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Make Your Own Picture 



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Tourists and Amateurs Should Use the Scov 
Portable Dry Plate Outfits. 



The Cameras we make for amateurs are not mere toys— they have been used and appro-\ 
eminent photographers. Certainly no apparatus can compare with that made by our Am 
Optical Co.'s Factory, in durability, accuracy and elegance of finish. It is in use in all parts 
globe, and has by merit won this wide-spread reputation. Be not deceived by what is copied 
it. See that your apparatus bears the brand of our factory. 

The Ne Plus Ultra Outfit Cameras are warranted to produce pictures of the highest excel 
ihey are accurate in every respect, and are made of white wood, stained in imitation of mahc 
or ebonized. 

B Outfit, % plates $ 12.00 I D Outfit, 6%i, 8^ plates $ 

C " % " and stereo 18.50 | 203 " 5s plates 

204 Outfit, 61.^, 8^ plates $50.00 

Send for circulars, and when in Detroit call and examine. 

The Largest and Best Stock of Photograph Goods ^ Accessoi 



1. v 



ALBKRX Nl. HARRIS, 

15 Grand River Ave., Detr 
The Only Exclusive Photograph Supply House In Michigan. 



Pleasure Seekers and Sportsmen 

NORTHKRN IMICHIGAN 

Offers attractions Unsurpassed in tills Country. The Unrivalled Scenery of the 
Northern Woods and Lakes, the Puri?, Dry, and Bracing Air, 

Jordan and Boardman Rivers, Famous for Trout Fishing, 
Manistee River, the Celebrated Grayling Stream, 

'The numerous Inland Lakes affording Splendid Boating, Bathing, and all 

varieties of Fishing, accessible by convenient routes and comfortable 

transportation. The many Elegant and Comfortable Hotels 

provide ample accommodations at Reasonable Rates. 

IB Fams HONTING GROUNDS Of Norllifirii liclan 

WITH ITS GREAT VARIETY OF GAME. 



41ay Fever, Asthma, and Catarrh Suff-rers, the Climate of Northern Michigan 
affords Speedy and Permanent Ralief for your Ailments. 



In order to Fully Enjoy these Attractions START RIGHT, and purchase your 
) Tickets via the ( 



Commencing with the Season, PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING CARS will be run 

between Detroit, Petoskey, and Mackinaw, without change, in charge 

of Competent and Courteous Employees. 

JTAST TIME. SyiE COIMECTIONS. UMIOM DEPOTS. 



Through Tickets ou sale at all the Principal Ticket Oflices. Baggage Checked Through. 
J". B. MULLIKEN, W. A. CARPENTER, 

General Manager. General Passenger Agent. 

General Offices, Newberry & McMillan Building, Detroit, Mich. 

1 



EXCURSION TICKETS 



VIA THE 



Detroit, Lansing & Northern R. R. 

AND ITS CONNECTIONS, TO THE 

Principal Pleasure Resorts of Northern Michigan, 

are placed on sale June 1st of each seasou, and remain on sale until Sept. 30tli, and are 
good to return until Oct. 31st. These Tickets are sold at very low rates. 150 pounds of 
baggage is allowed on each ticket. 

DURING THE HUNTING SEASON 

the same low rates will be given to Hunters and Sportsmen. Dogs, Guns and Fishing 
Tackle carried free at owner's risk. 



If you cannot get the desired information respecting Rates, Time, etc., via this POPULAR ROUTE, 
apply to either of the undersigned, who will cheerfully and promptly reply. 

W. A. CARPENTER, or JOHN R. WOOD, 

General Passenger Agent, Traveling Passenger Agent, 

DETROIT. DETROIT. 

SYNOPSIS OF THE GAME LAWS OF MICHIGAN. 

The following animals are protected by law during the periods covered by the dates mentioned: 

DEER, or Virg nia Deer— F'rom December 1 to October 1, following. (Upper Peninsula, November 
15tb to .Vugust 15th, following.) 

WILD TURKEY— January 1st to October 1st. in each year. 

COLIN, or Quail, sometimes called Virginia Partridge, and Bob White— January 1st to November 
1st, in each year. 

PINNATED GROUSE, also called Prairie Chicken— November 1st to September 1st, in each year. 

RUFFED GROUSE, a so called Partridge and Pheasant— January 1st to September 1st, following. 

SNIPE, or any (wild) Water Fowl— May 1st to September 1st, in each year. 

WOODCOCK— January 1st to August ist, in each year. 

WOOD DUCK. TEAL,"MaLLARD or GRAY DUCK— January 1st to September 1st, in each year. 

SPECKLED TROUT— September 1st to May 1st. following. 

GRAYLING — November 1st to June 1st. following. 

Trout and Grayling must not be caught in any way or at any time except by Angling. 

Streams in which Brook Trout is not native stocked with such trout, are protected by law tnree 
years after the plant of such trout therein. 

It is not lawful lor any person or persons to capture in any manner in any of the inland or public 
waters of the State, or have in his possession Brook Trout or (Grayling of a less size than six (6) inches- 
in length, or to catch, or have in his possession any California trout, until the eleventh (11) day of June, 
188.^. 

No trap, snare or net ma.y be used to take any of the birds mentioned, nor any punt or swivel gun 
be used against wild fowl. \\'ild fowl must not be disturbed in their nesting places at night. Insect- 
ivomus birds must not be killed or taken, nor their nests molested at any time. 

The kinds of Game mentioned above mu.st not be sold or exposed for sale in the clo.se season, except 
during the first eight days thereof, and transportation companies or carriers may not carry or have in 
po.ssession any game in the close season except during the first .5 days. The sale or carriage or posses- 
sion of Grayling and Trout during the close season is prohibited. 

No firearms may be used against WILD PIGEONS within five miles, and no trap, snare, net or other 
means within two miles of their nesting places. 

No one may hunt on enclosed land, without the permission of the owner or lessee thereof. 

It is not lawful to use any .species of continuous nets at any time in the inland waters of the State, 
nor to spear or shoot fish during March and April, but MULLETS, SUCKERS, RED SIDES, WALL- 
EY'ED PIKE and STURGEON may be taken with spears or dip-nets during March, April and May, 

The owner or occupant of a dam across any stream must erect a regulation fish chute therein. 

The violation of the law in any of the above points is punishable by fine or imprisonment or both. 



PREFATORY 



ill HE Passenger 



Department of the Detroit, Lansing & Northern 
Railroad Company presents this little volume to the Traveling 
Public, with the compliments of the Company. In the preparation of: 
the work it has been the aim, not only to point out the many attrac- 
tions along the road, but also to give the Tourist reliable information^ 
about Detroit, and the numerous and attractive Summer Resorts of 
Michigan. It is also hoped that Business Men will feel an interest in* 
what the volume contains. 



Preston, Kean & Co., 
Bankers, 

Chicago. 



David Preston & Co. 

Campau Block, 67 Griswold Street, - Detroit, Mich, 



ST-A-IBXiXSHrE X) ISSS. ii^- 



Transact a General (Banking (Business — Jdake GcUeotions 

at all Accessiole -points — (Buy and Sell TJ. i3., /State, 

Gcunty, Gity and Scncol (^istriot (Bonds. 

ALLOW INTEREST ON TI^dE DEPOSITS. 

We Refer to the Importers and Traders' National Bank, iST. Y., with whom 
we have kept a continuous account for 20 years. 

When in Detroit do not fail to visit Otir Store. 

SPiOPPING BV MAIL 

is now well knowu to be a convenient, practical and advantageous manner of purchasing goods. 
An order entrusted to us for any kind of 

DRY GOODS 

Will be Promptly and Reliably Filled. 

We have an immense stock of Silks, Satins, Velvets. Black and Colored Dress 

Goods, Percales, Cambrics, Zephyrs, Linens, House Furnishing- Goods, 

Laces, Embroideries,. White Goods, Gloves, Hosiery, Small 

Wares, Trimming-s, Ribbons, Underwear, Corsets, 

Cloths, Cloaking-s, Shawls and Garments, 

Infants' and Children's wear. 

In fact Everything in the Dry Goods Line Necessary for a Lady's Complete Outfit. 

Send for Sample of any Groods Wanted. A Trial Order Solicited, 

TAYLOB, WOOLFENDEM & CO,, 

165 and 167 Woodward Avenue, DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 




fpC^ETROIT, the metropolis of the State of Michigan, and the eastern terminus of 
the Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railroad, is a city whose beauty and 
^^ attractions are conceded by all. During the summer seasons of the year thou- 
§'''^i|:^'t sands of people from the South and East flock to her hospitable doors, and from 
there make happy use of the innumerable routes open to pleasure seekers that radiate 
from Detroit as a 
center, and extend 
through the count I y 
round about. Cool 
refreshing bree/es 
serve to mitigate the 
summer's heat, and 
when ashore should 
happen to prove ot 
too high a tempeia 
ture, there are the 
many excursions 
that enable one to 
escape to the lakes 
and rivers. 

A HISTORY 

written of Detroit 

would say that the 

site of the city ^ is 

first occupied in 

1701, when the 

French traders es 

tablished a trading 

post at that point 

The Indians, moie 

over, made it the 

place of rendezvous, 

and for years at cti 

tain seasons they 

there congregated i"'7>if'i'f ^7 ''("^,';j"^ ^^ ^ i^j 

in large n umbers fuf p^^^v i^v,:.^, o.t^ iv>. \^^^^ Oi^i^, is^^^ Gkv.^=^. Pv.i>T. 

the exchange of commodities and for fishing. Gradually the little settlement grew, and 

as time wore on it became the scene of many a historic event. Innumerable conflicts 

were had with the Indians, and later there was bloodshed between the French and the 

English over the possession of the place. Detroit's fortunes were variable. It was now 





EWCOMB, ENDIGOTT & CO. 




Importers, Jobbers and Retailers of 









aa 



rvIlllirLery, 
CARPETS AND UPHOLSTERY. 



fi;®iaieiipall ffliaitlttoiFa amdl B'mffEniisitaffa 



^vCa.an.vi.£a.ct-va.rers of 



LADIES', CHILDREN'S AND INFANTS' WARDROBES 



DRESS AND CLOAK MAKING. 



Estimates given for furnishing Hotels, Public 
Buildings and Steamboats, Etc. 



Fine Trimmings, Laces, Silks, Dress Goods and Shawls a Specialty. 



FOREIGN GOODS IMPORTED DIRECT, AND PRICES ALWAYS 
MODERATE. 



SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. 

190,192,194,196 and 198 WOODWARD AVE., 



3Z)E!T:R,0IT. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



under French government, and then doing homage to the English. Afterwards, when 
the United States asserted itself, Detroit became the capital of the Territory, and later 
the State of Michigan. Now the seat of government is at Lansing, and Detroit, with a 
population of near 132,000, is the leading city of the State and among the most promis- 
ing of the West. In 1810 the number of her inhabitants was only 770. This number, 
in 1840, was increased to 9,102, in 1860 to 40,137, and in 1880 to 116,343. Including 
her suburban connections there were, in 1882, upwards of 169,620 persons who in reality 
belong to the city. 

THE SITUATION 

of Detroit is on the north bank of the Detroit river, from which river the city derives 
its name. The country at this point rises gradually from the river until in the western 
and northern portions of the city the elevation is 40 to 50 feet above the level of the 
water. This elevation, which is attained so gradually as to almost escape the notice of 
the visitor, affords excellent opportunities for perfect drainage, and this being taken 
advantage of by the civic authorities, the city 
enjoys the reputation of having the cleanest and 
most wholesome streets of any city approaching 
her size in the country. The city itself has a water 
frontage of six miles and a depth of three and one- 
half miles. Of this depth all but about one mile is 
quite closely built up, and mainly with new and 
modern buildings, many of which were erected at 
great cost. The streets of the city are broad, and 
are laid (mt, as a general thing, to run parallel or 
at right angles to the river, which at this point 
runs from the northeast to the southwest. From 
the center of the city there are, however, several 
main thoroughfares that radiate as the spokes of a 
wheel, furnishing more direct communication with 
the outskirts than were they laid out otherwise. 
A boulevard is in the course of construction, which will furnish an admirable drive 
around the city. The streets are well protected with shade trees and are paved with 
wood, excepting on some of the business thoroughfares, where the heavy teaming has 
made a stone pavement desirable. Machine street sweepers are used, which every 
night, in open weather, pick up all the dirt and dust that may have accumulated during 

the day. 

THE CITY GOVERNMENT 

•consists of a common council, with a mayor at its head, and various municipal boards, 
which are subject to the former. The police force is large and well organized; while 
the fire department is one of the most perfect of any in the country. Hundreds of 
thousands of dollars are spent annually in maintaining and improving these two depart- 
ments of public safety, and the time has come when criminals fight shy of the city, and 
•disastrous fires are a thing of extremely rare occurrence. 

IN TAKING A SOCIAL VIEW 

of the city, one sees every race on earth represented, and hears all manner of languages 
spoken. The people as a body are cultured and of means. Arts and amusements are 
fostered, and during the winter season the city is ablaze with social enjoyments. The 
•churches, of all denominations, are numerous, and the right hand of fellowship is 




Whitney's Opera House. 



Henky a. Newland. David L. Hempsted. Arba M. Seymour. Frederic Joy*. 

JAMES F. JOY, JAMES BURNS, Specials. 



HENRY A, NEWLAND & CO. 

Importers, Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

HATS, CAPS, FURS. 

Straw Goods, G-loves, etc. 

124 & 126 JEFFERSOK AYEKUE, DETROIT, MICH. 

L. G. GORTON. W. GEO. BLEWETT. 



GORTON, BLEWBXT & CO. 

Successors to E. B. Smith & Co. 

IMPORTERS, 

-€WH01ESAI.H AND RETAIL BOOKSHLLHRS^^- 

STATIONERS AND ENGRAVERS. 

86 Vv^OODWARD AVENUE, - DETROIT, MICH. 



Newest Books in the Market- Books in Artistic Binding. 

Fine Stationery and Engraving. Wedding and Party Invitations and Visiting Cards. 

Mail Orders Solicited. Fine Art Goods and Commercial Supplies. 

All orders promptly attended to. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 9 

extended to all strangers. Opera houses and theaters are numerous enough to provide 
adequate means for evening entertainment. Eight street car lines give transportation 



Detroit in 1796. 

REFERENCES, 

A. Fort PoncTiartr.Tin. 

B. Powder Marazine. 

C. Kinc;'sPalr'ce. 

D. Guard House. 

E. Jr 

F. Catholic Church. 

G. Fire started burning the 

town June ii, 1005. 

H, Birth place of Rev. Leon- 
ard Bacon, D.D., of Kcw 
Haven, Conn. 

...... Present Streets. 







to all parts of the city, while the coupe and carriage service is complete and the charges 

reasonable. 

THE ATTRACTIONS. 

To the visitor the city soon becomes most enchanting as a place for quiet rest and 
enjoyment. Detroit bears the reputation of being a residence town, and it is an undis- 



ESTABLISHED 1S64. 



DETROIT STOVE WORKS 






oo 
O 



— ) MANUFACTURERS OF ( — 



STOVES, RANGES, 



AND 



HOLLOW WARE. 



l-H 
P^ 







JEWEL STOVES 







Office and Salesrooms : 



< 

CQ 

O 
<1 



32 AND 34 WOODWARD AVE., 



IDetroit, IL/Iiclxig'a.rx- 



86 WABASH AVENUE, 



W. H. TEFFT, President. 



CHICAGO, ILLS. 

E. S. BARBOUR, Secretary. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



11 



puted fact that the number of persons of means who have sought this as a place for their 
homes is comparatively greater than of almost any other city. After leaving the center 
of the city, let the visitor go in whatsoever way he will, he finds elegant residences with 
spacious grounds, betokening the presence of wealth and culture. For several miles on 
some of the streets do these costly and attractive residences abound, while every year 
more are added to their number. Several attractive parks are located near the center of 
the city, but as has often been remarked, the shade trees are so numerous and luxuriant 
that the city in itself is almost a park. The places of interest In the city may be enum- 
erated as follows: 

The City Hall, a massive stone structure, built at a cost of $600,000, from the 
tower of which a most extensive view of the city and adjacent country may be had. 

The Soldiers 
and Sailors'Mon- 
ument, in front 
of the City Hall, 
an elaborate af- 
fair of granite 
and bronze. 

Two cannons, 

relics of the fleet 
which, under the 
command of 
Com. Perry, did 
such effectual 
service on Lake 
Erie during the 
war of 1812, are 
on the grounds 
of the City Hall. 
The Public 
Market Build- 
ings, opposite 

the City Hall. the Detroit Opera House. 

The Detroit Opera House, fronting the Campus Martius. 
Whitney's Grand Opera House, corner Fort and Shelby streets. 
Music Hall, corner Randolph and Monroe. 

The Public Library, in Center Park, completed at a cost of $125,000, with a well 
stocked library. 

A ride out Woodward avenue shows the immense retail stores of the city, the more 
notable of which are the dry goods establishments of Newcomb, Endicott & Co., and 
Taylor, Woolfenden & Co. Further along one passes through the Grand Circus Park, 
•which was originally intended as the center of the city, and from which it will be 
observed the streets radiate in all directions. The streets, however, are not long ones, 
excepting Woodward and Adams avenues, for the City Fathers found that the course 
they were pursuing would soon lead to confusion, and changed their plans to streets 
crossing each other at right angles. The Grand Circus Park is cut in twain by Wood- 
ward avenue, and each side is furnished with fountains, shade trees and settees. The 




R.W.KING & SON, 



IMPORTERS, J6BBERS AND RETAILERS OF 



S s 




"3 E- 



Detroit 



Agents for the Bailey Reflecting Lamps and Chandeliers for 
Churches, Halls and Private Buildings. 



REED & BARTON'S SILVER PLATED FLATWARE. 



SEND FOR ESTIMATES AND PRICES. 
No. 103 Woodward Avenue, DETROIT, MICH. 

VAIL & CRANE, 



rv\T[i 










^JK 



in I? 




MANUFACTURERS. 



48 TO 56 East Woodbridge Street, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

ALL NEW AND LARGEST IN STATE. 



ASK FOR PRICE LIST AND SHOW CARD. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



13 



remainder of Woodward avenue, for a distance of nearly tliree miles, is noted cliiefly 
for its fine places of residence. 

Jefferson avenue, running at right angles to Woodward avenue, contains tlie many 
wholesale and jobbing houses of the city, beyond which it extends for two miles and 
more with the residences of wealthy and prominent citizens. This avenue, as well as 
Woodward avenue, is 120 feet in width, and paved its entire length. 

Fort street, a residence thoroughfare, runs west from the City Hall, and is one of 
the oldest and most popular streets. 

Other streets that should be visited for the sake of viewing handsome and imposing 
residences are: Alfred and Edmund streets, both running east from Woodward avenue; 
Cass avenue, running parallel and to the west of Woodward avenue; and Lafayette 
avenue, running parallel and U) the north of Fort street. 

The House of Correction, on Russell street, in the noitheast part of the city, 
and to which noted criminals from the different parts of the country are sent, is 
also worthy of a visit. 
The Water Works 
Reservoir is near the 
House of Correction, and 
is a point of interest. 

The Water Works 
Pumping Engines are 
among the largest in the 
country. They are situ- 
ated out Jefferson ave- 
nue a distance of about 
five miles, and a drive to 
them carries one along 
the river front and is 
enjoyable. 

The Union Depot Gi'ain Elevator, an institution capable of caring for 1,300,000 
bushels of grain, is the largest elevator in Michigan, and will furnish entertainment for 
an hour's visit. It is at the foot of Twelfth street. 

The Michigan Central Depot, at the foot of Third street, where the trains of the 
Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railroad arrive and depart, is now in the course 
of construction, and when completed will be one of the most imposing structures of its 
kind in the country. Its cost will be not far from $200,000. 

The Cemeteries are two in number. Elmwood Cemetery is situated in the extreme 
eastern portion, and Woodmere in the extreme western portion of the city. Both are 
accessible by means of the Fort Wayne & Elmwood cars, and are visited annually by 
thousands. 

Fort Wayne, a military post, is one of the most interesting and picturesque places 
in the neighborhood of the city, and being readily reached by means of the Fort 
Wayne & Elmwood street cars, cannot fail to be of interest to all visitors. 

Griswold street, the Wall street of Detroit, contains many massive structures 
worthy of a visit. Among them are the Chamber of Commerce, where is situated the 
Board of Trade; the Newberry & McMillan building, in which are the headquarters of 
the Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railroad; the new Postofflce, in course of con- 
struction at a cost of $600,000; and the High School, at the head of the street. 




Music Hall. 



JNO. S. NEWBERRY, ALEXANDER DE LANO, H. R. NEWBERRY, 

PRESIDENT. VICE-PRES'T AND GEN'L MANG'R. SEC'Y AND TREAS. 



DETROIT STEEL WORKS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



f ^^(^ 'nU' 'MX' ■nU' '\i^ 'sl^ "si^ <l/^y^ S'<>i:^ ■vj^ ■sj^ 'sL- fsL" -nI^ ■nIx' . ^)/' \ 



STEEL 






SPRING STEEL A SPECIALTY. 








*&^^*^^te» 



^ik-di 



ALEX. DE LANO, Treas. and Mang'r. H. R. NEWBERRY, Secretary. 

DETROIT Car Spring Co., 

MANUFACTURERS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS OF 

Locomotive, Tender, Passenger t Freight 
Car Springs. 

krom: bksx cast steel. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



15 



DETROIT IS THE CENTER 

and the greatest of a dozen popular summer resorts, and the wealth of luxuries and 
privileges she offers at a nominal figure may be seen by a perusal of the following . 
extract from the columns of the Detroit Free Press: 

The summer season is here at last and the hot weather is being experienced every- 
where. In consequence a popular topic just now is: "Where shall we go to escape the 
heat and secure pleasure and comfort?" 

In considering the subject thought naturally turns to Detroit as one of the most 
complete and desirable of summer resorts in the world, possessing, as it does, all of the 
requirements of a popular watering place, and in addition, all of the advantages and 
luxuries of a city home. Unquestionably Detroit is the best drained and handsomest 
city in the United States, a fact which is admitted by all. persons who, by reason of 
extended travel and close observation, are best fitted to judge. With her broad streets — 
including over fifty miles of paved roadway — her dozen or more of parks, miles of 
densely shaded walks and hundreds of beautiful homes, 
besides a large number of fine public and private build- 
ings, Detroit courts comparison with any other city in the 
Union. In addition to all of these required beauties she 
is most extravagantly favored by Nature. 

THE BROAD RIVER, 

"Which is within ten minutes' ride of almost any part of 
the city, gives in the summer time immediate escape 
from the intense heat, the dust and the noise of the city, 
and this luxury is within the reach of all. 

For ten cents a person may ride back and forth 
between Windsor and Detroit or Belle Isle Park and the 
city, all the afternoon and evening. For fifty cents or 
less rides may be taken through Lake St. Clair and the 
river of that name, or down the Detroit river to the 
Wyandotte Mineral Spring Hotel, or further to the his- 
torical precincts of Amherstburg and Put-in-Bay. In 
. fact, there are a dozen or more popular, healthful and soldiers' and sailors' Monument. 
beautiful resorts within from one to three hours of Detroit, and the cost of making a 
trip to any of them is merely nominal. 

OTHER ATTRACTIONS. 

Beside this, Detroit is well provided with hotels and desirable private boarding 

houses, and for those visitors so inclined, offers many points of general public interest. 

For instance, the Detroit Public Library and the House of Correction are among the 

finest institutions of the kind in the country, while Elmwood Cemetery, Bloody Run 

and the Pontiac tree. Fort Wayne, the large stove manufactories, chemical laboratories, 

car shops, shoe factories, tobacco warehouses and other enterprises are well worth a visit, 

when by reason of a cool day the visitor has a day off from the river. Briefly no time 

need be wasted and no one need be uncomfortable or at a loss for something to do when 

in Detroit. 

THE ISLAND PARK. 

Citizens and visitors never tire of talking of the beauties of Michigan's straits, the 
like of which in all the States cannot be found. On the Detroit River Belle Isle Park— 




THE STEEL JAMB safe, 



MANUFACTURED BY THE 



BETRMl ®itEE aOMlP^XT 




A Sure Protection From Fire. 



SAFETY, UTILITY and BEAUTY COMBINED. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS OF OUR SIX STEP STEEL FLANGE 
MADE IN CAST IRON. 



The Door Frames and Jambs of these Safes are made of MALLEABLE ROLLED STEEL, of great 
tensile strength, crimped and rolled into six offsets or flanges, for which the company holds exclusive 
patent. 

All other Safes made in the United States have Cast Iron Door Frames and Jambs, which metal 
must be made thick in order to obtain sufficient strength, thus furnishing a direct avenue for the 
introduction of heat to the inside of the safe, while, thick as it is, it is constantly cracking, especially 
when exposed to fire, owing to its well known brittleness. 

Bj^ the use of this thin steel, we have solved the problem of how to make the front of a safe as 
invulnerable to fire as its other walls. 

These safes are in use thoroughout the length and breadth of our land, as well as in the countries 
of the Eastern Hemisphere; they have been everywhere exposed to fires of all kinds incident to human 
experience, but THERE HAS NEVER BEEN A SINGLE CASE where they have failed to protect their 
contents against loss or damage from heat, hence we do not fear to assert that they are THE BEST 
FIRE-PROOF SAFES IN USE, and while they are finished in all their appointments with great thor- 
oughness and beauty, we are able, on account of our great facilities for manufacturing, to offer them 
at prices so reasonable that we think no one who has books, papers or valuables to protect should be 
without one. 

BANK SAFES AND VAULTS, constructed with all the latest and most approved Bukglae Proob' 
Appointments, made to order. Also VAULT DOORS, IRON SHUTTERS and JAIL WORK. 

OFFICE AND FACTOR\' 

67 to 85 Fort St. East, betneeii Beaublen aud Autoiue, 
DETKOIT, MICH. 



DETROIT SAFE COMPANY. 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 17 

■belonging to the city — is the first gem bestowed by nature. Here dozens of pic-nic parr 
ties may be seen any day, while thousands of men, women and children in pairs, in 
family parties, and alone, seek the shade and comfort of the island. Below the city of 
Detroit are the Wyandotte Mineral Springs, with their capacious hotel and bath houses 
for the healing of the invalid. Farther down and across the river, picturesque Grosse 
Isle, Sugar Island and Bois Blanc Island serve as beauty's borders to quaint old Amherst- 
burg on the Canadian shore. Extending the ride for an hour or more across Lake Erie 
*and the excursionist may visit Kelley's Island, with its wondrous vineyards and wine 
■cellars, and Put-in-Bay Island, with its beach, its hotels, its drives and its society. 

UP THE RIVER. 

Going up the river from Detroit is a ride across Lake St. Clair, the most beautiful 
body of water in the great chain of inland seas, through the St. Clair Flats and the great 
government canal, and along the length of the St. Clair River, the banks of which are 
•crowded with pretty villages, handsome villas and romantic bits of woodland. The 
resorts to be visited on this side are the houses of the fishing and shooting clubs; the 
Star Island Hotel, with its four or five boats each way per day, and an unlimited field 
for sailing and fishing; the mineral springs and grand hotel at the pretty village of St. 
Clair, with pure air, a full view of all the shipping of the lakes, and society second to 
that of no summer resort in the country. Lastly comes Port Huron with its government 
protection — Fort Gratiot — a view of the mouth of stormy Lake Huron, and streets, 
buildings and business enterprises of a pleasant city. 

INTERIOR LAKES. 

Leaving Detroit by rail on any morning, a ride of from two to three hours will take 
the tourist either to Orion, Orchard or Walled Lake, any one of which is as pretty a 
little inland resort as could be wished, and all of them are supplied with hotels and 
liberal accommodations for hunting, fishing and shooting. Then, too, there is Mt. 
Clemens, which may be reached in an hour by rail, or in three hours by boat, the last 
named route being up the oddest bit of crooked marine thoroughfare to be seen auy- 
"where. Mt. Clemens has also mineral springs whose healing qualities are famous, and 
.-suitable hotel accommodations to make the place most popular. 

ACROSS THE LINE. 

Immediately across Lake St. Clair from the mouth of Clinton River, which flows 
-from Mt. Clemens, is the Thames, the Canadian counterpart of the Clinton, crooked, 
•quiet and picturesque, and up the Thames, after a three hours' ride from Detroit, 
■the tourist may visit Chatham, one of the prettiest and busiest towns in the Dominion. 

WHAT WE DEDUCE. 

Thus, with Detroit as the chief resort, there are a dozen or more desirable resorts to 
be visited on any day, either by boat or rail, each journey being cheap, pleasant and 
•desirable, bringing the traveler back for the night. If there is another city in the coun- 
try which can show so great a variety of resorts, which may be visited so comfortably 
and at so little cost, it has yet to be made known. 

The resorts of most large cities are from four to twenty-four hours away, and in 
this peculiarity Detroit compares with any of them, as a ride by boat of twenty-four 
hours will land the passengers at Mackinaw— a world-famed resort; a ride of twelve or 
fifteen hours by rail takes one to the Grand Traverse region with its trout streams, its 
inland chain of lakes and the Petoskey camp-meeting ground; and giing east by rail, 
Niagara Falls may be reached in eight hours. Truly it would seem that parties in 
selecting a place in which to pass the summer as comfortably as possible with a desire 
2 



iBaK^er, ii0iil|ittJ5 1 Cd,, 



( INCORPORATED.) 




MsiM W ©toMiss ®t ©^ttffliSis^ 



DETROIT, 



MICHIGAN. 



C. H. BUHL, Presidtiit. D. R. I'EIUCE, Sec'y and Tro;i! 



J. W. BAKTLETT, Meclianical Supt. 



Buhl Iron Works, 

.SUCCESSOKS TO 

B'ETMOiT Locomotive Womms^ 

Boiler Makers, Engine Builders and Founders 

REPAIRS A SF'ECIAETV. 

TtLird. Street, - IDetroit, :b/LlalOL. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Oysters ^4^ Foreign Fruits 



-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



HEKMETIOALLY SEALED GOODS, PICKLES, PEESEEVES, ETC. 

53, 55 and 57 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Micli- 



THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



19 




^ERICAN EAGLE TOBACCO COM 




to see and enjoy as much as possible for a reasonable outlay, would select Detroit above 
all others, and the increase of visitors and transient residents in Detroit shown every 
summer is undeniable proof that the facts set forth are rapidly coming to be appreciated 
in all parts of the country, particularly in the Southern and Southeastern States. 

AS A COMIVIERCIAL AND MANUFACTURING CENTER, 
The city of Detroit holds a most prominent position. She is situated in close proximity 
to the sources of supply of lumber, iron and copper, and the country around is suf- 
ficiently thickly settled to furnish an ample demand for all the goods manufactured. 
Besides the inquiry from the residents of the adjacent country, there is a large demand 
from cities throughout the 
United States and Canada 
for the goods turned out by 
Detroit concerns. Accord- 
ing to recently published sta- 
tistics, there are in the city 
of Detroit 986 manufacturing 
establishments, involving a 
capital of $20,923,700, and 
■whose products equal $48, 
459, 196 in the aggregate. The 
number of persons to whom 
employment is given by 
all these establishments is 
25,563, to whom is annually 
paid $9,005,438 as wages. 
All kinds of goods are here 
turned out, and many a day 
can be spent en joy ably and 
profitably in visiting the 
shops and factories. To 
those who have never seen 
the modus operandi of turn- 
ing out the many articles of necessity aud lu\ui\ used by tht people, the sight is one 
worthy of witnessing, and what is more, the busmess men of this city are only too glad 
to show. Here one can see made all articles of clothing, machinery, stoves, furniture, 
confectionery, and a dozen or more other things that go to make up a manufacturing 
center. For the making of boots and shoes there are 70 establishments, there are 70 more 
for tobacco and cigars, the American Eagle Tobacco Co., successors to the old and well- 
known house of K. C. Barker & Co., being the largest fine cut and smoking tobacco 
manufactory in the West, 27 for machinery, 35 for furniture, 3 for stoves, 13 for confec- 
tionery, and so on to the end of an almost inexhaustible list. The retail and wholesale 
establishments dealing in the various staples of the country are no less numerous than 
the manufacturing places, and sell goods far and near. As a grain distributing point 
Detroit is one of considerable importance. During the year 1883 there were received 
here 18,433 cars of grain, of which 14,923 cars were of wheat. There are four grain 
elevators, having a total capacity of 2,600,000 bushels. These elevators, during the year 
1882, handled 6,442,899 bushels of wheat, 1,196,351 bushels of corn, 1,359,958 bushels 
of oats, and 7,061 bushels of rye. On the Board of Trade the bulls and bears sold 
7,164,000 bushels of wheat for immediate delivery and 115,016,000 bushels in options, 
making a total business for the year of 122,120,000 bushels. 




ORGANIZED 1878. 



INCORPORATED 1882. 



DRS.K.&K. 



°or, ^« 



MEDICAL AND SURGICAL 



ASSOCIATION, 



DKXROIT, = = JVLICHIOAN, 

— ( IS THE ) — 

Most Famous and Successful Institution in the World. 



EXCLUSIVELY DEVOTED TO THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF 

lEFORIITIES AND CHRONIC AND OBSCDRE DISEASES 

OF THE 

EYE, EAR, BRAIN, THROAT, LUNGS, HEART, LIVER, KIDNEYS, STOMACH, 

GENITOURINARY ORGANS, BONES AND JOINTS, TOGETHER 

WITH ALL DISEASES PECULIAR TO MEN OR 

WOMEN, AND 

Catarrhal, Cancerous, Rheumatic, Scrofulous, 

AND OTHER BLOOD AFFECTIONS. 

NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASES A SPECIALTY. 



CONSULTATION, IN PEKSON OR BY CORRESPONDENCE, FREE. ALL COMMUNICATIONS 
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL. 

Send for our new books, " Guide to Health,"'' and " Golden Monitor.'''' 



8 -SKILLED SPECIALISTS,--! 8 

FIVE OF WHOM REMAIN CONSTANTLY AT THE HOME OFFICE, WHILE 

THIRTEEN VISIT THE PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE UNITED 

STATES AND CANADA. 



J. D. KERGAN, M. D., President. 

F. B. SMITH. M. D., Vice-President. 

W. W. KERGAN, Secretary and Treasurer. 



PROF. E. C. FRANKLIN, M. D., 

Of Michigan State University, 

Surgeon- in-Chief. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES. 



While treating of Detroit and its attractions it may not be amiss to make mention 
of the business firms whose enterprise has gone far in bringing the city of the straits to 
its present prominent position in the commercial world. Every branch of trade has been 
embarked in, and money has been expended with a lavish hand in the erection of stores 
and factories for the production and display of goods. No opportunities have been 
missed by the Merchants for the bringing of Detroit and her guods before the people of 
the country, and in every part of the United States and adjacent places can be found 
cards Or advertisements of those doing business here. With this publication the 
Detroit, Laiifiiing' & Xortlierii R. R. presents to its readers the advertisements 
of the leading houses and firms in their respective lines of trade, therebj^ showing a 
general representation of the bone and sinew of our city. 

Intending purchasers will consult their interests by visiting the tirms mentioned 
below, and visitors should not fail to see the palatial stores and busy factories of the 
loveliest city in tlie country. Merchants and manufacturers will give you a hearty wel- 
come, and show you through their establishments with pleasure. In giving fuller men- 
tion of the trade of Detroit, it may be said that the dry goods business, both in the jobbing 
and retail departments, occupies a prominent position. The firm of j^e^vcomb, 
£ii<licott & Co., located in a massive iron front building, Nos. 190 to 200 Woodward 
avenue, are Importers, jobbers and retailers of dry goods, millinery, carpets and uphol- 
stery, besides being general out-filters and furnishers, and manufacturers of articles of 
ladies' and misses' wearing apparel — also at 165 and 167 Woodward avenue, is the dry 
goods establishment of Taylor, Woolfcndcn & Co., who keep an immense 
stock of dress goods, house furnishing goods, trimmings and infants' and children's 
wearing apparel — of the exclusively wholesale dry goods firms, that of Edsoii, lloore 
& Co., 194 to 203 Jefferson avenue, is tie leading one, located in a magnificient build- 
ing built expressly for the requirements of their immense trade. Besides, in drj- goods, 
there is a large trade doue here in clothing. In the exclusive wholesale clothing 
trade, Heaveiiricli Dros. show an immense stock of ready-made clothing of all 
descriptions at 138 and 140 Jefferson avenue, one of the finest buildings in the 
city. In merchant tailoring, D. Coiigdoil &, Co., 73 Woodward avenue, and 
August Rasoli & Co., 79 Woodward avenue, carry well assorted slocks of cloths of 
all descriptions and prices, and make up clothing in the latest style and best of workman- 
ship. Ricliuiond, Backus «fc Co., 183 Jefferson avenue, make a specialty of rail- 
road printing, ticket cases, etc., and also keep a complete line of stationery, blank books, 
etc., and a full line of type-writing machines. Oortou, Blewctt &Co., successors 
to the old established house of E. B. Smith & Co., 86 Woodward avenue, are importers, 
booksellers, stationers and engravers; they also make a specialty of wedding and party 
invitations, wedding cards, fine art goods, and the newest books in the market will be 
found in their stock. R. W. Kiug & Sou, 103 Woodward avenue, extensive 
importers and dealers in crockery and glassware of all descriptions, have a prominent 
place in their branch of the city's trade; a look through their beautiful stock will be 



THE 



GRIFFIN CAR WHEEL COMPANY 



BUFFALO. 






DETROIT. 



CHICAGO. 









The Deti-oit Works of this c-onipany arc located ou the Uiie of M.O.R.R. near Twentieth street. They 
comprise mmierous buildings for the various departments in addition to the large main building. 
They are all of brick, with slate and iron roofs, and are constructed iu the most siibstanial manner. 
The Works cover four and one-half acres of ground and are equipped with the best of machinery and 
tools. Car wheels and car castings are a specialty, the daily out-put being 300 of the former and 30 
tons of the latter, or over 100 tons mantifactured niaterial daily. Shipments are made to all parts of 
the United States, Canada, Mexico, and some abroad. The company has in addition to the Detroit 
works, liranches at Chicago and Buffalo: the former known as the Griffin & Wells Foundry Co; the 
latter as Thos. F. Giiffin & Sons. The tniited out-put of tlie three companies is 700 wheels per day, and 
as their sales are made almost entirely to railroad comimnies for their monthly reqinrenients, this out- 
put is constantly uuiintained. The tliree companies however, have a capacity of 1000 wheels per day, 
and will probablv reach that out-put soon. They are the largest manufacturers in their line, in the 
United States. The l)usiness is conducted by Thos. F. (Jriflfln and his two sons, all of whom are thor- 
oughly practical in all the cletails of the work and give personal attention to the practical management. 

Detroit Metal I Heating Works 

JOHN B. DYAR, Proprietor. 

Manufacturer and Erector of 

STEAM HEATING APPARATUS 

Agents for Lawson's Hot Air Furnaces. 

Workers in Galvanized and Black Sheet Iron, Copper and Tin. 



DEALEE IN 



Steam Fitters' Supplies, Gas Pipe, Brass (joods, 

SHEET IRON, COPPEE, PIG TIN, SHEET TIN, EEGISTEHS, Etc. 
STORE, 52 WOODWARD AVENUE, 

^'''''''' S^I^^L ""' '' DETROIT. MICH. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES. 23 

time well spent. Among the successful banking institutions may be mentioned that of 
David Predion & Co., in their new quarters, Campau Building, 67 Griswold 
street, who do a general banking and collection business. The music trade is one 
largely catered to, and the lovers of such find in the ample warerooms of Roe 
Stcpliciis 184 and l!^6 Woodward avenue, whatever may be desired; all manner of 
musical instruments, sheet and book music can there be found. C. J. Wllitney, 
40 Fort street west, is an extensive dealer in music, band and orchestral instruments, 
and everything in the musical line. II. A. IVcwIaiid & Co., 124 and 126 Jefferson 
avenue, extensive jobbers and importers in native and foreign furs, rugs. etc. D. Pat- 
tcrjion, 266 Woodward avenue, has a large and interesting establisi)raent for the man- 
ufacture of granite monuments of the finest quality and workmanship. TheGold- 
siiiitli, Bryant & Strattoii Biisiiie§s ITnivcroiily, IMechanics' Hall, of which 
W. F. Jewell is the Principal, and the Maylicw Biiiiiic^tS College, Chamber of 
Commerce Building, are well known institutions for thorough and practical business 
education; the latter also makes a specialty of telegraphy. The leading house in photo- 
graphic supplies is that of A. M. Harris, 15 Grand river avenue, a specialty being the 
amateur or dry plate outfit. The popular photographers are Watxioii, 236 Woodward 
avenue, ]?Iiiiard, 224 and 226 Woodward avenue, and Randall, corner Williams 
and Madison avenues, each one having a large and convenient gallery with 
the latest of modern tippliances, good operators, and guarantee first-class work. 

C. Lingeniann & Sons, 26 Monroe avenue, manufacture umbrellas and 
parasols in all styles, and keep an elegant assortment on hand; also walking canes. 
■Wm. Reid, 73 and 75 Larned street west, can supply glass mirror plates, lead, 
oils, etc., by wholesale and retail. F. BauiTord & Co., 355 Jefferson ave., decora^ 
tors, painters, frescoers, have a reputation for excellent work; they also keep fine paper 
hangings, shades, etc. P. A. Billings, 176 Woodward ave., can supply mantels, 
grates, tiles, fenders, and everything pertaining to his department of the latest styles. 
The Detroit Conservatory of .Yliisic, 82 Fort street west, is known far and 
near for its thoroughness in musical training, the instructors being very skillful pro- 
fessors. E. Barrett Warnian, corner Woodward and Grand River aves., is a 
practical teacher of reading, voice culture, and dramatic action, and will be pleased to 
correspond with any one desiring to learn his method. Turkish, Russian, Roman 
and other Baths are administered to Ladies and Gentlemen at 274 Woodward ave., 
under the direction of Dr. Betts. The U.S. Uledical and Surgical Associa- 
tion of Drs. K. & K.., 159 Griswold street, comprising 18 skilled specialists, is an 
institution worthy of a visit, if for no other purpose than that of sight seeing, it being 
one of the largest and best conducted of its kind in the country. Dr. M. Hilton 
Williams, of the Detroit Throat and Lung Institute, 253 Woodward ave., 
makes a specialty of Throat and Lung Diseases, and meets with good success. J. V. 
Liisee, 146 Woodward ave., keeps a very large assortment of boots and shoes, making 
a specialty of ladies', misses' and children's fine shoes. Orders will be be carefully 
attended to and satisfaction guaranteed. The retail grocery trade is well represented by 

D. "Wallace, 119 Woodward ave., with a large and well assorted stock. 
He is also agent for the Austin Powder Co. D. D. Mallory & Co., 
53, 55 and 57 Jefferson ave., are wholesale dealers in foreign fruits, canned goods, 
etc. They also make a specialty of their Diamond brand of oysters. Brownlee 
& Co, foot of Shelby street, are reliable dealers in telegraph poles and posts, 
keeping large stocks on hand. The Union Yeast Company is one of the growing 
enterprises, and is known for the excellence of their goods. With the clear and pure 



JAMES MCMILLA.N, President. HUGH McMILLAN, Vice-President and General Manager, 

JAMES McGregor, General Superintendent. W. K. ANDERSON, Treasurer. 

JOSEPH TAYLOR, Secretary. HUGH DYAR, Assistant Manager. 

J. HILL WHITING, Superintendent of Foundries. 



MICHIGANIPMIMCOMPANY 



DETROIT CAR WHEEL CO. 

Manufacturers of Freight Cars, Car Wheels and Castings. 

Sf) WORKS AT GRAND TRUNK JUNCTION. 

[HE MICHIGAN CAR COMPANY'S WORKS, and the DETROIT CAR WHEEL COMPANY'S-- 
WORKS, located at the Grand Trunk Junction, three miles west of tha City Hall, though con- 
ducted by two distinct corporations, are controlled by the same parties, and are located side by 
side within the same enclosure, and combine their efforts in the manufacture of cars, giving 
employment to from 1,.500 to 2,030 men. The capital stock of these companies has been 
increased at various times until now they employ a capital of three-quarters of a million dollars. In 
the course of seven or eight years, by reason of the great demands of their business, they found it 
necessary to greatly extend the area and capacity of their works, and occupy a tract of over thirty 
acres of ground near the Grand Trunk Junction, where are all the buildings required for these works, 
which are thoroughly equipped with tlie best and most improved machinery adapted to the purposes 
of car building upon a most extensive scale. The Detroit Car Wheel Company began operations in a 
foundry on Atwater Street, near the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad Depot, in 1865, and as it supplied the- 
Car Works with wheels and castings, it was important that the two works should be located near 
together, and this was done, when the Car Company located at the Grand Trunk Junction, the Car 
Wheel Works occupying several acres at the northern end of the grounds of the Michigan Car Company. 
The two Works now completely occupy the thirty acres of land. 

The first building that claims our attention is a large fire-proof pattern shop, where are stored 
patterns of every car wheel that is or has been made, from the smallest IG-inch wheel for a tramway 
car, to the largest 42-inch wheel for passenger coaches. 

Next we come to the two large foundries, one foi- the moulding of car wheels, which is 200 by 250 
feet in dimensions; the other for miscellaneous castings, 150 by ~€0 feet, each of which contains two 
large cupolas for the melting of iron, and where over one hundred and fifty tons of iron are melted 
for the two f oundiies every day. For car wheels they use Salisljury , Lanesboro, Lake Superior, Southern 
ern and Ea.stern Irons, which have been found to make the best quality of wheels, and every wheel made 
is guaranteed. The rim of every wheel is chilled the thickness of an inch or more while undergoing 
the process of casting, the chilling giving to the iron the hardness of steel. Upon being removed fronv 
the moulds the wheels are placed in large annealing pits', where they are allowed to cool gradually, 
this process requiring three days. This foundry turns out 300 car wheels per day, about two-thirds of 
which are used by the Michigan Car Company, the remainder being sold to car works and railroad com- 
panies throughout the United States and Canada. The Car Wheel Company keep about 5,000 new 
wheels of all sizes in stock to supply orders which they may receive. In the second foundry, devoted 
to miscellaneous work, about seventy tons of- iron are melted daily, and some four or five thousand- 
castings are made, such as are used for cars, locomotives, and other railroad work. 

The blacksmith shop of the Michigan Car Company is a building 50 by 170 feet, in which there are 
twenty fires, two scrap furnaces, and two steam hammers for the forging of scrap and waste iron, bolt, 
heading machines and various other labor-saving machi?iery. and here all the blacksmith work for the 
cars is gotten out. The iron machine shop adjoins the blacksmith shop,' is GO by IOC feet in dimensions,, 
and is equipped with lathes, wheel boriug machines, planing machines for axle boxes, nut cappers, 
bolt cutters, bolt pointers, six-spindle drills for boring truck bars, liydraulic presses, etc. After each 
piece of iron has passed through the hands of the different workmen, it is ready to find its place in the 
construction of a car, and from here it is taken to the setting-up shop. 

The lumber used in the construction of cars is all of the highest grades, and is first kiln-dried, and for 
this purpose the company use four large dry -kilns, which have a capacity of drying upwards of 50,000- 
feet per daj'. The building devoted to getting out the woodwork of the cars is 90 by 1.50 feet in size,, 
with a wing 40 by 70 feet. 

The setting-up shop is a building 120 feet wide and 160 feet long, with some six or seven railroad 
tracks running through it parallel with each other, upon which the cars are erected. After leaving the- 
setting-up shop the cars go into the paint shop, where they receive three coats of paint, aftd thence are 
moved into the yard or upon a side track, where they are properly lettered, and are then ready for 
transportation. The company has of late had large contracts for building refrigerator cars, and hav& 
built an average of from three to four of these per day, making in all from 19 to 20 cars per day, 
which the company are now building. In the year 1882, 7,000 cars were built. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES. 25 

water of the Detroit river, and the latest improved machinery, the Cily Laundry, 42 
Michigan avenue, are enabled to handle and deliver promptly immense quantities of 
linen, and done up in the best possible condition. Farrand, Williams &. Co., 
corner of Larned and Bates streets, are importers and jobbers in drugs, manufacturing 
chemists, and dealers in druggists' sundries, paints and oils. If you have not secured 
hotel accommodations, better do so early. You will find the Iflieliis^aii Excliangc, 
corner of Jefferson avenue and Shelby street, or the Brunswick, corner of Griswold 
and State streets, first-class in all respects, very conveniently located, courteous and 
obliging clerks, and everything that goes to make up a good house. iL. Black & 
Co., 77 Woodward ave., have a large assortment of opera and field glasses, stereoscopic 
views, and make a specialty of jewelry made from Michigan agates. Roclnn & 
Davison, Jefferson ave., wholesale dealers in carriage goods, wheels, all kinds of 
■woodwork, iron, steel, leather, etc., pertainingto carriage outfitting. Vail & Crane, 
48 to 56 Woodbridge st. east, cracker and biscuit manufacturers, have the lai-gest estab- 
lishment in the state; an idea of their trade can be made when they use on an average 

80 barrels of flour per day. Walker, Hopkins & Co., Chamber of Commerce 
Building, grain and commission merchants, are about the heaviest dealers in the 
market. Bulil Sons & Co., 103 to 'ill Woodbridge st. west, jobbers and manu- 
facturers of hardware, iron and nails. Jas. Jcnks, 48 to 54 Randolph st., is a large 
dealer ia all kinds of wood and iron working machinery, portable and stationery 
engines, steam pumps, &c., and makes a specialty of the patent duplex injector, 
which he manufactures and claims to be the best boiler feeder in use. Detroit 
metal and Heating Works, 52 Woodward ave., manufacture steam heating 
apparatus; also agents for Lawson's hot air furnaces, and are general dealers in steam 
fitters' supplies, workers in galvanized iron, copper and zinc. Detroit Safe Co., 67 to 

81 Fort St. east, have a reputation of making the finest safes in the country. Their steel 
jamb safe is certainly the best fire-proof safe in the market; special features recommend it. 
A specialty is made of bank safes and vaults with the latest and most approved burglar- 
proof appointments; also vault doors, iron shutters and jail work. Griffin Car 
W^lieel Co., Foundry st. and M. C. R. R. The works cover U acres of ground, and 
are equipped with the best of machinery. Car wheels and castings are a specialty; the 
daily output being 300 of the former and 30 tons of the latter, or over 100 tons manufac- 
tured material daily. Detroit Steel W^orks and Detroit Car Spring Co., 
Michigan ave. and D. & B. C. R. R., manufacture all descriptions of elliptic spiral 
springs; use none but the best cast steel; workmen are skilled, and of long experience; 
furnaces are so constructed that the flame cannot come in contact with the steel, thus 
protecting it from any sulphurous and deleterious matter coming from the fuel, and 
improving the steel by their method of heating; machinery is new, and especially 
designed for them ; location is central, enabling them to deliver promptly ; each spring is 
thoroughly tested before leaving the works, and guaranteed. Bull I Iron Works, 
cor. Third and Larned sts., successors to Detroit Locomotive Works, have a very 
large establishment, and make repairs a specialty: they are also boiler makers, and engine 
builders and founders. Detroit Copper and Brass Rolling- Iflills, cor. 
Larned and Fourth sts., manufacture braziers and sheathing copper, sheet brass and yel- 
low metal; German and nickel silver, copper and brass wire; copper bottoms a specialty. 
micliigan Car Co. and Detroit Car Wheel Co., works Grand Trunk and 
M. C. R. R, Junction, manufacturers of freight cars, car wheels, and castings. 
In addition to manufacturing, the company repair or rebuild on an average 10 cars per 



COHSPMPTION 

CAN BE CURED. 




THE VAST NUMBER OF PERSONS TREATED AT THE 



i:)Et:e?.oit 

l(iiit4i|lBStMii 



PROXIES THIS FACT BEYOND A DOUBT. 



M.HILTON WILLIAMS, M.D. 



i\I. c. p. s. o., 



PROPRIETOR. 



Permanently established la the year 1870 for the cure of all the various diseases of the Head, 
Throat, and Chest— Catarrh, Throat Diseases, Bronchitis, Asthma, Consumption, Catarrhal Ophthal- 
mia (Sore Eyes), and Catarrhal Deafness. Also diseases of the Heart. Under the PERSONAL 
direction of Dr. Williams, who will remain in constant attendance at the Institute. The only lustituta 
of the kind in the state of Michigan. 

ALL DISEASES OFTHE RESPIRATORY ORG ANS TREATED BY 

MEDICATED INHALATIONS 

Combined witli proper Constitutional Remeilies for tlie Blooil, etc. 

IN" CATARRH.— Inhalations dissolve the hardened concretions that form in the nasal passages, 
scatter inttiiniii it ion, heal all ulc 'rated surfaces, and cure every case of catarrhal affection, no matter 
how lont; stin liiij; or fr-om what cause if may arise. 

IN THROAT DISS ASE 3.— Inlialations remove granulations, reduce enlarged tonsils, subdue 
inflammation, heal ulcerated soi-e throat, restore the voice when lost or impaired, and cure all acute 
cases, as diphtli ria. quinsJ^ etc., with amazing rapidity. 

IM BRONCHITIS.— Inhalations perform wonders bv restoring the mucous membrane to a 
healthy action; also immediately soothing the cough, and effecting entire cures in the most obstinate 
cases, whetlier in the acute or chronic forms. 

IN" AS PH -MA. -Inhalations im n-^diitely arrest ths paroxysms, and effect entire cures in every 
case by removiuL? all unnatin-al obstruction, and restoring the delicate air cells to their normal condi- 
tion, and the muvs are usually permanent. 

IN CONSU" VIP rON.-Iidialations ease the cough, loosen the phlegm, increase the circulation 
of the blood, assist assimilation, remove consolidation of the lungs, empty and heal cavities with 
woiidei-ful promprness, arrest hemorrhages, stop the wasting away of the lungs, scatter all pain, 
overcome all sh >rtaess of breath, and in fact cure all the earlier and very many of the later stages of 
consumption after all hope by other m?ans is gone. We would, therefore, urge all those who are 
afflicted and have failed in receiving any permment relief from other systems, to try this, the only 
rational system, and the only means by whicli permanent cures may be effected. 

Over 40,000 Cases Treated during the past 18 Years. 

CONSULTATION FREE AND PRICES WITHIN THE RE.-^CH OF ALL. 

Those who desire to investigate for themselves had better call personally at the office, but if 
impossible to do so, may write for " List of Questions" and "Medical Treatise," both of which will be 
sent free of cliarge. Address, 

9^e.tr'ott T7iroctt CLTtd Lizng Jrhstttizte , 
253 Woodward Avenue, zsetisoxi', i,4:icii- 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES. 27 

day, employing about 300 men in the work of repairing alone. These works are the 
largest and most complete of their kind on the American Continent. They use daily 
from 70,000 to 100,000 feet of lumber, thus affording a home market for a portion of the 
vast lumber products of our own state. If may be stated here that much of thfe bar 
iron and all the car axles used are manufactured at the Baugh Steam Forge Works in 
this city, while the Lake Superior iron ore used in the car wheels is smelted by the 
Detroit Iron Furnace Company, both of these enterprises being controlled by Messrs. 
Newberry & McMillan, the principal owners of the car works, and as the car works 
require the greater portion of the products of these establishments, they are the means 
of affording employment to about 3,000 men. To furnish power to drive the large 
amount of machinery connected with the works requires si.x large boilers and two 
engines. Combination Gas ITIacliinc Co., cor. Leib and Wigfttsts., manufacture 
gas machines of the best quality for lighting country residences, hotels, stores, &c., and 
judging from reports of working of over 4,000 machines in operation, they are a suc- 
cess. E. T. Barnuni Wire and Iron Woriis, 27, 29, 31 Woodward ave., 
has a very large establishment for the manufacture of wire and iron into many useful 
and ornamental articles, jail work, weather vanes, fences and railings being special 
lines. Detroit Stove Worlis: Tliese works were founded in 1864, and are located 
in Hamtramck, some two miles from the business centre of the city, and on the Detroit 
Riverfront. When in full operation 1,200 skilled artisans are eiuployed. An area of about 
eight acres is covered by the ground plan of the works. Over 800 difEerent varieties, 
sizes and patterns of stoves are manufactured, the annual products at the present time 
amounting to nearly 75,000 stoves, fluished and ready for the market. The expense 
attached to this work is about $40,000 per month, or $480,000 per annum. The 
principal feature is the famous "Crown Jewel Base Burner," combining all the 
improvements suggested by the foremost artisans of the day. E. F. l¥ebster & 
Co., 71 and 73 Shelby st., manufacture steam heating apparatus, hotel and steamboat 
ranges; general dealers in iron pipe, fittings, plumbers and gas fitters' supplies. Amer- 
ican Eag^ic Tobacco Co., 49 to 53 West Woodbridge st,, successors to the old 
and well known house of K. C. Barker & Co., have lately moved into a building built 
especially for their immense trade, showing a frontage of 106 feet on Woodbridge and 
also on At water St., and a depth of 200 feet, and is the largest manufactory of fine cut 
and smoking tobacco in th,. West. The officers are M. S. Smith, president; Jas. Clark, 
vice-president; Chas. B. Hull, manager and treasurer; A. Spaun, secretary. 

In sailing over the lakes and rivers of this beautiful country Powell & Dong- 
las, of Waukegan, 111., will make your trip pleasant by providing the best of boats of 
all descriptions. It would be prudent, however, to always have your life insured 
against accidents of all descriptions, which the Travelers' Insurance Co., the 
oldest and most reliable institution in the country, places within the reach of all at very 
low rates. 

Keep your Rockford Watch always wound up and you will always have 
correct time— very important for travelers. In closing we cannot forget the Calvert 
Lithograph Co., cor. Larned and Shelby sts., and the very handsome and artistic 
work they can do, the cover of this book being a fair sample of their work. The 
Moss Engraving Co., 535 Pearl st.. New York, for their careful and good work, 
specially noting the Bay View Camp Grounds, Petoskey and Traverse City, and last 
but by no means the least, John F. Eby & Co., printers, 65 Congress st. west, the 
printers of this book, whose work will compare favorably with any in the country. 



JAMES L. EDSON. GEO. F. MOORE. RANSOM GILLIS. CHAS. BUNCHER. 

STEPHEN BALDWIN, Special. 



EDSON, MOORE & CO, 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



194, 196, 198, 200 and 202 JEFFERSON AVE., 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN 






-MANUFACTURERS OF- 



MEM'S. YOUTHS' AMD BOYS' 



138 and 140 Jefferson Ave., and 34 and 36 Woodbridge St. West, 



ST. CLAIR. 

For a health and pleasure resort. St. Clair is, beyond doubt, especially favorable. 
The ground is high, for Michigan, rising westward from St. Clair river and northward 
from Pine river, giving a natural drainage in two directions. The climate is pleasant 
and salubrious, affording a large average of bright days. The nearness to the Great 
Lakes lengthens the fall and puts off the winter. Fogs are rare; winters mild; while 
those onslaughts of nature — droughts floods, tornadoes — which yearly cause such 
terror and destruction in many localities, are strangers here. 

HOTEL AND BATHS. 

The Oakland, as a hotel, is an admirable realization of its design, which was — 
to provide abundant jirstclaas accommodation for those seeking the benefits of the Spring, 
and for summer visitors and pleasure seekers. 

Its architecture is of the general Swiss style. Its broad verandahs are a character- 
istic feature, their total length (including bath house) being over §00 feet. 

The BathHouse is so arranged and so connected with the hotel that guests 
passing to and from their baths are not exposed to change of temperature. 

"'I'he Bath-Rooms at The Oakland are, without question, the Finest Public 
Batli-Rooius ill the United States." Of these there are thirty. The gentle- 
men's have convenient icardrobes, while each ladies' bath-room has a private dressing 
room — a convenience every lady will appreciate and which, it is believed, /crws a favor- 
able contrast with every other bathing establishment in the country. The ladies' and gentle- 
men's departments are entirely separate, each having a reception room and a parlor. 
The bath-tubs are porcelain lined. Beside other conveniences, the bath-rooms are 
supplied with large, handsome mirrors and electric call bells. There are also two 
sicimrning or plunge batlis, for ladies and gentlemen respectively. 

"Proper Amusement a Promoter of Health" is a doctrine in which the Oakland 
Management are firm believers. Beside the customary In-Door Games and Amuse- 
ments— including social and musical entertainments, the Swimming Baths, the Bowl- 
ing Alley (in a separate building) and the Billiard Parlor — the Oakland Grounds are 
peculiarly adapted to all Out-Door Games. Of other Out-Door Kecheations we 
have, first, that time-honored, healthful recreation. Walking — for which this region is 
peculiarly adapted. Next, Riding and Driving. The roads are generally good, free 
from stones and sand. The drive along the river is exceptionally tine. Of Boating, in 
its varieties, there is no end, the Oakland Boat House being within a stone's throw. 
The steamer trip to Detroit is most charming. One of the finest and swiftest private 
steam yachts in the country — owned and commanded by Murk Hopkins, Esq., is out 
frequently, seldom faihng to have on board Oakland guests. Good Hunting and 
Fishing are within easy reach. The duck hunting on " the St. Clair Flats" is famous. 
Fish of five to nine pounds are frequently caught near The Oakland. There are the 
usual opportunities for Eive>' Bathing. For Rambles and Pic-Nics few localities offer 
equal attractions. 

MT. CLEMENS. 



The county seat of Macomb county, Michigan, is located on the Clinton river, and 
is a beautiful and enterprising town of 4,000 inhabitants. Several fine buildings, 
notably the Court House, erected at a cost of $25,000, new hotels and stores, add greatly 
to the beauty of the city. Being only 18 miles from Detroit, it is soon reached by the 
Grand Trunk Railway, who give reduced rates to visitors and patients, and run five 
trains daily each way. or the steamer from Detroit in the morning, after a pleasant ride 
of four hours through the Detroit river, Lake St. Clair and Clinton river, lands you 
alongside the Bath House and Springs of the Mt. Clemens Mineral Spring Co. The 
discovery of the famous Mineral Waters, with their truly wonderful curative properties, 
have added greatly to the growth and importance of the town and made it known far 
and near. Thousands of invalids resort yearly to receive benefit from these celebrated 
springs. The Spring Company are rebuilding the Bath Houses and Reception Rooms, 
and when completed will have very fine and convenient accommodations, with a 
capacity of over 500 baths a day. The Avery House is connected with the Bath House 
by a covered hallway, a very desirable convenience for invalids, and under the new 
management the Avery is giving good satisfaction, which will tend to make Mt. 
Clemens a very popular resort. 



iiffi. iii 



T 



JOBBERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 




IRON AND NAILS. 



Nos, 103 to Hi Woodbridge St. West, 
DETROIT, MICHIGAN. 

Detroit Copper and Brass Rolling Mills, 

BRAZIERS' AND SHEATHING COPPER, 

Sheet Bi'ass ^ Yellow Metal 

kriiiiii aiid ltd Silver, Cifpcr iiid Brass \\n, Rivets and Burs. 



COPPER BOTTOMS. 



Cor. 4th and Larned Sts., DETROIT, MICH. 



ST. LOUIS. 

Since the discovery of the Magnetic Springs in 1869, the village of St. Louis has 
been a popular res-oit lor pleasure seekers, and tourists, until to day, the St. Louis Mag- 
netic Springs has a wnrld wide reputation. The Magnetic Springs, bath house and park 
have passed into the hands of two regular physicians and they have erected upon the 
latter, at a cost of over fifteen thousand dollars, a large, commodious and well ventila- 
ted brick building to be used as a sanitarium, and run in connection with the springs 
for the accommodation of invalids and all others desirous of visiting St. Louis. 

Many new and costly brick buildings were erected last season; among the more 
prominent, is the Magnetic Springs Hotel, a large three-story brick; Holcomb's Opera 
House, and Harrington's Hotel. The latter is a three-story brick, fitted up with all the 
modern improvements, and filling the long required want of a first class hotel. 

The Wcssel House and Commercial are the old hotels of the place, with gentlemanly 
landlords and clerks, always looking after the interests and comforts of their guests. 
There are also numerous boaiding houses; ample accommodations are therefore pro- 
vided for all who may visit St. Louis, the great Saratoga of the West, either for 
treatment or pleasure. The Holcomb Opera House is across the .street from the sanita- 
rium, and is the largest and finest opera house in the state outside of Detroit. St. 
Louis is a thriving village of 2,500 inhabitants, 120 miles northwest of Detroit, in 
Gratiot county, Michigan, is the business centre of a radius of twenty miles of magnifi- 
cent farming country now being rapidly settled up. Two railroads terminate here, the 
Saginaw Valley & St. Louis, and the Chicago, Saginaw & Canada, connection via 
Edmore of the Detroit, Lansing & Northern R. R. The village is well protected from 
tire by the Holly system of water works, two miles of pipe and sixty hydrants, and the 
sale of water for domestic purposes make the department self-sustaining. 5,325 feet of 
well built brick and stone tile sewers, drain the village and carry off unhealthy material. 
The public schools rival any in the state for thorough English instruction, employing 
ten teachers, with an actual attendance of 473 pupils. There are seven church build- 
ings, a public library with over 1,100 volumes. 

The LANSING WAGON 







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The attention of Dealers and Farmers generally is invited to TO THE LANSING WAGON for 
the following among many reasons. 

First— It is the Lightest Ruiiiiing Wagon made. This fact goes without saying among those who 
have used them. 

Second— Nothing but the very best of seasoned timber is used in their construction. Some of theni 
which have lieen in use in South Africa, where a rain storm is almost unknown, for nearly two years, 
are leported as giving the Very IJest of Siif lisfiirtioii. 

Third— The Wheels are all Boiled in l.iusoed (Ml before the tire is set, thus adding very materially 
to the life and strength of the timber, and obviating the tendency to shrink or check in dry seasons 
or climates. 

Fourth— They are thoroughly and substantially ironed. 

Fifth— They are the Best Painted and Finished wagons in the market. Every one warranted. 

Address, 

Lansing Wagon Works, Lansing, IVCich.. 

HIEAM SIBLEY & CO., Rochester. N.Y. MAHLER & THOMPSON, St. Paul, Minn. 



oivC-^n-ft. iiv£i=Xj:e:^.c:e:3^t co., oi=cl&icls., iTeT=. 



E. T. BARNUM, 




DETROIT, MICH. 



JAIL WORK 



A SPECIALTY. 





WroDElit Iron Fences, 
Roof CrestlDi 

Biillflers' Sopplies, 
Wiflilof Giiarils, 
Ml Raillif, 

WIRE CLOTH, 

For Fanning Mills, and 
Threshing Machines. 



Wire and Iron Works, 

29 and 31 Woodward Aven 
12, 14, 16 and 18 Alwater St., 




1^" Send for a Catalogue, stating your I ~, »„ j •,, i./ j j » 

, .' , I 27, 29 and 31 Woodward Avenue, 

wants, and we will make you I ,o,/,,c jioa^ x 

I 12, 14, 16 and 18 Alwater 

estimates. i 

Correspondence solicited. | DETROIT, MICH. 

ROEHM & DAVISON 



..i: WHOLES ALKIk.- 



iiRiiiiE leei! 



'I 



WHEELS, WOOD-WORK, IRON, STEEL, 



Varnishies, Leathier, Cloth, etc. 



DETROIT, 



MICHIGAN. 





^|> . . -S liSnuB y> 



SSffif^Rnnnn-D 



MAP OF THE CITY OF DETROIT. 



A. B. DICKINSON, 

Of Smith's Hotel, Hillsdale, Mich. 







Street Oars leave 

Central Depot for 

the Hotel every 6 

minutes. 



Dickinson & Carr 



Proprietors. 




FRANK H. CARR, 

Late Cashier Boody House, Toledo, Ohio- 



SWICK 









Strictly First Glass 
in all 

APPOINTMENTS. 



Corner State and 
Griswold Sts. 



$2.50 PER DAY. 



The Combination Gas Macliine Co. 

DETROIT, MICH., and WINDSOR, ONT. 

MANUFACTURE 




3»^..^^^:Ei[nrBir!^ 



^S) 



For ligrhtiner Country and Suburban^Resi- 
dences. Churches, Opera Houses. Seminaries, 
Stores, Asylums, Hotels, Mills, Factories or 
any place wanting artificial light. 



This is the Oldest and Most Reli- 
able Gas Machine in the 
Market. 



OVER 4000 MACHINES IN SUCCESSFUL 
OPERATION. 

For Particulars, Prices, etc., address, 

The Combination Gas Machine Co., 

DETROIT, MICH. 

^ JAMES H. MASON, 

Secy & Treas. and Gen'l Manager. 



CONSERVATORYOF MUSIC 

IITSTI?.TJCTOI^S: 

MISS MARY ANDRUS, MISS KATE JACOBS, MISS NELLY COLBY, 

MR. F. H. PEASE, MR. F. ABEL, Jr. MR. C. E. PLATT, MR. L. F. SCHULTZ. MR. J. H. HAHN. 



The branches taught are Piano, Organ, Violin, Viola, Cello, Vocal Culture, 
Harmony and Musical Composition. 

T. 13:. I3:-<^I3:3Sr, XDlrector, 32 I^ort St. 'Vv^est. 

MILLARD, PHOTOGRAPHER 

224 and 226 Woodward Ave., DETEOIT. 

PHOTOGRAPHS, in Life Size Busts, Grand Panels,. Large Groups, Boudoir 

Cabinets and Cards. 

PORTRAITS, Life Size (or smaller), in Crayon, India Ink, Water Colors, 

Pastelle or Oil. 



Parties Visiting the city are cordially invited to call at my Studio and examine specimens 
before placing their orders. Finest exhibit in the city. 

NIILLARD. 

The Representative Music House of Michigan. 

O- T- TX7-I^IT2sr:E]"2'. 
BAND AND ORCHKSTRAL INSTRUIvIENTS 

CLASSIC AND MODERN MUSIC, EVERYTHING IN THE MUSICAL LINE. 

^O ^ort street "TT^T'est, IDetroit, Is/Llali. 
TURKISH, RUSSIAN, ROMAN ^ELECTRIC 

ELEGANTLY ADMINISTERED 

AT 

274 Woodward Avenue, - Detroit, Michigan. 
OEO. I. BKTTS, Electrologlst. 
IVIRS. K. C. BETTS, NI. D. 




mechanics' block, 

Griswold St., opp. City Hall, 
detroit, mich. 



Is a live, practical Business School. 
Here business is taught by Business Men. 
Here is the place to acquire a thorough and prac- 
tical Business Education. 
To become a good practical Accountant. 
To become a good and rapid Business Penman. 
To become rapid and accurate in Arithmetic. 
To become a good Correspondent. 
To become familiar with the Laws of Trade.- 
To become a correct and ready Speller. 
To become a Short Hand Reporter. 
To become an expert Type AN'riter. 
To become quaUfied for any Business. 

For particulars call at College rooms, or address 

W. F. JEWELL, Principal. 



AupstRasch 



&CO. 



Mlors. 



79 WOODWARD AVE, 



August Rasch, 
Joseph J. Rummlkr, 
Henry Kiesling. 



Detroit, 



Dress Suits a Specialty. 




Granite Monument 

WORKS. 

3AlTERSOt»^j|0NUMENf 







266 WOODWARD AVE. 




]vlap of the Detroit, Lansing & Nortliern Railroad, and Connections. 



3^ m^j m^ m^) naE ^ m^) ^ 

THAT THE SHORTEST AND QUICKEST ROUTE 

(BY SEVERAL HOURS) 

From TOLEDO, OHIO and All Southern Points, 

TO THE 




ITS . 

GRAND RAPIDS & INDIANA 

AND 

DETROIT, MACKINAC & MARQUETTE RAILROARS, 



ON THE 



IS T7"i^ii^ ti3:e: 



TBli,AiAr1]or&MMI}'f 



WHICH HAS 



(EXCEPT SUNDAY) 



BETWEEN TOLEDO -™ SOUTH LYON, 

Where Close and Sure Connections are made with 



TO ABfD FROM THE WEST. 



Sleeping Car Berths — South Lyon to Mackinaw City or any intermediate point- 
may be secured by addressing the General Passenger Agent at Toledo. 

H. W. ASHLEY, W. H. BENNETT, 

Superintendent. General Passenger Agent. 



KRONl DKTROIT 

TO THE 

Summer Resorts of Northern Michigan— Traverse City, Northport, 

Old Mission, Elk Rapids, Charlevoix, Petoskey, Bay View, 

Harbor Springs, Mackinac and Marquette. 




^HE DETROIT, LANSING & NORTHERN RAILROAD is the most direct 
and in every way the best route from Detroit, the most beautiful and healthful 
city of the Northwest, to the far-famed and justly celebrated Summer Resorts of 
Northern Michigan. The road-bed is good and always in good repair ; the 
coaches are palaces on wheels ; the time is quick ; all the train men are courteous and 
gentlemanly, and all the appointments of the road are 
first-class in every particular. You may leave Detroit 
at 5.45 in the morning and thus enjoy a daylight ride 
through the very heart of Michigan ; or you may take 
the train in the evening, secure accommodations in one 
of the palatial sleeping coaches run on this line, go to 
bed, go to sleep, sleep soundly; dream of cool breezes, 
a ravenous appetite, renewed physical health, an exces- 
sive flow of animal spirits, and wake up in the morning 
at your journey's end in the full enjoyment of the cool 
breezes and ravenous appetite and ready to possess 
yourself speedily of the new life and vigor which this Northern climate always has in 
store for the jaded, careworn and overworked inhabitants of more Southern latitudes. 

The Detroit, Lansing & Northern leaves the city from the Union Depot, foot of 
Third street, where close connections are made with trains over the Canada and Toledo 
Divisions of the Michigan Central, Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk, and 
the Detroit and Cleveland Steamers. The new Union Depot building, now in process 
of construction, will cost not less than $200,000, and when completed be one of the 
iinest buildings of the kind on the continent. At Grand Trunk Junction, three miles 
out of the city, connections are made with the Grand Trunk from all points in Canada 
and the East, with the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern from Toledo, Cleveland, and 
all points South, and with the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific from Adrian and all 
points South and West. 

At Plymouth close connections are made with the F. & P. M. trains from Monroe 
and Toledo, and from Flint, Saginaw and Bay City. 

At South Lyon connections are made with the trains on the Toledo, Ann Arbor, 
■& Grand Trunk R'y, the short cut from Toledo. The trains on this road run from 
Pennsylvania Co. 's Depot, foot of Mulberry street, Toledo, and connect in same depot 
with Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne cfe Chicago R. R. for all points East and South, also with 
the Columbus, Hocking Valley & Toledo R'y trains for Columbus and other points in 
Central and Southern Ohio. 

Now fairly under way, we pass rapidly through one of the finest agricultural 
sections of the State. Island Lake, 41 miles west from Detroit, is a beautiful sheet of 
water, dotted here and there with picturesque islands. Last season this locality was 
selected for the annual encampment of Michigan State troops. 

Brighton, two miles farther on, is a quiet little inland town of 1000 inhabitants. 
Howell, 10 miles farther on, is the county seat of Livingston county; population 3,300. 
It is well supplied with churches and schools, has several good hotels, and is more than 
ordinarily enterprising in every way. Fowlerville and Williamston are thriving little 
towns between Howell and Lansing. 



A. O. BEMENT. 



G. W. BEMENT. 



C. E. BEMENT. 



C. A. GOWER. 



fo 



s- 




iliriktiltiiiml 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

9f * 



J 



Itlp 



^ — -([[ 



ieniiettt; 



BOB SLEDS AMD STO¥ES. 

LANSINQ, N/LICHIGAN. 




THE LANSING PATENT WHEEL SPRING HAREOW. 

SPECIALTIES: 



STrtctZZ CulttvcLtoi^s of Every Desci^tjjtiorh, 
W7zeel Sprtng Hcn^i^os/vs, 

Spring TootJx ctrhd Otl'ieT Hctrrovirs, 
TV7zeel CzzZtiT^citoT^s^ 

Cast CLTid, Steel Scrapers, Kettles, 
HeattTLg ccird Cook Stoves, 

JBoh Sleds for Road arzd Logging. 



Catalogue and Special Circulars Sent on Application. 

JSS 1. lEMllT & SQIS, 

LANSING, MICHIGAN. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 41 

LANSING. 

Lansing, the capital of the State, is beautifully located on Grand River. As the 
train crosses Capitol Avenue, just before reaching the depot, passengers may get a very 
excellent view of the capitol building. This building vv-as begun in 1872 and finished 
in 1878, at an expense to the State of $1,500,000. The building is magnificent in all 
its arrangements. From basement to dome it is honestly constructed. "We take great 
pleasure in presenting our readers wilh a good view of this building, on the last cover 
page of this book. A peculiarity in the history of Lansing is the fact lliat when the State 
capital was located here, the site on which the city now stands, as well as the surround- 
ing country, was little more than a howling wilderness. A legislative deadlock on the 
question of selecting a permanent location for the capital was settled by fi.xing upon the 
geographical centre of the lower peninsula, which put the State capital in the midst of a 
dense wilderness. Now, however, this wilderness "blossoms like the rose." The State 
Agricultural College is located about three miles out of Lansing. This institution is 
rapidly developing. The State Reform School for Boys, and the State School for the 
Blind, two of the best managed institutions in the country, are located here. Lansing is 
the trade centre of a large and rich section of the interior of the State, and has several 
prosperous manufactories. Prominent among them is the immense establishment of E. 
Bement & Sons, manufacturers of all kinds of agricultural implements, of which they 
have several specialties, notably their patent spring harrow. The Lansing Wagon 
Works is working up a large trade for their celebrated wagons, which are giving 
splendid satisfaction in every section of the country. They now turn out 3000 annually. 
Hotel accommodations are very good. The Saginaw Division of the Michigan Central 
connects in Union Depot with trains of the Detroit, Lansing & Northern R. R. Passen- 
gers from Jackson, Fort Wayne, etc., change here. The traveler will get good meals at 
the Depot Dining Rooms. All D., L. & N. day trains stop 20 minutes for meals. 

Beyond Lansing is Grand Ledge, somewhat noted as a resort for picnics and 
excursions during the summer season. The scenery here is very fine. A beautiful 
island in the river forms a delightful pleasure resort, on a small scale, for surrounding 
cities and towns. 

Portland is situated in the midst of a rich farming country, and is an enterprising, 
go-a-head town. 

IONIA. 

Ionia is one of the best towns in the State, though by no means the largest. It has 
a population of about 4,200. There are several fine churches here, one of the best 
graded schools in the State, a commercial college, several good hotels, and all things 
else which are needed to make a first class town. The Ionia House of Correction, an 
institution for the benefit of the younger class of criminals, is located about one mile 
west of the city. Tlie new shops of the D., L. & N., now being built at a cost of 
about $114,000, will add greatly to the welfare of the city, and will give increased facili- 
ties for keeping the motive power and rolling stock of the road in first-class condition. 

The Stanton Branch of the Detroit, Lansing & Northern runs from Ionia to Stanton, 
Edmore and Big Rapids, through the domain of extensive lumber forests and big saw- 
mills. The main line runs to Greenville and Howard City. Greenville, a town of 3,200 
inhabitants, is the county seat of Montcalm county. Howard City, 161 miles from 
Detroit and 34 miles north from Grand Rapids, is the present western terminus of the 
Detroit, Lansing & Northern road. At this point close connections are made with 
the Grand Rapids & Indiana R. R., through coaches being simply transferred from 
one road to the other. 

The first place of note north from Howard City is Big Rapids, located on Muskegon 
river. During the earlier years of its history this was known as one of the most wide- 
awake and enterprising of Northern Michigan towns. In later j'ears it has become more 
sedate, however, dependingmore on the agricultural and less on the lumbering resources 
of the country for its support. The Northern hotel, located here, is first-class in every 
particular. Big Rapids is also the present terminus of the Stanton Branch of the 
D., L. & N. 

Reed City is 13 miles north from Big Rapids. The Flint & Pere Marquette road 
crosses the Grand Rapids and Indiana R. R. at this point. 

Cadillac, the next town of importance, is beautifully located on the shores of one of 
the finest inland lakes of the State. The business portion of the town is near the lake 
shore, but the residences are mainly farther back on the higher grounds. There are 
several large saw-mills located here There are good hotels, fine churches, and a good 
school. The people are enterprising, the surrounding country is excellent, and the 
prospects for the future development of the town are good. Cadillac claims to be one 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 43 

of the Summer Resorts of Northern Michigan, and certainly one might go a good deal 
farther and fare a good deal worse. 

At Walton, a few miles north from Cadillac, we may take the Traverse City branch 
to Traverse City, or continue on the main line to Petoskey. 

TRAVERSE CITY. 
Traverse City is located at the head of the west arm of Grand Traverse Bay, and is 
the largest town on the Bay, having a population of about 2,000 souls. It is one of the 
oldest towns in this section of the State, having almost entirely lost the backwoods 
appearance that is characteristic of new towns generally. The location of Traverse 
City is one of rare beauty and healthfulness. To the North, as far as the eye can reach, 
is^Grand Traverse Bay. The shores of this Bay are heavily fringed with luxuriant 
evergreens which are reflected in the clear, bright waters with a witchery that is charm- 
ing to behold. The water of the Bay is remarkably pure and cold. A piece of crockery 
or any white object can be distinctly seen at a depth of 60 or more feet. The highlands 
which skirt the Bay and the islands resting upon its bosom are covered with greenest of 
forests, interspersed with frequent well-tilled fields and flourishing vineyards. There 
are no barren, inhospitable wastes in all the territory round this Bay, as the dwellers in 
more southerly climes have sometimes supposed, but the whole country is wonderfully 
prolific in fruits and vegetables of the finest quality. ■ Apples, peaches, pears, grapes, 
and other fruits are very abundant. The products of the Grand Traverse gardens 
look the second prize at the convention of the New York Pomological Society in 1874, 
and the display from this region at the Centennial in 1876 attracted universal attention 
and admiration, and received the first prize in the Michigan division. Various condi- 
tions combine to make this section of the State productive. Excepting in the immediate 
vicinity of the Bay, the soil is excellent. At Traverse City there is no soil, only sand, 
yet only a short distance back there is good soil. The ground never freezes in winter. 
This is owing to the fact that the snow falls early and remains until spring. Potatoes 
may be left in the ground all winter and come out in the spring as fresh and plump as 
though dug in the fall. As the ground does not freeze in winter, less time is required 
for vegetation to start in the spring than in locations farther south. The lake winds 
also exercise a very beneficial influence over this region. The waters of Lake Michigan 
cool the winds of summer, because the waters are cooler than the atmosphere in summer 
time. On the other hand, they warm the winds of winter, because they are warmer 
than the atmosphere in winter time. The winds, therefore, guard this region against 
the extremes of both heat and cold. South and west from Traverse City the country is 
rolling, in some places hilly. Numerous inland lakes of fantastic shapes and varied 
sizes, all well stocked with fish— black and rock bass, pickerel, muskalonge, etc., etc.,— 
are scattered through this region. The Boardman river, which empties into the Bay at 
Traverse City, is one of the finest trout streams in Northern Michigan. The Manistee 
river, which is accessible from Traverse City, is the famous Grayling stream of the 
world. Grand Traverse Bay affords the rare sport of trolling and the still rarer sport 
of deep water fishing for Mackinaw trout. Traverse City is a clean, well kept town. 
Its broad, gravel streets and its comfortable home-like dwellings, its substantial business 
blocks, as well as the surrounding scenery, is pleasing alike to residents and strangers. 
The extensive establishment of Hannah, Lay & Co. is located at this place. This com- 
pany sells over half a million dollars worth of goods per year. This spring they open 
their new establishment of six stores— four stories and basement— which, although 
immense, will be none too large for their business. This building is heated by steam, well 
finished and iurnished with one passenger and two freight elevators. This firm is 
largely interested in lumbering, own several fine propellers and substantially control 
the business of the Grand Traverse region. The new Insane Asylum of Northern 
Michigan is being located U miles southwest of the town, the grounds of which 
contain 360 acres of beautiful undulating land, overlooking Grand Traverse Bay. 
The hotel accommodations of Traverse City are most excellent, especially the P^rk 
Place Hotel, owned by Hannah, Lay & Co., which, under the able management of Col. 
J. D. Billings, has now a reputation of being one of the finest of hotels, with accommo- 
dation for 250 guests, at the reasonable rate of $2.50 and |3.00 per day. This hotel has 
large, airy, well-lighted rooms, well furnished and supplied with all necessary conve- 
niences, very broad corridors furnishing splendid promenades ; and last, but by no 
means the least, the splendid dining-room service, which has gone far to make the hotel 
famous. The hotel proper, and the portion specially reserved for summer business, 
is connected by a covered bridge which makes a very enjoyable promenade. The 
drives around Traverse City are very pleasant, and good rigs can be had at $3 per day 
for single horse and carriage ; $5 for double carriage, with driver. Team and boat, 
including guide, fishing tackle, etc., $6 per day. A trip around Grand Traverse Bay 



THE g EST. 



This well known 




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BUSINESS 

COLLEGE 



Has Departments of 

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Telegraphy and care of Batteries, 

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AND IS IN ALL^ RESPECTS SUPERIOR. 

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Is what the Report of the United States Commissioner of Education says of it. 
For Pamphlet Circulars, giving particulars, call at the College, 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 156 JEFFERSON AVENUE, 



Or address, at Detroit, Mich. 



IRA M:AYHE"W", LL. D., President. 



E. BARRETT WARMAN, 

Oor. Woodward and Grand Eiver Aves., DETEOIT, MICH. 

THE PRACTICAL TEACHER OF 

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READINGS AND LECTURES REASONABLE. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 45 

on one of Haniuili, Lay & Co.'s palatial steamers is one of the things to be remembered 
for a lifetime by the tourist. The grandeur of the scenery, the beauty of the waters 
below, the cool breezes that chase each other back and forth across the Bay, and the 
utter absence of that languor which is so common in more Southern latitudes during 
the heated term, all conspire to make the trip one of the most enjoyable of which the 
ordinary mortal can form a conception. As you proceed up the Bay an everchanging 
panorama of natural beauty and loveliness is spread out before you. Islands, bayous, 
villages, appear and disappear in quick succession. On the left, between the bay on 
which you are riding and Lake Michigan, is Leelenaw county, famous for its numerous 
trout streams, beautiful lakes, grand old forests and fine farms and vineyards. Com- 
paratively a few years ago, the Indians held undisputed possession of this entire 
country. 

NORTHPORT. 

N<irtliport, about 25 miles north from Traverse City, is the principal town on the 
west shore of the Bay. It is located on a charming little bayou, which affords the finest 
pleasure sailing in the world. The town knows nothing of fashion or dissipation. 
Abundance of sweet milk and good butter, whitefish, trout, bass, pickerel, fresh 
berries, fowl, mutton, with other things too numerous to mention, are placed before the 
tourist, and he has nothing to do but to eat and grow fat. A drive of only two miles to 
the westward from Northport brings the tourist to the high bluff on the shore of Lake 
Michignu, from whence he sees the Manitou, Fox and Beaver Islands, and far away 
southward that singular white peak known to sailors as Sleeping Bear Point. The 
Beaver Islands are famous in history as the home of King Strang and his Mormon 
followers: 

An enthusiastic admirer of Leelenaw county indulges in the following : 

" Come liither all 3e ttiat hunger and thirst after a good night's sleep and your desire shall be 
gratified, your nerves f hall have relaxation, and your brains recuperation. Your back bones shall get 
as flexiljle as willow switches and as springy as grasshoppers' legs; your cheeks shall get as plump as 
pomegranates and your skin the color of fresh tauned leather." 

The nariow peninsula which divides the East and West arms of the Grand Traverse 
Bay is one of the finest fruit regions in the world. 

Old Mission is located on this peninsula. This is a very small and unimportant 
town, yet is very beautifully located and is much frequented in summer time by tourists. 

On the East arm of the Bay, some 18 miles distant from Traverse City, is located 
the enterprising little town of Elk Rapids. This town contains several brick store 
buildings, a nimiber of handsome residences, neat and tasty churches, etc., etc. Its 
patron saints, Messrs. Dexter and Noble, own the large furnaces, the mills, stores, etc., 
etc. , situated here. They also own a number of large vessels which are engaged in 
carrying the immense products of their furnaces and mills to outside markets. The 
fishing privileges of this neighborhood are exceedingly fine. Brook trout of large size 
have been taken from the waters of the lake from the dock in the village. Bass Lake, 
distant one mile, is full of bass and pickerel. Yuba Creek, emptying into the bay six 
miles toward Traverse City, is a very fine trout stream. Within a distance of seven 
miles from Elk Rapids down Elk Lake, three streams empty into the lake, all excellent 
trout streams. 

The Grand Traverse Region has always been an interesting locality. For several 
centuries it was the favorite resort of the Indians. The supply of game was always 
good. Fish existed in great abundance. The climate was mild, and the soil, as now, 
very productive. The Jesuits established missions at various points around the bay 
at an early day. These missions were for a time flourishing. Both apple and peach 
trees were planted by the missionaries, and are still found growing wild in many localities. 

CHARLEVOIX. 

Charlevoix is located on the shore of Lake Michigan, a few miles north from the 
entrance to Grand Traverse Bay and about 18 miles south and west from Petoskey. 
The tourist may reach this point from Traverse City by either of two routes. He may 
go by steamer up Grand Traverse Bay or he may return to Walton Junction and pro- 
ceed northward by rail. If the latter of these two routes is selected, he will leave the 
train at Boyne Falls, take the stage 6 miles to Boyne City and from thence proceed by 
small steamer through Pine and Round Lakes, a distance of about 20 miles, to Charle- 
voix. The village of Charlevoix has one of the most charming locations of which the 
imagination can form a conception. It is situated on the high bluffs overlooking Lake 
Michigan, between Round Lake and Lake Michigan, and on both banks of Pine River, 
which forms the connecting link between Lake Michigan and the inland lakes just 
mentioned. Pine river is one of the shortest streams in the world, reaching only from 
Round Lake to Lake Michigan, a distance of not more than half a mile, but is sufficiently 



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DEALERS IN 

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12 & 14 Congress St. East. 

WILLIAM REID. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



47 



broad and deep to permit the passage of the largest lake vessels. The accompanying 
cut will give the reader a correct idea of this romantic locality. The village, Pine 
River, viith its high banks, Round Lake just back of the village and Pine Lake on 
beyond, are all distinctly shown. The citizens of the village have always shown a 
commendable pride in the developement of its industries, the care of their homes and 
the culture of their families. The village is not so small as to cut one off from the 
comforts of life, or so large as to be cursed with that rowdy element that might prove 
annoying to those who 
desire quiet for rest 
and recreation. The 
markets and stores are 
well stocked with the 
necessaries and luxur- 
ies of life. 

Round Lake is a 
small body of water, 
covering an area of not 
more than 30 acres, 
lying about midway 
between Lake Michi- 
gan and Pine Lake. i; 
It is connected with ,! 
the former by Pine ,; 
river and with the lat- li; 
ter by an artificial |i;: 
channnel, wide enough III;: 
and deep enough to lif*; 
admit the passage of 
the largest lake vessels. 
Pine Lake is a beau 
tiful sheet of water, 
stretching east and 
south to the distance 
of some 20 miles. 
About five miles east ; 
it divides into two 
arms, the south arm 
extending as its name 
implies, South to the v , 
distance of some 16 "l§jfM' 
miles. Into the finger 115 
end of the south arm ||fi 
flows the Jordan river, '||\: 
of which we shall learn f 
more further on. The 
scenery about these • 
lakes is grand. In 
1865, long before any 
one ever thought of 
locating a summer re- 
sort in this locality. 
Prof. Winchell, then 
State Geologist, in one 
of his published re- 
ports said : 

" From the foot of Pine 
Lake a scene of surpass- 
ins loveliness presents it- 
self. We land, perhaps, 
upon the wharf at the 

month of Pine river. Be- .^iiA,.i.r.,ui.v. 

fore us is a sandy slope, on the left of vehich we discover the usual features of a new settlement. 
Beyond is the forest. It is a pleasant October morning, however, and we follow the well-beaten road 
through the fresh clearings which stretch out for about a mile inland. "We emerge from a screen of 
forest trees and find ourselves standing upon an elevated bluff overlooking as lovely a sheet of water 
as the sun ever shone upon. You feel almost a transport of delight in emerging so suddenly from the 
depths of the hal^itual forest into a prospect so vast, so gentle in its features, so delicate in its tints, 
and so glowing in the sunshine of a fair October morning. Far away to the southeast for fifteen 
miles, stretches the placid, smiling surface of the water, its white and pebbly shore chasing the 
contour of the hills in all its meandering sinuosities. The verdant ridges rise on every side from the 







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N. B.— Special Attention paid to Packages sent by 
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MANl'FACTURERS OF 



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Office, foot of Shelby St., Detroit, Nlich. 




Send. TlvT^ee-aeTLt Stcbrrvp to 

W, H. BREARLEY, 

MTB0IT, MICH.. 
FOR CIRCULAR OF HIS 

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EXCURSIONS. 

This year the three excursions will leave Detroit June 27th, July 11th and July 25th. 
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This year the three ^cursions will leave Detroit June 27th, July 11th and July 25th. 
1^" A side trip from Quebec to LiveiVool has been arranged. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 49 

shining shore line, and hold the lake in their enchanted embrace, while rounded hill-tops bubble up 
in rapid succession across the retiring landscape, till hill, vale, and sky, green, purple, and blue, dis- 
solve together in the blended hues of the distant horizon." 

CHARLEVOIX SUMMER RESORT. 

Between Round and Pine Lakes and south of the main channel which connects 
them, is located the Charlevoix Summer Resort. The grounds of the resort comprise 
.-about 75 acres, and rise by three natural and well defined terraces from Pine Lake. 
The two lower terraces are sufficiently wide for cottage lots, with a broad walk in 
front, while the upper terrace stretches far away in a level plateau, from which glimpses 
of Lake Michigan are obtained. More than half of the tract is cleared land, other parts 
being thinly wooded, and the portion farthest from the water being covered with heavy 
timber, while in the rear of the whole the dense woods extend to a great distance. A 
handsome hotel has been erected on an eligible site, from which a charming view of the 
bright blue waters reaching away to the southeast is obtained. A goodly number of 
beautiful cottages also stand upon the terraces overlooking the lake. A music hall 30x50 
ieet, a bowling alley 80 feet long, sidewalks, fences, etc., etc., have recently been 
built. The company owning this resort was organized on the 21st day of May, 1878, 
■under the statute laws of Michigan. 

Board of Directors.— President, P. Ranney; Vice-President, D. B. Merrill; Secretary, G. E. 
Bardeen of Kalamazoo; Treasurer, fi. Woodbury; JJirectors— H. AV. Page, S. A. Gibson, H. F. VVeimer, 
I. D. Bixby, O. M. Allen. 

CHICAGO SUMMER RESORT. 

On the upper side of the channel, " hich connects Round and Pine Lakes, is located 
the Chicago Summer Resort. Of the origin of this resort the Chicago Evening 
.Journal, about a year ago, had the following to say: 

" During the past summer a company of Chicago gentlemen, desirous of taking a breathing spell 
"during the hot July and August days, visited Mackinac, Petoskey and Charlevoix. At the latter place 
they stayed several days, charmed by its surroundings, its cool nights, the pleasant, breezy days, the 
pure air, the absence of the dust and heat of the city, all of which combined to make their stay very 
pleasant. One of the gentlemen, liking the place so well, secured a piece of land intending it for a 
summer residence lot. The three other gentlemen, meeting some time after, and comparing notes 
and opinions regarding Charlevoix, agreed to purchase a large tract of land and set it apart for a sum- 
mer resort. This has been done, and a stock company formed, a charter oljtained and enrolled under 
•our State laws as the Chicago Summer Resort Company. Their capital stock has been placed at 
:$10.000, in shares of $100 each, subject to call. The land has been paid for and title secured. It is the 
intention of tlie company to spare no pains or expense to make this place very attractive to summer 
visitors. They have a fine location, high and dry, between two lakes, fronting "both of them." 

These resorts share in all the climatic advantages of Northern Michigan. The cool 
refreshing breezes from the lakes are most invigorating. Little or nothing is known of 
■summer's sultry heat, or of the close muggy air of dog days, so debilitating in most 
places. The nights are cool and so conducive to "balmy sleep, tired nature's sweet 
restorer." But this locality enjoys some advantages of climate peculiar to itself. Most 
summer resorts, being situated on the shores of the lake, with only the laud behind 
them, are as often subject to land as to ^uke breezes, and therefore do not escape sultry 
days. However, this is not the case here, situated between Lake Michigan and Pine 
Lake, with the depression of land throi h which Pine River runs forming a natural 
air channel, these resorts are never without a fresh breeze from one lake or the other. 
The cooler breezes from Lake Michigan blow during the day time, when most needed. 
The.se breezes are always purified as well as cooled by contact with large bodies of water. 
The situation is not unlike that of the famed Newport, lying between the Atlantic and 
Narragansett Bay. There are no low or marshy lands in the region to taint the air with 
miasma and breed annoying mosquitoes. A more fortunate combination of those 
circumstances which tend to make a summer resort desirable can scarcely be imagined. 
Those who have passed one or more summers in this locality recuperating their 
strength in its salubrious climate and thus securing a new lease of life are enthusiastic 
in its praise. 

Excellent advantages for bathing are at hand. Pine Lake, with its crystal waters, 
forming the eastern boundary of the grounds, is in the immediate vicinity of all the 
•cottages. On its shores bathing houses have been erected for the accommodation of 
those who desire to use them. The gradual sloping of the beach into the lake makes it 
safe for children to indulge in this delightful hot weather exercise. Those who prefer 
the more exciting sport of surf bathing can be accommodated by walking or rowing a 
mile to the shore of Lake Michigan. 

Few localities enjoy such excellent facilities for boating. Through the 
summer, Pine Lake is usually as placid as a river, while Round Lake, lying like a 
sparkling gem between the resort and the village, and protected from winds by the 
■encircling hills, is always safe for small row boats. At all hours of the day the trim 
-boats of the resort fleets may be seen gliding swiftly over the silvery bosom of these 
4 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

236 Woodward Ave., 
DETROIT. 



FINE ART GALLERY 



Call and see Pictures on Exhibition. 









[.V. LISEE, 

DEALER IN 

Ladies' Gents'. Misses 





-AND- 



CHILDREN'S 



FINE SHOES 

BEST MAKES AND LATEST STYLES. 



IVotioe to People Living out of the City. — A great many people find it 
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shoes can be sent by mail or express at a very small expense; I send shoes to any part of 
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and F. 

J. V. IvISEK, 14:G Woodward Ave., 
DETROIT, MICH. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



51 



lakes, oflenest propelled by oars in the hands of boys and girls, who thus mingle the 
most healthful exercise with romantic enjoyment. Those who crave the more thrilling 
sport of yachting may take a fifteen-mile sail up Pine Lake, or turning their prow- 
westward, glide out of the harbor into Lake Michigan's broad expanse, and thus dance 
over the waves along the wooded shore, or push out into the lake until the place of 
starting has dropped behind the horizon, thus securing all the effects of a sail in 
mid-ocean. , » 



-V 



^>^ 







ic'*v' 











CuJ:t 



BROOK TROUT. 



The whole Charle- 
voix region is famous 
for its excellent fishing 
grounds. Isaac Walton 
himself would have lev 
eled in his favorite spoi I C- * 
on the lakes and alon<,^ / 
the rivers and streams 
that are found in this ^ 
locality. In their season k\ 
lake trout, black bass, » _ 
pickerel, perch, and lici 
ring abound in the lakes 
while the gamey speck led 
trout, the fisherman s 
chief delight, make the 
cold waters of the Joi 
dan and Boyne Ri\eis 
as wftl as the se\eial 
smaller tributaries of 
Pine Lake, their favorite 
haunts. No rivers in 
the lower peninsula have 
acquired so famous a 
reputation for their 
choice trout as the Jor- 
dan and Boyne. Sports- 
men come hundreds of miles every year to enjoy the rapture of capturing these lively 
beauties, and even though they may fail to come in the season for a great catch, so 
enchanting is the scenery along the rivers, so invigorating is the air of this northern 
climate, and so novel the experience of camp life, while pursuing their piscatorial 
sports, that none return without feeling richly repaid for their trip. Those who spend 
the season at these resorts, have the advantage, however, of sportsmen, who come to try 
the pastimes for a few days only, as they are enabled to choose the best days in which 
to gratify their angling tastes. 

The following graphic description of a trip up the Jordan will prove interesting to 
our readers : ; 

" The party who went up the Jordan, yesterday, having entirely exhausted their stock of adjec- 
tives, offer a ten dollar chronio to any one who will invent a new one which will adequately express 
their admiration. 

" vSo ran the notice posted this morning in the hall of the Resort Hotel. Ever since we came here 
people have been telling us we must see the most celebrated trout stream of these regions, and we have 
replied, with easy indifference, that we would see about it, and finally only decided on the trip in hap- 
hazard fashion. 

"Forgive us, beautiful Jordan ! we came, we saw, and we were conquered. We shall never speak 
of you with indifference again. We rose early, and after a somewhat hurried breakfast, hastened to 
the dock. Up comes the little steamer Nellie Booth, and we step aboard, the captain swings up his 
hat, the people shout, and we are off. Before us lies beautiful Pine Lake, all dimpled and smiling in 
the early sunlight, while we sit on the deck in the fresh morning air, admiring the glories of nature, 
and drawing in new life with every breath. 

" About two miles from Charlevoix the steamer turned suddenly behind a point, and entered that 
part of the lake known as the South Arm. This is about sixteen miles long and from one to two wide, 
so that it somewhat resembles a broad river. Its scenery is varied and rich, but so entirely different 
from the main lake that it seems like a distinct sheet of water. The Jordan comes in at the very head 
of the arm, and we reached it about half -past eight. Our boat, which had been towed behind the 
steamer, was brought round, and, stepping over the side, we were soon safely seated — two ladies and a 
gentleman, besides the guide, who was to take us safely up the river, with its rapid current, its snags 
and eddies. In a few moments we had reached it, and he was pulling with a long, quiet stroke against 
the stream. 

"We had been fortunate in the day, its incidents and our company; we were not less so in our 
guide. Parrish was a 'character.' He came early to that part of the countrj^— though he is now at 
Charlevoix— and told us he had poled on the river for seventeen years, which we could well believe, for 
there was not a tree nor a snag, nor a ferny bank, nor a trout pool, but what seemed to him an old 
familiar friend. What a quaint forest flavor there was to all his stories; of how the Jordan was named 
by a good old aiethodist, Amos Williams, who was one of the earliest se( tiers, and how he built a large bark 
canoe on the banks of the stream, and when he launched it called it the ' Good Ship Zion;' of the early 



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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



53 



settlers and their loneliness ; of how these waters once swarmed with grayling, called by the natives 
'river fish;' of the deer that came down the runways to drink, and with beautiful lifted head and fright- 
ened dark eyes are sometimes seen by excursionists coming suddenly round a curve; of wonderful 
catches of fish, and liead-flrst tumbles of unlucky sportsmen into the icy pools. All this with homely 
simplicity, but brightened by a quick appreciation and a certain sense of the fitness of things. 

"After about a mile of 
rowing, the low wet banks 
are left behind, the scene 
grows wilder, and tan- 
gled, unbroken forests 
extend to the verj- water's 
edge. The rush of the 
river now becomes strong- 
er, and, looking do\\ n 
through its crystal cle.u 
ness, you see the gold< n 
sanded shallows, the bla( k 
logs, the swaying \el\etj 
green moss fit for a Naiad ^ 
bower, and the deep pooK 
in which a silver flash 
now and again shows 
where the trout are lying 
Dipping over the side. ^\e 
found the water so icy-cold 
that we could bear contact 
but a moment; and now 
we wished to drink of it, 
but found our guide had 
forgotten his cup. Just 
then we saw, under over- 
hanging branches, an anch- 
ored boat, and a tent gleam 
ing white through the 
trees. Pushing on shore to 
borrow a cup, we entered 
into conversation w ith the 
campers, who proved to be 
Southerners, flying from 
the summer heats and the 
yellow fever. The men 
were absent fishing, and a 
sun-burned little maiden, 
blowing soap bubbles, a 

woman cooking the dinner, 

and a grave dog, playing '^"^ 
guardian, were the "only 
occupants. 

■■ How we drank of the delicious water; how many times that day one of the party played Hebe, 
and filled up the nectar of the gods for my lady Venus and my lord Jupiter! 

"After two miles of rowing, the current becomes so swift that the oars can no longer be used, and 
now begins the most delightful part of the trip. Pai rish stands erect in the stern of the boat, spare 
and gray-haired, but sinewy and supple withal; in his hands he holds a long pole, tipped with iron, 
which he strikes now on the bottom, now against a log, still preserving his steady, unswayed attitude. 
Without a splash, without a jar, the boat moves up the rapids as if by magic. No sound breaks the 
deep stillness, save Nature's own— the clear call of an unseen bird, the cool splash and lipple of the 
stream, a kingfisher flapping heavily from bank to bank, little breaths of wind murmuring through 
the tops of the tall hemlocks and white cedars as if they were whispering about these strange intru- 
ders on their solitudes. 

" Half reclining on the bottom of the boat, crushing out the fragrance from the hemlock boughs 
strewn beneath you, you see, as you round each curve, fresher, wilder beauties opening on either hand. 
Sometimes the mighty hemlocks almost meet above your head, sometimes your path seems utterly 
choked up with water-logged timber and uprooted trees, till you glide suddenly through some narrow 
channel; often you bend low to pass under a squirrel biidge— a tall cedar fallen from bank to bank. 

"The prevailing tints of these woods is dark, but it serves as a strong background for the brighter 
colors. Vivid green moss is everywhere, and out of it grows all manner of plumy grasses and wander- 
ing vines. The golden rod is just beginning to enrich the wilderness with its prodigal wealth; and here 
and there that torch of the woods— the cardinal flower— burns its red flame to light its shadowy nook. 
Many delicate, and to us. strange varieties of fern dipped their long fronds in the water on the skirts of 
the forest, like fringe upon a petticoat, as the merry Rosalind hath it. 

" We had now nearly reached our destination, for though it is possible to ascend the stream for 
thirteen miles, it is not possible to do so in one day, and we were to content ourselves with a six-mile 
trip. In that short distance the river rises a hundred feet; thirty feet in this last mile. 

" On reaching our landing place, we walked for a quarter of a mile on a beautiful wood path, f>nd 
suddenly came out into a clearing, in the midst of which is the well-known Webster's, a large log 
tavern, where we found a comfortable resting place and a good dinner. After an hour's rest and a 
ramble in the woods, we returned to the boat, and were soon shooting down the current; indeed, so 
rapid was our course, that we made frequent stops, loth to lose the charm of that wild beauty. Yet, in 
truth, we can never lose it. To the kind thought that planned that day's excursion, we owe a whole 
gallery full of pictures that will have the advantage of never being dimmed by time. 

" We reached the steamer just in time to go aboard, and after a quiet ride over the lake, the sun- 
set and our party reached Charlevoix together, both fiery red in the face from a long day upon the 
water. What the sportsman finds in the Jordan I no not know. We found in it wonderful beauty, for 
we sought those woods simply as the outlawed duke and his forest rangers sought the wilds of Aiden 
— ' to fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.' " 




JORDAN RIVER. 



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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



55 



PETOSKEY. 

Petoskey is situated on the south side and near the head of Little Traverse Bay. It 
is built on the bluffs about 50 feet above the water. A more romantic location could 
scarcely be imagined. Chas. Hallock, Esq., thus speaks of it : 

" If we are out in a boat on the bay and look in toward the land, we perceive that Petoskey occu- 
pies a series of picturesque undulations that .spread out on either hand, and rises to the rear in the form 
of an amphitheatre. A lofty hmestone cliff flanks the town on the west. Its top is crowned with 
trees, among which are discovered the tents of many vacation tourists who are 'camping out.' Behind 
them rises an overtopping eminence, dotted with pretentious villas of wealthy i-esidents. From the 
•verge of this cliff the outlook is superb. Across, five miles distant, is the ridge of hills that line the 
■opposite side of the Little Traverse Bay. These sweep round in a symmetrical curve to the head of 
the bay two miles to the right, and then follow the hither shore until they rise and terminate in the 
cliff on which we stand. 

"All along in that direction, as far as sight can reach, we can trace the white line of the pebbly 
shore limned against the green of the hills; and then from the base of our cliff in a sweep of two miles 
or more to the left in the form of a crescent, ending in a wooded point. Tree-covered hills slope gently 
back and upward from the beach, and pretty cottages peep out from among their branches. The 
principal part of the town lies in the bowl of the amphitheatre, from which a jaracticable road leads 
through a ravine to the long pier which projects from the hollow of the crescent into the bay. This 
pier gives additional character and life to the scenery." 

Petoskey has a water front of about li miles, and extends inland about the same 
<3istance. The accompanying bird's eye view will give the reader a very correct idea 
of the lay of the city. 

Petoskey is of comparatively recent 
date. The locomotive engine, that van- 
guard of civilization, tirst pierced tliis 
almost interminable northern wilder- 
ness in 1874. It was not until just 
before midnight of the last day of that 
year that the first through train of cars 
reached the site whereon Petoskey now 
■stands. At that time the surrounding 
■country was a wilderness, but nine 
years have wrought a wonderful trans- 
formation. The village now numbers 
over 2,500 souls, and is rapidly assum- 
ing city airs. It is surrounded by a 
thriving and populous farming commu- 
nity. The transition from brush heaps, 
ustumps and log houses, to graded streets, 
ibroad walks, tine stores and dwellings, 
■schools and churches, palatial hotels, 
and a system of water works which a 
metropolitan city might well be proud 
of, has been magical indeed. 

Petoskey is indebted to an aged 
Indian chieftain, who still resides within 
lier borders, for her name. We quote 
the following from a historical sketch 
Tvritten by a resident of the village: 

. In the year 1V87, niaety-flve years ago, a chief of the Chippewas, Nee-i-too-shing (the Early Dawn), 
■with others of his tribe, went dovvn the lake shore into the south country hunting and trapping, as was 
their custom. On their return, well-ladeu with skins and game, they camped at Little Creek near the 
mouth of the Manistee River, where the city of Manistee now stands. Here was born the ' patron 
■saint' of the pretty village whose story we are about to relate. Nee-i-too-shing put back the deer-skin 
door of his rude lodge and looked up at the morning sky. Bright shafts of sunlight shot up like 
^streaks of flame lighting the eastern woods. Just then the first cry of his new-born child came to his 
ear, and he named him Neyas Pe-to-se-ga, which, translated, is 'The Rising Sun.' It was very fitting 
that the heir of ' Early Dawn" should thus be titled. The home of the Chippewa braves of whom I 
write was the region about Little Traverse Bay. The lodge of Nee-i-too-shing was about seven miles 
rorth and west of the present village of Harbor Springs. 

:i AVhen Pe-to-se-ga was twenty-two years old, he took for his wife the daughter of a near neighbor, 
Keway-ka-ba-wi-kwa. They planted an apple orchard, the remains of which still stretch their gnarled 
Jbranches above the sward near the populous Indian village, L'arbor Croche. (The Crooked Tree.) 
'And from their planting ground was borne 
The treasure of the golden corn.' 
P a Time was when the region about the bay could muster 4,000 warriors. Tread lightly, O, tourist, 
«peak reverently; the very soil beneath your feet is rich with their dust. 
' The Heaven hath augels watching round 
The lowliest Indian's forest mound. 
And they have made it holy ground.' 
."2 The missionaries persuaded the chief that a part of his name— Neyas— was an abbreviation of 
Jgnatius, the name of their great saint Loyola. Thus it became Ignatius Pe-to-se-ga. 




IGNATirS PETOSKEY,, 



THE ARLINGTON 

H. 0. ROSE & CO., - Proprietors. 

3". I^. I3:.u^'"5rES, Ijvdia.nag'er. 



fHIS NEW AND ELEGANT HOTEL, built at a cost of |60,000, con- 
tains over 100 Sleeping Rooms, Bath Rooms, Elevator, Electric Bells^ 
Steam Heaters, Elegant Reading and Smoking Rooms, Billiard Rooms and 
Bowling Alleys for ladies and gentlemen, spacious verandas, overlooking- 
the bay and town, is replete in all its appointments, and managed as a. 
FIRST CLASS HOTEL in every respect. The grounds comprise eight 
acres, tastefully laid out, and nothing that will conduce to the comforts of 
its patrons will be omitted. 

bates; - = iiJO RMB $3.00 PIl DilY. 

L, W, COLE, - The Druggist. 

• — ^_ « 

H KADQXJARTKRS 

FOR 



Hods, Reels, Ltrhes, Etc., Troixt Flies, Bclss 
Flies, I3cLss J3izgs, Etc. 



xn^jx^ai.aLi^r ^w^ox^ 



NEWS DEPOT 



ALSO 



Drugs and Medicines 

PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

South Side Lake St., PETOSKEY, MICH. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 57 

When the Government decided to try the experiment of sehooUng some of the brightest Indian 
children, Pe-to-se-ga sent his two eldest sons to a school in northern Ohio. It was a Protestant school 
and the priest objected, and finally declared he must bring the children home or he would be excom- 
municated. His wife, womanlilve, sided with the priest, and Pe-to-se-ga yielded, but so impatient did 
he become of such arbitrary rule he left the spot where he had spent 43 years of his married life, and 
moved, with his family, across the bay and settled on the south shore, upon land now comprised within 
the limits of the village. He and his sons owned nearly all of what is now the village of Petoskey. 
But the trouble did not cease. Protestant mission services were held within reach, and Pe-to-se-ga 
attended with his children. Mrs. Pe-to-se-ga would none of it, so she left her husband and went with 
his brother to her own relatives on the north side of the bay. 

The chief took another wife. Several years passed but the mother love in the dusky breast over- 
bore all other considerations, and Mrs. Pe-to-se-ga came back to her family, and the woman who had 
usurped her place was dowered and sent forth. They had fourteen children, of whom eight sons and 
two daughters are still living. 

Andrew Porter, a Pennsylvanian, was the first white man to invade the grounds of the Chippewas 
in this portion of the territory of Michigan, as a settler. What is now known as the old mission farm 
was his home. He seemed to love the wilds as well as the Indians themselves, and with the coming of 
civilization he abandoned his place— not, however, until he had held various offices of importance. 

But other eyes looked over this great heritage of forest and stream, and saw in it superlative 
beauty an<l pro>.;pective wealth. The locomotive engine, that vanguard of civilization, pierced the 
interminable wilderness and stopped upon the shore of Little Traverse Bay. The first through train 
arrived a little before midnight. December 31st, 1874, thus fulfilling the contract for the year. Just 
subtract that date from 188;! and you have the age of our heroine. Corrupt the musical, ancestral 
Pe-to-se-ga into the glib, unhandsome " Petoskey," and you have her name. We wish a compromise 
between the old and the new, could yet be effected with Petosega as tlie result. We don't like that 
Russianized, Yankeeized ending. She has no reason to be ashamed of her pedigree, for does not our 
brief narrative betray sterling traits of character in the chief for whom she was christened ? Should 
you choose to stroll some afternoon through the old council grounds, beyond Bear River, and climb 
the bluff to his neat cottage (the old cabin on the shore was torn down last year) and find him in his 
grand parlor, you would be struck with his intelligent countenance and dignified demeanor, though 
you know of his conversational powers only through an interpreter." 

If the tourist has any poetry iu his soul, or any appreciation of the beautiful in his 
mental make-up, he will be driven into rhapsodies by what he sees at Petoskey. A lady 
tourist from Ohio wrote to her home paper as follows : 

" The sunsets on the bay are enough to throw an artist's soul into ecstasy. Come with me. 
Yonder is the Gazelle, neat as a daisy, just rounding North Point, coming in from Mackinac. The 
ferries are steaming over from Little Traverse, courtesy ing as they come. The Grand Rapids, a swift 
propeller from Traverse City, is already in harbor. Tall-masted schooners are outlined against the 
glowing sky, and some laden ships of the fleet come in to cast anchor for the night. Canoes and 
pleasure yachts, with their singing, chatting crews, are on every side. Let us join these and row out 
midway, for a birds-eye view of the lovely scene. Sweep with your glance the circle of the hills, and 
it is one continuous gallery of beautiful pictures. The white line of pebbly beach, the green slope and 
chalky bluff, then terrace above terrace — village, farm and forest, until the outlying line of sentinel 
trees are crowned with the reflective pink and gold of the western world. Nowhere have I seen such 
responsive skies. Lakes Huron and Michigan rarely fail to bid each other good night and good morn- 
ing. Over there, to the north, are dim wreaths of smoke, rising cloudward. The practical observer 
will tell you it is from burning brush in a clearing, but I know it is a council fire lighted by invisible 
hands, and the spirits of departed braves people the shadows, hidden from unanointed eyes. On bluff 
and pier, and bridge and veranda, are gay groups, come out to see the sunset pictures; South of us, 
near tlie beach, amid the evergreens of the old "'council grounds," are the tents of the Richmond 
Guards. Their silk flags bow gently, and their band discourses most exquisite music. Behind them, 
the same wooded terraces, broken by the fertile slopes of Old Mission and other farms. Now turn the 
boat and look to the west— the wide watery, luminous west. See sapphire, and flame, and pearl, and 
blue, and amethyst — one dazzling, iridescent arch up to the deep blue of the zenith. Acres of golden 
refulgence span the horizon, and tinge the forests on either side. Our oars break liauid rubies wherever 
they strike. The colors change, the shadows deepen, and early lights begin to twinkle out from the 
villages across the bay. The sun is a ball of fire di-opping into the wave, and one brave boat with a 
single snowy sail goes out in the path of glory as if it might ride — 

" Over the sunset bar 
Right into Heaven." 

The healthfuTness of Petoskey is une.xcelled. No watering place or summer 
resort on the continent can boast of purer air, fresher breezes, or bettei- whitefish, than 
Petoskey. The facilities for recreation are also good. The woods abound with game 
and the rivers and lakes are full of fish. Bear River, which enters into Little Traverse 
Bay near Petoskey, is a wonderful stream, f urni-shing one of the finest -water powers in 
the world. Bear Lake, its source, is twelve miles long and one mile wide, and is 100 
feet above the level of the bay. The rowing and sailing on the bay are fine, except when 
the weather is stormy. The numerous trips that may be taken to surrounding points by 
rail or boat are novel in the extreme ti) those unused to them. 

The climate of Petoskey is a sovereign one for bilious diseases, hay fever, etc., etc. 
The Western Hay Fever Association has its headquarters at Petoskey, and something of 
the real veneration which the thousands who have been relieved from this loathsome 
disease by a visit to Petoskey have for this region of country may be learned from the 
following parody on hay fever, written by a member of this association and read at one 
of its meetings : 





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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



59 



The August heat was rising fast 
As from his home a pilgi-im passed, 
Who waved at parting twice and thrice 
A kerchief wrouglit in strange device: 
"Petoskey." 

His eyes were dim; his nose below 
Was burnished red, and full of woe. 
A quick involuntary wheeze 
Condensed his watchword to a sneeze: 
" Petoskey." 

His smarting eyes with loving light 
Dwelt on his home, a pleasant sight: 
Then as he faced the cool, clear north 
Again that mystic word broke forth : 
"Petoskey." 

"O, stay!" his weeping wife had said, 
" And let me soothe your fevered head." 



A scalding tear ran down his nose, 
And hoarse and faint his answer rose: 
" Petoskey." 

" O, stay!" his grandma said, " with me, 
And take a cup of ginger tea; 
You have a dreadful cold, I'm sure." 
But still he gasped the only cure: 
"Petoskey." 

" Beware the foi-est's tangled snares! 
Beware the wildcats, wolves and bears 1" 
As thro' the dark the headlight glowed 
A voice replied, far down the road: 
"Petoskey." 

And now his eyes are good as new; 

His nose has gained its normal hue; 

He joins his brethren in a cheer; 

They shout their watchword far and near: 

"Petoskey." 

The hotel accommodations are excellent. The Arlington, favorably situated on the 
beach with a good view of the bay, accommodates 300 guests. Rates $2.50 to $3.00, 
according to location. The building is of frame, with all modern conveniences and a 
good service. The Cushman House accommodates 150 guests, $2 per day. The Occi- 
dental can provide for 80, rate $2 per day. The Clifton House, situated convenient to 
railway depot, is a comfortable travelers' home. Mr. Rowan, the proprietor, is well 
acquainted with the Traverse Region, and is able and willing to supply information as 
well as the wants of the inner man. L. W. Cole's, the druggist, is headquarters for sports- 
men. Being well posted on fishing grounds, he may be a friend in need, especially if 
you have experienced the hard luck of returning empty handed, and, to save your laurels, 
purchased from some lucky one the string of beautiful fish exhibited as your catch. A 
single horse and carriage can be had for $2 and $3 per day ; double rigs $3 and $4 per 
day, with drivers. Team, with fishing rigs, $4 per day. J. E. Judd, photographer, 
is a good artist, and gives first-class work at astonishingly low rates. 

Bay View. 

Only a little distance 
from Petoskey is the far- 
famed Bay View — the 
Ocean Grove and Martha's 
Vineyard of the north 
combined in one. Bay 
View is very emphatically 
Methodistic in its origin, 
history and purposes. A 
company of Michigan 
Methodists a few years 
since made a thorough ex- 
amination of a large num- 
ber of places, with a view 
of locating a State camp- 
ground and summer resi- 
dence, and finally decided 
upon this location as the 
most desirable. An asso- 
ciation was formed, to 
which the Grand Rapids 
& Indiana Railroad Com- 
pany donated between 400 
and 500 acres of land, on 
condition that a given 
amount of money should 
be expended in the way of 
improvements within a 
given length of time. The 
relation has proved to be 
very fortunate, and the 
twofold purpose had in 
view is being fully realized 




speaker's stand, bay view. 



Though but seven years have passed since the 
location of the grounds, Bay View has already become immensely popular. Large 



Specimens, Curiosities, 

FISHING TACKLE, 



-AND- 



General Merchandise, 



-AT- 



MEAD'S 

News Depot, Free Museum 

AND 

VARIETY STORE, 

MARQUETTE, MICH. 

ClIPION HOUSE 



J. A. C. ROWAN, Prop. 



CONYENIENT TO DEPOT. 



Grand Central 



im^wmEm.. 



Cheboygan, 



Michigan. 



THE LEADING RODSE OF THE TOWN, 



riSSI CLASS IN ALL IIS AFFOINffiNIS, 



J. M. FRENCH, 



PROPRIETOR. 



Union House 



Tie Larpst and Best Appoiulel Hotel 
in tlie City. 



Five Minutes Walk from the Depot and Transfer 
Dock. 



Terms, $1.50 Per Day. EDMOND MASSY, Propr. 



^etosTLey, 



JVCtcTc. 



ST. IGNACE. MICH. 



RATES, $2.00 PER DAY. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 61 

numbers from the west and south annually avail themselves of the privileges it aifords. 
The association now numbers over 300 members and is increasing every year. Nothing 
but a good moral character is required as a test of membership, and the membership fee, 
which is $10. Each member is entitled to select and hold by lease, two lots on the 
ground, the annual rent for which is $5 per lot. Special accommodations in traveling 
to and from Bay View are given to the members and their families by presentation of 
certificate from the secretary by nearly all the railroads of the state, while to the public 
round trip tickets have thus far been sold at one fare during the season of the camp 
meetings. 

Bay View is beautifully located. The land rises from the bay in natural terraces, 
which afford delightful sites for residences. More than half the land has already been 
platted into lots, and over 250 lots have already been leased. On about half of these 
cottages have been built. 

The Bay View hotel and auditorium and a large number of cottages are supplied 
with water through pipes from a cold and never-failing spring that issues from a hill 
side 60 or 70 feet above the platted grounds. This spring re called Pisgah spring, and 
is of inestimable value to the encampment. 

Many points combine to make Bay View one of the most attractive summer resorts 
in the northwest. The bay itself is a gem of beauty, the grounds are delightful, the air 
is pure, the climate is healthful, the forests are grand, and the water is excellent. The 
place is easy of access. There is a depot and dock on the grounds, with daily boats and 
trains. The society is good. Rents and other expenses are low. 

The following are the oiBcers and committees for the present year: 

Officers.— President, Rev. D. F. Barnes, Coklwater, Mich.; Treasurer, David Preston, Esq., 
Detroit, Mich.; Secretari/. Rev. S. Reed, Owosso, Mich. 

Trustees.— David Preston, Esq., J. C. More, Esq., Watson Snyder, Esq., Rev. D. F. Barnes, Rev. 
W. H. Brockway, Rev. A. P. Moors, Rev. W. H. Shier, Rev. S. Reed, Rev. R. B. Pope. 

Committee on Arrangements and Worship.— A. P. Moors. W. J. Aldrich, R. B. Pope. 

On Claims and Accounts.— W. H Shier. W. Snyder, J. C. More. 

On Wavs and Means.— D. Preston, W. H. Brockway, J. W. Moon. 

On Titles and Ornamentation.— J. C. More, D. F. Barnes. 

On Health and Order.— W. H. Brockway, W. Snyder, C. H. Stowell, M. D. 

On Transportation. ~S. Reed, D. F. Barnes, O. R. Wilmarth. 

On Hotel.— J. C. More, W. H. Shier, L. R. Damon. 

On Sidewalks.— W. Snyder. L. L. Farnsworth, R. R. Pealer. 

Tlie public meeting;s to be held on the grounds during the coming summer will be as follows: 

Sunday School Assembly, July 24 to 29; Temperance Days, Jul^ .30 to .31; Camp Meeting, July .31 
to August 6; Missionary Sunday, Augu.st 12. 

The by-laws of the association, and any other needed information, will be cheerfully 
furnished on application to the secretary. Rev. S. Reed, Owosso, Mich. 

HARBOR SPRINGS. 

On the north side of Little Traverse Bay, about four miles distant from Petoskey 
and Bay View, is the curious little village of Harbor Springs, formerly Little Traverse. 
Harbor Springs is the county seat of Emmet county. It is located on a beautiful bay 
formed by Harbor Point, a narrow peninsula, projecting into the bay and enclosing a 
surface of a mile in. length and a half mile in width. It is the small bay that gives the 
place its Indian name of We que ton-sing, a name since appropriated by one of the 
neighboring resorts. 

The harbor shore is a pebbly beach, washed by waters of such crystal purity that 
fish and other objects are plainly visible upon the bottom at a depth of from thirty to 
fifty feet. All along the water's edge are large springs, from which gush streams of 
water as clear as air, and only twelve or fourteen degrees above the freezing point. 
Had the Spanish explorer who searched the wilderness of Florida for the mythical 
fountain of perpetual youth turned his attention in this direction, his search would not 
have been entirely in vaiu. The health-renewing properties of these waters are almost 
marvelous. Many visitors to this locality ascribe their rapid improvement in health and 
strength as much to the purity of these waters as to the well-known bracing and exhil- 
arating effects of the atmosphere. 

The land rises from the water some ten or fifteen feet, and is then almost perfectly 
level, thus making an unrivaled location for the business portion of the town. Back 
of this flat, parallel to and at a distance of from fifty to sixty rods from the beach, rises 
an abrupt bluff, seventy-five or a hundred feet in height. This is followed by a second 
plateau, diversified by a succession of terraces, affording fine building sites for resi- 
dences. A small trout brook, starting from springs at the foot of the bluff, winds its 
way across the lower flat and flows into the harbor. 

I' S Harbor Springs is so situated that the raw winds are excluded by the hills, and the 
warm land breeze tempered by passing over several miles of water. This accounts for 



THE AVERY HOUSE 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. P. B. BRADT, Proprietor. 




Kooiiis aud^Board Ifioin'lSlO.Jto $20j per Week, accordiug to ^Locatioir of Kooras. 



The Avery House, under the new management, has been thoroughly reimvateil and newly fur- 
nished, and is now able to accommodate Four Hundred Ouests with all the conifurts of a home. 
The house has all the Modern Improvements, such as Gas, Electric Bells, aud Steam, in every 
room. Is connected with the newly built and newly furnished Bath House of the Blount Clemens 
Mineral Spring Co. by a hallway that is kept at same temperatuie as hotel, thus preventing the 
patient taking a chill after leaving the bath, 

THE MOUNT CLEMENS 

MINERAL SPRINGS 

Surpasses all others on this Oontinent in the Treatment of 

Rheumatism, Gout, Neuralgia, Paralysis, Blood and Skin Diseases, Female Disorders, 
Diseases of the Liver, Kidneys and Urinary Organs. Thousands of Syphilitics 
have been restored here who had abandoned all other hope. For Ner- 
vous Debility, Insomnolency, Alcoholism, Blood Poisoning, and 
Lead or Mercurial Poisoning, the Baths are unexcelled. 
FKOM THESE "WATERS ABE PREPARED THE 

For Skin Diseases, Piles, etc. 

An Effervescing Aperient and Diuretic, Useful in Kidney Disease. 

— .A-l^JD THE — 

— SEND FOR CIRCULARS AND OTHER INFORMATION TO — 

Mount Clemens Mineral Springs Co., Mt. Clemens, Mich. 



RESORTS OF. NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



63 



the fact that the mercury invariably indicates greater regularity here than at any point 
in the vicinity where observations have ever been made. 

The authentic as well as the legendary history of the place is full of interest. 
Pieces of ancient crockery have been found here, indicating that it was once a stopping 
place frequented by the extinct race of Mound Builders, on their journeys from Mexico 
to the Lake Superior mines. For ages it has been a camping ground for tlie Indians, 
for whom it was well situated, its harbor being secure and abounding in fish. At the time 
of Marquette, the principal village of the Ottawas was L'Arbre Croche. It is said that 
they were finally induced to leave that place and establish themselves at Harbor Springs 
by the advice of a Catholic priest, who may have seen, with prophetic eye, the future 
importance of the 
place. It was some- 
thing like seventy 
or eighty years ago 
that a rude church 
was erected, and 
used as a place of 
worship for a num- 
ber of years, until 
the present struc- 
ture took its place. 
Gradually the bark 
lodges and wig- 
wams gave place to 
substantial cabins, 
and savage barbar- 
ism to a fair de- 
gree of civilization 
andenlighlenment. 
For many years 
this was a central 
point for the pay- 
ment of annuities, 
and was a trading 
post only exceeded 
in importance by 
Mackinac. 

The march of 
civilization has not 
yet effaced the 
marks of its occu- 
pancy by the In- 
dians. There are 
many Indian resi- 
dents left, the oldest of whom retain all the marked characteristics of their race. Here 
and there are dilapidated block houses, roofed with bark and fenced with palisades. 
Many of the original feasts and ceremonies of the tribe are still observed. There are 
many curious legends concerning the place, one of the most weird of which relates to 
Devil's Pond, an innocent looking pool near the portage of Harbor Point, where the 
Indians solemnly believe the Bad Spirit dwelt until frightened away by the noise of the 
■white man's saw-mill. 

We clip the following from the January number of the Continent: 

There is an antirniate<l Catholic cliurch at Harlior Springs which strangers always visit. If the Bel- 
gian priest who ministeis tliere in sacred things should happen to be absent, go to 3Iargaret Boyd at 
her house, a few rods distant. She will unlock the church for your inspection, give you the history of 
the mission, and recite the weird Indian legends with which the lovely harbor is fraught. 

"Aunt Margaret." as she is familiarly called, is a woman with a history. She is an Ottawa Indian, 
born at Little Traverse nearly seventy years ago; .she looks ten years younger. She claims to be the 
daughter of a right royal line of Ottawa chiefs, and her patrician origin is evinced by the carriage of 
her head, the Hash of her eye, and the beautiful smallness of her hands and feet. When she was nine 
years old the missionaries took her from her wild northern home to Cincinnati, and placed her in a 
convent school, where she i-emained five years. She is fairly well educated, has read a good deal, and 
speaks English perfectly. Her influence over the Indians of the district is almost unbounded; and her 
■work for the church, in the way of making translations of its books into the Ottawa language, has been 
very important. Her sympathies are entirely with her people. Their degradation humiliates her; 
while over the wrongs they continue to suffer at the white man's hands, she is full of indignation. In 
the autumn of 187(5 she made a journey to Washington in the interest of a number of Indian families 
who had purchased a tract of government land in Cheboygan, and had failed to receive their deeds. She 
had an interview with the President, who, she says, listened to her with the utmost courtesy, and assured 
her that everything should be made right. After their business talk was concluded. President Grant 
took her on his arm, and conducting her into another apartment, introducing her to his wife and 




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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



65 



several other ladies, stumbling a little over her long Indian name, which we will not attempt to repro- 
duce in English letters. 

The church at Harbor Springs was founded by Pere Jacques Marquette, a little more than two 
hundred years ago. During the wars of the succeeding years the Indians were scattered, and the 
mission abandoned. In 1815 French missionaries again erected the cross at the old stations along the 
coast, and called the red men together for worship. About that time a church of hewn logs was built 
near the harbor; in time it became unfit for use, and forty years ago the present frame structure was 
erected on the site of the old one. 

There is an inteUigent "aborigine" at Harbor Springs, named Black Bird, who has managed to 
pick up a knowledge of reading, writing, and local politics. He was postmaster there for fourteen 
years. During the last administration, the " rotation," or some other political wave, reached the bluff, 
and Black Bird was displaced. He is said to be wealthy ; but about five years ago he learned a lesson 
of the white man's peifldy that has 
made him a melancholy Indian ever 
since. A man, whom we will call Tom 
Talbot, opened a saloon in Petoskey. It 
was not a bad sort of saloon, as saloons 
go; but a worthy missionary on the 
south side opposed it on general princi- 
ples, and sought to put it down. Major 

, the prosecuting attorney of the 

district, was a friend of the missionary's 
family, particularly of a pair of bright 
yoimg lady daughters, and was easily 
persuaded to assist the Rev. P., who was 
a justice of the peace, in ousting Tom 
Talbot. Between them they served 
warrant after warrant on the poor 
saloon-keeper till life became a burden 
to him. Now it so happened that the 
Major was engaged in the manufacture 
and sale of cigars in Petoskey, and Tom 
took it into his head to look a little into 
his methods of doing business. There 
was an old Indian away down on the 
Charlevoix trail who kept a "store," 
and sold a good many of the Major's 
cigars. Talbot found out that the Major 
was letting him have stock at a slight 
reduction if he would return the boxes 
with the stamps uncanceled. The igno- 
rant savage gladly complied, and knew 
of several other red brothers in the 
interior who did likewise. Armed with 
these facts, Talbot came down sure and 
sudden on the Major; he was arrested 
at midnight and taken to Grand Rapids, 
where, after jjroper examination, he was 
lodged in jail to await trial. Things 
looked cloudy, and he began to plan for 
his liberty. He sent for Black Bird, and 
asked him to sign his bond for five 
thousand dollars. He was under obliga- 
tions to the accomplished Major in con- 
nection with his last ajipointment, and 
the Indian never forgets. He signed the 
bond, and the Major was released from 
custody, to appear at the next sitting of 
the United States Court. He did not Margaret boyd and son. 

appear. By the time Black Bird had reached Harbor Springs, the Major had reached Detroit; the 
next day he was in Canada, where he has since remained. Black Bird is watching for him all along 
the border. If you want to see a war-dance, just ask him if he has heard frovi the Major. The look 
which his grim visage assumes at the mention of that name is simply flendi.sh. It is generally believed 
around the bay that Black Bird would go farther for the privilege of taking the Major's scalp, than 
to get his money back with interest. 

The accommodation for visitors at Harbor Springs have been greatly increased, and 
will no doubt be fully adequate to the "wants of all who may visit this delightful resort. 
The village is connected with the outer world by a telegraph and railroad. 

WE QUE-TON-SING. 

We-que-ton sing is a beautiful resort, belonging to an association of Presbyterians 
organized in 1878, and is located on the north hill of Little Traverse Bay one mile east 
of Harbor Springs. 

The grounds, consisting of eighty acres, were formally opened to the public July 17, 
1878, when Hon. Schuyler Colfax delivered his famous address on Abraham Lincoln. 

The object of the association is to improve and make attractive its grounds, for the 
use of its members and their guests who wish a pleasant, healthful and inexpensive place 
to spend the summer months. 

The resort takes its name from that given by the Indians to the small bay upon 
which the village of Harbor Springs is located. The new association starts out with a 
capital stock of $5,000, with power to increase to $10,000. The stock, which has been 
5 




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This Hotel is now run in connection with the MAGNETIC SPRINGS, and 
is open the year round for the traveling public and those seek- 
ing health at the springs. The Magnetic Water is a 
certain specific in Bright's Disease, Diabetes, 
Calculus or Stone in the Bladder, 
Inflammation of Neck of 
Bladder and 
KIDNEY DISEASES. 



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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 67 

readily taken, is divided into shares of $25 each, and no person is permitted to take less 
than one, nor more than eight shares. Four shares entitle a person to one lot, and eight 
-shares to two lots, free from future assessments. 

The financial condition of the new association is quite flattering; its grounds, hotel, 
and other property are free from debt, and it has $3,500 to place in its treasury when- 
ever called for. Its object is to more fully carry out the plans of the old association. 
It is of a private character, its stock being sold only to such persons as are approved of 
by its Board of Directors, and it can be transferred only with their consent. 

The officers of the association are : 

L. H. Trask, Esq., President, Kalamazoo. H. H. Pope, Esq.. Sec'yi Allegan, Mich. Directors— W. O. 
Hughart, Esq., Grand Rapids. Mich,; H. H. Northrop, Esq.; R. Montgomery, Esq., St. Joseph, Mich.; 
Rev. John Redpath, Boyne Falls, Mich.; H. M. Morey, Esq. 

For copy of by-laws and other information concerning this association, address the 
secretary. 

HARBOR POINT. 

Harbor Point is on the opposite side of Harbor Springs from Weque-ton-sing. It 
adjoins the village of Harbor Springs, and comprises some fifty acres, jutting out into the 
bay for a mile, being sixty rods in width at the base, and narrowing gradually to a 
few rods in width at the apex in the bay. The land is high and rolling, and is covered 
with a fine growth of beautiful young trees, forming a park which, for natural beauty, 
is rarely excelled. On either side, the beach is covered with clean white sand, and 
gently slopes to the water's edge. On one side the water is quiet, and for many feet 
from the shore is shallow, thus affording excellent facilities for boating and still bathing. 
On the other side a beautiful surf is almost incessantly rolling, formed by a full sweep 
from the clear and sparkling waters of the lake as they roll into the bay, and. here is 
surf bathing unsurpassed anywhere unless it be at some of the favorite ocean resorts. 

Thus situated, the grounds of the Harbor Point Association afford a delightful water 
front of over two miles in extent, and being nearly surrounded by water, it is always 
cool and comfortable, and seems particularly adapted by nature for a summer resort. 

During the brief time which has elapsed since the association was formed, extensive 
improvements have been made to their property. About one-half of the tract has been 
platted and laid out into circuitous walks and drives; a fine hotel has been erected, and 
several handsome cottages already adorn the grounds. 

The capital stock of the association is $10,000, the most of which has already been 
sold. The stock is sold only in shares of $100, which entitles the owner to the use of a 
lot for a cottage, and board at the hotel at as near cost as may be deenjed consistent by 
the Board of Directors. 

About $10,500 have been expended in improving the grounds and building cottages. 
This association is of a private character, its stock being sold only to such persons as 
are approved of by the Board, and transferred only with their consent, the design being to 
make the resort such that all the stockholders, with their families, may be gathered 
together into one circle, and surrounded with the sacredness and purity of home. 

The officers of the association are: 

B. F. Simons, President, Lansing; T. AV. Westcott, Secretary, Lansing. Directors— S. D. Bingham. 
Lansing; John Robson, Lansing; W. P. Burhans, Ionia. 

ON TO MACKINAW. 

From the Little Traverse region the tourist may proceed to Mackinaw by either of 
three routes. The more novel of them is perhaps "what is known as the Inland Route. 
Between Petoskey, on Little Traverse Bay, and Cheboygan, which is located about 20 
miles south and east from the Straits of Mackinaw, there is a wonderful chain of navi- 
g;able lakes and rivers. The tourist should not fail to take this trip at some time during 
his stay in the north. Starting out from Petoskey in the morning you proceed by rail a 
distance of about five miles to Conway Springs, which is little more than a board 
landing at the head of Crooked Lake. This lake is about five miles in length. It is 
famous for its bass fishing and the numerous delightful localities for camping places 
along its shores. The cut on page 69 will give the reader a very clear idea of kind 
and size of fishes that inhabit the waters in this lake so numero»isly. A sportsmen 
writes as follows with reference to this lake and its surroundings: 

"I cannot begin to do this lovely lalcelet justice; suiHce it to say that we found it beautifully 
located in the forest primeval, with only a patch of new clearing upon the banks, and one small house 
at its foot— a very gem in a silver setting. 

' ' Fastening our boat to the limb of a fallen tree, we proceeded to catch a supply of minnows. 
After which— having rigged lines ready for business before leaving shore— we thought it time to see 
if any bass were around. I put on a minnow, made a cast, and the bait had scarce got out of sight 
ere it was taken with a rush. Four casts succeeded, and in rapid succession, four fine bass came out 
to interview me. After securing eleven from that tree top, we unhitched and paddled to another part 
of the lake, taking them, fish where we might. Right there we camped a fortnight, making our camp 




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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



69 



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BLACK BASS. 



as comfortable as could be and en- 
joying one constant dream of delight 
-tifty rods from camp we could 
catch all the minnows we wanted— 
enticmg them by means of some bait 
placed 111 a landing net, and turning 
to the other side of the boat and 
castmg mto deeper water, capture 
bass in the greatest profusion. They 
were so thick that we caught all 
needed in an hour a day, and even 
then returned to the water all fish 
weighing less than two and a half 
pounds. We had grand sport, for 
the black bass is really a game fish 
Vve also enticed from their native 
element several pickerel, which 
averaged eight pounds each. 

"Around this lake we observed 
a number of American eagles cir- 
cling, and, one day from my perch 
in the top of a tree, I giot one of the 
glorious birds of freedom. I hur- 
ried to the boat with my prize, but 
had hardly started when another 
came whirling in the air above, and 
seizing my gun I let fly the No. 8's, 
and by all that's holy, fetched him 
to the ground. Whew: two Ameri- 
can eagles in Ave minutes!!! How 
big we felt! I've chased the antelope 
over the plains and shot them with 
my Winchester rifle; stalked deer 
and elk in the mountain parks of 
Colorado, and hunted buffalo on the 
vast prairies of Kansas, but I do not 
think I ever felt so exhilarated as 
then. The next morning my com- 
panions declared I was muttering in 
Hiy sleep 'American eagles!— one 
flying !— No. 8's ! ' etc. 

"At the end of the fortnight we 
struck tents and departed silently 
but happy. The time had passed 
like a dream of blissful contentment 
—aye, a summer night's dream. 
Think of this, ye who flsh for suckers 
and catfish in the swamp streams of 
Indiana, and in the roily waters of 
the Kankakee— the experience of 
one who has cast his line in the 
sunny South, in the streams of the 
far West, and in our own beautiful 
Blichigan, reads like a very fairy 
tale. 

" No flies to botherfyou as up in 
Canada— no 'skeeters nor any no- 
see'ems— nothing to mar the pleas- 
ures—no hot, stifling nights-no 
clammy dews— no dark miasma 
creeping into the system— but rest 
—sweet sleep at night and a dreamy 
existence by day. 

"AVhat wonder, then, that the 
fisherman who has visited Northern 
Michigan loves to dream* of the 
halcyon time, and again looks for- 
ward to the lovely June days when 
the trout riseth "to the fly on the 
waters, and the worm squirmeth in 
anticipation of the hungry fish that 
lieth waiting under some log for 
just such a juicy fellow; when the 
grayling striketh hard and sharp for 
your bait, and waiteth for the disci- 
ple of Izaak in the Sturgeon and 
Pigeon rivers; while in every run- 
ning river— in every crystal lake— 
the gamey black bass jumpeth for 
whatever bait may be offered on the 
invitingly sharp hook— let it be frog, 
mouse, minnow, Dobson's hell-gra- 
mite, or any other thing. 

"In a word, if you want to enjoy 
a good time, take your wife and 
some fishing tackle, and go North; 
and on my faith as a follower of the 



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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



71 



gentle Izaak Walton, you will come home younger and better for your trip, and unless very hard to 
please, will have found some very warm friends among the hospitable Miehiganders." 

The staunch little steamer upon which you have embarked soon carries you safely 
across Crooked Lake and brings you to the head of Crooked River, which is the outlet of 
Crooked Lake. This river is seven miles in length and flows in a northeasterly direc- 
tion. The scenery is picturesque. True to its name the river is very crooked. So 
much so that it is navigated with difficulty in some places. 

Crooked River empties into Burt Lake, 
one of the prettiest lakes ever looked upon 
by the tourist. It is ten miles long by one 
wide, the length extending north and south. 
Crooked, Maple and Sturgeon Rivers, all 
large streams, pour their waters lavishly 
into this lake. Maple River is the outlet of 
Douglass Lake, which is two miles north of 
Burt Lake. All of these lakes and rivers 
are full of fish. 

Having crossed Burt Lake you enter 
Indian River, which is five miles in length. 
The country along this river is not the best 
In the world, but the scenery is beautiful. 

. Indian River empties into Mullet Lake, 
which is the largest lake of the series, being 
twelve miles long and from five to eight 
miles wide. Pigeon and Indian Rivers 
empty into this lake. Several good hotels 
are located at different points around it. 
This lake, too, is full of fish, and its shores 
abound in game. 

The outlet of Mullet Lake is Cheboygan 
River, six miles in length. Three miles 
down, Black River, which is as large if not 
larger than the Cheboygan, empties into 
the Cheboygan. Black River is the outlet 
of Black Lake, which is about the size of 
Mullet Lal^. From the junction of Black 
River witn the Cheboygan the stream is 
much wider and deeper than before, and a 
continuation of mills of various kinds line 
its banks until you reach Cheboygan. 

Cheboygan is a wide awake, ^o-a-head 
town of several thousand inhabitants, the 
county seat of Cheboygan county and the 
leading commercial city of this part of the 
State. Its saw mills are immense, turning 
out not less than 100,000,000 feet of lumber 
annually. The logs from which this lum- 
ber is cut are brought down from the inte- 
rior through the chain of lakes and rivers 
just described. Large quantities of cedar 
posts and railroad ties and square timber 
are also cut in the section drained by these 
lakes and rivers, and shipped to outside 
markets. Cheboygan has the usual quota 
of hotels, banks, grocery and dry goods 
stores, etc., etc., — not excepting saloons. 
The professions are well represenTed. There 
are several good churches, and a ggod pub- 
lic school. The location is admirable. The 
soil of the surrounding country is well 
adapted for agricultural purposes, and is in 
the hands of a hardy and enterprising class 
of farmers. 

Among the curious and valuable pos- grayling. 

sessions of the town are her flowing wells. These wells are bored from twenty-five to 
seventy-five feet deep, when a pure cold vein of water is reached, which as soon as the 




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RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. ^3 

auger is taken out spouts from three to five feet above the ground. By being tubed the 
water vvfill force itself much higher. These wells are conducive both to comfort and 
health. 

The "Lock" in Cheboygan River, near the upper end of the town, will prove 
immensely interesting to the average tourist. 

A -journey of only 18 miles across the Straits from Cheboygan completes the trip 
from Petoskey to Mackinaw by tlie inhxnd route. 

A second route from Petoskey to Mackinaw is by steamer up Lake Michigan and 
through the Straits. This is a most delightful journey in pleasant weather. As you 
pass out over Little Traverse Bay, memory is busy with the events of long ago, when 
the red men of the forest held undisputed possession of this entire region of country. 
Twelve miles north is Middle ViUage, located on the lake shore, and containing a few 
small houses and a mission church. Twelve miles north from Middle Village is Cross 
Village, located on the high table land overlooking a large and beautiful bay, and con- 
taining about 400 people, mostly Indians. The country surroundiag it is unexcelled for 
agricultural purposes. No finer potatoes can be produced on the continent than grow 
in the sandy soil of this region. Fruit of all kinds is also abundant. The moment your 
boat touches the dock, if in season, squaws offer you wild berries at prices which 
astonish you. 

The most noticeable feature of the town, so far as buildings are concerned, is the 
large convent built on an eminence just above the village. The aim of this is the edu 
cation of the poor children of the surrounding country. We visited this institution 
about twelve years since, and were greatly interested in what we saw. The convent 
contains an immense auditorium, which is so arranged that the audience, made up 
mainly of the people of the village, the choir, which is in the gallery opposite the pulpit, 
the monks seated by themselves, and the nuns also seated by themselves, can each see 
the officiating priest, while neither can see the other. The building was so constructed 
that the nuns could do wa.shiug, cooking, etc., etc., without even coming in sight of the 
male portion of the establishment. Father Wycamp, who had charge of the enterprise, 
took great pleasure in showing our party through the building and over the premises. 
Among other places to which he conducted us was a small building a little distance from 
the main building, where he made it a rule to spend some time each day in meditation. 
A collection of human skulls and other similar relics had been gathered together in this 
building, while underneath the floor, in the center of the building, was an empty grave, 
which the reverend Father had dug with his own hands. The object of the grave was 
both I'emote and immediate. Remotely, it was designed by the reverend Father as 
his own final resting place; but immediately, it was intended, with the liberal collection 
of skulls and other human bones, to turn his meditations into the right channel. 

Ten miles from Cross Village, near the western end of the Straits, is Waugohance 
lighthouse. , This is a very important light. It is built on Waugohance shoal, and is 
some distance from land. About twelve years ago the foundation of this structure 
became insecure through the constant action of the waters, and the government expended 
a large sum of money in repairs. A coffer dam was constructed about the light and the 
water pumped out, leaving the shoal on which it stands dry. A circle of solid masonry 
was then built up around the light of sufficient strength to stand during all time to come, 
if any earthly structure can stand that long. The stones used were flat, and from six to 
ten feet across. These were laid in cement and bolted together with large iron bolts. 

On some accounts the business of lighthouse keeping is desirable. It is not exces- 
sively hard work. The lighthouse keeper is not much troubled with disagreeable neigh- 
bors. He lives in absolute freedom from miasmas, mosquitos, congestive fevers, intermit- 
tenis, calomel, liver diseases, jaundice, cholera, dyspepsia, blue devils and duns. 

Farther on you see the island of St. Helena, Gro-ss Cut, Point La Barbe, etc., etc., 
to your left, and soon come to the narrowest part of the Straits. On your left is Point 
St. Ignace, on your right old Mackinaw-^about four and one-half miles distant from 
each other. As you pass between these two points you almost instinctively ask yourself, 
" Will a bridge go over or a tunnel go under these waters, or will the ages yet to come 
always be satisfied to depend upon ferry boats." These questions furnish ample scope 
for animated discussion. 

A third route is by rail from Petoskey to old Mackinaw. This is a ride of only 
about two hours duration, and is comparatively devoid of interest to the tourist. 

OLD MACKINAW, OR MACKINAW CITY, 

As it is now called, is a point of great historic interest. In 1763 a fort containing a 
company of British soldiers and a small village of French and Indians were located here. 
It was here that one of the most barbarous Indian massacres, connected with Pontiac's 
war, took place. Under pretense of playing a game of ball to celebrate the king's 




USE 



FARRAND'S 4 

^^ 

ODcentrated Essence of Jamaica Ginger, f 

For Cramps and Colics, Stomach Ache, Stomach 
Disorders, Indigestion, etc. 

Carefully prepared by skilled chemists, from selected materials of the best quality. It possesses 
in a concentrated form, all the valuable properties of Jamaica Ginger. It can be used with great 
benefit, wherever a warm cordial, or grateful stimulant is required. As a carminative in Diarrhoea, 
Incipient Cholera, and in all cases of prostration of the digestive functions, it is of inestimable value. 
No traveler or family should be without it. Price, 50 Cents per Bottle. 



BINOHAIVI'S RKD CORDIAL. 

The old and effectual remedy for all Summer Complaints. It will invariably cure Diarrhoea. Dysentery, 
Indigestion, Acidity of the Stomach, Flatulence, Colic, Pain in the Stomach and Bowels, Heartburn, 
etc., etc. It will be found a specific in all cases of Summer Complaint, arising from eating indigestible 
articles. Price, Large, $1.00 per bottle; Small, 50 cents per bottle. 



DAVIS' CARBOLIC OIL LINIMENT. 



In all cases where a liniment is required, this article will be found invaluable. It is one of the best 
family liniments ever offered to the public. Try it, and be satisfied of its wonderful curative powers. 

Price, Large, $1.00; Medium, 50 cents; Small, 25 cents per bottle. 

Cures all Pains, Nervousness, Debility, Delirium Tremens, Neuralgia, Fits, Sea Sickness, Female 
Complaints, etc., etc. Price, $1.00 per bottle. 



CONOKR'S TONIC LIVKR PILLS 

Never produce Nausea, Griping, Violent Purging, or any of the uncomfortable sensations that other 

Laxatives and Cathartics do. and yet. although so safe, pleasant and mild in operation, they are 

powerful to cure, in an extraordinary degree. Price, 25 Cents per box. 






For the cure of Catarrh, Hay Fever, Cold in the Head, Asthma, etc., they have no superior. 
Price, 10 cents per package. 



DR. JACK'S SANTONINE WORM LOZENQES, 

A Sure Remedy. Each Lozenge contains one-half gi-ain of Santonine — the active principle of Worm 
Seed. Price, 25 cents per box. 

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Iiiiportlni Ml MerclaDts M MaiifactiiriiE Ckmists, 

JOBBERS OP PAINTS, OILS, BRUSHES AND WINDOW GLASS, 

^¥* DETROIT, MICH.. ^^^ 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



75 



birthday, several hundred Indians gathered about the fort. When the game reached the 
highest pitch of excitement, when hundreds of excited Indians were running liither and 
yonder in the wildest confusion, when the fears of the garrison and village were entirely 
disarmed, when several hundred squaws with murderous hatchets concealed under their 
blankets had been placed inside the garrison under the pretense of getting them out of 
the way of the game, the shrill Indian war hoop was raised and every Indian at once 
forgot the game in which he was engaged, rushed inside the garrison, seized the hatchet 
till then concealed for him by his squaw, and began a work of death and destruction 
which for ferocity and savage cruelty has rarely been equaled and never surpassed in 
the history of the world. Our space will not permit a full description of the bloody 
scenes of that eventful day. For this we must refer the reader to "Old and New 
Mackinac," a work published some ten years since, and containing a full history of this 
section of the country 

MACKINAC ISLAND. 
'■ As pretty as a pic- 
ture," is the involuntary ex- 
pression of the touri.st as he 
looks upon Mackinac Island 
from the dock of his steamer 
as with stately majesty she 
bears him into the little har- 
bor. 

Mackinac Island has 
been a place of great interest 
as far back as authentic rec- 
ords reach. It received its 
name from the Indians. An 
old legend relates that a large 
number of people were as- 
sembled on Point St. Ignace, 
and, while intently gazing 
on the rising sun, during 
Q the great Mauitou, or Feb- 
< ruary moon, they beheld 
2 the Island suddenly rise up 
o from the water, assuming 
S its present name and form. 
g From the point of observa- 
§ tiou it bore a fancied resem- 
^' blance to the back of a huge 
g turtle; hence they gave it 
g the name Moc-che-ue-mock- 
"" e-nung, which means a 
^ great "turtle. This name 
s when put into a French 
dress, became Michilimacki- 
nac. From the island it 
passed to adjacent points. 
In some connections in the 
early history, the name is 
applied to the section as a 
whole ; in others to the 
point north of the Straits; 
but more frequently to that 
south of the Straits, now 
known as Old Mackinaw. 
The term is now obsolete, 
except as applied to the 
county which lies imme- 
diately north of the Straits, 
in which the island is in- 
cluded. The island has now 
taken upon itself the name 
of Mackinac, pronounced Mackinaw; ac is the original French termination. 

Father Marquette spent the winters of 1G70-71 in this island while preparing to 
establish his mission at St. Ignace. He was, doubtless, the first white man to visit it. 




-FOR- 



TOURISTS, HEALTH and PLEASURE SEEKERS 

NORTHERN MICHIGAN 

will present as usual 



PARK PLACE HOTEL 

AT TRAVERSE CITY, MICH. 

under the tried and thoroughly satisfactory management of COL. J. D. BILLINGS, 

Win continue to offer to tlie traveling public aU that can be desired in a Hotel. 



The Steamer CITY OF GRAND RAPIDS, 

CAPT. 0. E. WILBUR, 

WILL MAKE TRI- WEEKLY TRIPS BETWEEN 

TRAVERSE GITY, PETOSKEY, MACKINAW | ST. IGNACE. 

LEAVING TRAVERSE CITY, 

For the North, every Monday, Wednesday and Friday Morning. 

LEAVING MACKINAW AND ST. IGNACE, 

For the South, every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Morning. 

STOPPING AT NORTHPORT, CHARLEVOIX, PETOSKEY, CROSS VILLAGE, 

AND OTHER INTERMEDIATE POINTS, REGULARLY 

EACH WAY. 



The Steamer T. S- FAXTON, 

CAPT. A. G. ALDRICH, 

WILL RUN DURING THE SEASON AS FOLLOWS: 

Between TRAVERSE GITY, PETOSKEY g HARBOR SPRINGS 

LEAVING TRAVERSE CITY, 
FOR THE NORTH, on TUESDAY, THURSDAY and SATURDAY MORNINGS. 

LEAVING HARBOR SPRINGS AND PETOSKEY,: 
FOR THE SOUTH, on MONDAY, "WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY MORNINGS. 

Stopping regularly each way as usual at Old Mission, Elk Rapids, Torch Lake, Northport, Norwood 

and Charlevoix. 



N , B . — Close connections will be made by the above named steamers with all through trains on 
the G. R. & I. R. R. at Traverse City and Petoskey ; also on Mondays and Wednesdays with our large 
Chicago Steamer, City of Traverse. For all further information desired, address 

HANNAH, LAY & CO., 

Traverse City, Mich. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



77 



or at least to dwell upon it. The first permanent settlement on the island was in 1780, 
when the fort and town were removed to this point from old Mackinaw for greater 
security against the surrounding Indian tribes. Had the massacre of June 4, 1763 
described above never taken place, this island might still have been m the hands of 
natives. Contrary to the treaty of 1783, the English held possession of this island until 
1795, when they were compelled to give it up. , ^ , -r , . . ^ tvt ^r i 

The North American Fur Company, carried on by John Jacob Astor, ot JNew York 
city, had its headquarters on this island. This country controlled the commercial 
interests of the entire Northwest for a long series of years. 

The population of this island has always been, and still is, pretty badly mixed up. 
English, French, and Indian blood frequently flows in the veins of the same family. 
There are also many very excellent families who have come to the island at a 

comparatively recent date. . .,.,., i» +i, v. 

The town is a perfect curiosity. It is situated underneath the bluff, on the brov^ 
of which stands the fort. Main street extends for a distance of a mile or more around 
the beach and is one of the finest drives in the world. Beyond the western extremity 
of the town is the site of the old distillery where, in 1812, the terrified inhabitants were 
gathered for safety, while Captain Roberts, with his savage allies, took possession of the 
fort and island. Near by is the old Indian burying ground, where still sleeps the 
mouldering dust of many a brave son of the forest. Shanty town is mainly occupied 
by fishermen (who are absent during most of the summer in the fishing grounds, 
which extend from Drummond's island, near Detroit, around the north shores of Lakes 
Huron and Michigan, to Green bay). . tt • * 

The Catholic church is near the eastern end of the town. The Mission Home is at 
the extreme eastern end of the town. This derives its name from the fact that the 
property once belonged to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 
and was occupied by them for mission purposes. Rev, W. M. Ferry, father of ex-senator 
Ferry, was at the head of the establishment. 

Fort IVfackinac, built upon the brow of the cliff, just above the town, contains a 
small company of United States troops. There are six brass pieces, and arms and 
accoutrements for a full company. 




FORT HOLMES. 

Half or three-quarters of a mile to the rear of Fort Mackinac, is Fort Holmes. This 
was built soon after the British captured the fort in 1812. Each citizen was compelled 
to give three days work towards its construction. When completed, it presented a 



78 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



very fine appearance. It was first called Fort George, but after the surrender of the 
island it was called Fort Holmes, in honor of the lamented Major Holmes, who fell in 
the engagement at Early's farm, near the north part of the island. For a full account 
of this battle we must refer the reader to "Old and New Mackinaw," which is for sale 
at several places on the island. 

At a comparatively recent date the United States government has set apart a large 
portion of the island of Mackinac as a National Park. It is expected that a large sum 
of money will soon be expended for the improvement of this park. 

The natural scenery of Mackinac island is unsurpassed. Nature seems to have 
exhausted herself in the clustered objects of interest which everywhere meet the eye. 
The lover of Nature may wander through the shaded glens and climb over the rugged 
rocks of this island for weeks, and even months, and never grow weary. Each day 
some new object of beauty and interest will attract his attention. As you approach the 
island it appears a perfect gem. A finer subject for an artist's pencil could not be 
found. In some places it rises almost perpendicularly from the water's edge to the 
height of one hundred and fifty feet, while in others the ascent is gradual. Parts of Ihe 
island are covered with a small growth of hard-wood trees— beech, maple, iron-wood, 
birch, etc.,— while other parts abound in a rich variety of evergreens, among which 
spruce, arbor-vita?, ground-pine, white-pine, balsam, and juniper predominate. 
The geological aspects of the island are curious and interesting. 

On the northeast cor- 
ner of the i.sland is Rob- 
ertson's Folly. It is re- 
lated that in the years 
of long ago one Capt. 
Robertson built a sum- 
mer house upon this cliff 
where he was accustomed 
to make merry with his 
friends over the wine- 
glass, but that at a sub- 
sequent date the cliflf 
gave away, precipitating 
the summer house and its 
contents to the beach be- 
low, which circumstance 
gave rise to the name. 

ARCH ROCK. 

Is situated a little dis- 
tance north from Rob- 
ertson's Folly, and must 
be seen to be appreciated. 
We cjuote from "Old 
and New Mackinaw:" 

" Words cannot fully de- 
scribe it in all its grandeur. 
It is a magnificent natural 
arch, spanning a chasm of 
eighty or ninety feet in 
height, and forty or fifty feet 
in width. The summit of this 
rock is one hundred and forty- 
nine feet above the level of 
the lake. Its abutments are 
composed of calcareous rock, 
and the opening underneath 
the arch has been produced 
by the falling down of the 
great masses of rock now to 
•be seen upon the beach below. 
A path to the right leads to 
the brink of the arch, whence 
the visitor, if sufficiently 
reckless, may pass to its 
summit, which is about three feet in width. Here we see twigs of cedar growing out of what appears 
to be solid rock, while in the rear and on either hand the lofty eminence is clothed with trees and 
shrubbery— maple, birch, poplar, cedar, and balsam— giving to the landscape richness and variety. 
Before us are the majestic waters of Lake Huron, dotted to the distance with islands. We may now 
descend through the great chasm, "arched by the hand of God," and at the base of the projecting 
angle of the main rock find a second arch less magnificent, but no less curious and wonderful. Pass- 
ing under this, we soon reach the beach below, whence the view is particularly grand and imposing. 
The mighty arch seems suspended In mid-air above us, and as we gaze upon it. lost in wonder and 




ARCH ROCK, MACKINAC ISLAND. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



79 



admiration, we exclaim with the Psalmist, " Lord, what is man that thou takest knowledge of him, or 
the son of man that thuu makest account of him." 

A half mile to the west of Arch Rock, not far from Fort Holmes, is the not less 
celebrated 

SUGAR LOAF ROCK. 

Of this rock the author of 
" Old and New Mackinaw" 
says: 

" This rock is about one hun- 
dred and fifty yards from the foot 
of the high ridge, upon the south- 
east extremity of which stands 
Fort Holmes. The plateau upon 
^^hlch it stands is about one hun- 
dred and fifty feet above the level 
of the lake, while the summit of 
the rock is two hundred and 
eighty-four feet above the lake, 
givmg an elevation of one hun- 
dred and thirty-four feet to the 
lock itself. The composition of 
this rock is the same as that of 
Aich Rock. Its shape is conical, 
and from its crevices grow a few 
L ^ ines and cedars. It is cavernous, 
''x and somewhat crystalline, with 
ift its strata distorted in every con- 
' (tnable direction. In the north 
' side is an opening, sufiicient in its 
dimensions to admit several indi- 
Mduals. Here one might shelter 
fiom the most violent storm. 
Within this opening, upon the 
smooth surfaces of the rock, may 
be found the autographs of hun- 
dreds of eager aspirants after im- 
mortality. As we take refuge in 
this rock, we are reminded of the 
Rock of Ages, and led to sing, 
with the poet, — 
" Rock of Ages, cleft for me, 
Let me hide myself in thee." 

As we approach this 
rock along the road, the ef- 
fect is grand and imposing. 
The patriarch of the ages, it 
lifts its hoary head high up 
toward heaven, in utter de- 
fiance of the fury of the ele- 
ments The view is also 
very fine from the top of the ridge, whence, by its isolated position and bold form, it 
strikes the beholder with wonder and admiration. 

The "curious" are ever eager to know by what freak of nature this monstrous 
boulder has been placed in its present position. Has it been thrust up through the 
crust of the earth, like a needle through a garment, by some internal volcanic action? 
or has it been separated from the adjacent ridge and disentombed from its ancient 
sepulchre by a system of gradual denudation carried on by nature through the successive 
ages of the world's history? Science tells us that the latter hypothesis is the true one. 
Foster and "Whitney, in their geological report, mention the Arch and Sugar-loaf rocks 
"as particular examples of denuding action," and state that this denuding action, pro- 
ducing such an opening (as in the Arch), with other attending phenomena, could only 
have operated while near the level of a large body of water like the great lake itself. 
This coincides with the views of Professor Winchell. Traces of water-action now seen 
on the vertical sides of these two rocks, two hundred feet above the level of the water, 
are precisely the same as those seen upon the rocks close by the water's edge. To all 
fond of natural curiosities, these two rocks alone possess attractions sutHcient to justify 
a visit \o the northern lakes. 

Skull Rock. — Noted as the place where Alexander Henry was secreted by the 
Chippewa Chief, Wawatam, after the horrid massacre of the British garrison at Old 
Mackinaw. 

The British Landing. — So named from the fact that Captain Roberts, with his 
mixed command of English, French and Indians, here disembarked his forces to take 
the place in 1812. 




SUGAR LOAF, MACKINAC ISLAND. 



80 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



Scott's Gave. — This cave is underneath one of the huge rocks peculiar to Macki- 
nac. While inside this rock-roofed cavern, a peculiar sensation takes possession of 
you, and you are reminded of the scene described in the sixth chapter of Revelation, 
where the kings of the earth and the great men hide themselves in the dens and in the 
rocks of the mountains, and say to the mountains and rocks, " Fall on us and hide us 
from the face of him that sitteth on the throne, and from the wrath of the Lamb: for 
the great day of his wrath is come: and who shall be able to stand?" In the vicinity of 
this cave are yet standing a few patriarchs of the forest, remnants of the heavy growth 
of timber which at an early day covered the island. 

Early's Farm and the Devil's Kitchen are also points of interest, and the 
tourist should not fail to visit them. 




This rock stands out boldly 
from the side of the cliff, and in 
appearance is similar to the Sugar 
loaf rock. There are other points 
on the island to which romantic 
visitors have applied this name, 
but tradition has bestowed the title 
upon this. William M. Johnson, 
Esq., .formerly a resident of this 
village, gives us the following 
legend concerning it: 

" The huge rock called the ' Lover's Leap ' is situated about one mile west of the village of Macki- 
nac. It is a high, perpendicular bluflf, one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet in height, rising 
boldly from the shore of the lake. A solitary pine tree formerly stood upon its brow, which some 
vandal has cut down. 

" Long before the pale faces profaned this island home of the genii, Me-che-ne-mock-e-nung-o-qua, 
a young Ojibway girl, just maturing into womanhood, often wandered there, and gazed from its dizzy 
heights, and witnessed the receding canoes of the large war parties of the combined bands of the Ojib- 
was and Ottawas speeding south, seeking for fame and scalps. 

" It was there she often sat. mused, and hummed the songs Ge-niw-e-gwon loved. This spot was 
endeared to her. for it was there that she and Ge-niw-e-gwon first met and exchanged words of love, 
and found an affinity of soul existing between them. It was there that she often sat and sang the 
Ojibwa love song: ) 

" ' Mong-e-do-gwain, in-de-nain-dum, 
Mong-e-do-gwain, in-de-nain-dum, 

Wain-shung-ish-ween, neen-e-mo-shane, , 

Wain-shung-ish-ween, neen-e-mo-shane, 
A-nee-wan-wan-san-bo-a-zode, 
A-nee-wan-wan-san-bo-a-zode. 
" I give but one verse, which may be translated as follows: 

" ' A loon, I thought, was looming, 
A loon. I thought, was looming. 
Why ! it is he, my lover I 
Why! it is he, my lover! 
His paddle in the waters gleaming. 
His paddle in the waters gleaming.' 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 81 

"From this bluff she of ten watched and listened for the return of the war parties; for among 

them she kaew wasGe-niw-egwou, his head decorated with war-eagle plumes, which none but a brave 

could sport. The west wind often wafted far in advance the shouts of victory and death, as they 

shouted and sang upon leaving Pe-quod-e-noug (Old Mackinaw), to make the traverse to the Spirit or 

■ Fairy Island. 

"One season, when the war-party returned, she could not distinguish his familiar and loved war- 
shout. Her spirit told her that he had gone to the spirit- land of the West. It was so; an enemy's 
arrow had pierced his breast, and after his body was placed leaning against a tree, his face fronting 
his enemies, he died : but ere he died he wished the mourning warriors to remember him to the sweet 
maitl of his heart. Thus he died, far away fi-om home and the friends he loved. 

" Me-che-nemock-e-nung-o-qua's heart hushed its beatings, and all its warm emotions were chilled 
and dead. The moving, living spirit of her beloved Ge-niw-e-gwon, she witnessed continually beckon- 
ing her to follow him to the happy hunting-grounds of spirits in the west; he appeared to her in human 
shape, but was invisible to others of his tribe. 

■' One morning her body was found mangled at the foot of the bluff. The soul had thrown aside 
its covering of earth, and had gone to join the spirit of her beloved Ge-niw-e-gwon, to travel together 
to the land of spirits, realizing the glories and bliss of a future, eternal existence." 

Chimney Rock. — Some little distance farther on is "Chimney Rock," which 
Professor Winchell denominates one of the most remarkable masses of rock in this 
or any other State. 

ST. IGNACE. 

About five miles northwest from Mackinac island lies the enterprising town of St. 
Ignace. This town is finely yet singularly located. It lies in a sort of semi-circle 
around the head of East Morau Bay. At the extreme north end of the town is the 
immense establishment of the Mackinaw Lumber Company, while at the extreme south 
end is the no less immense establishment of the Martel Furnace Company. Lumber, 
shingles, lath, etc., etc., are manufactured on an extensive scale by the former of these 
two companies, while by the latter the native ore, as it is taken from the iron mines of 
the Upper Peninsula, is subjected to the grinding, melting, casting process, and fitted 
for use in the foundries of the country. Gathered about each of these two establishments 
is a little village, with stores, shops, residences, etc., etc., sufficient for the accom- 
modation of the few scores of individuals who are especially interested in them. 
Between these two establishments, and forming almost a continuous line from the one 
to the other, a distance of 3.} miles, is the main part of the town. There is scarcely a 
business place, and but very few residences comparatively, which are not located along 
the beach on one side or the other of the very fine drive-way, which runs from ten to 
fifty feet from the water's edge. Thus the town is all long and almost no width at all. 
There is scarcely a town in the State which can boast of a more extended water front. 
From 40 to 150 feet back from the water's edge the land rises, in some places abruptly, 
in others more gradually, to the height of from 20 to 50 feet, thus forming a terrace or 
table land most admirably and charmiagly adapted for residences. Upon tliis table land 
some fine dwellings have already been erected, while many others are in process of 
erection. 

The population of St. Ignace numbers some 2,500 souls, and is composed of French, 
Indians, half-breeds, etc., etc., who are the old residents of the town, and the much 
larger and much more enterprising "live Yankee," "Young America" population, 
which has settled there within the past six or eight years. There are about the usual 
number and variety of business places and much more than the usual amount of busi- 
ness done. 

Historically St. Ignace is one of the most interesting localities in the northwest. It 
was settled in 1671 by Father James Marquette, and for more than a quarter of a century 
was really the centre o£ everything in the great northwest. During this period it con- 
tained a garrison of about 200 well disciplined soldiers, with a fine fort of pickets and 
"about sixty houses which formed a street in a straight line." Some six or seven 
thousand savages dwelt in the villages near by. There was a Jesuit mission and college 
with an unbroken succession of Jesuit priests. The lands adjacent were cleared and 
well cultivated, and a sufficient quantity of Indian corn was produced for the use of 
both the French and savage inhabitants. The town continued to flourish until some 
dispute arose between Cadillac, the commander at the fort, and the Jesuits, when the 
former repaired to France, where he received a commission to establish Detroit, which 
he did in 1701. Subsequent to this date the town declined until 1706, when the Jesuits 
became discouraged, burned down their college and chapel and returned to Quebec. 
The garrison was re-established in 1814, but on the south side of the Straits at Old 
Mackinaw, now Mackinaw City. 

It was from St. Ignace that Father Marquette set out on the 17th day of May, 1673, 
in search of the Mississippi River. The good father had learned much of this river 
from the Indian tribes among whom he had labored, and had earnestly longed to see it 
with his own eyes. It was therefore with delight that he set out upon the journey. 
It was to this point that his bones were brought back in 1677, two years after his death 



Deti^oit, Fjac^mac \ Marqueiste 



RAILROAD. 



Cheapest, Shortest and Quickest Route 



-) BETWEEN (- 



ALL POIMTS EAST 



MARQUETTE, XEGAUWEE, E'ANSE, ISHPEITIIKG, HOUGHTON, 

HANCOCK, CALUMET, OXTOXAGOX, EAOEE 

HARBOR, LAKE LIXDEIV, 

— AND — 

All Points in the Iron and Copper Regions of Michigan. 

The term " Cheapest, Shortest and Quickest," has become stereotyped and is undoubtedly used at 
times when it ought not to be ; but when we tell you that we are 

M Miles iearer i Cities » East 

Of which you can satisfy yoiu'self by referring to any general Railroad Guide, than 
any of the lines via Chicago— we mean it. 

TWO MAIL AND EXPRESS TRAINS EACH WAY DAILY 

Between ST. IGNACE and MARQUETTE, at which city connection is made with the MARQUETTE, 

HOUGHTON & ONTONAGON RAILROAD for points mentioned above, and during 

season of navigation with Boats for 

DULUTHgiNORTHWEST 

AT ST. IGNACE CONNECTION IS MADE WITH THE MICHIGAN CENTRAL RAILROAD AND 
THE GRAND RAPIDS AND INDIANIA RAILROAD FROM AND TO THE CITIES AND 
TOWNS OF LOWER MICHIGAN AND POINTS IN THE EAST AND SOUTHEAST, 
AND WITH THE DETROIT & CLEVELAND STEAM NAVIGATION COM- 
PANY FOR PORT HUKON. DETUOIT, CLEVELAND, ETC., AND WITH 
FINE PASSENGER PROPELLERS FOR , 

lyLXH.-W-A.TJKIEE i 0H:I0A.C3-0, 

1^- Our equipment will be found first-class. STEEL BAILS, PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING 
C.<4i?S on Night Trains, etc., etc. The Straits of Mackinac are crossed on the fine Steam Ferry Boat 

" Algomah." 

UNSURPASSED HUHIINS AUB riSBIHEl it Foints ilon^ the line of the hi I M, 1. 1 

BE SURE AND PURCHASE TICKETS VIA D., M. & M. R. R. 

For information regarding Lands for Sale by the Company, apply to W. O. STRONG, Land 
Commissioner, Detroit. 

For information about Through Freight Rates and the purchase of Passenger Tickets to all points 
reached by this line, apply to 



D. McCOOL, Gen'l Supt., 

Marcjubtte, Mich. 



F. MILLIGAN. Gen'l Ft. & Pass. Agt. 

Marquette, Mich. 



RESORTS OF NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 83 

at what is now Ludington, and buried in a little vault in the middle of the chapel which 
he himself had constructed, and at the altar of which he himself had often officiated. 
After the chapel was burned down by the discouraged missionaries in 1706. the final 
resting place of Marquette was entirely lost sight of and the town ceased to be of any 
importance. 

Within a few years the burial place of Marquette has been discovered, and an asso- 
ciation has been formed to erect a suitable monument to his memory. The association 
is officered by men of means and culture, and it is confidently expected that on some 
appropriate spot in the viciuity of the Straits a suitable monument will soon be erected 
to the memory of the much lamented missionary and discoverer. 

The first event which gave new life and importance to St. Ignace was the erection 
of the Mackinaw lumber company's mill. The second was the erection of the Martel 
furnace in anticipation of the early completion of the Detroit, Mackinaw & Marquette 
Railroad, but the main tiling which has given new life and importance to the town is the 
completion of this railroad. Already the amount of ore, telegraph poles, ties, square 
timber, etc., which is brought to St. Ignace over this road for shipment is simply 
immense. 

The soil about St. Ignace produces abundantly. It is a rocky, gravelly, rotten 
limestone formation, which is especially adapted to the production of vegetables. 

From St. Ignace north and west to Marquette, on Lake Superior, the country is 
.new. Until within two or three years, or since the opening up of the Detroit, Macki- 
naw & Marquette Railroad very few permanent settlers could be found in this region of 
country. Since that date, however, hundreds of families have settled along the line of 
this road and the country is being rapidly cleared up. There are some barren plains 
through which the road runs, but much of the country is excellent for agricultural 
purposes. There are large tracts of as fine beech and maple timber along this line as 
can be found in the world. The Martel Furnace Company is clearing about 1,000 acres 
of this laud per year and converting its timber into charcoal. Trout Lake station is 26 
and McMillan is 63 miles from St. Ignace. Both the.se towns are destined to be import- 
ant. Numerous lakes, of all conceivable sizes and shapes, all full of fish, are scattered 
through this country, and the surrounding forests abound in an almost endless variety 
of game. 

Our space is too limited to make more than passing mention of the celebrated 
Pictured Rocks, a little off the line of the D., M. & M. R. R., well worth visiting, the 
scenery being of the grandest description and the fishing excellent. 

MARQUETTE. 

The great centre of the mining interests of the Lake Superior Iron Region is a 
thriving city of 5,500 inhabitants, beautifully situated on Iron Bay. The city occupies 
a moderately elevated site, affording one of the finest views of lake and inland scenery 
to be found in the Upper Peninsula. It is the eastern terminus of the Marquette, 
Iloughtcm & Ontonagon Railroad and the western terminus of the Detroit, Mackinaw «& 
Marquette Railroad which furniiliesall rail communication with Detroit and shortens the 
distance nearly 100 mileS. The city is lighted with gas and supplied with water from 
the lake by the Holly system of water works. The traveling public are well taken care 
of by several good hotels; the Northwestern especially being a first class summer resort, 
with all modern conveniences and beautifully located on the shore of the bay. 

One of the features of Marquette is the store or museum of Mr. T. Mead, where can 
be found some very fine mineral specimens, many of the products of Indian industry, in 
the way of birch canoes, bead work, etc. Here also can be found tbe papers and maga- 
zines published throughout the country. Mead's, especially in the summer season, is the 
great resort and headquarters for strangers seeking the amusmg, useful and marvelous 
in and around Lake Superior. 

Marquette, and in short the entire Lake Superior country, is full of interest to the 
tourist. No country in the world has so many attractions as a place in which to spend 
the heated term. The country is interestmg in its natural scenery, in its cool breezes, 
in its immense iron and copper mines, tlie largest in the world, in its history, in its 
business thrift and enterprise. Interestiag, in short, from whatever standpoint you 
view it. Only a few years ago and it was the sole possession of the dusky sons of the 
forest. 



THE "FISHING LINE." 



Tuf^ISIE TISIEl 



GRAND RAPIDS& INDIANA 



2§=RAILROAD.=f^ 



THE ONLY ROUTE TO THE 



Trout, Grayling and Black Bass Fisheries, 

J^lSTTD THE FT^lv^OTJS 

SUMMER, HEALTH i GAME RESORTS, § LAKES 



-OF- 



NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 



The waters of the Grand Traverse region and the Michigan North Woods are unsurpassed, if 
equaled, in the abundance and great variety of flsh contained. 

Brook. Trout abound in the streams, and the famous American Grayling is found only in these 
waters. 

The Trout Season begins May 1st and ends September 1st. The Grayling Season opens June 1st 
and ends November 1st. 

Black Bass, Pike, Pickerel and Muskalonge also abound in large numbers in the many lakes and 
lakelets of this territory. The sportsman can readily send trophies of his skill to his friends or " Club " 
at home, as ice for packing flsh can be had at nearly all points. 

Take your Family with you. The scenery of the North Woods and Lakes is very beautiful. The 
air is pure, dry and bracing. 

The Climate is peculiarly beneficial to those suffering with Hay-Fever and Asthmatic Affections. 

Nkw Hotels, with all modern improvements, have been erected, as well as many extensive addi- 
tions to the older ones, which will guarantee ample Accommodations for All. 

The completion of this line from Petoskey to Mackinaw City forms the most direct route to Macki- 
nac, St. Ignace, and, in connection with the Detroit, Mackinac & Marquette Railroad, to Marquette, 
Negaunee, L'Anse, Houghton, Hancock, and all points in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. 

During the season Round Trip Excursion Tickets will be Sold at Low Rates, and attractive 
train facilities offered to Tourists and Sportsmen. 

Dogs, Guns and Fishing Tackle carried Free at Owner's Risk. It is our aim to make Sportsmen 
feel "At Home '' on this route. For Tourist Guide, an illustrated book of 160 pages, free. Time Cards, 
Folders and further information, address 

-^. B. XjIEET, 

GEN'L PASS'R AGENT, GRAND BAPIDS, MICH. 






411 ElflE t41E Mftt, 



WYANDOTTE, MICH. 

These famous Springs are now controlled by a company composed of the celebrated 
Drs.K.&K.'sU.S. IHedical and Surgical Association and the WyaiKlotte 
IMincrai Springs Co., with Hon. Moses W. Field, President, John D. Kergan, 
M. D., Medical Superintendent, and Frank B. Smith, Resident Physician. This 
popular resort, famed for its waters of wonderful health-giving properties, aside from 
its being so delightfully situated on the famous Detroit river, will now be one of the 
most completely equipped sanitary establishments in America. The Bath Houses have 
all the modern conveniences, and all kinds of baths are administered. The Hotel is 
provided with elegant suites of rooms, good service, and will be kept strictly first- 
class in all respects. The grounds are beautifully laid out— with accommodations for 
all manner of out-door pastimes. Splendid boating and fishing. Several daily lines of 
steamers, and nine daily trains, give direct and speedy communication between Detroit 
and the Springs. Dr. Kergau (the medical sup't), during his recent visit to Great 
Britain, France and Germany, carefully examined their celebrated institutions for the 
purpose of getting information of the most value, and ensuring to the patrons of this 
sanitarium the most skillful and thorough treatment. 



Leading Business Houses.— Bloom & Co., foot of Woodward avenue, make 
a specialty of Tents, Awnings, and Flags, and are general dealers in Wire Rope, Cotton 
Duck and Awning Goods. This loft was established in 1835, and is the oldest on the 
lakes'— Tiie Union Cliair Works, corner Cass and Congress streets, manufac- 
ture Cane, Carpet, Perforated, and Wood Seat Chairs, and make a specialty of Office 
Chairs.— Eberts Bros., Walker Block, are Al in roofing with Slate, Iron, or Gravel; 
carry large stocks, employ a large force of men ; work in city and country attended to with 
promptness.— H. ». Edwards & Co., 16, 18 and 20 Woodward avenue, have a 
very extensive establishment, and a large stock of Gossamer Goods, Rubber Clothing, 
and all varieties of Rubber Goods, Leather Belting, Cotton Duck, Rope, Oakum, etc. 



BLOOM & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Tents, Awnings, Flags, Stack and 
Wagon Covers. 




The Union Chair Works, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Cane, Carpet, Perforated, and Wood- 
Seat Chairs. 



DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Wire Rope, Cotton Duck, Cordage 
and Awning Goods. 

«— )^%— TEiTTS TO liEisra:— %-«— B 

Prompt attention paid to country orders, and 
window awnings for hotels and private residences. 

Lofts over 9, 11 aud 13, foot Woodward Avenue, 
DETROIT. - MICH. 




Office and Works, cor. Cass aud Congress Streets, 
Detroit, Mich. J. R. McLaughlin, Manager. 

Send for Catalogues. Correspondence Solicited. 



-^ A FULLY C5- 

DESCRIPTIVK PAMPtilvKT, 

Giving analysis of the water of the St. Clair Mineral Springs, Testimonials, 

and other information of value and interest 

MAILED ON APPLICATION. 



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~J:3 do NOIXVOOT HHl £^ 



THE CELEBRATED WOOTON DESKS 



RECEIVED EVERYWHERE WITH 

— ^EXPRKSSIONS OK DELIOHT^— 

The Wooton Rotary Desks. 
Here are samples of two of these very popular office 
appliances, which invariably elicit the Admiration and 
Approval of business men wherever presented. Principle 
of construction novel and comprehensive. 

The lower sections are pivoted to the framework of the 
body of the desk, and, with a slight touch of the hand, 
rotate at the will of the operator. Awkward closets 
and drawers are thus done away with, and proper 
facilities afforded for the convenient classification of 
Books. Papers, etc. Pigeon-holes in cases filled with 
our Patent Filing Boxf^s. 

We make a great variety of Desks embracing this 
principle; our work way be seen in 

LEADING HOUSES THROUGHOl T THE COUNTRY. 




No. 8, Open. 



THE V/OQTOS CABINET OFFICE SECRETARY. 



This elegant Secretary 
was patented in 1874, 
and is now in use by 
Thousands in this 
Country and Europe. 

It is universally regarded 
the handsomest an 
most desirable appli- |y C f* 
ance for office or li- 
brary ever produced. 





No, 310, Roll Top. 



Open. 

For Full Details of our Various 
STYLES 

SEND FOE CATALOGUE. 

THE 

WOOTON DESK MNFG. CO. 

Indianapolis, Ind., 

U. S. A. 



THE 



WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS 

^ S AN ITAR lUM *" 



RIVER PARK HOTEL 



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The Drs. K. & K.'s U. S. Medical and Surgical Association now control this celebrated health 
resort, which, besides being famed for its healing waters, is the most delightfully situated and com- 
pletely equipped sanitarv estaMishintMit in A in<'ri(a-— offering, as it does, all the advantages of an 
elegant hotel and the ("O.IIFOIM'S AM» KKTIUKMKM OF A HOME, combined with all the modern 
appliances and resourc(-s of t lie most popular and noted "CUKES" in either the Old or New World. 
Our Medical Superintendent, duiing his recent visit to Europe, carefully examined the most celebrated 
Hydropathic and Massage institutions of England, Scotland, France and Germany. Such ideas and 
details of treatment as were found to be of greatest value, both as regards the care and treatment of 
our pati-ons, have been transplanted and improved upon in the arrangement of the WHITE SULPHUR 
SPRINGS SANITARIUM. The River Park grounds are famed for their romantic location, and a large 
amount of money has been expended in improving them wherever the combination of both nature 
and art could be made to produce THE PEREECTION OF BEAUTY. The buildings are all modern, are 
heated by steam, lighted with gas and furnished with electric bells and telephone connection with 
Detroit and the Association's business offices in the city. Steamers run several times daily during the 
season between Detroit and the gi'ounds. There are also nine trains daily connecting the city with the 
Springs. 

It should be remembered that the waters of these Springs have NEVER FAILED to cure RHEUMA- 
TISM, NEURALGIA, LIVER AFFECTIONS. KIDNEY DISEASES, DYSPEPSIA. CATARRH, SCROFULA, 
PARALYSIS, SKIN DISEASES, PILES. NERVOUS DEBILITY and many other diseases. The Plain 
Mineral Bath, the Russian Batli. and the Electro-Magnetic Bath are administered as the condition of 
the patient may require, as well as all other forms of Hydropathic applications. When demanded by 
circumstances or conditions, the patrons of this celebrated Establishment have all the medical and 
surgical advantages at the command of the U. S. Mkdical and Surgical Association, which is com- 
posed of EIGHTEEN PROFESSIONAL GENTLEMEN of acknowledged standing in their respective 
specialties. 

It is the purpose of the Association to keep this Health Resort open throughout the year. It has 
accommof'itions for '.iOO guests, and its facilities for the SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT of the various 
ailments iiicidental to men, women or children are unrivalled, where the personal attention of the 
members of their medical staff is necessary to perfecting cures of the various diseases treated of in 
this paper. The White Sulphur Springs Sanitarium offers all the inducements and advantages to be 
found on this continent, at a reasonable price. 



*- < e \^ TT sri. Ev 2jf- — '*" 

^ ^ O KS 3^' ^ ^ ^ 




IS SOLD BY 

Leading Dealers Everywhere. 



lait®sf 5 €®i %mM Malm il 



£J0:!) 



mt^M'tmi. mM 




A. SICHMOKD. F. H. A. BACKUS. C. N. AYRES. 

RICHMOND, BACKUS & CO., 

Blai Boot MaMlactirfirs 

STATIONERS AND BINDERS, 

183 Jefferson Ave., Detroit. 

^S'This Book was bound in our Factory. 



] l(f 





(Cut of No. 2 Type Writer.) 

No 1, $70 No 2, $100. Upper and lower case. 

No. 4, $80. 

State Agents for the 

TYPE-WRITER 

FOR 

MICHIGAN AND OHIO. 

EVERY FAMILY SHOULD HAVE ONE. 




v^-/- 



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MICHIGAN STATE GAPITOL 

-., ^l:;:[^. ^_ 

LANSING. 




ON THE LINE OF THE 

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Dejroit, Lansing ^ NoRTriERfsi 



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Railroad. 



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