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Full text of "Descendants of Chase Whitcher of Warren, N.H., fourth in descent from Thomas Whittier of Salisbury (Haverhill) Mass."

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GENEALOGY COL-L-ECTlON 



flliimil^Mli', PUBLIC I 



3 1833 01397 8843 




M ^ 



DESCENDANTS 



OF 



CHASE WHITCHER 



OF WARREN , N. H. 



FOURTH IN DESCENT FROM THOMAS WHITTIER 
OF SALISBURY (HAVERHILL) MASS. 



BY 

WILLIAM F. WHITCHER 



WOODSVILLE, N. H.- 
News Book and Job Print 
1907 



Only 100 Copies Printed 



No. 



PREFACE 

123S37S 

Tracing the descendants of Chase VVhitcher, fourth in 
descent from Thomas Whittier, who at the age of sixteen 
came in 1638 to Essex County, Massachusetts, has given 
the author of the following pages no little pleasure durino- 
the past few months. Chase Whitcher came to Warren, 
New Hampshire, in 1772, and was one of the pioneer set- 
tlers of that mountain town. He did not differ in any 
remarkable manner from the other pioneers of his day. He 
gave his country patriotic service during the War of the Rev- 
olution, rendered his town the service of the ordinary citizen, 
and lived to see his large family of children establish them- 
selves in homes of their own, in other towns and localities, 
none of them settling in Warren. There is nothing remark- 
able in the record of his descendants, but each may feel 
interested in knowing something of the other. The follow- 
ing pages will contribute something to such knowledge. The 
author wishes to express his grateful appreciation of the aid 
given him in the preparation of his work, by his cousins of 
various degrees, without which aid the completion of this 
genealogy would have been impossible. Especially is he 
grateful for courtesies in furnishing him photos, tintypes, 
daguerreotypes and ambrotypes which were in existence of 
the grandcliiMrcu of Chase ^^'hitcher. He hopes the albuu) 
he has collocti'd of these grandchildren .will be appreciated 
by their graiulchildien in tiiin. 

WOODSMLLK, X. II.. Dcmuhci-, 1907. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

I. Chask Whitcher Ancestry .... 1-11 

II. Settlemt:nt in Waeken 12-24 

III. Kmi(;i{Atiox to Coventry-Benton . . 25-37 

I\'. Descendants of William and Mary 

NoYES Whitcher 38-85 

\'. Descendants of Jacob and Sarah 

Richardson Whitcher .... 86-98 

XL Descendants of Joseph Davis and 

Miriam Whitcher Willoughby . 99-101 

VII. Descendants of Elisha and Martha 

Whitcher Fullam 102-108 

VIII. Descendants of David and Phebe P. 

Smith Whitcher 109-111 

IX. Mlscellaneous and Memoranda . . 112 

Errata 118 

Index 119-125 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



Frontispiece 

Thomas Whittiek Homestead, feont view 

Facing- Page 

Thomas Whittiek Homestead, rear view 



Chase Whitcher Homestead, Warren 

William Whitcher 

Martha Whitcher Full am .... 

Amos Whitcher 

Charles H. Whitcher 

WiNTHROP C. Whitcher 

James E. Whitcher 

Albion G. Whitcher • 

Louisa Whitcher Eastman .... 

Moses Whitcher 

Ward P. Whitcher 

Henry N. Whitcher, 

Milton D. Whitcher 

Chase R. Whitcher 

Charles C. Whitcher 

John W. Whitcher 

Samuel Whitcher 

David S. Whitcher 



6 
20 
22 
24 
40 
41 
42 
42 
42 
46 
48 
48 
48 
52 
52 
52 
52 
54 
56 



ot» 



Facing Page 
DaNIKL J. WHiTCHEIl 

Chakles O. Whitcher " 56 

IjtA Whitcheu " 60 

Frank Whitcher " *32 

Scott Whitcher '' 62 

William F. Whitcher " 64 

Sally Whitcher Wilson " QQ 

Hannah Whitcher Mann '' 68 

Chase Whitcher '' 70 

Mary Whitcher Titus " 72 

Ezra B. Mann " 76 

George Henry Mann " 76 

Orman L. Mann " 76 

Edward F. Mann " 78 

Daniel Whitcher " 80 

Burr Royce Whitcher " 82 

George L. Kibbie " 82 

Lamar Whitcher " 82 

Scott Whitcher " 82 

David Whitcher " 84 

Phebe Whitcher Brooks " 84 

Dorcas Whitcher Chandlki; .... " 86 

Levi M. WiirrcHEit " 88 

ILazkn Whitcher " 90 

Alonzo a. Whitcmki; ....... "■ 92 

.fAcoB ('. Whitcmei: "■ 94 

Ai:riiri: \\ . Wiiitciiki; - 94 

.Iamks II. \ViM,(ir(;iii;v '» 94 



vu 
Facing Page 

William Fkancis Fullam "• 94 

Sarah J. Whitchek Cramfoi'.d ... " 96 

William W. W^illoughby ..... " 98 

Samuel W. Willoughhy '' 100 

Francis Fullam '^ 102 

William Fullam '' 102 

Le.muel Fullam " 104 

Harriet Fullam Fair ranks. ... '' 106 

David M. Whitcher " 108 

Daniel B. Whitcher " 110 



CHAPTER I. 
CHASE WHITCHER— ANCESTRY. 

In his history of Warren, N. H., VVillimn Little has a 
moat interesting chapter on the earl_y t?ettlenient of that 
mountain town. The proprietors, fearful of h)t'ing their 
charter if the town remained without popuhition, began in the 
spring of 1768, to make what they regarded as generous of- 
fers to induce settlers to go into their wilderness possessions 
and establisii for themselves homes. They voted at iheir 
annual meeting to give each individual who should settle in 
town prior to October 1st of that year, fifty acres of land 
and six pounds in money. They ocnt a road clearing com- 
mittee to the new township, with instructions to lay out 
twenty-five lots of land in such places as they thought 
proper, each family settling, as provided for by the vote, to 
have one of the lots, the first settler to have first choici;, and 
the others choice in order of settlement. Under the terms 
of this offer, five families established themselves in town in 
the summer of 1768, and with additional inducements of- 
fered, two other settlers, John Whitcher and John Morrill 
came to town in the spring of 1769. For the next three 
years the matter of settlement was at a standstill, when the 
proprietors offered still larger inducements, determined that 
their charter should not be forfeited for lack of settlers. 
They laid out a new highway over the summit to Haverhill 
Corner, increased their offer of land to sixty acres, and pro- 
[)08ed bounties to those who should fall trees prej)aratory to 



CHASE WHITCHER AJSTD 



clearing land. As a result in the year 1772, the five who 
had made themselves homes were reinforced by nearly a 
dozen othcre;, most of whom brought their families with 
them. 

Among those, and youngest of them all, was Chase 
Whitcher, younger brother of John Whitcher, who was one of 
seven first settlers. He was born in Salisbury, Mass., Oct. 6, 
1753, son of Joseph and Marthr. Whittier, and was fourth 
in descent from Thomas Whittier, the first of his name in 
America, and supposed to be of Huguenot descent. The 
name almost from the first is variously spelled. There is 
evidence that for several generations it was pronounced as of 
two syllables — "VV hit-tier' — the "ti" of the second syllable 
having the sound of ''ch." The most common spelling of 
the name in the 1 7th century records is Whittier, though 
the name of Nathaniel, one of the sons of Thomas, b. Salis- 
bury, 1G58, appears frequently in the Salisbury records as 
"Whitcher." This form of spelling, and a similar one, 
"Whicher, which seem to have been espescially frequent in the 
Salisbury records, later became quite common, and some 
branches of the family came to adopt it uniforml}'^. 

Thomas Whittier was born in England in 1622. Little 
is known of his antecedents. His name first appears in con- 
nection with that of John Rolfe, spelled also Ralfe, Roffe, 
and Roafe, "who came to America in the ship Confidence in 
1638, from Melchett Parke, Wilts, via Southampton with 
wife Ann, daughter Hester, and 'servant', Thomas Whit- 
tier.'' Rolfe's will, dated March 29, 1663-4, after sundry 
items makes bequests: 5th, to '•'■Thomas Whittier's five 
children," * * * 7th to Richard Whittyer, my sister's son, 
and her son John Whittier." Thomas Whittier^ according 
to the Haverhill records, married Ruth Green. Just her 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



rel;ition to John Rolfe and Henry Rolfe his brother, who 
mentions Thomas Whittier n^ "kinsman" is uncertain. She 
may have been a half-sister, or a widow when she married 
Whittier, or po;?sibly a sister of John Rolfe's wife. Thomas 
Whittier, in the latter event may have been a nephew of 
the Rolfe's, as is stated by Pickard in his life of John 
Greenleaf Whittier. He was certainly thirty years younjifcr 
than John Rolfe. This much is certain, he came to America 
with the Rolfes, and was their relative either by blood or 
marriage. 

Thomas Whittle?-, the boy of sixteen, lived with the 
Rolfes, probably with John, who settled in Salisbury, until 
the time of his marriage sometime in 1646, when he was 
about twenty-four years of age. It is a tradition in the fam- 
ily that as a young man he was of gigantic size, weighing 
more than three hundred pounds before he reached the age 
of twenty-one, and that he was also possessed of proportion- 
ate physical and muscular strength. From facts obtained 
from the early records it is certain that he possessed both 
moral and physical courage in a high degree. 

He received his grant of land and settled at first, on attain- 
ing his majority, or previously, in Salisbury, on land which 
is now within the limits of the town of Amesbury and bor- 
dering on the Powow river, a tributary of the Merrimac. 
Included in the grant which he received was a hill which 
still bears his name. He lived in Salisbury until early in 
1649, serving the town in various offices of trust, and was 
sent as a deputy from the town to the General Court. He 
lived for a few months in that year across the river in New- 
bury, but some time in that same year, 1649, must have 
taken up his residence in Haverhill, about ten miles up the 
river from his former home, as the Haverhill records show 



CHASE WHITGHER AND 



that his ehlest son, John, was born in that town, December 
23, 1649. He lived in Haverhill the remainder of his life, 
where all hi;* children were born, except his eldest daughter, 
Mary, born Oct. 1), 1647 in Salisbury. That Pickard's 
statement that he went to Haverhill in 1647 is incorrect is 
evidenced l)y the fact that he was given liberty by Salisbury 
to make three barrels of tar in that town early in 1649. 
Chase, in iiis history of Haverhill, states that he went from 
Xewbury to Haverhill about 1650, but as already noted, his 
son, John, was born in Haverhill in December, 1649. He 
settled some mile or more away from the Merrimac in the 
eastern part of the town, upon the bank of a small stream 
now known as "Country Brook," but then as "East 
Meadow Brook." In his first house, which was built of 
loo-s, and which was situated about a mile southeast of the 
one he built later, all but the eldest of his ten children were 
born. His five sons all possessed the stalwart proportions 
of their father, each of them being more than six feet in 
height. He lived in this log house with his large family 
until he was about sixty-six years of age, when he began to 
hew the oaken timbers for a new dwelling, selecting the site 
upon the banks of a pretty rivulet running along the base of 
what is known as Job's Hill. His new and commodious 
house, which has sheltered generation after generation of his 
descendants, and which, still standing, has acquired fame as 
the birthplace of his great-great grandson, John Greenleaf 
Whittier, was erected in 1688-89, and was occupied by 
Thomas Whittier until his death, Nov. 28, 1696, and by 
his widow until her death in July, 1710. The spot is a 
picturesque one but has always been isolated. Hei'e in the 
northeast corner of the town, and only three miles from the 
city with its 30,000 inhabitants, was such seclusion from the 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



outside world, that from the time of the erection of the 
Whittier house, to the present, no neighbor's roof has been 
in sight. The scene of "Snowbound" is laid here, and in 
this idyl of New England life, the poet says, referring to 
the isolation of the home : 

"No social smoke 
Curled over woofis of snow-hung oak," 

In his life of the poet Whittier, Pickard gives a descrip- 
tion of the surroundings of the [)ioneer Thomas, and also 
some insight into the life and character of one who was no 
ordinary man in the world and times in which he lived. 
He says : 

"Haverhill was first settled in 1640, and was for seventy 
years a frontier town, an unbroken wilderness stretching to 
the north for more than a hundred miles. During the first 
forty years of the settlement, there was no trouble from the 
Indians who fished in the lakes and hunted among the moun- 
tains of New Hampshire ; but during the next thirty years 
they were frequently hostile, and Haverhill suffered all the 
horrors that accompany savage warfare. When these hos- 
tilities began, in 1676, Thomas Whittier had been living in 
his log house on East Meadow Brook for nearly thirty years, 
receiving frequent visits from the Indians, whose respect and 
friendship he won by the fearlessness and justice he dis- 
played in his dealings with them. 

"When friendly intercourse with the pioneers was broken ' 
and the savages began to make their forays upon this ex- 
posed settlement, several houses in the town were fitted up 
as garrisons, and we find that in 1675 Thomas Whittier was 
one of a committee appointed to select the _ houses that 
should be fortified as places of refuge. But though many of 
his townspeople were killed or carried into captivity, he 



OHASE WHITOHER AND 



never availed himself of this shelter for himself or his fam- 
ily, and it is the tradition that he did not even bar his doors 
at ni^^ht. His frame house, now standing, was built in the 
midst of the Indian troubles, and he had occupied it several 
years before the principal massacres, the records of which 
make the bloodiest pages in the annals of Haverhill. The 
Hannah Dustin affair occurred in 1697, a year after the 
death of the pioneer. The Dustins lived in the western part 
of the town, remote from the Whittiers, and nearly all the 
traffic events of these troublous times in Haverhill were 
beyond the limits of the East Parish. But the Indians in 
their war paint occasionally passed up the Country Brook, 
and the evening firelight in the Whittier kitchen would re- 
veal a savage face at the window. But this household was 
never harmed. 

"Thomas Whittier was a contemporary of George Fox, 
and appears to have had much respect for the doctrines of 
the new Society of Friends. In 1652, he was among the 
petitioners to the General Court for the pardon of Robert 
Pike, who had been heavily fined for speaking against the 
order prohibiting the Quakers Joseph Peasley and Thomas 
Macy from exhorting on the Lord's Day. The meetings of 
the Quakers had been held in their own dwelling-houses. 
A petition against this order had been signed by many of 
the residents of Haverhill, and when it was presented in the 
General Court, a committee of that body was appointed to 
wait upon the petitioners, and command them to withdraw 
it or suffer the consequences. Some of them did retract 
when thus callen upon, but two of the sixteen who refused 
were Thomas Whittier and Christopher Hussey, both of 
them ancestors of the poet. The only punishment they re- 
ceived was withdrawal for some years of their rights as 




O g 

CO " 

< B 

O -i 

H 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



"freemen." The disability in the case of Whittier was re- 
moved in May, 1666, when he took the oath of citizenship. 
The franchise at this time was granted only to those who 
were named as worthy by the General Court. He not only 
had the right to vote, but was an office-holder and njan of" 
mark in Salisbury and Newbury for many years previous to 
his residence in Haverhill, and had also been a member of 
the General Court ; and there can be little doubt that the 
delay in conferring upon him the full rights of citizenship in 
the last-named town was due to doubts respecting his ortho- 
doxy. It may be that his interest in the doctrines of the 
new sect carried him beyond the point of desiring for its 
preachers fair play and freedom of uti;erance, but there is no 
evidence that he joined the Society of Friends. Indeed, we 
find him in his later years acting upon the ecclesiastical com- 
mittees of the church then dominant in the colony. 

His capacity for civic usefulness was recognized for years 
before the right to vote was conferred upon him. In laying 
out roads, fixing the bounds of the plantation, and in other 
ways, his engineering skill was drawn upon. When he 
came to Haverhill from Newbury, in 1647, it was consid- 
ered of sufficient importance to note in the town records the 
fact that he brought with him a hive of bees that had been 
willed to him by his uncle, Henry Rolfe. This incident 
seems emblematic of the industry and thrift which have so 
largely characterized his posterity ; and it has furnished a de- 
vice which has been woven by some members of the family 
into the Whittier monogram." 

CHILDREN OF THOMAS AND RUTH GREEN WHITTIER. 

2. I. Mary, b. Salisbury, Oct. 9, 1647, m. Haverhill, 
Sept. 21, 1666, Benjamin Page. 



CHASE WHIT CHER AND 



3. II. John, b. Haverhill, Dec. 23, 1649, m. Jan. 14, 

1685-6, Mary Hoyt. 

4. III. Ruth, b. Haverhill, Nov. 6, 1651, m. Salisbury, 

Apr. 20, 1675, Joseph True. 

5. IV. Thomas, b. Haverhill, Jan. 12, 1653-4, resided 

in Haverhill, d. Haverhill, Ort. 17, 1728, no chil- 
dren. 

6. V. Susanna, b. Haverhill, March 27, 1656, m. July 

15, 1674, Jacob Morrill. 

7. VI. Nathanieh b. Haverhill, Aug. 14, 1658. 

8. VII. Hannah, b. Haverhill, Sept. 10, 1660, m. May 

30, 1683, Edward Young of Haverhill. 

9. VIII. Richard, b. Haverhill, June 27, 1663, resided 

Haverhill, d. March 5, 1724-5, no children. 

10. IX. Elizabeth, b. Haverhill, Nov. 21, 1666, m. 

June 22, 1699, James Sanders, Jr., of Haverhill. 

11. X. Joseph, b. Haverhill, May 8, 1669, m. Mny 24, 

1694, Mary Peasley. 

(7). Nathaniel Whittier, (or as the name is some- 
times spelled in the records, Whitchei\) son of Thomas and 
Ruth (Green) Whittier, b. Aug 11, 1658, settled in Salis- 
bury, and married 1st, Aug. 26, 1685, Mary, widow of 
John Osgood of Salisbury. Her maiden name was Mary 
Stevens, b. 1647, daughter of John and Katherine Stevens 
of Salisbury. She m. Nov. 5, 1668, John Osgood of Salis- 
bury, who d. Nov. 7, 1683-4. They were the parents of 
six children. She d. May 11, 1705. Nathaniel m. 2d, Mary, 
widow of Joseph Ring of Salisbury. Her maiden name 
was Mary Brackett, daughter of Capt. Anthon Brackett 
and Anne his wife, and granddaughter of "Michel" 
and Elizabeth Mitten, formerly of Casco Bay. Nathaniel 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



Whittier took the oath of iillegiance at Haverhill in 1677, 
and was admitted a freeman in 1690. His first wife, Mary, 
was a witness in the Susanna Martin trial in 1692. 
"Goodwife" Martin was tried for witchcraft at Salem, June 
29, and executed July 19, 1692. Both Nathaniel and 
Mary, however, signed the petition in favor of xMary Brad- 
bury, who was also convicted of witchcraft in that year, hut 
was not executed. 

Nathaniel died in Salisbury, July 18, 1722, his widow. 
Mary, surviving him until July 19, 1742. 

CHILDREN OF NATHANIEL AND MARY OSGOOD 
WHITTIER. 

12. I. Reuben, b. Salisbury, March 17, 1686-7. 

13. II. Ruth, b. Salisbury, Oct. 14, 1688, m. Apr. 9, 

1723, Benjamin Green, probably of Dover, N. H. 
There is a record of the baptism of Ruth Whitcher. 
adult, Aug. 1716, Salisbury church. 

(12) Heuhen Whittier or Whitcher made his home in 
his native town, Salisbury, until his death at the age of 36 
in 1722, a few months after the death of his father. He 
was married to Deborah Pillsbury of Newbury in the latter 
part of 1708, the record of publishment being dated Nov. 13 
in that year. He was a member of the Salisbury militia, 
and was one of the "one-half of the company" which was 
"imprest for her majesties' service in the field," in 1710. 
In the list of the men thus "imprest" and who went to Exe- 
ter, N. H., July 5, 1710, his name appears as "Rubin 
Whicher." In the order to sergt. Thos. Bradbury of Salis- 
bury, who had charge of the Exeter expedition, he is ex- 
horted by Capt. Henry True, to be "very Kerfull of your- 



14. 


I. 


15. 


II. 


16. 


III. 


17. 


IV. 


18. 


V. 


U). 


VI. 


20. 


VII. 



10 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

self & men in your March." Reuben Whittier died in 
Salisbury, Nov. 18, 1722. His widow, Deborah, m. Sept. 
1724, Zechariah Eastman of Salisbury, son of John and 
Mary (Boynton) Eastman. 

CHILUKEN OF REUBEN AND DEBORAH PILLSBURY 
WHITTIER. 

Mary, b. Salisbury, Sept 25, 1709. 
Nathaniel, b. S;ilisbury, Aug. 12, 1711. 
William, b. Salisbury, Nov. 20, 1714. 
Reuben, l>. Salisbury, 171(3. 

Richard, b. Salisbury, 1717. 

Jd.'itph, b. Salisbury, May 2, 1721. 
Benjamin, b. Salisbury, May 4, 1722. 

The records of the West Church, Salisbury, show that 
Dec. 2, 1722, just subsequent to death of Reuben, his seven 
(•hildren received the sacrament of baptism, the name ap- 
pearing ill the record as "Witcher." In the final settle- 
ment of his estate the committee on the division reported 
that it could not be divided without loss. Nathaniel 
Whittier, eldest son, who was heir to a double portion, 
bought out the others and gave his bond to pay, dated May 
'1^, 1733. With the consent of their mother, Joseph Os- 
good was appointed May 24, 1733, guardian of the three 
youngest children, Richard, Joseph and Benjamin. 

(19) Joseph Whittier, son of Reuben and Deborah 
Pillsbury Whittier, also resided in Salisbury. He m. in 
Salisbury, Jan. 13, 1743, .Martha, daughter of John Evans, 
Esq., of Nottingham, N. H. They were quiet, God-fearing 
people, and the records show that they were connected 
with the Second Church, being received into its communion 



HIS DESCEJ^DANTS. 11 

Jan. 4, 1756, the name being spelled on the record 
"Whitcher." Previously, Nov. 13, 1748, Joseph and 
Martha had "owned the covenant" on the occasion of ihe 
baptism of their three little daughters, Deborah, Dorothy 
and Sarah. The children of Joseph and Martha Evans 
Whitcher were all born in Salisbury, but it is not probable 
that any of them settled in their native town, as the names 
of none of them appear in the records of the town, either 
church or civil, after the year 1756. Three of the four sons 
certainly went to Warren, N. H., one daughter, Sarah, died 
in 1748, and it is not unlikely that the parents, Joseph and 
Martha, may have, late in life, made their homes with some 
one of their children, if they had not, as will subsequently be 
suggested, removed to Kingston, N. H. 

CHILDREN OF JOSEPH AND MARTHA EVANS WHITTIEK 
OR (whitcher). 

Deborah, b. Salisbury, Sept. 4, 1744. 
Dorothy, b. Salisbury, Nov. 30, 1745. 
Sarah, b. Salisbury, Sept. 18, 1747, d. Dec. 

29, 1748. 
John, b. Salisbury, June 19, 1749. 
Reuben, b. Salisbury, Sept. 19, 1751. 
Chase, b. Salisbury, Oct. 6, 1753. 
Joseph, b. Salisbury, Oct. 31, 1755. 

For four generations the family had been, at least in the 
branch which has been thus far traced, identified with the 
town of Salisbury. 



21. 


I. 


22. 


II. 


23. 


III. 


24. 


IV. 


25. 


V. 


26. 


VI. 


27. 


VII 



12 CHASE WHITOHEB AND 



CHAPTER II. 

SETTLEMENT IN WARREN. 

As hus been previously noted, Chase VVhitcher came to 
Warren, as nearly as can be ascertained, in the spring of 
1772. His brother, John, had come three years previously, 
and two other brothers, Keuben and Joseph, came a little 
later than Cha^e. The question naturally arises, why did 
these brothers leave Salisbury and make their way, for a 
long (lis^tMUce through an almost unbroken wilderness into 
northern New Hampshire, to establish homes for themselves 
in the wilderness town of" Warren ? Several answers sug- 
gest themselves. Salisbury had become a comparatively 
(dd town, having been settled for more than one hundred 
and twenty-five years. The land available for farming pur- 
poses had been taken up, improved, and much of it had 
been worn out. The young men of the town had become 
re^tles8 and were seeking new openings and fields for their 
activity. Many of the previous generation had left the 

town for newer settlements in the southern part of New 
Hampshire and in eastern Maine. Governor Benning 
XN'entworth of the New Hampshire province was granting 
numerous charters of townships, so numerous that a large 
section of the Connecticut valley, especially west of the Con- 
necticut river where he claimed jurisdiction, was known as 
the New Hampshire Grants. Land was cheap in these new 
townships, indeed was to be had for the asking, on condition 
that it be occupied and improved, so eager were the grant- 
ees or proprietors to secure the settlement and improvement 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 13 

of their possessions. The sons of Joseph and Martha 
Whittier, if they had the pioneer spirit, would naturally be 
attracted by the inducements offered in some of these new 
towns, and (Jhase Whitcher, the hoy, not quite nineteen, 
evidently had this spirit. It may be interesting to quote 
the account given of him by Little, the historian of Warren : 

"Chase Whitcher came next, and although a mere boy he 
took possession of a lot of land in the north part of the 
town, fell a few acres of trees, and built himself a log camp 
covered with bark. He was sent by the proprietors, they 
observing that he was a resolute youth, that they might if 
possible fulfill the first condition of the charter. 

"He was a tall, bony, rawhuilt fellow with a spare face, 
red hair, fond of the forest, and given to hunting and trap- 
ping. The mink, muskrat and otter he caught by the foamy, 
roistering Oliverian : beaver he trapped at Beaver-Meadow 
ponds, the head waters of the Wild Ammonoosuc, and his 
sable lines ran here and there upon the sides of the moun- 
tains. The cry of his old hound-dog in the woods was 
music to him, and following a moose one day he climbed 
on Moosehillock, (or Moosilauke) being the first settler 
that ever stood on its bald summit. 

"At another time he was chasing a wild buck, which ran 
down on the rocky crest of Owl's Head mountain. Whitcher 
heard the baying of his faithful hound in the distance, at 
regular intervals, each time coming nearer, and cocking his 
rifle got behind a rock, thinking to shoot the stag as he 
passed. He did not have to wait long. The deer burst out 
of the thin woods fifty rods away, too far off for a shot, and 
bounded towards the edge of the precipice. He whistled to 
the old dog following closely behind, whose three wild yells 
rang out regularly upon the clear mountain air, but could 



14 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

not make him hear. Neither deer nor hound heeded where 
they were going, and when they reached the brink of the 
mountain, in the excitement of the moment the hunter held 
his breath, as he saw the buck, unable to stop, and the great 
black hound, intent only on his prey, both leap far out over 
the edge of the precipice, then falling swift as lightning dis- 
appear in the abyss a hundred fathoms down. 

*'In an hour the young man had climbed down through 
the woods by a roundabout way to the foot of the mountain, 
where he found the deer dead, and his hound with one leg 
broken and otherwise terribly bruised. The dog had lighted 
on the top of a great pine, which broke the force of his fall. 
In time he got, well, but could never be induced to run 
another deer on the top of Owl's Head mountain." 

But the question, why did the Whitcher brothers choose 
Warren in preference to other towns, is still unanswered. 
The family records are silent on this subject, but the early 
records of Salisbury, Haverhill and Amesbury, throw some 
light on the matter, enough to warrant drawing some con- 
clusions which may be helpful. The town of Warren was 
granted January 28, 1764, to John Page, Esq., of Kings- 
ton and 56 others. John Page was a prominent citizen of 
Kingston, and the others mentioned in the grant were his 
friends and neighbors in Kingston and adjoining towns, and 
friends in Salisbury, Haverhill, and Amesbury, Mass., 
towns which had been the homes of his parents, grandpar- 
ents and great grandparents. He was himself a native of 
Haverhill, born about 1710-11, and was a great-grandson of 
John Page who settled in Haverhill about 1652. His 
granduncle, Benjamin, son of John, m. Sept. 21, 1666, 
Mary, eldest daughter of Thomas and Ruth Green Whittier. 
The descendants of John the first were numerous, not only 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 15 

in Haverhill, but also in Salisbury and Amesbury. Then, 
too, among the associate grantees ot Warren are found the 
names of William Whitcher and Joseph Whitcher. The 
former was a son of Reuben and Deborah Pillsbury Whit- 
tier, born in Salisbury, Nov. 20, 1714. William Whitcher 
removed to Kingston contemporaneously with John Page, 
who went there from Haverhill. The Joseph named was 
probably the father of John, Reuben, Chase, and Joseph, 
and brother of William. This much is certain, there is no 
trace of Joseph and Martha Evans Whittier to be found in 
Salisbury after about 1760, and it would have been only 
natural that they should have followed his brother, William, 
to Kingston, a New Hampshire town which was but a few 
miles distant from Salisbury. There is also another hint 
which may be helpful in suggestion as to why Ohase Whit- 
cher in seeking a new home went to Warren. The names 
of no less than four .VIorrills appear among the Warren 
grantees. Increase Morrill, of Amesbury, who died in 
June, 1777, left to his children a grant of land in Warren. 
Among his children was a daughter, Hannah, born June 19, 
1753, baptized July 14, 1753, as appears by the Amesbury 
church records. Chase Whitcher, after he came to Warren 
in 1772, made more or less frequent trips to his old home, 
and in the summer of 1777 went down to Amesbury, mar- 
ried July 6, Hannah, daughter of Increase and Sarah Her- 
bert Morrill and brought her to the home he had established 
in the north part of the new town. 

The reasons why Warren became the objective point for 
these four pioneer brothers, are thus made comparatively 
clear. It was not an accident that Warren was chosen in- 
stead ot some of the other nearby chartered towns. 



16 0HA8E WHITOHER AND 

Hannah Morrill* was no ordinary woman, as her chil- 
dren, and those of her grandchildren who remembered her, 
bore abundant testimony. Like her husband, she came of 
(rood, sturdy, early New England stock as the record of her 
ancestry proves. (1) Abraham Morrill (or Morrell) came 
from England, and settled first in Cambridge in 1632-3, 
He probably came in the ship "Lion" which arrived in Sep- 
tember, 1632. He is first mentioned in the Cambridge 
records, Jan. 1632-3, where he was proprietor in 1636. 
He was a planter, millwright and ironfounder, and was a 
member of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company 
of Boston in 1638. He was fined in 1641, for "seling his 
servant his time." He removed to Salisbury about that 
time and received land in the first division of that town, was 
a commoner and was taxed in 1650. In company with 
Henry Say wood he built a corn mill on the Powow in 1641. 
Only four men were taxed for a larger amount in Salisbury, 
and his estate at death inventoried £564. He married June 
10, 1645, Sarah, daughter of Robert Clement, of Haverhill. 
He died June 20, 1662, while on a visit to his brother Isaac 
in Roxbury. 

*The record in the town clerk's office in Warren gives the date of 
the birth of Hannah Morrill, wife of Chase Whitcher as June 19, 
1758. This record was not made till at least thirty years after her 
marriage, and occurs in the family record of Chase and Hannah 
Morrill Whitcher in which the name and date of birth of each of 
their children are given. In the Salisbury and Amesbury records of 
the Morrill family there are found numerous "Hannahs," but none 
in the records of either town, anywhere near the age of Chase 
Whitcher except one "Hapnah" of Salisbury, b. in 1752, and 
"Hannah," daughter of Increase, of Amesbury, b. June 19, 1753. 
It would be comparatively easy to mistake a "3" for an "8," and 
by such mistake, what is undoubtedly an error in the Warren 
records was made. The Warren, N H. and Amesbury, Mass. records 
agree bo far as they go, except in this single particular, and all 
other evidence available indicates beyond doubt that Hannah Mor- 
rill, wife of Chase Whitcher, was the daughter of Increase Morrill, 
of Amesbury, 



2. 


I. 


3. 


II. 


4. 


III. 


5. 


IV. 


6. 


V. 


7. 


VI. 


«. 


VII. 


9. 


VIII. 


10. 


IX. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 17 

CHILDREN OF ABRAHAM AND SAKAH CLEMENT MORRILL. 

Isaac, b. Salisbury, July 10, 1646. 

Jacob, b. Salisbury, Aug. 24, 1648, in. July 

15, 1674, Susanna, daughter of Thomas 

and Ruth Whittier. 
Sarah, b. Salisbury, Oct. 14, 1650. 
Abraham, b. Salisbury, Nov. 14, 1652. 
Moses, b. Salisbury, Dec. 28, 1655, m. Kt - 

becca Barnes. 
Aaron, b. Salisbury, Aug. 9, 1658. 
Richard, b. Salisbury, Feb. 6, 1660. 
Lydia, b. Salisbury, March 8, 1661. 
Hepzibah, b. Salisbury, Jan. 1663 (pos- 

thumus). 

(6). Lieutenant Moses Morrill of Amesbury, b. Dec. 
28, 1655, m. Rebecca, daughter of William and Rjichel 
Barnes of Salisbury and Amesbury. She was dismissed 
from the Salisbury to the Amesbury church, Feb. 8, 1699, 
and with her husband was living in Amesbury as late as 
1726. She died Apr. 3, 1727, and her husband died in 
Salisbury, May 20, 1731. 

CHILDREN OF MOSES AND REBECCA BARNES MORRILL. 

11. I. Rachel, b. Amesbury, Aug. 12, 1686. 

12. II. William Barnes, b. Amesbury, March 19, 

1688, m. June 6, 1717, Lydia Pillsbury oi' 
Salisbury. 

13. III. Sarah, b. Amesbury, Jan. 30, 1689-90. 

14. IV. Hannah, b. Amesbury, Aug. 14. 1692. 

15. V. Ann, b. Amesbury, Oct. 9, 1694. 

16. VI. Judith, b. Amesbury, Dec. 20, 1696. 



18 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

(12). William Barnes Morrill of Ainesbury, East 
Parish, b. March 19, 1688, son of Moses and Rebecca 
Barnes Morrill, m. let, June 6, 1717, Lvdia Pillsbury of 
Salisbury; 2nd in 1733, Judith 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM BARNES AND LYDIA PILLSBURY 
MORRILL. 

Moses, b. March 9, 1717-18. 
Rebecca, b. Nov. 9, 1719. 
Increase, b. Oct. 15, 1721. 
Mary, b. Oct 20, 1723. 
Simeon, b. May 9, 1726. 
Hannah, b. Sept. 28, 1728. 
William, b. Nov. 18, 1730. 
Lvdia, (by second wife) b. June 4, 1734. 
Eliot, b. May 2, 1737. 
Lvdia, b. July 13, 1739. 

The above named were all born in Amesbury, East Par- 
i!^h. The record of the baptism of the four younger chil- 
dren appears in the East Parish Church records. 

(19). Increa.'^e Morrill, b. Oct. 15, 1721, m. Nov. 
22, 1744. Sarah Herbert of Salisbury. She owned cove- 
nant in First Church, Amesbury, May 17, 1747, and was 
received to full communion the same day. His will is 
dated May 15, 1777, and was proved June 14 the same 
year, about three weeks previous to the marriage of his 
daughter, Hannah, to Chase Whitcher. He gave land in 
Warren to children. Mrs. Morrill was a devoted member 
of the first Amesbury church, in the records of which the 
baptism of each of her children appears. 



17. 


I. 


18. 


11. 


19. 


in. 


20. 


IV. 


21. 


V. 


22. 


VI. 


23. 


VII. 


24. 


vin 


25. 


IX. 


26. 


X. 



27. 


I. 


28. 


II. 


29. 


III. 


30. 


IV. 


31. 


V. 


32. 


VI. 


33. 


VII 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 19 

CHILDREN or INCREASE AND SARAH HERBERT 
MORRILL. 

Rebecca, b. Jan. 27, 1746. 

Richard, b. March 29, 1748. 

Sarah, b. Nov. 1, 1750. 

Hannah, b. June 19, 1753, baptized July 14, 

1753. 
John, b. Oct. 13, 1755. 

William, b. baptized,. Sept. 3, 1758. 

Samuel, b. Feb. 4, 1761. 

The above were all born in Amesbury, and it was from 
her Amesbury home that Hannah Morrill went with her 
husband in July, 1777, just after the death of her father, 
to her new home in Warren. That home was a log hout^e 
in a clearing of a few acres on the Oliverian, at what is now 
known as Warren Summit, or GlencliflP. The house was 
but a tew rods from the present Gleiicliff railroad station, 
and near that occupied so many years by Mr. and Mrs. 
James Harriman and known as the Karriman place. Neigh- 
bors were few. A settleuient had just been made on Coventry 
Meadows, nearly two miles away through the forest ; John 
Whitcher was established on Pine Hill, a mile and a half 
distant , there were four or five other families within a ra- 
dius of two miles, and that was all. It was a humble home, 
with furniture and household utensils of the most primitive 
sort, where luxury was unknown, and where the barest ne- 
cessities of life were often scarce and scanty. Nearly every- 
thing was of home production, and life in this wilderness 
settlement and home was a struggle for existence. In this 
home of hardship and poverty, for life could have been little 
else than hardship and poverty, the eleven children of Chase 



20 CHASE WHITCHEB AND 

iitul Hamiiih Morrill Whitcher were born ;ind reared. 
There were no schoola, at least none for the older of the 
children, but the mother found time to give them each a fair 
education. The father was too busy felling trees, clearing 
land, gathering his scant crops, to say nothing of his trap- 
pinw and hunting, to give much attention to the education 
(tf his children, and even had he not been too busy, the 
luiither was better equipped for the task of teaching. 

The War of the Revolution was in progress when Chase 
W'iiitcher brought hif bride home, and he had already taken 
an active part in that struggle. He was on one of his trips 
"down country," probably vitfiting his relatives in Kingston, 
when the jiews came of the fiyht at Concord and Lexington, 
April 19, 1775. He was not long in deciding his course, 
and .V|>ril 23, 1775 found him a member of Capt. Henry 
Dearltitrn's company, Col. John Stark's regiment, on his 
wav to Charlestown. His three months' service lasted till 
August 1, and as a member of Col. Stark's regiment he par- 
ticipated in the battle of Bunker Hill. After the failure of 
Arnold's ex|)edition to Canada, there was much excitement 
in \\'ancn as well as all along the frontier in the summer of 
177b over a threatened invasion from Canada, and there was 
a great demand for arms and ammunition. The number of 
thirteen gtms was needed in the Warren settlement, and 
they could be obtained only at Exeter. Chase Whitcher 
was given by the Coos Committee of Safety the sum of 
twenty-four pounds to make the necessary purchase, he giv- 
ing security to pay the same when demanded. He went to 
Exeter, secured the guns and ammunition, and loading them 
on his horse, led his beast thus loaded, through the wilder- 
ness over a rough bridle path for most of the way, until he 
brought them safely to Warren, where they were quickly 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 21 

distributed among the settlers. Again, only a little time af- 
ter his marriage when the call came for volunteers to join 
John Stark at Bennington, he became Sept. 8, 1777, a 
member of Capt, Nathan Sanborn's company in Col. 
Stephen Evans' regiment and served till December 16th in 
that same year. 

In the same spirit that moved him to join the ranks of 
those fighting for independence, the early records show that 
he bore his part in the affairs of the frontier town. 
The scant records of the early town meetings show that he 
served in the offices of' constable, then a highly important 
position, tax collector, moderator, and for years filled the 
various minor offices of his tovvn with fidelity and usefulness. 
He was also prominent in the militia of the town, the title 
"Lieut." being given him in the town records. He was al- 
ways poor. The inventory of his taxable property was never 
in any one year, more than five hundred dollars, but there is 
evidence that he avoided debt, and met the modest obliga- 
tions he incurred. Famous as a hunter, he shot and 
killed the only caribou ever killed in his section, was the 
first white man to stand on the summit of Moosilauke, a 
mountain afterward owned by one of his grandsons, was the 
first to welcome the Methodist itinerant to the North Coun- 
try, and was a member of the first class formed by that 
pioneer itinerant, Elijah R. Sabin, who was appointed by 
the New York Conference to the Landaff circuit in 1800. 
The account given by Little of Sabin's visit is an interesting 
one. He says : 

"One day in July, 1800, a solitary horseman was seen 
riding up the road. He stopped at Joseph Merrill's inn, 
baited his horse, and while he was eating his own dinner 
casually dropped a few words upon religious matters. They 



22 CHASE WHIT CHER AND 

seemed to make but little impression, and saying something^ 
about stony ground and hardness of heart, he rode away 
over Pine hilF to the Summit. That horseman was the Kev. 
Elijah R. Sabin, a missionary ot Methodism. Hundreds of 
them were riding the country through, preaching in the 
houses, the barns, in the forests, or out in the broad open 
air, anywhere they could get a congregation to hear them, 
bringing new religious ideas to the people. 

"That night he stopped with Mr. Chase Whitcher, by the 
wild roistenng Oliverian. The morrow was the sabbath, 
and after the morning meal a meeting was sugijested. Mr. 
Whitcher was pleased with the idea. A messenger went to 
the settlers on Pine hill, down on old Coventry meadows, 
and to Mr. Eastman's, the first settler of High street. 

'*By ten o'clock, quite a congregation had assembled, and 
under the maples — they grow there now — by the laughing 
stream, the first religious meeting was held on the summit. 
They had no choir, but the reverend man sang in clear 
sweet voice, one of those stirring revival hymns of John V^es- 
ley, which were then waking men's souls through all the 
land. His discourse took powerful hold on his little con- 
gregation, and before he left this valley, hollowed between 
five peaks of the mountains, he had laid the foundation for a 
society, and formed a class consisting of three members — 
Chase Whitcher, Dolly Whitcher, afterwards the widow 
Atwell, and Sarah Barker. When he was gone his words 
were not forgotten. Many believed his doctrine was true, 
and before the year passed more than thirty persons had 
joined the class." 

This was the beginning of Methodism in Warren, where 
it has been for nearly a century the leading religious society. 
The lives of Chase and Hannah Morrill Whitcher, must, 




WILLIAM WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 23 

from the very circumstances of the time, have been filled 
with hardship and toil, but they lived to see their children 
grow up and make homes for themselves, and to see the 
town in which they were among the few pioneer settlers, 
become one of the prosperous mountain towns of the state. 
Hannah Morrill Whitcher died Oct. Slst, 1826, at the age 
of 73, and Chase Whitcher died in Feb. 1836, in his 83<J 
year. Above their graves in the little cemetery at Warren 
Summit there was erected by their grandson, the late Ira 
Whitcher, in 1889, a substantial marble monument. 

CHILDREN OF CHASE AND HANNAH MORRILL 
WHITCHER, 

(All born in Warren, N. H.) 

28. I. Levi, b. Sept. 22, 1779, died in infancy. 

29. II. Dolly, b. Jan. 22, 1781, m. John Atwell of 

Haverhill, and resided in Benton. They 
had one son. Chase Whitcher Atwell, who 
died in Boston about 1889 without issue. 

William, b. May 23, 1783. 

Molly, b, Apr. 16, 1785, died unmarried. 

Chase, Jr., b. Sept. 5, 1787, m. March 21, 
1813, at New Holderness, N. H,, Mary 
Green, of New Holderness. They resided 
in Warren until about 1830, when they 
removed to Coventry (Benton), afterwards 
returning to Warren, where he died, Jan. 26, 
1850. His widow died in Benton, Decem- 
ber 14, 1863. They left no children. 

Levi, 2d, b. Aug. 31, 1789, d. unmarried. 

Jacob, b. June 22, 1791. 

Miriam, b. March 18, 1794, m. Joseph Davis 



30. 


Ill 


31. 


IV. 


32. 


V. 



33. 


VI. 


34. 


VII. 


35. 


VIII 



24 CHASE WHITQHEB AND 



Willoughby of New Holdernees, N. H., b. 
Oct. 19, 1788, d. Aug. 27, 1853 and resi- 
ded in that town until their death. They 
had three children : 

(1). William Whitcher, b. Feb. 26, 
1816, d. Somerville, Mass., Aug. 10, 
1877, m. Sept. 21, 1845, Harriet M. True 

■ of Holdernes8,N. H., b. April 10, 1823. 
Their two children were, George T., b. 
Somerville, June 28, 1846, and Harriet 
M., b. Somerville, Jan. 23, 1856. 

(2). Fatima, b. Oct. 19, 1818, d. 
Chelmsford, Mass., Sept. 23, 1867, m. 
Samuel Putney, Chelmsford, Mass. They 
had one daughter, Ella Putney. 

(3). Samuel W.. b. May 6, 1822, d. 

Boston, Sept. 20, 1860, m. , 

left two sons, James H., and Charles. 

Hannah, b. March 16, 1796, died unmarried. 

Martha, b. July 18, 1798, m. Elisha Fullam. 

David, b. Jan. 15, 1803. 

None of the children of Chase and Hannah Morrill 
Whitcher settled permanently in Warren. Chase, Jr., 
spent some years in town after reaching his majority, but 
about the year 1830, removed to Coventry, (now Benton), 
where his three brothers had previously gone, and where 
Dolly and Martha, two of the three daughters who maVried, 
also lived for a time. For the first half of the eighteenth 
century, the children and grandchildren of Chase Whitcher 
were prominent factors in the history of that town. 



36. 


IX. 


37. 


X. 


38. 


XL 



1 


^3 


1 


P^SB 


n 




m 1 

M 





MRS. MARTHA (WHITCHER) FULL AM. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 25 



CHAPTER III. 
EMIGRATION TO COVENTRY-BENTON. 

Chase VVhitcher had never acquired real estate in Warren 
suitable for settlement, aside from that of his homestead. 
This, a part of which is now, as has before been said, the 
so-called Harriman place, was lot numbered eighteen in the 
seventh range, which, in the second division of lots had been 
drawn by Abraham Morrill of Salisbury one of the grantees 
of the town, was sold by him to Chase Whitcher for the sum 
of five pounds, lawful money, by deed of March 14, 1775. 
Chase Whitcher was named in the deed as of Nottingham. 
which was then the residence of his father, Joseph Whittier, 
who, it will be remembered, had married his wife, Martha 
Evans, in that town. Joseph, as has before been noted, 
was also one of the original proprietors of Warren. Chase 
was then in his 22d year, and not having acquired title 
to land in Warren, where he had spent much of the previous 
three years with his brother, John, and being unmarried, was 
naturally described as having domicile with his father. The 
date of this deed, March 14, 1775, also accounts for his 
presence "down country" that spring, and for his becoming 
a member, April 23, of Captain Henry Dearborn's company 
on its way to Charlestown and Bunker Hill. On his re- 
turn to Warren in the late summer, he began clearing his 
land, and making ready for a home. His father had con- 
siderable holdings of land in town, not only as original pro- 
prietor, but also by acquisition of what remained of the origi- 



26 CHAiSE WHITCHER AXD 

nal share ur right of his brother, William of Kingston, hav- 
ing purchased this, Oct. 2, 1776, of Isaac Whitcher and 
Nathaniel Whitcher, executors of the estate of William. 
These holdings he from time to time disposed of to his sons, 
John, Reuben, Chase, and Joseph, Jr. One of his convey- 
ances bearing date of Feb. 14, 1783, is that of "lot num- 
bered eighteen in the eighth range of lots in the second 
division in Warren," and was "in consideration of the love 
and good will that I baire to my son. Chaise Whitcher of 
Warren, in the County of Grafton, and in further consid- 
eration of the sum of thirty pounds, lawful money, to me in 
hiind, paid before the delivery hereof by the said Chaise 
Whitcher." This lot lies up on the mountain to the south- 
west of \\'arren Summit station, and has never been avail- 
able for settlement. It now belongs to the estate of the late 
Ira Whitcher, a great-grandson of Joseph, though it passed 
through many hands before it came into his possession. 

Chase Whitcher also became possessed of land in Cov- 
entry. By deed of Sept. 30, 1788, he purchased of Sam- 
uel Atkinson of Boscawen, a hundred acres in Coventry for 
the sum of thirty pounds, this being described as a tract 
which had been "deeded to one John Marston, February 5, 
1780, on condition that he settle in that town," which con- 
dition, Marston had failed to fulfill. He had thus become 
interested in Coventry lands, and when his eldest son, 
William, came to man's estate, the almost unbroken wil- 
derness of the north part of Coventry, seemed to offer a 
better chance for settlement than what remained of lands in 
Warren, that had not been taken up for improvement. It 
was, therefore, in the year 1805, that William Whitcher 
went over the pass between the mountains, follow- 
ing a rough path which had been surveyed for the building 



mis DESOENBANTS. 27 

of a road, and began clearing land for a home, afterwards 
the homesteads of his sons, Moses, William, Jr., and Ira. 
Later he was followed by his brothers, Jacob and David, 
who had at first settled in Warren, and by his sister, Dolly, 
who had married John Atwell of Haverhill, whither he had 
come from the State of Maine. 

Jacob WHiitcher at first established himself in W^arren, 
purchasing a farm of his father-in-law, Stephen Richardson, 
of thai town, in February, 1815, but he later removed to 
Groton, Vt., and still later to Coventry, where he j)ur- 
chased of Benjamin Knight, of Landaff, a farm of fifty acres. 

David Whitcher, youngest son of Chase, arranged to take 
the homestead farm of his |)arents, and to remain with them 
to care for them in their declining years, for, December 19, 
1823, a few weeks before he reached his majority, his 
father deeded to him "all that j)art of my farm which 
lieth on the easterly side of the road leading from Haverhill 
to Warren, except one acre and a half where the buildings 
now stand, occupied by Chase Whitcher, Jr." Still later, 
Oct. 12, 1827, Chase Whitcher deeded to him a hundred 
acres on the mountain to the southwest, the consideration 
being $100. 

John and Dolly Whitcher Atwell removed from Haverhill 
to Coventry about 1819, and settled on a lot near Landaff 
line, afterwards the farm owned by Samuel Whitcher, and 
later by Stephen C. Sherman, — which had been purchased 
by W^illiam W'hitcher of Elisha Tyler in 1813. After the 
death of her husband, about 1829, Dolly Whitcher Atwell 
returne«i to the home of her father, in Warren, and arrange- 
ments were made which led to the removal of David 
Whitcher to Coventry. Her mother had died in 1826, and 
it was felt that she and her sister, Molly, who had remained 



28 CHASE W HIT Q HER AND 

at home unmarried, were perhaps better fitted than others 
to o-ive their father the care he needed, now that he had 
passed hid three-score years and ten. That William 
Whitcher came from Coventry and assisted in making the 
arrangements, is evident from the fact that the deeds of real 
estate which were made October 20, 1830, appear to have 
hocn acknowledged by him as justice of the peace. On this 
<l;it<>, David Whitcher deeded to Dolly At well and Molly 
Whirclier, both of Warren, fur the consideration of five 
hundred dollars, that portion of the homestead of his father 
which had been deeded to him seven years previously, and 
they, in turn, executed a mortgage of the property to their 
father, the condition of this instrument being in the follow- 
ing language : "if we, the said Dolly and Molly, shall at all 
tinics maintain and support the said Chase Whitcher, our 
father, Iioth in sickness and health, provide him with con- 
venient accommodations, a sufficiency of good, wholesome 
food, and doctoring, clothing, and lodging, good fires, and 
a physician and proper nursing in sickness and health, and 
take prudent and good care of him at all times during his 
natural life, and shall be at all his funeral charges, then this 
deed sK.all be void and of none effect.'* William Whitcher, 
in writing this instrument, certainly did not intend that any- 
thing which would safeguard the comfort of his father, 
should be omitted, even though those who were to care for 
him were his own daughters. David Whitcher, with his 
wife and infant son, removed almost immediately to Coven- 
try, and settled just to the south of his brother, Jacob, on 
a lot of land which he purchased of Ira Goodall, and which 
was later known as the Curtis farm. It appears that 
when David deeded to his sisters, his wife did not join in 
the deed, since subsequent to his death, his widow, Phebe P., 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 29 

then of New Hamptoii, in consideration of one hundred 
dollars, by deed of October 1, 1835, released to Dolly and 
Molly, her rights of dower in the land previously deeded by 
her husband. In this deed, Molly is called Polly, the 
names seeming to be interchangeable, • 

Chase Whitcher, Jr., had as early as 1814, acquired 
a lot of land in Coventry, where he cleared a small farm on 
which he lived at various times, until a few years before his 
<lr;ith. when he returned again to Warren. This farm, 
whicli has l)een for the past thirty or forty years a forest, 
was about three-fourths of a mile to the southeast of the 
Orrin Marston homestead, and a fourth of a mile to the east 
ot the North and South road, being reached by a private 
way. 

(30). William Whitcher, eldest son of Chase and 
Hannah Morrill Whitcher, was like his father, a genuine 
pioneer, and proved himself such when he began life for him- 
self in the almost unbroken forest of the north part of 
Coventry. He secured land near the Landaff line, and pro- 
ceeded in the years 1805 and 1806, to clear away the forest 
and build his home. His original homestead was made up 
of jjarts of lots numbered thirteen, fifteen, twenty-two, and 
fifty-nine in Gerrish survey. His first house, built of logs, 
was erected on lot numbered fifteen, on the same spot where 
nearly forty years later, his son, Ira Whitcher, built his 
home. To this house he brought his wife in February, 
1807, and here or in the house he afterward built, were 
born his ten sons and six daughters, all of whom with a 
single exception, lived to marry and establish homes of their 
own. From the beginning he was active in town affairs, 
hie name first appearing among the town officers as highway 
surveyor in 1807, and from that time until he removed to 



30 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

LandafF, on the banks of the Wild Ammonoosue, in 1856, 
he was one of the leading spirits of his town, and filled at 
different times all the various town offices. The town when 
he came to it was without roads, and no citizen accomplished 
80 much as he in constructing them, thus giving means of 
communication with the adjoining towns of Bath and 
Haverhill, which in the early part of the century were the 
leading business, social, and political centres of the North 
Country. He had himself, considering his time and cir- 
cumstances, a good education, and appreciating its value, 
did all in his power to secure the establishment of schools, 
that his children might receive their advantages. He ac- 
quired quite large tracts of land by purchase from non-resi- 
dent owners, and at tax collector's sales, and some of these 
acquisitions involved him in litigation. This naturally gave 
him a knowledge of the forms of law, and early commis- 
sioned a justice of the peace, he was familiarly known as 
"the Squire," and later as the "Old Squire." In this 
capacity he became the conveyancer for the town, drew up 
their wills for his townsmen, the petitions for building high- 
ways, presided at justice courts, and in his later years was 
the confidential adviser of his neighbors on almost all ques- 
tions affecting them. Prudent, cautious, far-sighted, his 
advice was recognized as eminently sound and trustworthy. 
He was a man of deep piety, imbued with the old New 
England religious faith and principles, and was foremost 
among his townsmen in seeking to promote piety and religion 
among them. He did not as a boy of seventeen join that first 
Methodist class, formed by the pioneer and saddlebag itine- 
rant in his father's house in Warren in 1800, but he received 
on that occasion, religious impressions which moulded all 
his after life. He became a member of the Methodist 



HI8 DESCENDANTS. 31 

Episcopal denomination early, and for many years before 
the "Union meeting house" was erected in 1846, he fre- 
quently, as licensed exhorter, or local preacher of his denom- 
ination, conducted religious meetings in barns, schoolhouses, 
or private dwellings, or assisted the early circuit riders, who 
occasionally made appointments in Coventry, in making their 
horseback pilgrimages through the backwoods towns. There 
are many living who remember him in his later years, sitting 
reverently in his wing pew in the meeting house, listening 
attentively to the sermon of the Methodist or Baptist 
preacher, as the case might be, and then as the sermon 
ended, rising in his place to add to the sermon a few pithy 
sentences in reinforcement of what had been heard. He 
was a man who took life seriously, and with a family of 
sixteen children to provide for, with the discomforts and dis- 
couragements of a backwoods mountain town to be met, 
overcome, or endured, he naturally had little time or dis- 
position for levity. 

A few years after his marriage his log house was replaced 
by a frame building, and about the year 1830, he built the 
house still standing, afterwards owned and occupied by his 
sons, first by Moses Whitcher, then by Chase Whitcher, and 
now owned by William W. Eastman. He lived here until about 
1835, when he purchased the Nathan Coburn place, where 
he liv^'d wirii his son, Daniel, until about 1855 he removed to 
Landiiff, where he died March 5, 1859, having nearly com- 
pleted his seventy-seventh year. His old age was gladdened 
bA' the prosperity of his children, most of whom were settled 
around him, and in the welfare of whose families he was 
deeply concerned. In his domestic life he was fortunate and 
happy. He married, February 15, 1807, Mary, eldest 
daughter of Samuel and Sarah Collins Noyes of LandafF, 



S2 CHASE WHITCHER AJS^B 

who was born in that town, November 5, 1787, and who 
died in Benton, September 27, 1848, in her sixty-first year. 

She wae one of a large family. Of her seven brothers, all 
like herself born in Landaflf, James, Samuel, Daniel, Jona- 
than and Amo&, spent the greater part of their lives in that 
town. Moses became a resident of Haverhill, and Nathan- 
iel of Lyndon, Vt, Her father, Samuel Noyes, was one of 
the early settlers of Landaflf. With his brother, Jonathan, 
he went to LandaflP from Plaistow in the autumn of 1782, 
having purchased of Nathaniel Peabody of Atkinson, for the 
8um of 50 pounds, one of the original rights or shares of 
land which was granted to Gershom Bates in the charter of 
1764. His deed was dated August 16, 1782, and a part 
consideration, in addition to the fifty [)ounds, was that he 
should take possession of one of the one hundred acre lots 
which had been laid out, within three months from the date 
of the deed, and should begin immediate settlement. He 
chose a location near the spot where the old town and meet- 
ing house was afterwards erected, and cleared his farm, 
which remained in his possession during his life, and after- 
wards, in the possession of some of his descendants until the 
year 1903. His wife Sarah Collins, was a member of one 
of the oldest New England families, a woman of great 
courage, of devoted piety, and of abounding cheerfulness 
and hopefulness. 

Mary Noyes was not twenty years of age when she went 
to Coventry as the wife of William Whitcher. As has been 
noted, she went with him into a home in the wilderness, 
where but a few acres of land had been cleared, and where 
they began life together with no other capital than good 
health and willing hands. In the next twenty-four years 
they became the parents of ten sons and six daughters, for 



HI^ DESCENDANTS. 33 

all of whom «?he cared, alinotit unaided, and lived to st^e thcui 
all grow to the estate of voun«' nuinhood and woinanhtxid. 
One son died at the age of seventeen, but all the others 
married and settled in homes ot their own. Mnry Noycs 
Whitcher was m remarkable woman. 

William Whitcher married second, October 3, 184i>. 
Catherine Moore, widow of Fr;incis Knight, of Bath, Sjip 
died October 19, 1874. 

CHILDREN OF WILLIAM AND MARY NOYES AVHITCHER. 

{All Born in Coventry-Denton.) 

Moses, b. December 26, 1807. 

William, Jr., b. December 26, 1808. 

Amos, b. May 18, 1810. 

Louisa, b. December 22, 1811. 

Winthrop Chandler, b. February 20, 1813. 

Sanmel, b. August 24, 1814. 

Ira, b. December 2, 1815. 

Sally, b. May 25, 1817. 

Hannah, b. April 4, 1819. 

James, b. October 1, 1820, died August 20, 

1838. 
Chase, b. January 20, 1822. 
Mary, b. October 28, 1823. 
Susan, b. May 20, 1825. 
Daniel, b. January 20, 1827. 
David, b. June 17, 1828. 
Phebe, b. February 24, 1831. 



(34). Jacob Whitcher, (b. June 22, 1791), married 
November 11, 1813, Sarah, daughter of Stephen Richardson, 



39. 


I. 


40. 


II. 


41. 


III. 


42. 


IV. 


43. 


V. 


44. 


VI. 


45. 


VII. 


46. 


VIII. 


47. 


IX. 


48. 


X. 


50. 


XI. 


51. 


XII. 


51. 


XIII. 


52. 


XIV. 


53. 


XV. 


54. 


XVI. 



34 CHASE WHITOHER AND 

Jr., of Warren. She died May 9, 1834. He married 2d, 
July 16, 1834, widow Rebecca Allen, of Lisbon. As has 
been previously stated, he settled at first in Warren, on a 
farm purchased of his father-in-law, but about 1826, re- 
moved to Groton, Vt., where he remained until 1828, when 
he removed to Coventry, settling on a half one hundred acre 
lot near the Haverhill line, afterwards known as the Charles 
M. Howe place, and where his youngest child was born. 
Here his wife, Sarah, died May 9, 1834. An index to her 
character may be found in the brief obituary notice which 
appeared in the Democratic Republican, printed at Haver- 
hill, May 28, 1834. "Death :— In Coventry, N. H., of 
the consumption. May 9th, Mrs. Sarah Whitcher, wife of 
Mr. Jacob Whitcher, in the 46th year of her age. She 
made a profession of religion in the 13th year of her age, 
and maintained a good life and died a happy death. She 
has left seven children to mourn the loss of a kind mother, 
after a sickness of 18 months which she bore with patience 
and Christian forbearance." 

Jacob Whitcher was a man of impulsive temperament, 
but a good citizen, a kind neighbor, and loyal in his friend- 
ships. As will be noted, he remarried a few weeks after the 
death of his wife, a fact which occasioned some criticism. 
It is related that his brother, William, felt called upon to 
remonstrate with him, and his answer to the remonstrance 
was a characteristic one. He said in substance: "William, 
my wife was a good woman, but she was sick a long time, 
and I've some children who need a woman's care and train- 
ing. You say that folks will talk ; let 'em talk. I know 
my business and am competent to take care of my own af- 
fairs ; Sarah is as dead as she ever will be, and I'm going to 
bring home a woman to be a mother to my children." He 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 35 

did 80, but the marriage was not an ideally bappy one, and 
his expectation that the widow Allen would fill a mother's 
place was disappointed. Previous to his death, which oc- 
curred January 11, 1841, he made his will under date of 
November 6, 1840, appointing his nephew, Moses Whitcher. 
as sole executor, and naming Isaac Morse, of Haverhill, as 
the guardian of his minor children. He made specific be- 
quests to each of" his children, authorized the sale of his real 
estate, consisting of his homestead, and two forty-acre lots 
in the town of Haverhill, and directed that as soon as it should 
be sold, his widow, Rebecca, should be paid a specific sum 
in lieu of dower, and that the residue of his estate should be 
divided equally among his children. His estate was not 
large, but at that time the sum of the fourteen or fifteen 
hundred dollars which it amounted to, placed its possessor in 
what were regarded as comfortable circumstances in 
Coventry. 

1239378 

CHILDREN OF JACOB AND SARAH RICHARDSON 
AVHITCHER. 

Dorcas, b. Warren, July 10, 1814. 
Levi M., b. Warren, October 29, 1815. 
Hazen, b. Warren, May 21, 1817. 
Stephen R., b. Warren, June 18, 1819, d. at 

Benton, January 1, 1843. 
Alonzo A., b. Warren, June 8, 1821. 
Lorinda, b. Warren, August 3, 1825, d, at 

Groton, Vt., September 3, 1826. 
Jacob, Jr., b. Groton, Vt., June 8, 1827. 
62. VIII. Sarah Jane, b. Coventry, August 31, 1830. 



55. 


I. 


56. 


II. 


57. 


III. 


58. 


IV. 


59. 


V. 


60. 


VI. 


61. 


VII 



36 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

(37). Martha Whitcher^ youno^est daughter of Chase 
and Hannah Morrill VVhitcher, b. Warren, July 18, 1798, 
ui. at Warren, November 16, 1820, Elisha FuUam, who 
was born in Fitzwilliani, N. H., November 21, 1794. She 
died in West Brookfield, Mass., March 8, 1870. He died 
at Worcestesr, Mass., May 15, 1872. 

They lived tor about tour years after their marriage in 
Warren, when they removed to Holderness, where Miriam 
Whitcher Willouijhby was living, living there for nearly ten 
years, when they went to Granby, Vt., and after a few 
years there, lived in various places, until in their later years 
they made their home with their children in North Brook- 
field and West Brookfield, Mass. A daughter-in-law writes 
of her : "Mr. Fullam's mother, who spent the last years of 
her life with us, I know to have been a woman of unusual 
strength of character and honesty of purpose, never at any 
sacrifice stepping one jot from the path of duty, and with a 
disposition so sweet and gentle that she was loved by all who 
knew her. She was worthy of the children and grandchil- 
dren who also give her memory reverence." They never 
had a permanent home in Benton, though Mrs. Fullam 
about 1849-1851, with her youngest daughter, Harriet, 
occupied a tenement in the house of her brother William, 
and later for a few years in Woburn, where her daughter 
married. Elisha Fullam suffered for years from poor health, 
and to his wife fell in a large degree the support and care of 
her children in their early years. 

CHILDREN OF ELISHA AND MARTHA WHITCHER FULLAM. 

63. I. Francis, b. Warren, August 5, 1821. 

64. II. William, b. Warren, February 14, 1823. 
*64. III. Maria, b. Holderness, April 7, 1825, d. Hoi- 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 37 

derness, April 21, 1826, 

65. IV. Darius, b. HoidernesB, July 21, 1827, d. Hoi- 

derness, September 2^, 1828. 

66. V. Lemuel, b. Holdernese, May 23, 1830. 

67. VI. Mary, b. Holderness, July' 18, 1834, d. Hol> 

derness, September 7, 1834. 

68. VII. Harriet, b. Granby, Vt., August 23, 1836, 



(38). David Whitcker, youngest son of Chase and 
Hannah Morrill Whitcher, b. Warren, January 15, 1803, 
m. March 20, 1828, Phebe P. .Smith, b. March 7, 1799. 
He resided in Warren, living with his father till the autumn 
of 1830, when he removed to Coventry, settling as previous- 
ly stated. He was a man of rigid integrity of character, of 
devoted piety, and gave promise of great usefulness as a 
citizen. He was elected in 1835 one of the selectmen, but 
died after a brief illness from typhoid fever, April 3, the 
same year, in the 33d year of his age. 

CHILDREN OF DAVID AND PHEBE P. SMITH WHITCHER. 

69. I. Joseph Smith, b. Warren, August 25, 1828. 

70. II. David Marston, b. Coventry, June 30, 1831. 

71. III. Daniel Batchelder, b. Coventry, July 6, 1833. 

The families of these children of Chase and Hannah Mor- 
rill Whitcher, except that of William Whitcher, settled for 
the most part in other towns and in other states. Nearly 
all of his children made homes for themselves in Benton, 
though later in life one after the other removed from town. 
At the present time not one of the name Whitcher resides in 
town, and but four of the grandchildren of William and 
Mary who bear other names are among its residents. 



3:8 OHA8E WHIT CHER AND 



CHAPTER IV. 

I>ESCENDANTS OF WILLIAM ANI> MARY NO YES 
WHITCHEK 

(39). Moses Whitcher, eon of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. December 26, ISQI, m. 1834, Sarah, 
daughter of Samuel and Dorcas Foster Royce of Haverhill. 
She was born in Landaff, October 19, 1813. On attaining 
his majority, Moses Whitcher engaged in business tor him- 
self, and a little later formed a partnership with his brother 
William, Jr., which continued until the death of the latter 
in 1839. They engaged extensively in farming, clearing 
large tracts of forest land, and in the manufacture of lumber. 
The firm acquired an enviable reputation for energy, enter- 
prise and thrift, and they were not only successful them- 
selves from a financial standpoint, but did much to improve 
the condition of affairs in the town. After the death of 
William Whitcher, Jr., Moses Whitcher purchased his 
brother's interest in the partnership, and carried on business 
alone, being without doubt the leading business man in the 
town. He had received a better education than fell to the lot 
of his brothers, and at an early age became prominent in 
town affairs. He was for several years superintending 
school committee, town clerk, and selectman, and represented 
Benton in the legislature 1842, 1843 and 1844. He was 
public spirited, believed in the possibilities of Benton as a 
prosperous community, and did everything in his power to 
promote its welfare and prosperity. He was one of the 
chief promoters of the erection of a meeting house, and it 



HIS DESOENDANTS. 59 

was while engaged in superintending the cutting of trees to 
•fee sawed into the frame of the building, that he was instantly 
killed by the falling of a tree, March 18, 1846. His sud- 
den death was a shock to the whole community, which rec- 
ognized that it had lost its leading t^itizen, a loss that 
seemed irreparable. His estate amounting to upwards of 
■eleven thousand dollars at his death, was a large one for 
Jiis time and was a monument to his thrift and business 
ability. He left no children. 



(40). William Whitcher, Jr., son of William and 
Mary Noyes Whitcher, b. December 26, 1808^ m. 1835, 
Lucinda C, born in Lisbon, February 9, 1815, daugh- 
ter of James Noyes. He died after a brief illness, October 
16, 1839, leaving one daughter, Betsey N., b. 1837, d. 
April 14, 1842. His widow, Lucinda C, m. 2d, William 
Harrison Blake of Lisbon, November 12, 1841, d. at Lis- 
bon, November, 30, 1860. 

William Whitcher, Jr., was a man of stalwart physical 
proportions, of great powers of endurance, and of untiring 
activity and industry. In his partnership with his brother 
Moses, each supplemented the activities of the other, making 
the partnership a most effective one. At his death their 
farm comprised more than four hundred acres, and they were 
the owners also of other large tracts from which they were 
engaged in cutting the lumber for manufacture. 



(41). Amos Whitcher, son of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. May 18, 1810, d. Stoneham, Mass., 
February 13, 1880 ; m. December 20, 1835, Polly, daugh- 



4a CHA8E WHITCHER AND 

ter of Joseph and Eunice Priest Young, b. Lisbon, Septem- 
ber 26, 1815, d. Stoneham, Mass., May 22, 1821. 

After his marriage, Amos VVhitcher settled in what wa& 
afterwards known as "Whitcher Hollow," where he built 
his house and shop for the manufacture of butter firkins, sap 
buckets, pails, and other utensils made by the coopers of his 
time. He was captain in the militia, and later was carpen- 
ter and builder, superintending the erection of large farm 
buildings, the building of dams, and the erection of saw and 
starch mills. Afflicted from his young manhood with a 
lameness caused by ulcers, he discovered a remedy, which 
greatly relieved, if it did not entirely cure him, and gave 
him a reputation among those similarly afflicted for some re- 
markable cures. He served his town as its postmaster for a 
period of twenty-five years or more, and was town clerk for 
five years. He was a devoted member of the Free Will 
Baptist church, and for many years held the ofiice of deacon. 
His home was a free hotel for the ministers of his denom- 
ination, and during all his life he was untiring in his efforts 
to promote the moral and religious welfare of the community 
in which he lived. About the year 1878 he removed with 
his wife to Stoneham, Mass., where most of his children had 
preceded him, and they both resided there during the re- 
mainder of their lives. 

CHILDREN OF AMOS AND POLLY YOUNG WHITCHER. 

(All horn in Coventry-Benton.) 
72. I. Lucinda Coburn, b. October 7, 1836, d. 

Stoneham, Mass., October 27, 1871; m. 
November 5, 1854, Horace Webber, son 
of Sylvester and Lucy Webber Gordon, b. 
LandaflP, May 7, 1833, d. Stoneham, Mass., 
March 26, 1886. 




AMOS WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 41 

After their marriage they resided in 
Landaff, Bath, and Benton, until about 
1868, when they removed to Stoneham, 
residing there until their death. He was 
engaged much of the time dealing in coun- 
try produce, and later owned a boarding 
house at Weirs. 

73. II. Amaret A., b. June 23, 1840 ; m. January 14, 

1862, Emery Barnes, son of Jacob March 
and Malinda Cox White, b. Irasburgh, Vt.. 
October 26, 1833. 

They resided in Landaff for several years 
after their marriage, but removed to Stone- 
ham, Mass., previous to 1870, where he 
has since been engaged in the express busi- 
ness between Stoneham and Boston and 
Stoneham and Lynn for a period of more 
than thirty-five years. He has always ta- 
ken a deep interest in political matters, and 
has been affiliated with the Republican 
party from its organization. They are ac- 
tive and useful members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Previous to his mar- 
riage, Mr. White spent several years in 
California, engaged in a search for the elu- 
sive gold, and has in the years since, paid 
two or three visits to the Pacific Coast. 

74. III. Charles Henry, b. February 10, 1843, d. 

Stoneham, Mass., April 12, 1887; m. 
January 1, 1868, Minerva Judith, daughter 
of David and Hannah Parker Bowman, b. 



42 CHASE WHITOHER AND 

in Lyman, February 20, 1850, d. Stone- 
ham, Mass., March 6, 1886. 

Charles H. Whitcher on attaining his 
majority, engaged in the blacksmithing and 
wheelwright business in his native town un- 
til about the year 1871, when he removed 
to Stoneham, Mass., entering the employ 
of Hazen Whitcher and Oliver H. Marston, 
in the manufacture ot window and door 
screens, picture frames, etc. He was an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Before leaving Benton he served 
for several years as town clerk. He died 
after a brief illness of paralysis, leaving one 
son, Milton Durgin, born in Benton, Octo- 
ber 5, 1869. 

75. IV. VVinthrop Chandler, b. March 22, 1845; m. 
September 22, 1875, Eliza Eleanor, 
daughter of Moses and Emily S. Spofford, 
b. in Danville, August 6, 1849. 

Winthrop C. Whitcher completed his 
education at the New Hampton Institution, 
New Hampton, and after spending some 
little time in Benton, went to Stoneham, 
Mass., about 1872, entering at first the 
employ of his brother-in-law, E. B. White, 
in the express business, but later formed a 
partnership with his brother James E., in 
the grocery business, which continued until 
about 1888, when his brother retired from 
the firm, and he has since conducted it very 




CHARLES H. WHITCHER. 



WINTHROP WHITCHER. 




JAMES E. WHITCHER. 



ALBION G. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 43 

successfully alone. He has been active in 
town affairs, filling various official positions 
and has been for some time a member of 
the Stoneham school committee. He is an 
active and prominent member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, superintendent of 
the Sunday school, interested and active in 
all matters looking to the growth and de- 
velopment of his adopted town, recognized 
by all as a valuable and useful citizen. 
He has no children. 

76. V. James Edgar, b. November 29, 1847, d. Au- 
gust 27, 1891 ; m. September 8, 1875, 
Susan Relief, daughter of Person C. and 
Lucy S. Thompson, b. Holderness, Jan- 
uary 28, 1851. James E. Whitcher at- 
tended school at Newbury, Vt., and at 
New Hampton, and soon after reaching his 
majority went to Stoneham, Mass., being 
employed for a time in a grocery store un- 
til he went into business for himself in part- 
nership with his brother. He was a lead- 
ing member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and was active in the affairs of the 
town. He served on the board of select- 
men, and represented Stoneham twice in 
the Massachusetts House of Representatives. 
He was a Republican in politics. A little 
previous to his brief illness and death in the 
summer of 1891, he had successfully passed 
an examination for a clerkship in the Bos- 



44 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

ton Custom House, to which he was to 
have been appointed by collector Beard. 
He was a man of pleasing address, of un- 
impeachable integrity, and was held in the 
highest esteem by his large circle of friends. 
He left no children. 

77. VI. Florence Victoria, b. May 3, 1852 ; m. Wil- 

liam C. Young of Bath, b. January 1, 
1838. They have lived since their mar- 
riage on their farm near Swiftwater village. 
Children: (1) Clarence E., and (2) 
Carrie E., b. December 25, 1870. Clar- 
ence E. d. in Bath, April 21, 1881. (3) 
Walter, b. January 27, 1877, d. near 
Norfolk, Va., June 7, 1907. (4) Ada, 
and (5) Arthur, b. September 19, 1878. 
(6) Austin, b. October 26, 1880. (7) 
Homer, b. January 7, 1884. (8) James, 
b. March 9, 1887. Of these children of 
William C. and Florence Whitcher Young, 
Ada, Arthur, and Homer reside on a farm 
they own near Norfolk, Va., where their 
brother Walter died in June, 1907. His 
mother was on a visit to him at the time of 
his death and his remains were brought 
north for burial in the cemetery at Swift- 
water. 

78. VII. Albion George, b. August 28, 1854; m. Nov- 

ember 21, 1885, Ella Josephine, daughter 
of Eli D. and Mary S. (Hawkins) Rich- 
ards, b. Woodstock, Vt., December 13, 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 45 



1857. Albion G. Whitcher followed his 
brothers to Stoneham, Mass., after reaching 
his majority, but later removed to a farm in 
Montpelier, Vt. He is engaged in farming 
there at the present time. He has no chil- 
dren, 

(72). 

CHILDREN OF HORACE W. AND LUCINDA WHITCHER 
GORDON. 

I. Ella, b. October 28, 1855 ; d. July U, 1858. 

II. Ada, b. March 25, 1857 ; m. 1877, Daniel Webster, 

son of George W. and Mary Hunt Cloutman of 
Stoneham, Mass. Reside in Stoneham : children, 
(1) Ethel Kate, b. October 29, 1877; (2) May 
Ella, b. July 23, 1879, d. July 27, 1879. Ethel 
Kate, m. October 29, 1902, Edward Amos, son of 
Amos and Ellen Joy Jarvis of Cambridge : chil- 
dren, (1) Bessie Cloutman, b. February 27, 1904, 
d. February, 1904; (2) Dorothy May, b. Sept. 
9, 1905. 

III. Elmer Eugene, b. August 2 1858 : m. January 13, 

1878, Ella C, daughter of John and Lydia Rod- 
man Walker of Stoneham; m. 2d, March 12, 
1884, Nellie M. Howe of Lincoln, Neb. Chil- 
dren, George Scott, b. Sept. 8, 1888, d. Febru- 
ary 16, 1890 ; (2) Irma May, b. June 6, 1890. 

IV. May Ella, b. May 18, 1860: m. May 18, 1882, 

Joseph Henry, son of Joseph S. and Charlotte 
Chase of Maiden, Mass., child, Elmer Brown 
Chase, b. April 6, 1884, d. July 22, 1884. 



46 CHASE WHITCH^R AND 

V. Carrie, b. March 15, 1862, d. June 30, 1865. 

VI. Wilbur Cratts, b. May 22, 1864, m. June 15, 1898, 

Lillian Little Noyes, daughter of Joseph M. an(J 
Eliza J. (Crockett) Little, b. Warren, July 8^ 
1866. Reside in Warren. 

VII. James Whitcher, b. October 12, 1871, m. August 

12, 1892, Louise B., daughter of Alonzo and 
Louise Caswell of Stoneham. Children, (1) Les- 
lie Clayton, b. November 16, 1893 ; (2) Law- 
rence Nickerson, b. October 28, 1903. 



my- 

CHILDKEN OF* EMERY B. AND AMARET WHITCHER 
WHITE. 

I. Lulu Frances, b. LandafF, June 9, 1864 : m. Febru- 

ary 7, 1885, Homer C, sod of Cyrus and Abbie 
Hay of Stoneham, Mass. One child, Dana Percy, 
b. June 24, 1885, m. October 8, 1906, Mad- 
eline Lemay. 

II. Lewis Bailey, b. LandafF, September 18, 1865, m. 

October 26, 1885, Isadore Frances, daughter of 
William E. and Sarah A. Cook Weston, b. Read- 
ing, Mass., March 22, 1865. Children, (1) Vera 
Lewis, b. Woburn, Mass., April 6, 1887 ; (2) 
Arthur Francis, b. Stoneham, Mass., July 7, 1889, 
d. February 9, 1891 ; (3) Florence Mae, b. Stone- 
ham, October 22, 1893 ; (4) William Emery, b. 
Stoneham, Mass., December 19,1897; (5) Mil- 
dred Evelyn, b. Stoneham, Mass., August 25, 
1899; (6) Leon Weston, b. Cliftondale, Mass., 




MRS. LOUISA WHITCHER EASTMAN. 



HIS DESOEJSTDANTS. 47 

June 19, 1904; (7) Elsie Hazel, b. West New 
York, N. J., January 10, 1907. Lewis B. White 
is a book-keeper in New York City. 
III. Elvah Grace, b, Landafl, December 7, 1867, d. 
Stoneham, Mass., May 25, 1904. 

79. Milton Durgin Whitcher, son of Charles H. and 
Minerva Bowman Whitcher, b. Benton, October 5, 
1869, m. Stoneham, Mass., August 15, 1906, Julia 
Ellen, daughter of Calvin and Cecilia Fell Kinnear, 
■b. in Sackville, New Brunswick, April 10, 1883. 
Reside in Stoneham. 

Children : 
80. Milton, b. Stoneham, Mass., June 10, 

1907. 

(42). Louisa Whitcher, daughter of William and 
Mary Noyes Whitcher, b. December 22, 1811, d. May 4, 
1889 ; ra. March 1, 1841, Sylvester, son of James and 
Polly Eastman, b. Coventry, August 3, 1814, d. January 
19, 1860. After their marriage they resided in Piermont, 
Benton, and in north-eastern New York, until about 1852, 
when they returned to Benton. He was an invalid during 
the last fifteen years of his life, and his care and support as 
well as that of their children, fell largely to the lot of the 
wife. She was a woman of great energy, who accepted al^ 
ways hopefully a life which abounded in toil and hardship. 
She was a loyal and enthusiastic Methodist, as devoted and 
loyal to her denomination as was her brother Amos to his, 
the Free Will Baptist, and this was devotion and loyalty 
indeed. 



48 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

CHILDREN OF SYLVESTER AND LOUISA WHITCHER 
EASTMAN. 

I. George Edward, b. Piermont, December 8, 1841 r mv 
Ist, March 14, 1866, Rebecca W., daughter of 
David and Azubah Judd Bronson, Children, (1) 
Louisa Ellen, b. June 21, 1868 ; (2) Mary Eliza- 
beth, b. May 20, 1874- She m. Ist, July 2, 1894, 
William F. Policy of Quebec, P. Q., who d. in 
New Mexico, September 17, 1895, m. 2d, June 6, 
1906, Walter J. Trafton of Lynn, Mass, b. 1875, 
8on of Edward S. and Lizzie A. Peckham Trafton. 
George E. m. 2d, September 17, 1906, Susan S. 
Clark, daughter of Sylvester and Lucretia Egule- 
ston Clogston, b. 1840. Reside in North Haver- 
hill, where he is engaged in farming and manufac- 
ture of sleighs and wagons. 

IL Ruth Jane, b. Benton, September 7, 1845, m. at 
Benton, March 2, 1870, Charles A., son of Amos 
L. and Mahala DollofF Veazey, b. Bridgewater, 
March 23, 1842. Was a successful farmer in Ben- 
ton for several years, but for the last fifteen years 
has owned the country store at Benton, Mrs. 
Veazey holding the position of post-mistress. They 
have two children : 1 William Dana Veazey, b. 
Benton, July 7, 1871, m. at Laconia, October 18, 
1899, Winnifred Alice, daughter of Jefferson and 

Mary Smith Gilbert. Children: (1) Alice 

Winnifred, b. October 8, 1900, d. June 24, 1901 ; 
(2) Allen Gilbert, b. March 18, 1903. 2 Jen- 
nie F. Veazey, b. Benton, April 13, 1874, m. at 
Benton, November 28, 1900, Willis Allen Brown 




MOSES WHITCHER. 




WARD P. WHITCHER. HENRY N. WHITCHER 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 49 

of Springfield, Vt. ; reside at Bellows Falls, Vt., 
one child, Donald Allen Brown. — William D. 
Veazey graduated at New Hampton Institution, 
studied law with Judge Charles F. Stone of Laeo- 
uia. On his admission to the bar, became a member 
of the law firm of Jewell, Owen and Veazey of that 
city, having a large and lucrative practice. Has 
been County Solicitor of Belknap County for three 
terms, and in addition to his law business is exten- 
sively engaged in lumbering, having an extensive 
mill plant in Thornton in the Pemigewasset Valley. 
HI. William Whitcher, b. in Jay, New York, November 
14, 1850, came to Benton with his parents about 
1852, where he has since resided : m. 1st, May 28, 
1878, Georgie A. Aldrich of Haverhill, b. April 16, 
1861 ; d. April 19, 1892 ; m. 2d, February 6, 1893, 
Edna Ann Morse, widow of Josiah J. Eastman 
and daughter of Welton and Mary Ann Morse of 
Easton. William W. Eastman owns the farms 
formerly owned by Moses and William Whitcher, 
Jr., and later by Chase and Ira Whitcher, and has 
been engaged in farming and lumbering. He has 
been active in all the affairs of the town, has served 
as selectman, road agent, tax collector, town clerk, 
and was a member of the Constitutional Convention 
of 1889. He is justly recognized as one of the 
most influential citizens of his town. 



(43). Winthrop Chandler Whitcher, son of William 
and Mary (Noyes) Whitcher, b. February 20, 1813, d. in 
Landafl, March 20, 1844: m. January 28, 1836, Mercy 



50 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

Priest Noyes, widow of Samuel Noyes, Jr., ot LandafF. She 
died October 24, 1889. 

After his marriage he resided until his death on the farm 
in LandafF, owned in part by his wife, the farm where his 
mother was born and which was cleared and settled by his 
grandfather, Samuel Noyes. He was a man of stalwart 
frame, capable of untiring energy, and his early death after a 
brief illness from blood poisoning Caused by a slight wound, 
terminated a career which gave promise of being greatly suc- 
cessful. His wife was a woman of sterling qualities of char- 
acter, evinced when twice widowed, by her training of, and 
care for a family of young children, one of whom was born 
subsequent to the death of her husband. She lived to see 
all her children, by both her first and second husbands, set- 
tled and established in homes of their own, and to be in some 
measure repaid for her devoted care lavished upon them, by 
a like loving care given her by them in her later years. 

CHILDREN OF WINTHROP C. AND MERCY (PRIEST) 
WHITCHER. 

(All born in Landaff.) 
Moses, b. December 10, 1836. 
Ward Priest, b. December 27, 1837. 
Henry Noyes, b. March 24, 1840. 
Mary Jane, b. April 5, 1842, d. April 28, 1843. 
Sarah H., b. Nov. 29, 1844, m. Sept. 21, 

1862, Lafayette McConnell of Landaff. 

Children : 1 N. Kate, b. Nov. 24, 1863, d. 

Nov. 10, 1880 ; 2 b. June 10, 

1865, d. June 25, 1865 ; 3 Mercy Ann, b. 

November 7, 1867, d. September 3, 1868 ; 

4. Erailie W., b. January 20, 1872. 



81. 


L 


82. 


n. 


83. 


m. 


84. 


IV. 


85. 


V. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 51 

(81). Moses Whitcher^ son of Winthrop C. and Mercy 
Priest Whitcher, b. December 10, 1836; d. in Lisbon, 
April 30, 1903; m. 1st, June 5, 1861, Julia E., daughter 
of Orrin and Lavina Wallace Bronson, b. LandafF, August 
3, 1842, d. May 7, 1885 ; m. 2d, April 5, 1894, Amanda 
S., daughter of John C. and Mary Simonds Atwood, b. 
Landaff, April 6, 1852. 

Until a year or two before his death, Moses Whitcher was 
always a resident of LandafF, where he was a successful far- 
mer, owning the farm upon which he was born, and which 
had been cleared from the forest by his own great-grand- 
father, Samuel Noyes. He was also engaged at various 
times in lumbering operations, and was was one of the lead- 
ing and influential citizens of the town. Though averse to 
holding public office, he served for several years as one of 
the selectmen, and filled all the various town offices. He 
was a genuine type of the hard-working, successful New 
Hampshire farmer, recognizing that success on hilly New 
Hampshire soil is only accomplished by hard work. 

CHILDREN OF MOSES AND LAVINA ( BRONSON ) WHITCHER. 

(All born in Landaff.) 

86. I. Pheeb. P., b. October 18, 1863, m. Daniel J. 

Whitcher. 

87. II. Maud, b. December 21, 1866, d. June 23, 1869. 

88. III. Jennie N., b. January 27, 1871. Is a success- 

ful teacher in the public schools of Quincy, 



(82). Ward Priest Whitcher, son of Winthrop C. 
and Mercy Priest Whitcher, b. December 27, 1837, d. in 
Lisbon, May 14, 1892 : m. at Concord, September 8, 1859. 



52 CHASE WHIT CHER AND 

Pheeb H., daughter of Levi and Hannah Sanborn Perkins, 
b. Loudon, September 16, 1837, d. in Lisbon, April 10, 
1899. 

Ward P. Whitcher graduated from New Hampton Insti- 
tution in 1859, and soon after his marriage had charge of 
the express and telegraph office at Tilton, remaining there 
until 1866, when he established himself as a druggist in 
Lisbon. Besides this he also conducted an extensive insu- 
rance business, this being continued by his widow after his 
death. He took an active part in the affairs of his village 
and town, but being an uncompromising Democrat, political 
preferment in the Republican stronghold of Lisbon did not 
naturally fall to his lot. He was, however, twice elected 
treasurer of Grafton County, and was one of the recognized 
leaders of his party in the North Country. He was a 
Mason, an Odd Fellow, and member of various fraternal 
and benevolent orijanizations. 

CHILDREN OF WARD P. AND PHEEB PERKINS WHITCHER. 

89. I. Frank P., b. New Hampton, July 23, 1863. 

90. n. Chase Roy, b. Lisbon, December 8, 1876. 

(89). Frank P. Whitcher, son of Ward P. and Pheeb 
Perkins Whitcher, b. New Hampton, July 23, 1863: m. 

1886, Hattie Louise, daughter of Edward Dean of 

Haverhill, b. 1858, d. in Lisbon in 1891. He resides in 
the State of Washington. Daughter : 

91. Edith Aldeane, b. Lisbon, May 6, 1887. She is a 

stenographer, resides No. Haverhill. 

(90). Chase Roy Whitcher, son of Ward P. and 
Pheeb Perkins Whitcher, b. Lisbon, Dec. 8, 1876: m. July 




MILTON D. WHITCHER. CHASE R. WHITCHER. 





JOHN W. WHITCHER. 



CHARLES C. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 53 

20, 1898, Eda M., daughter of Foster M. and Susan M. 
Cakes Aldrich, b. Lisbon, Sept. 4, 1876. Daughter: 

92. Pheeb H., b, Lisbon, February 16, 1906. 

Chase R. Whiteher pursued the study of architecture at 
the Institute of Technology in Boston, and with private in- 
structors in that city, and established himself in Manchester. 
He has designed and furnished plans for some of the most 
important public buildings in the state, is enthusiastically 
devoted to his profession, and is recognized as one of the 
leading and most successful architects of northern New 
England. He resides in Lisbon and has his business office 
in Manchester, 

(83). Henry Noyes Whiteher, son of Winthrop C. and 
Mercy Priest Whiteher, b. March 24, 1840: m. 1863, 
Emilie E., daughter of John C. and Mary Simonds At- 
wood, b. LandafF, February 21, 1845. He is a prosperous 
farmer in his native town, his farm being a valuable and 
productive one. His farm buildings are modern and de- 
lightfully located, are among the finest in town. 

CHILDREN OF HENRY N. AND EMILIE ATWOOD WHITCHER. 

(All born in Landaff.) 
Charles C, b. February 19, 1864. 
Mary A., b. July 4, 1869 : m. June 17, 1896, 
Harry E. Heath. They have one child, 
Doris, b. Ponemah, December 30, 1902. 
John Winthrop, b. September 9, 1876. 
Stark F., b. December 24, 1878, d. May 22, 
1897. 
97. V. Mercy F., b. July 8, 1885. 



93. 


I. 


94. 


n. 


95. 


m. 


96. 


IV. 



54 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

(93). Charles C. Whitcher, son of Henry N. and 
Emilie Atwood Whitcher, b. February 19, 1864 r ra. April 
24, 1890, Carrie, daughter of Lorenzo D. and Lomira 
Noyes Hall of LandafF. Son ; 
98. Mark H., b. Woodsville, December &, 1894. 

Charles C. Whitcher who is at present engaged in busi- 
ness in the West, was ior two years, 1895-1896, treasurer 
of the Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank, when he re- 
signed to go West ; later returned and in company with his 
brother, John W., was engaged in the lumber business m 
Vermont, later engaging in the insurance business at Lisbon. 



(95). John Winthrop Whitcher, eon of Henry N. and 
Emilie Atwood Whitcher, b. September 9, 1876 : m. June 22, 
1898, Queenie, daughter of Oscar W. and Lydia O. Straw. 
Has been engaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber, 
since attaining his majority, in Landaff, in Vermont, and 
Woodstock. 



(44). Samuel Whitcher, son of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. August 24, 1814, d. in Easton, Octo- 
ber 8, 1879 : m. at Lisbon, May 4, 1840, Emily, daughter 
of Joshua and Lydia Jesseman Quimby, b. Lisbon, January 
25, 1818, d. in Easton, May 5, 1888. 

Samuel Whitcher, after attaining his majority, was em- 
ployed for a time on a farm in Bath, and about the time of 
his marriage purchased the farm in Coventry formerly occu- 
pied by John Atwell, and later known as the Stephen C. 
Sherman farm, where he remained engaged in fatming until 
about the year 1845, when he removed to East Landaff, now 




SAMUEL WHITCHER. 



HI8 DESCENDANTS. 55 

Easton, where he engaged in farming and the manufacture 
of lumber until his death. He was a man of unimpeachable 
integrity, devoted to his family and home, industrious and 
prudent, and secured by these qualities of character for him- 
self and family a substantial competence. Denied by the 
strenuous circumstances of his early life the. advantages of the 
schools, he saw to it that the education of his children in the 
common schools of his town was supplemented by academic 
instruction, and lived to see them well established in life. 
In religious matters he thought for himself, and accepted 
from the kindness and goodness of his own nature the Uni- 
versalist faith, shaming by his life and example many who 
held to more rigid theological beliefs. A life-long Democrat 
in his political faith, he never held public ofHce, but never, 
on the other hand, shirked his duties as a citizen of his town 
and community. He was a useful citizen, a good man. 

CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND EMILY QUIMBY WHITCHER. 

99. I. Lydia Emily, b. in Benton, June 22, 1841 : 

m. November 23, 1864, William Harvey 
Policy, son of David and Mary Neal Polley, 
b. Haverhill, June 22, 1841. They lived for 
a time in Beverly, Mass., where W. H. Pol- 
ley was engaged in the manufacture of shoes. 
He sold his business in Beverley about 1870, 
and went to Michigan to engage in the same 
business. Later he removed to Montreal, 
Canada, and later still to Quebec, where 
for about thirty years he has been engaged 
in the manufacture of shoes, doing for many 
years a large and extensive business through- 
out the Dominion. After the death of his 



56 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

son he disposed of his factories, and for the 
few past years has been employed as superin- 
tendent of a large shoe manufactory. Mr. 
and Mrs. Polley are well and favorably 
known in the English speaking community of 
the French city, have been, as the apostle re- 
marks, "given to hospitality," and Mrs. Pol- 
ley is earnest and efficient in her charitable 
and benevolent activities. 

Their son, William Flint Polley, b. De- 
cember 28, 1865, in Beverly, Mass., m. J>dy 
21, 1894, Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
George E. and Rebecca Bronson Eastman, 
b. May 20, 1874. He was associated in 
business with his father until compelled to re- 
linquish work because of ill health. He d. 
in New Mexico, September 17, 1895, and 
was buried in the family lot in the west ceme- 
tery, Benton. 

100. n. Betsey Samantha, b. Benton, February 5, 
1844, m. February 10, 1869, William, son 
of George and Electa Cowan Kendall, b. 
Winchester, April 16, 1835. William Ken- 
dall was engaged in business in New York 
previous to his marriage, but subsequently 
became a partner of his brother-in-law, D. J. 
Whitcher in the lumber business, their mill 
being situated on the Wild Ammonoosue in 
Easton. They continued this very success- 
fully until about 1890, when they sold their 
mill and lands to the Fall Mountain Paper 




DAVID S. WHITCHER. 




DANIEL^ J. WHITCHER. CHARLES O. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDAJSJT8. 57 

Co., and he retired from business purchasing 
a small farm in Benton, where with his wife 
he has since resided. He made extensive im- 
provements on his residence, which is finely 
located, conynanding one of the finest views 
of hill and mountain in a town which is unsur- 
passed among New Hampshire towns for its 
beauty and charm of scenery. In politics he 
is a staunch Republican, and has filled the 
various town offices, besides representing 
Benton in the legislature of 1897, the first 
and only Republican ever elected as represen- 
tative from that overwhelmingly Democratic 
town. They have no children. 

101. III. David Simeon, b. in East Landaff, now Eas- 

ton, November 30, 1846, d. in Easton, 
March 14, 1881. He graduated at New 
Hampton Institution, and studied law in the 
oflfice of Hon. Harry Bingham of Littleton. 
Admitted to the bar, he began practice in 
that town with good prospects, but failing 
health compelled him to relinquish his profes- 
sion, and he returned to his home in Easton 
shortly before his death. 

102. IV. Daniel James, b. Easton, February 2, 1849 : 

m. February 1, 1894, Pheeb Perkins (86), 
daughter of Moses and Julia E. (Bronson) 
Whitcher of Landafl. They reside in Easton 
on the former homestead of his father, Sam- 
uel Whitcher. They have one child : 

103. Lucile Betsey, b. Easton, August 11, 1897. 



58 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

Daniel J. Whitcher, was educated in the 
schools of Easton, at Tilton Seminary, and 
New Hampton Institution, and soon after 
attaining his majority engaged in the lumber 
business with his brother-in-law in Easton, 
under the firm name of Whitcher & Kendall. 
When this plant was sold to the Fall Moun- 
tain Paper Co., and the partnership was dis- 
solved, he purchased the mill and homestead 
formerly owned by his father, and is still en- 
gaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber. 
He has served the town in various capacities, 
and represented Easton in the legislature of 
1878. He is a successful business man, giv- 
ing careful attention to his business affairs, 
and is devotedly attached to his family and 
home, and is influential in all matters pertain- 
ing to the interests of his town. 
104. V. Charles Ora, b. Easton, November 21, 1852: 
m. July 2, 1874, Josephine Viola, daughter 
of Abner and Deborah Thompson Kimball, 
b. Franklin, December 11, 1852. Reside in 
\^'^ood8ville, have one daughter : 

105 Kate Deborah, b. Easton, Febuary 13, 1885, 
is engaged in the millinery business in 
Woodsville. 

Charles O. Whitcher, like his brothers, at- 
tended the New Hampton Institution, and af- 
ter his marriage engaged in the lumber 
business with his father, in Easton, until he 
entered the employ of the Boston, Concord & 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 59 

Montreal Railroad and removed to Woods- 
ville about 1886, where he still resides. 
Leaving the employ of the railroad in 1898, 
he purchased the business of Stickney Bros., 
in what was known as the "Brick Store" in 
Woodsville, which he conducted till the au- 
tumn of 1903, when he closed the business 
out, and has since been variously employed. 
Is an active supporter of the Universalist 
church, and is an Odd Fellow and a member 
of the Masonic fraternity. 
106. VI. Susan Editha, b. Easton, April 20, 1859 : m. 
April 21, 1877, George Harvey, son of Jere- 
miah A. and Lydia Howe Clark of Benton ; 
d. in Benton, April 24, 1900. George H. 
Clark began the practice of dentistry, but 
abandoned it on account of his health and 
purchased the Peter Howe farm in Benton, 
opposite the residence of his brother-in-law, 
William Kendall, where he still resides. 
Since the death of his wife he has lived with 
Mr. and Mrs. Kendall. 



(45). Ira Whitcher, son of William and Mary Noyes 
Whitcher, b. December 2, 1815, d. in Woodsville, Decem- 
ber 9, 1897 : m. at Haverhill, November 27, 1843, Lucy, 
daughter of Samuel and Dorcas Foster Royce, b. Haverhill, 
October 11, 1814, d. Woodsville, September, 26, 1885. 

Ira Whitcher had only the educational advantages of a 
backwoods town, and only limited use of these, his school 
education ending with a few weeks in each of two or three 



60 CHASE WHITOHER AND 

winters. There were few or no books accessible, and even 
had there been plenty, he would have had little time for 
reading. The few books to which he did have access, how- 
ever, the Town Officer, the New Hampshire Statutes, the 
Bible, Webster's Spelling book, and one or two of the old- 
time readers, he knew, and with their aid obtained a practi- 
cal if not liberal education. On reaching his majority he 
entered the employment of his brother Moses, for whom he 
worked six years for the compensation of twelve dollars and 
a half a month and board. He clothed himself by extra 
jobs, and saving his entire wages, purchased the farm on 
which he lived until the spring of 1870, and built the house 
in which he established his home in the autumn of 1843. 
Becoming the administrator of the estate of his brother 
Moses, on the death of the latter in the spring of 
1846, he naturally became engaged in the lumber 
business, which he successfully followed during the remain- 
der of his life, farming becoming a secondary consideration. 
He was a believer in the gospel of hard work and practiced 
his belief. He was far-sighted, thrifty, practiced rigid 
economy, but was also open-handed and public spirited. 
He advocated liberal appropriations for roads, schools, and 
other matters of interest to his town, and was a liberal sup- 
porter of the institutions of the church. Although actively 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal church, he was no 
sectarian, and gave the other religious denominations of his 
town his hearty support. He was elected one of the select- 
men of Benton in 1842, and during the next twenty-nine 
years was constantly in its service, holdmg at various times 
every possible office, except that of superintending school 
committee. He represented the town six times in the legis- 
lature, served for six years as one of the Coramiasioners of 




IRA WHITCHER. 



ffI8 DESCENDANTS. 61 

Grafton County, was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1850, and was one of the commission elected by 
the legislature to supervise the rebuilding of the State House 
in 1864. He was the agent of Benton for a series of years 
in the management of litigation in which the town was en- 
gaged, and was frequently appointed referee in cases to be 
settled out of court. Benton had no resident lawyer, and he 
did for his townsmen much of the work for which in the lar- 
ger towns of the state, legal talent is employed. He was 
conveyancer, writer of wills, administrator and executor of 
estates, guardian of minors and insane, legal adviser in cases 
involving large and small interests, and all this for the most 
part with little or no compensation. In 1870 he removed to 
Woodsville in order to be close to railroad facilities, but re- 
tained and added to his landed interests in Benton, though a 
few years previous to his death he sold several thousand 
acres of forest to the Fall Mountain and Winnipesaukee 
Paper Companies. He increased his lumber business, erect- 
ing in company with the late Lewis C. Pattee a steam saw- 
mill at Woodsville, and the year after his removal, erected 
his commodious residence on Court Street, now occupied by 
his son, William F. Whitcher. Woodsville in 1870 was 
little more than a straggling collection of a dozen or more 
houses, a store, and railroad station. To him more than to 
any other individual was due its growth and prosperity dur- 
ing the twenty-five years. Successful in business, he accu- 
mulated a handsome property, and was in its use generous 
and helpful to those needing aid, and was possessed of a 
broad public spirit. He was largely instrumental in secur- 
ing for the village its water works and electric light service, 
the removal of the County seat from Haverhill Corner to 
Woodsville, the erection of the substantial Court house on 



62 CHA8E WHITCHER AND 

the lot given by him to the county, the structure being built 
under his personal supervision, the establishment of the Sav- 
ings and National banks, while the Free Public Library 
building with its thousand volumes of well selected books as 
a beginning of a library, a Methodist Episcopal church 
property free from debt, the gift of a fine pipe organ, and a 
fund for the support of the church services are among the 
monuments he left to his memory. On removing to Woods- 
ville he made himself an active factor in Haverhill town life, 
serving for several years on the board of selectmen, and rep- 
resenting the town in the legislature of 1891, when he was 
in his seventy-sixth year. In his political affiliations he was 
a life-long Democrat, though during the war of the Rebel- 
lion he was an ardent supporter of the war measures of the 
administration, and gave of his time and energy to keep full 
the quota of soldiers from his town, where opposition to the 
war was rife. Given to hospitality, the latchstring to his 
home was always out. After the death of his wife to whom 
he was devotedly attached, in 1885, his daughter, Mrs. 
Mary E. Whitcher Abbott, presided in his home until her 
death, but a few months before his own. Reserved and 
quiet in his manners, severely unostentatious in his mode of 
life, hating pretence and indolence alike, his long life was 
one of ceaseless activity. His integrity was never questioned, 
and his tenacity of purpose was such that he knew no such 
word as failure in the accomplishment of his plans. 

CHILDREN OF IRA AND LUCY ROYCE WHITCHER. 

(All born in Benton.) 

107. I. William Frederick, b. August 10, 1845. 

108. H. Mary Elizabeth, b. July 17, 1847, d. April 15, 

1897: m. November 1, 1877, Chester, son 




FRANK WHITCHER. 




SCOTT WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 63 

of Moses and Lucia Eastman Abbott of Bath, 
b. October 13, 1850. She was educated in 
the schools of her native town and at Newbury 
and Tilton Seminaries. Devotedly attached 
to her home, she remained a member of it 
after her marriage, her husband entering the 
employ of her father. She gave her parents 
untiring care and service, and was a deserved 
favorite in the social and religious circles of 
the village. A lover of music, she was the 
leading spirit of the church choir, and aside 
from her home duties, was active in charitable 
work. Childless herself, her home was a fa- 
vorite resort of children, who cherished for 
her the warmest affection. Her death fol- 
lowed an illness of only a few days, and was 
a blow most sadly felt by her aged father and 
by her wide circle of relatives and friends. 

109. III. Frank, b. June 21, 1849, d. November 7, 
1875 : m. April 27, 1875, Lizzie A., daugh- 
ter of Russell and Ann Walker King of 
Haverhill, b. February 5, 1848, d. January 
9, 1881. 

Frank Whitcher, after a short time spent 
in the business department of New Hampton 
Institution, entered into business with his 
father, but fell a prey to New England's 
scourge, consumption, and died but a few 
months after his marriage in his twenty-sev- 
enth year. 



64 0HA8E WHITCHER AND 

110. IV. Scott, b. November 2, 1852, d. January 22, 
1875. Was educated at Tilton Seminary and 
the State Normal School, became clerk in the 
National Bank of Newbury at Wells River, 
Vt., retiring some months before his death on 
account ot failing health. The summer of 
1874 he spent in the Adirondacks, going to 
Florida in the late fall in hope of warding off 
what proved to be pulmonary consumption. 
He lived but a brief month after his return 
home in December, 1874. 



(107). William Frederick Whitcher, eon of Ira and 
Lucy Royce Whitcher, b. August 10, 1845 ; m. 1st, Decem- 
ber 4, 1872, at Middletown, Conn., Jeannette Maria, 
daughter of Dr. Ellsworth and Maria T. Haling Burr, b. 
Middletown, Conn., December 6, 1845, d. Maiden, Mass., 
September 25, 1894; m. 2d, November 4, 1896, at Stone- 
ham, Mass., Marietta Amanda, daughter of Darius and 
Mary A. Dean Hadley, b. Woburn, Mass., July 21, 1858. 
William F. Whitcher, on reaching his majority, abandoned 
the saw mill and lumber yard, fitted for college at Tilton 
Seminary in one year, entered Wesley an University, Mid- 
dletown, Conn., in the autumn of 1867, graduating with the 
class of 1871, with honors, Phi Beta Kappa rank, and win- 
ning prizes for excellence in debate and oratory. Studied 
theology in Boston University, joined the Providence, (now 
the New England Southern) Conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and filled pastorates in South Yarmouth 
and New Bedford, Mass., and Newport and Providence, 
R. I. In 1881 he became a member of the staff of the 




WILLIAM F. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESC:E]SIDANT8. 65 

Boston Traveller, and its editor-in-chief four years later. 
In 1892 he became literary editor of the Boston Daily Ad- 
vertiser, and three years later took charge of the court re- 
ports, which have for many years been a special feature of 
that paper. Resigning this position after the death of his 
father, he removed to Woodsville, where he now resides. 
Besides devoting himself to the affairs of the Ira Whitcher 
estate, he is editor and proprietor of the Woodsville News, 
and is actively engaged in literary work. Is especially in- 
terested in genealogy, American local, and political hie^tory 
and biography, and his collection of books and pamphlets 
bearing upon these subjects is one of the most extensive and 
valuable in the state. During his eighteen years residence 
in Maiden, Mass., he served for nine years on the Maiden 
School Committee, was its chairman, and took an active 
part in political affairs. Since his removal to New Hamp- 
shire he has been a member of the legislatures of 1901, 
1903, 1905, 1907, serving each session on the Committee 
on Judiciary, in 1903 on State Library, and in 1905 and 
1907 on Banks. Has been trustee of the State Library 
since 1903, of the Woodsville Free Library since 1898. Is 
a trustee of the Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank. Is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. New England Metho- 
dist Historical Society, the New Hampshire Historical So- 
ciety, Sons of the American Revolution, and other 
organizations fraternal and literary. His political affilia- 
tions have been with the Republican party since 1887. Has 
one son : 

111. Burr Roy ce Whitcher, M. D., son of William F. 
and Jeanette M. Burr Whitcher, b. New Bedford, 
Mass., November 6, 1878. Prepared for college 



66 0HA8E WHITOHER AND 

in the Maiden, Mass., High School, graduated from 
Dartmouth College in the class of 1902, from the 
Dartmouth Medical School, class of 1905. En- 
gaged in hospital work in Boston, Mass., and 
since 1906 has practiced his profession in that city. 
Is a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 

(46). Sally Whitcher, daughter of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. May 25, 1817, d. in Bath, March 12, 
1893: m. November 11, 1849, Amos, son of Daniel and 
Lovisa Wilson, b. LandafF, August 29, 1826, d. Woods- 
ville, November 20, 1906. 

After their marriage they resided in Benton until about 
1866, when they removed to Bath, purchasing a farm about 
one mile from Swiftwater village, upon which they lived un- 
til about 1886, when they purchased a farm nearer the vil- 
lage, where Mrs. Wilson spent the remainder of her life. 
This was subsequently sold, Amos Wilson making his home 
thereafter with his daughters. Sally Wilson was a woman 
of great strength of character, of cheerful disposition, of the 
warmest sympathies, which found expression in a life filled 
with helpfulness for others. Her life was one of rare un- 
selfishness. Both her husband and herself were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and their lives were consis- 
tent with their profession. 

CHILDREN OF AMOS AND SALLY WHITCHER WILSON. 

(^All born in Benton.) 

I. William Francis, b. April 27, 1852, d. Bath, May 
11, 1873. 




MRS. SALLY (WHITCHER) WILSON. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 67 

II. Susan Mann, b. April 24, 1854: ni. Ist, January 15, 

1873, Alvah E. Haywood of Haverhill ; 2d, Febru- 
ary 26, 1891, Harvey Dean of Haverhill; 3d, 
James M. Spinney of Woodsville. Have no chiL 
dren. They reside in Woodsville. 

III. George Mann, b. October 8, 1855, d. Benton, De- 

cember 17, 1863. 

IV. Alice Isabel, b. August 19, 1857: m. December 26, 

1877, John Adams, son of George Ray and Susan 
Gould Noyes, b. Walden, Vt., October 20, 1857. 
they resided with her parents, purchasing the farm 
about 1886. In 1903 they sold the ftirm and re- 
moved to Woodsville, where they still reside, Mr. 
Noyes being in the employ of the Boston & Maine 
railroad. They have two children, both born in 
Bath: (1) Leoua Agnes, b. June 11, 1880; (2) 
George R., b. August 28, 1887. 

47. Hannah Whitcher, b. April 4, 1819, d. July 21, 
1896, in Woburn, Mass. : m. March 11, 1837, James 
Austin, son of Samuel and Mary Howe Mann, b. LandafI, 
August 13, 1816, d. Woburn, Mass., March 23, 1874. 

For a few years after their marriage they resided in New- 
bury, Vt., but in 1849 removed to Woburn, Mass., where 
they resided until their death. Mr. Mann was a carpenter 
and builder, and was engaged in building houses until within 
a few months of his decease. The street upon which he re- 
sided for the last eighteen years of his life, and where hie 
widow lived till her death, bears his name, and the buildings 
upon it were erected by him. They were among the ten 
original members of the First Methodist Episcopal church of 
Woburn, and Mrs. Mann was the last survivor of these. 



68 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

CHILDREN OF JAMES AUSTIN AND HANNAH WHITCHER 

MANN. 

I. George Henry, b. December 11, 1837, d. February 

11, 1839. * 

II. Moses Whitcher, b. Newbury, Vt., February 11, 

1846. 

III. Lucy Etta, b. Woburn, Mass., October 14, 1855. 

Unmarried. Resides in Lexington, Mass. 

IV. Abbie Louise, b. Woburn, Mass., January 16, 1860; 

m. June 11, 1885, Simeon Edgar of Woburn^ 
Mass., b. February 15, 1849, in Harwich, Mass., 
son of Simeon and Betsey Smith Kendrick. He is 
a leather dresser, and they resided at Woburn until 
1901, when they removed to Sault Ste. Marie, 
Mich., where they still reside. They have no chil- 
dren. 

(II). Moses Whitcher Mann, son of James A. and 
Hannah Whitcher Mann, m. June 20, 1870, Elizabeth 
Jenkins Clapp, b. Boston, Mass., November 16, 1847, 
eldest daughter of Samuel Socrates and Tryphena (Clapp) 
Holton of Winchester, Mass. Moses W. Mann engaged in 
business with his father as a builder, for some two years 
after reaching his majority. At the time of his marriage was 
in charge of improvements in the western part of Medford, 
building the first house in the section then opening up, now 
almost entirely filled with residences, many of which were 
erected by him, a section now one of the most attractive of 
the city. He has been actively engaged in building, and 
has nearly all the years since been a resident of West Med- 
ford, doing much to promote its growth and prosperity. He 




MRS. HANNAH WHITCHER MANN. 



HI8 DESCENDANTS. 69 

is a member of the Medford Historical Society, and was one 
of the founders of Trinity Methodist Episcopal church, bear- 
ing heavy burdens in its early years of growth and develop- 
ment. Their children were all born in West Medford, 
Mass: 

(1). James Whitcher, b. March 13, 1871, m. May 29, 
1895, Christina, daughter of Thomas and Isabella 
Clarke, b. Halifax, N. S., January 6, 1874. 
Reside Glens Falls, N. Y. They have children : 
1, Mildred Isabella, b. West Medford, Mass., 
September 7, 1896; 2, William Holton, b. West 
Medford, Mass., August 3, 1901 ; 3, Grace Eliza- 
beth, b. Glens Falls, N. Y., June 13, 1904. 

(2). Georgianna Holton, b. February 7, 1874: m. 
December 16, 1896, Harvey Scott, son of Dana 
Francis and Adella Maria Bacon of Lexington, 
Mass. Is real estate agent and lives at Arlington 
Heights, Mass. 

(3). Mabel Maria, b. July 22, 1875 : m. Charles C, son 
of Hopkins H. and Mary Toppan Meloon of Med- 
ford, Mass. Is a glass-worker, resides Medford 
Hillside, Mass. They have children : 1, Ivy Car- 
men, b. November 1, 1895; 2, Myrtle May, b. 
September 6, 1898 ; 3, Ernest, b. May 6, 
1900, d. May 12 ; 4, Everett, b. May 6, 1900, d. 
May 6. 

(4). Franklin Merritt, b. Feb. 13, 1879: m. August 6, 
1902, Mabel, daughter of George and Mabel 
Pitts. Is an architect. Resides in Kansas City, 
Missouri. 



70 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

(5). Ruby Grace, b. March 7, 1880. Milliner in Glens 

Falls, N. Y. 
(6) David Whitcher, b. September 17, 1887. 



Ohase Whitcher, son of William and Mary Noyes 
Whitcher, b. January 20, 1822, d. Benton, May 4, 1883 : 
m. June 3, 1848, Sarah Royce Whitcher, widow ot his 
brother Moses (39), b. Landaff, October 19, 1813, d. Con- 
cord, February 17, 1878. 

Chase Whitcher, the third to bear that name, was during 
his active and energetic life one of the most prominent and 
influential citizens of his native town. He was, after his 
marriage, engaged extensively in farming, and also in the 
lumber business in partnership with his brother Ira, until 
about 1857, and thereafter, until his death, conducted suc- 
cessfully a large business of his own. He owned, in whole 
or in part, several sawmills on the Wild Ammonoosuc in 
LandafF, now Easton, as well as in Benton, and was also a 
large owner of real estate. Of a generous, impulsive dis- 
position, with warm sympathy for those in distress or in 
need of financial assistance, he was the constant helper of 
many, who in their shiftlessness and improvidence abused 
his friendship and generosity. He became for this very rea- 
son in his later years, involved in expensive litigation, 
which seriously affected the value of his otherwise large 
property. He represented Benton six times in the state leg- 
islature, in 1852, '53, '65, '66, '69 and '70, and was, during 
a period of more than twenty-five years, almost continuously 
in the service of his town in various capacities, such as town 
clerk, postmaster, and selectman. He was a liberal sup- 
porter of the Methodist Episcopal church of which his wife 




CHASE WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 71 

was a devoted member, and was always ready to promote 
any movement which he believed to be for the welfare and 
prosperity of the community. In his political affiliations he 
was a life-long Democrat, was active in the councils of his 
party, and enjoyed an extensive acquaintance with politicians 
and men in public life. In 1875 he removed his family to 
Concord, erecting a house on Court Street, now owned by 
his daughter, Mrs. Edward F. Mann. Much of his own 
time was, however, spent in Benton, where he still retained 
large property interests, and where in his old home his last 
illness and death occurred in 1883. 

CHILDREN OF CHASE AND SARAH ROYGE WHITCHER. 

(All horn in Benton.) 

112. L Frances Catherine, b. August 22, 1849, d. 

Woodsville, October 4, 1889. Was a grad- 
uate of Tilton Seminary, an accomplished mu- 
sician, greatly beloved by a large circle of 
friends for rare and loveable qualities of char- 
acter. Was unmarried. 

113. 11. Elvah Geneva, b. November 19, 1850, m. 

Providence, R. I., January 10, 1881, Ed- 
ward Foster, son of George W. and Susan 
Whitcher Mann, b. Benton, September 7, 
1845, d. Concord, August 19, 1892. She 
graduated at Tilton Seminary, and after her 
marriage resided in Concord, then for a time 
in Woodsville, returning to Concord, where, 
since the death of her husband in 1892, she 
still resides. Is a member of St. Paul's 



72 0HA8E WHITCHER AJSFD 

Episcopal church, and enjoys a wide acquain- 
tance in church and social circles. Her only 
daughter, Marian, died in 1896. 
114. III. Hannah, b. November 15, 1853, d. October 
15, 1854. 

(50). Mary Whitcher, dauj^hter of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. October 28, 1823, d. Lisbon, March 
31, 1895 : m. June 1, 1841, Jason, son of John Smith and 
Sally Boynton Titus of Lyman ; b. Lyman, September 25, 
1814, d. Lisbon, September 3, 1895. 

Immediately after her marriage, she went to reside with 
her husband on the farm in Lyman, about a mile and a half 
from the village of Lisbon, owned by his father, and which 
became her husband's on the death of his parents. Their 
seven children were born there, and received their education 
in the Lisbon schools. Mr. Titus was a successful farmer? 
and about 1880, disposed of his farm and took up his resi- 
dence in Lisbon village. His wife was a woman of great 
energy of character, and her devotion to her church, the 
Methodist Episcopal, was second only to her devotion to 
her family. The church in Lisbon never had more loyal, 
enthusiastic, self-sacrificing supporters than Jason and Mary 
Whitcher Titus. 

CHILDREN OF JASON AND MARY WHITCHER TITUS. 

(All born in Lyman.) 

1. Charles Harvey, b. October 25, 1842, d. West Som- 

erville, Mass., April 24, 1906: m. January 1, 
1865, Lizzie J. Brisson of Boston. 

Charles Harvey Titus, on reaching his majority, 
went to Boston, entering the employ of an express 




MRS. MARY (WHITCHER) TITL 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 73 

company, and running as messenger for some 
years between Boston & Albany. About 1869, he 
went West and was conductor on several railroads, 
residing a part of the time in Iowa, and in Colo- 
rado. He came East about 1894, and entered the 
employ of the Concord & Montreal railroad, and 
later of the Boston & Maine, becoming night super- 
intendent of the North Union station, until fail- 
ing health compelled his resignation a few months 
before his death. He was an efficient railroad 
man, of fine personal presence, deservedly popular 
with his associates, and his long railroad service 
both in the East and West gave him a large range 
of personal acquaintance. His children — (1) Mary 
Elizabeth, deceased; (2) Charles H., deceased; 
(3) Jay Sterling Morton, b. July 13, 1875 ; (4) 
Bessie, b. July 9, 1880. Jay Sterling Morton 
resides with his mother in North Deering, a suburb 
of Portland, Me. 

2. Holman Drew, b. August 31, 1845, m. November 

7, 1871, Mary A., daughter of John C. and Mary 
Simonds Atwood, b. LandafF, October 19, 1847. 
Is a prosperous farmer in Landaflf. They have 
three children : (1) Lizzie, b. LandafF, Novem- 
ber 14, 1877, m. October 25, 1898, George F. 
Clement of Landaff . He is a farmer ; represented 
Landaff in the legislature of 1907. Have one 
child, Edgar T., b. January 30, 1901. (2) Clara, 
b. LandafF, February 16, 1881 ; m. June 3, 1902, 
Gerald T. Clark. They have one child : Neal, b. 
May 18, 1903. (3) Harry, b. June 17, 1890. 



74 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

3. Herman Prescott, b. December 2, 1848, d. Lisbon, 

October 19, 1889. Was a machinist and inventor. 
Was unmarried. 

4. George Wendell, b. November 14, 1850, d. Low- 

ell, Mass., February 11, 1901 ; m. Ist, at 
Amesbury, Mass., March 13, 1877, Ida M., 
daughter of William and Rebecca Jones of Ames- 
bury ; d. March 9, 1881. They had one child, 
Cora F., b. January 12, 1879; m. 2nd, at 
Amesbury, December 28, 1882, Mattie J. Run- 
nels. They had three children : (1) Mary Ethel, 
b. March 13, 1884, m. November 22, 1905, 
Charles D. Kidder of Lowell ; (2) Oscar Bradford, 
b. February 8, 1886; (3) Jason Wendell, b. 
August 6, 1894. 

George W. Titus was in the nickel plating busi- 
ness for several years at Amesbury and later at 
Lowell. Was a man greatly respected and an 
active member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
His widow and children reside in Lowell, Mass. 

5. Theron Woolson, b. May 27, 1855, m. May 10, 

1877, Emma E., daughter of James Clough of 
Lyman. They have three children: (1) Grace 
May, b. June 15, 1878, m. July 5, 1903, Frank 
Rymes, and have one son ; (2) Florence E., b, 
March 7, 1885; (3) Ardelle, b. February 10, 
1891. Theron W. Titus resides in Ayer, Mass. 

6. Fred Milon, b. August 20, 1860, m. let, Eva A. 

Wheelock and they had two children : (1) Mabelle 
Frances, b. December 4, 1882 ; (2) Herman Eu- 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 75 

gene, b. February 23, 1885. He m. 2nd, Mary 
Rogers, and they have one daughter, Irene. He 
is now in the employ of one of the largest electrical 
plants in the world at Schenectady, N. Y., where 
he now resides. 

7. Bertha May, b. December 13, 1864, m. at Lowell, 

Mass., August 30, 1899, Gardner, son of Henry 
C. J. Wills, b. May 20, 1859, in Salem, Me. 
He is a clerk and bookkeeper and they reside in 
Lowell, Mass. 

(51). Susan Whitcher, daughter of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. May 20, 1825, d. Benton, October 6, 
1854; m. January, 1843, George W., son of Samuel and 
Mary Howe Mann, b. LandafF, February 19, 1821, d. Ben- 
ton, January 6, 1901. 

Mrs. Mann was a woman of most attractive personality, 
and her early death in her thirtieth year, leaving five young 
children, was a sad blow, not only to her own immediate 
family, but to a large circle of devoted friends. Her husband 
resided in Benton till his death, and was one of the leading 
citizens of the town. He filled at different times all the vari- 
ous town offices, was six times elected to the state legisla- 
ture, was a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1876, 
and served for several years as a member of the State Board 
of Agriculture. He was a Universalist in his religious 
belief, and an enthusiastic Democrat. For years the con- 
ventions of his party would hardly have recognized them- 
selves as such except for his presence. He combined the 
business of carpenter and builder with that of farmer, and he 
had large real estate interests in Woodsville. 



76 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

CHILDREN OF GEORGE W. AND SUSAN WHITCHER MANN. 

{All born in Benton.^ 

1. Ezra Bartlett, b. November 2, 1843, m. January 7, 

1868, Ellen Sarah, daughter of George W. and 
Sarah Glazier Bisbee of Haverhill, b. August 8, 
1844. 

Ezra B. Mann entered the employ of the Boston, 
Concord & Montreal Railroad in 1863, and re- 
mained with the road in the capacity of freight 
conductor until 1872, when he entered into part- 
nership with George S. Cummings in the drug 
business in Woods ville, under the firm name of 
E. B. Mann & Co., and has since continued in 
this business. Besides the regular business of a 
druggist, he is also a dealer in paints and oils, 
drain pipe, explosives, wall paper, newspapers, 
periodicals and stationery, his store being one of 
the largest and best appointed in the North Country. 
He has been an active promoter of every enter- 
prise which has led to the rapid growth and devel- 
opment of Woodsville. He has served the town 
of Haverhill for several years on the board of select- 
men, represented it for two years in the legislature, 
and is one of the recognized leaders of the Demo- 
cratic party in the state. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Woodsville Aqueduct and Electric 
Light Company and is its president. Has been a 
trustee of the Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank 
from its organization and for several years its pres- 
ident. He is president of the Woodsville Opera 
Building Association, and has been its manager 




EZRA B. MANN. 




GEORGE HENRY MANN. ORMAN L. MANN. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 77 

since the large and commodious opera block was 
erected. His residence is one of the finest in the 
village and he is a large owner of real estate. He 
is an Odd Fellow, Elk, a 33d degree Mason, raem- 
ber of the Raymond consistory, Scottish rite, and 
of New Hampshire's most famous military organi- 
zation, the Amoskeag Veterans. He has visited 
all sections of the country and enjoys a wide 
acquaintance with prominent men. Has five child- 
ren, all born in Woodsville : 

(1). George Edward, b. May 7, 1874. Resides in 
Woodsville, and is superintendent of the Aqueduct 
and Electric Light Co, Is a Knight Templar and 
member of other fraternal organizations. 

(2). Ira Whitcher, b. January 8, 1877, m. Janu- 
ary 8, I90I, Josephine, daughter of Frank E. and 
Nellie E. Kibbie Thayer, b. Manchester, July 5, 
1879. They have two children: 1, Margaret 
Burns, b. October 22, 1901 ; 2, Luvia Jeanette, 
b. April 30, 1905. Resides in Woodsville and is 
member of the firm of E. B. Mann & Co. 

(3). Harry Bingham, b. April 22, 1880; is in 
employ of Boston & Maine R. R. ; locomotive 
fireman. 

(4). Luvia Ellen, b. April 1, 1884; graduate of 
"V^'oodsville High School and Emerson School of 
Oratory, Boston ; is instructor in elocution, and 
has fine reputation as reader. 

(5). Henry Carbee, b. July 21, 1886; graduate of 
Woodsville High School, and Clark University, 
Worcester, Mass., class 1907. Will study law. 



78 OHASE WHITCHER AND 

2. Edward Foster, b. September 7, 1845, d. Concord, 

August 19, 1892; m. Providence, R. I., January 
10, 1881, Elvah G. (112), daughter of Chase and 
Sarah Royce Whitcher, b. November 19, 1850. 
They had one child, Marian, b. February 13, 1882, 
d. November 5, 1896. 

Edw^ard F. Mann was educated in the schools of 
his native town and at Tiiton Seminary. Entered 
the employ of the Boston, Concord & Montreal 
Railroad in 1865, in the passenger service; was 
baggage-master, conductor, train despatcher at Con- 
cord, assistant superintendent with office at Woode- 
ville, and after consolidation of the road with the 
Concord, under the name of Concord & Montreal, 
was general superintendent of the system with 
office at Concord, until his death, w^hich followed 
an illness of several months from pulmonary con- 
sumption. Of genial manners, thoughtful always 
for others, he was recognized as one of the most 
popular of railroad conductors and efficient of rail- 
road officials during his long term of railroad ser- 
vice. No one, however lowly his position, ever 
asked a reasonable favor of "Ed" Mann and was 
denied. A Democrat in his political affiliations, 
he stood high in the councils of his party, and was 
known as one who did things when he undertook 
them. He represented Benton in 1871 and 1872 
in the New Hampshire House, the North Country 
senatorial district twice in the State Senate, was 
the candidate of his party for Congress in 1888, 
and ran largely ahead of his ticket, being defeated 
only by a narrow plurality in a district strongly 
Republican. 




EDWARD F. MANN. 



HI8 DESCENDANTS. 79 

3. George Henry, b. February 19, 1848; m. January 

26, 1874, Elnora, daughter of David and Myra 
Clifford Gove, b, Wentworth, December 9, 1850. 
G. Henry Mann entered the employ of the Bos- 
ton, Concord & Montreal Railroad in 1869, and 
remained in its service as freight, cattle train and 
passenger train conductor for a period of thirty-two 
years, when he left in 1901 to become a partner 
with his son, Fred H., in the business of a general 
store in Woodsville, under the firm name of Mann 
& Mann. He is a Democrat of the radical variety, 
who never hesitates to express his opinion of cor- 
porate trusts and monopolies. He represented 
Haverhill in the legislature of 1885, being elected 
after a prolonged contest, while there was no elec- 
tion for the other representative to which the town 
was entitled. Of his seven children, all born in 
Woodsville, five are living : 

(1). Luna Ardelle, b. October 22, 1874; d. Octo- 
ber 22, 1875. 

(2). Fred Henry, b. July 6, 1876; m. .Tune 16, 
1900, Daisy Margaret, daughter of Frank and 
Laura Richardson Colby, b. Lunenburg, Vt., 
December 5, 1881. Is in business in Woodsville 
with his father, under the firm name of Mann & 
Mann. 

(3). Eda Frances, b. January 1, 1879 ; d. March 9, 
1907; m. September 4, 1901, Dr. Selwyn K., 
son of Kenson E. Dearborn of Bristol, b. Septem- 
ber 10, 1879. 



80 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

(4). Ada Myra, b. December 25, 1881. Is a teacher 
in the public schools of Concord. 

(5). Harley Elmer, b. October 21, 1883 ; m. Octo- 
ber 9, 1905, Martha Alvina, daughter of William 
and Sarah Smalley Hardy, b. Haverhill, December 
29, 1885. Train despatcher, Woodsville. 

(6). Scott Whitcher, b. December 9, 1885; is a 

student in Dartmouth College. 
(7). Ida, b. January 15, 1894. 

4. Osman Oleander, b. December 18, 1852; d. Octo- 

ber 20, 1870. 

5. Orman Leander, b. December 18, 1852; m. De- 

cember 24, 1873, Ella Josephine, daughter of 
Benjamin and Aurilla Bisbee Haywood, b. Novem- 
ber 30, 1852. Is a prosperous farmer in Benton 
and prominent citizen of the town. They have one 
child: Grace May, b. November 18, 1876; m. 
Ist, June 30, 1896, Charles P., son of Charles T. 
and Sarah Pike Collins. Two children ; Eva F., 
b. February 8, 1900, and Osman M., b. July 18, 
1902; m. 2d, July 17, 1904, Charles C, son of 
Alfred E. and Mary Clark Tyler. Reside in 
Benton. 

(52) . Daniel Whitcher, son of William and Mary Noyes 
Whitcher, b. January 20, 1827, d. March 2, 1894; m. 
October 20, 1850, Nancy Royce, daughter of Francis and 
Catherine Moore Knight, b. July 27, 1829. 

Daniel Whitcher was a marked personality, of fine physi- 
cal presence, and endowed with an aggressive activity, he 
made himself felt as a potential factor in whatever circle he 




DANIEL WHITOHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



moved. On reaching the estate of manhood he associated 
himself in business with his father, who then resided on the 
homestead farm in Benton. They were also owners of a 
saw-mill on the Wild Ammonoosuc in the town of Landaff, 
where they afterwards resided and where a hamlet grew up 
subsequently known as Whitcherville. The value of this 
saw-mill and other property depended upon the construction 
of a highway down the Wild Ammonoosuc valley, giving the 
products of this locality, and of others up the river in a sec- 
tion of the town known as "Bunga," access to markets. The 
opening up of the highway was the reasonable thing, and it 
now seems strange that the towns of Landaff and Bath ever 
opposed its construction. Daniel Whitcher became the chief 
party to the litigation caused by the petition for the road, and 
fought through a period of twelve years the controversy to a 
successful issue, the road being constructed in 1860. This 
was perhaps the most famous road case ever known in 
Northern New Hampshire, and there is little doubt that the 
towns involved on the one hand, and the petitioners on the 
other, expended money enough during the process of the con- 
troversy to have built the road two or three times over. The 
litigation became a dominant factor in the politics of several 
towns for years, and much bitterness of feeling was engen- 
dered. Daniel Whitcher was also engaged in the manufac- 
ture of potato starch at a mill which he owned in Whitcher- 
ville, and at several other mills which he owned wholly or in 
part in Bath and Haverhill. He was part owner in a tan- 
nery which was in successful operation for several years, and 
he also opened and conducted a general store. In his varioua 
activities he was always aggressive, resourceful, never a quit- 
ter and usually a winner. Upon the decadence of the potato 
starch industry and the abandonment of the tannery busi- 



82 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

nes8 he removed with his family from Whitcherville to Bath, 
purchasing a valuable farm property near " Rum Hill," and 
carried on an extensive lumber business until a short time 
before his death. He was an ardent and devoted advocate of 
the Unitarian faith, and was the prime mover in the organi- 
zation of the Unitarian Society in Bath, and the erection of 
its house of worship. In politics he was a Democrat. He 
represented Benton in the legislature of 1858 and 1859, his 
election each time being the result of a heated and bitter 
" Bunga Road " campaign, in which he won out by a single 
vote over the late George W. Mann. After his removal to 
Landaff and the termination of the road controversy, he rep- 
resented that town in the legislature, though he had spent 
the energy of years and much money in fighting the town, 
not only in road case, but also in its finally successful efforts 
to secure a division into two townships. His widow resides 
with her daughter in Salem, Mass. 

CHILDREN OF DANIEL AND NANCY R. KNIGHT WHITCHER. 

115. I. Kate Kiamesh, b. Benton, May 16, 1853; d. 

Landaflf, December 20, 1880. Was a gradu- 
ate of Tilden Seminary, West Lebanon, and 
a successful teacher. 

116. II. Moses Knight, b. Benton, November 28, 1855 ; 

d. Landaflf, April 9, 1862. 

117. III. Nellie Grace, b. Benton, October 22, 1857; 

m. September 3, 1888, John D. H., son of 
Stephen and Rebecca G. Gauss of Salem, 
Mass., b. January 4, 1861. Mr. Gauss is 
proprietor of the Saturday Evening Observer 
and an extensive job printing establishment in 




BURR ROYCE WHITCHER. LAMAR WHITCHEK 




GEORGE L. KIBBIE. SCOTT WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 83 

Salem. He is interested in political affairs, is 
one of the leading members of the Republican 
party in his section of the state, and has rep- 
resented his city in the Massachusetts House 
and his Essex district in the Massachusetts 
Senate. They have three children : (1) «Tohn 
Whitcher, b. April 1, -1890; (2) Katherine 
Ferncroft, b. February 25, 1892. (3) Grace 
Josephine, b. June 1, 1894. They reside in 
Salem, Mass. 

118. IV. Elizabeth Rowena, b. Benton, July 16, 1859; 

m. December 20, 1881, Charles E. George, 
son of Isaac K. George. She has two child- 
ren : (1) Lamar, b. September 15, 1882. 
(2) Scott, b. June 5, 1884. She resides 
with her mother and her two sons, who have 
taken the name of Whitcher, in Salem, Mass. 

118.* Lamar Whitcher is in the employ of the New 
England Telephone and Telegraph Co., hav- 
ing supervision of the offices in Northern New 
England. 

118.** Scott Whitcher is private secretary to the 
trustee of the estate of the late Matthew 
Stickney of Salem. 

119. V. Carrie Ardelle, b. Landaff, July 6, 1861. 

Artist, unmarried ; resides in Boston. 

120. VI. Josephine Lucy, b. Landaff, April 8, 1863 ; d. 

Salem, May 10, 1907. 

121. VII. Ira Dana, b. Landaff, October 4, 1865 ; d. 

Landaff, February 14, 1867. 



84 OHASE WHITOHER AND 

122. VIII. Mary Belle Bailey, b. Landaff, February 10, 

1869; m. in Bath, May 24, 1891, William 
v., son of George and Mary Hill Ashley, b. 
Milton, Vt., May 26, 1864. Reside in 
Woodsville. Mr. Ashley is train despatcher 
in the Woodsville railroad office, and his wife 
conducts a successful millinery business. They 
have one son, Daniel Whitcher, b. March 15, 
1894. 

123. IX. Dan Scott, b. Landaff, November 22, 1873 ; 

d. Bath, May 17, 1878. 

(53). David Whitcher, son of William and Mary 
Noyes Whitcher, b. June 17, 1828 ; m. February 23, 1853, 
Sally Ann, daughter of Amos and Huldah Bronson Noyes, 
b. Landaff, December 29, 1829. He engaged at first in 
farming in Benton, but just before his marriage purchased 
the Moses Noyes farm near North Haverhill Village, which 
he owned for nearly fifty years, and was recognized as one 
of the most successful farmers in Haverhill, the banner farm- 
ing town of the state. He never devoted himself exclusively 
to any single line of farming, always watching his opportu- 
nity and devoting his acres to that which offered the greatest 
profit. During the war of the rebellion, when wool was 
nearly dollar wool, he utilized nearly all his farm facilities 
in sheep raising, but when wool growing was less productive 
his farm became a dairy. He proved that farming, even 
in Northern New Hampshire, can be made to pay. A few 
years since he purchased a fine estate in North Haverhill 
village, where he has since resided, and a little later retiring 
from active farming, has devoted himself to looking after his 
investments. He forms his own opinions, is a man of 




DAVID WHITCHER. 




MRS. PHEBE M. (WHITCHER) BROOKS. 



HIS DESCENDANTS, 85 

decided convictions, political, temperance and religious , 
which he never hesitates to avow. He has never been 
candidate for public office, is a Democrat, a prohibitionist, 
a Methodist Episcopalian. He has been a trustee of the 
Woodsville Guaranty Savings Bank from its organization. 
Is the last survivor of the sixteen children of William 
Whitcher. 

CHILDREN or DAVID AND SALLY A. NOYES WHITCHER. 

{Born in North Haverhill,) 

124. I. Quincy Noyes, b, December 14, 1853 ; d. 

April 1, 1864. 

125. n. Hattie Blanche, b. March 28, 1860; m. Sim- 

eon Sanborn. She lived after her marriage for 
some years in Contoocook, but a few years since 
returned to North Haverhill and established 
herself in a pleasant home presented to her by 
her father. She has three children : (1) Roy 
E., b. October 29, 1894; (2) Carl R., b. 
February 19, 1896; (3) Marion L., b. 
November 22, 1898. 

(54). Phehe Marston Whitcher, daughter of William 
and Mary Noyes Whitcher, b. February 24, 1831 ; d. Bos- 
ton, June 4, 1870 ; m. in Woburn, Mass., Moseley N., son of 
Timothy and Eveline Grimes Brooks of Franconia. They re- 
sided in Woburn until 1869, when they removed to Boston. 
She was a woman of attractive personality, a favorite in her 
family and the social circles of which she was a member. She 
was a member of the First Congregational Church in 
Woburn. 



S6 CHASE WHITCHER AND 



CHAPTER V. 

DESCENDANTS OF JACOB AND SARAH RICH- 
ARDSON WHITCHER. 

(55). Dorcas Whitcher, daughter of Jacob and Sarah 
Richardson Whitcher, b. July 10, 1814 ; d. 1873 ; m. about 
1841, Joseph Chandler of Lisbon. For the most part of 
their married life they lived in the towns of Landaff and Lis- 
bon. They were hard-working, honest. God-fearing people, 
respected by their neighbors in the communities in which 
they lived, lacking only in the "faculty" of becoming fore- 
handed. They had five children : 

1. Joseph, Jr., b. Lisbon, December, 1843 ; d. White- 

field, March 26, 1906; m. March, 1881, Nancy 
Jane, daughter of Adams and Mary Morris Streeter 
of Lisbon, b. May 16, 1856. Joseph Chandler, 
Jr., enlisted August 13, 1862, in Company G, 
Eleventh New Hampshire Volunteers, and was 
honorably discharged July 6, 1865. He was 
severely wounded in the battle of Fredericksburg, 
December 13, 1862, and was transferred to the 
invalid corps September 17, 1863, rendering 
service there until his discharge. His widow 
resides in Lisbon. 

2. George, b. 1846, d. 1897 ; m. Ellen Blair of Haver- 

hill. They had two children : George, who \% 
deceased, and Lona, who is living. 





MRS. DORCAS WHITCHER CHANDLER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 87 

3. Ellen, b. 1848 ; in. Noble Donahoe of Littleton, 

where she resided until her death. 

4. Mary. 5. Martha. Neither of the latter married 

and both died in their young womanhood, Martha 
having fitted herself for teaching, and was engaged 
as a teacher at the time of her death. None of 
the family are now living. The family record had 
been carefully kept in the family bible belonging 
to Dorcas Chandler, and was in the possession of 
her daughter, Ellen, whose home in Littleton was 
destroyed by fire a short time before her death. It 
has been impossible to obtain anything like a satis- 
factory record of the family. 

(56). Levi Morrill Whitcher, son of Jacob and Sarah 
Richardson Whitcher, b. Warren, October 29, 1815 ; d. 
Manchester, March 3, 1883; m. Bradford, Vt., Mrs. Eliza 
(Simonds) Niles, daughter of Elizur and Susan Jenkins 
Simonds, b. Bradford, Vt., January 14, 1815 ; d. Manches- 
ter. March 18, 1907. 

Levi M. Whitcher suffered from an attack of scarlet fever 
when about eighteen months old, from the results of which 
he became a deaf mute. When about eighteen years of age 
he attended school at the A-inerican Asylum for the Educa- 
tion and Instruction of Deaf and Dumb at Hartford, Conn., 
where he obtained a good common school education, and 
learned his trade of cabinet maker, which he followed during 
life. He was a good workman, an intelligent citizen, who 
kept himself well informed of the events of the day, and was 
devoted to his family. Availing himself of the best oppor- 
tunities offered for work at his trade, he lived in Bradford, 
Vershire and Chelsea, Vt., in Warren, Orford, Lyme and 



88 CHASE WHIT CHER AND 

Tilton, N. H., and Quincy, Mass., finally locating in Man- 
chester, where he died. His widow, a woman of great force 
of character, survived him by nearly twenty - five years, 
retaining her mental faculties to a remarkable degree until 
just before her death in her 93d year. She was survived by 
two daughters, four grand-children, four great-grand-child- 
ren, and a half brother, State Senator Elizur Southworth of 
Illinois, ten years younger than herself. She was the grand- 
daughter of Indian and Revolutionary War soldiers ; her 
father fell in the war of 1812, and she gave two sons by 
her former husband to the war for the union. 



CHILDREN OF LEVI MORRILL AND ELIZA SIMONDS 
WHITCHER. 

12Ik I. Emma Jane, b. Vershire, Vt., December 16, 
1849. 

She m. 1st, Howard Kibbie. They had one 
child, George Levi Kibbie, b. Tilton, October 
16, 1866 ; m. 1st, Emily J. Elkins of Man- 
sonville, P. Q., who died in 1904. He m. 
2d, Olive M. Porter, of Manchester, N. H. 
They have no children. Reside in Manches- 
ter. He '8 and has been for some years city 
editor of the Manchester Union. 

Emma Jane, m. 2d, A. W. Hayford. 
Reside in Manchester. They have two child- 
ren : 
(1) Albert H. b. July 4, 1870. He has been 
twice married ; 1st to Hattie Wingate of Man- 
chester. Two children : George Harold, b. 




LEVI M. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 89 

Manchester, March 10, 1892 ; 2 Warren 
Clinton, b. Manchester, October 2, 1893 : 
m. 2(1, Minnie O. Cummings of Roxbury, 
Mass. Two children : 1, Mildred Cora, b. 
Boston, September, 1903 ; 2, Nellie Louise, 
b. Boston, September, 1905. They reside in 
South Lyndeboro. 

(2) Nellie Mabel, b. Quincy, Mass., March 13, 
1873 ; m. John Wesley Smith of Manches- 
ter. They have no children. 

127. II. Sarah Ellen, b. Chelsea, Vt., January 12, 

1851 ; m. Clarence Leslie, eldest son of Gil- 
bert and Abigail Robinson Jeffers of Orford. 
They lived in Orford till about 1877, when 
they removed to Manchester, residing there 
until 1905, when they removed to New Bos- 
ton, where they now reside. They have one 
child, Emma Frances, b. Manchester, October 
19, 1879. Is unmarried and resides with her 
parents. 

(57.) Hazen Whitcher, son of Jacob and Sarah Richardson 
Whitcher, b. Warren, May 21, 1817 ; d. Stoneham, Mass., 
May 14, 1891 ; ra. Benton, February 12, 1838, Sally, 
daughter of Kimball and Sally Streeter Tyler, b. Benton, 
May 27, 1810; d. Stoneham, Mass., October 20, 1899. 

Hazen Whitcher received his education in the schools of 
his native town, and went to Benton with his father, where 
he learned the carpenter's trade and engaged in farming, 
his farm being near that of his father, until 1846, when he 
went to Stoneham, Mass., where he engaged in business as 



90 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

a carpenter and builder, following this for a number of 
years, becoming one of the principal builders of the town. 
In connection with this he carried on the undertaking busi- 
ness, and later the manufacture of picture frames until 1871, 
when he engaged in the hardware business, having pre- 
viously sold the frame manufacturing business to his son-in- 
law. He continued this business till about 1886, when he 
retired to look after his real estate holdings in Woburn as 
well as in Stoneham. In his early business years in Stone- 
ham he served as deputy sheriff for four years, and was on 
the police force of the town for sixteen years, and for more 
than half of this time was chief. He was successful in his 
business ventures and accumulated a handsome property. 
Quiet and reserved in his bearing, unostentatious in manner 
of life, he had the uniform respect of his fellow townsmen, 
and was always faithful to trusts committed to his hands. In 
religious belief he was a Universalist, and was sexton of the 
Universalist Church until the property was sold in 1869, 
after which he worshiped at the Unitarian Church until his 
death. 



CHILDREN OF HAZEN AND SALLY TYLER WHITCHER. 

128. I. Hannah H., b. 1839 ; d. 1847. 

129. II. Betsey Tyler, b. 1841 ; d. in infancy. 

130. III. Sarah Richardson. 

(130.) Sarah Richardson Whitcher, daughter of Hazen 
and Sally Tyler Whitcher, m. July 1, 1862, Oliver Hutch- 
ins, son of Caleb Morse and Betsey Hubbard Marston, b. 
Sandwich, December 17, 1837. 




HAZEN WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 91 

The early education of Col. Oliver H. Marston was 
obtained in the schools of his native town and later in the 
high school of Stoneham, to which town he first came in 
1855. Returning to Sandwich on reaching his majority, he 
engaged in the manufacture of pails, continuing in this busi- 
ness until 1862, when he raised the larger part of a com- 
pany of volunteers in Sandwich, was commissioned captain, 
and his company went to the front as a part of the Four- 
teenth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. In the memo- 
rable battle of Cedar Creek, Capt. Ripley, the officer in 
command of the regiment, was taken prisoner, and the com- 
mand fell upon Captain Marston. He was wounded early 
in the morning in the left arm, but retained command durino- 
the battle, and his wound was not dressed until twelve hours 
after he was shot. A few months later he was commissioned 
lieutenant-colonel and was placed in command of the regi- 
ment. His regiment was in Augusta, Ga., at the time of 
the capture of eTefferson Davis, and it was detailed to escort 
him, with Alexander H. Stevens and several of Davis' cabi- 
net officers, who had also been captured, from the railroad 
station to the steamboat by which they were taken to Savan- 
nah. After being mustered out in July, 1865, he engaged 
in trade in Sandwich in a general store until 1869, when he 
went to Stoneham, and shortly afterward went into business 
with his father-in-law, Hazen Whitcher. He is still in busi- 
ness in that town, making a specialty of manufacturing- 
machines for measuring medicinal powders, and machine- 
folded powder papers for laboratories, druggists, etc. He 
has been a member of the Stoneham school committee and 
chief of police for two years. He is a prominent member of 
the Congregational Church, a charter member and first 
Worshipful Master of King Cyrus lodge F. & A. M., a 



92 OHASE WHITCHER AND 

member of J. P. Gould Post 75, G. A. R., and of various 
fraternal and benevolent organizations. Mr. and Mrs. Mars- 
ton have one child : 

Mary Williamine, b. April 17, 1863 ; m. Stoneham, 
October 18, 1888, Arthur Libbey, son of Emery 
and Hannah Lincoln Souther, b. Stoneham, July 11, 
1865. The reside in Stoneham. Have two children : 
(1) Oliver Marston, b. August 22, 1889; (2) 
Harriet Whitcher, b. February 3, 1893. 

(59.) Alonzo Addison Whitcher, h.W&xvew ^5 \xnQ^,\^2\ ; 
d. Stoneham, Mass., January 16, 1854; m. July 20, 1848, 
Jerusha, daughter of Joseph and Mehitable Towns of Lis- 
bon, b. April 25, 1825; d. Philadelphia, Pa., December 
19, 1901. 

Alonzo A. Whitcher went from Benton to Stoneham 
when a young man, where he was employed in the shoe busi- 
ness at the time of his early death, giving promise of a suc- 
cessful career. His widow, a woman of sterling qualities of 
character and highly esteemed by all who knew her, survived 
hitn for nearly fifty years. 



CHILDREN OF ALONZO A. AND JERUSHA TOWNS WHITCHER. 

131. L Elvah J., b. 1849 ; d. October ( ?) 1851. 

132. n Ella Frances, b. October 7, 1852; m. June 

28. 1877, William Solomon of Baltimore, 
Md They have one child, Sarah S., b. 
Baltimore, Md., December 27, 1882. They 
resids in Philadelphia, Pa. 




ALONZO A. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 93 

(61). Jacob Whitcher, Jr.^ b. Groton, Vt., June 8, 
1827; d, Woburn, Mass., J.anuary 17, 1878; m. Ist, 
Stoneham, Mass., April 24, 1851, Sophronia G., daughter 
of Jeremiah and Mary Jaques, b, Sanbornton, May 27, 1827 ; 
d. Woburn, Mass., August 31, 1863; m. 2d, Woburn, 
Mass., April 24, 1864, Celenda Thompson, daughter of 
Warren and Eliza R. Fox, b, Woburn, Mass., July 27, 
1840. 

Jacob Whitcher, Jr., went from Benton to Stoneham 
about 1849, having previously learned the trade of carpenter, 
but a year or so later established himself as a carpenter and 
builder in Woburn, where he remained in business until 
shortly before his death, when failing health forced him to 
retire. He did a successful business in building by contract, 
and about 1860 established a lumber yard in Woburn, 
becoming a large distributor of lumber, while at the same 
time he was actively engaged in building by contract. He 
was a man of great energy, of thorough-going integrity in 
business matters, and had gained a solid business success when 
stricken with the dread disease cancer. On beginning busi- 
ness for himself he inserted an initial in his name, and was 
always known as Jacob C Whitcher. By his first marriage 
he had one child : 

133. Helen Sophronia, b. Woburn July 27, 1852; d. 
January 17, 1863. 



CHILDREN OF JACOB C. AND CELENDA T. FOX AVHITCHER. 

(All born in Woburn, Mass.) 
134. I. Arthur Warren, b. October 3, 1865. 



94 CHASE WHIT CHER AND 

135. II. Jacob Franklin, b. March 31, 1869, d. Decem- 

ber 7, 1875. 

136. III. Jeannie Eliza, b. December 13, 1870, d. May 



137. IV. Mary Celenda, b. October 29, 1874; d. West 

Newton, Mass., April 20, 1902: m. April 
5, 1898, Henry A. T. Dow. One child, 
Henry Kenneth, b. February 18, 1901. 

138. V. Carrie Louise, b. June 28, 1877; d. March 

10, 1900. 

(134). Arthur Warren Whitcher, b. October 3, 1865 : 
m. June 17, 1896, Edith May, daughter of George E. 
and Arvilla Nickerson of East Madison, N. H., b. Novem- 
ber 8, 1874. They reside in Woburn, Mass. ; have no 
children. 

Arthur War)en Whitcher served his apprenticeship in the 
drug business during his high school vacations and high 
school course. Graduating from the Woburn high school 
in 1883, he took a four-year course in the Massachusetts 
College of Pharmacy, graduating in 1887. He entered busi- 
ness for himself in 1891, purchasing a drug store in W^oburn, 
where he enjoyed a liberal patronage until he sold his busi- 
ness in February, 1898. In 1889 he became secretary,, and 
in the following year treasurer of the Woburn Cooperative 
Bank, holding these positions until 1898, when he resigned. 
It was early in this year that he was attacked by the Klon- 
dike fever, and disposing of his business, he headed an expe- 
dition comprised of nine men and penetrated the wilds of 
Alaska. They wintered in latitude 66'^ ^° north, on the 
Hogatsakakat river, a branch of the Koyukuk river, a north- 




JACOB C. WHITCHER. 




ARTHUR M. WHITCHER. 





JAMES H. WILLOUGHBY. WILLIAM FRANCIS FULLAM. 



BIS DESCENDANTS. 95 

ern tributary of the Yukon. They secured vastly more expe- 
rience than gold, and the expedition from a financial stand- 
point \A'as a failure. He returned to Wohurn in the summer 
of 1899, and, on regaining his health, somewhat Ijroken by 
the hardships of the previous winter, re-purchased his former 
business early in 1900, and has conducted it successfully 
since. He has never held public office, but has been actively 
interested in many movements for the public good. In 
1893 he became interested in the much discussed renewal of 
the lease of the post office building, and was active in secur- 
ing the removal of the office to its present leased location. 
In 1900 he first suggested securing a Congressional appro- 
priation for the erection of a Federal building in Woburn. 
In 1901, a Mr. L. M. Harris had Woburn entered upon the 
calendar, and in 1906 an ai)pro{)riation of $12,000 for the 
purchase of a site was secured. The appropriation for the 
building, $63,000, will doubtless be made the coming winter. 
As in all such cases there was at once more or less of dis- 
agreement as to a site. A number of sites were offered, but 
all were declared unavailable except one in the rear of the 
main business street of the cily, and inconvenient of ap- 
proach, and this met with the decided disaj)proval of a major- 
ity of the citizens. The day the deal was to be closed by the 
government for this site, a delay was granted in resj)onse to 
the following telegram: "15,000 residents Woburn and 
Burlington insist on further consideration post office. Await 
advice." After four months of persistent but quiet work a 
proposal, offering for the sum of $10,000 a lot near the 
public library building, conveniently accessible from ail 
points, was made the Treasury department and was accepted 
by the department August 6, 1907. The Woburn Jour- 
nal of August 9 says of the contest relative to the site : 



96 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

"It must be conceded that the favorable termination was 
due to the activity of Mr. A. W. Whitcher and Mr. Charles 
F. Remington. They worked hard but not in the interest 
of any one of the several bidders." The Daily Times said : 
"It appears that one of the most interesting wire-pulling 
matches of the town has come to a head." The Woburn 
City Council, after a flash-light photograph had been taken 
of the assembled citizens in the council chamber, approved 
at 10.05 p. m. of the construction of a new street made nec- 
essary by the selection of this lot of land, and in a few 
days was read from the sign post the name adopted at his 
suggestion, ''Federal Street,'" done in gold, overlaying 
a bright red post card, green stamped, and cancelled, Sep- 
tember 26, 1907, the date of birth of a new era in the city's 
history. Mr. Whitcher is interested in the collection of 
historical relics, and among articles of the Colonial and Rev- 
olutionary period has the bayonet belonging to the flint lock 
musket which was carried by Chase Whitcher at the battle 
of Bennington in August, 1777. 

(62). Sarah Jane Whitcher, b. Coventry, August 10, 
1830; d. Windsor Locks, Conn., April 19, 1864; m. 
Middletown, Conn., June 21, 1860, the Rev. Andrew Kerr 
Crawford, b. Economy, Nova Scotia, April 22, 1830; d. 
Oakland, Calif., October 11, 1897. 

Sarah Jane Whitcher was not quite four years of age at 
the death of her mother and but ten years old when her 
father died. She lived in the families of her father's rela- 
tives until she was fourteen or fifteen, when she secured 
employment in the mills at Lowell, Mass., where she saved 
from her earnings a sufficient sum to give her a few terms in 
Wesleyan Academy at W^ilbraham, Maes. While there she 
met Andrew K. Crawford, who was preparing for college, 




MRS. SARAH J. WHITCHER CRAWFORD. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 97 

and an attachment was formed, resulting in their marriage 
on the day of his graduation from Wesleyan. Of devoted 
and self-sacrificing piety, they had each consecrated them- 
selves to the service of foreign missions, and it was a griev- 
ous disappointment to them that when they had fitted them- 
selves for this work, they had passed the age limit at which 
the Methodist Episcopal Church accepted missionaries for 
the foreign field. They entered the home work, Mr. Craw- 
ford joining the New York East Conference, and filled 
important pastorates in that conference until 1869, when he 
was transferred to the California Conference. His wife was 
his devoted and helpful co-worker until her early death. He 
filled appointments in the California Conference until 1884, 
and was subsequently professor in the University of the 
Pacific. Was principal of an academy in Olympia, Wash., 
in 1894-95, and returning to California became a Congre- 
gational clergyman until his death. His grandfather settled 
in Nova Scotia during the latter part of the eighteenth cen- 
tury, and by so doing was unable to present hie claim to the 
Earldom of Crawford and Lindsay, to which he believed 
himself the rightful heir on the extinction of the titular line 
in 1809. They had two children : 

(1) Sarah Adalette, b. Windsor, Conn., June 28, 
1861; m. June 20, 1894, Benjamin Fred Hall, 
I druggist and real estate broker in Palo Alto, Cal., 

where they now reside. She graduated from the 
University of the Pacific, San Jose, Cal., in the 
class of 1884, and until her marriage was engaged 
in teaching in Olympia, Wash., and in Cali- 
fornia. Children: 1, Lucy Alice, b. November 
7, 1895 ; 2, Myron Crawford, b. May 8, 1897. 



98 CHASE WHITOHER AND 

(2) John Wesley, b. Windsor Locks, Conn., April 
19, 1863 ; m. about 1890, Mrs. Belle Athern. 
Is a house painter and decorator at Clements, 
San Joaquin Co., Cal. One child, Ilene, b. 
September 1, 1900. 




WILLIAM W. WILLOUGHBY. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 99 



CHAPTER VI. 

DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH DAVIS AND 
MIRIAM WHITCHEK WILLOUGHBY. 

SEE PAGES 23-24. 

35. (1). William Whitcher Willoughby, Boxio^ 5 os,e^\\ 
Davis and Miriam Whitcher Willoughby, b. February 26, 
1816 ; d. Somerville, Mass., August 10, 1877 ; m. Septem- 
ber 21, 1845, Harriet M. True, of Holderness, b. April 10, 
1823. 

Mr. Willoughby established himself in business in Somer- 
ville, Mass., as carpenter and builder, v^^as successful in his 
business and a highly respected citizen. His widow still 
resides in that city, making her home with her son, George 
T. Willoughby. 
Children : 

(1). George T., b. Somerville, Mass., June 28, 
1846; m. September 11, 1878, Ann Maria 
Field, daughter of Moses and Malinda 
Sprague of Boston, who died December 7, 
1903. Two children: 1, Mabel S., b. 
September 4, 1879, d. April 1, 1892; 2, 
Bertha T., b. March 26, 1888. Mr. Wil- 
loughby succeeded to the business of his 
father which he conducts successfully. 
(2). Harriet M., b. Somerville, January 23, 1856. 
Resides with her mother and brother in the 
family residence on Central street. 



100 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

35. (2). Fatima Willoiighby, daughter of Joseph 
Davis and Miriam Whitcher Willoughby, b. October 19, 
1818; d. Chelmsford, Mass., September 23, 1867; m. 
Samuel Putney, b. (Woodstock, N. H., 1817) ? d. Chelms- 
ford, Mass. 

Children : 

(1). Mary Ella, b. Chelmsford, Mass., 1852 ( ?) ; 
m. Luther C. Upham, and resides at Old 
Orchard, Me. They have tvk^o children : 1, 
George W., who is married and resides in 
Biddeford, Me., and 2, Ruby M., who lives 
with her parents in Old Orchard, where they 
are proprietors of the Sea Side House, a 
well-known summer hotel. 
(2). Josephine, b. Chelmsford and died at the age 
of eighteen months. 

35. (3). Samuel W. Willoughby, son of Joseph Davis 
and Miriam Whitcher Willoughby, b. May 6, 1822 ; d. 
April 20, 1860 ; m. 1848, Elizabeth Ann Merrill, b. 1828, 
d. April 22, 1852. 

Mr. Willoughby was associated with his brother William 
W. as carpenter and builder and resided in Boston, where 
his two sons were born. 

Children : 

(1). James Henry, b. Boston, October 27, 1848 ; 
m. June 30, 1874, Jennie Lind Howard of 
Chelmsford, Mass. He fitted for college at 
New Ipswich, N. H., and graduated at Dart- 
mouth College in the class of 1873. En- 




SAMUEL W. WILLOUGHBY. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 101 

gaged in teaching. Was principal of the 
high school in Middleborough, Mass., for 
thirteen years, and subsequently principal of 
the high school in Dover, N. H., lor one 
year, and of the high school in Nashua for 
two years. Is at present with the New 
England Telephone and Telegraph Co. with 
headquarters in Boston. His ff.miiy reside 
in Nashua. He has been actively interested 
in public affairs in the city of his residence ; 
is a Republican in" politics, and in some 
campaigns has taken an active part. Is a 
member of the Masonic and other frater- 
nities. Children: 1, Maude Howard, b. 
June 10, 1875 ; 2, Ruth Marion, b. Sep- 
teinbr21, 1876; 3, Blanche Sullivan, b. 
June 11, 1878 ; 4, Edith Hapgood, b. Jan- 
uary 23, 1882 ; 5, Alice Merrill, b. October 
23, 1886; 6, Walter Irving, b. December 
27, 1888, d. January 8, 1889 ; 7, Florence 
Ladd, b. December 15 1891. 

(2). Charles William, b. Boston, April, 1850; d. 
Minneapolis, Minn., 1893; m. in Minne- 
apolis and left at his death two children : 
Charles W., Jr., and Blanche M. He went 
west when a young man and at the time of 
his death vv-as foreman of construction for 
the Western Union Telegraph Co. at Min- 
neapolis, 



102 CHASE WHITCHER AND 



CHAPTER VII. 

DESCENDANTS OF ELISHA AND MARTHA 
WHITCHER FUL.LAM. 



(fi3). Francis Fallam, son of Elisha and Martha 
Whitcher FuUam, b. Warren, August 5, 1821 ; d. in Sara- 
toga, Cal., Januany 26, 1889; m. April 27, 1847, Harriet 
N. Darling of Kutland, Mass. 

(64). William Ftillam, b. Warren, February 14, 1823 ; 
d. North Brookfield, Mass., December 20, 1893 ; m. Rut- 
land, Mass., November 23, 1848, Ann Maria Bryant of 
Lunenburg, Vt. 

William FuUam went to Worcester, Mass., in 1845, and 
learned the carpenter's trade of Capt. Lamb, a well-known 
builder of that city. In 1848 he established himself in North 
Brookfield, and was a resident of that town for nearly halt 
a century. He was a man of great decision of character, of 
untiring energy and industry, and his business was a large 
and lucrative one. Most of the buildings erected in North 
Brookfield for a period of forty years were built by him or 
under his supervision. He did much by his public spirited 
activity to promote the prosperity of his town, and his integ- 
rity was never questioned. He was a member of the First 
Congregational Church, and for many years previous to his 
death he never failed to be found in his accustomed place in 
church and Sunday school. 




FRANCIS FULLAM. 




WILLIAM FULLAM. 



HW DESCENDANTS. 103 

Children : 
All born in North Broolc field ^ Mass. 

I. Grace Ella, b. February 19, 1852; m. March 13, 

1873, James M. Doane of North Brookfield. They 
lived in Brockton for some years, where Mr. Doane 
was employed as a cutter in a shoe factory. At the 
present time they reside in North Brookfield. They 
have one daughter, Florence, b. November 10, 
1873; m. October 7, 1897, Frank W. Clark of 
Brockton. 

II. Lizzie Maria, b. February 28, 1854; d. April 18, 

1854. 

III. William Francis, b. October 1, 1855; m. December 

31, 1878, Anna Maria Kingsbury. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of North Brookfield and 
at the Leicester Academy. In 1879 he became a 
partner with his father as contractor and builder, 
under the firm name of William FuUam & Co. Since 
the death of his father he has carried on the busi- 
ness, his two sons, William Harrison and Frederick 
Arthur, being associated in business with him. He 
is one of the leading citizens of his town, has served 
as selectman and water commissioner, is president 
of the Board of Trade, and a trustee of the Nortel 
Brookfield Savings Bank. Is a member of the First 
Congregational Church. He has three children : 
(1) William Harrison, b. August 15, 1880; m. 
November, 1902, Nellie Goodwin of Rutland, Mass. 
They have two children : Ruth Anna, b. October 



104 CHASE WHIT CHER AND 

19, 1903, and Grace, b. April 19, 1907. (2) 
Frederick Arthur, b. May 23, 1883 ; m. March 22, 
1904, Edna A. Boyd of Oakham, Maes. They 
have two children ; William Francis, b. October 
14, 1904, and Kenneth Bullard, b. November 15, 
189(5. (3) Charles Francis, b. February 25, 1885. 

IV. Frederick Lincoln, b, April 7, 1859 ; m. 1st, May 21, 
1884, Alice Maria Bryant; d. February 14, 1888 ; 
m. 2d, June 1893, Etta R. Rice of Barre, Mass. 
After leaving school he was associated with his 
father in the lumber business and in building, and 
later was engaged in business for himself in Barre 
and North Brookfield. Mass, He is at present 
Superintendent of the Worcester County Gas Works 
at Leominster, Mass. Resides at Clinton, Mass. 

{^^). Lemuel Fullam, son of Elisha and Martha 
Whitcher Fullam, b. Holderness, May 23, 1830; d. West 
Brookfield, Mass., December 23, 1893; m. 1st, September 
22, 1853, Lucy T. Johnson of North Brookfield ; d. March 
9, 1857 ; m. 2d, Susan F., daughter of William and Martha 
A. Marsh Adams of West Brookfield. 

Lemuel Fullam, after spending his boyhood in New Hamp- 
shire and Vermont, obtained employment in a boot and shoe 
factory in Rutland, Mass., and about 1854 engaged in man- 
ufacturing boots and shoes at North Brookfield for the Batch- 
elder Company. After a year or two he became inspector 
of goods for a large boot and shoe jobbing house in New 
York, but in 1858 went to West Brookfield and built a fac- 
tory of his own, and until 1882, when his establishment was 
burned, he conducted a large and successful business, the 




LEMUEL FULLAM. 



HIS DESCEJSIDANT8. 105 

largest of any manufactory in town. At the outbreak of the 
war of the rebellion he sustained heavy losses from the failure 
of his principal customers who had a large Southern trade, 
but his creditors granted him an extension, and with return- 
ing prosperity he paid them every dollar due them with 
interest. When his factory burned in 1882 he retired from 
business, but by no means from the activities of life. He 
had a wide acquaintance among shoe and leather men, and 
ranked as an exceptionally able business man. There were 
few manufacturers of his day who had as complete a knowl- 
edge of all departments of the work as he. During his 
business life Mr. Fullam took an active part in town affairs. 
He was progressive and instituted village improvements 
which have made West Brookfield one of the most charming 
spots in Worcester County. He insisted upon good roads, 
good sidewalks and a good fire department. He led the 
town into building a system of concrete walks, by building 
the first one from the railway station to the town hall at his 
own expense. If once interested in a project, he was a man 
of great energy, and few men would or could adhere to a 
course of action so persistently as he if he thought he was in the 
right. Possessed of great executive ability, his services were 
ever at the call of the poor and struggling, and he was the 
confidential adviser and helper of scores of young men who 
were striving to make their way against odds. It will be 
noted that his elder brother, W^illiam, died in North Brook- 
field on Wednesday, December 20, 1893. His funeral was 
on Saturday, and his brother Lemuel was not feeling in his 
usual health, and decided that he would not accompany his 
family to the funeral. When they returned they found him 
in bed, unconscious. He never rallied, but died at eleven 
o'clock, at the same hour his brother had passed away in 



106 CHASE WHITOHEll AND 

North Brookfield three days before. The two brothers were 
men of large stature and of great physical strength, a char- 
acteristic of both families of FuUam and Whitcher. Jacob 
Fulham, the first son of Col. Francis Fulham, founder of 
the family in America, is noted in history for his daring and 
prowess as an Indian fighter, and was known as the strong- 
est man in New England, unless that claim were disputed by 
Thomas Whittier, 1622-1696. 

Children : 

All born in West Brookfield, Mass. 

I. Martha, b. January 4, 1860 ; m. September 14, 1886, 

Frank Warren, son of Warren Augustus and Mary 
F. Burgess Blair, b. West Brookfield, December 
15, 1857. Martha received her education at the 
Worcester Oread Institute, Wellesley College and 
the Boston Art Museum. Mr. Blair prepared for 
college at Williston Seminary and graduated at 
Amherst College, class of 1880. He entered the 
newspaper profession, was editor and part owner 
for twelve years of the Worcester Telegram, was 
later managing editor of the Boston Transcript, and 
is now night editor of the Boston Post. They have 
one child: Margaret Amidon, b. Worcester, Mass., 
July 23, 1887. Student in Smith College. 

II. Charles Adams, b. November 29, 1864; d. October 

17, 1865. 

III. Mary Lucy, b. September 28, 1866; d. February 

28, 1867. 

IV. Frank Lemuel, b. January 6, 1870; m. September 

12, 1906, Mabel Annie, youngest daughter of Oliver 




MRS. HARRIET (FULLAM) FAIRBANKS. 



HIS DESCENBAI^TS. 107 

Eaton and Harriet N. Porter French of Newport, 
R. I. He was educated at Worcester Academy and 
Harvard College, Lawrence Scientific. After grad- 
uation he held positions as chemist, first with E. R. 
Squibb & Sons, Brooklyn, N. Y., then at the United 
States Torpedo Station, Newport, R. I., then with 
the International Smokeless Powder Works, Parlm, 
N. J., where he is now superintendent. Is a mem- 
ber of American Chemical Society ; is a Congre- 
gationalist. 

(68). Harriet Fullam, daughter of Elisha and Martha 
Whitcher Fullam, b. Granby, Vt., August 23, 1836; m. 
October 5, 1856, Isaac, son of Ebenezer and Margaret Glea- 
son Fairbanks, b. Brimfield, Mass., April 14, 1833; d. 
North Brookfieid, Mass., April 19, 1906. 

Harriet Fullam left Benton with her mother when about 
fourteen years of age, and after attending school in North 
Brookfieid for a time, worked in a tailor's shop in North and 
West Brookfieid and Woburn, Mass., until her marriage. 
They lived on a farm for a ievf years, when Mr. Fairbanks 
became book-keeper and foreman in a lumber yard until a 
few years before his death. 

THEIR CHIDLREN : 

I. D wight Edward, b. Burlington, Mass., July 7, 1858 ; 

d. North Brookfieid, Mass., January 10, 1868. 

II. Fannie Rosa, b. North Brookfieid, Mass., October 22, 

1876. After completing her public school course 
she spent two years at the Missionary Training 
Institute, South Nyack, N. Y., but on account of 



108 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

her mother's age and health, has never left home to 
enter the missionary work. They are members of 
the Congregational Church and reside in North 
Brookfield, Mass. 




DAVID M. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 109 



CHAPTER VIII. 

DESCENDANTS OF DAVID AND PHEBE P. 
SMITH WHITCHER. 

Phebe P. Smith, wife of David Whitcher, b. March 7, 
1799, was daughter of Joseph and Betsey Marston Smith of 
New Hampton. After the death of her husband in Coventry, 
April 3, 1835, she returned to New Hampton with her 
children, and died there July 20, 1880. 

(69). Joseph Smith Whitcher, son of David and Phebe 
P. Smith Whitcher, b. Warren, August 25, 1828. He 
learned the carpenter's trade, but has in later years devoted 
himself chiefly to farming. Resides in New Hampton, where 
he has been a useful and respected citizen. Has served on 
the school board and is a member of the Free Baptist Church. 
Is unmarried. 

(70). David Marston Whitcher, son of David and 
Phebe P. Smith Whitcher, b. Coventry, June 30, 1831 ; m. 
October 13, 1862, Julia A., daughter of Jonathan Perkins 
and Catherine Neal Norris, b. Meredith, May 7, 1843. 

David M. Whitcher learned the carpenter's trade and also 
engaged in farming in Center Harbor and Meredith, and has 
taken an active interest in town affairs, holding various offi- 
cial positions. Is a member of the Meredith Congregational 
Church. Has a daughter : 

(139). Ellen Ardelle Whitcher, daughter of David 



no CHASE WHITCHER AND 

M. and Julia A. Norrie Whitcher, b. Center 
Harbor, September 13, 1863; m. January 
1, 1884, Frank A., son of James and Eliza- 
beth Davis Bartlett, b. January 20, 1853. 
They reside in Meredith and have one son : 
Perkins Norris Bartlett, b, March 21, 1885. 

(71.) Daniel Batchelder Whitcher, son of David and 
Phebe P. Smith AVhitcher, b. Coventry, July 6. 1833 ; d. 
New Hampton, 1902 ; m. September 9, 1875, Elmina Josie, 
daughter of William and Eliza Smith Brown of Meredith, b. 
February 22, 1853. 

Daniel B. Whitcher was a successful farmer in New 
Hampton, quiet and reserved, devoted to his family and his 
church. Free Baptist, taking an active interest in town affairs, 
but declining any official position. 

CHILDREN OF DANIEL B. AND ELMINA BROWN WHITCHER 

(All born in JVeiv Hamjiton.) 

140. I. Phebe M., b. November 14, 1876; m. Octo- 

ber 20, 1906, Harry E., son of Enoch and 
Mary Foss Flanders of New Hampton. 
Reside in New Hampton. 

141. n. Eliza M., b. May 25, 1878 ; m. December 25, 

1900, Joseph S., son of William and Abbie 
Knight Gordon, b. September 19, 1877. 
They reside in Westbrook, Me., and have 
two children : (1) Dorothy M., b. October 
23, 1901; (2) Adelaide S., b. November 
12, 1903. 




DANIEL B. WHITCHER. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. Ill 

142. IIL Mina J., b. December 8, 1880; m. December 

8, 1904, Carl M., son of Marlin S. and 
Ellen F. Carr Meader, b. Haverhill, Novem- 
ber 14, 1880. They reside in North Haver- 
hill. 

143. IV. Milton J., b. May 16, 1885. 

144. V. Algernon D., b. May 28, 1893. 



112 GHASE WHITCHER AND 



CHAPTER IX. 

MISCELLANEOUS AND MEMORANDA. 

Mention has been made in a previous chapter of the 
brothers of Chase Whitcher, John and Reuben, elder, and 
Joseph younger than he, who came to Warren. Joseph does 
not appear to have permanently settled in town, as his name 
appears on the list of voters but three times, nor is there any 
record of his having married in town or having a family 
there. 

John Whitcher, b. Salisbury, Mass., June 19, 1749; m. 
December 6, 1770, Sarah Marston of Salisbury, b. October 
14, 1748. Their eleven children were all born in Warren. 

1, Joseph, b. November 10, 1772 

2, Reuben, b. December 30, 1773. 

3, John, b. August 10, 1775. 

4, Betty, b. October 3, 1778. 

5, Sarah, b. October 17, 1779. 

6, Henry D., b. October 30, 1782. 

7, Obadiah, b. October 11, 1784. 

8, Batchelder, b. August 3, 1787. 

9, Obadiah 2d, April 23, 1789. 

10, Jeremiah, b. January 29, 1790. 

11, Rebecca, b. December 19, 1795. 

Reuben Whitcher, b. Salisbury, Mass., October 5, 1751 ; 
ra. September 17, 1776, Elizabeth Copp, b. Hampstead, 
April 14, 1761. They lived in various places after their 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 118 

marriage, but finally settled in Thetford, Vt., about 1795, 
There is a record of six children. 

1, Betsey, b. Wentworth September 10, 1777. 

2, Dorothy, b. Piermont, March 8, 1779. 

3, Joshua, b. Piermont, June 9, 1781. 

4, Joseph, b. Moretown, Vt., January 22, 1783. 

5, Reuben, b. Thetford, Vt., March 8, 1785. 

6, Samuel, b. Warren, December 18, 1786. 

Mary Noyes, wife of William Whitcher (30), was, as 
previously noted (page 32), the eldest daughter and child of 
Samuel and Sarah Collins Noyes of Landaff. Her ancestry 
is traced to 

Nicholas Noyes, b. in England, 1615-1616, and who 
came to Newbury, Mass., in 1633. He married Mary 
Cutting. 

2. Timothy, son of Nicholas and Mary Cutting Noyes, 

b. Newbury, Mass., June 23, 1655; m. 1680, 
Mary Knight. He saw service in King Philip's 
war. 

3. Timothy, son of Timothy and Mary Knight Noyes, 

b. Newbury, Mass., January 2, 1690 ; m. 1718, 
Lydia Plummer. 

4. Sylvanus, son of Timothy and Lydia Plummer 

Noyes, b. Newbury, Mass., February 24, 1719 ; 
m. 1741, Phebe Chase. 

5. Samuel, son of Sylvanus and Phebe Chase Noyes, 

b. Plaistow, September 12, 1760; ra. Sarah 
Collins. Samuel Noyes d. February 27, 1846. 
Sarah Collins Noyes d. June 4, 1853, aged 91. 



114 CHASE WHITGHER AND 

CHILDREN OF SAMUEL AND SARAH COLLINS NOTES. 

All born in Landaff. 

1, Mary, b. November 5, 1787; m. February 15, 1807, 

William Whitcher of Coventry. 

2, Phebe, b. , 1789. 

3, James, b. August 13, 1791 ; m. 1812, Violette Coburn. 

4, Samuel, b. November 27, 1793, d. July, 1835; m, 

Mercy Priest, 

5, Caleb, b. February 28, 1796. 

6, Amos, b. Aprils, 1797, d. 1880; m. 1824, Huldah 

Bronson. 

7, Daniel, b. 1798, d. 1859 ; m. Susan Quimby. 

8, Nathaniel, b. June 10, 1800; m. let, Betsey Bartlett, 

2d, Mrs. Luella Keniston, 3d, Aurilla Cole. 

9, Jonathan, ; m. Harriet Cole. 

10, Polly. 

11, Susan. 

12, Moses, b. 1806, d. 1852 ; m. Ist, Mary Howe, 2d, 

Lydia Royce, 3d, Zylphia Clark. 



Joseph Davis Willoughby of New Holderness was mar- 
ried in Warren to Miriam, daughter of Chase and Hannah 
Morrill Whitcher, December 23, 1812, by Abel Merrill, 
Justice of the Peace. 



In the sixty-five years since 1842, there have been but 
twenty-five years in which a son or grandson of William 
Whitcher of Benton has not been a member of the New 
Hampshire legislature. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 115 



Henry N. Whitcher of Landaff (83), son of Winthroj) C. 
and Mercy Priest Whitcher, d. September 9, 1907. 



The following may be taken as a specimen of rural gTHve- 
yard literature during the first half of the 19th century ; it 
appears on a small headstone in the Landaff cemetery : 
" Taken by the resistless hand of Death 
from the fond Embrace of a loving 
Mother, Betsey, daughter of William 
and Lucinda C. Whitcher, who died 
April 14, 1842, aged 5 years and 2 days." 

" Betsy, Betsy, art thou fled 
And left us here in tears? 
Early enrolled among the dead 
To sleep till Christ appears!" 

No portrait of Chase Whitcher or of his wife Hjinnah 
Morrill was ever made, and nearly all of their children had 
died before the days of the daguerreotype or of its successor, 
the photograph. The author esteems himself fortunate that 
he was able to secure photographs of two of these, the eldest 
son, William Whitcher, late of Benton, and the youngest 
daughter, Martha Whitcher Fullam, late of North Brookfield, 
Mass. Chase and Hannah Morrill Whitcher had 38 grand- 
children, of whom 31 lived to marry, and of these photo- 
graphs or reprints from daguerreotypes were secured of 25. 
These were of all kinds from poor to good, but they were 
each the best that could be obtained. But four of these 
grandchildren are now (1907) living: David Whitcher of 
North Haverhill, Joseph Whitcher of New Hampton, David 
M. Whitcher of Center Harbor and Mrs. Harriet Fullam 



116 CHASE WHITCHER AND 

Fairbanks of North Brookfield, Mass. Of great-grandchildren 
there have been 100, of whom 51 are now, so far as known, 
living. Of great-great-grandchildren there have been 119, 
of whom 102 are living. Of great-great-great-grandchild- 
ren, fifth generation from Chase and ninth from Thomas, 
there have been born 51, of whom 46 are now living. There 
have been two of the sixth generation from Chase and tenth 
from Thomas, of whom one is living, Dorothy May Jarvis, 
born September 9, 1905. 

The views of the Whittier home in Haverhill, Mass., are 
from photographs taken by Mr. Edward Denham of New 
Bedford, Mass., who kindly furnished them for this work. 
One is a front view taken near the Haverhill and Ames- 
bury road, and the other from the road to Plaistow, showing 
the rear of the house and the famous flower garden so beloved 
by the poet. The house was built by Thomas Whittier in 1688, 
and remained in the family until the death of the poet, when 
it became the property of the Whittier Memorial Association. 
It is of interest to the world at large as the birthplace of the 
Quaker poet, as the scene of perhaps his greatest poem, 
"Snow Bound," but it has a special interest also to the 
descendants of Chase Whitcher of W^arren, as being the 
home of his great grandfather, Thomas Whittier, built in his 
later years, after he had become comparatively well to do 
and increased in worldly goods. The house was badly dam- 
aged by fire October 17, 1902, but was speedily restored to 
its original appearance, while the family furniture, relics and 
souvenirs were saved by the heroic exertions of Mrs. J. M. 
Ela, who at that time and since has had the care of the 
house. As it stands to-day it is a fine example of the old 
Colonial farm house, showing little trace of the ravages of 
two hundred and nineteen years, and is rich in its family and 
historical associations. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 117 

The house built by Chase Whitcher at Warren, near the 
Olencliflf station, on the White Mountains Division of the 
Boston & Maine Railroad, and near the Warren Summit 
post office, is a much more modest structure, and shows 
vastly more the ravages of time and decay, but it was the 
home of Warren's "boy settler," the house where both he 
and his son Chase, Jr., were licensed in the early years of 
the nineteenth century "to keep open tavern and to sell 
spirituous liquors," and has to-day the distinction of being 
the oldest house in the town of Warren. It has passed out 
of the possession of the family, and is now owned and, 
with some modern additions, is occupied by its owner, Mr, 
Charles Tyrrell, as a residence. 



118 CHASE WHITOHER AND 



ERRATA 



On page 32, in third line, for seven read eight. 

On page 32, in fourth line after 8amuel, insert Caleb. 

On page 33, for 50 XI read 49 XI. 

On page 33, for 51 XII read 50 XII. 

On page 39, in fifteenth line, for William Harrison Bhike 

read James Harrison Blake. 
On page 83, in twenty-second line, for Matthew Stickney 

of Salem read Montgomery Sears of Boston. 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



119 



INDEX OF NAMES 





PAGE 




PAGE 


A 




Bisbee, Ellen S. 


76 






George W. 


76 


Abbott, Chester 


63 


Sarah G. 


76 


Moses 


63 


Blair, Ellen 


86 


Lucia Eastman 


63 


Frank W. 


105 


Adams, Mary A. Marsh 


104 


Margaret A. 


106 


SusaD F. 


104 


Mary F. Burgess 


105 


William 


104 


Warren A. 


105 


Aldrich, Eda M. 


58 


Blake, James A. 


39 


Foster M. 


53 


Bowman, David 


41 


Georgia A 


49 


Hannah Parker 


41 


Susan M. 0. 


53 


Minerva 


41 


Allen, Rebecca 


34 


Boyd, Edna A. 


104 


Ashley, Daniel W. 


84 


Brisson, Lizzie J. 


72 


George 


84 


Brackett, Mary 


8 


Mary H. 


84 


Anthon 


8 


William V. 


84 


Bronson, Azubah 


48 


Athern, Belle 


98 


David 


48 


Atwell, Chase W. 


23 


Julia E. 


51 


Dolly Whitcher, 


28 


Lavinia 


51 


John 


23, 27 


Orrin 


51 


Atwood, Amanda S. 


51 


Rebecca 


48 


EdaM. 


53 


Brooks, Eveline G 


85 


Emilie E. 


53 


Levi 


85 


John C. 


51, 53 


Moeeley N. 


85 


Mary S. 


51, 63 


Brown, Elmira J. 


110 






Eliza S. 


110 






Donald A. 


49 


B 




William 


110 






Willis A. 


48 


Bacon, Adela M. 


69 


Bryant, Alice M. 


102 


Dana S. 


69 


AnnM. 


102 


Harvey S. 
Barker, Sarah 


69 


Burr, Ellsworth 


64 


22 


Jeannette M. 


64 


Barnes, Rebecca 


17 


Maria T. H. 


64 


Barnes, Rachel 


17 


C 




Bartlett, Elizabeth 


110 




Frank A. 


110 


Chandler, Dorcas Whitcher 


86 


James 


110 


Ellen 


86 


Perkins Norris 


110 


Joseph 


86 



120 



CHASE WHIT CHER AND 





PAGE 




PAGC 


Chandler, Joseph, Jr., 


86 


D 




George 
Martha 


86 

86 


Darling, Harriet N. 
Dean, Edward 


102 
52 


Mary 

George of George 


86 
86 


Harvey 
Hattie L. 


67 
52 


Lona of George 


86 


Dearborn, Kenson E, 


79 


Chase, Charlotte 

Elmer Brown 


45 
45 


Selwyn K. 
Doane, Florence 


79 
103 


Joseph H. 


45 


James M. 


103 


Joseph S, 


45 


Donalioe, Noble 


87 


Clark, Frank W. 
George H. 
Jeremiah A. 


103 

59 
59 


Dow, Henry A, T. 
Henry K. 


94 
94 


Lydia H. 


59 


E 




George T. 


73 






Neal M. 


73 


Eastman, George E. 


48, 59 


Susan S. 


48 


James 


47 


Clarke, Christina 


69 


John 


10 


Isabella 


69 


Josiah J. 


49 


Thomas 


69 


Louisa E. 


48 


Clement, Edgar T. 


73 


Mary (Boyntou) 


10 


George F. 


73 


Mary E. 


48,56 


Sarah 


16 


Polly 


47 


Cloggston, Lucretia 


48 


Ruth J. 


48 


Sylvester 


48 


Sylvester 


47 


Clough, Emma E. 


74 


William W. 


31, 49 


James 


74 


Zechariah 


10 


Cloutman, Daniel W. 


45 


Elkins, Enid J. 


88 


Ethel Kate 


45 


Evans, John 


10 


George W. 


45 


F 




Mary Ella 


45 




Mary (Hunt) 


45 


Fairbanks, Ebenezer 


107 


Caswell, Alonzo 


46 


Dwight E. 


107 


Lonia B. 


46 


Fannie E. 


107 


Louise 


46 


Isaac 


107 


Colby, Daisy M. 


79 


Margaret G. 


107 


Frank 


79 


Flanders Harry E. 


110 


Laura K. 


79 


Enoch 


110 


Collins, Chas. P. 


80 


Mary Foss 


110 


Chas. T. 


80 


French, Harriet N. P. 


107 


EvaF. 


80 


Mabel A. 


106 


Osman M. 


80 


Oliver E. 


106, 107 


Sarah T. Pike 


80 


Fox, Eliza R. 


93 


Sarah 32 


1, 113 


Warren 


93 


Copp, Elizabeth 


112 


Fullam, Elisha 


36, 102 


Crawford, A. K. 


96 


Martha Whitcher 36, 102 


Ilene 


98 


Darius of Elisha 


37 


John Wesley 


98 


Francis " 


36, 102 


Sarah Adalette 


97 


Harriet " 


37, 107 


Cummings, Minnie O. 


89 


Lemuel " 


37, 107 



HliS DE8GENDAI^T8. 



121 





PAGE 




PAGE 


Fullam, Maria 


36 


Gordon Irma May 


45 


Mary 

WilMam " 36, 


37 


Joseph S. 


110 


102 


Lawrence Nickerson 46 


Frederick L. 




Leslie Clayton 


46 


of William 


104 


May Ella 


45 


Grace E of William 


103 


LuciudaWhitcher 


45 


Lizzie M. 


103 


Lucy Webber 


40 


WilliamFrancis 




Wilbur C. 


46 


of William 


103 


William 


110 


Charles F. of 




Gove, David 


79 


William Francis 


103 


Elnora 


79 


Frederick A. of 




Myra C. 


79 


William Francis 


104 


Green, Benjamin 


9 


William H. of 




Mary 


23 


William Francis 


103 


Ruth 


2 


Grace of William H. 


104 






Ruth Anna of 




H 




William H. 
Kennetli Bullard of 


103 


Hadley, Darius 

Marietta A. 


64 
64 


Frederick A. 


104 


Mary A. 
Hall, Benj. F. 
Carrie 


64 


William Francis of 




97 


Frederick A. 


104 


54 


Charles A. of 




Lomena D. 


54 


Lemuel 


106 


Lorenzo 


54 


Frank L. of Lemuel 


106 


Lucy Alice 
Myron Crawford 
Hardy, Martha A. 


97 


Martha of Lemuel 


106 


97 


Mary Ij. of Lemuel 


106 


80 






Sarah S. 


80 


G 




William 


80 


Gauss. Grace iST. 


83 


Hay, Abbie 


46 


Katherine F. 


83 


Cyrus 


46 


John D. H. 


82 


Homer C. 


46 


John W. 


83 


Hayford, Albert H. 


88 


Rebecca 


82 


A. W. 


88 


Stephen 
George, Chas. E. 
Isaac K. 


82 


George H. 


88 


83 
83 


Mildred C. 
Nellie L. 


89 
89 


Gilbert, Jefferson 


48 


Nellie M. 


89 


Mary S. 
Goodwin, Nellie 


48 


Warren C. 


89 


103 


Haywood, Alvah E. 


67 


Gordon, Ada 


45 


Aurilla 


80 


Adelaide S. 


110 


Benjamin 


80 


Abbie Knight 


110 


Ella J. 


80 


Carrie 


46 


Heath, Doris 


53 


Dorothy M. 


110 


Harry E. 


53 


Elmer E. 


45 


Holton, Elizabeth J. C. 


68 


Ella 


45 


Samuel S. 


68 


George Scott 


45 


Tryphena C. 


68 


Horace W. 40, 45 


Howard, Jennie L. 


100 



122 



CHASE WHITGHEB AISTD 





PAGE 


Howe, Nellie M. 


45 


Hoyt, Mary 


8 


J 




Jacques, Jeremiah 


93 


Mary 


93 


Sophronia G. 


93 


Jarvis, Amos 


45 


Bessie C. 


45 


Dorothy May 


45 


Edward 


45 


Elleu Joy 


45 


Jeffers, Abigail R. 


89 


Clarence L. 


89 


Emma Frances 


89 


Gilbert 


89 


Johnson, Lucy T. 


104 


Jones, Ida M. 


74 


Rebecca 


74 


William 


74 


K 




Kendall, Electra 


56 


George, 


56 


William 


56 


Kendrick, Betsey S. 


68 


Simeon 


68 


Simeon E. 


68 


Kibble, George L. 


88 


Howard 


88 


Kidder, Chas. D. 


74 


Kimball, Abner W. 


58 


Deborah T. 


58 


Josephine V 


58 


King, Ann W. 


63 


Lizzie A. 


63 


Russell 


63 


Kingsbury, Ann M. 


103 


Kinnear, Calvin 


47 


Cecilia F. 


47 


Julia E. 


47 


Knight, Catherine M. 


80 


Francis 


80 


Nancy R. 


80 


L 




Little, Eliza Crockett 


46 


Joseph M. 


46 



M 



Manu, Samuel 67-75 


Mary H. 67-75 


James A 67-68 


George W. 71, 75 


, 76 


Abbie L. of James A. 


68 


Geo. Henry " 


68 


Lucy E. 


68 


Moses W. 


68 


David W. of Moses W. 


70 


Franklin M. '" 


69 


Georgiana H. " 


69 


James W. " 


69 


Mabel M. 


69 


Ruby G. " 


70 


Grace E. of James W. 


69 


Mildred I. 


69 


William H. '• 


69 


Ezra B. of George W. 


76 


Edward F. " 71 


, 78 


George Henry " 


79 


Orman L. " 


80 


Osman C. " 


80 


George E. of Ezra B. 


77 


Harry B. 


77 


Henry C. 


77 


Ira W. 


77 


LuviaE. " 


77 


Luvia Jeannette of 




IraW. 


77 


Margaret B. of Ira W. 


77 


Marian of Edward F. 


78 


Ada M. of Geo. Henry 


80 


Eda F. 


79 


Fred H. 


79 


HarleyE. •' 


80 


Ida 


80 


Lena A. " 


79 


Scott W. 


80 


Grace M. of Orman L. 


80 


Marston Betsey H. 


90 


Caleb M. 


90 


Oliver H. 90 


, 91 


Mary W. 


92 


Sarah 


112 


Meader, Carl M. 


111 


Ellen F. Carr 


111 


Marliu S. 


111 


Merrill, Elizabeth A. 


100 



Hl;S DESOEiVnAJS/TS. 



123 





( 


'AGE 








PAGE 


Mfloon, Charles C. 




69 


Norri 


IS, Catherine N. 




10« 


Ernest 




99 




Jonathan P. 




109 


Everett 




69 




Julia A. 




109 


Hopkins H. 




69 


Noyes, Amos 


32. 


, 84, 114 


Ivy C. 




69 




Caleb 




32, 114 


Mary T. 




69 




Daniel 




42, 114 


Myrtle M. 




69 




George R. 




67 


Morrill, John 




1 




George Roy 




67 


Jacob 




8 




Huldah 




84 


Abraham 




16 




James, 


32, 


, 39, 114 


Abraham of Abraham 


17 




Jonathan 




32, 114 


Aaron " 




17 




John A. 




67 


Hepzibah " 




17 




Moses 




67, 114 


Isaac ' 




17 




Mary 


31. 


, 32, 113 


Jacob " 




17 




Leona 




67 


Lydia " 




17 




Lillian Little 




46 


Moses " 




17 




Luciuda C. 




39 


Richard 




17 




Mercy Priest 




50 


Ann of Moses 


17 




Phebe 




114 


Hannah ' 




17 




Polly 




114 


Judith 




17 




Nathaniel 




32, 114 


Eachel 




17 




Sally A. 




84 


iSarah 




17 




Samuel 31, 


50, 


113, 114 


William Barnes 


;of 






Samuel, Jr. 




32, 50 


Moses 


17, 


. 18 




Sarah Collins 




31, 113 


Elliott of William B. 


18 




Susan A. 




67, 114 


Hannah " 




18 




Nicholas 




113 


Increase " 


15, 18 


,19 




Timothy of Nichol 


as 113 


Lydia 




18 




Timothy of Ti: 


mothy 113 


Moses " 




18 




Sylvanus ' 




113 


Rebecca " 




18 










Simeon " 




18 




o 






William 




18 










Sarah Herbert 


15,18 


,19 


Osgood, John 




8 


Hannah of Increase 






J oseph 




10 




15, 16, 


, 19 




Mary 




8 


John of lucrase 


19 




P 






Eebecca " 




19 








Richard " 




19 


Page, 


Benjamin 




7,14 


Samuel " 




19 




John 




14 


William 




19 


Peasley, Mary 




8 


Morse, Edna A. 




49 


Perki 


ns, Hannah 




52 


Mary A. 




49 




Levi 




52 


Welton 




49 




Pheeb H 




52 


N 






Pillsbury, Deborah 




9, 10 








Lydia 




17, 18 


Nickerson, Arvilla 




94 


Petts, 


, George 




69 


Edith May 




94 




Mabel 




69 


George S. 




94 


Polley, David 




55 


Niles, Eliza Simonds 




87 




Mary Neal 




55 



124 



CHASE WHITCHER AND 



Policy, W. Harvey 
William F. 

Porter, Olive M. 

Putney, Samuel 

Mary, Ella 
Josephine 



Quimby, Emily 
Joshua 
Lydia 



PAGE 
55 

48, 56 

88 

24, 100 

24, 100 

100 



54, 55 
54 
54 



Rice, Etta R. 
Richards, Eli D. 
Ella J. 
Mary S. 
Richardson, Stephen, Jr. 

Sarah 
Ring, Joseph 

Mary 
Rogers. Mary 
Rolfe, Henry 

John 
Royce, Dorcas Foster 
Lucy 
Samuel 

Sarah 38, 

Runnells, Mattie J. 



Sabin, Rev. E. R. 
Sanborn, Carl R. 

Marian L. 

Roy E. 

Simeon 
Sanders, James, Jr. 
Simouds, Eliza 

Elizur 

Susan 
Smith, John W. 
Phebe P. 
Solomon, William 

Sarah S. 



104 
44 
44 
44 



8 

8 

75 

3 

2, 3 

38 

59 

38 

70, 71 

74 



21, 22 



87, 



Souther, 



Ella W. 
Arthur L. 
Emery 
Hannah 
Harriet W 



Souther, 
Spinney, 
SpofEord, 

Sprague, 
Stevens, 
Streeter, 



Oliver M. 
James M. 
Eliza E. 
Moses 
Ann M. 
Malinda 
Moses 
John 

Katherine 
Mary 
Adams 
Mary J. 
Mary M. 



92 

67 

42 

42 

100 

100 

100 

8 

8 

8 

86 

86 



Thayer, Frank E. 
Josephine 
Nellie E. 

Thompson, Person C. 
Susan S. 
Celenda 

Titus, Jason 
John S. 
Sally B. 

Chas. H. of Jason 
Fred M. 
Bertha M. 
Herman P. " 
Geo. W. " 

Holman D. " 
Theron W. " 
Bessie of Chas. H. 
Chas. H. " 
Jay S. M. 
Mary " 

Clara of Holman D 
Harry " 

Lizzie " 

Cora F. of Geo. W. 
Jason W. " 
Mary E. " 
Oscar B. " 
Ardelle of Theron W. 
Grace W. " 

Florence E. " 
Herman E. of Fred M. 
Irene '• 

Mabelle F. 

Towns, Jerusha 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



125 







PAGE 


PAGE 


Towns, Joseph 




92 


Whitcher, Molly of Chase 23 


Mehitable 




92 


27,28 


Trafton, Edward S. 




48 


Chase of Chase 23,27 


Lizzie A. 




48 


Jacob " 23, 27 


Walter J. 




48 


33, 34, 35, 86 


True, Harriet M. 




24, 100 


Miriam of Chase 23,114 


Joseph 




8 


Hannah " 24 


Tyler, Alfred E. 




86 


Martha " 24, 26 


Chas. C. 




80 


David " 24, 27 


Kimball 




89 


28, 37, 109 


Mary C. 




80 


Amos of William 


Sally 




89 


33, 39, 40 


Sally Streeter 




89 


Chase of William 

31, 70, 71 


u 






Daniel of William 

33, 80, 81, 82 


ITpham, Geo. W. 




100 


David of William 


Luther C. 




100 


33, 84, 85 


Ruby M. 




100 


Hannah of William 

33, 67 


V 






Ira, of William 

23, 26, 59, 60, 61, 62 


Veazey, Amos 




48 


James of William 33 


Allen G. 




48 


Louisa " 33, 47 


Alice W. 




48 


Mary " 33, 72 


Chas. A. 




48 


Moses " 27, 31 


Jennie F. 




48 


35, 38 


Mahala 




48 


Phebe M. " 33. 85 


William D. 




48 


Sally " 33, 66 
Samuel " 27, 54, 55 


w 






Susan '* 33 






William, Jr. of 


Walker, Ella C. 




45 


William 27, 38, 39 


John 




46 


Winthrop C. of 


Lydia R. 




45 


William 33, 49, 50 


Weston, Isadore F 




46 


Betsey N. of 


Sarah A. 




46 


William, Jr. 40 


William E. 




46 


Alonzo A. of 


Wheelock, Eva A. 




74 


Jacob 35, 92 


Whitcher, Chase of Josepl 


1 2,11 


Dorcas of Jacob 35, 86 


12, 13. 14, 


15, 


16, 19, 


Hazen " 35,89 


20, 22, 23, 


25, 


26, 27, 


Jacob C. or 


28, 29. 






Jacob, Jr., of 


Hannah Moi 


•rill 


16, 


Jacob 35, 93 


20, 


,22. 


, 23, 29 


Levi M. of Jacob 


Dolly of Chase 


22,23 

27, 28 


35, 87, 88 


Levi of Chase 


23 


Lorinda of Jacob 35 


William " 




23,26 


Sarah J. " 


27, 28, 


,29, 


, 32, 33 


35, 96, 97 



126 



GHA8E WHITCHER AND 



Whitclier, Stephen R. of 

Jacob 35 

Daniel B. of David 

37, 110 
David M. of David 

37, 109 
Joseph Smith of 

David 37, 109 

Albion G. of 

Amos 44, 45 

Amarett A. of 

Amos 41 

Charles H of 

Amos 41, 47 

Florence V. of 

Amos 44 

James E. of Amos 43 
Lucinda C. " 40 

Winthrop C. 2d 

of Amos . 42 

Henry N. of Win- 
throp C. 50,53,115 
Mary Jane of 

Winthrop C. 50 

Moses " 50, 51 

Sarah H. " 50 

Ward P. " 50, 51 

Betsy S. of Samuel 56 
Charles O. of 

Samuel 58 

Daniel J. of 

Samuel 56, 57 

David S. of 

Samuel 57 

Lydia E. of 

Samuel 55 

Susan E. of 

Samuel 60 

Frank of Ira 63 

Mary E. of Ira 62, 63 
Scott " 64 

William F. of 

Ira 61, 62, 64, 65 

Elvah G. of 

Chase 71, 72, 78 

Frances C. of 

Chase 71 

Hannah of Chase 72 
Carrie A. of Daniel 83 
Dan S. of Daniel 84 



Whitcher, Elizabeth R. of 

Daniel 83 

Ira D. of Daniel 8» 
Jopephiue L. of 

Daniel 83 

Kate R. of Daniel 82 
Mary B. B. of 

Daniel 84 

Moses K. of Daniel 82 
Nellie G. " 82 

Hattie B. of David 85 
Quincv X. '•' 85 

Emma J. of Levi M. 88 
Sarah E. '• 89 

Betsey T. of Hazeu 90 
Hannah H. '' 90 
Saral. R. " 90 

EIlaF.of AloDZoA. 92 
Elvah J. ' 92 

Arthur W. of 

Jacob C. 93, 94, 95 
Carrie L. of Jacob C. 94 
Helen S. " 93 

Jeannie E. " 94 
Jacob F. '^ 94 

Mary Celenda '• 94 
Ellen Ardelleof 

David M. 109 

Algernon D. of 

Daniel B. Ill 

Eliza M. of 

Daniel B. 110 

Milton J. of 

Daniel B. 110 

Mina J. of 

Daniel B. Ill 

Phebe M. of 

Daniel B. 110 

Milton D. of 

Chas. H. 47 

Jennie N. of Moses 51 
Maud " 51 

PheebP. " 51,67 
LucileB.of Daniel J. 57 
Kate D. of Chas. O. 58 
Frank P. of Ward P. 52 
Chase R. " 52 

Chas. C. of 
Henry N. 53, 54 



HIS DESCENDANTS. 



127 



Whitcher, John VV. of 

Henry N. 53, 54 

Marv AofHenryN. 53 
Mercy F. '• 53 

Stark F. '' 53 

Burr Koyce of 

William F. 65 

Lamar 83 

Scott 83 

Edith A of Frank P. 52 
PheebH.ofChaseR. 53 
MarkH of Chas. C. 53 
John of Joseph 
Whittier 

11, 12, 26. 112 
Children of 112 

Reuben of Joseph 
Whittier 

11, 12, 26, 112 

Children of 113 

White, Arthur F. 46 

Elvah G. 47 

Emerv B 41. 46 

Elsie H. 47 

Florence M. 46 

Jacob M. 4[ 

Lewis B. 46, 47 

Lulu Frances 46 

Leon W. 46 

Malinda C. 41 

Mildred E. 46 

Vera L. 46 

William E. 46 

Whittier, Thomas 2. 3, 4, 7, 14 

Ruth Green 7, 14 

John Greeuleaf 3, 4 

Elizal)eth of Thomas 8 

Hannah " 8 

Joseph '• 8 

John " 8 

Mary '' 7, 14 

Nathaniel " 2, 8 

Richard " 8 

Ruth " 8 

Susanna " 8 

Thomas " 8 

Beuben of Nathaniel 

9,10 
Ruth of Nathaniel 9 
Benjamin of Reuben 10 



Whitcher, Joseph of Reuben 

2, 10, 11, 13, 15, 25 
Marv of Reuben 10 

Nathaniel '' 10 

Reuben '• 10 

Richard '• 10 

William '' 10 

Joseph of Joseph 

11, 12, 26, 112 
Deborah 11 

Dorothy 11 

Sarah ' 11 

Willouj^hbv, Joseph D. 24,14 

Fatima of Joseph D. 

24, 100 
Samuel W. of 

Joseph D. 24, 100 
William W. of 

Joseph D. 24, 99 

George T. of 

William W. 24, 99 
Harriet M. of 

William W. 24,99 
James H. of 

Samuel W. 24, 100 
Charles W. of 

Samuel W. 24, 100 
Bertha T. of 

George T. 100 

Mabel S. of 

Georsje T. 100 

Chas. W. of 

Chas. W. 101 

Blanche M. of 

Chas. W. 101 

Alice M. of 

James H. 101 

Blanche S. of 

James H. 101 

Edith H. of 

James H. 101 

Florence L. of 

James H. 101 

Maud H. of 

James H. 101 

Ruth M. of 

James H. 101 

Walter I. of 

James H. 101 



128 



CHASE WHITOHER AND 



Wilson, Ainos 


66 


Alice I. 


67 


Dauiel 


66 


George M. 


67 


Lovisa 


66 


Susan M. 


66 


William F. 


67 


Wills, Gardner 


75 


Henry C. J. 


75 


Wingate. Hattie 


88 



Young, Ada 


44 


Arthur 


44 


Austin 


44 


Carrie E. 


44 


Clarence E. 


44 


Eunice 


40 


Homer 


44 


James 


44 


Joseph 


40 


Polly 


39 


William C. 


44