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Full text of "Desoto (1984)"

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University of the 80's 



1984 DeSoto 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 




http://www.archive.org/details/desoto198400unse 




Fireworks at all the home football games were just a small sample of the many exciting things in store for the Memphis State community during the year . 




University of the 80's 



1984 DeSoto 

Memphis State University 

Memphis Term., 38152 

Volume 72 




AvjX^te 



Opening 


2 


Student Life 


8 


Academics 


74 


Sports 


126 


People 


168 


Organizations 


248 


Greeks 


272 


Index 


324 


Closing 


332 



*• 





2 Opening 







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Images. Beyond the statue of Elvis and the 
Libertyland gate, these images of Memphis meet the 
knowing eye of a Memphis State student and remind 
him of how it is and was to be part of this experience at 
this time and place. 

Reflections, both real and surreal. Sometimes the 
cinemascopic panorama of a scene stretched bigger- 
than-life across the eye's curved surface, bending 
reality in ways it may never be shaped again. At this 
time and place an acceptabled phenomenon made 
more palatable because the time and place is right for 
suspending the concrete and allowing the mind to 
stretch as well, even if the perspective we brought here 
is altered in the process. 

This dreamlike lapse is neither a negation of our 
perspective nor a random search for something to 
replace it. The lapse is merely an altered and 
temporary state, permissible for this moment when it 
may never be permissible again or before. It is a time 
for expanding horizons and imagining what realities lie 
beyond that which can be easily grasped. 

And yet it is a time for reality as well. 

We seek not fantasy but knowledge; not escape but 
involvement; not error but truth. Our eyes are open to 
the fact that we are of this world. The goal is self- 
fulfillment but with a wider purpose. 

Inconsistencies. The contrasts of time and motion, 
beauty and the commonplace, age and eternity, 
vocation and avocation. ..all juxtaposed in a 
kaleidoscope of color or in patterns of shapes and 
sizes seemingly designed to confuse, only present 
choices. Perhaps it's the decisions we must now make 
that will take us away, one way or the other. Selections 
can no longer be made for us. They are ours to make. 



Opening 3 




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We gaze and are astounded. We are seeing perhaps 
for the first time, standing on an uncertain ground, on 
a cold and foreign soil, at patterns spreading out 
before us in all directions. And only now do we realize 
the scope of the choices that are there. We had not 
dreamed them before; had not realized their expanse, 
their immensity. Impressionable, impatient, yet nearly 
immobile, we pause here to consider — because 
pausing as well is the purpose of this place. 

Like a circle, a perfect orb with neither beginning nor 
end, this is the time that makes us whole if we will 
allow it to work it's complete power. Looking back at 
some future time, perhaps through the mist of a fond 
memory of person, place or just what may seem later 
as brief contentment, we will find more than meets 
today's eyes. 

Beyond the statue of Elvis and the red-and-white 
awning at Friday's, these are the images which will 
shape the picture of our lives as we grow — BETTER 
THAN EVER. 




4 Opening 





Opening 5 








6 Opening 




Photos on pages 2-7 by Arthur A. Terry. Terry, who heads the 
photo-journalism emphasis in the department of journalism, was 
picture editor of National Geographic Magazine, and was chief of 
layout and production in their illustrations department. He taught at 
the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, N.Y. and at the 
University of Missouri School of Journalism, where he also served as 
photo editor of the Columbia Missourian. 



Opening 7 




8 Student Life 





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Dorm Life continued to be the topic of 
conversation. Whether the good, the bad, or the 
ugly, all the dorm rooms were filled as other 
students camped in lobbies and waited for 
someone, anyone, to change his mind and move 
out. 

The dismay continued through registration as 
students both old and new watched in horror as 

the lines grew and grew and gFCW, 

and pulling cards for classes became a standing 
room only affair. 

Theatre buffs held a faint glimmer of hope that 
they'd survive registration to find out how the 
theatre department planned to top "Whole Lotta 
Shakin'." The musical about Memphis music, 
was created by Memphis State's Gloria Baxter 
and Keith Kennedy along with George Caldwell, 
Marshall Jacks, Joe Mulherin and Henry 
Swanson. 

All the students who survived the initial shocks 
were treated to the good things college life can 
bring as Memphis State showed it was BETTER 
THAN EVER. 



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Welcome Week 


10 


Working 


12 


Parking 


13 


Bookstore 


14 


Registration 


15 


Games People Play 


16 


Homecoming Week 


18 


Homecoming 


20 


Divine Tour 


22 


Studying 


26 


Whole Lotta Shakin' 


28 


Nightlife 


32 


CETA 


34 


Fashion 


36 


Theatre 


40 


Music 


46 


Band 


52 


WSMS 


58 


The Daily Helmsman 


60 


DeSoto 


62 


Dorm Life 


64 


Miss MSU 


66 


Campus Speakers 


68 


Cheerleaders 


70 



Student Life 9 



SAC Hosts A Watermelon Welcome 



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Snacking on watermelon is a pasttime which can be 
the cause of more than a few funny faces. 

Jo Strickland "sharpens" her expertise in slicing and 
dicing by lending a hand in the watermelon slaughter. 



The first couple of weeks back to school 
can be very tiring and also somewhat 
depressing because the realization that 
summer is over and the rat race has started 
again sets in. 

To chase away those "back-to-school 
blahs," the Student Activities Committee 
sponsored a "Watermelon Bust" Sept. 7. 
The SAC admitted that the beautiful 
weather certainly contributed to the esti- 
mated turnout of 900 people. That day 
deans and directors from departments all 
over campus wielded sharp knives... to cut 
the 30 watermelons needed to serve the 
crowd. 



The next event was the "Spirit With 
Pizazz" concert presented at the University 
Center Sept. 8, followed by HPER Pool 
Party Sept. 9. Though the attendance for 
these was considerably smaller than for the 
Watermelon Bust, the SAC considered the 
response to the activities good. 

The activities were brought to a close 
with the SAC mass meeting Sept. 12. This 
meeting, disguised as an ice cream social, 
introduced all interested students to the 
SAC and the various duties they perform 
on campus. 

— Sondra Lewis 



Photos by J. Scon Vanzandt 



* 




1 Welcome Week 




A slice of watermelon on a hot day can be cool, refreshing— and a little messy. 

Even students on the go stopped long enough to take a rest and a bite of watermelon 
while amused faculty members look on. 




Welcome Week 



Jobs 



Money. It's something that no college 
student has enough of. Assumming that 
they are not independently wealthy, most 
students either get help from Mom and 
Dad or get a job. 

In spite of the tight job market, many 
Memphis State students do work — on and 
off campus — and sometimes both. 

Toya Mason, a desk clerk at Mynders 
Hall, is one of the lucky ones who doesn't 
have to skip classes of drive like a maniac 
to get to work. She works 12 hours a week, 
and her work schedule, as is typical of 
campus jobs, is adjusted to fit around her 
classes. Her duties consist of answering the 
telephone and enforcing visiting rules. 

Another on-campus worker is Susan 
Martin. She works 18 hours per week with 
Computer Services where she is a "trouble- 
shooter". It is her job to make sure that the 
Univac computer terminals around campus 
work properly, sometimes a hectic job. 

Most of the jobs held by Memphis State 



students are off campus because the ma- 
jority of students are commuters. 

Peter Anderson, one such commuter, 
works about 35 hours per week at a movie 
theatre in Whitehaven. Although he often 
has to work on weekends, he said he has 
lots of time to study once the movie starts. 
The bonus is getting to see all the latest 
movies free. 

Another off campus worker, Cynthia 
Armistead, is head nurse of orthopedic 
surgery at Baptist Central Hospital. Al- 
though currently on educational leave of 
absence to pursue a pre-med degree, her 
usual duties consist of coordinating surgical 
cases and keeping the doctors aware of 
their surgical schedule. 

At Memphis State University, student 

jobs are as varied and colorful as the 

students themselves. Besides providing 

financial support, having a job builds that 

all-important sense of pride and self- 

steem. 

— Ingrid Smithey 



Music major Cosy Collier pays the piper (and the rest 
of the bill collectors) by working in the game room at 
Putt-Putt Golf and Games on Summer. 





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Photo by Cedric Woodson 




Charles Miller, a junior engineering major, was employed 
as a work-study student by the MSU Law Library during 
the fall semester of 1983. Shelving books was only one of 
the duties that Charles performed for the library through- 
out the semester. 



^**^%*~:: .... 



Photos by J. Scott Vanzandt 

Filing information into the books and various other study aides used by the law students was the most 
frequent and one of the most important jobs that Charles did during the semester. 



1 2 Working 



I remember when one of my teachers 
told us we couldn't have class because she 
couldn't find a parking place. 

I remember when my friends and 1 
removed huge rocks from a parking place, 
so I could park. 

The things people will do for a parking 
place never ceases to amaze me. 

I remember almost losing my religion 
(I don't believe in using profanity) when I 
saw a car in two parking places after I had 
been searching in vain for 20 minutes for 
just one. 

Of all the woes I have gone through at 
Memphis State, parking has been my 
biggest one. 



Yet, I read in the school's newspaper, 
The Daily Helmsman that out of 157 
institutions surveyed, MSU ranked no.# 1 
in parking availability to students. 

That same Helmsman article also cited 
a comprehensive study by Harland 
Bartholomew and Associates, a planning 
and survey firm, concluding that Memphis 
State does have a major parking problem. 
This problem is easily seen in the 
statistics that were shown in the Helms- 
man: 

1. In 1980, Memphis State had 7,017 
Parking spaces, 14,400 full-time 
undergraduates and a total of 20,656 
students. 



2. This year, Memphis State had 
7,367 parking spaces, 15,436 full- 
time students with a total of 22,040 
students. 

Nevertheless, several solutions have 
been proposed. These solutions consist of 
a parking garage (which would only 
house 400 cars), re-arranging of class 
schedules and re-routing of traffic around 
Memphis State. 

My own solution to my own parking 
problem, however, was to get up at 
6:30am so I could arrive at school at 
7:30am. 

— Ruth Turner 



Parking: A Big Problem at MSU 





Photos by Odric Woodson 



Parking 1 3 



UNIVERSITY STORE: 



Books 

and More 



While many students and staff only 
ventured to the basement of the Uni- 
versity Center once a semester to select 
their text books, others found it a great 
place to browse and buy MSU memor- 
abilia, magazines, computer score 
sheets etc. This was due to the manage- 
ment of Jim Lippy and the old MSU 
bookstore's change into the University 
Store. Of course, this was only a 
reflection of things which have been 
building for several years. 

One of the most recent changes was 
the expanded electronics shop, contain- 
ing everything from transistor radios 
to computer hardware and software. 
The clothing section was redone by 
moving the apparel from shelves to 
department-store-style racks and hang- 
ers. Updated clothing styles were added 
for the fashion minded. The card stand 



became a department with greeting 
cards from several manufacturers, 
stationery and other paper products. 

During the year, plans for a gift 
department became a reality. Also 
planned was a new textbook computer 
system which would lessen some of the 
problems of ordering and reordering 
books and would hopefully help reduce 
the mark-up on used textbooks. 

Assistant manager Brian Young also 
hoped to "open our own silk-screen 
printing shop where we can make our 
own t-shirts,"and to isolate magazines 
and candy into a separate section. If 
approved these changes would take 
place as part of a five-year expansion 
plan. 



— Loretta Harder and Lisa Burleson 




Photo by Pholo Services 

James C. Lippy, University Store Manager. 







Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 

Sophomore Sylvia Ruby stocks up on notebooks, 
hoping to avoid another trip to the hectic bookstore. 
At the beginning of the semester, the bookstore is 
overrun with students who hope to take their pick of 
textbooks. 



Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 

Pamela Brown, a sophomore studying medical technology, finally escapes the crowded bookstore. It takes 
several weeks for the bookstore to return to its usual calm atmosphere. 



14 Bookstore/Registration 



REGISTRATION: Frustration 



Chaos on a Grand Scale 



What campus event occurs four times a 
year, throws the University Center into 
chaos, and causes even the most sane 
among us to believe that they are losing 
their sense of direction? Yes, you're right if 
you said that the answer is Registration! 

What exactly is registration? Well, the 
explanation sounds simple enough. Reg- 
istration is the time when a MSU student 
does not pass Go, does not collect $200, 
but heads straight for the UC to get class 
cards for the courses of his choice, pay his 
fees, and make sure that all of the correct 
offices and computers are aware of his 
existence. 

What does registration really mean? It 
means getting lost in the crowd, dealing 
with the frustration of not being able to get 
the classes you need, and practically signing 
away your soul for expenses. Registration 
is waiting in long lines, following arrows, 
reading a thousand signs, and wondering if 
this is someone's idea of a joke. 

These experiences are nothing new to 
the battle-scarred vets who have earned 
their stripes in registrations past. But what 
of the first-timers? What war stories had 
they collected their first time out? 

Everyone asked thought the entire system 
would probably run much more smoothly 
if computerized. It was also generally 
agreed that the process itself was entremely 
confusing and could probably be made 
easier. 

Freshman Brooke Duncan, a broadcast 
news major, said, "There was entirely too 



much red tape. Those responsible for 
registration should definitely take a close 
look at other alternatives to the present 
system and find a way to make things move 
along easier." 

Photojournalism major Loretta Harder, 
also a freshmen, agreed with Brooke and 
added, "At orientation, we were really not 
told what to expect (during registration). I 
had no idea what the process was truly like 
until the day I got there." 

Sondra Lewis, a sophomore advertising 
major and recent transfer student, had a 
different perspective: "I transferred to MSU 
from a small junior college. Our registra- 
tion consisted of standing in a line, talking 
to a counselor, and filling out a class sheet. 
I knew that I was in trouble at the MSU 
registration the minute I saw the first 
arrow and looked at the first 47 signs right 
inside the door." 

Oh well, new students but same old 
complaints. However, freshman Steve 
Norman, a business major, sums it up the 
best: "I just can't wait to try it again. 
Maybe I'll get everything right this time!" 



The packet center ii only one of the many pit stops in 
the registration survival game for these students who 
did not receive their packets. 



After being closed out of some classes, these students 
retreat, hoping to discover some alternate strategies 
for surviving the semester. 



Photo by Karen Carter 





Vi 



Photo by Karen Carter 



On the verge of complete madness, these frustrated, 
exhausted registration victims hope in vain that the 
end is near. 



Student Life 1 5 



Games People Play 




With over two thousand people packed 
into the campus residence halls, polite 
conversation and TV watching could stretch 
only so far. 

Then the times of torment arrived. 

Students cashed their savings bonds and 
headed for the dark basement of the Uni- 
versity Center — it was game room time. 

This mysterious cave housed billiard 
tables, dart boards — and those dreaded, 
quarter-eating, habit-forming VIDEO 
GAMES. There, in that dark hole, students 
with frantic, calloused hands furiously 
worked the controls of the machines. 

For confirmed video junkies, wh< 
couldn't find the strength to make the trip 
across campus to the Center, there were 
even some games in dorm lobbies. 

Joey Welsch, a junior majoring in 
business management, was one of the 
addicts. "Video games are my life," he said. 
"I've seriously though about changing my 
major." Several other students also made 
videos both their pastime and play time. 

Some students managed to resist the 
vidoes, but succumbed to other forms of 
enetertainment. These may have included 
a barking contest between Robinson and 
Browning Halls at 1 1:30 p.m., gambling in 
the lobby of Smith Hall on who would be 
the first person to get a parking ticket on 
Patterson Street, or scaling the walls of 
Richardson Towers. 

Chess, backgammon and frisbee were 
some of the more conventional ways of 
keeping busy. Carla Andreas, a freshman 
majoring in biolqgy, said, "I enjoy more 
intellectually stimulating pastimes," Ms. 
Andreas, known as the Tiddly-Winks 
Champion in seven states and two 
Canadian provinces, also claimed to be the 
undefeated master of thumb-twiddling. 

-Steve Norman 



Taking a firm stand against the computerized mind of 
a video game can be a lot harder than it looks. 



16 Games 




Video games usually require rapid hand-eye coordination from inexperienc- 
ed players as well as consistent high-scorers. 



The game room also offers ping-pong and pool for those who prefer their 
games tried and true instead of new. 






Paranoid politics — to get them before they get you is the key rule of survival in 
the world of video games. 



Games 17 



Homecoming: 

A Week of Festivities 



With party fashions, big-band sounds, 
colorful displays and flashy fireworks, this 
year's Homecoming was a blast — All these 
were used in a salute to "Memphis State 
and Memphis Music: A Winning Com- 
bination." 

"This year's Homecoming theme was 
chosen to show the relationship between 
Memphis State and Memphis music," 
according to Jo Strickland, Student Activi- 
ties Council advisor. The theme was selected 
to coincide with the reopening of Beale 
Street, home of W.C. Handy's "Memphis 
Blues". 

Homecoming festivities were opened by 
Fashion Board models swaying in party 
fashions to music from the movie 
Flashdance. They strutted across the stage 
showing party goers what to wear to 
Homecoming activities. 

Also strutting across the stage was the 
1983 Homecoming Court — Tina Cody, Lisa 
Hatchett, Vikita Partee, Angela Thompson 
and Lyndi Whipple. 

On Tuesday, the Order of Omega, a 
national honorary group for fraternity and 
sorority members and their advisors, gave 
a reception for the faculty members. This 
event, held in the University Center's 
Faulkner Lounge, provided Greek members 
a chance to get acquainted with faculty 
members. 

On Wednesday, a crowd of around 100 
listened to Memphis State's jazz band, 
Southern Comfort. The MSU Birdland 
Repertory was also featured. 

Thursday was the day the Homecoming 
displays were seen along Central Avenue. 
Built by several student organizations and 



judged by art department members, win- 
ning displays were announced at the pep 
rally that night. They were: first place 
"Tiger Victory Will Have Eagles Singing 
the Blues,"by Alpha Gamma Delta Sorority 
and Sigma Chi Fraternity; second place, 
"Rock-n-Roll Over the Eagles to Make 
Them Sing the Blues," by Alpha Delta Pi 
Sorority and Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity; 
spirit award was given to Delta Gamma 
Sorority. 

The pep rally ended with fireworks 
flashing over a crowd of about 1000 while 
the Memphis State band played such songs 
as "Hold That Tiger" and "Eye of the 
Tiger." 

Spirit With Pizazz performed to the 487 
people who attended the first sold-out 
Mississippi River "Showboat" Dance in its 
four-year history. The band satisfied musi- 
cal tastes from New Wave to soul music. 

The partying continued on the Saturday 
before the 46th Annual Homecoming game 
with an old-fashioned barbecue sponsored 
by the MSU Alumni Association and 
music performed by "Turning Point." 

At half-time, the Homecoming Court 
was presented and Memphis State's March- 
ing band saluted Memphis. Selections in- 
cluded Elvis'"Love MeTender"and W.C. 
Handy's "Memphis Blues." Even though 
Tiger fans were disappointed by the final 
score of the game, 27-20, they were treated 
to an exciting second-half rally from a 20-0 
deficit at half-time. 

— Ruth Turner 



The Tigers never gave it less than their best 
during the game with the University of 
Southern Mississippi, despite the 27-20 
loss. 





18 Homecoming 






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Colorful Homecoming displays exhibited student creativity as 
well as involvement during the week's activities. 



Homecoming 19 



The fireworks symbolize renewed hope for a victorious 
homecoming after several years of disappointment 
for Memphis State fans. 




Photos by J. Scott Vanzandt 



Mesmerized by the spectacular fireworks display, the crowd at the Homecoming 
Pep Rally anxiously gazes into the heavens and wonders what will appear next. 

Tiger mascot Pouncer creates his own excitement as he stirs up the crowd with his 
zany antics. 




20 Homecoming 



Homecoming Court: 



a winning combination 



To start the Homecoming Festivities, 
five young ladies were chosen from 
13 candidates to serve on Memphis 
State's Homecoming Court. 

This year's members were Tina Coda, 
a senior business-secondary education 
major; Lisa Hatchett, a senior broadcast 
major; Vikita Partee, a junior pre-med 
major; Angela Thompson, a senior 
computer engineering technology major 
and Lyndi Whipple, a junior accounting 
major. 

In order for a young lady to be a 
candidate for the Homecoming Court, 
she must be enrolled for a minimum of 
six semester hours at the time of election. 
She must also have a 2.5 G.P.A. or 
more. 

According to Jo Strickland, adviser 
for the Student Activities Council, the 
Homecoming Court was representative 
of the girls at Memphis State. She said 
the court, which was introduced at the 



annual Homecoming Fashion Show and 
again to over 1,000 people at the 
Homecoming pep rally, also represented 
MSU during other Homecoming activ- 
ities such as the Riverboat Dance, the 
Saturday barbecue, and the 46th Annual 
Homecoming game. "Homecoming 
Week can be hectic, but it is a lot of 
fun," Strickland said. 

Agreeing with Strickland, Tina Coda, 
who was sponsored by Delta Gamma 
Sorority, described participating on the 
Homecoming Court. "It's different; it's 
a lot of fun, and I enjoyed it," she said. 
Besides being a member of the Home- 
coming Court, Coda was president of 
Delta Gamma Sorority, treasurer of 
the Student National Education Associ- 
ation and active in the Order of Omega. 

Lisa Hatchett, sponsored by Delta 
Zeta Sorority and Lambda Chi Alpha 
Fraternity, said she enjoyed reigning on 
the Homecoming Court. She exclaimed, 




Photo by Art Gridcr 



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Tina Coda 



Photo by Terry Sweeney 

Lisa Hatchett 





"It's an honor to be selected by your 
fellow students to represent the Tigers 
during the Homecoming Festivities." 
Hatchett also models for the Fashion 
Board and is active in the Blue Chippers. 

Vikita Partee, the representative of 
the Black Student Association, also felt 
that being a member of the Homecoming 
Court was an honor. She said that being 
elected was a big responsibility. Yet, she 
said that it was a reponsibility that she 
welcomed. "It has made me feel part of 
MSU," she said. Vikita was also a 
resident adviser in Richardson Towers 
North. 

Lyndi Whipple, a candidate for both 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity and 
Alpha Deta Pi Sorority, also felt pri- 
vileged to serve on the Homecoming 
Court. Her exclamations about her reign 
were,"I feel privileged! It's exciting! It's 
an honor! and it's fun!" Whipple was 
also a member of the Student Ambas- 
sador Board. 

Angela Thompson, the Pan-Hellenic 
candidate was also a member of the 
Homecoming Court. She is also treasur- 
er of Delta Sigma Theta and a member 
of the Minority Engineering Club. 

Other candidates were Tracy Ander- 
son, a junior accounting major; Sarah 
Carroll, a senior management major; 
Denise Drummond, a sophomore medi- 
cal records administration major; Jen- 
nifer Harthum, a senior graphics design 
major; Anna Jefferson, a senior produc- 
tion management major; Beth McLeod, 
a senior advertising major; Missy Webb, 
a senior special education major and 
Janice Grisamore, junior marketing 
major. 

— Ruth Turner 




Photo by Art Grlder 

Vikita R. Partee 



Photo by Art Grlder 

Angela Thompson 



Photo by Barbara Whipple 

Lyndi Whipple 



Student Life 21 



MSU Takes A Divine Tour 



Memphis on the Mississippi, which has 
always proudly acknowledged its ties to 
Memphis on the Nile, warmly greeted its 
latest opportunity to look at the glory 
which is Egypt when "A Divine Tour of 
Ancient Egypt" opened in 
October at the University Gallery. 

More than 75 Egyptian antiquities and 
art objects went on display in what the Art 
Department called its most ambitious 
project to date. Students and the commu- 
nity were afforded a rare glimpse of 
statuary, reliefs and papyri of this ancient 
civilization. The pieces represent Egyptian 
culture from 3500 B.C. to the seventh 
century. 

The objects were painstakingly collected 
from such donors as the British Museum, 
the Brooklyn Museum, the Detroit Institute 
of Arts and the Boston Museum of Fine 



Arts. In addition, both the City of Memphis 
and the Memphis Pink Palace Museum 
loaned pieces. Numerous anonymous col- 
lectors contributed works to complete the 
exhibit. 

Heralded as the largest exhibition of 
Egyptian antiquities in this part of the 
country since the visit of the "Treasures of 
Tutankhamun", the exhibit opened Oct. 6 
with a fanfare of belly dancers, Arabian 
horses and visiting dignitaries. Egyptian 
Ambassador Dr. Ashraf Ghorbal also paid 
a call. 

Students greeted the arrival during half- 
time of the Virginia Tech game, as the 
University Band played "King Tut" while 
forming Egyptian symbols, and belly 
dancers gyrated across the field. 

Divided into four sections, the Divine 
Tour explored ancient Egyptian concepts 



of religion, focusing upon the major centers 
of worship; Memphis, Thebes and Abydos. 
Some of the highlights included statues of 
Isis and Horus, the Triad of Deities from 
ancient Memphis, a life-size statue of the 
lion-headed goddess Sakhmet, and the 
mummy of Ankh Ptah Hotep, who died 
during the first century. 

Also on display was the gallery's own 
permanent collection of Egyptian art, the 
only such collection in the Mid-South. 

A lecture series by a group of world- 
famous Egyptologists accompanied the 
exhibit. The exhibit and lectures were both 
free and open to the public. 

The program was made possible through 
grants from Union Planters National Bank, 
Republic Airlines, the Tennessee Commit- 
tee for the Humanities and Walker and 
Associates, Inc. 




22 Divine Tour 





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Divine Tour 23 






Images of the Memphis 



24 Divine Tour 






of the past . . . 



Divine Tour 25 



"Studying — The Inevitable Evil" 



Sooner or Later. . . 



Studying — no one enjoys it but if you're 
a student at Memphis State, or any other 
college, you'll have to do it sooner or later. 
It's not too much fun but it can be made 
tolerable if you have the correct methods 
and proper atmosphere. 

Many students need total silence with no 
distractions but others, such as Dave 
Skorupa, a freshman journalism major, 
prefer to listen to music while they study. 
Dave also said dim lighting helps him, but 
others may like brighter light. 

Every student has a different way of 
approaching the task. Many study their 
text books or their notes. Alicia Plunk, a 
sophomore journalism major, says she 
likes to prepare study sheets and outlines 
to help her. 

Where you study and who you study 
with are also important factors. It appears 
that most students nowadays prefer to 
study alone. "All-nighter" group study 
sessions seem to be out. Tracy Colston, a 
senior accounting major, says she's been to 
one but they make her so tired that she 
does poorly on the test the next day. 

Most people like to study at home or 
right here at the University. But some 
people find more interesting places to 
study. For example, freshman music major 
Alicia Lee, likes to study in her car. 

Now we come to that most dreaded 
topic — tests. Some people get upset about 
them or become a little uneasy. However, 
most tests are pre-announced so there's 
usually no need to panic and plenty of time 
to prepare for them. However, many 
students still wait until the last minute to 
study for their exams. Everyone knows 
what it's like to cram for an exam. Even the 
most studious and organized students have 
been guilty of it at one time or another. 
Sometimes it can't be helped but it should 
be avoided as much as possible. 

Obviously, finals are the greatest cause 
of apprehension to most test-takers. They 
are, as Dave Skorupa observes, "like the 
last nail in your coffin." 

The times that people study and how 
long they study differ depending on the 
number and difficulty of the courses they 
take and whether they work or not. Many 
study on their free time over the weekend. 
Others prefer to save the weekend for fun 
and study after school or after work on 




Mechanical engineering majors Sharariar Abolghasemi and Reza-Madjdi consult with one another on an 
assignment. 




Studying with friends can often make the time-consuming task a little easier. 



26 Student Life 




weeknights. Still others study simply when 
they can find the time. 

Now for everyone's favorite part of 
studying— breaks! Some people like to 
take naps, eat or watch TV. Some like 
Alicia Lee, prefer to go out to ease the 
tension of studying. Breaks are an 
important part of the study process and 
should be taken regularly. 

So, it would seem, studying isn't as bad 
as many think it is. Especially if you study 
properly, in the right places, with the right 
people and take plenty of breaks! 

— Melissa Robbins 



Lane Garth plows through class material while 
Stephanie Schuler has chosen an easier past-time. 




Preparing for class outside the library for a change of 
pace can be just as beneficial as studying indoors. 




Taking time out to give a photographer a smile can be 
a welcome distraction from studying. 



Student Life 27 



Amidst the frenzy of pre-performance preparations, Julie Myers hurriedly applies 
the finishing touches to her makeup. 

The effort cast members must take to pull together a professional production is 
shown by the expression on Victor Brown's face. Felicia Morgan and Steve 
Wilkerson concentrate on getting it just right. 





Photo* by J. Scott Vanzindt 



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Musical Director George Caldwell keeps an eagle eye on the performers as last Artistic Director Philip Giberson points out flaws in the day's rehearsal, 
minute details are coordinated. 



28 ShakiiV 



WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN' GOING ON! 



They promised to do a "whole lotta 
shakin'," and they didn't let their audience 
down. 

The cast of Whole Lotta Shakin ' con- 
tinued to thrill Mud Island audiences last 
summer — its second in a row — with a few 
changes in the cast, composition, and 
choreography of the show. 

Shakin', the first musical highlighting 
Memphis' music heritage, trimmed its 
original cast of 24 members, 12 men and 12 
women, down to 20. Unlike its premier 
run, all cast members in the updated show 
had a Memphis connection. Artistic Dir- 
ector Keith Kennedy called the switch a 
"tremendous help." "These talented young 
people are key products of the culture the 
show is about," he said. He also said the 
change helped the cast's morale. 

According to Marcquinne Charles, dance 
director, a student at Memphis State's Law 
School, and an original cast member: "The 
energy of the show is much different, much 



greater. People from Memphis in the cast 
now care about the show and have a good 
time with it. There's more support among 
cast members and from the administration." 

"The beginning of the show was histor- 
ically accurate, but for the general public it 
wasn't entertaining in a showbiz kind of 
way," said the returning music director 
George Caldwell. It was shortened from 1 2 
minutes to a four minute medley. Vocal 
click tracks, recordings of the songs, were 
made in a studio and played behind the 
singers to reinforce the sound during the 
show. This cleared up the sound problems, 
which detracted from the performances 
during the first run. 

Gloria Robinson, another veteran of the 
cast and student at Memphis State, said 
the show "changed a whole lot!" 

"The biggest difference is the familiness 
of the cast. Everybody's enjoying what 
they're doing," she said. The biggest 
difference for Robinson, however, was her 



solo "Gee Whiz," sung by Memphis State's 
Lori Brown in the original show. Robinson 
is a veteran of USO shows and has 
performed at Libertyland for two years. 

A surprise addition to the cast was 16- 
year-old Kirsten Kite. Special lines were 
written into the show to suit her youthful 
demeanor. Kite said her experiences among 
older cast members were "different". 

"You gotta adjust yourself so you can 
get along better," she said. "But it's fun. 1 
like it better than working with people my 
own age." She quickly added that the cast 
members tease her about her size. 

She also complained that her friends at 
school talked about the show all the time. 
"I don't like to talk about it around them," 
she said. "Teachers at Overton (High 
School) point out my mistakes all the time. 
When relatives come, my parents always 
show videotapes of me, and I go upstairs to 
watch television." 




Tim Shipman warms up for the grueling practice ahead as other cast members 
follow his lead. 



Sandy Beach leads a portion of the ensemble in a rousing rendition of "Tutti 
Frutti." 




Student Life 29 



...and the SHAKIN' continued 



In the next five years, Kite plans to 
continue her showbiz training in Memphis 
State's commercial music program. Her 
previous experiences before Shakin' in- 
cluded a performance at the Westinghouse 
Convention in Las Vegas and the lead in 
To Kill a Mockingbird at Playhouse on 
the Square. 

First timer Tim Shipman said the show 
was a great experience. "It's a natural rush 
to hear people say 'Memphis is proud of 
you. Thanks for what you're doing.' " 

"It's stretched me to my limits," he 
added. "I'm not that much of a dancer, and 
it made me sing higher than I thought I was 
capable of." 

What were the rewards of appearing in 
the cast? 

Shipman won a part in the chorus of 
Pirates of Penzance at Playhouse on the 



Square in the fall. He also got a steady job 
singing at Memphis Memories. He called 
the experience "invaluable in more ways 
than one." 

"It'll keep me working for the next year," 
he said. 

What are the future plans for the show? 

Kennedy said the show could possibly 
run in New York. "All of that is only pipe 
dreams," he said, because it would cost 
about $1.5 million to do it. "It's just now a 
healthy adolescent, but it has potential." 

— Jacqueline L. Jones 



Elvin Brown and partner show the crowd at the High 
School Hop what Rock n' Roll is all about. 




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The Black Company sings of "John the Revelator" in the section of the show 
devoted to old time gospel. 




Photos by Phyliss Smith 




The White Company, led by Brenda Patterson, shows how people worshipped on Brenda Patterson, Kirsten Kite, and Mark Johnson portray a not so ideal showbiz 
the other side of town. family. 



30 Shakin 1 




Marcquinne Charles lights up the stage as she portrays a member 
of the "Lockers" dance group in a salute to Issac Hayes' "Shaft." 

The cast sings about "River Rollin" and ends the show on a joyful 
note, indicative of the pride the members have in the city. 




Photos by Phyllss Smith 



31 



NIGHTLIFE 



After parking, it's the next most talked 
about item on the Memphis State campus. 
What's available. ..and can I afford it? 

Going out to eat rates first and foremost 
with students. But the pricetag most often 
determines the menu. A quick hamburger 
at Wendy's goes for $1.29 and may be 
considered more fast-food survival than 
an outing to many students. 

But the range traveling up or down the 
Strip is modest and can go through a 
barbeque at Little Pigs for $1.79 to a 
medium-size pizza at Garibaldi's for $6.69 
to $7.75, depending on the style of crust. 
Those students not limited to the campus 
area can find something to fit any pocket- 
book, anything from the $1 plus ham- 
burger to a $75 meal for two in some of 
the better Memphis restaurants. 

Going out for a drink may suit even 
more lifestyles, and depending on the 
place and the hour, students can find a 
25c beer or go high class at $3.50 for a 
mixed drink. Happy hours with two-for 
the-price-of-one drinks are pretty com- 
mon, if that's your pleasure. 

Video games have captured a large 
student following and for the addicts who 
can't wait for a game at the University 
Center, there are ample machines at 



establishments and arcades all around 
the town. Cost: 25c to 50c per game. 
Sound cheap? Not for a novice player! 

The ever popular Saturday night movie 
is not a cheap outing any more. Though if 
you're lucky, you may find just the movie 
you want to see is showing at the UCorat 
one of the free— or at least inexpensive- 
film festivals at the library. Brooks or 
Dixon art galleries. If you MUST have 
first run, it can cost you up to $5 for a 
night at the movies. 

For the sports enthusiast, not only 
does Memphis State offer a dazzling 
variety of spectator sports, but there is 
also plenty of time and space for the do- 
it-yourselfer. Swimming, tennis and in- 
tramural sports are all available to any 
student. The city sports scene is also 
growing, though it will cost you a little 
more to see the Showboats or the 
Americans. 

The exercise craze has hit Memphis 
State, just as it has taken over the rest of 
the USA. Here the health fiend can put 
on an old pair of sneakers and take a run 
in the park, or go spend a fortune on 
weights, fancy sweats and running shoes. 
It all adds up to keeping fit, and the cost is 
up to you. 




Dating can go along with any of the 
above or none of the above. But if you 
want a separate category for a good old- 
fashioned honest to goodness date, try to 
be original and maybe invite that special 
person for a walk in the rain, a house and 
buggy ride at Overton (in season), or a 
boat ride. The range is limited only by 
your imagination. Otherwise, try just 
hanging out. Good friends can make 
anything seem like fun. 

When all else fails, think STUDYING. 
Improve your mind. Improve your grades. 
Just think what it'll do to your image. But 
if that turns you off, you can always turn 
on your television set. No danger of 
improving your mind. But you might just 
have some fun. 



32 Student Life 





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CETA: Helping Teenagers Explore New Horizons 



The World of Work took on new meaning for a 
group of young students last summer when the Evening 
of Soul Foundation gave them a look at the World of 
the Performing Arts. 

Each summer 14-to-l 7 year olds are taken under the 
wing of the Comprehensive Employment Training Act 
to learn job skills and earn while learning. Last year, 
possibly the last summer for the program due to federal 
budget cuts, 62 young people, recommended by their 
schools, churches and the Tennessee Department of 
Employment, got their chance at performing arts jobs 
and training. Everything from props and scenery 
design to writing and acting was fair game for the 
students as they created a final "graduation" show. 

"These young people were offered a kind of 
atmosphere that enhances the total child," according 
to Erma Clanton, associate professor in theater and 
communication arts. 

Fourteen-year-old Diane Young of Melrose High 
agreed with Miss Clanton and added that the classes 
on self-awareness helped her become more conscious 
of herself in relation to others. Young said she learned 
that she "shouldn't get upset because people do things, 
but keep your cool and accept things as they come." 



Another 14-year-old from Melrose said the self- 
awareness classes helped her bring out more of her 
personality and gave her a lot more self-confidence. 
She added that the "world of work" classes helped her 
to learn how to complete employment applications and 
how to present herself on job interviews. 

Seventeen-year-old Jackie Jones of Fairley High 
said, "it didn't matter if we got paid or not because they 
did a lot of things we really liked to do." Also, she said 
that they got help in such classes as English. 

Although the atmosphere was very relaxed, Miss 
Clanton said there were no problems because the 
young people had a set of rules to follow. Many people 
were surprised to find anything that involved dancing 
and acting so well organized, she added. 

The relaxed atmosphere allowed the students to play 
a major role in the type of show to be done, and the 
themes used related to the students' lives in some way 
and had a solution, Clanton said. 

"Most of the students were religion-conscious, but 
some wanted to leave the church and go out into the 
world. We wrote a play that involved this theme," said 
Clanton. The play they staged last summer, "Ordinary 
People", was based on the story of the prodigal son. 

— Donneshia Owens 




Matrice Russell, a grateful CETA participant, presents a gift of appreciation from the 
group to Erma Clanton, director of the program and an associate professor at theatre of 
Memphis State. 

Tonya Carruthers mournfully watches the "Prodigal Son "as he heads for the bright lights 
of New York City. 



34 EOS Foundation (CETA) 




Rosalind Nichols sings of the reasons why "None but the 
Righteous" shall see God. 

As the toast of New York, the "Prodigal Son," played by 
Thomas Martin, enjoys the fruits of the fame he so actively 
sought. 




In the finale, the cast tings about how the problems they portrayed are those faced everyday by "Ordinary People" and celebrates the "Prodigal Son's" return. 



Student Life 35 



"Energetic to Elegant" 






Since MSU has the advantage of beinga 
relatively large school, one can see a wide 
variety of exciting fashions on campus and 
in the classroom. Most people like to take 
popular items and create their own looks. 
Personal style is usually determined by 
one's personality and individual lifestyle, 
so there is no "standard" code of dress at 
MSU. Fashions range from elegant to 
trendy to very casual. 

For winter wear, dark colors, especially 
blacks and grays, seem to be popular. 
Women's suits sport longer jackets as well 
as padded shoulders and cinched waists. 

This winter's biggest trend is accessor- 
izing. Handbags, shoes, belts and scarves 
add splashes of color to the darks and 
neutrals. Red, yellow and teal are hot 
colors for accessories this year. Large 
earrings and bold metallic jewelry add 
drama to simple suits and sweater dresses. 

More casual looks include sweats, jump- 
suits and cropped jeans. The "Flashdance" 
look — layers of sweatshirts (often torn), 
tee-shirts and legwarmers — is extremely 
popular and practical for cooler weather. 
Striped baggy jeans are the latest look in 
ladies' casual wear. For a fun change of 
pace close-fitting, mid-calf length jeans are 
worn with heels and colored hose. 

Fashion at MSU doesn't stop in the 
women's department. Men's clothing is 
also moving away from the ultra-preppy 
styles to a more sophisticated, tailored 
look. Sportswear separates are topping 
fashion lists this winter. Tailored slacks are 
seen under bulky sweaters or tab-collared 
shirts in bold colors. Tweed is a definite 
frontrunner; a tweed jacket is almost a 
"must have." 

Men's casual looks this winter center 
around more neutral colors. Camoflauge- 
patterned pants and jackets are big again 
and jeans, as always, are also high on the 
list. Pinstripes and black denim are new 
treatments of the tried-and-true blue jeans. 

Upcoming spring fashions will have a 
dramatic appeal. The biggest single item 
this spring will be the chemise and similar 
waistless styles. For optimum versatility 
they may be belted or worn loose. Look for 
bright, neon pastels and white cotton. 
Loose, unstructured jackets and longer, 
fuller skirts will be popular, as will loose, 

Winter and spring have never looked 
better at Memphis State! Just a short walk 
across campus will reveal the special flair 
that so many students have for dressing to 
suit their personalities. 

— Ingrid Smithey 




36 Fashion 



"Memphis State Fashion 
Displays a Unique Range of Apparel" 




The DeSoto would like to thank Gloria 
Vaught, a junior marketing major, and 
Hilary Hines, freshman for allowing us to 
use photographs from their portfolios. 
Both are professional models in the 
Memphis area. 




Fashion 37 



















"Bold and Brassy, Short and Sassy, Cool and Collected 



38 Fashion 




V. 





MSU Students Show Style. . . . " 



Fashion 39 



A New Adaptation Starts the Season 



The Memphis State University Theatre 
began its 1983-84 season with a production 
of Moliere's "Tartuffe," translated and 
adapted for the MSU stage by director 
Douglas J. Koertge. 

"Tartuffe,"astory of religious hypocracy, 
takes place in Paris in 1929. It focuses on 
the plight of Oregon family who have 
become virtual slaves to Tartuffe, a shyster 
whose supposed religious piety has kept 
the master of the house in the dark as to his 
true nature. However, the other members 
of the household see Tartuffe for what he 
really is and plot to expose him. Through a 
chain of events that has the audience 
screaming for Tartuffe 's blood by the last 
minutes of the play, the villain is seen by all 
for the snake he is. But just when ill-gotten 
victory appears to be his, it is snatched 
away and he learns, all too well, that crime 
doesn't pay. 

Besides giving its audiences fine serio- 
comic entertainment by a capable cast, 
"Tartuffe" was also an elegant visual treat. 
Jan Chambers, making her debut as the 
MSU Theatre's scenic designer, created a 
set which contributed greatly to the rich 
1920 Parisian atmosphere. 

— Sondra Lewis 




Mariane (Emily Woodward), Damis (Alan Frazier), C leante (Hermit Medsker) and Dorine (Barbara 
Beatty) explain their problems with Tartuffe to Elmire (Donna Kimball). 





Orgon ( Mel Shra wder) listens with rapt attention as Tartuffe 
(Vic Clark) speaks of his religious suffering. 



! 



"I don't want to marry that horrid man!" Mariane sobs upon learning of 
her father's plan to marry her to Tartuffe. 



40 



Theatre 



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Elmire convinces her husband Orgon to hide in the piano to witness 
Tartuffe's hypocracy. 




Tartuffe attempts to seduce the beautiful Elmire 
to leave Orgon and join forces with him. 




Tartuffe informs the Orgon household that he now owns their home and land. 



Theatre 41 



The Studio Theatre 
Is Smaller Only In Size 



The MSU Studio Theatre, training ground for graduates 
working toward advanced degrees and a showcase for smaller 
productions, opened its 1983-84 season with a production of 
William Inge's "Bus Stop". 

Directed by graduate assistant Christie Bowles, "Bus Stop" is 
the story of several bus passengers stranded in a diner in a small 
town outside of Kansas City. Even though the audience is allowed 
glimpses into the lives of all the passengers, the action centers 
around the turbulent romance of Cheri, a singer and dancer in a 
sleazy nightclub, and Bo Decker, a belligerent, but insecure 
cowboy. As the story unfolds, we learn Cheri has been virtually 
kidnapped by Bo and they are en route to his ranch, much to her 
dismay. But as the play progresses, we discover that Bo is much 
more insecure than he appears and Cheri, Originally unsure of her 
feelings for Bo, cares more for him than she thought. 

Besides the outstanding direction and cast performance in this 
production, which has been said to rival the fall Main Stage 
production in excellence, graduate assistants Scott Bowden's 
scene design and Robin Gail Jackson's Costumes were also a 
tremendous attribute to the look and feel of the play. 

— Sondra Lewis 





Photos by J. Scott Vanzandt 

Looking for any escape from Bo's overbearing affections, Cheri (Kathy Yarman) 
takes cover in the diner. 



Bo Decker (John Dye) sulks after losing a fist fight to the local sheriff. 



42 Theatre 



Unaware of his disreputable past, Elma Duckworth (Suzye Lomenick) falls prey to 
Dr. Gerald Lyman's (Ken Zimmerman) flattery. 

Bo decides that he will take Cheri with him by force if she will not come with him 
agreeably. 




Theatre 



MSU Theatre Season Leaps Forward 

With "Strider" 



"Strider," a play with music by Mark Rozovshy based on a 
story by Leo Tolstoy, was a 1983-84 MSU Theatre production 
which compelled audiences to use their imaginations. For those 
who attend shows expecting the entire world to be painted out for 
them with sets, props, and costumes, "Strider" was quite a shock. 
We, the audience, were taken through Russian countryside, city 
streets, and lavish apartments, decorated only by the barest of sets 
and props, the rest provided courtesy of our own imagination. 

"Strider" is simply the story of the birth, life, and death of a 
horse. However, Strider was born a piebald, considered 
undesirable in a horse. It is this fact which separates him from the 
other horses and causes him to lose Swan, his only true love. After 
a few years of glory in the city, Strider returns to his birthplace, 
old and worn, to become an object of scorn to the other horses and 
to eventually be killed by his master. 

However, "Strider" is more than just a depressing horse story. 
Through Strider's thoughts we can draw some very true 
conclusions about man's treatment of anyone or anything different 
— and the tragic results it can bring about. 

Directed and staged by Keith Kennedy and Susan Chrietzberg, 
"Strider" possesses a large cast with many performers who took 
on double roles. Also noteworthy was Dirk Kuyk's lighting design 
which gave the simplistic set great versatility. 

— Sondra Lewis 



Strider and Swan (Teri Harrison) tell their true feelings for each other in a moment 
alone. 




Photos by l. Scott Vanundt 




A newborn Strider (Tim Greeson) looks upon the world with wonder for the first time. 



44 Theatre 




Stricter speaks of the ridicule and abuse he suffers from the other horses because he is different. 




Prince Serpuhovsky (Galen Fott) and Marie (Kasi 
Saunders) drink to a toast as Fritz (Tim Fall) looks 
on. 



Strider waits patiently for his impending death. 




Theatre 45 



Musicians Offer Lively Schedule 



From Traditional to Contemporary, 
Sounds of Music Fill the Campus 



The Department of Music at Memphis 
State offers a plethora of traditional, con- 
temporary and regional musical presen- 
tations throughout the calendar year. 

Student and faculty recitals are virtually 
a weekly event during the academic year, 
but a fine program of special presentations 
by the department's bands, choral en- 
sembles and other groups provides musi- 
cal fare fit for any ear. 

One special presentation during the fall 
term was a performance of "Don 
Pasquale" by the Opera Theatre at MSU. 
Thomas Machen was artistic director and 
Robert Griffith music director for this 
three-act opera written by Gaetano 
Donizetti and Giovanni Ruffini. The 
production was staged and performed by 
undergraduate and graduate music majors 
with scenic and lighting design by Alex 
Jankowski and costume design by Kris 
Hanley. Opera Memphis, the community 
opera company, provided assistance. 

Another annual event of note is the 
Visiting Artist Recital. This fall's presen- 
tation was mezzo-soprano Marilyn 
Jewett, accompanied by Allison Nelson 
at the piano. 

Among jazz performances, were those 
by the MSU Jazz Singers, Bill Bastian, 
director; Blue Ascendance, Gary Topper, 
director; Southern Comfort Jazz Ensem- 
ble with Memphis saxophonist Fred Ford, 
and the Birdland Repertory Company, 
Tom Branch, combo leader. These jazz 
presentations were part of the Fall Jazz 



IV and the Annual Homecoming Jazz 
Concert. 

Performances were also presented by 
the Memphis State String Quartet, Uni- 
versity Orchestra, Brass Quintet, Uni- 
versity Wind Ensemble, Percussion En- 
semble, Memphis State Woodwind 
Quintet and the several chorus ensembles 
at MSU 

Also charming the ears of the Memphis 
State community were The University 
Singers, a highly select Choral ensemble 
under the direction of Dr. John Cooksey. 

Membership in the group of approxi- 
mately 65 voices is open through audition. 
Diversity in its musical offerings is a goal 
of the Singers, who perform primarily at 
University and community functions, al- 
though the group does a Spring tour to 
promote the University throughout the 
region. 

The Singers have received many honors, 
including first place position at the 
Overton Square Christmas Choral Con- 
test, and the opportunity to perform for 
the Tennessee American Directors' As- 
sociation/ Tennessee Music Educators' 
Convention in both 1982 and 1983. 

The University Singers also performed 
for the Music Educators' National Con- 
ference-Southern Division in Louisville, 
and received a standing ovation. The 
group performed as backup singers for 
Barry Manilow in his Memphis Concert, 
1982, and served as his hosts at a workshop 
Manilow presented at Memphis State; 



The Singers are at their peak for the 
Christmas holiday season when they are 
featured in an annual Christmas concert. 
Music in the repertoire includes a variety 
of secular literature as well as spirituals 
and lighter pieces for the performances. 

Another large choir of approximately 
70 persons, is the Oratorio Society, 
composed of Memphis State University 
students and faculty together with mem- 
bers of the Memphis community. 

Dr. Walter Wade directs the group 
which performs large choral works such 
as Haydn's "Lord Nelson Mass" and the 
Faure "Requiem." The group holds re- 
hearsals each Monday evening during the 
academic year. 

The MSU Men's and Women's Choir 
is a unique organization which offers the 
chance to perform a wide variety of 
music. This group is open to both the 
experienced musician and the interested 
amateur. 

Designed primarily for non-music ma- 
jors, the Women's Choir was conducted 
this year by Jules Mercier with Bill Welsh, 
accompanist. The Men's Choir is con- 
ducted by Dr. John Cooksey with John 
Goodwin, accompanist. Sandra A. 
Morrow and Margie L. Winter are co- 
presidents of the Women's Choir; Alan 
Crone is president of the Men's Choir. 

Since their beginning in 1980, these 
two choirs have grown to some 45 
members in each group. This newest of 
the choral groups at Memphis State 



46 Student Life 



offers many opportunities for students to 
expand their musical and personal hori- 
zons as well as to promote the University 
throughout the Memphis community. 

Gospel music is a popular regional spe- 
cialty which is performed by the Memphis 
State Gospel Choir. 

Open to all students, this group offers 
the opportunity to perform contemporary 
gospel, spirituals and gospel hymns. Once 
a member of the MSU Gospel Choir, a 
student may audition for the Show Choir 
whose members are selected from the 
broader group. 

Director of the MSU Gospel Choir is 
Ms. Lulah Hedgeman. 

Highly specialized music is the bill of 
fare for the Camerata Singers, a small, 
select group of students. 



This choir is directed by Ms. Konnie 
Saliba and performs primarily medieval 
and renaissance music. Its annual high- 
light is a December presentation co- 
sponsored by the Student Activities 
Council: the Memphis State Christmas 
Madrigal Dinner. 

The 1983 Madrigal Dinner(two nights) 
was held in the University Center Multi- 
purpose Room which was converted into 
a 13th century English manor. Before a 
backdrop of "tapestries," two members 
of the Camerata Singers served as lord 
and lady of the manor with the rest of the 
chorus taking roles of English gentry in 
an entertainment open to students and 
the public. 

The dinner begins as the Camerata Singers 
offer a processional and make a wassail 



toast and song. Banners and pewter adorn 
the tables, and diners represent towns- 
people visiting the manor house for the 
holiday celebration. A traditional dinner 
of choice prime rib or Cornish hen, fresh 
fruit and "wassail" precedes a flaming 
plum pudding dessert. 

During the meal, the Camerata Singers 
wander through the ballroom singing 
songs and chatting with the guests. 

After dinner, the singers return to the 
main stage for a 45-minute concert of 
14th, 15th and 16th century music from 
Germany, France, Spain and England. 
Accompanied by the Collegium Winds, 
the Singers intensify the authenticity of 
the evening by performing to instruments 
popular during the period: the recorder, 
the gamba, bells and tambourines. 




Ready to perform their speciality, 13th to 
15th century music, the Camerata Singers 
use renaissance and don medieval attire to 
heighten the effect. Amajor project is the 



annual Christmas Madrigal Dinner which 
begins with a processional and wassail 
toast and proceeds to an elaborate tra- 
ditional Yuletide meal. 



Student Life 47 



Playing an instrument like the cello with expertise 
takes years of practice to achieve. 



Practice 
Makes 
Perfect 










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The University Orchestra gathers for a show of force 
in musical power and ability. 






48 Music 




Max Huls sets the tempo for the orchestra 



Music 49 



Beauty of Song Finds Many Forms 



The Men's Choir, conducted by Dr. John 
Cooksey, performs a wide variety of music. 
The choir is open to both experienced 
musicians and interested amateurs. 





The MSU Women's Choir, designed pri- 
marily for non-music majors, is one of the 
newest choral groups on campus. Formed 
in 1980, the group is conducted by Jules 
Mercier. 



50 




Don Pasquale (Emerson Green, Jr.) begs Dr. 
(Malatesta (Dudley "Hal" Otey) to introduce him to 
Norina (Lura Elliot), who is posing as "Sophronia." 

Ernesto (Ian Bourg), Don Pasquale's nephew, sings 
of his lost happiness. 




Opera Offers Fun, 
Drama 

For those of you who like a little move- 
ment with your music, the MSU Depart- 
ment of Music offers their Opera Theatre. 
For their 1983 fall production, the depart- 
ment chose "Don Pasquale," the story of 
an old bachelor who marries, an act which 
brings disastrous results. 

Two seperate casts were chosen to present 
the production on alternating nights, giving 
the viewing public a chance to receive a 
double dose of department's talent. Com- 
plimenting the fine vocal performances 
were the bright costumes and sets. 

The comedy, with music by Gaetano 
Donizetti and libretto by Giovanni Ruffini. 
was under the artistic direction of Thomas 
Machen and the musical direction of Robert 
Griffith. 

— Sondra Lewis 



Opera 



51 



MSU MARCHING BAND 



Deranged is only one of the many 
terms used to describe the 240 people who 
masochistically marched two long hours 
every weekday during football season. 

The members of the marching band 
convened on Memphis State's campus 
almost two weeks before classes started. 
During band camp, the students marched 
five to seven hours a day and spent three 
hours in an indoor rehearsal. After school 
started, the band practiced two long 
hours every weekday, as many of the 



residents of Robison and Hayden Halls 
can verify. Whenever the band people 
took up their weapons and attacked the 
practice field, Dr. Sidney McKay and 
Mr. Arthur Theil, the band's directors, 
could be seen (and heard) teaching the 
mad mob a new half-time show. 

Last season, the band performed five 
different half-time shows. Their first show 
consisted of "Star Wars" themes and the 
"Ewok Celebration Song.'" The band 
saluted the arrival of the Egyptian Art 



Show at the MSU Art Gallery by learning 
a special Egyptian show which opened 
with "Aida"and closed with "King Tut." 
The band also learned a show in honor of 
Memphis Music for the homecoming 
football game. "Gotta Get to Memphis," 
Elvis'"Memphis"and "Love Me Tender," 
and "Greatest Love of All" were some of 
the songs performed during the MSU/ 
Southern Mississippi game. 

Each year, the MSU Band hosts the 
Mid-South Invitational High School 




The Mighty Sound of the Souths last half-time 
show was one of their most dazzling and creative! 
The show opened with the circus song (Thunder 
and Blazes). The Bengal Lancers put down their 
flags and displayed a beautiful, multi-colored 
maypole. After a concert tune, the band performed 
a percussion feature, Carnival. The show ended 
with Greatest Love of All as arranged by a 
member of the band 

Freshman saxophone player Jeff Davis exhibits 
one of the many fashions and trends that helped 
marchers stay cool during band camp. 

Clarinet player Gary Buss concentrates on his 
upcoming performance. 




52 Band 




The Mighty Sound of the South 




Many marchers just can't stand the pre- 
game pressure! Even though members often 
wonder why they wade through mud and 
brave the wind and rain on the practice 
field, the excitement felt as Saturday and 
game time roll around usually make up for 
all the work into practice. Mellophone 
player Dan McKee doesn't let the pressure 
of a performance dampen his spirits. 
Saxophone players Leslie Bitner and 
Angela Barr break from their deep con- 
centration on their performance the minute 
they see a camera. 



Last years' officers were: 
Mel Northsworthy President 
John Langham Vice President 
Sheri Smith Secretary 
Scott Little Treasurer 
Beth Armstrong Librarian 
Elected as class reps were: 
Bob Seay & Carol King Seniors 
Kenny Loyd & Cheri Theil Juniors 
Tim Walker & Kenneth Mealer Sophomores 
David Graves & Carla Andreas Freshmen 



Marching Contest at the Liberty Bowl. 
Twenty high school bands came from 
Mississippi, Arkansas, Kentucky, and 
Tennessee to compete for "The World's 
Largest Trophy," that went to the first 
place band. The Reserve Grand Champion 
and the Grand Champion bands from the 
contest marched the pre-game and half- 
time shows at the MSU/Tulane game. 

Most of the music and drills used by 
the band were composed and drawn by 
the graduate assistants Ken Geise, 
Rhendle Millen, and Marty Courtney. 
Lenore Thomas helped the Bengal Lancers 
prepare their drills during band camp, 
and also helped coordinate the flag corps' 
show during the season. George 
Schneider, a senior mellophone player, 
composed an arrangement of "Greatest 
Love of All," which was used as a closer 
for several shows. 

The Mighty Sound of the South per- 
formed a pre-game and half-time show at 



every home game (with the exception of 
the Tulane game), and marched at the 
Alabama, Vanderbilt, and Mississippi 
State away games. Some other songs that 
the band performed included "Thunder 
and Blazes" (which was highlighted by 
two unicyclists several jugglers), "In the 
Stone," and "I Goto Rio". 

Of course, band does not live on march- 
ing alone. The Band Alumni Association 
held a dance for the MSU Band at the 
Schlitz Brewery Ballroom. There were 
also fun and thrills had by all at the 
annual band banquet. This year's mad 
meal was held at the Hobby Hills Country 
Club. 

Although the band suffered from severe 
financial cutbacks, last year proved to be 
a prosperous year for the band. Cheri 
Theil, one of the field commanders, 
remarked, "This year's band is better 
than last year's. Most of the band 
members' attitudes are a lot better this 
year". The band was elated to learn that 
trumpet section leader Mike Yopp had 
decided to tie the knot. Mr. Yopp was 
married on October 21st, or "the Friday 
of the open weekend before the Vandy 
game" as most members remembered it. 
Each year, the band elects officers and 
class representatives to help Dr. McKay 
make some decisions involving the band. 
The members of the Mighty Sound of 
the South hold many memories of the 

1983 marching season. They will never 
forget practicing in the cold October rain; 
the MSU/ Alabama game where they 
were herded 10 people to 8 seats; the 

death of Carla Andreas' Toyota Corona; 

and the pre-game fireworks at the first 

football game that scared the dickens out 

of the unsuspecting freshmen. 



Band 53 



BARITONES: Lynn Gilmore, Tim Collins, Earl Hampton, 
Steve Teichmann, Jim Maxwell, Derrick Holmes, Bess Trouy. 



■nm 







During the two long, hot, torturing weeks of band camp last 
August, the band members marched endless hours in the blazing 
sun. Sun tans were everywhere along with one dominant feeling 
among the marchers-THIRST! The band provided soft drinks 
for the students as they practiced their hearts away on the 
practice field by the field house. Angela Barr, having survived 
the mad stampede to the refreshments, relaxes with a refreshing 
cola, worth its weight in gold! 

CLARINETS: first row: Pam White, Jere Douglas-section 
leader, Lori Kelley, Terry Artz, Gary Buss, Glenda Webster; 
second row: Kelley Kraft, Marian Love, Carol Schmidt, Ginger 
Martin, Pam Pugh, Carl Rusterholtz; third row: Kamal Ibn- 
Turiya, Carol King-section leader, Mark Sowell, Glenn Lucas, 
Spensha Ingram, Debbie Dumas. 




PICCOLOS: first row: Kellye Scott, Stacy 
Smith, Papatya Curtis, John Langham-section 
leader, Cindy White, Susan McKay, Jackie 
Collins, Mollie Edminster; second row: Sue Lynne 
Perry, Kim Rhodes, Tari Bauer, Pam Hedrick, 
Kelly Thomas, Terri Turney, Nancy Gray, Connie 
Clingan; third row: Sheri Smith-section leader, 
Cookie Spencer, Le Ann Maclin, Elaine Bannister, 
Ave Barker, Elizabeth Shelton. 




54 Band 




FRENCH HORNS: (Mellophones): first row: Deborah 
Yount, Lisa Moore, Dan McKee, Lacye Prewitt, Susan 
Mills, Melissa Cox; second row: Sam Cardinal, Larry 
Coats, Jim Dickenson, George Schneider-section leader, 
-<on Covington, Stephen Norman, Alex Trobaugh. 



TROMBONES: first row: Brenda Rutledge-section 
leader, Tammy O'Neal, Connie Mascroft, Barry Pinlac, 
Andrew Hester, James Solomon; second row: Scott Kinney, 
Kenneth Cole, Richard Prokup, John Wiley, Gary Menees, 
Kurtis Thurman; third row: Woody Dickenson, Greg 
Lowry, David Bratcher-section leader, J. D. Sargent, 
David Chipman, Robert Stoyer. 




Tigerette Christi Gray during one of the band's many 
performances. The Tigerettes often practiced for hours 
after the rest of the band had left the field. The Tigerettes 
performed several different shows for the pre-game and 
half-time drills. 



TUBAS: first row: Rodney Holland, Pete Pancella, 
Wayne Shaw, Donald Bailey, Jim Bougue, David Graves; 
second row: Elmo Hoffman, Tad Dowdy, Calvin Daughtry, 
Bob Seay-section leader, Craig Andreas. 



Student Life 55 



PERCUSSION: First row: Mike 
Warren, Leiza Broeker, Kevin 
Statham, John Payne, Bart Dixon, 
Brad Gurley, Scott Trammell, Jay 
Fite, Ricky Smith, Keith Morris, 
Terri Pincheon, Van Carter; second 
row: Mike Chiodo-instructor; Jeff 
Rogers, Teddy Dean, Trey Moore, 
Eddie Miller, Bob Morrison-instruc- 
tor; third row: Jay Cain, Pat 
Bohannan, Jonathan Smith, Leslie 
York, Bob Springfield; not pictured: 
Susan Martin. 




SAXOPHONES: front row: Kathy 
Roberts, Gene Sparks, Tim Walker, 
Denise Peacock-section leader, 
Alvin McKinney, Shell Berry, 
Michael Richardson, Carl Hess- 
section leader; second row Ricky 
Buchanan, Kevin James, Angela 
Barr, Leslie Bitner, Harold Collins, 
Calvin Smith, Sean Medek, Jeff 
Davis, Laurie Petriskie; third row: 
Stephen Stansbury, Jamie Burks, 
Kim Russell, m Mike Wilson, Al 
Gabriel, (aria Andreas, Tim Van- 
Frank, West Beibers, Jeff Gatlin. 




«i» 4* *.. «i* -' - t&idimxto&L* 



TRUMPETS: first row: Fuzzy 
Northsworthy-section leader, Mike 
Yopp-section leader, Mike Mc- 
kenzie; Bob Malewski, Thomas 
Russell, Dedrick Davis, Larry 
Jones, David Richardson; second 
row: Willie Screech Smith, Juan 
Williams, Jeff Lovelace, Kenny 
Loyd, Kenneth Mealer, Scott 
Thompson, Beth Armstrong, 
Melody Phillips; third row: Wesley 
Fowler, Doug Kirkpatrick, Paul 
Harvey, Scott Little, Chuck Bryant, 
Jimmy Patrick, Alan Bateman, 
Brian Kelley; fourth row: Rudy 
Boldreghini, Mickey Hanner, Jeff 
Darby, Luke McGarrh, Rod 
Martin, Johnny Jeffords, Hugh 
Ackermann; fifth row: Richard 
Thornton, Doug Sparkman, Steve 
Wike, Greg Nelson, Cedric Winfrey, 
Judith Hampton, Wendell Fuller, 
David Risner; sixth row: Russ 
Chessor, Dan Seymour, Willie 
Waldman, Don Rawlings, Kevin 
Perry, Michael Martin. 




56 Band 





BENGAL LANCERS: back row-Shelia Penilton, Jackie Howard, Konna 
Donnelly, Pam Riddick, Amy Ewell, Jane Panyard, Leigh Howell, Dawn 
Johnston, Missy Melvin, Kathy Hardinm, Marsha Rowe-Instructor; front row- 
Janet Pejza, Anne Spell, m Barb Ramey, Patti Brown, Tonya Lewis, Karen 
Johnson, Regina Harris, Trudi Pruett, Laura Stickell, Lisa Staten. 







i 



Barb Ramey practices her routine as the band marches to Greatest Love of All. 



TIGERETTES: first row-Lisa Riepma, Kathy Babb, Lori Kessler-MSU Golden 
Girl, Cathi Haynes: second row: Kristie King, Connie Wilborn, Jan Gray, Tina 
Sanford: third row: Melodie Rickard, Terri VanEaton, Melissa Moore: fourth 
row: Christi Gray, Jo Alice Carnathan. 



Band 57 



a 



; A nd A II That Jazz " 

MSU's Own Radio Station 
Moving Into Live Reports 



"All That Jazz" is more than just music 
to WSMS ears. It is the motto of the 
Memphis State radio station, which began 
brodcasting with an all-jazz format in 
1979. 

The overall format remains primarily 
jazz, but has grown to include such special 
features as Tiger football, basketball and 
baseball home games. Lady Tiger home 
games and live broadcasts of musical 
presentations from Harris Auditorium. 
Other live coverage includes 7:30 to 9 a.m. 
traffic reports which concentrate on campus 
parking conditions (and who doesn't need 
it?), The Miss MSU Pageant and all Metro 
Tournament basketball. 

Live gospel music by the Spirit of 
Memphis Quartet is featured Sunday 
mornings between 8 and 9 a.m., and a 
special feature, "Tell It Like It Is" is aired 
three times daily with students giving their 
opinions on important topics of the day. 




It takes a lot of technical know-how to keep those 
broadcasts going as Tom Mann has learned. 



58 wsms 



Approximately 40 students are involved 
in the operation of the station with an 
additional 10 who work out of the news 
department in the Meeman Journalism 
Building. The station news is fed directly 
from the newsroom to the station in the 
Theatre and Communication Arts Building. 

The primary concern of the station now is 
to increase the power, and thus the coverage 
and signal quality of the station, according 
to General Manager Bob McDowell. 

"Presently we are investigating several 
alternatives - including the possibility of 
building our own 400 foot tower in Shelby 
County and increasing our power from 250 
watts to 10,000," McDowell said 

"This change will increase our coverage 
from a 7 miles radius to an approximate 20 
miles," he said, "and will greatly improve 
our signal quality." 



Where's that album? No more doubts as Amy George 
carefully files them away and selects more music for 
Memphis State's radio station, WSMS. 



Lisa Hatchett plots a few surprises for WSMS 
listeners. The station is moving into more news and 
live reports this year. 





Tim Brown keeps the discs spinning in keeping with 
the WSMS motto: "All That Jazz". 




wsms 59 




Time out to relax for Alicia Mathews, who assists in Business manager Ann Baker believes in organization and order, as her desk shows. Her assistant manager, 

sending the Helmsman to mail subscribers and James Kirkland, and contract manager, Nancy Wilson, agree. 

advertisers. 

Campus News Hot off the Press 

Daily Helmsman Covers the World 
With Student Reporters, Editors 



The presses roll and Memphis State's latest news hits the 
stands in the Helmsman. This free student paper is published 
Tuesday through Friday. It brings information on campus 
activities to all students. The editorial staff includes an 
Editor-in-Chief, two associate editors, (one of whom is also 
the photography editor), a business manager, and a General 
Manager — a new position formed this year. 

Most reporters for the Helmsman are members of the 
Journalism Department's Reporting Class. Each reporter is 
given a beat — for pratical purposes, a building — to cover and 
is responsible for reporting any activities occurring in that 
building. If there is a meeting of a special committee, or a 
student gathering (i.e. a pep rally), a reporter is assigned to 
cover it for the Helmsman. 

Writing these articles is a requirement for the Reporting 
class, and its instructor gives the articles to the editor. Each 
member of the class is also required to work in the Helmsman 
office for at least one hour per week. 

According to fall editor Kathy Krone: "We try to be as 
professional as possible, but most of the staff is inexperienced. 
The newspaper is organized as a learning experience. It gives 
the journalism students an opportunity they might not get 
otherwise." 

Not all of the members of the Helsman staff, however, are 



journalism students. Any MSU student may join the staff. 

Producing a paper four days a week involves long hours 
and dedication, said Krone, who admits to averaging between 
10 and 15 hours per day in the office. She said that "you 
sacrifice a lot, but if you are serious about journalism, it gets 
in your blood, and the experience will stick with you." 

On the day before the paper comes out, most articles are 
turned in by 3:30 p.m. to allow enough time for them to be 
typeset and laid out and printed. The typesetting is done in the 
Journalism building, but the paper is printed elsewhere. At 2 
a.m. a courier picks up the flats, from which the paper is 
printed, drives 70 miles to New Albany, Miss., where the 
9,500 copies are printed, and delivered to MSU by 6:30 a.m. 

Trina Jones is the General Manager. She considers herself 
the "behind the scenes administrator." Her responsibilities 
encompass all facets of the Helmsman: advertising, editorial, 
and production. Her major job is to be available when needed 
to give advice to the editors, or to help smooth out a problem 
that may arise. 

Jones emphasizes that "this is a student newspaper." "It is 
an educational tool for the students," she said. "They have the 
responsibility of putting the paper together. I am here for 
them if they have any problems." 

—Susan O'Connor 



60 Helmsman 




It takes a lot of people to produce a daily newspaper, 
and it's never easy to catch editorial and production 
staffers in one place at one time. Front row (seated) 
fall editor Kathy Krone and photo/associate editor 
Karen Carter. Row 2: Nancy Bailey, associate sports 
editor; Robert Baker, typesetter; Terry Britt, associate 
sports editor; Rebecca Babineaux, summer editor; 
Cindy Eschbach, paste-up artist; Trina Jones, general 
manager, and Dan Stringfellow, associate editor. 
Back row: Charles Brown, spring 1983 editor; Kay 
Cartwright, production manager; Jeff Atnip, paste- 
up artist, and Martin Wakefield, paste-up artist. 




Reporter Leanne Alexander turns down an offer to 
rewrite her story.. ..but in a friendly way. 

Every staff needs a little support, and Helmsman 
staffers get that helping hand from M arcia Gnuschke, 
records and information clerk; Trina Jones, general 
manager; and Ron Spielberger, advertising adviser. 



Student Life 61 



The DeSoto 



Thanks for the Memories 







DeSoto staff, front row (I to r) - Mary Lynn Caldwell, Melissa Robbins, Sondra Lewis, Nike Olubadewo, Nelson Bonds; back 
row (I to r) - Chuck Schrimsher, Chris Carothers, Steve Norman, Ethan Porter, Cedric Woodson. 



"What is the DeSoto?" 

Ask that question to any number of 
students and the odds are that one will get 
answers ranging from "The what?" to 
"Wasn't he some explorer or something'.'" 

Well, yes, DeSoto was some explorer or 
something, but that isn't the right answer 
to this question. The correct answer is 
(drumroll, please). ..the Memphis State 
yearbook. 

Why all the fuss over a yearbook? Well 
to start with the obvious, the DeSoto is a 
book of memories, most of them good and 
a few, unfortunately, sad. Nevertheless, it 
is all the times we can look back on and 
remember how we felt at a certain place 
and time. The names, the faces, the 
activities and events it would be a 

challenge for any MSU student to look 
through the book without finding some- 
thing that would call up a few special 
memories. 

A second important aspect of the year- 
book is the staff. Whereas other student 
publications on campus are staffed mainly 
by journalism and English majors, the 
DeSoto has staff members from all aspects 
of the campus. For example, Jacqueline 



Jones, fall editor for the 1984 DeSoto, was 
a journalism magazine major, but spring 
editor Scott Vanzandt carries a chemistry 
major. 

Third, since the book is worked on over 
a great deal of time, staffers can learn 
about every aspect of publication from the 
original creation of ideas for the book to 
gathering the necessary information to 
layout and paste-up. Yet, in spite of the 
lengthy production time, there is still the 
challenge of meeting deadlines with work 
to be proud of. 

Finally, the best asset the book possesses 
is the fact that it is a book full of 
information. Students, faculty, admini- 
stration, campus organizations and events 
- the DeSoto has the scoop on it all, both 
facts that are public knowledge and in- 
formation that is not so well known. 

The DeSoto is not what everyone thinks 
it is. And thank goodness! Who would 
want "an explorer or something" as a 
yearbook? —Sondra Lewis 

The following staff members are not pictured: Donna 
Spencer (business manager), Ruth Turner, Ingrid 
Smithey, Lou Carmichael, Tonda Brewer, Clayton 
Reed, Jill Butler and Stacy Powell. 




Editors (I to r) - Steve Norman, Academics/ Greeks; 
Mary Lynn C aid well. People; Sondra Lewis, Assistant 
Editor/Student Life; Melissa Robbins, Organizations; 
Ethan Porter, Sports. 



62 DeSoto 




Jacqueline Jones, fall co-editor for the 1984 DeSoto, 
is a senior majoring in magazine journalism. 







m* 



1 




Scott Vanzandt, spring co-editor, is a sophomore 
majoring in chemistry. 



/ 




"No one told me I'd have mechanical duties!' 





Ethan captured in his natural facial position 
mouth moving. 



'Why dont you people get a clue?' 



DeSoto 63 



DORMS: There's No Place Like Home 



Aside from the terrors of moving, 
the inconveniences of cracker-box 
rooms, the loss of privacy because of a 
roommate and the constant cries for 
any food not warmed up in a microwave 
for the sixth time, some "dormies" still 
felt dorm life was all they could ask for. 
Residents searched for anything from 
Cap'n Crunch posters to empty beer 
bottles to give their room a homey 
(rather than homely) look. The 1 1 
dorms, which ranged from the casual 
simplicity of Hayden Hall to the big 
Hilton feeling of Richardson Towers, 
housed 2,285 students this year. 

For most freshmen from out of 
town, the first week meant seven days 
of suffering until they could get home 
for those things the Residence Life 
office did not provide: rugs, posters, 
dressers with adequate drawer space, 
comfortable chairs, lamps, food — and 
money. After the first month of school, 
most dorm rooms had reached the 



minimum requirements needed to be 
classified as a home rather than a cell. 

Pam Riddick, a junior majoring in 
education, who lived in Richardson 
Towers during the fall, liked the 
conveniences of on-campus living. 
Riddick enjoyed always having some- 
one around. "Living in a dorm, you're 
never lonely," she said. 

Ann Spell, a sophomore majoring in 
public relations, resided in Smith Hall 
and cited another plus. "Living on 
campus helps cut down on parking 
problems. You also meet a lot of 
people you wouldn't meet if you 
commuted or lived in an apartment." 

According to Rawls Hall's Laura 
Stickel, "Home is where the hot water 
and air conditioner are." Stickel 
enjoyed campus living even though 
Memphis wasn't quite like Henderson- 
ville. 

While lacking home-cooked meals, 
comfortable beds, clean bathrooms, 



and well-stocked refrigerators, dorm 
residents had some advantages over 
commuters. "Dormies"got a head start 
on parking, learned a good deal about 
the campus, and discovered never-be- 
fore-seen ways of conquering absolute 
boredom. 

Though there were times when 
residents may have wanted to run 
madly out of the building and never lay 
eyes on it again, there were also times 
that made dorm life enjoyable: short- 
sheeting the bed of that guy who shaved 
once a month and never cleaned out 
the sink; using a hair dryer to blow 
baby powder under the door of that 
girl who kept the floor up every night 
laughing hysterically at "Leave It to 
Beaver" reruns; spraying Lysol on that 
person who always concocted the worst 
smelling garbage for dinner and smelled 
up the entire floor for a week; or using 
toilet paper to mummify that guy who 

was always 

— Steve Norman 



Junior Pam Riddick collects tid bits from all over to decorate her room in Towers 
North. Her room, shared with Barbara Ramey, depicts travels from Chicago's St. 
Patrick's Day Parade to MSU's Mummy Mania. Miss Riddick's only complaint 
about dorm life is that the elevators frequently break down. 

Rene Jamerson, physical therapy major, hit it lucky and got a little moving help 
from a friend, Todd Frayser. making her move into Rawls Hall with "only barest 
necessities" took more muscle power than most newcomers expected. 




64 Dorm Life 




Probably one of the most valuable possessions from home is a 
person's pillow. Smith Hall resident Ann Spell agrees with this fact 
since she travels by bus a good deal with the band. 




Laura Stickel lived in Rawls Hall where she was known for her notorious invasions 
of her friends' rooms. Here, Miss Stickel has intruded upon Trudi Pruett who lived 
down the hall from her. 

Studying is not one of the more frequent habits of people who live in the dorm. 
Here, Jamie Burks is caught "out of character" as he studies for his class. 



Student Life 65 



MS V Beauties Never Miss A Beat.. 



Photo* by Mark Copley 




A bright smile from a sparkling winner— Sharon Russell, Miss Memphis State of 1983 (above). Miss Russell shares the spotlight with second 
alternate Cathy Young and first alternate Paula Everitt (inset). 



66 Miss Memphis State 




J :'• ■• 



Anita Knight, 1982 Miss Memphis State, 
displays the wonderful vocal talent which 
helped her capture her title. 





In a dazzling display of beauty and 
color, the contestants line up for the 
judges' final inspection. 



Definitely on her toes, Ellen Andrews treats 
the audience to a spirted talent exhibition. 



Lisa Koehler's shining smile, as well as a 
beautiful gown, helps to paint a picture ol 
delicate Southern beauty. 



...And Please the Crowd, Naturally 



"We've Got the Beat." At least that's 
what 14 contestants vying for the Miss 
Memphis State title believed April 9, 1983 
at the University Delta Lounge. 

First place winner of the title and $250 
was Sharon Denise Russell. Sponsored by 
Phi Mu, Ms. Russell is a 19-year-old 
sophomore communications and broad- 
casting major. 

First runner-up, Paula Everitt, a junior 
in early childhood education, was self- 
sponsored. She won $150. 

Second runner up was a 21 -year-old 



senior majoring in fashion merchandising, 
Cathy Young. She was sponsored by Alpha 
Gamma Delta. Miss Young won a double 
award of $100 and the title of Miss 
Congeniality. 

About 800 people attended the compe- 
tition which included three events: talent, 
swimsuit and evening gown, and personal 
interview. 

Ms. Russell won all three events. Her 
talent performance was a jazz-acrobatic 
routine to Paul Jabarrei's "Yankee Doodle 
Dandy". 



Miss Memphis State 67 



Lecture Circuit Sparks Campus 



The lecture circuit at Memphis State has 
been electric and ecclectic, with talks 
ranging from the future of black women to 
life with "The Beav." 

The Consumer got a fair share of at- 
tention when consumer advocate Ralph 
Nader hit campus last spring and showed 
the world that he still hasn't forgiven and 
forgotten General Motors' sins. And he 
has added a few other corporations to his 
list as he urged students to get together to 
"fight crimes in the marketplace." 

Nader, who took on the auto industry in 
his best-seller "Unsafe at Any Speed", won 
a lawsuit against General Motors for in- 
vasion of privacy, and used the $425,000 
settlement to begin his consumer interest 
movement. Public Citizen. 

His visit followed a March talk by 
Shirley Chisholm, first black woman elected 
to Congress, and the first to seek the 
Democratic nomination for the U.S. Pre- 
sidency. She warned her audience that she 
did not like President Reagan's policies 
one bit and urged a speedy return to caring 
for the poor and elderly who are unable to 
care for themselves. 

Moving out of the political arena and 
into the private sector. Dr. William H. 
Masters, human sexuality authority, told 
students that "sex is a natural function" 
which improves as communication between 
the partners improves. The doctor covered 
a variety of myths and misconceptions 
which cloud human sexual activity in his 
March speech in the University Center. 




Human sexuality expert Dr. William H. Masters told 
students that sex is a natural function which improves 
as communication between partners improves. 



Political activity was very much in the 
news during the early fall and the campus 
was not immune to campaign fever. May- 
oral hopefuls D'Army Bailey, Otis Higgs, 
Timothy Mathews and L. A. "Tony" Watts 
spoke Sept. 19. Although Mayor Dick 
Hackett and Robert "Prince Mongo" 
Hodges didn't make it to the forum, the 
others presented their platforms and tried 
to point out how they differed. Mayor 
Hackett appeared later in the year at a 
Snack n Rap session. 

Presidential fever then struck, and the 
campus was treated to visits from Demo- 
cratic contender, the Rev. Jesse Jackson 
Nov. 30. His speech had students cheering 
as he called for "a new coalition, a new 
course and a new leadership." A few days 
later, former astronaut Sen. John Glenn 
(D.,Ohio) made an appearance speaking of 
his agriculture program as he tried to 
interest Mid-Southerners in his presidential 
bid. 

Other astronauts also found the Memphis 
State campus a powerful draw, as Michael 
Coats appeared in September to discuss 
the space shuttle program, and Brig. Gen. 
Charles Duke, one of the few men ever to 
set foot on the moon, spoke in January. 

Governmental agencies sent representa- 
tives to garner support for programs, clarify 
issues and generally educate the public on 
how government affects every life. Dr. 
Murray L. Weidenbaum, former chairman 
of President Reagan's Council of Economic 
Advisers, made an October appearance to 
describe an economic policy for the 1980s, 
and Sherlene McCarther made a trip to 
Memphis to recruit for the Peace Corps. 

The darker side of governmental activity 
was discussed by former CIA agent John 
Stockwell who, in a March speech, urged 
the dismantling of that agency. 

The lighter side of the news also got its 
fair share of student time and attention 
with the September performances of "The 
Amazing Kreskin", billed as the world's 
foremost mentalist, followed in February 
by the one and only Beaver. Jerry Mathers, 
who starred in the popular television series, 
"Leave It to Beaver" found an enthusiastic 
audience ready to hear about his life as a 
child star. 

More specialized subjects were dealt 
with by speakers sponsored by a variety of 
campus groups. The River City Contemp- 
orary Writers' Series offered a number of 
lectures by authors and writers. Journalists 
heard Bernard Kalb, NBC's State Depart- 
ment reporter talk on Freedom of Infor- 
mation at the annual FOI Forum. And Dr. 
Robert Arnot, a consultant to the Inter- 



national Olympic Committee, spoke on 
science and sports. 

Arts and religion came into focus early 
in the school year when The Divine Tour of 
Ancient Egypt bowed in at the University 
Gallery, bringing with it a series of speakers 




Consumer advocate Ralph Nader told students to 
unite to "fight crime in the marketplace". Nader, who 
lambasted the American automobile industry in his 
book "Unsafe at Any Speed, "is founder of the public 
interest organization, Public Citizen. "Nader's 
Raiders" have become a well known consumer force. 



on Egypt, ancient gods and archeology. 
Russian religious poet, Dimitri Bobyshev, 
also appeared to speak on life and religion 
in the USSR. 

Women in Action featured Channel 5 
anchorwoman Brenda Wood, city council- 
woman Minerva Johnican, and Shelby 
County government representative Clau- 
dette Nichols in a panel discussion of what 
the future holds for black women. 

This was but the tip of the campus 
iceberg, for daily talks and lectures and 
captured interested audiences on subjects 
ranging from alcoholism to defense policy 
and from psychic phenomenon to surviving 
the Holocost, completing the circuit. 



68 Campus Speakers 



The Amazing Kreskin, billed as the world's foremost mentalist made a campus 
appearance to amaze and entertain MSU students. 




Mayoral aspirants D'Army Bailey and Otis Higgs came to campus in the fall to 
present their platforms and explain how their programs differ from that of 
incumbent Mayor Dick Hackett. Hackett made a later visit to the campus to speak 
during a Snack n Rap session. 



Campus Speakers 69 



Winning Style Takes Spirit Squad to Orient 



Memphis State's Spirit Squad, composed 
of mascot, mike-men, pompon squad and 
cheerleaders, for the second straight year, 
took the champion's crown in the National 
Cheerleaders Association Collegiate Cheer- 
leading competition. The squad showed its 
winning style in the arena and via television 
this year. 

U.S. Rep. Don Sundquist led in praise 
of their performance saying, "...the MSU 
cheerleaders have now placed higher and 
won more collegiate cheerleading competi- 



tions than any other school in the country. " 
The group won the crown in competition 
with 20 finalists at Moody Coliseum on the 
Dallas campus of Southern Methodist 
University Jan. 14. The complete routines 
of the five top winners, MSU, Michigan 
State University, Clemson University, 
Louisiana Tech University and the Uni- 
versity of Florida were shown on national 
cable television. 

The MSU victory received farflung 
acclaim, for later that month, team 



members were invited to perform their 
award-winning routines in Japan in a 
three-month international festival, begin- 
ning in the spring. 

The all-expense paid trip to Kyushu, 
Japan sends current and former members 
of the squad to perform at Mitsui 
Greenland, a theme and entertainment 
complex similar to Disney World in 
Orlando, Fla. 




70 Student Life 




Student Life 71 




72 Student Life 




Student Life 73 




74 Academics 




r i 



i 'V 
." « * 





f\uJdb^i(A 



The rafters of the administration building 
shook with exitement when school officials 
heard the news that Memphis State had 
received 100% acreditation in all accreditable 
programs offered by the university. Memphis 
State was the only public university in 
Tennessee to be so designated. 

The campus recording studio, the pride 
and joy of the College of Communications 
and Fine Arts, continued to create an 
excellent learning environment for students 
preparing to enter the competitive field of 
music. 

Engineering students continued to be 
entertained by delightful robots which helped 
teach the would be engineers about 
automation and robotics. 

And the school's academic standards 
increased, students began spending more time 
after class in tutoring sessions and began 
taking their lessons more seriously. 

Signs of change and promise for the future 
were all around and the news was on the vine 
—Memphis State was BETTER THAN EVER 



Av^Ae 



Campus 




School 


76 


Who's Who in 




American Colleges 


77 


AROTC 


88 


AFROTC 


89 


Honors Program 


90 


Alpha Epsilon 




Delta 


92 


Gamma Beta Phi 


93 


Phi Kappa Phi 


94 


Omicron Delta 




Kappa 


95 


Phi Eta Sigma 


96 


Golden Key 




National 




Honor Society 


97 


Commercial Music 




Program 


98 


Library Sciences 


99 


Robots at MSU 


100 


Chuckalissa Indian 




Village 


102 


May Graduates 


103 


August Graduates 


114 



Academics 75 



MSU Campus School 



Contrary to many MSU students' be- 
liefs, the Campus School in the southeast 
corner of the campus is not a graduate 
school for Munchkins. The little people 
who swarm about the Campus School are 
children in grades one through six who 
attend the MSU Campus Elementary 
School. This school is the same thing asa 
public school — only different! 

Children assemble for fun in the sun. 



I ■ mA 2 




An early start in computer training aids children in 
MSU Campus School. 



The Campus School is a public school 
that is run under the direction of the 
MSU College of Education. Unlike public 
schools, enrollment into the school is not 
determined by district zoning. Admittance 
to the Campus School is set according to 
the following factors: if the child has a 
parent on the faculty, if a brother or sister 
is in the school, and if the geographic 
position of the child's home qualifies. 
Parents must request that their child be 
admitted to the school. There are no 
academic requirements for admittance, 
but the dominant impression of the Cam- 
pus School is that of a superior education. 

The director of the Campus School is 
Mrs. Peggy Williamson, who was gradu- 
ated from Southwestern at Memphis. 
The assistant director, Mrs. Debbie Men- 
doza, has a degree from Memphis State. 

The 473 children at the school have 
acquired a healthy familiarity with the 
MSU campus. They use the field by the 



field house for recreation and they also 
use the pool in the HPER Complex for a 
swimming class. The classes at the school 
take tours of the greenhouse atop the Life 
Science Building and they also tour the 
MSU Art Gallery. 

There are 22 faculty members at the 
Campus School. Each one is an accredited 
instructor and acts as supervising teacher 
for students from the College of Educa- 
tion. The MSU students operate in a 
work/study program at the Campus 
School. Several of the faculty members 
have degrees from Memphis State. 

Campus School is in its 71st successful 
year. Founded in 19 12 as Training School, 
it became the MSU Campus School in 
1963. The lucky children who attend 
Campus School enjoy several benefits 
found in private schools, along with the 
advantages of going to a public school. 

— Steve Norman 



The playground lays silent as children are busy at work inside. 




76 Education 




MSU Campus School offers a balanced program. 



WHO'S WHO 



Thirty-eight Memphis State students 
were selected to appear in the 1983 edition 
of Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities . In keeping with the established 
traditions, the students were judged on the 
basis of their academic success, their 
participation in activities and organiza- 



tions, and their community involvement. 

The publication, which lists promising 
young Americans, was founded by Pettus 
Randal in 1934 in order to facilitate the 
acknowledgement of college students 
throughout the country who were recog- 
nized by both their faculty and peers for 



their outstanding services. 

In 1983, as in previous years, strong 
emphasis was placed upon the applicants' 
over-all contributions; and only those who 
possessed the proper, well-rounded char- 
acteristics were selected for inclusion. 



Not Pictured 



Robert Ellis 
Major: Accounting 
Graduated from Briarcrest H.S. 
Activities & Honors: SGA, Judicial 
Affairs Board, Pi Kappa Alpha, Student 
Ambassador Board, Young Alumni As- 
sociation, Blue Chippers, Campus Cru- 
sade for Christ 



Linda Faye Glass 
Major: Secondary Education-English 
Graduated from York H.S., Virginia 
Activities & Honors: Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Golden Key National Honor 
Society, National Dean's List, National 
Council of Teachers of English, Kappa 
Delta Pi 



Stephen F. Knack 
Major: Political Science, Economics; 
Minor: International Relations 
Graduated from Bartlett H.S. 
Activities & Honors: Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, Pi Sigma Alpha, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Golden Key National Honor Society, 
Pre-Law Society 



Gail Wellborn Morton 
Major: Biology; Minor: Physical Science 
Graduated from Kingsbury H.S. 
Activities & Honors: Chi Beta Phi, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, Gamma Beta Phi, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Beta Beta Beta, Golden Key 
National Honor Society, National Dean's 



List, Volunteer at LeBonheur Children's 
Hospital 



Brent Goodwin Robertson 
Major: Electrical Engineering; Minor: 
Math 

Graduated from Ridgeway H.S. 
Activities & Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Golden Key Na- 
tional Honor Society, Sigma Chi, Tau 
Beta Phi, SGA, Student Ambassador 
Board, MSU Academic discipline Com- 
mittee, MSU Baseball Team, Young Life, 
Memphis Jaycees 



Janie L. Taylor 
Major: Home Economics (Fashion Mer- 
chandising); Minor: Marketing 
Graduated from Scheffield H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kapa, Kapa Omicron Pi, Delta Gamma, 
Women's Panhellenic Council, SAC, 
SGA, 1983 Maid of Cotton 



Theresa Gay Williams Tibbals 
Major: Recreation & Parks Administra- 
tion; Minor: Psychology 
Graduated from Jackson Central-Merry 
H.S. 

Activities & Honors: Mortar Board, 
University Programs, Sierra Club, MSU 
Dean's List, Homecoming Committee, 
Director Miss Memphis State Pageant 



WHO'S WHO 








E. Elaine Bannister 

Major: Early Childhood Education 
Graduated from Hopkinsville H.S., 

Kentucky 
Activities and Honors: National Dean's 
List, Golden Key National Honor 
Society, International Reading As- 
sociation, Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha 
Delta, American Orff-Schulwerk 
Association, MSU Student Tennes- 
see Education Association, MSU 
Interfaith Council, Wesley Council, 
SGA, Fashion Board, Mighty Sound 
of the South Marching Band, MSU 
Concert Band, Pep Band, Home- 
coming Committee, Tiger "20," Blue 
Chippers, Tiger Pawer Hostess, FCA 



Luis Miguel Altuve 

Major: Civil Engineering; Minor: Math 
Graduated from San Augustine H.S., Ven- 
ezuela 
Activities and Honors: National Dean's List, 
MSU Dean's List, Hispanic Organization, 
International Association, ASCE, Catho- 
lic Hispanic Community, International 
Group of Memphis; also attended Univer- 
sity of Arkansas. 



Gregory E. Barnes 
Major: Accounting; Minor: Economics 
Graduated from Millington Central H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Beta Gamma 
Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key 
National Honor Society, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Beta Alpha Psi, Omicron Delta 
Epsilon, Alpha Lambda Delta, Youth 
Athletics Coach 




78 Who's Who 



WHOS WHO 



Joanna Burke 

Major: Finance; Minor: Marketing 
Graduated from Ridgeway H.S. 
Actvities and Honors: Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Golden Key National Honor Society, 
Mortar Board, Honors Student Associa- 
tion, Student Ambassador Board, Talking 
Library Services Participant, Delta Gam- 
ma, Panhellenic Council, Order of Omega 





Charles Kevin Campbell 

Major: Accounting 

Graduated from Towering Oaks Baptist H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Phi Eta Sigma, Beta 
Gamma Sigma, Golden Key National 
Honor Society, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa 
Alpha, IFC, Order of Omega; also attend- 
ed University of Mississippi 




Larry Allen Dawson, Jr. 
Major: Finance 

Graduated from Sky- View Academy 
Activities and Honors: Greek Editor for 
DeSoto, SGA, Student Ambassador 
Board, Outstanding Young Achievers 
of America, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Sigma Chi, Order of Omega 



Who's Who 79 



WH03 WHO 



Brian E. Devine 

Major: Pre-Dent.; Minor: Chemistry 
Graduated from Father Ryan H.S., Nashville 
Activities and Honors: National Dean's List, 
Mortar Board, Golden Key National 
Honor Society, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Chi 
Beta Phi, Hayden Dorm Council, Knights 
of Columbus, Pi Kappa Alpha, P.E. 
Coach for Saint Anne's School; also 
attended Spring Hill College 





Carta Jean Dixon 

Major: Special Education 
Graduated from Bishop-Byrne H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Kappa Delta Pi, Sigma Phi, SGA, Action 
Civitan Club, Special Olympics Fitness Club, 
Delta Gamma, Order of Omega 



r 



Helen Delores Ford 
Major: Social Work; Minor: Sociology 
Graduated from G.W. Carver H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Phi Theta Kappa, Stu- 
dent Social Work Organization, National 
Association of Social Workers, BS A, Mem- 
phis Volunteer Placement; also attended 
Shelby State Community College 




80 Who's Who 




/ 



X 



WHO'S WHO 




Anthony Edward Frulla 

Major: Microbiology; Minor: Chemistry 
Graduated from Christian Brothers H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Alpha Epsilon 
Delta, Golden Key National Honor 
Society, Phi Kappa Phi, Chi Beta Phi, 
Beta Beta Beta, Knights of Columbus, 
Lambda Chi Alpha 



Edward Lee Giaroli 

Major: Accounting; Minor: Finance 
Graduated from Christian Brothers H.S. 
Activities and Honors: National Dean's 
List, Golden Key National Honor So- 
ciety, Phi Kappa Phi, Beta Alpha Psi, 
National Association of Accountants, 
BSU, Insurance Club, Volunteer for 
United Way, Lambda Chi Alpha 





Paula Anita Gray 

Major: Civil Engineering 

Graduated from Jackson Central Merry 
H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Golden Key Na- 
tional Honor Society, ASCE, Tau Beta 
Pi, Society of Minority Engineers and 
Technologists 



Donald Ray Hankinson, Jr. 

Major: History; Minor: Criminal Justice 

Graduated from Bartlett H.S. 

Activities and Honors: National Dean's 
List, Interfraternity Council, Phi Alpha 
Theta, Geology Club, Phi Gamma 
Delta, Order of Omega, Intramural 
Advisory Board, Greek Intramural 
Man of the Year, 1980. 








>*&$ 



. '' i-: 




Who's Who 81 



WH03 WHO 




Gaylon Lee Harris 

Major: Math (Statistics); Minor: Chem- 
istry 

Graduated from Central H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Alpha Epsilon Delta, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, Student Affiliates 
of American Chemical Society, 
MSU Social Discipline Committee, 
MSU Academic Appeals Commit- 
tee, Presidential Scholar, Pi Kappa 
Alpha, Teacher's Assistant-Chemis- 
try Dept. 

Sara Lee Harbuck 

Major: Elementary Education 
Graduated from Memphis Preparatory 

School 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Student Ambassador Board, 
Student National Education Asso- 
ciation, Whitehaven The Atrix, 
BSU, Delta Gamma; also attended 
Jackson State Community College. 





Lisa Lynette Hatchett 

Major: Broadcast Communication 
Graduated from Jackson Northside 

H.S. 
Activities and Honors: National Dean's 
List, MSU Dean's List, WSMS, 
Vocal Jazz Ensemble, Fashion 
Board, Blue Chippers, Memphis 
Jaycees, Delta Zeta; also attended 
Jackson State Community College 



82 Who's Who 




R. Maurice Hollingsworth 
Major: International Business 
Graduated from Craigmont H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Mortar Board, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, SEIFC, Stu- 
dent Ambassador Board, Cheerlead- 
ing Squad-Mascot, Order of Omega, 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Alpha 
Supreme Council, Interfraternity 
Council 




Kenneth R. Madden 

Major: Political Science; Minor: Public Ad- 
ministration 

Graduated from McCrory H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Pi Sigma Alpha, SGA, 
TISL Representative, Tennessee State Legis- 
lative Intern, Student Ambassador Board, 
University Standing Committee on Social 
Discipline, Young Republicans, Lads to 
Leaders, Kappa Alpha, Delta Gamma An- 
chor Brother, Interfraternity Council, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa 



Joanne Kay Longfield 

Major: Interior Design 

Graduated from Raleigh-Egypt H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Gamma Beta 
Phi, Mortar Board, American Society 
of Interior Designers, Alumni Student 
Competition, Tiger Lillies, Blue Chip- 
pers, FCA, American Red Cross, 
Campus Crusade for Christ, Order of 
Omega, Alpha Delta Pi, Kappa Alpha 
Little Sister 




Who's Who 83 



WHO'S WHO 



Harvey Williams Matheny 
Major: Civil Engineering 
Graduated from Covington H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Tau Beta Pi, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
National Dean's List, ASCE, Weight- 
lifting Club, Navigators 





Elizabeth James McMillan 
Major: Communications 
Graduated from Craigmont H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Mortar 
Board, SGA, Pom-Pon Squad, 
Women's Professional Business 
Association, Alpha Gamma Del- 
ta, Lambda Chi Little Sister 



5- * 



r 
l 



Alice Louise Peacock 

Major: Journalism (Public Relations) 
Graduated from Marshall County H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kappa, SGA, Sigma Delta Chi, Public 
Relations Student Society of America, 
BSA, Student Ambassador Board, 
Harambe, Collegiate Minority Jour 







84 Who's Who 



WHO'S WHO 



Karen Lorraine Pittman 

Major: Music Education; Minor: Sci- 
ence 

Graduated from Briarcrest H.S. 

Actvities and Honors: Mortar Board, Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, Gamma Beta Phi, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, Sigma Alpha Iota, Music Educators 
National Conference, Student Ambassa- 
dor Board, Undergraduate Appeals Com- 
mittee, Camarata Singers, Junior Panhel- 
lenic, University Programs, Order of 
Omega, Phi Eta Sigma 




■<:.■■" '-■ 
















Gregory Singleton 

Major: Elementary Education; Minor: Public 
Relations 

Graduated from Lexington H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Kappa Delta Pi, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Mortar Board, 
SGA, Interfaith Council, Order of Omega, 
Kappa Alpha, Interfraternity Council, 
Delta Gamma Big Brother, Phi Theta 
Kappa; also attended Jackson State 
Community College. 




Laurel Catherine Stephan 

Major: Biology-Pre-Med; Minor: Chemistry 
Graduated from Christian County H.S., Kentucky 
Activities and Honors: Phi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Mortar Board, Golden Key National Honor Society, 
Liberal Arts Honor Society, Alpha Epsilon Delta, SGA, 
Blue Chippers, Alpha Gamma Delta, Lambda Chi Crescent, 
delegate for TISL; also attended University of Kentucky 







Who's Who 85 



WHO'S WHO 



Lisa Dodd Turner 

Major: Vertebrate Zoology 

Graduated from Gallatin H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Student Ambassador 
Board, 3.00 Club, SGA, TISL Representa- 
tive, Homecoming Committee, Order of 
Omega, Panhellenic Council, Alpha Gamma 
Delta, Little Sister of Sigma Alpha Epsilon 








William Kavin Vaughn 

Major: Electrical Engineering 
Graduated from Bolivar Central H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Mortar Board, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Presidential Scholar, Golden Key 
National Honor Society, Tau Beta Pi, IEEE, 
Student Ambassador Board, Varsity Cheer- 
leader, Mascot, University Standing Com- 
mittee on Athletics, Kappa Alpha. Omicron 
Delta Kappa 



Julia Ann Thompson 
Major: Marketing 

Graduated from Saint Agnes Academy 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Mortar Board, American 
Marketing Association, Student 
Ambassador Board, Big Brothers/ 
Big Sisters of Memphis, Pi Beta Phi, 
Order of Omega, International 
Who's Who in Fraternities and 
Sororities 



86 



Who's Who 



Thomas Edward "Doc" Watson 
Major: Criminal Justice 
Graduated from Frayser H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Young Community Leaders 
of America, Arnold Air Society, 
Police Marksmen Association, Emer- 
gency Medical Technician, 8 year 
Veteran of the USAF-785th Air 
Force ROTC, 2nd Lt., Fraternal 
Order of the Police, Air Force Asso- 
ciation; also attended Jeff Davis 
Junior College 








Amy Elizabeth Schadrack 

Major: Biology-Vertebrate 

Graduated from Immaculate Conception H.S. 

Activities and Honors: Humphreys Society, 
Chi Beta Phi, Pre-Law Advisory Committee, 
Presidential Scholar, Volunteer at LeBonheur 
Children's Research Hospital 



Beth Curtis Windsor 

Major: Biology /Pre-Med; Minor: Chemistry 
Graduated from Germantown H.S. 
Activities and Honors: Mortar Board, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta 
Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key National 
Honor Society, Delta Gamma, Order of 
Omega, Student Ambassador Board 




Who's Who 87 



ARMY ROTC 



Providing practical experience in the art 
of organizing, motivating and leading others 
is the aim of the Military Science Program. 

There is no military obligation for 
enrolling in the Basic Course. Students are 
not required to wear uniforms or attend 
leadership laboratory. However, before 
entering the Advanced Course, the Basic 
Course must be completed. 

To be eligible for the two-year Advanced 
Course, a student must be enrolled with the 
University, have full-time status with two 
years remaining as either an undergraduate 
or graduate and be a U.S. citizen. Final 
selection is based on demonstrated academic 
performance, leadership potential, a qualify- 
ing score on the Officer Selection Battery of 
Tests and physical qualifications. 

Semester field training exercises are 
conducted over a weekend and are an 
extension of the lab. Students are required 
to attend a six-week Advanced Camp during 
the summer between their two years in the 
Advanced Course. It is held at Fort Riley, 
Kansas, a U.S. Army post. 

Students are paid for the six weeks and 
are furnished quarters and rations as well as 
transportation to and from camp, or a 
mileage allowance for use of their own 
vehicle. 



' r < -■ *•<"." 



-,,"' 



it 




A company of Memphis State AROTC 
cadets enjoy a brisk run after a stren- 
uous workout. 



Major David C. DeGrange, Professor 
of Military Science, oversees adminis- 
trative matters of AROTC. 



"AIRBORNE!!!" exclaims Gene Con- 
sterdine as he rappels down a building's 
face. Consterdine is a member of the 
Army ROTC detachment which spon- 
sors bi-annual rappelling clinics for 
members and other interested students. 





*».*" *:.,.*- 



Staff Sgt. Penwarden, Master Sgt. Rogers, Capt. 
McDonald, Sgt. 1st Class Pruit, Maj. DeGrange, 
Capt. Darden, Sgt. 1st Class Keith, Capt. Hall, 
Sgt. Maj. Nicolo, Capt. Yatto 




88 Academics 




Air Force ROTC 



Accepting an Air Force ROTC scho- 
larship translates into a four-year stint 
in the Air Force as second lieutenant 
with a starting salary of $18,500. 

The four-year college scholarship 
covers all expenses except dorm fees. It 
also includes $100 a month allowance. 

There is a catch. Students must qualify 
on the basis of achievement, not need. 
Requirements are ACT scores beyond 
24 (preferably 26-27), rank in the top 10 



Colonel Douglas W. Stockton, the newly installed 
Professor of Aerospace Studies. 




percent of the class and major in elec- 
trical engineering, mechanical engineer- 
ing, computer and similar programs. 
Other majors are accepted, however. 

Three officers teach the 40 students 
who now have scholarships. Courses 
include flight instrucion, Air Force 
organization, military history, leader- 
ship, management and national security 
policies. Many courses resemble those 
in business and political science 





The members of Angel Flight relax before one of their 
meetings. 



Lieutenant Colonel James Kasperbauer retired as 
Professor of Aerospace Studies at MSI' last year. Lt. 
Col. Kasperbauer received his doctorate at Memphis 
State last August. 



AFROTC 89 



MSU HONORS PROGRAM 




90 Honors 



The first two years of honors work at 
Memphis State University are taken large- 
ly in what is called the General Honors 
Program. At this level, most of the honors 
classes are special sections of lower- 
division courses that fulfill basic degree 
requirements, such as the introductory 
courses in English, philosophy, education, 
economics, music, history, computer 
programming, theater, the sciences and 
many others. 

These classes differ from regular classes 
in several ways: (1) they are smaller, 
limited to a maximum of 15 students; (2) 



they are taught by carefully chosen faculty 
who have the reputation of being excellent 
teachers and scholars; (3) there is more 
emphasis on class discussion and student 
participation; (4) the general quality of 
the class is higher, though the quantity of 
work done should not differ greatly from 
that in a regular class. 

Also a part of the General Honors 
Program is an introductory interdisci- 
plinary course called The Honors Forum. 
It is a freshman-level course designed to 
introduce bright students to the many 
intellectual and cultural opportunities 







available in a university community. It 
consists of a series of lectures, demon- 
strations, performances and concerts in a 
variety of disciplines. 

Any student who has completed a 
minimum of six lower-division hours and 
has a grade point average of at least 3.25 
is eligible to enter one of three advanced 
honors tracks, which, if successfully 
completed, will lead to graduation with 
honors. The first advanced honors track 
available is the departmental honors 
program track. If a student is majoring in 
a department that offers an honors 
program, he may complete the require- 
ments of that program and graduate with 
honors in a particular discipline (e.g. 
"With Honors in Anthropology"). 

The second advanced honors track is 
the college-level track. This provides 
programs that are college-wide and will 
lead to graduation with honors in a 
broader area than those offered by 
departments. At present there are three 
such programs: The Fogelman College of 
Business and Economics ("With Honors 
in Business Administration"), The College 
of Education ("With Honors in Edu- 
cation"), and The University College, 
which has a joint program with the 
University Honors Program. 

The third track is a broadly inter- 
disciplinary program offered by the 
University Honors Program itself and 
will lead to graduation "With University 
Honors". It consists of a series of junior- 
level honors colloquia and senior-level 
honors seminars, with the option of a 
senior-level honors thesis. 




Honors 91 



ALPHA EPSILON DELTA 







.. ,..;. :_; 




Officers 

Beth Windsor 

President 

Anthony Frulla 

Vice President 

Brian Devine 

Secretary 
Christina Chen 

Treasurer 

(not pictured) 

Gail Morton 

Scalpel Reporter 

Rachel Larussa 

Historian 



The Tennessee Delta chapter of Alpha 
Epsilon Delta was founded at MSU in 
1974. AED originated in 1926 at the 
University of Alabama. Presently, there 
are 135 chapters across the nation. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta was formed in 
order to encourage and recognize excel- 
lence in premedical scholarship and to 
promote contacts and cooperation be- 
tween medical and premedical students, 
educators and medical professionals. 

To be eligible for membership in AED, 
students must be enrolled in 36 hours in a 
preprofessional program. Students must 
have a 3.0 GPA in science and a 3.3 GPA 
overall. 

AED's advisors are Joanne B. Sims, 
Dr. Thomas Caplinger and Dr. Peter 
Bridson. In February of 1983, AED hosted 
speaker Dr. Emil Freireich, a cancer 
specialist from the University of Texas 
Cancer Center, and also promoted 
a Health Career Day in March of 1983. 



Members 



Melissa Ball 
Robbie Billings 
John Branwell 
Melody Breeden 
Susan Carter 
Connie Childress 
Donna Clary 
Anthony Colvin 
Maria Cornelius 
Randall Davis 
Donna Donati 
Trudy Edwards 
Alise Grogan 
Brad Gurley 
James Henry 
Carrie Irausquin 



Jim Kutchback 
Michelle Lard 
David Mann 
Trent Marcus 
Nancy McShan 
Sylvia Musicante 
Vinh Nguyen 
Lee Norris 
Aaron Owens 
Guinn Paulk 
Ann Raebel 
David Reid 
Emily Riales 
Laurel Stephan 
Phong Tran 
Mureena Turnquest 



92 Honors 



GAMMA BETA PHI 



Gamma Beta Phi was instituted in 
March of 1964 in South Carolina. The 
motto of the honor organization is 
Progressus per Eruditionem. Gamma 
Beta Phi came to the Memphis State 
campus in 1977. Its purpose is to en- 
courage scholastic effort and to reward 
academic merit. 

Gamma Beta Phi supports WKNO 
Radio and St. Jude's Children's Re- 
search Hospital. It also participates in 
public television's Action Auction. 

Admission into the society is granted 
to those students who have completed 
at least 15 credit hours of graduate work 
and who are in the top 15% of their 
class. 

By June of 1981, there were 16,000 
students who were members of the 72 
chapters that existed in eleven states. 







Grace Barger 
President 

Marilyn Chandler 
Secretary 



Officers 

Tom Spencer 

(Not pictured) 

Treasurer 



Andrea Collins 

(Not pictured) 

Historian 



Paula Tidwell 
Reporter 

Dr. Cheryl Chang 

(Not pictured) 
and 

Dr. Berkeley Kalin 
Advisors 



Members 



Lisa Gail Abrams 
Helen J. Adams 
Elizabeth A. Armstrong 
Amy A. Austin 
Marcella T. Banbel 
Dianne A. Baker 
Janet A. Baldinger 
Grace Berger 
Tommy C. Barker 
Ted M. Beasley 
Allen L. Bell 
James Benson 
Robbie E. Billings 
Melody W. Breeden 
Brenda K. Britzer 
James L. Brogdon 
B. Charles Brown 
Nick Brown 
Phil R. Bryant 
Amy Buckner 
Susan Carter 
Melissa Calderon 
Barbara Carey 
Marilyn Chandler 
Robert Chiarizzio 
Susan Clabough 
Patricia Cline 
Andrea Collins 
Ddanna Davis 
Vince DeGutis 
Keith Dennen 
Diana Dennis 
Rebecca Dyer 
Mary Earheart 
Elizabeth Earl 
Trudy Edwards 
Carl Ekendahl 
Michelle Ellis 



Michele Eskenazi 
Helen Flowers 
Gloria Fondren 
Ginger Fortune 
Julie Frazier 
Tammy Free 
Victoria Fry 
Laura Galloway 
Ronald Gatlin 
Joseph Giaroli, Jr. 
Ellen Gordon 
Oman Grant 
Frank Gubera 
Margaret Hay 
Heather Hendren 
Rhonda Hester 
Jeffrey Hiss 
Barbara Hitzhusen 
Judith Hoen 
Cynthia Hough 
Foster Hudson 
Patricia Hunt 
Mary Ashley Ingram 
Ilinda Jackson 
Carita Johnson 
Ginger Johnson 
Cathleen Kelly 
Gayla Kennemore 
Jane Ellen Knight 
Kathy Krieger 
Raymond Larwood 
Deborah Lard 
Erica Lusk 
Lis Leatherwood 
Jeffrey Lensman 
Laura Lewis 
Steve Likens 
Michele Lockhart 



Joanne Longfield 
Mack McCaul, Jr. 
David McCune 
Jerry McKissack 
Jama McMains 
Margo Madaio 
Patrice Maloney 
Connie Maples 
Trent Wright Marcus 
Mark Martin 
Rob Martin 
Lisa Matlock 
Leah May 
Ida Meece 
Michael Meeks 
Cynthia Mekus 
Linder Metts 
Lloyd Miller 
Robbin Mitchell 
Darlene Moore 
Douglas Morgan 
Sandra Morgan 
Vicki Morrison 
Gail Morton 
Mary Murphy 
Christoper Nemec 
Kent Norman 
Michael Orians 
Tony Ortiz 
Pamela Patterson 
Laura Patterson 
June Peoples 
Christina Pina 
Linda Porterfield 
Julie Potter 
Melissa Pruitt 
Charles Putnam 
David Reid 



Mary Richards 
Nancy Richie 
Pamela Riddick 
Tim Rochelle 
Alice Roebuck 
Timothy Roland 
Laura Rowland 
Eugenia M. Sackey 
Stephanie Sanders 
Maria Schmidt 
John S. Scott II 
Karen Seay 
Patrick Sherley 
Judy Shipman 
Lori Simmons 
William Smith 
Thomas Spencer, Jr. 
Helen Stagg 
Robert Stagg 
Frank Steiner 
Judy Sternberger 
Mathew Stevens 
Sheryl Strayorn 
Gail Suratt 
Tracy Swanson 
Gary Taylor 
Paula Tidwell 
Lark Torti 
Pennelope Turnbow 
Charles Utterback 
Amy Wagner 
Wynne Walker 
Eric Werenskjold 
Linda Wray 
William Wray 
Pamela Wright 
Jacqueline Yarbrough 
Bonita Young 



Academics 93 



PHI KAPPA PHI 




The foremost goal of the National Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 
was the recognition and encouragement of superior academic 
achievement in all fields of study. Also, the honorary realize that good 
character was a necessary quality in its members. 

Membership in Phi Kappa Phi is open only to those students whose 
records indicate that they were eligible to graduate Magna Cum 
Laude, juniors with at least a 3.2 G.P. A., and seniors with at least a 3.5 
G.P.A. 




Officers 

Ramona M. Mahood 
President 

(Not Pictured) 

Brent G. Robertson 

Vice President 

Thomas D. Shockley, Jr. 

President Elect 

(Not Pictured) 

David A. Collins 
Executive Director 

(Not Pictured) 

Betsy F. Vaught 
Treasurer 

(Not Pictured) 



Student Members 



Randy John Ahrens 
Elizabeth Allene Armstrong 
Carol Elizabeth Babb 
Gregory Eugene Barnes 
Turney Powers Berry 
Joanne Lynn Bonnet 
Carolyn Faye Booth 
Patsy Ann Blankenship 
Sandra Lucia D. Branch 
William Quinn Britt 
Allan Pete Browder 
Charles Kevin Campbell 
Howard Smith Carman 
LeRoy McClure Carter 
Susan Herbers Clabough 
Vickie Cheryl Cole 
William Edward Cooper 
Russell Jerry Deaton 
Keith Cameron Dennen 
Deborah Lynne DeWitt 
Peggy Lea Diffee 
Susan 1. Duffel 
Steven D. Ebe 
Barbara Gregory Edwards 
Trudy Dianne Edwards 
Barbara Cheryl Ewing 
Linda Leigh Fitch 
Anthony Charles Frulla 
Mary Ann Furniss 



Eddie Lee Giaroli 
Laurens Elizabeth Glass 
Charles Allen Goforth 
Patricia Eileen Gresham 
Michael Tandy Hall 
Stephanie Elsie Hamilton 
Diane Meinert Hammonds 
JoAnne Hardesty 
Sherrie B. Herring 
Vanessa Lynn Herring 
Marilyn Arlene Hirth 
Jeffrey Michael Hiss 
Shirl Taylor Hodum 
William Edward Hornor 
Valeria Paschall Hurt 
Cathy Jean Ivey 
Louise Taylor Jackson 
Laura Lee Jaworski 
Joseph Carl Jeans 
Jan Rosslyn Jerome 
Stephan B. Johns 
Lisa Katherine Jorgensen 
Suzanne Marie Josephs 
Cheryl Rule Kent 
Laura Lyn Reimold Kingsley 
Steve Knack 
Billy Joe Knight 
Kathleen Sue Krone 
Thomas Lee Lancaster 



Kerry Stevan Long 
Susan Lynn Longo 
Shirley Gupton Lynn 
Leah Mead May 
Doris Faye McDaniel 
Terry Lee McGhehey 
Sandra Simpson McKnight 
Aurelia W. Michaels 
Lisa Carol Millican 
Rebecca A. Montgomery 
Brenda Kaye Moore 
Terry Lyn Morrison 
Sandra Ann Morrow 
Daniel Quinn Murphy 
Lisa Parsons 
Jimmy L. Patrick 
Beth Shand Patton 
Shannon Frazier Pitner 
Pablo Plaza 

Linda Marion Porterfield 
Wilma J. Proctor 
Lenore Ann Rae 
Juanita McMillin Rast 
Patricia Faye Ray 
Jewell S. Reid 
Brent Goodwin Robertson 
Sidney Lynn Robinson 
Mike Kevin Russell 
John Francis Shields 
Debra Elaine Silverfield 



Jan L. Slutsky 
Dorothy M. Smith 
Erin Faith Smith 
Paul Harris Sorrelle 
Jane Burke Streit 
Mohammad Ali Tobatabai 
Donna Rice Tatum 
Linda G. Taylor 
Michael Edward Terry 
Ronald Buford Thomas, Jr. 
Robert Craig Thompson 
Shirley Lynette Townes 
Mary Kay Trout 
W. Steven Vollmer 
Teresa Jo Watkins 
Evelyn Diggs Waters 
David Richard Weigel 
Mary Carter Wells 
Dorris Wheeler White 
Wanda B. Whitsitt 
Terry L. Wilkinson 
F. Michael Williams 
John Louis Williams 
Jimmy Wilson 
Jo W. Wilson 
Nancy Tyler Wilson 
Beth Curtis Windsor 
Charles Keith Winn 
Carolyn Lee Woods 
Ruby Fay Workman 



94 Honors 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 



Omicron Delta Kappa was created at 
Washington and Lee University in 1914 
in order to recognize individuals who 
possessed high social, cultural and moral 
values both in campus and community 
life. 

The honorary club has long been 
known for its emphasis upon the whole 
person, both as a member of the 
collegiate community and as a contribu- 
tor to a better society overall. Prospec- 
tive members were required not only to 
possess high academic marks, but also 
were required to have exhibited the 
qualities of leadership and responsibility. 

The MSU chapter has been especially 
active in the annual University-wide 
Honors Assembly. Judge Ann Pugh 
and Mr. Charles Fisher were two of the 
speakers that gave lectures to the club. 



A dministrative 
Members 

Mr. Jay Andersen 

Dr. Jerry N. Boone 

Mr. Charles W. Cavagnaro 

Mr. J. Phillip Cannon 

Dr. Thomas G. Carpenter 

Dr. Donald K. Carson 

Dr. Charles W. Crawford 

Dr. J. Rex Enoch 

Captain Randall M. Fountain 

Professor W. Walton Garrett 

Dean Clarence O. Hampton 

Mr. Richard D. Jones 

Dr. James C. Kasperbauer 

Mr. Robert W. McKinley 

Professor Dan S. Murrell 

Dr. Patricia H. Murrell 

Dr. James MusKelley 

Dr. Van N. Oliphant 

Dr. Richard R. Ranta 

Ms. Elma N. Roane 

Dr. R. Eugene Smith 

Mr. Ronald E. Spielberger 

Dr. Alicia C. Tilley 

Dr. David M. Vaught 

Mrs. Bets F. Vaught 

Dr. John H. Wakeley 

Mr. W. Terrell Williams 





£ 





Officers 



Mr. R. Maurice Holligs worth 
President 

Gaylon L. Harris 
Vice President 

Dean David A. Collins 
Faculty Secretary/ Treasurer 

(Not Pictured) 

Dr. James R. Chumney, Jr. 
Faculty Advisor 

(Not Pictured) 



Student 
Members 



Jon D. Albright 
Holly M. Baker 
Joanna C. Burke 
Sarah A. Carroll 
Carolyn J. Chumney 
Larry Allen Dawson 
Carla J. Dixon 
Carl R. Elliott 
Joseph E. Flynn 
Sara L. Harbuck 
Shirley T. Hodum 
Danny W. Kail 
Joanne K. Longfield 
Kenneth R. Madden, Jr. 
Randy K. Mathenia 
Robert S. McCullough 



Elizabeth J. McMillan 
Nancy N. McShan 
Mary Ann Murphy 
Jeffery D. Parrish 
Alice Louise Peacock 
Karen L. Pittman 
Brent G. Robertson 
Gregory R. Singleton 
Matthew T. Smith 
Laurel C. Stephan 
Thomas F. Svoboda 
Julia A. Thompson 
Kathryn H. Thompson 
Lisa D. Turner 
W. Keith Vaughan 
Thomas E. Watson 
Beth C. Windsor 



Honors 95 



PHI ETA SIGMA 



Phi Eta Sigma was founded in 1 923 at 
the University of Illinois as a National 
College Scholastic Honor Society for 
freshmen. It encouraged and rewarded 
high scholastic achievement among 
freshmen in institutions of higher 
learning. 

All freshman men and women were 
eligible to join who had a cumulative 
grade-point average equivalent to or 
better than 3.5 at the close of any 
curricular period during their first year. 

Throughout the year, Phi Eta Sigma 
sponsored various activities which 
benefited the surrounding community. 







Officers 

Troy Cowan 
President 

Lynda Mitchell 
Vice President 

(Not Pictured) 

Nancy A. Grogan 
Treasurer 

Jacqueline M. Yarbrough 
Secretary 

Dean Clarence Hampton 
Faculty A dvisor 

(Not Pictured) 



Members 



Ahmad, Norlizah 
Albright, Jon Douglas 
Bennett, Lizbeth Ann 
Brown, Kurt Alan 
Chan, Christina Y. 
Copeland, Mona Louise 
Cotten, Carol Lee 
Eakes, Melinda D. 
Ewell, Amy Suzanne 
Farrris, Laura Anne 
Ford, Karen L. 
Green, Juanita 
Hendren, Heather Jo 
Hughes, Craig Stewart 
Jackson, Darryl Mitchell 
Jackson, Kimberly Diane 
Keys, Demetrice 
Lacy, Leah Michelle 



Lattimore, Robert Luis 
Lewis, Jacquelin A. 
Likens, Steve W. 
Limberg, Steve 
Loskove, Michael Aaron 
Low, Yeng Keong 
McKinnie, Sandra Kaye 
Montgomery, Van A. 
Moore, Brad 
Moore, Deborah K. 
Morris, Alan L. 
Mynatt, Robert N. 
Peel, Dan F. 
Pipkin, Betty Amelia 
Putnam, Charles Michael 
Okorare, Markson Ochuko 
Reed, John Richard 



Ricossa, Raymond J., Jr. 
Rittelmann, Carrie 
Sackey, Eugenia-Marie 
Schmidt, Maria Christine 
Schwartz, Brian William 
Sewell, Wendolyn 
Sipes, Charleyn 
Stevens, Matthew Hudson 
Strickland, James S., Jr. 
Strickler, Ruth Anna 
Thompson, Linda Yvonne 
Tran, Phong Hung 
Van Frank, Tim 
Vandersteeg, James David 
Womack, Raymong W. 
Woods, John B. 
Wray, Lynda Mitchell 
MCraven, Patricia A. 



96 Honors 



GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 




Officers 



William Gerald Smith 
President 

Suzanne Josephs 
Vice President 



Harold Garrett 
Secretary 

Pamela Patterson 
Treasurer 



Frank M. Dyer, Jr. 
Advisor 



The Golden Key National Honor Society 
was established to recognize and encourage 
scholastic achievement and excellence in all 
undergraduate fields of study. It came to 
Memphis State in 1978. 

Golden Key charges its members to 
dedicate themselves to maintain personal 
standards of scholastic excellence and to 
promote these standards of achievement at 
their college or university. Continued 
dedication to scholastic excellence will serve 
as a model for fellow students to emulate. 

Golden Key is open to all Juniors and 
Seniors who have a 3.3 or better G.P.A. It 
awards two scholarships on an annual 
basis. They are the Outstanding Junior and 
Senior Awards. Golden key supports 
WKNO Public Television. 



Student Members 



Leigh A. Alexander 
Karen L. Alley 
Robert E. Armbruster, Jr. 
Theresa A. Artz 
Rebecca B. Askew 
Madelyne R. Atkins 
Melissa L. Ball 
Esther E. Bannister 
Tommy C. Barker 
Robbie E. Billings 
Carolyn F. Booth 
Lori Anne J. Brandon 
Leiza C. Broeker 
Phillip R. Bryant 
Mary Jane Bush 
Carol A. Carlton 
George E. Cathey 
Christina Y. Chan 
Reba G. Clark 
Kerry O. Cleveland 
Patricia R. Cline 
Caryn A. Coffey 
Susan L. Cohen 
Vickie C. Cole 
Tracy L. Colston 
Mary A. Cox 



William S. Crone 
Deanna L. Davis 
James R. Davis 
Randall A. Davis 
Vincent M. DeGutis 
Iris A. Dichtel 
Catherine D. Diel 
Hilda D. Dlugach 
Sue C. Ellzey 
Michele A. Exkenazi 
Helen K. Fast 
Patricia Ferguson 
William A. Fiete 
Helen B. Flowers 
Ginger C. Fortune 
Jackie L. Foster 
Russell Fowler 
Roger A. Gaines 
Phillip L. Galbreath 
Scott R. Gamblin 
Margaret L. Garavelli 
Frederick J. Grabo 
Patricia E. Gresham 
W. Todd Groce 
Roseann M. Halcomb 
Julie B. Hampton 



Jan S. Hanover 
March S. Hanover 
Jeffrey M. Hiss 
Steven P. Hiss 
Judith S. Hoehn 
Rosemary C. Hoiliday 
Joyce R. Howell 
Ming M. Hsu 
Foster E. Hudson 
Catherine J. Hughes 
Stacy B. Hume 
Mark E. Jackson 
Anita G. James 
Carita F. Johnson 
Carmen M. Johnston 
Kim Josh 
Lisa L. Kennedy 
Dorothy O. Kirsch 
Angel K. Klyce 
Stephen F. Knack 
Stephen L. Kokajko 
Donna J. Lampley 
Sandra K. Langston 
Alicia Lax 
Betty J. Lazarini 
Harry R. Levey 



Steven W. Likens 
Terry Anne Lupo 
Dea A. Maclin 
Elizabeth L. Mann 
Zahira J. Marrouche 
Mark W. Martin 
Glenn W. Mayfield 
James B. Mead 
Barbara C. Meester 
Lloyd D. Miller 
Rebecca A. Montgomery 
Gail W. Morton 
Michael R. Morton 
Mary Ann Murphy 
Jennifer C. Nunley 
Toby W. Paone 
James R. Peyton 
Sarah P. Porteous 
Ernestine S. Potts 
Michael G. Ramsey 
Jewell S. Reid 
Jeanette M. Rewalt 
Emily R. Riales 
Pamela M. Riccick 
Robert A. Rife 
Desiree E. Rukendorfer 



Eugenia Marie Sackey 
Hugh B. Scott 
William K. Seaton 
Marie F. Sellers 
Rebecca J. Simeon 
Lori G. Simmons 
Manipdeep K. Singh 
Ginnylee S. Slagle 
Barbara E. Sorenson 
Donna E. Spencer 
Jerry C. Stanfield 
Kenneth B. Stonebrook 
Gail M. Suratt 
Bonnie S. Toland 
Phong H. Tran 
W. Steven Vollmer 
Stephen A. Walker 
Steve W. Watkins 
Sheila R. Welch 
Jo W. Wilson 
Carolyn L. Woods 
Susan H. Woods 
Brent A. Worley 
Charlotte L. Wright 
Jacqueline M. Yarbrough 
Rebecca B. Zills 
Barbara L. Zukowski 



Academics 97 



The Business End of Music 



"A whopper of a music studio" is an apt description of the 
sophisticated equipment used in the Commercial Music 
Program. 

The recording areas feature a series of 636 console with 
automation, a 24-track recorder with noise reduction and a 
two-channel recorder by MCI and Studer. 

The control room and studio playback are handled by Urei 
Lime Aligned monitors. Some of the other equipment in the 
control room and lab include: DBX compressor/ ltmiters, 
Valley People signal processors (fer sure, fer sure!), Eventide 
Harmonizer, Akai three-head cassette deck, active direct boxes 
by Countrymen Associates and passive boxes with Jenson 
transformers. 

The high quality microphones are from Neumann, 
Sennehiser, AKG, Electro-Voice, Sure, Crown and others. The 
electronic lab features a Moog 3C synthesizer with 1 6 sequence 
units, sample and hold, 3M half-inch four-track, and TEAC1/ 
4 inch two-track. 

While musicians are a top priority, it takes some sophisticated equipment and people 
with plenty of know-how to produce the sounds that turn the audience on. 



The Squeaky Wheels take a break from practice after 
running through their numbers in the studio. Pictured are 
Darrell Johnson, piano; Kenneth Harris, drums, and 
Gerrard McVay, guitar. The " Wheels" are one of eight jazz 
combos who brighten the scene in the Music Building. 
Eugene Rush is coordinator of the Division of Jazz and 
Studio Music who wversees the bands, combos and vocal 
jazz offerings. 



Students in Commercial Music are prepared to work in copy 
writing, artist management, accounting, packaging display and 
publishing. Students interested in music business or recording- 
engineering can work toward a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 
Commercial Music. 

Those interested in Studio-Live Performance or Composi- 
tion-Arranging may earn a Bachelor of Music degree. 

The Commercial Music program is well aware of the total needs of this business of music, 
and offers recording and engineering training as well as instruction in live performance 
skills. 





Photo* by C«4ric I. Woodson 



98 Academi 



mics 



Library Sciences 



The Library Science department 
instructs students in how to provide, 
organize and access information for 
the use of the general public. 



There are currently 20 to 25 stu- 
dents enrolled in classes which range 
from management skills, bibliogra- 
phy, cataloging and classifying to th 
use of computers in retrieval ar 
storage. The graduate level program 
offers a Master of Science degree aid 
is proud to point out that all of H s 
graduates wanting a career in libraries 
have readily found jobs. 




Library Science night class undertakes a project in 
bibliography card cataloguing. Rebecca 
Robertson, left, and Joann Lynn try to concentrate 
on the cards rather than the camera. 



In two years, however, the de- 
partment will be phased out and 
training in library sciences will no 
longer be available in the city of 
Memphis or in the surrounding areas. 
Low student enrollment was cited as 
the cause. 

In 198 1, the department was sepa- 
rated from the College of Arts and 
Sciences and became an independent 
program. As a non-accredited sepa- 
rate division, it has found problems 
in maintaining an enrollment. 

Library sciences training in this 
area will soon be available only 
through private institutions. 




Going through the card cataloguing exercise are, 
from left, Jacque Patterson, Arlynn Katz Mirvis, 
John David Reabe, Connie Jackson, Rebecca 
Robertson and Joann Lynn. Course instructor is 
Dr. Evelyn G. Clement, professor of Library 
Science, not pictured. 



Photo* by J. Scott Vanundt 



Soyna Smith, left, gets a tip from Dr. 
Ronald H. Epp, assistant professor of ~- 
philosophy, as classmate Jacque Patterson ~ 
looks on. 




Academics 



99 



ROBOTS: A touch of the Future 



What is a robot? 

A robot is a "reprogrammable, multifunctional mani- 
pulator designed to move materials, tools, parts or specialized 
devices through variable programmed motions to accomplish 
a variety of tasks." 

That's an awful lot to describe the "typical" robots seen in 
"Buck Rogers" or "Lost in Space," but that is the technical 
definition. 

Robot comes from the Czech word robota which means 
servitude, work or drudgery. Robots are very useful in 
welding, casting, forming, transporting and inspecting 
materials. 

MSU has three robots, housed in the Herff Engineering 



Building. Two of these are small Hero I Robots, that can be 
easily moved on any smooth surface. Students learn how to 
program and study the mechanisms of the Hero I, which cost 
Memphis State between $1500 and $2500. 

Memphis State's other robot is an Unimate industrial 
robot. Its cost can be as much as $30,000. However, the 
engineering department received the Unimate as a gift from 
Whirlpool. It is made by the Heath Company in St. Joseph, 
Mich. The Unimate is a stationary robot that can lift as much 
as 275 pounds with its mechanical arm. 

There are very few of the industrial type robots in use in 
Memphis. Those here are utilized in loading, unloading and 

weldin S -Felicia Smith 



Photos by C. Woodson 




THE LONG ARM OF THE LAW — Memphis States Unimate robot has a moveable arm that 
can lift several hundred pounds; however, the robot itself is stationary. 




100 Robots at MSU 



The College of Engineering in the Space Age 





DANGER! DANGER, WILL ROBINSON! — This HERO I robot is one of the 
Engineering Department's 2 robots used by the students in that college. The small robots 
move about freely and cost the University $2,000. 



The HERO I robot is displayed to several amused and interested students. The space-age 
life seen in "The Jetsons" and "Lost in Space" seem ever more closer while watching the 
small robot roam about. 



HERO I slightly resembles the R2-D2 droid in the movie "Star Wars." Memphis State 
traveled many lightyears to purchase this robot from the Jawas! 




Academics 101 



CHUCALISSA; The Past Revisited 

The College of Arts and Sciences helps bring back a taste of days gone by 



The Chucalissa Indian Museum and 
Village Reconstruction is an off-campus 
facility of the department of anthropology 
of Memphis State. The museum at the site 
houses an introductory slide show, case 
exhibits on Indians and archaeology of 
Chucalissa and the Mid-South, and audio- 
visual programs covering special topics in 
traditional Indian customs of the region. 
Also in the museum are offices, a reference 
library, a laboratory and research collec- 
tions. 

The annual Choctaw Indian Pow-wow 
was held at the Chucalissa Indian Village 
Aug. 6 and 7. The Pow-wow consisted of 
Choctaw dances and games and the Green 
Corn Ceremony. This ceremony is de- 
scribed by authorities at the village as a 
combination of New Year's, Thanksgiv- 
ing, Yom Kippur, Lent and Mardi Gras. 
This revival of Indian ceremonies is part of 
an effort to restore traditional customs 



and to educate non-Indians in Choctaw 
culture. 

The area inside the village is made up of 
several different structures. There are nine 
reconstructed huts, two enclosed cases 
exhibiting archaeological excavations, a 
main mound with the village chiefs hut 
atop it and a village plaza. 

During the summer, archaeological ex- 
cavations are often in progress as workers 
try to learn more about life in the pre- 
historic village. There are several courses 
in archaeology and museum work offered 
at Chucalissa. These courses are part of 
the department of anthropology's pro- 
gram. Included in this program are regular 
college courses and Continuing Education 
courses for members of the general public 
who wish to learn more about particular 
topics. 

Founded in 1000 A.D., Chucalissa was 
abandoned and reoccupied several times 



during the next 500 years. The 1000 to 
1500 people of the final village, dating to 
about 1500 A.D., were capable farmers, 
craftsmen, and artists. They lived in per- 
manent towns of thatch-roofed houses 
grouped around the town square, raised 
their crops in the river bottom below the 
village, and made their own tools and 
implements of daily life as well as ceramic 
art. 

The name "Chucalissa," Choctaw for 
"abandoned houses," emphasizes that this 
is an ancient town rather than one still 
occupied by its original inhabitants. 

Hard work on the part of staff and 
students is evident at the Chucalissa 
Village. The College of Arts and Sciences 
has successfully recreated a time period 
that otherwise would have been lost for- 
ever. 

— Susan O'Connor 



Photos Courtesy of C.H. Nuh Musturo 




Some of the special events sponsored by Chucalissa 
are Choctaw stickball games, dancing and crafts. The 
Choctaw game of stickball is very similar to lacrosse. 
Such events are a good display of traditional Indian 
activities. 



Several Chucalissa Indians take part in a Pow-wow 
at the Chucalissa Village. Part of the ceremonies 
includes the Green Corn ceremony which represents 
several of the holidays celebrated here in America. 




102 Chucalissa 



Herff College of Engineering 



The Herff College of Engineering 
serves the educational and research 
needs of the industrial community, the 
metropolitan area, the state and the 
nation. It is divided into Departments 
of Civil Engineering, Electrical Engi- 
neering, Mechanical Engineering, En- 
gineering Technology and Geology. The 
Institute for Engineering Research was 
founded in 1970 for the promotion of 
participation of students and faculty in 



research and service activities. The Col- 
lege of Engineering moved into its 
modern three-building complex in 1 970- 
71. There are 161,110 square feet of 
space in the facilities which house 
offices, classrooms and several special- 
ized laboratories equipped with modern 
furnishings. The engineering adminis- 
tration building houses the 3-story en- 
gineering library, study lounges, the 
auditorium and a computer terminal. 



May Graduates 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

summa cum laude 
Rodney Thomas Cagle 
Michael Raymond Trombley 

magna cum laude 
Michael Jon Bartz 
Steven Eugene Benton 
Eva Renee Broadaway 
Patricia Ann Towery 

cum laude 

Jane Sanders Cribbs 

all other graduates 
C. Harrison Alewine 
Alan Jeffrey Bozof 
Barry Charles Braslow 
Edwin Walter Carr 
Stanley Alan Casey 
Kar Mee Chiang 
Jeffery Wayne Fawcett 
Alden James Friedman 
Emma Mae Garrison 
Mohsen Ghaderi 
John Curtis Hannah 
Ahmad Faiyazul Haque 
Billy Ray Hodges 
Lonnie Edward Loeffel 
James Michael McFadden 
Dennis Andrew Norton 
Peter Imade Obasuyi 
Rex Alan Phillips 
Dona Rebecca Price 
Eddie Y. Shao 
Jerry Allan Sigler 
Phillip Dewayne Waldrup 

Bachelor of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering 

magna cum laude 
Arthur Neil Porter 
James Edward Roach 

all other graduates 
Roy Mark Dickson 
Edward Clarke Gaitley 
Michael Allen Harrison 
Thomas Charles Kindy 
Michael Craig Kleimeyer 
Roger Curtis Leitschuh, Jr. 
Kenneth La Verne McEnroe 
Siavosh Ebrahim Nehoray 
Robin Elaine Peak 
Thomas Scott Ray 
Kimberley Ann Raye 
William Clyde Starr 



Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

magna cum laude 
Charles Floyd Long 
Pablo Plaza Romero 

cum laude 

Mitch Allen Blankenship 

all other graduates 

Ali M. Al-Sayyed 

Khalid Mohammed Al-Sayyed 

Kenneth Wallace Badowski 

Shirley Jean Boldon 

William Everette Higgins 

Charles David Hill 

Pete Guy Jacobs 

Douglas Lee McKelvey 

Bassam Sakaan 

Ray LaGardo Strickland 

Randy Thomas 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 

cum laude 
Terrence Lee Davis 
Sharon Lea Everett 

all other graduates 
William Darwyn Hart 
Joan Elaine Levy 
Charles Ray Willcox II 

Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering Technology 

magna cum laude 
Phillip Anthony Poteet 
cum laude 

Susan Elizabeth Brandt 
James Gerald Freeman 
Eric R. Johnson 
Patrick Leroy Sherley 
Kenneth Allen Smith 
James Christopher Watson 

all other graduates 
Clice Eugene Bodiford 
Kenneth Bernard Boyce 
Alan Frank Bragg 
John Alan Brower 
Melinda K. Hamblett 
Joe Calvin Harris II 
Richard Peyton Johnston 
William Paul Jordan 
Rodger Kay Larson 
Buford Keith Layne 
Marshall Warren Martin 
John Ndubuisi Odo 
Charles Thomas Rhyne III 
Phillip Rudolph Scruggs, Jr. 



Maharaj Ladi Sood 
Kenneth Joseph Sorrentino 
Brenda May Waldrop 
John Pritchett Watson 
Daniel Edward West 
Eddie Levin Wheeler, Jr. 
Douglas Clinton Wicks 

Bachelor of Science in Technology 

magna cum laude 
Cecil Owen Colter 
Larry Edward Murphy 



Master of Science 

Ghassan Bahij Attiyeh 

B.S.C.E., 1980, Memphis State University 
B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 

Michael Lynn Beasley 

B.S.C.E., 1975, Memphis State University 

Robert Ernest Berry 

B.S.E.T., 1976, Memphis State University 

Howard Smith Carman 
B.S.E.T., 1976, Memphis State University 

Larry Craig Donmoyer 

B.S., 1978, Pennsylvania State University 

Majid Esfahani Hatamzadeh 
B.S., 1980, Christian Brothers College 

Daniel Richard Hazard 

B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 

Conway Todd Hughes III 

B.S., 1980, Middle Tennessee State Univer- 
sity 

Robert Walker Hummel 

B.A., 1976, Southwestern at Memphis 
B.S., 1981, Memphis State University 

Johnny J. Jeffries 

B.S., 1977, Memphis State University 

Sandra Lynn Kessler 

B.S., 1979, University of Missouri 

Jerry Hamilton Lemons 

B.P.S., 1981, Memphis State University 
B.S.B.A., 1982, New York University 

Ralph Leroy Miller, Jr. 

B.A., 1966, Harding University 

Raymond Po-Choi Ng 

B.S.E.E., 1980, Memphis State University 

Charles M. Samaha 

B.S., 1972, American University of Beirut 
B.S.C.E., 1982, Memphis State University 

Hamid Reza Setayeshpour 
B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 

John L. Simpson 

B.S., 1968, Jackson State University 

Keshavan K. Tiruvallur 

B.E., 1978, Bangalore University 



Academics 103 



Bachelor of Arts 

magna cum laude 
Deborah Lynn Bullington 
Keith Anthony Moore 
Sherry Jean Murphree 

cum laude 
Michael James Berry 
Lydia Diane Lay 
Patricia Ann Linzy 
Dror Melman 

all other graduates 
Judith Janine Hernon 
Beth Hoople 
Cathryn A. Huettel 
Laura Jane Huettel 
Dana Meryl Jones 
Karissa Holly Kadlec 
Lisa Angela Langenbach 
Michael Neil Lebovitz 
Beverly Diane McKnight 
Bart Edward Mallard 
Sandra Denise Marcrum 
James Arthur Marsh 
Ronald Glenn Maxey 
Jack Miller, Jr. 
Ginger Kay Morgan 
Deidre White Odumakinde 
Mark Stephen Price 
Mary Katherine Puckett 
Ellen Lawrence Reilly 
Dana Beth Schatz 
Leanne Simmons 
Carol Renee Smith 
Robert J. Steffan 
Virginia C. Tatom 
Sharon K. Taylor 
Eric Lawson Turnipseed 
Karl Irvin VanBuren 
Marvin Wright 
Elizabeth Leigh Zollotuchen 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

magna cum laude 

Traci Day Dettelbach 
Lisa Ruth Melton 

cum laude 
Barton Lee Breen 



The College of Communication 
and Fine A rts 



Bachelor of Fine Arts cont. 

Stanley Bryan Gibson 
Angela Marie Hester 
Debra Annette Johnson 
Kathryn Elaine Lillard 
Kathryn McLaughlin Lloyd 
Raymond Joseph Nakhleh 
Teresa Lynn Roberts 
Sara Lynne Rogers 
Laurie Seay 

Catherine Miles Underwood 
Margaret Edwards Vance 
Tawana Yvonne Wright 

Bachelor of Music 

summa cum laude 
Robert Charles Stagg 
Lisa Vanhoozer Ham 

magna cum laude 
Ross Allen Rice 

all other graduates 
Kawanda L. Buford 
Joanne Ellis 

Jerome Charles Franklin 
Lynne Radcliffe Howard 
Jill Marie Janovetz 
Paul Eugene Turnbow 

Master of Arts 

Mary Tobin Baltz 

B.S., 1961, Memphis State University 
Rita Broadway 

B.A., 1965, Northeast Louisiana Univer 
sity 

M.S.L.S., 1971, Louisiana State Univer 
sity 
Nancy Busby Donelson 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Kathy Daws Gardner 

B.A., 1968, Union University 

M.A., 1975, Memphis State University 
Anne W. Manning 

B.A., 1964, Grove City College 
Catherine Ann McGee 

B.S., 1974, Memphis State University 



Sharon Kathleen McNeal 

B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Martha Jane Hysmith Quails 

B.S.E., 1969, Memphis State University 

M.L.S., George Peabody College 
Anna Kay Walker 

B.A., 1962, Southern Methodist Univer 
sity 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Dixie W. Avey 

B.S., 1957, Memphis State University 

Master of Fine Arts 

Maritucker Franklin 

B.A., 1979, Memphis State University 
Geoffrey Allan Grehan 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Robin Jaffe 

A. A., 1981, Brookdale Community Col 
lege 

B.A., 1981, Thomas A. Edison State 
College 
Sidney Bryant Lynch 

B.A., 1972, University of the South 

M.A., 1975, Memphis State University 
Sheri Diane Stephens 

B.A., 1979, Mount Holyoke College 

Master of Music 

Christopher Canute 

B.M.E., 1980, Northern Michigan Uni 
versity 
Robin Swaim Davis 

B.M., 1963, University of Alabama 
Julia Ann Dye 

B.S., 1981, Ball State University 
Gale Jones Murphy 

B.M.E., 1976, Southern Missionary Col 
lege 
Dudley Harold Otey 

B.M., 1980, Memphis State University 
Sharron Dewayne Stephens, Jr. 

B.M., 1976, University of Alabama 
Christina Gladney Wellford 

B.A., 1973, Southwestern at Memphis 



Monica Dura n 






Elizabeth Anne Jacobsen 






Robert Charles Shatzer 


/~)/'n/7f*/ftf/'ffl 


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all other graduates 


lSlZIJUl till c#f c 


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Lillian Corinne Brock 
Gina Marie Coda 
Charles Fray Cooper, Jr. 










Barbara Ann Forte 


cum laude 


Kathy Zoe Hathaway 




Karen Dee Branim 


Tammy Jean Hoffman 
Ruby Jean Hughes 




Ann Holt Newton 


Bachelor of Science in Nursing 


Denice Carol Pian 


Evelyn Lashay Jones 




Ellen Wuchina 


Therese A. Jones 
Rebecca Elaine King 


summa cum laude 
V. Joan Foropoulos 


all other graduates 


Linda J. McLendon 


Annette Ruffin Anderson 


Carol Dando McManus 


Mary Caroline Montanus 


Eddie M. Bouie 


Ruby Dandridge Miller 




Mary Jane Collier 


Karen Austin Mitchell 


magna cum laude 


Loretta Wesby Dandridge 


Susan Donnette Mullikin 


Cathy Lynn Lash 


Patricia Anne Gavin 


Cheryl Lynn Purvis 


Annetta Talbot Beauchamp McNabb 


Almeta Yvonne Handy 


Elizabeth Solomito j 


Jane S. Owen, 


Debra Ann Hardy 


Camille Ann Wurtz 


Penny Lynn Tice 


Veonnie Harper 


Donna Carol Zaino 


Deborah Lynn VanSickle 






Bess E. Vieron 







1 04 Graduates 



College of Education 



Bachelor of Science in Education 

magna cum laude 
Rebecca Massie Bostick 
Candice Lynette Cain 
Eileen Emick Castle 
Rhonda Chris Cary Eldridge 
Shirley Taylor Hodum 
Terry Lyn Morrison 

cum laude 
Yvonee Johnson Barrett 
Valerie Louise Bennett 
Teri Babette Denaburg 
Michele Renee Dote 
Elizabeth Alison Earl 
Catherine Diane Emery 
Marcus Owen Johnston 
Cynthia Lynn Ligon 
Carol Denise McChristian 
Christopher Charles McDowell 
Debbie Leigh Pylant 
Jan Rachel Sturdivant 
Joanne Boiler Tyree 
Cynthia S. Vaughn 
Teresa Jo Watkins 

all other graduates 
Sharon Rebecca Abramovitz 
Cecelia Renee Adams 
Barbara Jo Allen 
Sandra McMinn Barnett 
Beatrice Walton Beckley 
Martin Pruitt Boldt 
Ella Mitchell Bolton 
Yuletta Pearl Buford 
Victoria Gina Butler 
Catherine Causey Byrd 
Cheryl Colette Cathey 
Susan Smith Champion 
R. Rosetta Crawford 
Karen Lee Crosby 
Susan Louise Davenport 
Elizabeth Sewell Deck 
Kimberly Ann Duppins 
Judith Myers Esgro 
Gigi Diane Evans 
Tony Eugene Farmer 
Alex Timothy Favazza 
Marilyn Charlene Fleming 
Beverly J. Flippin 
Charles Donald Garner 
Mary Patricia Glasheen 
Lucy Cothran Good 
Cindi Kay Green 
Linda Greer 
Benjamin Joel Gruder 
JoAnn Francis Harmeier 
Cynthia Ann Haynes 
Glenda Marie Hester 
Laurie Diane Holland 
Amy Grace Hoyle 
Carolyn Loretta Hunter 
Denese Marcia Ingram 
Fredda Robinson Jackson 
Harriet Jackson 
Frances Hayward Jeu 
Charlene Renee' Kelley 



Sharon Kay Kennedy 
Renee Denise Kerr 
Deborah Ann Kress 
Cindy Jo Lygutis 
Linda A. McCarver 
Donna Alene McKinney 
Cynthia Ann Malone 
Tamara Lucille Miller 
Marcia Marie Monk 
Howard Dudley Montague 
Amy Anne Montesi 
Stoney Phillips Montgomery 
Amy Lynn Moore 
Janet Lee Newton 
Cynthia Renee O'Daniel 
Nancy Helton Parker 
Karl John Pensak 
Kari Lynn Reynolds 
Pamela Gail Richardson 
Pamela Raye Rumage 
Regina Voight Russell 
Cynthia Jean Ryan 
Eva Quails Scott 
Stephanie Clare Stoddard 
Cheryl Ann Stringfellow 
Mary Kuehl Sudduth 
Beverly Morris Suggars 
LeAnn Sumner 
Terry LeAnn Taylor 
Beverly Gail Thomas 
Sherron Renee Trammell 
Elizabeth A. Young Triplett 
Cathy Elizabeth Welden 
Dianjunese Jameshia Williams 
Gloria Darlene Williams 
Hal Franklin Williford, Jr. 
Cynthia Covington Wills 
Karen Michelle Wilson 
Cynthia Marie Wright 
Thomas Joseph Yatsula 
Jerry Wayne Young 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

cum laude 
Rolana K. Amis 
Kathleen Ann Newbern 
Susan Annette Whitaker 

all other graduates 
Denise Ashby Brogdon 
Linda Carol Browder 
Laura Lee Jaworski 
Gail Gerbig Rook 
Alison June Smith 
Jannette Stockdale 

Bachelor of Music Education 

cum laude 
Jennifer Rose Williams 

all other graduates 
John Frederick Hiltonsmith 
Deana Lynn Seigler 
Lisa Dawn Wilson 

Master of Education 

Kathryn Durham Beaty 

B.S., 1960, University of Tennessee 



Thomas Fleming Bland 

B.S., 1978, Christian Brothers College 
Jerry Ann Hopper Buring 

B.S.E., 1977, Memphis State University 
Caroline Taylor Campbell 

B.S.E., 1967, Abilene Christian University 
Esther Cunningham Cochran 

B.S., 1975, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Brenda Lynn Coppedge 

B.S.E., 1976, Memphis State University 
Mary J. De Larco 

B.A., 1969, College of St. Teresa 
Sharon Ann Fiddler 

A. A., 1969, Freed-Hardeman College 

B.S.E., 1971, Memphis State University 
Jeffrey James Fik 

B.S., 1975, Memphis State University 
Sarah Davis Ford 

B.A., 1951, Vanderbilt University 
Bobby Paul Grisham 

B.S., 1959, Mississippi State University 
Carole Manley Hanson 

B.S.E., 1975, Memphis State University 
Gwendolyn Boykin Harris 

B.S., 1961, Tennessee State University 
Jacqueline P. Harris 

B.A., 1965, Lane College 
Debra Kay Hatcher 

B.S.E., 1980, Memphis State University 
Mary Carolyn Hayes 

B.A., 1974, Lane College 
Anne Trimble Holzemer 

B.A., 1970, Memphis State University 
Marion Turner Jones 

B.S., 1969, Lane College 
Valvarie J. Jordan 

B.S., 1978, East Texas State University 
Josephine Thomas King 

B.S., 1956, Alabama A & M University 
Barbara Jachimiak Kirsch 

B.S.E., 1977, Memphis State University 
G. David Ligon 

B.S., 1976, Memphis State University 
Susan Beth S. Lindsay 

B.S.E., 1977, Memphis State University 
Ella P. Macklin 

B.S., 1964, Tennessee A & I University 
Shirley Y. H. McCray 

A. A., 1962, Wilson Junior College 

B.S., 1967, Memphis State University 
Lorraine Craig Miller 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
Sandra Dee Monce 

B.S.E., 1982, Memphis State University 
Lisa Dawn Moore 

B.S., 1979, Union University 

B.S., 1970, Memphis State University 
Sherron Ledbetter Moore 

B.S., 1967, Memphis State University 
David Wayne Morris 

B.S., 1978, Harding University 
Susan McNeely Nicholas 

B.A., 1971, Southwestern at Memphis 
Betsy Moore Pardue 

B.S., 1972, Memphis State University 
Judy Kathleen Philcox 

B.S., 1967, University of Nevada-Reno 
Christeve Agnes Robinson 

B.A., 1976, University of Tennessee 
Susan Denies Robinson 

B.S., 1980, Union University 



105 



Master of Education Continued 

Helen R. Rodewald 

B.S.E., 1967, Missisippi College 
Sherry LeAnn Roper 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
Carnie David Sokol 

B.S.E., 1980, Memphis State University 
Cecile R. Spencer 

B.M.E., 1965, Delta State University 
Judith Leone Thomas 

B.S.E., 1974, Memphis State University 
Myrna Van Buskirk 

B.A., 1969, Lambuth College 
Wanda C. Wake 

B.A., 1975, Trinity College 
Evlyn D. Watson 

B.S.B.A., 1979, University of Mississippi 
Barbara Lindsay Whitaker 

B.S., 1982, Memphis State University 
Jane Waldrop Williamson 
Helen Jane Wilson 

B.S.E., 1966, LeMoyne-Owen College 



Master of Science 

Barbara B. Baker 

B.S.E., 1980, Tennessee Tech University 
Virginia Collier Bales 

B.S., 1973, University of Tennessee 
Michael L. Beech 

B.S., 1976, Barry College 
Mary Jo Boehms 

B.S., 1966, University of Tennessee 
Barbara Bromley Boswell 

B.S., 1976, Memphis State University 
Mary Katherine Boyle 

B.S.E., 1979, Memphis State University 
Judith Elaine Conkin 

B.P.S., 1980, Memphis State University 
Frederick Wayne Curry 

B.S.E., 1981, Memphis State University 
Dana Brandon Couch Davis 

B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Paul Douglas Davis 

B.S., 1980, American Technological Uni- 
versity 
Donna M. Donato 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
Jayne Allen Fields 

A.S., 1955, Armstrong College 

B.S.N. , 1958, Emory University 
Pamela L. Hoskins 

B.S., 1979, University of Tennessee 
Reba Matthews Howse 

B.A., 1974, Memphis State University 
Kimberly S. Kirk 

B.S.E., 1981, Freed-Hardeman College 
Teresa Anne Luna 

B.A., 1979, Union University 
Gwendolyn D. McCoy 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
Barry James McCrory 

B.S., 1970, Mississippi State University 

M.Div., 1977, Memphis Theological Semi- 
nary 
Mary C. Owen 

B.A., 1970, Auburn University 
Elaine Deverell Patterson 

B.S., 1968, University of Tennessee-Mar- 
tin 



Connie Elaine Kennemer Siler 

B.F.A., 1979, Memphis State University 

Inge Ladwig Szucs 

A. A., 1978, Mississippi County Commun- 
ity College 
B.S., 1981, Park College 

Education Specialist 

Theresa Ann OToole 

B.A., 1980, Southwestern at Memphis 
M.A., 1981, Memphis State University 

Doctor of Education 

Lawrence H. Campbell - Department of 
Curriculum & Instruction (Reading) 
A.B., 1970, Point Park College 
M.A., 1973, Duquesne University 
M.S., 1975, Duquesne University 
Dissertation: "The Effects of Cognitive 
Strategy Training on Reading Achieve- 
ment and Piagetian Cognitive Level 
Among High- Risk College Freshmen" 
Major Professor: Dr. Robert A. Kaiser, 
Associate Professor of Education 

Keith H. Dunlevy - Department of Educa- 
tional Administration and Supervision 
B.S.E., 1961, Geneva College 
M.Ed., 1964, Westminster College 
Dissertation: "A Comparative Study of 
the Role Expectations of Elementary 
Principals Held by Principals and Parents 
in Schools with Different Racial Com- 
positions " 



Douglas H. C. Northcutt - Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction (Higher Ed- 
ucation) 

A. A., 1963, Florida College 
B.A., 1966, California State University 
M.S., 1969, California State University 
Dissertation: "An Analysis of Written 
Policies on Part- Time Faculty in Selected 
Public Community Colleges in the United 
States " 

Major Professor: Dr. Charles S. Claxton, 
Associate Professor of Education 

Rodolfo Angelo Palazzolo - Department of 
Curriculum and Instruction (Higher Edu- 
cation) 

B.S., 1965, Memphis State University 
M.A., 1968, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "A Comparative Study of 
Medical School Performances Between 
Science and Non-Science Majors " 
Major Professor: Dr. Robert L. Carru- 
thers, Associate Professor of Education 

Carlos Glenn Price - Department of Educa- 
tional Administration & Supervision 
(Higher Education) 
A. A., 1966, Crowley's Ridge College 
B.A., 1968, David Lipscomb College 
M.Ed., 1977, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Selected Factors Related 
to Organizational Climate in University 
Academic Departments in Arkansas" 
Major Professor: Dr. George J. Huys, 
Professor of Education 




Carol Reece, a graduate student majoring in education, takes advantage of the computers at the education 
building. Students use the terminals to type up and print out exams and other materials. 



Major Professor: Dr. Frank H. Markus, 
Professor of Education 
Mary Ellen Jukoski - Department of Curri- 
culum & Instruction (Higher Education) 
B.A., 1973, College of St. Rose 
M.S., 1974, State University of New York 
at Albany 

M.A., 1977, College of St. Rose 
Dissertation:" Accreditation of Selected 
Non-Traditional Colleges and Universi- 
ties " 

Major Professor: Dr. Charles S. Claxton, 
Associate Professor of Education 



JoLeta McDowell Reynolds - Department 
of Educational Administration & Super- 
vision 

B.S., 1966, Middle Tennessee State Uni- 
versity 

M.A., 1970, Tennessee Technological Uni- 
versity 

Ed.S., 1973, Tennessee Technological Uni- 
versity 

Dissertation: "A Comparative Study of 
the Competency Level of Basic Skills First 
Teachers in the Critical Competency Areas 
and Student Achievement Gains" 



Graduates 



Major Professor: Dr. W. Elzie Danley, 
Professor of Education 

Gerald L. Schile - Department of Educa- 
tional Administration and Supervision 
(Higher Education) 
B.A., 1970, Carthage College 
M.A., 1971, Roosevelt University 
Dissertation: "Effectiveness of Using a 
Microcomputer to Provide Remedial In- 
struction Prescriptions in a Navy Tech- 
nical Training Course" 
Major Professor: Dr. Frank H. Markus, 
Professor of Education 

Hugh Harlen Vaughn - Department of Cur- 
riculum & Instruction(Higher Education) 
B.S., 1957, Mississippi State University 
M.S., 1960, University of Tennessee 
Dissertation: "The Relationship Be- 
tween Social Work Students' Philosophy 
of Human Nature and the Selection of a 
Method of Specialization " 
Major Professor: Dr. A. Ford Haynes, 
Professor of Education 



Barry Alan Vinick - Department of 
Counseling & Personnel Services 
B.S., 1970, University of Tennessee 
M.Ed., 1974, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "771^ Effects of Assertive- 
ness Training on Aggression and Self- 
Concept in Conduct Disordered Adoles- 
cents" 

Major Professor: Dr. Patricia H. Murrell, 
Professor of Education 

Chris Edward Wethered - Department of 
Special Education & Rehabilitation 
B.S., 1972, Idaho State University 
M.S., 1976, Idaho State University 
Ed.S., 1978, University of Miami 
Dissertation: "Effects of Interface Activa- 
tion Schemes on Response Times and 
Accuracy for Cerebral Palsied Students" 
Major Professor: Dr. John G. Greer, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Education 

Ronnie D. Wilkins - Department of Special 
Education & Rehabilitation 
B.A., 1970, Ouachita Baptist University 



M.S., 1975, University of Central Ar- 
kansas 

Dissertation: "An Intra-System Evalua- 
tion of the Vocational Evaluation Process " 
Major Professor: Dr. Charlene P. DeLoach, 
Associate Professor of Education 
Wanda B. Winnette - Department of Coun- 
seling & Personnel Services 
B.S.E., 1969, Memphis State University 
M.Ed., 1972, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "The Effects of a Problem- 
Solving Classroom Meeting on the School 
Behavior of Selected Students" 
Major Professor: Dr. Patricia H. Murrell, 
Professor of Education 



College of Arts and Science 



Bachelor of Arts 

summa cum laude 

Turney Powers Berry 

(With University Honors) 
(With Honors in History) 

Barbara Jean Burns 

Beth LeAnn Hillis 

John Nash Mayfield 

(With Honors in English) 

Julie Dawn Pascoe 

magna cum laude 

Barbara Eyleen Farmer 
Diana Louise Hay 
John Miller Jones 

(With Honors in History) 
Karen Bell Lavallee 
Darlene Winbush Moore 
John Francis Shields 
Linda Land Todd 

cum laude 

Anthony Hood Burdick 
Andrew S. Cain 
Marcquinne Marchelle Charles 
Trinda Lee Clark 
Martine Chamberlin Cole 
Rosalind Steins Cottrell 
Joan F. Dermon 
John Robert Eason 
Aubrey Sterling Floyd 
Marlyce Qualyn Harris 
Timothy Brian Hegarty 
Earnestine McKinnie 
Betty Lou Pannier 
Robin Reed Port 
Daniel Thomas Shelton 
Melanie Jeanene Taylor 
Lark Ann Torti 



all other graduates 

Mischelle Alexander 
Yvonne Atkins 
Richard Henry Branyan 
Carl Daniel Brollier, Jr. 
Charles Jean Burton 
Marion Elizabeth Chiles 
Craig Roland Corey 
Chris Darwin Cothran 
Candace Jane Cox 
Nathan Fred Cox III 
Hoyt Thomas Davis 
John Thomas Dwyer, Jr. 
Nancy Roberts Edwards 
Andrew T. Forman 
Betty Ruth Gardner 
Mary Martin Gentry 
Mary Patricia Glasheen 
Bonnye Kent Griffin 
Debra Jean Harlow 
Timothy Phillips Harrison 
Kathy F. Hays 
Sandra L. Herron 
Glenda Marie Hester 
J. Michael Hill 
Barbara Jane Ann Johnson 
Cynthia Jane Jones 
Paula L. Joyner 
Elliott Anthony LaBarre 
Stacey Beth Manis 
Elizabeth Suzanne Molinary 
Herbert Louis Morgan, Jr. 
Faye Doss Newton 
Coral Garmon Niknahad 

Master of Public Administration 

Valerie Gail Hassell 

B.S., 1978, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Doris B. McGhee 



B.S., 1965, LeMoyne-Owen College 
B.S.M.T., 1969, University of Tennessee 

Kathleen Ann O'Hay 
Carl Logan Pfeiffer 
Gregory Martin Quinn 
Gretchen Regina Raber 
Jesusa Rosalia Ramos 
Charles Knox Rhodes 
Roy Bryant Scott 
Lillian M. Seaberry 
Shireen Michelle Slcobel 
John Ervin Stokes 
Linda Ann Thomas 
Jeanne Lockhart Thurman 
Gary Franklin Tillman 
Lark Ann Torti 
Charmaine Adele Towles 
Ronald Wade Westmoreland 
Strickland Jones Wilkinson 

Bachelor of Science 

summa cum laude 

Vadim Gringolts 
Bill A. Jeffries 
Mark Edward Reed 
William Andrew Wray 

magna cum laude 

Andrew Carter Dirmeyer 
Lisa Carol Dodds 
Barbara Gregory Edwards 
Charles Troy Morrissette, Jr. 

cum laude 

Kathleen M. Cullen 
Anna Marie Gatlin 
Esther Alicia Gonza lez 
Susan Marie Martin 
Michael Joseph Rook 
Mary Ellen Thomas 



Graduates 1 07 



Bachelor of Science continued 



Master of Science 



all other graduates 

Jay Allison Bobo 
Glenn Franklin Chamberlain 
Jay Phillip Fisher 
Alden James Friedman 
Laura McLennan Hudson 
Patricia L. Jones 
Phyllis Yvonne Kendall 
Fhomas Michael Likins 
Gregory Allen Lyles 
Mancy Joseph Medile 
Elizabeth Suzanne Molinary 
Tricia C. L. Pan 
Alfonso Enrique Roggiero 
Bradford Glisson Simmons 
Richard Michael Taylor 
Fredrick Eugene Thomas 
Limmy Joe Tom 
Charles Randle Wheatley 
David Andrew Williams 
Steven Michael Young 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

James Bruce Pitner 



Master of Arts 

Carol Elizabeth Babb 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Billie Kathryn Barton 

A. A., 1976, Shelby State Community 

College 

B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
Donna Kay Baugus 

B.A., 1977, Memphis State University 
Barbara Zlata Fisher-lnman 

B.A., 1980, Rice University 
Timothy Joseph Freeman 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Jeanine Heishman Griggs 

B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
Lynda Yates Hamblen 

B.A., 1969, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 

M.S.E., 1978, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 
Linda Savage Hammons 

B.B.A., 1977, Memphis State University 
Craig H. Lahren 

B.A., 1980, University of North Dakota 
Merrie Boudreaux Morrison 

B.P.S., 1977, Memphis State University 
Charles Nuten O'Bryant 

B.A., 1981, Florida State University 
Mary Malissa Peacock 

B.A., 1980, Lambuth College 
William Arthur Ruleman 111 

B.A., 1979, University of Virginia 
Amie Austin Todd 

B.A., 1980, Vanderbilt University 
Paul Edwin Trew 

B.A., 1979, Memphis State University 



Lisa Bradley Alex 

B.A., 1980, Case Western Reserve Uni- 
versity 

W. Edward Amos 

B.S., 1979, Jacksonville University 

Harold Duane Campbell 

B.M., 1981, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 

Elizabeth Clewell Epp 

B.A., 1964, Cedar Crest College 
B.S., 1979, University of Tennessee 

Thomas Gill Goodman 

B.S., 1980, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 

Brian Stuart Hammons 

B.S., 1981, University of Central Arkansas 

Michael L. Hancock 

B.S., 1980, Vanderbilt University 

Cindy L. Hanson 

B.A., 1980, University of Minnesota 

Leslie F. Johnson 

A.B., 1963, University of Kansas 
M.A., 1964, University of Kansas 
B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 

Sandra Louise Martin 

B.A., 1978, University of Georgia 

Dwight W. Moore 

B.S., 1972, University of Arkansas 
B.S., 1977, University of Arkansas 

Avinoam Rapaport 

B.S., 1981, Memphis State University 

Judith Karen Rogers 

B.A., 1970, Union University 

Tommy Childress Vinson 

B.A., 1981, Southwestern at Memphis 

Danny Claude Williams 

B.S., 1977, Memphis State University 

Leonard J. Wiseman 

B.S., 1979, Memphis State University 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Gary James Barnes - Department of Speech 
Pathology 

B.A., 1978, San Diego State University 
M.A., 1979, San Diego State University 
Dissertation: "An Acoustic-Perceptual 
Investigation of Two Types of Stress 
Production in Speakers with Parkinson 's 
Disease and Speakers with Right Hemis- 
phere Cortical Lesions " 
Major Professor: Dr. G. Albyn Davis, 
Associate Professor of Audiology & 
Speech Pathology 

Yao Foli Modey - Department of History 
B.A., 1975, University of Ghana 
M.A., 1978, Wake Forest University 
Dissertation: "The Struggle Over Prohi- 
bition in Memphis " 

Major Professor: Dr. Charles W. Craw- 
ford, Professor of History 




Paul James Neal - Department of Psychology 
B.S., 1972, Westmont College 
M.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
Dissertation:"/! Psychological Treatment 
Program for Prevention of Decubitus 
Ulcers in Spinal Cord Injured Patients " 
Major Professor: Dr. Kenneth L. Lich- 
stein. Associate Professor of Psychology 

Sarah Jane Warrington - Department of 
Biology 

B.S., 1962, Memphis State University 
M.S., 1970, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Early Development of Ec- 
tomycorrhizae between Pisolithus tinc- 
toruis Hyphae and Pinus taeda Short 
Roots" 

Major Professor: Dr. H. Delano Black, 
Associate Professor of Biology 

Elaine Steere Willey - Department of Psy- 
chology 

B.A., 1967, Wellesley College 
M.S., 1976, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Factor Analysis: A Com- 
parison of Analytical Methods of Rotation 
with Artificially Constructed Orthogonal 
Simple Structure Solutions " 
Major Professor: Dr. Raymond E. Hart- 
ley, Professor of Psychology 

Lynette Boney Wrenn - Department of 
History 

A.B., 1949, University of North Carolina 
A.M., 1952, Harvard University 
Dissertation: "The Taxing District of 
Shelby County: A Political and Adminis- 
trative History of Memphis, Tennessee 
1879-1893" 

Major Professor: Dr. Charles W. Crawford, 
Professor of History 



Graduates 



The Fogelman College of Business and Economics 



Bachelor of Business Administration 

summa cum laude 

Mary Frances Bryant 
Brenda Lou Diffee 
Linn Sanford Ezell 
James W. Fisher 

(With Honors In Economics) 
Bernard Frederick Hetherington, 

magna cum laude 

Peggy Lea Diffee 
Elizabeth Camille Fite 
Deborah Jo Mills Mueller 
Debra Elaine Silverfield 
Marsha Gay Smith 
Denise Laraine Strickland 
Donna Taliaferro Thomsen 
Carol Lynne Vincent 
Michael Dee Warren 
(With University Honors) 

cum laude 

Dawn Marie Armbrust 
Kathy Elizabeth Carmon 
William Stephen Crossnoe 
Barbara Michelle Erickson 
Lynda Elaine Galey 
Cynthia Renee Jones 
James Arnold Kopald 
Robert William Laarhoven 
Raymond Keith Larwood 
Daria Jean Lawrence 
Loretta Garmon Martin 
Jennifer Ruth Matlock 
Ronnie Paul McCulloch 
Cheryl Reeves McCullough 
Cynthia Louise Morgan 
Marcella Catherine Siracusa 
Donna Dyer Smith 
Suzanne Gaither Smith 
Elizabeth Anne Stukenborg 
Allison Annis Tanner 
Avery Ann Towne 
Stephanie Christine Weaver 
Charles Darwyn Webber 

all other graduates 

Kenneth Tyrone Abram 
Christy Eugene Adams 
John Gregory Adams 
Beverley Perkins Addison 
Valerie C. Adkins 
Robert Gregory Akin 
Palmer Smith Albertine 
Dulles Delano Alexander 
Jeffery Craig Anderson 
Christina Mandlove Angell 
Vann Terrence Avirett 
Lendon Dee Balch, Jr. 
Randall Brent Baldock 
David Earl Barnett 
Susan Meyer Barney 
Daniel Kimbrell Barton 
Barbara LoAnne Beech 



May Graduates 

James Robert Bell 

Cheryl Hungerford Beneke 

Patricia Jean Blake 



Derick Derone Bond 

Jeffrey M. Boone 

Dennis Patrick Botto 

John Erwin Marshall Bowers 

Charles Curtis Boyle 

Edward Christopher Boynce, Jr. 

Tom Edward Breen, Jr. 

Judy Lynne Briggs 

Christopher Damian Brignole 

Jeanne Marie Britt 

Keeth Reed Broussard 

Phillip Wayne Brown 

Sharon Janice Brown 

Karen Denise Browne 

Anita Carol Burch 

Dorothy Anne Burns 

Michael Allen Burns 

L. Butler 

Victoria Terese Campbell 

Gregory Paul Candebat 

Judson Williams Cannon 

Gary Curtis Casto 

Alba Rosa Castro 

Jeff Wade Churchwell 

David Chipton Clary 

William Lyle Collins 

Connie Acred Conklin 

William Oren Crumby III 

John Michael Cyrill 

Christine Ann Danehy 

Cynthia Ann Davis 

Thomas Alan Davis 

Lester Kent Diamond 

John Gregory Dunavant 

Thomas A. Edwards 

Bobby Craig Elder 

Brenda Fay Epps 

Kurt Douglas Frederick 

Paula Ann Barney Fullington 

Christopher Lee Garner 

Jim Robert Garner 

John Martin German 

Gail Rickman Goldsmith 

Charles E. Goodfellow, Jr. 

Gary Wayne Gordin 

Patricia Ann Grant 

Gayle S. Grayson 

Beverly Ruth Green 

Debra Carole Green 

Sandra Denise Hamilton 

Sidney Dawson Harmon 

Freda Elizabeth Harris 

Ray Paxton Harris 

Cecil Francis Harrod 

Kathy Ann Hartley 

Kenneth Edward Heim 

Cheryl Lynn Herring 

Cynthia Marie Herring 

Deena Lynn Heskett 

Brenda Ann Hicks 

Lorelei Louise Hisky 

Deborah Jean Hodgin 

Daniel Cameron Hoffman, Jr. 

James Clyde Holley, Jr. 

Theresa Renee Hovda 

Paul Michael Howell 

Jonathan Ayers Hudgins 

Paticia Lynn Huff 

Carol Drew Hunt 

Lisa Carol Hunter 



Tammye Renee Hurdle 
Susan McClure Hurtado 
Anthony Mark Isabel 
Michael Thomas Jack 
Jeffery Alan Jones 
Luther Allan Jones 
Harold Roger Jumper 
Terrence Robert Kelley 
Malcolm Jay King 
Raymond Wallace Kohn 
Athanassios Kostopoulos 
David James Lackey 
Stephen Lawrence Lebovits 
Christopher I homas Lewis 
Randy James Long 
Barnell Lowe 
Gregory Alan Lowery 
William Bailey Lowery 
Donald Lewis Lowry 
Evelyne Marie Lee Malone 
Duane Clark Marshall 
Russell Lee Marshall 
Darrell Lee Martin 
Nita Bernell Martin 
Barbara McFerren McClough 
Martin Charles McCord 
Kim Klinkhammer McDonald 
William Dennis McGaughran 
John Darren McGrory 
Robert Eugene Mclntyre II 
James Edwin McKnight 
Charles Thomas Melkent 
Lucretia Ann Miller 
Genola Bishop Morris 
Edmond Lorance Moss . 
Dennis Michael Mullenix 
Patricia Ann Murchison 
Douglas Gene Nanney 
Gloria Jean O'Bryant 
Tawana Oliver 
Carol Lee Owens 
Betty Lee Liles Pace 
Susan Louise Pannell 
Cary Clifton Pappas 
David L. Parker 




Graduates 



109 



Bachelor of Business Administration corn. 

Willette Arlene Patton 

Edward Pease 

Mark Coe Pendergrast 

Patrick Evans Pennington 

Ronald David Piccolo 

Mark Kevin Pierce 

Mark Steven Pils 

James Brian Prather 

Joseph Oscar Price III 

Deborah Jean Province 

Pauline H. Abney Pugh 

Donald Lee Ralph 

Carolyn C. Ramage 

John Taylor Reed 

Susan Gail Riley 

Carolyn Fay Robertson 

Catherine Thron Robinson 

Mary C. Rosen 

Michael Edward Rowland 

Charles David Ruch 

Sandra Lynn Runyan 

Robert David Russell 

Hassan Pierow Salehi 

William Arthur Sandridge 

Sharon Ruth Schafer 

Allen Ray Scott 

Stacy Andrews Seamans 

John Mark Selberg 

Janaah Salim Shamoon 

Stephen Lawrence Sharp 

Connie Marie Shaw 

Robert Arvel Shaw 

Robert David Shelby 

Yit Choy Christina Shum 

Elizabeth Ozier Sims 

Jeffrey Lynn Smallwood 

David Charles Smith 

Kevin Michael Speed 

Patrick Louis Steepleton 

Kenneth Alan Steinberg 

Donna Louise Stephenson 

Marilyn Lenee Steppe 

Josephine Loretta Stith 

Virginia Diann Stitt 

David John Strahota 

Steven Syken 

Gregory Prewitt Taylor 

Patricia Anne Taylor 

Sheryl Ann Taylor 

William Steele Taylor, Jr. 

Aronda Allen Thetford 

Michael Ryals Thomas 

Larry Wayne Thompson 

Ralph Thompson, Jr. 

Loretta Ann Tibbs 

Reba Faye Tidwell 

Simon Tong 

Rorie Nadine Trammel 

Lester Eugene Truby 

Dennis E. Turner 

Tammy June Templeton VanDerVoort 

Eileen Frances Vogel 

Marilyn Diane Wade 

Cornell Quimby Walker 

David Shepherd Walker 

Stephen Douglas Walker 

Paul Flynn Wallace 

Linda Kay Walls 

Jeffrey Bernard Ward 

Suzanne Warren 

Mitchell Dean Waters 

Michael Andrew Watson 



Jimmy Randall Weatherford 
Reginald Lee Weaver 
LaTanya Angelita West 
Mary B. Marques Whisenhunt 
Joyce Garner Wilborn 
Martha Jane Wilkinson 
Robert Hancel Wilkinson, Jr. 
Barry Mason Williams 
David Dowlen Williams 
Leslie Ray Williams 
Jay Derek Wilson 
David S. Winestone II 
Ronald Lee Winkler 
Lisa Maria Wise 
Cynthia Grace Witte 
Brooks Fred Woloshyn 
Brenda Lynn Woods 
Michael Wayne Woods 
Simon Moses Woody, Jr. 
William Baxter Worden 
Frank Paul Worthen 
Paul L Wright 
Paul Jean Yarbrough 
Dianne Young 
Loretta Valencia Young 
Jamae White Zarshenas 

Master of Business Administration 

Donna Abney 

B.A., 1974, Memphis State University 
Vernetta Faye Anderson 

B.B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Steven L. Bauer 

B.B.A., 1974, University of Wisconsin-Mil- 
waukee 
Tonya Zanne Beasley 

B.S., 1981, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 
Susan Mary Bevalac 

B.S.E., 1972, Memphis State University 
David Spafford Bishop 

B.A., 1981, University of Tennessee 
Hunter Marion Brumfield, Jr. 

B.S., 1971, Missisippi State University 
Dennis Craig Burbank 

B.S., 1974, University of Arkansas-Little 

Rock 
Mary Rita Burke 

B.B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Timothy Wynn Butler 

A.A., 1975, Oxford College 

B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
Anthony Mark Canepa 

B.S., 1965, Arkansas State University 

M.Ed., 1978, Memphis State University 
Lenon J. Coleman 

B.A., 1968, Memphis State University 
Sandra L. Deeser 

B.A., 1979, Southwestern at Memphis 
James Stuart Dickey, Jr. 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Mary Ann Furniss 

B.S., 1966, University of Richmond 
Robert L. Gholson, Jr. 

B.A., 1974, Tennessee State University 
Duane Allen Herrington 
•A. A., 1968, Northwest Mississippi 

Junior College 

B.B.A., 1972, Memphis State University 
Mary Elizabeth Higgins 

B.A., 1979, University of Southern Cali- 
fornia 
John Stuart Hooser 

B.S., 1974, Missisippi State University 




The Business Buil<Jing-an innocent looking struc- 
ture. But woe unto you who stumble into the 
torture of Economics 2110! 



Brian E. Hufford 

B.S.I.E., 1974, Missisippi State Univer- 
sity 
Kevin Anthony Hunt 

B.A., 1979, University of Tennessee 
William Stephen Jackson 

B.B.A., 1982, Memphis State University 
Jennifer Elaine Jenkins 

B.A., 1978, University of Tennessee 
Michael Dale Johnson 

B.B.A., 1979, Memphis State University 
Stephen J. King 

B.S.E., 1973, University of Arkansas 

M.Ed., 1974, Memphis State University 
Joe Clifton Kirby 

B.S., 1964, University of Arkansas 
Paul M. Klinck 

B.B.A., 1975, Memphis State University 
Margaret Olive Kossman 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Janell Marie Kurtz 

B.S., 1978, Pennsylvania State University 
Harold Eugene Langley 

B.B.A., 1977, Memphis State University 
J. Logan McCabe, Jr. 

B.A., 1972, Memphis State University 
Karen Theresa Mehrhoff 

B.A., 1980, Louisiana State University 
Paul G. Milici 

B.A., 1966, Rutgers University 
John William Minton 

B.A., 1972, University of Northern Col- 
orado 

M.A., 1975, University of Northern Colo- 
rado 
Bonnie Gay Moore 

B.A., 1977, Southwestern at Memphis 
Mary Kathryn Morin 

B.S., 1969, University of Dayton 
Kenneth Wayne Moten 

B.S.E.T., 1976, Memphis State University 



"ij Graduates 



Patricia Tomlinson Nix 

B.S., 1951, Southwestern at Memphis 

B.S.M.T., 1953, University of Tennessee 

M.S., 1980, Memphis State University 
Michael Grant Oakley 

B.I. A., 1981, General Motors Institute 
Stephen G. Oenning 

B.A., 1969, Christian Brothers College 
Christopher V. Palmer 

B.S.B.A., 1974, Christian Brothers College 
Michael A. Panarese 

B.A., 1977, North Central College 
Monte Robert Panitz 

B.A., 1970, Memphis State University 
Beth Shand Patton 

B.S.I. M., 1980, Purdue University 
Douglas L. Patton 

B.S.I.E., 1979, Purdue University 
James Maurice Peel 

B.S., 1966, Louisiana Polytechnic Institute 
Vanessa K. Porter 

B.B.A., 1977, Memphis State University 
Harry J. Pratt III 

B.S.C.E., 1974, Christian Brothers College 

M.S.C.E., 1980, Memphis State University 
Wallace Richard Pyne 

B.S., 1952, University of Missouri 
Zelodious Leilani Queen 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Margaret Ann Ramsey 

B.S., 1979, University of Tennessee 
John Joseph Reynolds 

B.S., 1973, University of Baltimore 
Virginia Morgan Scarbrough 

B.S., 1975, University of Tennessee 
Steven T. Schultz 

B.A., 1968, Dennison University 

J.D., 1971, Vanderbilt University 
Howard L. Schuster 

B.B.A., 1954, University of Oklahoma 
Sherry S. Simon 

B.A., 1970, Kansas State University 
Jannelle Loggins Smith 

B.S.I. E., 1978, Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology 
Prema Sriram 

B.C., 1977, Bombay University 
Laurie Waddy Stock 

B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
William Steven Taylor 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Pravin J. Thakkar 

B.S.M.E., 1967, Christian Brothers Col- 
lege 
Steven Daniel Thamer 

B.S., 1973, Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology 

M.A., 1980, Pepperdine University 
William D. Theodorou 

A.S., 1975, Fulton-Montgomery Community 

College 

B.A., 1977, Syracuse University 
James Vernon Thomas III 

B.S., 1974, University of Tennessee 
Gregory A. Ton 

B.B.A., 1974, University of Missisippi 
Billy Allan Tuberville 

B.A., 1965, University of Arkansas-Little 

Rock 

M.A., 1968, University of Missouri-Kan- 
sas City 
John A. Van Steenberg 

B.S., 1969, University of Alabama 



William A. Whitten 

B.S., 1970, Christian Brothers College 
Carl R. Williams 

B.S., 1976, Mississippi State University 

B.S.I.E., 1976, Mississippi State University 
Torri Renee Wyatt 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 



Luke Yancy III 

B.S., 1971, LeMoyne-Owen College 

Master of Science 

Stanley Joseph Kristo 

B.A., 1953, University of Detroit 



The Department of 
Aerospace Studies 

May Graduates 

Candidates for Air Force Commission 



Andrew S. Cain 
Barbara G. Edwards 
Edward C. Gaitley 
Ray P. Harris 
Manuel A. Hidalgo 
Paula L. Joyner 
Phyllis Y. Kendall 



John F. Shields 
William C. Starr 
Charles B. Still 
Frederick E. Thomas 
Simon Tong 
Reginald L. Weaver 
Michael W. Woods 



^5V;r' 




:.> 



«N 



Members of the Air Force Reserved Officers Training Corps congregate behind Robison Hall for inspection. 



Graduates 



University College 



Engineering (cont'd) 

Bachelor of Liberal Studies 

Turney Powers Berry, sumina cum laude 

(University Honors) 
Harry Eugene Steele, summa cum laude 

(University Honors) 

Master of City & Regional Planning 

Judy J. Daniel 

B.A., 1974, University of Missisippi 

M.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Reva Mark Kriegel 

A.B., 1962, Barnard University 
Charles N. Sandifer 

B.S., 1959, Louisiana State University 
Patricia A. Tobin 

B.A., 1979, University of South Florida 
Wesley B. Townson 

B.S., 1977, Columbus College 

Master of Science (Individual Studies) 

Barbara Jane Sherrill 

B.S., 1981, Memphis State University 
Catherine Anne Welsh 

B.A., 1975, Vanderbilt University 

Master of Science (Library Science) 

Pamela Noranne Bray 

B.S.E., 1981, Memphis State University 
Rhonda McMillen Kemp 

A. A., 1977, Martin College 

B.S., 1979, Lambuth College 



Bachelor of Liberal Studies 


Master of Arts 


Turney Powers Berry, summa cum laude 


(Audiology & Speech Pathology) 


Harry Eugene Steele, summa cum laude 




- 


Susan Elaine Barnhart 


Bachelor of Professional Studies 


B.S., 1981, Pennsylvania State Univer- 


Charles Allen Goforth, summa cum laude 


sity 


Judith Victoria Belsky, cum laude 


Dawn Violet Dershem 


Charlotte Conant Hayes, cum laude 


B.A., 1980, San Diego State University 


Leah Ann Kleinfeldt, cum laude 


Marjorie Lisa Foster 


Richard P. LaRhette, cum laude 


B.A., 1981, University of Missisippi 


Michael Stuart Pasquale, cum laude 


Lori Lee Galey 


Gene Francis St. Pierre, cum laude 


B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 


Arthur Lee Bergeron 


Chad W. Hess 


Reginald Lynn Boring 


B.A., 1980, San Diego State University 


Warren Wesley Brown, Jr. 


Janice Kathryn Hoffman 


Victor Wayne Carnathan 


B.S., 1981, Texas Christian University 


David Alan Coleman 


Roxanne Marie Jennemann 


Alan Gustav Fritsche 


B.A., 1981, Southern Illinois University 


Bartley Sanford Garey 


Patsy Hardin Morgan 


William Edward Horrell, Jr. 


B.A.E., 1979, University of Missisippi 


Jim W. Jones, Jr. 


Renee Michelle Poteet 


David Warren Kelley 


B.A., 1980, University of Arkansas- 


John Gordon Kerr 


Little Rock 


Charles Dalton Lovell, Jr. 


Patricia Ann Thaczuk Walker 


Reginald Tyson McCants 


A. A., 1978, Three Rivers Community 


Kristine Bruns Nutting 


College 


Neal Allan Pillsbury 


B.A., 1980, Southeast Missouri State 


Gregory Mark Powers 


University 


Wendy Lynn Sturm 


B.S.E., 1980, Southeast Missouri State 


Marilyn Crowder Wannamaker 


University 


Robert Dwayne Williams 





The Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law 



J. Blake Anderson 

B.A., The University of the South 
John Steven Anderson 

B.A., Lambuth College, 1980 
Judy Broadstreet Barker 

M.S., University of Tennessee, 1976 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1975 
Donna Lorraine Barlett 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1980 
Charles H. Bassford 

M.B.A., Tennessee Technological Univer- 
sity, 1979 

B.S., William Jennings Bryan, 1978 
Robert Michael Black 

B.A., University of Missouri, 1980 
Sam Berry Blair, Jr. 

B.S., University of Virginia, 1979 
John Allen Bobango 

B.A., Arkansas State University 
Lisa Walker Bobango 

B.B.A., Southern Methodist University, 

1980 
Timothy H. Bolden 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Kathleen C. Boyle 

B.S., St. Joseph's College, 1979 
Anthony Russell Brown 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Garry Gene Brown 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1979 



May Graduates 

Wendy Elizabeth Bryant 

B.S., East Tennessee State University, 1978 
Wilma Jean Buczek 

B.A., George Peabody College, 1975 
Dana Michael Busch 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1979 
Thomas H. Butler III 

B.S., Vanderbilt University, 1980 
John Wheeler Campbell 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Judith Ellen Cardoso 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Pamela Warnock Coleman 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Samuel L. Crain, Jr. 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1977 
Lloyd Vernon Crawford 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Sheila Jordan Cunningham 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1979 
Timothy Allen Deere 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1977 
Paul Kenneth Dick 

B.A., University of South Florida, 1980 
James Stuart Dickey, Jr. 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Handel Roland Durham, Jr. 

B.B.A., LeMoyne-Owen College 
Shawn Patrick Ellis 

B.A., Southwest Missouri State University, 

1980 



David Kelsey Ettman 

B.S., Milsaps College, 1979 
James S. Evans 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1978 
John Michael Farris 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 

1980 
Bruce Lee Feldbaum 

B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1980 
Marie Christine Ferran 

B.S., Tennessee Technological Univer- 
sity, 1980 
Robert Mark Field 

B.S., University of Alabama, 1980 
Walter L. Fitzgerald, Jr. 

M.S., University of Tennessee, 1982 

B.S., Mercer University, 1979 
Gregory Stewart Flanagan 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 

1980 
Michael Arthur Flexsenhar, Jr. 

B.A., Carthage College, 1980 
Douglas Gene Garrett 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1976 
Danny Scott Goulder 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Vicki Lynn Green 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1980 
Loren Ricki Grossman 

M.S., California State University, 1974 

A.B., University of California, 1972 



1 2 Graduates 



Richard Joseph Guercio 

B.A., St. John's University, 1979 
Albert Einar Gustafson 

M.B.A., University of Missouri, 1972 

B.A., Kansas Wesleyan University, 1966 
James Alan Harden 

B.A., Austin Peay, 1977 
Adella Malvezzi Heard 

A.B., University of Notre Dame, 1979 
Deborah A. M. Henderson 

B.A., Christian Brothers College, 1976 
Kerrin F. Hendren 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
John Spaulding Hicks 

B.P.A., University of Missisippi, 1980 
Brucie Waggener Hooks 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1979 
Joanne Martin Jenkins 

B.S.N., Memphis State University, 1980 
Janice Eileen Joki 

B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute & 
State University, 1978 
James Willard Juroe 

B.S., Belmont College, 1979 
Janell Marie Kurtz 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1978 
Gregg Irwin Lansky 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1979 
William Branch Lawson 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1976 
James Philip Livingston 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1977 
William Bradley Lockert 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1980 
David Keith Lower 

B.S., Southern Illinois, 1980 
Clim Madlock, Jr. 

M.A., Memphis State University, 1972 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1970 
Russell Marks 

B.S., College of William and Mary; 
Christopher Newport College, 1977 
Susan Cass Marks 

A.B., Smith College, 1980 
Robert William Marshall, Jr. 

B.A., Christian Brothers College, 1980 
Patricia Gayle McCarty 

B.A., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Lealand Lane McCharen 

B.A., Millsaps College 
Guy Wallace McClure 

B.A., Vanderbilt, 1980 

B.A., Vanderbilt, 1980 
Michael Dale McCullar 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1977 
Mark Steven McDaniel 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 
1980 
Terry Lee McVay 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Karin Lee Miller 

B.A., University of Florida, 1978 
Matthew Thomas Miller 

B.A., Yale University, 1980 
Gary B. Minor 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1979 
David Murray Monypeny 

B.B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1980 
Charles William Mooney 

B.S., Evangel College, 1977 
Dwight Terry Moore 

M.P.A., Memphis State University, 1975 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1970 



C. Raymond Myers, Jr. 

B.S., Clemson University, 1975 
Verni Owen Nerren 

B.S., Memphis State University, 1972 
Patricia Nelson Nozinich 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1978 
Howard Robert Orfield 

B.S., East Tennessee State, 1980 
Paul Richard O'Rourke 

B.S., Boston College, 1971 
Anna Jane Parkey 

B.S., Union College, 1972 
Kevin Glenn Patterson 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Carla Ann Peacher-Ryan 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1978 
Chris Alan Pentz 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1980 
Thomas Steven Perry 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1974 
Mark Murie Petzinger 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1976 
Florence Annette Powell 

A.B., Sweetbriar College, 1980 
John Priest Pritchard 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1974 
Audrey Kay Quails 

B.A., University of Detroit, 1977 
Mary Chumney Rich 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Van Lewis Riggins, Jr. 

B.B.A., Austin Peay State University, 
1980 
Ron G. Robbins 

B.A., Carson-Newman College, 1977 
Gwendolyn Rooks 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1975 
Gary L. Rosenthal 

B.A., C. W. Post, 1979 
Mary Beth Ryan 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Sonja Faye Schwartz 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1980 
David Samuel Seay 

B.A., Bluefield College, 1980 
Cindy Louise Sentell 

B.S., Murray State University, 1979 
Wanda B. Shea 

B.S., Memphis State University, 1970 
Joy Marie Sims 

B.A., Hollins College, 1976 
James Jeffery Slingerland 

B.S., Florida State University, 1979 
Perry Glen Smith 

B.S., Tennessee Technological University, 
1978 
Sidney Lee Springfield 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1980 
Barry Paul Staubus 

B.S., East Tennessee State University, 
1979 
David Sherrell Stockton 

B.A., East Tennessee State , 1975 
Rodney Keith Strong 

B.A., Morehouse College, 1977 
Charles E. Traylor 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Michael Byron Tulloss 

B.A., Vanderbilt University, 1980 
Langdon S. Unger, Jr. 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Gary Eugene Veazey 

B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University 



Deborah Brooks Walls 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1979 
Linda Lynn Haskins Walls 

M.E., Memphis State University, 1978 

B.S.E., Memphis State University, 1977 
Leigh S. Walton 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1980 
John Lynn Watson 

B.S., Vanderbilt University, 1980 
Virginia Watson-Griffee 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1978 
Latricia Gail Webb 

B.S., Murray State University, 1980 
Gary Lynn White 

B.S., Memphis State University 
Gary Roy Wilkinson 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
Jeffrey H. Whitten 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1980 
Thomas Elton Williams 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 1978 
Clifford Wilson 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1978 
Katharine Ann Witherspoon 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis, 1980 
William Edgar Woodson, Jr. 

B.S., Freed-Hardeman College, 1980 
Anne Schley Wright 

B.S., University of Tennessee, 1974 




Graduates 13 



THE COLLEGE 
OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Everyone can remember either hearing 
about or being forced to cut open a poor 
frog in a high school biology class. The 
College of Arts and Sciences goes far 
beyong the dissection of toads and 
grasshoppers. There are three major 
concentrated areas from the 14 depart- 
ments in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The Humanities are composed 
of psychology, mathematics, philosophy, 
and foreign languages. The Natural 
Sciences range from biology to physical 
geography. Political science, anthro- 
pology, and economics are only a few of 
the areas covered in the Social Sciences. 

The Master of Arts degree programs 
are generally open to anyone who has 
completed the Bachelor of Arts degree. 
A Master of Arts can be pursued by 
students majoring in anthropology, 
criminal justice, English, geography, 
history, philosophy, political science, 
psychology, romance languages, and 
sociology. 

The Master of Public Administration 
degree programs are open to students 
with adequate preparation in the social 
sciences or in business courses. Those 
students striving for this interdisciplinary 
degree complete a core curriculum in 
public administration courses and a 
concentration in General Public Ad- 
ministration, Health Services Admin- 



istration, Urban Management and 
Planning, Comparative and Develop- 
ment Administration, Public Policy 
Analysis/ Program Analysis, or Criminal 
Justice Administration. 

The Master of Science degree program 
is a non-thesis degree designed for 
students seeking in-depth knowledge of 
natural and mathematical sciences. 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered 
within the College of Arts and Sciences 
in the Biology, Chemistry, History, 
Mathematical Sciences, and Psychology 
Departments. 



Jeff Chambers examines the contents of his flask 
during his organic chemistry lab. 



„. >-• /# ■'■ 




The Graduates... 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Magna cum laude 

Nancy Niles Minton 
Fred Palmer Wilson, Jr. 



Cum laude 

Belinda Leah Lemorrocco 
Susan Lynn Longo 
Linder Lewis Metts, Jr. 
Cynthia Jean Relyea 
Robin Ann Rhoads 
Paul Campbell Shipe 
Vayden Porter Waddy III 



All other graduates 

James Alfred Charles Beatty 
Paul Geoffrey Garland 
Robert Joseph Garrett 
Larry Shawn Gurley 
Tiffany Jenkins Hefferman 
Alexander Robertson Hill 

with Honors in Psychology 
Sherry Colette Ihrig 
Terry Michael Jaco 
Shih-Hsiung Kao 
Thomas Michael Likins 
Robert Love, Jr. 
Michael Marc Masla 
Calvin Jeffrey Mullins 
Donna Feraci Schrader 
Charles Brent Sutton 




For some reason, Debbie Brooks is actually enjoying taring (that's measuring, to 
non-chem majors) some particle*. 



"Sell 7,H# shares and check my securities. "Though they are 
not the New York Stock Exchange, the facilities in the 
computer room of the Dunn Building provide much needed 
services to students. Here, Lee Conley and Greg Jackson 
discuss their "options" of their out-of-class assignments. 



114 August 1983 Graduates 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
NURSING 



Patricia Ruth Brownlee 
Jessie M. Payne 
Cheryl Lynn Purvis 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Karen Overton Anderson- 
Psychology 



Department of 



B.A., 1972, Wellesley College 
B.S., 1979, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Psychological Preparation 
for Cardiac Catheterization: A Comparison 
of Informative, Modeling, and Cognitive- 
Behavorial Approaches" 
Major Professor: Dr. Sam B. Morgan, 
Professor of Psychology 



John Truman Fanning- 
Psychology 



Department of 



B.A., 1974, Texas Technological University 
M.A., 1976, Stephen F. Austin University 



Dissertation: "Living with End-Stage Renal 
Disease: A Comparative Study " 
Major Professor: Dr. Kenneth L. Lichstein, 
Associate Professor of Psychology 



Leroy Frazier — Department of Chemistry 

B.S., 1974, Rust College 

M.S., 1977, Memphis State University 

Dissertation: "Conformational Studies on 

Diastereomers of A Ipha- Hydroxyalkyl 

Sulfolane Compounds. " 

Major Professor: Dr. Raymond R. Bard, 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Percy Auburn Jaquess- 
Biology 



Department of 



B.S., 1970, University of Tennssee 
M.S., 1977, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "The Sublethal Effects of 
Certain Metal Salts on the Metabolism and 
Morphology of Selected Procaryotic and 
Eucaryotic Organisms" 
Major Professor: Dr. Joseph S. Layne, 
Associate Professor of Biology. 



David M. Kranc— Department of Chemistry 

B.S., 1977, University of Pittsburgh 
Dissertation: "Synthesis and 
Characterization of a Boron Containing 
Amino Acid for Use in Slow Neutron 
Capture Therapy of Tumors" 
Major Professor: Dr. James C. Carter 

Lisa Odstfeld — Department of Psychology 

B.A., 1977, University of Arizona 
M.S., 1980, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Gender Identify Factors and 
Attributional Style as Predictors of Sexual 
Dysfunctioning " 

Major Professor: Dr. Michael B. Lupfer, 
Professor of Psychology 



Susan Joan Stalgaitis 
Psychology 



-Department of 



B.S., 1977, Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., 1979, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Perceptual Factors in the 
Acceptance of Sexual Violence Against 
Women " 

Major Professor: Dr. Andrew W. Meyer, 
Asssociate Professor of Psychology 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Summa cum laude 
Susan Elaine Calhoun 

Magna cum laude 

Kay Frances Carlton 
Carolyn Jean Chumney 

with Honors in History 
Paula June Dickson 
Norman Lamar Dixon, Jr. 
Janice Lynne Ford 
Leigh Anne Kingsley 
Terry Lee McGhehey 

with Honors in History 

Cum laude 

William Neely Carruthers, Jr. 

Mildred Diane Gay 

Debra S. Gilbert 

Charlotte La Vars Holder 

Stephen White Humes 
with University Honors 
with Honors in English 

David Lyle Kennedy 
with University Honors 

William Kenneth Randolph 

Charis Anne Isom Wichers 

All other graduates 

David Lee Anthony 
Mark Carroll Atkinson 
Deborah Ann Barton 
Helen Marie Bolden 
Hugh Douglas Bowman 
Mark Steven Brown 
Mary Alice Bruce 
Martha Huffman Carson 






Yvonne Steeley Churchill 
Parker Cole Conley 
Robert G. Crumby 
Darrolyn Matlock Currie 
Dorothy Ann Doherty 
Connie Terasa Daughtery 
Calvin L. Engstrom 
Donald Edward Farmer II 
Chauncey Tobias Gray 
Gaylon Stanley Hall 
Leigh C. Harwell 
Rebecca Ann Hathaway 
Cecil Hervey 

Manuel Anthony Hildalgo 
Randle Elton Hopkins 
James P. Johnson III 
Susan Lee Kurts 
Claire LaNelle Lindsey 
Valerie Anne Loney 
Joy Tanner Lubin 
Mark Anthony Wells Ludlow 
Valarie Lorraine Macklin 
Carl David McVoy 
Michael Kary Meadows 
Robin Scott Miles 
Sharon Walsh Miner 
John Joseph Nieman III 
Lester Clinton Nix III 
Kenneth Roger Richie 
Charles Bradley Robb 
Kenneth Threefoot Rosenberg 
Bruce Perry Samuels 
Rodney Taylor 
Vickie Lynn Thomas 
Jeffery Lee Walker 
Mary Elizabeth Wells 
Richard Allan Word 
Barbara Park Zeisel 




Lookout, Pentagon, here come Pam Pratt and Carol 
Hall! Miss Pratt and Miss Hall were caught studying 
in the computer library of the Winfleld Dunn Building. 



Academics 115 



THE COLLEGE 

OF COMMUNICATION 

AND FINE ARTS 



The College of Communication and 
Fine Arts is one of the most active colleges 
on campus. The College is housed in the 
Theatre Building, the Music Building, the 
Meeman Journalism Building, Jones Hall, 
the Art Building, and one of the campus' 
newest buildings, the CFA Building. 

The Theatre Building contains theatres 
and studios along with several classrooms. 
Many performances are held in the Main 
Stage, Studio Theatre, and Lab Theatre 
auditoriums. The CFA Building is the 
home of dance studios, the MSU Art 
Gallery, the music studio, and the Mighty 
Sound of the South, the MSU Marching 
Band. The Music Building provides an 
escape for several thousand students. 
Along with classrooms and offices, the 
Music Building consists of the Harris 
Auditorium and rehearsal classrooms for 
many vocal and instrumental ensembles. 
Students also flock to the Music Library 



and practice rooms. The Music Library 
offers scores and recordings of hundreds 
of composers' works. For $4, music majors 
and non-music students alike can tickle 
the ivory of the pianos furnished in these 
practice rooms. 

The Meeman Journalism Building 
contains journalism classes, the Helms- 
man, and the DeSoto. Jones Hall and the 
Art Building also have art- and com- 
munication-oriented classes. The offices in 
the Graphic Designs Building were moved 
to Jones Hall last year. 

The College of Communication and 
Fine Arts, directed by Dean Richard 
Ranta and Associate Dean Raymond M. 
Lynch, has more than 1 1 5 faculty and staff 
members in the college who focus on 
preparing students for studies in applied 
arts, communications, and performing 
arts. 




The Graduates, 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Cum Laude 

Tammy Lynn McCord 
Sarah Elizabeth Melvin 
Virginia Anne Rutledge 

All other graduates 

Stephen Mark Koch 
William Caldwell Askew 
Mary Joan Ball 
Shekita M. Bickham 
Christopher Lee Childress 
William G. Dierssen 
Michael Keith Gentry 
Deborah Faye Hendry 
Leslie Ann Hester 
Viola Elizabeth Johnson 
Robin Susanne Ligon 
Julie Elise Mandelman 
Renee Marshall 
Michael Storey Martin 
Pamela Aden McCormick 
Beverly Diane McKnight 
Vivian Razelle Morman 
Emil Jerome Morris 
Linda Elaine Morris 
David Eugene Mowry 
Diebre White Odumakinde 
Pamela Chambers Prewitt 
Terea Marie Jacobs Riggs 
Rochelle Elaine Simpson 
Dorothy Gail Stovall 
Randy Paul Threet 
Eric Lawson Turnipseed 
Phillip Steven Webster 
Jeffery Allen Winter 
Marvin Wright 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS 

Michael Anthony Allgeier 
Lillian Corinne Brock 
Randall Wayne Cope 
Edward Earl Hall 
Deborah Jean Likley 
Kathryn McLaughlin Lloyd 
Linda Christine Rendtorff 
Lauree Kelly Shields Riggin 
Tommy Laverne Williams, Jr. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 



Photo by J. Scoll Vanzandt Cum IjJudt' 



The Communication and Fine Arts Building, one of the newest buildings on campus, is a center of constant 
bustling activity. Inside are dance studios, a music studio, the MSU Art Gallery, the practice room for the MSU 
Marching Band, and several offices and classrooms. 



Dorothy Avery Cox 
Kawanda L. Buford 



116 May 1983 Graduates 



Graduate Degrees in Communication 

and Fine Arts 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Marian M. McCown 

B.A., 1976, University of Arkansas 

Robert Wayne McDowell 

B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 

Mark Wayne Taylor 

B.A., 1980, Southwestern at Memphis 

Roger Dennis Turner 

B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 

Robert Lane Wright, Jr. 

B.A., 1977, David Lipscomb College 



MASTER OF FINE ARTS 

Philip Keith Byrne 
B.S., 1971, University of Leeds 
M.S., 1972, University of Leeds 
Ph.D., 1971, University of Leeds 

Annette Elizabeth Fournet 

B.F.A., 1979, Memphis Academy of Arts 

Geoffrey Allan Grehan 

B.A\, 1980, Memphis State University 



MASTER OF MUSIC 

Karen Diane Cremer 

B.M., 1982, Memphis State University 

Joseph Aloysius Davis III 

B.M.E., 1976 Henderson State University 

Lee D. Harris 

B.A., 1980, Harding University 

Gale Jones Murphy 

B.M.E., 1976, Southern Missionary College 



Mark Glenn Putnam 

A.A., 1976, Martin College 

B.M., 1981, Middle Tennessee State 

University 

John Douglas Sanders 

B.M., 1979, East Texas State University 

Debra Hewitt Smith 

B.M., 1978, Mississippi College 

Mark Lee Waynick 

B.M.E., 1977, Central Methodist College 

Christina Gladney Wellford 

B.A., 1973, Southwestern at Memphis 



DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS 

Larry E. McFatter — Department of Music 

B.M., 1977, Belmont College 

M.M., 1979, Memphis State University 

Dissertation: "Cradle Song for Soprano 

Voice and Chamber Orchestra " 

Major Professor: Dr. Donald W. Freund, 

Associate Professor of Music 




Graduate Assistant Karen Salop spent a major portion 
of her life backstage of "Bus Stop" getting ready for 
opening night. The Theatre Building houses the Main 
Stage, the Studio Theatre, and the Lab Theatre. 
Crews and casts are open to all students who will 
dedicate the hours and hours of work involved in a 
production. 





Photos by J. Scott Vmzindl 

"What a Feeling!" 

Victor Clark, Lucinda Rio and Dierdre Hade practice their Jazz II class in Studio A. The CFA Building 

contains practice rooms and music studios. 

Laurie LoBello Mozarts herself senseless as she takes advantage of the Music Library to help her with her 
homework. The Music Library, on the first floor of the Music Building, offers scores, stories, and sound tracks 
of many hundreds of composers for students to check out or listen to with the library facilities. 



Academics 117 



The Fogelman College of Business and Economics 



Bachelor of Business Administration 

summa cum laude 

Mitzi Wright Mathenia 

magna cum laude 

Delia Carol Benner 
Barry Alan Bianchi 
William Quinn Britt 
Shari Dee Westby Garner 
Patricia Ann Hart 
Cheryl Rule Kent 
Sharlene Ann Mahaffy 
Deborah Jo Mills Mueller 
Thorsteinn Frimann Sigurdsson 
Eric Stockburger 

cum laude 

Janet A. Abraham 
Clarke Coe Bell 
Terry Sweat Brown 
Paul Andrew Henson 
James Joseph Kleber 
Lilly Carol Massengill 
Jessica A. Murphy 
Dennis Stuart Pope 
Joe M. Ray, Jr. 
Ruth P. Simpson 
Bonnie St. Clair Spracher 
John Michael Thornbury 
Wesley Ward Voyles 
Donna Carol Waggener 
Lucy Marino Wall 
Nancy Sargent White 

all other graduates 

John Milton Akers 
Robert Gregory Akin 
Jennifer Kellie Heiberg Allen 
Patricia Deneise Allen 
Lisette Legeai Andrews 
Mary Christine Aviotti 
David Wayne Barczak 
James Willis Barrett 
Tommy Lee Beck 
John George Beckman, Jr. 
Gregory Dwayne Bethel 
Phyllis Marie Blanchard 
Larry S. Bloomfield 
Daniel Lamarr Bobo 
Gregory Darshae Bowden 
Melissa Fine Brenner 
John Merle Brooks 
Angella Ruth Brown 
Larry Horton Bryant 
Jeffrey Ellis Carson 
Joseph Alan Cartwright 
Paul Alan Chambers 
Nancy Ann Chaney 
William Nelson Chauncey 
Tyrone Chears 
Deborah Siler Claypool 
Amanda King Coalter 
Steven Jerome Cooksey 
Thomas Jeffrey Cox 
Meredith Alan Crawford 
Mark Lance Criner 
David Lawrence Cunningham 
Harriet Kremser Cwikiel 
Brian Timothy Davis 
Michael Christopher Dion 
Michael Douglas 



Mark Clawson Duke 

James William Edwards 

Shirley R. Elliot 

Richard Lynn Emerson 

Charles Jerome Epps 

Kathy Ann Excarre 

Edward Rubin Frank, Jr. 

Melanie Lynn Franklin 

Lisa Anne Frans 

Billy Ward Gand, Jr. 

Authur Irwin Gans 

Jackie Neal Galin 

John Martin German 

Ural Liddell Grant, Jr. 

Jesse Bert Gresham, Jr. 

Celia Ann Grugett 

Mark Reed Hadley 

Regeania Anne Haynes 

Donald Lee Heckman, Jr. 

James Michael Henry, Jr. 

Brenda Ann Hicks 

William Scott Holbrook 

Eric L. Horton 

Lauren Elizabeth Hurt 

Laura Denise Indorf 

Evelyn Elizabeth Irwin 

David Bruce Isabell 

David Tual Ivy 

Linda Williams Joyner 

Paula Jean Cannon King 

Nicholas Harry Kouniakis 

Robert Eugene Lafferty, Jr. 

John Andrew Lamar 

Debra Abigail Leaks 

Ginger Ann Leslie 

Tamra Lea Lipper 

Gregory Alan Lowery 

William Martin Luckett 

Sandiago Luna 

Evelyne Marie Lee Malone 

Vinvecca Renbeck Bogard Manning 

Darrell Lee Martin 

Garrick Phillip Martin 

Felecia Resha Mathews 

Michael Stephen McClain 

Barbara McFerren McClough 

Michael Alan McConnell 

Grace Ellen Magarel McNamee 

Gwedolyn Kay Mebane 

Lori Lynn Melockoff 

David Randall Mills 

Debbie Renee Moore 

Herbert Bernard Moriarty 

Jeffrey David Morrow 

Patricia Lee Murphy 

Ronald Sterling Mynatt 

Patricia Maxwell Newsome 

Timothy O'Neal Nieman 

Steven Earle Noble 

Teresa Lynne O'Malley 

James Paul Page 

David L. Parker 

Rodney Raymond Parkinson 

Melissa Waldrop Pentecost 

Hassan Pierow Salehi 

Margaret Antoinette Porter 

Judith Karen Caldwell Pratt 

Dennis Allen Rainey 

Julia Ann Fulton Reeves 



Brenda Ellen Regel 
Angela Ann Reynolds 
Dawn Lovelace Roberts 
Danny Edward Robinson 
David Morris Robinson 
Gregory Duane Rose 
Vincent Charles Salemi 
Robert Patrick Shearer 
Michael D. Shields 
Jacqueline Sue Shirtino 
Regina Faye Sisson 
George Andrew Slusarz 
Renzi E. Smith 
Sam Sneed 
Dena Jo Sparkman 
Jacquelyn Anne Stedman 
Benjamin Gilbert Stevenson 
William Henry Stokes, Jr. 
Glen Edward Sturdivant 
Phillip Outland Sutherlin 
Charles George Tackett 
Larry Darnell Taylor 
Stephen Robert Templeton 
Aronda Allen Thetford 
Stuart Barry Thomas 
Ralph Thompson, Jr. 
Rhonda Etoyle Tramble 
Rorie Nadine Trammel 
Ralph Nolan Travis, Jr. 
John Bernard Van Zandt 
Sheryl Ann Webb 
Michael Gavin Carter Webster 
Tena Jo Bastow Wehrman 
Gary Joseph Weik 
Joseph Paul Weingarten, Jr. 
Russell Martin Wherry 
Kenneth Whittington III 
Joyce Marie Woods 
William Lawrence Woody 
Frank Paul Worthen 



Master of Arts 

Nikos Lyras 

B.A., 1978, Southwestern at Memphis 
Dorothy M. Smith 

A.S., 1977, Shelby State Community 
College 

B.A., 1980, Southwestern at Memphis 
Master of Business Administration 

Betty Carolyn Brawner 

A.S., 1980, Volunteer State Community 
College 

B.B.A., 1982, Memphis State University 
Patricia Margot Brown 

A. A., 1979, Freed-Hardeman College 

B.S., 1981, Freed-Hardeman College 
Timothy Wynn Butler 

A. A., 1975, Oxford College Emory Uni- 
versity 

B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
William Stephen Byington 

B.S., 1978, University of Tennessee 
Emmanuel Cargill 

B.B.A., 1981, Ecole Superieure de Com- 
merce et D'Administration des Enterprises 
Wilder F. Conley, Jr. 

B.S., 1956, Tulane University 



118 Graduates 



Mary E. Dennison 

B.S., 1978, Bethel College 
Sajjan Singh 

B.S., 1977, University of Manitoba 
Greg Alan Duvall 

B.S., 1980, University of Kansas 
Timothy Donald Flatt 

B.B.A., 1981, Harding University 
Michael E. Gibson 

B.S., 1981, Harding University 
Michael E. Gibson 

B.S., 1981, Le Tourneau College 
Ronald Charles Hart 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Richard Thomas Heagy 

B.B.A., 1982, Memphis State University 
David Lavelle Higginbotham 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 
Cynthia M. Hunter 

B.S., 1977, University of Missouri 
John Terrell Lunn 

B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 
Linda Marler 

B.S.E., 1973, Memphis State University 
Laura Chrestman Middleton 

B.A., 1969, Memphis State University 
Audrey Burleigh Moore 

B.S.E., 1973, Memphis State University 
Cecilia M. Murray 

B.S.E., 1976, Memphis State University 
Mary Helen Ola 

B.B.A., 1980, University of Mississippi 
John Thomas Ray 

B.B.A., 1981, Memphis State University 

James Thomas Rhodes 

B.S., 1972, Morningside College 
Patricia Marie Steward 

B.B.A., 1979, Memphis^ State University 
Margaret Alice Taylor - 

B.A., 1974, Memphis State University 
M.A.T., 1976, Memphis State University 
Marshall Kerwin Trussell 

B.B.A., 1978, University of Mississippi 



Dexter Lewis Varnell 

B.S.C.E., 1968, Texas Technological Uni- 
versity 
James Charles Wilson 

B.A., 1973, Ohio State University 
M.A., 1973, Ohio State University 

Master of Science 

Steven Allan Ascroft 

B.C., 1976, Dalhousie University 

Roy E. Fite 

B.B.A., 1977, Memphis State University 

Allen Rae Hilms 

B.S.E., 1973, Concordia College 

John William Minton 

B.A., 1972, University of Northern Colo- 
rado 

M.A., 1975, University of Northern Colo- 
rado 
M.B.A., 1983, Memphis State University 

Cynthia Dale Walko 

B.B.A., 1978, Memphis State University 

Doctor of Business Administration 

Tommy A. Gates — Department of Man- 
agement 

B.S., 1974, University of Tennessee at 
Martin 

M.B.A., 1976, Memphis State University 

Dissertation: "Development of an App- 
lied Model of Employee Turnover " 

Major Professor: Dr. Elmore R. Alexan- 
der III, Associate Professor of Manage- 
ment 

Steven G.Greene — Department of Market- 
ing 

B.A., 1975, Southeastern Louisiana Uni- 
versity 

M.B.A., 1978, Southeastern Louisiana 
University 

Dissertation: "A Study of Advertising 
Slogan Recall in the Fast Food Industry " 

Major Professor: Dr. C. Lyn Abercrom- 



bie, Associate Professor of Marketing 
Richard Peter Heine,Jr. — Department of 
Management 

B.B.A., 1967, Loyola University 
M.B.A., 1969, University of New Orleans 
Dissertation: "The Relationship Between 
Hospital Communication and the Com- 
mitment of the Physician Medical Staff" 

Major Professor: Dr. Elmore R. Alex- 
ander III, Associate Professor of Man- 
agement 

E. James Randall — Department of Market- 
ing 

A. A., 1964, Manatee Junior College 
B.A., 1968, University of South Florida 
M.B.A., 1973, University of South Florida 
Dissertation: "Selection of Sales Person- 
nel Through the Use of Assessment Centers" 
Major Professor: Dr. Ernest F. Cooke, 
Professor of Marketing 



University College 



1400 Bachelor of Professional Studies 

summa cum laude 

Michael Richard Breault 
Shirley Gupton Lynn, 

magna cum laude 

Patricia Ferguson Crighton 

all other graduates 

James Leonard Burke III 
Jimmie Wall Farris 
Larry Wayne Garrett 
Ruth Flynn Hooker 
Reginald Tyson McCants 
Gary Ellis Mc Knight 
Christopher Muth 
Lee Alan Tubbs 



Beverly Betty Turnipseed 
William Henry Ward 
Robert Hampton Young 

Master of Arts 
(Audiology & Speech Pathology) 

Deborah Clotilde Dailey 

B.A., 1980, University of Tennessee 

Alicia Dianne Hightower 

B.A., 1981, University of Mississippi 

Cynthia Lee Price 

B.S., 1981, University of Southern Mis- 
sissippi 

Robert L. Sherbecoe 

B.S., 1978, Davidson College Patricia 
Fincher White 



B.A., 1980, Louisiana Tech University 

Master of City & Regional Planning 

Eugene Stephen Bryan 

A. A., 1971, Pierce Junior College 

B.S., 1973, Pennsylvania State University 

Master of Science (Individual Studies) 

Hugh Arnold Jeffreys 

B.S., 1974, Memphis State University 

Sally Joplin 

B.S.E., 1982, Memphis State University 

Richard E. McClary 

B.A., 1954, University of Alabama 

James Scott McKee 

B.A., 1976, Middle Tennessee State Uni- 
versity 



Graduates 19 



Herff College of Engineering 

August Graduates 



Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Larry Mitchell Berryman 
Charles Stewart Ferguson 
David Bruce Parker 
Mikal Andoni Qassis 
Michael Lawrence Thompson 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

Chong In Chi, summa cum laude 

KokYin Ho, magna cum laude 

Razeck Salvador Azrak, cum laude 

Brenda Lily Pan, cum laude 

Susan Lynn Parker, cum laude 

Karen Elaine Bonner 

Jovino Diaz-Fernandez 

Stacy Jane Fortner 

Mobolaji Olasunkawmi Lawal 

Debra Sue Murphy 

Joseph Anthony Toarmina 

Bachelor of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering 

Marcus Arnold Neely, cum laude 
Donald Allan Abbott 
Renato Corra 
Roger Fair Ervin 
Charles Alvin Garrett II 
Lp-ura Leigh Kenner 
Anthony Dale Prescott 
James MacArthur Sneed 

Bachelor of Science in Geology 

Charlene Christiana Epps, summa cum laude 



Joanne Lynn Bonnet, magna cum laude 
Lanny Reed Latham, magna cum laude 

Sherril Ann Gautreaux 
Maurice Douglas White 

Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering Technology 

John Allen Baker 
Robert Allen Beardsley 
Carl Edward Carson 
Eric J. Dickey 
Jill Doss Green 
William A. Hancox III 
Maclin Hobbs Holt 
Leland Young Pope 
Stephen Allen-Prigden 
Eddie Morris Pullen 
Randall Mark Randolph 
Henry McKinney Swope 

Bachelor of Science in Technology 

Gerald David Armitage, cum laude 

Eldred Marshall Butterfield 
Billy Wayne Murray 
Robert Glen Smith 
James Richard Yarbrough, Jr. 

Master of Science 

Donald O. Barber 

B.S., 1976, Metropolitan State University 
Daniel M. Benecke 

B.A., 1981, University of Tennessee- 
Chattanooga 



Thara Buranapongskul 

A.S., 1975, Paul Smith College 

B.S.C.E., 1978, Memphis State University 
Kuo — Tsi Chang 

B.S., 1978, National Chung-Hsing Uni- 
versity 
Tunney Allen Dong 

B.S.E.E., 1982, Memphis State University 
Richard James Doyle 

A.B., 1964, Boston College 

M.A., 1966, Boston College 

Ph.D., 1978, Boston College 
Dennis Carey Elrod 

B.S.E.T., 1977, Memphis State University 
Wayne Joseph Loner 

B.S., 1973, Purdue University 
William E. Luton 

B.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Ann Garrecht Metzger 

B.S., 1975, Memphis State University 
Aurelia Wammack Michaels 

B.S., 1969, Southwestern at Memphis 
Jayanthi Lakshmi Narayana 

B.E., 1979, University of Bombay 

M.E., 1981, University of Bombay 
Imad Nazem Samaha 

B.S., 1982, Memphis State University 
Leroy James Sentif 

A.S., 1980, State Technical Institute 

A.S., 1981, State Technical Institute 

B.S., 1982, Memphis State University 
Weldron Leon Weatherford 

B.S.E.T., 1973, Memphis State University 



The Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law 



August Graduates 




Donald Harold Allen 

B.P.A., University of Mississippi, 1980 
William C. Anderson, Jr. 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1974 
Robert V. Bickers, Jr. 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1977 
Daniel Martin Birdwell 

M.A., Memphis State University, 1977 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1971 
Thomas Lindsey Brannon 

M.E.D., Southwestern Baptist Theologi- 
cal Seminary, 1965 

B.A., William Carey College, 1963 
Dana Michael Busch 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1979 
Johnny Ray McFarland 

B.A., Memphis State University, 1980 
John Gilbert Parrish, Jr. 

B.S., Murray State University, 1980 



Dean David Pifer. 

Ph.D., University of Mississippi, 1972 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1963 
Tommy Darel Reeves 

B.B.A., Lambuth College, 1979 
Sonja Faye Schwartz 

B.A., University of Alabama, 1980 
Helen Clawson Smith 

M.Ed., Memphis State University, 1968 

B.S., Memphis State University, 1962 
James L. Stewart 

B.B.A., Memphis State University, 1968 
Ralph Jacob Veth 

B.S., Manhattan College, 1973 
Vicki Tyler Williams 

B.A., University of Mississippi, 1974 
Daniel Ray Woody 

B.S., Memphis State University, 1971 



1 20 Graduates 



College of Education 



August Graduates 

summa cum laude 

Annamarie Barber 
Sandra Kaye Gatlin-Smith 

magna cum laude 

Melissa Curtner Welch 
LeeAnne Williams 

cum laude 

Lisa Hahn Newman 
Leonard Joseph Ruck 
Theresa Cunningham Wilson 

all other graduates 

Michael D. Ball 
Ronald Joseph Barsotti 
Margaret Lisa Bedwell 
Henry Walter Bieber, Jr. 
Theresa Evans Bohannon 
Laura Lynn Brown 
Beverly Lynn Burns 
Cynthia Louise Cardosi 
Waymon Eugene Carter, Jr. 
Susan Smith Champion 
Virginia Ann Crihfield 
Linda Ellen Crone 
Dottie Lynn Douglas 
Lisa Carol Faquin 
Kim Ann Goold 
Jeffery Vardaman Harrison 
Barbara Grace Johnson 
Pamela Ann Kenny 
Ramona Susan Lay 
Cindy Love 

Debra Paulette Lowery 
Robyne Diane Miles 
Billy Wayne Murray 
Natalie Elizabeth Newman 
Judith Ellen Oberton 
Dennis P. Paden 
Kathy Coleron Powell 
Cynthia Jean Ryan 
Eva Quails Scott 
Ora Lee Shannon 
Theresa Ann Soro 
Beverly Morris Suggars 
Barbara Ann Sydow 
Carla Ann Thomas 
Marva Kaye Turner 
Kathleen Renee Vollm 
Mitchell Williams 
Terry Jay Williams 

Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 

magna cum laude 

Amy Albright Wagner 

cum laude 

Martha Bridges Leitner 

al other graduates 

Patricia Elaine Burton 
Anita Rose Gentry 
Roxie Waynette Lesh 
Jacqueline Starnes Mason 
Carol Morris 









Linda Lee Noble 
Valarie Elisa Pang 
Rachel Sidney Wheeler 

Bachelor of Music Education 

cum laude 

Delia Frances Cornelia 

all other students 

Michael R. Bump 
Lisa Ann New 
Timmy Ray Turner 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Charles E. Bryant, Jr. 

B.S., 1974, Austin Peay State University 
Thomas Stephen Collums 

B.A., 1972, Memphis State University 
Christiane Gilbert 

B.A., 1971, Memphis State University 

M.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Virgil P. Holder 

B.S., 1980, Memphis State University 
Michael B. Semore 

B.A., 1976, Freed-Hardeman College 
Louis Witchers 

B.A., 1972, Trinity Christian College 

Master of Education 

Maggie H. Edwards 

B.S., 1966, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Deborah Lynn Engle 

B.S., 1979, University of Tennessee 
Freida Loret Evans 

B.A., 1975, Lambuth College 
Joyce Hays Fesmire 

A.S., 1973, Jackson State Community 
College 

B.S., 1975, Lambuth College 
Eleanor Finch-Johnson 

B.S., 1966, Alabama A&M University 
Jamie Bickel Flowers 

B.S.E., 1978, Memphis State University 
Debra Lockard Foster 

B.S.E., 1978, Mmephis State University 
Timothy R. Foster 

B.S., 1970, Murray State University 

B.S., 1979, Memphis State University 
David Ray Fronabarger 

B.S., 1975, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Nancy Carol Gentry 

B.S.E., 1972, Arkansas State Unversity 
Olivere Robinson George 

B.S., 1955, LeMoyne-Owen College 
James N. Gienapp 

A. A., 1971, St. Paul's College 

B.S., 1973, Concordia Teachers College 
Joe David Graves 

B.S.E., 1972, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 
Rebecca Craft Gray 

B.S., 1980, Memphis State University 
Sharon Elizabeth Green 

B.S.E. 1974, Memphis State University 
Diane Meinert Hammonds 

B.S.E., 1978, University of Central Ar- 
kansas 



Frank Morgan Harris 

B.S., 1956, Tennessee A&I State University 
Pamela Lynn Drew Harris 

B.S.E., 1977, Memphis State University 
Cheryl Jane Harvey 

B.S.E., 1978, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 
Robyn Jane Hassell 

B.S.E., 1978, Memphis State University 
Anne Marie Hawkins 

B.S.E., 1978, Memphis State University 
Dixie Marilyn Henry 

A.S., 1979, Jackson State Community 
College 

B.S., 1980, Bethel College 
Robin Northrop Hill 

B.S., 1976, Mmephis State University 
Marilyn Arlene Hirth 

B.S., 1980, Lambuth College 
Vivian W. Hogue 

B.S., 1971, Memphis State University 
Pamela Joyce Holley 

B.A., 1978, Southern University 
Sue N. Howard 

B.S., 1977, Memphis State University 
Carole Roberts Hughey 

B.S., 1968, Memphis State University 
Cathy Jean Ivey 

B.S., 1972, Memphis State University 
Daphene Dianne Parr Jenkins 

B.S., 1965, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Shirley Petterson Jobe 

B.S., 1970, Memphis State University 
Jana Louise Johnson 

B.A., 1979, Union University 
Cathondra M. Jones 

B.A., 1976, Lane College 
James Clarence Jones 

B.A., 1972, San Francisco State University 

B.S.E., 1981, Memphis State University 
Johnny Kiddy 

B.S., 1973, Union University 
Maera Farnham Kobeck 

B.A., 1967, Arkansas College 
Marcia McCall Landers 

B.S., 1967, Memphis State University 
Jamye Barnes Lane 

B.S., 1976, Mississippi State Unversity 
Darois Sharon Libby 

B.S., 1967, University of Southern Missis- 
sippi 
Kathy Jeanette Linam 

B.S., 1975, Lambuth College 
Jeffrey Wayne Long 

B.S., 1979, University of Tennessee 
Frank Michael Love 

B.S., 1973, Memphis State University 
Katie Lou Love 

B.S.E., 1974, Memphis State University 
Majorie Bosley Lowe 

B.A., 1972, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Lelia Smith Maclin 

B.S., 1956, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Patricia A. Maclin 

B.S., 1967, Tennessee A&l State University 
Jan Mochow Mattingly 

B.S.E., 1972, Memphis State University 
Nancy Lee McCord 

B.A.E., 1981, University of Mississippi 
Eddie Warren McDougal 

B.A., 1965, Lambuth College 
Carol Morris Miller 

B.S., 1970, Memphis State University 
Gloria J. Miller 



Graduates 121 



B.S., 1972, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Ronald M. Mohundro 

B.S., 1973, Memphis State University 
Grace Lyon Montgomery 

B.S., 1957, University of 
Mississippi 
Jean Buntin Moody 

B.S., 1955, Tennessee State University 
Freddie Gayle Moore 

B.A., 1968, Lambuth College 
Jane Roudebush Murray 

B.A., 1965, University of Tennessee 
Marilyn Joyce Ange Nanney 

B.S.E., 1976, University of Tennessee- 
Martin 
Cindy Lou New 

A.A., 1974, Brenton-Parker Junior College 

B.S.E., 1976, Georgia Southern College 
Lewie Alexander Norful 

B.A., 1959, Philander Smith College 
Elizabeth Nobles Olson 

B.S.E., 1979, Memphis State University 
Janet Lynn Locke Osborn 

B.S., 1978, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Susan Paden Page 

B.A., 1979, Southern Methodist University 
Alice Maund Parker 

B.S.E., 1977, West Virginia University 
Donna Ruth Pearson 

B.S., 1980, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Sharon Rhodes Pearson 

B.S.E., 1978, Memphis State University 
Pamela Scully Pratt 

B.S., 1975, Memphis State University 
Sharon Anne Allen Prewitt 

B.S., 1971, Memphis State University 
Lisa Pugh 

B.S., 1981, Tennessee State University 
Margaret Glanker Rains 

B.S., 1978, University of Tennessee 
Merab Banks Reedy 

B.A., 1959, University of Mississippi 
Deborah Lee Rike 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
Jeffrey Dal Robinson 

B.S., 1982, Auburn University 
Donald Keith Schmidt, Jr. 

B.S.E., 1975, Memphis State University 
Joan Chism Sigman 

B.S., 1977, University of Tennessee 
LaJeannia J. Smeltser 

B.S.E., 1975, Memphis State University 
Barbara Lynn Smith 

A.S., 1973, Dyersburg State Community 
College 

B.S., 1978, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Carol Jean Smith 

B.A., 1963, Memphis State University 
Ruth Peterson Sowell 

B.S., 1969, Olivet Nazarene College 
Debbie Finley Stallings 

B.S., 1978, Bethel College 
Elizabeth Ann Terrell 

B.S.E., 1980, Memphis State University 

B.F.A., 1980, Memphis State University 
Barbara Jill Thomas 

B.S., 1981, Union University 
Ramona Hopping Tidwell 

B.A., 1961, Western Washington College 
Cynthia Robison Tipton 

B.S.E., 1972, Memphis State University 
Susan M. Todd 

B.S., 1964, University of Tennessee 
Thomas Monroe Vandiver 



B.S., 1978, Union University 
Philip Don Vaughn 

B.S.E., 1982, Memphis State University 
Mark Douglas Vigus 

B.S.E., 1980, Memphis State University 
Pamela Britt Villaflor 

B.S., 1982, University of Tennessee-Martin 
Suzanne M. Wallace 

B.S.E., 1970, University of Alabama 
Beverly Morton Ward 

B.S., 1978, Memphis State University 
David Edward Warmbrod 

A.S., 1971, Jackson State Community 
College 

B.S., 1974, University of Tennessee-Mar- 
tin 
Suzanne Blair Watkins 

B.S.E., 1969, Memphis State University 
Patricia Morrison Westrich 

B.S., 1976, Lambuth College 
Dorris Wheeler White 

B.S., 1965, Memphis State University 
Frances Juanita Williams 

B.S.E., 1963, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Helen Jane Wilson 

B.S., 1966, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Earl Hunt Wiman 

B.S., 1977, Union University 
Julia Doggett Woodard 

B.S., 1953, LeMoyne-Owen College 
Cynthia Malone Woods 

B.S., 1970, Memphis State University 

Doctor of Education 

Barbara A. Galtelli-Department of Special 
Education & Rehabilitation 

B.A., 1960, Memphis State Unive 
Major Professor: Dr. Wilson L. Dietrich, 
Professor of Education 
James Clemens Kasperbauer-Department 
of Curriculum & Instruction 

B.G.E., 1965, University of Nebraska 

M.A., 1973, Central Michigan University 

M.A., 1975, Central Michigan University 

Dissertation: "An Analysis of Selected 

Factors Related to Student Enrollment in 

Non-Traditional Undergraduate Degree 

Programs " 

Major Professor: Dr. Paul L. Jones, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Education 
Leslie Lakshmanan-Department of Curricu- 
lum & Instruction 

B.S., 1972, Bemidji State University 
M.Ed., 1980, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Factors Influencing the Ef- 
fectiveness of Inservice Education on the 
Utilization of a Multi-Disciplinary Ap- 
proach to Environmental Education" 

Major Professor: Dr. Ronald W. Clemin- 
son, Professor of Education 
Susan Stueart Steinriede-Department of 
Curriculum & Instruction 

B.S., 1974, University of Arkansas 
M.Ed., 1975, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "Most Characteristic Pro- 
blems in Word Processing Centers as View- 
ed by Word Processing Operators, Super- 
visors, and Managers of Word Processing/ 
Administrative Support Centers" 

Major Professor: Dr. Charles E. Reigel, 
Professor of Business Education 
Ira Leonard Sumner, Jr. -Department of Cur- 
riculum & Instruction 



B.S., 1960, Clemson University 
M.Ed., 1964, University of Tennessee at 
Chattanooga 

Dissertation: "The Relationship Between 
Inferential Reading Comprehension and 
Selected Variables Among Students in 
Grades Four Through Six" 

Major Professor: Dr. Barbara G. Burch, 
Professor of Education 
Janis Forbes Tyderle-Department of Curr- 
iculum & Instruction 

B.S.E., 1968, Memphis State University 
M.S.T., 1972, Memphis State University 
Dissertation: "The Effects of Hands- On 
Experiences with Common Fraction Mani- 
pulatives on the Mathematical Achievement, 
Attitude Toward Mathematics, and Use of 
Manipulatives of Prospective Elementary 
Teachers " 

Major Professor: Dr. Joseph F. Crabtree, 
Professor of Education 




1 22 Graduates 




Academics 1 23 




1 24 Academics 




Academics 1 25 




Photos by J. Scott Vanzandt 



126 Athletics 





■* 








itlau* 



Amid shouts of joy, the Tiger football team opened 
the season triumphantly, with a 32-17 trouncing of 
Ole Miss. Over 50,000 fans jammed into the Liberty 
Bowl September third to witness the team's first 
winning effort against the Rebels in seven years. 

The Tigers carried the momentum of this victory 
through the football season, and campus spirit 
reached a feverish pitch that spilled over into 
basketball season. During basketball press day, 
present fans and future Tigers met their favorite 
players. The Tigers talked to fans and gave out those 
all-important autographs as proof of the meeting. 

Hackeysack, the newest sports craze to sweep the 
nation, also invaded campus. The Student Activities 
Council sponsored a three-day clinic on the University 
Center Mall, that ended with what was touted as the 
first hackeysack tournament in the city. 

The excitement that goes with the thrill of challenge 
continued to build until students could no longer 
contain the news that the sports at Memphis State 
were BETTER THAN EVER. 









AvjX^e 



Baseball 154 

Football 158 

Basketball 168 

Lady Tiger's Basketball 176 

Volleyball 180 

Tennis 182 

Lady Tiger's Tennis 184 

Handball 186 

Racquetball 188 

Track & Field 192 

Golf 194 

Lady Tiger's Golf 196 

Soccer 198 

Gymnastics 200 
Lady Tiger's Gymnastics 202 

Itramurals 204 

Inside Sports 206* 







Photo by Loretta Harder 

Students show off their Hackysacking skills during 
the three day clinic on the UC mall. 



Athletics 127 








This section of the DeSoto is dedicated to four 
outstanding Memphis State baseball players who died 
in two separate tragic accidents. 

Doug Granger, Richard Webster, Paul Dunn and 
Chip Colbert will long be remembered for the qualities 
they brought to the Tiger baseball team. 

Doug, who died in July, 1982 after an injury sustained 
during a softball game, was a member of the 1978 team. 
Although the Tigers missed qualifying for the prestigious 
College Baseball World Series, Doug played a major 
role in the setting of a team NCAA record for hitting, 
and personal NCAA and MSU records. These records 
include most at bats, most hits and most runs scored in a 
single game. In addition, Doug earned a place on the 
Metro All-Tournament Team. 

Richard, Paul and Chip, who died in January, 1983 in 
an accident, while on a duck-hunting trip also helped to 
set the stage for the strong 1983 Tiger season. 

Richard "Squeaky" Webster (1978-81) was probably 
the best defensive catcher in the history of Memphis 
State University. He was a member of the Metro All- 
Tournament Team in 1978, 1980 and 1981. In 1981, he 
was a member of the Metro All-Conference Team and 





signed a professional contract with the New York Mets. 
After playing for two years with the Mets, Richard was 
regarded as one of their top young pitching prospects. 
In only his second year as a pitcher, Richard posted an 
8-8 record for the Lynchburg, Va. team of the Carolina 
League and was penciled-in as a starter for the Mets' AA 
affiliate in Jackson, Miss. 

A transfer student from Shelby State Community 
College in Memphis, Paul Dunn (1981-82) was a 
valuable asset to Memphis State. In 1 98 1 , he experienced 
his greatest moment as a Tiger when he blasted two 
consecutive home runs at Tim McCarver Stadium 
against Metro Conference arch-rival, Florida State. 

Chip Colbert (1980-82) proved valuable to the Tiger 
squad both on and off the field. Off the field, his great 
sense of humor was the motivating factor in keeping his 
teammates in the right frame of mind. On the field, 
Chip, a two-year letterman, finished the 1982 season 
with an average of .332 and a percentage of .932. Chip's 
greatest moment came when he, as a freshman, belted a 
grand slam homerun against the Tennessee Volunteers. 

Doug, Richard, Paul and Chip were four great 
players. Although they are no longer with us, our 
memories of them will last forever. 








Doug Granger 



Richard Webster 



Paul Dunn 



Chip Colbert 



128 Baseball 



Tiger Nine Celebrates 




Players Post Record Year at 33-12 



It's no crime as pitcher Gary (.alio, a criminal justice 
major, helps to rob Ole Miss of victory. The freshman 
right hander led the way to a 4-2 win. 

Photos by Photo Services 



Once again the Memphis State baseball 
team enjoyed another outstanding season 
in 1983 as the Tigers posted a 33-12 record, 
including a 25-6 showing at home and a 
31-10 regular season record. 

The Tigers, however, were not so fortun- 
ate in post-season play. Memphis State 
was 2-2 in the double-elimination Metro 
Conference Tournament in Tallahassee, 
Fla. After pounding Louisville 13-2 in the 
opening round, the Tigers were edged, 4-2, 
by a very tough Tulane team, which 
Memphis State had beaten twice earlier in 
the season. Bubba Cummings was credited 
with the win in a 1-0 decision over Virginia 
Tech before Louisville got revenge and 
sent MSU packing with an 8-5 win. 

Memphis State had a 2-3 record against 
two of the best teams in the South. The 
Tigers were thumped, 12-7, by Alabama in 
Tuscaloosa early in the season. The two 
teams split a two-game series in Memphis 



as Tim Corder tied a school record of 25 
career-wins set by Blair Gilbert. Corder 
fought off the Tide for a 5-2 win with home 
run help from pitcher/ outfielder Cummings 
and Allen Sigler. MSU dropped a tough 
3-2 game to the Tide the very next day. 

South Alabama came to Memphis and 
escaped with a split of a two-game series. 
MSU won the first game, 3-1, but lost the 
next day, 4-3. Other season highlights 
included an 11-4 whipping of cross-state 
rival Tennessee and a 7-6 win over bitter 
rival Florida State. 

When the June baseball draft rolled 
around, MSU baseball fans felt sure 
Corder, who finished with an 8-1 record 
and a 2.87 ERA, would be an early round 
selection. The junior from Covington, 
Tenn., was drafted and signed a pro- 
fessional contract with the Boston Red 
Sox, bypassing his senior year at Memphis 

Continued 

The Tigers celebrate a record year with a hearty cheer 
and a team salute following their 4-1 win over the 
Tennessee Tech Eagles. With a 33-12 overall win 
record, the nine has something to cheer about. 

Outfielder Jeff Field takes a mighty swing at the ball 
as he works to keep his ERA high. The junior is a 
physical education major at Memphis State. 




iki&E> . »=•: . --.-- 



Baseball 129 



Tiger Nine Cont. 



State. As a team, the Tigers posted a 3.90 
ERA compared to a 6.50 mark for the 
opposition. Corder and Tom Ragan both 
pitched shutouts — Corder a 3-0 win over 
Tennessee Tech and Ragan a 10-0 thrashing 
of Illinois Wesleyan. 

The Tigers slugged out a team batting 
average of .31 1 with 53 home runs. Junior 
shortstop Tim Dulin hit a whopping .380 
with 10 home runs, the second highest total 
to Sigler's 1 3 round trippers. Sigler knocked 
out a .331 average and a team-leading 45 
RBI and nine game-winning hits. 

Junior Shane Young bounded back after 
an off year in his sophomore campaign to 
post impressive numbers — a .370 average 
with nine home runs and 35 RBI. Young, 
who stands 6-4 and 230-pounds, is a first 
baseman/ designated hitter, but worked 
during the fall as a pitcher for the '84 
season. Steve Gaither 

Head coach Bobby Kilpatrick offers a few words of 
sage advice to first baseman Shane Young as he 
comes up to bat against Alabama. The Tigers took the 
game 10-2. Young, a junior majoring in physical 
education, was named a designated hitter for the 
NCAA Eastern Regional All-Tournament team. 

Photos by Photo Services 




.-• ";/■ ■■'■ ' : >■"' 





1983 Tiger Baseball Statistics 




-*•> 


Date 


MSU OPP. 


Date 


MSU OPP. 


3/1 


LAMBUTH COLLEGE 


7 





4/1 


ILLINOIS WESLEYAN 


10 





3/3 


U.T. MARTIN 


5 





4/1 


ILLINOIS WESLEYAN 


9 


8 


3/3 


U.T. MARTIN 


7 


3 


4/4 


TENNESSEE TECH 


11 


2 


3/8 


Tennessee Tech 


3 





4/4 


TENNESSEE TECH 


7 


3 


3/8 


Tennessee Tech 


4 


1 


4/14 


SOUTH ALABAMA 


3 


1 


3/13 


Oie Miss 


4 


2 


4/14 


SOUTH ALABAMA 


3 


4 


3/15 


Alabama 


7 


12 


4/16 


ARKANSAS-LITTLE ROCK 


5 


3 


3/18 


UNION UNIVERSITY 


15 


4 


4/16 


ARKANSAS-LITTLE ROCK 


13 


1 


3/18 


UNION UNIVERSITY 


9 


3 


4/19 


ALABAMA 


5 


2 


3/19 


MIDDLE TENN. STATE 


12 


2 


4/19 


ALABAMA 


2 


3 


3/22 


Vanderbilt 


5 


12 


4/23 


Horida State 


1 


2 


3/23 


Austin Peay 


4 


3 


4, 23 


Florida State 


6 


2 


3/23 


Austin Peay 


13 


1 


4/24 


Florida State 


7 


6 


3/ 25 


Murray State 


1 


8 


4/26 


OLE MISS 


6 


9 


3/29 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 


9 


4 










3/29 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 





2 


5/1 


TULANE 


12 


11 


3/30 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 


6 


5 


5/1 


TULANE 


13 


10 


3/30 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 


3 


5 


5/6 


AUSTIN PEAY 


14 


1 


3/31 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 


10 





5/6 


AUSTIN PEAY 


12 


11 


3/31 


EASTERN ILLINOIS 


9 


3 


5/7 


TENNESSEE 


11 


4 










5/8 


TENNESSEE 


9 


8 




Metro Conference Tournament 






5/12 


Louisville 


13 


2 


5/13 


Virginia Tech 


1 





5/13 


Tulane 


2 


4 


5/ 14 


Louisville 


5 


8 



^ 



Scott Andrews, Outfielder 
Phil Bryan, RH Pitcher 
Roy Campbell, Outfielder U\ 



Tim Corder, RH Pitcher 

Bubba Cummings, LH Pitcher 

Kevin Dotson, Outfielder 



yK 



Tim Dulin, Inftelder 

Jeff Field, Outfielder 

Gary Gallo, RH Pitcher 






*Jk +Jk 





130 Baseball 



Bobby Kilpatrick: 



Coach with the Midas Touch 



Hey baseball fans! It's time to play a 
game of "Guess Who?" about a certain 
Memphis State University baseball coach. 
Are you ready for the clues? Here we go... 

First clue: He took over the MSU 
baseball program in 1972. Second clue: He 
has never had a losing season in over a 
decade at MSU. Third clue: He has earned 
himself a reputation as one of the most 
successful coaches in both the south and 
the nation. 

Enough clues? Well just in case you're 
not as familar with Memphis State baseball 
as you should be, the answer is Coach 
Bobby Kilpatrick. After stepping up to bat 
for the baseball program, Kilpatrick trans- 
formed 1971's 11-29 squad into the 19-14 
unit of 1972. Fortunately for MSU baseball 
fans, the transformation has never stopped. 
The Tiger's 33-12 record at the close of the 
1983 season brought Kilpatrick's career 
record to a 373-156 mark. Talk about the 
Midas Touch! 

His first great team is thought to be his 
1978 squad which led the NCAA in hitting, 
took the Metro Conference crown, and 
advanced to the NCAA regionals, just 
missing the World Series of college baseball. 
Because of the achievements of his Tigers, 




Kilpatrick was named the NCAA South 
Region Coach of the Year. 

Then again, in 1981, Kilpatrick headed 
up another unit which made a showing in 
NCAA regional play. The 1981 team 
completed the season with a 48-11-1 rec 
ord, the best in Memphis State history. 
They won their first 1 1 games and 2 1 of 22, 
for the best start ever in MSU history. 



Coach Kilpatrick has an impressive 
baseball background himself. He is a 
graduate of Central High School in Mem- 
phis, where he was an all-city selection as a 
center fielder for three years. In 1958, he 
took his team to the Tennessee State 
Championship and was named to the All- 
State team. 

After high school, he attended the 
University of Mississippi after signing a 
baseball grant-in-aid. Moving infield to 
become a second baseman, he helped Ole 
Miss take the 1959 and 1960 Southeastern 
Conference championships. 

After graduating from Ole Miss, Kil- 
patrick was drafted by the Chicago White 
Sox. During his four years in the White 
Sox organization he received the award for 
the Top Minor League Player in May of 
1962. 

Upon returning to Memphis, Kilpatrick 
was hired as the baseball coach at Treadwell 
High School. Later he moved to Catholic 
High School as both a football and baseball 
coach. He returned to coach at his alma 
mater. Central High School, in 1967, where 
he was twice named Memphis High School 
Coach of the Year before finally moving to 
Memphis State. Sondra Lewis 




MA 






*u 






Mi 






'■<v 








*b 




* A 




1 ^ 






Don Goldstein, RH Pitcher 
Dennis Gourgeot, Infielder 
Mike Gourgeot, Infielder 
Mark Ham, Outfielder 
Eric Kinnaman, Infielder 
Chris Litano, RH Pitcher 



Mike Morrison, Catcher 
Roger Nelson, RH Pitcher 
Greg N orris, RH Pitcher 
Tom Ragan, RH Pitcher 
Brent Robertson, Infielder 
Allen Sigler, Outfielder 



Don Thomason, Catcher 
Charles Stanford, RH Pitcher 
Wayne Thompson, Catcher 
Jeff Williams. LH Pitcher 
John Yaracs, LH Pitcher 
Shane Young, First Baseman 






< 



Baseball 131 




At a tense moment, Phillip "Doom" Haynes (32) 
shows his concern. The senior guard is one of only 
two current Tigers to play in every game for the past 
three years. 

It's Andre Turner again, this time showing the serious 
side of the game as he shoots against Ole Miss. 

Time out for a few laughs as Andre Turner and Bobby 
Parks relax and show it's not all hot, heavy and 
serious business. 




132 Tiger Basketball 



Memphis State Has . . . M(Xt4> M&h**' 




Photos by Phvliss Smith 




It takes strong defensive blocking by Tiger Phillip 
Haynes (32) to prevent a score by Middle Tennessee 
State. 

Tiger newcomer Dewayne Bailey (42) teams up with 
Baskerville Holmes (43) as the two forwards aim to 
score against Ole Miss. 



Tiger Basketball 1 33 




All- American Keith Lee (24) shows the form which 
has carried him to the top as he slams one in against 
Detroit. 





Tiger forward Baskerville Holmes (43) takes a leap at the basket as he scores against Middle Tennessee State. 
The flying sophomore is also know as "Batman" for obvious reasons. 

Andre Turner, sophomore guard (10), shows that style isn't all in the playing. His sense of humor comes 
through on court as well as off, though he admits he's tired of hearing about his small size. The 5 foot 10 inch 
guard allows as how that's tall enough to show his winning ways. 



1 34 Tiger Basketball 




Photos by Phyliss Smith 




It's Keith Lee again, this time on the defensive as the Tiger 
forward blocks an Ole Miss blocking attempt. 




It's times for a conference as head coach Dana Kirk steps in to 
consult with Andre Turner (10) and Baskerville Holmes (43). 



Tiger Basketball 1 35 



Tigers Rank As One of the Best 







Probably one of the most exciting and 
quotable coaches in the Metro conference 
is Memphis State head coach Dana Kirk. 

Before arriving at Memphis State, Kirk 
held tenure with the Louisville Cardinals 
as an assistant coach from 1971 until 
1976. He also served as the Tampa and 
Virginia Commonwealth mentor before 
joining the Tigers. 

When Kirk arrived here, the basketball 
program was on a decline but with his 
inside-outside approach, recruiting within 
the Memphis area first, the Tigers showed 



improvement over the next two years, 
even if the record didn't. 

Kirk and his staff of Larry Finch and 
Lee Fowler recruited Mid-Southerners 
Keith Lee, Bobby Parks and Memphians 
Andre Turner and Phillip "Doom" 
Haynes. The staff added St. Louis native 
Derrick Phillips. 

The 13-14 records his first two years 
kept improveng and these new, better 
records took the squad to the "sweet 16" 
to face Wake Forest, Villanova, George- 
town and Houston over the next two 
seasons. 

But, Houston's depth was the final 
undoing of the Tigers' 1982-83 hopes. So, 
Kirk and his staff plucked Memphis 
natives William Bedford, John Wilfong, 
Dewayne Bailey and Chicagoan Larry 
Bush from the recruiting pie. 

Recruiting went so well Bailey was red- 
shirted so he wouldn't 
lose a year of eligibility for the following 
season. 

Kirk, who won his 200th career game 
early in the 1983-84 season, lends his 
name to many charities in the city thus 
improving MSU's image in the com- 
munity. 

In addition to Kirk's busy chores at 



MSU and his charity work, the Tiger 
coach has two different radio shows, has 
a television playback show and also guests 
on early-morning programs. 

When Kirk arrived, besides using his 
inside-outside approach, he started a 
three-phase program. Kirk first strove to 
revitalize "the sagging fortunes of Tiger 
basketball. 

"I wanted to rebuild a program that 
was down, win the Metro title and 
compete for the national championship," 
Kirk said. 

The 1983 December schedule included 
UCLA and Iowa; the first time the Tigers 
had played such tough competition early 
in a season. The Tigers lost both games 
and dropped to the low reaches of the 
polls. 

But, MSU soon returned to the upper 
echelons of the Top Ten. Kirk doesn't 
care about polls until late February. He's 
fond of saying, "I'd rather win in March 
than in December." 

The last two years and the probabilities 
of returning to the NCAA competition 
prove him right. 

Kirk is married and has two daughters, 
Koby and Kasha. 

—Mark Hayden 



1983-84 TIGER BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



V 



Nov. 


25-26 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


3 


Dec. 


10 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


21 


Dec. 


29 


Dec. 


30 


Jan. 


2 


Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


7 


Jan. 


14 


Jan. 


18 



MID-SOUTH CLASSIC 
Middle Tennessee State at MSU 
Detroit at MSU 
Mississippi State at MSU 
Ole Miss at MSU 
MSU at UCLA 
Texas Tech at MSU 
WINSTON TIRE CLASSIC 
Consolation and Finals 
Eastern Kentucky at MSU 
MSU at Cincinnati 
MSU at Tulane 
Southern Mississippi at MSU 
MSU at South Carolina 



Jan. 


23 


Jan. 


28 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


4 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


20 


Feb. 


22 


Feb. 


27 


March 


3 


March 8-10 



Tulane at MSU 
Oklahoma at MSU 
Virginia Tech at MSU 
Alabama-Birmingham at MSU 
MSU at Florida State 
South Carolina at MSU 
Florida State at MSU 
Louisville at MSU 
MSU at Southern Mississippi 
MSU at Virginia Tech 
Cinciinnati at MSU 
MSU at Louisville 
METRO TOURNAMENT 




>\ 




1 36 Basketball 




All American Keith Lee, No. 24, junior forward, comes out of the crowd even when 
he's double-teamed to make a graceful bounce at the basket 






Larry Finch, Assistant Coach 



Lee Fowler, Assistant Coach 



Hubie Smith, Graduate Assistant 












Jon Albright 
DeWayne Bailey 
Willie Becton 
Larry Bush 
Phillip Haynes 
Baskervilie Holmes 
Tony Hubbard 

Keith Lee 
Ricky McCoy 
Bobby Parks 
Derrick Phillips 
Aaron Price 
Andre Turner 
John Wilfong 



Basketball 1 37 





Many basketball experts who picked 
Memphis State in the pre-season top five 
were taken aback when losses to UCLA 
and Iowa befell the Tigers in December. 
But, 1984 brought better tidings and back 
into good graces with the pull services. 

After four straight games against little 
opposition, the Tigers were humbled by 
Bob Bord and the Mississippi State Bull- 
dogs. The Bulldogs used a slow-down 
approach for a one-point decision. 

The bumpy road continued with a 1-1 
week in mid December. A win against Ole 
Miss preceded a 14-point loss to the 
Bruins of UCLA. The Bruins improved 



their career mark to 3-0 against Memphis 
State. 

Whether it was the aura of former 
coach John Wooden or the play of Kinny 
Fields and company, UCLA embarrassed 
the Tigers, 65-51, at Pauley Pavilion and 
in front of national cameras. 

Iowa soundly thrashed the Big Blue, 
73-66, when head coach Dana Kirk finally 
showed his frustration by echoeing 
a statement by the cartoon character 
Popeye. "I've taken all that I can and I 
can't take no more." He also vowed to 
stop harrassing the referees after each 



1 38 Sports 




game. 

The statements set off a blaze under the 
Tigers who opened the 1984 year with a 
6-0 overall record and a 5-0 slate in the 
Metro by defeating Cincinnati, Southern 
Mississippi, South Carolina and twice 
shellacking Tulane. 

Individuals on their own made news 
for the Tigers. Dwayne Bailey was red 
shirted and Larry Bush was indefinitely 
suspended from the team after facing 
rape charges. 

But former Melrose center William 
Bedford fit in well in Kirk's game plan in 



Tigers '84 Campaign 
Filled With Surprises 




-i . 



early 1 984 after being found academically 
ineligible for the '83 fall semester. 

The 7-0 freshman quickly moved to 
intimidate his opponents with slam dunks 
and blocked shots and quickly appeared 
to be known as Memphis State's truest 
center since Don Holcomb in 1969-72. 

With the Tigers having knocked off the 
Tulane Green Wave twice in January 
only Louisville and a much-improved 
Virginia Tech team appeared to stand in 
the way of seeing the Tigers live up to 
pre-season expectations. The Metro con- 
ference skippers voted the Tigers odds- 
on-favorite to snatch the Metro flag. 



Sports 1 39 



ALONE AT THE NET, No. 5 Cathy Williams, 5-5 junior 
guard, makes it all look so easy as she goes up for a layup 
after coming in front of her defender. 



ACTION PLAY DRIVE moves No. 13 Vera Webb, 5-10 
sophomore forward, past opponents in a Mississippi State 
game early in the season. 



SOPHOMORE guard Yvette Blue, 5-8 No. 22, looks for a 
team mate pass while opponent tries to block Blue's progress 
toward the net. 





flBtnpMs Stat* 
kntiB of iff Ik 




Photos by MSD Photo Service! 



1 40 Lady Tiger Basketball 




Hard luck Games Can 't Make Them Quit: 

Lady Tigers Show Their Stripes 



After the first 17 games of the season, the 
Lady Tigers basketball squad gained and 
suffered from winning and losing streaks. 

Memphis State started with an opening 
victory in the first game of the MS U Lady 
Tiger Classic. Then, the team fell on hard 
times by losing their next three games. 
They were all close battles, though. 

After two convincing victories against 
foes from Mississippi, a five game losing 
streak left the team puzzled. Four of the 
five losses were by five points or less, 
including three at the Miami Masonic 
Classic. The team returned home ready to 
redeem themselves — and did they ever! 

Beginning with a conference victory over 
Southern Mississippi (96-77), the Lady 
Tigers eagerly reached for the .500 mark 
again. After defeating Mississippi State by 



14 points, the team faced a rough road. 

Two road conference battles proved to 
be welcome sights as they posted their sixth 
and seventh wins against Virginia Tech 
and Florida State. Nationally ranked 
Ole Miss blocked their attempt to obtain 
an even record. 

Battling shot for shot with the talented 
Lady Rebels, MSU fell five points short of 
victory (66-61). Even though the loss was 
not a good sign, holding top ten ranked Ole 
Miss to such a slender advantage and 
allowing them to escape only after a fierce 
struggle was reason for optimism. 

With a record of 7-9, the team had to 
tfavel again — this time to Oral Roberts 
University. Another close game gave the 
squad confidence to face more conference 
play in February. The result was more 



pleasant this time, as the Lady Tigers 
squeaked by ORU (66-65). 

Regina Street led the team with a 19.8 
scoring average while also pulling down 
nearly 10 rebounds per game. Cathy 
Williams added 14.5 points a game to help 
a balanced attack that included two other 
double figure scorers. 

Senior Wanda Simpson teamed with 
Street inside and grabbed over 9 rebounds 
per contest while registering 13 blocked 
shots. Vera Webb added 12.4 points from 
her forward spot and also played excellent 
defense. Outside, Williams and freshman 
guard Ruth Ann Forsythe combined for 
145 assists and 58 steals. 

— Ethan Porter 





REGINA STREET, No. 50, the Lady Tigers'6-4 center, slows Creightons Lady Jays with 
a shot against four defenders under the board. 



6-1 Center Pam Seymore, No. 40, a junior, puts up a fingertip shot from the floor against 
four Lady Jay defenders. 



Lady Tiger Basketball 1 41 



Johns and Lady Tigers 
-A Winning Combination 



Memphis State has one of 
the best women's basketball 
coaches in the college ranks, 
but few seem to realize that 
fact. Coach Mary Lou Johns 
seems to fit into the Rodney 
Dangerfield category of gaining 
no respect. 

Entering her 13th season as 
leader of the Lady Tigers, Johns 
record stands at 264-113, the 
fifth best winning percentage in 
women's collegiate basketaball. 

Since arrivingat MSU, Johns 
has guided the Tigers to 1 1 
winning seasons, including four 
in which the teams were na- 
tionally ranked. 

During the summer, Johns 
coaches a pair of Amateur 
Athletic Union (AAU) teams 

and conducts a basketball camp for girls. Her AAU 
teams have been quite successful. In fact, the 1982 
squad qualified for the nationals. 

While a student at Memphis State, Johns competed 
in basketball, volleyball and badminton. During her 
early tenure at the Lady Tigers' helm, she also taught 
women's tennis. 

Johns graduated from MSU in 1964, and she 
became the Memphis State head coach after 




compilinga record of 48-5 while 
coaching at Hillcrest High 
School. 

Johns' many NCAA wins 
have all been satisfying , but 
two games during the 1983-84 
campaign may have been the 
sweetest victories of them all 

Foes Louisville and Louisiana 
Tech. had been stumbling 
blocks for the Tigers for the last 
few years, 

but an early-season confronta- 
tion with the Cardinals saw 
Memphis State on the winning 
side of a 77-75 battle, and a 
Feb. 1 1 meeting with the Lady 
Techsters ended with a victor- 
ious 72-69 outcome. Louisville 
had knocked the Tigers out of 
the Metro championship picture 
twice during the last three post-season tourneys. And, 
before the Lady Tigers' victory. La. Tech had been the 
number one ranked team in the nation. 

Recognized as one of the country's top coaches, 
Johns is one of only 65 coaches allowed to vote in Mel 
Greenberg's National Women's Basketball Poll. 

Johns is married and has two children: Jay and 
Jimbo. 

— Mark Hayden 



\ 






<3 



Donna Murphy, Asst. Coach 

Diane Jones Lee, Part Time Asst. 

Kathy Nelson, Manager 





Joy Jensen, Asst. Manager 

Marty Hobdy, Asst. Manager 

Lisa O'Neal, Statistician 







1 42 Lady Tigers Basketball 




Guard Ruth Ann Forsythe leaps to the challenge of a rebound, facing some 
determined competition from Delta State. 





1983-84 Lady Tiger Basketball Schedule 




12/3 


Illinois 


Champaign, 111. 


12/6 


DELTA STATE 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


12/10 


MISSISSIPPI VALLEY STATE 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


12/17 


Mississippi State 


Starkville, Miss. 


12/19 


Jackson State 


Jackson, Miss 


1/2,4-5 


Hurricane Classic 


Miami, Fla. 


1/2 


Cal. State Fullerton 




1/4 


Miami 




1/5 


Indiana 




1/11 


Alabama 


Tuscaloosa, Ala. 


1/14 


SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


1/18 


Mississippi State 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


1/21 


Virginia Tech 


Blacksburg, Miss. 


1/23 


Florida State 


Tallahassee, Fla. 


1/27 


MISSISSIPPI 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


2/1 


Oral Roberts 


Tulsa, Okla. 


2/4 


Southern Mississippi 


Hattiesburg, Va. 


2/6 


Tulane 


New Orleans, La. 


2/9 


LOUISVILLE 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


2/11 


LOUISIANA TECH 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


2/14 


South Carolina 


Columbia, S.C. 


2/16 


TULANE 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


2/18 


FLORIDA STATE 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


2/23 


Mississippi 


Oxford, Miss. 


2/26 


CINCINNATI 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


3/1 


ORAL ROBERTS 


MSU FIELD HOUSE 


3/5 


Metro Conference 


Cincinnati. Ohio 


3/6 


Metro Conference 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


3/7 


Metro Conference 


Cincinnati, Ohio 












Yvette Blue, Guard 
Ranee Fletcher, Forward 
Ruth Ann Forsythe, Gaurd 
Desma Hunt, Forward 
Kim Pope, Guard 





Pam Seymore, Center 
Wanda Simpson, Center 
Regina Street, Center 
Leslia Warren, Forward 
Vera Webb, Forward 
Cathy Williams, Guard 



Lady Tigers Basketball 1 43 



Lady Tiger Volleyball Serves Up 
Hard-Hitting Action 



As a young lady once so accurately put 
it, "there is no place like home." Memphis 
State's volleyball team learned that being 
away from home can be a frightening 
experience, as they posted a 15-18 record 
this season. 

At home the Lady tigers were unde- 
feated (9-0) which may give coach Diane 
Hale good reason to want more games 
played in the fieldhouse in 1984. With six 
players finishing their final season at 
Memphis State, the future looks uncer- 
tain. Yet with returning players Lori 
Jones (most serving aces), and spectacular 
freshmen Angie Glaub, Peggy Rule and 
Mia Stephens, the outlook is optomistic. 

Glaub, who led the team in blocking 

Kim Fraser keeps her eye on the ball as she prepares 
to deliver a forceful serve. 



Holly Buford springs upward for a powerful return 
at the net as Drenda Roberts readies herself for any 
needed assistance. 




assists (114), is considered a strong, 
aggressive hitter. Rule saved an incredible 
343 shots with diving digs, while Stephens 
has proved her ability as a setter in only 
one season by collecting 614assists, nearly 
half of the team total. 

Since volleyball is truly a team sport, 
the Lady Tigers will have to work even 
harder together in order to replace the 
talent lost to graduation. Possibly the 
most painful loss will be that of Holly 
Buford. Buford led the team in nearly 
every attacking category and also in solo 
blocks. An all-Metro selection for three 
years, Buford was described by Coach 
Hale as "the most devastating hitter on 
the squad." 



One statistic probably best sums up the 
frustration that came from playing well, 
but just not good enough for a winning 
record. That statistic was the team's game 
record (63-62). Five times the Lady Tigers 
lost five game matches. Also, they lost, 
three times on the road to teams that were 
beaten at the fieldhouse (Ole Miss twice, 
Arkansas State). 

With an improving record and signs of 
a bright future, the volleyball squad 
should look forward to the 1984 season. 
And if they can learn from some of the mistakes 
that were made thes year, the Lady Tigers 
should have a winning campaign and 
compete strongly for the Metro Confrence 
title. 

— Ethan Porter 




r 



Sandy Gardner (Asst. Coach) 
Lisa Knox (Manager) 





V. 



Carol Grigg (Statistician) 
Holly Buford 





1 44 Lady Tigers Volleyball 




Head Coach Diane Hale 

Any successful team can attribute the 
majority of its accomplishments to the 
talent that makes up the squad; but usually 
their potential would not be reached with- 
out a fine coach. Diane Hale is a coach who 
has brought excellence to Memphis State 
through her volleyball teams. 

Coach Hale has compiled a record of 
159-1 14sincearrivingat Memphis State in 
1978, after coaching at the University of 
Tennessee and Iowa State University. 
Considered one of the top coaches in the nation, Hale is a member 
member of the board of directors in the United States Volleyball 
Association's Delta Region. Locally, she directs the Junior 
Olympic Development program. 

A Knoxville native. Hale received her bachelor's and master's 
degrees at UT. While an undergraduate, she played four years of 
volleyball and competed in the nationals during her freshman and 
junior seasons. 

Hale has worked hard at recruiting the best players from 
around the country to assure a winning tradition; but in doing so, 
she has made certain that her team performs as well off the court 
as they do on. With intelligent players such as Terri Clarke and 
Peggy Rule, the university can look directly to the volleyball 
squad for a true example of the student-athlete. 



/* 



Vs 



LADY TIGER VOLLEYBALL 






Volleyball Results 








MSU 


OPP. 




MSU 


OPP. 


UCLA 





2 


Southern Miss. 


3 





Loyola Marymount 





2 


Cincinnati 





3 


Utah 


1 


2 


Tennessee 





3 


Cal-Santa Clara 


1 


2 


George Washington 


1 


3 


Ole Miss 


3 


2 


Morehead State 


2 


3 


Arkansas State 


3 


1 


Arkansas State 


2 


3 


Cincinnati 


1 


3 














Mississippi State 


3 


1 


Virginia Tech 


3 

















Ole Miss 


3 


2 


Louisville 


2 


3 








Tennessee Tech 


2 


3 


Ala-Birmingham 


3 


2 


Southern U. 


3 





Ole Miss 





i 


SW Louisiana 


3 


2 


SE Missouri State 


3 





Mississippi State 


3 


1 


SE Missouri State 


3 


1 


Ole Miss 





3 


Arkansas State 


3 





Florida State 


1 


3 


Tulsa 


3 





South Carolina 


2 


3 


Illinois 


3 





Tulane 





3 


Louisville 


1 


3 




A sudden-death showdown at the net can often be the deciding factor in the 
outcome of a match. 













Teri Clarke 
Kim Fraser 
Angie Glaub 
Beth Johnson 
Lori Jones 

Wynne Moore 
Drenda Roberts 
Peggy Rule 
Mia Stephens 
Amy Watson 



in 
OS 

> 
< 

cu 



Lady Tigers Volleyball 145 



Lady's Team Struggles 

But Still Shows Pride and Promise 



s 



Women's Tennis Results 
Murray State beat MSI 
Southern Illinois beat MSU 
MSU beat Illinois State 
Louisville beat MSU 
Arkansas beat MSU 
Northeast Louisiana beat MSU 
Louisiana State beat MSU 
Southwestern Louisiana beat MSU 
Centenary beat MSU 
MSU beat Middle Tennessee State 
Ole Miss beat MSU 
Auburn beat MSU 
Alabama beat MSU 
MSU beat Birmingham Southern 
Alabama-Birmingham beat MSU 



"\ 



7-2 
7-2 
5-4 
6-3 
8-1 
7-2 
8-1 
8-1 
5-1 
7-2 
9-0 
9-0 
8-1 
6-3 

2? 



The Lady Tiger tennis squad finished 
the fall season with a disappointing 3-12 
record, yet the team did exibit signs of 
promise. 

Jennifer Jones proved her great ability 
by posting an excellent match record of 
10-5 against very stiff competition. She 
also had a winning doubles percentage to 
aid the Lady Tiger cause. Rose Grasso 
won eight matches, while Robyn Stern 
and Sara Phillips contributed several 
more victories. 

Through the early stages of the year, 
the team performed quite well, including 
a win against Illinois State. The next four 
matches were against opponents from 
Louisiana. The Lady Tigers found out 
that folks in Bayou country can serve and 
volley as well as anyone around. 

The team's other victories came in 
show-downs with Middle Tennessee State 
and Birmingham Southern. The squad's 
record did not reflect the effort put forth, 
and Coach Peterson helped them to realize 
that if they keep trying hard, their fortunes 
will improve. 




i£L 



"N 




No Blues for 'Miss Pete' 



v 



Coach Peterson 



Women's tennis coach Charlotte 
Peterson completed the fall season of her 
ninth year at Memphis State with an 
attitude that not every coach can attain. 

Although her team had a slow start 
during the fall campaign, Peterson keeps 
spirits high with her use of psychology. She 
is quite knowledgeable in sports psycho- 
logy. In fact, her article "Psychological 
Aspects of Coaching Tennis" was published 
in a national tennis guidebook. 

A native Memphiananda 1972 graduate 
of MSU, "Miss Pete", as she is affec- 



tionately called, was a member of the Lady 
Tigers tennis team for three years. After 
graduating, Peterson served as an assistant 
tennis coach while earning her master's 
degree in physical education. 

In the late 1970s, Coach Peterson was 
state and regionally ranked in doubles 
competition, but has since chosen to devote 
more of her time to coaching the Lady 
Tigers. She now serves on the NCAA 
Division 1 Championship Tennis 
Committee. 

-Ethan Porter 



r 




Rose Grasso 

Sharlyn Hamilton 

Jennifer Jones 






Laura Liltiard 
Sara Phillips 
Robyn Stern 






146 Sports 




/" 



Men's Tennis Results 



MSI! beat Ole Miss 
MSU beat Alabama-Birmingham 
MSU beat Louisiana Tech 
Ark-Little Rock beat MSU 
MSU beat Oral Roberts 
MSU beat Southern Mississippi 
MSU beat Principia 
Murray State beat MSU 
MSU beat Alabama-Birmingham 
MSU beat U.T. Martin 
MSU beat Arkansas State 
Alabama beat MSU 
Southern Illinois beat MSU 
Southern Illinois Ed. beat MSU 
MSU beat Illinois State 
k Ark-Little Rock beat MSU 



6-3 
7-2 
7-2 
7-2 
6-3 
9-0 
8-1 
5-1 
5-2 
7-2 
8-1 
5-1 
7-2 
9-0 
7-2 



Strong Start 
Boosts Netters 




The men's tennis team used a 
quick start to post a 12-6 record 
this season. The Tigers were 
benefited by strong doubles per- 
formances and six players with 10 
or more singles victories to their 
credit. 

The team opened the year with 
six convincing victories in their 
first seven matches. The lone loss 
came at the hands of a strong 
Arkansas-Little Rock squad. Fol- 
lowing a bitter defeat against 
Murray State, MSU put everything 
together to win five straight 
matches. Their set record during 
that stretch was an astounding 36- 
7. The Tigers final victory for the 
year was a 7-2 win against Illinois 
State. 

Led by Tiger Buford (coach 
Buford's son), Grant Denton, 
David Nicholson and Jerry Gray, 
the team's singles play was out- 
standing. However, their doubles 
play proved to be their strongest 
suit. Team members Buford, Julio 
Martins and Greg Long posted 
outstanding doubles records. But, 
not to be far outdone, every other 
member of the squad also finished 
with a winning season record. 

— Ethan Porter 




Bill Conley 
Eduardo Eche 
Jefi Gray 
Peter Lebedevs 



Greg Long 
Julio Martins 
Jerry McGuffee 
David Nicholson 




Tommy Buford 



Head coach Tommy Buford has been a 
big influence on local tennis for many 
years. As coach of the Memphis State 
men's tennis team, Buford has guided the 
Tigers to five Metro Conference titles. In 
the community, he is even more well- 
known for directing the U.S. Indoor 
Championships at the Racquet Club. 

Buford graduated from Southwestern at 
Memphis in 1957, where he won the 
Tennessee Intercollegiate Championship. 
After pursuing a graduate degree from 
Mississippi College and serving as tennis 
professional at River Hill in Jackson, 
Buford was offered the positions of head 
coach at MSU and pro at the University 
Club. 

Since his arrival at MSU in 1966, his 
teams have nearly 300 wins to their credit. 
Buford has brought a winning tradition to 
a program that he admits had to be started 
nearly from scratch. During that time, the 
team has flourished. In fact, from 1976-80 
the Tigers reigned as Metro champions. 

Having duties at both Memphis State 
and the Racquet Club to contend with, it 
might seem that Coach Buford has little 
time to keep his game sharp. Yet, in 1981 
he teamed with his son, Tiger, to win the 
National Father and Son Claycourt 
Championships. And in 1980, he was 
ranked first in the state for the Men's 45- 
under division. 

-Ethan Porter 




Sports 147 



Handball, Racquet ball . . . Fast-Paced A ction 



When many sports enthusiasts are asked 
to describe the game of handball, most are 
left nearly speechless and comment "It's 
racquetball without the racquet...! think." 

In actuality, handball preceded the game 
of racquetball, and contrary to popular 
belief, is often a faster-paced sport. So, is 
handball a sport that stands in the shadow 
of its fanatically popular offspring? The 
Memphis State handball squad doesn't 
think so and has posted many impressive 
victories to prove its point. 

Youth again prevailed for a Tiger squad, 



as the handball team faired quite well with 
only one senior. However, that one player 
will most assuredly be missed. Doug Pope's 
improvement in two years of competition 
has lead him to become a major asset to the 
team. 

Steve Stapleton claimed another national 
title for Memphis State, placing first in the 
Intercollegiate "B" Singles Division. 

Sophomore Pete Brown teamed with 
Stapleton to form one of the most 
devastating doubles teams in the nation. 
Brown's dedication to the game of handball, 



coupled with his natural ability, has given 
Coach Mazzone the right to call Brown "a 
very strong national contender." 

Power is the name of Shawn Massey's 
game. He hits the ball as hard as anyone 
can and he uses that intimidating style to 
keep extremely close to the team's top 
ranking. 

Two first year players, James Shine and 
Tim Whitehorn, give the team great balance 
in the "C" division. Their progress in only 
one season has helped enhance the team's 
success in both singles and doubles. 




Coach Mazzone 



Coaching, competing, officiating, direct- 
ing and instructing ...Charles Mazzone has 
performed every duty that could be thought 
of for his sport — handball. But apparently 
that's not enough to keep him busy, becuase 
he is quite active with Memphis State and 
the community in other areas, too. 

After graduating from Kingsbury High 
School, Mazzone entered MSU, where he 
earned his bachelor's and master's degrees. 
While doing his graduate work in 197 1 , he 
became assistant handball coach with the 
MSU Extramural Program. He attained 
his current status of head handball coach 
in 1977. 

Mazzone has contributed greatly to local 
handball and racquetball tournaments 
while also participating in them. He has 



served as the director for the Memphis 
State-Jack Gillespie Handball Tournament 
as well as assisting in the direction of the 
MSU-Union Planters Racquetball Classic. 
In addition, Mazzone is the Southeast 
Intercollegiate Commissioner for the 
United States Handball Association, and 
is a member of several local, regional and 
national sports organizations. 

Not only has the coach kept a strong 
interest in four-wall indoor sports, but he 
also teaches many activity classes such as 
aquatics, tennis and badminton. He also 
works closely with the American Red 
Cross teaching first aid and safety. 

Mazzone and his wife Sally have two 
children: Mark, 10, and Holly, 6. 



Handball Players 



Shell Berry 

Pete Brown 

Shawn Massey 

Doug Pope 



James Shine 

Steve Stapleton 

Tim Whitehorn 

Trish Breen 





>m«^. 





1 48 Sports 



Many universities take pride in the fact 
that a team representing the school reigns 
as national champion in its particular 
sport. Not too many institutions can boast 
about forming a dynasty in an athletic 
competition, but Memphis State's racquet- 
ball squad deservedly ranks as one. 

Although a team championship cannot 
be accomplished without a group effort, 
the racquetball players individually showed 
their prowess. With a variety of personalities 
that combine to make up the squad, a 
calming factor must keep tempers down 
and spirits high. That is the job of the team 
captain. 

Senior Jed Cowell occupies the un- 
enviable position of captain. His success is 
due mainly to his ability to earn the respect 
of his teammates with his patient attitude. 
On the court, Cowell gives a total effort — 
hustling, diving, digging for every shot hit 
by his opponent. 

If experience can truly help an athlete to 
progress in his particular sport, then, by 
the time Andy Roberts is a senior at MSU, 
a new category of racquetball player may 
have to be instituted. Roberts, a freshman 
from Memphis, already has won several 
prestigious championships, including the 
Newbern Invitational, which matches the 
14 top amateurs in the nation. Roberts also 
has second place finishes in the 1983 Junior 
Nationals and Leach Nationals to his credit. 
With power and pinpoint precision forming 
his style, Roberts intimidates nearly 
everyone he plays. 

Sophomore Jim Jeffers has had to 
"suffer" as the team's second ranked player. 
Winner of the 1094 Jackson Open, Jeffers 
probably would have won seveal more 
tournament finals, but Roberts saw to it 
that he settled for runner-up. Jeffers prefers 
the backhand to put points away, but he 
certainy has a complete game. 

Graduating players Brian Sheldon and 



Richard Smith have brought strength to 
the squad in different areas. Sheldon is one 
of the country's best doubles competitors 
with fabulous court coverage. Smith, 
conversely, chooses to earn his points more 
quickly with hard, low drive serves. 

Racquetball is not a sport that can be 
labeled exclusively for men. The Lady 
Tigers have made certain of that. 

Coach Larry Liles' female squad is very 
young, with only one player in her third 
year of college, yet the team members have 
already proved themselves to be extremely 
competitive. 

Kathy Gluvna, the "veteran" of the 
team, is the current American Amateur 
Racquetball Association's national intercol- 
legiate champion. She played with the 
United States World Games team in Costa 
Rica during the fall. Using a forceful 
backhand and a dominating style, Gluvna 
forces opponents to play her game, which 
has enabled her to reach the status of 
number two on the team. 

Holding down the number one spot is 
freshman Toni Bevelock. According to 
Liles, Bevelock's ability to place shots 
while on the run is comparable to that of 
any female racquetball professional. She 
reigns as the current mixed doubles national 
champion, while also capturing several 
individual tournament crowns. 

The lone sophomore on the team is 
Krista Fox, who has established herself 
mainly as an accomplished doubles player. 
She lives up to her name as she moves 
'quick as a fox' and seems always to 
surprise her foes by positioning herself 
where they least expect her to be. 

The remaining three competitors are all 
freshmen. Teresa Beresford, Kim Cooling 
and Ann Higginbotham all work very hard 
and show great promise. With a little more 
experience, this trio may occupy the top 
three spots on the Lady Tiger's squad. 




Coach Liles 

If there could be a racquetball capital of 
the world, it would be safe to say that 
Memphis might merit that distinction. With 
dozens of racquetball facilities throughout 
the area, it is apparent that the sport is 
enjoyed by most of the Mid-South. 

Could there possibly be a little inspiration 
behind the incredible growth of the sport? 
Many feel that this honor belongs to Larry 
Liles. 

Liles, a graduate of Memphis State, has 
gained the majority of his recognition from 
the fact that his men's squads have won 
seven national championships in the sport. 
He has worked to make his team a dominant 
force in the game by bringing in players who 
can successfully hold down individual 
national titles as well as be powerful team 
members. 

Liles' women's squads have also placed 
very high in national competition over the 
years. This year, two of his players. Toni 
Bevelock and Kathy Gluvna, reign as 
national title holders in mixed doubles and 
singles respectively. 

Also, Liles performs as well as those he 
coaches. He has held several city, state, and 
regional titles and won the National Racquet- 
ball Doubles Championship in 1981. 








Men's Racquetball 



Jed Cowell 
Jon Harlan 
Jim Jeffers 
Ross Luxom 
Pat McGrew 






^A 











Mike Moffia 
Andy Roberts 
Brian Sheldon 
Richard Smith 
Mark Waldorf 
Peter Wong 

Women's Racquetball 

Teresa Beresford 
Toni Bevelock 
Kim Cooling 
Kathy Gluvna 
Ann Higginbotham 
Krista Fox (not pictured) 



Sports 149 



Team Effort Pays Off A t 
Metro Championships 



The Memphis State track team's 1983 season was noted for the 
tremendous team effort shown at the Metro Conference Indoor 
Championships and several outstanding individual performances. 

The team's performance was fair before the Metro indoor, in 
which they earned five track titles and four runner-up spots. Only 
a lack of field event competitors stopped them from capturing the 
team title. Tyjuan Cowan was voted MVP for the meet. 

The following week at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Victor Lacey and 
Colin Hume qualified for the NCAA Indoor Championships. 
Lacey posted the season's best time for the 440-yard run (47.44), 
while Hume broke a school record, becoming the first Tiger in 
history to run the mile in under four minutes with a time of 
3:59.58. At the NCAA Championships held in Pontiac, Mich., 
Hume reached the mile run finals, where he placed seventh. 

The outdoor season was injury plagued. The Tigers' top four 
sprinters were all sidelined during the season with leg injuries; 
however, there were some individual highlights. William Singleton 
had four 800-meter runs under 1:49.00, including a victory at the 



prestigious Dogwood Relays. Also, Hume placed 10th in the 
NCAA Championships in Houston while running in the 1500- 
meter cometition. 

The 1983 cross country season saw some outstanding efforts 
from British imports David Topham and Colin Hume. 

Topham showed fine early season form in winning a five-mile 
invitational in Cape Girardeau, Mo. He followed that by clocking 
a personal best in a similar event in Little Rock one week later. 

Hume then took full advantage of Topham's absence due to 
injury by posting his first win at the Ole Miss Invitational in 
Oxford. Hume went on to win the Metro Conference title, and he 
also placed sixth in the NCAA regionals. The fine performance at 
the regionals qualified him for the finals where he finished in the 
middle of a very strong international field. 

The season saw the emergence of two promising freshmen — 
Gary York and Chris Horton. The combination of these two and 
the British pair should push the Tigers into a challenging position 
for next year's Metro Conference title. 



MSU Track Team 



Derrick Burroughs 

Gary York 

Glynis Turner 

David Tropham 

Gerald Thornton 

Jon Mathis 

Charles Marshall 

Billy Logan 



Victor Lacey 

Colin Hume 

Michael Hudson 

Chris Horton 

Glenn Hill 

Keith Golden 

Rick Draper 

John Curry 







1 50 Track 





Head Coach 
Glenn Hays 



In his 1 3 years of heading up the Memphis 
State track program, Glenn Hays has 
brought Metro Conference Champion- 
ships, nationally recognized athletes and a 
solidly run varsity sport to the university. 

After graduating from Southwestern at 
Memphis in 1962, Hays began his career at 
the school as an assistant track coach. 
After one year there, he left to become the 
head coach of cross country and track at 
Battle Ground Academy in Nashville. In 
1970, Hays arrived at MSU, following 
successful stints at Valparaiso (Ind.) Uni- 
versity and Virginia Tech. 

While at Memphis State, Coach Hays 
has produced national champions such as 
Terron Wright and Ed Hammonds, and he 
has led the Tigers to the Metro Conference 
Championship in cross country. 

— Ethan Porter 



"\ 







HI 

< 

On 



Track 151 



Linksters A im for the Flag. . . 




Shane Marvelli shows concentration, sinking a short 
putt. 



Lynn Parkes' Lady Tiger golfers over- 
came a slow start to post three top ten 
finishes in fall competition. Improvement 
is definitely evident from the team's 1982 
fall performance. 

With senior Kathy Vendetti lowering 
her stroke average each semester, Parkes 
looked to her for team leadership. Gaining 
four top ten finishes in five tourneys this 
fall, Vendetti has accomplished nearly every 
goal within her reach. 

Renee Schafer and Margaret Shaffer 
played in every match, finishing with respec- 
table scoring averages in the low 80's. Since 
both are undergraduates, their steady pro 



gress will be heavily counted upon in the 
future. 

Half of Renee's rounds were at or below 
80, and she had her best finish (20th place) 
at the Carrier Tournament in Memphis. 
Margaret also had a 20th place finish. Hers 
came in during a 36 hole match in Kentucky 
when she shot rounds of 78 and 80. 

Combining with the four other regulars 
and transfer student Molly Baney, the 
future looks bright for the Lady Tigers. II 
the team continues its rapid progress, the 
spring should be a very pleasant farewell 
for Vendetti and welcome experience for 
the returning golfers. 

—Ethan Porter 



Head Coach Lynn Parks 

Lynn Parkes entered her eighth year at the helm of the Lady Tigers* golf program 
this fall giving her players what she has provided since starting as a graduate 
assistant. She gave them support and a great teacher of the game of golf. 

After graduating from the University of Alabama in 1 973, Parkes returned to her 
home state of Tennessee to coach high school golf in Lawrenceburg. She then 
arrived at Memphis State, seeking a master's degree in physical education, and also 
to bring women's golf to the university. 

A member of the Ladies Professional Golf Association, 
Parkes is an area adviser for the National Golf Foun- 
dation. Using her excellent teaching ability, she has taken 
her knowledge of the game further than MSU. She has set 
up instructional clinics and provided lessons in Memphis, 
throughout the state, and in other parts of the nation. 

A former Memphis city finalist and state semifinalist in 
ameteur golf competition, Parkes has contributed greatly 
to the success and improvement of Memphis State golf 
and golf for the local area as well. 

— Ethan Porter 




Lady 

Tigers 

Golf 



Margaret Shafer 

Judy Staub 

Kathy Vendetti 

Beth Walthal 

Lori Whitaker 



Molly Baney 

Leah Lacy 

Nikki Payne 

Renee Schafer 




^Hr 




W -•"'■ 


«A 


1 ^ : 


''* 


f^ 


<1 ■ 





SM 


*Kmm 




m * 


y 


"i 


m 




J\ 


its 





1 52 Golf 



The Fall season for the Memphis State 
golf team turned out to be quite successful. 
In all four tournaments, the Tigers 
finished in the top ten. Signs of great 
promise came from co-captain Donnie 
Cude. He was team medalist three times 
and had a 73.5 stroke average for the 
season. 

The team placed first in the opening 
tourney at Murry State, defeating ten 
teams by shooting consistently. J. J. 
Fashimpaur's final round 71 earned him 
second place individual honors for the 54 
hole tournament. Also capturing fourth 
and fifth place in individual competition 
were Cude and team captain Bobby Dick 



respectively. The victory gave them con- 
fidence going into the LSU National 
Tournament. 

Although the Tigers shot a much lower 
score than in their first win, all the team 
could manage was a 10th place finish. 
Facing 14 teams, the Tigers score of 883 
was 36 shots off the pace. Cude had a 
three day total of 218, which was good 
enough for 21st place. Possibly the most 
encouraging news came from sophomore 
Paul Hollahan who had carded previous 
rounds of 80 and 83. He finished with a 
sparkling 71. 

The third tournament was the local 
Hillman Robbins Invitational. Eighteen 



teams competed and MSU finished fifth. 
Cude was again team medalist, ending up 
ninth overall. Since the event was held in 
town, 1 1 team members were able to 
participate. This gave Coach Cook a 
chance to survey all of his talent, and gave 
some of the younger players valuable 
experience. 

With two players finishing in the top 
ten, the Tigers ended the fall season on a 
high note by placing ninth at the Dixie 
Intercollegiate Tournament. Dick shot a 
blistering 67, which propelled him to 10th 
position after the three day event which 
drew 24 teams. 

—Ethan Porter 



Head Coach Jim Cook 



In 12 years of coaching golf at Memphis State, Jim Cook is 
proud of his teams' accomplishments. Winning the Metro 
Con ference title and only once finishing lower than runner up 
since the Tigers joined the league, he has every reason to be 
ecstatic. Seeing some of his players win individual titles is 
quite rewarding. But Coach Cook feels that the trophies and 
recognition do not begin to compare with his players' 
contributions off the the course. 

"The value of the sport means more than what my players 
are doing now," Cook said. "They will make their mark 
throughout the community later. That's what is important," 
he added. 

A graduate of MSU in 1968, Cook jokes about the 
responsibilities he faces as coach, but confesses that he loves 
his position. "I'm a recruiter, father figure, travel coordinator, 
scheduler, cajoler and, on occasion, a beggar." 

Honored as Metro Coach of the Year, Cook feels he owes 
most of his success to his players and the university. "Since we 



have been given the opportunity to represent Memphis State, 
every player will do so, or he won't play. That's my 
philosophy!" 

"We have to realize that golf is 
only a game, and that there are 
millions of other things that should 
be thought of first," he stresses. "If 
we don't take ourselves or the game 
seriously, we will be successful." 

Watching 86 percent of his players 
graduate and enter the "serious part" 
of life as successful citizens makes 
Cook realize that he has done a 
good job. He wants to remain at 
Memphis State as long as he knows 
he is doing his job well. He expects 
to be here for a long time. 

—Ethan Porter 









t 



n 




f z * h 



Donnie Cude 
Bobby Dick 
J.J. Fashimpaur 
Paul Hollahan 
Kurt Johannes 




John Kartheiser 
Greg King 
Shane Marvelli 
Jon McKamie 
Van Montgomery 
Ray Pearce 



Tiger 
Golf 



Golf 1 53 



Soccer Team Finishes 
First Winning Season 




Only in its second season qf varsity 
status, the Memphis State soccer team 
had a very successful season under Head 
Coach Peter Bermel. 

Despite playing one of the toughest 
schedules in the country, the soccer Tigers 
finished the year at 11-9, their first winning 
season. The 1 1 victories included triumphs 
over Ole Miss, Tennessee and two wins 
over arch-rival Southwestern at Memphis. 

Bermel's squad also played an exhi- 
bition game against the Memphis 
Americans midway through the season. 
They had good attendance at the match 



and raised plenty of money for the team 
scholorship fund. 

One of the standouts on the '83 team 
was captain Didier Aur. The only senior 
on the team, Didier gave the Tigers a 
potent attack as well as leadership on and 
off the field. His greatest honor this 
season was being named as a draft choice 
by the Americans. 

Larry Creson, Pat Johnson, E. J. Gilley 
and Mike Muller also had great per- 
formances in '83 and will be back to lead 
the Tigers next season. 




Paul Abbott 

didier Aur 

Paulo Aur 

Tony Bridges 

Larry Creson 



Phoung Dang 

Brian Douglas 

Pat Fisher 

Erik Gilley 

Kenny Heckman 









154 Sports 









Coach Bermel 



The growth and success of soccer 
locally and nationally is astoun- 
ding, and Memphis State coach 
Peter Bermel has made his team 
competitive after only two seasons 
of collegiate play. 

Bermel came to the United States 
from Arnhem, Netherlands in 
1964, arriving in Memphis two 
years later. For 13 years he has 
been extremely active in Memphis 
youth soccer, sharing the talent 
that allowed him to play inter- 
nationally as a midfielder. 

Bermel brought soccer to the 
university in 1977 as a club sport 
and worked very hard to establish 
it on the varsity level. Heading a 
team that finished with a mark of 
7-11-2 in its initial campaign, 
Bermel used local high school 
talent to attain success. Aside from 
Memphis State, he has helped the 
soccer program at Southwestern 
at Memphis for the last eight 
years. 

Bermel has been involved with 
soccer since the age of eight, con- 
tributing not only as a referee. He 
has served as president of Memphis 
Adult Amateur League, as well. 
— Ethan Porter 







David Jackson 
Pat Johnson 
Mike Kauker 
Michael Mueller 
Matt Pettinger 



Ricky Pugh 
Edward Smithwick 
Bobby Wiabel 
Bobby Wiabel 
Won Yun 




Sports 1 55 



Tiger Tumblers Always Land On Their Feet 



Katsutoshi "Katsu" Kanzaki has complet- 
ed his fourth season as the Memphis State 
men's gymnastics coach, but it looks to be 
his final year. The reason is certainly not 
due to his coaching ability or the in- 
effectiveness of his squad. In fact, Kanzaki 
is one of the most highly respected coaches 
in the country, and the team's record 
during his tenure has been quite impressive. 

The very controversial explanation for 
the extinction of the entire gymnastics 
program (including the women's team) is 
one of support. According to President 
Thomas Carpenter and Athletic Director 
Charles Cavagnaro, gymnastics does not 
fit into the growth of Memphis State's 
athletic package, therefore Kanzaki's job 
as head coach is no longer necessary. But 
that did not stop him from putting up a 
courageous fight. 

Kanzaki is a very dedicated man when 
the subject is gymnastics. Before arriving 
at MSU, Kanzaki spent 12 years coaching 
at the Memphis School of Gymnastics, 
producing many gymnasts that competed 
at the national level. 

During his competitive days he was a 
member of the Japanese national team. He 
performed quite well, placing in the top 10 
in the individual all-around competition in 
the 1963 World University Games. In 
addition, he was an alternate for the 1964 
Olympic Games held in Tokyo. 

While attending Northeast Louisiana 
State University where he received his 
master's degree, Kanzaki reigned as United 
States National Champion. In 1967, he 
was presented the Diamond Award signify- 
ing the Gymnast of the Year. 



With a true balance of power, Lance Sherley displays 
a firm hold on the rings. 



Terry Bryson has been a very busy 
woman since she started the women's 
gymnastics program at Memphis State. 
Although she has taken time out to care for 
her two children and has contributed greatly 
to the progress of gymnastics throughout 
the country, Bryson has not lost her incen- 
tive to keep the Lady Tigers among the 
nation's best gymnasts. 

During her years at MSU, Coach Bryson, 
a native Tennesseean, has sent her teams to 
the national championships and even to 
Venezuela to help conduct clinics. 

Bryson started the women's gymnastics 



program at the University of Alabama and 
also served both as a judge and as a board 
of directiors member for the United States 
Gymnastics Federation. 

Last summer Coach Bryson received 
possibly her greatest honor for the effort 
she has put forth. She was selected to work 
with the Sports Operation Division at the 
United States Olympic Training Center in 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Recruiting fine talent each year and 
showing constant progress toward national 
prominence have made the sport of wo- 
men's gymnastics an important part of this 
university. 




r 



Tigers Gymnasts 




Coach Katsu 
Kanzaki 



Ralph Barron 
David Brosig 

Jon Conrad 
Mark England 

Neal Nelson 



Ronald Ross 
Lance Sherley 
Chuck Terrell 

Brian Walker 
John Zeringue 








1 56 Sports 




Light on her feet, Nancy Ammann demonstrates a 
lively, precise movement from her beam routine. 



With a combination of talent that gave coach Terry Bryson 
great optomism for 1983, the Lady Tiger gymnasts posted a 
respectable 3-4 record against extremely stiff competition. The 
squad was sparked by consistent team scores and individual 
efforts that included three new school records. 

Against Jacksonville (Ala.) State, the women broke the record 
for team scoring by collecting 170.95 points. In each of the last four 
meets, the team has tallied at least 165 points; and even when the 
squad was not victorious, they were always within contention. 

Individually, everyone was nearly equal in every event, with 
four members averaging between 33.75 and 34 points in overall 
competition. Junior Roberta Rahija tied the all-around school 
record by earning 34.5 points during one meet. 

On the balance beam, freshman Mary Bird earned a spot in the 
Memphis State record books along with sophomore Leslie 
Phillips who excelled at the floor excercise. Maureen Hall led the 
team in all-around and balance beam events during her first 
season. 

After finally fully recovering from sophomore vear back 
surgery, senior Nancy Ammann continued to show her strength in 

the vaulting competition by leading the team in that event. 

Facing a heavy schedule that includes national powers Missouri, 
LSU and Penn State, the road to victory looks bumpy. Yet, with 
the consistent improvement shown, the Lady Tigers' future looks 
bright. 



Leslie Phillips exhibits the fluid grace which enabled 
her to dazzle judges and set a new school record of 9.5 
in floor exercise. 





Nancy Ammann 
Mary Bird 
Maureen Hall 






Lady Tigers Gymnasts 



La Tony a McMutcheon 
Leslie Phillips 
Roberta Rahija 
Mary Trout 





Terry Bryson 
(Head Coach) 



David Neel 
(Asst. Coach) 



Sports 1 57 







1 58 Sports 




Sports 



He Fought For A Team's Tomorrows. 



"There is one thing which gives radiance 
to everything. It is the idea of something 
around the corner. " 

— G.K. Chesterton 

For those of us who did not know Rex 
Dockery, Chris Faros, Charles Greenhill 
or Glenn Jones personally, that tragic day 
when a plane crash took their lives is 
probably little more than a blur. Now, 
when their names are mentioned or we are 
somehow reminded of that day, there are 
vague memories filled with regret and 
sorrow over lives cut too short. They fade 
away, but not before showing us how much 
they are still missed. 

If you want to look at these four men in 
the cold, impersonal terms of prominence, 
naturally Coach Dockery was the most 
well-known. Just about everyone on cam- 
pus (as well as the many fans off-campus) 
knew him personally, knew something 

about him or at least knew who he was. 1 

But you cannot use cold, impersonal 
terms for a man who was anything but cold 
and impersonal. What cold, impersonal 
man would have stuck with a team which 
was constantly torn apart by sports critics 
and was positively dwarfed in the face of an 
outstanding, nationally-acclaimed basket- 
ball team? Coach Dockery brought the 
Tigers through two seasons with stats 
almost painful to recall, yet kept his spirit 
and drive, always ready to fight for and 
with his team. 

Then, in the fall of 1983, the puzzle 
pieces fell into place. Although many people 
would say a 6-4-1 record is no great 
achievement, it was simply a promise of 
things to come. The Tigers were moving 
up. 

But I don't think Coach Dockery was 
really surprised. When you read the quote 
above and think about him and his team, 
you realize his "something around the 
corner" was the foresight of all the Tigers 
could be. In his eyes, the Tigers were just 
on a side street, looking for the right road. 

Thanks, Coach, for leading us around 
the right corner. 

We just wish you could have traveled 
with us a little farther 

— Sondra Lewis 




1 60 Dedication 













Dedication 1 61 



Winning Season Puts the Roar back into 



The 1983 football season was a big step 
for Memphis State. After succesive 1-10 
seasons, the Tigers put some ferociousness 
back into their roar. 

"We've accomplished one of our season 
goals," said Tiger quarterback Danny 
Sparkman, who earned this year's starting 
assignment from Trell Hooper and Page 
Belongy. "The thing I remember most is 
our first win over Ole Miss, our archrival." 

MEMPHIS STATE 37, OLE MISS 17 
(Liberty Bowl) — This win meant the most 
to Tiger fans, since they had up short 
against Ole Miss for the past three years. 

NORTH CAROLINA 24, MEMPHIS 
STATE 10 (Chapel Hill, N.C.)— The 
highly-touted Tar Heels got all they could 
handle from a scrappy bunch of Tigers. 
North Carolina jumped to 10-0 before 
MSU stormed back to tie the Tar Heels by 
intermission. The Tigers drove 80 yards in 
1 2 plays for a Sparkman to Smokey Jordan 
touchdown pass from six yards out. A Tar 
Heel fumble gave the Tigers possession at 
the Carolina 1 2 but MSU had to settle for a 
28-yard Don Glosson field goal. 

VIRGINIA TECH 17, MEMPHIS 
STATE 10 (Liberty Bowl)— Virginia Tech's 



defense had a real nasty reputation, and 
the Tigers agreed after a disappointing 
loss. It was a game marked by missed 
scoring opportunities and inconsistency on 
offense. Tiger scores came with a dazzling 
73-yard pass from Sparkman to Jordan 
and a 26-yard field goal by Glosson. 

ALABAMA44, MEMPHIS STATE 13 
(Tuscaloosa) — The Tigers learned a good 
first half does not a game make. MSU 
charged to a 10-3 halftime lead before 
60,000 stunned fans. Glosson kicked a 
first-quarter field goal and tight end Ricky 
Sparkman made a falling catch on a four- 
yard pass from cousin Danny to start Tiger 
fans thinking upset of the century. The 
Tide's lone score was a 42-yard field goal. 

The second half, however, was all 
Alabama, and MSU fans wondered who 
kidnapped the Tiger team that played the 
first half. Save a 48-yard field goal by 
Glosson, The Crimson Tide drowned the 
Tigers with a 21 -point third quarter and a 
20-point fourth quarter. 

MEMPHIS STATE 28, TULANE 25 
(Liberty Bowl) — Tulane quarterback Jon 
English probably wished he had not gotton 
a court-order to allow him to take on the 



Tigers. MSU's secondary came up with 
four interceptions. 

After Tulane jumped to a 3-0 lead, 
Rozell Clayton took a screen pass from 
Sparkman and raced down the sideline 41 
yards for a 7-3 lead. Again Tulane jumped 
ahead with two third-quarter touchdowns 
before Enis Jackson made his first college 
reception, a 71-yard TD pass from 
Sparkman. Defensive back Donnie Elder 
intercepted an English pass and returned it 
13yards for another touchdown and a 21- 
17 Tiger lead. Jackson was not through, 
hooking up with Sparkman for an 18-yard 
touchdown pass and a 28-17 lead. 

Tulane scored another touchdown and 
moved to within three, 28-25, after a two- 
point conversion and the Green Wave 
mounted its final effort with time running 
out. English threw into the end zone but 
Percy Nabors, who had two interceptions 
on the night, tipped the ball and freshman 
Clay Bitner made the interception to 
preserve a 28-25 victory. 

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 27, 
MEMPHIS STATE 20 (Liberty Bowl)— 
Heavily favored Southern Miss blew to a 
27-0 lead in the fourth quarter before 



< 



David Alford, Wide Receiver 

Rob Arthur, Defensive Back 

Irving "Duke" Atkins, Fullback 

Clyde Avant, Flanker 

Ken Balkunass, Offensive Guard 

Harold Beane, Defensive Tackle 



John Beard, Wide Receiver 
Nathan Beason, Defensive End 
Eric Becton, Running Back 
Page Belongy, Quarterback 
Clay Bittner, Defensive Back 
Dwight Blalock, Tight End 



David Booth, Defensive End 

Dennis Borcky, Defensive Tackle 

Chip Bowers, Rover 

Glenn Boyd, Fullback 

Andy Bramlett, Linebacker 

Don Bramlett, Defensive End 



David Brandon, Tight End 

Eric Brooks, Quarterback 

Ken Brown, Running Back 

Eric Caldwell, Wide Receiver 

Greg Capshaw, Fullback 

Bevin Carpenter, Linebacker 





















162 Football 



the Tigers 



Memphis State started what could have 
been called the greatest comeback of all 
time. With fans streaming for the exits, 
freshman Jerry Harris returned a kick off 
98 yards and gave MSU life. Less than two 
minutes later, Sparkman hit Eric Becton 
with a 12-yard TD pass. With 3:27 left, the 
Tigers capped another drive when Spark- 
man hooked up with James 'Punkin' 
Williams on a six-yard touchdown pass. 
MSU's last-ditch effort to score with 1:26 
left fell short and US M held on for a 27-20 
win. 

MEMPHIS STATE 24, VANDERBILT 
7 (Nashville) — After an off week, the Tigers 
took to the road for three games and got 
off to a good start. Glosson's 32-yard field 
goal and Dwight Blalock's stumbling catch 
gave Msu a 10-7 lead after one quarter. 
Vanderbilt was not to score again, but the 
Tigers got insurance as Williams ran over 
defenders for a 20-yard touchdown run 
and Jeff Womack ran all over the field 
shedding tacklers before being credited 
with a nine-yard TD jaunt. 

MEMPHIS STATE 30, MISSISSIPPI 
STATE 13 (Starkville Miss.)— The Tigers 
Continued on Page 166 




The Tigers didnt knuckle under on this play against Virginia Tech. They held the line, but that wasn't enough as 
MSU fell prey to Virginia Tech (10-17) in the second home game of the season. 







A 





















Kevin Chapman, Running Back 
Rozell Clayton, Fullback 
Kurt Crain, Linebacker 
Derrick Crawford, Wide Receiver 
Edell Davis, Offensive Guard 
Tom Dorian, Offensive Guard 



Steve Droke, Defensive Back 
David East, Center 
Donnie Elder, Defensive Back 
Jeff Ellis, Defensive End 
David Esp, Offensive Tackle 
Eric Fairs, Linebacker 



Curt Garrett, Fullback 

Ted Gate wood, Fullback 

Don Glosson, Kicker 

Jon Graunke, Defensive Tackle 

Charles Greenhill, Defensive Back 

Gary Harper, Offensive Tackle 



Michael Harper, Flanker 
Jerry Harris, Flanker 
Tim Harris, Defensive End 
Carl Harrison, Running Back 
Wally Hatfield, Punier 
Gregg Hauss, Kicker 



< 



Football 163 



Tigers' Donnie Elder meets Tulane's Robert Griffin in 
a face to face confrontation. 

Danny Sparkman, Tiger Quarterback, draws back to 
throw a pass during the Virginia Tech game. At games 
end Sparkman had passed for 67 yards including one 
touchdown pass. 





Photo by Cedrk Wood too 



Photo by Karen Carter 



< 

On 



Rick Hechinger, Offensive Guard 

Chuck Henderson, Linebacker 

Joe Hennelly, Rover 

Tracy Holmes, Running Back 

Trell Hooper, Quarterback 

Ronnell Houston, Defensive Tackle 



Greg Hughes, Defensive Back 

Gary Hunt, Defensive Back 

Thomas Ingles, Kicker 

Enis Jackson, Flanker 

Todd Jobes, Offensive Guard 

Smokey Jordan, Flanker 



Jim Kutchback, Linebacker 

John Lindsey, Defensive End 

Tim Long, Offensive Tackle 

Edwin Lovelady, Wide Receiver 

Mike McKay, Defensive Tackle 

Mike Martin, Center 



Mat Matthews, Defensive Back 

Greg Montgomery, Defensive Tackle 

Keith Mutters, Linebacker 

Troy Myers, Running Back 

Percy Nabors, Defensive Back 

Bubba Nelms, Offensive Tackle 






















164 Football 



Rex Dockery 



The "Fight" in the "Fighting Tigers 



55 



And now a trivia question for all you 
devoted MSU Tiger Football fans... 
What important event occured on De- 
cember 17, 1980? Well if you have kept 
up to date on your Tiger Football 
History, you would know that December 
17, 1980, was the day that Rex Dockery 
was named head football coach at 
Memphis State University and Tiger 
football has been looking up ever since. 

Dockery, raised in Cleveland, Tenn., 
graduated from Bradley County High 
School and signed with the University 
of Tennessee where he lettered two 
consecutive years as an offensive line- 
man. 

He began his coaching career in 1966 
as head coach at Harriman High School. 
In 1968 he moved to Morristown East 
High School where he led his team to a 
two-year record of 19-2 and finally to 
capture the 1969 Tennessee State AAA 
Championship. 

After four years as a high school 
coach, Dockery became an assistant 
coach at the University of Tennessee 
under Bill Battle for the 1970 and 1971 
seasons. In 1972 he moved to Georgia 
Tech as the offensive line coach. From 




there, Dockery moved to Vanderbilt 
University as offensive coordinator, 
where he remained for two years. When 
Vanderbilt head coach Steve Sloan 
moved to Texas Tech, Dockery also 
joined the Red Raiders as offensive 
coordinator. 

In 1978, Dockery moved into the 
head coaching position at Texas Tech 
when Sloan left to become the coach at 



Ole Miss. In his first season, he led his 
team to a 7-4 record and was named the 
Southwest Conference and NCAA 
District VI Coach of the Year. His 
overall record at Texas Tech was 
15-16-2. 

Although when Dockery joined the 
MSU coaching staff, he began with a 
young and unseasoned football team, 
the final 1-10-0 record was deceiving. 
There were close competitions with 
Mississippi State, Virginia Tech, Florida 
State and Ole Miss, in addition to the 
victory over Georgia Tech. 

Dockery confronted a difficult season 
in 1982, complete with a tough schedule 
and devastating injuries. Again the 
Tigers finished with a 1 - 1 0-0 record, the 
single victory being a 12-0 shutout over 
Arkansas State University. However, 
the Tigers suceeded in building a repu- 
tation as a persisitant, hard-working 
and hard-hitting outfit that could look 
forward to greater things. It was that 
reputation and the Tigers' spirit and 
optimism that carried over into the 1983 
season, thanks to coach Dockery and 
our great Tiger football team. 

— Sondra Lewis 




























Darrell Nelson, Tight End 
Doug Nettles, Defensive Back 
Jack Oliver, Offensive Guard 
Mike Omar, Center 
Ralph Patton, Linebacker 
Leroy Prout, Linebacker 
Johnnie Robinson, Tight End 

Randy Samples, Defensive Back 
Greg Sanders, Defensive Back 
David Schmidt, Offensive Tackle 
Geddes Self, Offensive Tackle 
George Skouteris, Linebacker 
Danny Sparkman, Quarterback 
Ricky Sparkman, Tight End 

Anthony Strong, Linebacker 
Jim Thomas, Offensive Guard 
John Thompson, Offensive Guard 
Reginald Thompson, Defensive Back 
Ellis Turner, Defensive End 
Jeff Walker, Offensive Tackle 
Johnny Walker, Linebacker 

Stan Weaver, Punter 
Jeff White, Offensive Guard 
James Williams, Running Back 
Eric Wilson, Linebacker 
Jeff Womack, Running Back 
Joel Woods, Running Back 
Cedric Wright, Defensive End 



Photos by Photo Scrvko 



Football 165 



Tigers 9 Roar Getting Louder... 



Continued from Page 163 

Improved their imaginary SEC record to 
3-1. The Bulldogs could muster only two 
first-half field goals against the Tiger 
defense while Williams pounded in from 
two yards out and Glosson booted field 
goals of 28 and 37 yards. The defense 
limited State's wishbone attack to a touch- 
down in the second half. MSU, however, 
exploded again as Derrick Crawford 
hauled in a 50-yard bomb and a three- 
yarder from Sparkman before Glosson 
booted a 21 -yard field goal. 

MEMPHIS STATE 43, CINCINNATI 
10 (Cincinnati, Ohio) — This was the wild 
one! After both teams had lack-luster 
first halves, the Tigers struggled to a 13- 
10 lead in the fourth quarter. MSU 
scored on Womack's 43 yard run and 
Glosson's field goals of 38 and 45 yards 
before the scoring barrage. Sparkman 
was hobbled by an ankle injury and Page 
Belongy took the controls. Becton took a 
Belongy pitch and ran 54 yards for a 
touchdown at the 4:37 mark. Ten seconds 
later, after a fumbled kick off was 
recovered by Curt Crain, Womack scam- 
pered in from nine yards out. A minute 
and ten seconds later, defensive end Tim 



Harris blocked a punt attempt into the 
end zone for a safety. Charles Greenhill 
returned the free kick 69 yards for another 
touchdown and the final tally came with 
39 seconds remaining when Belongy 
scored from eight yards out after Nabors 
returned an interception 24 yards. 

ARKANSAS STATE 14, MEMPHIS 
STATE 14 (Liberty Bowl)— What was 
supposed to have been a party for MSU's 
last home game, turned out to be a bust. 
The fired-up Indians man-handled the 
sluggish Tigers and were it not for an 
83-yard touchdown bomb, Sparkman to 
Crawford, and Nabors' 77-yard intercep- 
tion return, the Tigers would not have 
escaped a loss against the team that 
provided the previous year's lone win. 

Indian quarterback Tim Langford ran 
the triple-option to near perfection and 
showed he could pass as he threw a 60- 
yard TD pass over three Tiger defenders. 

MEMPHISSTATE 45, LOUISVILLE 
7 (Louisville, KY.) — The Tigers feasted 
on Cardinal for their Thanksgiving dinner 
with a 45-7 thrashing of Louisville in the 
season finale to give Memphis State's 
football its first winning season since 
1977. 

The Tigers ended the season with a 



6-4-1 mark on the strength of 28 second- 
half points. MSU jumped toa 17-7 lead at 
the intermission and never looked back. 

Glosson's 32-yard field goal gave MSU 
a 3-0 lead but Louisville bounced back 
with seven points in the second quarter 
before the Tigers marched 66 yards in 12 
plays. The drive was capped by Woods' 
two-yard dive. MSU scored again when 
Williams broke several tackles at the line 
of scrimmage and bulled 63 yards before 
the half ended. 

The icy conditions didn't stop the Ti- 
gers. Womack scored from 14 yards out 
and Williams scored his second TD on a 
17-yard run and the Tigers led 31-7. 
Womack finished with 140 yards rushing 
while Williams totaled 121. MSU gained 
392 yards on the ground and 39 through 
the air. 

Belongy came on to relieve Sparkman 
at quarterback and completed his first 
touchdown pass as a collegian, a 23 yard 
strike to Avant. MSU's final score came 
when linebacker Crain picked off a pass 
and returned it 74 yards for a touchdown 
and a 45-7 win. 

—Steve Gaither 



r 



«5 

-G 

o 



Lou Alford, Administrative Aid 

Murry Armstrong, Dorm Superviser 

Michael Joe Cannon, Student Assistant 

Marvin Chatman, Student Assistant 

Stan Eggen, Tight Ends 



Chris Faros, Offensive Coordinator 

James Fox, Wide Receivers 

Roy Gregory, Defensive Line 

Keith Hackett, Graduate Assistant 

Vince Hoch, Secondary 







Jim Hueber, Offensive Line 

Dean Lotz, Strength Coach 

Rusty Russell, Defensive Ends 

Jimmy Sharpe, Running Backs 

Chip Wisdom, Defensive Coordinator 








1 66 Football 




Danny Sparkman, sophomore quarterback 
shows his strength as the Tiger line smashes 
ahead in the season game against Virginia 
Tech. 

Derrick Crawford, senior receiver, per- 
forms a sweep feat in the opening game of 
the season against Memphis State's arch 
rival Ole Miss. The Tigers were victorious 
in the battle which can "make the season" 
in terms of satisfaction and pride during 
the opener which is usually the toughest 
game of the year. Crawford is now a 
member of the Memphis Showboats USFL 
team begun in 1984. 




Football 1 67 



/" 




* 





1 68 People 




What makes a great University? 

Some people would have you believe it is 
ivy-covered buildings built by world-famous 
architects, or spacious campuses with park- 
like grounds rolling over the countryside. 
Others rate them by tuition fees, so much per 
pound. 

For some, the measure of worth is 
longevity — traditions built by generations of 
the same families who attend the school with 
unquestioning regularity. 

We at Memphis State recognize all those 
virtues. 

But we think we know the one ingredient 

which makes a University truly great. It's 
people. 

We want to show you some people who 
care. They care a lot about what happens on 
this bustling urban campus. 

Buildings and traditions are great, and we 
know ours will come as we age. Right now, 
we like the young can-do spirit which makes 
everything seem possible. 

For us, it's the here, the now, the living and 
sharing with people who care which makes 
this place and this time BETTER THAN 
EVER. 



AvH^e 



>v 



Graduates 


170 


Seniors 


172 


Undergraduates 


181 


Faculty and staff 


213 


President Carpenter 


216 


Administration 


220 


Features and Faces 


240 



People 1 69 



Graduates 



Ahrens, Lee 

Arije, Wesley 

Bagherian, Ali A. 

Baker, John 

Beard, Cheryl 



m 


a 



Burnett, Arneta 

Carranza, Alain 

Cartwright, Richard D. 

Chang, Jacqueline 

Charlton, Dale R. 



Deacon, Lynda 

Donohue, Francis 

Ertel, Mark E. 

Ferguson, Mary 

Gill, Robert 






Who Is That Masked Mascot? 






Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 



Although they seldom appear in public at the 
same time, Kevin Vaughan and Thomas Roehm 
enjoy the second looks they inspire when they are 
together. 



Patrolling the sidelines at Memphis State 
University basketball games this year is a 
tall, orange tiger named Pouncer. 

Inside that tiger suit, two Memphis State 
students split time going through routines. 
They are Kevin Vaughan, a senior engineer- 
ing major from Bolivar, Tenn., and Thomas 
Roehm, a junior engineering major from 
Clarksville, Tenn. 

Vaughan is a veteran of the Pouncer 
suit, having been inside it the past three 
years. "The three years that I have been 
doing the routines have probably been the 
most fun a college student could have," 
Vaughan said. 

"Being Pouncer has been a way for me to 
put humor into the games Memphis State 
plays, but there is also a serious side of it 
for me," Roehm said. 

"The serious side of Pouncer has allowed 
me to meet various businessmen and local 
celebrities (in the Memphis area), which I 
hope will help provide me a business 
contact when I graduate," Roehm said. 

"My first year as mascot, I travelled with 
the football team to Atlanta for the game 
with Georgia Tech. All was going well for 
the team and me that day until the last few 
minutes of the game. With about three 
minutes left, I noticed a bunch of Georgia 
Tech's fraternity pledges running from the 
stands at me, trying to rip off my tail and 
anything else they could grab from the suit. 



If it weren't for my brother Richard who 
helped chase them off, I would have lost 
my suit and my job," Vaughan said. The 
good times as Pouncer however, have been 
far greater than the bad, and with this, the 
first year for scholarships, they are continu- 
ing to get better. 

Ranking first on Pouncer's list of thrills 
was the basketball team's trip to New York 
City last season. "Everybody has his own 
opinion of what the city is like, but it was 
100 percent better than anything I expect- 
ed," Roehm said. 

"It was a first class trip all the way, with 
the highlight of the trip being our lunch at 
Tavern in the Green in Central Park. The 
only words to really describe the experience 
is unbelievable. The reputation for class 
surpassed any expectations," Vaughan said. 

Although playing the role of Pouncer is 
a time consuming job, Vaughan and Roehm 
are also involved in many other Memphis 
State University activities. 

Vaughan is a presidential scholar on the 
Dean's list, a member of the Ambassador 
Board, a brother in the Kappa Alpha 
fraternity and a member of the Mortar 
Board. 

Roehm is a member of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity and works at the Mem- 
phis State University athletic ticket office. 

—Brian Rosenberg 



170 Graduates 




Hill, Randall 
Hoffman, Lenora 
Hughes, Steven L. 
Jones, John 
Maness, Glenda 



Matheny, Pamela A. 
Oliver, Anthony 
Orio, Edward Bennett 
Pierow-Salehi, Abdollah 
Riley, Barbara 



Shields, Michael D. 
Taylor, Horace 
Taylor, Pearline 
Whittenburg, Mark 
Wickham, Kathleen 




Photo b j- Thorau Sit 

Whether it is on a football field or basketball court, the antics of the mascot 
always delight the crowd. 



Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 



171 



Accampo, Anthony 

Adams, Mark 

Albright, Jon 

Aiejea!, Eead 

Alexander, Doug 



Alexander, Leanne 

Allen, Benjamin 

Allen, Donna 

Ammann, Nancy 

Anderson, Joyce Ann 



Atkins, David 

Atkins, Gwendolyn 

Aughtry, Ceasar 

Autry, Jeff 

Baggett, William 



Baker, Amelia 

Baker, Pamela 

Balestrino, Robert 

Banks, Larry 

Bannister, Elaine 



Barbee, Diva 

Barker, Ave 

Barker, Cynthia 

Beacham, Scott 

Beacham, Timothy 



Beasley, Pamela 

Bell, Allen 

Benson, Carolyn 

Biggs, John 

Bigham, Valerie 



Bishop, Sherri 

Black, David 

Bobo, Melissa 

Bolton, Jean 

Bowie, Florence 



Bratcher, Karen 

Breeden, Tommy 

Breen, Bill 

Brice, Carol 

Brisentine, James 




172 Seniors 



Seniors 




Brooks, Mavis 
Brown, Cassandra 
Brown, Frannie 
Brown, Mark 
Brown, Ron 



Browning, Donna 
Bruce, Rebekah 
Burke, Margaret 
Burke, Joanna 
Burns, Charles 



Burton, Ann 
Bustamante, Rene 
Camp, A. Renee 
Campbell, Eula 
Campbell, Kevin 



Carbage, Judy Ann 
Cardosi, Leigh 
Carroll, Sarah 
Carter, Debra 
Casey, Mollis 



Certion, Lois 
Chandler, Jane 
Chandler, Marilyn 
Chenault, John 
Christenson, Linda 



Clabough, Susan 
Clark, Kathleen 
Coakley, Kathleen 
Coda, Tina 
Colby, Sandra 



Coleman, Harris 
Cox, Joe H. 
Cristina, Mary 
Crum, Missy 
Cychowski, Catherine 



Daugherty, Bernia 
Davis, Michele 
Dawson, Allen 
Deaton, Ward 
Dennis, Jacqueline 



Seniors 173 



Seniors 



Devine, Brian E. 

Dickerson, Joyce 

Dickerson, Rebeca 

Dickey, Winfred 

Dismukes, Cindy 



Dorian, Thomas 

Dortch, Rita 

Dutcher, Sandra 

Elliott, Carl 

Emerine, Craig 



Farmer, Lee 

Ferguson, Patty 

Fiete, Bill 

Fisher, Deborah Lynn 

Flynn, Joe 




Ford, Helen 

Ford, Robert 

Ford, William Douglas 

Franklin, Venita 

Frulla, Anthony 




Fulp, Robert 

Gaines, Andy 

Garrett, Vickie 

Germany, William 

Giaroli, Eddie 



Giaroli, John 

Glasco, Patricia 

Goin, Jerry 

Gonzalez, Gina 

Goode, Harder 

Gorden, Jerlena 



Gray, Paul A. 

Green, Ken 

Green, Sharon- Annette 

Greer, Constance J. 

Gross, Jeff 

Gruenewald, Roniann 



Gylfe, Susan 

Hall, Laura 

Hankinson Jr., Don 

Hanley, William 

Harbuck, Sara 

Harris, Gaylon 



m 


- . ::■ f 











W> Xr: 




174 Seniors 



Harris, Lachary 
Harrison, David L. 
Harthon, Jennifer 
Harty, Beth 
Hatchett, Lisa 



Haynes-Crawford, Catherine 

Hayes, James R. 

Hess, Felicia 

Hobday, James Michael 

Holland, Dana 



Holliday, Rosemary 
Holliday, William Chris 
Hollingsworth, Don 
Hollings worth, R. Maurice 
Hopkins, Natalie 




Photo by Cedric Woodson 

Bill Hudson knows how to take advantage of the nice weather and get his studying done at the same time. 



Seniors 175 



Jett, Duncan 

Johnson, Carmin 

Johnson, Johann 

Johnson, Vereilia 

Jones, Anthony 

Jones, Jacquline 

Jones, Janet 



Jones, Rita 

Jones, Russell 

Judy, Melissa 

Kent, Troy 

Key, Keith 

Kiepe, Anthony 

King, Ronnie 



Knight, Jane 

Koleas, Karen 

Krieger, Kathy 

Kuehl, Gregory 

Kuykendall, Sandra 

Lane II, Charles 

Larussa, Rachel 



Lax, Greg 

Leaveile, Sherri 

Lewis, Laura 

Lomax, Kevin 

Longfleld, Joanne 

Lyons, David 

Maclin, Samuel 



Madden, Kenneth 

Malone, Troy 

Mapes, Terri 

Maness, Phil 

Martin, Amy 

Martin, Barry 

Massa, Lisa 



Matheny, Harvey 

Mathews, Marion D. 

Maxwell, Michael 

May, Leah 

McCauley, Larry S. 

McGee, Shirley 

McKee, Mark T. 



McKenzie, G. Thomas 

McKinnie, Linda Faye 

McLeod, Elizabeth 

McMillan, Jamie 

McPhail, Frank 

Messer, Alan 

Miley, Lydia 



Miller, Joyce M. 

Moitozo, Mary 

Moody, Julia 

Moore, M. Elizabeth 

Morris, Michael A. 

Morton, Gail 

Murphy, Sheila 




176 Seniors 
















•35**" 



Seniors 

Arcade 'Bouncer' Commands Respect 



If you happen to walk into the University Center's Side Pocket, you may see a room filled 
with pool tables and video machines. You will also notice the constant noise from these 
pastimes. But there is one person in the arcade who truly should not go unnoticed — Johnny 
Barnes. 

At first glance behind the counter of the Side Pocket's service desk, on Monday, 
Wednesday or Friday, you will see a person 

you had better be polite to. That's Johnny. Pho, ° by J s* " v,n " nd « 

Standing six feet tall and weighing slightly 
more than 300 pounds, Barnes may seem 
dangerous until you get to know him. 

"I get to know just about everybody who 
walks through that door, one way or 
another," Barnes said. "If the student causes 
no problems and damages nothing, I'm 
nice to him. But if someone causes trouble, 
I won't hesitate to let them know." 

"Sir," he says quietly. A young man 
quickly stops leaning on a pool table. One 
word is all Johnny had to say. Barnes 
points out that there are rarely any pro- 
blems, and, in fact, most people are just 
looking for something to do instead of 
going to class. "We have our biggest crowds 
on Friday, because most everyone skips 
then," he said. 

A customer finishes his games of pool 
and approaches the desk. "Number seven," 
the customer mumbles. Johnny walks back 
to the board filled with ID's, and pulls off 
the student's card. "That will be $500," 
Barnes jokes. He then realizes that the 
student is not amused. "Oh, sorry. I guess I 
read it wrong. You only owe $1.60." 

Barnes' humor is mostly directed toward 
the regular customers who stand around 
the desk, talking about anything that comes 
to mind. One student told Barnes that an 
employee of the Side Pocket had made $60 
giving change. "You've got about as much 
sense as a dead squirrel," Barnes yells. 
"How can anyone make money giving 
change?" The student just stood there. 

Barnes does not simply sit around and talk. He must constantly check for damaged 
equipment and serve the many customers who enter the arcade. Occasionally, a strange 
incident may occur that makes Barnes' day more difficult. "Those guys over there have 
problems," he said. "The other day they were playing pool with a friend who got hit in the 
head with the cue ball. I had to take the guy over to the Health Center." 

When he is not too busy, John usually relaxes and lights up either his pipe or a cigar, 
despite customer complaints. "They call these cigars aromatic!" And what do they call 
Johnny? "Wonderful," he said. 

—Ethan Porter 




Johnny Barnes is always around The Side Pocket 
when students need assistance. 



Seniors 177 



Seniors 



Neely, Keith 

Nguyen, Vinit 

Nixon, Lori 

Noble, Georgina 

Nowrouzi, Ahmad 



Orians, Steve 

Osborn, Melinda 

Oselukwue, Ekenechukwu 

Owens, Donneshia 

Palmer, David 



Palvso, Teresa E. 
Paone, Toby 

Parrish, Jeffery 
Patterson, Sandy 

Patton, Charles 



Pelaez, Jeannette 

Perkins, Jay Thomas 

Peterson, Phillis 

Petry, Rebecca 

Pickel, Morgan 



Pitner, Shannon 

Poirier, Terry 

Porterfield, Linda 

Prokopchak, Perrian 

Rash, E. Lawrie 



Rast, Juanita 

Ratchford, Stephanie 

Redmon, Joan 

Renfrow, James Mark 

Rio, Lucinda 



Roberts, Timothy C. 

Robertson, Brent 

Rosenberg, Brian 

Rowland, Laura 

Russell, Michael 



Russell, J. Shane 

Sanderson, Beth Ann 

Sandridge, Cheryl 

Saxon, Robert 

Scheinberg, Sid 







m 


WOMB 





178 Seniors 




Schklar, Stanley 
Schoen, Greg 
Scott, James 
Scott, Louise 
Scruggs, Chris 



Scruggs, James 
Sesson, Roy 
Shafer, Carl 
Sharp, Don 
Shea, Virginia 



Shelly, Gary 
Shelton, Lynda 
Sheppard, Lonnie 
Sherbert, Kristy 
Simeon, Rebecca 



Singleton, Greg 
Smith, Denise 
Smith, Felicia 
Smith, Matt 
Smith, Oretta 



Sorenson, Barbara 
Sowell, Mark 
Stephan, Lauri 
Stewart, Ricky 
Stewart, Theaese 



Stewart, Thomas 
Stonebrook, Kenneth 
Stroman, Joe 
Svoboda, Thomas 
Taylor, Cynthia 



Taylor, James 
Taylor, Janie 
Taylor, Yvonne 
Thomas, Willie 
Thompson, Angela 



Thompson, Julie 
Thompson, Kathryn 
Thornton, Christopher 
Thweat, Martha 
Tidwell, Tommie 



Seniors 179 



Seniors 



Tigner, James 

Titner, Susan 

Toney, Michael 

Turner, Lisa 

Turner, Ruth 



Vaughn, Kevin 

Veteto, Freddie 

Volman, Cynthia 

Waddell, Lisa 

Wakeley, Susan 



Walker, Cornell 

Wallace, Adriann 

Walters, Barbara 

Ward, Allen 

Ward, Davis 



Ware, Fredrick 

Watson, Thomas 

Webb, Mary 

Welch, Jimmy 

Wesson, Sharon 



West, Bernetta 

Whitaker, Lori 

White, Pamela 

Williams, Celeste 

Williams, Martha 



Williams, Sanders 

Williams, Selena 

Wilson, Melissa Ann 

Windsor, Beth 

Winter, Margie 



Wood, Nancy 

Woods, Brad 

Wright, Jimmy 

Yancy, Cary 

Young, Bruce 



Yow, James 

Zavodny, Edward 

Zenner, Shellie 




180 Seniors 



Underclassmen 





- ■ 






Abby, Gail So. 
Abedaldein, Taweig Jr. 
Accampo, Roy Fr. 
Acey, Kenneth Jr. 
Ackerman, J. Keith Jr. 



^^H^Hd3&^:: S&IsH&sSbS 




U ,,,^ 



Acuff, Sondra Fr. 
Adair, Steve So. 
Adams, Jami Fr. 
Adams, Mary So. 
Addison, Earline Jr. 




Ahmad, Zakiah So. 
Ajayi, Olanrewaju Jr. 
Albonetti, Tim So. 
Aldinger, James So. 
Alexander Jr., Charles Jr. 



Alexander, Scott So. 
Allen, Kelly Fr. 
Allen, Rhonda Fr. 
Allen, Richard So. 
Amagliano, Marie Fr. 



'Cookie Caper' Inspired Grandma's Return to School 



Her first story, "The Cookie Caper," 
sold to a children's magazine for $40, 
gave Laverne Daley the boost she needed 
to start out on a caper of her own. 

It made her think seriously about 
writing as a career, and eventually to 
enroll as a full time student at Memphis 
State. 

The story was written simply to enter- 
tain her two small children but friends 
convinced Daley she should try to get it 
published. 

Daley said the story's quick sale made 
her try other writing projects. But, some 
of the projects turned out to be almost 
more than she could handle. That's 
when she decided to get some training. 

"I had several stories published — 
then people started asking me to do 
writing I felt I couldn't handle, like 
public relations type stories. I didn't feel 
I knew enough about it." 

Coming back to school was not an 
easy step for her, adding the responsi- 
bility of a full course load to raising a 
family. But she's learned to deal with it. 



"You'd be surprised what you can let 
go. You learn to do the important things 
and let the non-essentials go," she said. 

Daley said her husband and their two 
teenagers still living at home have been 
very supportive — even when she has to 
ignore them to study for a math test. 

But the dual role hasn't slowed Daley 
down too much. She's been active on 
campus, is a past-president of the Society 
of Professional Journalists and is still 
very active in the organization. 

"College can be a lot more fun if you 
don't have other commitments," Daley 
said. "I envy those who don't — they can 
get involved with so much — there's a lot 
going on out there (at Memphis State)." 

Daley has had several stories publish- 
ed in local magazines and journalism 
trade journals. She completed an intern- 
ship at Mid South Business and was a 
writer for two years in Memphis State's 
media relations department. 

She's still not sure what will happen 
after graduation, but she plans to stick 
with writing as a career, either in news 



writing or public relations. 

"I'm not really locked into any type of 
writing. I wouldn't mind working for a 
trade journal." 

Whatever happens, Daley says she is 
glad she decided to return to school. 

"I've met a lot of fantastic people, 
students and teachers." 

—Rebecca Babineaux 




Photo hy J. Scott Vinundt 



Underclassmen 181 



Undergraduates 



Amminger, Sylvia Fr. 

Anderson, Feicia Jr. 

Anderson, Tracy Jr. 

Andrews, Ellen So. 

Andreas, Carla L. Fr. 



Angelo, Jo Anna Fr. 

Armstrong, Dana Fr. 

Arnold, Jan Fr. 

Ashcraft, Stefanie Fr. 

Askew, Amelia So. 



Atkins, Angelia Jr. 

Attias, Michael Fr. 

Atwood, Valerie, Fr. 

Austin, Lavita So. 

Aviotti, Angle Jr. 



Aviotti, Tricia Fr. 

Averett, Jackie Fr. 

Baggett, Kimberly Fr. 

Baine, Lynn So. 

Baker, Kenrick Fr. 



Baker, Thomas J. Fr. 

Baldridge, Tim Jr. 

Bardos, Dominic So. 

Barger, Grace So. 

Barker, Brenda Fr. 



Barker, R. Kana So. 

Barker, Sonya So. 

Barkley, Cathy R. So. 

Barnes, Mary L. So. 

Baroff, Kenneth Fr. 



Baumgartel, Lew So. 

Beard, Betty Fr. 

Beard, Jeff So. 

Beard, John F. Fr. 

Bearden, Carla Jr. 



Beare, Cecilia Page Jr. 

Beasley, Bryan Fr. 

Beasley, Ted M. Fr. 

Beghtol, Larry David Fr. 

Beibers, West So. 







182 Undergraduates 




Beickert, Matt So. 
Bell, Artunyala So. 
Bell, Emmett D. Fr. 
Bell, Jerry Jr. 
Bell, Myrna Jr. 



Bell, Steve So. 
Bennewitz, Marda So. 
Benson, Trad Fr. 
Berrid, Baraba Fr. 
Berryhill, Paul So. 



Betts, Paul Fr. 
Biggers, Anthony Fr. 
Bingham, Matt Fr. 
Bird, Mary Fr. 
Bizzell, Rod So. 



Black, Carlos Jr. 
Blair, Jennifer So. 
Blakely, John Ross Fr. 
Blankenship, Susan Jr. 
Bogard, Lisa So. 



Boldreghini, Rudolph A. 
Bolton, Chuck Jr. 
Bond, Misty Fr. 
Bondurant, Michael Fr. 
Booker, Jan Fr. 



Jr. 



Boone, Michael So. 
Borron, Gina So. 
Bousson, Brent So. 
Bousson, Danny Jr. 
Bouz, Todd Fr. 



Bowden, Jeff L. So. 
Bowers, John So. 
Bowles, David Fr. 
Boyd, Alecia Fr. 
Boyd, Sinthy Fr. 



Bradford, Tina So. 
Bradley, Stacey So. 
Bragg, Frank So. 
Braswell, Stephanie Fr. 
Bready, Merri Beth So. 



Undergraduates 183 



Tom Disney and Frank Blauer battle till the death 
as Donna Kimball placidly watches and Tim 
Greeson juggles. Clif Gordon, president of the 
Fred Mertz Association, is there to help familiarize 
students with the theatre department, which is 
staging the exhibition. 












Breeden, Jonna Fr. 

Breen, Joey Jr. 

Brennan, Tracey Jr. 

Brewer, Tonda Fr. 

Brewster, Chantal So. 



Bridgeman, Gary So. 

Briley, LeAnn Fr. 

Britt, Angela So. 

Britt, Terry Fr. 

Brogdon, James So. 



Brown, Patti Fr. 

Brown, Steve So. 

Browning, Angela G. So. 

Brumbaugh, Jay So. 

Bryant, Karen So. 



Bryant, Lindsey Fr. 

Bryant, Melanie So. 

Buckner, Amy E. Jr. 

Buckner, Bonnie Fr. 

Bunnell, Jon Jr. 



Burgess, Amy Jr. 

Burks, Ginny Fr. 

Burks, Jamie Fr. 

Burleson, Lisa Jr. 

Burns, Avis Jr. 




Photo by J. Scott Vauantft 




1 84 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 




Burns, Margaret Fr. 
Burrow, Laura Fr. 
Burton, Cynthia So. 
Burton, Janet Jr. 
Butcher, Elizabeth So. 



Butler, Jill Fr. 
Butier, Polly Jr. 
Buzzard, Ginny Fr. 
Byer, Bill So. 
Byrd, Tory Jr. 



Cagle, Tracey Fr. 
Cahill, Cecelia Jr. 
Caldwell, Mary Lynn Jr. 
Campbell, David So. 
Campbell, Jonathan Fr. 



Carayiannis, Dean So. 
Cardosi, Teresa So. 
Carlin, Vicki Fr. 
Carmichael, Lewie Fr. 
Caron, Elizabeth F. Jr. 



Carps, Mike J. Jr. 
Carr, Angela D. Jr. 
Carrington, Cindy Jr. 
Carrington, Kristy Fr. 
Carrington, Lesa Jr. 



Carroll, Michael So. 
Cartwright, Adam Fr. 
Carvel, Randon Jr. 
Casad, Denise D. Fr. 
Casad, Michelle So. 



Cashin, Debora Jr. 
Cathey, Damon Fr. 
Cavagnaro, Scarlett Fr. 
Chamberlain, Clay So. 
Chambers, Colis Fr. 



Chambers, Jeff So. 
Chandler, Cindy Fr. 
Channel), Charlene So. 
ChanneU, Darryl So. 
Childress, Melody Fr. 



Undergraduates 1 85 



Undergraduates 



Chiles, Lynn So. 

Christian, Lisa Fr. 

Chunn, Bobby Jr. 

Churchman, Debbie Fr. 

Clack, Brent So. 



Clark, Gerald Jr. 

Clary, Donna Jr. 

Clayton, Alan Jr. 
Clayton, Christy Jr. 
Clayton, Zedric Fr. 



Clear, Karen Fr. 

Clemens, Charles Fr. 

Clements, Merry Elizabeth Fr. 

Clements, William L. Jr. 

Coakley, Mary Leslie Jr. 



Coakley, Paula Jr. 

Cobb III, John B. Fr. 

Coda, Nina Fr. 

Coffey, Caryn Jr. 

Coffey, Cheryl Fr. 



Cole, Cindy Jr. 

Coleman, Chris So. 

Coleman, Kristen Fr. 

Coleman, Tracey Fr. 

Collie, Elaine Jr. 



Collins, Jacqueline Jr. 

Collins, Sandra Lynn Fr. 

Cornelia, Virginia Fr. 

Compton, Paul So. 

Conley, Lee J. Jr. 



Conner, Lisa So. 

Conrad, Robert Fr. 

Consterdine, Gene Jr. 

Conway, Patrick So. 

Coop, Stacy So. 



Cooper, Catherine Jr. 

Cooper, Debbie Jr. 

Coppock, Cary Jr. 

Couch, David Fr. 

Counce, Eric Fr. 




186 Undergraduates 








Couts, Glenna Fr. 
Cowan, Troy M. So. 
Coyle, Glenn So. 
Crain, Cara Fr. 
Craven, Ginger Fr. 



Cremerius, Mary Angela Jr. 
Crislip, Lauren Fr. 
Crisp, Faith A. Jr. 
Criswell, Jennifer Fr. 
Crockett, Martin Jr. Fr. 



v* ""^aw aW ' 

I. fyw If Br 

* • H|||L f "m 

'£ -1 BL mm 



Crockett, Patrick So. 
Crone, Alan Fr. 
Crone, Karen Fr. 
Cross, Cynthia Fr. 
Crowder, Kevin Fr. 



Crowell, Nicki /r. 
Cummings, John /r. 
Cutrell, Joe Jr. 
Dale, Allan Jr. 
Daniels, Kenneth Fr. 



Daniels, Leslie Fr. 
Da Ponte, Leigh Ellen So. 
Davenport, Yulanda Fr. 
Davidson, Mark Fr. 
Davis, Ricky Fr. 



Davis, George Jr. 
Davis, Shirley Fr. 
Dawson, Jeffrey Fr. 
Dawson, Lori Fr. 
DeBerry Jr., James Jr. 



De Frank, Philip Fr. 
Delo, John Jr. 
Denford, David Jr. 
Denton, Margaret Fr. 
Depperschmidt, Andrew Jr. 



Depperschmidt, Joan L. Fr. 
DePriest, Michael Jr. 
DeShazer, Michael Jr. 
Desnica, Tammi So. 
Dickenson, Forest T. Fr. 



Undergraduates 187 



■ ■■■;; : ;- 



Life's All New to Foreign Students 



Facing a new language, a new setting 
and a new lifestyle, foreign students 
have to be very special. They must adapt 
to the push and shove atmosphere and 
still concentrate on the demanding 
academics that brought most of them to 
America. Most of the students have 
found the transition bearable and some- 
times surprisingly pleasant. 

"1 came, I saw, and I was conquered!" 
exclaimed Max Hajiomer during a 
friendly gathering amidst the sounds of 
soul and reggae music. 

Hajiomer, a senior from Malaysia 
majoring in civil engineering, said that 
he was conquered by the friendliness he 
found throughout the country. "Before 
I got here I thought everybody was like 
Archie Bunker," he said. 

Abdollah Pierow-Salehi, a graduate 
student from Iran who is seeking a 
second degree in City and Regional 
Planning, said that he loved this country. 
"You can go where you want and buy 
what you want." 

Not every student feels quite at home 
in America, though. The pressures and 
problems of fitting in make some 
students wonder if the better education 
that can be received is really worth the 
hassles they face. 

Engineering major Ibrahim 
Khairuddin from Malaysia has found 
America to be just like he saw in the 
movies. He did point out, though, that 
he has adapted easily. 

Likewise, Jim Sigh, a native Kenyan, 
sees America as a strange country. "It's 
a fast country," he said. Singh also 
added that Africans are friendlier. 

Dean Arthur Holman, the advisor of 
Foreign Student Affairs, works closely 
with the International Student Associa- 
tion. "It is another method of having a 
political, economical and social view of 
the world besides that of our television 
and newspapers, "he said. Holman feels 
that working with foreign students is 
quite rewarding. 

Ruth Turner 




Foreign students prove that music is a universal language. 





These foreign students joke about their experiences at Memphis State. 



188 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 




Dickenson, James Jr. 
Dickerson, Martha Fr. 
Dickerson, William Ft. 
Dickey, Karen So. 
Dickinson, Bumey Jr. 
Dixon, Angela So. 
Dockery, Trey Fr. 



Donnelly, Donna Jr. 
Doring, Jennifer Ft. 
Dorsey, Catherine So. 
Dorscy, Terri Fr. 
Dote, Michael Jr. 
Doty, Suzanne So. 
Douglas, Joe So. 



Doyle, Kathryn Fr. 
Droke, Jeffrey Jr. 
Drummond, Denise So. 
DuBoise, Mark A. Jr. 
Duggan, Michael Fr. 
Duke, Charles Fr. 
Dulin, Kevin So. 



Duncan, Jennifer Fr. 
Duncan, John, Phillip So 
Duncan, Robert Fr. 
DuPriest, Darlene So. 
Durham, Phyllis R. Jr. 
Durham, Shannon Fr. 
Durham, Terry Jr. 



Dwight, Cynthia Jr. 
Dye, Orenetta Jr. 
Eanes, Mary Fr. 
Echie, Kenneth Jr. 
Edingbourgh, Larita So. 
Elliott, Romeo E. Jr. 
Elliott, Tonia Fr. 



Ellis, Conn Fr. 
Ellis, Donna Fr. 
Ellis, Rebecca So. 
Ellison, Marvin Fr. 
Ellison, Vince So. 



Elmore, Linda So. 
Engleberg, Alan Jr. 
Enoch, P. Denise So. 
Enos, DeeDee. Fr. 
Eppes, Jeanette So. 



Ervin, Steve So. 
EsmaeU, Kateh Jr. 
Estes, Cindy So. 
Evans, Gary E. Jr. 
Evans, Ken Fr. 



Undergraduates 189 



Undergraduates 



Ewell, Amy So. 

Ewell, Ethel M. Fr. 

Farmer, Kenneth N. Jr. 

Farr, V. Deneen Ft. 

Farrell, Fredric Michael So. 



Farrelly, D. Craig Jr. 

Fason, Yolanda Fr. 

Faulk, Teresa Fr. 

Feisal, James P. So. 

Felts, Annette Fr. 



Ferguson, Felicia Fr. 

Ferguson, Lisa Fr. 

Fernandez, Jeff Fr. 

Few, Jana Fr. 

Finley, Lea So. 



Fite, Jay Fr. 

Fitzpatrick, Velma L. Fr. 

Flaherty, Jeff So. 

Fletcher, Lynn Fr. 

Flynn, Deborah So. 



Flynn, Ondraetta Jr. 

Fogarty, Larry Jr. 

Folsom, Cindy Fr. 

Folson, Wendy Fr. 

Ford, Karen So. 



Foshee, Holli Jr. 

Foutch, Daryl So. 

Fox, Craig Jr. 

Foxx, Betsy So. 

Foy, Perry So. 



Franklin, Roy So. 

Frazier, Julie Jr. 

Frazier, Karl Jr. 

Fredi, Sharon So. 

French, Tawana Fr. 



Fruelich, David Jr. 

Funk, Terry Jr. 

Gabriel, Al So. 

Gallagher, Glenn M. Jr. 

Galvin, Greg Fr. 




1 90 Undergraduates 




Gammon, Sherrie So. 
Gannett, Victoria Fr. 
Gardner, Mac Jr. 
Gardner, P. J,, Jr. 
Gardner, Kevin Scott So. 



Garrett, Andrew So. 
Gates, Charlotte So. 
Gatlin, Gary Fr. 
George, Amy Jr. 
Giardi, Nancy So. 



Giaroli, Linda Jr. 
Giddings, Donna K. So. 
Gilliam, Tracy N. Jr. 
Gilmors, Sophia Ft. 
Gilreath, Todd Fr. 



Glasser, Jill Fr. 
Glideweli, Sherri Fr. 
Gobert, Cynthia Fr. 
Gordon, Paul Jr. 
Gordon, Robin Fr. 



Gore, Jeff So. 
Graff, Leesa Fr. 
Graham, Jon Fr. 
Grandberry, Letha Fr. 
Grant, Joseph Fr. 



Graves, Damon Fr. 
Gray, Carol Fr. 
Gray, Maggie Carole Fr. 
Gray, Sheryl So. 
Greaney, Devin Fr. 



Gregory, C. Durrell Jr. 
Griesinger, Kathryn Jr. 
Griffith, William A. So. 
Grimes, James So. 
Grisanti, Allison Jr. 



Grogan, Alise So. 
Gruenwald, Chris So. 
Gunn, Robin So. 
Guthrie II, Bruce H. Jr. 
Guthrie, Christy Fr. 



Undergraduates 191 



Cindy Hales -Breaking Tn 



T«v» 



11911119 



n 



In the Spring ^4 semester, Cindy 
Hales was named to the position of 
company commander of the Memphis 
State Army ROTC program. After 
receiving her bachelor of science degree 
in biology this May, Hales, the first 
female ever to fill the post, will be 
commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in the 
U.S. Army. She has already received 
her branch assignment and will become 
an officer in the Signal Corps — the 
group which is responsible for co- 
mmunications in the army. 

At the end of her sophomore year at 
MSU, Hales decided to investigate the 
ROTC program ,and she decided that it 
would be a good opportunity for her. 
She applied for and won an ROTC 
scholarship which covers her tuition, 
her lab fees and a fixed rate book 
allowance in addition to a $100 per 
month paycheck. 

Hales has completed both Basic and 
Advanced ROTC camps over her last 
two summers and has moved up through 
the ranks from squad member to an 
assistant in administration/training/ 
supply NCO to company commander. 



As company commander, Hales is the 
ranking cadet officer and is responsible 
for all third and fourth year cadets' 
training. 

She was assigned to the position of 
company commander by the ten cadre 
members, the Regular Army officers 
stationed at MSU to oversee the ROTC 
program here. Their decision was based 
upon her grades, her personal abilities, 
her scores at ROTC Advanced Camp 
and her projected future potential. 

Although 75 percent of the cadets in 
the ROTC program are male, Hales 
said that all the cadets work together 
with mutual respect. "Sometimes the 
guys give me a hard time, but it's more 
teasing than anything else," she said. "I 
respect them, and they respect me." 

Hales, who graduated from high 
school a year early, will be only 20 years 
old when she receives her commission as 
an officer in the army. "Being involved 
in the ROTC program has helped me 
learn a lot of things I'm capable of doing 
that I might not have thought of before," 
she concluded. 















Photo by J. Scott Vanandt 



1 92 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 





f\ 


f 





Gutierrez, Gus So. 
Guy, Arthur So. 
Hacket, Margaret Jr. 
Halamka, Kathy Fr. 
Hall, Daniel Fr. 
Hali, Thomas So. 
Ham, John So. 



Hamer, Sandra Fr. 
Hamilton, Kathleen F. So. 
Hamilton, Kelly So. 
Hamm, Geary Jr. 
Hancock, Tracy Jr. 
Haney, Tony Fr. 
Hanns, Randall Fr. 



Hardeman, Dana So. 
Harder, Loretta Fr. 
Hardin III, Clinton So. 
Hardison, Debie Jr. 
Hardy, Cynthia R. Jr. 
Hardy, David Fr. 
Harlan, Jon So. 



Harmon, Kimberly So. 
Harrington, Michael So. 
Harris, Jeanne So. 
Harris, Melissa Jr. 
Harris, Stephanie Fr. 
Harris, Tyjuana Fr. 
Harrison, Angela Fr. 



Harrison, FayBeth So. 
Harrison, Jeffrey Robert So. 
Harshbarger, Clay So. 
Hart, Laura Fr. 
Harthum, Nancy So. 
Hartsoch, Mary So. 
Harvell, Barbara Fr. 



Harvey, Douglas Fr. 
Hay, Margaret Jr. 
Hayes, Tony Fr. 
Heath, Mark So. 
Heavey, Jeffrey Jr. 
Hedgeman, Denita Fr. 
Heimbach, Jeff Fr. 



Hentz, David So. 
Hernandez, Lisa Fr. 
Hess, Raymond So. 
Hethmon, Douglas Fr. 
Hewitt, Sherry Fr. 
Hewlett, Irene Jr. 
Hill, Carol Fr. 



Hinson, Cindy Fr. 
Hodges, Mark So. 
Hodnett, Lee Jr. 
Hoffman, Michael Jr. 
Holliday, Julie Fr. 
Hollingsworth, James So. 
Hollingsworth, Sherri So. 



Undergraduates 1 93 



Undergraduates 



Holman, Daniel Jr. 

Holmes, Chris So. 

Holmes, Julie Jr. 

Holmes, Robert Fr. 

Hooper, Daniel Jr. 



Horton, Sandra Jr. 

Hough, Cynthia Jr. 

House, Candy Jr. 

Housley, Michael So. 

Houston, Bruce So. 



Houston, Phillip Fr. 
Howard, Carole So. 
Howard, Charles Fr. 
Howard, Robert So. 
Howell, Dornetta Willese Jr. 



Huckaby, Tim So. 

Hudson, Carmen Fr. 

Hudson, Foster Jr. 

Huey, Lendia Jr. 

Huff alter, Tim, Jr, 



Huffman, Cheron Fr. 

Huffman, Layn Jr. 

Hughes, Todd So. 
Hughey, Mark E. So. 

Huls, Christine Fr. 




These three Air Force ROTC cadets enjoy a little 
relaxation after their lab. Lenny Brunson shows 
freshman Nursing major Betsy Cantrell where to 
lay her bead as Ron Campbell looks on. 




1 94 Undergraduates 




Undergraduates 1 95 






Jones, Kim Fr. 

Jones, C. Michael So. 

Jones, Michael Fr. 

Jones, Regina Fr. 

Jones, Stanley So. 



Jones, William Fr. 

Jordan, Burner Dene Jr. 

Jordan, Jay Fr. 

Jordan, Susan Jr. 

Joyner, Tommy So. 



Kallaher II, Walter H. So. 

Katsner, Maria So. 

Kazemba, Michael So. 

Keith, Richie Jr. 

Kelly, David Jr. 



Keltner, Sharon Jr. 

Kenton, Dennis So. 

Kenton, Thomas Fr. 

Kesler, David So. 

Kessler, Lori So. 



Kirby, Gwendolyn So. 

Kirkpatrick, Douglas Fr. 

Kleinaitis, Ramona Fr. 

Knight, Donna Fr. 

Knight, Sheri So. 



Knowlton, Terri L. So. 

Kozak, Ronald Fr. 

Krell, Kurt Jonathan So. 

Krock, Brian So. 

Kuntzman, Art Fr. 



Kutz, Gary Jr. 

Lafflfeau, James Fr. 

Land, Laura E. Jr. 

Lard, Michelle Jr. 

Lartigue, Latonya Fr. 



Laseter, Tricia So. 

Lawrence, Beth So. 

Lawrence, Gregory Lamont So. 

Lawrence, Monica Leigh Fr. 

Le, Tam Fr. 




1 96 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 




Le, Tuong Fr. 
Lee, Jeff Fr. 
Leavell, Martin Fr. 
Lester, Kenneth Jr. 
Levy Jr., Rayford M. So. 



Lewis, Sondra So. 
Lewis, William Jr. 
Limbaugh, Maria Fr. 
Linder, Scott So. 
Lindsey, Edward Fr. 



Linxwiler, John So. 
Lobianco, Tommy So. 
Lock, Charles Jr. 
Lomas, R. Kenneth Fr. 
Lopez, Stanley Fr. 



Love, Candy Jr. 
Lowrey, Keri So. 
Luckett, Jamie So. 
Luke, John Jr. 
Lunati, Judy Jr. 



Lupo, Terry So. 
Lynxwiler, Melissa Fr. 
Macdonald, Philip Fr. 
Maddock, Jeffrey Jr. 
Magee, Esther So. 



Mallard, Karen Fr. 
Malone, Karen Fr. 
Malone, Lewanna Fr. 
Malone, Tammera Fr. 
Malunda III, Melvin So. 



Maluaney, Michael Fr. 
Manley, Stephen Fr. 
Maples, Cannie Marie Jr. 
Marenshi, Lisa So. 
Marion, Barbara Fr. 



Markham, Donna Jr. 
Marshall, Barry A. Jr. 
Marshall, Kevin So. 
Martin, Rod So. 
Martin, Sheila Jr. 















M '■':"■ 





— 



Undergraduates 197 



Undergraduates 



Mason, Earnestine Jr. 

Massa, Paula So. 

Massey, Elizabeth So. 

Massey, Shawn Jr. 

Mathews, Candace Fr. 



May, Martha V. Fr. 

Mays, Tamara So. 

McAdoo, Steven William Jr. 

McAfee, Chris So. 

McCarley, Dru Fr. 



McClain, Donna Fr. 

McClinton, Trelis Jr. 

McCommon, John Jr. 

McCown, Donald Keith So. 

McCutcheon, LaTonya So. 



McDonald, Arthur So. 

McElrath, Tracy So. 

McGary, Fred Jr. 

McGaw, David Jr. 

McGhee, Michael Fr. 



McGuffee, Jere Fr. 

McKee, Leslie S. So. 

Mc Kinney, Alvin Fr. 

McKinney, Sandra K. So. 

McMillon, Ricky Fr. 



McMullin, Lynda Fr. 

McNatt, Maria So. 

McNeese, Kevin So. 

McPipkin, Debra E. Fr. 

McShan, Nancy Jr. 

Meadows, Tammy So. 



Mech, Jeff Jr. 

Meece, Katherine So. 

Mefford, Michael A. So. 

Meihofer, Mark Fr. 

Meier, Curt So. 

Melvin, Missy Fr. 



Meriweather, Debbie Jr. 

Merritt, Will Fr. 

Merriweather, Anita Jr. 

Mickens, Anthony Fr. 

Middleton, Tanya So. 

Miles, Scott So. 




■ 98 Undergraduates 



"if 



■ si * 



■llif L 



m 



S 



i 



"TMi 



SBPtPffl ' 



:,. 



\ 



./ 



Millard, Dan 7r. 
Miller, Laura Jr. 
Miller, Norman N. Jr. 
Miller, Wes Fr. 
Minor Jr., Ambrose So. 



Mitchell, Allison So. 
Mitchell, Deborah So. 
Mitchell, Joyce D. So. 
Mitchell, Teri So. 
Montgomery, Cathy So. 



Montgomery, David Jr. 
Montgomery, Van So. 
Moore, Bennett Jr. 
Moore, Gregory Jr. 
Moore, Linda So. 



Moore, Louise Craig Fr. 
Moore, Trey So. 
Moretta, Judy Fr. 
Morgan, Rebecca Fr. 
Morgan, Russell Fr. 



Morris, Stacy So. 
Morton, Michael Jr. 
Moss, David Jr. 
Mozingo, K. Leslie So. 
Mullaney, Michael Jr. 



Tom Clark and Cosy Collier take 
advantage of the first spring-like day of 
the semester and get outside for some 
fresh air. Clark is walking and talking 
with Collier as they pass Memorial 
Grove near the math and foreign 
language building. 



Undergraduates 1 99 



Undergraduates 






Muller, Karla So. 

Munnings, Marcia Jr. 

Myers, Bobby D. Jr. 

Myrick, Pamela Fr. 

Naderi, Kourosh Fr. 

Nanez, Cherie Jr. 

Nanney, Robert Jr. 



Nathaniel, Eileen Fr. 

Naylor, Suzanne Jr. 

Neely, Verlisa Fr. 

Nelson, Beth So. 

Nelson, Greg Fr. 

Nelson, James So. 

Nelson, Tim Jr. 



Nettles, Lori So. 

Newborn, Clifferdean Jr. 

Newell, Sheila So. 

Newson, Stephen K. Jr. 

Newton, Thomas So. 

Neyman, Joseph Fr. 

Nixon, Terrie Fr. 



Norman, Stephen Fr. 
Norsworthy, Whitney Fr. 

Northern, Andy Fr. 

Nunley, Jennifer Jr. 
O'Bryant, Shaun Fr. 
O'Connor, Susan Fr. 
O'Donnell, Steve So. 



O'Neil, Lisa Fr. 

Oatman, Bradley Fr. 

Odigie, Ohonsi Jr. 

Oeding, Kimberly Fr. 

Oliver, Laurie Fr. 

Olubadewo, Nike So. 

Orians, Mike Jr. 



Osborne, Catrina Jr. 

Owen, Bobby So. 

Owen, Dana Fr. 

Owens, Aaron Jr. 

Oyeniya, Sunday Jr. 

Pagano, Lou So. 

Pallme, Daniel So. 



Pancella, Pete So. 

Panneli, Mark So. 

Panni, Susan So. 

Panyard, Jane Ellen So. 

Paone, Thad William Jr. 

Papineau, Dawn Fr. 

Parker, Kristen Fr. 



Parnell, Melanie Fr. 

Parrish, Melanie Fr. 

Pate, Diane Fr. 

Pate, Sherri So. 

Patrick, Carolyn Fr. 

Patrick, Jamita Fr. 

Patterson, Keith Fr. 





,^7%'ip ^*^k 








200 Undergraduates 





X 


















Green Loves Her Work 



How does Diane Green, a nutrition 
major working on a career in sports 
medicine, go about getting practical 
experience? 

The junior, who prepped at Memphis 
Central High School, is MSU's only 
female varsity men's trainer. 

Trainer, you say? 

Green reports to the Kennedy Complex 
at 1 p.m. every day and is among the last 
to leave about 7 p.m. Her daily duties 
include applying ankle tape or other pro- 
tective wraps to soccer players and making 
juice for the football and soccer teams. 

But that's only the beginning. 

"I sometimes go over to football 
practice, and if it is busy, I begin taping 
some of them," said Green. After all the 
taping is out of the way, she watches over 
practice in case an emergency occurs. 

"We are there in case someone needs to 
be iced, or if someone needs help for a 
pulled muscle," she explained. 

Green also assists in "treatments," 
planned programs for players with injured 



'Just One of the Boys' 

muscles or broken bones. 

Green goes to all home football games 
and some of the away matches. However, 
soccer is her main sport. She watches 
over the soccer team most afternoons. 
Her job on the field is to provide water or 
towel off players as they march to the 
sidelines. 

This summer Green worked with ath- 
letes in rehabilitation, mainly those 
coming off operations in the spring. 

Despite her non-stop schedule, Green 
enjoys her lifestyle. "I enjoy working with 
the players," she said. "There is something 
new going on every day." 

The limitations of being a female trainer 
in male-dominated sports is a question 
Green is often asked. "I do everything 
except go into the locker rooms," she 
said. 

Besides the obvious limitations, Green 
is out there giving her best. "I hope to be 
doing this next year, too," said Green. "It 
will give me experience that will help me 
in the future." 

—Nancy Bailey 




Undergraduates 201 



Undergraduates 



Patterson, Pam S. So. 

Patterson, Rebecca Fr. 

Payne, Jerald So. 

Payne, Leigh Jr. 

Payne, Lori Fr. 



Peacock, Rhonda Fr. 

Peavy, Michael Jr. 

Pecoraro, Cyndi Jr. 

Peel, Mary Fr. 

Peples, Derek Fr. 



Pendergast, Patti Fr. 

Pepper, Steve Fr. 

Percle, Pamela Ann So. 

Perkins, Beverly Fr. 

Perkins, Susan Fr. 



Perry, Cynthia D. So. 

Perry, Lori E. So. 

Person, Patrick R. Jr. 

Peters, Elizabeth A. Fr. 

Petty, Scott Jr. 



Phifer, James A. So. 

Phillips, Laura Fr. 

Phillips, Melody Fr. 

Phillips, Sussan Fr. 

Pickens, Billy So. 



Pickett, Wanda Fr. 

Pinckney, Pete So. 

Pinlac, Barry So. 

Pipkin, Betty Amelia So. 

Pitner, Tom So. 



Pittman, Laurie So. 

Pledger, Jenny Fr. 

Plunk, Ken So. 

Plunk, Lisa Fr. 

Polk, Tuney Jr. 



Polk, Vonda Fr. 

Follow, Adam Fr. 

Porter, Rodger Fr. 

Poston, Cheryl Fr. 

Powell, Patrick So. 




202 Undergraduates 




Powell, Thomas Jr. 
Pratt, Sandra Jr. 
Prince, Kelly Fr. 
Pruett, Trudy Fr. 
Pryor, Antionette Karen Fr. 



Pulliam, Elizabeth Jr. 
Railings, Tony Jr. 
Ramia, Amy Fr. 
Rash, Camille Jr. 
Redden, Kim Fr. 



Reeves, Ann E. Fr. 
Reyle, Richard Fr. 
Reynolds, Mark So. 
Rhodes, Kim Fr. 
Rhodes, Ten Jr. 



Riales, Emily Jr. 
Richards, Ronda Fr. 
Richardson, Bill Fr. 
Richardson, Randy Jr. 
Richmond, Tommy Jr. 



Rickard, Melodic So. 
Riddick, Pam Jr. 
Riggins, Beverly Diane Jr. 
Riggins, Kirk Fr. 
Riggins, Mary A. Fr. 



Riley, Davis So. 
Robbins, Jeffrey Scott Jr. 
Roberson, Terri Jr. 
Roberts, Fred Fr. 
Roberts, Tiffany Fr. 



Robins, Carol Fr. 
Robins,, Randy So. 
Robinson, Beth Jr. 
Robinson, David Fr. 
Robinson, Keith R. Jr. 



Robinson, Luevergie So. 
Robinson, Sean Jr. 
Rockstroh, Medford Murr Jr. 
Rodenhiser, David So. 
Roehm III, Thomas E. Jr. 



Undergraduates 203 



Rogers, Jeffrey So. 

Rone, Deanna Fr. 

Rone, Steve Jr. 

"Ronza, Rick So. 

Roop, Walter Jr. 



Rose, Richard Jr. 

Rosenberger, Theresa Fr. 

Rosenkranz, Jack So. 

Rowell, Leigh Anne Fr. 

Rowland, James Jr. 



Rucker, Zina So. 
Ruddell, Tracey Fr. 

Rush, Bubba So. 
Russell, Sharon Jr. 
Russom, Karen Fr. 



Ryan, Kelly Fr. 

Saba, Kathy So. 

Safari-Jafarlou, Parvin Jr. 

Sanders, Kimberly F. So. 

Sanders, Libby So. 



Sanders, Stacy So. 

Sanders, Stephanie Jr. 

Sarver, Steven W. So. 

Satterfield, Emma Fr. 

Scales, Charlayne Fr. 



Shane Merritt, Bing Bingham and 
Laurie Phillips take advantage of a 
break in the cold weather to enjoy some 
outdoor relaxation. 




w w ^ 

Hi 







•.« 






204 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 




Scarpace, Jeff Fr. 
Scates, Sean Fr. 
Schifani, Milissa So. 
Schifani, Paul Jr. 
Schklar, Ruth Jr. 



Schocn, Lori So. 
Schrimsher, Chuck Fr. 
Schuler, Daniel So. 
Scoggins, Steven So. 
Seabaugh, Jeff Fr. 



Sellers, Constance Jr. 
Sewell, Tim Fr. 
Seymour III, David A. Jr. 
Shaffer, Amy K. Fr. 
Shanks, Stacey So. 



Sharpe, Penni Jr. 
Shaw, Bill Fr. 
Shea, Toney Fr. 
Sheffield Jr., Joe So. 
Shipley, Christie Fr. 



Shroder, Robert Edward So. 
Shuster, Robert James Jr. 
Simmons III, Edward D. Jr. 
Simmons, Mark Jr. 
Simpkins, Harry So. 



Simpson, Larry Jr. 
Singleton, Penne Jr. 
Sinquefield, Charles So. 
Sipes, Charleyn So. 
Sisk, Timothy Fr. 



Slattery, Michael So. 
Sletto, Shad Fr. 
Sloan, Paul Jr. 
Sloan, Tommy Jr. 
Small, Laura Fr. 



Small, Tammy Jr. 
Smith, Cathy Jr. 
Smith, Felicia So. 
Smith, Kim Fr. 
Smith, Kim M. Fr. 



Undergraduates 205 




206 Undergraduates 



Undergraduates 




Suratt, Gail Jr. 
Sweatt, Tara So. 
Swope, Curtis Fr. 
Swords, Angela Fr. 
Swords, Cindy Ft. 



Tabb, Tony Jr. 
Taggart, Trade Ft. 
Taras, Chris So. 
Tate, Debra Ft. 
Tate Jr., Floyd Jr. 



Taylor, James Jr. 
Taylor, Jeanette So. 
Taylor, Kimberly So. 
Taylor, Reginald Jr. 
Taylor, Terry So. 



Taylor, Vince So. 
Teague, Jeff So. 
Templeton, Irene Jr. 
Terrett, James So. 
Terry, Tonja Fr. 



Theiner, Cindy So. 
Thiemann, Robin Fr. 
Thomas, Angela Fr. 
Thomas, Melissa So. 
Thomas, Rich Fr. 



Thomas, Shirhonda Fr. 
Thompson, Bennett Fr. 
Thompson, Dick Jr. 
Thompson, Donna So. 
Thompson, Eric Fr. 



Thompson, Lajuna Fr. 
Thompson, Linda So. 
Thompson, Lisa Jr. 
Thompson, Mary Fr. 
Thompson, Scott Fr. 



Thompson, Susie So. 
Thweatt, Terri Jr. 
Tidwell, Paula Jr. 
Tilton, Laura So. 
Tims, Randy Jr. 






Undergraduates 207 



Tiscia, Leonard So. 

Todd, Chris So. 

Todd, Susan Jr. 

Tomes, Tim Jr. 

Topps, Yourlandwra Fr. 






Towles, Lisa Fr. 

Townsend, Mildred Jr. 

Traylor, Nathan So. 

Treece, Sherry So. 

Tregler, Wayne So. 



Trout, Melanie Jr. 

Trout, Michele Fr. 

Trout, Michelle Fr. 

Truitt, Cheryl So. 

Trull, Regina Jr. 



Tubbs, Emily So. 
Tucker, Andrea Fr. 

Tuell, Mardie So. 
Tuggles, Denise Jr. 
Tuley, Shaneen So. 




Nightown Makes Night Life Pay Off 



Two Memphis State students drew up 
the blueprints tor a nightclub in the 
Memphis State area and saw their plans 
come to fruition eight months later. It 
their business continues at the current 
feverish pitch, they should be there for a 
long, long time. 

Both students wanted to have fun and 
show a little profit at the same time. 
They've done it, thus far with Jeffrey's 
Nightown — formerly London Transport. 

"We wanted to build a place that was 
classy and had good entertainment," 21- 
year-old Chuck Bolton, a senior in inter- 
national business, said. Bolton is the 
club's main investor. 

The junior partner in the deal is 20- 
year-old Michael Deering. Another MSU 
student -- Christopher Folk a junior 
majoring in hotel management, helped 
Bolton to design the club. 

Bolton and Deering became friends 
after being introduced by a mutual friend 
during their spring vacation in Destin, 
Fla. The three were involved in a car 



accident but the MSU students escaped 
unharmed. 

"That was the first time I had met 
Chuck," Deering said. Deering runs the 
entertainment side of Nightown. 

Bolton came to the entertainment field 
after trying his hand at selling insurance. 
"The money was good but I got bored 
having to wear a coat and tie every day." 

"By the spring we will have the largest 
patio restaurant in Memphis," Folk said. 
He also has plans to buy the other half of 
the club, owned by Bolton's father. 

The three Memphis State students had 
a rough time getting financial backing for 
the project. Bolton contributed half the 
money he received by selling his insurance 
company, and a silent partner chipped in 
the rest in September. 

The silent partner, though, sold his half 
to Bolton's father later in the year. 

After the financial backing went 
through, the trio began renovating the 
club, which also housed Yesterdays, at 
one time. 

"We wanted to do and oversee the 



work ourselves, so for about three weeks 
1 slept on the floor," said Bolton. 

Folk manages the restaurant section of 
the club. It's called Jeffrey's after the 
friend who introduced the two. Folk 
should manage the restaurant well - his 
parents own Folks' Folly. 

Bolton has little experience running a 
restaurant or a nightclub, though. So, he 
surrounded himself with experts from the 
field. Fat Schrider is the key to the 
business, Bolton said of the main chef. 

Bob Beni/e, owner of Destin's original 
Nightown, aids Bolton in finding concert 
promoters. Nightown's performers have 
ranged from the Drifters to the Producers. 

Bolton adds that the club will showcase 
comedians three times a week, along with 
rock and rhythm and blues groups. 

So far, Jelfrey's Nightown has been 
attracting good-si/ed audiences. With a 
little more luck, it could begin attracting 
crowds from outside the Memphis State 
area. 

— Maria Acchiardo 



208 Undergraduates 



- Undergraduates 




Turner, Dariene Fr. 
Turner, Elizabeth Louise Fr. 
Turner, Ellis Jr. 
Turner, Robert Jr. 
Turney, Gene So. 



Tylis, Theresa So. 
Vandergriff, Cheryl Fr. 
VanVulpen, Andy Jr. 
Vanzandt, John Scott So. 
Vaught, Debbie So. 



Venson, Jane So. 
Vescovo, Melanie Jr. 
Vickers, Vicki Jr. 
Vogelsang, Craig So. 
Vowell, Renee' So. 



Waddington, Cady So. 
Wade, John So. 
Wade, Susan Jr. 
Wahlstrom, Stan Fr. 
Wakim, Patti Fr. 




Undergraduates 209 



Undergraduates 



Walker, Scott Fr. 

Walker, Susan Fr. 

Walpole, John S. Jr. 

Ward, Melanie Fr. 

Warren, Lesia So. 



Warren, Lorri Fr. 

Warren, Mary Jr. 

Warrington, Darlene Jr. 

Washburn, Frances So. 

Washer, Jann Lea Jr. 



Watkins, Terry Fr. 

Watkins, Tina Fr. 

Watkins, Valerie L. Jr. 

Watts, Shawn Fr. 

Weatherby, Darla Jr. 



Webb, Jack So. 

Webb, Sandy So. 

Webber, Patricia Fr. 

Wells, Orlando So. 

Werner, Scott So. 



West, Cheryl Fr. 

West, Levon Jr. 

West, Sandra So. 

West, Sandra Jr. 

Wheat, Michele K. So. 



Whipple, Melinda Jr. 

White, Harriet Jr. 

White, James Allen Jr. 

White, Kimberly Fr. 

Whittaker, Linda D. So. 



Whitworth, Butch Fr. 

Wiggins, Veronica So. 

Wigley, Stephanie Fr. 

Wike, Deanna Fr. 

Williams, Yunetta Ann Jr. 



Williams, Anthony Fr. 

Williams, David S. So. 

Williams, Sylvia Fr. 

Williamson, Milton Jr. 

Willingham, Craig Jr. 




210 Undergraduates 





Willis, LaVere Jr. 
Wills, Susan Jr. 
Wilson, Clifford So. 
Wilson, Matthew So. 
Wilson, Michael Fr. 



Wilson, Rick Fr. 
Wilson, Tammie Fr. 
Windsor, Carrie So. 
Windsor, Conde So. 
Winegard, Debby Fr. 



Winstead, Pat So. 
Winterowd, Jenny Fr. 
Witherspoon, Sedella Fr. 
Wolfe, Charles Fr. 
Wood, David So. 



Woodcock, Lisa Jr. 
Woods, Gloria Jr. 
Woods, Shandra So. 
Woodson, Cedric Jr. 
Wooten, Lynn Fr. 



Wray, Lynda So. 
Wren, Curt Fr. 
Wright, Doug So. 
Wright, Gerald So. 
Yarbrough, Jacqueline M. Jr. 



'*$L. ■*****-: ^^^ 



For the moment, flashing a bright smile for the 
camera is more important than studying to Michael 
Mazyek. 



Undergraduates 21 



Professor Heeds Call of the Nile 



Ancient Memphis beckoned and Dr. 
John DeMott, journalism professor at 
Memphis State, heeded the call which 
took him from the Mississippi to the Nile. 

Dr. DeMott returned to Memphis in 
August after a year as visiting professor 
at the American University in Cairo, near 
the site of the older Memphis. 

For him, journalism bridged the gap 
between the two cities, allowing him time 
to work and study in a dynamic city of the 
Arab world, and the chance to research 
both ancient and modern Arabic life. 

"I taught graduate and undergraduate 
journalism courses and did research," Dr, 
DeMott said. "But one study I did had 
nothing to do with journalism — it was a 
study of religion in ancient Memphis, 
which, along with Pharaonic history, is 
one of my special interests." 

Other DeMott research did pertain to 
journalism — a study of the Islamic press 
code of ethics, another on women in 
Egyptian media and another dealing with 
the representation of the scribe — the 
penman who, among the ancient Jews, 
was teacher, interpreter and copyist of 
Jewish scripture and law. 



Dr. DeMott also studied the Middle 
East News Agency, which serves the 
Egyptian government and which also 
reports, in French and Arabic, worldwide 
news to the Arabic world and Arabic 
news to the outside world. 

Along with his students, Dr. DeMott 
researched the English language Egyptian 
Gazette, founded by the British 103 years 
ago. "The Gazette is a fascinating news- 
paper, changing now into a very modern 
paper mostly for Americans in Cairo," 
Dr. DeMott said. "For years it was 
mainly for British colonials, filled with 
British news and cricket game results. 
Now it reports American football." 

Dr. DeMott's students at the American 
University were mainly Egyptian, al- 
though there were also students from 
other Arab countries and from other 
parts of Africa, from France, Indonesia, 
Latin America and the U.S. 

What is the main difference between 
those students and MSU students? "In 
Egypt, all graduates are guaranteed jobs 
following graduation," Dr. DeMott said. 
"The government provides full employ- 
ment." 



As mementos of his sabbatical year in 
Egypt, Dr. DeMott brought back with 
him an assortment of miniature scimitars — 
those short, single-edged, curved-bladed 
sabers which conjure up visions of long- 
ago battles between Arabs and Turks. 

— Laverne Daley 




Yatsula, Kathleen A. So. 

Young, Debra So. 

Young Jr., Kenneth Fr. 

Young, Kevin Fr. 

Young, Pamela So. 



Young, Virginia E. Fr. 

Youngner, Greg So. 
Yun, Won Jr. 

Zachry, Michael Fr. 
Zekavati, Shahriar Jr. 



Zoccola, Susan Fr. 

Zorbino, Frank Jr. 

Zubiate, Genevieve Fr. 




212 Undergraduates 



Faculty and Staff 




Agrawal, Surendra 
Alley, Anita S. 
Anderson, Jay 
Ball, Ann M. 
Barnett, Sharon 



Barton, Frank 
Berl, Robert L. 
Byer, William J. 
Cianton, Erma 
Cleminson, Ron W. 



Clement, Evelyn 
Collier, James A. 
Conners, Dr. Patricia 
Cox, David N. 
Crase, Dixie R. 



Crawford, Robert 
Dameron, John Lasley 
DeMott, John 
Dolph, Richard 
Duckworth, Lewis Augustus 



Etheridge, George W. 
Franceschetti, Donald R. 
Franklin, Stanley P. 
Freed, Rita 
Giannangelo, Duane 



Gilley, Mark 
Goens, Myrtle 
Green, Betty W. 
Grossman, Matthew R. 
Hall, Marlene 



Hall, Vickie 
Haynes, Pamela 
Hopkins, Bobbie H. 
Hopkins, W. Clyde 
Jayanthi, Lakshmi 



Jones, Coy A. 
Jones, Richard D. 
Kalin, Berkley 
Knight, Janie S. 
Landry, Emry 



Faculty and Staff 213 



Faculty and Staff 



Lipinski, Linda 

Lipmaii, Larry 

Markus, Frank 

McDcvitt, Ian 

McKay, Dr. Sidney 



McLellan, Kevin 

Morrison, Mrs. Joyce 

Muench, Mrs. Sandra 

Myhre, Guy 

Ordman, Dr. Edward T. 



Ordman, Mrs. Eunice 

Pertl, Dr. Mars 

Phillips, Mr. William S. 

Pilcher, Mike 

Plunka, Dr. Gene 



Pool, Alan 

Poureh, Phyllis 

Pugh, Russell 

Rakowski, Dr. James 

Rayburn, Dr. L. Gayle 




Charles Brown 
Selected For 

National 
Competition 




Charles Brown 



4 Faculty & Staff 




Segui, Dr. William 
Shaffer, Frank 
Smith, Dr. Ann D. 
Spielberger, Mr. Ronald 
Spurbeck, Peter 



Stagg, Dr. Louis Charles 
Steff, Richard 
Stone, Dr. Gerald 
Sweeney, Robert B. 
Thompson, James 



Tucker, Mr. Bob 
Vasser, Debbie 
Walker Jr., Hollie 
Wilkerson, Mrs. Dorothy 
Williams, Dr. David 



Williams, Willella 
Wollert, Dr. James 
Woolner, Dr. Rosestelle 
Young, Mr. Bob 
Young, Dr. Joyce 



Bruce Charles Brown, a Memphis State 
journalism major, was one of 20 students 
selected in the 1984 national competition 
for a Sears Congressional Internship in 
Washington, D.C. 

Brown, 21, is the first winner Memphis 
State has had for the $2,050 internship, 
open only to juniors and seniors in jour- 
nalism programs accredited by the Ac- 
crediting Council on Education in Jour- 
nalism and Mass Communication 
(ACEJMC). 

Brown's internship was in the Wash- 
ington office of Sen. Slade Gorton, Re- 
publican from the State of Washington. 
During the February-to-April term of the 
appointment, Brown worked as a member 
of Sen. Gorton's staff in a variety of tasks 
designed to familiarize him with the 
functions of a legislative office. 

In addition to the work with Sen. Gorton, 
Brown participated in an academic en- 
richment program organized by Louis 
Kohlmeier, director of the National Center 
for Business and Economics Communic- 
ation at the American University and a 
Pulitzer-Prize winning Washington corres- 
pondent while with the Wall Street Journal. 



Brown is working toward a second major 
in political science and has a 3.2 GPA. He 
has been active with the Daily Helmsman, 
having served as managing editor and 
editor for the 1982-83 academic year. He 
has interned with The Comercial Appeal 
and is a former part-time writer for the 
West Memphis Daily Times. 

A total of 35 nominations for the intern- 
ship was received and evaluated by the 
1983 national selection committee com- 
posed of judges Kohlmeier; Donald 
Hileman, dean of the College of Com- 
munication at the University of Tennessee; 
and Gerald F. Seib of the Wall Street 
Journal. 

All costs of the program are borne by 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. as part of the 
firm's continuing commitment to higher 
education. 

The Sears Congressional Internship 
program began in 1 969 in cooperation with 
the journalism accrediting council. Since 
its inception, the program has had 299 
interns serving in 274 different Congres- 
sional offices, 52 on the staff of Senators 
and 247 on the staff of members of the 
House of Representatives. 



Faculty & Staff 215 




216 President Carpenter 



Carpenters Now 4- Year Veterans 




The head of this compex organization called Memphis State 
is President Thomas G. Carpenter, now completing his fourth 
year in that role. 

Although Dr. Carpenter was raised in Winston-Salem, N.C., 
he attended college in Atlanta, Ga., his birthplace. He left 
Georgia State to serve in the U.S. Navy from 1944-46, and when 
he married a Memphis native, Oneida Pruette, moved here to 
complete his undergraduate degree in business at Memphis 
State. 

He went on to earn his masters in economics at Baylor 
University and his doctorate in economics at the University of 
Florida. From 1965 to 1980 he remained at the University of 
North Florida, first as business manager, then vice president 
for academic affairs, and finally president, the post he held 
until coming full circle back to Memphis State. 

An earnest booster for the University, Dr. Carpenter feels 
that even the campus community has to be reminded of its own 
quality. As for the city, when he became president in the 
summer of 1980, he found that many citizens still thought of 
Memphis State as they remembered its teacher college days. 

"This is one of two comprehensive universities in the state," 
he reminds anyone who will listen. "People come on campus 
and say what wonderful facilities we have, but unless they come 
here they don't know about it." That was one of his first 
priorities when he took over the reins as president: making the 
state, the city and the campus itself aware of the high quality, 
and the even higher potential he envisioned. 



Dr. and Mrs. Thomas G. Carpenter are marking their fourth year as Memphis 
State's President and First Lady. It was a homecoming for Mrs. Carpenter, 
who is a Memphis native. 




ii air '« 

~s I 



President Carpenter 217 



President Shows Pride in University 



Admitting that there are still a few 
problems to be solved, Dr. Carpenter cites 
financial cutbacks and parking as two of 
the major ones. The state of the economy 
has hurt all campuses, he believes. Here, he 
notes that many organizations had prob- 
lems maintaining membership when so 
many students couldn't afford to participate 
or had to work just to stay in school. He is 
concerned with that lack of participation 
because he believes extra-curricular acti- 
vities play a major role in college life for the 
individual student and the university. 

The University will continue to make 
concerted efforts to see that this aspect of 
campus life will develop more fully, he 
says. Dr. Carpenter continues to support a 
strong athletic program, believing this is 
one of the many ways the University 
impresses its image upon the country. He 
believes that the positive image of Memphis 
State athletes has encouraged many to 
explore other programs at the University 
and has helped determine its growth. 

Carpenter, who believes in an "open- 
door" policy realizes he can't possibily talk 
to each of the 22,000 students, but "I will 
see as many as I can," he says. 



l^ v 9HIISi 







i 



MSU's President Thomas Carpenter gets a lesson in computer technology from Tandy Corporation's 
Sid Agent (standing). The company presented the computer to the University in September. 




Looking mighty happy as they receive their J. Wayne Johnson Scholarship Awards are Melisha Hendrick, Jo Ann Longfield, 
Jean Bolton and Allen Dawson. President Carpenter presented the awards which are given annually by the Alumni 
Association and the Ambassador Board. 



218 President Carpenter 




WmBM 



Miss MSU, Sharon Russell, gets a congratulatory kiss from President Carpenter after her election. 




Grace Barger, President of Gamma Beta Phi, and other members of the honor 
society present Dr. Carpenter with an honorary membership. 



President Carpenter 219 




Though he enjoyed his college years, Dr. R. 
Eugene Smith, vice president for business and 
finance, says he is glad he doesn't have to compete 
with today's students. They are more sophisticated 
today and have a broader educational background, 
he believes. 

Working and studying kept him too busy for 
many activities, but the Lebanon, Tenn. native says 
it was still a lot of fun. He received his bachelor's 
degree from Middle Tennessee State College in 
1957 and went to work for the State of Tennessee as 
an auditor. He had moved up to the post of director 
before leaving government for Memphis State 
University, where he became auditor and budget 
director in 1963. He received his master's degree 
here in 1966 and his doctorate from the University 
of Mississippi in 1979. 

Dr. Smith also teaches a graduate course in 
finance at MSU and is a member of numerous 
professional organizations and committees. 

He is married to the former Anne Clement of 
Paris, Tenn., and they have three children: David, 
16; Daiel, 9 and Genie Anne, 13. 

— Ruth Turner 



Dr. Oliphant, who was born in Taylor, Miss., 
had spent a childhood of moving from state to state, 
wherever his father's job with Tenneco took them. 
After graduating from a Pennsylvania high school, 

he decided it was time to return "home." 

While a student, he was a member of the Society 
for the Advancement of Management; Alpha Kappa 
Psi, a business fraternity; Beta Gamma Sigma, and 
the Baptist Student Union. After receiving his 
bachelor of business administration in 1963, he 
went on to obtain his master's degree from Memphis 
State in 1964. In 1969 he received his doctorate 
from Mississippi State University. 

He then taught finance and economics and was a 
research assistant in the Manpower Center at 
Mississippi State. Later he became a professor of 
management in the Fogelman College of Business. 

Dr. Oliphant calls his 1975 trip to Japan a high 
point in his career. Representing Memphis State 
and speaking at the MSU sister institution, Chuo 
Gakuin University in Tokyo, was an experience he 
says he will never forget. He still stays in touch with 
some members of the Japanese university faculty. 

Dr. Oliphant and his wife, Carolyn, have one 
daughter, Renee, now 15. 

— Ruth Turner 




220 Administration 



Vice Presidents 



Sports played a big part in the life of Dr. Donald 
K. Carson, vice president of student services. "I 
think there's real value in athletics if it's not 
overdone," the one-time defensive back says. "It 
provided me with a college education!" 

Still an avid sports fan, Dr. Carson reminisced 
about his college life at the University of Kentucky 
which, in addition to the football team, also 
included serving as chairman of the Judicial Board 
and membership in Student Government and Sigma 
Chi fraternity. 

When he graduated in 1962, Dr. Carson went on 
to attend William Andrew Patterson School of 
Diplomacy, receiving his doctorate degree in 1966. 
Those years brought him more than a degree, 
however, for while a graduate student, he married 
his high school sweetheart, Felicia Shoemaker, of 
Oneida, Tenn. 

After completing his graduate work, Dr. Carson 
taught at Kentucky Southern College, now a part of 
Louisville University, and then at Georgetown 
College. He became dean of students at Marshall 
University in Huntington, W. Va., where he re- 
mained until coming to Memphis State as associate 
vice president for student affairs in 1974. 

The Carsons have three children: sons Chris, 16 
and Todd, 14 and a daughter Molly,9. 

—Ruth Turner 





Dr. Jerry Boone, vice president for academic 
affairs, needs all his skills in psychology to keep that 
busy office running smoothly. 

It was the Veteran's Administration Hospital 
which first drew Dr. Boone to Memphis, and his 
next move was to the Memphis Speech and Hearing 
Center. While working there as a psychologist, he 
began teaching part time at Memphis State, and the 
attachment grew. 

His clinical psychology and administration have 
a lot in common, Dr. Boone maintains saying, 
"You meet a lot of interesting people in both places; 
sometimes it's hard to tell the difference!" 

"I did everything you are supposed to do in high 
school," he claims. Then he went on to the University 
of Mississippi where he received a bachelor's degree 
in both speech and English. He sang with a quartet 
and was also on the debating team and says he 
enjoyed those college years enormously. "Unor- 
ganized fun is the best kind," he says. 

He then went to the University of Florida and 
received his master's degree in speech pathology 
and psychology. He taught speech pathology for 
the next five years before returning to school, this 
time, Vanderbilt University. After he completed his 
doctorate, Memphis beckoned. 

Dr. Boone and his wife, Doris, have five children 
ranging in age from 8 to 31. 

—Ruth Turner 



Administration 221 



ACADEMIC DEANS 



Dr. John H. Wakely, Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences, is a firm believer in the value of 
education. 

"I believe it is necessary to be educated, no matter 
what you want to do," he said. 

He believes even more specifically that a Liberal 
Arts education can best serve to enhance one's life, 
and has lived that belief by spending much of his 
own life obtaining it. 

Dean Wakely, a native of Mansfield, Ohio, 
started on his personal education road at the 
College of Wooster in Ohio, majoring in psychology. 
To finance that education, he worked at odd jobs 
which included being a shoe salesman, grocery 
store clerk and stevadore. 

He received his bachelor's degree in 1954 and 
then entered the armed forces where he served until 
1956. Upon returning to the United States, he 
entered North Carolina State where he received a 
master of science degree. He then went on to 
Michigan State University for his doctorate. 

His first job after graduating was with Corning 

Glassware in Corning, N. Y. It was not long until he 

returned to his real love, education. After teaching 

at several universities, he came to Memphis State in 

1980, becoming Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences. 

— Ruth Turner 



Dr. M.E. Bond, Dean of the Fogelman College 
of Business since 1979, was first interested in a 
career in economics, but changed his mind. It was a 
change he has never regretted. 

During the 1950s and 60s, he worked at odd jobs 
to pay his way through college — The University of 
Iowa — where this native of Bloomfield County, 
Iowa obtained his degree in business administration. 

While teaching some banking courses in 
Minnesota he discovered a new love. "I found that I 
really enjoyed teaching," he said. So back to Iowa 
he went to attend graduate school. 

He later began teaching at college level and has 
continued that career for 20 years. 




222 Administration 



Dr. Nicholas L. White, Dean of the Cecil C. 
Humphreys School of Law, believes that most of 
his goals in life have been fulfilled. "Things have 
fallen in place pretty well," he muses. 

Dr. White, a native of Ohio, said that his first 
goal was to go into his family's business, which he 
did after receiving a degree in business and 
economics. After several years the field of law 
began to interest him more and more, so he began 
law school in Cincinnatti. 

"I looked upon the law as a real opportunity to 
do some interesting and challenging work for the 
rest of my life," he said. 

After graduating from law school, he became a 
partner in a national law firm. But after 14 years, he 
decided he would really like to teach the subject he 
knew best. In addition, teaching has given him the 
freedom to pursue other matters pertaining to law, 
he said, adding that while he was in private practice, 
he did not have that kind of freedom. 

Dr. White will be retiring as dean at the end of 
this year, but plans to continue teaching and doing 
research. He has served as dean for seven years. 

—Ruth Turner 








Dr. Richard Ranta, Dean of the College 
of Communication and Fine Arts is the 
only dean that young college has had. He 
actually helped to create the college, which 
combines music, art, journalism and theatre 
and speech and became its dean in 1977. 

It's a happy combination for the dean 
who, in his college years, won a Best Actor 
Award and worked on local radio and 
television stations to pay his tuition. 

He came to Memphis State in 1972 as a 
professor in the communication department. 

The Minnesota native holds the reputa- 
tion as "campus workaholic", and with his 
many interests and activities probably does 
need more than 24 hours in his day. In 
addition to his Memphis State respon- 
sibilities, he is a force in the Grammy 
Awards, chairman of the Memphis and 
Shelby County Music Commission, has 
been on the board of Memphis Ballet/ Ballet 
South and Opera Memphis, works with 
the W^CNO Advisory Board and with 
Concerts International. 

Art and culture do not have a monopoly 

on his life, however, for he is an avid sailor 
and tennis player. 

"I like what I'm doing. I like the people 
and the college and the city. I like to feel 
that what I do can make a difference," he 
says. 



Administration 223 



A CADEMIC DEANS 



Dr. Orville E. Wheeler, dean of the Herff College 
of Engineering, is a pioneer from the Space Age. 

Wheeler, a native Memphian with an interest in 
architecture, attended Vanderbilt University. Since 
no major in architecture was offered, he chose to 
study civil engineering. He then attended the Uni- 
versity of Missouri where, in 1955, he received his 
masters of science in civil engineering. 

Between the years of 1955-59, Dr. Wheeler was a 
pilot and airship commander in the U.S. Navy. He 
was stationed at Lake Hurst, N.J. 

After he left the Navy, he worked for aircraft 
companies and the space program in Huntsville, 
Ala. during the early sixties. He said that during 
this period many people were working to put a man 
on the moon. "It was a decade of inventing on 
schedule," he now says. 

In 1972, Dr. Wheeler went to Milwaukee to work 
for Bucyrus-Erie Co., a manufacturer of strip- 
mining equipment. He was chief structural engineer 
there until 1978 when he became dean of the 
College of Engineering at Memphis State. 

Since coming to Memphis State, Dr. Wheeler has 
been a regional officer in the American Society for 
Engineering Education and a director of the 
Engineers Club of Memphis. 

Ruth Turner 




"I like teachers, I like books and 1 like students," 
said Dr. Ramsey Fowler, Dean of the University 
College. All those likes have come together to make 
his post the perfect job for him. 

Dr. Fowler, a native of Brooklyn, entered the 
world of higher education with a scholarship to 
Princeton University where he received his degree 
in education. Later he won a scholarship to Harvard 
University, where he received a master of arts 
degree. 

After graduating, he taught high school in Boston 
for two years and then returned to school himself. 
This time it was the University of Michigan, where 
he received his doctorate. 

In 1968, Dean Fowler came to Memphis State to 
work in the English department. During this time, 
he directed the sophomore and freshman English 
courses. He also worked in the development of a 
writing program and wrote the Little Brown Book. 

In 1980 he became Dean of the University 
College. 




224 Administration 



Dr. Robert L. Saunders, Dean of the College of 
Education, is the senior dean on the Memphis State 
campus. 

After obtaining degrees from Auburn University, 
Troy Teacher's College, Millsaps College and 
Franklin and Marshall College, Saunders started to 
make that contribution by teaching high school 
students. 

"I thought I was going to starve to death as a 
teacher," he said with a laugh, adding that he didn't 
have a car and had to work weekends to make ends 
meet. He moved up the administrative ladder, 
becoming a principal. 

People told him he was a good administrator, so 
after receiving his doctorate, he went into higher 
education administrative work. 



H. Joan Dodson, a native of Sparta, Tenn., says 
that she has never regretted going into the nursing 
field. "I like the feeling you get when helping 
someone," she said. 

Ms. Dodson, chairman for the Department of 
Nursing, said that working in this field provides an 
opportunity to assist people through life crises. 

Ms. Dodson studied at the University of 
Tennessee where she received a B. S. degree in 
nursing in 1958. 

In 1967, she decided to get a masters degree in 
education so that she could teach nursing. "I felt 
that I could help more people in this role," she said. 

She worked in this program until it was phased 
out in 1980 when the current B. S. N. Program was 
begun. Before joing the new B. S. N. Program, Ms. 
Dodson returned to the University of Tennessee 
Center for the Health Sciences where she received a 
masters degree in nursing in 1978. 

— Ruth Turner 








Dr. Dorothy A. Arata,Dean of the 
Graduate School, said the main thing she 
has wanted to do with her life is to 
contribute in some meaningful way. 

A native of New York City, Dr. Arata 
has spent a good part of her life learning. 
After attending high scool in Brooklyn, she 
studied chemistry at Brooklyn College, 
intending to become a doctor. She later 
received her master's from Cornell Uni- 
versity and her doctorate from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 



Administration 225 



Academic Administration 




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Dr. J. Ralph Randolph says he hopes 
the University Press will stimulate scholar- 
ship on the Memphis State campus, re- 
sulting in better teachers. He has held the 
job as director since October, 1979, and 
believes that progress has already begun. 

As director,Dr. Randolph oversees all 
operations of the Press and securing 
manuscripts. Right now, the Press is 
publishing the Tennessee County History 
Series. 

A graduate of the University of 
Albuquerque, he was an American history 
major, and that sense of history is obvious 
in the work of the Press. 

What about the future? 

Dr. Randolph says that if revenues 
improve, the Press will undertake some 
expansion. For himself, he hopes to get on 
with some more writing. 

Dr. Randolph is married and has three 
children. 

—Ruth Turner 



Being born in a log house in Tipton 
County, Tennessee, may have been a hum- 
ble beginning for Dr. John Y. Eubank Jr., 
but MSU's dean of Admissions and Re- 
cords has come a long way since then. 

He now handles student admissions, re- 
gistration, maintenance of records and 
issuance of student transcripts. 

Dean Eubank has been at Memphis 
State for 23 years. He received his bachelor's 
and master's degrees here and earned his 
doctorate at the University of Tennessee in 
history. 

Dean Eubank didn't have much time for 
extra-curricular activities during his own 
college days. He held several part-time jobs 
including working in the school cafeteria 
and in the laundry room of his dorm. He 
was also a campus representative for Camel 
cigarettes. 

Dean Eubank and his wife have a son at 
Baylor University and a daughter in junior 
college. 

—Ruth Turner 




226 Administration 




"Never stand still and never quit learn- 
ing," is the advice Dr. Victor Feisal gives 
MSU students. 

Dr. Feisal himself has been learning 
alot in his job as associate vice president 
for General Academic Administration. 
He said his job consists of coordinating 
the budgets of all academic units and over- 
seeing the employment, tenure, promotion 
and salary administration of facult. 

Born in Missouri, Dr. Feisal has been 
at Memphis State for 27 years. He earned 
his undergraduate degree at MSU, his 
master's at the University of Houston and 
his Ph.D. at the University of Georgia in 
microbiology. He has a son at Memphis 
State, a daughter soon to be here and 
another daughter in high school. 

What are his plans for the future? "Re- 
tirement," he said with a smile. 

—Ruth Turner 






Dr. John Dill saw his share of the 
country as he went about the business of 
getting an education. 

Now the associate vice president for 
academic affairs and academic programs 
at Memphis State University, he is a 
native of Washington, D.C. and did his 
undergraduate work at Howard Univer- 
sity. After receiving his bachelor of science 
degree, he moved on to New York City to 
obtain his master of arts degree from 
Columbia University and then to New 
York University for his doctorate in 
psychology. 

That preparation led him to Memphis 
State where in his present position he is 
responsible for all undergraduate aca- 
demic programs and curriculum. He deals 
with regulations and policies on all under- 
graduate degree requirements. He is also 
dean for independent academic programs 
which are not affiliated with any of the 
colleges. 

—Ruth Turner 




Administration 227 



Lester J. Pourciau, director of libraries at 
Memphis State, has been at the University for 14 
years. He has the general managerial responsibility 
for all university libraries with the exception of the 
law library. 

He received his bachelor of arts degree from 
Louisianna State University, where he majored in 
German, and then earned his masters degree in 
library science at that same university. 

He then attended Indiana University, obtaining a 
doctorate in academic library administration, 
information science and higher education. 

Dr Pourciau is an involved member of the 
academic community, having served on the Aca- 
demic Senate in 1971-72 and 1974-76. He was 
Senate vice chairman in 1975-76 and was winner of 
the Memphis State Administrative Staff Award in 
1982. 



Non traditional students. 

That's what Dean R. Wilson Walker calls 
Memphis State's evening students. He works closely 
with the 6,500 students who come to class when the 
other students go home, since he is the Dean of 
Evening Academic Services., 

Walker's office is a busy one, for it is, like one- 
stop shopping, responsible for providing all the 
University services to evening students. 

Dean Walker has been at Memphis State for 15 
years and has served in the Evening Academic post 
since 1977. 

Originally from Gibson County, Tenn., he 
attended Lambuth College in Jackson where he 
received his undergraduate degree. His graduate 
degrees were earned at George Peabody College in 
Nashville. 







"What we're looking for here is to develop an 
institution with research capabilities," says Dr. E.P. 
Segner, associate vice president for research. 

Dr. Segner has been at Memphis State for eight 
years and is responsible for coordinating all research 
activities at the University. 

He is from Austin, Texas, where he also attended 
college and received his bachelor's and master's 
degrees. He obtained his doctorate in structural 
engineering at Texas A & M. 

For the future, Dr. Segner says he hopes to help 
Memphis State develop research capabilities to a 
level consistent with the size and importance of this 
major state university. 

— Melissa Robbins 



228 Administration 




Dean Clarence O. Hampton, associate dean of 
students at Mephis Stae, says his real ambition in 
life was to be a coach. So after returning from the 
North Pacific Aleutian Islands where he was 
stationed during World War II, he enrolled at 
Lambuth College in Jackson, Tenn. He stayed true 
to that dream and received his bachelor of science 
degree with a major in physical education. 

During his undergraduate years, Dean Hampton 
was a member of several clubs, including Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. He also had the honor of being 
selected to Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. 

After graduation, he attended graduate school at 
Scarrith College in Nashville, majoring in religious 
education and also minoring in social work. In 
1955, he attended Memphis State where he received 
a master of education degree in guidance and 
personal services. He has also done postgraduate 
work in guidance, personal services and admin- 
istration for higher education. 

During the 1970s, Dean Hampton worked as a 
probation officer, often serving as a counselor to 
juvenile delinquents. Comparing that job to his 
present work, he says his biggest adjustment was 
the change from being a counseling friend to an 
authority figure. 



"I have never really been out of school 
since I started the first grade," says Jo 
Strickland, adviser to the Student Activities 
Council. 

Explaining that school has been a lifetime 
home for her, Ms. Strickland, a native of 
Clearwater, Fla., says she has been in 
school one way or another for a long time 
and has always enjoyed it. 

Ms. Strickland began college at Stetson 
University in Deland, Fla. Before receiving 
a bachelor's degree in history in 1977, she 
was very active on campus. 

She returned to Memphis State to work 
on a masters degree in guidance counseling. 

After graduating, Ms. Strickland worked 
at Christian Brothers College, in the 
admissions department. In 1980 she became 
MSU assistant adviser to University Pro- 
grams. In 1 982 she was promoted to adviser. 
Her position includes working with such 
committees as Fashion Board, special 
events and speakers, all of which she says 
she thoroughly enjoys. 




Administration 229 




Working with a big company was the 
original ambition of John Jay Anderson 
director of University Center. 

A native of Logan, Utah, Anderson 
attended Utah State University. He majored 
in business administration, following boy- 
hood instincts. Anderson said he pictured 
himself with a job in accounting. Then, he 
said he realized that would be a mistake. "I 
couldn't sit for eight hours a day!" he said. 
After being graduated, he was a military 
personnel officer for two years. 

When Anderson returned from service, 
he became program director of Utah State's 
University Center. In 1968, he accepted the 
directorship of MSU's University Center. 

Anderson said he found considerable 
satisfaction in his job. "It's a never ending 
diversity of activities that keeps me in- 
terested, programs come and go. The real 
excitement is watching the developement 
of a student," he said. 

Anderson is firm in his beliefs about the 
importance of outside activities. He said, 
"The right amount of extracurricular 
activities is advantageous to any individual. 



STUDENT EDUCATIONAL SERVICE 



Adviser for Greek Affairs, Ms. Mindy 
Sopher, has made college life her career. "I 
wanted to be a continual student and a 
continual educator," she said. 

A native of Grove City, Penn., she 
started college majoring in political science 
at Wittenberg University in Springfield, 
Ohio. 

As an undergraduate, she was president 
of Kappa Delta sorority and the Residence 
Hall councel. She also helped write the 
school's mission statement which created a 
safe and healthy campus. 

Though her main interest was politics, 
she was greatly influenced by college life- 
styles. She said she believes in living up to 
the vows of her sorority. 

Later, she attended Bowling Green State 
University. She received a Master of Arts 
in college student personnel. Then, she 
became involved with Greek affairs at 
Heidelberg College in Tiffin, Ohio. 

Before coming to MSU this year, she 
was involved with several Greek organi- 
zations at numerous universities. She said 
MSU is a very pleasant place to work 
because the people are warm. She said, "I 
can tell people are very loyal to Memphis 
State." 




230 Administration 



Marriage and family counseling was the 
primary ambition of Dr. Dewaine Rice, 
director of resident life at MSU. That idea 
slowly changed after he realized working at 
a university would be more interesting. 
"There's something about a college campus 
that's invigorating," he said. 



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Dr. Rice said his undergraduate years at 
University of Central Arkansas in Conway 
were delightful He was a member of the 
residence counsel and the psychology club. 
Before receiving a bachelor of science in 
psychology in 1971, he was married. 

After being graduated, Dr. Rice, a Little 
Rock native, taught junior high school 
science in West Memphis. In 1974 he 
entered MSU's graduate school. 

Dr. Rice worked as a graduate assistant. 
He said it didn't take long to become 
enthralled by the administrative aspect of 
the University. 

By 1975, Dr. Rice became assistant director 
of residence life. After only two years, he 
was promoted to director. 



Dr. Robert A. Marczynski, assistant 
dean for Student Judicial Affairs, has been 
involved with residence life most of his 
career. 

A native of Lansing, Mich., Dr. 
Marczynski is a lawyer who worked in the 
residence life office during his law school 
days at the University of Toledo in Toledo, 
Ohio. 

"I tried to combine my law backgound 
with my higher education background," he 
said. And Dr. Marczynski is still combining 
the two in his current job which deals with 
student discipline. 

Even though he may see the bad side, 
Dr. Marczynski says he enjoys working on 
a college campus. His first enjoyment of 
campus life came when he attended John 
Karroll University, where he received a 
degree in economics. He earned his law 
degree at Toledo in 1981, and got his 
Tennessee law certificate in 1982. 

While an undergraduate, he was a 
member of many clubs and the recipient of 
many honors including being named to the 
National Dean's List. 



Administration 231 



Student Educational Services 




"I am not doing what I prepared to do at age 18" 
said Dr. Marion F. Emslie, associate dean of 
students at Memphis State University. 

Despite an interest in law, she began her under- 
graduate career at Boston University in English. 
However, Dr. Emslie was soon wooed into Public 
Relations and Communications. 

The exciting and artistic opportunities she 
envisioned as a writer propelled her into countless 
activities. She said living and learning are prere- 
quisites to being a good writer. 

After receiving a bacclaureate in Communications 
in 1961, Dr. Emslie successfully explored com- 
mercial writing. VVGBH, the prominent educational 
Boston television is listed as only one of Dr. 
Emslie's clients. 

To satisfy her need for learning, she entered 
Northeastern University. Pursuing a Master of 
Education, her area of interest was American 
history and diplomacy. 

Even with two strong degrees and solid work 
experience, Dr. Emslie was not satisfied. Prior to 
coming to Memphis State in 1977, Dr. Emslie 
received a Doctorate in Higher Education Ad- 
ministration from the University of Virginia. 

Dr. Emslie said she feels the variety of skills, 

especially writing, and experiences she accrued are 

a plus in all types fo careers. 

— Ruth Turner 



Having a dream is a must, according to 
Dean Arthur Holmon, associate dean for 
Minority Affairs at Memphis State. 

Earning a football scholarship and 
working at an ice house in Nashville, 
Holmon, a native Memphian, sought to 
fulfill his dream by attending Tennessee 
State. 

Though he had no ambition to go to the 
pros, Holmon was drafted by the Minnesota 
Vikings. He played one pro year, but an 
injury ended that possible career. 

Holmon returned to Tennessee State 
and received a degree in history. He then 
taught and coached in the Memphis school 
system for nine years. During that time he 
earned a Master's in Secondary Education 
from Memphis State. 

In the early 70s, Holmon became an 
assistant dean of students at MSU and 
worked primarily with minority students. 




232 Administration 




The Coordinator of Academic Coun- 
seling at MSU, Ms. Dorothy Dodson, said 
she was drawn into University work. 

A teacher at jackson, Tenn., Junior high 
school, ms. Dodson heard an MSU speaker 
discuss academic counseling. "You've just 
described the only counseling job I'll give 
you a nickel for," she said. 

But Ms. Dodson's career started at a 
much earlier age. She said during her 
elementary school days at Alamo, Tenn., 
she often helped her aunt teach. She said 
she often was asubstitute teacher. 

Ms. Dodson earned a biology degree 
along with an elementary teacher's certi- 
ficate from Lambuth College. 

Immediately after her trip to the Orient, 
Ms. Dodson came to Memphis to teach at 
Hollywood Jr. High. She also enrolled in 
MSU's graduate program. With a Master's 
degree in counseling, she returned to 
Hollywook Jr. High. 

She soon became Academic Counselor 
at MSU. After eight years she became the 
Coordinator of Academic Counseling. Ms. 
Dodson said she continuse to be involved. 
"That's just my life," she said. 

— Ruth Turner 









"Ever since high school, I've had a great interest 
in people and their potential," said Dr. Dennis 
Heitzmann, director of the Center for Student 
Development. 

Dr. Heitzmann, a native of Chicago, received a 
B.A. in psychology from Notern Illinois University 
in 1968. To pay his way through college he drove 
delivery trucks through rioting Chicago. He also 
worked on the loading docks. 

Dr. Heitzmann received an M.A. in counseling 
psychology from DePaul University in Chicago in 
197 1 and earned his Ph.D. in counseling psychology 
at the University of Texas at Austin in 1974. 

Dr. Heitzmann moved from Texas to Memphis, 
originally to Southwestern University where he 
taught in the Psychology Department and worked 
as a counselor. In 1977 he came to Memphis State 
to direct the Center for Student Deelopment. His 
present duties range from monitoring the center's 
budget to counseling students. 

Dr. Heitzmann said he continues to find 
psychology fascinating and stimulating and that it 
really applies to all facets of his work. "The 
knowledge of psychology and the knowledge of 
people help me to be a better administrator," he 
said. 

—Ruth Turner 




Administration 233 



STUDENT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 



Walter S. Warren, Director of Placement Ser- 
vices, said that his job is to help students sell 
themselves to prospective employers. 

"I believe everybody is selling a product, idea, or 
themselves in everything they do," he said. 

Warren, a native of Union City, TN, wanted a 
career which involved selling. He started moving 
toward this goal when he began attending Memphis 
State during the days of Win Wilfong. He graduated 
from MSU in 1958 with a degree in marketing. 

After graduating, he worked for International 
Harvester and Ford Motor Company in Memphis. 
When he came to MSU's Placement in 1968 to look 
for a job, he was hired by the placement department. 
While working there, he received his masters degree 
in marketing. 

In explaining the transition he made from selling 
products to selling people, Warren pinpointed the 
major difference: a product doesn't have a 
personality. 

Warren has had many honors, including being 
the president of three organizations: Tennessee 
College Placement Association, Southern College 
Placement Association and the College Placement 
Council. 




Allen J. Hammond, Director of Student Financial 
Aid, saJ he likes being in the business of helping 
people. 

Hammond, a native of Memphis, started working 
toward his career goals when he attended LeMoyne 
Owen College to study biology and science. His 
studies were interrupted when he was drafted into 
the army in the early sixties during the Berlin Crisis. 

While in the army, he became a member of the 
Presidential Honor Guard where he performed 
ceremonial duties for President Kennedy. 

After serving two years in the army, Hammond 
returned to LeMoyne Owen where he received a 
degree in biology and science. After graduating, he 
taught in the Memphis City School System for six 
years. 

In 1968, he received a masters degree in guidance 
counseling. In 1970, he started working at Memphis 
State as a counselor in the financial aid office. In 
1973, he became director of the department. 




234 Administration 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 




Memphis State's Director of University Com- 
munity Relations, Charles Holmes, has his roots in 
Memphis. He's a graduate of Memphis State with 
bachelors' in both journalism and English. 

During his college years, Holmes was a frequent 
participant in extra-curricular activities. Beyond 
his time-consuming position as editor of the student 
newspaper (then the "Tiger Rag"), he was a member 
of Pi Delta Epsilon, journalism honorary. He said 
he believes being involved in on-campus activities 
helps a student become more oriented and gives a 
student better visibility on campus. 

After graduation, Holmes served two years in the 
Army and worked for the next five years with The 
Commercial Appeal. 

Holmes has been with Memphis State since 1962. 
He serves as counsel to President Thomas 
Carpenter in addition to administering the Uni- 
versity's public relations efforts. 

—Ruth Turner 



Billy J. Murphy, assistant to the President for 
Athletics, has been a winner ever since he got to 
Memphis State University. Not only was he one of 
the nation's winningest football coaches during his 
Tiger reign, but he also won top laurels as Athletic 
Director, a post he assumed in 1966. 

In addition to establishing MSU as a southern 
gridiron power, Murphy has led the University to a 
self-sustaining athletic program and to some of the 
finest athletic facilities in the region. 

Under his leadership, the Tigers took three M VC 
conference titles, and Murphy was voted MVC 
Coach of the Year three of his four years in the 
conference. He was inducted into the Tennessee 
Sports Hall of Fame in 1975. 

A graduate of Mississippi State, where he starred 
as a tailback in 1941 and 1942, Murphy left school 
for service in the United States Marine Corps. He 
served in the Pacific Theater from 1943 to 1945, 
then returned to Mississippi State and captained 
the Bulldogs in his final year. 

He is a native of Siloam Springs, Ark. and is 
married to the former Elizabeth Parrish of Stark- 
ville. The Murphys have two children. 




Administration 235 




Fred Simmons has been assistant to the president 
since his arrival at Memphis State in March, 1 98 1 . 
He grew up in Archer, Fla., and spent time in the 
military before attending college. 

A graduate of the University of Florida, Simmons 
majored in economics. He has specialized in 
university development, having helped establish 
several colleges in Florida before being brought to 
Memphis State. 

One of Simmons' many job responsibilities is to 
monitor Memphis State's computer system. He 
oversees inventory space for the University's com- 
puters, determining if there is enough space for the 
system's hardware. 

Simmons said he believes extra-curricular acti- 
vities such as social clubs and organizations 
contribute much to a student's maturity and 
learning, beyond an individual's academic obli- 
gations 

—Ruth Turner 



Charles Cavagnaro, Memphis State's 
Athletic Director since November, 1982, 
came to the campus via The Commercial 
Appeal. 

Cavagnaro had been sports editor and 
metropolitan editor of the newspaper before 
taking on the athletic director's post. But 
his experiences have extended beyond 
writing about the sports scene to managing, 
for he was general manager of the Memphis 
Pros, a professional basketball team, in 
1970. He was the youngest general manager 
in professional basketball at that time. 

He then returned to the Commercial 
Appeal and worked as night metropolitan 
editor, executive sports editor, assistant 
managing editor and finally metropolitan 
editor. 

A lifelong Memphian, Cavagnaro at- 
tended elementary and high school in 
Memphis, and received a Bachelor of 
Science degree in journalism from Memphis 
State in 1966. He began working for the 
Commercial Appeal while he was still a 
freshman at Memphis State. 

He is co-author of the History of Ole 
Miss Football, and is credited with starting 
the Crime Stoppers Program. 

He and his wife Pat have three children, 
one of whom is a freshman at Memphis 
State. 












236 Administration 




Chairman of the Academic Senate is Dr. 
Coy A. Jones, assistant professor of 
management in the Fogelman College of 
Business and Economics. 

Dr. Jones, who is in his third year at 
Memphis State, has served on the Senate 
for two years. 

The Senate, made up of both faculty and 
administrators, makes formal and specific 
recommendations to the President, and 
through him, to the State Board of Regents, 
on all matters of University policy in which 
the faculty has a concern. It is organized to 
include faculty decisions in the governing 
of the University and to serve as a forum 
for determining and expressing the official 
opinion of the faculty and other academic 
personnel. 

Dr. Jones, who is in his first year as 
chairman of the Senate, completed his 
undergraduate work at the University of 
Oklahoma before going on to Central 
State University for his Master of Business 
Administration degree. He returned to the 
University of Oklahoma to complete his 
doctoral degree. 



Administrative 

Staff 




An all-around athlete herself, Elma 
Roane has helped to move the Memphis 
State women's athletic program for nearly 
40 ysars. Now Assistant Director for 
Women's Athletics, she is proud of both 
the program's growth and excellence. 

She was selected to the Memphis Park 
Commission's Hall of Fame in softball in 
1973 and that same year also received the 
award of which she is especially proud: the 
award of the Southern District of the 
Association of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation. The award is given to 
those who have shown excellence as a 
teacher and given outstanding service and 
leadership in the areas of health, physical 
education and recreation. 

She also received a Certificate of Re- 
cognition from the Tennessee Commission 
on the Status of Women for "her out- 
standing efforts in promoting opportunities 
for women in athletics and physical edu- 
cation.". In 1980 she was the first woman 
to be inducted into Memphis State's "M" 
Club Hall of Fame, and then in 1982 was 
named to the Tennessee State Hall of 
Fame. 



Aministration 237 



Mrs. M. Jean Nelms, Coordinator of 
Veterans Services, is a veteran of Memphis 
State. 

A country girl from Finger, Tenn., she 
transferred from Freed-Hardeman College 
in Henderson, Tenn., to Memphis State in 
1967. As a student, she worked in Scates 
Hall, the same building in which her office 
is presently located. She received a bachelor 
of science degree in education from 
Memphis State in January, 1969 





After graduating, Ms. Nelms taught 
junior high school in Selmer, Tenn. Later, 
she moved to Memphis where she worked 
as a receptionist and bookkeeper. She 
became a secretary in the Veterans Services 
office at Memphis State in 1973, and later 
began working on her masters degree in 
guidance and personnel services. 

"Coming to work at Memphis State was 
like coming home," she said. She became 
Coordinator of Veterans Affairs at Shelby 
State Community College in the spring of 
1977 and received her masters degree that 
fall. 

After serving at Shelby State for over 
two and a half years, she returned to MSU 
as Coordinator of Veterans Services. "It 
was like coming home all over again," she 
said. 



Donna Sparger, Director of Handicapped 
Services, grew up in Pilot Mountain, N.C. 

She attended Appalacian University in 
Boone, N.C. In 1964, she received a bachelors 
degree in business education and in 1968 a 
masters degree in school coun seling from that 
same university 

After her graduation, Ms. Sparger taught 
for four years before becoming a counselor 
for the Tennessee Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. She held that post four years 
and then became director for the Tennessee 
Client Assistance Project before coming to 
Memphis State as Director of Handicapped 
Services. 

Ms. Sparger is currently active in the 
Association of the Handicapped Student 
Service Programs in Post-Secondary Ed- 
ucation. 

— Ruth Turner 



238 Administration 




Dr. David A. Collins, an assistant to the 
vice president for Business and Finance 
was born in 1927 in Greenville, S.C. 

Dean Collins served two years in the 
Navy and moved to Washington, D.C. to 
work as a clerk for the FBI. 

Earning his bacheor's degree in history 
in 1953, Dean Collins worked in the 
admissions department at Presbyterian 
College and moved to Memphis in 1954 as 
a field representative for Pi Kappa Alpha's 
national headquarters. He was married 
and became associate director of the 
fraternity during those years. 

Collins enrolled at Memphis State's 
graduate school where he earned a Master's 
in Educational Administration and then 
took a position as assistant dean of students 
at Auburn University in Alabama. 

In 1964, he returned to Memphis State 
as assistant dean of students and later 
became assistant to the vice president of 
student educational services and coor- 
dinator of religious activities, a job he still 
holds. 



STUDENT EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 



"Working with students tends to make me feel 
young," said Teresa Loser, adviser for New Student 
Orientation and Religious Affairs. 

A love of working with students steared Ms. 
Loser, a Muncie, Ind. resident, into education. She 
said she wanted to do more in life than teach, 
though. 

Recalling college life in the mid 1970's, she said 
those days were the best memories of her life. 
"Greek life was my main background, I wouldn't be 
here today if 1 hadn't been in a sorority," she said. 

Ms. Loser was a member of the Indiana University 
Student Foundation and Sigma Kappa sorority. "I 
got more out of school because of outside activities," 
she said. She said she believed the extracurricular 
involvement during college is as important as the 
academic aspects. 

Her Bachelor of Science Degree in Education in 
hand, Ms. Loser began traveling as a field con- 
sultant. Soon, however, she enrolled at Kent Uni- 
versity graduate school. Prior to receiving a Masters 
in Student Personnel Administration, she worked 
as an adviser to the Pan-Hellinic women's counsel. 

In 1983 Ms. Loser came to Memphis State. She 
said the main objective of her job is helping students 
get the most out of their organizational experiences. 

— Ruth Turner 




Administration 239 



Features and Faces 




Lisa Hatchett 



Pholo by Cedric B. Woodson 



Beautiful People 

Beauty pageants give girls a chance to 
show off their beauty and talent. But that 
is not all, Jo Strickland, program adviser 
for the Student Activities Council, said. 
The contests also provide the girls with a 
means to earn money to further their 
education. 

And the girls from Memphis State Uni- 
versity are taking advantage of the oppor- 
tunity. Last year, five MSU girls won 
local pageants to go on to Miss Tennessee. 
This year two girls went on to capture 
spots. But going on to other contests is 
not the main reason many of the girls get 
into beauty contest. 

Lisa Hatchett, Miss Memphis and a 
member of the MSU Homecoming Court 
said, "I've gained self-confidence, devel- 
oped my public relation skills and met a 
lot of people." 




Sharon Russeil 



Miss Hatchett, a senior broadcast com- 
munications major and the assistant 
manager at the campus radio station 
WSMS, said the hardest things she has to 
cope with are people's preconceived no- 
tions of Miss Memphis and the busy 
schedule she has now. 

Miss Hatchett said this has been one of 
the biggest years of her life. She does not 
plan to continue with the beauty contest, 
but would like to pursue her career in 
broadcasting. 

On the other end of the beauty con- 
testant spectrum is Sharon Russell, the 
reigning Miss Memphis State. This jun- 
ior broadcast communications major has 
been in beauty pagents since she was 10 
years old. Over the years she has accumu- 
lated over 300 trophies and 100 crowns. 

Miss Russell agrees that the pageants 
have been beneficial because she got a 
chance to meet more people and she did 
enjoy the publicity. 

Janie Taylor, the Maid of Cotton, did 
not go on to the Miss Tennessee contest, 
but she said she felt excited about winning 
her contest. 



Photo bj Clayton Rted 



240 People 




Photos by MSU Photo Services 



Mobile is 
no swinger 

Jane Poodry, an associate professor of 
design at MSU, has designed a mobile 
which hangs immobile in the student lounge 
area of the Fogelman College of Business 
and Economics. And she would like to see 
someone 'get things moving'. 

The large art mobile has a mobility 
problem which "can and should be cured," 
according to Poodry. 

"It needs crosscurent fans, ".she ex- 
plained. There's not enough wind to make 
anything rotate in there. Sometimes when 
a large crowd is leaving classes from dif- 
ferent directions, it generates enough wind 
to move it, but only barely, "she said with a 
note of dismay. 

There is a small fan in the balcony, but 
Poodry recalls one of the engineers who 
installed the mobile remarked that he had a 
fan in his fireplace bigger than that one. 

The 800 pound mobile, which measures 
1 2 feet wide and 1 8 feet long is a wonderful 
spectacle of color and design. 

For 40 years, Poodry has designed floats, 
costumes, pageants and theatrical sets, but 
said the "Blue Chip" mobile, as it is nomed, 
is her largest work to date and she would 
like to continue working on a "grand 
scale". 

She would still like to see "Blue Chip"in 
action. "As a designer, 1 don't have the 
power to make someone get it operating; 
however, 1 would like to see it moving. It 
only needs the proper installation of ade- 
quate fans," she said. 




People 241 



Features and Faces 



RA 

Loves 
Work 




Don't talk about a free room to resident 
advisers. They know that room is far from 
free — it's hard-earned, every square inch of 
it. 

But first year resident adviser Kathy 
Fields says that the friendships she has 
formed have made the work well worth the 
effort. 

Kathy works the Mynders Hall desk for 
five hours each week, and has enjoyed 
getting to know everyone in the dorm. "I 
applied for the job because 1 think I can 
relate to the residents well, since we are on 
the same age level," she says. 

She does not want residents on her floor 
to think of her as "just an RA", but also as 
a friend who can help with their problems. 
The main goal is to establish one-on-one 
friendships with her residents, she adds. 

Resident advisers, in addition to putting 
in five hours on the desk each week, must 
also take a 24 hour duty twice a week. Only 
class time is excepted. A new R A must also 
take a counseling class for one semester. 

Kathy, who is a 1982 graduate of Fayette 
Ware High School in Summerville, Tenn., 
is a sophomore accounting major at 
Memphis State. 



Photo by Clayton Reed 




•'hoto by Emily Belote 

Jama Cartwright, a student teacher at the Campus School, explains the basics of Geometry to her students. 



242 People 




Student teacher Wanda Johnson answers a question. 



Photo by Emily Belote 




Students 

Teaching 
Students 



Jama Cartwright returns homework papers to her students. 



Photo by Emily Belote 



The student teaching experience helps 
prepare teachers to handle situations that 
no textbook could adequately descibe. 

For most educators, their days of student 
teaching are something which they remem- 
ber in later years with a smile, even if they 
found it difficult to muster a smile at the 
time 

Sharon Martin had one such experience. 

While most women highly value a youth- 
ful appearance, Ms. Martin, an MSU 
secondary education major, found her 
"babyface"toto be more of an aggravation 
than an asset while teaching at Wooddale 
Junior High School. 

When she entered the school on her first 
morning, she was met disapprovingly by a 
group of teachers in the hall. "They stopped 
me and asked where I was going," Martin 
said. After she explained to them that she 
was a teacher, not a student, they let her go 
on her way. 

Before Martin could make it up the 
stairs to her classroom, she heard the 
booming voice of the vice principal saying, 
"Young lady, where are you supposed to 
be?" Once again, she explained who she 
was and where she "was supposed to be." 

Ms. Martin said she enjoyed student 
teaching after she finally made it from the 
hall into the classroom. 

Of course, student teachers have to deal 
with more weighty problems than making 
it down the hall without a hall pass. 

Sharon Sorlie, a secondary education 
major, encountered a situation that raised 
serious questions in her mind while student 
teaching in a special education class at 
Wooddale Junior High. 

After having an incoherent conversation 
with one of the students in the class, she 
wondered if the student were indeed re- 
tarded, or if he had been mistakenly clas- 
sified as retarded because of some emo- 
tional problems. 

Sorlie explained that it is sometimes 
difficult to differentiate between retardation 
and emotional disturbance. It is important 
for teachers to get to know their students 
and observe any possible problems which 
may need attention. 

Student teaching can be both weird and 
wonderful, but it is an important part of 
preparing MSU education majors to 
become competent teachers. 



People 243 



Memories Live On Beale 



Imagine yourself waiting tables in a busy 
restaurant: taking orders, serving drinks, 
running food, keeping water glasses filled 
— the works. 

Now imagine that in your spare time 
between these duties you must hop onstage 
and sing a song or two before you can go 
back to check on your tables. 

As nerve-racking as it sounds, that's 
exactly what several Memphis State 
students do every night to earn a living. 

The restaurant is Memphis Memories, 
located at the corner of Fourth and Beale, 
and its distinction lies in that the waiters 
and waitresses entertain with their melodious 
talents, as well as hustle between the kitchen 
and the tables, to keep their customers 
satisfied. 

The search for such talented "wait- 
persons" led Otto Gross, the restaurant's 
owner, and Walter Dunn, the general 
manager, to Memphis State. Dr. David 
Russell Williams, chairman of the music 
department, was happy to assist them. 

"I thought we had some people who had 
that talent, so I gave them a list of names," 
said Williams. 

There is a general consensus among the 
employees that the idea, which was inspired 
by a similar restaurant in Nashville — the 



Chattanooga Choo Choo — is a good one. 

"1 think the customers enjoy having the 
waiters and waitresses sing and that makes 
working here all that more enjoyable," said 
Ian Bourg, a graduate student majoring in 
opera. "I could wait tables anywhere, but 
here I get to entertain as well as make a 
living." 

Bourg, who sings such songs as "Blue 
Suede Shoes," "Teddy Bear," and "Can't 
Help Falling in Love," said that he worked 
in a restaurant with a similar format in 
Kansas City, but that the music at Memories 
is more "oriented around Memphis." 

Joyce McKinney, a 19-year-old freshman 
said, "I love working here. It's exciting. It's 
a challenge to get the food out hot while 
keeping the audience hot with my voice. 

"Singing is my way of life, now, my 
income. I plan to sing later on, but as a 
hobby; I'm going into interior design, "said 
Ms. McKinney, who never before sang 
professionally but "in every high school 
program I was singing a solo." 

Ms. McKinney sings the restaurant's 
theme song, "Memories" ("The Way We 
Were"), and others such as "Inseparable", 
and "Feel that Old Feeling". 

"It's a good idea, a very good idea," said 
Royce Mitchell, senior. "Beale Street will 



attract a lot of people from out of town and 
this is a good way to expose your talents." 

Mitchell, a senior majoring in Theater 
and Communication, said that he hopes to 
go to California to "make my dreams come 
true. Meanwhile the experience I get here 
as a waiter will be extremely valuable to 
me." 

Becky Eason Burkett has a different 
opinion. 

"I was hoping to never have to wait 
tables again, but it's okay. I enjoy singing 
and working with the people." 

Burkett is a graduate student working 
on a master of arts with a concentration in 
jazz composition and studio production. 
She said that she is finishing an album side 
for her thesis project that will include two 
other Memories employees: Chris Bryars 
on drums and Ray Barbett on bass. 

"It's mostly Top 40, jazz." said Burkett, 
who performs "Natural Woman", "If 
Loving You is Wrong", and "Come in from 
the Rain". 

Memphis Memories' has entertainment 
nightly. The first show starts at 7 p.m. and 
lasts about 45 minutes, and is followed by 
two more shows each about 30 minutes 
apart. 

— Jim Allen 




244 Memories 




•-1. 






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-;,, -.,:■■. , : :;:.. 







TAKING 

A 
BREAK 




246 People 



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People 247 




248 Organizations 






Wanna make this big campus seem a little 
bit smaller and friendlier? Then join an MSU 
organization. There are plenty to choose 
from and at least one is probably just right 
for you. 

The organizations here on campus consist 
of many different types of people and do 
many different things. They sponsor many 
activities such as the Homecoming elections, 
blood drives, book co-ops, speakers and 
much more. 

However they are not all fun and games. 
They serve a big purpose here at MSU — 
helping the students to get involved, helping 
them to set goals for their lives, and even 
more, helping them to achieve those goals. 

So, if you'd really like to make some new 
friends and get involved then one (or more) 
of the MSU organizations is for you. And 
there couldn't be a better time than now 
because Memphis State's organizations are 
BETTER THAN EVER. 



r 



fi*4wt 



*\ 



Student Ambassador 




Board 


250 


Resident Advisors 


251 


Student Government 




Association 


252 


Student Activities 




Council 


258 


Student Interfaith 




Council 


262 


Christian Student Center 


264 


Baptist Student Union 


265 


Black Student 




Association 


266 


ASCE 


267 


University Center 


267 


Housing and Home 




Furnishing 


268 


Memphis State Planning 




Association 


268 


Students of Personnel 




Administration 


269 


Insurance Club 


269 


Blue Chippers 


270 


Russion Culture Club 


271 



Organizations 



Angie Aviotti 
Joan Bolton 

vice president for special events 
Joanna Burke 
Ann Burton 
Sarah Carroll 

social chairman 

Tina Coda 
Caryn Coffey 

Allen Dawson 

vice president for development 
Cathy Diel 
Sharon Elliott 
Wes Ellis 

president 
Phil Feisal 
Julie Frazier 
Kevin Garner 

Vickie Garrett 

reporter historian 
Amy George 
Donna Giddings 
John Hartney 
Jan Hubbard 
Gordon Kelly 
Lori Kessler 

Michele Lockhart 
Kenneth Madden 
Amy Martin 

vice president for student relations 
Shiela Murphy 
Morgan Pickel 

vice president for public relations 
Brent Robertson 
Paul Schifani 

Bill Snodgras 
Tom Avoboda 
Julie Thompson 
Susie Thompson 
Lisa Turner 

secretary/ treasurer 
Kevin Vaughan 
Beth Windsor 

Conde Windsor 
Debra Young 





Host and hostess with the mostess? 

That's the Student Ambassador Board, 
whose members serve as official hosts and 
hostesses for the University. 

Organized in 1972, the Board has taken 
over the major project of providing campus 
tours for all incoming freshmen. The group 
meets twice monthly at the Alumni Center. 

Officers include Wes Ellis, president, 
and vice presidents Amy Martin, student 
affairs; Morgan Pickel, public relations; 
Allen Dawson, development; Jean Bolton, 
special events; Sarah Carroll, social events; 
Jon Albright, alumni/ hospitality; Debra 
Young, historian, and Lisa Turner, secre- 
tary. Bobby Plunk serves as adviser. 



Student Ambassador Board 



250 Student Ambassador Board 



Resident Advisors 



f 



:- 





The Resident Advisors: Front Row: Karma Bruce— Hall Director, Penne Singleton, Shiela Murphy, Jenina Cantler, Melanie Wook ward, Renee 
Swisher, Dottie Souder— Hall Director. Second Row: Julia Stock, Vikita Partee, June Peoples, Kim Belleque, Shearon Weems, Angela Grubbs, 
Teresa Mull, Melissa Smith. Third Row Janice Hughlett, Lynn-Rochelle Pilkerton, Kathy Fields, Babbette Bryan, Gene Consterdise, Wandra 
Delly, Marry Moitozo, Willie Wimbly. Fourth Row: Lee Proctor— Hall Director, Dayne Hill, Foster Hudson, Kathy Griesinger, Pat Glasco, 
Felicia Hess, Lee Faulkner. Fifth Row: Rima Powers— Hall Director, Mike Brock, Nick McCaldo, Vince Wardlaw, Kevin Bonner, Tammy 
Carson, Rob Herd. Sixth Row: Lisa Miller, Paul Bawell, Luther Dewalt, Tom Der, Terry Nichols, Craig Corey — Program Coordinator. Back 
Row: Steve Morley — Hall Director, Jeff Etheridge, Jack Cleminshaw, Jim Coleman, Bill Evans, Raja Issa— Head Resident, Richard Hudson. 



66 



Few Limits to This Job/' says busy RA 



Need a shoulder to cry on? 

Need someone to hold down that noise 
level? 

Whatever is needed in your campus 
home away from home — the residence 
hall — your resident advisor will try to 
supply. 

Memphis State University operates four 
residence halls for men and six for women, 
and although no one is required to live in 
the dorms, they are very popular places 
indeed. Residents are accepted on a first 
come, first-served basis, so applications 
never stop at the Office of Residence Life. 

Once you've made it into a dorm, look 
first for that indispensible resident adviser. 

RA's are selected each spring on the 
basis of group and personal interviews. All 



are fulltime students with a GPA of no less 
than 2.25. All have lived in a residence hall 
for at least one semester, so they are 
familiar with all the rules, regulations and 
problems which may arise. One RA is 
assigned to each residence floor. Their 
work knows few limits: it may range from 
opening up a door for a locked-out student 
to solving some pretty weighty personal 
problems. As a former RA said, "We are 
responsible for the men or women on our 
floor. It's our job to help in any way we 
can." 

That help includes making sure that all 
dorm rules are followed and programming. 
RA's provide a monthly program, either 
social or educational, for the residents of 
their floor. 



"No two days are ever alike," another 
former RA commented. "We can be up all 
night if something serious happens, or we 
can have a whole day where nothing at all 
goes on." There can be times when this 
"part-time" job looks like anything but, 
and the variety of demands seems over- 
whelming. "It can be a really hard job, "she 
says but the rewards can be enormous. 

The largest residence hall on the MSU 
campus is Richardson, with its two towers. 
The smallest men's dorm is Newport and 
the smallest women's dorm McCord. There 
are no coed dorms at MSU, but visitation 
rights run from noon until 2 a.m. Friday 
and Saturday, and noon to midnight the 
rest of the week. 



Student Life 251 



Student Government Association 



The Student Government Association 
(SGA) at Memphis State University is the 
governing board for student policy recom- 
mendations. 

Composed of students elected by the 
MSU student body, the group has a list of 
continuing activities including: Schlitz Belle 
Hospitality Night, Book Co-op, Student 
Discount Directory, the SGA Scholarship 
program, the Student Life Insurance Plan, 
campus Speaker Programs, the Lobby 
Against Financial Aid Cuts and the 
Tennessee Intercollegiate Legislature. 
Other special activities of the SGA depend 
on student interests in any given year. 

Leaders of the SGA are members of the 
Executive Branch of the organization and 
this year are Mary Ann Murphy, junior, 
president; and Greg J. McKenna, graduate 
student, vice president. 

The SGA Cabinet plans programs and 
executes Senate Bills and Resolutions. 
Members and their offices are: Mark Baker, 
senior, secretary of state; Richard 
Cartwright, third year law student, attorney 
general; Scott Crone, junior, budget di- 
rector; Mary Earheart, junior, secretary of 
public relations; Jerry Gnuschke, junior, 
secretary of academic affairs; John D. 
Hartney, junior, executive assistant to the 
president; Gary Vernon Kutz, junior, as- 
sociate secretary of state; John M. 
Linxwiler, sophomore, secretary of campus 
affairs; Troy Malone, sophomore, assistant 
to the secretary for public relations; and 
Gene Kevin Turney, sophomore, associate 
attorney general. 

The Judicial Branch consists of a Student 
Court, headed by Chief Justice Hansel Jay 
McCadams, a third-year law student, and 
eight justices. Justices are: Kelvin W. 
Bonner, senior; Phil R. Bryant, senior; Joe 
Crabtree, associate chief justice, second- 
year law student; James W. Fisher, senior; 
Steve W. Likens, junior; Nancy McShan, 
junior; Richard Paul Prokup, senior, and 
Janie Taylor, senior. 

The court hears student traffic appeals 
and recently was granted the power to hear 
social discipline cases. It also has juris- 
diction over SGA constitutional matters. 

The largest branch of the SGA is the 
Legislative Branch which presents bills and 
resolutions to improve student life at 
Memphis State. Headed by Lauri Catherine 
Stephan, senior, speaker of the Senate, this 
body is composed of 32 senators. They are: 
senators of the College of Business, Angelia 
K. Atkins, sophomore; Larry Allen 
Dawson, senior; Jeffrey Heavey, junior; 
and Thomas Lopez, sophomore. 




The SGA Executive Council: Hansel McCadams, Chief Justice; Greg McKenna, Vice President; Lauri 
Stephan, Speaker of the Senate; Mary Ann Murphy, President. 

The members of the Executive Council being sworn in by Dr. Thomas Carpenter, President of MSU, at an 
SGA banquet. 




Arts & Science College representatives, 
Catherine Hayes-Crawford, senior; 
Christopher T. Holmes, sophomore; and 
Kenneth R. Madden, senior, who is also 
speaker pro tempore. 

Communications & Fine Arts College 
senator Yunetta Ann Williams, junior; 
Education College representatives Penni 
Sharpe, junior; Greg Singleton, senior; 
and Kathryn H. Thompson, junior; En- 



gineering College senators Ruth Jeanette 
Hurst, junior; and Brent G. Robertson, 
senior; University College senator Lucinda 
A. Rio; and Law School senator Nelle 
White, second-year law student. 

The remaining senators are elected at- 
large and include: Brent Bousson, sopho- 
more; Beth Caron, sophomore; Randon 
Carvel, junior; George Davis, junior; 
Catherine Denise Diel, junior; Teresa 



252 Organizations 




SrudeNT Government Association 




Faulk, freshman; Joe Flynn, senior; Kevin 
Scott Garner, sophomore; Jeanne Harris, 
sophomore; Elizabeth (Beth) P. Harty, 
senior; Lakshmi N. Jayanthi, graduate 
student; Walter Kallaher II, sophomore; 
Jim S. Strickland, sophomore; James 
Patrick Turpin, senior; Cary Yancey, 
senior, and Debra Young, sophomore. 

Five standing committees serve the SGA. 
They are the Legislative Committee which 



oversees attendance, conduct, procedures 
for expulsion from the SGA and other 
internal matters; the Finance, Ways & 
Means Committee which handles budgetary 
matters; Student Life and Welfare Com- 
mittee which deals with matters pertaining 
to the academic and general policies of 
MSU; and the Judiciary Committee which 
oversees changes in SGA by-laws, amend- 
ments to the constitution and review of 



appointments to SGA office. This com- 
mittee has the Rules and the Credentials 
subcommittees. 

Kenny Madden chairs the Legislative 
Council; Brent Robertson heads the 
Finance, Ways & Means Committee; 
Walter Kallaher heads Student Life & 
Welfare; Cathy Diel chairs Education; and 
Catherine Hayes-Crawford heads the Ju- 
diciary. 



Organizations 253 




The SGA Senate: Brent Bousson, Walter Callaber, Cary Yangey and Debra Young. 



Two of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation's on-going projects are the awarding 
of scholarships and the Memphis State 
Book Co-op. 

SGA reserves 16 percent of the student 
activity fee funds collected for an SGA 
Academic Scholarship Program for which 
any MSU student may apply. Those 
awarded the scholarships are obligated to 
perform service for about 30 hours each 
semester on SGA committees or as ap- 
pointed cabinet officers. To qualify for the 
awards, a student must have at least a 2.75 
GPA or a 21 score on the SAT test as an 
in-coming freshman. 

Holding SGA Academic scholarships 
during the current year are Allen Dawson, 
John Hartney, Catherine Hayes-Crawford, 
John Fields, John Linxwiler, June Peoples 
and Greg Singleton. 

The SGA Book Co-op is the plan 
developed by the organization as a service 
to help MSU students avoid the high cost 
of textbooks. 

Used textbook sellers bring their books 
to the Co-op, where they are displayed for 
buyers. Unsold books are returned to the 
owner, who is paid for any books sold, less 
a 10 pecent handling fee which covers 
expenses, possible damage or theft. 

Co-op duty is taken seriously by the 
SGA, which sees the program as a direct, 
one-on-one program to help MSU stu- 
dents. Every SGA member takes a shift 
with the co-op, and learns the co-op pro- 
cedures to be able to answer students' 
questions promptly and accurately. 

The book exchange is a relatively new 
SGA project which is only beginning to be 
recognized as a potential money-saving 
opportunity by students. Those who or- 
ganize and operate the co-op are convinced 
it will become an event on which Memphis 
State students will depend to ease the 
financial burden of rising educational costs. 



The SGA Senate: Greg Singleton, Kenny Madden, 
Lauri Stephan— Speaker of the Senate, Thomas 
Lopez and George Davis. 




254 Organizations 




The SGA Senate: Back Row— Kevin Garner, Allen Dawson, Teresa Faulk, Brent Robertson Front Row — Anne Williams, Penni 
Sharpe 




The SGA Court: Front Row:— Janie Taylor, Nancy McShan, Steve Likens. Back Row — Phi I Bryant, Kelvin Bonner, Joe Crabtree, 
Hansel McCadams, Chief Justice, James Fisher. 



Student Government 955 



Perhaps the most exciting event Student 
Government Association members parti- 
cipate in during the year is the Tennessee 
Intercollegiate State Legislature (TISL), a 
convention of the state's college leaders. 

Held in Nashville in November, TISL 
was organized by the 50 SGA's on 
Tennessee campuses as a method of coor- 
dinating the activities of student leadership 
organizations statewide. 

TISL is funded by privatedonationsand 
dues from member institutions. It is a 
nonpartisan student educational organi- 
zation which meets four days at the State 
Capitol as a senate and house of repre- 
sentatives to consider resolutions and bills 
reflecting the concerns of Tennessee's higher 
education students. Some 100 pieces of 
legislation - offered by delegations from 
each of the participating schools — are 
considered during the event, and topics 
range from environmental concerns to 
highway construction and the quality of 
higher education. 

Ten pieces of legislation are selected 
from the bills passed to be submitted to the 
Tennessee General Assembly for possible 
action during the legislative sessions. 

In 1983, Memphis State's delegation to 
TISL included 20 members, the largest 
single delegation at the event. Seventy-two 
bills were considered by the 20th General 
Assembly — 23 written and sponsored by 
Memphis State delegates. Of the nine bills 
selected for presentation to Tennessee Gov. 
Lamar Alexander, four were sponsored by 
Memphis State's delegation. 

Several Memphis State students also 
held positions of responsibility at TISL. 
John Hartney served as treasurer and a 
member of the Executive Council; 
Catherine Hayes-Crawford, who was chair- 
man of the Memphis State TISL delegation, 
was named to the Board of Directors, and 
Mary Ann Murphy served as West 
Tennessee Recruiter. 

Four members of the Memphis State 
delegation were selected to receive the 
Carlisle Award, an annual award to the 10 
most outstanding legislators at the General 
Assembly, determined by their lobbying, 
debate and leadership talents. The winners 
were Murphy, Hayes-Crawford, Richard 
Cartwright and Cary Yancey. Having four 
of the Carlisle winners from one school's 
delegation was a first for TISL. 

Another first for the convention was 
Hayes-Crawford's nomination as the first 
female candidate for TISL governor. 
Although defeated in a close race, her 
nomination was a reiteration of Memphis 
State's preeminent role for TISL, 1983. 

Other MSU delegates earning recogni- 
tion, in the form of Legislative Awards, 
were Hartney, Kenny Madden, Anne 
Williams and Jim Strickland. 




Mary anne Murphy, President of SGA, gives an office report to the members of SGA. Other 
officers, Laurel Stephan and Charleyn Sipes, are also in attendance. 




Bennett Moore (on table), President of Motown, donates at the SGA Blood Drive while SGA 
President Mary Ann Murphy and Todd Hughes look on. 



256 Organizations 




The Southern Optometry Group visited campus 
to examine some of the students' eyes. 



During the 1983-84 academic year, two 
special matters drew the attention of 
Student Government Association members: 
conducting polls to determine Memphis 
State students' feelings about general 
campus policies and about the campus 
parking situation. 

The general campus policy poll found 
that Memphis State students generally 
favored having alcohol in dorm rooms (62 
percent) and having a campus pub (72 



percent). Sixty-eight percent of students 
answering the survey approved a policy 
whereby one male and one female residence 
hall would allow 24-hour visitation. 

Other policy matters found 78 percent of 
responding students favoring a standard- 
ized textbook policy, against a $1 increase 
in the student activity fee (51 percent), 
opposed to raising the legal drinking age 
from 19 to 21 (52 percent), in favor of using 
University general funds for multi-level 



parking garages (61 percent), in favor of 
using traffic fines for construction of 
multi-level parking garages (64 pecent), 
favored using superior teaching perfor- 
mance as a major factor in deciding tenure 
for professors (78 percent), and favored 
students having more input in the faculty 
tenure review process (70 percent). The 
student opinion poll on campus parking 
was distributed to faculty and Memphis 
State staff as well. 




An early meeting of the SGA Council finds a full house pondering student problem. 



Student Government 257 



The Student Activities Council gives 
students the opportunity to develop their 
vocation, citizenship, problem solving and 
personal growth skills. 

Group workshops, personal meetings 
and a positive, caring environment are all 
contributing factors that motivate students 
to volunteer their time and energies to the 
Student Activities Council. 

The Council has two staff advisers and a 
staff secretary who provide assistance, 
guidance, a pat-on-the-back for a job well 
done and a shoulder to cry on when the 
outcome is less than hoped, said Laina 
Wakeley, 1983-84 SAC president. 

Student Activities Council personnel are 
assisted by the nine board members who 
head the standing committees of the or- 
ganization. "Secret buddies" help persona- 
lize group meetings, and friendship is a key 
factor in the council's success, Wakeley 
said. 

The Student Activities Council Concerts 
Committee is charged with providing the 
Memphis State student body with a wide 
variety of entertainment throughout the 
school year. 

Members of the Concerts Committee 
contact musical groups to perform on 



campus and seek the widest possible range 
of contemporary sounds. The committee is 
also responsible for providing adequate 
assistance for the smooth functioning of 
each sponsored event, including manpower 
and technical assistance. 

The Concerts body is charged with 
evaluating each event on the basis of 
quality and merit for future reference. 

Students who direct the activities of this 
committee head its public relations effort; 
its administration — including surveys to 
determine the kind of musical presentations 
students desire; and its production phase 
which encompasses lighting, sound and 
setup-takedown of equipment. 

Focus on dress and fashion is the work 
of the Student Activities Council Fashion 
Board Committee, which tries to interest 
Memphis State students in a variety of new 
fashions. 

This group plans and implements all of 
SAC's fashion shows, which involves a 
blend of interests by off-campus sponsors 
and on-campus groups. 

The Fashion Board is a quasi-educational 
unit as well, because its members instruct 
in aspects of modeling and production of 
the shows it sponsors. 



Each year the group evaluates the shows 
it puts on and reports on successes for 
future Fashion Boards. 

Elements of the committee are those 
directing advertising and promotion, and 
the technical aspects of the show itself. 
Fashion Board schedules events for Wel- 
come Week, Homecoming, a bridal show, 
and special on-campus and off-campus 
events. 

Selection and presentation of feature 
films is the duty of SAC's Films Committee. 
It not only selects films to show students, 
but provides the fare at reduced cost. 
Faculty and MSU staff members are 
included in the intended film audience. 

This group secures films and video tapes 
for presentation, plans and adminsters 
special movie programs and works with 
co-sponsoring organizations to ensure the 
success of each program. 

In addition to the leaders who handle 
co-sponsorships, scheduling, advertising 
and hospitality, the group is responsible 
for extensive equipment use and main- 
tenance. 



SA C Means Fun and Friendship 




The Student Activities Council sponsors many events such as speakers like the 
mentalist the Amazing Kreskin (above) and the Homecoming election. 



258 Organizations 




The SAC Production Committee: Bill Binford, Tammi Desnica, Greg Kuehl, Chairman; Don Hudgins. 



The SAC Hospitality Committee: Front Row: Julie Vike, Gloria Woods, Maria Kastner, Melanie Tarnell, Lori 
Payne. Back Row: Kenny Diel, Joey Breen, Anthony Jones, Danny Palmie, Tommy Lobianco. 




amimmmmmsmmmmm 



sac 259 



Student Activities 



Friendship is Key to Council's Success 



SAC's Hospitality Committee serves as 
host and ambassador for student activity 
events. 

Members serve as personnel to work 
concession booths, seek out non-University 
Program events for which they may repre- 
sent Memphis State and evaluate all 
Hospitality Committee activities for future 
reference. 

The group works with academic depart- 
ments on campus, student organizations 
and off-campus activities as well. 

The technical, behind-the-scenes work of 
the Student Activities Council is spear- 
headed by its Production Committee. 

Student participants learn a variety of 
potential vocational skills with sound 
equipment, lighting, loading and unloading 
of performers'equipment. The group must 
keep an accurate inventory of SAC equip- 



ment and must insure that others using the 
SAC equipment are adequately trained in 
its correct operation. 

Getting maximum exposure for all 
Student Activities Council events is the 
duty of the Publicity Committee which 
must employ a variety of marketing and 
public relations skills. 

This committee maintains and updates 
SAC's marquee on the second floor of the 
University Center, distributes all publicity 
requests for SAC, coordinates the on-and 
off -campus advertising and public relations 
activities of SAC, strives to enhance SAC's 
image on campus and in the surrounding 
community and evaluates the success of its 
efforts for future members. 

Sub-chairmen for internal events include 
the public relations liaison for arts, audio- 
visual, Fashion Board, Hospitality, indoor 



recreation, music, outdoor recreation, 
speakers and special events. 

Advertising for all SAC events comes 
under the direction of the Publicity Com- 
mittee which designs and produces all 
fliers, Helmsman newspaper ads, banners 
and posters. The group distributes these 
materials and insures that advertising 
exceeds SAC's minimum standards for 
timeliness and quality of production. 

Outdoor and indoor activities and tour- 
naments fall under the direction of the 
Student Activities Council's Recreation 
Committee. 

This group coordinates and runs all 
sponsored outdoor events including exhibi- 
tions and visiting professionals. The com- 
mittee provides selected trips to students, 
faculty and staff at reduced rates. 

Indoor recreation and tournaments are 




Photo by Art GrMtr 
Front Row: Craig Moore, Carla Yarborough, Lori Clark, Amy Pinner; 2nd Row: Missy Wilson 
(Chairperson), Debbie Allen, Beth Nicholson, Karen Kidd, Lyndi Whipple, Janie Taylor (Vice 
Chairperson); 3rd Row: Julie Wage, Angela Rixter, Christi Guthrie, Lynn Williams, Connie 
Wilborn,' 4th Row: Ken Lee, Michelle Horner, Phyllis Reindhart, Lauren Faquin, Lisa Reindhart 
(Secretary), Cuffy Hill, Beth Reeves, Andy Augeris; 5th Row: T.J. French, Jimmy Rout, Alan 
Campbell, Pat Conway, Ambrose Minor; 6th Row: Tim Nieman, Mark McKee, Brad Bauers. 



260 Organizations 



The SAC Speakers Committee: Front Row: Anthony 
Jones, Troy Malone, Kelly Allen, Kim Smith; Chair 
erson. Back Row: Traci Benson, Bruce Guthrie, 
Maria Limbaugh. 





THE SAC Publicity Committee: Troy Malone, Margaret Hatchett; 
Chairperson, Tim Burford. Not pictured: Greg Youngner, Kateh 
Esmaeli, Beth McCloud. 



also directed by members of the Recreation 
Committee. A major event in this area is 
the Memphis State College Bowl program. 
Winners of the campus-wide tournament 
are coached by the committee to prepare 
MSU winners for their regional contest. 

Additional indoor recreation events 
include chess, backgammon, table tennis, 
billiards and football-darts contests. 

Members of the SAC Speakers Com- 
mittee educate and entertain Memphis 
State students by providing well-known 
personalities to lecture on a variety of 
subjects. 

The committee contacts educational 
speakers and schedules programs to provide 
a balanced program of topics. In addition 
to scheduling, committee members provide 
adequate assistance for each event, work 
with co-sponsoring organizations and 
evaluate all speaker events for quality and 
merit. 

Memphis State's Homecoming and Miss 
Memphis State pageant are directed by 
SAC's Special Events Committee. 

These two annual events are among the 
foremost offerings the University Programs 
division has, and work to make them an 
annual success requires a major effort by 
all students concerned. 

In addition to the pageant and Home- 
coming activities, the committee works 
closely with the Student Activities Council 
for any special programs SAC may sponsor. 



sac 261 




Father John Boll, Catholic Student Center Chaplain, greets a new student during orientation. 



262 Student Interfaith Council 



Student Interfaith Council 



Members Give Life 
to Brotherly Love 



Composed of representatives from char- 
tered religious organizations on campus, 
The Student Interfaith Council sponsors 
and promotes activities to foster the spirit 
of brotherhood. 

Two representatives from each campus 
religious organization serve on the Council 
and coordinate and assist with the activities 



of each group. Its meetings, held twice a 
month, are designed to promote interfaith 
understanding and exchange of ideas. 

The Council was represented at the 
Student Organizations Fair and sponsored 
a religious organization fair. Religious 
Emphasis Week was a major spring 
program. 



Interfaith Council Officers: Back Row: Carlos Torres, Catholic Student Center; Kent Edwards, Baptist Student 
Union; Renee Schafer, Catholic Student Center; Beth Walthal Fellowship of Christian Athletes; Trent Marcus, 
Christian Student Center. Second Row: Teresa Loser, Advisor; Julie Bailey, Assistant Advisor. First Row: Lori 
Nettles, President; Ruth Schklar, Jewish Student Union. 




Student Interfaith Council 263 



The Christian Student Center 



Activities of the Christian Student Center 
at Memphis State provide an assortment 
of entertaining events, charitable projects, 
community involvement and Christian 
fellowship to the members. 

Weekly activities include Monday night 
dinners, Thursday lunches, Bible credit 
class, life talks and Friday night devotionals. 

Special events sponsored by CSC include 



a hospitality booth where beverages are 
distributed to registering MSU students, 
and work days during which center 
members help CSC faculty and older 
citizens in the Highland Street Church of 
Christ. 

Three retreats per year are provided for 
members of the Christian Student Center, 



and members attend several seminars each 
year. Several special meal-related activities 
include breakfast devotionals, kick-off 
dinners and banquets. 

Members of CSC advertise in campus 
literature and prepare brochures and 
packets to be distributed to new MSU 
students at the beginning of each semester. 




Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 



FRONT ROW: James Riles, A.M. Burton, Chuck Foley, Nina Walker, Sherry SECOND ROW: Martha Burton, Scott Nelms, Lynn Davis, Don Morris, Regina 
Watson, Lisa Brown, Jimmy Stewart, Brenda Day, Missy Wilemon Freshour, Trent Marcus, Eddie Burgess, Bryan Hare, Ken Hall, Jeff Wright, Clyde 

Howell, Susan Lemley 



264 Christian Student Center 



Baptist Student Union 



Mission: Growth and Service 




The Executive Council of the Baptist Student Union 
coordinates and plans group activities. Front Row: 
Denise Styers, Donna Clary, Margaret Vargo. Back 
Row: Walker Wright, Ron Brown, Becca Petry, Mark 
Murley, Lori Nettles, Rondy Hill, Dawn Bold, Roy 
Sessom, Ronnie Hawkins. 

The Baptist Student Union began as a national 
movement in 1922. The Memphis State branch dates 
back to the 1930's. 

Offering a program of Christian witness, spiritual 
growth and dicipline and world service, the group holds 
regular noonday luncheon meetings each Tuesday and 
Friday and Harambee at 7 p. m. Thursdays. 

The Union works closely with the Student Interfaith 
Council and supports the Student Missions Program and 
the Upper Volta Hunger Relief Project of the Tennessee 
Baptist Convention. On campus, it has presented or 
participated in Black History Week, a fall Welcome Back 
Party, a box lunch picnic, which featured a 40 foot 
banana split, and Missions Emphasis Week. 

Officers include Becka Petry, president; Lori Nettles, 
vice president; Donna Clary, summer missions; Ron 
Brown, missions; Margaret Vargo, communications; 
Roy Sessoms, Harambee; Denise Styers, Baptist Young 
Women; Mark Murley, music; Tom Hall, social; Randy 
Hill, athletics; Debbie DeWitt, programs; Laura Lynn 
Griffin, newsletter editor. 




In addition to special meetings, the Baptist Student 
Union offers noonday luncheon meetings each Tuesday 
and Friday so that students can get together in fellowship 
throughout the week. 



bsu 265 



Black Student Association 



The Black Student Association at 
Memphis State is the collective voice of 
campus black students. Its goal is to 
encourage academic excellence and social 
awareness as students strive for unity. 

The BSA does many things for its 
members, such as informing them of job 
opportunities, providing tutors in various 
subjects, advocating changes which stu- 
dents consider desirable, lobbying before 
the Student Government Association and 
providing entertaining and informative 
activities. 

Why is a Black Student Association 
needed at Memphis State? The reasons are 
many, BSA officers believe. It promotes 
the culture of black Americans by sponsor- 
ing culturally enriching programs. It works 
to make sure that the University considers 
the interests and needs of its black students, 
as well as to motivate black students to 
participate in everything at the University. 
It advocates efforts to address the concerns 
and problems of black students and it 
works to unite the black community. 

The stated purpose of the BSA is to unite 
the social, academic and economic values 
of black students; to unite black minds; to 
assist black students in achieving their 
goals; to educate them on cultural, political, 
economic and social concerns and, most 
importantly, "to foster ideals of brother- 
hood between all races and nationalities so 
that one day there will be no need for the 
Black Student Association." 

Melissa Robbins 



Lessons in Leadership 

And Fellowship 
Are Taught By BSA 




: : :: 



Photo by Art Crider 

The Black Student Association: Alice Peacock— president, Vonda Polk — secretary, Eugenia 
Young — secretary, Rayford Levy, Fawn Beldrer. Back Row: Derwin Newborn, Cortez 
Hampton, Brinley "Omar" Spight— editor, Dedrick Davis, Bryant K. Wilhite— program 
director. 



266 Organizations 



American Society of Civil Engineers 



The American Society of Civil Engineers - Front Row: Neal Newman, Chuck Wrenn, Nasser 
Safieddine, Mohammad Srour, Sahba Rouani, Mohammed Hajiomar, Abdul Rais, Abdul Ahafer, 
Paula Gray, Harvey Matheny, Linda Boyd, Rob Julp, Albert Givens, Julian Savage, Frank 
McPhail, Dr. William Segui - Advisor; Second Row: Lee Conley, Laura Rowland, Ted Tyree, Phil 
Brewer, Keith May; Back Rows: Paul Medlin, Jeff Gross, Nedal Abuhantash, Awi Shahadan, Sami 
Abdelfattah, Ahmad Dabdoub, Idris Shafiai, Salami Mohd Mustaffa Bin, Mahmoud Masoud, 
Dave Sabatinim, Nayef Abu-Asbba, Francisco Reyes, Luis Altuve, Ali Abbad, David McGaw, 
Shahriar Zekavati. Ted Beasley, Greg Jackson, Andy Gaines, Paul Rodgers, Doug Ford, Danny 
Johnson, Ahmad Nowrouzi. 




The American Society of Civil Engineers 
was founded in 1852, making it the oldest 
professional engineering society in the 

nation. 

The object of the society is to promote 
interest in the study of civil engineering 
and to advance it as a profession. By 
helping students begin their professional 
contacts, the association feels it is fulfilling 
an important role. 

In March of last year, the MSU chapter 
won first place in a concrete canoe race, 
which is more than just a boating event for 
this organization. It is an exercise in 
surveying, design and building. 

Officers are Harvey Matheny, president; 
Rob Fulp, vice president, Laura Rowland, 
executive secretary; Paula Gray, corres- 
ponding secretary, and treasurer Frank 
McPhail, who points out that the chapter 
has the lowest dues of all engineering 
organizations because of the support given 
by the professional chapter. Faculty adviser 
is William T. Segu. 



The University Center Staff: Front Row-Jo Strick- 
land, Student Activities Council Program Adviser; 
Jay Anderson, Director- University Center; Dorothy 
Wilkerson, Scheduling and Information Manager; 
Back Row - Willie Maelin, set up assistant; Carrie 
Terrell, Student Activities Council secretary; Sandra 
Muench, Director's Administrative secretary; Richard 
Jones, Assistant Director - University Center; Bob 
Young, Student Activities Council Assistant Program 
Advisor; Aubre Harris, set up assistant. 

In its operations format, the Center 
coordinates all offices and facilities housed 
within its walls. When it comes to pro- 
gramming, its function is as varied as the 
groups the University recognizes. 

The staff of the Center consists of 
assistant director, Richard Jones; program 
advisers, Jo Strickland and Bob Young; 
game room manager, Pat Landry; night 
manager Mike Pilcher; scheduling and 
information, Dorothy Wilkerson; two set- 
up people, Willie Macklin and Aubrey 
Harris, and administrative secretary, 
Sandra Munch. 




University Center 



organizations 267 



Planning Association 




The MSI Planning Association: Back Row— Doc Adams, Don Jones, Alain Carranza, Alan Pool, Luchy 
Burrell. Front Row— Connie Sabater, John Baker, Jeff Reece, Jerry Oliver, Frank Donohue, Mary Ferguson. 



Have you ever wondered why Overton 
Park is located where it is? Or who decided 
the Parkway route? 

Memphis may not have had the benefit 
of today's surveys, protections and plans in 
the days those decisions were made, but 
today's modern city requires the services of 
city planners. And Memphis State is ready 
to provide the trained workers to fill that 
role. 

It all began in 1974 when the Graduate 
Department of Planning began operations 
and offered a two year professional degree, 
Master of City and Regional Planning. 

Hoping to provide a communication 
between student and professional planners 
and community leaders, the students 
formed the Student Planners Association 
that first fall. The name was later changed 
to the Memphis State University Planners 
Association. 

The group meets each week in the 
department of geography and planning. 
Officers are: Kay Artis, president; Frank 
Donohue, vice president; Mary Love, 
secretary and Alain Carranza, treasurer. 



Housing/ Home Furnishing 



Creating Beauty 

in the Home 
is Designers Ideal 



House Beautiful is what the Housing and 
Home Furnishings Association has in mind 
as it seeks to promote an awareness and 
understanding of the importance of the 
study of home furnishings. 

Begun in 1980, the organization works 
with the department of home economics 
and brings decorators, interior designers 
and people from retail furniture and acces- 
sory establishments to speak on campus to 
students with special interests in the area. 
The group also holds decorating seminars 
and plans to offer pilgrimage tours. 

The group points with pride to indi- 
vidual members who have won scholar- 
ships offered by the Home Furnishings 
Association. 

Angela Ziegler serves as president of the 
group; Ginger Kinzel is vice president and 
Debbie Beard is secretary/ treasurer. 



268 Organizations 



Personnel 



Memphis State's Students of Personnel 
Administration don't have to blow their 
own horn. Their national organization did 
it for them by granting them the Chapter 
Merit Award last spring at the national 
convention in New York City. 

The award was given in recognition of 
organization and programming excellence, 
and the Memphis chapter vows to keep 
right on deserving that honor. 

Formed on campus in 1979, the group is 
affiliated with the American Society for 
Personnel Administration and is sponsored 
by its local chapter, The Memphis Per- 
sonnel Association. Its goals are to keep 
personnel students professionally informed 
and to develop a nucleus ot truly protes- 
sional personnel administrators. 

Officers are president, Susan Clabough; 
secretaries, Rosemary Hollidayand Lynda 
Shelton, and public relations director Patty 
Ferguson. Dr. Coy A. Jones is adviser. 



Fogelman College of Business, home of the Students 
of Personnel Administration. 




Insurance Club 




Organized in 1970 as a social club for 
insurance students, the MSU Insurance 
Club provides a social meeting ground for 
students who share the same major. 

In addition to bi-weekly meetings, mem- 
bers visit the Tennessee Department of 
Insurance in Nashville each year and also 
visit a local insurance company office. Two 
parties with insurance alumni are also held 
each year. 

Officers include John N. Giavoli Jr., 
president; Denise Smith, vice president, 
and Melinda Osborn, secretary-treasurer. 



The MSU Insurance Club: Front Row— William S. 
Phillips, Milinda Osborn, Karen Dickey, Sandra 
Bland, Terry Poirier. Back Row— King Hussey, 
Winfred Dickey, Stan Tallent, Mars Perth Not 
Pictured —Karen Seay. 



Organizations 269 



Blue Chippers 



Let's Hear It 



Who says that Memphis State is bettd 
than ever? 

The Blue Chippers for one. 

Now in their second year on campus, the 
Blue Chippers know what school spirit is 
all about and want to share that knowledge 
with every student on campus. 

Working closely with the athletic depart- 
ment, the Chippers sponsor banner contests 



at Homecoming. The Campus Crawl dance 
and pep rally held in the fall and tailgate 
parties at all home games were among their 
major activities this year. 

Melisha Hedrick is coordinator; Lee 
Hodrett, assistant coordinator; Kim Rawls, 
secretary, and Elaine Bannister, public 
relations director. 

Bobby Plunk serves as adviser. 



For the Home Team 




Blue Chippers keep school spirits high as students gather to show their support for 
the Tigers at the Homecoming Pep Rally. 



270 Organizations 



Russian Culture Club 




Since being established in 1963, the 
Memphis State Russian Culture Club has 
attempted to "educate the student body 
and the community as a whole," said club 
president John Bass. The club, which meets 
one night each month, gives students a 
chance to see more of the culture of the 
country whose language they are studying 
than they are able to see in the limited 
classroom time. Featured at their Tuesday 
night meetings were movies, slide presen- 
tations and guest speakers relating to the 
Slavic theme of the club. Along with the 
Russian Culture Club, Slavic language 
students were also able to gain admittance 
into Dobro Slovo, the Slavic language 
honor society. During the year a variety of 
events took place including a Christmas 
party, a symposium on the Ukranian famine 
of 1932 and the guest appearance of Dr. 
Dmitry Bobyshev, a Russian born dissident 
poet. 



Officers 



Members 



John Bass — President 

Jud Phillips— Social Chairman 

Jim Butcher— 1st Vice President 

Mark Nunn— 2nd Vice President 

Dr. Tamara Miller— Faculty Advisor 

Louis Stukenbourg — Assoc. Treasurer 

Susan Briggs— Recording Secretary 

Whitney McKinnie— Corresponding Secretary 

Debra Chaves — Treasurer 



Robin Jordan 
Dave Branyan 
Coral Nikhammud 
Tammy Moss 
Christine Goodwin 
Jerry Harden 
Mark Nestemacher 
Dana Hunsucker 
Jeff Edwards 
Melanie Pewatts 
Craig Steen 
Don Olds 
Mike Patrick 



Russian Culture Club 271 




,:* 



HHSBIHW& 




... 




The Greeks. 

Natives of no foreign country, these campus 
kinfolk share only a special state of mind. From the 
first frantic scramble of Rush, they enter a land of 
their own design, seeking a family, a clan, to which 
they can happily belong. 

For some, going Greek is the gateway to easy 
camaraderie and a ready-made social life. For others, 
it is the start of deeper friendships which can endure 
beyond campus days, an opportunity for community 
service and a sense of belonging. 

The call to community service was strong in Greek 
activities this year, with numerous benefits and 
collections to aid local and national health and 
service agencies. 

The fun and games promise met easy fulfillment 
with a variety of activities and events. Derby Day 
field events brought friendly competition to a new 
level as the brothers and sisters raced, jumped and 
paraded, determined to be the best. 

All-Sing moved that competition from the field to 
stage as the sororities and fraternities tried to sing 
and dance their way to victory. Burger Bust 
celebrated yet another talent as Greek trenchermen 
ate their way to fame in a race to see who could 
consume the most hamburgers. Anchor Splash found 
the groups meeting and competing in and out of the 
swimming pool. 

Fashion shows, dances, parties and banquets all 
together made 1984 for the Greeks BETTER THAN 
EVER 



Rush 

Derby Day 

All Sing 

Burger Bust 

Anchor Splash 

Order of Omega 

Sigma Gamma Rho 

Delta Zeta 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

Pi Beta Phi 

Delta Gamma 

Phi Mu 

Sigma Kappa 

Alpha Kappa Alpha 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Golden Hearts of 

Sigma Phi 

Epsilon 

Little Sisters of The 

Crimson Cross 

Kappa Alpha 

Pi Kappa Alpha 

Little Sisters of The 

Shield and Diamond 

Little Sisters of Sigma 

Chi 

Sigma Chi 

Pi Kappa Phi 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Kappa Sigma 

Phi Gamma Delta 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Zantiffani 

Interfraternity 

Council 



Aviwte 



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Greeks 273 



TV US ft* Opening the Door to 

Greek Life... 



One of the biggest Greek activities of the year is Rush. Rush is a 
week of parties in which each participant has an opportunity to 
meet different Greek individuals and groups in order to decide 
whether to become a part of Greek life on campus by pledging. 

Barbara Walters, president of Sigma Kappa sorority, said, 
"Like all Greek groups, we look for a person who is willing to be 
active in the group and can still keep a satisfactory grade point 
average. 

"We look for high school activities because chances are, if a girl 
was active in high school, she will also be active in college," she 
said. 

Rush can sometimes be a time of frustration and pressure, but 
Mindy Sopher, adviser for Greek affairs, offered some encourage- 
ment. "Just be yourself. Enjoy getting to know people and go into 
rush with an open mind." 

Each sorority has some form of entertainment, such as singing 
or acting out skits. "Sorority rush is structured and formal," said 
Sopher. 

During rush week, sorority rushees go to parties in the sorority 
rooms in the Panhellenic Building. Only members and rushees 
attend. 

Fraternity formal rush is for men who are apprehensive about 
going through rush on their own, according to Tommy Svoboda, 
IFC vice-president. 



Sorority rush offers rushees a chance to get acquainted with the different sororities 
on campus and choose which one is most suitable for them. Barbara Walters, 
president of Sigma Kappa, has a quiet chat with a prospective Greek. 




Karren Koles of Alpha Gamma Delta extends a friendly welcome to one of their 
many rushees. 



274 Rush 





The sororities take one night of Rush to perform skits for the 
rushees. Alpha Delta Pi's skit was "The Rainbow Connection." 

Krista Macko and Scarlett Cavagnaro discuss Greek life with 
actives from one of the sororities. 



Rush 275 



RUSH 



The fraternity rushees attend parties at each fraternity house. 
Members, alumni and little sisters are present. 

Svoboda said a more relaxed atmosphere prevails in fraternity 
rush. Fraternity men mingle with rushees and some fraternities 
have alumni speakers and slide shows. 

Joining a fraternity or sorority is one way to make a large 
campus seem smaller, according to one sorority pledge. 

Along with the benefits of Greek life come financial obligations, 
however. 

Charles Dunstan, chapter adviser for a sorority said average 
dues for sororities are $25 per month. In addition, a pledge fee of 
about $40, an initiation fee of about $100 and a badge fee ranging 
from $5 to $50 is paid only once. 

Svoboda said the average dues for fraternities are about $35 per 
month. An initiation fee of about $135 and a pledge fee of about 
$40 is paid one time. Residents of the fraternity house pay more. 

The only other requirement for pledging is a 2.0 grade point 
average for Panhellenic and a 2.5 GPA for Pan-Hellenic. 

—Cathy Diel 




The "FIJI Waltz" is always a popular step at the FIJI house at their parties, as 
demonstrated by Cara Crane and Terry Watkins. 

Fred "Woosey" Towler of Phi Beta Sigma exhibits his B.K.O. capabilities (Basic 
Keg Operations). 

In the cool of the fall evenings, parties generally wander out to the porches of the 
three Sigma Alpha Epsilon houses. 




276 Greeks 




Greeks 277 



Sigma ChVs 



The Memphis State sororities partici- 
pated in Sigma Chi's annual Derby weeks 
in October of last year. Pi Beta Phi was 
the overall winner. Alpha Gamma Delta 
had a good week and came in second, 
while Phi Mu came in third. 

Things were started with a campus 
parade and then the sororities got busy! 
Pi Beta Phi won the derby snatch which 
entailed snatching and keeping the hats 
of several fraternity brothers. Pi Phi tied 
with Alpha Gam in the number of field 
event wins. Egg-a-Sig, shoe stack, water 
balloon toss, and musical water buckets 
were just a few of the field events that 
co-chairman Geary Hamm and Allen 
Dawson thought up for the ladies. Miss 
Derby Doll was Kathy Hamilton, of Pi 
Phi, and Phi Mu's Miss Melanie Trout 
was awarded Miss Shape. The Photo 
Scavenger Hunt was won by Alpha Gam 
and the Derby Hunt or Golden Derby by 
Alpha Delta Phi. The Sigma Kappas 
were voted to have had the most spirit 
overall. 

The week held loads of fun, celebra- 
tions, and parties, the largest of which 
was held by Sigma Kappa in which over 
five hundred people attended. 



Golden Man Larry Fogarty, of Sigma Chi, won the 
Dress- a - Pledge competition for Phi Mu as the 
"Oscar". 






Delta Zeta's Francis Washburn and Cindy Theiner of Alpha Delta Pi exhibit their skill 
and concentration in the water-balloon toss. 



278 Greeks 




Derby Day 





photo* by J. Scott Vauandt 

Nothing could keep Phi Mu's Krista Smith from having 
fun at Derby Day. Scarlett Cavagnaro and Marty 
Mitchusson had no trouble at all keeping Krista's spirits 
up. 

Egg on your face! Sigma Chi President Allen Dawson 
enjoys the many benefits of his elected office. Each year, the 
participants of Derby Day use similar ways to show their 
appreciation of Derby Days. 



Phi Mu's Constance McCullough and Tracey Anderson summon all 
their energy and concentration for their impending challenge. 



Greeks 279 



A 11 Sing 



All Sing was held last March at the Cook 
Convention Center. The campus sororities 
and fraternities competed in a contest 
based on talent and stage presentation. 
Only hand motions and hand-held props 
were allowed, with each group being given 
dire warnings against excessive foot move- 
ment. 

The judges consisted of local professional 
musicians. First place in the fraternity 
division went to Kappa Alpha, whose 
theme was "The Past 20 Years in American 
Music." 

Alpha Gamma Delta won first place in 
the sorority division with "A Salute to the 

user. 



The brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon get together for 
their show of television openings. Gilligan's Island is 
sung by Dave Palmer, Scott Lay, Tommy Pitner, 
Paul Donee, Warrior Dorian, Jojo Atkinson, Raoul 
Delgado and Mike Rodenhiser. 

Dawn Armbrust, Lucindo Rio, Laura Lewis, Nancy Harthun and Pam 
Williams perform their version of Minstrels to earn Sigma Kappa a first 
place win in the small division. 



The talent of the Pi Kappa Phi brothers gleams in their rendition of Hair. 






280 All Sing 



Bustin' Burgers for M.D. 





The seventh annual Kappa Alpha Burger 
Bust was held at Danver's restaurant on 
Highland Street last fall. The profits from 
the Bust were donated to Kappa Alpha's 
national philanthropy, by Danver's, and 
the beverages and tee-shirts were sponsored 
by Coors. Money was raised from a $25 
entry fee, personal pledges and profits 
from tee-shirts and drinks. The two-man 
teams were given five minutes to engulf as 
many hamburgers as possible. The record 
still stands at six burgers. Last year thirteen 
teams participated in the event. Pi Kappa 
Alpha took first place, Lambda Chi Alpha 
placed second and Kappa Alpha came in 
third. Over 500 dollars was raised last year, 
which surpassed any previous year's in- 
come. The competition is open to any entry, 
though most competitors were fraternities. 
Future plans include opening a division to 
sororities. -Tonda Brewer 



"If I NEVER see another hamburger, itll be too soon!" Jed Mahar and Randy 
Richardson work together to give the KAs a third place victory. 

"Col." Jed Mahar shoves those burgers for M.D. 



Randy Richardson tries to take just one more bite. 




Greeks 281 



Delta Gamma's 




One of the categories of Anchor Splash competition was the Mermaid Contest. Phi 
Mu's Melanie Trout, winner of the competition, rests on the shoulders of Sigma Chi's 
Corwin Arthur and Mark Anderson. 

"I'm Gumby!" Lambda Chi's Kelly Ryan, alias Gumby, plunges into the water during 
the swimming competition. 



282 Greeks 



Anchor Splash 




Delta Gamma sorority hosted the 
annual Anchor Splash swimming com- 
petition for Memphis State University's 
fraternities. No admission was charged, 
but donations were accepted and contri- 
buted for aid to the blind and for sight 
conservation. 

The events started with the retiring of 
the first place trophy to its permanent 
location at the Lambda Chi house. The 
champs came back and gave all a good 
run for their money. Lambda Chi walked 
off with first place awards with Bathing 
Beauty or Mr. Muscle, Johnny Chenault, 
Beautiful Legs Tony Phifer, Water Ballet, 
and the Fraternity Spirit award. 

All the first place wins just were not 
enough. The Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
brothers replaced Lambda Chi and were 
the overall winners of the event. Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon won four of the seven 
events in the swimming contest. Lambda 
Chi won three of the seven swimming 
events. Pi Kappa Alpha came in third 
place overall. 

The sororities had a good showing. 
Delta Zeta won the spirit award, Phi 
Mu's Melanie Trout won the mermaid 
contest and Phi Mu Tina Johnson won 
the most beautiful eyes contest. 

Everyone had a good time admiring 
swim strokes, legs and eyes, and the MSU 
Greeks helped raise money for a much 
needed service. 



Grace, poise, skill, and good looks are all vital parts of the Water Ballet 
Competition. Pi Kappa Alpha's Skip Dickenson, Randy Tims, and Mark 
Copley exhibit all of these characteristics as they demonstrate their talent. 

Muscle Man Jimmy Dolan of Sigma Alpha Epsilon competes in the Muscle Man 
Competition. Jimmy came close, but Lambda Chi took first place in the 
competition. 



Greeks 283 



ORDER OF OMEGA 



The Order of Omega was founded at the 
University of Miami in 1959 by a group of 
outstanding fraternity men who felt that 
individuals in the Greek community should 
be recognized for their service to the 
fraternity and the university. The Order of 
Omega strives to recognize those Greek 



men and women who have attained a high 
standard of leadership in interfraternity 
activities and to encourage them to continue 
along such a line. Order of Omega also 
works to bring together outstanding Greek 
members to create an organization which 
will help to mold the sentiment of the 



institutiion on questions of local and 
intercollegiate fraternity affairs. 

The 30 members of the Order of Omega 
award the Presidential Award to the most 
outstanding president of the previous year. 
They also host a Teacher's Tea and 
members initiation in the spring semester. 




Joanna LongfieM-President 
Greg Singleton-Vice President 
llinda Jackson- Treasurer 
Lisa Turner-Secretary 
Scott Beacham-Xappa Sigma 
Timothy Beacham-Xappa Sigma 
Leslie Bitner (not pictured) 
James Brisentine-Zfappa Sigma 
Joanna Burke-Delta Gamma 

Janet Burton-Gamma Phi Beta 
Kevin Campbell-Xappa Alpha 
Sarah Carrol-.-1/pAa Gamma Delta 
Jeffrey Carson (not pictured) 
Tina Coda-Delta Gamma 
Allen Dawson-S/gma (hi 
Don Hankinson-FIJI 
Sarah Harbuck-Delta Gamma 
Jennifer Harthun-Si;ma Kappa 

Melisha liedrick (not pictured) 
Maurice Hollingsworth-P/Ace 
Dana Holland-Pm Mu 
Matt Smith- A appa Alpha 
Tom Svoboda-FIJI 
Julie Thompson-Pi' Beta Phi 
Barbara Wallers-.SVgma Kappa 
Beth Windsor-DWfa Gamma 
Jimmy Wright 



SIGMA 
GAMMA RHO 



One of the newest groups on campus, 
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Gamma Chi 
Chapter is only three years old, being 
reactivated at MSU in 1981. 

The sorority is led by Anita Merri- 
weather, president; Lydia Miley, vice 
president; and Ortania Carson, secretary- 
treasurer. 

A social sorority, the group promotes 
leadership, friendship, scholarship and 
community activity. SGR members parti- 
cipated in the Channel 3 Television Health 
Fair, Muscular Dystrophy Fund Raiser, 
Greeks Treat St. Joseph and Sigma Week. 
Other philanthropic interests are the Na- 
tional Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People, Sickle Cell Foundation, 
March of Dimes, Hemophilia Foundation 
and LeBonheur Hospital. 

The MSU chapter is affiliated with 
national Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, 
Inc., which was founded at Butler Uni- 
versity in Indianapolis in 1922. 




I 

■ v 






'*> 




284 Order of Omega/Sigma Gamma Rho 



DELTA ZETA 




Kathryn Thompson 
President 



Sandy Dutcher 

Vice President Pledge 



Frances Washburn 
Recording Secretary 



Melissa Harris 
Open Rush 




Nkki CroweO 
Vice President 



Lisa Hatchett 
Corresponding Secretary 



Cindy Burton 
Treasurer 




Sonya Barker 
Merri Beth Bread. y 
Karen Dkkey 



Mary Eanes 
Nancy Giaroii 
Stephanie Harris 



Mary Hartsoch 
Judy Lunati 
Elizabeth Massey 



Susan McKee 
Kelly Prince 
Rhonda Richards 



Diane Riggins 
Mary Anne Riggins 
Linda Thompson 



Shaneen Tuley 
Tina Watkins 
Deana Wike 




Delta Zeta is an active member of the 
Greek system at Memphis State. Every 
Monday evening, the 34 ladies of Delta 
Zeta hold their meeting to chart out some 
of their many activities. 

The Delta Zeta Sorority received several 
awards and honors last year. Having re- 
ceived first place in the All-Sing Mixed 
Divison, the members revved up their 
spirits again to capture the Anchor Splash 
Spirit Award. Delta Zeta's Lisa Hatchett 
was awarded the title of Miss Memphis 
and was a Homecoming Court Candidate. 
The Most Improved Scholarship in the 
Panhellenic was also awarded to Delta 
Zeta along with the Philanthropy Award 
for the 19th Province in Tennessee. The 
sorority gives the Ruth Younghanse Cren- 
shaw Award to an outstanding senior and 
an award to the year's Best Pledge and the 
Best Active. 

In order for a prospective Delta Zeta to 
pledge, she must have a 2.25 GPA. A 2.00 
GPA is necessary to be initiated. The ladies 
of Delta Zeta host the Delta Zeta Follies to 
raise money for a Greek Scholarship pro- 
gram. Nationally, Delta Zeta supports the 
Gualladet College for the Speech and 
Hearing Impaired in Washington State. 



Greeks 285 



ALPHA DELTA PI 




a An 



Alpha Delta Pi is in its 36th year at 
Memphis State. It was the first secret 
sorority for women at MSU, coming to 
Memphis in 1947. ADPi strives to unify 
sisterhood and to promote friendship and 
scholarship among its members and college. 
Ladies who pledge ADPi enjoy the warmth 
and friendliness of the sorority sisters. 

The sorority is enjoying national success 
with a new charter having been organized 
last year at Austin Peay State University in 
Clarksville, Tennessee. Several of the ADPi 
members from Memphis State helped with 
the installation in November of 1983. 

For a lady student to maintain her 
membership in ADPi, she must have a 2.0 
GPA. Alpha Delta Pi works with all the 
Greek organizations in the Panhellenic 
Council; it also supports the National 
Ronald McDonald House Program. The 
ladies of ADPi host a fall Barn Party in 
October and a Pledge-Active Dance in 
November. 

Each year the sorority presents the Fra- 
ternity of the Year Award to the fraternity 
that actively participates in Greek intra- 
mural activities. ADPi also bases its deci- 
sion on a fraternity's scholarship standing. 

Alpha Delta Pi was proud to have 
Melisha Hedrick elected as Greek Woman 
of the Year! 



Roniann Gruenewald, President 

Joanne Longfield, Vice President of Efficiency 

Amy Buckner, Vice President of Pledge Education 

Cynthia Hough, Treasurer 

Catrina Osborne, Corresponding Secretary 



Jean Bolton, Panhellenic Delegate 

Laura Miller, Rush Chairman 

Caryn Coffey, Scholarship Chairman 

Lyndi Whipple, Standards Chairman 

Sherri Pate, Reporter/ Historian 

Melissa Schifani, Guard 

Mary Angela Cremerius, Registrar 

Leigh Payne, Junior Member At Large 

Not Pictured: 

Melissa Davis, Recording Secretary 

Ann Pulliam, Membership Chairman 

Lisa Warren, Chaplain 

Suzanne Pinson, House Chairman 

Melisha Hedrick, Senior Member At Large 




286 Greeks 




Sondra Acuff 
Angie Aviotti 
Mary Barnes 
Lisa Bogard 
Tracey Cagle 



Elizabeth Caron 
Cindy Chandler 
Cheryl Coffey 
Karen Crone 
Kathryn Doyle 



Amy Ewell 
Christy Guthrie 
Lee Hodnett 
Ramona Kleinaitis 
Keri Lowrey 



Suzanne Naylor 
Beth Nelson 
Whitney Northsworthy 
Kim Redden 
Carol Robins 



Deanna Rome 
Leigh Anne Rowell 
Tracy Ruddell 
Sherry Snead 
Susan Snead 



Kelli Sullivan 
Cindy Theiner 
Donna Thompson 
Lisa Towles 
Susan Wills 



Virginia Young 



Greeks 287 



ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 




AFA 



Alpha Gamma Delta sorority has plenty 
to show for its 37 years here at MSU. Ever 
since it came to Memphis State on April 12, 
1947, Alpha Gam has worked diligently in 
the Greek system at MSU and in the 
surrounding community. 

The ladies of Alpha Gam hold initiation 
into their sorority annually in January. 
There is frequently an initiation ceremony in 
May, depending on the number of Spring 
Rushees. Last year, Alpha Gamma Delta 
went from a pre-Rush 43 to a total of 66 
members after Rush. 

Along with the other sororities and fratern- 
ities on campus, Alpha Gam works with the 
Panhellenic, Pan-Hellenic and Interfratern- 
ity Councils. At the Greek Awards banquet 
last year, Alpha Gam received the Sorority 
of the Year Award for 1982-83. The sisters 
of Alpha Gam were also the Intramurals 
winners for the same years. In competition 
with the other sororities in All-Sing, Alpha 
Gamma Delta came away with first place. 
Their theme was "A Salute to the U SO. " The 
ladies sang songs from the '40s that were likely 
to have been sung to the troops on U SO tours. 
"Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree," "The 
Wild Blue Yonder"and "111 Be Seeing You" 
were a few of the songs from their program. 



Each year, Alpha Gam sponsors a balloon 
derby which benefits Juvenile Diabetes. The 
ladies raise money by selling balloons with a 
ticket attached to them. Last year, they 
raised nearly $500 for their charity. 

Alpha Gam strongly encourages scholastic 
achievement among its sisters. Members 
must have a 2.0 GPA to maintain their mem- 
bership; there are also required study ses- 
sions for the pledges and actives. There are 
several awards given within the chapter. 
Best Pledge Award, Activities Woman of the 
Year and other awards promote study and 
involvement among the sorority members. 

Alpha Gam's year is full of many scheduled 
activities. All-Sing, Rush, Derby Day, Greek 
Week and Homecoming are yearly events 
that the ladies look forward to. Alpha Gam 
hosts their formal, the Rose and Buff Cotil- 
lion, and participates in the Cerebral Palsy 
Fashion Show, Banner and Car-Decorating 
contests and a Pledge-Alumni dinner. Par- 
ents' Tea, Teachers' Tea and Christmas 
parties are held yearly also. 

The ladies of Alpha Gamma Delta enjoy 
their work and fun during the year, and they 
enjoyed a successful year last year with 
many honors, awards and memories to 
show for their work. 



Officers 



Ann Williams (Not Pictured) 

Jamie McMillan 

Lori Nixon 

Laurie Stephan 

Debbie Vaught 







Gloria Vaught (Not Pictured) 

Beth Lawrence 

Penni Sharp 

Kelly Lewis (Not Pictured) 

Emily Riales 



Connie Maples (Not Pictured) 

Sarah Carroll 

Sandy Webb 

Cynthia Gillam (Not Pictured) 

Karen Ford (Not Pictured) 

Machelle Lard 









Members 



Ellen Andrews 

Stefanie Ashcraft 

Angela Britt 






288 Greeks 






Angela Browning 
Alecia Boyd 
Kristen Coleman 






Lori Dawson 
Denise Drummond 
Alise Grogan 






Jeanna Harris 
Jenny Hurst 
Jane Knight 






Karen Koleas 
Maria McNatt 
Debra Pipkin 






Kimberly Oeding 
Laurie Pittmen 
Terri Roberson 







Beth Robinson 
Stephanie Sanders 
Charleyn Sipes 
Angela Thomas 






Lisa Turner 
Melanie Ward 
Yunetta Williams 



Greeks 289 



PI BETA PHI 




Pi Beta Phi has been very successful ever 
since it came to Memphis State in 1962. 
Nationally, it is the 2nd largest sorority. 
Among the national fraternities for women, 
Pi Beta Phi ranks as the largest. Nation- 
wide, the sorority supports Arrowmont, 
Arrow in the Arctic, and the Holt House. 

Pi Beta Phi prides itself on the many 
honors and awards it has received. Among 



these are the titles of the highest pledge 
GPA and highest overall GPA. 

The ladies of Pi Beta Phi present the 
Mrs. Rawls Award on an annual basis for 
the outstanding Greek leader of the year. 
Officers not pictured below are Karen 
Crader, Treasurer, and Lisa Koehler, 
Secretary. 



TIBO 



Julie Thompson 
President 



Susan Todd 

Vice President of Mental A dvancement 




Amy George Tory Byrd 

Vice President of Moral A dvancement Vice President of Social A dvancemer 



Donna Allen 
Amelia Askew 
Melissa Bobo 
Karen Bratcher 
Patti Brown 

Ginny Burks 
Teresa Cardosi 
Ginger Craven 
Joan Depperschmidt 

Jennifer Doring 

Jennifer Duncan 
DeeDee Enos 




290 Greeks 




Allison Grisanti 
Laura Hall 

Kathleen Hamilton 
Dana Hardeman 
Debbie Hardison 
Fay Beth Harrison 
Laura Hart 
Beth Harty 
Julie Holmes 
Kathryn Hume 
Gina Hurley 



Angela Jones 



Terry Lupo 



Cathy Montgomery 



Sheila Newell 



Lisa O'Neil 



Teresa Paluso 



Mary Peel 



Betty Pipkin 



Stacey Shanks 



Christie Shipley 



Jennifer Stratton 



Mary Thompson 



Susie Thompson 



Melanie Vescovo 



Susan Webb 



Mary Webb 



Cheryl West 



Lynn Wooten 



Kathleen Yatsula 



Greeks 291 



DELTA GAMMA 





Delta Gamma has served as a good 
example of a sorority at Memphis State 
since its inception in 1965, and 1983 was no 
exception. Founded nationally at Lewis 
School for Girls (now Ole Miss) in 1875, 
Delta Gamma has effectively combined the 
scholastic and social aspects of campus life 
and extended their influence throughout the 
community. 

The Delta Gams were awarded for their 
efforts — honored as the most outstanding 
chapter in Province IX which includes West 
Tennessee, Louisiana and Mississippi. The 
ladies also won spirit trophies for the home- 
coming pep rally and Greek Week. The 
sorority excelled athletically, headed by 
Anna Marie Mottola, and was crowned 
Intramural Champion for Spring of 1983. 

With help from panhellenic delegate Ann 



Burton, fraternity education advisor Conde 
Windsor and historian-activities chairman 
Lee Farmer, the members have worked 
closely with other campus organizations to 
instill support for campus unity. Putting 
forth much time and effort at Memphis 
State does not limit the Delta Gams from 
aiding charities, though, especially the 
blind. 

Social chairman Kim Rawls has planned 
to make 1984 an even better year with 
pledge swaps, formal and informal rushes 
and many dance formals. When the Delta 
Gammas meet in February at the annual 
Province Leadership School at Ole Miss, 
they will be looking to repeat as outstanding 
province chapter and to prove that sororities 
are an important part of a university such as 
Memphis State. 




Tina Coda 
President 



Officers 



Ann Burton 
Panhellenic Delegate 





Sara Harbuck 

Vice President of Chapter Relations 



Kate Cychowski 
House Manager 





Jennifer Nunley 
Treasurer 



Lisa Massa 
Recording Secretary 





Beth Windsor 

Vice President of Pledge Education 



Valerie Bigham 
Corresponding Secretary 




292 Greeks 




Kelly Allen 
Marie Amagliani 
JoAnna Angelo 
Tricia Aviotti 
Traci Benson 




Jan Booker 
Ginny Buzzard 
Tracey Coleman 
Jannifer Criswell 
Angela Dixon 




Victoria Gannett 
Jill Glasser 
Leesa Graff 
Margaret Hay 
Carol Hill 




Dawn Johnson 
Maria Limbaugh 
Katharine Meece 
Missy Melvin 
Ten Mitchell 




Louise Craig Moore 
Karla Muller 
Amay Ramia 
Ann Reeves 
Melodie Rickard 




Felicia Smith 
Kim Smith 
Belinda Stiedle 
Sheryl Strayhom 
Parti Wakim 




Lorri Warren 

Melissa Ann Wilson, Foundation Chairman 

Carrie Windsor 

Conde Windsor, Fraternity Education 

Jenny Winterowd 



Greeks 293 



PHIMU 



•xV//> 




<S>M 



The Kappa Lambda Chapter of Phi Mu 
was installed at Memphis State in March 
of 1947 at a ceremony at the Peabody. As 
one of the first National Panhellenic 
Council groups installed at MSU, Phi Mu 
is the second oldest National Organization 
for Women. 

Because of their busy schedule last year, 
the sisters of Phi Mu have received many 
awards and honors. At the Leadership 
Conference at Ole Miss last July, Phi Mu 
won the Phi Mu slogan contest. Phi Mu"s 
Melanie Trout was the winner of the 
Mermaid Contest at Delta Gamma's 
Anchor Splash last year, and Sharon 
Russell was named Miss Memphis State. 



Phi Mu's Barn Party and Alumni-Col- 
legiate Party were held last year, and, 
needlss to say, a good time as had by all! 
Phi Mu participated in the Student Or- 
ganizations Fair and Sigma Chi's Derby 
Day festivities. 

The ladies of Phi Mu must maintain a 
2.0 GPA to remain in good standing. The 
Most Improved Scholarship Award is given 
annually by Phi Mu at the Greek Awards 
Banquet. Phi Mu supports a different 
charity each year. Last year, Phi Mu raised 
and donated money to Multiple Sclerosis. 
Nationaly, Phi Mu supports Project HOPE 
(Health Opportunities for People Every- 
where). 





Cindy Taylor-President 



Gina Gonzales- Treasurer (not pictured) 



Lawrie Rash- Vice President 




Georgina Noble-Secretary 



Cindy Dwight-Panhellenic Delegate (not pictured) 




Harriet White-Provisional Member Director 



294 Phi Mu 




Tracy Anderson 
Carla Andreas 
Gina Borron 
Joanna Breeden 
Bonnie Buckner 



Denise Casad 
Michelle Casad 
Scarlett Cavagnaro 
Lynn Chiles 
Sandra Collins 



Lauren Crislip 
Faith Crisp 
Donna Ellis 
Kathy Halamka 
Dana Holland 



Cheron Huffman 
Leslie Irvine 
Lisa Irvine 
Christina Johnson 
Donna McClain 



Elizabeth Moore 
Terrie Nixon 
Camille Rash 
Sharon Russell 
Karen Russom 



Krista Smith 
Tamara Smith 
Jill Smothers 
Angela Swords 
Irene Templeton 



Terri Thweatt 
Sherry Treece 
Melanie Trout 
Michelle Trout 
Tammie Wilson 



Phi Mu 295 



SIGMA KAPPA 



The Sigma Kappa Sorority has been 
established on the Memphis State campus 
for the last thirty-seven years. They were 
officially founded May 3, 1947, as the 
second sorority at Memphis State. The 
forty-five member sorority gives its support, 
partitipation, and dedication to the campus 
and community. Their purpose is to help 
make each sister the most of what she can 
and wants to be. Through their activities to 
the school and community this goal is 
achieved. 

The Sigma Kappas participate in such 
campus events as All Sing, Greek Week, 
Derby Day, the Sigma Kappa Fall Party, 
the Sigma Kappa Crown Pearl Ball, and 
Pledge Swaps. The sisters work closely 
with their own Alum Group. 

Gerentology is their local philanthropy. 
Visits, songs, home-made items and parties 
are just a few of the treats given to the local 
elerly in the area. Their National Philan- 
thropies are the Maine Sea Coast Mission 
and the American Farm School. The Maine 





Sea Coast mission helps tne underprivi- 
ledged in the Maine area, and the Farming 
School is located in Greece and educates 
Greek children on the fundamentals of 
farming in hopes of preventing the children 
from living a life of poverty. 

This year the Sigma Kappas were 
awarded first place in the All Sing Small 
Division, second overall with intramural 
wins, the "Turkey Trot" with Miss Suzi 
Feyen, and recognition from the National 
Sigma Kappa for excellent service with 
Alum-Active relations. Four sisters were 
initiated into the Order of Omega this year 
as well. 

The Sigma Kappa Sorority requires a 
minimum of 2.00 GPA. Study buddies, 
quiet hours, as well as a teacher file are 
offered to help maintain high grades. 
Scholarships are awarded each year, one to 
the Most Outstanding Senior and one to 
the most outstanding Sigma Kappa in the 
form of the Outstanding Sigma Award. 



Barbara Walters-President 




Laura Lewis- Vice President 



Jennifer Harthun-Seconrf Vice 
President of Membership Selection 





Officers 



Ilinda Jackson-Second Vice President 
of Pledge Education 




Lucinda Rio-Secretary 



Carol Brice-Panhellenic Delegate 




296 Greeks 




Sylvia Amminger 





Jennifer Blair 





Shirley Davis 





Denise Enoch 





Nancy Harthun 




Lynn Baine 



LeAnne Briley 



Cindy Dismukes 



Debra Fisher 



Cindy Hinson 



Christy James 





Candy Love 




Tracy McElrath 




Perrian Prokopchak 



Theresa Rosenberger 





Virginia Shea 



Valerie Smith 





Michele Wheat 



Lisa Hernandez 



Nancy Wood 





Greeks 297 



ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 



Q ^D 




In 1908, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority became America's first Greek letter organization 
established by and for black women. With an international nucleus of more than 70,000 
service oriented sorors, AKA has continuously etched her footprints in the sands of time. 
The innumerable imprints have addressed the needs, issues and problems of the day. The 
MSU Epsilon Epsilon Chapter was chartered in 1968. Since that time, the ladies of AKA 
have been involved in many campus and community activities. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha was established as a service organization. Today their influence and 
concerns stretch far beyond campus gates and student interests. The major goals of 
program activities center upon significant issues in AKA's larger national life and focus on 
areas which range from remote corners of 
depressed communities to world-wide cares 
and concerns. Epsilon Epsilon is locally 
giving service as the only undergraduate 
adopter of a city school, granting scholar- 
ships and aide to its students. 

The list of honors and recognitions that 
AKA has received lately is lengthy and 
impressive. The Black Student Association 
of MSU awarded AKA with a Certificate of 
Award for Dedication and Service last 
February. Last March, AKA received the 
following awards at the 51st Southeastern 
Regional Conference, held in Biloxi, Missis- 
sippi,: 1st Place Civic Involvement Award, 
1st Place Undergraduate Achievement A- 
ward and 1st Place Pictorial History Award. 

AKA also received a Certificate of Appre- 
ciation from the American Heart Association 
for sponsoring a Jump-a-thon for charity. 
The ladies also were recognized by Lincoln 
Elementary School for their volunteer service 
there. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha also supports the 
NAACP, UNICEF, UNCF, NCNW, AKA 
Cleveland Job Corps Center, Sickle Cell 
Anemia, LeBonheur Children's Research 
Hospital and a local senior citizen's home. 

The members of AKA must maintain a 
2.5 GPA in order to stay in the sorority. 
AKA gives the Prominent Black Woman 
Award on an annual basis, along with 
Barbara K. Phillips Scholarships and Lead- 
erships grants. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha's calendar year is a 
very busy one. September is the month that 
AKA schedules their AKA Week on campus. 
Founder's Day is also in September. AKA's 
Prominent Black Woman Banquet is held in 
October, and the Sweetheart dance, the 
Pink and Green Ball, is held in December at 
the Benchmark Hotel. March is the month 
for AKA's Regional Conference, held in 
Nashville, and a Senior Banquet is held in 
May. Each month, AKA invites a group of 
Lincoln Elementary students to MSU for a 
planned program. 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is obviously 
a very busy and productive organization 
here on campus. The ladies are very proud 
of their sorority, and MSU and the city of 
Memphis are fortunate to have such an 
organization here. 



Officers 

(Not Pictured) 

Sandra Bland 

Grammateus (Secretary) 

Sharon Ivy 
Tamiouchos (Treasurer) 



Irene F. Hewlett 
BasHeus (President) 




Theasese Steward 
Anti-Basileus (Vice President) 




Lisa R. Waddell 
Dean of Pledges 





Jayne Chandler 
Natalie Hopkins 




Clifferdean Newborn 
Constance Sellers 



Bernetta West 
LaVere Willis 



AKA 



298 Greeks 



Phi Sigma Kappa 




J. Keith Ackerman Dean Carayiannis 




William Clements 





Roger Porter 




Mark DuBoise 

The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity was 
established at Memphis State in May of 
1 969. With the twenty-fifth aniversary came 
some changes. The brothers started a new 
little sister program and a new alumni 
program. This year the alumni donated 
money to refurbish the front room of the 
house. Some other changes on the board 
include renovating the old house or buying 
a new one, but these plans are still on the 
drawing board. 

The 25 member fraternity enjoys a close 
feeling of unity and brotherhood that 



Leonard Tiscia 




Angela Carr 
Little Sister 




Tammy Meadows 
Little Sister 




Joe Cutrell 




Daniel Pallme 

cannot be found in larger groups. All the 
brothers work and maintain at least a 2.0 
GPA at the same time. As a working 
fraternity, there is not always time for the 
many different greek events; however, they 
do participate in all events that aid good 
causes. Within the last year, the Phi Sigs 
helped raise money for a local politician, 
St. Jude's Childrens Research Hospital 
and the Kidney Foundation. The brothers 
had apoclipse now, still in saigon, ship 
wreck and moonlight ball as some of their 
themes for the larger parties given this 
year. 




Lawrence Smith 





Amy Burgess 
Little Sister 




Tricia Laseter 
Little Sister 




Tammy Small 
Little Sister 



Cady Waddington 
Little Sister 



Sandra West 
Little Sister 



Phi Sigma Kappa 299 



Golden Hearts of SIGMA PHI EPSILON 



2$E 




Officers 

Tina 0\dham-President 

Mary Epsy- Vice President 

Terri Th weatt-/? ecording Secretary 

Beth Howard-Corresponding Secretary 

Lawrie Rash-Parliamentarian 

Tay Gi\\-Historian 



The Golden Hearts, sister organization to 
the brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon, focuses all 
itw attention on assisting the brothers of Sig 
Ep with all social functions and charitable 
activities. 

The primary community activity is ac- 
companying Sig Ep on their annual outing 
for Memphis orphans, although the Golden 
Hearts continue a series of fund-raising and 
social activities throughout the year in 
support of the fraternity's men. 

The Golden Hearts are proud to represent 
their fraternity brothers and enjoy their work 
with Sig Ep. 

Initiation into Golden Hearts is held every 
spring. 




• 



Johnna Breeden 




Elizabeth Edwards 




Carol Gray 






Brenda Howard 




Judy Kay 



Constance McCullough 



Terri Nixon 





Tina Oldham Kristen Parker 





Kelli Sullivan 



Irene Templeton 




Terri Thweatt Sherry Treece 



300 Greeks 



LITTLE SISTERS OF THE CRIMSON CROSS 



OFFICERS 

Beth McLeod-President 
Jenny Hurst- Vice President 
Tracy Cochran-Secretary 

(not pictured) 
Susan Panni-Treasurer 
Stephanie McCar\er-Parliamen(arian 

(not pictured) 







Tracey Brennan 
Elaine Collie 



Lisa Conner 
Mary Cristina 
Linda Giaroli 




Nancy Giaroli 
Debbie Hardison 
Sandra Horton 
Leigh Huckaby 



Established in the early 70's, the Little 
Sisters of the Crimson Cross support the 
activities of their brothers in Kappa Alpha 
and represent the hospitality attributed to 
the belles of the South. 

Each month, the little sisters award the 
Gentleman of the Month Award to the 
active who has best displayed the idea of a 
southern gentleman. They also award the 
Gentleman of the Year Award in May to 
the brother who has shown the character- 
istics of a gentleman throughout the year. 
Matt Smith received the award for 1982- 
1983. 

Little Sister Rush is held in February 
and the annual Casino Party is held in 
March. Last February, the sisters threw a 
surprise Valentine's party for their brothers. 
The Black and White Formal is held yearly 
in April. Also in April was a softball battle 
between the little sisters of Kappa Alpha 
and those of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. The 
Sisters of the Crimson Cross help their 
brothers with their support of Muscular 
Dystrophy in their many fund raisers. 




Gina Hundley 
Teresa Hunter 
Dena Hurdle 
Kathy Krieger 
Joanne Longfield 




Sherri Pate 

Patti Prendergrast 

Betty Pipkin 

Stacy Sanders 

Beth Anne Sanderson 

Lori Schoen 

Charleyn Sipes 
Cathy Smith 
Stacy Stewart 
Tracie Toggart 
Donna Thompson 
Susan Wills 



Little Sisters of the Crimson Cross 301 



KAPPA ALPHA 




KA 



"We're number one!" Kappa Alpha exclaims, pointing out that the fraternity is both 
the oldest and the largest on the Memphis State campus. 

As the biggest big brothers, Kappa Alphas work closely with the Interfraternity 
Council, Student Government Association and the Student Ambassador Board. The 
93 members explain their purpose as promoting brotherhood and social interaction. 
And of course, traditions of good old southern hospitality, as their busy social 
schedule shows. 

Activities this year included Burger Bust, Old South Week, a luau, Black and White 
formal, and Halloween, Christmas and New Year's Eve parties for a start. Other 
projects including a Homecoming float, Homecoming Party and participation in the 
Miss MSU Pageant. Kappas also sponsored a national leadership institute. 

When the Kappas raise their voices in song, they make it count, as they showed by 
winning the Greek All-Sing award and then going on to take the overall award. They 
were also winners of Greek Week and managed to raise more money than any other 
fraternity for the Muscular Distrophy Association drive. 

Matt Smith is chapter president; Kevin Campbell, vice president; Greg Singleton, 
secretary; Kenny Madden, corresponding secretary; Scott Miles, historian; David 
Kelly, treasurer; Scott McCall, parliamentarian; Joe Mahar, doorkeeper, and George 
Davis, ritualist. 

The chapter was started on the Memphis State campus in October, 1948. 



Kevin Campbell 
Vice President 





David Kelly 
Treasurer 




Matt Smith 
President 





Greg Singleton 
Secretary 



Kenny Madden 
Corresponding Secretary 



Scott Miles 
Historian 




George Davis 
Ritualist 




302 Greeks 





ttii 




*aiifc 





William Baggett 
John Biggs 
Jon Bunnell 
Cary Coppock 
Glenn Coyle 
Kenneth Daniels 



Robert Fulp 
Greg Galvin 
Harper Goode 
Daniel Hall 
Douglas HArvey 
Tony Hayes 



Todd Hughes 
John Hundley 
Ken Hunt 
Robert James 
Ronnie King 
Art Kuntzman 



Scott Linder 
Phillip Macdonald 
Thomas McKenzie 
Van Montgomery 
Mark Pannel 
Charles Patton 



Michael Peavy 

Randy "Big Boy" Richardson 

Tommy Richmond 

Fred Roberts 

David Robinson 

Medford Rockstroh 



Rick Ronza 
Jack Rosenkranz 
Bill Shaw 
Lonnie Sheppard 
Ricky Stewart 
Kenneth Stonebrook 



Curtis Swope 
James Taylor 
Kevin Vaughn 
Rick Wilson 
Curt Wren 



Greeks 303 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 




Gaylon Harris-President 




Steve Hughes- Treasurer 



OFFICERS (not pictured) 



Scott Nance- Vice President 



Tim Matheson-Secretary 



John Huffman-Parliamentarian 




riKA 



Pi Kappa Alpha was one of the first 
fraternities at MSU, coming to Memphis 
State in December of 1947. in 1968, Pi 
Kappa Alpha received the Smythe Award 
as outstanding chapter in the nation. The 
fraternity has also received the Newell 
Award and the Fraternity of the Year 
Award since its rebirth in 1981. The Pikes 
were awarded the Regional Award for 
Outstanding Pledge Program, too. 

The gentlemen of Pi Kapa Alpha support 
the Big Brothers of Memphis with their 
time, efforts, and donations. Members of 
Pi Kappa Alpha must have a 2.0 GPA to be 
initiated into the fraternity. Awards are 
given on an annual basis to the most 
improved active GPA, the highest pledge 
GPA, and the highest big brother and little 
brother combined GPA. 

Vice Presient Scott Nance, Secretary 
Tim Matheson,and Parliamentarian John 
Huffman worked wih the presient and 
treasurer of the fraternity to achieve a 
record year in the history of the Pikes at 
MSU. ' 






fcJLJI m % tMJk 



Tim Albonetti 
Michael Carroll 
Clay Chamberlain 






Chris Coleman 
Brian Devine 
John Duncan 



Carl Elliot 
Conn Ellis 
Joe Flynn 






Mac Gardner 

Jerry Goin 

Chris Gruenwald 






304 Pi Kappa Alpha 



41. '* 




Jon Harlan 

Maurice Hollingsworth 

Michael Hoffman 




tilt 



Tim Huffaker 
James Jacobs 
Jene McGuffee 




Robert Nanney 
Mike Orians 
Steve Orians 



PIKES 




:»« 




Lou Pagano 
Thomas E. Roehm III 
Bubba Rush 




J* Ik 4* 



Joey Solomito 
John Solomito 
Rich Thomas 



r 



A* AM 




Randy Tims 
Andy VanVulpen 
Shawn Watts 




Pat Winstead 



Pi Kappa Alpha 305 



SISTERS OF THE SHIELD 

AND DIAMOND 



The newly organized Sisters of the Shield 
and Diamond serves as an auxiliary support 
group for the brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha. 
The twenty ladies who were Pike Little sisters 
last year helped their Greek brothers in their 
support of-Big Brothers of Memphis and the 
Oak Hall Run for Saint Jude's Children's 



Hospital. They also co-sponsored the annual 
Dream Girl Formal and the Chapter's Pot- 
lucks. Each year the little sisters honor a 
brother who has displayed superior leadership 
qualities with their Pike Man of the Year 
Award. 




Ellen Andrews 




Sherri Hollingsworth 





Ann Burton-President 



Jean Bolton 




Sarah Carroll 





Jan Hubbard 




Sheri Knight 




IIKA 



Angela Dixon 



Lisa Marenshi 





Denise Drummond 



Laurie Pittman 





Robin Gunn 



Becky Stotts 





Jeanne Harris 



Lori Whitaker 




306 Sisters of the Shield and Diamond 



SIGMA CHI'S LITTLE SIGMAS 



For the past 23 years, the Little Sigmas 
of Sigma Chi have worked primarily to 
benefit their fraternity brothers. The little 
sisters help with the fraternity's Rush 
schedule and in planning and giving parties 
throughout the year. 

The fifty ladies who were chosen to be 
Little Sigmas last yearawarded their annual 
Man-of-the-Year Award to the brother 
that they considered to have shown out- 
standing leadership ablities. The Little 
Sigmas enjoy their work with Sigma Chi; 
they benefited from a productive year in 
the 83-84 school year under the directorship 
of their liason, Tim Tomes. 




OFFICERS 
Paula Massa- Treasurer 
Debra Scott- Vice President of Rush 
(not pictured) 

Tracey Hitt-Secretaryfnot pictured) 
Shelley Zenner-Sweetheart 






Sherri Bishop 




Lisa Bogard 




Karen Bratcher 





Caryn Coffey 




Emily Riales 




Faith Crisp 




Lucinda Rio 




Alise Grogan 




Beth Robinson 



Janet Burton 




Julie Holmes 




Tamara Smith 




Michelle Casad 




Candy House 




Regina Trull 



Sigma Chi Little Sigmas 307 



SIGMA CHI 





Allen Dawson-President 




Ever since their arrival at Memphis 
State in June of 1954, the gentlemen of 
Sigma Chi have had a strong belief in 
community, civic and campus activities. 
The brothers of Sigma Chi are composed 
of many different temperaments, talents, 
and convictions. 

Sigma Chi supports the Wallace Village 
for Abused Children, in Boulder, Colorado. 
They also raise and donate money to Saint 
Jude Children's Hospital, the Christian 
Children's Fund, Muscular Dystrophy and 
Cerebral Palsy research and National 
Hemophilia Foundation. 

The members of Sigma Chi work closely 
with the Panhellenic Council and the 
Interfraternity Council. Last year's busy 
schedule proved to be beneficial to Sigma 
Chi. The fraternity received first place in 
the Greek Fashion Show and All-Sing 
Poster Contest. They took second place in 
Intramurals and All-Sing Mixed Division 
with Pi Beta Phi Sorority. They also placed 
third in Greek Week Festivities. 

At the annual Greek Awards banquet, 
Sigma Chi gives the highest GPA recog- 
nition award for the most deserving pledge. 
Sigma Chi is the sponsor of Derby Day at 
MSU, in which all the sororities participate. 
They also sponsor the Sweetheart's Ball 
and Little Sigma Halloween Party. The 
Greek Fashion Show, Homecoming, Bro- 
therhood Day and Greek Ladies Night are 
also yearly events with Sigma Chi. 

Not pictured below is Phil Feisal-Rush 
Chairman. 




Chris Holliday- Vice President 



Robert Ford-Treasurer 






Tim Tomes-Recording Secretary 



Geary Hamm 



James Rowland-Corresponding Secretary 





Rob Shuster-Editor 



308 Greeks 







ilAI 










lAAMM 




I "^* ^m i* 




pf*.F 


ilk 











tiM m M 






H^tfl M^Jm 



Scott Alexander 
Rod Bizzell 
Michael Boone 
John Bowers 
Jeff Chambers 



Lee Conley 
Gene Consterdine 
David Couch 
Eric Counce 
Ward Deaton 



Craig Emerine 
William Germany 
Tracy Gilliam 
Paul Gordon 
James Gremes 



Authur Gut 
Robert Howard 
Layn Huffman 
Walter Kallaher 
Jamie Luckett 



Steven McAdoo 
Kevin McNeese 
Jeff Mech 
Mark Meihofer 
Dan Millard 



Tim Nelson 
Aaron Owens 
Jay Perkins 
Scott Perry 
Mark Renfrow 



Kirk Riggins 
Brent Robertson 
Sean Robinson 
Richard Rose 
Richard Royle 





Paul Sloan 
Tommy Sloan 
Tony Tabb 
Vince Taylor 
Jeff Teague 






Steve Rone 
Scott Walker 
Allen Ward 
Craig Willingham 
Matthew Wilson 
Doug Wright 



Greeks 309 



PI KAPPA PHI 




Officers 



Jeff Drake-Archon 

David Forrest- Vice A rchon 

Robert Balestrino- Treasurer 

Trey Moore-Secretary 

Mike DePriest- W arden 

Gary Bridgman-//«fo/7a/i 

Mark Brown-Chaplain 



nK$ 



Tim Baldridge 



Robert Balestrino 
Mark Brown 



Jeffrey Drake 

Glenn Gallagher 

Shawn Massey 

Trey Moore 



Adam Follow 
Shane Russell 

Hary Simpkins 
James Terrett 

Eric Thompson 




Bill Byer 

Patrick Crockett 

Michael DePriest 



Formed to promote fellowship, honor, 
and mutual trust among its members, the 
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity was founded as 
the Gamma Delta Chapter at MSU in 
May, 1966. The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi 
strive to uphold the traditions and ideas 
of Memphis State and to encourage 
academic excellence among its members. 

A 2.0 GPA is required of anyone who 
wishes to pledge Pi Kappa Phi and is also 
required of its active members. Joining 
the fraternity has many advantages. 
Members can participate in activities 
such as parties, local and national meet- 
ings, dancees, charity events, and many 
other gatherings. 

The fraternity awards the Gary E. 
Heing Most Dedicated Brother Award, 
the Best Plidge Award, and the David C 
George Highest GPA Award to the 
brothers who most deserve these honors. 

The fraternity had a very busy schedule 
last year. They participated in the Area V 
Conclave, during which 1 6 chapters from 
across the South-Central United States 
send representatives. The Gamma Delta 
Chapter sent 15 brothers to Birmingham, 
Alabama, to represent their chapter. 

The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi are 
active in the Spottswood Neighborhood 
Association. They also support their 
national philanthropy. Project PUSH 
(Play Units for the Severely Handicap- 
ped). During the 1983-84 school year, Pi 
Kappa Phi raised $1,000 for this project. 



310 Greeks 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 



Lambda Chi Alpha has tried to find a few new twists to the normal manner in which a 
fraternity is run. They have succeeded in stressing scholastics first, due mainly to the 
efforts of scholarship chairman Rick Krapels (not pictured below). By implementing 
group study sessions, grade reports and teacher reports, a high academic status for the 
brothers of Lambda Chi is ensured. 

The gentlemen do take time out for a little fun, though. Competing in the annual 
Anchor Splash swimming event, Lambda Chi Alpha has reigned as champion four times. 
Second place honors also were earned this year for their talents during All Sing. Last 
year, Lambda Chi won the Water Ballet, Mr. Muscles and Spirit awards at Anchor 
Splash. 




Danny Bousson 
President 




Scott Werner 
Vice President 




John Giaroli 
Treasurer 




The brothers of Lambda Chi serve the 
needs of Les Passes Rehabilitation Center, 
the Kidney Foundation and Cystic Fibrosis. 
Inside the fraternity, the leaders of Lambda 
Chi Alpha have given new members an 
opportunity to fit right in. Rush chairman 
last fall was Daryl Fowler (not pictured 
below). With an associate member system 
that replaces the common pledge system, 
Lambda Chi gives their members a chance 
to have equal rights which allows the 
fraternity as a whole to run more smoothly. 




AXA 




Pete Pinckney, Secretary 
Tommy Powell, Social Chairman 
Billy Pickens, Fraternity Educator 
Steve Bell, Alumni Relations 
Brent Bousson, Ritualist 




Kenneth Baroff 
Paul Berryhill 
John Chenault 
Robert Duncan 
Anthony Frulla 



Al Gabriel 
Eddie Giaroli 
William Griffith 
John Ham 
Jeffrey Hume 



Donald Jones 
Tommy Joyner 
Ryan Rally 
Anthony Kiepe 
Mark McKee 



Shaun O 'Bryant 
James Phifer 
Bennett Thompson 
Greg Younger 
Frank Zorbino 



Greeks 311 



KAPPA SIGMA 



KS 



Don Hollingsworth 

Bobby January 

William Jones 

Jay Jordan 

Douglas Kirkpatrick 



Brian Krock 
Kenneth Lomas 

Will Merritt 
Keith Patterson 



Jeff Autrey 
Timothy Beacham 



Kevin Dulin 

Gary Evans 

Jeffrey Heavey 



Mark Hodges 




Mark Reynolds 



Steven Sarver 
Carl Shafer 
Shad Sletto 




David Wood 
Jimmy Wright 



Won Yun 



312 Greeks 



Chartered at Memphis State in 1951, 
Kappa Sigma has had many years of hard 
work, prestigious honors and plain fun. 

The 35 gentlemen of Kappa Sigma 
were involved in many activities through- 
out the year. The District 12 Conclave 
was held in March of 1983. Seven chapters 
from West Tennessee and West Kentucky 
gathered at MSU for a weekend of semi- 
nars and workshops. Along with Kappa 



Sig's Valentine's Day Party was the fra- 
ternity's Bahama Mama Party, held in 
April. At the party, a vacation in the 
Bahamas was raffled off. The fraternity 
also hosted two Back-to-School Parties 
and a Halloween Party. The Little Sisters 
of the fraternity (The Stardusters) hosted 
a Starduster Ball for their Greek brothers. 
Kappa Sigma also had a Founder's Day 
gathering on December 10th, celebrating 




Jimmy Brisentine 
Grand Master 




David Moss 
Grand Procurator 




Tim Roberts 

Grand Master of Ceremonies 




the founding of their fraternity. Every 
two years there is a Grand Conclave, a 
national convention for the fraternity. 
Last year this was held in Knoxville at the 
World's Fair Holiday Inn. 

The members of Kappa Sigma actively 
emphasize the importance of studying. 
Study sessions for actives and pledges are 
held to help all members maintain the 2.0 
GPA necessary to be a member of the 
fraternity. An award is given to the Big 
Brother/ Litle Sister with the highest 
GPA. 

At the Biennial Grand Conclave, Kappa 
Sigma received awards for the Most 
Improved Chapter, the Most Improved 
District, the Top Scholarship Award for 
continuously exceeding the All Fraternity 
and All Men's averages, and also a Chap- 
ter Standards Award for excellence in 
Chapter programs. 

Curt Meier was awarded the Grand 
Scribe Efficiency Award, and the Ritual 
Proficiency Award was given to Jimmy 
Brisentine and Scott Beacham. 

During Greek Week, Kappa Sigma's 
Cary Pappas was named Fraternity of the 
Year and, along with Scott Beacham and 
Jimmy Brisentine, was inducted into the 
Order of Omega, an honor society for 
Greek members at MSU. 

Kappa Sigma had a very busy year last 
year, and the members have plenty to 
show for the hard work and endless 
efforts that they put into their fraternity. 



Curt Meier 
Grand Scribe 




Scott Beacham 
Grand Treasurer 




Greeks 313 



PHI GAMMA DELTA 



The brothers of Phi Gamma Delta 
encourage their members to develop good 
study habits as well as enjoy an active 
social life. They promote their scholastic 
interests by awarding $135 annually to 
the pledge with the highest grade point average. 
It appears their enthusiasm has paid off 
since Phi Gamma Delta now holds the 
Delta Cup, the award presented to the 
Interfraternity pledge class with the highest 
GPA. 

It's not all work for Fiji, though. Some 
of their major social events include the 
annual graduate brothers dinner, the 
Black Diamond Formal and the Fiji 
Islands Luau from which the fraternity 
gains its nickname. A little time must also 
be spent in song since the 34 members of 
the fraternity teamed up with the sisters 



of Delta Zeta to take first place in the 
mixed division of 1983's All-Sing. 

The gentlemen of Phi Gamma Delta 
donate their fund-raising profits to St. 
Joseph's Hospital. Four Fiji members 
also attended the International Leadership 
Training Academy and Workshop, spon- 
sored by the fraternity. 

Phi Gamma Delta members have a- 
chieved a great deal as a group and 
individually. For their promotion of school 
spirit, the Blue Chippers designated Phi 
Gamma Delta their Most Spirited Group. 
When discussing individual honors, Fiji 
names members Troy Cowan, who received 
the highest pledge GPA in the Interfra- 
ternity Council and Burnie Dickinson, 
who was named the Greek Intramural 
Man of the Year. 




Don Hankinson, Jr. 
President 




Harris Coleman, Jr. 
Treasurer 




Scott Smith 
Recording Secretary 




John Jones 
Corresponding Secretary 



FIJI 




Jim Scruggs 
Historian 



314 Phi Gamma Delta 



James Aldinger 



David Atkins 



Jeff Bowden 



Mike Carps 



Troy Cowan 



Alan Crone 



Allan Dale 




Phi Gamma Delta 315 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 



The Brothers of Sigma Alpha Epslon 
celebrated their 30th year here at MSU 
last November, having come to Memphis 
State in 1953. The Greek organization 
exists to provide a social outlet for its 
members and to create a lasting bond of 
brotherhood. 

The sixty-five brothers of SAE con- 
vene once a week on Sunday nights for 
their weekly planing sessions. Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon sponsors a boxing tour- 
nament in October along with "Lucy's 
Ball." The sweethearts of the fraternity 
host their formal in the fall, also. At the 
end of spring, Sigma Alpha Epsilon 




hosts its "True Beat Formal." Also 
during the spring semester is SAE's 
Little Sister Rush and their annual 
Spring Weekend. 

Locally and nationally, the brothers 
of Sigma Alpha Epsilon raise and donate 
money to Easter Seals. To maintain a 
membership in Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
students must keep a 2.0 cumulative 
GPA. The fraternity awards the annual 
Most Valuable Player Award to the 
outstanding player on the basktball 
team and an award for the Spring 
Football Classic. 



2AE 



Chris Saxon-President 




Alan Clayton- Vice President 

Joel Johnson-//ourc Managerfnot pictured) 

Paul Schifani- Treasurer 





Jerry Bell 



Tom Dorian-Pledge Trainer 





Paul Compton 



Chuck Bolton 




6 Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



Jeff Gore 



Jeff Heimbach 



Wes Miller 



Tom Pitner 



Philip deFrank 



Andrew Depperschmidt 





Stephen Newsom 




Edward Simmons III 



Mark Simmons 




Joey Douglas 



Trey Dockery 







Ricky McMillon 



Barry Marshall 




Kenneth Young 



David Rodenhiser 




Christopher Thorton 



Dick Thompson 



Jeff Sullivan 




Michael Zachary 




Sigma Alpha Epsilon 317 



ZANTfflPHANY 



Due to the fact that we were unable to 
sell this one miserable little page, 
Zanthiphany, the society of do-nothing 
journalists, lives again. 

Zanthiphany, created in the early 1 960"s 
when unsold space became the rule rather 
than the exception, has remained a sacred 
inspiration for our dedicated DeSoto staff 
throughout the year. The ZT creed, 
"Deadlines are not carved in stone," gave 
us much needed encouragement during 
our midnight treks to Krystal and to Stop- 
and-Go to play Pole Position. And who 
can forget calling FM 100 to request "Beat 
It" seven times in the same night? 

Yea, surely David Sasuachwa, founder 
and revered leader of Zanthiphany, was 
with us this year. His spirit, often seen by 
disoriented staffers on the brink of mental 
collapse, was heard to utter such jewels of 
wisdom as "Never rearrange Donna's filing 
system," and "When are you people going 
to clean this place up?" 

As usual, the ZT social event of the 
season was the Screaming Mimi Ball held 



/.anthipanv Members Are: 

Scott (Go For It) Vanzandt 

Sondra (Get Bent) Lewis 

Ethan (How's Your Spanish Grade?) Porter 

Steve (Get a REAL Job)Norman 

Donna (Check Out My Rock) Spencer 

Cedric (III Shoot It) Wilson 

Melissa (Don't Give Me Captions) Robbins 

Tonda (Give Me Something To Do) Brewer 

Chris (I GOT a Real Job) Carothers 

Mary Lynn (I Need Stories) Caldwell 

Lou (III Have it Later) Carmichael 

Ruth (I Can Write it) Turner 

Chuck (Wanna Buy a Shirt) Schrimsher 




in the Pandemonium Room of the 
Riverbottom Club. Music for this gala 
event was made possible by Steve Norman's 
connections with "Foxy Roxy's Banana 
Boat Band, "who offered rousing renditions 
of such songs as "Just-A-Swanging" and 
"La Cucaracha." 

Another highlight of the year was the 
presentation of the "Frog of the Year" 
award. This award is given to a staff 
member who has made an unique contri- 
bution to the book, thereby securing 
Zanthiphany's existence for at least another 
year. This year the award was shared by 
Tonda Brewer, whose alert attention to 
detail enabled her to spot the first mistake 
leading to the infamous "Indexgate," and 
Ethan Porter, whose prolific writing ability 
has helped him to capture the record of 
most bylines in a single section. 

Well, when all's been said and done (and 
hopefully turned in), Zanthiphany and its 
legacy will still live on as long as there is 
space to fill. All that we, the ZT members 
of 1983-84, have to say is: "Don't ask us— 
we just work here." 



318 Zanthiphany 



1NTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 




R. Maurice Hottingsworth-President 



Lee Conley- Vice President 
of Public Relations 

Mike Orians- Treasurer 
Greg Singleton-Secre/flo' 



Tommy Svoboda- Vice President of Rush 



The Interfraternity Councl. A place where Greeks 
have met since 1949 to share common problems and 
concerns. And a forum for communication and 
cooperation among members of the Greek community. 

That is how Council president R. Maurice Hollings- 
worth sees it. And he hopes the 10 member chapters 
agree. 

The Council works closely with the Panhellenic and 
the Pan-Hellenic Councils and sponsors activities of 
its own as well. This year members held a boatride 
during Homecoming and worked on Greek Week. 
They also sponsored the Sleeky Greek Fashion show 
held in the spring term. 

Officers are proud that their member chapters 
raised over $30,000 to support various philanthropies, 
including the United Cerebral Palsy and Cystic Fibrosis 
drives. 

The Council requires a 2.0 grade point verage and 
awards citations for the highest chapter GPA, the 
highest active GPA and the highest pledge GPA. 

Other officers include Lee Conley, vice president for 
public relations; Tommy Svoboda, vice president of 
rush; Mike Orians, treasurer and Greg Singleton, 
secretary. 




Matt Beickert 



Danny Bousson 
Allen Dawson 




Robert Duncan 
Dan Hankinson, Jr. 
Gaylon Harris 
Walter Kallaher II 




Gary Kutz 
David Moss 
Daniel Pallme 
Robert Saxon 
Carl Shafer 
Matt Smith 



Interfraternity Council 319 




320 Greeks 




V 



THE FRATERNITY OF 

%^^ MU TAU CHAPTER 




Greeks 321 



MSU Photo Services 



From glamor shots and high-fashion 
photographs to passport and ID pictures, 
at Memphis State they all come through 
the same capable hands of University Photo 
Services. 

Photo Services does all photo work for 
University publications, information offices 



and academic departments. Included in 
that domain are application and passport 
pictures as well as portraits. ID photos are 
a major effort for the department, since the 
beginning of each semester finds hundreds 
of new students scrambling for that magic 
plastic-coated card. 



Gil Michael is director of photo services, 
with Art Grider as photographer-cinema- 
tographer; Tom Wofford, photographer; 
Don Moy, student photographer, and 
Phyliss Smith, photography coordinator. 
Directed studies students also assist in the 
program. 




Tom Wofford 



Gill Michaels — Director 




Art Grider 



Phyliss Smith 



Don Moy 



322 Photo Services 




Photo Services 323 



ABBAD. ALI 267 
ABBOTT. DONALD ALLAN 120 
ABBOTT. PAUL 154 
ABBY, GAIL 181 
ABEDALDEIN, TAWEIG 181 
ABNEY, DONNA 1 10 
ABRAMOV1TZ, SHARON R 105 
ABRAMS, LISA GAIL 93 
ABU-ASBBA, NAYEF 267 
ABUHANTASH, NEDAL 267 
ACCAMPO, ANTHONY 172 
ACCAMPO. ROY 181 
ACEY, KENNETH 181 
ACKERMAN, J. KEITH 181 
ACKERMANN. HUGH 56 
ACUFF. SONDRA 181,287 
ADAIR, STEVE 181 
ADAMS, CECELIA RENEE 105 
ADAMS, HELEN J 93 
ADAMS, JAMI 181 
ADAMS, MARK 172, 312 
ADAMS. MARY 181 
ADDISON. EARLINE 181 
AGRAWAL, SURENDRA 213 
AHAFER. ABDUL 267 
AHMAD. NORL1ZAH96 
AHMAD, ZAKIAH 181 
AHRENS, LEE 218 
AHRENS. RANDY JOHN 94 
AJAY1, OLANREWAJU 181 
AL-SAYYED, KHAL1D M 103 
ALBONETT1, TIM 181 
ALBRIGHT, JON DOUGLAS 95, 

96, 172.250 
ALDINGER. JAMES 181, 315 
ALEJCAL, EEAD 172 
ALEW1NE, C HARRISON 103 
ALEXANDER, DOUG 172 
ALEXANDER, JRCHARLES 181 
ALEXANDER, LEANNE 172. 61 
ALEXANDER, LEIGH A 97 
ALEXANDER, SCOTT 181, 309 
ALFORD, DAVID 162 
ALLEN, BARBARA JO 105 
ALLEN, BENJAMIN 172 
ALLEN, DONALD HAROLD 120 
ALLEN, DONNA 172,290 
ALLEN, KELLY 181,292 
ALLEN, RHONDA 181 
ALLEN, RICHARD 181 
ALLEN-PR1GDEN. STEPHEN 120 
ALLEY, ANITA S 213 
ALLEY, KAREN L 97 
ALLGEIER, MICHAEL A 116 
ALPHA DELTA PI 21, 275, 286 
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA 274, 278, 

288 
ALTUVE, LUIS MIGUEL 78, 267 
AMAGLIANI, MARIE 181, 293 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 

ENG 267 
AMIS, ROLAND K 105 
AMMANN, NANCY 172 
AMM1NGER, SYLVIA 182 
ANDERSON, FE1CIA 182 
ANDERSON, J BLAKE 112 
ANDERSON, JAY 213,95 
ANDERSON. JOHN JAY 230 
ANDERSON, JOHN STEVEN 112 
ANDERSON, JOYCE ANN 172 
ANDERSON, J R WILLIAM C 120 
ANDERSON, KAREN OVERTON 

115, 139 
ANDERSON, MARK 282 
ANDERSON, TRACEY 21, 182, 

279 
ANDERSON, VERNETTA FAYE 

110 
ANDREAS, CARLA L 53, 56, 82 
ANDREAS, CRAIG 55 
ANDREWS, ELLEN 182, 288, 67 
ANDREWS, SCOTT 130 
ANGELO, JOANNA 182, 293 
ANTHONY, DAVID LEE 115, 139 
ARATA, DOROTHY A 225 
AR1JE, WESLEY 170 
ARMBRUST, DAWN 280 
ARMBRUSTER. JR ROBERT E 

97 
ARMITAGE. GERALD DAVID 

120 
ARMSTRONG. BETH 53. 56 
ARMSTRONG. DANA 182 
ARMSTRONG. ELIZABETH A 93, 

94 
ARNOLD, JAN 182 
ARTHUR, CORWIN 282 
ARTHUR, ROB 162 
ARIZ. TERRY 54 



ARTZ, THERESA A 97 
ASHCRAFT, STEFAN1E 182.288 
ASKEW. AMELIA 182,290 
ASKEW, REBECCA B 97 
ASKEW. WILLIAM CALDWELL 

116, 140 
ATKINS, ANGEL1A 182 
ATKINS, DAVID 172, 315 
ATKINS, GWENDOLYN 172 
ATKINS, IRVING 162 
ATKINS, MADELYNE R 97 
ATKINSON, JOJO 280 
ATKINSON, MARK CARROLL 

115, 139 
ATNIP, JEFF 61 
ATTIAS, MICHAEL 182 
ATT1YEN.GHASSAN BAH1G 103 
ATWOOD, VALERIE 182 
AUGHTRY, CEASAR 172 
AUR, DIDIER 154 
AUR, PAULA 154 
AUSTIN, AMY A 93 
AUSTIN. LAVITA 182 
AUTREY, JEFF 172, 312 
AVANT, CLYDE 162 
AVERETT, JACKIE 182 
AVEY, W DIXIE 104 
AVIOTT1, ANGIE 182, 250, 287 
AVIOTTL TRIC1A 182, 293 
AZRAK, RAZECK SALVADOR 

120 
BABB, CAROL ELIZABETH 94 
BABB, KATHY 57 
BAB1NEAUX, REBECCA 61 
BAGGETT, KIMBERLY 182 
BAGGETT, WILLIAM 172,303 
BAGHER1AN, ALI A 170 
BAILEY, DONALD 55 
BAILEY, NANCY 61 
BAINE, LYNN 182 
BAKER, AMELIA 172 
BAKER, ANN 60 
BAKER, DIANNE A 93 
BAKER, HOLLY M 95 
BAKER, JOHN ALLEN 120, 170 
BAKER, KENRICK 182 
BAKER, PAMELA 172 
BAKER, ROBERT 61 
BAKER, THOMAS J 182 
BALD1NGER, JANET A 93 
BALDR1DGE.TIM 182 
BALESTRINO, ROBERT 172 
BALKUNASS, KEN 162 
BALL, ANN M 213 
BALL, MARY JOAN 116 
BALL, MELISSA 92 
BALL, MICHAEL D 121 
BALTZ, TOB1N BALTZ 104 
BANBEL, MARCELLA T 93 
BANEY, MOLLY 152 
BANKS, LARRY 172 
BANNISTER, ELAINE E 54, 78 
BANNISTER, ESTHER E 97 
BARBEE, DIVA 172 
BARBER, ANNAMARIE 121 
BARBER, DONALD O 120 
BARDOS, DOMINIC 182 
BARGER, GRACE 93 
BARKER, AVE 54, 172 
BARKER, BRENDA 182 
BARKER, CYNTHIA 172 
BARKER, JUDY B 112 
BARKER, R. KANA 182 
BARKER, SONYA 182,285 
BARKER, TOMMY C 93, 97 
BARKLEY, CATHY R 182 
BARLETT, DONNA L 112 
BARNES, GREGORY E 78. 94 
BARNES. JOHNNY 177 
BARNES, MARY 287 
BARNES, MARY L 182 
BARNETT, SHARON 213 
BARNHART.SUSANELAINE 112 
BAROFF. KENNETH 182, 311 
BARR, ANGELA 53, 54, 56 
BARRETT, SANDRA M 105 
BARRETT, YVONNE J 105 
BARRISTER, ELAINE 172 
BARSOTTI. RONALD J 121 
BARTON. DEBORAH 115. 139 
BARTON, FRANK 213 
BARTZ, MICHAEL JON 103 
BASSFORD. CHARLES H 1 12 
BATEMAN, ALAN 56 
BAUER, STEVEN L 110 
BAUER, TAR1 54 
BAUER, TER1 54 
BAUMAN, CARL 112 
BAUMGARTEL. LEW 182 



BAXTER, GLORIA 9 
BEACH, SANDY 29 
BEACHAM, SCOTT 172, 284, 313 
BEACHAM, TIMOTHY 172, 284, 

312 
BEANE, HAROLD 162 
BEARD, BETTY 182 
BEARD, CHERYL 170 
BEARD, JEFF 182 
BEARD, JOHN F 162, 182 
BEARDEN, CARLA 182 
BEARDSLEY, ROBERT ALLEN 

120 
BEARE, CECILIA PAGE 182 
BEASLEY, BRYAN 182 
BEASLEY, MICHAEL LYNN 103 
BEASLEY, PAMELA 172 
BEASLEY, TED M 93, 182, 267 
BEASLEY, TONYA ZANNE 1 10 
BEASON, NATHAN 162 
BEATTY, JAMES ALFRED I 14 
BEATY, KATHRYN D 105 
BECKLEY, BEATRICE W 105 
BECTON. ERIC 162, 163 
BEDWELL, MARGARET L 121 
BEGHTOL, LARRY DAVID 182 
BE1BERS, WEST 182,56 
BEICKERT, MATT 183 
BELL, ALLEN L 93, 172 
BELL, ARTUNYALA 183 
BELL, EMMETT 183 
BELL, JERRY 183 
BELL, MYRNA 183 
BELL, STEVE 183, 311 
BELONGY, PAGE 162 
BELSKY, JUDITH VICTORIA 1 12 
BENECKE, DANIEL M 120 
BEN1ZE, BOB 208 
BENNETT, L1ZBETH ANN 96 
BENNETT, VALERIE LOUISE 105 
BENNEWITZ, MARDA 183 
BENSON, CAROLYN 172 
BENSON, JAMES 93 
BENSON, TRACI 183,293 
BENTON, STEVEN EUGENE 103 
BERGER, GRACE 93 
BERGERON, ARTHUR LEE 112 
BERL, ROBERT 213 
BERMEL, PETER 154 
BERRID, BARABA 183 
BERRY, MICHAEL JAMES 104 
BERRY, ROBERT ERNEST 103 
BERRY, SHELL 56 
BERRY, TURNEY P 112,94 
BERRYH1LL, PAUL 183, 311 
BERRYMAN, LARRY M 120 
BETTS, PAUL 183 
BEVALAC, SUSAN MARY 110 
BEVERLY, DIANE M 116 
BICKERS, JR ROBERT V 120 
BICKHAM.SHEKITA M 116 
BIDGEMAN.GARY 184 
BIDSON, PETER 92 
B1EBER, JR HENRY W 121 
BIGGERS, ANTHONY 183 
BIGGS, JOHN 172, 303 
BIGHAM, VALERIE 172, 292 
BILLINGS, ROBBIE E 92, 93, 97 
BIN, SALAMI MOHD267 
BINGHAM, BING 204 
BINGHAM, MATT 183 
BIRD, MARY 183 
BIRDWELI , DANIEL M 120 
BISHOP, DAVIDS 110 
BISHOP, SHERR1 172 
BITNER, CLAY 162 
BITNER, LESLIE 53, 56, 284 
B1ZZELL, ROD 183,309 
BLACK STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

21 
BLACK, CARLOS 183 
BLACK, DAVID 172 
BLACK, ROBERT MICHAEL 1 12 
BLAIR, JENNIFER 183 
BLAIR, JR SAM BERRY 112 
BLAKELY.JOHN ROSS 183 
BLALOCK, DW1GHT 162, 163 
BLAND, SANDRA 298 
BLAND. THOMASFLEMING 105 
BI.ANKENSHIP, MITCH A 103 
BLANKENSHIP, PATSY ANN 94 
BLANKENSH1P, SUSAN 183 
BLAUER, FRANK 184 
BLUECH1PPERS21 
BLUE, YVETTE 140, 143 
BOBANGO, JOHN ALLEN 112 
BOBANGO, LISA WALKER 112 
BOBO, MELISSA 172,290 
BODIFORD, CL1CE EUGENE 103 



BODOWSKI, KENNETH W 103 
BOGARD, LISA 183,287 
BOHANNON, PAT 56 
BOHANNON, THERESA E 121 
BOLDEN, HELEN M 115, 139 
BOLDEN, TIMOTHY H 112 
BOLDON, SHIRLEY JEAN 103 
BOLDREGH1N1, RUDOLPH A 56, 

183 
BOLDT, MARTIN PRUITT 105 
BOLTON, CHUCK 183, 208 
BOLTON, ELLA MITCHELL 105 
BOLTON, JEAN 172, 286 
BOLTON, JOAN 250 
BOND, M E222 
BOND, MISTY 183 
BONDURANT, MICHAEL 183 
BONNER, KAREN ELAINE 120 
BONNET, JOANNE LYNN 120.94 
BOOKER, JAN 183, 293 
BOONE, JERRY 221 
BOONE, JERRY N 95 
BOONE, MICHAEL 183, 309 
BOOTH, CAROLYN FAYE 94, 97 
BOOTH, DAVID 162 
BORCKY, DENNIS 162 
BORING, REGINALD LYNN 112 
BORRON, GINA 183 
BOST1CK, REBECCA MASSIE 105 
BOUGVE, JIM 55 
BOUSSON, BRENT 183, 311 
BOUSSON, DANNY 183,311 
BOUZ, TODD 183 
BOWDEN, JEFF L 183, 315 
BOWERS, CHIP 162 
BOWERS, JOHN 183,309 
BOWIE, FLORENCE 172 
BOWLES, DAVID 183 
BOWMAN, HUGH D 115, 139 
BOYCE, KENNETH B 103 
BOYD, ALEC1A 183, 289 
BOYD, GLENN 162 
BOYD, LINDA 267 
BOYD, SINTHY 183 
BOYLE, KATHLEEN C 112 
BOZOF, ALAN JEFFREY 103 
BRADFORD, TINA 183 
BRADLEY, LEWIS 8 
BRADLEY, ST ACEY 183 
BRAGG, ALAN FRANK 103 
BRAGG, FRANK 183 
BRAMLETT, ANDY 162 
BRAMLETT, DON 162 
BRANCH, SANDRA LUCIA D 94 
BRANDON, DAVID 162 
BRANDON. LORI ANNE J 97 
BRANDT, SUSAN E 103 
BRAN1M, DEE KAREN 104 
BRANNON, THOMAS L 120 
BRANWELL, JOHN 92 
BRASLOW, BARRY C 103 
BRASWELL, STEPHANIE 183 
BRATCHER, DAVID 55 
BRATCHER. KAREN 172, 290 
BRAY, PAMELA NORANNE 112 
BREADY, MERRI BETH 183, 285 
BREEDEN, JONNA 184 
BREEDEN, MELODY W 92, 93 
BREEDON. TOMMY 172 
BREEN, BILL 172 
BREEN, BRAIN LEE 104 
BREEN, JOEY 184 
BRENNAN, TRACEY 184, 301 
BREWER, TONDA 184 
BREWSTER, CHANTAL 184 
BR1CE, CAROL 172 
BRIDGES, TONY 154 
BR1LEY, LEANN 184 
BR1SENTINE, JAMES 172, 284 
BRISENTINE, JIMMY 313 
BRITT, ANGELA 184, 288 
BRITT, TERRY 184,61 
BRITT, WILLIAM QUINN 94 
BRITZER, BRENDA K 93 
BROADAWAY, EVA RENEE 103 
BROCK, LILLIAN CORINNE 1 16 
BRODWAY, RITA 104 
BROEKER, LEIZAC56, 97 
BROGDON, DENISE ASHBY 105 
BROGDON, JAMES L 93, 184 
BROOKS, ERIC 162 
BROOKS, MAVIS 173 
BROWDER, ALLEN PETE 94 
BROWDER, LINDA CAROL 105 
BROWER, JOHN ALAN 103 
BROWN, ANTHONY R 112 
BROWN, CASSANDRA 173 
BROWN. CHARLES B 61. 93 
BROWN. ELVIN 30 



BROWN, FRANNIE 173 
BROWN, GARRY GENE 112 
BROWN, JR WARREN W 112 
BROWN, KEN 162 
BROWN, KURT ALAN 96 
BROWN, LAURA LYNN 121 
BROWN. MARK S 1 15. 139, 173 
BROWN. NICK 93 
BROWN, PAMELA 14 
BROWN, PATTI 184, 290, 57 
BROWN, RON 173 
BROWN, STEVE 184 
BROWN, VICTOR 288 
BROWNING, ANGELA C 184,289 
BROWNING, DONNA 173 
BROWNLEE, PATRICIA R 115, 

139 
BRUCE, MARY ALICE 115, 139 
BRUCE, REBEKAH 173 
BRUMBAUGH, JAY 184 
BRUMF1ELD, HUNTER M 110 
BRYAN, PHIL 130 
BRYANT, JRCHARLESE56, 121 
BRYANT, KAREN 184 
BRYANT, L1NDSEY 184 
BRYANT, MELAN1E 184 
BRYANT, PHILLIP R 93, 97 
BRYANT, WENDY E 112 
BUCHANAN, RICKY 56 
BUCKNER. AMY E 93, 184, 286 
BUCKNER, BONNIE 184 
BUCZEK, W1LMA JEAN 112 
BUFORD, KAWANDA L 104, 1 16, 

117 
BUFORD, YULETTA PEARL 105 
BULL, MELISSA L 97 
BULL1NGTON, DEBORAH L 104 
BUMP, MICHAEL R 121 
BUNNELL, JON 184, 303 
BURANAPONGSKUL, THARA 

120 
BURBANK, DENNIS CRAIG 110 
BURGESS, AMY 184 
BURING, JERRY ANN H 105 
BURKE, JOANNA C 79, 95, 173. 

250, 284 
BURKE, MARGARET 173 
BURKE, MARY RITA 110 
BURKS, G1NNY 184, 290 
BURKS, JAMIE 184, 56, 65 
BURLESON, LISA 184 
BURNETT, ARNETA 170 
BURNS, AVIS 184 
BURNS, BEVERLY LYNN 121 
BURNS, CHARLES 173 
BURNS, MARGARET 185 
BURROW, LAURA 185 
BURTON, ANN 173,250, 292 
BURTON, CINDY 285 
BURTON, CYNTHIA 185 
BURTON, JANET 185,284 
BURTON, PATRICIA ELAINE 121 
BUSCH, DANA M 112, 120 
BUSH, MARY JANE 97 
BUSS, GARY 52, 54 
BUSTAMANTE. RENE 173 
BUTCHER, ELIZABETH 185 
BUTLER, II THOMAS H 112 
BUTLER, JILL 185 
BUTLER, POLLY 185 
BUTLER. TIMOTHY WYNN 110 
BUTLER. VICTORIA GINA 105 
BUTTERFIELD. ELDRED M 120 
BUZZARD. GINNY 185. 293 
BYER, WILLIAM J 185, 213 
BYRD, CATHERINE 105 
BYRD, TORY 185. 290 
BYRNE. PHILLIP KEITH 117 
CAGLE, RODNEY THOMAS 103 
CAGLE, TRACEY 185, 287 
CAH1LL, CECELIA 185 
CAIN, ANDREW III 
CAIN.CANDICE LYNETTE 105 
CAIN, JAY 56 
CALDERON, MELISSA 93 
CALDWELL, ERIC 162 
CALDWELL, GEORGE 28, 299 
CALDWELL, MARY LYNN 185 
CALHOUN, SUSAN E 115, 139 
CAMP, A. RENEE 173 
CAMPBELL, CAROLINE T 105 
CAMPBELL, CHARLES K 79,94 
CAMPBELL, DAVID 185 
CAMPBELL. EULA 173 
CAMPBELL. JOHN W 112 
CAMPBELL, JONATHAN 185 
CAMPBELL, KEVIN 173, 284, 302 
CAMPBELL. ROY 130 
CANEPA. ANTHONY MARK 1 10 



324 Index 



CANNON, J PHILLIP 95 
CANUTE, CHRISTOPHER 1*04 
CAPLINGER, THOMAS 92 
CAPSHAW, GREG 162 
CARAY1ANNIS, DEAN 185 
CARBAGE, JUDY ANN 173 
CARDINAL, SAM 55 
CARDOS1, CYNTHIA L 121 
CARDOSI, LEIGH 173 
CARDOSI, TERESA 185, 290 
CARDOSO, JUDITH ELLEN 112 
CAREY, BARBARA 93 
CARLIN. VICK1 185 
CARLTON, CAROL A 97 
CARLTON, KAY F 115, 139 
CARMAN, HOWARD S 103, 94 
CARM1CHAEL, LEWIE 185 
CARNATHAN, JO ALICE 57 
CARNATHAN, VICTOR W 112 
CARON, ELIZABETH 185, 287 
CARPENTER, BEVIN 162 
CARPENTER, THOMAS G 95 
CARPS, MIKE 185, 315 
CARR, ANGELA 185 
CARR, EDWIN WALTER 103 
CARRANZA, ALAIN 170 
CARRINGTON, CINDY 185 
CARR1NGTON, KRISTY 185 
CARRINGTON, LESA 185 
CARROLL, MICHAEL 185 
CARROLL, SARAH 95, 173, 21, 

250, 284, 288 
CARRUTHERS.WILL1AMN 115, 

139 
CARSON, CARL EDWARD 120 
CARSON, DONALD K 221, 95 
CARSON, JEFFREY 284 
CARSON, MARTHA H 115, 139 
CARSON, ORTANIA 284 
CARTER, DEBRA 173 
CARTER, JR WAYMON E 121 
CARTER, KAREN 61 
CARTER, LEROY MCCLURE 94 
CARTER, SUSAN 92,93 
CARTER, VAN 56 
CARTWRIGHT, ADAM 185 
CARTWRIGHT, KAY 61 
CARTWRIGHT, RICHARD D 170 
CARVEL, RANDON 185 
CASAD, DEN1SE 185 
CASAD, MICHELLE 185 
CASEY, HOLL1S 173 
CASEY, STANLEY ALAN 103 
CASHIN, DEBORA 185 
CASTLE, EILEEN EM1CK 105 
CATHEY, DAMON 185 
CATHEY, GEORGE E 97 
CAVAGNARO, CHARLES W 95, 

238 
CAVAGNARO, SCARLETT 185, 

275, 279 
CERTION, LOIS 173 
CHADER1, MOHSEN 103 
CHAMBERLAIN, CLAY 185 
CHAMBERS, COLIS 185 
CHAMBERS, JEFF 1 14, 185, 309 
CHAMPION, SUSAN SMITH 121 
CHAN, CHRISTINA Y 96, 97 
CHANDLER, CINDY 185, 287 
CHANDLER, JANE 173 
CHANDLER, JAYNE 298 
CHANDLER, MARILYN 173,93 
CHANG, CHERYL 93 
CHANG, JACQUELINE 170 
CHANG, KUOTSI 120 
CHANNELL, CHARLENE 185 
CHANNELL, DARRYL 185 
CHAPMAN, KEVIN 163 
CHARLES, MARCQU1NNE 29, 

318 
CHARLTON, DALE R 170 
CHEN, CHRISTINA 92 
CHENAULT, JOHN 173,283,311 
CHESSOR, RUSS56 
CHLCHONG IN 120 
CHIANG, KAR MEE 103 
CHIAR1ZZIO, ROBERT 93 
CHILDRESS, CHRISTOPHER L 

116 
CHILDRESS, CONNIE 92 
CHILDRESS, MELODY 185 
CHILES, LYNN 186 
CHIODO, MIKE 56 
CH1PMAN, DAVID 55 
CHRISTENSON, LINDA 173 
CHRISTIAN, LISA 186 
CHUMNEY, CAROLYN JEAN 95, 

115, 139 
CHUMNEY, JR JAMES R 95, 186 



CHURCHILL, YVONNE S 115, 

139 
CHURCHMAN, DEBBIE 186 
CLABOUGH, SUSAN H 94, 173 
CLACK, BRENT 186 
CLANTON, ERMA 213, 34 
CLARK, GERALD 186 
CLARK, KATHLEEN 173 
CLARK, REBAG97 
CLARK, TOM 199 
CLARK, VICTOR 117 
CLARY, DONNA 186,92 
CLAYBOUGH, SUSAN 93 
CLAYTON, ALAN 186 
CLAYTON, CHRISTY 186 
CLAYTON, ROZELL 162, 163 
CLAYTON, ZEDR1C 186 
CLEAR, KAREN 186 
CLEMENS, CHARLES 186 
CLEMENT, EVELYN G 99, 213 
CLEMENTS, MERRY E 186 
CLEMENTS, WILLIAM 186 
CLEM1NSON, RON W 213 
CLEVELAND, KERRY O 97 
CLINE, PATR1CA R 97 
CLINE, PATRICIA 93 
CLINGAN, CONNIE 54 
COAKLEY, KATHLEEN 173 
COAKLEY, MARY LESLIE 186 
COAKLEY, PAULA 186 
COATS, LARRY 55 
COBB, JOHN 186 
COCHRAN, ESTHER C 105 
COCHRAN, TRACY 301 
COD, CHARLES FRAY JR 104 
COD, GINA MARIE 104 
CODA, NINA 186 
CODA,TINA21, 173, 186,250,284, 

292 
COFFEY, CARYN A 97, 186, 250, 

286 
COFFEY, CHERYL 186, 287 
COHEN, SUSAN L 97 
COLBERT, CHIP 128 
COLBY, SANDRA 173 
COLE, CINDY 186 
COLE, KENNETH 55 
COLE, VICKIE CHERYL 94, 97 
COLEMAN, CHRIS 186 
COLEMAN, DAVID ALAN 112 
COLEMAN, JR HARRIS 173, 314 
COLEMAN, KR1STEN 186, 289 
COLEMAN, LENON J 110 
COLEMAN, PAMELA W I 12 
COLEMAN, TRACEY 186, 293 
COLETTE, CHERYL 105 
COLLIE, ELAINE 186,301 
COLLIER, COSY 199 
COLLIER, JAMES A 213 
COLLIER, JANE MARY 104 
COLLINS, ANDREA 93 
COLLINS, DAVID A 94, 236, 95 
COLLINS, HAROLD 56 
COLLINS, JACQUELINE 54, 186 
COLLINS, SANDRA LYNN 186 
COLLINS, TIM 54 
COLLUMS, THOMAS S 121 
COLSTON, TRACY L 97 
COLTER, CECIL OWEN 103 
COLV1N, ANTHONY 92 
COMELLA, DELLA F 121 
COMELLA, VIRGINIA 186 
COMPTON, PAUL 186 
CONLEY, LEE 186, 267, 309 
CONLEY, PARKER C 1 15, 139 
CONNER, LISA 186, 277, 301 
CONNERS, PATRICIA 213 
CONRAD, ROBERT 186 
CONSTERDINE, GENE 186, 309, 

88 
CONWAY, PATRICK 186 
COOP, STACY 186 
COOPER, CATHERINE 186 
COOPER, DEBBIE 186 
COOPER, WILLIAM E 94 
COPE, RANDALL WAYNE 116 
COPELAND, MONA LOUISE 96 
COPLEY, MARK 283 
COPPEDGE, BRENDA L 105 
COPPOCK, CARY 186, 303 
CORDER.TIM 129, 130 
COR1NNE, LILLIAN 104 
CORNELIUS, MARIA 92 
CORRA, RENATO 120 
COTTEN, CAROL LEE 96 
COUCH, DAVID 186 309 
COUNCE, ERIC 186,309 
COURTNEY, MARTY 53 
COUTS, GLENNA 187 



COVINGTON, RON 55 
COWAN, TROY 187, 314, 315, 96 
COX, DAVID N 213 
COX, DOROTHY AVERY I 16, 1 17 
COX, JOE H 173 
COX, MELISSA 55 
COY, MARY A 97 
COYLE, GLENN 187, 303 
CRADER, KAREN 290 
CRAIN.CARA 187 
CRAIN, JR SAMUEL L 112 
CRAIN, KURT 163 
CRASE, DAVID R 213 
CRAVEN, GINGER 187, 290 
CRAWFORD, CHARLES W 95 
CRAWFORD, DERRICK 126, 163 
CRAWFORD, LLOYD V 1 12 
CRAWFORD, R ROSETTA 105 
CRAWFORD, ROBERT 213 
CRAWFORD, TINA 57 
CRAY, NANCY 54 
CREMER, KAREN DIANE 117 
CREMERIUS, MARY A 187, 286 
CRESON, LARRY 154 
CRIBBS, JANE SANDERS 103 
CR1HFIELD, VIRGINIAANN 121 
CR1SL1P, LAUREN 187 
CRISP, FAITH 187 
CRISTINA, MARY 173, 301 
CRISWELL, JENNIFER 187, 293 
CROCKETT, MARTIN 187 
CROCKETT, PATRICK 187 
CRONE, ALAN 187, 315 
CRONE, KAREN 187,287 
CRONE, LINDA ELLEN 121 
CRONE, WILLIAM S 97 
CROSBY, KAREN LEE 105 
CROSS, CYNTHIA 187 
CROWDER, KEVIN 187 
CROWELL, NICKI 187, 285 
CRUM, MISSY 173 
CRUMBY, ROBERT G I 15, 139 
CUMM1NGS, BUBBA 129, 130 
CUMMINGS, JOHN 187 
CUNNINGHAM, SHEILA J 112 
CURR1E.DARROLYNM 115,139 
CURTIS, PAPYTA 54 
CUTRELL, JOE 187 
CYCHOWSK1, CATHERINE 173 
CYCHOWSKI, KATE 292 
DABDOUB, AHMAD 267 
DALE, ALLAN 187, 315 
DALEY, LAVERNE 181 
DAMERON, JOHN LASLEY 213 
DANDRIDGE, WESBY L 104 
DANG, PHOUNG 154 
DANIEL, JUDY J 112 
DANIELS, KENNETH 187, 303 
DANIELS, LESLIE 187 
DAPONTE, LEIGH ELLEN 187 
DARBY, JEFF 56 
DARDEN, CAPT88 
DAUGHERTY, BERNIA 173 
DAUGHTERY, CONNIE T 115, 

139 
DAUGHTRY, CALVIN 55 
DAVENPORT, SUSAN L 105 
DAVENPORT, YULANDA 187 
DAVIDSON, MARK 187 
DAVIS, DEANNA L 93, 97 
DAVIS, DEDR1CK 56 
DAVIS, EDELL 163 
DAVIS, GEORGE 187,302 
DAVIS, JAMES R 97 
DAVIS, JEFF 52, 56 
DAVIS, JOSEPH A III 117 
DAVIS, MELISSA 286 
DAVIS, MICHELE 173 
DAVIS, RANDALL A 92, 97 
DAVIS, RICKY 187 
DAVIS, SHIRLEY 187 
DAVIS, SWAIN ROBIN 104 
DAVIS, TERRENCE LEE 103 
DAWSON, ALLEN 173, 250, 278, 

279, 284, 308 
DAWSON, JEFFREY 187 
DAWSON, JR LARRY A 79, 95 
DAWSON, LOR1 187,289 
DEACON, LYNDA 170 
DEAN, TEDDY 56 
DEATON, RUSSELL JERRY 94 
DEATON, WARD 173, 309 
DEBERRY, JAMES 187 
DECK, ELIZABETH SEWELL 105 
DEERE, TIMOTHY ALLEN 112 
DEERING, MICHAEL 208 
DEESER, SANDRA L 110 
DEFRANK, PHILIP 187 
DEGOTIS, V1NCE93 



DEGRANGE, MAJ. DAVID 88 
DEGUTIS, VINCENT M 97 
DELGADO, RAOUL280 
DELO, JOHN 187 
DELTA GAMMA 282, 283 
DELTA SIGMA THETA 21 
DELTA ZETA SORORITY 2 1 , 283, 

285 
DEMOTT, JOHN 212, 213 
DENABURG.TER1 BABETTE 105 
DENFORD, DAVID 187 
DENNEN, KEITH C 93, 94 
DENNIS, DIANA 93 
DENNIS, JACQUELINE 173 
DENTON, MARGARET 187 
DEPPERSCHMIDT, ANDREW 

187 
DEPPERSCHMIDT, JOAN 187, 

290 
DEPR1EST, MICHAEL 187 
DERSHEM, DAWN VIOLET 112 
DESHAZER, MICHAEL 187 
DESNICA, TAMM1 187 
DETTELBAD, TRAC1 DAY 104 
DEVIN, BRIAN E 174 
DEV1NE, BRIAN E 80,92 
DEW1TT, DEBORAH LYNNE 94 
DIAZ-FERNANDEZ, JOV1NO 120 
D1CHTEL, IRIS A 97 
DICK, BOBBY 153 
DICK, PAUL KENNETH 112 
DICKENSON, FOREST 187 
DICKENSON, JAMES 55, 189 
DICKENSON, SKIP 283 
DICKENSON, WOODY 55 
DICKERSON, JOYCE 174 
DICKERSON, MARTHA 189 
DICKERSON, REBECA 174 
DICKERSON, WILLIAM 189 
DICKEY, ERIC J 120 
DICKEY, JR JAMES S 110, 112 
DICKEY, KAREN 189, 285 
DICKEY, WINFRED 174 
DICKINSON, BURN1E 189, 314, 

315 
DICKSON, PAULA JUNE 1 15, 139 
DICKSON, ROY MARK 103 
DIEL, CATHERINE D 97, 250 
DIERSSEN, WILLIAM 116 
DIFFEE, PEGGY LEE 94 
DILL, JOHN 227 
DISMUKES, CINDY 174 
DISNEY, TOM 184 
DIXON, ANGELA 189,293 
DIXON, BART 56 
DIXON, CARLA JEAN 80, 95 
DIXON, JR NORMAN L 115, 139 
DLUGACH, HILDA D 97 
DOCKERY, REX 126, 165 
DOCKERY, TREY 189 
DODSON, DOROTHY 233 
DODSON, H JOAN 225 
DOHERTY, DOROTHY ANN 115, 

139 
DOLAN, JIMMY 283 
DOLCE, TODD 8 
DOLPH, RICHARD 213 
DONATE DONNA 92 
DONEE, PAUL 280 
DONELSON, BUSBY D 104 
DONG.TUNNEY ALLEN 120 
DONMOYER, LARRYCRAIG 103 
DONNELLY, DONNA 189, 57 
DONOHUE, FRANCIS 170 
DORIAN, THOMAS 163, 174 
DORIAN, WARRIOR 280 
DOR1NG, JENNIFER 189, 290 
DORSEY, CATHERINE 189 
DORSEY, TERRI 189 
DORTCH, RITA 174 
DOTE, MICHAEL 189 
DOTE, MICHELE RENEE 105 
DOTSON, KEVIN 130 
DOTY, SUZANNE 189 
DOUGLAS, BRIAN 154 
DOUGLAS, DOTTIE LYNN 121 
DOUGLAS, JERE 54 
DOUGLAS, JOE 189 
DOWDY, TAD 55 
DOYLE, KATHRYN 189, 287 
DOYLE, RICHARD JAMES 120 
DROKE, STEVE 163 
DRUMMOND, DENISE 189, 21. 

289 
DUBOISE, MARK 189 
DUCKWORTH. LEWIS A 213 
DUFFEL, SUSAN L 94 
DUGGAN, MICHAEL 189 
DUKE, CHARLES 189, 315 



DULIN, KEVIN 189,312 
DULIN.TIM 130 
DUMAS, DEBBIE 54 
DUNCAN, BROOKE 15 
DUNCAN, JENNIFER 189, 290 
DUNCAN, JOHN PHILLIP 189 
DUNCAN, ROBERT 189, 311 
DUNN, PAUL 128 
DUPPINS, K1MBERLY ANN 105 
DUPR1EST, DARLENE 189 
DURA1N. MONICA 104 
DURHAM, HANDEL R 112 
DURHAM, SHANNON 189 
DURHAM, TERRY 189,315 
DURHAN, PHYLLIS 189 
DUTCHER, SANDRA 174, 285 
DW1GHT, CYNTHIA 189, 294 
DYE, ANN JULIA 104 
DYE, ORENETTA 189 
DYER, REBECCA 93 
EAKES, MELINDA D 96 
EANES, MARY 189,285 
EARHEART, MARY 93 
EARL, ELIZABETH A 93. 105 
EAST, DAVID 163 
EBE, STVEN D 94 
EDINGBOURGH. LARITA 189 
EDM1NSTER. MOLLIE 54 
EDWARDS, BARBARA G 94. 1 1 1 
EDWARDS, MAGGIE 121 
EDWARDS, TRUDY D 92. 93. 94 
EKENDAHL. CALR 93 
ELDER, DONNIE 162, 163, 164 
ELDR1DGE, RHONDA C 105 
ELLIOTT, CARL R 95, 174 
ELLIOTT, ROMEO 189 
ELLIOTT, SHARON 250 
ELLIOTT, TON1A 189 
ELLIS, CONN 189 
ELLIS, DONNA 189 
ELLIS, JEFF 163 
ELLIS, JOANNE 104 
ELLIS, MICHELLE 93 
ELLIS, REBECCA 189 
ELLIS, ROBERT 77 
ELLIS, SHAWN PATRICK 112 
ELLIS, WES 250 
ELLISON, MARVIN 189 
ELLISON, V1NCE 189 
ELLZEY, SUE C 97 
ELMA, ROANE 239 
ELMORE, LINDA 189 
ELROD, DENNIS CAREY 120 
EMER1NE, CRAIG 174, 309 
EMERY, CATHERINE DIANE 105 
EMSL1E, MARION F 232 
ENGLE, DEBROAH LYNN 121 
ENGLEBERG, ALAN 189 
ENGSTROM, CALVIN L 115. 139 
ENOCH, DENISE 189 
ENOCH, J REX 95 
ENOS. DEEDEE 189,290 
EPP, RONALD H 99 
EPPES, JEANETTE 189 
EPPS. CHARLENE C 120 
ERTEL, MARK E 170 
ERVIN, ROGER FAIR 120 
ERV1N, STEVE 189 
ESCHBACH, CINDY 61 
ESGRO, JUDITH MYERS 105 
ESKENAZI, MICHELE 93 
ESMAELI, KATEH 189 
ESP, DAVID 163 
ESTES, CINDY 189 
ETHER1DGE, GEORGE W 213 
ETTMAN. DAVID KELSEY 112 
EUBANK. JOHN Y 226 
EVANS, FREIDA LORET 121 
EVANS, GARY 189.312 
EVANS, GIG1 DIANE 105 
EVANS, JAMES S 112 
EVANS, KEN 189 
EVERETT. SHARON LEA 103 
EVER1TT. PAULA 66, 67 
EWELL. AMY S 96. 190, 287. 57 
EWELL. ETHEL 190 
EW1NG. BARBARA CHERYL 94 
EXKENAZ1. MICHELE A 97 
FAIRS, ERIC 163 
FANNING. JOHN T 115. 139 
FAQUIN. LISA CAROL 121 
FARMER. II DONALD E 115. 139 
FARMER. KENNETH 190 
FARMER. LEE 174 
FARMER, TONY EUGENE 105 
FARR, DENEEN 190 
FARRELL. FREDR1C 190 
FARRELLY. CRAIG 190 
FARRIS. JOHN MICHAEL 1 12 



Index 325 



HARRIS, LAURA ANNE 96 

FASH1MPAUR, J J 153 

FASHION BOARD 21 

FASON, YOLANDA 190 

FAST, HELEN K 97 

FAULK. TERESA 190 

FAVAZZA, ALEX TIMOTHY 105 

FAWCETT, JEFFERY W 103 

FE1SAL, BILL 308 

FEISAL, JAMES 190 

FE1SAL, PHIL 250 
FEISAL, VICTOR 227 
FELDBAUM, BRUCE LEE 1 12 
FELTS, ANNETTE 190 
FERGUSON, CHARLES S 120 
FERGUSON, FELICIA 190 
FERGUSON. LISA 190 
FERGUSON, MARY 170 
FERGUSON, PATRICIA 97, 174 
FERNANDEZ. JEFF 190 
FERRAN, MARIE C 112 
FESM1RE. JOYCE HAYS 121 
FEW, JANA 190 
FIDDLER. SHARON ANN 105 
FIELD, JEFF 129, 130 
FIELD, ROBERT MARK 1 12 
F1ETE, BILL 174 
F1ETE, WILLIAM A 97 
F1K, JEFFREY JAMES 105 
FINCH-JOHNSON, ELANOR 121 
FINLEY, LEA 190 
FISHER, CHARLES 95 
FISHER, DEBORAH LYNN 174 
FISHER, PAT 154 
FITCH, LINDA LEIGH 94 
F1TE, JAY 56 
FITE, JOY 190 
FITZGERALD, JR WALTER I 

112 
FITZPATRICK, VELMA 190 
FLAHERTY, JEFF 190 
FLANAGAN, GREGORY S I 12 
FLEMING, MARILYN C 105 
FLETCHER, LYNN 190 
FLETCHER. RANEE 143 
FLEXSENHAR, MICHAEL A 112 
FLIPP1N, BEVERLY J 105 
FLOWERS, HELEN B 93, 97 
FLOWERS, JAMIE BICKEL 121 
FLYNN, ANDRAETTA 190 
FLYNN, DEBORAH 190 
FLYNN, JOSEPH E 95, 174 
FO, BARBARA ANN 104 
FOGARTY. LARRY 190. 278 
FOLK, CHRISTOPHER 208 
FOLSOM, CINDY 190 
FOLSON, WENDY 190 
FONDREN, GLORIA 93 
FORD, DOUG 267 
FORD, HELEN DELORES80, 174 
FORD, JANICE LYNNE I 15, 139 
FORD, KAREN L 96, 190, 288 
FORD, ROBERT 174,308 
FORD, SARAH DAVIS 105 
FORD, WILLIAM DOUGLAS 174 
FOROPOULOS, V JOAN 104 
FORSYTHE, RUTH ANN 141, 143 
FORTNER, STACY JANE 120 
FORTUNE, GINGER C 93, 97 
FOSHEE, HOLL1 190 
FOSTER, DEBRA LOCKARD 121 
FOSTER, JACKIE L 97 
FOSTER, MARJORIE LISA 112 
FOSTER, TIMOTHY R 121 
FOUNTAIN, RANDALL M 95 
FOURNET, ANNETTE E 117 
FOUTCH, DARYL 190 
FOWLER, RUSSELL 97 
FOWLER, WESLEY 56 
FOX, CRAIG 190 
FOXX, BETSY 190 
FOY, PERRY 190 
FRANCESCHETT1, DONALD R 

213 
FRANKLIN, JEROME C 104 
FRANKLIN, MARITUCKER 104 
FRANKLIN, ROY 190 
FRANKLIN, STANLEY P 213 
FRANKLIN, VENITA 174 
FRAYSER, TODD 64 
FRAZ1ER, JULIE 190, 250, 93 
FRAZ1ER, KARL 190 
FRAZ1ER, LEROY 115, 139 
FREDI, SHARON 190 
FREE, TAMMY 93 
FREED, RITA 213 
FREEMAN. JAMESGERALD 103 
FRENCH, TAWANA 190 
FREUND, DONALD W 117 



FRIEDMAN, ALDENJAMES 103 
FRITSCHE, ALAN GUSTAV 112 
FRONABARGER, DAVID R 121 
FRUEL1CH, DAV1DI 90 
FRULLA, ANTHONY 174.311,92 
FRULLA, ANTHONY C 94 
FRULLA, ANTHONY E 81 
FRY. VICTORIA 93 
FULLER. WENDELL 56 
FULP, ROBERT 174, 267, 303 
FUNK, TERRY 190 
FURNISS. MARY ANN 1 10, 94 
GABRIEL, AL 190, 311, 56 
GAINES, ANDY 174, 267 
GAINES, ROGER A 97 
GA1TLEY, EDWARD C 103, I 1 1 
GALBREATH, PHILL IP 1 97 
GALEY, LOR1 LEE 112 
GALLAGHER, GLENN 190 
GALLO, GARY 129, 130 
GALLOWAY, LAURA 93 
GALV1N, GREG 190,303 
GAMBLIN, SCOTT R 97 
GAMMA BETA PHI 93 
GAMMON, SHERRIE 191 
GANNETT, VICTORIA 191, 293 
GARAVELL1, MARGARAT 1 97 
GARDNER, DAWS KATHY 104 
GARDNER, KEVIN SCOTJ 191 
GARDNER, MAC 191 
GARDNER, P. J. 191 
GAREY, BARTLEY S 112 
GARLAND, PAUL G 114 
GARNER, CHARLES D 105 
GARNER. KEVIN 250 
GARRET, VICKIE 174 
GARRETT, ANDREW 191 
GARRETT, CURT 163 
GARRETT, DOUGLAS G 112 
GARRETT, II CHARLES A 120 
GARRETT, ROBERT J 114 
GARRETT, VICKIE 250 
GILLIAM, TRACY 191, 309 
G1LMORE, LYNN 54 
G1LMORS, SOPHIA 191 
G1LREATH.TODD 191 
GIVENS. ALBERT 267 
GLASCO, PATRICIA 174 
GLASHEEN, MARY P 105 
GLASS, LAURENS E 94 
GLASS, LINDA FAYE 77 
GLASSER, JILL 191, 293 
GLIDEWELL, SHERR1 191 
GLOSSON, DON 163 
GNUSCHKE, MARCIA6I 
GOBERT, CYNTHIA 191 
GOENS, MYRTLE 213 
GOFORTH, CHARLES A I 12, 94 
GOIN, JERRY 174 
GOLDSTEIN, DON 131 
GONZALES, GIN A 174, 294 
GOOD, LUCY COTHRAN 105 
GOODE, HARPER 174, 303 
GOOLD, KIM ANN 121 
GORDEN, JERLENA 174 
GORDON. CL1F 184 
GORDON. ELLEN 93 
GORDON, PAUL 191, 309 
GORDON, ROBIN 191 
GORE, JEFF 191 
GOULDER. DANNY SCOTT 1 12 
GOURGEOT, DENNIS 131 
GOURGEOT, MIKE 131 
GRABO. FREDERICK J 97 
GRAFF, LEESA 191, 293 
GRAHAM, JON 191 
GRANDBERRY, LETHA 191 
GRANGER, DOUG 128 
GRANT, JOSEPH 191 
GRANT, OMAN 93 
GRAUNKE, JON 163 
GRAVE, REBECCA CRAFT 121 
GRAVES, DAMON 191 
GRAVES, DAVID 53, 55 
GRAVES, JOE DAVID 121 
GRAY. CAROL 191 
GRAY.CHAUNCEYTOBIAS 1 15, 

139 
GRAY, CHRIST1 55, 57 
GRAY, JAN 57 

GRAY, MAGGIE CAROLE 191 
GRAY, NANCY 54 
GRAY, PAUL A 174 
GRAY, PAULA 267 
GRAY, SHERYL 191 
GREANEY, DEVIN 191 
GREEN, BETTY W 213 
GREEN, C1NDI KAY 105 
GREEN, DIANE 201 



GREEN, JILL DOSS 120 
GREEN, JUAN1TA 96 
GREEN, KEN 174 
GREEN, SHARON E 121 
GREEN, SHARON-ANNETTE 174 
GREEN, V1CKI LYNN 112 
GREENH1LL, CHARLES 163 
GREER, CONSTANCE J 174 
GREER, LINDA 105 
GREESON, TIM 184 
GREGORY. DURRELI 191 
GREHAN, GEOFFREY A 104, 117 
GREMES, JAMES 309 
GRESHAM, PATRICIA E 94, 97 
GRIES1NGER, KATHRYN 191 
GRIFFIN, ROBERT 164 
GRIFFITH, WILLIAM 191, 277, 

311 
GRIMES, JAMES 191 
GR1SAMORE, JANICE 21 
GR1SANT1, ALLISON 191, 291 
GR1SHAM, BOBBY PAUL 105 
GROCE, W TODD 97 
GROGAN, AL1SE 191, 289, 92 
GROGAN, NANCY A 96 
GROSS, JEFF 174, 267 
GROSSMAN, LOREN R1CK1 112 
GROSSMAN, MATTHEW R 213 
GRUDER, BENJAMIN JOEL 105 
GRUENEWALD, RONIANN 174, 

286 
GRUENWALD, CHRIS 191 
GUBERA, FRANK 93 
GUERCIO, RICHARD J 113 
GUNN, ROBIN 191 
GURLEY, BRAD 56, 92 
GURLEY, LARRY SHAWN 114 
GUSTAFSON, ALBERT E I 13 
GUT, AUTHUR 309 
GUTHRIE, BRUCE 191 
GUTHRIE, CHRISTY 191,287 
GUTIERREZ, GUS 193, 315 
GUY, ARTHUR 193 
GYLFE, SUSAN 174 
HACKET, MARGARET 193 
HADE. D1ERDE 117 
HAJIOMAR. MOHAMMED 267 
HAJIOMER. MAX 188 
HALAMKA. KATHY 193 
HALCOMB, ROSEANN M 97 
HALES. CINDY 192 
HALL, CAPTON1E 88 
HALL, DANIEL 193, 303 
HALL, EDWARD EARL 116 
HALL, GAYLON S 115, 139 
HALL, LAURA 174, 291 
HALL, MARLENE 213 
HALL, MICHAEL TANDY 94 
HALL. THOMAS 193 
HALL, VICKIE 213 
HAM, JOHN 193. 311 
HAM, LISA VONHOOZER 104 
HAM, MARK 131 
HAMBLETT, MEL1NDA K 103 
HAMER, SANDRA 193 
HAMILTON, KATHLEEN 193, 

278, 291 
HAMILTON, KELLY 193 
HAMILTON, STEPHANIE E 94 
HAMM, GEARY 193, 278, 308 
HAMMONDS, DIANE M 121, 94 
HAMPTON, CLARENCE 96 
HAMPTON, CLARENCE O 229, 

95 
HAMPTON, EARL 54 
HAMPTON, JUDITH 56 
HAMPTON, JULIE B 97 
HANCOCK, TRACY 193 
HANCOX, III WILLIAM A 120 
HANK1NSON, DAN 314 
HANKSON.JR DONALD R 81, 
HANLEY, WILLIAM 174 
HANNAH, JOHN CURTIS 103 
HANNER, MICKEY 56 
HANNS, RANDALL 193, 315 
HANOVER. JAN S 97 
HANOVER, MARCH S 97 
HANSON, CAROLE MANLEY 105 
HAQUE, MOHMAD F 103 
HARBUCK, SARAH LEE 82, 95, 

174, 284, 292 
HARDEMAN, DANA 193, 291 
HARDEN, JAMES ALAN 113 
HARDER, LORETTA 15, 193 
HARDESTY, JOANNE 94 
HARDIN, CLINTON 193 
HARDIN, KATHY M 57 
HARDISON, DEBBIE 291, 301 
HARDISON, DEB1E 193 



HARDY, ANN DEBRA 104 
HARDY, CYNTHIA 193 
HARDY, DAVID 193 
HARDY, YVONNE ALMETA 104 
HARLAN, JON 193 
HARME1ER, JOANN F 105 
HARMON, KIMBERLY 193 
HARPER, GARY 163 
HARPER, MICHAEL 163 
HARPER, VEONNIE 104 
HARRINGTON, MICHAEL 193 
HARRIS, FRANK MORGAN 121 
HARRIS, GAYLON L 82 95, 174 
HARRIS, GWENDOLYN B 105 
HARRIS, II JOE CALVIN 103 
HARRIS, JACQUELINE P 105 
HARRIS, JEANNA 289 
HARRIS, JEANNE 193 
HARRIS, JERRY 163 
HARRIS, KENNETH 98 
HARRIS. 1 ACHARY 175 
HARRIS. LEE D 117 
HARRIS. MELISSA 193. 285 
HARRIS. PAMELA L 121 
HARRIS. RAY 111 
HARRIS, REG1NA 57 
HARRIS. STEPHANIE 193, 285 
HARRIS, TIM 163 
HARRIS, TYJUANA 193 
HARRISON, ANGELA 193 
HARRISON, CARL 163 
HARRISON, DAVID L 175 
HARRISON, FAY BETH 193, 291 
HARRISON, JEFFERY V 121, 193 
HARRISON, MICHAEL A 103 
HARSHBARGER. CLAY 193 
HART, LAURA 193, 291 
HART, WILLIAM DARWYN 103 
HARTHUN, JENNIFER 21, 175, 

284 
HARTHUN, NANCY 193, 280 
HARTNEY, JOHN 250 
HARTSOCH, MARY 193, 285 
HARTY, BETH 175, 291 
HARVELL, BARBARA 193 
HARVEY, DOUGLAS 193, 303 
HARVEY, PAUL 56 
HARWELL, LEIGH C 115, 139 
HATAMZADEH, MAJ1D E 103 
HATCHER, DEBRA KAY 105 
HATCHETT, LISA L 82, 175, 212 
HATFIELD, WALLY 163 
HATHAWAY, REBECCA 115, 139 
HATHAWAY, ZOE KATHY 104 
HAUSS, GREGG 163 
HAY, MARGARET 193 293 93 
HAYES, CHARLOTTE C I 12 
HAYES, JAMES 175 
HAYES, MARY CAROLYN 105 
HAYES, TONY 193, 303 
HAYNES, CATH1 57 
HAYNES, CYNTHIA 105 
HAYNES, PAMELA 213 
HAYNES-CRAWFORD, 

CATHERINE 175 
HAZARD, DANIEL R 103 
HEARD, ADELLA M I 13 
HEATH, MARK 193 
HEAVEY, JEFFREY 193, 312 
HECH1NGER, RICK 164 
HECKMAN, KENNY 154 
HEDGEMAN, DEN1TA 193 
HEDR1CK, MELISHA 284, 286 
HEDRICK, PAM 54 
HEFFERMAN, TIFFANY J 1 14 
HEIMBACH, JEFF 193 
HEITZMANN, DENNIS 233 
HENDERSON, CHUCK 164 
HENDERSON, DEBORAH A I 13 
HENDREN, HEATHER JO 93, 96 
HENDREN, KERRIN F 113 
HENDRY, DEBORAH FAYE 1 16 
HENNELLY, JOE 164 
HENRY, JAMES92 
HENTZ, DAVID 193 
HERNANDEZ, LISA 193 
HERNON, JUDITH JANINE 104 
HERRING, SHERRIE B 94 
HERRING, VANESSA LYNN 94 
HERR1NGTON, DUANE A I 10 
HERVEY, CECIL 115, 139 
HESS, CARL 56 
HESS, CHAD W 112 
HESS, FELICIA 175 
HESS, RAYMOND 193 
HESTER, ANDREW 55 
HESTER, ANGELA MARIE 104 
HESTER. GLENDA MARIE 105 
HESTER. LESLIE ANN 116 



HESTER, RHONDA 93 
HETHMON, DOUGLAS 193 
HEWITT, SHERRY 193 
HEWLETT, IRENE F 193, 298 
HICKS, JOHN SPAULDING 1 13 
H1GG1NS, JOHN HOOSER 110 
HIGG1NS, WILLIAM E 103 
H1LDALGO, MANUEL A 111, 115, 

139 
HILL, ALEXANDER R 114 
HILL, CAROL 193, 293 
HILL, CHARLES DAVID 103 
HILL, RANDALL 171 
HILTONSMITH, JOHN F 105 
HINSON, CINDY 193 
HIRJH, MARILYN ARLENE94 
HISS, JEFFREY M 93,94,97 
HISS, STEVEN P 97 
H1TCHUSEN, BARBARA 93 
HO, KOK YIN 120 
HOBDAY, JAMESM1CHAEL 175 
HOBDY, MARTY 142 
HODGES, BILLY RAY 103 
HODGES, MARK 193, 312 
HODNETT, LEE 193, 287 
HODUM, SHIRLEY T 94, 95, 105 
HOEHN, JUDITH S 93, 97 
HOFFMAN, ELMO 55 
HOFFMAN, JANICE K 112 
HOFFMAN, JEAN TAMMY 104 
HOFFMAN, LENORA 171 
HOFFMAN, MICHAEL 193 
HOLDER, CHARLOTTE L 115, 

139 
HOLDER, VIRGIL P 121 
HOLLAHAN, PAUL 153 
HOLLAND, DANA 175, 284 
HOLLAND, LAURIE DIANE 105 
HOLLAND, RODNEY 55 
HOLLFORD, CHRISTINA G I 17 
HOLLIDAY, CHRIS 308 
HOLLIDAY, JULIE 193 
HOLLIDAY, ROSEMARY 175 
HOLLIDAY, ROSEMARY C 97 
HOLLIDAY, WILLIAM C 175 
HOLLINGSWORTH. DON 175, 

312 
HOLLINGSWORTH, JAMES 193 
HOLLINGSWORTH, MAURICE 

175, 284, 83,95 
HOLLINGSWORTH, SHERR1 193 
HOLMAN, DANIEL 194 
HOLMES, BASKERVILLE 126, 

134, 135 
HOLMES, DERRICK 54 
HOLMES, JULIE 194,291 
HOLMES, ROBERT 194 
HOLMES, TRACY 164 
HOLMON, ARTHUR 188, 232 
HOLT, MACL1N HOBBS 120 
HOLZEMER, ANNE T 105 
HOMECOMING COURT 20. 21 
HOOKS. BRUCIE W 113 
HOOPER, DANIEL 194 
HOOPER, TRELL 162, 164 
HOOPLE, BETH 104 
HOPKINS, BOBBIE H 213 
HOPKINS, NATALIE 175, 298 
HOPKINS, RANDLE E 115, 139 
HOPKINS, W CLYDE 213 
HORREII . JR WILLIAM E 94, 

112 
HORTON, SANDRA 194, 301 
HOUGH, CYNTHIA 194, 286, 93 
HOUSE, CANDY 194 
HOUSLEY, MICHAEL 194 
HOUSTON, BRUCE 194 
HOUSTON, PHILLIP 194 
HOUSTON, RONNELL 164 
HOWARD, CAROLE 194 
HOWARD, CHARLES 194 
HOWARD, JACKIE 57 
HOWARD, LYNNE R 104 
HOWARD, ROBERT 194, 309 
HOWELL, DORNETTA 194 
HOWELL, JOYCE R 97 
HOYLE, AMY GRACE 105 
HSU, MING M 97 
HUBBARD, JAN 175, 250 
HUCKABY, LEIGH 175, 301 
HUCKABY, TIM 194 
HUDSON, BILL 175 
HUDSON, CARMEN 194 
HUDSON, FOSTER E 93, 97, 194 
HUETTEL, CATHRYN A 104 
HUETTEL, LAURA JANE 104 
HUEY, LEND1A 194 
HUFFAKER, TIM 194 
HUFFMAN, CHERON 194 



326 Index 



HUFFMAN, LAYN 194, 309 - 
HUFFORD, BRIAN E 110 
HUGHES, CATHERINE J 97 
HUGHES, IICONWAYTODD 103, 

194,303 
HUGHES, CRAIG STEWART 96 
HUGHES, GREG 164 
HUGHES, JEAN RUBY 104 
HUGHES, MARTIN 175 
HUGHES, STEPHEN 175 
HUGHES, STEVEN L 171 
HUGHEY, MARK 194 
HULS, CHRISTINE 194 
HUME, JEFFREY L 175, 311 
HUME. KATHRYN 195, 291 
HUME, STACY B 97 
HUMES, STEPHEN W 1 15, 139 
HUMMEL, ROBERT W 103 
HUNDLEY, GINA 195,301 
HUNDLEY, JOHN 195,303 
HUNT, DESMA 143 
HUNT, GARY 164 
HUNT, JR CHARLES 175 
HUNT, KEN 195, 303 
HUNT, KEVIN ANTHONY I 10 
HUNT, PATRICIA 93 
HUNTER, CAROLYN L 105 
HUNTER, TERESA 195, 301 
HURDLE, DENA 195, 301 
HURLEY, GINA 195,291 
HURLEY, SHERRY 195 
HURST, JENNY 195,289,301 
HURST, ROBERT 195 
HURT, VALERIA PASCHALL 94 
HUSS1E, GWENDOLYN 175 
IBN-TURIYA, KAMAL 54 
1GBALAJOBI.THEOPH1LUS 195 
IGOU, MARY 195 
1HR1G, SHERRY COLETTE 114 
INGLES, THOMAS 164 
INGRAM, CHRIS 195 
INGRAM, DENESE MARCIA 105 
INGRAM, KEITH 195 
INGRAM, MARY ASHLEY 93 
INGRAM, SPENSHA54 
IRAUSQU1N, CARRIE 92 
IRVINE, LESLIE 195 
IRVINE, LISA 195 
ISOM, CATHERINE 195 
1SOM, MICHAEL 175 
IVEY, CATHY JEAN 94 
IVY, SHARON 298 
JACKS, MARSHALL 9 
JACKSON, CONNIE 99 
JACKSON, DARRYL M 96 
JACKSON, DAVID 155 
JACKSON, ENIS 162, 164 
JACKSON, FREDDA R 105 
JACKSON, GREG 267 
JACKSON, HARRIET 105 
JACKSON, 1L1NDA 195, 284, 93 
JACKSON, JANICE 195 
JACKSON, JUDY 195 
JACKSON, K1MBERLY D 96 
JACKSON, LEWANDA 195 
JACKSON, LOUISE TAYLOR 94 
JACKSON, MARK E 97 
JACKSON, WILLIAM S 110 
JACO, TERRY MICHAEL 114 
JACOBS, JAMES 195 
JACOBS, PETE GUY 103 
IACOBSEN, ELIZABETH 104 
IACQUES, PERCY AUBURN 115 
JAFFE, ROBIN 104 
IAMERSON, RENE 64 
1AMES, ANITA G 97 
1AMES, CHRISTY 195 
1AMES, KAREN 195 
IAMES, KEVIN 56 
IAMES, ROBERT 195,303 
IAMES, ROWLAND 308 
IAMES, TIM 308 
IAMES, TOMMIE 175 
IANOVETZ, JILL MARIE 104 
IANUARY, BOBBY 195, 312 
IAQUESS, PERCY AUBURN 139 
IARRELL, KENNETH 195 
1AWORSKI, LAURA LEE 105,94 
IAYANTHI, LAKSHMI 213 
IEANS, JOSEPH CARL 94 
IEFFERSON, ANNA 175, 21 
IEFFR1ES, JOHNNY J 56, 103 
IENK1NS, JENNIFER E 110 
IENKINS.JOANNEMARTIN 113 
IENNEMANN, ROXANNE M 112 
IENSEN, JOY 142 
IEROME, JAN ROSSLYN 94 
IETT, DUNCAN 176 
IEU, FRANCES HAYWARD 105 



JOBES, TODD 164 
JOHANNES, KURT 153 
JOHNS, MARY LOU 142 
JOHNS, STEPHAN B 94 
JOHNSON, BARBARA G 121 
JOHNSON, BILL1E 195 
JOHNSON, CARITA F 93, 97 
JOHNSON, CARMIN 176 
JOHNSON, CHRISTINA M 195 
JOHNSON, CYNTHIA D 195 
JOHNSON, DANA 195 
JOHNSON, DARREL98 
JOHNSON, DAWN 293 
JOHNSON, DEBRA A 104 
JOHNSON, ERIC R 103 
JOHNSON, GINGER 93 
JOHNSON, JAMES P 1 15, 139 
JOHNSON, JOHANN 176 
JOHNSON, KAREN 57 
JOHNSON, MARK 30 
JOHNSON, MICHAELDALE 110 
JOHNSON, PAT 155 
JOHNSON, RENA 195 
JOHNSON, THOMAS 195 
JOHNSON, TINA 283 
JOHNSON, VEREILLA 176 
JOHNSON, VIOLA E 116 
JOHNSTON, CARMEN M 97 
JOHNSTON, DAWN 195, 57 
JOHNSTON, ELLEN 195 
JOHNSTON, MARCUS O 105 
JOHNSTON, RICHARD P 103 
JOK1, JANICE EILEEN 113 
JONES, ATHERESE 104 
JONES, ANGELA 195, 291 
JONES, ANTHONY 176 
JONES, BRENDA 195 
JONES, C MICHAEL 196 
JONES, CATHERINE MARIA 195 
JONES, COY A 213, 239 
JONES, DANA MERYL 104 
JONES, DONALD 195, 311 
JONES, JANET 176 
JONES, JOHN 171, 195, 314 
JONES, JR JIM W 112 
JONES, KIM 196 
JONES, LARRY 56 
JONES, MARION TURNER 105 
JONES, MICHAEL 196, 315 
JONES, MIKE 277 
JONES, REG1NA 196 
JONES, RICHARD D 213, 267, 95 
JONES, RITA 176 
JONES, RUSSELL 176 
JONES, STANLEY 196 
JONES, TRINA60, 61 
JONES, WILLIAM 196, 312 
JORDAN, BURNER DENE 196 
JORDAN, JAY 196, 312 
JORDAN, SMOKEY 162 
JORDAN, SUSAN 196 
JORDAN, VALVAR1E J 105 
JORDAN, WILLIAM PAUL 103 
JORDEN, SMOKEY 164 
JORGENSEN, LISA K 94 
JOSEPHS, SUZANN A MARIE 94 
JOSH, KIM 97 
JOYNER, PAULA L 111 
JOYNER, TOMMY 196, 311 
JUDY, MELISSA 176 
JULP, ROB 267 

JUROE, JAMES W1LLARD 113 
KADLEC, KAR1SSA HOLLY 104 
KAIL, DANNY W 95 
KAL1N, BERKLEY 93, 213 
KALLAHER, II WALTER H 196, 

309 
KAO, SH1H-HSIUNG 1 14 
KAPPA ALPHA PSI 277 
KASPERBAUER, JAMES C 95 
KATSNER, MARIA 196 
KAUKER, MIKE 155 
KAZEMBA, MICHAEL 196 
KEITH, RICHIE 196, 315 
KEITH, SGT 1ST CLASS R. 88 
KELLEY, BRIAN 56 
KELLEY, CHARLENE RENEE 105 
KELLEY, DAVID WARREN 1 12 
KELLEY, LORI 54 
KELLY, CATHLEEN 93 
KELLY, DAVID 196,302 
KELLY, GORDON 250 
KELLY, RYAN 311 
KELTNER, SHARON 196 
KEMP, RHONDA M 112 
KENDALL, PHYLLIS Y 111 
KENNEDY, DAVID L 115, 139 
KENNEDY, KEITH 299 
KENNEDY. LISA L 97 



KENNEDY, SHARON KAY 105 
KENNEMORE, GAYLA 93 
KENNER, LAURA LEIGH 120 
KENNY, PAMELA ANN 121 
KENT, CHERYL RULE 94 
KENT, TROY 176 
KENTON, THOMAS 196 
KERR, JOHN GORDON I 12 
KERR, RENEE DENISE 105 
KESLER, DAVID 196 
KESSLER, LORI 196, 250, 57 
KESSLER, SANDRA LYNN 103 
KEY, KEITH 176 
KEYS, DEMETRIC96 
KHAIRUDDIN, IBRAHIM 188 
KIEPE, ANTHONY 176, 311 
KILPATRICK, BOBBY 130, 131 
KIMBALL, DONNA 184 
KINDY, THOMAS CHARLES 103 
KING, CAROL 53, 54 
KING, ELAINE REBECCA 104 
KING, GREG 153 
KINGJOSEPHINETHOMAS 105 
KING, KRISTIE 57 
KING, RONNIE 176, 303 
KING, STEPHEN J 110 
KINGSLEY, LAURA LYNN 

RE1MOLD94 
KINGSLEY, LEIGH A 115, 139 
K1NNAMAN, ERIC 131 
KINNEY, SCOTT 55 
KIRBY, GWENDOLYN 196 
KIRBY, JOE CLIFTON 110 
KIRK, DANA 135 
K1RKLAND, JAMES 60 
K1RKPATR1CK, DOUGLAS 56, 

1 96, 3 1 2 
K1RSCH, BARBARA J 105 
K1RSCH, DOROTHY O 97 
KITE, KIRSTEN 29, 30 
KLEIMEYER, MICHAEL C 103 
KLEINAITIS, RAMONA 196, 287 
KLE1NFELDT, LEAH ANN 112 
KL1NCK, PAUL M 110 
KLYCE, ANGEL K 97 
KNACK, STEVE 77,94,97 
KNIGHT, ANITA 67 
KNIGHT, BILLY JOE 94 
KNIGHT, DONNA 196 
KNIGHT, JANE E, 176, 213, 289 
KNIGHT, SHERI 196 
KNOWLTON, TERR1 L 196 
KOCH, STEPHEN MARK 116, 140 
KOEHLER, LISA 67,290 
KOKAJKO, STEPHEN L 97 
KOLEAS, KAREN 176,289 
KOLES, KARREN 274 
KOSSMAN, MARGARETO 110 
KOZAK, RONALD 196 
KRAFT, KELLEY 54 
KRANE, DAVID M 115, 139 
KRELL, KURT JONATHAN 196 
KRESS, DEBORAH ANN 105 
KRIEGEL, REVA MARK 112 
KR1EGER, KATHY 176, 301, 93 
KRISTO, STANLEY JOSEPH 1 1 I 
KROCK, BRIAN 196 
KRONE, KATHLEEN S 60, 61, 94 
KROOK, BRIAN 312 
KUEHL, GREGORY 176 
KUNTZMAN, ART 196, 303 
KURTHELEER, JOHN 153 
KURTS, SUSAN LEE I 15, 139 
KURTZ, JANELL MARIE 110 
KURTZ, JONELL MARIE 1 13 
KUTCHBACK, JIM 164,92 
KUTZ, GARY 196 
KUYKENDALL, SANDRA 176 
LACY, LEAH M1CHELLE96, 152 
LAFFIFEAU, JAMES 196 
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 
FRATERNITY 21, 277 
LAMPLEY, DONNA J 97 
LANCASTER, THOMAS LEE 94 
LAND, LAURA E 196 
LANDRY, EMRY 213 
LANDRY, PAT 267 
LANE, 11 CHARLES 176 
LANGENBACH, LISA A 104 
LANGHAM, JOHN 53, 54 
LANGLEY, HAROLD E 110 
LANGSTON, SANDRA K 97 
LANSKY, GREGG IRWIN I 13 
LARCO, MARY JOE 105 
LARD, DEBORAH 93 
LARD, MICHELLE 92, 196, 288 
LARHETTE, RICHARD P 112 
LARSON, RODGER KAY 103 
LARTIGUE, LATONYA 196 



LARUSSA, RACHEL 176,92 
LARWOOD, RAYMOND 93 
LASETER, TR1C1A 196 
LASH, CATHY LYNN 104 
LATHAM, LANNY REED 120 
LATTIMORE, ROBERT LUIS 96 
LAWAL, MOBOLAJI O 120 
LAWRENCE, BETH 196, 288 
LAWRENCE, GREGORY L 196 
LAWRENCE, MONICA L 196 
LAWSON, WILLIAM B 113 
LAX, ALICIA 97 
LAX, GREG 176 
LAY, LYDIA DIANE 104 
LAY, RAMONA SUSAN 121 
LAY, SCOTT 280 
LAYNE, BUFORD KEITH 103 
LAZAR1NI, BETTY J 97 
LE.TAM 196 
LE, TUONG 197 
LEATHERWOOD, LISA 93 
LEAVELL, MARTIN 197 
LEAVELLE, SHERRI 176 
LEBOVITZ, MICHAEL NEIL 104 
LEE, DIANE JONES 142 
LEE, JEFF 197 
LEE, KEITH 134, 135 
LEITNER, MARTHA B 121 
LEITSCHUH, ROGER C JR 103 
LEMONS, JERRY H 103 
LEMORROCCO, BELINDA L 1 14 
LENSMAN, JEFFREY 93 
LESH, ROX1E WAYNETTE 121 
LESTER, KENNETH 197 
LEVEY, HARRY R 97 
LEVY, JOAN ELAINE 103 
LEVY, JR RAYFORD M 197 
LEWIS, JACQUELIN A 96 
LEWIS, KELLY 288 
LEWIS, LAURA 176,280,93 
LEWIS, SONDRA 15, 197 
LEWIS, TONYA 57 
LEWIS, WILLIAM 197 
L1GON, CYNTHIA LYNN 105 
LIGON, DAVID G 105 
L1GON, G DAVID 105 
LIGON, ROBIN SUSANNE 116 
LIKENS, STEVEN W 93, 96, 97 
LIKINS,THOMASMlCHAEL 114 
LIKLEY, DEBORAH JEAN 1 16 
LILLARD, KATHRYN E 104 
LIMBAUGH, MARIA 293 
L1MBERG, STEVE 96 
L1MBOUGH, MARLA 197 
LINDER, EDWARD 197 
L1NDER, SCOTT 303 
LINDSAY, SUSAN BETH S 105 
L1NDSEY, CLAIRE L 115, 139 
L1NDSEY, JOHN 164 
L1NKW1LER, JOHN 197 
L1NZY, PATRICIA ANN 104 
LIPPY, JAMESC 14 
LITANO, CHRIS 131 
LITTLE, SCOTT 53, 56 
LIVINGSTON, JAMES P 1 13 
LLOYD, KATHRYN M 104, 1 16 
LOBELLO, LAURIE 117 
LOB1ANCO, TOMMY 197 
LOCK, CHARLES 197 
LOCKERT, WILLIAM B 113 
LOCKHART. M1CHELE 250, 93 
LOEFFEL, LONN1E E 103 
LOMAS, R. KENNETH 197. 312 
LOMAX, KEVIN 176 
LONER, WAYNE JOSEPH 120 
LONEY, VALERIE ANNE 115, 139 
LONG, CHARLES FLOYD 103 
LONG, KERRY STEVAN 94 
LONG, TIM 164 
LONGF1ELD, JOANNE KAY 83, 

93,95, 176,284,286,301 
LONGO, SUSAN LYNN 1 14, 94 
LOPEZ, STANLEY 197 
LOSER, TERESA 236 
LOSKOVE, MICHAEL A 96 
LOVE, CANDY 197 
LOVE, CINDY 121 
LOVE, JR ROBERT 114 
LOVE, MARION 54 
LOVELACE, JEFF 56 
LOVELADY, EDWIN 164 
LOVELL, JR CHARLES D I 12 
LOW, YENG KEONG96 
LOWE, MAJORIE BOSLEY 121 
LOWER, DAVID KEITH 113 
LOWERY, DEBRA P 121 
LOWREY, KERI 197, 287 
LOWRY, GREG 55 
LOYD, KENNY 53. 56 



LUBIN. JOY TANNER 115. 139 

LUCAS, GLENN 54 

LUCKETT, JAMIE 197. 309 

LUDLOW. MARK ANTHONY W 
115. 139 

LUKE, JOHN 197 

LUNATI. JUDY 197.285 

LUPO. TERRY ANNE 97. 197. 291 

LUSK, ERICA 93 

LUTON, WILLIAM E 120 

LYGUTIS, CINDY JO 105 

LYNCH, BRYANT SIDNEY 104 

LYNCH, RAYMOND M 140 

LYNN, JOANN 99 

LYNN, SHIRLEY GUPTON 94 

LYNXWILER, MELISSA 197 

LYONS, DAVID 176 

MACDONALD, PHILLIP 197,303 

MACHN, LEANN 54 

MACKLIN. ELLA P 105 

MACKL1N, VALARIE L 1 15. 139 

MACKLIN. WILLIE 267 

MACKO, KRISTA 275 

MACLIN, DEA A 97 

MACLIN, LELIA SMITH 121 

MACLIN, PATRICIA A 121 

MACLIN, SAMUEL 176 

MADAIO, MARG0 93 

MADDEN. JR KENNETH R 95, 
176. 250 

MADDEN, KENNETH R 83, 302 

MADDOCK, JEFFREY 197 

MADLOCK, JRCLIM 113 

MAGEE, ESTHER 197 

MAHO, ROMONA M 94 

MALEWSKI. BOB 56 
MALLANEY, MICHAEL 199 
MALLARD, BART E 104 
MALLARD, KAREN 197 
MALONE, CYNTHIA ANN 105 
MALONE, KAREN 197 
MALONE, LEWANNA 197 
MALONE, TAMMERA 197 
MALONE, TROY 176 
MALONEY, PATRICE 93 
MALUANEY. MICHAEL 197 
MALUNDA, III MELVIN 197 
MANDELMAN.JULIEEL1SE 116 
MANESS, GLENDA 171 
MANESS, PHIL 176 
MANLEY, STEPHEN 197 
MANN, DAVID 92 
MANN, ELIZABETH L 97 
MANNING, W MANNING 104 
MAPES, TERRI 176 
MAPLES, CONNIE 197, 288. 93 
MARCRUM, SANDRA D 104 
MARCUS, TRENT W 92, 93 
MARCZYNSKI, ROBERT A 231 
MARENSHI, LISA 197 
MARION. BARBARA 197 
MARKHAM. DONNA 197 
MARKS, RUSSELL 113 
MARKS, SUSAN CASS 113 
MARROUCHE, ZAHIRA J 97 
MARSH, JAMES ARTHUR 104 
MARSHALL, BARRY A 197 
MARSHALL, JR ROBERT W 113 
MARSHALL, KEVIN 197 
MARSHALL, RENEE 116 
MARTIN. AMY 176. 250 
MARTIN, BARRY 176 
MARTIN, GINGER 54 
MARTIN, MARK 93 
MARTIN, MARK W 97 
MARTIN. MARSHALL W 103 
MARTIN. MICHAEL 56 
MARTIN, MICHAELS 116 
MARTIN, MIKE 164 
MARTIN. ROB 93 
MARTIN. ROD 197. 56 
MARTIN. SHEILA 197 
MARTIN. SUSAN 56 
MARTIN. THOMAS 35 
MARVELL, SHANE 153 
MASCROFT. CONNIE 55 
MASLA. MICHAEL MARC 1 14 
MASON. EARNEST1NE 198 
MASON, JACQUELINE S 121 
MASOUD. MAHMAUD 267 
MASSA, LISA 292 
MASSA, PAULA 198 
MASSEY, ELIZABETH 198. 285 
MASSE Y. SHAWN 198 
MATHENIA. RANDY K 95 
MATHENY. HARVEY W 84. 176. 

267 
MATHENY. PAMELA A l 7 l 
MATHEWS, CANDACE 198 



Index 327 



MATHEWS. MARION D 176 
MATLOCK, LISA 93 
MATTERS. KEITH 164 
MATTHEWS, ALICIA 60 
MATTHEWS, MAT 164 
MATT1NGLY, JAN M 121 
MAWRY, DAVID EUGENE 116 
MAXEY, RONALD GLENN 104 
MAXWELL, JIM 54 
MAXWELL, MICHAEL 176 
MAY, K1ETH 267 
MAY, LEAH MEAD 93, 94, 176 
MAY, MARTHA V 198 
MAYFIELD, GLENN W 97 
MAYS TAMARA 198 
MAZYEK, M1CHAEL211 
MCADOO. STEVEN 198, 309 
MCAFEE, CHRIS 198 
MCCABE, J LOGAN 110 
MCCANTS, REGINALD T I 12 
MCCARLEY, DRU 198 
MCCARTY, PATRICIA G 113 
MCCARVER, LINDA A 105 
MCCAUL, JR MACK 93 
MCCAULEY, LARRY S 176 
MCCHAREN, LEALAND L 1 13 
MCCHRIST1AN, CAROL D 105 
MCCLAIN, DONNA 198 
MCCL1NTON, TRELIS 198 
MCCLURE, GUY WALLACE 113 
MCCOMMON, JOHN 198 
MCCORD, NANCY LEE 121 
MCCORD, TAMMY L 116, 140 
MCCORMICK, PAMELA A 1 16 
MCCOWN, DONALD KEITH 198 
MCCOWN, MARIAN M 117 
MCCRAVER, STEPHANIE 301 
MCCRAY, SHIRLEY Y H 105 
MCCULLAR, MICHAEL D 1 13 
MCCULLOUGH. CONSTANCE 

279 
MCCULLOUGH, ROBERT S 95 
MCCUNE, DAVID 93 
MCCUTCHEON, LATONYA 198 
MCDANIEL, DORIS FAYE 94 
MCDANIEL.MARKSTEVEN 113 
MCDONALD. ARTHUR 198 
MCDONALD, CAPT 88 
MCDOUGAL, EDDIE W 121 
MCDOWELL, CHRISTOPHER C 

105 
MCDOWELL, ROBERT WAYNE 

117 
MCELRATH, TRACY 198 
MCENROE, KENNETH L 103 
MCFADDEN, JAMES M 103 
MCFARLAND, JOHNNY R 120 
MCFATTER, LARRY E 117 
MCGAFFEE, JERE 198 
MCGARRH, LUKE 56 
MCGARY, FRED 198 
MCGAW, DAVID 198 
MCGEE, ANN CATHERINE 104 
MCGEE, SHIRLEY 176 
MCGHEE, MICHAEL 198 
MCGHEHEY, TERRY LEE 115, 

139,94 
MCGRAW, DAVID 267 
MCKAM1E, JON 153 
MCKAY, MIKE 164 
MCKAY, SIDNEY 52 
MCKAY, SUSAN 54 
MCKEE, DAN 53, 55 
MCKEE, LESLIE S 198 
MCKEE, MARK 311 
MCKEE, MARKT 176 
MCKEE, SUSAN 285 
MCKELVEY, DOUGLAS LEE 103 1 
MCKENZIE, GTHOMAS 176,303 
MCKENZIE, MIKE 56 
MCKINLEY, ROBERT W 95 
MCKINNEY, ALVIN 198,56 
MCKINNEY, DONNA ALENE 105 
MCKINNEY, SANDRA K 198 
MCKINNIE, LINDA 176 
MCKINN1E. SANDRA KAYE 96 
MCK1SSACK, JERRY 93 
MCKNIGHT, BEVERLY D 104, 

116 
MCKNIGHT, SANDRA S 94 
MCLENDON, J LINDA 104 
MCLEOD, ELIZABETH 21, 176, 

301 
MCMAINS, JAMA 93 
MCMANUS, DANDOC 104 
MCMILLAN, ELIZABETH J 84, 

95 
MCMILLAN, JAMIE 176, 288 
MCM1LLON, RICKY 198 



MCMULLIN, LYNDA 198 
MCNABB, ANNETTA T 104 
MCNATT, MARLA 198 
MCNATT, PIPKIN 289 
MCNEAL, KATHLEEN S 104 
MCNEESE, KEVIN 198, 309 
MCPHAIL, FRANK 176, 267 
MCP1PKIN, DEBRA E 198 
MCRAVEN, PATRICIA A 96 
MCSHAN, NANCY 198, 92, 95 
MCVAY, GERRARD98 
MCVAY, TERRY LEE 113 
MCVOY, CARL DAVID I 15, 139 
MEAD, JAMES B 97 
MEADOWS, MICHAEL K 115. 

139 
MEADOWS, TAMMY 198 
MEALER, KENNETH 53, 56 
MECH, JEFF 198. 309 
MEDEK. SEAN 56 
MEDLIN, PAUL 267 
MEECE, IDA 93 
MEECE, KATHERINE 198, 293 
MEEKS, MICHAEL 93 
MEESTER, BARBARA C 97 
MEFFORD, MICHAEL A 198 
MEHRHOFF, KAREN T 110 
MEIER, CURT 198, 313 
ME1HOFER, MARK 198, 309 
MEKUS, CYNTHIA 93 
MELMAN, DROR 104 
MELTON, LISA RUTH 104 
MELVIN, MISSY 198, 293, 57 
MELVIN, SARAH E 116, 140 
MELZGER, ANN G 120 
MENDOZA, DEBBIE 76 
MENEES, GARY 55 
MERIWEATHER, DEBBIE 198 
MERR1TT, SHANE 204 
MERR1TT, WILL 198, 312 
MERR1WEATHER, ANITA 198, 

284 
MERTZ, FRED 184 
MESSER, ALAN 176 
METTS, JR L1NDER L 93, 1 14 
MICHAELS, AUREL1A W 94, 120 
M1CKENS, ANTHONY 198 
MIDDLETON, TANYA 198 
MILES, ROBIN SCOTT 115, 139 
MILES, ROBYNE DIANE 121 
MILES, SCOTT 198,302 
MILEY, LYDIA 176,284 
MILIC1, PAULG 110 
MILLARD, DAN 199, 309 
M1LLEN, RHENDLE53 
MILLER, CAROL MORRIS 121 
MILLER, DANDR1DGE R 104 
MILLER, EDDIE 56 
MILLER, GLORIA J 121 
MILLER, JACK JR 104 
MILLER, JOYCE M 176 
MILLER, JR RALPH LEROY 103 
MILLER, KARIN LEE 113 
MILLER, LAURA 199, 286 
MILLER, LLOYD D 93, 97 
MILLER, LORRAINECRAIG 105 
MILLER, MATTHEW T 113 
MILLER, NORMAN 199 
MILLER, TAMARA L 105 
MILLER, WES 199 
M1LLICAN, LISA CAROL 94 
MILLS, SUSAN 55 
MINER, SHARON W 115, 139 
MINOR, GARY B 113 
MINOR, JR AMBROSE 199 
MINORITY ENGINEERING CLUB 

21 
M1NTON, JOHN WILLIAM 110 
MINTON, NANCY NILES 1 14 
M1RVIS, ARLYNN KATZ 99 
MITCHELL, ALLISON 199 
MITCHELL, AUSTIN KAREN 104 
MITCHELL, DEBORAH 199 
MITCHELL, JOYCE D 199 
MITCHELL, LYNDA 96 
MITCHELL, ROBBIN93 
MITCHELL, TERI 199, 293 
M1TCHUSSON, MARTY 279 
MOHUNDRO, RONALD M 121 
MOITOZO, MARY 176 
MONCE, SANDRA DEE 105 
MONK, MARCTA MARIE 105 
MONTA, MARY CAROLINE 104 
MONTAGUE, HOWARD D 105 
MONTES1, AMY ANNE 105 
MONTGOMERY, CATHY 199,291 
MONTGOMERY, DAVID 199 
MONTGOMERY, GRACE L 121 
MONTGOMERY, GREG 164 



MONTGOMERY, REBECCA A 94, 

97 
MONTGOMERY, STONEY P 105 
MONTGOMERY, VAN A 96, 153, 

199, 303 
MONYPENY, DAVID M 113 
MOODY, JEAN BUNT1N 121 
MOODY, JULIA 176 
MOONEY, CHARLES W 1 13 
MOORE, AMY LYNN 105 
MOORE, BENNETT 199 
MOORE, BONNIE GAY 110 
MOORE. BRAD 96 
MOORE, BRENDA KAYE 94 
MOORE, DARLENE93 
MOORE, DEBORAH K 96 
MOORE, DWIGHT TERRY 113 
MOORE, FREEDIE GAYLE 121 
MOORE, GREGORY 199 
MOORE, KEITH ANTHONY 104 
MOORE, LINDA 199 
MOORE, LISA 55 
MOORE, LISA DAWN 105 
MOORE, LOUISE CRAIG 199,293 
MOORE, M ELIZABETH 176 
MOORE, MELISSA 57 
MOORE, SHERRON L 105 
MOORE, TREY 199, 56 
MORETTA, JUDY 199 
MORGAN, DOUGLAS 93 
MORGAN, FELICIA 28 
MORGAN, GINGER KAY 104 
MORGAN, PATSY HARDIN 112 
MORGAN, REBECCA 199 
MORGAN, RUSSELL 199 
MORGAN, SANDRA 93 
MORIN, MARY KATHRYN 110 
MORMAN, VIVIAN R 116 
MORRIS, ALAN L 96 
MORRIS, CAROL 121 
MORRIS, DAVID WAYNE 105 
MORRIS, EMIL JEROME 116 
MORRIS, KEITH 56 
MORRIS, LINDA ELAINE 116 
MORRIS, MICHAEL A 176 
MORRIS, STACY 199 
MORRISON, BOB 56 
MORRISON, MIKE 131 
MORRISON, TERRY LYN 105,94 
MORRISON, V1CK1 93 
MORROW, SANDRA ANN 94 
MORTON, GAIL W 77, 92, 93, 97, 

176 
MORTON, MICHAEL R 97, 199 
MOSS, DAVID 199, 313 
MOTEN, KENNETH WAYNE I 10 
MOTTOLA, ANNA MARIE 292 
MOWRY, DAVID EUGENE 116 
MOZ1NGO, K LESLIE 199 
MUELLER, MICHAEL 155 
MULHER1N, JOE 9 
MULLER, KARLA 200, 293 
MULLIKIN, SUSAN D 104 
MULL1NGS, MARC1A 200 
MULL1NS, CALVIN J 114 
MURPHREE.SHERRYJEAN 104 
MURPHY, DANIEL QU1NN 94 
MURPHY. DEBRA SUE 120 
MURPHY, DONNA 142 
MURPHY, GALE JONES 117 
MURPHY, JONES GALE 104 
MURPHY, LARRY E 103 
MURPHY, MARY ANN 93, 95, 97 
MURPHY, SHIELA 176,250 
MURRAY, BILLY W 120, 121 
MURRAY, JANE R 121 
MURRELL, DAN S 95 
MURRELL, PATRICIA H 95 
MUSICANTE, SYLVIA 92 
MUSKELLEY, JAMES 95 
MYERS, BOBBY D 200 
MYERS, JRC RAYMOND 113 
MYERS, JULIE 28 
MYERS. TROY 164 
MYNATT, ROBERT N 96 
MYR1CK. PAMELA 200 
NABORS, PERCY 162, 164 
NADER1, KOUROSHO 200 
NAKHLEH, RAYMOND J 104 
NANEZ, CHERIE 200 
NANNEY, MARILYN JOYCE 121 
NANNEY, ROBERT 200 
NARAYANA, JAYANTH1 L 120 
NASSA, LISA 176 
NATHANIEL, EILEEN 200 
NAYLOR, SUZANNE 200, 287 
NEELY, KEITH 178 
NEELY, MARCUS ANROLD 120 
NEELY, VERL1SA200 



NEHORAY, S1AVOSH E 103 
NELMS, BUBBA 164 
NELMS, M JEAN 237 
NELSON, BETH 200,287 
NELSON, DARRELL 165 
NELSON, GREG 200,56 
NELSON, JAMES 200 
NELSON, KATHY 142 
NELSON, ROGER 131 
NELSON, TIM 200,309 
NEMEC, CHRISTOPER 93 
NERREN, VERNI OWEN 113 
NETTLES, DOUG 165 
NETTLES, LOR1 200 
NEW, CINDY LOU 121 
NEW, LISA ANN 121 
NEWBERN.KATHLEENANN 105 
NEWBORN, CL1FFERDEAN 200. 

298 
NEWELL, SHEILA 200 
NEWELL, SHEL1A 291 
NEWMAN, LISA HAHN 121 
NEWMAN, NATALIE E 121 
NEWMAN, NEAL 267 
NEWSON, STEPHEN K 200 
NEWTON, HOLT ANN 104 
NEWTON, JANET LEE 105 
NEWTON. THOMAS 200 
NEYMAN, JOSEPH 200 
NG, RAYMOND PO-CHOl 103 
NGUYEN, VINH 92 
NGUYEN, V1NIT 178 
NICHOLAS, SUSAN M 105 
NICHOLS, ROSALIND 35 
NICOLO, SGT MAJ DAVID 88 
NIEMAN, III JOHN J 115, 139 
NIX, 111 LESTER C 115, 139 
NIX, PATRICIA T 111 
NIXON, LORI 178,288 
NIXON, TERRIE 200 
NOBLE, GEORGINA 178, 294 
NOBLE, LINDA LEE 121 
NORFUL, LEWIE A 121 
NORMAN, KENT 93 
NORMAN, STEPHEN 200 
NORMAN. STEVEN 15, 55 
NORRIS, GREG 131 
NORR1S, LEE 92 
NORSWORTHY, WHITNEY 200 
NORTHERN, ANDY 200 
NORTHSWORTHY, FUZZY 56 
NORTHSWORTHY, MEL 53 
NORTHSWORTHY, WHITNEY 

287 
NORTON, DENNIS ANDREW 103 
NOWROUZI, AHMAD 178, 267 
NOZ1NICH, PATRICIA N 1 13 
NUNLEY, JENNIFER 20.0, 292 
NUNLEY, JENNIFER C 97 
NUTTING, KR1STINE BRUNS 1 12 
O'BRYANT, SHAUN 200, 311 
O'CONNOR, SUSAN 200 
O'DANIEL.CYNTHIARENEE 105 
O'DONNELL, STEVE 200 
O'NEAL, TAMMY 55 
O'NEIL, LISA 142, 200, 291 
O'ROURKE, PAUL RICHARD 113 
OAKLEY, MICHAEL GRANT 111 
OATMAN, BRADLEY 200 
OBASUYI, PETER IMADE 103 
OBERTON. JUDITH ELLEN 121 
ODIGIE.OHONS1 200 
ODO, JOHN N DUBU1SI 103 
ODSTFELD, LISA 115, 139 
ODUMAKINDE, DEIDRE W 104, 

116 
OEDING, K1MBERLY 200, 289 
OENNING, STEPHEN Gill 
OKORARE, MARKSON O 96 
OLIPHANT, DR. VAN N. 95, 220 
OLIVER, ANTHONY 171 
OLIVER, JACK 165 
OLIVER, LAURIE 200 
OLIVERE, ROBINSON G 121 
OLSON, ELIZABETH N 121 
OLUBADEWO, MIKE 200 
OMAR, MIKE 165 
OMICROW DELTA KAPPA 95 
ORDER OF OMEGA 284 
ORFIELD, HOWARD R 1 13 
ORIANS, MICHAEL 93 
OR1ANS, MIKE 200 
ORIANS, STEVE 178 
ORIO, EDWARD BENNETT 171 
ORTIZ, TONY 93 
OSBORN, JANET LYNN 121 
OSBORN, MELINDA 178 
OSBORNE, CATRINA 200, 286 
OSELUKWUE.EKENECHUKWU 



178 
OTEY, HAROLD DUDLEY 104 
OWEN, AARON 92 
OWEN, BOBBY 200, 315 
OWEN, DANA 200 
OWEN, JANE S 104 
OWENS, AARON 200, 309 
OWENS, DONNESHIA 178 
OYENIYA, SUNDAY 200 
PADEN, DENNIS P 121 
PAGANO, LOU 200 
PAGE, SUSAN PADEN 121 
PALLME, DANIEL 200 
PALMER, CHRISTOPHER 111 
PALMER, DAVID 178, 280 
PALUSO, TERESA 178,291 
PAMELA, SCULLY PRATT 121 
PAN, BRENDA LILY 120 
PAN-HELLENIC 21 
PANARESE, MICHAEL III 
PANCELLA, PETE 200 
PANG, VALAR1E ELISA 121 
PAN1TZ, MONTE ROBERT 111 
PANNELL, MARK 200, 303 
PANN1, SUSAN 200, 301 
PANYARD, JANE ELLEN 57, 200 
PAONE, THAD WILLIAM 200 
PAONE.TOBY 178 
PAPE, LELAND YOUNG 120 
PAPINEAU, DAWN 200 
PAPPAS, CARY 313 
PARDUE, BETSY MOORE 105 
PARKER, ALICE MAUND 121 
PARKER, DAVID BRUCE 120 
PARKER, KR1STEN 200 
PARKER, NANCY HELTON 105 
PARKER, SUSAN LYNN 120 
PARKEY, ANNA JANE 113 
PARKS, BOBBY 135 
PARKS, LYNN 152 
PARNELL, MELANIE 200 
PARRISH, JEFFERY D 95, 178, 

315 
PARRISH, JR JOHN G 120 
PARRISH, MELANIE 200 
PARSONS, LISA 94 
PARTEE. V1K1TA 21 
PASQUALE, MICHAEL S 1 12 
PATE, DIANE 200 
PATE, SHERR1 200, 286, 301 
PATNAM, MARK GLENN I 17 
PATRICK, CAROLYN 200 
PATRICK, JAMITA 200 
PATRICK, JIMMY 56 
PATRICK, JIMMY L 94 
PATTERSON, BRENDA 30 
PATTERSON, JACQUE 99 
PATTERSON, KEITH 200, 312 
PATTERSON, KEVIN GLENN 113 
PATTERSON, LAURA 93 
PATTERSON, PAMELA 93, 202 
PATTERSON, REBECCA 202 
PATTERSON, SANDY 178 
PATTON, BETH SHAND 1 1 1 94 
PATTON, CHARLES 178, 303 
PATTON, DOUGLAS L III 
PATTON, RALPH 165 
PATTON, WILLETEARLENE 110 
PAULK, GU1NN 92 
PAYNE, JERALD 202 
PAYNE, JESSIE M 115, 139 
PAYNE, JOHN 56 
PAYNE, LEIGH 202,286 
PAYNE, LORI 202 
PAYNE, NIKK1 152 
PEACHER-RYAN, CARLA A I 13 
PEACOCK, ALICE LOUISE84.95 
PEACOCK, DEN1SE 56 
PEACOCK, RHONDA 202 
PEAK, ROBIN ELAINE 103 
PEARCE, RAY 153 
PEARSON, DONNA RUTH 121 
PEARSON, SHARON R 121 
PEASE, EDWARD 110 
PEAVY, MICHAEL 202, 303 
PECORARO, CYNDI 202 
PEEL, DAN F96 
PEEL, JAMES MAURICE 1 1 1 
PEEL, MARY 202,291 
PEJZA, JANET 57 
PELAEZ, JEANNETTE 178 
PENCELLA, PETE 55 
PENDERGAST, PATT1 202 
PENDERGRAST, MARK COE 110 
PENILTON.SHELIA 57 
PENNINGTON, PATRICK E 110 
PENSAK, KARL JOHN 105 
PENTZ, CHRIS ALAN 113 
PENWARDEN, SSGT DUANE 88 



328 Index 



PEONE, TOBY W 97 
PEOPLES, JUNE 93 
PEPLES. DEREK 202 
PEPPER, STEVE 202 
PERALE, PAMELA ANN 202 
PERKINS. BEVERLY 202 
PERKINS, JAYTHOMAS 178.309 
PERKINS, SUSAN 202 
PERRY, CYNTHIA D 202 
PERRY, KEVIN 56 
PERRY, LORI E 202 
PERRY, SCOTT 309 
PERRY, SUE LYNNE 54 
PERRY, THOMAS STEVAN 113 
PESON, PATRICK R 202 
PETERS. ELIZABETH A 202 
PETERSON, PHILL1S 178 
PETRISKIE, LAURIE 56 
PETRY, REBECCA 178 
PETTINGER, MATT 155 
PETTY, SCOTT 202 
PETZINGER, MARK MURIE 113 
PEYTON, JAMES R 97 
PHI GAMMA DELTA 277 
PHI Ml 275, 278, 282 
PHIFER, JAMES A 202, 311 
PH1FER, TONY 283 
PH1LCOX. JUDY KATHLEEN 105 
PHILLIPS. LAURA 202 
PHILLIPS, LAURIE 204 
PHILLIPS, MELODY 202, 56 
PHILLIPS. REX ALAN 103 
PHILLIPS, SUSSAN 202 
PI BETA PHI 278 
PI PHI 278 

PICCOLO, RONALD DAVID I 10 
PICKEL, MORGAN 178, 250 
PICKENS, BILLY 202, 311 
PICKETT, WANDA 202 
P1CKNEY, PETE 311 
PIERCE. MARK KEVIN 110 
PIEROW-SALEHI, ABDOLLAH 

171. 188 
PIFER, DEAN DAVID 120 
PILCHER. MIKE 267 
PILLSBURY, NEAL ALLEN 112 
PILS. MARK STEVEN 110 
PINA, CHRISTINA 93 
PINCHEON, TERRI 56 
PINCKNEY, PETE 202 
P1NLAC. BARRY 202. 315, 55 
PINSON. SUZANNE 286 
PION, CAROL 104 
PIPKIN, BETTY A 96, 202.291,301 
PITNER, SHANNON 178 
PITNER, SHANNON F 94 
PITNER, TOM 202, 280 
PITTMAN, KAREN L 85 95 
P1TTMAN, LAURIE 202, 289 
PLAZA, PABLO 94 
PLEDGER, JENNY 202 
PLUNK, BOBBY 250 
PLUNK, KEN 202 
PLUNK, LISA 202 
POIRIER, TERRY 178 
POLK, TUNEY 202 
POLK, VONDA202 
POLLOW, ADAM 202 
POPE, KIM 143 
PORTEOUS, SARAH P 97 
PORTER, ARTHUR NEIL 103 
PORTER, RODGER 202 
PORTER, VANESSA 111 
PORTERFIELD, LINDA 178,93 
PORTERFIELD, LINDA M 94 
POSTON, CHERYL 202 
POTEET. PHILLIP A 103 
POTEET.RENEE MICHELLE 112 
POTTER, JULIE 93 
POTTS, ERNESTINES 97 
POLNCER 20 
POURCIAU, LESTER J 228 
POWELL. FLORENCE A I 13 
POWELL, KATHYCOLERON 121 
POWELL, PATRICK 202 
POWELL, THOMAS 203 
POWELL, TOMMY 311 
POWERS, GREGORYMARK 112 
PRATHER, JAMES BRIAN 1 10 
PRATT, III HARRY Jill 
PRATT, SANDRA 203 
PRENDERGRAST, PATT1 301 
PRESCOTT, ANTHONY D 120 
PREWITT, LACYE 55 
PREWITT, PAMELA C 116 
PREWITT, SHARON ANNE 121 
PRICE, DONA REBECCA 103 
PRICE, 111 JOSEPH OSCAR 110 
PRICE, MARK STEPHEN 104 



PRINCE, KELLY 203.285 
PR1TCHARD, JOHN PRIES I 113 
PROCTOR. W1LMA J 94 
PROKOPCHAK, PERRIAN 178 
PROKUP, RICHARD 55 
PROUT, LEROY 165 
PROVINCE, DEBORAH JEAN 110 
PRUETT, TRUDI 57.65, 203 
PRUIT, SGT 1ST CLASS 88 
PRU1TT, MELISSA 93 
PRYOR. ANTIONETTE K 203 
PUCKETT, MARY K 104 
PUGH. ANN 95 
PUGH, LISA 121 
PUGH, PAULINE H 54. 110 
PUGH, RICKY 155 
PULLEN, EDDIE MORRIS 120 
PULLIAM. ANN 286 
PULLIAM, ELIZABETH 203 
PURVIS, CHERYLLYNN 104, 115. 

139 
PUTNAM. CHARLES M 93, 96 
PUTNAM. MARK GLENN 117 
PYLANT, DEBBIE LEIGH 105 
PYNE, WALLACE RICHARD I 1 1 
QASSIS. MIKOL ANDONT 120 
QUALLS, AUDREY KAY 113 
QUALLS. HYSM1TH JANE 104 
QUEEN, ZELODIOUS L 111 
RAE, LENORE ANN 94 
RAEBEL, ANN 92 
RAGAN, TOM 130, 131 
RAINS, MARGARET 121 
RALPH, DONALD LEE 110 
RAMAGE, CAROLYN C I 10 
RAMEY, BARBARA 57, 64 
RAMIA, AMY 203, 293 
RAMSEY, MARGARET ANN III 
RAMSEY, MICHAEL G 97 
RANDOLPH, RALPH 226 
RANDOLPH, RANDALL M 120 
RANDOLPH, WILLIAM K 115. 

139 
RANTA.RICHARDR95. 140.223 
RASH, CAMILLE 203 
RASH, E LAWR1E 178. 294 
RAST, JUANTTA M 94, 178 
RATCHFORD, STEPHANIE 178 
RAWL1NGS, DON 56 
RAWLS, KIM 292 
RAY. PATRICIA FAYE 94 
RAY. THOMAS SCOTT 103 
RAYE, K1MBERLEY ANN 103 
REABE, JOHN DAVID99 
REDDEN. KIM 203, 287 
REDMON, JOAN 178 
REED, JOHN RICHARD96 
REED, JOHN TAYLOR 110 
REEDY, MERAB BANKS 121 
REEVES, ANN 293 
REEVES, ANN E 203 
REEVES, TOMMY DAREL 120 
REID, DAVID 92, 93 
REID, JEWELLS 94, 97 
RE1LLY, ELLEN LAWRENCE 104 
RELYEA, CYNTHIA JEAN 114 
RENDTORFF, LINDA C 1 16 
RENFROW, JAMES M 178, 309 
REWALT, JEANETTE M 97 
REYES, FRANCISCO 267 
REYLE, RICHARD 203 
REYNOLDS, JOHN JOSEPH 1 I 1 
REYNOLDS, KARI LYNN 105 
REYNOLDS, MARK 203, 312 
RHOADS, ROBIN ANN I 14 
RHODES, KIM 203, 54 
RHODES, TER1 203 
RHYNE, III CHARLES T 103 
RIALES, EMILY 203, 288, 92, 97 
R1CCICK, PAMELA M 97 
RICE, DEWA1NE 231 
RICE, ROSS ALLEN 104 
RICH, MARY CHUMNEY I 13 
RICHARDS, MARY 93 
RICHARDS, RHONDA 203, 285 
RICHARDSON, BILL 203 
RICHARDSON, DAVID 56 
RICHARDSON, MICHAEL 56 
RICHARDSON, PAMELA G 105 
RICHARDSON, RANDY 203, 303 
RICHIE, KENNETH R 115, 139 
RICHIE, NANCY 93 
RICHMOND, TOMMY 203, 303 
RICKARD, MELODIE 203, 293, 

57 
R1COSSA, JR RAYMOND J 96 
RIDDICK, PAMELA 57, 64, 93, 

203 
R1EPMA. LISA 57 



RIFE, ROBERT A 97 
RIGGIN, LAUREE K I 16. I 17 
RIGG1NS. BEVERLY DIANE 203 
RIGG1NS. DIANE 285 
RIGGINS. JR VAN LEWIS 113 
R1GG1NS. KIRK 203, 309 
RIGGINS, MARY A 203 
RIGGS, TEREA M JACOBS 1 16 
RILEY. BARBARA 171 
RILEY. DAVIS 203 
RILEY, SUSAN GAIL 110 
RIO. LUCTNDA 117. 178.280 
RISNER. DAVID 56 
RITTELMANN. CARRIE 96 
ROACH. JAMES EDWARD 103 
ROANE. ELMA N 95 
ROB, SHUSTER 308 
ROBB, CHARLES BRADLEY 115. 

139 
ROBB1NS. JEFFERY SCOTT 203 
ROBBINS. RON G 113 
ROBERSON, TERRI 203. 289 
ROBERTS, BRENT G 94 
ROBERTS, FRED 203, 303 
ROBERTS, KATHY 56 
ROBERTS, TERESA LYNN 104 
ROBERTS. TIFFANY 203 
ROBERTS. TIMOTHY C 178. 313 
ROBERTSON. BRENT G 77. 94, 

95, 131. 178. 250. 309 
ROBERTSON. CAROLYN F 1 10 
ROBERTSON. REBECCA 99 
ROBINS. CAROL 203. 287 
ROBINS. RANDY 203 
ROBINSON, BETH 203, 289 
ROBINSON. CATHERINE T I 10 
ROBINSON. CHRISTENE A 105 
ROBINSON, DAVID 203. 303 
ROBINSON, GLORIA 29 
ROBINSON, JOHNNIE 165 
ROBINSON, LUEVERG1E 203 
ROBINSON, SEAN 203, 309 
ROBINSON, SIDNEY LYNN 94 
ROBINSON, SUSAN DENIES 105 
ROBINSONS, KEITH 203 
ROCHELLE, TIM 93 
ROCKSTROH, MEDFORD 303 
ROCKSTROH, MEDFORD M 203 
RODENH1SER, DAVID 203 
RODGERS, PAUL 267 
ROEBUCK, ALICE 93 
ROEHM, 111 THOMAS E 170, 203 
ROGERS, JEFF 56 
ROGERS, JEFFREY 204 
ROGERS, MASTER SGT ROY 88 
ROGERS, SARA LYNNE 104 
ROLAND, TIMOTHY 93 
ROLLINGS, TONY 203 
ROME. DEANNA 287 
ROMERO. PABLO PLAZA 103 
RONE. DEANNA 204 
RONE, STEVE 204, 309 
RONZO, RICK 303, 204 
ROOK, GERBIG 105 
ROOKS, GWENDOLYN 113 
ROOP. WALTER 204 
ROSE. RICHARD 204, 309 
ROSEN, MARYC 110 
ROSENBERG, BRIAN 178 
ROSENBERG. KENNETH T 115. 

139 
ROSENBERGER, THERESA 204 
ROSENKRANZ, JACK 204, 303 
ROSENTHAL, GARY L 113 
ROUANI, SAHBA 267 
ROWE, MARSHA 57 
ROWELL, LEIGH A 57. 287, 204 
ROWLAND, JAMES 204 
ROWLAND, LAURA 178, 267, 93 
ROWLAND, M1CHEAL E 1 10 
ROYLE, RICHARD 309 
RUBY. SYLVIA 14 
RUCH, CHARLES DAVID 1 10 
RUCK, LEONARD JOSEPH 121 
RUCKER, Z1NA204 
RUDDELL, TRACY 204, 287 
RUKENDORFER, DESIREE E 97 
RUMAGE. PAMELA RAYE 98 
RUNYAN, SANDRA LYNN 110 
RUSH, BUBBA204 
RUSH, EUGENE 98 
RUSSELL, J SHANE 178 
RUSSELL, KIM 56 
RUSSELL, MICHAEL 178 
RUSSELL, MIKE KEVIN 94 
RUSSELL, REG1N A VOIGHT 105 
RUSSELL, ROBERT DAVID 1 10 
RUSSELL, SHARON 204, 294, 66. 

67 



RUSSELL. THOMAS 56 
RUSSOM. KARAN 204 
RUSTERHOLTZ, CARL 54 
RUTLEDGE, BRENDA 55 
RUTLEDGE. VIRGINIA A 116. 

140 
RYAN. CYNTHIA JEAN 105. 121 
RYAN, KELLY 204, 282 
RYAN. MARY BETH 113 
SABA. KATHY 204 
SACKEY. EUGENIA M 93. 96, 97 
SAFARI-JAFARLOU, PARVIN 

204 
SAKAAN, BASSAM 103 
SALEHL HASSAN PIEROW 110 
SALOP. KAREN 117 
SAMAHA. CHARLES M 103 
SAMAHA, 1MAD NAZEM 120 
SAMPLES. RANDY 165 
SAMUELS. BRUCE P 115. 139 
SANDERS, GREG 165 
SANDERS, JOHN DOUGLAS 117 
SANDERS, KIMBERLY F 204 
SANDERS, LIBBY 204 
SANDERS, STACY 204 301 
SANDERS, STEPHANIE 204, 289, 

93 
SANDERSON, BETH A 178, 301 
SANDIFER. CHARLES N I 12 
SANDRIDGE, CHERYL 178 
SANDRIDGE, WILLIAM A 1 10 
SARGENT, JO 55 
SARVER. STEVEN 204 312 
SATTERFIELD, EMMA 204 
SAUNDERS, ROBERT L 225 
SAVAGE, JULIAN 267 
SAXON, ROBERT 178 
SCALES. CHARLAYNE 204 
SCARBROUGH, VIRGINIA M 111 
SCARPACE, JEFF 205 
SCATES. SEAN 205, 315 
SCHADRACK, AMY E 87 
SCHAFER, SHARON RUTH 110 
SCHAFFER. MARGARET 152 
SCHAFFER, RENEE 152 
SCHATZ, DANA BETH 104 
SCHE1NBERG.S1D 178 
SCHIFANI, MELISSA 205, 286 
SCHIFAN1, PAUL 205, 250 
SCHKLAR. RUTH 205 
SCHKLAR, STANLEY 179 
SCHMIDT, CAROL 54 
SCHMIDT. DAVID 165 
SCHMIDT, MARIA C 93, 96 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 53, 55 
SCHOEN, GREG 179 
SCHOEN, LORI 205,301 
SCHRADER, DONNA F 1 14 
SCHR1DER, PAT 208 
SCHR1MSHER, CHUCK 205 
SCHULER, DANIEL 205. 315 
SCHULTZ. STEVEN Till 
SCHUSTER, HOWARD L 1 1 1 
SCHWARTZ, BRIAN W 96 
SCHWARTZ, SONJA F 113, 120 
SCOGG1NS, STEVEN 205. 315 
SCOTT, ALLEN RAY 110 
SCOTT, EVA QUALLS 105, 121 
SCOTT, HUGH B 97 
SCOTT. II JOHNS 93 
SCOTT, JAMES 179 
SCOTT, KELLYE 54 
SCOTT. LOUISE 179 
SCRUGGS, CHRIS 179, 315 
SCRUGGS, JAMES 179, 314 
SCRUGGS, JR PHILLIP R 103 
SEABAUGH, JEFF 205 
SEAMANS, STACY A 110 
SEATON. WILLIAM K 97 
SEAY, BOB 53, 55 
SEAY. DAVID SAMUEL 113 
SEAY, KAREN 93 
SEAY, LAURIE 104 
SEGNER, E P 228 
SEGUI, DR WILLIAM 267 
SE1GLER, DEANO LYNN 105 
SELBERG, JOHN MARK 110 
SELF, GEDDES 165 
SELLERS, CONSTANCE 205. 298 
SELLERS, MARIE F 97 
SEMORE, MICHAEL B 121 
SENTELL, CINDY LOUISE 1 13 
SENTIF, LERAY JAMES 120 
SESSON, ROY 179 
SETAYESHPOUR, HAMID R 103 
SEWELL, TIM 205 
SEWELL. WENDOLYN 96 
SEYMORE, PAM 141. 143 
SEYMOUR. DAN 56 



SEYMOUR, III DAVID 205 
SHAFER. CARL 179. 312 
SHAFFER. AMY K 205 
SHAFFER. MARGARET 152 
SHAFFER. RENEE 152 
SHAFIAL IDR1S267 
SHAHADAN. AWT 267 
SHAMOON.JANAAHSALIM 110 
SHANKS. STACEY 205. 291 
SHANNON, ORA LEE 121 
SHAO, EDDIE Y 103 
SHARP, DON 179 
SHARP. LAWRENCE S 110 
SHARPE. PENN1 205.288 
SHATZER. ROBERT 104 
SHAW, BILL 205, 303 
SHAW. CONNIE MARIE 1 10 
SHAW. ROBERT ARVEL 110 
SHAW. WAYNE 55 
SHEA, TONEY 205 
SHEA, VIRGINIA 179 
SHEA. WANDA B 113 
SHEFFIELD. JR JOE 205 
SHELBY. ROBERT DAVID 1 10 
SHELLY, GARY 179 
SHELTON. ELIZABETH 54 
SHELTON, LYNDA 179 
SHEPPARD. LONNIE 179. 303 
SHERBERT. KRISTY 179 
SHERLEY. PATRICK 93 
SHERLEY, PATRICK LEROY 103 
SHERRILI .BARBARAJANE 112 
SHIELDS. JOHN Fill 
SHIELDS. JOHN FRANCIS 94 
SHIELDS, MICHAEL D 171 
SHIPE. PAUL CAMPBELL 114 
SHIPLEY, CHRISTIE 205, 291 
SHIPMAN. JUDY 93 
SH1PMAN, TIM 29, 30 
SHOCKLE, THOMAS D 94 
SHRODER, ROBERT 315 
SHRODER. ROBERT E 205 
SHUN, YIT CHRISTINA CHOY 

110 
SHUSTER, ROBERT JAMES 205 
SIGH, JIM 188 
SIGLER. JERRY ALLAN 103. 129. 

131 
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 277. 

280 
SIGMA CHI 278. 282 
SIGMA GAMMA RHO 284 
SIGMA KAPPA 274, 278 
SILVERFIELD. DEBRA E 94 
SIMEON, REBECCA J 97. 197 
SIMITH. JANNELLE L 111 
SIMMONS. FRED 238 
SIMMONS, III EDWARD D 205 
SIMMONS, LEANNE 104 
SIMMONS. LORI G 93. 97 
SIMMONS. MARK 205 
SIMON. SHERRY Sill 
S1MPK1NS. HARRY 205 
SIMPSON, JOHN L 103 
SIMPSON. LARRY 205 
SIMPSON, ROCHELLE E 1 16 
SIMPSON, WANDA 141. 143 
SIMS. ELIZABETH OZIER 110 
SIMS. JOANNE B92 
SIMS. JOY MARIE 113 
SINGH, MANTPDEEP K 97 
SINGLETON. GREGORY R 85. 

95. 179.284. 302 
SINGLETON. PENNE 205 
S1NGUEFIELD. CHARLES 205 
SIPES, CHARLEYN 205. 289. 301. 

96 
SISK, TIMOTHY 205 
SKELTON. ELIZABETH 54 
SKOUTERIS. GEORGE 165 
SLAGLE. GINNYLEE S 97 
SLATTERY. MICHAEL 205 
SLETTO. SHAD 205. 312 
SLINGERLAND. JAMES . I 113 
SLOAN. PAUL 205. 309 
SLOAN, TOMMY 205. 309 
SLUTSKY, JAN L 94 
SMALL. LAURA 205 
SMALL. TAMMY 205 
SMALLWOOD. JEFFREY L I 10 
SMITH, AHSON JANE 105 
SMITH, CALVIN 56 
SMITH. CAROL RENEE 104 
SMITH. CATHY 205. 301 
SMITH. DAVID CHARLES 1 10 
SMITH. DEBRA HEWITT 117 
SMITH. DENTSE 179 
SMITH, DOROTHY M 94 
SMITH. ERIN FAITH 94 



Index 329 



SMITH, FELICIA 179. 205. 205. 

293 
SMITH. HELEN CLAWSON 120 
SMITH. JONATHAN 56 
SMITH, KENNETH ALLEN 103 
SMITH, KIM 205, 293 
SMITH, KIM M 205 
SMITH. KR1STA206, 279 
SMITH, LAWRENCE 206 
SMITH. LORI 206 
SMITH, MATTHEW T 95, 179, 

284, 302 
SMITH, ORETTA 179 
SMITH. PERRY GLEN 113 
SMITH, R EUGENE 95, 220 
SMITH, RICKY 56 
SMITH, ROBERT GLEN 120 
SMITH, SCOTT 314 
SMITH, SCOTT M 206 
SMITH, SHER1 53, 54 
SMITH, SHORI 54 
SMITH, SOYNA 99 
SMITH, STACY 206, 54 
SMITH, SUSAN 105 
SMITH, TAMARA L 206 
SMITH, VALERIE 206 
SMITH, WILLIAM 93 
SMITH, WILLIE SCREECH 56 
SMITHEY, 1NGRID206 
SMITHWICK, EDWARD 155 
SMOTHER, JILL 206 
SNEAD. SHERRY 206, 287 
SNEAD, SUSAN 206, 287 
SNEED. JAMES M 120 
SNODGRAS. BILL 250 
SNOW, STEVEN 206 
SOLOM1TO, ELIZABETH 104 
SOLOM1TO, JOEY 206 
SOLOMITO, JOHN 206 
SOLOMON, JAMES 55 
SOOD, MAHARAJ LADI 103 
SOPHER, MINDY 230, 274 
SORENSON, BARBARA E97, 179 
SORO. THERESA ANN 121 
SORRELLE. PAUL HARRIS 94 
SORRENTINO, KENNETH J 103 
SOWELL, MARK 179,54 
SPARGER, DONNA 237 
SPARKMAN, DANNY 162, 164, 

165 
SPARKMAN, DOUG 56 
SPARKMAN, RICKY 162, 165 
SPARKS. GENE 56 
SPEED, KEVIN MICHAEL 110 
SPELL, ANN 57,64,65,206 
SPENCER, COOKIE 54 
SPENCER, DONNA E 97, 206 
SPENCER, JR THOMAS 93 
SPENCER, SONYA 206 
SPENCER, TOM 93 
SPIELBERGER, RONALD E 61. 

95 
SPILLERS, TERESA 206 
SPRINGFIELD, BOB 56 
SPR1NGF1ELD.S1DNEYLEE 113 
SRIRAM, PREMA 111 
ST JUDES93 

ST.PIERRE.GENE FRANCIS 112' 
STAGG, HELEN 93 
STAGG, ROBERT C 93, 104 
STALGAITIS, SUSAN J 115, 139 
STANFIELD, JERRY C 97 
STANFORD, CHARLES 131 
STANLEY, DELLA206 
STANSBURY, STEPHEN 206, 56 
STARKS, BR1DGITTE 206 
STARR, WILLIAM C 103, 111 
STATEN, GINA D 206 
STATEN, LISA 57 
STATHAM. RICHARD K 206 
STAUB, JUDY 152 
STAUBUS, BARRY PAUL 113 
STEADMAN, PEGGY A 206 
STEELE, HARRY EUGENE 112 
STEEPE, MARILYN LENEE 1 10 
STEEPLETON, PATRICK L 110 
STEFFAN, ROBERT J 104 
STEINBERG, KENNETH A 1 10 
STE1NER, FRANK 93 
STEPHAN, LAUREL C 85, 92 
STEPHAN, LAURIE 179, 288 
STEPHEN, LAUREL C 95 
STEPHENS. DIANE SHERI 104 
STEPHENS, JR DEWAYNE S 104 
STEPHENSON, DONNA L 110 
STERNBERGER, JUDY 93 
STEVENS, MATHEW93 
STEVENS, MATTHEW H 96 
STEWARD, THEASESE 298 



STEWART. GREGORY 206 
STEWART, JAMES L 120 
STEWART, RICKY 179, 303 
STEWART, STACY 206. 301 
STEWART, THEAESE 179 
STEWART. THOMAS 179 
ST1CKEL, LAURA L 57, 64, 65, 
' 206 

STIEDLE, BELINDA 206, 293 
STILL, CHARLES 111 
STINER. JUDITH 206 
STITH. JOSEPHINE L 110 
ST1TH, VIRGINIA D1ANN 110 
STOCK, LAURIE WADDY 111 
STOCKDALE, JANNETTE 105 
STOCKTON, DAVIDS 113 
STODDARD, STEPHANIE C 105 
STONE, GINA L 206 
STONEBROOK, KENNETH 179, 

303, 97 
STOTTS, BECKY 206 
STOVALL, DOROTHY GAIL 1 16 
STOYER. ROBERT 55 
STRAHOTA, DAVID JOHN 110 
STRATHAM, KEVIN 56 
STRATTON, JENNIFER 206. 291 
STRAYHORN. SHERYL 93, 206, 

293 
STREET, REGINA 141, 143 
STREET, JANE BURKE 94 
STRICKLAND, JO 10,21,229,267 
STRICKLAND, JR JAMES S 96 
STRICKLAND, NORMA 206 
STRICKLAND, RAY L 103 
STRICKLEN, RUTH ANNA 96 
STRINGFELLOW.CHERYLA 105 
STRINGFELLOW, DAN 61 
STROMAN, JOE 179 
STRONG, ANTHONY 165 
STRONG, MARILYN 206 
STRONG, RODNEY KEITH 113 
STUDENT AMBASSADOR 

BOARD 21, 250 
STUDENT NATL EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATION 21 
STURDIVANT, JAN RACHEL 105 
STURES, K1MBERLY E 206 
STURM, WENDY LYNN 112 
SUDDUTH, MARY KUEHL 105 
SUGGARS, BEVERLY M 105, 121 
SULLIVAN, D D 206 
SULLIVAN, JEFF 206 
SULLIVAN, JOHN 206 
SULLIVAN, KELLI 206, 287 
SUMNER, LEANN 105 
SURATT, GAIL M 97, 201, 93 
SUTTON, CHARLES BRENT 114 
SVOBODA, THOMAS F 95, 179, 

250,284,315 
SWANSON, HENRY 9 
SWANSON, TRACY 93 
SWEATT, TARA 207 
SWOPE, CURTIS 207, 303 
SWOPE, HENRY MCK1NNEY 120 
SWORDS, ANGELA 207 
SWORDS, CINDY 207 
SYDOW, BARBARA ANN 121 
SYKEN, STEVEN 110 
TABB, TONY 207. 309 
TAGGART, TRACIE 207 
TARAS, CHRIS 207 
TATE, DEBRA 207 
TATE, JR FLOYD 207 
TATOM, VIRGINIA C 104 
TATUM, DONNA RICE 94 
TAYLOR, CYNTHIA 179, 294 
TAYLOR, GARY 93 
TAYLOR, GREGORY P 1 10 
TAYLOR, HORACE 171 
TAYLOR, JAMES 179, 207, 303 
TAYLOR, JANIE L 77, 179 
TAYLOR, JEANETTE 207 
TAYLOR, JR WILLIAM S 1 10 
TAYLOR, K1MBERLY 207 
TAYLOR, LINDA G 94 
TAYLOR, MARK WAYNE 117 
TAYLOR, PATRICIA ANNE 110 
TAYLOR, PEARLINE 171 
TAYLOR, REGINALD 207 
TAYLOR, RODNEY I 15, 139 
TAYLOR, SHARON K 104 
TAYLOR, SHERYL ANN 110 
TAYLOR, TERRY L 105, 207 
TAYLOR, VINCE 207, 309 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM Sill 
TAYLOR, YVONNE 179 
TEAGUE, JEFF 207, 309 
TE1CHMANN, STEVE 54 
TEMPLETON, IRENE 207 



TERRETT, JAMES 207 
TERRY, MICHAEL E 94 
TERRY, TONJA 207 
THAKKAR, PRAV1N 111 
THAMER, STEVEN DANIEL I I I 
THE1L, ARTHUR 52 
THE1L. CHER1 53 
THE1NER, CINDY 207, 278, 287 
THEODOROU, WILLIAM III 
THETFORD, ARONDA A I 10 
THIEMANN, ROBIN 207 
THOMAS, ANGELA 179,207,289 
THOMAS,.BEVERLY GAIL 105 
THOMAS, CARLA ANN 121 
THOMAS, FREDERICK EMI 
THOMAS, 111 JAMES VIII 
THOMAS, JULIE 179 
THOMAS, KATHRYN 179 
THOMAS, KELLY 54 
THOMAS, LENORE 53 
THOMAS, MELISSA 207 
THOMAS, M1CHAELRYALS 110 
THOMAS, RANDY 103 
THOMAS, RICH 207 
THOMAS, RONALD BUFORD94 
THOMAS, SHIRHONDA 207 
THOMAS, TIM 165 
THOMAS, V1CKIELYNN 115. 139 
THOMAS, WILLIE 179 
THOMASON, DON 131 
THOMPSON, ANGELA 21 
THOMPSON, BENNETT 207, 311 
THOMPSON, DICK 207 
THOMPSON, DONNA 207, 287, 

301 
THOMPSON, ERIC'207 
THOMPSON, JOHN 165 
THOMPSON, JR RALPH 110 
THOMPSON, JULIA ANN 86, 95 
THOMPSON, JULIE 250, 284, 290 
THOMPSON, KATHRYN H 95, 

285 
THOMPSON, LA.IUNA 207 
THOMPSON, LARRY W 1 10, 131 
THOMPSON, LINDA Y 96, 207, 

285 
THOMPSON, LISA 207 
THOMPSON, MARY 207, 291 
THOMPSON, MICHAEL L 120 
THOMPSON, REGINALD 165 
THOMPSON, ROBERT C 94 
THOMPSON, SCOTT 207, 315, 56 
THOMPSON, SUSIE 207, 250, 291 
THORNTON, CHRISTOPHER 179 
THORTON, RICHARD 56 
THREET, RANDY PAUL 116 
THURMAN, KURTIS55 
THWEAT, MARTHA 179 
THWEATT, TERR1 207 
T1BBALS, THERESA G 77 
TIBBS, LORETTA ANN 1 10 
TICE, PENNY LYNN 104 
TIDWELL, PAULA 207, 93 
TIDWELL, REBA FAYE I 10 
TIDWELL, TOMM1E 179 
TIGNER, JAMES 180 
T1LLEY, ALICIA C 95 
T1LTON, LAURA 207 
TIMS, RANDY 207. 283 
TIRUVALLUR, KESHAVAN 103 
TISCA, LEONARD 208 
TITMUS, SUSAN 180 
TOARMINA, JOSEPH A 120 
TOBATAI, MOHAMMAD ALI 94 
TOBIN, PATRICIA A 112 
TODD, CHRIS 208 
TODD, SUSAN 208, 290 
TOGGART, TRACIE 301 
TOLAND, BONNIE S 97 
TOMES, TIM 208 
TON, GREGORY 111 
TONEY, MICHAEL 180 
TONG, SIMON 110, 111 
TOPPS, YOULANDRA 208 
TORT1, LARK 93 
TOWERY, PATRICIA ANN 103 
TOWLES, LISA 208, 287 
TOWNES, SHIRLEY L 94 
TOWNSEND, MILDRED 208 
TOWNSON, WESLEY B 112 
TRAMMEL, ROR1ENAD1NE 110 
TRAMMELL, SCOTT 56 
TRAMMELL, SHERRON R 105 
TRAN, PHONG HUNG 96, 92, 97 
TRAYLOR, CHARLES E 1 13 
TRAYLOR, NATHAN 208 
TREECE, SHERRY 208 
TREGLER, WAYNE 208 
TRIPLETT, ELIZABETH A 105 



TROBAUGH, ALEX 55 

TROMBLEY, MICHAEL R 103 

TROUT, MARY KAY 94 

TROUT, MELANIE 208, 278, 282, 
283, 294 

TROUT, MICHELE 208 

TROUY, BESS 54 

TRUBY, LESTER EUGENE 110 

TRUITT, CHERYL 208 

TRULL, REGINA 208 

TUBBS, EMILY 208 

TUBERV1LLE, BILLY A III 

TUCKER, ANDREA 208 

TUELL, MARD1E 208 

TUGGLES, DENISE 208 

TULEY, SHANEEN 208, 285 

TULLOSS, MICHAEL BYRON 113 

TURNBOW, PAUL EUGENE 104 

TURNBOW, PENNELOPE93 

TURNER. ANDRE 134, 135 

TURNER, DARLENE 209 

TURNER, DENNIS E 110 

TURNER, ELIZABETH L 209 

TURNER, ELLIS 165,209 

TURNER, LINDA 284 

TURNER, LISA D 86, 95, 180,250, 
289 

TURNER. MARVA KAYE 121 

TURNER, ROBERT 209 

TURNER, ROGER DENNIS 117 

TURNER. RUTH 180 

TURNER, TIMMY RAY 121 

TURNEY, GENE 209 

TURNEY, TERRI 54 

TURNIPSEED, ERIC L 104, I 16 

TURNQUEST, MUREENA92 

TYL1S, THERESA 209 

TYREE, JOANNE BOLLER 105 

TYREE, TED 267 
UNDERWOOD, CATHERINE M 

104 
LINGER, JR LANGDON S I 13 
UTTERBACK, CHARLES 93 
VAN FRANK, TIM 96 
VAN STEENBERG, JOHN A 1 I 1 
VAN VULPEN, ANDY 209 
VAN-FRANK, TIM 56 
VANBUREN, KARL 1RV1N 104 
VANCE, MARGARET E 104 
VANDERGRIFF, CHERYL 209 
VANDERSTEEG, JAMES D 96 
VANDERVOORT, TAMMY J 110 
VANEATON, TERRI 57 
VANS1CKLE, DEBORAH 1 104 
VANZANDT, J. SCOTT 209, 336 
VAUGH, BETSY F 94 
VAUGHAN, KEVIN 170, 250, 303 
VAUGHN. CYNTHIA S 105 
VAUGHN, WILLIAM K 86, 95 
VAUGHT. BETS F 95 
VAUGHT, DAVID M 95 
VAUGHT, DEBBIE 209, 288 
VAUGHT, GLORIA 288 
VEAZEY, GARY EUGENE 113 
VENDETTI, KATHY 152 
VENSON, JANE 209 
VESCOVO, MELANIE 209, 291 
VETEO, FREDDIE 180 
VETH, P.ALPH JACOB 120 
VICKIiRS, VICK1 209 
V1ERON, BESS E 104 
VOGEL, EILEEN FRANCES 110 
VOGELSANG, CRAIG 209 
VOLLM, KATHLEEN RENEE' 121 
VOLLMER, W STEVEN 94. 97 
VOLMAN. CYNTHIA 180 
VOWELL, RENEE 209 
WADDELL, LISA R 180, 181 
WADDINGTON, CADY 209 
WADDY, III VAYDEN P 114 
WADE, JOHN 209 
WADE, MARILYN DIANE 110 
WADE, SUSAN 209 
WAGNER, AMY A 93, 121 
WAHLSTROM, STAN 209, 315 
WAKEFIELD, MARTIN 61 
WAKELEY, JOHN H 95 
WAKELEY, SUSAN 180 
WAKELY, JOHN H 222 
WAK1M, PATTI 209, 293 
WALDMAN, WILLIE 56 
WALDROP, BRENDA MAY 103 
WALDRUP, PHILLIP D 103 
WALKER, CORNELL Q 1 10, 180 
WALKER, DAVIDS 110 
WALKER, JEFFERY LEE 115, 139, 

165 
WALKER, JOHNNY 165 
WALKER, KAY 104 



WALKER, PATRICIA A 112 
WALKER, R WILSON 228 
WALKER, SCOTT 210, 309 
WALKER, STEPHEN A 97 
WALKER, STEPHEN D 1 10 
WALKER, SUSAN 210 
WALKER, TIM 53,56 
WALKER, WYNNE 93 
WALLACE, ADR1ANN 180 
WALLACE, PAUL FLYNN 1 10 
WALLS, DEBORAH BROOKS 113 
WALLS, LINDA KAY 110 
WALLS, LINDA I. 113 
WALPOLE. JOHN SCOTT 210, 

315 
WALTERS, BARBARA 180, 274, 

284 
WALTHAL, BETH 152 
WALTON, LEIGH S 113 
WANNAMAKER. MARILYN C 

112 
WARD, ALLEN 180,309 
WARD, DAVID 180 
WARDJEFFREYBERNARD 110 
WARD, MELANIE 210, 289 
WARE, FREDRICK 180 
WARREN, LESLIE 143, 210 
WARREN, LISA 286 
WARREN, LORRI 210,293 
WARREN, MARY 210 
WARREN, MIKE 56 
WARREN, SUZANNE 110 
WARRINGTON, DARLENE 210 
WASHBURN, FRANCIS 210, 278, 

285 
WASHER, JANN LEA 210 
WATERS, EVELYN D1GGS 94 
WATERS, MITCHELLDEAN 110 
WATKINS, STEVE W 97 
WATKINS, TERESA JO 105, 94 
WATKINS, TERRY 315 
WATKINS, TINA 210, 285 
WATKINS, VALERIE L 210 
WATSON, JAMES C 103 
WATSON, JOHN LYNN 113 
WATSON, JOHN PR1TCHETT 103 
WATSON, MICHAEL A I 10 
WATSON, THOMAS 180 
WATSON, THOMAS E 95 
WATSON, THOMAS EDWARD 

"DOC" 87 
WATSON-GRIFFEE, VIRGINIA 

113 
WATTS, SHAWN 210 
WAYN1CK, MARK LEE 117 
WEATHERBY, DARLA 210 
WEATHERFORD, JIMMY R 110 
WEATHERFORD, WELDON 120 
WEAVER, REG1NALDL 110, 111 
WEAVER, STAN 165 
WEBB, JACK 210 
WEBB, LATR1CIA GAIL 113 
WEBB, MARY 180, 291 
WEBB, MISSY 21 
WEBB, SANDY 210, 288 
WEBB, SUSAN 291 
WEBB, VERA 140, 141, 143 
WEBBER, PATRICIA 210 
WEBSTER, GLENDA 54 
WEBSTER, PHILL1PSTEVEN 116 
WE1GEL, DAVID R 94, 128 
WELCH, JIMMY 180 
WELCH, MELISSA C 121 
WELCH, SHEILA R 97 
WELDEN, CATHY E 105 
WELLFORD, CHRISTINA G 104, 

117 
WELLS, MARY CARTER 94 
WELLS. MARY E 115. 139 
WELLS, ORLANDO 210 
WELSH, CATHERINE ANNE 112 
WERENSKJOLD, ERIC 93 
WERNER, SCOTT 210, 311 
WESSON, SHERON 180 
WEST, BERNETTA 180, 298 
WEST, CHERYL 210, 291 
WEST, DANIEL EDWARD 103 
WEST, LATANYA ANGELITA 1 10 
WEST, LEVON 210 
WEST, SANDRA 210 
WHEAT, MICHELE K 210 
WHEELER, EDDIELEVINJR 103 
WHEELER, ORVILLE E 224 
WHEELER, RACHEL S 121 
WH1PPLE,MELINDA2I,210,286 
WHISENHUNT, MARY B 110 
WHITAKER, LORI 152, 180 
WHITAKER, SUSAN A 105 
WHITE, CINDY 54 



330 Index 



WHITE. DORR1S WHEELER 94 
WHITE, GARY LYNN 113 
WHITE, HARR1ET2I0. 294 
WHITE, JAMES ALLEN 210 
WHITE, JEFF 165 
WHITE, KIMBERLY 210 
WHITE, MAURICE D 120 
WHITE, NICHOLAS L 223 
WHITE, PAMELA 54, 180 
WHITS1TT. WANDA B 94 
WH1TTAKER, LINDA D 210 
WH1TTEN, JEFFREY H 113 
WHITTEN, WILLIAM 111 
WHITTENBURG, MARK 171 
WH1TWORTH, BUTCH 210 
W1ABEL, BOBBY 155 
WICHERS, CHARIS A 115, 139 
WICKS. DOUGLASCL1NTON 103 
WIGGINS, VERONICA 210 
WIGLEY, STEPHANIE 210 
W1KE, DEANNA2I0, 285 
W1KE. STEVE 56 
W1LBORN. CONNIE 57 
WILBORN, JOYCE GARNER 110 
WILEY. JOHN 55 
W1LKERSON, DOROTHY 267 
WILKERSON, STEVE 28 
WILKINSON, GARY ROY I 13 
WILKINSON, JR ROBERT H I 10 
WILKINSON, MARTHA J 110 
WILKINSON, TERRY 1.94 
W1LLCOX, CHARLES R II 103 
WILLIAMS, ANN 288 
WILLIAMS, ANTHONY 210 
WILLIAMS, BARRY MASON 110 
WILLIAMS, CARL Rill 
WILLIAMS, CATHY 140, 141, 143 
WILLIAMS, CELESTE 180 
WILLIAMS, DAVID D 110 
WILLIAMS, DAVIDS 210 
WILLIAMS, D1ANJUNESE J 105 
WILLIAMS, F MICHAEL 94 
WILLIAMS, GLORIA D 105 
WILLIAMS, JAMES 163. 165 
WILLIAMS, JEFF 131 
WILLIAMS, JENNIFER R 105 
WILLIAMS, JOHN LOUIS 94 
WILLIAMS, JR TOMMY 1 116, 

117 
WILLIAMS, JUAN 56 
WILLIAMS, LEEANNE 121 
WILLIAMS, LESLIE RAY 110 
WILLIAMS, MARTHA 180 
WILLIAMS, MITCHELL 121 
WILLIAMS, PAM 280 
WILLIAMS, ROBERT D 112 
WILLIAMS, SANDERS 180 
WILLIAMS, SELENA 180 
WILLIAMS. SYLVIA 210 
WILLIAMS, TERRY JAY 121 
WILLIAMS, THOMAS E 113 
WILLIAMS, VICKI TYLER 120 
WILLIAMS, W TERRELL 95 
WILLIAMS, YUNETTA ANN 210, 

289 
WILLIAMSON, MILTON 210 
WILLIAMSON, PEGGY 76 
W1LLIFORD, JR HAL F 105 
WILL1NGHAM, CRAIG 210, 309 
WILLIS, LAVERE 23,298 
WILLS, CYNTHIA C 105 
WILLS, SUSAN 211,287,301 
WILSON, CLIFFORD 113, 211 
WILSON, ERIC 165 
WILSON, FRED PALMER 114 
WILSON, JAY DEREK 110 
WILSON, JIMMY 94 
WILSON, JO W94, 97 
WILSON, KAREN MICHELLE 105 
WILSON, LISA DAWN 105 
WILSON, MATTHEW 211, 309 
WILSON, MELISSA ANN 180, 282, 

293 
WILSON. MICHAEL 56, 211 
WILSON, NANCY TYLER 60, 94 
WILSON, RICK 211, 303 
WILSON, TAMMIE 211 
WILSON, THERESA C 121 
WINDSOR. BETH CURT1S87.94, 

95, 180,250, 284,292 
WINDSOR, CARRIE 211, 293 
WINDSOR, CHARLES KEITH 94 
WINDSOR, CONDE 21 1, 250, 293 
W1NEGARD, DEBBY 211 
W1NESTONE, II DAVID S 1 10 
WINFREY, CEDRIC 56 
WINKLER, RONALD LEE 110 
W1NSOR, BETH 92 
W1NSTEAD, PAT 211 



WINTER, JEFFERY ALLEN I 16 
WINTER, MARGIE 180 
WINTEROWD, JENNY 211, 293 
WISE, LISA MARIA III) 
W1TCHERS, LOUIS 121 
W1THERSPOON, KATHARINE A 

113 
W1THERSPOON, SEDELLA 211 
WITTE, CYNTHIA GRACE I 10 
WKN0 93 

WOLFE, CHARLES 211 
WOLOSHYN. BROOKS FRED 1 10 
WOMACK, JEFF 163, 165 
WOMACK, RAYMONG W 96 
WOOD, CAROLYN LEE 94 
WOOD, DAVID 211, 312 
WOOD, NANCY 180 
WOODCOCK, LISA 211 
WOODS, BRAD 180 
WOODS. BRENDA LYNN I 10 
WOODS, CAROLYN L 97 
WOODS, GLORIA 211 
WOODS, JOEL 165 
WOODS, JOHN B96 
WOODS.M1CHAEL WAYNE 110, 

111 
WOODS, SARA H 97 
WOODS, SHANDRA 211 
WOODSON, CEDRIC B 211 
WOODSON, JR WILLIAM E 213 
WOODY, DANIEL RAY 120 
WOODY, JR SIMON MOSES 1 10 
WOOTEN, LYNN 211,291 
WORD, RICHARD A 115, 139 
WORDEN, WILLIAM B 110 
WORKMAN, RUBY FAY 94 
WORLEY, BRENT A 97 
WORTHEN, FRANK PAUL 110 
WRAY, LYNDA M 96,93, 211 
WRAY, WILLIAM 93 
WREN, CURT 21 1, 303 
WRENN. CHUCK 267 
WRIGHT, ANNE SCHLEY 113 
WRIGHT, CEDRIC 165 
WRIGHT, CHARLOTTE L 97 
WRIGHT, CYNTHIA MARIE 105 
WRIGHT, DOUG 211, 309 
WRIGHT, GERALD 211 
WRIGHT, JIMMY 180, 284, 312 
WRIGHT, J R ROBERT LANE 117 
WRIGHT, MARVIN 104, 116 
WRIGHT, PAMELA 93 
WRIGHT, PAUL L 110 
WRIGHT, TAWANNA Y 104 
WURTZ, CAM1LLE ANN 104 
WYATT, TORR1 RENEE III 
YANCY, CARY 180 
YANCY, III LUKE 111 
YARACS, JOHN 131 
YARBROUGH, JACQUELINE M 

211,93,96.97 
YARBROUGH. JR JAMES R 120 
YARBROUGH, PAUL JEAN 110 
YATSULA, KATHLEEN A 212 

291 
YATSULA, THOMAS J 105 
YATTO, CAPT DAVID 88 
YOPP, MIKE 53, 56 
YORK, LESLIE 56 
YOUNG, BETH 250 
YOUNG, BOB 267 
YOUNG, BONITA93 
YOUNG, BRIAN 14 
YOUNG, BRUCE 180 
YOUNG, CATHY 66 
YOUNG, DEBRA 212 
YOUNG, D1ANNE 34, 110 
YOUNG, JERRY WAYNE 105 
YOUNG, JR KENNETH 212 
YOUNG, KATHY 67 
YOUNG, KEVIN 212 
YOUNG, LORETTA V 110 
YOUNG, PAMELA 212 
YOUNG, PATRICIA L 121 
YOUNG, SHANE 130, 131 
YOUNG, VIRGINIA 212, 287 
YOUNGER, GREG 212, 311 
YOUNT, DEBORAH 55 
YOW, JAMES 180 
YUN, WON 3, 155, 212 
ZACHRY, MICHAEL 212 
ZA1NO, DONNA CAROL 104 
ZARB1NO, FRANK 311 
ZARSHENAS, JAMAE W 110 
ZAVODNY, EDWARD 180 
ZEISEL, BARBARA P 115, 139 
ZEKAVATLSHAHR1AR2I2 
ZENNER, SHELL1E 180 
Z1LLS, REBECCA B 97 



ZOCCLA, SUSAN 212 
ZOLLOTUCHEN, ELIZABETH L 

104 



ZORBINO, FRANK 212 
ZUB1ATE, GENEVIEVE 212 
ZUKOWSKI, BARBARA 1 97 



Colophon 



Volume 72 of the Memphis State University 
yearbook, the DeSoto was printed by Jostens/ 
American yearbook company of Clarksville, Tennessee 
in April, 1984. Two-thousand copies of 336 pages were 
printed using an offset lithography process. The cover 
is craftline embossed on Saddle #495 base material 
with a Mission grain and a Black #326 overtone rub. 
All primary ink applications on the front lid, spine and 
back lid are silkscreened in Pale Gold #328. The cover 
is set on 150-pound board and formed with a 2 l /% inch 
distance between the boards. Trim size for all pages is 
9 X 1 2 inches. Paper stock is 100-pound gloss enamel 
throughout the book. The endsheets are printed on 
65-pound Talisman coverweight stock and are of Light 
Beige #285 with a primary inking of Black #395. 

The book was typeset, laid out and pasted up within 
the journalism department. The primary typeface is 
Times Medium. Headlines are set in Times Medium, 
Times Medium Italic, Times Bold and Times Bold 
Italic. Page numbers are set in Megaron Bold, and the 
Opening is set in Megaron Medium. Section headings 
on the divider pages are set in Formatt No. 5251. 

All color pages were reproduced from color 
transparencies of either 35mm or 2!/4 x 2'/4 inch format 
Transparencies were shot on a variety of films including 
Kodak Ektachromes 64, 160, 200 and 400; Kodak 
Kadachrome and 3M 640T. All black and white 
pictures were shot on either Kodak Plus-x or Tri-x 
films. 

Screen overlays on the black and white Sports pages 
are 30% Black as are the shadow overlays on the 
divider pages. Pages 20-21 have a 30% Tempo #P-700 
overlay, and pages 22-25 have backgrounds of 30% 
Red - 30% Yellow. Pages 77-87 have 30% Chocolate 
#463 overlays, and pages 92-97 have backgrounds of 
Mustard #132. 

Individual class portraits were taken by Sudlow 
Photography of Danville, 111. who also provided the 
Greek composite pictures. 

The theme of the book was loosely carried as "Better 
Than Ever," highlighting the change in emphasis of the 
book to a new, more modern copy oriented format. 



Colophon 331 



1984: Is Big Brother Here? 



Yes, it was finally the year. Long awaited 
by two generations of Americans, it was 
finally 1984. 

George Orwell's 1949 bestseller was a 
smashing hit again as people drained 
reprints from local bookstores all over the 
country, and Memphis was no exception. 
English teachers met the challenge with 
vigor; the classic was well integrated into 
political science, communication studies, 
philosophy, history, technology. ..all did 
their part to focus on the Orwellean 
prophecy and to "compare and contrast" 
with that was actually occurring in this 
year of Big Brother. 

Were we to ignore the significance of 
1984 we might escape criticism this year 
while there's plenty of discussion on the 
topic. But we are a yearbook, and a 
permanent record of what happened at 
Memphis State in 1984 . So, we'll have a 
shot too. 

George Orwell's 1984 has not come to 
be, not in the world as far as we know, not 
in America or Memphis and certainly not 



at Memphis State University. Still, there 
are comparisons: 

We do not have telescreens that watch 
us, but we have televisions sets we watch. 
There has been a rejuvination of interest in 
soap operas - afternoon serial dramas 
which draw a mixed audience of male and 
female viewers. The characters and plots 
are so involving some students simply will 
not schedule classes during "their soap." 
Prime-time, night hits are: Dynasty Dallas, 
and Hotel (all soaps); Remington Steel, 
Night Rider and The A-Team (action- 
drama); and Cheers and Three's Company 
(situation comedies). 

Winston Smith, 1984\ hero, hated 
doing his morning exercises, but was afraid 
not to. Today exercising is in great vogue 
with numerous tapes and records to put 
people through their paces. Jane Fonda's 
exercise record rivaled Michael Jackson's 
"Thriller" album as a number 1 hit. On 
campus, aerobic dance classes are filled as 
even MSU football squad gets into step 
with the rhythm. 

Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 





i! 



ROTHER 



n 



w m 



\A 



, i unci listening tool He wants to know that yog plan to attend the 1984 
Association for Education In Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMG) 
convention from August 6 through August B, 1 904 it will ha hosted by the College 
of Journalism and Communications, University ot Florida, Gainesville, Florida 
3201 1. It you are not ptennlng to attend the convention, |ust where will you be? 
Everyone has to be somewhere, on 



As endless rows of Eurasian soldiers 
marched onward in the background, 
Winston Smith and co-workers took out 
their aggressions on the screen image of 
arch-enemy Goldstein during their daily 
"Two Minute Hate". Today we have Alien 
video arcade games; Pac Man, Centipede, 
Defenders, Ms. Pac Man , Astroids and a 
host of popular quarter-eaters to bang and 
bruise in the University Center basement. 

In 1984, "Newspeak" was Big Brother's 
new language of INGSOC. Winston Smith, 
in the Ministry of Truth, was familiar with 
words such as "doubleplusungood"(extreme- 
ly unsatisfactory), "fullwise" (in full), 
"upsub" (submit to a higher authority), 
and "antefiling" (before filing). Today we 
"systemitize" almost everything so when it 
"impacts on" it, the mind, will not be 
boggled. A "revenue enhancement program" 
is taxes, a "disruptive reentry system" is the 
Titan 11 Missile and a "destabilizing action" 
is a war. 

Winston Smith used a dictaphone 
called a "speakwrite." Today we have 
computers that talk to us and we are on the 
verge of having home computers that will 
understand, at least enough to write, what 
we say to them. George Orwell seems to 
have predicted more reliance upon the 
printed word than we have today. In 1984, 
the word is quickly becoming electronic. 



332 Closing - 1984 




Pholo by Clay Scrugp 






Photo b\ J. Scotl Vanzandl 



Closing - 1984 333 




< ' ■■■ 




Photo by Clay Scruf ft 



334 Closing - 1984 





Photo by J. Scott Vanzandt 



In the book, people attended the 
"flicks" which had military themes and 
portrayed graphic violence. Consider the 
recent vintage "Blue Thunder, ""Scarface," 
and "Sudden Impact," among a rash of 
tremendously popular horror thrillers 
which leave little mayhem to the 
imagination. 

Julia, Winston's lover, operated a 
machine which produced the plots of novels 
in a fiction-writing department in the 
Ministry of Truth. Today, the latest 
electronic entertainment from Infocom is 
computer disks with names such as Witness, 
Zork, Infidel, Deadline, and Enchanter. 
The home computer operator can spend a 
day creating a mystery novel which unfolds 
only when the "detective" makes decisions. 
There are many similarities between 
Orwell's technological predictions/ warnings 
and the world as we know it (if we are 
willing to stretch reality a bit.) But his 
world of 1984 is certainly vastly different 
than the one we know. 

We believe technological advancements 
have improved the lives of humans. Most 
of our personal experience with science is 
through devices that have made chores 
more simple, improved medical care, 
provided knowledge about the universe, 
increased our leisure time and extended 
our freedoms. Consider: 

Today the use of a slide rule is taught 
as if the instrument was an abacus. Science, 
engineering, math and statistics majors 
consider the device primitive compared 
with their electronic calculators. 

Computer literacy is in. ..in fact it is 
the law. Youngsters are considered illiterate 
if they do not understand elementary 
computer programming by the end of 
junior high school. 

Robotics was successfully demonstrat- 
ed in 1983 as a labor-saving (and manu- 



Photo by Clay Scruggs 

facturing cost saving) concept with a full 
line of welding robots at the Nissen 
assembly plant in New Smyrna, Tenn. 

Early in 1984, Schering-Plough, home- 
based in Memphis, was awarded FDA 
permission to manufacture interferon using 
genetic grafting. Health science centers in 
Memphis have successfully experimented 
with liver and bone marrow transplants, 
and we are in the early stages of laser 
surgery. 

In all, the technological advances are 
impressive. But perhaps the most satisfying 
realization is that most have improved life. 
Even as the economy fluctuates between 
recession and recovery (which it certainly 
has in the last year), we have the impression 
that the quality of life is better now than it 
has ever been in the past, and Memphis 
State University itself is tangible evidence 
of that improvement. 

Education has been the solution for 
many of the past's problems and inequities. 
Today that truism is more widely accepted 
among all peoples. It is emphasized at 
every graduation ceremony when families 
of MSU graduates offer a collective cheer 
for the first member to earn a college 
degree. It is felt by every freshman who 
forestalls earning a quick wage to work 
toward a more satisfying, more worthwhile 
contribution that might be made a little 
later. These are the attitudes of 1984. 

Whether we credit Orwell with producing 
only an interesting fantasy, chide him for 
being mistaken about the direction the 
world was going or cheer him for providing 
a warning to leaders of the 1950's, we are 
blessed that progress has not taken us into 
his 1984 totalitarian nightmare. We have 
to be glad he chose to do it to the fictional 
Winston Smith and thankful that in some 
small way his work may have us closer 
toward the freedoms we cherish todav. 



Closing - 1984 335 



Editor's Note 



As 1 watch the final few pages of this 
book finally go to press, 1 cannot help but 
reminisce a bit. 

Coming into a job such as editing the 
DeSoto in mid-stream is not easy, but the 
book is finished, and for that fact I must 
thank everyone who helped me through 
the rough times. It is a well known fact 
around the office (sometimes too well 
known) that 1 did not want the job when it 
was offered to me; but I accepted it and felt 
compelled to complete what 1 had started. 

There is a great deal of work involved in 
putting out a publication of this size, and 
no one person could ever hope to succeed 
without a tremendous amount of assistance. 

Sondra, as my assistant editor and as my 
friend, you have without doubt been one of 
the most important factors in my keeping 
my sanity throughout the year. I could 
always count on you to be there at those 
times at which 1 needed either a warm 
shoulder to cry on or a swift boot. I know 
that we have had some bad times in the 
past and will have more in the future, but 1 
will always choose to remember the great 
times which we spent together. You have 
given me a lifetime of fun, albeit often 
bizzare fun, in the time we have known 
each other. Thank you from the bottom of 
my heart. I will be around if you ever need 
anything "always and forever." 

Tonda, you have given me so much more 
than you could ever know. You were there 
to help me pick up the pieces and go on 
when 1 wasn't sure that 1 could, and your 
sense of humor your adorable smile gave 
me that extra push to get through many 
days which seemed insurrmountable. The 
work you did compiling the index might 
not seem very significant to some; however, 
I realize the countless hours which were 
spent indexing when you really had better 
things to do. Also, even though your 
bylines were left off more of your stories 
than they were put on, we both know that 



you wrote the Anchor Splash copy. And 
who could forget the AFROTC page'.' 
Ihank you so much for all those times 
when you asked "is there anything I can do 
to help/'' You did more than you know by 
just being there. 

Cedric, what can 1 really say? What is a 
yearbook without pictures? Not much if 
you asked me (then, as a photographer 1 
may be a bit prejudiced), but thanks to you 
we will never know. You were always on 
hand when those times came that a picture 
just had to be shot and there was no one 
around to shoot it. But more than that, you 
were a good friend throughout the year. I 
wish that there were some way in which I 
could repay you for all the good times you 
brought my way - even if your jokes are 
usually "gross." Thanks for being around. 

Steve, you were one of the saving aspects 
of this year. Not only did you do the 
academics section; but also, you jumped in 
and did the greeks. A great deal of any 
credit which comes to this book rightfully 
belongs to you. Your work was very vital 
to the production of this DeSoto 1 wish 
that 1 could list all the work you did, but 
the space on this page does not allow it. 
Your sense of humor brought a certain, 
off-the-wall vitality to the staff, and 1 will 
always remember the "allnighters' 'which 
you helped me through. Thanks for the 
memories, and best of luck as a Kappa 
Sigma 

Ethan, you stepped in to save the sports 
section after it had a rough start, but you 
dove in and started writing almost without 
question. We have had our differences in 
the past, and I'm sure we will have more; 
however, 1 think we'll make it through 
them. 1 haven't had as much of a chance to 
show you the real me as 1 would have liked, 
but the pressure from all sides just kept 
pushing. Thank you for everything. You 
helped make this book possible. 



Mary Lynn, we too have had ou 
disagreements, but then hasn't everyone 
You are one of the few staff members wh 
was here before this fiasco of a year begar 
We knew more of what to expect than dii 
the new people on the staff, but even w 
could not predict that it would turn out lik 
it did! I hope that you won't take anythin 
which was said or done to heart. I certainl 
won't. Feeling are so brittle at times 
Thank you for staying around and helpin 
to see this book to completion. 

Melissa, you got the organizations sectio: 
finished; and even though you may feel a 
though you didn't do that much on th 
section yourself, it was done while yoi 
were in charge of it. That is more thai 
anyone else can say. Thank you for stickim 
out the year with me and staying all thos> 
hours when you could have been at home 

Mrs. Morrison, you have done so muc 
more than should have been asked of an 
"advisor." Your hours of dedicated wor 
have not gone unappreciated, and I hop 
that you will not look upon this year wit 
only bad memories. This was your firs 
year as our advisor, and we all know that i 
wasn't easy. Without your undying willing 
ness to work on the book, it never wouf 
have come to be. Thank you for everything 
1 only wish there was something 1 could d< 
to show my gratitude. 

1 know that 1 must have left at leas 
someone out, but at this thirteenth hour 
my memory is not as keen as it should be 
therefore, to the countless numbers o| 
people who also helped to produce thi:j 
book, 1 say "thank you, and I'm sorry then 
wasn't room to list everything you did." 

This year has been an unforgetabli 
experience for me. Not only did I learn ; 
great deal, but also, 1 had the opportunit; 
to meet many new, interesting people wh< 
1 might not have otherwise met. 1 wil 
always treasure my time as DeSoto editor 



336 Editors Note 



& 



University of the 80s 



1984 DeSoto 



B&tfa, l(U+> cv&n. 



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