishment of the industry for which they are 
needed will contribute directly in important 
measure to the war effort of the United States 
and the security of the hemisphere. 

I have noted with satisfaction and interest the 
agreements entered into by Your Excellency 
with the Secretary of Agriculture for the estab- 
lishment of an agricultural experiment station 
at Tingo Maria and for the purchase through the 
Commodity Credit Corporation of that portion 
of the Peruvian cotton production which is in 
excess of sales for Peruvian consumption and for 
export to other purchasers. I also take pleasure 
in informing you that my Government has 
found it possible to arrange to make available to 
Your Excellency's Government the services of 



competent experts in highway engineering, 
erosion control, coal mining, and tea processing. 

My Government has noted with great satis- 
faction the measures adopted by the Peruvian 
Government to control the commercial and 
financial operations of persons whose activities 
are deemed inimical to the security of the hemi- 
sphere, which are referred to in Your Excellen- 
cy's note, as well as Your Excellency's statement 
that the Government of Peru will consult 
with the Government of the United States 
regarding any measures which may be necessary 
to prevent such persons from benefiting from 
the agreements reached between our two Govern- 
ments. It is understood that the two Govern- 
ments will consult particularly with respect to 
the policies and procedures to be adopted for 
dealing with cotton which may be produced by 
persons or firms on the United States Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 

I likewise welcome the information that the 
Government of Peru is carrying on discussions 
with the Foreign Bondholders Protective Coun- 
cil, Incorporated, looking towards an early re- 
sumption of payments on the Peruvian dollar 
debt. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 



ECONOMIC COLLABORATION WITH NICARAGUA 



[Released to the press April 25] 

The Nicaraguan Minister of Foreign Affairs, 
Dr. Mariano Arguello, and the President of the 
National Bank of Nicaragua, Dr. Jesus Sanchez, 
have concluded their visit in Washington, dur- 
ing the course of which negotiations were under- 
taken relating to the construction of the Nicara- 
guan section of the Inter-American Highway, 
an extension of credit by the Export -Import 
Bank, the availability of supplies and equip- 
ment for the maintenance of certain industries 
vital to the economy of Nicaragua, defense meas- 
ures of mutual interest, and the development of 
rubber production for purchase by the United 
States. 



1. Notes were exchanged on April 8, 1942 pro- 
viding for the cooperation of the United States 
in the construction of the Inter-American High- 
way in Nicaragua, in accordance with the Inter- 
American Highway Act signed by the President 
of the United States on December 26, 1941. 
This exchange of notes provides for the com- 
pletion of the Inter- American Highway in Nica- 
ragua on the basis that Nicaragua will assume 
one third of the cost of the construction of the 
Highway in Nicaragua; the remaining two 
thirds will be borne by the United States under 
the above-mentioned Act. 

The section of the Inter- American Highway 
from Managua, the capital of Nicaragua, north 



APRIL 25, 1942 



369 



65 miles to Sebaco and south 29 miles to Diri- 
amba, has been largely completed by the Nicara- 
guan Government. The exchange of notes 
effected on April 8 will permit the completion 
of this part of the Highway, and its extension 
to the Honduran and Costa Rican frontiers, in- 
volving about 175 miles of construction. 

2. Negotiations were concluded relating to 
the extension of a line of credit, not to exceed 
$500,000, in favor of the Banco Nacional de 
Nicaragua by the Export-Import Bank of 
Washington. 

3. Expression was given by Dr. Arguello to 
the vital importance of certain industries in the 
internal economy of Nicaragua and to the re- 
quirements of those industries for supplies and 
equipment essential to their continued opera- 
tion. The Government of the United States 
has assured the Nicaraguan Government that, so 
far as the materials are available in the United 
States under present conditions, every effort 
will be made to assist those industries essential 
to the national economy of Nicaragua to obtain 
supplies and equipment for the maintenance of 
production at normal levels. 



4. Dr. Arguello also discussed, while in Wash- 
ington, a number of matters of interest to the 
two Governments in relation to continental de- 
fense. Agreement was reached regarding the 
cooperation of the United States in the con- 
struction of a highway which will join the At- 
lantic and Pacific sections of Nicaragua and 
will at the same time have an important bearing 
upon the defense of this highly important area, 

5. An agreement in principle has been 
reached whereby the Nicaraguan Government, 
acting through the Banco Nacional de Nica- 
ragua, will make available for purchase by the 
Rubber Reserve Company all crude rubber pro- 
duced in Nicaragua which is available for 
export. 

6. The Government of the United States, act- 
ing through the Department of Agriculture, has 
agreed to assist the Nicaraguan Government in 
the establishment of an agricultural-demonstra- 
tion station with a view to increasing Nicara- 
guan agricultural production, particularly with 
respect to the development of rubber and abaca, 
and to that end will send a group of competent 
experts to Nicaragua, 



RADIO ADDRESS BY PHILIP W. BONSAL ON INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONSHIPS 



[Released to the press April 25] 

I am deeply grateful to Edward Tomlinson 
for affording me this opportunity of address- 
ing his radio audience. Mr. Tomlinson is a pio- 
neer and remains a leader among those who on 
the air and in the press have made and con- 
tinue to make important contributions to that 
mutual understanding and community of in- 
terest which is at the basis of the relations today 
so happily existing between the 21 American 
republics. His work has been well and favor- 



1 D slivered over the Blue Network on April 25, 1942. 
Mr. Bonsai is Chief of the Division of the American 
Republics, Department of State. 
456620—42 2 



ably known to all of us who are familiar with 
this important phase of the political and 
economic relations of our country. 

Unfortunately the work of Mr. Tomlinson 
and his colleagues, based as it is upon intimate 
knowledge of American problems — and I use 
the term American in the broadest sense of the 
word — is from time to time counteracted by ir- 
responsible and unfounded statements which 
are widely circulated. One such statement was 
called to my attention recently. It was to the 
effect that at the recent meeeting in Rio de 
Janeiro the United States representatives made 
a large number of promises which they did not 
have the ability to carry out. It was alleged 



370 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



that our delegation offered to the other Amer- 
ican republics priorities in the furnishing of a 
long list of supplies, equipment, and machinery 
urgently needed by the fighting fronts and by 
our own war industries. The purpose of the 
offer is alleged to have been to secure certain 
commitments, presumably of a political nature, 
from our neighbors. Those promises, it is 
stated, have not been fulfilled, and our neigh- 
bors are alleged in this statement to feel that 
they were deceived at Rio. 

These allegations are completely false. The 
American republics understand and have con- 
fidence in each other. Furthermore, they under- 
stand the world conditions and particularly the 
world emergency today confronting free nations. 
They are conscious of the interdependence of 
their economies. They appreciate the factors 
which make it more or less possible to transport 
goods between them. They have resolved to- 
gether to take all adequate measures for the 
maintenance of their economic stability. 

They know, however, that that stability as 
well as the prospect of an increased development 
of their own economic possibilities is intimately 
tied to the achievement of the military victory 
to which the peoples of the Americas look with 
the utmost confidence. 

Those who lightly accuse our Government of 
deliberately making false promises demonstrate 
among other things their own ignorance of the 
background of the inter-American relationship 
as it exists today. That relationship is not the 
creation of a moment's inspiration. Its founda- 
tions were laid over a century ago. 

The 21 American republics are, in fact, united 
in many measures to meet danger threatening 
them all. However, the action which they are 
now taking is possible because the machinery 
for collaboration and the mutual confidence 
necessary for solidarity had been created before 
the danger arose in its present form. In other 
words, ours is not an improvised policy. 

A very brief survey of the major steps taken 
over the past few years in order to build up our 
inter-American solidarity to the point where it 
is now successfully meeting almost daily emer- 
gencies of an international character is appro- 



priate. The first of these steps was taken at 
Montevideo in 1933 at the seventh of a series of 
international conferences of American states 
which had been held since 1889. There the 21 
American republics defined the rights and duties 
of sovereign states and renounced any inter- 
vention in each other's internal affairs. By 
treaty the United States renounced the right 
which it had previously asserted in certain in- 
stances to intervene forcibly in the affairs of 
its neighbors. By its actions in the succeeding 
years the United States demonstrated its ad- 
herence to the new principles and its dedication 
to the policy of the good neighbor. Thus was 
the specter of imperialism laid to rest in the 
political field and the juridical equality of each 
sovereign nation firmly established. 

Nineteen hundred and thirty-three — this was 
the year in which the American republics laid 
the cornerstone of international confidence and 
cooperation in this hemisphere; it was also the 
year of Hitler's coming to power in Germany. 

Three years later the American republics 
assembled at Buenos Aires at a special confer- 
ence called by President Roosevelt. It was 
there agreed that the peace of any one of the 
American republics was a cause of common 
concern to all. A procedure of consultation 
was devised and the obligation to consult to- 
gether was assumed in the case that peace were 
threatened from any source. 

Many of the statesmen of our hemisphere 
were in 1936 already thoroughly aware of the 
degree to which the path of the aggressor in 
Europe and Asia had been smoothed because 
those nations interested in the maintenance of 
international law and order had failed to stand 
together and to agree upon common measures 
of resistance. In 1936 the fatal policies of 
appeasement and self-delusion had already 
borne fruit, and the Third Reich had been 
allowed unilaterally and by force to overthrow 
the international statutes upon which the peace 
of Europe rested. 

Still further seeking to weld together their 
continental community, the American republics 
met at Lima in December of 1938. Europe was 
already in the shadows. Munich had come and 



APRIL 25, 1942 



371 



gone, and few believed that even the highly 
favorable terms which Hitler had there ex- 
tracted from the unprepared democracies would 
long be respected by him. 

At Lima the American republics magnificently 
reaffirmed their continental solidarity and pro- 
vided that in order to facilitate the necessary 
consultations the Ministers of Foreign Affairs 
of the American republics or their representa- 
tives, when deemed desirable and at the initia- 
tive of any one of them, would meet together. 

Within three weeks of the outbreak of the 
war in September of 1939 there was assembled at 
Panama the First Consultative Meeting of the 
Foreign Ministers of the continent. At that 
meeting emphasis was upon immediate measures 
for keeping the effects of the conflict from the 
hemisphere. Procedures with regard to neutral- 
ity and security were adopted. In retrospect, 
however, perhaps the most important achieve- 
ment was the establishment of the Inter- Amer- 
ican Financial and Economic Advisory Com- 
mittee, consisting of one representative of each 
of the 21 governments, which has been in per- 
manent session in Washington since November 
of 1939 and has furnished a constant medium, 
for the consideration of the many and serious 
economic problems resulting from the ever- 
spreading war and for the adoption of far- 
reaching measures designed to meet those prob- 
lems. For example : that Committee is respon- 
sible for the Inter- American Coffee Agreement ; 
it devised the arrangements under which 100 
former Axis vessels immobilized in American 
ports are now serving the Americas. 

In the summer of 1940 the surrender of France 
brought the war much closer to our hemisphere. 
France has had for generations colonial pos- 
sessions in the West Indies and on the mainland 
of South America. Those possessions, in the 
hands of a government subservient to the aggres- 
sor nations, might prove a source of great dan- 
ger to the free nations of the continent. Under- 
standing this situation thoroughly, the 21 Amer- 
ican republics before the end of July 1940 had 
adopted at the Second Consultative Meeting of 
Foreign Ministers held at Habana an Act and a 



Convention providing for the provisional ad- 
ministration of European possessions by an 
inter-American organization in case of the dan- 
ger of a change in sovereignty over those regions. 

At the same meeting the representatives of the 
American republics took occasion to declare 
"that any attempt on the part of a non-American 
State against the integrity or inviolability of 
the territory, the sovereignty or the political in- 
dependence of an American State shall be con- 
sidered as an act of aggression against the States 
which sign this declaration". All 21 represent- 
atives signed the declaration. 

On December 7 the United States of America, 
one of the 21 American republics, became the 
victim of aggression of one of the Axis partners ; 
the other partners declared war on us. Again 
the procedure of consultation was called into 
play. Again the American republics affirmed 
the declaration which they had made at Habana. 
The Foreign Ministers acted, reaffirming the 
complete solidarity of the countries which they 
represented and their determination to cooperate 
jointly for their mutual protection until, in the 
words of the important resolution which they 
there adopted, "the effects of the present aggres- 
sion against the Continent have disappeared." 
They recommended that each country break off 
its diplomatic relations with the Axis powers 
in accordance with the procedures established 
by its own laws and in conformity with the posi- 
tion and the circumstances pertaining to each 
country in the existing continental conflict. 

The Rio Meeting covered a very wide field 
of matters of inter-American interest. It was 
fitting that it should do so since it met at a time 
of unparalleled crisis and since it was the third 
in a series of meetings held under the consul- 
tative procedure. It would not be possible here 
to attempt to review all that was accomplished. 
The record has been published. 1 Suffice it to 
say that in 40 carefully drafted resolutions the 
entire field of the political and economic prob- 
lems of the Americas was covered. And in 



1 For test of Final Act, see the Bulletin of February 
7, 1942, p. 117. 



372 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



addition to these tangible and concrete resolu- 
tions it is important to stress the tremendous 
power of the intangible forces which are to- 
day influencing the course of inter-American 
relations. 

At a gathering such as this at Rio — not a 
conference in the usual and formal sense but 
rather a meeting of friends and colleagues — 
statesmen responsible for guiding the foreign 
policies of 21 sovereign nations meet on in- 
formal terms. They sit down in subcommit- 
tees and work together in formulating their 
common policies. Their exchanges of views 
are not confined to formal sessions but are 
continued in small groups at the luncheon 
table or at social gatherings. Many familiar 
faces are seen — old friends who have partici- 
pated in previous inter-American gatherings. 
The intimate bonds of friendship generated 
through this simple and effective mechanism 
have had and are continuing to have a signifi- 
cant effect in promoting mutual understand- 
ing and a feeling of common responsibilities 
in the face of the dangers threatening our 
continent. 

We in the Americas have behind us over a 
decade of experience in the practical applica- 
tion of international fair-dealings. We do not 
make promises to each other which we know 
we can not make good. There is not the 
slightest foundation for the allegation that 
promises were made at Rio which this Govern- 
ment was in no position to make good. Our 
friends know that we are fighting a war of 
survival; many of them are fighting at our 
side. They know too that the officially stated 
economic policy of this Government is to aid 
in maintaining the economic stability of the 
other American republics by recognizing and 
providing for their essential civilian needs on 
the basis of equal and proportionate considera- 
tion with our own. Just as no one can predict 
the exact future course of the war to the day 
of ultimate victory, so no one can predict the 
extent of the privations and sacrifices to which 
the civilian populations in the United States 
and the other American republics may be sub- 



jected before that day arrives. Equally cer- 
tainly the maintenance of economic stability 
in each one of the American republics, which 
are making so important a contribution to our 
own war effort, is an important objective of 
this Government's war-time policy. The de- 
tails of that policy are being worked out daily 
in friendly consultation and conference be- 
tween the officials of the various governments 
concerned. 

Those officials and their governments believe 
in the Rio resolutions. They believe that the 
United States will carry out its stated policy. 
They have daily evidence of the carrying out 
of that policy. They know that since the Rio 
Meeting about 50 scarce articles, including 
important groups of iron and steel products, 
rayon, certain chemicals, and farm machinery, 
have been the subject of allocation for export 
by our Government in accordance with its 
slated policy regarding civilian needs in the 
United States and in the other American 
republics. 

Since Rio eight of the other American 
republics have sent official delegations to Wash- 
ington for the purpose of entering into recipro- 
cal commitments with this Government in a 
large variety of matters, mostly of an economic 
character. These commitments continue to be 
entered into in a spirit of mutual understand- 
ing, confidence, and knowledge. Surely the 
record is a clear demonstration that the Ameri- 
cas both in peace and in war have found and 
are following a course of cooperation for the 
benefit of all. 

PAYMENT BY BOLIVIAN GOVERNMENT 
TO STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

I Released to the press April 22] 

In compliance with the agreement signed on 
January 27, 1942 at Rio de Janeiro by the 
Minister of Foreign Relations of Bolivia and 
the authorized representative of the Standard 
Oil Company of Bolivia and the Standard Oil 
Company (New Jersey), 1 the Bolivian Gov- 



1 Bulletin of February 21, 1942, p. 172. 



APRIL 25, 1942 



373 



eminent has paid the Standard Oil Company 
(New Jersey) the sum of $1,729,375. This 
amount represents the principal of $1,500,000 
with interest at the rate of three percent per 
annum from March 13, 1937, and is in payment 
for all the rights, interest, and properties in 
Bolivia of the Standard Oil Company (New 
Jersey) and of its subsidiary, the Standard 
Oil Company of Bolivia, as they existed im- 
mediately prior to March 13, 1937 and for the 
sale of the existing maps and geological studies 
which are the result of their explorations in 
Bolivia. 

MIXED COMMISSION, UNITED STATES 
AND ARGENTINA 

[Released to the press April 22] 

In accordance with the provisions of the 
second paragraph of article XII of the trade 
agreement between the United States and Ar- 
gentina, which became provisionally effective on 
November 15, 1941, there has been established in 
Buenos Aires a commission consisting of rep- 
resentatives of the Governments of the United 
States and Argentina. The commission will 
study the operation of the agreement, make 
recommendations relating thereto, and consider 
such other matters as may be submitted to it 
by the two governments. The representatives 
of the Government of the United States are 
members of the staff of the American Embassy 
at Buenos Aires who participated in the nego- 
tiation of the agreement ; those of the Govern- 
ment of Argentina are members of the Inter- 
Ministerial Committee. 

The commission will function as a conven- 
ient agency for informal discussion of trade- 
agreement matters of interest to one or both 
governments. It will not supersede in any 
way the usual diplomatic channels of commun- 
ication between the two governments; nor will 
it, either as a joint commission or as separate 
United States and Argentine commissions, 
supersede established channels in either coun- 
try for communication between private indi- 
viduals or firms and the government concerned 



in regard to matters affecting the trade agree- 
ment, or the established organization and pro- 
cedure for reaching decisions relating to such 
matters. 



Commercial Policy 



TRADE-AGREEMENT NEGOTIATIONS 
WITH MEXICO 

[Released to the press April 21] 

Pursuant to section 4 of an act of Congress 
approved June 12, 1934, entitled "An Act To 
Amend the Tariff Act of 1930", as extended by 
Public Resolution 61, approved April 12, 1940, 
and to Executive Order 6750, of June 27, 1934, 
public notice of intention to negotiate a trade 
agreement with the Government of Mexico was 
issued on April 4, 1942. In connection with 
that notice, the Acting Secretary of State pub- 
lished a list of products on which the United 
States will consider the granting of concessions 
to Mexico, and announced that concessions on 
products not included in the list would not be 
considered unless supplementary announce- 
ment were made. 

The Acting Secretary of State announced 
on April 11, 1942 that certain other products 
had been added to the list issued on April 4, 
1942. 

The Secretary of State now announces that 
the products described below have been added 
to the lists issued on April 4, 1942 and on April 
11, 1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
has prescribed that all information and views 
in writing and all applications for supplemental 
oral presentation of views relating to products 
included in the second supplementary list shall 
be submitted to it not later than 12 o'clock 
noon, May 11, 1942. They should be addressed 
to "The Chairman, Committee for Reciprocity 
Information, Tariff Commission Building, 
Eighth and E Streets NW., Washington, 
D.C." Supplemental oral statements with re- 



374 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



gard to any product contained in this list will 
be heard at the public hearing beginning at 
10 a.m. on May 18, 1942, before the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information, in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, unless persons interested 
in these products request that they be heard 
at a later date acceptable to the Committee. 

Suggestions with regard to the form and 
content of presentations addressed to the Com- 
mittee for Reciprocity Information are in- 
cluded in a statement released by that Com- 
mittee on December 13, 1937. 

SECOND SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF PRODUCTS 



United States 

Tariff Act ot 1930 

Paragraph 



Description of article 



Rice polish. 
Rice bran... 



Ht per lb. 

Ht per lb. 



Committee for Reciprocity Information 

trade-agreement negotiations with mexico 

Public Notice 

Second Supplementary List of Products 

Closing date for submission of briefs, May 11, 
1942 ; closing date for application to be heard, 
May 11, 1942 ; public hearings open, May 18, 
1942. 

The Committee for Reciprocity Information 
hereby gives notice that all information and 
views in writing, and all applications for sup- 
plemental oral presentation of views, with re- 
gard to the second supplementary list of prod- 
ucts announced by the Secretary of State on 
this date in connection with the negotiation of 
a trade agreement with the Government of 
Mexico, shall be submitted to the Committee for 
Reciprocity Information not later than 12 
o'clock noon, May 11, 1942. Such communica- 
tions should be addressed to "The Chairman, 
Committee for Reciprocity Information, Tariff 
Commission Building, Eighth and E Streets 
NW., Washington, D.C." 



A public hearing will be held, beginning at 
10 a.m. on May 18, 1942, before the Committee 
for Reciprocity Information, in the hearing 
room of the Tariff Commission in the Tariff 
Commission Building, when supplemental oral 
statements will be heard with regard to the 
products contained in the second supplementay 
list, unless persons interested in these products 
request that they be heard at a later date 
acceptable to the Committee. 

Six copies of written statements, either type- 
written or printed, shall be submitted, of which 
one copy shall be sworn to. Appearance at 
hearings before the Committee may be made 
only by those persons who have filed written 
statements and who have within the time pre- 
scribed made written application for a hearing, 
and statements made at such hearings shall be 
under oath. 

By direction of the Committee for Reciprocity 
Information this 21st day of April 1942. 
E. M. Whttcomb 
Acting Secretary 

Washington, D.C, 
April 21, 1942. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
PERUVIAN CONGRESSMAN 

[Released to the press April 25] 

Dr. Jose Angel Escalante, a member of the 
Chamber of Deputies of the Congress of Peru, is 
expected to arrive in Washington on April 28, at 
the invitation of the Department of State. Dr. 
Escalante, who represents one of the provinces 
of the Department of Cuzco, is owner of El 
Comercio, a daily newspaper that has been in 
circulation for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. In 1930 he was Minister of Education and 
Justice in the President's Cabinet. 

Dr. Escalante is an ardent supporter of de- 
mocracy and is an energetic advocate of hemi- 



APRIL 25, 1942 



375 



spheric solidarity. Last year he introduced a 
motion, which the Chamber of Deputies passed, 
that a message "reaffirming democratic prin- 
ciples" be sent by the Peruvian Congress to 
the other legislative bodies of the American 
republics. 

Dr. Escalante is especially interested in the 
subject of Indians throughout the Americas 
and is planning to confer with authorities on 
Indian affairs in this country. He is also keenly 
interested in pre-school instruction, secondary 
education, and our newspapers. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES 
OF PERUVIAN ENGINEER 

[Released to the press April 25] 

Enrique Laroza, director of the National 
School for Engineers at Lima, Peru, arrived 
in "Washington by plane on April 25, at the 
invitation of the Department of State, for a 
visit to engineering centers in this country. 

Senor Laroza, who is himself an electrical 
engineer educated in the United States and in 
Europe, is especially interested in sanitary- 
engineering methods and in recent develop- 
ments in laboratory equipment. While here 
he plans to visit Yale, Johns Hopkins, a num- 
ber of well-known foundations, and various 
factories. His visit will include a side trip to 
Toronto to confer with directors of the Inter- 
national Petroleum Company, who grant two 
fellowships annually to the School for En- 
gineers which he heads. 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES 
OF PARAGUAYAN OFFICIAL 

[Released to the press April 25] 

Dr. Sigfrido Gross-Brown, Collector of In- 
ternal Revenue of the Republic of Paraguay, 
will arrive in Washington on April 27. Dr. 
Gross-Brown, who is coming here at the invita- 
tion of the Department of State, will make a 
study of United States methods of tax adminis- 
tration, collection, and control. He will also 
visit representative law schools and colleges of 
business administration. He has been a pro- 
fessor of law at the University of Paraguay 



at Asuncion, a judge in the commercial courts, 
and a member of the Civil Court of Appeals. 

Dr. Gross-Brown has also served as an offi- 
cer of the Paraguayan Army and as a member 
of the Superior Military Court. 



The Foreign Service 



DEATH OF WIFE OF AMBASSADOR 
LEAHY 

[Released to the press April 21] 

On April 21 the Secretary of State sent the 
following telegram to Admiral William D. 
Leahy, American Ambassador at Vichy, re- 
garding the death of Mrs. Leahy : 

"Mrs. Hull and I were greatly distressed and 
pained by the sad news which has just reached 
us. "We are grieving with you in the great loss 
which you have suffered in serving your country 
and send you our very deepest sympathy." 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press April 25] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 18, 1942 : 

F. Willard Calder, of New York, N.Y., Vice 
Consul at Belfast, Northern Ireland, has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Foynes, Ireland, 
where an American Consulate will be estab- 
lished. 

Samuel H. Day, of Berkeley, Calif., Consul 
at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, has been desig- 
nated Commercial Attache at Pretoria, Trans- 
vaal, Union of South Africa. 

Oscar W. Frederickson, of Tacoma, Wash., 
Vice Consul at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Asuncion, 
Paraguay. 

Charles Gilbert, of Brooklyn, N.Y., Vice Con- 
sul at Madrid, Spain, has been appointed Vice 
Consul at La Paz, Bolivia. 

James G. McCargar, of Palo Alto, Calif., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Vladivostok, 
U.S.S.R. 



376 

Lynn W. Meekins, of Hershey, Pa., Commer- 
cial Attache at Pretoria, Transvaal, Union of 
South Africa, has been designated First Secre- 
tary of Legation at Pretoria, Transvaal, Union 
of South Africa. 

Paul G. Minneman, of Mendon, Ohio, now 
serving in the Department of Agriculture, has 
been designated Agricultural Attache at Ha- 
bana, Cuba. 

Shiras Morris, Jr., of Hartford, Conn., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Mon- 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

tevideo, Uruguay, has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 

John Randolph, of Niagara Falls, N.Y., now 
serving in the Department of State, has been 
assigned as Consul at Edmonton, Alberta, 
Canada. 

G. Frederick Reinhardt, of Oakland, Calif., 
Third Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul 
at Moscow, U.S.S.R., has been assigned for duty 
in the Department of State. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



LABOR 



Agreement with Canada Regardint: 
Unemployment Insurance 

By an exchange of notes dated March 6 and 
12, 1942 an agreement was entered into between 
the Government of the United States of 
America and the Canadian Government re- 
specting coordination and integration of the 
unemployment-insurance laws of the United 
States and Canada, so that duplication of con- 
tributions with respect to the same services 
and duplication of insurance payments with 
respect to the same period of unemployment 
may be avoided. 

The agreement entered into force on April 
12, 1942. It may be terminated by either 
Government after 60 days' notice to the other 
Government. 

Provision for the maintenance of a federal- 
state unemployment-insurance program in the 
United States is contained in the Social Se- 
curity Act (Act of August 14, 1935, ch. 531, 
title III, §302, 49 Stat. 626, as amended by 
Act of August 10, 1939, ch. 666, title III, 
§301, 53 Stat. 1378). Provision for an un- 
employment-insurance program in Canada is 
contained in the Unemployment Insurance Act, 



1940, Chapter 44 of the Statutes of Canada. 
1940. It was considered desirable by the repre- 
sentatives of the U.S. Social Security Board 
and the Canadian Unemployment Insurance 
Commission that the application of such laws 
be coordinated. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Agreement for the Exchange of Official 
Publications with Panama 

An agreement for the exchange of official 
publications between the United States and 
Panama was concluded by an exchange of notes 
dated November 27, 1941 and March 13, 1942, 
effective as from November 27, 1941. 

Each Government furnished to the other a 
list of the publications to be exchanged. The 
publications will be received by the Library 
of Congress on behalf of the United States 
and by the Ministry of Foreign Relations on 
behalf of Panama. Each Government agreed 
to bear the postal, railroad, steamship, and 
other charges arising in its own country and to 
expedite the shipments as far as possible. It 
was also agreed that new and important publi- 
cations which may be initiated in the future 
shall be included in the lists for exchange with- 
out the necessity of subsequent negotiations. 



APRIL 25, 1942 



377 



STRATEGIC MATERIALS AND FINANCE 

Agreements with Peru 

An announcement regarding a series of de- 
cisions on matters of collaboration between 
Peru and the United States, together with an 
exchange of notes between the Secretary of 
State and the Peruvian Minister of Finance 
and Commerce, appears in this Bulletin under 
the heading ''American Republics". 

Agreement with Nicaragua 

An announcement regarding negotiations 
concluded between the Government of Nica- 
ragua and the Government of the United 
States relating to various matters of collabora- 
tion between the two Governments, appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "American 
Republics". 

COMMERCE 

Trade Agreement with Argentina 

An announcement regarding the establish- 
ment of a Mixed Commission, consisting of 
representatives of the Governments of Argen- 
tina and the United States, as provided in the 
trade agreement between the two countries 
which entered into effect provisionally Novem- 
ber 15, 1941, appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Rafael Gimenez has been appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Central Translating 
Office, effective April 1, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1051). 

Mr. George L. Brandt, a Foreign Service 
officer of class I, has been designated an Exec- 
utive Assistant to Assistant Secretary of State 
Mr. Long, effective April 21, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1054). 



Legislation 



Sixth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation 
Bill, 1942. H. Kept. 2030, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6S68. 
10 pp. 

Amending the Act Requiring Registration of Foreign 
Agents. H. Rept. 2038, 77th Cong., on S. 2399. 12 pp. 



Publications 



Regulations 



Safeguarding Technical Information : Authority for 
Admission of Foreign Nationals. (Army: War De- 
partment.) [Cir. 109, W.D., April 13, 1942.] 7 
Federal Register 2963. 



Department of State 

The Problem of Economic Peace After the War: 
Address by Leo Pasvolsky, Special Assistant to the 
Secretary of State, delivered at Delaware, Ohio, 
March 4, 1942. Commercial Policy Series 72. Pub- 
lication 1720. 22 pp. 5C. 

Diplomatic List, April 1942. Publication 1724. ii, 96 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OP THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



MAY 2, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 149— Publication 1736 



C 



ontents 




The War Pag6 

Address by the President to the Nation 381 

Lend-lease aid: Iraq and Iran 383 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel . . . 383 

American Republics 

Conference of representatives of central banks or equiv- 
alent institutions of the American republics . . . 383 
Visit to the United States of the President of Peru . . 384 
Death of General Iglesias of Peru 384 

Commercial Policy 

Exchange of notes with Haiti regarding trade agree- 
ment 384 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Costa Rican author and 

educator 385 

General 

Death of Mrs. Lea Burdett 385 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 385 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 

Eighth Pan American Child Congress 386 

The Foreign Service 

Diplomatic confirmations 386 

Treaty Iniormation 

Extradition: Treaty with Canada 387 

Flora and fauna: Convention on Nature Protection and 

Wildlife Preservation in the Western Hemisphere. 387 

Publications 387 

Legislation 388 



MAY 14 1942 



The War 



ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT TO THE NATION 



[Released to tlie press by the White House April 28] 

It is nearly five months since we were at- 
tacked at Pearl Harbor. For the two years 
prior to that attack this country had been gear- 
ing itself up to a high level of production of 
munitions. Yet our war efforts had done little 
to dislocate the normal lives of most of us. 

Since then we have dispatched strong forces 
of our Army and Navy to bases and battle fronts 
thousands of miles from home. We have 
stepped up our war production on a scale that 
is testing our industrial power and our engi- 
neering genius and our economic structure to 
the utmost. We have had no illusions about 
the fact that this would be a tough job — and a 
long one. 

American warships are now in combat in the 
North and South Atlantic, in the Arctic, in the 
Mediterranean, and in the North and South 
Pacific. American troops have taken stations 
in South America, Greenland, Iceland, the Brit- 
ish Isles, the Near East, the Middle East, the 
Far East, the Continent of Australia, and many 
islands of the Pacific. American warplanes, 
manned by Americans, are flying in actual com- 
bat over all the continents and all the oceans. 

On the European front the most important 
development of the past year has been the crush- 
ing offensive on the part of the great armies of 
Russia against the powerful German army. 
These Russian forces have destroyed and are 
destroying more armed power of our enemies — 
troops, planes, tanks, and guns — than all the 
other United Nations put together. 



broadcast April 2S, 1942. The complete text of 
the address is printed in the Congressional Record for 
April 29, 1942 (vol. 88, no. 83), p. A1719. 



In the Mediterranean area matters remain, 
on the surface, much as they were. But the 
situation there is receiving very careful atten- 
tion. 

Recently we have received news of a change 
in government in what we used to know as the 
Republic of France — a name dear to the hearts 
of all lovers of liberty — a name and an institu- 
tion which we hope will soon be restored to full 
dignity. 

Throughout the Nazi occupation of France 
we have hoped for the maintenance of a French 
Government which would strive to regain inde- 
pendence, to reestablish the principles of "Lib- 
erty, Equality, and Fraternity", and to restore 
the historic culture of France. Our policy has 
been consistent from the very beginning. How- 
ever, we are now concerned lest those who have 
recently come to power may seek to force the 
brave French people to submission to Nazi 
despotism. 

The United Nations will take measures, if 
necessary, to prevent the use of French territory 
in any part of the world for military purposes 
by the Axis powers. The good people of France 
will readily understand that such action is essen- 
tial for the United Nations to prevent assistance 
to the armies or navies or air forces of Germany, 
Italy, and Japan. The overwhelming majority 
of the French people understand that the fight 
of the United Nations is fundamentally their 
fight, that our victory means the restoration of 
a free and independent France — and the saving 
of France from the slavery which would be im- 
posed upon her by her external enemies and her 
internal traitors. 

We know how the French people really feel. 
We know that a deep-seated determination to 

381 



382 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



obstruct every step in the Axis plan extends 
from occupied France through Vichy France 
to the people of their colonies in every ocean and 
on every continent. 

Our planes are helping in the defense of 
French colonies today, and soon American Fly- 
ing Fortresses will be fighting for the liberation 
of the darkened continent of Europe. 

In all the occupied countries there are men, 
women, and even little children who have never 
stopped fighting, never stopped resisting, never 
stopped proving to the Nazis that their so-called 
"New Order" can never be enforced upon free 
peoples. 

In the German and Italian peoples them- 
selves there is a growing conviction that the 
cause of Nazism and Fascism is hopeless — that 
their political and military leaders have led 
them along the bitter road which leads not to 
world conquest but to final defeat. They cannot 
fail to contrast the present frantic speeches of 
these leaders with their arrogant boastings of a 
year ago and two years ago. 

On the other side of the world, in the Far 
East, we have passed through a phase of serious 
losses. 

We have inevitably lost control of a large por- 
tion of the Philippine Islands. But this whole 
Nation pays tribute to the Filipino and Ameri- 
can officers and men who held out so long on 
Bataan Peninsula, to those grim and gallant 
fighters who still hold Corregidor, and to the 
forces which are still striking effectively at the 
enemy on Mindanao and other islands. 

The Malayan Peninsula and Singapore are in 
the hands of the enemy; the Netherlands East 
Indies are almost entirely occupied, though re- 
sistance there continues. Many other islands 
are in the possession of the Japanese. But there 
is good reason to believe that their southward 
advance has been checked. Australia, New 
Zealand, and much other territory will be bases 
for offensive action — and we are determined 
that the territory which has been lost will be 
regained. 

The Japanese are pressing their northward 
advance in Burma with considerable power, 



driving toward India and China. They have 
been opposed with great bravery by small Brit- 
ish and Chinese forces aided by American fliers. 

The news in Burma tonight is not good. The 
Japanese may cut the Burma Road ; but I want 
to say to the gallant people of China that no 
matter what advances the Japanese may make, 
ways will be found to deliver airplanes and mu- 
nitions of war to the armies of Generalissimo 
Chiang Kai-shek. 

We remember that the Chinese people were 
the first to stand up and fight against the ag- 
gressors in this war ; and in the future an uncon- 
querable China will play its proper role in 
maintaining peace and prosperity not only in 
eastern Asia but in the whole world. 

For every advance that the Japanese have 
made since they started their frenzied career of 
conquest, they have had to pay a very heavy 
toll in warships, in transports, in planes, and 
in men. They are feeling the effects of those 
losses. 

It is even reported from Japan that some- 
body has dropped bombs on Tokyo and on other 
principal centers of Japanese war industries. 
If this be true, it is the first time in history that 
Japan has suffered such indignities. 

Although the treacherous attack on Pearl 
Harbor was the immediate cause of our entry 
into the war, that event found the American 
people spiritually prepared for war on a world- 
wide scale. We went into this war fighting. 
We know what we are fighting for. We realize 
that the war has become what Hitler originally 
proclaimed it to be — a total war. 

Not all of us can have the privilege of fighting 
our enemies in distant parts of the world. 

Not all of us can have the privilege of work- 
ing in a munitions factory or shipyard, or on the 
farms, or in oil fields or mines, producing tho 
weapons or the raw materials which are needed 
by our armed forces. 

But there is one front and one battle where 
everyone in the United States — every man, 
woman, and child — is in action and will be 
privileged to remain in action throughout this 
war. That front is right here at home, in our 
daily lives and in our daily tasks. Here at home 



MAY 2, 1942 



383 



everyone will have the privilege of making 
whatever self-denial is necessary, not only to 
supply our fighting men but to keep the eco- 
nomic structure of our country fortified and 
secure during the war and after the war. 



LEND-LEASE AID: IRAQ AND IRAN 

[Released to the press by the White House May 2] 

The President announces that he has found 
the defense of Iraq vital to the defense of the 
United States in accordance with provisions of 
the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 1941. Conse- 
quently, upon completion of the formalities 
required by sections 4 and 7 of the Act, Iraq 
will be eligible to receive lend-lease assistance. 

The President also announces that he has 
found the defense of Iran to be vital to the 
defense of the United States in accordance with 
the provisions of the Lend-Lease Act of March 
11, 1941. The representations required by sec- 
tions 4 and 7 of the Act having been made by 
the Iranian Government, Iran is now eligible 
to receive lend-lease assistance. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

[Released to the press April 27] 

The Department of State announces that a 
group of about 500 Axis officials from South 
American countries, to be exchanged for cor- 
responding personnel from Europe, arrived at 
New Orleans and departed by train. It was the 
original intention to transport them directly to 
the vessel which would repatriate them to Eu- 
rope, but the arrival of that vessel having been 
delayed, it became necessary to accommodate 
them a few days in the United States. Their 
journey from New Orleans to New York was 
interrupted at Cincinnati where they presently 
are and where they will remain for a few days 
until the expected arrival of the Drottningholm 
from Sweden. 

The party is composed of Germans and 
Italians bound for Europe, and some Japanese. 
The Japanese are not proceeding upon the first 
vessel to sail and will consequently be in the 
United States a longer period, or until there 
shall depart from New York the vessel which 
will effect the exchange of American officials 
from the Far East. 



American Republics 



CONFERENCE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF CENTRAL BANKS OR EQUIVALENT 
INSTITUTIONS OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



The Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee at its regular session on 
April 16, 1942 approved a resolution (no. XXV) 
on the convening of a conference of representa- 
tives of central banks or equivalent or analogous 
institutions of the American republics. The 
text of the resolution follows : 

"The Inter-American Financial and Eco- 
nomic Advisory Committee considers that it is 
now the opportune time to convene a Conference 
of Representatives of Central Banks or Equiva- 
lent or Analogous Institutions of the American 



Republics, for the purpose of drafting stand- 
ards of procedure for the uniform handling of 
bank credits, collections, contracts of lease and 
consignments or merchandise, involving real or 
juridical persons who are nationals of a S'ate 
which has committed an act of aggression 
against the American Continent, pursuant with 
the terms of Resolution VI of the Third Meeting 
of Consultation of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics held in Rio de 
Janeiro. 

"The Committee recommends, therefore, that, 
allowing for a sufficient time to make adequate 



384 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



preparations and in order that the delegates 
may attend with the best information of their 
respective Governments on the topics to be dis- 
cussed, the aforesaid conference be held prior 
to July 1st of the present year in the City of 
Washington. 

"When a report on this resolution is sent to 
the Governments, they shall be requested to sub- 
mit their particular points of view regarding 
the Agenda of the Conference. They shall like- 
wise be requested to send data relative to the 
control systems and administrative practices 
applied in their respective countries with re- 
gard to the operations listed in Resolution VI 
of Rio de Janeiro, such as texts of the laws and 
regulations now in force in this matter; de- 
scription of the government organization 
charged with the enforcement of said laws and 
regulations ; rules of procedure adopted by said 
government organization; various types of 
operations authorized by the abovementioned 
organization in the performance of its official 
functions, and all other information which they 
may deem useful in the study of the problems to 
be faced by the Conference." 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
PRESIDENT OF PERU 

On May 5 President Manuel Prado of Peru, 
with members of the presidential party, will 
arrive, on an official visit to the United States, 
at Miami, Fla., where he will be received by 
United States and Peruvian officials. 

He will proceed to Washington, where he will 
be the guest of the President at the White House 
and will attend a state dinner. The Peruvian 
President will be received by the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in session sep- 
arately and will attend several luncheons and 
dinners in his honor. During his stay in the 
United States he will visit Annapolis and West 
Point, war industries in Detroit and Buffalo, 
and other points of interest. 

After a few days' stay in New York City, 
President Prado will, according to the present 
schedule, leave for South America on May 20. 



DEATH OF GENERAL IGLESIAS OF PERU 
STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

[Released to the press April 30] 

It is with the deepest regret that I have 
learned of the death of General Iglesias, the 
distinguished Peruvian statesman and soldier, in 
Washington. For many years he gave his great 
and varied talents unselfishly to the service of 
his country, culminating his career as Minister 
of Finance and Commerce and then as Minister 
of War. I know that his many friends in the 
United States join me in extending to his coun- 
try and his family our sincere condolences. 



Commercial Policy 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH HAITI RE- 
GARDING TRADE AGREEMENT 

[Released to the press April 27] 

Notes were exchanged on April 25, 1942 be- 
tween Mr. John Campbell White, American 
Minister at Port-au-Prince, and M. Charles 
Fombrun, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Haiti, 
regarding certain provisions of the trade agree- 
ment with Haiti signed on March 28, 1935. 1 

The translated text of the note from the Hai- 
tian Foreign Minister, the reply to which is in 
similar terms, is, in part, as follows : 

"Excellency: 

"I have the honor to refer to the recent con- 
versations regarding the trade agreement be- 
tween the Republic of Haiti and the United 
States of America, signed on March 28, 1935, 
and to confirm the understanding reached as a 
result thereof that the Government of the Re- 
public of Haiti and the Government of the 
United States of America are in agreement as 
follows : 



1 Executive Agreement Series 78. 



MAY 2, 1942 



385 



"1. The provisions of Articles I and II of 
the trade agreement of March 28, 1935 shall not 
prevent the Government of either country from 
imposing at any time on the importation of any 
article a charge equivalent to an internal tax 
imposed in respect of a like domestic article or 
in respect of a commodity from which the 
imported article has been manufactured in 
whole or in part. Moreover, the provisions 
of Article IV of the said agreement shall not 
prevent the application to cigarettes originat- 
ing in the United States of America of an 
increase in the internal tax to the same extent 
that the internal tax on domestic cigarettes is 
increased. 

"2. Nothing in the trade agreement of March 
28, 1935 shall be construed to prevent the adop- 
tion or enforcement by either country of meas- 
ures relating to public security, or imposed for 
the protection of the country's essential inter- 
ests in time of war or other national emergency. 

"I avail myself [etc.]" 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF COSTA 
RICAN AUTHOR AND EDUCATOR 

[Released to the press April 27] 

Rogelio Sotela, Costa Rican man of letters, 
Secretary of the University of Costa Rica, and 
former Governor of Punt arenas, arrived in 
Washington on April 26, accompanied by 
Senora Sotela, for a tour of educational insti- 
tutions in this country. Seiior Sotela has edited 
the well-known literary review Athenea and is 
author of historical and critical works as well 
as of a series of volumes of poetry. During his 
career as a poet he has been awarded numerous 
prizes and medals in national and international 
competitions. Senor Sotela has also been dec- 
orated by the Government of Peru and is a 
member of various learned societies at home and 
abroad. 



In addition to having served as Governor, 
Seiior Sotela has been a deputy to the National 
Congress of Costa Rica, Attorney General of 
the Republic, and Secretary of the Costa Rican 
Embassy in Peru. He taught a survey course 
on Hispanic-American literature in the Inter- 
American Summer University at San Jose and 
has given a lecture course at the University of 
Panama. 

Seiior Sotela's most recent works include a 
literary history of Costa Rica and a volume 
of poetry, Rimas Serenas. 



General 



DEATH OF MRS. LEA BURDETT 

[Released to the press April 2G] 

The Department has been informed by the 
American Consul at Tabriz, Iran, that Mrs. Lea 
Burdett, of Italian nationality and the wife of 
Mr. Winston Burdett, a representative of the 
Columbia Broadcasting System, was shot and 
killed in an automobile by a member of a band 
of five Kurds near Miandoab on April 24. Mrs. 
Burdett, who was the representative of the news- 
paper PM, was touring Kurdistan accompanied 
by an interpreter, policemen, and two Kurds, all 
of whom escaped unharmed. She was buried at 
the Catholic cemetery at Tabriz. 

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through March 1942, as shown in the reports 
submitted by persons and organizations regis- 
tered with the Secretary of State for the solici- 
tation and collection of contributions to be used 
for relief in belligerent countries, in conformity 
with the regulations issued pursuant to section 
3 (a) of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effec- 
tive by the President's proclamations of Sep- 
tember 5, 8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the 



386 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



act of November 4, 1939 as made effective by 
the President's proclamation of the same date, 
has been released by the Department of State 
in mimeographed form and may be obtained 
from the Department upon request (press re- 
lease of April 28, 1942, 42 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa ; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



EIGHTH PAN AMERICAN CHILD 
CONGRESS 

[Released to the press May 1] 

The President has approved the designation 
of the following persons as delegates on the part 
of the United States to the Eighth Pan Ameri- 
can Child Congress which will convene at 
Washington, D. C, on May 2, 1942. 1 

Katharine F. Lenroot, LL.D., Chief, Children's Bureau, 
United States Department of Labor ; Member of the 
International Council of the American International 
Institute for the Protection of Childhood; Chairman 
of the Organizing Committee of the Congress; Chair- 
man of the Congress 

Frank G. Boudreau, M.D., Executive Director, Milbank 
Memorial Fund, New York, N.T. ; Chairman, Food 
and Nutrition Board, National Research Council 

M. O. Bousfield, M.D., Director for Negro Health, 
Julius Rosenwald Fund, Chicago, 111. ; Member of the 
Planning Committee, White House Conference on 



Children in a Democracy ; Secretary, National Citi- 
zens Committee, White House Conference on Children 
in a Democracy 

William G. Carr, Ph.D., Associate Secretary, National 
Education Association, Washington, D.C. ; Member of 
the Organizing Committee 

Edward C. Ernst, M.D., Medical Director, United States 
Public Health Service; Assistant Director, Pan 
American Sanitary Bureau, Washington, D.C. 

Jane M. Hoey, Director, Bureau of Public Assistance, 
Social Security Board, Federal Security Agency, 
Washington, D.C. 

Bess Goodykoontz, D.Ped., Assistant Commissioner of 
Education, United States Office of Education, Federal 
Security Agency, Washington, D.C. 

Henry F. Helmliolz, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, 
Graduate School of Medicine, University of Minne- 
sota, Section on Pediatrics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, 
Minn.; Member of the Organizing Committee 

The Right Reverend Monsignor Bryan J. McEntegart, 
LL.D., Past President, National Conference of Catho- 
lic Charities, New York, N.Y. ; National Secretary, 
Catholic Near East Welfare Association ; Member of 
the Organizing Committee 

Mrs. Maria Pintado Rahn, Associate Professor of Social 
Work, College of Education, University of Puerto 
Rico, San Juan, P.R. 

Felix J. Underwood, M.D., Chairman, Committee on 
Maternal and Child Health, Association of State and 
Territorial Health Officers; Executive Officer, State 
Board of Health, Jackson, Miss. 



The Foreign Service 



1 Bulletin of March 7, 1942, p. 222. 



DIPLOMATIC CONFIRMATIONS 

On May 1, 1942 the Senate confirmed the 
nominations of the following officers in the 
Diplomatic Service: 

Carlton J. H. Hayes, of New York, to be 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary of the United States of America to Spain. 

Cornelius Van H. Engert, of California, now 
a Foreign Service officer of class I and consul 
general at Beirut, Lebanon, to be Envoy Ex- 
traordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of 
the United States of America to Afghanistan. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



EXTRADITION 

Treaty with Canada 

[Released to the press April 29J 

The Secretary of State, Mr. Cordell Hull, 
and the Canadian Minister, Mr. Leighton Mc- 
Carthy, signed an extradition treaty between 
the United States and Canada on April 29, 
1942. 

The extradition treaty entered into by the 
United States and Great Britain in 1931 
(Treaty Series 849) does not apply to Canada, 
and provisions in regard to extradition in sev- 
eral treaties and conventions concluded between 
the United States and Great Britain from 1842 
to 1905, which were superseded in the relations 
between the United States and Great Britain 
by the treaty of 1931, have continued to apply 
between the United States and Canada. The 
provisions in these older treaties and conven- 
tions will be superseded by the new treaty in 
the relations between the United States and 
Canada when it is brought into force by ratifi- 
cation by the two countries and exchange of 
ratifications. 



States of America, Bolivia, Cuba, the Domini- 
can Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Nicaragua, 
Peru, and Venezuela, and subsequently was 
signed on behalf of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, 
Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Haiti, 
Mexico, and Uruguay. 

The convention provides for the establish- 
ment, whenever practical, of national parks, 
national reserves, nature monuments, and strict 
wilderness reserves, including the protection 
of natural fauna and flora. 

Instruments of ratification of the convention 
have been deposited by the United States of 
America, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, 
Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, and Venezuela. In 
accordance with the provisions in section 3 of 
article XI of the convention which stipulates 
that the convention "shall come into force three 
months after the deposit of not less than five 
ratifications with the Pan American Union", 
the convention entered into force on April 30, 
1942, three months after January 31, 1942, the 
date of the deposit of the fifth ratification, 
which was the ratification of Haiti. 



FLORA AND FAUNA 

Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife 
Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 

[Released to the press April 30] 

On April 30, 1942 the President proclaimed 
the Convention on Nature Protection and Wild- 
life Preservation in the Western Hemisphere 
which was opened for signature at the Pan 
American Union on October 12, 1940 and was 
signed on that day on behalf of the United 



Publications 



Department of State 

Publications of the Department of State (a list cumu- 
lative from October 1, 1929). April 1, 1942. Publi- 
cation 1723. 30 pp. Free. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 4, May 1, 1942, to Revision I of February 
7, 1942. Publication 1734. 21 pp. 



387 



388 DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Legislation 



An Act To amend the Act entitled "An Act To require 
the registration of certain persons employed by 
agencies to disseminate propaganda in the United 
States, and for other purposes", approved June 8, 1938, 
as amended. Approved April 29, 1942. [S. 2399.] 
Sixth Supplemental National Defense Appropriation Act, Public Law 532, 77th Cong. 12 pp. 

1942 : An Act Making additional appropriations for Relating to the Payment by Certain Persons in the 

the national defense for the fiscal year ending June Armed Forces of the United States Entitled To Be 

30, 1942, and for other purposes [defense aid, pp. 5, 9; Naturalized Under Title III of the Nationality Act 

passport agencies, p. 21 ; salaries, ambassadors and of 1940, as Amended, of Fees for the Issuance of 

ministers, p. 21]. Approved April 28, 1942. [H. R. Certificates of Arrival. H. Rept. 2061, 77th Cong., 

6S68.] Public Law 528, 77th Cong. 25 pp. on H. R. 6972. 2 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOB OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



MAY 9, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 150— Publication 1740 



C 



ontents 




The War Page 

Occupation of Madagascar by the British 391 

Developments in Martinique 391 

Fall of Corregidor: 

Statement by the Secretary of State 392 

Message from New Zealand 392 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel. . . . 392 

Commodities allocated to other American republics . . 393 
Argentine appreciation for assistance to crew of tanker 

Victoria 394 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 4 to Revision I . . . . 394 

American Republics 

Visit to the United States of the President of Peru: 

Statement of President Roosevelt 395 

Program of visit 395 

The Far East 

Cultural Factors in the Far Eastern Situation: Address 

by Joseph W. Ballantine 397 

Europe 

Embassy rank for representation between the United 

States and the Netherlands 402 

The Near East 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 

Iraq 403 

Australasia 

New Zealand postal concessions to Allied forces . . . 404 

[OVER] 







ontents-coNriNVED 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. Page 
Eighth Pan American Child Congress: 

Address by Assistant Secretary Long 405 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 406 

The Foreign Service 

Foreign Service conference in Mexico City 408 

Retirement of Consul General Carter 409 

Personnel changes 409 

Commercial Policy 

Trade agreement with Peru 410 

Treaty Information 

Legal Assistance: Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of 

Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad ... 422 
Postal: Universal Postal Convention and Parcel Post 

Agreement, 1939 423 

Commerce: 

Trade Agreement with Peru 423 

Trade Agreement with Haiti 423 

Regulations 423 

Publications 423 



The War 



OCCUPATION OF MADAGASCAR BY THE BRITISH 



[Released to the press May 4] 

The French Ambassador in Washington was 
informed on the evening of May 4 in the fol- 
lowing sense: 

The President of the United States has been 
informed that Madagascar has been occupied 
by British forces. This occupation has the full 
approval and support of the Government of 
the United States. The island of Madagascar 
presents the definite danger to the United Na- 
tions of occupation or use by the Axis powers, 
especially Japan. Such occupation by the Axis 
powers would constitute a definite and serious 
danger to the United Nations in their fight to 
maintain the kind of civilization to which 
France and to which the United Nations have 
been so long accustomed. 

The Government of the United States is at 
war with the Axis powers, and if it becomes 
necessary or desirable for American troops or 
ships to use Madagascar in the common cause, 



the United States will not hesitate to do so at 
any time. 

The United States and Great Britain are in 
accord that Madagascar will, of course, be re- 
stored to France after the war or at any time 
that the occupation of Madagascar is no longer 
essential to the common cause of the United 
Nations. 

In view of the fact that the island of Mada- 
gascar will be held in trust for France, in 
order to protect it from attack by any one of 
the Axis powers, any warlike act permitted by 
the French Government against the Govern- 
ment of Great Britain or the Government of 
the United States would, of necessity, have to 
be regarded by the Government of the United 
States as an attack upon the United Nations 
as a whole. 

The American Charge at Vichy was in- 
structed to convey this message to the French 
Government. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN MARTINIQUE 



[Released to the press May 9] 

The President has directed a visit by Ad- 
miral John H. Hoover, as Commander of the 
Caribbean Sea Front, accompanied by a rep- 
resentative of the Department of State, to Mar- 
tinique for the purpose of seeking with the 
French High Commissioner there an under- 
standing with respect to the local problem 
presented by the French possessions in the 



Caribbean area arising out of the collaboration 
policy of Monsieur Laval. 

Admiral Hoover and Mr. Samuel Reber, As- 
sistant Chief of the Division of European Af- 
fairs, Department of State, arrived at Mar- 
tinique the morning of May 9. 

Admiral Hoover is authorized to propose 
an arrangement whereby the French flag may 
continue to fly over the French Caribbean pos- 
sessions and French sovereignty there will re- 

391 



U. S. SUPER1NTFNDENT OF DOCUMENT* 
MAY 23 1942 



392 

main unchanged, and whereby Admiral Rob- 
ert will continue to be recognized as the ulti- 
mate governing authority of French Caribbean 
possessions. 

Should mutually satisfactory arrangements 
be reached with Admiral Robert as High Com- 
missioner, assuring that the French authorities 
in the French Caribbean - Atlantic Coast area 
will not furnish aid or comfort to Axis forces, 
the United States is prepared to safeguard the 
interests of France in these areas, to maintain 
their economic life, and to assure that all assets 
of the French Government in the French Car- 
ibbean possessions be held for the ultimate use 
of the French people. 

FALL OF CORREGIDOR 
STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 

[Released to the press May 6] 

Corregidor and Bataan will live forever in 
the memory of Americans. They stand for 
reverses that are but preludes to victory. The 
heroism and the glorious sacrifice of their de- 
fenders are a fire in which the soul of America 
is being tempered into invincible steel. 

MESSAGE FROM NEW ZEALAND 

[Released to the press by the White House May 7] 

The President has received the following 
cable message from the Right Honorable Peter 
Fraser, Prime Minister of New Zealand : 

"Will you kindly inform President Roosevelt 
how profoundly the Government, Parliament 
and people of New Zealand have been moved by 
the fall of Corregidor. 

"The very gallant defense of the fortress 
against overwhelming odds has been, and ever 
will be an inspiration and a glorious example 
to all of us who are banded together to resist 
aggression and to preserve and restore freedom. 

"Corregidor has not been in vain — it will live 
forever in the memory of man as one of the 
great feats of arms of all time." 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

[Released to the press May 4] 

The S.S. Drottningholm is expected to sail 
from New York on May 7 with Axis officials 
and nationals en route to Lisbon. 

The Department of State is endeavoring to 
make arrangements to charter the S.S. Grips- 
holm of Swedish registry for use in the ex- 
change of United States and Latin American 
diplomats and nationals from Japan. 

[Released to the press May 7] 

The Swiss Government has consented to act 
as guarantor for the compliance of the various 
governments concerned with the terms of the 
agreement reached by these governments for 
the exchange of Axis and American diplomats 
and nationals. 

Lt. Col. Charles Gossweiler of the Swiss 
Army was designated by the Swiss Govern- 
ment to act as its representative and is aboard 
the S.S. Drottningholm together with Mr. 
Frederick B. Lyon, an officer of the Depart- 
ment of State. The Portuguese Government 
has consented to act for all the governments 
concerned as guarantor for the exchange on 
Portuguese territory. It is contemplated that 
a number of similar exchanges will be carried 
out as soon as possible. 

[Released to the press May 7] 

Ambassadors and ministers of the Axis, with 
their staffs and other nationals, who departed 
on May 7 on the S.S. Drottninghohn for Lisbon 
to be exchanged with American officials and 
nationals formerly in Germany, Italy, Hun- 
gary, Rumania, and Bulgaria, have been con- 
centrated during their stay in the United States 
at Asheville, N. C, White Sulphur Springs, 
W. Va., and Cincinnati, Ohio. 

This part of the exchange has been arranged 
with the cooperation of the following Ameri- 
can republics which have broken relations with 
Germany, Italy, and Japan : Bolivia, Colombia, 



MAY 9, 1942 

Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecua- 
dor, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, 
Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, and Vene- 
zuela. 

The Governments of Brazil, Paraguay, and 
Uruguay, which have also broken relations with 
the Axis, have cooperated among themselves 
and with the United States for a direct con- 
temporaneous exchange of officials and nation- 
als from Rio de Janeiro and Montevideo. 

The groups arrived in Jersey City on six 
special trains on May 7. The group from Ashe- 
ville, composed of 226 Italian, Rumanian, and 
Bulgarian officials and nationals left Asheville 
in two trains at 3 : 40 p.m. and 4 : 30 p.m., May 6. 
The group from White Sulphur Springs, com- 
posed of 426 German officials and nationals, left 
White Sulphur Springs in three trains at 11 : 45 
p.m., May 6, and 12:45 a.m. and 1:05 a.m., 
May 7. The group from Cincinnati, Ohio, com- 
posed of 215 German and Italian officials and 
nationals, left Cincinnati on one train at 6:30 
p.m., May 6. The remaining persons depart- 
ing on the Drottningholm were non-officials and 
were collected in New York. 

All of these persons arrived in New York on 
the morning of May 7 and were transported by 
bus from the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in 
Jersey City direct to the American Export Line 
pier, where the Drottningholm was lying. 
They were immediately embarked as the busses 
reached the gangway. 

[Released to the press May 7] 

The Swedish-American steamship Drott- 
ningholm sailed from Jersey City on May 7, 
1942 with German, Italian, Hungarian, Ruma- 
nian, and Bulgarian officials from the United 
States and the other American republics, and 
their families, staffs of their respective mis- 
sions, and accompanying nationals, totaling 948 
persons. A list of passengers, showing their 
status, nationality, and the countries from 
which they have departed, was released on May 
7, 1942 as Department of State press release no. 
197. This voyage is the first exchange, of Axis 
diplomats and nationals. 



393 

A list of United States officials, officials of 
certain of the other American republics, and 
American newspaper correspondents being ex- 
changed for Axis officials and newspaper 
correspondents sailing on the steamship Drott- 
ningholm on May 7, 1942 was issued as 
Department of State press release no. 205. 
The American diplomats and nationals will 
board the vessel on its return trip from Lisbon. 

A list of other United States nationals and 
nationals of the other American republics who 
will return on the Drottningholm, from Lisbon 
will be announced later. 

COMMODITIES ALLOCATED TO OTHER 
AMERICAN REPUBLICS 

[Released to the press May 4] 

The Government of the United States, as a 
further measure of inter-American cooperation, 
has announced in Washington a list of addi- 
tional commodities allocated to the other Amer- 
ican republics for the second quarter of 1942. 

This list, announced jointly by the Depart- 
ment of State, the Board of Economic Warfare, 
and the War Production Board, supplements 
the allocations announced on April 4, 1942 x and 
comprises the following materials: Iron and 
steel; lead; natural amorphous graphite; fluor- 
spar; uranium salts and compounds; ascorbic 
acid; thiamine hydrochloride; sulf anilimide ; 
sulfaguanidine; cranes, hoists, and derricks; 
and mechanical household refrigerators. 

The Board of Economic Warfare and the 
War Production Board are developing admin- 
istrative procedures which are expected to 
implement more effectively the allocations to 
the other American republics. In order to 
avoid undue congestion of export shipments at 
ports and railway terminals and to insure that 
the commodities most urgently needed by our 
neighboring republics are given preference 
over less essentinl goods, consideration is being 
given to a plan to coordinate the issuance of 
export, licenses with the availability of ocean 
freight. 



1 Bulletin of April 4, 1942, p. 274. 



394 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ARGENTINE APPRECIATION FOR 
ASSISTANCE TO CREW OF TANKER 
"VICTORIA" 

! Released to the press May 9] 

The following message of appreciation was 
received by the Under Secretary of State from 
the president and the secretary of the Argen- 
tine. Navigation Company Mihanovich: 

"Buenos Aires, May 7, 191$. 
"On behalf of the. Argentine Navigation 
Company Mihanovich, I have great honor in 
expressing to Your Excellency our deepest ap- 
preciation of the chivalrous attitude adopted 
by the American Government in connection 
with the misadventure experienced by our 
motor vessel Victoria. Under the existing cir- 
cumstances, such an attitude, of which we have 
at this moment been notified by our Minister of 
Foreign Affairs, is most particularly appreci- 
ated by us and calls for our most profound and 
sincere gratitude. Please accept the expression 
of the Company's and our personal respects. 
Alberto A. Dodero, President 
Angelo Sanchez Elia, Secretary" 

The following reply was sent by the Under 
Secretary of State : 

"Washington, May 8, 19J t 2. 
"On behalf of the Government of the United 
States, I thank you and Doctor Sanchez Elia 
and the members of the Mihanovich company 
for the very generous message concerning the 
assistance rendered by the United States Naval 
Patrol to the officers and crew of the Argen- 
tine tanker Victoria. My Government is of 
course particularly happy that, in being en- 
abled to render assistance after the torpedoing 
of the Victoria, it was able to effect the rescue 
of officers and men who can continue to main- 
tain commerce between the American republics 



despite the indiscriminate and lawless attacks 
of a ruthless enemy. With warm personal re- 
gards and best wishes to the members of your 
company. 

Sumner Welles" 

Ambassador Armour at Buenos Aires has 
repoi'ted that Sehor Dodero, president of the 
Mihanovich organization, also called upon him 
personally to express appreciation. At the 
same time, Seiior Dodero presented Ambas- 
sador Armour with a gift of $20,000 for the 
Navy Relief Society in Washington, which he 
stated the Mihanovich organization wished to 
contribute to the relief of American naval sea- 
men as a testimonial of the organization's ap- 
preciation of the part played by the United 
States Navy in saving the officers and crew of 
the Victoria. Ambassador Armour has been 
requested to express the deep appreciation of the 
Navy Relief Society. 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 4 TO 
REVISION I 

(Released to the press May 4] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Secretary of Commerce, the 
Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coordi- 
nator of Inter-American Affairs, on May 4 
issued Supplement 4 to Revision I of the Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, 
promulgated February 7, 1942. 1 

Part I of this supplement contains 477 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 25 deletions. Part II contains 114 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 18 deletions. 



1 List printed in 7 Federal Register 3293. 



American Republics 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE PRESIDENT OF PERU 
STATEMENT OF PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT 



[Released to the press by the White House May 7] 

I am particularly happy to welcome His 
Excellency, the President of Peru, to the United 
States and to Washington. This unprecedented 
visit of the Chief Executive of Peru during his 
active inciunbency in that high office is a con- 
crete indication of the strong bonds which today 



exist between Peru and the United States. 
President Prado's visit is, I believe, a splendid 
example of the friendly and cooperative rela- 
tionships between the American republics 
which are determined to preserve freedom and 
democracy in the Americas. 



PROGRAM OF VISIT 



[Released to the press May 7] 

The revised program for the visit of His 
Excellency Manuel Prado, President of the 
Republic of Peru, follows. 

Wednesday, Mat 6 
President Manuel Prado, with the following 
members of the presidential party, will arrive 
at Miami late in the afternoon. 

His Excellency Dr. Francisco Tudela 
His Excellency Dr. Victor Andres Belaunde 
The Honorable Dr. Roberto MacLean Estenos 
The Honorable Sefior Carlos Holguin de 

Lavalle 
Dr. Pedro Bustamente, Presidential Secre- 
tary 
Gen. of Aviation Fernando Melgar, Military 

Aide 
Capt. of the Navy Jose R. Alzamora, Naval 

Aide 
Col. Jose M. Tamayo, Military Aide 
American Ambassador R. Henry Norweb 

The President of Peru will be received by the 
following officials : 

His Excellency Manuel de Freyre y San- 
tander, Ambassador of Peru at Wash- 
ington 



The Honorable George T. Summerlin, Chief 
of the Division of Protocol of the De- 
partment of State 

The Honorable Gonzalo N. de Aramburu, Di- 
rector of Protocol of the Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs of Peru 

Brig. Gen. John B. Coulter, U.S.A., Military 
Aide to President Prado 

Capt. Paulus P. Powell, U.S.N., Naval Aide 
to President Prado 

Thtjhsdat, Mat 7 

9:15 a.m. President Prado and the mem- 
bers of the presidential party will leave from 
Miami for Washington. 

4:15p.m. The President of Peru and the 
presidential party will arrive at Washington, 
D.C., where they will be received by an official 
reception committee. Military honors will be 
rendered. 

5: 30 p.m. President Prado will arrive at the 
White House. 

8:00 p.m. State dinner at the White House. 
President Prado will remain at the White 
House for the night. 

395 



396 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Friday, May 8 

10:30 a.m. President Prado will leave the 
White House for the Blair House, 1651 Penn- 
sylvania Ave. 

11:30 a.m. Leave for visit to Annapolis. 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon in honor of the Presi- 
dent at the Naval Academy. 

5:30 p.m. Reception for chiefs of mission 
at the Blair House. 

8:15 p.m. The Under Secretary of State, 
Mr. Sumner Welles, will give a dinner at Oxon 
Hill Manor in honor of President Prado. 

Saturday, May 9 

10:00 a.m. Leave for visit to Arlington 
Cemetery (Tomb of the Unknown Soldier) and 
Mount Vernon. 

1 :00 p.m. Luncheon at Blair House. 

4:00 p.m. Reception at the Pan American 
Union. 

5:30 p.m. Press conference at the Blair 
House. 

8:15 p.m. Dinner at Peruvian Embassy in 
honor of President Prado, followed by recep- 
tion. 

Sunday, May 10 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon in honor of President 
Prado by Assistant Secretary of State and Mrs. 
Adolf A. Berle. 

P.M. Open. 

. Monday, May 11 

A.M. Visit to the Capitol. 
P.M. Open. 

4 -30 p.m. Leave Blair House for Union Sta- 
tion. 

5:10 p.m. Leave Washington for Detroit. 

Tuesday, May 12 

8:15 a.m. Arrive Detroit. 

8 :30 a.m. Leave for Ford Willow Run Plant 
and return to the River Rouge Plant. Lunch- 
eon at Dearborn Inn by Mr. Edsel Ford. 

1:30 p.m. Leave for Chrysler Tank Ar- 
senal. 

2:00 p.m. Arrive Tank Arsenal. 



3:45 p.m. Leave for Proving Grounds. 
4:30 p.m. Leave for hotel. 
7:30 p.m. Dinner by Chrysler Corporation 
at Detroit Club. 

Wednesday, May 13 

2:55 a.m. Leave Detroit for Buffalo. 

7:45 a. m. Arrive Buffalo. 

A.M. Visit to Curtiss-Wright Airplane 
Plant No. 1. 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon by the Curtiss-Wright 
Company in honor of President Prado. 

P.M. Visit to Curtiss-Wright Airplane 
Plant No. 2. 

P.M. Visit to Niagara Falls. 

7:30 p.m. Dinner at the Statler Hotel. 

10:00 p.m. Leave Buffalo for Boston. 

Thursday, May 14 

9:10 a. m. Arrive Boston. 

10:30 a. m. Visit to Harvard University. 

1 : 30 p. m. Luncheon in honor of President 
Prado by the Governor of Massachusetts. 

4:00 p. m. Leave Boston for New York. 

9:05 p.m. Arrive New York. Proceed to 
Waldorf Astoria Hotel. 

Friday, May 15 

9:00 a. m. Leave for West Point. 

1 : 00 p. m. Luncheon in honor of President 
Prado at the Military Academy. 

3: 30 p. m. Departure for New York City. 

7 : 15 p. m. Dinner in honor of President 
Prado by the Council on Foreign Relations. 

Saturday, May 16 

12:30 p. m. Leave for Belmont Park. 
1 : 15 p. m. Luncheon in honor of President 
Prado at the Turf and Field Club, given by 
Mr. George D. Widener, President of Belmont 
Park. 

Sunday, May 17 
Open. 

Monday, May 18 

1:00 p. m. Luncheon in honor of President 
Prado by the Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York. Dinner — open. 



MAY 9, 1942 



397 



Tuesday, Mat 19 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon — open. 
8: 00 p.m. Farewell dinner in honor of Pres- 
ident Prado given by the Pan American Society. 

Wednesday, May 20 
A. M. Open. 



1:00 p. m. Luncheon — open. 

..'.■ OS p. m. Leave for Miami by train. 

Thursday, May 21 

3:05 p. 7)t. Arrive Miami. 

Friday, May 22 

Leave Miami by plane for Peru. 



The Far East 



CULTURAL FACTORS IN THE FAR EASTERN SITUATION 
ADDRESS BY JOSEPH W. BALLANTINE 1 



[Released to the press May !1] 

I feel especially privileged today to be the 
guest of a society with so long and honorable 
a record of dedication to the advancement of 
culture and to the cultivation of interest in 
public affairs. I feel that our greatest hope of 
rebuilding a new world on progressive lines 
out of the sorry plight in which we now find 
ourselves lies in enlightened and far-sighted 
leadership, which can only be provided by men 
of broad and liberal culture. 

The direction which emphasis upon culture 
or the converse gives to national policies is well 
illustrated in the history of the Far East. 

China early in its history recognized the 
value to society of men of letters and accorded 
its four principal social groups a relative pre- 
cedence in the following order : Literati, farm- 
ers, artisans, and merchants. Today in China's 
resistance against Japanese aggression this 
social grouping has no practical significance. 
Chinese armies are recruited from all classes, 
and the courage with which military leaders 
such as Chiang Kai-shek and Pai Chung-hsi 
are keeping up their struggle against heavy odds 



1 Delivered before the American Whig Cliosophic 
Society, Princeton, N.J., and broadcast over station 
WTTM, Trenton, N.J., May 9, 1942. Mr. Ballantine 
is a Foreign Service officer assigned to the Division 
of Far Eastern Affairs, Department of State. 
4,1!>S14 — 42 2 



has caused the Chinese people to revise their 
estimates of the place of the soldier in society. 
This, however, is beside the point which I wish 
to bring out, namely, that in traditional Chinese 
political philosophy the emphasis has been upon 
national policies of peace rather than those of 
war. 

Japan, which borrowed from China much of 
its culture and philosophy as well as its system 
of writing, accepted in name the Chinese order 
of social precedence, but with characteristic 
Japanese adaptability used the Chinese ideo- 
graph which in China was employed to desig- 
nate the literati class to designate the samurai 
or warrior class. 

Membership in the literati class in China was 
not a matter of birth but of the successful pass- 
ing of rigorous examinations which were con- 
ducted by the state and which were open to all. 
Throughout the 400 years of the Han dynasty 
various systems for the selection of men for 
public offices were tried. But from the begin- 
ning of the seventh century to the beginning of 
the twentieth century, for 1,300 years, the main 
sj'stem of selection of men for office was by 
competitive examination open to all people, 
irrespective of lineage, wealth, or religion. 
Throughout the centuries there has thus been 
developed a deep-rooted tradition that officials 
are not born of a class but should be selected 



398 

through some system of open and competitive 
examinations. In this way China came to be 
governed not by an hereditary aristocracy but 
by a civil service deeply and widely rooted 
among the people at large. Traditionally, 
Chinese officialdom has been sensitive to the 
voice of public opinion and averse to disregard- 
ing manifestations of the will of the people. 
Although in Imperial China the Emperor was 
theoretically the wielder of absolute power, this 
was a power circumscribed by important limi- 
tations. Notwithstanding his exalted title, 
"Son of Heaven", the Emperor was not regarded 
as a divine being but merely as the person upon 
whom Heaven had for the time being conferred 
its mandate to rule the Chinese Empire. If the 
Emperor ruled badly, this was regarded as 
evidence that he had forfeited the confidence of 
Heaven, and anyone who succeeded in over- 
throwing him could rightfully establish a new 
Imperial line which in turn could enjoy the 
support of Heaven. Such concepts constitute 
an important factor in accounting for the 
essentially democratic nature of the Chinese 
social system and for the remarkably enduring 
character of Chinese political institutions. 

On the other hand, in Feudal Japan the 
ruling classes consisted of an hereditary aris- 
tocracy comprising the daimyo, or feudal lords, 
and their warrior retainers, the samurai. The 
samurai developed traditions and ethics which 
were peculiar to themselves. In such a society 
as that in Japan there also naturally developed 
class interests, and the samurai class, jealous of 
its prerogatives and power, strove always to 
place its own interests foremost. When the 
feudal system was declared at an end in 1868, 
there was wide-spread dissatisfaction among the 
samurai over their being shorn of their privi- 
leged position and especially over the adoption 
of universal conscription whereby the privilege 
of bearing arms was extended to commoners. 
Although the system of universal education 
which was introduced enabled commoners to 
compete for entry into the government service, 
this development, owing to various circum- 
stances, did not have the effect of liberalizing 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and broadening the political outlook and inter- 
ests of those who controlled the armed services. 
The Japanese restoration of 1868 marked the 
ascendancy of the western clans led by Choshu 
and Satsuma over the eastern clans repre- 
sented by the Tokugawa Shogunate. The in- 
fluence of the Choshu clan predominated in the 
Army and that of the Satsuma clan predomi- 
nated in the Navy. For a considerable period, 
statesmen of these two clans alternated in office 
as Prime Ministers. The Army and the Navy 
thus competed with each other for political 
power and for appropriations for expansion 
whereby to increase their political influence. 
The unique position of the two armed services 
in the Japanese national polity has been an 
important contributory factor to the aggressive 
courses which Japan has pursued during the 
last decade. In the case of the Army, inde- 
pendence of civilian control is assured by the 
direct access to the Throne enjoyed by the Min- 
ister of War and the Chief of the General Staff 
and by the fact that by law the Minister of War 
must be an Army officer of at least the rank 
of Lieutenant General. Thus the Minister of 
War is not responsible to the Prime Minister or 
to the Diet, and the Army is in a position to 
dictate to the Cabinet through the fact that the 
Cabinet must collapse if no one qualified for 
the post of Minister shall agree to serve. A 
parallel situation exists with respect to the 
Navy. The size, the recruitment, and the equip- 
ment of both the Army and the Navy, according 
to Prince Ito's interpretation of the Japanese 
constitution, belongs to the sovereign power of 
the Emperor, and no interference with it by 
the Diet should be allowed. 

How this system has affected the Japanese 
Government's course of policy and action is 
clearly illustrated by the developments which 
led to the occupation of Manchuria in 1931. 

With its officers inheriting the traditions of 
the landed gentry and its ranks recruited 
largely from the peasantry, the Army's point 
of view is largely agrarian. Prior to 1925 
the Army had more or less confined its interest 
in domestic political questions to matters con- 



MAY 9, 1942 



399 



cerned with military affairs. But the popular 
unrest, particularly among the farmer peasants, 
arising from the severe economic distress of 
the years following 1929 afforded the Army an 
opportunity to bid for greater political power. 
The Army felt itself directly affected by the 
economic crisis, as it believed that disaffection 
among the peasantry might result in disaffec- 
tion in the fighting services. Denouncing the 
parliamentary parties and the capitalists, who 
were charged with selfishly exploiting the 
masses and with betrayal of national interests 
by tolerating Chinese disregard for Japan's al- 
leged rights and by pursuing a policy of inter- 
national cooperation, the military leaders came 
forth in 1930 and 1931 with a program of social 
and economic reconstruction, of extreme re- 
actionary nationalism, and of a strong and 
independent foreign policy. 

Conscious of its rising political power, grow- 
ing out of popular dissatisfaction with the exist- 
ing leadership, and aware of the inability of 
the government to interfere materially in its 
activities, the Japanese Army struck suddenly 
in Manchuria in 1931, confident that a success- 
ful campaign there would enhance its popu- 
larity and power and contribute to the allevia- 
tion of the economic situation at home. Its 
confidence in the popularity of the action taken 
was justified; public opinion ratified whole- 
heartedly the fait accompli in Manchuria. 

From 1931 onward, Japanese national policies 
came to be more and more dominated by a mili- 
tant military class, bigoted, arrogant, grasping, 
and steeped in the traditions of a stultifying 
feudal code which inculcated a distorted sense 
of values. It was not to be expected that such a 
class could furnish Japan a leadership capable 
of working out along constructive lines liberal 
and progressive policies which would be de- 
signed to promote the real interests of the Jap- 
anese people as a whole and at the same time 
be consistent with consideration for other 
peoples. 

Japan's courses in recent years reveal a steril- 
ity of intellectual and moral leadership which 
is not only barren of any ideas calculated to 
benefit humanity at large but does not even offer 



a constructive plan for bettering the livelihood 
and welfare of the masses of the Japanese peo- 
ple themselves. For a long time Japan has had 
an objective of expansion as well as a plan, the 
execution of which was governed by a policy 
of opportunism. Japanese military leaders 
have bid for the support of the Japanese people 
by developing the slogan of a crusade to free 
China and the rest of East Asia from what they 
call "the shackles of white domination", and by 
alleging that the white powers were encircling 
Japan militarily and stifling her economically. 
In their appeal they have effectively used sen- 
tentious slogans, such as "The New Order in 
Greater East Asia" and "The Greater East Asia 
Co-Prosperity Sphere", which have been suc- 
cessfully revised and expanded as Japan's con- 
quests have extended to embrace progressively 
expanding objectives. These slogans are omi- 
nous in their implication of Japan's purposes of 
unlimited conquest and domination. 

When Japan first came into contact with the 
western world, its military leaders were im- 
pressed only with the material side of western 
civilization. They cared little for the social 
gains which had been achieved by the Occident, 
but what they set about doing was to develop 
Japan's economic strength in order that Japan 
might become powerful militarily. In the 
space of a few decades Japan built up an indus- 
trial system which in respect to its productive 
power compared favorably with that of many 
occidental nations. While this did result to a 
certain extent in raising the standard of living 
of the people, a much greater part of Japan's 
increased production than was necessary for 
real defense needs, instead of being distributed 
to the public, went into armaments. Thus it 
was that Japan was able to maintain itself 
both as a first-class military power and as a 
naval power. How far Japan has achieved 
this status at the expense of the welfare and 
standards of living of the masses of the Japa- 
nese people it is difficult to say, but it is per- 
tinent to observe that Japan has a death rate 
70 percent greater than that of the United 
States and much greater also than that of any 
western European industrial nation. It is 



400 

true, of course, that Japan's death rate is 
much lower than those of China or India, but 
these countries are much less developed eco- 
nomically than is Japan, owing to causes which 
are unrelated to any question of a dispropor- 
tionately heavy burden of armaments. 

Much as one may sympathize with the legiti- 
mate desires of any people to improve their 
opportunities and better their livelihood, it is 
questionable whether such an aspiration can be 
permanently realized through the out-moded 
techniques of nineteenth-century imperialism, 
whereby the objectives sought can be attained 
only at the expense of other peoples through 
the establishment of a master-and-slave rela- 
tionship. Such a program leads only to in- 
creased human unrest and insecurity, to waste- 
ful and unsound commercial policies based upon 
strategic rather than economic considerations, 
and to accelerating unlimited international 
competition in armaments which adds to the 
burdens of the population. 

Japan's occupation successively of Formosa, 
of Korea, and of Manchuria did not benefit 
the standard of living either of the native 
population or of the masses of the Japanese 
people. In Formosa, after Japanese occupa- 
tion, the native farmers were forced to divert 
to cane production large areas which were 
better adapted for rice production, and the 
Japanese taxpayer had to bear the burden 
of a highly protected sugar industry which 
thus yielded profits only to a few Japanese 
capitalists. In Manchuria it is probable that 
Japan has wasted huge sums in unproductive 
strategic enterprises which a normal peace 
economy would never have warranted. In oc- 
cupied China elsewhere* than in Manchuria 
Japan's economic gains have been achieved 
chiefly by dispossessing Chinese property own- 
ers in favor of Japanese instead of by the 
creation of new wealth. 

There is no apparent reason why Japan 
should not have been able through policies 
of peace and fair-dealing to have assured the 
future well-being and prosperity of the Japa- 
nese people. Japan has easy access to the con- 
tinent of Asia and the Western Pacific region, 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

areas which possess vast resources of raw mate- 
rial and which provide almost unlimited mar- 
kets for manufactured products. Japan thus 
is exceptionally well situated to provide for 
its future by developing as an industrial and 
commercial power. With many comparative 
advantages for the production of a great vari- 
ety of manufactured goods, Japan has stood 
tn gain more than almost any other country 
by accepting and applying the principle of 
non-discrimination in international commercial 
relations. The adoption of such a liberal pol- 
icy cannot, however, be expected unless Japan 
should got rid of her present reactionary lead- 
ers, who cling to exploded theories of military 
and political domination. 

The best safeguard against a country's 
adopting courses of aggression is democratic 
institutions, which insure that control of poli- 
cies is vested in the people, as the people stand 
most to lose by .policies of aggression. 
Through the spread of education the people can 
best prepare themselves for responsible self- 
government on a basis which makes for liberal 
policies most likely to promote international 
peace and stability. 

There is a close connection between the essen- 
tially democratic character of Chinese national 
institutions and the historically peaceful char- 
acter of Chinese national policies. One can- 
not but be impressed by the fact that the 
Chinese, notwithstanding the fact that they 
have been engaged in a bitter struggle with 
Japan for their survival as a nation, have not 
neglected the matter of education, but have 
transferred to Free China many of the insti- 
tutions of learning situated in areas under 
Japanese occupation. It may be expected that 
when peace in the Far East is restored and 
the Chinese are able to turn their energies from 
their struggle of resistance to peaceful pursuits 
they will be able to give fuller play to their 
traditional love of learning, and thus there 
will be spontaneously assured the future prog- 
ress and strengthening of their democratic way 
of life. 

May we not also hope that in Japan, too, 
defeat of Japanese armed forces will result in 



MAY 9, 1942 



401 



the thorough discrediting among the Japanese 
people of their military leaders for having 
brought suffering and disaster to the nation 
through pursuit of policies of aggression. It 
may be expected that at the same time the 
samurai cult and all that it implies will fall 
into disrepute. The Japanese nation would 
then be free to hearken to the voice of coun- 
selors of truer vision and greater wisdom whose 
leadership would take Japan along courses of 
peace and worthwhile international coopera- 
tion. 

In the new Asia which we expect to see emerge 
from the present war, what wdll be the role of 
the United States? This is a question of great 
concern and importance to all of us. There is 
a tendency on the part of many Americans in 
considering this question to emphasize the con- 
tributions which the United States is to make to 
Asia, I do not wish to appear to deny the 
validity of the maxim that it is more blessed to 
give than to receive, but in order to bring out 
the point of view that our future cultural contri- 
butions should not be a one-way proposition I 
wish to call attention to the desirability that we 
in America realize more fully and more general- 
ly that Asia possesses treasures of great value 
to us besides silks and other material goods — 
intellectual and spiritual treasures whose in- 
spiration may contribute much toward helping 
us to adjust our sense of values and enabling 
us to adapt ourselves to new conditions and to 
play a more useful role in the world to come. 

Let me illustrate by one example. All the 
religions of Asia, including Christianity, em- 
phasize spiritual values as compared with 
material values. Because of our war effort our 
people must now look forward to giving up for 
some time to come at least many of the material 
things which we have come to regard as essen- 
tial for the enjoyment of life. It seems to me 
that we will be able to adjust ourselves more 
happily and more readily to the new situation 
which is impending if we can take lessons from 
the people of Asia in simplifying our daily 
lives and in looking more to nature to inspire 
our lives. A decade ago, at the time of the 
serious depression when people in this country 



were complaining of hard times, I happened 
to be stationed in Canton, China. I often used 
to watch the boat people, and it was a never- 
ending source of pleasurable wonderment to 
me to see how cheerful those people were 
notwithstanding the inadequacies, by our 
standards, of their lives. For shelter they had 
a covered boat not much larger than an ordinary 
rowboat, For bedding each member of the 
family had a blanket. With a small charcoal 
brazier for cooking and a monthly budget of 
perhaps $2 for food, the housewife managed 
to provide the family with a well-balanced diet. 
Hardly a boat was without a sprig of flowers, 
tastefully arranged, and perhaps a scroll paint- 
ing or two with which these people satisfied 
their craving for the beautiful. I often won- 
dered whether those boat people would not have 
considered themselves rich beyond the dreams 
of avarice if they had had as much to live on 
as many in this country whom we might regard 
as being on the verge of destitution. I do not 
advocate our trying to live as the Cantonese 
tanka, but I think we could profit much by 
cultivating the Oriental's love of nature, his 
love of art, and his appreciation of simple and 
useful things. With such a beginning we 
would be better prepared to appreciate the 
profound teachings of Oriental philosophies, 
with their emphasis upon values which we have 
overlooked in our preoccupation with material 
standards. We have a national habit of meas- 
uring both effort and result in terms of money : 
we say that this work of art cost so many 
hundreds of thousands of dollars or that our 
national war effort during the current year is to 
cost so many billions. Vast as are our natural 
resources and our national wealth, I do not 
believe that we can expect material factors to 
win the war for us. We cannot measure in 
dollars and cents the amount of moral force, 
faith in ourselves and in our cause, courageous 
resolve, and the spirit of sacrifice that must be 
mobilized and applied to bring us victory. 

A wider diffusion in this country of an 
understanding and appreciation of the culture 
of Asiatic peoples will not only benefit us in 
meeting our own problems of living but will 



402 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



also assist us in meeting our responsibilities as 
members of a world society. While most of us 
accept as an abstract ideal the principle of the 
equality of peoples and of nations, are we not 
lacking in real conviction that it has any sound 
basis in fact — for we are apt to look down upon 
the other fellow because he is not like us? We 
must therefore endeavor to broaden our outlook 
to a point where we can become capable of 
judging others by standards of value other than 
our own. By so doing we shall be better quali- 
fied to appraise other peoples at their true 
worth. Only then may we expect to view more 
realistically the ideal of equality. 

In considering how best we may prepare our- 
selves for an important role in the future of 
Asia we must not proceed on the basis of an 
assumption of our own superiority, nor should 
we assume that all that we find good in our 
civilization must also be good for the people 
of Asia. I hope that our contributions can be 
large along spiritual and intellectual lines — 
especially in the field of political ideologies — as 
well as along material and scientific lines. We 



must clearly recognize, however, that it is for 
the Asiatics to decide what they are going to 
take of our civilization. We must also remem- 
ber that much that we have come to regard as 
axiomatic in our political ideology is not neces- 
sarily so to Asiatics. 

The importance of the role which we shall 
play in Asia in the future will depend not only 
upon the intrinsic merits of our civilization and 
our culture but upon the measure of our success 
in gaining the respect and confidence of the peo- 
ples of Asia. Our success in this direction will 
depend in turn upon the success of our efforts 
to develop a genuine sympathy for those peoples 
based upon an understanding of their problems 
and aspirations and an intelligent appreciation 
of their cultures and their human worth. With 
such a beginning we shall be better qualified to 
address ourselves to concrete measures of prac- 
tical cooperation in the task of laying the foun- 
dations for a regime of progress and peace with 
justice and fair-dealing in the Pacific area — 
and wherever we have relationships. 



Europe 



EMBASSY RANK FOR REPRESENTATION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND 

THE NETHERLANDS 



[Released to the press May 7] 

Just two years ago the peace-loving Dutch 
people were treacherously attacked by German 
armies, and since that time the territory of the 
Netherlands has been treated as a slave state 
by Germany. But the cruel oppression to 
which they have been subjected has never im- 
paired the unfaltering determination of the 
Dutch people to regain their independence. 

Since that time the Netherlands East Indies 
have been invaded by Japan, and the gallant 
defense of the Dutch forces against over- 
whelming odds has constituted an outstanding 
chapter in the history of the present war. 

The matchless resistance of the Dutch people 



throughout the world for these past two years 
proves their heroic stature in the defense of 
their liberties. 

With this in mind the President recently sug- 
gested to the Queen of the Netherlands that the 
rank of the diplomatic representation between 
the two countries should be raised to that of an 
embassy. 

The steps toward the accomplishment of this 
proposal have now been completed, and the 
President will receive, on May 7, Dr. Alexander 
Loudon, until now Minister of the Netherlands 
to the United States, who will present his let- 
ters of credence as the first Ambassador of the 
Netherlands in Washington. 



MAY 9, 194 2 

[Released to the press May 7] 

The text of the letter from Her Majesty 
Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands accred- 
iting Dr. Alexander Loudon as first Ambassa- 
dor of the Netherlands to the United States 
which was presented to the President at noon 
on May 7, follows : 

"With you I feel, Mr. President, that it is 
fitting to give adequate expression to the ties 
of especially close friendship which have come 
into being between our countries through their 
joint sacrifices in our common endeavour to up- 
hold, together with the other united nations, a 
proper balance between the rights and the 
duties of human beings and of states against 
those who, in order to satisfy ambition and 
greed, are out to enslave others. I share your 
conviction that this purpose can be served by 
resolving that the diplomatic envoys we ex- 
change should henceforth have the status of 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipoten- 
tiary, and it gives me great pleasure to know 
that you agree when I hereby accredit Dr. 
Alexander Loudon in that capacity to the 
United States. 

"I trust that he will continue to prove himself 
worthy of this new mark of my confidence and 
to merit your approbation." 



403 

[Released to the press May 8] 

The text of the credentials presented by the 
Honorable Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., to 
Her Majesty Queen Wilhelmina of the Nether- 
lands as first Ambassador of the United States 
to the Netherlands, follows: 

"Your Majesty: 

"The stouthearted courage and gallant spirit 
which Hollanders have shown on every front 
in their determined resistance to wanton ag- 
gression by Germany and by Japan have 
stirred the imagination of the American people. 

"We are proud that the men of our armed 
forces have in recent months fought side by side 
with the brave soldiers, sailors and airmen of 
the Netherlands forces in the Indies and in the 
Caribbean. 

"It seems fitting therefore that the United 
States and the Netherlands should as a mark of 
their united efforts against their common ene- 
mies henceforth exchange diplomatic repre- 
sentatives with the rank of Ambassador. I 
have been very pleased to learn that you have 
agreed to receive the Honorable Anthony J. D. 
Biddle as Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary of the United States of Amer- 
ica near Your Majesty's Government, and I 
trust that you will give full faith to any action 
which he may take on behalf of his Government. 
Franklin D Roosevelt" 



The Near East 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE 
MINISTER OF IRAQ 



[Released to the press May 4] 

The remarks of the newly appointed Minister 
of Iraq, Mr. Ali Jawdat, upon the occasion of 
the presentation of his letters of credence, 
follow : 

"Mr. President: 

"I have the honor to hand to you the letters 
by which His Royal Highness the Regent, acting 
on behalf of my August Sovereign King Faisal 
II. has accredited me as Envoy Extraordinary 



and Minister Plenipotentiary of Iraq to the 
United States of America. 

"It is a source of especial pride to me that 
His Royal Highness should have selected me to 
be the first representative of Iraq in this great 
country. The bonds between the Arabs and the 
United States are many. In particular Ameri- 
can institutions have played a part unique in 
international relations by their contribution 
to the constructive and cultural development 



404 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the Arab renaissance, of which my presence 
here today is but one symbol. 

"I take up my office at a time when humanity 
as a whole is passing through perhaps the 
severest test to which it has ever been subjected, 
and when all who love liberty and justice must 
stand together to defend these priceless treas- 
ures. It will be my constant endeavor to 
strengthen the close relations which have now 
for so many years existed between the two peo- 
ples, and I trust that I shall merit the confidence 
and good-will of yourself, Mr. President, and 
those of your administration, which are so 
necessary for the success of my mission. 

"I am particularly charged to convey to you 
in the name of my Sovereign cordial greetings 
and wishes for your personal happiness and for 
the prosperity of the United States of America, 
and to these I beg leave to add my own.'' 

The President's reply to the remarks of Mr. 
Ali Jawdat follows: 

"Mr. Minister: 

''It gives me great pleasure to receive from 
you the letters by which His Royal Highness 
the Regent, acting on behalf of your August 
Sovereign King Faisal II, has accredited you 
as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary of Iraq to the United States of 
America. 

"I am particularly happy to welcome you as 
the first representative of Iraq in this country. 

"The long and noble history of the Arabs and 
their contributions to the progress of civiliza- 
tion are well known. You have been good 
enough to allude to the assistance which Ameri- 
can institutions have afforded to the modern 
Arab world, and I should like to express my 
sincere hope that the ties now existing between 
our two countries will be maintained and 
strengthened in all fields of effort. I am con- 
vinced that each of our two peoples has much 
to contribute to the well-being and advancement 
of the other. You may rest assured, Mr. Min- 
ister, that in the performance of your important 
task you will meet with the most sincere co- 
operation and good-will on our part. 



"You have arrived at a period when the way 
of life and the principles cherished by the peo- 
ples of our two countries are seriously threat- 
ened. I am sure that we shall stand together, 
as we must, and that as the result of the common 
efforts put. forth by all free peoples, your labors 
here will be performed in happier circumstances 
than those which we are now witnessing. 

"I shall be grateful, Mr. Minister, if you 
will convey to His Royal Highness, on behalf 
of your Sovereign, my deep appreciation of the 
cordial message which you have voiced and my 
warm greetings and best wishes for your Sov- 
ereign's personal happiness and for the pros- 
perity of Iraq." 



Australasia 



NEW ZEALAND POSTAL CONCESSIONS 
TO ALLIED FORCES 

I Released lo tile press May K] 

The Department of State has been advised 
by the New Zealand Legal ion in Washington 
that special postal concessions have been made 
to American Army personnel stationed in New 
Zealand. These concessions are as follows: 

1. Free surface postage within and beyond 
New Zealand. 

2. Reduced airmail postage to Australia 3d. 
each half ounce. 

3. Reduced inland-telegram rate Id. word 
without charge for address. 

These concessions will extend to any British 
or Allied forces stationed in or passing through 
New Zealand. In addition, in respect of par- 
cels received from or posted to the United States 
by members of the United States armed forces 
in New Zealand the usual New Zealand termi- 
nal credits of 30^ per inward parcel and 2d. 
per pound outward parcel respectively will be 
waived. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



EIGHTH PAN AMERICAN CHILD CONGRESS 
ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY LONG ' 



[Released to the press May 3] 

Madam President, Your Excellencies, Dis- 
tinguished Delegates and Guests: 

It is my pleasure and privilege on behalf of 
President Roosevelt and the Honorable Cor- 
dell Hull, Secretary of State, to welcome you 
to Washington and to extend to you their most 
cordial greetings. The President and Mr. Hull 
have also requested that I convey an expression 
of their deep interest in the humanitarian work 
which has inspired you to come to Washington 
for this important meeting. 

I have received the following personal mes- 
sage from President Roosevelt which he has 
asked me to deliver to you : 

The White House, 
Washington, May 1, 1942. 

Personal Message to the Eighth Pan American 
Child Congress 

It is my great pleasure to extend a most 
cordial welcome to the delegates from the 
American republics to the Eighth Pan Ameri- 
can Child Congress. I wish that it were pos- 
sible for me personally to greet you in this 
opening session, and to thank you for coming 
such long distances, at great personal inconven- 
ience, in order that we may counsel together 
concerning the ways in which childhood may be 
safeguarded in the midst of war and assured 
the fullest opportunity in the future, which we 
are struggling to make one of hope and free- 
dom and development for all human beings. 
You will feel, I trust, that the city named for 
the first President of the oldest American re- 
public is truly your home, a place where the 
ideals of Washington, Bolivar, San Martin, 



1 Delivered at the Pan American Union May 2, 1942. 



Tiradentes, O'Higgins, and the other great lib- 
erators may find expression in a congress de- 
voted to the interests of children. 

Your deliberations and the firmness of your 
purpose to apply to the practical concerns of 
everyday life the principles which you will 
here declare, will contribute in great measure 
to the extension and fulfilment of the good- 
neighbor policy as the basic principle of inter- 
national association. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The Eighth Pan American Child Congress 
convenes at an hour when the democratic proc- 
esses of free peoples are being seriously threat- 
ened. It meets at a time when law and order 
are being challenged and when the regime of 
security and opportunity which we in the West- 
ern Hemisphere have so long enjoyed is placed 
in grave jeopardy. The medieval oppression 
and brutality revived by certain nations as in- 
struments of national and international policy 
now cast shadows on all the peace-loving nations 
of the world. One of the worst tragedies of 
the present situation is the devastating effect 
which it will have upon many of the children 
in different parts of the world. Many children 
who are innocent of any responsibility for the 
vicious acts of oppression will pay in blighted 
lives, broken spirits, and lost opportunities for 
the devastation and carnage which is being 
wrought. 

The effects of the world-wide conflagration 
are already being felt throughout the Americas 
in economic and social dislocations. It is im- 
perative in our all-out efforts to prosecute this 
war to a successful conclusion that we do not 
lose sight of the less dramatic but equally press- 
ing duty of safeguarding the welfare of our 

405 



406 

children. The great struggle which we are 
waging against the powers of evil is primarily 
to guarantee for the coming generations a leg- 
acy of peace and brotherhood, untrammeled by 
the threats and fears of greed and brute force. 
It is most encouraging that in these difficult 
times the peaceful processes of mutual collabo- 
ration of free peoples for the purpose of pro- 
moting the welfare of their children may go 
on unabated. This series of conferences, of 
which this is the eighth, was inaugurated over 
a quarter of a century ago during the first 
World War. In war as in peace, the peoples of 
the American republics are convinced that the 
welfare of their children is of paramount im- 
portance. While the children of the independ- 
ent nations which have been ruthlessly overrun 
by the Axis countries are undergoing malnutri- 
tion and are being subjected to privation and 
suffering, the free democracies of the Americas 
are meeting in one of their periodic conferences 
to formulate plans for their children's welfare. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

and at the same time the armed forces of these 
governments are taking steps to secure for them 
a decent future. You will, of course, discuss 
special problems arising from the present war 
situation, but you will also continue your col- 
laboration on a broad, constructive program 
during the post-war period. 

You have undertaken, therefore, a heavy re- 
sponsibility to plan for the protection of chil- 
dren of the Americas during the present emer- 
gency and to strengthen the foundations for 
a great continental program to assure for them 
their birthright of peace, freedom, health, and 
security. Your task will be facilitated and your 
efforts encouraged by the splendid opportunity 
of friendly collaboration and mutual respect 
which happily prevails among the free nations 
of the Americas. 

On behalf of the Government and people of 
the United States, I extend hearty greetings 
and best wishes for the success of the Eighth 
Pan American Child Congress. 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE " 



[Released to the press May 7] 

It is always a high privilege to welcome the 
distinguished group of representatives of the 
American family of nations. The privilege is 
all the greater when the subject of the confer- 
ence is that of the care of children. 

In the presence of so many people who have 
given their lives to this most important of social 
studies, I speak with the greatest diffidence. As 
a layman in the field, I can only make a few 
very simple observations. 

The entire subject of the care and assistance 
which government and private organizations 
can give to children has been pioneered by a 
few brave and noble souls who long ago realized 
that the principal work of the mature genera- 
tion is to clear the path for stronger and more 
successful generations to come after. One of 
my earliest memories is of the discussion held 
on this subject by Jane Addams, at Hull House 
in Chicago — that great training school from 



' Delivered at the White House May 6, 1942, 



which came a succession of brilliant women 
whose names are known throughout the con- 
tinent. Later, I had the happy privilege of 
breakfasting often with Florence Kelly, whose 
kindly mind of cold steel planned the early 
American laws which restrained the evils of 
child labor. Nor can one forget the gracious 
presence at those frequent breakfasts of Grace 
Abbott, whom Miss Lenroot worthily succeeds. 

We have passed, in the United States, 
through two phases of development in our deal- 
ing with the problems of child study. I think 
we are about to emerge from a third phase. 
Perhaps you will permit me, even as an outsider, 
to speak of these three phases. 

A generation ago the approach toward chil- 
dren was always sentimental. Such institutions 
as we had to deal with the problem were largely 
based on pity for children who were being 
badly dealt with by life: institutions for the 
care of orphans; societies for the prevention 
of cruelty to children; arrangements to give 



MAY 9, 1942 



407 



occasional pleasure to the children of the poor. 
These were splendid and worthy ; they reflected 
every credit on the many kindly souls who es- 
tablished them and maintained constant interest 
in their work. 

But, as time wore on, we came to realize that 
pity was not enough. We learned that it was 
insufficient to attempt to right wrong after the 
harm was done. We began to think in terms of 
social science and of community organization. 

We learned to consider that it was a social 
crime to separate a mother from her children 
merely because of poverty, and systems of 
mothers' pensions were worked out. We learned 
that it was futile to provide medical charity for 
babies unless assistance for prenatal care was 
worked out, that while children's hospitals were 
necessary, it was even more necessary to set up 
standards and methods under which children 
should be adequately nourished and adequately 
taken care of — so that children's diseases should 
be prevented. We found out that while it was 
a great thing to provide vacations and play- 
grounds for city children, it was even more im- 
portant to see to it that children were not 
driven by thousands into factories or other 
forms of labor which injured their health and 
crippled their spirits. 

We even learned that while it was a generous 
impulse to provide orphanages for children 
without parents, it was far more intelligent to 
place children in homes capable of rearing them 
under normal circumstances. We discovered 
that all our work to correct juvenile delin- 
quency must be secondary to programs of cre- 
ating conditions in which the child should not 
be steered toward a life of degradation and 
ultimate crime. 

The list could be extended indefinitely, but 
the point is sufficiently plain. God forbid that 
the swift and gracious human reaction which 
makes all civilized people kindly toward chil- 
dren should ever die out. But with it must go 
cooler, more analytical treatment of the basic 
problem — an organized, disciplined attack 
upon those conditions, social, intellectual, and 
moral, which lie at the roots of the misfortune 
of children. 

So began the scientific phase of children's 



work. It has been a long and fruitful period — 
and is far from being ended. Through it have 
come major advances in the field of medicine 
and medical care for mothers and infants and 
children and adolescents. As a result of it, 
there have come the beginnings of an organized 
body of knowledge in the fields of psychiatry 
and child psychology. In jurisprudence and 
law we are gradually learning to adapt the old 
procedure of the police and criminal courts to 
the newer technique of studying children as in- 
dividuals and of endeavoring to correct delin- 
quency exactly as a doctor tries to correct a 
physical ailment. Our schools have become 
centers in which not merely the minds of chil- 
dren are taught but in which their bodies can 
be strengthened, their nutrition guided, and 
their awareness of the community can be in- 
creased. Our industry is at length learning, 
and our laws are beginning to assure, that chil- 
dren shall not become industrial cannon fodder. 

Throughout the American Continent you 
will find in varying degree codes of laws and 
professional practices more advanced than any 
in the world. 

A third phase has begun to suggest itself. 
This is the idea that youth, as such, should be 
set apart from the body of society and should be 
separately dealt with by all agencies of private 
and public organization. 

I am not clear that I agree with this new 
suggestion. Bluntly, and speaking merely as 
an individual, I am inclined to question the 
value of what are called "youth movements". 
I doubt if children and young people have a 
separate interest, apart from society as a whole. 
The results of the last 20 years of work seem to 
me to show beyond doubt that you cannot take 
care of the interests of children unless you also 
consider and deal with the conditions of 
homes — that is to say, of parents. While there 
are endless things which can be and should be 
done for young people, the object must be not 
to separate young people from the community 
but to bring them rapidly into it. The lessons 
we have learned would seem to indicate that 
there can be no fragmentation of society, that 
personality is indivisible. If this be so, it fol- 
lows that our endeavor to raise the standards 



408 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of childhood must be an integral part of our 
entire program for raising the standards of 
living and the standards of the entire commu- 
nity. The more we work at the problem of 
children, the more we find that they are at the 
heart of society as a whole. 

Precisely here, I think, the attitude of the 
Americas branches off from many of the atti- 
tudes which have recently been coming to us 
from Europe. It must be remembered that 
youth movements began as adjuncts to mili- 
tarism: they were frankly intended to raise 
youth which would enter the continental armies. 
This origin of the attempt to set youth apart 
from the life of a nation as a whole goes back 
even to the close of the Napoleonic wars. Later 
it was made use of by certain of the European 
revolutionary movements. Particularly, and 
more viciously, it was used by the Nazi move- 
ment, which began by endeavoring to seize 
control of all of the youth movements in its 
area, promised a glorification of youth, and has 
just completed its singularly evil work by de- 
creeing that all children from 10 years old up 
should be condemned to forced labor. Still 
worse, these children — including, today, every 
German child — are seized and put to forced 
labor, not primarily for the work they can do 
but so that they can be held as hostages for the 
behavior of their parents. It is not the first 
time that a movement of this kind has been 
perverted into an instrument of hideous oppres- 
sion. 



But this perversion does point a moral. It 
evidences the weakness of a society in which 
any age group is set apart and encouraged to 
assert interests adverse to the nation as a whole. 
In social science, as well as in the human heart 
and in the Christian religion, we are all of us 
members of one body, and none of us lives to 
himself or dies to himself. As the sentimental 
regard for a lonely child brought the orphan- 
age, and as the scientist re-created from the old 
orphanage the normal home, so we, in entering 
the third phase, see the problem of children 
as a part of the problem of advancing civiliza- 
tion as a whole. 

You will pardon this brief review of the so- 
cial history of a great movement. I like to 
think that for us, members of the American 
family of nations, there is a symbolism which 
we can take to heart. In our international life 
we have learned that sentimental affection be- 
tween nations is great but that it must be supple- 
mented by the careful, realistic, and scientific 
consideration and solution of problems. And 
we have learned that no nation, and no group of 
nations, can set itself apart from the great body 
of world affairs. In international life as in 
individual life, no one lives to himself and no 
one dies to himself. 

Therefore, a meeting of this kind, in the 
shadow of the greatest war in history, is a happy 
portent for the future. Like the rainbow in 
the tempest clouds, it offers the sovereign gift 
of hope. 



The Foreign Service 



FOREIGN SERVICE CONFERENCE IN MEXICO CITY 



A conference of Foreign Service officers in 
charge of consular posts of the United States 
in Mexico was held in Mexico City from April 
27 to May 2, 1942. The conference, held under 
the chairmanship of George S. Messersmith, 
American Ambassador to Mexico, afforded a 
full opportunity for the exchange of views and 



discussions of those matters which concern For- 
eign Service officers in their actual work at their 
respective posts. Wayne C. Taylor, Under Sec- 
retary of Commerce of the United States, and 
Jaime de Torres Bodet, Mexican Acting 
Foreign Minister, addressed the opening ses- 
sion of the conference. The meeting was at- 



MAY 9, 1942 



409 



tended by the following officers from the De- 
partment of State: John G. Erhardt, Chief, 
Division of Foreign Service Personnel ; Chris- 
tian M. Ravndal, Chief, American Hemisphere 
Exports Office; Herbert S. Bnrsley, Assistant 
Chief, Division of the American Republics; 
Walter X. Walmsley, Jr., Assistant Chief, Di- 
vision of the American Republics; Francis H. 
Russell, Assistant Chief, Division of World 
Trade Intelligence; and William W. Butter- 
worth, Jr., Foreign Service officer assigned to 
the Department of Commerce. 

This meeting took place in accordance with 
the practice inaugurated some years ago of con- 
sular officers' in various sections of the world 
meeting for the purpose of discussing consular 
practice, particularly with the end of securing 
uniformity. 

RETIREMENT OF CONSUL GENERAL 
CARTER 

[Released to the press May 7] 

Mr. James G. Carter, American Consul Gen- 
eral at Tananarive, Madagascar, will retire from 
the Foreign Service effective as of December 
31, 1942. Mr. Carter will have completed over 
:56 years of duty in the Foreign Service at the 
time of his retirement, which is mandatory 
under the law requiring the retirement of all 
Foreign Service officers upon reaching the age 
of 65. 

Mr. Carter has served with distinction at 
Tamatave and Tananarive, Madagascar, and 
Calais. France. At the end of 19i0, when it 
became essential to have an officer of high rank 
and experience at Madagascar, Mr. Carter was 
assigned to that post. He has served there with 
the same distinction and to the entire satis- 
faction of the Department. He will be suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Clifton R. Wharton, a Foreign 
Service officer now detailed as Consul and Sec- 
ond Secretary, and temporarily in charge, at 
Monrovia, Liberia. The quality of Mr. Whar- 
ton's work, in the Department's judgment, 
fully warrants his transfer to this post, which 
at the present time has assumed particular 
importance. 

In recognition of his many years of useful 
service the Secretary of State is addressing to 



Consul General Carter a letter expressing ap- 
preciation of his services. 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press May 9] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since April 25, 1942 ; 

George D. Andrews, of Chattanooga, Tenn., 
Second Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Panama, Panama, has been designated Second 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Santiago, 
Chile, to serve in dual capacity. 

J. Webb Benton, of Pen Ryn, Cornwell 
Heights, Pa., Consul at Marseille, France, has 
been assigned as Consul General at Marseille, 
France. 

Howard A. Bowman, of Calexico, Calif., 
Consul at Glasgow, Scotland, has been assigned 
as Consul at Cali, Colombia. 

John W. Dye, of Winona, Minn., Consul at 
Nassau, New Providence, Bahamas, has been 
assigned as Consul General at Nassau, New 
Providence, Bahamas. 

James B. Engle, of Chicago, 111., has been 
ajopointed Vice Consul at Quito, Ecuador. 

Daniel Gaudin, Jr., of Philadelphia, Pa., Vice 
Consul at Alexandria, Egypt, has been assigned 
as Consul at Alexandria, Egypt. 

Rupert A. Lloyd, of Phoebus, Va., has been 
appointed Vice Consul at Monrovia, Liberia. 

Timothy John Mahoney, of Petaluma, Calif., 
Clerk at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Terry B. Sanders, Jr., of Edinburg, Tex., 
Vice Consul at Puerto de la Cruz, Venezuela, 
has been appointed Vice Consul at Managua, 
Nicaragua. 

The assignment of Winfield H. Scott, of 
AVashington, D. G, as Consul at Bombay, India, 
has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. Scott 
has been assigned as Consul at Paramaribo, 
Surinam. 

Alfred T. Wellborn, of New Orleans, La., 
formerly Vice Consul at Hong Kong, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Kunming, China. 

Arthur R. Williams, of Golden, Colo., Consul 
at Cali, Colombia, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Panama, 
Panama, and will serve in dual capacity. 



Commercial Policy 



TRADE AGREEMENT WITH PERU 1 



[Released to the press May 7] 

A trade agreement between the United States 
and the Republic of Peru, negotiated under the 
authority of the Trade Agreements Act, was 
signed on March 7, 1942, at Washington by the 
Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State of 
the United States, and His Excellency Sehor 
Dr. David Dasso, Minister of Finance and Com- 
merce of the Republic of Peru. The agreement 
will enter into force 30 days following the day 
of its proclamation by the President of the 
United States and by the President of Peru. or. 
if the proclamations do not take place on the 
same day, on the thirtieth day following 
the later in time. It is expected that proclama- 
tion of the agreement here and in Lima will 
occur in the near future. The text of the agree- 
ment will shortly be printed in the Executive 
Agreement Series. 

The agreement is designed to improve trade 
relations between the two countries, and the 
reciprocal concessions for which it provides 
cover a substantia] portion of the trade between 
them. The concessions include reductions, by 
each country, of its tariffs on specified products 
of the other country; binding of certain tariff 
rates against increase ; and bindings of specified 
commodities free of duty. The general provi- 
sions of the agreement include, among other 
things, important assurances against discrimi- 
natory tariff, quota, or exchange treatment of 
imports from either country into the other. 



1 The information in this release has been prepared 
by representatives of the Department of State, the 
Department of Agriculture, the Department of Com- 
merce, the Department of the Treasury, and the Tariff 
Commission. These Government agencies, under the 
reciprocal-trade-agreements program, cooperate in the 
formulation, negotiation, and conclusion of all trade 
agreements entered into by the United States under 
the provisions of the Trade Agreements Act of 1934, 
as extended by joint resolutions of Congress approved 
March 1, 1937, and April 12, 1940. 
410 



Trade between the United States and Peru 
has increased in recent years. Total trade be- 
tween the two countries, which amounted to 
$56,343,000 in 1929, fell sharply during depres- 
sion years to a low of $7,647,000 in 1932. Total 
trade had risen by 1939 to $33,205,000, however, 
and in 1940, under the stimulus of the war, to 
$41,066,000. 

The United States had an export balance in 
its trade with Peru during the decade 1921-30 
as well as during the period since 1930. During 
the period 1921-30 United States exports to 
Peru averaged $22,424,000, and imports from 
Peru averaged $20,917,000. During the period 
1931-40, exports to Peru averaged $13,064,000 
and imports from Peru $10505,000. Normally 
a large portion of total United States imports 
from Peru has represented imports of copper 
for refining and export to other countries. 

United States exports to Peru consist pri- 
marily of manufactured and processed articles. 
Imports from Peru, on the other hand, are 
chiefly raw materials. Of total exports of do- 
mestic merchandise to Peru in 1940, amounting 
to $22,596,000, machinery and vehicles ac- 
counted for $8,564,000; other metal manufac- 
tures, $4,812,000; chemical products, including 
paints, $2,563,000; wood and paper products, 
$1,502,000; and food products, $638,000. Total 
imports for consumption from Peru in 1940 
were valued at $15,364,000, of which metallic 
minerals accounted for $11,064,000; hair, wool, 
and cotton fibers, $2,001,000; cane sugar, $716,- 
000; and hides and skins, $562,000. 

Analysis of Text of Agreement 

The reciprocal concessions provided for in 
the trade agreement are listed in schedules I 
and II appended thereto. Schedule I includes 
concessions made by Peru on imports from the 
United States, and schedule II covers conces- 
sions made by the United States on Peruvian 
products. 



MAY 9, 1942 



411 



I. CONCESSIONS OBTAINED FROM PERU ON EXPORTS 
OF UNITED STATES PRODUCTS 

Peru grants concessions on products im- 
ported from the United States involving 50 
paragraphs of the Peruvian tariff schedule. In 
the case of 40 of these, the agreement provides 
for duties lower than those now in effect and in 
the case of 10 for the binding of existing cus- 
toms treatment during the life of the agree- 
ment. In the case of 19 of the 40 paragraphs 
for which lower duties are provided, the re- 
duced rates are lower than the rates of duty 
in effect prior to December 1941, when ordinary 
Peruvian import duties (which are specific) 
were increased generally by 20 percent to com- 
pensate for depreciation of the currency. 

Imports from the United States into Peru of 
products on which concessions were obtained 
amounted in 1940 to 43,600,000 2 Peruvian soles 3 
($7,068,000) or 26 percent of total Peruvian 
imports from the United States in that year. 
Of this amount, approximately $5,111,000 rep- 
resents imports of products which will benefit 
from duty reductions, while about $1,957,000 
represents imports of products which receive 
the benefit of bindings against increase in duty. 

Duty reductions 

The principal products on which Peru grants 
reductions in duty to imports from the United 
States are: Automobiles and trucks; parts for 
automobiles and trucks; typewriters and cal- 
culating machines; certain dried fruits; cer- 
tain canned vegetables ; canned fruits ; prepared 
oats ; and fresh apples, pears, and plums. 

Typewriters and parts (Peruvian tariff item 
1022) 

The existing rate of duty i on typewriters 
and parts is 0.96 sol per gross kilogram, equiva- 
lent to approximately 8 percent ad valorem. 



3 Partly estimated. 

3 This figure and other Peruvian import figures 
mentioned in the text have been converted at the rate 
of $0.1621 per sol. 

* The Peruvian rates of duty referred to through- 
out the text are ordinary rates of duty and do not 
include various supplementary import charges. Such 
supplementary charges are bound against increase in 
article VII of the agreement. 



Under the trade agreement this rate is reduced 
to 0.80 sol per kilogram. Peruvian require- 
ments for typewriters and parts are met en- 
tirely by imports, amounting in 1940 to $140,- 
000, of which the United States supplied $123,- 
000 or more than 87 percent. Other suppliers 
in normal times are Germany and Switzerland. 

Calculating machines and parts (Peruvian tariff 
item 1023) 
The existing rate of duty on calculating 
machines and parts is 1.44 soles per gross kilo- 
gram. Under the trade agreement the rate is 
reduced to 1.20 soles per gross kilogram. The 
ad valorem equivalent of the existing rate 
ranges from approximately 4 percent to 12 
percent ad valorem. ^Requirements are met 
entirely by imports, chiefly from the United 
States, Germany, and Sweden. Of total im- 
ports in 1940 valued at $52,000, the United 
States supplied $45,000 or 87 percent. 

Trucks and truck chassis and trailers (Peruvian 
tariff item 1226) 

On automobile trucks, chassis, and trailers, 
the agreement establishes a rate of duty on im- 
ports from the United States of 0.02 sol per 
gross kilogram. The existing rate of duty of 
0.024 sol per kilogram is equivalent to approxi- 
mately 1 percent ad valorem. 

The United States is by far the largest sup- 
plier of Peruvian imports of trucks, chassis, and 
trailers. In 1940 total imports into Peru were 
valued at $1,129,000 and those from the United 
States at $1,096,000. 

Passenger automobiUs (pars. 1228, 1229, 1230, 
1231, and 1236) 
On passenger cars the agreement provides for 
more favorable customs treatment for five tariff 
classifications constituting approximately 77 
percent of total Peruvian imports of passenger 
cars in the last seven months of 1940, 6 or for im- 
ports valued at $638,000 as compared with 
total passenger-car imports valued at $829,000. 
While existing ordinary rates of duty are not 



5 Because of a change in tariff classifications, imports 
of automobiles for the first 5 months of 1940 are not 
comparable with imports during the remainder of 
the year. 



412 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



reduced by the agreement, it is provided that 
automobiles within these five classifications 
shall be classified for customs purposes, and 
duties shall be imposed, on a legal-weight basis 
rather than on gross weight, as previously. In 
practice, this means that the weight of the ship- 
ping cases in which automobiles are imported 
will not result in subjecting such automobiles 
to a rate of duty higher than that which would 
be imposed if the automobiles were imported 
unboxed, and that the cases themselves 
will not be dutiable at the rate established for 
automobiles. 

Parts for automobiles, omnibuses, truck*, motor- 
cycles, bicycles {Peruvian tariff item 1275 ) 

This tariff item includes spare parts and re- 
placements of all kinds for the articles speci- 
fied, except axles and batteries. The existing 
rate of duty of 0.24 sol per gross kilogram, 
which is equivalent to approximately 6 percent 
ad valorem, is reduced under the provisions 
of the agreement to 0.20 sol per gross kilogram. 
As the United States is the predominant sup- 
plier of automobiles, busses and trucks, vir- 
tually all imports of spare parts originate in 
the United States. Total imports of articles 
classified in tariff item 1275 amounted in 1940 
to $631,000, of which imports from the United 
States accounted for more than 93 percent. 
Oats prepared as a foodstuff {Peruvian tariff 
item 14.67) 

The existing rate of duty on prepared oats 
is 0.06 sol per gross kilogram when imported 
from the United States and 0.03 sol per gross 
kilogram when imported from Chile. Under 
the trade agreement the rate to the United 
States is reduced to 0.04 sol per gross kilogram 
for prepared oats when imported in containers 
with a net content not in excess of two kilo- 
grams. Total Peruvian imports of prepared 
oats in 1940 were valued at $69,000, of which 
$21,000 were imported from the United States 
and $48,000 were imported from Chile. Im- 
ports from the United States are chiefly in 
packaged form whereas those imported from 
Chile are chiefly in bulk. 



Preserved legumes and vegetables prepared in 
any form: asparagus, soaps, baked beans, 
and corn {Peruvian tariff item 1^88) 
The existing rate of duty on canned vege- 
tables under tariff item 1488 (excluding such 
products as canned mushrooms, tomato sauce, 
pickles, etc.) is 0.24 sol per gross kilogram on 
imports from the United States (equivalent to 
about 21 percent ad valorem) and 0.12 sol per 
gross kilogram on imports from Chile. Under 
the trade agreement the rate to the United 
States is reduced by 50 percent, or to 0.12 sol 
per gross kilogram, on canned asparagus, soups, 
baked beans, and corn. Total imports of all 
products under this tariff item in 1910 were 
$38,000, of which imports valued at $23,000 
originated in the United States and imports 
valued at $10,000 in Chile. 

Fn sh fruits of all kinds: apples, pears, and 
plains {Peruvian tariff item 1505) 
The existing rate of duty of 0.02 sol per kilo- 
gram on imports of fresh fruits, which is 
equivalent to approximately 5 percent ad valo- 
rem, is applicable to imports from all countries 
except Chile, imports from which are duty 
free. Under the trade agreement the United 
States obtains duty-free treatment for imports 
of fresh apples, pears, and plums for seasonal 
periods corresponding to the months of greatest, 
export from the United States, when imports 
from Chile are negligible. These seasons are 
as follows: Fresh apples, from September 1 to 
the last day of the following February; fresh 
pears, from July 1 to December 31; and fresh 
plums, from May 1 to October 31. Total im- 
ports into Peru of fresh fruits, except fruits 
imported from Ecuador (which consist largely 
of bananas), amounted in 1940 to $39,000. 
Imports from the United States in that year 
were valued at $10,000 and imports from Chile 
at $27,000. 

Dried fruits and nuts {Peruvian tariff items 
1506, 1510, 1511, and 1513) 
The agreement reduces by 50 percent exist- 
ing rates of duty on walnuts (item 1506) ; dried 
fruits in boxes (item 1510, which includes such 
dried fruits as raisins, prunes, and apricots in 



MAY 9, 1942 

bulk) ; dried fruits, including shelled nuts, in 
containers other than boxes (item 1511) ; and 
dried fruity which are stoned or cut (item 1513). 
The ad valorem equivalents of the present rates 
of duty on imports of these products from the 
United States range from about 8 percent in 
the case of walnuts to about 60 percent in the 
case of dried fruits in boxes. Total Peruvian 
imports of all dried fruits under the tariff items 
listed above amounted to $77,000 in 1940, of 
which $38,000 were imported from the United 
States. Imports from Chile, which are free of 
duty, amounted to $30,000 in the same year. 

Canned fruits in water, syrup, or their juices 
(Peruvian tariff item 151Jf) 
Under existing tariff treatment canned fruits 
imported from the United States are dutiable 
at a rate of 0.30 sol per gross kilogram, the ad 
valorem equivalent of which, according to Uni- 
ted States trade figures, ranges from about 28 
to 42 percent. Under the trade agreement the 
rate to the United States is reduced by 50 per- 
cent, or to 0.15 sol per gross kilogram. The 
principal canned fruits exported to Peru from 
the United States are peaches, pineapples, pears, 
and salad fruits. Total Peruvian imports of 
canned fruits in 1940 amounted to $53,000. Of 
this amount, imports from the United States 
accounted for $21,000 and imports from Chile, 
which benefit from duty-free entry, for $29,000. 

Other duty reductions 

Rates of duty below those now effective in 
Peru are also provided by the agreement for 
the following, among other, important products 
imported from the United States : Douglas fir 
and similar woods; radio and telegraph trans- 
mitters and receivers; tools and utensils not 
specially provided for; dentifrices; electric re- 
frigerators; storage and dry-cell batteries; 
metal furniture; certain types of paints and 
lacquers; radio receiving tubes; safety razors 
and safety-razor blades; chewing gum; sar- 
dines in tomato sauce; and canned salmon. In 
addition, the duty surcharge on certain pharma- 
ceutical specialties when imported in large 
containers is removed. Detailed information 
on these products is included in the statistical 



413 

analysis of concessions granted by Peru printed 
below (Table A). 

Duty bindings 

Products on which existing Peruvian tariff 
rates are bound by the agreement against in- 
crease include the following : Agricultural and 
mining machinery; wheat flour; radio trans- 
mitting tubes; sewing machines; plate glass; 
certain pharmaceutical specialties; and mov- 
ing-picture projectors and exposed films. Trade 
and tariff data on these items are also included 
in Table A. 

II. CONCESSIONS GRANTED ON IMPORTS OF PERUVIAN 
PRODUCTS INTO THE UNITED STATES 

Imports from Peru of products on which con- 
cessions are accorded in the agreement amounted 
to $4,084,000 in 1940 or 26 percent of total Uni- 
ted States imports for consumption from Peru 
in that year. Of this amount, $2,058,000 repre- 
sents reductions in duty, $71,000 bindings of 
duties which had been previously reduced in 
trade agreements with other countries, and 
$1,955,000 bindings on the free list. 
Duty reductions 

The principal commodities on which reduc- 
tions in existing rates of duty are accorded by 
the United States are sugar; long-staple cot- 
ton; hair of the alpaca, llama, and vicuna; bis- 
muth; and coca leaves. In the following dis- 
cussion, paragraph numbers refer to paragraphs 
of the Tariff Act of 1930. 

Sugar (par. 501) 

The agreement establishes a tariff rate on 
Peruvian sugar equivalent to $0.9375 per 100 
pounds of 96° sugar. This rate will apply to 
all imported sugar which is dutiable at the 
maximum rate. Under the Tariff Act of 1930 
the rate to Peru and other full-duty countries 
was $2.50 per 100 pounds ; this rate was reduced 
to $1,875 per 100 pounds under section 336 of 
the Tariff Act in connection with the imposition 
of restrictions on the marketing of sugar in 
the United States pursuant to the provisions of 
the Jones-Costigan Act of 1934. The rate of 
$1,875 per 100 pounds was equivalent to 137 
percent ad valorem on the basis of 1939 imports 
of sugar from full-duty countries. 



414 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Imports of sugar have been subject to quotas 
under the Jones-Costigan Act and the Sugar 
Act of 1937. In accordance with the provisions 
of title II of the latter act, import quotas es- 
tablished on imports of Peruvian sugar 
amounted to 5,557 short tons, raw value, in 1937 ; 
to 5,967 short tons in 1938; to 5,944 short tons 
in 1939 ; and to 5,377 short tons in 1940. How- 
ever, imports of sugar from Peru charged 
against the Peruvian quotas in those years were 
53.682 short tons, 56,256 short tons, 38,599 short 
tons, and 13,250 short tons, respectively. This 
is accounted for chiefly by the fact that there 
were reallocated to Peru certain portions of un- 
filled full-duty quotas pertaining to other for- 
eign countries and to the Philippine Islands. 
Imports of sugar from Peru in the first 9 months 
of 1941 were valued at $1,305,000, as compared 
with total imports of full-duty sugar in that 
period valued at $3,007,000. 

In order to permit the utilization during the 
emergency of supplies of sugar originating in 
areas not provided for or not adequately pro- 
vided for, in the sugar quotas established under 
title II of the Sugar Act of 1937, title II was 
suspended by a proclamation of the President 
issued on April 13, 1942. 

Long-staple cotton {cotton having a staple of 
one and one-eighth inches or more in 
length) (par. 783) 
Under the trade agreement the duty on cot- 
ton having a. staple of iy s inches or more is re- 
duced from 7 to Sy 2 cents per pound. Before 
passage of the Tariff Act of 1930, long-staple 
cotton was duty-free. 

The trade agreement does not affect the total 
quantity (45,656,420 pounds) of long-staple 
cotton iy 8 inches and over but less than l 11 /i6 
inches permitted to be entered into the United 
States per quota year beginning September 20, 1 



1 Pursuant to section 22 of the Agricultural Adjust- 
ment Act of 1933, as amended, the President on Sep- 
tember 5. 1939 issued a proclamation (effective Sep- 
tember 20, 1939), imposing absolute import quotas on 
long-staple and certain other types of cotton. The 
quota on long-staple cotton was imposed by the Presi- 
dent pursuant to a finding by the United States Tar- 
iff Commission that such cotton was being imported 



and the right is reserved, in article X of the 
agreement to maintain or impose quotas in con- 
nection with governmental measures designed 
to control production, market supply, or prices 
of like domestic articles. However, in connec- 
tion with this item, the Peruvian negotiators 
requested that an investigation be undertaken 
immediately, under section 22 of the Agricul- 
tural Adjustment Act, with a view to deter- 
mining whether it would be possible at this time 
to consolidate all the present country quotas on 
cotton having a staple length of 1% inches or 
more but less than l n / 16 inches into a single, 
global quota, and it was agreed to request the 
Tariff Commission to make such an investi- 
gation. 

Long-staple Peruvian cotton is characterized 
by its uniformity, roughness, and tensile 
strength, which make it suitable for a number 
of specialized uses, particularly for manufac- 
ture of underwear, part-wool textiles, asbestos, 
and cotton duck and other strong fabrics, all in 
demand in the war effort. 

Long-staple cotton, principal export crop of 
Peru, accounted in 1940 for 58 percent of the 
value of Peru's total agricultural exports. 
Production in most recent years has ranged 
from about 360,000 to 380,000 bales (of 500 
pounds), of which approximately 10 percent 
lias been consumed by the local textile industry. 

Only a small percentage of United States 
cotton production is long-staple. Production 
during the period 1937-39 averaged approxi- 
mately 840,000 bales (of 500 pounds), only 
about 6 percent of total annual average United 
States production of all staple lengths during 
that period (14,235,000 bales). 

Hair of the alpaca, llama, and vicuna (par. 
1102 (I)) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1930 the duty on 
hair of the alpaca, llama, and vicuna was as 



under such conditions and in sufficient quantities as to 
tend to render ineffective the export-subsidy aspect of 
the program undertaken under the Soil Conservation 
and Domestic Allotment Act with reference to cotton. 
Subsequently, on December 19, 1940, the President sus- 
pended the quota limitations as applied to cotton with 
a staple length of l 1 %e inches and over. 



MAY 9, 1942 



415 



follows : In the grease or washed, 34 cents per 
pound ; scoured, 37 cents per pound ; on the skin, 
32 cents per pound ; sorted or matchings, if not 
scoured, 35 cents per pound. Under the trade 
agreement with Peru the duties on these classes 
are reduced respectively to 18 cents, 21 cents, 16 
cents, and 19 cents per pound. 

Alpaca, llama, and vicuna hair is produced 
chiefly in Peru. No hair of these types is 
grown in the United States. Such hair is used 
in the manufacture of luxury outer wear or is 
blended with wool in making less expensive 
specialty weaves of types which cannot be ob- 
tained from wool alone. United States con- 
sumption of this hair constitutes a very small 
part of the total consumption of apparel wool 
and hair. In 1939 the apparent consumption of 
hair represented less than 1 percent of that of 
apparel wool. 

Coca leaves (par. 36) 

The duty on coca leaves under the Tariff Act 
of 1930 was 10 cents per pound. Under the 
trade agreement with Peru, the duty is reduced 
to 5 cents per pound. The ad valorem equiva- 
lent of the 10-cent rate was 54 percent in 1939. 

Coca leaves are obtained from a tropical 
shrub native to Peru, which is not grown in 
the United States. The leaves are used as a 
raw material for medicinal alkaloid cocaine. 
In addition to their cocaine content, the leaves 
contain certain other constituents which are 
utilized in the preparation of soft drinks. 

Peru is the principal source of United States 
imports of coca leaves. Total United States 
imports of coca leaves in 1940 amounted to 
830,000 pounds, valued at $156,000; imports 
from Peru in that year totaled 658,000 pounds, 
valued at $116,000. 

Bismuth (par. 377) 

Under the Tariff Act of 1930 bismuth was 
dutiable at 7% percent ad valorem. In the 
agreement with Peru this duty is reduced to B% 
percent ad valorem. 

Peru is one of the world's largest producers 
of bismuth and is almost the sole supplier of 
imports entered into the United States under 
this tariff paragraph. Bismuth is produced in 
the United States as a byproduct of the lead- 



refining industry. Beginning in 1930 there 
have been large imports of bismuth contained 
in lead bullion. United States production, 
therefore, comes from the processing of both 
domestic and imported lead ore and bullion. 
Total United States imports of bismuth under 
par. 377 in 1940 amounted to 124,000 pounds 
valued at $118,000; all imports in that year 
came from Peru. 

In addition to the products described in the 
foregoing paragraphs, the agreement provides 
for reductions in duty, or in the import tax, 
which were not previously granted in other 
agreements, on the following articles: certain 
insecticide materials advanced in value or con- 
dition, including pyrethrum or insect flowers, 
and derris and barbasco root (par. 35) ; certain 
cabinet woods not further manufactured than 
sawed and flooring of such woods (par. 404) ; 
certain cabinet-wood lumber, rough, or planed 
or dressed on one or more sides (Internal Reve- 
nue Code, section 3424) ; candied, preserved, or 
ground ginger root (pars. 778 and 781) ; and 
certain types of hemp (par. 1001). Tariff and 
trade data relating to these products are in- 
cluded in the statistical analysis of concessions 
granted to Peru (Table B). 

Bindings of rates of duty reduced in previous 
trade agreements 

Various rates of duty or import tax which 
were reduced by the maximum percentage per- 
missible under the Trade Agreements Act in 
trade agreements with other countries are bound 
against increase in the trade agreement with 
Peru. The products to which such rates apply 
are ground barbasco or cube root (par. 35) ; 
certain types of flax (par. 1001) ; and balsa lum- 
ber, rough, or planed or dressed on one or more 
sides (Internal Revenue Code, section 3424). 

Trade and tariff data relating to the fore- 
going products will be found in the statistical 
analysis of concessions granted to Peru 
(Table B). 

Free list 

The agreement binds on the free list imports 
of certain commodities that are not produced at 
all in the United States or are not produced in 
quantities sufficient to supply domestic demand. 



416 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The following products are bound on the free 
list in the agreement with Peru and have not 
been bound on the free list in other agreements: 
Crude pyrethrum or insect flowers (par. 1602) ; 
cochineal (par. 1609) ; tara (par. 1670) ; guano 
(par. 1685) ; leche caspi (par. 1686) ; vanadium 
ore (par. 1719) ; and oiticica oil (par. 1732). 

The following articles, bound on the free list 
in the agreement with Peru, have also been 
bound on the free list in other agreements: 
Cinchona and other barks from which quinine 
may be extracted (par. 1619) ; coffee, except 
coffee imported into Puerto Rico (par. 1654) ; 
undressed otter skins (par. 1681) ; crude india 
rubber (par. 1697) ; crude gutta balata (par. 
1697) ; crude or unmanufactured barbasco or 
cube root (par. 1722) ; quinine sulphate and 
cinchona-bark derivatives (par. 1748) ; raw 
reptile skins (par. 1765) ; raw goat and kid skins 
(par. 1765) ; unground ginger root, not pre- 
served or candied (par. 1768(1)); tagua nuts 
(par. 1778) ; tamarinds (par. 1779) ; sawed 
balsa lumber and timber, not further manufac- 
tured than planed, and tongued and grooved 
(par. 1803(1)); and balsa, Spanish cedar, 
granadilla, mahogany, rosewood, and satin- 
wood, in the log (par. 1803(2)). 

Trade and tariff data relating to products 
bound on the free list are found in the statis- 
tical analysis of concessions granted to Peru 
(Table B). 

III. GENERAL PROVISIONS AND EXCHANGE OF NOTES 

The general provisions of the agreement 
embody the basic principle of equality of treat- 
ment essential to the development of interna- 
tional trade upon a sound and nondiscrimina- 
tory basis. They define the nature of the 
obligations assumed by each country in making 
tariff concessions to the other, set forth recipro- 
cal assurances of nondiscriminatory treatment 
with respect to all forms of trade control, and 
contain provisions relating to various other 
matters affecting the trade between the two 
countries. 

Provisions relating to treatment of trade in 
general 
Article I provides that the United States 
and Peru shall in general accord to each other 



unconditional most-favored-nation treatment 
with respect to customs duties and related 
matters, including methods of levying duties 
and charges and the application of rules and 
formalities. This means that each country ob- 
ligates itself to extend to the other, immediately 
and without compensation, the lowest rates of 
customs duties which are granted to any other 
country, either by autonomous action or in 
connection with a commercial agreement with 
a third country. 

Article II of the agreement relates to the im- 
position of internal taxes or charges levied in 
either country on products imported from the 
other and provides that such taxes or charges 
shall not be higher than those imposed on like 
articles of domestic or other foreign origin. 

Article III applies the principle of nondis- 
criminatory treatment to import quotas, pro- 
hibitions, and other forms of restriction on im- 
ports. Any such restriction is to be based upon 
a predetermined amount of imports of the 
article, i.e., a global quota. If either country 
establishes such restrictions and if any third 
country is allotted a share of the total amount 
of permitted importations of any article, the 
other country shall also be allotted a share 
which shall be based upon the proportion of the 
total imports of such article which that country 
supplied in a previous representative period. 

Article IV extends the principle of nondis- 
criminatory treatment to any form of exchange 
control by either country over the transfer of 
payments for imports originating in the other 
country. Accordingly, provision is made that 
the Government of either country shall accord 
to any product originating in the other country, 
in regard to restrictions or delays on payments, 
exchange rates, and taxes or charges on ex- 
change transactions, treatment no less favorable 
than that accorded the like product originating 
in any third country. 

Article V extends the principle of nondis- 
criminatory treatment to foreign purchases by 
the Government of either country or by govern- 
ment monopolies. 

Article VI provides for the prompt publica- 
tion of laws, regulations, and administrative 
and judicial decisions relating to the classi- 



MAY 9, 1942 



417 



fication of articles for customs purposes or 
to rates of duty. With certain customary ex- 
ceptions relating to anti-dumping duties, health 
or public-safety measures, etc., the article also 
provides that no administrative ruling by 
either country effecting advances in rates of 
duties or in charges applicable under an estab- 
lished and uniform practice to imports origi- 
nating in the other country, or imposing any 
new requirement with respect to such importa- 
tions shall, as a general rule, be effective retro- 
actively or with respect to articles imported 
prior to 30 days from the publication of notice 
of such ruling in the usual official manner. 

Provisions relating to concessions 

Articles VII and VIII of the agreement 
relate to the tariff concessions granted by each 
country on products of the other and provide 
that products included in the schedules annexed 
to the agreement shall, upon importation into 
the other country, be exempt from ordinary cus- 
toms duties higher than those specified in the 
schedules and from all other charges in con- 
nection with importation in excess of those im- 
posed on the day of signature of the agreement 
or required to be imposed thereafter by laws 
in force on that day. 

Article IX permits either country, notwith- 
standing the provisions of articles VII and 
VIII, to impose on any product imported from 
the other country an import charge equivalent 
to an internal tax imposed on a similar domestic 
product or on any article from which the im- 
ported product has been made. 

Article X contains a general undertaking 
that no quantitative restrictions shall be im- 
posed by either country on importations from 
the other country of any of the products listed 
in the schedules annexed to the agreement, with 
a reservation that this provision does not apply 
to quantitative restrictions imposed by either 
country in conjunction with governmental 
measures which operate to regulate or control 
the production, market supply, or prices of like 
domestic articles, or which tend to increase the 
labor costs of production of such articles, or 
which are necessary to maintain the exchange 
value of the currency of the country. Para- 
graph 3 of article X excepts from the general 



undertaking not to impose quantitative restric- 
tions on articles listed in the schedules, measures 
imposed by the United States on imports of 
coffee from Peru pursuant to the provisions of 
the Inter-American Coffee Agreement or of any 
other international agreement. 

Article XI contains a provision for broad 
consultation between the Governments of the 
two countries in regard to all matters affecting 
the operation of the agreement through the 
medium of a mixed commission to be established 
under the terms of paragraph 2 of the article. 
Paragraph 1 of the article provides that if the 
Government of either country considers that 
an industry or the commerce of that country is 
prejudiced, or any object of the agreement is 
nullified or impaired as a result of any circum- 
stance or of any measure taken by the other 
Government, the latter Government shall con- 
sider such representations or proposals as may 
be made by the former Government; and if 
agreement is not reached, the Government mak- 
ing the representations or proposals shall be 
free to suspend or terminate the agreement in 
whole or in part on 30 days' written notice. 

Provisions as to application of the agreement 
Article XII provides that the agreement 
shall apply, on the part of both countries, to 
the territories and possessions included in their 
customs territories, the most important of 
which in the case of the United States are 
Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The most- 
favored-nation provisions of the agreement 
will, however, apply also to those possessions 
of the United States which have separate tar- 
iffs, including the Philippines, the Virgin 
Islands of the United States, American Samoa, 
and the island of Guam. 

Article XIII excepts from the application of 
the agreement special advantages granted by 
the Government of either country to adjacent 
countries to facilitate frontier traffic, and ad- 
vantages accorded to any third country as a 
result of a customs union. There is also in- 
cluded the usual exception relating to special 
advantages accorded by the United States and 
its territories and possessions or the Panama 
Canal Zone to one another or to the Republic of 
Cuba. 



418 

Furthermore, in an exchange of notes ac- 
companying the agreement, the Government of 
the United States agrees not to invoke the pro- 
visions of article I of the agreement in respect 
of any tariff preferences which Peru may ac- 
cord to a contiguous country, provided such 
tariff preferences conform to the formula rec- 
ommended by the Inter-American Financial 
and Economic Advisory Committee on Septem- 
ber 18, 1941, pursuant to resolution LXXX of 
the Seventh International Conference of Amer- 
ican States at Montevideo, approved Decem- 
ber 24, 1933. This formula stipulates : ( 1) That 
any such tariff preferences shall be made effec- 
tive through trade agreements embodying tariff 
reductions or exemptions; (2) that the parties 
to such agreements should reserve the right to 
reduce or eliminate the customs duties on like 
products imported from other countries; and 
(3) that any such tariff arrangements should 
not be an obstacle to any broad program of eco- 
nomic reconstruction involving the reduction 
of tariffs and the scaling down or elimination 
of tariff and other trade preferences with a view 
to the fullest possible development of interna- 
tional trade on a multilateral unconditional 
most-favored-nation basis. 

Article XIV provides that nothing in the 
agreement shall prevent the adoption or 
enforcement by either country of measures 
relating to imports or exports of gold, sanitary 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

regulations and the like, or measures relating 
to public security, or imposed for the protection 
of the country's essential interests in time of 
war or other national emergency. 

Article XV provides for sympathetic consid- 
eration of representations in regard to customs 
regulations and related matters and the appli- 
cation of sanitary regulations. If there should 
be disagreement between the two Governments 
with respect to sanitary laws or regulations, a 
committee of experts including representatives 
of both Governments may be established upon 
request of either Government. This committee 
would then study the matter and submit recom- 
mendations with respect thereto. 

Article XVI provides that the agreement will 
come definitively into force 30 days after its 
proclamation by the President of the United 
States and the President of Peru, or, in the 
event the proclamations do not take place on the 
same day, 30 days after the proclamation which 
is later in time. Article XVI also provides that 
the agreement shall remain in force for a period 
of 1 wo years from its effective date unless termi- 
nated earlier pursuant to the provisions of 
article XI. If neither Government has given 
the other, prior to the expiration of the two- 
year period, notice of intention to terminate the 
agreement, it will continue in force thereafter, 
subject to termination on six months' notice. 



TABLE A 

Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Obtained From Peru (Schedule I) 

(n.a.=statistics not available) 



Peruvian 
tariff 
item 

number 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Dutiable 


Ordinary rates of duty 
in soles 


unit 


Pre-agree- 

ment 


Under agree- 
ment 




43.20 
0.60 


36.00. 

0.60 


Gross kilo... 




0.48 
0.216 


2.00 per 100. 
0.216 


Gross kilo... 


Sq. metor... 


0.06 


0.05 


Each 


Free 


Frco 


Gross kllo... 


0.18 


0.13 


Grosskilo... 


0.84 


0.70 


Gross kilo... 


0.144 


0.12 


Gross kilo... 


1.20 


0.90 


Gross kilo... 


0.96 


0.80 


Gross kilo... 


1.44 


1.20 


Gross kilo... 


0.75 


0.144 



Peruvian 

imports 

from U. S. 

in 1940 
(1,000 soles) 



Hats for men and boys 

Metal furniture 

Safety-razor blades 

Plate glass. - 

Ordinary woods, including Douglas flr, pine, etc. 

Wooden railway ties 

Plywood -.. 



1022. 
1023. 
1077. 



Enamel paint* _ _ _ 

Oil paints. , 

Pigmented lacquer 

Typewriters and parts 

Calculating machines and parts 

Paraffined cardboard containers for packing butter and assimilated products. 



See footnotes at end of table. 



MAY 9, 1942 



419 



TABLE A— Continued 
Itemized List of Taeiff Concessions Obtained From Peru (Schedule I) — Continued 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Peruvian 

Imports 
from U. S. 

in 1940 
(1,000 soles) 



Tools and utensils, including abrasive paper and cloth — 

Automobile trucks, chassis, and trailers 

Passenger automobiles weighing up to 1,350 gross kilos ' 

Passenger automobiles, weighing over 1,350 but not over 1,400 gross kilos J 

Passenger automobiles, weighing over 1,400 but not over 1,450 gross kilos « _ 

Passenger automobiles, weighing over 1,450 but not over 1,500 gross kilos' 

Passenger automobiles, weighing more than 1,700 but not more than 1,750 gross kilos 2 . . 

Machinery directly employed in agriculture, stockraising, and mining. 

Machinery for industries derived directly from agriculture and mining, and marine 
machinery. 

Sewing machines and parts 

Parts for motor vehicles, not specified -- — 

Cylinders for dictating machines _. 

Dictating machines and parts - 

Storage batteries and plates, and dry-cell batteries 

Radio and telegraph transmitting and receiving apparatus... 

Electric refrigerators and parts 

Bulbs for flashlights and miners' lamps 

Radio tubes: 

For receiving 

For transmitting... 

Moving-picture projectors and parts _ 

Moving-picture films, exposed 

(The Republic of Peru agrees to permit temporary entry of films under bond for 
preliminary showing and censorship and no duties will be collected If films are 
reexported within 20 days without public showing.) 

Oats prepared as a foodstuff in containers with net contents not in excess of 2 kilos 

Canned asparagus, soups, baked beans and corn 

Chewing gum. 

Fresh apples, when imported from September 1 to the last day of the following Febru- 
ary, inclusive. 

Fresh pears, when imported from July 1 to December 31, inclusive.. 

Fresh plums, when imported from May 1 to October 31, inclusive.. 

Walnuts 

Dried fruits, in boxes 

Dried fruits in other containers, including shelled nuts... _ 

Dried fruits, stoned or cut _ 

Canned fruits.. 

Wheat flour 

Flour of oats, rye, corn, rice, and farina, when imported in containers with net contents 
not in excess of 2 kilos. 

Canned salmon 

Sardines prepared in tomato sauce 

Pharmaceutical specialties in oils, emulsion, or in suspension 

Pharmaceutical specialties in tablets, pills, capsules, perles. and granules 

(The Republic of Peru agrees that it will not subject articles classified under items 
1842 and 1846 to duty surcharges because of the size of the container. At present 
there is a surcharge of 50% for articles under item 1842 when imported in con- 
tainers of over 500 c. c. and for articles under item 1846 when imported in 
containers of over 100 units.) 

Safety razors. 

Dentifrices- 



Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo.. 



Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 

Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Doz 

Doz 

Doz 

Gross kilo. 
Legal kilo. 



Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo.. 
Gross kilo. 

Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 

Gross kilo. 
Gross kilo. 
Legal kilo. 
Legal kilo. 



Legal kilo. 
Gross kilo. 



0.18... 
0.024.. 
0.216.. 

0.24... 

0.276.. 

0.312. . 

0.676.. 

0.012. . 
0.018... 

0.018. . 
0.24.... 
0.84... 
2.40... 
0.30... 
2.16... 
0.456.. 
1.80.... 

21.60— 
21.60... 
4.80.-. 
14.40.. 



0.06.... 
0.24.... 
2.16.... 
0.02.... 

0. 02. . . . 
0.02... 
0.072... 
0.30.... 
0.64— - 
0.36— 
0.30— 
0.05.... 
0.072... 

0.18-.-. 
0.24— . 
0.60— - 
9.60— 



0.15 

0.02 

0.210 (legal 

kilo). 
0.24 (legal 

kilo). 
0.276 (legal 

kilo). 
0.312 (legal 

kilo). 
0.676 (legal 

kilo). 

0.012 

0.018 

0.018 

0.20 

0.50 

1.20. 

0.26 

1.80 

0.40 

0.90. 

11.00 

21.60 

4.80 

14.40 



0.04. 
0.12. 
1.20. 

Free. 

Free. 
Free. 
0.036 
0.15. 
0.27. 
0.18. 
0.16. 
0.05. 
0.04. 

0.12. 
0.16. 
0.60. 



2.50 
1.10. 



1 Includes pyroxylin paints and solvents for diluting it. 8 Under the agreement "gross kilos" is changed to read "loga kilos". 3 Juno I- 
December 31, inclusive. ' Covers all canned legumes and vegetables. » Estimated. • Covers all fresh frnlta. 



420 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE B 

Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Made to Peru (Schedule II) 

Except as otherwise noted import data do not include imports free of duty under special provisions of the Tariff Act of 1930, or imports from Cuba 
subject to preferential reductions in duty; n.a. = statistics not available. 



Description of article (abbreviated) 



Before agreement 



After agreement 



Ad valorem equiv- 
alent on basis of 
imports in 1939 



Before 

agree- 
ment 
(percent) 



After 
agree- 
ment 
[percent) 



U. S. imports for consumption 
(in 1,000 dollars) 



A. Reductions in Duty 

Pyrethrum or insect flowers, and derris, 
tube or tuba root, advanced in value 
or condition, not containing alcohol. 

Barbasco or cube root, advanced in value 
or condition, other than ground, not 
containing alcohol. 

Coca leaves 

Bismuth... 

Spanish cedar, granadilla, mahogany, rose- 
wood, and satinwood: In the form of 
sawed boards, planks, deals, and all 
other forms not further manufactured 
than sawed, and flooring. 

Sugars, taDk bottoms, sirups of cane juice, 
melada, concentrated melada, concrete 
and concentrated molasses . . . and 
all mixtures containing sugar and 
water . . . 

Ginger root, candied or otherwise prepared 
or preserved. 

Spices and spice seeds: 
Ginger root, not preserved or candied, 
ground. 

Cotton having a staple length of \H inches 
or more in length. 

Hemp and hemp tow 

Hackled hemp 

Hair of the alpaca, llama, and vicuna: 

In the grease or washed 

Scoured 

On the skin 

Sorted or matchings, if not scoured- 



B. Bindings of Present Duty 

Barbasco or cube root, ground, not con- 
taining alcohol. 

Flax straw _ __ 

Flax, not hackled... ._ 

Flax, hackled, including "dressed line" 

Flax tow and flax noils 



C. Bindings on Free List 



Pyrethrum or insect flowers, crude, not 
containing alcohol. 

Cochineal, and extracts thereof, not con- 
taining alcohol. 

Barks, cinchona or other, from which 
quinine may be extracted. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



10% ad val 

10% ad val 

10* per lb 

7\i% ad val 

15% ad val. (See 
below, I.R.C., 
section 3424). 



$1,875 per 100 



20% ad val- .. 
5* per lb 

7* per lb 

2* per lb 

3ht per lb.... 

34* per lb 

37* per lb 

32* per lb 

35* per lb 

T » 5% ad val.. 

■$1.50 per ton 

10 Hi per lb... 
>' lh* per lb. 

11 H* per lb... 

Free.. 

Free 

Free.. 



5% ad val 

5% ad val 

5* per lb 

3?4%adval 

7H% ad val. 
(See below, 
I. B.C., section 
3424). 

$0.9375 per 100 
lbs. of 96° 
sugar. 

10% ad val 

2).v*perlb 



1* per lb ... 
IHt per lb. 



18* per lb . 
21* per lb.. 
16* per lb. 
19* per lb. 



5% ad val. 



$1.50 per ton. 

Ht per lb 

Hit per lb... 

H>* per lb 



Bound free. 
Bound free.. 



> (Less 
than 
500). 



(Less 
than 
500). 



MAY 9, 1942 



421 



TABLE B— Continued 
Itemize) List of Tariff Concessions Made to Peeu (Schedule II) — Continued 



Para- 


Description of article (abbreviated) 


Rate of duty 


Ad valorem equiv- 
alent on basis of 
imports in 1939 


U. S. imports for consumption 
(in 1,000 dollars) 


nun] bcr 

in Tariff 

Act of 

1930 


Before agreement 


After agreement 


Before 
agree- 
ment 
(percent) 


After 

agree- 
ment 
(percent) 


From Peru 


From all coun- 
tries 




1939 


1940' 


1939 


1940' 




C. Bindings on Free List— Continued 

Coffee, except coffee imported into Puerto 
Rico and upon which a duty is im- 
posed under the authority of section 319. 










32 

»3 

6 

205 

"36 

4 

16 
992 
13S 


78 

"20 
5 


139, 546 

i>4 

149 

212 

'» 198 

179, 658 

265 
992 
168 

1,708 
1,392 

274 

15, 396 

23 

190 

5 

190 

'• 1, 890 


126, 771 




















































'•78 
45 

34 

1,217 

186 






India rubber, crude, including Jelutong or 
pontianak. 








































Barbasco or cube root, crude or unmanu- 
factured, not specially provided for. 

Oiticica oil, expressed or extracted 

Quinine sulphate and all alkaloids and salts 
of alkaloids derived from cinchona 
bark. 






















2,218 












































336 


273 


15, 887 


1768(1)... 


Ginger root, not preserved or candied, if 
unground. 








































9 


1803(1)... 


Sawed balsa lumber and timber, not fur- 
ther manufactured than planed, and 
tongued and grooved, not specially 
provided for. 

Balsa, Spanish cedar, granadilla, ma- 
hogany, rosewood, and satinwood, in 
the log. 


Free (See below, 
I.R.C., sec- 
tion 3424). 


Bound free (See 
below, I.R.C., 
section 3424). 










211 






'•18 


'•13 


'• 2, 111 















' Preliminary. 

' Not including derris, tube or tuba root. 

3 No imports of derris or tuba root. 

' Includes derris or tuba root and ground barbasco or cube-'root. 

• Includes ground barbasco or cube root. 

• Includes imports of lignum-vitae, lancewood, ebony, and boxwood. 

7 Covers hair of the Cashmere goat, alpaca, Angora rabbit, and other like animals. 

»• The duty on ground barbasco or cube root was reduced from 10 percent ad valorem to 6 percent ad valorem in the agreement with Venezuela, 
effective December 16, 1939. 

8 Included above under par. 35, "Barbasco or cube root, advanced In value or condition, other than ground, not containing alcohol." 

9 The duty on flax straw was reduced from $3 per ton to $1.50 per ton in the agreement with Canada, effective January 1, 1939. 

» The duty on flax, not hackled, was reduced from Hi cents per pound to fi cent per pound in the agreement with the United Kingdom, effective 
January 1, 1939. 

" The duty on flax, hackled, was reduced from 3 cents per pound to 1M cents per pound in the agreement with the United Kingdom. 

11 The duty on flax tow and flax noils was reduced from one cent per pound to H cent per pound in the agreement with the United Kingdom. 

'• "Crude articles, n.s.p.f., for tanning", including tara. 

» "Crude articles, n.s.p.f., for dyeing, coloring, staining, or tanning", including tara. 

18 "Gums and resins, n.s.p.f.", including leche caspi. 

>• Not including granadilla. 



422 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



TABLE B — Continued 
Itemized List of Tariff Concessions Made to Pebu (Schedule II) — Continued 



Section 

number ol 

Internal 

Revenue 

Code 


Description of article (abbreviated) 


Rate of tax 


Ad valorem equiv- 
alent on basis of 
imports in 1939 


U. S. imports for consumption 
(in 1,000 dollars) 




Before 

'agree- 

Jment 

(percent) 


lAfter 
agree- 
ment 
(percent) 


From Peru 


From all coun- 
tries 








1939 


1940 > 


1939 


1940 > 




Balsa lumber, rough or planed or dressed 
on one or more sides. 

Spanish cedar, granadilla, mahogany, rose- 
wood, and satinwood lumber, rough, 
or planed or dressed on one or more 
sides. 


"$1.50 per 1,000 

bd. ft. 
$3.00 per 1,000 
bd. ft. 


$1.50 per 1,000 

bd. ft. 
$1.50 per 1,000 

bd. ft. 











































» The import tax of $3 per 1,000 board feet was reduced to $1.50 per 1,000 board feet in the agreement with Ecuador, effective October 23, 1938. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

United States 

The instrument of ratification by the United 
States of the Protocol on Uniformity of Powers 
of Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad, 
which was opened for signature by the states 
members of the Pan American Union on Febru- 
ary 17, 1940, was deposited with the Union on 
April 16, 1942. 

The protocol is now in effect between the fol- 
lowing states: the United States of America, 
Brazil, El Salvador, and Venezuela. 

Article I of the protocol sets forth rules to 
which powers of attorney must conform by 
providing that the attesting official shall certify 
to the identity and legal capacity of the person 
executing the instrument; to the authority of a 
representative executing a power of attorney 
in the name of a third person and that such 
representation is legal according to documents 



exhibited; and in addition, in the case of a 
power of attorney executed in the name of a 
juridical person, to the due organization, home 
office, and legal existence of the juridical person 
and that the purposes for which the instrument 
is granted are within the scope of its objects 
or activities. 

In addition to laying down the rules to which 
powers of attorney must conform the principal 
purposes of the protocol are to place the burden 
of proof on the party challenging the power of 
attorney (article II) ; to recognize the validity 
of general powers of attorney to consummate 
administrative acts (article TV) ; to provide 
that powers of attorney executed in one country 
in conformity with the protocol, and legalized 
in accordance with the special rules governing 
legalization, shall be given full faith and credit 
in the other countries (article V) ; and to permit 
representation of any person, who may inter- 
vene or become a party to a suit, by a volunteer 
pending due substantiation of the volunteer's 
authority (article VIII). 



MAY 9, 1942 



423 



POSTAL 

Universal Postal Convention and Parcel Post 
Agreement, 1939 

Venezuela 

There is quoted below, in translation, a note 
received from the Swiss Minister at Washing- 
ton regarding the change in the status of Vene- 
zuela under article IV, table 2, Transit Charges 
of the Parcel Post Agreement signed at Buenos 
Aires May 23, 1939 : 

"Febbuaby 24, 1942. 
"Mb. Secretary of State : 

"By order of my Government, I have the 
honor to advise you that, on the proposal of 
the Postal Administration of the United States 
of Venezuela and with the unanimous consent 
of the Administrations which adhered to the 
Agreement of Buenos Aires relative to parcel 
post, the final protocol of the said agreement, 
Article IV, Table 2, Transit Surcharges, No. 13 
Venezuela (United States), may receive the 
following additions: 

"Column 6 : 100 

"Column 7 : 150 

"Column 8: 200 

"The present declaration is made in applica- 
tion of Article 23, Paragraph 1, of the Univer- 
sal Postal Convention. 

"In requesting you to be good enough to take 
cognizance of the foregoing, I avail myself 
[etc.] 

Bruggmann" 

COMMERCE 

Trade Agreement with Peru 

On May 7, 1942 a trade agreement between 
the United States and Peru was signed at Wash- 
ington by the Secretary, of State and the Peru- 
vian Minister of Finance and Commerce. It 



will shortly be printed in the Executive Agree- 
ment Series. 

An analysis of the general provisions and 
reciprocal benefits of the agreement appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "Commercial 
Policy." 

Trade Agreement with Haiti 

An exchange of notes between the American 
Minister to Haiti and the Foreign Minister of 
Haiti regarding certain provisions of the trade 
agreement between the two countries signed on 
March 28, 1935 (Executive Agreement Series 
78), appeared in the Bulletin of May 2, 1942, 
page 384. 



Regulations 



Imports of Strategic Materials. May 4, 1942. (War 
Production Board.) [Amendment No. 5 to General 
Imports Order M-63.] 7 Federal Register 3327. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Detail of Military Officer of the United States To Serve 
us Assistant to Adviser of Remount Service of the 
Peruvian Army — Signed March 11, 1942; effective 
February 14, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 240. 
Publication 1730. 10 pp. 5tf. 

Other Government Agencies 

Annual Report of the American Historical Associa- 
tion, 1939. (H. Doc. 962, 76th Cong.) xxvi, 115 pp. 
55tf (cloth). 

Latin American Songs. Recordings of Latin American 
Songs and Dances : Annotated Selected List of 
Popular and Folk Music. By Gustavo Duran. 
[Music Series 3.] (Pan American Union.) 67 pp., 
illus. 304 (paper). 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WKEKI.Y WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR nF THE RI7READ OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



MAY 16, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 151— Publication 1742 



6 



ontents 




The War Page 
Commemoration of second anniversary of invasion of 
the Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg: 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle 427 

Chronology, December 1941 to April 1942 428 

Proclaimed List: Revision II 433 

Advisory Mission to India 433 

Lend-lease operations . . . . 434 

General 

Address by Assistant Secretary Berle before the Council 

on Books in Wartime 434 

Travel of seamen 437 

American Republics 

Paraguay: Anniversary of independence 437 

Europe 

Embassy rank for representation between the United 

States and Norway 438 

The Near East 

Opening of direct radio-photo service between the 
United States and Egypt: Statement by the 
President 439 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Mexican editor 439 

Visit to the United States of Colombian historian. . . 439 

The Foreign Service 

Death of Vice Consid and Mrs. John M. Slaughter in 

Guayaquil earthquake 440 

Personnel changes 440 

[over] 



U. S. SUPFRINTFNDFNT OF DOCUMENT* 

JUN 2 1942 







OJltGTL tS— CONTINUED 



Page 

Legislation 440 

Treaty Information 

Publications: Agreement with Bolivia 441 

Sovereignty: Act of Habana Concerning the Provi- 
sional Administration of European Colonies and 

Possessions in the Americas 441 

Visa fees: Agreement with Argentina 441 

Publications ; 442 



The War 



COMMEMORATION OF SECOND ANNIVERSARY OF INVASION OF THE 
NETHERLANDS, BELGIUM, AND LUXEMBOURG 

ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE ! 



[Released to the press May 10] 

On May 10, 1940, two years ago, the criminal 
masters of Germany directed the German armies 
to invade Holland, Belgium, and Luxembourg. 
They did not quibble about war guilt. They 
boasted of their war guilt. They announced 
that these countries would not emerge from Ger- 
man chains for a thousand years. 

These two years have proved beyond possible 
question that all the Nazi spies, Gestapo, S.S., 
and Black Hundreds have been, and will con- 
tinue to be, powerless to break the spirit of these 
loyal countries. 

As the third year of occupation begins, the 
German tide is already beginning to ebb. 

The weapons for German defeat have been 
forged : the anger of all civilization ; the gird- 
ing of Britain; the resistance of Russia; the 
mighty, developing power of the United States; 
the knitting together of the United Nations. 
There is no longer a doubt that the Netherlands, 
Belgium, and Luxembourg will be liberated. 
Their freedom is only a matter of time. 

These two years have seen the destruction of 
Nazi hopes. 

Their political plans for Europe are every- 
where breaking up as the invaded countries re- 
fuse to accept slavery. 

Their economic plans have resulted in a ris- 
ing tide of starvation and want. 

Only the military lines remain, and these are 
merely a facade concealing a crumbling founda- 
tion within. The masters of Germany, and 



1 Broadcast from New York, N.Y., on May 10, 1942. 



their servants, even today are anxiously ex- 
amining the facts and the figures which foretell 
ultimate and inescapable disaster. 

It is, therefore, time to begin to think about 
that justice which must be done when the war 
ends. For it is plain that justice must be done. 

The Atlantic Charter made it plain that none 
desires to enslave, annihilate, or destroy the 
German people. Yet, clearly, it will be impos- 
sible to protect Germans who are in countries 
which they have savagely and brutally op- 
pressed. The Germans who now sit in Holland, 
in Belgium, and in Luxembourg are merely 
awaiting their own destruction. Safety for 
them must lie in flight back to their own coun- 
try. In the coming day of victory it may not 
be easy for them to go back. 

The individual Gestapo agents, Black Troop- 
ers, and others guilty of cruelty, robbery, and 
oppression of civilians and prisoners must be 
held to account. The names of many of these 
men are already known to the United Nations. 
They will learn that none can break the laws 
of civilization with impunity. Account should 
also be taken of those occasional instances in 
which the Germans in occupying countries have 
behaved with honor and respect toward the peo- 
ple in their care. The fate of these men must 
be determined by their own deeds. 

Europe has long known that nations with 
brave hearts, however small they may be, are 
deathless and unconquered. The past two years 
have proved this anew. Again we in the United 
States salute the bravery of the Belgian people. 

427 



428 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



We are today giving pledges to the future by 
establishing for the first time in American his- 
tory an embassy to the Royal Netherlands 
Government. Happily, the Government of 
Luxembourg, established in Canada, is our near 
neighbor. 



That these countries and all free countries 
might live, Belgians, Dutch, and Luxembourg- 
ers have given their lives. By doing so they 
have affirmed a faith which inspires the United 
Nations to ever greater efforts for final and ulti- 
mate triumph. 



CHRONOLOGY, DECEMBER 1941 TO APRIL 1942 ' 



mi 

December 7 

{December 8, Tokyo time) 

Japan attacked United States and British ter- 
ritory beginning at 1:20 p.m. (7:50 a.m., 
Honolulu time) and occupied the Interna- 
tional Settlement at Shanghai. New York 
Times, December 8, 1941, pp. 1, 4 ; Decem- 
ber 9, p. 14 ; Department of State Bulletin, 
December 20, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 534-535. 

Japan rejected United States document dated 
November 26 delivered at 2:20 p.m. at 
Washington. Department of State Bulle- 
tin, December 13, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 466- 
470 ; ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 
534-535. 

The Japanese Emperor declared war on the 
United States and the British Empire. 
New York Times, December 9, 1941, p. 28 ; 
Department of State Bulletin, December 20, 
1941, Vol. V, p. 557. 

Canada declared a state of war with Japan. 
Department of State Bulletin, December 
20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 558. 

Peru offered its assistance to the United 
States in war with Japan. Ibid., Decem- 
ber 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 501. 

Greece announced (on December 10) its sev- 
erance of diplomatic relations with Japan. 
Ibid., p. 509 ; ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, 
p. 344. 

Yugoslavia announced (on January 19, 1942) 
a state of war with Japan. Ibid., February 
7, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 144. 



1941 
December 8 

Japan invaded Thailand, which capitulated. 
New York Times, December 9, 1941, p. 10. 
Great Britain declared war on Japan. New 
York Times, December 9, 1941, p. 1; De- 
partment of State Bulletin, December 20, 

1941, Vol. V, p. 557. 

The United States declared a state of war 
with Japan (4:10 p.m.). Department of 
State Bulletin, December 13, 1941, Vol. V, 
p. 475 ; ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol. V, 
p. 557. 

Australia declared a state of war with Japan. 
Ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 559. 

Brazil announced its solidarity with the 
United States in war with Japan. Ibid., 
December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 488. 

Colombia severed diplomatic relations with 
Japan. Ibid., pp. 489-490; ibid., April 18, 

1942, Vol. VI, p. 340. 

Costa Rica declared war on Japan. Ibid., 

December 13, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 490-^91; 

ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 558. 
The Dominican Republic declared war on 

Japan. Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, 

p. 492. 
Ecuador announced its solidarity with the 

United States in war with Japan. Ibid., 

p. 493. 
El Salvador declared war on Japan. Ibid., 

p. 493. 



1 For chronology covering period March 1938 to De- 
cember 1941, see the Bulletin of December 27, 1941, p. 
590. 



MAY 16, 194 2 



429 



1941 

December 8 — Continued. 

French National Committee, established at 
London, and its Pacific territories declared 
war on Japan. New York Times, Decem- 
ber 9, 1941, p. 18; Department of State 
Bulletin, December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 
559. 

Guatemala declared war on Japan. Depart- 
ment of State Bulletin, December 13, 1941, 
Vol. V, p. 494. 

Haiti declared war on Japan. Ibid., p. 495. 

Honduras declared war on Japan. Ibid., 
p. 496. 

Mexico severed diplomatic relations with 
Japan. Ibid., pp. 497-498; ibid., April 18, 
1942, Vol. VI, p. 346. 

The Netherlands and the Netherlands Indies 
declared war on Japan. New York Times, 
December 8, 1941, p. 7 ; Department of State 
Bulletin, December 20, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 
558-559. 

New Zealand declared a state of war with 
Japan. Department of State Bulletin, De- 
cember 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 559. 

Panama declared war on Japan. Ibid., De- 
cember 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 500. 

Venezuela anounced its solidarity with the 
United States and other American nations 
in war with Japan. Ibid., p. 503. 
December 9 

Argentina announced that it does not con- 
sider the United States "in the position of a 
belligerent country in this conflict" with 
Japan. Ibid., pp. 485^86. 

China declared war on Germany, Italy, and 
Japan. Ibid., pp. 506-507. 

Cuba declared war on Japan. Ibid., pp. 491- 
492. 

Egypt severed diplomatic relations with 
Japan. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 
341. 

Nicaragua announced a state of war with 
Japan (effective December 11). Ibid., 
December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 499. 



1941 
December 9 — Continued. 

The Union of South Africa declared a state 
of war with Japan. Ibid., December 20, 
1941, Vol. V, p. 559. 
Uruguay announced its solidarity with the 
United States and that it does not consider 
the United States as belligerent. Ibid., 
December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 502. 

December 10 

Bolivia announced that it does not consider 
the United States and other American re- 
publics at war in self-defense as belliger- 
ent. Ibid., pp. 487-488. 

Chile announced that it does not consider 
the United States and other American na- 
tions in the "present conflict" as belligerent. 
Ibid., p. 489. 

The Lebanese Republic offered its assistance 
to the United States. Ibid., p. 510. 

Paraguay announced its solidarity with the 
United States in war with Japan. Ibid., 
pp. 500-501. 

December 11 

Germany declared a state of war with the 

United States. Ibid., pp. 481-482. 
Italy declared a state of war with the United 

States. Ibid., p. 482. 
The United States declared a state of war 

with Germany (3: 05 p.m.) and with Italy 

(3:06 p.m.) Ibid., pp. 475-476. 
Costa Rica declared war on Germany and 

Italy. Ibid., p. 491. 
Cuba declared war on Germany and Italy. 

Ibid., p. 492 ; ibid., December 27, 1941, Vol. 

V, p. 583. 
The Dominican Republic declared war on 

Germany and Italy. Ibid., December 20, 

1941, Vol. V, p. 547. 
Guatemala declared war on Germany and 

Italy. Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 

495. 
Mexico severed diplomatic relations with 

Germany and Italy. Ibid., p. 498; ibid., 

April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 346. 



430 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1941 

December 11 — Continued. 

The Netherlands announced (on December 
30) a state of war with Italy. Ibid., Feb- 
ruary 7, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 144. 

Nicaragua declared war on Germany and 
Italy. Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, 
p. 499. 

Poland declared war on Japan. Ibid., p. 507. 
December 12 

El Salvador declared a state of war with 
Germany and Italy. Ibid., February 7, 
1942, Vol. VI, p. 145. 

Haiti declared war on Germany and Italy. 
Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 495; 
ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol.V, p. 548. 

Honduras declared war on Germany and 
Italy. Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, 
p. 496; ibid., December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 
548. 

Panama declared war on Germany and Italy. 
Ibid., December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 500. 

Rumania declared a state of war with the 
United States. Ibid., p. 483. 

Uruguay decreed the prohibition of German 
and Italian commercial activity. Ibid., p. 
503. 

Venezuela announced that it does not consider 
American states at war with non-American 
states as belligerent. Ibid., December 20, 
1941, Vol. V, p. 549. 
December IS 

Argentina announced that it does not con- 
sider the United States as belligerent in 
war with Germany and Italy. Ibid., pp. 
545-546. 

Bulgaria declared a state of war with the 
United States and Great Britain. Ibid., 
December 13, 1941, Vol. V, p. 483. 

Colombia announced its inter-American sol- 
idarity in the war of Germany and Italy 
with the United States. Ibid., December 
20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 546. 

Great Britain announced (on December 27) 
a state of war with Bulgaria. Ibid., Feb- 
ruary 7, 19 12, Vol. VI, p. 144. 

Hungary declared a state of war with the 
United States. Ibid., December 13, 1941, 
Vol. V, p. 482. 



mi 

December 13 — Continued. 

The Union of South Africa announced (on 
December 31) a state of war with Bulgaria. 
Ibid., February 7, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 144. 

December 15 
Costa Rica recalled its Minister from France. 
New York Times, December 16, 1941, p. 9. 
Egypt severed diplomatic relations with 
Hungary and Rumania. Department of 
State Bull, tin. April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 
341. 

December 16 

Czechoslovakia, through President Benes, 
proclaimed a state of war with all coun- 
tries at war with Great Britain, the Soviet 
Union, or the United States. Ibid., De- 
cember 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 543. 

December 17 

Albania's declaration of war on the United 
States reported. New York Times, De- 
cember 18, 1941, p. 6; Department of State 
Bulletin, December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 561. 

December 18 

Great Britain announced the occupation of 
Portuguese Timor by Australian-Dutch 
forces. New York Times, December 19, 
1941, p. 1. 

December 19 

Colombia severed diplomatic relations with 

Germany and Italy. Department of State 

Bulletin, December 20, 1941, Vol. V, p. 547; 

ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 339-340. 
Mexico severed diplomatic relations with 

Hungary. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, 

p. 346. 

December 20 

Belgium announced a state of war with 

Japan. Ibid.. February 7, 1942, Vol. VI, 

p. 143. 
Mexico severed diplomatic relations with Bul- 
garia. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 

345-346. 
Nicaragua announced its declaration of war 

on Bulgaria, Hungary, and Rumania. 

Ibid., December 27, 1941, Vol. V, p. 584; 

ibid., February 7, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 143. 



MAY 16, 1942 



431 



mi 

December 22 

Prime Minister Winston Churchill of Great 
Britain arrived at the White House as 
President Roosevelt's guest. Ibid., De- 
cember 27, 1941, Vol. V, pp. 573-578. 
December 23 

Joint United States - Canadian agreement on 
war production policy announced. Ibid., 
pp. 578-579. 

Mexico announced an absence of diplomatic 
relations with Rumania. Ibid., April 18, 
1942, Vol. VI, p. 347. 
December 2 % 

Haiti declared war on Bulgaria, Hungary, 
and Rumania. Ibid., February 7, 1942, 
Vol. VI, p. 144. 
December 25 

Forces of French National Committee estab- 
lished at London seized St. Pierre and 
Miquelon. New York Times, December 26, 
1941, p. 1; Department of State Bulletin, 
December 27, 1941, Vol. V, p. 580. 
December 31 

Venezuela severed diplomatic relations with 

Germany, Italy, and Japan. Department 

of State Bulletin, January 3, 1942, Vol. VI, 

p. 6; ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 349. 

December {date not given) 

Saudi Arabia asked the Italian Legation 
there to close. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. 
VI, p. 349. 

191,2 
January 1 

Led by President Roosevelt, Prime Minister 
Churchill, Ambassador Maxim Litvinoff, 
and Foreign Minister T. V. Soong, 26 
United Nations signed a Joint Declaration 
at Washington, reaffirming the Atlantic 
Charter of August 14, 1941, and pledging 
their cooperative war effort. Ibid., Jan- 
uary 3, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 3^. 
January 5 

Egypt severed diplomatic relations with Bul- 
garia and Finland. Ibid., April 18, 1942, 
Vol. VI, p. 341. 



1942 
January 6 

Egypt suspended diplomatic relations with 
France. The Times (London), January 7, 
1942, p. 3 ; Department of State Bulletin, 
April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 341. 
January 13 

Nine allied governments-in-exile (Poland, 
Norway, the Netherlands, Belgium, Free 
France, Yugoslavia, Greece, Czechoslo- 
vakia, and Luxembourg) signed a resolu- 
tion on their war aims, at London. New 
York Times, January 14, 1942, p. 6. 
Janicary 21 

Spain closed the Polish Legation there. 
Files of the Department of State. 

January 23 

The Czechoslovak and Polish Governments- 
in-exile at London signed an agreement for 
confederation after the war. New York 
Times, January 24, 1942, p. 2. 
January 24 

Peru severed diplomatic relations with Ger- 
many, Italy, and Japan. Department of 
State Bulletin, April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 
348. 
January 25 

Thailand announced (on January 31) its dec- 
laration of war on Great Britain and the 
United States. Ibid., February 7, 1942, 
Vol. VI, p. 144. 

Great Britain and the Union of South Africa 
announced (subsequently) a state of war 
with Thailand. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. 
VI, p. 338. 

Uruguay severed diplomatic relations with 
Germany, Italy, and Japan. Ibid., p. 349. 
January 26 

Coordination of United States - British war 
effort announced. Ibid., January 31, 1942, 
Vol. VI, pp. 87-88. 
January 27 

Eire protested United States armed forces in 
Northern Ireland. New York Times, Janu- 
ary 28, 1942, p. 4. 
January 28 

Bolivia severed diplomatic relations with 



432 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



19J# 

January 28 — Continued. 

Germany, Italy, and Japan. Department 
of State Bulletin, April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, 
p. 339. 
Brazil severed diplomatic relations and com- 
mercial relations with Germany, Italy, and 
Japan. Ibid. 
Paraguay severed diplomatic relations with 
Germany, Italy, and Japan. Ibid., p. 348. 
Final Act on cooperation signed at Rio de 
Janeiro by the 21 American republics. 
Ibid., February 7, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 117- 
141. 
January 29 

Alliance treaty signed at Tehran between 
Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and Iran. 
Ibid., March 21, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 249-252. 
Ecuador severed diplomatic relations with 
Germany, Italy, and Japan. Ibid., April 
18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 340. 
Ecuador and Peru signed protocol settling 
their boundary dispute. Ibid., February 
28, 1942, Vol. VI, pp. 195-196. 
February 5 
Iran severed diplomatic relations with France. 
New York rwn.es,' February 6, 1942, p. 4. 
February 6 

Uruguay declared that it considered Great 
Britain as non-belligerent. Ibid., Feb- 
ruary 7, 1912, p. 7. 
February 15 . 

Singapore surrendered to the Japanese. 
Ibid., February 16, 1942, p. 1. 
February 23 

Mutual-aid agreement between the United 
States and Great Britain signed. Depart- 
ment of State Bulletin, February 28, 1942, 
Vol. VI, p. 190. 
February 27 

Executive order signed by the President au- 
thorizing the creation of a Joint Mexican - 
United States Defense Commission. Ibid., 
p. 193. 
February 28 

United States recognized the administrative 



im 

February 28 — Continued. 

control of the French National Committee 
established at London over New Caledonia 
and other French island possessions in the 
Pacific. Hid., March 7, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 
208. 

March 5 

Egypt severed diplomatic relations with 
Thailand. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, 
p. 341. 

March 6 

Announcement made of United States Mis- 
sion to India. Ibid., March 7, 1942, Vol. 
VI, p. 209. 

Rumania severed diplomatic relations with 
Brazil. Ibid., April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 
348. 

March 9 

The United States and Great Britain jointly 
created the Anglo-American Caribbean 
Commission. Ibid., March 14, 1942, Vol. 
VI, p. 229. 

March 17 

Gen. Douglas MacArthur arrived in Aus- 
tralia to become Supreme Commander of 
the United Nations forces in the South- 
western Pacific. New York Times, March 
18, 1942, p. 1. 

March 18 

Notes exchanged between the United States 
and Canada in regard to the detailed ar- 
rangements for the construction of a mili- 
tary highway to Alaska. Department of 
State Bulletin, March 21, 1942, Vol. VI, 
p. 237. 

March 20 

Russia and Japan extended temporary fisher- 
ies agreement for an additional year. 
New York Times, March 21, 1942, p. 1. 

March 21 

The United States and China signed an agree- 
ment for financial aid to China. Depart- 
ment of State Bulletin, March 28, 1942, 
Vol. VI, p. 263. 



MAY 16, 1942 



433 



1942 
March 29 

Great Britain offered dominion status to 
India after the war in return for Indian co- 
operation in the war against the Axis 
powers. New York Times, March 30, 1942, 
p. 1. 
March 30 

Pacific War Council established in Washing- 
ton. Ibid., March 31, 1942, p. 1. 

April 4 

The United States recognized the administra- 
tive control of the French National Com- 
mittee established at London over the 
French territories of Equatorial Africa and 
the French Cameroons and announced its 
decision to establish an American Consulate 
at Brazzaville. Department of State Bul- 
letin, April 4, 1942, Vol. VI, p. 273. 

April 9 

Bataan captured by the Japanese. New York 
Times, April 10, 1942, p. 1. 

April 11 

The All-India Congress Party and the Mos- 
lem League rejected the British proposals 
for Indian dominion status after the war. 
Ibid., April 12, 1942, p. 1. 

April 12 

Iran severed diplomatic relations with Japan. 
Department of State Bulletin, April 18, 
1942, Vol. VI, p. 345. 

April 14 

Pierre Laval restored to power in France by 
Marshal Henri Petain. New York Times, 
April 15, 1942, p. 1. 

April 17 

Admiral William D. Leahy, American Am- 
bassador to France, recalled to Washing- 
ton for consultation. Ibid., April 18, 1942, 
p.l. 

April 23 

The Union of South Africa severed diplo- 
matic relations with France. Department 
of State Bulletin, April 18, 1942, Vol. VI, 
p. 349. 



1942 
April 28 

President Roosevelt, in his "fireside chat", de- 
clared that the United Nations will take 
measures, if necessary, to prevent the use 
of French territory in any part of the world 
for military purposes by the Axis powers. 
New York Times, April 29, 1942, p. 1. 

PROCLAIMED LIST: REVISION II 

[Released to the press May 15] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunc- 
tion with the Secretary of the Treasury, the 
Attorney General, the Secretary of Commerce, 
the Board of Economic Warfare, and the Coor- 
dinator of Inter- American Affairs, pursuant to 
the proclamation by the President of July 17, 
1941 providing for "The Proclaimed List of 
Certain Blocked Nationals", on May 15 issued 
Revision II x of the Proclaimed List. Revision 
II supersedes and consolidates Revision I, dated 
February 7, 1942, and the four supplements 
thereto. 

No new additions to or deletions from the 
Proclaimed List are made in this revision. Cer- 
tain minor amendments are made. 

Revision II follows the listing arrangement 
used in Revision I. The list is divided into two 
parts : Part I relates to listings in the American 
republics and part II to listings in countries 
other than the American republics. Revision 
II contains a total of 8,241 listings, of which 
5,972 are in part I and 2,269 in part II. 

ADVISORY MISSION TO INDIA 

[Released to the press May 14] 

The Department has been informed that Col. 
Louis Johnson, Personal Representative of the 
President in India, recently has undergone an 
operation for a nasal infection at New Delhi. 
Upon the advice of his physicians he plans to 
return to the United States within the near 
future. 



1 Printed in 7 Federal Register 3587. 



434 



LEND-LEASE OPERATIONS 



[Released to the press by the White House May 15] 

1. Total lend-lease aid in April 1942 to all 
countries amounted to $677,000,000. 

2. Lend-lease aid has been rising steadily 
each month since the program started. In 
March 1941 lend-lease aid amounted to $18,- 
000,000. In March of 1942 it amounted to $588,- 
000,000. Lend-lease aid in April was at an an- , 
nual rate of more than $8,000,000,000, compared 
with an annual rate of $4,000,000,000 last 
December. 

3. Total lend-lease aid from the inauguration 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

of the program to May 1, 1942, amounted to 
$3,835,000,000. 

4. Since the start of the program the pro- 
portion of fighting weapons to food, drugs, raw 
materials, and other industrial materials has 
steadily increased. Today the major part of 
the aid supplied is in the form of finished mu- 
nitions. 

5. The division of the guns, planes, ships, 
and industrial materials between our own armed 
forces and industries and those of our Allies 
is made by military, naval, and industrial ex- 
perts in a manner aimed at putting the supplies 
to their most effective use in fighting our com- 
mon enemies. 



General 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY BERLE BEFORE THE COUNCIL ON 
BOOKS IN WARTIME * 



[Released to the press May 13] 
I 

In the next few weeks practically everyone 
in the United States will enter upon a very inter- 
esting experience. A great part of civilian ac- 
tivity will be turned from present use to war 
production. Rationing will limit the use of 
most things. By summer's end it will no longer 
be possible to occupy leisure time in motoring. 
It will not be as easy to visit the moving pic- 
tures. Quiet will descend on even the most 
crowded roads. Civilian life will have less in 
it of sound, of light, and of motion. 

This means that we shall have once more the 
great luxury of living again in our own minds. 
The experience will be no hardship. We shall 
merely return to habits of life and thought 
which served the country well up to a genera- 
tion ago. 

Our fathers, in simpler upbringing, had to 
seek contact with ideas through their education, 
from their churches (they went to church, and 
wanted to), but most of all from their books. 



1 Delivered at Times Hall, New York, N. Y., May 12, 
1942. 



These ideas were examined and reexamined; 
they entered the very pattern and substance of 
life ; they were drawn into the habit of experi- 
ence; they became an integral part of personal 
and national life. 

This explains, in part, the passionate thirst 
for access to books which characterized Ameri- 
can life as late as 30 years ago. We forget too 
easily the struggles by which community after 
community sought to have a public library. 
You do not now find a young worker in a steel 
mill anxiously seeking a library as did the 
young Andrew Carnegie, or resolving that the 
first fruits of his fortune will be devoted to ex- 
tending that privilege to other people. A gen- 
eration has grown up which never rode seven 
miles in a buckboard to the village center of a 
Saturday afternoon, because that was "library 
day", and spent an eager hour searching for the 
right books to take home to the family to read 
evenings when work was done. 

Now, by the good fortune of enforced sim- 
plicity, we are coming back to that phase in its 
modern equivalent. As the casual stimuli of 
motion and sight are no longer readily avail- 
able, books come into their own. 



MAY 16, 1942 



435 



It thus becomes imperative that everyone who 
has anything to do with books shall take good 
care that the books are worthy of the place 
which is vouchsafed them. Authors, pub- 
lishers, universities, and the self-constituted 
guardians of our intellectual life must at length 
perform their appointed function. They must 
make the pattern and the texture of this Ameri- 
can age of war. If these war years have any- 
thing to say to their own time, or to the times 
which come after, here is the rostrum and this 
the occasion. With nations, as with men: as 
they think, so they are. 

II 

It is time now to recall that great division of 
literature which DeQuincey taught us a cen- 
tury ago. You will recall DeQuincey's famous 
distinction between the "literature of informa- 
tion" and the "literature of power". The lit- 
erature of information could teach, but the 
literature of power could move the spirit of 
men. Information dealt with facts, with 
impressions, and with reason, cast in the mould 
of the existing circumstances. But the litera- 
ture of power reached to the very wellspring 
of the human soul, and it was timeless because 
it sought eternal values in ideas and in human 
life. 

Of the literature of information we have 
enough and more than enough. The scientific 
age through which we have passed has indeed 
produced a volume and a wealth of teaching 
literature beyond parallel — if collection of facts 
be the criterion. The publishers' lists furnish 
instruction in every kind of subject, from the 
habits of words (for instance, Hayakawa's 
Language in Action) to the facts of the Far 
Eastern war recently compiled by Mr. Harold 
Quigley. Even a non-technical reader can 
range from greatly written history, like Pro- 
fessor Sam Morrison's Admiral of the Ocean 
Sea or Forrest Davis' The Atlantic System, to 
the cool economics of Alvin Hansen's Fiscal 
Policy and Business Cycles or to the last popu- 
larization of mechanical science. If you are 
given to light literature, you can read the rush 
of books about South America, generally by 



excellent reporters or novelists whose command 
of English is rather better than their knowl- 
edge of the American continents — a rush of 
books which, by the way, has provoked a secret 
treaty between a brilliant Mexican diplomat and 
the Assistant Secretary of State. It calls for 
the production (by us, but under a pseudonym) 
of a book about North America as seen by a 
South American reporter who had eight days to 
visit the country, and a publisher's contract to 
turn out an exhaustive philosophical, social, 
and economic interpretation of these United 
States for the edification of a thirsty and un- 
suspicious public in the South American 
capitals. 

All this is well enough. Yet there are solid 
reasons for believing that this new American 
public about to find itself, these men and 
women newly asked to live in their own minds, 
these newly parted from the artificial support 
of things outside, deep in their hearts are now 
passionately searching, not for the literature of 
information but for the literature of power. 

For the great experiences of the time and the 
intimate experiences of people are swiftly 
bringing close the deepest and most funda- 
mental questions. They are not questions of 
fact. They are the riddles of human life. Those 
of us who have the high privilege of contact 
with the people directly affected by the his- 
torical forces of today have little doubt of this. 
A man goes out with a bomber command; his 
comrade is left behind, watching moment by 
moment the record of his flight, his struggle, 
his success, or his death. An exile comes in to 
fire a shot for the liberation of his country ; his 
family, hostages to an invader, may be tortured 
or killed as a result. A girl waits endlessly 
without news of her lover on a far-away naval 
unit. A family scans the brief communiques in 
the vain hope of learning where a son, a father, 
or a brother may be. A businessman is asked to 
tear down the work in which he has spent his 
life. The teachers, who have lived in certain 
currents of ideas, find that in middle or late 
life they must build a new life from the ground 
up. 

In different ways all are asking the same ques- 



436 

tion, seeking the same answer, looking for the 
same light. Whence comes the strength that 
enables men and women to look with clear eyes 
on these huge, blind forces and, in terror, pain, 
or death, still to assert that life is great, that 
the human spirit is supreme, that there is an 
infinite plan which at the end is infinitely kind? 
For this they must believe, else life is chaos; 
and to accept chaos is to accept death before its 
time. 

Ill 

Rightly, our guide, DeQuincey, insisted on 
the overwhelming superiority, indeed on the 
sheer necessity, of the literature of power. 
From it alone comes the real answer to these 
spoken— and oftener unspoken— questions 
which arise again and again as the quiet deepens. 

They are the poignant questions which have 
been asked since the birth of the human mind. 
Perhaps no greater example exists of the litera- 
ture of power than that brought forth in Greece 
when Greece stood up against the darkening 
hosts of empire and defended for our modern 
world the privilege of thought. You remember 
Aeschylus' tragedy of Prometheus— Prome- 
theus, who had assaulted Zeus himself to find 
the immortal fire; Prometheus, finding himself 
alone and merely a man amid the clashing nat- 
ural forces which he did not understand, with 
the cynical, mocking Hermes by his side. In 
the midst of tempest, earthquake, and strug- 
gling with, certain destruction, Prometheus 
hurled at Zeus his great assertion of faith: 

... let him fling my form 

Down whirling gulfs, the central storm 

Of being ; let me lie 
Plunged in the black Tartarean gloom; 
Yet — yet — his sentence shall not doom 

This deathless self to die. 

That question and that answer, appearing 
in the triumphant literature of power 500 years 
before the birth of Christ, has not changed, 
though two and a half millennia have run their 
course. The glorious answer thunders down 
the course of history — and men who never heard 
of Prometheus are the stronger for it. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

Today the question is doubly asked. It must 
be doubly answered. Men who are asked to 
toss their hopes, their lives, and the lives of 
their dearest into the crucible of world war and 
revolution may properly inquire why they, as 
individuals, are bound to this battle against 
chaos. Even more, they have a right to ask 
what spiritual forces are building which can 
draw from the diverse agonies of struggle and 
horror those values on which a newer and more 
glorious civilization can be built. Hermes, the 
realist, counseled the followers of Prometheus 
to run away, to save themselves, to make terms. 
He said that Prometheus was a madman who 
did not understand the lesson of force when 
he saw it. His counsel of realism and cow- 
ardice is Mein Kampf verbatim — the German 
propaganda poured out today by every Berlin 
radio and even by some weaklings in the Ameri- 
can press. Precisely because of Aeschylus, for 
2,500 years men have been braver than they 
were; nations have been less willing to accept 
the compromises of cowardice. Because of the 
literature of power, Quislings have not suc- 
ceeded and conquerors have not had their way 
with the spirits of the weak. 

For an unbroken half century we have chiefly 
dealt in the literature of information. Actu- 
ally, our last really great adventure in the 
literature of power was probably the product 
of the Civil War. Universities have taught. 
They have not led. Toying too much with the 
undoubted truth that knowledge is power, too 
little have we dealt with the greater truth that 
power is never an end in itself. As a result our 
country has had no authentic saint since Lin- 
coln, and our most splendid literature is humble 
beside the priceless bits of simple prose in which 
a war president called for strength to do right 
as God might give us to see the right. 

IV 

Books in warime ! They must be some- 
thing more than objects of trade. It was an 
aphorism of my father's that every man could 
at his choice make of his mind a warehouse, 
a palace, or a temple. Out of books which we 
are given there will largely be constructed these 



MAY 16, 1942 



437 



buildings in -which all of us must dwell. In 
the greatest of our individual crises — the crisis 
of long parting, the crisis of bereavement, the 
crisis of fear, the crisis of death — in these we 
must live in these mind-dwellings alone. Then 
the teacher is silent, at length ; the voices which 
come must speak as with the voice of God. 

Without this the prophecies fail, the tongues 
cease, the knowledge vanishes away. Truly we 
have a right to ask of those who write, of uni- 
versities who nurture writers, and of all asso- 
ciated with them that they keep faith — faith 
with the men and women who for them are 
going through the dark hours. If authors still 
may write, if publishers still may print, if uni- 
versities still may teach, it is because, and only 
because, many and many men for faith alone 
are prepared to give their lives, their children's 
lives, and all they have for the defense of that 
right. 

There is no scientific formula which justifies 
this. Courage was not born in a physical 
laboratory, nor sacrifice and endurance in a 
school of economics. 

Rather, we seek, from whatever source we 
can, that hope and faith and strength which 
assert a spiritual triumph beyond reach of 
weapons of destruction. Rather, we claim — 
albeit humbly and pitifully — that we, too, are 
a part of that humanity which is also partly di- 
vine. From those who can call out in us these 
qualities, by which alone knowledge becomes 
wisdom and strength becomes virtue, we must 
draw the qualities which let us look beyond the 
travail of the dying days. 

On the face of dark waters we all must set 
our individual, unimportant, and forgotten 
courses. But we have a right to ask that the 
navigators shall show us the way by the light 
of great and distant stars. 

TRAVEL OF SEAMEN 

The Secretary of State on April 30, 1942 is- 
sued regulations stating that a seaman who is 
a national of the United States and who is 
traveling in the pursuit of his vocation may 



travel on a vessel of any state named in any 
proclamation issued by the President under au- 
thority of section 1 (a) of the joint resolution 
of Congress of November 4, 1939 x on or over 
the north Atlantic Ocean, north of 35 degrees 
north latitude and east of 66 degrees west longi- 
tude, or on or over other waters adjacent to 
Europe, upon compliance with the provisions 
of the rules and regulations relating to the con- 
trol of American nationals entering and leaving 
territory under the jurisdiction of the United 
States, which were issued by the Secretary of 
State on November 25, 1941 2 and subsequently 
amended. 



American Republics 



PARAGUAY: ANNIVERSARY OF 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press May 14] 

The text of a telegram sent by the President 
of the United States to General Higinio 
Morinigo, President of the Republic of Para- 
guay, follows : 

"Mat 14, 1942. 

"It gives me great pleasure on this national 
anniversary of the independence of Paraguay to 
send Your Excellency my personal greetings 
and my best wishes for the well being of the 
people of Paraguay. 

"In these critical times, when the independ- 
ence of the American republics has assumed an 
even greater significance, Paraguay may well 
take pride in the sacrifices it has made to win 
and preserve its liberty. The people of the 
United States have welcomed the convincing 
demonstrations which your Government has 
given that it is vigilantly determined to resist 
the forces of unbridled aggression threatening 
free peoples everywhere. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



1 54 Stat. 4. 

'Bulletin of November 29, 1941, p. 431. 



Europe 



EMBASSY RANK FOR REPRESENTATION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND 

NORWAY 



I Released to the press May 12) 

Upon the occasion of the nomination by the 
President of the Honorable Anthony J. Drexel 
Biddle, Jr., as the first American Ambassador 
near the Government of Norway, the following 
statement was issued by the Department: 

For two years the annals of the age-old 
struggle of free men to preserve their liberties 
have been enriched by the heroic feats of Nor- 
wegian men, women, and even children in their 
unrelenting resistance to the vicious German 
invaders who now occupy their country. 

Assailed from without by overwhelming 
military force and betrayed from within by a 
handful of traitors headed by a man whose very 
name has become synonymous with perfidy, 
the Norwegian people and their King have 
nevertheless been unfalterable in their determi- 
nation to restore their freedom. 

Accordingly, as an indication of the im- 
portance which this Government attributes to 
the participation of the Norwegian Govern- 
ment and of Norwegians throughout the world 
in the war effort of the United Nations, the Pres- 
ident has proposed to the King of Norway that 
henceforth the two countries exchange diplo- 
matic representatives with the rank of ambas- 
sador. The King of Norway having agreed to 
the President's proposal, the President has 
today sent to the Senate the nomination of the 
Honorable Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., who 
has twice served as American Minister to Nor- 
way, as first Ambassador of the United States 
near the Government of Norway. 

[Released to the press May 13] 

The text of the credentials from the King of 
Norway accrediting the Honorable Wilhehn 
von Munthe af Morgenstierne as first Nor- 
438 



wegian Ambassador near the Government of the 
United States follows: 

"I greatly appreciate your proposal that the. 
representatives of our respective countries 
should be given the rank of Ambassador in rec- 
ognition of the special ties of friendship and 
collaboration which unite our peoples in their 
common fight against the enemies of all free 
nations. 

"In consequence I hereby accredit Mr. Wil- 
hehn von Munthe af Morgenstierne to you as 
my Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipo- 
tentiary and I am convinced that he will con- 
tinue to merit your full confidence in his new 
capacity." 

[Released to the press May 13) 

The text of the credentials from the President 
of the United States accrediting the Honorable 
Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., as the first Am- 
bassador of the United States near the Govern- 
ment of Norway is given below. Mr. Biddle 
presented these credentials to the King of Nor- 
way in London at noon, London time, May 13. 

"Your Majesty: 

"It is with great satisfaction that I have 
learned of your agreement to receive the Honor- 
able Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., as first Am- 
bassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary 
of the United States of America near the Gov- 
ernment of Norway. 

"In peace, and now in war, unique ties link 
the destinies of the peoples of Norway and of 
the United States. Norwegian-born men and 
women by the hundreds of thousands have 
found in the New World a warm welcome among 
kindred people and have made immeasurable 
contributions to the spiritual and material de- 
velopment of their adopted land. 



MAY 16, 1942 



439 



"Intrepid Norwegian sailors on every sea face 
daily dangers alongside their comrades in arras 
of the United States to the end that the horror 
of war brought on both our nations by a ruth- 
less enemy shall give way to a peaceful world 
dedicated to the uninterrupted advancement of 
the principles of freedom. 

"It is peculiarly fitting, therefore, that the 
United States and Norway should exchange 
Ambassadors as a symbol to our friends and to 
our enemies of the unity of purpose of two na- 
tions equally determined to maintain their free- 
dom against the assault of evil forces. 

"I trust that Mr. Biddle will continue to enjoy 
Your Majesty's confidence and that you will 
give full credence to what he shall say on the 
part of the United States. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



Cultural Relations 



The Near East 



OPENING OF DIRECT RADIO-PHOTO 
SERVICE BETWEEN THE UNITED 
STATES AND EGYPT 

STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT 
[Released to the press by the White House May 13] 

The opening of direct radio-photo service 
between Egypt and the United States is one 
more vital link in the world-wide network of 
communications. The constant, rapid inter- 
change of news — both in words and in pic- 
tures^ — is an essential in the establishment of 
freedom of speech, freedom of information, 
throughout the world. 

Through this new means of communication, 
which spans the battles of the Atlantic and the 
Mediterranean, I greet our friends in Egypt 
and our friends as well as our own sons and 
brothers now serving in Africa and the Near 
East in the armed forces of the United Nations. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
MEXICAN EDITOR 

[Released to the press May 12] 

Dr. Gabriel Mendez Plancarte, editor and 
publicist, has arrived in Washington as the 
guest of the Department of State. He will 
spend three weeks in this country, visiting New 
York and Boston and devoting special atten- 
tion to our educational programs and social leg- 
islation. 

Dr. Mendez Plancarte is editor of the Mexican 
literary and philosophical review Abside, which 
is an ardent exponent of the solidarity of the 
United Nations. He is also author of Horatio 
en Mexico, a definitive study of the Classic in- 
fluence on Mexican literature. He studied for 
eight years in the Latin American College in 
Rome. Although in constant correspondence 
with our writers on historical and literary sub- 
jects, he has not hitherto visited the United 
States. 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
COLOMBIAN HISTORIAN 

[Released to the press May 12] 

Dr. Guillermo Hernandez de Alba, eminent 
historian of Bogota, Colombia, and Senora Her- 
nandez de Alba have arrived in this country. 
Dr. Hernandez de Alba, who is here at the invi- 
tation of the Department of State, is interested 
in visiting Virginia and Massachusetts to con- 
sult records dealing with the colonial origins of 
our democratic system of government. He is 
also especially interested in visiting and examin- 
ing all collections in this country containing 
documents related to the history of Colombia, 
particularly during the colonial period. 

Dr. Hernandez de Alba has published authori- 
tative works on Colombian cultural and artistic 
history and has devoted much time to tracing 
recorded cultural interchanges between North 
and South America. 



440 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Foreign Service 



DEATH OF VICE CONSUL AND MRS. JOHN 
M. SLAUGHTER IN GUAYAQUIL EARTH- 
QUAKE 

[Released to the press May 14] 

The Secretary of State made the following 
statement : 

"I have learned of the tragic death of Vice 
Consul and Mrs. John M. Slaughter, in the 
earthquake in Guayaquil, with the deepest re- 
gret. This is another instance of a Foreign 
Service family who have given their lives in 
the service of their country in as true a sense as 
if they had been killed upon the battlefield." 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

On May 12, 1942 the Senate confirmed the 
nomination of Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr., of 
Pennsylvania, as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary of the United States of 
America near the Governments of the Nether- 
lands and Norway now established in London. 
Mr. Biddle will continue to serve concurrently 
and without additional compensation as Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to 
Poland and Belgium and as Envoy Extraor- 
dinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Czecho- 
slovakia, Yugoslavia, and Greece, the Govern- 
ments of which are now established in London. 

[Released to the press May 16] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since May 9, 1942 : 

Waldo E. Bailey, of Winona, Miss., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Lon- 
don, England, has been designated Second Sec- 
retary of Embassy and Vice Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

James G. Carter, of Brunswick, Ga., Consul 
General at Tananarive, Madagascar, is retiring 



from the Foreign Service, effective January 1. 
1943. 

Cabot Coville, of Los Angeles, Calif., for- 
merly assigned to serve in the Office of the 
United States High Commissioner to the Philip- 
pine Islands at Manila, Philippine Islands, has 
been designated Second Secretary of Embassy 
and Consul at Lima, Peru, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Edward L. Freers, of Cincinnati, Ohio, Vice 
Consul at Port-of-Spain, Trinidad, British 
West Indies, has been designated Third Secre- 
tary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Asuncion, 
Paraguay, and will serve in dual capacity. 

The assignment of Wilfred V. MacDonald, 
of St. Louis. Mo., as Third Secretary of Em- 
bassy and Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt, has 
been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. MacDonald 
has been designated Third Secretary of Em- 
bassy at Ankara, Turkey. 

Harold Playter, of Los Angeles, Calif., Con- 
sul at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, is retiring 
from the Foreign Service, effective November 
1, 1942. 

The assignment of Byron White, of Fayette- 
ville, N. C, as Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Asuncion, Paraguay, has been 
canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. White has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Montevideo, Uruguay, and will 
serve in dual capacity. 



Legislation 



Settlement of Claims of American Nationals Against 
the Government of Mexico : Message from the Presi- 
dent of the United States Transmitting a Report 
by the Secretary of State Recommending the Enact- 
ment of Legislation To Provide for the Settlement 
of Claims of American Nationals Against the Gov- 
ernment of Mexico Comprehended Within the Terms 
of Agreements Concluded by the United States and 
Mexico. H. Doc. 722, 77th Cong. 7 pp. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 



PUBLICATIONS 
Agreement with Bolivia 

An agreement for the exchange of official 
publications and scientific and literary works 
between the Government of the United States 
and the Government of Bolivia was entered 
into by an exchange of notes dated January 26 
and 31, 1942. 

The agreement entered into force on January 
31, 1942 and will remain in force for an in- 
definite period, but it may be abrogated by 
three months' notice by either party. Each 
Government furnished to the other a list of the 
publications of its different departments and 
agencies which it agreed to remit. It was also 
agreed that the lists should be amplified with- 
out previous notice by either party to include 
any new important publications that may be is- 
sued in the future. Each Government agrees to 
pay the postal and shipping charges within 
its respective country. The official office for 
the remittance of the publications of Bolivia is 
the Department of Intellectual Cooperation of 
the Foreign Office, and the official interchange 
office on the part of the United States is the 
Smithsonian Institution. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

Act of Habana Concerning the Provisional 
Administration of European Colonies and 
Possessions in the Americas 

Chile 

By a letter dated May 6, 1942 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 



the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Chile of the Act of Habana Con- 
cerning the Provisional Administration of 
European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas, signed at Habana on July 30, 1940, 
was deposited with the Union on April 28, 1942. 
The instrument of ratification is dated Feb- 
ruary 17, 1942 and contains the "reservation of 
the rights of Chile in Antarctica" made at the 
time of signature. 

VISA FEES 
Agreement with Argentina 

An agreement has been concluded by an ex- 
change of notes dated April 17, 1942 between 
the Government of the United States and the 
Government of Argentina providing for the 
reciprocal waiver of fees for passport visas and 
for fees for applications for passport visas for 
non-immigrants for citizens of Argentina trav- 
eling to the United States, its territories and 
possessions, including the Philippine Islands so 
long as the Philippine Islands continue under 
the sovereignty or authority of the Government 
of the United States of America, and for na- 
tionals of the United States, including citizens 
of the Philippine Islands, traveling to Argen- 
tina. 

The agreement which will become effective 
on June 1, 1942, was concluded under the au- 
thority conferred by the act of February 25, 
1925 (43 Stat., pt. 1, 976), relating to the con- 
clusion of arrangements with foreign countries 
for the reciprocal waiver or reduction of visa 
fees for persons other than immigrants. 

441 



442 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Publications 



Department of State 

Leased Naval and Air Bases : Agreement and Exchanges 
of Notes between the United States of America and 
Great Britain and Protocol between the United 
States of America, Great Britain, and Canada Con- 
cerning the Defense of Newfoundland — Signed March 



27, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 235. Publica- 
tion 1726. 44 pp. lOtf. 

Cooperative War Effort : Declaration by United Na- 
tions, Washington, January 1, 1942 ; and Declaration 
Known as the Atlantic Charter, August 14, 1941. Ex- 
ecutive Agreement Series 236. Publication 1732. 
4 pp. 5<f. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Revision II, May 5, 1942, Promulgated Pursuant to 
Proclamation 2497 of the President of July 17, 1941. 
Publication 1737. 196 pp. Free. 

Diplomatic List, May 1942. Publication 1738. il, 98 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year; single copy, 10tf. 



. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1942 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price 10 cents ----- Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIBECTOB OF THE BTJBEATJ OF THE BUDGET 









THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



MAY 23, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 152— Publication 1745 







ontents 



The War Page 

Statement by the Secretary of State 445 

Treatment of civilian enemy aliens and prisoners of 

war 445 

Agreement with Panama for lease of defense sites . . 448 
Why Are We Fighting and For What: Address by 

Stanley K. Hornbeck 452 

Masters of Bigotry: Address by Raymond H. Geist . 466 

Government officials in Manila 472 

American Republics 

Inauguration of "Network of the Americas" program: 

Address by the Under Secretary of State .... 473 

Conference of representatives of central banks or equiv- 
alent institutions of the American republics . . . 474 

The Department 

Relations with Board of Economic Warfare 475 

Procedure with regard to dispatch of missions abroad . 476 

Commercial Policy 

National Foreign Trade Week: Statement by the Sec- 
retary of State 478 

General 

Verification of passports of American citizens .... 480 
False assertions regarding document alleged to be in 

the Department files 480 

[OVER] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENT" 

JUL 19 \Ui 







ontents-comixvED 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. Page 
Inter-American Conference of Police and Judicial Au- 
thorities 480 

The Foreign Service 

Diplomatic confirmation 481 

Treaty Information 

Naval missions: Mission to Brazil 481 

Sovereignty: Convention on the Provisional Adminis- 
tration of European Colonies and Possessions in 

the Americas 481 

Defense: Agreement with Panama for Lease of Defense 

Sites 481 

Legislation 482 

Publications 482 



The War 



STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 



[Released to the press May 23] 

I have noted with uneasiness that some of the 
American people, seeing the rapidly increasing 
strength of the United States and United Na- 
tions' successes in various places, are inclined to 
anticipate an earlier victory than they had here- 
tofore expected. We can too easily be over- 
optimistic. We are in a hard fight which will be 
won only by the combined all-out efforts of all 
our people and all the United Nations. 

We should accept our successes in a spirit of 
sober thanksgiving and meet oui reverses with 
a grim determination to fight all the harder to 
ultimate and complete victory. 

I have said it recently, but I repeat because it 
is most important : "Victory will come sooner and 



with a vast saving in suffering, in life, and in 
property in proportion as every man and woman 
in this country and in each of the United Na- 
tions realizes the extreme danger from the pur- 
poses of the worst barbarian leaders in all 
history, who plan to conquer and brutally sub- 
jugate the world by methods of unparalleled 
savagery. Victory will be hastened by every 
additional ounce of effort which each one of us 
puts forth in a situation that is as threatening 
as if his own house were on fire. It will be de- 
layed and will involve an incalculable and mi- 
ne essary increase in suffering and in losses 
with any weakening of such realization and 
with any lagging in effort and exertion." 



TREATMENT OF CIVILIAN ENEMY ALIENS AND PRISONERS OF WAR 



[Released to the press May 23] 

Upon the outbreak of war in Europe the Gov- 
ernment of the United States, actuated by hu- 
manitarian motives, expressed the earnest hope 
to the British, French, and German Govern- 
ments that they could give thought to avoiding 
harsh treatment of enemy aliens. It was pointed 
out that there had grown gradually among civ- 
ilized states the conviction that there should 
be no retaliation against prisoners of war for 
acts of their governments. This conviction re- 
ceived international sanction in the Prisoners of 
War Convention which was signed at Geneva in 



1929. It was suggested that the same reasoning 
should apply to civilian enemy aliens unfor- 
tunate enough to be caught under enemy juris- 
diction and that just as the nations had aban- 
doned the idea that prisoners of war are hos- 
tages for the good behavior of the enemy so the 
same idea in respect to civilians might be held. 
It was recognized that belligerents might feel it 
essential to maintain surveillance and some re- 
strictions upon the acts of civilian enemy aliens. 
These ideas were in general accepted and applied 
by the three belligerents to whom the American 
Government addressed its communication. 



445 



446 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Upon the entry of the United States into the 
war the Government of the United States with 
reference to its declaration to the British, 
French, and German Governments informed the 
German, Italian, and Japanese Governments 
that it intended on its part to apply the prin- 
ciples set forth in its declaration and in line 
therewith to apply to civilian enemy aliens as 
liberal a regime as was consistent with the safety 
of the United States. This Government de- 
clared that enemy aliens whom it might be found 
necessary to intern would be treated at least as 
favorably as prisoners of war. To that end this 
Government informed the German, Italian, and 
Japanese Governments that it intended to apply 
to civilian enemy aliens taken into custody by it 
the provisions of the Geneva Prisoners of War 
Convention, so far as those provisions might 
be adaptable to civilians, and that it expected 
the enemy governments to extend like treatment 
to American citizens taken into custody by them. 
The Italian Government replied that it would 
be glad reciprocally to apply the Geneva Pris- 
oners of War Convention to American civilians 
interned by it. The Japanese Government re- 
plied that it would extend the provisions of the 
Convention reciprocally to American civilian 
internees provided that the American Govern- 
ment did not make use of the provisions of the 
Convention to compel Japanese civilians in its 
hands to work against their will — to which this 
Government agreed. The German Government 
stated that pending the completion of negotia- 
tions which were going on between the German 
and American Governments for the mutual re- 
patriation of each other's nationals, it preferred 
not to undertake additional international obli- 
gations, especially since it hoped that it would 
be possible to substitute repatriation for intern- 
ment. This Government replied that, as it had 
stated at the outbreak of the war, it did not 
desire to effect general internment of German 
nationals and preferred that citizens of the other 
country whose presence in either country ap- 



pears prejudicial to the national safety should 
be repatriated. It added that pending the re- 
patriation of German nationals held in custody 
in the United States the Government of the 
United States would in accordance with its pre- 
vious declaration to the German Government 
apply to them the provisions of the Geneva 
Prisoners of War Convention and that it had 
taken note from reports received by it from 
official neutral sources that the German Govern- 
ment was apparently applying the provisions 
of this Convention to American civilians held 
in custody by it. 

Upon the declaration of war between the 
United States and Germany and the United 
States and Italy, the Geneva Prisoners of War 
Convention, to which all three countries are 
parties, was put into effect as regards prisoners 
of war. Japan, which is not a party to the 
Prisoners of War Convention, has agreed to 
apply it reciprocally to American prisoners of 
war. 

The Geneva Prisoners of War Convention 
lays down in general terms the rights and duties 
of prisoners of war. The prisoners may be in- 
terned in towns, fortresses, or enclosed camps 
but they may not be imprisoned except as an 
indispensable measure of safety nor held in 
unhealthful regions. They must be lodged in 
buildings or in barracks affording all possible 
guaranties of hygiene and healthfulness and 
given generally the same accommodations and 
food as the depot troops of the holding power. 
They must receive medical treatment and be 
given liberty in the exercise of their religion. 
Sports and intellectual recreational diversions 
organized by them are to be encouraged by the 
holding powers. Officer prisoners must receive 
from the holding power the same pay as officers 
of corresponding rank in the armies of that 
power, provided this pay does not exceed that 
to which they are entitled in their own army. 
The labor of private soldiers may be utilized 
by the holding power with payment of wages 



MAY 23, 1942 



447 



in accordance with the rates in force for soldiers 
in the national army doing the same work or, 
if no such rates exist, according to rates in 
harmony with the work performed. 

The Convention also provides that prisoners 
of war may be allowed to correspond with 
friends and relatives and that their correspond- 
ence shall enjoy the postal frank. They may 
receive parcels containing foods, books, and 
other items. They may deal with the author- 
ities through men of confidence or agents ap- 
pointed by them from among themselves. The 
Convention specifies the procedure to be fol- 
lowed in imposing disciplinary punishments on 
prisoners of war and in their trial and punish- 
ment for crimes. Sick and wounded prisoners 
are to be repatriated. 

The Convention further provides for the es- 
tablishment of official information bureaus to 
exchange lists of prisoners among the belligerent 
powers and for work by relief societies in the 
prisoner-of-war camps. It also provides that 
representatives of the protecting powers shall 
visit camps to insure compliance with the provi- 
sions of the Convention and permits the carry- 
ing out by the International Red Cross 
Committee, with the consent of the interested 
belligerents, of its recognized humanitarian 
work. 

The German, Italian, and Japanese Govern- 
ments are apparently abiding by their under- 
takings to apply to prisoners of war the Geneva 
Prisoners of War Convention and, so far as they 
are adaptable, to extend the application of the 
provisions of that Convention to American 
civilians. 

The Japanese have permitted official neutral 
observers to visit American prisoners of war in 
Japan and American civilians interned in Japan 
and in a number of places which were in Japa- 
nese hands at the outbreak of the war between 
the United States and Japan. The Japanese 
have permitted these official neutral observers in 
some cases to speak alone with the Americans 
and in other cases to speak with them in the 



presence of Japanese officials. American pris- 
oners of war and civilian internees so inter- 
viewed have made no serious complaints of in- 
fractions of the Convention. The prisoners are 
reported to be receiving standard Japanese 
Army rations. The private soldiers at the camp 
at Zentsuji are being given employment in agri- 
culture for which they receive pay. Civilians 
are in part interned under similar conditions in 
camps, in part under forced residence in their 
own houses, and in part at large under parole. 

The Government of the United States, how- 
ever, still remains without information from 
official neutral sources regarding the condition 
of Americans in the Philippines, in parts of 
occupied China, in Hong Kong, in Malaya, and 
in the Netherlands East Indies, to which the 
Japanese Government has not yet admitted of- 
ficial neutral observers. Efforts have been 
made and are currently being continued to ob- 
tain Japanese consent to admit to these places 
also official neutral observers for the purpose 
of investigating the condition of American 
citizens, both interned and not interned. 

Americans interned in Germany are accom- 
modated in heated buildings and are reported 
to receive the rations of German depot troops. 
They are permitted to receive visits from their 
relatives and are allowed to exchange mail with 
friends and relatives and to receive parcels and 
supplementary food and clothing. They re- 
ceive good medical attention, and in most cases 
the aged and sick are reliably reported to have 
been released. Their general health is stated 
to be good. 

Americans interned in Italy are reliably re- 
ported not to be confined in camps but to be 
under orders to remain in certain towns and 
districts. 

This Government is endeavoring to fulfil its 
undertakings with regard to the Geneva Con- 
ference and at the same time is insisting that 
the full benefits of the Convention be recip- 
rocally granted by the enemy countries to Amer- 
ican citizens in their hands. 



448 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



AGREEMENT WITH PANAMA FOR LEASE OF DEFENSE SITES 



[Released to the press May 18] 

The Governments of the Republic of Panama 
and the United States of America have reached 
an important agreement covering the use by 
the armed forces of the United States of nu- 
merous defense areas in the Republic of Pan- 
ama. The agreement, to enter into effect when 
approved by the National Assembly of Panama, 
was signed at Panama on May 18 by the Am- 
bassador of the United States, Edwin C. Wil- 
son, and the Panamanian Minister of Foreign 
Affairs, Octavio Fabrega. 

At the tame time announcement was made of 
the satisfactory settlement of certain outstanding 
problems in the relations between the two coun- 
tries, as embodied in notes exchanged May 18, 
1942 between the Secretary of State and the 
Panamanian Ambassador in Washington, Senor 
Don Ernesto Jaen Guardia. Among the vari- 
ous points on which agreement ha9 been reached, 
those of particular significance follow: The 
withdrawal of the Panama Railroad Company 
from real-estate operations in the cities of Pan- 
ama and Colon by turning over to Panama cer- 
tain lots owned by the company in those cities; 
the delivery to the Government of Panama of 
the waterworks and sewerage systems lying 
wholly within territory under the jurisdiction 
of the Republic of Panama ; and the liquidation 
of Panama's indebtedness arising out of the con- 
struction of. the strategic Rio Hato - Chorrera 
Highway. The agreements reached on these 
three points will be submitted to the Congress 
of the United States for approval. 

Pending the conclusion of the agreement for 
the use of the defense areas, the Panamanian 
Government has permitted the military forces 
of the United States to occupy and develop 
these areas as gun emplacements, airplane-de- 
tector stations, bombing ranges, and auxiliary 
air fields. The largest of these is the Rio Hato 
air base, situated some 80 miles to the southwest 
of the Canal. 

Immediately following the attack by the 
Japanese on Pearl Harbor, Panama declared 
war on Japan, Germany, and Italy and since 



that time has taken numerous and effective steps 
which have demonstrated that republic's will- 
ingness to assume promptly and whole-heart- 
edly its responsibility as a partner in the defense 
of the Panama Canal, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Treaty of Friendship and 
Cooperation signed at Washington on March 2, 
1936. 

This agreement is another significant land- 
mark in the history of the relations between 
the United States and Panama and constitutes 
an important contribution to the security of the 
Canal and the defense of the Hemisphere. 

[Released to the press May 18] 

The text of the agreement for the lease of 
defense sites in the Repubkc of Panama 
follows: ' 

"The undersigned, Octavio Fabrega, Minister 
for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Panama, 
and Edwin C. Wilson, Ambassador of the 
United States of America, acting on behalf of 
our respective Governments, for which we are 
duly and legally authorized, have concluded the 
following Agreement : 

"The Governments of the Republic of 
Panama and of the United States of America, 
conscious of their joint obligation, as expressed 
in the provisions of the General Treaty of 
Friendship and Cooperation, concluded March 
2, 1936, to take all measures required for the ef- 
fective protection of the Panama Canal in 
which they are jointly and vitally interested, 
have consulted together and have agreed as 
follows : 

"Article I 
"The Republic of Panama grants to the 
United States the temporary use for defense 
purposes of the lands referred to in the 
Memorandum attached to this Agreement and 
forming an integral part thereof. 3 These 



1 The text here printed conforms to the signed 
original. 

3 Not printed. Identification of the strategic areas 
involved is withheld for reasons of military secrecy. 



MAY 23, 1942 



449 



lands shall be evacuated and the use thereof by 
the United States of America shall terminate 
one year after the date on which the definitive 
treaty of peace which brings about the end of 
the present war shall have entered into effect. 
If within that period the two Governments be- 
lieve that, in spite of the cessation of hostilities, 
a state of international insecurity continues to 
exist which makes vitally necessary the con- 
tinuation of the use of any of the said defense 
bases or areas, the two Governments shall again 
enter into mutual consultation and shall con- 
clude the new agreement which the circum- 
stances require. 

"The national authorities of the Republic of 
Panama shall have adequate facilities for ac- 
cess to the defense sites mentioned herein. 

"Article II 
"The grant mentioned in the foregoing arti- 
cle shall include the right to use the waters 
adjacent to the said areas of land and to im- 
prove and deepen the entrances thereto and the 
anchorage in such places as well as to perform 
in/on the said areas of land all the works that 
may be necessary in connection with the effec- 
tive protection of the Canal. This gives no 
right to commercial exploitation or utilization 
of the soil or subsoil, or of adjacent beaches and 
streams. 

"Article III 
"Military and naval aircraft of Panama 
shall be authorized to land at and take off from 
the airports established within the areas re- 
ferred to in Article I. Similarly, military and 
naval aircraft of the United States shall be au- 
thorized to use military and naval airports es- 
tablished by the Republic of Panama. The 
regulations covering such reciprocal use shall be 
embodied in an agreement to be negotiated by 
the appropriate authorities of the two countries. 

"Article IV 
"The Republic of Panama retains its sov- 
ereignty over the areas of land and water men- 
tioned in the Memorandum referred to in Ar- 
ticle I and the air space thereover, as well as 
complete jurisdiction in civil matters, provided, 
however, that during the period of temporary 



occupation contemplated by this Agreement, 
the Government of the United States shall 
have complete use of such areas and exclusive 
jurisdiction in all respects over the civil and 
military personnel of the United States situ- 
ated therein, and their families, and shall be 
empowered, moreover, to exclude such persons 
as it sees fit without regard to nationality, from 
these areas, without prejudice to the provisions 
of the second paragraph of Article I of this 
Agreement, and to arrest, try and punish all 
persons who, in such areas, maliciously com- 
mit any crime against the safety of the military 
installations therein; provided, however, that 
any Panamanian citizen arrested or detained 
on any charges shall be delivered to the author- 
ities of the Republic of Panama for trial and 
punishment. 

"Article V 

"The Republic of Panama and the United 
States reiterate their understanding of the 
temporary character of the occupation of the 
defense sites covered by this Agreement. Con- 
sequently, the United States, recognizing the 
importance of the cooperation given by Pan- 
ama in making these temporary defense sites 
available and also recognizing the burden 
which the occupation of these sites imposes 
upon the Republic of Panama, expressly under- 
takes the obligation to evacuate the lands to 
which this contract refers and to terminate 
completely the use thereof, at the latest within 
one year after the date on which the definitive 
treaty of peace which brings about the cessa- 
tion of the present war, shall have entered into 
effect. It is understood, as has been expressed 
in Article I, that if within this period the two 
Governments believe that in spite of the cessa- 
tion of hostilities, a state of international inse- 
curity continues to exist which makes vitally 
necessary the continuation of the use of any of 
the said defense bases or sites, the two Govern- 
ments shall again enter into mutual consultation 
and shall conclude the new Agreement which 
the circumstances require. 

"Article VI 

"All buildings and structures which are 
erected by the United States in the said areas 



450 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



shall be the property of the United States, and 
may be removed by it before the expiration of 
this Agreement. Any other buildings or struc- 
tures already existing in the areas at the time 
of occupation shall be available for the use of 
the United States. There shall be no obligation 
on the part of the United States herein or the 
Eepublic of Panama to rebuild or repair any 
destruction or damage inflicted from any cause 
whatsoever on any of the said buildings or 
structures owned or used by the United States 
in the said areas. The United States is not 
obliged to turn over to Panama the areas at the 
expiration of this lease in the condition in which 
they were at the time of their occupation, nor 
is the Republic of Panama obliged to allow any 
compensation to the United States for the im- 
provements made in the said areas or for the 
buildings or structures left thereon, all of which 
shall become the property of the Republic of 
Panama upon the termination of the use by the 
United States of the areas where the structures 
have been built. 

"Article VII 
"The areas of land referred to in Article I, the 
property of the United States situated therein, 
and the military and civilian personnel of the 
United States and families thereof who live in 
the said areas, shall be exempt from any tax, 
imposts or other charges of any kind by the 
Republic of Panama or its political subdivi- 
sions during the term of this Agreement. 

"Article VIII 

"The United States shall complete the con- 
struction at its own expense of the highways 
described below, under the conditions and with 
the materials specified: 

"Highway A-3. (Shall extend from Pifia 
on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus to the Canal 
Zone boundary at the Rio Providencia. It 
shall be at least ten feet in width and con- 
structed of macadam.) 

"Extension of the Trans-Isthmian Highway 
following the line of the P-8 road. (Specifica- 
tions shall be the same as for the Trans-Isthmian 
Highway. The extension shall start at Mad- 
rinal, by -passing Madden Dam by a bridge over 



the Chagres River below the Dam to connect 
with the P-8 road at Roque and shall extend 
the P-8 road from Pueblo Nuevo into Panama 
City. It is understood that the pavement of 
the bridge over the Chagres River will be lo- 
cated above the elevation established as the 
Canal Zone boundary.) 

"Upon the completion of these highways the 
Government of the United States will assume 
the responsibility for any necessary post con- 
struction operations, that is, the performance 
of work necessary to protect the original con- 
struction until such time as the roads become 
stabilized. 

"The Government of Panama guarantees that 
the roads under its jurisdiction used periodi- 
cally or frequently by the armed forces of the 
United States will be well and properly main- 
tained at all times. The Government of Pan- 
ama will ask for the cooperation of the Govern- 
ment of the United States in the performance 
of repair and maintenance work on the said 
roads whenever it deems necessary such coop- 
eration in order to fulfill the aforesaid guaran- 
tee, such as for example in the case of emer- 
gencies or situations which require prompt 
action. 

"The Government of the United States will 
bear one third of the total annual maintenance 
cost of all Panamanian roads used periodically 
or frequently by the armed forces of the United 
States, such cost to cover the expense of any 
wear or damage to roads caused by movements 
related to defense activities. The amount pay- 
able by the United States will be based upon 
accounts presented annually by the Republic 
of Panama giving in detail the total annual ex- 
penditures made by it on each highway used 
periodically or frequently by the armed forces 
of the United States, and upon accounts sim- 
ilarly presented by the Government of the 
United States giving in similar detail the ex- 
penditures made by that Government in re- 
sponse to requests from the Government of 
Panama as set forth above. In the event that 
the Government of the United States has ren- 
dered cooperation in the maintenance of the 
said roads, the expenses incurred by that Gov- 
ernment in so doing will be credited toward 



MAT 23, 1942 



451 



the share of the United States in the total main- 
tenance of the roads under the jurisdiction of 
Panama^. 

"In consideration of the above obligations 
and responsibilities of the United States, the 
Government of the Republic of Panama grants 
the right of transit for the routine movement 
of the members of the armed forces of the 
United States, the civilian members of such 
forces and their families, as well as animals, 
animal-drawn and motor vehicles employed by 
the armed forces or by contractors employed by 
them for construction work or others whose 
activities are in any way related to the defense 
program, on roads constructed by the United 
States in territory under the jurisdiction of 
the Republic of Panama and on the other na- 
tional highways which place the Canal Zone in 
communication with the defense areas and of 
the latter with each other. It should be under- 
stood that the United States will take at all 
times the precautions necessary to avoid, if pos- 
sible, interruptions of transit in the Republic 
of Panama. 

"Article IX 
"All roads constructed by the United States 
in the territory under the jurisdiction of the 
Republic of Panama shall be under the juris- 
diction of Panama. As to those secondary 
roads constructed by the United States for the 
purpose of giving access to any defense site, 
Panama grants to the military authorities of 
the United States the right to restrict or pro- 
hibit public travel on such roads within a rea- 
sonable distance from such sites if such restric- 
tion or prohibition is necessary to the military 
protection of such sites. It is understood that 
such restriction or prohibition is without preju- 
dice to the free access of the inhabitants estab- 
lished within the restricted areas to their 
respective properties. It is also understood 
that such restriction or prohibition is not to be 
exercised on any part of any main highway. 

"Article X 

"The Government of the United States of 

America, when constructing the air bases and 

airports on any of the sites referred to in Article 

I, shall take into consideration, in addition to 

462286—42 2 



the requirements of a technical order for the 
safety thereof, the regulations on the matter 
as have been or may be promulgated by the 
joint Aviation Board. 

"The Republic of Panama shall not permit, 
without reaching an agreement with the United 
States, the erection or maintenance of any aerial 
lines or other obstructions which may consti- 
tute a danger for persons flying in the vicinity 
of the areas intended for air bases or airports. 
If, in constructing the said air bases and air- 
ports, it should be necessary to remove lines of 
wire already strung because of their constitut- 
ing an obstacle thereto, the Government of the 
United States shall pay the costs of the removal 
and new installation elsewhere which may be 
occasioned. 

"Article XI 

"The Government of the United States agrees 
to take all appropriate measures to prevent arti- 
cles imported for consumption within the areas 
referred to in Article I from passing to any 
other territory of the rest of the Republic except 
upon compliance with Panamanian fiscal laws. 
Whenever it is possible, the provisioning and 
equipping of the bases and their personnel will 
be done with products, articles and foodstuffs 
coming from the Republic of Panama, provided 
they are available at reasonable prices. 

"Article XII 

"The sites referred to in Article I consist both 
of lands belonging to the Government of the 
Republic of Panama and of privately owned 
lands. 

"In the case of the private lands, which the 
Government of Panama shall acquire from the 
owners and the temporary use of which shall 
be granted by it to the Government of the 
United States, it is agreed that the Government 
of the United States will pay to the Government 
of Panama an annual rental of fifty balboas or 
dollars per hectare for all such lands covered 
by this Agreement, the Government of Panama 
assuming all costs of expropriation as well as 
indemnities and reimbursements for buildings, 
cultivations, installations or improvements 
which may exist within the sites chosen. 



452 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"In the case of the public lands the Govern- 
ment of the United States will pay to the Gov- 
ernment of Panama an annual rental of one 
balboa or dollar for all such lands covered by 
this Agreement. 

"There are expressly excepted the lands sit- 
uated in the Corregimiento of Rio Hato, 
designated by No. 12 in the attached Memo- 
randum, it being understood that for this entire 
tract the United States Government will pay 
to the Government of Panama an annual rental 
of ten thousand balboas or dollars. 

"The rentals set out in this Article shall be 
paid in balboas as defined by the Agreement 
embodied in the exchange of notes dated March 
2, 1936, referred to in Article VII of the Treaty 
of that date between the United States of 
America and Panama, or the equivalent thereof 
in dollars, and shall be payable from the date 
on which the use of the lands by the United 



States actually began, with the exception of the 
lands situated in the Corregimiento of Rio Hato 
designated by No. 12 in the attached Memo- 
randum, rental for which shall commence Jan- 
uary 1, 1943. 

"Article XIII 

"The provisions of this Agreement may be 
terminated upon the mutual consent of the sig- 
natory parties even prior to the expiration 
thereof in conformity with Articles I and V 
above, it being understood also that any of the 
areas to which this Agreement refers may be 
evacuated by the United States and the use 
thereof by the United States terminated prior 
to that date. 

"Article XIV 

"This Agreement will enter into effect when 
approved by the National Executive Power of 
Panama and by the National Assembly of 
Panama." 



WHY ARE WE FIGHTING AND FOR WHAT 



ADDRESS BY STANLEY K. HORNBECK ' 



[Released to the press May 22] 

It seems to me especially appropriate to dis- 
cuss here at Chapel Hill the subject of why we 
are fighting and for what. North Carolina's po- 
litical history and its record of education and 
interest in public affairs are such that I am sure 
full and earnest consideration has been and is 
being given by most of you and your fellow 
citizens to this subject. The fact that the char- 
ter of this university was granted in the year 
in which the French Revolution began must of 
itself be a constant reminder to you, as to other 
institutions of learning, of the importance of 
fully understanding the present threat to a cen- 
tury and a half of the development throughout 
the world of free government. The State of 
North Carolina was outstanding in its insistence 



upon the adoption of the Bill of Rights as an 
integral part of the Federal Constitution. 
Needless to say, the principles embodied in both 
of those documents are nowhere cherished and 
upheld with greater determination than here. 

I understand that day after tomorrow a new 
naval aviation training center is to be commis- 
sioned at this university. The Navy Depart- 
ment lias announced that this training school 
will be the Eastern center for the Navy's vast 
new program for the preparation of 30,000 pilots 
per annum. North Carolina's traditions are 
obviously still in full vigor. 



1 Delivered under the auspices of the International 
Relations Club, University of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill, N.C., May 21, 1942. Mr. Hornbeck is Adviser on 
Political Relations, Department of State. 



MAY 23, 1942 

In September 1931 the Japanese Army 
launched an attack upon China, in Manchuria. 
In September 1935 the Italians launched an at- 
tack upon humanity and decency, in Ethiopia. 
In 1936 Italy and Germany intruded without 
warrant and with force into the affairs of a 
neighboring country, Spain. In July 1937 
the Japanese Army began in North China an 
assault destined to involve the whole Far East 
and every nation that has interests there. In 
1938 Germany embarked upon operations of 
conquest which in the next year compelled 
the British Empire to resort to arms in self- 
defense. And in 1941, with Germany already 
sinking American ships in the Atlantic Ocean, 
Japan attacked the United States in the 
Pacific ; Germany and Italy promptly declared 
war on the United States; and the United States 
was compelled to go to war in self-defense. 

This country was attacked and is now at war 
because of what we have stood for and are as a 
nation — with all that our position as a great 
power means to the aggressor nations in terms 
of principles and policies and in terms of eco- 
nomic and military strength. The programs of 
conquest pursued by Japan and by Germany 
have been and are such as to necessitate for their 
success the destruction of every democracy and 
therefore the attempt, sooner or later, by one 
or both of those countries to subjugate the 
United States. 

We do not have to rely upon mere estimates 
to know that world domination is the aim of 
each of those powers. Their leaders have de- 
clared their intentions. As far back as 1578 
Hideyoshi, the first Japanese empire builder, 
said that when he had conquered the various 
Japanese islands not then under the control of 
his master, he would "go over and take Korea". 
"With Korean troops," he continued, "I intend 
to bring the whole of China under my 
sway. ... I shall do it as easily as a man rolls 
up a piece of matting and carries it under his 
arm." Thereafter he would extend his empire 



453 

to India, Persia, and such other Asiatic nations 
as the Japanese then knew of, as well as the 
islands of the southern Pacific. In 1927 the 
authors of the Tanaka Memorial said : "In the 
future if we want to control China, we must 
first crush the United States just as in the past 
we had to fight in the Kusso-Japanese War. 
But in order to conquer China we must first 
conquer Manchuria and Mongolia. In order 
to conquer the world, we must first conquer 
China." Kegardless of the question of who 
wrote that Memorial, the course followed by 
Japan since 1927 and the utterances of not a 
few highly placed Japanese, especially since 
1937, have been utterly and completely in line 
with the concept expressed in those words. 

Nazi Germany's concepts and intentions are 
amply expounded in Hitler's various public and 
published utterances and in the testimony of 
those who are or who have been his close 
associates. 

On December 10, 1940 Adolf Hitler stated 
in an address: "... The fact remains that 
two worlds are face to face with one another. 
Our opponents are quite right when they say, 
'Nothing can reconcile us to the National So- 
cialist world.' How could a narrow-minded 
capitalist ever agree to my principles ? It would 
be easier for the Devil to go to church and 
cross himself with holy water than for these 
people to comprehend the ideas which are ac- 
cepted facts to us today. . . ." 

In Mein Kampf Hitler has said: ". . . the 
folkish view of life corresponds to the innermost 
will of nature, as nature restores that free play 
of the forces which is bound to lead to a per- 
manent mutual higher breeding, until finally 
the best of mankind, having acquired the pos- 
session of this earth, is given a free road for 
activity in domains which will lie partly above, 
partly outside it. 

"We all sense that in the distant future prob- 
lems could approach man for the conquest of 
which only a highest race, as the master nation, 



454 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



based upon the means and the possibilities of 
an entire globe, will be called upon." 

Francis Hackett in his recent book, What 
Mein Kampf Means to America, well sum- 
marizes the essence of Nazi Germany's threat 
to the democratic world: ". . . what is the 
choice, if one ponders Mein Kampf? It is be- 
tween a Hitler world and a non-Hitler world. 
A power such as he wields has its lever in the 
will to war that he has fostered. It has its ful- 
crum in the democracies' will to peace." 

On September 27, 1940 these two would-be 
conquering nations, Japan and Germany — each 
bent on world domination — formally allied 
themselves, together with Germany's satellite, 
Italy, in a treaty the essence of which was that 
if any country not already at war with them 
placed obstacles in the way of the program of 
conquest of any of the three powers those powers 
would unite in political, economic, and military 
action against such country. 

The United States, both before and after this 
attempted intimidation, indicated its objection 
and opposition to the Axis moves of aggression 
by constant protest and by giving aid to the 
countries that were attacked — especially aid to 
Britain and her allies and aid to China. In De- 
cember 1941 the aggressors attacked us because, 
like the nearer neighbors whom they had earlier 
attacked, we must be rendered impotent or their 
programs would come to naught. 

In point of time the United States was drawn 
into the "shooting" war when Japan struck at 
us at Pearl Harbor. We might have stayed out 
of the armed conflict for a little while longer. 
We might have stayed out until Europe had 
been completely overrun by Germany and until 
eastern Asia had been completely overrun by 
Japan. We might have stayed out until the 
world situation had become one in which thi9 
country would have had to meet, by itself, at- 
tacks by a more powerful Germany and a more 
powerful Japan. We might have enjoyed a few 
months more of fictional "neutrality" and tech- 



nical "peace" had not the people and the Gov- 
ernment of the United States possessed prin- 
ciples; had not the Government of the United 
States advocated world-wide acceptance and 
observance of those principles; had not the 
people and the Government of the United States 
over a long period of time objected to and diplo- 
matically opposed programs of conquest by 
force; had not the Government of the United 
States declined to disregard various commit- 
ments to which both it and Japan were parties 
to various countries which had become the ob- 
jects of aggression; and had not the United 
States begun to assist these countries in their 
resistance to aggression. We might have 
stayed out a little while longer had we been 
willing to withhold aid from our friends and to 
give aid to their enemies and ours. 

Thanks to the heroic and vigorous resistance, 
first of the Chinese, then of the British and some 
other European peoples, and next of the Rus- 
sians, we, attacked in our turn and now at war, 
are not fighting alone against victorious con- 
querors. We are under great obligation to those 
nations whose armed resistance preceded ours, 
and it behooves us to reflect with appreciation 
upon the benefits which we have derived and are 
deriving from their resolute sacrifices. Presi- 
dent Roosevelt's recent references to China are 
a stirring expression of our obligation to and 
our admiration for one of those nations. 

On April 28 the President said : 

"The Japanese may cut the Burma Road ; but 
I want to say to the gallant people of China that 
no matter what advances the Japanese may 
make, ways will be found to deliver airplanes 
and munitions of war to the armies of Generalis- 
simo Chiang Kai-shek. 

"We remember that the Chinese people were 
the first to stand up and fight against the ag- 
gressors in this war; and in the future an un- 
conquerable China will play its proper role in 
maintaining peace and prosperity not only in 
eastern Asia but in the whole world." 



MAT 23, 1942 



455 



In the course of our pre-war relations with 
Japan the Government of the United States re- 
fused to comply with brazen Japanese propo- 
sals that this country underwrite a peace set- 
tlement between Japan and China on the basis 
of the then existing military situation — thereby 
enabling Japan to impose a victor's peace upon 
China — and that we agree to pursue a course 
which would in effect facilitate further activi- 
ties of conquest by Japan directed against Rus- 
sia, against Thailand, against the Dutch, against 
the British, against the French, against the 
Portuguese, against the Philippines, and there- 
fore against us. In the case of Germany it was 
patent that we would not comply with similar 
demands which were implicit in Germany's 
program of conquest though not expressly 
presented. 

Because limitations of time necessitate limi- 
tation of subject, I wish in this discourse to 
discuss especially the causes of and the issues 
involved in that part of our war which is now 
being waged in the Far Eastern theater. In 
so doing I do not for a moment mean to imply 
that we are engaged in more wars than one. 
On the contrary, we are engaged in one war, 
a world war: a conflict between concepts and 
practices of democratic self-determination and 
concepts and practices of total autocratic dom- 
ination ; a conflict, world-wide, between princi- 
ples and procedures of law on the one hand and 
principles and procedures of brute force on the 
other hand. 

It happens that in this world conflict our 
principal opponents are two militant, militaris- 
tic nations the controlling leaders of each of 
which have for many years planned to achieve 
domination first of their neighbors and ulti- 
mately of the whole world. That these two 
militant, militaristic nations might at some 
time in the unpredictable future stand in oppo- 
sition each to the other does not detract from 
the global nature of our present conflict, be- 
cause any such future challenge of one of the 



aggressors to the other over the issue of world 
domination would arise only after subjugation 
of the United States. Whatever incidents of 
noncooperation arising out of some potential, 
ultimate clash of interests may before their de- 
feat occur between Germany and Japan will, of 
course, be to the military benefit of the United 
Nations, but such incidents, if and when, are 
almost sure to be of minor influence as con- 
trasted with the common major interest of Ger- 
many and Japan in the defeat of the powers 
that now resist them. Therefore, any examina- 
tion of the causes of and the issues involved in 
our belligerency with either Germany or Japan 
should be clearly regarded as addressed to only 
a part of a single and indivisible conflict. 

Dr. Hu Shih, the illustrious Ambassador of 
China to the United States, has recently called 
attention to the fact that world conquest has 
long been Japan's national ideal. As Dr. Hu 
stated, Japan's ruling class has been trained 
for centuries in a militaristic tradition. For 
present purposes it is pertinent to review and 
to contrast Japanese and American policies dur- 
ing the past 100 years or so. 

In 1833 the United States entered into its first 
Far Eastern treaty, a treaty with Siam. This 
treaty provided for peace and for dependable 
relationships. 

Some 10 years later, in 1844. Caleb Cushing 
negotiated our first treaty with China — similar 
in purport. 

In 1854 Commodore Perry negotiated the first 
of the treaties with Japan; and Japan, which 
for something more than 200 years had kept 
itself aloof from the world, began intercourse 
with the Occident. During the subsequent pe- 
riod of Japan's introduction to the Family of 
Nations the United States did its utmost to be- 
friend Japan. In regard to the entire Pacific 
area this country has consistently urged, as it 
has for other parts of the world, the importance 
of fair treatment among nations, and wherever 
possible the United States has attempted to dis- 



456 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



courage encroachments by any nation upon the 
independence and sovereignty of others. As 
President Roosevelt said in his message to Con- 
gress on the fifteenth of last December, "this 
American attitude was especially important to 
Japan." It has ; of course, also been important 
to China and to other countries of the Far East. 
From the days of Townsend Harris to the 
days of Joseph Grew the American Government 
and American nationals in many walks of life 
have whole-heartedly contributed to the politi- 
cal, the economic, and the social development of 
Japan along modern lines. 

In the Philippines — where our interest be- 
gan by accident — the United States has con- 
sistently followed a policy of preparing the 
Islands and their people for independence and 
has in recent years set a definite date, 1946, for 
the establishment of that independence. 

In the year 1908 this Government and the 
Government of Japan, by an exchange of notes, 
agreed that they were determined to support 
"by all pacific means at their disposal the in- 
dependence and integrity of China and the prin- 
ciple of equal opportunity for commerce and 
industry of all nations in that empire", that it 
was "the wish of the two Governments to en- 
courage the free and peaceful development of 
their commerce on the Pacific Ocean", and that 
their policy was "directed to the maintenance 
of the existing status quo in" the Pacific. To 
the principles set forth in that agreement the 
United States has faithfully adhered. 

In 1921 and 1922 this Government, by its par- 
ticipation and leadership in the deliberations 
of the Washington Conference, gave outstand- 
ing evidence of its matured and earnest inter- 
est in the maintenance of peace with justice in 
the Pacific Ocean and the Far East. That Con- 
ference was convened for the primary purpose 
of bringing about through international agree- 
ment a halt in the international race in naval 
armaments which was imposing upon the na- 
tions involved a staggering burden. This Gov- 



ernment, in the interest of securing an agree- 
ment, not only proposed a program calling for 
greater sacrifices by this country than by any 
other in the matter of the tonnage of warships 
actually in commission or under construction 
but also, in recognition of the desire of Japan 
for security, agreed to refrain from fortifying 
its island possessions. And in the Nine Power 
Treaty this Government, the Japanese Govern- 
ment, and all Ihe other conferring powers 
agreed to respect China's sovereignty and to 
provide to China full opportunity to develop 
and maintain an effective and stable govern- 
ment. 

In contrast to the record of the United States 
with regard to the Far East, Japan has, since 
shortly after its resumption of intercourse with 
the rest of the world, assiduously followed a 
program of territorial expansion and political 
domination. 

In the decade of the 1870's flickerings of Jap- 
anese imperialistic ambition began to appear 
in various activities. In 1871 certain inhab- 
itants of the Loochoo Islands who had been 
shipwrecked on the southern coast of Formosa 
were murdered by Formosan savages. The Jap- 
anese Government took up the case and before 
it was through with the matter gained Chinese, 
British, French, and American tacit assent to 
her claim of sovereignty over the Loochoos and 
in 1879 proclaimed the incorporation of those 
islands in the Japanese administrative system. 

In 1875 the Japanese Government obtained 
recognition by Russia of Japan's complete sov- 
ereignty over all the Kurile Islands, a group 
which stretches northeast of Japan for 700 or 
800 miles. In 1876 the Japanese Government 
incorporated as a part of Japan's dominions the 
Bonin Islands which lie some 600 to 700 miles 
to the east of southern Japan. 

In 1875 a Korean fort fired on a Japanese 
gunboat while that vessel was surveying the 
mouth of the Han River. In the next year 
Japan, by means of an expedition which did 



MAT 23, 1942 



457 



not fail (o display military prowess, "'per- 
suaded" the Korean Court to enter into a treaty. 
In the ensuing years Japanese agents, by in- 
trigue, by open and often violent interference 
in Korean affairs, and by frequent use of armed 
forces, steadily undermined the Korean Gov- 
ernment and prepared the way for the subjuga- 
tion of Korea to Japan which was consummated 
in 1910. 

In 1894 Japan made war on China and as a 
result acquired in 1895 Formosa and the Pesca- 
dores which lie off the coast of southeastern 
China. 

In 1904 Japan made war on Russia and as a 
result acquired in 1905 the southern portion of 
Saghalin and transfer to itself of Russia's 
rights in regard to Port Arthur, the nearby 
Kwantung leased territory and the South Man- 
churia Railway. 

In 1910 Japan concluded its long campaign of 
encroachment upon Korean rights and interests 
with enforced annexation of that unhappy 
country. 

In 1914, at the beginning of the World War, 
Japan seized the German insular colonies in the 
Pacific and as a result acquired in 1919 under 
the Treaty of Versailles a mandate over those 
areas. In their subsequent administration of 
the mandate the Japanese respected neither the 
letter nor the spirit of the mandate agreement. 
Of most importance in that connection, develop- 
ments since December 7, 1941 have clearly 
shown that they made long and careful prepa- 
rations to utilize those islands as advanced mil- 
itary and naval bases. 

Also during the World War Japan seized the 
former German holdings in Shantung Prov- 
ince, China ; and only very reluctantly did she 
in 1922, as a result of pressure brought and price 
paid by the other powers participating in the 
Washington Conference, relinquish control 
there. 

Further during the period of the World War 
Japan also attempted through the notorious 



Twenty-one Demands to obtain far-reaching 
rights and privileges in China. Had what she 
demanded been granted in toto, China would 
forthwith have become a Japanese dependency. 

In 1931 Japan occupied Manchuria by force. 

In 1933 Japan seized Jehol, penetrated into 
the neighboring province, Chahar, and extorted 
from China by threat of force a demilitarized 
zone in a section of North China extending al- 
most as far south as Peiping. 

In 1935 Japan established in the demilita- 
rized zone a semi-autonomous puppet "govern- 
ment" and instigated in the five northern prov- 
inces a so-called "autonomy movement". 

In 1937 Japan embarked on military opera- 
tions in North China which soon developed into 
an all-out attack on the whole of China. 

In 1939 Japan annexed the Spratley Islands 
which lie between southern Indochina and 
Borneo. 

In 1940 Japan by threat of force obtained 
effective military domination of northern Indo- 
china, and in 1941 by further threats of force 
she obtained an extension of this control over 
the remainder of Indochina. 

In 1941 Japan attacked American and British 
territory in the Pacific. The various moves in 
the unfolding of her program of aggression 
since December 7 in Hawaii, in the Philippines, 
in Thailand, in Borneo and the Netherlands 
East Indies, in Malaya, in Burma, in New Brit- 
ain and New Guinea, and in the Indian Ocean 
are fresh in our minds. 

This continuous militaristic expansion over 
nearly three quarters of a century has been ac- 
complished in disregard of treaty pledges and 
other commitments and by threat or use of force. 
In definite admission and affirmation of her con- 
temporary policy of conquest, Japan openly as- 
sociated herself with Germany in 1936 by enter- 
ing the Anti-Comintern Pact, and with Ger- 
many and Italy in 1940 by entering into a formal 
alliance with those nations. 



458 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Wherever Japanese military and political con- 
trol has extended — in Formosa, in Korea, in the 
Japanese mandated islands, in Manchuria, and 
in other parts of China — the commercial inter- 
ests of the United States and other countries 
have suffered from Japanese efforts to drive out 
those interests through a systematic program of 
interference and discriminatory treatment and 
through the granting to Japanese interests of 
subsidies and monopolies and special "protec- 
tion". 

As early as 1899 the Japanese Government es- 
tablished a camphor monopoly in Formosa, the 
world's chief source of natural camphor. After 
Japan's occupation of Korea practically all the 
foreign trade of that country gradually was 
channeled through Japan. In the islands of 
Micronesia, for which Japan was given a man- 
date, the doors soon were effectually closed to 
practically all foreign intercourse. 

At the time of the Japanese occupation of 
Manchuria the Japanese Government gave as- 
surances that the Open Door would be main- 
tained there. However, the principal economic 
activities in that area were soon taken over by 
special companies controlled by Japanese na- 
tionals and established under special charters 
according them a preferred or exclusive posi- 
tion. As a result, a large part of American and 
European enterprises that formerly had oper- 
ated in Manchuria were forced to withdraw 
from that area. 

This channeling of the movement of goods 
was effected primarily by means of exchange 
control exercised under the authority of regu- 
lations issued under an enabling law which pro- 
vided expressly that for the purposes of the law 
Japan should not be considered a foreign coun- 
try nor the Japanese yen a foreign currency. 
Equality of opportunity thus virtually ceased 
to exist in Manchuria. 

Soon after the hostilities between Japan and 
China began in 1937, there developed in the 
areas in China which came under Japanese mil- 



itary occupation a situation similar in its ad- 
verse effects upon American and European busi- 
ness to that in Manchuria. The Japanese set 
up puppet regimes which instituted systems of 
trade and exchange control and monopolies of 
a character discriminatory in favor of Japaneso 
trade and business. The trend of Japanese pol- 
icy made it clear that the Japanese Government 
was seeking to establish in areas under its mil- 
itary occupation such a general preference for 
and superiority of Japanese interest as would 
nullify the principle of the Open Door and its 
assurance to nationals of third powers of equal 
opportunity. 

As the Japanese troops advanced in China 
they took possession of practically all Chinese 
national, provincial, and municipal enterprises, 
occupied practically all privately owned Chineso 
industries of substantial size, confiscated or pur- 
chased at arbitrary rates with questionable cur- 
rency available stocks of raw materials, and in- 
stituted Japanese purchasing monopolies for 
those materials. In form, the public enter- 
prises seized were consolidated and reorganized 
as subsidiaries of either the large Japanese 
Government-controlled North China Develop- 
ment Company or the Centrr.l China Promotion 
Company; in fact, most of those enterprises 
were either operated directly by the Japanese 
Army or turned over to Japanese industrialists 
to operate. In form and in fact, the privately 
owned enterprises have in most cases become 
"Sino-Japanese" enterprises, with the Japanese 
assuming the advantages of management. 

By the year 1940 the Japanese Government 
had publicly revealed an enlargement of Japan's 
declared objectives from the earlier projected 
inclusion of China as a unit in Japan's "New 
Order East Asia", to an inclusion in that new 
order of the colonial possessions of European 
powers in southeast Asia and the western 
Pacific. 

An essentia] feature of Japan's proposed new 
order has been the creation of a self-sufficient 



MAY 23, 1942 



459 



economic bloc comprised of the various regions 
of the western Pacific area and referred to as 
the "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere". 
Japanese leaders have envisaged Japan's serving 
as the industrial unit in this bloc and relegating 
to the other units the function, under Japanese 
direction, of producing raw materials. 

Previous experience and current develop- 
ments have indicated clearly that establishment 
of the proposed new order in Greater East 
Asia would mean politically subservience within 
a vast area to the will of one country; would 
mean, economically, employment of the re- 
sources of that area primarily to the benefit of 
that one country; and would mean, socially, 
the aggrandizement of that one nation and the 
reduction of all other nations within that area 
to the role of inferiors. Such a -program obvi- 
ously impaired and menaced the economic and 
social interests of the United States and other 
third countries. More important, however, it 
jeopardized our broader interests — our interest 
in peace with security and in progress by orderly 
processes in international relations. 

From what we have seen of Japanese methods 
in Formosa, in Korea, in the Japanese mandated 
islands, and in Manchuria and other parts of 
China under Japanese military occupation, re- 
alization of Japan's objectives would mean the 
shutting off of an important area of the world 
from freedom of access on a non-discriminatory 
basis by the United States and other third coun- 
tries. It would mean that all intercourse be- 
tween that extensive area and third countries 
would be at the dispensation of Japan — ena- 
bling Japan to exact tribute therefrom much 
the same as in feudal times transit trade and 
contact in general were subjected by predatory 
barons to exactions under the name of protec- 
tion. 

Notwithstanding constant and unremitting 
efforts by the American Government to protect 
American interests by peaceful means and not- 
withstanding assurances by the Japanese au- 



thorities of a desire on their part for peace and 
an intention on their part to respect American 
rights, disregard of or interference with those 
rights and interests were constant and were ever 
on the increase. 

The primary cause of the present armed con- 
flict between Japan and the United States has 
been pursuit by Japan of this policy of conquest 
and determination on Japan's part to continue 
to pursue — with increasing intensity — that pol- 
icy. In pursuit of that policy, Japan's militant, 
militaristic leadership disregarded law, violated 
treaties, impaired and trampled upon the rights 
of this and other countries, took the lives of 
American nationals, physically assaulted and 
injured other American nationals, bombed and 
otherwise destroyed American property — in- 
cluding a naval vessel (the Panay), merchant 
vessels, hospitals, churches, schools, business 
houses, and residences — forcibly interfered with 
lawful American trade, ruined the legitimate 
business of many American nationals, com- 
pelled this country to make huge expenditures 
for defensive armament, made threats against 
this country, took advantage of this country's 
profound desire for peace and our patient effort 
to maintain amicable relations with their coun- 
try, and finally launched a treacherous surprise 
attack followed by a declaration of war. 

The essential facts regarding the Japanese 
diplomatic approach to the United States in 
1941 and our Government's responses on the 
subject of an "agreement" can be stated simply 
and in a few words : Japanese spokesmen came 
to the United States Government and said that 
Japan wanted an agreement regarding the sit- 
uation and problems in the western Pacific and 
eastern Asia. This Government was not ask- 
ing for an agreement, and, if Japan's inten- 
tions were peaceful and non-aggressive, there 
was no need for an agreement; but this coun- 
try and its Government wanted peace, and this 
Government replied that it would be glad to 
discuss with the Japanese Government the facts 



460 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the situation and the possibility of arriving 
at an agreement. The Japanese made various 
proposals to which it was impossible for the 
United States to agree, and in making those 
proposals they intimated that unless the United 
States agreed to what they proposed their coun- 
try would continue with its program of con- 
quest by force. At the same time, they asked 
the American Government to indicate what 
would be acceptable to this country as the 
provisions of an agreement, and they were given 
from time to time during the course of the con- 
versations, and finally on November 26, clear 
indication of this country's views. The Amer- 
ican Government at no time asked or demanded 
that an agreement be concluded nor did it at 
any time suggest that if an agreement were not 
concluded this country might resort to other 
than peaceful methods; its proposals of Novem- 
ber 26 were in no sense whatever "demands", 
and when it put forward those proposals it 
expressly and specifically stated in the written 
communication which covered them that they 
constituted a sample of what would in the 
opinion of the Government of the United States 
be sound as a basis for further discussion. One 
thing this Government did ask constantly and 
consistently: it asked that Japan desist from 
and refrain from use of armed force. Mean- 
while, and for a long time before November 
26 — as was demonstrated on December 7 — the 
armed forces of Japan were preparing for an 
armed attack on the United States as Japan's 
alternative to an assent by "agreement" on the 
part of the American Government to what 
Japan's spokesmen were demanding; and on 
December 7 Japan's armed forces attacked this 
country (and Great Britain) without warning. 
Simply stated, Japan has proceeded with a 
long-cherished and carefully developed program 
of conquest — in disregard of law, in disregard 
of treaties, in disregard of the rights and inter- 
ests of all other nations, in disregard of any 
civilized standards of morality and justice — 



employing any and every means which she has 
been able to devise or to acquire. 

In the conflict between Japan and her neigh- 
bor, China, the great issue has been and is 
whether the Chinese are to rule in their own 
country or the Japanese are to conquer, rule 
over, and enslave China and the Chinese. In 
the conflict between the United States and the 
associates of the United States on the one side, 
and Japan and Japan's allies on the other side, 
the great issue is whether peace-loving peoples 
are to rule in their various countries or the 
world's most notorious and ruthless aggressors 
are to conquer, rule over, and enslave the world. 

Concisely put, this war, forced on what are 
now the United Nations by the Axis powers, 
is a world conflict between concepts and prac- 
tices of civilization and concepts and practices 
of barbarism. The issue is that of survival or 
destruction — throughout the world — of con- 
cepts and practices of national independence and 
personal freedom. 

In this context it may be well for us to think 
for a moment of the fundamental national in- 
terests, interests of the United States, that are 
for us at stake in this world struggle. 

In a letter to the Vice President of the United 
States on January 8, 1938, the Secretary of 
State, Mr. Hull, gave expression to an adequate 
concept of national interest in words to which 
attention cannot too often be directed. 

I venture to repeat the substance of that state- 
ment with a little amplification : 

The interest of the United States in situations 
nbroad is measured in more than terms of the 
number of American citizens residing in a given 
place or region at a given moment, is more than 
the amount of investment of American citizens 
in a particular locality, is more than the volume 
of our trade — past, present, or potential. Those 
are, of course, important interests, but, over and 
above them, this country has interests that are 
and always will be broader and more funda- 
mental. These more important although less 



MAY 23, 1042 

obvious interests arise out of and rest upon the 
fact that only by respect on the part of the 
nations of the world for orderly processes in 
international relationships is there any chance 
for peace, and only in a world where there is 
peace — based on law and order and justice — can 
this country be secure. That the United States 
be able to live in peace and to enjoy security, 
that the world be safe for the people of the 
United States — and for other law-abiding and 
peace-desiring people and nations, these are na- 
tional and Nation-wide interests. These are 
primary concerns of the United States and of 
all of its people. These are fundamental and 
vital. These go beyond and transcend in im- 
portance the various material interests and con- 
cerns of persons (individuals), of property, of 
profits, of privilege, or even of prestige. 

On January 15, 1941 the Secretary of State, 
in his testimony on the Lend-Lease Bill, stated 
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the 
House of Representatives : 

"During the past eight years, our Government 
has striven, by every peaceful means at its dis- 
posal, to secure the establishment in the world of 
conditions under which there would be a rea- 
sonable hope for enduring peace. We have pro- 
ceeded in the firm belief that only if such con- 
ditions come to exist will there be a certainty that 
our country will be fully secure and safely at 
peace. The establishment of such conditions 
calls for acceptance and application by all na- 
tions of certain basic principles of peaceful and 
orderly international conduct and relations. 

"Accordingly, in the conduct of our foreign 
relations, this Government has directed its ef- 
forts to the following objectives: (1) Peace and 
security for the United States with advocacy 
of peace and limitation and reduction of arma- 
ment as universal international objectives; (2) 
support for law, order, justice, and morality and 
the principle of non-intervention; (3) resto- 
ration and cultivation of sound economic meth- 



461 

ods and relations, based or equality of treatment ; 
(4) development, in the promotion of these ob- 
jectives, of the fullest practicable measure of 
international cooperation ; (5) promotion of the 
security, solidarity, and general welfare of the 
Western Hemisphere." 

A few months later, just about a year ago, on 
May 31, 1941, in a letter to the newly appointed 
Minister for Foreign Affairs of China, the Sec- 
retary of State said : 

"As you know, the program in which the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States put 
their trust is based upon and revolves about the 
principle of equality of treatment among na- 
tions. This principle comprehends equality in 
international relations in a juridical sense, non- 
discrimination and equality of opportunity in 
commercial relations, and reciprocal inter- 
change in the field of cultural developments. 
Implicit in this principle is respect by each na- 
tion for the rights of other nations, perform- 
ance by each nation of established obligations, 
alteration of agreements between nations by 
processes not of force but of orderly and free 
negotiation, and fair dealing in international 
economic relations essential to peaceful develop- 
ment of national life and mutually profitable 
growth of international trade. One of the pur- 
poses of this program is to effect the removal of 
economic and other maladjustments which tend 
to lead to political conflicts." 

Such recent statements of American foreign 
policy are simply affirmations, with constantly 
increasing precision and clarity, of concepts and 
policies formulated and developed in the course 
of the long continuity of the relationships that 
our growing Republic (our Democracy) has 
had with the other countries of the world. 

We have believed in and have contended for 
the principles of law and order in world affairs ; 
for respect for treaties; for full regard for the 
rights and duties of nations: the right of na- 



462 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tions to security, the right of nations to enjoy 
life and to pursue happiness in their own way 
so long as these activities do not unlawfully in- 
jure others; for performance of obligations; for 
preservation of the good products of human 
thought, ingenuity, and effort ; for promotion of 
activities which advance the interests of human- 
ity in general; for the principle of equality of 
opportunity; for good-will and peace among 
men. In diplomacy we have always contended 
for these things. When forced to do so, we have 
resorted to arms for their defense. 

It is obvious that, toward safeguarding our 
national interests, there is more to be considered 
than territory (soil), more than persons, more 
than property, more than trade. Fundamental 
concepts and national institutions are more im- 
portant than are material possessions. Secu- 
rity with justice is more important than wealth. 
Self-respect is more important than prestige. 
Our way of life is more important than our 
momentary physical comfort. Honor, good 
faith, and desire and intention and effort to be 
a good neighbor are more important than power. 
All these things must be safeguarded and de- 
fended — by peaceful means as far as possible, 
by force when we are attacked. 

It is not our American concept that there 
should be a static world or a frozen status quo. 
As a nation we have always had in mind the 
evolution of society, of political institutions, of 
economic instruments and devices accomplished 
through cooperation and conciliation, through 
the pacific settlement of controversies and 
through the general improvement of all condi- 
tions, national and international, by peaceful 
methods and processes. 

Which brings us to the question: "Why are 
we fighting now, and for what?" 

We are fighting today because we have been 
and are attacked. We are fighting because we 
have things — material, political, and spiritual — 
worth defending. We are fighting because if 
we did not fight, if we did not defend these 
things, we would lose them. 

We are fighting for security — security for our 



material possessions, our political possessions, 
and our spiritual possessions. 

We are fighting for our lives, for our coun- 
try's life — our national existence. We are fight- 
ing in defense of our way of life and of the way 
of life of others, who in varying degrees are like 
us and who in varying degrees are in the same 
situation — having been attacked or menaced — 
as are we. 

We are fighting — not for the first time — in 
defense of the concept of democracy; fighting 
against the concept of autocracy. We are fight- 
ing — as we have fought before — to preserve, to 
maintain, to extend, and to share our freedom, 
resisting an effort of aggressively minded na- 
tions to impose upon the world, and therefore 
upon us, a slave regime. 

We are fighting for the principles and policies 
set forth in the Atlantic Charter. The eight 
points of that Charter have been well summar- 
ized in the following language: "(1) no terri- 
torial aggrandizement ; (2 and 3) self-determi- 
nation of nations; (1) access by all nations, on 
equal terms, to the trade and raw materials of 
the world needed for their economic prosperity ; 
(5) collaboration of all nations in the economic 
field to secure improved labor conditions and 
social security; (6) a peace that will 'afford to 
all nations the means of dwelling in safety with- 
in their own boundaries'; (7) freedom of the 
seas; (8) the ultimate abandonment of force by 
all nations, and, 'pending the establishment of a 
wider and permanent system of general security,' 
the disarmament of nations 'which threaten, 
or may threaten, aggression outside their 
frontiers.' " 

'"We are fighting", as Francis B. Sayre, the 
United States High Commissioner to the Philip- 
pines, who returned a few weeks ago from the 
grim siege of Corregidor, has said in a recent 
address, "We are fighting for the rights of all 
mankind." 

In this conflict other peoples are fighting side 
by side with us, and we know and our associates 
know why we fight and what we jointly are 
fighting for. 



MAT 23, 1942 



463 



In the Declaration of the United Nations, 
representatives of the noble company of the 26 
associated nations subscribed to the purposes and 
principles embodied in the Atlantic Charter and, 
recognizing that these nations are banded to- 
gether "in a common struggle against savage 
and brutal forces seeking to subjugate the 
world", pledged their governments to employ 
their full resources and cooperation and to make 
no separate armistice or peace. 

It is important that we understand and ap- 
preciate our brave and gallant associates in 
this conflict. It is important for our own full 
participation in this world-wide armed struggle 
and for our performance of our appropriate role 
in the settlement that must come, that we under- 
stand and appreciate the interests, the history, 
the culture, the character, the capacities, the as- 
pirations, and the deeds of our associates. 
President Roosevelt in his address of February 
23 described the nature of this association of the 
United Nations and paid tribute to some of the 
most outstanding of our associates in the follow- 
ing language : 

"The United Nations constitute an association 
of independent peoples of equal dignity and 
importance. The United Nations are dedicated 
to a common cause. We share equally and with 
equal zeal the anguish and awful sacrifices of 
war. In the partnership of our common enter- 
prise we must share in a unified plan m which 
all of us must play our several parts, each of 
us being equally indispensable and dependent 
one on the other. 

"We of the United Nations are agreed on cer- 
tain broad principles in the kind of peace we 
seek. The Atlantic Charter applies not only to 
the parts of the world that border the Atlantic 
but to the whole world : disarmament of aggres- 
sors, self-determination of nations and peoples, 
and the four freedoms — freedom of speech, free- 
dom of religion, freedom from want, and free- 
dom from fear. 

"The British and the Russian people have 
known the full fury of Nazi onslaught. There 



have been times when the fate of London and 
Moscow was in serious doubt. But there was 
never the slightest question that either the 
British or the Russians wovdd yield. . . . 

"Though their homeland was overrun, the 
Dutch people are still fighting stubbornly . . . 

"The great Chinese people have suffered 
grievous losses; Chungking has been almost 
wiped out of existence, yet it remains the capital 
of an unbeatable China." 

We and our associates are going to win the 
war, and we and our associates are going to win 
the peace that follows. 

In the recently spoken words of a seasoned 
officer of our Army who was our Military At- 
tache at Belgrade when the Nazis attacked 
Yugoslavia and who has had exceptional oppor- 
tunities for observing the military might of our 
enemies : 

"Remember that we also have a military tra- 
dition. It is the best there is. It consists of 
never having lost a war. Our enemies know 
what that means. We face the challenge again. 
The job is not easy, but we can do it. We have 
the heart. We have the brains. We have the 
potential strength. When we have organized 
the team, which includes the Nation as a whole, 
we will win." 

On Sunday, May 10, Prime Minister Churchill 
said: 

". . . We have mighty Allies, bound irrev- 
ocably by solemn faith and common interests to 
stand with us in the ranks of the United 
Nations. 

"There can only be one end. When it will 
come or how it will come I cannot tell. But, 
when we survey the overwhelming resources 
which are at our disposal, once they are fully 
marshalled and developed, as they can be, as 
they will be, we may stride forward into the 
unknown with growing confidence." 

For what do we fight ? 

We fight first in self-defense, for the survival 
of the soil, the principles, and the institutions 



464 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BTJLLETIN 



that we cherish ; second, in performance of ob- 
ligations ; third, to make the world safe for the 
United States and for other democracies ; fourth, 
to make the world a better world in which to 
live — for ourselves and for all mankind. 

There lie ahead two great tasks : first, that of 
winning the war; second, that of making a bet- 
ter peace settlement than any that has hereto- 
fore been made. 

The peace settlement when this war has been 
won must contain provisions which will give 
security and make possible justice among na- 
tions. It must contain provisions which will 
discourage aggression and restrain would-be 
aggressors. It must provide reasonable scope 
for the normal, legitimate aspirations of peace- 
fully inclined and industrious peoples every- 
where. In these and other respects the peace 
which we envisage and toward which we are 
fighting must be more generously conceived and 
more firmly supported than any that has been 
achieved in the past. The peace which we now 
seek cannot be founded merely on faith or on 
hope or on charity — or on all of these. The 
peace that will follow this war must be a peace 
maintainable and maintained by cooperative 
vigilance and common effort. 

A few days ago, on May 17, our Secretary 
of State, Mr. Hull, said : 

"The United Nations have already resolved 
that once victory is achieved the economic rela- 
tions among nations will be based on the prin- 
ciples and objectives which have been tirelessly 
advocated by our Government on all appro- 
priate occasions in recent years. These prin- 
ciples and objectives have been affirmed and 
incorporated in the declaration of August 14, 
1941, known as the Atlantic Charter. They 
have been accepted as a common program by 
all our allies in the United Nations Declaration 
of January 1, 1942. 

"The far-reaching economic objectives of the 
Atlantic Charter cannot be attained by wishful 
thinking. . . . 

"With the prospect of a better world before 



them, I am confident that the people of our Na- 
tion and the peoples of all the other United 
Nations will relentlessly pursue with unflagging 
zeal our common paramount objective : an early 
and decisive victory over our enemies." 

Both Japan and Germany talk of a "new or- 
der". Everyone realizes that the old order both 
in Asia and in Europe was far from satisfactory. 
No one denies the need for a new order. But, no 
one except the Japanese militaristic leaders and 
the Nazi militaristic leaders wants the kind of 
a new order which Japan and Germany are 
attempting to force upon the world. There can 
be no returning to the old order, but the people 
of the world want none of the Japanese and 
Nazi "new order" of brutality, ruthless regi- 
mentation, and enslavement. The new order 
which must follow this war will be created by 
the peace-loving and law-abiding nations, and 
it will be for the benefit of mankind. 

In the making of the peace we must profit by 
the lessons of experience. Let us keep in mind 
the steady march of aggression which began in 
Asia in 1931, spread to Africa in 1935, to Europe 
in 1936, and which lashed directly at the United 
States in 1941. Let us remember the failure of 
the peace-loving peoples and their governments 
to resort to effective measures to halt that march 
of aggression until it became more than obvious 
that it was a movement for universal supremacy. 
During the progress of this march, the peace- 
loving nations placed reliance largely upon ap- 
peals to reason to stop it. 

The advance of the Japanese Army in Man- 
churia in September 1931 was met only by such 
appeals. Otherwise. Great Britain and the 
United States and the League of Nations stood 
by, notwithstanding the injury done not only 
to a peaceful nation, China, but to the whole 
structure of world order and hence to the in- 
terests of Great Britain, of the United States, 
and of other law-abiding powers. The Cove- 
nant of the League of Nations had come into 
force only 11 years before; the Nine Power 
Treaty, designed especially to settle the post-war 
problems of the Far East, had been signed only 



MAY 23, 1942 



465 



9 years before; the Kellogg Pact had been in 
effect only 3 years. And yet, only by words — 
words of admonition, remonstrance, exhorta- 
tion, and protest — did the world resist that as- 
sault upon this new and laboriously erected 
structure of peace. 

In 1935, aggression in Africa. In 1936, ag- 
gression in Europe. In 1937, further aggres- 
sion in Asia. Still the world relied on appeals 
to reason — only. 

In 1938 and 1939 aggression heaped upon 
aggression in Europe. Still, appeals to rea- 
son — only, and lingering hope that those appeals 
would be adequately efficacious. 

Finally, in September 1939, the democratic 
powers of Europe at long last were compelled 
to oppose force with force. 

In 1940 and 1941 Japan extended the scope 
of her aggressions. She occupied first the 
northern and then the southern part of French 
Indochina. She finally attacked the United 
States and the British and the Netherlands 
possessions. And the United States and Great 
Britain and the Netherlands were then com- 
pelled to resist force with force. 

This sad record of misplaced trust and in- 
adequate measures clearly indicates that for 
the great military advantages which the Axis 
powers have obtained and for the grave and 
desperate situation in which the United Nations 
find themselves today, the latter are themselves 
in no small measure responsible. It should also 
point to the responsibility which the people 
of these nations now owe to themselves and to 
the world to restore by deeds the balance and 
sanity and equilibrium which for a decade mere 
verbal support of an ever diminishing status 
quo did little to preserve. It should, further, 
point to the responsibility which we shall bear 
to ourselves and to the world when the peace 
is made that reliance in the future not again 
be placed upon treaties and laws and processes 
of discussion alone. 

The "never again" that becomes a slogan 
after this war has been won must be the "never 
again" of a determination on the part of all 
peace-loving members of the Family of Nations 



not to tolerate disregard of pledges, violation 
of law, and refusal decently to respect the rights 
and the opinion of mankind. 

Meanwhile, in our progress toward a dem- 
ocratic peace we must above all fully recognize 
the seriousness of the armed struggle in which 
we are now engaged. This is a struggle which 
is not limited to soldiers, to sailors, and to air- 
men. It is a struggle which calls for greater 
and ever-faster production of the implements 
of war. This country of ours must tridy be the 
"arsenal of democracy" while making itself the 
strongest of democracy's combat units. This is 
a struggle which calls for the utmost effort on 
the part of labor, on the part of industrial man- 
agement, on the part of technicians of all kinds, 
on the part of our men, our women, and even 
our children : a struggle which calls, in short, 
for the fullest possible effort of each and every 
one of us. This effort requires effective national 
unity, extensive and intensive self-denial, and 
rigorous self-discipline. 

This war will not be won by wealth of re- 
sources alone. It will not be won by production 
alone. It will be won by men — fighting; and 
by men and women and children — supporting 
from behind the lines the men who do the 
fighting. 

Both the winning of the war and the win- 
ning of the peace-to-be call for the utmost ef- 
fort of which every man, woman, and child in 
this country and in each of the United Nations 
is capable. To achieve that full effort it is es- 
sential that each of us understand clearly why 
we are fighting and envisage adequately what 
we are fighting for. Once it has been realized 
in full seriousness throughout our whole great 
country that our national survival and the 
future of our way of life are at stake, that defeat 
would mean destruction of these, and that vic- 
tory will afford opportunity to advance the 
cause of freedom and of a square deal among 
men and nations, the people of our United 
States will meet to the limit the demands which 
this tragic conflict has imposed and, in vastly 
increasing proportions, is going to impose 
upon us. 



466 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



MASTERS OF BIGOTRY 
ADDRESS BY RAYMOND H. GEIST ' 



[Released to the press May 22] 

On the night of February 27, 1933 I beheld 
from the balcony of my home in the Bellevue 
Park in Berlin the red glow of the flames which 
were consuming the German Reichstag, the fu- 
neral pyre on which the short-lived liberties of 
the German people were extinguished. For 
three years I had watched the gathering storm 
which, when it broke with incredible swiftness 
and fury, far surpassed in reality and terror the 
liveliest forebodings which imagination can 
conceive. A new monster, like the hungry 
beasts of the arena, was let loose upon thousands 
of innocent victims whose cries of anguish have 
swollen to the convulsive sobs of millions in 
many countries where the Axis conquerors have 
fixed their iron heels. For seven long years I 
worked within the precincts of this monster's 
domain while he grew to incomparable power, 
insolent exultation, and disdain. He has 
amassed great weapons of war on land and sea, 
gigantic armies, and vast productive means with 
which he has embarked upon a career of ruth- 
less conquest — an attempted conquest of the 
world and of its civilization. The insidiousness 
of his early course before he fell with fire and 
sword upon his neighbors reveals the method of 
his treachery and guile. The great fraud un- 
folded from day to day within plain view of the 
whole world; but none was so profoundly de- 
ceived as those fellow citizens of his who lis- 
tened to him in the market place offering free- 
dom from want and national resurrection when 
he was preparing chains and dungeons for all 
who put their trust in him. 

Hitler took his first step toward political 
conquest at home at a time when the public 
mind was agitated about questions of national 
economy in the midst of serious unemployment. 
He availed himself of all the weaknesses and 
of all the strengths in the existing German 



1 Delivered before the National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews in Washington on May 22, 1942. Mr. 
Geist is Chief of the Division of Commercial Affairs, 
Department of State. 



commonwealth. Under the so-called totali- 
tarian system he has transformed those weak- 
nesses into brutality and callous inhumanity 
while the strength and youth of his people have 
been systematically developed and devoted 
to the pursuit of war. No indictment can rest 
heavier on a people than on the Germans of 
this generation who have failed to hold their 
place in the forward march of civilization. 
This apostasy — this total desertion of a great 
nation from faith, principles, and heritage — is 
a graver event in the annals of the world than 
the threat of armies and engines of war. The 
causes of this defection are not to be found in 
the sequence of historical occurrences in Europe 
preceding the rise of Hitler's National Socialist 
regime. No conceivable combination of hostile 
foreign powers could have driven the Germans 
to such frenzy as to wreck their national in- 
tegrity and self-respect and to destroy their 
humanity. 

Situated in the center of Europe, the German 
people have had equal opportunity to develop 
their civilization contemporaneously with 
other European states. Through the centuries 
the enlightenment which has characterized civil 
and political progress in England and France 
and other European states was consistently 
frustrated in the souls of the Germans. They 
devoted themselves with superhuman skill and 
energy to the chemistry of matter and to scien- 
tific labors in response to their one overwhelm- 
ing passion : the lust for power. Like Faust, 
the supreme creation of Germany's greatest 
thinker, the nation stood ready to ally itself 
with the prince of darkness to gain the desired 
end. This motive, subconsciously activating 
itself in the people's daily life, determined most 
profoundly the civic and moral status of the 
nation. No virtue could freely thrive in the 
German heart which mitigated or nullified the 
nation's lust for power. 

Above all during the pre-Bismarckian era, 
when other nations in Europe were forging 
ahead in the vanguard of civilization in re- 



MAT 23, 1942 



467 



sponse to the great influence of enlightenment 
that came with and after the Renaissance, the 
princely rival houses in Germany were im- 
mersed in the stolidness of their own insularity 
and retained to a remarkable degree the feudal 
concepts of the Middle Ages. Nor did the basic 
mental structure of the German people change 
with the advent of a united Reich. The supreme 
directives came from Prussia, which authorita- 
tively infused into the minds of all Germans 
the militaristic cult and the lust of war. Envy- 
ing other nations which had forged empires and 
which had expanded their powers on the seven 
seas, the German nation, once having emerged 
from its feudal impotence, developed the un- 
appeasable, aggressive policy toward other 
European states that has drenched the world in 
blood for nearly a century. This grim design, 
never yielding to the loftier ways of peace and 
to the enlightenment of civilization, has deeply 
permeated the German way of life. The guilt 
of this plot has steadily controlled German 
mental processes both in public and in private 
life. It became the habit of the nation to think 
in terms of war preparing for the inevitable 
day of days: der Tag. Militaristic show of 
power and enthronement of the god of war have 
not concealed, however, that which lies deeper 
in the heart of the Reich than all else: ines- 
capable, relentless, tormenting fear ! 

In no age and in no country in the world has 
fear become so universal, so tragic, and so im- 
placable. The discipline which notoriously 
characterizes the German people is the most 
patent manifestation of an ever-present intui- 
tive dread. The German obeys because he must 
and because he fears. He finds his freedom 
only in a self-imposed austerity which tran- 
scends the demands of the master. He is 
reared in severity and disciplines his children 
with a stern mind. Fear is ever-present in the 
German home ; it determines the course of pub- 
lic affairs and fixes the Government's policies. 
It has been inherited from generation to gener- 
ation, gnawing at the heart of the nation and 
slowly killing the soul. 

The development of political, civil, and so- 
cial life in the first and second Reichs paved 



the way for the complete subjugation which 
followed under Hitler. During the nineteenth 
century when great advancement toward polit- 
ical freedom was being made in other coun- 
tries in Europe, where the lively processes of 
enlightenment and liberal thought were con- 
tributing mightily to the advance of civiliza- 
tion, German life moved stolidly along a sepa- 
rate path. Great energy was employed in the 
development of industry, commerce, and tech- 
nical achievement. Political, civil, social, edu- 
cational, and religious life, the free exercise of 
which characterizes the free man, continued 
steadily under the auspices and discipline of 
the state. The four freedoms which our Presi- 
dent has proclaimed as the incontestable rights 
of man and which we have enjoyed from the 
earliest times were not permitted the Germans. 
These four freedoms were not in accordance 
with the policy and aims of the government. 
The common exercise of the four freedoms 
would not have led to der Tag. It is not sur- 
prising, therefore, that German civilization 
during the long period known as modern times 
has utterly failed to contribute to the world's 
uplift in the realm of moral and spiritual ad- 
vancement. In that nation there have been 
men of genius whose enlightenment and aspira- 
tions to advance the common good of man have 
been second to none and who have fought 
for the truth ; but these men have not had gen- 
eral following at home and have left little im- 
pression upon their own countrymen. From 
Heine to Thomas Mann they have been out- 
casts. 

Today, in view of what has happened in the 
world, in view of the ruthless policy which the 
German Government has been pursuing at home 
and abroad for nearly a decade, a closer exam- 
ination of German institutions may be necessary 
if we are to appraise properly the responsibility 
and culpability of those who have used these 
institutions to further their designs upon the 
peace of the civilized world. 

In the domestic political field before the Hit- 
lerian advent none of the major or minor politi- 
cal parties was free to do more than advocate 
policies of social and civic reform. The Party 



468 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



of the Social Democrats and the Catholic 
Centrum Party under auspicious circumstances 
might have led the German people to a realiza- 
tion of the freedom which we know; but the 
bigotry of the nationalists, the militarists, and 
the landed aristocracy kept alive the hate and 
the aggressive intent which the Germans har- 
bored toward their neighbors. 

In the realm of foreign politics the Germans 
had broken with their neighbors — and in fact 
with the whole world — generations ago. If the 
answer to the last war had been German domina- 
tion in Europe, they would likewise have pre- 
pared before this for the world struggle which 
is now upon us. The Germans have steadily 
lacked sufficient confidence in their own destiny 
to believe that they could fulfil their role in 
modern civilization by peaceful cooperation with 
other nations. Conscious of their achievement 
in the spheres of material, scientific, and tech- 
nicological progress, they have become arrogant 
and conceited — which was not only marked and 
confirmed in the public utterances of the last 
Kaiser but which in the bombasts of Hitler and 
his associates has amazed and shocked the world. 

It has been characteristic of the political 
thinking in Germany to ignore those traditions 
which from the days of Aristotle and Plato have 
been the directives of those nations, including 
our own, which have sought to attain a reason- 
able and cultivated civilization. We have 
availed ourselves of the inspiration of the 
Greeks and have built our political institutions 
in harmony with the world's best practices, in- 
corporating into our political system the most 
liberal and enlightened way of life. England 
had its Magna Charta in the thirteenth century. 
The short-lived bill of rights vouchsafed to the 
Germans lasted slightly over a decade, which the 
majority of the nation by popular vote sacri- 
ficed on the altar of Hitler. It was the rancor 
of separate faction? in Germany, their un- 
quenchable partisan thirst for power, which pre- 
vented the German people from uniting in the 
cause of their own salvation and in winning 
political freedom. The parties themselves split 
into factions on issues of minor importance to 
the whole nation but vital to their own selfish 



interests. So in the long history of that coun- 
try a majority in the nation has never been able 
to lead the rest along paths of peace, enlighten- 
ment, and prosperity. No political party has 
ever had a clear substantial majority in Ger- 
many whose espousal of the public welfare was 
founded on commonly accepted principles. 

The struggle for freedom in Germany has 
yet to be fought. With the victory of Hitler it 
would be long delayed, probably for genera- 
tions. To lay the foundations for the advent of 
freedom among the German people would be a 
long and arduous task. How much bigotry, 
prejudice, intolerance, and narrow-mindedness 
would have to be overcome ! What intolerable 
crimes against humanity would have to be ex- 
piated before atonement and reconciliation with 
the rest of the world would be achieved ! 

Under the shadow of authoritarian rule a vast 
administration of officials and of civil servants 
had learned obedience and discipline in the 
performance of their duties. They were not free 
to question the policies of the imperial govern- 
ment or to work within the scope of their office 
for the political amelioration of the country. 
During the brief life of the republic enlightened 
Germans like Gustave Stre^eman struggled he- 
roically to bring their fellow countrymen to 
support the liberal form of constitutional gov- 
ernment which had been adopted at Weimar and 
to cooperate in strengthening international sol- 
idarity, friendship, and peace. The reactionary 
elements supported by the militarists, powerful 
industrialists, and big land owners swiftly un- 
dermined the structure of the republic and 
opened the gates which admitted the Hitlerian 
hordes. The men who led Germany during 
these fateful years of the republic undertook an 
unrealistic task. They were asking their fellow 
citizens, who only know how to obey, to choose 
their own free destiny and to assume and main- 
tain by the exercise of their votes responsibility 
for themselves. This has utterly failed in Ger- 
many and under similar circumstances would 
fail again. This tragic example of political in- 
competency bears witness to the necessity of 
pursuing without stint the proper education 
among the people of enlightened and liberal po- 



MAT 23, 1942 



469 



litical thought. It is not enough that men 
should he law-abiding, disciplined, faithful, 
and efficient in their work. They must realize 
that theirs is the obligation to preserve freedom 
and to march themselves as the citizens of a 
whole nation in the vanguard of civilization. 

Previous to his accession to power Hitler 
avoided giving warning of the fate which he 
had in store for the religious life of the country. 
In order to introduce paganism the destruction 
of the church and established religion was fore- 
cast in the teachings of those in the party whose 
duty it was to develop a new "view of life". In 
spite of the incessant attacks made on the Cath- 
olic and Protestant churches, and in defiance 
of the intolerable pressure and persecution 
which has had to be borne by those who have 
remained faithful to their beliefs, the back of 
Christianity lias not yet been broken in Hitler's 
Reich. From the beginning the inability of the 
church in Germany to play a decisive role in 
shaping the destiny of the country, its failure 
to lead the German people more positively to 
acquire political concepts and principles equal 
to those cherished in other civilized countries, 
contributed more than any other factor to the 
moral collapse which the German nation has 
endured under Hitler. This was due not to the 
ineffectualness of the teachings of the church 
but to the sustained pressure over a long period 
of time of the German state, which demanded 
obedience even in spiritual things. When state 
and church are in conflict on the highest moral 
issues which concern the fate of the people, 
when the one is aiming at aggression and the 
other at peace, when the one seeks to enthrone 
the power of might and the other good-will 
among men, a struggle ensues which destroys 
the state and paralyzes the religious life of the 
nation. But the question remains: Why was 
not the Christian church in Germany a greater 
force in animating the national conscience to 
a higher degree of political and moral respon- 
sibility? It is because the supreme mentor of 
the people in all questions relating to national 
policy was the state. In our country the church 
constitutes an integral part of public opinion, 
and it is heard on all occasions. Enlightened 



citizens from every walk of life, including the 
leaders of the church, guide our thinking; and 
thus public opinion is openly formed. 

While religious leaders in Germany sought 
through the years to mold public opinion on 
momentous questions affecting the destiny of the 
people and during the last decade in the strug- 
gle with Hitler, Pastor Niemoeller and others 
have won the sympathy and admiration of the 
whole world, in general the church in Germany 
has limited its activities to religious and pas- 
toral functions and the maintenance of paro- 
chial schools. In contemplating this situation it 
will be apparent how mightily the religious in- 
stitutions of a country can cooperate in de- 
fending freedom and in fostering democratic 
principles of government. In the great strug- 
gle for liberty which mankind has been carrying 
on from the dawn of civilization, the inspira- 
tion of religion has been a potent aid in creating 
an enlightened public conscience. Neither the 
Catholic nor the Protestant church in Germany 
wielded sufficient influence in national affairs to 
turn the German people away from embarking 
on the catastrophic adventure with Hitler. Be- 
fore the National Socialists came to power, and 
while Hitler and his accomplices were violently 
campaigning throughout the length and breadth 
of the land, disturbing the peace and com- 
mitting violence against the Jews and their po- 
litical opponents, the mass of public opinion was 
fortified neither in the strength of religious con- 
viction nor in unity of common thought to with- 
stand the outrages everywhere committed. The 
absence of any organized opposition to the com- 
mon menace of Hitler was as complete in Ger- 
many as it was without. The church, main- 
taining the even tenor of its way, was power- 
less in the teeth of the gathering storm to 
arouse public opinion until the first blow was 
struck. What it was able to do then through 
the opposition of a few courageous souls was 
too little and too late. 

What powerful blows might have been leveled 
at the demagogue if the German people during 
the previous generation had been able to find 
some common basis of understanding in their 
religious life and had been able to allay the 



470 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



prejudices -which kept them from establishing a 
basis of united public action ! Had there been 
effective cooperation in the pursuit of common 
aims among Protestants, Catholics, and Jews in 
pre-Hitlerian Germany, it is doubtful that the 
National Socialists could ever have come to 
power. 

Nor can much more be said for the educational 
systems which have flourished for ages in the 
German Reich. Again the body of that system 
has demonstrated its strength, but the spiritual 
content of German learning lias failed to reach 
the mark. In no country has research been pur- 
sued with more persistent energy, skill, and suc- 
cess. The roots of science have penetrated 
deeply into the soil of knowledge, and the fruits 
of such labors have been brilliant and epoch- 
making discoveries. One might suppose that 
this excellent and painstaking work, this in- 
defatigable labor in the laboratories of science, 
would have redounded to the blessing of human- 
ity and would have conduced to the emancipa- 
tion of the German people. On the contrary, all 
that has been done in the realm of science 
through generations of diligent and laborious 
study has been finally converged into the hideous 
process of total war. German scientific efforts 
have always been preeminently connected with 
chemistry, that alchemy of transmuting some- 
thing common into powerful and deadly sub- 
stances, which have made the laboratories of 
Germany the terror of the civilized world. 

Likewise in the German universities intellec- 
tual standards have been reached and scholar- 
ship has risen to renowned heights. But in 
those halls the Teuton has held sway where the 
clash of sword and the bloody duel was the 
highest academic honor. Here flourished the 
raging and arrogant nationalism of the Prus- 
sian youth and the mysterious cult of German- 
ism, which revived the medievalism of the race 
and the latent paganistic longing. That aca- 
demic freedom was wiped out in Germany the 
world may well regret ; but in appraising those 
influences which contributed to the downfall of 
free learning, no little blame is due to the uni- 
versities themselves, which absurdly fostered 
vainglorious and exaggerated patriotism. More 
than any others the intellectuals of Germany 



were chilled and intimidated by the imperial 
frown. 

The universities have been the properties of 
the state ; and those that taught and they who 
learned were obliged to conform to the estab- 
lished order and to carry on the militant tradi- 
tions to which the nation was dedicated. Unlike 
our public-spirited college presidents, the rectors 
of the German universities are disciplinarians 
and stern governors. They make no appeals to 
the nation at large on outstanding questions of 
the day ; nor in their long history have they had 
any part in formulating and proclaiming those 
ideals of freedom and enlightenment which great 
seats of learning are expected to foster and make 
known. Thus, in German universities, only the 
students have been vociferous — not in the cause 
of freedom, tolerance, universal understanding, 
the golden rule, and good-will among men but 
in the cause of reactionary nationalism, intol- 
erant Germanism, and Teutonic supremacy. In 
the German universities the professors had to 
teach what the students wished to hear; other- 
wise the benches were empty and the perquisites 
lacking. In sucli an atmosphere and under such 
a system only those scholarly lecturers could rise 
to favor and prominence whose talents were re- 
nowned in curricula inoffensive to the state and 
in harmony with German processes of thought. 

The advent of the totalitarian Hitler brought 
on the world's stage a group of political leaders 
whose bigotry and intolerance have surpassed 
anything the world has ever known. The cult of 
Hitler had no background logically connected 
with political events which transpired during 
the years of the republic. The plan of establish- 
ing a National Socialist state was conceived by 
Hitler and in part explained to his followers. 
The full scope of the undertaking, with its vast 
application of totalitarian oppression and anni- 
hilation, was not defined and elaborated until 
power was seized and the bloody whip was 
firmly grasped. Then millions who had ap- 
plauded the violent harangues of the dictator 
and responded to his passionate, vehement rant 
were aghast when the first repressive blow was 
struck against the thousands who were hurried 
off to torture and to death. 



MAT 23, 1942 



471 



Throughout the land there arose, as from the 
teeth of the dragon which Cadmus slew, in- 
numerable satellites and functionaries, masters 
of bigotry who carried the Hitlerian scourge 
into every village and hamlet of the German 
Reich. Never was so much hate unleashed in 
the world as on the sixth of March in 1933 when 
the totalitarian state of Hitler came to power. 
The flood of oppression and bigotry engulfed 
the whole existing order. All that had been 
made by human skill, genius, and labor, the 
fruits of a thousand years of national endeavor, 
were seized as instruments of power and rightful 
booty. The creators were marked men. 

Against no special group was the fury more 
relentlessly directed than against the Jews of 
Germany. The claims of Hitler that these 
people had offended against the social order and 
the so-called German way of life were without 
the slightest foundation. On the contrary no 
group had contributed more since the days of 
Frederick the Great to the renown, progress, 
and greatness of the Reich. For many genera- 
tions while imperial power in that country was 
in the making, the German noble families were 
too proud to send their sons into the professions 
and sought careers in public service, in the army, 
in diplomacy, and at court where there was the 
vain and senseless hope of appearing in the en- 
tourage of the Kaiser. It was the lot of the 
Jews to perform the services that were lacking, 
and for many generations they successively dis- 
tinguished themselves in all the sciences, pro- 
fessions, arts, industry, commerce, and public 
services. They of all the Germans were the 
most cultivated and observed with peculiar skill 
the amenities and decorum of a true civilization. 
When Hitler came to power the Jews of Ger- 
many constituted closely one percent of the total 
population, but the record of their achievement 
and contribution to the glory and greatness of 
the German Reich was vastly in excess of their 
numerical strength. 

The attacks upon the Jews by the vast Hitler 
machine, their disenfranchisement, their humil- 
iation, their despoliation, the torture and mur- 
der, and finally their mass expulsion from the 
Reich were motivated by no popular movement 



among the German people. This unholy out- 
rage was conceived in the abnormal brain of 
Hitler, and the machine of the party ruthlessly 
and systematically put the plan into execution. 
The great mechanism of the state with its un- 
limited power and its vast organization of of- 
ficials and police was set in motion to hunt out 
and destroy one person in every hundred, young 
and old, man, woman, and child, not because he 
professed another religion but because Hitler 
had placed the mark of destruction on every 
Jew. The cause was not only religious but po- 
litical bigotry. The broad-mindedness of the 
German Jews, their sympathy with and natural 
devotion to a liberal and tolerant view of life, 
and their fearless work in the cause of freedom 
disqualified them from having any part in the 
Hitlerian scheme of things. They were con- 
demned because politically they were unassimi- 
lable in the Third Reich and the plunder of their 
property worth billions of marks was eagerly 
coveted by the National Socialist hordes. This 
is the true cause of the persecution of the Jews 
in Germany ; all pretense that it was due to race 
or religion was pure fraud. Since Hitler was 
unable to confess to the world that his purpose 
in despoiling the Jews was to seize their wealth, 
he invented the ridiculous theory of racial su- 
premacy which he knew the mass of his untu- 
tored followers, who were the only ones who 
counted in his scheme of things, would naively 
accept. 

At the great Catholic Church, which has 
mothered civilization throughout Christendom 
for nearly 2,000 years, the master of political 
bigotry was unable to strike the mortal blow 
which destroyed the German Jews. But his 
hatred and jealousy of the universal Catholic 
Church is even deeper and more deadly. The 
Catholic Church is doomed in Hitler's Reich. 
The National Socialist view of life is in strict 
opposition to the fundamental beliefs of the 
Christian church, just as violence and war are 
opposed to mercy and peace. The Concordat 
which Hitler made with the Holy See was 
purely a gesture of convenience. It was a part 
of his policy of choosing one victim at a time. 
The grand strategy which Hitler is employing 



472 

in dealing with the Catholic Church is to post- 
pone the final blow until in a supine Europe, 
with all opposition crushed, he would be able 
to destroy utterly the papal supremacy over 
the universal Catholic Church, confiscate all 
Catholic property, and establish the pagan 
church of the new order in Europe, where only 
Hitler and his creed of foice would be wor- 
shipped. In preparation of this scheme, which, 
if it should ever be accomplished, would shake 
the foundations of the religious world, the 
National Socialist masters of bigotry have de- 
livered three major blows at the Catholic 
Church. The first has been the relentless and 
cruel order by which the Catholic parents have 
been compelled to withdraw their children from 
Catholic schools. The second was the false 
indictment of the Catholic sisters as violators 
of the German currency laws. And the third 
was the public arraignment of innumerable 
priests on absolutely false and perjured evi- 
dence compromising their morality and integ- 
rity of character. 

The National Socialists in their blind and 
insolent bigotry are seeking to possess them- 
selves of the magnificent structure of civiliza- 
tion itself in order to tear down stone by stone 
its lofty temples of religion, liberty, science, 
and culture, In its stead they are rearing gi- 
gantic arsenals of war, far-flung camps of sol- 
diery, and prisons for those devoted to liberty 
and to the practice of their faith. Since through 
the intolerance of Hitler the Protestant and 
Catholic churches are doomed to destruction 
in the countries which he rules, in which faiths 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

his own followers have been reared, what possi- 
ble hope of survival could there be for the prac- 
tice of the Mohammedan or the Buddhist re- 
ligions if once the legions of the Germans 
possessed the lands of those faiths ? 

In one sense alone has Hitler achieved an 
absolute totalitarianism: he and his followers 
have become the world's masters of total bigotry. 

All that civilized man has found beneficial 
to his happiness and progress has been de- 
stroyed or attacked. It is not the bloody march 
of warlike conquests nor the enslavement of 
men's bodies in the service of the aggressor 
which has aroused the whole of mankind in 
this universal war but the ghastly truth that 
this grim, relentless design is to overwhelm the 
human soul in a chaos of darkness and tyranny. 

Those who have been engulfed hj the totali- 
tarian hordes have been thrown into physical 
bondage and misery ; but they have not lost the 
determination to remain steadfast in the cause 
of freedom, knowing in their hearts that the 
march of tyranny will be halted and the aggres- 
sors destroyed. The United Nations, which 
have taken up the challenge to civilization, will 
never turn back but will carry this struggle to 
the ultimate day of victory. It will then be 
realized that this mighty conflict has been un- 
leashed by those who have attempted to arrest 
the march of mankind toward progress and 
committed treason against the human race 
itself. 

Our Nation has become the hope of the world. 
We shall not fail ! 



GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS IN MANILA 



[Released to the press May 20] 

The Department has received the following 
information regarding Government officials at 
Manila. 

Inli rued in the building on Naushon Road: 
Nathaniel P. Davis (Foreign Service Inspector), 

Woodstown, N.J. 
Paul P. Steintort (Consul) and wife, Newport News, 
Va. 



Charles H. Whitaker (Vice Consul), son Paul and 

daughter Andrea, Apponaug, R.I. 
Erich W. Hoffman (Vice Consul), Maplewood, N.J. 
Frances Whitney (Clerk), Henderson, Colo. 
John P. Coffey (Clerk), Chicago, 111. 
C. Porter Kuykendall (Consul, Karachi) and wife, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
George M. Abbott (Consul, Marseille), wife and 

daughter Anne, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 



MAY 23, 1942 



473 



Knrl L. Rankin (Commercial Attache^ Cairo) and 

wife, South Bridgton, Maine 
Samuel Sokobin (Consul, Kobe), San Francisco, 

Calif. 
Horatio Mooers (Consul, Mexicali), San Diego, Calif. 
Peter K. Constan (Vice Consul, Cairo) and wife, 

West Newton, Mass. 
Lloyd N. Parks (Clerk, Cairo), Bogard, Mo. 
Charles H. Stephan (Vice Consul, Kobe), Berkeley, 

Calif. 
Robert Burton (Clerk, Peiping), New London, Conn. 
Mrs. Frank P. Lockhart, Portsmouth, Va. 
Mrs. Sarah Parsons 
Alice Erdelyo 
Interned in Villa 911 Del Pilar: 
Claude Buss, Somerton, Pa. 
Frederick Noble, Hamilton, N.Y. 
Donald Cochran, Seattle, Wash. 
Ervin Ross, Topeka, Kans. 
Charles Franks and wife, Sunnyside, Wash. 
Reynolds North, San Mateo, Calif. 
Albert Price, Salt Lake City, Utah 
Page Nelson, Washington, D.C. 



George Gray, La Mesa, N.Mex. 

Maxwell Anderson, Sac City, Iowa 

William Hebbard, Ishpeming, Mich. 

Robert Gurney, Spencer, S.Dak. 

Mrs. Gratian Gurney, with infant Mary Melissa four 

months old 
Gordon Ells and wife, Norfolk, Va. 
Joaquin Fernandez 
Ruth Lovell, Fresno, Calif. 
Bertha Greusel, McCook, N'ebr. 
Marq Connor, Elmhurst, Long Island, N.Y. 
Elise Flahaven, San Francisco, Calif. 
Virginia Hewlett, Danville, Va. 
Margaret Pierce, Wilmington, Calif. 
Mona Raymond, Honolulu, T.H. 
Edward Mack 

Messrs. Ora, Erza Lautzenheiser, Hamilton, Ind. 
Mrs. Helen Burke, Seattle, Wash. 
Mrs. Jennie Jurgenssen, Roanoke, Va. 
Mrs. Rebecca Thompson Karrer, Carlisle, Ind. 
Mrs. Helen Morton, Arlington, Va. 
Mrs. Emery Rullson 
Mr. David 



American Republics 



INAUGURATION OF "NETWORK 
ADDRESS BY THE UNDER 

[Released to the press May 20] 

I am charged tonight by the President of the 
United States to express to the Columbia Broad- 
casting System and to all of those who are listen- 
ing in, in our sister republics and in our own 
land, his deep gratification with the development 
which has made possible this linking together 
of radio networks throughout the Americas and 
his assurance that this new enterprise will meet 
with the success which it so well merits. 

It is only a short time ago that representa- 
tives of the Columbia Broadcasting System dis- 
cussed with me their plan for the improvement 
of the transmission of radio programs from the 
United States to our neighbors of the New 
World. Tonight this plan has become a reality. 
These words I am speaking can be heard 
throughout the length and breadth of the Amer- 
ican republics. Radio stations in all the 
Americas are contributing their facilities so that 



OF THE AMERICAS" PROGRAM 

SECRETARY OF STATE • 

tins and subsequent programs may be rebroad- 
cast for the benefit of millions. 

Man's conquest of space is one of the great 
achievements of the contemporary world. But 
this achievement imposes heavy responsibilities 
upon those in whose hands these new instru- 
ments of communication rest. The constructive 
use of these instruments can contribute nobly to 
human progress. But we all of us know by the 
events of the past decade how their misuse in 
other lands has thwarted human progress ; how 
such misuse in no small part has been respon- 
sible for the great world tragedy of today. 

In the field of radiocommunication the United 
States broadcasting companies have discharged 
their obligation witb a full sense of their re- 
sponsibility as potent factors in our democracy. 
Their broadcasts of the news have been distin- 
guished by their impartiality, their accuracy, 
and their integrity. 



1 Broadcast by Mr. Welles over the Columbia Broad- 
casting System May 19, 1942. 



474 

Here in the Western Hemisphere we can 
learn from the radio every day what is taking 
place in the world, whether that be good or bad, 
encouraging or disheartening. We can listen 
to news gathered from every corner of the globe, 
knowing that occurrences of the day are pre- 
sented to us just as they have happened. 

Within the Axis countries and the nations 
which they have overrun, no man can know the 
truth from the radio broadcast to which he 
listens or from the newspaper which he reads. 
All he obtains from those sources are the lies 
he is fed by the propaganda agencies set up 
by the Axis leaders to keep him in ignorance 
of the truth. 

And no one realizes more fully than these 
world outlaws themselves the everlasting sig- 
nificance of these great words: "For you shall 
know the truth, and the truth shall make you 
free." 

To retain our liberties we require freedom 
of information, and every means that can be 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

devised to increase and to perfect the inter- 
change of accurate information between us 
constitutes an added bulwark not only to our 
own democratic institutions but to the security 
of our inter- American system as well. 

We are free men in the Americas. 

That is why the United States has not needed 
and does not need to engage in propaganda in 
its dealings with its neighbors in the New 
World. 

You don't have to undertake propaganda in 
your relations with your friends and your equals 
when the channels of free communication are 
open to you. And that, thank God, is the sit- 
uation as regards the 21 American republics. 

For that reason I welcome and I am grateful 
for this new service to the cause of inter-Amer- 
ican understanding which is provided by the 
"Network of the Americas". It affords a clarion 
challenge to those who would enslave the souls 
of men — addressed to them by those who will 
win the victory to insure the freedom of the 
human spirit. 



CONFERENCE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF CENTRAL BANKS OR EQUIVALENT 
INSTITUTIONS OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS 



[Released to the press by the Pan American Union May 22] 

The Inter- American Financial and Economic 
Advisory Committee, under the chairmanship 
of Sumner Welles, met in plenary session at the 
Pan American Union on May 22 and set June 
30 as the opening date for a conference of rep- 
resentatives of the central banks or equivalent 
institutions of the American republics. 

The conference evolves from resolution VI 
adopted at the Third Meeting of the Ministers 
of Foreign Affairs, which met at Rio de Janeiro 
last January. 

Part of general hemispheric-unity measures, 
the resolution provides for a conclave to meet 



"for the purpose of drafting standards of pro- 
cedure for the uniform handling of bank credits, 
collections, contracts of lease and consignments 
of merchandise, involving real or juridical per- 
sons who are nationals of a State which ha3 
committed an act of aggression against the 
American Continent." To be considered also 
are measures to safeguard the wartime economy 
of the American nations. 

It is expected that representatives from all 
the American republics will be in attendance 
at the conference. It will be in session at the 
Pan American Union for a period of approxi- 
mately 10 days. 



The Department 



RELATIONS WITH BOARD OF ECONOMIC WARFARE 



On May 20, 1942 the President issued the 
following ''Clarification and Interpretation of 
Executive Order No. 9128 of April 13, 1942, in 
Respect of Certain Functions of the Department 
of State and the Board of Economic Warfare" : 

"The following will clarify certain relations 
and functions of the Department of State and 
the Board of Economic Warfare in the adminis- 
tration of the President's Executive Order No. 
9128 l regarding the Board and provide for co- 
operative action between them. 

"It is contemplated that meetings of the Board 
will be held at least every two weeks. An 
agenda for each meeting will be circulated in 
advance, and each member of the Board is free 
to raise questions upon his own initiative. 

"In the making of decisions, the Board and 
its officers will continue to recognize the primary 
responsibility and position, under the President, 
of the Secretary of State in the formulation and 
conduct of our foreign policy and our relations 
with foreign nations. In matters of business 
judgment concerned with providing for the pro- 
duction and procurement of materials to be im- 
ported into this country for the war effort, in- 
cluding civilian supply, the Department will 
recognize the primary responsibility and posi- 
tion of the Board. In many cases a decision 
may involve both matters of foreign policy and 
business judgment in varying degrees. No 
clear-cut separation is here possible. Accord- 
ingly, if occasions arise in which proposed ac- 
tion of the Board or its officers is thought by 
officials of the State Department to be at vari- 
ance with essential considerations of foreign 
policy, the Secretary of State and the Chairman 



1 Bulletin of April 18, 1942, p. 337. 



of the Board will discuss such matters and reach 
a joint decision, in matters of sufficient impor- 
tance obtaining direction from the President. 

"The Board will continue to recognize that 
it is the function of the Department of State to 
conduct or authorize the conduct of all negotia- 
tions with foreign governments in Washington 
and abroad. In negotiations relating to the 
production and procurement of commodities in- 
tended for import in accordance with the Pres- 
ident's Executive Order, the State Department 
will recognize the necessity for the participa- 
tion of representatives of the Board in order 
that the latter may adequately discharge its re- 
sponsibilities. In short, for the effective exer- 
cise of the functions both of the Board and the 
Department, it is essential that from the incep- 
tion of any project there be complete exchange 
of information, mutual consultation and mu- 
tual confidence. 

"In negotiations regarding lend-lease master 
agreements, subsidiary agreements, and ar- 
rangements for their implementation, includ- 
ing reciprocal aid to the United States, the De- 
partment will obtain the advice, and with re- 
spect to the importation of materials and com- 
modities (other than arms and munitions) 
will obtain the participation of the Board and 
keep it fully informed. 

"Missions and individuals desired by the 
Board to be sent to the field shall be agreed up- 
on by the State Department and the Board in 
the light of their common desire to increase to 
the maximum the war effort. The Board will 
recognize that all functions which are being or 
can be performed through the regular or auxil- 
iary Foreign Services of the Department should 
be so performed. The persons and missions 
which the Board contemplates being sent to the 



476 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



field, other than through the services men- 
tioned, are those needed for the specialized tech- 
nical and operational functions connected with 
production and procurement. The Depart- 
ment of State will recognize the need for send- 
ing such persons. In exceptional circumstan- 
ces the Board and the State Department will 
collaborate in sending joint missions on prob- 
lems arising from export control or the general 
economic warfare activities of this Govern- 
ment. 

"The Board will recognize that persons sent 
abroad, as provided above, shall be authorized 
by the Secretary of State, shall assume the sta- 
tus directed by the Secretary of State, and in 
this respect be subject to the jurisdiction of the 
Secretary of State. The Chief of the United 
States Diplomatic Mission in a foreign country 
is the officer of the United States in charge in 
that country under whose supervision are coor- 
dinated the activities there of all the official 
representatives of the United States. All ne- 
gotiations abroad with foreign governments or 
officials should be conducted by or under the di- 
rection of the Chief of the Diplomatic Mission 



in the manner described above applicable to ne- 
gotiations in which the Department and the 
Board participate. All activities should be 
fully reported to the Chief of the Diplomatic 
Mission and be conducted under his advice and 
instructions. He will respect the position of 
the Board's representatives in matters of tech- 
nical and business judgment and, should ques- 
tions arise that cannot be settled by agreement 
in the field, which should rarely be the case, 
they will be reported through the State Depart- 
ment and settled by the Secretary of State and 
the Chairman of the Board. 

"All communications to and from persons or 
missions sent abroad shall be through the facili- 
ties of the Department of State and diplomatic 
missions unless other means are agreed upon 
between the Board and the Department of State. 
The Department will do its utmost to provide 
expeditious means for such communications. 

"Both the Department of State and the Board 
of Economic Warfare and their officers recog- 
nize in the present emergency the need for speed 
in action and the importance of avoiding all 
delay in the decision of important matters." 



PROCEDURE WITH REGARD TO DISPATCH OF MISSIONS ABROAD 



On April 18, 1942, the Acting Secretary of 
State issued the following departmental order 
(No. 1052) : 

"Attached is a copy of a letter addressed re- 
cently to the various executive Departments and 
Agencies which have had, or may have, occasion 
to send representatives on special missions 
abroad. It was written with a view to insuring 
complete coordination and centralization of the 
activities of this Government in foreign 
countries. 

"If the proposed procedure is to be effective, 
it is essential that individual officers of the De- 
partment not enter directly into agreements with 
officials of other Departments and Agencies con- 
cerning the dispatch of their representatives 



abroad prior to consideration of the matter by 
the Committee set up in the Department for that 
purpose. All informal proposals of this char- 
acter should first be referred to Assistant Secre- 
tary Shaw who will see that they are given 
prompt attention. 

"The Committee will not act definitely upon 
any proposals without first conferring with the 
appropriate Geographic and other interested 
Divisions of the Department. 

"To provide a central, consolidated file of the 
representatives of other Departments and Agen- 
cies carrying on activities abroad, the Division 
of Foreign Service Administration is hereby 
designated to maintain a complete record of 
such representatives. 



MAY 23, 1942 



477 



"It will be noted from the attached letter 
that Army and Navy personnel are excepted 
from the prescribed procedure ; in addition, mod- 
ifications of the requirements -will be made in 
the case of: (1) officials of the United States 
Government sent abroad under the provisions of 
Public Law No. 63, 76th Congress; (2) persons 
sent under the Department's program of co- 
operation with the other American Republics; 
and (3) persons sent by the Coordinator of In- 
ter-American Affairs under projects which have 
been cleared with the Department in accordance 
with established procedure. 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary" 

[Attachment] 

"Department of State 
" Washington 

"The conduct of the war has brought about a 
great increase in the dispatch of individuals and 
groups to foreign countries on a variety of mis- 
sions. It is essential that orderly procedure be 
established to determine the propriety and scope 
of proposed missions in the light of all our rela- 
tions with the country concerned, to facilitate 
necessary war work, to prevent duplication of 
effort, and to provide centralized control over 
Government representatives abroad and over 
our dealings with foreign governments. Only 
in this way can the Department of State dis- 
charge its responsibility under the President for 
the conduct of foreign relations, assure the full 
utilization of the existing and potential per- 
sonnel of the Foreign Service and do its part to 
see that the combined efforts of all the executive 
agencies in the foreign field shall be unified and 
effective. 

"In order to discharge this responsibility the 
Department desires to clarify the procedure by 
which Government agencies wishing to send in- 
dividuals, or groups outside the United States 
may have their proposals promptly considered 
and acted upon and by which the status and 
duties of such persons while outside the United 
States and as representatives of the Govern- 
ment may be defined. 



"The Department has established a commit- 
tee of three under the chairmanship of the Un- 
der Secretary of State to consider with the in- 
terested Government agencies — except the War 
and Navy Departments, as to which a regular 
procedure is already in effect — all plans and 
proposals which require the dispatch of per- 
sonnel on official business outside the limits of 
the United States and its insular and territorial 
possessions. To consider the administrative as- 
pects of these trips, Mr. G. Howland Shaw, As- 
sistant Secretary of State, and to consider the 
economic aspects Mr. Dean Acheson, Assistant 
Secretary of State, will be members of the com- 
mittee. 

"The interested Departments and agencies 
are asked to designate ranking officers to meet 
with the committee from time to time as the 
need arises. Wherever a proposal may concern 
Departments or agencies other than the one pre- 
senting it, their representatives will be notified 
and asked to present their views to and meet 
with the committee. 

"The interested Departments and agencies 
are also asked in the future to submit to this 
Department in writing all plans and projects in 
as complete detail as possible. These letters 
should be addressed to the Secretary of State, 
attention of Mr. G. Howland Shaw, Assistant 
Secretary of State. Full information should be 
furnished as to 

"(a) the name of the project and country or 
countries to be visited, 

"(b) the names of the proposed representa- 
tives with a brief biographical sketch of each 
along with a statement as to what investigation 
has been made of the loyalty and responsibility 
of each, 

"(c) the complete itinerary, 

"(d) a description of operations and objec- 
tives of the project, 

"(e) the relation of the project to those in the 
same field carried on by other agencies of this 
Government, 

"(f) any expressions of interest on the part 
of the governments of the countries to be visited, 



478 

" (g) the proposed instructions to be given to 
these representatives, and 

"(h) the manner in which it is proposed that 
salary, travel and contingent expenses of such 
representatives are to be paid. 

"To insure complete coordination and cen- 
tralization of the activities of representatives of 
this Government in the countries in which they 
operate, instructions have gone forth to the 
chiefs of the appropriate diplomatic missions 
directing them to establish machinery fully ade- 
quate to assure thorough direction and super- 
vision of all such representatives operating in 
the countries to which they are accredited. 
These instructions have made it abundantly 
clear that all official representatives of this 
country are responsible at all times to the chief 
of mission in the country in which they operate. 
The appropriate chiefs of mission have been 
further informed that in order to assure the ade- 
quate fulfillment of this responsibility, all cor- 
respondence of whatever nature between rep- 
resentatives abroad and the branch of this Gov- 
ernment by which they are employed will be 
carried out through the diplomatic pouch and 
this Department's telegraphic service. 

"It is believed that the procedures described 
will eliminate duplication of effort by Govern- 
ment agencies, keep to a minimum difficulties 
and misunderstandings with the governments 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

of the countries to which representatives are 
sent, and permit these representatives to per- 
form abroad in an orderly and efficient manner 
the missions with which they have been en- 
trusted. 

"Sincerely yours, 

Sumner Welles 
Acting Secretary" 

The above letter was dispatched to the follow- 
ing departments and agencies under the dates 
indicated : 

Board of Economic Warfare Feb. 26, 1942 

War Production Board " " " 

Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs — "' 

Coordinator of Information " " " 

Department of Commerce " 

Treasury Department " " " 

Department of Agriculture " " " 

Department of the Interior " " " 

War Shipping Board " " " 

Lend-Lease Administration " " " 

Federal Security Agency--. " " " 

Federal Cominuuk'ations Commission " " " 

Office of Civilian Defense.. " " " 

Department of Justice Mar. 3, 1042 

Post Office Department " " " 

Department of Labor " " " 

Maritime Commission " " " 

Smithsonian Institution " " " 

Tariff Commission " " " 

Tennessee Valley Authority " " " 

National Housing Agency " 18 " 

Office of Price Administration " 20 " 



Commercial Policy 



NATIONAL FOREIGN TRADE WEEK 
STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE 1 



[Released to the press May 17] 

During the year that has elapsed since the last 
observance of Foreign Trade Week, a vast 
change has occurred in our country's position 
which as profoundly affects the work of those 
engaged in foreign commerce as it does the life 
and work of every one of our citizens. 



1 Made in connection with the celebration of National 
Foreign Trade Week, May 17-23, 1942. 



Our country is at war. Together with more 
than 20 nations united with us in this great 
struggle, we are engaged in repelling the at- 
tacks of powerful and ruthless enemies and are 
marshalling our human and material resources 
for armed blows that will crush once and for 
all the forces of conquest and domination. 

The greatly expanded production of our war 
industries is flowing in ever-increasing volume 



MAY 23, 1942 



479 



to our own heroic fighters and to all the battle- 
fronts of the. United Nations. With unity and 
singleness of purpose, by doubling and redou- 
bling our efforts, we are hastening the day of 
complete victory over the enemies of human 
freedom — the day when we can begin to build 
upon firm foundations a world of peace and 
progress. 

In this all-embracing endeavor foreign trade, 
as all other phases of our economic activity, 
must serve the imperative requirements of the 
great task that is before us. The international 
movement of goods is indispensable to the win- 
ning of the war. It will be equally indispensa- 
ble to the winning of the peace. 

When the war is over, enduring peace and 
advancing prosperity will be impossible unless 
international trade and international economic 
relations in general are established on the basis 
of fair treatment and mutual benefit. Our war 
effort itself will be immensely strengthened if 
we make sure now that one of the principal 
things we are fighting for is the establishment 
of a new and better system of international 
economic relations. 

The United Nations have already resolved 
that once victory is achieved the economic rela- 
tions among nations will be based on the princi- 
ples and objectives which have been tirelessly 
advocated by our Government on all appro- 
priate occasions in recent years. These princi- 
ples and objectives have been affirmed and 
incorporated in the declaration of August 14, 
1941, known as the Atlantic Charter. They 
have been accepted as a common program by 
all our allies in the United Nations Declaration 
of January 1. 1942. 

Of particular interest to foreign traders is 
the fourth point of the Atlantic Charter which 
promises "to further the enjoyment by all 
States, great or small, victor or vanquished, of 
access, on equal terms, to the trade and to the 
raw materials of the world which are needed 
for their economic prosperity". This must of 
necessity involve the rehabilitation, on a sound 
basis, not only of trade relations but also of 
monetary, financial, and all other international 
economic relations. 



A first step has been taken to implement the 
United Nations program in the economic field. 
In an agreement with the British Government, 
signed on February 23, 1942, it is stipulated, 
among other things, that in the final deter- 
mination of the benefits to be provided to the 
United States by the United Kingdom in re- 
turn for aid furnished under the Lend-Lease 
Act "the terms and conditions thereof shall be 
such as not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutually advan- 
tageous economic relations between them and 
the betterment of world-wide economic rela- 
tions." Provision is also made for agreed ac- 
tion by the two Governments, open to the par- 
ticipation of other like-minded countries, "di- 
rected to the expansion, by appropriate inter- 
national and domestic measures, of production, 
employment, and the exchange and consump- 
tion of goods, which are the material founda- 
tions of the liberty and welfare of all peoples ; 
to the elimination of all forms of discrimina- 
tory treatment in international commerce, and 
to the reduction of tariffs and other trade bar- 
riers; and, in general, to the attainment of all 
the economic objectives set forth in the Joint 
Declaration [Atlantic Charter] . . ." 

The far-reaching economic objectives of the 
Atlantic Charter cannot be attained by wishful 
thinking. We in this country must realize that 
their achievement will be impossible if we fol- 
low policies of narrow economic nationalism, 
such as our extreme and disastrous tariff policy 
after the last war. We must realize that our 
own prosperity depends fully as much on pros- 
perous conditions in other countries as their 
prosperity depends on ours. We must show 
now by our positive acts of collaboration with 
other nations of like mind that we are prepared 
to shoulder our full share of responsibility for 
building a better world. 

With the prospect of a better world before 
them, I am confident that the people of our 
Nation and the peoples of all the other United 
Nations will relentlessly pursue with unflag- 
ging zeal our common paramount objective : an 
early and decisive victory over our enemies. 



480 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



General 



VERIFICATION OF PASSPORTS OF 
AMERICAN CITIZENS 

Regulations issued by the Secretary of State 
on May 7, 1942 with regard to the control of 
persons entering and leaving the United States 
pursuant to the act of May 22, 1918, as amended, 
state that — 

"No verification of passport shall be required 
of a citizen of the United States, or a person 
who owes allegiance to the United States : 

11 (a) When returning to the United States 
from a foreign country where he had gone in 
pursuance of the provisions of a contract with 
the War or Navy Departments on a matter vital 
to the war effort if he is in possession of evidence 
of having been so engaged and has a valid pass- 
port; or 

"(&) When returning to the United States 
from a foreign country as a member of the flying 
staff, operating personnel, or crew on board an 
arriving aircraft which is under lease to or con- 
tract with the Government of the United States 
or on board an American aircraft which is 
engaged in commercial air-transport service for 
the carriage of goods, passengers, or mail be- 
tween the territory of the United States and a 
foreign country." 

FALSE ASSERTIONS REGARDING DOCU- 
MENT ALLEGED TO RE IN THE DE- 
PARTMENT FILES 

[Released to the press May 18] 

In response to inquiries concerning the article 
by Chesly Manly in the Washington Times- 
Herald on Saturday, May 16, 1942, asserting 
that a quoted account "of the UDA 1 is contained 



in the files of the State Department" and which 
quoted the alleged document under the subhead 
"State Department's View", a careful search of 
the records and files of the Department of State 
reveals no trace of the alleged document and 
no record of its ever having been received by the 
Department of State. The inference given in 
the article that the alleged report was prepared 
in the Department of State is absurd. 



International Conferences, 
Commissions, Etc. 



1 Union for Democratic Action. 



INTER - AMERICAN CONFERENCE OF 
POLICE AND JUDICIAL AUTHORITIES 

[Released to the press May 19] 

The Government of the Argentine Republic 
has extended an invitation for this Government 
to be represented at the Inter-American Con- 
ference of Police and Judicial Authorities which 
will convene at Buenos Aires on May 27, 1942. 
With the approval of the President, the follow- 
ing delegation will represent the United States 
at the Conference : 

Carl B. Spaeth, Delegate, Member of the Emergency 
Advisory Committee for Political Defense, Mon- 
tevideo 

William Sanders, Adviser, Assistant to Mr. Spaeth 
at Montevideo 

Clifton P. English, Secretary, Vice Consul at Buenos 
Aires 

The Conference is being held pursuant to a 
resolution of the Second Meeting of the Min- 
isters of Foreign Affairs of the American Re- 
publics which recommended that the govern- 
ments formulate coordinated rules and proce- 
dures with a view to aiding police and judicial 



MAT 23, 1942 



481 



authorities in the repression of subversive ac- 
tivities. The Third Meeting of Foreign Min- 
isters recommended that the Conference be held 
in May instead of September 1942 as previously 
agreed upon by the Argentine Government and 
the Governing Board of the Pan American 
Union. 



The Foreign Service 



DIPLOMATIC CONFIRMATION 

On May 21, 1942 the Senate confirmed the 
nomination of Lincoln MacVeagh, of Connecti- 
cut, now Envoy Extraordinary and Minister 
Plenipotentiary of the United States to Iceland, 
to be Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Pleni- 
potentiary of the United States to the Union of 
South Africa. 



Treaty Information 



Compiled in the Treaty Division 

NAVAL MISSIONS 

Mission to Brazil 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Brazil, an agreement was signed on May 7, 
1942 at Rio de Janeiro, by the American Am- 
bassador to Brazil and the Brazilian Minister 
for Foreign Affairs providing for the detail of 
a United States Naval Mission to Brazil. 

This agreement in effect replaces the agree- 
ment between the United States and Brazil 
signed on May 27, 1936 (Executive Agreement 



Series 94). It will remain in force for a period 
of four years beginning with the date of sig- 
nature. The services of the Mission may be 
extended beyond the period stipidated by re- 
quest of the Brazilian Government six months 
before the expiration of the agreement. Pro- 
visions are also contained in the agreement pro- 
viding for its termination by either Government 
under certain circumstances. The provisions 
contained in the agreement are similar in gen- 
eral to provisions contained in agreements be- 
tween the United States and certain other 
American republics providing for the detail of 
officers of the Army or Navy to advise the armed 
forces of those countries. 

SOVEREIGNTY 

Convention on the Provisional Administration 
of European Colonies and Possessions in the 
Americas 

Nicaragua 

By a letter dated May 18, 1942 the Director 
General of the Pan American Union informed 
the Secretary of State that the instrument of 
ratification by Nicaragua of the Convention on 
the Provisional Administration of European 
Colonies and Possessions in the Americas, signed 
at the Second Meeting of the Ministers of For- 
eign Affairs of the American Republics, held 
at Habana July 21-30, 1940, was deposited with 
the Union on May 12, 1942. 

The instrument of ratification is dated De- 
cember 19, 1941. 

DEFENSE 

Agreement With Panama for Lease of Defense 
Sites 

The text of an agreement between the United 
States and Panama signed on May 18, 1942 at 
Panama, providing for the lease to the United 
States of defense sites in Panama, appears in 
this Bulletin under the heading "The War". 



482 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Legislation 



Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce, and the 
Federal Judiciary Appropriation Bill for 1943 : 
Hearings Before the Subcommittee of the Commit- 
tee on Appropriations, United States Senate, 77th 
Cong., 2d sess., on H.R. 6599. [Department of 
State, pp. 19-46, 176-179.] 603 pp. 
S. Kept. 1347, 77th Cong., on H.R. 6599. 5 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Foreign Service List, April 1, 1942. Publication 1739. 
iv, 117 pp. Subscription, 50? a year ; single copy, 15<*. 



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THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 



MAY 30, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 153— Publication 1747 



C 



ontents 



P»ge 



The War 

Memorial Day address by the Under Secretary of 

State 485 

Switzerland: Address by James B. Stewart 489 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel . . . 491 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 1 to Revision II ... . 492 

General 

Use of Red Cross insignia for commercial purposes . . 492 
Contributions for relief in belligerent countries: 

Revision of rules and regulations 495 

Tabulation of contributions 495 

Registration of agents of foreign principals 496 

American Republics 

Peru-Ecuador boundary: Appointment of United 

States technical adviser 496 

Argentina: Anniversary of independence 497 

Visit to the United States of Venezuelan Foreign 

Minister 498 

The Department 

Death of Ira F. Hoyt 498 

Death of Sydney Yost Smith 499 

Appointment of officers 499 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 499 

Publications 500 

[over] 




i 
JUL 13 1942 







OJltGTltS— CONTINUED 



Treaty Information Pag« 

Military missions: Agreement with Colombia .... 501 
Legal assistance: Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of 

Attorney Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad . . . 501 

Finance: Taxation Convention with Canada 501 

Restriction of war: Prisoners of War Convention . . . 501 

Extradition: Treaty with Canada 502 

Legislation 502 



The War 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press May 30] 

Today, as our Nation faces the gravest danger 
it has ever confronted since it gained its inde- 
pendence, the American people are once more 
meeting together in every State of the Union 
to commemorate the observance of Memorial 
Day. 

In the elm-shaded churchyards of the New 
England hills, in the more newly consecrated 
burial places of the West, here in the quiet 
century-old cemeteries of the South, men and 
women throughout the land are now paying 
tribute to the memories of those who have made 
the ultimate sacrifice for their country and for 
their fellow men. 

Eighty years ago our people were engaged in a 
fratricidal war between the States. In the 
fires of that devastating struggle was forged 
the great assurance that within the boundaries of 
the United States men were and would remain 
free. The lives of those who died in that contest 
were not laid down in vain. 

Forty-four years ago the United States went 
to Mar to help the gallant people of Cuba free 
themselves from the imposition by a nation of 
the Old World of a brutal tyranny which could 
not be tolerated in a New World dedicated to the 
cause of liberty. Through our victory in that 
war there was wrought a lasting safeguard to 
the independence of the republics of the Western 
Hemisphere. Our citizens who then gave up 
their lives did not do so in vain. 

Twenty-five years ago the United States de- 
clared war upon Germany. Our people went to 
war because of their knowledge that the domina- 
tion of the world by German militarism would 
imperil the continuation of their national exist- 
ence. 



We won that victory. Ninety thousand of 
our fellow Americans died in that great holo- 
caust in order to win that victory. They died 
firm in the belief that the gift of their lives 
which they offered their country would be uti- 
lized by their countrymen as they had been 
promised it would be — to insure beyond doubt 
the future safety of the United States through 
the creation of that kind of world in which a 
peaceful democracy such as ours could live in 
happiness and in security. 

These ninety thousand dead, buried here on 
the slopes of Arlington and in the fields of 
France where they fell in battle, fulfilled their 
share of the bargain struck. Can we, the living, 
say as much ? Can we truly say on this Memorial 
Day that we have done what we as a nation 
could have done to keep faith with them and 
to prevent their sacrifice from being made in 
vain ? 

The people of the United States were offered 
at the conclusion of the last war the realization 
of a great vision. They were offered the op- 
portunity of sharing in the assumption of re- 
sponsibility for the maintenance of peace in the 
world by participating in an international or- 
ganization designed to prevent and to quell the 
outbreak of war. That opportunity they re- 
jected. They rejected it in part because of the 
human tendency after a great upsurge of emo- 
tional idealism to seek the relapse into what 
was once termed "normalcy". They rejected it 
because of partisan politics. They rejected it 
because of the false propaganda, widely spread, 



'Delivered by Mr. Welles at the Arlington National 
Amphitheater, May 30, 1942. 

485 



486 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



that by our participation in a world order we 
would incur the danger of war rather than avoid 
it. They rejected it because of unenlightened 
selfishness. 

At the dawn of the nineteenth century an 
English poet wrote of his own land : 

She is a fen 
Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, 
Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower 
Have forfeited their ancient dower 
Of inward happiness. We are selfish men. 

In 1920 and in the succeeding years we as a 
nation not only plumbed the depths of material 
selfishness but we were unbelievably blind. We 
were blind to what constituted our own enlight- 
ened self-interest, and we therefore refused to 
see that by undertaking a measure of responsi- 
bility in maintaining world order, with the im- 
mediate commitments which that might involve, 
we were insuring our people and our democratic 
ideals against the perils of an unforeseeable fu- 
ture, and we were safeguarding our children and 
our children's children against having to incur 
the same sacrifices as those forced upon their 
fathers. Who can today compare the cost in 
life or treasure which we might have had to 
contribute towards the stabilization of a world 
order during its formative j'ears after 1919 with 
the prospective loss in lives and the lowering 
of living standards which will result from the 
supreme struggle in which we are now engaged. 

During the first century of our independence 
our forefathers were occupying and developing 
a continent. The American pioneer was push- 
ing ever westward across the Alleghenies into 
the fertile Ohio Valley, the Mississippi and Mis- 
souri country, the Southwest, and finally to the 
Pacific Coast. The shock of disaster elsewhere 
in the world was hardly felt; relief from recur- 
ring depressions could always be found by ex- 
panding our frontiers, by opening up new lands 
and new industries to supply the needs of our 
rapidly expanding population. Thus cushioned 
against the impact of events abroad, the Ameri- 
can standard of living steadily improved and be- 
came the hope of down-trodden peoples of other 
lands. 



Protected by two great oceans to the east and 
to the west, with no enemies to the north or to 
the south, the nineteenth century imbued into 
the minds of our people the belief that in their 
isolation from the rest of the world lay their 
safety. 

But the oceans shrank with the development 
of maritime communications, and the security 
which we enjoyed by reason of our friendly 
neighbors vanished with the growth of aviation. 

And even in our earlier clays our industries 
became increasingly dependent upon raw mate- 
rials imported from abroad ; their products were 
sold increasingly in the markets of the Old 
World. Our urban industrial areas in the East 
became more and more dependent on our agri- 
cultural and mining areas in the West. All be- 
came increasingly dependent on world markets 
and world sources of supply. 

With the close of the first World War the 
period of our isolation had ended. Neither from 
the standpoint of our physical security nor 
from the standpoint of our material well-being 
could we any more remain isolated. 

But, as if by their fiat they could turn back 
the tides of accomplished fact, our leaders and 
the great majority of our people in those post- 
war years deliberately returned to the provincial 
policies and standards of an earlier day, think- 
ing that because these had served their purpose 
in the past they could do so again in a new and 
in a changed world. 

And now we are engaged in the greatest 
war which mankind has known. We are reap- 
ing the bitter fruit of our own folly and of our 
own lack of vision. We are paying dearly as 
well for the lack of statesmanship and for the 
crass errors of omission and of commission, so 
tragically evidenced in the policies of those 
other nations which have had their full share 
of responsibility for the conduct of human 
affairs during the past generation. 

What can we now do to rectify the mistakes 
of these past two decades? 

The immediate answer is self-evident. We 
must utterly and finally crush the evil men and 
the iniquitous systems which they have devised 
that are today menacing our existence and that 



MAT 30, 1942 

of free men and women throughout the earth. 
There can be no compromise. There can be no 
respite until the victory is won. We are faced 
by desperate and powerful antagonists. To 
win the fight requires every ounce of driving 
energy, every resource and initiative, every 
sacrifice, and every instinct of devotion which 
each and every American citizen possesses. 
None of us can afford to think of ourselves; 
none of us can dare to do less than his full part 
in the common effort. Our liberty, our Chris- 
tian faith, our life as a free people are at stake. 
Those who indulge themselves in false opti- 
mism, those who believe that the peoples who 
are fighting with us for our common cause 
should relieve us of our due share of sacrifice, 
those who are reluctant to give their all in this 
struggle for the survival on the earth of what 
is fine and decent must be regarded as enemies 
of the American people. 

Now more than ever before must we keep the 
faith with those who lie sleeping in this hal- 
lowed ground — and with those who now at this 
very hour are dying for the cause and for the 
land they love. 

And after we win the victory — and we will — 
what then ? Will the people of the United States 
then make certain that those who have died 
that we may live as free men and women shall 
not have died in vain? 

I believe that in such case the voice of those 
who are doing the fighting and the voice of 
those who are producing the arms with which 
we fight must be heard and must be heeded. 

And I believe that these voices of the men 
who will make our victory possible will demand 
that justice be done inexorably and swiftly to 
those individuals, groups, or peoples, as the case 
may be, that can truly be held accountable for 
the stupendous catastrophe into which they have 
plunged the human race. But I believe they 
will likewise wish to make certain that no ele- 
ment in any nation shall be forced to atone 
vicariously for crimes for which it is not re- 
sponsible and that no people shall be forced 
to look forward to endless years of want and of 
starvation. 



487 

I believe they will require that the victorious 
nations, joined with the United States, under- 
take forthwith during the period of the armis- 
tice the disarmament of all nations, as set forth 
in the Atlantic Charter, which "may threaten 
aggression outside of their frontiers". 

I believe they will insist that the United Na- 
tions undertake the maintenance of an inter- 
national police power in the years after the war 
to insure freedom from fear to peace-loving 
peoples until there is established that permanent 
system of general security promised by the At- 
lantic Charter. 

Finally, I believe they will demand that the 
United Nations become the nucleus of a world 
organization of the future to determine the final 
terms of a just, an honest, and a durable peace 
to be entered into after the passing of the period 
of social and economic chaos which will come 
inevitably upon the termination of the present 
war and after the completion of the initial and 
gigantic task of relief, of reconstruction, and 
of rehabilitation which will confront the United 
Nations at the time of the armistice. 

This is in very truth a people's war. It is a 
war which cannot be regarded as won until 
the fundamental rights of the peoples of the 
earth are secured. In no other manner can a 
true peace be achieved. 

In the pre-war world large numbers of people 
were unemployed ; the living standards of mil- 
lions of people were pitifully low ; it was a world 
in which nations were classified as "haves" and 
"have nots", with all that these words imply in 
terms of inequity and hatred. 

The pre-war world was one in which small, 
vociferous, and privileged minorities in each 
country felt that they could not gain sufficient 
profits if they faced competition from abroad. 
Even this country with its rich natural resources, 
its vast economic strength, a population whose 
genius for efficient production enabled us to ex- 
port the finest products in the world at low cost 
and at the same time to maintain the highest 
wages — a country whose competitive strength 
was felt in the markets of the world — even such 
a nation was long dominated by its minority 
interests who sought to destroy international 



488 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



trade in order to avoid facing foreign compe- 
tition. 

They not only sought to do so but for long 
years following the first World War largely 
succeeded in doing so. The destruction of in- 
ternational trade by special minority interests 
in this and in other countries brought ruin to 
their fellow citizens by destroying an essential 
element upon which the national prosperity in 
each country in large measure depended. It 
helped to pave the way, through the impoverish- 
ment and distress of the people, for militarism 
and dictatorship. Can the democracies of the 
world again afford to permit national policies 
to be dictated by self-seeking minorities of 
special privilege? 

The problem which will confront us when the 
years of the post-war period are reached is not 
primarily one of production, for the world can 
readily produce what mankind requires. The 
problem is rather one of distribution and pur- 
chasing power, of providing the mechanism 
whereby what the world produces may be fairly 
distributed among the nations of the world, and 
of providing the means whereby the people of 
the world may obtain the world's goods and 
services. Your Government has already taken 
steps to obtain the support and active coopera- 
tion of others of the United Xations in this great 
task, a task which in every sense of the term 
is a new frontier — a frontier of limitless ex- 
panse — the frontier of human welfare. 

When the war ends, with the resultant ex- 
haustion which will then beset so many of the 
nations who are joined with us, only the United 
States will have the strength and the resources 
to lead the world out of the slough in which it 
has struggled so long, to lead the way toward 
a world order in which there can be freedom 
from want. In seeking this end we will of 
course respect the right of all peoples to deter- 
mine for themselves the type of internal eco- 
nomic organization which is best suited to their 
circumstances. But I believe that here in our 
own country we will continue to find the best 
expression for our own and the general good 



under a system which will give the greatest 
incentive and opportunity for individual enter- 
prise. It is in such an environment that our 
citizens have made this country strong and great. 
Given sound national policies directed toward 
the benefit of the majority and not of the minor- 
ity and real security and equality of opportunity 
for all, reliance on the ingenuity, initiative, and 
enterprise of our citizens rather than on any 
form of bureaucratic management will in the 
future best assure the liberties and promote the 
material welfare of our people. 

In taking thought of our future opportuni- 
ties we surely must undertake to preserve the 
advantages we have gained in the past. I can- 
not believe the peoples of the United States and 
of the Western Hemisphere will ever relin- 
quish the inter-American system they have 
built up. Based as it is on sovereign equality, 
on liberty, on peace, and on joint resistance to 
aggression, it constitutes the only example in 
the world today of a regional federation of free 
and independent peoples. It lightens the dark- 
ness of our anarchic world. It should constitute 
a cornerstone in the world structure of the 
future. 

If this war is in fact a war for the liberation 
of peoples, it must assure the sovereign equality 
of peoples throughout the world as well as in 
the world of the Americas. Our victory must 
bring in its train the liberation of all peoples. 
Discrimination between peoples because of their 
race, creed, or color must be abolished. The age 
of imperialism is ended. The right of a people 
to their freedom must be recognized as the 
civilized world long since recognized the right 
of an individual to his personal freedom. The 
principles of the Atlantic Charter must be guar- 
anteed to the world as a whole — in all oceans 
and in all continents. 

And so in the fullness of God's time when the 
victory is won the people of the United States 
will once more be afforded the opportunity to 
play their part in the determination of the kind 
of world in which they will live. With cour- 
age and with vision they can yet secure the 



MAY 30, 1942 



489 



future safety of their country and of its free 
institutions and help the nations of the earth 
back into the paths of peace. 

Then on some future Memorial Day the 
American people, as they mark the graves of 



those who died in battle for their country in in vain. 



these last two World Wars, can at last truly 
say : "Sleep on in quiet and in peace ; the victory 
you made it possible for us to win has now 
been placed at the service of your country and 
of humanity ; your sacrifice has not been made 



SWITZERLAND 

ADDRESS BY JAMES B. STEWART ' 



[Released to the press May 27] 

Mr. President and Members of thes Mile High 
Club: 

I am delighted to be back once again in Colo- 
rado and to be your guest today. Like thou- 
sands who have lived here from time to time I 
have a real affection for this mountain country, 
and I should like to have brought along with 
me some of my sweltering Washington friends — 
especially one who on the day I was leaving 
the State Department said to me very seriously : 
"Jim, I have a favor to ask of you. During 
your stay in Denver you will no doubt take a 
trip or two. When you do, and you come to 
your first trout stream, please stop a moment 
and just think of me." 

I have just returned from Switzerland, that 
island of democracy which is today surrounded 
by what Hitler is pleased to call his "new or- 
der" — which now connotes one of horror and 
death. He would, of course, like nothing bet- 
ter than to drag Switzerland into his hell-pot 
and thus extinguish once and for all the light 
of liberty which burns there. The tough little 
democracy is a real thorn in the side of Hitler's 
regimented Germany. If only an anesthetic 
could be administered and the thorn quietly re- 
moved I But the wide-awake Swiss are having 
none of that and so the Germans must, as usual, 
resort to force if they are to accomplish their 
end. 



1 Delivered before the Mile High Club of Denver, 
Colo., May 26, 1942. Mr. Stewart was formerly Ameri- 
can Consul General at Zurich, Switzerland, and is now 
appointed American Minister to Nicaragua. 



Since my return I have frequently been asked, 
"Will the Germans attack Switzerland, and, if 
so, have the Swiss any hope of successful re- 
sistance?" No one can answer those questions 
with certainty. However, there are sound rea- 
sons why Germany in its own best interests 
should hesitate to attack Switzerland. First 
and foremost Switzerland is prepared. When 
I drove across the French-Swiss border in Au- 
gust 1940 it was necessary for me to engage a 
chauffeur as every road sign had been removed. 
By the time I reached Zurich I had seen enough 
barbed wire and concrete defense work through- 
out the country to convince anyone and espe- 
cially the Germans that the Swiss people and 
their Government were in deadly earnest. Hard 
and well-trained soldiers were stationed at their 
posts of duty, and determination and confidence 
could be seen in the countenance of every man 
and woman. Switzerland was ready for the 
worst. But I do not wish to give those of you 
who have visited, studied, or played in that 
beautiful country a distorted picture of the 
scene. The lush countryside was just as satis- 
fying and the glorious mountains just as exhila- 
rating as when you knew them. The quaint 
villages were as spick and span as only Swiss 
villages can be. In fact, to quote a borrowed 
tribute, the whole country looked exactly as if 
it had had its face washed three times a day. 

In spite of Switzerland's extensive prepara- 
tions and her highly efficient citizen army, it is 
now accepted as a fact that a German army was 
ready to march across the Swiss border in May 



490 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1940 to get at France. However, the early col- 
lapse of that country caused the war lords to 
countermand the order. At the present time it 
is difficult to see what advantages would accrue 
to Germany from an invasion of Switzerland. 
On the contrary there would be notable disad- 
vantages. For instance, the German High 
Command no doubt fears that the St. Gotthard 
and Simplon tunnels would be blown up in the 
event an invasion should be attempted. That 
would be a serious blow to Germany and to her 
so-called Axis partner, Italy, because through 
those tunnels hundreds of freight cars laden 
with coal and war supplies pass daily between 
the two countries. The Brenner Pass alone 
could not accommodate the traffic necessary to 
supply Italy and at the same time furnish war 
supplies to General Rommel's army in Africa. 
The High Command also fears that power plants 
along the Rhine between Germany and Switzer- 
land might meet the same fate, and those plants 
supply vital German industries with power. 
The Germans also recognize that the efficient 
Swiss factories might be bombed. Party lead- 
ers realize that their efforts to soften the watch- 
ful Swiss with fifth columnists have been a fail- 
ure. Finally, it may be that the corrupt and 
overbearing German leaders who are now in ab- 
solute power fear that if Switzerland should dis- 
appear as an independent sovereign nation there 
would be no spot to which they could flee if a 
storm should break. 

As to the second part of the question, I would 
answer that in the affirmative because I believe 
that the Swiss have confidence in their ability 
to successfully resist the enemy. That opinion 
is based on two years of association with those 
upstanding. God-fearing people and familiarity 
witli their history, which dates from 1291 and 
covers 650 years of freedom. Notwithstanding 
differences in race, language, and religion, the 
Swiss stand today as they stood yesterday a 
united people, their strength springing from a 
common ideal and background. Every Swiss 
citizen knows that the only hope he has of sav- 
ing that which is so precious to him is to be 



strong and to have the will to die for his ideal. 
He may be obliged to see a part of his country 
overrun by hordes from the north, in which 
case he would move into his mountain passes and 
fortresses and from these wage battle to the 
death. And well does his bad neighbor know it. 

Everyone desires to know what is taking place 
in Germany itself. I can only tell you what one 
learns and senses from across a neutral frontier. 
German newspapers and periodicals come into 
Switzerland, and whereas they studiously seek 
to give a distorted picture of conditions in the 
democracies and especially in the United States 
and at the same time to make one believe that 
all is well in Germany, nevertheless illuminating 
items can be gleaned from the press which in- 
dicate that this is not the case. From the Ger- 
man papers I learned that special typewriters 
are being made for persons with only one arm 
and that automobiles are being built for persons 
without legs. I noticed that publicity is being 
given to a "politeness campaign". Prizes are 
to be distributed to the winners. 

Friends have asked me about German edu- 
cation. It is not an exaggeration to say that 
from the age of 7, German children cease to 
come under the influence cf their parents or 
their church. They have been taken over by 
the state. The recent graduation of pupils 
from Germany's Adolf Hitler schools recalls 
the Fuehrer's scornful observation that "the 
British have their Eton College and we have 
our Adolf Hitler schools". And what are the 
aims of the Nazi Eton? A German, broad- 
casting to South America, gave the answer: 
"National socialism has broken away from the 
old concepts of education." It certainly has ! 
The ideal graduate today is a good, tough, 
obedient Nazi who has no responsibility to his 
parents or to his church. And therein we have 
the clue to the German definition of freedom 
of youth: freedom from moral restraint, free- 
dom from having to think about conduct. 
Physical training is placed above mental 
training, mechanical skill above intellect, and 
blind loyalty to the party above everything else. 



MAY 30, 1942 



491 



Let us see what a loyal Nazi thinks of the prod- 
uct of the Nazi system of education. Friedrich 
Hussong, the German novelist, recently made 
this statement: 

"I am compelled to point to a certain amount 
of bad behavior prevalent to an embarrassing 
extent among youth. This refers to exceptions, 
on the whole. 

"Nevertheless, bad examples are particularly 
dangerous to young people. We want to give 
just an idea of the kind of complaints we re- 
ceive. There is, for instance, the complaint of 
a wounded officer in a military hospital who 
says that youthful rowdyism does not even stop 
short before war casualties. 

"It is with mixed feelings that we listen to a 
complaint about a 13-year-old girl who tells her 
mother: 'You are a public menace.' Which is 
more amazing, the brat who dares say such 
things or the mother who stands for it?" 

Hussong concludes by attributing youth's bad 
behavior to the fact that parents, teachers, and 
Hitler youth leaders are now at the front. 

News items show that severe prison sentences 
for minor offenses are common in Germany to- 
day. In many cases arrests are the result of the 
wide-spread practice of denunciation which is 
regarded as the citizens' highest duty and it is 
drilled into children of all ages as a part of their 
education. Children denounce their parents, 
married people denounce each other, friend 
denounces friend until now this revolting prac- 
tice has become a veritable plague. Recently I 
was told the following by one of my Swiss 
friends. One day last winter a German manu- 
facturer living in Constance, a town on the 
German-Swiss border, was ordered before the 
local police. He was given a lecture and a warn- 
ing about listening to foreign broadcasts. A 
month later he was once more called by the 
police who told him that having again listened 
to a foreign broadcast he must go to a concen- 
tration camp. The man was allowed to return 
home to make certain preparations and to his 
inquiry the policeman with him stated that it 



was the man's own son who had denounced him. 
That man entered his home, shot his son and 
himself. 

During my stay in Switzerland I was im- 
pressed with the sinister, baleful, and murderous 
quality of the German machine, its implacable 
hatred for everything we stand for, and its con- 
suming passion to conquer and to exploit. When 
I returned home I noted with satisfaction our 
solidarity and the extent of the war effort which 
is undoubtedly giving the enemy much food 
for thought. Reason for apprehension, how- 
ever, is seen in an apparent disposition on the 
part of most people to be satisfied with our 
progress and to be without any real fear of the 
terrible menace that threatens. Confidence is 
a grand quality but over-confidence in these 
times can be disastrous. Even now some peo- 
ple are concerned as to whether we shall be 
sufficiently generous to the vanquished. This 
is not the time for such speculation. There is 
much hard work ahead and many sacrifices to 
be made before there is any question of victory. 
But victory there must be, as there can be no 
compromise with those nations whose ruthless 
and able forces have set out to bring about our 
destruction. Nation after nation has under- 
estimated the enemy and then came surprise, de- 
feat, and ruin. The small vanquished nations 
are looking to us. Our responsibility is tre- 
mendous, and should we make the mistake that 
they have made all would be lost. We must not 
lose. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

United States officials and their families and 
American newspaper correspondents returning 
fi-om Lisbon on the Drottningholm are listed in 
Department of State press release 245 of May 
28, 1942. American nationals other than offi- 
cials, and officials and nationals of the other 
American republics, are listed in press releases 
256 and 258 of May 29, and 259 of May 30, 1942. 



492 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 1 TO 
REVISION II 

[Released to the press May 25] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attorney 
General, the Secretary of Commerce, the Board 
of Economic Warfare, and the Coordinator of 
Liter-American Affairs, on May 25 issued Sup- 



plement 1 to Revision II of the Proclaimed List 
of Certain Blocked Nationals, promulgated May 
12, 1942. 1 

Part I of this supplement contains 236 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 28 deletions. Part II contains 87 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 15 deletions. 



General 



USE OF RED CROSS INSIGNIA FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES 



[Released to the press by the White Douse May 25] 

The President on May 25 addressed identic 
letters to Senator Frederick Van Nuys, Chair- 
man of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, 
and to Congressman Sol Bloom, Chairman of 
the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, read- 
ing as follows : 

"On April third, I transmitted to the Con- 
gress of the United States a report from the 
Acting Secretary of State, with an accom- 
panying draft bill designed more effectively to 
implement the provisions of the Red Cross 
Convention of 1929, 2 and asked that favorable 
consideration be given to the proposed 
legislation. 

"The Army, Navy and State Department feel 
strongly that war time conditions make the pro- 
posed legislation necessary. The American Na- 
tional Red Cross also strongly favors the enact- 
ment of the legislation. The proposed legisla- 
tion has been checked by the Department of 
Justice. 

"The Red Cross as a world wide movement, 
and the Red Cross emblem, to symbolize its ac- 
tivities, came into being through the Geneva 
'Convention for the amelioration of the condition 
of the wounded in armies in the field.' This 
Treaty, which was adopted on August 22, 1864, 3 
and supplemented and strengthened by the 



Geneva Conventions of 1906 4 and 1929, marks 
one of the great achievements of civilized man- 
kind. It is one of the few and the oldest of 
multi-lateral treaties still in force and effect. 
In the original and supplemental treaties, provi- 
sions were made for the humane treatment of 
prisoners of war, for the neutralization and 
protection of the personnel of the Red Cross, and 
of the Medical and Hospital personnel of the 
armed forces in time of war. Also, as a means 
of identification of those entitled to such protec- 
tion, the Red Cross was adopted as an emblem, 
the use of which was prohibited by anyone or 
for any purpose other than those stipulated in 
the treaties. As an added precaution against 
the misuse of this significant emblem the con- 
tracting Governments committed themselves to 
prohibit and prevent, or to recommend the pro- 
hibition of the use of this emblem in their re- 
spective countries by anyone other than the 
Sanitary services of the armies and navies and 
the National Red Cross Societies. 

"Prior to the first Treaty of Geneva, there 
was no known use within the United States of 
the Red Cross as a commercial trademark. Not- 
withstanding the exclusively humane purpose 
for which the Red Cross and its emblem were 
created and adopted, some individuals and or- 
ganizations thereafter registered in this country 



L 7 Federal Register 3867. 

'Treaty Series 847 (47 Stat. 2074). 



'Treaty Series 377 (22 Stat. 940). 
'Treaty Series 464 (35 Stat. 1885). 



MAY 30, 1942 

the Eed Cross name and emblem, as a trademark. 
This was done prior to the enactment of laws 
to make effective provisions of the Treaty pro- 
hibiting the use of the Red Cross name or em- 
blem for commercial purposes. Evidently those 
who adopted this trademark did so because of 
a belief that the unique character of the Red 
Cross name and emblem would have unusual 
significance and potential commercial value. 

"To great numbers of loyal Americans it 
seems almost a sacrilege for any person for pri- 
vate material benefit to use an emblem created 
by international agreement solely for humane 
purposes and as a protective mark for the estab- 
lishments caring for the sick and wounded of 
armies and those engaged in extending aid to 
them. That such use preceded this Govern- 
ment's exercise of its prohibitive powers should 
not stand as a bar to the passage of remedial 
legislation in the public interest. 

"This country today faces the greatest chal- 
lenge. Millions of its citizens are serving for its 
preservation. There are — there will be — sick 
and wounded on our battle front. It is our 
solemn obligation to give them every comfort 
and protection within not only the letter but 
also the spirit of the Treaty of Geneva. 

"It should now be the declared policy of this 
Government to give adequate and complete pro- 
tection to an emblem which, increasingly over 
the years, has come to be recognized by all na- 
tions as the symbol necessary to make possible 
humanitarian succor to the sick and wounded 
of armjes and the needy and distressed peoples 
of the world. I most earnestly commend the 
pending legislation to the favorable action of 
the Congress. 

"I am sending an identic letter to the Honor- 
able Sol Bloom. Chairman, Committee on For- 
eign Affairs, House of Representatives. 
"Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 

[Released to the press May 24] 

The text of a letter addressed to the Honor- 
able Sol Bloom, Chairman of the House Com- 
mittee on Foreign Affairs, by the Secretary of 
State follows: 



493 

llM ^ „ „ "Mat 23, 1942. 

"My Dear Mr. Bloom : 

"The following relates to the bill H.R. 6911, 
introduced by you on April 9, 1942 to imple- 
ment article 28 of the convention signed at 
Geneva on July 27, 1929 6 by preventing the use 
of the Red Cross insignia for commercial 
purposes. 

"I understand that your committee has held 
extensive hearings on this bill, which naturally 
has encountered considerable opposition from 
people who have been using the Red Cross as a 
trade-mark on their products and in their es- 
tablishments. It is not my purpose to review 
those hearings or to undertake to combat the 
arguments that have been advanced against the 
proposed measure, but rather to state from an 
unbiased point of view my understanding of 
our obligations under the convention. 

"The bill relates to paragraph (a) of article 
28 of the convention. The article reads: 

" 'The Governments of the High Contracting 
Parties whose legislation may not now be ade- 
quate shall take or shall recommend to their 
legislatures such measures as may be necessary 
at all times : 

" ' (a) to prevent the use by private persons 
or by societies other than those upon which 
this Convention confers the right thereto, of 
the emblem or of the name of the Red Cross 
or Geneva Cross, as well as any other sign or 
designation constituting an imitation thereof, 
whether for commercial or other purposes ; 

" '(&) by reason of the homage rendered to 
Switzerland as a result of the adoption of the 
inverted Federal colors, to prevent the use, 
by private persons or by organizations, of the 
arms of the Swiss Confederation or of signs 
constituting an imitation thereof, whether as 
trade-marks, commercial labels, or portions 
thereof, or in any way contrary to commercial 
ethics, or under conditions wounding Swiss 
national pride. 

" 'The prohibition mentioned in subparagraph 
(a) of the use of signs or designations consti- 
tuting an imitation of the emblem or designa- 



'' Treaty Series 847. 



494 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



tion of the Red Cross or Geneva Cross, as well as 
the prohibition mentioned in subparagraph (b) 
of the use of the arms of the Swiss Confederation 
or signs constituting an imitation thereof, shall 
take effect from the time set in each act of legis- 
lation and at the latest five years after this Con- 
vention goes into effect. After such going into 
effect it shall be unlawful to take out a trade- 
mark or commercial label contrary to such pro- 
hibitions.' 

"I understand that there has been discussion 
before the committee of the words 'shall take or 
shall recommend to their legislatures' such 
measures as may be necessary to prevent the use 
of the Red Cross or Geneva Cross, etc. I think 
that you and I, as well as members of the com- 
mittee, can readily appreciate why this obliga- 
tion was placed in the alternative form. i. e., 
'shall take or shall recommend'. It was realized 
that this convention, like many other interna- 
tional agreements, would require implementa- 
tion. Some of the signatory governments might 
have been able to implement it by orders or de- 
crees, but it was recognized that governments 
such as our own would be under the necessity of 
seeking the assistance of their respective legis- 
lative bodies. In such cases the executive could 
only recommend legislation. The provision in 
this convention is not unique in this respect. 

"However, our obligation under the conven- 
tion is not fulfilled merely by making a recom- 
mendation. I say this for the reason that the 
last paragraph of article 28 clearly shows that 
the prohibition against the use of the Red Cross 
or Geneva Cross 'shall take effect ... at the 
latest five years after this Convention goes into 
effect.' Herein lies our unqualified obligation to 
restrict the use of the Red Cross insignia to the 
purposes contemplated by the agreement. 

"Questions have also been raised at the hear- 
ings, I believe, as to why, if the convention con- 
templated an absolute prohibition on the use of 
the emblem for commercial purposes, the execu- 
tive branch of the Government did not earlier 
recommend legislation for this purpose. I shall 
not undertake to answer this question except by 
stating that, as you and I well know, it is not 



uncommon for administrative officials to allow 
matters of this sort to drift until there is some 
impelling reason for action. 

"At the time the act of January 5, 1905 was 
passed there was no provision in the convention 
under which we were then operating, namely, 
that of 1864, regarding the use of the Red Cross 
emblem for commercial purposes. Yet the Con- 
gress restricted the use to persons and corpora- 
tions who were then lawfully entitled to use it. 
Later we became a party to the convention of 
1906 containing restrictive provisions, and the 
Congress on June 23, 1910 passed an act con- 
fining the use of the emblem to persons, corpora- 
tions, or associations which had used it for law- 
ful purposes prior to January 5, 1905 but limit- 
ing the use to the 'same purpose and for the 
same class of goods'. 

"The convention of 1929 broadened the scope 
of the earlier convention in many particulars 
and incorporated article 28, which I have quoted 
above. There can be no doubt, it seems to me, as 
to our obligation under that article, and it is 
hardly worthy of us to rely upon what was 
done in 1910 as a fulfillment of this unqualified 
obligation. The fact that we failed in 1910 to 
enact adequate legislation is no excuse for our 
failure now to comply with our undertaking. 
The 32 years which have elapsed since the act 
of 1910 was passed have brought about many 
changes in world affairs. We are today in the 
midst of a struggle for human freedom and for 
the alleviation of the condition of oppressed 
peoples. We are in immediate need of the full 
benefits of the Red Cross convention, which has 
for its purpose the amelioration of human suf- 
fering and the condition of the sick and wounded 
on the field of battle. Commercial interests 
in many directions have been required to adjust 
themselves to the war needs of our country and 
to requirements for the preservation of our do- 
mestic institutions. It should be our purpose 
to surround the Red Cross, a symbol of missions 
of mercy, with every safeguard against uses 
likely to impair its effectiveness. None of us 
has any desire unreasonably to interfere with 
the legitimate commerce and trade of our people 
but I think that all of us have a desire to foster 



MAY 30, 1942 



495 



and advance humanitarian endeavors. This is 
characteristic of our people. I have great doubt 
as to whether by confining the use of the Red 
Cross insignia to Red Cross purposes the gen- 
eral course of our commercial endeavors would 
be greatly affected, certainly not for long. Our 
business people are too ingenious to permit such 
a situation to develop. Moreover, I am disin- 
clined to believe that any manufacturer would 
desire to hold on to a trade-mark if he felt that 
tc do so would prejudice the common good. In 
my judgment, the common good can best be 
served by reserving for the exclusive use of the 
medical services of the Army and Navy and the 
Red Cross organizations an emblem which has 
been chosen as their symbol and which we, along 
with other Governments, have by treaty under- 
taken to protect. I do not think that we should 
be less liberal in giving effect to these obliga- 
tions than have other Governments parties to 
the convention. 

"I am therefore hopeful and strongly recom- 
mend that the bill which you have under consid- 
eration shall be enacted into law. 
"Sincerely yours, 

Cordell Hull" 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 



IN 



REVISION OF RULES AND REGULATIONS 

[Released to the press May 28] 

Pursuant to the authority vested in the Presi- 
dent by sections 8 and 13 of the joint resolution 
of Congress approved November 4, 1939 * and 
delegated to the Secretary of State by the Presi- 
dent's Proclamation 2374 of November 4, 1939, 2 
the Secretary of State on May 28 issued the fol- 
lowing revision of the rules and regulations 
issued on November 6, 1939 3 governing the 
solicitation and collection of contributions for 
use in France; Germany; Poland; the United 



1 54 Stat. 8, 11 ; 22 U.S.C. 448, 453. 
2 Bulletin of November 4, 1939, p. 453. 
'Bulletin of November 11, 1939, p. 482. 



Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, New Zea- 
land, and the Union of South Africa, subse- 
quently made applicable to the solicitation and 
collection of contributions for use in Norway, 
Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Italy, 
Greece, Yugoslavia, Hungary, and Bulgaria. 
Paragraph 161.14 was amended in substance as 
follows : 

Causes for revocation. The Secretary will ex- 
ercise the right reserved under paragraph 7 to 
revoke any registration upon receipt of evidence 
which leads him to believe that the registrant 
has solicited, under the name used in its appli- 
cation for registration, funds or contributions 
for any purpose other than for medical aid and 
assistance or for food and clothing to relieve 
human suffering, as stipulated in paragraph 2, as 
amended ; has failed to maintain such a govern- 
ing body as that described under paragraph 11 ; 
has failed to employ such a treasurer as that de- 
scribed under paragraph 11 ; has employed any 
of the methods for soliciting contributions set 
forth under paragraph 12 ; has employed unethi- 
cal methods of publicity ; or has failed to attain 
a reasonable degree of efficiency in the conduct 
of operations. 4 

TABULATION OF CONTRIBUTIONS 

A . tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through April 1942, as shown in the reports sub- 
mitted by persons and organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State for the solicitation 
and collection of contributions to be used for 
relief in belligerent countries, in conformity 
with the regulations issued pursuant to section 
3 (a) of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effective 
by the President's proclamations of September 
5, 8, and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of 
November 4, 1939 as made effective by the Presi- 
dent's proclamation of the same date, has been 
released by the Department of State in mimeo- 
graphed form and may be obtained from the 



* These regulations In codified form appear in 7 
Federal Register 3957. 



496 

Department upon request (press release of May 
30, 1942, 40 pages). 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

REGISTRATION OF AGENTS OF FOREIGN 
PRINCIPALS 

All functions, powers, and duties of the Secre- 
tary of State under the act of June 8, 1938, as 
amended by the act of August 7, 1939, requiring 
the registration of agents of foreign principals, 
were, by an Executive order (no. 9176) signed 
May 29, 1942, transferred to and vested in the 
Attorney General. The text of the order ap- 
pears in the Federal Register for June 2, 1942, 
page 4127. 



American Republics 



PERU-ECUADOR BOUNDARY 
APPOINTMENT OF UNITED STATES TECHNICAL ADVISER 



[Released to the press May 29] 

The Protocol of Rio de Janeiro, signed on 
January 29, 1942 by the representatives of Peru 
and Ecuador for the purpose of delimiting their 
common frontier, provides for the definitive 
demarcation of the new boundary between the 
two countries. This protocol, having been rati- 
fied by the Peruvian and Ecuadoran Congresses, 
is now in effect. Articles five and seven thereof 
place certain responsibility on the Govern- 
ments of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and the 
United States to assist in this demarcation 
should such assistance be required under the 
terms of the protocol. In order to carry out its 
share of this responsibility, the Department 
takes pleasure in announcing the appointment 
of Dr. George M. McBride, distinguished 
American geographer and professor of geog- 
raphy at the University of California, Los An- 
geles, Calif., as technical adviser to the boundary 
experts of the two countries. He will depart 
shortly for Ecuador and Peru to assume these 
duties. 



Dr. McBride, who was educated at Park Col- 
lege, Auburn Theological Seminary, and Yale 
University, has taught in Santiago, Chile, 
Oruro, Bolivia, La Paz, Bolivia, Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Yale, Clark University, the University 
of Wisconsin, University ol Oklahoma, Okla- 
homa Southwest Teachers College, Columbia 
University, San Diego State College, and the 
University of California. For a number of 
years he was associated with the American Geo- 
graphical Society. He is the author of Agrar- 
ian Indian Communities of Highland, Bolivia; 
Land Systems of Mexico; and Chile: Land and 
Society. A biography of Dr. McBride will be 
found in Who's Who in America, 1942-43. 

The Department has been advised that the 
preliminary session of the Peru-Ecuador 
Boundary Demarcation Commission will be held 
at Puerto Bolivar, Ecuador, on June 1, 1942. 
This meeting will be devoted to organization 
and will be attended by the delegates of Ecuador 
and Peru and the neutral military observers of 
the four friendly governments who are lending 
their assistance. 



MAT 30, 1942 



497 



ARGENTINA: ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE 



[Released to the press May 25 J 

The texts of two telegrams sent by the Presi- 
dent of the United States to the President of Ar- 
gentina, His Excellency Dr. Roberto M. Ortiz, 
and to the Acting President of Argentina, His 
Excellency Dr. Ramon S. Castillo, respectively, 
upon the anniversary of the independence of 
the Argentine Republic follow: 

The President of the United States to the 
President of Argentina 

Mat 25, 1942. 

As we in the American Republics celebrate 
the anniversaries of those solemn acts upon 
which our sovereignties are based, we are con- 
fronted with the harsh fact that many liberty- 
loving peoples who less than three years ago 
were independent members of the family of na- 
tions are today enduring a bitter slavery. Their 
homes have been invaded — their liberties sup- 
pressed. 

Therefore, in extending to you my congratu- 
lations upon this highly significant Argentine 
anniversary, I take particular pleasure in ex- 
pressing my confidence that the spirit of resist- 
ance to aggression and devotion to democracy 
so nobly personified in your actions and in your 
utterances will lead the people of your great 
country, as in the past, along those paths which 
alone can insure the continued preservation of 
those political and economic freedoms upon 
which our American civilization is based. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The President of the United States to the 
Acting President of Argentina 

Mat 25, 1942. 

On this memorable date, the anniversary of 
the independence of the Argentine Republic, I 
wish to extend to Your Excellency and to the 
Argentine people my cordial greetings. At the 



same time, I express the conviction, which I feel 
sure is shared by Your Excellency, that because 
of their unity the peoples of the Republics of the 
Americas will preserve that freedom and liberty 
gained for them by their forefathers which is 
today challenged as never before hi the history 
of their independence. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 



[Released to the press May 28] 

The translation of a telegram from the Presi- 
dent of the Argentine Republic, His Excellency 
Dr. Roberto M. Ortiz, which has been received 
by the President of the United States, follows : 

"Buenos Aires, May 27, 191$. 
"I sincerely appreciate the kind and friendly 
greeting which Your Excellency forwarded to 
me on the anniversary which we Argentinians 
celebrated with feeling and fervor. The spirit- 
ual satisfaction produced in us by the remem- 
brance of the events which led to our freedom 
cannot lessen the distress with which we learn of 
the grief of the citizens of nations which yester- 
day were free and today are deprived of that 
highest dignity. The attitude of the people of 
my country, in the face of the suffering of those 
who have been subjugated or attacked, cannot 
be other than that marked out by the country's 
historic guiding rules and by the democratic 
feeling which, since the emancipation of the 
Republic, has ever molded its institutions and 
directed its ways of life. Argentina being iden- 
tified with the fate of the sister nations of Amer- 
ica, whose civilizations, culture, and ideals are 
common to us, her reaction to any unjust aggres- 
sion must be and always will be that of the most 
forthright repudiation and of complete solidar- 
ity. In transmitting to you these sentiments and 
returning your greetings, I renew to you the 
assurance of my friendly consideration. 

Roberto M. Ortiz" 



498 

VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF VENE- 
ZUELAN FOREIGN MINISTER 

[Released to the press May 28] 

The Foreign Minister of Venezuela, His 
Excellency Dr. C. Parra-Perez, has been in- 
vited to visit the United States as a guest of 
the American Government and will arrive in 
Washington on Wednesday, June 3. He will 
be accompanied by Sefior Rodolfo Rojas, Min- 
ister of Agriculture, Seiior J. Gil-Fortoul, 
Director of the Foreign Office, Dr. Jose Joaquin 
Gonzalez Gorrondona, Chairman of the Import 
Control Commission, and others. 

Dr. Parra-Perez and the members of the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

party will remain in Washington from June 3 
until June 7, when they will depart for a 
survey of war industries, ending with a visit to 
New York City, where they will arrive on 
June 10. 

In Washington, the program of the Foreign 
Minister includes a reception at the Venezuelan 
Embassy and other official entertainment by the 
Secretary of State and the Under Secretary of 
State. The British Ambassador, the Pan 
American Union, and Mr. and Mrs. Nelson 
Rockefeller will also receive the distinguished 
Venezuelan visitors. 

After the visit to New York Dr. Parra-Perez 
will return directly to Venezuela. 



The Department 



DEATH OF IRA F. HOYT 



[Released to I he press May 2S] 

Mr. Ira Ford Hoyt, Passport Agent of the 
Department of State at New York, died in New 
York on May 28. For the past few years Mr. 
Hoyt had not been in good health, but his 
illness did not prevent him from performing 
the arduous and important functions of Pass- 
port Agent. He had a heart attack on Monday 
night, May 25, and was ordered immediately 
to St. Francis Hospital in the Bronx where he 
died at 2 a. m. on May 28. 

Mr. Hoyt had a varied career. He was born 
in South Norwalk, Conn., on July 2, 1876 and 
was educated in the same place. He was 
engaged in theatrical enterprises for many years 
and had a great interest in the theater. He was 
a member of the General Assembly of Connecti- 
cut for the term 1907-08 and Commissioner of 
Charities at Derby, Conn., in 1908; and on June 
17, 1918 he was appointed to a position in the 
Department of State. In 1919 he was appointed 
Passport Agent at New York, a position he 
held until the time of his death. He had be- 
come a specialist in the regulations relating to 
travel in the United States and in the principal 



countries of the world in which American citi- 
zens were accustomed to travel. As an au- 
thority on the laws of citizenship of the United 
States his services were irvaluable to persons 
who applied at the Passport Agency in New 
York for passports, for the establishment of 
citizenship is always a necessary condition to 
the obtainment of a passport. At all times he 
gave himself to the duties and obligations of 
his position as Passport Agent of the Depart- 
ment of State. His loss will be felt not only 
by the traveling public in New York and 
vicinity whom he has served so faithfully and 
efficiently for the past 23 years but also by those 
in the Passport Agency and in the Department 
with whom he has been associated. 

The Passport Agency in New York will be 
closed out of respect to the memory of Mr. 
Hoyt on Saturday, May 30, the day of the 
funeral. An officer of the Department has been 
designated to represent it at the funeral services, 
which will be held at St. Raymond's Church, 
Castle Hill Avenue, Bronx, New York. The 
burial will be at Derby, Conn. 



MAY 30, 1942 



499 



DEATH OF SYDNEY YOST SMITH 

[Released to the press May 30] 

Mr. Sydney Yost Smith, Principal Adminis- 
trative Assistant and Drafting Officer of the 
Department of State, died during the night of 
Friday, May 29. Mr. Smith had heen a valued 
employee of the Department of State for 61 
years. 

The Secretary of State addressed the follow- 
ing letter to Mrs. Smith : 

"Mat 30, 1942. 
"Dear Mrs. Smith : 

"I have learned with deepest sorrow of the 
death of your husband. Mr. Smith rendered 
very helpful services to the State Department 
with great public spirit and wholehearted de- 
votion over a period of many years. His friends 
and associates will feel a keen sense of personal 
loss with his passing. 

"Mrs. Hull and I send you and your family 
our heartfelt sympathy in your bereavement. 
"Sincerely yours, 

Cordell Hull" 

A biography of Mr. Smith, as given in the 
Department Register, follows : 

"Sydney Yost Smith — bom Washington, 
D. C, Nov. 28, 1857; Roys Academy; private 
tutors ; in real-estate office 1 yr. ; asst. reporter, 
House of Representatives, 1879-80 ; elk., Pen- 
sion Office, 1880-81; app. elk. at $900 in the 
Dept. of State July 1, 1881 ; at $1,200 Dec. 19, 
1884; at $1,400 Aug. 16, 1886; at $1,600 July 1, 
1889 ; at $1,800 Sept. 5, 1891 ; chief, Diplo. Bu., 
Apr. 8, 1897 -Nov. 30, 1918; mem. of Bd. of 
Examiners for the Diplo. Ser. ; disbursing officer, 
4th Int. Conf . of Am. States, Buenos Aires, 1910, 
and Chilean Centennial, Santiago, 1910; draft- 
ing expert, Am. Commn. to Negotiate Peace, 
Paris, 1918-19 ; drafting officer at $3,000 July 1, 
1919; at $3,500 Jan. 16, 1922; at $3,800 July 1, 
1924; at $4,200 May 1, 1925; at $4,800 July 1, 
1928; at $5,000 July 1, 1930; at $5,200 June 15, 
1941." 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Olaf Ravndal was appointed an Assistant 
Chief of the American Hemisphere Exports 
Office, effective May 11, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1056). Effective May 28, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1058), Mr. Albert M. Doyle, a 
Foreign Service officer of class IV, and Mr. 
Charles F. Knox, Jr., a Foreign Service officer 
of class VII, were also designated Assistant 
Chiefs of that Division. 

Mr. Courtney C. Brown was appointed an 
Assistant Chief of the Division of Defense Ma- 
terials, effective April 6, 1942 (Departmental 
Order 1057). 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press May 30] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since May 16, 1942 : 

Maynard B. Barnes, of Vinton, Iowa, First 
Secretary of Legation and Consul at Reykjavik, 
Iceland, has been assigned as Consul General at 
Brazzaville, French Equatorial Africa. 

Alvin M. Bentley, of Owosso, Mich., has been 
appointed Foreign Service Officer, Unclassified, 
Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and Vice 
Consul of Career, and has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 

H. Francis Cunningham, Jr., of Washington, 
D.C., formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Berlin, Germany, has been designated Third 
Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Stockholm, Sweden, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Forrest N. Daggett, of Pasadena, Calif., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career, and assigned as Vice 
Consul at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 

Frederick E. Farnsworth, of Colorado 
Springs, Colo., Vice Consul at Montreal, 



500 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Canada, has been assigned as Consul at Montreal, 
Canada. 

The assignment of Waldemar J. Gallman, of 
Wellsville, N. Y., as First Secretary of Embassy 
at Ankara, Turkey, has been canceled. In lieu 
thereof Mr. Gallman has been designated First 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at London, 
England, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Outerbridge Horsey, of New York, N. Y., 
Vice Consul at Budapest, Hungary, has been 
designated Third Secretary of Embassy and 
Vice Consul at Madrid, Spain, and will serve 
in dual capacity. 

M. Gordon Knox, of Villanova, Pa., formerly 
Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, Ger- 
many, has been designated Third Secretary of 
Legation and Vice Consul at Stockholm, 
Sweden, and will serve in dual capacity. 

Henry G. Krausse, of Brownsville, Tex., Vice 
Consul at Matamoros, Mexico, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Reynosa, Mexico. 

F. Kidgway Lineaweaver, of Philadelphia, 
Pa., Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba, has been 
assigned as Consul at Habana, Cuba. 

James G. McCargar, of Palo Alto, Calif., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career, and has been assigned 
as Vice Consul at Vladivostok, U.S.S.R. 

Brewster H. Morris, of Villanova, Pa., for- 
merly Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany, has been designated Third Secretary 
of Legation and Vice Consul at Stockholm, 
Sweden, and will serve in dual capacity. 

David K. Newman, of St. Louis, Mo., Vice 
Consul at Alexandria, Egypt, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Port Said, Egypt. 

Nelson R. Park, of Longmont, Colo., Consul 
at Barranquilla, Colombia, has been assigned as 
Consul at Matamoros, Mexico. 

Ernest V. Polutnik, of Great Falls, Mont., for- 
merly Vice Consul at Budapest, Hungary, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Glasgow, Scot- 
land. 

Milton C. Rewinkel, of Minneapolis, Minn., 
formerly Third Secretary of Legation and Vice 
Consul at Budapest, Hungary, has been desig- 
nated Third Secretary of Legation at Lisbon, 
Portugal. 



T. Ayres Robertson, of St. Louis, Mo., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Monterrey, Mex- 
ico. 

William Langdon Sands, of Ft. Myers, Fla., 
has been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career, and has been as- 
signed for duty in the Department of State. 

William L. Smyser, of Elkins Park, Pa., for- 
merly Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany, has been designated Third Secretary 
of Embassy and Vice Consul at Madrid, Spain, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

Walter J. Stoessel, Jr., of Beverly Hills, 
Calif., Vice Consul at Caracas, Venezuela, has 
been designated Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Caracas, Venezuela. 

John Z. Williams, of Reno, New, Vice Consul 
at Ciudad Trujillo, Dominican Republic, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Tampico, Mexico. 

Casimir T. Zawadzki, of Buffalo, N. Y., for- 
merly Clerk at Berlin, Germany, has been ap- 
pointed Vice Consul at Belfast, Northern Ire- 
land. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Digest of International Law, by Green Haywood Hack- 
worth, Legal Adviser of the Department of State. 
Vol. Ill, Chs. IX-XI. Publication 1708. vi, 820 pp. 
$2. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 1, May 22, 1942, to Revision II of May 
12, 1942. Publication 1743. 17 pp. 

Other Government Agencies 

Foreign Trade of Costa Rica for 1939 and 1940. (Pan 

American Union. ) Foreign Trade Series No. 194. 8 

pp., illus. 5<J. 
Foreign Trade of Ecuador for 1939 and 1940. (Pan 

American Union.) Foreign Trade Series No. 195. 

6 pp., illus. 50. 
Flags and Coats of Arms of American Republics. (Pan 

American Union.) 14 pp. 100. 
Paraguay. (Revised edition.) (Pan American Union.) 

American Nation Series No. 16. 32 pp., illus. 5<f. 



Treaty Information 



MILITARY MISSIONS 
Agreement with Colombia 

[Released to the press May 20] 

In response to the request of the Government 
of Colombia, an agreement was signed on May 
29, 1942, by the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secre- 
tary of State, and Seiior Dr. Gabriel Turbay, 
Ambassador of Colombia at Washington, pro- 
viding for the detail of a United States Military 
Mission to Colombia. 

The agreement is made effective for a period 
of four years beginning with the date of signa- 
ture. The services of the Mission may be ex- 
tended beyond that period at the request of the 
Government of Colombia. 

The agreement contains provisions similar in 
general to provisions contained in agreements 
between the United States and certain other 
American republics providing for the detail of 
officers of the United States Army or Navy to 
advise the armed forces of those countries. 

LEGAL ASSISTANCE 

Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad 

[Released to the press May 25] 

United States 

The President on May 22 proclaimed the 
Protocol on Uniformity of Powers of Attorney 
Which Are To Be Utilized Abroad, which was 
opened at the Pan American Union on Febru- 
ary 17, 1910 to the signature of states members 
of the Union. 



The protocol is now in effect with respect to 
the United States of America; Brazil; El Sal- 
vador, with reservations ; and Venezuela, with a 
modification. The protocol was signed also for 
Panama, Colombia, Nicaragua, and Bolivia, but 
no one of these Governments, for each of which 
signature was ad referendum, has as yet de- 
posited its instrument of ratification. 



The protocol lays down rules to which powers 
of attorney must conform. In addition, the 
principal purposes of the protocol are to place 
the burden of proof on the party challenging 
the power of attorney ; to recognize the validity 
of general powers of attorney to consummate 
administrative acts; to provide that powers of 
attorney executed in one country in conformity 
with the protocol and legalized in accordance 
with the special rules governing legalization 
shall be given full faith and credit in the other 
countries; and to permit representation of any 
person, who may intervene or become a party to 
a suit, by a volunteer pending due substantiation 
of the volunteer's authority. 



FLNANCE 

Taxation Convention with Canada 

On May 28, 1942 the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the President 
of the Convention between the United States and 
Canada providing for avoidance of double-in- 
come taxation, modification of certain conflict- 
ing principles of taxation, reductions of certain 
rates of taxation, and establishment of exchange 
of information between the United States and 
Canada in the field of income taxation, signed 
at Washington on March 4, 1942. 



RESTRICTION OF WAR 

Prisoners of War Convention 

A statement regarding the attitude of this 
Government toward the treatment accorded to 
civilian enemy aliens and prisoners of war and 
the assurances received from the German, Ital- 
ian, and Japanese Governments regarding the 
application of the Prisoners of War Convention, 
signed at Geneva July 27, 1929 (Treaty Series 
846), appeared in the Bulletin of May 23, 1942, 
page 445. 

501 



502 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



EXTRADITION 

Treaty with Canada 

On May 27, 1942 the Senate gave its advice 
and consent to the ratification by the President 
of the Extradition Treaty between the United 
States and Canada signed on April 29, 1942. 



Legislation 



Supplemental Estimate of Appropriation for the 
Department of State : Communication from the 
President of the United States transmitting supple- 
mental estimate of appropriation for the fiscal year 
1942, amounting to $50,000, and a draft of a proposed 
provision pertaining to an existing appropriation, 
for the Department of State [International Boundary 
Commission, United States and Mexico]. H. Doc. 
735, 77th Cong. 2 pp. 



Four Supplemental Estimates of Appropriations for the 
Department of State: Communication from the Presi- 
dent of the United States transmitting four supple- 
mental estimates of appropriations for the fiscal years 
1942 and 1943, amounting to $697,300, aud five drafts 
of proposed provisions pertaining to appropriations, 
for the Department of State. [Supplemental esti- 
mates : Salaries, Department of State, 1942, $120,000 
contingent expenses, Foreign Service, 1942, $500,000 
contingent expenses, Foreign Service, 1943, $48,000 
U. S. contributions to international commissions, 
congresses, and bureaus, 1943, $29,300. Proposed 
provisions : Salaries, ambassadors and ministers, 
1942-43 ; miscellaneous salaries and allowances, For- 
eign Service, 1942 and 1943 ; cooperation with the 
American republics, 1943 ; Eighth Pan American 
Child Congress, 1942; International Committee on 
Political Refugees, 1942.] H. Doc. 741, 77th Cong. 
4 pp. 

Settlement of Claims Against Mexico. H. Rept. 2186 
77th Cong., on H. R. 7096. [Incorporates letter from 
the Secretary of State to the President, dated May 
11, 1942, transmitting draft of proposed legislation.] 
11 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents ... - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIEECTOB OP THE BDBEAU OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULLETIN 



JUNE 6, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 154— Publication 1750 



C 



ontents 



The War p age 
Declaration of war by Mexico on Germany, Italy, and 

Japan 505 

Warning to Japan regarding the use of poisonous 

gases 506 

Mutual-aid agreement with China 507 

Declarations of a state of war with Bulgaria, Hungary, 
and Rumania: 

Message of the President to the Congress, June 2 . 509 

Joint declarations by the Congress, June 5 . . . . 510 
Address by Assistant Secretary Acheson to Americans 

of Italian descent 510 

Our Education, This War, and Essentials of Peace: Ad- 
dress by Stanley K. Hornbeck 512 

Hitler's visit to Finland 522 

Traffic in arms, ammunition, etc 522 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 2 to Revision II ... . 522 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel . . . 522 

Persons arriving on the S.S. Gripsholm 522 

The Near East 
Visit to the United States of the King of Greece . ; 523 

Commercial Policy 

Generalization of trade-agreement duties 524 

[over] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT Of OOCUMtNK 

JUL 13 1942 







ontents-coNrmvED 

Publications Page 

Hackworth's Digest of International Law, volume III . 525 
Foreign Relations of the United States, 1927, volumes 

I, II, and III 525 

General 

Labor riots at Nassau 527 

The Department 

Appointment of officers 527 

Treaty Information 

Postal: Universal Postal Convention, 1939 528 

Mutual guaranties: Mutual-Aid Agreement with 

China 528 



The War 



DECLARATION OF WAR BY MEXICO ON GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN 



[Released to the press June 2] 

An exchange of correspondence between the 
Secretary of State and His Excellency Ezequiel 
Padilla, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Mexico, 
follows : 

[Translation] 

" Mexico City, June 1, 191$. 

''51309. Your Excellency is aware of the un- 
speakable aggression committed against Mexico 
by the totalitarian submarine which on May 13 
last torpedoed and sank the Mexican merchant 
ship Potrero del Llano. 

"As sole reply to the protest made by this 
Ministry, the Axis powers proceeded, seven days 
later, to inflict a new injury upon us, torpedoing 
and sinking, under identical circumstances, an- 
other of our ships, the Faja de Oro. 

"In both instances we suffered the loss of a 
large number of the crew. In the face of such 
deeds, the President of the Republic, in con- 
formity with the corresponding law of the Fed- 
eral Congress, declared today that since the 22d 
of May, 1942 a state of war has existed between 
Mexico and Germany, Italy, and Japan. 

"In placing the above facts before Your Ex- 
cellency, I do so not only in conformity with the 
spirit of the resolutions adopted at the Consul- 
tative Meetings of the Ministers of Foreign Af- 
fairs of the American Republics but also, and 
more particularly, in accordance with the policy 
of sincere continental cooperation which inspires 
the policy of Mexico. 

"Your Excellency will recall that, not only at 
the Pan American Conferences but also at every 
international meeting in which we have partici- 
pated for many years, representatives of Mex- 



ico — in close collaboration with the representa- 
tives of Your Excellency's country — have 
labored tirelessly to the end that relations be- 
tween states might be established upon bases of 
honor and justice, in order that humanity might 
live without the threat of impending world con- 
flagrations. These efforts were in conformity 
with the pacific spirit of our people and the 
juridical tradition of America. Now that at- 
tacks upon our sovereignty oblige us to resort 
to a measure which we sincerely desired to see 
outlawed from international life, we resort to 
it under the compulsion of circumstances but 
retaining our firm conviction that the victory 
of the democracies will permit the reorganiza- 
tion among all nations of a permanent regime 
of law based on mutual respect and reciprocal 
understanding. 
"I renew [etc.] Ezequiel Padilla" 



"June 2, 1942. 

"I have received Your Excellency's telegram 
informing me that on June 1, 1912, the Pres- 
ident of Mexico declared that a state of war has 
existed between Mexico and Germany, Italy 
and Japan since May 22, 1942. 

"Mexico like other free nations has pre- 
ferred to fight to preserve its liberty and in- 
dependence than to submit to unprovoked and 
cowardly attack and live as a slave in a world 
dominated by the brutal force and frightful- 
ness of Axis overlords. Accordingly, Mexico 
has taken her place among the battle forces 
fighting for an international order based upon 
full respect for the just rights of individuals 
and of sovereign nations. 

505 



506 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



"The people of the United States salute the 
people of Mexico for their courageous and un- 
equivocal stand on the side of liberty and 
decency. 

"I take pleasure [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



[Released to the press June 2] 

The text of a telegram from the President of 
the United States to the President of Mexico, 
His Excellency General Manuel Avila Camacho, 
follows : 

"June 2, 1942. 

"I have been informed that the United Mexi- 
can States has made formal declaration of war 
on Germany, Italy, and Japan, thereby taking 
up a battle position alongside other freedom- 
loving nations which have been the subject of 
criminal aggression by these enemies of human 
liberties. Mexico, too, became the victim of 
unprovoked attack and Mexico has, in charac- 
teristically resolute and virile fashion, answered 
this challenge to its dignity and liberty. Once 
again the Axis tyrants have woefully erred in 
their appraisal of the temper of a free nation. 

"The people of the United States share with 
me the honor of welcoming Mexico to that com- 
munity of nations united in fighting for the 
preservation of freedom and democracy. At the 
same time, I extend to you on their behalf their 
deepest sympathy to the families of your coun- 
trymen who have already given their lives for 
our common cause. By our victory and the use 
we make of it we shall consecrate the memory 
of their supreme sacrifice. 

"I take this opportunity to send you my warm 
personal regards and my appreciation of your 
many and valuable contributions to our common 
cause. 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



[Released to the press June 2] 

The following statement by the Secretary of 
State was made in reply to a press inquiry : 

"The declaration of war of the United Mexi- 
can States is a further evidence that the free 



nations of the world will never submit to the 
heel of Axis aggression. 

"Mexico was among the first of the world's 
great nations to recognize the dangerous impli- 
cations of the aggressive aims of the enemies of 
civilization and accordingly cooperated fully 
in the common defense of the American conti- 
nent. For instance, Mexico vastly increased the 
production of strategic materials which are so 
vital to the success of the entire war effort. Mex- 
ico gave inspiration and leadership to the recent 
meeting of Foreign Ministers at Rio. 

"The United States will never forget the 
friendly policies adopted by Mexico as a partici- 
pant in the defense of the Western Hemisphere. 
Still less will the United States forget the moral 
and material support resulting from Mexico's 
declaration of war. 

"The people of Mexico must indeed have a 
deep sense of pride in the fact that they have 
again demonstrated that the free peoples of the 
world are determined to make whatever sacri- 
fice may be necessary to maintain the sacred 
principles upon which their independence was 
founded." 



WARNING TO JAPAN REGARDING THE 
USE OF POISONOUS GASES 

[Released to the press by the White House June 5] 

The President has made the following state- 
ment: 

"Authoritative reports are reaching this Gov- 
ernment of the use by Japanese armed forces in 
various localities of China of poisonous or noxi- 
ous gases. I desire to make it unmistakably 
clear that if Japan persists in this inhuman 
form of warfare against China or against any 
other of the United Nations such action will be 
regarded by this Government as though taken 
against the United States, and retaliation in 
kind and in full measure will be meted out. We 
shall be prepared to enforce complete retribu- 
tion. Upon Japan will rest the responsibility." 



JUNE 6, 1942 



507 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH CHINA 



[Released to the press June 2] 

An agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and China on the principles 
applying to mutual aid in the prosecution of the 
war was signed June 2 by the Secretary of State 
and the Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs. 
The provisions of the agreement with China are 
the same in all substantial respects as those of 
the agreement between the Governments of the 
United States and Great Britain signed on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1942. 1 

This agreement was negotiated, as was the 
agreement with Great Britain, under the pro- 
visions of the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 1941, 
which provides for extending aid to any country 
whose defense is determined by the President to 
be vital to the defense of the United States. 

The agreement with China provides that this 
Government will continue to supply aid to that 
country and to receive such reciprocal aid as 
that country may be in position to supply in 
carrying on the war which the United Nations 
are waging against common enemies. 

The agreement does not attempt at this stage 
to foresee or to define precise and detailed terms 
of settlement. It lays down certain broad prin- 
ciples designed to prevent any narrowly con- 
ceived settlement which might have disastrous 
effects on the economic welfare of our own peo- 
ple and the Chinese people. 

To this end, article VII of the agreement pro- 
vides that the ultimate settlement to be reached 
between the United States and China shall be 
such as not to burden commerce but rather to 
promote mutually advantageous economic re- 
lations between the two countries and the bet- 
terment of world-wide economic relations ; that 
it shall include provisions for agreed action by 
the two countries, open to participation by all 
other like-minded countries, directed to the ex- 
pansion of production, employment, and the 
exchange and consumption of goods, to the 
elimination of all forms of discrimination in in- 



ternational commerce, to the reduction of trade 
barriers, and in general to the attainment of 
economic objectives identical with those set 
forth in the Joint Declaration of August 14, 
1941, known as the Atlantic Charter. Provision 
is also made for conversations at an early, con- 
venient date between the two Governments with 
a view to determining the best means of attain- 
ing these objectives. 

The text of the agreement follows. 2 

"Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Republic of China 
declare that they are engaged in a cooperative 
undertaking, together with every other nation 
or people of like mind, to the end of laying the 
bases of a just and enduring world peace se- 
curing order under law to themselves and all 
nations; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Republic of China, 
as signatories of the Declaration by United 
Nations of January 1, 1942, have subscribed to 
a common program of purposes and principles 
embodied in the Joint Declaration made on 
August 14, 1941 by the President of the United 
States of America and the Prime Minister of 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland, known as the Atlantic 
Charter; 

"And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that the 
defense of the Republic of China against aggres- 
sion is vital to the defense of the United States 
of America ; 

"And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
Republic of China aid in resisting aggression; 

"And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of the Republic of China 
receives such aid and of the benefits to be re- 
ceived by the United States of America in return 



1 Bulletin of February 28, 1942, p. 190. 



! The text here printed conforms to the original. 



508 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



therefor should be deferred until the extent of 
the defense aid is known and until the progress 
of events makes clearer the final terms and con- 
ditions and benefits which will be in the mutual 
interests of the United States of America and the 
Republic of China and will promote the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of world peace ; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Republic of China 
are mutually desirous of concluding now a pre- 
liminary agreement in regard to the provision 
of defense aid and in regard to certain consid- 
erations which shall be taken into account in 
determining such terms and conditions and the 
making of such an agreement has been in all 
respects duly authorized, and all acts, conditions 
and formalities which it may have been neces- 
sary to perform, fulfil or execute prior to the 
making of such an agreement in conformity 
with the laws either of the United States of 
America or of the Republic of China have been 
performed, fulfilled or executed as required; 

"The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

"Article I 

"The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of the Republic of China with such de- 
fense articles, defense services, and defense in- 
formation as the President of the United States 
of America shall authorize to be transferred or 
provided. 

"Article II 

"The Government of the Republic of China 
will continue to contribute to the defense of the 
United States of America and the strengthen- 
ing thereof and will provide such articles, serv- 
ices, facilities or information as it may be in a 
position to supply. 

"Article III 

"The Government of the Republic of China 
will not without the consent of the President 



of the United States of America transfer title to, 
or possession of, any defense article or defense 
information transferred to it under the Act of 
March 11, 1941 of the Congress of the United 
States of America or permit the use thereof by 
anyone not an officer, employee, or agent of the 
Government of the Republic of China. 

"Article IV 

"If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of the Republic of China of any defense 
article or defense information, it becomes neces- 
sary for that Government to take any action 
or make any payment in order fully to protect 
any of the rights of a citizen of the United States 
of America who has patent rights in and to any 
such defense article or information, the Gov- 
ernment of the Republic of China will take such 
action or make such payment when requested to 
do so by the President of the United States of 
America. 

"Article V 

"The Government of the Republic of China 
will return to the United States of America at 
the end of the present emergency, as determined 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica, such defense articles transferred under this 
Agreement as shall not have been destroyed, 
lorf or consumed and as shall be determined by 
the President to be useful in the defense of the 
United States of America or of the Western 
Hemisphere or to be otherwise of use to the 
United States of America. 

"Article VI 
"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the Republic of China full 
cognizance shall be taken of all property, serv- 
ices, information, facilities, or other benefits or 
considerations provided by the Government of 
the Republic of China subsequent to March 11, 
1941, and accepted or acknowledged by the Pres- 
ident on behalf of the United States of America. 



.TUNE 6, 194 2 



"Article VII 



"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the Republic of China in re- 
turn for aid furnished under the Act of Congress 
of March 11, 1941, the terms and conditions 
thereof shall be such as not to burden com- 
merce between the two countries, but to promote 
mutually advantageous economic relations be- 
tween them and the betterment of world-wide 
economic relations. To that end, they shall in- 
clude provision for agreed action by the United 
States of America and the Republic of China, 
open to participation by all other countries of 
like mind, directed to the expansion, by appro- 
priate international and domestic measures, of 
production, employment, and the exchange and 
consumption of goods, which are the material 
foundations of the liberty and welfare of all 
peoples; to the elimination of all forms of dis- 
criminatory treatment in international com- 
merce ; to the reduction of tariffs and other trade 
barriers; and, in general, to the attainment of 
economic objectives identical with those set 
forth in the Joint Declaration made on August 
14, 1941, by the President of the United States of 



509 

America and the Prime Minister of the United 
Kingdom. 

"At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining^ the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

"Article VIII 

"This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

"Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this second day of June, 1942. 

"For the Government of the United States 
of America 

Cordell Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

"For the Government of the Republic of 
China 

T. V. Soonq 

Minister for Foreign Affairs 

of China?" 1 



DECLARATIONS OF A STATE OF WAR WITH BULGARIA, HUNGARY, AND RUMANIA 
MESSAGE OF THE PRESIDENT TO THE CONGRESS, JUNE 2 



[Released to (he press by the White House June 2] 

To the Congress of the United States of 
America : 

The Governments of Bulgaria, Hungary, and 
Rumania have declared war against the United 
States. I realize that the three Governments 
took this action not upon their own initiative 
or in response to the wishes of their own peoples 
but as the instruments of Hitler. These three 
Governments are now engaged in military ac- 



tivities directed against the United Nations and 
are planning an extension of these activities. 

Therefore, I recommend that the Congress 
recognize a state of war between the United 
States and Bulgaria, between the United States 
and Hungary, and between the United States 
and Rumania. 

Franklin D Roosevelt 

The White House, 
June 2, 191$. 



510 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 
JOINT DECLARATIONS BY THE CONGRESS, JUNE 5 



"Joint Resoi/otion Declaring that a state of war 
exists between the Government of Bulgaria 
and the Government and the people of the 
United States and making provisions to 
prosecute the same. 1 

"Whereas the Government of Bulgaria has 
formally declared war against the Government 
and the people of the United States of America : 
Therefore be it 

'■'■Resolved by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, That the state of war 
between the United States and the Government 



of Bulgaria which has thus been thrust upon the 
United States is hereby formally declared ; and 
the President is hereby authorized and directed 
to employ the entire naval and military forces 
of the United States and the resources of the 
Government to carry on war against the Govern- 
ment of Bulgaria ; and, to bring the conflict to a 
successful termination, all of the resources of the 
country are hereby pledged by the Congress of 
the United States. 

"Approved, June 5, 1942." [Joint resolutions 
declaring a state of war with Hungary and 
Rumania, mutatis mutandis, were also approved 
June 5, 1942. 2 ] 



ADDRESS BY ASSISTANT SECRETARY ACHESON TO AMERICANS OF 
ITALIAN DESCENT J 



[Released to the press June 31 

I am honored in the invitation of the Mazzini 
Society and of the Italian-American Labor 
Council to address tonight this impressive gath- 
ering of fellow countrymen. 

On this day which is dedicated to the memory 
of Garibaldi, that great fighter for the freedom 
of Italy, Americans of Italian descent are once 
more reaffirming their determination to play 
their full part in the battle for American and 
world freedom. Once more a message of hope 
goes across the ocean — as in the days of Gari- 
baldi — to the Italian people, again oppressed 
and prostrated under foreign domination. 

The people of Italy have been dragged into 
this war against all their true instincts and in- 
terests by the blind ambition of one man and a 
small clique of adventurers and Quislings. 

Two years have passed from the day when 
Mussolini embarked on what he expected to be 
a short and profitable war adventure. Cer- 
tainly he did not anticipate that two years after 
this declaration of war on France and Britain 
he would find himself not only in the position 
of a despised vassal but confronted by a world 
coalition, which included the Government and 
people of the United States of America. 



Our countrymen of Italian descent know that 
the Government of the United States did all 
that was in its power to prevent the catastrophe 
of Italy's intervention in Hitler's war. This 
is possibly still unknown to the Italian people, 
who have been denied for many years all knowl- 
edge that did not suit the- interests of their dic- 
tator. But the record is clear. It is a record 
of the efforts of this Government for peace and 
friendship, and of the guilt of the dictator. 

In the spring of 1940, after the Nazis had 
smashed through the Lowlands and when 
France was on the verge of collapse, President 
Roosevelt was informed by Ambassador Phil- 
lips that Mussolini had decided to enter the war 
on the side of Germany. The President took 
direct and personal steps in an attempt to stop 
that calamity. He gave his assurance that this 
Government would lend its weight to seeing 
that any agreement which might be reached 
through negotiations would be faithfully ex- 
ecuted. Mussolini replied that negotiations 
looking toward a peaceful settlement such as 

1 Public Law 563, 77th Cong. 

2 Public Law 564 and 565, respectively. 

3 Delivered before the Italian-American Rally at 
Washington, June 2, 1942. 



JUNE 6, 1942 



511 



the President had suggested were "contrary to 
the spirit of Fascism", and that he intended 
to retain what he called his "freedom of action". 
The public knows that on June 10 Mussolini 
plunged his 45 million fellow countrymen into 
a disastrous and futile war. 

The record bears full evidence of the fact 
that President Roosevelt went to the limit of 
his efforts to keep the Italian people out of the 
war. It shows the arrogance, conceit, and folly 
of the Fascist dictator who in his contempt for 
peace and democracy underrated — to his sor- 
row — the determination and strength of the free 
peoples of the world. 

War against France, a nation so close to Italy 
by common bonds of culture and tradition, was 
an unspeakable crime. So was Mussolini's war 
against England, which shattered an old tra- 
dition of friendship. Yet more follies and 
crimes were to come. In the fall of 1940 Mus- 
solini dragged the Italian people into war 
against Greece, a land for whose independence 
Italian patriots had fought and died. A year 
later Mussolini made the final blunder, the 
declaration of war against the United States 
which had been discovered by an Italian, named 
after an Italian, and to the forging of which 
into a nation millions of Italians had given the 
full measure of their lives and work. 

This catalog of outrages cannot be imputed 
simply to the aberrations and miscalculations of 
the man Mussolini. It finds its roots in the gos- 
pel of dictatorship, unbridled ambition, and con- 
tempt for freedom and democracy which have 
been from the very beginning identified with 
Fascism. 

But Fascism is not the product of the spirit 
or the mind of the Italian people or of the his- 
tory of Italy. Not even all the dramatics of 
Mussolini over 20 years could create that illu- 
sion. So it is right that a clear line be drawn 
between Fascism and the Italian people. We 
must see clearly that Mussolini's infamous "stab 
in the back" of June 1940 was also a thrust to the 
heart of the Italian people. 

Machiavelli— of whom Mussolini pretends to 
be a disciple — warned rulers against entering 
into a compact with a more powerful ruler. The 

464776 — 12 2 



penalty that the Italian dictator and, unfortu- 
nately, the Italian people have to pay for having 
disregarded that principle is only too apparent. 
Italy today finds itself reduced to the status of 
a mere appendage of Hitler's empire and must 
live on the crumbs which fall from his table. 
It has to rely on the Germans for industrial 
materials. It is being stripped of its agricul- 
tural resources and has to accept food rations 
vastly inferior to those of Germany and even of 
some of the occupied countries. Its skilled work- 
ers are being combed out from Italian indus- 
tries, and hundreds of thousands of farmers are 
taken from their fields to supply fodder for the 
German masters. Germans are in control in 
Italy — in control of economic life, of adminis- 
tration, of police. The common man of Italy, 
long deprived of his rights, finds himself help- 
less and without hope. 

It is to this common man of Italy that the 
implications of Mussolini's war against the 
United States are clearer than to anybody else, 
for he knows about America far more than his 
Fascist rulers. He knows that the American 
people were never the enemy but were the tra- 
ditional friends of the Italian people. Never 
before in their history have Italy and the 
United States been at war. He looks across 
the ocean for light and hope. 

And so it was natural that Americans of 
Italian descent should answer the challenge of 
Mussolini's war in unity of purpose with all 
other Americans and take their place in the 
front ranks of the fight for American freedom. 

The loyalty and patriotism of these Ameri- 
cans have not surprised this Government, how- 
ever much may have been the disappointment 
to Mussolini and his propaganda machine. For 
Americans of Italian descent not only stand fully 
and unreservedly with America and all that 
America stands for ; they also realize that Amer- 
ica and the United Nations are the trustees for 
the future of the land of their fathers. 

The President of the United States has made 
it clear that the liberation of the Italian and 
other peoples from the military cliques which 
hold them in their clutches is one of the war 
aims of the United Nations. Fascism must be 



512 

destroyed. Mussolini and his fellow gangsters 
must be rooted out. But for the Italian people 
the Atlantic Charter furnishes the pledge which 
is essential to their restoration to a free and 
full life: the enjoyment with all states, great 
or small, victors or vanquished, of access on 
equal terms to the trade and raw materials of 
the world. Without this access Italy cannot 
live. Mussolini has cut it off and chosen to gam- 
ble instead upon a vassal's pickings in Hitler's 
"new order". But the final choice lies with the 
Italian people. We cannot doubt what it will 
be, for they know from bitter experience the 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

miseries of the road along which they have been 
led. They know too that those miseries must 
continue with increasing intensity until they 
destroy the cause of them and reestablish them- 
selves in the line of their own traditions as 
one of the free peoples of the earth. 

Let us — all of us — bend our every effort on 
the supreme task which lies before us : to win 
the war. Victory will make freedom secure 
here in America and will break the chains of 
all the oppressed. It will make the Italian peo- 
ple once more the arbiters of their own destiny. 
Victory for America means freedom for Italy. 



OUR EDUCATION, THIS WAR, AND ESSENTIALS OF PEACE 
ADDRESS BY STANLEY K. HORNBECK 1 



[Released to the press June 1 ] 

There was a time — not long since — when I 
would have felt that in coining from Washing- 
ton, D. C, to Logan, Utah, I had traveled far. 
But today, when the Ferry Command of our 
Army Air Force is carrying men and munitions 
across oceans and continents in defense of Wash- 
ington and of Logan, the State of Utah and the 
District of Columbia seem very near neighbors. 
They are, in fact, near neighbors in more than a 
physical sense. All Americans everywhere are 
now united as never before in a vital endeavor 
from which — though it has been thrust upon 
us — we do not shrink. 

The mountains of Utah, towering in majesty, 
beauty, and strength above fertile valleys, are 
symbols of the solid rock in the American spirit 
which safeguards and enhances our enormous 
productivity now increasingly devoted to the 
sternest task with which we Americans have ever 
been confronted. Your snow-clad, water-yield- 
ing mountains and wide, crop-producing valleys 
are Utah's pride and the source of her strength ; 
they also are a part of the heritage of all 
Americans. 



1 Delivered at the commencement exercises of the 
Utah State Agricultural College, Logan, Utah, June 1, 
1942. Mr. Hornbeck is Advisor on Political Relations, 
Department of State. 



I am indeed happy to be here on this June 
morning in a land rich in the traditions of those 
hardy pioneers who less than a hundred years 
ago first journeyed here in quest of peace with 
freedom and a fair livelihood. Those tradi- 
tions now stand you and all other Americans 
in good stead. The sturdy settlers who first 
proved the soil of Utah and laid the foundations 
of its community life faced difficulties the sur- 
mounting of which called for qualities strikingly 
like those now demanded for performance of 
the tasks which now confront their descendants 
and all the rest of us. We, as they had to, must 
succeed or perish. We, as they had to be, must 
be strong and united to protect ourselves from 
our enemies. The distances that our men must 
span are, even with the developments in modern 
means of communications and transportation, 
comparable in difficulty to those which the 
founders of this commonwealth had to traverse 
in reaching their "promised land". When the 
victory toward which we now strive is won, the 
people of this country will have to lead the way 
in breaking ground and building a structure in 
international relations not less novel, not less 
difficult to consummate than was the developing 
here by dauntless and devoted pioneers of the 
culture of which this college is a symbol and a 
servant. 



JUNE 6, 1942 



513 



To American youth generally, to the young 
men and women of our colleges, and especially 
to those whose commencement is this year, the 
first truly global war which the world has ex- 
perienced has overwhelming significance. 

War brings to all of us toil and sacrifice and 
sorrows as well as opportunities for service and 
achievement, but war's greatest burdens fall 
upon youth. One may almost say that rela- 
tively war means inconvenience and strain to 
the older generation while the "blood, sweat, 
and tears" which are, as Mr. Winston Churchill 
has eloquently pointed out, the price of victory 
must of necessity be borne in major part by those 
who have the vigor, the resiliency, and the 
stamina of youth. 

Youth must sail the ships, fly the planes, man 
the guns. By and large, youth must man the 
factories which produce the vast stores of ma- 
teriel needed by the armed forces, ours and 
those of our gallant associates. Scarcely less 
onerous a burden: those who are now young 
will, after victory, have to repair the ravages 
of world-wide warfare and to struggle with the 
many problems produced by those ravages. 
These are vast tasks — vaster than any genera- 
tion of Americans has hitherto faced. And 
they are tasks to which you, students and grad- 
uates of today, will from this day forward have 
to devote an increasingly large share of your 
total energies — physical, mental, and moral. 

To achieve these present and future tasks all 
of us need to be equipped with and to draw upon 
maximum powers of analysis and reasoning. 
We need to look backward with critical eye in 
order to profit from experience. We need to 
examine with reserve and detachment the vari- 
ous explanations and the many proposals which 
will be offered — as always — f r o m many 
quarters. 

Seldom, it seems to me, do those who are older 
feel sorry for youth. I, however, and many 
others of those who now are senior, when we 
think of the many things that those who are 
growing up in these days have to learn, the 
many more things that they need to learn and 
must try to learn, the effort that they must 
make to know enough merely to survive, and the 
extraordinary effort that those must make who 



are to achieve the making of some contribution 
to human progress, on the one hand feel sorry 
for those who are students and graduates now 
and on the other hand envy them the opportu- 
nity that is theirs to learn, to achieve, and to 
live into and through the next half-century. 

Education is in any generation a synthetic 
process and its content is elastic. Ingredient 
and limitation number one are what the teach- 
ing generation knows. Next determinate is 
that which the learning generation needs to 
know and is able to "take". In the days when 
I was among those whom the teachers tried to 
teach, the teachers knew reading, writing, 
'rithmetic, spelling, grammar, geography, his- 
tory, botany, geology, chemistry, physics, Latin 
and Greek, the Bible, and more or less of what 
is called philosophy. These were the principal 
subjects that the teachers were prepared to teach, 
and these were the subjects to which the ma- 
jority of students were expected to have been 
exposed between kindergarten days and the day 
of a college commencement. The specialities 
there were, of course, law, medicine, engineer- 
ing, agriculture, theology. But those were of 
and for the few. Yes, there were also the horse 
and the buggy. And then suddenly we and our 
teachers had to begin studying and to know 
about electric lights, trolley cars, storage bat- 
teries, rubber tires, internal-combustion engines, 
Mr. Ford's motorcars, radio. There came in 
1914 a war in Europe, and we had to begin to 
know about Europe, and war. And we learned 
about submarines. In the fall of 1916 Wood- 
row Wilson said that he had been learning of 
things in this world which not long before he 
would not have believed could be. In 1917 we 
learned about unrestricted submarine warfare. 
In April of that year the United States was 
drawn into that war — a "made in Germany" 
war — which became known as the World War 
and is now spoken of as World War I. And we 
learned about Germany — and war — and we be- 
gan to learn about Asia. 

Then there came a peace conference at Paris 
and a League of Nations and a disarmament con- 
ference at Washington and an agreement to re- 
duce and limit armament and to pursue peace- 
ful courses in the Pacific and in eastern Asia. 



514 

More to teach and more to learn. And there 
came negotiation and the signing of a pact, the 
Kellogg-Briand Pact of Paris, wherein more 
than 60 nations denounced war and pledged 
themselves to employ none but peaceful means 
for settlement— if, when, and as— of their dis- 
putes. 

Teachers in the 1920's had to know about and 
to teach those things in addition to all earlier 
subjects, and students had to learn about them. 

Meanwhile men had learned to fly; men were 
building planes and fitting them with all sorts 
of instruments; men were building 30,000-ton 
battleships and 50,000-ton merchant ships; men 
were building concrete roadways and under- 
river tunnels and over-river suspension bridges 
and streamlined trains; men were perfecting 
X-ray devices; men were smashing atoms. In 
this country men were dreaming that there 
would never again be a financial crash and never 
again be a war. 

Then, in 1929, came financial crash. In 1931, 
came the Manchuria incident. In 1935, Italy 
and Ethiopia. In 1937, North and Central 
China. In 1939, war in Europe. In 1941, Ger- 
many's attack on the Soviet Union, and Japan's 
and her Axis partners' attacks on the United 
States and Great Britain. 

And now we, the United States, are again 
at war; most of the world is at war; and you 
and I and everybody that we know and all the 
people of the United States and most of the 
people of the whole world are confronted with 
problems and are faced with facts that were 
never in the ken, the thought, or the imagination 
of those who were teaching and those who were 
acquiring their formal education a short half- 
century ago. 

No wonder curricula have changed. No won- 
der some of the best of the older fundamental 
subjects have been dropped or are neglected. 
What a multitude of things there are that youth 
now must know, therefore must learn, and there- 
fore must — in part at least — be taught ! 

And there is no slackening of the pace of 
change and of expansion : new inventions, new 
products, new developments — constantly — about 
which we have to learn, even to survive. What 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

the world has experienced since 1914 shows only 
too clearly how absolutely essential it is that 
persons and nations which hope and expect to 
survive shall learn more about — and learn better 
about — history, economic laws, social forces, na- 
tional and other national and international psy- 
chologies — learn more about all that is connoted 
by and in the term "geo-politics" than anyone 
ever has known before. 

Truly the responsibility that lies with teach- 
ers of today and of tomorrow and the burden of 
acquiring knowledge that falls upon those who. 
students today, will be the men and women of 
tomorrow, are staggering in proportions and in 
importance. And this responsibility and that 
burden are probably of greater import, greater 
potential consequence here in the United States 
and among the people of this country than any- 
where else in the world : because here, in a land 
excelling in natural resources and blessed with 
a comparatively favorable climate, men and 
women who came from all parts of the world, 
who were seeking opportunity, who had imagi- 
nation and courage and will and brains and 
brawn, decided to establish a new polity, a 
state composed of many states, a government of 
the people, by the people, and for the people, a 
society of free men, guaranteed freedom by their 
own laws, enjoying freedom through respect 
for laws and applied faith in orderly processes; 
and because our forefathers succeeded in doing 
that ; and because they bequeathed to us a goodly 
heritage; and because we must keep and must 
improve and must share that heritage; and be- 
cause to do that we must have security ; and be- 
cause to have security there must be peace ; and 
because we can achieve none of these unless we 
make it our business to excel in knowledge, in 
wisdom, and in effort. 

It is not that we are better people than are 
those of other lands — any or all; not that we 
are a superior breed ; not that we are a divinely 
chosen or Heaven-appointed race; not that we 
should or that we can or that we wish to or that 
we will rule over others. It is that we possess 
resources, that we are advantageously located, 
that we have developed a favorable political and 
social order, that we are possessed of good-will, 



JUNE 6, 1942 



515 



and that we cherish the ideals of liberty, free- 
dom, cooperation, peaceful relationships, se- 
curity, and justice for, by, and among men and 
nations. 

It is because of all this that there rests upon 
us extraordinary obligation and responsibility — 
at once to ourselves and toward all mankind. 

We must learn much; we must know much; 
we must do much. 

Far from perfect are our institutions. Far 
from perfect are our ideals. Far from perfect 
are our attitudes, our methods, our manners, our 
procedures, our performances, and the results, 
consequences, and products thereof. Excessive 
self-esteem and superlative self-confidence are 
unbecoming anywhere, ill-behoove any nation, 
and, where indulged in, are a prelude to deca- 
dence and catastrophe. The most common and 
obvious symptom of the weakness that professes 
itself strength is manifested in boasting. Think 
not too well of thyself; be not too confident of 
thy prowess; boast not; talk not too much of 
anything that thou mayest know, that thou 
mayest have done, that thou mayest intend to do, 
that thou mayest guess, or that thou mayest 
suspect. 

History repeats itself because history is made 
by human beings ; human beings are human and 
finite, and human beings reproduce themselves. 
The child may not look like or behave as did 
his parent, but the man is in large measure the 
product and projection of his ancestral line. 
Generally speaking, the physical and mental re- 
actions of the mature man tend to approximate 
those of his forebears. And the same is true of 
races and of nations. Generally speaking, a 
great body and a wide range of reactions are 
foreseeable and predictable. Generally speak- 
ing, that which in the past has made men and 
nations strong will in the future, given similar 
circumstances, make men and nations strong. 
That which in the past has weakened or de- 
stroyed men and nations will in the future, given 
similar circumstances, weaken or destroy na- 
tions. History repeats itself — approximately — 
if and when and as combinations of similar cir- 
cumstances are approximately repeated. 

There is, of course — constantly — change. And 
there is, unquestionably, progress. In the past 

4G4776 — 12 3 



hundred years there has been conspicuous and 
remarkable progress. We have discovered and 
devised many ways for safeguarding human life 
and health, for repairing damage to parts, tis- 
sues, organs. We have invented warning sig- 
nals and safety devices. We study and teach 
and learn what to eat and drink — and what not. 
We impose upon ourselves some sumptuary 
regimes, and there are imposed upon us others. 
We have developed some immunities. We have 
lengthened the life span. But fundamentally 
that which has in the past been wholesome re- 
mains wholesome, and that which has in the past 
destroyed men will in the future destroy men. 
And remedies and devices which have been tried 
and been found wanting will, if tried again, 
be found wanting. 

And so of nations. There have been improve- 
ments. There are safeguards. There is prog- 
ress. But the world has not yet succeeded in 
putting effectively into practice formulae and 
procedures which, if adopted and adhered to by 
all nations, would produce conditions of secu- 
rity, insure the doing of approximate justice, 
restrain would-be aggressors, prevent wars, and 
insure nations that want peace against being 
drawn into wars. 

And now our country, a country whose gov- 
ernment and people have put peace in the fore- 
front of their desire, has again been drawn into 
and is engaged in war. 

How, why — and for what ? 

Suppose we discuss during the remainder of 
this hour some of the causes of our being now 
at war and some of the issues that are involved. 
Perhaps something that I may be able to say 
on those subjects may be helpful to some of those 
who at this moment are approaching and per- 
haps even to some who are already engaged upon 
the tremendous and vital tasks which lie ahead. 

In September 1931 the Japanese Army 
launched an attack upon China, in Manchuria. 
In September 1935 the Italians launched an 
assault upon humanity and decency, in Ethiopia. 
In 1936 Italy and Germany intruded without 
warrant and with force into the affairs of a 
neighboring country, Spain. In July 1937 the 
Japanese Army began in North China an aggres- 
sion destined to involve every nation that has 



516 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



interests in the Far East. In 1938 Germany 
embarked upon operations of conquest which in 
the next year compelled the British Empire to 
resort to arms in self-defense. And in 1941 
Japan attacked the United States in the Pacific ; 
Japan and Germany and Italy promptly de- 
clared war on the United States and on Great 
Britain; and the United States was compelled 
to fight in self-defense. 

This country was attacked and is now at war 
because of the objectives at which the aggressors 
aim and because of what we have stood for and 
are as a powerful democracy — with all that our 
position means to the aggressors in terms of 
principles and policies and in terms of economic 
and military strength. The programs of con- 
quest pursued by Japan and by Germany have 
been and are such as to necessitate for their suc- 
cess the destruction of every democracy and 
therefore the attempt, sooner or later, by one or 
both of those countries to subjugate the Western 
Hemisphere. 

We do not have to rely upon mere conjectures 
to know that world domination is the aim of 
each of those powers. Their leaders have 
clearly declared and their acts have amply dem- 
onstrated their intentions. At intervals from 
at least as far back as 1578 the Japanese, and 
from the days of Frederick the Great the Ger- 
mans, have cherished dreams of, have talked of, 
and have worked for conquest and dominion. 
Both of those nations are committed to policies 
of world-wide rule by force. To see what rule 
by them means we have only to look at the mas- 
ter-and-slave relationship which now prevails 
between those who govern and those who are 
governed within their own borders and wher- 
ever their armed forces are in control. 

On September 27, 1940 those two nations, 
Japan and Germany, formally allied themselves, 
together with Germany's satellite, Italy, in a 
treaty the essence of which was that if any coun- 
try not already at war with them placed ob- 
stacles in the way of the program of conquest 
of any of the three, those powers would unite in 
political, economic, and military action against 
such country. 

The United States, both before and after this 
attempted intimidation, indicated its objection 



and opposition to the Axis moves of aggression 
by constant protest and by giving aid to the 
countries that had been attacked — especially to 
Britain and her allies and to China. In Decem- 
ber 1941 all three of these aggressors struck at 
us because, like the nearer neighbors whom they 
had earlier attacked, we must be rendered im- 
potent or their programs would come to naught. 

In point of time the United States was drawn 
into the "shooting" war when Japan attacked 
us at Pearl Harbor. We might have stayed 
out for a little while longer. We might have 
staj 7 ed out until Europe had been completely 
overrun by Germany and until eastern Asia had 
been completely overrun by Japan. We might 
have stayed out until the world situation had 
become one in which this country would have 
had to meet, by itself, attacks by a more pow- 
erful Germany and a more powerful Japan. 
We might have enjoyed a few months more of 
precarious "neutrality" had not the Government 
and the people of the United States possessed 
principles; had not the Government of the 
United States advocated world-wide acceptance 
and observance of those principles; had not the 
people and the Government of the United States 
over a long period of time objected to and dip- 
lomatically opposed programs of conquest by 
force; had not the Government of the United 
States declined to give an assent, either in fact 
or in effect, to a pursuance of a program of 
aggression. We might have stayed out a little 
while longer had we been willing to withhold 
aid from our friends and to give aid to their 
enemies and ours. 

The essential facts regarding the Japanese 
diplomatic approach to the United States in 
1941 and our Government's response on the sub- 
ject of an "agreement" can be stated simply and 
hi a few words: Japanese spokesmen came to 
the United States and said that Japan wanted 
an agreement regarding the situation and prob- 
lems in the western Pacific and eastern Asia. 
The United States was not asking for an agree- 
ment. If Japan's intentions were, as her 
spokesmen declared them to be, peaceful and 
non-aggressive, there were already in existence 
several agreements to which Japan and the 
United States were parties, respect for which 



JUNE 6, 1942 



517 



by both countries would amply insure pursuit 
by each of peaceful courses. But the people and 
the Government of the United States believe 
in processes of discussion and agreement in in- 
ternational relations, and we are favorably 
predisposed toward suggestions and proposals 
the declared objective of which is maintenance 
and promotion of peace. This Government 
therefore replied that it would be glad to discuss 
with the Japanese Government the facts of the 
situation and the possibility of arriving at an 
agreement. The Japanese made various pro- 
posals to which it was impossible for the United 
States to agree. The Japanese asked the Ameri- 
can Government to indicate what would be 
acceptable to this country as the provisions of 
an agreement, and this Government gave them 
from time to time during the course of the con- 
versations clear indication of this country's 
views. The American Government at no time 
asked or demanded that an agreement be con- 
cluded ; its last submitted proposals of Novem- 
ber 26 were in no sense whatever "demands", 
and when those proposals were put forward 
they were accompanied by express and specific 
statements in the written communication which 
covered them that they constituted a sample of 
what would in the opinion of the Government 
of the United States be sound as a basis for 
further discussion. One thing this Government 
did ask constantly and consistently: it asked 
that Japan desist from and refrain from pro- 
cedures of aggression. Meanwhile, and for a 
long time before November 26, the armed forces 
of Japan were — as was demonstrated on Decem- 
ber 7 — preparing for an armed attack on the 
United States as Japan's alternative to an assent 
by "agreement" on the part of the American 
Government to what Japan's spokesmen were 
demanding; and on December 7 Japan's armed 
forces attacked this country (and Great Britain) 
without warning. 

Thanks to the heroic and vigorous resistance — 
first of the Chinese, then of the British and 
some other European peoples, and next of the 
Russians — we, attacked in our turn and now at 
war, are not fighting alone against victorious 
conquerors. It behooves us to reflect — and with 
appreciation — upon the benefits which we have 



derived and are deriving from the resolute sac- 
rifices of those nations whose armed resistance 
has preceded ours. 

In the long conflict wherein China has resisted 
Japan the great issue has been whether the 
Chinese are to continue to rule in their own 
country or are to be conquered, ruled over, and 
enslaved by the Japanese. In the conflict in 
which this country and the associates of this 
country, including China, are now resisting the 
Axis allies, including Japan, the great issue is 
whether peace-loving peoples are to continue to 
rule in their various countries or are to be con- 
quered, ruled over, and enslaved by the world's 
most notorious and ruthless aggressors, Japan 
and Germany in particular. 

Concisely put, this war, forced on what are 
now the United Nations by the Axis powers, 
is a world conflict between concepts and prac- 
tices of civilization and concepts and practices 
of barbarism. The issue is that of survival or 
destruction — throughout the world — of concepts 
and practices of national and personal liberty, 
of free nations and free men. 

In this context it may be well for us to think 
for a moment of the fundamental national in- 
terests, interests of the United States, that are 
for us at stake in this struggle. 

In a letter to the Vice President of the United 
States on January 8, 1938, our Secretary of 
State, Mr. Hull, gave expression to an adequate 
concept of national interest in words to which 
attention cannot too often be directed. 

I venture to repeat with a little amplification 
the substance of that statement : 

The interest of the United States in situations 
abroad is measured in more than terms of the 
number of American citizens residing in a given 
place or region at a given moment, in more than 
the amount of investment of American citizens 
in a particular locality, in more than the volume 
of our trade — past, present, or potential. Those 
are, of course, important interests, but, over and 
above them, this country has interests that are 
and always will be broader and more funda- 
mental. These more important although less 
obvious interests arise out of and rest upon the 
fact that only by respect on the part of the na- 



518 

tions of the world for orderly processes in in- 
ternational relationships is there any chance for 
peace, and only in a world where there is peace — 
based on law and order and justice — can this 
country be secure. That the United States be 
able to live in peace and to enjoy security, that 
the world be safe for the people of the United 
States— and for other law-abiding and peace- 
desiring people and nations — these are national 
and Nation-wide interests. These are primary 
concerns of the United States and of all of its 
people. These are fundamental and vital. 
These go beyond and transcend in importance 
the various material interests and concerns of 
persons (individuals) , of property, of profits, of 
privilege, or even of prestige. 

It is obvious that, toward safeguarding our 
national interests, there is more to be considered 
than territory (soil), more than persons, more 
than property, more than trade. Fundamental 
concepts, principles, and national institutions 
are more important than are material posses- 
sions. Security with justice is more important 
than is wealth. Self-respect is more important 
than prestige. Our way of life is more im- 
portant than our momentary physical comfort. 
Honor, good faith, desire and intention and ef- 
fort to be a good neighbor are more important 
than power. All these things must be safe- 
guarded and defended. 

In the field of foreign policy the people and 
the Government of this country have believed in 
and have contended for the principles of law and 
order in world affairs; for respect for treaties; 
for full regard for the rights and duties of na- 
tions : the right of nations to security, the right 
of nations to enjoy life and to pursue happiness 
in their own way so long as these activities do 
not unlawfully injure others; for performance 
of obligations; for preservation of the good 
products of human thought, ingenuity, and ef- 
fort ; for promotion of activities which advance 
the interests of humanity in general; for the 
principle of equality of opportunity ; for good- 
will and peace among men. In diplomacy we 
have always contended for these things. When 
forced to do so, we have resorted to arms for 
their defense. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

We are fighting today because we have been 
and are attacked. We are fighting because we 
possess and we cherish things — material, politi- 
cal, and spiritual — worth defending. We are 
fighting because if we did not fight, if we did 
not defend these things, we would lose them, and 
we and the world would lose the values which 
they represent. 

We are fighting for security — security for 
our material, our political, and our spiritual 
possessions. 

We are fighting for our lives, for our coun- 
try's life — our national existence. We are fight- 
ing in defense of our American way of life and 
of the way of life of nations who in varying 
degrees are like us and who in varying degrees 
are now in the same situation of peril — having 
been attacked or menaced — as we are. 

We are fighting — not for the first time — in 
defense of the concept of democracy; fighting 
against the concept of autocracy. We are fight- 
ing — as we have fought before — to preserve, to 
maintain, to extend, and to share our freedom, 
resisting an effort of aggressively minded na- 
tions to impose upon the world, and therefore 
upon us, a slave regime. 

We are fighting for the principles and poli- 
cies set forth in the Atlantic Charter. The 
eight points of that Charter have been well sum- 
marized in the following language: "(1) no 
territorial aggrandizement; (2 and 3) self-de- 
termination of nations ; (4) access by all nations, 
on equal terms, to the trade and raw materials 
of the world needed for their economic pros- 
perity; (5) collaboration of all nations in the 
economic field to secure improved labor condi- 
tions and social security; (6) a peace that will 
'afford to all nations the means of dwelling in 
safety within their own boundaries'; (7) free- 
dom of the seas; (8) the ultimate abandonment 
of force by all nations, and, 'pending the estab- 
lishment of a wider and permanent system of 
general security,' the disarmament of nations 
'which threaten, or may threaten, aggression 
outside their frontiers.' " 

"We are fighting", as Francis B. Sayre, the 
United States High Commissioner to the Philip- 
pines, who returned a few weeks ago from the 
grim siege of Corregidor, has said in a recent 



JUNE 6, 1942 



519 



address, "We are fighting for the rights of all 
mankind." 

In this conflict other peoples are fighting side 
by side with ns and toward common objectives. 

In the Declaration of the United Nations, rep- 
resentatives of the noble company of the 26 
associated nations subscrihed to the purposes 
and principles embodied in the Atlantic Charter 
and, recognizing that these nations are banded 
together "in a common struggle against savage 
and brutal forces seeking to subjugate the 
world", pledged their governments to employ 
their full resources and cooperation and to make 
no separate armistice or peace. 

It is important for our own full participa- 
tion in this struggle and for our performance 
of our appropriate role in the settlement to 
come, that we understand and appreciate the 
interests, the history, the culture, the character, 
the capacities, the aspirations, and the deeds of 
our gallant associates. President Roosevelt in 
his address of February 23 described the nature 
of the United Nations' grouping and paid tribute 
to some of the most outstanding of its members 
in the following words : 

"The United Nations constitute an association 
of independent peoples of equal dignity and im- 
portance. The United Nations are dedicated to 
a common cause. We share equally and with 
equal zeal the anguish and awful sacrifices of 
war. In the rjartnership of our common enter- 
prise we must share in a unified plan in which 
all of us must play our several parts, each of us 
being equally indispensable and dependent one 
on the other. 

"We of the United Nations are agreed on cer- 
tain broad principles in the kind of peace we 
seek. The Atlantic Charter applies not only to 
the parts of the world that border the Atlantic 
but to the whole world : disarmament of aggres- 
sors, self-determination of nations and peoples, 
and the four freedoms — freedom of speech, free- 
dom of religion, freedom from want, and free- 
dom from fear. 

"The British and the Eussian people have 
known the full fury of Nazi onslaught. There 



have been times when the fate of London and 
Moscow was in serious doubt. But there was 
never the slightest question that either the Brit- 
ish or the Russians would yield. . . . 

"Though their homeland was overrun, the 
Dutch people are still fighting stubbornly . . . 

"The great Chinese people have suffered griev- 
ous losses; Chungking has been almost wiped 
out of existence, yet it remains the capital of 
an unbeatable China." 

For what do we fight ? 

We fight first in self-defense, for the survival 
of the soil, the principles, and the institutions 
that we cherish; second, in performance of ob- 
ligations ; third, to make the world safe for the 
United States and for other democracies ; fourth, 
to make the world a better world in which to 
live — for ourselves and for all mankind. 

We and our associates are of course going to 
win, but we will win only by and with tremen- 
dous effort. 

Two great tasks confront us: first, that of 
defeating the enemy; second, that of making a 
better peace settlement than any that has here- 
tofore been made. These are not separate tasks : 
the problems which they present are interwoven 
and intermeshed and intermingled. 

War does not have its beginning at the mo- 
ment when resort is first had to armed force. 
It begins before that. When the stage of spill- 
ing of blood is arrived at, the process of con- 
flict is reaching its climax. And war does not 
end when a treaty of peace is signed. War ends 
and peace prevails when conditions of law and 
order, of justice and stability have been made 
actual, when causes for conflict no longer exist. 

Peace is not in itself a condition ; it is a prod- 
uct of a condition. It is not something that 
can be created; it is something that can be 
brought about and be maintained only as a 
consequence of a process of eliminating causes 
of conflict and convincing the great majority 
of men everywhere that both private and public 
interests will be better served by their refrain- 
ing from than by their resorting to use of force. 
Peace will prevail when conditions of peace 
have been created. 



520 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The new order which must follow this war 
will be created not by the Nazis and not by 
Japan's militant, militaristic leaders but by the 
peace-loving and law-abiding nations, and it 
must be a new order for the benefit of all man- 
kind. 

The peace settlement concluded when this 
war's victory has been won must contain provi- 
sions which will give security and make possible 
justice among nations. It must contain provi- 
sions which will discourage aggression and re- 
strain would-be aggressors. It must provide 
reasonable scope for the normal, legitimate as- 
pirations of peacefully inclined and industrious 
peoples everywhere. In these and other re- 
spects the peace which we envisage and toward 
which we are fighting must be more generously 
conceived and more firmly supported than any 
that has been achieved in the past. The peace 
which we now seek cannot be founded merely 
on faith or on hope or on charity — or on all of 
these. The peace that we make must be a peace 
maintainable and maintained by common effort 
and constant, cooperative vigilance. 

In the making of this peace settlement we 
must profit by the lessons of experience. Keep- 
ing in mind the steady march of the movement 
of conquest which began in Asia in 1931, ap- 
peared in Africa in 1935, assumed triangular 
form in Europe in 1936, and lashed directly at 
America in 1941, let us vividly remember the 
failure of the peace-loving peoples to resort to 
effective measures to halt that march until its 
onward sweep showed conclusively that it was 
a movement for universal supremacy. 

The advance of the Japanese Army in Man- 
churia in 1931 was met only by appeals to reason. 
Otherwise, notwithstanding the injury done not 
only to a peaceful nation, China, but to the whole 
structure of world order and hence to the in- 
terests of Great Britain, of the United States, 
and of other law-abiding powers, Great Britain 
and the United States and the League of Na- 
tions stood helplessly by. The Covenant of the 
League of Nations had come into force only 11 
years before ; the Nine Power Treaty, designed 
especially to settle the post-war problems of the 
Far East, had been signed only 9 years before ; 
the Kellogg Pact had been in effect only 3 years. 



And yet, only by words — words of protest, of 
admonition, of remonstrance, and of exhorta- 
tion — did the world resist that assault upon this 
new and laboriously erected structure of peace. 

In 1935, aggression in Africa. In 1936, ag- 
gression in Europe. In 1937, further aggres- 
sion in Asia. Still appeals to reason — only. 

In 1938 and 1939, aggression after aggression 
in Europe; still appeals to reason — only — with 
lingering hope that those appeals would be ade- 
quately efficacious. The peace-loving powers 
had adopted the principle of relying on peaceful 
processes, and none of them desired nor were 
any of them prepared to employ procedures of 
forceful coercion. 

Finally, in September 1939, the democratic 
powers of Europe at long last were compelled to 
resist force with force. 

In 1910 and 1911 Japan extended the scope 
of her aggressions. She occupied French Indo- 
china. And then she attacked the United States 
and British and Netherlands possessions. And 
then the United States had no further choice: 
we had to fight. 

This sad record of misplaced trust and inade- 
quate measures clearly indicates that for the 
great military advantages which the Axis pow- 
ers have obtained and for the grave situation 
in which the United Nations find themselves 
today, the latter — the majority of the people of 
most of the democracies — are themselves in no 
small measure responsible. It should also point 
to the responsibility which these nations now 
owe to themselves and to the world to restore by 
deeds the regime of sanity, confidence, and rea- 
sonable opportunity which during a long decade 
mere verbal support of an ever-diminishing se- 
curity did little to preserve. It should further 
point to the responsibility to the world which 
will be that of the United Nations to see to it 
that in the years to come reliance is not again 
placed by peace-loving nations upon treaties 
and laws and good-will and processes of appeal 
to reason alone. 

The "never again" that becomes a slogan after 
this war has been fought and won must be 
the "never again" of a determination on the part 
of all peace-loving members of the Family of 



JUNE 6, 1942 

Nations not to tolerate disregard of pledges, 
violation of law, and refusal decently to respect 
the rights and "the opinions of mankind". 

The machinery of peace may be devised by 
statesmen; but the conditions which will make 
it possible for that machinery effectively to func- 
tion must be produced by the common effort of 
all who seek and who wish to maintain peace. 
That task is one to the solution of which it is 
possible and necessary for all right-minded men 
and women the world over to contribute. 

Living, and to live, we learn. Seeking im- 
provement, we make effort. Making effort, we 
achieve. Through the sum total of man's efforts 
the world can be made what most men's nature 
impels man to make it, a place in which life is 
secure and every man's and every nation's needs, 
deeds, and causes are fairly weighed in the 
scales of justice. 

Meanwhile, in our progress toward a demo- 
cratic peace we must above all fully recognize 
the seriousness of the armed struggle in which 
we are at this moment engaged. This is a strug- 
gle which is not limited to soldiers, to sailors, 
and to airmen. It is a struggle which calls for 
greater, faster, most efficient production of the 
implements — more implements, better imple- 
ments — of war. This country of ours must truly 
be the "arsenal of democracy". It must also 
produce the most powerful of democracy's com- 
bat units. This is a struggle that calls for the 
utmost effort of labor, of industrial management, 
of technicians of all kinds, of our men, our 
women, and even our children. Ours are tasks 
which call, in short, for the maximum possible 
effort of each and every one of us. To win 
this war, to achieve our tasks, we must have 
effective national unity, comprehensive and in- 
tensive self-denial, and rigorous self-discipline. 

This war will not be won by wealth of re- 
sources alone. It will not be won by produc- 
tion alone. It will be won by human effort, 
human toil, human sacrifice. It will be won 
by the efforts of men and women and children. 
It will be won by making and by fighting: mak- 
ing on the part of those who behind the lines 
furnish the implements and the materials re- 
quired for the fight; fighting by men qualified 
and chosen for that function, men who will hold 



521 

strategic positions, men who will advance on 
land, at sea, and in the air, men who will defeat 
the enemy. Resources are important ; produc- 
tion is essential ; but these are not enough. To 
win we must also fight — tremendously. 

For our country to do its part, there is need 
for the best and the most effort of which every 
man, woman, and child throughout the land is 
capable. To attain that maximum of effort it 
is essential that every one of us clearly under- 
stand why we are fighting and for what we 
fight. Once it is realized in full seriousness 
throughout the whole of our United States that 
for us our national survival and the future of 
our way of life are at stake, that defeat would 
mean destruction of these, and that victory will 
afford opportunity to advance the cause of free- 
dom and of justice among men and nations, the 
united people of our powerful democracy will 
meet to the limit the demands which this tragic 
conflict has thrust and, in vastly increasing 
proportions, is going to impose upon us. 

What our country's ultimate place and part 
in the vast arena of human endeavor may be 
none can foresee. But whatever it may be we 
are all of us at every moment contributors to 
the making. Coming to our tasks with equip- 
ment which the brains and brawn, the toil and 
suffering of mankind throughout the ages have 
produced, we add day by day to that equipment. 
If we but rightly employ what our predecessors 
have produced and what we and our contempo- 
raries add, and if we but rightly direct the forces 
which through serious study and devoted toil 
are more and more each day being made our 
servants, we need have no fear of what lies 
ahead. 

Therein lies the initial advantage, the peculiar 
opportunity, and the special responsibility of 
those who are so fortunate as to take into the 
arena a college education — most of all, those 
whose equipment in that respect is brand new, 
utterly up-to-date, of the 1942 model. 

None has a greater duty and none a greater 
need to participate fully in the present and 
future national effort than have this year's grad- 
uates. No one has a greater personal stake in 
this war than have you. The "set" of your lives 
will be determined by the victory in this 



522 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



titanic struggle and its aftermath. The great 
present marshalling of this country's human and 
physical resources offers for each of you un- 
precedented opportunities. At no time in the 
recent past have the energies and talents of 
youth been so much in demand. Probably 
never in our country's history have there been 
available more or greater or better opportunities 
for youth to make its mark in our national life. 
The exigencies of this war and of the peace to 
be made put a premium upon your intelligence, 
your knowledge, your energy, your courage. 

Today's and tomorrow's high goals are at your 
disposal. The confidence which you naturally 
and properly feel in your ability to respond 
promptly to the call of opportunity and to 
measure up to the responsibilities which will 
soon be yours is, I am sure, fully shared by those 
who have been and who are your teachers. 

You are on the march. Acquit yourselves as 
did your forebears — a sturdy company among 
the makers of America. 



HITLER'S VISIT TO FINLAND 

On June 6 the Secretary of State, in reply to 
inquiries from the press concerning Hitler's 
visit to Finland, said : 

"It is evident that the visit is a deliberate ruse 
on the part of the Germans to compromise Fin- 
land further in the eyes of the anti-Axis world 
and a cover for the desperate attempts of Hitler 
to induce Finland to make further contributions 
to Axis military campaigns. A reported state- 
ment yesterday of a Finnish spokesman in Hel- 
sinki may be interpreted to mean that Finland 
is balking at the German pressure. 

"We are watching the situation most closely 
to see whether this visit of Hitler results in any 
greater degree of cooperation with Hitler 
against the United Nations." 

TRAFFIC IN ARMS, AMMUNITION, ETC. 

Regulations governing the international traf- 
fic in arms, ammunition, and implements of war 



and the exportation of helium gas, tin-plate 
scrap, and articles involving military secrets 
were promulgated by the Secretary of State on 
June 2, 1942, and are printed in the Federal 
Register for June 4, 1942, page 4216. These 
regulations supersede earlier regulations issued 
by the Secretary of State. 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 2 TO 
REVISION II 

[Released to the press June 3] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Acting 
Attorney General, the Secretary of Commerce, 
the Board of Economic Warfare, and the Co- 
ordinator of Inter-American Affairs issued on 
June 3 Supplement 2 to Revision II of the Pro- 
claimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals, 
promulgated May 12, 1S42. 1 

Part I of this supplement contains 214 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 19 deletions. There are no additions or de- 
letions in this supplement under part II, which 
relates to countries outside the Western 
Hemisphere. 



EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

Ten officials of enemy countries and their fam- 
ilies and approximately 930 non-officials were 
scheduled to sail for Europe on the S.S. Drott- 
ningholvi on June 3, 1942. The officials are 
listed in Department of State press release 275 
of June 3, 1942. 



PERSONS ARRIVING ON THE 
S.S. "GRIPSHOLM" 

A list of 193 persons arriving from Europe 
on the S.S. Gripshohn, scheduled to reach New 
York on June 8, 1942, has been issued as Depart- 
ment of State press release 277 of June 4, 1942. 

1 7 Federal Register 4222. 



The Near East 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE KING OF GREECE 



[Released to the press June 3 J 

Wednesday, June 10 

P.M. The King of Greece, His Majesty 
George II, and his party will arrive at Wash- 
ington, D.C., where they will be received by 
an official reception committee. Military honors 
will be rendered. 

His Majesty's party will include : 

His Excellency Emmanuel Tsouderos, Prime 

Minister of Greece 
Col. Demetrios Levidis, Marshal of the Court 
Capt. Petros Stathatos, Aide-de-Camp to the 

King 
Mr. Demetrios Nicolareizis, Private Secretary 

to the Prime Minister 

Col. Louis Fortier, U.S.A., Military Aide to 
the King, and Capt. Andrew S. Hickey, U.S.N., 
Naval Aide to the King, will also be attached 
to the party. 

P.M. His Majesty will arrive at the White 
House. 

8: 00 p.m. State dinner at the White House. 
The King of Greece will remain at the White 
House for the night. 

Thursday, June 11 

10 : 00 a. m . Leave the White House for the 
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Arlington Na- 
tional Cemetery, and Mount Vernon. 

1 : 00 p.m. Luncheon at the Yugoslav Lega- 
tion. 

4 : 30 p.m. Visit to Red Cross headquarters. 

8: 00 p.m. Dinner by the Secretary of State 
at the Carlton Hotel in honor of the King of 
Greece. 

Friday, June 12 

JO: 00 a.m. Prime Minister will call on the 
Secretary of State. 



10:20 a.m. Prime Minister will call on the 
Under Secretary of State. 

11:00 a.m. Press conference at the Blair 
House. 

1:00 p.m. Luncheon at the Greek Legation. 

4 : 00 p.m. Presentation, Chiefs of Diplo- 
matic Missions, at the Blair House. 

5 : 30 p.m. Visit to Women's Press Club. 

8:30 p.m. Dinner by the Secretary of the 
Navy at Chevy Chase Club. 

Saturday, June 13 

10:00 a.m. Call of the Prime Minister at 
the office of the Coordinator of Information. 

12:30 p.m. Luncheon at National Press 
Club. 

4:00 to 0:00 p.m. Royal audiences at the 
Greek Legation. 

7 : 30 p.m. Dinner by Assistant Secretary of 
State Berle. 

Sunday, June 14 

9 : 15 a.m. Leave for the United States Naval 
Academy at Annapolis. 

10: 00 a.m. Arrive at Admiral's House, An- 
napolis. Luncheon at Annapolis by the Com- 
mandant of the Naval Academy. 

3 : 30 p.m. Arrive in Washington. 

5: 00 p.m. Visit to Greek War Relief Group. 

Monday, June 15 

11:00 to 11:45 a.m. Audience, Overseas 
Writers Association. 

12: 20 p.m. Visit to the Capitol. Luncheon 
at the Greek Legation. 

7 : 30 p.m. Dinner at the Greek Legation. 

10 : 00 p.m. Reception at the Greek Legation. 

Tuesday, June 16 

His Majesty the King of Greece and party 
will depart for New York. 

523 



Commercial Policy 



GENERALIZATION OF TRADE-AGREEMENT DUTIES 



[Released to ihe press June 1] 

The President on May 30, 1942 addressed a 
letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, the Hon- 
orable Henry Morgenthau, Jr., concerning the 
application of duties artd other import restric- 
tions proclaimed in connection with trade agree- 
ments entered into under the authority of the 
Trade Agreements Act. A copy of the Presi- 
dent's letter is given below. 

As in previous letters of this nature, the pres- 
ent letter directs that the proclaimed duties and 
other import restrictions, so long as they are in 
effect, shall be applied generally to products of 
all foreign countries, with appropriate provi- 
sion for the special treatment applicable to Cuba 
in accordance with our trade agreement with 
that country. 

The Trade Agreements Act authorizes the 
President to suspend the application of trade- 
agreement rates of duty to products of any 
country because of its discriminatory treatment 
of American commerce or because of other acts 
or policies which tend to defeat the purposes 
of the act. In the administration of this pro- 
vision of the act the Department follows closely 
the acts and policies of foreign countries, and 
previous letters since 1935 have withheld the 
benefits of trade-agreement reductions from 
products of Germany because of the discrimina- 
tory treatment of American commerce by that 
country. This exception has been omitted from 
the present letter as unnecessary because the 
outbreak of war terminated all trade between 
the United States and Germany and other en- 
emy countries and enemy-occupied countries 
except under license. While the new letter does 
not specifically withhold the application of 
trade-agreement reductions to products of any 
country, it makes it clear that the provisions of 
the Trading with the Enemy Act, as amended, 
and the orders and regulations issued pursuant 
thereto effectively prevent Germany and other 
524 



enemy countries from deriving any benefit from 
such reductions. 

It will be noted also that the present letter 
directs the extension to other countries of the 
duties which may be proclaimed in connection 
with future trade agreements as well as those 
heretofore proclaimed and now in force. In 
the past it has been customary to issue a new 
generalization letter in connection with the 
proclamation of each new trade agreement. 
Under existing circumstances this no longer 
seems necessary, and accordingly the directions 
contained in the present letter will continue in 
force until modified by ihe President. 

The letter follows: 

"The White House, 
"Washington, B.C., May 30, 1948. 
"My Dear Mr. Secretary : 

"Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me 
by section 350 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as 
amended (48 Stat. 943; U.S.C., 1940 ed., title 19, 
sec. 1351), I hereby direct that the duties and 
other import restrictions now in effect and here- 
tofore proclaimed, and the duties and other im- 
port restrictions hereafter proclaimed, in con- 
nection with trade agreements (other than the 
trade agreement with Cuba signed on August 
24, 1934, as amended) which have been or shall 
be entered into under the authority of the said 
section, as originally enacted or as extended (48 
Stat. 944, 50 Stat. 24, 54 Stat. 107; U.S.C., 1940 
ed., title 19, sec. 1352), shall be applied on and 
from the date of this letter, or, as the case may 
be, shall be applied on and after the effective 
date of such duties and other import restrictions, 
to articles the growth, produce, or manufacture 
of all foreign countries except Cuba, so long as 
such duties and other import restrictions remain 
in effect and this direction is not modified. 

"Such proclaimed duties and other import 
restrictions shall be applied to articles the 



JUNE 6, 1942 



525 



growth, produce, or manufacture of Cuba in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of the trade agree- 
ment with Cuba signed on August 24, 1934, as 
amended. 

"Nothing in this letter shall be deemed to au- 
thorize the importation of articles or any other 
act in violation of the Trading with the Enemy 
Act, as amended, or any other statute, or any 
order or regulation issued pursuant thereto. 



"My letter addressed to you on October 31, 
1941 with reference to duties and other import 
restrictions heretofore proclaimed in connection 
with trade agreements is hereby superseded. 

"You will please cause this direction to be 
published in an early issue of the weekly Treas- 
ury Decisions. 

"Very sincerely yours, 

Franklin D Roosevelt" 



Publications 



HACKWORTH'S "DIGEST OF INTERNATIONAL LAW", VOLUME III 



[Released to the press June 3] 

The third volume of the Hackworth Digest of 
International Law has just been issued by the 
Department of State. The two preceding vol- 
umes were issued in April 1941. The third vol- 
ume, consisting of 820 pages, includes three 
chapters, namely, "Nationality", "Passports and 
Registration*', and "Aliens". The chapter on 
"Aliens", for example, covers such subjects as 
entry and residence, personal rights and duties, 
property rights, expulsion, immigration, and 
deportation. The material comprised in the 
volume relates to developments and precedents 
in the period since 1906. 



Four additional volumes treating of such sub- 
jects as treaties and executive agreements, hem- 
ispheric security, state responsibility, modes of 
redress, war, and related subjects have gone to 
press. There will also be an additional volume 
containing a comprehensive index and a Table 
of Cases. 

Since the basic expense of printing this work 
is borne by the Department of State, the Govern- 
ment Printing Office is able to offer the book to 
others at the nominal sum of $2 covering only 
the cost of running off additional volumes for 
sales purposes. 



'FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES, 1927", VOLUMES I, II, AND III 



[Released to the press June 4] 

The Department of State released on June 
4 three volumes of the series Foreign Relations 
of the United States, containing more than 
2,200 pages of documents giving the record of 
its diplomatic activities for the year 1927. 
These volumes are issued in accordance with the 
standing Departmental order of March 26, 1925 
providing for substantially complete publica- 
tion "of the correspondence relating to all major 
policies and decisions of the Department in the 



matter of foreign relations, together with the 
events which contributed to the formulation 
of each decision or policy, and the facts incident 
to the application of it." The Departmental 
order is printed in full in Foreign Relations 
of the United States, 1914, Supplement, pp. 
in-rv. 

The documents are arranged by subjects, mat- 
ters of a multilateral nature being in a section 
designated "General" and those primarily con- 
cerning the relations of the United States with 



526 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



one other country under the appropriate country 
heading. Volume I contains the "General" sec- 
tion and questions concerning Argentina, Aus- 
tralia, Austria, Bolivia, Canada, and Chile. 
Volume II includes sections on China, Colom- 
bia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, Domin- 
ican Republic, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Ger- 
many, and Great Britain. Volume III treats 
of Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Italy, 
Latvia, Liberia, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, 
Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Persia, 
Peru, Poland, Rumania, Russia, Spain, Sweden, 
Switzerland, Turkey, Uruguay, Venezuela, 
Yemen, and Yugoslavia. 

Documents on efforts for arms limitation and 
proposals to assure peace are of exceptional in- 
terest and importance in the light of later 
events. The 1927 Foreign Relations volumes 
open with an account of the Three-Power Con- 
ference at Geneva for the Limitation of Naval 
Armament, negotiations in which the United 
States, Great Britain, and Japan participated 
after France and Italy had declined invitations 
to attend (I, 1-159). The arms problem is also 
dealt with in papers relating to the Preparatory 
Commission for the Disarmament Conference 
(I, 159-213) and the draft convention on pri- 
vate manufacture of arms (I, 213-235). The 
preliminary negotiations leading to the Pact of 
Paris are recorded in the section on France, 
Briand's proposal for a pact of perpetual peace 
between the United States and France leading 
to a counter proposal for a multilateral treaty 
renouncing war (II, 611-630). 

Repercussions of ideological conflicts abroad 
are seen in the activities of Italian Fascist or- 
ganizations in the United States (III, 125-128) 
and newspaper attacks in the United States 
against the Italian Government (III, 129-131). 

The War of 1914-18 left problems to be dealt 
with in 1927: Disposition of property held by 
the Alien Property Custodian (1, 301-308), Aus- 
trian loans (I, 442-^475), claims of American 
citizens against the French Government for 
sequestered property (II, 707-717), allocation 
of money received from Germany under the 
Dawes plan (II, 722-727) , the effect of priority 
claims for reparation with regard to bankers' 
loans to German states and municipalities (H, 



727-730) , British war debts (II, 731-745) , agree- 
ments between the United States and Great 
Britain on pecuniary claims (II, 745-755), re- 
leases of property under trading-with-the-enemy 
acts (II, 755-759), funding of Greek debt (III, 
1-19), payment of war debt by Liberia (III, 
159-168), allocation of former German cables 
(III, 275-284), and agreement with Turkey to 
reestablish diplomatic relations and preserve the 
status quo as to commerce (III, 765-804). 

Commercial relations as usual played a promi- 
nent part in the activities of the Department 
of State in 1927. The United States partici- 
pated in the World Economic Conference at 
Geneva (I, 238-246), in the Conference for the 
Abolition of Import and Export Prohibitions 
and Restrictions (I, 246-285), and in the work 
of a committee on double taxation and tax 
evasion (1,286-288). New commercial treaties 
were considered with Argentina (I, 421^123), 
Bolivia (I, 477^80), Chile (I, 517-526), Costa 
Rica (II, 500-502), Cuba (II, 503-518), Czecho- 
slovakia (II, 539-544), France (II, 631-703), 
Peru (III, 594-599), Rumania (III, 631-637), 
Sweden (III, 740-753), Uruguay (111,813-819), 
Venezuela (III, 820-824), and Yugoslavia (III, 
828-865) ; but the only treaty of this nature 
signed in 1927 was that with Honduras (III, 
92-115). Many other subjects treated in these 
volumes concern the protection or promotion of 
American business enterprises, notable illustra- 
tions being cases involving oil interests in Mex- 
ico (LTI, 169-228) and Spain (III, 655-729). 

Assistance by the United States in placing 
the Nicaraguan Government on a more stable 
basis, in which Mr. Henry L. Stimson played a 
notable part, is recorded at length (III, 285- 
478). Other cases in which the United States 
took an interest in matters relating to the in- 
ternal government of foreign countries include 
amendments to the Haitian constitution and 
election law (III, 48-80) and the assumption 
by the American Government of functions 
allotted to it in agreements between the Fire- 
stone interests and the Liberian Government 
(HI, 136-159). 

A number of subjects relating to interna- 
tional law and diplomatic practice are treated, 
including representation of the United States 



JUNE 6, 1942 



527 



in the work of the International Commission of 
Jurists at Eio de Janeiro (I, 364-409), reply by 
the Department of State to questionnaires on in- 
ternational law submitted by the League of Na- 
tions (I, 410-413), the status of League of Na- 
tions officials in the United States (I, 413-414), 
diplomatic or consular immunities (I, 414-417, 
549-551; III, 248-253, 756-764), acquisition of 
property for embassy or legation purposes (I, 
417-418), suits against United States Shipping 
Board vessels in foreign courts (I, 418), rules 
of precedence as regards certain officers of the 
United States (I, 419-420), interpretation of 
the convention of December 2, 1899 and the Mer- 
chant Marine Act of 1920 with respect to British 
commercial rights in American Samoa (II, 
760-775). 

The China section, as in earlier Foreign Rela- 
tions volumes, is the largest of those dealing 
with individual countries (II, 1-498). For the 
greater part the documents in this section con- 
cern the civil war in China and problems grow- 
ing out of it with respect to protection of Amer- 
ican life, property, and interests. The question 
of a loan by American bankers to the South 
Manchuria Railway, a Japanese concern, was 
considered, but no formal proposal was pre- 
sented to the Department of State (II, 482-492). 

Fweign Relations of the United States, 1927, 
was compiled under the direction of Dr. E. 
Wilder Spaulding, Chief of the Division of 
Research and Publication, and Dr. Ernest R. 
Perkins, Chief of the Research Section of that 
Division. 

Copies of these volumes will be available 
shortly and may be obtained from the Super- 
intendent of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D.C. The price of volume 
I (lxxxi, 565 pages) is $1.50; of volume II (en, 
841 pages) $2; and that of volume III (xovn, 
885 pages) $2. 



During the week of June 1-6 the Department 
also released : 

American Delegations to International Conferences, 
Congresses, and Expositions and American Repre- 
sentation on International Institutions and Commis- 



sions, With Relevant Data. Fiscal Year Ended June 
30, 1941. (Compiled in the Division of International 
Conferences.) Conference Series 51. Publication 
1718. vi, 130 pp. 200. 

Military Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Colombia Continuing in Effect 
the Agreement of November 23, 1938 — Effected by 
Exchange of Notes Signed November 19, 1941 and 
February 19, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 237. 
Publication 1741. 2 pp. 50. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 2, June 2, 1942, to Revision II of May 12, 
1942. Publication 1746. 10 pp. 

Claims: Convention Between the United States of 
America and Mexico — Signed at Washington Novem- 
ber 19, 1941 ; proclaimed April 9, 1942. Treaty Series 
980. 7 pp. 50. 



General 



LABOR RIOTS AT NASSAU 

[Released to the press June 2] 

The American Consul at Nassau, Mr. John 
W. Dye, has reported to the Department of 
State that on June 1, laborers from the local 
airfield struck for higher wages and rioted. 
The rioters smashed automobiles and shop win- 
dows and looted freely on Bay Street. 

The Consul reported at noon on June 2 that 
there were still some disturbances that morning 
but by noon military police had arrived. No 
further rioting was anticipated. 



The Department 



APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. John Van Antwerp MacMurray was, on 
June 1, 1942, appointed a Special Assistant to 
the Secretary of State and will perform such 
duties as may from time to time be assigned 
to him in this capacity by the Secretary of State 
(Departmental Order 1059). 



528 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Treaty Information 



POSTAL 
Universal Postal Convention, 1939 

Croatia 

There is printed below a translation of a 
note received from the Swiss Minister at Wash- 
ington informing this Government of the adher- 
ence of Croatia to the Universal Postal Con- 
vention signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 : 

"April 7, 1942. 
"Mr. Secretary of State : 

"By order of my Government, I have the 
honor to advise you that, by note of May 26 
last, the Government of Croatia informed the 
Government of the Swiss Confederation of the 
adherence of Croatia to the following acts, 
signed at Buenos Aires on May 23, 1939 : 

"Universal Postal Convention, with provisions 
concerning the transportation of regular 
mails by air ; 

"Agreement concerning letters and insured 
boxes ; 

"Agreement concerning parcel post, with pro- 
visions concerning the transportation of 
parcel post by air ; 



"Agreement concerning money orders, with pro- 
visions concerning the service of postal 
traveller's checks. 

"The present notification is sent in conformity 
with Articles 2 and 3 of the said Convention. 

"In application of Article 25, Paragraph 3, of 
this agreement, the Croatian Government will 
be placed in the fourth class as regards the dis- 
tribution of the costs of the International 
Bureau. 

"The adherence of Croatia will take effect be- 
ginning on the date of the present notification. 

"In requesting you to be good enough to take 
note of the foregoing, I avail myself [etc.] 

Bruggmann" 



MUTUAL GUARANTIES 
Mutual— Aid Agreement With China 

The text of an agreement between the Govern- 
ments of the United States and China, signed 
June 2, 1942, on the principles applying to 
mutual aid in the prosecution of the war, ap- 
pears in this Bulletin under the heading "The 
War". 



For Bale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents ... - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAO OF THE BUDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



BULI 



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ontents 



H 



"* nr\ 



i 



tin 



JUNE 13, 1942 

Vol. VI, No. 155— Publication 1754 



The War Page 

Conversations between the President and Mr. Molotov . . 531 
Mutual-aid agreement with the Union of Soviet Socialist 

Republics 531 

Combined Production and Resources Board and Combined 

Food Board, United States and Great Britain 535 

Nazi mass terrorization in Czechoslovakia 536 

Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel 536 

United Nations Day 536 

Australasia 

Presentation of letters of credence by the Minister of 
Australia 537 

American Republics 

Argentina : Anniversary of independence 539 

Europe 

Great Britain : Birthday of the King 539 

Cultural Relations 
Visit to the United States of Cuban publisher 539 

The Foreign Service 
Personnel changes 539 

[ovee] 




U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
JUL 13 1942 



c 



ontents-cwTiKvizD 



Treaty Information Page 

Telecommunications : International Telecommunication 

Convention, Revisions of Cairo, 1938 540 

Extradition : Treaty with Canada 540 

Finance: Taxation Convention with Canada 541 

Mutual guaranties: Mutual-Aid Agreement with the 

Soviet Union 541 

Commerce : Duties and Other Import Restrictions in Con- 
nection with Trade Agreements 541 

Legislation 541 

Publications 541 



The War 



CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT AND MR. MOLOTOV 



[Released to the press by the White House June 11] 

The People's Commissar of Foreign Affairs 
of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, Mr. 
V. M. Molotov, following the invitation of the 
President of the United States of America, 
arrived in Washington on May 29 and was for 
some time the President's guest. This visit to 
Washington afforded an opportunity for a 
friendly exchange of views between the Presi- 
dent and his advisers on the one hand and Mr. 
Molotov and his party on the other. Among 
those who participated in the conversations 
were: The Soviet Ambassador to the United 
States, Mr. Maxim Litvinoff; Mr. Harry 
Hopkins; the Chief of Staff, General George C. 
Marshall ; and the Commander in Chief of the 
United States Fleet, Admiral Ernest J. King. 
Mr. Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, joined in 
subsequent conversations on non-military 
matters. 



In the course of the conversations full under- 
standing was reached with regard to the urgent 
tasks of creating a second front in Europe in 
1942. In addition, the measures for increasing 
and speeding up the supplies of planes, tanks, 
and other kinds of war materials from the 
United States to the Soviet Union were dis- 
cussed. Also discussed were the fundamental 
problems of cooperation of the Soviet Union and 
the United States in safeguarding peace and 
security to the freedom-loving peoples after the 
war. Both sides state with satisfaction the 
unity of their views on all these questions. 

At the conclusion of the visit the President 
asked Mr. Molotov to inform Mr. Stalin on his 
behalf that he feels these conversations have been 
most useful in establishing a basis for fruitful 
and closer relations between the two govern- 
ments in the pursuit of the common objectives 
of the United Nations. 



MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH THE UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST REPUBLICS 



[Released to the press June 12] 

An agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics on the principles applying to 
mutual aid in the prosecution of the war was 
signed on June 11 by the Secretary of State 
and His Excellency Maxim Litvinoff, Ambas- 
sador of the Soviet Union at Washington. The 

466024 — 42- 



provisions of the agreement are the same in all 
substantial respects as those of the agreement 
between the Governments of the United States 
and Great Britain signed on February 23, 1942 ' 
and the agreement between the United States 
and China signed on June 2, 1942. a 



1 Bulletin of February 2S, 1942, p. 190. 
'Ibid., June 6, 1942, p. 507. 



531 



532 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



As in the case of the agreements with Great 
Britain and China, the agreement with the 
Soviet Union was negotiated under the pro- 
visions of the Lend-Lease Act of March 11, 
1941, which provides for extending aid to any 
country whose defense is determined by the 
President to be vital to the defense of the United 
States. 

The agreement signed on June 11 is an addi- 
tional link in the chain of solidarity being 
forged by the United Nations in their twofold 
task of prosecuting the war against aggression 
to a successful conclusion and of creating a new 
and better world. 

The agreement reaffirms this country's deter- 
mination to continue to supply in ever-increas- 
ing amounts aid to the Soviet Union in the war 
against the common enemy. The agreement 
also provides for such reciprocal aid as the So- 
viet Union may be in a position to supply. But 
no matter how great this aid may prove to be 
it will be small in comparison with the magnifi- 
cent contribution of the Soviet Union's armed 
forces to the defeat of the common enemy. 

This agreement which adds the Soviet Union 
to the growing list of countries that have joined 
in a determination to take practical measures 
to create a better world hereafter, does not at- 
tempt to foresee or to define precise and detailed 
terms of settlement. It lays down broad prin- 
ciples that are designed to prevent any narrowly 
conceived settlement which might have disas- 
trous effects on the economic welfare of our 
own people, the Soviet people, and the world 
generally. 

Article VII of the agreement embodies firm 
assurances that the two Governments will col- 
laborate to the fullest extent in promoting 
mutually advantageous economic relations by 
means of agreed action open to the participation 
of other like-minded countries. This article 
provides further that the ultimate settlement of 
lend-lease obligations to be reached between the 
United States and the Soviet Union shall be 
such as not to burden commerce but to expand 
production, employment, and the exchange and 
consumption of goods; to eliminate all forms 
of discrimination in international commerce 
and to reduce trade barriers; and, in general, 



to contribute to the attainment of the economic 
objectives set forth in the Joint Declaration 
of August 14, 1941, known as the Atlantic 
Charter. 

Conversations between the two Governments 
will be undertaken at an early, convenient date 
with a view to working out the best means of 
attaining these objectives. 

An exchange of notes between the Secretary 
of State and the Soviet Ambassador, also signed 
on June 11, confirms an understanding between 
the two Governments that this mutual-aid 
agreement replaces and renders inoperative the 
prior lend-lease arrangements between the two 
Governments. 

The texts of the agreement * and of the ex- 
change of notes are given below. 

Text of Agreement 

Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics declare that they are engaged 
in a cooperative undertaking, together with 
every other nation or people of like mind, to 
the end of laying the bases of a just and endur- 
ing world peace securing order under law to 
themselves and all nations; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, as signatories of the Declara- 
tion by United Nations of January 1, 1942, have 
subscribed to a common program of purposes 
and principles embodied in the Joint Declara- 
tion, known as the Atlantic Charter, made on 
August 14, 1941 by the President of the United 
States of America and the Prime Minister of 
the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland, the basic principles of which 
were adhered to by the Government of the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on Septem- 
ber 24, 1941; 

And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant to 
the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that 
the defense of the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics against aggression is vital to the defense 
of the United States of America ; 



1 The text here printed conforms to the original. 



JUNE 13, 1942 

And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to the 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics aid in re- 
sisting aggression; 

And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics receives such aid and of the 
benefits to be received by the United States of 
America in return therefor should be deferred 
until the extent of the defense aid is known and 
until the progress of events makes clearer the 
final terms and conditions and benefits which 
will be in the mutual interests of the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics and will promote the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of world peace; 

And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet. 
Socialist Republics are mutually desirous of 
concluding now a preliminary agreement in 
regard to the provision of defense aid and in 
regard to certain considerations which shall 
be taken into account in determining such terms 
and conditions and the making of such an agree- 
ment has been in all respects duly authorized, 
and all acts, conditions and formalities which 
it may have been necessary to perform, fulfill 
or execute prior to the making of such an 
agreement in conformity with the laws either 
of the United States of America or of the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics have been per- 
formed, fulfilled or executed as required ; 

The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows: 

Article I 

The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- 
lics with such defense articles, defense services, 
and defense information as the President of the 
United States of America shall authorize to be 
transferred or provided. 

Article II 

The Government of the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics will continue to contribute to 



533 

the defense of the United States of America 
and the strengthening thereof and will provide 
such articles, services, facilities or information 
as it may be in a position to supply. 

Article III 

The Government of the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics will not without the consent 
of the President of the United States of America 
transfer title to, or possession of, any defense 
article or defense information transferred to it 
under the Act of March 11, 1941 of the Congress 
of the United States of America or permit the 
use thereof by anyone not an officer, employee, 
or agent of the Government of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics. 

Article IV 

If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 
of any defense article or defense information, 
it becomes necessary for that Government to 
take any action or make any payment in order 
fully to protect any of the rights of a citizen 
of the United States of America who has patent 
rights in and to any such defense article or in- 
formation, the Government of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics will take such action 
or make such payment when requested to do so 
by the President of the United States of 
America. 

Article V 

The Government of the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics will return to the United States 
of America at the end of the present emergency, 
as determined by the President of the United 
States of America, such defense articles trans- 
ferred under this Agreement as shall not have 
been destroyed, lost or consumed and as shall 
be determined by the President to be useful in 
the defense of the United States of America or 
of the Western Hemisphere or to be otherwise 
of use to the United States of America. 

Article VI 

In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 



534 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics full cognizance shall be taken of all 
property, services, information, facilities, or 
other benefits or considerations provided by the 
Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics subsequent to March 11, 1941, and 
accepted or acknowledged by the President on 
behalf of the United States of America. 

Article VII 

In the final determination of the benefits to be 
provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics in return for aid furnished under the 
Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, the terms and 
conditions thereof shall be such as not to burden 
commerce between the two countries, but to pro- 
mote mutually advantageous economic relations 
between them and the betterment of world-wide 
economic relations. To that end, they shall in- 
clude provision for agreed action by the United 
States of America and the Union of Soviet So- 
cialist Republics, open to participation by all 
other countries of like mind, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate international and do- 
mestic measures, of production, employment, 
and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the lib- 
erty and welfare of all peoples; to the elimina- 
tion of all forms of discriminatory treatment 
in international commerce, and to the reduction 
of tariffs and other trade barriers; and, in gen- 
eral, to the attainment of all the economic ob- 
jectives set forth in the Joint Declaration made 
on August 14, 1941, by the President of the 
United States of America and the Prime Min- 
ister of the United Kingdom, the basic prin- 
ciples of which were adhered to by the Gov- 
ernment of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics on September 24, 1941. 

At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 
attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments, 



Article VIII 

This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Governments. 

Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this eleventh day of June, 1942. 

For the Government of the United States of 
America : 

Cordell Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

For the Government of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics : 

Maxim Litvinoff 
Ambassador of the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics at Washington 



The Secretary of State to the Ambassador of 
the Soviet Union 

Department of State, 
Washington, June 11, 19J$. 
Excellency : 

In connection with the signature on this date 
of the Agreement between our two Governments 
on the Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in 
the Prosecution of the War Against Aggres- 
sion, I have the honor to confirm our under- 
standing that this Agreement replaces and ren- 
ders inoperative the two prior arrangements on 
the same subject between our two Governments, 
the most recent of which was expressed in the 
exchange of communications between the Presi- 
dent and Mr. Stalin dated respectively Febru- 
ary 13, February 20, and February 23, 1942. 

Accept [etc.] Cordell Hull 

The Ambassador of the Soviet Union to the 
Secretary of State 

June 11, 1942. 
Excellency : 

In connection with the signature on this date 
of the Agreement between our two Governments 
on the Principles Applying to Mutual Aid in 



JUNE 13, 1942 



535 



the Prosecution of the War Against Aggression, 
I have the honor to confirm our understanding 
that this Agreement replaces and renders inop- 
erative the two prior arrangements on the same 
subject between our two Governments, the most 



recent of which was expressed in the exchange 
of communications between the President and 
Mr. Stalin dated respectively February 13, Feb- 
ruary 20, and February 23, 1942. 
Accept [etc.] Maxim Litvinoit 



COMBINED PRODUCTION AND RESOURCES BOARD AND COMBINED FOOD BOARD, 
UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN 



[Released to the press by the White House June 0] 

The President announced on June 9 on behalf 
of himself and the Prime Minister of Great 
Britain the creation of a Combined Production 
and Resources Board and a Combined Food 
Board. 

The general purpose of the two boards was 
announced with release of memoranda addressed 
by the President to Mr. Donald Nelson, who will 
act as the American representative on the Com- 
bined Production and Resources Board, and to 
the Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Claude Wick- 
ard, who will act as the American representa- 
tive on the Combined Food Board. 

The text of the memorandum to Mr. Nelson 
follows. 

"In order to complete the organization needed 
for the most effective use of the combined re- 
sources of the United States and the United 
Kingdom for the prosecution of the war, there 
is hereby established a Combined Production 
and Resources Board. 

"1. The Board shall consist of the Chairman 
of the War Production Board, representing the 
United States, and the Minister of Production, 
representing the United Kingdom. 

"2. The Board shall : 

"(a) Combine the production programs of 
the United States and the United Kingdom into 
a single integrated program, adjusted to the 
strategic requirements of the war, as indicated 
to the Board by the Combined Chiefs of Staff, 
and to all relevant production factors. In this 
connection, the Board shall take account of the 
need for maximum utilization of the productive 
resources available to the United States, the 



British Commonwealth of Nations, and the 
United Nations, the need to reduce demands 
on shipping to a minimum, and the essential 
needs of the civilian populations. 

"(b) In close collaboration with the Com- 
bined Chiefs of Staff, assure the continuous 
adjustment of the combined production pro- 
gram to meet changing military requirements. 

"3. To this end, the Combined Chiefs of Staff 
and the Combined Munitions Assignments 
Board shall keep the Combined Production and 
Resources Board currently informed concerning 
military requirements, and the Combined Pro- 
duction and Resources Board shall keep the 
Combined Chiefs of Staff and the Combined 
Munitions Assignments Board currently in- 
formed concerning the facts and possibilities of 
production. 

"4. To facilitate continuous operation, the 
members of the Board shall each appoint a 
Deputy ; and the Board shall form a combined 
staff. The Board shall arrange for such con- 
ferences among United States and United King- 
dom personnel as it may from time to time deem 
necessary or appropriate to study particular 
production needs; and utilize the Joint War 
Production Staff in London, the Combined Raw 
Materials Board, the Joint Aircraft Committee, 
and other existing combined or national agen- 
cies for war production in such manner and to 
such extent as it shall deem necessary." 

The text of the memorandum to Secretary 
Wickard follows. 

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by 
the Constitution and as President of the United 



536 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



States, and acting jointly and in full accord 
with the Prime Minister of Great Britain, I 
hereby authorize, on the part of the Government 
of the United States, the creation of a joint 
Great Britain - United States board to be known 
as the Combined Food Board. 

"In order to cooi-dinate further the prosecu- 
tion of the war effort by obtaining a planned 
and expeditious utilization of the food resources 
of the United Nations, there is hereby estab- 
lished a Combined Food Board. 

"The Board will be composed of the Secretary 
of Agriculture and of the Head of the British 
Food Mission who will represent and act under 
the instruction of the Minister of Food. 

"The duties of the Board shall be : 

"To consider, investigate, enquire into, and 
formulate plans with regard to any question in 
respect of which the Governments of the U.S.A. 
and the U.K. have, or may have, a common 
concern, relating to the supply, production, 
transportation, disposal, allocation or distribu- 
tion, in or to any part of the world, of foods, 
agricultural materials from which foods are de- 
rived, and equipment and non-food materials 
ancillary to the production of such foods and 
agricultural materials, and to make recom- 
mendations to the Governments of the U.S.A. 
and the U.K. in respect of any such question. 

"To work in collaboration with others of 
the United Nations toward the best utilization 
of their food resources, and, in collaboration 
with the interested nation or nations, to formu- 
late plans and recommendations for the devel- 
opment, expansion, purchase, or other effective 
use of their food resources. 

"The Board shall be entitled to receive from 
any Agency of the Government of the United 
States and any Department of the Government 
of the United Kingdom, any information avail- 
able to such Agency or Department relating to 
any matter with regard to which the Board is 
competent to make recommendations to those 
Governments, and in principle, the entire food 
resources of Great Britain and the United States 
will be deemed to be in a common pool, about 
which the fullest information will be inter- 
changed." 



NAZI MASS TERRORIZATION IN 
CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

[Released to the press June 12] 

Reports that Hitler has demolished the vil- 
lage of Lidice, slaughtered every male inhabi- 
tant thereof, incarcerated every woman in a 
concentration camp, and sent the children to in- 
stitutions called forth the following statement 
by the Secretary of State : 

"This latest example of mass terrorization 
through wanton butchery of hostages and brutal 
torture of innocent women and children has 
shocked and outraged humanity. Savage tribes 
at times followed such vile practices but quickly 
turned away from them as being so utterly in- 
human and beastly as to be unworthy even of 
savages. I am not surprised that Hitler has 
revived this unspeakable relic of the darkest 
periods of history. His act is in thorough keep- 
ing with all that he represents." 

EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND 
CONSULAR PERSONNEL 

I to the press June 11] 

The sailing of the S.S. Gripsholm with the 
Japanese officials and other nationals to be ex- 
changed has been postponed for two reasons: 
first, the American Government has failed to 
receive from the Japanese Government the list 
of the American nationals to be exchanged out 
of China ; second, the Japanese Government has 
refused safe conduct to the Gripsholm until 
June 16. 

The persons will remain aboard the Grips- 
holm in New York waters in expectation of the 
receipt of the above-mentioned list from the 
Japanese Government. The ship will depart 
on a rearranged schedule on or about June 16. 



UNITED NATIONS DAY 

[Released to the press June 13] 

The following representatives of the United 
Nations have been invited to the White House 
on Sunday afternoon, June 14, 1942, on the occa- 
sion of United Nations Day : 



JUNE 13, 1942 



537 



The Right Honorable the Viscount Halifax, The British 
Ambassador 

Mr. Maxim Litvinoff, The Ambassador of the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics 

His Excellency Dr. T. V. Soong, The Chinese Minister 
for Foreign Affairs 

Sir Owen Dixon, The Minister of Australia 

Count Robert van der Straten-Ponthoz, The Belgian 
Ambassador 

The Honorable Leighton McCarthy, The Minister of 
Canada 

Seflor Dr. Don Luis Fernandez, The Minister of Costa 
Rica 

Seflor Dr. Aurelio F. Concheso, The Ambassador of 
Cuba 

Mr. Vladimir Hurban, The Minister of Czechoslovakia 

Seflor Dr. J. M. Troncoso, The Minister of the Domini- 
can Republic 

Seflor Dr. Don Hector David Castro, The Minister of 
El Salvador 

Mr. Philon A. Philon, Counselor of the Greek Legation 

Seflor Dr. Don Adrian Recinos, The Minister of Guate- 
mala 



Mr. Fernand Dennis, The Minister of Haiti 

Seflor Dr. Don Julian R. Caceres, The Minister of 

Honduras 
The Honorable Sir Girja Shankar Bajpai, Agent Gen- 
eral for India 
Mr. Hugues Le Gallais, The Minister of Luxembourg 
Dr. A. Loudon, The Ambassador of the Netherlands 
Air Commodore L. M. Isitt, Air Attache' of the New 

Zealand Legation 
Seflor Dr. Don Le6n DeBayle, The Minister of Nica- 
ragua 
Mr. Wilhelm Munthe de Morgenstierne, The Ambas- 
sador of Norway 
Seflor Don Ernesto Ja€n Guardia, The Ambassador of 

Panama 
Mr. Jan Ciechanowski, The Ambassador of Poland 
Mr. Ralph William Close, The Minister of the Union 

of South Africa 
Mr. Constantin Fotitch, The Minister of Yugoslavia 
Seflor Dr. Don Francisco Castillo Najera, The Am- 
bassador of Mexico 
The Honorable Manuel Quezon, The President of the 
Philippine Commonwealth 



Australasia 



PRESENTATION OF LETTERS OF CREDENCE BY THE MINISTER OF AUSTRALIA 



[Released to the press June 10] 

The remarks of the newly appointed Minister 
of Australia, Sir Owen Dixon, K.C.M.G., upon 
the occasion of the presentation of his letters of 
credence, follow: 

''Me. President: 

"It gives me great pleasure to hand to you 
today letters by which His Majesty the King ac- 
credits me as his Envoy Extraordinary and Min- 
ister Plenipotentiary at Washington with the 
especial object of representing in the United 
States of America the interests of the Common- 
wealth of Australia. In tendering my letters of 
credence and also the letters of recall of the 
Right Honourable Richard Gardiner Casey, 
D.S.O., M.C., first Australian Minister at "Wash- 
ington, I bring with me sincere good wishes from 
His Majesty's Government in the Common- 
wealth of Australia and from the Australian 



people for your personal welfare and happiness 
and for the prosperity and fortune of the nation 
whose destinies you have guided for so long with 
such conspicuous courage and ability. 

"It is now more than two years since the es- 
tablishment of the Australian Legation at Wash- 
ington. During this period the world has been 
shaken to its foundations as country after coun- 
try, including the United States itself, has been 
compelled to take up arms in defence of its in- 
stitutions and culture. My Government deeply 
appreciates the friendly advice and good coun- 
sel given to the Australian Minister at Wash- 
ington during this time. Events have made 
increasingly evident the need for close consulta- 
tion, without which my Government could not 
readily make known its own point of view or 
ascertain the point of view of the United States. 



538 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



For this reason my Government received with 
great pleasure advice of the decision to establish 
in Washington the Pacific War Council. Just 
before the establishment of the Council the Com- 
monwealth Government had sent to the United 
States on a special mission the Right Honourable 
Herbert V. Evatt, K.C., M.P., Minister of State 
for External Affairs and Attorney General. 
Dr. Evatt attended the first and later meetings 
of the Council before proceeding to England 
and was thus afforded the opportunity of ex- 
pressing in person the views of the Australian 
Government. My Government is convinced 
that only through such personal contact and 
continual consultation between the representa- 
tives of allied countries can misunderstanding be 
avoided and plans be made for the most effec- 
tive prosecution of the war. 

"I need hardly assure you, Mr. President, that 
I myself shall do my utmost to extend and im- 
prove the friendly relationships which now exist 
between the United States and Australia. Aus- 
tralians are deeply grateful for the tangible 
interest in her welfare which has been shown by 
the Government of the United States. In this 
connection I need refer only to the brilliant and 
successful naval action fought recently in the 
Coral Sea, the courageous exploits of American 
airmen operating from Australia and New 
Guinea, and the presence in Australia of a sub- 
stantial number of American forces whose bear- 
ing and efficiency have been an inspiration to all. 
In return, may I assure you that the Australian 
Government and the Australian people are de- 
termined to contribute to their utmost to the 
defeat of the enemy. By increasing — in every 
way they find possible — the war effort of Aus- 
tralia, they hope to give proof that this is their 
settled purpose." 

• The President's reply to the remarks of Sir 
Owen Dixon follows : 

"Mr. Minister : 

"I am very happy to welcome you to Wash- 
ington and to receive from your hands the letters 
which accredit you as His Majesty's Envoy 



Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 
with the special object of representing in the 
United States of America the interests of the 
Commonwealth of Australia. 

"I greatly appreciate the friendly greetings 
and the earnest good wishes which you have 
brought from the Government and people of 
Australia. May I take this opportunity to re- 
affirm once again the feelings of warmest friend- 
ship of myself and of the American people for 
the people of Australia and of the whole British 
Commonwealth of Nations. 

"The close bonds of blood and sentiment 
which unite our peoples are now drawn ever 
firmer by our common struggle against the 
forces of conquest and tyranny. We now stand 
as comrades in arms defending our common lib- 
erty and our existence as free peoples. We have 
walked through dark days together. We share 
the awful sacrifices of war. American fighting 
forces now stand guard in Australia side by side 
with the gallant Anzacs. The Australian 
people have taken these American soldiers into 
their homes as sons and brothers. The United 
States and Australia, along with other United 
Nations, have pledged themselves to contribute 
their full resources to the struggle and to press 
onward together until victory is complete. 
With faith in our high cause and with determi- 
nation to overcome all obstacles ahead, we can- 
not fail. 

"I have welcomed the special mission of the 
Right Honorable Herbert V. Evatt to Washing- 
ton and London and the opportunity which it 
has afforded for the fullest consultation on all 
aspects of war policy. I am sure that these 
conversations have already borne fruitful re- 
sults. The creation of the Pacific War Council 
in Washington now provides machinery for 
continued consultation through personal con- 
tact and for the pooling of all views on the 
conduct of the war. 

"I hope your stay in Washington may be a 
pleasant one and I wish to assure you that the 
American Government will endeavor to help 
you in every way to carry out your duties as 
Minister." 



JUNE 13, 1942 



539 



American Republics 



ARGENTINA: ANNIVERSARY OF 
INDEPENDENCE 

[Released to the press June 0] 

The translation of a telegram from the Act- 
ing President of the Argentine Republic, His 
Excellency Ramon S. Castillo, which has been 
received by the President of the United States, 
follows : 

"Buenos Aires, May 27, 191$. 
"It is a great pleasure for me to acknowledge 
the receipt of the friendly message whereby 
Your Excellency associated yourself with the 
celebration of our national holiday, which goes 
back to the common struggle which the Ameri- 
can peoples carried on to obtain their freedom, 
in the great principles which today inspire their 
joint action. 

Ramon S. Castillo" 



Europe 



GREAT BRITAIN: BIRTHDAY OF THE 
KING 

[Released to the press June 11] 

The President, on June 11, sent the following 
telegram to His Majesty George VI of Great 
Britain : 

"Upon the occasion of the celebration of Your 
Majesty's birth it gives me great pleasure to 
extend my sincere good wishes for your health 
and happiness and for the continued well being 
of all of your people. 

"At this time last year I took occasion to ex- 
press to you the sympathy and admiration of the 
American people for the valiant defense of 
liberty in which the people of the British Em- 
pire were then, as now, so bravely engaged. To- 
day the people of this nation are firmly joined 



in spirit and in arms with the people of the 
British Empire and the people of all of the 
United Nations in the high resolve that freedom 
and justice shall be preserved and made secure. 
Franklin D Roosevelt" 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF CUBAN 
PUBLISHER 

[Released to the press June 12] 

Dr. Pedro Cue, of Cuba, publisher of El 
Mundo, one of Habana's leading newspapers, 
and Senora de Cue will arrive in Washington on 
June 14. Dr. Cue, a former member of the 
Cuban Senate, will spend six weeks in this coun- 
try as a guest of the Department of State. His 
paper, one of the leading dailies of Hispanic 
America, has for many years maintained an edi- 
torial policy of friendship with the United 
States and of inter-American cooperation. 
From the beginning of the present conflict it 
has continuously upheld the cause of the dem- 
ocracies. 

While in this country Dr. Cue will be the guest 
of newspapers in various cities and will also 
visit the Schools of Journalism of Columbia, 
Harvard, Boston, Chicago, Northwestern, Mis- 
souri, and Texas Universities. 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press June 13] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since May 30, 1942 : 

Stephen E. Aguirre, of El Paso, Tex., Consul 
at Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico, has been 
assigned as Consul at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. 



540 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Byron E. Blankinship, of New York, N. Y., 
has been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career and has been assigned 
for duty in the Department of State. 

William F. Busser, of Philadelphia, Pa., Vice 
Consul now serving in the Department of State, 
has been designated Third Secretary of Em- 
bassy and Vice Consul at Mexico, D. F., Mexico, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

William E. Dunn, of Sulphur Springs, Tex., 
Commercial Attache at Guatemala, Guatemala, 
has been assigned for duty in the Department 
of State. 

Elbridge Durbrow, of San Francisco, Calif., 
formerly Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Rome, Italy, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

F. Russell Engdahl, of Spokane, Wash., for- 
merly Consul at Shanghai, China, died on May 
13, 1942. 

Ernest E. Evans, of Rochester, N. Y., Consul 
at Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has been 



assigned as Second Secretary of Embassy and 
Consul at Mexico, D.F., Mexico. 

Douglas N. Forman, Jr., of Somerville, 
Mass., has been appointed Foreign Service Offi- 
cer, Unclassified, Secretary in the Diplomatic 
Service, and Vice Consul of Career and has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Bogota, Colombia. 

George P. Shaw, of San Diego, Calif., First 
Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Mexico, 
D.F., Mexico, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Joseph S. Sparks, of Glendale, Calif., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Unclas- 
sified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, and 
Vice Consul of Career and has been assigned as 
Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba. 

Orray Taft, Jr., of Santa Barbara, Calif., 
Vice Consul at Algiers, Algeria, has been as- 
signed as Vice Consul at Mexicali, Baja Cali- 
fornia, Mexico. 

George H. Winters, of Downs, Kans., Consul 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been assigned as Consul at Nuevo Laredo, 
Tamaulipas, Mexico. 



Treaty Information 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

International Telecommunication Convention, 

Revisions of Cairo, 1938 
Turkey 

According to notification no. 404 dated April 
1, 1942 from the Bureau of the International 
Telecommunication Union at Bern, the notifi- 
cation of the approval by Turkey of the follow- 
ing Regulations and Protocols annexed to the 
International Telecommunication Convention, 
signed at Madrid December 9, 1932, as revised 
at Cairo April 4 and 8, 1938, was received by 
the Bureau on March 17, 1942 : 
Telegraph Regulations and Final Protocol 
Telephone Regulations and Final Protocol 



General Radio Regulations and Final Protocol 
Additional Radio Regulations, and Additional 
Protocol 

EXTRADITION 
Treaty with Canada 

On June 6, 1942 the President ratified the 
Extradition Treaty with Canada which was 
signed on April 29, 1942. 

The treaty will enter into force, according to 
the provisions of article XIV, ten days after 
the exchange of ratifications. It will remain in 
force for a period of five years, and in case 
neither of the parties shall have given notice 
one year before the expiration of that period 



JUNE 13, 1942 



541 



of its intention to terminate the treaty, it shall 
continue in force until the expiration of one 
year from the date on which such notice of ter- 
mination shall be given by either of the parties. 
On the coming into force of this treaty it shall 
supersede all other existing treaties or conven- 
tions relating to extradition between the United 
States of America and Canada. 

FINANCE 

Taxation Convention with Canada 

On June 4, 1942 the President ratified the 
Taxation Convention between the United States 
and Canada signed on March 4, 1942. 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual-Aid Agreement with the Soviet Union 

The text of an agreement between the Gov- 
ernments of the United States and the Union 
of Soviet Socialist Republics, signed June 11, 
1942, on the principles applying to mutual aid 
in the prosecution of the war appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "The War". 

COMMERCE 

Duties and Other Import Restrictions in 
Connection with Trade Agreements 

The text of a letter from the President to the 
Secretary of the Treasury concerning the appli- 
cation of duties and other import restrictions 



proclaimed in connection with trade agreements 
entered into under the authority of the Trade 
Agreements Act, appeared in the Bulletin of 
June 6, 1942, page 524. 



Legislation 



Amending Section 24 of the Immigration Act of Febru- 
ary 5, 1917. S. Rept. 1475, 77th Cong., on H. R. 
5870. 2 pp. 

Amending the Nationality Act of 1940 To Preserve the 
Nationality of Citizens Residing Abroad. H. Rept. 
2225, 77th Cong., on H. R. 7152. 3 pp. 

Estimate of Appropriation for the Office of Coordinator 
of Inter- American Affairs of the Office for Emergency 

Management, Fiscal Year 1943, of $28,638,000: Com- 
munication from the President transmitting the esti- 
mate of appropriation. H. Doc. 773, 77th Cong. 2 pp. 



Publications 



Department of State 

Diplomatic List, June 1942. Publication 1748. ii, 98 
pp. Subscription, $1 a year ; single copy, 10^. 

Inter-American Coffee Agreement : Supplementary Proc- 
lamation by the President of the United States of 
America, Issued February 27, 1942, Declaring That 
the Inter-American Coffee Agreement Signed at 
Washington November 2S, 1940 Entered into Full 
Force among All the Signatory Countries on Decem- 
ber 31, 1941. Treaty Series 979 (Supplementary to 
Treaty Series 970). 2 pp. 5tf. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOE Off THE EDREAD OF THE BUDGET 









THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 



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JUNE 20, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 156— Publication 1755 



ontents 



THE WAH Page 

Flag Day address by the President 545 

Mexican adherence to the Declaration by United 

Nations 546 

Philippine adherence to the Declaration by United 

Nations 547 

United Nations Rally: Address by the Under Secretary 

of State 548 

Mutual-aid agreement with the Belgian Government . 551 
Agreement with Cuba for military collaboration . . . 553 
Exchange of diplomatic and consular personnel and 

other nationals 553 

Europe 

Visit to the United States of the King of Yugoslavia. . 554 

American Republics 

Rubber agreement with Costa Rica 554 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of educators from Cuba and 

Uruguay and editor from Colombia 555 

The Department 

Two Divisions abolished. 556 

The Foreign Service 

Personnel changes 556 

[over] 








U. S. SUPERI 

JUL 13 1942 

OTitSTl tS— CONTINUED 

Treaty Information Page 

Finance: Taxation Convention with Canada 557 

Mutual guaranties: Mutual-Aid Agreement with the 

Belgian Government 557 

Defense: Agreement with Cuba 557 

Strategic materials: Agreement with Costa Rica . . . 557 

Publications 557 

Legislation 558 



The War 



FLAG DAY ADDRESS BY THE PRESIDENT 



[Released to the press by the White House June 15] 

Today on Flag Day we celebrate the Declara- 
tion of the United Nations — that great alliance 
dedicated to the defeat of our foes and to the 
establishment of a true peace based on the free- 
dom of man. Today the Republic of Mexico 
and the Commonwealth of the Philippine 
Islands join us. We welcome these valiant 
peoples to the company of those who fight for 
freedom. 

The four freedoms of common humanity are 
as much elements of man's needs as air and 
sunlight, bread and salt. Deprive him of all 
these freedoms and he dies; deprive him of a 
part of them and a part of him withers. Give 
them to him in full and abundant measure and 
he will cross the threshold of a new age, the 
greatest age of man. 

These freedoms are the rights of men of 
every creed and every race, wherever they live. 
This is their heritage, long withheld. We of 
the United Nations have the power and the men 
and the will at last to assure man's heritage. 

The belief in the four freedoms of common 
humanity — the belief in man, created free, in 
the image of God — is the crucial difference be- 
tween ourselves and the enemies we face today. 
In it lies the absolute unity of our alliance, op- 
posed to the oneness of the evil we hate. Here 
is our strength, the source and promise of 
victory. 

We of the United Nations know that our faith 
cannot be broken by any man or any force. 
And we know that there are other millions who 
in their silent captivity share our belief. 

1 Delivered June 14, 1942. 
467261 — 12 



We ask the German people, still dominated 
by their Nazi whipmasters, whether they would 
rather have the mechanized hell of Hitler's 
"new order" or — in place of that — freedom of 
speech and religion, freedom from want and 
from fear. 

We ask the Japanese people, trampled by 
their savage lords of slaughter, whether they 
would rather continue slavery and blood or — 
in place of them — freedom of speech and re- 
ligion, freedom from want and from fear. 

We ask the brave, unconquered people of the 
nations the Axis invaders have dishonored and 
despoiled whether they would rather yield to 
conquerors or have freedom of speech and re- 
ligion, freedom from want and from fear. 

We know the answer. They know the an- 
swer. We know that man, born to freedom in 
the image of God, will not forever suffer the 
oppressors' sword. The peoples of the United 
Nations are taking that sword from the op- 
pressors' hands. With it they will destroy 
those tyrants. The brazen tyrannies pass. 
Man marches forward toward the light. 

I am going to close by reading to you a prayer 
that has been written for the United Nations 
on this day: 

"God of the free, we pledge our hearts and 
lives today to the cause of all free mankind. 

"Grant us victory over the tyrants who 
would enslave all free men and nations. Grant 
us faith and understanding to cherish all those 
who fight for freedom as if they were our 
brothers. Grant us brotherhood in hope and 
union, not only for the space of this bitter war 
but for the days to come which shall and must 
unite all the children of earth. 

545 



546 

"Our earth is but a small star in the great 
universe. Yet of it we can make, if we choose, 
a planet unvexed by war, untroubled by hunger 
or fear, undivided by senseless distinctions of 
race, color, or theory. Grant us that courage 
and foreseeing to begin this task today that 
our children and our children's children may 
be proud of the name of man. 

"The spirit of man has awakened and the 
soul of man has gone forth. Grant us the 
wisdom and the vision to comprehend the great- 
ness of man's spirit, that suffers and endures so 
hugely for a goal beyond his own brief span. 
Grant us honor for our dead who died in the 
faith, honor for our living who work and strive 
for the faith, redemption and security for all 
captive lands and peoples. Grant us patience 
with the deluded and pity for the betrayed. 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

And grant us the skill and the valor that shall 
cleanse the world of oppression and the old 
base doctrine that the strong must eat the weak 
because they are strong. 

"Yet most of all grant us brotherhood, not 
only for this day but for all our years — a 
brotherhood not of words but of acts and deeds. 
We are all of us children of earth; grant us 
that simple knowledge. If our brothers are 
oppressed, then we are oppressed. If they 
hunger, we hunger. If their freedom is taken 
away our freedom is not secure. Grant us a 
common faith that man shall know bread and 
peace — that he shall know justice and right- 
eousness, freedom and security, an equal oppor- 
tunity and an equal chance to do his best, not 
only in our own lands but throughout the world. 
And in that faith let us march toward the clean 
world our hands can make. Amen." 



MEXICAN ADHERENCE TO THE DECLARATION BY UNITED NATIONS 



[Released to the press June 15] 

An exchange of correspondence between the 
Secretary of State and His Excellency Ezequiel 
Padilla, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Mexico, 
follows : 

[Translation] 

"Mexico City, June 5, 19!$. 

"51274. Your Excellency has undoubtedly 
had occasion during recent years to evaluate the 
international conduct observed by Mexico in 
the face of the constant transgressions of law 
committed by the powers which, having equal 
aims from the beginning, subsequently ended 
by associating themselves in their unbridled 
ambition for world domination, signing the 
Tripartite Pact. From the time when, in Sep- 
tember 1939, an uncontainable Pan-Germanism, 
clothed in a singularly arbitrary dictatorial 
ideology, unloosed war on Europe, the Govern- 
ment of Mexico has given public expression to 
its sympathy for the cause of the democracies 



which are trying to prevent the world from fall- 
ing under the despotism of the totalitarian 
states. Hence, interpreting this obvious policy 
of the Government of Mexico, at the Third 
Consultative Meeting of Ministers of Foreign 
Affairs of the American Republics, it, with true 
pleasure, signed resolution XXXV relating to 
the Atlantic Charter. Now that my Govern- 
ment — for reasons of which Your Excellency 
is aware — has found itself compelled, in de- 
fense of its outraged sovereignty, to declare it- 
self to be in a state of war with Germany, Italy, 
and Japan, it considers that the time has ar- 
rived to give more concrete adherence to the 
joint program outlined by His Excellency 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United 
States of America, and by His Excellency Win- 
ston Churchill, Prime Minister of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ire- 
land, on August 14, 1941. In taking this de- 
cision my Government does but continue the 



JUNE 20, 1942 



547 



firm line of its national policy. In fact, the 
principles contained in the Atlantic Charter 
coincide with the aspirations for social justice 
which have invariably ruled the actions of my 
country in the international field; they indicate, 
as goals of the present conflict, objectives of 
such importance and nobility as to justify the 
greatest sacrifices; and, in brief, they constitute 
an ideal for the realization of which Mexico has 
worked from the beginning of its independent 
life. Accordingly, I have the honor to inform 
Your Excellency that in accordance with in- 
structions which I have received from the Presi- 
dent of the Republic Mexico formally adheres, 
by means of the present message, to the declara- 
tion of the United Nations dated January 1, 
1942. 
"I renew [etc.] Ezequtel Padilla" 



"June 12, 1942. 
"I have received your telegram of June 5, 
1942 stating that the principles contained in 
the Atlantic Charter coincide with the aspira- 



tions for social justice of the Mexican people; 
that these principles clearly express the direc- 
tives which have invariably ruled the actions 
of Mexico in the international field; that the 
principles indicate, as goals of the present con- 
flict, objectives of such importance and nobility 
as to justify the greatest sacrifices; and that 
accordingly Mexico formally adheres to the 
Declaration by United Nations of January 1, 
1942. 

"It is indeed gratifying that Mexico has asso- 
ciated itself with the other United Nations 
which have pledged themselves to employ their 
full resources, military or economic, in the task 
of overwhelming the forces of evil that seek to 
dominate and enslave the world. On behalf 
of this Government, which is the depository for 
the Declaration by United Nations, I take pleas- 
ure in welcoming Mexico to the group of United 
Nations which are engaged in the struggle for 
the preservation of liberty and the democratic 
way of life. 

"Please accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



PHILIPPINE ADHERENCE TO THE DECLARATION BY UNITED NATIONS 



[Released to the press June 15] 

The texts of letters exchanged between the 
President of the Commonwealth of the Philip- 
pines, His Excellency Dr. Manuel L. Quezon, 
and the Secretary of State regarding Philip- 
pine adherence to the Declaration by United 
Nations follows: 

"Washington, D.C., June 10, 191$. 
"Mr. Secretary: 

"The people of the Philippines are whole- 
heartedly devoted to liberty and fully subscribe 
to the principles set forth in that great docu- 
ment known as the Atlantic Charter which was 
proclaimed by President Roosevelt and Prime 
Minister Churchill on August 14, 1941. 

"We have been battling since December 7, 
1941 to preserve our country from the menace of 
Japanese aggression. Although a large part 
of our territory is overrun by Japanese military 
forces, our soldiers are still actively engaged in 



meeting and harassing the foe wherever pos- 
sible. We do not intend to be cowed by the 
armed might of Japan. We shall continue the 
struggle with every means in our power. 

"We desire to associate ourselves with those 
nations which are fighting for the preservation 
of life and liberty against the forces of bar- 
barism that seek world domination. Accord- 
ingly, the Commonwealth of the Philippines 
hereby formally adheres to the Declaration by 
United Nations of January 1, 1942. 

"I am [etc.] Manuel L. Quezon" 



"Washington, D.C., June 13, 1942. 
"My Dear Mr. President : 

"I have received your communication of June 
10, 1942 stating that the people of the Philip- 
pines are wholeheartedly devoted to liberty and 
fully subscribe to the principles set forth in the 



548 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Atlantic Charter; that they desire to associate 
themselves with the nations which are fighting 
for the preservation of life and liberty against 
the forces of barbarism that seek world dom- 
ination; and that accordingly the Common- 
wealth of the Philippines formally adheres to 
the Declaration by United Nations of January 
1, 1942. 

"The entire freedom-loving world admires 



the great, courage and valor shown by the peo- 
ple of the Philippines during the past six 
months as they have gallantly fought to pre- 
serve their country from Japanese aggression. 
On behalf of this Government, as depository 
for the Declaration by United Nations, I take 
pleasure in welcoming into this group the 
Commonwealth of the Philippines. 

"Please accept [etc.] Cordell Hull" 



UNITED NATIONS RALLY 

ADDRESS BY THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE ' 



[Released to the press June 18] 

A few of us here tonight were privileged to 
be present in the White House last Sunday at 
an historic ceremony. 

That ceremony marked the adherence to the 
Declaration of the United Nations of two new 
members of the roll of honor. 

It signalized the entrance into the rights and 
obligations of that pact of the people of the 
Commonwealth of the Philippines, whose epic 
resistance against the invading hordes — whose 
loyalty to their American brothers — will never 
be forgotten by the people of the United States. 
No nation has ever more fully earned its right 
to its independence. 

That ceremony of last Sunday likewise 
marked the formal adherence to the United 
Nations' Declaration of our great neighbor, the 
Republic of Mexico. In the annals of our 
Western Hemisphere no nation has been more 
jealous of her sovereign rights, more deter- 
mined to preserve her liberties, more staunch 
in upholding the principles of inter-American 
solidarity, upon which the security of the New 
World depends, than Mexico. From the very 
outset of the curse of Hitlerism the Government 
and people of Mexico have seen the world issues 
clearly. They have, as always, placed them- 
selves squarely beneath the standard of liberty. 



1 Delivered by Mr. Welles at the United Nations 
Rally in Baltimore, Md., June 17, 1942, and broad- 
cast over tbe Mutual Network. 



When finally the assassins of the seas slaugh- 
tered Mexican seamen engaged in legitimate and 
peaceful trade, Mexico in her proud tradition 
unhesitatingly declared war upon the Axis 
powers. On June fourteenth the people of 
Mexico became one of the United Nations. 

Twenty -eight peoples — in all continents, of 
all creeds, of all races — are now joined together 
in this highest of all enterprises, the preserva- 
tion of human liberty. 

I think that all of us last Sunday felt 
equally that that assembly of representatives 
of these 28 United Nations, headed by the Pres- 
ident of the United States, symbolized two 
great assurances: the assurance that through 
our unity the victory will unquestionably be 
ours, and the assurance that because of this very 
unity we can look forward with hope and re- 
newed faith to the future, after the war is won. 
For cooperation between us all in this peoples' 
struggle finally to destroy the curse of Hitlerism 
and the pestilence of Japanese militarism is 
essential to the winning of this war. 

This lesson of the need for such cooperation 
has been a hard-earned lesson. It was learned 
by some countries too late to save them. It was 
learned by others on the very brink of disaster. 
Some nations may not yet have learned it. But 
it has been learned by the United Nations, and 
the United Nations will win the war in con- 
sequence of it. 



JUNE 20, 1942 



549 



Will the tragic experiences which humanity 
underwent between November 1918 and Sep- 
tember 1939 also bear fruit? Have we all 
learned in this hard and perilous way that co- 
operation is no less essential in maintaining 
peace than in winning a war? 

During this war the people of the United 
Nations will have lived in the constant shadow 
of danger; they will have offered their all to 
safeguard their liberties and to defend that 
which they hold dear. 

When the war ends, these present shadows 
will lift; the immediate physical dangers will 
have passed. 

The memory of man is sometimes short. We 
can none of us again afford to forget the lessons 
we have learned: that cooperation to win the 
victory is not enough ; that there must be even 
greater cooperation to win the peace, if the 
peace is to be that kind of a peace which alone 
can prevent the recurrence of war — a peace 
which is more than a mere interlude between 
battles. 

Without such cooperation we shall have again 
economic distress, unemployment, poverty, and 
suffering for millions of people — suffering, 
which while less acute is longer drawn out and 
is but little less hard to bear than the miseries 
of war; suffering, which as surely as night 
follows day is the breeder of wars. 

In our conduct of the war we are all of us 
cooperating with confidence in each other — 
fully, completely. This form of partnership 
must obtain a momentum that will carry over 
into the post-war period. We must cultivate 
the habit. 

The final terms of the peace should wait until 
the immediate tasks of the transition period 
after the defeat of the Axis powers have been 
completed by the United Nations and until the 
final judgments can be coolly and rationally 
rendered. 

But the organization through which the 
United Nations are to carry on their cooperation 
should surely be formed so far as practicable 
before the fires of war which are welding them 
together have cooled. Everything which can 
be done to this end before the war is over must 



be done. Every act or measure of cooperation 
among the United Nations must be scrutinized 
to see whether it cannot also be made to serve 
in the winning of the peace. 

On June eleventh last this Government con- 
cluded a master lend-lease agreement with the 
Soviet Union which deals with the principles of 
mutual aid in the conduct of the war. In this 
agreement the United States and the Soviet 
Union undertake to continue to furnish each 
other with supplies, information, and services 
needed for the war effort to the full extent of 
their ability. The agreement thus deals with a 
matter of prime importance from the standpoint 
of the war effort. 

But this agreement also looks forward to the 
peace. The agreement reaffirms adherence to 
the Atlantic Charter, and the two Governments 
pledge themselves to cooperate with each other 
and all other nations of like mind in a concerted 
and determined effort to promote the betterment 
of world-wide economic relations. 

Article VII of the agreement envisages in- 
ternational and domestic measures directed to 
the expansion of production, employment, and 
the exchange and consumption of goods, which 
are the material foundations of the liberty and 
welfare of all peoples. The best means of at- 
taining these and other objectives, such as the 
elimination of all forms of discriminatory 
treatment in international commerce and the 
reduction of tariffs and other trade barriers, 
will be the subject of continuing conversations 
between the two Governments. 

Similar master lend-lease agreements have 
thus far been concluded with three other coun- 
tries in addition to the Soviet Union: with 
Great Britain on February 23, 1942; with the 
Republic of China on June 2, 1942 ; and yester- 
day with Belgium. Thus, in effect, five of the 
world's great nations have become partners, 
with full equality of status, in a new world 
understanding — an economic understanding, 
open to the participation of all other nations of 
like mind; an economic understanding which 
may well become the nucleus of a United Na- 
tions organization for the relief and economic 
reconstruction of the post-war world. 



550 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



During the difficult transition period be- 
tween the end of the war and the final conclu- 
sion of peace there will be vital need for such 
an organization. Millions of the world's 
peoples will be homeless; in Europe and in 
Asia transportation systems will be ruined, pro- 
duction facilities destroyed, farms laid waste, 
cities devastated; we shall all of us be con- 
fronted with the gigantic task of converting to 
peacetime uses whole industries now producing 
munitions of war. There must be agreement 
upon the objectives to be attained; machinery 
for carrying out the agreed action of the United 
Nations; and cooperative effort of the highest 
order among all the United Nations, to which 
the oppressed peoples of the earth may look with 
hope when they have cast off their chains. 

In these, our purposes and our endeavors, we 
in the United States are fortified by the knowl- 
edge that we may count upon the firm support 
and assistance of those of our neighbors of the 
New World who are not represented among the 
United Nations but who have severed all rela- 
tions with the Axis powers and who have thus 
refused to permit their territory to be utilized 
by agents of the tyrannies that have dared to 
attack the New World against their fellow 
Americans and against their own security. 
Eleven of the American republics are now num- 
bered among the United Nations. And in the 
supreme task of guarding the independence of 
the Western Hemisphere so that the liberties 
of all the peoples of the Americas may be secure 
we may well pay tribute tonight to the help and 
the encouragement which those of us engaged 
in war derive from all the many practical and 
generous forms of support offered us by the 
Governments and people of Brazil, of Colombia 
and Venezuela, of Peru and Ecuador, of Bolivia, 
Paraguay, and Uruguay. 

Throughout these past weeks the Axis sub- 
marines, when they have been able to do so, 
have already attacked and sunk indiscrimi- 
nately merchant vessels of all the American na- 
tions. If they have adhered to any standards, 
such standards would have disgraced the pirates 
of the Dark Ages. Now the Hitlerite govern- 
ment, by means of the announcement of a paper 



blockade, openly threatens to sink any vessel 
engaged in legitimate and lawful trade between 
the eastern coast of the United States and the 
rest of the hemisphere. 

The American republics have at all times 
insisted upon their untrammeled right to main- 
tain inviolate freedom of communication be- 
tween them. Their well-being, their very exist- 
ence, depends upon the exercise of this right. 
I cannot believe that any of the free peoples 
of the Americas will ever acquiesce in the brazen 
effort of Hitlerite Germany to cow them into 
accepting Hitler's dictation as to the manner 
in which they shall enjoy their rights as mem- 
bers of the American family of nations. 

As we meet here tonight, men and women 
in all parts of the world are dying for the sake 
of the cause which we uphold. The Chetnik 
in the mountains of Yugoslavia, the guerrillas 
in Greece, the patriots of Czechoslovakia, 
Poland, Norway, Holland, Belgium, Luxem- 
bourg — yes, and of occupied France — who are 
murdered daily by the agents of the Gestapo 
are all of them offering up their lives because 
of their belief in what you and I believe. 

The valiant armies of the Chinese who have 
successfully withstood the Japanese onslaught 
for five cruel years; the superb hosts of the 
Soviet Union whose matchless resistance long 
since turned the tide; the fighting men of Can- 
ada, (if Australia, of New Zealand, of South 
Africa, of the British Navy, of the British 
Army, and of the British Air Force who have 
for so long borne the burden and heat of the 
struggle; and now of our own Navy, of our 
own Army, and of our own Air Force are all 
of them fighting gallantly — and, thank God, 
successfully, joined in one common objective: 
the great objective to preserve our common lib- 
erties and to make men free. 

Through the union of the United Nations 
their victory will be assured. 

In the words which the President spoke last 
Sunday: "Man, born to freedom in the image 
of God, will not forever suffer the oppressors' 
sword. The peoples of the United Nations are 
taking that sword from the oppressors' hands." 



JUNE 20, 1942 

MUTUAL-AID AGREEMENT WITH THE BELGIAN GOVERNMENT 



551 



[Released to the press June 16] 

An agreement between the Governments of 
the United States and Belgium on the principles 
applying to mutual aid in the prosecution of the 
war was signed on June 16 by the Secretary of 
State and the Belgian Ambassador, Count 
Robert van der Straten-Ponthoz. 

The provisions of the agreement are the 
same in all substantial respects as those of the 
agreements between this Government and the 
Governments of Great Britain, China, and the 
Soviet Union. 1 As in the case of the former 
agreements, that with the Belgian Government 
was negotiated under the provisions of the 
Lease-Lend Act of March 11, 1941, which pro- 
vides for extending aid to any country whose 
defense is determined by the President to be 
vital to the defense of the United States. 

The signing of this agreement adds Belgium 
to the growing list of those countries who have 
pledged their material as well as spiritual re- 
sources to a common victory of the United 
Nations. 

As in the others this agreement embodies the 
firm assurances that the Governments of the 
United States and Belgium will collaborate to 
the fullest extent in promoting mutually advan- 
tageous economic relations by means of agreed 
action open to the participation of other like- 
minded countries. 

The text of the agreement signed on June 
16 follows : 2 

"Whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Belgium declare that 
they are engaged in a cooperative undertaking, 
together with every other nation or people of 
like mind, to the end of laying the bases of a 
just and enduring world peace securing order 
under law to themselves and all nations; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Belgium, as signatories 



1 Bulletin of February 28, 1942, p. 100; June 6, 1942, 
p. 507; and June 13, 1942, p. 531, respectively. 

2 The text here printed conforms to the original. 



of the Declaration by United Nations of Jan- 
uary 1, 1942, have subscribed to a common pro- 
gram of purposes and principles embodied in 
the Joint Declaration made on August 14, 1941 
by the President of the United States of Amer- 
ica and the Prime Minister of the United King- 
dom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 
known as the Atlantic Charter; 

"And whereas the President of the United 
States of America has determined, pursuant 
to the Act of Congress of March 11, 1941, that 
the defense of Belgium against aggression is 
vital to the defense of the United States of 
America ; 

"And whereas the United States of America 
has extended and is continuing to extend to 
Belgium aid in resisting aggression ; 

"And whereas it is expedient that the final 
determination of the terms and conditions upon 
which the Government of Belgium receives such 
aid and of the benefits to be received by the 
United States of America in return therefor 
should be deferred until the extent of the de- 
fense aid is known and until the progress of 
events makes clearer the final terms and condi- 
tions and benefits which will be in the mutual 
interests of the United States of America and 
Belgium and will promote the establishment 
and maintenance of world peace ; 

"And whereas the Governments of the United 
States of America and Belgium are mutually 
desirous of concluding now a preliminary 
agreement in regard to the provision of defense 
aid and in regard to certain considerations 
which shall be taken into account in determin- 
ing such terms and conditions and the making 
of such an agreement has been in all respects 
duly authorized, and all acts, conditions and 
formalities which it may have been necessary 
to perform, fulfill or execute prior to the mak- 
ing of such an agreement in conformity with 
the laws either of the United States of America 
or of Belgium have been performed, fulfilled or 
executed as required ; 



552 

"The undersigned, being duly authorized by 
their respective Governments for that purpose, 
have agreed as follows : 

"Article I 

"The Government of the United States of 
America will continue to supply the Govern- 
ment of Belgium with such defense articles, de- 
fense services, and defense information as the 
President of the United States of America shall 
authorize to be transferred or provided. 
"Article II 

"The Government of Belgium will continue 
to contribute to the defense of the United States 
of America and the strengthening thereof and 
will provide such articles, services, facilities or 
information as it may be in a position to supply. 

"Article III 
"The Government of Belgium will not with- 
out the consent of the President of the United 
States of America transfer title to, or possession 
of, any defense article or defense information 
transferred to it under the Act of March 11, 
1941 of the Congress of the United States of 
America or permit the use thereof by anyone 
not an officer, employee, or agent of the Gov- 
ernment of Belgium. 

"Article IV 
"If, as a result of the transfer to the Govern- 
ment of Belgium of any defense article or 
defense information, it becomes necessary for 
that Government to take any action or make 
any payment in order fully to protect any of the 
rights of a citizen of the United States of Amer- 
ica who has patent rights in and to any such 
defense article or information, the Government 
of Belgium will take such action or make such 
payment when requested to do so by the Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. 

"Article V 
"The Government of Belgium will return to 
the United States of America at the end of the 
present emergency, as determined by the Pres- 
ident of the United States of America, such 
defense articles transferred under this Agree- 
ment as shall not have been destroyed, lost or 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 

consumed and as shall be determined by the 
President to be. useful in the • defense of the 
United States of America or of the Western 
Hemisphere or to be otherwise of use to the 
United States of America. 

"Article VI 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of Belgium full cognizance 
shall be taken of all property, services, in- 
formation, facilities, or other benefits or con- 
siderations provided by the Government of 
Belgium subsequent to March 11, 1941, and ac- 
cepted or acknowledged by the President on 
behalf of the United States of America. 

"Article VII 

"In the final determination of the benefits to 
be provided to the United States of America by 
the Government of Belgium in return for aid 
furnished under the Act of Congress of March 
11, 1941, the terms and conditions thereof shall 
be such as not to burden commerce between the 
two countries, but to promote mutually advan- 
tageous economic relations between them and 
the betterment of world-wide economic rela- 
tions. To that end, they shall include provision 
for agreed action by the United States of 
America and Belgium, open to participation by 
all other countries of like mind, directed to the 
expansion, by appropriate international and do- 
mestic measures, of production, employment, 
and the exchange and consumption of goods, 
which are the material foundations of the lib- 
erty and welfare of all peoples ; to the elimina- 
tion of all forms of discriminatory treatment in 
international commerce, and to the reduction of 
tariffs and other trade barriers ; and, in general, 
to the attainment of all the economic objectives 
set forth in the Joint Declaration made on 
August 14, 1941, by the President of the United 
States of America and the Prime Minister of 
the United Kingdom. 

"At an early convenient date, conversations 
shall be begun between the two Governments 
with a view to determining, in the light of gov- 
erning economic conditions, the best means of 



JUNE 20, 1942 



553 



attaining the above-stated objectives by their 
own agreed action and of seeking the agreed 
action of other like-minded Governments. 

"Article VIII 
"This Agreement shall take effect as from this 
day's date. It shall continue in force until a 
date to be agreed upon by the two Govern- 
ments. 

"Signed and sealed at Washington in dupli- 
cate this sixteenth day of June, 1942. 

"For the Government of the United States 
of America : 

Coedell Hull 
Secretary of State of the 
United States of America 

"For the Government of Belgium : 

Cte. R. v. Straten 

Ambassador of Belgium 

at Washington''' 

AGREEMENT WITH CUBA FOR MILITARY 
COLLABORATION 

[Released to the press June 18] 

It has been announced that His Excellency 
Jose Manuel Cortina, Minister of State of Cuba, 
and the Honorable Spruille Braden, American 
Ambassador to Cuba, have signed, at Habana, 
an agreement whereby the Cuban Government 
offers facilities to the United States War De- 
partment for training aviation personnel and 
for operations against enemy underseacraft. 

It is understood that after termination of the 
emergency the facilities will become a training 
center of the Cuban Air Force. 

In offering these facilities the Cuban Gov- 
ernment, an ally and co-belligerent which was 
among the first of the American republics to 
declare war on the Axis, has taken a most im- 
portant step in collaborating in the joint war 
effort. 

The training center will be located in the 
vicinity of Habana. By special arrangement 
between the Cuban and United States Govern- 
ments and between the British Royal Air Force 
and the United States War Department, con- 
tingents of Royal Air Force personnel will be 



stationed at this post, following their basic- 
training courses, to complete their combat 
training. 
Work on the installations will begin at once. 

EXCHANGE OF DIPLOMATIC AND CON- 
SULAR PERSONNEL AND OTHER NA- 
TIONALS 

[Released to the press June 18] 

The motorship Gripsholm, carrying nation- 
als of Japan and Thailand from the Western 
Hemisphere to be exchanged at Lourenco 
Marques, Mozambique, Africa, for nationals of 
the United States, certain of the other American 
republics, and Canada from enemy areas in the 
Far East, sailed from New York, N. Y., on 
June 18. 

There were embarked on the Gripsholm ap- 
proximately 495 Japanese and Thai officials as 
well as 602 non-official Japanese and Thais. The 
vessel will call en route at Rio de Janeiro, where 
it will take aboard approximately 403 addi- 
tional Japanese official and non-official nation- 
als from Brazil and Paraguay. Thus a total 
of about 1,500 persons will be transported by 
the American exchange vessel on its first voy- 
age to Lourenco Marques. 

On its return voyage to New York the 
Gripsholm will carry a similar number of of- 
ficial and non-official nationals of the United 
States and other countries in the Western Hem- 
isphere whose transportation as far as Lourenqo 
Marques from Japanese and Japanese-controlled 
territories, except the Philippines, will be pro- 
vided by the Japanese Government. The round- 
trip voyage of the Gripsholm to Lourenco 
Marques and return to New York is expected 
to require approximately 60 days. 

The Gripsholm will proceed under safe con- 
ducts issued by the belligerent governments. 
Representatives of the Swiss and Spanish Gov- 
ernments, which are respectively in charge of 
the representation of the interests of the United 
States and Japan in the territory of the other, 
will travel on the vessel and will have jurisdic- 
tion over all matters which may arise relating 
to the voyage or to the execution of the exchange 



554 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



agreement. Sefior Don Luis de Silva, Marques 
de Zahara, has been designated as the Spanish 
representative on board the Gripsholm, and 
Monsieur Joseph Straessle has been designated 
as the Swiss representative. 

[Released to the press June 15] 

The Department of State has noted a broad- 
cast from Berlin stating that the Japanese Gov- 
ernment intends to court-martial Mr. J. B. 
Powell and Mr. W. B. Opper, American corre- 
spondents in Shanghai. The Department does 
not credit this story as the Japanese Govern- 
ment has formally agreed to include these men 
in the group of Americans who are to be re- 
patriated and who are to leave the Far East 
under safe conduct this week. 



A list of American officials and newspaper 
correspondents whose names have been received 
through the Swiss authorities from the Japa- 
nese authorities to be repatriated from Japanese- 
controlled territory in the Far East, with the 
exception of the Philippines, has been issued 
as Department of State press release 303, of 
June 18, 1942. 

A list of nationals of the other American re- 
publics and Canada whose names have been re- 
ceived through the Swiss authorities from the 
Japanese authorities to be repatriated from 
Japanese-controlled territory in the Far East, 
with the exception of the Philippines, has been 
issued as Department of State press release 306, 
of June 19, 1942. 



Europe 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF THE 
KING OF YUGOSLAVIA 

[Released to the press June 17] 

His Majesty Peter II, King of Yugoslavia, 
will visit the United States shortly as the guest 
of this Government, on the invitation of the 



President. His Majesty will spend his first 
evening in Washington at the White House, 
where a dinner will be given in his honor. 

A dinner w-ill also be tendered the King by 
the Secretary of State, and a luncheon will be 
given by the National Press Club. His Majesty 
will also be received by the Newspaper Women's 
Club. While in Washington the King will 
visit the Capitol, Arlington Cemetery, Mount 
Vernon, Annapolis, and other points of interest 
and will give a dinner and reception at the 
Yugoslav Legation. 

Upon leaving Washington he will visit war 
industries and then proceed to New York City, 
where various functions are being planned in 
his honor. 



American Republics 



RUBBER AGREEMENT WITH COSTA RICA 

[Released to the press June 1G] 

The Rubber Reserve Company, the Depart- 
ment of State, and the Board of Economic 
Warfare announced on June 16 the signing of 
an agreement with the Republic of Costa Rica, 
under the terms of which the Rubber Reserve 
Company will purchase within the next five 
years all rubber produced in Costa Rica which 
is not required for essential needs there. 

While Costa Rica has in the past produced 
only a small amount of rubber, the country 
has considerable potential resources of that 
product, both wild and cultivated. The Rub- 
ber Reserve Company, acting with the Board 
of Economic Warfare, will aid in the develop- 
ment of these resources and expend the neces- 
sary funds for that purpose. 

The signing of the contract is another step 
in the program of the United States to assure 
to the united war effort the maximum effective 
use of the rubber produced in the Western 
Hemisphere. 

Agreements for the acquisition of local rub- 
ber production have now been concluded with 



JUNE 20, 1942 



555 



Brazil, Peru, and Nicaragua as well as Costa 
Rica, and negotiations are proceeding with the 
other American rubber-producing countries. 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF EDU- 
CATORS FROM CUBA AND URUGUAY 
AND EDITOR FROM COLOMBIA 

[Released to the press June 15] 

Prof. Medardo Vitier, professor in the Nor- 
mal School and in the Institute of Matanzas, 
arrived in Washington on June 15, accompanied 
by Seiiora Vitier, on the initial stage of a tour 
of United States educational institutions under 
the auspices of the Department of State. 

Professor Vitier is a frequent contributor to 
the press and was formerly Secretary of Edu- 
cation of Cuba. He is the founder of the well- 
known Froebel School in Matanzas and has been 
the recipient of many awards and honors for 
outstanding educational and literary works. 
Among these may be mentioned the prize of the 
Cuban Bar Association for a study of Jose 
Marti; the National Literature prize for his 
work on political and philosophical thought in 
Cuba in the nineteenth century; and the De- 
partment of Education award for his definitive 
critical and biographical book on Enrique Jose 
Varona. 

While in this country Professor Vitier will 
visit leading secondary schools and representa- 
tive universities as a basis for a report to his 
Government on educational methods in the 
United States. 

[Released to the press June 18] 

Dr. Emilio Oribe, distinguished Uruguayan 
educator and one of that country's most eminent 
poets, arrived in Washington by plane from 
Montevideo on June 18. He will spend two 
months visiting universities and other cultural 
centers in this country as a guest of the De- 
partment of State. 



Dr. Oribe, who is professor of literature at 
the University of Montevideo, was educated in 
that institution and in Paris, where he received 
the degree of doctor of medicine and later did 
graduate work in philosophy and art at the 
Sorbonne. He is the author of numerous 
books, among the most recent being volumes of 
poetry and critical essays on the philosophical 
interpretation of art. 

[Released to the press June 20] 

Jorge Zalamea, one of the most active literary 
men in Colombia, arrived in Washington from 
Bogota on June 20. He is here at the invitation 
of the Department of State and will visit news- 
papers and radio stations in this country during 
a two-month tour on which he will also meet 
representative United States publishers. 

In a recent literary poll made in Colombia, 
Jorge Zalamea and German Arciniegas shared 
honors in being voted the nation's two most pop- 
ular contemporary prose writers. 

Sehor Zalamea is a frequent and popular 
commentator over the national radio station at 
Bogota. His recently published volume of 
comparative essays on Spanish and French cul- 
ture is an amplification of a series of broadcasts 
which while appealing to a popular audience is 
at the same time distinguished by high critical 
standards and "a fine combination of erudition, 
taste, and enthusiasm". This work — and his 
travel here — is to be followed by a similar vol- 
ume on the United States. 

Among Seiior Zalamea's activities as editor 
is the publication of a series of broadsides at- 
tractively presented and each containing one 
long or several short selections from contem- 
porary Colombian writers. These publications 
are being widely circulated throughout the other 
American republics and have had an enthusi- 
astic reception from the critics. 

While Sehor Zalamea's primary interests are 
criticism and editorship, his range is wide. He 
is the winner of the first prize recently awarded 
by the Colombian National Broadcasting Sys- 
tem for a theatrical work and is well known as 
a lecturer not only in his own country but in 
the neighboring republics and in Spain. 



556 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



The Department 



TWO DIVISIONS ABOLISHED 

The Secretary of State, on June 18, issued 
the following Departmental order (no. 1061) : 

"The Division of Exports and Defense Aid 
and the Division of Studies and Statistics are 
hereby abolished. 

"The responsibility for administration of 
section 12 of the Act of November 4, 1939 (the 
Neutrality Act), the Act of September 1, 1937 
(the Helium Act), and the Act of February 
15, 1936 (the Tin Plate Scrap Act), which has 
heretofore been vested in the Division of Ex- 
ports and Defense Aid, is hereby transferred 
to the Division of Commercial Affairs. 

"Matters of foreign policy involved in the 
Act of July 2, 1940 (the Export Control Act), 
and the Acts of June 28, 1940 and May 31, 1941 
(in so far as priorities or allocations for export 
are concerned and in so far as they remain 
unaffected by the responsibilities vested in the 
American Hemisphere Exports Office, estab- 
lished by Departmental Order No. 1029, dated 
February 20, 1942) shall be the responsibility 
of the Division of Defense Materials in col- 
laboration with the Economic Adviser and the 
affected political divisions. 

"The responsibility for all matters of for- 
eign policy coming under the Act of March 11, 
1941 (the Lend-Lease Act) is hereby transferred 
to the Division of Commercial Policy and 
Agreements. 

"In addition, there is hereby transferred to 
the Division of Commercial Policy and Agree- 
ments, the responsibility formerly vested in the 
Division of Studies and Statistics to collaborate 
with the interested divisions and offices of the 
Department and to prepare current studies, 
analyses and data of statistical value needed in 
connection with matters arising before the 
Board of Economic Operations, or as may be 
required by any of the divisions of which it is 
composed, in connection with policy considera- 
tions, the conduct of economic warfare and re- 
lated activities. 



"Nothing in this Order shall be construed as 
modifying Departmental Order No. 917-A of 
February 3, 1941. 

"Mr. Charles Bunn, in addition to such other 
duties and responsibilities that may be as- 
signed to him as Special Assistant to the Under 
Secretary, shall serve as consultant to the Di- 
vision of Commercial Policy and Agreements. 

"The Division of Personnel Supervision and 
Management will take the necessary action to 
effect the transfer and classification of affected 
personnel and their equipment. 

"The provisions of this Order shall be effec- 
tive immediately and shall supersede the provi- 
sions of any existing order in conflict therewith." 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press June 20] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since June 13, 1942 : 

Robert P. Chalker, of Pensacola, Fla., for- 
merly Third Secretary of Embassy at Berlin, 
Germany, lias been assigned as Vice Consid at 
Birmingham, England. 

Douglas Jenkins, Jr., of Charleston, S. C, 
Second Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul 
at Stockholm, Sweden, has been designated Sec- 
ond Secretary of Legation and Vice Consul at 
Managua, Nicaragua, and will serve in dual 
capacity. 

Gerald G. Jones, of Pierre, S. Dak., Vice 
Consul at Belfast, Ireland, has been appointed 
Vice Consul at Habana, Cuba. 

Duane B. Lueders, of Henning, Minn., has 
been appointed Foreign Service Officer, Un- 
classified, Secretary in the Diplomatic Service, 
and Vice Consul of Career and assigned as Vice 
Consul at Montevideo, Uruguay. 

John H. Morgan, of Watertown, Mass., Sec. 
ond Secretary of Embassy and Consul at 
Madrid, Spain, has been designated Second 



JUNE 20, 1942 



557 



Secretary of Embassy and Consul at Bogota, 
Colombia. 

The assignment of Kenneth S. Patton, of 
Charlottesville, Va., for duty in the Department 
of State has been canceled. In lieu thereof, Mr. 



Patton has been assigned as Consul General at 
Calcutta, India. 

Thomas A. Weir, of New York, N. Y., has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Tenerife, Canary 
Islands. 



Treaty Information 



FINANCE 
Taxation Convention with Canada 

On June 15, 1942 the Secretary of State, Mr. 
Cordell Hull, and the Minister of Canada at 
Washington, Mr. Leighton McCarthy, ex- 
changed ratifications of the convention and pro- 
tocol between the United States and Canada for 
the avoidance of double taxation, signed at 
Washington on March 4, 1942 ' by Mr. Sumner 
Welles, Acting Secretary of State, and the 
Canadian Minister. 

The Senate gave its advice and consent to the 
ratification of the convention and protocol on 
May 28, 1942, and the President ratified them 
on June 4, 1942. 

The convention and protocol are brought into 
force by the exchange of ratifications and be- 
come effective retroactively as from January 1, 
1941. They will continue in force for a period 
of three years after that date and indefinitely 
thereafter until terminated as of January 1 of 
any year on six months' notice given by either 
Government. 

On June 17, 1942 the President proclaimed 
the convention and protocol, which will shortly 
be printed in the Treaty Series. 

MUTUAL GUARANTIES 

Mutual-Aid Agreement with the Belgian 
Government 

The text of an agreement between the Govern- 
ments of the United States and Belgium, signed 



June 16, 1942, on the principles applying to 
mutual aid in the prosecution of the war appears 
in this Bulletin under the heading "The War". 

DEFENSE 

Agreement with Cuba 

An announcement regarding the signature of 
an agreement at Habana between the United 
States and Cuba whereby the Cuban Govern- 
ment offers to the United States facilities for 
training aviation personnel and for operations 
against enemy underseacraft, appears in this 
Bulletin under the heading "The War". 

STRATEGIC MATERIALS 

Agreement with Costa Rica 

An announcement regarding the signature of 
an agreement with Costa Rica under the terms 
of which the Rubber Reserve Company will 
purchase over the next five years all rubber pro- 
duced in Costa Rica which is not needed by 
that country, appears in this Bulletin under the 
heading "American Republics". 



Publications 



1 Bulletin of March 7, 1942, p. 225. 



Department or State 

Memorial Day Address by Sumner Welles, Under Sec- 
retary of State, Delivered at Arlington National Am- 
phitheater, May 30, 1942. Publication 1749. 9 pp. 

The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 3, June 19, 1942, to Revision II of May 12, 
1942. Publication 1753. 20 pp. 



558 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Legislation 



Custody of Japanese Residing in the United States. 
S. Rept. 1496, 77th Cong., on S. 2293. 7 pp. 

Departments of State, Justice, and Commerce and the 
Federal Judiciary Appropriation Bill, 1943. H. 
Rept. 2236, 77th Cong., on H. R. 6599. 10 pp. 

Export Control : Hearing before the Committee on 
Military Affairs, United States Senate, 77th Cong., 
2d sess., on S. 2558, a bill to further expedite the 
prosecution of the war by authorizing the control 



of the exportation of certain commodities. June 5, 
1942. 10 pp. 
Second Deficiency Appropriation Bill, Fiscal Year 1942 : 
Hearings before the Subcommittee of the Committee 
on Appropriations, House of Representatives, 
77th Cong., 2d sess. [Department of State, pp. 
76-86.] 105 pp. 
H. Rept. 2241, 77th Cong., on H. R. 7232. 12 pp. 
Fifth Report to Congress on Lend-Lease Operations for 
the Period Ended June 11, 1942 : Message from the 
President of the United States transmitting the 
fifth ninety-day report to the Congress on opera- 
tions under the Lend-Lease Act. H. Doc. 799, 77th 
Cong. 32 pp. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. — Price, 10 cents - - - - Subscription price, $2.75 a year 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUEEAD OF THE BDDGET 



THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE 

BULLETIN 







ontents 



JUNE 27, 1942 
Vol. VI, No. 157— Publication 1761 



The War p ag e 
Joint statements by President Roosevelt and Prime 

Minister Churchill 561 

Congratulations to the Soviet Union on successful re- 
sistance to Nazi aggression 562 

Sinking of the Colombian schooner Resolute 562 

Proclaimed List: Supplement 3 to Revision II ... . 563 

Repatriation of Americans from the Far East .... 563 

General 

Passport requirements for American seamen 563 

Death of A. Manuel Fox 564 

Registration of foreign agents 564 

Contributions for relief in belligerent countries .... 564 

Cultural Relations 

Visit to the United States of Ecuadoran official . . . 565 

American Republics 

Resignation of President Ortiz of Argentina 565 

Adjustment of defaulted bonds of the Agricultural 

Mortgage Bank of Colombia 565 

The Department 

Death of Wilbur J. Carr 566 

Liaison with the Office of War Information 566 

Appointment of officers 566 

[over] 




JUL 13 1942 







ontents-coNTiKVED 



Foreign Service p» K e 

Personnel changes 566 

International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 
Inter-American Conference on Systems of Economic 

and Financial Control 567 

Second Inter-American Conference on Agriculture . . 568 

Publications 

Treaties and Other International Acts: Volume 6 . . 569 
List of publications issued during the last quarter . . 570 

Treaty Information 

Telecommunications: North American Regional Broad- 
casting Agreement 572 

Legislation : ; 573 



The War 



JOINT STATEMENTS BY PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT 
AND PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL 



[Released to the press by the White House June 22] 

A joint statement by President Roosevelt 
and Prime Minister Churchill follows : 

"The President and the Prime Minister, as- 
sisted by high naval, military, and air authori- 
ties, are continuing at Washington the series of 
conversations and conferences which began on 
Friday last [June 19]. The object in view is 
the earliest maximum concentration of Allied 
war power upon the enemy, and reviewing or, 
where necessary, further concerting all the 
measures which have for sometime past been 
on foot to develop and sustain the effort of the 
United Nations. It would naturally be impos- 
sible to give any account of the course of the 
discussions, and unofficial statements about 
them can be no more than surmise. Complete 
understanding and harmony exist between all 
concerned in facing the vast and grave tasks 
which lie ahead. A number of outstanding 
points of detail which it would have been diffi- 
cult to settle by correspondence have been 
adjusted by the technical officers after con- 
sultation with the President and the Prime 
Minister." 

[Released to the press by the White House June 27) 

On the safe return of the Prime Minister to 
England, the following statement was issued 
simultaneously in London and in Washington : 

"The week of conferences between the Pres- 
ident and the Prime Minister covered very fully 
all the major problems of the war which is con- 
ducted by the United Nations on every continent 
and in every sea. 

468978—42 



"We have taken full cognizance of our dis- 
advantages as well as our advantages. We do 
not underrate the task. 

"We have conducted our conferences with the 
full knowledge of the power and resourceful- 
ness of our enemies. 

"In the matter of the production of munitions 
of all kinds, the survey gives on the whole an 
optimistic picture. The previously planned 
monthly output has not reached the maximum 
but is fast approaching it on schedule. 

"Because of the wide extension of the war to 
all parts of the world, transportation of the 
fighting forces, together with the transportation 
of munitions of war and supplies, still consti- 
tutes the major problem of the United Nations. 

"While submarine warfare on the part of the 
Axis continues to take heavy toll of cargo ships, 
the actual production of new tonnage is greatly 
increasing month by month. It is hoped that 
as a result of the steps planned at this confer- 
ence the respective Navies will further reduce 
the toll of merchant shipping. 

"The United Nations have never been in such 
hearty and detailed agreement on plans for 
winning the war as they are today. 

"We recognize and applaud the Russian re- 
sistance to the main attack being made by Ger- 
many, and we rejoice in the magnificent resist- 
ance of the Chinese Army. Detailed discus- 
sions were held with our military advisers on 
methods to be adopted against Japan and for 
the relief of China. 

"While exact plans — for obvious reasons — 
cannot be disclosed, it can be said that the com- 

561 



562 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



ing operations which were discussed in detail at 
our Washington conferences between ourselves 
and our respective military advisers will divert 
German strength from the attack on Russia. 



met twice before: first in August 1941 and 
again in December 1941. There is no doubt in 
their minds that the over-all picture is more 
favorable to victory than it was either in August 



"The Prime Minister and the President have or December of last year." 



CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SOVIET UNION ON SUCCESSFUL RESISTANCE TO 

NAZI AGGRESSION 



[Released to the press June 22] 

The text of a message addressed by the Secre- 
tary of State to the People's Commissar of For- 
eign Affairs of the Union of Soviet Socialist 
Republics, Mr. V. M. Molotov, follows : 

"I extend through you to the Government and 
people of the Soviet Union on behalf of the Gov- 
ernment and people of the United States, con- 
gratulations upon the success with which you 
have resisted the brutal aggression of Nazi Ger- 
many and have thus frustrated the plans for 
world conquest so over-confidently laid by our 
common enemy. For one year the peoples of the 
Soviet Union have been engaging the armies 
not only of Nazi Germany but also of those other 
European countries the governments of which 
have accepted Nazi dictation. In this struggle 
the armed forces of the Soviet Union, with the 
heroic support of the entire population, have so 
acquitted themselves as to win the admiration 
of the liberty-loving peoples of the world and to 



earn a place in history beside those Russian 
Armies which over a century and a quarter ago 
did so much to ruin the plans of another aspirant 
to world conquest. 

"During the past year the American people, 
although themselves threatened by aggression 
from several directions, have gladly shared their 
arms and supplies with the Soviet Union. It is 
planned that during the coming year these arms 
and supplies will pour forth from our factories 
and countryside in an ever widening stream until 
final victory has been achieved. 

"We are confident that before the end of an- 
other year the instigators of this war will have 
been given to understand how seriously they 
have underestimated the determination and the 
ability for effective action of the peace-loving 
nations and will have learned that in an aroused 
world aggressors can no longer escape the con- 
sequences of acts resulting in human suffering 
and destruction." 



SINKING OF THE COLOMBIAN SCHOONER "RESOLUTE" 



[Released to the press June 27] 

The Secretary of State, when asked to com- 
ment on the sinking and subsequent machine- 
gun attack on the survivors of the Colombian 
schooner Resolute, made the following state- 
ment: 

"The particularly revolting and horrifying 
circumstances of the machine-gunning by an 



Axis submarine crew of the survivors of the tor- 
pedoed Colombian schooner Resolute has pro- 
duced the deepest feeling of indignation in the 
American people. These murderous tactics of 
Nazi pirate crews only serve to redouble the re- 
solve of decent men to exterminate the per- 
nicious evil of vicious Nazism. My deepest sym- 
pathy goes to the families of the victims and to 
the Colombian nation." 



JUNE 27, 1942 



563 



PROCLAIMED LIST: SUPPLEMENT 3 TO 
REVISION II 

[Released to the press June 22] 

The Secretary of State, acting in conjunction 
with the Secretary of the Treasury, the Attor- 
ney General, the Acting Secretary of Com- 
merce, the Board of Economic Warfare, and 
the Acting Coordinator of Inter- American Af- 
fairs, on June 22 issued Supplement 3 to Re- 
vision II of the Proclaimed List of Certain 
Blocked Nationals, promulgated May 12, 1942. 1 

Part I of this supplement contains 308 addi- 
tional listings in the other American republics 
and 21 deletions. Part II contains 228 addi- 
tional listings outside the American republics 
and 3 deletions. 

With the issuance of this supplement the 
Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals 



has been extended to include certain cases in 
Andorra, Iran, Iraq, and Liechtenstein. 



REPATRIATION OF AMERICANS FROM 
THE FAR EAST 

Lists of American nationals whose names 
have been received through the Swiss authori- 
ties from the Japanese authorities to be repatri- 
ated from Japanese-controlled territory in the 
Far East, with the exception of the Philippines, 
have been issued as Department of State press 
releases 315 and 320, of June 24 and 27, 1942. 
The lists include the names of nationals from 
Manchuria, Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Indo- 
china, Thailand, and Shanghai. 



General 



PASSPORT REQUIREMENTS FOR AMERICAN SEAMEN 



(Released to the press June 23] 

Under the amendment of April 2, 1942 2 to 
the rules and regulations prescribed by the Sec- 
retary of State on November 25, 1941 3 relating 
to the supervision and control over the depar- 
ture from and entry into the United States or 
the outlying possessions thereof of American 
nationals, a seaman when traveling in the pur- 
suit of his vocation between any territory under 
the jurisdiction of the United States and any 

1 7 Federal Register 4639. 
3 Bulletin of April 4, 1942, p. 292. 
8 Ibid., November 29, 1941 p. 431 ; and March 14, 1942, 
p. 231. 



foreign country or territory for which a valid 
passport is required under the regulations of 
November 25, 1941, as amended, is not required, 
prior to 6 o'clock in the forenoon of July 1, 
1942, to be in possession of a valid passport. 

Notwithstanding the inconvenience and diffi- 
culties which are sometimes involved in obtain- 
ing the evidence of American nationality re- 
quired as a condition to the issuance of pass- 
ports, a large majority of American nationals 
who pursue the vocation of seamen have applied 
for and obtained American passports. How- 
ever, because of the exigencies of the present 
situation due to the. conditions growing out of 



564 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



the war, the lack of knowledge on the part of 
many seamen who have been at sea for long 
periods of the application to them of the rules 
and regulations of November 25, 1941, as 
amended, and the short periods of time in which 
seamen now remain in American ports before 
again going to sea, a number of seamen have 
not yet applied for and obtained passports. 

While it has not been deemed advisable to 
extend beyond 6 o'clock in the forenoon of July 
1, 1942 the period when American seamen travel- 
ing between territory under the jurisdiction of 
the United States and any foreign country or 
territory will be exempted as a class from the 
necessity of bearing passports, the Secretary of 
State has taken cognizance of the valid reasons 
which have existed in the cases of many Amer- 
ican seamen who have not yet applied for pass- 
ports and is consequently authorizing the col- 
lectors of customs and immigration officials at 
the various ports in territory under the jurisdic- 
tion of the United States to permit until further 
notice any American seaman to depart from or 
enter American territory if he has in his pos- 
session a continuous discharge book, a certificate 
of identity, or a license or other document quali- 
fying him to serve as an officer or seaman on 
vessels of the United States and upon the un- 
derstanding that he will at the earliest oppor- 
tunity apply for a passport. The exercise of 
such authority is permitted by section 58.3(g) 
of the rules and regulations issued on November 
25, 1941, which reads as follows: 

"No valid passport shall be required of a citi- 
zen of the United States or a person who owes 
allegiance to the United States : 

"(g) When specifically authorized by the 
Secretary of State, through the appropriate 
official channels, to depart from or enter into the 
continental United States, the Canal Zone, the 
Commonwealth of the Philippines, and all ter- 
ritories, continental or insular, subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States." 



DEATH OF A. MANUEL FOX 

[Released to the press June 22] 

The following statement has been made by 
the Secretary of State: 

"I have been deeply grieved to learn of the 
sudden death at Chungking on June 21 of Mr. 
A. Manuel Fox, American member of the Chi- 
nese Currency Stabilization Board. Mr. Fox 
served his Government well and faithfully for 
many years, both here and abroad. The wide 
range of his duties during an important and 
varied career brought him into close collabora- 
tion and cooperation with officers of this De- 
partment. His recent duties in China were 
arduous and often placed him in physical jeop- 
ardy, but he was indifferent to such considera- 
tions and was unflagging in his efforts in line 
of duty. It may truly be said that he died at 
the front. By his passing, the Government has 
lost an able and zealous servant." 



REGISTRATION OF FOREIGN AGENTS 

Rules and regulations for the administration 
of the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938, 
as amended, prescribed by the Department of 
Justice, are printed in the Federal Register for 
June 25, 1942, page 4717. 



CONTRIBUTIONS FOR RELIEF IN 
BELLIGERENT COUNTRIES 

[Released to the press June 26] 

A tabulation of contributions collected and 
disbursed during the period September 6, 1939 
through May 1942, as shown in the reports sub- 
mitted by persons and organizations registered 
with the Secretary of State for the solicitation 
and collection of contributions to be used for re- 
lief in belligerent countries, in conformity with 



JUNE. 27, 1942 



565 



the regulations issued pursuant to section 3 (a) 
of the act of May 1, 1937 as made effective by the 
President's proclamations of September 5, 8, 
and 10, 1939, and section 8 of the act of Novem- 
ber 4, 1939 as made effective by the President's 
proclamation of the same date, has been re- 
leased by the Department of State in mimeo- 
graphed form and may be obtained from the 
Department upon request (press release of 
June 26, 1942, 37 pages) . 

This tabulation has reference only to contri- 
butions solicited and collected for relief in bel- 
ligerent countries (France; Germany; Poland; 
the United Kingdom, India, Australia, Canada, 
New Zealand, and the Union of South Africa; 
Norway; Belgium; Luxembourg; the Nether- 
lands; Italy; Greece; Yugoslavia; Hungary; 
and Bulgaria) or for the relief of refugees 
driven out of these countries by the present war. 



American Republics 



Cultural Relations 



VISIT TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
ECUADORAN OFFICIAL 

[Released to the press June 24] 

The most recent guest of the Department of 
State is Senor Gustavo Mortensen Gangotena, 
of Quito, Ecuador, who arrived in Washington 
on June 23. He will spend several weeks in 
this country visiting municipal administrative 
agencies. 

A deputy from the Province of Pichincha to 
the last Congress of Ecuador, Senor Mortensen 
Gangotena is now president of the Municipal 
Council of Quito. He is a specialist in admin- 
istration and will observe our own municipal 
systems with a view to adapting to Ecuador our 
most practical and most progressive methods in 
city-management. 



RESIGNATION OF PRESIDENT ORTIZ OF 
ARGENTINA 

[Released to the press June 25] 

The following statement has been made by 
the Secretary of State : 

"It is with deep regret that I have learned 
that Dr. Ortiz has felt it necessary as the result 
of ill-health to present his resignation as Presi- 
dent of the Argentine Republic to the Argen- 
tine Congress. His resignation at this time 
marks the departure from the inter-American 
political scene of one of the most outstanding 
figures in the Western Hemisphere. The con- 
tributions of President Ortiz toward the dem- 
ocratic way of life have identified him as a 
great leader of a free people. It is my earnest 
hope that he may regain his health so that his 
services may once more be available to his peo- 
ple during these critical times." 

ADJUSTMENT OF DEFAULTED BONDS OF 
THE AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE BANK 
OF COLOMBIA 

[Released to the press June 25] 

The following statement has been made by 
the Secretary of State: 

"I have been gratified to learn that the Agri- 
cultural Mortgage Bank of Colombia has today 
[June 25] offered an exchange of Republic of 
Colombia 3 percent dollar bonds for the Bank's 
defaulted dollar bonds. This is a sequel to the 
adjustment by the Government of Colombia in 
December 1940 of its own defaulted bonds. 
While the Government of the United States has 
no direct interest in the matter and the bond- 
holders, of course, must decide for themselves 
whether to accept the Bank's offer, it is never- 



566 



DEPAKTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



theless considered that this is a further con- 
structive effort to adjust Colombian foreign 
indebtedness on an equitable basis." 



The Department 



DEATH OF WILBUR J. CARR 

[Released to the press June 26] 

The Secretary of State has made the follow- 
ing statement : 

"I have learned with the deepest regret of 
the death of Mr. Wilbur J. Carr, former Assist- 
ant Secretary of State and Minister to Czecho- 
slovakia. The debt which the Department of 
State and the Foreign Service owe to his years 
of devoted and unstinted service can never be 
repaid. That we have been able to meet the 
heavy burden of the present war is in large 
measure due to his planning and his foresight. 
The Foreign Service, as it exists today, is in 
large measure his creation. He laid the foun- 
dations upon which we have built. His mem- 
ory will be cherished, not only by those who 
were associated with him but by many others 
whose careers in the public service he has made 
possible." 

LIAISON WITH THE OFFICE OF 
WAR INFORMATION 

The Secretary of State, on June 25, issued 
the following Departmental order (no. 1064) : 

"On June 13, 1942, the President of the United 
States signed Executive Order No. 9182 estab- 
lishing an Office of War Information and pro- 
viding specifically in Article 3 that the Secre- 
tary of State shall be represented, together with 
the heads of other Departments and Agencies 
of the Government, on a Committee of War In- 
formation Policies. 

"The special section of the Division of Cur- 
rent Information responsible for maintaining 
liaison with the information agencies of the 
Government is hereby charged exclusively with 



the establishment and maintenance of liaison 
with the Office of War Information. 

"Mr. Michael J. McDermott, Chief of the Di- 
vision of Current Information, is designated to 
represent the Secretary of State on the Com- 
mittee on War Information Policies. In the 
event that Mr. McDermott is unable to be pres- 
ent personally at a meeting of the Committee on 
War Information Policies he may designate to 
represent him, depending upon the subject un- 
der discussion by the Committee at the time, the 
appropriate officer assigned to assist him by the 
respective geographical divisions of the De- 
partment or the Division of Cultural Rela- 
tions. . . ." 

APPOINTMENT OF OFFICERS 

Mr. Frederick B. Lyon was designated to 
serve as an Executive Assistant to Assistant Sec- 
retary of State Berle, effective June 16, 1942. 
Effective the same date, he was also designated 
Assistant Chief of the Division of Foreign Ac- 
tivity Correlation (Departmental Order 1062). 

Mr. Simon G. Hanson was designated Con- 
sultant to the Board of Economic Operations, 
effective June 18, 1942 (Departmental Order 
1063). 

Mr. Charles W. Yost and Mr. Henry J. Wad- 
leigh were appointed Assistant Chiefs of the Di- 
vision of Special Research, effective June 1, 1942 
(Departmental Order 1065). 

Mr. Howard K. Travers, a Foreign Service 
officer of class III, was designated Chief of the 
Visa Division, effective June 22, 1942 (Depart- 
mental Order 1066). 



The Foreign Service 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

[Released to the press June 27] 

The following changes have occurred in the 
American Foreign Service since June 20, 1942 : 



JUNE 27, 1942 



567 



Wainwright Abbott, of Pittsburgh, Pa., Con- 
sul at Suva, Fiji Islands, has been assigned as 
Consul General at Suva, Fiji Islands. 

E. Tomlin Bailey, of Hasbrouck Heights, 
N. J., formerly Third Secretary of Embassy at 
Berlin, Germany, has been assigned for duty in 
the Department of State. 

Byron E. Blankinship, of New York, N. Y., 
now serving in the Department of State, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Tijuana, Baja 
California, Mexico. 

James C. H. Bonbright, of Kochester, N. Y., 
formerly Consul at Budapest, Hungary, has 
been assigned for duty in the Department of 
State. 

John A. Calhoun, of Berkeley, Calif., Vice 
Consul at Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, has 
been assigned as Vice Consul at Cairo, Egypt. 

Lewis E. Gleeck, Jr., of Chicago, 111., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Stock- 
holm, Sweden, has been designated Third Sec- 
retary and Vice Consul at Helsinki, Finland, 
and will serve in dual capacity. 

R. Horton Henry, of Douglas, Ariz., Second 
Secretary of Embassy at Buenos Aires, Argen- 



tina, has been assigned for duty in the Depart- 
ment of State. 

A. Dana Hodgdon, of Leonardtown, Md., 
formerly Second Secretary of Embassy at 
Rome, Italy, has been assigned for duty in the 
Department of State. 

Karl deG. MacVitty, of Nashville, Tenn., 
Consul at Noumea, Caledonia, has been assigned 
as Consul General at Noumea, Caledonia. 

Robert E. Wilson, of Tucson, Ariz., Vice 
Consul at Bahia Blanca, Argentina, has been 
assigned as Vice Consul at Rosario, Argentina, 
in order to open a new office at that post. 

Burford K. Isaacs, Jr., of Fort Worth, Tex., 
Vice Consul at Buenos Aires, Argentina, has 
been appointed Vice Consul at Bahia Blanca, 
Argentina. 

Archibald R. Randolph, of Casanova, Va., 
Assistant Commercial Attache at Caracas, 
Venezuela, has been designated Acting Com- 
mercial Attache at Guatemala, Guatemala. 

Harold Shullaw, of Wyoming, HI., Third 
Secretary of Embassy and Vice Consul at Cairo, 
Egypt, has been assigned as Vice Consul at 
Jidda, Saudi Arabia. 



International Conferences, Commissions, Etc. 



INTER-AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON SYSTEMS OF ECONOMIC 
AND FINANCIAL CONTROL 



[Released to the press June 27] 

The Inter- American Conference on Systems 
of Economic and Financial Control, which will 
hold its inaugural session at Washington, 
D.C., on June 30, 1942, is being convoked by the 
Inter-American Financial and Economic Ad- 
visory Committee in accordance with a resolu- 
tion of the Third Meeting of the Ministers of 
Foreign Affairs of the American Republics. It 
will undertake the formulation of standards of 
procedure for the uniform administration by 
the American republics of financial and other 
controls involving real or juridical persons who 



are nationals of a state which has committed 
an act of aggression against the American Con- 
tinent. This Government has accepted the invi- 
tation extended by the Inter-American Finan- 
cial and Economic Advisory Committee, and 
the President has approved the designation of 
the following official delegation : 

Delegate: 
Edward H. Foley, Jr., General Counsel, Department 
of the Treasury 
Advisers: 
Emilio G. Collado, Special Assistant to the Under 
Secretary of State 



568 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



Donald Hiss, Chief, Foreign Funds Control Division, 
Department of State 

Edward G. Miller, Jr., Foreign Funds Control Divi- 
sion, Department of State 

Harry D. White, Assistant to the Secretary of the 
Treasury 



Bernard Bernstein, Assistant General Counsel, De- 
partment of the Treasury 

John W. Pehle, Assistant to the Secretary of the 
Treasury 

L. Werner Knoke, Vice President, Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York 



SECOND INTER-AMERICAN CONFERENCE ON AGRICULTURE 



[Released to the press June 27] 

This Government has accepted the invitation 
of the Mexican Government to be represented 
at the Second Inter-American Conference on 
Agriculture, which will be held at Mexico City 
from July 6 to July 16, 1942. The President 
has approved the following delegation to repre- 
sent the United States at the meeting : 

Delegates: 

The Honorable Claude R. Wickard, Secretary or 
Agriculture, chairman of the delegation 

The Honorable Richard M. Kleberg, United States 
Representative from Texas 

Eugene C. Auchter, Ph.D., Administrator of Agricul- 
tural Research, Department of Agriculture 

Albert G. Black, Ph.D., Governor, Farm Credit Ad- 
ministration, Department of Agriculture 

John B. Hutson, Ph.D., President, Commodity Credit 
Corporation, Department of Agriculture 

Edwin Jackson Kyle, Dean, School of Agriculture, 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, 
College Station, Tex. 

James D. LeCron, Director of Division of Nutrition 
and Food Supply, Office of the Coordinator of 
Inter-Anjerican Affairs 

Edward A. O'Neal, President, American Farm Bureau 
Federation, 58 East Washington Street, Chicago, 
111. 

James G. Patton, President, National Farmers Union, 
3501 East Forty-sixth Avenue, Denver, Colo. 

Knowles Ryerson, Assistant Dean, College of Agri- 
culture, University of California, Davis, Calif. ; 
Chairman, Committee on Inter-American Coop- 
eration in Agricultural Education 

William Wesley Waymack, Litt.D., LL.D., Vice Pres- 
ident and Editor, editorial pages, Register and 
Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa 



Leslie A. Wheeler, Director of Foreign Agricultural 
Relations, Department of Agriculture 

Milburn L. Wilson, D.Sc, Director of Extension 
Work, Department of Agriculture 

Advisers: 

Lester De Witt Mallory, Agricultural Attached, Amer- 
ican Embassy, Mexico City 

Raleigh A. Gibson, First Secretary, American Em- 
bassy. Mexico City 

Ralph H. Allee, Chief, Division of Latin American 
Agriculture, Office of Foreign Agricultural Rela- 
tions, Department of Agriculture 

Secretaries: 

Clarke L. Willard, Assistant Chief, Division of Inter- 
national Conferences, Department of State 

William K. Ailshie, Third Secretary, American Em- 
bassy, Mexico City 

Philip L. Green, Latin American Specialist, Office of 
Foreign Agricultural Relations, Department of 
Agriculture 

The Mexican Government has extended simi- 
lar invitations to all the other American re- 
publics. 

An organizing committee, appointed by the 
President of Mexico, has drafted the agenda of 
the Conference on the basis of recommenda- 
tions submitted by the several governments. 
The agenda, which have been approved by the 
Governing Board of the Pan American Union, 
emphasize the role of agriculture during the 
present emergency and the reconstruction pe- 
riod as well as the technical aspects of prob- 
lems affecting the science throughout the invited 
countries. 



Publications 



TREATIES AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL ACTS: VOLUME 6 



[Released to the pre6s June 23] 

Advance copies of volume 6 of Treaties and 
Other International Acts of the United States 
of America, edited by Dr. Hunter Miller and 
published by the Department of State, were 
received by the Department on June 23 from 
the Government Printing Office. 

This volume, covering the period from June 
1852 to January 1855, contains 21 international 
acts. 

. The most notable document in the volume is 
Perry's Treaty of March 31, 1854 with Japan. 
For the first time in United States treaty com- 
pilations, the full text of this agreement is 
printed : the English and Japanese versions of 
the treaty, together with the certified transla- 
tions in the intermediate languages of the nego- 
tiations, Chinese and Netherlandish; the Eng- 
lish and Japanese versions of the additional reg- 
ulations; the English texts and certified Nether- 
landish translations of subsidiary papers; and 
the chart of article 5, a full-scale reproduction 
of which is in a pocket inside the back cover. 
The detailed account given of the negotiations 
is a composite based chiefly on four primary 
sources : The original despatches of Commodore 
Perry; the Narrative of the Expedition of an 
American Squadron, Perry's official published 
report of the mission ; the journal of Dr. Samuel 
Wells Williams, chief interpreter of the mis- 
sion ; and the Diary of an Official of the Bakufu, 
a contemporary Japanese record. In conven- 
ient form for reference, there is provided a 
calendar of the itinerary of Commodore Perry, 
based on the original log books of his flagships. 
The whole document, texts and editorial notes, 
runs to 228 pages. The five visits made by Com- 



modore Perry to Loochoo and his compact of 
July 11, 1854 with the Government of Loochoo, 
which, both in time and circumstance, was 
closely related to the treaty with Japan, are 
also fully depicted (pp. 743-86). Commodore 
Perry's views regarding American bases in Far 
Eastern waters will be found of peculiar inter- 
est at this time (see pp. 554-56, 762-64, 771-72, 
775). 

Another outstanding document is the treaty 
of December 30, 1853 with Mexico. Although 
generally called the Gadsden Treaty, after the 
American negotiator, James Gadsden, all its 
essential provisions, including those for terri- 
torial cession and payment, were rewritten in 
the United States Senate. The story of the ne- 
gotiation is told in the editorial notes with 
ample quotation from the original despatches 
of Gadsden, whose notions of spelling, punctua- 
tion, grammar, and rhetoric were nothing if not 
original and whose frankness in the expression 
of his opinion enlivens the narrative. 

The Canadian Reciprocity Treaty of June 5, 
1854 was the first agreement for free trade in 
enumerated commodities to be entered into by 
the United States. The course of the negotia- 
tions, which were protracted for five years, is 
traced in the editorial notes, with references to 
and quotations from both State Department 
and Foreign Office records. 

The convention of July 22, 1854 with Russia 
set forth principles of neutral rights that had 
long been advocated by this Government, and 
it provided for accession to those principles by 
other nations. The editorial notes include an 
account of the negotiation of the convention, 
with citations of and quotations from relevant 

569 



570 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



papers in both the State Department and the 
Soviet archives, and an account of the subse- 
quent attempts to obtain accessions, which were 
largely frustrated by the Declaration of Paris 
following the close of the Crimean War. 

Among other international acts in the volume 
are the convention of February 8, 1853 with 
Great Britain for the general settlement of 
claims, some of which had troubled Anglo- 
American relations for two decades or more, 
and the first two treaties between the United 
States and Argentina, that of July 10, 1853 for 
the free navigation of the Rivers Parana and 
Uruguay, and the commercial treaty of July 27, 
1853. 

Five agreements in volume 6 have not here- 
tofore been printed in United States treaty 
collections. 

Other features of the volume are two maps 
prepared by the Office of the Geographer of the 
State Department, one illustrating the river 



system of the Rio de la Plata and the other the 
votes in the Senate on the boundary clauses of 
the Gadsden Treaty; a summary list of the 
claims before the Commission under the con- 
vention of February 8, 1853 with Great Britain ; 
a list of the treaties and other international acts 
applicable to the boundary between the United 
States and Mexico; a facsimile reproduction of 
the certificate of exchange of ratifications of 
Perry's Treaty; an addendum to the editorial 
notes to the treaty of December 12, 1828 with 
Brazil (vol. 3, pp. 451-484), consisting of the 
text of the long-missing despatch of William 
Tudor of the same date, enclosing the treaty; 
and an 18-page bibliography of the writings 
cited in the volume. 

Volume 6 (xxx, 886 pages) will be available 
shortly. It may be obtained from the Super- 
intendent of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington, D.C., at a price of $3.25 a 
copy, including postage. 



LIST OF PUBLICATIONS ISSUED DURING THE LAST QUARTER 



During the quarter beginning April 1, 1942 
the following publications have been released 
by the Department : * 

1702. The Program of the Department of State in Cul- 
tural Relations. Reprinted from the "Department of 
State Appropriation Bill for 1943: Hearings Before 
the Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropria- 
tions, House of Representatives, Seventy-seventh Con- 
gress, Second Session, on the Department of State 
Appropriation Bill for 1943". Inter-American Series 
21. 32 pp. 5tf. 

1708. Digest of International Law, by Green Haywood 
Haekworth, Legal Adviser of the Department of State. 
Vol. Ill, chs. LX-XI. vi, 820 pp. $2. 

1709. Laws and Regulations Affecting the Control of 
Persons Entering and Leaving the United States. 
February 1, 1942. iv, 43 pp. 10^. 

1710. Expropriation of Petroleum Properties: Agree- 



ment Between the United States of America and 
Mexico — Effected by exchange of notes signed Novem- 
ber 19, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 234. 7 pp. 

1714. Cultural Relations Among the Democracies. 
Inter-American Series 22. vi, 20 pp. lOtf. 

1715. Foreign Consular Offices in the United States. 
February 1, 1942. iv, 49 pp. 150. 

1716. Radiocommunications : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Other American Re- 
publics (Revision of Habana Radiocommunications 
Arrangement of 1937) — Signed at Santiago, Chile, 
January 26, 1940; notification of approval by the 
United States of America communicated to the Gov- 
ernment of Chile June 26, 1941. Executive Agreement 
Series 231. iv, 69 pp. 150. 

1717. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 144, 
March 28, 1942. 15 pp. lO0. a 

1718. American Delegations to International Confer- 
ences, Congresses, and Expositions and American 
Representation on International Institutions and 
Commissions, With Relevant Data. Fiscal Tear 



1 Serial numbers which do not appear in this list have 
appeared previously or will appear in subsequent lists. 



'Subscription, $2.75 a year. 



JTPNX 27, 1942 



571 



Ended June 30, 1941. (Compiled In the Division of 
International Conferences.) Conference Series 51. 
vi, 130 pp. 200. 

1719. Treaties and Other International Acts of the 
United States of America, edited by Hunter Miller. 
Vol. 6, Documents 152-172 : 1852-1855. xxx, 886 pp. 
$3.25 (buckram). 

1720. The Problem of Economic Peace After the War : 
Address by Leo Pasvolsky, Special Assistant to the 
Secretary of State, delivered at Delaware, Ohio, 
March 4, 1942. Commercial Policy Series 72. 22 
pp. 50. 

1721. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

145, April 4, 1942. 40 pp. 100. 

1722. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 3, April 11, 1942, to Revision I 
of February 7, 1942. 19 pp. Free. 

1723. Publications of the Department of State (a list 
cumulative from October 1, 1929). April 1, 1942. 
30 pp. Free. 

1724. Diplomatic List, April 1942. ii, 96 pp. Sub- 
scription, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1725. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

146, April 11, 1942. 21 pp. 100. 

1726. Leased Naval and Air Bases : Agreement and 
Exchanges of Notes Between the United States of 
America and Great Britain and Protocol Between the 
United States of America, Great Britain, and Canada 
Concerning the Defense of Newfoundland — Signed 
March 27, 1941. Executive Agreement Series 235. 
44 pp. 100. 

1727. Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of 
the United States, 1927 (in three volumes). Vol. I. 
lxxxi, 565 pp. $1.50. 

1728. Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of 
the United States, 1927 (in three volumes). Vol. 
II. cti, 841 pp. $2 (buckram). 

1729. Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of the 
United States, 1927 (in three volumes). Vol. III. 
xcvn, 885 pp. $2. 

1730. Detail of Military Officer of the United States 
To Serve as Assistant to Adviser of Remount Service 
of the Peruvian Army : Agreement Between the 
United States of America and Peru — Signed March 
11, 1942; effective February 14, 1942. Executive 
Agreement Series 240. 10 pp. 5<#. 

1731. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

147, April 18, 1942. 27 pp. 100. 

1732. Cooperative War Effort: Declaration by United 
Nations, Washington, January 1, 1942 ; and Declara- 
tion Known as the Atlantic Charter, August 14, 1941. 
Executive Agreement Series 236. 4 pp. 50. 

1733. Index to the Department of State Bulletin, vol. 
V, nos. 106-131, July 5-December 27, 1941. 32 pp. 



1734. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 4, May 1, 1942, to Revision I 
of February 7, 1942. 21 pp. Free. 

1735. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

148, April 25, 1942. 17 pp. 100. 

1736. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

149, May 2, 1942. 10 pp. 100. 

1737. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Revision II, May 12, 1942, Promulgated Pur- 
suant to Proclamation 2497 of the President of July 
17, 1941. 196 pp. Free. 

1738. Diplomatic List, May 1942. Ii, 98 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 100. 

1739. Foreign Service List, April 1, 1942. iv, 117 pp. 
Subscription, 500 a year ; single copy, 15tf. 

1740. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

150, May 9, 1942. 35 pp. 10<». 

1741. Military Mission : Agreement Between the United 
States of America and Colombia Continuing in Effect 
the Agreement of November 23, 1938 — Effected by 
exchange of notes signed November 19, 1941 and 
February 19, 1942. Executive Agreement Series 237. 
2 pp. 5tf. 

1742. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

151, May 16, 1942. 18 pp. 100. 

1743. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Nationals. 
Supplement 1, May 22, 1942, to Revision II of May 
12, 1942. 17 pp. Free. 

1745. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

152, May 23, 1942. 40 pp. lOtf. 

1746. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 2, June 2, 1942, to Revision II 

. of May 12, 1942. 10 pp. Free. 

1747. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

153, May 30, 1942. 20 pp. lOtf. 

1748. Diplomatic List, June 1942. ii, 98 pp. Subscrip- 
tion, $1 a year ; single copy, 10^. 

1749. Memorial Day Address by Sumner Welles, Under 
Secretary of State, delivered at Arlington National 
Amphitheater, May 30, 1942. 9 pp. Free. 

1750. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

154, June 6, 1942. 26 pp. 10«S. 

1751. Treaties Submitted to the Senate, 1941: Pro- 
cedure During 1941 on Certain Treaties Submitted 
to the Senate 1923^1 and Their Status As of De- 
cember 31, 1941. iv, 13 pp. lOtf. 

1752. Why Are We Fighting and For What? Address 
by Stanley K. Hornbeck, Adviser on Political Rela- 
tions, Department of State, delivered at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, May 21, 1942. Far Eastern 
Series 5. 28 pp. Free. 

1753. The Proclaimed List of Certain Blocked Na- 
tionals. Supplement 3, June 19, 1942, to Revision II 
of May 12, 1942. 20 pp. Free. 



572 



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN 



1754. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

155, June 13, 1942. 13 pp. 10<J. 

1755. The Department of State Bulletin, vol. VI, no. 

156, June 20, 1942. 16 pp. 10^. 

Treaty Series : 

979. Inter-American Coffee Agreement : Supplementary 
Proclamation by the President of the United States 
of America, Issued February 27, 1942, Declaring That 
the Inter-American Coffee Agreement Signed at 
Washington November 28, 1940 Entered Into Full 
Force Among All the Signatory Countries on Decem- 
ber 31, 1941. ( Supplementary to Treaty Series 970. ) 
2 pp. 5<t. 

980. Claims: Convention Between the United States 
of America and Mexico — Signed at Washington No- 
vember 19, 1941 ; proclaimed April 9, 1942. 7 pp. 50. 

The Department of State also publishes the 
slip laws and Statutes at Large. Laws are 
issued in separate series and are numbered in 
the order in which they are signed. Treaties 
also are issued in a separate series and are num- 
bered in the order in which they are proclaimed. 
All other publications of the Department since 
October 1, 1929 are numbered consecutively in 
the order in which they are sent to press, and, 
in addition, they are subdivided into series 
according to general subject. 

To avoid delay, requests for publications of 
the Department of State should be addressed 
direct to the Superintendent of Documents, 
Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 
except in the case of free publications, which 
may be obtained from the Department. The 
Superintendent of Documents will accept de- 
posits against which the cost of publications 
ordered may be charged and will notify the 
depositor when the deposit is exhausted. The 
cost to depositors of a complete set of the pub- 
lications of the Department for a year will 
probably be somewhat in excess of $15. Orders 
may be placed, however, with the Superintend- 
ent of Documents for single publications or for 
one or more series. 

The Superintendent of Documents also has, 
for free distribution, the following price lists 
which may be of interest : Foreign Relations of 
the United States; American History and Bi- 
ography; Tariff; Immigration; Alaska and 
Hawaii ; Insular Possessions ; Laws ; Commerce 
and Manufactures ; Political Science ; and Maps. 



A list of publications of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce may be obtained from 
the Department of Commerce. 



Treaty Information 



TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement 

New found/ and 

By a communication dated June 2, 1942 the 
Director of the Inter-American Radio Office at 
Habana informed the Secretary of State that he 
had received a notification from the Secretary of 
State of Cuba informing him of the adherence 
of Newfoundland to the North American Re- 
gional Broadcasting Agreement signed at Ha- 
bana on December 13, 1937. The adherence was 
notified to the Cuban Government by the Brit- 
ish Legation at Habana by a note dated Janu- 
ary 20, 1942. The text of the note addressed to 
the Cuban Minister of State by the British Min- 
ister at Habana, which was furnished to this 
Government as an annex to the communication 
of June 2, 1942 from the Director of the Inter- 
American Radio Office, is quoted below : 

"OIR/Regional N. A./170 Terranova. 

"La Habana, 4.III.1942. 

"North American Regional Broadcasting 
Agreement (La Habana, 1937). 

"Part VII. Adhesion, in the name of New- 
foundland by His Majesty's Government in the 
United Kingdom. 

"(Copy) 

" 'British Legation. 
" 'Havana, 20th. January, 1942. 
" 'Yotjr Excellency: 

" 'The Director of the Inter-American Radio 
Office, in his communication to this Legation of 
February 14th. 1941, drew the attention of His 
Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom 



JUNE 27, 1942 



573 



to the fact that the North American Regional 
Broadcasting Agreement of Havana, 1937, was, 
under Part VII, open the adherence in the name 
of Newfoundland. 

" 'I have the honour under instructions from 
His Majesty's Government to notify Your Ex- 
cellency as follows. 

" 'His Majesty's Government in the United 
Kingdom desire, hi accordance with Part VII 
thereof, that as from the date of notification the 
North American Regional Broadcasting Agree- 
ment signed at Havana on December 13th, 1937, 
should be applied to Newfoundland. 

" 'As in virtue of this notification His Maj- 
esty's Government in the United Kingdom must 
be regarded as a contracting party to the agree- 
ment in respect of Newfoundland, I am in- 
structed to request the Cuban Government to 
furnish His Majesty's Government with certi- 
fied copies of the texts of the agreement in ac- 
cordance with its final clause. 

" 'His Majesty's Government assume that de- 
tailed arrangements for the participation of 



Newfoundland will be drawn up in consultation 
with the competent authorities of Newfound- 
land and submitted to all the contracting gov- 
ernments for their approval. 
" 'I avail myself [etc.] 

George Ogilvie- Forbes' " 



Legislation 



According Privileges of Free Importation to Members 
of the Armed Forces of Other United Nations, to 
Enemy Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees and 
Detainees. H. Rept. 2274, 77th Cong., on H.J. Res. 
327. 2 pp. 

Providing for the Registration of Trade-Marks Used in 
Commerce, To Carry Out the Provisions of Certain 
International Conventions, and for Other Purposes. 
H. Rept. 2283, 77th Cong., on S. 895. 33 pp. 

Facilitating Disposition of Prizes Captured by the 
United States During the Present War. H. Rept. 
2287, 77th Cong., on H.R. 7211. 3 pp. 



. 3. GOVERNMENT I 



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