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Full text of "Description of the Colt's double-action revolver, caliber .38, with rules for management, memoranda of trajectory, and description of ammunition ... April 1, 1905. Rev. Oct. 3, 1908"

U D 




No. 1919 



DESCRIPTION 



OF THE 



Coifs Double-Action Revolver 

CALIBER ,38 

WITH RULES FOR MANAGEMENT, MEMORANDA 
OF TRAJECTORY, AND DESCRIP- 
TION OF AMMUNITION 



{FOUR PLATES) 



APRIL 1, 1905 
REVISED OCTOBER 3, 1908 
REVISED JUNE 19, 1917 




WASHINGTON 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 



No. 1919 



ij. S. Cv<?< V^cr nee. dep'T*' 

DESCRIPTION 

OF THE 

Coifs Double-Action Revolver 

CALIBER .38 

WITH ^ RULES FOR MANAGEMENT, MEMORANDA 
^OF TRAJECTORY. AND DESCRIP- 
TION OF AMMUNITION 



{FOUR PLATES) 



APRIL 1, 1905 
REVISED OCTOBER 3, 1908 
REVISED JUNE 19, 1917 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 






\3 



--m 



(Form No. 1919.) 
THE OFFICIAL NUMBER OF THIS COPY 



The Commanding Officer or the Post or Coast Defense 
Ordnance Officer to whom this copy is issued will be 
held personally responsible for its safe=keeping. When 
another officer relieves him a receipt for it by number 
will be taken, which should be mailed to the CHIEF OF 
ORDNANCE, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. 



m= 



m 



NOTE. — This pamphlet may be destroyed when super- 
seded by one of later date. 

(2) 



War Department, 
Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 

Washington, June 19, 1917. 
This manual is published for the information and government of the Regular Army 
and National Guard of the United States. 
By order of the Secretary of War: * 

William Crozier, 
Brigadier General, Chief of Ordnance. 
(3) 

105405—17 



3G5267 



CONTENTS. 



Pagn. 

Ammunition 14-15 

Component parts 5 

Different models in service 5 

Dimensions 11 

Exterior ballistics 11-13 

Important points 10 

Operation of the parts. - 6-8 

Parts issued for repairs 9-10 

Parts not issued 10 

To dismount and assemble 8 

To eject the shells and load 8 

(4) 



DESCRIPTION OF COLT'S DOUBLE-ACTION REVOLVER, 

CALIBER .38. 



(4 PLATES.) 



DIFFERENT MODELS IN SERVICE. 

The Colt's double-action revolvers, caliber .38, in service are 
marked Army, models 1894, 1896, 1901, and 1903. The first model 
issued was that of 1892, but all the revolvers of that model were 
altered into model of 1894 by the addition of the locking lever, which 
is pivoted by its screw in a recess in the left side of the frame and 
prevents the hanomer being cocked until the cyUnder is positively 
closed and locked. The models of 1894 and 1896 are identical. The 
model of 1901 differs from the previous models in having the hntt 
swivel for lanyard. The model of 1903 differs from the model of 1901 
in having the diameter of the bore reduced to insure better accu- 
racy and in having a smaller and better-shaped handle. The model 
of 1901 revolvers last made have the thinner stocks 

COMPONENT PARTS. 

Part I, Class VII, Section 2. 
Crane bushing. 
Crane lock. 
Crane-lock screw. 
Cylinder and ejector, assembled. 
Cylinder bolt with spring, assembled. 
Cylinder- bolt spring. 
Ejector rod. 
Ejector-rod head. 
Ejector spring. 

Gauge for space between cy Under and barrel. 
Hammer with strut, strut pin, and strut spring, assembled. 
Hammer pin. 
Hammer stirrup. 
Hammer-stirrup pin. 
Hammer-strut spring. 
Hand and spring, assembled. 
Hand spring. 
Latch pin. 
Latch spring. 
Locking lever. 
Locking-lever screw. 
Mainspring. 

Mainspring tension screw. 
Punch and set for replacing recoil plates. 

(5) 



Range rod for testing alignment of the barrel and chambers of cylinder. 

Rebound lever. 

Rebound-lever pin. 

Rebound-lever spring. 

Rebound-lever-spring pin. 

Recoil plate. 

Screw driver. 

Side-plate screw. 

Stock, right ^ (model of 1901 or model of 1903). 

Stock, left ^ (model of 1901 or model of 1903). 

Stock pin. 

Stock screw. 

Trigger (includes rebound-lever arm pin). 

Trigger pin. 

OPERATION OF THE PARTS. 

Plate I is a side view of the revolver. 

Plate II shows the revolver with the side plate and stock removed, 
and with cyhnder and other parts cross-sectioned to show construc- 
tion. 

Plate III shows the component parts except the barrel, sight, and 
frame. 

In the plates, parts are given the same numbers as in the list of 
component parts and in the description that follows. 

The barrel (1) is firmly screwed to the frame (17). Until the 
adoption of the model 1903 the exact diameter of the bore was 0.363 
inch. It is now 0.357 inch, and all new barrels used in the repair of 
revolvers of whatever model are of this size. The front sight (42) is 
brazed on the barrel. The rear sight is merely a longitudinal groove 
in the upper surface of the frame. 

The lock mechanism is contained in the frame and consists of the 
hammer (18) with its stirrup (20), stirrup pin (21), strut (22), strut 
pin (23), and strut spring (24) ; the trigger (47) with its pin (48) ; the 
rebound lever (34) with its spring (37) ; the hand (25) with its spring 
(26) ; the cylinder bolt (9) with its spring (10) ; the locking lever (30) ; 
and the mainspring (32) . 

The hammer (18), trigger (47), and rebound lever (34) are pivoted 
on their respective pins, which are fastened in the left side of the 
frame (17). The lower end of the mainspring (32) fits into a slot in 
the frame and its upper end engages the hammer stirrup (20) . The 
mainspring tension screw (33) regulates the intensity of the blow of 
the hammer. 

The lower end of the rebound-lever spring (37) is secured to the 
frame by the rebound-lever-spring pin (38), and the free end bears 
under the rear end of the rebound lever so that the latter, when the 

1 Includes escutcheons, plain and threaded. Model should be stated. 



trigger (47) is released after firing a shot, carries the hammer back 
to its safety position and forces the trigger forward. 

The revolver may be used either single action or double action. 
In filing double action, pressure upon the trigger (47) causes its 
upper edge to engage the hammer strut (22) and thereby raises the 
hammer (18) until nearly in the full-cock position, when the strut 
will escape from the trigger, and the hammer, under action of the 
mainspring (32), will fall and strike the cartridge. In firing single 
action, the hammer (18) is first pulled back with the thumb until 
the upper edge of the trigger (47) engages in the fuU-cock notch in 
the front end of the lower part of the hammer. Pressure on the 
trigger wiU release the hammer which, under the action of the main- 
spring (32), will fall and strike the cartridge. A projection on the 
upper part of the trigger, working in a slot in the frame prevents 
the cylinder from making more than one-sixth of a revolution at a 
time by entering one of the grooves nearest the rear end of the sur- 
face of the cyhnder. When the cylinder is swung out of the frame 
the slot in the rear end of the crane pivot is turned so that the pro- 
jection on the forward part of the trigger can not enter it, which 
locks the trigger and prevents cocking of the hammer. 

The cyhnder bolt (9) is pivoted on the trigger pin (48), and its 
spring (10), bearing on the rebound-lever arm, causes the nose of 
the bolt to project through a slot in the frame ready to enter one of 
the rectangular cuts in the surface of the cyhnder. During the first 
part of the movement of the trigger in cocking the revolver, the 
nose of the bolt is withdrawn from the cyhnder, permitting free rota- 
tion thereof. The object of the cyhnder bolt is to prevent rotation 
of the cyhnder in transportation, and its omission would not disable 
the revolver. 

The hand (25) is attached by its pivot to the trigger, and as the 
latter swings on its pin when the hammer is being cocked, the hand 
is raised, revolves the cylinder, and serves to lock the cyhnder in 
proper position at the time of firing — i. e., the axis of the chamber 
containing cartridge to be fired coinciding with the axis of the bore 
of the barrel. The hand spring (26) insures the engagement of the 
hand with the ratchet. An abutment on the side plate supports 
the hand spring in rear. 

The locking lever (30) is pivoted by its screw (31) in the left side 
of the frame, and its head enters a recess in the latch (27), so that 
its lower end, when the latch is pushed to the rear, moves forward 
imtil it is immediately over that part of the pivot of the hand (25) 
projecting on the left side of the trigger (47). The trigger is thereby 
locked, and it is impossible to cock the hammer until the cylinder is 
positively closed and locked by the latch. 



8 

The cylinder (8) has six chambers. It revolves around and is 
supported on a central arbor of the crane (4). The crane fits into a 
recess in the frame below the barrel and turns on its pivot arm, 
which rotates in a hole in that part of the frame below the opening 
for the cylinder, and is secured by the crane lock (6) and crane-lock 
screw (7). The ejector rod (12) passes through the center of the 
arbor of the crane supporting the cylinder, and, projecting under the 
barrel, is terminated by the ejector-rod head (13). The ejector (11), 
of which the ratchet forms a part, is screwed on the rear end of the 
ejector rod with a left-handed thread and then firmly secured by 
upsetting the metal. The ejector spring (14) is coiled around the 
ejector rod within the cylinder arbor of the crane, the front end 
bearing on a shoulder of the rod and the rear end on the crane bush- 
ing (5), which is screwed with a left-handed thread into and closes 
the cylinder arbor. 

The thumb piece of the latch (27) slides longitudinally on the left 
side of the frame, and the barrel of the latch works in a hole in the 
frame. The latch spring (29) is coiled inside of the barrel of the 
latch, and is retained therein by the latch pin (28). The latch pin 
also secures the latch and hmits its play. When the cylinder is 
swung into the frame, the barrel of the latch, under the action of 
the latch spring, is forced into a recess in the ejector and locks the 
cyhnder in position for firing. 

The recoil plate (39) is driven into its recess in the frame and 
secured therein by slightl}^ upsetting the rim. 

To Eject the Shells and Load. 

To eject the shells and load, push the latch to the rear and swing 
the cylinder to the left, out of the frame; pressure against the front 
end of the ejector-rod head will empty the chambers, and the cyl- 
inder is then ready to be loaded; swing the cylinder into the frame, 
taking care that it is revolved so that the cylinder bolt will enter one 
of the rectangular cuts in its surface. 

To Dismount and Assemble Revolver. 

To dismount the revolver, remove the parts in the following order: 
(a) Crane-lock screw (7) and crane lock (6) ; (h) crane (4) with cyl- 
inder (8); (c) stock screw (46) and stocks (43) and (44); (d) side 
plate screws (41) and side plate (40); (e) hand (25) and hand spring 
(26); (/) mainspring (32); (g) hammer (18); (h) rebound lever (34) 
(i) rebound-lever spring (37); (j) cyhnder bolt (9) and spring (10) 
(k) trigger (47); (I) locking-lever screw (31) and locking lever (30) 
(m) latch pin (28) and then latch (27) and latch spring (29). 

The crane and cyhnder should not be further dismounted or the 
recoil plate removed except at ordnance depots. The crane and 
cylinder are dismounted as follows: (a) Unscrew ejector (11) from 



ejector rod (12), left-handed thread; (b) remove cylinder (8) from 
crane arbor; (c) unscrew ejector-rod head (13) from ejector rod (12); 
(d) unscrew crane bushing (5), left-handed thread; (e) remove ejector 
rod (12) and spring (14). 

To assemble reverse the above order. 



PARTS ISSUED FOR REPAIRS. 
To Ordnance Officers of Posts and Regiments. 

For making repairs to these revolvers in the hands of troops in 
field and garrison the following spare parts are issued to ordnance 
officers of posts and regiments. The number opposite each part is 
the maximum for 100 revolvers, which has by experience been found 
necessary for ordinary repairs per year. Kepairs involving the 
replacement of parts other than these can only be properly made at 
depots by expert workmen with the proper tools. 

In making requisition for spare parts, it is imperative that the 
model or models for which the parts are required be stated. 



Name of component parts. 



Crane lock 

Crane-lock screw 

Cylinder bolt with spring, assembled 

Cylinder-bolt spring 

Ejector-rod head 

Hammer with strut, strut pin, and strut spring 

assembled 

Hammer stirrup 

Hammer-sfirrup pin 

Hammer-strut spring 

Hand spring 

Latch pin 

Latch spring 

Locking lever 

Locking-lever screw 

Mainspring 

Mainspring tension screw 

Rebound lever 

Rebound-lever spring 

Rebound-lever-spring pin 

Side-plate screw 

Stock, right i (model of 1901 or model of 1903) 

Stock, left 1 (model of 1901 or model of 1903) 

Stock screw 

Trigger (includes rebound-lever arm pin) 

Appendage : Screw driver 



Number. 



1 Includes escutcheons, plain and threaded. Model should be stated. 

To Ordnance Depots. 

In addition to the above, the following parts and special gauges 
and tools are issued to ordnance depots : 



Crane bushing. 

Cylinder and ejector, assembled. 
Ejector rod . 
Ejector spring. 
Hammer pin. 

Hand and spring, assembled. 
Gauge for space between cylinder and 
barrel. 



Punch and set for replacing recoil plates. 
Range rod for testing alignment of the 

barrel and chambers of cylinder. 
Rebound-lever pin. 
Recoil plate. 
Stock pin. 
Trigger pin. 



10 

In replacing a hand in a revolver, it is important that it be so 
adjusted that the upward movement of the hand will not begin 
to revolve the cylinder before the trigger withdraws the cylinder 
bolt. To insure this it may be necessary to file the hand shghtly 
at the end which first engages the ratchet, and as this may bring 
the two points of the hand which engage the teeth of the ratchet 
too near together, the lower projection may also have to be slightly 
filed. The length and thickness of this lower projection must be 
adjusted so as to bring the cylinder in proper position for firing. This 
can be done only by expert workmen at a factory. 

PARTS NOT ISSUED. 

The following parts are not issued : 

Barrel. Frame. 

Crane. Latch. 

Cylinder without ejector and ejector rod. Side plate. 

Ejector without cylinder. Sight. 

In the case of breakage or injury, disabling the revolver, to parts 
other than those that may be issued for repairs as designated, either 
separately or assembled, th-e revolver must be returned to an arsenal 
for repairs. 

IMPORTANT POINTS. 

(1) The revolver should he Icept clean, free from rust, and properly 
oiled. The oil should nx)t he used in excess. Waste oil left in the 
mechanism wiU cause the parts to gum and worlc stiffly. 

(2) The tension screw should never he screwed in tighUy unless 
the mainspring fails to explode the primer, and if screwed in too much 
pierced primers will result, and the pull, especially on the double-action, 
he greatly increased. 

(3) The loclc mechanism must nx)t he tampered with. The side plate 
should not he removed except under the supervision of a noncommis- 
sioned officer. 

(4) Never attempt to remove the side plate hy prying it out of place. 
It should he jarred out of place hy smart hlows struclc with a piece of 
wood on the left side of the frame where it is covered hy the stock. 

(5) The side plate must he replaced from the rear so as to put its 
pin in rear of the hand spring. If this pin he placed in front of the 
hand spring, the spring wiU he destroyed upon cocking the hammer. 

(6) The cran£ and cylinder must not he dismounted unless suitable 
tools are available. 

(7) Never attempt to open the cylinder when the hammer is cocked. 

(8) Never attempt to cock the hammer until the cylinder is fuUy 
closed and locked in the frame. 



11 

DIMENSIONS. 

^ . , . /pounds.. 2 

W«'g" lounce... 1 

Total length inches. . 11. 5 

Barrel: 

Length do 6 

, ^^ /models 1894, 1896, and 1901 do 363 

Diameter of bore-. |^^^^j^gQ3 ^^ 35^ 

Rifling, number of grooves 6 

Grooves: 

Width inches. . . 156 

Depth do 003 

Twist, one turn in do 16 

Lands, width do 03406 

Cylinder: 

Length do ... . 1. 499 

Diameter do 1. 52 

Chambers: 

Number 6 

Diameter inches. . . 3825 

Front sight, height above axis of bore do 6045 

EXTERIOR BALLISTICS. 
1. Rapidity op Fire. 

This pistol can be fired 18 times in 44 seconds, loading each chamber 
separately, and beginning and ending with cylinder closed and cham- 
bers empty. Using the 'loading pack" furnished by the Colt's 
Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Co., 18 shots have been fired in 29 
seconds, beginning and ending as above stated. This was firing 
without aim. 

Aiming at 25 yards' distance, at a figure slightly smaller than that 
of an average man and using the pistol as a self-cocker, the chambers 
being loaded separately, 18 shots have been fired in 1 minute and 24 
seconds, giving 13 hits. Using the pistol as a ''single-action" 
weapon the same number of hits in 18 shots have been obtained in 1 
minute and 27 seconds. 

Aiming at the same figure, and at the same distance with the 
loading pack, 16 hits out of 18 shots have been made in 1 minute, 
using the pistol as a self-cocker, and in 1 minute and 25 seconds as a 
"single-action" weapon. 

2. Accuracy. 



Deviations. 


25 3'ards. 


50 yards. 


75 yards. 


100 yards. 


150 yards. 


200 yards. 


Mean horizontal. 

Mean vertical 

Mean radial 


Inch. 

0.668 

.515 

; .903 


Inches. 
0.604 
1.400 
1.553 


Inches, 
2.278 
1.612 
2.884 


Inches. 
2.400 
1.994 
3.656 


Inches. 
2.762 
7.296 

' 8. 018 


Inches. 
4.600 
6.990 
9.255 






3. 


Drift. 









The drift or deviation due to the rifling is, in this arm, to the left, 
but is more than neutralized by the puU of the trigger when the pistol 



is fired from the right hand. 



12 



Careful firings jnade with a pistol with right-hand, and one with 
left-hand rifling of the service pitch, the weapons being carefully 
sighted and clamped in a fixed rest, gave the following as the drift : 



At 25 yards. 


At 50 yards. 


At 75 yards. 


At 100 yards. 


At 150 yards. 


Inch. 
0.75 


Inches. 
1.09 


Inches. 
1.57 


Inches. 
2.24 


Inches. 
7.80 



The result of these firings indicated that but little reliance could 
be placed on results obtained at over 75 yards. A very slight varia- 
tion in the ammunition produced such widely varying results at the 
longer ranges as to render even an average of many results unreliable 

and misleading. 

4. Recoil. 



Weight of 
revolver. 


Weight of Weight of 
powder charge. | ball. 


Recoil 
(theoretical). 


Pounds. 
2.06 


Orains. Grains. 
16 150 


Foot-pounds. 
1. 998 



5. Penetration in White Pine. 



Range in yards. 


25 


50 


75 


100 


150 


200 


Depth in inches 


4.97 


4.35 


4.26 


3.64 


3.05 


2.90 





A penetration of 1 inch in white pine corresponds to a dangerous 

wound. 

6. Velocity. 

The muzzle velocity of this weapon with the Frankford Arsenal 
cartridge, with about 3i grains of smokeless powder and 148-grain 
bullet, is 750 feet per second. The instrumental velocity was ob- 
tained by means of the Le Bouleng6 chronograph, taking a mean 
of 20 shots. The remaining velocities at the various ranges were 
calculated by t^e aid of the formulae and tables in Ingalls's Hand-^ 
book of Problems in Direct Fire. 







remaining 


VELOCITY. 






At 25 
yards. 


At 50 
yards. 


At 75 
yards. 


At 100 
yards. 


At 125 
yards. 


At 150 
yards. 


At 175 
yards. 


At 200 
yards. 


Ft. sec. 
689.9 


Ft. sec. 
671.9 


Ft. sec. 
654.5 


Ft. sec. 
637.5 


Ft. sec. 
620.9 


Ft. sec. 
604.8 


Ft. sec. 
589.09 


Ft. sec. 
573.8 






7. Force 


OP Impact. 






At 25 
yards. 


At 50 
yards. 


At 75 
yards. 


At 100 
yards. 


At 125 
yards. 


At 150 
yards. 


At 175 
yards. 


At 200 
3rards. 


Ft. lbs. 
155.2 


Ft.lbs. 
147.2 


Ft.lbs. 
139.7 


Ft. lbs. 
132.5 


Ft. lbs. 
125.7 


Ft. lbs. 
119.3 


Ft.lbs. 
113.2 


Ft. lbs. 
107.4 



13 

8. Dangerous Space. 

The following tables show the dangerous space for this arm, at 
ranges from 25 to 200 yards, under the varying conditions of the 
weapon being used by both mounted and foot troops and against 
each of these: 

The height of a mounted man is, as usual in determinations of 
dangerous spaces, taken to be 96 inches, and the height of a foot 
soldier 68 inches. The weapon is supposed to be fired from the 
height of the eye, or 92 inches for a momited man and 64 inches 
for a foot soldier. The points aimed at with mounted and foot 
soldiers, respectively, are 84 and 34 inches from the ground. 

The determination of dangerous spaces was made by filling the 
revolver from a fixed rest, thi'ough screens, and by means of the 
holes made by the bullet determining the actual trajectory. A 
number of these were measured and the mean trajectory taken. 
By graphical representation the dangerous spaces were then laid 
of! and measured. 

INFANTRY AGAINST CAVALRY. 



Distance. 


Ascending 
branch ol 
trajectory. 


Pesrending branch. 


Maximim 

continuous 

dangerous 

space. 


Total 

dangerous 

spare. 


Before 1 Teyond 
object. 1 object. 


Yards. 

25 

50 

75 
100 
150 
200 


Yards. 


Yards, i Yards. 
All I ."ifi-K 


Yards. 
81.8 
113.2 
132.4 
152.5 
201.0 
125. S 


Yards. 
81.8 
113. 2 
132.4 
152.5 
201.0 
150.0 




All 
All 
All 
All 

80. S 


63.2 
57.4 
52.5 
51.0 
45.0 








24.2 



INFANTRY AGAINST INFANTRY. 



25 
50 
75 
100 
150 
200 




All 
AM 
AU 
All 
49.2 
43.1 


25.6 

49.3 

39.9 

34. 75 

34.6 

30.6 


50.6 
93.3 
114.9 
134. 75 
83.8 
73.7 








12.25 
7.0 



50.6 
99.3 
114.9 
134. 75 
96.05 
80.7 



CAVALRY AGAINST INFANTRY. 



25 
50 
75 
100 
150 
200 


















14.2 

27.8 
39.4 
43.4 
36.9 
35.5 



13.8 


27.0 


24.25 


52.05 


27.3 


66.7 


27.0 


07.4 


28.9 


85.8 


27.2 


62.7 



27.0 

52.05 

66.7 

67.1 

65.8 

62.7 



CAVALRY AGAINST CAVALRY. 



25. 


All 


All 


25.0 


50.0 


50.0 


60 


A 11 


All 


40.2 


90.2 


90.2 


75 


All 


All 


42.0 


117.0 


117.0 


100 


All 


All 


41.2 


141.2 


141.2 


150 


27.5 


80 


40.3 


120.3 


147. 8 


200 


8.0 


,-9 


:i9.8 


98.8 


106.8 



14 

AMMUNITION FOR COLT'S DOUBLE-ACTION REVOLVER, CALIBER .38. 

Ball Cartridge. 
(Plate IV.) 

This consists of a cylindrical brass case containing a suitable 
charge of smokeless powder, an exterior primer containing 0.3 
grain of igniting composition, and a lubricated lead bullet weighing 
148 grains. 

Primer. 

The primer consists of a cup which contains the primer compo- 
sition (a), and an anvil (b) for resisting the blow^ of the firing pin. 
The anvil' is pierced with two vents, by which the flame is com- 
municated to the charge. Ignition is produced by crushing the 
composition between the cup and anvil by blow of firing pin. 

Powder. 

The powder at present used is a nitroglycerin sporting powder 
similar to that used in shotguns. The charge varies with the kind 
and lot. At present about 3 J grains are used. 

Bullet. 

The form of the bullet is a cyhnder surmoimted by a conical 
frustum, which is surmounted by a spherical segment. Two rectan- 
gular cannelures contain the lubricant. There is a dished cavity in 
the base, by which the bullet is brought to proper weight without 
change of exterior lorm. 

Inches. 

Length of bullet 0. 72 

Diameter of cylindrical part of bullet 357 

Total length of cartridge 1. 362 

Lubricant. 

The lubricant is Japan wax. The bullet enters the case beyond 

the cannelures to entirely cover and protect the lubricant. To 

render the cartridge waterproof the case is tightly crimped around 

the bullet. 

Packing. 

The cartridges are packed in pasteboard boxes containing 20 c^ar- 
tridges each. One hundred pasteboard boxes, or 2,000 cartridges 
are packed in one zinc case, hermetically sealed, with handle for 
tearing open. The whole is inclosed in a wooden box, the eover of 
which is fastened with thumbscrews and sealed with wire. 

Pounds. 

Weight of 100 cartridges 3 

Weight of 2,000 cartridges, packed 72 



15 

Blank Cartridge. 

This cartridge has the same case and primer as the ball cartridge. 
There is no bullet. A charge of 7 grains of E. C. powder is pressed 
in the case and held there by crimping the case over a cup of shellacked 
paper. 

These cartridges are packed in a manner similar to the ball car- 
tridges. The packing-box cover has not the quick-opening thimib- 
screw fastening. A box of 2,000 blank cartridges packed weighs 
30 pounds. 

War Department, 

Office op the Chief op Ordnance, 
Washington, June 19, 1917. 

April 1, 1908. 
Revised October 3, 1908. 
. Revised June 19, 1917. 
26791-J-35. 
33735-20&-1. 
Form No. 1919. 
Ed. June 19-17—10,000. 



PLATE IV. 



38 CAL/B£R R^VOLV£R CARTR/D6E3, 



^_ /.02SMAX. 
/.O/S MfN . 




/.3 67 MAX. 



/.357M/A/. 



BALL CA^TR/OGE, 




3H£LLAC 
PAPER CUP 



/.O/S M/W. 
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