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Full text of "Style (1920)"

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1TX LI JL/ IV 




LONGCLOTHS, CAMBRICS AND SHEETINGS 

SOFT TO THE NEEDLE, LAUNDER BEAUTIFULLY, STRONG IN TEXTURE. 

R.CHARDHAWORTHXND COMPANY, LIMITED.'eNGLAND - M.LLS ON MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL - THE SHOW MILLS OF LANCASHIRE 










Stylishly Tailored— Well Cut— Beautifully Fitted 



Town and Country Wear 



Never befoi e have we < » r 1 1 - 1 ed su< li an elaborate and brilliant showing for Spring, I hi- \ ei \ latest fashionable fabrics and si lei 
in almost endless \ ai iel> . 

The new Sports idea, as developed in these beautifully tailored and fitted coats and suits for Spring, does credit i<> our wonderful 
stall hi Mastei \rtists and Designei 

If you cannui come to Market, ask us to send you, at frequent intervals, special Digests featuring our newest styles and fabrics. 



NEW VORK 
\v. ru.i Huilding 
.ili Wi and !3rd Si 



(>. Ken yon Company, Inc. 



NEW 'HlKK 



Oil, \(.ci 

Congress and 

Franklin Strw ts 



DRY. GOODS REVIEW, January 16, 1900. Volume XXXII. Published everj month by the MacLean Publishing Co.. Limited. 143-153 Universit 
Toronl ion price. $2.00. EnU'reil aa tecond-claaa matter, Julj 1-t. 1912, al the Post Office at Buffalo, under the Act of Man 

matter :it th,- Po ment, Ottawa, 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




sail 



AT LAST 

"REAL RIBBONS" BACK AGAIN 

FOR IMMEDIATE 

DELIVERY 



Taffettas 



SWISS 

Satin - Lingerie 

All Widths and[Colors 



FRENCH VELVET RIBBONS 

Our No. 333 - All Widths - Black Only 



LARGE ASSORTMENT 

AMERICAN - DRESDEN - FANCY RIBBONS 

"Everything in Dry Goods" 



:va 



Greenshields Limited 



illllP^lll^O E VE N TE Etsr 




Victor: a*5 quare 
" montreal • 



I) I; Y GOODS REV] E W 



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DC 



DC 



DEZ3C==DC 



DC 



3. &♦ Eing e%tlfe Company, 

Himttetr 



S.lk 



s 

that are 
distinctive 

in 

coloring* 

ana 

designs 





Silk. 

that are 

dependable 

for 

quality 

and 
service 



Silks for Spring 



Duchess Satins 

Crepe de Chines 

Fancy Stripes and Plaids 

Chinese Silks 



Charmeuse Satin* 

Georgettes 

Fancy Trimming Silk* 

Japanese Silks 



Our stock for immediate delivery is large and well assorted 

THE SILK HOUSE OF CANADA 

A. S. KING SILK CO., Limited 

59-61 Wellington St. We*t Toronto 

Foreign Offices : 
Zurich, Switzerland Lyons. France 

Yokohama, Japan Cheroo, China 



Sm c 



DC 



DE3C 



DC 



DC 




DRY GOODS REVIE W 



ALL our representatives 
are out for 1920. One of 
them will call on you soon 
and you will do well to com- 
plete your entire Spring re- 
quirements. 



AT this time ot year, our 
stock has never been so 
large as now and we hope our 
friends will avail themselves 
of this opportunity to get im- 
mediate delivery on many at- 
tractive and seasonable lines 
of Dry Goods. 




John M. Garland Son & Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA - - CANADA 

Wholesale Dry Goods 






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DRY GOODS R E V I K W 



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To the Trade 



Every Department 

Assorted as Fully 

as Possible 

For the Assorting Trade: 

Staples 
Linens 
Dress Goods 
Hosiery and Gloves 
Ready to Wear Goods 
Men's Furnishings 
Smallwares 
House Furnishings 

Our travellers are now on the roadVith a full range 
of samples. We solicit through them your esteemed 
orders. 

Our letter order department is fully equipped with 
a competent staff to forward your daily orders with 
prompt dispatch. 

We shall be pleased to have you 

Visit Our Warehouse 

JOHN MACDONALD & CO., LIMITED 

TORONTO 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

$> ** ' - . '* % 

JS ill 

Special This Week 

: TO THE BUYER 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Men's Lined Leather Mitts, $6.50 per dozen. 

Men's Horse Hide Front, Pullover Mitts, $12.00 per doz. 

Men's Heavy Grey Wool Socks, at $5.50 and $6.50 per doz. 

Men's Heavy Jumbo Knit Sweater Coats, in brown, maroon and myrtle, $64.00 

per doz. 

READY-TO-WEAR 

Hosiery Seconds, Ladies' Hose, 15 in., fibre silk boot, with cotton top. Spliced 
heel and toe. Black and white. Sizes 8y L >, 9, 9VL>, 10. Put up in 1 dozen to a 
box, solid size. Special at $6.50 per dozen. 

Boys' 2/1 Rib Black, Heavy Union Hose. Size 6, $4.25; 6V->, $4.45; 7, $4.60; 
71/2, $4.80 ; 8, $5.15 ; 8y L >, 9, 9y 2 , 10, $5. 40. Put up in i/ 2 doz. to a box, solid size. 
Ladies' White Flannelette Nightgowns, high or low neck, embroidery trimmed. 
Sizes 56, 58, 60. Put up in V- 2 dozen boxes assorted sizes. Price $24.00 per 
dozen. Scarce goods. 

DRESS GOODS 

36-in. Mercerized Poplin, 35-yd. pieces. Colors: Ivory, Taupe, Old Rose, Copen, 
Heliotrope, Brown, Myrtle, Garnet, Navy, also Black, at 75c per yd. 

STAPLE DEPARTMENT 

S5, 35-inch Striped Flannelette, 31c per yd. Large range of patterns. 

LINEN DEPARTMENT 

Bordered Crash Roller Towels, assorted borders. Length, 2y 2 yds. $9.50 per 
dozen. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT 

Congoleum piece goods, 3 yds wide, in three good selling designs. 65 sq. yds. 

in a roll, at 85c sq. yd. 

Bungalow Curtain Nets, 30-in., 19c; 34-in., 21 1 ->c; 36-in., 24c and up. 

Tapestry Rugs, iy 2 yds. x 2 yds., at $6.50 each. 

Velvet Rugs, V/ 2 yds. x 2 yds., at $11.50 each. 

Heavy Jute Pile Fringed-end Hearth Rugs, 27 in. x 54 in., $27.00 per dozen; 

24 in. x 48 in., $21.00 per dozen. Also made in hall runners, 2 ft. 3 in. x 7 1 .'» 

ft., $5.00; 2 ft. 3 in. x 9 ft., $6.00 each; 2 ft. 3 in. x 10V., ft, $7.00 each; 2 ft. 

3 in. x 12 ft., $8.00 each. All Oriental designs. 

Yours very truly, 

JOHN MACDONALD & CO., LIMITED 

TORONTO 



D I; Y miODS REVIEW 



Made in CANADA, by 



"HOOVER" 

Will Be the Big 

"BUY-WORD" here 

for Electric Cleaners 



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^■**i i I fill ~*^^ ^^^■9^ w '%v#4 #V4fiv3LW ^^&2 2. ^^^^Hftnfe 



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ELECTRIC 



SUCTION 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



CANADIANS for CANADIANS 




WITH The Hoover's new big 
factory in operation at Ham- 
ilton, Ontario, with its 30,000 square 
feet of floor area entirely given to the 
complete manufacture of Hoovers by 
Canadians, The Hoover will rapidly 
parallel, throughout the Dominion, 
its United States record for tremen- 
dous sales. 

National advertising in all leading 
Canadian magazines supplements 
the advertising which will circulate 
in Canada through the medium 
of twenty-three United States 
periodicals. 

Canadian dealers will have at their 
disposal the entire array of local 
publicity helps, the all-inclusive 
variety of which has created an envi- 
able reputation for The Hoover. 



The famous Hoover method of dealer 
co-operation that has made fortunes 
for dealers elsewhere, and bars the 
United States factory from adding 
new dealers, although output has 
been tripled, will be available for the 
profit of Canadian dealers. 

Be assured that we did not lay 
foundations sufficient for adding two 
more floors on our new factory here 
without knowing from past experi- 
ence that we would need them. 

You will find us all over Canada in 
a year— why not profit from the out- 
set rather than lose months by delay? 

Send for the particulars now and be 
in on the ground floor! 

The Hoover Suction Sweeper Company 
of Canada, Limited 

Factory and General Offices: Hamilton, Ontario 






SWEEPER 



ItBeats... 
as it Sweeps 

as it Cleans 



1»KV GOODS REVIEW 




W ' 






Made 

in 
Four 
Sizes 

000 

00 



1 



COLONIAL MAID 





S WILL ♦ 

> NOT ♦ 

* RUST S 
o » 







I SIZE < 

1 «i 
I ♦ 




in 



It's al 
the Spring 





DRESS ~ FASTENER 

M VDE IN CANADA 



»»»»»»»»»»»»»<>»»o<k>»»v»»»»»»»»»»»»o»»»o»^»o»» 



Strong — 
Durable 
Made of 
Brass 



It's a Snap to Snap This Snapper 

Colonial Maid 

Wire Spring Dress Fasteners 



c 



HIS IS NOT A 

FRICTION FASTENER 

rv/i D i. ' MADE 

Made in Dili IS WITH 

Canada HIGHLY TEMPERED 

wire spring m m 

KNOWS WHEN TO HOLD 
AND WHEN TO LET GO 



BRASS 
will not 
rust 



ALSO PUT UP IN ONE GREAT GROSS 
CABINETS ASSORTED 24 CARDS EACH 
WHITE AND BLACK .-. .-. SI7ES: 00-0-1 

To be had of all leading wholesalers. 

Manufactured by 

Colonial Fastener Co., Limited 

Montreal, Que. 






DRY GOODS REVIEW 





GILBERT'S 

NEW WHEEL TOY 

Retails at $9.00, $15.00 and $22.50 

Order this for May delivery and get benefit of our 
gigantic advertising campaign in Saturday Evening 
Post and all boys' magazines. 



Order Your Wireless Sets 
for Spring Delivery. 

Cash in on the summer Toy season. 
Sets from $7.50 to $97.50 retail. 



These are all Gilbert Lines. Erector the famous steel construction toy. Electrical Sets, Wireless 
Sets, Tractors, Chemistry Sets, Magic, Puzzles, Phone Sets, Nurses Outfits, Carpenters Tool 
Chests, Soldering Outfits. 

Send for Catalogue and let us book your Spring and Fall order NOW. 

The A. C. Gilbert-Menzies Co., Limited 439 k TorS£to t west 




Manufacturers of Gilbert's Toys 



Agents for Gilbert's Polar Cub Electric Fan 



10 



DRY CO (I DS REV] i:\V 




WHY CARRY MORE 
THAN ONE LINE 

OF HOME DYES 

when with this attractive counter container 
properly filled you can supply 22 colors from dainty 
pink to jet black and navy blue. 

These colors are permanent, will not run, fade, 
crock or wash out. Sunset is the only soap dye that 
will permanently dye silk, wool, cotton or mixed 
goods the same shade and depth of color in the 
same dye bath. 

Dyes and cleans in one operation. 
Will not stain hands or utensils. 

This Compact Attractive Container Sells 

Sunset 
SoapDyes 

Selling at 15c, these dyes pay you more profit 
than any other home dye. 

Extensively, truthfully advertised, Sunset is fast 
becoming the leading home dye. Are you getting 
your share of the sales and profits? 

If you don't carry Sunset in stock — order a 
gross — now — in this sales stimulating container. 
Put it on your counter and watch the quick turn- 
over. Sunset is a marvel in repeats. 

Order from your jobber or write 

Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Inc. 

New York Toronto 

NORTH AMERICAN DYE CORPORATION 

LIMITED 
Toronto Cm i la M> j il V?-rm, NY. 




YOU CAN SELL WITH CONFIDENCE 
IF YOU HAVE THIS MARK ON YOUR 

SHIRTINGS 



There is an enormous range of fine designs, and 
you are sure to find just the one you want! 

The SHIRTINGS include Zephyrs, Cheviots, Silk 
and Cotton, Fancy Mattes, Ceylons, All-wool and 
Union Taffetas. 

The Dress Goods include the ORIGINAL SCOTCH 
GINGHAMS and latest novelties in Voiles and 
Crepes. 

David & John Anderson, Limited 

ATLANTIC MILLS, GLASGOW 

REPRESENTED IN CANADA BY 

GREENSHIELDS, LIMITED, MONTREAL 



INFANT'S FOOTWEAR, LTD. 

LONDON, ENGLAND 



Canadian Branch: 

GREENE-SWIFT BLDG., 

LONDON, ONTARIO 



Soft-Sole Shoes, in Kid, Silk, Poplin, 
Wool, Etc., 

Hard-Sole Shoes; Children's Woolly- Wear, 
Bonnets, Gaiters, Mitts, Etc. 




SPECIAL SPRING 
APRON DRESS 

As Illustrated 
From $11.00 to $14.00 

I'rinl House Drum $19 00 up 

Children's Dresses .... 7.00 " 

Rompers 6.50 " 

Creepers 5.25 " 

Aprons 8.35 " 

Send in a letter order — prompt 

shipment. 

Travellers now out. 

D. Ginsburg & Company 

515 College St., Toronto 



DKY GOODS REVIEW 



ll 




I 



What About Spring 
Samples ? 

The satisfaction to your customer and the profit 
for yourself are both greater when you feature 

ART CLOTHES 



COOK BROS &- 



/JLLtN LIAAITCC? 



IMadc to Measure 
[ I Large Range of 

Dependable Materials 

Trimmings of the best quality only. Styles and 
tailoring of the very highest class. We would 
like to have every retailer who does not know 
ART CLOTHES talk to any retailer who does. 

The opinions of our customers are the frankest 
testimonials we can offer. 

An alliance with us for Spring will assure you 
advantages. 

We can accept a few more applications if they 
come from the right kind of merchants — and 
sent at once. 

Cook: Bros. & AllefJ 

Wholesale Tailors 

TORONTO 










12 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




Look for the Blue Star 




The Guide to Style and Quality 



Wise buyers of to-day have no trouble 
in finding what they require in every 
seasonable line — The Blue Star Range 
unquestionably stands first in presenting 
the smartest and newest fancies which 
fashion decrees. 



LACES 

EMBROIDERIES 

DRESS TRIMMINGS 

GEORGETTES 

CHIFFONS 



WASH GOODS 

RIBBONS 

HOSIERY 

BRASSIERES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 



\\ e are manufacturers and 
importers of Laces, Dress 
•'rimming and Embroideries. 
Importers of Fancy Dry 

rOOda. 



iffluser 3Broti)er$ (Canaba) limtteb 



New York 
Baltimore 



12 ST. HELEN STREET, MONTREAL 

Boston Philadelphia Chicago London Nottingham T Paris Calais 
Los Angeles San Francisco Caudry Le Puy St. Gall 




Qp 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



13 





For Spring and Summer 1920 



The latest and most attractive designs 
and fabrics in popular colors that are 
exquisite — are of the unsurpassed ex- 
cellence which has made the Blue Star 
line famous for its quick-selling quali- 
ties. 




Our European agents are constantly 
in touch with the fashion-makers, and 
keep us advised of the newest trends on 
the continent. 



We can give you immediate delivery 
on anything you want for present sell- 
ing — J ust l et us know — But be sure and 
see our spring offerings. 



JWutfer ^Brotfjertf (Canaba) Htmiteb 

12 ST. HELEN STREET, MONTREAL 

New York Boston Philadelphia Chicago London Nottingham Paris Calais 
Baltimore Los Angeles San Francisco Caudry Le Puy St. Gall 



11 



DRY GOODS RE VIE W 






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ALPHONSE RACINE, LIMITED, is more than 
a mere dry goods warehouse — It is an organiza- 
tion of buyers who go abroad to the markets of the 
world to select goods in quantities sufficient to meet 
the needs of their customers; in quality up to the 
Racine Standard. 

-It is a service, a group of salesmen ever ready to 
co-operate with you and supply you with the latest in- 
formation, who strive to their utmost to be of real 
service to you. 

— Behind these men is a stock such as few can equal ; 
large, complete, but everchanging; with the newest 
and latest always available; with the quality of com- 
pleteness which makes it known as — 



"The House with the Big Stocks 



** 



ALPHONSE RACINE, LIMITED 

MONTREAL 

QUEBEC 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



15 





for 
jprfffil^ and c 



For the most profitable Spring 
and Summer season — select 
your merchandise where variety 
is largest — where deliveries are 
timely — and where quantities 
are unequaled. 



a^'Bir jfMiEi nun W)wj (3S®@dk 



14 DEPARTMENTS 

A — Cotton Staples. 

AX — Flannelettes. 

B — Wash Goods. 

C — Woollens, etc. 

D — Linens. 

E — Dress Goods and Silks. 

P — Men's Underwear and Sweaters. 

G — Home Furnishings. 

H — Ladies' Hosiery and Underwear. 

I — Men's Fancy Furnishings. 

J — Ladies' Ready-to-Wear. 

K — Smallwares and Notions. 

L — Men's Fine Shirts. 

M — Working Men's Wearables. 



ALPHONSE RACINE, LIMITED 

60-82 St. Paul Street West, Montreal 

Dry Goods Jobbers and Manufacturers 



mmm±<bw 



SHERBROOKE 

OTTAWA 
1 1 1 Sparks Street 



SAMPLE ROOMS: 

THREE RIVERS 

QUEBEC 
68 Church Street 



SYDNEY. N.S. 

TORONTO 
123 Bay Street 





16 



D K V GOODti K K VI E W 





CANADIAN-MADE 


COTTON BATTING 




1 

■ 


Order 

VICTORY BATS, NORTH 

STAR, CRESCENT AND 

PEARL. 

Packed in Shipping Cartons, or in Bales. 

The best value for the price. 




w ' ' *^? 


Can be had in 125, 100, 80, 67 or 50 rolls to 
the bale or 124, 96, 80, 64 or 48 to a lot of 
four cartons. 


• 


Any Wholesale House 



Biggest Government Sale 
Of The Season 

ALL NEW GOODS TO THE TRADE 

United States Navy Surplus Stock Con- 
sisting of the Following Articles: 

Gents Furnishings and Piece Goods 
2fi0,000 Blankets. 

60,000 prs. Woolen Drawers. 

60,000 prs. Woolen Shirts. 

84,000 prs. Woolen Gloves. 
::.">() Muskrat Caps. 

12,000 Rubber Hats. 

10,000 Rubber Hats. 
7,(1(10 Rubber Hats. 
168,000 prs. Woolen Socks. 

27,000 prs. Arctics. 

10,000 Cravats, C.P.O. 
100,000 Jack Knives. 
330,000 Jerseys 
oiK), (MX I I.acers, silk, trousers. 
:.' l.i.odd pis. Leggings. 
350,000 yds. 30-ounce Blue Cloth. 
300,000 yds. Braid. 
150,000 Whisk Brooms 
000 Hair Brushes. 

80,000 Scrub Brushes (fibre). 

50,000 Shoe Brushes. 

50,000 pes. Scissors. 

15,000 Flannel Shirts (blue). 

Address: — Commander John I). Robnett, (SC) 
I .S.N. In charge Navy Surplus 
Mores. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Teh-phone Dickinson 6300, branch 583. 



SHEET MUSIC 

added to your various lines will attract more cus- 
tomers to your store than any other medium you 
could employ. This with a liberal profit in addi- 
tion, should warrant you in making immediate ar- 
rangements to take on a line. 

The McKINLEY EDITION 

OF TEN CENT MUSIC 

is the best line as a foundation for your sheet music 
department. It is the most popular line of Standard, 
Classic and Teaching Music. It is universally en- 
dorsed by teachers, students and the general music 
loving public. Each selection is placed in a heavy 
manila stock cover bearing name and number of the 
selection, 20 substantial stock boxes and 500 cata- 
logs bearing your business imprint. The sale of 
McKINLEY MUSIC affords you 

150 PROFIT 

The McKinley Edition (revised for Canadian trade) 
conforms in every detail with Canadian copyright 

laws. 

Our Jobbing Department is the largest and moat complete in 
the country. We can take care of your wants for anything in 
sheet music. 

jttci&tnlep jWusric Company 

Till-: LARGEST sum i'mi Sit inn si 
IN l III WORI i> 



CHICAGO, LL 
1501-13 E. 55th St. 



NEW YORK 

I4i \V. 4^ tli St. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



17 




Endorsed by all the really big 
wholesalers. 14,000 letters 
of appreciation from satisfied 
merchants. A field corps of 
101 men — an office force of 
sixty— all personally inter- 
ested in the forward move- 
ment of the Kelly System — all 
profit sharing workers; indi- 
vidually protected by our 
Mutual Welfare Society. 
Efficient Service can only be 
furnished by an efficient 
organization. 





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IRY 



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UILTUPDN HQNOQ 

by ability 



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THE 

GREATEST 
SPECIAL SALES 
ORGANIZATION IN THE WORLD 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE MAKING. 

A quarter century of research and 

experience the expenditure of unlimited 

capital and the adherence to a standard of "Better Service" 

Has resulted m a selling system that is "More than a Sales 

( 1'iiipany". These super-merchandisers- these master originators 

amalgamated in one efficient institution have proven to be the 
world's greatest selling system. 

This powerful force is what you get in Kelly Service. The best brains 
of the world in their respective lines are arrayed here. This is the para- 
mount reason why the "tine man" Sales Company has had to go This is why Kelly Service 
grows stronger, bigger, better. These men hold profitable special selling campaigns, <or 
merchants oi the better class, from coast to coast Now booking lor t9S0. 





DRY GOODS REVIEW 



19 




20 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



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SERVICE 
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A specially built, permanent home- 
Market Survey Division — Adverti 
Department Art Department coupled 
scientific methods and modern equipment 

contributing in making Kelly Sales the pi 

of all in selling supremacy Each minute i 
is handled by an executive that is ch< 
trom his past performance of MAKINC 
Good — Executives that are judged by 
the dollar guage only. 

Honor built this service 
ability carries it on. 



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DRY GOODS REVIEW 



21 




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HOSIERY 



Anticipating the demand for all classes of hosiery we have a splendid assort- 
ment in cashmere, cotton, lisle and pure silk. Special range of ladies' 
cashmere, $4.50 to $15.00. Good assortments in cotton and lisle children's 
hose and half hose. There is a scarcity in all classes of hosiery and we recom- 
mend you to order early. 

Linen Dept. 

This department is now replete with 
a full range of damasks, crashes, 
and all classes of household linens. 
Special, 16 '^ inch bordered crash, 
18c yd. 



Dept. C 

Apron Gingham, 27 in., at 32c. 
Aladdin Suiting, assorted stripes, 
and plain colors, 42 Vic. 



Romper Cloth, 
blue, 52 '/.e. 



32 in., pink and 



Dept. D. 

Just received from Switzerland the 
following silks : — 

Paillette, Duchesse, Wash Satins in 
blacks and colors, also a full range 
of 40 in. French Georgette Crepe, 
all at popular prices. 

Write for samples. 



Dept. U. 

Our travellers are carrying a full 
range of children's and ladies' 
knitted vests and drawers, also a 
complete range of lisle, silk and 
chamoisette gloves. 



Dept. W. 

All Wood Serge 54 in., black and 
blue, $3.25. 

Black Italian, 51 in., $1.15. 

5 1 in. Tweed. $1.90, $2.10. 

Full range of Men's Suitings for 
Spring. 



Dept. M. 

Mufflers. We have in stock, for 
immediate delivery, a very full as- 
sortment of Brushed Wool Muf- 
flers, Fringe Ends, from $7 per 
dozen to $32 per dozen. 

Caps. — Knitted Wool for Women 
and Children, in "seconds" and 
perfect goods. "Seconds" from 
$3.50 per dozen upwards. 

Laces. Our stock is now complete, 
in staple and novelties for year 
1920. 

WHITEWEAR 

Some specials for your January whitewear sale. 

White Cotton Corset Covers $3.50 to $16.50 doz. 

Drawers 6.00 to 12.00 doz. 

Petticoats 9.00 to 24.00 doz. 

Nightgowns 13.00 to 24.00 doz. 



Exceptional values in "Ready-to-wear" 
Immediate delivery 

Dresses, No. 1010, 

' No ' 



$4.50 



Child's Colored 

sizes 2, 3, 4 

Child's Colored Dresses, 

sizes 6 to 12 13.50 

Ladies' Print House Dresses, No. 596, 

sizes 36 to 44 18.00 



1013, 



Ladies' Print House Dresses, No. 597, 

sizes 36 to 44 18.00 

Ladies' Stripe Gingham House Dres- 
ses, No. 601, sizes 36 to 44 18.00 

Ladies' White Repp Skirts, No. 1177, 

sizes 23 to 30 13.50 

Ladies' Print Kitchen Aprons (no 
sleeves), No. 593, assorted pat- 
terns $6.50 special 



We give special attention to letter orders, telegrams, and long distance telephone 
orders. If our traveller r> not calling on you, kindly notify us and we will have him call. 

HODGSON SUMNER & CO., LIMITED 



84-92 Le Royer Street 



8391 St. Paul Street West - 21 St. Sulpice Street 

MONTREAL 

SAMPLE ROOMS: Metropole Building, SHERBROOKE. 7 Charest St., QUEBEC. Windsor Hotel, 
OTTAWA. Carlaw Bldg., 28-30 Wellington St. West, TORONTO. 503 Mercantile Bldg., VANCOUVER*. 



22 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



— I»1>»H1W, 



5 




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■ 






The House of Dry Goods Values 



i 



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npHIS is the reputation we have 
■■■ built up through 75 years of 
conscientious dealing with our cus- 
tomers. Our trade-mark stands for 
all that is best in quality, style, work- 
manship and VALUE. 

Pursuing our usual policy of taking 
a serious interest in the welfare of 
our employees, we have recently 
inaugurated a plan under which 
each employee is given free life 
insurance, ranging from $500 to 
$5,000, thereby cementing the 
friendship and mutual goodwill of 
our staff. It is our endeavor to* 
secure for our patrons the service 
and co-operation that only a loyal 
and painstaking staff can give. 




P. P. MARTIN & CO., LIMITED 



": 






50 St. Paul Street West 
MONTREAL 



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DRY GOODS REVIEW 



23 



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Our Linen Department 




DURING the past few months of 
tremendously increased de- 
mand for fine white linens, we 
have been compelled to open a large 
department devoted to linens ex- 
clusively, where we have collected a 
varied and extensive range of linens, 
of excellent quality. 



Toilet Articles 




PERFUMES, Powders, Soaps of 
best makes which prove irresist- 
ibly attractive to your custom- 
ers. A few of these lines are listed 
below: 



Coty 


Leuthnic 


Rigaud 


Taylor 


Houbigant 


L. T. Piver 


Pinaud 


Rorer and Gallet 


Guerlin 


\ iv in ill III 


D'Orsay 


Arly 



Kerkoff 
Marceau 

I in i-.i- 

Colgate 

Mozart 




House Furnishings 

Carpets Curtains Blankets 
Towellings, etc. 

SAMPLES GLADLY SUBMITTED 

P. P. MARTIN & CO., LIMITED 

50 ST. PAUL ST. W., MONTREAL, QUE. 

Quebec : 7 Rue Charest Ottawa : 25 Sparks Street 

Sherbrooke: 103 Wellington St. Three Rivers: 82 Royal Street 

St. Hyacinthe: 229 Cascade St. Toronto: 152 Bay Street 



i«mw»\iy«w»^r^i^r>»itfifir,*i^i^r?w 



24 



D K V GOODS RE VIE W 




The House with over a century 's reputation for value 




Manufacturers and Merchants 

119 Wood Street, London, E.C. 2, England 



The Brand 
trusted all 




that is 

over the world 



Before Buying for 
the Spring — See the 

"OBERON" 

1920 Range 

It has been specially selected to meet the 
requirements of the Canadian trade — your 
trade. 

It is a strong collection of lines that sell 
freely, attract new business, and add to the 
prestige of the house that sells them. 

Further, all "OBERON" Goods are tested 
goods. They are trusted the world over for 
their reliability. 

Each line in the "OBERON" Range, 1920, 
represents a profitable business opportunity 
for you. 

Ask our representatives to show you the 
complete range. 

Canadian Representatives: 



EASTERN PROVINCES 
Mr. Bugh I). Marshall. 
Stair Building 
Cor. Bay and Adelaide 

Streets. Toronto 



WESTERN PROVINCES 
Mr. G. E. Ledder. 
Grace Court, 
Cornoz Street. 
Vancouver. B.C. 



"OBERON" 

SPCIALITIES 

Hosiery, 
Underwear, 
Sports Coats, 
Knickers, 
Knitted Scarves 

in Silk, 
Artificial Silk 

and Wool, 
Ladies' and Men's 

Pyjamas, 
Towels, 
Quilts, 

Rugs, Blankets, 
Sheets, Linens, 
Haberdashery, 
Men's Shirts, 
Dressing Gowns, 
Ties, Braces, 
Collars, Caps, 
Ladies' and Men's 

Raincoats and 

Waterproofs. 



George Brettle & Co. 

119 Wood Street, London, E. C. 

ENGLAND 



Ltd. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



25 




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RIGHT IN THE VAN OF DRY GOODS STORES 

and every department under a SPECIALIST 



Calicoes, Flannels, Blankets 

Linens and Towels 

Scotch and Soft Furnishing 

Curtains and Curtain /Nets 

Dress Goods 

Printed Cottons 

Flannelettes (Dyed and Printed) 

Mantles and Costumes 



DEPARTMENTS— 

Dress Skirts 

Laces and Embroideries 

Handkerchiefs and Neckwear 

Ribbons 

Silks and Velvets 

Flowers and Feathers 

Trimmed Millinery 

Straws and Semi-Trimmed 



Gloves 

Hosiery and Woven Underwear 

Furs and Umbrellas 

Haberdashery 

Huttons and Trimmings 

Blouses 

Sports Coats 

Ladies' and Children's Outfitting 



We call attention to DRESS MATERIALS, SILKS, RIBBONS, PRINTED 
COTTONS, of which we hold large and varied stocks, and in all of which we 
do a large Canadian business. 

Every attention is given to all enquiries, and a cordial welcome is extended to 
those buyers visiting the Old Country this year. 



Cable 
Address: 
PAWSON, 
LONDON 



K St. Paul's Churchyard, LONDON E C A 

!«*««,., "PAWSON.C.NT, LONDON." -WI1I/VH, t . V* . «* 



>fion«: •>• city (•Una*) 



"^^y^" 



A.B.C. 
4th and 5th 

Edition 
and W.U.T. 
Codes Used 



■B >' T " 



DK Y (!()() I) S it K v I E W 




Cablegrams: Merryfield, London 

BASTIN, MERRYFIELD & CRACKNELL, Ltd. 

12 GREAT PORTLAND STREET 

LONDON, W. 1 

ENGLAND 

Nvoelties in 

SILKS WAISTS 

LACES DRESSES 

SEQUIN GOODS KNITTED GOODS 
SCARVES FANCY HANDBAGS 

ORGANIZED FOR WORLD BUSINESS 



ROBERT WHITTAKER & Co., Ltd. 

5 BREAD ST., LONDON, E.C. 4, ENGLAND 

A. B.C. Code, 5th Edition. Telegrams: "Subdue London" 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Ladies' Dress Materials and Cotton Dress Fabrics 

We hold a large and varied stock of every description of Wool Dress Goods and 
Cotton Dress Fabrics at prices suitable for the Canadian Market and ready for 
immediate delivery. Our stock comprises wide ranges of the following: — 



SERGES 


TARTANS 


SHEPHERD CHECKS 


ARMURES 


CHEVIOTS 


SUITINGS 


SPONGE CLOTHS 


FANCIES 


TWEEDS 


COATINGS 


EOLIENNES 





Our new ranges for Spring and Summer, 1920, are now in the hands of Mr. H. D. 
Marshall, Stair Building, Bay St., Toronto, to whom all enquiries should be 
addressed. 

To Canadian buyers visiting the English Market we extend a cordial invitation to 
visit our warehouse, which is situated in the Heart of the London Dry Goods 
Trade. 






V2*> 



As we are reminded of the advent of ANOTHER YEAR, we are 
reminded also that we have, during those already gone, given our 
best services to our clients, and while this is a fact, it is not stated 
in any SPIRIT OF BOASTING, but rather as a reminder to our- 
selves and our customers that OUR MOTTO 



<J> 



1 



r^* 



is operative and compelling for both 
PRESENT AND FUTURE. 

CROCKERS LTD. 

Friday Street, London, England 



.1 mum 
E* • ■• ■ i — 
I ill" 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIMl. 

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DRY liOODS K K V I E W 







4iS&*W 






f 

4 



Spinners of 

every description of yarn 

for Hosiery Manufacture 

Telegrams 
i Leicester 

Vahmc \StANNINGLEY 
89 Stanningley lARNd ] i/ciruir^ 
24KEICHLEY fEIGHLEY 

3464 Fort Hill Boston \Boston 
Codes- ABC 5 th Ed Western Union. 



Telephone 

ff 7 °i\LB IC ESTER 



»§^i*— > 



Stamford Street 

LEICESTER eng 



AMERICAN OFFICE:- 184 SUMMER STREET 
BOSTON. 
COMBING A SPINNING 
SPRINGFIELD MILLS, KEIGH LEY and SWINNOW MILLS, aRAMLEY,Yt 




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to 



hi; V GOODS REVIEW 




BB" Laces 



it 



Torchons, Clunies, etc. 

Exact Reproductions of 
Hand-Made Goods 



Agent:} 

MR. A. B. FISHER 

400 Empire Bldg. 
64 Wellington St. W. 

TORONTO 




Stocks 

in 
Toronto 



Finest Quality Valenciennes 
and other Lingerie Laces 

Novelty Dress Laces 

Manufactured by 

Birkin & Co., Broadway, Nottingham 

Founded 1827 

LONDON: 110 Chcapsidc PARIS: 19 Rue d'Uzes 

NEW YORK: 73 Fifth Avenue 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



31 







DRY 'JOODS REVIEW 




Cables: 

'Phil, 

Manchester '" 



Mills and 



Factories 



TEAN 

CHEADLE 

MANCHESTER 

CONGLETON 

ETC. 




Headquarters: 35 Church Street, Manchester 



i 'ables: 
"Phildon, 
London." 

Branches: 

LONDON 

LIVERPOOL 

SHEFFIELD 

CARDIFF 

MELBOURNE 

SYDNEY 

BRISBANE 

CHRISTCHURCH 

ETC. 



A FEW LEADING LINES 
Tamborina, the Beautiful Lawn 

For Beautiful Lingerie 

Dorcas Cambric 



OPALINE 



The Finest Cambric in the World 
OPALETTE 



SHINERETTE 



For Costume and Coat Linings, Draperies, Cushions, etc. 

FLANNELLETTE 

A Special make and Finish for the Canadian Market 



Galateaf Stripes 

NlfN2 N3 



Sateen Suiting 

SI S2 S3 



39/40" COTTON CREPE DE CHINE in all LeadingTolours 
29/30" INDOMITABLE NURSE CLOTH in 65 Ways 
38" Ditto in 39 Ways 



WRITE FOR PATTERNS 



MONTREAL 

Mr W. F. MACOUN. 
211, Lindsay Buildings. 



Canadian Representatives 

TORONTO 

Mr. J. E. ROBSON. 
471 , Dovercourt Rd. 



VANCOUVER 

Mr. A. F. HOUSTON. 
801 Credit Foncier Building 



cteNPhiliDS&(3B 



MANCHESTER 

MANUFACTURERS 




&l LONDON 
AND EXPORTERS 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



33 




J_ 






s*mr 



The Head Offices of the C.P.A 

Mr. Edward Foster- 

direct CANADIAN Repre- 
sentative of The Calico Printers' 
Association, Limited, Manchester, 
England- the HOME of BRITISH 
PRINTS— draws particular atten- 
tion to the popular specialties 
enumerated below. 



SHEENORE 

The dress fabric you cannot afford « 
miss. 

Unique in its conception and execution 



You are reminded that samples of all 
C.P.A. brands can always be seen, and 
that enquiries addressed to 

10, Coristine Buildings, 
20, St. Nicholas Street, 
MONTREAL. 

or to 7 1 0, Empire Building, 
64, Wellington St. West, 
TORONTO. 

will receive the prompt and careful attention 

of Mr. Foster 

THE CALICO PRINTERS' ASSOCIATION LTD. 
MANCHESTER, EN GPL AND. 




34 



D k Y GOODS RE VI E W 




Millinery and Haberdashery Wire 

Chenilles, Hat Braids 

Dress and Mantle, Dress Cords and Girdles 

Artificial Silk, Braids and Ribbons 

Embroidery Silks, Tassels, Pom, Etc. 

Upholstery Cords and Trimmings 

Scroll, Argyle, Saddle Bag and Flat Gimps 

Fringes, Tassels, Etc. 

Made in Silk, Cotton, Wool, Etc. 

Artificial Silk Straw Braids for Millinery 

Hat Manufacturing. 

Suppliers to Wholesale and Shipping Houses. 
Shipping and Strictly Wholesale Trade Especially Catered For. 




TELEGRAMS: 
DAVENPORT 
MACCLESFIELD 



P. Davenport 

BRIDGE ST. MILLS 

MACCLESFIELD, ENGLAND 

CAN \l)l \\ AGEN l 

R. C. PARSONS, 34 FRONT STRKKT VVKST, TORONTO 



MANCHESTER 
OFFICE; 

)9 PICCADILLY 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 





1 



When Bedtime Comes" 



LISTA PURE SILKS 



not only make exquisite Blouses, Shirts 
and Pyjamas, but are simply ideal for 
Children's Dresses and Sleeping- Suits. 
In the clothing of your merry, romping 
boys and girls quality counts; it is here 
in wear and washing that 



LISTA SILKS ARE SUPREME 

Manningham Mills, Bradford, England 



Agents: 

HENDERSON & SMYTH 
Toronto and Montreal 



36 



DRY GOODS RE VI E W 




-> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 III I I.I— 

=£llllllllllllllllll III 1 1 1 1 , 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III HI lil HI III 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11= 




80 

New Colour 

Designs 



To create an effect at once arresting, pleasing 
and inviting is the essence of good salesman- 
ship, especially at the opening of a new 
season. To pull up the casual shoppers with 
a delighted exclamation is to get your business 
talked about. 

There is no line of goods to-day more effective 
for this purpose than "Vigil" Silk. It is a 
draw — and a big seller. It is known the world 
over as the Pure Silk with the maker's guaran- 
tee of purity, quality and fixity of colour. 
It is the silk that outwears at least four 
present-day Crepe de Chines, yet can be re- 
tailed at a reasonable price even in these times. 

The demand in England for these new "Vigil" 
colours is enormous. We strongly advise you 
to cover your needs at once and to mark your 
order for "earliest possible delivery." By so 
doing you will not only ensure getting the 
best prices and a better chance of complete 
delivery, but also obtain the prestige whicn 
follows from an early display of goods in 
great demand. 

Walker Bros. 

Ravensthorpe Mills, Dewsbury, YORKSHIRE 
and 56-57 Aldermanbury, London, E.C. 

Telegraphic and Cable Addresses, Yorkshire: — "Vljrll, 
Dewsbury." London: "Vyfcilsyl. Cent," 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE: Geonre Peterson & 
Co., 517 Coristine Building. Montreal. 




13)11 



fl 



1 1 1 1 1 11 III I II I 111 I II 1 1 1 ■ I ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III III 1 1 1 1 1 1,1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 III III I III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II III III 
I.I I I III I I I I 111 I I I I I 111 I I I II I I ! I I I I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 111 1 1, 111 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1:1 I I III 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1:1 1 I I 



MINI II 
I, III, I 



III ,111.11 I lUIIIIM 
1111111111111111.11111 



HI 1111111:11:1111 Tz- 

ii.ii I ii in I ill ii 1 1.: 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



37 




Ii|l|||||||||||||llllllll!lllllllllll!lllllllll!lllllilll!lllll I I I I I I 



WOOLLEN and WORSTED 
COSTUME CLOTHS 



SPECIALTIES: 



SAND SERGES 

TWEEDS 

DYED CHEVIOTS 

FINE WORSTEDS 

LADIES' OVERCOATINGS 



JOSEPH FOSTER & Co. 



CALDER MILLS 

ELLAND, YORKSHIRE 

ENGLAND 



Established 1853 



London Warehouse : 
I LANGHAM PLACE 
REGENT STREET W. 



^-v^jXLnjiiiiiiitiiLitiiJLiintuiiiHiii'tFLiTniiiiiLtLiiiUiKiunLiU'i'.j.niiJiiiru^iii:!'!! i;t!i i- 1 .1 -Eitii' i- l i : [iniH^a;tuitU!r,i^iitit',i' m.im it'i ii t<i; [it.|i r r i<nt 1 11111: 1: l. 1 lit : j iit,(,i:t:r r.i ,i i:t ' r i>t: n j .rtiin t ri;t ih^m: im nr nri: L.}UitULi:iiii[LtiiiHJii!i:int! .1 ; - ' 



DIM GOODS ft E V 1 K \\ 




Telegraphic Address: "Cyrus" Bradford 
Code used, A. B.C. 5th Edition 



Cyrus Brook & Sons, Ltd. 

Offices: 5 Union Street 

Bradford - England 



Manufacturers of — 
Buntings, Serges, 

Shalloons, Coatings, 

Scarfs, Gabardines, 

Tammies, Custom Cloths 

and 
Silk and Wool Casement Cloths. 

Manufactured at St. Dunstan's Mill, 
Mill Lane, and Shuttleworth Works, 
Faii-weather Green, Bradford, Eng. 

Canadian Agents; 

Arthur H. Parks, 77 York Street, Toronto 

William Parks, 43 St. Sacrament Street, 
Montreal 



LADIES' and CHILDREN'S 

KNIT SPORTS COATS AND^SCARVES 

Boys' and Men's Knit Jerseys 
Men's Cardigan Jackets 
Aviator and Balaclava Caps 
And Tarn O'Shanters 

RUSSELL & CO. 

Scotch Cap and Hosiery Manufacturers 

ROBERTLAND MILLS 

i,YLWARTON, SCOTLAND 



John Ainscow & Co., Ltd. 

Spinners and Manufacturers 

TURKISH TOWELS, QUILTS, 
COUNTERPANES, &c. 

Beehive Mills, Lostock, Bolton; 

California Mills, Stockport; 

34 Charlotte Street MANCHESTER 

Canadian Agent. Walter William., 508 Read Building, 
45 St. Alexander St., Montreal 



PHILLIPS & PIPER 




•0Z0NIA" 
Model 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers and Exporters 

IPSWICH, ENGLAND 

LONDON WAREHOUSE : 17, NEW UNION STREET, E.< .' 
BRISTOL " : 16, MARV-LE-I'ORT STREET. 



SPECIALITIES. 

"OZONIA" Oilskins in Silk or Cotton. 
"ORWELL" Waterproofs. 
"PYTCHLEY" Breeches and Pantaloons. 
"LAMBOURNE" FLANNEL Trousers. 
"RANELAGH" Sports Coats. 
"RENDLESHAM" Rain Coats. 
High-Grade Overcoats. 




Kmidrnl Canadian Rcprettntalivm: 

C. W. HARVEY PIPER 

Telephone: Adelaide 1290 621 Empire Building 



PYTCHLEY" 
Model 



64 Wellington St. W., Toronto 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



39 




TO THE SMALLWARE AND NOTION TRADE 

Kirby, Beard & Co., Limited, Birmingham, England 

Announce that their mills at Birmingham and Redditch (England), are now entirely 
devoted to the manufacture of their world-wide known : — 

PINS 

PIN SHEETS 

HAIRPINS 
HAIRPIN BOXES 
and CABINETS 

SAFETY PINS 

NEEDLES 
NEEDLE CASES 

COMPANIONS 
and WORK BOXES 

MANICURE CASES, 
Etc., Etc. 

Produced as only the highest skilled labor and the finest quality materials attain. 

Canadian Representatives: 

Messrs. Mclntyre, Son & Co., Limited, Victoria Square, Montreal, Que. 





Wholesale and 

LADIES' WEAR 






All Wool Serges 
Union Serges 
Cotton Serges 
All Wool Dress Gabs. 
Union Gaberdines 
Cotton Gaberdines 
Figured Dress Cloths 



Voiles 

Artificial Silks 
Dress Poplins 
All Wool Checks 
Union Checks 
Cotton Checks 
Rainproofings, etc 



MEN'S WEAR 

Serges 

Fancy Suitings 

Overcoatings 

Trouserings 

Rainproofings 

Colonial Suitings, etc. 



Export Only 

FURNISHING FABRICS 

All Wool Casements Figured Cabinet Linings 



Union Casements 
Cotton Casements 
Cotton Poplins 
Cotton Repps 
Figured Repps 
Figured Cotelines 



Figured Damasks 
Figured Poplins 
Silk and Wool Casements 
Roman Satins 
Curtain Linings 
Printing Cloths, etc. 



TELEGRAMS 
•VITALITY 
BRADFORD ' 
A. B. C. Code 
5th Edition 



BROWN, VICKERS & CO. 

Proprietor — S. H. Vickers 

Manufacturers of Dress Goods for Men's and Ladies' Wear 

and Furnishing Fabrics 

CARTWRIGHT MILLS, INGLEBY ROAD, BRADFORD, ENG. 



TELEPHONES 

4332 

Counting House 

4980 

Other Depts. 



«6Tl l gWWWWrih7ffl?ffi l H^l^ ^ 






Ill 



I; V G ' > REV] E W 




The Canadian Wholesale Houses have 
made liberal provision for supplies of 
Wm. Anderson Zephyrs for 1920 




Wm, Anderson & Co., Ltd. 

Pacific Mills and 12 Princes Square 
Toronto GLASGOW New York 



43 Scott St. 



48 White St. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



41 




The Fine Scotch Underwear 
with the Fine Scotch Finish 




1 



The Pesco Range 

( Adapted for the Can- 
adian trade) 

In Pure Wool and Silk 
and Wool textures. 

Guaranteed unshrink- 
able. 

For Ladies — Combina- 
tions, Vests, Spencers, 
Bodices, Drawers, 
Knickers, Nightdi-esses, 
etc. 

For Children — Com- 
binations, Nightdresses, 
Sleeping Suits, Shirts, 
Trousers, Knickers, etc. 

For Gentlemen — Shirts, 
Trousers, Combina- 
tions, etc. 

Also 
Pesco Hose and Half 
Hose in Black, Colours 
and Mixtures. 



I 







PESCO, the best known high- 
class Underwear made and 
sold within the United King- 
dom, is now available for Can- 
ada and dealers will do well, 
before ordering for Fall, to 
wait the forthcoming visit of 
the newly-appointed Pesco 
men. 

TPHERE is a rich harvest of business 
-*■ in store for those who adopt this 
well-tried line. Its cha-m of quality is 
irresistible and makes buyers friends. In 
the Old Country it has an enthusiastic 
clientele and a sales-forcing reputation 
that is the envy of the trade. 

A DD it to your range of specialties 
■**• this season, and you will add to 
your business a powerful ally and to 
your store a fresh point of interest. 
Anion est the class whose custom is most 
desirable, Pesco compels attention and 
creates an immediate and permanent 
demand. 

Now on the ground with samples 

MESSRS. C. & A. G. CLARK, 
35 Wellington St. West, Toronto. 

MR. R. C. POYSER, 
214 Drummond Building, Montreal. 

MESSRS. THE HANLEY & MACKAY 

CO. 

62 Albert Street, Winnipeg 

Sole Makers : 

Peter Scott & Co., Ltd. 

Hawick, Scotland 
Sold direct to the retail. 

Showcards. Window Tickets and Literature supplied. 
Enquiries invited. 



TRADE MARK 



12 



DRY GaODS REVIEW 




II I (.K Wis 

U \kl I I 1 

(.1 \s<;<>\\ 



GODBi 

\ ha:. 
sin Kill I ION 



WILSON & CO 

48 ALBION STREET 

GLASGOW 



MANUFACTTRERS 

Ecru and Colored Madras Muslins, 

Coin Spots and Figured Harness 

Book Muslins Robe Muslins 

Voiles 

Anglo-Swiss and Broche Muslins, 

"Wilsco" Lawns, "Zelette" 

LACE CURTAINS 

LACE NETS 




Cable Address : 
'Currie Stewarton* 




John 
Currie 
Son & Co. 

Bridgend Works 
STEWARTON, Ayrshire, N.B. 

Makers of Scotch Knit Woollen Goods 

Including 



Ladies' and Gents' Fleecy 

Scarves in self and 

striped effects 



Gents' Viator 

and Aviator 

Caps 



Ladies' and Children's Machine and Hand Knit 
Caps and Tarn O'Shanters. 

Ladies' Spencer and Jumper Coats. 
Sole Agent for Canada 

G. B. OLIVER 

116 Mail Buildings 106 Bay Street 

TORONTO 



William Forrest & Co., Ltd. 

Stew ar ton Lace Worlds 
STEWARTON - - . SCOTLAND 

Lace Curtain, Woollen Cap and Hosiery Manufacturers 



Lace Dept. 

Curtains 

Vitrages 
Piece Goods 
Brise Bisc 



Cap Dept. 

Machine and Hand Knit 

Tarn O'Shanters 
Aviator Caps 
Men's Turbans 
Ladies' Caps 



hosiery Dept. 

( Children's Combinations 
Children's Jerseys 
Fleecy Scan es 
Ladies' Coats 



Canadian Representative : 

Mr. John Black, 22 Fraser Buildings, Montreal 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



43 




KING'S CELEBRATED 
SCOTCH WINDOW HOLLANDS 



have been made for one 
are recognized throughout 
most saleable shading. They 
are unshrinkable, fast colors 
and widths. To insure get 
ers are advised to Examine 
Also inside Holland Tab on 
that each bears name of 




hundred and forty years and 
the world as the best and 
are unequalled for quality, 
and made in all colorings 
ting genuine goods, custom- 
Tickets and Paper Bands. 
end of each piece and see 
"John King & Son." 



SOLD BY ALL LEADING WINDOW SHADE JOBBERS 

Made by 

JOHN KING & SON 

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Established 1775 
Canadian Representatives: CAMPBELL. SMIBERT & CO.. MONTREAL and TORONTO 



J. BARCLAY & CO. 

STEWARTON, SCOTLAND 



Specialities : 

Ladies' Coats and Caps 
Children's Coats and Caps 

Gaiter Suits 

Scarves 
Ladies* and Gents' Scarves 
Gentlemen's Cardigans, etc. 




.*- 



44 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




iiiii i imi i iii i iiiiini iiiiiiiinmiimiiiimiiiiiir 




tti im t niiimiiiiiiiiDilll 




Regirereo No 362 OOS 



I I I I ! ITT 



The Hall-Mark of 

Maximum Comfort and 
Durability at Minimum Cost. 

FIRST IN THE FIELD AND STILL LEADING. 

Manufactured on THE GRADUATED 
PRINCIPLE, and Commencing with TWO 
THREADS in the TOP. it increases in 
WEAR-RESISTING PROPERTIES as it 
descends. 

Thus THE LEG HAS THREE THREADS, 
THE INSTEP AND FOOT FOUR, 
and the HEEL and TOE FIVE, 
making it essentially 



A HALF HOSE 
FOR HARD WEAR. 

ABSOLUTELY SEAMLESS 
PERFECT IN FIT 
GUARANTEED UN8HRINKABLE 



To be had from any of the Leading Wholesale Dry Coods Houses 



/»! >! I ITT TTTMTTTTTTTTTTT MITT T T1 1 TTI ' 




'TTTTTTTITTTTTTTTTT^ 




READY FOR SPRING? 

The spring trad* in f.-mey light cotton fabrics for light 
dresses, undergarments, etc., will mean a big demand for 

Nainsooks. Cambrics, Madapolams, Calicoes, and 
Diaphalene — the wonderful new cotton that looks 
and feels like silk. 

Your customers will ask for thi-s*- fabrics, because they know 

that the name "Horrockses" has been the mark of "quality" 

in cotton cloths for a century and a quarter. 

Order your spring stock through our Canadian agent. 

JOHN E. RITCHIE 

591 St. Catherine St. West, Montreal 

Branches: Toronto, ^Vancouver 

United States Agents: WRIGHT & GRAHAM CO. 

110 Franklin St, : New;York City 

HORROCKSES, CREWDSON &JCO., LIMITED 

Cotton Spinneri and Manufacturer! 

Manchester, England 



GOOD TAILORING IS LABOUR LOST 
IF THE CLOTH IS ILL SHRUNK 



~4/w* 



t 
t 



MAKE SURE IT IS SHRUNK :: AND WELL SHRUNK :: AND KNOW BY WHOM 

THERE'S LITTLE SATISFACTION IN SUCH A STAMP AS "SHRUNK," "WELL 
SHRUNK," "LONDON SHRUNK," OR "SHRUNK BY LONDON PROCESS." 
INSIST ON A SHRINKER'S GUARANTEE— ON THE STAMP OF A FIRST 
CLASS FIRM OF LONDON SHRINKERS— BEST OF ALL ON THE STAMP OF 

JENNENS, WELCH & Co., Ltd., 

Cloth Workers and Shriakers, and Proprietors of the Famous "JENNWEL" Waterproof Finish 

LONDON, HUDDERSFIELD and BRADFORD, ENGLAND. 

WHEN ORDERING ENGLISH CLOTHS. SAY "TO BE SHRUNK BY JENNENS. WELCH & CO.. Ltd." 






ESTABLISHED 1849 



BRADSTREETS 

Officea Througnout the Civilixed World. 

OFFICES IN CANADA: 

Calgary. Alt*. Ottawa. Ont. Montreal, Qu. 

Edmonton. A1U. St. John. N.B. Quebec. Que. 

Halifax. N.S. Vancouver, B.C. Toronto. Ont. 

London, Ont. Victoria, B.C. Winnipeg, Man 

Hamilton. Ont_ 

•eputatlon gained by long years of vigorous 
conscientious and successful work. 

THOMAS C. IRVING, 



General Manager 
Western Canada 



TORONTO. CANADA. 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



45 




Telegra ms''PlN GLOUCESTER.' 
TELEPHONE N? 897 



England. 




MMmM 




London Adores 

Glasgow 
Manchester 



36 &. 37, Monkwell Street. EC. 
II Miller Street. 
I7a, Sackville Street 



Also at Paris.Brussels. and AMSTERDAh 



r 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE ORIGINAL "DONNA"' HAIR WAVERS. 



Christmas 1919. 



To our Friends and Clients in Canada, 

* 

Hearty Greeting, and Best Wishes for 1 920 

May Peace Reign in Righteousness 

We have now resumed full production of our Peacetime Manufactures of excel- 
lent and reliable qualities. 

Our plant and machinery have been brought up-to-date, and we are able to 
compete for all requirements, viz: — 

HAIR PINS, of all varieties. 

PATENT "DONNA" HAIR WAVERS. 

HOOKS and EYES, etc. 

We beg to say we have appointed Messrs. Beck Bros. & Turner, Ltd., Montreal, 
Offices and Showrooms,- 207 St. Mary Street, Montreal, as our agents in Canada, 
and they will be pleased to quote you and to send samples. All orders will receive 
prompt attention. 

For and on behalf of 

The Gloucester Pin Manufacturing Co., Ltd* 



H. M. WILLIE, 

Director. 



16 



DRY GOODS RE VIE W 



New Novelty Dress Goods for Spring 1920 



A wonderful collection of beautiful and exclusive 
sheer fabrics. See samples now in the hands of 
our representatives. 

FANCY AND FLORAL VOILES 

Four ranges in plain weave, comprising Light, Medium and 
Dark shades. 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.00 

MERCERIZED TUSSAH 

The assortment includes Rose, Silver, Copen, Myrtle, Taupe, 
Tan, Brown, Navy and Black. 

ilf 1 36-inch Per Yard, $1.00 

SILK CHECK CHIFFON 
In well-assorted range of Light and Dark shades. 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.00 

FIGURED AND FLORAL MARQUISETTES 
Chiffon and Tussah 

Fine range of color combinations in exceedingly attractive 
designs. 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.25 

SILK STRIPE AND PLAID VOILE 

For exclusive, dressy wear. Seven desirable shadings for 
street and afternoon wear. 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.35 

MESSALINE FLORAL FOULARDS 

Attractive fabric for waists or dresses, also makes excellent 
lining for coats, etc. Shades range includes Old Rose, Taupe, 
Saxe, Terra, Purple, Emerald, Navy and Black. 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.35 

SATIN STRIPE VOILE JUST RECEIVED 

Good weight sheer cloth. Staple shades, JERSEY SUITING CLOTH 

Bisque, Saxe, Copen, Myrtle, Tan, Navy Good weight, fine weave in colors which 

and Black. include Sand, Kangaroo, Taupe, Dark 

36-inch Per Yard, $1.75 Grey, Copen, Russian Green, Mid Brown 

and Dark Navy. 

BROAD SATIN STRIPE VOILE CURRAH AND GOODWOOD STRIPE 

With beautiful large all-over floral CHECK DRESS SERGES 

design. Shades include Silver, Reseda, Suitable for Golf Waists or Separate 

Copen, Light Slate, Saxe, Navy, also Skirts. In two-tone effects. An exclu- 

Black. sive dress noveltv. 

36-inch Per Yard, $2.25 50-inch Per Yard, $4.85 




The W. R. BROCK COMPANY, (Limited) 

TORONTO 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

Wash Goods for Spring 1920 

PLAIN COLORED VOILES 

^V ORGANDIES 

MULLS 

CANTON SILKS 
FANCY PRINTED (Georgette Patterns) 

BATISTES 
VOILES 
ORGANDIES 
FOULARDS 
SILK STRIPE VOILES TOBRALCO VESTINGS 

Our new range of Wash Fabrics is the most extensive and 
complete that it has ever been our privilege to show. Hav- 
ing already booked fully 50% more business than our best 
previous record, we are still in a position to take care of 
your wants. 

The W. R. BROCK COMPANY, (Limited) 

TORONTO 




48 DRV COO DS REVIEW 



It must be admitted that the supply of Dry Goods is limited for 1920. 
Stiffer prices, may also be counted on. Here are a few leaders at present 
prices, and while they last : 



GLOVES 

For Children, in Black and White Lisle 
For Ladies, in Lisle, Black and White 

in Silk, Black, White, Greys. 



HOSIERY 

Whites in Lisle, Italian Silk, Mercerized, 
Fibre Silk, all Silk. 

Blacks in Lisle, Italian Silk, Mercerized, 
Fibre Silk, all Silk. 

ALSO 

Fibre Silks in Navy, Browns, Grey, Cordovans. 
All Silks, Brown, Navy, Grey. 



All the Above at Popular Prices 



THE W. R. BROCK COMPANY, LTD. 

MONTREAL 



49 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

The Recognized Authority of the Canadian Dry Goods Trade 

Published Fifteenth of Each Month Advertising Forms Close Twelfth of the Month 

Vol. XLII. Toronto, January, 1920 No. 1 

EDITORIAL CONTENTS 

Frontispiece 50 Men's Wear 68 

Higher Price Range 51 Canadian Buyer's Views of European 



Records That Master Details 52 

Unique History, Looks Back 60 Years 55 

Trade News Essential 56 

A Miniature Merry-Go-Round 57 



Markets 70 

Dress Fabrics 74 

Furs 94 

Millinery 102 

Knitted Goods 66 



Merchants Faced With 58 Fancy Goods . 77 

New Training System 59 Dress Accessories 80 

Decline Will Be Gradual 61 Equipment and Display 90 

Prosperous Towns Mean Prosperous House Furnishings — 

Canada 62 Infants' and Children's Wear — 

Market Reports 63 Ready-to- Wear — 

Editorial 66 Buyers' Market Guide — 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager 

Publishers of Dry Goods Review, Hardware and Metal, The Financial Post, MacLean's Magazine, Farmers' Magazine, 
Canadian Grocer, Men's Wear Review, Printer and Publisher. Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and 
Manufacturing News, Power House, Sanitary Engineer, Canadian Foundryman, Marine Engineering of Canada, 
Canadian Motor, Tractor and Implement Trade Journal.. 

Cable Address: Macpubco, Toronto: Atabek, London, Eng. 

PUBLISHERS OP 

DRY GOODS REVIEW 

ESTABLISHED 1687. 

ALEX. WALES, Manager. 
MISS A. R. WHALLEY. Editor. 

A. B. CASWELL, Eastern Manager. H. H. BLACK, Associate Editor. 

W. H. WARAM, Toronto and Ontario Representative. P. A. CRANE, Associate Editor. 

E. J. SHEARMAN, Montreal Representative. W. S. McCULLO UGH . Advertising Dept. 

C. A. COLLINS, Western Representative. MISS H. E. CARTER, Advertising Dept 

MISS N. M. EVANS, Associate Editor. ROY A. HUNTER, B.C. Representative. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal, Southam Building, 128 Bleury St., Telephone Ma"in 1004. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave.. 

Telephone Main 7324. Winnipeg, 1103 Union Trust Building. Telephone Main 3449. Vancouver, 39 Tenth 

Avenue, West. 
GREAT BRITAIN— London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain. Limited. 88 Fleet Street, E.C. E. J. Dodd. 

Director. Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address: Atabek. London, England. 
UNITED STATES-— New York, Mrs. E. C. Gibb, Room 1606, St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway (cor 26th St.). Chicago, 

111., A. H. Byrne, Room 1401, Lytton Bldg., 14 E. Jackson St., Telephone Harrison 9133. Boston, C. L. Morton, 

Room 734, Old South Building, Telephone Main 1024. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE— Canada, Great Britain. South Africa and the West Indies, $2 a year; United States, 

$2.50 a year; Other Countries, $3 a year; Single Copies, 20 cents. Invariably in advance. 



50 



DRY GOODS RE VIE W 



& Spring QTatllcur 




Several of the new features are depicted in this interesting 
frock of navy serge. The sleeves are of the new fashionable 
length and the flaring sides from the waistline are considered 
good. The revival of gold braid trimming is decidedly new, 
and there's a bit of gold straw on the hat. Always one must 
have a "feminine" ruffle around the neckline. 



51 



Higher Price Range Almost Universal for 1920 

Decreased Production the Chief Factor for Regrettable Conditions — Coal Strike Cut 

Capacity in Two. 

By THEODORE MORGAN, Merchandising Manager for Henry Morgan & Co., Montreal 



THE outlook for Spring is bad 
from whatever point of view we 
look at it. Prices are going to by 
higher in almost every department, and 
materials will be scarce. This is not the 
fault of the merchant, nor of the manu- 
facturer; the fault rests with the whole 
community. At the bottom of all, as 
the chief factor in higher prices and 
scarcity, is the decreased production, 
and for this labor must be held chiefly 
responsible. Taking industries as a 
whole, I think it would be a fair esti- 
mate that production is not running over 
60 per cent, of the capacity, and in ad- 
dition to this, the quality is poorer. 
There has been a regular turmoil 
created through the demand for higher 
wages and shorter hours, and this has 
worked out in the inevitable vicious cir- 
cles. The reaction is coming when the 
period of readjustment sets in. 

Labor Has Not Met Capital 

The biggest single factor, as I have 
said, is that labor is soldiering on the 
job. Capital has been forced to meet labor 
without labor meeting capital. The only 
way to secure a lower cost is to increase 
production, but the 8-hour basis has 
come in, with many employees coming 
to work at 10 a.m., and the manufac- 
turer loaded with orders is forced to ask 
them to work overtime, say from 4 to 
6.30, and pay at overtime rates. This 
adds to the cost all along the line. 
Spoiled in the Making 

Then there is a good deal of material 
spoiled in the making, through ineffici- 
ent or careless workers. There are more 
flaws in the material by the yard; more 
errors in the workshop. Clothing manu- 
facturers are complaining of this all the 
time. This is due to a great extent to 
a lack of interest, a lack of an intelli- 
gent, co-operative attitude between em- 
ployer and employee. 

Capital, as a whole, in my opinion, 
has been very generous to labor, and has 
acted very logically and reasonably 
throughout it all This is true of those 
in England, France, the United States 
and Canada, but they have not had the 
response on the part of labor that would 
have been justified under the circum- 
stances. 







Take the coal strike as an example of 
a cause of higher prices and scarcity of 
merchandise for the year 1920. A 
prominent manufacturer in the United 
States writes us that they will be cut 
down in capacity to 50 per cent, for the 
rest of the Winter as a result of this 
strike. So that the evils extend much 
farther than the few weeks of the ex- 
istence of the strike. The cutting down 
of production through a scarcity of fuel 
will extend to all kinds of mills, to the 
looms, to the higher cost of materials by 
the yard. This thing comes in through 
many ramified angles. Conditions have 
thus been aggravated through a de- 
creased output, where it should have 
been increased, or the normal, at least, 
been maintained. 

To offset this there are being in- 
stalled labor-savin;;- machines, and bet- 



f ^t^i^i^iaiMiMi^^iyii^iiyiiiyiiiyjiai iEg 1 



Dry Goods 
Review 

Wiskes All 

Its 

Readers 

a 

Prosperous 

New Year 



iffirs ffirsi^iTTTtiiraiffWSi^i^ ^ 



ter organization, but this naturally is 
a slow process, and the advantages will 
be slow in coming. 

No Horizon for Lower Prices 

Hence, I do not see any horizon for 
lower prices while demand continues at 
the present high level. The actual 
scarcity of goods has a tendency to force 
the manufacturer to work overtime in 
order to fill his orders, which in turn, 
increases the cost of production. 

In one line, knit goods, since the 
opening prices have gone up 10 per cent, 
and twice in some cases. One manu- 
facturer told me that his production was 
cut down 20 per cent, below normal. 

Then the clothing manufacturers can- 
not get the skilled workers they need, 
nor can the dressmakers, nor the millin- 
ers, so in every direction a scarcity has 
developed. 

In a good many cases the manufac- 
turers are not getting a normal profit, 
because if they tried to make it, the cost 
of the goods would be so high as to pre- 
vent sales. There is, for example, a 
certain type of Spring coat for which 
we cannot pay more than $150, a coat 
that a woman would not pay more for, 
but on which the maker will receive 
actually less net profit than under nor- 
mal conditions. Many manufacturers I 
know would be willing to close their 
shops rather than continue under the 
strain they are in now. 

As an illustration of what is happen- 
ing in every line of merchandise: I 
have just read a night letter from a De- 
troit manufacturer of cars who has noti- 
fied us that there will be an increase in 
the price of $300 a car on the first of 
January, and probably another in the 
Spring. And the motor car, luxury or 
not, is an index of mo^t commodities. 
When the prices of cars are going down, 
prices in general are declining; the in- 
crease in the price of cars indicates an 
increase in other lines of goods. This 
manufacturer states that strikes have 
held up his production; not necessarily 
strikes in all departments, but a strike 
in one will delay production in others. 
Then, too, the coal sti'ike has lessened 
production, and added to costs as well. 
So it goes, in every direction. 






Records that Master Details 



for the Dry Goods Dealer 



\ System Explained Whereby Full Details Are Always At Hand— To Increase Business 
\nd Spot Leakages Accurate Records Must be Kept— Merchandise Should All be 

Departmentized. 



MAN'S a merchant, after he has 
Footed up his annual inventory 
sheets, fuels that after all has 
been said and done the information 
which the annual Inventory affords him 
is entirely too indefinite. Ninety-nine 
times out of a hundred the net returns 
fall far short of what he had expected 
and what he was justly entitled to in 
view of the volume of business he has 
dune through the year just closed. He 
takes his pencil and tries to figure out 
why it is his profits are so small. He 
just can't understand where his profits 
have gone. But there is nothing in his 
inventory that will tell him. It doesn't 
show up the leaks that have sapped 
away his profits, nor does it show the 
merchant what he can do to better the 
situation. 

The result of this is that a great 
many merchants are making very little 
or no money, and in some cases dealers 
are actually losing money. At the close 
of the year, a year of long hours and 
hard work, they make the unhappy dis- 
covery that they have accomplished very 
little in the way of actual net profits 
for themselves; they have made very 
little money. About all they get out of 
the year's work is the work, and there 
can be but very little satisfaction to 
them in that thought. 

The trouble lies in the fact that de- 
cidedly too many merchants are running 
their business in a haphazard fashion; 
they are leaving entirely too much to 
guesswork. They are sailing through 
the sea of business, but without a chart 
to guide them safely to Port Success. 
They are depending upon Providence to 
turn their efforts into results, and such 
a course is almost sure to lead to 
failure. 

Cannot Do Good Business on Guesswork 

During these days of keener competi- 
tion, rising costs and narrower margins 
of profit, the merchant dare not leave 
the important details of his business to 
guesswork, he should have a system of 
records that will enable him to know 
whether or not he is making money, and 
exactly how much. Not at the end of 
the year, but at the close of every busi- 
■ lay, week ami month, but, most of 
all, he should have records that will 
show him every minute detail of his 
business in order that he may know 
just where to locale the leak that may 
ipping his profits and enable him 
ply a remedy before it is too late. 



By WALTER ENGARD. 

These things are absolutely necessary 
if one is to get a fair return on his 
business. 

The business man wants facts. He 
deals in facts, and when he operates his 
husiness in the realm of surmise and 
fiction, the results are apt to be disas- 
trous. 

The merchant who must wait until the 
annual inventory is taken in order to de- 
termine whether or not his business is 
making money; whether or not every de- 
partment of his business has been con- 
ducted successfully throughout the year, 
and whether or not there has been some 
leak in his business, is taking a mighty 
big chance. He should make it a point 
to know these important facts and 
figures regarding his business at the 
close of each business day, and unless 
he does know he is not in a position to 
make his business return him all the 
profit that is possible. 

Records Indispensable to Merchant 

Records should be to the dry goods 
dealer what a thermometer is to a 
physician, or a carburetor is to the auto- 
mobile — in other words — indispensable. 
Records are absolutely necessary at all 
times to the life of the dry goods store. 
Through his records the dry goods 
dealer should be able to tell just what 
is being done in every department of 
his business, whether or not that de- 
partment is successful; whether or not 
there is some place in his business that 
needs quick action and prompt attention 
in order to apply a remedy to cure de- 
fects shown by his records. Such records 
afford the dry goods dealer an accurate 
means for promptly correcting errors 
or extravagances in policies and 
methods for checking the accumulation 
of otherwise inevitable losses, and for 
quickly developing plans which will re- 
sult profitably. They will also keep the 
dealer posted upon the rate of turnover 
in each department and every up-to- 
date, progressive merchant fully appre- 
ciates the value of rapid turnovers, for 
they release tied-up capital and increase 
the profits. 

Of course, to secure this information 
necessitates the installing of a proper 
system of records. It is utterly impos- 
sible to obtain accurate reports of your 
husiness without accurate records. 

The best system of records for any 
business is one that will give the mer- 
chant all the information necessary for 



the efficient management of his busi- 
ness with the least effort. This system 
should be simple, yet accurate and com- 
plete. It should be convenient and econ- 
omical. Such a system cannot be of 
such character that the cost of main- 
tenance will be excessive, yet if it is not 
complete a very large part of its value 
is lost. 

A Suggested System 

With this article we are publishing a 
system of store records for the dry- 
goods dealer, on which your daily trans- 
actions are summarized. Only a few- 
entries are required daily, yet this sys- 
tem of records will at all times be a 
mirror of your business. It will show 
you every day, and any day, every im- 
portant fact and figure of your busi- 
ness. This system is composed of: 

(1) "Perpetual Inventory Sheet," 
Form No. 1. 

(2) "Daily Record of Sales," Form 
No. 5> 

(3) "Purchase Record Sheet," Form 
No. 3 

(4) "Daily Expense Sheet," Form 
No. 4. 

Each of these forms provides for the 
daily entry of the figures for a month; 
that is, a new set of sheets must be 
used for each month, and on the extreme 
left-hand side has been provided a col- 
umn for the entry of the date upon 
which the figures are entered. 

In the very first place, before going 
into details regarding this system of 
records and its working, I wish to em- 
phasize this one fact: that success will 
result only if the necessary care is given 
to getting the records started right, and 
keeping them going. Records can be 
made practically automatic, but they are 
bound to require some intelligent super- 
vision; and they are not worth the paper 
upon which they are written unless you 
make them a practical guide for the 
future control of your business. 

Benin With An Inventory 

In starting this system of records 
the very first thintr to do is to take a 
physical inventory of all stock on hand. 
This is the only way by which you can 
be sure that the future information 
shown you by these records is going to 
be accurate. This inventory cannot be 
too exact, and you should impress upon 
all those who participate in the taking 
of this inventory the absolute neces-ity 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



53 



of counting and entering every item cor- 
rectly. 

Your Business Must Be Departmentized 

If you should not already keep your 
stock by departments, I would advise 
that the first thing you do is to depart- 
mentize your stock. In order to operate 
any store at the highest point of ef- 
ficiency, it is necessary that each small 
part of the business be operated 
successfully. One small part of the 
business, creating friction, may cause 
the entire store to come to a stand-still; 
that is, a leak, a loss, a waste, some- 
where in the business may cause the 
entire institution to be operated at a 
loss. The successful merchant not 
only knows what results he gets, but he 
also knows just why he gets them, and 
he is in a better position to get the same 
results again and again, and to get bet- 
ter and better results. 

The following department classifica- 
tion is suggested, although it can be 
changed to suit requirements, depend- 
ing upon the size of the store and the 
various kinds of merchandise handled: 

(1) Underwear and hosiery. 

(2) Linens and domestics. 

(3) Laces, embroideries, handker- 
chiefs, veilings, bags and purses, and 
gloves. 

(4) Notions, buttons, toilet articles, 
etc. 

(5) Patterns. 

(6) White and colored dress goods. 

(7) Silks, satins, and linings. 

(8) Women's ready-to-wear. 

(9) Children's ready-to-wear. 



(10) Corsets and corset accessories. 

(11) Millinery. 

(12) Furs. 

(13) Rugs, blankets, comforts, drap- 
eries, etc. 

(14) Miscellaneous. 

Of course, there are some stores that 
may need an entirely different classifi- 
cation, but the main point to bear in 
mind is that by departmentizing your 
store you will be able to handle it bet- 
ter; and you will know just what each 
department is doing. 

Making Out the Inventory Sheets 

In taking the inventory you should 
provide regular inventory sheets, which 
may be purchased from any first-class 
book store at very small cost. Each 
department should be inventoried separ- 
ately and the records of each depart- 
ment kept separate. Each sheet used in 
taking the inventory should be num- 
bered, so that if any are lost you will 
know about it. This inventory sheet 
should be so ruled and spaced as to 
provide for the entering of the sheet 
number, the department, by whom in- 
ventoried, etc.; also for entering the 
name of the articles, the quantity, the 
unit cost, the unit selling price, the 
total cost and the total selling price. 
As soon as you have completed the in- 
ventory you will take the inventory 
sheets for each department separately 
and total the cost of all stock in that 
department. 

As soon as this has been completed, 
then you will turn to the first form of 
this system of records, the "Perpetual 



Inventory Sheet," Form No. 1, and you 
will enter the cost of all stock in each 
department, as shown by the inventory 
sheets, entering the figure in the column 
headed "Stock on Hand," as provided 
under each department heading, using: 
the line marked "Inventory Last Month.'" 
Then you will ascertain the total cost 
of all stock on hand for the entire store 
and then enter this figure under the 
heading, "Total Stock," in the column 
headed "All Stock on Hand," as pro- 
vided on this form at the extreme right- 
hand side of the form. 

As soon as you have completed this 
operation, the system is ready for work. 

In presenting this system of records, 
or for that matter any system, it will be 
necessary that you thoroughly under- 
stand that you must adopt the use of 
the sales slip system of making a record 
of every transaction. This is very im- 
portant if your records are to be kept 
accurate. 

Necessity of Price Tickets and Salesslipa 

One point before going further — it is 
also necessary that you provide price 
tickets for practically every article in 
stock, and see to it that every article 
bears a price ticket, upon which has 
been entered the cost and the selling- 
price per unit. The cost price should be 
entered on the price ticket by using a 
code, thereby keeping the cost from 
coming in contact with the customer, 
or even the sales people. This is a 
very important point in the working of 
this system, as it will facilitate the 
handling of the record to a very marked 















FORM 


NO 




1 


















"Perpetual Inventory Sheet" 

Month of- *9 






Pepl'A' 


D&l'B- 


DegfC 


DeptV 


P»pf£- 


J>e£tT \ 


TaUl&xM 




1 




at 


St©* 

°* . 
Hand 


3p 
•ft 






£ 




9toa 

35 




^ 

A 


Utod 


% 




Hmi 


& 




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Ud 


2. 


35 


'#M'M. t* 


,r -. 












































•o 


' 














































). 














































J 












































O 















































FORM NO. 3. 



"Purchase "Record Sheet" 

Month of /9 




p 
H 


PUROWSEDOF 


INVOICE 
N(X 


Of 

invoice 


WTSlBCmoH TO Z>£mRTJ"tEtrtS 


"A* 


-B" 


"C" 


•©• 


- a - 


-F" 














































o 


































































o 























FORM NO. 2 



FORM NO. 4 



Daily Ttecord of Sates" 

Month «/ /V 






Tbta/Saki 


DepLW 


DeptV 


jtytr 


DepfP 


JPeptT 


jkpir 




0»n 


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54 



I) I; Y GOODS REVIEW 



degree, as will be Been a tittle further. 

This price ticket should be upon the 
article itself whenever possible. Of 

course, on some items it will he impos- 
sible to have a price ticket, and in 

the price ticket should be at- 
tached to the bin, drawer or box in 
which they are kept. No article should 
go into stock until it has been marked. 

Now, when the saleswoman make-; a 
sale, she will make out a sales slip, 
upon which she will enter the name of 
the article or articles sold, the quantity 
of each, the cost mark as shown by the 
price ticket and the price received, as 
well as the department from which it 
is sold. As these records provide for 
keeping the sales for each department 
separately, it is necessary that the de- 
partment be designated on the sales 
slip, so that the sale may be credited 
to the proper department. In case of 
the saleslady making sales to a cus- 
tomer from more than one department, 
she will make out a separate sales slip 
for the articles from each department, 
thus enabling the bookkeeper to keep 
each department's sales separate and 
gTeatly facilitating the work. 

In entering the cost mark of the 
article on the sales slip, the salesperson 
might enter the cost mark on the orig- 
inal slip for the convenience of the 
bookkeeper in securing the cost of the 
sales as provided by this system; by re- 
moving the carbon from between the 
sales slip this cost mark would not 
come in contact with the customer. 

These sales slips should go imme- 
diately to the cashier following the sale. 
The cashier should have a sheet of 
paper on hand at her desk, so ruled as 
to allow the entry of the amount of 
each sale made as shown by the sales 
slip when it comes to her for each de- 
partment, and also for the cost of the 
article sold. She should keep the sales 
of each department separate, entering 
the sales in one cohimn and the costs in 
another. In this manner the sales in 
each depai-tment, as well as the cost of 
the goods sold, will be kept entirely 
separate, and at the close of the day 
the cashier will total each of these col- 
umns, giving her the total amount of 
sales that day in each department and 
the total cost of the goods sold in each 
department. An adding machine will 
facilitate this work to a great degree, 
although it should not require any great 
amount of time if done by pencil. 

Daily Sales Recorded 

soon as she has determined the 
amount of sales in each department, 
also the costs, she will turn to the 
"Daily Record of Sales" sheet, Form No. 
2, and enter the cost ami the amount 
of the sales in each department as pro- 
vided on this form. Under the head- 
ing, "Total Sales," she will enter the 
total amount of the sales for the entire 
store, also the cost of all goods sold; 
this will be found by adding the figures 
for the various departments. 

At the close of the month, the book- 
keeper will total each column, and this 

you the total of the sales in each 



department for the month, also the cost 
of the goods sold that month out of 
each department. Subtracting the 
from the amount of the sabs you will 
have the -Mount of gross profit 

each department has made during the 

month, also tbi' total gross profit made 
from the entire store. 

With this form you are able to keep 
an eye upon the progress of each de- 
partment. You are able to know just 
what departments are forging ahead the 
fastest and which ones are needing a 
little pushing. 

Purchases (lucked Up 

Now, with Form No. 3, the "Purchase 
(1 Sheet," you are able to keep an 
accurate account of the purchases for 
each department. When an invoice is 
received for goods purchased it should 
be kept on a spindle until the ; 
actually are received at the store, at 
which time the goods should be checked 
with the invoice to ascertain whether all 
the goods billed have been received and 



FIVE PRINCIPLES OF 
INVENTORY 

First — Inventory at least once a 
year, better twice, or monthly. 

Second— Tell the truth about 
your inventory. Don't place fic- 
titious values on your goods, for 
by so doing you fool no one but 
yourself. 

Third — Under rather than over- 
value; a thing is worth what it 
letches in the open market, not 
what you paid for it. 

Fourth — Classify your inven- 
tory as follows: — (a) Real estate 
and land owned, (b) Furniture 
and fixtures, include machinery, 
etc. (c) All equipment outside of 
actual material used in work or 
outstanding on orders, (d) Small 
odds and ends inventory in bulk, 
(e) Merchandise on hand. 

Fifth — Charge off so much per 
year for depreciation of fixtures, 
had accounts, premium on insur- 
ance and lessened earning power. 



then the invoice should be O.K.ed and 
handed to the bookkeeper. As soon as 
she receives the invoice she will turn 
to this Form No. 3 and enter the in- 
voice, entering the date, the name of 
the firm from whom purchased, the in- 
voice number, and the amount of the in- 
voice. In case there should be some 
items billed on the invoice that do not 
go into stock to be re-sold, but instead 
are to be used in the conduct of the busi- 
ness, such items as paper, twine, boxes, 
etc., she will deduct the amount of such 
items and charge them to expense and 
not to purchases. She will then dis- 
tribute the purchases to the various de 
partments, charging each department 
witli the goods so hilled that go into 
that department. With this form you 
know at all times the amount of your 
purchases in each department, and you 
are in a position to know whether you 
aic buying ahead of the sales in that 
department or behind the sales, thus 
either checking up on your buying 



that department and avoiding overatook, 

or speeding up bu.s ing in order not to 
lose any Ball 

Now, turning again to Form No. 1, 
you will note that this form provides 
for the keeping of a perpetual inven- 
tory of each department, thus showing 
you the amount of stock on hand in 
each department at the close of any day. 
At the close of the day, after the book- 
keeper has entered the sales and pur- 
chases as provided on the other forms, 
she will enter on this form, Form No. 
1, the cost of the purchase for each de- 
partment as shown by the "Purchase 
Record Sheet," Form No. 3, in the col- 
umn headed "Cost of Purchases," also 
the total cost of all purchases under the 
heading "Total Cost of All Purchases," 
as provided at the extreme right-hand 
side of this form, Form No. 1. Then, 
turning to the "Daily Record of Sales," 
Form No. 2, she will enter from this on 
Form No. 1 the cost of the goods sold 
in each department in the column 
headed "Cost of Sales." Now, adding 
the cost of the purchases to the amount 
of stock on hand for the preceding day, 
as shown by this form on the line above, 
and subtracting the cost of the day's 
sales she will have the value of the 
stock still on hand in each department, 
and this figure will be entered in the 
column headed "Stock On Hand." 

With this form, the dry goods dealer 
can watch his turnover in each depart- 
ment. He will also be able to determine 
in which departments he can speed up 
the turnover, thereby releasing tied-up 
capital and increasing his profits. 
Expenses Allotted to Departments 

Form No. 4, the "Daily Expense 
Sheet," is for keeping an accurate 
record of all expenses and for the dis- 
tribution of the expenses to the various 
departments. Every cent of expense 
should be charged on this form, enter- 
ing the date, the item and the amount, 
and then the total should be distributed 
to the different departments in propor- 
tion to their participation in it. For in- 
stance, rent will be charged to the vari 
ous departments, according to the space 
they occupy in the store. The salary of 
the manager will be distributed to the 
departments according to their sales. 
The office expense in a like manner. 
Salaries, insurance, taxes, depreciation, 
advertising, display expense, heat and 
light, bad debts, etc. 

At the bottom of this form you will 
note that space has been provided for 
entering the percentage ratio which the 
expenses in each department bear to 
the total sales in that department. Thus, 
the dealer may know at the close of each 
month whether his percentage of mark- 
on is sufficient to cover his cost of op- 
erating that department and to leave 
him a fair margin of profit. 

With such a system of records, the 
dealer has every important fact and 
figure at his finger tip. They give him 
in a simple form thorough knowledge 
of the business, and with them there is 
no necessity of "guess-so" methods, 
which have proven so expensive to the 
retail merchant. 



55 



Unique History, Looks Back 60 Years 

D. Magee's Sons, Ltd., of St. John, N.B., Began Business With An Ideal of Service Years Be- 
fore Confederation — Built Hats in 1859 — Awarded Certificate of Merit — Well Equip- 
ped Store and Carefully Kept Stock — Expanding in 1920. 



A CANADIAN store which has a 
history unique in its success of 
more than 60 years, is that of D. 
Magee's, Sons, Ltd., at St. John, N.B. 
Like most stores whose growth and sta- 
bility have proven highly successful, this 
store's founder had a very distinct ideal 
as his business foundation. R«alizing 
that one's success or failure depends 
upon* the method of doing business, 
rather than the collecting of high prices 
from a trusting public, the late David 
Magee, father and grandfather of the 
present members of the firm, held a 
well-founded desire to put the very best 
of his ability into every braneh of the 
goods which he handled. He was him- 
self a practical hatter and furrier with 
all the old-time pride of achievement. 
Away back in 1859, seven years before 
Confederation had made the Dominion 
of Canada, this firm began business in 
a small way, and its uninterrupted suc- 
cess during that long period is evidence 
enough of its sincerity of purpose. 

Building Hats in 1859 

Hats were built by hand in the days 
when Mr. David Magee started Ms 
shop. He was a practical hatter and 
also manufacturer of the old Beaver 
hats wh'ch were in the height of fashion 
at that time. The present-day silk 
plush hats are descendents of the old 
Beaver, but, like their ancestors, are of 
such intricate manufacture that they 
must even now be made by hand. 

In 'making the old Beaver hat, the 
beaver was whipped into shape with a 
bow similar to that used for playing a 
violin. Every process of manufacture 
was by hand, slow and tedious. It is 

doubtful if more than a very few of the 
old-time Beaver hat makers are still liv- 
ing. 

Workmen in those days took pride in 
their craftsmanship and endeavored to 
embody in their handiwork their very 
best skill. A trade such as hat-making 
could not be learned in a few months. 
An apprenticeship of years was often 
required before one could graduate as a 
master workman. 

The Evolution of 60 Years 

Naturally, in the 60 years that havp 
now passed, styles, processes and 
methods have changed very materially, 
but the original makers of hats who 



understood the hand production were 
well equipped for meeting the exigencies 
of fashion and readily adapted them- 
selves to new demands. 

In making the silk hats of to-day the 
silk plush is used to cover a special 
gossamer body. The gossamer body is 
made from a specially manufactured 
white cotton, saturated with gum shel- 
lac reduced to a liquid. The silk plush 
is manufactured in Paris. 

The perfecting of special machinery 
has made it possible to manufacture at 
least a part of nearly everything wear- 
able by machinery except silk hats. It 
is claimed that they are the only thing 
that is still made entirely by hand. 

In the days when D. Magee's, Sons, 
Limited, was founded, a hatter was re- 
quired to do all the work of building a 
silk hat. To-day, as in most trades, the 
work has become specialized and men 
are trained to make some certain part 
of the hat rather than the whole. The 
making of silk hats is really an art, but 
because of the changing styles of hats, 
is gradually dyinf out. 

A Foundation For the Future 

It is doubtful if Mr. Magee, when he 
was weaving quality into his hats and 
capes, realized that the day of "hurry- 
up" machine-made goods would find 
quality, as in his time, a dominating 
factor in creating more and more busi- 



ness for this better class store each 
year. 

Mr. Magee was also known in his time 
as an expert cap maker — each cap in 
those days was cut out and carefully 
made by hand — to-day thousands of 
caps are cut and made by machinery. 
Mr. Magee was a practical fur cutter, 
at first doing all the work himself until 
his business grew to such an extent that 
he was compelled to import experts 
from England to assist him. 

As far back as 1859 David Magee 
was awarded a certificate of merit, 
under the Seal of the Province, for hats 
and caps exhibited at expositions held 
at St. John, Halifax and Fredericton. 

It's a long step from the period of 
hoop skirts, Beaver hats and minuets to 
these days of jazz bands and slender 
slimness; each decade has brought forth 
a different idea as to what is what in 
wearing apparel and in general con- 
duct. The evolution, however, has not 
left the Magee store in the background. 
Living up to their original ideal, th" 
owners have made many changes called 
for by the times, but have endeavored 
never to sacrifice the best in service 
and in merchandise. 

To-day, the Magee store is one of the 
most attractive of its kind in the whole 
Dominion, and compares favorably with 
the best on Fifth Avenue. Dignity, 
cheerfulness and satisfaction fairlv 




The above is a view of the main floor of the D. Magee's Sons, Ltd., store of St. 
John, N.B. The history of this store dates back to before Confederation and it 
was built up on a definite principle of business. 






V liOODS l; K \' 1 K \\ 



ite from the modern fixtures, orna- 
mentations ami furnishings. 

main floor is finished in 
soli I Honduras mahogany and the fix- 
tures arc hand-carved and very costly. 
r chairs placed conveniently are 

themselves an invi'ation to the public to 
come in and accept the hospitality of 
the shop. The illustrations portray the 
carefully kept .-loci., neat cabinets, gen- 
eroos displays and the touches of luxury 
in the palms and mooseheads. The 
Beeond floor is finished throughout in 
golden oak and is also a work of real 
store art. Full length mirrors are a 
feature of both the hat and fur depart- 
ments. ' 

D. Magee's Son;, Limited, have de- 
termined upon a policy of still greater 
expansion during the year to come. With 
their reputation for aggressive mer- 
chandising of high-tirade goods there is 
no doubt that they will find their busi- 
ness continuing in its phenomenal suc- 
cess during the next year. 




SOU another' view of the D. Magee's Sons, Ltd., ston of St. John, S.ll. 
placing of chairs around gires a very tpicious appearance to the store. 



The 



Trade News Essential 

Even at the End of the Line 

Even For Indians, Foreigners and Far-out Settlers Merchant Finds 

It Necessary to Have Good, Reliable and Frequent 

Information For His Employees. 



ONE would scarcely think that the 
matter of latest styles and newest 
fashions would be of very great in- 
terest to a community such as Turtle- 
ford, Sask., whose population is less 
than three hundred, and its location the 
last town on the C.N.R. from Battleford 
north. And yet, Mr. Fred Donovan, who 
conducts a general store in that town, 
finds that it is of the utmost importance 
that his six sales peoples are thoroughly 
acquainted with details of style, colors, 
trimmings, and the other numerous de- 
tails concerning dry goods. Moreover, 
they are expected to know the amount 
of materials which are required for 
various purposes and be able to make in- 
telligent suggestions as to combinations 
of materials, colors and trimmings and 
the making up these fabrics into suit- 
able styles and useful articles to appeal 
to their customers. This knowledge of 
becoming styles is a big factor in devel- 
oping the dry goods trade in this par- 
ticular store. Mr. Donovan caters to 
rs coming from fifty to one hun- 
dred miles distant, and he finds them 
eager to purchase intelligently, even 
though they wear their hats and gowns 
and wraps in pioneer settlements. These 
far-out customers find that it is all the 
moie necessary for them to purchase 
the newest goods in order that with the 
second season's wear they will not ap- 
pear old-fashioned. 

Impartial Courtesy Effective 

It has been a matter of Mr. Donovan's 
special attention that his sales people 



give every legitimate attention to every 
visitor to his store. They endeavor to 
gain as a regular customer anyone 
who makes an initiatory purchase. Na- 
turally, in this location, there is a wide 
variance among the visitors, but irre- 
spective of color, race or financial sta- 
tus, they are treated with courtesy by 
the Donovan staff. Returns and com- 
plaints are avoided to a very great 
extent by the sales-people assisting the 
customer to make a careful choice 
rather than purchase in a haphazard 
manner. 

Mr. Macartney, head salesman, who 
has been with Mr. Donovan ten years, 
is an expert at show-card writing. 
Plainly, yet neatly and attractively 
printed cards are used to great advant- 
age. These show cards are printed in 
large lettering and can be read clearly all 
over the store at a glance. These have 
resulted in quick sales for lines of dry 
goods, especially those of the periodical 
reduction sales. 

Mr. Donovan himself finds a special 
interest in the study of his customers 
and moves among them continually with 
a word of welcome, a smile or an ex- 
planation fitly placed. 

Advantages From Indian Trade 

Indians from two reserves trade at the 
Donovan store. They make gloves, 
moccasins, coats, etc., from hides trim- 
med with beads and worked in various 
shapes and designs characteristic of the 
race. By attracting this custom to his 
store, Mr. Donovan is enabled to pro- 



cure their products and gets many sub- 
stantial orders from paints at great dis- 
tances for the genuine Indian-made 
goods. 

Thousands of dollars worth of furs 
are handled by Mr. Donovan during the 
winter season. Here again the Indians 
are regular sources of supply. In ad- 
dition, there are professional trappers 
of all nationalities, and farmers and 
ranchers from the North Country bring 
in muskrat, weasel, wolf and bear, for 
which there is keen demand. 

Gets the Lay of the Land in the Summer 
Time 

Another factor of importance in Mr. 
Donovan's success is h's habit during 
the Summer-time of motoring through 
the country, making personal canvas 
and getting acquainted in that way with 
those who might be possible customers. 
He is also enabled to estimate the sea- 
son's income for the settlers and farm- 
ers and judge carefully as to credits 
and purchases for his own shelves. 

The windows and show cases of the 
store are also points of special attention 
for the management. It is aimed that 
they never look slovenly, but that at all 
times they express an idea well in ad- 
vance of the season, which is a shop- 
ping suggestion for customers continu- 
ally. 

This store, the connecting link be- 
tween the primitive and the conventional 
areas, no doubt finds in its year's rou- 
tine of business many instances which 
seldom touch the average merchant 
throughout the Dominion, and yet its 
success and the very appeal which it 
makes to its far-out customers are 
based upon the most fundamental prin- 
ciples of merchandising, and therein 
introduces the touch of romance to the 
commonplace in a way which is of the 
utmost interest to the trade elsewhere, 
and a matter of satisfaction and suc- 
cess to the instigator. 



57 



A Miniature Merry-Go-Round 

A Toronto Merchant Has Hit Upon Quite the Most Unique Toy Attraction — Built it Him- 
self and Has Tent, Music, Lights, Everything Complete — The Idea Has Brought 

Manv a Customer to His Store. 



I 



r T IS the very best advertisement 
I've ever had, though, to be candid, 
that was not my object in making 
it," said A. E. Payne, who conducts a 
dry goods store at 258 Christie street, 
Toronto, while he obligingly put his 
miniature merry-go-round into action. 

And while the gallant knights and 
haughty damsels, grinning clowns and 
good-natured bears, sped merrily around, 
ne related the story of the unusual toy. 
"Four or five years ago, while at the 
Island, the idea occurred to me that it 
would be very interesting to the children 
of my neighborhood to see a sort of 
pocket edition of the Island merry-go- 
round. 

"Not long after, while holidaying in 
Muskoka, I began to work on the idea, 
and, working on it in my spare mo- 
ments, had it ready for my Christ- 
mas window display." 

This unique toy rests on a platform 
thirty, inches in diameter and is a re- 
plica of the larger toy which delights 
the heart of kiddies — and not a few 
children of larger growth — at many an 
amusement park. The figures are ex- 
ceedingly lifelike. The dolls were 
dressed by Miss Payne — and are surely 
persons of quality. The greatest diffi- 
culty experienced by Mr. Payne was in 
securing the necessary beasts of burden, 
as they have to be all of one height. 

At night the toy is illuminated by 
red and blue lights, set in the canopy, 
and on a level with the platform. Dur- 
ing the Christmas season a small music 
box, playing a repertoire of eight tunes, 
supplies the melody that adds the final 
touch of realism. 

A small motor furnishes the neces- 
sary power, and as the toy is mounted 
on bail-bearings, the cost of running 
it is very light. 

"The first Christmas it appeared the 
store was nearly mobbed by the little 
folks," continued Mr. Payne. "In fact, 
they hung around so persistently • tha f 
I seriously considered removing it from 
the window altogether. 

"And then people whom I had never 
seen before began to drop in. 'Bobby 
does nothing but talk about your merry- 
go-round. He pestered us until we 
promised to come to see it,' was the way 
one lady explained her and her hus- 
band's presence in the store. All these 
newcomers were purchasers. 

"Then the kindergarten teachers of a 
nearby school heard of it, and requested 



permission to bring their pupils up here 
to see it at close range. The result 
was that as many as three hundred 
children have been jn the store, or with 
their ncses ghied to the window looking 
in, at one time. 

"The small child sees not only the 
toy, but others as well. Maybe a toque 
c r a pair of mittens, a baby's cap or a 
da r nty apron fcr mother, catches her 
eye, and when she goes home she takes 
advantage of the first opportunity to 
tell the family all about 'the nice things 
Mr. Payne has in his store.' 

"By actual count, our small visitors 
r/ay be the means of bringing in any- 
where from two to a dozen people who 
otherwise would never hear of us." 
"Do people never ask to buy it?" 
"Often," replied Mr. Payne, smiling 
remini-scently. "Each year a parent or 
an uncle or aunt comes in and inquires 
the price. 

"When I tell them that the actual 
cost of construction, exclusive of the 
motor, was fifty-five dollars, they decide 
that it is too expensive, even for the 
nicest baby in the world. 

"Last year, however, I had a very 
persistent customer. He offered me one 
hundred dollars as a first bid, and when 
I declined it he jumped to $125. 
"'Say, who's buying this thing? You 



or 



'The 



Co.,' he replied. 'We 



need it in our toy department. What 
do you want for it?' 

" 'If the Company, with all 

their facilities for attracting the pub- 
lic, are willing to pay that for it,' I 
said, 'it is worth a great deal more to 
me.' " 

And there it is — as unique a toy 
and as odd an advertising medium as 
you will find anywhere in Toronto. 



SOME POINTS FOR IMPORTERS 

In his report as the President of the 
Montreal Wholesale Dry Goods section 
of the Board of Trade for the year 1919, 
George S. Cleghorn, who is general 
manager of the W. R. Brock Co., Ltd., 
Montreal, dealt with a number of points 
that will be of interest to all importers 
in the dry goods trade. 

In the review of the work of the 
association during the year, he referred 
to the habit cf importers in the past 
in employing junior clerks for their 
Custom House work. Early in the year, 
however, the Department of Customs 



had adopted a regulation requiring 
clerks making affidavits at the Customs 
House in connecticn with entries on the 
behalf of importers, to be of the full 
age of twenty-one years. This forced 
importers to employ only senior clerks 
for this work, which involved increased 
expense on their part. The importers' 
side cf the case was fully presented to 
the chief inspector of the Customs De- 
partment, but the department refused to 
alter its decision and the regulation has 
remained in effect. 

The valuation of goods for purposes of 
duty took up the attention of the section 
on several occasions during the year. 
Particularly in regard to the difficulty of 
establishing the fair market value of 
goods where there was a continued ad- 
vance in the price of these goods. Late 
this Fall the Department of Customs 
had provided for the addition of a fixed 
advance to the invoice values of certain 
lines of goods in establishing the value 
of duty, when specific information could 
not be obtained in respect to definite ad- 
vances which may have taken place be- 
tween the time of purchase and ship- 
ment. The goods to which those regula- 
tions applied were cotton fabrics, silk 
fabrics, and ribbons, from all countries. 
There was also a provision by which the 
regulation went back to the 1st of 
August, and this feature was protested 
against. The Acting Commissioner of 
Customs, replying to the representations 
of the Association, said that when the 
Department had knowledge that an ex- 
porter has either failed or refused to 
declare the values for duty purposes re- 
quired by law, it was compelled by such 
law to require that the goods be pro- 
perly appraised, and when the actual 
fair market value as sold for home con- 
sumption at the time shipment was not 
declared on the Custom's invoice by the 
exporter, the responsibility for such 
omission must be borne by the importer. 
The Association was successful in hav- 
ing a change made in regard to the 
early closing of railway freight sheds. 
The Transportation Bureau of the Board 
of Trade made arrangements after sev- 
eral conferences with the Railway War 
Board, that the old order of 1911 should 
be in effect so far as the closing hours 
of the freight sheds were concerned, 
namely the railways should take freight 
up to 5 o'clock p.m. in the winter season, 
and until 6 o'clock p.m. in the summer 
time. This enabled the wholesalers tO' 
get out a large number of extra ship- 
ments the same day that an order was 
received, which they would not be able 
to do, had the early order gone into 
effect for the summer months. 






Merchants Face Wave of Dishonesty 

Warning Issued by Merchants' Association of Montreal — Fake Order From Retailer to 

Wholesaler — "Out-of-Town" Customer. 



IN THE current issue of the organ 
* of the Merchants' Association of 

.Montreal, which is termed "Greater 
.Montreal," the first page is devoted to a 
warring to merchants, shippers and 
others in regard to what is termed "A 
unusual wave of dishonest methods 
of. all kinds." This — it is declared, has 
broken out in Montreal. "Thefts from 
warehouses, rigs — crafty tricks played 
on messenger boys — forged orders for 
goods — misrepresentation in soliciting 
advc rtising — forged cheques — misrep- 
resentation of identity. Every conceiv- 
able plan to separate business men from 
their goods or money seems to have been 
crowded into the period since the last 

ie of our bulletin." 
Six samples of recent cases are given 
in order to warn the members of the 
association, including a forging of an 
order in a wholesale house, thefts from 
messenger boys, cashing of cheques, 
charging goods to an out-of-town cus- 
tomer, getting advertising dishonestly 
from merchants, and a fake rush order 
by 'phone from a wholesale house by a 
so-called retail customer. These cases 
were as follows: 

A Forged Order. 

The game seems to have been worked 
this way: Saturday noon when the man 
who generally takes the orders of a certain 
wholesale house had left, another employee 
in the office took out from the recording 
machine blank form for order No. 503 — he 
filled it out for $600 worth of goods for a 
certain customer and forged the name of 
the man who usually takes the orders and 
left the order on a desk in the office. He 
then went out, telephoned to the ware- 
houseman, giving the name of the man 
whose signature appeared on the order, and 
told the warehouseman that he had made 
out an order and left it on a certain desk 
in the office. 

He instructed the warehouseman to se- 
cure the order and to be ready to deliver 
the goods when the customer's carter called. 
He then sent a carter from the regular 
stand who secured the goods. 

The details of what is presumed to have 
happened afterwards are too long to go 
into; suffice it to say that the goods have 
not since been seen. An arrest has been 
made in this case and prosecution is pro- 
mg. 

Waylaying Messenger Boys. 

A method of theft which has received 
de'rsble publicity in the press is that 
of stopping a messenger boy carrying valu- 
able tfoods, asking him to go a message, 
offering to hold his goods, with the re-ult 
that when the boy returns both the man for 
whom he went the message and 

have disappeared. 

merchants that we know of were vic- 
timized in this way and the accused was 
sentenced t<> two years on each of four 



offences, the sentences to run concurrently. 
It should be mentioned that the Associa- 
tion had nothing to do with the arrest of 
a certain innocent man in connection with 
a similar case which received publicity in 
the press. 

Cashing Cheques. 

Most business houses make a habit of 
cashing no cheques, but when the son of 
one of the biggest out of town customers 
comes to a wholesale house with a cheque, 
it seems rather hard to refuse to cash it, 
especially when he has a good story. 

Three or four wholesalers have been vic- 
timized by a party who claimed to be the 
son of a leading Quebec merchant and who 
offered cheques to be cashed. These cheques 
were not signed by the merchant in ques- 
tion, but by himself. The victims naturally- 
felt that the son of such a man would have 
a substantial account, and the fact that he 
was presenting his own cheques seemed to 
do away with suspicion. It was a surprise, 
therefore, to find out that he was not at 
all the son of the merchant in Quebec. 

This party has been sentenced to two 
years penitentiary. 

Charging Goods to Out-of-town Customers. 

This is a case of a young lady who re- 
presents herself to be an out-of-town cus- 
tomer who has been dealing with a leading 
retail store and who has always paid her 
accounts promptly. As she called taxis to 
take her to a leading hotel such as the cus- 
tomer used and knew all the details in con- 
nection with her account, she did not have 
very much difficulty in securing certain 
goods. Suspicion was aroused, however, 
and she was placed under arrest. 

Advertising. 

Two cases of advertising more or less 
legitimate, have been brought to our at- 
tention. One is that of securing advertising 
for cover of stationery to be used in a 
certain hospital. The impression left with 
most merchants was that the hospital was 
getting all the money given in such adver- 
tising. As a matter of fact, the arrange- 
ment with the hospital was that free sta- 
tionery would be supplied, provided the 
name of the hospital and letters of intro- 
duction from hospital authorities could be 
used in securing the advertising. 

Another similar instance is selling tickets 
r or a concert given by capable parties, but 
in selling these tickets the professional 
saleslady put forth a charity plea for a re- 
cognized local institution rather than the 
merits of the concert. As a matter of fact, 
the promoters paid the institution a certain 
amount which they received whether or not 
the business men approached would buy a 
ticket. 

These two instances were brought to the 
attention of members, but it is proposed 
with the beginning of the year that the 
Association shall t^ke more definite steps in 
stopping such solicitation for advertising 
and sale of tickets. 

Fake Telephone Calls. 

This is a case of a rush order given by 
telephone from the retail customer to a 
wholesale house. An auto delivery i- 
cured and sent to call for the goods. The 
goods are delivered and signed for by the 
driver of the auto, who is innocent of the 
scheme, and the wholesaler never again 
sees or hears anything about the goods. 

An arrest has been made in this case and 
the prosecution is proceeding. 



1'ln efforts taken by the Association 
to prosecute all cases i f dishonest; that 
members were TOctkna of has tended to 
make them more immune from this last 
WS 'c of crime. 

Licenses for Drhcrs 

A suggestion has been made by the 
Merchants' Association, and that is that 
there should be licenses issued for driv- 
ers of deliveries. It is pointed out that 
when the head of a delivery system finds 
that a number of his drivers have not 
appeared on a certain morning, he must 
replace them at once. He often takes on 
men who have been discharged the very 
day before, among them men who have 
been guilty of theft in connection with 
their previous employment. The sug- 
gestion is made that the name and ad- 
dress of every driver should be regis- 
tered, as well as his photograph, and 
that he be given a license numb t :it the 
City Hall. Sup'„r ; ntender f s then would 
only engage a man carrying a license 
and v/ould be able to secure their record 
through the hcousc number. They might 
change their name, but they could not 
change their ruml-er. The members jf 
t'.i.' Associati r.i r .ve been a.-ked to ex- 
press their opinion on this proposal. 

OFFICERS FOR 1920. 

The following are the new officers of 
ihe Merchants' Association for 1920: 

Board of Dir.ctoi= — E. E. Wallace, 
President, butter merchant; H Racine, 
first Vice-President, Alphonse Racine, 
Limited; P. H. Bartley, second Vice- 
President, Mark Fisher Son? & Com- 
pany; J. H. Armstrong, Greenshields 
Limited; E. Arnold. Grand Trunk Rail- 
way System; Wm. Cook, Almy's, Lim- 
ited; C. Dumaresq, Hartt & Adair Coal 
Company; A. Dupuis, Dupuis Freres; 
H. R. Gray, Gunn, Langlois & Company, 
Limited; D. Harrison, Dent Harrison; 
P. E. Joubert, Lamontagne, Limited; F. 
M. McRobie, Canadian Transfer Corn- 
pan v; L. S. Mitchell, Robert Mitchell 
Company, Limited; G. Morris, Ogilvie 
Flour Mills Company, Limited; A. 
Murphy, Chas. Guard & Compnay, 
Limited; Ed. Quinn, Canadian Cartage 
& Storage Co.; F. W. Stewart, duett 
Peabody & Co., of Canada, Limited; 
Wm. Wells, Cunningham & Wells, 
Limited. 

The Executive Committee which has 
full power to act between meetings of 
the Board of Directors is composed of 
the following: 

President, E. E. Wallace; 1st Vive- 
President, 11. Racine; 2nd Vice-Presi- 
dent, P. H. Bartley; Ed. Quinn, C. 
Dumaresq. 



New Training System at Murray-Kay's 

Superintendent at Toronto Departmental Store Does Important Work— Employment, Edu- 
cation and Welfare Skilfully Handled— An Unusual Personality Behind It All. 



urr\ 



HE whole thing is a matter of 
practical psychology and char- 
acter study," says Mrs. Jean 
Belford of her work as superintendent 
of employment and education in Murray- 
Kay's, Ltd., Toronto. And just to talk 
with her on the subject instils one with 
a like amount of enthusiasm for this 
business of selecting and training sales- 
people. It makes one feel that if a 
salesgirl is ambitious and willing to de- 
vote all her energies, to learning her 
work, there is no degree of efficiency to 
which she cannot attain, when there is 
such a deal of thought being given to 
her advancement. 

Mrs. Belford does not need to tell one 
that she is in love with her work. It is 
seen in her contented manner and her 
joyful smile, which is just as whole- 
hearted when directed toward the girl 
to whom she is refusing a position be- 
cause of her inability, as towards the 
representative of DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW. 

Ten Years' Experience 

Added to this enthusiasm Mrs. Bel- 
ford contributes ten years of experience 
in a similar work in the States, which 
were preceded by a thorough training in 
the retail business. Strange to say, she 
was not trained as an educational 
director, but as a buyer. Her training 
consisted of a private course which she 
paid for in a large departmental store. 
This included courses in tailoring, corse- 
try, millinery, in fact every branch of 
the business was studied in a complete 
and practical manner. Then she applied 
for a position as buyer, but was asked to 
accept an appointment as educational 
supervisor instead, and has remained in 
the work ever since. And thus it seems 
that Fate has simply put her where she 
belongs. - 

This Store Aims At Refinement 

To return to the work as applied in 
Murray-Kay's, the logical place to be- 
gin is where the new employee is em- 
ployed. In this work, it is necessary for 
great discrimination to be shown; 
especially in such a store as the one 
under discussion, where it is desired 
that a certain atmosphere of refinement 
shall be maintained throughout. This 
means that every would-be employee 
must evince certain elements of culture 
in his or her deportment and general 
appearance. This does not mean that 
her clothes should be especially fine, or 
her education above the average; but 
it means that she must show evidences 
of that subtle abstraction which the 
trained psychologist is able to detect as 
refinement. Moreover, the latter is 
seldom deceived by a pose, an affecta- 
tion of culture which is not genuine and 



which would not last to the end of a 
trying day in a retail store. And, most 
important of all, the very essence of this 
striving after an atmosphere of refine- 
ment is embodied in the slogan: 
"Courtesy and Service" to all, without 
regard to a customer's appearance, the 
size of her purchase, or the length of 
her purse. 

The Training of a Junior 
In Murray-Kay's, juniors are em- 
ployed at the age of 15 at $1 a day. 
They are first trained as parcellers and 
cashiers, there being a parceller and 
cashier in each desk head of from five 
to eight juniors, whose duty it is to 
train beginners. Their duties here 
include also the detection of errors 
on sales slips. Some boys are used as 



KILL THE FROST 

Once more DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW would remind you that in 
cold weather nothing retards sales 
so much as a window glazed over 
by "Jack Frost." First, board the 
inside of the windows or have 
tight-fitting sashes to prevent the 
warmer air of the store entering. 
Next bore a row of holes at the 
base of the window and a similar 
set at the top. This will permit 
a free flow of air and keep the 
temperature down. 

A simpler plan is to start the 
electric fan running first thing in 
the morning and keep it running 
all day. This keeps the warm air 
on the move and lowers the tem- 
perature so frost will not have a 
chance to collect. The sight of an 
electric fan working in Winter 
also will help to attract attention 
to the windows, more especially 
if it be made to blow upon a small 
Union Jack or a bathing-girl doll. 
It suggests the comfortable tem- 
perature inside the store. 



messengers. When juniors are deemed 
to be sufficiently adept in their duties 
to be considered permanent, they are 
supplied with a blue serge uniform by 
the firm. After six months or a year, 
juniors are given an opportunity of be- 
coming salespeople and are placed in de- 
partments, providing they have shown 
sufficient ability. In the same way, the 
sales force is under sci'utiny and the 
most ambitious among them are given 
every opportunity to become trained as 
assistant buyers. 

Although the organizing work of the 
employment office, the keeping of 
records and filing of applications, etc., 
is done by competent assistants, the 
actual work of interviewing applicants 
and conducting the lectures on sales- 



manship are attended to by Mrs. Bel- 
ford alone. She must also O.K. all leav- 
ing slips. 
Educational Lectures and Conferences 

Educational classes are held on every 
working day of the week excepting Mon- 
days and Saturdays, and during each 
week the entire sales force, with the 
exception of those members who are of 
old standing are required to be present 
at one of the classes. The lectures last 
for 30 minutes, and after that, time is 
allowed for the asking and answering 
of questions, not only in connection with 
the lecture just completed, but with re- 
ference to any problem that has been 
encountered in the store life. 

As an intimation of the trend that 
these lectures take, here are a few of 
the subjects: "The power of thinking 
and its results," "Putting thoughts into 
action," "Vital results of action in sell 
ing," "Habits are but a repetition of 
acts and acts are the results of thought." 

Older members of the staff, assistant 
buyers, and buyers are called in their 
turn to what are known as Class Con- 
ferences. These are of a strictly busi- 
ness nature and are truly conferences 
where a frank discussion of specialized 
business problems is carried on. For 
buyers and their assistants, the discus- 
sions generally bear on vital points in 
business policy and the disciplining of 
the sales force. 

"A Confession" 

Both lectures and conferences are 
much appreciated by the employees, as 
evidenced by their interested attention; 
direct results in the work, and also by 
their personal testimony. One salesman, 
who has been with the firm since its be- 
ginning, was pleased to come to Mrs. 
Belford at the close of the first class 
conference with what he termed " a 
confession." "I strenuously opposed the 
idea of coming to this meeting," he said, 
"but yielded finally out of respect to 
yourself. Now I feel bound to tell you 
that I have thoroughly enjoyed every 
minute and I'm going to make a point 
of being at every one I possibly can." 
He meant it, too, and Mrs. Belford ap- 
preciated the compliment the more 
coming as it did from one of the oldest 
and most respected of the firm's em- 
ployees, and one who had had many 
years' experience in retail business. 

Connected with this work is the keep- 
ing of records relative to the efficiency 
of members of the staff. All eri-ors are 
reported and noted, and these reports 
are taken into account as a basis of 
promotion or increase in salary. 

Avoiding Misfits 

As another means towards promoting 



60 



DRY G O O D S R E V I E W 



efficiency, it is every 

nl working in the department to 
which she is In'st adapted. This means 
that she is frt-e to come to Mrs. Belford 
at any time to request a transfer, and 
often after investigation of her abilities 
it is grunted. Of coarse, ■ decided effort 
is made when the girl is first being em- 
ployed to give her the work that she can 
do best, hut it is inevitable that misfits 
are sometimes found. A department 
bead sometimes ma\ have occasion to 
be dissatisfied with a saleslady's work, 
but the employee cannot be discharged 
until Mrs. Belford has investigated the 
case, and probably given her a further 
chance in another department. 

The system of handling lateness is as 
follows. If an employee is only late oc- 
casionally and that a matter of about 
five minutes, she may obtain a pass 
from her department head and does not 
have to forfeit the day's work. If, how- 
ever, she is an habitual late, she is 
called to Mrs. Belford's office on three 
different occasions, and after a quiet 
little talk is permitted to continue her 
work. But if this method fails to bring 
about punctuality on the part of the em- 
ployee, there remains one of two things 
to be done. If the case is considered in- 
corrigible, the employee is discharged 
after being given these three chances to. 
overcome her fault. But if it is be- 
lieved that it can be corrected, she is 
transferred to another department, 
probably at a lower wage. "And," states 
Mrs. Belford, "the result of such trans- 
fers has, in most cases, been quite suc- 
cessful, because the employee takes a 
fresh start amongst her entirely new 
surroundings and profits by her former 
errors." 

Employees' Welfare 

Although Murray-Kay's do not pre- 
tend to have a welfare association of 
any kind, their employees' well-being is 
looked after in an efficient manner. 
There is a hospital in the store where 
emergency cases of sickness are brought; 
there is a lunchroom, where all the staff 
may obtain their meals at cost; and 
when an employee with a good loyal 
record becomes ill, her wages are paid 
in full while she is away. Best of all is 
the Christmas gift, inaugurated in De- 
cember, 1919, of insurance policies to 
every employee who has been at least 
six months with the firm. 

In spite of the immense volume of 
business which Murray-Kay's shared 
this year with the trade in general, the 
employment problem was at no time 
acute. There was always plenty of 
extra holiday help to be had and Mrs. 
Belford was even forced to turn many 
away. Her plan was to employ college 
students on Saturdays, beginning in No- 
vember, and then, when their holidays 
began, they were in a position to come 
on the staff as thoroughly capable help. 
And these college students were not all 
men. Some were girls, anxious to make 
a little money in their spare time, or 
else just in search of a little experience 



in unfamiliar work. One girl came be- 
sbe means to make her protY 
inie as that of Mrs. Belford, and 
believed that the right place to begin 
was by being an employee herself. For 
this reason she intends to devote al) 
bar vacations to work in business 
houses. 

Thoroughly Systematized 

All this work of being the guide and 
mentor of from 500 to 800 employees 
seems like a fairly large program for 
one woman, however unusual her attain- 
ments. When asked how she is able to 
accomplish it, she answered: "Simply 
by having a well-defined system of my 
own, wherein I arrange to be in a cer- 
tain department at a certain time, and 
so on." Every afternoon is spent on 
the floor, where she notes personally 
the work of the salespeople and searches 
out problems to be met in the educa- 
tional lectures. 

Mrs. Belford has been with the firm 
only three months, but in that time has 
made herself quite at home in Toronto. 
"You see," she says, "I was born in 
Canada, but was quite a small girl when 
we moved to the States, so that I may 
be said, like the negro boy, 'to have 
growed right up with the States.' " She 
also stated that she found it easier to 
feel at home here because of the great 
resemblance between Washington and 
her former home (where she was with 
the Palais Royal), and Toronto in re- 
gard to their natural surroundings, their 
parks, etc. But then, anyone meeting 
Mrs. Belford and coming in contact with 
her warm, friendly smile could easily 
understand without being told how it is 
that she can settle down so quickly, 
gather around her a circle of friends and 
gain the confidence of her associates. 



FOUR AND A HALF DAYS' WORK 

DURING THE SUMMER 

MONTHS 

A new arrangement of holidays was 
announced at Winnipeg on Dec. 22 
when Geo. H. Stewart, president and 
managing director of Hollinsworth & 
Co., Winnipeg, was host at a dinner 
and theatre party given to the em- 
ployees of the company, and several 
personal friends. At each employee's 
place was the customary Christmas 
cheque. 

Mr. Stewart announced that as another 
Christmas present, store would be closed 
Friday, the day after Christmas. He 
also made the announcement that after 
Jan. 1, each employee would receive one 
full day each week as a holiday during 
the months of January, February, June 
and December, and during the months 
of July and August, Saturday after- 
noons and a full day during the week. 
During the months not mentioned they 
would receive one half-day each week. 



The employee's then presented their host 
with a handsome reading lamp. 

During the dinner Mr. Stewart paid 
tribute to the hearty co-operation, loy- 
alty and faithfulness of the emplo 
and stated that the success which the 
business of the company had attained 
was due to their support and good will. 
He looked upon them, not only as em- 
ployees, but as his friends, he said, and 
in order to be a friend to the employees, 
one must implicitly trust them. He had 
the most implicit confidence in every 
member of the staff, he declared. Any 
business that existed simply for the 
purpose of making money, Mr. Stewart 
said, had no right to exist. Life, happi- 
ness and citizenship were essential, or 
the business would not be worth while. 
Replying on behalf of the employees S. 
E. Rathsburg, assistant manager of the 
company, assured Mr. Stewart that 
every one in his employ was most grate- 
ful. Their gratitude, he declared, was 
not limited to the present occasion, 
much as they appreciated the dinner, 
the theatre party and the Christmas 
gifts. It was rather the good will and 
thoughtfulness behind it that made 
them happy, and it was rather to the 
unfailing courtesy and consideration 
that characterized their daily relations 
throughout the year that they would 
pay tribute. 



TWO STATUES UNVEILED 

In the Winnipeg store of the T. Eaton 
Co. the fiftieth anniversary of the foun- 
dation of the business was commemorat- 
ed in December 11 in a ceremony much 
similar to that which took place in the 
Toronto store on December 8. It con- 
sisted of the unveiling of a statue of 
the late Timothy Eaton and its presen- 
tation by M. McGee, second vice-presi- 
dent, to Sir John Eaton, the present head 
of the firm. 

The presentation was made before 
several thousand employees, and the an- 
nouncement was made that, beginning 
January 2, the Winnipeg store would 
close at 5 p.m. rather than 5.30, with 
Saturday a half-holiday throughout the 
year, and a whole holiday during July 
and August. These latter changes are 
made in fulfilment of the wishes of the 
founder of the firm, who, as explained 
when the Toronto store adopted this 
schedule a year ago, wanted his em- 
ployees to ha\e one day free for recrea- 
tion and another for rest nnd worship. 



Windsor merchants benefited this 
Christmas by two unusual contingencies. 
First, the fact that Canadian monev is 
discounted 10 per cent in Detroit lias 
meant increased trade in Windsor, and 
second, the regulations which hinder un- 
vaccinated persons from entering the 
State, has also helped to decrease con- 
siderably the crowds crossing the ferry 
to do Christmas shopping. The mer- 
chants therefore inaugurated a "buy-at- 
home" campaign, so "it's an ill wind 
that blows nobody any good." 



61 



Decline Will Be Gradual 

Best Authorities Believe That Decline in Prices, When It Comes, Will Extend Over Period 

of From One to Three Years — Drop Will Be Absorbed Without Serious 

Losses — Should not Affect Buying of Stock 



SOME day there will ,be a return Lo 
normal conditions in all branches of 
merchandise and industry. High 
prices in foodstuffs, in wearing apparel, 
in all the common necessaries of life 
must inevitably drop sooner or later. 
Things cannot remain abnormal for an 
indefinite length of time; there must 
come the turning in the road, and then 
the decline in prices that seem to have 
mounted high as Haman's gallows dur- 
ing the last few years. History repeats 
itself in prices, as it does in the affah's 
•of men and the conflicts of the nations. 
After the American Civil War, prices in 
many of the necessaries of life mounted 
even higher than they are to-day. But 
the decline came, and it will come again 
as surely as the rising of tomorrow's 
sun. 

How Will It Come? 

How will it oome? The question is 
already beginning to agitate the minds 
of manufacturers and retailers. The as- 
sault on the high prices of foodstuffs 
has been persistent and has resulted in 
reductions along certain lines. Next will 
come the demand for reduced prices in 
men's and women's wear. The war 
altered many a man's life; it started 
new currents of thought and created 
new habits of life. It taught conserva- 
tion of energy, conservation of raw ma- 
terials, conservation of wealth. It taught 
men how to save, and how to work, so 
that they might save. Along with the 
tragedy of the war also came oppor- 
tunity for safe and profitable invest- 
ment in Victory bonds. Men and wo- 
men discovered that they could make a 
suit or a dress or a pair of shoes last 
longer by a little mending if it meant 
that they could buy another $50 Vic- 
tory bond. 

This lesson will not be forgotten if 
the time ever comes when the consum- 
ing public begins to feel that they are 
being needlessly bled by the manufac- 
turer or the retailer who demands too 
great a profit. For example: The 
gentlemen who shine shoes in a certain 
city decided one day that, on account of 
the advance in prices due to the war, 
and because everybody else seemed to 
be "doing it," they would ask fifteen 
cents instead of ten. They did it. For 
a week their stalls were empty; people 
did their own shining of shoes. Then 
they dropped the price back to ten 
<cents. But in the meantime, many men 
and women had learned the art of shin- 



ing their own shoes, and they never 
went back. 

Profits Have Been Fair 

Retailers of dry goods have, we be- 
lieve, demanded a profit not unduly ex- 
cessive during the last four years. 
There have, probably, been exceptional 
cases, but these have been very few and 
there has been a ready disposition on 
the part of the trade to fulfill the spirit 
as well as the letter of the various or- 
ders of the Board of Commerce. 

But, as has been said before, the time 
is coming when there must be a decline 
in the abnormally high prices that have 
prevailed during the years of the war 
and which still remain exceptionally 
above normality. It is a time which 
may be dreaded to a more or less de- 



Whether in the immediate or the 
distant future, the time is coming 
when there must be a decline in 
prices. With that decline, there 
arises a score of problems that are 
of vital interest to the retailer in 
dry goods. How is it coming? 
Will it be a sudden decline or will 
it be spread over a considerable 
period of time? If it is to be 
sharp, how is the retailer to weath- 
er it? If it is to be a matter of 
months, perhaps years, what are 
the best ways to prepare for it? 
In the accompanying article some 
effort is made to throw light on the 
subject. 



gree by manufacturer and retailer alike. 
There is a feeling among the men of the 
trade that this decline must come; and 
many are wondering how they are going 
to meet it. 

Decline Will Be Gradual 

Those who are best able to judge say 
that the decline in prices will be gradual, 
so gradual, in fact, that retailers will 
be able to absorb the altered prices 
without much loss to themselves. A 
sudden and sharrp drop in prices would 
create complications that might be 
dangerous and exceedingly harmful. 
Both manufacturers and retailers will 
seek to avoid it and can avoid it with 
co-operation. It would be to no one's 
benefit to dislocate the markets by a 
sudden drop. By the very nature of 
things, moreover, the decline must be 
gradual. The only thing that will cause 
the cost of things to drop will be greater 
production; and greater production is 
not a thing of a day or week, or even 
months. Competent judges believe that 
this decline, when it comes will be 



spread over a period of one or two 
years. Some even say it will be three 
years. 

The Effect on Stocking 

From the standpoint of the retailer 
there is a vexed problem here. There 
is, at present, a hesitancy among many 
of the men of the trade to stock goods 
— much less to over-stock on them — 'be- 
cause of the uncertainty of future 
prices. If a man can get immediate 
delivery on a consignment of goods, 
which, formerly, he retailed at one- 
third of the price at which he retails 
them now, he will buy them and bank 
on a quick turnover. But when his de- 
livery is delayed from one to four or 
five months — and he feels morally cer- 
tain they will be in the majority of 
cases — he hesitates about ordering. He 
does not want to be left with a stock of 
goods on which there has suddenly 
fallen greatly reduced prices. 

Perhaps this condition among the 
trade is not very general at the present 
time. The decline dees not seem a thing 
of the immediate future. There seems, 
at present, little relation between order- 
ing and delivery, so far as fear of a dis- 
astrous decline coming suddenly is con- 
cerned. In some cases, premiums are 
being paid for deliveries, and it is more 
than probable that some of the retailers 
of dry goods will have goods coming 
into their stores next Fall that should 
have been there for the Spring trade. 
And they will take them; and, perhaps, 
be glad to get them. Fear of a decline, so 
far as can be judged at present, is not 
resulting in a holding back of orders 
from the manufacturers. 

But It Will Come 

It will come, however. But in the 
meantime, retailers need have no fear 
of keeping their lines well stocked with 
goods on which they are getting a 
reasonable profit — and that means most, 
if not all lines. A .sudden and sharp de- 
cline would be as unfortunate as a run 
on a well-established bank. Nothing 
would be gained by it and there would 
be considerable loss to many who would 
suffer innocently. Everything points to 
the fact that this decline must come — 
though there may be no evidence of it 
as yet — .but when it does come it will 
be of such a character that great losses 
will not be sustained and there will be no 
serious dislocation of business. It is as 
well for every retailer to keep his eye 
on developments as they are bound to 
affect his business; but we see no need 
for him to view the inevitable decline in 
prices with any degree of apprehension. 



82 



I) li Y GO0t>S RE VIE \V 



Prosperous Towns Mean 

a Prosperous Canada 

By E. M. Trowem, Secretary, Dominion Executive Council, The Retail Merchants' 

Association of Canada, Ottawa 



THERE are very fen people in Canada who have not 
heard the argument used, that in order to pay our 
national debt we must produce more goods, whether 
they are from the forest, the mine, the field or the sea, 
The object is to exchange these goods for other goods that 
we require, but which we cannot produce. The more goods, 
therefore, that Canada can produce the richer she becomes, 
and the richer that she becomes the better business place 
it is for those who live here. If the above argument is 
sound for Canada as a whole it should also be sound for 
any part of Canada. 

Makes for Progress 

Competition among nations is the strongest incentive 
toward progress. The Canadian people are proud of Can- 
ada because of the ideals she has set up, and she is, there- 
fore, proud of her flag and proud of her race. This is the 
incentive for higher development. To build up Canada we 
must do as all sane men would do in their own private 
business; they must build up their treasury, and so we 
must build up the Canadian Treasury. Hundreds of millions 
of dollars in the treasury of any foreign country are of no 
use to the Canadian Treasury unless we can get some of 
it by exchanging our products for it. 

Would Become Dormant 

If the world was one great commonwealth and there 
was only one treasury, we would become dormant through 
want of competition, and we would become lost through 
enormity. Competition is the mainspring that forces us 
on toward higher ideals. This is true in -every position in 
life. The citizens of every city, if they are happy and 
contented, take a pride in their surroundings. They want 
their city to be the best in Canada, and they strive toward 
.that end. This produces a healthy rivalry, and so it is with 
the towns and villages of Canada. 

Variety and Style 

•• Follow the argument a little further, and competition 
among the citizens for better homes produces a variety and 
style that lends a charm to life, and which could not be 
found where every house was built after the same plan and 
of the same style of architecture. If legitimate competi- 
tion, therefore, is an advantageous incentive among nations, 
cities, towns, villages and individuals, it must be encour- 
aged and not destroyed, providing it receives no special 
privileges and does not undertake to take advantage of 
its position. 

Goes Hand in Hand 

Wherever there is prosperity there is usually progress. 
Prosperity is not always represented in dollars and cents. 
If it were *o and all the dollars and cents in Canada 
got into the hands of two people, no one could say that 
Canada's prosperity was impaired if the amount this year 
remained the same as last year, or was somewhat greater, 
but if this condition was produced we would begin to see 
evidences of lack of prosperity all around us. 

How About This? 

In making a survey of all the towns and villages 
throughout Canada, can anyone say that they see great 



evidences of prosperity? Can they see more stores being 
built or new additions to old ones? Is there more paint 
used than formerly on the store fronts? Are the stocks 
doubling up or keeping pace with the population? Is 
there a general appearance of prosperity all around ? 
Are there more and better pavements, better fire-fighting 
appliances, more contented civic employees, better paid 
public school teachers, etc.? If not, why not? Could 
it be because of the lack of pride in the town or village? 
Is the money that is paid to the farmers or producers 
passing through the town or village and circulating so 
that all engaged therein can have an opportunity of being 
rewarded for their services, or is the money going direct 
to one or two large mail order houses hundreds of miles 
away, and starving the trade of the town? 

Reduce Its Power 

Take the actual trade and business out of a town and 
you reduce its power to pay taxes. Taxes can only be 
paid by those who have money to pay them. Mendicants 
and beggars never pay taxes. Every retail merchant who 
has a store in a town should make it a rigid rule to buy 
all the things he requires from his fellow retail merchants 
in the town. If the goods you want are not in stock, 
ieave your order and encourage your fellow retail mer- 
chant to stock them. If retail merchants themselves 
patronize and encourage mail order catalogue houses, 
how can they complain if others do the same thing? 

Keep It At Home 

If you want your town to thrive you must keep your 
money in local circulation. You must constitute yourself 
a town booster. Canada's continued prosperity depends 
upon her live, up-to-date towns. It is far better to have 
eight million happy and contented people in Canada, all 
having enough work to keep them busy and sufficient 
salaries to enable them to lay something away for a 
rainy day, than it is to have thousands out of employment, 
thousands receiving starvation wages, thousands in the 
poor houses, and a few living in luxury and abundance. 
The more active, energetic towns that we have the more 
equitable will be the distribution of wealth. 

Vital To Our Future 

Canada's future depends upon the prosperity of her 
towns and villages. If the towns and villages of Canada 
decline, Canada will also decline. If you want your town 
to die, take your money out of circulation and send it 
away to a mail order house. If you want a thriving, 
up-to-date place where the people love to congregate, be 
a town booster; take an interest in the stores in your 
town; encourage those who keep clean, comfortable hotels, 
where commercial travellers can stay with comfort and 
obtain good meals. If you have a local paper, weekly or 
daily, subscribe to it, and if you are a merchant or a 
manufacturer advertise in it and see that the proprietor 
keeps everlastingly boosting your town. If it is worth 
living in it is worth boosting; if it is not worth living 
in we would advise you to move out as quickly as possible 
md give place to better men. 



63 




THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE 



SCARCITY of goods and rising prices con- 
tinue to be the features of the dry goods 
markets and trade. In every department 
of the trade the same story is told ; the repeti- 
tion becomes wearisome when one listens to it 
both from the wholesaler and the retailer. 
Manufacturers complain that they are unable 
to get their orders filled by the mills; retailers 
say that they cannot depend upon the orders 
they place with the wholesaler. And so the 
endless cycle continues. 

The outlook for the year does not lend itself 
to the view that there will be a great improve- 
ment before the curtain falls on 1920. The 
world demand for goods has reached propor- 
tions hitherto undreamed of, and the effort to 
fill this gigantic order is partially paralyzed by 
shorter hours of labor. Labor costs are soaring 
everywhere and they form one of the big, if not 
the biggest factor in the rising prices in all lines 
of dry goods. There is nothing on the horizon 
that would indicate that these demands will be 
one whit less during the year upon which we 
have just entered. 

While the supply of raw wool seems to be 
abundant — reports from England indicate that 
there are between 4,000,000 and 5,000,000 
pounds on hand — production does not show any 
marked increase. At the Bradford mills, for 
instance, where production was increased ten 
per cent, three months ago by overtime, workers 
have ceased this overtime, though it is claimed 
that they violated an agreement in doing so. 
Buyers returning from England who have spent 
weeks in the very heart of the woollen district 
state that conditions are worse than they have 
been for years and that there is no question 
about rising prices during the present year. In 
the space of a few weeks, botany suitings ad- 
vanced from four to seven shillings per yard. 
Styles and fashions are largely determined by 
quantities of goods to be had. 



In Japanese, French and Chinese silks, there 
has been an advance in the last month of from 
15 to 20 per cent. The unfavorable rate of ex- 
change is increasing these prices from 7 to 10 
per cent, on account of payments having to be 
made through New York. Lists placed in the 
hands of the jobbers by the manufacturers are 
being constantly revised, both as to price and 
delivery. Georgettes, crepe de chine and habu- 
tai have advanced ten per cent. Rationing is 
being adopted by manufacturers and whole- 
salers. 

In draperies and curtains, for the first time 
since the outbreak of the war, French tapestries 
are finding their way into Canada in small lots. 
Repeat orders for the same show an advance of 
between 30 and 50 per cent. Canadian velours 
continue strong, with an increase in the last 
month from $3.50 to $4.50 per yard. 

Canadian mills are reported to be falling 
down on deliveries of cotton goods. Spot busi- 
ness is very brisk among the wholesale houses. 
Merchants, anticipating still further advances 
in all lines, are buying freely and taking what 
they are allowed from the jobbers. Fall prices 
are said to be such that surprise will be occa- 
sioned both by the retailer and the consumer. 
Staple lines continue to advance. 

The linen situation is described by one buyer 
as being worse than any other situation in the 
trade and he predicts that in six months' time 
there will be no pure linen on the market. The 
reason is that Russia and Belgium, the former 
sources of supply for most of the world's needs, 
are not forwarding any flax. 

Notions show some increases over a month 
ago and there is a marked shortage in some 
lines. In boots and shoes there have been some 
advances in felt goods and leather goods con- 
tinue harder to procure. 



SILK 



Further Advances in the last month of 
From 15 to 20 Per Cent.— Rate of Ex- 
change Increasing Prices Nearly 
10 Per Cent. 

SILK. — Advances in the last month of 
from 15 to 20 per cent, in Japanese, 
Chinese, French and Swiss silks are re- 
ported, and all indications point to a still 
further advance in these prices. De- 
liveries from the mills are from two to 



four months late and wholesalers are ex- 
pecting them to be still worse as the year 
advances. Jobbers are being advised 
that they need not expect goods at the 
prices quoted in a revised list, which 
means that the revising of the revised 
list cannot even be accepted as final. 
With such conditions prevailing in the 
important matter of deliveries retailers 
would appear to have doubtful times 
ahead of them. 

An important item that is sending up 



prices is exchange. Canadian houses, in 
buying Swiss, Japanese or Chinese silks, 
are obliged to pay in New York currency 
and are thus compelled to pay the un- 
favorable rate of exchange. Within the 
last two months this has meant an in- 
crease in itself of from eight to ten per 
cent. 

Spot prices in all lines have held very 
firm, but desirable goods are scarce. Re- 
tailers are coming to Toronto in increas- 
ing number? to pick up what they can 






DRY GOODS REVIEW 



"in tlu' different Louses. ;u'.<l whole- 
advising that, with the pre- 
vailing and continued scarcity in these 
lines the retailer would do well to make 
periodical trips to the city for pick-up 

One house received a large ship- 
ment of Mescalines and Duchess satins 
on the Monday erf a recent week, and by 
Friday they had only a few ends left. 
They did not even have the time to get 
out the samples of these goods; buyers 
came to Toronto to pick them up I 

make little objection to prices, realizing 
that they either have to pay the price 
• without the <roods. 

There has been an unusually large sale 
of metal brocades daring the last three 
week Thes« are used for vestings. 
Two cases received just before Christmas 
by one house are now I'll sold out. 

Georgettes, Habutai, and crepe de 
Chines in the last two weeks have shown 
a still further advance of ten per cent. 
All reports coming from the mills are 
ie effect that they are booked up 
for months ahead with orders and that 
deliveries cannot be made on time nor 
in the quantities desired. Much of the 
condition prevails as between the whole- 
saler and the retailer; rationing: i? being 
adopted in a number of cases. 

WOOL 

Miners Scout Idea That Prices Will Come 

Down in 1920 — Steady Advances in 

All Lines Reported From Europe 

WOOL. — Hope that prices might ease 
during the year 1920 in woolens and 
dress goods are shattered by a careful 
examination of the markets and the 
general conditions affecting production. 
While there seems to be an abundance 
of the raw material — one report is that 
there are 5,000,000 pounds in England — 
production does not seem greatly on 
the up-grade, and, as yet, nowhere nearly 
reaches the demand. An important de- 
velopment is the decision of the wool 
combers, owing to shortage of tops, to 
cease working systematic overtime 
agreed upon at Bradford three months 
ago, and which increased the output ten 
per cent. Five hundred wool combers 
are, accordingly, unemployed, and oper- 
atives refuse to continue overtime until 
these are absorbed. A cessation of over- 
time work will inevitably cause a serious 
falline: off in the output of tops during 
the next few weeks and will stiffen the 
attitude of the topmakers. 

Buyers of larcre houses are purchasing 
all they can get in most lines of dress 
goods. "Prices are climbing, deliveries 
are poor, ?nd we are taking anything 
we can get," is the way one buyer ex- 
ed it, and he spoke the opinion of 
most of them. This feeling that goods 
will be harder and harder to get as the 
year advances, is sharply felt by nearly 
all the buyers. To-day the best ship- 
ment that can be obtained from Encland 
is Aiurust ami September. One house 
has been able to nurchase a little of 
Frervh roods recently, the ranqre being 
verv small and the nrice proportionately 
high. These were in t^c finer dress 
goods. 

A buyer who has just returned from 



England where he Bpenl a month in the 
Btated i' iNa GOODS 
REVIEW thai conditions there were 
■ than they had ever been during 
all the years he had gone to England on 
purchasing trips, lie spent a month in 
the very centre of the woolen district, 
and from the time he got there until he 
left i here had boon an advance of from 

four to seven shillings en hot. 
ings. "There is no question about it," 
id, "the mice will be higher yet 
and there will be more difficulty in get- 
ting the goods. There is no possible re- 
duction in sight. The situation in the 
trimming end which is of eoual imp* i < 
ance to the tailoring trade is not one 
whit better. Silicias, Beatrices, twills 
and Italian cloths have all shared in an 
advance of from 20 to 30 per cent. Re- 
ports from the Bradford mills are that 
they are filled up with order? for the 
entire year, and have heavy bookings for 
1921. 

Still another buyer emphasized the fad 
that there had been an advance in all 
lines of woolens from 25 to .'!3 1-3 per 
cent, over last season. English mills, he 
said, were booked up for six months 
ahead and were quite independent of 
prices. He could see no reduction in 
prices for 1920 but, on the other hand, 
believed thtre would be increases of from 
25 to 50 per cent. The rationing system, 
he said, was being adopted both here and 
in Europe. Not until labor conditions 
became more settled would prices come 
down. He stated that there war, a reyiort 
that French looms were producing 50 per 
cent, of their pre-war output and that 
before the end of the year they wouTd 
exceed pre-war output by 20 per cent. 
In style and fashion buyers from manu- 
facturers and retailers as well are taking 
what, they can get with little consider- 
ation for prices. 

NOTIONS 

Patent Belts Good for Spring — All Prices 
Advancing — Many Lines' In- 
creasingly Scarce 

NOTIONS.- -All notions to advance in 
price and to become scarcer month by 
month. In some lines it is almost impos- 
sible to get them at all. Wholesale 
houses are besieged with orders which 
they find it impossible to fill because 
they cannot get the goods themselves. 
Within the last two weeks, for instance, 
there has been a sharp advance of three 
shillings a cross on ste^l needles, and all 
notions containing steel show sharp ad- 
vances. 

Wooden knitting needles have remain- 
ed fairly firm in price and are selling 
poorly because celluloid needles arc much 
more in demand. The celluloid have ad- 
vanced in price because there is an in- 
creased demand for the celluloid combs. 
The needles themselves are abnormallv 
hierh in price and are almost as difficult 
to get. 

COMBS. — Side combs and back combs 
in celluloid are active. Jobbers who 
have bought from Lhe mills last summer 
and were promised samples early in De- 
cember have not even received the 



though they have frequently 

been advised of increase in prices. 

BELTS Patenl belts are predicted 
as being rood for the Spring season 

will he shown in one half, five- 
eighths, three-quarters, and one-inch 
widths. Jobber! btate that when the 
prices are announced there will be a big 
advance over last year. 

HOOKS AND KYKS.— Hooks and eyes 
are quoted at $3 per great gross, and 
fasteners at si per gross for the 
plain hack and $8 to >9 for the rolled 
Safety pins are very high, in 
price and there will he no more 5 cent 
safety pins in the assorted sizes. Gross 
assorted cards t'-.-i -oh' last year at 
$4.80 are now selling for $6. 

HAIRPINS. — Wire hairpins are very 
high and scarce. It is now impossible to 
gel a box under 10 cents. 

In elastics it is hard .to arrive at any 
uniform price. Different widths seem to 
be selling at almost any price. Houses 
vary in their quotations considerably, but 
an average price is about that quoted last 
month. 

Circular pillow cottons ranging from 
40 to 4(> inch widths are selling from 45 
to 05 cents. These prices are very var- 
iable, changing almost from day to day. 

Canadian and English mendinp: yarns 
are quoted at substantially the same 
price as a month ago. 

LACES AND 
EMBROIDERIES 

Prices Still Continue High — Business 

Very Brisk — Orders Being Placed 

For Spring 1921 

LACES AND EMBROIDERIES. — 
Higher prices arc p-evailing in silk and 
cotton nets; in fact anything that has 
silk in it at all shows an advance in 
price even during the last month. On 
Georgettes, crepe de Chines and habu- 
tai there has been an advance in the last 
two weeks of over 10 per cent. Old 
Country markets, which are the source 
of supply for a large proportion of these 
goods coming into Canada, are already 
deluged with orders for the balance of 
the year, particularly is this the case 
with silk nets. Wholesalers are picking 
up a good deal of nets, Malines, and 
Valenciennes. 

The business being done in laces and 
embroideries by the manufacturers' 
agents is phenomenal. In this depart- 
ment of the trade the wholesalers are 
alive to the fact that supplies will not 
be too plentiful for at least a year to 
come, and they are buying all they can 
get, and at the terms quoted, be they 
ever so extreme. One agent told DRY 
GOODS REVIEW that in the last eight 
months they had done more business by 
two and a half times than in any nre- 
vious twelve months before the war. Sell- 
ing is already in progress for the Snrine - 
of 1921. Big advance orders are beine. 
placed and at terms never before dream- 
ed of. The prices quoted are those pre- 
vailine at the time of delivery. In snite 
of these uncertain terms orders are being 
placed very freely by the different 
houses. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



65 



ing through at all and wool velours are 
practically prohibitive at the present 
time. French wool velours to the trade 
at the present time would range from 
$15 to $18 per yard. 

Import and spot business are both 
good. One firm told DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW that, within the last month, they 
had sold over 100,000 yards of Georgette. 
A big shortage of black Malines is re- 
ported. There has been unusual activity 
in the sale of baby flouncings. 



LINENS 

Situation Worse Than in Any Other Line 

of Dry Goods — No Flax Coming 

From Russia or Belgium 

LIKENS. — "Worse than in any other 
line of dry goods, and that is saying a 
good deal," was the way one buyer ex- 
pressed his opinion of the linen market 
and the outlook. lie further stated to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW that, in the 
course of six months, he did not believe 
there would be any linens on the market. 
Russia and Belgium, from which coun- 
tries most of the raw material formerly 
came, are not sending any forward to 
the mills for manufacture, and the 
natural consequence is that production cf 
goods out of the flax is reaching a stand- 
still. With conditions in their present 
chaotic state in Russia, and with Belgium 
merely getting back on her feet after the 
war, the outlook is not promising for 
many months to come. The flax from 
Ireland is hardly to be considered in the 
world situation. 

Spot prices are still on the advance, 
which, however, is net causing whole- 
salers the worry that lack of goods is. 
There appears to be very little linen 
goods amongst jobbers. The United 
States is getting a good deal of what is 
to be had at the present time. On the 
whole the outlook for the linen products 
is not over bright. 

Retailers are picking up what lines 
they can to meet current demands, but 
many are going awav with but a handful 
of stuff. 



CARPETS AND RUGS 

No Improvement in Situation — Deliveries 
Bad and Prices Still Advancing 

CARPETS AND RUGS.— There is no 
improvement in the situation with re- 
gard to rugs and carpets from a month 
ago. Prices are still shooting upwards 
and deliveries are notoriously bad. The 
greatest difficulty with which whole- 
salers are meeting is to get the goods 
after they have placed their orders for 
them. One jobber stated to DRY GOODS 
REVIEW that goods ordered last June 
had not yet arrived. These were Spring 
goods. Firms will give no guarantee 
that the prices will be the same as those 
quoted at the time of purchase. A char- 
acteristic letter received from a British 
house is to this effect: "Owinrr to the 
difficulty of petting: the materials and 
the scarcity of labor, all orders are en- 
tered with the right to cancel on our 



part and as regards price, only at such 
prices are are ruling at the time of de- 
livery." English houses are advising 
that orders be placed now for 1921. 

Whereas there used to be a good deal 
of time spent in selecting patterns in 
rugs and carpets, there is not likely to 
be. so much time spent in selecting for 
the next couple of years. One buyer told 
DRY GOODS REVIEW that an English 
house had within the last few days sent 
its representative to their house asking 
them to say what number of rugs they 
wanted for 1921. They would give no 
patterns or prices. The Toronto house 
lid as they were asked, too. 

Stock sheets of jobbers show that there 
is very little stock on hand. These sheets 
are almost empty, and lines are exceed- 
ingly scarce both in quantity and designs. 



COTTONS 



Prices Still Advancing and Deliveries 

Worse Than Ever — Retailers Buying 

Freely Anticipating Higher 

Prices 

COTTONS.— Prices have very little 
bearing on the cotton situation to-day, 
that is, on prices paid for goods manu- 
factured from the raw cotton. From the 
mills to the retailer goods are being ra- 
tioned. Wholesalers state that they are 
looking to harder times so far as getting 
goods is concerned. So far as prices 
are in question, they point out that prices 
quoted from day to day in the papers 
are prices for speculation and are not 
the prices actually paid by the man who 
buys the cotton. That price, they say, 
is considerably higher and is on the 
steady up grade. The world shortage 
has recently been emphasized in a state- 
ment issued by J. S. Wanamaker, presi- 
dent of the American Cotton Association, 
in which he says that the world is after 
17,000,000 bales of American cotton, and 
that recent European offers have been 
larger than any previous one or any num- 
ber of previous ones combined. He urges 
the producers of cotton to hold it for the 
time being. 

Mills are not delivering goods as they 
were ordered. Canadian mills are falling 
down on deliveries on all heavy staples. 
American prices are out of sight and, on 
account of the rate of exchange prices 
are well nigh prohibitive. However, as 
was stated to DRY GOODS REVIEW by 
one buyer, what can be had must be 
bought in the United States, and this 
can onlv have the tendency to keep prices 
on staple lines and fancy lines high. 

Spot business is very brisk. Merchants 
are buying very freely anticipating still 
higher prices. According to the best of 
authority, these advancing prices are 
bound to come. The jobbers state that 
when the Fall prices are announced there 
will be some great surprises both to re- 
tailer and the consumer as well. These 
prices will not likely be announced by 
the mills for a couple of months yet. 

There are complaints among some of 
the houses of the scarcity of bleached and 
unbleached cottons, which, a few years 



ago used to be about the most common 
article of the trade. All prints and print 
goods have been removed from the list 
by a number of houses because they are 
all sold up. 

Bags have recently taken a jump from 
$58 to $65 a bale. 

In the Manchester area there have 
been some rapid and profitable ex- 
changes in cotton mills during the past 
year. In nine months no fewer than one 
hundred and fifty mills changed hands, 
and at prices far in excess of the prices 
paid before the war. Millionaires have 
been made daily by the rapid selling and 
buying of these mills. 



CURTAINS AND 
DRAPERIES 

Few French Tapestries are Now Coming 
But Repeat Orders Will Show Ad- 
vance of From 30 to 50 Per Cent. 

CURTAINS AND DRAPERIES.— For 
the first time since the outbreak of the 
Great War some French tapestries are 
on the way to some of the large whole- 
sale houses in Toronto. These coverings 
in quality are high-class and the quan- 
tity is very limited. Only about fifty 
pieces are in this shipment for one house. 
The price, in comparison with prevailing 
prices of tapestries, will be very reason- 
able, but repeat orders will be at an ad- 
vance of from 30 to 50 per cent. They 
were produced by French mills before 
they had really time to estimate the cost, 
and the higher quoted prices for repeats 
indicate the increased cost of production. 
A few English tapestries are also coming 
through to Canada. 

Canadian velours continue to demand 
a good sale, though there has been an ad- 
vance daring the last month of from 
$".50 to $4.50 per yard. v \'hr>lesalers 
state that the product of the Canadian 
mills is very srood and is taking well with 
the trade. No French velours are com- 
ing forward. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

Advances in Felt Goods— Leather Goods 
Advancing and Increasingly Diffi- 
cult to Get 

BOOTS AND SHOES.— An advance in 
light felt slippers of from 5 to 15 per 
cent, according to the quality is recorded 
since a month ago. Packs and moc- 
casins are up in price Leather <roods in 
kid and black calf are even higher than 
a month ago. and wholesalers expect that 
the prices will advance still further. 

It is predicted that Oxfords will be 
exceedingly good for the coming season 
in both men's and women's style. High 
and low heels will be worn. A New York 
model in 12-£ and 14-R will be shown 
and is expected to be among the big- 
sellers. 

Sport trade is brisk and. as in all other 
lines, goods are very hard to get. Re- 
tailers seem disposed to pay any price 
as long as they can get the goods. 







DRY GOODS REVIEW 

Recognized Authority of Canadian Dry Goods "Trade 



Vol. XXXII 



TORONTO, JANUARY, 1920 



No. 1 



■ r.foflll&lGiaiffiiQ 



.1 RECORD ('III: 1ST MAS SE LSOA 
"/^l lll.'lsTM AS business was never so good be- 
ij f,,, . This Is the report from small towns 
and Large all along the line. The extremely 
opld weather with a small amount of snow in cer- 
tain districts prevented as frequent visits from the 
country folk as would otherwise have been register- 
ed during the few days preceding Christmas. Never- 
theless, DRY GOODS REVIEW -latV lias not come 
in contact, directly or indirectly, with a single in- 
stance of a dry goods merchant being dissatisfied 
with the business done. Likewise, among the whole- 
salers of all classes of dry goods where the manage- 
ment Ls in close touch with merchants, there is entire 
satisfaction expressed over the projects for the nexl 
sis months at least. Collections are good and buyers 
are eager to gel goods. They are even more negli- 
gent of prices than they were a year ago. ''Let me 
have the goods and Ell promise not to look at the 
invoice until I gel home," one merchanl is reported 
to have remarked to a Toronto wholesaler. Many of 

the large Stores were sold out of different staple lines 

ral days before Christmas and wholesale shelves, 

1 mm. were hare. 

So then, all off to a uood start now for another 
1 ,•! us join hands -the DRY ( ;0()DS men in 



veal' 



each community— and work together to eliminate 
the petty grievances and jealousies of times past, l.ei 
11- make dry <M>ods merchandising, so far as we in- 
dividually are concerned, a business in which high 
principles rul< — a service to the community of which 
all may be justly proud. 



Moreover, these facts in every instance bear out 
the statements made by authorities in the trade— so 
Far M ,1,,.-. could ventures definite statement in the 

of the cloud of uncertainties as they wen- 
ported i-, the January issue of LEY GOODS RE 
VIEW one year ago. 

Prices have climbed to unheard of pinnacles; the 

world shortage of g is ha- been, in the mam. the 

reason; but labor problems were the outstanding 
tribulation of the year. Labor ha.- made manj 
mauds which have been granted, and. on the whole. 
working conditions have verv much improved m 
the Last twelve months. True. it. has not always 
been the ease thai employers have made the ad- 
vance- voluntarily, hut the fact remain- that life 
is a Letter thin-, generally, than it ever was he 1 
Bn d it Ls 1- 1"' expected, as a natural sequenee. that 
the quality of work during 1920 will he corres- 
pondingly improved. 

That is what the employer asks for the new era 
already opening up— that employees will work 
while thej work and play while they play. He 
invitee them to work carefullv. accurately and en- 
thusiastically, and meanwhile. Longfi for a dav when 
parents will train their children so. and when our 
educational system, from the kindergarten tip, will 

realize that Canadian citizen-hip demand- thorough- 
ness. 

Only application with an accuracy which will 

eliminate waste, so far a- possible, will increase the 

amounl of Baleable go >ds on the market to an extent 
required for the lowering of prices generally — let 
salaries he what they will. 



WORLD SHORTAGE OF COMMODITIES 

AN article elsewhere in this issue by a Mon- 
retailer- Mr. Theodore Morgan points 

0111 very definitely £h< situation a- he finds it at 
tie- vari 1:- sources of merchandise supply. The edi- 
tors Of DRY GOODS REVIEW have made careful 
i' .n- of the markets in both Canada and 
id, ITnited States and have interviewed representor 
,,,; import"! ? from British and French 
houses who are in close contacl with conditions 
abroad, and everywhere the facts are as pointed oul 
in Mr. M01 gan's article. 



RETAILING FOR /•''.*" 

Till-; period of readjustmenl 1- uecessarily a long 
one , .\- DRY GOODS REVIEW advised a 
V ear ago, it advises again to-day, and with em- 
phasis: Do nol -peculate in buying. Under presenl 
conditions the wise merchant will endeavor to Belect 
1 which has real value in it and to procure 
sufficient to cover a jusl estimate of his require- 
ments. He will study his inventory sheet- for 
every line of goods with the utmost care. 1 te will 



DRY GOODS R E V I E W 



67 



consult with his buyers or salespeople as to their 
impressions gained from actual contact with cus- 
tomers concerning the class of goods to he empha- 
sized; he will visit the markets personally as fre- 
quently as possible; he will study his trade papers 
regularly and will remember that it is the business 
of DRY GOODS REVIEW to assist him in every 
way possible in building up a sound and successful 
dry goods trade by presenting the truth as to con- 
ditions in every column of its pages — that what it 
has to say is not "just talk." Retailing to-day is a 
profession. It requires just such study as does any 
of the older professions if it is going to live up to 
its best possibilities. 



A SUBSCRIBER'S QUESTION 

A SUBSCRIBER writes asking why it is that 
"manufacturers will persist in advertising so 
strenuously items which they find impossible to 
deliver. . . One instance is Brand Under- 
wear of last season. You could not buy this under- 
wear except very early last season, yet it is adver- 
tised in almost any paper that amounts to any- 
thing. . . We believe at this time these cam- 
paigns add unnecessary cost to goods." 

This is a point which has been very much dis- 
cussed during the past few weeks by prominent 
advertising men. It mast be remembered,, however, 
that the advertising of to-day is for to-morrow's 
business. The dry goods trade is in a very healthy 
condition generally just now, and for that reason 
there are a great many new stores opening up 
throughout the Dominion. It would be quite a 
natural thing for this new generation of merchants 
to conclude, perhaps unconsciously, that there were 
other lines just as good as the firms with which 
they have been familiar indirectly. The advertis- 
ing of to-day is in reality a business insurance for 
the future against loss of trade through keener com- 
petition. Now that firms of long standing in Eng- 
land and Europe are preparing to come back to 
their Canadian customer again it is only to be ex- 
pected that our new and much enlarged mills will 
make every effort to maintain their position in the 
domestic markets. True, demand is beyond their 
possible supply at present, but the times are abnor- 
mal, everyone will admit, and it is against that 
time when selling will be more difficult than buy- 
ing that firms with foresight are providing. 



DEMANDING BETTER GOODS 

PROSPERITY loosens the purse strings. For 
some time past mei'chants not only in Canada 
but in many other countries have been finding that 
it was not a question of selling goods but of getting 
goods to sell. Business was so good and production 
conditions were so altered that they could not get 
supplies. The condition exists to-day and the 
situation in many lines is just as acute as it was 



during the war period when all kinds of restrictions 
were imposed with a view of getting people to cur- 
tail their buying. To-day people have more money 
to spend than ever before and they are spending it. 
They have learned something, though, in the past 
five years, and that is that cheap articles are dear 
at any price. The fact that people have realized 
this is making for better business. Dry goods mer- 
chant- state that it is easier now than ever before 
to sell really high class products. It is not a ques- 
tion of price with most customers, but of getting 
something that is good that is going to be worth 
the price they pay. Many merchants believe that 
the lesson people have learned will, to a very large 
extent, become permanent, and that from now on 
the great buying public will continue to demand 
better goods. 



IMPORTANCE OF BUSINESS PAPERS 

AX Association of Railway Executives undoubt- 
edly represents the mosl capable and progres- 
sive business men on the continent. Practically all 
of them have worked their way up from minor 
positions and they know every phase of labor, 
business and public opinion. They should know 
it better than any other class in the community. 

Recently the Association of Railway Executives 
of the United States wanted to lay before the country 
the fundamental facts of the railway situation. 
They selected a number of newspapers for this pur- 
pose. Out of the total Dumber, 42 were purely 
trade and technical newspapers. 

This is <me more experience which we commend 
to the attention of the Dominion Government which 
employs M. E. Nichols, at a bigger salary than he 
ever earned before, as Director of Public Informa- 
tion. The two daily newspapers which Mr. Nichols 
directed went insolvent. Mr. Nichols reported and 
passed his report to the Government that business 
newspapers were of no public value and were not 
entitled to admission to the newspaper mails. Should 
such a man who is; so far behind the times be re- 
tained at such a high salary and in so important 
a public position? 



EDITORIAL ITEMS 

A HAPPY New Year! 

* * * 

THE prospects look good for it. 
1 * * * 

WHO put the muss in Christmuss? Nobody. It 

isn't there. 

* * * 

ANOTHER advance in silks is expected soon 
"thev sav," owing to the combination of leap year 
and 'the H.C.L. 

IT MIGHT be better in that case to marry her than 

to buy her the silk dress ! 

* * * 

DON'T forget to cut out the Dictionary column 
in each issue and save it for reference. 



68 



Dry Goods Review 



Possibility of Big Business 

Despite Soaring Price Era 



WITH a view to getting the 
opinion of the trade regarding 
the outlook for the year upon 
which we have just entered, and the 
conditions, >\ ident or problematical, 
likely to affect it, DRY GOODS RE- 
VIKW, .some weeks ago, sent out to re- 
tailers from the Atlantic to the Pacific, 
a letter in which a number of specific 
questions were asked. To summarize 
these questions, it was asked what were 
the prospects for the trade for 1920; 
would the re-establishment of soldiers 
into their former occupations affect the 
trade; what goods were coming from 
England; the treatment accorded retail- 
ers by manufacturers; two or three 
questions regarding the attitude of the 
public toward high prices; probable de- 
liveries; and the work of the High Cost 
of Living Commission. 

Business to be Had 

Without exception almost, the opin- 
ion of the retailers is that there is big 
business to be had during 1920. One 
reply received stated that the outlook 
was problematical; but, judging from 
the general tone of replies to other 
questions, we are inclined to the view 
that the matter of deliveries entered 
largely into the answer to this particu- 
lar question. The great majority of the 
replies range all the way from "fair" 
to "excellent." In spite of the fact that 
there seems no immediate prospect of 
reduction in prices, in fact, in spite of 
prices, whatever they are or might be, 
there is an unprecedented demand for 
clothing and accessories of the finest 
qualities. The money is in the country; 
the phenomenal success of the Victory 
Loan effort bears testimony to that 
fact. On the part of the purchaser, 
there seems to be no retrenchment. Dur- 
ing the war, the most rigid economy 
was practised in some respects, and this 
probably affected the clothiers as much, 
if not more, than any other branch of 
merchandise. The pendulum is now 
swinging the other way; and the re- 
tailers have experienced, during the 
year just closed, one of the best years 
of their history. Nineteen hundred and 
twenty will probably go one better. 

Labor Situation Important Factor 

A factor entering into the whole sit- 
uation is that of labor; and it is a factor 
difficult to estimate in these days of so 
much labor unrest. Too many unin- 
formed people have imagined that by 
some miraculous falling down of manna 
from heaven the high cost of living will 
be reduced. Others have supposed that 
a mere increase in wages is the solu- 
tion of the whole matter. But those best 
able to judge are preaching the gospel 



of work. Until there is greater produc- 
tion, the outlook for a reduction in the 
cost of living is not particularly bright. 
On the full understanding of this mat- 
ter depends, in a large measure, the de- 
velopment of the trade for 1920. Re- 
tailers who have expressed their views 
to us, realize this. A coal strike which 
ties up trains, a textile strike which 
cuts off production, a strike of the rail- 
waymen which interferes with trans- 
portation, a dock-workers' strike which 
closes in on the import trade — all these 
strikes have their effect upon the retail 
trade among the clothiers. 

Deliveries Are Affected 

A strike amongst the garment work- 
ers, of course, has its immediate effect 
upon the trade; but there is reason to 
believe that the largest manufacturers 
of men's and boys' wear will be com- 
paratively free of this during the new 
year. Over twenty manufacturers in 
this city alone have arranged a satis- 
factory wage scale with their em- 
ployees; but, what is more important to 
the trade in general, they have arrived 
at an agreement with the employees 
whereby a strike is practically elim- 
inated from the labor horizon. 

Other strikes, however, are bound to 
affect the outlook and the development 
of the trade during the year. The gen- 
eral unrest following the war has not 
encouraged greater production, which is 
the solution of the high cost of living. 
If there is added to this a paralyzing or 
partial closing down of manufacturing 
institutions on account of a shortage of 
coal, the situation will only be aggra- 
vated and deliveries to the retailer will 
be more uncertain than they have been. 
Many of the replies received deal with 
this question of deliveries; and there is 
no doubt it is one of the most important 
phases of the trade for 1920. Behind it, 
and to a large extent responsible for it, 
is that chain of events which begins 
with a strike somev/here. 

Manufacturers Doing Their Best 

"Canadian manufacturers are doing 
all they can to supply the trade with 
goods in demand," feems to express the 
general view of the retailers with re- 
gard to deliveries, so far as they lay in 
the hands of the manufacturers. One 
man says they are "slow in filling or- 
ders, if filled at all," and he complains 
that the prices are too high. Still 
another retailer in expressing the view 
that deliveries are slow from the manu- 
facturers states that he believes they 
are treating all their customers alike. 
"A strike too independent at times," is 
the way one man writes of the manu- 



facturers; and he adds a bit of good ad- 
vice in the suggestion that the man who 
has his shelves well stocked with goods 
is the man who will do the business. He 
concludes by saying, "We are stocking 
heavy." 

It would seem that the opinion of the 
trade is that the manufacturers are do- 
ing all they possibly can to cope with 
the ever-increasing orders that come 
from the retailers. There is a fitting 
recognition of the difficulties with 
which they have to contend. In view of 
the unsettled condition of the labor 
market, retailers will hardly need to be 
reminded that early stocking of all 
goods is advisable. 

Public Accept High Prices 

One of the questions asked was with 
regard to the attitude of the purchaser 
of a suit of clothes who was told that 
he would have to pay about $70 for a 
suit, which he thought he might get for 
$35. The replies which we have re- 
ceived to this question seem to indicate 
that the public seems to be pretty well 
informed regarding the factors which 
have entered into a situation that de- 
veloped abnormally high prices. The 
scarcity of raw materials on account of 
scanty production, the increased cost of 
labor, and the higher cost of commodi- 
ties which go to make up overhead ex- 
penses are recognized by the purchaser 
as legitimate, if grudgingly accepted, 
reasons for the increased cost of cloth- 
ing and accessories. 

One man says that while the public 
mildly protests against high prices, it 
does not prevent them from buying, and 
the people who have money far outnum- 
ber those who have not. Another man 
says the public have got used to high 
prices and they now pay the increased 
price and "never bat an eyelid." "What 
the customers say sometimes would not 
be nice in cold type," is the breezy reply 
one retailer offers: while a man from 
the far Pacific Coast says he has no cases 
of this kind because "the people in the 
West have more sense." 

The Outlook Good 

On the whole, the survey which we 
have made through the replies of re- 
tailers leads us to the conclusion that 
the year 1920 should be the best year 
ever, so far as potential business is con- 
cerned. The business is to be had. 
Whether labor conditions will become so 
settled that production will be uninter- 
rupted and steadily increase, and so 
make possible this business which but 
awaits the garnering of the enterprising 
merchant, is something which no man 
can. at this time, foretell. 



Dry Goods Review 



MEN'S WEAR SECTION 



69 



Suitings With More Colors ; 

Fall, 1920, Will Be Brighter 

With the War Over More Time is Being Devoted to Fancy Cloths 

— Higher Prices Paid For All Orders Than Last 

Year — Business on a Day to Day Basis 



MORE color in men's suitings will 
be among' the offerings to the 
retailers for the Fall of 1920. 
During the war when the conservation 
of time and the conscription of man- 
power affected the labor market to such 
an extent many of the British manufac- 
turers, in particular, were compelled to 
drop colorings in their productions. 
With the war over, however, and many 
of the men getting back to their previ- 
ous vocations, manufacturers are able to 
devote more attention to a greater 
variety of styles in cloth manufacture. 
This they are doing; and the Fall of 
1920 will provide greater opportunities 
for the trade in point of colored suit- 
ings. These colorings will be in both 
the check and striped goods, and fat and 
lean alike will have their choice when 
the finished .product is on the market. 

Sees Only Price Advances 

A manufacturer with whom DRY 
GOODS REVIEW chatted on the ques- 
tion of prices of these suitings, which 
are largely the production of British 
houses, said he saw no reduction dur- 
ing the present year. "For every yard 
of goods we have bought for delivery in 
1920," he said, "we have paid an ad- 



vanced price over 1919." In these ad- 
vances, he said, there was no regularity, 
except that worsted goods had advanced 
the greatest in price of any of their or- 
dered quantities. ' But on most of them 
it was a case of doing business from day 
to day, rather than from month to 
month, as the case used to be. They 
have had instances of placing an order 
with an English firm, confirming it by 
cable, and in the course of a day or so 
being advised that the price had ad- 
vanced. The reason for this was that 
the stock on which the original order 
had been placed had been sold out be- 
tween the time of ordering and confirm- 
ing, and the goods ordered from this 
side of the water had to be supplied 
from new stock. And the question of 
getting new stock is a question that is 
affected from day to day by labor con- 
ditions and supplies of raw material. No 
guarantees can be given by anyone, ap- 
parently, that deliveries will be made. 
This firm informed DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW that they had failed to get de- 
liveries on goods which had been ordered 
two years ago. The position of this firm 
is similar to many others; it is harder 
to fill orders than to get business. 



More "Made in Canada" Goods? 

Unfavorable Rate of Exchange Resulting in Larger Bookings With 
Canadian Houses — Retailers Either Cancelling Orders 
or Delaying Payment Until Dollar Reaches More 
Normal Value. • 



RETAINERS may be able to give 
an additional "punch" to their 
sales in the not far-distant fu- 
ture by advertising and offering for 
sale more "Made in Canada" goods than 
they have been buying of late. While 
rates of exchange are bound to work a 
hardship in individual cases, in the long 
run it may not be a bad thing for a 
country perfectly capable of financing 
itself that the rate of exchange some- 
times goes against it. A number of re- 
tailers are finding out at the present 
time that the unfavorable rate of ex- 
change in New York is working consider- 



able of a hardship because the value of 
their dollar is fluctuating between 85 
and 95 cents. This is one of the things 
on which the retailers who* appeared 
before the Dominion Board of Com- 
merce did not count when giving: their 
evidence relative to the cost of selling 
over the counter. But it constitutes a 
legitimate item in figuring out over- 
head costs; and, moreover, it is an item 
that mounts to considerable proportions 
these days. Canadian buyers who are 
paying bills in the United States these 
days are complaining of the unfavorable 
rate of exchange and, incidentally, are 



losing quite a number of dollars 'because 
of it. As one retailer expressed it to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW: "If this rate 
of exchange keeps up for the whole 
summer, it will ruin us." 

Has Its Compensation. 

It has its compensation, however. 
Many Canadian jobbers who have been 
running to the United States for goods 
that have been made in Canada are now 
seeking cover by ordering Canadian- 
made goods. The head of a firm manu- 
facturing hosiery, for instance, stated 
to DRY GOODS REVIEW that job- 
bers who had said to him eight months 
ago that they would buy in the United 
States because they could get better 
prices were now "kicking themselves" be- 
cause they were paying their bills when 
the rate of exchange was at the worst 
that it had been for many years. These 
same jobbers, at that time, believed that 
United States business men were doing 
a wise thing in selling at lower than 
mill prices during the months that fol- 
lowed the signing of the armistice. Now, 
however, they are not quite so sure of 
their ground. 

But, what is more important for the 
moment is that retailers and jobbers 
are, in many cases, cancelling their 
United States orders if they can and 
booking Canadian goods. In some cases 
they are unable to do this; but they are 
trvin-r, at all events, to hold up pay- 
ment until the exchange rate becomes 
more favorable to them. 

Aids "Made in Canada" Campaign 

There is reason to hope, therefore, 
that while there may be cases where in- 
dividual hardship has been experienced, 
in the long run it will increase Canadian 
production and aid the "Made in Canada" 
campaign. There never was a time in 
the history of Canada when there was 
such a pressing necessity for an or- 
ganized campaign for the greater pro- 
duction of Canadian goods. And no man 
stands better to profit by Canadian- 
made goods than the retailer. On the 
whole, Canadian merchants are not yet 
ready to re-open accounts with Germany. 
With the rate of exchange against them 
in the United States, there may be a 
slackening of business in that quarter. 
The inevitable result will be a greater 
output of Canadian goods, both for home 
consumption and export. That is great- 
ly to be desired. The people of Canada 
were never in a better humor to patron- 
ize Canadian-made goods; and there 
seems some likelihood of the re- 
tailer being given the opportunity of 
offering more of them for sale than he 
has been doing during the last decade 
or so. 



Tti 



M F N s \\ E A l; S ECT [ON 



Dry Goods /,\ ,iew 



Canadian Buyer's Views of European Markets 




as tin y 
chandm itn 



. » i i < I I ft '/ 1 1 • < HI ' I II ' i I . " II I UOI ' I . till I 1 1 I V I I II ' I t IV 1 1 CtV II I 1 1 I II I • ' I II I I ' I II I 1 1 I i i I' ^ I i <f 1 1 I H IIU It isU li- 

lt 1/ exist over liner and as they will influena deliveries, prices and tht quality of mer 
ported mil, Canada from Europe "ml the East during tin year L920, Tin EDITOR. 



COTTONS 

In ordei to appreciate fully the conditions of the 
cotton trade, one mu-i look at the situation from a 
world point of view for Lancashire is such an enor j 

mOUS producing centre that lief prices arc governor! 

by world conditions. 

While Manchester. ii|> to the present moment 
has received bu-1 few orders, she knows thai there is 

a great world shortage and a tremendous need for 
clothing. This is one of the great assurances for a 
future trade prosperity. China is desperately short 

of cotton g Is, and must buy in the Lancashire 

market. Norway and Sweden and other neutrals 
will he very heavy purchasers the moment the Brit- 
ish embargo is lifted, permitting them to buy their 
requirements. We know that Central Europe, es- 
pecially Germany and Austria, will he in great Deed 
of these cotton productions, and to-day Russia and 
Poland are in desperate straits for clothing. The 
- reports received in Manchester reveal a de- 
plorable state of affairs in many parts of Russia and 
Poland, where thousands upon thousands of work- 
people are unable to leave their homes because of 
tin utter lack of clothing of any description; con- 
ditions have been so acute that bed clothing of all 
description- in these countries has been (ait up into 
clothe- to enable the work-people in go out to their 
daily tasks. Representatives from Russia, Rou- 
mania and Belgium have been to Manchester centre 
for the placing of their large order-. * 

CARPETS 

Their output was reduced to in per cent, work- 
ing capacity in the making of carpets, and they are 
now working to aboul 75 per cent capacity. This 
roughly i- characteristic of tin- percentages of the 
various carpel manufacturers. 

As I mentioned above, there is still great diffi- 
culty in securing skilled mechanics to change over 
the various machinery, and for this reason carpet 
manufacturers will be some months yet before they 
can reach capacity output. Prices will remain high. 
and one must look for no drop hu- sometime to 
cane. The dyeing is very high, and of course wool 
is firm and high, and up to the present there has 
been greal difficulty in securing the desired amount 

of wool. The latest prices for jute for the haek- 
of carpet- ha- been reduced in price. Imt this single 
article contributes very little to the cosl of the com- 
pleted carpet. 

Labor conditions are -till very precarious, and 
firm- are experiencing all kind- of difficulties in the 
handling of their employe* 



GINGHAMS 

Prii-e- are firm in Scotch ginghams, and one 
may look for no drop even in the quite distant fu- 
ture. ( >f course, in all the finer grade- of ginghams, 
Egyptian yarn is used, and this yarn ha.- not been 
subjected to any of the past price fluctuations. 

Regarding the question of price again, the dye- 
ing cost of ginghams i- high, and in every line this 
fact has been very noticeable. 

GLOVES 

The best -kins for Buede gloves come from South 
V.merica, for glace kid gloves from Prance, and in 
the second grades from Spain and Italy. A very 
poor grade of skin- for cheap gloves i- now being 
imported, a, line which was consumed almost en- 
tirely by Germany in the past. The supply of skins 
i- very limited, and it is because of a \er\ real 
shortage that prices will remain high for manj 
months to come. Manufacturers, in order in secure 
the Decessary goal -kin- from South America, must 
buy a mixed hale which comprises skin- of all oilier 
animal- as well. 'and these they must re-sell on the 
open market. 

Owing t<> the adverse exchange, Prance i- al- 
lowed to import from Spain but a limited number 
of skins— this importation i- regulated by the 
French Government. The Italian Government has 
prohibited the export of Italian skin-, owing to the 
greal need and scarcity of these in their own coun- 
try. This, therefore, has forced all glove manufac- 
turers to bid against one another for the very limited 
French production of skins, ami even if prices of 
skins should come down this year, ii would takeover 
one year to affect the price of the finished article. 

The »love manufacturers have, for instance. 
boughl next year's supply of -kin- which take nearly 
a year to (Mire and lan. and. therefore, prices to the 
purchaser for the next year will he the quotations 
based on these purchases, and not on any fluctuating 
market prices that might prevail to-morrow. 

This briefly i- the glove situation of Prance, and 
there are not at the present moment enough skin- in 
France to permit the factories to work t<> their full 
capacity. 

SILKS 

Business conditions in Italy may he roughly 
summarized as follows, being the result of an inter- 
view with a manufacturer who had just returned 
from this place: 

The Italian Government ha.- taken complete 
control of Italy's major industry, that of the raw 



MEN'S WEAR SECTION 



71 



Canadian Buyers' Views of European Markets- (Continued) 



silk, and has determined to maintain prices as this 
is her most valuable revenue returning industry. 

Despite the competition of Japanese and Chinese 
raw, the Italian will hold its own in both the Swiss 
and French markets owing to its higher lustre and 
finer quality. Silk prices will, therefore, remain 
firm for some time to come. It is interesting to 
note in passing that about one-third of Italy, that 
was producing the mulberry trees and the silk co- 
coons, has been occupied by the Austrian army and. 
therefore, her output has been considerably reduced. 

This determination of the Italian Government 
to maintain the price of raw silk is directly reflected 
in the higher prices of Swiss ribbons and silks, and 
of all silk productions at Lyons, France. 

CHINA 

Wages have increased fully 70 per cent, since 
the war, and the unions are now demanding a 
further 20 per cent, increase. This contention the 
potteries hope to settle by a further 10 per cent, ad- 
vance during this next week. I give you the follow- 
ing illustration of the wage advances: — - 
1919 1919 

Girls 4s 12s per week 

Women ... 12s 25a " 

Men 35s £3 10s • " 

Saggar makers thai constitute one of the funda- 
mental branches of pottery making, were paid be- 
fore the war 82s 6d per week, and to-day receive 
£3 10* and £4. 

Coal practically is to-day adding more to the 
cost than any other single factor, owing to the tre- 
mendous quantities that must be used in each kiln 
for the firing *>f the potteries, dial has increased 
100 per cent, in cost, and is to-day 27s per ton. 

To appreciate the increase here one musl see 
these various ovens fired to a white heat for from 
30 (d 48 hours for one small batch of china. 

The cartage is another important factor - in 
1919. the coal oartaee to maintain 14 ovens was £25 
per week, to-day only ovens are going and the coal 
cartage is £66 per week. 

The cost of hone and clay has advanced very 
much in price, and there is slight hope of these 
material* coming down to any extent, 

I am told that the potteries are still desperately 
short of men. and that in many shops there are no 
men at all. As I stated above, the potteries would spe- 
cialize on certain patterns, and this is already evi- 
denced by certain plants making only egg cups and 
others tea cups and saucers, revealing this new 
tendency. As a result plants will concentrate on 
fewer patterns, and there will be no guarantee as to 
the length of time a pattern will be carried. 

The potteries will estimate cost much more care- 
fully to-day than ever heretofore — there will be 
fewer patterns and at higher prices. 

Some firms will require •"> years to fill back orders, 



and in tin- respect it will take many months to fill 
the orders they already have in hand. 

HOSIERY 

The question of raw material is the greatest 
single factor entering into the reduction of cost, 
and not until there is a material drop in this market 
can we look for cheaper cashmere hosiery and wool 
underwear. 

The manufacturers of Leicester have faced un- 
told difficulties, and they are by no means free from 
these as yet, and I feel that so many factors have 
entered to increase the cost of production, many of 
which have come to stay permanently, that reduc- 
tions will be small, slow in coming and disappoint- 
ing from our point of view. 

The cost of soap, for instance, which is a very 
bis item in the washing and scouring of wools, has 
increased several fold in price, and this i- hut one of 
many conditions that impresses one of the utter 
futility df ever again realizing anywhere near old- 
time price level-. 

The revolution of trade and an upheaval from 
the bottom has brought a high level of manufac- 
turing costs that for some time to come will seri- 
ously embarrass and curtail Great Britain's exports 
on a competitive basis. 

Everything in England is up, and is up to stay, 
and I he manufacturers themselves fully realize this 
grave handicap in the building and even in the 
maintaining of a healthy export business. They 
are fully conscious of this new danger, and because 
of the extraordinary demands of labor with in- 
creased wages, reduced working hours and uncer- 
tainty of raw material prices, that it will be some 
time before they are in a position to export success- 
fully 'in a really competitive basis. 

LACES 

Coal is a greater factor than labor in the lace 
mills, where it is so largely a question of machinery, 
and the coal situation in England promises to be a 
very serious factor in maintaining high prices for 
a long time to come. Another handicap in the lace 
hade has been that the highest skilled labor went 
into munitions and are not anxious to return. The 
lace industry was not called upon from a war stand- 
point with exception of making netting for the 
army for Egypt and such places. 

DRESS GOODS 

Here again the labor situation is seriously affect- 
ing the dress goods market, and is affecting prices to 
even a greater extent than the question of raw ma- 
terial, nor can one except a complete settlement of 
this labor situation within a period of a few months: 
it is far more deep-seated and wide-spread, its causes 
having had firm root before the war. and there are 
many unsolved problems yet existing between capital 
and labor. 

I was told yesterday for instance, that men dis- 
charged from the army going back to Yorkshire, re- 
Continued on page 81 



72 



M I : N ' 8 W E A R 8 ECTION 



Dry Ooods Review 




They Stand the 

"Wear" Test 

Once Tried — Always Worn 

IN 1920 there will be a stronger demand than ever for 
Canadian poods. "TAPATCO" Gloves are Canadian. No 
need to sell imported goods, when you can get a Canadian 
article so good as this. 

"TAPATCO" Gloves are made for the hardest wear. 
Farmers — Engineers — Mechanics — Lumbermen and Railway- 
men, all appreciate TAPATCO Gloves. 

Order from your jobber now. 



'PIUS is a line xhut knows no selling 
i>"ii thej Bell all thf year 'round 
and make both friends and profit for every 
merchant who stocks them. We make 
Glovea for all OUt-door and indoor work 
Gloves that are widely recognized as DC 

-.•-situ.- extreme quaiHt; Gloves that en- 
sure satisfaction to the wearer and "re- 
peats" for the Dealer. 

Made by The 

American Pad & Textile 
Company 

CHATHAM, ONTARIO 




'BRANnr 

GLOVES & MITTS 

STYLES — Gauntlet, Knit Wrist and Band Top. 

WEIGHTS — Heavy, Medium or Light. 

MATERIALS — Leather Tip, Leather Faced, Jersey 
Gloves and Mitts in Tan, Slate or Oxford. 




Why early orders for C ARH ARTT 

Overalls, Allovers and Gloves are 

AdviSclblB ^ ne continued scarcity of raw 
materials and restricted output 
together with heavy shipments of manufac- 
tured products overseas have combined to 
stiffen prices which show a decided tendency 
to go higher. In view of these conditions 
therefore it would be well for every dealer who 
can to send along his order now for Carhartt 
Overalls, Allovers and Gloves and thereby 
save himself possible disappointment in 
Spring deliveries. Since manufacturers, 
including ourselves, are producing only 
enough to supply visible needs, the force of 
this suggestion is apparent. 

Hamilton Carhartt Cotton Mills 

Limited 
Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 




Dry Goods Review 



MEN'S WEAR SECTION 



73 






X 




Haugh Brand 

Kiddies' Garment 

the 

Original 

kiddies' garment for general 
wear all the year round, in 
and out of doors. 

The most practical, most ser- 
viceable and most attractive 
of its kind on the market. 

The immense popularity of 
Haugh Brand Garments be- 
speaks the genuine satisfac- 
tion they give everywhere. 

Manufactured by 

The J. A. Haugh Mfg. 
Company, Limited 

TORONTO, CANADA 

Also Makers of Arm and Hammer Brand Overalls and Work Shirts. 



Indispensable 

in Every 

Child's 

Wardrobe 




Dry (Ian da Review 



Spring Fashions in Cottons 

i \\ 111!. 

hi >ui M. 

hnlu'ded. 



TIIK approach of Spring and the 
opening of Spring buying has in 
no way dispelled the tendency rec- 
orded in DRY GOODS REVIEW from 
time to time during the past season as 
to printed voiles being of the utmost im- 
portance for 1920. So keen and steady 
lias the inquiry been for this material 
that manufacturers have responded gen- 
erously with biy: ranges of designs and 
color combinations showing quite differ- 
ent effects from those of previous sea- 
sons. In fact, this matter of design has 
necessitated the manufacturers obtain- 
ing the most capable designers for this 
work. Competition in the trade no long- 
er lies in the matter of selling the goods, 
but in producing the finest range of de- 
signs and best qualities possible. 

Blues, Browns and Bright Shades 

In colorings for Spring all shades of 
blue predominate and second only to 
blues come browns which is an unusual 
feature of a Spring season. Browns are 
usually a strictly Fall color, but this year 
brown is mentioned very prominently by 
milliners, dressmakers, silk and cotton 
goods producers. Of course, the lighter 
shades will be preferred. Beaver tone, 
tan, sand colors, gold when combined 
with blue, golden brown, champagne, 
beige, and combinations of different tones 
of browns and blues together are to be 
seen in practically every collection of de- 
signs. The blues and browns form the 
leading class by themselves, the second- 
ary colors are high. They include green, 
grey, mauve, rose, canary, cherry, and 
dull mixtures. The novelty cottons, on 
the whole, however, are really of less 
'"sporty" colorings than are the new 
silks. But with such a range of colors 
and a collection of around 75 different 
patterns of the larger houses, there 
seems to be little doubt that the mer- 
chant will have a splendid chance of mak- 
ing an individual showing of fashionable 
voiles for the coming Summer. Fine 2- 
ply plain white voiles are also quite ac- 
tive. 

Borders Imitate Metallic Embroideries 

Patterns for the most part tend to the 
allover style, rather than the individual 
foulard spots which characterized the 
season of a year ago. A scattering of 
border designs is shown in most collec- 
tions. One of the leading manufacturers 
finds that in bordered effects those which 
suggest the patterns which have been in 
vogue in gold and silver laces for even- 
ing wear during the Winter are the ones 
which meet with most favor for Spring, 
one keeps in mind the styles of 
■ ■ dresses, suggestions for 
making up the bordered goods are in- 
numerable. One difficulty with the bor- 
■ thl past has been the 



limited number of designs which have 
been considered suitable for this mater- 
ial. The fashions for all styles of 
dresses this year are most favorable for 
the advent of bordered goods. Over- 
blouses, tunics, short sleeves, surplice 
bodices, panels and so on are all readily 
adaptable with charming effects from 
these bordered materials. The fact re- 
mains, however, that the allover designs 
are those which will mean the bulk of 
business. 

Organdies are spoken of very highly 
for the American market, while Amer- 
ican houses are selling more organdies to 
Canadian buyers, they report, than they 
have in previous seasons. The fact re- 
mains that organdies are a comparative- 
ly small item in Canada. Swiss organ- 
dies are considered especially fashion- 
able this year and sell in white and plain 
colors, both pastel and bright shades. 
There is a range of about seven qualities 
of these on the market and the price 
to the wholesaler is from 65 cents up. 
This will mean that the retailer will have 
to get $1 to $1.50 per yard. In plain 
white organdie there are a few novel 
patterns developed in weave by the use 
of a heavy thread at intervals. These 
heavy threads form a check or stripe and 



are very dainty. There are BOme printed 
organdies on the market as well this 
year, but the sheer daintiness of the 
fabric makes it more generally favorable 
in the plain colors. 

White Goods and Ratines Prominent 
If price is of any importance what- 
ever this Summer when it comes to the 
selection of material for a separate 
skirt, there is no doubt that the new cot- 
ton cloths offered will have ready ac- 
ceptance, not because they are low in 
prices but because silks are so extreme- 
ly high. The prices of these fine cottons 
for separate skirts will be quite high 
enough to satisfy the present dealer. 
Fine gabardines and tricotines are the 
leading features in weave, and patterns 
in checks, stripes and plaids are numer- 
ous. The weave is very fine and the 
texture pliable so that they are suitable 
for draping or pleated styles and the soft 
wide girdles. 

Ratines are one of the leading novelty 
features for 1920. These effects are seen 
in both silk and cotton goods. Some 
of the cotton ratines are of mercerized 
threads which give them a very soft and 
silky effect. Some patterns, too. are 
shown in these goods and mottled color- 
Continued on page 111 




New 
Voiles 



1. New idea in bor- 
dered voile. Pat- 
tern in gold color 
on navy blue re- 
sembles metallic 
laces in vogue at 
present. 

2. Taupe ground 
with 3-inch broken 
stripe blocks and 
motif in blue, rose, 
green, etc. 

3. Navv jrround 
with 2 «/, - i n c h 
blocks. Half of 
each block is grass 
green and half is 
prey. 

From the Spring 
range of Haas 
Brothers Fabrics 
Corporation, New 
fork. 



Dry Goods Review 



75 



Canadian Investigates Cotton Situation 

Gets no Satisfaction From British Manufacturers — Slightly Better Hopes From Big Jobbers 
— Prices Advancing Rapidly — Splendid Outlook for the Cotton Department for 1920. 

By a Department Store Buyer just back from Europe 



HAVING just returned from a tour 
of the textile centers of England 
in an effort to get merchandise 
for my department, I am impresed both 
with the discouraging and the encourag- 
ing features of the situation over there. 
For immediate delivery I found little; 
yet the orders I placed amounted to 
several times what I would have bought 
in normal times before the war. Wheth- 
er the promises of delivery will be car- 
ried out, I dc not know. In any case 
there will be long delays. 

Nothing to Sell Before September 

In one case in Manchester, I went in- 
to one of the biggest jobbing houses in 
England and asked for goods. -'Very 

sorry, Mr. , but we haven't any for 

you." 

"Oh, let's have no more of that now; 
you've been saying that so long." 

"Well, September deliveiy is the earl- 
iest we could think of and there's only a 
chance of that." 

Avoided Manufacturers 

That was the usual answer; in most 
cases, next Fall, and often nothing at 
all during 1920. So far as the manufac- 
turers were concerned, I simply avoided 
them; there was no use wasting time 
trying to see them ; they were loaded up. 
So I spent my time with the big jobbers, 
and the small ones as well, and got some 
satisfaction, at least. 

Machinery 

Everywhere I heard the same story: 
labor not willing even to do a good eight- 
hour day's work, and machinery run 
down. In mill after mill the looms had 
been working day and night during the 
war, and were not in shape to start in 
again without overhauling or being re- 
placed; and the repairing took a long 
time, and new machinery much longer, 
for every mill is after it. 

Germany Will Rush Orders 

The formal signing of the peace treaty 
will make things worse. So far com- 
paratively little has been sold to Ger- 
many and Austria: I found a feeling 
against trading until the peace treatv 
case formally into effect. Now that it 
has, I believe there will be rush of or- 
ders from the Central Empires and this 
with the demand now pressing from 
other countries will make the cotton 
textile situation more acute than ever, 
and prices must move up still more. 

Price Up One-Third 

Indeed I have just experienced the 
price advance on some lines I bought, al- 
though not in a personal form. I got 
some voiles over there at 24d, 25d and a 
third at 24d a yard. That, was in De- 



cember. To-day those prices are up 
one- third or over, as follows: 

Advances in Voiles in Three Weeks 



rice paid in Dec. 


Jan. price. 


Advance 


24d. per yd. 


33d. 


37% 


25<i. per yd. 


34d. 


36% 


24d. per yd. 


32d. 


33 1-3% 



This is liable to happen at any time. 
Scarcity of Raws 

One other incident on the negative 
side. Going over I met several represen- 
tatives of the deputation of the cotton 
industry of England — the Lancashire 
spinners, etc. — who had been to the con- 
ference in New Orleans, and they feel 
pretty sober about the small supplies of 
raw cotton; this last year's crop was less 
than the world's requirements. They also 
found serious alarm over the very in- 
dependent position now taken by the 
negroes down South; they would plant 
just what they wanted, and no more, 
and their demands for wages were grow- 
ing steadily. In this connection, it is in- 
teresting to note that a commission of 
British experts is investigating the pos- 
sibilities of growing cotton in other 
countries, such as Persia, South Africa, 
etc. Of course this will have no effect 
for some years, but it is at least en- 
couraging to know that if the threaten- 



ed scarcity in raw cotton can be remedied 
this will be done. 

Improvement by Fall 

Now, on the other hand, while pre- 
sent prospects for deliveries are not en- 
couraging, long before the end of the 
present year we will see production of 
the English mills greatly increased, and 
this will be the first real step towards 
lower prices. What I learned in Eng- 
land as to what production is likely to 
be by the end of 1920 impresses me 
strongly with the conviction that the 
real high level of prices will be reached 
this year, and a slight improvement 
come towards lower levels. Not that I 
feel there will be any sudden or mark- 
ed break for many months; indeed for 
years; it will be a very gradual process. 
Good Prospects for Department 

You ask me what the prospects are 
for business in cottons this year. Very, 
very promising. The time has really 
come, I think, when women will turn 
from the high price of silks to cottons. 
When they can get a 2-ply voile for Id 
to '2d a yard, and silks have risen so 
greatly, I believe, women will come back 
to cotton — and what really is more at- 
tractive for summer wear? What we 
Continued on page 81 




For Summer Wear 



Nos. 1, 2 and 3 are three of the new fancy Gabardines in fine close weave for Sum- 
mer skirts and wash suits. These are featured by Weissenbach & Kay, Inc., New 
York. The other numbers are silk and cotton mixtures in Georgette weave shown 
in new Spring designs and colorings by Herbert B. Lederer & Co., New York. No. 4 
is sapphire blue and sand; No. 5, sand and black; No. 6, light and dark blues; No. 7, 
a sport pattern in red and blue on white ground: No. 8 is gold design on Copen- 
hagen blue ground. 



76 



Dry Goods Review 








Paris. Prance. 

EDITOR, l'UY 6000 REVIEW: 
This Winter's fashion seems to 
have, settled as follows: Panniers 
and drapings for evening wear, with 
capes made of fur or silk and fur. 

Straight and slightly fitting at the 
waist COStumea for day wear. 

We have the narrow skirt, somewhat 
longer than heretofore, with a very long 
riding-coat jacket; the robe manteau 
similar to last year's, only it would be 
open like a real coat, but for an under 
panel of black satin that keeps it- closed 
in front. 

Blouses are either the chemisier type, 
with high collar and long sleeves, and a 
tie made of washable linen, generally 
with farcy stripes, or crepe de Chine, 
(needless to say that a very warm coat 
is wanted with such light garments), or 
we again see the long chemise tunic in 
jersey, of which I shall tell you more 
presently. 

Less Showy Colors Prevail 

The shades, too, are more decent; we 
see a good deal less of showy colors, 
while dark brown, dark green, dark blue, 
and especially black are most in favor. 
The latter shade in velvet, silk or voile 
trimmed with jet and with a tinge of 
lighter silk to show that it is not a 
mourning uniform, are mostly seen for 
evening wear and theatre dresses. In 
fact, black velvet is always wanted as 
it suits every complexion, winch it 
softens, and besides it shows up the 
whiteness of the skin. Needless to say 
that for such purposes, the dress is low 
necked, not so low, however, as was first 
devised. Only eccentric women or ac- 
tresses will wear garments such as have 
been sketched in the fashion papers of 
all the world, and as my purpose was 
always to giv< you hints of what is be- 
intr worn by reliable "elegantes," I shall 
never insist on these eccentricities, which 
are not the rral French taste. 

Fancy Velvets for Tailored Costumes 

Black velveteen comes it: also in tailor- 
ed costumes in the straight line men- 
I above, but as a rule it is not en- 
titely black but lightened by white 
stripes as in the sample enclosed, which 
is very effective. 

In grey it is very nice, too, for instance 
there is a mixture of black and 
spotted stripes or a checked design of 
grey tiny irregular squares on a black 
ground; also in plain mole color. 

I have bi miens of tailored cos- 

made in all these samples and T 
found them very nice indeed The latter 
ally looks dainty if worn with grey 



buckskin shoes, stockings to match, a 
toque of grey velvet, with a veil also 
grey like the gloves. A scarf of taupe 
fox and some gauntlet cuffs to match 
would complete this ensemble of grey, 
which would have to be exactly of the 
same shade. 

As you see, stripes and checks are still 
fashionable. 

Printed Velvets for Trimmings 

There are also printed chiffon velvets, 
to be used for trimmings rather than for 
whole garments, although, of course. 
they would not be bad thus. 

There is a stripe of black velvet on a 
deep blue ground. It could be had in 
other shades. Then there is a checked 
motif, blue ground with a big black 
check, and another check of blue and 
biack slanting stripes. 

A similar motif, only in green or red, 
could also be had. 



SUMMARY OF PARIS FASH- 
IONS FOR MID-WINTER 

Tunic blouses of linen and crepe 
de Chine. 

Black velvet with touch of color 
in high favor. 

Extreme Decollete styles mis- 
represent Paris. 

Fancy velvets for tailored cos- 
tumes and trimmings. 

Printed velvets with furs used 
to make reversible coatees. 

Expensive furs make place for 
plush substitutes. 

Fashionable garments have lin- 
ings in same shade. 

Woolen tricot gaining in prom- 
inence. 



I have seen these used in connection 
with fur in coatees; they were supposed 
to line the coatee unless one chose to 
have them on the ton, with the fur in- 
side, in which rase the collar was turned 
up and showed the fur. In a word it was 
a reversible coat. 

New Fur Linings 

By the way, some people, who are get- 
tine tired of lining fur coats with printed 
satin are using plain velvet or even 
duvetyn. I am toid, however, that these 
materials, the latter especially, are not 
very practical as they are not smooth 
like satin and therefore less easily taken 
off. It is a pity, for the appearance of 
a duvetyn lining is very fine indeed. 

As fur is in greater demand than ever, 
and as it is as scarce as expensive, the 



plush substitutes are gaining favor daily. 
Thus we have all the varieties of plush 
creased so as to imitate caracul, Persian 
even, or the kind that looks like broad- 
tail, as you see in the samples I am en- 
closing. 

Whether in black, green, brown, blue 
or purple, it will make some effective 
capes, to be trimmed with' a bit of fur 
around the neck and at the armholes. 
This for day wear; for evening wear it 
might have a band a few inches deep of 
uncurled Thibet all around the cape, and 
would look extremely smart. 

Pile Fabrics for Millinery 

One cloth I have seen is not a velvet 
specimen, for it is too heavy, nor a plush 
sample, as the hair is quite flat; I should 
call it a "panne" of a veiy fine quality, 
which will, of course, find many uses, 
whether in the millinery department 
where its suppleness makes it fit to be 
draped into the twisted toques and tur- 
bans that are so fashionable just now, 
or in the dress and coats department, 
where it might be used in every conceiv- 
able manner. 

Another specimen of plush, a very 
thick one, looks so much like fur, that 
unless one is near enough a garment 
trimmed with it, to be able to blow the 
hair, and see the cloth ground, one can't 
distinguish it from real fur. At a cou- 
turier's T saw some blouses, made of Jer- 
sey, with a band of brown plush similar 
to this, round the neck, arms and bot- 
tom, which were as cosy in appearance 
as dainty in look. 

Knitted Fabrics Grow Finer 
Jersey does not seem to have lost 
favor, only it looks more and more like 
tricot. The sample herewith, for in- 
stance, shows you how flat and loose our 
manufacturers have made it. This speci- 
men is in black artificial silk. One of 
the most fanciful and beautiful samples 
I have seen of embossed Jersey I am 
also enclosing. When worked into gar- 
ments, it is really very smart, although 
simple. 

A tailored costume at a couturier's 
was thus devised: 

A long half-fitting jacket, made of 
brown duvetyne, exactly in the shade of 
enclosed jersey pattern. Lining also of 
the same color (I told you already that 
it is fashionable now to have the lining 
in the shade of the garment). When the 
lady took off her jacket, she appeared 
in a robe chemise perfectly straight, 
made entirely of that Jersey, but for a 
band 15 inches deep at the bottom, that 
was in duvetyne, to show that the dress 
and the jacket were matched. No trim- 
ming, except a silk cord at the waist, no 



Dry Goods Review DRESS FABRICS 

The Fabrics Described by Paris Correspondent 







1. Velveteen in tiny 
grey irregular squares 
on black ground. 2. 
Plush imitating broad- 
tail. Made in colors 
as well as black. 3. 
Velveteen with black 
and grey spotted 
stripe. 4. Black vel- 
veteen with fine white 
stripes. 5. Embossed 
silk jersey; very fine 
texture. 6. Chiffon 
velvet in green blocks 
with printed blocks of 
solid black and of 
black and green bias 
stripes. 7. One of the 
new flat, loose silk 
jerseys. 8. Sapphire 
blue chiffon velvet 
with black stripes. 
Reproduction reduced 
one-half. 



collar and short sleeves. I think this 
model was the prettiest I have seen in 
Paris this season (at least to my taste). 

We have many similar robes chemise 
worn with tailored costumes, in place of 
skirts and blouses. 

Greek Tunics With Narrow Belts 

When skirts are adopted, the blouses 
are often Greek tunics of silk jersey, 
opened in points, and with the waist 
underlined by a narrow belt made of 
cloth or silk cord. Sometimes one or two 
big flowers are embroidered on the Jer- 
sey. 

Woolen tricot is being worn more and 
more extensively. 



The nicest novelty of the season is a 
kind of kimono made of two bands of 
tricot, joined at the back, flounced on a 
very wide tricot belt that is rolled twice 
around the waist; the sleeves are not 
fastened, and are finished with a tassel 
at each end, as well as the belt. It is 
found very convenient for home wear, 
where fuel is still scarce, for this little 
coatee leaves all movements free. 

I shall tell you more about hosiery in 
my letter on lingerie. 

Next month, I shall deal with general 
fancy accessories, also with ribbons, and 
the ways to use them. 

Yours very truly, 





s 



PILE FABRICS 

All of those in the trade who have 
anything to do with pile fabrics are 
unanimous in their enthusiasm over the 
market for their goods for next year. 
Already orders of substantial propor- 
tions have been placed in Em - ope and 
elsewhere for goods of this nature. In 
a recent issue of DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW it was pointed out that a very 
strong demand for velveteen was on the 
way for next Winter, and each month 
seems to emphasize this tendency. Vel- 
veteen has gotten away from its com- 
monplace position and is now numbered 
among the high class fabrics. This, of 
course, is due in part to more care be- 
ing placed upon its production than used 
to be, and to the rise in the price ac- 
cordingly. Velveteen, is no longer 
looked upon as a substitute for silk 
velvet, but is i. fabric with its own 
merit. 

Many of the most attractive after- 
noon costumes are made of velveteen 
with a touch of real old lace. Sport 



coats and capes are being shown in 
velveteen for the Spring and velveteen 
linings are used for Winter garments 
on many occasions. 



Corduroys Strong 

There is a steady and keen demand 
from all over also for corduroys. 
Speaking with a manufacturer of these 
lines in New York, DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW was informed that business is 
exceptionally good. His firm had man- 
aged to keep deliveries up to the end 
of the year, but their output for the 
whole of 1920 was already alloted. He 
has noted a big call for corduroys for 
wraps and for the kimona trade. Blouse 
makers too are using corduroys for 
smocks. Some of these new corduroy 
smocks lined with Japanese silk in a 
delicate shade and trimmed with hand 
embroidery in worsteds are exceedingly 
smart. 

The Winter has been an exceptional 
call for chiffon velvets. These have 
been used more during this season than 



77 



for a number of years past, for after- 
noon and evening dresses and for elabor- 
ate wraps and millinery. The majority 
of manufacturers who specialize in pile 
fabrics are making up lines of chiffon 
velvets just now, but in finish, the 
French goods seem to have the lead 
Novelty brocaded velvets and two-toned 
effects are quite fashionable and in good 
demand for special purposes. On the 
American markets are some materials 
in mohair v/hich are new and unusual. 

Manufacturing conditions are quite as 
troublesome in pile fabrics as in all the 
other textiles and as demand for these 
lines grows and production is lowered, 
the shortage is keenly felt. One New- 
York manufacturer who, expects the big- 
gest season ever known in pile fabrics 
despite prices being higher than last 
year states that the shortage of dress 
velvets and velveteens will surely assert 
itself since the mills will turn out about 
half the quantity of last year. 



Silk and Cotton Mixtures 

The fact that the prices of the 
high class printed Georgettes, which are 
really very fashionable for next Sum- 
mer, are beyond the purse of the aver- 
age purchaser, some manufacturers be- 
lieve, therefore, makers of silk and 
cotton mixtures goods are looking for 
a stronger market than ever before for 
their product. While silk-and-cotton 
Georgettes have been on the market for 
the past four or five years and are, 
therefore, not really a new fabric, still 
their range of designs this year is quite 
different from what has appeared before. 
They follow very closely the fine color 
and designing of the Georgette, and it 
is as a substitute for the high priced 
Crepe that the mixture goods are being 
featured. It is felt that in this capacity 
there should be a ready market. Both 
highly-colored novelties and staple types 
of patterns and colorings are to be had. 
This fabric sells to the wholesales at 
around 80 cents, with duty to be added. 
While this price is considerably higher 
than the article was originally offered 
for it is still far below the prices paid 
for Georgette, and merchants, therefore, 
who have a clientele including some 
who want novelty goods, but are unwill- 
ing to pay the rates of all-silk Georg- 
ettes, will no doubt find this line of 
fabrics saleable readilv. 



Admission to the British Industries 
Fair, to be held at London, Birmingham 
and Glasgow in February next, is by in- 
vitation only. Canadian buyers who pro- 
pose to visit the fair can obtain invita- 
tions from the British Trade Commis- 
sioners in Canada at Montreal, Toronto, 
and Winnipeg respectively. 



78 



Dry Goods Review 



Fine Array of Silks for Spring 

rds Show Developm 

in Shi 






WHETHER it is that manufactur- 
ers at silks in the United States 
are ■ l>it timorous of the readi- 
with which the public will accept 
the prices which must be asked during 
this year, or whether it is a matter of 
catering to a wealth-laden public, the 
bust remains that manufacturers are 
putting forth every effort to offer a 
range of silks for this year which will 
entice by its very gorgeousness, and 
this despite machinery and labor render- 
ing manufacturing conditions the worst 
ever. 

.More in silks than in any other line of 
textiles is there a competition in produc- 
tion, rather than the old-time competi- 
tion in buying. The competition in pro- 
duction amounts to almost every well- 
established firm aiming to offer its 
clientele a bigger range of color, design 
and weave than it has ever done before. 

This condition of course applies more 
to the New York manufacturers than it 
does to European. It is rather early yet 
to see competition among the European 
mills in their present state. Their one 
endeavor is an individual effort to attend 
each to his own business to the utmost 
of his ability. The result is that though 
little more than a year has elapsed since 
the heart of France was in its trenches, 
her marvellous adaptability has allowed 
her to ship silks and fineries to this 
country in quantities impossible since 
1915. Canadian stores are now featur- 
ing French and Swiss goods in quite a 
nice range. For that reason a goodly 
number of staple types of stripes and 
checks will be worn in this country dur- 
ing 1920. So will the pompadour silks 
which featured delicately-shaded flowers 
and floral effects. These are being made 
up with plain colored Georgette crepe to 
match or else with Georgette printed in 
t\\o same design. 

Foulard Colorings Increase 

But to return to the American silks 
whence we look for novelty, as stated in 
earlier issues of DRY GOODS REVIEW, 
foulards are again imported. The pat- 
terns in foulards this year are perhaps 
a little more fanciful and irregular than 
has been the case previously, and fre- 
quently they combine one or two colors 
in rather new effects. The colorings on 
the whole, too, are of lighter and slight- 
ly brighter effects than last year. Among 
the outstanding colorings this year are 
draeron-fly blue, electric blue, old China 
blue, rather a deep orchid, browns and 
tan, jade and bisque, while gray, taupe, 
rose, navy and gold appear in the de- 
sicning. 

In the plain silks, which, too, will he 
wanted in considerable quantities for 
Spring and Summer, the range of color- 
is almost unended. Each firm has 
a different set of names for its colors in 
chiffons, Georgettes and novelty silks, as 
well as plain silks, but scarcely two 



I \MII<>\ Mil.K SII.K ( OLORS 
FOR SPRING 

K'< d-brow 
Red-vellows. 
Yellow. 
< xpucine. 
Ilrique. 

Nui and Rand browns. 
Tans. 

Ml blues, with green cast. 
W ine red. 

Orchid, with pink cast, 
.lade. 
Nile. 



names coincide between different firms 
though the colors are frequently dupli- 
cated. Brilliant, dignified, simple, what- 



ever one' in coloring, it can be 

satisfied this year and be in fashion. 
\ (ialaxy of High-Grade Novelties 

There are some unite striking novel- 
ties among the silks which will retail 
at around $10 a yard. These silks are 
for the most part heavy in appearance, 
but very pliable and soft in texture and 
woven in plain as well as figured pat- 
terns. This heavy effect is attained by 
coarse and irregular weaving and loose 
cordings and brocade-like design. Some 
of the fashionable names are almost de- 
scriptive of the silks themselves, and 
give a fair idea of the type of silk being 
featured. For instance, Tussatyne is a 
heavy-looking silk with a close herring- 
bone cord. Kordovan crepe is a thick, 
soft and pliable silk with threads that 
appear to be coarsely twisted. This is 




A Few of the Novelty Silks For 1920 

1 "Cordelle" — in dragonfly blue and light gold, with brocaded pattern developed by 
having the cords flat for the background and raised for the pattern. 

2 Rhapsode — in rose and white, giving a cool, frosted effect. A block pattern is dis- 
tinguishable as well as fine single and double stripes. These two are shown by the 
Carl Shoen Silk Corp., New York. 

'i Silk ratine in deep gold color. 

4 Fishermaid, in alternate green and white, open weave threads making what might be 
called a ratine net. 

5 Ostend striped silk in blue and white twilled effect. This silk is featured by Weissen- 
bach and Kay, Inc., New York. 

6 "Newport Cord" in pale pink. 

7 \ new pattern in blue and white kumsi-kumsa. The circle measures .IVi inches across. 

8 An interesting fine, slightly bias cord in mixture of pale grey-green with black, called 
veldette. Shown by Pelgram & .Meyer, Inc., New York. 

9 Chinchilla satin, in pure white with crinkled surface. The crinkle is maintained by 
tight warp threads on the under side. Nos. 3, 4, 6, 7 and 9 are from the Mallinson 
Spring lines for 1920. 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



79 



SOME Ol;' THE NKW COLOR NAMES 



Bosphore (new blue). 

Minaret (flame). 

Mandarine (red-brown). 

Heron (grey). 

Sahara (light brown). 

Twilight blue (dark). 

T'hrysis (cerise). 

Fiume (jade with blue cast). 

Trappist (reddish yellow). 

Esperance. 

Pershing orchid. 



made in striped and checked patterns as 
well as plain. Another firm features 
Cordelle, Rhapsode and Chimerai, all of 
which are developed in the cord-like 
silks. Still another firm has Thistledu, 
silk Ratine, and Newport cord. In ad- 
dition there are new versions of Kumsi- 
kumsa and Fantasi and silks along that 
order with which the trade is already 
familiar. 

There is a wide variety of novelty 
satin being shown for Spring. One of 
the newest of these is chinchilla satin; 
this is in white with a gently crinkled 
surface, which resembles the surface of 
chinchilla fur. Kitten's ear crepe is 
featured again and in brocaded effects 
as well as plain, and so, too, are the rich 
two-toned satins. 

Another of the novelty silk offerings 
this year is scarcely to be classed with 
any one type, because it is so very open; 
it is given the name of Fisher-maid. This 
silk seems to be woven with double 
threads knotted and crossing at such in- 
tervals as to leave open spaces almost 
like a fish net. One design in this silk 
shows the double thread alternately in 
green and white in both warp and weft, 
so that the effect is like a fine plaid. 
It is also very delicate in a pale pink 
shade. This silk is said to be successful 
for dresses for the Southern trade and 
also made up into pull-overs and smocks 
suggesting the filet crochet garments. 
Silk ratine mentioned above is a very at- 
tractive silk made on the same plan as 
ratine in cotton, which was fashionable 
about six years ago. The silk production 
will be used for suits, trimmings, dresses, 
skirts, etc., on tbe tailored order. 

Fine Knitted Silks Shown 
The fashion for knitted silk continues 
in importance. There are some extreme- 
ly fine silk materials of this nature be- 
ing shown, and the presesd or embossed 
patterns giving brocaded effects are con- 
sidered especially fine. The plain fabrics 
are shown in finer stitches than have 
been on the market previously. In fact 
they are so fine that one would scarcely 
recognize them as knitted silk at all until 
they are deliberately stretched out by 
the hands. These patterns are given the 
names of Treco and Trellisette. Denisette 
in brown, black and navy blue for dresses 
is rare indeed. These silks will retail 
in New York at about $8 or $10 a yard. 
Silk Duvetyns Gain in Favor 
Another range of silks which is de- 
cidedly prominent in fashion circles is 
the type of silk resembling duvetyn. This 
has been on the market for some seasons 



Antwerp. 

Chaume (like biscuit). 
Pheasant brown. 
Roubaix (brownish grey). 
Apres Midi (deeper than Nile). 
Soiree (deeper than sky). 
Jonquille (deeper than cream). 
Hortensia (pinkish blue). 
Marigold (lit ween coral and 
orange). 



past, but not in the variety it is at pre- 
sent. A number of manufacturers are 
turning out these silk duvetyns under 
various names Among them are "Peach- 



NKW SILK FEATURES 

Ctsrd effects. 

Heavy crepe we;r 

Rough and irregular surfaces. 

Silk ratine. 

Brocaded crepes and cords. 

Georgettes, with fine art silk 

stripes. 
Printed chiffons. 
Silk duvetynes. 
Silk trecos. 
Fishermaid. 



bloom," "Gloveskin," "Kordovan," 

"honeycomb," and so on. The last two 
of these are described by their names, 
since the one has a fine cord effect and 
the other a faint checked effect, resemb- 
ling a honeycomb. Some idea of the im- 
portance of these silks is estimated by 
the range of colors which some manu- 
facturers are putting out in this one line 
of silks alone. Nineteen colors in duve- 
tyns are included in one range. 

Georgette crepes, too, are coming in 
for a great deal of attention in the way 
of new designs. Perhaps the most popu- 
lar type of these is the little fine crinkled 
stripe of white or gold. These stripes 
are made of artificial silks, giving the 
effect of silver or gold on the dull back- 
ground. The threads are so fine that 
it does not seem to have been difficult 
to select names which describe the ma- 
terial. One, for instance, is called "Sea- 
spray," and another, "Dream Crepe." In 
printed patterns the Georgettes are to 
be had in peculiar futurist effects. These 
are mysterious in both outline and color 
combinations, but are very effective and 
attractive on the whole. Summerv pat- 
terns, such as branches of foliage, flower 
effects, etc., are also very promising in 
Georgettes. 

Hand-blocked Chiffon Patterns 
Owing to the extremely high prices 
Continued on page 105 




From the Canadian Market 

1 and 2 are new satin foulards; 3. Satin stripe Swiss taffeta with shadow- 
cross stripes. The ground is Burgundy, the satin stripes dark green and 
the shadow stripes dull gold. 4. A dainty pattern in printed sand-colored 
crepe de Chine. Red, green, purple and black in the tiny design. 5. Satin 
for skirts, trimming sport dresses, etc., in multi-colored stripes. 6. Swiss 
taffeta in sapphire blue with brown stripe and green and gold satin line 
stripes. 7. A rich brocade in Spring green and gold, very much in vogue 
just now. Designs reduced one-half in reproduction. From A. S. King 
Silk Co., Ltd., Toronto. 



so 



Dry Ooods Review 



Fine Finish Woollen Fabrics Wanted 

One or Two New High-Grade Offerings — Small Checks and Striped Novelties for Sport 
Skirts, Coats and Trimmings — White Wool Jersey Gains Favor — High Colors for 
Sport, Navy for Fashion, Little Hope for Novelty in Next Fall's Goods. 



FASHION is once more tending to- 
wards the fine, close weaves in 
woollen fabrics. Not because the 
product is any more plentiful, but be- 
cause if one has the price the finer goods 
are to be had at times. There are fine 
wool tricotmes, fine gabadines, serges 
and duvetyns on the market which are 
eqnal to anything which has ever been 
placed there, and this despite the fact 
of the extreme scarcity of wool and the 
difficulties of manufacturing conditions 
The reason for the present shortage of 
materials is no doubt owing to the fact 
that the quality is there, and it is quality 
goods which people want. In colors, too, 
the staple navy blue is that wherein 
value predominates. Navy blue is popu- 
lar far beyond everything else for 
Spring tailored suits, but for other pur- 
poses a number of novelties are to be 
had. Wool duvetyns are very much 
liked for both dresses and suits, and also 
coats and wraps, but strange to say, 
this popular material sells better in 
everything else than in navy blue; there 
is very little of it in that shade. Duvetyr. 
is preferred in the mahogany or brique 
shades. Bright greens, bright blues, 
light browns and other novelty shades 
are sold, of course. 

Coarser materials such as polo cloth 
are extremely popular for separate coats 
and the rougher weaves are liked for 
trimmings. 

White Jerseys Popular 

For sport suits and skirts there is no- 
thing smarter than striped serges and 
checked serge and velours. Both these 
patterns are of a finer type than was 
popular a couple of years ago. Stripes 
do not exceed an inch in width as a rule 
and the checks range around the eighth, 
quarter, and half-inch sizes. 

Wool jerseys are very much to the 
fore again. In addition to their popu- 
larity in high shades such as jade, tur- 
quoise, peacock, drafron-fly, and gold, 
also taupe, tan and grey, they are altra- 
fasbionable in white or cream for separ- 
ate shirts and also for suits. 

A novelty fabric which is on the mar- 
ket this year is after the duvetyn order 
but is called glovr-skin and is featured in 
ch< i-ks, in combinations of black and 
white, blue and white, and brown and 
white. The checks are V« and ', inch. 
A number of manufacturers have adopt- 
ed the French idea of using these check- 
id materials with plain poods for suits 
and coats with either one used as trim- 
ming. 

Cheruit twill is another fabric in wool 
on the market, which is especially adapt- 
able for suits and tailored dresses. 

P;uiuin sure is a very fine materiaf, 
and so, too. is wool stockinette, both of 
which are adaptable for any purpose re- 
qu'- ; njj a fine [Trade woo] material. 

Dove twill is a verv fine fabric of 




Spring- Woolen Cloths 

1. Brown and white checks, %-in. size. 

2. Black and white 3-16 in. checks. 

3. Black and white, 1%-in. squares 
inside half-inch cross stripes. 

These are the new "gloveskin" mater- 
ials, reversible, one side having a 
velours finish the other resembling 
serge. Shown by Haas Brother Fab- 
rics Corporation, New York. 



gabardine weave, especially designed for 
dresses. There is also a special dress 
weight in tricotine which is the same 
finish as that for suits, but is of lighter 
weight and fine thread for dresses. 

One f'rm is featuring a line of sport 
wool cloths which they characterize as 
unfinished worsteds. These are twilled 
in heather mixtures, and may be had 
also in three-color checks. Some fine 
even crepes are shown for dresses. 

These delectable tastes of new 
woollen goods will only serve to 
keep up the insistent demand for the 
cloths which people have been unable to 
procure for so long. This demand is 
even more persistent with regard to 
British manufacture than it is in the 
United States. British manufacturers 
are compelled to refuse orders simply 
because they cannot give the required 
deliveries for new goods. There is no 
easing in the situation for finer wools 
and not likely to be so long as the call 
is almost exclusively for botany and fine 
crossbreds. 

Tweeds will be made quite a feature 
for Spring owintr to the revival of sport 
apparel. Tweeds in heather mixture and 
in preys are in special demand, especial- 
ly in the finest weaves. Reports from 
Scotland are to the effect that manufac- 
turers are beinp rapidlv booked un for 
all they can turn out for the Winter of 
1920-21, with prices for the finer quali- 
ties of wools used for these Scottish 
tweeds advancing daily. Several cloths 
are quoted at four times their pre-war 
price. 

While shipments from the Old Country 
show some increases over the war period 



quantities arriving are still far below 
requirements. Canadian textile mills 
are reported to be working at capacity. 
In fact, their whole output of jerseys, 
velours, serges, homespuns, tweeds, etc., 
are spoken for for months ahead. 

While the trade can get along very 
nicely on what is available for the 
Spring and Summer requirements there 
is anxiety felt as to securing the long- 
hoped-for ranges of woollen fabrics for 
next Fall's showinjrs. 



LINEN 

May Have No Pure Linens At All a Year 
Hence 

As has been the case for several years 
past, varying opinions are heard with 
reference to conditions in the linen 
trade. A number of importers declare 
that it is very difficult to get supplies and 
that they are becoming more and more 
scarce and the price is going higher and 
higher. The latter condition is true, as 
quotations indicate. One large importer 
stated that he had been over to England 
about three months ago and was goinp 
over again in a week or two to see if 
he could pick up some more. !,inens 
were so scarce that he had little pure 
linen, and was forced to accept cotton 
goods. Of "union" goods he handled 
very little. 

Another importer, this time in one of 
the largest linen departments in a re- 
tail store in Canada, stated to DRY 
GOODS REVIEW that he had never had 
a better supply of linens than at the 



Dry Goods Review 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



81 



Canadian Buyers' Views of European Markets — (Continued) 



Continued 

sume their former positions and intent upon work- 
ing with the old-time vigor, were told by their fel- 
low workers to quit it and carry on in the manner in 
which the present employees were doing. British 
labor has secured a reduction in the working hours, 
and this has put the price of the finished article up, 
and now British labor, not content with shorter hours 
and higher wages, is attempting to demoralize con- 
ditions still by loafing on the job; this will seriously 
affect the competitive powers of Great Britain in 
world trade, and is bound to re-act disastrously upon 
the working man who supposedly created these con- 
ditions for his own benefit. 

RUGS 

The condition in Turkey is possibly the worst 
in the East, for it is believed that Germany has 
thoroughly cleaned the country of all fine rugs, and 
as the people have had to kill their sheep for food, 
the question of a wool supply will be very serious. 
It is believed here in London that the price of Turk- 
ish rugs, when such are available, will be over last 
quotations. Many of the finest Turkish weavers 



from page 71 

were Greeks living under the Ottoman rule, and the 
slaughter of these people by the Turks surpasses de- 
scription, so that even eventually, this industry has 
been dealt a blow from which it will take years to 
recover. 

LINENS 

The present reserve stock of flax is very low. 
and there will be no change in linen prices until 
after the new crop is on the looms, and manufac- 
turers will be able to quote prices for goods in hand. 
It is interesting to note here that many firms will 
continue to make fine aeroplane linen, and this is 
a war industry that will continue with a strong de- 
mand in Peace times, and is bound to affect price*, 
especially fine double damasks, prices of which, it 
is believed, will go still higher. 

Tt is interesting to note that enough flax was 
grown in Ireland only to supply the markets of the 
United Kingdom last year for about 6 weeks run- 
ning — this is an interesting indication of the real 
shortage that exists. It will be June of 1921 before 
new goods manufactured of Belgian flax can be 
placed on the market. 



present time. He, too, is going shortly 
to Ireland and Scotland to get addition- 
al supplies but he said that his exper- 
ience was that he could get all that he 
required or nearly so in the highest 
grades of linen. Long ago he had de- 
cided not to stock the medium and lower- 
priced goods or cottons at all, as his 
class of trade wanted the pure article. 
On this condition he had been buying 
very heavily, particularly two years ago 
and one year ago, and was in splendid 
shape at the present time. The medium 
grade and the coarser lines, he said, 
were very scarce, owing to the use of 
them during the war, but the finest 
grade he found he could secure if he 
was willing to pay the price. 

A report from Ireland at the end of 
December stated that there was a steady 
enquiry for the all-linen article, especial- 
ly from the United States, but demand 
from South America and the Colonies 
was also good, but it was necessary that 
the bulk of business be done in cottons 
or unions. One Canadian rpm-esentative 
stated to DRY GOODS REVIEW that it 
was his opinion that by the end of this 
year there would be absolutely no pure 
linen goods available. The home re- 
quirements are so keen that he thinks 
everything available will be taken up 
there. While manufacturers are doing 
their best to provide for their over- 
seas' customers, they feel that the dearth 
of flax will not permit of enough pure 
linen fabric to be made to be of any 
consequence for export. One shipment 
which this representative had received 
early in January had been stamped on 
the packages for entry into the United 



States and had evidently been "side- 
tracked" for the Canadian market. 

One Toronto store, which has always 
made a feature of its linen department, 
was offering a lot of plain hemstitched 
linen serviettes at $6 a dozen. Several 
dozen of these were disposed of the first 
day and each day thereafter until at the 
end of a fortnight the stock began to 
got quite low. Meanwhile the buyer 
had asked for more from the whole- 
sale and finally received a new lot of 
15 dozen, but these were at a figure re- 
quiring the retail price to rise to $7. 
Even then they moved out steadily, to- 
gether with end-cloths, runners and 
luncheon cloths to match. 

The 48-hour working week in the Bel- 
fast linen trade went into operation the 
week before Christmas. This reduces 
the working hours for the week by 7 
with the weekly pay unchanged from 
that for the 55-hour week. 

The Belfast "Linen Trade Circular," 
Ireland's leading linen journal, in a very 
recent issue states in part: 

"Flax. — There is not a glimmer of 
light as regards the position of Russion 
flax, and Scotch spinners, who have re- 
duced their production to the same ex- 
tent as has been current in Ireland for 
a long time, are agitating for the re- 
tention of the small warehoused supplies 
of Russian fJax for their use. Irish 
fibre is lacking in the best qualities. The 
outlook as regards raw material as a 
whole is most disquieting, and substi- 
tutes for flax on a very large scale are 
to be considered by the Empire Flax 



Growing Committee of the Boar 1 of 
Trade. The question of seed for next 
year is a matter of urgency. There will 
be only a small quantity of good Dutch 
seed available, and no improvement in 
this respect can be looked for until fresh 
seed is got out of Russia, and when that 
will be or what quantity can be obtained 
are matters of grave uncertainty. 



FINE FINISH WOOLEN FABRICS 
WANTED 

Continued from page 75 

can bank on is that they will not buy 
poor stuff. They bought good silks when 
they did not show anything like the ad- 
vance that woolens and cottons and, now 
that they have soared so that the com- 
parative value is net in them as before, 
too, there will be a stronger demand for 
good cottons. 

More Home Dressmaking 

There is another favorable factor: 
Ready-to-war has jumped to such exces- 
sive prices that women stand aghast at 
paying them. This will bring them to 
do far more of their own dressmaking 
than they have for years back. In my 
own department this is the case already. 



A NEW COTTON 

"Granette," a mercerized irregular 
weave of cotton fabric, used for skirts, 
suits, boys' blouses, etc. 



82 



1) K I - - F \ B R ICS 



Wh 



en in 



&y\ NEW YORK 









VISIT 



v4 



285-4^ive: 

PINE TREE SILKS 




Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



83 




WINGS ON YOUR STOCK 



GOOD advertising of good goods 
puts wings on any stock. It 
flies out in parcels — it flutters back 
in dollar bills. 

The trade mark at the head of this 
advertisement is the house mark of 
the Dominion Textile Company, 
Limited, Montreal. It is our stamp 
for sheetings, pillow-casings, towel- 
ling, prints, drills — everything that 
we make. It certifies that we believe 
in our goods. 

We are advertising this trade mark 
extensively. Telling the prudent 
housewife that the cotton which 



bears this mark is the best of cotton 
and the cheapest in the long run. 
We are suggesting reasons why she 
should use more of it and why she 
should insist upon getting Prue Cot- 
tons always. 

By linking your selling campaign 
with ours you can make sure of in- 
creasing your sales of cotton goods, 
stimulating the good opinion of your 
customers, and adding to your 
profits. 

Be ready when you are asked for 
Prue Cottons! 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY Limited 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



84 



1 1 R ESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 




SPRING 1920 

Below are a few names of some of our leading 
lines of PRIESTLEYS' DRESS GOODS 



COLORS 

(ALL WOOL) 

ANCONA SERGE 
RALEIGH SERGE 
FALCON SERGE 
MIRANDA FABRIC 
PANDORA POPLIN 
SATIN DUCHESS . 
PARMA SAN TOY 



BLACKS 

WOOL TRICONA 

TRICOTINE 

MELROSE 

CASHMERE 

TAFFETA 

ZERO CORD 

SICILIAN 



The Leading Shades for SPRING 1920 

SAND REINDEER TOBACCO 

PUTTY KANGAROO WINE 

TAUPE KING FISHER NAVY 

ELEPHANT PEKIN BLACK 

GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

"Everything in Dry Goods" 

VICTORIA SQUARE MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



85 



Belgian Royalty's Approval o 
y\mprJcafL Silks 





Silks de Luxe 



SERVICE OE l* «'" £ 

*. iiq<? G»o Washington. 
On hoard the USS Geo 

*«*«*«* 10th, 1919. 



faUii 1" «™« U " 



~ he Secretary to the Q.ecn cf the 

,., heen directed to have the honor to 
Belgian, nae heen ^ the 

expreea the sincere than 9 " f - ^^ 

-— rf 'Cr send to Her 

A C° have heen eo Vind as 
80 " • , Her with that hea.tlful .11*. 

,v,lle presenting Her wi 




tIaa Spec lal - 
r oute ^. . 

Jc >H. „ - 

" 8 " U9 «m n,«. st 

^s'w. b lue , 



^"^yyo^. 




DRESS FABRICS Dry Goods Re 




o o o • 




New Silks 

New Service New Organization 



TRADE A MARK 




DUCHESSE 


TAFFETAS 


MESSALINES 


HABUTAI 


CREPE DE CHINES 


GEORGETTES 


PONGEES 


SATINS 


NEW NOVELTY 


SILKS 



See our Samples before placing. 
Every piece reliable. 

HAMM & RILEY SILK COMPANY 

LIMITED 

55 Bay Street - Toronto 



i x^r s 



We Specialize in Broad Silks 

X I 

Li niirHFSSF TAFFFTAS LJ 



• O I o 



VI I o — g I E^^^r^nr^=c3F=^nnr 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



87 







<fi 




TRADE MARK 



SUITINGS 



Profitable for the Merchant- --Economical for the Customer 
These Wholesalers sell WOOLTOUCH. Send for samples. 







Greenshields Limited, 
Montreal, Que. 

Alphonse Racine, Limited, 
Montreal, Que. 

The W. R. Brock Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Gordon,Mackay & Co., Limited, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Vassie & Company, Limited, 
St. John, N.B. 

Canadian Representative : 

Chas. Duncan, 42 Rainsford Road, 
Toronto, Ont. 



BEDFORD MILLS, INC. 

80-82 Leonard St., New York City 





^ 



\ 




88 



D l: ESS l'A liltlCS 



Dry Goods Review 





The gfun in the painting ae*iv litat ertoted Jnm Rhapiod'e and Ike nxrrap team Cerdelle 

N elusive coloring that shifts and changes with every move of the 
wearer — a luminous radiance that ripples in every fold and lurks 
in every shadow — of these is born the magic that lifts the new 
Penikees Silks into the realm of art. 

Three distinct weaves — Cordelle, Chimerat, Rhapsode, — alike in 
delicacy of sheen, and in depth and brilliancy of tone, but each offering a fresh con- 
ception of how much beauty can be woven into a silken fabric. Dark shades that 
make fascinating day wear, and pale hues designetr'to glow under evening lights. 
The mills where these new silks have just been created have for 
years been making fine American silks for American women. You can now 
identify them by the name Penikees in the selvage of every piece. 



DE/glKEE> 



I he silk novelties described 
Mow have just been brought 
out, and are admirably adapt- 
ed lor suits, wraps, dresses 
and skirts. They come its a 
wide range of exquisite shades 



A new changeable silk, hav- 
ing an exquisite crinkled sur- 
face of almost metallic lustre 

R.HAVS ODE 

Resembling Chimerai in tex- 
ture, but revealing in certain 
lights self-color plaids or 
blocks of the most subtle 
nature 

A heavily corded silk that is 
yet marvelous!)- soft and pli- 
able, the paler shades having 
a silvery sheen 



Among the other Pxmcm nov- 
elty lilki arc: 

SPORTUSSAH 
SYLVA-SPRE 

and 

PENIKEES DUVETYN 

The more staple weaves include 
Penikees Crepe de Chine i 
Penikees Crept Meteor, 
Penikees Satins 
Penikees Charmesue 
Penikees Pop/ins 
Penikees Georgettes 
Penikees Faille de Sate 
Penikees -Silk and W-l 
and Printed Nvveltui 



CARL SCHOEN 
SILK 

CORPO RATION 

Rn-^ww, REIL1NG 6-SCHOIN , ut 

760 FOURTH AVE 
NEW YORK. 



The advertisement reproduced in miniature above will appear as a full page in 
bUirk and white i» the February Ladies' Home Journal; and in a full page in the 
original colors in Vogue for January 15; Fashion Art for January; Le Costume Royal 
for February; and the spring numbers of the Butterick Quarterly, Standard Quarter- 
ly, New Idea Quarterly, and the Pictorial Fashion Book. The advertising of PENI- 
KEES Silks, thus introduced t<> tin American women, wiU be continued regularly and 
ntly. 

Carl Schoen Silk Corporation, 260 Fourth Ave., New York 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



89 




90 



D R ESS FA BRICS 



Dry Goods Review 






dfi 



looog^oo 



Mark Fisher Sons & Co. 

Two New and Important 
Departments 



I 



LINENS 

"Kingfisher" 

Scalloped and hemstitched 

TABLE CLOTHS and 

NAPKINS, TRAY CLOTHS 

TEA CLOTHS, SCARVES 
Finest quality, best selling de- 
signs and sizes. 

Staples 

Crashes, huckabacks, terries, 
white and coloured mercerized 
damasks, linen damasks, linen 
table cloths, and napkins, En- 
glish bath towels, white and 
colors. 

"Snowcrest" 

Madapolams, longcloths, 
sheets and pillow cases 



SILKS 

Just arrived from Switzerland. 

An Elegant Quality All Silk 
Duchess Mousseline 

In High Novelty and Lighter 
Shades for Party Gowns. 

Other Silk Ranges include : 

Navy Chiffon Taffetas 
Black Chiffon Taffetas 
Black Duchess Satins 

and exceedingly rich Crepe 
Back Charmeuse in handsome 
colours, made by Bonnet et 
Cie, of Lyons. 



Your Mail-order enquiries will receive immediate attention 



MARK FISHER SONS & CO. 

Fine|Woollens, Silks, Tailors' Trimmings, Linens 

28 VICTORIA SQUARE MONTREAL 



70 Bay St. 


286 and 290 McDermott Ave. 


420 Cordova St. 


TORONTO 


WINNIPEG 


VANCOUVER 


231 Mollis St. 


93-99 Germain St. Booth Bldg., Sparks St. Lister Chamber 


5 DufTield Block 


11 \l II \\ 


ST. JOHN OTTAWA HAMILTON 


LONDON, Ont. 



n 






Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



91 








»»Tt*«» 



Spring and Fal 
Deliveries 



CREPE DE CHINES 
GEORGETTE CREPES 
CHIFFONS 
NINONS 

NOVELTY SILKS 
SILK SHIRTINGS 
COTTON SHIRTINGS 
PLAIN SATINS 
FANCY SATINS 
COTTON VOILES 



Stocks in most of thcseT qualities 
always on hand in Toronto Ware- 
house- 



Write us for particulars. 



Albert Godde, Bedin & Cie 

PARIS 

TARARE 

LYONS 

Empire Building, 64 Wellington Street West 
Telephone : Adelaide 3062 

TORONTO 





DAY & NIGHT 
-=■ \\ Wear 



.. ■ , . . ' .. 




The Mark of Fine Merchandise 




Your customers have confidence in 
any product carrying the "DAY 
AND NIGHT WEAR" Label be- 
cause they are assured it represents 
Quality. Have you a representative 
stock of "Viyella" and "Clydella" 
Flannel? 

Our advertising appears in 

MACLEAN'S 

CANADIAN HOME JOURNAL 

LITERARY DIGEST 

LADIES' HOME JOURNAL 

VOGUE 

HARPER'S PAZAR 

COUNTRY LIFE 

TOWN AND COUNTRY 

GOLF ILLUSTRATED 

Wm. Hollins & Co., Limited 



62 Front St. W. Toronto 
New York, U.S.A. London. England 



DAYfc L NIGHT 

^ ^ V\ Wear 



Trade Mark Read 




;il' 



1>I!KSS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 



THIS SEASON 

The House of Variety and Style--- 

VOSS & STERN 

71 Fifth Avenue 
NEW YORK 

Is represented by 
Mr. Reuben Rose 

Included in his line are 

Novelties in Flouncings, 
Bandings and Laces for 
Evening Wear that radiate 
elegance and originality. 

Printed Voiles and Printed 
Organdies of exclusive pat- 
terns and color combina- 
tions. 

Printed all Silk Chiffons 
and Crepes of attractive 
floral patterns so much de- 
sired by women of to-day. 

Silk and Cotton Crepes de- 
manded by women for 
popular-priced waists and 
dresses. 

And a complete line of 
Laces, Embroideries, Net- 
tings and Wash Goods. 

VOSS cSc STERN 

NEW YORK 



The Deacon Shirt 
Company 

beg to announce that their travellers 
are on the road with the new Fall 
line of 

Working and Outing Shirts, 

Flannels, Taffetas, plain and fancy, 

Tweeds, Drills, Flannelettes, 

Oxfords, Sateens, etc. 

Night Shirts, Pyjamas, 

Boys' Waists. 

The Deacon Shirt Co. 

BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO 



SPECIAL VALUES 

Direct from Mill to the Trade through 
Commission Merchants 

Grey and Fancy Worsteds 

Mine and Black Serges 

I'ure Wool Scotch Tweeds 

for Men's Wear 

Also 

Botany Wool Serges, Gabardines, Etc. 

for Women's Wear 

C. E. ROBINSON & CO. 

Importers and Commission Merchants 

Mappin & Webb Building 

10 VICTORIA ST. MONTREAL 

Tel. Uptown 85S3 



Say You Saw It 
in 

Dry Goods Review 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



93 




Our 
Stupendous 



M 



enagene 



r lpHE increasing cost of furs and the scarcity of fur-bearing ani- 
mals offer an unsurpassed opportunity for style variations in 
artificial fur fabrics. 

. The "Shelton Looms" has anticipated this situation and the 
novel fur effects created for garments and trimmings, are amazing 
in their variety. 



Seal Effects — Brown Backs 

Ungava 
Hudson Bay 
Unimak 
Poletex 
Polarkin 

Beaver or Nutria Effects 
Yuwin 
Furist 
Furmoss 
Sofurra 
Also in Mole colors 

Tiger Qualities 

Cheetah 
Jaguar 



Black Seal Simulations 

Lapinex 

Prybiloff 

Nishni 

Moleskin Ideas 

Anniemole 
Varimole 
Artex 
Yulex 

Bearskin Reproductions 

Nuphur 



Fur Pelt Effects 

Persica Lamb 
Baby Lamb 
Sea Otter 
Civet Cat 
Marten 
Sable 
Hah'seal 
Muskrat 
Kerami 

Deerskin Imitations 

Doe 
Gazelle 



Retail stores find much satisfaction in handling these beautiful 
textiles by the yard. Our national advertising is bound to result in 
many calls for these materials. 

We want to make our goods better known to you in Canada. 
Where already introduced, they are increasing in demand. 




SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL & CO. INC. 

395-401 Fourth Avenue, New York 






Dry Oooda Review 



First Canadian Fur Auction to be Held in April 

tnpany Has Been Organized With Prominent Fur Dealers and a Number of Financial 
Leaders— Greatesi Fox Pelt Collection in the World Will Stimulate Dyeing 

Industry as Well. 



PLANS for the organizations of fur 
auctions for Canada have been 
ilo\ eloped since last month's issue, 
and a charter has been granted to the 
Canadian Fur Auctions Sales Limited, 
and an offering of stock will be placed 
on the market. It is almost certain at 
the time of writing that the first auction 
will be held in Montreal in the month of 
April. Estimates of the value of the 
skins that will be sold in a year at the 
three auctions that probably will be re- 
quired, run all the way from $10,000,000 
to $15,000,000. Whatever the amount, 
the venture promises to be to the ad- 
vantage of those engaged in the fur 
trade, all along the line from the trap- 
per to the manufacturer, and incidental- 
ly to the retail merchant. 

Advertise Fox Pelts All Over World 

Keen interest is being maintained in 
the auction proposals by the fox breed- 
ers of Prince Edward Island, and a num- 
br of members of the Fox Breeders' As- 
sociation had a conference with the di- 
rectors of the Auction Company early in 
January. They were informed that it was 
the intention to give special publicity to 
the fox pelt offerings in all the fur-buy- 
ing centers of the world, with the idea 
that by far the best collection will be 
gathered together in Canada to be seen 
in the world. Great interest is being 
shown in New York, London, Paris and 
other fur centers in the outcome of the 
Canadian venture, and buyers from the 
States and Europe are expected to be 
drawn in large numbers by the superior 
lots of the special furs that Canada pro- 
duces above any other country in the 
world. 

Will Develop Dyeing 

It is learned that the company will not 
limit its activities to the selling of furs 
on commission, as is done by some of the 
large houses in the United States. In 
addition to the auction sales it is the in- 
tention to buy a large quantity of furs 
and also to engage in the dyeing of skins. 
This part of the fur business has been 
very limited in the past in Canada, al- 
though great developments have taken 
place since the war shut out European 
dyeing houses for the most part. The 
new company will develop this part of 
the business and it is their intention to 
undertake the finest forms of fur dyeing 
that are required for the Canadian manu- 
facturer. 

Fur Dealers Iiehind It 

Among the prominent fur firms in- 
terested actively in the auction plans 
are the following: A. Pierce, president 
of A. and E. Pierce. Limited; A. A. 
Allan, president of A. A. Allan and Co., 
Ltd.; R. S. Coltart, vice-president of 
Holt, Renfrew and Co., Ltd., and the Red- 
mond Co., Ltd.; P. G. Gnaedinger, pre- 



sident of L. Gnaedinger, Son and Co.; 
E. E. Cummings, of Cummings and Cum- 
in ings, and F. Cooper, vice-president of 
Boulter, Waugh, Ltd. 

In addition, powerful financial in- 
terests distinct from the trade are back- 
ing the company, among these being: 
Lord Shaughnessy, chairman of the 
board of directors of the Canadian Paci- 
fic Railway; Sir Herbert Holt, president 
of the Royal Bank of Canada and the 
Montreal Light, Heat and Power Com- 
pany; Lome C. Webster, director of the 
Merchants' Bank of Canada and the 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co.; P. P. 
Cowans, of the Montreal stock broker- 
age firm of McDougal & Cowans; J. W. 
McConnell, president of the St. Law- 
rence Sugar Refinery, and W. A. Black, 
vice-president of the Ogilvie Flour Mills 
Company. 

At the conference held in Montreal,, 
representatives from the Fox Breeders' 
Association of Prince Edward Island, in- 
cluded Hon. A. E. Arsenault, former 



& Co., Ltd.; E. W. Manson, B. G. Ro 
and J. W. Colbeck, of Summerside, 
P.E.I. ; Walter S. Grant, J. S. Wedlock 
and J. D. Jenkins, of Charlottetown. 

It is of interest to note that there was 
an issue offered to the public of $2,500,- 
000 of 7 per cent, cumulative preferred 
stock, with a bonus of 35 per cent, of 
common stock. The total common stock 
issue amounts to $2,500,000, the same 
as the preferred. The issues will both 
be listed on the Stock Exchange. 

• The list of directors includes the fol- 
lowing: E. E. Cummings, Jr., general 
manager (Cummings & Cummings); R. 
S. Coltart, of Redmond & Co.; A. Pierce, 
of A. & E. Pierce; all of whom are con- 
nected with the fur trade; also Lord 
Shaughnessy; Senator Lome C. Web- 
ster; J. W. McConnell, Sir Herbert Holt; 
W. A. Black; and four fur men, one rep- 
resenting Prince Edward Island, one for 
Qeuebec, one for Ontario and one from 
Western Canada, probably Edmonton, as 
a centre of the fur trade there. 



And How They Cost! 




"Oh, what are those cute little animals?" 
"Why, up here we call 'em muskrats, but when they 
reach the city they're Hudson Bay seals." 



Premier of the Province: J. A. Webster, 
of Charlottetown, and Herbert Cham- 
pion, fox raising and other enterprises 
in their province. Accompanying the 
party, and also interested in fox farm- 
ing, were: Creelman McArthur, M.L.A., 
president Brace, McKay & Co., Ltd.; H. 
T. Colman, vice-president R. T. Holman 



M. Davidson, furrier, Rideau Street, 
Ottawa, was married to Miss Vineberg 
on January 4. Miss Vineberg has been 
secretary of the Hebrew Ladies' Benevo- 
lent Society for some seventeen years 
and was recently presented with an il- 
luminated address as a mark of esteem 
by the members of the society. 



Dry Goods Review 

Hudson Seal Coats 

While very few of the fur manufac- 
turers have done much yet in the mak- 
ing up of samples for the season of 
1920-21, there is a general agreement of 
opinion as to the price situation, in so 
far at least as a substantial advance is 
concerned over the prices that have ruled 
for the season just closing. As was 
intimated in these columns for two or 
three months back, the prices that will 
be paid for the raw skins have been 
howing advances in nearly every line. 
The figures quoted last issue show a 
very marked advance in several kinds 
of pelts. This, in itself, would account 
for a fairly marked advance in prices 
for next Fall. There is, in addition, an 
increase during the year of some 20 per 
cent, in labor and the costs of dyeing 
are also considerably higher. Alto- 
gether the manufacturer will have to 
fix a price that will cover this and is 
likely to show an advance of anywhere 
from $50 to $150 a garment, or higher 
for the highest class goods, in Hudson 
seal coats. 

There is a disposition to bring out 
more samples of the shorter or sports 
coats for next Fall as a fairly good 
reception met those that were shown 
this year. It is known, of course, that 
in New York, 36-inch coats have been 
popular, and in the larger cities of Can- 
ada this had a fairly good sale this past 
iseason. Of course, it is not expected 
that in staple sales anything but the 
42- and 45-inch garments will meet with 
a ready response. While there is not 
as much fur used in the shorter coats, 
hence they are cheaper. It is not the 
women who could not afford a longer 
coat who buy these coats. It is a fash- 
lion model chiefly, and it is the weather 
:that will decide in the main the length 
jof the coat. However, fashionable de- 
mands cover a good deal of business, 
and some of the manufacturers are go- 
ing to extend the number of lines in the 
shorter coats over those they showed 
for the past season. 

Another element in the increased cost 
will be silk. A manufacturer remarked 
that where he was able to eet silks in 
the past for $2.50 he would have to pay 
and $3.25 a yard, so that this, too. is 
a factor, although not comparable to the 
advance in skins themselves. This will 
be one of the little items that will help 
the totals mount up. 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



95 



Fur Reports From Western Canada 

A report from. Winninee; auotes the 
chief inspector of the Hudson's Bav 
Company, A. Bassott. as declaring: that 
there would not be the absolute short- 
age of muskrat that had been rumored 
this Winter, but this undoubtedlv would 
be scarce, as it had be Q n for the past 
three years. Lvnx would be scarce, but 
he exDected a slierht imm'ovement over 
last year when the supply was the 
smallest since 1910. 





, .U_ i ,..----. 




Photographing 
Special Fur Pieces 




^^•k. 




fm Jm 


This is a sample of a little folder 




^£k 1 


that Holt, Renfrew & Co., of Mont- 
real, issued several times this sea- 
son among a selected list of custo- 
mers. The special point about this 
is that the illustration is not just 
printed on the paper, but is a 
proof of a cut made from a photo- 
graph taken of a Russian sable 
scarf in the store. This proof is 
attached at the upper end to the 
coarser paper of the folder. This 
is done also on an inside page. The 
effect of this plan not only en- 
sures an improved print of the 
coat or scarf, but gives the cus- 
tomer the impression of a special 
print being made for her herself. 






Jlolt.F^nfvw 





MAY ABANDON THE 

FEBRUARY FUR SALES 

Greatly Increased Costs May Put New Value on Stock Carried Over 

to Next Year. 



THE certainty that prices of furs 
for next Fall will be much higher 
than they were this present 
season presents a problem to the mer- 
chant who has to decide very soon 
whether he shall make the usual season- 
able reductions of "25 to 50 per cent." 
in the Christmas prices, in order to clear 
his stock out in February, or whether 
he shall take the stand that this Hudson 
seal coat that he has marked at $550 
will sell at $700 next Winter, if he 
doesn't sell it this season to clean up, 
say at $400. 

Different merchants will have varying 
views on this subject, but the acute sit- 
uation so far as prices are concerned is 
causing the most radical of former years 
to pause. With many merchants, and 
quite properly, too, it is a fixed policy 
not to carry over any goods into another 
season, as there is usually depreciation 
in value, perhaps a change in style, loss 
in interest, insurance, etc. This settles 
the point in normal times, but furs 
threaten such an advance that many 
merchants have decided to make little 
effort to dispose of first-class stocks at 
least, at much of a discount. 

One large retail firm that was inter- 
viewed stated that they were making 
extensive improvements to their build- 
ing and they were faced with this prob- 
lem: should they sell their furs, their 
sets and ccats, at the ordinary reduction 
and get rid of them saving them from 



being rendered dusty and thus injured 
in quality and value by the building 
operations, or should they put them 
away on the ground that the values 
would increase by next Fall? They 
thought that the best plan was to sell 
them, and they will put them on the 
market at a fairly good reduction. 

There was another point to influence 
this firm and one that must be kept in 
mind by other merchants, and that is in 
this case they had a number of sets of 
wolf and a few other lines that had not 
been selling well, and they thought it to 
their advantage to get rid of these at a 
reduced price. In order to attract buy- 
ers they could not limit the reduction to 
these but they put in others amongst 
them as the more goods that they had 
at an attractive price they felt the 
greater the attraction to the buying 
public, and the greater the chance of 
them disposing of some of the slow lines 
they had collected in the last year or 
two. 

Another firm stated that their reduc- 
tions would not be nearly as much as 
last year. Where they had been paying 
about $2.25 or $2.50 for muskrats for 
the early season, the Winter muskrat 
now was costing them over $4, and some 
quotations as high as $4.80 had been re- 
ceived. Silks that had cost $2.25 to $2.50 
were now selling at $3 to $3.50, so why 
make much of a sacrifice ? 



96 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



Dry Goods Review 



RELIABILITY 



Furs can be dyed two ways- --one is the wrong way, 

the other is 

The Hollander Way 

You can RELY ON THE DYE when it's 

Hollander's 

Hollander Seal and Sealine have become famous 
throughout the trade. Now comes 

Hollander Electric Seal 



our latest production, which we are now offering to the 
trade. It is the result of the combined efforts of our lab- 
oratory, plant and efficient staff of trained dyers and 
dressers. 

We welcome your problems, Mr. Fur Manufacturer, 
and we are pleased to give you the latest ideas in fur- 
dyeing and dressing. Let us get together. 

We solicit your inquiry, no matter how small your 
problem may seem. 



A. Hollander & Son, Limited 

64 Queen Street :: Montreal 

N. Y. Office: 129 West 30th Street 









Dry Goods Review FUR DEPARTMENT 97 



Let Us First Wish You 
A Prosperous New Year 

What Does the New Year Offer Us? 

Increased opportunities, and the as- 
surance that prices will not decline. 
Of this we are positive. There 
need be no hesitancy in placing or- 
ders for your reasonable require- 
ments, as pre-war conditions and 
prices will not obtain for years to 
come. 

Our travellers are now heading in 
your direction with our usual com- 
plete range of samples, embracing, 

Mitts and Gloves, Mackin- 
aws, Sheep-Lined Coats, 
Fur Coats, etc., etc. 

And we bespeak for them your 
usual valued orders. 

James Constine & Co. Limited 

Montreal 



FUR i> 1: i" \ 1; T M E NT 



Dry <•' <><•■!.■< Re vie iv 




ESTABLISHED IN 1852 



MOOSE HEAD BRAND FURS 

FIRST GUNS 

Being fired in thj selling campaign for Fall 1920 under the 

following chief operators: 



K. I. AMEY - - 
\Y. S. DEXTER - - 
R. DAY - 
WM. HAGUE 
]. P. HYLAND - 
J. H. LAPIERRE - 



N.B and P.E I. 

- Nova Scotia 

- - - Ontario 
- - - Ontario 

- - - Ontario 

- - Montreal 



E. N. LAYALLEE - - - Quebec 

A. LEFORT ------ Quebec 

CI IAS. VALOIS - - - - Quebec 

F...G. B. HAMILTON - Manitoba 
ALEX. ROSS - - - Saskatchewan 

B. L. MOOREHOUSE, Alberta & B.C. 



SHOWING 



Fur Coals and Robes, Cloth Caps, Mitts and Gloves, Fur-Collared Coats, 
Motor Plush Rugs, Mackinaws and Sheep-Lined Coats, Sweater Coats, Mufflers 



L. Gnaedinger, Son & Co. 

90-94 St. Peter Street 
MONTREAL 



Dm Goods Review 



FUR DP] PART ME NT 



99 



Cummings & Cummings 




SKINS 

We have on the floor: 
Persian Lamb 
Mink 

Aust. Opossum 
Skunk 
Muskrat 
Hudson Seal 
Wolf 
Lynx 



MONTREAL 




Persian 

Lamb 

1921 



Very soon our salesmen will 
be showing you our new 
samples. We cannot too 
strongly emphasize the wis- 
dom of buying. 



Russian Sables— Silver Foxes 

We are making a special showing of 
these skins. They merit your inspection. 



SKINS 

We have on the floor: 
White Fox 
Cross Fox 
Kolinsky 
Raccoon 
Beaver 
Ermine 
Squirrel 
Moleskin 



100 



V I'K I) K PA KT M E NT 



Dry Goods Review 




l)ry Goods Review 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



101 




DYNAMO BRAND 
1> 



By this Mark you are enabled to 
recognise MALINES which can- 
not be equalled in Quality—absolute 
Exclusiveness and Economy. 



MONTREAL 
Room 705 

Read Blcig. 
Tel. Main 6524 



"Dynamo Brand" Malines 

Are guaranteed Rainproof. They resist Rain — Dampness — 
Snow — Sun and Perspiration. 

They excel where others fail, and they naturally become the 
ideal Maline for Millinery and for Maline Scarves, so appro- 
priate for evening wear. They are economic, because one 
yard of Dynamo Maline offers more advantages than two 
yards of any other make. Buy Dynamo Maline, it is the 
Original Guaranteed Rainproof Maline. 

CHAS. MOUTERDE {United Makers) 

The only selling agents for Gros Million & Co. of Lyons (France) for the 
Dominion of Canada. We only sell to the Wholesalers. 



80 Wellington 
St. West, 

TORONTO 
Tel. Adel. 4184 

















A String on 
Your Finger 

— lest you forget 
to turn to the latter 






part of this issue 






and read the 
Buyer's Market 




1 


Guide. 







Squirrels 

DYED 

Taupe and 
Battleship Grey 




Rabbits 

DYED 

Kitt 

and 
Mole 



Foxes Wolves 
White Foxes 

DYED 

Taupe and 
Battleship Grey 

FURS DYED 



THE NEWEST SHADES 

Prompt, Skilful Service 



The Hollander Fur Dyeing 
Co., Limited 

645 St. Paul St. - Montreal 



[02 



Dry Goods Review 



Labor Fills Season With Uncertainties 

Millinery in All Its Branches Suffers From I nsettled Labor— Everything Possible Bein^ 

Broughl Out to Supplement Insufficient Supplies Therefore, a Season of Novelty 

at Hand New York Wears Snug Turbans Just Now. 

Writlt'ii by staff member of Dry Goods Review upon recent trip to New York, especially for this issue. 



NEW YORK. December, 1919: The 
millinery situation for spring is 
in the midst of one of the most 

incertain periods it has ever passed 
through. Materials, which for many 
years have continued "good," are impos- 
sible to procure. Others are in very 

imited quantities and prices are ex- 
orbitant. Substitutes have to be tried 

■ut, and everybi dy is trying out Bome- 
•hivg different. 

The labor situation adds very materi- 

lly to the uncertain conditions. Labor 
.n the hat factories, as well as among 
the trimmers for the wholesale, is at a 
very uncertain stage. Workers are 
"inually asking for higher wages and 
shorter hours and are interfering 
materially with the regular flow of busi- 
ness, which should be in swing at this 
time of the year. No permanent settle- 
ment seems possible. The large houses 
are no better off in this respect than the 
smaller ones. One of the best known 
wholesale houses in New York showed 
DRY GOODS REVIEW representative 
a line of body sailors which they had 
selected at $24 a dozen for the advance 
opening displays. Just a couple of 
weeks after this, when he wanted t i giv? 

>n order for his regular season's goods, 
the price had advanced to $36 a dozen 
This is only one i xample of what is tak- 

ng place in every line <f material used 
n the millinery work. It all depends on 
■ w early one places his orde* for .u<>:>.ls 
as to what the price to the retailer and 
the consumer must be. The retailer 
themselves will do well to bear this in 
mind, for the one feature which will 
ehaiacterize the trade throughout the 
coming year is that there will be a 
competition in buying, rather than 

ompetition in selling. 

Some Early Innovations 

Numerous novelties are being brought 
out for the Southern trade, and among 
them are some which are looked upon 
as good numbers for the regular sum- 
mer business. One of these is Batavia 
cloth. This i> a cloth of open weave 
made of hair and embroidered in darn- 
ing and running stitches in worsteds or 
silks, in the fashionable colors, such as 
henna, deep blues, tans and browns. 
The designs are in large floral and con- 
ventional motifs, giving an allover 
effect, and the cloth is used to cover the 
whole crown and brim. It is quite light 
in weight and fits the shape smoothly. 
Haircloth, of closer weave, is also being 
featured with some success. 

leathers and kids are considered good 
prospects for Spring and early Sum- 
mer. Paris is fond of .them in black, 



natural and colored tones. They are 
used in large round or fancy spots ap- 
pliqued to the crown and brim, or for 
bands, brims or whole shapes. Patent 
leathers used in strips or twisted and 
cut in unusual forms, is a close com- 
petitor of cellophane, which has been 
described previously in DRY GOODS 
REVIEW. Both materials are thin and 
glossy in effect, and are shown in a 
variety of colors as well as in black and 
white. 

There are several novelty mohair 
fabrics which are very new and which 
are being taken up quite extensively by 
the millinery trade. It appears that any 
of the light weight, smooth-finish fabrics 
will be used for the coming season rather 
than hats of the one-time fashionable 
straw. Not that straw is at all passe, 
but it is very scarce, as intimated in the 
beginning, and. therefore, it is a novelty 
as well as an ultra-fashionable mater- 
ial for hats. 

Another new , material is a fabric 
with cotton back and tufted with very 
narrow visca straw. The material is 
soft and elastic and lends itself well for 
draping. One of the big firms manufac-. 
turing hats of this cloth gives it simply 
the name of straw-cloth. It is used for 
both tailored and sport styles. Taffto- 
phane is another new material with a 
striped surface and dull finish which 
make it of more subdued effect than 
cellophane, but is no less pleasing. 



Raffia embroidery used on malines 
and on several of the novelty silks 
makes up some of the at: new 

models. This is developed in the quieter 
street tones, as well as in sport ideas. 
The shoestring braid worked into sun 
burst rays and embroidery effects is 
also good. 

For Southern wear there is nothing 
which surpasses the hats made entirely 
of ribbon. Ribbons combined with 
brocade, too, are very good. There are 
two-inch Japanese brocaded ribbons used 
attractively as trimming and another 
ribbon of heavy red silk tape is embroid- 
ered with a smooth gold thread. These 
are quite effective used with the new 
silks, both plain and fancy, and many 
printed patterns are being made up for 
the new models for the South. Straw- 
laid on in cross;-bars, stripes, circles an 1 
embroidery outlines, is effective as 
trimming. 

Maline Remains Good 

Maline is found to be taking a firmer 
hold on the millinery trade, a- the : 
advances. For current dress wear it is 
especially liked in the shape known as 
the "bird cage" tan, in which it is used 
to encase brocade, duvetyn or velvet. 
Black maline used with glycerined or un- 
curled ostrich, is especially good. Quite 
an unusual model was shown in a Fifth 
avenue shop recently. The hat was of 
soft folds of maline with no other trim- 



*B5Q^ 







SEEN IN NEW YORK 

The two hats at the left depict the new puffed satin ef- 
fects shown for early Spring- The underlining are of 
straw. 

The hat in the centre, made of hlack maline, looks de- 
mure enough here, but can you imagine that ostrich 
edge being mottled in all the gay colors of the rainbow 
— and some the rainbow never shows? It is from Gid- 

dintf's. 

At the right is one of the trig little turbans that are so 
fashionable. This one has its tire brim all covered 
with black grosgrain. The crown is panne velvet and the 
tassel is a long flat one held down close to the crown 
by a band of half-inch riboon. 



Dry Good* Review 



MILLINERY 



103 



naing than an extending edge of un- 
circled ostrich, dyed in bright mottled 
tones of capucine, peacock, henna, sky 
blue, tan, etc.. ostrich trimmings. Roll- 
ing Chin Chin models, bulky side crown 
effects, turbar.s, and the larger dress 
hats of maline use bands of glycerined 
ostrich on the under brim or to cover 
the entire crown. In some cases the 
ostrich is replaced by a silky black 
grass. 

Puffed Satin Brims 

Among the interesting tailored modes 
for early spring are sailors with under 
brim and side crowns of lisere and the 
crown-top and upper brim of satin put 
on loosely, so that it gives a soft, puffy 
effect. No trimming is required. The 
favorite color in this style seems to be 
'lark brown, though blacks, navy, etc., 
are to be had. 

Just at present New York is 
practically entirely devoted to the small 
turban, which has developed from 
the Hindu turban of a year or so ago. 
This present-day fashionable turban is 
simply a silk or brocade-covered crown 
with a soft sash passing around the 
side, intertwined as a girl braids her 
hair, and usually of the same color and 
material as the shape. So popular is 
this type of turban this season that a 
foreigner might look upon it as the 
"uniform" head-dress of Americans. At 
the least, it is staple this season. The 
idea is developed in little rainy-day 
cloths, in delicate evening materials, in 
tailored satins, velvets or duvetyns, in 
the richly-embroidered and brocaded 
ribbons, and is even being made up in 
bright-colored crepes and organdies for 
summer. 

And in Conclusion 

On the whole, the outlook for spring 
is for medium and small shapes to pre- 
dominate. Crowns are of a fairly gener- 
ous size, and brims may turn up in Chin 
Chin shape, roll up in Spanish sailor 
style, turn slightly down in cloche de- 
sign, droop slightly with extension 
towards the front, which is a naive re- 
minder of the poke bonnet of the past 
two summers. Then there are the more 
or less severe shapes with brims turning 
abruptly off the face and sometimes 
shooting off into surprising heights and 
points; soft fabric brims turning up- 
ward, and the regulation severely flat 
brim of two to four inches in width. A 
good reception is promised for flower 
turbans and for flower and ribbon trim- 
mings. Medium and narrow ribbons are 
preferred and colored, as well as black 
cire ribbons are again featured. One 
style of hat which is considered espe- 
cially likeable is the one with the petal 
brim. This is not exactly a new idea, 
but is one which works out nicely in the 
available materials. The "petals" may 
form a scalloped outline for the brim 
or may be rolled back from the edge, 
giving a more realistic flower effect. In 
dainty summer silks, softly edged with 
straw, these are very attractive. 




A Spring Novelty 

The new "straw cloth" for 
1920 is featured in this 
smart sport hat. Gaily 
colored silks are used for 
the trimming. 



STRAWS COSTLY 

In the straw hat trade matters with 
regard to supplies are not exactly de- 
pressing, but still they might be more 
cheering. All braids are scarce, and 
especially those that fashion has de- 
creed shall be the favorites, e.g., lisere 
and Italian milan, as well as all the 
shiny straws. Practically none is com- 
ing from England; some are coming 
from Italy, but not freely. It is the 
best braids that are .scarcest, and the 
best braids that are most wanted. 
From China and Japan, one can get 
braids in fair quantities, but in the 
cheaper grades, and it almost looks as 
though these two countries were going 
to capture this, as well as a number of 
other fancy industries in which their 
production has become noticeable since 
the war for its quantity and cheapness. 
The reason is that living and labor 
there are so much lower than in Eng- 
land and Europe that it seems useless 
for these latter countries to try to 
compete, except as regards high quality 
products. Those who have their orders 
placed for Spring straw shapes are 
to be congratulated, according to some 
authorities in the trade. The danger 
is that manufacturers will be unable 
to fill their orders complete for the 
Spring trade. One large firm sent its 
travellers word the middle of Decem- 
ber that they had only two days' notice 
in which to finish their bookings, as 
the firm could accept no more. 

Increases in price, it is stated, are 
liable to be up to 40 or 50 per cent, 
in many cases. But this is due not only 
to the scarcity of braids and their con- 
sequent higher price, but also to Vn° 
increased cost of doing business, of 
getting factory help, of shellac, paper, 
twine, boxes, everything in fact that 



enters into the putting of the product 
before the public. From 25 to 35 per 
cent., says one dealer, is a conservative 
estimate of the increase in the price of 
straw millinery since what are known 
as normal times. As this does not be- 
gin to compare with the advances in 
other lines of women's wear, it is only 
to be expected that increases would 
come sooner or later. 



GIVES INSURANCE POLICIES 

Every employee of Canadian Cottons, 
Limited, at all the mills, to the number 
of about 3,000, has been presented with 
an insurance policy as a New Year's 
gift. The employees will be insured 
for amounts ranging from $500 to 
$1,500, according to the length of ser- 
vice under the group insurance plan. 
The action of the Board is taken as a 
mark of appreciation of the efficiency 
and loyalty of the employees. The adop- 
tion of the group insurance plan has 
been carried out in a number of organ- 
izations in Canada since permission 
was granted by the Insurance Depart- 
ment to write this form of insurance. 
It was only two months ago that Can- 
adian Cottons adopted another plan for 
strengthening the desire for co-opera- 
tion amongst the employees, namely, the 
granting of a bonus for increased pro- 
duction. 



A PROSPEROUS MERCHANT 

R. A. Briscoe, dry goods merchant at 
Gait, Ont., purchased this month the 
finest residence in his town. The price, 
it is understood, was $20,000, the high- 
est figure ever paid for a house in Gait. 



104 



Dry Goods Re vino 



Cellophane, Cire and Bright Colors for Spring 

Canadian Market Has Novelties, But Rangesof Requirements Impossible Deliveries Slow 
French Houses Making Chiefly For Home Trade Just Now — Another Month 
May See Brighter Outlook for Style. 



ONE hates to think of millinery 
designers being concerned with 
anything in any way mundane or 
OQtside the BCOpe of artistic aspirations, 
but the truth is that fashion creators in 
this industry are faced with a most 
lamentable Btate of affairs. No longer 
is their chief concern the evolving of a 
masterpiece in original design and from 
the daintiest and most luxurious of the 
materials on their shelves. Instead, they 
are lying awake nights wondering when 
they are going to get deliveries on, 
models and materials that they have 
been expecting since last November. It 
is not a case of conceiving a design and 
then executing it in whatever fabric 
fancy dictates, it is rather a case of 
figuring out what sort of chapeau may 
be evolved out of the materials on hand. 
"My trip to New York was most dis- 
appointing," said one wholesale buyer 
to DRY GOODS REVIEW. "The models 
were disappointing, and supplies were 
almost impossible to procure. Cello- 
phane will be used extensively but will 
be restricted by the deliveries. Things 
were never in such a difficult state for 
the millinery business as they are now. 
Prices simply must go up on the average 
about 25 per cent. If you have observed 
closely, millinery so far has not ad- 
vanced in the same proportion as other 
articles of women's apparel; although 
people in general have been buying high- 
er priced models. But this is just due 
to the fact that women are anxious to 
secure good quality in whatever they 
buy nowadays and when they can pay 
$100 and $150 for a suit they do not 
hesitate when asked $35 for a hat. The 
later must be in keeping with the suit." 

French Goods Almost Unobtainable 

Another buyer just returned from 
France found a similar condition of af- 
fairs. Ribbons. ornaments, braids all 
seemed to be trying to elude his search. 
The factories were already filled with 
Orders and could not promise deliveries 
for many months. The most satisfac- 
tory buying he could do was in the hand- 
made flowers and fancies; but here quan- 
tities were very limited. "Xovelties of 
all sorts," he stated, "are practically off 
the market. The French are making 
them for then hut when we have 

to wait a year to get them over here, 
they are no longer novelties." 

The greatest reason for this condi- 
tion of affairs seems to be the stupen- 
dous demand which is fairly over- 
whelming the French, Swiss and Ameri- 
can markets, already much impeded by 
labor troubles. Also, the outburst of 
gayety following the war has much to do 
for this demand being so prevalent 
throughout the entire dry goods trade. 



Regarding fashions, so far as they are 
known, no strikingly new shapes can 
be announced. Small off-the-face shapes 
are the most prevalent; and draped tur- 
bans are going to be smart also for 
early spring wear. One very attractive 
one is being shown made of gold cloth, 
the top of the crown of brown velvet. 
In the several folds of the gold cloth 
monkey fur had been inserted which 
stood up all around in sort of shaggy 
ridges. 

The draped turban covered with 
maline is seen also. Malines are going 
to continue to be used to a considerable 
extent, also cellophane, fancy straw 
braids, raffia, and a number of fabrics 
such as Batavia cloth, haircloth and raf- 
fia fabric. 

Shiny Novelty Trimmings Featured 

Cellophane in particular is being used 
in all sorts of ways. It is used in nar- 
row stripes, braided and covering the 
whole shape. It is made into flowers 
and ornaments. Another mode was 
seen in a dashing little model which 
had two-inch bands of black cellophane 
interlaced with black satin in a basket 
weave to form the upturned brim. Soft 
folded satin made the crown. 

Cire effects are going to be good, too, 
judging from the modes prevalent in 
Paris and New York. They seemed par- 
ticularly so to one Toronto buyer who 
made a wide selection of novel wing 
arrangements. 



In Paris one notices indications of a 
Chinese influence in millinery. These 
are very quaint and lend themselves 
well to spring fashions. Suzanne Tal- 
bot is even bringing out some models 
copied from Egyptian headdresses. 

Gaj Colors for the South 

For Southern wear Toronto shops are 
showing hats with slightly drooping 
brims in very gay colors, flames, geran- 
ium, French, Dutch and old blues. A 
marked feature is the amount of hand- 
work put on some numbers. Hats of 
satin, duvetyn, or linen are embroidered 
in wool or silk and very dainty are the 
designs. Crowns in the hand-made hats 
are chiefly of the soft crushed variety 
that have been seen during the season 
past. One smart blocked sailor of rose 
peanut straw had a two-inch band 
around the crown, and one folded over 
the edge, of fluffy white angora; two 
one-inch squares of pearl on the crown 
band were the only other trimming. The 
effect was both dainty and unusual. 
These strictly summer hats, however, are 
not for the present season for any but 
high-class shops in the larger cities. 
But similar styles to these worn at the 
Southern resorts are generally found to- 
be good during the summer season fol- 
lowing. 

Buyers from Paris are remarking on 
the continued vogue for veils of all 
sorts. Few of the smartest hats are 
seen without them. Some of the new- 




Spring Chapeaux 



Black maline is used in a novel way in the model at the left. It is overlaid with straw 
piping braid and trimmed with burnt tfoo.se. The chic model at the right has a crown 
of embroidered silk with straw braiding and a band of picot ribbon. Photos by cour- 
tesy of I). B. Fisk Co, Chicago. 



Dry Goods Review 



MILLINERY 



105 





> 



est designs are being brought over to 
Canada, but owing to their price ($20 
to $30 retail), it is not likely that any 
outside of the most exclusive trade will 
select them. 

They are largely of the draped va- 
riety, some three-cornered with a wide 
net border having thread-run motifs. 
Filet and Shetland meshes are used, too. 
Heal Chantilly laces are reported to be 
worn "over there"; but here only the 
wide borders are seen of Chantilly. 
Some of the veils have the pattern out- 
lined in thread of a contrasting shade. 
In this line, black and white promises 
to be best, probably because of its con- 
servatism. 

Millinery 

Some of the designs are most unusual, 
but although intrinsically beautiful, it is 
hard to imagine the average woman 
wearing one with a street costume. For 
instance, there is one embroidered in 
red and black giving a distinctly 
Chinese effect. Another has a large but- 
terfly worked with ribbon which rests 
on the crown of the hat. Another veil, 
embroidered in black, had two special 
portions to be cut off; one to be used 
for the crown of the hat, the other for 
the brim. The part that remained — a 
large square — is then draped over the 
chapeau. Why buy a new hat at all? 
Why not just buy a new veil? 



Fine Array of Silks For 
Spring 

Continued from page 79 

of Georgettes this season, chiffons are 
coming in for much more attention than 
In the past few seasons. These chiffons 
too, have been improved in design and 
coloring so that they may be used quite 
well in place of Georgette, and many of 
them have a crepe finish. "Paulette" 
chiffon is one line which is claimed to 
be durable, and offered in such colors as 



Right: Georgette crepe stitched with 
silk floss, narrow velvet streamers and 
silk flowers are not the only factors re- 
sponsible for the beauty of this hat. Its 
little turn-down brim makes it generally 
becoming. 

The brim at the left is of woven strands 
of black silk braid. The crown is jade 
silk, embroidered in gold and black. It's 
a nobby model but dignified, too. Photos 
by courtesy of Gage Brothers, Chicago. 



hortensia, soiree (blue), geranium pink, 
jonquille, marigold, Vcsuvia, blue Lor- 
raine (which is similar to Alice 'blue), 
Chateau Thierry (which is a tan border- 
ing on khaki). Another chiffon called 
"Pompadour" is characterized by hand- 
blocked designs, which utilize nine to ten 
colors, all well blended in medium and 
more delicate shades of the Spring color- 
ings. 

Satin stripe and printed patterns com- 
bined are also very attractive in both 
chiffons and Georgettes. In dark 
shades these make up prettily into Sum- 
mer afternoon and even street dresses. 

The first offerings have been put on 
the market of the U. S. Government 
cartridge silks, transformed into their 
new c >lormgs and pattern-, for clothing 
purposes. No bright colors arc used, but 
the blue, pink, brown, gray and dark 
green are all rich, and the fabrics have 
been dyed exceedingly well. Em- 
bossed and hand-embroidered decora- 
tions are shown in the finished article. 
The effect of the embossing on the 
natural color is said to be not unlike silk 
brocading upon heavy white silk. Some 
of the natural cloth was reserved and 
eyelet embroidery in border effect shown 
on it. For sport wear some skirts are 
made up showing extremely heavy hand- 
embroidery in elaborate designs in white 
yarn on these silks after they were dyed 
various hues. Some printed patterns 
are also offered for sports wear. 

On the whole there is a splendid range 
of fashionable silks offered, and provided 
one has the price he can get quite a nice 
selection. In purchasing these goods, 
however, 'the price" includes a good 
deal of "overhead" added to the manu- 
facturers' quotations, whether one buys 
in the New York market or from 
Canadian wholesalers. This will simply 
mean that for the most part Canada will 
forego the highest priced lines and select 
the plainer merchandise of good quality, 
as the recent tendencies have shown. 

While indications point to an improve- 
ment in prospects in the silk trade in- 
sofar as Switzerland and France are 




concerned, at present -serious delays in 
dehvenes of ooods are complained of by 
all importers. One wholesale house that 
expected dehvenes of silk goods, such 
as taffetas, paillettes, satins, etc., in 
December now does not expect to get 
them until April, the manufacturers of 
Switzerland stating that the delay in 
product.on had been due partly to a lack 
of raw material and partly to a shortage 
ot coal. England, of course, has far less 
coal than she required for her own in- 
jures, and, besides that, she supplies 
Italy and Switzerland to some extent 
Germany, from whom Switzerland at 
ord.nary times received a large quantity 
of coal, ,s far behind in its supplies to 
France according to the terms of the 
ireaiy. 

Ar.o.he. importer stated that he had 
just received word from Switzerland that 
the nulls would not accept confirmation 
unless they had both the raw material 
and the coal on hand. From this he 
comes to the conclusion that there is no 
such thing as confirmation of an order 
This, of course, also applies to the price 
because there is no guarantee of prices 
until the goods are actually shipped An- 
other report comes from Switzerland 
that in a few months it will be almost 
impossible to secure any satin-backed 
goods, as the backing, which is ordinarily 
very cheap, is so high now that it sell's 
at the price of No. 1 silk. This will in- 
clude silks such as grenadines, char- 
lneuse, etc. 

Some Canadian importers are blamin^ 
the trade in the States for bidding so 
high for Japanese silks and sav that 
they are almost out of reason. A crood 
many importers in Canada have given 
up the idea of buying any more silks at 
the present nrice, claiming that thev are 
too hi>h. This, of course, is purely a 
matter of opinion. One year aero some 
-importers and thousands of local mer- 
chants gave up buying certain lines as 
they were too high, and now they are 
much higher and they have gone into 
the market again, being forced to do it 
on account of the wiping: out of their 
own stocks on the shelves. 



loe 



MILLINER Y 



i > ri/ dt, (,<is n, . 








... 



LAMM,, 
GAGE 

XN anticipation of an increased demand during the year 1920. we 
materially increased our facilities for supplying our customers with 
GAGE merchandise, only to find that the demand had increased even 
faster than we could have anticipated. 

The prevailing conditions regarding merchandise, labor, hours of work and transportation 
are such as to warrant the belief that desirable styles will be difficult to secure, particularly as the 
season advaix e8. 

With a view of enabling our loyal patrons to secure a satisfac- 
tory showing of GAGE styles, we will — on January 5, 1920 — at our 
Chicago store, 18-22 S. Michigan Avenue, and at our New \ oris stoic. 
S. W. Cor. 5th Ave. and 37th St., display an unusually comprehensive 
line of Spring merchandise, including imported novelties, tiimmed 

and tailored hats. ~^W^ PRODUCERS 

^-^ OF CORRECT 

We urge that you take advantage of this opportunity to place millinery 

your orders early and to make your selections from an unbroken stock. Chicago New York Pans 







£3 



G73 



Dry Goods Review 



MILLINERY 



107 



..»»* 



We invite you to 
TAKE A LOOK 

into our 

Spring Styles 

of unusual 
distinction and value 




Wholesale Millinery 

Spring 1920 

Opening Monday, first March 
and following- days 

MODEL HATS 
MILLINERY NOVELTIES 

Early buyers will find us thorough ly 
prepared in all departments from 9th 
February. 

Inspection by the trade cordially 
invited. 

G. Goulding & Sons 

~55 a Wellington*St. W., Toronto ,h 

WINNIPEG OTTAWA HAMILTON 



^% 



108 



Dry Goods Review 

What Toys Will You Sell in 1920? 

A Brief Survey of the Field of Toy-Making — Embracing Domestic and Import Trade 



T!IK year L920 promises to be a 
bigger year than ever for toys 
and dolle of domestic production. 
Tin. I » i i_r wholesale houses sold Canadian 
toys and dolls during the year that has 
ju-t closed to an extent that has been 
tme of no previous year, and the year 
was remarkable for the big wholesale 
business done in the hist two months of 
the year. 

There wire in 1919 many improve- 
ment.-! over the early war years. The 
dolls for instance, have lost sonic of that 
amateurish appearance which often add- 
ed greatly to the amount of salesman- 
ship required to dispose of them over 
the retail counter. The now lines are 
very graceful, and the faces are pattern- 
ed after Canadian ideas. The unbreak- 
able dolls are finding greatest favor, 
The old-style wax dolls are almost oft 
the market, these productions being 
chiefly those of Austria and Germany. 
Educational toys continue quite popular. 

It is not to be understood from this 
that, the bulk of the toys solid in the 
stores are made right here in Canada. 
Far from it; the toy industry in fact, 
in this country, is only in its infancy, 
hut it is solidly established now and is 
bound, to prow to big proportions with 
substantial advances each year. 

Canada buys toys from Great Britain, 
France, Japan, and the United States. 
No German toys have as yet appeared, 
or if they have they have been effectu- 
ally camouflaged. There is no indication 
that there will be any German toys 
brought into Canada this year, either. 
The sentiment against them is unani- 
mous — wholesalers and customers in- 
cluding the ultimate consumers, the kid- 
die-; themselves. 

One buyer for a bier department store 
in Toronto, when asked by a newspaper 
reporter whether there were any German 
toys in stock in tbat store, remarked em- 
phatically: "Not a one and there never 
will be as far as I am concerned. It is 
against the policy of our firm, and he- 
sides, I never bought such an excellent 
collection of toys in my life." 

II" referred especially to toys bought 
; n Scotland. These he said, were prin- 
cipally stuffed animals, and he consider- 
ed that they excelled all other available 
toys of that nature, being not only per- 
fect in shape and design, hut most dur- 
alble. The ponies will bear the weight 
of a man. Other remarknbV toys from 
Scotland, which were turned out at the 
Clyde, and have a special appeal to the 
small hoys, are sailing yachts, which are 
most complete, and are made on model 
measurem 

\n interesting fact about the English 
toy industry is that while before the war 
England onlv enioved an outmit of some 
25 per cent of h< r own consumption, they 
am now turning out fully 85 per cent, 
and large quantities for export. Some 



of the English toys are the finest en the 

market, and they have taken the lead 

in a'l lead, Boldiers, which are greatly in 

demand. 

Then there are English horse sets and 
the quam est old doll houses which are 
replicas of the old English houses. 
Educational Toys 

A feature of the English toys as well 
as the American is that some thought 
has been given by the manufacturer to 
turn out constructive and educational 
toys, especially in the line of engineer- 
ing. This branch of the toy trade is. 
hound to show still further development 
in 19-J0. 

French Toys 

French toys are getting a stronger 
foothold than ever before in Canada. 
This will be still more noticeable in 1920. 
French peasant women, with the aid of 
the returned soldiers, gave a most unique 
contribution to the 1919 Christmas trade. 
There are all manner of French toys, 
includ'ng dressers, shoo flies, autos, and 
figures, which are exceptionally fine 
work. There are animal heads made of 
paper, which are used for parades and 
other festive occasions. The French also 
send to Canada ponies and saddles, pull 
toys artistically painted by the soldiers, 
handsome tea sets and dolls' sets, be- 
side different celluloid toys and games. 

The French excel in the finish of their 
dolls, and they will continue in strong 
demand in the Canadian trade. 
As to the U.S. 

When it comes to toys from the U. S.., 
it is a fact that even before the war 
Canada imported toys from that source 
to a far greater extent than was gener- 
ally thought even by retailers. Many of 
the latter, buying from, the big jobbing 
houses, were under the impression that 
they were buying German goods, when 
these goods were really made in the 
U.S. There were some disputes in the 
early years of the war with some deal- 
ers who adopted the "Missouri attitude." 
They had to he convinced that the goods 
were really made in the U.S. It was 
not that the wholesalers had misled the 
trade at all, hut what was the use of 
wasting time in going into an abstract 
question that didn't matter in the ante 
helium days? Everybody knows of the 
many- other unbounded beliefs largely 
held by a great proportion of people, from 
belief in ghosts to tihe efficacy of carry- 
ing a horse chestnut to cure rheumatism. 
However, the war stirred up this ques- 
tion of the source of the toys that came 
into Canada and as there really were 
large quantities of toys imported from 
Germany this supply has had to he other- 
wise met. The result was enormously 
increased tov manufacturing activity in 
the United States. One outcome of this 
has been a veritable revolution in toy 
making, so that even if the people on 
this side of the ocean would stand for 



German toys coming over, the German 

makers would find themselves woefultty 

outdistanced in the merit and originality 

d itself in the out - 

put of the toy manufacturers in the U.S. 
whose total output now far exceeds the 
combined total of German and U.S. made 
toys in the years before the war. 

TOY AIRPLANES 

The widespread interest in airplanes 
is reflected in the corresponding interest 
in "Toyland" in toy airships, and this 
is a line, dealers will find, that will sell 
readily every month of the year. Items 
of this class should, by all means, be 
included in stocks purchased for year- 
round trading by dealers who have not, 
heretofore, dealt in toys to any great 
extent, or who have, in the past, re- 
stricted their toy dealing largely to the 
Christmas season. Following is a 
suggestion for an item for a toy trade 
advertisement from a recent advertise- 
ment of the Murphy-Gamble store, Ot- 
tawa : 

Mechanical Airplanes. Large 
size. One of the most popular of 
the season's toys, and in reality 
"the newest thing under the sun." 
Will give hums of delight with its 
bird-like flight. Special Monday, 
75 cents. 

Of course, there are different forms, 
equally good, of devising to,y trade ad- 
vertisements. For instance, a good 
advertisement of these airships would 
be to devote, say, a double-column 
space, four inches deep, entirely to this 
item, including an illustration of it; 
but a composite advertisement, giving 
news about various toys, devoting a 
paragraph to each, is frequently ad- 
visable. 

VANCOUVER.— Miller & Coe, Ltd.„ 
in their holiday trade newspaper ad- 
vertisements, had a picture of Santa 
Claus, with a big hand pointing to the 
word DOLLS in display type, and this 
was followed by the following para- 
graph : 

Beautiful faces, natural curly hair 
and sleeping eyes with long lashe3, 
have these new dolls. Their bodies are 
of kid, jointed. They are light and 
pleasing; several sizes; $5.00 up. Truly 
the ideal gift doll. 

INDUSTRY IS BOOMING 

An indication of how the toy industry 
in Canada is booming, is the difficulty 
of some of the toy factories in getting 
enough help to be able to fill orders in 
stipulated time. One factory having 
large orders to execute before March 1, 
1920, has been advertising for fifty more 
hands, offering good wages to learn the 
business, with the assurance of steady 
employment for male or female opera- 
tives. 



Dry Goods Review 



109 



Increase Range of Fancy Wools 

Manufacturers Feel That the Keen Demand is Worthy of Their Encouragement — Stamped 
Goods Selling at Prices Far Above What was Anticipated a Few Years Ago — 
Vogue for Fancy Combs Growing Steadily and Surely — Notion Prices Firm. 



THE price of fancy wools continues 
to mount so precipitately that 
should the fact of his remarkable 
importance ever become impressed on 
the mind of the sheep, it would mean 
the end of the old expression: "Meek 
as a lamb." How could any lamb be 
meek if he knew the way industry was 
begging and bartering for his cast-off 
overcoat? Moreover, in this day of in- 
sisting on one's rights, does any one sup- 
pose that the same lowly sheep is get- 
ting his share of the net profits of wool ? 
He gets no more juicy grasses than he 
did before the war; and in some cases 
not nearly so much. Surely this is a 
case that should be investigated by those 
afflicted with the mania for investiga- 
tions; for it is perfectly plain to anyone 
who has ever driven a motor car 
through a sheep-raising district that 
this, the most vital branch of the pro- 
duction of wool, does not receive an ade- 
quate reward for its services in compari- 
son with the rise in the price of the 
finished article. 

However, it remains that someone, 
shearer, comber, spinner, shipper, who- 
ever it may be — seems to make it his 
business to add a liberal percentage to 
the price of wools every few months or 
so. For instance, in the finer qualities 
of wool for knitting sweaters, scarfs, 
etc., the increase for Spring is from 
30 to 40 per cent on all lines, one line 
of Bei-lin zephyr having advanced from 
$2.55 to $3.95. 

In medium grades, such as Shetland, 
the advance is not so remarkable, yet in 
no lines is there any sign of a falling off 
in the demand; and a few new colors are 
being put on the market owing to the 
maintenance of the vogue. Wholesalers 
are advising their customers to place 
their orders early. When the jobber 
has to wait ten months for deliveries it 
behooves the merchant to be forehanded. 
One prominent wholesaler stated to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW that he had 
already booked twice as many orders 
as were in this time a year ago, in spite 
of the fact that he had been forced to 
discontinue a number of lines in differ- 
ent departments because of their 
scarcity. 

High Grade Stamped Goods Selling 

In stamped goods, too, the inquiry is 
brisk, and people seem to be buying 
goods of better and still better quality 
all the time. "Take children's dresses," 
stated one dealer, "a few years ago 
$1.50 was the most that a merchant 
could ask for a little stamped dress. 
Now they can get rid of dozens at $3.45. 
Women's nightgowns, too, are being put 
on the market made of extra fine dur- 



able materials to retail as high as $7. 
Not so long ago $3 was the most that 
could be asked. They seem to be realiz- 
ing that it is a waste of time to put 
fine hand embroidery on materials that 
are not of high quality." 

The artificial silk used for embroid- 
ery and crochet work is getting very 
hard to obtain because of the difficul- 
ties among practically all United States 
manufacturers. Consequently, a decided 
increase in price is only to be expected. 
This amounts, in some cases, to 48 per 
cent., but in others 'tis no more than 20 
per cent. 

Fringes are still good for finishing 
centerpieces of the natural color linen, 
but manufacturers are not producing as 
many lines as formerly and prices have 
increased considerably, one three-inch 
variety gong up 100 per cent. Beads 
are still used extensively for trimmings 
as well as for home-made necklaces, 
and deliveries are fairly sure. 
Bluebird Revives 

Then there are numerous fancy pins 
of the gilt or enamel sort to be had, 
which always have a ready sale. The 
Blue Bird design is appearing again 
with some slight variations, possibly in 
honor of the visit of Maurice Maeter- 
linck to this side of the Atlantic and 
the opening in New York of the Blue 
Bluebird Revives 

Much concern is being felt in the celu- 
loid trade because of its scarcity. Sheet 
celluloid is difficult to obtain and the 
producers of combs and barrettes suffer 
in consequence. 

There is little call for the steel knit- 
ting needles for sox which had such a 
big run during the war; the burden of 



buying being more on the long wooden 
needles used for sweaters. 

Surprising Interest in Fancy Combs 

Fancy combs are growing in variety 
and popularity. One large retailer told 
DRY GOODS REVIEW he was forced 
to make an extra trip to New York 
in the middle of January, because he 
had sold out at Christmas time a stock 
of combs that he had expected to last 
through the Spring. 

Ivory buttons are strong and a few 
lines of fancies, but the demand for the 
latter is not assured. Pearls, of course, 
are a staple line, but their price will in 
some cases be a little higher. 

Cap hair nets are having a brisk 
sale and rather outdoing the fringe 
variety just now. 

Narrow Leather Belts Active 

Another article coming into promi- 
nence is the narrow leather belt. These 
are being shown on a number of early 
Spring suits, so that their counter trade 
is possibly due to that fact, coupled with 
their debut with the shawl scarf of last 
Fall. 

The outlook for all lines of notions 
for this year shows a fair range of 
goods, but "thinly spread," with prices 
firm. 



Training the Customers of Tomorrow 

The department stores of Omaha, 
Neb., have started a systematic cam- 
paign to educate the coming generation 
of women customers in the texture, 
value and quality of fabrics, by in- 
augurating dolls' sewing classy for lit- 
tio giris. 




For a Baby 
Princess 

"Simply adorable" is the 
only way to describe this 
infant's set, crocheted of 
palest blue artificial silk in 
filet with wide borders in 
pink flower design. Further 
touches of exquisiteness are 
added by white silk lining*, 
edgings of narrow Valen- 
ciennes, and countless ros- 
ettes of pink ribbon. Shown 
by Hambly & Wilson, Ltd. v 
Toronto. 



11-' 



FANCY GOODS NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods He view 



M w ITEMS FOR THE FANCY GOODS 
DEPARTMENT 

Attractive braided girdles, especially 
when they are finished with long, silk 
tassels, art' much favored just now. 
Some of them have the tassels fiat with 
rather elaborate ornaments at the top. 

A new idea which promises well is a 
one-piece pillow slip. These slips are 
woven closed on either side, making them 
likely to rip than when there are 
Beams. They have snap fasteners at- 
tached on a tape at the open and ready 
for use. The colors are guaranteed hy 
the makers. The slips can be retailed 
at about BO et'iits or $1 a piece. 

Toronto stores are showing stamped 
white cotton voile blouses to be embroid- 
ered in colored worsteds. They have also 
some white cotton crepe smock blouses 
stamped for the same purpose. The pat- 
terns are rather elaborate and the color- 
ings usually deep and highly contrast- 
ing. One of the smock blouses was 
shown worked in deep shades of purple, 
in quite heavy embroidery. A braided 
girdle of the worsted with tassels in a 
lighter shade was shown with the smock. 
Buyers find that these stamped garments 
sell better when there is very little mak- 
ing up to be done with them. For that 
reason the voile blouses are being taken 
faster than the smock blouses, since the 
design of the blouses is with kimono 
sleeves, while the smocks have to have 
slits made at the sides and worked 
around the edges. 

A display in the Bush Terminal Sales 
Building, in New York, during Decem- 
ber, which caused a great deal of in- 
terest among the public, as well as with 
toy buyers, was the Mar-Jean toy city. 
This toy city occupied a booth, about 
eight feet wide, and contained a per- 
fectly laid out city with street lights, 
street ears, parks, residential and busi- 
ness sections, all built in miniature and 
lighted as a "full grown" city. The 
street cars and automobiles operated, of 
course, and so did the lights in the build- 
ings and in the streets. 

A new type of lamp shade which is 
creating a good deal of interest is made 
of a kind of parchment. This is sten- 
cilled and hand touched with a kind of 
shellac which is transparent. The color 
effects brought out are quite interesting 
and the semi-transparent type of shade 
i- a better distributor of linrht than the 
heavy silk shades which have been so 
popular. The designs, of course, are a 
little more conventional than the 
"dressy" ~ilk shades. Perforated tin is 
beinfi used also for a new type of lamp 
shade with a good deal of success. 

Among the scores of interesting dis- 
plays for the fancv goods buyer which 
are he Bush Terminal Sales 

Building, m New York, are the cases 
showing a new style of rag articles. 
In the first place the ra< r s used for these 
articles are of very soft texture, such 
as flannelette and silks. In the next 
place the colorinsrs are kept delicate, in 
pastel tin!- for the mosl oart. The re- 
sult dainty little pillow and 
quilts for the baby carriage and then 



there are slipper ba^s, school bags, and 
all sorts of articles from which these 
materials are made. Some of the quilts 
and pillows are woven with borders and 
fancy patterns, or have a light-toned 
border stencilled. Pinks, blues, mauves 
and grey, combined with white or ivory, 
are characteristic coloring. 



.Merchants Make 
Suggestions For 

Wholesalers and 
.Manufacturers 

The iii. in, i of how manufacturers anil 
wholesalers send out invoices has been 
discussed in times passed in DRY (JOODS 
REVIEW, and some methods have been 
improved vastly since then. However, new 
weaknesses seem to crop up as new meth- 
ods are tried out. The latest suggestion 
comes from a merchant in St. Catharines. 
Ont., who has been much inconvenienced 
at limes by receiving his invoices in one 
of three ways: namely, a week or so later 
than the goods, attached to the parcel, or 
within the parcel Itself. 

The objections to the first method are 
easily seen. It is unpleasant, when one's 
stock has run low and a customer is 
standing at the counter asking for the 
goods to know that they are in the slock 
room waiting for an invoice before being 
brought out to be sold. The second method 
lolvei this difficulty to a certain extent, 
but in the case of many orders, after the 
goods have been handled by th» express 
company the invoice has been torn from 
the outside wrapping. In this event, the 
merchant must first wait a week in hopes 
that the invoice will come by mail: then 
he writes, and by the time a duplicate has 
been forwarded another week has almost 
elapsed. The third method is unsatisfac- 
tory because, unless the stock clerk is look- 
ing for an invoice, he is apt to unwrap 
the goods and discard the wrapping with- 
out noticing the invoice within. 

Should be Marked "Invoice Within" 
Other retailers interviewed on this sub- 
ject agree that trouble often occurs from 
one or another of the e causes. The most 
satisfactory manner in which to receive 
an invoice, according to the general opin- 
ion, seems to be to have it enclosed with 
the goods and the parcel marked plainly on 
the outside — "Invoice Within." If such a 
custom were to become habitual, stock 
clerks would look for the invoice immedi- 
ately upon undoing the goods, inconveni- 
ence would be avoided and the stock room 
kept clear of merchandise which should be 
on the counter. 

Like Terms to be Stated Definitely 
Another practice not very well liked by 
merchant I is that of marking invoices — 
"Terms as Before." This may be all right 
in the case of old customers, and even 
then, a merchant must sometimes refer 
back to former orders to discover just 
what the terms are, for it is possible now 
and again to confu e one account with an- 
other. But in the case of new customers, 
would it not facilitate matters were the 
terms stated in brief on all invoices? 

Present day conditions bring forth 
their own contingencies and one of these, 
that both manufacturer and merchant alike 
put up with, its the delay in deliveries. 

Marking Balance of Orders Helpful 
But the fact remains that a considerable 
amount of extra bookkeeping is entailed 
by having orden arrive in small dribbles. 
It is troublesome to keep track of the or- 
der, how much has been received and how 
much is yet to come. This, however, has 
been overcome by some wholesalers who 
append to every invoice a memo stating the 
amount of the order still standing and 
thus the merchant is enabled to see at a 
glance just where his order stands. This 
is another small matter which, if noted by 
dealers in general would tend to eliminate 
fricl ion M well as a good deal of waste 
time and expense. 



THE PAISLEY SHAWL 

Paisley, the seat of the thread trade, 
has other claims to celebrity. For man) 
yean there was manufactured in this 
town the garment famous as the "Har- 
ness plaid" or Paisley shawl, an excel- 
lent imitation of the more famous pro- 
duct of Kashmir. At one time a trade 
exceeding 11,000,000 annually was done 
in the article. 

Harness weaving in Paisley fell on evil 
days; but demand for the Paisley shawl 
is going up by leaps and bounds. One 
serious difficulty confronts manufactur- 
ers, and that is the scarcity of skilled 
labor. To meet this shortage a local 
scheme is being formulated whereby 
women will be trained specially for the 
work. Arrangements are in process of 
completion for the training of a given 
number of women at a time who will be 
paid a specified sum for maintenance 
during the period of instruction and who 
at the close of this period will be enabled 
to earn good wages. — The Drapers' Or- 
ganizer. 



"WORKINGMAN" WANTS TOYS OF 
REAL VALUE FOR HIS CHILDREN 

In spite of the fact that retailers in 
general found a call for the higher- 
grade toys mostly, same manufacturers 
complain that even the biggest merch- 
ants would not handle their best 
lines. The result was that previous to 
Christmas they received a large number 
of letters and money orders for their 
most expensive articles from parents 
who had become acquainted with the 
goods through advertising. 

These, of course, are toys of real 
educational value, costing up to $60 
apiece and designed not merely to amuse 
children, but to have an educational 
value as well. The remarkable thing 
about it is that the majority of these 
people are from what might be called 
the "overall class" — mechanics and so 
forth, to whom the toy, if such it can 
be called, means the sacrifice of a whole 
week's wages. This means that they 
must see in the article something dis- 
tinctly helpful in the training of the 
child. 



JAEGEB COMPANY'S UNIQUE 
DINNER 

Cold Watches to Staff Members of Over 
Twenty Years' Standing 
\ unique event in connection with the 
Jaeger Company took place just before 
Christmas in the form of two simul- 
taneous dinners to commemorate the 
first year of peace, the one held in Lon- 
don. England by the parent company, 
and Die other in Montrei I. head office of 
the Canadian branch. A feature of both 
■ rings was the presentation of gold 
watches to the members of the staffs who 
had been in the company's service for 
twenty years < r more, and it was signi- 
ficant that it required eighty-one of 
these watches to cover the number of 
"veteran" employees. Three in Canada 
were fortunate recipients of this hand- 






Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



111 



some gift: E. F. Edwardson, the Cana- 
dian manager, who lias been with the 
company for twenty-three years: P. A. 
S. Osborne, who is branch manager at 
Winnipeg, twenty-one years' service, and 
Miss Alice Lace, twenty-one years, now 
factory manager. In the last-mentioned 
case the gift was a gold bracelet watch. 
The appreciation of the souvenirs was 
enhanced by the fact that the presenta- 
tion was made by the son of the manag- 
ing director and chairman of the com- 
pany in England, H. R. Tomalin, who is 
attending McCill University. In addition 
to these special gifts each member of the 
staff received a special peace bonus. 
After the dinner the staff were the guests 
of the company at a performance at the 
Princess Theatre. 

During the evening two cables were re- 
ceived from England and the reading of 
these aroused much enthusiasm. One 
was from the London directors, and read 
as follows: "Board sends good wishes 
for a jolly evening and a happy Christ- 
mas, both well earned.'" The second one 
was a personal one from A. H. Patterson, 
who had been manager in Canada since 
the inauguration of the Canadian branch 
until the anoointment of Mr. Edwardson 
in 1916. His message read: "Personal 
greetings to all old staff friends." 

The whole evening marked a very 
pleasing milestone in the history of the 
Canadian branch. 



A NEW CANADIAN CORSET 

A new corset is being offered to the 
Canadian trade this month. It has been 
produced in Toronto for some years past 
and the makers feel that the time has 
come when it should be sold through 
merchants. Canadian patents have 
been taken out and the company incor- 
porated as the Uplift Corset Company, 
Limited, capitalized at $1,000,000. They 
have spent some $125,000 in the past 15 
years in perfecting the corset for uni- 
versal fitting, which is based upon the 
hip development of the individual. There 
are 13 basic models. The feature of the 
corset is its belt, which fastens easily 
across the abdomen before the corset is 
fastened up on the figure, and is de- 
signed not to slip up after it is once 
adjusted. These new lines will retail at 
somewhere about $9.50 to $15.00 a pair, 
according to the materials selected. 



J. R. Moodie & Sons, Hamilton, have 
acquired the glove factory property on 
Cross Street, Dundas, as an additional 
plant for their general lines, and are 
converting it into a modern knitting 
plant. 



BOOKLETS RECEIVED 

An attractive 8 x 11 book of 14 pages 
and cover is being mailed by the Inter- 
national Fur Exchange (Funsten Bros. 
& Co.), St. Louis, Miss., to the fur trade. 
It is printed in two colors on beaver 
tinted book paper with heavy grey cover, 
embossed and tied with grey silk cord 
and is well illustrated. It is designed to 
set forth the advantages of buying and 
selling furs in St. Louis. 



A DICTIONARY OF 
DRY GOODS TERMS 

IVORY 

(Continued from last month) 

A maker of one of the leading lines 
of ivory goods points out in a book- 
let sent to his customers that the pro- 
cess of manufacturing ivory requires 
the utmost cleanliness and care in 
mixing, etc. Cellulose in its purest 
state obtainable is used in the form 
of tissue paper made from pure cot- 
ton rags. It is made up uncalen- 
dered, about 12 lbs. to the ream, of 
24 in. x 36 in. sheets, free from dirt 
and sizing. 

Strong nitric and sulphuric acids, 
alcohol, camphor in the pure re- 
fined flowers are among the raw ma- 
terials required. 

All the water used in the chemical 
process is filtered, sometimes twice, 
in order to insure a uniform white 
color. 

BUTTONS 

Buttons are made chiefly of ivory 
(vegetable), celluloid and celluloid 
compositions, ivoroid, glass, pearl- 
galalith, bone, wood, etc. Those made 
of vegetable ivory are most expensive. 
The nuts are very hard and have to 
be sawed. They gro'w in the South. 

Pearline finish is & finish on glass 
buttons, given to resemble a pearl 
bead. Glass buttons are also m<\de in 
bright colors and hand-painted. 

Galalith is made of milk baked with 
a powder which renders it solid. It 
comes to the button makers in sheets 
about % of an inch thick. Many gala- 
lith buttons are fashioned by hand, 
which makes them very expensive. 

The Ivory Nuts are scarce. 

Celluloid buttons are dyed by hav- 
ing the dye sprayed on them. 

Shank — The part by which the but- 
ton is sewn to the material. Cloth 
buttons usually have a canvas shank. 
A shank button is one which is not 
sewn through holes in the top of it. 

Die is the pattern of the button. It 
it made of hard steel and forced into 
the material by machinery, cutting 
out the button the shape it is to be. 
This process is known as turning. 

Blank is the ivory before it is turn- 
ed. Ivory is first turned into white 
and then machine dyed. 

Sand blast is :i finish on ivory but- 
tons. It is smooth and dull. They 
have a high polish finish also. 

Ocean Pearl is the pure white and 
natural smoked pearl. It is made of 
pearl shells taken from the ocean. It 
is also called mother of pearl. The 
white pearl buttons are made from 
the light part of the shell and the 
smoked pearls are made from the 
darker part of the shell. About seven- 
eighths of the shell is dark, which 
accounts for the smoked pearls be- 
ing cheaper than the White pearl. 

Mississippi or Fresh Water Pearl 
is the pearl of the shells taken from 
the Mississippi. The pearl is very 
white and lacks some of the lustre of 
the ocean pearl. It is cheaper than 
oco-\n pearl. 

Japanese Pearl comes from Japan. 
It is also a salt water pearl. Cream- 
ish color with very faint pink and 
green tints noticeable in it. 

Brass and nickel are also used for 
buttons. Dull and shiny finish in 
both. Also oxydized finish which is 
almost a dark grey in the nickel. 

Brass satin finish both in white 
silver and matt gold. 

(To be continued) 



Pugh Specialty Co. Ltd. 

38-42 Clifford Street, Toronto, Canada 

Manufacturers and 
Manufacturers' Agents 

We own or control 5 Canadian Factories. 

Some of our lines are 

French Ivory, 

Pennants, Cushions and Textile 

Novelties, 
Post Cards and Booklets for all seasons 

and occasions, 
Ladies' and Men's Purses, Wallets, etc., 
Souvenir Novelties (biggest range in 

Canada). 
Our Catalogue is worth having. 
Our travellers cover Canada. 



The employees of the Dominion But- 
ton Co., Waterloo, Ont., received a plea- 
sant New Year surprise in the form of 
a cash bonus of from $1 to $150 based 
on an average of $10 for single em- 
ployees and $20 for married employees 
for each year of their employ with the 
company. 

Mr. Stephen Haas, president of Geors»- 
H. Hees & Co., Ltd., Toronto, has this 
month been elected vice-president of the 
Union Bank of Canada. Mr. Haas is 
also director of Columbia Mills, Inc.. 
New York Power Corporation, Canadian 
General Electric Co. and Park Union 
Foreign Banking Corporation. He has 
been director of the Union Bank of Can- 
ada since 1911. 



SPRING FASHIONS IN COTTONS 

Continued from page 74 
ings such as heather mixtures. This 
material may be had in a close firm or 
loose open weave. In the closer weaves 
the looped pile is short and tight so that 
in some cases almost a velours effect is 
obtained. These are rather high in price 
selling in the New York stores now at 
around $2.25 a yard. There are also 
some combinations of voile with ratine 
stripes which are very exclusive and 
sell around $8.50 yard. The plain weave, 
however, can be had at about $1 a yard 
Yellow, pinks and blues are shown a 
good deal in this material. 

Big Season for Ginghams Again 

A very big' season is again to be ac- 
corded ginghams. Plain colors, stripes 
and checks are features in these rather 
than the large and loud plaids of last 
season. More than the usual amount 
of yellow and orchid shades are observ- 
ed in the new offerings, but for the most 
part the colors are the lively ones which 
are characteristic of ginghams. One 
wholesaler remarked that he anticipated 
doing just double the business in Scotch 
ginghams that he did last year. 

Practically all the New York depart- 
ment stores were cay with their 1920 
cotton displays during the first week of 
January. According to reports received 
from New York, some of the stores must 
have looked almost like a formal Spring 
Opening. Lord & Tavlor, for instance, 
had in their cotton coods department dec- 
orations of parasols, palms, artificial 
flowers and canaries, which gave a de- 
cidedly Springlike ntmosphere. 



FANCY <;<)ODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 




DL 
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In l:/UU, the Hook &Eyt 









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2h 1920, tfte New Shape 
'"Forget® me © Jiof " 




Introducing To Canada 
Harmony Forget-me-not Snaps 

Here is the latest, greatest improvement sewing eyelets; smaller and neater on 

in Snap Fasteners. The Exclusive For- the garment. Lustrous rust-proof finish, 

get-me-not shape makes this snap easier dependable spring, carefully rolled 

to handle; the needle can't miss the easy- edges. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR SAMPLES AND PRICKS. 

Federal Snap Fastener Corporation 

25-29 West 31st Street New York City 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE : WILL P. WHITE, LIMITED 
489 St. Paul St. West, Montreal 65 Simcoe St.. Toronto 



"A boon to the busy 
sewer," writes one 
enthusiastic woman. 






Harmony Forget-me-not 
Snaps retail for 10 cents 
a card. 




Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



113 



fn: 

III 
III 
III 
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III 
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III 
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III 
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II 
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111 
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ill 
ill 
in 
hi 
in 
in 
in 
in 
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in 
in 
in 
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ui 
in 
ill 
in 
in 
in 

ui. 



BOOT LACE 
CABINETS 

Goodasilk 

Globe 

Nufashond 

(Fabric tipped) 

Vogue 



HEART 

Brand 

Dress Beltings 

Tapes 

Braids 

etc. 



BUTTONS 

Pearl, Glass, Celluloid, Horn, 

Composition, Agate, etc. 

— Special Pearl Button Cabinets — 

1920 (Freshwater) Velvet Lady (Ocean Pearl) 



3^anS3St. 



VEILS 

With Elastic 

Celia Glad 

(Plain mesh) 

Gismonda 

(Fancy figured) 




SNAP 



MENDING 
WOOL 

Cards and Skeins 
Black and Colors 



Special 
HAIR PIN BOXES 

Rhonda 
Rhoda 
Floral 
Celia Glad 



4/0 to 2. All sizes in stock 
White and Black 



HAIR NETS 

Real Human Hair 
Tidy Wear (Fringe) 
R-22, R-24, R-400 
Easifix -Cap 
Queen Charlotte 
Veilanet 
Yoda Lane 



SOME AGENTS For- 



BULL DOG 

Coat 

Chains 

Bachelor 

Buttons 

Plush 
Buttons 



Luke Turner & Co., 

J. Bonas & Son, 

Morris & Yeomans, 

Rosenwald Bros., 

Howard Wall, Ltd., 

Buttons, Ltd., 

F. Bapterosses & Cie, 

Star Pin Co., 

Narrow Fabric Co., 

Henry Myer Thread Mfg. Co., 

Federal Snap Fastener Corp'n., 

LoBars Detachable Button, Inc., 

W. Wendtland, Inc., 

New American Button Works, 

Winwal Button Co., 



Leicester, Eng., 
Derby, Eng., 
Redditch, Eng., 
London, Eng., 
London, Eng., 
Birmingham, Eng., 
Paris, France, 
Derby, Conn., 
Reading, Pa., 
Chicago, 
New York, 
New York, 
New York, 
New York, 
Rockford, 111., 



Elastic Webs and Braids. 

Tapes, etc. 

Needles and Crochet Hooks. 

Hairnets. 

Dean's Tape Measures. 

Metal and Covered Buttons. 

Agate Buttons. 

Pins and Hair Pins. 

Braids. 

Threads. 

Harmony Snap Fasteners. 

Bull Dog Bachelor Buttons and Coat Chains. 

Fancy Glass Buttons. 

Celluloid Buttons. 

Winwal Button Moulds. 



WHOLESALE and MANUFACTURERS ONLY SUPPLIED 



Will P. White, Limited 

TORONTO -65 Simcoe Street 
MONTREAL-489 St. Paul St. West 



:=5l 
— III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
Ul 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
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III 

III 

III 

III 

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in 
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114 



FANCY GOODS. NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 





Irish Linen Threads 



Manufactured by 

Island Spinning Co., Ltd. 

Lisburn, Ireland 
Here is an absolutely reliable thread for 

Wholesalers and Manufacturers 

of leather jroods and clothing. "Fountain Brand" linen thread costs no more than 
ordinary brands. Yet it is greatly superior to them in strength and durability. It is 
THE thread for the particular manufacturer who wants the best. 

1 2 -lb. and 1 -lb. Patent Wind Cops; 1, 2 and 4-oz. Spools. 
Colors — Black, White. White? Brown 

Sole Agents for Canada: 

WALTER WILLIAMS & CO. 



MONTREAL: 508 Read Building 



TORONTO: 20 Wellington St. W 



•u Hie SSSlMiZ ^iQZ^Ii£ruLYlliG?filffijR0n1^ liuiiu :(S. iQfit 




III 



THREE BEE WOOLS 




'BADE MARK 



WOOLS 

For Immediate Delivery 



When you are in the market 
for wools of any kind, ro'-i: 
to the big Wool House. You 
will find our range in all 
lines complete. 



HAMBLY & WILSON 



LIMITED 
II Wellington Street West 



Toronto — 



- 1 1 1 1 ii i \ in m 1 1 1 1 1 u 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 muuH iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.T 




Make More than'500% Profit 

By making buttons of the same materials 
you sell to your customers for dresses and 
suits, and in that way assure them of 
buttons that match perfectly. 
"Your store is not complete without a 
Menkin complete button making outfit, 
and interchangeable button dies." 
It helps the sale of dress materials and 
makes it possible for you to reduce the 
size of your finished button stock. No 
left-overs — or sale of buttons at the end 
of each season. 

IMPORTANT 

If you now use a button machine tell u^ its name 
and a list of what buttons you are now able to 
make. We will send vou sample button moulds 
and show vou how to make PERFECT BUTTONS 
the MENKIN way. 

"Service" That's Our Motto 

S. MENKIN, Inc. 

Creators, Promoters and Producers of Covered 
Button Supplies for over Sixty Years 

143 West 28th St., New York 



Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



115 



NERLICH&CO. 




For Spring and Summer 1920 

We are showing a splendid range of Sporting 
Goods, including Baseball, Tennis and Football 
Supplies, Croquet, Bathing Caps, Hammocks, 
Flags, Souvenirs, Wheel Goods, Summer Toys. 



ASK FOR 

PRICE LIST 

OF 

EASTER GOODS 



SPRING AND 

SUMMER 
CATALOGUE 

READY 

EARLY IN MARCH 



NERLICH & CO. 



146 Front St. West 

(OPPOSITE UNION STATION) 



Toronto 



lit. 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 




'KurleyKew 
Hair Wavers 

and 

Crimpers 

Easy to adjust 

Comfortable to wear 

Produce a quick attractive 
wave 

Made of Soft, Pliable 
washable cotton 

No metal to cut or injure 
the hair 

WAVERS 

-inch - 6 in Box 

$2.25 per Doz. $24.00 per gross 

CRIMPERS 

5-inch - 6 in Box 

$9.00 per gross Boxes 



Staple Smallwares for Spring 



Our stock is complete of the following lines : — 



Morralls Needles 
Crochet Hooks 
Darners 

Knitting Needles 
Derby Safety Pins 
Colonial do. 
Capsheaf do. 



Ric Rac Braids 

Stickerei Trimming 

Lingerie Tape 

Mending Cotton and Wool 

Hat Elastic 

Garter Web 

Hair Nets and Sport Veils 



We advise an early purchase as prices will be higher and deliveries more 
difficult to obtain in future. 



Wrinch-McLaren, Limited 



77 Wellington St. West 



TORONTO, Ontario 



Dry Goods Review, 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



117 



Morimura Bros. 

53-57 West 23rd St. 

New York 

IMPORTERS 

of 

JAPANESE MDSE. 

For Delivery 1920 

Toilet Brushes 

Tooth, Nail, Hair, Hat, 
Cloth, Shaving 

Sole Agents for U.S.A. and Canada 

Sakabe & Co., Inc., 
Osaka, Japan 



Pearl Buttons 

Staple and fancy designs in 
assorted cabinets. 

Sole Agents for U.S.A. and Canada]] 

Nagai & Co., Kobe, Japan 



China Toy Tea Sets, 

Bisque Dolls, 

Celluloid Dolls, Toys, 

Xmas Tree Ornaments, 

Baskets, Lacquer Ware 

On Import Only 



Li 



111 




T 

The old ''stand-by" in family sewing 



"W&N," Monarch 
and Meteor Brands 

for binding, pip- 
ing, fancy work 
and trimming, in 
white, black and 
colors. 

Reliable fabrics, 
cut on true bias, 
selvages trim- 
med, seams 
opened and 
pressed. 

Easy to sell 
because they 
are easy to 
use. 



Made in U.S.A. 
Since 1898 




Look for the 
trade mark 
and portrait 
of Wm. E. 
Wright o n 
every pack- 
age. 



WRIGHTS E-Z- T RI M 

The newest labor-saver 




All ready to 
sew on middy 
blouses and 
sailor suits. 
Two yards in a 
piece — enough 
for collar, cuffs 
and yoke. 

, Pretty, 
handy and 
economical. 

Keep your 
stocks up 
on the old 
and the new 
popular 
labor - sav- 



Wm. E. Wright & Sons Co.,Mf rs . 

315-317 Church Street, NewYork 

Stocks carried at all Agencies 

CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

E. S. RANSOM Geo. F Anderson's Son 

2Z3 W. Jackson Boulevard 613 North Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA 

James F. McCarriar, 1011 Chestnut Street 



' WRIGHTS 
BIAS FOLD TAPE 

\ It turns itself 



In U.S. Pat. Off. 



US 



\\<Y GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOY 



/' y Qoodi I U view 



Introducing 




It's the WILSON "Cord 
and Slide" Garter — the first 
really comfortable hose sup- 
porter. 

In all America there's 
nothing like it. Never has 
there been a 
hose supporter 
so quickly suc- 
cessful. 

It allows 
child r e n to 
grow up straight, "like little 
soldiers." Gives complete 
freedom of movement. Does 
not jerk the stockings — 
does not tear. And it does 
keep stockings tidy. 



Heres big news, too! 

For over 18 years CMC style hose supporters 
have been the leaders on the market. 

No other hose supporter has won such a tre- 
mendous sale in Canada. Because no other hose 
supporter has been devised quite so good as 
the CMC. 

No part to make a round hole in the stocking. 
No loop to pinch the stocking. Just a plain, pro- 
tected clasp (highly-plated and non-rustable) 
that cannot possibly tear, wear or slip. 

During the war the demand for CMC Hose Sup- 
porters far outstripped our production. Materials 
and labor have been scarce. 

Now we are in a position to meet any demands. 
Figure your needs now — in Women's, Misses', Chil- 
dren's. Place your order at once for this satisfactory, 
guaranteed, profitable hose supporter — dired or 
through your jobber. 

C. H. Westwood 

Mfg. Co., Limited 

TORONTO 



A new hose supporter with 
features that win prompt 
welcome from every mother 



WILSON 



Over a million mothers 
have bought Wilson Hose 
Supporters already. 

We are now making it 
and distributing it to the 
Canadian 
trade. 



Hose Supporter 



In two styles 
— with shoul- 
der straps as 
shown here 
and "pin-to-waist" style. 
Order now — direct or 
through your jobber. 

Wilson's retail at 50c. 
Your profit 40 per cent. 




Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



119 



-KT>'«*«G- 



mm i^m, i in — """"—.'..... '^' 




New and Fascinating Way 

1 

to'do Beautiful Art Embroidery 



"Marvel" 
Hand Embroiderer 



At last the tedious, tiresome work 
of embroidering, stitch after stitch, 
slowly and carefully and evenly by 
hand has been eliminated with the 
greatest and most practical inven- 
tion since the sewing machine — the 
Marvel Hand Embroiderer. The 
finest pieces of embroidery work in 
the most elaborate designs can be 
finished with remarkable ease and. 
rapidity. 

THE COMFLETE "MARVEL" 

OUTFIT 

consists of the Marvel Embroiderer, a 
specially made Marvel hoop and a full 
assortment of Marvel needles. The 
Marvel Embroiderer is a small, com- 
pact contrivance, is but 8 inches high 
and weighs less than 5 ounces. It can 
be carried most conveniently in an 
embroidery bag and particularly prac- 
tical for use while travelling. 

Fully guaranteed; approved and en- 
dorsed by Good Housekeeping Insti- 
tute. Note the approval star. 



$7.50 

Complete 



Marvel Needlekraft Works 

309-311 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK CITY 

Write at once for an Agency for your town to 

J. H. WINTERS CO., LIMITED, 431 KING ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Quebec Agent: Sole Right for Canada 

L. E. AUGER, SOMMER BLDG., MONTREAL 



U! 



Si\ 




r Department of Household Engineering! 

i Good Housekeeping Institute J 

C 1 *"" Conducted bu ,99 *L& 






Dry Goods Review 



Canada to Capture British Trade 

Canadian Mills Not Accepting Export Business at Expense of Domestic Market. Says F. H. 
Yapp, Secretary of Woollen Manufacturers' Association Will be Able to Turn 
Out Finer Tweeds, Serges, and Worsteds Decline in Prices Not "\ el 

World Shortage and Decreased Production Responsible. 



THAT the Canadian market is not 
being depleted because Canadian 
manufacturers are accepting ex- 
port business, that the time is approach- 
ing when much of the finer grades of 

tweeds, serges, and, in time, worsteds, 
now imported from Great Britain, will 
be turned out by the Canadian mills, and 
that there is not yet in sight any decline 
in price? owing to the world shortage of 
wool and the decreased production 
noticeable in all countries — these are the 
statements and convictions of Frederick 
H. Yapp, secretary of the Canadian 
Woollen Manufacturers' Association, 
Hamilton. Mr. Tapp discussed at length 
and with perfect frankness the whole 
situation in woollens so far as the Can- 
adian producer was concerned, and he 
laid special emphasis on the statement 
that the domestic market in Canada was 
not suffering because of the export busi- 
ness done by the association. Accom- 
panying the increased earning powers of 
the people of Canada was a demand for 
the finer lines of tweeds, serges and wors- 
teds and silk and cashmere hosiery in 
both ladies' and gentlemen's wear. Can- 
adian mills producing these lines were 
not en<ra'.ring in any export business to 
the disadvantage of the Canadian mar- 
ket; it was those mil'.s turning: out the 
coarser srrades: mills whose capacity had 
been greatly increased during: the war 
to turn out underwear and socks for the 
men in arms, which were now making: 
•rood? for expert trade. goods which were 
not in demand to any great extent in 
Canada. Mr. Yanp made the emphatic 
statement that orders for hundreds of 
thousands of dozens of silk and cash- 
mere hosiery had been turned down 
though the price offered was better than 
that received in Canada, because the 
Canadian mills did not wish to deplete 
the domestic market. 

Will Capture British Trade 

One of the promising features of the 
Canadian production, according to Mr. 
Yanp, was the output of the finer grades 
of tweeds and serges for suitings and 
coatings for men's wear. Many of the 
Canadian mills, he said, were now being 
equipped with the necessary machinery 
to make these finer grades, and he be- 
loved the time was net far off when the 
British trade in this respect would be 
n i antured to a large extent. 

No Decline in Prices Yet 

Mr. Yapp could not see a decline in 
prices for a year at least. The world's 
supply of wool would not be made up for 
years to come, following the war and its 
tremendous demand on all wool'en mat- 
erials. Production, owing to decreased 



hours and lack of productive power, 
showed an alarming falling off in some 
quarters. In spite of the decrease in 

this respect wages increased and thus 

overhead expenses were added to mater- 
ially. 

"The export business is not being done 
at the expense of the domestic market," 
said Mr. Yapp very emphatically. "It 
has absolutely no effect whatever on the 
supphj of goods for the domestic mar- 

"In the first place there are two cle 
of mills in Canada, that is two classes of 
mills making goods for men's wear. One 
class of half a dozen mills is making 
tweeds, serges and worsteds equal to 
any made by the Britisn mills. The 
second class is making the old-fashioned 
Canadian untearable tweeds, friezes, 
mackinaws and blankets, etc. The mills 
that make this heavyweight stuff have a 
ii that lasts only from four to six 
months as they can make the necessary 
supply in that time. The untearable 
tweeds .ire not in very great demand 
at the present time because all the or- 
ders arc for the higher class goods. The 
mills that have been making these heavy- 
weight goods are the mills which are 
making eoods only for export orders, 
and the export business is of this class 
of goods. If they were not making these 
goods for export they would he closed 
down as they are not equipped for turn- 
ing out the finer lines for which there is 
such a demand in Canada. 

"The first class of mills mentioned 
have not taken any orders whatever for 
export but are working wholly on Do- 
minion orders. The statement has been 
made by some parties and in some news- 
papers that if these mills would not take 
export business they would be compet- 
ing for the Dominion market, and, in 
consequence there would be lower prices 
in their particular lines. This is not the 
case as the price of wool is fixed by the 
world demand and supply and the com- 
paratively small amount used in Canada 
would have no effect whatever upon the 
general price? 

Production Shows Decrease 

Mr. Yapp said there had been a mark- 
ed decrease in production since the sign- 
ing of the armistice in November of 
1918. He attributed this partly to the 
f.°.ct that the productive power of the 
individual had. in many cases, been tem- 
porarily lessened because of the tension 
during the four and a half years of the 
war. Families with two or three girls 
who had been engaged in war work and 
who had brothers or near relatives at 
the front, showed that their productive 



power had been weakened because of the 
strain under which they had lived dur- 
ing those years. But there were other 
, attributable to the general labor 
unrest and increased demands which had 
lessened production. 

"With regard to production," said Mr. 
Yapp, "during the last year since the 
sie-ning of the armistice all the mills 
hare reduced their hours of labor by an 
ge of ten per cent. They have in- 
creased their wages to such a degree 
that operatives are earning more money 
during the reduced hours of labor than 
they earned during the war with longer 
hours. This reduction of working hours 
means not only a corresponding reduc- 
tion in the output — which is thus costing 
ten per cent more — but means also an in- 
creased cost per yard in the overhead ex- 
penses. The reduction, however, is not 
limited to the proportionate reduction in 
the hours of labor but is actually, in 
some cases, twenty per cent, less instead 
of ten per cent., owing to a general lack 
of — well, I can think of no better word 
than "pep" on the part of the employees. 
Many firms have shown a reduction in 
twenty per cent, output though their 
working hours are only ten per cent, 
fewer. 

Canada the Cheapest Market 

"The increased demand on the Cana- 
dian mills has enormously increased 
owing to the fact that importations from 
Great Britain especially have been cut 
down by, probably from 50 to 75 per 
cent., and this reduction in importations 
is partly owing to the same causes oper- 
ating in Great Britain as those mention- 
ed as operating in Canada, and partly 
to the fact that a very much higher price 
can be obtained by British houses in 
other countries than can be obtained iu 
Canada. This, in itself, is pretty con- 
clusive evidence that Canada to-day is 
the cheapest market in the world for 
woollen goods." 

To verify this statement, Mr. Yapp 
said that shipments were being made to 
the United States to-day to firms will- 
ing to pay a forty per cent, duty on the 
.dian woollens. 

v\ orld Shortage Prevents Decline 

"As to the future," continued Mr. 
Yapp, "I cannot see any possible decline 
in the price for a year to come but I 
think that, owing to the fact that many 
of our mil's are increasing their capa- 
city and equipping them with machinery 
to make the finer lines of goods, the 
shortage will be relieved to some extent 
ever, though there is no decrease in price. 
The world shortage in wools cannot be 
made up for years to come. 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



121 



"The situation with regard to worsteds 
will not he relieved to the same extent 
as serges and tweeds, for the same rea- 
son that the machinery used in making 
worsted yarns — a large proportion of 
which has, hitherto, been imported — can- 
not be obtained for at least two years 
to come." Mr. Yapp here referred to 
the combs that are used in the making 
of worsteds. 

Have Turned Down Orders 

Mr. Yapp stated that the Canadian 
mills had at their disposal an enormous 



supply of the heavy grade stocks, due to 
the fact that their capacity to turn out 
these goods was greater than the de- 
mand, which was for finer grades. 

Im conclusion, and to emphasize the 
fact that the Canadian mills were not 
accepting export orders to the dis- 
advantage or depletion of the Canadian 
domestic market, Mr. Yapp said: "We 
have turned dcwn orders for hundreds 
of thousands of dozens of cashmere and 
silk hosiery for export, and at higher 
prices than have been paid in Canada." 



Fine Soft Wools for 



Sweaters, Scarfs, etc. 

Novelties for Summer Appearing — Pastel Shades in Rainbow Ef- 
fects Growing — Fancy Scarfs New — Tricollette Still in 

Fashion. 

AFTER one of the biggest knit 
goods seasons in years, manufac- 
turers are setting out hopefully 
in 1920 with every expectation of a 
continued demand. In spite of the 
scarcity of tops and the labor difficul- 
ties, they are in hopes of turning over 
an immense quantity of business and 
going a fair way to meet the super- 
normal inquiry. 

In sweaters, high grade trade seems to 
be asking chiefly for silk and fine wool 
knitted models in Tuxedo effects. These 
include the full Tuxedo collar extending 
right to the hem, and also the shorter 
Tuxedo, finishing above the waistline. 
Some people still cling to the fancier 
designs, but it is expected that the 
simpler cuts and stitches will win out in 
the end. For Palm Beach trade, the 
Canadian shops are showing some knit- 
ted wool sweaters in plain straight 
styles with large sailor colors of striped 
brushed wool and cuffs to match. 
Sports — angora is also being shown — a 
knitted fabric with a brushed finish. 
This comes in most attractive stripes 
and colorings, as well as the plain 
colors. Sets are shown consisting of a 
skirt, scarf and tarn to match; or a 
jacket of sports angora, with a matching 
band trimming a white skirt of baronet 
satin. Purple, paddy, and numerous 
blues and yellows are seen to good ef- 
fect in this material. 

Some of these jackets are in plain 
straight styles, possibly sleeveless; 
others are in a tie-on blouse effect. The 
skirt pockets and belts are often orna- 
mented with a fancy nosegay made of 
wool. 

Many Pastel Tints Combined 

New York is talking about rainbow ef- 
fects in sweaters, but the colors are not 
vivid. They are pastel shades blending 
delicately into each other. 

Scarfs are promised great popularity 
this coming season as well. In these, 
too, the collars are going to be softer, 
and stripes more subdued. Originality 
in design is being put into the weaves, in 




A IQ20 Sweater 

Stewart & Co., New ^oik, are showing this 
attractive new sweater of soft wool with 
long revers, ripple flare, flowing sleeves and 
narrow leather belt. Rows of plain knitting 
among rows of stocking stitch make smart 
rib trimming. The colors featured are 
grey, purple, peacock, black and buff and 
it retails at Stewart's at $11.95. 



which great variety is seen. Some are 
in raised square patterns; others in 
stripes. An invisible cross-bar design 
is exceedingly attractive and should 
•gain many admirers. These are in silk 
weaves. Little change is to be noticed 
irr the wool scarfs shown, as their day, 
except for steamer trips, will be prac- 
tically over for another season when the 
cold weather is gone. The large brushed 
wool variety, however, continue in 
favor, with pockets and narrow leather 
belt, and maybe a matching tarn. Some 
mid-Winter arrivals in soft brushed 
wool have narrow belts (one and a half 



inches) of the same material and color, 
secured in front with a metal buckle. 
Others have plain knitted belts attached 
at the back. 

Tricolette Still in Vogue 

Tricolette skirts in the more con- 
servative shades, such as navy, brown, 
and grey, are promised a good run. They 
are being made up in plain styles, but 
all impressions of sameness are dis- 
pelled by the wealth of design demon- 
strated in the knitting of the material 
itself. Plain weaves are used as well, 
since people have not yet tired of the 
supple softness of this fabric. Some of 
the Canadian makers of silk sweater 
coats have added tricolette to their 
output for this year. 

Handbags of tricolete will be on the 
market this year and their popularity 
is assured by the extent of the demand 
which could not be satisfied last season. 
In this day, when a variety of fancy 
handbags has almost become one of 
the necessities of a smart woman's 
wardrobe, one of tricolette with a cir- 
cular, leather-finished handle is far 
from being unacceptable. 



MRS. McMICHAEL LEAVES 
GOSSARD CO. 

Mrs. C. S. McMichael, who is known 
to corset buyers in Canada from coast 
to coast, has severed her connection with 
the Canadian H. W. Gossard Co. and 
also with the parent company in Chi- 
cago. Mrs. McMichael is spending some 
months in California and Honolulu and 
does not intend to take up active busi- 
ness life again until next Fall. Her 
many Canadian friends will join with 
DRY GOODS REVIEW in wishing her 
the best results possible from hei well- 
earned holiday. 



PARISIAN CORSET MFG. CO. EX- 
TENSION 

Four Storey Addition to Quebec Plant at 
Cost of $75,000 
The Parisian Corset Manufacturing 
Co., Ltd., of Quebec, are arranging for 
a four storey addition to their present 
building in order to provide them with 
the necessary increased space that they 
now require. The new addition will be 
70 x 40 feet and will include a basement. 
The offices will be situated in the new 
building and the entrance will be on St. 
Valier Street. Construction will begin 
in the Spring and the cost of the exten- 
sion will be about $75,000. 



The Arundel Street Mills, Chester Rd., 
Manchester, Eng., have amalgamated 
with E. H. Price & Co., Ltd., of London, 
Hadleigh and Catteris. The new firm 
is registered as E. H. Price & Holmes 
Smith, Ltd. In addition to making all 
classes of webbing the new firm will 
manufacture door mats, cocoa and other 
fibre matting, jute and cotton sacks, 
hearth-rugs, etc. They have also pur- 
chased and newly equipped the Lan- 
cashire Mills, Manchester, Eng. 



122 



K N I IT ED GOODS 



Dry Goods R< 




Buster Brown Stockings 
Lower the Clothing Bill 

IT ERE'S a real proposition for your customers! 
* -*■ Cold-weather stockings at a reasonable 
price. Closely-knitted from extra-long yarn, 

warm and durable sturdy stockings that will 

stand the strain of winter sports. 

Your customers will welcome Buster Brown 
Stockings. Welcome the saving they will effect 
in clothing bills. Welcome the mending they 
will save by their long wear. 

Buster Brown's Sister's Stockings are excellent for the 
girls. Knitted from fine mercerized lisle, in Black, Leather 
Shade, Tan, Pink, Blue and White. Shaped to fit and 
moderate in price. 

Order Buster Brown Stockings, and Buster Brown's 
Sister's Stockings from your wholesaler. 



THE GHIPMAN-HOLTON KNITTING CO. 

HAMILTON. - ONTARIO 



>WM 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



123 



1 



%, 




- . 



ti 







7r 









»'■* 



Yef 






The Home of 

"TIGER BRAND" 

Heavy Elastic Rib Underwear 

For Men and Boys 

Representatives are now out, featuring* our 
samples for Fall, 1920. 

It is a well-known fact that our several lines are 
the best value on the market and have been for 
many years. 

The Gait Knitting Company, Limited 



GALT 



Manufacturers of Underwear 
and Knitted Specialties 

Agents : 



ONTARIO 



ONTARIO— 

J. E. McClung, Toronto. 

QUEBEC— 

P. DeGruchy, Montreal. 

MARITIME PROVINCES- 

Fred S. White, 
St. Stephen, N.B. 



%-mm+IMHMH^^ 




TIGER BRAND 



WESTERN PROVTNCES- 

Hanley, MacKay Co., 
Winnipeg. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA— 

Hanley, MacKay Co., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



r_M 



K N I T T KD GOOD S 



Dry Goods Review 




Bentro-Knit Range for Nineteen-Twenty 



pni; Fall and Winter, 1!>^>. our representatives 
are dow showing the complete range of 

Men's, Women's and Children's 

SWEATER COATS 

MUFFLERS, MUFFLER SETS, 

TOQUES, CAPS, 

MITTS and GLOVES 

We believe you will find the inspection 
of this line a matter of much interest. 




For Spring Delivery 

Boys' and Girls' 

JERSEYS 

in a complete range of styles 
and colorings, also 
Men's and Women's, 
Boys' and Girls' 

BATHING SUITS 



The Williams -Trow Knitting Company 



Limited 



Stratford 



Canada 



J. M. ROBERTSON &, CO., 
Toronto. 



J. B. TROW & Co., 
Montreal. 



O'BRIEN, ALLEN <St CO. 
Winnipeg. 

A. J. SNELL, Vancouver. 



A. M. MOUAT &CO. 
Calgary. 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



125 





LIGHT-WEIGHT 
UNDERWEAR 



Offers Coolness With Comfort 

Your customers will like these light, form-fitting 
union and two-piece garments. 

Every point of strain is amply reinforced in order 
that the garments may give the utmost in satis- 
factory wear. 

Your jobber has them 

Atlantic Underwear Co., Limited 

MONCTON, N.B. 
E. H. WALSH & COMPANY MONTREAL, TORONTO 

Selling Agents for Quebec, Ontario and Western Provinces. 



Peerless Brings Repeat Orders 

OF course you want repeat orders. Peerless 
Underwear points one sure way of getting 
them. Lay in a stock of Peerless Underwear for 
the coming winter. Display it on the counter. 

Recommend Peerless to all your customers it 

will sell itself in future. 



Peerless Underwear 

Company, Limited 

CONTROLLED BY 

J. R. Moodie & Sons, 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONTARIO 



MOODIER 




128 



K N I T T K I » liOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




The New 

Ballantyne 

Range 






SHAW I.I.I Is. kMTTKD 
COATS, PULLOVERS, CAP 
AND MUFFLER SI-IS. 
MUFFLERS, TOQI KS, 
TAMS, CAMS. Mil rl 
GLOV ES, IIOSI KRY, 



Y 



ij(JR needs in Fancy Knitted Goods will 
this year be well served by the enlarged 
Ballantyne plant. Our floor space has 
been practical ly doubled, and the new machin- 
t ry installed enables us to produce fabrics of a type and 
quality new to the Canadian trade. But one of the biggest 
features about our new plant is that it enables us to concen- 
trate on quality, as we have done in the past. Despite the 
greatly increased demand for Ballantyne Knitted Goods, we 
are able to give the same careful attention to all details of 
manufacture, with the result that we can supply an increased 
number of customers with goods of the old standard quality. 



R. M. BALLAN 



STRATFORD 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



127 



Season of 

Nineteen- 

Twenty 



N'S AND BOYS' JER- 
r S, CHILDREN'S SUITS 
AND 




^%m 



Wttinf 






BALLANTYNE Knitted Goods for 1920 
ire now ready to be shown to the trade, and 
our representative will soon pay you a visit. 
You will find the range more complete than 
ever this year, new lines have been added, and the styles 
shown in the standard Ballantyne garments comprise the 
smartest fashions yet created by our designers. In the past, 
Ballantyne styles have done much to create popularity for 
knitted garments : this year we invite your judgment on their 
leadership when the Ballantyne man visits your store. Bal- 
lantyne style coupled with Ballantyne quality is a winning 
sales combination. 



E, LIMITED 



CANADA 




L28 



K \ ITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




We stand behind every garment! 



You, Mr. Retailer, appreci- 
ate being able to offer goods 
that you KNOW are guar- 
anteed by the manufacturer. 

We guarantee 

Beaver Underwear 

for 

Quality 

Size 

Workmanship 

Let this be your protection 
in your Underwear Sales. 



Beaver Underwear 

Fleece Lined- 
For Men and Boys 

Combinations and Two-piece 



Children's 
Ribbed Underwear 



Wholesale Trade Only 



BEAVER KNITTING MILLS, LIMITED 



ALTON 



ONTARIO 



Selling Agents 



Ontario and Western Canada 

R. R. DAVIS 

33 Melinda St. 
Toronto 




Quebec and Maritime Provinces 

WM. C. FORSTER 

43 St. Sacrament St. 
Montreal 



DRY GOODS KEV1E W 



129 



Monarch-Knit 



THE MONARCH KNITTING COMPANY .LIMITED 




SWEATERS-HOSIERY -YflRAIS 





THE Monarch-Knit trade-mark 
stands for quality, first and fore- 
most. Our deliberate policy from 
the inception of the company has been 
to make our trade-mark stand as the 
recognized symbol of reliability in 
knit-wear. We put into every Monarch- 
Knit article a quality of material and 
workmanship that results in the entire 
satisfaction of the ultimate buyer in 
the confidence that, by so doing, we 
could build up a list of loyal custom- 
ers throughout every part of Canada. 
Results have amply justified this con- 
sistent policy. On the following pages 
we submit for your examination a few 
lines from our extensive range of 
stylish novelties which will be leading 
sellers during the Spring and Fall. 
Samples are now in the hands of our 
travellers, and we solicit your ex- 
amination of the full range when a 



TME MONrtRXM KNITTING CO. LIMITED 

DUNNVILLE 
St.CATHARINES St.THOMAS buffalo, n.y. 




130 



>RY GOODS REV] E W 







^ 




;.' 




4 








pILET styles will be all the 
rage for Spring and Summer 
wear. We are showing an ex- 
ceptionally extensive range of 
these popular styles, of which the 
four illustrated on this page are 
but a very small portion. You 
will need a good assortment to 
fill the Spring demand, and will, 
therefore, be well advised to place 
a liberal order when the Monarch- 
Knit traveller calls. 



Write for Filet Style 
Book for Spring. 








m 



3 = 



sfe 



DRY GOODS EEVI E W 



i:;i 




I> If V GOODS REV] R \V 




52 



3E 



Place Your Order Now for 



ART IN KNITTING MONARCH YARNS 



Hook No. 4 




Place your orders 
in advance lor 

MONARCH FLOSS 
MONARCH DOWN 
MONARCH DOVE 

Canada's leading 
balled yarns. 



Cover design shown on 
opposite page, ^g^- 

The great success of our 
Nos. 1 , 2 and 3 books proves 
that they filled a real need. 

This need is based on the 
fact that women everywhere 
in Canada are intensely inter- 
ested in hand-knitting. And 
they cordially welcome a 
book of instructions which 
illustrates the very newest 
styles and explains the pro- 
cess, stitch by stitch, in a way 
that all can quickly under- 
stand. 



Book number four now in preparation 
is being built on the usual 

Monarch-Knit Standard of 
Perfection 

Trade Price 17c each 
Retail at 25c 

The new book will be ready for de- 
livery in February. Place your order 
NOW for a liberal quantity, and be 
sure of your supply. 



This Book Increases Yarn Sales 

Experience proves that there's nothing so effective in stimulating yarn sales. 
Everywhere these books have been displayed the sales of MONARCH 
FLOSS, MONARCH DOWN and MONARCH DOVE have been 
greatly increased. And these yarns themselves are big trade-builders be- 
cause they have the smoothness, the quality and the beautiful shades that 
women require. 

Please Let Us Have Your Order Now! 



TME MONflRCM KNITTING CO. LIMITED 

DUNNVILLE 
St CATHARINES St.THOMAS BUFFALO. N.Y. 




i 




DRY G O D S R E V I E W 




i.; i 



MM GOODS REVIEW 




Monarch- Knit Hosiery for Men and Women 



\I/E are showing the most complete and up-to-date range of Silk Hosiery in 
Canada for Men and Women. These goods have several special features 
as above illustrated, which, combined with their good quality and beautiful finish' 
make them sure to please your most critical customers. 



II 

3t 



TME MONrtRCM KNITTING CO. LIMITED 

DUNNVILLE 
St.CATHARINES St.THOMAS buffalo, n.y. 



DRY GOODS REV TEW 



135 







— The outside fabric of 
this Monarch Knit 1 2 :> 
Coat is Closely woven 
with a smooth surface 
that wiU not "Rough 
up." It is double- 
seamed throughout 
and will give excep- 
tionally long wear. It 
is both showerproof 

and windprnn!'. 



Monarch-Knit Sweater Coats and 
Sweaters for Men and Boys 

The Monarch-Knit M 1-2-3 Coat is noted for 
comfort and long wear. It is made in all sizes 
for men and boys. Be sure to place a liberal 
order for this number when our traveller calls 
with samples of our Fall range. 

We also s/?on> above some of the sport styles from 
our Fall range. 




::i; 



DIM' GOODS REV] E \\ 



ilk • - 



^ 



Monarch-Knit 

|ru:i.ni-ij;»aj^i/i.^^-M;vM«rim.i 




SWEATER COATS 

For Women, Misses, Girls and Children 



Stylish Slipovers for Women, 

Misses, Girls and Children 

* * * 

Children's Suits and Rompers 

* * * 

Scarf Sets with Tarns or Caps 



* * * 



Individual Tarns, Caps and 
Scarves 



* * * 



Fancy Silk Senonta Scarves 

* * * 

Sweater Coats for Men and Boys 






Pullover Sport Sweaters for Men 

and Boys 

* * * 

Jerseys for Men and Boys 

* * * 

Bathing Suits 

# * * 

Toques and Motor Scarves 

* * * 

Skirts for Women and Children 




HOSIERY 

Thread Silk, Artificial Silk and Mercerized for Men and Women 



* * * 



HAND-KNITTING YARNS 




Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



137 



Circle-Bar Hosiery 

for 

Fall 1920 



MEN 




WOMEN 




CHILDREN 




(^)UR representatives are 
now on the way to see 
you with samples of Circle- 
Bar Hosiery for Fall 1920. 

Owing- to shorter working hours and 
the drought in Australia killing off 
a great many fine wool-bearing 
sheep, well-made, satisfaction-giving 
cashmere hosiery such as Circle-Bar 
may be scarce — therefore we sug- 
gest you estimate your requirements 
carefully, and be ready to order on 
conservative basis when our repre- 
sentatives call. 



The Circle -Bar Knitting 
Co., Limited 

Kincardine, Ontario 




PectCTcnco 

HOSIERY 






K N I TT I'. D < J - OODS 



Dry Goods Review 




Protected bj Canadian Letter! Patent N 131,529 

The Visor "4 in 1" Sweater 

(Four Sweaters in One) 

Note the four ways the collar can be worn. The most practical and 
best selling coat on the market. Made in manv weights in HALF- 
CARDIGAN, SHAKER, and JUMBO stitch. 

We make also this year the best SHAWL COLLARS on the market 
in all our lines. Also V-NECKS, PULL-OVER sweaters with stripes, 
and other lines of PULL-OVERS for Men and Ladies. Also Double 
Reversible CAPS, Ladies' CAPS and SCARFS, BRUSHED and UN- 
BRUSHED, Men's SCARFS, BRUSHED and L'N-BRUSHED. We 
have added several new attractive lines this year, both in Men's, 
Ladies', and Boys'. Some of them lightweight for Spring delivery. 
All with the superior VISOR finish. 

One of our representatives will call early in the season. Don't place 
your order until you have seen our complete line. We have added 
two more salesmen this year and now cover all of Canada. 

VISOR KNITTING COMPANY, LIMITED 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO 

Factories also at Niagara Falls, N. Y. 




Mothers are Good Customers 

If you can sell the mothers of your district and keep them sold, you win a big 
asset in your business. 
You can do so if you carry 

PRISCILLA BRAND 

infants' and children's woollies. Woollen caps, toques, jackets, leggings, stockings, 
infantees, mufflers, are important articles in the small child's outlit. 
Priscilla Brand woollen garments are made of the purest wool by expert workers, 
in both hand-made and machine-made lines. They are the standard of quality. 
Our traveller will call on you early in the New Year. 



HENRY DAVIS & CO., Limited 



259 Spadina Ave., Toronto 



WINDSOR PRINT WORKS 

86-88 WORTH STREET, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 

MANUFACTURERS OF PRINTED and DYED COTTON FABRICS 
FOR JOBBING AND CUTTING-UP TRADE 

PERCALES, FLANNELETTES, WASH FABRICS 

CANADIAN AGENTS: 
John Paterson, 309 Coristine Bldu., Montreal; Wilson & Paterson, 510 Empire Bldu., Toronto 



Dry Goods Review KNITTED GOODS 139 



Our Men are now on the Roaa 
with a full range of 

WOOLLEN GOODS 

FOR FALL 1920 

conmtmg of 

Men s ana Ladies Sweaters 

Men s and Ladies Hosiery 

Men's Gloves and Mitts 

Mackinaw Coats 

Underwear 

Also 

Working Shirts 
Overalls, etc. 



vvait and see our range before buying 
It will fiay you 



Denton, Mitchell k£ Duncan 

79-83 Wellington St. Wt.t 
Toronto, Ont. 



140 



K N I T T i: D GOODS 



Nature, Inc.— 

original silk manufacturer 



1 LINY, the well known old Roman 
writer, often referred to silk. When it was 
first introduced into Rome it was worth its 
weight in gold. Silk garments for men 
were then regarded as effeminate luxury. 

Times have changed since the days of An- 
cient Rome. To-day silk is decidedly 
more reasonable in price as well as finer 
in quality. 

But modern methods have brought with 
them modern imitations of real silk. 

We have no quarrel with imitation silk. 
It serves a very real usefulness. 

But still we are just old-fashioned enough 
to want every Monito Silk Stocking to be 
real silk — silk-worm silk. 

That they are is a comforting thought to 
the merchant who wants to say — "Here 
are stockings which are guaranteed to be 
of pure silk." 

Moorhead Knitting Co., Inc. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Monito sales service 
radiates from the following offices: 



NEW YORK 
200 Fifth Ave. 
(428 Fifth Ave. 
Bldg.) 

BIRMINGHAM 
12 Potter Bldg. 

BOSTON 

31 Bedford Street 

ST. LOUIS 

5 2 Wainwright 
Bid*. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 
260 IStn Ave. 

ATLANTA 

225 Peach Tree 
Arcade 



KANSAS CITY 
506 Ridge Bldg. 

DALLAS 

1019 Commerce St. 

PITTSBURGH 
3043 Jenkins Ar- 
cade 

READING 

1416 Perkiomen 
Ave. 

NEW ORLEANS 
314 Hennen Bldg. 

INDIANAPOLIS 
319 c c i d e ntal 
Bldg. 




Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



141 



t-A gggj O ritfo ;""* 1 *^ 7j&K f?*" an » r.} T3^if^^^\ n^j n"""* *^ ^^5^5^ fiQj""**'»^ > l Q^^2^5v^ ^S^im*"**"^ aiQ V' 1 "* . 

Your Customers Will Like 



^^■§^^||p^^f "^ 




THE PURE WOOL 

UNDERCLOTHING 

THAT WILL NOT SHRINK 



"CEETEE" is in a class by itself. 
Made on different machines and none 
like it made in Canada — guaranteed 
unshrinkable. 

"CEETEE" is the perfect product of 
over sixty years' specialization in 
the making of real, comfortable and 
fitting underclothing. 

By pushing all lines "Turnbull's" 
Underwear you increase your busi- 
ness and secure a pleased patronage. 

Each year we create business for you, 
with our broad, national advertising 
campaigns. 

Our travellers are now on the road 
with a complete range of samples. 

Don't place your order before seeing them. 



The C. Turnbull Co. of Gait 

Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO 

Established 1859 



These are our 
Trademarks 
CEETEE 



p ure vjoo v . 



LOOK FOR THE SHEEP 

The pure wool underclothing that 
will not shrink. 




Splendid quality plain knitted and 
special closed crotch. 




Ribbed underwear, very popular 

with boys and girls — very 

elastic. 



\rH£k\ \*X-»[ VS«sr* Y^wsr* \1S3«?4, \*"s«s?->l \*^£. \v^»,i \«£r^».7 Y«fHsH \^r^-. 



142 



Dry Goods Review 



Fashionable Accessories Seen in Paris 

Paris Correspondent of Dry Goods Review Writes Special Letter on the Latest Trimmings 
\nd Novelty Dress Accessories— Paris is to Appear in Pleats and Ruffles And 

Frills Next Summer. 



PARIS. December, 1919. — I will tell 
you this month about some sundry 
trimming that mere timidly shown 
early in the season, but that are get- 
ting so much in favor that I feel sure 
they will be the rage next Summer. 
Tht re are three various new trimmings: 

Leather 

As a rule, white kid will make some 
dainty collar bands. It will edge frills 
on children's garments. It will make 
waistcoats, and we have some whole 
blouses entirely made of that supple 
kid leather. In the latter case, it is not 
plain, but has some embroidery made of 
"points de crcix" of different colors, all 
very bright. Such blouses are the ki- 
mono of the season, quite plain, but 
draped under the arms. In many in- 
stances, we see the leather carved or 
beaded with jet or galalith beads. Ir- 
regularly stripped, it will give a new 
fringe effect. 

When our children have their coats 
trimmed with leather, their hats are 
matched. 

This fashion, just out, ought to grow 
into great favor, for I hear that the 
couturiers intend to use leather quite 
extensively in their Spring collection, 
even in connection with fur; for in- 
stance, a band of Hudson will be joined 
to the next by a band of leather. 

Needless to say that every shade will 
be used. As a matter of fact, you can 
now buy a whole skin just as you pur- 
chase a yard of cloth. 

Patent Leather Effects are Novel 

The same popularity applies to oil- 
cloth. This material will be used in the 
same manner as leather. 

In belts it has already won many suf- 
frages, for you can get everywhere 
belts of all sizes, either in plain oil- 
cloth or in silk, with oilcloth cut into 
flowers, leaves or all sorts of motifs that 
show up the silk underneath. As a rule, 
when choosing a like belt, the silk should 
be in the shade of the dress and the 
leather or oilcloth in black. An excep- 
tion can be made for tan or gray suede 
leather worn with silk of the same 
shade. 

• by real leather, we have the 
Ruban Cuir. This ribbon, which looks 
like leather, in reality is as supple as 
can be wished. It makes some exceed- 
ingly dainty belts, some bows on fur col- 
lars, etc. There is besides a similar sort 
of libbon, only it is striped with wide 
diagonal cords, am! it i< less supple. 

These arc seen in all shades. 

Another specimen of cire ribbon is 
more like oilcloth than the former. Its 
liicht weight and thinness will make it 
perfectly fit for Summer wear and its 










suppleness will allow its use in the frills 
and ruches that will be fashionable 
next season; for — mark my words — the 
coming year will see any amount of 
ribbons, pleats, frills, tucks, etc. 

If my prognostics are correct, there 
should be no more fringes, unless in 
ribbons, as roughly shown in specimens 
herewith, and there we have edgings 
rather than real fringes. 

One shows you ribbon edging a piece 
of silk. You see how it is worked in 
triangles made of bits of ribbon cut and 
folded to give that effect. They are 
sewn close to each other. 

I have seen a very dainty combination 
of silk Jersey thus trimmed. It looked 
neat and very nice, indeed. 

In nainsook, it will edge some collars 
or brassieres to perfection. 

The second is the remnant of fringes, 
made of bits of ribbon worked into 
loops. I daresay we shall see many of 
these loops next year, whether all of 
the same size or in different lengths. 

The third shows how to edge a band 
of silk with a ribbon. Shirred, as per 
this pattern, it will make some "chico- 
ree" ruffles to be used on children's or 
young ladies' dresses. This will prove 
a sufficient trimming, which will be 
quite effective. 

\ I said before, we shall have (at 
lea: t I think so) any amount of ruf- 
n the couturiers' Spring collection. 
I have, therefore, made a few speci- 
mens to show you how to work ribbon 
in this case: 



Dainty 

Trimming 

1. Corners of Jibbon 
edging silk. 2. Loops of 
ribbon form a new kind 
of fringe. 3. Silk nich- 
ing edged with ribbon. 
I. "Ruche" border for 
sleeves and necklines. 5. 
Double "ruche," more 
flufTy. 6. Especially for 
lingerie or wider for 
dresses. 7. Two rows of 
gathers are also effective. 
S. How to "run" the rib- 
bon in order to make the 
rosettes of No. 9 in 
either wide or narrow 
ribbon. 

Sent from Paris to DRY 
GOODS REVIEW. 



Four shows you the simplest way of 
making a "ruche." When nicely ruf- 
fled it looks rather nice, and makes 
delightful borders for frills, necklines, 
sleeve edges, etc. 

Five is similar, only it is double, and, 
therefore, more fluffy. 

S ; x, a plain "chicoree" sample, gather- 
ed in the middle, will be used in many 
instances on lingerie especially, and if 
made of wide ribbon, on dresses. 

The same applies to seven, which has 
tw'o rows of gathers. In wide ribbon or 
silk, it will give us what we call "bouil- 
lone." 

As to eight, which is nothing but a 
plain ribbon gathered diagonally from 
one side to the other, it will make some 
very r dainty crowns, whose use will be 
very diversified; in tiny ribbon, similar 
to roccocco, it will be seen on lingerie. 
Bigger, it will have a ready place on our 
"debutantes' " ball dresses. 

Such dresses, in mauve ninon, with a 
few such wreaths here and there in the 
skirt, and a lunch of Parma violets at 
the waist and in the hair, will look sweet 
indeed. 

These gatherings can be seen edging 
straight frills. As a matter of fact, 
there is a rage for them just now, and 
I have even seen some jewel boxes in- 
tended for Christmas presents, made of 
crystal, and entirely trimmed OUtalde 
with borders of ribbon thus frilled. 

Some New Ribbons 

Amongst other novelties in the rib- 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



143 



bon department, I might mention: Some 
plain "faille" ribbon with "picots edges." 

Others in striped panne velvet, in two 
shades, navy blue and red, for instance, 
one-half inch wide, or in various mixtures 
of shades, such as light blue and white on 
half the width, and dark blue and white 
on the other half, which make them 
look striped. 

Very broad ribbons to be used as 
sashes are either in lame or in taf- 
fetas, plain or chameleon. I have more 
confidence in the latter, for we have 
seen too much of lames for several 
seasons. 

I must also mention that I strongly 
believe in all sorts of pleatings. For 
Winter wear, although they had been 
devised, it was unlikely they would be 
really fashionable, as the materials were 
too thick for such a purpose, but the 
light voiles, muslins, etc., generally worn 
in Summer will be perfectly suitable for 
the full development of this fashion. 
Paris Will be Veiled 

Veils, always fashionable, will be 
the rage next Spring. They will be 
made of embroidered net and will hang 
down the back as far as the waistline, 
or, in other instances, they will just cover 
the tiny toqut- which we shall wear in 
light shades of silk. Many of these 
will also be made entirely of feathers, 
thus continuing the present fashion, ac- 
cording to which the head-dress for 
evening wear should consist of several 
partridges' or pheasants' feathers fixed 
in the hair. We have had also some 
flowers made of feathers, and some 
feather skirts. These I mention because 
they are original, for they are by no 
means the staple fashion. 

What is staple, though, in the feather 
department, is the fan made of one 
big ostrich feather fastened on an ivory 
or tortoise shell handle. Sometimes 
you have several feathers graded in 
size, and in some instances blended. In 
the latter case, the handles are 'in gala- 
lith in the shade of the feathers, which 
are uncurled. 

UMBRELLAS are still the thick, 
cane-looking implement we have had for 
several seasons. Most all handles are in 
ivory, inset with gold or mother of 
pearl motifs. The wrist handle is gener- 
ally a bracelet, also in ivory. 

BAGS are still beaded and the shape 
most in favor is the regular pouch. 

NECKLACES of large beads are not 
so fashionable, but the gold engraved 
and carved pendants that our jewellers 
have devised lately are real marvels, 
whether they be in plain gold or in gold 
and pearls or diamonds. 

KEEPSAKE BRACELETS are now 
in elephant hairs, with pearls, by rows 
of three. 

Nowadays, we do not wear any HAT- 
PINS, but we have some BROOCHES 
that cross the hat. They are real ar- 
rows of platinum with diamonds or (for 
cheaper articles) in silver and strass 
beads. Their length is from four to 
six inches and the tiny specimens are 
worn on the chest. 



Some fancy articles have been made, I will soon tell you about a collection 

such as colored beads, or fanciful ar- of silks I have just seen, 
rows, but the plain ones have easily With my heartiest wishes for a pros- 

won favor over the others. perous New Year, I remain, 

Your very truly, 




Longer Gloves on the Way 

It is Hoped That by the Time a Real Vogue Develops Better Supplies 
Will be Available— 1920 Outlook Sees Little Hope of Replen- 
ishment — Big Increase in Quotations Over a Year Ago. 



GLOVES have surely had their 
share in the big business that was 
done during the past season. A 
buyer of a large, ready-to-wear store in 
Toronto stated to DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW that the sale in gloves this past 
year exceeded that of the last five years 
together. So many varieties had a 
strong appeal that it would be hard to 
name any one line as the favorite. 

Kids were good, especially white, but 
silks seemed to be a little better. The 
trade in kids, however, was better than 
it had been any time during the last four 
years. Then there were the chamois- 
ettes, plain or duplex. Woollen gloves 
were good, also silk and wool and the 
two-toned fibre silk, wool lined, which is 
a clumsy looking glove but unequalled, 
its wearers declare ; foi motoring. 

"Women like the closed wrist, I find," 
said the buyer mentioned above, and per- 
haps that is why gauntlet and strap 
wiists have been popular and promise 
to continue so. Considerable variety is 
noted, especially in silk lines, in the 
treatment of the gauntlet cult's when pin 
tucks or lace insets are employed. 

In the States, it is said, in some places 
the sale ol long gloves exceeds that of 
short, and a prominent importer be- 
lieves that the Canadian trade will ex- 
perience similar conditions, probably by 
next Fall. The increase in the demand 
for long gloves, he thought, would come 
gradually during the Summer months. 

Some inquiry for three-quarter lengths 
is expected for Spring, but not enough 
to affect the sale of the shorter lengths, 
so that's "the long and short of it." 

Increases in prices for next season are 
certain. Quotations to the Canadian 
trade from France are around $50 and 
$60 for plain, short kids, and the rise in 
silk floss will help to boost prices still 
further. It is expected then that the 
steady demand for chamoisette will be 
quickened as the price of silks and kids 
advance. 

60 Per Cent. Higher in France 

Speaking to the "Daily Garment 
News." New York, William J. Harrigan, 
New York representative of Rey-Jouvin 
Freres, French glove makers, expressed 
feelings of distress over the 1920 out- 
look in the glove trade. Predicting stag- 
gering prices though unable to tell just 
what the advance would be, he said that 



some varieties of gloves are selling 60 
per cent, higher for this Spring wear 
than they did in the Spring of 1919. 

"The scarcity of kid gloves is one of 
the most important reasons for the in- 
crease in the price of gloves," he said. 
"During the war the animals in France 
(which make the best quality gloves), 
were killed for food. Breeding was 
neglected and naturally a lessened sup- 
ply was the result. 

"Then the silk floss with which the 
gloves are made has advanced enorm- 
ously as is generally known. Added to 
the strikes and labor troubles and the 
result is a chaotic situation. 

"There was a general strike of the 
tanners in France that lasted for weeks 
and was finally settled in October. Dur- 
ing the time of the strike many skins 
were neglected and ruined as the result. 
Then there are troubles in the glove fac- 
tories. Labor is short and all the factors 
combine to high prices." 

Regarding: the situation among the 
American manufacturers, labor troubles 
and the shortage of skins have placed 
American manufacturers in the same po- 
sition as the French. 

As an example of the increase in the 
price of mocha gloves, which are very 
popular, jrloves that sold for $36 a dozen, 
wholesale, last Spring, are now quoted 
at $50 a dozen. Cane skin gloves now 
selling for $39 wholesale are expected 
to advance to $42 within a short time. 
Twenty-ei<?ht button gloves now retail- 
ing at $5 25 a pair are predicted to ad- 
vance to $6 within a few weeks. French 
mousquetaires are quoted at $12 a pair. 



DRY GOODS TRADE LIKELY TO BE 
WELL REPRESENTED IN TO- 
RONTO BOARD OF TRADE 
FOR 1920 
Mr. C. Marriott, of G. Goulding & 
Sons, was elected Jan. 16, by acclama- 
tion, as president of the Toronto Board 
of Trade. Mr. B. B. Cronyn, of the W. 
R. Brock Co., Toronto, is nominated for 
the vice-presidency; and for the council, 
Mr. A. R. Auld, president of Nesbit & 
Auld; R. W. Eaton, director of the T. 
Eaton Co., and R. A. Stapells, president 
of the McElroy Mfg. Co., are among 
those nominated. The elections will 
take place January 26. 



Ml 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Qoods Review 







The newest 

spots and meshes 

being offered for Spring, 

1920. Featuring the Spanish spot 






The two centre 

designs are from E. & Z. 

Van Kaalte. New York. The 

others are shown by Herbert B. 

Lederer & Co., New York. 



Yardage Veilings Important for Spring 

Spanish Spots I'sed for Newest Designs — Fa ncy Meshes the Yo^ue — Black and Brown Lead- 
ing Colors, With Navy and Taupe in Third Place. 



THE matter of Spring veilings is 
interesting from two or three 
standpoints. The first one is that 
veilings by the yard are showing renew- 
ed activity. Even the high-class trade 
seems to regard the veil with an eye 
for utility though of course the made- 
up separate veils are still to be had in 
many artistic and original conceptions. 
Fancy Meshes Featured 
The next interesting feature about 
Spring veiling is the matter of design. 
The popular type of smart veil is almost 
invariably in novelty mesh. The thread 
is on the whole a little finer perhaps than 
it was a year ago, though still fairly 
coarse. As to trimming, all the big veil- 
ing houses are featuring the Spanish 



spot. The Spanish spot is characterized 
by threads woven back and forth into 
squares of different sizes. These squares 
are grouped to form patterns such as 
little crosses, double crosses and so on in 
geometric effects. Sometimes a thread 
slightly heavier than the regular mesh 
threads, connects these spots, so that 
jagged or more even squares are formed 
and sometimes circles and ovals. In the 
fancy meshes the openings are sometimes 
as large as three-quarters of an inch or 
an inch. The trench mesh, which was 
out last year is shown again with slight 
variations; this time there are none of 
the woven parts to it, the mesh being 
quite open and still without any spots 
in the pattern. 



A few of the Spanish mesh veilings 
have border effects, but these are fewer 
in number than the all-over patterns. 

More elaborate designing is shown on 
some of the novelty offerings; they hpve 
heavy scroll patterns on fine square and 
hexagon meshes, and dcubtless many 
smartly dressed women liking "some- 
thing different" will wear these in the 
Spring. In the matter of color, black 
takes the lead once more, but instead 
of navy, brown comes next to black, 
which is rather unusual in a Spring 
season. After brown come navy, taupe, 
and some purples. There is a new shade 
a lighter brown than is usually shown in 
foils. It is called castor, which has been 
shown in fabrics for the past few sea- 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



145 



sons. It is a dull shade of brown, but 
one which seems to meet with approval. 

The variety of sport or slip-on veils 
seems not to have decreased. These will 
be made up of the Spanish spot veilings 
and with the small chenille and woven 
dot effects, some in all-over patterns and 
some only partially ornamented. This 
style of veil has come to be a staple and 
does not allow of any more unusual 
features than are brought out in veilings 
on the whole. 

In the high-class separate veils the 
patterns are quite elaborate, large scroll 
designs are shown, and such unique 
motifs as pineapples, pine cones, and so 
on. Then there are the ribbon-run bor- 
ders and scroll and dot patterns; also 
two-color effects which those who like 
something exclusive and of a novelty 
nature seem to select. 

Prices Not Materially Changed 

Although veil makers have had their 
own difficulties with production this year 
as have other lines of textiles and lace, 
still there does not seem to be the big 
increase in prices in veils which charac- 
terizes certain other goods. Some of the 
houses report an advance of perhaps 10 
per cent, on prices of last Spring, but 
some of their numbers are higher than 
that, while others are lower. The new 
design veilings by the yard can be pur- 
chased in most of the stores at around 
75 cent* to $1 and $1.25 a yard, which is 
not so very different from what the pub- 
lic has been accustomed to pay 



Ecru Neckwear the Vogue 

A Little Row of "Tabs" Around One's Neckline Designates One as 
"Up-to-date"— In France They Call Them "Petals." 



NOTTINGHAM LACE 

A Nottingham lace manufacturer has 
the following letter in a recent issue of 
;he "Drapers' Record" of London: 

Sir, — It is very pleasant to read about 
:he boom in the lace trade, but the 
truth is, our industry is face to face 
with an unprecedented position. The 
lemand is there right enough, and even 
;he outrageous prices asked for yarn 
ind the advances in cost of labor, etc., 
nave not been able to extinguish the 
lemand. 

We are suffering from a veritable 
.*otton famine, due to the refusal of the 
spinners to carry out their contracts, 
whilst the bulk of their .yarn is being 
sold (via Holland) to Germany and 
ibroad generally. 

Our manufacturers can only obtain 
paltry doles at a profiteerinnr price, 
>qual to or above that which the for- 
eigner, glad to get cotton at any price, 
s willing to pay. 

i Appeals have been made to the Board 
>f Trade to intervene and secure a fair 
proportion of the production to keep 
iur important home industry, with its 
housands of workpeople, going, but our 
•leputation was met with the reply that 
10 intervention was possible, as "Eng- 
and must keep up her exports." It was 
j)ointed out that in the form of lace the 
kalue of that yai-n, if exported, would 
>e trebled. 

! No reply! Of course! That is what 
|ve pay Cabinet Ministers for!! 
Yours obediently, 

LACE. 




,.' ,..,. ; ,.., t i,i. i i n iijuiii i i i .i'ii . i " !■ ■ ■ ~t 



An Artistic 
Neckpiece 

The essence of daintiness is 
this diminutivp collar of 
ecru batiste, buttonholed 
and designed in the popular 
tab style. Shown by the 
Phoenix Novelry Co., To- 
ronto. 



IT is predicted that the big thing in 
neckwear for Spring will be "tab" col- 
lar's. These are simply a row of small 
tabs which fit well to the round-necked 
frocks and blouses, and are being de- 
veloped in such dainty materials as flat 
Venise and guipure laces; Georgettes and 
organdies. The tabs may be semi-circu- 
lar, square, pointed, edged with narrow 
Valenciennes or embroidered. These are 
what the French call "petal" collars, 
which is really a more dainty and pleas- 
ing term. 

Ecru tints are very good and seem to 
be winning their way into the favor of 
the trade. One attractive and good sell- 
ing number is of pale ecru organdie, 
delicately embroidered in royal blue. 
These tab effects are being sold in made- 
up collars and also by the yard, but it is 
noticed that finer qualities are found in 
the made-up lines. 

It is not thought, however, that the 
sale of flat collars in net and laces will 
be displaced by the line mentioned above. 
These are still seen to advantage in 
square, round and tuxedo styles made of 
embroidered net, Georgette, and all man- 
ner of real and machine-made laces. 
Some of these, too, are being shown .in 
the fine Indian hand-crochet lace which 
is such a favorite lace for doylies, centre- 
pieces, etc. 

Then there are the abbreviated gilets 
— "modesty fronts" which give a charm- 
ing touch of femininity to the severest 
of tailored gowns. They feature puffed 
net and more laces, but are sometimes 



of pique bound of stiched in colors. These 
gilets are still short as they have been 
worn during the first part of the Winter. 

A few Medici effects are noticed but 
they are appealing simply to the highest 
class trade. When asked "What of the 
fate of frillings?" a manufacturer re- 
plied: "Frillings will be worn as long 
as round necks are good on blouses and 
dresses, but their vogue this year will 
not likely be as pronounced as it was a 
year ago." 

The New York stores are all laying 
stress on the tab collars mentioned above 
and anticipate these as leaders for early 
Spring. Little is seen in white, practi- 
cally everything beinjr in ecru color. 



SPAIN'S CONTRIBUTIONS 

A characteristic Spanish production is 
the making of steel jewelry, inset with 
gold and silver work. The best work is 
done by hand at Granada, Toledo, and 
Eibar, and the wide range of jewelry 
and fancy articles made find a ready 
sale, not only among the Spanish, but 
also among the tourists visiting that 
country. 

The making of gold and silver mesh 
purses is also a distinctive Spanish in- 
dustry, being centred in the Balearic 
Islands. The separate links are individ- 
ually welded and the decorative hand- 
carving and sawing give them a very 
artistic and beautiful finish. One of the 
largest factories is at Palmo de Mal- 
lorca. 

The fan is in widespread use through- 



146 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Ooode R< vu u 



out Spain, and an important industry in 
Valencia exists for the production of 

ordinary and hand-painted fans. The 



best fans are artistically decorated with 
typical Spanish scenes. — The Weekly 
Bulletin. 




French Ribbons 



They're almost too gorgeous for the commonplace name of ribbon. Nevertheless 
they come in that category. The bluebirds at the left are very brilliant in blue 
and silver. The middle piece is of rich brown and green. The lower left is of 
dull sold and brown and the right is blue and silver. These are used for bodices. 
bags, trains, sashes, etc. Imported by Ribbons Ltd., Toronto. 




Fashionable Bags For Spring 

\ popular t\po of avenue bag is show n at the left. It is of patent leather with wide 
■tripe. This one has no interior fittings, but is gotten up for general purposes. 
In the centre is a new cantee;. vanity bag. It is of fine grained patent leather lined 
with gold color faille and fitted with mirror, purse, nickel puff box, lip sticr. and hair- 
pin hexes and handkerchief pocket. 

One of the new kodak bags is also illustrated; it is in kebu grain with figured sateen 
lining, and is fitted with oval mirror, purse and small nickel-covered shopping pad with 
pencil. It has three compartments, stamp pockets, etc. From Canadian Leather Pro- 
ducts. Ltd., Toronto. 



LEATHER GOODS 

There are some interesting new devel- 
opments to be had on the Canadian 
market in purses for Spring. Buyers 
will find if special interest for 

the Easter trade, although there is no 
doubt orders will be placed for earlier 
business, owing to the fact that there 
has been such a demand for all this class 
of goods for the Christmas season. 
Leather goods manufacturers state that 
they have never had so many requests 
to get last-minute goods as they have 
during the season just closed. The 
long stretch of extremely severe weather 
in the West .-lightly curtailed the buy- 
ing in that part, but everywhere else, 
where climatic conditions have not inter- 
fered, business has been phenomenal and 
merchants are pretty well sold out in 
every thing they had. 

A decidedly new note is seen in the 
fashionable purses for the new season. 
This new style bag is called the "kodak 
bag." It is a flat leather purse of very 
fine finish and oblong in shape, the 
handle being attached at one of the nar- 
row ends. The handles themselves are 
longer than have been the custom for 
some time and are suitable for slipping 
over the arm, as does a folding kodak 
case, for ease in carrying. The bag 
itself opens in envelope fashion and is 
neatly lined with silk or faille to match 
the outside and is fitted with mirror, 
eyebrow pencil, change purse, rouge 
box and other vanity accoutrements. 

While the popular trade likes heavy, 
rather conspicuous leathers, those who 
prefer quality goods will purchase the 
finest of pin seals and soft, velvet-fin- 
ished leathers in these purses. 

It may not be generally known that 
ostrich skin has been tanned and used 
for various purposes for which fine skins 
have been used. The price, of course, 
is exceedingly high, but this tanned 
ostrich skin has quite a decided individu- 
ality in its graining. Possibly the strong 
vogue for ostrich feathers and trim- 
mings of all kinds has been responsible 
for the leather manufacturers adopting 
this finish in their fine leathers. There- 
fore, we see almost the identical grain 
of the ostrich skin when it is pushed 
up into wrinkles in the new fash- 
ionable bag leathers. The grain is deep 
and uneven and of quite a smart appear- 
ance. This finish is to be had in beaver 
color, browns, blues and other shades 
desirable for carrying with Spring | 
suits. 

Speaking of new leathers, one manu- 
facturer mentioned to DRY GOODS RE-J 
VIEW that he was called upon recently 
by a traveller representing a firm' 
specializing in shark skin. Readers ofl 
DRY GOODS REVIEW will remember', 
about a year ago that this attempt toj 
tan and dress shark skin for the various . 
purposes for which hides have been used J 
was described at that time and now we| 
have the samples of the leather on the 
ma'ket. The fact, however, that it i 
exceedingly high in price forbids its "s 






Son 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



147 




Attractive 
Accessories 

1. A smart ribbon 
sash. 2. A novel bou- 
doir cap made of rib- 
bons with ribbon flow- 
ers. 3. Black satin 
ribbon is cut to fol- 
low the outline of the 
design in the fancy 
figured ribbon in this 
pretty bag. 4. A new 
interpretation of the 
Miser bag, made of 
plain and brocade' 
ribbons and drop trim- 
mings of the fancy 
ribbons. These are 
models shown by Pel- 
gram & Meyer, Inc., 
New York. 5. One of 
the new ostrich grain 
kodak bags in velvety 
grey shade. 6. A ko- 
dak bag with original 
lines, in black pin 
seal. Note the length- 
ened handle straps. 
Shown by Julian Sale 
Leather Goods Co., 
Toronto. 



almost entirely, although the quality of 
the leather is said to be very fine. It 
is more suitable, however, for suit 
cases and club bags and articles of that 
sort, where good, heavy qualities are re- 
quired. Some of the New York firms, 
however, are experimenting with the 
article and have placed on the market 
some initial samples. They give it the 
name of ocean leather. One number 
shown is almost square and has a flat 
side-strap and gold clasp. The lining is 
silk moire. 



LACES AND EM- 
BROIDERIES 

Prices higher and deliveries worse, is 
the verdict of lace dealers this month. 
A buyer just returned from the lace 
centers in Europe states that the de- 
mand for laces at the present time is 
much in excess of the supply to be had 
in the European houses. In his estima- 
tion, production in France is still only 
about 50 per cent, of normal and there 
can be no hope of lower prices until three 
things have been accomplished — a drop 
in the price of raw materials, some 
settlement of the labor troubles that 
exist in the lace-making industry as well 
as in other fields of trade and, conse- 
quently, increased production. 

Tn Canada, the demand is for laces of 
every variety, Valenciennes being about 
the most popular because of the great 
variety of its uses and its comparative 
cheapness. Guipures also, both in nar- 
row and wide, are going to have prom- 
inence. Metallic goods are still holding 
their own. The demand for silk nets is 
liable to fall off after Easter on account 
of their use being generally restricted to 
evening wear. At present, though, the 
demand is strong find sunnlies scarce. 

As for cotton nets, it is thought by 
some that they will be good in blouses 



and to some extent for dresses for sum- 
mer; but their vogue is always rather 
spasmodic. 

Most British lace makers are booked 
up for six months or more. Nottingham, 
it seems, would not mind being taken 
off the buyers' map. 

French goods are coming across slow- 
ly but surely to the dealers that have 
orders long standing. Prices are ex- 
ceedingly high and the depreciation of 
the franc which one would expect to 
result in our favor, i? counteracted by 
the fact that we have to buy our 
foreign drafts in New York where the 
exchange is against us. Moreover, most 
orders are accepted now only at the 
market price when shipped. 

Some dealers are anticipating an 
awakening of the demand for embroi- 
deries this Summer. Indications of it 
they say, are seen in New York and 
the Southern resorts. Moreover, the 
high price of silk underwear will mean 
more business in cotton lingerie which 
is bound to increase embroidery sales 
if the fine lines of embroideries reach 



UMBRELLAS 

Canadian Finn Sells to New York Re- 
tailer — Silk Tops Scarce 

"Our business has increased 50 per 
cent, in the last year," said one manu- 
facturer to DRY GOODS REVIEW, 
"and we did half as much business in 
cheaper goods and twice as much as 
usual on the high grade stuff." This 
means that although the output was 
little greater than the average, the turn- 
over was bigger. 

The nublic, it seems, is buying better 
umbrellas and also sunshades for the 
demand is increasing for colored tops. 
These parasols in different shades made 
of fine quality silk which mav be used 
either as umbrellas or sunshades are 



considered by many to be an economy 
although the price may be high. They 
sell now to the retailer at $20 where 
once they cost only $36 a dozen. 

From the retailers' point of view, how- 
ever, the $5 umbrella sells to-day just 
as readily as a %\ one did in "the good 
old days." 

The big difficulty to be met in respect 
to the colored varieties is the scarcity of 
silk. Mills report themselves filled up 
with orders for 1920 so that the manu- 
facturers' output will have to be res- 
tricted by the supplies he has already 
on hand. 

Bakelites, rings and cords are still the 
chief features of the handles, the new 
designs for Spring being not yet quite 
ready. 

An indication of the large demand in 
the United States and the difficulties of 
the manufacturers over there who up 
till now have been able to supply their 
own market, is seen in an inquiry by 
wire which came to a Toronto manufac- 
turer a month or so ago from one of 
the largest retail stores in New York. 



London, Eng., is featuring as the 
latest novelty in fans, one with some 
half dozen or more large ostrich plumes 
curling in all directions from a common 
centre. 

The Toronto shops are showing some 
very neat looking spats for women. They 
are made of heavy satin in black, nigger 
brown and buff colors, and when worn 
with a smart pump give the effect of a 
satin-top boot. 



The Dominion Corset Company has a 
bill before the Quebec Legislature pro- 
viding for an increase in capital from 
$1,000,000 to $2,500,000. The company 
declares that its assets now arc equal 
to the larger amount asked for as its 
authorized capital. 



148 



DRESS A.CCESS0RI1 - 



Dry Goods Review 



Best Value 

in Canada 




None Better 
Made Anywhere 





Avenue Bags, Top Handles, $13.50 to $96.00 Doz. 
Vanity Purses, Strap Back, $7.50 to $72.00jDoz. 



Manufactured by 

CANADIAN LEATHER (PRODUCTS 

LIMITED 
144 Front Street West, TORONTO 

Montreal Office: 230 McGill Street, C. E. Dcmers 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



149 



Best Value 

in Canada 




None Better 
Made Anywhere 



Kodak Bags, All Leathers, $27.00 to 54.00 Doz. 
Vanity Boxes, All Leathers, $60.00 to $84.00 Doz. 



Manufactured by 

CANADIAN LEATHER PRODUCTS 

LIMITED 

144 Front Street West, TORONTO 

Montreal Office: 230 McGill Street, C. E. Demers 



D R E S S ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 





The pictured dress is a skilful and 
colorful composition of indestructible 
crepe and 

"J. C." SATIN 
DE LUXE RIBBONS 

"J.C." are America's best ribbons and 
their originality and elegance of design 
add a delicate jewel-like glitter to gowns. 
"J.C." Ribbons are widely preferred by 
dress creators and ready-to-wear manu- 
facturers. There's one for every need- 
buy them by name. 

LADY FAIR 

A new double-faced satin ribbon. There is only one genuine Laiy Fair 
Kibbon--"J.C- LADY FAIR Be sure the name appears on every 
bolt you buy. 

SATIN DE LUXE 

Best Satin and Taffeta ribbon. 

VIOLET 

Ideal lingerie ribbon in pink., blue and white 

TROUSSEAU 

Rosebud and Polk.a Dot lingerie ribbon. 

SANKANAC 

Popularly priced Satin and Taffeta ribbon. 

DEMOCRACY 

A gros grain ribbon "For the people." 
(All registered trade mark names) 

JOHNSON, COWDIN & COMPANY, Inc. 

"Amrrica'i BcmI Ribbons" 

40 East 30th Street New York 

Kate Pullman, dancing star m 
"Roly Boly Eyes," wearing d 
trimmed with "J.C." Satin de I. 
Ribbon. 



Dry Goods Review DRESS ACCESSORIES 151 



8 

V 




The Smartest of Spring Neckwear 



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In PHOENIX NECKWEAR the dictates of 
Fashion are always anticipated and reflected in 
a way most beneficial to the Trade. You are 
not only FIRST with the LATEST, but have for 
your customers those "different" effects that are 
so very desirable, and so readily appreciated. 

The PHOENIX claim to distinction lies in ex- 
quisite designs of individuality and character, 
daintily carried out and faultlessly finished. 
Yet Phoenix Neckwear costs no more than 
ordinary Neckwear. 



LACE TUXEDOS 
SCALLOPED EDGES 

(For Rounding Necks) 

JABOTS 
GILETS 
SETTS 

and 

all popular Neckwear 
Lines 

PROMPT DELIVERIES 






<v 



TORONTO 

154 Pearl Street 




**&* 



8 

D 

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D 

: 

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8 

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jj C30t3Dt^r7^DOQODl^-ODeior^»OOOUnT^T^^ 






DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 



^<3G- 



-G_3- 



—££>£>£< 




)^<30- 



Silk Lingerie 

Our Spring range comprises 
many new and distinctive 
features in Camisoles, Com- 
binations, Bloomers, Gowns 
and Athletic Underwear. 

Something really new! 

Embroidered Satin and Silk 
Underskirts. 



Embroidered Voiles 

Dame Fashion says "Embroidered Voiles 
for Spring." You will find hundreds of 
patterns, in white and colored novelty 
effects, in our range. 



Novelties 

For Evening and Party Wear. 

In stock for immediate delivery. 

Many exclusive designs in Gold 
and Silver Embroidered Georg- 
ette Crepe Flouncings, Allovers 
and Bandings. 

Metallic Laces of all description. 




'The Canadian Made Line 

Manufactured by 

H. P. RITCHIE y CO 



38 CLIFFORD ST., 
TORONTO 



- c y 






Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 




/^\UR representatives are now on their respective 
^-^ Territories, showing an extensive range of 
exclusive Novelties for the Spring of 1920. 

See our line of Women's Embroidered Handkerchiefs to 
retail at three for a quarter. 

Manufactured by 

H. P. RITCHIE y CO. 

38 CLIFFORD ST., 
TORONTO 



154 



>RESS \ CC E ss or i E s 



Dry Goods Review 








W£l£tTU--**^L* 




Made in Canada 



Our Salesman will call on you shortly 

with a new and complete line, both single and duplex 
gloves, in a great variety of styles. 

Griffin Gloves 

Chamois Suede Duplex 
Chamois Suede and Silk 

Double the weight, wear and warmth, but wash as well as a 
single-ply glove. 

Delightfully smart and snug-fitting — in a large variety of all 
the wanted shades. 

GRIFFIN GLOVES will give complete satisfaction to your 
customers — and yourself. 



GRIFFIN GLOVES Limited 

TORONTO 

Sole Sel/ing Agent*: 

Richard L. Baker & Company 

84 Wellington St. West Toronto 









Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



155 




Society Sport Veils Fore- 
shadow Quick Profits 

On the counter— right beside your cash 
register is the place for a "Society" Sport 
Veil Cabinet. 

In the half-minute it takes you to make 
change— your lady customer will see, 
covet and buy one of the six fashionable 
veil motifs, colorfully illustrated outside 
— and ready-packed inside the cabinet. 

A Quick Sale- 25c for the Register— and 
a Good Margin of Profit 

Each half gross cabinet of ' SOCIETY" 
SPORT VEILS contains the six styles- 
elastic banded to eliminate knots and 
pins,— ready-to-take— packed in sanitary 
envelope?. 

"Society" Sport Veils are 
Nationally Advertised 

Your wholesaler can supply you. If he 
cannot, write us. Act now — this is the 
season for veils. 



HERBERT B. LEDERER CO. 

A CORPORATION 
Manufacturers and Importers 
91-93 Fifth Avenue New York City 



1 



156 



kfkr 



-RESS ACCESSORIES 






Dry Goods Review 




The "Popular "JAZZ" Fan 



Ostrich Feather Fans 



Certain it is that the Ostrich Feather 
Fan has become an accepted, taken-for- 
granted part of the smart evening toil- 
ette. The superb colorings in which 
they are shown, and the gorgeously 
graceful plumes have captivated the 
hearts of Fashio;.'3 Devotees everywhere. 

Whether it be to match Milady's gown, 
or to strike a note of brilliant contrast, 
we can supply you with the wanted 
shade. 

Illustrated is the "JAZZ" Fan, with three 
uncurled ostrich plumes held in the new 
stationary holder, with ring handle. 

Another immensely popular Fan is the 
"Prince of Wales," showing three curled 
plumes of dazzling splendor, arranged to 
resemble the Crest of "Our Prince." 

Many other irresistible styles. 
In any color. 



Dominion Ostrich Feather Co. 

Limited 

78 Wellington Street W. 

TORONTO 




Look lor thii 







Tr.dt Mark 



HANDKERCHIEFS 



Our salesmen will call on you shortly 
with a new range of fancy handker- 
chiefs for Christmas 1920. Also in- 
cluding staple lines for Men and Wo- 
men for immediate, and fancy effects 
for the Easter trade. 



EMBROIDERIES 



All indications point to an enormous 
demand for embroidery this season. 
We foresaw this and are showing, 
for early delivery, a large range cov- 
ering all styles from one inch inser- 
tions to 27-inch flouncings. 



LACES 



will be, if anything, more popular this 
Spring than they were last Fall. We 
have on hand large stocks of Vals., 
Torchons, Clunys, Filets — Also Cam- 
isole effects and metal laces. 



Give us a 

call when 

in the city 

on your Spring 

buying 

trip. 




IMPORTANT 

Mail Orders 

receive 

special 

attention 



I .w 



*« 



Westlake Brothers, Limited 

24 Wellington Street West, Toronto 






Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



157 



CABLE ADDRESS " DEMTCO 

WESTERN UNION UNIVERSAL COO* 



MANUFACTORIES 

LONDON England 

MARTOCK England 

WORCESTER England 
GRENOBLE France 

BRUSSELS Bfig.um 
NAPLES. Italy 





WAREHOUSES 
LONDON 

PARIS 
NEW YORK 
MELBOURNE Av»n-«Nt 
MONTREAL 



C4/MM. 

January 1st, 1920. 



TO OUR CUSTOMERS AND THE TRADE :- 

For your valued patronage during the past year and for your 
considerate appreciation of our efforts to serve you, we beg to tender 
our thanks. 

The difficulties attending the manufacture of fine gloves have 
considerably increased due to the world shortage of essential materials 
and the scarcity of necessary highly skilled labor. The immediate out- 
look is for shorter supplies with a rising market. 

It affords us much gratification that we were enabled to take 
particularly good care of customers who acted in accordance with our 
advice last season by placing orders early for Fall delivery. 

The conditions prompting our suggestion are now much 
accentuated, the demands made upon us for merchandise being the greatest 
in our history; while our resources (already the largest in the glove 
world) are being further developed by every possible means. 

Our travellers will submit for your inspection samples of Kid, 
Suede, Cape, Mocha, Buck and Chamois gloves, unlined, silk lined, lined 
lamb, fur, wool and seamless for immediate and Fall delivery, also 
woollen knitted and silk and fabric gloves. 

We respectfully direct your particular attention to goods 
stamped "DENT'S ENGLISH CUT" which we specially recommend on account of 
their intrinsic worth and super-wearing qualities. 

May we strongly impress upon you the imperative necessity of 
full and early placing to enable us to protect your interests and avoid 
later disappointments. 

Yours very truly, 




^x2^4 








DRESS ACCESSORIES 



I>ry Oooda R< vieu 



We Are Meeting 
Increased Demand 



Don't Delay 

Orders if you 

Expect Early 

Shipments 



ONLY by increasing our output of Silk 
Threads and Shoe Laces have we been 
able to meet the demand of the trade. 



w 



E are not only turning out larger quan- 
tities, but also new colors in our various 



lines. 



Independent Silk Limited 

350-360 St. Paul Street, East, Montreal 




GIRDLES 



The Latest 
Novelty 



You will find us first 
always with new 
effects in 

Girdles Fringes 

Braids Tassels 

Cords, etc. 



Our ranye of Furriers' Supplies also includes: 

Buttons, Crochet and 

Celluloid Chains, 
ami all fur novelties. 

Samples and prices on requesi 

Canadian Braid and Trimming 
Co., Limited 

39 Dowd St., MONTREAL 

Toronto Branch 96 King St. West 
L. B. Ellis, Representative 




MAPLE LEAF HOSIERY 

Pure Wool 

The Old Reliable Brand made up to a 

standard not down to a price. 

Wail for our Representative. 

The Goderich Knitting Co., Limited 

Goderich Ontario 




Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



159 




Our Travellers are Just Leaving 

on their first trip for the New Year, and it will be but a matter of a 
few days until you may have the pleasure of meeting one of the 
"Julian Sale" representatives, and the opportunity of seeing and mak- 
ing selections from the splendid range of samples carried. 

Our travellers have never started out with a 
better line — a most complete range of leath- 
er goods and novelties. Just such merchan- 
dise as you will be pleased to sort up with to 
meet the demand of the Spring trade. 

We invite you to give the "Julian Sale" line the consideration it merits 
and your esteemed orders will have prompt and careful attention. 

Wait for the "Julian Sale" man ! 

The JULIAN SALE LEATHER GOODSCO. Limited 



Wholesale — Factories — Sample Rooms and Offices: 



600 King Street West 



TORONTO 



160 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 



For Your Protection 



With the prevailing Ribbon Shortage, 
ever increasing demands— and sub- 
sequent higher prices— it is most 
essential that you protect yourself. 

We are now taking orders, for delivery 
at once— also for delivery in February, 
March, and April, at present prices. 

Our stock today consists chiefly of 
plain Swiss Merchandise, also French 
Fancies. , 

Velvet Ribbons and grosgrains will 
be used largely for Millinery purposes. 



SAMPLES 

GLADLY 

SUBMITTED 



Ribbons, Limited 



TORONTO 
100 Wellington St. West 



WINNIPEG 
McDermott and Arthur Sts. 



n 



Dry Goods Review 

I 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



161 



tiiiiiimii 



1 




?% 




ISM 



You can always depend upon 
Acme samples to reflect the new- 
est ideas well in advance of their 
introduction. And there is real 
satisfaction in knowing that all 
Acme merchandise you buy will 
measure up to your highest stand- 
ards. 



ACME GLOVE WORKS 



Limited 
MONTREAL 



==Our Complete Line 

FINE DRESS GLOVES 

KNIT GOODS 

WORKING GLOVES AND MITTS 

MACKINAW^CLOTHING 

SHEEP-LINED CLOTHING 

LARRIGANS MOCCASINS OVERALLS 

WORK SHIRTS 



nimiiiiii 



dn. 



m 



=rz2i 



r 



^ 



y 




162 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




p)@nDina§> 

French Novelty Veils 

and 

Veilings 

in all the newest shades. 



in all colors for 
millinery and drapes. 

Georgette Crepes 

(French or Japanese) 

In a wonderful assortment of 
colors, including Black an d Navy. 

Evening Dress Trimmings 

Silk Nets and Metal Cloths 

Write for an assortment. Mail orders 
promptly attended to. 



/ / / Wellington Street West 
Toronto 




BMMMSESSi 



Dry Goods Revievj 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



^^^^^^^S^^S^^^^^ ^^^^^SeSS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 1 ^ 



'W 



Introducing to the Trade 



The 



Uplift 



(Name Registered) 



Corset 



Decidedly different from any Corset ever placed on the Market. 



ENQUIRIES SOLICITED 

We desire to place the UPLIFT Corset 
in only exclusive stores — one in each town 
— with proper fitting facilities and rooms. 
Special instructions will be given to Re- 
presentatives, in the correct fitting of the 
Uplift Corset. 



Call at our Factory when in 
Toronto or write us at once. 



Uplift Corset Company, Limited 

14 Millstone Lane 
Toronto Canada 



H 



A 



^ -i-^ -x-Jiq-j La ^-j^j^ 



164 



EQ l I I' \l i: N T A \ D Ml SP I. A Y 



Dry OodiU Review 






.1 Suggestion For January Corset Display 































• 
















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»»ak 


P.*. 






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Large branches of oak leaves, palms, and just a few ribbon garlands arranged as above make simple but dignified and 
attractive diaplaj of corsets and brassieres. The single scenic panel in the background and the plush-covered benches are 
also in good taste. Any one of the three groups would also be effective for a small store window. 




A Spring Opening Window 



This window was shown las( \<-ar but will bear attention for a Spring opening this year. The simplicity in the arrange- 
ment as well as | he interesting background work unite to make a model show window for style study which is necea- 

HU] in advance of a new season. 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



165 




January Advertising 

Left: A splendid layout for a 
blouse sale. In fact the whole 
arrangement of ready-to-wear 
matter is highly commendable. 
Gordon Drysdale, Limited, Van- 
couver, B.C., who used this 3- 
column ad. last January, are 
noted for their artistic and 
very readable advertising. It 
will be noted that they use com- 
parative prices throughout this 
announcement. 



l 9 "l 5li«Wu£al40* ) $U«ei 



Plmjn \>|„ ur . ind S 



[H3 



ITS] 



For Co«U. C»pe». Septette Pieces 



Silk Rrnnajii Skl« 



HM2 



rsn 



knitlcd Wool Spencer* 



Right: This ad. from one of the 
leading Fifth Avenue depart- 
ment stores, New York, was 
also used to assist in the Jan- 
uary clearance in 1919. In the 
upper corners mention is made 
of Spring merchandise already 
to be seen, but seasonable 
goods are given primary' im- 
portance. Note the enhanced 
effect on the whole ad. of 
leaving the middle item un- 
boxed but surrounded by spe- 
cial "boxed" announcements. 



(.love* Haodkcrcttich 



G«D 



Infanta ' and Children '> 



Men's l ! ndenreax 



Lm«li CndrntannmU 



Men's. Wmi*r Hout* Rot*-. 



JVM U< 1 I I M-. N >.\ 1 t 



Women'-, and Miwc.' Apparel 



ff I ■ MI M I H IB ■ — *T ' — - — T~ ' T"*- 1 



It lank el Wrapper. 



Some New Features in Store Service 

How Ogilvy's, Montreal, are Using Vacated Toy Space — An Original Idea in Developing the 
Store's Shopping Service — -New Arrangement of Departments Throughout. 



AN indoor golf school is rather a 
novel form of "merchandise" for a 
dry goods store to offer, but this is 
a line that has just been presented to the 
public by Ogilvy's Department Store of 
Montreal. This indoor golf school is 
located on the third floor of the store, 
and in so far as room is concerned, it 
takes the place of the toy department, 
which, of course, occupied considerable 
space up to the first of this year. This 
space will be vacant for several months 
until summer lines of carriages and 
bicycles are located there, and the gen- 
eral manager of the store, J. A. C. 
Poole, conceived the idea of utilizing it 
in this manner, and he has' made an 
arrangement with Charles Murray, one 
of the best-known professional golf men 
of Montreal, and a Canadian champion 
for many years, to take charge of this 
school. As Mr. Poole explained to DRY 
GOODS REVIEW, this is one of many 
ways in which he was seeking to make 
this store popular; to have the people 



use the word "Ogilvy's" in describing 
something interesting that was happen- 
ing. 

Shower Baths and Tea for Golfers 

Hence it is that a couple of hundred 
men and perhaps a hundred women go 
there once or twice a week to get their 
lessons in indoor golf. There are three 
or four departments that are arranged 
for this, and stands for their clubs, and 
in about a week or so after this school 
opened, a shower-bath was put in for 
the men to use after a strenuous prac- 
tice. Adjoining the "school" there is a 
little arcade, where tables are set out 
and there the ladies, particularly, and 
the men, if so inclined, may order up 
ice cream and a cup of tea and cake, 
and so on, from the regular lunch room 
down below. Then, at the back of this, 
there is a room for the ladies to dress 
in preparation for a strenuous after- 
noon or morning's exercise. 

Just what actual returns come into 



the store from this will be difficult for 
anyone, the general manager included, 
to figure out. It is part of a general 
plan, however, of the store to make it- 
self an attractive place for the people 
who are likely to prove customers, or 
who are customers. It is planned to 
get it away from what might be called 
"cut and dried" business, side types of 
dry goods stores. Ogilvy's is not so 
much a store that depends upon tran- 
sient trade to a great extent, as one 
wanting to work up a good home trade 
more with the residents of the commun- 
ity to the west of it running through 
Montreal and Westmount and the out- 
lying districts. It i? trying to produce 
an "air" for people on entering it, that 
will make them think that they are 
welcome, and that it is a bright, cheer- 
ful place in which to do any business 
that they may desire. There is music 
from the gallery or mezzanine floor, as 
it is often called, which catches the ear 
of one on entering, and they usually 



L66 



EQ I tPME NT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Good>8 Revii u 



have bright, seasonable decorations, and 
perhaps, most of all, the various de- 
partments are located bo to make them 
most convenient for women, covering 
as great a number of needs as they 
could wish. 

\ \ t r> Special Shopping Service 

Before entering more on this point, 
it should be mentioned that a personal 
service department of the store has 
been organized, which goes beyond that 
of the great majority of stores, either 

in Canada or the United States. There 

are a number of stores, many of them 
mentioned before in DRY GOODS RE- 
VI KW, which accept orders by tele- 
phone and send a shopper through the 
store to fill these orders, allowing her 
to use her judgment in the matter very 
often of the goods themselves, shade, 
price, trimmings, etc. A number of the 
department stores have this fea- 
ture developed to an extent that is very 
valuable and accommodating to the 
customer, and, they trust, profitable to 
themselves in the long run. 

In the case of Ogilvy's, one step 
farther will be reached, and that is, a 
customer may be ill and desires to get 
certain dress goods, house furnishings, 
neckwear, or any other lines which they 
are unable to choose themselves, owing 
to their illness. They 'phone to the 
store and a shopper makes a special trip 
to their house, either with samples or 
without them, and gets the order and 
comes back and purchases it, and sends 



it out by regular delivery, or, in urgent 
cases, a special delivery service is pro- 
vided. 

It will be interesting to note to what 
extent the store is able to provide this 
service to a number of customers. A 
natural objection that the merchant 
who had not tried it would make, would 
be that the stoic could not possibly af- 
ford to cover, perhaps, BO <>v 100 cus- 
tomers in this way; that the expense 
would be too great and no profit that 
the customer would give on this order 
or dozens of others, perhaps, in the fu- 
ture, would warrant the store in going 
to this individual expense. The new de- 
parture is just now more the matter of 
a test or an experiment, and further 
particulars will be given in a few 
months to show how it is working out. 
Unusual Wants Cared For 

A third point is worthy of note in 
connection with this idea of making the 
store serviceable to the customer, and 
that is a department will be installed 
on the ground floor, where a customer, 
who cannot find a certain thing she 
wants in the store, will go and make 
her wants known, and the store will do 
its best to get such an article for her. 
This is a theory that is carried out in 
a great many stores, of course, but sep- 
arating a department, having a special 
place in the store where customers go 
to give orders for goods that they can- 
not get in the regular department of the 
store, would appear to be a new de- 
parture, whose experience also will be 



watched with keen Interest all over 
Canada. 

A number of changes have been made 
in the placing of tli i departments in the 
store in the last few months for the 
purpose of furthering the convenience 
of the shopper. The general principle 
of these changes lay in regrouping cer- 
tain sections that seem to fit in I" 
with one another than certain other 
sections that adjoined them before. The 
present arrangement of the first floor 
will bear this out. Running across the 
front of the store, in a very attractive 
layout with modern equipment, in the 
way of stands, show cases, cabinet?. 
etc., are the ready-to-wear department 
and the millinery department, side by 
side. The centre of the store runnintr 
right across from side to side is the 
lingerie, French and Philippine, and so 
on, and general underwear and white- 
wear section. Back of this, on the left- 
hand side, is the dress goods, including 
woollens, silks, and next to this in the 
other section is the infants' department 
and the toys that have been brought 
down from upstairs. Joining the in- 
fants' department and the toys is an 
idea that will commend itself to very 
many merchants, particularly those who 
have formed the belief in keeping a toy 
department that will be open a whole 
year. 

In next issue, further details will be 
given of the regrouping of departments 
in this store and others, with sketches 
showing locations. 



House Organs With Laugh on Page One 

Combination of the Lighter Side of the Store's Life With Articles That Will Help the Clerks 

— How Western and Eastern Stores Run These. 



TWO house organs, one from 
Montreal, and the other from 
Swift Current, Sask., reached the 
office of DRY GOODS REVIEW this 
month. The latter came from a store 
whose bright business methods have 
been referred to on several occasions 
in the past, the W. W. Cooper Co., of 
Swift Current. The former is from a 
store that is being developed with 
marked success under the management 
of J. A. C. Poole, along the lines to a 
great extent of a women's store, what 
might be termed a family business in 
the sense that an intimate connection 
is sought with steady "repeat" business. 
This is .las. A. Ogi'vy's, Limited. 

Avoid the Dry-as-Dust Type 

Both house organs agree in the main 
purpose of publication: to develop a 
feeling of fellowship among the mem- 
bers of the Btaff; to cheer them up; and, 
then, not in a too direct manner, to pro- 
mote efficiency. Some house organs 
lry-as-dust because the latter pur- 
pose stands forth to the exclusion of 
all else that might attract the staff to 



read it. There is too much lecturing 
done; the house organ might be termed 
a School Without a Playground, with 
an 8-hour session and no recess. 

Not so the two copies from West and 
East. "Ogilvy's Booster" is the title 
of one; a better term, it may be re- 
marked, than the more obvious one, 
"Store News." Therefore, the Western 
one should change its name to a little 
less staid title. The "Booster" has a 
special type, nothing stereotyped about 
it; it fits the name. 

Coming down to the contents: the 
first page of the "Booster" is a per- 
sonal gossip department. Such, for in- 
stance: 

Did Mr. Storey try to kill that dog when 
he dropped the Rug? 



We understand that Lizzie has added a 
hairpin to her collection: a human one. 



By the way, we were almost forgetting 
Mendelssohn. She is the happiest girl 
in the store. It certainly is a beautiful ring. 
Congratulations. 

Any time Carrie is late now she cannot 
blame the Chateauguay train. The 7.56 was 
only late twice all the summer, anyhow. 



Mr. Peacock went fishing in the Lauren- 
tians. He would probably have had better 
luck at Atlantic City. 

Lost, stolen or shaved — one very fine mus- 
tache. Apply Mr. Rogers, ground floor. 

At the top of the personal news on 
the first page are the familiar words 
in italics, with a slight variation: 
There's a chiel amang us takin' 

notes; an' dagon't man, he'll prent 

them. 

Prize of Two Dollars for Suggestion 
This, by the way, was used as a re- 
sult of a suggestion that was made in 
response to an offer to pay for the best 
ones that are offered. For the issue 
under review, a prize of two dollars was 
paid to a member of the staff for an 
article on "Legibility," which is printed 
in the issue. The "Booster" editor re- 
fers to it as "excellent," and goes on in 
a note to commend it to everyone. At 
the same time, it does not appear on 
the first page. 

The second page contains a very 
practical article in reference to a sale 
of hosiery, with the article on "Legi- 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



167 



bility" referred to before. On page 
three is an editorial by the editor, D. C. 
Weston, Ogilvy's Social Club, etc. 

The last page contains an article on 
"Speak Grammatically," "Boosting or 
Busting," etc. 

Interspersed are little originals, or 
clippings, such as the following: 

The Girl in Pink — "He put his arm around 
me five times last night." 
Her Friend in Blue. — "Some arm!" 



Money talks, but the only thing it says 
to some people is "good-bye." 



In the December issue there is an 
article by the general manager of the 
store, Mr. Poole, on, "Am I a Real 
Salesman?" Store news items include 
doings of the bowling league, the Hal- 
lowe'en dance, etc. 

Cooper's "Store News" is printed on 
a yellow-colored paper with a calendar 
finish instead of a coarse finish. The 
front page is arranged for a special oc- 
casion, with a cut of the Prince of 
Wales, who was to visit the town 
shortly. Possibly items of a light na- 
ture, the gossip of the store, might be 
used to good effect on this page, on or- 
dinary occasions, as a light diet for 
more solid food inside. 

A department, "Around the Store," is 
started in this initial issue, and this 
could profitably be developed into the 
contents of the first page. For instance, 
this item probably hits off a "sore" 
point: 

"Have you any book • covers?" 
Tell that to the advertising man, 
but get ready to run. 

"The Boss Says" 

One bright feature of this issue is the 
"mixing" in here and there of humorous 
cuts with the reading matter, or a more 
serious one — a very serious one — two 
Scotchmen curling — when an item ap- 
pears about the Cooper rink. 

On the last page is the beginning of 
what promises to run in each issue, an 
article by the president, W. W. Cooper. 
There is a "box" head with the title, 
"The Boss Says." Probably the supply- 
ing of this for each issue will cause Mr. 
Cooper more worry than plans for in- 
creasing his January sales by ten or 
fifteen thousand dollars. 

At the bottom of each of the inside 
pages, in italics, is an epigrammatic 
saying that causes the reader to stop 
and think. This is a commendable idea. 
Indeed, this first issue promises many 
good things for "Store News." 

As much as possible the contents 
should be original, giving sales in- 
stances that have come to the attention 
of the various buyers and department 
managers, with suggestions based on 
these. Helpful hints should be given 
side by side with news of the social end 
of the life of tha store— in order to 
strengthen the store spirit. Have the 
items bright, crisp, and therefore brief. 



A Department Responsible Now and 
Then 

It might be worth while having the 
various departments take the respons- 
ibility for one or more pages, month 
by month. This would create a certain 
competition as to which one turned out 
the most readable, and helpful "copy." 

In any case, the only successful store 
organ is the one in which the co-opera- 
tion of the staff can be secured and 
held. 

DRY GOODS REVIEW would wel- 
come other copies of store organs, with 
an account from the editors of how they 
are compiled, and the part each plays 
in the life of the store. 



Window and Sales Force 

London, Ont.. Window Trimmer Makes 

Some Observations Overseas — 

Teamwork Brings Results 

The co-operation necessary between 
a store's sales force and its advertising 
and window display efforts was the 
subject of a conversation between a rep- 
resentative of DRY GOODS REVIEW 
and P. H. Mulvey, window dresser and 
advertiser for John H. Chapman and 
Company, London, Ont. Three years 
ago, Mr. Mulvey left a position as win- 
dow dresser for the Robert S. Simpson 
Company to go overseas, and has but 
recently returned to take up the work 
again in London. While on leave, how- 
ever, he was careful to note window dis- 
plays and merchandising methods in 
England and compare them with simi- 
lar activities in the Canadian trade. 

"In England," he stated, "the dry 
goods stores do not advertise so exten- 
sively as they do in Canada, and that 
is why they show more of the 'commer- 
cial' type of windows, rather than the 
purely 'artistic' In fact, the greater 
part of the business is done through the 
window displays. The customer sees 
what she wants in the window, sees 
the price of it, and has only to walk 
into the store and pay the money. Of 
course, it depends a great deal on the 
salesgirl who attends her whether she 
buys just the article she w r anted or is 
persuaded by some subtle suggestion to 
make further purchases." 

The one reason for which Mr. Mulvey 
advocates the commercial window is be- 
cause it supplements the work of the 
disinterested salesgirl, who is not con- 




cerned with selling her customer any- 
thing she did not originally intend to 
buy. The window, with articles plainly 
ticketed also saves this salesperson the 
trouble of even telling the customer the 
price of the desired article. But this 
method of selling, employed exclusively, 
would lead to almost what one might 
term a "Cafeteria" store; and would 
tend to eliminate the species, considered 
by a number of merchants to be al- 
ready almost extinct, known as alert, 
interested salespeople. 

Some girls are even so disinterested 
that they are quite ignorant of the 
goods being shown in the store windows 
or those that are being advertised other- 
wise. This is really unpardonable, but 
is perhaps due to some extent in the 
larger stores where salespeople are not 
in a position to study the store windows 
carefully, to the failure of department 
heads to make known to them what 
goods are being featured for special 
sales. 

Shopping is Specialized in England 

"Another thing one notices in Eng- 
land," says Mr. Mulvey, "is that the dif- 
ferent classes of trade are more dis- 
tinct than in Canada. There are three — 
low, medium and high class. For in- 
stance, poor people would not think of 
doing their shopping in a high class 
district; in the west end of London, such 
as Oxford street, Bond street, Regent 
street, Piccadilly and many other parts 
I could mention, where you would see 
nothing but very tastefully decorated 
windows. These windows would not in- 
terest a good portion of the public at all, 
because they are looking for a 'commer- 
cial' window, where a large number of 
different articles would be displayed and 
ticketed and they could almost decide 
on their purchases outside of the 
store." 

But the fact remains that behind these 
artistically arranged windows there 
must be an efficient salesforce or half 
the value of the display is lost. Sup- 
pose a customer is attracted by, let us 
say, a blouse in the window and enters 
to inquire the price. If the salesgirl 
understands readily which blouse the 
customer is interested in and hastens 
to put in her hands an identical one in 
the proper size; or in the case of an 
exclusive model, when all sizes are not 
available, shows a similar design that 
would fit the customer; the chances are 
thai an immediate sale can be made and 
the purpose of the window fulfilled. If, 
however, a saleslady is not quick to 
understand by the customer's descrip- 
tion which one of the blouses on display 
she wishes to see, or says with that air 
of finality which is most annoying to 
a customer, "No, Ma'am, we haven't 
your size in that line," without suggest- 
ing in its place a blouse of similar de- 
sign, not only is a sale lost, but a certain 
amount of goodwill is also forfeited. 

Far too many salesgirls are interested 
in a customer only where they think that 
it is going to mean an immediate c ?ly 
Continued on page 169 



168 



Dry Goods R< rrew 




Striking window display in the Miller & Coe store, showing one of the twin girls demonstrating toys.— See other view below. 

Maximum Display Store Front 

By Use of Glass, Old Hotel Building is Made Into Finest China Store on Continent- 
Novel Schemes Help Make Sales 



IT use.l to be the old Butler Hotel, 
on Hastings Street, but after the 
rpentem and glaziers had followed 
out the architect's plans, the old buildin? 
became what is said to be the best laid- 
out china store on the Continent of 
America. Visitors come from Eastern 
Canada and the States, and they all con- 
cede that though other retail toy stores 
may excel in some detail, tbere isn't the 
equal of the store of Miller & Coe, Van- 
couver, in its g-eneral layout. 

In order to have the greatest possible 
window space, the windows are doubled, 
as seen in the picture, to form a Show- 
room where during 1 the day or during 
the evening the public may wander 
around and pay the fullest attention to 
the poods displayed. Then ajrain, this 
open display well extends up through the 
mezzanine floor and the other two 
Stories, so four floors of display are 
comfortably seen from the "court" of 
the entrance. As an added attraction, 
Mr. Miller had two little girls, twins, 
sit one in each window on the toy sid" 
and play with the toys. This has been 
a great drawing card; the public never 
seems to tire of standing for a few min- 
utes and watching the girls use the var- 
ious toys displayed. 

In the interior of the store, a mez- 
zanine floor or balcony has been huilt, 
and the centre of the store has been re- 
served right to the roof as a light well. 
.As *oon as one steps into the store the 
entire displays on three more floors arc 
visible. In the summer time around each 
floor at the light well flow< r boxes ar- 
kept stocked with bloom ; ng flowers awl 
ferns, and the effect is very beautiful. 
The backgrounds in the large window - 



are always seasonable, and are a great 
help in making the windows attractive. 

While the walls are completely fur- 
nished with wall cases with sliding doors 
Mr. Miller has dispensed with the glass 
silent salesmen. "I have found by actual 
experience that it promotes sales to use 
taiblee instead and let the prospective 
purchasers handle the china. There is 
no breakage." he stated, in answer to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW'S question. 

In the wall cases Mr. Miller is instal- 
ling fixtures made entirely of glass. 
"There will be no shadows" he explain- 
ed. Above the light well that occupies 
the centre of the store there is a large 



skylight, and Mr. Miller stated that from 
the first of April till the end of August 
they needed no electric lights — a saving 
during the summer that took care of 
such items as the insurance on the 22,599 
srpiare feet of plate glass in the front 
of the building, and such items. 

"You advertise a doll hospital," re- 
marked the interviewer. "Yes," replied 
Mr. Miller, and the fact that we do re- 
pair dolls brings an enormous lot of other 
toy business. We go on the obvious facr 
that every child in Vancouver has a 
birthday once a year. These anniver- 
saries occur every day in the year, and 
we never lose sight of that fact. Toys 
are an every- day producer. Many mer- 




\n»tt 



Coe, with the other member of the Twin Girls playing with toy* 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



169 



chants make the mistake of thinking of 
them as simply a Christmas specialty." 

"What about German toys," was ask- 
ed. "As long as we are in business they 
will be the last purchase we are likely 
to make," asserted Mr. Miller. "Nor is 
there any necessity to think of them 
agadn. Ninety per cent, of our toys at 
the present time are made in the United 
States, and they are good toys. The 
remainder are Canadian, a few British 
toys, and a few cheap Japanese imita- 
tions. For instance we are getting some 
Kewpies from Japan now; the first 



samples were crude, hut in the absence 
of anything else, they sold. The Japs 
are also making pretty good bisque 
heads for dolls. The United States manu- 
facturers are turning out good toys, and 
for that matter, in our chinavvare the 
American patterns are splendid sellers. 
They are snappv patterns, and although 
I don't think the wearing quality is as 
good as the Old Country pottery, it is 
the pattern, not the wearing quality that 
sells the majority of the dinner sets." 

Asked about pricing - the articles in 
the window and on the table, Mr. 



Miller said that he considered it the best 
practice. "I seldom quote a 97-piece 
dinner set in my window," he said. "I 
have found it best to show an attractive 
pattern and quote a 50-piece set; it 
doesn't seem so high." Mr. Miller in- 
cidentally mentioned that a traveller for 
German toys had called on him recently, 
but he really had not been interested, 
no did he know of any other of the Van- 
couver merchants who ordered any Ger- 
man toys forward. The Vancouver store 
of Miller & Coe is a splendid example of 
the possibilities of a three-story build- 
in?- 26 feet wide. 




Illustrating novel 
method of increas- 
ing display front- 
age. 



WINDOW AND SALES FORCE 

(Continued from page 167) 
to be put to their credit. That is why 
some exclusive shops are not in favor 
of giving commissions to their sales 
force; but prefer to rely on their concern 
in the store to keep up the sales records. 
They fear that the inferior type of sales- 
girl may be impatient with the customer 
who is "just looking" when her mind is 
resting on a bonus for sales; and the 
desire to make friends for the store as 
well as sales will be lost sight of. In 
Mr. Mulvey's words, "There is far too 
much selling to customers and not 
enough waiting on them. It is surpris- 
ing how ladies will talk of a store where 
the salesgirls are courteous and helpful 



DAILY SPECIAL SALE 

Make each day a bargain day 
and every article shown a bargain 
is a plan tried by a progressive 
dealer recently. He caused to be 
made a gilt frame well-lighted and 
of handsome design. He placed a 
card thereon, reading: "Each day 
we will display a Special bargain 
at the price of $5" 

Each day saw a new article 
displayed until people got to look 
for what was to be shown. The 
goods were all good, always priced 
at a popular figure, and before 
long the idea took so well it has 
been made a feature. 



in making suggestions and do not show 
themselves to be anxious only to make a 
sale." 
All Displays Should Invite Inspection 

The value of the window display is to 
attract the shoppers' attention, to mak;. 1 
them want to come inside and see the 
articles at closer range. This is the 
case both with respect to the "commer- 
cial" window and the "artistic," where 
goods are not ticketed, but simply dis- 
played in their most beautiful setting. 
After the shopper has come inside, it is 
the place of the sales force to keep her 
there by showing her more goods than 
she actually came in to see, and to make 
her come back again and again by giving 
her courteous attention and absolute 
satisfaction in the articles purchased. 

The "artistic" window display points 
the article to the customer and says, 
"See how beautiful it is." Then the lat- 
ter goes into the store and the sales- 
girl tells her the price, selects the cor- 
rect size, and should send the customer 
away with the thought that she must 
tell one of her neighbors what a pretty 
blouse, dress, etc., she bought through 
having seen it in so-and-so's window. 

The "commercial" window points to 
the garment and says, "See what good 
value you are getting for the money." 
Then the customer must go in and han- 
dle the goods and try it on, although she 
has already decided that she wants it at 
the stated price, if it is all that it ap- 
pears to. be in the window. Here is 
where the efficient salesgirl comes for- 



ward and has a chance to make another 
friend for the store by helping the cus- 
tomer select the right size and by giving 
her courteous service, even in the sale 
of a bargain-counter article. And if 
perhaps the right size is not to be had, 
she does not answer, "Sorry, but we're 
all sold out of your size," then turn to 
another customer; but shows her an- 
other article from regular stock which 
is of good value and would be liable to 
serve her purposes as well. 

Window displays have an important 
place in the trade of a store; an efficient 
sales force has an even more important 
one. Without the other, either one loses 
50 per cent of its usefulness. Together 
their work augments itself to an unbe- 
lievable extent. It is a case of team- 
work "doing the trick." 



TELEPHONE EFFICIENCY 

In an effort to improve efficiency 
a well-known institution caused to 
be made a series of tests in an ef- 
fort to demonstrate how to hold 
the lips to the mouthpiece in order 
to obtain the best results. The ef- 
fects on transmission were ex- 
pressed in miles. Following was 
the result of the tests: Lips dis- 
tant — one inch, two inches, three 
inches, four inches; loss in miles 
57, 138, 179 and 218. Evidently 
the way to get the best results is 
to talk into and not at the tele- 
phone. 



170 



EQUIPMENT \ N l> l> I s |« |. AY 



/>;•'/ (ioods Review 



.? 



,V 



f 



*' 



P> 



f 




Ribbons" 



^ 



I 



There are Fixtures 



\ 



Are you making the most of 
every department? For in- 
stance, are your ribbons get- 
ting proper attention? 

Kent-McCIain, Limited 

Toronto Show Case Co. 

181 to 199 Carlaw Avenue 
Toronto 



'*, 



°c 



£ 



*1 



'*-, 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



171 




Notions'* 



and Fixtures 

Displaying your goods pro- 
perly is your strongest selling 
factor. Let us help you to 
make the very best of it. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

Kent-McClain, Limited 

Toronto Show Case Co. 

181 to 199 Car law Avenue 
Toronto 






,V 






^ c 



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# 



172 



(I [PMENTANDD] S I* I. A V 



Dry Goods Review 



Dale Wax Figure Co., Limited 

Toronto 

CANADA'S LEADING DISPLAY FIXTURE HOUSE 




No. 70/E-Dale Natura 
Enamel Children's Forms. 




No. 4035— Waist Stand 

beautifully finished in Rich 

Gold with Black Relief. 



Manufacturers of 



High Grade Wax Figures 

and 

Display Forms of All Kinds 



Our new line of Art Display Fixtures. 

Catalogue now on the Press. 
Write for copy to-day 



Get 

Ready 

for 

Big 

Spring 
Business. 



Send 1 



in 



your 
Orders 
Early. 




We 

make 
Every- 
thing 
for 
the 
Better 
Display 

of 
Merchan- 
dise. 



No. 2 — One of our life-like 
Wax Figures. 



AGENTS : 

P. R. MUNRO, 150 Bleury St., MONTREAL 

E. R. BOLLART & SON, 501 Mercantile Bldg. 

VANCOUVER 




No. 3061— Plateau beautifully 
finished in Old Gold 




No. 3— Children's Full Bust 



( 



c 




No. 3025— Coat and Dress Stand, 
finished in Old Gold and Old Ivory. 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



173 



An up-to-date National Cash Register gives 
a merchant control of his business 




[T forces each clerk, or the merchant 
A himself, to make a record of every 
sale he handles. The record must be 
complete before change can be made 
or the transaction finished. 

The record of each transaction is 
brought to the attention of the cus- 
tomer in two ways : by the electric- 
ally lighted figures at the top of the 
register and by the printed receipt 
which she receives. 

The record is also printed and added 
automatically at the time the trans- 
action takes place. These accurate 
records are the foundation of good 
storekeeping. 



A merchant must have such records to control his business and 
to make up his income tax report. An up-to-date National Cash 
Register gives them to him cheaply, accurately, and quickly 

The National Cash Register Company of Canada, Limited 

BRANCH OFFICES: 



Calgary 714 Second Street W. 

Edmonton 5 McLeod Bldg. 

Halifax 63 Granville St. 

Hamilton 14 Main Street E. 

London 350 Dundas Street 

Montreal 122 St. Catherine Street, W. 

„. Ottawa 306 Bank Street 



Quebec 133 St. Paul Street 

Regina 1820 Cornwall Street 

Saskatoon 265 Third Avenue, S. 

St. John 50 St. Germain Street 

Toronto 40 Adelaide Street 

Vancouver 524 Pender Street, W. 

Winnipeg 213 McDermot Avenue 



FACTORY: TORONTO. ONTARIO 



174 



I 01 [PMENT A N D DISPLAY 



Dry Goods /.'■ 



Get DELFOSSE'S New Spring Supplement at once 

Order Early or be Disappointed 

Buyers of Display Fixtures and Forms 
Particularly to those who want the best 

Quality Display Fixtures and Forms 

has !>.-■■ ii our motto for twenty years. Our Ions 
experience enabled us to guarantee every' Fixture, 
Form and Wax Figure for durability and style. 

DELFOSSE & CO. 

247-249 Craig St. West 

Factory: 1 to 19 Hermine St. 

M0NTRE\L 





Our Flesh 
Fnamel is 
guaranteed — 
won't crack 
nor peel. 



We make and 

repair Wax 

Ftg*uroK. 



^T^ 




Canadian re- 
presentative of 
the celebrated 
Wax Figures 
of Pierre 
Imans, Paris. 






No. 2027 
New Model Waist Form. 



No. 557A. 
Waist Rack. 



No. 2031 
New Waist Uisplayer 



No. 2006 

We have 6 different 

new styles in Dress 

Forms. 



%mm^&^ 



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Two Hundred 
Unit Sectional Fixtures 

Scientificall) designed to take care of every 
item of merchandise handled by Clothing. 
Gents' Furnishing, Dry Goods, or 
Department Stores. 

Buy as you like. 

Add when required. 

Catalogue and particulars on request. 

Jones Bros.4Co.I imitg 4 

(Ttore Fitter? 

Eri»t«rr\ Branch: H«od Office Western Branch 

71 BUury Str«t 29 31 Adelaide StWect. 437 Main Street 

Montreal PQ Toronto Ont. Winnipeg M*n 

tn mffiJitnan witfl and mmiiu/*:turtn$ In Corn***, undar We patanli <sf 
Tha Ororxd Amptdd SAow Cosa Comf>nny 



Vfti/fru'/t/i'm 

W. war i as* C£**^ 



tit /a 7» 



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Our Vanity Girls 

The Cutest Ever in Miniatures 




JANET 

Flat effects in wood, hand painted. Arms move at the 

shoulders and elbows. Each model 1.1 inches high. 

Write for circular containing 
more figures and list of prices. 

J. R. PALMENBERC.'S SONS, INC. 

63-65 WEST 36th STREET, NEW YORK 

BOSTON CHICAGO BALTIMORE 

26 Kingston Street 204 West Jackson Blvd.] 108 West Baltimore Street 



Dry Goods R&oiew 



EQUIP M K N T AND DISPLAY 



175 



What Is YouRjg/vjsfuAL (osr 

*ybrS£izvfC£ Equipment 




The investment and maintenance of your 
cash and charge handling system is a 
debit which must be written off the books 
every year. 

Is it large or is it small? 

It's small if you use a Lamson centralizing 
carrier system — whether wire line, elec- 
tric cable or pneumatic tube. For the 
centralized system is the most economical 
of all store systems, and according to the 
experience of many stores, the safest, 
most elastic and efficient. 

As an example is Jules Gauvin, of Quebec 
City, who uses a Lamson Electric Cable 
Carrier system. He says: 

"The centralized system operates very 
efficiently and economically. Its initial 
cost was comparatively small. It has 
reduced errors in handling cash and 
charge sales. Its service is most satisfac- 
tory to our customers." 



General Offices at Boston, Mass. 



176 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



Concerning the Navajo Rug 

Sheep Raisin-. Wool Production and Famous Rugs Resulted From 

Present Given by Spaniards to Native Indians in South. 




A sheep-shearing outfit in New Mexico. 



WHEN the early Spaniards first 
reached the country which is to- 
day known as New Mexico and 
Arizona, they found there the native 
American, or Indian of that period, 
weaving blankets and robes in a crude 
manner upon looms that were even 
more crude. Hides and the feathers of 
wild animals and birds were utilized 
by these Indians in their primitive en- 
deavors to produce by the loom clothing 
as well as blankets. 

The Spaniards, in their endeavors to 
make friends with these native Indians, 
however seductive this friendship later 
proved to be to the simple faith of the 
native aborigines, presented them with 
sheep, and looms of Spanish origin, and 
notwithstanding the belief that the fun- 
damental basis for these gifts was their 
greed for the gold which they suspected 
lay hidden beneath the mountains of 
this territory, dominated by the Indians 
it remains without a doubt that this 
Rift of looms and sheep enabled the 
New Mexico and Arizona native, the 
Navajo and Hopi Indians, to render a 
real service to New World arts and 
crafts. The Navajo rug is now far re- 
nowned as an execution of wondrous 
beauty and conception. 




The Famous "Apache Trail'' 

It followed that with unforeseen 
thrift and industry, this gift of sheep 
to the native American, grew to such 
overwhelming proportions that to-day 
flocks of thousands of sheep may be seen 
peacefully grazing upon every turn in 
the new-old highway of the Apache in 
Arizona, familiarly known to the mod- 
ern motorist as the "Apache Trail." 
Not only along the Apache Trail is this 
true, but in the remotest districts of the 
Navajo and Hopi, the most active in- 
dustry has become that of raising sheep. 
The white man, following his Indian 
brother into this territory, likewise fol- 
lowed him in the matter of the native 
industry. 

Mechanical Shearing 

In the shearing of these tremendous 
flocks of sheep, it has become necessary 
to resort to modern mechanical methods. 

Electric motors are carried from 
ranchero to ranchero in the Spring of 
the year. They are equipped with 
shears, which are manipulated by bands 
of native Indian sheep-shearers, who 
follow the sheep from ranch to ranch, 
clipping the wool from the Lacks of these 
faithful little servitors of mankind. 
These electric shears are not always as 
true as were the old-fashioned hand- 
propelled kind, for beneath the power 
of electricity they often slip and th2 
hide is pierced, and sometimes cut very 
deeply. 

The day of old-fashioned industrial 
methods, however, having passed, these 
sheep with faithful and patient fore- 
bearance, are submissively aiding the 
wool industry. 



DOMINION OILCLOTH TO BITLD BIG 

PLANT 

Will Spend a Million Dollars on Makin» 

Important Extensions 

Plans of a very extensive nature, and 
involving an outlay of approximately 
$1,000,000, are announced by John 
Baillie, on behalf of the Dominion Oil- 
cloth and Linoleum Co., Ltd., Montreal, 
of which Mr. Baillie is vice-president and 
managing director. "We are going to 



make our plant second to none." -aid 
Sir Baillie, "and while we have been 
extending and making improvements to 
the plant for the past thirty years or 
more, keeping the plant up-to-date, we 
are taking advantage of the quieter 
times to prepare for the future. At the 
present time it is very dieult to get raw 
materials, such as jute, linseed oil and 
cotton fabrics." 

The plans outlined will be carried out 
at the works on Parthenais Street. Ac- 
tual operations are expected to b 
at an early date, and this will depend 
upon the weather conditions. Plans will 
involve the replacement of some of the 
present buildings, which, although kept 
up-to-date by frequent improvements, 
will give way to the larger plans con- 
templated. New machinery and equip- 
ment will be added. 

While the company plans to do a 
much larger business in Canada, 
where increased demands are expected 
for oilcloths, linoleums, etc., an export 
trade will be developed in due time. 



POINTS FOR THE SALESM IN 

Good window shades give an inviting, 
fresh, attractive look to a home. They 
give it dignity. They contribute to it 
an air of cleanliness. Passersby judge 
the inside of the house and its people 
by the story that the window-shades and 
curtains tell. 

The manager of one of the most suc- 
cessful furnishing departments said, in 
reply to the question of how he kept his 
salesmen and other help always busy, 
even in quite times: 

"There are no quiet times in my de- 
partment, because, when things tend to 
slacken up our sellincr staff get out and 
visit the customers at their homes. There 
are always windows which need reshad- 
ing, and a tactful suggestion only is 
necessary to get the orders. General re- 
touching all round frequently follows. 
It pays." 

The shade department is one of the 
best little trade builders that a merchant 
can find. When a new family moves to 
town and into their house, the first thing 
the good wife does is to pin newspapers 
across the windows. She wants shades 
right off, you see. See that your delivery 
man and messengers have a plan for in- 
forming your store as to the exact time 
a family is "moving in." Keep in touch 
with your local carter or expressman to 
give you the tip when he has a contract 
for movinf household roods around town 
or from the freight yards. 

It pavs to have a man at the house 
the moment the people move in; he 
should be equipped with a shade speci- 
men book, a measuring stick or tape line 
and a "welcome-to-our-city" attitude 
with this proposition: "You will probablv 
he wantine shades ripht away for your 
windows, Mrs. Jones? I've just drooped 
in with these colors which will no doubt 
appeal to you, and from which you may 
make selections. Will measure your 
windows for you ripht now and fit and 
hang your shades at once. This will re- 
lieve vou of that much in gettinc com- 
fortably settled as quickly as possible." 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



177 



If you care to extend your services 
further and she should happen to have 
on hand some shades still in good form, 
you could suggest cutting them to fit 
in an equally speedy manner. 

Ten chances to one you will sell her 
and also have first chance for her trade 
in carpets, rugs, stair rods, and other 
fittings. A new family as a customer 
is worth the work of getting her. Use 
your shade department. It works. 

It is a good plan to try to invent rea- 
sons why a customer should buy various 
things which you may show her, and to 
practise up ways of stating the reasons 
by suggestions, or by giving them in an 
informal manner. Which do you think 
would do the trick: "Can't I sell you a 
pair of these new marquisette curtains, 
your dining-room needs them badly, Mrs. 
Jcnes?" or "You haven't seen these new 
marquisette curtains yet, have you, Mrs. 
Jones ? I am sure you would like them 
in your dining-room." 

Don't assume that because you are 
doing somewhat better than last year 
in point of increased i-a'cs that yoa cm 
afford to ease up and rat yourself on the 
back. For four years household buy- 
ing was cut down and down. When tlu.t 
business is regained — so far as it can be 
— a new level will be struck, and it is ex- 
pected the level will ho reached by a 
downward slope. In years of plenty 
prepare for years of quiet. 



CHIEF FACTOR OF HUDSON'S BAY 
RESIGNS 

Chief Factor James Thomson, one of 
the oldest officers of the Hudson's Bay 
Company has asked to be relieved of 
the active management of both the de- 
partments under bis charge. 

Mr. Thomson has been in the service 
of the Hudson's Bay Company for more 
than forty years, and during that period 
has held positions of trust in the far 
north, the interior, at the coast, and of 
recent years in Winnipeg For some time 
past, as land commissioner, he has ably 
administered the land department, and 
lately was given the additional appoint- 
ment of fur trade commissioner. At the 
time of his appointment to that position 
he was made a chief factor of the com- 
pany in recognition of his past services. 
Mr. Thomson's valuable experience will 
not, however, be lost to the firm, for he 
has been appointed a member of the 
Canadian advisory committee. 

CHANGE OF FIRM NAME 

On January 3 the Gait Robe Company 
changed its name to Stauffer-Dobbie Ltd. 
There is no change of ownership or man- 
agement, Mr. Geo. A. Dobbie remaining 
as president, Mr. Jos. Stauffer vice-presi- 
dent and secretary-treasurer, and Mr. 
Jas. H. Bennett as managing director. 
The change of name was felt to be ad- 
visable owing to the increased variety of 
output by the firm since its inception. 




Among the bonuses paid by dry goods 
firms this past year was one of 10 per 
cent, to the employees of A. Racine Ltd., 
wholesale dry goods, Montreal. 



An Attractive "Hope Chest" 

A cedar box covered with cretonne. These are made by returned soldiers at the 
Khaki League. Shown by Greenshields, Ltd , Montreal. 

Rising Prices for Bedding 

Active Demand Reported for "Indian" Blankets — Quality Mer- 
chandise Wanted — European Demand Affecting 
Canadian Supplies. 

fi I "^ OR a long time it was a habit, 
rl now it is a disease — these 
"*■ letters that keep coming every 
day telling us there's a ten per cent, in- 
crease on this line and twenty per cent, 
increase on that." So spake Mr. F. 
Somers, buyer of linens and beddings 
for the Robt. Simpson Co., Ltd. "There 
seems to be no hope of lower prices in 
the near future. We just have to go 
ahead ordering about three or four 
months earlier than we did in normal 
times, and then taking a gamble on 
when we'll get deliveries, and, in some 
cases, whether or not we'll get the whol? 
of our order." 

But what does it matter if prices do 
go up, so long as people are able to 
pay them, and manufacturers are able 
to produce an article that is worth the 
price? In Mr. Somers' opinion, the high 
price (about $30) asked for pure all- 
wool Scotch blankets has not checked 
their sale to any extent. Yet there ars 
other buyers who think differently — that 
a smaller number of these high-grade 
blankets has been sold, although the 
money turnover has been greater. 
Colored Cotton Blankets Active 

The most popular number in bedding 
appears to be the heavy cotton blanket 
in dark colors: red, navy, green, brown, 
woven in those designs of Indian origin 
which are best known by their interpre- 
tation in the Navajo rugs and blankets. 
These are attractive to a great many 
tastes, are warm, serviceable, and com- 
paratively low-priced. They are used, 
indeed, by some folks in place of down 
comforters, since colorings may be had 
to harmonize with various rug and wall- 
paper shades. Than again, you will see 
them thrown over couches, or stretchers 



at Summer cottages or college resi- 
dences; and even in the "working goil's" 
hall bedroom, over her "fold-down-open- 
out" bed. 

In the regulation blankets, white with 
blue or pink stripes, made of percentage 
yarns, the rule holds that "cheap goods 
are hard to sell." "For instance," says 
Mr. Somers, quoted above, "you show 
a customer this cotton-and-wool blanket 
at $12.95, and she considers it robbery; 
because she can't see what it is in the 
article that she's paying for, the ap- 
pearance doesn't justify it, and she 
knows it won't wear. But if you show 
her an all-wool blanket of American or 
Scotch make, nicely gotten-up, at $25 
or $30, she can see what she is getting 
for her money." 

Owing to the volume of flannelette 
goods being shipped to the Continent 
from Great Britain, an increased de- 
mand has been placed on the Canadian 
product, which has reduced supplies to 
a considerable degree. The quality of 
the goods, nevertheless, has been im- 
proving, and compares quite favorably, 
it is reported, with that of other coun- 
tries. In this, as in other lines, the 
American product is said to be noted 
for the niceness of its finish, and the 
British for its fine quality. 

Sheetings are comparatively plenti- 
ful, but prices are high. Chintz counter- 
panes have a ready sale, although they 
cannot outdo the white crochet variety; 
and as for the old colored counterpanes 
that one finds on one's grandmother's 
bed, they appeal only to a limited class. 

Down comforters, of course, still have 
plenty of calls, for no one can deny 
their cosy, luxurious appearance. But 
deliveries are slow. 



178 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Goods Review 



Ritf*^fl*eu_ra&tS8 r i!l 



i- 




TK, 



Draperies of Refinement and Character 

Spring being the ideal time for increasing the sales of your drapery 
department, be sure to have an interesting, fresh stock on hand. Order 
early if you would ensure best selection, and prompt deliveries. This 
Spring should prove a record breaker in House Furnishings sales, and of 
course, the best is what will be the most in demand. You will find our 
range comprehensive and you will appreciate the splendid quality and good 
value shown. 

Those wanted shades, in most harmonious combinations and designs 
will be found in great variety in our Spring lines of 

CHINTZ 

CRETONNE 

SHADOW CLOTH 

CURTAIN NETS 

CURTAIN SCRIMS 

MADRAS MUSLINS 

PLAIN POPLINS 

'The Handkerchief House of Canada 

, LACE GOODS CO.,u^ 



[ 



a 



64 Wellington Street West TORONTO Third Floor Empire Buildintf 

IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 



*«-»-. 



^fwutenemro 



■■&znx?zr<^?s'. 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



179 




GRASS R. UG S 



TRADE MARK REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 



CONSIDER YE WELL 



Mr. Floor Covering Buyer: 

Knowing conditions as you do, realizing the impossibility 
of obtaining your requirements in heretofore easiest and best 
selling lines, are you not going to stock up heavily on other 
merchandise, full-order shipments of which you know will 
go forward on specified dates? 

It is a far reach from high-priced woolen and worsted rugs 
to grass. But what are you going to do if your customers 
have bare floors to cover and worn-out coverings to replace? 

Consider ye well — CREX rugs. While shipments are 
heavy and unfilled orders the largest in our history, stocks of 
materials are well above the average and labor has been less 
of a disturbing factor than heretofore. 

We are in position, therefore, to fill orders with more than 
reasonable promptness, but as February and March are nat- 
urally our heaviest shipping months we suggest that your 
order be placed as early as possible in the New Year to insure 
delivery in time for the opening of your Spring business. 

Our 1920 lines — De Luxe, Herringbone and Regular 
weaves — have attracted a great deal of attention. Patterns, 
colorings and novelties, both startling and conservative, have 
been added. They'll interest you and your customers. 

Consider ye well. 



Full rug-size color reproductions 
and price list mailed on request 



CREX CARPET COMPANY 

212 Fifth Avenue, New! York, N.Y. 



Originators and Manufacturers for 20 Years of Wire-Grass Floor Coverings 



ISO 



BOUSE FURNISHINGS 



I>dj Goods Review 





Spring 1920 

CANADIAN-MADE 

LINOLEUMS 

FLOOR OILCLOTHS 

FELTOL FLOOR COVERINGS 

TABLE OILCLOTHS 






Important Announcement 
NEW SAMPLES 

of all lines are now in the hands^of the 

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS TRADE 

We invite all dealers in house furnishings and floor cover- 
ings to inspect our complete range of all lines, which will 
be found to contain a great variety of patterns, suited to 
every need. The values being offered in Canadian-made 
goods are unequalled, and it is to the interest of every mer- 
chant handling floor coverings to carefully inspect our 
samples before placing any orders for Spring. 

QUALITY DESIGNS PRICES 

to suit the Canadian Trade 






Manufactured by 

Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Co., Limited 

MONTREAL 





Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



181 



1 



I 

ij 

I 
ij 

1 



II 



m 



illllSlllSillHIIIIBIIIII 




NOVELTY CURTAINS 



Spring housecleaning always 
means new curtains and 
draperies. Largely increased 
sales will be yours if you have 
the attractive, quick-selling 
lines we offer you for Spring. 
Now is the time to secure the 
best selection, at advantage- 
ous prices. 



[Marquisette and Scrim^Curtains 

For exquisite finish and quality our numbers in 
these lines cannot be surpassed. Your "buying 
sense" will instantly appreciate the unusual 
value shown. 

Buy Canadian Made Draperies\Made in\Canada 



Quality 




Satisfaction 



CANADIAN 



DRAPERIES 



LIMITED 



145 Wellington St. West 

Toronto 

Telephone: Adelaide 4708' 



■ 



| 
I 



I 



siiiiiiii^iiiiiiii^i»iiiii=iiiiiin=ii!iiiiili! 



182 



HOUSE V I RNISHING6 



Dry Goods Revieiv 




SPRING 

D 
R 
A 
P 
E 
R 
I 

E 
S 



See Our New Lines 

Selected to appeal to popular demand, 
unusually artistic in tone and design, 
and of such splendid value as to in- 
vite comparison with any on the 
market. 

White and Ecru Madras 
Mixed Colour Madras 
Self Colour Madras 
Mercerized Repps 

(Plain and figured) 
Bungalow Nets 
Muslins (Assorted widths) 
"Aurora" Casement Cloth 
Fine Nottingham Curtains 
Novelty Curtains 

Agents for 

Wm. Strang & Son, Glasgow, Scot. 
Hood, Morton & Co., Newmilns. 
Stirling-Auld & Co., Darvel. 
John Watson, Manchester, Eng. 
Biltmore Curtain Co.. Montreal. 

Write for samples or call personally 

In The Heart of The 
Dry Goods District 




J. B. Henderson & Company 

Limited 

80 Bay Street - - TORONTO 



F. J. BHUMGARA, 

Manufacturer of Indian Art 
Ware and Importer of Indian 
and Oriental Carpets, Rugs, 
and Embroidery, Hand-printed 
Curtains, &c. 



I AM now offering from stock Mirzapore, Mal- 
bar and Calcutta Carpets and Rugs in various 
sizes from 6 ft. x 3 ft. to 15 ft. x 10 ft. 
I can also supply Carpets and Cotton Prints in 
all sizes of Covers and Curtains from stock. 

Also select designs in Chinese Skirts, Coats, 
Sleeve Ends and other Embroideries. 

I hold a large stock of Indian, Cornelian and 
Agate Stones in various colours and designs and 
am continually receiving fresh consignments 
every month. 

Also novelties in Brassware — Flower Pots, 
Trays and Bowls in all sizes for early delivery. 



28, CAMOMILE STREET, 
LONDON, E.C.3. 



Telephone: London Wall 3131 



Telegraphic Addren: 'Bhumgara, | Ltd, London 



s 

A 
T 


SEND FOR OUR PRICES 


S 

o 




I 


ELASTIC RIB UNDERWEAR 


L 


FINE CASHMERE 


I 


s 


JERSEYS AND SWEATERS 


F 


HEAVY WOOL SOCKS 


D 


TWEEDS AND ETOFFES 




A 


ETC. 




C 

T 




V 
A 




A R 


1ITCHELL WOOLLEN CC 


»• u 


O 


LIMITED 


E 


N M 


ITCHELL - ONTARI 



IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS 

Art Needlework and Fancy Goods 

"Peri-Lusta" "Crystal" 

Mercerized Cottons Artificial Silk 

Embroidery Materials 

Fancy Linens and Piece Goods 

MADEIRA HAND EMBROIDERED 
LINENS and HANDKERCHIEFS 

Campbell, Metzger & Jacobson 

932-938 Broadway New York Cor. 22nd St. 

Canadian Showroom and Factory : 

Bay and Wellington Sts., - Toronto, Canada 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



183 



DALY & MORIN, Limited 

Dalmor 

Window Shades and Shade Cloths 
Drapery and Upholstery Fabrics 
Art Novelty Curtains and Piece Goods 
Drapery and Upholstery Hardware 



TO THE TRADE ONLY 



MONTREAL SALESROOMS 
55 ST. SULPICE STREET 



FACTORY and WAREHOUSE 
MONTREAL-LACHINE, QUE. 



PRIME AND RANKIN, LIMITED 



We Are Now Showing 
Handkerchiefs 

With the collection we offer you this 
season, we are certain to interest all our 
old customers and many new ones. We 
invite your attention to this new range, 
including all the new creations, as well 
as the popular-priced and staple lines. 
Our opportune buying enables us to offer 
many attractive values that cannot fail 
to impress buyers as desirable for the 
Christmas handkerchief trade. 



McLintock's Unrivalled 
Down Quilts 

The 1920 range of Down Quilts will be 
out January 20th and will include a wide 
range of new designs and colorings. The 
high standard of these goods and most 
satisfactory deliveries effected, assure us 
of your continued appreciation and pre- 
ference for this line. 

We are sole selling agents in Canada for 
McLintock's Ventilated Down Quilts. 



PRIME AND RANKIN, LIMITED 

S. ROETHER, President 

* 

DIRECTORS : 
W. J. Squires, W. N. H. Hood, N. R. Cooper 



184 



HOI SE (•' i' i: X I s ii i \ i, > 



Dry Goods /.'< < 




This design, pattern 410. 24 in.. 60c per yard; 36 in., 70c per yard. Other patterns at 55c and 65c. (Prices in Canada.) 

Of Interest to the Canadian House Furnishing Buyer 

After studying the Canadian market most thoroughly with the object of appointing an agency in 
Canada, we have appointed 

GREENSHIELDS, LIMITED 

Montreal 

our sole distributors for our laraous Cott^a-lap Surround. Rujr Borders and Wood Grains. All inquiries should be uudr mil d 
to our agents, at Montreal, where sampler and prices will be ch.orfully submitted. 

The Cott-a-lap Company. Somerville, N. J. 



F. W. LANE & CO., LIMITED 

4 SNOW HILL, LONDON, E.C. I . 

England 



Specialists in [Hand- 
Printed Bedspreads, 
Table Covers, 
Cushion Cases, etc., 
in Cotton and Silk. 



Also 

Silk Mitre Cosies, 

Cushions, 

Printed Silks 

and 

Novelties 




Exclusive 
Designs. 

Choice 
Colourings 



Telegrams, 

Japshaw, Cent.. London. 
A.B.C. Code, 4th Edition. 



Cushion C>»e No. 2329 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



185 



v ■ /:. — .. 



> 






d 



< 



\ 



The I Oriental Textiles Co., Limited 

OSHAWA - ONT. 




We weave, dye and finish 
Silk and Cotton 



VELOURS 
MOHAIRS 

and 
PLUSHES 



Sal 



esrooms 



33 MELINDA STREET 
TORONTO 



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\/\i/\/\ii\y\/ii/\i/\/v\ivi/\i/i/M/iiv\iy\/iA/n/i/\/\/iy\A/\ a\/\/\a/vi/\/h\)\i\/\i\i/\/i\i\ai\i/\i\/)' ^ 



186 DRY GOODS REV] E W 




ol 



A.B.C. HOSIERY 



FOR CHILDREN 

Made in all sizes 

4 to 10 inches 

1 and 1 Rib 

RECOGNIZED AS THE BEST 

Best for sturdy quality. 
Best for desirable fit. 
Best for long, hard wear. 

FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

Any make of Hosiery that will win such 
immense popularity as A. B.C. HOSIERY, for 

children, now enjoys, through its resistance to 
the strenuous wear imposed by children, needs 
no further recommendation for adults. 

Complete line. 



ALLEN BROS. CO., LIMITED 

883 Dundas St. East - Toronto 

"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 

It" °5i 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



187 



V 



r*V? 



PURE THREAD 



lifliCtKI S!i 



MADE IN CANADA 



[T S A CASE or 
CHANGI OF 
NAIS4I AND 
/ADDILESP 
y ONLY. 



We have decided to change our name from The 
Wilson Mfg. Co. to "Allen Silk Mills," having 
bought out the interests of a silent partner. 
"The Wilson Mfg. Co.," manufacturers of 

"WINSOME MAID" 

pure thread Silk Hosiery, has been under our 
per onal management since it was started and we 
will continue to have full charge and supervision. 
Owing to the great increase in our business on 
account of the splendid quality of our 

"WINSOME MAID" 

hose, we have found it necessary to move into 
larger quarters, and after January 1st, our ad- 
dress will be 



AnjLEN £MK MfflLlP 

4^ JDJWNZPM/E* TK2BCOTO 



In Our New Factory 

We will be able to fill orders more promptly and 
greatly assist our dealers in making more sales of 

''Winsome Maid" 

Pure Thread Silk Hosiery 

You will find this Hosiery the most satisfactory 
line you could handle. 



ALL COLORS 



Allen Silk Mills 



STANLEY McLEOD 

449 Granville St., Vancouver 

Western Representative 



43 Davies Ave. 
Toronto 

"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 

H. SWITZER, 193 Sparks St., Ottawa, Representative for Eastern Ontario and Montreal 



JONES-CAIRNS LIMITED 

St. John. N.B. 

Eastern Representative 



L88 



I) K Y G 00 DS R E V I E W 







1920 

"The Specialty House of Canada' 

MclNTYRE, S0N& CO. 

LIMITED 

Montreal 

Canada 

Our Salesmen are now on their territories with com- 
plete Showings from all departments. 

Dress Goods 

Sill^s and Velvets 

Linens (Crown Brand) 

Cotton Dress Fabrics 

Woven Zephyrs and Wool Taffeta Shirtings 

Hosiery 

Gloves 

Underwear 

Smallwares and Notions 

Ribbons, Laces and Embroideries 

Sole Selling Agent* for 

"Trefousse" Kid and Suede Gloves 

"Niagara Maid" Gloves, Hosiery and 

Glove Silk Underwear 

Permanent Offices at 

Halifax, Quebec, Ottawa, Peterboro, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Winnipeg, Regina, Calgary and /Vancouver. 



Mclntyre, Son & Co., Limited 

MONTREAL 




MPVMHMM 






" 







DRY GOODS REVIEW 



189 



babies' Mear Pulletm 



SMARTEST STYLES 



JANUARY 1920 



HIGHEST VALUE 



ladies 


Wear Limited 


JL/ 




1-9-2-0 




HANDKERCHIEF SEASON 

OPENS ON FEBRUARY 1st 






With the most complete range ever 
shown to the Canadian trade. 






Fancy Boxed Lines 

Envelopes 

Initials 

Printed French Novelties in 

Linen and Cotton 
Plain Linen and Lawns for 

Men and Women 



Our Representatives are now on 

the road showing our complete 

line of Silk and Lingerie Blouses, 

Silk Underwear, Neckwear, 

Laces and Veilings 



Ladies Vv ear Limited 

563 College Street, Toronto 

W. F. Gorortn. President 



190 



D K V HOODS UK V] E W 



Wab 




asso 



Lawns 

Nainsooks 

Madapolams 

Bridal-Cloth 

Voiles 

Organdies 

Middy Cloths 

Piques 

Cambrics 

Longcloths 

Circular Cottons 

Sheets and Slips 

Sheetings 



— The best goods for the best trade — 



THE WABASSO 

Three Rivers 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



191 



Wab 



asso 




The Trade Mark of Purity 

Purity Guaranteed 
Width Guaranteed 



Examine and closely 
compare the even 
weaves, the perfect 
bleach, the absolute 
purity of the lines bear- 
ing the "Wabasso 
trade-mark 



Always the Premier 
White Cotton Mills of Canada 

COTTON COMPANY, Limited 

Quebec 



L92 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Accuracy Is The Supreme Test 

Before buying any Measuring and Computing Machine 
for your Piece Goods Department, test it for its accuracy 

In measurement. 

l\ en an inaccurate machine may save you money over the 
old methods of measuring by hand, but the 

aofHoMtfCR 

Accurately measures material of any width or weight. 
Accurately computes every sale. Costs 30% less than any 
other machine on the market. 
Is the Greatest Money Saver of them all. 



The Only Accurate Machine 
On The Market 




This is dot claim and it is a broad one. But it is 
easy t<> prove it by test measurements with any other 

machine. 

Your Machine must be RIGHT 

if you want to get the full 100'; returns from your 
Yard Goods Department. 'Phi- error in measurement 
of an inaccurate machine is repeated with every 
transaction and constitutes an additional overhead 
expense which must be charged to the department. 

Buy the Clothometer on its merits 

The Clothometer is a new. improved measuring and 
computing machine, which is rapidly training in favor 
over machines of an earlier make. But don't be 
content to purchase any machine without using your 
own judgment in selection. It is easy to make a com- 
parative U'st of their merits before buying. The 
Clothometer is sold on its merits under a three-year 
guarantee of satisfaction. 



What the CLOTHOMETER Does For You 

Wipes out all the big annual losses from overmeasurement — prevents errors in figuring 
sales checks saves the time and increases the efficiency of your sales clerks — (rives 
vour customers confidence and increases the prestige of your store. IT DOBS NOT 
MARK YOUR FABRICS. 



Measuring Devices 

and 
Computing Chart 



Everything is plain t' 
and easy Hi read. Mea- 
sures up to 12 yards in 
'.. yard units. Give in- 
stant computation from 
1 to 12 yards of cloth 
in the ' .. yard units, at 
i» different costs per 
yard. Your choice of 116 
different price charts. 



Write To-day for Descriptive Folder and Full 
Information 

Distributors for Canada: 

The Clothometer Sales Company, Ltd. 

44 Princess Street Winnipeg, Canada 



DRY GOOD S REVIEW 



Canada's 
Silk 




Progressive 
House 




"Everything in Silks" 



JO. BOURCIER 






65 Bay Street 
TORONTO 



Victoria Square 
MONTREAL 



LIMITED 

Bovd Building 
WINNIPEG 



101 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

TRe Trade Mark 




TKe Ix^side XIil«Oii 



is the fleecy "Woolnap" which 
has always been so popular a 
feature with a large number of 
your customers. 




shows evidence of the extra-care- 
ful workmanship and high-grade 
yarns which mark every garment 
we make-unsurpassed in Canada. 



"St. George" WOOLNAP 

will enhance your reputation as a judge of underwear values. Stock it, 
for the customers who want warmth, wear and comfort. Judge for your- 
self and we are confident you will find it worthy of your strongest 
recommendation to your most particular customers. 

AGENTS : 
COYLE & RODGER, 230McGill St., Montreal; R. COPPING & SON, 31 Melinda St.. Toronto; A.R. McFARLANE, Vancouver 

@sh awa, Canada 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



*d* 



.. 



V / 



'"Hi 



'J 




vo*: 



pood up 

^tfour Underwear Sales 

It can't be done with garments of in- 
different quality. Nor with underwear 
which is "not what it was before the war. 

Customers who still want the kind the^ 
used to get will be best satisfied witl 



44 



St <3eorge" 



Unshrinkable UNDERWEAR 

FOR MEN'S WEAR 

In these days of uncertain qualities youi 
customers will rely more than ever or 
your judgement and knowledge of under- 
wear values. 

Critical comparison will quickly satisfy you that St. George 
Brand Scotch Knits, Heavy Wool Ribs and Fine Elastic Com 
binations and Two-piece are the best values in Canada today- 
even better than in pre-war times. 

AGENTS 

COYLE & RODGER 
230 McGill St. - Montreal 



A, R. McFARLANE 



R. COPPING & SON 
31 Melinda St. - Toronto 

Vancouver 



The 8@H®F1ILD W®SIAI! CtiUbMmw 



196 



D in' GOODS RE VIE \Y 




***"- ~-r*£T^ 



Hawthorn Fabrics 



- combine with rich beauty of 
colorings, the quality necessary to 
stand extraordinary wear and tear. 





Hawthorn 

fabrics now include : Jersey 
Cloth, Knitted Suitings, Vel- 
our Cloakings. 



Ask for them by the 
yard or in made up 
garments. 



Hawthorn Mills, Limited 



Carleton Place, Ontario 



Selling Agents: 
TORONTO Little & Little, 152 Bay St. VANCOUVER A. R. HcFarlane, Mercantile Hldg. 

MONTREAL Lake I-'. Moore. Coristine Bids- 
WINNIPEG Fred Rumble, 506 McArthur Block. CALGARY— A. M. Mouat, 515 First St. E. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



197 





JACE. 



'•> ^fir Setter 

(jofnp£a \ 'fifty 



HbOl Hose and Hawthorn Rvtxld / j 



Face Cloths 



or men and women 



DAINTY - - ATTRACTIVE 
SANITARY 



Terry Towelling 

from 1 6 to 27 inches wide — 
very popular 



There are attractive colored 

display cards at your disposal. 

— Send for them — 




Your wholesaler will send 

samples of these lines 

upon request. 



J^atotfjorn Jflilte lamtteb 



Carltton ijplacc, <£>nt. 



Selling Agents : 
TORONTO Little & Little. 152 Bay St. VANCOUVER -A. R. McFarlane. Mercantile Bldg. 

MONTREAL Lake F. Moore, Coristine Bldg. 
WINNIPEG-Fred Rumble. 506 McArthur Block. CALGARY -A. M. Mouat. 515 First St. E. 



Terry 



Bath and Face Towels 

are ideal for every purpose, 
all sizes plain or fancy hemmed. 




AfiwraXtnof B«»a>pr» Pore Wool How and Hawthorn fabric 



L99 



D 1; y GOODS REV! E W 



^ 



TOW£LS 



Announcement 

To the many customers and business connections of 

The Gait Robe Company 



We wish to announce a change in the name of 
the firm. On this date the business will be 
taken over by 

Stauffer-Dobbie Limited 



There will be no change of ownership nor of 
management. The former partners and 
officers will continue to own and control the 
new company. 

The Gait Robe Company wishes to thank its 
many friends in the trade for the favors 
extended during their business life — while 
Stauffer-Dobbie Limited, solicit a continuance 
of patronage and goodwill. 



STAUFFER-DOBBIE Limited 



GALT 



ONTARIO 



JOS. STAUFFKR 

Vicc-Prcs. and S 



GEO. A. DOBBIE 

President 



JAS. H. BENNE1 l 

\l n Direi 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



19S 



TOWELS, 




What the GALT LABEL will mean to you 

— Towels so sturdily made, of pile threads of 2 PLY 
yarn, that they give twice the wear of the ordinary 
towel made of single thread pile. 

— Towels so closely and evenly woven and with such 
artistic border effects, that they make an instant 
appeal for their soft finish and attractiveness. 

These features combine to ensure SATISFACTION. 
That is what brings you customers, isn't it? And 
after all is said, isn't it customers you are after? Let 
Gait Towels help you secure and retain them. 

Complete range of samples in the hands of 
our travellers. 

STAUFFER-DOBBIE Limited 



GALT 



ONTARIO 



Western Agent: T. H Wardell, 102 Hammond Bldg., Winnipeg 
Montreal: M. R. Bricker, 43 St. Sacrament'Street 



SSSS*i 



#f-^«: Ki%ft>v 



•J.I.I 



DRY GOODS REV] E \\ 




I 



Your Easter Requirements 



These two Trade Metros mean 
Maximum Value and Smartness 



P. K. COMPANY, LIMITED 

Successors to 

PERRIN FRERES & CIE 

Sommer Bldg., Montreal 



iSSS= 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



201 




should be anticipated NOW 



These two Trade Marias will faithfully 
maintain the reputation of your House 

P. K. COMPANY, LIMITED 

\ 

Successors to 

PERRIN FRERES & CIE 

Sommer Bldg., Montreal 



>J 



to: 



l> i; Y GOODS l! i: v I E w 




oforr 



ring 



I 8 *' 66 
((Wellington 

l st w. I, 





vein 



ng 



T 



ry us 



for S 



carce 



Gooch 



SILK NETS 

Black, White, light colors. 



METAL LACES 

Big assortment 
Gold, Antique, Steel, Silver. 



LACES 

Special value in assortments. 
Four lots at attractive prices. 



[SILK BRIDAL VEILS 



36,C0 doz. up. 



That big seller in V eils. 

"MONA LISA" 

will arrive soon again in black 
and colors. 



Our Salesmen start out January IQth 
Wa;c, or write us. 



PANADAYEILING CQ 



LIMITED 



TORONTO 





J 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



203 



m 



I 




No. 1568/P 



The Registered Trade Name 

(Oar- €x\am 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

Stands for 

The Highest Quality Obtainable 

in Display Forms 

The merchants of Canada realize this — as a 
result our Fall orders for DUR-ENAM Forms 
greatly exceeded our manufacturing facilities. 
In order to better meet the ever-increasing de- 
mands for DUR-ENAM Forms, we have recently 
made extensive alterations to our factory. With 



s 





No. 1150 



treble our former capacity we now confidently hope to make prompt deliveries of DUR-ENAM 
Forms, Wax Figures, and Display Fixtures for the Spring trade. 
Avoid any possibility of disappointment by 

PLACING YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE! 
We manufacture the most complete line of Display Fixtures and Artistic Wax Figures made 
in Canada. 

Send for illustrated Folder and Price List. 

CLATWORTHY & SON, LIMITED 



Established 1896 



TORONTO 



Incorporated 1908 



AGENTS: Vancouver, B.C., M. E. Hatt & Co., Mercantile Bldg. Winnipeg, Man., O'Brien Allan Co., Phoenix Block 

Montreal, Que., E. O. Barette & Co., 301 St. James St. Halifax, N.S., D. A. Gorrie, Box 273 




204 



DRY GOODS REV] E W 



U A GOOD OLD PROVERB" 



THE PRESENT 

CRY 

ALL OVER 
CANADA 

IS 

NO GOODS 
NO GOODS 



"KING SOLOMON" 

IN THE BOOK OF PROVERBS 

SAID: 

Go to the little ant, thou sluggard, and 
learn its ways and be wise, a little 
animal that has no overseer, protects 
itself with food in the summer to have 
enough for its family in the winter. 

AND WHAT A WISE PROVERB! 

The merchants, "Such Wise Men." 
should have protected themselves with 
merchandise when goods were low, 
when foolish people had cold feet, 
that was the time to buy and protect 
your trade and country. 



THE PRESIDENT OF OUR COMPANY STUDIED WELL 

THE BIBLE AND ITS PROVERBS 



WE HAVE 


WE HAVE 


PROTECTED 


WHITE LINGERIE 


OUR CUSTOMERS 


WAISTS 




AT THE OLD PRICES 


AND ARE READY 


MIDDIES AND 


TO STAND BY THEM 


HOUSE DRESSES 


FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS 


CREPE DE CHINE -r\ T AATTCPC 
IIABl TAI SII.K r>L,ll \J &Ej& 
GEORGETTE A-* -■— * V-^ ^s K^r m^ *k^t 



THE 



STANDARD FACTORY of CANADA 



LIMITED 



- 1 



OFFICE WD PLANT 
DENIS, Dl LI I'll AND DROLET STREETS 



MONTREAL 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



205 



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The last word in Knitting Yarns 

B0NW0RTH YARNS 



Their delightful quality, always so 
quickly recognized, and their beauti- 
ful colorings in such a variety of 
shades — have made them immensely 
popular everywhere. 

Two of our special lines are — 

"SUPER" 

and 

"ELECTRA" 

The former is a 2-ply Floss, sold in 
balls, and the latter a w 4-ply fingering 
yarn, sold in skeins. Both are ideal 
yarn that cannot be surpassed for 
beauty and charm. 




CANADIAN WOOLLENS, LIMITED 



PETERBOROUGH 



Wor.ted Yarn Spinners and Dyers 




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.'ir.-ir.ir.-imr.-ir.-ir.-ir.-ir.-ir.irnrnmr.nr.nr.nr.-ir.nr.nr.nr.-ir.nr.nr.nr.'- 



1RADC WARM 



206 



I! E A.DY -TO - W E A i; 



Dry Goods Review 



Fashions in Pans 




\ prettj evening cloak in green and gold lame. The > o k t- is >;old lame on ground 
• ■I black velvet. There is a wide scarf of unld gauze finished «ith gold tassels. A fox 
lur finishes the neck. The lining is black liberty satin. 

"Robe Lillian" is the name given to the little dinner dress of black crepe satin. 
The sleeves are of black lare. and the sides, forming modified panniers, are trimmed 
%. i l h black lace. The girdle is novel, being fashioned of wool and yellow pearls. Sent 
direct to l»IO GOODS REVIEW from Charles Drecoll, Ltd., Paris. France. 



READY-TO-WEAR 



207 



Late Winter Models 




A luxurious Winter coat in two-piece effect is this one of caracul plush, from the 
Shelton looms, with deep fur trimming. 

The evening wrap is of chiffon velvet with wide opossum collar, cuffs and bands. 
The sleeves are cut more on the kimona than the dolman plan, but roominess and 
comfort are maintained with good lines. Photos from Sydney Blunv-nthal & Co., 
New York. 






l; E A I> Y -TO-W E A R 



Dry Goods Review 



Fashionable New York Apparel 




i. ■ ~p, -hj* '- a -•;;::''j:,;;"::::r;!;,i;::';:S KMS sa 



prod-. 

Schoen Silk ( orporation, Sew \orK 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



209 



New York Spring Styles 




Two attractive new toilettes, showing at the left a hint of tin- incoming of pleats. 
The interesting design, with its hraidinu. is developed in "Ruff-a-nurT"" »ilk. Side full- 
ness is again noted at the right, \>ith a trace of tht- /<>um\ »■ >kin. This attractive model 
is made of the new "chinchilla" satin. Photos from H. K. Mallinson & Co., New York. 






K E A 1) Y-TO-W E \ K 



Dry Goods Revievi 



1920 Fashions for Sport 




Two of ilu- ne* sport costumes for the coming season The "Sportsangora" sleeve- 
Photos from Nathan Schnsn. New ^ ork. 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



211 




DRESS FABRICS 



Silk and wool duvetyns; fancy cotton 
Silk and wool serges; taffeta, heavy 

onette, fine, plain and embossed trecos; 

ratine; foulards; printed and striped Geor 

organdies. 



and plain wool gabardines, 
cord and crepe silks; satins, including bar- 
heavy crepe de Chines; silk taffeta; heavy 
gettes; printed chiffons; voiles; ginghams; 



COATS 

Shorter than last season; 36-38 in. Polo cloth, 
helted. Straight and semi-fitted lines; slightly 
flaring- below the waist; flat pockets; convertible 
collars; straight and flaring sleeves; capes 
shorter than last season. Wraps are loose, with 
large full collars and resemble capes as much 
as coats. 



SUITS 

Bloused, Eton and bolero lines; some straight 
boxed models. Fancy openings and irregular hem 
lines; narrow belts or silk or braided girdles; 
some have decided side flare below the waist. 
Tuxedo and other modest styles of collars; inset 
pockets; narrow sleeves. Braid and embroidery 
trimming. Skirts straight and simple, comfort- 
ably wide. 

DRESSES 

Sheer silk gowns are soft and draped still; 
sleeves short or else three-quarter and loose. 
Skirts fairly full — taffetas strong; lace, bead 
and embroidery trimming. Heavy silks and wool 
cloths more tailored; trimmed with brushed wool 
or Angora; tunic styles, long sleeves, some deep 
armholes; round and square necks; narrow, loose 
belts. 

BLOUSES 

Short sleeves for dressy styles, long for 
tailored. Round and square necks; many printed 
and fancy materials; lace trimming, also tucks, 
hemstitching, beadwork and embroidery; tunic- 
styles strong. 

SKIRTS 

Separate skirts are short, 10 to 12 in. from 
ground. Pleated and accordeon pleated, flaring 
slightly from hips; smooth fitting around hips 
and waist. Georgette crepe, crepe de Chine, all 
the novelty silks and satins, also white gabardine, 
white jersey and novelty serges and velours. 



MILLINERY 

Glossy trimmings, straws and ornaments; cite 
ribbons and silks; malines; straw cloth, new; 
Breton sailors; chin chins, raffia embroidery, puf- 
fed satin brims; telescope crowns, medium and 
small sizes continuing with off-the-face effects. 

NECKWEAR 

Lace, net and embroidery in ecru in "petal" 
or "tab" round collars; vestees, waistcoats in 
elaborate ribbons, brocades, etc. Plain white 
organdie and pique tuxedos. 

GLOVES 

!.! and lfi-button lengths gaining; long silk 
gloves to be good for Summer. White kids good 
just now. Tan, grey, sand, mastic, taupe, navy. 
brown, black, all good for Easter. 

RIBBONS 

(ire ribbons for millinery show some ten- 
dencies to be good for dress trimmings also. 
Elaborate brocades and metallic effects show 
much more intricate patterns than formerly. 
Used for bodices, waistcoats, sashes, panels, bags, 
etc. Many uses for lingerie ribbons. 

PURSES AND HAND BAGS 

Fancy silk bags on conservative frames; velvet 
bags very strong: kodak purses in ostrich and 
zebu grains new. Avenue- bags still popular. 

VEILS 

Veilings of more interest to buyers than separ- 
ate veils; Spanish spots and fancy meshes popu- 
lar; black, brown, castor, navy, and some purple 
selling for Spring. 

SWEATERS 

Tuxedo strong. Flaring skirts and flaring 
lower sleeves prominent; some slip-overs; fine 
wools and silks coming in. Bright colors in 
wider variety then ever. Filet, combined with 
plain and fancy knitting. 



212 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



New Models from Canadian Houses 




Up-to-date in everj lint- is this Spring suit of navj gabardine. Vote the full 
Tuxedo, the black military braid tfivinu a bolero effect, the narrow leather belt, the 
silk \cstec richly embroidered in black, scarlet and gold; and the uneven hem of <he 
jacket. Shown bj the Ontario Cloak Co., Toronto. 

Georgette loses none of its attraction, though it has several seasons' vogue to its 

credit. This m-vv afternoon frock of Georgette is elaborately beaded and embroidered, 
and takes note of tl"- lashion for round necks, louse sleeves and sofl '.'irdles. from 
the \ rt Cloak and Suit Co., Ltd.. Montreal. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



213 



For Misses 



1920 SpringftCoat 





Interesting, indeed, is this smart, straight-line suit of all-wool velour, in brown and 
tan checks. The strap trimming of the material cut bias is new. The suit is silk 
lined. Shown by Lazare & Novek, Montreal. 

What a swagger sport coat is this of tan polo cloth in which to withstand March 
winds! The unique flared pockets and straight across collar are its newest features. 
Shown bv Barron & Dick, Toronto. 



214 



Mid-Winter in New York 

Luxury on Every I land. But Inconspicuous Styles Characterizing Street Costumes Evening 

Wear Elaborate and Costly Main- Precious Little \ lies of Fine Quality. 

Thee article was written by staff member of Dry Goods Review who made a special trip to New York for this 



NEW YORK, December, 1919: It's 
a rich man's Christmas and 
everybody is rich. So one might 
characterize, in brief, the atmosphere of 
the Christmas Bhopping season. The 

stoics are filled with Rood things from 

Occident and Orient, from the far south 
and from the north. The best of every- 
thing* bad been culled. Cheap and tawdry 
merchandise is conspicuous by its 

absence, and while no doubt many a 
shopper would like to make her pur- 
chases at perhaps half the price she is 
paying, on the whole she is pleased be- 
yond measure with the gifts which she 
is able to carry home this year. 

Heaver Browns Frequent 

On the streets New York does not ap- 
pear in elaborate toilette, particularly 
in the day time. There is quite notice- 
able a popularity for beaver colored 
suits and coats and for various other 
shades of brown. These are richly trim- 
med with beaver fur, but other fur 
trimmings have been showing and in 
coats and jackets Hudson seal is fashion- 
able still. 

Small hats are worn everywhere. But 
when Milady opens her purse to pay for 
her Christmas selection of gifts one 
notices immediately that it is an ex- 
quisite beaded or brocaded bag which 
holds her money, and this may be valued 



at anywhere from $20 to $100 or more. 
She has quite laid aside her cretonne 
shopping bag which was so much in evi- 
dence bast year and more so the year be- 
fore. These chintz, cretonne and other 
fabric shopping bags which were a dis- 
tinct fad so ^hort a while ago are no 
more seen. When one carries small 
parcels this Season, one carries them in 
a Boston bag and this bag is alike the 
property of men, women and youth. It 
is a bag usually of soft, plain, brown 
leather, measuring from 12 to 14 inches 
long, with an oval-shaped bottom and 
soft, plain, leather top, fitted into a 
leather covered frame with round, 
leather covered handle, but no clasp. 
Then there is also the small-sized club 
bag and stiff leather shopping bag or 
satchel with the regulation frame and 
clasp but these are not quite so popular 
as the Boston bag. 

One next notices when Milady is pay- 
ing for her purchases that her hand is 
well gloved. She does not necessarily 
wear the fine, French gloves which were 
on everybody's hands a few years ago. 
Nevertheless, her fabric or heavy, silk 
glove with novelty embroidery or cuff is 
a well fitting glove; or her heavier wash- 
able cape or mocha glove is of a color to 
match her outer garments, and it too fits 
her well. 



Her veil is neat but one must allow 
he'- at times to keep the coy — and to 
the masculine taste — unreasonable, spots 
which figure on her cheek or across her 
eyes or chin. Her shoe is a well-fitted 
one, also in a shade of brown to match 
her suit. It is on a graceful last with 
comfortable walking heel and a sole of 
practical weight. If her shoes are high 
she probably wears silk hose of the $2 
to $3 order. If it is an Oxford she 
wears, she may have a good English 
wool, cashmere hose to match the shoe 
and possibly spats of a suitable tone. 
Taking her general street turnout, Lady 
New York is plainly and practically 
gowned and seldom appears in what is 
extreme in style or loud in color. 

Luxurious Evening Garments 

On colder days furs are gorgeous and 
in the evening one sees New York in her 
good clothes. Social occasions are the 
centre of interest in daily life and there- 
fore they must be provided for in her 
wardrobe also. There is nothing too 
gorgeous or luxurious to appeal to 
Milady as within the realm of her pos- 
sible possession. Rich brocades, ex- 
quisitely draped furs, satins and velvets, 
perfect specimens of ostrich fans and 
bags, elaborate footwear and headwear 
seem to be the property of the majority. 



Modes of the Moment (is Seen in New York 




Black rhifTon velvet with 
green satin sash. 




Black satin quilted. El- 
bow sleeves and cham- 
pagne kid gloves. 



\ 





Henna peach-bloom with 
cartridge pleating. 



4 
Taffeta or serge frock 
with novel panniers. 
Tailored effect. 



Evening frock of ceriae 
taffeta and gold lace. 



For fuller descriptions see accompanying article. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



215 



Just to mention one bit of toggery 
which Fifth Ave. is featuring, there is 
silk hosiery which you find inset with 
•delicate lace over the instep and up the 
front in the usual way, but the pattern 
at the join is outlined with small 
brilliants which no doubt add much to 
the whole glittering toilet. Of course, 
the weaver must be careful not to get 
nervous and rub one foot against the 
other or the gems would be liable to 
form a "Jacob's ladder." 

Short Sleeves and Supple Lines 

The accompanying sketches will give 
you some idea of the fashionable gowns 
which characterize the mid-Winter 
season this year. Louise, on Fifth 
Avenue, shows the black chiffon velvet 
model. The skirt appears to be made 
simply with two tucks so deep that they 
form tiers. The bodice is perfectly plain 
with round neck and short, tight sleeves. 
A striking bit of color relief is provided 
in the soft, myrtle, green, satin sash 
with deep silk fringe on both ends. 

On Fifth Ave. a shopper was noted 
wearing a trim tailored costume of 
black satin quilted all over. It was 
made in the simple, slightly fitted lines 
shown in No. 2; a narrow leather belt, 
small taupe fox fur and long champagne 
kid gloves were worn with it. 

Richness of color and fabric were 
well displayed in No. 3, a henna toned 
silk duvetyn, with no other trimming 
whatever than bands of cartridge pleat- 
ing of the same material. This gown 
•depicts a style that is ultra smart for 
early Spring. 

The unusual panniers of No. 4 are the 
result of a straight piece of the taffeta 
held around the hips, but much too large 
to fit; it is caught into folds across the 
front and back and the balance is just 
left to go its own bouffant way at either 
side. This idea is used in black taffeta 
afternoon frocks and was also noted in 
a navy blue serge dress. 

A unique idea for an evening frock is 
shown in No. 5. The skirt is cut off 
short at the sides and left long front 
and back to give the full sides so much 
in vogue. The material is cerise taffeta. 
This section of the dress is edged with 
three little frills of the taffeta. A drop 
skirt of deep gold lace gives a richness 
that is charming; the bodice is likewise 
filled in with gold lace. Another model 
was seen in this style but developed in 
black satin and black chantilly lace. 

Gold Kid Purses a Novelty 

Among the new accessories offered to 
the exclusive trade are small, flat purses 
of real tortoise shell. These are round- 
ed at the corners and are set in plain, 
narrow, dull, gold frames. Little, flat 
purses of 2% to 4 inches in length, 
made of soft, gold finished kid are quite 
a new item and are causing much delight. 
There is almost an epidemic of beaded 
bags in the shops this year. They 
amount almost to a speculation for 
practically every shop that has any ap- 
peal to make to women passersby does 
it by showing an array of beaded bags 
in its window. The designs, coloring and 
shapes are legion, and, as sug- 




A Visitor to Canada 

This is not "Victoire," but it is Mrs. 
Coburn, who plays "Victoire" with her hus- 
band in "The Better 'Ole." It was remarked 
during her stay in Toronto that Mrs. Co- 
burn bears a strong resemblance to our 
former Princess Patricia. Like the Prin- 
cess, Mrs. Coburn's costumes are simple of 
line, but artistic in effect. Here she is 
wearing a beautiful silk negligee. When en- 
tertained by the Toronto Women's Press 
Club she wore a black velvet gown in 
straight lines, with tunic, and trimmed with 
gold and bead bands. Her hat was a black 
velvet Breton faced with bright green vel- 
vet, a black tassel hanging from under the 
brim against her hair, and there were nar- 
row tulle ties bow-knotted under her chin. 

gested earlier in this article, 

the price runs up in the hun- 
dreds. For "everyday" wear, however, 
the velvet bag is the thing. $3.75 to 
$10.00 is the price range which takes in 
most of these. 

Lord and Taylor's are showing some 
novel knitted silk scarfs. These are in 
shawl style with a wide, fancy stripe 
forming a panel dowTi the back; a knit- 
ted belt is attached across the back and 
fastens over the front sections; the 
upper edge folds back to form a collar 
and revers. 

Latest Touches in Blouses 

One of the smartest tailored blouses 
noted was of tomato colored crepe 
meteor with rows of faggotting in the 
same color connecting bands of it. Vic- 
tory and dragonfly blues have much 
favor for blouses. Some of these have 
American Beauty satin girdles. At 
Saks a whole display of high grade 
blouses was shown with red satin girdles, 
the majority of the blouses were in these 
bright blues. One was trimmed very 
effectively on collar and cuffs with a 



touch of henna satin. Browns, sand 
shades, pinks and navys are also among 
the colors featured prominently in most 
of the shops. Short sleeves are gaining 
favor every day for the more dressy 
styles. 

There has been quite a liking for 
accordeon pleating this season. Some 
buyers and manufacturers speak highly 
of it for Spring too, but opinions differ 
in that regard. However, there are 
some attractive smock blouses and 
frocks featuring it at present. One 
costume at Arnold Constable's showed 
a heavy coral crepe skirt with one-inch 
pleats all the way around; worn with it 
was a finely accordeon pleated Georgette 
smock in the same color. The pleating 
was caught into half-inch bands at the 
round neck and on the short sleeve." 
The girdle was made of the Georgette 
braided. 

Corduroy smocks in rather bright 
colors including canary, turquoise, jade, 
etc., and trimmed with wool, hand em- 
broidery in a variety of colors are shown 
in several of the shops. Wanamaker's 
show in their French shops several 
smart smocks with hats to match. Such 
materials as taffeta and silk duvetyn 
are favored. One set in henna, one in 
navy, one in rose with white, and one 
with yellow and white were especially 
attractive. 

Original Items for the Kiddies 

The styles for kiddies are quite dis- 
tinctly their own and perhaps more at- 
tractive just now than ever before. 
Smock dresses for girls are very smart. 
Some of the new numbers at Wana- 
maker's have striped chambray shirts 
with plain colored smocks. White pique 
which is always in good taste for chil- 
dren was made up into a smart design 
in which the front section was caught 
by black sash ties, knotted softly at the 
back. A narrow black tie was worn at 
the neck also. The little peg-top 
rompers are proving quite successful and 
there are one piece apron dresses in 
colors such as green, rose, etc., with ties 
holding the back and front panels in 
place. 

Gidding's show a dainty little party 
frock of pale pink Georgette. One-inch 
velvet ribbon in the same shade hangs in 
stripes over the skirt and each piece is 
fastened loosely under the hem — a sug- 
gestion from the culotte skirt, possibly; 
at the waist is a fascinating girdle of 
little blue silk flowers, fine lace finishes 
the neck and sleeves. 

One of the original playthings for 
kiddies shown at Wanamaker's is the 
crow seat. A huge black crow, about 
2 feet to 30 inches high seems to be 
standing on one foot with his wings out- 
spread. The outspread wings form a 
seat which every little kiddie wants to 
try. With exception of his beak and eye, 
Master Crow is jet black— made of 
smooth-finished enamelled wood. 

An Effective Display Idea 

A little rounded corner window in 
which Lord and Taylor's usually have 
something original to show, one day be- 
fore Christmas contained a step ladder 



216 



R E A.DY-TO- W E \ R 



Dry Goods Ri vii u 




Two turquoise blue "week-end" suits for warmer weather wear, and an 

apricot color "week-end " frock with a separate coat (risht). The smart 

accessor] items, as well as the garments, are of silk. By courtesy of 

.). A. Migel, Inc., New York. 



painted entirely with dull tinsel paint; 
From its fraii ( and steps were shiny 
hangings suggesting frost and icicles. 
This made a m ique stand for displaying 

odd toys cl" various character and is an 

.\ hich tie "V could adopt 

with little expense. Wouldn't it be ef- 
fective in a spring display adorned or 
twined with cherry blossoms? A few 

days later Lord and Taylor had in their 
window a beautiful hand-made minia- 
ture of an Italian Cathedral. 

Despite a week of rainy weather in 
the most of the shopping season, the 
New York stores are all happs over the 
keen interesl and hie; purchases by 
shoppers. This season has been the 
most successful 'in .their history and 
hopes are high for the New Year, that 
more goods will be available than was 
possible this year. There seems no fear 
of continued ready sale. By the way, 
during that rainy week an unusually 
smart cape was seen on the Avenue. It 
was a full length one, of course, and 
was made of Black Watch plaid in very 
ift, fine materia] which ke.^t the weight 
light. 



New Flowered Voile Frocks 

Exquisite Fabrics Made Up in Variety of New Styles— Net, Ribbon and Satin Trimmings- 
Silk and Tinsel Embroidery on Serge Dresses. 



BACK again more beautiful than 
ever is the dress of flowered voile 
in a wealth of colors and all man- 
ner of fascinating designs. Some are 
original and others have appeared be- 
fore in printed Georgette. So enthusias- 
tic did one dealer wax that he declared 
they were going to be five times as good 
as last year. Already, he claims, he has 
received 400 per cent, more orders than 
he had at this time a year ago. Prices 
are going up higher than any one an- 
ticipated, and English voiles that cost 
26d. a yard when ordered at the be- 
ginning of the season are now priced 
34d. for repeat orders, 33 1-3 per cent, 
increase inside of a few months. But 
then in silks and serges, dress manufac- 
turers are unable even to get quotations 
before next Fall. 

Short-sleeved dresses are going well,, 
although the more cautious buyers are 
placing at least 50 per cent, of their 
orders on the long-sleeved lines. These 
printed voiles are made up in a wide 
variety of styles and really look so smart 
that it is not expected there will be any 
difficulty in obtaining the comparative- 
ly hiirh prices that are being asked. For 
the little white or yellow ticket that the 
customer will look for when she goes 
to purchase her Summer wardrobe is 
lii ble to say anything between $10 and 
$40. 

Net Lace and Trims 
\ great deal of cream net and lace is 



being used in combination with the voile. 
It appears in frilly neckpieces, puffed 
vestees and flaring cuffs. The tab. col- 
lars of lace or net mentioned elsewhere 
in this issue are noted on many of the 
smartest numbers. 

Plain voile in matching shades is used 
in combination with the flowered and 
also with harmonizing colors in frocks 
of all-plain materials. 

Ribbons make an attractive trimming. 
They are applied in a variety of novel 
designs. One frock with a round neck 
and "baby" sleeves had the neck and 
sleeve hems edged with loops of navy 
satin ribbon on inch wide. Through 
these loops inch wide scarlet ribbon was 
threaded to tie in a fetching little bow. 
Wide Girdles 

The inch wide ribbon sometimes finds 
place as a girdle with a tiny bow and 
long streamers at the back, but most of 
the waistlines are concealed beneath 
wide crushed girdles of self material or 
satin. 

This latter material harmonizes well 
with the dull finish of the fine voile and 
is used not only as girdles but as cuffs 
and revel's as well. 

The skirts show a varied development. 
There are peplums single and double, 
and a few of the longer overskirts. 
Little draped effects appear here, and 
again at back or side which remind one 
what an admirable material voile is for 
such purposes. A few tiny frills are 



shown, placed at the edge of peplums or 
diagonally across a plain straight skirt; 
but they are not introduced as lavishly 
as last year. 

More Tabs 

Tabs are not being confined to collars 
but are used elsewhere as well on some 
dresses. One dainty model made of shell 
pink voile and trimmed profusely with 
narrow Valenciennes had two wide tabs 
down the back, edged with lace. 

Dresses of embroidered voile in all 
white are on the market and are report- 
ed to be taking well in some localities. 

Silk and Serge Numbers 

For early spring wear there are gen- 
erally a number of silk and serge dresses 
sold. In serge, embroidery of silk and 
tinsel is very strong and seems to have 
ousted beading almost entirely. Wide hip 
effects, known otherwise as "the Velas- 
quez silhouette," are introduced in a few 
taffeta numbers but it is not yet known 
how the trade will like them. One of 
these had a straight skirt with a panel 
at both sides, front and back, of accord- 
eon pleating three winches wide. 

It is expected that the dress season 
will be a good one this year; but there 
is a feeling among the manufacturers 
that if business is too good on tailored 
gowns in the Spring, they will be unable 
to procure materials for next Fall's 
trade. Possibly, however, "something 
will turn up before then." 



Dry Goods Revieiv 



READY-TO-WEAR 



Navy Blue for Suits 

Materials are Varied — Tailored and Tuxedo Effects Good- 
Narrow Leather Belts — Uneven Hems. 



NOTHING has yet been found to 
supersede navy blue in milady's 
favor for her Spring suits. Thus 
the great majority of models being 
shown are of that shade whose general 
becomingness and adaptability to many 
occasions has kept it so long in the lead. 
Materials being shown are tricotines, 
jerseys, serges, gabardines, poire and 
twills, with tweeds and shantung for 
sport models. 

Styles are varied, and, instead of de- 
veloping any very new designs, seem 







rather to illustrate the most attractive 
features that modish suits have shown 
during the past several seasons. 

There are quite a few strictly tailored 
designs with braid bound lapels. Nar- 
row shawl or Tuxedo collars are best. 
Bloused models are shown, but most 
have a plain loose-fitting waist, in a 
straight-line effect. Some few are 
smoother fitting, with moderately rip- 
pled skirts, the fullness chiefly at the 
sides. Others have skirts laid in flat 
pleats tacked down. 

Eton Effects Shown 

Although Eton jackets are seen in 
New York in misses' sizes, the general 
opinion is that they will not prove very 
attractive throughout the Canadian 
trade. A similar effect is noticed in a 
few designs, but practically no real 
Etons will be shown. 

Then there are the belts to be men- 
tioned — very narrow ones and of leather 
or suede, in a great many cases. Some 
have one small buckle fastening; some 
two. The cloth ones now and again tie 
at the back or front. 

Concerning vestees. We shall have 
them with us again in the Spring of 
1920. But, although cleverly embroid- 
ered and tucked, they seem to have 
abandoned the place of prominence they 
occupied last season. Many of the 
vestees reach only to the waist-line, and 
give the impression of a blouse front 
being revealed by the half-open jacket. 
In fact, the chief place of vestees in 



217 

Spring lines appears to be that of con- 
tributing to the uneven outline of the 
coat skirt. 

Uneven Hem Lines 

This outline is created by means of 
box pleats extending down the front and 
back, to about four inches below the 
rest of the skirt. Other skirts show an 
imitation of a man's frock coat. Still 
others are seen made of two side and 
one back panels simulating petals. In 
this respect the ingenuity of the de- 
signer is being brought out to a com- 
mendable degree, and much varitey is 
seen. 

Trimmings have changed little. Sev- 
eral kinds of braid are being used — 
soutache and military being the most 
popular. Tuckings, too, are used on 
pockets and vestees, and hand embroid- 
ery in tinsel or silk lends an air of dis- 
tinction to some of the dressier models. 
Fancy machine stitching is very good, 
also. 

Skirts are generally plain, shorter 
than last year, about one and a half 
yards around the bottom, and about 
eight inches from the floor. One model 
seen, of sand color Poiret twill, was 
gathered to a yoke at front and back, 
which was ornamented with half a 
dozen rows of royal blue stitching. The 
same trimming was featured on the 
jacket. 

Suit manufacturers are hoping that 
the pronounced vogue for dresses which 
has been in force for so many seasons 
now will subside for the Spring season 
to some extent, and give suits "their 
day"; but dress people and dress buyers 
are of the opinion that the life of the 
dress fashions will be maintained with 
that of automobiles, and that looks like 
a "sure thing" into the indefinite future. 




Silk Lingerie Holding its Own 

In Spite of Talk of Revival of White Cotton Underwear — Laces 

and Pin Tucks for Trimming — Satin and Embroidered 

Georgette New. 




Here are a few sketches showing the un- 
usual hem lines of some of the season's 
smartest suit models. The designs illus- 
trated are only indicative of the various 
modes. 



A REVIVAL of the popularity of 
white cotton undergarments is be- 
ing talked about by some dealers. 
Their chief reason is the ever-increas- 
ing price of silk underwear and the in- 
ability of the average customer to pay 
it when next Summer arrives. Another 
reason is the talked-of revival of the 
lingerie dress. To this end, American 
manufacturers are creating princess 
slips of sheer white fabrics trimmed 
with net ruffles and lace insertions. 

Nevertheless, silk lingerie is still a 
most important item in the Canadian 
trade. Satins and habutais are leading. 
Crepe de Chine appears in the highest 
grade lines, but its durability is not con- 
sidered as great as the other two fabrics. 

White, flesh and pink continue to be 
the leading shades in spite of the colors 
that are predicted in New York for 
novelty lingerie. True, the specialty 



stores here show fragile sets in pale 
green, or orange Georgette with black 
lace, maybe, or rose velvet trimmings 
— the sort of thing that makes a man 
say: "Do they really wear 'em?" and 
a few lines in pale blue or mauve are 
sold by the average retailer. But the 
bulk of the trade sticks with the old 
conservative hues. 

In more elaborate garments, rich ef- 
fects are obtained by the use of fine 
laces for ornamentation, by dainty 
hand-embroidery, or by combining with 
embroidered Georgette. 

These combinations are new and very 
attractive. One model seen was of pink 
satin with a wide band of white Georg- 
ette embroidered in pink. New York is 
showing the "chemaloon," a wash satin 
combination of chemise and bloomers, 
and trimmed with lace and ribbon flow- 
(Continued on page 218) 






i; i: \ nv-Tii- w E a i: 



Dry Qoode !!• • •■ w 



What of the Sports Coat ? 

Opinions Vary on Three-quarters or Full Length Models — Straight 
Lines Good Question of Buyers Spreading Orders. 



THERE i- a difference of opinion 
amongst manufacturers as to 
whether the 94 -length sports coat, 
introduced in New York last Kail and 
popular here in fur styles this Winter, 
is going to have a definite vogue for 
Spring, L920, The styles and fabrics 
nted are charming enough, but the 
question is: Will they take with the 
bulk of the trade '.' 

Some argue that the fact that the 
shorter coats, taking less material, may 
\»- sold for a smaller price will attract 
attention to them. Others say that when 
a woman has to pay $35 for a sport coat, 
which cannot be worn on all occasions, 
she will rather pay $45 or $. r )0 for a full- 
length model, useful for all purpo 

That is, of course, outside of the high- 
class trade, where customers are used 
to buying more than one new coat in a 
season. 

Straight Loose Lines 

There is no doubt, however, that trade 
will be good in the staple garment — 
full-length coats of gabardine, broad- 
cloth or silvertone. Little that's new in 
style has been introduced; straight. 
loose lines being the rule. The day of 
the dolman is believed to be passed, ex- 
cept, perhaps, as a Summer wrap. 

One smart coat shown was of grey 
broadcloth on straight lines, with a nar- 
row notched collar and a short, slightly 
flaring panel set over each hip. 

The sports jackets are made of polo 
cloth, covert cloth, gabardine or silver- 
tones. They are cut on loose comfort- 
able lines and manv have a decided ten- 



demy to flare out towards the hem. 
Trimmings are negligible, but in the 
smoother fabrics, tuckings of various 
sorts art' seen on pockets or cuffs. Belts 
are narrow, sometimes made of self 
material; oftener it is a belt of leather 
in a matching shade with a tiny buckle. 

Retailers Musi Act First 

In commenting on the report of the 
Montreal Cloak and Suit Manufacturers' 
banquet, which appeared in the Decern 
ber issue of DRY GOODS REVIEW, a 
traveller for a prominent Toronto firm 
referred to the subject discussed of urg- 
ing retailers to spread out their pur- 
chases. "Such a movement," he stated, 
"must assuredly come from the mer- 
chants themselves. It will come eventu- 
ally, but the trade is not yet educated to 
its necessity. Most merchants purchas- 
ing stock are just like my wife when 
she goes to buy a dress. She looks at 
all the goods in one store and then she 
says. 'Well, I'll go and have a look in 
such and such another store before I 
decide,' and so on, until she finally has 
to come back to the first store and tak" 
the first one she liked. They don't want 
to buy until they have seen everybody's 
line. So, even if we have our samples 
ready early, we have to wait until every- 
one else is ready before we can get well 
away with our orders. The manufac- 
turers can do nothing but beg and plead 
until the buyers get the habit of buying 
systematically in and out of season, so 
that we can keep going throughout the 
year." 



Original Idea for Marking Tickets 

Sr. Catharines Merchant Uses Colors Instead of Size Figures- 
Finds He Can Fit Some Customers A4ore Satisfactorily 

This Way. 



HERE is a novel scheme used by 
the Hoffman Cloak Co., of St. 
Catharines, Out , and originated 
by Mr. Hoffman himself, who believes 
that, as in selling shoes, it is not neces- 
sary for a customer to know the exact 
size of the garment she is purchasing, 
women, he claims, just verging on 
stoutness who have been accustomed to 
buy n 36 or .'IS size suit do not care to 
he reminded of their coming fate by 
being told that they can no longer wear 
anything smaller than size 40. 

Thus, a customer comes and asks for 
i ut the salesgirl, seeing at a glance 
that she can only be ftttted with a 40, 
quietly shows a 40 and th« customer 
knows no difference unless -mc inquires 
closely. The idea is not to have the 
size marked on the ticket but indicated 
to the sales staff alone by the color of 
th( ticket. The levice is quite simple 



as illustrated by the cut shown. The 
colorr. mentioned here, however, are not 
exactly those used in the store referred 
to. 

The shades named enumerate the dif- 
ferent colors of tickets used. The let- 
ter.- at the top, L, M, C, B, refer to the 
various classes of garments. "Ladies, 
.Misses, an! Children's, and Babies." 
For blouses, a ticket, of smaller size 
than the others is used. The numbers 
underneath show the sizes. Thus, the 





L 


tl 


c 


e 


SKIRT4 


Blue 


34 


t¥ 


4 


/ 


zzss-zit 


Yellow- 


J6 


llo 


? 


Z 


2S-2i 


Pink 


3? 


IS 


10 


3 


Z1-Z3 


Red 


¥o 


zo 


IZ 


4 


Zf-SO 


Purple 


>J-Z 




tf 


s 


31 -32 


White 


1//// 






6 


3Z-M 


Green 


'A 






7 


3S--H-3! 



SILK LINGERIE HOLDING ITS own 

(Continued from page 217) 

era. The bloomers are finished with 
Oblong "petals," which hang like a frill 
below the knees. 

Next to lace of all sorts, the most 
favored trimming seems to be pin tucks. 
They may be placed in rows, squares, 
or diamonds. 

Camisoles cut on bodice lines are the 
prevailing mode, but many women are 
beginning to" prefer the painted shoul- 
ders. On the whole, little is new in 
styles; envelopes, camisoles and bloom- 
ers being the staple garment. 



w\ 


m &* m 

mi 




■hm 



For Evening Wear 

A hlliiiL' underskirt for the most shimmer- 
ing dance frock is this brief affair in >hell 
pink satin without flounce or ruffle. It has 
a hemstitched hem and pale blue embroid- 
ery. Shown by H. P. Ritchie A. Co., Toronto. 

ticket itself shows only the price of the 
garment and a letter L, M, C, or B. Sep- 
arate skirts do not need a letter as 
they are so easily distinguished. 

Now, you see how it is put into prac- 
tice. A salesgirl takes a dress from the 
rack, sees a bhie ticket with L marked 
on it and knows instantly that it is a 
ladies' size, 34 bust. Should it be a 
yellow ticket bearing the letter I., she 
knows that it is size 36. If though the 
yellow ticket had on it the letter Bff, it 
would indicate a misses' size 16. In re- 
gard to skirts, the matter is a little 
more difficult as there are so many more 
sizes to take Into consideration But in 
this line, several wp.ist measurements 
arc grouped under each color and the 
correct one discovered by fitting. 

Some merchants might object to this 
method on the ground that when the 
customer asks decidedly whether the 
garment is the size she asked for. the 
saleswoman may have to admit— upon 
occasions — that she did rot comply with 
the customer's request and dissatisfac- 
tion ensues at once. However, the point 
of view of Mr. Hoffman is readily appre- 
ciated and he finds that his salespeople 
handle the problem very satisfactorily. 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



219 



Skirts Are Slightly Fuller 

White Gabardine Big for Summer — Trimmed With Pin Tucks and 

Slit Pockets. 



A Pretty Waist 



THE white gabardine skirt prom- 
ises to continue big this coming 
season with the Canadian trade. 
Its most attractive features this year 
are the novel trimmings of pin tucks 
on belt, pocket flaps and above the hem. 
The latter, by the way, is about 60 in. 
around — very slightly wider than last 
year — and 7 to 9 inches off the floor. 

New Pocket Features 

Patch pockets are little seen, having 
been largely displaced by "cut-in" 
pockets, showing much originality in 
the cut and decoration of the flaps. 
Pearl buttons are still used by way of 
ornamentation, but not profusely on ac- 
count of their high price. 

White embroidered gabardine looks 
well in separate skirts also, and seems 
to be taking well. Designs are large 



and form a fancy border above the hem. 
Silk embroidery also finds a place on 
serge skirts, and buyers are showing 
quite a fondness for these lines. Plaid 
and accordeon-pleated models appear in 
the higher-priced garments, but their 
vogue is not assured. 

Pleated Skirts Revive 
Kilted effects and flat pleated lines 
are being introduced and are meeting 
with some popularity. They are pos- 
sibly a forerunner of the fuller skirts 
which Paris and New York have been 
hinting at all Winter. 

The importance of the separate skirt 
for Spring and Summer business can 
hardly be over estimated. 

The well-dressed woman's wardrobe 
must have several, both for sports wear 
and dressier occasions. 




Georgette Blouses for Spring Suits 

Lavish Beading — Over-blouses — Two-tone Effects — The Coming of 

the Short Sleeve. 



GEORGETTE promises to be the 
important fabric for blouses to 
be worn with tailored suits. 
Prices are not showing any sign of ceas- 
ing their advance and it is stated by one 
manufacturer that the larger stores are 
now handling $50 waists without any 
hesitation. 

But then, these expensive waists really 
look like a lot of money to the customer. 
They are lavishly trimmed with beading 
which in many cases takes one girl sev- 
eral days to accomplish on each individ- 
ual model. The hand embroidery too 
helps to boost the price but neverthe- 
less it prevails as the fashionable note. 
Of course some of these waists — the 
overblouse and smock lines — make a 
whole dress when worn with a matching 
skirt. And the overblouse is said to be 
coming in stronger than ever. Smocks, 
too, are promised a good season. 

Many blouses made of combinations 
of two colors of georgette are featured 
and are much liked by the buyer. The 
sand and brown combination and the 
white and copen are favored numbers. 

Round Necks Passing? 

The V-neck is making itself noticeable 
on some of the newest designs and it is 
even predicted that this coming season 
will see the passing of the round neck 
for awhile. But Fashion does not al- 
ways follow predictions and the chances 
are that women will choose whichever 
neck seems most becoming, for some 
time yet. 

Collars are beginning to come back 
also. Just now they may be found at 
the back of some blouses of which the 
front is simply bound, giving the ap- 
pearance of a plain round neck. Then 
there are the square collars on necks 



which maintain the round outline as well. 

Short Sleeves in Most Ranges of 

Samples 

As for short sleeves, the public has 

not yet adopted them wholeheartedly 

and it is predicted by some that they 



Georgette crepe is the material, with dainty 
embroidered collar and cuffs. The two-way 
tucks and double hemstitching add mater- 
ially to the attractive model. Shown by 
Caplin Dress & Waist Company, Montreal. 

will not do so before next Fall. Others 
are more hopeful that they will be pret- 
ty generally worn by Summertime. Thus, 
manufacturers are showing some models 
with full short sleeves and also others 
with long tight sleeves that button at 
the wrist. 




A I q 20 Blouse 

An interesting new sport 
blouse of Georgette crepe 
with plaid Angora collar 
and cuffs. Angora trim- 
ming is quite the feature 
of 1920 outing garments^ 



220 



INFANT'S AND CHILDRENS' SECTION 



Dry Good« Review 



PARTY I ROCKS 

\ W indow of Them at Simpson's Show- 
ed ( 'lexer Designing — Hi^h Waists 
— Medium Full Skirts 

The other day there was an interest- 
ing group of small girls' "best" dl 
in a window of the Robt. Simpson Com- 
pany. Ltd. There were only about half 
a dozen there, but each one was quite 
distinctive and clever touches were ad- 
ded to the display by means of three 
Stands, on which were shown simple 
black velour hats in the tailored styles, 
so suitable to an eight or ten-year-old. 

At the base of two of the stands were 
.1 pair of white kid gloves and a pair of 
black patent "Mary Jane's." Around the 
foot of the third was draped a small 
animal stole of Isabella fox — just the 
right size for a little girl — and beside 
it a junior edition of the fashionable 
ostrich feather fan in canary yellow. 
Can you not imagine how the heart of 
any little girl would stand still with ex- 
citement as she looked in that window; 
and bow her eyes would shine as she 
studied each frock separately and 
selected "the very one she wanted"? 

There was a very simple frock of 
natural colour shantung with a high 
waistline, smocking, and just a few 
touches of embroidery in brown and 
yellow. Another more elaborate model 
was in robin's egg blue taffeta. The 
neck, sleeves, and hem were edged with 
self pleatings, and there were slits at 
each side, bound with pleatings, which 
opened over an inset of Valenciences 
lace. Wool embroidery in shades of 
brown, pink, and mauve adorned the 
yoke. Through neck, sleeves, and high 
waist line, two-toned ribbon in shades 
of blue and rose was threaded and tied 
in bewitching little bows. 

There was one of shell pink net, all 
frilly and with no trimming outside of a 
narrow blue sash and clusters of pink 
velvet forget-me-nots at waist and 
neck. 

Practically all were high-waisted with 
plain yokes and straight gathered 
skirts, medium full. Sleeves were short 
and puffed, or plain with frilled cuffs. 

One little design by way of variation 
had a surplice collar ending in long 
streamers, which crossed in front and 
tied in a perky bow at the back. The 
material was white organdie with frills, 
picot-edged in Copenhagen blue on 
both sides of the ties, and also on the 
skirt and cuffs. 




DAINTY IIKADWEAR 
FOR THE BABY 

Samples are on the road for little 
girls' and babies' headgear for Spring, 
1920, and, although styles and fabrice 
vary little from those of previous 
seasons, much can be done in the way 
of placing a ribbon rosette or a cluster 
of flowers to add distinction to even the 
tiniest of bonnets. 

Faille silks or white silk poplins are 
good sellers, and need only a little 
cording, shirring, or ribbon by way of 
trimming. But for Mid-Summer wear, 
fluffy lingerie headwear is considered 
best. These are made of organdie or 
lawn, befrilled with Valenciennes, finish- 
ed with hand embroidery or threaded 
with ribbon. 

Poke Bonnets Liked 

For two- and three-year-olds, just 
growing out of ordinary bonnets, there 
are artistic poke shapes, made of fine 
straw braids or of straw and Crepe-de- 
chine combinations. It is on these 
smallest of chapeaux that vari-colored 
nosegays, fashioned of satin or velvet, 
make their appearance. 

Then there are the little "tailored" 
hats, so to speak, in pique and starched 
fabrics, that mothers like for the boy- 
baby when he's ju.st beginning to walk. 
In these, the scalloped edge is compet- 
ing with the straight hem, but touches 
of hand embroidery are still used as 
finish. 

Little coats for wearing with these 
hats are made of pique, poplin, or Crepe- 
de-chine. The latter, of course, are for 
the high-class trade. 

Prices show a tendency to increase, 
not for any one particular reason, but 
in keeping with the advancing costs of 
everything. 



RIBBONS 

The past month has seen the arrival 
on the Canadian market of some ex- 
quisite pieces of French and Swiss 
goods which have gladdened the hearts 
of wholesalers in this country. The 
month of December cleared practically 
everything available in the ribbon line 
from their shelves. For the most part, 
these new arrivals were ordered some 
time early last Spring and are only now 
to be had. As one manufacturer put it, 
some of these new patterns are quite 
worth painting, so exquisite are the de- 
signs and the workmanship with the 
metallic and high lustre effects. There 
is an excellent range of coloring 
throughout and the backgrounds are in 
satin or faille. The metallic and glit- 
tering effects are in such rich colors as 
gold, silver, steel, dragon-fly blue, em- 
erald, etc. 

The uses of these new ribbons are 
many. For instance, some of them are 
made with borders down one side, so 
the ribbon is especially adapted for 
bodices for evening dresses. Many are 



used by milliners as hat crowns and 
trimmings, and then the fashionable 
waistcoats use another supply; cushions 
and handbags also are responsible for 
a number of the designs especially de- 
veloped. 

It is incidental that prices are ex- 
ceedingly high, but the ribbons are only 
allowed to stay on the wholesalers' 
shelves for a few days at a time, when 
they immediately pass on to the retailer 
and consumer. 

The demand for lingerie ribbon is 
keener than ever before. Last year one 
Canadian jobber sold a million yards of 
one line only. This year he has al- 
ready received consignments of four 
similar lines with a variety of widths 
and colors in each. They are all pass- 
ing out as quickly as he can get them, 
he states. 

The bumble bee and shamrock pat- 
terns, which have not been on' the Can- 
adian market for four years, are to be 




. I Miniature 



Can you imagine anything more appealing 
than this tiny pullover sweater made for the 
baby? It is of a soft shade of rose wool 
trimmed on collar, cuffs, tie and pockets 
with grey angora. It retails in New York 
at $7, which designates it as all the more 
luxurious. 



had again this year, that is, provided 
the buyer is on the spot when the goods 
arrive from Europe and is able to take 
them out at once. 

New Conceptions in Metallic Goods 
"Last year everything metallic sold, 
regardless of art or workmanship," said 
one New York manufacturer to DRY 
GOODS REVIEW. For this year, how- 
ever, there has been considerably more 
care put into the developing of more 
intricate designs and unique colorings, 
and, as a result, both French and Am- 
erican metallic brocades are, to say the 
least, extremely interesting. Just this 
month one New York house has placed 
on the market the first few of its 
Spring range of brocades and the de- 
signs show some really new conceptions 
expressing fanciful stories of pixies, 
cobwebs, thistles, fairies, airy clouds, 
butterflies, and spiders. These are creat- 
ing a good deal of interest among the 
trade, and well they may. The color- 
ings are rich and artistically blended, 
and the metallic parts have a really at- 
tractive finish. 

Continued on page 221 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



221 



Corset Prices Higher 

Spring, 1920, Will See the Peak in Prices, Says an Authority- 
Manufacturing Conditions Are Bad — A Problem to 
Maintain High Standards. 

Written for Dry Goods Review by a Canadian Corset Manufacturer 



CONDITIONS in the corset trade 
have not relaxed much; if any- 
thing, the tension is growing. It 
is almost an old story now with the 
manufacturer that prices are going up 
and supplies getting more scarce. Yet, 
it is truer to-day than at any time 
"within the l'ast five years. 

Materials are now more difficult to 
obtain, and, moreover, higher in price 
than at any period during the great 
world-wide war. Because of the seem- 
ing exorbitant cost of corset commod- 
ities, our prices are soaring skyward, 
seemingly out of all proportion, and, 
further these prices are not holding. 

We have been advised from every 
•quarter to buy to out capacity and get 
the goods in at once, regardless of 
Tiow much must be paid, and accepting 
deliveries whenever and however they 
can be effected. The situation sounds 
and is actually alarming. Last year 
we had our basement piled up with vari- 
ous corset materials, while this season 
it is reduced to a few insignificant 
cases. This alone emphasizes the situa- 
tion pretty well. 

LABOR. — This is another factor quite 
important and one which is tying up 
the industry. Although our position 
has improved since the Summer, yet 
the labor difficulties then confronting us 
have not entirely subsided. 

PRODUCTION has been lessened be- 
cause of the reduced working hours 
per week — none of the employees, na- 
turally, will accept a lesser wage for the 
shortened working period. However, 
we are meeting the demands so far as 
we are able, with consistency to busi- 
ness principles. 

DELIVERIES.— They cannot be made 
promptly or before many weeks from 
receipt of orders. P'or some time past 
we have admonished our friends to di- 
rect their requirements without delay, 
allowing us as much time as possible 
for the execution thereof, and, to their 
advantage, accepting prices as quoted. 

However, it is fully expected that be- 
fore very much longer corset manufac- 
turers will be in a position only to ac- 
cept booking orders at prices govern- 
ing at date of shipment. This is 
anticipated to become effective at a close 
date. 

Prices at Highest Peak Next Spring 

PRICES.— It ds our firm belief and we 
advocate for Spring 1920 prices for 
corsets will reach the highest peak. 
Ths assertion is based simply on the 
fact that materials being scarce and 
expensive, labor at a top-notch figure, it 
is out of aid logic to conclude other 



than high prices will prevail throughout 
the greater part of the coming year. 

STYLES. — Due to the particularly 
heavy season and the aforementioned 
reasons, we have not been in a position 
to give the question of new patterns the 
attention deserving; yet, on the other 
hand, we are not looking forward to any 
radical change. 

QUALITY. — Customers are requested 
to be less exacting than usual, for qual- 
ities of all lines of materials cannot be 
as good as heretofore; it is not always 
possible to obtain materials of the old- 
time quality standard. 

We are doing all in our power, how- 
ever, to maintain the character of our 
regular production, and to insure con- 
tinued popularity of our line of corsets. 



EATON'S FEATURE BREAKFAST 
COAT 

The silk breakfast coat illustrated in 
the July (Fall) issue, 1919, of DRY 
GOODS REVIEW was given special at- 
tention in the advertising of the T. Eaton 
Co.'s Toronto store on Jan. 9. The break- 
fast coat is described there as "a great 
favorite among' the more practical negli- 
gees, with no floating sleeves to obtrude 
in the duty of pouring coffee. It may be 
had in orchid satin, French blue taffet:\ 
shot with rose, etc." Just one little in- 
stance of the reliability of the informa- 
tion provided by DRY GOODS REVIEW. 



RIBBONS— Continued from page 220 
What Montreal Says 
Montreal, Jan. 17. — Much more 
favorable news is coming from Switzer- 
land in regard to the ribbon situation. 
A large importer of ribbons told DRY 
GOODS REVIEW that he had received 
invoices for a big shipment of taffetas, 
satins and other lines, and expected 
them to be landed in a few days. The 
goods had actually left Switzerland. He 
looked for a much better condition in 
regard to deliveries, and felt now that 
there had been a marked advance to- 
wards a pre-war state. Since the col- 
lapse of the strike at Basle the work- 
men had kept at work, and the mills 
reported a great improvement in pro- 
duction. Orders had to be given many 
months in advance, as the mills were 
loaded with demands for goods, and, of 
course, prices had the same tendency in 
Switzerland as everywhere else to get 
higher and higher, but with the domestic 
demand in Canada this really did not 
appear to matter much. If the goods 
could be delivered, the retailers and the 
public were willing to meet any price. 
Delays must be expected, and some 
goods that were ordered in August last 
would not reach Canada until next 
Summer. On the other hand, the large 
shipment he was momentarily expect- 
ing had been ordei-ed in June last, so 
that the average pre-war time notice 
was not being exceeded. 

The opening up of the Swiss market 
would tend to transfer a goo i deal < f 
the buying from the United States. An- 
ticipating this, a manufacturer there, 
who originally lived in France, had 
lately secured an agency for French 
Dresden ribbons and was having these 
forwarded direct to Canadian custom- 
ers, so as to save the duty. 




Pretty New Bandeaux 

Dainty bandeaux for the debu- 
tante's coiffure are illustrated 
here. They are easily fashioned 
of ribbon and add materially to 
the party toilette. By courtesy 
of Johnson, Cowden & Co., Inc., 
New York. 



222 



Dry Goods Review 



_ in ii ii n i in in in in i in ii ii 1 1 ii ii i in i ii in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini nun i i ii i in in ii i ii in ii ii ii i m ii i m r_ 

NEWS AMONG THE TRADE I 

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H. C. DEPARTMENT CHANGES 

HANDS 

<>nr of the biggest business trans- 
fen in the Okanagan Valley for some 
years was negotiated early in January, 
when the Penticton Department Stores 
changed hands, Mr. W. A. Wagenhauser 
selling out to Mr. C. W. Nicholl, a new- 
Ci mer from the prairie. Mr. Nicholl was 
president of Nicholls, Limited, in Cas- 
tor. Alberta, until a year ago when he 
sold out. It was the impressions he 
gained while on a motor trip through 
British Columbia last year that decided 
him to return to Penticton, with the re- 
sult that he purchased the department 
store. Mr. Nicholl is a native of Grand 
Valley, Ont., and has been in the store 
business since boyhood. 

Mr. Wagenhauser is considering the 
formation of a building company in Pen- 
ticton, and if successful one of their 
first propositions will be the erection of 
a large and modern apartment block. He 
is also negotiating for the establishment 
of a large fruit business, but so far his 
plans are already very indefinite along 
this line. 



NEW IDE\ AT MURRAY-KAY'S 

Early in the New Year, Murray-Kay's, 
Toronto, announced the opening of a 
"Shopping Service." This system of 
maintaining a staff of special shoppers 
for customers, both in and out of the 
city, is one that is proving successful 
in a number of the departmental stores. 
The shoppers give advice and make sug- 
gestions according to the information 
given in customer's letter or received by 
telephone, and make up orders frequent- 
ly for a whole wardrobe or for furnish- 
ing a new home. 



ACQUIRES NEW SPINNING MILL 

Sydney Blumenthal & Company, Inc., 
have purchased the plant of the Herman 
Auken Company, embroidery makers, at 
South River, N. J. The new proprietors 
are converting the plant ; nto a mill for 
spinning yarns. It will be known as the 
South River Spinning Company, and 
will make the yarns for the Shelton 
There is 36,000 square feet of 
floor space in the new mills — which 
really comprise five mills, as well as 
other buildings p.nd 25 tenement houses 
for emplovees. South River is between 
New Brunswick and Perth Amboy, on 
the Rariton River Railway, affordintr ex- 
cent shipping facilities. 



An addition has been erected to the 
scouring plant of the T. H. Taylor Com- 
pany, Ltd., Chatham, Ont., manufac- 
turers of blanket cloth, mackinaws, 
flannels, tweeds, etc. The cost of the 
new addition is approximately $2. r >,iioo. 



L. N. IMH LIN. LID.. OTTAWA. GIVE 
BONUS 

\ very pleasing event took place at 
the close of New Year's Eve at the big 
store of L. N. Poulin, Ltd., Sparks St., 
Ottawa, when the staff to the number of 
about 230 were called together and ad- 
dressed by Mr. I'oulin. In a few kind 
words he announced that the firm were 
rewarding all those who had given at 
least one year's faithful service to the 
firm by distributing a bonus, not as an 
extra salary but as a present. Mr. 
Poulin said the year had been a banner 
one and he thought it only fair that the 
workers should share in the good things, 
at the same time expressing the hope 
that a similar event may take place at 
the end of June. 

Mr. Warren, the manager, then called 
Mr. T. Marcil, manager of the men's fur- 
nishing depai'tmcnt, and presented him 
with a nice umbrella as a token of appre- 
ciation from the staff in that department. 

\ few reminiscences, hearty hand- 
shakes and a word of thanks to the firm 
for their generosity, brought the meet- 
ing to a close. 



EMPLOYEES TO HOLD STOCK 

With the commencement of the present 
year a new system of co-operation with 
their employees was put into effect by 
the firm of Prime & Rankin, Ltd., To- 
ronto. By the new arrangement the 
men are afforded an opportunity of hold- 
ing stock in the company. Mr. S. Roether, 
who is now president, has been asso- 
ciated with the business since its found- 
ing in 1892, and the directors, too, are 
men of long standing with the house. 



McCASKEY'S SYSTEMS. LTD , TO 

RONTO, WILL MOVE TO 

GALT, ONTARIO 

McCaskey Systems, Limited, have pur- 
chased a complete modern manufactur- 
ing plant, which was erected during the 
war for munitions purposes. Having 
outgrown their present premises, they 
have chosen Gait for their head office 
and factory. It is understood they will 
move into their new building in July 
or August of this year. 

The Chicago office of the C. Kenyon 
Company moved, Dec. 31, from Con- 
gress and Franklin streets to Brooks 
Building, 223 Jackson Blvd. at Frank- 
lin street. 



A farewell was gi"en December 17 to 
Messrs. Deadman and Brockbank, of the 
T. Eaton Co., Toronto, upon the occasion 
of their leaving to assume new duties at 
the Moncton branch. Mr. Deadman was 
presented with a handsome silver tea 
service, and Mr. Brockbank with a prettv 
pearl and diamond tie pin. Music and 
dancing followed the presentation. 



REALLY A LARGE CLUB HOUSE 

The Carl Schoen Silk Corporation has 
given a contract for the erection of a 
huge two-storey building to adjoin the 
present structure of the Petersburg silk 
mill at East Scranton, Pa. 

The purpose of the new structure will 
be to promote social welfare among the 
three hundred or more employees of 
the concern. 

On the ground floor there will be a 
cafeteria 41 x 44 feet. 

There will be a kitchen with pantry, 
store-room and refrigerator accommoda- 
tions, also a laundry. There will be a 
gymnasium and shower bath accommo- 
dations for both women and men. 

An auditorium with seating capacity 
for 350 people will be on the second 
floor, and will have a stage and dress- 
ing rooms. Seating arrangements will 
be such that the chairs can be moved 
tor dancing, etc. There will also be 
social, music and rest rooms, as well as 
sewing room for the girls, and smoking 
and reading rooms for the men, and 
large verandahs, both open and enclosed. 
An experienced nurse will be on hand at 
all times. 

Tennis courts and baseball grounds 
have already been in use and will be 
enlarged, and it is probable that a 
swimming pool will also be erected. 



Mr. J. K. Anthony, proprietor of the 
'Women's Store." at. Brampton, Ont., 
began his second year's business last 
month with a new 20-foot addition. The 
store is now a most attractive one with 
wall decorations ;n soft shades of brown 
and tan, and the shelves and other fit- 
tings enamelled in white. 



Among the numerous dry goods firms 
to adont a system of group insurance for 
their employees is D. E. Macdonald & 
Bros., at Guelph. This firm has over 70 
employees, many of whom have been 
with the firm for a long period of years 
and will receive insurance amounting to 
$2,000 or ever. The system went into 
effect just before Christmas. 



On January 8 the firm of H. P. Ritchie 
& Co., Toronto, held a successful dance 
on the main floor of the factory. About 
150 of the staff and their friends were 
present, and the general verdict was "an 
excellent time." 



J. R. Moodie & Sons, Hamilton, have 
acquired the glove factory property on 
Cross street, Dundas, as an additional 
plant for their general lines and are 
converting it into a modern knitting 
plant. 



iivy Goods Review 



223 



minimi 



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NEWS AMONG THE TRADE 



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GENERAL MANAGER OF T. EATON 

CO.'S WINNIPEG STORE PASSES 

AWAY 

Mr. A. A. Gilroy, general manager of 
the Winnipeg store of the T. Eaton Co., 
Limited, and a director of the company, 
died in Winnipeg on Sunday morning, 
Dec. 28, after an illness of some years. 
Mr. Gilroy was prominently connected 
with the Eaton Company from 1892 to 
1905, when upon the opening of the 
Winnipeg store he was appointed its 
manager, and in 1907 was elected a di- 
rector of the company. 

His genial personality, his large sym- 
pathies and kindly nature made him the 
idol of the thousands of employees un- 
der his control, and beloved by all with 
whom he came in contact. In municipal 
affairs he took an active part, and it was 
during his term of office as president of 
the Board of the Winnipeg Industrial 
Exhibition in 1912 that H.R.H. the Duke 
of Connaught paid a visit to Winnipeg 
and opened the exhibition. 

Mr. Gilroy was a keen sportsman and 
a great lover of horses, and owned a 
fine stable of horses himself. For years 
there were always some splendid ex- 
hibits in the Winnipeg Horse Show from 
the Gilroy stables. 

Mr. Gilroy was associated with many 
clubs of a social and athletic nature, and 
he was a member of Broadway Meth- 
odist Church. His wife, who was Miss 
Minnie Hopkins, of Whitby, Ont., died 
in 1914. He is survived by one son, 
Harold, of Balmoral, Manitoba, and a 
sister, Mrs. Chephas Sleep, of Seagrave, 
Ontario. 

Three services were held in Winnipeg, 
Dec. 31, upon which day the store was 
closed. Virtually every employee of the 
Winnipeg store and a large number of 
personal friends, as well as members 
of the Eaton family, who came from To- 
ronto, were at the funeral. 



Mogo & Co., of Japan, who have 
branches in all parts of the world, deal- 
ing in silks, fancy goods, etc., have 
opened an office in Toronto. 

The second annual convention of the 
Retail Clothiers' Association of Ontario 
will be held in Toronto on Feb. 20, 21 
and 22 next. 



Mr. C. I. Finn. Ladies' Furnishings, 
Dalhousie Street. Ottawa, is discontinu- 
ing business, selling out at a special 
sale. 



Mackenzie Limited, Wholesale Lum- 
berman's Outfitters, have nurchased the 
Imperial Building, Oueen Street, Ottawa, 
with a frontage of 66 feet on Queen 
Street and a depth of 99 feet for $75,- 
000, their present premises on Lyon and 
Albert Streets being too small for pre- 
sent turnover. 



J. H. GOULD CO. EXTENDS 
FURTHER 

The firm of J. H. Gould, Ltd., St. 
Thomas, Ont., has recently purchased 
the large three-storey, stone and brick 
building at the corner of Talbot and 
Mary streets from the estate of the late 
Joseph Mickleborough. 




Mr. J. H. Gould, St. Thomas, Ont. 

This progressive department store 
was originally a dry goods establish- 
ment, but has been considerably en- 
larged since its beginning in 1903. Two 
years ago it was taken over by J. H. 
Gould, Ltd., of which the general man- 
ager and president is Mr. Gould him- 
self, who came to St. Thomas from Re- 
gina, Sask. 



Bryson-Graham Limited, Sparks 
Street, Ottawa, held a happy little re- 
ception recently to present a diamond 
ring- to Miss Arnott, manager of the 
Toilet and Stationery Departments, to 
mark the splendid record of the years' 
sales which show a greater increase than 
the other departments. Mr. C. Rupert, 
manager of the Men's Furnishings, was 
also remembered, the firm presenting 
him with a gold watch as a permanent 
souvenir of their appreciation of a work 
well done. 

NEW INCORPORATIONS 
Brown Woollen Mills, Limited, have 

been incorporated at Kingsville, Ont., 

with capital of $200,000. 

Denton, Mitchell & Duncan, Limited, 

have been incorporated at Toronto with 

a capital of $700,000. 



SMOOTH TRICK TO STEAL FURS 

Who got the fine $700 fur coat from 
one of the biggest stores in St. Catherine 
St. W. ? That is the little problem a 
merchant would like to solve; so far it 
has baffled all his efforts and those of 
a corps of detectives as well. 

It was a well-laid scheme that secured 
the coat. When the Christmas trade was 
at its height a lady and gentleman of 
apparent means entered the shop to see 
fur coats. The lady donned the garment 
and was delighted with the $700 article. 
Suddenly she became faint, and her com- 
panion asked the saleslady to assist her 
to the rest room. She did so, the cus- 
tomer in the confusion wearing the coat. 

Then the employee returned to the 
anxious husband in the fur section. 
After a few minutes, as the purchaser of 
cents had not returned, the gentleman 
requested the clerk to go to the rest 
room to see if anything had happened 
to his wife. 

She wasn't there — that was the start- 
ling discovery she made. The coat was 
missing, too. A rush back to the fur de- 
partment revealed the third sensation in 
the case — the husband was cone too. 
Since that time coat and customers have 
never been seen. 



CANADIAN FUR SALES IN MARCH 

Arrangements have been completed 
for the first Canadian fur auction to 
take place in March. Headquarters and 
chief warehouse will be at Lagauchetiere 
and St. George Sts., Montreal. It is 
expected that millions of dollars' worth 
of furs will be stored and sold in the 
building, and so special facilities and 
safeguards have to be provided. Cold 
storage for warm weather is being in- 
stalled, also special fur presses and 
shipping appliances, and a special build- 
ing with even light for the proper grad- 
ing and judging of furs. The tempor- 
ary offices are in the Windsor Hotel, 
Montreal. Buyers have arranged to be 
present from all the chief buying cen- 
tres of this continent and Europe. 



Mr. A. J. Frieman, Ottawa, is a very 
great believer in system. A few weeks 
ago he installed a complete machine 
bookkeeping- equipment, and has follow- 
ed this up by sending Mr. J. F. Asselin, 
manager of the coats, suits and dresses 
department, with Mr. S. R. Ouellette, 
accountant, to study conditions and 
methods in Chicaeo. . The great estab- 
lishment of Marshall Field was studied 
at first hand, every assistance being 
given by the management there to their 
Canadian friends. The visit is proving 
a real benefit to the store, many valu- 
able ideas being planned along the lines 
shown to be such a success in Chicago. 



224 



Dry Goods Review 

^ llllll,lllu IMIIMWI mi mi urn mini in u i i minimi mi imimiii lining 

NEWS AMONG THE TRADE \ 

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MARSHALL & HARDING NOW 
T. Harding has entered into partner- 
ship with II. I). Marshall, manufactur- 
es' agent, Toronto. The new firm will 
be known as Marshall & Harding, and 
are now located in new and larger 
premises in the Carlaw Building on 
Wellington St. W. 



SALESMEN OK GREENSHIELDS, 

LIMITED 

Seventy-Three Prom All Over Canada at 

Convention Meld in 
Monlreal 
An imposing gathering was made up 
of seventy-three salesmen of Green- 
shields, Ltd.. at their convention held in 
-Montreal during December. Represent 
tatives of the staff of this wholesale 
house were present from all important 
business centres from the Atlantic to tht 
Pacific coast. Five business sessions 
were held in which subjects of mutual 
interest were discussed by the gathering 
with the executive department heads. 
The directors of the company entertained 
their visitors and the department heads 
and the older employees at the Montreal 
Club, at which 130 had dinner. The 
firm of Greenshields Ltd. was founded 
in 1884 by Samuel and John Green- 
shield, who were grandfather and father 
respectively of the late Edward B. Green- 
shields, who in turn was the first pre- 
sident of the firm under its present name 
of Greenshields Ltd. 



W.LEN SILK MILLS NOW 

The Wilson Mfg. Co., of Toronto, 
makers of "Winsome Maid" hosiery, are 
moviner this month to new enlarged quar- 
ters at 43 Davies Avenue, Toronto. The 
name is also being changed to the Allen 
Silk Mills on account of a silent partner 
being bought out bv Allen Bros. Co., 
Ltd. 

An announcement cf the changes, 
which is being mailed to each of the 
firm's customers, shows a sketch of the 
new buildine with its employees' re- 
creational room on the third floor, and 
calls attention to the increased capacity 
and output. A feature of the Allen Bros. 
Co. poliev is that a bonus is given em- 
plovoes based on the quality of their 
workmanship. At Christmas lime this 
firm entertained its members at a ban- 
quet, where a substantial sum was dis- 
tributed as a Christmas uift in recogni- 
tion of loyalty and eood work throughout 
the vear. after which everyone joined in 
playing informal <rames until a late hour. 



H \MII.TON MILL IMPROVEMENTS 

The Mercury Mills of Hamilton, Ont., 
are just completing a three storey en- 
largement to their plant. This will 
mean more machines and more space 
for the machinery already in use. 

In this new section is located the gen- 
erating plant of the carrier system of 
ventilation, which is being installed 
throughout the whole building Bv this 
system, we understand all the air to 
be used is washed. Dast«urized and 
homogenized befn-e being utilized for 
breathing purposi 

A successful device used by the 
Mercury Mills to obtain operators is the 
offer of a cash premium to each em- 
ployee who brings in another operator 



providing both old and new employees 
are with the firm at the end of three 
months. For a skilled operator, the 
premium is twice that for an unskilled 
one. A member of the staff of DRY 
GOODS REVIEW was recently given 
the pleasure of going through the 
Mercury Mills and seeing the various 
processes whereby underwear and 
hosiery derive their shape and being. 

DEATH OF MR. I). W. GLASS 

Mr. David \V. Glass, vice-president of 
the Continental Costume Company, a 
prominent Toronto business man, died 
very suddenly at his home on December 
11. The late Mr. Glass, who had been 
suffering for some time from acute in- 
digestion, but who continued to carry on 
his business up to the day before his 
death, was preparing to leave for his 
office on Thursday morning when he was 
suddenly overcome, and passed away 
within a few minutes. 

The late Mr. Glass was born in Port 
Hope, Ont.. 48 years ago. He came to 
Toronto early in life and entered into 
business with the wholesale dry goods 
firm of Caldicott, Burton and Spence, 
with whom he remained for twenty 
years. He left there to join the Conti- 
nental Costume Company. The late Mr. 
Glass is survived by his widow and a 
young son as well as by one brother, Mr. 
Robert Glass, and two sisters, Mrs. S. G. 
Currie and Miss Charlotte Glass. 



CHAS. S. BOTSFORD DEAD 

Word reached Toronto, January 15, of 
the death in the Canary Islands of 
Charles S. Botsford, a well-known To- 
ronto man, who for over twenty-five 
years was engaged in the dry eroods 
business in Queen Street West. The late 
Mr Botsford left last November to 
spend the Winter in the Canary Islands. 
At that time he was in good health, but 
in early December he was taken ill with 
nerve trouble. Then be contracted in- 
fluenza, which resulted in his death. 

A native of Newmarket, Mr. Botsford 
came to Toronto in his youth and onened 
a dry {roods store. He was in business 
between twenty-five and thirty years, 
until hi« nroner*-y, at Hacknev and 
Oueen Streets, was purchased by the 
city. He disposed of his large stock hv 
opening stores in several parts of the 
Province and then retired from business. 

He is survived by two sons, one a mer- 
chant in London. Eneland. and the other 
a minine: eno-inper in New York. ;-> d one 
daughter. Miss Gladys, living in London 
with her brother. 



Georce Na^ey has severed his con- 
nections with the Art Clonk & Suit Com- 
pany. Montreal, in order to give his en- 
tire time to The American Waist -v 
Dress Companv, with which business he 
has also been associated. 



The firm of Beattie Bros., St. Cathar- 
ines, Ont., has just been augmented by 
the inclusion of a third brother, G. W. 
Beattie, formerly managing director of 
R. H. Knight Ltd.. Sault Ste. Marie. All 
three brothers were at one time with this 
latter f lrm but have gradually severed 
their connections and irone into the dry 
goods and ready-to-wear trade. The 
brothers enjoy working together, they 
say, in spite of an occasional difference, 
which "always blows over inside half an 
hour." The business, which four years 
ago occupied only the main floor, now 
covers three storeys and is already in 
need of more space. 



H. braidberg & Co., of St. Catharines, 
Ont., are selling out their ready-to-wear 
business there and moving to Thorold, 
where they already have a men's wear 
store. 



H. J. Zacks, of Peterborough, Ont., has 
sold the dry goods business of which he 
has been the proprietor for twelve years 
to B. Chester, and is leaving the city. 



The retail merchants of St. Thomas 
met on December 12 and formed a local 
organization for the purpose of discus- 
sing trade policy and methods of im- 
proving the help situation. This is the 
sort of co-operation which is sorely 
needed in the trade in the big majority 
of towns throughout the Dominion. 
Here's to the success of the St. Thomas 
organization. 



The wedding took place at Lynn, N.B., 
early in January, of Miss Edith Louise 
Boone and Arthur B. Chase, of Swamp- 
scott, Rev. William Appleton Lawrence, 
the rector of St. Stephen's Church, of- 
ficiating. The bride was, until recentlv, 
in charge of the ribbon department at 
the T. W. Rogers Co. store in Lynn. 
Mr. Chase is employed by the United 
Shoe Machinery Company in Beverly. 



The Peter Mc Sweeney (',,., Ltd., at 
Moncton, N.B., report that the first 
week of their two weeks' "Red Tag" 
sale, which began immediately after 
Christmas, brought the largest volume 
of business ever handled by them in one 
week of such a sale. 



The firm of Johnson & \nders">n. 
Newton Mills, VS.. has been dissolve'!, 
the business now being conducted by 
lames F. Anderson, formerly of the firm. 



Jury Goods Review 



KliAU Y-TU-WiiAK 



zzo 




The McElroy Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Garmenis 



MAKING 




FAMOUS FOR THEIR 



Fit, Cut, Style, 

Hang and Finish 

HEAD OFFICE: 

47 Simcoe St. - Toronto 



Silk Muslin 
Underwear 

Manufactured by 

LONDON 
LADIES' WHITEWEAR 

Also complete range of 
Children's Dresses for 
immediate shipping. 

OFFICE AND FACTORY: 

41 Craig St. East, Montreal 




Star Skirt Company 

436 St. Catherine St. W. 
Montreal 

Skirts 



Announcing 

Meiselman & 
Rosenbloom 

7 Bleury St., Montreal 

A new partnership of two capable ex- 
perienced and widely known Coat and 
Suit men 

Manufacturing 

COATS AND SUITS 
for Spring 1920 

New range comprising garments of 
Style, Quality and Value now ready for 
your inspection. 



WAISTS 

We carry in stock always 
for prompt delivery a fine 
selection of Voiles, Crepe 
de Chines, Georgette and 
Silk Waists. Send for 
samples. 



%>mz 




1187 Mt. Royal Ave., Montreal 



MERCHANTS ! 

You will realize at once the 
quick-selling, profit-producing 
possibilities in our exquisite 

DRESSES 

For Spring 1920 

Georgettes, Wool Jerseys, 
Taffetas, and Printed Voiles 



New York Mercantile Co. 



24 Wellington St. W. 
TORONTO 






SMARTNESS 
and CHARACTER 



are the two outstanding qualities 
which recommend our new line of 
Suits and Coats for Spring and Sum- 
mer, 1920. 

Smart in style and made in all the 
newest weaves and colors with the 
same high standard of excellence and 
workmanship which has distinguished 
our line as representing the best 
available anywhere. 

If one of our travellers has not called 
upon you, let us know and we will 
arrange to have him see you. 

We invite all out-of-town buyers to 
drop in and see our stocks when in the 
city. 




Montreal 




"Childish Simplicity" 

That is the fea- 
ture always to be 
found in chil- 
dren's garments 
of good taste. 

We are special- 
izing in the pro- 
duction of at- 
tractive Dresses 
for Children. 



Plain and fancy voiles, with trimmings 
of lace, pleatings, hand embroidery, etc. 
Serviceable, smart Shantung styles, in- 
cluding middy dresses. 

Our Specialty 

White Embroidery Dresses in many 
pleasing styles, including Empire and 
French designs, and staple lines of un- 
usual charm. 

Ideal for your Juvenile 
Department. Faultless 
in finish. 

G. F. Reid & Company 

Brampton, Ontario 






It K A l) Y-TO-W I". A R 



/'/■// Godda /•'< vit u 






P. C. CORSETS 



correct in every detail 




FRONT AND BACK LACE 

PINK - - - WHITE 



The women who dress 
well, must maintain a cor- 
rect figure. P.C. Corsets 
have won a reputation of 
pleasing the most fas- 
tidious. New exquisite 
and attractive models af- 
fording all the comfort, 
flexibility and lightness so 
desirable for the new style. 

Most certainly your 
Corset Department 
should carry a complete 
range of P.C. Styles and 
Models. 



Parisian Corset Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

QUEBEC, QUE., CANADA 

Branches: TORONTO, 76 Bay St., MONTREAL, 329 Craig St. W. 



Wetteni Rq * II BUT1 I R, 

21 Sylvester Wilton Bldg., Winnipeg. 



]• S. BRUNEAU, Representative for Nov.! Scotia, 
including Cape Breton. 



GEORCiF. S. OX I. FY. Representative (or New 
Brunswick and Prince Ed»'ard 'eland' 



Dry Goods Review- 



READY-TO-WEAR 



227 



.•' ■ ' ■«-«" jjjs^Y 




CANADIAN 
CONVERTERS 
COMPANY 

Limited 

MONTREAL 



ndersJiirt 



No. 4901 



Our stock of Silk Underskirts f or 
Immediate Delivery, for Xmas 
trade, Now Ready. 

We specialize in Taffeta and Jap 
Silks, comprising all shades in a 
large range of "up-to-date" 
styles. 



1> 







R E A DY-TO- W i: \ R 



Dry Qoode /•'> >'lew 




ter:. TK&ttA* 



- J-: 



^Bf^gTO^g 



^ 





The New Home of 

ART GARMENTS 
at 

New Wilder 
Building 

323 Bleury Street 

(In the heart of the uptown 
shopping district). 

With increased facilities, con- 
veniences and production, we 
will be in a better position than 
ever to meet your requirements. 

ART 

DRESSES - SKIRTS 

for Spring 

are most interestingly varied 
and up to the minute in styles, 
colors and materials. Our 
travellers are now on the road 
with them. Be sure to see 
them! It will be to our mutual 
advantage. 



ART CLOAK & SUIT CO., LTD. 



323 BLEURY ST. 



Showroom 

Kent Bldp., Toronto 
H. M. NASH 



Quebec Showroom 

Brunct Bldp., Quebec 

R. DIONNE 



Wcftarn Province! 

302 Hammond Blk. VVpg. 
J. W. COLLETT 



MONTREAL 



Maritime Province! 

B. R. ETTENBERG, JR. 



Montreal, C. ROSE 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



229 



Keen business men are coming more and more to realize how important 
to their success is the use of High Grade Merchandise. 

The American Waist & Dress Co., Ltd. 

has been making good blouses all the time. Its foundation has been laid in the mortar 
of integrity. It early dedicated itself to the production of Better Merchandise. 

The American Waist & Dress Co., Ltd. 

after years of conscientious study and experience has borne fruit in the qualities 
which give our blouses recognized superiority. 

The American Waist & Dress Co., Ltd. 

customers who know our blouses, will tell you it is a pleasure to sell them. 



100% 
Service 

100% 
Satisfaction 




Looks Well 

Launders Well 

Lasts Well 



U^f product of 
Individuality Clegance 
and (Jharm 



Style 

Quality 

and 

Workmanship 



If your blouse department is not giving you the desired results, there is a reason. 

Good Merchandise is the foundation of Good Business. 

Allow us to demonstrate the superiority of the Blouses made by 

The American Waist & Dress Co., Ltd. 

Place your order early if you desire good delivery as Easter falls on April 4th. 

Our Spring range will be Ready for showing January I st. 

The American Waist & Dress Co., Ltd. 



Toronto Showroom: 
404 Kent Bldg. 



46 St. Alexander St. 
MONTREAL 



Winnipeg Showroom: 
302 Hammond Bloc\ 



230 



It E A DY-TO- W i: \ R 



Dry Ooode /■'■ 



GOETZ & OTT1NGER 

EXCLUSIVE DRESSES FOR YOUNG WOMEN 
I 13 EAST 33rd STREET 
NEW YORK 



TELEPHONE: MADISON SQ. 8574 and 8575 



I. BERMAN 

MANUFACTURER AND IMPORTER OF 

TAILORED AND SPORT DRESSES 



99-103 Madison Avenue 



New York 



MAX WABER 
MARRY M SSI I K 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

39-41 W. 32nd ST. 

Telephone 2569 Madison Sq. 



TRIO WAIST COMPANY 

Makers of Trio Waist 

S.W. COR. 22nd AND ARCH STREETS 

PHILADELPHIA 




Dolls' Wigs 

We are now enlarging our 
plant for the manufactur- 
ing of Dolls' Wigs during 
1920 in "Real Human 
Hair" and "Mohair." 



Universal Hair Goods Mfg. Company 

Fraser Building 

43 St. Sacrament St. MONTREAL 

We are (he only Dolls' Wigs Manufacturers in the Dominion. 




Ir r esistible! 



Waists 



The new VOGUE WAISTS for Spring 
are all that can be desired and have a 
charm and individuality unsurpassed. 
They come in the smartest of fabrics, 
including GEORGETTE, CREPE DE 
CHINE, VOILES and SILKS. 




Dresses 



There is a freshness and beauty about 
the latest VOGUE DRESSES in the 
new silks for Spring and Easter. Out of 
the ordinary in style, quality and work- 
manship. GEORGETTE, CHARM- 
IT "SE, DUCHESSE and TAFFETAS. 



QUALITY CONSIDERED YOU PAY US LESS 



VOGUE WAIST & DRESS CO., 



207 St. Catherine St 

BLUMENTHAL BUILDING 



*"'■ MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



23 r 



BRICKENDEN & McCRIMMON 

LONDON - ONTARIO 

Manufacturers of 

INFANTS' WEAR 
DRESSES 

Silk, Muslin, Voile and Embroidery 

CAMISOLES 

BOUDOIR CAPS 

DUST CAPS 

APRONS 



We carry a well assorted stock in all 
departments — Ready-to-Wear, Tub Dresses, 
Blouses, Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves, Laces 
and Embroidery and a general line of 
Smallwares. 

Be sure to see our range. 

Letter Orders Given Prompt Attention 



Kassab Kimono 
Mfg. Co. 

Sommer Bldg., Montreal 

Designers and Makers of Exclusive 
KIMONOS ! NIGHT GOWNS 






Children's 

Dresses and Middies. Made from 
newest English ginghams, etc. 
Sizes from 6 to 14 years of age. 

Ladies' Middy Smocks 

in all the latest styles and newest 
materials. Jersey Bloomers in 
pink and white Jersey cloth. 
Aprons in prints and plain aprons 
with elastic. 

Boys' Blouses 

in Prints, assorted stripes, and 
also Chambray, blue and cham- 
pagne. 

Samples and prices on request. 

IDEAL DRESS CO. 

1488c St. Lawrence Blvd. 

MONTREAL 



<v,< 
M 



w^m 



NEGLIGEES 
BATH-ROBES 
PETTICOATS 
BLOOMERS 



ENVELOPES 
CORSET COVERS 
CHEMISES 

PAJAMAS 



Travellers will go on the road shortly 
with complete lines. 



To Wholesalers, Jobbers and Others 

Consignments are Solicited 



for our 



Great Semi-Annual 

Stocktaking Auction 
Dry Goods, Boots, Clothing, Etc. 

to be held at our Auction Rooms, 453 and 
455 St. James St., and 131 to 137 Inspector 
St., Montreal, on 

Tuesday, lOth February 

Note: Cash advances are made on 
consignments if desired. Our weekly 
dry goods auction every Tuesday is 
recognized as the best medium for 
disposal of residue stocks of every 
description. Kindly make entries for 
above important auction not later 
than 7th February. 

FRASER BROS. 

Auctioneers 






R E A I) Y-TO-W KAR 



Dnf Qooda ll> view 



A Lesson in Coat tr 




BHER703 

&SONS 



TheBiqPopidar 
Price Coat & 
Suit House 



2 West 53rd St.. 




Dry Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



233 



uil buijini fc^prin^ 





RHERZ03 

&SONS 



The Bia Popular 
Price Cbat'& 
Suit House 



2 West 33rd St., 



• 



i; ■!■: \ i> v- to- w 1: AR 



Dry Qoode Review. 



When The Out-of-Town Buyer 
Comes To New York 

he (or she) aims to do a lot in a few days. In these times even staples are not 
always easy to locate quickly, and how much more difficult it is to turn at once 
to the novel and unusual ! 

May we suggest a solution of this latter difficulty? Novel effects in 

Silks and Satins for the Millinery and Hat Trade 

are our specialty, not simply keeping abreast of current demands, but usually 
a little ahead of and creating them. 

We believe you will find that it will pay your buyer to drop in on us. 

BETTINSON & CADE, Inc. 

417 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK 



1 



?^H5M5^MMM!Mi5 



J 



/\ 



y 




"Joyce' 



simplicity i liiiili 

i: "I Al'1,1 N 

MAID ' til silk Geo e,.-a model foi the 

•II I lie -h[.'.v.r Mouse front; 
\ 

■ 

Price $10.35 



Distinctive Blouses 




"different" 

in 

Style, 

Quality 

and 
Finish 



Our Own Original Creations 

We show one of our new models, 
and we have many others equally fine. 
Read particulars of our style "JOYCE" 




m 

1952 ST. LAWRENCE 

Makers of Georgette, Crepe ie Chine, Hash Silk and Voilc~Jilouses 

;■ ;■• ■ ■■■■ v., ..;- ... -.; ;,;■ - ... ..;:,;; gjj 



. 



Dru Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



235 




\ 



.B. 



MAKERS 

OF 

NATIONAL 

BRAND 
GARMENTS. 



THE 

COAT 

HOUSE 

OP 

CANADA 



Coat 

Specialists 

for 

Ladies & Misses 

In Ram and Utility Coat,. 

Our range of materials con- 
sists of Bolivia, Polo Cloth, 
Goldtone, Silvertone, Trico- 
tines, Serges, Velours, Fancy 
Tweeds. 

We still maintain the 

NATIONAL 
STANDARD 

of excellence in Ladies' and 
Misses' Garments. 



Our travellers will call upon you 

shortly with a full range of these 

interesting models. 



A-A-AA-A-A ; A-AA-4AA A A«Ayf / 




236 



l; i: A I) Y- TO- WEAR 



Dry Goods Review 



"Seeing is Believing 

Our SPRING Line of 



*» 



CLOAKS and SUITS 

is so very attractive and extensive that we would prefer 
your SEEING them to our attempting to describe them 
to you. They speak for themselves ! Now in the hands 
of our travellers. 

See them ! 




Cor. St. Catherine West and Mountain Sts., MONTREAL 




Thistle Brand 

Guaranteed 

Overcoats 

are sold 

in all the 

best stores 

from 

Coast to Coast. 



The Thistle is Your Protection 

THISTLE BRAND 

WATERPROOF AND MOTORING 

TOP COATS 

For Ladies and Men 

Sure to attract 
Sure to sell 
Sure to satisfy 



See our handsome Spring models now in the hands 
of our Salesmen. They cannot be surpassed for 
smartness, quality and finish. 

Write for samples and prices 



SCOTTISH RUBBER CO. 

Limited 

316 Notre Dame Street, West 

MONTREAL 




Drj/ Goods Review 



READY-TO-WEAR 



237 




288 R E A I) V -TO- W E A R Dry Goods R< 



Ready 



for 



Spring! 



A line brimful of 
Dominating Values in 
Youthfully Styled 
SUITS and COATS 
at Popular Prices — 
A line that will smash 
its way to the heart of 
every buyer! 



COATS FROM.' $12.75 to *35-oo 

SUITS FROM $16.75 ^ #45oo 




erzo&s 

Cloak 6" Suit Co. ** /^^ 

JJ33 Broadways I ^ 
4t35 th &3w h Srs.Nc\vYorl^ ^L J 



SAMUEL HBRZOGPRES- 



Vnj Goods Review 



■ 
READY-TO-WEAR 



239 




Middies 

Sport 

Skirts 

and 

Smocks 



—M * *" K TOf- 



CIRCLE 







- CROSS 
-REGISTERED 

Anticipate Your Spring 
Needs NOW! 

There is nothing to be lost and every- 
thing to he gained, by ordering 
EARLY. In a word, you ensure 
getting ir hat you want when you 
want it- — at lowest prices. 

The dealer who knows the OTROLE 
CROSS Trade Mark knows good 
value. The distinctive style, the 
traditional quality, and the reason- 
able prices — have all combined to 
make CIRCLE CROSS garments im- 
mensely popular everywhere. 

Our Spring lines are ex- 
ceedingly attractive. Be 
sure to see them. 

COLE-WHITAKER 

Limited 

292 St. Catherine St. West 

MONTREAL 





Nurses' 
and 



Maids' 

Regulation 

Uniforms 




- 
i i i 









■ 



DRY <;<><)I)S RKVIKW 



MOTHE 



ADE SECTION 



Ssss&ssj^ 



ill 



I J 



f? 51 



& dJ 






The Original "Two Boys" Sheets 




IN©^ 



Arc made from best Egyptian and American cottons: Diligent scrutiny in all stages of 
manufacture maintains that unbeatable quality upon which their world-fame rests. 




Canadian Agent: 

E. W. DEAN & SON, 324 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C 

Agency for remainder of Canadian Territory in contemplation 

Sole Manufacturers: 

RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 



6 MOSLEY ST., MANCHESTER 

Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 



ENG. 



., .-/,:; I,.- 



^Q°° 00 <^ oo s l 




ii 

n 

f 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



241 




ll!llllllllll|i|l: 



Ii? 5~l 



la eJ 



ooog^oo oo^ooo 




BLEAK LOW MILLS, TOTTINGTON, near BURT, LANCASHIRE 



NOTICE 

Every article named on Messrs. Rigg Bros.' List is both spun and woven 
at their mills at Bleaklow, Nr. Bury, Lancashire. The mark "RIGG'S 
MANUFACTURE" appearing on the selvedge constitutes a guarantee of 

the highest quality. 




Made of 



are the standard product 



Entirely 



purest p * -p) . . ! - Free of 

cotton or the British market Fniin gs 

Canadian Agent: 

E. W. DEAN & SON, 324 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

Agency for remainder of Territory is contemplated 

Sole Manufacturers: 

RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 

6 MOSLEY ST., MANCHESTER 



ENG. 



Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 






ooog^-oo oo^Jooo 



f? fl 






ri 



i 



i ' 1 1 l i - U U U S KKVIEW 




--iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin mill iiii i.i '!= 




Established 1798 



NEWEY 

BROS. LIMITED 

BREARLEY STREET 
BIRMINGHAM 



Manufacturers of 



NEWEY'S 

SNAP FASTENERS 

NEWEY'S 

HOOKS & LOOPS 

NEWEY'S 

HAIRPINS 



We are specialists in the manufacture 
of all small wire and sheet metal goods. 

All our wares are BRITISH THROUGH- 
OUT and have a finish and reliability 
which makes them outstanding. 

Our enormously increased war-time 
machinery has now been adapted to the 
production of our peace-time goods and 
we are now in a position to supply. 



I CONTRACTORS TO THEl 
| ADMIRALTY, WAR ANDl 
| INDIA OFFICES. 1 

liiiiiiiiiinii iiLiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiir 



CtSS) 



Toy Spades 

With All Steel Blades 

J. T. Darlington 

Manufacturer of 

Seaside Spades and 

Buckets, and Flags 

of All Nations 



FOR WHOLESALE AND 
EXPORT TRADE 



Birches Green Works 

Erdington Birmingham, England 




We Specialize in 

BIRLEY 

Patent Folding Suit 
and Costume Boxes 

We also manufacture all 
kinds of Folding Boxes 



QUALITY and SERVICE 



Dominion Paper Box Co. 

LIMITED 
Toronto Ontario 



J 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



243 




Have you sent along a trial order 
yet? If not, write to-day. British 
quality lines 
always pay to 
handl 



Sphere 
Suspenders 

are 

Suspenders 

of 

Quality 



grip so firmly with so gentle a 
grasp that the finest stockings 
are safe from tears. They hold 
the corset correctly in position 
and in this way ensure the suc- 
cess of the gown. 




Display them on 
your counter. 

Ask 
about 
Sphere 
Brownies 
for the 
little ones. 



WHOLESALE ONLY 



FAIRE BRO s & Co., Ltd., Leicester, England. 



WORKS: ST. GEORGE'S MILLS, LEICESTER. 



Makers of Sphere Braces and Garters for Men and Sphere\Brou)nies for Children. 



244 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




"Just Right!" 

ry well dressed woman realizes the importance of choosing the 
BIGHT Battoni for her smart costumes. Buttons will either make 
or mar any costume. Your Button Display must always be exten 
and tasteful. 

In our Spring lines of exclusive BUTTONS you will find styles and 
shades that will be Jl'ST BIGHT for any type of costume." 

Select your Spring stock NOW! 

Fverything in BUTTONS. Also Tailors' Small Wares and Fancy 

Trimmings. 

The Ontario Button Co., Limited 

Kitchener, Ontario 




SLIP-ON VEILS 

Wide range of popular 
meshes, with many ex- 
tremely smart and becom- 
ing designs in Chenille, 
Silk, etc. 



9Scwtf*^j$ 



Made in France — the home of all things 
of particular charm and artistic beauty. 
Your PARTICULAR customers will ap- 
preciate them. 



HAIR NETS 

Silk and Human Hair. 
With or without elastic. 
Fringe and cap styles. 
Sturdy and neat. 



Large Stock always on hand 

THE BONNIE-B COMPANY 



TORONTO 156 Yonge Street 



NEW YORK-222 Fourth Avenue 



We Take the Opportunity of 
Thanking Our Customers 



Gipe-Hazard 
Store Service 

Co., Ltd. 



113 Sumach St. 
Toronto : : Canada 





For their patronage in the years 
gone by, and >1bo to State our 
regret at our inability to have 
served many with greater dis- 
patch than we were able to do. 
h them to know, however, 
that we did our best under the circumstances, as never before did orders 
pour in upon us as they have in the year just closed, and never before 
have we experienced such difficulties of obtaining help and materials to 
?nable us to cope with them. 

May we say that we are looking forward for better things in the year 
we are just entering upon. 




CONDENSED ADVERTISEMENTS 



I i>r rent* per word per insertion. Ten 

w 



extra for box number. 



; \.\TKD MERCHANDISE EXPERTS FAMILIAR WITH CLOTH- 
ing. dry goods, and shoes. Must b« :<2 u> l."> years of age, good ap- 
pearance, must have unlimited initiative and be able to submit high- 

rvferences. Permanent position. Hig compensation while learning 

under our expert sale conductors who earn from $1,000 to $10,000 per 
year. Will give five year contract to gentlemen who qualify and guar- 
antee steady employment. 

Through our assets being a half million dollars and an established 
l.ii. mess of 25 years, a wonderful opportunity is being offered for ■ 
few extra salesmen right now. Apply A. J. Stewart, sale, manager. 
T K Kelly Sales System. Minneapolis. Minn. 



ADVERTISER, WINDOW TRIMMER AND CARD WRITER. DE- 
Bires position. Western and Eastern Canada experience. Box 190, 
Dry Goods Review. 143 University Ave., Toronto. 



TTOSIERY AGENT. WHOLESALE AND EXPORT. REQUIRES 

agencies in knitted goods (stockings, underwear, scarves, coats for 
lii I, men and children), also for gloves. L. A. Nelson, .V.», Gresham 
Street. London, E.C. 



TRAVELLER HAVING GOOD CONNECTION WITH WHOLESALE 
and retail dry goods and gent's furnishing trade in the Maritime 
Provinces desires a good line on commission basis. Box No. R, Dry 
Review, 128 Bleary St., Montreal. 



UANTKD SALESMAN OR SALESLADY. THOROUGHLY El 

ent and capable of taking charge of dry goods and ladies' and chil- 
dren's ready-to-wear department in general store. Must be good stock- 
keeper, sales builder, good appearance, good character. Salary and 
commission proposition. Apply in own hand writing giving all par- 
ticulars as to personality, age, experience, references, capabilities, 
salary expected. J. A. Virtue, Mossomin, Sask. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



245 




^^^Sv ssssssssssssssss 



You buy service when you subscribe to DRY GOODS REVIEW. We have facilities for procuring information about new goods, 
novelty lines, unusual requirements, etc., and the Service Department is always at your disposal. If the information you seek is not to 
be found in our Buyers' Market Guide, or in the advertising pages of this issue, cut out the coupon below and fill in your questions. 
Every day these are coming in and they are welcome. We are glad to be of any possible assistance to our readers. Following are 
lust a few of the enquiries received during the past month : 

(The Buyers' Market Guide, next page, contains many addresses of use to you.) 



Dictionary- 
New York, N.Y. — Please tell me the name of the 
person compiling a dictionary of dry goods terms 
in Edmonton, Alta., as reported in Dry Goods Re- 
view? 

Answer — Name was forwarded. 

Window Trims and Show Cards 

Raymond, Alta.; Stellarton, N.S. — Please tell me 
where I can procure books on window trims and 
show card writing? 

Answer — Addresses of publishers were sent. 

British Yarn Exporters 

Peterboro, Ont. — Please tell me the names of Bri- 
tish firms which export yarn? 

Answer — Addresses \oere sent. 

Spats 

Richmond, Ont. — Please tell me where I can pro- 
cure spats for women and girls? 

Answer — Addresses of firms were sent. 

Store Fronts 

St. Thomas, Ont. — Will you be good enough to 
advise us as to firms ivho instal store fronts? 

Answer — Names of several were forwarded. 

Underwear and Brassieres 

Ottawa, Ont. — Would you please let me know the 
address of the manufacturers of Turnbull's Under- 
wear; the Canadian manufacturers of brassieres; 
also silk and silk and wool underwear? 

Answer — Lists and addresses were sent. 

Cuts for Catalog 

Amherst, N.S. — Please tell me where I can pro- 
cure electro cuts for a catalog, also addresses of 
firms who printca talogs? 

Answer — Names of firms were sent. 



Hockey Suits 

Bashaw, Alta. — / would like to get in touch with 
a knitting firm who manufacture hockey suits? 

Answer. — Name has been given to a firm that 
does this work. 

Corsets 

Elmira, Ont. — Let me know where the manufac- 
turers of Thompson's Glove Fitting Corsets are 
located? 

Answer — The address is George C. Batchellor & 
Co., 130 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Hats Reblocked 

Killam, Alta. — Do you knoiv of a firm in Canada 
that reblocks hats? 

Answer — An address was forwarded. 

Cotton Mills 

Neustadt, Ont. — Please tell me where I can pro- 
cure print and cotton for manufacturing purposes? 

Answer — List of Canadian, American and British 
mills was sent. 

Measuring Device 

Ayer's Cliff, Que. — Please tell me where I can 
procure a measuring device for piece goods? 
Answer — Names of firms were forwarded. 

Glove Publication 

Kitchener, Out. — Please be good enough to inform 
me if there is a publication in the interests of the 
glove trade? 

Answer — Glovers' Review, of Gloversville, N.Y., 
is the only one of which we know in America. 

Remodelling Suitcases 

Massey, Ont. — Please tell me the address of a 
firm that remodels suit cases and hand bags? 

Ansiver — Name was forwarded. 



THE DRY GOODS REVIEW 

143-153 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 

TORONTO 

PLEASE TELL ME WHERE I CAN PROCURE 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



For Subscribers 



INFORMATION WANTED 



DATE 



192 



246 



DRY GOODS REV! E W 




The The mpion Lace & Veiling Co., Limited 
Laces. Veilings, Geor- 
gettes. Ninons. "My 
Lady" Silk Hair Nets, 
Princess Pat Human 
Hair Net*. Sport 
Veila. 

Cor. Wellington and 

York St*.. 

Toronto. Canada. 




CHICAGO MERCANTILE CO. 



Importers, Manufacturers, Jobbers of 

WHOLESALE MILLINERY 

Wrile to. day for 

Our Latest Catalog of New Styles 

159 161163-165-167-169-171 No. Michigan Are. 
that. A. Slonehill, Pro. CHICAGO, ILL. 

TORONTO. ONT.. Show Room, 30 Wellington St. W. 



Infants', Children's, Girls' 
and Misses' Dresses 

We are Specialists in these tines 

H. L. WATTS, LIMITED 

400 Richmond St. W., Toronto 



T. H. Birmingham & Co. 

LIMITED 
99 Spadina Ave., TORONTO 

Maker, of 

Women's High Grade 
Neckwear 
The Exclusive Neckwear House" 



9 -; 



"EVERYTHING IN SILKS" 

M . Ascher Silk Corp. 

Distributors^Iroquois Silk Mills 
102 Madison Avenue, New York 



Manufacturers of 

Shoulder PADS Sleeve 
and Canvas Fronts 

Importers and Jobbers 

Jute. Union, Linen, Collar, Canvas 
Ideal Importing Co., Ltd. 



468 King St. W. 



Toronto. Ont. 



References : London. Eng. New York — 
Montreal 

FRED. BIRKS 

Commission Dry Goods 
14 Phillips Sq., MONTREAL, Can. 

Tel. Up. 38a. Covering all Province. 



GERSTENZANG BROS. 

Popular Priced 
Flowers and Feathers 

670-674 Broadway, NEW YORK CITY 



It is reported that the Vander- 
bilt residence between 57th and 
f>Nth streets on Fifth Avenue, Now 
York, which was sold this month 
for $5,500,000, was purchased by 
the Marshal Field Co. of Chicago 
for the purpose of erecting "the 
finest department store in New 
York." Another report stated 
that the property is to be turned 
into a $20,000,000 hotel. No offi- 
cial announcement as to who the 
purchaser was, has been made yet. 

The merchants on Fifth Avenue 
— famous for its Easter parade of 
fashions — have organized to make 
"The Avenue" especially attractive 
this year. "Art week" will be ob- 
served March 29 to April 4, and 
merchants of all classes are enter- 
ing into the project with enthus- 
iasm. Window displays and street 
decorations will come in for very 
special attention. "Art Week" is 
to be an annual event hereafter. 

Bradford has a good head for 
millions, but even Bradford can- 
not estimate the many millions this 
Government of ours will have 
made when their wool dealings 
come to be wound up. Having this 
in mind, the Yorkshire topmaker, 
spinner, or manufacturers has 
quite a restful conscience over his 
own profits. "The more for the 
Government, the more for us," they 
say. "It is going to be years be- 
fore the world's demand for cloth 
reaches the normal. Meanwhile 
we have the goods to sell — at a 
price." 

They never dream about lean 
kine in the West Riding. — London 
Daily Mail. 

Some of the current quotations 
on staple cottons are as follows: — 
Sheetings. — Best, plain sheeting, 
two yards wide arc offered at 
$1.00; No. 50, 2 yards at 80 cents; 
and No. S3, 2 yards at 67% cents. 

Grey Cottons.— No. 80, 36 ins. is 
selling at 27 Vi cents; and No. 75, 
:5f> ins. at 21% cents. 

Circular pillow cotton ranging 
from 40 to 46 ins. is quoted at 
from 45 to 65 cents; nainsook is 
from :50 to 42% cents. Cambric 
is selling at from 30 to 42% cents. 

Cheesecloth is quoted at 9% 
cents per yard; and longcloth from 
21% to 42% cents. 

Acting Commercial Attache, 
Henry F. Grady, London, writes to 
the United States Bureau of Com- 
merce as follows: 



VEILINGS and 
SILK N ETS 

HODGES & LETTAU 



232 McGill St. 



Montreal 



Write J or our latent 

, .4I: Special Catalogs 

^^^•^•r:it' , il\ C19I9 




Wholtsate Dry Coods ant* Central Merchandise 



John W Farweil Company 



Pyjamas 

for 

Style and Quality 

THE FOSTER MFG. CO. Ltd., 

Parkeston, Essex, England 



Canada's 

Largest Makers of 

Cotton Flags 

Write for Price* 

THE COPP, CLARK CO- 

517 Wellington St. West Toronto 





"HOOSIER" 

The bcit 36-inch brown 
domestic in America 

Buy it by the bale; 
tell it by the bolt 

Indiana Cotton Milts 

( "a nncl ton, I nd.,l'.S. A. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 

Artificial Flowers, Plants and Vines. 
Window Decorations, Japanese and 
Chinese Decorations, Papier Mache 
Novelties, Electric Lighted Flower 
Busihes. Write for our Catalogue. It's 
free for the asking. 

The Botanical Decorating Company 

IneenotmtMl 
208 W. Adams St., Chicago, III. 



t) 



BALLOONS 

Printed with your ad- 
vertisement at smah 
cost. Brings t h ■ 
mothers and children. 

L. G. BEEBE, 
53 Yonge St., Toronto 



Real HARRIS, LEWIS ?'and 
SHETLAND HOMESPUNS 

Direct from the makers. Special light- 
weights for Ladies' wear — all shades. 
Patterns and Prices on Application. 
S. A. NEWALL & SONS, StomowiT, Scotland 

Stale shade desired and uhtthtr ftf Ladles' tit Cents' 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



247 




Kent-McClain Again 

Montreal— The stores of (Mr. Henry (Marks 
have always been good examples of what 
a men's furnishing store should be and to 
the uninitiated his Peel Street store, for in- 
stance, did not offer much room for im- 
provements. However, by utilizing the 
space between the original cases and the 
oeildng iMr. Marks has put to work a large 
space that is excellently suited to the dis- 
play of hats. This has liberated much other 
space suited to other lines. The fixtures 
were all supplied by Kent McClain. Limit- 
ed, (Toronto Show Case Co..) of Toronto. 



WRIGHT'S BIAS FOLD TME 

norai I" ti ,ra.- s.«.ts ev.Tvu-h.Tv Mn.Jc 
USA since 1X98 "W & N," Mon- 
arch and Meteor brands. Kt-Hable fabrics 
ut on true bias. Selvaues trimmc-il. Scams 
jpmvn anrt pressed Trademark and por. 
trait of Wm, E. Wright on every package, 

I WRIGHTS E-Z-TRiM Newest Labor Saver 
I ready to sew on middy blouses and 
1 sal or suits. 2-yd. piece makes collar, cuffs 
I and yoke. 
Wm. E. Wright & Soot Co. Mfr>. 




Sold by 
Jobbers 
everywhere 
315 Church St. N. T. 



Spotless Shrinked Finisher 
Shrinks and finishes Woolens, Wash 
Goods, Silks, etc. 

Remnants, window and ledge displays 
are made saleable at full price: 

Write for De Luxe Catalog. 
THE SPOTLESS SHRINKER CO.. CLEVELAND, 



RIBBONS OF DISTINCTION 

'J-'C" Ribbons have peculiar 
charm. Widely advertised to 
the consumer under their 
trade-mark names for the 
protection of the dealer. 
"8ATLN DE LUXE" 
I vO. .»W/ "TROUSSEAU" 

\Lf%w^»S// "LADY FAIR" 

•SAN'KANAC" "VIOLET" 
"DEMOCRACY" 
JOHNsu.N, COWiDIN 4 CO., 40 E. 30th St, 
New York, NY. Made in U.S.A. 




DTROMFR TOTTENHAM 

HAIR GOODS MANUFACTURER, 

HAIR-FRAMES F P° A R s P H R , E o S N E r 1 

WHOLESALE & EXPORT ONLY 



CABLE ADDRESS: TROMEROLO.LONOON 



BRIGHT AND SNAPPY 

SHOWCARDS, SIGNS, 

PRICE TICKETS 

MAIL ORDERS Given Prompt Attention 
SHOW CARD DEPT. 

ADVERTISING SYSTEMS 

16 Ryrie Bldg. TORONTO Phone: Main 480 



For REAL VALUES in 
COATS and SUITS 

Mail orders to or call on 
The G.B.G. Mfg. Co., Inc. 
15 East 26th St., NE W YORK CITY 

SHOW CARD WRITING 

A MONEY MAKING PROFESSION 

FOR BOTH MEN AND WOMEN 

Easily learned in short time by simple 
method. We teach you how. Write for 
booklet. 

AMERICAN SHOW CARD SCHOOL 

217 Ryrie Building 

Yonge & Shuter Sts., Toronto, Can. 



"The marked and growing tend- 
ency of British industries to take 
on syndicate form has been a mat- 
ter for more or less comment from 
•public and press alike for some 
months past. This tendency ap- 
pears to be reaching its zenith in 
the British cotton trade, where the 
number of mills that have chang- 
ed hands in the two or three 
months approximate seventy. The 
Lancashire cotton industry has 
been greatly excited as a result 
of the action of syndicates in buy- 
ing up cotton mills at exceedingly 
high prices. New companies are 
constantly being floated, the shares 
being eagerly taken up at a prem- 
ium by the general public or in- 
terested groups. According to 
varying press statements, (many 
large fortunes have been made, 
and men of even quite moderate 
financial standing are reported to 
have reaped profits ranging from 
$25,000 to $50,000." 

Announcement has been made by 
the British Wool Comptroller that 
all the 40,000 bales of Australian 
and 10,000 bales of New Zealand 
staple (practically two-thirds be- 
ing merino) of the original allot- 
ment for the auction sales to be 
held in Boston, are expected to 
arrive by the middle of January. 
Bids on the British wool sold at 
Boston will be accepted from any 
quarter. It is asserted that Can- 
adian activity at the Boston sales 
is certain, and that an appreciable 
part of the merino offerings will 
move to the Dominion. 

A rather sharp increase in 
prices for winter and early spring 
clothes was predicted by members 
of the National Association of 
Wholesale Clothiers and Tailors of 
the United States at the annual 
meeting held in Chicago recently. 
Wage increases to journeymen 
tailors, approximating 200 per 
cent, since' 1914, scarcity of raw 
materials and plentiful money 
were the causes they assigned. It 
was pointed out that popular 
priced suits that before the war 
sold at $25 will cost $60 next 
Spring. 

The consumption of American 
cotton in 1919, is expected to be 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 
13,000,000 bales, of which total, 
Europe will probably take 6,000,- 
000 bales. If European takings 
amount to the latter figure, some 



I Specialize in Boot Laces 

for the wholesale trade, in the better 

grades. 

Banded in pairs, in gross boxes 

Fancy Cabinets. 100 pairs, banded in 

pairs. These are more profitable than 

bulk make-up. Also 

LEATHER LACES, all kinds. 

E. W. McMARTIN, MONTREAL 



H. Levy & Sons, Limited 

198 McGill Street - MONTREAL 

Phone MAIN 1457 

Woollens, Linings, Trimmings, etc. 

For Clothing and Cloak Trades 



The Gem of trie Not tons 




Columbia Fssrn^. 
Comp.r.y 
CH1CAOO 



^Mdk D B. Fisk&Co. 

cf 1 ^^ _ Chicago 



MTRCH AN DUE 



ncago 

New York Salesroom : 

Open Throughout the Year 

411 Fifth Avenue 



ADVERTISEMENT WRITERS and 
SHOW CARD WRITERS WANTED 

Big demand for both men and women. 
We prepare you in few months at home 
— under experts. Our graduates in 
demand. They earn good money. Get 
particulars. Write 

SHAW CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL 

Toronto, Canada (Dep. D.R.) 



Cork Socks 

Manufacturers of Cork, Linoleum, Felt, 
Paper, Flushing in all colours. Flannel- 
ette, Asbestos, Loofahs, etc., Fleeciea. 
^tc. Ladies, Gent's and Children's. St. 
Cecilian Works, 46-48 Haymerle Road, 
Peckham, London, S.E. 15. 




Manufacturer a 
329-331 Fourth Ave., N. Y. 

SUPERBA BINDING 
BRAIDS, CORDS, DRESS TRIMMINGS 



Fred Jones & Company 

Manufacturers and Importers 

Babies' Hand Crochet Goods Notions 

Babies' Hand Knit Goods Novelties 

Art Needlework Materials 

Room 617, Empire Building 

64 WELLINGTON ST. WEST, TORONTO 



248 



DRY HOODS REVIEW 




Kent-McClain Again 

ll.lllf.iv N.&- Kennedy's. 1. Illllt.il. llllTi- 

.1 and used rjpportunltl 
further dcralop Hi.' dtopUo effldencj of 
ilu-ir handaomt Mm store. A lit: ■ 
titU- n m I"* in ■ 

»all fixture, for the ■bowlraj of silk 
•iv fizton for ■santaa 
These fixture* are ill In qua 
«k and u> r. bulll by Knit-M 
Limited, [Toronto tnpeiiy), 




PERPLEXED ! 

Then let us solve your business 
building problems; we are solv- 
ing them daily for thousands of 
lire merchants with our trade 
pulling, selling and merchandis- 
ing plans, human Interest copy, 
letters, illustrations, events, etc 
Full particulars upon request. 

THE ECONOMY SERVICE 

231 West 39th St. ( New York City 




CHILDREN'S 

GARMENT 

DRYING FORMS 

NON-RUSTING 

PATENTED 

Write for Circular 

No. 31 

J. B. T1MBERLAKE 

& SONS, Mln. 
Jackson Michigan 



"Mesh Bags will be more 
fashionable and popular 
than ever the coming 
season." 

WHITING & DAVIS CO. 

SHERBROOKE. QUE. 



SIGN WRITING 

Do your own card writing 

Write for our catalogue which will tell you 
what you need. Best goods at closest prices 

ARTISTS' SUPPLY CO. 

77 York St., Toronto 




aFtliiiriKDP 



iiiui — 



Die Standard Popular Priced 
WAISTS America 
CheL-N- GROSS <3> Cleveland 



Bartell Patent Pockets 

Used and Endorsed by 59 
Canadian Clothing Manu- 
facturers. This List can be 
had from 

BARTELL PATENT POCKET CO. 

17 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 



WRITE US FOR 

Textile and Knitting 
Machinery 

We are Specialist* 

W. J. WESTAWAY CO. 

72 JAMES ST. N. HAMILTON 



idea of the enormous amount of 
money to be derived from the 
United States from the sale .of this 
one commodity may be pained by 
considering that 6,000,000 bales is 
3,000,000,000 pounds, and at thirty 
cents per pound, would be worth 
$900,000,000 in United States cur- 
rency. Converting that sum into 
sterling, the least depreciated of 
all the allied exchanges, it will 
take £245,000,000 to purchase the 
6,000,000,000 pounds of cotton, 
whereas when exchange was 
normal, the cost to Europe would 
be only 1185,000,000. 

It is reported in Continental 
newspapers that the German firms 
finishing cotton goods have fixed 
their rates at 700-900 per cent, ad- 
vance upon pre-war prices. 

A tour of Canada is being ar- 
ranged for next August, when a 
Canadian Government exposition 
train will carry French merchan- 
dise of various lines. The French 
steamship line is to carry the 
samples across free. Besides sales- 
men, the train will be equipped 
with reels to give exhibitions of 
fashion films and manufacturing 
methods. A committee has been 
appointed to urge the couturier to 
show model gowns, hats and tex- 
tile novelties. 

Raw cotton w?s quoted January 
15 at 39.25 in New York. 

New importations of sweaters 
are being shown in the large cen- 
tres in many unique models. 
Three-quarter sleeves, raglan, 
kimono, and set-in models are fea- 
tures. These are shown in the 
sheerest weaves, from chiffon al- 
paca to pure silk models. Quite 
the sheerest of all are the dentelle 
sweaters made of a thread that is 
said to be neither silk, cotton nor 
wool, but a combination of all 
three. It is a Tuxedo sweater 
with pockets and comos in all the 
hieh shades. Equally sheer are 
the spider wool shawls of the fin- 
est camel hair which are shown 
only in white. 

SIGN AND CARD 
WRITERS' SUPPLIES 

FIRST AID TO THE 

Card Writer and Window Display Man 

SUPPLY DEPT. 

Tor.nl. ADVERTISING SYSTEMS M.in imj 



TAPES 

ALL WIDTHS AND QUALITIES 

CARRIED IN STOCK 

Walter Williams & Co. 

508 READ BLDC, MONTREAL 
20 WELLINGTON ST. W„ TORONTO 



AWNINGS 

FOR 
Stores, Offices, Factory, or Residence. 

Write for Price Littl and Meaturement] 

Charts. AddreMi 

C. H. PETCH 

Successor to 
EDMONDSON & PETCH 



Ottawa 



Canada 



.Smallwares 

AND 

Hosiery 

The Robert Hyslop Co urn* 

HAMILTON ONTARIO 




GOLDFINE'S LIMITED 

Wholesale Dry Goods and 
Men's Furnishings 

BARGAINS ALWAYS ON HAND 

Write for Particular* 

227 Craig St. West, Montreal 



PILLOWS and COMFORTERS 

GET PRICES BEFORE BUYING 

The Toronto Feather & Down Co. 

LIMITED 

2151-8 Dundsi Street Weil - TORONTO ] 

Montreal Winnipeg Vancouver 

P. M. LeMaiitre McRae & Walker H. E. Walker 



Choir Gowns 

The Best in Design 

The Best Made 

The Most Reasonable in Price 

HARCOURT & SON, LIMITED 

103 King Street W., Toronto 



We Manufacture 

Paper Boxes 

that will 
Make Your Goods More Attractive 

A. D. SHOUP CO., Limited 
TORONTO 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



249 




Kent-McClain Again 

Brookville — The Robert 'Craig Company, 
Limited have completely remodelled the in- 
terior of their store by installing a quan- 
tity of new fixtures. These are in ma- 
hogany finish and comprise a large section 
of revolving wardrobe with mirrors, tables 
and a special cabinet for furs. Kent-Mc- 
Clain, Limited, (Toronto Show Case Com- 
pany), Toronto, built the fixtures. 




CLIMAX PAPER 
BALERS 

ALL STEEL-FIREPROOF 
"Turn* Watte 

into Profit" 
12 SIZES 
Send for Catalog. 

CLIMAX BALER CO. 
Hamilton, Ont. 



LETTER SERVICE 

MULTIGRAPHING 

Addressing Folding Inserting 
Mailing 

NEW UP-TO-DATE EQUIPMENT 

Write for Prices 
Letter Service Department 

ADVERTISING SYSTEMS 

216 Ryrie Bldg. TORONTO Phone M. 480 



ESTABLISHED 1S72 

Knitting Machinery 

Power and Hand 

May we hear from you ? 

CREELMAN BROS. 

Box 837, Georgetown, Ont., Canada 



„& 



o ooooooo 



OO00OOO0VOCO03 



Bead Co. 



imerican r>eaa ^ainc. 

BEADS AND NECKLACES 

485 FIFTH AVENUE 
new vorivo CITY 



STUYVESANT 3619 

Art Button & Novelty 
Mfg. Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Jet and Fancy Glass Buttons 
For Jobbing Trade Only 

Decorators on Buttons of Every Description 
814 BROADWAY - NEW YORK 




Manufacturers and Import- 
ers of Human Hair Goods, 
Hair Ornaments, Sundries, 
Real Human Hair Nets, 
Dolls' Wigs. 

Universal Hair Goods 

Mfg. Company 

Fraser Building 

43 St. Sacrement St., Montreal 

We are the only Dolls' Wigs 
Manufacturers in the Do- 
minion. 



Artists and 
Card Writers Supplies 

Tell us your needs. 

ART METROPOLE LTD. 

14 Temperance St. Toronto 



Orders for textiles from Can- 
adian mills to the amount of over 
$8,000,000 are pending;, the secur- 
ing of which depends principally 
upon the arrangements of details 
in connection with credits. This 
business has come to a head dur- 
ing the past three weeks, and of- 
ficials representing the woollen 
manufacturers of Canada and the 
Government have been in confer- 
ence with the representatives in 
America of the all-Russian Govern- 
ment of Omsk. 



Small collars, including the 
short back collar, the tiny bib, the 
surplice, and the narrow coliar, in 
round and square neck forms, says 
an Exchange, are being revived in 
the season's new neckwear. Even 
the straight rolling collars are be- 
ing diminished in length. The ma- 
terials used in these collars are 
extremely fine and dainty. Em- 
broidered net collars are also find- 
ing much favor. 



The Universal Hair Company, 
Montreal, have entered upon a new 
line of manufacture which will be 
of interest to the trade. They are 
specializing in dolls' wigs, a line 
which hitherto has always been im- 
ported and for which there was 
quite a scarcity during the war. 



The National Shoe Retailers' 
Association of America held a 
very successful convention in Bos- 
ton the week of Januarv 12th, at 
which there were over 5,000 re- 
tailers of shoes in attendance. 
Quite a number of Canadian mer- 
chants were among these. 



HATS 

Cash for Old Stock. 
For Stiff Hats, Black or Colored. 

DUBRULE MFG. CO., Ltd. 

164 McGILL ST., MONTREAL 



DIRECTORIES 



Of all Canadian Trades. 
All branches of the Dry Goods Trade covered by 
WOMEN'S WEAR, JULY; MENS WEAR. 
SEPT,; TEXTILE PRODUCTS, JAN., com- 
bining above two. 

c n Li- l- r 222 Craig W., Montreal. 

rraser Publishing Lo- 122 Wellington W , Toronto 



DUCK CLOTHING - SUMMER SUITS 

CADET UNIFORMS 
BOY SCOUT EQUIPMENT, CHOIR GOWNS 

All Clothing Specialties. 

The Miller Mfg. Co., Ltd. 



44-46 York St. 



Toronto 



PATTERNS 

Regardless of what your pattern experience 
may have been it will pay you well to investi- 
gate our new pattern proposition. 100% profit 
— Patterns not sold returnable for full credit 
like cash— Fashion Sheets free. 
EfooM Patterns are illustrated in The Ladies' 
Home Journal and will outsell any other pat- 
tern on the market. 

Write to-day for samples of our beautiful 
Kashion Publications and full details of our 
new plan. 

THE HOME PATTERN CO., Inc. 

1 16 Fifth Avi-.. Now Y..rk Toronto Kh.-i.tv 216 Victoria St 



"GARRITY'S PERMANENT 
WAVING FLUID" 

Keeps the Hair in Wave or Curl for Days 

Manufacturers of 
Garrity's Silk Hair Wavers and Binders 

L. M. GARRITY & COMPANY 

31 Bedford St. Boston, Mass. 

Trade Mark Reg. U.S.A. Pat. Off. 



KPVERALLS 

Mum 

Copyright name for one-piece 
garments for children I to 8 years. 
Made and Guaranteed by 

LEVI STRAUSS & CO., San Francisco. Cal. 

1021 Medinah Bldg., Chicago. 377 Broadway, New York 



FLOWERS 
DISPLAY FORMS 
FIXTURES 

Art ■ anels for Window Backgrounds. 
Send for Catalogues. 

EASTERN SALES COMPANY 
43 SCOTT ST. TORONTO 



TOYS 



and all other world famous Gilbert Toys made in 
Canada. Visitors Welcome 

THE A. C. GILBERT-MENZIES CO., LIMITED 
439 King St.W. Toronto 



Embroidery Foundation 

Forms 
"TICO" Standard of the World 

Samples and Catalog on Request 

THE INITIAL COMPANY, INC. 

Wytheville, Virginia, U.S.A. 
New York Chicago Los Angeles 



250 



DRY 



00 DS REV] E \V 




* 1 1 




1 I i 



<SE©.TCE G. SMUTJHI 

MAM 1 V II RERS' AGENT 
403Canada Building, Winnipeg, Man. 



KKADY TO WF.AR AND 
DRY GOODS .SIM ( |,M TIES 



rancouver 



Calgary 



Regina 



T. H. VVardell 

i : Hammond Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. 
Dry Goods Commission Broker 

11 '///; Staff Cot)i > tttg it ' nlory 
Port Arthur to Vancouver 



\\ J E ARE OPEN TO REPRE- 
' ' sent British or French and 
Canadian manufacturers of dry 
goods and kindred lines through- 
out the Province of Ontario. 

EUROPEAN AGENCIES 

29 COLBORNE STREET 
TORONTO, CANADA 



J. DUDGEON & CO. 

Manufacturers' Agents and Commission Merchants 
New Birks Building - Montreal 

We Follcm m>: 

1 iii' - 

Dress Goods 

\\ .ui<l I iii. .ii s, i^r- s and t 

Cloaking! 

i Seals, < 

Laees 

\ _ , i tn I. i I . 

Olotl i: I ' 

Wool Travelling Rug:. 

R ititiful 

• | atti in- 
Irish Linens 
In Damasks, T 
I,m. ii 9hi ting I' I. ' • ii I '■ iwing 

and Bund ' ' aM kinds. 

Nottingham I.ace Curtains and 
Bungalow Nits. 



FRED. RUMBLE 

Manufacturers' Agent 
300 Hammond Bldg., Winnipeg, Man. 

DRY GOODS AGENCIES TO 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE 



E. A. PALMER 

MANUFACTURER'S AGENT 
925 Oftsington Ave., Toronto, Ont. 

With a good connection in the Wholesale 

and Retail Trade, wishes to represent 

tfactdTera of Ladies' and Children's 

Wear and other lines of Dry Goods in 

i tt t.i rio 



Agencies wanted for Great Britain 
L. A. NELSON 
Hosiery & Knitted Goods 

AiM-nt. \\ h<ili-.;i U- and Export. 
H— i duuaxtfa, London. Kngland. 

59, (ire ham St.. B.C. 1- 
ii t" represent manufacturers, all 
except Summer Ribbed Under- 
ivi'n r. 



BitabUthed ist8 

P. DAVENPORT, Silk Manufacturers 

Bridge street Mills, Maccle&fleld, Eng. 

London, Luton, Manchester. England. 

Agent for Canada: 

ROBERT C. PARSONS 

Foy Building, 34 Front Street West, Toronto. 



> iaer, back to business after 3 

serrioe overseas, wishes Oanadian, 

(iiii it I: 

nun's wear ' ■ ■ •■ Well 

bed «ilh lutli retail and wholesale 

dry K>»»ls and nuns wear trade-; in the 

A • -. 185, Dry Goods Review. 

.. Canada. 



AGENCIES WANTED FOR CANADA 
Foreign manufacturers would find, in using 
our loru; experience and good connection, a 
first-class medium to develop an extensive 
trade with Manufacturers. Wholesale 
and Departmental Stores. Our firm, since 
1904, specialize in medium and high grade 
Cloths, Dress Goods, Silks. Velvets, etc. 
Notable firms only should apply at 

\(,K\<:i 1)1. NChjVEAUTES, 
Dandurand Building. Montreal. Canada 



The William Herbinson Co. 

222 McDermot Ave. Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Cable Address: "Herbinson" A. B.C. code. 5th Edition 

COMMISSION BROKERS 

Specializing Notions, Fancygoods & Haberdashery 

for the Wholesale Trade and Department Store 
Salesmen covering territory — Winnipeg to Vancouver 

Canadian Made Underwear 

Commission firm with sample- rooms and 
offices in Montreal, Toronto and Winnipeg 
desires the agency of a Canadian manu- 
facturer of Woollen Underwear. 

Long connection with the trade. Whole- 
sale only. Write care of 

BOX 182, DRY GOODS REVIEW. 
143-153 University Ave., Toronto 



AGENCY WANTED 

i' i igeni, with 

vam i in. lie good line 

fi .in manufacturer suitable for thi i> 

1 'liitiu trade. II. iv. tin- lust of connections 
B itlah Columbia and 

vi Iran Box If* Dry 

view, 143-163 Cnlvi \ I 



DAVIES & CO. 

Manufacturers' Agents 

Boom % 16 U i 

Witti In the Wl 

i; Drj Goods wish bo repraflei>t British 

.ui'l C&nadlgU) ma mi fact i i * rn Ontario 

and Quebec. 



AGENCY WANTED 
For Quebec and District 

Box 187 

Dry Goods Review 

143-153 University Ave., Toronto 

J. BROWN & CO. 

210 Bon-Accord Bldg. 
WINNIPEG, - MAN. 

Manufacturers Agents 

Men's, Ladies' and Children's 
Ready-to-Wear 

Open to represent Manufacturers for the West 



\\ ANTED — Agency of Specialties 
for Quebec City and District. B 
connections and references. Reply 
to G. A. VANDRY, 28 St. Joseph 
St., Quebec. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



251 




Above is cut of J. L. Wyckoff, who has become Editor of CANA- 
DIAN GROCER. 

Mr. -Wyckoff has been in the grocery business for over 25 years. 
In 1894 he began as clerk in W. H. Branton's store, London, Ont. 
Five years later he joined the staff of James Wilson & Co., of the 
same city. When this firm retired from business three and a half 
years later, he became associated as clerk with T. A. Rowat & Co., 
who are in business yet in London. In 1908, Mr. Wyckoff w r a 
selected branch manager for Rowat & Co., and in 1914, launched 
into the grocery business for himself and which he has conducted 
successfully ever since. On January 1 he sold out to join the staff 
of CANADIAN GROCER as Editor. 

The appointment of Mr. Wyckoff, an experienced merchant, to this position is along 
the lines of the policy of the MacLean Publishing Company of securing men for res- 
ponsible positions who have been in the retail business, who know how goods are 
actually bought and sold and who are able to advise and suggest with authority. Not 
long ago a retailer became associated with us who was manager of a store doing 
quarter of a million turnover. Former successful retailers are connected with the 
staffs of all our business papers. Here is the list; get in touch with those that interest 
you: 

Weekly Monthly 

CANADIAN GROCER DRY GOODS REVIEW 

HARDWARE AND METAL MEN'S WEAR REVIEW 

DRUGGISTS' WEEKLY BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER 

Semi-Monthly 

SANITARY ENGINEER 



MacLean Publishing Co., Limited 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



DRY GOODS REV] E W 




jjjL 

1 



41 ' 



tv 




ow 



Consumer Advertising 

During the year 1920 the Irish Linen Society's Advertising 
will deal with merchandising, rather than general publicity. 
The various forms of household articles and wearing apparel 
in which Irish Linen reaches the consumer will be featured, 
both pictorially and in copy. 

Seasonable thoughts will be employed- -Fashion elements stressed, and 
throughout the campaign a basic theme, that for these various stated pur- 
poses there is no substitute for the True Irish Linen. 

This campaign will have an effect of sending customers into your depart- 
ments asking for specific articles of true Irish Linen. Your stocks should 
he prepared with this in view. 

In our trade advertising announcements, notice will be given in advance 
of each new consumer message, and the merchandise emphasized. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Kg Irish Linen Society^ 

1920 PROGRAM 
WILL HELP 



Watch these and take the opportunity of lmt;„„ ■ • 

tising with your own particular depa men It oca!" H ^^ ^ 
dow displays. In this manner you win concentra rh n""? "^ Win " 
f nera, hnen campaign on yo^r store, NSXMfe^£ 

***** 

* * * 

Unfortunately the flax shortage still continues to exist Tl ■ , • " 

great restrictions in manufacturing m J • lhls results in - 

increase the production of C Irish r'^ " "^""'^ imp ° Ssible t0 
stantly growing demand. V^^ ^s iXlTT- "j? the ^ 
arrangements, with all possible sneeH f g y adv,sable to make 

Insh Linen for the rJS^St^LS^' " n * ° f TfUe 



" ™ h r, cE and ™™ ™" 

iNew York City 



25 1 



F I* l: D E I" A B T M E NT 



/■>/•// d'oods Review 




The Canadian Fur Auction Sales Co., 



of Montreal 



Limited 



organized and financed by a representative body of Canada's 
It aders in great commercial enterprises will hold its 

First Great Sale of Raw Furs in March 

Offering immense quantities of fresh, original, unculled Canadian furs — the best in 
the world — UNMIXED with inferior Southern varieties, the Company will sell to the 
highest bidder of hundreds of eager buyers from all parts of the United States and 
Europe. 

You get the world's best prices on the WORLD'S BEST FURS, your CANADIAN 
goods, at our sales. 

We do not issue extravagantly-quoting, misleading price lists, but we DO see that 
your furs bring absolutely top prices. 

Kuyers from London, Paris, New York, Chicago and other great distributing centres 
have already arranged to attend the MARCH SALE. 

The widespread interest shown by buyers clearly indicates the unusual scarcity of 
law furs; unmistakably points to an unusually keen demand, particularly for the finer 
furs — Canadian goods We are not unduly optimistic in predicting 

World's Record Prices for Our March Sale 

LIBERAL CASH ADVANCES will gladly be made on request 
accompanying any shipment, large or small, pending sales. 

Write us. Get our advices — market reports, accurate, reliable guidance to you in buying, and 

Ship Now 

any quantity of any variety or grade. No market in the world will net you better results. Last day of receiv- 
ing for this sale is MARCH 1. 



The CANADIAN FUR AUCTION SALES CO., 



MONTREAL 
Temporary Offices : Windsor Hotel, Montreal 



LIMITED 



Dry Goods Review 



FUR DEI'AR T MENT 



255 




No. 



ONE FINGER MITTS 

10116 Split, doz 



No. 13616-Cream Horsehide, doz. 16.50 

ONE FINGER GAUNTLETS 
No. 10219-TBrown, split, doz... 

No. 1081!)- Sheepskin, doz 7.50 



WHY WORRY 

ABOUT HIGH PRICES OF GLOVES ? 



We have a good stock on hand, 
for immediate delivery, of our 
famous 

HIGH QUALITY 
WORKING GLOVES 

in 

SHEEPSKIN, 

YELLOW SPLIT, 

ALASKA SPLIT, 

CREAM HORSEHIDE, 

PIGSKIN, Etc 



.% 7.00 





GAUNTLET MITTS 

No. 10n ! doz 

No. 13446— .Pigskin, doz 10.25 

n Horsehide, doz. 1 1 . ." 



SHORT GLOVES 

Doz. 

No. 10360 -Cow Flank Split $6.50 

No. 1086O Sheep. Chicago Glove, split 

cuff s. 00 

No. L846J P l.in. Rivetted Glove, spin 

cuff 16.00 

No. 13-469 Pigskin, Rivetted Glove, split 

back and band 13.50 

No. 13660 'Cream Horsehide, Chic; 

Glove, split back 18.00 





GAUNTLET GLOVES 



Doz. 



17 I Cow Flank Split $ 7.00 

1052 Mule 5.50 

No. 13670 Cream Horsehide, split back. 16,50 
No. 13674— -Cfeam Horsehide. split curl'.. 19.25 



PULLOVER MITTS. 

Doz. 

No. 14050 Mule with black imitation. 

Leather Band ' 3 50 

No. 10413 Green split 

No. 13611 — Cream Horsehide, split back 12.00 
No. 13613 — Cream Horsehide 16.80 



We advise early orders at these prices which hold good only while present stock, lasts. 

The Redmond Co., Limited 

Winnipeg Montreal 



256 



DRY <; oo 1) s h i: V I K w 



INDKX TO ADVKRTISERS 



A 

Icme Glove Work*. I.t.l 161 

Advertising Systems 247.248,248 

. de Nouveautae 

Ainscon & Co.. Ltd., John 88 

Allen Bros. Co.. Ltd i->. 

Allen Silk Milk 187 

American Bead Co., tnc 248 

American Pad .v Textile Co 72 

American Show Card School 2 17 

American Waist & Dress Co 229 

Anderson & Co., Ltd., Wm 10 

Anderson Ltd., U. & J 10 

Art Button & Novelty Mfg. Co 249 

A.t Cloak & Sail Ci 228 

Artists' Supply Co 

Art Mctrop.de. Ltd 249 

Aseher Silk Corp., M 246 

Atlantic Underwear Ltd 125 

H 

Ballantyne l.t.l.. It. M 126, 127 

Harclay, J U 

Bat-tell Patent Pocket Co 248 

Bastard, J. & W 

Bastln, Merryfleld & Cracknell, I.td... 2ti 

Bates & Innes. Ltd 237 

Beaver Knitting Co., Ltd 12* 

Bedford Mills, tnc -7 

Beebe, L. G 246 

Belding-Paul-Corticelli Ltd Hack 

Bentley & Clifton Ltd 29 

Herman. 1 230 

Bettinson & Cade 284 

Bhumgari. F. J 182 

Hirkin & Co.. T HO 

Birks, Fred 246 

Birmingham & Co.. Ltd., T. II 246 

Ulumonthal & Co.. Sidney 93 

Bonnic-B Co 211 

Botanical Decorated Co.. Inc 246 

Boarder Ltd.. J. 193 

Bradstreets 44 

BretUe & Co.. Ltd.. Geo 2 1 

Brickenden & McCrimmon 231 

Brock Co.. Ltd.. W. It.. Montreal 18 

Brock Co.. Ltd.. W. R.. Toronto... 16, 17 

Brooks & Co.. Cyrus 38 

Brown & Co., -1 250 

Brown, Vickers & Co 39 

C 

Calico Printers' As ociation 33 

Campbell, Metzger & Jackson 1*2 

Canada Veiling Co.. Ltd 2(12 

Canadian Braid & Trimming Co 

Canadian Consolidated Bobber Co.. Ltd. 

Inside hack c ivet 

Canadian Converters Co., Ltd 227 

Canadian Draperies. Lid 1*1 

Canadian Fur Auction Sale-, Co., Ltd. 2". i 

Canadian Leather Products, Ltd. .. 1 Is-'.i 

Canadian Woollens Ltd 192 

Caplin Waist & Kress Co 231 

Carhartt. Hamilton. Cotton Mills. Ltd. 72 

Castle Braid Co. , : 2 17 

Chicago Mercantile Co 2l(i 

Chipman-Holton Knitting Co., Ltd . 122 

-Bar Knitting Co.. Ltd 187 

Clatworthy & Son. Ltd 

Climax Baler Co 249 

.meter Sales Co 192 

Cole-Whittak.r Ltd 239 

Colonial Fastener Co . Ltd 8 

Colombia Fastener Co 2 19 

Cook Bros. * Allen. Ltd 11 

Coop-Clark Co.. Ltd 246 

inc & Co.. Ltd.. James 97 

t .Ma-lap Co 1*1 

Craftana 44 

Creelman Bros 249 

Crex Carpet Mfg. Co 17'.' 

Crocker, Son- & Co.. Ltd 27 

Cummings & Cummings 99 

Cummings, D. H 

Currie, John 12 

D 

Dale Wax Figures Co . I.'. I 172 

Dalj & Morin. Ltd 188 

Darlington, J. T 212 

Davenport & ('•■ , P 31 

Davies & Co 250 

Davis & Co Ltd . H. nry 138 

Deacon Shirt Co 92 

v Co 171 

Dent. Allrroft A Co 

Denton, Mitchell & Duncan 139 

Dominion Oi. ci..th k- Linoleum Co., Ltd l-o 
Dominion Ostrich Feather Co., Ltd 

Dominion Paper Boat Co J1J 

Textile Co.. Ltd 

16 

. Ltd 219 



Dudgeon & Co., J 260 

B 
11 Sales Co 249 

Economy Service 21* 

ii Velvet & Cord Dyers' Assoc... 31 

European Agendas 2.">o 

European Novell v Co 230 

F 

Bros. & Co., Ltd 213 

Farwell Co., John V 246 

Federal Snap Fastener Corp 112 

Fisher, Son- \ Co., Ltd.. Mark '."! 

Fisk & Co.. I). B 2 17 

Forrest & Co., Wm 42 

Joseph 37 

Foster Mfg. Co., I.t.l 

leaser Bros 231 

Fraser Publishing Co 219 

G 

(i. B. G. Co 2 17 

Gage Bros. & Co 106 

Gait Knitting Co.. Ltd 123 

Garland. Son & Co.. Ltd.. John M 3 

Garrity & Co., 1.. M 2 19 

Gerstenzang Bros 216 

Gilhert-Men/ies Co., Ltd.. A. C 9. 2 1V 

Ginsburg & Co.. 1) 10 

Gipe-Hazard Store Service Co.. Ltd.... 211 

Gloucester Pin Mfg. Co.. Ltd 1-"> 

Gnaedinger, Son & Co.. Ltd., I 

Godde. Bedin & Cie. Albert 91 

i.h Knitting Co.. Ltd 

Goetz & Ottinger 230 

Goulding & Sons, G 107 

Goldfines. Ltd 2 1* 

Greenshields, Ltd 1. B4 

Griffin Gloves. Ltd 17 1 

Gross Co.. L. N 248 

H 

Hanililv & Wilson, Ltd , 111 

Hamm & Riley Silk Co 86 

L.ircourt & Son, L*d 248 

Haugfa Mfg. Co.. Ltd., J. A 78 

Haworth & Co., Ltd., Richard. . Front cover 

Hawthorn Mills, td 196. 197 

Hend. 1 . Ltd.. J. B 182 

Herbinson Co.. William 250 

Herzog Cloak & Suit Co 238 

Herzog & Sons. Ph 232.233 

Hodges & Lettau 2 16 

Hodgson, Sumner & Co., Ltd 21 

Hollander & Co., Ltd.. A 96 

Hollander Fur Dyeing Co.. Ltd 101 

Hollin. & Co., Ltd., Wm 91 

Home Pattern Co., Inc 219 

Hoover Suction Sweeper Co. of Can . 

Ltd 6. 7 

Horroc Crewdson & Co.. Ltd 44 

Hyslop Co.. Ltd.. Robert 248 

I 

Ideal Garment Co. 1 New York I 248 

Ideal G-rment Co. I Montreal I 231 

ideal [moort : Co Ltd 246 

In. I pendent Silk Ltd 

Indian- Cofon Mills 2)6 

Infant-' '•'... t wear, Ltd 10 

'•<itial C ... Inc 219 

Irish Linen Society 262.268 

J 

Jennens. Welch & Co., Ltd 14 

Johnson Cowdin & Co 160, 2 17 

I. to s ]•■ & Co Ltd 174 

.Ion.- A Co. Fred 217 

Julian Sale Leather Goods Co.. Ltd... 179 
K 

Kassab Rimona Mfg. Co 231 

Kelly Sales System Co., T. K 17-20 

Kent-McClain Ltd. ... 170. 171. 2 17. 2 Is. 2 19 

Konvon Co.. Inc.. C In-idc front cover 

King Silk Co.. Ltd.. A. S 2 

King & Son. John 18 

Kirby, H aid & Co., Ltd 39 

L 

Label Chevalier & Co.. Ltd 100 

Is Co Ltd 17« 

1.. die-' Weai Ltd 1*'.' 

Lsmson Co 176 

Lane & Co.. F. N 184 

Lazare & Novek 236 

Lederer, Herhert B 166 

Lev v & Sons. Ltd., H 247 

Lister & Co.. Ltd 

London Ladies' Whitewear 225 

M 

Macdonald & Co.. Ltd.. John 1,6 

Mallinson & Co.. Inc.. H. R 

Martin & Co., Ltd.. P. P 22. 23 

McElroj Mfg. Co 

Mclntyre, Son & Co., Ltd i*« 

McKinlej Music Co 16 



M Martin. E. W 217 

Meisehnan & Rosenbloom 225 

Menkin & Co.. Inc.. S 114 

Miller Mfg. Co.. Ltd 2 19 

Mitchell Woollen Co.. I.t.l 1*2 

Monarch Knitting Co.. Ltd 129.136 

Moorhcad Knitting Co.. Inc 140 

Morimurs Bros 117 

Mouterdo, Charles 101 

Muser Bros. (Canada), Ltd 12. 13 

N 
National Cash Register Co. of Canada, 

Limited 173 

National Rubber Co. of Canada 235 

Navy Dept.. U.S.A 16 

Nelson. L. A 250 

Nerlich & Co 115 

Newall & Sons, S. A 246 

Newey Bros 212 

New York Mercantile Co 225 

North American Dye Corporation 10 

O 

Ontario Button Co., Ltd 211 

Oriental Textiles 1*.; 

P 

Palmenberg's Sons. Inc., J. R 17 1 

Palmer. E. A 

Parisian Corset Mfg. Co., Ltd 226 

Parsons, Robert C 250 

Pawsons & Leafs, Ltd 25 

Peerless Underwear Co., Ltd 125 

Petoh, C. Q 248 

Philip... J. i N 32 

Philips & Piper 38 

Phoenix No.elry Co 151 

Pine Tree Silk Mills Co 82 

P. K. Co 200. 201 

Prime & Rar.kin Ltd 1* 1 

Pugh Specialty Co Ill 

Putnam, A. E 151 

R 

Racine Ltd., Alphonse 11. 15 

Raven & Co., Ltd., Wm II 

Redmond Co., Ltd 255 

Reid & Co., G. F 225 

Regent Cloak Co 225 

Ribbons. Ltd 160 

Rigg Bros. & Co.. Ltd 240. 241 

Ritchie & Co., H. P 152. 153 

Robinson & Co., C. E 92 

Rumble, Fred 250 

Russell & Co., A 38 

S 

Schoen Silk Corp., Carl 88 

Srhofield Woollen Co., Ltd 191.19'. 

Schreiber. Rudolph 89 

Scott & Co.. Peter 41 

Scottish Rubber Co 236 

Shaw Correspondence Schools 2 17 

Shoup Co.. Ltd., A. D 

Smith. George G 250 

Soot less Shrinker Co 217 

Standard Factory of Can 205 

Star Skirt Co 225 

StaufTer-Dobbie. Ltd 19C 

St. Cecilian Works 217 

Strauss & Co., Levi 219 

T 
Thompson Veiling & Lace Co., Ltd.. 162. 246 

Timberlake & Son;. J. B 248 

Toronto Feather & Down Co.. Ltd 21* 

Trio Waist Co 230 

Tromer, D 217 

Turnbull Co.. C Ill 

U 

Universal Hair Goods Mfg. Co 230.289 

Uplift Corset Co 163 

V 

Vandrv, G. A 250 

Visor Knitting Co.. Ltd 138 

Vogue Waist Co 230 

Vol & Stern 92 

W 

Cotton Co.. Ltd 190. 101 

Walker Bros. & Co.. Ltd 36 

Wardell. T. W 250 

Watt.-, Ltd . H. L 246 

•away Co.. W. J 24S 

Westlake Bros.. Ltd 156 

W.t wood Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. C. H 118 

White Ltd.. Will P 113 

Whiting & Davis Co 

WhitUiker * Co.. Ltd.. Robert 26 

Wilson & Co 42 

Williams. Walter 111.21* 

William--Trow Knitting Co.. Ltd 124 

Win. Lor Print Works 138 

Winter* Co.. Ltd.. J. H 119 

Wright & Sons Co.. Wm. E 117. 217 

Wrinch. McLaren Ltd 116 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 






DOMINION 
RAYNSTERS 

"Made-in-Canada" Raincoats 

more than ever meet 
the popular demand 



The line of "DOMIN- 
ION RAYNSTERS" for 
Spring is the most com- 
plete and comprehen- 
sive we have ever 
offered. 

The range of styles, pat- 
terns and values has been 
planned to meet the popu- 
lar demand — and stores 
which carry clothing for 
men, women and children, 
will find in these reliable 
Raincoats the garments 
best suited to their trade. 
The "Raynster" label in a 
raincoat is your assurance 
for quality, workmanship 
and absolute 
service. 

Write our 
nearest 
branch to- 
day for style 
book and 
price lists. 




Dominion Rubber System 

Service Branches are located at 

Halifax, St. John, Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto. Hamilton, Kitchener, London, 

North Bay, Fort William, Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Lethbridge, 

Edmonton, Vancouver and Victoria 





DRY U OODS LIE VIE W 






NEEDLE CRAFT 

Tfie Roduct makes the At possible 









■/• 



A 



Stamped Articles 
Or Embroidering 

Latest styles and 
ideas in Lingerie, 
Children's Dresses 
and a great variety 
of dainty and use- 
ful articles. 

Belding Paul Corticelli limited 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 







K.J 

5 



^J ~* 



• " 









Vol. XXXII 



Publication Office : TORONTO, FEBRUARY, 1920 



No. 2 




Write for this 
New Catalog 

showing an exceptionally 
modish line of silk and wool 
filet sweaters, fine wool 
scarf shawls (fastened with 
belts), and beautiful wide 
silk scarves. These styles 
are designed especially for 
summer selling. Some of 
the most popular models 
are illustrated in colors, 
giving you an excellent idea 
of their beauty and enab- 
ling you to gauge their sell- 
ing possibilities for youv 
trade. 

There will undoubtedly be 
a brisk demand for these 
goods as they embody the 
very latest modes in knit- 
wear. So that you can place 
your order for quick de- 
livery, you will need a copy 
of our catalog right away. 
Fill in and mail us the 
coupon below and we will 
send a copy by return mail. 

We have made special pro- 
visions to have these addi- 
tions to our Spring range 
ready for 

Delivery May 1st. 

THE MONARCH 

KNITTING CO., 

LIMITED 

Head Office: Dunnville,-Ont. 

Factories: Dunnville, St. Catha- 
rines and St. Thomas. Ont.. and 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

Manufacturers of Ladies' Silk 

Knitted Coats, Men's. Women's. 

Children's Worsted Sweater Coats, 

Hosiery. Fancy Knit Goods. 

Monarch Yarns. 

MAIL US THIS COUPON 

Monarch Knitting Co.. Ltd.. 

Dept. D.G.. Dunnville. Ont. 
Mail copy of your new Spring 
Catalog to: 

Name 

Address 



DRY cooh- REV] E \\" 




i 



Coats and Suits 



LADIES' POLO COATS, in genuine Camel's hair and wool 
fabrics, enjoy the widest popularity. Warm and fluffy they 
add brilliancy to any scene. Note them at the Southern 
resorts. 

SPORT KNIT SUITS, in plain and Scotch Heather mixtures. 
Nothing quite so smart, comfortable or appropriate for the 
average woman's outdoor activities. They are adapted to the 
open country and are serviceable to a degree beyond the life 
of other fabrics 



KEN YON WEATHERPROOFS — KENREIGN WATER 
PROOFS, for both men and women. In every variety of 
fabric. Built on the principle that the best is the chear.est. 

Make a memo to call and see these lines when you come to 
Market. 



NEW YORK 

Fifth Ave. Bide,.. 23rd St. & 5th Ave. 



Style Digests are issued at frequent intervals, to those who 
ask for them. 

C. KENYON COMPANY Chicago 

NEW YORK 223 Jackson Boulevard at Franklin St. 



s 



fin GOODS REVIEW, Februarj LB, 1920. Volume XXXII. Published everj month 1» the MacLean Publishing Co., Limited, 148-153 Univei ,n \ 

cription i' Entered .-i- second-class mart th< Po Office ;it Buffalo, under thr Acl of March :ir.i 

Office Department, Ottawa, 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




Attractive 

' 'Hope 
Chests" 

Made by return- %M 

ed soldiers at the ** 

Khaki League. 

Strongly made 
cedar chests cov- 
ered with the 
latest cretonne. 

Famous "Kumfy" Rugs 

Kumfy Rugs, in tartan, plaids and 
k plain colors; grey, blue, green, 
camel, navy, silver and helio. 

a When your clients see the Shield 

i'i; : ;'j^ mark on a rug they know you are 

offering them the most perfect rug 

/ produced, both as regards enduring 

J quality and beauty of color and 

^^■■■fl ^^ design. 

Jfr H \ ^^<^^A\)pi You naturally want in handle a 

really high grade, profitable line. 
Therefore it will pay you to stock 
on "Kumfy Travelling Rugs." 

NKw\wl HK Enid 58x68 $ 6.75 each 

Mabel 58x68 8.75 each 

Brenda . . .60x70 12.00 each 

Katie . . . .56x72 14.50 each 

TOPS W We ARE WELL STOCKED WITH 

''Wff/i <•* Ml/jl/.lllf.tlKi'BHSr^^^H^ THESE IMPORTED RUGS. 

SPECIAL LINES. We arc sole Selling Agents, namely: 

Cott-a-lap Rug Surrounds. Sanitary Shield Brand Pillows. Kumfy Brand Blankets. 
Cosy Brand Comforters. Shield Brand Draperies. 




GREENSHIELDS, LIMITED 



17 VICTORIA SQUARE 



MONTREAL 



I) K Y GOODS l; E V I E W 



yiOl ini f n ii ii h ii ii II II 11 II II II 11 11 II II I) ii ii ii ii ii ii Tnn oiCX 






21. ft. &mg £>ilk Company 

Himtteb 

THE SILK HOUSE OF CANADA 



Duchess Satins 

Crepe de Chines 

Fancy Stripes ana Plaids 

Chinese Silks 




Charmeuse Satins 

Georgettes 

Fancy Trimming Silks 

Japanese Silks 



Spring Silks 

All the Season s newest 
ana smartest shades in a 
great variety or exceedingly 
attractive designs and 

weaves. 

The excellent quality in- 
variably shown in our Silks 
is ideally expressed in our 
Spring range. 



Our stock for immediate delivery is large and well assorted 



A. S. KING SILK CO., Limited 



59-61 Wellington St. West 

Foreign Offices : 
Zurich, Switzerland 
Yokohama. Japan 



Xoronto 



Lyon*, France 
Cheioo, China 



Doioaxg" " ll ll I I II I I " " " " " " " i i ii ii ii ii ' I ii JDioi 1010: 



|i ii ii i i ii ll I I ■' i' 'i ii » II DDDOIO' 



8 



% 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




EVERY MERCHANT 
should have on hand a &ood 
stock of VOILE DRESS 
GOODS for Spring and 
Summer Trade. 

These &oods are largely re- 
placing the more expensive . , 
lines of dress materials. 

We have in stock now a bi& 
ran^e of the choicest lines 
shown by British, Canadian, 
and American manufactur- 
ers. These were bought one 
year a&o and our customers 
will £et the advantage of the 
several increases in price 
that have taken place in the 
meantime. 





John M. Garland Son & Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA - - CANADA 

Wholesale Dry Goods 




lillV coons ItKVIKW 



■M 



t 



a ,. ., ,xxur...; 




Made 

in 

Four 

Sizes 

000 

00 



I 



«6««^««««««««0»0««»«9990««««0(>««00««6««4^«I>» 



COLONIAL MAID 




0»0»»»»»»»»»0»»»0<>»^»V»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»00<»»»0 



It's all in 
the Spring 




Strong — 
Durable 
Made of 
Brass 



It's a Snap to Snap This Snapper 



Colonial Maid 

Wire Spring Dress Fasteners 



Made in 
Canada 



CH I S IS NOT A 
FRICTION FASTENER 
D „ + • MADE 
OUt IS WITH 
HIGHLY TEMPERED 
WIRE SPRING m m 
KNOWS WHEN TO HOLD 
AND WHEN TO LET GO 



BRASS 
will not 
rust 



ALSO PUT UP IN ONE GREAT GROSS 
CABINETS ASSORTED 24 CARDS EACH 
WHITE AND BLACK .-. .-. SI7ES: 00-0-1 

To be had of all leading wholesalers. 

Manufactured by 

Colonial Fastener Co., Limited 

Montreal, Que. 






DRY GOODS REVIEW 5 

| tt i 3C 3t ft SS 3tt K . . J ' i 



at 






To the Trade February, 1 920 



IMPORTANT 

Samples of the following lines are now m 
the hands of our Travellers and can also 
be seen in our Warehouse. 

Mens and Boys' 

Sweaters, Sweater Coats and Underwear. 

Ladies' and Misses' 

Hosiery, Underwear, Sweater Coats, and 
Flannelette Gowns. 

Flannels and Blankets 

We would suggest that you place your 
orders with us at once and secure — 

Present Quotations 

JOHN MACDONALD & CO., LIMITED 

TORONTO 

k — « x a x w 



\t 



\t 



I 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



Made in CANADA, by 



The 

LARGEST SELLING 

Electric Cleaner 
in the WORLD 

-and WHY! 



m ■' mm ~^^-*^ 






M 1 


7 


ML s 


M\t 


&iii H 'il 


■1 

HI J! 


TTF" 










— 1 


I^^^^^E^^^^^*^ 1 



Qfce HO 




ELECTRIC 



SUCTION 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



CANADIANS, for CANADIANS 




THE HOOVER isthe largest selling 
electric cleaner in the world for 
two good and sufficient reasons. 

The first reason is that only The 
Hoover is three cleaners in one: 
the only combined electric carpet- 
beater, carpet-sweeper and vacuum 
cleaner. 

Because it beats ... as it sweeps as 
it suction cleans, The Hoover thor- 
oughly removes dirt from carpetings. 
That is what all purchasers seek. 

And it also straightens crushed nap, 
revives colorings, and prolongs the life 
of rugs and carpets. 

The second reason is that The 
Hoover has wonderful dealer co-opera- 
tion behind it. 

The Hoover organization gives the 
dealer and his sales force all the benefit 
of past successful experience in the 
work of introduction. 

Little space is asked. Little capital 
is involved. Shipments are arranged 



so that Hoovers rarely stay in stock 
longer than a few weeks. 

The profits assured the dealer are of 
a size that exceeds his profits by the 
year on any other line of merchandise. 

This co-operation, now offered to 
dealers in Canada, has boomed sales 
so as to make it impossible to add 
more dealers in the United States - 
and that is in the face of a tripled 
factory output there. 

This suggests the proposition which 
we invite you to consider, now that 
the newly erected Hoover factory at 
Hamilton, Ontario, is completed. 

Write at once for particulars. The 
Hoover advertising campaign in all 
leading Canadian magazines, in addition 
to the advertising circulating through 
the dominion in twenty-three United 
States periodicals, is creating a desire 
for The Hoover in every province. 

The Hoover Suction Sweeper Company 
of Canada, Limited 

Factory and General Offices: Hamilton, Ontario 






It Beats... 
as it Sweeps 
as it Cleans 



SWEEPER 



DRY GOODS REVIhlW 




The Council and Executive Committee of the Irish Linen Society 
have opened premises in Belfast for greater convenience and better 
service to linen buyers who go direct into the Belfast market. 

This Bureau is located on the corner of Bedford and Howard 
Streets — one of the most central points in Belfast. 

Its functions are to furnish detailed merchandise information to 
buyers — to supply latest market news — to assist buyers in a per- 
sonal way with regard to hotel accommodation and transportation 
bookings. 

The New York Office of The Society — 231 West 39th Street — 
gladly co-operates in a similar way, with buyers coming into the 
New York market. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




L 



S 



IRISH LINEN SOCIETY'S 

BUREAUS- READING ROOMS 

CORNER BEDFORD & HOWARD STS 

BEL FAST 



The principal points of interest to you are, of course, information 
as regards fashion tendency — market conditions, and the avail- 
ability of supplies. 

This information is furnished generally through the medium of 
the advertising by The Society. Anything in the way of special 
information which is not covered will be gladly supplied by either 
of the above offices. 

There is every indication at present that there will be a more ade- 
quate supply of Dress Linens for the coming summer. Buyers, 
nevertheless, are urged to get in touch with their wholesale 
houses, as even with this additional supply in view, stocks cannot 
be expected to meet fully the demand. 



«©fe IRISH LINEN SOCIETY 

BELFAST IRELAND ^-<8^J 



** 




sneer worfh 
tnere is no 
;subsf i+ute 

TRUE IRISH 

LINTEiST 



10 



l> K V CooDS K K V I E W 




3 * 5 ™ TKe Trade Mark 



mjM 




'4p 



'" ; '<<V,' 1 'ri'i\''. , ' ;Jv ' v 



identifies a pro- 
duct which is even 
BETTER than 
before the war. 



■;? 



X 



V 



Hi 



Tine Inside Tke O 



is the fleecy "Woolnap" which 
has always been so popular a 
feature with a lar^e number of 
your customers. 




/j 



shows evidence of the extra-care- 
ful workmanship and hi^h-grade 
yarns which mark every garment 
we make—unsurpassed in Canada. 



"St. George" WOOLNAP 

will enhance your reputation as a judge of underwear values. Stock it. 
for the customers who want warmth, wear and comfort. Judge for your- 
self and we are confident you will find it worthy of your strongest 
recommendation to your most particular customers. 



COYLE & RODGER. 230McGill St., Montreal; 



AGENTS : 
R. COPPING & SON, 31 Melinda St.. T.ronto: A.R. McFARLANE, Vancourer 



Twiie SctKMFIBLD WOOLLEN H'O-.tmiw* 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



11 




12 



n K V GOODS REV] E W 



f 



I 




" K. & S." 

Rubber Goods 

We are, through special arrange- 
ment able to offer the trade "K. & 
S." Rubber Goods at manufacturers 
prices. H.O. Bottles, Ice Bags, 
Syringes, etc., are ready sellers. 
We recommend them to you. 

Tires— Inner Tubes 

"K. & S." brand tires and inner 
tubes will find a ready market and 
we offer them to you at attractive 
prices. 

" Westinghouse " 

Home Comforts 



! 



DESK LAMPS 
SHADES 
PERCOLATERS 
IRONS 



CHAFING DISHES 
TOASTERS 
EGG BOILERS 
HOT PLATES 



These labor-saving electrical appliances make 
ideal wedding gifts. You should have a well 
assorted stock for the spring and summer trade. 



P. P. MARTIN & CO., LIMITED 

50 ST. PAUL ST. E., MONTREAL, QUE. 



Quebec : 7 Rue Charest 
Sherbrooke: 103 Wellington St. 
St. Hyacinthe : 229 Cascade St. 



Ottawa: 166 Sparks Street 
Three Rivers: 82 Royal Street 
Toronto: 152 Bav Street 



v.\ 



: Xg 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



13 



r ye£oxcte^>c 



The New 
Idea in 
Underwear 
Fabric 



Velvatex Process — combining 
extra comfort, quality with durabil- 
ity — permits oi a selling price that 
brings Velvatex form fitting com- 
binations within reach of all. 

Made in two-tone color effects in 
light shades, giving that aristocratic 
appearance which appeals to the 
highest class trade. 



Leading Wholesalers are Now 
Offering "Vehatex' 

Sales-Agent to the 
wholesale trade 

C. O. Paton 

23 Foy Bldg. 
Toronto 




r \j ^m^x j t 







^efoxtfce/x IJndejnireac 







Made 

in 
Canada 



14 



DRY (MX) PS REVIEW 




Look for the Blue Star 




For your Millinery Ooening 



Ribbons 



contribute much to the art of 
millinery. They make possible many appealing 
variations of the newest style themes and multiply 
many fold the beauty of every new version. 

A captivating note of distinction is added to your 
millinery by a tasteful choice of ribbons. There's 
one for every need, and it would be most profitable 
for you to stock a large variety in your ribbon de- 
partment. 



LACES 

EMBROIDERIES 

DRESS TRIMMINGS 

GEORGETTES 

CHIFFONS 

WASH GOODS 

RIBBONS 

HOSIERY 

BRASSIERES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 




All the newest trends are 
well represented in our sup- 
ply. In sheer beauty of 
shade and colorings these 
ribbons excel any we have 
previously offered. 

We are manufac- 
turers and importers 
of Laces, Dress Trim- 
ming and Embroid- 
eries. Importers of 
Fancy Dry Goods. 



jfflu^r brothers! (Canaba) Itmtteb 

12 St. Helen Street, Montreal 



■adelphia Chicago London Nottingham Paris Calais 
San Francism Caudry Le Puy St. Gall 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



15 



W*« 



HBw 



k *••* ■** 



V 



~ v s 



\ 



K 



kVVv. 



NU 



*\W>J^ 



^ 



Jnn 7vaJjL~iwudk/ 



■• 'UA 



i^«a£? 



^ 



The A^Wtto Cotton Compeny 

Limited y 

Three J<ivcrvS , fiuebc 



R.C .Carver 



16 



i) K V GOODS R E V I E VV 




our sales are "Better 

f 



Our I nitjue Advertising 

is gifted with .; drawing power that 
will swamp your store with buyers- 
Thousands are waiting with their mon- 
ey for your sale put on in the Kelly Way. 
Take advantage of this opportunity to 
dominate your community as the lead- 
ing store. A half million dollars back 
of every statement we make. 





We Accomplish 
Success Everywhere — 

In the face of crop failure, bad loca 
tion or stormy weather. Our sales are 
brighter, bigger— More successful than 
ever. Getting the crowds! Getting the 
profits! Getting results! It's Big— It's 
Great. 

* ' v • u 



Connect with KELL Y 

and in a few days start banking the 
money for those shelf warmers— It's un- 
1 derstood that your name on the coupon 
does not obligate you in any way We 
give a binding guarantee to close you 
out completely or reduce your stock. 
We solicit stocks of from $5,000 to 
$500,000 




I ATJ d • A'J : T • 1 1 Yl 



TALKING ABOUT 




1 



I «v 



We 9 re the Biggest in the World — Because We're the Best 



R M. Dickson 

- & Company 
Wolfcrs Mercantile Co. 
P, I Damge 
Franklin "^ -v 1 j ■ i > 1 >- Co 
Walker Towle 
McLean & Garland 
Geo. Wladis 
i I B< iyer Co. 
M I) 

-A 



Lexington, Texas 

Florcn e Alabama 

Hopkins, M 

Fairbanks. Iowa 

Royalton, Illinois 

M< irris, Minnesota 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Binghamton New York 

Bradford, Pennsylvania 

ingfii Id, Ohio 

A 



Shannon & Gram 
W I Murphy Co 
McNulty Co 
Clements Bros 
The Huh Clothing Co 
I )i v. ej & llessel 
Cox Cash Stores 
Lanham & Sons Co 
J G Ditsworth 
M I' McDowell 

a. 



Hamilton, Ontario 

Crawfordsville, Indiana 

Big Rapids, Michigan 

Clayton. Wisconsin 

North Platte, Nebraska 

Cheney. Kansas 

Little Rock, Arkansas 

Rome Georgia 

Charbonneau, North Dakota 

FultOll, Kentucky 



\Y 1- Hunt 

J K liurg 

11 I: Wilkins 

II 1. Hansen 

II II Thomas 

Tin- Keystone Store Co 

J S 1 limiting 



Wister, Oklahoma 

Letcher. South Dakota 

Port Arthur Ontario 

Miles City Montana 

Kichton Yermonl 

Danielson. Connecticut 

ithtown Branch L I.N Y 



u^y - *-^^ *-**)' k» ^ 




-T»* 



If you are waiting for a chance to 
unload or close out 

HERE'S YOUR OPPORTUNITY 

Send me particulars regarding your Famous System. 



N» 



Town.. 

Bin of nock 



T. k. kll.li s\|.KS SYSTEM. Minneapolis Minn 



~i 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



17 




Home Furnishings 




Department 
"G" 

Everything 

in 
Dry Goods 



14 DEPARTMENTS 

A — Cotton Staples. 

AX— Flannelettes. 
B — Wash Goods. 
C — Woollens, etc. 
D — Linens. 

E — Dress Goods and Silks. 
F — Men's Underwear and Sweaters. 
G — Home Furnishings. 
H — Ladies' Hosiery and Underwear. 

I — Men's Fancy Furnishing*. 

J — Ladies' Ready-to-Wear. 
K — Smallwares and Notion*. 
L — Men's Fine Shirts. 
M — Working Men's Wearables. 



We have a splendid varied collection of 

Carpets Draperies 

Linoleums Curtains 

in all the popular makes, colorings and patterns 

Beautiful colors and rare designs harmoniously blended are 
well represented in our great range of these goods. All in 
the well-known, unvaryingly reliable "Racine quality." 

ALPHONSE RACINE, LIMITED 

60-98 St. Paul Street West, Montreal 

Dry Goods Jobbers and Manufacturers 
PERMANENT SALES OFFICES: 

OTTAWA QUEBEC TORONTO HAILEYBURY SYDNEY RIVIERE DU LOUP 

1 1 1 Sparks St. Merger Bldg. 123 Bay St. Metabanick Hotel 269 Charlotte St. Hotel Antil 

SHERBROOKE and THREE RIVERS 

Factories: — Beaubien St., Montreal; St. Denis, Que.; St. Hyacinthe, Que. 




18 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



If You Value a 
DOLLAR 

and contemplate a measuring machine 
Get a 

aofHoMC-KR 

(CLOTH-OM-ETER) 

Measures material of any width or weight, 
accurately computes every sale. 
Stops all wastage on your gxjods. 

Prevents errors in 
figuring Bales checks. 

Saves time and money. 

(lives customers confi- 
dence in your store. 

COSTS 30' \ LESS 

than any other ma- 
rl line on the market, 

Write for descriptive 
folder 

Distributors for Canada 

Clothometer Sales Co., Ltd. 

44 Princess St. 

Winnipeg - - Canada 




SHEET MUSIC 

added to your various lines will attract more cus- 
tomers to your store than any other medium you 
could employ. This with a liberal profit in addi- 
tion, should warrant you in making immediate ar- 
rangements to take on a line. 

The McKINLEY EDITION 

OF TEN CENT MUSIC 

is the best line as a foundation for your sheet music 
department. It is the most popular line of Standard, 
Classic and Teaching Music. It is universally en- 
dorsed by teachers, students and the general music 
loving public. Each selection is placed in a heavy 
manila stock cover bearing name and number of the 
selection, 20 substantial stock boxes and 500 cata- 
logs bearing your business imprint. The sale of 
McKINLEY MUSIC affords you 

150 PROFIT 

The McKinley Edition (revised for Canadian trade) 
:onforms in every detail with Canadian copyright 

laws. 

Our Jobbing Department is the largest and moat complete in 
tbe country. We can take care of your wants for anything in 
sheet music. 

jflc&tnlep fflu&it Company 

THE LARGEST SHEET Mi si< Hoi si 
in I III WORLD 



CHICAGO, LL 
1501-13 E. 55th St. 



NEW YORK 

14 q \V. 45th St. 



CANADIAN-MADE 



COTTON BATTING 

Order VICTORY BATS, NORTH 
STAR, CRESCENT and PEARL 




Packed in 

shipping 

Cartons 

or in 

Bales 

The best 
value for 
the price. 

Can be had 
in 125, 100, 
80, 67 or 50 
rolls to the 
bale or 124, 
96, 80, 64 or 
48 to a lot 
of four car- 
tons. 

Any 

Wholesale 

House 



Manager Wanted, for Cana- 
dian National Newspapers 
& Periodicals Association 

To act also as Secretary-Treasurer, 
and carry on the Association's gen- 
eral work, under the direction of the 
President and the Board of Directors, 
study the interests of the various 
classes of publication in the Associa- 
tion, and plan and carry on promo- 
tion work in their interests. Appli- 
cants should understand advertising 
and merchandising. 

Apply in writing only, stating ag^ 
full details of experience, and salary 
expected. Applications will be treat- 
ed as confidential. 

Address Acton Burrows, Presi- 
dent, Canadian National Newspapers 
& Periodicals Association, 70 Bond 
Street, Toronto. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



19 




d 



>use 



"READY-TO-WEAR 



** 



A visit to our ready-to-wear department to inspect our range of "Dorothy 
Frances" Waists would, we fell sure, be profitable to you. We have new 
models appearing every week and we cordially invite you to come and see 
them. Our new method of displaying our stock is very convenient for buyers 
and a great time-saver. Come and see it. 



Dept. U— 

Men's Leather Working Mitts and 
Gloves, all descriptions and value, 
from $2.25 up to $39.00 doz. 

Men's Working Shirts from $11.50 
up to $36.00 doz. 

Dept. H— 

We have now on hand a full stock 
of Misses' and Boys' Cotton Hose, 
in fine gauze ribs, 1/1 and 2/1 rib. 
Some lines may be offered in differ- 
ent colors, such as Black, White and 
Brown. Sizes in all lines from 4% 
to 10. Prices ranging from $3.90 to 
$6.50 per dozen. 

Dept. S — 

Byssine Mercerized Sewing Cotton. 
Black and White, size 10, 150-yard 
spools, 67c doz. 

Dept. M— 

Knitted Woollens — Infants' and 
Children's Bootees, Leggings, Muf- 



flers, Sets, Caps. Hoods, Overalls, 
Polka and Jackets. 

Ladies' Honeycomb Shawls (white). 
Sets. Mufflers. Headwear, Shawl 
Muffler; (very new). Hug-Me-Tights. 

Dept. D — 

Special Values D865, 44-in. yarn- 
dyed serge in white, drab, Copen v 
brown, taupe, navy, light grey, old 
rose and black, at $2.95 per yard. 

Our range of Wash Dress Goods 
for Spring is most comprehensive, 
including tinted Muslins, Voiles, Or- 
gandies, Japonelles, Ratines, Dimi- 
ties, Vestings and Marquisettes. 

Dept. W— 

Everything in Woollens, Tweeds 
and Suitings. Be sure and see out- 
line of Scotch Tweeds. 

We have the following Glass Tow- 
elling in stock : 
Red and Blue Check (fine), 18-inch, 

25c yard. 



Red and Blue Check (heavy), ls-in.. 

25c yard. 
Red Only Check I heavy I, 20 21-in., 

27%c yard. 
Red Only Check ( heavy I. 22 23-in., 

30c yard. 
Red and Blue Check (heavy), 22-in., 

30c yard. 

Dept. C— 

Aladdin Cloth. 27-inch, plain and 
fancy stripes, 45 lie yard. 

Flannelette, F. S., striped and 
checked, 28-inoh, 35c yard. 

White Artillery Cotton, linen fin- 
ish, 36-inch, 45c yald. 

Dept. R— 

Hodsum Brand Overalls, in black 
and blue denims, blue and white 
-.triDes and cottonades. 

Umbrellas, large assortment in 
stock. 

Waterproofs, domestic and British 
makes. 



We have just received our stock of Sporting Goods for 1920, comprising 
Hammocks, Baseballs, Baseball Mitts and Gloves, Hollow Rubber Balls, 
Solid Rubber Balls, Lacrosse Balls, Fishing Tackle, Skipping Ropes, 
Marbles and Tops. 



We give special attention to letter orders, telegrrms, and long distance telephone orders. 

All orders shipped same day as received. 

If our traveller is not calling on you, kindly notify us and we will have him call. 

HODGSON SUMNER & CO., LIMITED 



8391 St. Paul St. West . 



21 St. Sulpice St. 

MONTREAL 



84-92 Le Royer St. 



SAMPLE ROOMS: Metropole Building, SHERBROOKE. 7 Charest St., QUEBEC. Windsor Hotel, 
OTTAWA. Carlaw Bldg., 27-30 Wellington St. West, TORONTO. 503 Mercantile Bldg., VANCOUVER. 

Can. Bank of Commerce Bldg., THREE RIVERS 



i ii 1 1 1 1 i.i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i.i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ni;i in'iwiiiwiiiii iii 1 1 1 i.i.i n iiimniniiiiiiiHiiiwiii:! i ri i h iiri'iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiiiiiiii i 




Manufacturers and Merchants 

119 Wood Street, London, E.C. 2, England 



"OBERON" LINES 

Sell Freely — Everywhere 

X T the back of all enormous trade expan- 
** sion are the goods sold. They are the 
vital factor, and, when examined, will in- 
variably be found to be of exceptional, dis- 
tinctive merit. This is exactly the case with 
our famous "OBERON" branded goods. 
They are sold in all parts of the world and 
the ever-increasing demand for them neces- 
sitates frequent enlargement of our factories 
and organization. "OBERON" branded 
goods are essential stock for the better to 
best class trade. 

"OBERON" SPECIALITIES 

Hosiery, Underwear, Sports Coats, Knickers, 
Knitted Scarves in Silk, Artificial Silk and Wool, 
Ladies' and Men's Pyjamas, Towels, Quilts, 
Rugs, Blankets, Sheets, Linens, Haberdashery, 
Men's Shirts, Dressing Gowns, Ties, Braces, 
Collars, Caps, Ladies' and Men's Raincoats and 
Waterproofs. 

Ask to see samples 

at our Canadian Offices 



Eastern Provinces 

Marshall & Harding 
Carlaw Building 

Wellington St. West 
Toronto 



Western Provinces 

Mr. G. E. Ledder 
Grace Court 

Cornox Street 

Vancouver, B. C. 




RtfJ. Trade Math 



"OBERON" 

Men's Pyjamas 

Cotton Pyjamas, 
150/- to 240/- per doz. 

"Ceylon and Taffeta" 

Pyjamas, 

1687- to 550/- per doz. 

Self Colors and Fancy 
Stripes — good styles. 



a 



OBERON" 

Summer Gowns 
for Men 

Fancy Printed Crepes, 
21/9 each 

Fancy Printed Lustra, 
28 6 each 

Fancy Printed Twill 
Silk, 

63 - each 

Exclusive designs. 



GEORGE BRETTLE & CO., LTD. 

119 WOOD STREET, LONDON, E.C. 2, ENGLAND 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiimiiiimimiii 





to c/z ers 




U RB AN US 



smug 



URBANUS 

The Ladies' New Dress Fabric 

Urbanus is all pure Botany Wool 

Reliable and guaranteed 

ALL BRITISH 
Buy the best — it is cheapest 

/\lways looks excellent 

Nothing could serve you better 

LJ nsurpassed in coloring and texture 

Satisfaction assured 



Width 50-51 inch. 
NEXT DELIVERY. MARCH - APRIL 




EnrUE 



CROCKER S Ltd 




22 



D It V GOODS UKVIK W 




ROBERT WHITTAKER & Co., Ltd. 

5 BREAD ST., LONDON, E.C. 4, ENGLAND 

A.B.C. Code, 5th Edition. Telegrams: "Subdue London" 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Ladies' Dress Materials and Cotton Dress Fabrics 

We hold a large and varied stock of every description of Wool Dress Goods and 
Cotton Dress Fabrics at prices suitable for the Canadian Market and ready for 
immediate delivery. Our stock comprises wide ranges of the following: — 



SERGES 

CHEVIOTS 
TWEEDS 



TARTANS 
SUITINGS 
COATINGS 



SHEPHERD CHECKS 
SPONGE CLOTHS 
EOLIENNES 



ARMURES 
FANCIES 



Our new ranges for Spring and Summer, 1920, are now in the hands of Marshall 
& Harding, Carlaw Building, Wellington St. West, Toronto, to whom all 
enquiries should be addressed. 

To Canadian buyers visiting the English Market we extend a cordial invitation to 
visit our warehouse, which is situated in the Heart of the London Dry Goods 
Trade. 



MILLINERY AND HABERDASHERY WIRE 

Chenilles. Hat Braids, Dress and Mantle, Dress Cords and (Jirdles, Artificial Silk. Braids and Ribbons. 
Kmbroiderv Silks, Tassels, I'om, etc. Upholstery Cords and Trimmings, Scroll, Argyle, Saddle Bag and 
Flat Gimps, DRESS FRINGES, Tassels, etc. 

MADE IN SILK, COTTON, WOOL, ETC. 

Artificial Silk Straw Braids for Millinery Hat Manufacturing 

SUPPLIERS TO WHOLESALERS AND SHIPPING HOUSES 
SHIPPING <XD STRICTLY WHOLESALE TRADE ESPECIALLY CATERED FOR 




v *»°"0 „ 



- 



TELEGRAMS: 
I) \\ ENPORT 

M \< ( I.KSI IKI.I) 



BRIDGE ST. MILLS 

Canadian tgeni : R 



P. DAVENPORT 



M W< III STER 

01 I ICE: 

39 PICCADILLY 

MACCLESFIELD, ENGLAND 

( PARSONS, M FROM' ST. WEST, TORONTO 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



23 



OTHER L 





TT I r PHONES CENTRAL 17 3 2 (3 Lines; 
I LLLCRAMS SARSENET.CENT.LONDON 
CABLEGRAMS -SARSENET, LONDON 




23. S<? ? / S-9, SW/tefrrn an 6<sto> 







(CORNER OF ADDLE. STREET 



^V/. £c7.<2, February 



/'/2C 



TO THE CANADIAN WHOLESALER. 



With silk prices steadily rising it 
is important that you connect up with 
the firm actually in touch with all 
available sources of supply* 

The demand is so enormous at the 
moment that it is imposaible to specify 
any special offers, but the good3 are 
HERE. 

Your enquiries are solicited and 
we respectfully suggest that it will 
pay you to instruct your London buying 
agent or representative to call on ua 
at once and inspect our large range of 
samples. 

He will be assured of a hearty 
welcome. 



Tours faithfully, 




P.S. Please watch our announcement 
in this paper each month. 




m 



Spinners of 

every description of yarn 

for Hosiery Manufacture 



Telephone 

2470, 



Telegrams 

.{LEICESTER [LE,CESTER 

89 Stanningley iARIVj ) u ciru . csy 
24 KEICHLE Y \KEIGHLEY 

3464 Fort Hill Boston [Boston 
Codes- ABC. 5 th Ed Western Union. 



gyn^ ^ 




Oi 



A 



Stamford Street 

LEICESTER eng 



/if* 



J 



4 jL^' AMERICAN OFFICE:- 184 SUMMER STREET \&J§ 

BOSTON. 
COMBING A SPINNING 



SPRINGFIELD MILLS, KEIGH LEV and SWlNNOW MILLS, BRAMLEY, YOfiKS. 









DRY GOODS REVIEW 





t „» St. James's Buildings Oxford St.. Manchester. 
The Head Offices of the C.P.A.^Ltd. 



Mr. Edward Foster- 

direct CANADIAN Repre- 
sentative of The Calico Printers' 
Association, Limited, Manchester, 
England-the HOME of BRITISH 
PRINTS — draws particular atten- 
tion to the popular specialties 
enumerated below. 

CEPEA SERGE 

Designs suitable for Men's Shirts 
and Pyjamas. 

Also for Ladies' and Children's 
Summer Dresses. 

You are reminded that samples of all 
C.P.A. brands can always be seen, and 
that enquiries addressed to 

10, Coristine Buildings. 
20, St. Nicholas Street 
MONTREAL, 

or to 7 1 0, Empire Building, 
64, Wellington St. West, 
TORONTO. 

will receive the prompt and careful attention 

of Mr. Foster 



tuna: 







26 



h I! \ 



i m ) 1 1 > u i . \ i r. \> 




MAKE SURE IT IS SHRUNK :: 

THERE'S LITTLE SATISFACTION IN SUCH A STAMP AS "SHRUNK," "WELL 
SHRUNK," "LONDON SHRUNK," OR "SHRUNK BY LONDON PROCESS." 
INSIST ON A SHRINKER'S GUARANTEE— ON THE STAMP OF A FIRST 
CLASS FIRM OF LONDON SHRINKERS— BEST OF ALL ON THE STAMP OF 

JENNENS, WELCH & Co., Ltd., 

Cloth Workers and Shrinkers, and Proprietors of the Famous "JENNWEL" Waterproof Finish 

LONDON, HUDDERSFIELD and BRADFORD, ENGLAND. 

WHEN ORDERING ENGLISH CLOTHS, SAY "TO BE SHRUNK BY JENNENS. WELCH & CO.. Ltd." 



\ 



LADIES' and CHILDREN'S 

KNIT SPORTS COATS AND SCARVES 

Boys' and Men's Knit Jerseys 
Men's Cardigan Jackets 
Aviator and Balaclava Caps 
And Tarn O'Shanters 

RUSSELL & CO. 

Scotch Cap and Hosiery Manufacturers 

ROBERTLAND MILLS 

SiEWARTON, SCOTLAND 



John Ainscow & Co., Ltd. 

Spinners and Manufacturers 

TURKISH TOWELS, QUILTS, 
COUNTERPANES, &c. 

Beehive Mills, Lostock, Bolton; 

California Mills, Stockport; 

34 Charlotte Street MANCHESTER 



idian Agent: Walter Williams, 508 R«ad Building, 
45 St. Alexander St., Montreal 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



27 






Lister & Co. Ltd. 

SILK SPINNERS, MANUFACTURERS 
DYERS AND FINISHERS 







DRY GOODS U !•: \ I 1. \\ 




The Canadian Wholesale Houses have 
made liberal provision for supplies of 
Wm. Anderson Zephyrs for 1920 




Wm. Anderson & Co., Ltd. 

Pacific Mills and 12 Princes Square 
Toronto GLASGOW New York 



43 Scott St. 



48 White St. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



29 




The Fine Scotch Underwear 
with the Fine Scotch Finish 




The Pesco Range 

( Adapted for the Can- 
adian trade) 

In Pure Wool and Silk 
and Wool textures. 

Guaranteed unshrink- 
able. 

For Ladies — Combina- 
tions, Vests, Spencers, 
Bodices, Drawers, 
Knickers, Nightdresses, 
etc. 

For Children — Com- 
binations, Nightdresses, 
Sleeping Suits, Shirts, 
Trousers, Knickers, etc. 

For Gentlemen — Shirts, 
Trousers, Combina- 
tions, etc. 

Also 
Pesco Hose and Half 
Hose in Black, Colours 
and Mixtures. 




pESCO, the best known high- 
* class Underwear made and 
sold within the United King- 
dom, is now available for Can- 
ada and dealers will do well, 
before ordering for Fall, to 
wait the forthcoming visit of 
the newly-appointed Pesco 
men. 

*pHERE is a rich harvest of business 
A in store for those who adopt this 
well-tried line. Its charm of quality is 
irresistible and makes buyers friends. In 
the Old Country it has an enthusiastic 
clientele and a sales-forcing reputation 
that is the envy of the trade. 

ADD it to your range of specialties 
**■ this season, and you will add to 
your business a powerful ally and to 
your store a fresh point of interest. 
Amongst the class whose custom is most 
desirable, Pesco compels attention and 
creates an immediate and permanent 
demand. 

Now on the ground with samples 

MESSRS. C. & A. G. CLARK, 
35 Wellington St. West, Toronto. 

MR. R. C. POYSER, 
214 Drummond Building, Montreal. 

MESSRS. THE HANLEY & MACKAY 

CO. 

62 Albert Street, Winnipeg 

Sole Makers: 

Peter Scott & Co., Ltd. 

Hawick, Scotland 
Sold direct to the retail. 

Showcards. Window Tickets and Literature supplied. 
Enquiries invited. 




TRADE MARK 



ou 



I'H i v > i i \ i i ' .- u r. \ i i', h 




KING'S CELEBRATED 
SCOTCH WINDOW HOLLANDS 



have been made for one 
are recognized throughout 
most saleable shading. They 
are unshrinkable, fast colors 
and widths. To insure get 
ers are advised to Examine 
Also inside Holland Tab on 
that each bears name of 




hundred and forty years and 
the world as the best and 
are unequalled for quality, 
and made in all colorings 
ting genuine goods, custom- 
Tickets and Paper Bands. 
end of each piece and see 
"John King & Son." 



SOLD BY ALL LEADING WINDOW SHADE JOBBERS 



Made by 



JOHN KING & SON 

GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Established 1775 
Canadian Representatives: CAMPBELL, SMIBERT & CO., MONTREAL and TORONTO 



TELEGRAMS: 

\\ AKEFUL 

GLASGOW 



CODE: 
A. B.C. 
5TH EDITION 



WILSON & CO. 

48 ALBION STREET 

GLASGOW 



MANUFACTTRERS 

Ecru and Colored Madras Muslins, 

Coin Spots and Figured Harness 

Book Muslins Robe Muslins 

Voiles 

Anglo-Swiss and Broche Muslins, 

"Wilsco" Lawns, "Zelette" 

LACE CURTAINS 

LACE NETS 



■ " " ■ ' ' i i i i i i i i i i i i i l i i l n i 1 1 i i i l 1 1 I 1 i i M 1 I > 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 I ■ 1 . j H I 1 1^ 




Regisr-erea No 262 OOS 



iiiTiTii 111 1 ii t i ni timi i in ii 1 1 1 i miml J 




The Hall-Mark of 

Maximum Comfort and 
Durability at Minimum Cost. 

FIRST IN THE FIELD AND STILL LEADING. 

Manufactured on THE GRADUATED 
PRINCIPLE, and Commencing with TWO 
THREADS in the TOP. it increases in 
WEAR.RESISTING PROPERTIES as it 
descends. 

Thus THE LEG HAS THREE THREADS, 
THE INSTEP AND FOOT FOUR, 
and the HEEL and TOE FIVE, 
making it essentially 



A HALF HOSE 
FOR HARD WEAR. 

ABSOLUTELY SEAMLESS 
PERFECT IN FIT 
GUARANTEED UNSHRINKABLE 



To be had from any of the Leading Wholesale Dry Coods Houses. 



/ imi i iii i ii iii iiii i iin ii mni iiii iiii T iiiiiimm i niiM i i i ilii^ 



TAILORS' LININGS 



SHEETINGS 



LONGCLOTHS 



BLANKETS 



FLANNELETTES 




SPERO 

ON SELVEDGE OUR GUARANTEE 



BRITISH 




MAKE 



SUPER-STANDARDISED QUALITY 

COTTON GOODS 

"THE BEST IN THE WORLD" 



MILLS ON MANCHESTER SHIP CANAL 



THE SHOW MILLS OF LANCASHIRE 



1 



r? 4i 



I 




Are made from best Egyptian and American cottons: Diligent scrutiny in all stages of 
manufacture maintains that unbeatable quality upon which their world-fame rests. 




Canadian Agent: 

E. W. DEAN & SON, 324 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

Agency for remainder of Canadian Territory in contemplation 

Sole Manufacturers: 

RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 

6 MOSLEY ST., MANCHESTER 

Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 



ENC. 



li 



ooo€^-oo oo^ooo 



1 



u 



[? t jl 







BLEAKLOW MILLS, TOTTINGTON, near BURY, LANCASHIRE 



NOTICE 

Every article named on Messrs. Rigg Bros.' List is both spun and woven 
at their mills at Bleaklow, Nr. Bury, Lancashire. The mark "RIGG'S 
MANUFACTURE" appearing on the selvedge constitutes a guarantee of 

the highest quality. 





Made of 



Cotton 



are the standard product Entirely 
of the British market Inn 



ngs ™ 



Canadian Agent: 

E. W. DEAN & SON, 324 Seymour Street, Vancouver, B.C, 

Agency for remainder of Territory is contemplated 
Sole Manufacturers: 

RIGG BROTHERS, LTD. 

Cotton Spinners and Manufacturers since 1836 

6 MOSLEY ST., MANCHESTER 



ENG. 



Cables: Rigg Brothers, Manchester 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 




• *^rtJ*^ 




ui\ 







**j^X£A%yn/n&4 . 




St. Paul's Churchyard 



FACTORIES 10 & 11 Warwick Lane, K.<:. 

paternoster Building .C. LONDON, ENG. 

Cables, Churchyard, London. 



A. B.C. Code, 5th Edition 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



35 



Always in Demand 

Horrockses" fabrics are always in demand. They are Mg 
business builders for the dealers who handle them, and add 



prestige to their stores. 



Nainsooks, Cambrics, Madapolams, Calicos, Ducks 
and Drills, and Diaphalenc — the wonderful new 
cotton that looks and feels like silk. 

These famous fabrics have been the favorites of the house- 
wives of three generations. Their "quality" has marked 
Horrockses' fabrics as the most reliable cotton cloths manu- 
factured. 

Are you prepared for the big spring business in this line? 
Order through our Canadian agent. 




JOHN E. RITCHIE 

591 St. Catherine St. West 
Montreal 

Branches: Toronto, 
Vancouver 

United States Agents: 

WRIGHT & GRAHAM CO. 

110 Franklin St, 

New York City 

HORROCKSES, 
CREWDSON & CO., 

LIMITED 
Cotton Spinners and 

Manufacturers 
Manchester, England 



Telegraphic Address: "Cyrus" Bradford 
Code used, A.B.C. 5th Edition 



Cyrus Brook & Sons, Ltd. 

Offices: 5 Union Street 

Bradford - England 



Manufacturers of- 




Buntings, 


Serges, 


Shalloons, 


Coatings, 


Scarfs, 


Gabardines, 


Tammies, 


Custom Cloths 



and 
Silk and Wool Casement Cloths. 

Manufactured at St. Dunstan's Mill, 
Mill Lane, and Shuttleworth Works, 
Fairweather ^reen, Bradford, Eng. 

Canadian Agents; 

Arthur H. Parks, 77 York Street, Toronto 

William Parks, 43 St. Sacrament Street, 
Montreal 



This Line 

is Complete 
Fills Every 

Requirement 

We mean just that — you need no other 
line of dyes when you carry 

Sunset 

SoapDyes 

Twenty-two beautiful, full-toned colors 
are in the Sunset assortment — more than 
any other line offers. They cover the full 
gamut of tone and shade from lightest blue 
to deepest black. 

Your customer can match almost any 
color from the Sunset Color Card. 

The selling arguments for Sunset are 
complete and convincing. They are fast — 
will not crock, fade or wash out. They dye 
all fabrics — silk, cotton, linen or wool or 
any combination at the same time in the 
same dye bath, with perfect results. 

They do not soil the hands or stain 
utensils. Every woman will value such a 
feature. 

The Sunset Counter Container 

Holds, Attracts and Sells 
The Best Dye in the World. 

Harold F. Ritchie & Co., Inc. 

NEW^YORK - TORONTO 
North American Dye Corporation, Ltd. 

Toronto,iCanada Mount Vernon, N.Y. 




:m 



DRY HOODS RKVI V. W 




SALE OF MILITARY AND 

Other Government Stores 

Equipment and Supplies for Hospitals, Institutions, Bunk- 
houses, Camps, Dining-Rooms, Kitchens, etc. 

Bedsteads, Furniture, Hardware, DryGoods, Rubbers, Overshoes and other 
Footwear, Blankets, Sheets, Pillows, Baskets, Woodenware, 

Brushes, etc. 

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT AND MACHINERY- 
AMBULANCES. 



The Stores are located at various places throughout Canada 



Instead of or in addition to sales by sealed tender 

PRICE LISTS WILL NOW BE ISSUED 

for most articles — the goods being offered in lots for purchase by wholesale 
houses, jobbers, and the trade generally. 

TRADE ONLY SUPPLIED 

except that arrangements previously announced for sale to returned sol- 
diers and sailors and widows and dependents of same through the G. W. V. 
A. and similar organizations and to hospitals and philanthropic institutions 

will be continued. 



SALES WILL CEASE IN MARCH. Any balances left will be cleared 
by public auction shortly thereafter. This advertisement will not be repeat- 
ed. Those interested should therefore apply AT ONCE for price lists and 
other information to the 

SECRETARY OF THE WAR PURCHASING COMMISSION. BOOTH BUILDING, OTTAWA 

February, 1920 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



37 



W/E are daily getting in 
*^ shipments of much- 
wanted lines in all our De- 
partments. Send us a letter 
stating your Dry Goods 
wants — or better still use a 
lettergram to save delay, and 
to satisfy your customers. 




MONTREAL 



\J 



38 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 







Announcement 



The trade will appreciate the fact that we have 
gathered extensive assortments of Spring goods 
which are now ready for the inspection of buyers 
visiting Toronto during this month. 

The assortment includes : Wash Fabrics, Dress 
Goods, Silks, Carpets, Draperies, Smallwares, 
Hosiery, Gloves, Underwear, Ladies' Ready-to- 
Wear Garments, Men's Furnishings and Work 
Clothing. 

Regardless of ever-changing conditions, the 
demand for goods continues exceedingly brisk, 
while prospective deliveries continue to cause 
anxiety. We are nevertheless prepared to meet 
sorting requirements for the Spring season in a 
comprehensive manner and our stock includes 
some of the latest available novelties. 

Customers will find us ready to serve them with 
our usual promptness. We advise an early visit as 
staples and other lines are by no means plentiful. 
Knowing these conditions, we advise you to act 
accordingly. 



The W. R. Brock Company (Limited) 





39 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

The Recognized Authority of the Canadian Dry Goods Trade 

Published Fifteenth of Each Month Advertising Forms Close Twelfth of the Month 

Vol. XLII. Toronto, February, 1920 No. 2 

EDITORIAL CONTENTS 

Frontispiece 40 Men's Wear 51 

Sixty years with Wholesale Dry Goods 41 Dress Fabrics 56 

Read.j ust men l Period at Hand 42 Furs 72 

„ . _, , „ ~ Millinery 82 

The Function- ol a Board of Corn- 
Knitted Goods 88 

merce 43 

Dress Accessories 106 

Human Service. Not Automatic, 

V alley ( rOOds 118 

Wanted 45 Toy, 126 

Why Not Use Transfer? Equipment and Display 130 

Editorial Page 47 j [ousefurniahinga 150 

Markets 48 Ready-to- Wear 158 



THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, President H. T. HUNTER, Vice-President 

H. V. TYRRELL, General Manager 

Publishers of Dry Goods Review, Hardware and Metal. The Financial Post, MacLean's Magazine. Farmers' Magazine. 
Canadian Grocer, Men's Wear Review, Printer and Publisher, Bookseller and Stationer, Canadian Machinery and 
Manufacturing News, Power House, Sanitary Engineer, Canadian Foundryman. Marine Engineering of Canada, 
Canadian Motor, Tractor and Implement Trade Journal.. 

Cable Address: Macpubco, Toronto: Atabek, London, Eng. 

PUBLISHERS OF 

DRY GOODS REVIEW 

ESTABLISHED 1887. 

ALEX. WALES, Manager. 
MISS A. R. WHALLEY. Editor. 

A. B. CASWELL. Eastern Manager. H. H. BLACK. Associate Editor. 

W. H. WARAM, Toronto and Ontario Representative. W. S. McCULLOUGH, Advertising Dept. 

E. J. SHEARMAN, Montreal Representative. MISS H. E. CARTER, Advertising Dept 

C. A. COLLINS, Western Representative. ROY A. HUNTER, B.C. Representative. 
MISS N. M. EVANS, Associate Editor. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal, Southam Building, 128 Bleurv St.. Telephone MaHn 1004. Toronto, 143-153 University Ave.. 

Telephone Main 7324. Winnipeg. 1103 Union Trust Building. Telephone Main 3449. Vancouver, 39 Tenth 

Avenue, West. 
GREAT BRITAIN — London, The MacLean Company of Great Britain, Limited, 88 Fleet Street, E.C. E. J. Dodd. 

Director. Telephone Central 12960. Cable Address : Atabek, London, England. 
UNITED STATES— New York, Mrs. E. C. Gibb, Room 1606, St. James Bldg., 1133 Broadway (cor 26th St.). Chicago, 

111., A. H. Byrne. Room 1401, Lytton Bldg., 14 E. Jackson St., Telephone Harrison 9133. Boston, C. L. Morton, 

Room 734, Old South Building, Telephone Main 1024. 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE — Canada. Great Britain. South Africa and the West Indies. $2 a year; United States, 

$2.50 a year: Other Countries, $3 a year: Single Copies. 20 cents. Invariably in advance. 



40 



DRY GOODS REV] K W 



$arts Jflobelg 




/?o6e Daplims: Can you imagint anything rider than the 
maroon satin with elaborate gold embroidery of this evening 
gown? The scurf is of maroon tulle. 

Manteau Veronesi : Tht evening wrap is an elegant on< of red 
velours with gold embroidery and trimmed with kolinsky. These 
art two very new creations by Cheat. Drecoll, Paris, who sent the 
photos direct to Dry Goods Review. 



Dry Goods Review 



41 



Sixty Years with Wholesale Dry Goods 

George Sumner, President of Hodgson, Sumner & Co., Montreal, Honored by Appointment 
as President of Board of Trade — Down at 8 a.m. — Some Interesting Hobbies. 



WHEN a man has spent 60 years 
in the wholesale dry goods busi- 
ness in Canada, besides several 
years previous to that in England be- 
fore he came out to this country, it might 
be assumed without much argument that 
he was entitled to something of a rest in 
the year 1920. But George Sumner, 
president of the wholesale dry goods 
house of Hodgson, Sumner & Co., con- 
sented to accept the busy position of 
president of the Montreal Board of Trade 
this year, at the unanimous request of 
the members, filling out his term, first of 
second vice-president, and last year as 
vice-president of that important body. 
It may be taken for granted, and is by 
those who know him best in his own 
business, that he will work pretty near- 
ly as hard as usual for Hodgson, Sum- 
ner & Co. during the year 1920, and will 
increase his ordinary day's span in order 
to accomplish the task that he has ac- 
cepted as head of one of the most im- 
portant bodies of business men in Can- 
ada. 

Gets Down at 8 A.M. 

When the name of the new president 
is associated with that of "work," it must 
be taken to mean work of the real old- 
fashioned kind. Although president of 
his own company, doing business with 
merchants all over this country, and 
finding his business growing steadily 
year by year, the head of Hodgson, Sum- 
ner & Company has never been known, 
in the 60 years he has been connected 
with that business, to "take it easy." 
An official of that company, in whose 
words there is every reason to place con- 
fidence, although he admits he does not 
get the information first-handed, declares 
that Mr. Sumner reaches his office at 8 
o'clock" in the morning, and is sometimes 
waiting for the man to open the office 
door. (The question whether Mr. Sum- 
ner has a key of his own is hardly rele- 
vant here.) From early morning he 
works right through until late in the 
afternoon. And he has done this for 
60 years. 

In the Early Sixties 

When DRY GOODS REVIEW spoke 
to him about the early days, he talked 
of the time in the '60s when there was 
no such thing as a Saturday half-holiday, 



and everyone, from the office boy up, was 
glad to rest his weary body on Sundays. 
There were no telephones in those 
days: no power elevators; no small 
trucks to transfer goods to different de- 
partments. And when navigation open- 
ed in the spring, the employees often had 
little of their nights to themselves. The 
opening of navigation meant not only 
the receipt of goods from Europe, that 
had been held out over the whole winter 
— in the absence of railways and other 
connections with the Atlantic ports — but 




Mr. George Sumner, Montreal. 

it also meant that goods that had been 
ordered months before had to be rushed 
up the St. Lawrence, or down, as the 
case might be, to fill orders from out- 
lying points in Quebec Province, or On- 
tario, or futher west. Those were the 
days, too, when there were no travellers 
as there are to-day, covering every sec- 
tion in the remote parts of Canada; when 
merchants — usually the heads of big 
general stores — wanted goods, they came 
for them. Those were also the days 
when ,£ s. d. were Canadian currency. 
Those were the days when nearly all the 
merchandise sold by the store had to 
be brought in from England and other 
European countries, because at that time 



no such a thing as cotton textile mills 
existed in Canada. 

Mr. Sumner joined the business in 
1860, four years after it was established 
as Foulds & Hodgson. Later the name 
was changed to Hodgson, Murphy and 
Sumner, and later still to Hodgson, Sum- 
ner & Company. On the death of the 
president, Mr. Jonathan Hodgson, in 
1914, Mr. Sumner, who was then vice- 
president, was appointed president of the 
company, a position which he holds to- 
day. 

Of travelling in connection with this 
firm, he has done a great deal. At first, 
in the earlier years, this meant going 
along the River collecting from mer- 
chants at various centres, such as Three 
Rivers, and others along the St. Law- 
rence. Later he took the place of Mr. 
Hodgson on trips to Europe. Through 
all his connections with this firm he 
has shown qualities of method, thorough- 
ness and punctuality in his dealings with 
the staff and his customers in a widen- 
ing circle over Canada. 

Hobbies: Art, Photography, Natural 
History 

Apart from his valuable service to 
the Board of Trade, Mr. Sumner has not 
felt any inclination to take part in muni- 
cipal life, or increase his connections 
with business interests far removed from 
his initial undertaking. But he has cer- 
tain hobbies that are uncommon. He is 
keenly interested in natural history, and 
for several years was associated with the 
late Sir William Dawson, McGill's emi- 
nent principal, as vice-president of the 
Natural History Society of Montreal, 
when Principal Dawson was its presi- 
dent. In photography Mr. Sumner 
proved that his skill far outran the aver- 
age amateur's, and he ranks high among 
Canadian photographers. In a third di- 
rection he has maintained a deep interest 
for many years with the Antiquarian 
and Numismatic Society of Montreal. A 
fourth has been the Art Association, with 
which, too, he has been actively connect- 
ed, and in which he has shown a keen 
discrimination. In these contrasting di- 
rections has come the relief to him from 
the unusually exacting pi - ogram of busi- 
ness activities that he has sedulously 
prescribed for himself throughout his 
long business career. 



42 



Thinks Readjustment Period is Now at Hand, 

No Sudden Slump in Prices at all Likely 

\\ . I. Donald, Ph.D., Secretary Chamber of Commerce, Niagara Falls, Writing For Finan- 
cial Post, Throws Light Upon Future Developments in Business. 



Bl SINESS men everywhere are 
considering the outlook for the 
future, especially the business 
trend for the year 1920. No one can 
predict the immediate future with 
any degree of confidence, but a num- 
ber of facts point to some general 
conclusions. 

First. — The retail business men feel 
that general business is very prosper- 
ous. Unfortunately, however, few of 
them calculate that the price level is 
generally high, and that what seems 
to be a greatly-increased cash busi- 
ness is not actually an increase in 
business. One business man said to 
me recently that business is not as 
good as it ought to be. While the 
volume of turnover in dollars and 
cents seems high, as a matter of fact 
it should be higher than it is, in view 
of the present price levels. 

Second. — One business man recently 
slated that he is looking for a con- 
siderable depression in prices and is 
keepir.jr his stock down to the lowest 
possible level. We were discussing 
the question of Canadian exchange, 
which is a critical question here in 
Niagara Falls, where we get a very 
considerable Canadian trade. This 
business man. one of our largest 
clothinjr merchants, stated that he be- 
lieved that it would be a good thing 
for merchants to keep their present 
stocks movincr and tret them off their 
shelves at present prices even if they 
have to stand all the discount on Can- 
adian money. In other words he made 
it clear that he anticipated a decline 
in prices in the next six months or 
less, and that business men will do 
well to dispose of their present high- 
priced stocks and that they should 
buy cautiously in the near fr.tu.re. 

Third. — I was impressed recently 
by the fact that people are not spend- 
ing money as freely as they were a 
few weeks or months ae:o. While in 
the theatre the other ni<rht in a West- 
ern city I was amazed at the small at- 
tendance. It was due in part, I am 
sure, to the coal shortage due to the 
coal strike. The possibility of un- 
employment due to the lack of fuel 
supplies certainly threw a scare into 
the minds of the people. Whether they 
have entirely recovered or not I do 
not know. To bo sure, the \merican 
people recover from their fears with 
amazinp alaeritv. 

Relations With Britain 

Fourth. — European market condi- 
tions must have an effect on Ameri- 
can business conditions Furope can- 
not afford to pay America an extra 
or 50 per cent.. $4.S4 of British 



money bu\s only $3.82 worth of 
American goods, even at the present 
high prices in America. The British 
pound probably buys less than one- 
third of v/hat it bought in America 
four years ago. Of two possible reme- 
dies, the first is for America to loan 
Great Britain enormous quantities of 
money, and if she does loan this 
money she can loan it only for goods 
sold to Europe, which will in turn in- 
crease Europe's productivity. America 
cannot afford to loan Europe money 
for purely consumption purposes, nor 
can Europe afford to borrow money 
for purely consumption purposes. 

The second alternative is that Europe 
will eventually stop importing. In 
any case Europe must stop importing 
anything that looks like luxuries, 
which is certainly going to affect a 
very large part of American industry. 
In addition I have a very strong 
conviction that next year Europe will 
import much less in the way of Ameri- 
can foodstuffs. The production of 
foodstuffs this yeai has been low. 
She has not managed to readjust her 
economic situation sufficiently to pro- 
vide a bumper crop. I am confident 
that this will change this next sum- 
mer, so that Europe will not only dis- 
pense with American luxuries but she 
will also be able to cet along with less 
of American foodstuffs. I think that 
will become perfectly apparent before 
the first of July. 

Cancellation of U. S. Orders 

Formerly it was the habit of debtor 
countries to adjust their trade 
balances by means of shipments of 
erold. This Europe cannot do, nor can 
she afford to have a continual un- 
favorable balance of trade with 
America. It seems to me that Ameri- 
can export trade must seek South 
American and Asian markets. The 
Canadian market is troing to be partly 
lost to the United States because the 
discount on the pound sterling is the 
equivalent of an additional 25 per 
cent, preference in favor of British 
products. There have been huge can- 
cellations of Canadian orders in the 
United States in the course of the last 
couple of weeks. 

Fifth. — Another bit of evidence is 
a common comment to the eTect that 
bier Republican interest* in the United 
States are very anxious to see a de- 
pression during the next six or eight 
months. They feel that it is coming 
sooner or later and they would rather 
Have it conic 1 under the present admin- 
istration than after the Republicans 
— if successful — get into office. Per- 



sonally I put no stock whatever in this 
sort of argument. My first reason is 
that there are very important bankinp 
interests acknowledging Democratic 
allegiance which are just as powerful 
as banking connections with Republi- 
can allegiance. My second reason is 
that while there are individual rogues 
in business I cannot be made to be- 
lieve that big business men in the 
United States could ever be brought 
together to agree to use financial 
power to effect political turnover, even 
if it could be done to their advantage. 
My third reason is that big business 
suffers from financial depression as 
much as any other element. Manufac- 
turing prosperity is so intimately in- 
terwoven with the interests of bank- 
ing that the banks have no advantage 
whatever in purposely causing depres- 
sion. 

Federal Reserve System 

Sixth. — Another factor to consider 
in the future situation is the influence 
of the Federal Reserve System. 
People who used to talk about New 
York bleeding the country and caus- 
ing financial depression, completely 
lacked an understanding of financial 
onerrtions. They fail to understand 
that what caused financial depressions 
was the withdrawal of funds from 
New York by their banking correspon- 
dents and connections in other cities 
and States. This withdrawal neces- 
sitated a curtailment of loans in New 
York City, with a consequent with- 
drawal of funds, especially ir the mns f 
liquid market, namely the stock mar- 
ket. 

The National Banking System, be- 
fore the establishment of a Federal 
reserve System, encouraged the pil- 
'ne up of reserves in New York City. 
This encouraged speculation in the 
stock market, but when reserves had 
to be withdrawn from New York, 
f.'nds were withdrawn from the stock 
market and prices came down with a 
crash. The whole system was un- 
elastic both as to expansion and con- 
traction of credit, so that the system 
was very likely to see great ups and 
downs in financial America. 

Contrast that condition with condi- 
tions in most European countries, few 
of which have had financial depres- 
sions the way America experiences 
them. Here they come regularly 
about eveiy t"n years, but since the 
establishment of the Federal Reserve 
System the American credit system 
has been made elastic. Remember 
how well the New York Stock Mar- 
(Continued on page 44) 



The Functions of a Board of Commerce 

An Address Delivered Before the Members of the Dominion Board of the Retail Merchants' 
Association of Canada, at a Special Meeting in Ottawa, by E. Trowern, Secretary. 



WITH the advance of civilization a 
great many men recognized that 
much more could be accomplished 
for the improvement of trade con- 
ditions by consultation with one another, 
than could be accomplished by destructive 
and unfair competition. This desire produced 
the formation of craft guilds and a host of 
trade associations of various kinds. As these 
organizations grew in power and influence 
and improved their trade conditions, these 
conditions became conspicuous and stood out 
in open contrast with the conditions which 
prevailed under unorganized effort. Those 
who were not organized and those who sus- 
pected that these various guilds and trade 
organizations were formed for the purpose 
of overcharging and increasing prices to the 
public, but who had no means of knowing 
whether their suspicions were true or not, 
raised a public clamor, and this public clamor 
reached the ears of the politicians, and, with 
their usual astuteness to try and do some- 
thing to catch the popular vote, the Conser- 
vative Party, on February 26th, in the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-nine (1889), in- 
troduced an amendment to the Criminal 
Code, under the guidance of Mr. Clark Wal- 
lace, M.P., known as Section 498 of the 
Dominion Statutes, entitled: "Legislation to 
prevent Combines in Restraint of Trade." 

The Object of the Measure 

The object of this measure was to attempt 
to stop the operation of the various or- 
ganizations, whether their purposes were 
good or bad. No tribunal was provided 
whereby an investigation could be made by 
those competent to know what the effect 
would be upon the general public of the 
various decisions that were arrived at by 
any commercial body, but the clauses in the 
Act were narrow, dangerous, meddlesome and 
unreasonable, and, like all other artificial 
attempts to interfere with the natural and 
God-ordained laws of trade, this legislation 
proved to be of no value to the public, but 
only a good source of revenue for the legal 
profession. Briefly, this legislation threaten- 
ed all persons who were engaged in com- 
merce who met together for the purpose of 
mutual protection with a summons to appear 
at the Police Court, and it gave every Police 
Magistrate in Canada power to charge them 
with violating the Act. 

Laboring Classes Exempt 

This dangerous piece of legislation, how- 
ever, did not apply to the laboring classes, 
who were clever enough to see its real pur- 
pose, and they had a clause inserted as 
follows: — 

"Nothing in this section shall be con- 
structed to apply to combinations of 
workmen or employees for their own 
reasonable protection as such workmen 
or employees." 

The placing of this clause in the Act im- 
mediately created class legislation — the very 
thing that we . are all endeavoring to be 
freed from — and the very fact that the above 
clause was inserted proved that the legisla- 
tion was purely camouflage. 

After reciting our views concerning this 
Act, it might very properly be asked by some 
retail merchants, what was our association 
doing in the matter to allow such legislation 
to pass? The answer is that all this occur- 
red over thirty years ago, before the Retail 
Merchants' Association of Canada came into 
existence. It was legislation of this sort 
that proved the need of an association and 



hastened its formation, and although the 
association had not been formed at that time 
your secretary has a distinct recollection of 
appearing, as a retail merchant, before a 
special committee of the House of Commons, 
with a number of public-spirited Canadian 
citizens, among whom was that old highly- 
respected war horse who has helped to fight 
many commercial battles in his day, and who, 
I am pleased to say, is still active and at 
his post, Mr. Hugh Blain, of Toronto, and 
after some strenuous arguments we suc- 
ceeded in having several clauses inserted in 
the Act which removed, to a small extent, 
some of its dangerous features. 

Meddlesome Piece of Legislation 

During the entire thirty-one years that 
this legislation has been on the Statute 
Books, very few cases have ever been brought 
to court, and the principal ones have cost 
those who defended their action thousands 
of dollars, and left the public to-day in 
a worse position than it was before this 
meddlesome piece of legislation was enacted, 
and legitimate organization work among all 
commercial classes has been hampered, and 
trusts and monopolies abound greater than 
ever. 

Through a counter agitation, which had 
been continuously made by various commer- 
cial classes, and particularly by our asso- 
ciation, from the time that the afore- 
mentioned legislation was enacted, the poli- 
ticians, true to their instincts, again placed 
their ear to the ground and heard the mm- 
b'ing- of discontent, and on May 10th, 3910, 
the Liberal Party placed an Act upon the 
Statute Books, through the Hon. Mackenzie 
King, which was known as "An Act to pro- 
vide for the Investigation of Combines, 
Monopolies, Trusts and Mergers." 

When this Act was introduced it also 
contained some clauses ' that would have 
seriously interfered with the operations of 
the retail trade, but fortunately our asso- 
ciation had come into existence, and upon 
the presentation of our case we were ac- 
corded a respectful hearing and our recom- 
mendations were incorporated into the Act 
and it became law. We fully anticipated, 
however, that upon its passage the old Com- 
bines Act would be abolished, but in this 
we were mistaken, as we were again told that 
the "General public might become alarmed 
and the 'opposition' would strongly oppose 
its removal, and they would make political 
capital out of it," so the commercial classes 
of Canada had to content themselves with 
knowing, that two pieces of legislation had 
been placed upon the Statute Books, both 
having the same object in view, but both 
of them diametrically opposed to each other. 

Under the last mentioned legislation, al- 
though it contained some useful clauses, 
only one or two cases had come before the 
courts, although it was open for anyone so 
disposed to take advantage of the legisla- 
tion. The difficulty was that while the Act 
was a reasonable and fair one, and quite 
an improvement on the former Act, no per- 
manent machinery was provided to carry 
it out. 

Commercial Conditions Disturbed 

The chief fact, therefore, remains that 
both political parties considered that some 
legislation was necessary to control com- 
bines, monopolies, trusts and mergers, and 
they both provided legislation for that pur- 
pose, but both attempts proved of no value 



in providing a remedy — they only compli- 
cated and disturbed commercial conditions. 
As soon, however, as the war broke out 
we were faced with new and extraordinary 
conditions, and we all willingly consented to 
all sorts of restrictions and curtailment of 
our personal liberty in order to free our- 
selves once and for all from the reign of 
the Prussian autocrat. In our eagerness and 
our desire to accomplish our purpose we 
were subjected, as it is well known, to some 
of the most unfair and uncalled for "Orders- 
in-Council," all having in view the fact that 
the retail merchant class, instead of being 
the chief factors who were engaged in doing 
everything in their power to "keep the home 
fires burning," and notwithstanding that the 
official records show that from among our 
sons, clerks and drivers, etc., we represented 
the largest single class who took up arms — 
that we were out to deliberately take ad- 
vantage of these brave and noble-hearted 
women who were not only suffering the men- 
tal and physical strain of having to take 
care of their little families without the ad- 
vice and support of those brave men who 
were fighting for our liberty, but. in addition, 
■■•<• were the class who had to be especially 
legislated against. 

Refused to be Discriminated Against 
These conditions existed until such time 
as we could no longer bear the accusations 
and annoyances, and by our strong con- 
demnation of those Orders-in-Council, and 
our refusal to be improperly discriminated 
against, we succeeded in having the Orders 
that affected us the most severely annulled, 
and those who were appointed to operate 
them removed. While we were thus defend- 
ing ourselves and endeavoring to preserve 
our place in the economic distribution ot 
retail merchandising — some few classes in 
the community, together with those of the 
public press who were not familiar with our 
position, and who desired sensational matter 
to sell their publications — notwithstanding 
the fact that they require our advertising 
to enable them to live — were stating that 
we wished to avoid public investigation, ana 
we, therefore, determined that we would ask 
the Dominion Government to appoint a 
special committee of the members of the 
House to make a full report on our position, 
as well as on the cost of living generally. 
The committee was appointed and an ex- 
haustive investigation took place, and I am 
pleased to say that the findings of the com- 
mittee in no way showed that the retail mer- 
chants of Canada were guilty of taking 
undue profits or conducting their affairs in 
an improper manner. 

Cost -of -Living Committee 

For a great many years our association 
has been advocating the appointment of an 
Inland Trade Commission, consisting of cap- 
able business men who had practical ex- 
perience in commercial affairs, and so we 
appeared before the special Committee of 
the House of Commons and urged again the 
appointment of such a commission. On page 
723 of the Cost of Living Report, which 
sets forth the evidence which was presented 
asking for the appointment of such a com- 
mission, we stated among other things: — 
"We would suggest that the Board be 
comprised of five members; one manu- 
facturer, one wholesaler, two retailers 
and a commercial solicitor." 
The special Committee reported favorably 



•II 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



:uui recommended that ■ commission be ap- 
pointed, consisting of three members to bo 

appointed as occasion required. Legislation 
was introduced and very careful considera- 
tion was given to it as it passed through 
the various stages of the House of Com- 
mons and the Senate. 

The manner in which the Bill was drafted 
gSTC us considerable concern as we saw 
gnat danger ahead for us if those appointed 
to administer the Act were unfamiliar with 
practical, commercial transactions. We felt. 
however, that the Government would, in 
their own interest-, see that properly quali- 
fied men were appointed on the Board or 
great discredit would be cast upon them, as 
well as upon the Act itself. It might be men- 
tioned here that upon the passage of this 
Act, the Act which was placed upon the 
Statute Books by the Liberal Government, 
and which has been previously referred to, 
was repealed, and the Act placed upon the 
Statute Books by the Conservative Govern- 
ment still remains. 

Wanted a Proper Trade Court 

It must be remembered also that the reason 
for the passage of the Board of Commerce 
Act as understood by a great many members 
of the House of Commons and the Senate, 
as well as by the general public, was of an 
entirely different character to what we un- 
derstood it, as members of our association. 
The public and others regarded the Act as a 
measure that would reduce the cost of living 
and prevent combines and mergers. The mem- 
bers of our association regarded it as a 
measure that would establish a proper court 
or tribunal for the adjudicating of all trade 
matters, similar to the manner in which the 
Railway Board deals with all matters con- 
cerning railways. 

In the presentation of our case before the 
special Committee of the House on the Cost 
of Living when we were urging for the 
passing of the Act, the following statements 
appear in the printed report: — 

"We suggest that the proposed Inland 
Trade Commission should consist of com- 
petent, commercial persons, who shall 
be men of knowledge, experience in 
trade, manufacturing, wholesale and re- 
tail. We would suggest that all trade 
agreements made between any persons, 
firms, corporations or association en- 
gaged in the same or other lines of trade 
throughout Canada, in which the arrang- 
ing of prices is concerned, should be sub- 
mitted with full reasons therefor, to the 
said commission for their examination 
and approval, and any persons, firms. 
or corporations who entered into such 
agreements without submitting them 
and having the approval of the Inland 
Trade Commission would render them- 
selves liable to prosecution. 

"The formation of this commission 
would enable any person or persons to 
have commercial practices and com- 
plaints investigated, and practices which 
are found to be iniurious to the trade, 
or contrary to public interest could also 
be investifatd and decisions rendered 
thereon, similar to the decisions that 
are arrived at bv the Dominion Rail- 
way Commission." 

As snon as the Act became law, we imme- 
diately ureed upon the members of the Gov- 
ernment the necessity of appointing capable 
ins on the Board who had a complete 
knowledo-e of the retail trade. For some 
n best known to the Government the 
three persons who were apnointed. and who 
now constitute the Board, have had no 
practical knowledge of the manufacturing, 
wholesale or the retail trade, and although 
the laboring interests enjoy special nrivi- 
and are exempt from the operations 
of the Act. they pressed for representation 
OB the Board and they were favored bv 
having one of their class appointed, while 
the requests of the retail merchants were 
utterly ignored. 



Endeavoring to I i\ Profit! 

Administration of the Act up to the 
present time has proven that our fears were 
well grounded, and instead of the Act be- 
coming a measure of strength to all the 
commercial interests, and something which 
the public would regard as a business men's 
court, they now see the harrowing spectacle 
of a group of three men, who are unfamiliar 
with the underlying principles of trade, en- 
deavoring to fix the profits under which 
retail merchants should operate, and every- 
thing that they have so far endeavored to 
investigate has increased in price instead 
of decreasing, as those who are unfamiliar 
with the laws of supply and demand ex- 
pected. 

This brief outline of our position leads 
us to the following considerations: — 

1. Should the Act be abolished en- 
tirely, or 

2. Should the manner under which 
it is being operated be changed? 

The reasons which we put forth as an 
association for the establishment of such a 
Board is, in our opinion, just as necessary 
as it was when the legislation was passed 
which created it. The chief thing that we 
require to do is to see that is properly 
administered, 

No Court Like It in the World 

It is always a very unwise proceeding to 
attempt to criticize any action of any per- 
son or persons unless we have an amend- 
ment to put in its place, and we would, there- 
fore, suggest that instead of the Board of 
Commerce attempting to meddle with the 
peculiar details of the various sections of 
trade, and acting in a manner unheard of 
by any properly qualified court in the world 
— ■ that is, by the court laying a charge 
against tin individual or a group of in- 
dividuals, and after so doing they proceed 
to sit in judgment on the said supposed 
transgressor or transgressors whom they 
have charged, and then try a case that they 
themselves have been the means of accus- 
ing before the evidence has been heard. 
These proceedings are so unfamiliar to the 
Canadian public, and to the principles of all 
free men, such as retail merchants, and so 
contra to what we all understand and kno»- 
to be British fair play, and which wo all 
admire so profoundly, that it is a wonder 
it has been allowed to continue even so lonrr 
as it has without being overthrown, which 
it seems is now about to take place. 

Our answer to the two questions should 
therefore, be. to the first question —Should 
the Act be abolished entirely? No. And to 
the second question - Should the manner 
under which it is being operated be chancred? 
Yes. And. in order to present our views 
as to how we think the Act should be ad- 
inmistered. we would suggest the following: 

1. The Board of Commerce should meet 
properly appointed committees from — 

The Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 
The Wholesale Merchants' Association, 

and 
The Retail Merchants' Association of Can- 
ada, 
and other organized, commercial industries, 
and secure proposals from them as to how 
the trades in which they are interested 
could be improved by proper regulation. 

2. That instead of the court endeavoring 
to dictate to the commercial classes as to 
how they should conduct their affairs they 
should become a real court and decide on 
the evidence that is laid before them on anv 
commercial matter, and in this manner their 
judgments will be respected. 

3. That all agreements that are made, 
either by a group of manufacturers amone 
themselves, or between the wholesale trade 
and the manufacturers, or between the 
manufacturers, the wholesalers and the re- 
tnilers, should be laid before the Board of 
Commerce, and the parties thereof should 
appear, if peressary. and give the reasons 
why siid ae-reements are made. 

4. That all price contract agreemon** re- 



garding trade-marked goods should be laid 
before the Board for final ratification. 

o. That charges could be made to the 
Hoard by any person who was subject to 
unfair and unethical methods of trading, 
and the same could be investigated and a 
remedy enforced. 

8 Persons should be dealt with who are 
engaged in unfair commercial practices whose 
methods are contrary to the public interest. 

7. That if it was found that the opera- 
tions of any commercial legislation that is 
now on the statute books is operating un- 
fairly and not producing the results aimed 
at, that the effects of said legislation should 
be laid before the Board and if the Board 
decided that the complaint so laid justified 
a change in the Act they could make a 
recommendations to the Government. 

H. The Board should strictly avoid inter- 
fering with the regular and natural chan- 
nels of trade, and devote their time to see- 
ing tha the said proper channels of trade 
are not interfered with. 

9. That they should investigate the reason 
for the increase of any commodity, com- 
mencing with the producer or manufacturer, 
and encourage the manufacturer to assist 
the Board. 

10. That all classes of the community buy- 
ing or selling merchandise should come un- 
der its operations. 

11. That all agents and subsidiary agents 
in connection with the Board should be 
abolished, and that the Board itself should 
be the only constituted authority to take 
evidence. 

12. That the Board should consist of five 
persons; one manufacturer, one wholesaler, 
one retail merchant, one farmer and one 
commercial solicitor or judge. 

13. That all commercial .statistical reports 
should be under the direction of the Board 
of Commerce and removed entirely from the 
Department of Labor, or other Departments. 

There are other important matters that 
could properly come under the direction of 
the Board, and we feel sure that every 
retail merchant in Canada is only too willing 
to give every possible assistance to raise 
the standard and elevate the commercial 
conditions of Canada. 



THE READJUSTMENT PERIOD 

Continued from page 59 

ket stood the strain of the declaration 
of war in 1914. To be sure there was a 
decline in prices, but the Federal Reserve 
Act had been put into effect a few months 
before and instead of complete commer- 
cial ruin as might have been expected 
under the old system, America recovered 
at once. 

My personal opinion is that the Federal 
Reserve System has ended the system of 
periodical crises. The liquidation of 
markets since 1914 has gone on gradually 
and systematically rather than disast- 
rously and with ruin. I do not believe 
that we will ever be able to mark off 
definite periods of crises and depression 
the way we did formerly. 

If it were true that business men were 
disposed to deliberately swing business 
conditions to affect the democratic rite 
adversely, which I do not believe they 
would, it might have been possible under 
the old banking law, but I do not believe 
that it is feasible under the Federal Re- 
serve System. Our present banking 
system is so much more flexible that it 
would take something a good deal more 
fundamental than the unsound political 
judgment of a few men to control the 
commercial situation in such a fashion. 



Dry Goods Review 



45 



Human Service, Not Automatic Wanted 

A Lecture by Superintendent to Employees of Toronto Store — How Not to Receive an Ex- 
change — What is Meant by "Human" Salesmanship — Making 1920 Mean Much 

or Little. 



FOLLOWING is an outline of a lec- 
ture given by Mrs. Jean G. 
Belford to some of the employees 
of Murray-Kay's, Ltd., one morning at 
the beginning of the year, when a DRY 
GOODS REVIEW representative "drop- 
ped in." 

A group of alert looking salespeople 
gave most interested attention through- 
out the whole 40 or 50 minutes and one 
cannot wonder at this for if your mind 
should wander for a moment you were 
liable to miss one of the jests or amus- 
ing anecdotes that were interspersed 
through the talk. 

Employees' Lunchroom 

Before beginning the main part of the 
lecture, she spoke of a recent change 
that had been made in the employees' 
lunch room and the efforts that were be- 
ing put forth by the executive and em- 
ployees to make this lunch room suc- 
cessful. The space and most of the ex- 
penses are being given by the firm so 
that the cost of the food and a little 
extra help was all that had to be paid 
by the employees. But there was need- 
ed, Mrs. Belford stated, a more thorough 
spirit of co-operation amongst the latter 
in conforming to the rules of the lunch- 
room, such as returning their soiled 
dishes to the counter provided and a 
few other small items which, when over- 
looked by the few, caused considerable 
inconvenience for the many. 

"Next, I want to thank you all for 
your earnest help and co-operation dur- 
ing 1919," she said. "With the em- 
ployees rests the most of the credit for 
the great success of the Murray-Kay 
firm in the past year. And to the em- 
ployees should go the thanks." 

Then Mrs. Belford began her lesson 
by depicting with inimitable humor the 
approach of a customer to a counter 
with an exchange. Her excellent mimi- 
cry of the timid customer, the gracious 
saleslady who received her request and 
the second saleslady to whom she openly 
referred the customer as soon as she 
learned that it was an exchange, brought 
forth unrestrained laughter. The sales- 
people saw at once the humor in a situa- 
tion that they had been seeing and act- 
ing many times a day. It was a good- 
natured laughter that could not have 
come if they had felt themselves to be 
ridiculed. It was the thought of the 
bonus for her sales that caused the 
saleslady to act in this manner. Here 
is the conversation that followed, minus 
the rather dramatic presentation: 

Customer Approaches Counter 

The customer has approached the 
counter, opened her parcel and stated 
that she wished an exchange; the sales- 



girl looks at it casually and asks: "Well, 
what about it?" Then the customer 
states, apologetically, that it doesn't 
match her suit (supposing the article to 
be a blouse) and would like to know if 
they have anything nearer the right 
shade. 

"Haven't a thing," says the salesgirl, 
still resting her hands on her hips and 
gazing at the customer coldly. But by 
this time, the latter has Been glancing 
timidly around, has seen something like 
what she wants at the end of the coun- 



In the January issue "Dry Goods 
Review" published an outline of the 
educational system used in the 
Murray-Kay store. This month we 
publish a summary of one of the 
daily lectures which was given at 
the beginning of the year to all 
the sales people in various groups 
and was attended by a staff repre- 
sentative of "Dry Goods Review." 



ter, and asks: "What's that over there? 
I think that's the right shade." 

"Oh, is it?" comes the answer; "I 
didn't know you wanted to pay that 
much. That's $15.85. Is that too 
much?" Now, as the customer had all 
the time been quite indifferent to price 
so long as she found the exact thing 
she wanted, the sale was completed. 

Always Be Gracious And Attentive 

Hereupon, Mrs. Belford urged her 
listeners to give every customer an 
equal amount of graciousness and atten- 
tive service no matter whether the latter 
wanted to make a purchase, secure an 
exchange, credit, refund, or was just 
looking at the merchandise. 

"Bring out your goods and show them. 
Don't hurry your customer. A hurried 
mind cannot grasp quickly. When the 
customer starts to ask questions, answer 
in a clear positive tone and with a con- 
vincing manner. Then, when the proper 
moment comes for closing the sale, ask 
a question that demands a positive an- 
swer, such as, 'Which do you prefer?' 
or 'Will you have it sent?' Try to 
close the sale tactfully. Never allow 




any expression on your face or in your 
voice that would make the customer 
think you were forcing her judgment. 
Don't say, 'This is just the thing for 
you.' 

Ability Not Judged by Salesbook 
"The firm makes allowance for a cer- 
tain number of exchanges and refunds 
but when they begin to come too fre- 
quently, I begin to question the capa- 
bility of the salespeople. We do not 
measure your ability by the number of 
transactions that appears on your sales- 
book but by the amount of actual profit 
you bring in to the firm. So. if you want 
to make a gain for yourself, you must 
make a gain for the firm. An alert 
wide-awake salesgirl, even in the toilet 
goods department, may make a $100 sale 
to a customer who comes in to buy an 
orange stick if she is thoroughly con- 
versant with her stock and takes pains 
to draw her customer's attention to it. 

"You should also try to suggest any 
new goods throughout the store, no mat- 
ter whether in your department or an- 
other. Try to keep in touch with the 
newest modes and know when the store 
has acquired some especially .fine mer- 
chandise. The new embroideries and 
voiles are now coming in; so are a num- 
ber of fascinating designs in printed 
georgette. Learn to call these designs 
by their names; such as Algerian, Per- 
sian, Egyptian and Pompadour pat- 
terns. 

"Never draw a long face when you 
see a customer approaching with an ex- 
change, credit or refund. You never 
know what's behind it. Always meet her 
with a gracious smile and listen to her 
request attentively, no matter how ab- 
surd it is — even, in fact, if the goods 
were bought five years ago." 

An Amusing Transaction 

Then followed an incident which ac- 
tually happened in a store with which 
Mrs. Belford had formerly been con- 
nected. 

"I was called to the adjusting bureau 
to settle a dispute between a customer 
and the manager. Now, Mr. Smith was 
perfectly capable of handling the case 
but I could see by the twinkle in his 
eye when I entered that there was some 
humor connected with it; and besides, 
often the introduction of a third party 
is able to smooth over a difficulty a 
little more tactfully. "What is the 
trouble, Madame?" I asked. "It is a 
suit of men's underwear that I wish a 
refund on." So I lifted the cover of the 
box and saw a suit of pure wool under- 
wear of very fine quality; but I knew by 
its make that it could not have been 
purchased in the store within the last 



46 



UKY liOODS REVIEW 



if these goods were bought here it must 
have been some time ago." 

"*Oh, yes,' she said, '1 guess it's near- 
ly six years now.' And then she told 
hex story: 'Yon see, shortly after 1 
bought them my husband died without 
having worn them at all. So I put them 
away in morphine, thinking perhaps I'd 
man-y again. Hut I didn't get married 
till just recently and then 1 found that 
they won't lit my husband.' Well, I just 
couldn't resist her. She was so Bincere; 
so we gave her credit for about one- 
third of what they eost, and the woman 
went away, so pleased with the store 
and its service that she recommended all 
her new husband's friends to shop there, 
which meant quite a bit as he was a 
prominent business man of the city 

Human Service Wanted 

"We don't wire how low your salcs- 
record is if we know that you have put 
forth every effort to serve your cus- 
tomers, for it will all come back to the 
store again in increased patronage. We 
want human service, not automatic. We 
could almost make a machine that could 
lift its arm to a shelf, take down a box 
and select a certain size, but we want 
an intelligent service that includes a 
knowledge of the goods and a pleasant 
friendly reception for every customer. 
We don't care if a hundred people come 
in this store simply to call on you; for 
it means that they are interested in the 
and keeping in touch with its ac- 
tivities. The story is told of how t.Tc 
Esquimaux were first taught the English 
language and how they first learned the 
meaning of the word 'good.' After 
several months it was thoroughly im- 
pressed on their intelligence and it pleas- 
ed them so immensely that they told all 
their relatives and friends and soon fami- 
lies were coming hundreds of miles to 
learn the meaning of the word 'good' 
Xow, we don't have to travel 500 miles 
by dog sled to acquire knowledge. We 
can «et ;:P we want sitting in an arm- 
chair in a warm, well-lip-hted room, and 
yet many of us neglect the opportunity." 

Message for 1920 
Then Mrs. Belford brought the lecture 
to a close with a direct appeal to her 
audience to improve themselves during 
the coming year by their own efforts. 



"YOU may make the \ear L920 ttl 
much or little." -In- said. "Time will 
work no miracles in your position unless 
you do youi part by increasing your 
efficiency. For to realize what the fu- 
ture holds for us, we must be able to 
look into the future and prepare for it, 
to visualize one's position weeks, months 
and years ahead. 

"We are quite sure of one thing. If 
we do not prepare for a successful future 
in the present by increasing our wealth 
of information, we will have only our- 
selves to blame when we find in future 
; i ars we are in the same slow stream, 
drifting with the tide, without an anchor 
or a future. 

"Our opportunities for study are al- 
most limitless. Day and evening schools 
niter to those who seek knowledge, the 
means of a liberal education. 

"Then why advance the argument of 
your length of service in seeking ad- 
vancement in position or salary? 

"Term of service. Very often it is the 
sole basis of a salesman's demands. They 
claim because the year 1919 has closed 
successfully with their firm they are en- 
titled to advancement. What an absurd 
claim unless you bring with your request 
a proof of better quality and service on 
your sales record for the year. 

"The man or woman who has improv- 
ed idle moments in acquiring informa- 
tion which they use consciously or un- 
consciously in their work, need have no 
fear. .Merchants are looking for such 
people eveiy day, with bright receptive 
minds, able to absorb, give out and put 
their thoughts into execution without be- 
in- prompted. THE PUBLIC TO-DAY 
WANTS SINCERE HUMAN SERVICE, 
NOT AUTOMATIC." 




Why Not Increase Your Business 
by Use of the Transfer? 



EVERY -tore, with more than one 
depa lor the handy, 

business-increasing transfer sys- 
tem. Merchants who have installed such 

;.it( that -ale-- were made that 

would not under ordinary circumstances 

have been secured by the store without 

i ■ . 

The transfer card is a simple form. 

Most stores ire the follow ;em: 

On each <ales check they stick a gum- 



med label which is attached to each 
transfer card in pad form and detached 
as needed. This card has the first line 
for the name and address of the pur- 
chaser. The second line is for the date 
ami number of the clerk starting the 
transfer. Then come ruled lines, each 
line being used for a department sale. 
For example, a customer makes a pur- 
chase. The sale is entered as follows: 



I (ep1 Amount 

Clerk 

To the sales check is attached a label 
as jnsl explained. Sales checks and 
goods are sent to the wrapping desk 
where the customer receives them in 
one package. 

Handel lin.thets, of Chicago, have the 
following to state in regard to their 
"transfer" system: 

Salespeople are requested to suggest 
to customers the use of transfer pur- 
chase tickets. 

State their advantages in a few words: 

But one payment for all purchases, 
on completion of shopping. 

The certainty of prompt delivery in 
one group of all articles purchased. 

Remember, too, the advantage to 
yourself and to your fellow employees, 
both selling and non-selling. They are, 
briefly, that: 

You don't have to handle money. 

The cashier does not have to make 
change. 

The delivery system is saved time and 
trouble. 

The adjustment bureau is much less 
likely to receive complaints. 

To give an idea of just what a transfer 
system is, John Wanamaker has on each 
floor of his New York and Philadelphia 
stores transfer sub-stations. Coming 
down to stores smaller, but as important 
in their locality, let us quote from the 
"store paper" of a coast town establish- 
ment, which states in a recent issue: 

"In speaking of the wonderful increase 
in business and improvements in the store 
service the past year, let us say a few 
words in regard to our transfer system. 
Our transfer business has increased pro- 
portionately as much as the business of 
any other department in this store and 
is growing every clay. We have estab- 
lished a record of nearly one and one- 
half minutes from the time customers 
pay the bill till the package is placed 
in their hands. The transfer system 
has been of great aid in building up the 
percentage in each and every depart- 
ment. It cannot be denied that a trans- 
fer customer buys more and goes away 
better satisfied than the one who makes 
innumerable purchases and tires herself 
waiting in each case for package and 
chancre. Our transfer customers are 
steady patrons of the store, composed 
of persons who have shopped the transfer 
way and found the advantage of this 
manner of shopping." 

Let us now quote from a house in 

Philadelphia. This concern each year 

holds a transfer contest with great suc- 

Following is the announcement 

of the contest. 

Cash I'ri/cs For Our Employees 

You can win a prize if you try. Con- 
test starts October 23, and continues till 
December 1. Prizes as follows: 
1st prize. To salesperson starting 
the greatest number of trans- 
fers $10.00 

2nd nrize. To the next th 

each 5.00.... 

3rd prize. To the next five, each 2.50 
4th prize. To the next five, each 1.00 
14 prizes. $42.50 in prizes. 



I 



^^J^J!^!^!^WJ!^!WJ[WJt®J^lWJ[^^ 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 

Recognized Authority of Canadian Dry Goods Trade 



Vol. XXXII 



TORONTO, FEBRUARY, 1920 



No. 2 



ilEfiffiTSlffgffrSlff^^ 



WHAT HAVE WE HERE? 

NOW. if ever, is the golden opportunity for the 
merchant to cash in on the "Made-in-Canada" 
slogan. DRY GOODS REVIEW has frequently 
?t.ated during past years, that such a slogan, based 
on sentiment purely, would not get the dealer any- 
where with the public. The consumer will buy 
what to him is best value regardless of where it is 
made, but now that he is fully aware of the added 
cost in good Canadian dollars of buying merchan- 
dise imported from countries where our money is 
at a discount it is not a difficult matter to point out 
to him why goods made in Canada should be advan- 
tageous for him to buy at present. The campaign 
should result, too, in acquainting consumers more 
intimately than before with the wide variety of 
goods which Canada is now producing and the con- 
sideration which these products really merit. 



SHOPPING EARLY ON SATURDAYS 

THE Clerks' Association in St. John, N. B., has 
gone on record in favor of appealing to the 
Women's Council, the Young Women's Patriotic As- 
sociation, the Trades and Labor Council and other 
bodies about the city with a view to having their 
members do their shopping before one o'clock on 
Saturdays. This is a good plan and one that will 
find favor with the dry goods merchants. There 
are hours on Saturday when there is a certain 
"slackness," and later on in the day there is a big 
rush. In spite of all that may be said and done there 
will always be this last-minute rush. It is human 
nature. But if some of the people can be got out 
early it will mean easier and better business. The 
"shop early" slogan has been used with some effect 
around the Christmas season, and it should be con- 
tained. Even though no heed is paid to the cry to 
"shop early," there is the suggestion of "shopping" 
in the call, and this in itself is good advertising. 



NO NEW YEAR DEPRESSION YET 

NOW that the trade has made its way safely 
through the clearance sales and stock-taking 
month of January and is well on its way into Feb- 
ruary with records that have gone splendidly over 
the top, its countenance has assumed a smile of con- 
fidence that bids fair to remain during the balance 
of the year. There were predictions that January 
and February would see price depressions and other 
omens of approaching hard times, but those mer- 
chants who kept themselves posted on the close 
scrutiny of the markets which DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW has afforded each month, went ahead with 
confidence and saved themselves any worry over 
"the troubles that do not happen." 

The trade generally is now looking forward to 
at least six months of the best business in their his- 
tory. True, a return of influenza is making some 
difference in certain of the larger centres, but the 
feeling is (hat there is an attitude on the part of the 
public generally to buy. and it is so pronounced as 
to herald prosperity throughout the trade in Canada. 



STUDY SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
^T^ HIS is the time of the year when every mer- 
-*- chant should be looking for ideas to supple- 
ment his general plans for the year. With Spring 
approaching the announcement of the presence of 
new goods in the most effective manner is a problem 
of no small importance. Throughout this issue will 
be found reproduction of advertisements which have 
been used by some of the best retail store advertisers 
in Canada and every one of them is worthy of study 
by both large and small stores. The layouts and 
•natter used are not the result of a hurried moment's 
scribbling but of careful thought on the part of 
people who know what it means to advertise well. 



I- 



Universal Demand Keeps Prices High 

The Drv (kx>ds Market Situation Past Month Sees No Declines. 



THE MARKETS AT A GLANCE 

TORONTO, Feb. 16 — While there have been 
no marked advances during the past month, 
the price tendency, wherever it has asserted 
itself, has been upward. Scarcity of goods, in- 
crease in prices and slow deliveries are a tale 
often told by retailer, wholesaler and manufac- 
turer; yet, they constitute the three outstanding 
features of the market to-day and are likely to 
for months to come. The trade is concerning 
itself more with getting goods than with the 
prices they are called upon to pay for them. 
Until production nearer approaches demand, 
this will continue to be the case. 

There has been a marked falling off in pur- 
chasing from the United States, due to the ex- 
change rate. Houses from across the line are 
feeling this and are sending their representa- 
tives here with offers to divide the exchange 
rate and to hold up payment for a period of six 
months. In spite of the exchange rate, how- 
ever, buying is being done in the United States 
of a number of lines not procurable from other 
sources. 

In all cotton lines, trade has been very brisk. 
English mills are filled up with orders and are 
refusing further bookings for the present year. 
This, with the high exchange rate, is making it 
difficult for Canadian buyers to get their sup- 
plies advantageously. English bleached sheet- 
ings took a jump of about 15 per cent, during 
the past month. 



In woolens, more English goods are finding 
their way to Canada in the last few weeks than 
during the previous eighteen months. Prices 
are advancing in accordance with the general 
trend of the whole dry goods market. Tremen- 
dous advances in French wool taffetas and gab- 
ardines are recorded. All Japanese silks have 
advanced in price. 

The linen situation is one of the most hope- 
less in all dry goods lines. No raw materials are 
coming forward and it is believed that all low 
lines will be off the market within three months, 
leaving only very high-priced materials for the 
trade. 

Some new French creations used for cover- 
ings and draperies have arrived in Canada, the 
first of their kind for five years. They are sell- 
ing to the trade at from $2.75 to $7.00 per yard 
and the quantities are limited. 

Canadian mills manufacturing carpets and 
rugs are filled up with orders for the remainder 
of the year and are refusing further business. 
Labor is hard to get and hours have been cut 
down to such an extent that it is impossible to 
turn out all the trade could use. 

In notions, there have been some slight ad- 
vances in certain lines. In laces and embroid- 
eries, conditions in England are such as to lend 
little encouragement to sufficient supplies or de- 
creasing prices. Mills are refusing further 
orders for the current year. 



WOOLENS 



More English Goods Coming — Big Ad- 
vance in French Wool Taffetas — Big 
Demand for Cotton Voiles 

While more English woolens are mak- 
ing their way into Canada, the supply 
is not nearly large enough to satisfy the 
trade. One wholesale house informed 
DRY GOODS REVIEW that more Eng- 
lish woolens had reached them (luring 
the last few weeks than during the whole 
previous eighteen months. Among the 
fancier lines that are coming in, theirs 
is the briskiest trade being done. They 
are seldom brought forward on the sales 
shelves of the wholesale houses but are 
sold out to buyers who have asked for 
deliveries of anything that is good. As 
in all other lines of dry goods, spot 
trade is excellent and the only complaint 
that wholesalers have is that they are 
unable to get all the goods that are 
wanted by the trade. Most of the houses 
have adopted the rationing system in 
woolens ;ind cottons. There are big re- 
tail houses which would gladly clear out 



the shelves of the largest wholesalers in 
business if they could get the goods. 

Prices have continued to advance and 
will probably go on advancing for some 
time yet. The opinion is expressed by 
men who have recently returned from 
England that prices are bound to go 
higher before there is a decline, and that 
they will never get down to where they 
were before the war. For instance, crepe 
de chine which sold at $1 in May last is 
now selling at $2.46. There are other 
advances more sensational than this. 
French wool taffetas that used to sell 
at 35 cents are now selling at $2.20; and 
gabardines that used to sell at frofh 
$1.10 to $1.25 are now going at $5.50. 

There is a lively trade in gabardines, 
whipchords, tricotines, serges, with a 
few fancy weaves of plain materials. 
There is a big demand in the dress goods 
lines for silk striped cotton voiles in 
different shades. Figured materials in 
these cotton voiles are also selling well. 
An indication of the advances in these 
lines is shown in some repeat orders, be- 
ing placed by wholesalers, which have 



advanced 50 per cent, from the time they 
were first ordered. All Japanese silks 
for dress materials have advanced 
rapidly. 

The amount of business being done 
with United States firms is reduced in 
quantity. Here, again, the exchange rate 
is largely affecting trade with houses 
on the other side of the border. To off- 
set this, business is drifting back to Eng- 
lish houses, wherever orders can be 
placed — business which was interrupted 
during the war. Wholesalers state that 
they are unable to get more than a small 
proportion of the quantities they would 
like, but believe the English houses are 
doing the best they can to fill Canadian 
orders. 

COTTONS 

American Houses Offering to Divide the 
Exchange Rate — Big Advance in Bleach- 
ed Sheetings — Deliveries Are I.ate 

An interesting development in the 
cotton merchandise, and in other lines as 
well, has developed during the last few 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



49 



weeks. American houses are sending 
their representatives to visit Canadian 
wholesalers, some of whom are offering 
to divide the exchange rate with the 
Canadian buyer. As the rate now stands, 
many American houses are losing all of 
their Canadian trade which is usually 
large in cotton goods and silks. The offer, 
of course, is in the nature of a "gentle- 
man's agreement"; but it has been made 
very frequently during the past few 
weeks. 

The demand being made on wholesalers 
for cotton goods of all descriptions is 
very heavy. An instance of it was fur- 
nished DRY GOODS REVIEW by one 
staple man in one of the large wholesale 
houses in Toronto who stated that he 
had made a complete turnover of his en- 
tire stock of staple cottons in a month. 

The buyers of all cotton goods are 
faced with many difficulties, just as the 
retailer is. English mills are refusifijj 
to take orders and the Canadian buyers 
are thus forced to place orders from o 
to 10 times as heavy from the United 
States as they were formerly in spite of 
the exchange rate. Orders for cotton 
goods placed months ago were on the 
basis of a 5 to 6 per cent, exchange rate; 
now it is 15 or 16 and houses have sold 
all their goods on this basis before they 
have paid for their own supplies, which 
will now have to be done at the existing 
exchange rate. 

Deliveries from Canadian mills are 
said to be very poor and it is urged by 
some buyers that the government should 
cut out the tariff on the raw materials 
so that the Canadian mills could get 
more with which to turn out the orders 
they have taken. Deliveries that were 
to have been made in July will not now 
come till October, according to the latest 
word received by wholesale houses. 

During the past month English bleach- 
ed sheeting has taken a jump of about 
15 per cent. All important sheetings 
have taken a similar advance. 

LINENS 

Only High-Grade Linens in Two or 

Three Months — Lower-Priced Lines 

Nearly All Off Market 

The disorganization of Russia and the 
reconstruction of Belgium will, for many 
months to come, have a profound effect 
upon the linen market. Until something 
approaching normal quantities are forth- 
coming from these two countries, it 
might be expected that prices will be 
high and that only high-priced lines will 
be available in limited quantities. A 
manufacturer's agent informed DRY 
GOODS REVIEW that, from present in- 
dications, there would be nothing but 
high-priced lines on the market within 
three months and that all the lower 
lines were now practically off the market. 
Or, as the buyer of a large wholesale 
house put it, "there isn't a linen market 
any more." 

Getting back to the mills, DRY 
GOODS REVIEW was informed that 
labor was being let out in a number of 
them because there was no material with 
which to go on. 



So far as prices are concerned, it may 
be expected that there will be advances 
on any lines that are offered for sale. 
The action of the British government, 
so agents in this country are informed, 
in virtually taking control of Irish flax 
by fixing the price may be considered to 
be the forerunner of an advance of about 
75 per cent, in price as this is the differ- 
ence between the Irish and the conti- 
nental price. 

In comparison with the world's needs, 
there will be a big scarcity this year. 
The outlook decidedly lends itself to 
higher prices and reduced lines. 

LACES AND 

EMBROIDERIES 

Conditions Becoming More Difficult — 

Prices Show Daily Advances — Belief 

That Highest Prices Have Not 

Yet Been Reached 

Advices reaching Canada from manu- 
facturers' agents who are now in Eng- 
land are to the effect that conditions are 
becoming more difficult all the time and 
that the level of high prices has not yet 
been reached. Nottingham mills are 
swamped with orders and practically 
have everything they can handle for the 
balance of the present year. Yarns are 
almost unobtainable and when they do 
get them there is the further difficulty 
at the mills. During the past five years, 
the machinery has fallen into dis-repair 
and so pressed are the manufacturers 
with orders that they do not like to take 
the time to put them in the proper con- 
dition. The information goes to show, 
however, that manufacturers are doing 
their best to meet the needs of their cus- 
tomers to the extent that they are ra- 
tioning them according to past business 
and are not taking fresh orders from 
new sources. 

Since the first of the year, there have 
been advances all along the line of about 
20 per cent, and the opinion is express- 
ed by one manufacturers' agent that the 
highest prices have not yet been reach- 
ed by one manufacturer's agent that the 
other than to say they will be according 
to conditions at time of delivery, and 
there are no guarantees given as to deli- 
veries. These conditions are common to 
all silk, wool and linen materials. Agents 
are advising the trade to cover them- 
selves as best they can for the next 
twelve months. All import orders from 
the middle of December have been can- 
celled. 

Spot business is very good. Laces, nets 
and malines are selling as fast as whole- 
salers can get them in stock. Some 
beautiful metal laces are being shown 
which have advanced in price consider- 
ably since December. One wholesaler, in 
cabling to England for some nine differ- 
ent lines in laces, was advised that the 
advances were from 35 to 80 per cent. 

Americans are making a very strong 
bid for some of the highest quality 
French creations. They are offering 
from 10 to 20 per cent, advance on prices 
offered from elsewhere. There are also 



a few quotations being received on Ger- 
man laces; advances run from 800 to 
1,000 per cent., due to the lack of raw 
materials. 

SILKS 

Japanese Market Recovering — Little 

Buying Going on in the U. S. — Spot 
and Placing Business Very Lively 

A slump in the Japanese raw silk mar- 
ket of about 20 per cent, within the last 
few weeks is beginning to show recovery, 
and during the last week there has been 
an increase of 5 per cent. There was a 
temporary lull in purchasing of raw silks 
due to the prospects of a bumper crop 
this year, but interests which have faith 
in the ultimate condition of the market 
are buying heavily again and the whole 
outlook is being stabilized. 

During the last month there has been 
a further advance in Swiss silks of about 
25 per cent. While considerable quanti- 
ties of Swiss silks are now arriving, the 
quantities are not nearly as large as 
could be easily handled here. Many of 
them are going out to the trade without 
the preliminary of arranging samples for 
display. Wholesalers state that spot 
business is all that they could hope for, 
and then some. Stocks of silks on the 
wholesalers' shelves are practically ex- 
hausted. Placing orders for fall are un- 
usually brisk. Ordinarily, these orders 
do not come in until the end of March 
but there has already been a big sale 
for fall. Retailers seem to realize fully 
that both quantities and prices will be 
scarcer and higher and they are getting 
all they possibly can, regardless of the 
prices being asked. Wholesalers state 
that they are not having the slightest 
difficulty in disposing of their stocks. 

Trade with houses across the line has 
become a problem. The exchange rate is 
making many lines prohibitive and along 
with it, the lines most wanted at any 
price are unavailable because of the 
home demand over there. The Swiss 
silks are relieving the situation for 
many of the local houses. These Swiss 
silks can now be landed in Toi-onto at 
the same price as they are quoted in 
New York because of the exchange 
situation. The duty is being saved in 
this way. 

Silk and cotton poplins have taken a 
big advance, so big, in fact, that there is 
little buying in them. Charmeuse silks 
are very strong, so are taffetas, pail- 
lette and duchess. All lines that can be 
procured are selling rapidly to the trade; 
some of the houses have been obliged to 
close down on busines because orders are 
so heavy and their own supplies are so 
light. One house informed DRY GOODS 
REVIEW that, for the first time in their 
history, a big Toronto retail house had 
actually "pleaded" to them for some cer- 
tain lines of silks which they especially 
wanted. 

Difficulty is being experienced in get- 
ting foreign silks because their mills 
have all the business they want right 
at their doors. One buyer expressed 
this condition by saying that thev were 
supplying Canada with just sufficient 
quantities to keep their trade. 



60 



DRY GOODS R I'- VI EW 



NOTIONS 



Slight Advance* in Seme Lints — Deli- 

\ cries Lata OB Combs — Further 
Advances Likel) 

While there have been only a few ad- 
vances in prices during the last month in 
notions, there is nothing to indicate a 
decline; in fact, the tendency is in the 
othei direction. Among notions, elastics 
have been about the hardest to get and 
have shown the most rapid advances. 
There seems to be some reason to expect 
that this situation may be a little eased 
off shortly, so far as available quanti- 
ties are concerned because a Hamilton 
firm is about to manufacture cotton elas- 
tics and have already shown samples and 
made large sales. An eight cord wide 
elastic laid down here will cost about 
and will have to sell for something 
over $8. A twelve cord is selling to 
the trade for about $8.40 but it may be 
expected that this will reach nearer $12 
before long. 

Pearl buttons in particular have shown 
sharp advances of about 50 per cent, and 
the scarcity of the better qualities has 
resulted in substitutes being largely 
used. The prices of all buttons are hold- 
ing fairly firm. 

The sale of combs has been very live- 
ly and manufacturers and wholesalers 
are getting many more orders than they 
are able to fill. Deliveries are about two 
months late and it seems next to im- 
possible to get supplies. Nothing under 
2~> cents is shown and prices go much 
higher for the better qualities. 

Needles are quoted at $7.20 per gross 
for standard packages of 15 needles tb 
each and are costing about $5 to import 
per gross. Celluloid needles for sweater 
knitting, 12 to 15 inches, are selling at 
from $2.25 to $3 per dozen pair. Wood- 
en needles in the large sizes are selling 
at from $1.25 to $3 per dozen pair. 

Hooks and eyes are quoted at $3 per 
gross cards; dome fasteners at $4 per 
gross cards with the roll back and hand- 
selected at $8.40 per gross. Safety pins 
are $4.50 per gross a dozen to the card 
and brass safety pins at $9 per gross. 

Crochet cottons are higher and are now 
selling to the trade at $2.25 per dozen. 
There are some very nice shades in mer- 
cerized crochet cotton selling to the 
trade at about 40 cents per ball. Mend- 
inir yarns are selling well but the Eng- 
lish skeins are still very hard to get. 
Two and a half gram skeins of the Eng- 
lish yarns are quoted at $9.60 per gross. 
Canadian yarns arc selling well and are 
quoted at $7.20 for the skeins and $4.50 
for the cards. 

DRAPERIES 

AND CURTAINS 

French Coverings and Tapestries Have 

Arrived — Further Advances in Velours 

— Some Improvement in Delis cries 

A line of French creations is on the 

market for the first time in five years. 

of coverings and draperies 

in brocades and the shades are in rose. 

blues and greens. It is not expected that 



they are going to last very long, for 
there is a brisk market for all new goods 
in tapestries and coverings. The prices 
quoted to the trade are from $2.75 to 
$7.00. 

During the past month, there was a 
further advance in velours of from 15 
to 30 per cent., according to the differ- 
ent qualities. Manufacturers are ex- 
periencing an increasing difficulty in get- 
ting yarns. Deliveries are improving 
somewhat. Whereas, houses were send- 
ing out their representatives who could 
not guarantee any deliveries or prices, 
they are now in a better position and can 
give some definite information to the 
trade regarding prices and deliveries. 

As yet, there are no French velours to 
be had. The opinion was expressed to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW by one buyer 
that there would not likely be any of 
these on the market yet for a period of 
two years at least. Canadian velours 
still continue to sell well. 



BOOTS AND SHOES 

General Advance in January Prices — 

Tendency is Toward Higher Prices — 

Black Shoes Being Worn More 

During the month of January there 
was a general advance in the price of 
shoes, an advance which will apply to 
fall deliveries. There is a tendency, 
though not a marked one, toward the 
higher-priced shoes. Spot prices are re- 
maining quite firm with the exception 
of the very fine kid, and there is likely 
to be further rapid advances in these 
lines. 

There is a somewhat noticeable trend 
toward black shoes again. If London is 
to be the style-setting centre of the 
world in this respect, then there will be 
a change in the near future to the black 
shoes again. Over there, they are giving 
up the tan shoes nearly altogether, but 
the tendency on this side of the water at 
the present time is not nearly so 
marked. 

There has been, during the last few- 
weeks, a lively trade in patent leather 
pumps and oxfords. Patent leather 
promises to be stronger for spring than 
for some time. 

CARPETS AND RUGS 

Mills Sold Up Until the End of the Year 

— Labor Scarce — Further Increases 

in Prices 

The story of carpets and rugs is a 
very simple one. The whole problem is 
to produce the orders that are booked 
and, as a matter of fact, according to 
manufacturers' agents, this is impos- 
sible. The skilled labor required for this 
class of work is hard to get and harder 
to train, and the mill owners are at the 
mercy of the laborers. Content with the 
money they are able to earn in short 
days, they come and go at will with the 
result that the Canadian mills arc ui 
able to work up all the yarns they could 
get from English and Scotch sources. 
Practicallv all Canadian mills are book- 



ed with orders to the end of the year 
and are accepting no more. One agent 
informed DRY GOODS REVIEW that 
he had just refused an order for the 
delivery of $10,000 worth of rugs be- 
cause he could not get them from the 
mills. 

On the first of December, there was 
an advance of 5 per cent, on nearly all 
lines. During January, there has been 
a further advance of 10 per cent. 



MODELS SHOWN 
AT NEW YORK 
FOR YEAR 1920 

Ulsterettes Dominate Exhibit — Over- 
coats and Sack Coats in Double- 
P.reasted Models — Some Novelties 

Some of the features of the style 
exhibit at the International Association 
of Clothing Designers' convention held 
in New York in January are described 
in "Men's Wear" as follows: 

Ulsterettes dominated the exhibit. 
For the most part there were three- 
button models, belted, and carrying but 
little from the models sold during the 
current season. Sack coats shown were 
mostly of a semi-form fitting model, 
about 31 inches long, but the extreme 
waist line model was not among the ex- 
hibits. Only an occasional high point 
lapel was seen. The exhibit of sack 
coats was composed mostly of two and 
three-button, double-breasted models, 
and some one-button models were shown. 
No display of evening clothes was made. 
A limited display of boy's clothing dis- 
closed no radical departure from cur- 
rent styles. 

An ulsterette, which attracted the at- 
tention and favorable comment of the 
visitors, was a three-button model having 
two breast pockets with lapels and two 
slash side pockets. It had an inverted 
pleat to waist. A revere from each 
shoulder to the bottom contained ten 
rows of stitching as did the flaps on 
pockets and the belt. 

A novelty that occasioned interest 
was a three-button ulsterette with flap 
patch pockets. It had leather buttons 
throughout, its two-piece belt in the 
back being finished off with two leather 
buttons and the cuffs were likewise 
trimmed with two leather buttons each. 
Its belt drew the garment somewhat 
tight against the form. It had a deep 
vent to the waist. Practically all of 
the overcoats and most of the sack 
coats were double-breasted models and 
deep vents characterized nearly all of 
the exhibits. Most of the ulsters had 
soft roll collars, which buttoned to the 
second button. The color in which these 
models were shown was mostly brown, 
with a fair number of dark grays. Cuffs 
were seen on most of the ulsters, al- 
though some overcoats were displayed 
which had the vent cuff. 



Dry Goods Review 



51 



Fashions the World Over, 

London, Paris, America 

New Creations Hark Back to the Days of Queen Victoria and the Year 1830 — Military Discip- 
line Shown in Paris Styles — Chesterfields Strong in Hyde Park — American Styles 

Becoming More Conservative. 



SINCE that fateful day, in August, 
1914, fashionable men the world over 
in whose veins good, red blood ran, 
have been devoting their energies to war 
and after- the-war problems. In patent 
leather shoes and mufti suits, the cream 
of France's manhood shouldered the 
musket, and, with a wave of the hand 
and a smile on his lips, bade good-bye 
to wife, mother, sister, and sweetheart. 
With a set of the jaw and a hard glint 
in his eye, England's aristocracy buckled 
on his armor, knowing that a big job 
was ahead of him, but determined to for- 
sake Hyde Park and the fashionable set 
until that job was finished. The Cana- 
dian, who is known as one of the best- 
dressed men in the world : donned his 
khaki uniform instead of the natty suit, 



corset coats and other fancy garments in 
the United States, the styles there are 
drifting back to more conservative lines, 
thought being given to the necessity of 
conserving materials so difficult to pro- 
cure. Next Fall will see some changes in 
suitings in Canada, also looking to a 
more conservative style. 

Vogue in Old London 

In London, Chesterfields are more to 
the liking of the Englishman than the 
loose Raglan. Velvet as a trimming for 
the collars and cuffs is being largely 
used. With the top hat, the younger set 
are wearing the frock overcoat, more 
tight-fitting than heretofore. The morn- 
ing suit with very full skirt very much 
like those worn in the days of Queen Vic- 



the loose, Belgian shoulder; or he wears 
a double-breasted overcoat, buttoning on 
the right, and with a belt made of the 
same material. It follows the line of his 
figure in drapery. Chesterfields are 
worn also, the skirt of which drapes in 
toward the knees. The Frenchman's suit 
is close-fitting, and whether it be lounge, 
morning or evening clothes, the sleeves 
are tight. Trousers are worn short, and 
spats, better made and closer fitting than 
any other spat in the world, are worn 
everywhere in a wide variety of colors. 
Evening clothes worn in France are very 
beautiful. A graceful curve shows the 
white line of the waistcoat, and the 
sleeves are adorned with a silk cuff that 
matches short revers. The tails of the 
coat hug the figure. 




The Campbell Manufacturing Co., of 
Montreal, submitted two models at the 
recent convention of designers held at 
the Mc Alpine Hotel, New York, which 
were awarded merits. One of these 
models, a front and rear view of 
which are shown in the accompanying 
pliotographs, shows one trend of the 
Fall and Winter fashions for 1920. 
A glance at the two views shown will 
indicate the snug-fitting, ultra-fash- 
ionable appearance of this particular 
model. Attention is drawn to the 
high-waist ed, form-fitting coat, the 
full skirt and the slit, bell-shaped 
coat cuff. 




and did his bit. "Sammy." from across 
the line, shut his eyes to those extremes 
in dress to which he is a devotee, and 
helped to form the last great army to 
cross the Atlantic to fight the German 
menace. 

And now it is all over. Some of the 
immediate after-the-war problems have 
been settled. With the new age that is 
dawning after such a world-upheaval, 
new styles are emerging. London is see- 
ing some of the styles that prevailed 
during the days of Queen Victoria. Paris 
is looking still further back into history, 
and creations that graced the Bois away 
back in 1830 are again seeing the light 
of day and the brilliance of the Parisian 
night. Having seen the extremes in 



toria, has made its appearance in Hyde 
Park; there were the same side pockets 
on the waistline and the ticket pocket at 
the right hand. The white tie and the 
spike-tailed coat are being worn in the 
evening very largely. Evening clothes 
worn in London show that great atten- 
tion is being paid to line the same as is 
done with those of the fairer sex. 

In Gny Taree 

The Frenchman, having lived the mili- 
tary life for five years, re-enters civilian 
life with military discipline and dress, 
leaving a noticeable influence on his 
garments. His overcoat is built after 
the style of the cavalry officer, with 
plenty of drapery about the skirt and 



The extreme style of form -fitting 
trousers with frills on the ankle, and 
shirts with lace collars and cuffs, similar 
to those worn away back in 1830, will be 
shown; it remains to be seen whether it 
will be adopted by the smart set. There 
will be a cloak about the length of the 
claw-hammer coat, and around the ankles 
of the trousers there will be a shirred 
border. The colors will be dark blue, 
grey, prune color, dark wine, and rusty 
brown. 

American Styles 

The difficulty of getting fine-grade 

cloths for gentlemen's suitings may have 

a radical effect upon coming styles in 

both the United States and Canada. 

CContinued on page 52) 



M E N 



WEAB SECTION 



STYLE TENDENCIES OE 1920 

SG^T-sa ;:: is-steuttssz srftr ttsa 

which was adopted was as follows:— 

1920 Style Forecast 

The report in full follows: — 

"Tendency for sack coats is longer in length, liberal chest and shoulder 

■"^WrySS :!v:^aT <i n i ; i ld P wTrfr,oose, draped effects, especially of 

- Young men's three-button sack. Length, 30% inches Medium shoulder 
Narrow notched lapel, regular pockets, narrow flaps Medium Width sleeve 
finished with vent and three buttons. Body, semi-form fitting with ■ ™"™ 
hips Twelve-inch hook vent. Medium low gorge Pockets, 9% inches below 
hreast line Lower button on line with lower pocket. . 

"3 Young men's two-button sack. Length, 31 inches. Shou der, 5 inches. 
Semi-peaked lapels. Regular flap pockets. Sleeves roomy at elbow, tapering 
t wrFst with open vent finished with three buttons. Body slender lines; deeded 
chert effeVt Seam back, no vent. Low gorge. Pockets, 9% inches below breast 
line Lower button, 2% inches above pocket. Nearly straight front, boldly 
rounded corners, clinging hip effect. inches Shoulder 

"4 Young men's extreme two-button sack. Length, 31 % inches, bnouiaer 
:, inches Narrow notched lapel. Low gorge. Welt or piped pockets^ Sleeves 
roomy at elbow, tapering to wrist with open vent finished with three buttons. 
Body slender lines, decided chest effect. Seam back, n ° J? n ^ J°'af fVont 
inches below breast line, lower button 3 inches above pocket. Cutaway front, 
extremely rounded corners, clinging hip effect. „„„„„,) 

"5 Young men's three-button double-breasted sack. Soft roll to second 
button 31 inch™ long. Shoulders, 5 inches wide. Half peaked lapel medium 
width low gorge Flip pockets. Sleeves roomy at elbows, tapering to wrists 
v fh open v^ finished with three buttons Body slender lines decided chest 
effect. Seam back, no vent. Pockets, 9% inches below breast line. Lower 
button opposite pocket. Clinging hip effect. 

"There is a tendency in young men's trousers toward bell bottom effects. 
"Waistcoats-Single-breasted, no collar, 14-inch opening; 5 button, length, 

"V to*2£JE££l overcoat. Length, 42 inches. Velvet collar. Regular 
pockets.^er^ bac ^^ breasted _ form _ fitting overcoat. Forty-one inches long. 
Hook' vent. Regular pockets. Sleeve open vent and no button. Collar optional. 

"8 Young men's three-button, double-breasted overcoat Forty inches long. 
Soft roll to second button. Notched lapel, medium width. Low gorge. Regular 
pockets. Body slender lines, decided chest effect deep hook vent. 

"9 Ulsterette. Three button, double-breasted. Forty-three inches ong. 
Body'slender lines, decided cfhest effect. Belt optional. Flap or patched pockets, 

deC »10°°Mtn's 1, ulster. Three or four button, double-breasted. Forty-eight 
inches long. Patch pockets with flaps, muff pockets optional. Two-piece back 
belt with two buttons. Plain vent, sleeves finished with tab and two buttons. 
"11 English raglan. Three buttons, double-breasted. Length, 46 inches. 
Large patch pockets. One or two-piece sleeves. Deep armhole. Belt all around 

" •'l*> UC Ra C glan ulsterette. Three-button. Double-breasted. Three-quarter belt 
or belt all around with buckle. Slanting or patch pockets. Inverted pleat at 
centre of back. Three-piece sleeve. Length, 43 inches. _ fc „„ M „ 

"13 Slip-on overcoat. Length, 43% inches. Four and one-half inch shoulder. 
Rnlit sleeve finished with cuff Low armhole. Full skirt. Coat has patch pocKets. 
No vent." 

Chalk Lines for Fall 

Blues With Varying Widths of Stripes Are Selling Well— Demand 

for Finer Suitings— Canadian Mills Are Turning Out 

Some Nice Lines — Prices Firmer. 



Dry Goods Review 

are new creations that would never have 
been accepted before the war, creations 
that are entirely cotton, and yet sell as 
high as $4 and $5 a yard. 

Chalk lines, varying in width, are sell- 
ing very well for next Fall. They are 
shown in a large variety of widths in a 
blue cloth of high-grade quality. Scotch 
tweeds with a Saxony finish art also be- 
ing shown in a wide ranee. These are 
cloths from British houses. 

The Canadian mills are turning out 
some very nice materials in browns, 
olives and purple mixtures. The stripe 
is prominent in them with an over-check. 
These are in the fine worsted material, 
and travellers state that there is a brisk 
sale for them amongst the retailers who 
have seen them. 

The trade will find that the trimmings 
of the modern suit are to be reckoned 
with in the making of a suit. During 
the last month there have been two ad- 
vances in haircloth. Canvas has also 
taken a big jump in the last month, 
^limmings for a suit that used to cost 
about $3 will now cost about $9. 



TRAVELLERS who are out on the 
road with Fall goods in overcoats 
and suitings say that the trade is 
picking up the newer creations very 
quickly. Although they are not seeing a 
full range of samples because the whole- 
salers themselves have received only in- 
complete deliveries of their orders, they 
are buying just the same and taking the 
traveller's "say so" for a part of the 
order they are placing. Wholesalers sat 
that the orders they have placed with 
British houses are coming in two and 
three pieces at a time instead of as or- 



dered. Much of their stuff is coming in 
by express. 

Prices being asked are firmer than 
they were a year ago. While there is 
an advance in all lines, the advance in 
tweeds is not as great as that in blues 
and other plain cloths of high-grade 
quality. At the same time, it is an in- 
structive lesson to see the tremendous 
advances that have been made during the 
last five years. A worsted suiting, all 
wool, that used to sell to the trade at 
$2.25 or $2.50 a yard, now runs up to 
between $8.25 and $10.50 a yard. There 



FASHIONS THE WORLD OVEK 

(Continued from page 49) 
Europe's needs must be supplied first, 
and manufacturers of clothing are find- 
ing it hard to get all the materials they 
want. It is probable that a serious 
effort will be made to come nearer a 
standardization in men's clothing, elim- 
inating as much as possible extreme 
styles that require extra time and labor 
to create. Accompanying this, will be an 
effort to conserve materials. The cuff 
on the sleeve and the trousers may go, 
thus conserving much material. Can- 
adian designers who have recently re- 
turned from the convention in New York 
state that the coming fall season in suit- 
ings will be more conservative. Coats 
will be a trifle longer and not so shapely 
as they have been for some seasons. At 
the same time, the waist line will be 
dropped a little. On the other hand, some 
ultra-fashionable styles are being shown 
with high waist-line and pinch backs. The 
need of greater production is liable to 
affect styles considerably in all lines of 
men's wear. Ties are getting narrower, 
shirts have less color in them, hats with 
narrower brims are the vogue for the 
coming season. But the prices of all 
lines show no inclination to decline. 

COTTON GROWING IN QUEENS- 
LAND 

Owing to the high price of cotton 
special efforts are being made to en- 
courage the growth of cotton in Queens- 
land, "and the Agricultural Department 
has distributed large quantities of seed 
to intending "rowers. In the northern 
portions o' Australia there are very 
large areas of land suitable for grow- 
ing purposes, but the cost of labor is a 
serious obstacle to combat. Many ef- 
forts have been made to develop the in- 
dustry, and it has been proved possible 
to grow the highest quality of cotton. 

Experiments are now being made with 
a machine for picking cotton and, it is 
stated, have been successful. 



Dry Goods Review 



53 



Roman Stripes and Bars in Ties; 

Floral Designs Also Being Shown 

Nothing Startlingly New in Spring Neckwear — Scarcity of Silk Brings Narrower Shapes — 
Swiss Silks Shown in Better Qualities Than American — Buyers Get Short Quanti- 
ties in New York — Buying Retail for Manufacture. 



AMONG the new creations in neck- 
wear for the Easter trade, stripes 
and floral designs will take a 
prominent place. The whole neckwear 
outlook for the present year does not 
promise anything' startlingly new. The 
market for silks is strictly limited; and 
both styles and designs in ties will be 
very much dependent upon the quanti- 
ties of silks that manufacturers are able 
to get, rather than the particular kinds 
they would like to get. Both the manu- 
facturer and the jobber are not worry- 
ing one whit about getting rid of their 
goods; their worry consists of wonder- 
ing how they can get what they want 
either to make up into ties or to sell to 
the retailer. 

Educating the Public 

"We are going to try to educate the 
people to wear narrower ties," said one 
manufacturei to DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW, "because of the scarcity of silks. 
If men want wider ties they will have 
to pay the price for them. We have 
a standard size; wider than that will 
mean $2.00 a dozen more, and if a man 
takes the narrower one he can get i 
for $2.00 a dozen less." Inasmuch, there- 
fore, as there do not appear to be any 
very distinctive styles or notions for 
the coming seasons, the l'etailer is pretty 
safe in booking what appeals to him for 
the particular community in which he 
does business. 

As indicated in last month's DRY 
GOODS REVIEW, ties are to be nar- 
rower. Ties shown at Easter will be 
narrower than those that have been on 
the market for some months past; 
withal, there will not be a radical 
change. All lines of men's wear this 
year, be it a suit of clothes, a necktie, 
a hat, a shirt, or what not, promise to 
be more than ordinarily conservative on 
account of more attention being paid to 
production than fancies. 

Will Conserve Silk 

By cutting ties narrower, vast quan- 
tities of silk will be saved. The Ameri- 
can styles are even more radical in this 
respect that the Canadian promise to 
be. Some of their creations for Easter 
will run as narrow as 3% inches at the 
bottom. The narrowest tie being shown 
by one house is 4 inches at the bottom. 
Their standard tie is 5% inches; and the 
widest one will be 6 inches at the bot- 
tom. The prices of these ties will range 
from $13.50 to $36.00 a dozen. The 
range is large in stripes and floral de- 
signs in all colors, among which are 



some beautiful blendings. After Easter, 
foulards and polka dots will come in 
rather strong. 

In case foulards do not come, provi- 
sion has been made by one manufacturer 
to use American dress goods silks. These 
will make up into ties selling from 
$12.00 a dozen up, but they are all in 
stripes. There are many colors, but 
only the stripe is shown in design. 

Deliveries of silks to be made up into 
neckwear are very slow. DRY GOODS 
REVIEW was informed by one maker 
that silks ordered a year ago had just 
arrived the middle of January. All de- 
liveries seem to be from two to four 
months behind scheduled time. Price 
tendency is to stay up. and any repeats 
that are being booked are considerably 
in advance of the original order. In 
the case of Switzerland, for instance, 
where silks for nockwear are largely 
procured, the Government has declared 
that forty-four hours constitute a 
week's work. It used to be fifty-six 
hours, then it went down to forty- 
eight. With the working week forty- 
four hours, it is not difficult to under- 
stand why deliveries are being delayed. 

Buyers who have recently returned 
from New York, where they sought silks 
for manufacturing into ties, come hack 
with but scanty success. One buyer 
showed a representative of DRY 
GOODS REVIEW a creation that had 
its origin in the Alabama cotton fields 
and was woven on silk looms. It used 
tj make up into a tie that sold to the 
consumer at 25 cents; it will now sell 
at not less than $1.00 and more likely 
$1.25. As the demand is for the better 
goods, this buyer thinks that the sale 
of these ties will be very slow. Other 
silks that were formerly bought in New 
York at 82% cents are now $3.25 net at 
New York. 

Mr. Milne, of the Wm. Milne Com- 
pany, states that silks in New York have 
advanced nearly one hundred per cent, 
in the last few months, since October. 
Stripes, he says, are coming in strong 
again and the shapes wil be decidedly 
uarrower than they were. The necessity 
for so conserving silk that a tie at a 
reasonably popular price may be put 
on the market is, he says, the cause for 
this. Knitted ties in New York are as 
narrow as 1% inches, and while he does 
not think they will get so narrow here, 
he believes that by Easter there will be 
a marked difference in the styles being 
shown. Roman stripes are good, so are 
plain bars. Mr. Milne stated that he be- 
lieved he was very fortunate in New 



York in getting the silks he wanted; he 
got about 20 per cent, of what he ex- 
pected to get. 

As an evidence of the way in which 
the retail trade is buying, Mr. Milne 
stated that he had put a bunch of 
samples out on the road on a Monday 
and had called them in on Thursday, 
because they were all sold out. There 
is a line out at $10.50, but the more 
popular line in the cheaper grades is 
$12.50 to $13.50. 

Mr. Cannon, of the A. T. Reid Co., 
Ltd., states that the materials being 
shown in New York for ties are of a 
poor quality in the grades that go to 
make a popular-priced tie. He showed 
DRY GOODS REVIEW a silk sent 
from New York at $21.00 a yard that 
looked very poor ir. comparison with 
Swiss creations at $24.00 that were de- 
cidedly good in quality and design. Mr. 
Cannon believes that the Swiss silks 
will soon be coming to the relief of the 
trade here, and that, although prices will 
be very high, the qualities will be much 
better in the Swiss creations. He re- 
ports that houses offering their silks 
for sale in New York were sorry they 
did not ask more for them, as they 
would have had no difficulty in getting 
them. 

According to Mr. Cannon, the day of 
novelties is passed — at least for some 
time to come. No more can the manu- 
facturer ask for certain designs and 
fancy creations for particular seasons — 
he takes what he can get and he gets 
what somebody wants to let him have. 
Stripes, he says, are very good and ties 
are narrower. Ties being shown in New 
York in the wider shapes are the cheaper 
lines while the better lines are the nar- 
rower ties. This will be followed here. 

This house also reports trade very 
active among the retailers. Mr. Cannon 
said they had bought 60 ranges for ties 
in two cloths, 30 in each cloth. They 
were sent four samples in each iinc and 
they went on the road with these 
samples, explaining to the trade that 
there would be 26 other ranges, the 
selection of which would be left open. 
In spite of this, they have sold very 
quickly. 

An interesting case has come to the 
notice of DRY GOODS REVIEW. A 
certain tie manufacturer went to a large 
retail establishment in Toronto and 
bought $5,000 worth of silk over the 
counter for ties. It seems that this was 
the only way — and the cheapest way — 
he could get what ho wanted. 



:>4 



-M E N s \\ EAR SECTION 



Dry Goods Review 




Have you placed your order for 

Carhartt Overalls 



Orders should be placed now if 
delivery is expected in sixty days. 
Raw materials and finished goods 
still continue to be scarce and are 
likely to be for a long time to come. 
Make sure of your needs by ordering 
now. 



Hamilton Carhartt Cotton Mills, Limited 

Toronto Montreal Winnipeg Vancouver 
Manufacturers of Carhartt Overalls, Allovers and Work Gloves 




They Stand the 

"Wear" Test 

Once Tried — Always Worn 

IN 1920 there will be a stronger demand than ever for 
Canadian goods. "TAPATCO" Gloves are Canadian. No 
need to sell imported goods, when you can get a Canadian 
article so good as this. 

"TAPATCO" Gloves are made for the hardest wear. 
Farmers — Engineers — Mechanics — Lumbermen and Railway- 
men, all appreciate TAPATCO Gloves. 

Order from your jobber now. 



I'HIS is a line that kn- IJinK 

ear 'round 
and make both friends and profit for every 
; chant n4u We make 

Gloves for all rat-door and indoor wort 
Gloves that arc widely recognized aa i 
se^ • me quality-— Gloves that en- 

■ i> m to the wearer and "re- 
r the Dealer. 

Made by The 

American Pad & Textile 
Company 

CHATHAM, ONTARIO 



GLOVES & MITTS 

STYLES— Gauntlet, Knit Wrist and Band Top. 

WEIGHTS — Heavy, Medium or Light. 

Also Leather Tip and Leather Faced Gloves, Jersey 
Gloves and Mitts in Tan, Slate or Oxford. 



Dry Goods Review 



MEN'S WEAR SECTION 



ft RT CLOTHES 



COCK STOS. E>- 



'&\ 



/qLL^M LiMiTen 



MADE TO MEASURE 



CONTINGENCIES 

If you are preparing to-day for the contingencies of to- 
morrow, this will interest you. 

Did you lose sales on account of late deliveries last season? 
Have you a big stock of unseasonable clothing on hand that 
must be sold at a loss, or carried until next Fall? 

Deliveries of piece goods will be more serious this Spring 
than last year. 

We cannot too strongly emphasize the advantages of a 
Special Order Department. 

You can eliminate to a very great extent the possibility of 
"Losing Sales," "Carrying Over Stock," and do more busi- 
ness on "Less Capital," with less risk and no worry. 

You can secure the very best trade in your locality with a 
range of samples representing our Two Hundred and Fifty 
Thousand Dollar ($250,000.00) Stock of high-class woolens, 
and what's more, every sale you make will increase your 
prestige. "ART CLOTHES" are high class in every 
respect. 

We anticipate extra big business this year, and have made 
every possible preparation both in purchases and produc- 
tion. 

There are a few sets of samples to be placed in good hands 
where we are not already represented. 

"WE SOLICIT INQUIRIES" 

Better Write or Wire to-day 

Cook: Bros, fc Allen* 

Wholesale Tailors 



55 

r 




TORONTO 



56 



Dry Goods Review 




£d$e?v ftanvxjuJiPaJiid 




Paris, France, 

January, 1920. 

EDITOR, DRY GOODS REVIEW: 
From what I hear, and from what 
1 have seen so far in the novelties 
of materials to be used next Summer, it 
appears that we shall have plenty of 
highly-colored stuffs; there will be dif- 
ferent shades, all very bright, seen on 
one piece of material, whether it be 
wool, light silk fabric, sueh as ninon or 
crepe, satin, taffetas, or any of the cot- 
ton fabrics used in Summer garments. 

Plain materials will be used for tailor- 
ed costumes, and we shall see some silk 
serge, silk gabardine, silk tricotine, and 
all the ribbed materials usually made in 
wool, Shantung and Tussor, plain and 
in every shade, seem to be favored. 

Taffetas will have a large place in 
the dresses next Summer, and we shall 
see it, either in several shades — "came- 
leon," as we call it here — or with pom- 
padour designs, and regular narrow 
stripes. 

(becks will be seen on "faille." in one 
or two showy shades, such as blue or 
red. 

In the collection of which I am sending 
you samples, you will notice that there 
are hardly any dots. At least they are 
not the regular moon we saw last year. 
They are longer, or they are replaced by 
squares, or lozences of large size. Ex- 
cent on taffetas, there are very few ex- 
amples of stripes regularly drawn, but 
some crooked lines in every side, 
<•- pecially in Foulard. 

This is going to be one of the leading 
Summer materials. Some people even 
think that, as satin will be scarce, we 
may have to use foulard for linings. In 
any event, its vogue for Summer dresses 
is sure to grow, for it started last year 
already. 

Satins are very seldom plain, except 
in broche. Otherwise you have some big 
designs quite up to date, as we shall 
see below, or ancient looking, such ^s 
cashmere. We might see some oi this 
next season, for. already you can see in 
the big drv goods stores some embroid- 
ered shawls whose fashion may return. 
Here, they often use satin moire, 
which gives a softer hue to the printed 
designs. Printed Shantune, to be used 
in connection with a plain one. is to 1- 
looked upon too. as the shades are verv 
soft, and pastel-like, and ought to 

ladv who does not dare to wear 
gaudy colors. 

Resille Effects Novel 
Another novelty is as follows: 
\ piece of ninon, whose ground is grey 
or white, has some black ) rintings which 



LATEST FASHION HINTS 
FROM PARIS 

Paris revels in many novelty 
materials for Spring and Sum- 
mer. 

Highly-colored fabrics for 
Summer. Many colors com* 
Lined in wool, silk and cotton. 

Heavy silks in wool weaves 
for tailored costumes. Raw 
sdlks strong. 

Taffetas verv popular, es- 
pecially cameleon (shot) ef- 
fect-, pompadour designs, etc. 

Poulards good', but none of 

plain spot Or dot patterns. 

Revival of fancy satins. 
Lace and veiling patterns 
printed on silk- a oovelty for 

Summer frocks. 

Pastel blue a fashionable 
-hade. 

Flounces and frills much in 
evidence. 



represent either the lozenges of real net, 
or the squares of filet lace, with black 
patches to imitate the embroidery on 
these "resilles." You can obtain with 
them some dresses for the seaside, de- 
vised in every conceivable manner; the 
skirt plain with the band piinted at the 
bottom, which makes it look like lace, 
and the bodice similarly worked for in- 
stance, or the whole of the dress with 
that "resille," which is quite as nice. 

If the present fashion does not wear 
out quickly, we ought to see by the side 
of gaudy shades, many combinations of 
black and white; at the present moment, 
black is the note of elegancy in all even- 
ing garments, whether in velvet or in 
Charmeuse. 

The following samples will illustrate 
the above prognostics: No. 1 shows you 
how crepe de Chine is printed this sea- 
son: all these samples have a dull ground; 
whether it be pastel blue, a very fashion- 
able shade, by the way, in plain stuff, 
or beige, grey, gold, mauve, none is 
showy, but the printed motifs make up 
for the plainness of the ground; every- 
where there, you may have some flowers, 
strange in shape, and stranger in shades, 
yel neat, on account of the combination 
of the colors. One sample even shows a 
fruit, which might be a melon, for what 



I know. 1 would not use them for whole 
garments, but I could very well see them 
showing up a dress of plain crepe in the 
shade of the ground. One should be 
careful in choosing the color, though, 
for they are rather unique and would 
not suit any complexion. 

No. 2. — Here we have some specimens 
of ninon, white ground with stripes that 
make checks and oblong dots. The 
colors are very bright there. 

No. o— Also ninon is a good pattern 
of "camoufled" material; the ground, 
white originally, has received a fair 
amount of painting, of all shades, which 
effect is not bad at all, and blouses of 
this stuff might be a success in the full 
Summer. 

No. 3.— A sample of schappe silk, 
where the square idea is developed all 
alone. Chemisier blouses, or white 
blouses with a collar, revers, cuffs and a 
shirt front would look neat under a 
tailored costume. Children's dresses 
would also be comfortable. 

No. 4.— A decidedly "art nouveau" de- 
sign, both in colors and shapes, although 
gaudy at first look, is not bad, and would 
be very effective, as lining on the Sum- 
mer garments we shall wear at the 
Casino, either at the seaside or at water- 
ing places. 

The same applies to No. 5, whose 
colors, although different, give the same 
appearance. 

No. 6.— More steady, although rather 
bright, would be found very useful for 
home adornments, for its regular de- 
signs are quite fit for furniture trim- 
mings. For linings, if veiled with plain 
ninon, it would be effective. 

No. 7 is less showy in color, but very 
elaborate in design, for that big blue 
rose with make it suitable for big ob- 
jects. 

No. 8 is one out of several curious 
specimens of printed stuffs where sub- 
jects are devised. There, we see a couple 
walking under the trees. Somewhere 
else. I saw a piper playing under a 
bush while a marquis, dressed like a 
real marquis of the 17th century, 
dances with his lady. And there are 
many similar instances worked on satin, 
or more often on ninon, where the hues 
are softer and lighter. « 

Last of all, I will show you three pat- 
terns of foulard, which you will agree 
with me, ought to find a ready sale 
evervwhere. 

No. 9 is a mixture of stripes and ob- 
lono- dots: it is not verv showy, yet not 
dull, on account of the brown stripe, 
which p-events it from hem* a mourninc 
cloth. It ought to be fashionable, for it 
will suit every figure; the stripes and 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



57 



those dots of a particular shape will 
make the lady who will wear a dress of ' 
that material look thin if she is rather 
stout, and if she is not, she will look 
taller, and she can always remedy her 
slimness by having some flounces or 
frills which, as I have told you pre- 
viously, will be the vogue. If she is too 
stout to wear flounces, she can have it 
pleated, and the effect will be none the 
worse for it. 

No. 10 will be the uniform for elderly 
ladies, although it may make them look 



a bit stout. Still it is rather original 
with its irregular black dots, with a 
tinge of white, here and there. 

As to No. 11, I am sure all girls will 
fancy it, for the shade is very youthful 
looking, not gaudy, yet not dull and 
those irregular stripes, which I mention 
above, make the whole look uncommon 
and nice. Besides, it is modest and no 
mother will object to any Summer dress 
in this material, which, of course, can 
be made in all shades of ground. 

Yours very truly, 





Paris Silks 



an extra fine grade. Such women are 
the despair of salespeople, besides be- 
ing next to helpless themselves. The 
schools should teach children textiles 
and their comparative values. Since 
they don't, at least not here, the stores 
will have to." 

The first class under Miss Marston 
was attended by 200 little girls between 
the ages of 5 and 12 years. 

A table full of remnants, so short 
as r,o be worthless for selling, was put 
^t the disposal of the children, who 
were allowed to choose anything they 
wished to make into dolls dresses. 
After choice had been made each was 
instructed by an expert saleswoman as 
to texture, quality, and value of the 
piece of goods. Comparisons were made 
between fabrics and the suitableness of 
the material discussed. 



(Described in accompanying' letter] 
Nos. 1 are printed crepe de chines. Nos. 2 and 3 are georgettes. No. 4 a close "pussy- 
willow" weave. Nos. 5, 6, 7 and 8 are printed satins. Nos. 9, 10 and 11 are foulards. Sent 
direct to Dry Goods Review from Paris, France. 



Training the Customers of 
To-morrow 

The department stores of Omaha, 
Neb., have started a systematic campaign 
to educate the coming generation of wo- 
men customers in the texture, value and 
quality of fabrics, by inaugurating dolls' 
sewing classes for little cirls. 

Miss Mary Marston, manager of the 
dress and suit department o ? one of 



the largest department stores, was the 
originator of the idea. 

"Women are the buyers for every 
family," says Miss Marston, "and as 
such they should know values. Women 
who know values are not only eood b'iv- 
ers for themselves, but they make good 
customers for the store. All too few 
women nowadays know materials. They 
cannot tell the difference between a 
fair grade of serge, for instance, and 



WILL CONSIDER 
FOUNDATION OF 
TEXTILE SCHOOL 

Definite Plans Will Be Laid Before On- 
tario and Quebec Governments 

The Textile Foundation of Canada held 
a meeting at the Queen's Hotel, Toronto, 
on January 15th, the main object of 
which was to discuss the possibility and 
advisability of establishing a textile 
school in Canada. Col. L. W. Gill, Direc- 
tor of Technical Education of the Dom- 
inion Department of Labor, addressed 
the meeting and pointed out that what 
aid was given would be given through 
the provincial channels and he urged the 
Foundation to present a clear-cut and 
definite program. Col. Gill is of the 
opinion that favorable consideration 
would be given an appeal for aid by the 
education authorities. This point was 
further elaborated by Dr. F. Merchant, 
Director of Technical Education for the 
Province .of Ontario, who explained 
under what conditions a provincial 
grant would be made. 

As a result of the deliberation, a rep- 
resentative committee was appointed to 
formulate a definite plan to place before 
the governments, both in Ontario and 
Quebec. 

Those present included the following: 
Thomas Hepburn, Preston; H. Quarm- 
ley, Guelph, Ont.; D. V. Pannabaker, 
Hespeler, Ont.: O. F. Kironac, Warwick, 
Que.; F. H. Yapp. Hamilton, Ont.; T. 
P. Webster, E. S. Bates and C. A. Rey- 
nolds, Montreal; H. G. Smith, Hamilton, 
Ont.; J. W. Worth, Peterboro, Ont.; J. 
M. Lalor, Toronto; A. Burnton, London, 
Ont.; J. J. Harpell, Ste. Anne's, Que.; 
C. W. Bates, Carleton Place, Ont., presi- 
dent of the Canadian Textile Institute. 
President Bates was in the chair. 

There are days when old fashions are 
making their reappearance. King Al- 
fonso of Spain recently attended a so- 
cial function wearing a purple-colored 
dress suit. Knee breeches and buckled 
shoes have made their appearance in Old 
London recently, too. Why shouldn't 
men show their calves ? 



58 



Dry Goods Review 



Taffetas to be Strong for Spring 

Browns and Blues are the Best Colors — No Improvement in the Raw Silk Situation- 
Dealers Differ on Buying Policies. 



SPRING is just about here and with 
it will come your customers asking 
for more and more silks of all sorts, 
but ofteneet for georgettes, taffetas, 
charmeuses, shirtings and crepe de 
(hints. It is believed that taffeta will 
most probably be the leading silk fabric. 
Its dull ClispneSS generally does prove 
attractive after the satiny stuffs that 
have been worn during the winter sea- 
son, and its practicability for late Spring 
suits is easily acknowledged. 

As for colors, the demand seems to be 
for browns but it is expected that it will 
swing round to navy blue. Even now, 
the latter is a close second. After these 
come Belgium and Copenhagen blues, 
tans, taupes, black and plum. 

Georgettes are wanted largely in the 
two-thread construction and crepe de 
Chines in the medium grades although 
there is a certain number of calls for 
the four-thread variety. 

Importers Trying to Look Ahead 
Prices on raw silk, and consequently 
on broad silks have not yet begun to 
show any inclination to quit increasing. 
They are already two and a half times 
pre-war value and about 100 per cent, 
higher than last June. In fact, quota- 
tions are now around $19 a pound. Trade 
is still good; but importers have their 
spy glasses out and are trying hard to 
see into the future and know just when 
that period of depression is going to 
come which some people have been pre- 
dicting since the beginning of the war. 
One Yokohama firm wrote in November 
that thev expected the "slump"' in Jan- 
uarv or 'February of 1920. But every- 
one' knows that this prediction has not 
been fulfilled and, according to several 
men in close touch with the trade is not 
liable to be fulfilled even during the 
ent year. 
It is not expected that any change 
can be effected in the prevalent exag- 
gerated demand and scarcity of goods 
until the consumer yets to the point 
where he can no longer afford to pay the 
increased prices and will therefore be 
compelled to substitute cotton. That 
this condition is approaching is evidenced 
by the fact that one shirt factory which 
has, since the war. beer, making little 
else but silk shirts, has given them up 
entirely and is now buying nothing but 

•<>n. 

\- things are at present, prices are 
moving in a circle. Factorv operators 
who have contracted the h; bit of wear- 
ilk underwear and Georgette blouses 
insist on hie] for them. 

when the manufacturer must pnv 
^jph i 9 more money for his 

And as the nrnduct goes up in 
e workers find the "cost of 
living" increasing and h;. k for 

more wa| 



Trying to Increase Production 
The situation in broad silks, of course, 
hinges on the price of raw silk, and there 
is no prospect of this coming down until 
the output is increased. Eflorts are be- 
ing made to encourage the industry in 
China, but the crop last year was only 
20 per cent, normal owing to the bad 
weather. A movement is on foot 
amongst Chinese manufacturers to form 
an association for the purpose of en- 
couraging and protecting the industry. 
This movement has been stimulated by 
the recent contribution of $5,000 from 
the American Silk Association. It wilJ 
however, be a matter of several years 
before anything definite can be effected 
along these lines, especially in China 
where the industry has not approached 
the scientific basis upon which it is es- 
tablished in Japan. 

How to Buy 

One dealer would advise retailers to 
buy as much broad silks as they can get, 
for prices are going to continue to rise 
as far as one is able to see. Another 
would suggest that they buy no more 
than is necessary to stock their shelves 
for that is what the importer is also 
tloing in order to reduce losses to a mini- 
mum when the period of depression ar- 
rives which seems to be so surely ex- 



pected. The matter must be settled 
finally by the conditions which prevail in 
the dealer's own locality and the amount 
of stock which he already has to offer. 

One of the largest Toronto buyers sent 
an order to New York for $2,500 worth 
of novelty silks to supplement his earlier 
orders and could get absolutely none. 
He also ordered 25 pieces of Georgette 
crepe and had to be satisfied with two 
pieces. This buyer states decisively that 
prices cannot come down because every- 
one is buying and placing orders at high 
figures for 1921 as well as for this year. 



Mr. Dall, of the Dall Real Lace Com- 
pany, Vancouver, has left for China and 
Japan. It is stated that the lace mak- 
ers in the Orient, from which markets 
this company receives many of its laces, 
are going into the manufacture of veil- 
ing and netting, evidently finding the 
latter more profitable than the hand- 
made lace. The hand-made laces are, of 
course, made in the homes of the people 
— in most cases, the entire product of 
the district being sold to local merchants 
for cash. The Dall Real Lace Company 
have recently extended their field to in- 
clude manufactured lingerie featuring 
their lace, and at present have fifty 
operatives working in a modern factory. 




€> 




iiN'^* 



Fancy Georgettes For IQ20 

1. Salmon pink with silver (white artificial silk) stripes called scaspra>. Shown 
l>\ I'eljrram At Meyer, New York. 2. An olive green ground is here enlivened bj ■ 
mysterious pattern in white, cerise and purple. Shown bj Carl Schoen Silk Corp 
.'i. Peacock blue with goM silk stripes, from K. II. Mallinson & Co. I. Navy with 
silver stripes. 5. Vi\\ with tan floral motif and na\ \ stripes. These two are from 
Weissenbach & Kay, Inc. 6. The shell pink ground here makes a delicate setting for 
the lace] fern pattern in navy. Shown by l{. H. Mallinson's. New- York. 



Dry Goods Review 



59 



Raw Silk Holdings Large? 

Said to be $250,000,000 of Raw Silk on New York Market — Claim That Japan is Curtailing 

Production in Order to Boost Prices. 



SPEAKING of the holdings on the 
raw silk market, the New York 
"Journal of Commerce" states: 

"The recent applications for ad- 
ditional insurance cover on raw silk 
gave rise to animated discussion in silk 
circles regarding the amount of raw 
goods now in warehosues in this city. 
About six weeks ago, it was estimated 
that the value of raw silk stored in 
various warehouses reached the total of 
$250,000,000. It was estimated by well- 
informed persons that the approximate 
value of raw silk is in the neighborhood 
of $300,000,000. 

"One of the interesting features in 
connection with the numerous applica- 
tions for insurance coverage is the fact 
that cancellations have been very mod- 
erate. This is due to the silk being sent 
into the markets for manufacturing pur- 
poses, but it is pointed out by the in- 
surance experts that the amount con- 
celled has been more than made up by 
the new coverage applications. 

"When the story of the vast silk hold- 
ings in this city was originally publish- 
ed, there were many denials on the part 
of raw silk dealers that stocks were 
being held for higher prices. The silk 
men denied emphatically that they were 
hoarding stocks, but the matter assumed 
such a peculiar aspect that the Depart- 
ment of Justice in Washington consider- 
ed making investigation. It was said 
at the time that the manufacturers were 
perfectly willing to pay high prices for 
the raw goods, because they passed it on 
to the consumer. 

"While it was practically impossible 
to secure a thoroughly accurate idea of 
the amount of stocks in the warehouses, 
inquiry in the insurance district revealed 
that approximately $250,000,000 of in- 
surance was being carried on raw silk. 
The silk dealers, who asserted that this 
was not the case, declined to say how 
much, in their opinion, the value of the 
stocks was, but they made a general 
statement that the value of the supplies 
in question was not anywhere within 
the $250,000,000 mark. 

Amount Very Large 

"From reliable sources it was learned 
that the amount of raw silk in ware- 
houses is very large and is constantly in- 
creasing instead of diminishing. It was 
said by one authority that he believed 
New York held the largest stocks of 
raw silk in the world. He added that, in 
his judgment, the stocks in the ware- 
houses in this city were far greater than 
the visible supplies in the Yokohama 
primary markets. 

"PhiliD Sturm, an American business 
man, who has been doing business in 
Yokohama a long time and who is now 
in this country on a visit, declared that 
the Yokohama interests were aware of 



the tremendous demand for silk in this 
country and were curtailing production; 
in fact, doing everything they could to 
keep up prices. 

" 'There has been a good deal of talk 
in Yokohama regarding high silk prices 
in this country,' said Mr. Sturm, 'and 
while I do not desire to go into details, 
there is no doubt in my mind that prices 
are being maintained as the result of 
lessened production.' 

"The demand for raw silk in this 
country has never been greater, accord- 
ing to experts, and importers and deal- 
ers are apparently in close touch with 
the situation, for prices have constant- 
ly shown an upward tendency. A silk 
importer who declined to permit the 
use of his name, but who admitted that 
he had large stocks on hand in two ware- 
houses in this city, said: 

Reason for High Prices 

" 'It's a purely economic proposition. 
Of course, the Japanese in the primary 
markets are familiar with the situation 
here. You don't suppose for a moment 
that they are going to throw large stocks 
on the market. They are asking and 
getting higher prices. The raw snk 
dealer is obliged to raise his prices to 
the manufacturer, and the consumer, 
that is, the man who wants silk ties, 
shirts, underwear and other silk articles 
of apparel, appears to be perfectly will- 
ing to stand his share of the rise.' 

"While not a single raw silk dealer 
would admit that the Yokohama mark- 
ets are being manipulated, there is a 
well denned belief in trade circles that 
considerable manipulation has been go- 
ing on. It is felt that the Japanese are 
responsible in a large measure for the 
rise in prices, and it is pointed out that 



prices in Yokohama have been firm right 
along. It is argued that stocks in the 
primary markets are extremely low and 
that no effort is being made to increase 
production. 

"The insurance market for raw silk in 
New York is closed. The companies 
have taken on all that they can, and 
those brokers who are seeking additional 
coverage are having a hard time of it, 
it is reported. The same situation ob- 
tains in London. The cancellations have 
been insignificant as compared with the 
applications that have poured into the 
insurance market. 

"Recently two large steamers carry- 
ing silk cargoes arrived in San Francis- 
co. The silk was divided up into ship- 
ments for as many trains, so as to dissi- 
pate any impression that might arise re- 
garding large silk holdings. One of tfie 
leading raw silk importing firms in thfs 
country, which until recently had $2,000,- 
000 of raw silk in the Hudson Terminal 
warehouses is known to have acquired 
additional stocks which are now occupy- 
; n"- two entire cellars in these ware- 
houses." 



The employees and travellers of Ham- 
bly & Wilson, wholesale fancy goods, 
Toronto, were entertained by the firm in 
an original manner at the Hotel Mos- 
sop on January 20. Seven professional 
entertainers were in attendance and be- 
sides a banquet, a bonus was given to 
all connected with the firm. 



Miss A. Laughlin, of Hambly & Wil- 
son, Toronto, has returned after spend- 
ing six weeks in New York. 




The Season s 
Foulards 



i. 



white twill 



Navy and 
foulard. 

2. Sand and Victory blue. 

3. Navy and champagne 
satin-face foulard. 

4. Navy and white fine 
twill. 

5. Sand and pussy-willow 
weave with red and blue 
pattern — for lining. 

No. 4 is from H. R. Mallin- 
son & Co. The others are 
Doucette prints from Weis- 
senbach & Kay, Inc. 



60 



Dry Goods Review 



Agreeable Disappointment in Woolen Prices 

First Fall Quotations Do Not Show as Great an Advance as Was Expected -- Yet One 

Line of Serge Jumps From $3.85 to $6.62' _> 



NEW YORK. Some Blight consola- 
tion is found by buyers in woolen 
goods at the opening prices of 

the American Woolen Company for Fall 
1920, which have just been announced. 
This consolation consists in the fact that 

the advances for Fall, although very 
high as compare, I with the prices for 
the fall of 1919, yet are not as high as 

were expected. In other words, the 

trade might be said to have been "agree- 
ably disappointed." 

This does not mean that prices in 
woolens have not advanced. On the con- 
trary, in a great many lines they are up 
from 60 to 70 and as high as 75 per 
cent, over those of one year ago. In 
these lines it may be said, as in many 
others during the past year or so, that 
only now will the public begin to realize 
the real advances that have taken place 
in woolen goods. The American Woolen 
Company which owns over 50 mills is 
regarded in many respects as the basic 
information for the opening of each sea- 
son. The company is offering several 
times as large an allotment for next 
Fall as it did for last Spring. The offer- 
ings for Spring were cut down to a 
fraction of theii normal extent owing 
to the fact that the company visaed 
once for all to shut up on future orders 
so that they did not accept any more 
business than they could possibly cover 
in the regular Spring season of 1920. 
This leaves them comparatively free 
fo>- accepting business for next Fall. 
This includes a fairly large allotment 
for their Canadian customers as well. 

Adxance of 50 Per Cent, on Coarser 
Lines 

Prices in general seem lower on the 
coarser wools than on the finer. In a 
9-our.ce serge, a price of $2.25 per yard 
compared with $1.50 a year ago or 
ail advance of only 50 per cent, from the 
previous year. In cotton worsteds and 
all worsted fancy suitings, prices nmge 
from $1.50 to $7.50 a yard as compared 
with prices last year ranging from $1.10 
and $2. SO. In woolen and cotton fabrics, 
including suitings and coatings, prices 
range: For suitings, between $^.05 and 
07; overcoatings, $2.65 to $C>.40; flan- 
nels, kerseys, friezes, $2.S2' 2 to $5.55, 
while last year the range was between 
$1.32'- and $:'..:<.">. Other woolen and 
worsted fabric prices range, in the case 
from $3.60 to $10.50, and 
rcoatings from *S to $10, while last 
tin range was $1.95 to $5.27%. In 
. of Berge the price advance 
J2.37% to $3.97%. 
In broadcloth: Hark colors, advancing 
from $2.20 to $3.37%, while in light 
colors a certain line advanced from 
12% to $3.62%. 
In lustone. dark colors, advanced 
from $2.20 last year to $3.50, whereas 



in light colors the advance was from 
1.75. 

Export Business 

A representative of the company stated 
to DRY GOODS REVIEW that they 
were not attempting to do an export 
business with England, although there 
was a temporary strong demand. Their 
idea was that they would develop busi- 
ness in countries like South America, 
Holland, Norway and Sweden and some 
Eastern countries where there was a 
prospect of permanent business. At the 
present time, export business to Europe 
is rendered very difficult by reasons of 
the exchange situation, and the difficulty 
of providing credits, but the company, 
which is formed into the American Wool- 
en Products Company for export busi- 
ness, expected very soon that some ar- 
rangements would be made with large 
houses bringing in goods from Russia, 
for instance, and selling woolen goods 
from various mills in the United States 
against these shipments. 



barriers. Buc now, these objections 
been removed and girls are being 
brought over from Ireland as fast as 
housing accommodations can be secured 
(Or them here. These Irish colleens ap- 
pear to a bright, cheerful lot who sing 
and laugh while they work around the 
reels and clean out the "wet-spinning" 
machines. 

Yarns spun here range anywhere 
from 12 to 60 lee which is the finest 
being produced. Since this Canadian 
spun yarn is little more than " a drop in 
the bucket" towards meeting the linen 
demand, there is bound to be every en- 
couragement for the development of the 
industry in this country, and it is hoped 
some real relief will be afforded in the 
not distant future. 



ADVANCE OF 20' I 

ON LINENS 

The past month has been no slacker 
in maintaining its part in the rise of 
linens. An advance of 20 per cent, went 
into force in January and' Irish manu- 
facturers cabled that no more orders 
were to be taken after January until 
further notice. An additional advance 
is expected the first of March. When 
demand is strong enough and goods 
scarce enough that the trade is paying 
$13.25 for towels which before the war 
were $3.5 a dozen, there is no likelihood 
of prices receding until something hap- 
pens to equalize more nearly the sup- 
ply and demand. 

The Canadian linen industry is forg- 
ing ahead with more business than it 
can possibly take care of, despite the 
fact that success seems to be attending 
all the operations from flax growing to 
weaving and marketing. 

It's just the thin-edge of the wedge — 
the amount of real Canadian linen that 
is on the market at present. But there 
is little doubt that the quantity is going 
to become more noticeable inside of a 
few years. Every year the acreage de- 
voted to flax-growing is being increased 
and although the labor for flax-pulling 
is more expensive than in the old coun- 
trv. H has almost come to be settled 
condition now that "linen at any price" 
is marketable. 

The difficulty felt in producing Can- 
adian spun yarns is that of securing ex- 
perienced help. A few handfuls of skill- 
ed workers were brought over during 
last vear ami then for several months 
the immigration authorities intei 



BOARD OI TRADE ANNOl NCE- 

MENT— BRITISH DYE PURCHASES 

IN GERMANY 

With reference to the paragraphs 

whicn appeared in a number ol news- 
papers on the ^2nd .January, relative to 
British dye purchases in Germany, the 
Board of Trade announce tnat there are 
some important inaccuracies in the 
statements made. The committee men- 
tioned in the paragraphs in question was 
selected by the color-using nades and is 
acting on their behalf and not on be- 
half of the Board of Trade, and the 
British Government is not responsible 
for the finance of the purchases. The 
action taken is, however, with the full 
knowledge and approval of the Board of 
Trade. It may be added that the quanti- 
ty of dyes to which British users are en- 
titled under the reparation clauses of 
the Peace Treaty will probably be sub- 
stantially in excess ol the 1,500 tons 
stated, but the purchases now being 
made will be in addition to whatever 
amount may be received under the Peace 

Treatv. 

♦ 

LONDON STORE ENLARGES 

T. F. Kingsmill, London, Ont., has 
erected a new three-storey building, 380 
ft. long by 80 ft. wide, next to the drj 
goods store, which will provide double 
the former store space. The ground 
floors are all made into one. A splendid 
furniture section is being arranged and 
enlarged space given to dry goods; car- 
pets and rugs, which have always been 
a special feature, will all be in the new 

building. 

♦ ■ 

Silver Bros., manufacturing furriers, 
Montreal, I re doubling the capacity of 
their factory by taking possession of a 
flat in the New Sommer Building, now in 
course of erection adjoining the pi 
Sommer Building. Mayor Street, Mont- 
real. 



Dry Goods Review 



61 



Shelves Are Bare in France 

Stocks Gone, Production Low and Mills Sold Up — Orders Must be Placed Months Ahead- 
Paris Girls Do Not Wear Thin Georgette Blouses — They Like Short Skirts — A 
Letter From France Concerning Canada. 



DRY GOODS REVIEW has received 
the following letter from Mr. H. 
B. Gagnereau, who, representing 
one of the large silk manufacturing con- 
cerns in France, paid a visit to Canada 
last Fall and contemplates a return trip 
to this country in May. In a note added, 
Mr. Gagnereau wishes to protest strong- 
ly against the reports of some buyers in 
both Canada and the United States de- 
precating the importance of Paris' world 
fashion influence as compared with her 
place a few years ago. It is ridiculous, 
he believes, that the generations of study 
which have given France her leadership 
in that field should not be able to main- 
tain her importance for her in the face 
of the activities of novices for a few 
seasons. There is no such thing in 
France as a costume manufacturer, he 
says. Every garment is a creation and 
made by hands that love to create. 

Mr. Gagnereau enumerates some of 
the difficulties and the assets characteriz- 
ing French industry and while some 
members of the trade may take excep- 
tion to one or two of the points mention- 
ed, the letter is nevertheless of interest 
from the Frenchman's point of view. 

Editor, DRY GOODS REVIEW:— 
You have asked me what have been my 
impressions about the Canadian trade 
from my recent trip to Canada. I will 
try to summarize a few of them, which 
I think, will be valuable to your readers 
and the retail trade in particular. 

I must say at once that a great op- 
portunity is still open in Canada where 
so many resources can be found. I have 
no doubt that with peace Canada is go- 
ing to experience prosperity unknown 
heretofore. 

The very first subject I would deal 
with and which is particularly acute for 
French and even British goods is the 
rate of exchange at which we pay duties 
for imported goods. According to the 
decision of the Governor in Council, the 
franc is not depreciated and therefore 
we pay duties on the rate of .193 cents 
whilst the franc is really worth 10 cents. 
The queerest thing in the present mat- 
ter is that we pay at the British Con- 
sulate in France the Consul's fee at the 
depreciated rate to have the invoices 
legalized, so that the currencies have not 
the same value on both sides of the 
water. 

I quite understand that the Canadian 
Government may be in need of money as 
are all the nations who were engaged in 
this war; however, we in France have 
suffered particularly more than anybody 
else and therefore are anxious to re- 
cover. 

The depreciation of the franc favors 
our export business and this is the only 



way to obtain the balance which would 
bring the value of the franc to its old 
rate; however, our prices are high on 
account of this depreciation and there- 
fore, if we do not pay the duties on the 
real value of the franc, we are handi- 
capped towards other nations which are 
in a better position. We believe that all 
importers and retail stores must have 
felt this abnormal situation, and I am 
surprised that our Canadian friends 
should not adopt the policy of the neigh- 
boring country, the U. S. A., where we 
pay the duties at the prevailing rate of 
exchange the day the goods are shipped. 

French Novelty Silks Liked 

Regarding the silk situation, I have 
found that we had lost quite a consider- 
able ground during the war owing to 
Japanese conditions. However, silk is 
scarce in Japan as everywhere else and 
they cannot sell much cheaper than we 
do. Furthermore, during all my visits 
to the retail trade, the feeling is one of 
poor satisfaction with Japanese goods 
which, as a rule, have not been delivered 
up to sample. Furthermore, even with 
all the progress of Japan, they have not 
been able to produce yet any silk goods 
finished in the standard of French goods. 
Loading in Japan is unknown and you 
seldom find a cheap crepe de Chine which 
does not slip. 

In fancy novelties, they are not yet 
ready to produce anything like we do in 
France. 

Conditions on this side are about what 
they were six months ago with stocks 




all gone, production very slow with the 
48 hours' week and demand tremendous 
from all countries. Silk is as scarce as 
anywhere else and prices will keep high 
for quite a long time on account of the 
demand. Buyers should not hesitate to 
place their orders as early as they can in 
order to obtain delivery and as soon as 
they have the opportunity, for some- 
times they even have not this oppor- 
tunity, manufacturers being sold out for 
months to come. 

Paris Girls Prefer Crepe de Chine for 
Blouses 

In plain silks, there are no particular 
fabrics to mention as being new, spe- 
cially, in popular prices; the favor on 
this side is more for crepe de Chine 
than for Georgette as is the case in 
Canada. Something strange to write 
and especially for your market is that, 
if the French girl wears short skirts and 
may therefore show her ankles, she will 
never wear such transparent blouses 
made of Georgette as I found in Canada 
and the United States, particularly in 
the popular and medium classes. 

Prints are also very strong; however, 
some of them are not suitable yet for 
the Canadian market. I mean the mo- 
dern designs in bright colorings; some 
very pretty floral effects are seen, how- 
ever, and for underwear dainty designs 
can be found. An article nearly un- 
known in Canada is silk voile Triple, 
triple both ways, which will make beauti- 
ful underwear as strong as any other 
material. 

I trust that Canadian buyers will not 
be frightened by prices on this side as 
they certainly bear in mind that when 
they pay for an article 10 francs, it is 
only worth for the seller half of this and 
the people at home are the only ones 
who suffer from this state of things. 

I will close in mentioning and praising 
the hospitality and welcome I was grant- 
ed during my visit and have no doubt 
that the friendship between both nations 
will develop as strong in time of peace 
as in the war. 



An informal Spring opening took place 
at Stanley Mills & Company, Hamilton, 
on February 7. The opening included 
millinery and ready-to-wear. The store 
will not have any formal openings, but 
the Spring goods will be shown con- 
tinually from now on. Some special mer- 
chandise will be shown, of course, in 
time for Easter. A number of stores are 
adopting this plan this year, thereby en- 
deavoring to create a "12-months" sale 
of wearing apparel rather than centre 
it on two or even four seasons. 



62 



DRESS FABRICS 



Dry Goods Revieu 




When In New York City 

Visit 285 4th Ave. 



(Ground Floor) 



And Inspect 



The Pine Tree Silk Line 

Huge Assortments for Immediate Delivery 



FOULARDS 
WASH SATINS 
TUB SHIRTINGS 
SPORT SATINS 
(plain and fancy) 



TAFFETAS 
MESS A LINES 
CHARMEUSE 
CREPE DE CHINES 
CREPE METEORS 



WOVEN JERSEY SILKS 



THE PINE TREE SILK MILLS CO. 



285 4th Ave., NEW YORK 

SILK MILLS, PHILADELPHIA 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



63 




Canadian Money 

Canadian Made 

Should be Spent 
in Canada 

For Canadian 
Trade. 



We are advertising this 
trade mar\ from 
Coast to Coast 

Telling the good housewife 
that the cotton which bears 
this mark is the best of 
cotton and cheapest in the 
long run. 

Link your effort with ours 
and secure the benefit that 
will accrue from the in- 
creased sale of Prue Cot- 
tons. 



DOMINION TEXTILE CO., LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 






i» 1: !■: s> !•■ \ ii in cs 



Dry Goods Review 



# 



Mark Fisher Sons & Co 

Important Information 

from two of our live 

departments 



SILKS 

New Spring Silks 

that are and will be 

Wanted 

Cable Knit French Silks 
Richer than the heaviest 

Tricotine 
Now in stock, in Black, 
Ivory and popular shades, 
also 
Cameleon Poplins 
With a wondrous sheen — 
the fabric so much in de- 
mand by the smartest 
makers-up. 



LINENS 

Our buyer has just returned from the 
Kuropean markets where he has, de- 
spite the great scarcity of all linen 
goods, .succeeded in securing some 
excellent lines, goods that will be 
appreciated by our customers and 
friends. 

"Kingfisher" Brand 

Scalloped and hemstitched Table 
Cloths and Napkins, Tray Cloths," 
Tea Cloths^ Scarves, etc. 

STAPLES 

Crashes, huckabacks., terries, while 
and colored; mercerized damask-, 
linen damasks, linen table cloths 
and napkins: English hath towels, 
white and colored. 

"SNOWCREST" 

Madapolams, Longcloths, sheets and 

pillow cases. 



We would 9tronglj advise all our customers bo buy now 
as the next six months of the present, year will be a critical 
period owing to the absolute scarcity of all classes of merchan- 
dise. 



MARK FISHER SONS & CO. 

Fine Woollens, Silks, Tailors* Trimmings, Linens 

28 VICTORIA SQUARE MONTREAL 



70 Bay St. 
TORONTO 



286 and 290 McDermott Ave. 
WINNIPEG 



420 Cordova St. 
VANCOUVER 



-Ml Mollis St. 93-99 Germain St. Booth Bldfi., Sparks St. Lister Chamber 5 Duffield Block 

HALIFAX ST. JOHN OTTAWA HAMILTON LONDON, Ont. 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



65 



% 



MALLINSQNH 

SILK WEEKT 

^Mafphl st ta0 u mp 



will be the most notable event in silk sales history 

Coming at a period when Fashion decrees, more 
emphatically than ever, the popularity of silks for 
Spring and Summer outdooring, it offers a unique 
opportunity for profitable linking-up with wide- 
spread publicity of the internationally famous 

MALLINSONC 

1 1 Silks de Luxe O 

Already many of the leading retailers of the country have 
decided upon a close co-operation during all of that week. 

"Mallinson Silk Week" is a characteristic feature of the 
constant thought we give to co-operation with retailer and 
garment manufacturer. 

Mallinson methods insure profitable growth, and 
popularity to handlers of Mallinson Silks over the 

counter and in ready-to-wear fashioned 

in these unusual, original silks. 



S 



H. R. MALLINSON & COMPANY, Inc. 

"The Nezc Silks First" 

New York: Madison Ave. 31st Street. Chicago: 923 
Postal Telegraph Bids. Montreal: ">16 New Birks BIcIk'. 
Mallinson Silks are featured in Skirts manufactured 
by W. C. Bland. Montreal. 



66 



D R K S S FABRICS 



Dry Goods Review 





PRING 



( %**mf4«(i js&ggg r M 







TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY VANCOUVER 



SILKS, LIMITED 

100 Wellington St. West 
Toronto 



1920 EASTER GREETINGS 

We have to offer to the Trade 



■ 




Georgette Crepes 








Paillettes 








Taffetas 






Swiss and 


Duchess Satins 
Charmeuse Satins 




\ 


French 
Manufacture 


Messahne 






All Colors 


Tricolette 








Crepe de Chines 


I 




Everything in Black 


Silks 


at all 


pric 


es 





NOVELTIES Shot Chiffon Taffetas, beautiful floral 
Foulards, all colors, Novelty Kimono and lining Satins. 

Japanese Silks, Pongees, Habutai, Georgettes. 



FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



SILKS, LIMITED 



TORONTO 
100 Wellington St. West 



WINNIPEG 
McDermott and Arthur Sts. 



_HI LlZZZZZX: 



!• 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



67 





Itoucli 



DOITOUC 



TRADE MASS; 



SUITINGS 



NO SUCH THING AS A 
DULL SEASON 

in your Dress Goods Depart- 
ment if you stock WOOL- 
TOUCH suitings. 

While WOOLTOUCH is 
manufactured from cotton it 
takes the place of wool goods. 

It is made of the best grade of 
cotton obtainable; it is finish- 
ed to look and feel like wool ; 
it comes in a variety of attrac- 
tive designs and beautiful col- 
orings and has much of the 
warmth of wool. 

The economy of WOOL- 
TOUCH instantly appeals to 
the shopper. The fact that it 
is a material for EVERY 
SEASON makes it a boon to 
your Dress Goods Department. 

WOOLTOUCH is a trademarked name, 
and the use of same applied to any 
fabric not manufactured by the BED- 
FORD MILLS will be immediately inves- 
tigated. 

Ask your nearest wholesaler 
to send you samples of WOOL- 
TOUCH. 

Canadian Representitive: Chas. Duncan, 
42 Rainsford Rd., Toronto, Ont. 



BEDFORD MILLS, INC. 

80-82 Leonard St. New York City 



68 



1' R ESS FA BRICS 



Dry Goods Review 




Dry Goods Review 




DRESS FABRICS 



m 



w 



e specialize in 



Broad Silks 

Duchesse Taffetas 

Messahnes Habutai 

Crepe de Chines Georgette- 
Pongees Satins 
New Novelty Silks 



TRADE 



MARK 




A visit to our Showrocms when in the City will be a 
pleasure to us and of profit to you. 



Hamm & Riley Silk Co. 

Limited 
55 Bay St. Toronto 




* LU "Tln-'r T" n " ' i " 1 ' * ' 

TuadeJM a rJs. R e c d 



70 



D i; ESS 1" A B R ICS 



Dry Goods Review 



Georgette Crepes 

Chiffons 

Ninons 
Fancy Georgettes 




Grepe dc Chines 
French Voiles 
Plain and 
Fancy Satins 



Getting Back to Pre-War Conditions — 

We have opened up our import lines of Novelty Silks, 
Satins, Cotton Voiles and Silk Shirtings. Do not fail 
to write us, at once, for particulars about any of the 
above lines in which you may be interested, to ensure 
Fall delivery. 

Stocks in most of these qualities always on hand in 
Toronto Warehouse. 

Albert Godde, Bedin & Cie 

PARIS 

TARARE 

LYONS 

Empire Bldg. 64 Wellington St. W. 

Telephone: Adelaide 3062 

TORONTO 




The Deacon Shirt 
Company 

beg to announce that their travellers 
are on the road with the new Fall 
line of 

Working and Outing Shirts, 

Flannels, Taffetas, plain and fancy, 

Tweeds, Drills, Flannelettes, 

Oxfords, Sateens, etc. 

Night Shirts, Pyjamas, 

Boys' Waists. 

The Deacon Shirt Co. 

BELLEVILLE. ONTARIO 



Special Values 



"Direct from Mill 




to the Trade " 



"Through Commission Merchants." 

For Ladies' Wear 

Botany Wool Serges, Gabardines, etc., etc. 

For Men's Wear 

Indigo and Black Serges and Vicunas 

Grey and Fancy Worsteds 

Also 



Pure Wool 



Scotch Tweeds 



"Manufactured in Scotland of pure, new wool, free from 
cotton or other vegetable fibre, shoddy, mungo. thread 
waste or any other remanufactured wool." 

On account of 

THE HEATHER MILLS COMPANY, Selkirk (Scotland) 

"From whom we hate Sole Canadian Setting Agency" 

Stocks of all the above on hand. 
Ready for immediate shipment. 

C. E. ROBINSON & CO. 



Mappin & Webb Hulldinfl 
Importer 10 Vlctorlo Street 

MONTRFAL 



Commission 
Merchants 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS FABRICS 



71 





'utl're Fashions are exquisitely foreshadowed in the new Pen ikees Silks — Rhapsode 
— Chimcrai—Cordclle. Their infinite range of rich, yet elusive color- tones, the 
artistry of their soft, crinkly weaves, the luminous quality that seems to lie 
just below the surface, offer limitless possibilities for the creation of original costumes. 



Falling instinctively into lines of loveliness, 
they are as adaptable to modes for ceremo- 
nious wear as to the smart little week-end 
frock or the new types of sportwear. Made 



by mills that have for years been producing 
fine American silks for American women, 
and now for the first time, identified by the 
name PEfciKEES in the selvage of every piece. 



Carl School Silk Corporation, 260 Fourth Avenue, New York 



ABOVE is reproduced in a smaller size the 
full page advertisement of PENIKEES Silks 
that will appear in the exquisite original colors 
in VOGUE for February 15; LE COSTUME 
ROYAL for March; and FASHION ART for 
February. 



The same copy has been adapted to half page 
space in black and white in HARPER'S BAZAR 
for February; and the LADIES' HOME JOUR- 
NAL for March. This is the second advertise- 
ment of a national campaign to introduce these 
silks beautiful to the American woman. 



CARL SCHOEN SILK CORPORATION 



260 Fourth Avenue 



New York 



72 



Dry Oooda Review 



Hudson Seal Coats $200 More Apiece 

Skins Alone Will Cost $160 to $150 More For a Coat — Muskrat Soaring Above $5 Each 
Coonskin Coats and Beaver a Problem — Comparisons With the Days of 1914-15 



Till, tin manufacturers, who are 
..' tt.ng out their new lines tor tnt 
1 ah season of 1920, declare that 
on an average tne price 01 auason Seal 

coats to the trade will show an advance 
of about $200 each, as compared with the 
prices for the season just Closed. This 
advance will be due ehietly to tne exces- 
sive prices for muskrats, which have 
gone up from about $2.25 and $2.50 each 
to $5 or $5.25 by the time the manufac- 
turers have had to buy for the new sea- 
son's business. When one figures out 
that a 42-inch coat takes about 55 to 70 
skins, or an increased cost for the un- 
dressed fur alone of $100 to $150 for a 
coat, the source of the higher cost of 
these favorite garments is readily seen. 
In addition, there is a heavy advance in 
the price of silk linings which are now 
running as high as $12 to $13 a yard 
for brocaded lines, and further increases 
to ;; very considerable extent in the 
wages of operators. In connection with 
the last item the Montreal fur manufac- 
turers last year gave two advances, one 
in March and the other in November, and 
are under agreement to give another 
advance in March, 1920, and a fourth in 
November, 1920. In one case, as DRY 
GOODS REVIEW was informed, work- 
men were getting about $24 a week be- 
fore the war can command as high as 
$64 or $65 now. And even at that figure, 
they are complaining now that they are 
losing money as compared with their 
former lower wages. 

In spite of figures that will mean an 
average cost to the trade of coats at 
$500 to $650, and a selling price to the 
public in many cases of $800 or even 
more, the manufacturers are looking 
forward to a brisk trade in these coats 
for the coming season. 

Coon Skins May Kill Coat Trade 
An even greater problem than the ex- 
cessive cost of Hudson Seal coats, how- 
ever, confronts a certain section of the 
trade. Women can be relied upon in a 
lar^e percentage of cases to pay any 
price so long as they are anxious to net 
the goods, and they are fashionable. But 
manufacturers are fearful now that 
i here will be a limit to what mere men 
will he willing to pay, for instance, for 
coon coats. One manufacturer, who has 
a large connection in this line all over 
Canada, declared early in February that, 
he had decided definitely not to touch 
coon coats at what he called the Dri 
exorbitant pr ; ces for the sUJns. He 
showed an offer that he had from a 
large fur jobber, of $1S for extra la^ire 
dark skins, of $1 1 for lar< r e ones, of $10 
for medium and $6.50" for small. Re 
thought that on an averaure his skins 
would cost him about $12 each. He de- 
clared that his coats were takin? 40 
skins each, or even on $8 (for those he 



had in Btock), a total cost of $320 for 
the skins alone for a single coat. lie 
Lad worked it out that tli.s would com- 
pel ..mi to cnarge $460 to tne trade. Ibis 
same coat, lor the byst qual.ty, was sold 
this last season at $32o, and one year 
ago was Belling at about $250 or even 
less. 

This same dealer did not get any balm 
when he turned to beaver coats. He had 
a quotation of $41.50 for a skin which 
ho bought last season for $18.60. On a 
beaver coat 10 extra large skins are re- 
quired, which he figured would cost him 
at last $55 each, or a total of $550. This 
condition, he observed, "is keeping every 
one of us guessing. Eive years ago we 
were selling coon coats for from $32.50 
to $85 each, and you got a pretty swell 
coat for $100." 

Were 42 \\ Cents; Now $5 

One fur manufacturer turned up his 
records for DRY GOODS REVIEW for 
the years 1914 and 1915 to illustrate the 
advance that had taken place in that 
time. In 1915 he had sold 300 rat skins, 
dressed, at 42% cents each; to-day those 
skins cost $5 raw. 

In another case, he had sold 50 dress- 
ed mink skins at $7.15 each; to-day they 
aie asking $20 for them raw. 

Beaver Up From $11 To $43 

In another case 100 dressed mink skins 
were sold at $4.90. In another case 18 
beaver skins dressed and plucked, at 
$11 each; now the price is $41.50 raw 
and about $43 on an average plucked. 

In September, 1915, over 30 coon 
coats had been shipped to a Winnipeg 
customer at $45 apiece. In 1914, 60 
A'aska beaver coats, of the cheap grade 
that were used for driving out West, 
were sol.! at $13.65. The 1919 price for 
these was $39, and this year the price 
would be $54. 

In bhe same year 30 Persian lamb 
skins soid at $7.50, which to-day are 
bringing $35. 

Thus on the threshold of the new fur 
season of 1920-21, manufacturers can 
hold out no hopes of escape from the 
prophecy that has been made in these 
columns during the past two or three 
months, of sharp advances in price in 
practically all the most popular fur lines 
for 1920-21. 



Fur Industry and 

Wild Life Conference 

Under the joint auspices of the Com- 
mission of Conservation and the Ad- 
visory Board on Wild Life Protection, a 
national conference is bein<r hel I at the 
Windsor Hotel. Montreal, on Thursday 
and Fridav. Feb. 19 and 20, to take up 
urgent problems respecting the con-e-- 
vation of <' ; nada's valuable resoun •• 



wild life. Particular attention is 1. 
devoted to t lie various phases of the 
uir industry. 

1 In rapid advance in the price of furs 
has induced the most vigorous exploita- 
tion of our fur-bearing animals, and it 
is essential to secure the concerted ac- 
tion, not only of administrative authori- 
ties but of fur dealers, traders, trappers, 
sportsmen and other associated in- 
terests, to insure that this resource, 
while being exploited to the maximum 
extent, will not become depleted. An 
important feature of the conference will 
be the fullest consideration of the ex- 
tent and possibilities of fur farming, in- 
cluding the rearing not only of foxe 
of other fur bearers. 

Among the subjects to be discussed 
are: Problems of fur production, includ- 
ing care, nutrition and diseases of foxes; 
the registration of silver foxes; rearing 
of fur-bearers, other than foxes; fur 
statistics; the marketing of furs, the 
improvement of marketing methods, fur 
auction sales and trade names for furs; 
game lavs and their administration, in- 
cluding the sale of game and the work 
of pame protective associations. 

The conference will be a thoroughly 
representative gathering, and it is anti- 
cipated that the deliberations will be of 
the greatest service in promoting meth- 
ods for the practical conservation of the 
wild life resources of the Dominion. 

The fur business is Canada's most an- 
cient industry and everv effort should be 
made to maintain the fur production of 
the Dominion at the highest possible 
level consistent with the retention of 
the industry as a permanent asset. 



Startling Advances At 

St. Louis Fur Sales 

Every cue who handles furs in any 
capacity is always on the qui vive when, 
every three or four months, a big sale of 
raw furs is announced. As prices bound 
higher and higher the excitement in- 
creases accordingly and always with 
hope against hope that the usual 25 per 
cent. tT 100 per cent, increase will not 
find place. And yet at every sale for 
the past three oi fou- years t^e^e ab- 
normal increases have been noted. Manu- 
facturers pay the prices, make un the 
furs at increased labor cost, and the pub- 
lic pays the bills and seems happier 
than ever in its luxurious fur anoarel. 

\t tiie St. Louis fur sales which open- 
ed February 2. the following Chan Pi 
prices resulted: The 9.100 A'aska seal 
skins which were dressed, dyed and ma- 
chined for the United Spates <rove<nment 
sold at 55 DC- cent, hifrher t^an Septem- 
ber prices; Persians were "0 ner cent, 
hio-her than in September; moles. 75 per 



Dry Goods Review 



F L'R D E P A K T MENT 



73 



cent, higher than September; Russian 
squirrels, 90 per cent, higher than Sep- 
tember; fisher, 30 per cent, higher; bad- 
ger remained unchanged; mink, 150 per 
cent, higher; marten, 60 per cent, high- 
er; stone marten, 60 per cent, higher; 
baum marten, 50 per cent, higher; mar- 
mots, 75 per cent, higher; civet cat, 40 
per cent, higher; muskrat, including 
Southern, black and dressed, seal dyed 
and seal dyed muskrat plates, were all 
50 per cent, higher than September; 
crossed fox, 10 per cent.; white fox, 10 
per cent, higher; blue fox remained un- 
changed; silver fox, 40 per cent, higher; 
coneys, sealings and near seal, includ- 
ing French, American and German, and 
dressed coneys, were 40 per cent, higher 
for the foreign and 10 per cent, hieher* 
for domestic; red fox, 5 per cent, higher; 



Australian red fox, Karagon fox and 
Macedonian fox, all remained unchang- 
ed; chinchilla was 100 per cent, higher 
than September; Russian sables, 10 per 
cent, higher; Japanese sables, 10 per 
cent, higher than in September; Japan- 
ese mink and China mink, 100 per cent, 
higher; Japanese marten, 10 per cent, 
higher than in September; flying squir- 
rel, 10 per cent, higher; lynx, IV2 per 
cent, higher; lynx cat, 5 per cent, higher; 
wild cat, 10 per cent, higher; wolf, un- 
changed; China dogmats, Thibet and 
Thibet robes are reported as having 
brought in good prices. 

Hare seals, 20 per cent, higher than 
September; leopard cat, unchanged; 
house cat, 30 per cent, higher; American 
opossum, 50 per cent, higher; rin" 1 tail 
cat, 150 per cent, higher; otter, 25 per 



cent, higher; wolverine, 20 per cent, 
higher; grey fox, unchanged; South 
American fox, 40 per cent, higher; Swift 
fox, 30 per cent.; Guanacos, 10 per cent, 
lower, Russian pony, 12 ^ per cent, low- 
er; barunduki, 12% per cent, higher; 
bear, unchanged. Reindeer is reported 
as selling well, also white lamb. White 
hare remains unchanged; Australian rab- 
bit and New Zealand rabbit for furriers' 
grade is 10 per cent, lower than Septem- 
ber; other grades, 50 per cent, higher. 
Dutch rabbits sold well. Skunk was 20 
per cent, higher, and nutria, 65 per cent, 
higher. 

With these breath absorbing advances, 
considering the present levels of all the 
furs, the big Canadian sales about to 
take place in Montreal this Spring will 
be of even more intense interest. 



The Wearing Qualities of Various Furs 

An Interesting Classification — Sea Otter Most Durable of Furs --How Others Compare 
With It — Dyeing Reduces Durability in Most Cases 



THE use of furs as necessary ar- 
ticles of clothing, as well as for 
ornamental purposes, is as great 
to-day as ever, says Dr. Hauseman, of, 
the Zoological Laboratory, Cornell Uni- 
versity, writing in the "Scientific Month- 
ly," and indeed during the past several 
years seems to have increased the 
severity of its demands. Certain mam- 
mals are being rapidly reduced in num- 
bers, if not threatened with extinction; 
and certain furs are becoming rare and 
consequently expensive. Hence there 
arises the necessity for some methods 
wherebv the species from which any 
given fur was obtained can be indub : - 
tably determined. For it is possible to 
remodel and rename furs, that is, so to 
clip, dye and pull them, that Iheir ori- 
ginal appearance is altered to such an 
extent that they may be sold under 
names not their own. Furs so remodelled 
may be sold under the names of furs 
much superior in wearing quality or in 
warmth. 

Thus the pelts of animals from warm- 
er zones such as the woodchuck (mar- 
mot), opossum, Australian opossum. 
raccoon, weasel, Tartar pony, Manchu- 
rian dog, and certain monkeys are work- 
ed up by fur dressers into articles but 
little resembling their originals and sold 
under other names, usually under the 
names of animals of northern latitudes. 
Such furs are inferior to those from 
colder climates in suppleness and dura- 
bility of leather, denseness and silkiness 
of under, or fur-hair, fullness of over- 
or protective hair, and because d^e'. 
brittle and less durable in general. One 
of the most durable of all furs is that 
of the sea ctter (Latax lutris). Con- 
sidering this to be represented b" 100, 
the relative durabilitv of some common 
furs, when used with the fur outside 
(not for linings), is as follows; 



Species. Durability ( Otter 100) 

1. Beaver 90 

2. Bear, black or brown 94 

3. Chinchilla 15 

I. Ermine 25 

5. Fox, natural 40 

6. Fox, dyed 20-2"> 

7. Goat 15 

>. 11:,,- 05 

9. Kolinsky 25 

10. leopard 75 

11. Lynx 

12. Marten (skunk) 70 

18. Mink, natural 70 

1 1. Mink, dyed 36 

15. Mole (,7 

16. Muskrat 15 

17. Nutria ( Coypu rati, plucked .... 23 

18. Otter, sea lllO 

10. Otter, inland 100 

20. Opos urn 87 

21. Rabbit 05 

22. R?ccoon. natural 65 

23. Raccoon, dyed . . 50 

2 1. Sable 60 

26. Seal, hair ...» 80 

26. Seal, fur SO 

27. S luirrel, cr v 20 25 

28. Wolf 50 

20. Wolverine 100 

The misnaming of furs offered for 
sale in England reached, several years 
aco, such m-Trnitude that the London 
Chamber of Commerce gave notice that 
misleading names were not to be em- 
ployed, and that offenders were liable 
to prosecution. More definite legislation 
than now exists ought also to be had in 
this country. The -following table lists 
some of the best known furs, and their 
usual misnomers: 

Species Altered and sold as 

1. American sable Russian sable. 

2. Fitch, dyed Sable 

3. Goat, dyed Bear, of various kinds 

4. Hare, dyed Sable or fox 

5. Kid Lamb 

6. Woodchuck (marmot). Mink, sable, skunk 

dyed Seal, electric seal 

7. Mink, dyed Sable 

8. Muskrat (musquash), 

dyed Mink, sable 

0. Muskrat Imusiui hi. 

pulled and dyed "udson Bay s?al, Red 

i River seal 
10. Nutria (Coypu rat). 

pulled and dyed Seal, electric seal. 

Hudson Bay seal. R:d 
River seal 



11. Nutria I Coypu rati. 

pulled, natural Beaver, otter 

12. Opossum, sheared and 

dyed Bea vei- 
13. Otter, pulled and dyed ..Seal of various kinds 

14. Rabbit, dyed Sable 

15. Rabbit, sheared and 

dj ed Seal, electric 

Hudson Bay seal. Red 
River seal, mu 

16. Rabbit, white Ermine 

17. Rabbit, white, dyed Chinchilla 

18. Kangaroo (wallaby), var 

ions species, dyed.... Skunk (marten) 

19. Hare, white Fox 

20. Goat, dyed Leopard 



F. M! STAFFORD, LTD. 

One of Sudbury's biggest department- 
al store businesses has transferred to a 
new management, and in future the 
Stafford Twin Stores will be known as 
the firm of F. M. Stafford, Ltd., charter- 
ed to carry on retail and wholesale busi- 
ness in general merchandise. A joint 
stock company will operate the business 
with the following forming the direc- 
torate: President, F. M. Stafford; 1st 
vice-president, J. L. Jefries; 2nd vice- 
president, G. F. Stafford; secretary- 
treasurer, H. S. Berlanquet. 

F. M. Stafford, president of the new 
company, established the business of 
the Twin Stores in 1906 in Sudbury, and 
carried or business for ten years in 
the old building, which has been re- 
placed on the same site by a modern, 
up-to-date and well-stocked merchandis- 
ing establishment. 

With service as its watchword and a 
broad liberal policy marking the new 
enterprise, F. M. Stafford, Limited, 
loves to appeal to an even greater pat- 
ronage than the Twin Stores have in 
the past. 



Q ir John Eaton, KlB , has been elected 
to the board of directors of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Co., succeeding the late 
W. D. Matthews. 



71 



FUR I> K I* A \i T M E N T 



Dry Goods Review 




( )&( ' salesmen will shortly be out on 
Fall placing trips showing a line of 
exclusive models in desirable furs 
that you will want to have. Be on 
the lookout for them. 




s - - -J 

YALE Model 
ALASKA SABLE 




CUMMINGS & CUMMINGS 

St. Paul and St. Sulpice 
MONTREAL 



HUDSON SEAL 
COATEE 



Dry Goods Review 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



75 



i 




Furs of Distinction 



We owe our growth 
entirely to the kind "of 
service we render and 
the class of furs we pro- 
duce. While we speci- 
alize on furs, we are 
proud of the fact that 
the quality of our ser- 
vice is on a par with the 
excellence of the exclu- 
sive fur models we offer. 




LABERGE, CHEVALIER & CO. 

MONTREAL 



LIMITED 



TORONTO 
John Maitland, Rep. 



WINNIPEG 
Martin Williams, Rep. 



I 



• ■ 



Ml; DEPAR T M E N T 



Dry Goods /.'< 




Dry Goods Review FUR DEPARTMENT 



77 



RELIABILITY 



Furs can be dyed two ways- --one is the wrong way, 

the other is 



The Hollander Way 

You can RELY ON THE DYE when it's 

Hollander's 

Hollander Seal and Sealine have become famous 
throughout the trade. Now comes 



Electric Seal 

hitherto only produced in France exclusively, 
but now a Hollander product. For the first time 
in the history of the Fur Trade in Canada we 
offer for your inspection samples of "Made in 
Canada" Hollander Electric Seal. 



A. Hollander & Son, Limited 

64 Queen Street :: Montreal 

N. Y. Office: 129 West 30th Street 



iirWMtito\itoW»wwr^^ 



i 



78 



FUR D K I'A UTMENT 



Dry Goods Review 



The Path of Wisdom! 
Who Are Following It? 



Not the hesitating buyer, 

Nor the reckless plunger, 

But the man who recognizes world conditions 

And who profits thereby. 

All of which means 

That the world demand is great, 

And that prices are not declining; 

On the contrary, they are likely to advance. 

Therefore, be prudent and place your orders 

For Fall and Winter 1920 without hesitating, 

For we are back of you if a break should come. 

Our travellers are prepared to interest you 

With new fall samples of Fur Coats and Robes 

Also Mitts, Gloves, Mackinaws and Sweaters. 

They are heading your way now. 

(Jive them a hearing and 

Don't hesitate. 



JAMES CORISTINE & CO., 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



FUR DEPARTMENT 



79 




.ISHEE 



The Pioneer House of 
Canada 



A Reputation 

is not made in a day 



Since 1852 L. Gnaedinger, 
Son k Company have endeav- 
ored to establish a reputation 
for reliable dealing, for hon- 
est workmanship, and unsur- 
passed service with quality 
merchandise. 



The good will which we have gained by ful- 
filling the wishes of our patrons spurs us on 
to do our utmost to maintain, throughout the 
coming year, our enviable reputation of show- 
ing Exclusive Furs. 



The Moose Head Brand lines 
of Exclusive Furs will be shown 
shortly. 



L. Gnaedinger, Son & Co. 

90-94 St. Peter Street 
MONTREAL 



BO 



PUB l» E P A U T M E NT 



Dry Goods Revit w 



Sale March 22 



nd 




Ship your 
Raw Furs 
At Once 

Last Receiving Date 

March 1 st 



Attach one of these tags to your pack- 
age, bale or bales — take to express or 
post office and it will be on its way to 
join thousands of others already in our 
warehouse sorted, listed and put up in 
best possible shape, for the inspection 
and bids of hundreds of eager buyers. 

You will get the opinions on your furs 
expressed in the satisfying form of 
RECORD PRICES by at least 500 buy- 
ers from the chief great distributing 
centres of the world. 



IS IT 
TAG DAY 

FOR 
YOU? 



The SMALL SHIPPER is welcome- 
we want to prove to all consignors, large 
or small, our certain ability to get them 
real results. 

WE HAVE NOTHING to offer buyers 
at this sale but genuine average Cana- 
dian furs in ORIGINAL collections — 
that's all— just the best in the world! 
Immense quantities of every variety 
marked on this tag are on hand — yet we 
have not nearly enough — there are not 
enough anywhere to supply the uni- 
versally keen demand existent. 



March 1st is last receiving date; all shippers 
are cordially invited to attend the sale. 



ADDRESS: 



Canadian Fur Auction Sales Co., Limited 



MAIN OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE: 

130 Lagauchetiere Street, West 

TEMPORARY OFFICES 

Windsor Hotel, Montreal 



Quality in Quantity 
makes the REAL market 



References— Any Branch of any Canadian Chartered Bank 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



81 



F 




urs 

for 

Every 
Season 



Advance Fashions in Furs now be- 
ing shown, for which orders may 
be placed very advantageously at 
this time. 

All the wanted Furs are in our 
samples — of reliable quality and 
faultless finish. 

See the Samples 

The Sandham Company 

59-61 Wellington St. W. 
Toronto 



Squirrels 

DYED 

Taupe and 
Battleship Grey 




Rabbits 

DYED 

Kitt 
and Mole 



Foxes, Wolves 
White Foxes 

DYED 

Taupe and 
Battleship Grey 

FURS DYED 

IN ALL 

THE NEWEST SHADES 

PROMPT: SKILFUL SERVICE 

The Hollander Fur Dyeing- 
Co., Limited 



645 St. Paul St. 



Montreal 



s#> 








I 



— #% — 

HAUGH BRAND 

Kiddies' Garments 

Neat 

Attractive 

Durable 

Their economy has commended them to parents; their solid 
comfort to kiddies everywhere: 

TheJ.A.Haugh Mfg. Co. Ltd. 

Toronto, Canada 

Manufacturers of the famous "Arm & Hammer 



Shirts, Overalls 
Bloomers 




■h 



Trousers and 
Shopcoats 



^ftflftl^ 



82 



Dry Goods Review 



New York Says Flowers for Spring 

Masses of Them on Hats of Satin and Cellophane — Egyptian Ideas a Prominent Feature 

Cire Satin Being Used. 



NEW YORK, Feb. 10. — Flowers, 
flowers, and still more flowers is 
the newest dominant note in New 
York millinery. The variegated plum- 
age which has been featured through- 
out the past season has not exactly 
"gone by the board"; but has practi- 
< ally retired to a secondary place. True, 
the models sent from Paris to the Re- 
tail Milliners' Association Spring show- 
ing — the millinery event of the month — 
showed many plumes and scarcely any 
flowers at all. But this does not seem 
to have influenced New York designers 
to any extent, for the trade has seized 
upon flowers possibly because they look 
so "Springy" and are using them indis- 
criminately in wreaths, clusters, bunches, 
and facings — even as whole hats. 

One pretty little mushroom shape was 
shown having several loose poppies hung 
directly down the back and resting on 
the base of the neck. 

Little Straw Seen 

On the streets, straw has not yet 
made it? appearance to a noticeable ex- 
tent; satin, duvetyn, and velvet models 
are still worn. This rather leads the 
trade to presume that the four-season 
idea has thoroughly taken hold arid 
women in general will continue to wear 
a distinct type of hat for early Spring. 

An attractive style of hat seen at the 
Ritz and other fashionable lunching 
places is the small duvetyn shape with a 
deep cuff pulled out at each side and worn 
considerably by the younger set with 
short sports coats of fur. 

The off-the-face models and chin-chins 
are really considered the best for gen- 
eral trade but a few small mushroom 
shapes are beinp: shown; which seem to 
indicate a possible return to this type cf 
hat. Small and medium sizes prevail, 
althoueh a few lareer models were dis- 
played at the R.MA.A. showin.fr. Thev 
were of the sheer straw fabric which will 
probably be seen more in the warmer 
weather. These are extremely larcre and 
indicate that Summer will see a demand 
for the largest an'' floppiest of larce 
and floppy models. 

Egyptian Effects 
Hats of Egyptian designers an being 

featured by some of the high class trade. 
These are copied from the Egyptian 
models launched recently in Paris by 
Suzanne Talbot and Lewis. Sometimes 
the effect is produced by fulled ribbon 
or flowers which drop over the ears; 
sometimes low earflaps are incorporated 
into the shape itself in direct imitation 
of Egyptian headdresses. These latter, 
however, are believed to be altogether 
too extreme to be fully taken up by the 
trade. The idea, however, of the trim- 
ming beinp gathered at the sides to 
drop over the ears is considered by some 
to merit a certain amount of popularity 



so lonp as there is a tendency to have 
side fulnesses in skirts. 

Cellophane Everywhere 

Cellophane is the most in evidence of 
Spring materials. It is used in all man- 
ner of ways, depending on the ingenuity 
of the designer. It is braided and rolled 
and pleated, cut into strips and pasted, 
made into flowers and fancies of all 
sorts. An interesting development is ob- 
tained by rolling the cellophane, cover- 
ing the crown or brim with it, and then 
veiling the whole with folds of maline or 
a lace braid. This softens the brilliance 
of the cellophane and makes it more be- 
coming to certain types of complexion. 

Henna is spoken of as being the lead- 
ing color for Spring chapeaux — and an 
unmistakably bright henna at that. 
Other high tones are noticed also. 
Shades of flame and cherry are shown 
in close proximity to such greens as 
jade, emerald and leek. 

Fabrics Strong 

There are, however, large varieties of 
novelty fabrics being used, particularly 
in the little draped turbans where the 
beauty of the hat lies mostly in the 
material. These fabrics include Batavia 
cloth, haircloth, raffia cloth and such. 
And they appear to best advantage when 
trimmed with a band of cire satin. The 
later, indeed, is much used for it gives 
a brilliant effect similar to that obtain- 
ed from cellophane. 



Miss McEachern has been appointed to 
the management of the notion depart- 
ment of the A. J. Freiman store, Rideau 
Street, Ottawa. She was formerly with 
the H. J. Daly Company but later in 
Hamilton. 



Vivid 1 lenna Color 
Featured In 

New York Hats 

As Seen by 1'oronto Milliner 
Miss Pogue, head milliner for Mrs. 
Allan Smith, 744 Vfc Yonge Street, To- 
ronto, Ont, had just returned from a 
two weeks' trip to New York when seen 
by a DRY GOODS' REVIEW represen- 
tative. 

Flowers, she stated, were being used 
in abundance, but instead of the vari- 
colored bouquets and masses used be- 
fore, the flowers are all of a sameness, 
both of color and kind, for instance, in- 
stead of the customary small bouquets 
of French flowers one sees groups of 
one kind of flower only. The flower tur- 
bans, all of one flower in tones of one 
color, are also shown. Turned-back 
shapes and chin chins are general. Little 
else seems to receive much notice. All 
sorts of bright shiny straws are used; 
but henna in a vivid tone seems to be the 
fashionable color note; for summer, in- 
dications point to hats being very, very 
large, and made of such materials as 
mohair. 

Miss Pogue found her work very much 
hindered by the prevalence of the in- 
fluenza in New York and the fact that 
some business houses are re-arranging 
their hours so as to relieve the conges- 
tion on street cars during the ordinary 
rush periods. 



Dobensky <£r Co., Bancroft, Ont., have 
disposed of their dry goods business to 
Mr. Eli Lumb. The former firm have 
purchased a boot and shoe business in 
Cobalt. 




A Popular 
Style 

The smart turban 
of coarse straw in 
just this outline is a 
Sprinc (1920) favor- 
ite. The feather 
fancy, of course, 
must be placed at a 
smart angle, such as 
shown here. 



Dry Goods Review 



83 



Shiny Braids, Shiny Cellophane 

and Shiny Patent Leather 

Used On Off-the-Face Shapes, Chin-Chins, Watteaus and Pokes ■ — Medium Sizes With 
Dome-Shaped Crowns — Hand Work Makes Prices Higher 



LA.CQUERED effects are strong 
wherever one gees to see millinery 
displays. It is seen in the abund- 
ance of cellophane used in all manner of 
forms and places. In the pastel colors 
this material looks like nothing so much 
as candy — <:lear, bright, sugar candy 
such as is used to decorate confectioners' 
windows. There was one hat — a little 
dome-shaped turban, which began with 
yellow cellophane braided and wound 
around the top of the crown in an oval 
shape. Then came tan-colored cello- 
phane wound for about an inch; after 
that was an inch of Paddy green, then 
another strip of yellow, and finally at 
the base of the hat a rcw of two-inch 
Paddy faille ribbon, accordeon pleated. 
It almost made you lick your lips. 

Cellophane is also shown cut in strips 
and woven with maline. Sometimes it is 
made into flowers. Milliners are finding 
this material rather hard to work with, 
and it takes considerable time in the 
making owing to its brittleness and its 
liability to crack and break. But the 
public generally wants the things that 
are most difficult to give it. 

A Patent Leather Chin Chin 

Patent leather is an item which seems 
to be more prominent than usual. It is 
used as trimmings, as appliqued flowers, 
and in combination with braids. A dainty 
chin chin model on display had a gather- 
ed crown of soft patent and the rolled 
brim of the same. The inside of the brim 
was faced with turquoise blue satin. Its 
only ornament was an embroidered motif 
at the side front of the brim done in 
rose and blue silk. 

Another chin chin shape had the dome 
crown made of fine straw braid The 
soft brim was of sand-colored faille rib- 
bon cut in sections which were joined by 
hand faggotting in silk. The trimmings 
consists of a single oval-shaped coral- 
colored ornament. 

Watteaus and Pokes 

Besides these chin chins and off-the- 
face shapes, there are some Watteaus 
shown and a number of pokes. The 
Watteaus have been taken up by the 
trade in a way that has rather surprised 
the wholesalers. They are small, with a 
bow or streamers of ribbon at the back 
and sprays of fruit and flowers orna- 
menting the crown. Others have the 
flowers banked up the back. A slight 
up-turning of the brim in front gives 
a coquettish touch, but such hats are 
bought discriminately as they are be- 
coming only to certain types of faces. 

There was one little poke worth re- 
membering made of black maline in 
medium size with the ever-present dome 
crown. The brim edge was bound with 



straw braid and the base of the crown 
was encircled with a wreath of tiny 
flower fancies, chief among which were 
dandelions in several different colors, far 
from the shade that nature bequeathed 
to dandelions. At the back were half a 
dozen streamers of narrow picot ribbon 
in pastel shades. 

And this reminds us that said ribbons 
are being shown on tailored hats as well 
and sometimes used for making the en- 
tire hat with the addition of a little 
braid binding. And the flowers of the 
field generally referred to as "humble" 
are enjoying a prominent position on the 
smartest chapeaux along with a number 
of agricultural grains and a variety of 
small fruits which we should probably 
label as poisonous if we found them in 
the woods. 

New Materials 

Hair braids and Batavia cloth are 
much used, the latter making up well 
into small draped turbans a little like 
those of gold cloth and brocaded fabrics 
worn during the past season. 

For tailored models a few quills and 
glycerined ostrich are in evidence, also 
lacquered wings, but flowers promise to 
be the strongest feature in trimmings fh 
a short while. 

Then there is Batavia fringe and buprle 
braid. The lisere straws are in great 



demand but are quite scarce. A stun- 
ning model of rather large size made of 
black maline had a dome-shaped crown 
embroidered with lisere braid. The brim 
was wide and high in a Napoleonic effect 
and had stiff spikes of the braid set 
around the brim a couple of inches apart 
which extended on inch and a half above 
the edge. 

Titian and Rust 

Regarding colors, the conservative 
navy is very much in the lead; next 
comes browns, and then high tones such 
as flame and cherry red and jade. The 
henna mentioned by buyers returning: 
from New York is expected to be taken 
up by the Canadian trade very soon, but 
it is going to the called Rust and Titian. 

"Yes, we are charging more for our > 
models this year." said one designer to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW, "but then our 
materials are costing us more and the 
girls in the workroom are demanding 
increases every two weeks which w e have 
to give because we're so short. But then 
we're putting more work on the hats and 
our customers can see that they are get- 
ting something for their money. It 
doesn't seem to check their buying at 
all, anyway. A number of them have 
been back on their second trip so I be- 
lieve the consumer is willing to pay the 
price a= well." 




Neat and Pretty 

Trimming of frosty-look- 
ing silk foliage, luscious 
cherries — what more is de- 
sirable for a refreshing- 
looking Spring chapeau '. 
The crown is of straw. 



34 



\i i I. I. I n E i; Y 



l>ri/ Goods Revieu 



KNOWLEDGE OF FORM AMI COLOR 

SHOULD TAKE PRECEDENCE 

OVER UTILITY— SAYS ARTIST 

TO WOMEN DESIGNERS 

"Fashions from an Artistic Stand- 
point," was tin- Snbjecl Of BO illustrated 

address given recently by Alfred 

Howell, AIM' A., before an audience 

of the women's costume designers at 

the Toronto Women's An Association. 

Mr Howell claimed that the main 
thing standing in the way of proper 
development was the lack of artistic 
intelligence. The utilitarian viewpoint 
had dominated where the appreciation 
of form and color should be given con- 
sideration. 

Canada is face to face with a great 
crisis, according to Mr. Howell, who 
toKl his audience that new and best op- 
portunities lay ahead of the Canadian 
designers. Conditions have made it 
necessary for this country to produce 
on a larger and greater scale than ever 
befoie, and to do this successfully the 
creators of dress must accept their work 
as a liviner art and endeavor to create 
better things. 

Mr. Howell, who discussed the history 
of dress, told his audience that he fa- 
vored an adaptation of the Greek form 
of dress, and believed that much more 
stress should be laid on the suitability 
and personality of garments to the in- 
dividual wearer. 



OLD ESTABLISHED FIRM INCOR- 
PORATED 

The F. Kinsman Co., Limited, has been 
incorporated at Fonthill, Ont. This 
store, established by Danson Kinsman 
in 1862, is one of the oldest in the Nia- 
gara district. The present president, 
Mr. Fred. Kinsman, took charge of the 
business in 1884. The secretary of the 
new company is H. F. Kinsman, and 
the managing- director is Finest F. Kins- 
man. DRY GOODS REVIEW joins the 
many other friends of the firm in ex- 
tending 1 congratulations and rood wishes 
for the continued progress of the store. 



Canadian craft workers have been 
making rapid strides in the last few 
months and have turned out a large 
number of unique pieces of hammered 
copper, carved woodwork, pottery, 
"Batik" and iron work. A recent ex- 
periment made in Toronto resulted acci- 
dentally in a fine silver glaze lustre, 
which compares favorably with any of 
the imported pottery. 

The Batik work, which has been ex- 
tensively taken up, is a process of dye- 
ing on silk by means of wax. The pat- 
terns wash beautifully and are already 
being adopted for women's crowns, 
scarfs, millinery and bags, as well as for 
curtains and table runners. 

The Merit Skirt Company are succes- 
sors to the Star Skirt Company, of Moii 
treal. 

George Nagley, of the American Waist 
& Dress Company, is at present absent 
in England, and will he till about April 




A Becoming 
Model 

Large hat of navy blue 
Georgette, with cut edge 
viscoe braid, and trim- 
med with wild flowers. 
Shown by Milady Hat 
Co., Monteral. 



on a business trip in connection with his 
firm. 



WHAT ABOUT YOURSELF? 

Over yonder young Tomson is 
leaning against a telephone pole in 
front of a barber shop. If you 
passed that way last night you 
would have seen him, and you 
would have seen him the night be- 
fore, too, and the night before 
that. Most every evening young 
Tomson wastes two or three hours 
just leaning against that pole. 

Over here in the room above the 
drug store young Smith is study- 
ing. Every evening he aims to 
keep at his books for an hour at 
least. Some nights he's pretty 
tired, and it's a mighty hard job to 
rivet his attention to his studies, 
but somehow he manages to stick 
to it. 

Tomson and Smith used to loaf 
around a good deal together until 
Smith got a "hunch" that he wasn't 
making anything out of himself — 
that he wasn't building anything 
for the future. But somehow he 
couldn't make his pal see it that 
way. So the latter just idles away 
his time. 

As you read this it is safe to 
say that you would bank on Smith 
as I he man who eventually will 
come out ahead. Hut have you 
ever stopped to apply this case to 
yourself? Just what are you doing 
with your leisure time and just 
what are you doing for the future? 



250TH ANNIVERSARY THIS YEAR 

It is fitting indeed that the Hudson's 
Bay Co. enter into the elaborate plans 
which are under way for the celebration 
of the 250th anniversary of its incorpora- 
tion which occurs in May. The history 
of this company and, no doubt, the his- 
tory of Canada will be more intimately 
known to goodly numbers of her citizens 
after the celebration which is planned. 
Prize essays, moving pictures and ta- 
bleaux are just a few of the big things 
under way. Sir Robert Kindersley, the 
governor of the company, is coming to 
Canada for the event. 

The death occurred after a long ill- 
ness at Sarnia, Ont., on January 24th, 
of a well-known business man in the 
person of Mr. William James Proctor. 
The late gentleman conducted a general 
store in Sarnia for many years and was 
three times mavor of his town. 



CHANGE OF FIRM AT BATTLE- 
FORD, SA£K. 

Prince Bros., Limited, who have con- 
ducted a retail general store business 
during the past forty years at Battle- 
ford, Sask., discontinued operations on 
January 31st. They are succeeded by 
the new firm of B. Prince & Son, Limit- 
ed, under the management of Mr. Paul 
Price. 



S. Sugarman and Mr. Berger have 
opened a ladies' and men's furnishings 
and boot and shoe store at Bowman- 
ville, Ont., in the premises formerly oc- 
cupied by Wm. Scott, grocer. 



Dry Goods Review 



MILLINERY 



85 




Spring opening announcement of merit used 

by the Right House, Hamilton, Ont. 5 

columns by 14 inches deep. 



WESTERN BANQUET 

January 15th was the night cf a merry 
gathering of Swift Current, Sask., when 
Mr. W. W. Cooper entertained his de- 
partment managers, employees and their 
families to an elaborate banquet — the 
first since 1914. Formal invitations were 
sent and attractive menu and toast list 
booklets were printed by the Cooper 
Printery. The covers were of light 
green, tied with gold-color ribbon. An 
additional feature was a song sheet 
headed with a verse on Cooper skirts, 
sung to the tune of "Smiles," and fol- 
lowed by well-known popular and pa- 
triotic numbers. 

The banquet was given in the spacious 
dry goods department of the store, and 
Mr. Cooper addressed his 80 guests most 
cordially, outlining the history and prog- 
ress of the store and his strong faith 
in the community which had grown so 
rapidly during- the 17 years of the store's 
life there. The Cooper store claims to 
be the largest on the continent, taking 
the population into consideration. Mr. 
J. Tisdale thanked Mr. Cooper on be- 



Forma) Spring 1919 Exposition 

To-day, Wednesday, March the 12th, and Following Days 
Authentic Modes, Fabrics and Shades 



P^VERY effort has 
been made to pre- 
sent exclusive merchan- 
dise portraying the 
newest and most authen 
tic style tendencies- 
Women may now 
wisely select their new 
Spring Apparel, while 
stocks are fully complete 
and at their best, afford- 
ing the greatest variety 
of the season for selec 
lion. 




ring Smartest New York Hat-. As Well As Clever J 
Copies and Original Models from the 
Hands of Our Own Designers 




NEW SUIT BLOUSES 

In Crepe de Chine— $1500 

Slr.etlyT.ilor.dBlouiei ».'hS.IV M.M.rv 
Brjid .1 «d|«i .nd tuft. Hiih <oll»> 
Bml p*»rl notion. 

G«*>f.'l< — 110 '■> lw 



Some Becoming JVexv Costumes 

I E ything in Suits F 



lored Simplicity t< 
Extreme Chic 

0„, ncluiin «...mb!.i. .1 Sp, 
So.l. .rmoduci. tv„, new no 
in Vogue Thfm» .drud.d 



^ fl' 



A Rtm.rl.nbly Strong 
V.lu* in Women'i SmU 
Ai $39.50 




A Glimpse of Dainty 
Spring Frocks 




Boots. Hosiery, Gloves. Complete The Costume 

icuUi inlvrtfl art ih« lalkwuig n*w Uimi 

•TREFOUSSE French 
Kid Gloves-Pr,S2 50 



Of Interest to Misses 
Charming Frocks g% 

1.. r ,. to ,1.1. .....n.l. it,!..- *- ' 



l 






SV1TWS«T. ud C 




Puce Thread Silk Hose 
Priced, Pair. $2 75 



f\ And the Kiddies Too 




HENRY MORGAN & CO. LIMITED 



Henry Morgan & Co., Montreal, have a way of their own in making an appeal to their 

readers. Nothing is taken for granted. Each section of the advertisement above is a 

thing complete and readable and the ensemble pleasing. 




A Dashing Model 

This very Frenchy shape illustrates the 

vogue for shiny straw, off-the-face effects 

and satin crowns. 



half of the staff. A program was ren- 
dered by members of the staff and a 
five-piece orchestra, all of which were 
greatly appreciated. 



NEWS AMONG THE TRADE 

The social and entertainment commit- 
tee of the St. John Dry Goods Clerks' 
Association held a meeting on February 
9, when it was decided to hold a minstrel 
show in the near future to raise funds 
for publicity purposes. The St. John 
Opera House is going to be engaged. 
This association now has a business com- 
mittee, a social and entertainment com- 
mittee, an advertising committee and a 
managing committee. 



BUTTON MACHINE 

The machine employed in the making 
of covered buttons has been subjected 
to decided improvement. Hitherto a 
separate machine has been required for 
making each type of button. By the use 
of additional attachments which are sup- 
plied with the machine, any one ma- 
chine can now be used for producing 
more than forty different effects or types 
of covered buttons, such as plain shapes, 
buttons with French rim backs, buttons 
with American rim backs, acorn, bullet, 
full ball, etc. 

The use of one of these machines in 
the notion or dress pattern department 
would, no doubt, be welcomed by cus- 
tomers who desire covered buttons to 
match the dress for which they are buy- 
ing: the material, as they could take some 
of the fabric to the notion or pattern de- 
partment and quickly have it made into 
buttons of the desired size and shape. 



36 



M I I. I. I NKRY 



Dry Goods Review 



«R£ 




Increase Your Profits 



Visit our salesroom, 76 
Wellington St. West, 
and allow us the oppor- 
tunity to show you the 
advantage in buying 
direct from us, as Man- 
ufacturers. 

We earn- on the floor 
a complete stock of 
Ladies', Misses', and 
Children's Hats for im- 
mediate delivery. 

See our Novelty Flow- 
ers, Ornaments, and 
Braids, in stock now. 



Styles Correct, 
Superior in Finish 



Toronto Hat Co., Ltd. 

76 Wellington St. West 
Toronto, Ontario 



Branch : 
Hammond Block 

Winnipeg 
J. G. MARTIN 



Branch : 
Citizea Building 

Ottawa 
J. A. AYEARST 



£N£5V 



Your Dollar Buys More in Canada 

Why Pay Exchange 
If You Can Get 

New York Advanced 
Spring Models 

without discount at our 
Canadian showrooms, 489 
St. Paul St. W., Montreal; 
193 Sparks St., Ottawa. 
These rooms are now re- 
plete with a large showing 
of New York's trimmed 
latest models at prices rang- 
ing rrom 

$7.50 to $20.00 

Spring Opening March 1st. 

Milady Hat^Co., of Canada 




DYNAMO BRAND 



Wholesalers! 



This Trade Mark is your 
guide to — 



M 



"Dynamo Brand" Maline 

The Original Guaranteed 
Rainproof Maline 
Ideal for Millinery and Scarves. 
Resists rain, dampness, snow, sun, and 
perspiration. 

Exceptional quality 

Guaranteed 

Economical 

We are the only selling agents for Gros 
Million & Co., of Lyons (France) for the 
Dominion of Canada. 

CHAS. MOUTERDE 

(United Makers) 

80 Wellington St. West Tel. Adel. 4184 
TORONTO 

Room 705 Read BIdg. Tel. Main 6524 
MONTREAL 



Dry Goods Review 



M ILLINERY 






II 




1920 

Spring Opening 

Tylonday, First JVlarch 

Model Hats 

J^dillinery Novelties 

j^lewest Fashions 
Exclusive Styles 

Buyers visiting the d/iiarltets bejore 

opening date will find our stock 

complete in all departments 

Inspection by the Trade . 
cordially invited 



G. GOULDING & SONS 

55 Wellington St. West, Toronto 



W innipeg 
66 King St. 



Ottawa 
193 Sparks St, 



Hamilton 
28^ Jonn St. N 



X 



= Xf 



88 



Dry Goods Review 



Underwear and Hosiery Higher for 1921 

Yarns Scarce and High — Deliveries Poor — Production Below Normal Owing to Labor 
Situation Advances Range From 20% to 100''. 



«*Mpi() speak frankly, business is too 
good," said a knit goods manu- 
facture r to DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW. "We've been sold Up 1' 
couple of months now and are doing our 
best to cover our orders. But we're ab- 
solutely up a tree when it comes to get- 
ting deliveries on raw materials." This 
tersely sums up the situation amongst 
the majority of underwear and hosiery 
mills. 1'it sent prospects are good in 
that they are receiving more orders 
than they can (ill; but the future is so 
uncertain that very few are optimistic 
enough even to look ahead and make 
speculations, no less to make definite 
plans. 

They can pet no guarantee on deli- 
veries — which are just as bad, if not 
worse than they have ever been— "un- 
certain as life" is the way one man puts 
it. Owing to the extremely high Amer- 
ican exchange, the tendency is to turn 
to England; but there, they can get no 
satisfaction from the English spinners. 
One manufacturer has not yet received 
any materials ordered since November 
and some that were ordered in August. 
Another states that, in January, he 
cabled eight English firms for deliveries 
between August and December, 1920, 
and received a promise from only one. 
While the exchange would appear at 
first sight to boost Made-in-Canada 
goods, there is the counter action of that 
factor in purchasing the raw materials 
upon which the exchange has to be paid. 
It is necessary for the millmen to 
order two and three months earlier than 
in normal times and sometimes to ac- 
cept open orders. It is the opinion of 
some, moreover, that if the situation 
continues, the time will come shortly 
when the retailer will have to place open 
orders as well. 

Mercerized Yarns High Beyond 
Reason 

The situation as regards help is no 
better than it was last year. Expert 
help is continually a scarcity and even 
inexperienced girls seem to pay no heed 
to the "Help Wanted" signs which are 
the earmarks of most knitting mills 
nowadays. 

Under such conditions, it is little won- 
der that prices continue to leap up- 
wards. Increases on goods for next 
Fall will range anywhere from 20 per 
cent, to 50 per cent, and promise to go 
even as hi<rh as 100 per cent, above this 
Spring's values in mercerized lines. Silk 
hose are undeniably scarce and hose that 
sold before the war at $1 retail, now 
sell for ?2.'5.*> a pair. "But," says one 
manufacturer, "we're continually being 
surprised at the prices people are will- 
ing to pay." 

Another mill man pointed out that one 
line of hosiery which sold in 1918 at 
$6.25 was priced at ?5.Kr, in 1919 owing 



to the slump which occurred in February 
a year ago, but so marked have been the 
advances since then in yarns, labor and 
machinery that this same line will have 
to be $7.50 lor next deliveries and even 
at that profits will be cut down quite 
a little in order to keep the goods on the 
market at all. All lines of knitted goods 
are going up, he said. Unless there snould 
be a break in raw cotton — which is un- 
likely—a general advance of 50 per cent, 
will be necessary. Mercerized cotton 
yarns have gone up 30 cents a pound — 
in fact, they have advanced during the 
last (5 to 8 months from $1.60 to $4 a 
pound. This latter is the price being paid 
for lines for consumption in 1921 which 
will be shown in May and June next. 
These yarns are a material factor in 
maintaining the high prices for silk 
hosiery also, since a considerable pro- 
portion of mercerized yarns are used in 
the tops and feet of the silk lines. 

The feeling generally is that there 
cannot possibly be any drop in prices 
during 1920 or 1921, but that a decline 
is coming "some time." One wholesaler 
stated that he believed mill prices this 
year are at their peak but that the pub- 
lic will not be paying the extreme for 
nearly two years; after that, there 
should be an inclination downward, but 
only when production begins in some 
degree to cope with demand. 

Still the Call is for Quality Goods 

And yet the public continues to buy 
the better classes of goods. The num- 
ber of sales from one firm of the high- 
est grade goods was 10 per cent, to 20 
per cent, more than of the lower grades. 
Another man finds that his sales this 
year are already 100 per cent, greater 
in quantity than they were this time last 
year and 120 per cent, greater in value. 

As another illustration of this, one 
firm sent out samples of strong cotton 
hose for men and boys chiefly, at a com- 
paratively reasonable price. The re- 
sult was that orders just "dribbled" in 
while the demand for their higher priced 
lines was daily increasing. 

It is thought by some that retailers 
are a little too cautious in placing their 
orders if they really need the goods. 
And yet, very few firms are looking for 
new accounts and even giving quotations 
to any but their oldest customers. It 
took just six weeks last Fall for one 
hosiery firm to accept orders that would 
occupy their mill for six months ahead; 
and they had not covered all their cus- 
tomers. Since then, they have been re- 
fusing orders almost daily. 

No Concerted Action for Export Busi- 
ness This Year 

At the close of 1918 there was a feel- 
ing — despite predictions to the contrary 
— that prices would take a drop very 



early, and so buyers held back placing 
their orders during the early part of 
last year. The mills began to be afraid 
they would not have sufficient business to 
keep their machines busy and so went 
after export orders. A big amount of 
business was done for Roumania and 
other European markets, but now that 
domestic calls have returned in quantity 
the mills are endeavoring to take care 
of the home markets first. They feel 
that export trade is largely temporary, 
and it is much more to their advantage 
to turn out the goods required in Can- 
ada. There are some private export 
orders being filled, but they are not 
considered the mainstay of the industry, 
by any means. 

Some Canadian mills are sending 
shipments to England, so scarce are 
goods over there. One manufacturer 
stated that he could fill his mill three 
times over with orders. "Clothing 20,- 
000,000 men is a big problem for the 
mills of the world," he remarked, "and 
in addition, we cannot place any more 
machinery orders for two years, so busy 
are the machine-makers in replenishing 
the worn-out plants. Prices are prohibi- 
tive, as well." 

The gist of the underwear and hosiery 
situation for Canadian buyers is, then, 
that supplies during 1920-21 will prob- 
ably be equal to last year but no better; 
prices will be 25 per cent, to 50 per 
cent, or more higher for next Fall, 
Winter and Spring, 1921; qualities will 
on the whole be somewhat better; mer- 
cerized lines will practically be off the 
market. Goods are still being allotted 
which means that orders are being plac- 
ed farther in advance than in normal 
times. 

FINE FINISH 

UNDERWEAR 

WANTED 

Opera Vest Liked— A New Wool-finish 

Vest Featured — Directoire Bloomers 

Continue Big Line 

In women's underwear, there is more 
business being booked than ever before 
in all silk, and silk top garments. There 
are none of the Swiss rib silk goods on 
the market, which was the "exclusive" 
feature some five years ago. That make 
of garment requires twice as much silk 
as the glove silk materials which are 
now so much the vogue. In all merceriz- 
ed as well as mercerized with glove 
silk tops, and the all-silk garments, de 
mand is increasing for finer grades with 
short or no sleeves, or just a shoulder 
strap. In fact, even in the most sum- 
mery of cotton vests, the opera-top — 
is with only a shoulder strap fasten- 
ed to the straight top — has been given 
special attention and is selected by 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



89 



New Silk Knitted W ear 




These glove silk bloomers have double seat, which is 
their latest selling point, though by the growing popu- 
larity of glove silk underwear one would scarcely expect 
many new features to develop. 

A glove silk opera vest which has all the newest touches 

for fine fit and finish is shown here. Photos by courtesy 

of Mr. H. G. Clark, Toronto. 




buyers of stores, small and remote, as 
well as those in large city stores. In 
fact, more than one wholesaler points 
out that smaller merchants are more 
exacting even than the larger buyers 
because customers go to them for per- 
sonal attention and are not backward 
about stating exactly what they want 
and what their friends are wearing. 
More care is being placed on the fit and 
finish of women's undergarments than 
ever before. One Canadian manufac- 
turers is showing a range of 250 samples 
this Spring. This includes infants' 
lines. He find opera vests his biggest 
sellers. Swiss rib garments with fine 
mercerized or silk glove tops are popu- 
lar. Ribbon edging, or else tubing finish 
is proving successful. All through, the 
neat, plainer styles seem preferable 
though some elaborate lace tops are 
shown. 

One firm is showing, as a Winter vest, 
a soft cotton garment finished to re- 
semble wool; it is creamy and pliable 
like a very fine wool and has an arti- 



ficial silk stripe. This line is proving 
quite successful. 

Directoire bloomers are big sellers, 
especially in pink. A number of firms 
are making these and all speak em- 
phatically of their pronounced vogue. 

Prices in fine cotton vests for Fall 
will not show an advance of more than 
about 10 to 15 per cent, over last year. 



BRITISH HOUSES 
ATTEND TO 
FOREIGN TRADE 

An importer of British underwear and 
hosiery stated to DRY GOODS REVIEW 
that he had sold more goods during 
January than he did in a whole year 
before the war — and all the orders were 
for fine botany wools, and silk and wool 
garments. One, only, of his travellers 
had sold goods to the extent of $39,000 
during one week in January and another 
totalled $25,000 the same week. The 



problem this year, he finds, is to allot 
goods fairly — there is no difficulty in 
selling. Many merchants would specu- 
late just now if the wholesalers would 
allow it but it is their business not to 
allow one buyer to get more than his 
share. 

In explaining the present price situa- 
tion, this importer pointed out that be- 
fore the war $1 worth of raw material 
was made up by $1 worth of labor. That 
same amount of raw material now costs 
$3 and requires $4 worth of labor to 
make it up. This, the mills cannot af- 
ford to do because people will not pay 
$7 for a garment containing $3 worth 
of raw material. Therefore they have 
to put in $5 worth of raw material to 
$4 worth of labor and offer a $9 article. 
These are proportionate figures, of 
course, but they give a clear idea of 
conditions affecting production. 

As an example of how some British 
houses are endeavoring to re-establish 
themselves, firms which confined their 
output during- the war entirely to war 



91 



K N I I I" ]■: 1 1 hoods 



Dry (Joods Review 



. I Wool A ovelty 

This clever outdoor blouse 
ll of brow n and « bite 
brushed wool with plain-col- 
ored scarf, cuffs and pocket - 
band — a most comfortable- 
looking affair. 




work, spent the whole of the past year 
building a foundation for the future. 
They sent one man to work in a Can- 
adian mill for six months to study pro- 
duction conditions and another to a large 
department store for six months in or- 
der to learn consumers' requirements. 
They are taking orders now in lines 
which they feel are what the Canadian 
trade wants, in a well-made and well- 
finished article. 

With such thoroughness, it is quite 
probable that the British will have full 
ol of their foreign trade by an- 
other year. 

Prices advanced 15 per cent, in Jan- 
uary and a further advance is announc- 
ed to take place after March 1. This 
will be for merchandise for next Fall 
delivery. 



RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN FANCY 
SWEATERS 

Buyers need feel no hesitancy as to 
the prospects for pullover styles in 
fancy sweaters for the coming Summer. 
There is a bigger range than ever of 
them on the market, and they are the 
favorite style for the home-knitters as 
well. Another factor in the happy out- 
look for pullovers is the fact that the 
number of operation? necessary in their 
production is considerably less than for 
sweater coats, and therefore the cost of 
them is less. 



With the easier situation in supplies 
of artificial silk, quite a range of pull- 
overs in that material is shown. These 
are mostly in a stitch which imitates 
filet crochet and therefore requires less 
silk than the more familiar jersey 
styles; this, too, is an aid in providing 
a dressy, Summery looking article at a 
moderate cost. The styles vary 
from straight line effects with 
a tie belt and straight sleeves to very 
fancy designs with double flaring cuffs 
and skirt. Bell sleeves and cord girdles 
are also featured. 

This same style of pullover is to be 
had in soft wools, as well as the arti- 
ficial silk, and in a wide variety of 
colors. The knitted filet machine work 
is quite novel. 

Collars in Dutch cut are popular, and 
especially if accompanied by a cord and 
tassel tie. Neatly braided girdles, 
which pass around the waist twice and 
are finished with tassels, are considered 
good for both pullovers and sweater 
coats. 

Knitted Suits Shown 

In the regular knitted styles of 
sweater coats there are novelties also. 
The full length Tuxedo sweater with 
narrow sleeves, except just above the 
cuffs, where they extend into a soft 
puff, is a new note. Another good sell- 
ing number is the Tuxedo, whose collar 
extends wider at the bottom and is 



stitched at the side to form pockets. 
Some Tuxedos are shown, too, with a 
waistcoat attachment. A few of the 
more extreme numbers in the flaring 
styles are unusually long this season 
and the shorter numbers are considered 
smarter. 

The return of sports apparel and 
strictly outing costumes has provided a 
place for the knitted suit. This was 
brought out in the United States last 
year, and a couple of models illustrated 
in DRY GOODS REVIEW, and now the 
Canadian trade is showing a few models. 
One is designed for real service. It is 
a warm heather mixture wool with full 
coat fastening and straight plain skirt 
to match. The skirt is finished with a 
border pattern at the bottom, which is 
much neater than a hem. A more fanci- 
ful model is ribbed in Oriental blue and 
mist shades, the blue appearing between 
the ribs. The coat part of this' model 
is a Tuxedo and may be had with waist- 
coat, so that the whole may be worn 
as an outdoor dress, or as a suit with 
blouse. 

Varied Color Range 

The color range is interesting for this 
year. Heather mixtures are shown a 
good deal, but apart from these strong 
colors have the lead. Turquoise, Oriental 
blue, jade green, strawberry, American 
Beauty, old rose, buff and mist grey, 
are all prominent. Maize is liked very 
well for trimmings. One quite smart 
number in turquoise blue in fine knitted 
pattern had a filet collar in maize. 

The wide brush wool scarfs, which 
came into prominence early last Fall, 
are shown in a bigger variety than ever. 
There are scarfs which vary from 12 to 
27 inches in width, but the widest ones 
are considered the smartest. They are 
to be had in plain colors, with fringe 
ends, or with fancy black and white or 
colored borders, \vhich, when folded 
back, form a smart collar effect. Buff, 
or a natural camel hair color, is a fav- 
orite; grey mixtures and such bright 
colors as turquoise, purple, jade, etc., 
are also featured. The newest numbers 
have a belt, either braided or mohair, or 
of the wool itself, attached at the back 
and passing through slides at the sides, 
then tied in front. A small pocket at 
either side in front is another conven- 
ience. Rather large tarns are made up 
to match these comfortable scarfs; they 
make a very desirable set for Spring 
outings or boating later on. The me 
dium width scarfs of 15 inches are liked 
by the juniors. 

Novelties for Men 

Now that men and bovs are gettinu 
into swing again for sport occasions, the 
mills are putting added attention upon 
garments for them. There is an inter- 
esting array of bright-hued sweaters 
and pullovers shown. The pullovers are 
rather a novelty this year since they 
have not had a really strong vogue for 
some years. The same applies here as 
in women's pullovers, however. The 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



91 



pullover requires less time to make than 
the coat, and therefore the cost is kept 
down a little below that of coats. 

Another garment which will make an 
appeal to certain branches of the trade 
is a coat for men. It is made of closely 
knitted heather mixture wool and lined 
with a coarser knitted material in the 
same color. "The wind can't get 
through it," say the makers, and so it 
is especially good for driving, skating, 
and general outdoor work. 

Knitted vests for men are also to be 
had in heather mixtures and will no 
doubt be found comfortable during 
Spring winds. 

Most of the lines described above 
were not offered to the trade until 
within the last month, and are, in addi- 
tion to the regular Spring ranges, which 
were shown before Christmas. They are 
considered good lines for sorting up for 
Spring merchandising. 



Popular Knitted Numbers 



WHAT THE DISCOUNT DOES 

With regard to the exchange and 
duty situation, it is stated that one Can- 
adian woollen mill doing an annual busi- 
ness of over $1,000,000, placed orders in 
the United States last year for $258,000 
worth of raw materials; this year they 
placed less than $5,000 there; $50,000 
was placed in Canada, and the balance 
in England. A certain amount of re- 
sentment accompanies transactions made 
under those adverse conditions, and 
many feel that a big proportion of busi- 
ness will not go back across the border. 
'Moreover," said one recognized author- 
ity in the trade, "by the end of this year 
Canadian money will be at no discount." 




LATEST SWEATER 
NOVELTIES 

That sweaters " are worn at Palm 
Beach on account of their style, rather 
than their warmth, is evidenced by the 
variety of unusual models that are be- 
ing worn. Fancy Shetland, chiffon, al- 
paca and silk sweaters are most popular. 
There are also filet sweaters with 
Georgette linings In bright colors. Filet, 
used as trimming on tricolette sweaters, 
is not new, but when lined with Georg- 
ette, a most distinctive effect is the 
result. 

Just fancy a chemise coat of brown 
filet, lined with orange Georgette and 
featuring a vestee of silver tinsel! An- 
other model of white tricolette had a 
square inset of black filet, with the same 
decoration on the long sleeve. 

Fringe trimming is used considerably 
and "ostrichette," a decoration similar 
to marabou, appears on some tricolette 
models. 
Many Short-Sleeved Models Appearing 

Some manufacturers were prone to 
exercise caution in the matter of mak- 
ing sweaters with short sleeves until 
the success of the short-sleeved blouse 
was assured. But the result has been 
that many women at Southern resorts 



A shawl, scarf and cap set — the scarf has braided belt attached, also pockets and fringe 
The lacey pullover is in American Beauty artificial silk, in filet pattern and Dutch collar. Out 
of the smart Tuxedo models in fine white wool, with touches of black on buttons and tassels 
is at the right. From the Monarch Knitting Co., Dunnville, Ont. 



are seen wearing the short-sleeved 
sweaters over long-sleeved blouses. 

A variation in the ripple sweater has 
appeared as a "double flare" number. 
The rippled skirt is double, the upper 
one being a little shorter than the 
lower. On the cuffs, the double ruffle 
is repeated. A collar, notched at the 
shoulder, is another original feature of 
this model. 



LABOR AND 

FARMERS BUYING 
KNIT GOODS 

At the convention of the Jobbers' As- 
sociation of Knit Goods Buyers, held in 
New York on January 12, there appeared 
to be almost perfect agreement that the 
current high level of prices of knit 
goods would be maintained for at least 
the next year, with the probability that 
further advances would occur, reports 
the "Journal of Commerce." 

The arguments supporting the gener- 
ally-accepted viewpoint included the fol- 
lowing principal items: 

(1) The world-wide shortage of knit 
goods, creating a market in virtually 
all foreign countries. 

(2) Prospects of an unusually large 
domestic business, based upon the in- 



crease in spending, notably or the part 
of labor and the farming population. 

(3) Curtailment of productive capa- 
city through shortening of hours and 
difficulties of labor supply. 

(4) The high cost of raw materials, 
labor, etc. 

Mills' Attitude 

In support of the sentiment favoring 
higher price levels was noted the atti- 
tude of mills in refusing to sell for more 
than three months ahead, behind which 
lay a similar hesitancy upon the part of 
yarn manufacturers and the decreasing 
output and increasing price of yarns. 
The shortage of stocks in retailers' 
hands was also put forward as a contri- 
buting factor. 

Inquiry directed to a number of those 
in attendance failed to reveal any ma- 
terial anxiety respecting the possible ad- 
verse effect upon the knit goods industry 
which misrht result from inability of 
bankers, producers and other interests 
to evolve a method for financing the 
country's export trade, especially to Eu- 
rope. The representative of several 
mills asserted that, despite the unfavor- 
able foreign exchange situation, his firm 
was daily turning down man\ inquiries 
because of inability to obtain the goods 
required Generally the disposition w?.s 
to regai-d export business as of secon- 



n 



K .\ 1TTED <J O O 1 1 S 

Three of the Newest Opera fists 




At the li'fl is ;i "Winter" number of line wool-finish cotton with silk stripe; all three 

h;i\e ribbon ahoolder-Btrai», The middle numl)er is one of the popular cuts for evening 

wear when a low back is required: this is a Swiss rib number. At the ritfht is a white 

spring-needle \est with pink ribbon band and straps. From the Spring lines of the 

Peerless I'nderwear Co., Hamilton, Ont. 



dary importance in view of the difficul- 
ties of obtaining what was wanted for 
domestic needs and to feel that the prob- 
lem of financing foreign trade would be 
worked out in one way or another. Prac- 
tically the same conditions hold in Can- 
ada as were brought to notice in New 
York. 



Bathing Suit Styles 

Remain Staple 

Knitted bathing suits are selling in 
such quantities that mill men have little 
time to think about new styles for them 
or even touches of novelty. The fancy 
stripe trimming with belt or girdle to 
match is being featured again and prac- 
tically all the models shown have the 
ribbed cuff at the knee. Sleeveless 
styles with square or V-neck, or in 
some cases round neckline, are in gen 
eral demand. The range of styles offer- 
ed by any one firm is, if anything, cut 
down from last year in order to increase 
the output. Prices, of course, continue 
high. This is partly due to labor and 
yarn prices, and to some degree as 
well in the advances in sateen which is 
used for facings. Before the war the 
sateen used for these purposes cost the 
manufacturers 8 cents a yard. Last 
year the price was 22 cents and since 
then it has jumped to 24 and then just 
recently to 35 cents. While sateen would 
appear to be a small item in the cost of 
a bathing suit, ever, at 35 cents a yard, 
the fact remains that it has an influence 
and is taken into consideration when the 
priro for the output is being fixed. Other 
costs of material have all tended up- 
ward in the case of bathing suits as well 
as of other knitted lines. 



Remarks By 

Different Millmen 

"We arc urging all our customers to 
place orders now." 

"The retailer should just place orders 
as he needs the troods." 

"Bnvera should cover their needs now 
for this year." 

"The knit goods situation is as un- 
■ < rt:iin as life." 



"What is the use of asking for quota- 
tions? Look at the exchange." 

"We're just at the meicy of the people 
who have the raw materials." 

"We are continually surprised at the 
prices people are willing to pay." 

"There is no influence in sight that 
vould tend to lower prices." 



Dry Goods Review 

"The market in mercerized yarns has 
gone wild." 

"Pour months ago tine wool, the trade 
thought, wai as high as it could go. 
Since then it has advanced SO per cent." 

"We were afraid we could not do busi- 
ness this year because of prices, but we 

have plenty of it already." 

"Artificial silk supplies are consii 
ably easier than a year ago." 

"Canadian knitting mills are well and 
permanently established." 

"The only thing that could relieve the 
situation for this year would be longer 
working hours." 

"At least half the population of ' 
ada wears silk at some time." 

"We have not a glove to sell before 
October and can take no more orders 
before then in one of our biggest lines 
of hosiery." 



Messrs. Clatworthy & Son, Ltd., lfil 
King Street W., Toronto, are making 
alterations to their premises which will 
double their former space. They hope 
thereby to be able to catch up with their 
back orders. 



Buy r k.„ Co„ 



I Wu S.,u. f . M^uUvK lllM»-nijM]M, 



C. H. Smith Company, Limite d Daily Page of Store News! 



The Wool Market as 
Manufacturer of Knit- 
ted Goods Sees It- 



Obey That Irresistible 

Impulse of Spring 




To-morrow 



White Colloru Tk»l Win 
Imlant Approval 



A Glimpse at the Newest Materials m Ladies' Spring Suits 



i~ o» aba I 

UlaY. 



War Espoajtno an Warm 
CaxaVana ami Arena. 

TMfcM, O, au. U OV a-*. 






MM 



1 —r* mo 



ru>oa rtTTiTtaiTaTois 



Distinctive Daintiness In 
"Undies" 



BABY FLOLNCDNC 



rHer First Corset 



? Byl* ""rr"' ai* — 



25 to 45 ccolt • yard i 




FnfT rt *-— "- '" PMiMtb ( rM » . .- . 1J io.lt 

BaUy Bvtva. ftWft list lull! PttfUMMtnxi. IS to Il» 



•in minimi 






■• 



SECOND FLOOR 
PITT STREET STORE 



J/sM£k 



l.-SSAMTaiOl! SI LAST-1L' H 111 HTT ST IJigT 



Canadian 

Booster 

Toilet 

Preparations 



25c 
Hi 

2Sc.«», 
3»c 
49< 
49c 
49c 
49c 

Sfc.ISc 

S9c 

Jl 49 lo IS 99 

8f 

49c 

ISc 



The C. II. Smith Co., Windsor, Ont., used this page display in featuring Spring goods a year 
ago. Note the editorial on the all-important condition of the wool market, also the special 
announcements at the right. Red ink was used for the largest headings and the name. 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



93 



HAVE YOU ANY LOAFERS? 

If you found a clerk loafing on 
the job you certainly wouldn't of- 
fer to pay his room rent and then 
furnish him heat and light as 
well. 

But do you know that a great 
many dealers are doing almost the 
same thing with certain lines or 
their merchandise that are no more 
profitable than the loafing em- 
ployee? 

A salesman is engaged for no 
other purpose than to earn new 
profits. You certainly don't keep 
him just for ornament. 

It is the profit you are after — 
both on salesman and stock. 

Just stop to think for a moment. 
How much difference is there be- 
tween a shelf full of slowly moving 
stock or stock that does not move 
at all, and the clerk who is loafing 
on the job? Both were brought 
into your store to earn profits and 
both have refused to do it. Is 
there really any difference between 
the two — so far as their money 
value to you is concerned? 

Certainly not. 

You'd fire the clerk who loafed, 
wouldn't you? But how about the 
loafing merchandise — the shelf- 
warmers that are resting so com- 
fortably about your store? You 
are paying rent for the space they 
occupy. So also are you paying 
for the insurance that protects 
them from loss by fire. Other 
items of expense you can trace to 
them. Why shouldn't these shelf- 
warmers be given the same treat- 
ment that you would mete out to 
the loafing clerk? 

The keen and successful dealer 
would dismiss the loafing clerk. 
And he also would round up the 
loafing merchandise — mark it down 
— even below cost if necessary and 
send it kiting out of the door. 

He soon would have in place of 
the loafing clerk one who was 
worthy of his hire — one who would 
earn profits. In place of the loafing 
merchandise he also would fill his 
shelves with that which was in real 
demand — the merchandise that 
made quick profits and really was 
worthy of the space it occupied. 

Profit is eaten up by the stock 
that doesn't move. It is rather 
hard to avoid mistakes in pur- 
chases, but a wise rule to follow is 
to buy trade-marked, advertised, 
and honor-made goods. Then you 
are playing safe. 




For the Sportsman 

Warm and wooly enough for the breeziest 

green are these golf hose made in dark grey 

with cuff design in brown and white. Shown 

by the Royal Knitting Co., Guelph, Ont. 



LEAMING STORE 
ASSUMES FINE 
NEW APPEARANCE 

MR. J. H. Hynd, of Leamington. 
Ont., has just completed the re- 
modelling of his dry goods and 
men's furnishings store. He now has a 
modern store front and attractive win- 
dows panelled in oak and finished with 
a marble base. The brick work above 
che windows is finished in rock face 
stucco which adds to the imposing front. 
The floor space has been considerably 
enlarged by the opening up of the sec- 
ond floor for a complete women's ready- 
to-wear department and also one of the 
most attractive house-furnishings de- 
partments in Western Ontario. In con- 
nection with these departments there is 
a complete rest room fitted up for wo- 
men customers. 

The men's c'otMnT department, which 
is in charge of G. S. Parkinson, has in- 




creased so that it was necessary to build 
on an addition to the rear of the store. 
By taking out the front stairway new 
show windows were possible which af- 
ford a further important improvement. 
A modern system of lighting has been 
installed throughout so that the store 
is now a most creditable one. Mr. Hynd 
reports that his business has increased 
six times over from the original turn- 
over of four years ago. His success he 
attributes largely to good newspaper ad- 
vertising and his ability to back up that 
advertising with reliable merchandise. 
Especially when special sales are an- 
nounced is he careful to have the goods 
up to all that is claimed in the adver- 
tising. Mr. Hynd has an extensive * 
mailing list throughout the surrounding 
district and this has brought in con- 
siderable business. 



Plenty of Woolens 

For The Babv 



A manufacturers' agent, who handles 
imported as well as domestic lines of 
underwear, hosiery, gloves, etc., stated 
to DRY GOODS REVIEW recently that 
Canadian manufacturers have the most 
complete lines ever offered for infants 
and children. A visit to a number of 
the mills early in February seemed to 
bear this out, for there is a wide range 
of the very finest types of little soft 
white wool garments with flat lock 
seams, silk bindings, and the latest de- 
vices in fastenings in order to reduce 
the use of safety pins to a minimum. 

Socks for little tots are now being 
finished with a dainty crochet top, 
through which a crochet cord is threaded 
in order to tie the top in place. 

Sweaters and caps are in great 
variety and are modelled after the 
types for grown-ups wherever they are 
practicable. We see quite a variety of 
clever little pullovers, with cord tie at 
the collar, some with angora trimmings 
— which seem to be the special preroga- 
tive of infants — long-waisted effects, 
ribbed waistlines and cuffs, and so on. 
The newest adaptation is a miniature 
Tuxedo model, in regular sweatercoat 
style. It is fashioned of very fine wool, 
with the collar in fancv stitch. 



Over $12,000 in cash bonuses was dis- 
tributed by F. R. MacMillan, a prominent 
Saskatchewan department store owner, 
the first week in February, marking the 
close of the most successful business 
season of the store. 

Mr. MacMillan, in addressing the em- 
ployees, stated that the turnover had 
increased with the reduction in store 
hours in spite of the fact that the re- 
verse condition might have been ex- 
pected. 

Westlake Bros., Ltd., 24 Wellington 
Street W., Toronto, have increased their 
warehouse space to double its former 
size. 



!'l 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 






LT-xxrr.x n.i-i-i-i.T,T.i.T-T-T-^i-Ei-JJTj| 



Denton, Mitchell ty Duncan 



Wnolesale Dry Goods 
Gents Furnishings 
House Furnishings 



etc. 



See our Samples before 

placing Orders for Fall. 

It will pay you. 



Denton, Mitchell (y Duncan 

79-83 Wellington St. West 
Toronto. Ont. 



^:r^T;r^rTri-cr^^TT-x^T? - T ^^^ , nTi i-r mi 1 1 1 m U H mi rn n nTiTTlTTrmTTT ircf 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



9b 




The Trade Mark of Honest Value 



^, 




"Dods Knit" 

Underwear for Men and Boys 

Your customers will appreciate the exceptional sturdiness, splendid 
wearing qualities, and reasonable price of DODS KNIT garments. 



Combinations 
Elastic Knit 
Flat Knit 



Merino 



Two-piece Suits 
Scotch Knit 

Heavy Elastic 



To Wholesale Trade Only 



Dods Knitting Company, Limited 



Orangeville, Ontario 



SELLING AGENTS: 
Ontario and Western Canada : Quebec and Maritime Provinces 

R. R. DAVIS 
33 Melinda St., Toronto 



WM. C. FORSTER 
43 St. Sacrament St., Montreal 



& 



96 



KNITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 



The Gloves and Hosiery House of Canada 





^■■tf|»yfr b 



GELIGHTFUL ORIGINAL n 

As displayed in these models, added to the 
recognized AVON-KNIT quality, means sales 
and satisfaction. The full range includes 
many more clever effects in sweater coats, 
pullovers, mufflers and many new numbers 
added to our well-known line of toques, mit- 
tens, gloves, etc. 



Obey 1 hat Impulse 
and Order Noic 




AVON HOSIERY LIMITED 

Stratford, Ontario 



SOLE SELLING AGENTS 

RICHARD L. BAKER & CO. 

84 Wellington St. West 
Toronto 




© 



3 L" 



H C 



=© 



Dry Goods Review KNITTED GOODS 97 



They really do 

lower Clothing Bills 



You know how quickly a customer can be "sold" 
on an economical proposition now a days. The 
problem of clothing her boys is very real. 

Here's one way you can help her. Sell her Buster 
Brown Stockings. 

Buster Brown Stockings do wear longer. They stand 
the strain of boisterous play. They require less mend- 
ing. They cost less in the end. 

Buster Brown Stockings are closely-knit. Triple- 
reinforced at the toes and heels. Fitted with double- 
ply leg and foot. Smoothly knitted from extra-long 
yarn. Shaped to fit. Fast dyes keep them from fading. 

By recommending and selling Buster Brown Stockings 
tojyour customer you'll perform a real service. A ser- 
vice they'll not forget. 

Order from your wholesaler. 

Buster Brown's Sister's Stockings are excellent for 
the girls. Knitted from fine two-thread English mer- 
cerized lisle, in Black, Leather Shade Tan, Pink, Blue 
and White. Well shaped and moderately priced. Order 
a supply of these as well. 



THE CHIPMAN-HOLTON KNITTING CO., LIMITED 
Hamilton, Ont. 







STOCKING 







K N I T T KD GOODS 



I>ni Goods Review 



Customers Who Stay Sold 




You may depend upon 
ATLANTIC UNDER- 
WEAR to satisfy the 
most exacting under- 
wear requirements of 
your "hardest to please" 
customers. 

The next best thing to 
making a new customer 
is keeping him. Sell 
him ATLANTICS and 
insure his satisfaction. 



Ask your jobber 



UNDERWEAR 

Unshrinkable 



Atlantic Underwear Company, Ltd. 

MONCTON, N.B. 

E. H. WALSH & COMPANY 

Montreal and Toronto 

Selling Agents for Quebec, Ontario and Weitern Provinces 



Will I 



Trad 




RtCHMMO 

HOSIERY 



ncrease 
In Hosiery Department 

ONCE a customer finds a certain brand of Hosiery that fits 
perfectly, is smart, durable and good value, the dealer from 
whom it was purchased is assured continued patronage. 
That is what happens when merchants specialize in the sale of 
CIRCLE-BAR HOSIERY and familiarize customers with the 
name. The merchants can safely lay in a complete stock, know- 
ing eveiy pair will bring satisfaction. 

The reasons: — 

CIRCLE-BAR HOSIERY features the latest modes in silk, cash- 
mere, mercerized, lisle and cotton ; every pair has reinforced heels, 
toes and soles, no seams — no wrinkles. 

The customer is pleased with the stockings and the price, and you 
will be satisfied with the profit. 

The Circle-Bar Knitting Company 

Limited 
Kincardine '.' Ontario 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



99 



Bonworth 
Knitting Yarns 



'Super 



y * 



A 2-ply Floss sold in balls. 
Spun from Australian Wool. 
Ideal for the creation of 
smart attractive effects. 



'Electra' 

4-ply fingering with a spec- 
ial twist imparted to pre- 
vent splitting. Sold in 
skeins: Without equal on 
the market. Wonderfully 
soft and pliable. 

36 Colors 




CANADIAN WOOLLENS, 

Worsted Yarn Spinners and Dyers 

PETERBOROUGH ^SSSS^ 

MAOI IN CAMAPA ; 



LIMITED 



ONTARIO 



100 



k \ i r t l : i ) < ; < >< » i > s 



Dry Goods heview 





Sweater I !o 
Mulllers 
Muffler Sets 
Toques 

Caps 

Mili> and (cloves 

I'nys' Jerseys 

Bathing Suits 



The Buyers Are Enthusiastic- 

About the Bentro-Knit Range for 1920. They appreciate 
the real quality and good value that is still to be found in the 
Bentro-Knit line. If our representative has not yet called, 
you can look forward to seeing the excellent numbers in 
Sweater (.oats. Mufflers, Muffler Sets, Toques, Caps, Mitts 
and Gloves for Fall delivery, and the Bentro-Knit Boys' 
Jerseys and Bathing Suits for men, women and children 
for Spring and Summer delivery. 



The Williams-Trow Knitting Company 



Limited 



Stratford 



Canada 



J. M. ROBERTSON & CO. 

Toronto 



J. B. TROW & CO. O'BRIEN 7 . ALLEN & CO. 

Montreal Winnipeg 

A. J. SNELL, Vancouver 



A. M MOUAT & CO. 

Calgary 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



101 




A Problem We're Facing 

The tremendous difficulty of getting the pure woollen yards from which alone 

Priscilla Brand 

children's knitted garmets are made, has made it almost impossible to keep up with 
the wide-spread demand. 

This difficulty will grow less. Meantime, we wish to thank our customers for their 
patience, and ask their continued co-operation. We shall do our best to meet their 
needs as quickly as possible. 



HENRY DAVIS & CO., Limited 



259 Spadina Ave., Toronto 



Peerless Underwear 

PEERLESS Underwear has that dainty, beau- 
tifully-fashioned appearance which is so 
irresistibly appealing to the feminine mind. 

And it possesses as well the superior wearing 
qualities which have made Peerless garments 
the standard in many homes. 



MOODIER 




Peerless Underwear 
Company, Limited 

Controlled by 

J. R. Moodie & Sons, Limited 

Hamilton, Ont. 







Remember — there is no low grade 
or cheap "CEETEE"— only the 
very highest grade and best quali- 
ty underclothing bears the famous 
"CEETEE SHEEP" trademark. 
If you are catering to the best 

trade in your district you must sell "CEETEE" — 

For ordinary underwear you will find TURNBULL'S brand at least the 

equal of any made in Canada. 



CEETEE 

THE PURE WOOL 

UNDERCLOTHING 

THAT WILL NOT SHRINK 



MADE BY 



THE C. TURNBULL CO. OF GALT, ONTARIO 

Also Manufacturers of Turnbulls's Ribbed Underwear f Ladies and Children and Turnbull's 

"M" Bands for Infants. 



CEETEE " 



102 



K N I T T R I ) (iOODS 



lh-ij Gooda Review 



ii«iiiiiniBiiiiiinai 



| 
■ 



I 

| 
1 



| 
ll 



| 
| 

i 



i 



I 

I 
i 



Ladies' 




III 



| 
1 



Underwear 



OXFORD KNIT 

Summer or light-weight 

VESTS 

DRAWERS 

COMBINATIONS 

— Complete range — 

Oxford Knit garments are sold in the best stores everywhere, 
and are extremely popular with smartly dressed women. The 
superior, delightfully soft finish and the comfortable, neat cut 
of each and every Oxford garment have endeared them to 
wearers everywhere. 

The two lines illustrated are especially good sellers at this 
time. 

The upper one is a Spring needle knit with double shoulder 
straps. The lower one has a drop stitch pattern with rna- 
chine-made straps. 

Order your Spring stock NOW! 

See samples in the hands of your jobbers, 
or write us direct. 

The Oxford Knitting Company, Ltd. 



Woodstock 



Ontario 



Western Representative: T. H. WARDELL, 102 Hammond Block, Winnipeg 



II 
I 



I 



| 
1 



I 






l!=llllllll=ll 



Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



103 




Shawllets, Knitted Coats, 
Pullovers, Cap and 
Muffler Sets, Mufflers, 
Toques, Tams, Caps, 
Mitts, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Men's and Boys' Jerseys, 
Children's Suits, The 
Ballantyne Glove (Scotch 
Knit) 



The 

BALLANTYNE 



N 



a me 



on these lines of 
Knitted Goods is 
your Best Selling 
Argument, 
Because — 



it is found only on goods that attract by their bewitching 
style, in garments where style is paramount, and that you 
can always recommend for quality and sterling value. 

The Ballantyne range for Fall, 1920, is now being 
shown. In spite of our increased production, we can promise 
prompt deliveries only on goods that are ordered early. When 
the Ballantyne man calls on you, place your order for the full 
extent of your requirements. 



R. M. BALLANTYNE, LIMITED 

Stratford, Canada 



£ZL 



Il'l 



K NITTED GOODS 



Dry Goods Review 




Dry Goods Review 



KNITTED GOODS 



105 



The Mark of Fine Merchandise 




Jfafartcsi 




HAWTHORN 
FABRICS 



Wool Jersey 

Knitted 
Suitings 

Velour 
Cloakings 



HAWTHORN KNIT- 
TED SUITINGS, in 

plain and Scotch heather 
mixtures. Nothing quite so 
smart, comfortable and ap- 
propriate for the average 
woman's outdoor activities. 
They are adaptable to the 
open country, and are ser- 
viceable to a degree far be- 
yond the life of other fabrics. 

We will be glad to send you 
on request a list of the names 
of jobbers who sell Haw- 
thorn Knitted Suitings by 
the yard, or manufacturers 
who sell it in made-up gar- 
ments. 



ftatotfjorn jffltlte Htmtteb 



Carleton $lace, <0nt. 



106 



I) r;/ floods Review 



The Newest in Accessories 



New Goods for Spring Are Coming In, But Some Deliveries \re Slow 

Easter Merchandise 



Interest Live in 



A PERSIAN VEIL 

The newest thing in veils is a large 
draped affair having a two-inch border 
of silk embroidery in several colors in 
imitation of the pattern on Paisley 
shawls. 

The wide Shetland meshes are selling 
well in the stores in black, navy, brown, 
and purple. Elaborate French veils with 
scroll embroidery and heavy dots are 
featured by exclusive shops; but are 
rather out of the question for popular 
trade on account of the prices which 
range from $15 upwards. 

A NEW SET 

Amongst novelties from Paris is a 
matching turban and purse made of 
Dutch blue cloth brocaded in gold. The 
pattern is lavishly outlined by coral and 
gold beads. The purse is flat and lined 
with salmon faille, having a pocket mir- 
ror and change purse of the same mater- 
ial. 

FLOWER TRIMMINGS 

In response to the demand for silk 
flower trimmings on lingerie and evening 
wear, tbe French have created several 
new wreaths to be sold by the yard. One 
is of tiny flowers made of narrow bro- 
caded ribbon in a number of different 
colors. Another has wild roses made of 
raspberry satin plentifully interspersed 
with jade satin leaves. 

NECKLETS 

In bead necklets, the newest are those 
made of galalith in shades of amber, 
paddy, tan, grey and blue. They have 
rather large ornaments of self at the 
bottom in fanciful shapes, some of them 
with an Egyptian head of horse in a 
silver motif. They will sell from about 
$7 to $12 a piece. 

NECKWEAR 

Neckwear seems to be experiencing a 
lull in business February, preparatory to 
the brisk trade that is expected next 
month. This has been forewarned by 
the fact that the newest dress models 
are featuring collars, and women will 
i onsequently be refurbishing their 
collarless frocks of last season. Suits 
are showing vests in a great many cases, 
also, but they are shorter than last year 
and more in the form of a blouse front. 

Tabs and trillings are being extensive- 
ly made of net and laces, filet in par- 
ticular. Sets of embroidered organdie 
I with lace are featured by the high 
class trade. A new frilling of net in 
shades of jade, maize and rose em- 
broidered in gold is shown by the T. 
Eaton Co. 

M irabou neckpieces are again show- 
ing much activity for Spring. Tbe 
brown shades are in the lead, and tbose 
lined with soft silk are especially at- 
tractive. 



CORSAGES 
Corsages and Camillas <>f artificial 
posies are considered correct this sea- 
son, according to buyers just hack from 
New York. 

II INDBAGS AND PURSES 

The kodak leather bars which have 
been featured in DRY GOODS REVIEW 
are growing daily in popularity. The 
shape is one which seems to be liked by 
all classes of trade, and consequently 
there is quite an extensive price range 
in that style of bag. In more dressy 
bags chenille tassels have given place 
either to fine chain tassels in gold or 
silver finish or to a fairly large covered 
button in the material of the bag. Metal 
frames are once more the feature of 
fashionable bags. Some have chain 
handles and some have fabric handles. 
The frame itself is narrow and "digni- 
fied" and usually quite fancy. Some of 
them appear to be solid carved work 
with cupids, Dutch heads, flowers, 
foliage or conventional effects often 
in deeply-embossed patterns. These 
frames are rather expensive and de- 
liveries are slow but they are more dur- 
able than the celluloid type. 

Beaded bags continue to arrive from 
Paris and England in response to the 
generous appreciation which prevails 
for them. Exquisite workmanship, de- 
signing and rich coloring in great variety 
are everywhere evident. 

HIGH-GRADE LACES WANTED 

According to recent reports from the 
Nottingham markets, practically all of 
the lace manufacturers there are en- 
gaged on the better class of goods, since 



that is the merchandise that is meeting 
with most demand. Pleatings, filets, 
flouncings, wide insertions, and binche 
goods are finding a ready market in the 
United States, South America and 
France. Inquiries have been received 
from German and Austrian houses, it is 
said, but as yet no orders have been 
placed. Nottingham manufacturers, ac- 
cording to the reports, are in a far better 
position commercially regarding prices, 
quantities and deliveries than many of 
the Continental lace markets. Prices 
are high, and show, moreover, an up- 
ward tendency. 

SPRING FOOTWEAR 

A very strong demand is already 
opening up in footwear departments for 
low cuts for Spring. The Cuban heel, 
walking Oxford in black and brown is a 
decidedly popular style. The "shimmy" 
pump is also proving a good seller. It 
is characterized by a high cut in front 
and a high Louis heel. In fact, the 
pumps with shield fronts and semi- 
Oxford ties are quite "the thing." 
Buckles are just a little less prominent 
for Spring — possibly -owing to their high 
prices. A very big season later on for 
whites in both cloth and kid is undoubt- 
edly on the way, though many dealers 
are not stocking the high white kids at 
all, owing to their price. They would 
have to sell at $20, said one of the large 
Toronto buyers to a DRY GOODS RE- 
VIEW representative. 

Speaking of low cuts, one buyer who 
visited Boston recently, sat in the lobby 
of a hotel on purpose to observe the 
type of shoes favored by women. In 




Stuart Spring Bags 



A rich brown velours of deep pile is shown at the left. It has champagne lining and 
carved brass frame. In the centre is a brown leather linen-grain kodak bag — a style 
which is particularly popular. The soft richness of grey suede never "goes out." 
This one with silver frame is well liked. Note how the round inset in these soft bags 
adds to their capacity and the button finish makes them a little more tailored than the 
more familiar tassels. Shown by courtesy of the Western Leather Goods Co., Toronto. 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



107 




Legends in Ribbons 



Some of the airy, fairy, pixie and thistle designs originated by Johnson, Cowdin & Co., 
New York, in their new range of brocaded ribbons for 1920. The pattern at the left 
is in black, blues and old gold colors. In the middle is black, peacock blue and silver, 
and at the right, rich nasturtium shades with a subduing taupe. There is a story 

depicted in each. 



less than ah hour he counted 35 who 
were low cuts and 18 who had either 
high shoes or spats — which may have 
meant in several cases, low shoes being 
worn with the spats. "It may be the 
case that a little difference in price 
favors low cuts rather than high, but 
whatever the reason, the fact remains 
that more and more women are wearing 
low cuts throughout the year," he re- 
marked. 

A DRIVE FOR VEILS 

Why Not Talk Veilings for One Whole 

Week and See What Results That 

Will Brine in Your Town? 

Various branches of the trade in 
United States have found from time to 
time that a concentrated drive during 
some particular week on one special line 
of merchandise brings excellent results. 
There has been featured in past seasons 
a gingham week, a notion and sewing 
goods week, a blouse week and so. The 
idea has been used by the Canadian 
trade in some of these lines. Last year 
gingham week was made quite a success 
throughout the Canadian trade. Baby 
week is also well established. 

National veiling week is now being 
worked up across the line. The dates 
set are March 15th to 20th. The date 
itself is very opportune, not only for 
the purpose of giving a good start to 
the veiling business for Easter, but of 
giving it a foodhold in permanent popu- 
lar demand, the results of which would 
be felt for seasons to come. If every 
veiling department in Canada took ad- 
vantage of that veiling week to feature 
varieties and novelties as well as staple 
lines of veilings, there is no doubt that 
the impression made upon the public 
would be important. Why not take a 



long clear look ahead and make a special 
drive along with American merchants 
for the week beginning March 15th, to 
get some real results from the veiling 
counters. Canadian women as well as 
those elsewhere would no doubt appre- 
ciate educative efforts on the part of 
stores in the correct methods of wearing 
various types of veils and the patterns 
which are best adaptable to certain fea- 
tures. A little research work on the 
part of saleswomen and buyers could 
prepare them well from now until the 
veiling week with matter which would 
be of real interest to their customers. 

A great many women have been edu- 
cated to the value which a smart veil is 
to her costume but a great many still 
need suggestions as to the attraction of 
having a set of veils on hand. The pro- 
gressive veiling department will endea- 
vor to impress upon its customers the 
value of having different colored veils 
and different types of veils suitable for 
the different types of dress, just as the 
toilette is more perfect when a hat is 
part and parcel of the scheme and not 
just one hat worn with every costume. 

Other departments in the store might 
very well co-operate with the veiling de- 
partment in assisting in this education. 
For instance, when a woman selects a 
smart brown suit in the ready-to-wear 
section and a brown hat in the millinery 
section, both departments might suggest 
to her the selection of a suitable veil to 
complete the costume. Lace and neck- 
wear departments could also assist ma- 
terially. 

The featuring 1 of this veiling week is 
being conducted by the Veiling Asso- 
ciation of New York, who are nutting 
forth excellent suggestions for the fea- 
turing of veilings in window displays, 
showcards, newspaper advertising, etc. 



GLOVES 

One of the biggest items to be anti- 
cipated for the Easter trade is that of 
gloves. They are a most necessary ad- 
junct to the Spring suit and for every 
suit and separate coat, the smartly- 
dressed woman has one or two pairs of 
gloves. 

Silk is promised a bigger season than 
ever on account of the ever-increasing 
price of kids. Good silk glomes can still 
be had for prices ranging from $1.25 to 
$2.50 per pair retail. The thinner lines 
of chamoisette are also being shown ex- 
tensively, but the lined and duplex var- 
iety will probably have a rest from now 
until next Fall. And speaking of next 
Fall, there is little doubt of a big season 
in heavy chamoisette; one firm is al- 
ready sold up until January 1921. 

The colors for Spring are the suit 
colors, navy, browns, modes, and greys. 
No new style has been created to dis- 




ft 



li 



Early Spring Showing 



Millinery, Suits, Coats and Dresses 
Skirts, Waists, etc. 



| Commencing Tuesday, Feb.25| 

Thr 11*0 (Her being ^prmgMkr »<■ nlmJ 

making an tarty tkemtrng tn the 

jJv™«- Jepartmenli. 

miUa«*7— !'i'[J*'- J>f wt»nH b,»t. u, til it«- n« 

<r*\i> ball '•■ fli- • r lnm»*l »t»J ll 
4ai0<r trtrc*!!*. »nl ball and IMJII 






-■->l..nnrv »lv iv« 

t ukk kaftfe 



Drauaa lot Sprtnj laafan '>n.nt,t anil dir*m»ra 

Iim#« - l'h <»- It] ■> 'aiur» *nJ ap' 

- 'i*i of Wad*. *idrt toll 
iJc<t(« u,4 i mil tkiru, hntlntW. ft|tiln| •' »^»*. 
OuU n .« iboviai t« U • BtoM ancUhililrm 

*r» m -r<nrt ••■■ M, £ibar4inaa. 

.■ . ■ 

-• flftf* blhk1'< 
ltd I r- «'»n'» W> 

-■-. »lto in our \i.u" dt yntntit "t »r» 

■Jflv Ttupf- 

-* s/id KIod*. 




Tuesday, Juvenile Day* Brings Boy's Fleece-lined] 
Shirts and Drawers at 45c Per Garment 



«M Carneatt Oali. Skirt* M P..»*r 



■ rtrr.r bar* All dcarwf Om rW T.»U». al «S< 



Another Lot of Boy*' Lined Mitts oo Stle Tueidajr Moroiifai ik. r^.U P™, 25c | 



Tuesday Silk Specials 

SI. 25 

1) inch Celart-d Paflatta $!■■*■ 



Ladies' Boots Tuesday 
$1.50 




A good ad. for early Spring dis- 
play. Used by Robinson & Co., 
Winnipeg, Man. 5 columns wide 
by 18 Yi inches deep. 

place the gauntlet wrist in popular favor, 
although slight variations are shown in 
stitched trimmings and colored insets. 
The strap wrist with a single dome is 
very good and also the elastic wrist. 

In silk gloves a rather novel treatment 
is that of having the strap fastening un- 
der the wrist and a row of false fasteners 
down the side back of the cuff. 



108 



l> U KSS ACCESSOR I ES 



Dri/ Goods Review 




n 



y 



Knit Goods for Fall 



The effectiveness of a line of 
samples is best indicated by the 
business booked by salesmen 
showing them. 

At this period we have never be- 
fore had such a volume of knit 
goods business on our books for 
Fall delivery. 

Do not fail to see these samples, 
reflecting the very latest styles 
in a variety of beautiful plain 
and contrasting shades. 

Acme Glove Works 

Limited 

Montreal 



minimi 



m 



IT T HIlTnTT 




7\ 




Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



109 



— mv»' * ** ~** v: — i cor- 




Ritchie Silk Lingerie 

attracts women of all classes 



Many chic new creations in Satins and Crepe de Chines, daintily em- 
broidered, lace trimmed and many of the popular hemstitched styles. 
Make Ritchie Silk Camisoles, Combinations, Night Gowns and Under- 
skirts popular sellers in your lingerie department. 

Order now to insure delivery for Easter trade. 



Also makers of handkerchiefs, 
laces and embroideries. 

"The Canadian-made Line" 



H. P. RITCHIE & CO. 

38 CLIFFORD ST., TORONTO 




=*■ < 



110 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 






Birmingham Neckwear 
for Spring 



Sheer, crisp organdy and net, dainty crepes and 
chiffons, allover laces and combinations of fabrics 
are all extensively used in creating our splendid 
Spring range now showing. 

The designs are of the smartest and daintiest, the 
materials the finest — representing the most 
approved styles for Spring. 

Now is the time for placing Easter orders. 



T. H. BIRMINGHAM and CO., LIMITED 

93 to 99 SPADINA AVENUE, TORONTO 





T *oc ia^ 



" The Exclusive Neckwear House " 




Dry Goods Revievj 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



ill 



"JULIAN SALE" LEATHER GOODS 

New Lines for Spring 

Our new lines for Spring present many attractive and exclusive things — just such 
goods as will enhance the stocks and assortments of those who trade in fine leather 
goods and novelties — lines that are bound to attract custom to the retailers who 
feature high-class merchandise in these lines — good sellers — and unusual values. 



HAND BAGS 

AND 

STRAP HANDLE 

PURSES 

Out of our big range of samples we are 
-electing to feature here four lines that 
will be popular for Spring — and we urge 
that you place your orders without de- 
lay to insure complete and prompt de- 
livery. 





SILK BAGS 



CANTEEN BAGS 



SILK BAGS — These goods are in the high-grade 
class and very suitable for a select trade — beauti- 
fully fashioned and finished — in blacks and colors 
— very specially finished and fitted — SELL AT 
SIGHT. 

KODAK BAGS — In a very novel range — in this 
line we are featuring the new Ostrich grain 
leather, besides other leathers — and they are 
shown in black, green and other colors — ONE OF 
THE BEST SELLERS. 

CANTEEN BAGS— If anything, to be in greater 
demand than ever — they're so serviceable — our 
lines are special quality and are exceptionally 
well fitted and finished. VERY POPULAR. 



STRAP HANDLE PURSES— No lines that we 
have made in years have had greater sale than 
the "JULIAN SALE" strap handle purses- 
made in Ostrich grain, Vachette and other grain 
leathers — This will be a big season for them. 
FIFTY STYLES. 




STRAP HANDLE PURSES 



Our travellers have a complete 
range of samples of these and 
manv other lines you'll need and 
want— BE ON THE LOOKOUT 
FOR THE "JULIAN SALE" 
MAN — ORDER NOW, AND 
ORDER ENOUGH. 




KODAK BAGS 



The JULIAN SALE LEATHER GOODS CO. Ltd. 

Wholesale — Factories — Sample Rooms and Offices: 

600 KING STREET WEST - - TORONTO 



112 



► R E S S ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




CHAMO SUEDE DUPLEX 
CHAMOSUEDEANDSILK 



Mak 



e in 




Canada 



{^ruww^uccla^ 



As always — in the smart- 
est and newest styles and 

shade.-', faultlessly cut and 
finished, to give that Qi 
and lasting (it for which 
they are noted. 



Griffin Gloves Limited 

TORONTO 

Sole Selling Agents: 

Richard Baker & Company 

84 Wellington Street West, Toronto 






"The little things 
that count" 



Those little touches that 
mean so much to the smart 
costume are an important 
item on the shopping list of 
the well dressed woman. She 
knows that in securing just 
the right match, or contrast, 
the desired effect is assured. 

And of course BUTTONS 
naturally lead in importance. 
in lending the finishing 
touches. 

Let us assist you in- making 
your 
BUTTON DEPARTMENT 

the reputed place to buy al- 
ways just the right lines. 

All sort- of 
BUTTONS 
of irreproachable quality 
at right prices. 

See also our 

FANCY TRIMMINGS 

and 

1 WIORS' SMALL WARES 

Send for Samples. 



THE ONTARIO BUTTON CO. 

LIMITED 
KITCHENER - - ONTARIO 




EASTER will be 
here early in 
April and will 
bring the usual 
demand for Hand- 
kerchiefs of vari- 
ous kinds, so pop- 
ular as small re- 
membrance* . See 
our range of 
Fancy and plain 
numbers for that 
Season. 



HANDKERCHIEFS 

Our salesmen are now showing a large 
and well-assorted range, in both open stock 
numbers and fancy boxed effects, for the 
Fall and Xmas seasons. 



Staple numbers always 
in demand. We have 
eood stocks of plain 
cottons and linens, for 
immediate, Easter or 
Xmas trade, as re- 
quired. 



Westlake Brothers, Limited 

24 Wellington Street West -:- Toronto 




Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



113 



AMERICA'S BEST 



\ 



< I " 



HOPE HAMPTON, 
noted screen star, 
wearing a dancing frock 
created by Jesse Woolf & 
Co., Inc., and trimmed 
with "J.C." Satin de ZjUXt 
Ribbon. 



"J. C" Ribbons contribute much to the art of dress creations. 
They make possible many appealing variations of the newest 
style themes, and multiply many fold the beauty of every new 
version. 



a 



J. C." RIBBONS 



add a captivating note of distinction to garments. There's 
one for every need — buy them by name. 



LADY FAIR 

.1 new double-faced Satin ribbon. There 
is only one genuine Lady Fair Ribbon — 
•'J.C" LADY FAIR. Be sure the name 
appears on every bolt you buy. 

SATIN DE LUXE 

Best Satin and Taffeta ribbon. 



VIOLET 

Ideal lingerie ribbon in pink, blue and 
white. 

TROUSSEAU 

Rosebud and Polka Dot lingerie Ribbon. 

SAN KAN AC 

Popularly priced Satin and Taffeta ribbon 

DEMOCRACY 

-4 grosgrain ribbon "For the people." 
i All registered trade mark names) 



JOHNSON, COWDIN & COMPANY, Inc. 

"America's Best Ribbons" 
40 East 30th Street, New York 



114 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods Review 




Popularity! 



THE reason why these gloves are so 
widely known and well liked, is not 
hard to find. Anyone can tell you that 
the names stand for the highest quality in 
Glovedom. Modishly fashioned from 
selected material, they never fail to appeal. 






People have become 
more exacting in their 
choice of gloves, there- 
fore, they will ask for 
these brands — and what 
is more they will insist 
upon getting them. The 
dealer who cannot sup- 
ply them will lose the 
business of a customer 
worth while; a customer 
who recognizes, and 
D E M A N D S the 
BEST. Any dealer 
knows that a customer who gets 
his money's worth, is one of the 
greatest assets he has. 




LOVE 



RealChamoisette 

MADE IN CANADA 



It pays to carry a full line of 
these brands always. 



P. K. Company 



Successors to 



Perrin Freres & Cie 

Sommer Bldg. Montreal 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



115 



VAN RAALTE H^tls 






m* 



o> 



1920— Veils! Veils! Veils! 

FASHION says veils— and Veils cards, counter signs, selling aids and 

mean Van Raalte. Van Raalte aggressive national advertising — all 

shows a collection of beauties that typically Van Raalte— all aimed to 

will set the clever veil buyer's eyes make your veil business bigger, better, 

sparkling and heart a-bounding. Not more profitable, 
only irresistibly pretty veils, but show 

VAN RAALTE COMPANY 

New York Address: 16th Street and 5th Avenue Chicago Address: 105 South Dearborn Street 
Silk Gloves— Silk Underwear— Silk Hosiery 



in; 



DRE.SS ACCESSORIES 



Dry Goods R< i u u 



Jjgn^ttc^-ffJ 



SLIP-ON VEILS 

Wide range of popular 
meshes, with many ex- 
tremely smart and becom- 
ing designs in Chenille, 
Silk, etc. 

HAIR NETS 

Silk and Human Hair. 
With or without elastic. 
Fringe and cap styles. 
Sturdy and neat. 



Large stock always on hand 

THE BONNIE-B 

COMPANY 

TORONTO-156 Yonge Street 
NEW YORK-222 Fourth Avenue 













I 


#1 




MARABOU CAPES 

Are still very popular and are likely to con- 
tinue so on account of the high price of Sum- 
mer Furs. A cheap Fur in no way compares 
either in appearance or price with a Marabou 
Cape. They are warm, comfortable and styl- 
ish. We show a big line of all the newest 
snappy styles in Natural, Black, White, Grey 
and Taupe. 

DOMINION OSTRICH FEATHER CO. 

Limited 

78 Wellington St. West - Toronto 




Sizes 8, %Yi, 9 

1 doz. pr. to the 
box. 



A Business Producer 

The Nurses' Cuff is used by a large percentage of nurses in 
hospitals and homes, also by office employees and those wishing 
to protect their wearing apparel. 

Made by the Manufacturers of the famous K^TK"-^^ Collars 

THE PARSONS & PARSONS CANADIAN CO. 

Hamilton, Canada 



t 

1 










Canadian Braid and 
Trimming Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers of 
Girdles, Braids 
Cords 
Fringes 
Tassels 
Ornaments 
Buttons 
Fur and 
Dress Trimmings 

39 Dowd St., MONTREAL 

Toronto Branch 96 King St. W. 
I. B. Ellin, Representative 



Say You Saw It 
in 

Dry Goods Review 



Dry Goods Review 



DRESS ACCESSORIES 



117 




Neck 



wear 

Specially designed to please the discriminating snopper 

Up-to-the-minute styles, unusual effects, highest 
quality of materials, ana faultless finish — all are 
invariably found in PHOENIX NECKWEAR. 



LACE TUXEDOS 
SCALLOPED EDGES 

(For Rounding Necki) 

JABOTS 
GILETS 
SETTS 

and 

all popular Neckwear 
Lines 







**ch 




TORONTO 

154 Pearl Street 





PROMPT 
DELIVERIES 




118 



Dry Goods Review 



Novelties for Spring Needlework 

Some Aeroplane Linen Will be Available Shortly Otherwise Stamped Goods Mostly Cotton 
-Beads and Beadwork Supplies Increasing in Demand — A Novel Bag Idea -Instruc- 
tion Books Create Sales. 



THERE is the usual Spring enthu- 
siasm being shown m art needle 
work, stamped goods, crochet 
work and knitting for Spring. Depart- 
ments handling these goods are as busy 
beehives these days. The Toronto stores 
and some of the larger centres which 
have been affected are feeling the touch 
of the flu, but the natural trend of busi- 
ness is exceedingly live. Among the 
novelties being shown is a "baby's play- 
ground." This is a large square of 
white cotton of heavy, close weave, 
bound in Dutch blue and embroidered in 
black and blue. The letters "Baby's 
Playground" are in large scroll design. 

The utility of such an article would 
be quite evident to any mother who has 
one of the adjustable and portable fences 
that are used in the nursery or on the 
lawn for the baby to play in. 

Stamped blouses and smocks for wool 
embroidery which were mentioned in the 
last issue of DRY GOODS REVIEW 
are proving quite a success. Plain voile? 
in white or colors, cotton crepes, silk and 
cotton mixture goods and, in fact, any 
of the light weight, plain colored, wash- 
able materials suitable for Summer are 
being stamped and embroidered in 
colored wool or mercerized silk floss. 
Wool, however, is more effective and 
makes the embroidery stand out more 
prominently with perhaps a minimum 
of work. Kiddies' dresses, bloomers, 
hats and garments of all sorts are quite 
as strong as ever in the needlework 
department. 

The price of linen, both unbleached 
and bleached, is still so high that very 
little of it is offered in the ready stamp- 
ed goods. Some of the aeroplane linen 
has been purchased for the purpose and 
is expected to be finished and shipped in 
time for Summer requirements, but even 
it will come fairly high. 

Crochet and Embroidery for Lingerie 

Stamped lingerie, which includes both 
crochet and embroidery, is a leading line 
this season, and there must always be a 
place left for plenty of ribbon. Especial- 
ly with silk undergarments are ribbons 
very popular. As for crocheting itself 
the addition of a little color to a white 
pattern is paining in favor. There will 
be tiny Irish crochet roses in rose color, 
blue, yellow, or any other shade pre- 
ferred attached to the white filet ground 
work and perhaps a tiny edge of color 
to match the roses. The embroidery 
which is used alone with these crochet 
tops is usually white. The tendency 
throughout in embroidery for lingerie 
is more strongly towards white than the 
high colors this season. 

To\ve'« are still a verv prominent fea- 
ture and any amount of work and color 



combination is not too elaborate to ap- 
peal to the purchaser. Even tiny guest 
towels as well as bath towels will have 
both ends embroidered elaborately in a 
design the full width of the towel and 
perhaps a dainty initial also added. 

Head Work Supplies in Demand 

Whether it is the unusually extensive 
ranges of beaded bags which have been 
coming over from Paris this last year, 
or whether it is the interest which has 
arisen out of the training of invalided 
soldiers, something is responsible for a 
very keen demand for doing bead work 
at home. The woven bead necklaces are 
very popular but their price made up 
is partly responsible for many attempt- 
ing the weaving of them individually. 
Looms are being sold, both for these 
necklaces and for making beaded bags. 
The complete outfit required for this 
beading is the loom, linen thread, wax, 
needles, beads and the pattern. Many 
clever people work out their own pat- 
tern, but it has to be done on such a 
minute scale and geometrical as well, 
that those who can procure the ready- 
made patterns often save time by pur- 
chasing them. 

The matter of procuring sufficient 
quantities of beads and in a .good range 
of the desired colors is quite a problem 
for the average fancy goods depart- 
ment. Now that so many people are 
doing this bead work, the call for fine 
distinctions in colors is quite noticeable. 
Black and white beads are very much 
in demand and it is quite difficult to 
procure these in sufficient quantities. 
Practically all the colored beads used 
for this work are now coming from Italy 
and deliveries are necessarily irregular. 
The metallic beads, such as gold, silver 
and steel effects, are made in France, so 
that the matter of getting deliveries is 
the only drawback to the splendid busi- 
ness being done in these goods. 



An interesting successor to the popu- 
lar beaded bag is a new one made on 
canvas of soft texture. Coarse mer- 
cerized purl cotton is used and wrought 
through the canvas by means of a fine 
hook like a mat hook, and the thread 
is knotted, then clipped, so that the pat- 
tern, when finished, is like a deep pile 
velvet. Tapestry colors for the most 
part are used in floral and conventional 
designs. This idea is said to have orig- 
inated at Gimbel's, New York, and to 
be proving quite popular down there. It 
is not a new style of needle work at all, 
but resembles closely the wool work done 
in the same manner on velvet which used 
to make up some of the "parlor 
cushions" of our grandmothers' days. 

Instruction Hooks Good Salesmen for 
Supplies 

Shipments of sewing and embroidery 
needles are on the way and the supply 
promises to be fair for this year. 

If the quantity of fancy knitting be- 
ing done can be judged from the numbe'r 
of needles and knitting pins being sold, 
there never was such a vogue before for 
that line of handiwork. One of the 
wholesalers mentioned to DRY GOODS 
REVIEW that they sold more knitting 
pins in January than they had sold dur- 
ing any previous six months. Sales of 
instruction books for fancy knitting and 
crocheting are also exceedingly active. 
These books are sold at quite low prices 
considering their cost, but the idea of 
them is to stimulate sales of yarns, 
threads and other supplies. In this re- 
spect they are considered a decidedly 
paying proposition. A new edition of 
a Canadian booklet containing interest- 
ing wool novelties in color will go to the 
trade in March. The designs in it have 
all been tested by a woman who gives 
daily instruction in one of the big de- 
partment stores and who has developed 
a number of the designs herself, so that 
they are quite original. 




sp 



Dry Good* Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



119 



A DICTIONARY OF 
DRY GOODS TERMS 

[Continued from last month.] 

(Buttons Continued) 

(Ivory) 

Pressed finish — with more of a 
pattern than sand blast, but not 
highly polished. 

Ivory rims are for buttons with a 
cloth centre and ivory on the out- 
side. 

Rims are of two kinds; narrow 
and bevelled. The bevelled is the 
wider kind of rim and takes a 
smaller cloth button for the in- 
side. 

Prongs — small — are used to hold 
the cloth button to the ivory rim. 

Buttons are often made with a 
polished rim and a sand blast 
centre. 

Celluloid is fed to the die in big 
sheets. The die cuts it the right 
size and the heat applied moulds 
it to the same shape as the die. 

Buttons are spoken of as oval or 
oblong, square, round, pyramid, 
ball-shaped. 

COTTON 

Cotton, Carded Cotton which has 
been prepared for spinning by card- 
ing. Not so clean as combed cotton. 
It is an important process. A badly 
carded cotton will produce an inferior 
spun thread. 

Cotton, Combed — Cotton carded and 
also combed. Makes a better and 
cleaner yarn than if only carded. 

Cotton, Egyptian — White, grown in 
Upper Egypt from Sea Island seed. 

Cotton, Egyptian — Yellow, grown in 
Lower Egypt, long, fine, and of a light 
brownish color. 

Cotton, Gulf (or New Orleans) — In- 
cluding bender, or bottom-land, cot- 
ton. Comes next in importance and 
value after Sea Island. Staple meas- 
ures up to 1% inches, or nearly as 
long as Florida Sea Island. 

Cotton, Middling -The standard 
grade on which cotton contracts are 
based. 

Cotton, Sea Island — Grown on the 
islands of the sea bordering on South 
Carolina, Georgia and Florida. It is 
of a high grade, with very long, 
strong and silky staple. 

Cotton, Upland — Cotton grown on 
the uplands of the Southern States. 

Cotton Yarn, Mercerized — Cotton 
yarn treated to a caustic alkali bath 
while held under strong tension, thus 
acquiring a silky lustre. It changes 
the character of the fibre from a flat, 
ribbon-like shape to a rounded form. 
Named after Mercer, the inventor of 
the process. 

Count — The number of a yarn, in- 
dicating its yardage per pound. 

Cotton-Yarn Count — In this system 
No. 1 is 840 yards per lb.; No. 2, 1,680 
yards, etc. 

[To be continued.! 




New Ivory Picture Frames 

They stand securely on their own foundations without the necessity of any support 
from "behind the scenes." By courtesy of Pugh Specialty Co., Toronto. 



PARISIAN CORSET CO.'S EXTEN- 
SION 

A fire completely destroyed the offices 
and stockrooms of the Parisian Corset 
Manufacturing Company, Limited, at 329 
Craig Street West, Montreal, towards 
the end of January. The entire third 
floor of the building had been conveted 
into stockrooms, while the main floor 
was used for offices and selling through 
the sales agents of the company, Camp- 
bell, Smibert & Company. The stock, al- 
though large, was adequately insured. 
Arrangements were made at once by 
the company to secure new quarters, and 
business is being done from 227 Notre 
Dame Street West, until such time as 
the old stand at 329 Craig Street is re- 
paired. The factory superintendent is 
visiting New York and some of the 
largest American corset manufacturers 
with a view to purchasing modern ma- 
chinery which will be required when the 
new extension is completed in the late 
Summer. 



Pugh Specialty Co. Ltd. 

38-42 Clifford Street, Toronto, Canada 

Manufacturers and 
Manufacturers' Agents 

We own or control 5 Canadian Factories. 

Some of our lines are 

French Ivory, 

Pennants, Cushions and Textile 

Novelties, 
Post Cards and Booklets for all seasons 

and occasions, 
Ladies' and Men's Purses, Wallets, etc., 
Souvenir Novelties (biggest range in 

Canada). 
Our Catalogue is worth having. 
Our travellers cover Canada. 



SUDDEN DEATH OF WILLIAM 
CORISTINE 

One of the sudden deaths of the 
month in the trade was that of Wm. 
Coristine, son of the late James Cori- 
stine, who, although under forty years 
of age, had been president for twelve 
years of the Jas. Coristine Co., Limited, 
fur manufacturers and wholesale hat- 
ters, of Montreal, ever since he was 26 
years of age. The death of Mr. Coris- 
tine took place on February 12, follow- 
ing an operation and resulting directly 
from pneumonia. Mr. Coristine was 
well known to the fur trade and had 
been appointed a short time ago a 
director of the newly organized Mont- 
real Fur Sales Auction, Limited. He was 
a member of the Montreal Board of 
Trade and belonged to the James Club, 
the Canada Club, and the Montreal 
Hunt Club. 



AS TO EXPRESS CHARGES 

A matter which merits discus- 
sion by the trade was suggested to 
DRY GOODS REVIEW by a 
Guelph merchant recently. It was 
in reference to the payment of ex- 
press charges on shipments of 
goods which had been deferred 
through the fault of the whole- 
saler or manufacturer. When the 
wholesaler is unable to ship the 
goods in one or a definite number 
of shipments stipulated on the 
order form, it is the practice of 
this retailer to refer back the 
charges on these extra shipments 
which are due to the sender's in- 
ability to fill the order contract on 
time. 

Now this practice is not com- 
mon; but if you think it is fair, 
should it not be made the rule? 
DRY GOODS REVIEW would 
welcome an expression of opinion 
on this subject. If you wish to 
express your views without your 
name being published with them, 
please mention the fact, but send 
along your ideas on the matter. 



120 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry 'roods Revieu 




■nQLTs 



s #*% ^% / 



1 1 I 4 

Ills 



n ic/UU, the Hook & Eye 







1 / \ r \\ 



- ^^^4^/ 



23-29 West 31st Street 




"A boon to the busy 
sewer,' writes one 
enthusiastic woman. 




hi 1920, the New Shape 
"Torgetmme © not " 



Introducing to Canada 
harmony Forget-me-not Snaps 

Here is the latest, greatest improve- the easy -sewing eyelets: smaller* and 
ment in Snap Fasteners. The Exclusive neater on the garment. Lustrous rust- 
Forget-me-not shape makes this snap proof finish, dependable spring, carefully 
easier to handle : the needle can't miss rolled edges. 

Ask Your Jobber for Samples and Prices 

FEDERAL SNAP FASTENER CORPORATION 



New York City 



Canadian Representative : WILL P, WHITE, LIMITED 
489 St. Paul St. West, Montreal 65 Simcoe St., Toronto 






Harmony Forget-me- 
not Snaps retail for 
10 cents a card. 






23 




Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



121 



nil 

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hi 

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in 

in 

in 

hi 

in 

in 

in 

in 

in 

hi 



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IS: 



BOOT LACE 
CABINETS 

Goodasilk 

Globe 

Universal 

Nufashond 

(Fabric tipped) 

Vogue 



BUTTONS 

Pearl, Glass, Celluloid, Horn, 
Composition, Agate, etc. 

— Special Pearl Button Cabinets — 

1920 (Freshwater) Velvet Lady (Ocean Pearl) 



VEILS 
With Elastic 

Celia Glad 
(Plain mesh) 

Gismonda 
(Fancy figured) 



HEART 

Brand 

Dress Beltings 

Tapes 

Braids 

etc. 



on/a* 



SA/AP /XS7Zy/£/? 



Special 
HAIR PIN BOXES 

Rhonda 
Rhoda 
Floral 
Celia Glad 



- A7e - A/or Shaps 



4-0 to 2. All sizes in stock 
White and Black 



Hair Nets 

Real Human Hair 
Tidy Wear (Fringe) 
R-22, R-24, R-400 
Easifix Cap 
Queen Charlotte 
Veilanet 
Yoda Lane 



MENDING 
WOOL 

Cards and Skeins 
Black and Colors 



Z*zSi 



BULL DOG 

Coat 

Chains 

Bachelor 

Buttons 

Plush 
Buttons 



SOLE AGENTS 



Luke Turner & Co., 

J. Bonas & Son, 

Morris & Yeomans, 

Rosenwald Bros., 

Howard Wall, Ltd., 

Buttons, Ltd., 

F. Bapterosses & Cie, 

Star Pin Co., 

Narrow Fabric Co., 

Henry Myer Thread Mfg. Co., 

Federal Snap Fastener Corp'n 

LoBars Detachable Button, Inc 

W. Wendtland, Inc., 

New American Button Works, 

Winwal Button Co., 



Leicester, Eng., 

Derby, Eng. 

Redditch, Eng., 

London, Eng., 

London, Eng., 

Birmingham, Eng., 

Paris, France, 

Derby, Conn., 

Reading, Pa., 

Chicago, 
,New York, 
,New York, 

New York, 

New York, 

Rockford, 111., 



Elastic Webs and Braids. 

Tapes, etc. 

Needles and Crochet Hooks 

Hairnets. 

Deans Tape Measures. 

Metal and Covered Buttons, Buckles, etc. 

Agate Buttons. 

Pins and Hair Pins. 

Braids. 

Threads. 

Harmony Snap Fasteners. 

Bull Dog Bachelor Buttons and Coat Chains. 

Fancy Glass Buttons. 

Celluloid Buttons. 

Winwal Button Moulds. 



WHOLESALE and MANUFACTURERS ONLY SUPPLIED 



Will P. White, Limited 

TORONTO-65 Simcoe Street 
MONTREAL-489 St. Paul St. West 



!!! 

Ill 
111 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
III 
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III 
III 

II 
II 
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!!! 

Ill 
III 
III 
Ul 

III 
III 
111 
III 
III 

III 
III 
III 
III 
III 

■ a 



122 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 




Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



123 




'RADE MARK 



Three Bee and 

Gloria Qualities 

Wools 



ART NEEDLE LINES 

Dresses, Gowns, Centres, Towels, Baby 
Pillows, Pram Covers, Combinations, Pillow 
Cases, Cushion Tops, Instruction Books on 
Knitting and Crochet Work. 

CROCHET and EMBROIDERY 
THREADS 

FLOSSELL ARTIFICIAL 
SILK 

Hambly and Wilson, Limited 

Toronto 




Make More than 500% Profit 

By making buttons of the same materials 
you sell to your customers for dresses and 
suits, and in that way assure them of 
buttons that match perfectly. 
'Your store is not complete without a 
Menkin complete button making outfit, 
and interchangeable button dies." 
It helps the sale of dress materials and 
makes it possible for you to reduce the 
size of your finished button stock. No 
left-overs — or sale of buttons at the end 
of each season. 

IMPORTANT 
If you now use a button machine tell us its name 
and a list of what buttons you are now able to 
make. We will send you sample button moulds 
and show you how to make PERFECT BUTTONS 
the MENKIN way. 

"Service" That's Our Motto 

S. MENKIN, Inc. 

Creators, Promoters and Producers of Covered 
Button Supplies for over Sixty Years 

143 West 28th St. New York 



wnmrs i-i-trm 




A NEW YEAR— 
A NEW WAY 

The Greatest Labor- 
Saver 

All ready to sew 
on middy blouses 
and sailor suits. 
A two-yard piece 
is enough for col- 
lar, cuffs and 
yoke. 



Made of 
Wright's Tape, 
stitched in par- 
allel rows on 
fast colored per- 
cale. 

Live mer- 
chants push 
these popu- 
lar labor- 
savers. 




Used everywhere by 
home sewers 



for binding, 
piping, fancy 
work and trim- 
ming, in white, 
black and 
colors. 

Reliable fab- 
rics from first 
quality stock, 
cut on true 
bias, selvages 
trimmed, 
seams opened 
and pressed. 

Easily sold be- 
cause easily 
used. 

"W & N," 
Monarch 
Meteor 
Brands, 
known by 
their trade 
marks. 



Wm. E. Wright & Sons Co. 

Manufacturers 

315-317 Church Street New York 

Stocks carried at all Agencies 



WRIGHT'S 

BIASFOLDTAPE 

'. It turns itself ' 



CHICAGO 

E. S. RANSOM 

223 W. Jackson Boulevard 



ST. LOUIS 
Geo. F. Anderson's Son 
613 North Broadway 



PHILADELPHIA 
James F. McCarriar 
101 1 Chestnut Street 



L 



In U.S. Pat. Off. 



124 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



Dry Goods Review 




1 



1 



New and Fascinating Way 
to do Beautiful Art Embroidery 



"Marvel" 
Hand Embroiderer 



At last the tedious, tiresome work of 
embroidering, stitch after stitch, 
slowly and carefully and evenly by 
hand has been eliminated with the 
greatest and most practical invention 
since the sewing machine — the 
Marvel Hand Embroiderer. The finest 
pieces of embroidery work in the most 
elaborate designs can be finished with 
remarkable ease and rapidity. 

THE COMPLETE "MARVEL" 
OUTFIT 

consists of the Marvel Embroiderer, a spec- 
ially made Marvel hoop and a full assort- 
ment of Marvel needles. The Marvel Embroid- 
erer is a small, compact contrivance, is but 8 
inches high and weighs less than 5 ounces. It 
can be carried most conveniently in an em- 
broidery bag and particularly practical for 
use while travelling. 

Fully guaranteed; approved and endorsed by 
Good Housekeeping Institute. Note the ap- 
proval star. 

$7.50 

Complete 

Marvel Needlekraft Works 

309-311 FIFTH AVENUE 

NEW YORK CITY 



e 



Write at once for an Agency for your town to 



J. H. WINTERS CO., LIMITED, 431 KING ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Que6ec Agent: Sole Right for Canada 

L. G. AUGER, SOMMER BLDG., MONTREAL 



3 



I 



1 



r DowrrMtNTOfHouamou>ENGiNEEiuNcl 

, Good Housekeeping Institute J 

d 1 "*"* Conduct*! bu mi *A, 



Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



125 



Samstag & Hilder Brothers 



Broadway and 29th St. 



New York City 



G)lonia^^W^ty* 

The following should always be in your 

NOTION DEPARTMENT 



Make Colonial Quality the Standard 
of your Notion Department 

"BEST AT THE PRICE" 



FASHIONETTE INVISIBLE HAIR NETS 

Cap - All Colors - Fringe 

BABY DIMPLES SAFETY PINS 

Baby Dimples Neverlost Pins 
Baby Dimples Cradle Pins 

LADY DAINTY CELLULOID HAIR PINS 

Shell - Amber - Grey 

MYMANS COLLAR BANDS 

GOLD MEDAL BIAS TAPE 

White - Black 

DAISY SNAP FASTENERS 
VASSAR ELASTIC 

WE SPECIALIZE IN GREY AND WHITE HAIR NETS 
AND GREY HAIR PINS 

Sole Canadian Distributors 

for above mentioned specialties 



Canada Needle & Fishing Tackle Co., Limited 

76 Wellington St. West, TORONTO 






Dry Ooods Review 



Toys for Spring and the Holidays 

Man) New Lines Appearing— Educational Toys Appeal to Canadian Youth — Novelty and 
Souvenir Dolls Numerous Prosperity Keeps Stocks From Accumulating. 



Ni>w that the toy makers of the 
\\ c stern world have gotten away 
from the idea of imitating ideas 
originating in Europe; some idea ox wiiat 
the Canadian child wants as a plaything 
is evident. And also some idea of what 
the parents will pay for the right kind 
of toys is also evident. The fact that 
some of our Canadian manufacturers 
have made toys which have been very 
much in demand in Great Britain is evi- 
dence of the fact that this country can 
produce toys which are of world-wide 
concern. 

Perhaps no line of toys made on this 
continent has taken such strides ahead 
as have those of an educational nature. 
Constructional and educative toys of dif- 
ferent kinds are commanding almost uni- 
versal sale at unlimited price range. The 
mind of the modern boy, even up to him 
of high school age, is intensely practical 
and naturally, toys which make an ap- 
peal to such a bent will be most success- 
ful. 

One of the outstanding new produc- 
tions of an educational nature has been 
offered in Maryland. It is called a 
chemical toy, but strictly speaking, it is 
not a toy at all, but an elementary 
course in science. There are four chemi- 
cal outfits under the general name of 
"'Chemcraft" and the outfits sell in the 
United States at from $1.50 to $10 re- 
tail. In effect, they are miniature 
laboratories fitted with necessary mater- 
ials and apparatus for performing harm- 
less experiments and doing simple re- 
search. $10.00 is not now considered an 
unusual price for an article with such a 
purpose. A small house organ on chemi- 
stry accompanies the outfit and services 
as a medium through which numerous 
questions asked by young amateur 
chemists may be answered. Interest is 
thereby kept alive and the full possi- 
bilities of the outfit realized. 

Splendid ranges of w r ooden toys and 
dolls are on the Canadian market. Deli- 
veries of baseball goods are very slow 
and should an early spring occur retail- 
ers may find some difficulty in supplying 
the boys with these goods. The makers 
of the "Sandy Andy" toys are offering a 
line which are specially designed to be 
year round sellers. Some items are es- 
pecially adapted for the sea-shore and 
garden. In addition there is a complete 
wash-day outfit for the little girl: the 
tub with wringer attached and wash- 
board, clothes basket, clothes reel, 
clothes pins and clothes horse. 

Indian Novelties 

Strictly non-European are the new In- 
dian dolls. One called Karo Princess is 
an attractive little papoose round and 
chubby with a body suggesting an ear 
of eorn. She is supposed to tvpify the 
spirit of the Indian corn which is dis- 



tinctly a Dew-World product. There is 
also on the market a tribe of Indians in 
characteristic costumes and coloring. 
The garments are said to be made of 
real Indian blankets and, of course, a 
feather and bandeau is not wanting. The 
1920 Kiddie Kars and the toys of that 
order are mostly all to be had with an 
aeroplane equipment. One new line is 
worked like a tricycle with the aex-oplane 
wings across the front. Another has 
bicycle pedals with wooden wings in 
front. These wings are designed to 
make the speeding more easy. 

A recent line of whistling and grizzly, 
growling bears is proving very success- 
ful. These bears are made in different 
colors and with radium eyes which 
glisten in the dark, when their ears are 
pressed the whistling and roaring de- 
lights the youngsters. 

Quite a new thing is the line of en- 
tirely wooden mechanical toys; a num- 
ber of rather intricate mechanical de- 
vices are utilized in these. There is a 
cat catching a mouse, a team galloping 
horses with driver, etc. 

The lines of character dolls, such as 
those with real hair and veils, bathing 
girls, coquettes, and other souvenir types 
are larger than at any previous time and 
promise to be bigger sellers during the 
coming year than ever before. And, of 
course, there is no decrease in the variety 
of animals, both for Easter and other 
holiday seasons. Rabbits, bears and ele- 
phants are particularly in demand. 

A new skipping rope is to be had of 
wire spring around a cord core. This 
rope will retail at 25 cents but so far 
it is not promised ready acceptance. 

Savings banks in the form of a street 
car conductor's box are to be had again. 

Games, dolls, dishes and playthings of 
all sorts are finding their way to the 
wholesale shelves so that it really looks 
now as if fair supplies are likely to be 
on hand for the rush seasons, though 
everyone is aware that the prosperity 
of consumers generally, last year, is 
likely to continue this year, and in that 



case the busy season next Winter will 
probably witness as clean a sweep of 
wholesale toy shelves as was the case 
last year for some weeks before Christ- 
mas. 

Japanese tops are on the way in large 
quantities. Celluloid novelties of all 
sorts are especially big and an exten- 
sive range of rubber balls is also among 
the shipments which have already ar- 
rived. It is said by some of the whole- 
salers that the amount of Japanese 
goods on the Canadian market this year 
will be greater than ever before. 

A big line of bathing caps is coming 
through. Fewer cheap lines aie being 
shov.n and the advance of prices of bet- 
ter goods is seldom more than about 
10 cents a dozen. 



BELDING PAUL COKTICELLI HOLD 
CONVENTION 

The week following the convention of 
the Western sales staff of Belding Paul 
Corticelli, Limited, at the Fort Garry 
Hotel, Winnipeg, the Eastern salesmen 
met in Toronto, at the King Edward 
Hotel. Mi. C. A. Reynolds, general 
manager, spoke on general market con- 
ditions, and the outlook for the coming 
year. The meeting was also addressed 
by Mr. W. P. MacDougall, sales mana- 
ger, who commended the salesmen on 
their splendid work during the past year, 
and predicted brighter prospects for the 
future. The financial standing of the 
company was taken up by Mr. D. R. Ken- 
nedy, secretary-treasurer. Each day of 
the convention, items of vital interest 
to the salesmen were introduced and dis- 
cussed. 

All were guests of the firm at a com- 
bined dinner and theatre party, the first 
evening of the convention. The second 
evening a dance was given by the To- 
ronto office and warehouse staff, which 
resulted in a most enjoyable time and 
emphasized the spirit of co-opera«ion 
between the officials of the company and 




Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



127 



the employees. Presentations were made 
by the Toronto office salesmen of a 
travelling bag to Mr. R. H. Kayser, the 
manager of Toronto office, as a mark of 
appreciation for his splendid work dur- 
ing the past year. The salesmen con- 
nected with Toronto office were also 



presented with a large silver cup which 
is awarded each year to the office show- 
ing the largest percentage of increase 
in sales. Among presentations made in 
Winnipeg, was a handsome gold watch 
chain to Mr. G. Z. Reynolds, by the Win- 
nipeg office salesmen. 



Two Sales in Place of One 

Little Hints On How to Double Your Sales 



ONE Summer day I stepped into a 
dry goods store to change a collar 
for a more expensive one, and one 
that I liked better. On expressing my 
satisfaction at the style, the sales girl 
said: "There are just three more in the 
box, Mrs. Fishburne; I suggest you let 
me send these to your home." Result — 
three sales instead of one, and she re- 
duced the selling cost in that minute 75 
per cent., besides showing a higher aver- 
age sale. That is selling by suggestion. 

Now where is there another illustra- 
tion of suggestive selling, which question 
or form of expression will sell the most 
goods ? 

Saleswoman: 'Will four yards be 
enough?" or "Will five yards be too 
much?" 

Eight or nine times out of ten the 
customer buys the larger quantity, and 
you become a more profitable customer. 
Or again, in this instance, customer asks 
for a bottle of perfumery. Clerk: "Do 
you wish the large or small size?'' The 
chances are that she will sell the smaller 
size. Now here comes a sales person in 
the same department, and instead of 
asking questions, she simply brings out 
the larger size, mentions the price, and 
proceeds to make out the check. 

50 Per Cent. Will Buy Larger Size 

In the event the customer expresses a 
preference for the smaller size, all right. 
Sell it. Probably not more than 25 per 
cent, will ask for the smaller size; but 
"Madame, this larger size contains so 
much more in comparison with the dif- 
ference in price." I venture to say over 
50 per cent, will buy the larger size, and 
you have reduced your selling cost and 
increased your selling value to the store. 

Now I want to tell you tnis — every 
time you fail to sell as much as you 
could and should of an article, you leave 
that much opening for some other store 
to sell it. Suggest to the customer that 
it is well to have a supply in the house. 
Try it next time, try it every time; sell 
full size instead of half sizes; full pack- 
age instead of half; half dozen pair in- 
stead of one or two, good quality of any- 
thing instead of cheap and inferior. 

"You" Instead of "I" 

Selling by suggestion also means 
"Putting the desired thought in the mind 
of the customer," frequently attained by 
appealing to their sense of pride and 
vanity, their sense of economy or fash- 
ion, taste or smell. You can sell more 



goods quicker when you say, for in- 
stance: "This is going to be admired very 
much," than to say: "I like this very 
much." 

Just stop and consider the effect of 
the first form on the mind of the buyer, 
as compared with the second expression. 
We are wisely growing away frcm the 
selfish pronouns "I," "we," or "our," in 
selling goods. Is it not much better to 
capitalize on the customer's side by the 
use of "your," or "you" — such as "You 
will enjoy," or "You save," "Your com- 
fort," "Your pleasure," — you catch the 
idea? 

And just as surely "Now, what else, 
please?" will sell more additional ar- 
ticles than to say, "Anything else," or 
"Is this all?" both of which are negatives 
in thought and result. 

I know of a saleswoman whose sales 
and earnings, it is said, were three to 
one of her co-workers, simply because 
she never tried to sell goods singly or 
without suggestions that more than 
doubled her sales. It was always: "Two 
for a quarter, Madame?" or "Three for 
fifty cents?" or "Will you take three 
or six?" Note how she thinks in bigger 
units. This woman is interpreting her- 
self in a larger way, with resulting in- 
creased sales 

Think in Dollars 

If you want to soar to greater heights, 
look at the landscape, not down at the 
swamp. Don't talk or thing or act in 
pennies, but dollars. Self-inventory may 
show you a cause for your flows and 
pause in progress. 

One of our own co-workers recently 
made two sales instead of one by bring- 
ing out of the case some shaving lotion 
and talcum powder, at the same time 
showing the shaving brush originally 
asked for, taking it for granted that the 
man needed these requisites for shaving. 
The customer had but to see them to 
suggest his want, as he was already in 
a receptive buying mood. This can be 
followed with goods in other sections as 
well. It has been successfully practised 
in every line of duty, whether is selling, 
in service, or otherwise. 

The sales we could have made are not 
figured in an average because results 
never recognize undeveloped intentions. 
Yesterday is dead and to-morrow has not 
arrived — don't worry about them. To- 
day is here — use it! Think it over — but 
think. 



THE QUESTIONING BOY MAY NOW 
HAVE HIS WIRELESS OUTFIT 

It was in 1901 when Marconi first suc- 
ceeded in transmitting signals across 
the Atlantic from Cornwall to St. John's, 
Nfld. Wireless was no longer a dream 
but an actual practical method of tele- 
graphing without wires. From that time 
to this the amateur operators have 
grown in number and knowledge and 




to-day demand the most up-to-date ap- 
paratus obtainable. Now the leaders in 
educational toy production are giving the 
up-to-date boy all the service he de- 
mands on this science and are putting 
out in Canada sets ranging from $9 to 
$97.50; also parts for the amateur who 
wants to build and assemble his own 
plant. 

Illustrated is one of the receiving and 
sending sets which sells at $97.50. Illus- 
tration by courtesy of the A. C. Gilbert- 
Menzies Co. 



CASH-AND-CARRY PARCELS 

Cash-and-carry parcels are a 
unique feature at the George W. 
Robinson store, at Hamilton, On- 
tario. Small tables appear through- 
out the smallwares, notions and 
toilet articles departments of this 
store on the main floor, and par- 
cels all wrapped up and tied, ready 
for being carried home, are placed 
on them in groups according to 
their different prices. Loose 
samples of what is contained in 
the parcels appear on each of the 
tables, so that the customer knows 
exactly what she is buying. The 
articles are sold at about one-third 
reduction from the regular selling 
prices. Manager Smith, of the 
Robinson store, stated to DRY 
GOODS REVIEW that the "Cash- 
and-carry" idea is at present quite 
popular, and so long as it lasts 
these parcels will be prepared a 
few days out of each month and 
featured specially. So far the idea 
has been very successful, and the 
sales of goods in these departments 
have increased materially. 



128 



r wry GOODS, NOTIONS \M> TOYS 



Dry Goods Reii, w 



Easter Novelties 



^ 




r. 



W 



JL 




ATTRACTIVE, FAST-SELLING SPECIALTIES 
FOR EASTER TRADE. 

COTTON CHICKENS, ROOSTERS AND RABBITS. 

FANCY CANDY BASKETS, ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS. 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED PRICE LIST. 

NERLICH & COMPANY 

146-148 Front Street West - - TORONTO 



Dry Goods Review 



FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TOYS 



129 




w////mW//////////////A 



Get rich before Christmas — These are Summer lines 




^ •• * \ 



Wheel Toy 9004 retails at $ 9.00 
" 9006 " " 15.00 
" 9007 " " 22.50 



Gilbert's 

New Wheel 

Toy 

A boy can make his 
own Scooter, Wheel- (@ 
barrow, Geared Racer, 
Dog Cart, etc. 




These boys are making a geared Racer with 
the $15.00 set, No. 9006 




This is our 4009 Wireless (retail at $27.00) 



It is wonderful fun and a Real Education 

Have You Noticed Our Wireless 
Set — Advertising 

We carry a full line of Wireless Sets from 
$9.00 retail to $97.50 retail. It is a line worth while! 

The Gilbert list is as follows : 

— Electrical Sets — 
Engineering — Sur- 
veying — Weather Bureau — Civil En- 
gineering — Phono Sets — Wheel Toys 
— Chemistry — Tele-Sets — Wireless — 
Soldering — Airkraft — Tanks — Toy 
Motors — Tool Chests — Magic — Puz- 
zles — Mechanical Toys — Machine 
Guns — Bell Toys, etc. 

Write for our Canadian proposition NOW 



REG J 3 PAl.OFF. 



The A. C. Gilbert-Menzies Co., LtA,?o8o8T^ 

Mfrs. of Gilbert's Toys—Agents Gilbert's Polar Cub Fans— Vibrators and Motors 



ISO 



K Q I • I I" M E N T AND DISPLAY 



Dry Good* Review 




Spring Notions 

A striking window arrange- 
iin-iii of notions and one which 
attracted many a passerby. The 
idea of home sewing — with the 
open machine in the window, 
the complete supplies required 
and the finished house dress — 
brought forth the frequent re- 
mark, "That is a neat house 
dress, and easily made, too." 
The mending wools at the top of 
the display and the baby in the 
foreground were also clever 
touches. The window was trim- 
med by E. J. Hamilton, a war 
veteran, who is now in charge 
of the window trimming for 
Stanley Mills & Co., Hamilton, 
Ont. 



NEWS PRINT SITUATION AFFECTS 
COUNTER CHECK BOOKS 

Merchants using counter check books 
have probably found out that the diffi- 
culty in the newspaper market and the 
shortage of paper has affected the sales 
pad situation. 

Many paper mills are experiencing 
great delays in filling orders — and some 



are refusing to accept orders at all for 
current delivery of paper. 

The prices of books are likely to ad- 
vance considerably over present prices 
because many of the mills have advanced 
their prices of paper from $10 to $25 
per ton since January 1. 

The situation may develop to the point 
that it will be almost impossible to get 



The Day Before "The Big Day" 




This is how E. B. Crompton & Co., Brantford, Ont., had one of their windows deco- 
rated for Dollar-Day. Needleai to My, it »u-. o>ns.ii<r;n>ly ravaged by noon of Jan. 29. 



counter cheek books at all — or at least 
within a short delivery period. 

The makers are advising merchants to 
look well to this item, and anticipate 
their requirements for at least CO to 90 
days ahead. 



The Hoover Suction Sweeper Co. of 
Canada, Ltd., held a banquet at the 
Royal Connaught Hotel, Hamilton, Ont., 
on Feruary 12, to celebrate the produc- 
tion of made-in-Canada sweepers. The 
guests were first conducted through the 
new factory and then taken by cars to 
the hotel, where the first made-in- 
Canada sweeper was exhibited in the 
rotunda. A professional entertainer 
sang throughout the dinner and also led 
the guests in various popular melodies. 
Among the speakers at the close of the 
dinner were: The Hon. Walter Rollo, 
Minister of Labor; Mai. -General, The 
Hon. S. C. Mewburn, K.C., C.M.G.; Mr. A. 
C. Garden, president, Board of Trade, 
Hamilton; Mr. Charles G. Booker, mayor 
of Hamilton; Mr. Geo. H. Douelas, chair- 
man, Ontario division, Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association; Mr. W. H. 
Hoover, president, and Mr. H. W. 
Hoover, general manager of the firm. 



L. S. Plaut & Co., Newark, N.J., be- 
gan December 26 closing their store at 
five o'clock every day in the week, in- 
cluding Saturday. 






Dm Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



131 




Considerable variety is exhibited in this 
tasteful display of rugs. 




A Showing of Draperies and Housefurnishings by the T. Eaton Co. 



Pancakes Inspire Cap Sale 

A Few Live Ideas Pulled This Business Out of a Rut 



THE town was booming. Our popu- 
lation was increasing every year, 
but my business of retail dry 
goods did not seem to increase in pro- 
portion to the population. 

For a long time I thought it was due 
to hard times and the war. People were 
not buying as much as usual, I told my- 
self — but they were just as well dressed. 
They had to buy the goods somewhere. 

While I sat, one day, wrapped in a 
dark brown grouch, and threatened dark- 
ly to sell out (a desperate threat which 
everyone makes when business slumps), 
I happened to pick up a magazine, and 
turned the pages aimlessly. 

There was a short story with an illus- 
tration of a girl in a show window turn- 
ing pancakes. It was a good story — but 



I wondered, if put into actual practice, 
would it make a good sale. 

I yawned. 

That sale business was old stutf. I 
had been having sales for ten years — 
sales on coats, sales on suits, sales on 
ribbons, underwear — everything. 

But the man of the story had made 
it pay. What was it he had had a sale 
on? Oh, pancakes! But I didn't deal 
in pancakes. What did I have that would 
take their place? 

Just then a small girl came in to buy 
a pair of overshoes. On her head she 
wore, jauntily, one of those soft, fuzzy 
tam-o'-shanters. 

That was it. I had a lot of them in 
the night before. They were ju?t becom- 
ing popular and were nearer the grocer's 



pancakes than anything else I could 
think of. 

Only Three Weeks Till School 

But upon second thought the idea 
didn't seem especially brilliant. I might 
add something else — sweaters, they 
would be appropriate just now, for it 
was August and only three weeks till 
school began. 

But a motley assortment of sweaters 
and tam-o'-shanters piled in the window 
would not appeal to the girl or the 
mother as this fresh, bright rose-colored 
one, surmounting the black, silken curls 
of this child would. 

Then I got my inspiration, for it was 
nothing less. 

1 had slins printed advertising a 
"Schoolday Sale — Goods to be Displayed 
by Living Models." 

On the first day of the sale, Monday 
morning, my windows were dressed with 
(Continued on page 134) 



L82 



Ury Goods Review 



New Arrangement in Montreal Store 

Details of New Grouping of Departments at Jas. A. Ogilvy's — Bargain Section Relieves 
Departments — Personal Service for Customers Who Cannot Visit the Store. 



A\ outline in brief appeared in last 
issue covering certain changes 
that were being made in the lo- 
cation of departments in James A. Ogil- 
\>V, Limited, of Montreal, for the pur- 

of meeting the conveniens of 
women shoppers in the matter of group- 
ing of certain lines of merchandise. 
Further details with illustrations, from 
photographs taken for DRY GOODS 
REVIEW, and plans made of the lay- 
out of several departments, are given 
in this issue, and further details will 
show the object in view of the manage- 
ment and the changes that are gradually 
being brought about. 

Dress Goods Replaced Shoes 
The first illustration .hows a view 
taken from the balcony or mezzanine 
floor of the store looking down upon the 
rear, showing on the left hand side the 
dress goods department, and, adjoining 
it, the silks, and far off, towards the 
right, at the very rear, the linen depart- 
ment and in front of it the wash goods. 
Back of the dress goods department are 
cases and counters where the store does 
a huge business in wools. In the major- 
ity of large stores it is customary for the 
dress goods and silks to be located on 
the first floor rather than on the ground 
floor. It was decided here, however, that 
there was not only room in the rear of 
the ground floor for this department, 
but that it was better here than on the 
second floor. Moreover, as will be seen, 
it worked in with the wash goods and 
linens, which spread out to the far side 
of the store, making a complete group- 
ing of these allied departments. Ori- 
ginallv the boot and shoe department oc- 
cupied the left hand corner where the 
dress goods are now, but it was thought 
belter to remove this to the next floor, 
where it now occupies a similar corner 
but' with greatly extended space. The 
experiment has resulted very satisfac- 
torily lo both departments, increased 
sales following the improved conditions 
under which they both operated 

Linen Department Spread Out 

For a time the book and stationery de- 
partment ran down to the back of the 
store, separating the linen department 
from the other departments to the left 
of it. Now the linen department — one of 
the best in Canada, by the way — has 
grown so greatly that it required new 
space, and so was allowed to spread out 
crossing over to meet the wools, and 
the books and stationery were shifted a 
little more towards the front. 

Methods of Display 

To thosn that are interested, especial- 
ly in the display of goods, this photo- 
graph will repay close study. The var- 
ious lin«'c are shown here are gracefully 



draped, on counters and on tables and 
on the. ledges as well. Some ideas in 
the display of these yard goods miglu 
be secured from this view of the Ogil- 
vy dress goods and silk departments. 

\tn actions in the Centre Group 

So much for the rear division of the 
ground floor of the store. There are 
two other divisions into which it natural- 
ly falls; the front portion giving special 
prominence to those departments where 
sales are made to a great extent through 
the display of goods to transient cus- 
tomers, and, second, a narrow line run- 
ning along the centre between the front 
and the rear towards the side entrance, 
connecting this with the elevators in the 
store, a sort of easy-going, attractive 
group of departments, consisting of* a 
soda-fountain (adjoining the elevators), 
candy and cakes, fancy goods, writing 
paper, and a comparatively new depart- 
ment, the bargain section. The idea of 
this last mentioned is as a group of 
bargains of various kinds, thus drawing 
them off from the departments them- 
selves. This idea is developed in the 
Robt. Simpson Company's store in To- 
ronto to a very considerable extent. The 
selection of departments, small in size 
necessarily, for this central division, will 
explain in itself the idea of the manage- 
ment. 

Just behind this section is a group of 
tables for display purposes in front of 
the dress goods, silks, and wash goods 
departments. 

Men's and Boys' 

Coming to the front section of the 
store, which is roughly illustrated in a 
diagram in connection with this article, 
a number of changes have been made. 



rallj -peaking, it is divided off into 
women's goods and the men's depart- 
ment, the only one, by the way, in the 
store. This is on the right hand side of 
the entrance but does not occupy nearly 
one-half the front division space. Men's 
and boys' furnishings occupy the front 
portion of this with clothing for both at 
the rear of this. The department itself is 
doing an excellent business, depending 
chiefly on the women customers of the 
store going in to buy for men and boys. 
At the extreme left of the entrance is 
the art and needle work department and 
back of that leathered goods on ode 
side and umbrellas on the other. The 
next aisle towards the centre contains, 
on either side, lines of sweater coats 
as the rear, and the front on either side, 
the hosiery. One of the centre aisles 
has gloves in the front on the left side 
and iibbon on the other, with cut glass 
and jewelry and toilet goods farther 
back. The other centre aisle contains 
neckwear on both sides with laces, em- 
broidery, etc., towards the rear. 

Small wares on Front 
Along the front of the store on the 
left is the smallwares department in 
which the goods are excellently display- 
ed, as they must be to create sales in 
this department. Various changes have 
been made in the arrangements of this 
front group of ground floor depart- 
ments with the idea of those being locat- 
ed side by side which seemed to work in 
best. The choice that has been made 
may prove agreeable to merchants or 
the reverse, but at all events will contain 
suggestions for their consideration. 

Coming to the second floor of which 
mention was made in last month's issue, 
the front is divided into the ready-to 




The dress Roods and fancy wool section at Ofrilvy's, Montreal. Linens and wash Roodh 
are shown at the extreme richt. 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



133 




Ogilvy's New Arrange- 
ment 

The infants* wear department shown at 
the left adjoins the toy section shown 
below, as described in accompanying arti- 
cle. 



wear and millinery department, with 
show cases and stands that are ad- 
mirably adapted for the purpose. Down 
the centre is the whitewear department 
running from side to side with the finer 
lines of lingerie along the front. Then 
at the back of this are waists on the 
left hand side and kimonas and other 
similar lines on the right and the corset 
department extends along the sides of 
the wall. At the rear towards the left 
is the shoe department, with children's 
near the centre, and the infants' depart- 
ment and boys' on the right, the latter 
arrangement being a very recent one. 
Included in the latter grouping is a 
barber shop for children. 

On the second floor are the curtains, 
and rugs, furniture, lunch and rest room, 
manicure and hair-dressing parlors. 

The basement is utilized and is being 
used more and more by the company 
where a good business has been develop- 
ed. Here is contained the hardware de- 
partment, including stoves and ranges, 
leather goods, beds and mattresses, and 
so on. A complete list of the various 
groupings is contained in connection 
with this article. 

Mention was made in the last article 
also of the personal service that the 
store is developing. A clipping from the 
February issue of the "Shopper" will 
explain this. It reads as follows: 

Extension of Our Personal Service 

"We have much pleasure in announ- 
cing that it has been decided to extend 
the activities of our PERSONAL SER- 
VICE, so as to bring 0»ilvy's Store 
rin-ht into the homes of invalids, home- 
tied mothers, or others unable to leave 
the house on account of sickness or in- 
clement weather. 

"Briefly, it is this: Suppose you 
wanted a dress for a girl of 8 or 10 years 
of a~e. You phone our PERSONAL 
SERVICE DEPARTMENT (Uptown 
64001, statins age of child, color and 
material desired, length of dress, and 
an approximate price you wished to pay. 
One of our e^-nert shoppers would then 
select say three dres^. and brin™ them 




to your house. You could then make 
your selection and pay for it. 

"In other words, we desire to send 
our store into every home in the city 
where the shopper cannot come to the 
store. 

"We feel sure that this new departure 
in store service will be of a great boon 
to many people, and confidently look 
forward to being of greater service to 
the public than we have in the past. 
We hope you will avail yourself of it, 
should you at any time require to go 
shopping, and cannot, for one reason or 
the other, come to the store itself." 

List of new groupings at Ogilvy's 
Montreal : 



Basement 

Hardware 
Refrigerators 
Carden Tools 
Kitchen Ware 
Stoves and Ranges 
Leather Goods 
Beds and Mat- 
tresses 



Street Floor 
Dress Goods 
Wash Goods 
Silks 
Ribbons 
Lamp Shades 
Handkerchiefs 
Embroideries 
Stationery 



Street Floor 
(Continued) 
Wools 

Toilet Goods 
Candy, Cake and 
Soda Fountain 
Cut Glass 
Hosiery 
Sweaters 
Gloves 

Men's and Boys' 
Clothing and 
Furnishings 
Linens 
Smallwares 
Patterns 
Neckwear 
Art Needlework 
Umbrellas 
Laces, Veilings 
and ■ Trimmings 



First 


Floor 


Shoes 




Millinery 




Women's 


and Chil- 


dren's 


and In- 


fants' 


Under- 


wear 




Blouses, 


White- 


wear 




Children's 


Wear 


Toys 




Women's 


and 


Misses' 


Suits, 


Dresses 


and 


Coats 




Second Floor 


Curtains, 


Rugs 


Furniture 




Lunch and Rest 


Rooms 




Manicure 


i n d 


Hair Dressing- 


Parlors 





134 



E Q U I 1' M I •: NT AND DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 



1PRING "EXPOSITION 



Glowing Displays Throughout the Store Offer Reliable 
Guidance to (he Newest Whims of Fashion 



Tw« i I 
-ty U Mufili. UUM i 
tal~*r th.l or 
Vt-MUf uwUf of »Jb*rrt.: 

W.ihtbu twU'f 

■Mil M t««i*tV I* ODVUMkl II 

Accessories 

- 

1—ll1> MA M ■ Ml* pf«4i 
W -— - 



DBploym-fBl 

- ATt But, I itw*1 I 

l. .. I -r juJ^.uj wortlk," will tlM 
■ mrrrhuidi- whi. . t»- i- ratJti.ru> v »i«l <)uaIiU -u 





New Skirts 



* -.», U- .OI--J 



Millinery Modes 

0n» roar ri|«i to t. ■■ t.tuotlf aw 

pn«»-d it lb* oiilluirrj oi.*irv SBd BM m*r 
rrrt^inlr b>- aMufd bcx>nUDjtB'°** if ib-a 
rl,-,**- ,-»ffull», f,,r than ■■ - -rtuxuU *M 
*i (ml u U< inflo4* fif^drailj enry in- 

larpftttetlaa ■■* -m*rti>"t Uiui 

d***k>ptd for rPupMU! U-re »i-» ILato 

•tbu-b W'li] doHly la 10 taori that the ub 

fi|«*W ut rrltrthtrig. tnd On • I 

1 nnu. -which turn uhl/j-Jy up at 
If.- Ir-nl or all around- l> the if <l«uirn#r 
ill nuiU witixiut m 

I I 
.-m..fui in,.-, that On » i» 



*«Kit MriatJ 



The New Corset Styles 



t •■.,,, „( .1,4. 

■XtJ* .,« Wri Ml ,**, ■», A . 



I'AM VKES INSI'IKE CAP SALE 

(Continued from page lol) 

everything that a child of school age 
needs — one-piece dresses, coats, shoes, 
stockings, middy blouses, gloves, under- 
wear, hair libbons, and tam-o'-shanters 
and sweaters, of course. I did not even 
show a belt or a shirtwaist for anybody 
past the school age. 

Living Models Used 

But what really attracted was the 
novel mananer in which the sale itself 
was conducted — the living models were 
what gave it life. 

I had selected two of the prettiest 
little girls in town, of eight and twelve 
years, and a bright bov of ten. 

The smallest girl was little and red- 
haired. We dressed her in a charming 
dress of turquoise blue and tan plaid 
gingham which I had had made from 
my own stock in a late and interesting 
style. 

This displayed my yard goods for the 
benefit of the large majority of small 
town mothers who prefer to do their 
own sewing, and I carried the pattern. 
The goods in the bolt, with other attrac- 
tive materials, were given a conspicuous 
place. 



My ready-made school dresses were 
advertised by the older girl, who flaunt- 
ed a mass of auburn curls and flashed 
big, dark eyes. 

She showed off one of the dark-blue 
serges, ready-made, with the big white 
collar and cuffs, splendidly. 

The boy swaggered about in a nifty 
and durable suit of dark serge. All of 
the children wore stockings and shoes 
from stock, and all accessories to match 
— the little girls sporting such hair 
ribbons as would make other little f^irls 
lie awake nights. At first, I had hesi- 
tated to involve so much of my best lines, 
but in every case I found that I was able 
to sell the goods to the wearers at a very 
small discount, so my loss was small. 

Each child bore a placard. The smal- 
ler girl's read: "I am Gwin & Sinclair's 
Model. Mv Outfit Cost, Approximately, 
$5." 

The children thought this great sport 

all they had to do was to stroll about 
the store all day, for which each received 
two dollars. 

And when customers saw the children 
so substantially clad, as well as daintily, 
and noted the approximate cost, they 
could, in their mind's eyes, see their own 
child decked out the same. 



A Study in 
Store A 



Two Western Stores I se S.j 

merits Last March — Pil 

What a Cr 

By H. A. NICHOLS 

Both tlic advertisements illustrated 
are department store ads. Depart- 
ment Store Advertising is roughly 
placed in three classes. For conven- 
ience these classes may he designated 
A. BandC. 

Class A is known as a high-clas* 
store advertising, which caters to the 
well-to-do set and relies for bu.-in. 
on the high character of the merch- 
andise offered for sale rather than 
attractive values. This class of ad- 
vertisement is usually displayed in 
refined style and few, if any, prices 
are given. 

Class B is the middle-class store -ad- 
vertisement, which combines two 
policies. That is to present high- 
grade goods, and by using the low- 
price argument make an appeal to 
all classes of trade. 
Class C is termed the bargain store 
advertisement, which makes it- ap- 
peal to the consumer on the basis of 
low prices rather on the character of 
goods offered for sale. 
The advertisements in question be- 
long to Class A and Class B, respec- 
tively. Both bear the same illustra- 
tion but vary in text and in typo- 
graphical arrangement. The Davi 
Spencer advertisement (Fig. 1) be- 
longs to Class A. The A. E. Snell 
vertising which make- an appeal to 
Class B. 

Fig. 1 — The absence of prices and 
i In dignity of the typographical ar- 
rangement -how that the purpo-c of 
i lii- store, in this case at least. 
appeal to people of refinement who 
are supposed to consider quality be- 
fore price. 

Fig. 2 — Prices are featured in this 
advertisement and the type display 
as a whole is more vigorously treated 
than in Fig. 1. being typical of ad- 
vertising which make an appeal to 
all who may wish to buy. 



The last three days of the sale were 
devoted to clothes for the high school 
girls and conducted in the same manner, 
having three attractive girls of sixteen 
to eighteen, displaying school dresses, 
blouses and suits. Many of these were 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



135 



)epartment 
rtising 






stration in Spring Announce- 
Effects Obtainable — 
to Say. 

r Printer and Publisher 

Both advertisements in question are 
of a high order in their respective 
classes. The text matter is written 
in appealing style and the display 
is remarkably attractive. 
It would be difficult to conceive the 
illustrations (exactly alike in each 
case) presented to better advantage. 
From a typographical viewpoint the 
advertisements present a distinct 
contrast. 

Fig. 1 represents a typical Class A 
advertisement display. The various 
parts have been skilfully divided by 
"white space" instead of the custom- 
ary rules or boxes and the effect is 
decidedly artistic. 

The typography of Fig. 2 is in keep- 
ing with Class B Advertisement dis- 
play, being more prominent in tone, 
by virtue of the four panel effects, 
than Fig. 1. The reading matter 
within the panels is not up to the 
standard of typography apparent in 
the rest of the advertisement. The 
parts appear unnecessarily crowded 
together; this is particularly notice- 
able in the panel in the lower right- 
hand corner. 

A considerable difference is seen in 
the manner in which the heading and 
introductory matter are respective- 
ly presented in the two advertise- 
ments. Both represent effective styles. 
Fig. 2 is especially well treated. 
While there are Class A, B and C 
stores it does not necessarily follow 
that when a certain store uses a Class 
A, B or C advertisement that the 
store places itself in any of these 
divisions. Large department stores 
which cater to every class are now 
seen placing Class A advertisements 
in superior media and Class B and 
C in popular media. Irrespective of 
the class of media many stores, too, 
find that it suits their purpose to use 
A, B and C advertisements, as the 
occasion dictates. 



suitable for the young woman past the 
school age. 

When we noted a preference shown for 
any one suit or dress, we picked the girl 
most suited to the garment and had her 
try it on and walk through the store for 



iPRING "EXPOSITION 



C'PRING is Here and With it Hosts of Smart New Styles. Mosl Women Look Forward lo this 
•J Event with Eager Anticipation. This Year the Showing Will Afford Them More Real Delight 
for Choice and Variety Know No Restrictions. Here One Finds Modish Apparel For Every Need 
In Almost Endless Variety of Styles, Fabrics and Colorings. If We Can Judge by Ihe Enthusiasm 
which Past Spring Exhibits Have Called Forth, We Predict an Unusually Large and Appreciative 

Attendance Here. 



OPENING DATE MARCH 

AND FOLLOWING DAYS 



Many and Varied are 
the New Millinery 
Modes for Spring 




Quality Hosiery for Wome n 

'""'-'"I 



inspection. Approval always followed, 
and sales almost always did. 

Of course we had used discrimination 
in engaging the girls, choosing those 
with just the "pep" and temperament to 
carry the thing out successfully, for 
temperament of the wearer has a great 
deal to do with the carriage and appear- 
ance of the gown. 

Was the sale a success? 

I swelled not only the profit side of 
my account far above expectations, hut 
also my brain with ideas for other sales 
— sales of originality that became a reg<- 
ular feature, sales that were waited for. 



DEATH OF QUEBEC MERCHANT 

Mr. C. O. Paradis, proprietor of the 
large department store at Sorel, Que., 
died at his residence on Feb. 16, at the 
age of 66, after a lengthy illness. De- 
ceased was born at St. Denis, on the 



Richelieu, October 22, 1854. He went to 
Sorel in 1878 and founded the business 
which has become so prosperous and 
which he directed up to his death. He 
founded and operated the Popular Shirt 
Company, was the president of the Sorel 
Light and Power Co., and shareholder 
in other enterprises. He had been con- 
nected with the R. and O. Navigation 
Co., and Mayor of Sorel during 11 years. 

He was president of the Chambre de 
Commerce of Sorel, and well known in 
business circles in Montreal and had 
many acquaintances among the Liberal 
chiefs, especially the late Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier and Sir Lomer Gouin. 

A few days before his death the em- 
ployees of his store and some of the 
officials of the Popular Shirt Co., went 
to his bedside at his request and he bade 
them each adieu and shook hands with 
them. 



LS6 



EQ I I I' M E NT \\H D I 8 I' I. A Y 



Dry Qoodk !•' 




_-~. j. , — . 



....... . _ . J 








UTJ THE (ASH 



THE centralized system of handling sales puts the 
cash directly into your own hands upon payment 
by the customer. 

For the Lamson Carrier, whether wire line, electric 
cable or pneumatic tube— takes the cash with lightning 
swiftness to the central desk, where it is handled by 
your expert cashier. The receipts are under personal 
control. 

As with the cash, so with the charge. Centralized ser- 
vice is equivalent to putting the sale directly upon the 
books against the proper customer's account. 
That merchants realize more than ever the safety in this 
method is evidenced by an unprecedented demand for 
carrier systems. 

Atypical case is that of the Mount Royal Department Store (J. O. 
Gareau, Ltd.) in Montreal. They say: "fVe have found the centralized 
carrier system to be a safe plan of operation, besides giving us numerous 
other advantages. 



Safety is one of the many exclu ive 
points of merit. Ask for informa- 
tion regarding: the other*. 




Genera! Ofces at Boston. M-ass. 



Dry Goods Review 



K Q U I P M E N T AND DISPLAY 



137 





'five the Hands 



elltm 
Personality 



YOUR salespeople, Mr. Merchant, should be 
given every opportunity to exercise what- 
ever and all talent they possess ! For, are not 
your profits determined by the volume of 
sales? And cannot sales be increased by sales- 
people if they be relieved of practically all 
else, save selling? 

Typewriters, adding machines, and other mechanical devices are to-day 
recognized as necessary store equipment. You don't know how 
you could do without them. But, what of your salespeople ? They 
don't use the typewriter 1 They have no use for an adding machine ! 
But there is something they can use advantageously, something that will release 
their selling personality, and thai something is the MEASUREGRAPH. 

The MEASUREGRAPH measures 36 -inch yards unerringly. 
The MEASUREGRAPH records the number of yards measured. 
The MEASUREGRAPH computes 
the amount of the sale. Free your 
salespeople from the mechanical 
work the MEASUREGRAPH does 
and you have a real sales staff, a force 
of efficient salespeople who can 
bend every energy towards the ac- 
complishment ot the task that is 
theirs — selling. Then are you on the 
high road to reap the utmost as a 
result of their efforts. 

A post card will bring our 
representative 

The Measuregraph Company 
of Canada 

Makers of Fabric-Measuring, Cost-Computing 
Machines 

88 Bay St., Toronto 

The MEASLRECRAPH has been approved by weights and 

measures officials wherever submitted and carries the endorsement 

of thousands of enthusiastic users 




138 



]•: Q I,' IP M E N T A N I) DISPLAY 



Dry Goods Review 




This merchant finds it easy to make out Ms income tax report 

H 



E has a checking account at the 
bank and he uses an up-to-date 
National Cash Register. 



From his bank check book and his bills he 
gets the cost of running his store, cost of 
merchandise bought, and a record of pay- 
ments made. 

From his National Cash Register he gets a 
record of (1) cash sales, (2) charge sales, 
(3) received on account, (4) petty cash paid 
out, and (5) clerks' sales. 



These records give him the figures he needs 
for his income tax. They also give him 
control over his business every day of the 
year. 

This merchant knows that his register 
records are complete and accurate, whether 
they are made when business in his store is 
quiet or when there is a rush of selling. 

Without an up-to-date National Cash 
Register, these necessary figures would be 
hard to get, hard to keep, impossible to 
verify, and expensive to record. 



An up-to-date National Cash Register will give you the records you need to control your business 

The National Cash Register Company of Canada, Limited 

Factory: Toronto, Ontario 
Branch Offices: 

CALGARY 714 Second Street, W. QUEBEC 188 St Paul Street 

EDMONTON 5 McLeod Bid*. KEGINA 1820 Cornwall Street 

HALIFAX 63 Granville Street SASKATOON 265 Third Avenue, S. 

HAMILTON 14 Main Street, E. ST. JOHN 50 St. Germain Street 

LONDON 350 Dundas Street TORONTO 40 Adelaide Street 

MONTREAI 122 St. Catherine Street, W. VANCOUVER 524 Pender Street, W. 

OTTAWA 306 Bank Street WINNIPEG 213 McDermot Avenue 



Dry Goods Review 



EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 



139 



Sectional Fixtures 




This is Effective Display 

All your goods working for you all the time and 
without getting shop-worn. 

(JbnoNroSffowCASFCo) Limited 

181 to 199 Carlaw Avenue, TORONTO 

Write for particulars. 



14(1 



EQ I I P M E \ T \ N 1) 1) I S 1' I. \ V 



Dry Goods Review 



^ 



CANADA'S LEADING DISPLAY FIXTURE HOUSE 
always ready to meet your needs in 

High Grade Wax Figures 

and 

Display Forms of All Kinds 



ol 




Agent : 

P. R. MUNRO 

150 Bleury St. 
Montreal 



We make everything for the 
better display of merchandise 



See Our New Line of Art Display Fixtures. 
Write for Copy of Our New Catalogue. 

DALE quality means PERFECTION 



DALE WAX FIGURE CO., LIMITED 

86 York St. Toronto 




Agent : 

E. R. BOLLART&SON 

501 Mercantile Bldg. 

Vancouver 



L D 






%) 



Better Than Any Other 
Service 



Gipe-Hazard 
Store Service 

Co., Ltd. 



113 Sumach St. 
Toronto : Canada 





Our carrier system and ser- 
vice are as good a9 we say they 
are. We say that together they 
beat any other service, and soon 
save the investment. 

By them the merchant can 
perform more functions, and with a greater decree of dispatch and 
;iy than can be accomplished by any other system, all of which 
means that more customers can be better served without increasing 
your stafT of salesmen. Our circular, for the asking, explains a great 
deal. 



IMPORTERS and MANUFACTURERS 

Art Needlework and Fancy Goods 

"Peri-Lusta" "Crystal" 

Mercerized Cottons Artificial Silk 

Embroidery Materials 

Fancy Linens and Piece Goods 

MADEIRA HAND EMBROIDERED 
LINENS w HANDKERCHIEFS 

Campbell, Metzger & Jacobson 

932-938 Broadway New York Cor. 22nd St. 

Canadian Showroom and Factory : 

Bay and Wellington St$., - Toronto, Canada 




EQUIPMENT AND DISPLAY 141 







Announcement 

Prices effective January 12, 1920 

Runabout $ 710 

Touring 740 

Coupe -fully equipped 1050 
Se dan- fully equipped 1250 

Chassis 675 

One-Ton Truck Chassis 750 

Prices are f.o.b. Ford, Ont., and do not include War Tax 

Electric Starting- and Lighting- Equipment is supplied on 
Sedan and Coupe at prices quoted. On Runabout and 
Touring this equipment is optional at an additional cost 
of $100.00, exclusive of War Tax. 

Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited 

Ford, Ontario 



L42 



i:<» i I I- \! E N T AND DISPLA V 



We Specialize in 

BIRLEY 

Patent Folding Suit 
and Costume Boxes 

We also manufacture all 
kinds of Folding Boxes 



QUALITY and SERVICE 



Dominion Paper Box Co, 

LIMITED 
Toronto Ontario 




Selling Gloves 



A system of Store Fixtures that will double the 
capacity, increase the sale and make every size 
instantly available in your Glove Department, 
should interest you. The New Way System, one 
unit of which is shown above, will do this, not 
only in Gloves, but in every department. 

Let us explain the system. 

Jones Bros. & Co., Ltd. 

29-31 Adelaide St. W. 
Toronto 



Easter Is Early This Year 

Get ready early with a supply of 

DELFOSSE FIXTURES, BUST FORMS 
AND WAX FIGURES 



Quality 

the 
Highest 

Prices 

the 
Lowest 



j3 If you have 
not yet rc- 
ccived our 
new cata- 
logue, send 
for it. It is 
very interest- 
ing: 





•4R/V 




DELFOSSE & CO. 

247-249 Craig St. W. Factory, 1 to 19 Hermine St. 

MONTREAL 




Your 

copy is 
ready ! 



Right now is the time to send for your 
free copy of our "Guide to Better Win- 
dow Displays!" 

It's full of the latest creations in artificial 
flowers, decoratives and wicker-ware — and con- 
tains a multitude of new window display BUggeBr 
tions that will prove real business getters. There 
are so many original conceptions you will find 
it difficult to choose. 

Simply request your copy on your business 
stationery — we'll mail it immediately — it will end 
your display troubles! 

The Adler-Jones Co. 

206 S. Wabash Ave.. Chicago 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



143 




To Wholesalers and Manufacturers of 
clothing and leather goods 

Here is the thoroughly reliaible "Fountain Brand" 

Pure Irish Linen Thread 

which costs no more than ordinary brands but which 
is greatly superior to them in durability and strength. 

If you are looking for an absolutely dependable 
thread of proven worth, send for a sample order of 
"Fountain Brand." 

■/ 2 -lb. and 1-lb. Patent Wind Cops; 1, 2 and 4-oz. Spools. 
Colors — Black, White, Whitey Brown 

Sole agents for Canada: 

fountain brand Walter Williams & Co., Ltd. 

MONTREAL: 508 Read Building TORONTO: 20 Wellington St. W. 



ESTABLISHED 1849 



BRADSTREETS 



Offices Throughout the Civilized World 



Calgary, Alba. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Halifax, N.S. 
London, Ont. 



OFFICES IN CANADA: 

Ottawa, Ont. 
St. John, B.C. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 



Montreal, Que. 
Quebec, Que. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipc.T, Man. 
Hamilton, Ont., and St. John's, Nfld. 



Reputation gained by long years of vigorous, 
conscientious and successful work. 

C. A. B. BROWN, gSSi^SE 

TORONTO. CANADA. 



BUTTONS 

Owing to the uncertainty of costs of 

Material, we are asking our customers 
to place their orders early, which we 
shall execute at old prices as long as 
stock lasts. 

Look over our Range of Samples 

Our Travellers will be calling on you 

"CANADA'S EXCLUSIVE BUTTON HOUSE" 

A. WEYERSTALL & CO. 



66 Wellington St. W. 



TORONTO, Ont. 



'$P:- y 



The Right Place 
to buy— 



ELASTIC RIB UNDERWEAR 

FINE CASHMERE 

JERSEYS AND SWEATERS 

HEAVY WOOL SOCKS 

TWEEDS AND ETOFFES 

ETC. 

Our goods recommend to 
your customers in their at- 
tractive, well-fitting, long- 
wearing qualities. 

You will quickly recognize 
these satisfaction - ensuring 
features when you inspect 
our lines. 

Send for prices. 



MITCHELL WOOLLEN CO. 

LIMITED 

MITCHELL, ONTARIO 



Ill 



l> l{ Y GOODS REV] E W 




This Dome 




assures 



you 



That you are getting 
the finest quality ob- 
tainable in gloves. 






There is no uncertainty as 
to t he acceptance of 

Denf's as the quality 
gloves to feature for 
Spring and Summer sell- 
ing. 



It is time NOW to anticipate the heavy 
demand for kid and silk gloves for Easter 
and the Summer. 



Our travellers will submit for your inspection a 
full range of samples. It will be to your advantage 
to see them. 



DENT, ALLCROFT & COMPANY 

128 BLEURY STREET, MONTREAL 



BT 



DRY G D S K E V I E W 



145 







ew Designs in 

Ladies' Whitewear 

for Spring, 1921 



W$nM 



^fflcntXcaC 









S 



14G 



DRY GOODS REV] K W 



d£ 







D 



D 







D 

1 







3HO! 



D fl -J I 



3][E^f 



^3 



A. B. C. HOSIERY 




FOR CHILDREN 



Made in all sizes 

4 to io inches 

i and i Rib 



FOR ADULTS 



Special Features of A. B. C. Hosiery 

that will greatly increase YOUR Hosiery Sales 



Elastic Rib 

for 

Form-Fitting 




Finest Cashmere Yarns 

for 

Warmth 




Spliced Heel and Toe 

for 

Wear 



ALLEN BROS. CO., LIMITED 



883 Dundas St. East 



Toronto 



"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 



ID I 



3JIQ1 



u czDM 



M 



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DRY GOO DS REVIEW 



147 




"The Proof is in the Wearing" 

The ever-increasing demands for 

"WINSOME MAID" 

Pure Thread Silk*Hosiery 

are sufficient proof to us that our efforts to produce a line of Hosiery that 
will give dependable service, have been highly successful. 
The splendid wearing qualities of WINSOME MAID Hosiery, combined with 
its delightfully soft texture and finish, uniformity of weave, and perfection 
of fit, have won its present reputation. 

"CANADIAN GOODS ARE BETTER" 

Allen Silk Mills 



43 D 



avies /Ave. 



A^ 



Toronto 



STANLEY McLEOD 

449 Granville St., Vancouver 

Western Representative 

■i E. R. CLARRY 

S" 14 Algonquin Ave., Toronto 
Representative for 
Northern Ontario 



H. SW1TZER, 193 Sparks St., Ottawa 
Representative for Eastern Ontario and Montreal 

R. H. SWITZER, 35 Wellington St. West, Toronto 
Salesman for Toronto 

NORMAN SWITZER, 35 Wellington St. West, Toronto 
Representative for Western Ontario 



JONES-CAIRNS LIMITED 

St. John, N.B. 

Eastern Representative 

J. E. COTE 

66 Church Street 

Quebec, Que. 



S 



1 1* 



DRY GOODS REVIEW 



•-:I!IIIP : 



Veils and Veiling for Spring, 

Nobby designs -- attractive prices 

MOURNING VEILING AND VEILS 

ELASTIC VEILS 

"MONA LISA" 

The bi£, seller in Veils arriving soon in 
Black, Navy, Taupe, Prunella, Nigger 



Laces 

VALS.,BEADINGS, TORCHONS, NET TOPS. 
CHANTILLY 

Special Val. in Box lots. 

FLOUNCING WIDTHS 

White, Cream, Ecru, Black. 



Cotton and Silk Nets 



Silk Bridal Veils 



Metal Laces 



French Georgette, Crepe de Chine, 

Ninons 



We have a h\<\ stock ol scarce 
&oods it will pay j you to see. 



dUk 




PVNADAVEILING CO 



LIMITED 



TORONTO 




DRY GOODS REVIEW 



149 




CLATWORTHY & SON, LIMITED 




Established 1896 



,-*""*""*"! 



\ 




No. 1568-P 





No. 1590-N 




TORONTO 

Manufacturers of 

the most complete line 
of 

Display 
Fixtures 

and 
artistic 

Wax 
Figures 

Made in Canada 



Incorporated 1908 



OarCndm ^s 




REGISTERED TRADE MARK 



This Trade Mark is 
your protection in buy- 
ing Display Forms. 
DUR-ENAM Forms 
are the highest stand- 
ard obtainable. 

ORDER NOW FOR EASTER! 

Recent extensions to 
our factory allow for 
treble our former ca- 
pacity and warrant our 
confidence in our abil- 
ity to give PROMPT 
deliveries on your 
Spring Orders. 




\ 



AGENTS: 

Vancouver, B. C, M. E. Hatt & Co., Mercantile Bldg. 
Montreal, Que., E. O. Barette & Co., 301 St. James St. 
Winnipeg. Man., O'Brien Allan Co., Phoenix Block 
Halifax, N.S.. D. A. Gorrie, Box 273 




No. 1574 




150 



Dry Goods Review 



The Talk of the Town 

l nique Store at Midland, Out., Is Commended by Townspeople — Features Housefurnish- 

ings and Fancy Goods 



THOSE merchants who operate on 
the principle i nut a small store 
can only be carried on by having 
"a place for everything and everything 
.11 tnat place, 1 will perhaps be interested 
,n tin' stove oi Mr. \. G. Edwards a1 
Midland, Out. Although small and com- 
pact is this store, it has an idea which 
II carried throughout, and that is that 

a small store is just as much a field for 
originality and definite arrangement as 
any of the larger business institutions. 

Although Mr. Edward's store, which 
specializes in house furnishings and 
fancy goods, is still in its infancy, it is 
already the talk of the town, and stran- 
gers are advised to visit the store before 
leaving. This attraction is accomplish- 
ed b> the working out oi new ideas and 
the exercise of a good deal of hard work, 
but the whole at comparatively small ex- 
pense. During the Spring and rail sea- 
sons Mr. Edwards makes a special drive 
with his house furnishing and merchan- 
dise, and during the Summer and at the 
Christmas season fancy goods, infants' 
wear, and dress accessories are em- 
phasized. 
Booths of Evergreens Attract Attention 

When DRY GOODS REVIEW repre- 
sentative visited the store .luring the 
Christmas season there were just inside 
the entranc* door a1 either side, booths 
made of birch poles covered with ever- 
greens. Then- was a tabli m each booth 
and a tall flooi lamp in each corner of 
the booth. On one side of the store are 
sections of shelves about nine feet long, 
the first oi which contains fancy wool. 
the second crochet cotton, the third 



staphs, the fourth draperies, curtains, 

etc. Between th< sections are small 

tables which form suitable little alcoves 
for displaying a few special articles such 
as a centrepiece and vase, a runner and 
lamp, and so on. In front of these 
shelves are ten-foot weathered oak coun- 
ters or tables. These are built in heavy 
old English oak style. Above the shelf 
section is an excellent space for display- 
ing a few suggestions in draperies, will 
papers, an occasional vase and piec< of 
statuary. 

Adjustable Platform I selul 
On the opposite side of the store is one 
shelf about six feet high. This shelf 
is not crowded but displays Japanese 
wicker-work baskets, flower vases, etc., 
and every five feet or so is placed a 
smal: Japanese lamp with a silk and 
wicker shade. The variety of colors 
these lamps afford is very attractive. All 
these lamps were lit during the Christ- 
mas season. 

Under this shelf for a distance of 
thirty feel are tables with detachable 
legs. These tables will lower to a height 
of one foot from the floor, and when so 
adjusted form a platform which is nicely 
adapted for displaying curtains, draper- 
its, etc. These draperies are hung from 
arms attached to the wall. During the 
Christmas season when the platform is 
raised to table height, the arms are used 
lor displaying blouses and women's wear. 
Small lights with six-inch Japanese 
shades placed on the ends of these arms 
made very effective decorations during 
the holiday season. In the children's de- 
partment the shades were white, pink, 




Views in Midland Store 



showing the methodical arrangement of fancywork supplies. The mission counters are 
suitable for displaying table runners, vases, etc. Note. too. the wicker chairs. 



and pale blue, which an most suitable 
for the merchandise carried there. 

Towards the rear of the store, back 
ef these tables, then is a graduated 
counter which is used foi displaying 
kiddies' boetees, stockings, caps, coats, 
comforters, shawls, and in fact every- 
thing for a child up to two years of aire 
A unique idea in this department is the 
placing of Teddy bears in among the 
other things. There are also Eskimo 
dolls, kittens, little poodle dogs, etc. Mr. 
Edwards says this lisplay does much tc 
attract sinal. children's attention which 
is usually followed by the mother's, and 
-lie does not fail to note the great var- 
iety of pale blue, pink and white gar- 
ments purchasable for the little ones. 

The back of the store facing the en- 
trance is used for the wall-paper depart- 
ment. The wall-paper is contained in 
portable racks, which may be easily re- 
moved as the stock is sold. Behind the 
wall-paper section is the workshop 
wherein cushions, centrepieces, hand- 
bags, workbaskets, etc., are made, and 
also a certain amount of alteration is 
done for customers. 

Wicker Chairs at Counters 

Towards the front of the store are 
tables which, with the wall racks, are 
used for displaying ladies' silk waists, 
camisoles, silk combinations, boudoir 
caps, etc. The woodwork throughout is 
in dark green weathered oak, which hai- 
monizes nicely with the booths. An- 
other striking feature of this cheery and 
tasteful store is the replacement of the 
usual stool or wooden chair by attractive 
wicker chairs for the use of customers 
at counters. The improved appearance 
which these give to the store is readily 
seen in the accompanying dews. The 
windows of Mr. Edwards' store are a 
continual source of interest to passers- 
by. They are well lighted by shaded 
lights around the top. In each window 
or a little wicker stand stood a larsre 
light, when the representative of DRY 
GOODS REVIEW visited the store. On 
one side tin light had a blue Japanese 
shade, and on the oposite side a yellow- 
one. Stands of various heights displayed 
the articles, small and large, which were 
arranged with an eye for artistic balance. 
In the corners of the windows were large 
flower stands. The setting itself was 
auite an attraction had there not been 
a nice displas in addition. One window 
featured tabic runivrs. rugs and hou 
furnishings; the other featured doilies, 
table linen, and provided suitable spao 
for a few smart blouses. 

Evei since Mr. Edward's store 
be< n opened be has found business in- 
creasing steadily. This has be^n to an 
extenl surpassing his optimistic expecta- 
tions for a. town the size of Midland, with 
a population of about 7.000. Mr. Edwards 
has one price on each article, and that 



DRY a I ) S REVIEW 



151 



for cash, with satisfaction guaranteed 
or money refunded. His policy is that 
the customer must not be kept waiting. 
She must always have what she wants 
unless she asks for inferior goods. His 
success he attributes chiefly to his abil- 
ity to procure dependable goods always 
for his customers and to render them 
every attention possible in the store. 
The progress of this ambitious institu- 
tion will be watched with interest by the 
trade 



PROFESSOR PARSONS LECTURES 
AGAIN 

The name of Prof. Frank Alvah Par- 
sons, president of the New York School 
of Applied Art, is by no means a now 
one to Canadians. He has given a num- 
ber of lectures and series of lectures 
under various auspices in Canada, many 
of which have been reported in DRY 
GOODS REVIEW. 

Prof. Parsons has a very clear con- 
ception of the principles of hoursefur- 
nishing and decorating and his original 
way of expressing them has made him 
a favorite in the trade. 

The latest occasion of his visit to Can- 
ada was rather unique in that it is the 
first time in which carpet, upholstery, 
decorating, furniture, wall paper, and 
housefurnishing men of all branches 
met, along with art students, architects 
and managers of public buildings and 
institutions, under the auspices of a 
manufacturing concern, to listen to his 
series of lectures. The Toronto Carpet 
Company did not conceive of Prof. Par- 
sons' addresses as a scheme to adver- 
tise carpets, but felt that if facilities for 
education were placed within reach of 
salesmen in the housefurnishing de- 
partment they would respond readily and 
derive from such knowledge a quickened 
interest in their work that would result 
in the elevation of taste which could not 
but eventually redound to the benefit of 
business as a whole. Response to the in- 
vitation of the Toronto Carpet Mfg. 
Company was generous, and the series 
of lectures a decided success. The lec- 
tures were delivered during the week 
of January 12. The following subjects 
were discussed by Prof. Parsons: 

"How to Choose and Harmonire 
Color." 




The platform at the left is adjustable to various heights. It is admirable for display- 
ing curtains, draperies, floor lamps, etc. At the left and rear of the store is the 
infants' wear section and facing the entrance is a compact department for wallpapers. 



"French and Italian Periods, and How 
to Use Them." (With lantern slides.) 

"The Fundamental Relations of the 
Floor Coverings to the Decoration of a 
House." 

"The Meaning of Art, and How It is 
Applied to Carpets and Rugs." 

"How to Relate Patterns in Floor 
Coverings to the Rest of the Room." 

"English and Colonial Periods, and 
How to Use Them." (With lantern 
slides.) 

"The Principles Involved in Furnish- 
ing and Decorating a House." 

At the conclusion of the meetings, a 
hearty vote of thanks was tendered to 
the Toronto Carpet Manufacturing Com- 
pany for their enterprise in placing these 
facilities at the disposal of those in- 
terested, and hope was expressed that 
conventions along this, or similar lines, 
would be held in the future, if possible, 
annually. 

The suggestion was also made that a 
Carpet Club be formed in Toronto, and 
a committee was appointed to work out 
the preliminary organization. 



NEW PERMANENT SALES ROOMS 
FOR THREE RIVERS 

The Hodgson Sumner Co., Ltd., of 
Montreal, have opened new permanent 
sales rooms in the town of Three Rivers. 
Que., in the Canadian Bank of Commerce 
Building. These rooms will be in charge 
of Mr. Stanley Helleur, who has for the 
last few years had charge of this ter- 
ritory for the Hodgson Sumner Co., Ltd. 



TRADE NEWS 

The G. W. Robinson Company, of 
Hamilton, have decided, in order to give 
the best and quickest service to their 
clientele, to equip the whole store with 
cash registers. Their order is the largest 
that has ever been placed in Hamilton. 



All the retail stores at Leamington, 
Ont., are now closing at 6 p.m. and 10.30 
Saturday nights. During May, June. 
July, Au<?-ust, September and October, 
thev will be closed on Friday afternoons. 



Lay-It- Away Sale of \Vallpapers 

Here is a piece of really good news for all who intend to repaper their homes this Spring. Most people 
know that wallpaper prices are rising, and anyone wait ! ng until later will certainly pay a good deal more than 
at present. And we want all customers who are willing to take advantage of this special offer to read about 
this sale. There are two big advantages in buying nov, first, we give a discount of twenty per cent, on all 
wallpapers except those already reduced. As an additional advantage, we will accept a cash deposit of twenty 
per cent., and will store the goods for you until requ'red, providing the time limit is within the space of two 
months, the balance of the purchase price to be paid on delivery. 

Just figure out that twenty per cent, discount will pay the cash advantage and you will realize the full advan- 
tage of buying during this sale. 



The above advertisement was run by the Paquet Co. of Quebec and is reprinted for its suggestive value to the many dry goods merchants. 



'•- HO U S E K I RNISH1NGS Dry Goods Review 

■■■ GEO- H . HFF<> T SO N & CO, LIMITED ■:■ 



52 BAY STREET 

TORONTO 



4 \ 



•• W !? %7 



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SPfe i 4V 



BATTENBERG LACE 

No. 161. io inches Color- Ecru 

While we have the most attractive lot of 

LACES and INVENTIONS 

to trim all kinds of Window Shades, and 
while we manufacture the finest 

WINDOW SHADE CLOTHS 

— Our Alberta, Empire, Acme, Colonial, Royal 
Standard and Monarch Tint qualities — do] not 
forget that we are in the same position when 

YOU WANT 

Tapestries, Curtain Hangings, Scrim 
Curtains, Comforters, Pillows, Brass, Upholstery, Hardware 

Most of these are Canadian made 

~" -I- GIO.H. HEES. SON & CO. LIMITED -:■ 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



153 






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An All -Year Staple 

far-sighted merchants now 
display CREX continuously 

There is a constantly growing demand for CREX during every 
month' in the year. 

Dealers who keep a stock on display from January to December 
report an unusual consumer interest — due to it- recognized 
adaptability and practicability in every room in the home. 
It. will pay yon to have a good assortment of the three CREX 
weaves— DE LUXE, HERRINGBONE and REGULAR— in a 
prominent place on your floor. 

They are bound to attract your customers and result in increased 
sales during what you may have considered off-months. 

1920 color catalogs and 
price list mailed on rr quest 

CREX CARPET COMPANY 



212 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK 



\C 



SE3. 



m& 



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I .VI 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Dry Q tods Review 




NOVELTY C URTAINS 

Marquisette and 
Scrim Curtains 

The pleasing variety shown in our lines for 
Spring will greatly assist you in selecting 
an attractive, artistic stock for your Cur- 
tain Department. 

Re sun to see our new samples when our 
travellers caU on you. 

Our Trade-Mark is assurance of utmost 
value— and longest satisfaction. 

Our designs and the quality shown cannot 
be surpassed. 



It 

will 
pay 
you 




to 
see 
our 
lines 



CANADIAN DRAPERIES LIMITED 



145 Wellington St. West 
TORONTO 





Th« 



Oriental Textiles Co., 

Limited 



Osha 



wa 



Ontario 



We 

weave 

dye 

and 

finish 

Silk and Cotton 

Velours 

Mohairs 

and 
Plushes 



Salesrooms 

33 Melinda Street 
Toronto 



Dry Goods Review 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



155 





The Handkerchief House of Canada 

TORONTO 

MOVING 



The Lace Goods Company, Limited, 
with Offices and Warehouse at 64 
Wellington Street West for some time 
past, are moving across the street to — 

THE WELLINGTON BUILDING 

79 Wellington St. West 

With the rapidly increasing volume of 
business we have found it necessary to 
move to larger quarters. 

We attribute our splendid success to the 
attractive quality of our merchandise, the 
solid value shown in same, and unusual ser- 
vice — for which our house is noted; and 
equally to the loyalty and co-operation of 
our clientele from Coast to Coast. 

Travellers are now out with new range of 
Handkerchiefs for Xmas, 1920, and sorting 
in Laces, Embroideries and Draperies. 

We cordially invite you to visit us 
at our new address. 



Just Moving Across the Street 




="CS 



-L 



;S 




1 56 



HOUSE Kl'KN'ISIl 



Dry Good* /.'< 



NOW READY! 

The now Spring line JJ&lfflOr Art Novelty Curtains and Piece 
( Jck ids! \\ oil placed ion tracts and personally selected trimmings on the Continent and 
in Britain enable us to announce the handsomest designs and host values ye1 offered. 

See them and Judge for Yourself! 
and BUY NOW. 



muui 




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( 5 






All. C\\ \l)l AN M \l)l. 



bobhI 



Products 



DALY 

& 
MORIN 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 





Sole selling agents in Canada for the COTT-A-LAP COMPANY. We had the 
pleasure of advising you, through the above firm, last month, that we are their 
sole selling agents in Canada, and we are carrying these goods in stock. We 
have all the latest patterns and designs and would be glad to submit samples 
and quote prices upon request. 

GREENSHIELDS, LIMITED 

Montreal 



Dnj Goods Review 



II U S E F U RNIS II INGS 



151 



PRIME & RANKIN, LIMITED 

Now Showing Lines for Fall Trade 



The new Fall line which we are now showing is such that 
we feel warranted in preparing for the biggest Fall season 
in our history, and we have made our plans accordingly. 

Requirements should be anticipated early to assure satis- 
factory selection and delivery and our range of the various 
lines mentioned below will fully meet your needs and your 
expectations. 



CURTAIN NETS 

A splendid assortment of new patterns, 
including- many filet effects and exclusive 
designs, in Ivory and Beige. 



MADRAS MUSLINS 

A complete new range of patterns in 
these goods (made by John Brown & 
Sons, Limited) shown in White, Ecru, 
and colors. 



SCRIMS and 
MARQUISETTES 

Many new effects in Scrims, Voiles, and 
Marquisettes, shown in bordered or hem- 
stitched, lace edges, also printed Mar- 
quisettes. 



ART SATEEN 
and CRETONNES 

A very desirable showing of new Eng- 
lish Art Sateens and Cretonnes, 31" and 
50" widths. 



DOWN QUILTS 

New Fall range of McLintock's Venti- 
lated Down Quilts, showing all new pat- 
terns and colors. (Same satisfactory 
deliveries assured). 



WHITE QUILTS 

A complete line of English made White 
Quilts, in honeycomb, satin and dimity 
weights. 



CURTAINS 

Fall range of Curtains offers a very 
wide range of choice — 

Windsor Scrim Curtains 
Point Arab Curtains 
Irish Point Curtains 
Braided Lace Curtains 
Lace and Filet Net Curtains 



White and Colored Bath Towels, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Pearl Buttons, etc. 



PRIME & RANKIN, LIMITED 



W. J. SQUIRES 



S. ROETHER, President 

DIRECTORS: 
W. N. H. HOOD 



74 YORK STREET 



N. R. COOPER 



TORONTO 



!•#€ 



158 Org Qoodt fti 

Paris Decrees Low Waistline 

French Designers Adopt Basque Effects and Favor Shorter Jackets- — Taffeta Afternoon 
Frocks Exploit Short Sleeves — Redingotes and Directoire Modes Emphasized — 
Low-Backed Evening Gowns Still Prevail- Hats Simple and Youthful 



P.\ IMS seems to have gone to every- 
body's garden for her Easter 
bouquet. The couturiers have not 
only introduced period frocks with great 
success at the Spring openings, but seem- 
ingly all the countries of Europe and the 
East as well have offered their prettiest 
suggestions for the 1920 Spring modes. 
And there seem to have been a very few 
rejected. Although the French designers 
displayed a tendency to show greater 
individuality than ever at the February 
openings. This season they have almost 
universally agreed on one feature — that 
of the low waistline for Spring at least. 

Jaunty Spring Tailleurs 
The street tailleurs promise to be 
very smart, for they are to exploit 
jaunty little coatees and jackets con- 
siderably shorter, and these will be worn 
over skirts that may be fairly straight 
in line or enhanced with side pleatings 
which accentuate the flat back and front 
effect which almost all the big houses 
agree to. Some of the designers, includ- 
ing Germaine, Necole Groult and Weeks, 
have gone off on a tangent decidedly 
original, and have featured long three- 
quarter length jackets with gored waists, 
giving the nipped in effect at the normal 
waist line and a decided flare below. The 
street costumes encourage the use of 
contrasting materials, for frequently the 
jacket and skirt are fashioned of entirely 
different materials, and when this treat- 
ment is not featured, startling vestee 
novelties are found or collars and cuffs 
daringly faced with contrasting colors. 
Wide stripes of wool on silk, or silk on 
wool are also favored in entire costumes, 
and novel effects are introduced by 
means of blocking out designs with 
squares of oilcloth. 

Novelty in Street Coslumes 
Redingotes and Directoire modes are 
promised a vogue and picturesque ver- 
sions have been successfully shown at 
the openings this month at which many 
new features in pockets, revers and 
high -backed collars were shown. Short 
waistcoats were also featured and much 
bright embroidery on the tailleurs ex- 
ploiting very short tight casaques. There 
also seems to be an inclination to permit 
of greater freedom at the hem of the 
skirt and numbers of the best suit- 
costumes are just eight inches off the 
ground. 

Martial Atmand models for street 
wear show a great variety, for jackets 
designed by this famous house are not 
only both short and long, but th