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Full text of "Diary of Thomas Robbins, D. D., 1796-1854"

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PRESENTED 



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DIARY 



OF 



Thomas Robblns, D. D 



I jg6 — i8f;4. 



PRINTED FOR HIS NEPHEW 



Owned by the Connecticut Historical Society. 



IN TWO VOLUMES. 



EDITED AND ANNOTATED 



INCREASE N. TARBOX. 



VOLUME IL 
1826-1854. 



BOSTON: 
Beacon Press : Thomas Todd, Printer. 
1887., 



hi 



(OPYRKJHT, 1887, 

BY 

RoiMiiNs Battel I. 



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?§}VY0?^4> 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



18 S6. 

January. 

1. Wet. Afternoon it rained hard. Preached with old notes on 
Col. ii : 6. Administered the sacrament. Finished and preached my ser- 
mon on Ps. xc : lo. We have had twenty-two deaths the year past. 
Meeting full for such a day. We had a solemn season. Had no con- 
ference. Prepared this diary. Endeavored to devote myself to God for 
the ensuing year. 

2. Rode out and dined with the Januar}- meeting.' It appeared better 
than in years past. Have pretty severe trials. Attended the monthly con- 
cert. A good meeting. Cold and freezing. Read. 

3. Read. Rode out. It is not severe cold. Am pretty feeble. Wrote. 

4. Wrote. Read expositors on the genealogies of Matthew and Luke. 
Attended the church conference. Thermometer 14°. 

5. Thermometer at 8°. Wrote an expositor for the Observer." Wrote late. 
It cost me a good deal of labor. Worked some. The ground is very hard. 

6. Thermometer 14°. Rode to Hartford. Visited Mr. Wilcox.^ He 
is ver)^ feeble. Paid $7.50 for our meeting-house stoves — a donation. Paid 
for coins fifty cents. Got a few pamphlets. Attended our evening prayer- 
meeting. Quite full. Tired. My bank dividend was only two per cent. 

7. Rode to Enfield to exchange. Warm. Very good riding. My brother 
at home. The circumstances of this society have lately much improved. 

8. My brother went early to E. W. Wet and rainy. Preached on 
Acts xiii : 2, all day. At evening preached, with a written sermon, on 
Eph. ii : 14. The ground very wet. Visited a dying child. 

9. Rainy. Rode home. Crossed and visited at Pine Meadow."* The 
river is quite open. Very muddy. Read. 

10. Read newspapers. Worked some. Warm and faint. Thermometer 
at 60°. Read Smith's Virginia.^ 



' Of the civil authorities of the town. sor Locks. Dr. Robbins made his journey 

^ Connecticut Observer. home from Enfield by first passing the En- 

^ Rev. Carlos Wilcox, first pastor of the field Bridge, coming down on the west side 

North Church. He was settled there in to Pine Meadow, then down to the Scantic 

1S24; left in 1826. He was a man of fine Ferry, where he recrossed to East Windsor 

poetic nature, but destined to an early death. Hill. Though it was now the heart of 

He was born in Newport, N. H., Oct. 22, 1794, winter, he tells us that the river was " quite 

and died at Danbury, Ct., May 29, 1S27. open." 

* Pine Meadow is that part of ancient ^ -p^is jg the account given by John Smith 

Windsor now known as the town of Wind- of his early visits to Virginia. 



2 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

11. Wrote an exposition. I think I cannot bear so much study as in 
years past. Read the Bible, which I have, latterly, too much neglected. 
Thermometer about 40°. 

12. Rode out to Scotland.' Paid Mr. Wells $10 for old newspapers. 
It was about half a dollar a year. I have now nearly a file of the Courant, 
from its beginning in 1764. But little frost in the ground. Looked over 
the old papers. Read the Bible. Received of Mr. Wells $9 for grass he 
had of me summer before last.^ 

13. Arranged my old newspapers. Thermometer 28°. Wrote. Had a 
full prayer-meeting. Read the Bible. 

14. Wrote a sermon on Gen. v: 24. Quite rainy. The rains of this 
winter are of great benefit to the ground. My eyes are pretty poor. 

15. Wet, and very bad going. The fifth wet Sabbath in succession. Thin 
meeting. Expounded on Luke v: 27 to vi : 17, and preached the sermon 
written yesterday. Had a good conference. Visited. 

16. Read the Bible. Wrote. Rode to Hartford. Cold and tedious. 
Paid for the Christian Spectator,^ last year, $3, for the Missionary Herald 
$1.50, for new pamphlets purchased during the past year $1.79. Had sev- 
eral Registers* given me. My list of them now wants but two. 

17. Rode to Wintonbury and attended Ministers' Meeting. Preached on 
Acts xiii : 2. We had a good meeting. The riding very rough. 

18. Rode home.^ Looked at Judge Trumbull's^ library. His best work 
is given to Yale College. "Visited. 

19. Thermometer at 16°. Read. On the 17th paid for the Mirror,'' 
for a year, $2. Wrote. Rode out. The riding very good. 

20. Wrote an exposition. Walked and visited. Attended the evening 
prayer-meeting. 

21. Paid for oats $5.50. Wrote a sermon on Ps. cvi : 23. I write less 
accurately than I used to do. Wrote late. 

22. Wrote notes and preached on Luke xiv: 18, and preached on 
Ps. cvi: 23. Thermometer 12°. A pleasant day after five wet Sabbaths. 
Visited. 

23. Thermometer 15°. Rode to Coventry. Was disappointed of obtain- 
ing a quantity of ancient newspapers, which have been recently destroyed.^ 
Tarried with Mr. Calhoun.' Good riding. 



' This was a village in East Hartford, ' He went evidently by way of Hartford, 

now known as Burnside. and not by Scantic Ferry. 

2 This seems to imply that Dr. Robbins * John Trumbull, author of McFingal, 
was the owner of land somewhere in the ^ The Connecticut Mirror. 

vicinity. * He was gathering and preserving the 

3 The Christian Spectator, begun in 1819 contents of old attics. 

at New Haven; published ten years as a 'George A. Calhoun, D. D., one of the 

monthly, and then ten years as a quarterly, strong and able minsters of the State ; a 

when it was suspended. trustee of Yale, 1849-1864; pastor at North 

* State Registers of Connecticut probably. Coventry, 1819-1867. 



i826.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



24. Last night and today it has snowed considerably. Rode home. Bad 
going. Got some pamphlets of Mrs. Hunt, sister of Dr. Strong.* Read. 
Sleighs are out. 

25. Looked over pamphlets and papers. Wrote. Paid a blacksmith 
$3.64. Wrote, transcribing my will. Severe cold. 

26. Thermometer at 2°. Finished my will, except signing. Began to 
transcribe my General Association sermon for the press. At evening per- 
formed a marriage.^ The sleighing is poor. The river is frozen. 

27. Thermometer three below zero. Wrote on my transcribing. Read 
Smith's History. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

28. Wrote a sermon on John x : 27, 28. Had to write late. Am much 
affected with my tremor. 

29. Expounded on Luke vi : 17-39, '^'^^ preached the sermon written 
yesterday. Read. Attended a singing meeting. Yesterday it became quite 
warm. Thermometer above 40°. Today a little above freezing. 

30. Thermometer about 20° all day. Read Smith's History. Gave a 
poor man $1. Worked, piling and carrying in wood. Last evening received 
a good letter from my brother James. It snowed the greater part of the day. 

31. Last night it became very windy, and drifted the snow \Q.xy much. 
A very tedious day. Thermometer at zero, then rose to 3°, sunk to zero at 
noon, and continued to sink till night, with a clear sun. The air filled with 
snow. Wrote to my brother James. Finished reading Smith's History. 
Read the Bible. Few people to be seen abroad. Thermometer at bed-time 
six below zero. 

February. 

1. Thermometer at sun-rise 14° below zero. It has not been so cold 
for several years. It rose to 14° above. Walked and visited. Got a few old 
newspapers. Wrote. Read the Bible. 

2. Thermometer 12°. The weather moderates. I have taken a cold. 
Wrote, copying my sermon. At evening rode to Wrapping and performed 
a marriage.^ People go in sleighs, but it is poor. 

3. Thermometer 28°. Wrote on my copying. Walked and visited. It 
snowed, but the sleighing is poor. Attended the prayer-meeting. Yesterday 
received a letter from C. Sherman, of Suffield,*' requesting me to attend with 
an ecclesiastical council there, then in session. On account of my engage- 
ment at Wapping, I could not go. 



' Dr. Nathan Strong, of Hartford, was son 
of Rev. Nathan Strong, the life-long minister 
of what is now North Coventry. Mrs. Hunt 
was one of his daughters, living in Coventry. 

f Between Edward Goodwin, of Hartford, 
and Sarah Mills. This was not Mr. Edward 
Goodwin, of Hartford, who has only very 
recently passed, in a good, ripe old age, like 
his father and brothers. 



3 The parties to this marriage were 
Marvin Grant and Abigail Belcher, both of 
Wapping. 

* This was the Charles Sherman with 
whom he used to correspond in New Haven, 
where he was connected with one of the 
banks. His home now was at SuflSeld, 
where he held an important position both 
in church and town matters. 



4 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

4. Thermometer at 5°. Rode to Hartford. Have something of the 
influenza. It is very extensively prevalent, but not very severe. The Em- 
peror of Russia is dead.' He was very near my age. Wrote. Read the 
Bible. 

5. Preached, all day, an old sermon on 2 Thes. ii : 13. Attended the 
funeral of a child. Stormy. Much oppressed with influenza. Read. 

6. Read. People move with sleighs, but the. sleighing is poor. After- 
noon, kept Tudor's school. At evening attended the monthly concert. Quite 
hoarse and feeble. Mr. Killam,^ executor of the late Mrs. Day,' paid me 
$500, to be held as a fund for the benefit of this church and society. 

7. Rode to Hartford and met with association. Several were absent. 
We had a good session. My brother preached well. We were very well 
entertained at Mr. Linsley's.* Afternoon and evening quite rainy. 

8. The association licensed two candidates.' Did errands. Rode home. 
Quite muddy. Attended our church conference. Yesterday received a letter 
requesting me and a delegate to attend a council at Suffield. 

9. Rode out. Mr. Sprague,* of West Springfield, called here. Gave him 
a good many valuable pamphlets.' Wrote. At evening, Deacon Reed and 
Mr. Charlton called on me. 

ID. Walked and visited. The influenza has become very prevalent. 
Read. Quite rainy. Looked, over newspapers. 

11. Read. My health is poor. Concluded not to try to write a sermon. 
Worked some at my library. Wrote. Read the Bible. Wet. Thermometer 
in the morning at 40°. The ground thaws. 

12. Wrote notes and preached on i John v: 9. Preached an old sermon 
on Ps. Ixxxiv : 11. Baptized a child.^ It thawed a good deal and is very 
muddy. I cough considerably. Received a letter from my sister, and one 
from Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. Read. Feel much debility. 

13. I believe I took cold yesterday. My influenza has returned, and is 
very severe. My head is exceedingly pressed. Received a letter with a very 
valuable box of books, as a present from my excellent friend, Mr. Samuel S. 
Stebbins,' of Windsor. It consists of twelve volumes of Rosenmiiller on the 
Old Testament, and six volumes of his Greek Testament, with annotations. 
All executed in the elegant German manner. The greatest present, by far, 
that I have ever had for my library. Took medicine. 



' Alexander Paulowitch, who came to the ' Dr. Sprague was young yet, having been 

throne in 1801, and died in December, 1825. graduated at Yale in 1S15, but the taste 

Nicholas, his brother, succeeded, and was which was strong in him through life was 

publicly crowned at Moscow, Sept. 3, 1826. already showing itself. 

^ Mr. James Killam. ** Elizabeth, daughter of Wyllis Stough- 

3 Mrs. Mary Day, widow, who died March ton. 

15, 1825. ' Johann Georg Rosenmiiller's Scholia in 

* Dr. Joel H. Linsley, pastor of the South Fetus Tcstamentu7n, Leipsic edition, consisted 

Church, 1824-1832. of eleven volumes, and Scholia in Novum 

5 Horatio N. Hubbcll and Bennett Rob- Testamentum, Leipsic, 181 5-1835, six vol- 

erts. umes. These books came from the library 

^ Dr. William B. Sprague. of the late Rev. Samuel Stebbins. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 5 

14. Am ver}- ill. Walked a short distance and saw a sick child. Could 
not attend the funeral of an infant on account of my illness. Wrote some. 
Worked some at my librar}-. I have toward 1,500 volumes. Can do but 
little. 

15. Kept house almost wholly. Sent a messenger to inform Mr. Burt,' 
of Manchester, that I cannot preach at his fast on Friday. Wrote and read 
some. Thermometer in the morning at 16°. 

16. Thermometer near freezing. Walked and visited. Many people are 
afflicted with the influenza, and I think it is unusually severe. Wrote to 
Mr. Stebbins, of Windsor. Read the Bible. Can study but little. 

17. Walked and visited considerably. I think I have never known so 
many sick here. Got quite fatigued. Am pretty feeble, but my malady, 
through mercy, appears to be wearing off. Thermometer about 18°. 

18. Thermometer about 15°. Wrote. Rode to Wapping and visited the 
sick. It is thought that two thirds of the people in this town are unwell. 
Read the Bible. 

19. Expounded on Luke vi : 39 to vii : 18. Meeting quite thin, and a 
great deal of coughing. Preached an old sermon on Deut. ix : 5. At even- 
ing attended conference. Am quite feeble. 

20. Visited the sick. Rode to Hartford. Paid for old newspapers $1.80. 
It snowed some. Our winter is very irregular. We have many sick. 

21. Walked and visited the sick. Quite rainy. Read. My sight is 
manifestly impaired. 

22. Cold and blustering. Rode with Deacon Reed to Suffield to attend a 
council. We crossed at Warehouse Point, with my brother, after a detention 
of near three hours. It was bad, but the Lord helped us. Attended the 
business before the council. '^ Things appear ver}' bad. We sat late. 

23. Attended the business of the council all day. Took great pains 
to reconcile the contending parties. But the prospect is unfavorable. We 
were up quite late in preparing the result. Got much fatigued. Kindly 
entertained at Dr. Pease's. 

24. The council published their result in the morning. I fear we shall 
have to meet again. Rode home. Mrs. Moore ^ died yesterday. Several 
others are hard sick. Visited them. At evening attended the prayer- 
meeting. Ver>' tired. 

25. Walked and visited the sick. I think we have not had so much sick- 
ness since 1816. Mr. Olcott, one of our best men, is very low. Attended the 
funeral of Mrs. Moore. Am troubled with a cough. Prayed in six sick 
houses. 

26. Preached with old notes on 2 Pet. ii : i. Wrote an addition to an 



' Rev. Enoch Burt, pastor at Manches- A colleague was settled with Mr. Gay that 

ter (formerly Oxford parish, East Hartford), year (1S26), and Mr. Gay died in the follow- 

1824-1828. ing year. The precise nature of this church 

" This council seems to have been called quarrel does not appear, but it was some 

for the settlement of difficulties between the time before the breach was healed, 
church and its pastor, Rev. Ebenezer Gay. ^ Mrs. Eliza Moore, aged twenty-four. 



6 DIARY OF REV.' THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

old sermon, and preached on Prov. ix : 12. Thermometer at 56°. Very bad 
going. After meeting walked and visited the sick. Meeting quite thin. 
Very tired. 

27. It snowed and rained the most of the day. Wrote. Dr. Tudor is 
very low. Attended the funeral of Mr. Olcott.' He is a great loss to us. 
He died of influenza. Read. 

28. The death of the Emperor Alexander produces a great sensation in 
Europe. Wrote. Attended the funeral of a colored man.^ Rode out and 
performed a marriage.^ Wet and rainy. The going is extreme bad. Read. 

March. 

I. Rode to Hartford. Rainy and wet. I think I never saw the traveling 
here so bad. Signed and completed my will. Paid Dr. Strong" $5 for 
pamphlets. For the most of them I gave four cents each. Visited sick 
persons in East Hartford. Very little moving. 

'2. Visited the sick. Most of them are hopefully gaining. Performed a 
marriage in this neighborhood.' Rainy and dark. I do but little besides 
attending to the sick. 

3. Wrote. Rode out and visited. Visited the family of a man who died 
today.^ Read. Wet and dark weather. Omitted our prayer-meeting. 

4. Dr. Tudor is very low. Wrote the most of a sermon on i Tim. iv : 8. 
I Vi'rite slow and poorly. There seems to be no prospect of clear weather. 

5. Finished and preached my sermon on i Tim. iv : 8. Attended the 
funeral of the late Mr. Lyman. Very tired. Had no conference. The 
nights are wet and very dark, and the going very bad. Have some cough. 

6. Visited the sick and others. Am quite feeble. Our principal epidemic 
nov/ is pneumonia. Attended the monthly concert. It was quite thin. 
Tarried out. 

7. Dr. Tudor died last night, aged ninety-three. He graduated in 1750,' 
and has been first in the catalogue for near four years. Rode and visited 
the sick. Took cold and was quite unwell. My labors are fatiguing. 
Received, some days since, a letter from Sidney Mills,^ at Yale College. 

8. I took a sweat last night, and, through mercy, am better. Wrote a 
brief biography of Dr. Tudor, and delivered it at his funeral. Mr, Wheaton,' 
of Hartford, was present, and read the service at the grave. Wet and rainy. 



' Eli Olcott, aged seventy. * Mr. Nathan Lyman, aged fifty-eight. 

^ Mr. Thomas Palmer, aged seventy-two. ^ Was seventy-six years out of college. 

'Between Julius Hale, of Glastonbury, References have been so frequently made to 

and Eliza H. Bissell, of East Windsor. him that we need not now repeat the facts 

•* This was Dr. Nathan Strong, physician concerning his life, 
in Hartford, son of Dr. Nathan Strong, the ^ Sidney Mills, afterward a Presbyterian 

eminent divine. Nathan Strong, M. D., was minister, was graduated at Yale College that 

a graduate of Williams College, 1S02, and very year (1826). He was born in Canton, 

died in 1S37. He was son of Dr. Strong by Ct., March 29, 1799, and, after laboring in 

his first wife, daughter of Solomon Smith, of several places, died in Fairfax County, Va., 

Hartford. These pamphlets were, without in 1774. 
doubt, from Rev. Dr. Strong's library. 9 Rev. Nathaniel Sheldon Wheaton, D. D., 

-' Between Nelson Skinner, of Vernon, and then rector of Christ Church, Hartford, after- 
Fanny Skinner, of East Windsor. wards President of Trinity College. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 7 

9. Rode and visited. Attended the funeral of a little child of six years. 
The sick seem not to diminish. My cough is quite tedious. I hardly find 
any time for study. The weather continues dark and wet. Loaned $62 of 
the money of the Day legacy. 

10. Last night it rained hard. Wrote considerably. In the afternoon the 
weather cleared off warm and pleasant. The first clear sunshine since Sab- 
bath before last. The sun has barely appeared a few times, without clear 
shining, full twelve days. The most of the time it has been thick, cloudy, and 
dark, and every day more or less rain. The thermometer has been the whole 
time, I believe, above freezing. The ground very wet, and roads exceeding 
muddy. A most uncommon time. At evening attended the prayer-meeting. 
I have a good deal of cough. 

11. Last night my cough was very hard. Am quite feeble. Read. Can 
do but little. Wrote an obituary notice of Dr. Tudor. Took medicine. 
A pleasant day. 

12. Expounded on X^uke vii : 19-36, and preached an old sermon on 
Job xxvii : 8. Spoke Avith difficulty, but with greater ease than I feared. 
Read. Attended a singing meeting. 

13. Last night my cough was very severe. Rode out and visited the sick. 
The roads have dried very much in a short time. Read Calmet's Dictionary^ 

14. Wrote on a piece for the Connecticut Observer. Walked out and 
visited. Read the Bible. 

15. Walked and visited the sick and mourners. Received a letter from 
Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. Wrote. Have many hindrances. Cold. 

16. Walked and visited. Have but little time for my studies. Visited 
a school. We have a high and tedious wind. I do not recover from the 
influenza. Have much debility. Have much to do. Paid a merchant $1.33. 

17. Thermometer about 19°. Hindered by company. Wrote. At even- 
ing attended the prayer-meeting. Am disappointed of having some persons 
unite with our church which. I have expected. Late in the evening found that 
a neighbor, who owes me about $80, was in a failing state, and succeeded in 
getting an assignment of property in a demand on the town. W^as out quite 
late. 

18. Rode very early to Scantic and saw two of the selectmen, and got 
them to accept of my claim.^ The man is insolvent, and the saving of the 
debt is a providential favor. Assisted in examining a young woman for our 
communion. Had a fatiguing day. Found bad riding. 

19. Am pretty feeble. My cough is troublesome. Preached an old ser- 
mon on Dan. xii : 10. Thin meeting. Some snow and wet. We have the 
painful account of the death of Mr. Fisk,^ another missionary in Palestine. 
Read. 



' Augustine Calmet was born, Commercy, Mass., a graduate of Middlebury College, 1814. 

in France, in 1672. He was a notable scholar, He sailed for Syria in 1S19, and was very suc- 

and his two great works were Commentaire cessful. He died at Beirflt, Oct. 23, 1825. 

Litteral and Dktionitaire de la Bible. A memoir of him was written by Dr. Alvan 

^ On the man who had failed. Bond, of Norwich, Ct. His memory is held 

^ Rev. Pliny Fisk, a native of Shelburne, sacred in the New England churches. 



8 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D. [1826. 

20. Wet and rainy. Rode to Hartford. Carried books to the binder. 
Did errands. Paid for a few pamphlets niney-two cents. Got wet. Very 
tired. Wrote to Sidney Mills at college, and sent $70 to two Everest benefi- 
ciaries. Read. 

21. The late failure in this neighborhood makes much trouble. Rode to 
Wapping and visited two schools. Visited the sick and the afflicted. Cold 
and blustering. Much fatigued. Mr. Gaylord,' of Norfolk, came here and 
tarried. My labors seem to increase. 

22. Walked and visited. Visited a school. Have much difficulty in 
getting out the school visitors. Wrote. Our roads are mostly settled. 

23. Walked out and visited. Wrote the most of a sermon on Jer. v : g. 
Assisted in examining a young woman for our communion. Had to write 
late. 

24. Fast. Preached with old notes on Ezra viii : 21. Finished and 
preached my sermon on Jer. v : 9. Wet, and thin meeting. We are in 
a very stupid state. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Ver}- much 
fatigued. 

25. On the 22d paid ^5.60 for fourteen bushels of oats. Visited the sick. 
Rode to East Hartford and Hartford. The water is rising fast. Did errands. 
Went to Mr. Hawes^to make an exchange. Cold. Paid for corks seventy- 
eight cents. A little before ten in the evening there was a ciy of fire, which 
proved to be very alarming. Several buildings were burned in the center of 
the town. A good Providence remarkably blest the means used to arrest it. 
I got quite fatigued.^ 

26. Mr. Hawes rode to East Windsor and returned after meeting. A very 
raw and rough day. Preached on Ps. 1 : 5 and Eph. ii : 14. Something 
hoarse. At noon attended the funeral of a poor laborer — a stranger in town 
— who was burnt last evening in one of the houses, unknown at the time. 
At evening rode home, and attended the conference. The water is high. 

27. Read considerably. Wrote. The water is higher than it has been for 
three or four years. It is a great favor. Had a number of books bound, 
which make a valuable addition to my library. 

28. Read. Walked and visited the most of the day. At evening 
performed a marriage.* The approaching electors' meeting produces some 
electioneering, and it is well that it is no oftener than once a year. 

29. Wrote, copying my association sermon. Rode out. Disappointed in 
attending to an object which I wished to dispose of. Cold and windy. 

30. Wrote. Visited a school, large and well instructed. I lament that 
I can find no more time for study. Yesterday rode to Wapping and visited 
sick persons. 

31. Rode to Wapping and visited the sick. Cold and tedious. The roads 



2 



' Rev. Asahel Gaylord. and was to preach next day, but he turned 

Dr. Joel Hawes. out, with the rest, to help. He was always 

3 Under the old system of passing water ready to take hold of hard work, if needed, 
in pails, everybody felt that they must lend a * Between Lester Brewster, of Coventry, 

hand at a fire. Dr. Robbins was half sick, and Lucretia Grant, of East Windsor. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. . 9 

pretty well settled. Preached a preparatory lecture, with old notes, on 
Ps. li: 12. Dr. Strong, of Hartford, came here and brought me some of his 
father's books. Paid him $35 for twenty-four volumes. Montanus's' Hebrew 
Bible is very valuable. Paid him $1 for pamphlets. Attended the evening 
prayer-meeting. Both meetings quite thin. Much fatigued. 

April. 

1. Wrote a sermon on Rom. iii : 3. My tremor is burdensome, and 
I fear increases. Read. Warmer and quite dry. I write but poorly. 

2. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on Zech. xiii : 7. Admin- 
istered the sacrament. The church quite full. Admitted two young women - 
into the church. Preached the sermon written yesterday. Much fatigued. 
Had a very full conference. We had a solemn day. I pray for a divine 
blessing. 

3. Rode out and saw a sick child. Wrote. Our people did pretty well 
at the electors' meeting. Wrote. Rode to Hartford. Brought up books 
and pamphlets that were Dr. Strong's.^ Attended the monthly prayer- 
meeting. Quite thin. 

4. Rode out. Testified at the court of probate for two wills. Attended 
a long examination of our academy. The performance was very good. 
Visited. 

5. Rode to Wapping and visited the sick. Wrote to Mr. Benedict, of 
Vernon,* in answer to a letter I received from him yesterday. Rode to 
Hartford and got books which I have had bound. My library has lately 
been much enlarged and improved. Paid for an old book fifty cents. 

6. Read the Bible. Wrote the plan of a book-case. It snowed con- 
siderably. Visited a school. Worked, bottling cider. 

7. Read the Bible. Walked and visited. Visited Tudor's school. 
It performed very well. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Quite 
tired. 

8. Wrote on my catalogue of books. Rode to Wapping and attended 
the funerals of two men, of fifty-seven and sixty-four, who died suddenly, and 
both intemperate. Visited a sick "man. Could not attend to write a sermon. 
My brother came here, late in the evening, and tarried. 

9. Wet and rainy. My brother rode to Manchester to exchange. 
Expounded on Luke vii : 36 to viii : 16, and preached an old sermon on 
Acts v: 20. Rode to Wapping and attended the funeral of awomanMvho 
died yesterday of a consumption. Very tired. The funeral very large. 

10. It snowed fast the most of the day. My brother came in, in the 
morning, and staid till near night. Quite tedious. Read. Wrote on pecun- 
iary accounts. 



' Benedict Arias Montanus. His polyglot ' Dr. Nathan Strong, pastor of First 

Bible, in eight volumes, was very valuable. Church. 

He was one of the most learned divines of ■* Rev. Amzi Benedict, pastor at Vernon, 

his generation. He was born in 1527, and 1824-1S30. 
died at Seville, in Spain, in 1598. ^ Widow Mary Drake, aged 73. His 

^ Abigail Olcott and Marcia Gleason. funerals at Wapping were frequent. 



lO DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

11. Thermometer in the morning at lo', and rose during the day to 29°. 
Cold and tedious. The snow blew very much. It is seven or eight inches 
deep. Sleighs move a good deal. It has hardly been better sleighing 
through the winter.' Read the Bible. Wrote on my catalogue. Kept 
very much in. 

12. On the loth assisted in bottling cider. We have put down 260 
bottles. Wrote and worked on my library. Read the Bible. Thermometer 
in the morning about 15°, and rose a little above freezing. The snow wastes. 
My tremor embarrasses my writing. 

13. For three days past I have not been out of our yards. Wrote to 
H. Ellsworth,^ of Hartford, about going to Europe. Rode to Hartford. 
Bad riding. Attended the funeral of old Mrs. Drake. Read. Thermometer 
in the morning about 10°. Paid for pamphlets forty-four cents. Read late. 

14. Wrote on my catalogue of books. The weather is warmer and the 
most of the snow is gone. Yesterday read Judge Gould's^ very excellent 
oration. Reckoned accounts with Mr. Wolcott, which we have not done 
before since March 8, 18 19. His charge for my board and horse-keeping 
was but $104 a year. I procure my liquors, and grain for my horse. I owed 
him $187.66. He gave in $47.66, in consideration of my assistance in his 
building, etc.; I gave him my note of $831.25, given him at our last reckoning. 
He treated me liberally. Wrote. At evening attended our prayer-meeting. 
Donation, $3. 

15. Visited the sick. The thermometer rose to 67°. Wrote. Rode to 
Vernon to exchange with Mr. Benedict. The snow is mostly gone. Vegeta- 
tion begins to appear. Bad riding. 

16. Mr. Benedict rode early to East Windsor, and returned after meeting. 
Wet and rainy. Meetings pretty thin. The people here have a favorable 
prospect of erecting a new meeting-house. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23, and 
Eph. ii : 14. 

17. Last night we had a good deal of rain. Rode home through Wapping. 
Visited there. Paid $10 for the last volume of Calmet's dictionary. Read. 
There has been a disgraceful duel at Congsress." Received a letter from my 
brother. 

18. Visited the sick. We now have quite a number. Rode to Wapping 
and attended a funeral. Thermometer at 70°. Wrote. 

19. Last night it rained. Rode with Eveline' to Pine Meadow. Bad 
riding. Rode to Suffield. Saw Mr. Mann,* of Bristol, now preaching there 

' This is the eleventh of April, and those with the Litchfield Law School. What wa? 

who are in the habit of saying that the season the occasion of this oration we do not know 
of spring came on earlier when they were "* Between Henry Clay and John Randolph 

young will do well to heed this, and many Neither of them killed or wounded, 
similar facts presented in this diary. Sea- ^ Eveline Wolcott, youngest daughter oi 

sons varied then as now. Mr. Abiel Wolcott, now twenty-three years 

^ We suppose this to be Henry L. Ells- old. They went to call on her sister Frances, 

worth before spoken of, son of Chief-Justice Mrs. Harris Haskell. 
Oliver Ellsworth. ^ Rev. Joel Mann, pastor at Bristol, 

^ Judge James Gould, LL. D., connected R. L, 1815-1S26. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. II 

I hope their difficulties may be reconciled. Mr. Gay' is likely to be dis- 
missed. Returned to Pine Meadow. 

20. Rode home. Warm. Vegetation advances rapidly. Visited fourteen 
families. A man at Deacon Reed's, from Boston, is very low with a con- 
sumption. Tired. 

21. Quite cool. Visited the sick. I fear disease is increasing among 
us. Finished my regular course of visiting for the year, beginning at 
the first of May last. Have visited all the families in the society since 
that time — 176. I have been in arrear for two or three years past, but all 
are now brought up. In a few instances persons have moved away and have 
not been visited. The year past I have visited a great deal. Attended the 
evening prayer-meeting. Quite thin. Cold and windy. My brother sent 
me an excellent letter received from cousin William Le Baron. ^ Uncle 
Lemuel ^ has been very sick. 

22. Jack's* fleece unwashed, w-eight seven pounds. Well washed it would 
probably have been about three pounds. Attempted to write a sermon, but 
was prevented by other calls. Last night Mr. William Chadwick,' of Boston, 
died at Deacon Reed's of a consumption, having arrived here for the benefit 
of his health about three weeks ago. His parents came here a few hours 
after his death. This is the last of their five children, all of whom have 
died of a consumption. Was with them considerably. In the evening they 
went off with the poor widow for Boston. Visited the sick. Quite cold and 
windy. 

23. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on Ps. cxxx : 7. Afternoon 
preached an old sermon on Job xiv : 7. After meeting Mr. Sprague, brother 
of the young widow of Mr. Chadwick, who arrived here today, went off, 
with his corpse, for Boston. Attended the evening conference. Very tired. 
Tarried out. 

24. Visited. Rode to East Hartford and attended the funeral of the late 
Mrs. Olmstead. Mr. Fairchild went with me. Wet. Read. 

25. Wrote. Had company. Walked and visited the sick and others. 
Was out late. 

26. Rode to Enfield and preached for my brother at the annual meeting 
of their charitable associations. Their collections are liberal. Mrs. Robbins * 
is feeble. 

27. Returned. A'isited. Rode to East Hartford and procured some old 
newspapers for several years. Paid for them $4.75. Paid for two old books 
fifty cents. My file of letters is yet quite incomplete. 

28. Worked all the forenoon in the garden. Wrote to my cousin 
W. Le Baron, of Rochester. I am pretty feeble. Attended our evening 
prayer-meeting. 



' Rev. Ebenezer Gay, pastor there, 1793- ■'This refers to some sheep with which 

1837. Mr. Mann was his colleague, and he we are not acquainted. A dirty fleece, four 

was not dismissed. pounds dirt and three pounds wool. 

^ William Le Baron, son of Lemuel. ' Mr. William Chadwick, shoe merchant. 

^ Lemuel, minister of Rochester, Mass. * His brother Francis's wife. 



12 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

29. Wrote the most of a sermon on Heb. xii : i6. My eyes are quite 
poor. I wrote slow. Vegetation is backward. Cold and wet. 

30. Finished and preached my sermon on Heb. xii : i6. Expounded 
on Luke viii : 16-41. Pleasant and full meeting. Attended the evening 
conference. Saw blossoms on the daffas on the 25th. 

May. 

1. Wrote. Prayed and dined with our military company. Visited 
a man ver}^ sick. Sidney Mills,' our beneficiary, came here to see me. 
Attended our monthly concert. Thin and gloomy. 

2. Visited the sick. Rode to New Haven to attend the election. 
Hindered at Hartford. Got in late. Much fatigued. 

3. Attended the election. The ministers, about fifty, had a meeting in 
the morning and agreed to form a convention. They were kept gratui- 
tously by families, and were well treated by public officers. Dr. Beecher" 
preached well. Very warm. Saw Mr. Battell and many friends. Saw 
cousins S. and P. Battell. Mr. Nash' preached in the evening for the 
Domestic Missionary Society. Settled a long account with Gen. Howe and 
gave up his note. His book account was $33.32. He paid me $31.44 to 
balance the note. I paid his book account and seventy-five cents for quills. 
Am very kindly entertained at Mr. Roger Sherman's."* 

4. Made some calls. Rode home. The heat quite oppressive. The 
dust very tedious. Very tired. A man' has died in my absence. The 
thermometer today has been 82°. Saw blossoms on the early fruit-trees. 

5. Rode out with Ursula. She is pretty poor. Attended a funeral. 
Visited. Wrote. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Thermometer 80°. 

6. Yesterday we had our first asparagus. We might have cut on the 2d. 
Saw daffa blossoms on the 25th. Wrote the most of a sermon on 2 Cor. v : 19. 
Am quite languid. Thermometer 72°. Had no fire in my chamber. 

7. Finished and preached my sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19. Very dry and 
a tedious dust. My people are pretty slack about attending public worship. 
We had our annual missionary contribution and collected $32.05. There 
was no brief from the assembly.* Attended the conference. 

8. Last night we had some rain. Greatly needed. Wrote to Mr. E. B. 
Haskell. Paid a tailor eighty-two cents. Rode to Glastonbury with Ursula. 



' Sidney Mills, before noticed, who was Roger Sherman named in the diary had a 

in the Senior class at Yale, was a native of hospitable home near the college. 
Canton, and was assisted by the Everest ' Mr. Elisha Ranney, aged forty. 

fund in his studies for the ministry. He * It has been before stated that these 

became a Presbyterian minister, and died contributions in the Congregational churches 

in Virginia in 1874. of Connecticut, in the month of May, for 

^ Dr. Lyman Beecher, who went that very missionary purposes, were taken by order of 

year from Litchfield to Boston, to the Han- the State. It seems to be implied here that 

over Street Church. a brief statement was prepared and sent out 

3 Rev. Ansel Nash, of Tolland. to each church, which this year was wanting, 

■• Roger Sherman, the signer of the Dec- and the contribution therefore, as Dr. Rob- 

laration, died in New Haven in 1793. The bins implies, was not so large. 



[826.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



13 



They have a great work of grace there. Saw Mr. Griswold, their present 
preacher. Paid Mr. Lockwood' $2.50 for books and $2.50 for pamphlets. 
Saw blossoms on the apple-trees. 

9. Rode to Hartford. Got books at the bindery. Wrote. Hindered 
by company. 

10. Quite warm. Rode to Vernon and attended the meeting of the 
female society for promoting revivals of religion. An interesting and useful 
society. Met with the directors of the Annuity Society. Rode to the lower 
part of Scantic and performed a marriage.* 

11. Wrote on the business of the Ministers' Annuity Society. Rode to 
Hartford and attended the annual meeting of the same and of the board of 
directors. The society have lost two presidents in two years. Very dry 
and dusty. Traded $3.38. Fruit-trees appear well. People are planting. 

12. Wrote the most of the day on the business of the Annuity Society. 
Am pretty languid. My cousin, Mrs. Gridley/ and Gen. Mattoon** called 
here. Thermometer at 82°. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

13. Walked and visited. The heat very severe and the dust tedious. 
A remarkable season. Mr. Clark ^ came here from Suffield to exchange 
with me. Thermometer at 92°. Rode to Pine Meadow. 

14. Rode early to Suffield. Preached on Ps. 1 : 5 and Eph. ii : 14. 
Attended a third meeting and preached without notes on Job xlii : 5, 6. 
Much affected with the heat, and his congregation is rather small. Saw 
Mr. Gay. He feels very badly. I fear he will make much trouble here. 

15. Conversed with various persons respecting ecclesiastical concerns 
here. They have much anxiety on the subject. The heat still more severe. 
Afternoon rode to Enfield and home. My thermometer yesterday was 93° 
and today 97°. Paid a shoe-maker $2.25. Much fatigued. 

16. Mr. Bidwell * came from college and spent some time. Wrote. 
Visited. Thermometer at 97°. At evening set out for Norfolk. 

17. Last evening set out on a journey on account of the heat and dust, 
and did not stop, except twice to bait my horse with oats carried with me, 
till I arrived at my brother's, at Colebrook, a little after sunrise. Rode to 
Norfolk. My mother is quite well. Much fatigued. 

18. Mr. Battell is at the Assembly.' Visited Mr. Emerson. Brother F. 
and his wife came here. Yesterday afternoon the weather changed, and it 



' Rev. William Lockwood. 

^ Between Daniel N. Cone and Diantha 
Ladd. 

3 Mrs. Gridley is Mrs. Olmsted with her 
new married name. 

•• Gen. Ebenezer Mattoon was a Revolu- 
tionary officer, born in 1755, in Amherst, Mass. 
He was graduated at Dartmouth, 1 776. After 
serving faithfully in the war of the Revolu- 
tion, he retired with the rank of major, and 
since then had held many prominent civil 



offices. He died in Amherst, 1S43, aged 
eighty-eight. 

^ Some minister of the name Clark, who 
was supplying the pulpit at Suffield. He was 
not settled there. 

' Walter H. Bidwell, in the class of 1827. 
For many years a preacher, and then the 
owner and publisher of the Eclectic Maga- 
zine, New York. 

' Connecticut General Assembly, which 
this yaar held its session at New Haven. 



14 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826, 

is cooler. But we get no rain. At evening preached at a stated conference 
on EiDh. ii: 14. Tlie people here evince a good regard to the memory of 
my father. 

19. My mother rode in my sulky to the burying-ground, my brother and 
I walked by her and visited father's grave. Philip Battell came home from 
Middlebury College. He is Senior. Afternoon left Norfolk and rode to 
Canton. Tarried at a tavern. Gave Sally Laurence $i. On Wednesday 
gave $10 to my mother. Last evening received a letter from my brother 
James. The dust very severe, 

20. Rode quite early and got home in the morning. There have been 
two deaths here in my absence, an aged woman and a man.' Rode out. 
Something fatigued. The thermometer on the 17th was at 96°, since that 
it has been cooler. Afternoon attended the funeral of Mr. Ephraim Wolcott. 
Mr, Griswold came here from Glastonbury to exchange. In the evening rode 
down there. 

21. Preached on Ps. 1: 5, and i Thess. v: 3. There is a great and very 
good work of grace here. Mr. Griswold has been instrumental of much good. 
Near ninety are supposed to have got hope. The aspect of the congregation 
is very favorable. Quite warm. Preached in the evening without notes 
on John xii : 21. Meetings very solemn. Much fatigued. Mr. Griswold 
labors here as an evangelist, and labors hard. Put up at Col. Plumer's. 

22. Made calls. Rode home. The crops suffer much from the drought. 
Thermometer at 88°. Read. Am quite languid. Read late. 

23. Rode to Hartford with Eveline. Did errands. Our assembly do 
very poorly. They are entirely controlled by a few demagogues. Got 
three valuable folios, Livy^ and Bochart,^ sent from New Haven, Read, 
Thermometer 86°, 

24. Worked at my books. Wrote considerably. Rode out and visited. 
Thermometer 87°, People are quite alarmed at the drought. 

25. Rode to Hartford with Ursula, She is pretty feeble. Got things 
for Eveline. The river is getting low. Thermometer 82°. Wrote. Saw 
Mr. Seth Terry,* Walked out and visited. 

26. Mr. Scarborough, the attorney here, has lately failed and gone off, 
leaving his family. He was quite esteemed. It has produced a great 
sensation. He owed me $20. Cool, but no rain. The grass is turning 
brown. Walked and visited. Wrote. At evening attended the jDrayer- 
meeting. 

27. Wrote on a sermon on Isa. Iv : 6. Thermometer 93°. Have many 
hindrances. Am not able to study hard. Read. 

28. Last night we had a moderate, but most grateful shower. Wrote 
three pages, finished and preached my sermon on Isa. Iv : 6. The Baptists 



' Widow Hannah Burnham and Mr. ^ Samuel Bochart, a celebrated Oriental 

Ephraim Wolcott, the former aged seventy- scholar, 1 509-1 567. 
six and the latter sixty-four. ■* Lawyer and prominent citizen of Hart- 

- The Latin historian. * ford. 



1826.] PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR. 15 

baptized two young women. It appeared to excite much less attention than 
heretofore. We had a very hard wind. Cool. Attended the conference. 

29. Rode to East Hartford and got some ancient newspapers. Paid 
$1 for books and twenty-five cents for pamphlets. Cold. Visited a gram- 
mar school lately set up here. Read. 

30. I believe there was no frost this morning, though it was much feared. 
Looked over and arranged my newspapers. I have nearly a complete file 
of the Connecticut Courant from its beginning in 1764. Rode out and 
visited. Thermometer 65°. The drought is distressing. 

31. Wrote. Hindered by company. Rode to East Hartford and attended 
the funeral of S. F. Griswold, a victim of intemperance. People are evidently 
alarmed by the drought. Rode to Hartford. Mr. Wilcox' has been dismissed 
today from the North Society, in Hartford, on account of ill health. The 
town of New Haven shows great jealousy of Hartford. Procured catechisms, 
etc., for the children. On the 29th wrote to Rev. Prof. Fitch,^ of New Haven. 

Junk. 

1. Wrote two inscriptions for tombstones. Wrote. Visited. Rode to 
Wapping and visited the sick. Thermometer 87°. The most of vegetation 
appears to be stationary or failing. Numbers are ill from the effects of the 
influenza. 

2. Wrote. Read the Bible. Afternoon attended the first catechising 
for the season. Formed a Bible class of youth. At evening had a serious 
prayer-meeting. We had some light showers. Warm and sultr\'. 

3. Rode to Poquonnock and attended a funeral. There was much delay. 
The people there evince a great want of gbspel institutions. The heat ven,- 
oppressive. Thermometer 94°. Towards night and in the evening we were 
favored with some most refreshing showers. Received from Hartford a pair 
of spectacles, which I selected on Wednesday. They almost restore my sight. 
The cost is $4. It forms an era in my life.' 

4. Expounded on Luke viii : 41 to ix : 12, and preached an old sermon 
on Matt, vi : 24. V\q. should have had a meeting for prayer, on account 
of the drought, but for the showers of last evening. The heat severe. 
Thermometer 94°. Towards night we had a vi61ent thunder-shower. There 
was a good deal of rain. There has been but little before since April iSth. 
Walked out. Had no conference. 

5. Wrote. Read the Bible. Cool. Wrote a report on the Everest 
fund for General Association. Attended the monthly concert. Thin and 
disheartening. 

6. Worked in the garden. Rode to Windsor and attended association. 
We had less business than common. Most of the members present. 



' Rev. Carlos Wilcox, a brilliant young eighteen years before, the academy at East 

divine, destined to an early death. He died Windsor Hill. 

at Danburv', Ct., the following year (1827), at ^ He was nearly fortA--nine when he began 

the age of thirt}--three. to use glasses. With some the necessity 

^ Rev. Eleazar T. Fitch, D. D., Professor of comes earlier, and with some later, and with 

Divinity at Yale College. He taught, some some not at all, even in extreme old age. 



l6 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

7. After we had finished association business, and the members all gone 
but me, Mr. Loomis and Mr. Hathaway, from Suffield, came and consulted 
Mr. Rowland and me respecting Suffield affairs. We agreed to go there 
next week. Rode home. Warm. On the 5th I eat a few green peas. 
Attended a marriage.' 

8. Rode to Pine Meadow with Eveline. So warm that I staid till towards 
night. At evening attended our church conference. Thermometer 93°. 

9. Wrote. My tremor is bad. Read the Bible. Yesterday received 
a singular letter from Mr. Marsh,^ of Haddam. Rode out. Attended the 
evening prayer-meeting. Much oppressed with the heat. Thermometer 94°. 

10. Wrote the principal part of a sermon on Isa. xlix : 26. I write slow, 
both mechanically and intellectually. Thermometer 90°. The dust is very 
tedious. 

11. Wrote notes and preached on Ps. li : 10. Afternoon Mr. Gillett,' 
late of Gilead, preached for me. At evening attended the conference. The 
ground is again very dry. Thermometer 92°. The drought is extensive and 
severe. 

12. On the loth received a letter from Mr. Ely of Simsbur}'. Wrote. 
Walked and visited. Towards evening rode to Pine Meadow. Cool. 
Thermometer about 80°. 

13. Rode in the morning, with Mr. Rowland, to Suffield, and conversed 
with people there all day, laboring to devise means to reconcile those who 
are at variance. At the close it grew worse, and we broke up in painful 
disappointment, and Mr. Rowland went home. I remained and preached 
in the evening, without notes, op John x: 27, 28. We had a good meeting. 

14. In. the morning early had a serious and tender prayer-meeting. 
I spoke freely on the dangers of this people. After breakfast the alienated 
parties agreed, voluntarily, to submit their differences to a referee — Dr. Per- 
kins, Mr. Rowland, and me — to meet at Suffield on the 28th instant. Rode 
to Pine Meadow, Hartford, and home. Received a letter from Mr. Ely, of 
Simsbury, and one from my sister Battell. Received a valuable pair of 
boots from Mr. Chadwick,* of Boston — a fine present,. 

15. Mrs. Wolcott is quite feeble. Wrote. Rode to Wapping and visited 
the sick. Cool. Vegetation is almost at a stand on account of the drought. 
Wrote to Dr. Perkins and Mr. Rowland. 

16. Wrote. Received a letter from Rev. S. E. Dwight.' Visited. On the 
14th made my annual payments of $5 to the Annuity Society and $4 to the 
Retreat. Have many hindrances. Rode out. Attended the catechising 
of the children. The Bible class appears well. Had a full prayer-meeting. 



' The persons married were Jonathan ^ Rev. Nathan Gillet, pastor at Gilead 

Goodwin, of Hartford, and Clarinda New- (a parish in Hebron, Ct.), 1799-1824. 

bury. * Before mentioned in connection with 

^ Rev. John Marsh, D. D., pastor at Had- the death which occurred at East Windsor, 

dam, 1818-1834. He was the son of Dr. John ' Sereno E. Dwight, D. D., who had just 

Marsh, of Wethersfield, Ct., and became the resigned his pastorate of the Park Street 

well-known temperance advocate. Church, Boston. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 1 7 

17. Rode to Hartford. The dust and roads very bad. The drought 
is more severe than it has been. People are all alarmed. Had made a very 
good silk coat and vest. Wrote. Paid my book-binder $20. Thermometer 
about 80°. 

18. In the forenoon expounded on Luke ix : 12-28. Finished and 
preached my sermon on Isa. xlix : 26. Had a short intermission after the 
afternoon service, and attended a solemn season of prayer on account of the 
season. Such a drought so early in the season is not remembered. Our 
meeting was well attended. Very tired. Many late signs of rain have 
disappeared. 

19. Walked out and visited. About noon it began to rain, and continued 
moderately till night. A great mercy. Gave a poor woman a Bible. Wrote 
to Mr. Marsh, of Haddam. 

20. Wet and rainy all day. In the forenoon it rained hard. Wrote on 
my catalogue of books. Vegetation revives. Our people subscribe well for 
a new bell. 

21. Rainy and wet. I cannot remember a time when rain was more 
wanted, or when it came in a more grateful manner. How should all praise 
the Lord. Rode to Wapping and visited a sick man. \\' rote for my library. 
Walked out and visited. The earth is greatly refreshed. Mrs. Wolcott' 
is quite poor and feeble. 

22. Worked some. The rain appears to be over. Rode to Pine Meadow 
and to Hartford. Good riding. \\'rote to Dr. Perkins. Have a good deal 
to do for Eveline.^ Paid Mr. TrumbulP for books $14.25, and for pamphlets 
$1.31. Had some pamphlets given me. Paid for a book subscribed for (a 
hard bargain) $1.75. Got home late. 

23. Yesterday I lost, unaccountably, a five-dollar bill. W>ote. Afternoon 
rode to Hartford with Mr. Wolcott to get things for Eveline. We had a 
pretty hard shower. Our prayer-meeting was thin. 

24. In the forenoon we had the hardest shower we have had during the 
week. Wrote the most of a sermon on Eph. vi : 18. Read. The earth 
is most mercifully supplied with rain. 

25. Finished and preached my sermon on Eph. vi : 18. Forenoon 
preached with old notes on Rom. ii : 5. Had no conference. Visited. 
Read. 

26. Last night and today we had a number of hard showers. We have 
had about a week of wet. The earth is most graciously, but not redundantly, 
supplied. Rode to East Hartford and visited the parents of Mrs. Fairchild. 
Read. Paid a laborer $29. Read Mr. Dewey's" late election sermon at 
Boston. 

27. Received $12 for my grass' last year. Paid for repairs of my sulky 



' Mrs. Abiel Wolcott. eighty-one. He was a conspicuous member 

^ She is getting ready for her marriage. of the Hartford Wits. 
3 We understand this to be Judge John ■♦ Rev. Orville Dewey. 

Trumbull, author of McFingal. He was ' We have had a previous reference to 

now a man advanced in life, seventy-si.\ his sale of grass. He owned or leased a 

years old. He died in 1831, at the age of piece of meadow land. 



« 



^ 



l8 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

$16. Began and wrote some on an oration for Independence, which I was 
requested, yesterday, to deliver on the occasion. Walked to the meadow 
and found the grass better than I expected. My brother and wife called 
here. 

28. Rode to Scantic and saw Mr. Bartlett, and rode to Suffield to attend 
an ecclesiastical reference. Dr. Perkins did not come. Mr. Rowland and 
I were alone. We had a laborious hearing till ii o'clock at night. 

29. We finished our hearing with the lawyers in the forenoon. Ver}- 
tired. Towards night published our result, which was accepted by the 
parties. At evening preached, by desire, on Ps. cvi : 23. Kindly entertained 
at Mr. Loomis's. 

30. Visited during the forenoon and conversed with various persons. 
I am much encouraged at the prospects of reconciliation and peace which 
appear. The Lord give them his blessing. Mr. Loomis gave me $5. Rode 
home and preached a preparatory lecture -without notes on Luke xxii: 28, 29. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Much fatigued. 

July. 

1. Wrote what I could. Am poorly able to write. Cannot prepare for 
tomorrow as I could wish. Read. 

2. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on Matt, xxvi : 29. 
Administered the sacrament. The church quite full. Preached an old 
sermon on Isa. v: 4. The meeting cut short by a shower. Had no 
conference. 

3. Rode out. Good Mr. Hallock,* of Canton, has gone to heaven. 
Wrote on my oration. Mr. Andrews,^ of Danbury, called here and made 
a long stay while I was in a hurry on my writing. Attended the monthly 
concert. WTote late. Received a letter from Mr. Rowland. Wrote to 
him on Saturday. 

4. Finished and delivered my Independence oration. We had a very 
pleasant celebration. None here before since 1807. " About two hundred 
dined. A good many from East Hartford and Windsor. My brother was 
here and assisted me. We had some light showers. Our best people were 
generally present. All behaved well. Very tired. 

5. Rode to Hartford with Eveline. The celebrations of the national 
jubilee appear to have been very numerous and cordial.^ Paid for books 
$1.50; for repairing my sulky $1.50. Gave a neighbor $1. Have purchased 
twenty-three volumes of Judge Trumbull's books, and paid for them $15.75. 
Some of them are quite valuable. A very fine and growing season. Vege- 
tation has done remarkably since the rains. 

6. Read Potter's* Antiquities of Greece. A very valuable work. Wrote. 
Walked out. Am quite languid. 



' Rev. Jeremiah Hallock, graduated at ' The public observance of the day was 

Yale, 17S8, pastor at Canton Center, 1785- coming more and more into use. 

1826. '•John Potter, of Wakefield, Eng., 1674- 

2 Rev. William Andrews, pastor at Dan- 1747. At his death he was Archbishop of 

bury, Ct., 1813-1826. Canterbury. 



1S26.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. I9 

7. Rode to Wapping and visited. The heat returns after a long time 
of mild weather. Thermometer 90°. Attended the catechising and evening 
prayer-meeting. Much fatigued. We have an account of the death of the 
venerable and aged President Adams,' on the 4th instant, one of the first 
of American statesmen. Received a letter from Rev. E. Clarke,^ of Suffield, 
one from Dr. E. Tudor,^ of Middlebury, and one from Mr. Wheaton,* of 
Hartford, informing me, most unexpectedly, of my election to a seat in the 
corporation of Washington College.' I think I cannot accept of the place. 

8. Am too feeble to write a sermon. Walked and visited. Thermometer 
94°. Received a letter from S. Williams, of Hartford. Read. Wrote. 
People have begun harvesting. Had cucumbers. 

9. Preached an old sermon on 2 Cor. v: 17. Full meeting. Thermom- 
eter 87°. Attended the conference. Had read Dr. Mason's sermon in the 
National Preacher!' 

10. Received a letter from Rev. N. Porter. Wrote to Mr. Rowland. 
Walked out. The heat severe. Thermometer 90". Set out on a journey 
to New Haven, Rode to Meriden. 

11. Rode to Wallingford and New Haven. Was unsuccessful in inquiring 
for pamphlets. Much oppressed with the heat. Can do but little. Walked 
out. Saw Mr. Mills, of Norfolk. His son at college is sick. Visited friends. 
Yesterday morning heard of the death of Mr. Jefferson. He and Mr. Adams 
both died on the 4th instant. An astonishing concurrence of events. 
Minute guns were fired yesterday at Hartford. Newspapers are in mourning. 
Mr. Adams was ninety, Mr. Jefferson eighty-three. The latter, I believe, has 
never given any evidence of a belief in Christianity.' 

12. Rode very early to Bridgeport. W^ent to Mrs. Waterman's. Mr. Water- 
man has left a valuable librar}^ Yesterday looked at the large library of the 
late Dr. Morse. ^ Not equal, I think, to mine. Called at Milford. Rode to 
Mr. Swanton's, of Orange. Can do but little on account of the heat. The 
mosquitoes between Bridgeport and Stratford are insupportable. People 
are generally harvesting, and the harvest is pretty good. Better than has 
been expected. Paid for pamphlets $1. 

13. Paid Mr. Swanton for books, some quite rare, $6.50, and for pamphlets 
fifty cents. Rode to New Haven. Visited at college. Called on Mrs. Whit- 
ney.' Saw Mr. Battell's daughters." The heaf seems not to abate. The dust 
severe. Left New Haven after four o'clock, came to East Hartford, a heavy 
rain came on, and very dark, and I had to stop and stay. Minute guns 



- One of the most remarkable coincidences * Sermon of Dr. John M. Mason, 

in our national history was the death of John ' Jefferson was a free thinker in matters 

Adams and Thomas Jefferson on the same of religion, 

day, and that day the 4th of July, 1826. * Dr. Jedediah Morse, of Charlestown, 

^ Rev. Elam Calhoun Clark, a graduate lived in New Haven during his last years, 

of Williams College in 181 2. and his library was there. He died there 

* Dr. Edward Tudor, graduate of Middle- in this year, 1S26. 

bury College, 1821. 9 Mrs. Eli Whitney. 

■* Dr. Nathaniel S. Wheaton. '° Mr. Battell's eldest daughters were prob- 

' Now Trinity College. ably at school in New Haven. 



20 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

were fired in the afternoon at New Haven on account of the deaths of the 
Presidents. 

14. We have had a pretty heavy and very refreshing rain. Rode home. 
The thermometer for the three past days has been from 90° to 96°. Very 
much fatigued. Visited a school. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 
Quite thin. Cool. Mr. Wolcott's principal harvest-day was the 12th. Read. 

15. Wrote. Read. Afternoon rode to Sufheld on an exchange. 
Mr. Rowland is to supply me. Cool. Vegetation is very flourishing. 
Hindered. 

16. Preached on Phil, iii : 13, 14 and Acts xiii : 2. Administered the 
sacrament. The most of the church were present, and better united than 
they have been for a long time. I hope God designs good things for them. 
They have given Mr. Mann ' a call with great unanimity. We had a meeting 
in the evening and Mr. David Sherman ^ preached. Very tired. Tarried 
at Mr. Gay's. 

17. Visited families. It will be a good while before there can be a full 
reconciliation here, but I hope it may be effected through a divine blessing. 
Rode to Pine Meadow. The afternoon was quite rainy and I did not come 
home. 

18. Rode home. The ground quite wet. Rode to Hartford and assisted 
Mr. Wolcott about furniture. Rode to Northington and met with our 
Ministers' Meeting. Was late. The public exercise was in the evening, 
and I preached on Phil, iii : 13, 14. I hope our meeting may be improved, 

19. Looked over the remains of old Mr. Hawley.^ Paid for pamphlets 
$1.88, Rode to Farmington. Looked at the books of Gov. J. Treadwell." 
Rode to W^ethersfield and attended a public meeting. A number of ministers 
were present. There is a great work of grace there, A very pleasing work 
of grace is begun in East Hartford, The Lord extend it gloriously. Rode 
home. 

20. Wrote. Read. My eyes seem to grow more dim. The death of 
our two old Presidents, at the peculiar time of its occurrence, excites much 
attention. Wrote to Mr. Mann, of Bristol. Walked out. 

21. Rode to Wapping and visited a sick man. We had a shower. Pretty 
poor hay weather. Gave a poor woman $1. Attended a catechising and 
the evening prayer-meeting. Wrote to the postmaster of Hinsdale, N. H, 
Visited. 

22. Wrote letters to Mr. Wheaton, of Hartford, declining a place in the 
corporation of Washington College, to Mr. Rowland, of Windsor, to Mr. Yale, 
of New Hartford. Warm and sultry. Rode to Hartford with Eveline, There 
was a short but very powerful shower. Did errands. Eveline went home 
and I staid to preach tomorrow at the North Meeting-house. Mr. Kellogg, 
of Northington, went to supply me. 



' Rev. Joel Mann, late of Bristol, R. I. ^ He means by remains, old books and 

^ Probably Rev. David A. Sherman, grad- pamphlets. Rev. Rufus Hawley, pastor 

uated at Yale in 1802, and afterwards Pres- there, 1769-1826, had just died. 

ident of Tennessee College. ^ Of Farmington. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 21 

23. In the morning attended the large Sabbath-school. Preached on 
I Thess. v: 3 and Eph. ii : 14. This congregation has much increased. 
They feel their destitute state. At evening rode home. Quite warm. 

24. Am quite languid. Read. Taken up with company. Visited a sick 
man. 

25. Rode to Wapping and visited. People generally are getting their 
hay — a pretty good crop. Wrote. We fear Mrs. Wolcott has a dropsical 
affection. Whortleberries are very plenty. 

26. Walked and visited all day- We had a hard shower. We have 
several sick persons. Eat succotash. 

27. Rode to Hartford and Farmington. Paid Gov. Treadwell's family 
for books $6 ; pamphlets $2.50. The hay comes in well. 

28. Wrote. Our family are in poor health. Looked over pamphlets. 
Our evening prayer-meeting was pretty thin. We have no hope but in the 
unmerited mercy of our Saviour. 

29. Had a new cherry book-case brought me by the workman. It is 
a very good one. It is designed for Bibles and expositors. Wrote a part 
of a sermon on Rev. iii : 18. Wrote slow. My sight fails. 

30. Wrote early. Expounded on Luke ix : 28 to 51. Finished and 
preached the sermon begun yesterday. Full and solemn meeting. At even- 
ing had a full and serious conference. 

31. Wrote. Walked and visited. Rode to East Hartford and saw 
Mr. Fairchild. The revival there is great. It is hopefully advancing this 
way. 

August. 

I, Rode to Enfield and back in haste. My brother's elder step-son 
is in difficulty in New York, Had a small pine book-case brought home. 
Rode to East Hartford and attended the interesting union meeting near 
Glastonbury. It was full and very solemn. The work is great and advancing. 
Mr. Fairchild appears very well. Preached without notes on Num. x : 29. 
Showery, 

2. Quite warm. Rode to Wethersfield with company and attended the 
public meeting of people from that and the neighboring towns. The work 
of God goes on all around us. O that nothing may stay its progress. 
Spoke in the meeting. There is no preaching, but several ministers speak. 
Much fatigued by the heat. Mrs. Wolcott appears to have the dropsy, and 
we fear it is rapidly advancing. 

3. Rode with Ursula to Hartford, who is gone on a steamboat excursion 
with many others. Rode to Manchester to get some woman for domestic 
labor; unsuccessful. Fine hay weather. Wrote. \'esterday wTote to Judge 
Edwards, of New York,' in behalf of my brother's son. Much fatigued. 
Prepared for my journey, and rode in the evening to Hartford to go to 
Norfolk. 

4. Was called in the night and set out at half after one in the stage. 



' Judge Ogden Edwards. 



22 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

The morning quite cold. Got to Norfolk early. My mother is uncommonly 
well. Very tired. Mr. Battell absent. The season is late, but good. 

5. Visited a sick woman. Wrote to Dr. Tudor, of Middlebury, and sent 
him, for his sister Sophia, ^52. Gave my mother $5. Mrs. Battell very 
kindly let her best hired woman come home with me to help us for a while. 
Left Norfolk half after three, and got home at 11 P. m. Found a carriage 
for me at the bridge, but we broke down before we got home. 

6. Much fatigued by my journey. Visited a mourning family. Preached 
with old notes on Amos iv: 11, and an old sermon on 2 Cor. v: 10. 
Attended the funeral of a child who died in my absence. After meeting 
visited a Sabbath-school in the upper part of East Hartford. Rainy, and 
we had no evening conference. Am pretty feeble. Mrs. Wolcott appears 
to decline. 

7. Read. Attended the funeral of an aged woman at the poor-house 
belonging to the North Society. Visited. At evening our concert of prayer 
was thin. ■• 

8. Attended to my library. My book-cases are hardly sufficient for it. 
Visited a man very sick three times. Attended the weekly meeting at East 
Hartford. Very large and solemn. 

9. On the 7th received a letter from W. T. Williams,* of Lebanon, and 
one from Rev. E. Clarke, of Suffield. The same day we had here a council 
of physicians on Mrs. Wolcott's case. Yesterday received a town order 
of $82 for a debt against J. Bragg,^ which I have feared I should lose. Rode 
and visited the sick. Read. At evening attended our church conference. 
Very thin. Wrote. 

10. Visited a mourning family. A very healthy man died last night, after 
a short illness. Visited the Long Hill school. Attended the catechising 
of the children. They performed well. 

11. Had but little time for myself. Rainy. Attended a solemn funeral. 
Preached a lecture in the north part of the town, without notes, on 
Luke xiii: 4, 5. Had a good number. I hope to have the meeting 
continued weekly. At evening attended the prayer-meeting. Much fatigued. 

12. Worked some at my library. It rained without intermission all day. 
A great deal of water fell. Wrote the most of a sermon on Matt, xxv: 6. 
The dimness of my eyes increases. 

13. Wet and rainy. Thin meetings. Expounded on Luke ix: 51 to x : 11. 
Finished and preached the sermon on Matt, xxv : 6. Had a good conference. 
I hope we see some tokens of a gracious visit from God. The ground is very 
wet. 

14. Read. Wrote. Wrote to Dr. Janeway,' of Philadelphia. On the 



' William Trumbull Williams. He was Gov. Jonathan Trumbull. Hence the middle 

graduated at Yale in 1795. He was the name of the son. Hon. William Williams 

son of Hon. William Williams, signer of the was the son of Solomon Williams, D. D. 
Declaration of Independence. The wife of ^ The man who failed. 

William Williams was the daughter of the first ^ Rev. Jacob J. Janeway, D. D. 



i826.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



'23 



nth wrote to W. H. Bidwell,' of Yale College. Worked at my library. 
It makes me too much labor. Cloudy and wet. 

15. Wrote to Rev. G. Allen,= of Shrewsbury. Mr. Burt/ of Manchester, 
and Mr. Lee,* of Monroe, called on me. Rode with them to East Hartford 
and attended the weekly meeting. Wet and something showery. Preached 
without notes on Isa. xxviii: 17. The meeting not so full as last week. 

16. Rode to Hartford. Paid for my spectacles and case $4.25, Paid a 
merchant tailor for a silk coat and vest $22. Rode to Wethersfield and 
attended the public meeting. The work here is still great. Yery showery. 
Got home late. The ground is very wet. Much fatigued. 

17. Worked some. Hot and sultry. Rode to Wapping and visited a man 
apparently near death. Walked out. At evening attended a new conference. 
It appeared very favorably. Introduced Mr. Nettleton's hymns.^ 

18. On the 1 6th received a letter from Mr. and Mrs. Battell, one from my 
brother James, and one from G. A. Alden.^ Walked and visited. Warm. 
Preached my weekly lecture at the south, part of the town, on Luke xiii: 4, 5. 
Wet. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

19. Rode to Pine Meadow, expecting help tomorrow. Miss Eunice 
is very feeble, and I think cannot continue long. Very warm and faint. 
Mr. Gaylord,' of Hartland, came here to spend the Sabbath with me. I am 
quite languid and feeble. Thermometer, I conclude, near 90°. 

20. Early in the morning rode to Mr. Bartlett's and saw Mr. Vaill,* the 
Arkansas Indian missionary. Young Mr. Gaylord preached for me, and very 
welL The heat severe and ver}' oppressive. The air is damp. Thermometer 
91°. At evening Mr. Vaill came here and preached a good missionary sermon 
to a full and much interested meeting. 

21. Mr. Vaill and Mr. Gaylord spent the most of the day with me. My 
brother came here. Looked over pamphlets with Mr. Gaylord. Read. 

22. Worked at my bottles. W>ote. Had my sulky thoroughly repaired. 
Read. Rode to East Hartford and attended the public meeting. Not so full 
as sometimes. Preached on i Pet. iv: 7. 

23. Rode to Hartford with Eveline and attended an auction. Made 
considerable purchases. Visited. 

24. Rode to Wapping and visited the sick. One man apparently near 
dying. Attended the catechising of the children. They do well. Read the 
Bible. W^e have wet, damp, and warm weather, and very enervating. 

25. Walked and visited. We have some sick. The appointed afternoon 



' Walter H. Bidwell, who graduated at 
Yale in 1827. 

^ Rev. George Allen, who studied theol- 
ogy with Dr. Robbins. He was graduated 
at Yale, 1813, was settled at Shrewsbury in 
1823. Died in Worcester, Mass., 1883, in 
his ninety-second year. 

3 Rev. Enoch Burt. 

'• Rev. Chauncey G. Lee. 

5 Village Hymns, long used in New Eng- 



land, especially for prayer and conference 
meetings. 

^ Son of Rev. Francis Robbins's wife, 
of Enfield, by her first husband, Gideon S. 
Alden. 

" Rev. Flavel S. Gaylord, a graduate of 
Williams, iSi6, son of Rev. Nathaniel Gay- 
lord, pastor at West Hartland, 17S2-1841. 

' Rev. Herman L. Vaill. Received the 
honorary degree of A. M. from Yale, 1S24. 



24 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

meeting at the south part of the town was omitted on account of the rain. 
Wrote. Our evening prayer-meeting was thin. 

26. Rode to Hartford with Eveline, in company with Mr. Haskell and 
Frances. Procured articles. Wet and warm. On the 24th received a letter 
from Mrs. Battell and one from Mr. Yale,' of New Hartford. Towards night 
began a sermon on Jer. xvii: 5, 6. 

27. Rode to Wapping and attended the funeral of Mr. Grant. A great 
many people. Very tired, A favorable day and no wet. Had no conference. 

28. Wet and hard showers. It is a very wet season. Many oats are lost, 
as they cannot be harvested. Warm and sultry. Am very languid. Read. 
Paid for a book fifty cents. 

29. Wrote. Worked some. Rode to East Hartford and attended the 
meeting. Mr. Griswold ^ preached. I fear the work in the lower part of the 
town is not advancing. Wrote three short pieces for publication. The water 
has had a sudden and pretty great rise. 

30. Rode to Hartford and met with the general and principal officers 
of the brigade. Was appointed on a committee to prepare a military report. 
Rode to Wethersfield. Was too late to attend the afternoon meeting. 
Preached in the evening to a full house, without notes, on Isa. xxviii: 17. 
Received a letter from Mr. Bidwell,' at Yale College. 

31. Saw the foundation of the new State Prison."* It appears well. Rode 
home. Afternoon walked and preached at the south part of the town on 
Luke xiv: 18. At evening attended a conference. We have now had three 
pleasant days after more than a fortnight of almost constant cloudy and wet. 
Our meetings are well attended. 

September. 

1. Rode to Canton and saw the debtors of the Everest fund. Mr. Porter 
was not present, and Mr. Hallock is gone to a better world. The debtors 
did well. All that are there paid their annual interest — more than $200. 
Got home late. Wet and sultry. 

2. Visited three women hard sick. Am not able to write a sermon 
today. Had company. Visited. The constant damp and warm weather 
is very languid. 

3. Expounded on Luke x: 13 to the end. Preached with very short 
notes on Isa. xxviii: 17. Did poorly. Had a good conference. Much 
fatigued. Received a letter from Mr. and Mrs. Battell, and one from 
Dr. Janeway, of Philadelphia. The heat very oppressive. 

4. Rode early to Warehouse Point. Very sultry and oppressive heat. 
Attended a training at Wapping. The company did well. Attend ..d the 
monthly concert. Visited the sick. Was out late. Read. 

5. The thermometer today and two days past 86°, but a very languid 



' Rev. Cyrus Yale, a graduate of Will- ^ Rev. Samuel Griswold, probably, a grad- 

iams College, 181 1, pastor at New Hartford, uate of Yale, 181S. 
Ct., 1S14-1834. Dr. Edward D. Griffin was ^ Walter H. Bidwell. 

pastor here, 1795-1801. " At Wethersfield. j 



i826.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



and oppressive heat.' Wrote. Wrote letters to Mr. Battell, Col. White, 
of Danbur}^ W. T. Williams," of Lebanon, and Col. Belcher, of Hartford, 
and preached at the meeting without notes on Ps. cvi : 15. Visited. I fear 
the attention in East Hartford is declining. 

6. Last evening received a letter from Mr. Mann, of Bristol. On the 
4th paid a blacksmith ninety-three cents. Wrote three inscriptions for 
tombstones in a letter to Mr. Griswold, Washington. Visited the sick. 
At evening attended the church conference. We conclude to form an 
association in aid of foreign missions. The brethren appear to feel the 
importance of much prayer for a revival of religion here. 

7. Wrote to my brother. Rode out. Attended the catechising. Read. 
Wrote on a military report. 

8. Rode to Wapping and visited. Many people are gone to Manchester 
to attend a camp-meeting. It is a matter of festivity. Received a letter 
from my brother and wrote him in return.' Wrote. Attended the evening 
prayer-meeting. 

9. Walked and visited the sick ; one woman ver)' low. Wrote a part 
of a sermon on 2 Kings ii : 9, 10. Received a letter from Mr. Battell. 
Towards night my sister and her daughter Urania^ came here. Wrote late. 

ID. Was called early to see Mrs. Olcott, apparently near her end. 
Preached with old notes on Ps. ex : 3, and my sermon begun yesterday, 
not finished. Warm and sultrj'. At noon we had a hard shower. At evening 
we had a good conference. Many people are gone to camp-meeting * and our 
meetings were thin. 

11. Mrs. Olcott' died this morning. Visited the afflicted families. Paid 
the stage-driver for Urania to go to Enfield fifty cents. Rode with Mrs. Bat- 
tell and her child ^ to Hartford, She took her girl Louisa' with her, who has 
been with us five weeks. The heat oppressive. At evening attended a full 
conference. Late, my brother and his niece. Miss Gibbs,* came here on their 
way to New Haven. Quite tired. 

12. My brother went off. Paid a blacksmith thirty-one cents. Wrote. 
Prepared for my journey. Attended the funeral of Mrs. Olcott. Set out 
for New Haven, rode to North Haven, and tarried at a private house. Rode 
late. 

13. Rode to New Haven. A pleasant but warm day. Attended Com- 
mencement. The exercises were good. A great collection of people. Got 
acquainted with Mr. Cox,' of New York. The largest class graduated that 



' The old style and new style September 
heat. 

- William Trumbull Williams, Esq. 

3 Mrs. Joseph Battell, of Norfolk. Her 
daughter Urania was born May 30, 1814, and 
was now twelve years old, afterward the wife 
of Hon. James Humphrey, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

* On the old ground at Manchester. 
5 Mrs. Clarissa Olcott. 

* This child was probably Ellen Battell, 
about a year and a half old, now the wife of 



Azariah Eldridge, D. D., of Yarvnouth, Mass. 
She was the youngest of the family. 

' Louisa was the colored eirl who came 
from Norfolk, a little while before, to live in 
the Wolcott family. 

* This was his wife's niece. 

9 Samuel Hanson Cox, D. D., LL. D. Al 
that time he was pastor of the Laight Street 
Church. A most unique and notable man, 
father of Bishop Arthur Cleveland Coxe, 
D. D., of Western New York. 



26 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

ever has at any college in this country — ninety-nine. Three of the scholars 
are from Colebrook. The alumni of the college met and took measures 
to form a society. Attended the Concio ad Clerum. Mr. Lewis ' preached 
well. 

14. Attended a praver-meeting in the morning — very thin. Attended 
the* meeting of the Education Society. Rode to Bridgeport. Looked over 
Mr. Waterman's^ books. Attended a meeting in the evening with young 
Mr. Waterman. We had a hard shower. A new minister is like to be 
settled here.^ 

15. Paid Mr. Waterman for six volumes $22. Two of them were rare 
Bibles, which I am glad to procure. Returned to New Haven. Called 
at Judge Johnson's,* at Stratford. He gave me a few valuable pamphlets. 
I think his library- is larger than mine. Paid Gen. Howe his account against 
me for books, §16.25. ^'^'^^ for pamphlets here and at Milford eight}--eight 
cents. Left New Haven after sundown and rode to Meriden. Mosquitoes 
are very thick. 

16. Rode home early. Quite cool. Visited the sick. Some pretty low. 
Mrs. Wolcott's disorder increases. Wrote a will for a sick woman. At 
evening rode to East Hartford to make an exchange. Found Mr. Ludlow,* 
of New York, at Mr. Fairchiid's. Much fatigued by the business of the week. 
Received a letter from Sophia Tudor. 

17. Last night was ver}'- cold, but there was no frost to destroy vegetation. 
Mr. Ludlow preached in the forenoon remarkably well. I preached in the 
afternoon on Rev. iii : 18. Rode home and preached in the evening without 
notes on John i : 12. A solemn meeting. Visited a sick man hard sick. 

18. Wrote on a military report. Rode to Hartford and met with a military 
committee. Wet. I have many calls. Read. 

19. Walked and visited the sick. Rode to East Hartford with company, 
and attended the union meeting. Mr. Ludlow preached. Visited. I hope 
to get a few private prayer-meetings established here. 

20. A child in the neighborhood, of three years old, had about eighty 
drops of laudanum given her by mistake. It appeared a good while in 
a dying state, but has got better. Rode to East Hartford and met with 
the military officers of the regiment. Marched with them. They performed 
well. Visited. 

21. Visited a child ver}' sick. We have a good many sick. Visited 
a school. Attended our catechising. The last for the season. The children 
have done well. I hope the Bible class may have a blessing. At evening 
wrote. The first time I have had for myself since I took my journey, 

22. Yesterday received a letter from Col. Grannis, of Southington. 



' Rev. Isaac Lewis, Jr., of Greenwich. "■ William Samuel Johnson, LL. D., Strat- 

^ Rev. Elijah Waterman, pastor of the ford, Ct., 1727, graduated at Yale, 1744, died 

First Church in Bridgeport (formerly Strat- in Stratford, 1819. Dr. Robbins speaks of 

field), 1806-1825. the place as Judge Johnson's, according to 

3 Rev. Franklin Y. Vaill was settled there the old and familiar designation. 
in the following month (October, 1826). ^ Probably Rev. Henry G. Ludlow. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 27 

Wrote. Afternoon preached at the south part of the town on i Peter iv : i8. 
Attended our evening prayer-meeting. After which visited a family where 
a child had just died. Visited other sick persons. Was out quite late. 

23. Much fatigued. Wrote to my brother. Wrote the most of a sermon 
on Ps. 1 : 22. Wet. Hindered by company. Mrs. Wolcott had an operation 
for her dropsy, and nearly eighteen pounds of water were taken from her. 
The operation was not so tedious as was expected. Wrote late. 

24. Preached with old notes on i Cor. i: 17. At noon attended the 
funeral of a child. Cold and rainy. Finished and preached my sermon on 
Ps. 1 : 22. Thin meeting. Had no conference. 

25. Rode out and visited the sick. Afternoon rode to Hartford to see 
about my lawsuit, which is expected to come soon to trial. Attended the 
evening meeting. Am fatigued with continual labor. 

26. Visited the sick. Rode to East Hartford with my delegate and met 
with the consociation. The session was full ; all the churches represented 
but one. Henry G. Ludlow, of New York, was examined, appeared remark- 
ably well, and was ordained in the evening as an evangelist.' I was scribe 
and gave the right hand. It was a solemn meeting. 

27. The session of the consociation was interesting. The state of religion, 
by the accounts, is more favorable than it has been for several years. We 
had considerable difficulty with a young man who applied for license, but 
was not examined. Left the consociation before they got through to attend 
on the regiment. They appeared, conducted, and performed unusually well. 
Dark and wet. We were dismissed late. The evening very dark. Did not 
come home. Heard Mr. Ludlow preach in the evening. 

28. Walked early to Hartford. Rode home. Warm and faint. Was 
called to see a sick man, very low. Saw him repeatedly. He died towards 
night.' Preached a preparatory lecture with old notes on Isa. hi : i. 
Afternoon we had frequent and copious showers. The lecture quite thin. 
Visited the sick. 

29. Rode to Hartford. People have had a very bad time to get in 
crops. My cause does not come on this week. Assisted Eveline. Afternoon 
preached at the south part of the town on Matt, xi : 28. Attended the 
evening prayer-meeting. A good deal unwell and very tired. 

30. Mrs, Wolcott is very poor, and the water collects . again very fast. 
She went away to make trial of the Suffield water. Wrote. Am some better, 
but feeble. Attended the funeral of Mr. Moore. Fine weather. 

October. 

I. Have been unable, through business, fatigue and ill health, to prepare 
sermons. Preached with old notes on i Thess. ii : 10. Administered the 
sacrament. The church pretty full. Preached an old sermon on Isa. lix: 1-3. 
Baptized a child of Mr. Moore, ^ who was buried yesterday. Preached long. 
At evening attended the conference. Weak and very tired. 



' In 1837 he was settled over the College ^ Mr. Peter Moore, aged thirty-one. 

Street Church in New Haven, where he ^ Charlotte Frances, daughter of Mrs. 

remained till 1842. He was afterwards in I.ucy Moore. Such a baptism was fitted to 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. move the hearts of the congregation. 



28 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

2. Attended the funeral of a young woman,' who died at Middletown and 
was brought home. Visited a school at Wapping. Attended the semi-annual 
examination of our academy. The school is small. The performance was 
good. Attended the monthly concert. Quite thin. My lungs are weak. 

3. Visited the sick and others. Visited two schools. Wrote. Have 
been unwell with a bowel complaint for a week. The fall crops are like 
to be good. 

4. Rode to Hartford. My cause, through " the law's delay," is not like 
to be on this week. Gen. Howe and Mr. R. S. Skinner, ^ of New Haven, 
came herefrom Hartford and dined. Quite warm. Mr. Sprague^was here 
while I was gone. He gave me a very valuable volume of old Mr. Hooker,* 
of Hartford. On Monday Charles Olmsted,^ of East Hartford, gave me an 
ancient folio and returned my Vol. H. of Lardner, which I supposed to be 
lost. Rode to Pine Meadow and returned in the evening. Mrs. Wolcott 
is quite comfortable, but nothing seems to arrest her disorder. Pained with 
my complaint. 

5. Had the privilege of spending the whole day in my study without 
intermission. Purchased three acres of meadow land of William Tudor for 
$195.^ Gave B. Skinner a note of $ioo, and paid Mr. Tudor $95. Veiy fine 
growing weather. Wrote. Attended to the business of the Annuity Society. 
Yesterday paid Gen. Howe for a pamphlet fifty cents. Wrote late. 

6. Walked and visited the sick. Preached at Mr. Burnham's on 
Mark i: 40, 41. Find some new instances of awakening. I feel encouraged 
that God will do something for us in the greatness of his mercy. Attended 
the evening prayer-meeting. After which rode and visited the sick. 

7. Wrote. Hindered by business and company. Wrote the most of 
a sermon on Prov. xxiii : 26. Wrote five pages in the evening. I grow 
inaccurate in my writing. 

8. Wrote. Expounded on Luke xi : 1-14. Finished at noon and 
preached the sermon begun yesterday. After meeting rode and visited 
a sick family. Received a letter, by a messenger, from Dr. Butler and 
Mr. Bissell, of Sufifield, requesting me to go there immediately. Attended 
the evening conference. All the meetings very solemn. I hope God is with 
us. At nine o'clock left home and rode to Pine Meadow. Damp and cold. 

9. Rode early to Sufifield. There was considerable frost. The first 
we have had. It seems that Mr. Mann has very unexpectedly given a 
nerative answer to the call here. Conversed much with Mr. Mann and 
others. I believe he tojk the best course. Attended a church-meeting. 
Dea. Sherman ^ resigned his office and a new deacon was chosen. At the 



' Emily May, aged tweniy-one. "• The famous Thomas Hooker, first min- 

^ Gen. Hezekiah Howe and Roger S. ister of Hartford. 

Skinner, the latter graduated at Yale in ^ Charles Olmsted, Esq., a gentleman of 

18 1 3, and long a leading citizen of New wealth and culture. 
Haven. * He is buying more grass land. 

^ Rev. William B. Sprague, D. D., of ^ Dea. Charles Sherman, at New Haven 

West Springfield. in the early years of the diary. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 29 

request of the church Mr. Mann consented to reconsider the answer he 
had given to the call. The meeting was serious and harmonious. 

10. Left Suffield and rode to Hartford. My case in court delays. 
Mrs. Wolcott, at Pine Meadow, appears a little better. Rode home. Read. 
Received a letter from Mr. and Mrs. Battell. Wrote. Paid for pamphlets 
thirt}'-eight cents. Studied law. 

11. Did not go down to attend the cattle-show. Walked and visited the 
sick and others all day. We appear to have the merciful tokens of the divine 
presence. Three young women have got hope lately. I hope the work may 
continue. 

12. Rode to Hartford to attend to my case in court. It did not come on. 
Attended some of the exercises of the Agricultural Society. The annual 
exhibition was very good. Attended court. The judge presides pretty 
poorly. Rode home in a ver)' hard rain. Paid for oats $1.07. Wrote notes 
for my argument at court. 

13. Rode early to Hartford. The ground very wet. My cause for the 
Ministers' Annuity Society came on about noon. We had an intermission 
and continued till night. Most of the time in argument. I spoke with 
Mr. Ellsworth,' my attorney. The judge deferred charging the jury till 
morning. Got Mr. Hooker^ to rid^ up and preach for me at the south part 
of the town — my weekly lecture. Rode home. 

14. Rode early to Hartford. The judge told the jury there was little 
for them to do ; he stated the law which governed the case, and they gave 
a verdict in our favor. It is a signal, providential favor to our Annuity 
Society. Public feeling was considerably excited and much in our favor. 
Paid Bull $5.88. Paid Birge ninet}'-two cents. Gave a man fiity cents. 
Much fatigued. Wrote. Read. At evening began to write a sermon, when 
most unexpectedly Mr. Smith,^ of Durham, came in to spend the Sabbath. 

15. Mr. Smith preached very well, and we had a solemn meeting in the 
evening. His assistance was a great favor to me. Very fine weather. 

16. Mr. Smith went on his journey. Read. Walked out. Afternoon 
rode to Hartford, having been summoned by Mr. Watson to attend the court 
as a witness. The cause, as usual, did not come on. 

17. Yesterday wrote to my brother and to Mr. Strong, of Somers. On the 
15th received a letter from my brother. Plave now charged $2.17 to the 
Annuity Societ}^, which must be deducted from the charges of several days 
past. Wrote. Rode to Hartford for Mr. Watson. His cause was withdrawn 
by his brother, the plaintiff. At evening performed a marriage.'* Received 
four volumes of the Panoplist,^ one of the Herald in numbers, and fort)--six 
pamphlets — a valuable present from Mrs. Rogers. 

18. Have taken a cold. Wrote to Crocker & Brewster, of Boston. Wrote 



' Hon. William W. Ellsworth. ' The Panoplist began in 1S04, and in 

^ Rev. Horace Hooker. 1S17 passed into the Missionary Herald. 

^ Dr. David Smith. Previous to the Panoplist, the Massachusetts 

'' The parties were Hiram E. Stoddard, Missionary Magazine had run through five 

of Wethersfield, and Fanny Filley. volumes, and was merged in the Panoplist. 



30 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

for the Everest fund. Read the Bible. This has been too much neglected. 
Visited. At evening performed a marriage.' 

19. Wrote. Read the Bible. Visited the last of my summer schools. 
My brother's step-son, living with Mr. Haskell, conducts badly. Attended 
in the evening a full and attentive meeting. Mrs. Wolcott came home from 
Pine Meadow on Tuesday, and today returned. She is some better than she 
has been. 

20. Wrote on the business of the Everest fund. Wrote to Mr. Porter, 
of Farmington. Walked to Mr. Burnham's and preached on Acts xxviii : 24. 
Meeting quite thin. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. I think the grace 
of God is with us. Much fatigued. 

21. Looked over pamphlets. Wrote the most of a sermon on Luke xvi : 25. 
At evening my brother came here on his return from Norfolk. Mother is quite 
well. He is much afflicted with the conduct of his step-son Alden. Wrote 
late. Last night we had a hard rain. 

22. My brother went away very early. Last night quite rainy. Preached 
with old notes on Luke iv : 27. Finished and preached my sermon on 
Luke xvi: 25. Attended the funeral of an elderly woman.' Yesterday 
visited the mourning family. At evening we had a full and solemn meeting. 
Very tired. 

23. Received a letter from Ebenezer Clarke, of Somers, and wrote 
to him in reply. Rode to Wapping and attended the funeral of an aged man. 
I fear the Methodist who preaches there is doing injury. Met my brother 
at Mr. Haskell's. He is much afflicted with the conduct of Alden. Visited. 
In the morning we had considerable frost. Vegetation has not been stopped 
before. 

24. We had a hard frost. Rode to Hartford with Ursula and Eveline, 
Paid for domestic flannel $1.98. Quite cold. Mrs. Wolcott^ came home with 
Frances. She appears better. Received a most grateful present of a valuable 
preaching Bible from the young men in the society. It is in the first st}'le 
of execution from London. 

25. Walked and visited. Our sick are hopefully convalescing. Read the 
Bible. Rode to Wapping and preached in the evening without notes on 
Isa. xlviii : 22. Cold and tedious. Tarried at Wapping. 

26. Rode home. Visited. Attended the funeral of an infant child. 
In ten months we have had twenty deaths. In the evening we had an 
interesting and attentive meeting. 

27. Last night was very cold. Wrote. Preached at Mr. Burnham's on 
Job xlii : 5, 6. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Much fatigued. 

28. Wrote on my military report. I was obliged to do this, which 
prevented me from writing a sermon. At evening wrote notes for preaching. 
Read the Bible. 



' Elijah Grant, of New York, and Mary ^ Mrs. Abiel Wolcott, in her illness, had 

B. Flint were the parties united. been spending some time with her daughter, 

^ Miss Temasen Newbury, aged sixty- Mrs. Haskell, at Pine Meadow, on the other 

seven. side of the river. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 3 1 

29. Preached with the notes written last evening on Esther iv : 13, 14, 
and an old sermon on Amos iv : 12. Expressed my thanks publicly for the 
donation of my preaching Bible from the young men here. Had a full and 
attentive conference. Tarried out. 

30. Visited. Wrote and finished my military report. It has made me 
a good deal of labor. Read. Looked over pamphlets. 

31. Received a letter from Crocker & Brewster, of Boston. Wrote to my 
brother and to Gen. Howe, of New Haven. Read. Walked and visited. 

November. 

1. Rode to Hartford with Eveline. Rainy. Procured of Dr. Strong' six 
old volumes of the ranoplist^ in numbers, for $7.50, and one London volume 
of the Christian Observer, in numbers, for $3. I hope to make out a file 
of PanopUsts. Attended the evening meeting. Left it before it concluded 
and rode to Wapping and performed a marriage.^ Very dark. 

2. Looked over pamphlets. Wrote. Visited. Walked to the south 
part of the town and preached in the evening on Matt, xxiii : 37, 38. Much 
fatigued. 

3. Walked and visited. Read. My brother came here to see me. 
Wrote to Gen. Howe, of New Haven. On Tuesday I wrote to him and 
my brother and misdirected the letters.'* Read. Attended the evening 
meeting. Gave $1.10. 

4. Worked at my pamphlets. Plindered by company. Wrote the most 
of a sermon on 2 Kings vii : 3. Wrote nearly six pages in the evening. 
Have to use my glasses in writing steadily. 

5. Expounded on Luke xi : 14-37. Wrote and preached my sermon 
on 2 Kings vii : 3. It was not quite finished. At evening had a full con- 
ference. I fear lest God's good Spirit may be taken from us. 

6. Visited. Rode to Hartford with Eveline. Cold and a hard frost. 
Paid for fifteen pounds of mold candles $1.95. At evening went to the 
place of meeting for our monthly concert. It was rainy and very few 
attended. Read. Received a letter from Gen. Howe, of New Haven, and 
one from Mr. Benedict, of Vernon. 

7. Wrote. Read. Rode to Wapping and attended the funeral of a child, 
and visited a sick man there and one in Scantic. Rode to Enfield. My 
brother and his family are in a pretty gloomy state. 

8. Rode home. Called at Mr. Bartlett's. There is a good work of grace 
in that society, apparendy increasing. I fear we may be passed over. Cold. 
Found at my brother's two of my lost books. At evening attended the 
meeting. Wrote a plan for a foreign mission association. Capt. Bissell ' 



' Nathan Strong, M. D. ■ ^ The parties were George Foster and 

^ The Panoplist proper consisted of six- Betsey Ladd. 
teen volumes, 1S05-1820. It was preceded by ■* Pleasant to know that such an exact 

five volumes of the Massachusetts Missionary and careful man could sometimes make 

Magazine, and was merged, 1821, in the Mis- mistakes. 
sionary Herald. ^ Capt. Aaron Bissell. 



3- DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

paid me $82 — amount of my town order I had of Bragg. I have lost 
considerable in interest. 

9. Wrote to Mr. Benedict, of Vernon. My evening meetings occupy 
much of my time. Rode to Hartford. Assisted Mr. Wolcott in getting 
Eveline's furniture. Paid $1.25 for a pair of gloves. Preached at Mr. Burn- 
ham's' on Matt, xiv: 30. Very tired. My horse appears to be diseased. 

10. Wrote. My brother and his wife called here on their way to New 
York to attend the trial of their son. Rode out. Attended the evenina: 
prayer-meeting. Had a long walk. 

11. Wrote the most of a sermon on Matt, xxv : i, 2. Am fatigued with 
my evening meetings. Read. 

12. Wrote notes and preached on Ex. xvii : 11. Finished and preached 
my sermon on Matt, xxv: i, 2. Had a solemn audience. Had a full 
conference. Am weak at my lungs. I fear the Methodists are doing injur}' 
at Wapping. 

13. Quite cold. Attended to my horse. He is quite diseased. Received 
of Mr. O. Tudor $14. for fifty rods of land, which I sold him a good while 
ago — $12.50 the principal and $1.50 for interest. Read. At evening 
attended a meeting. Visited. Quite cold. 

14. Walked and visited. Worked at my library. Read Walsh's Appeal?' 

15. Rode out with Mrs. Wolcott. She is pretty feeble. Began in the 
afternoon and wrote the most of a sermon for Thanksgiving on Ps. cxvi : 12. 
Wrote five pages in the evening. It hurts me to study so late. 

16. Thanksgiving. Quite warm and pleasant. Finished and preached 
my sermon on Ps. cxvi : 12. Meeting well attended. Read W^alsh's ^//^(7/. 

17. Last evening received a letter from Mr. Whitman, of Boston, and one 
from Pres. Humphrey, of x\mherst. Wrote to Mr. Bartlett and sent him 
Pres. Humphrey's letter. Rainy. Set out to ride to Wethersfield, but 
returned on account of the wet. Looked over pamphlets. Wrote to 
Mr. V/hitman, of Boston. Warm. 

18. Worked at pamphlets. Received of my collector $40. Wrote to 
Mrs. Battell. Sent my good mother $5. Last night we had a hard rain. 
Yesterday the new steamboat ^ went up the river. Afternoon rode to Enfield 
to supply my brother tomorrow, while Mr. Hooker," of Hartford, is to supply 
me. My horse travels poorly. Quite cold. 

19. Cold. Preached on Rom. iii : 3 and Prov. xxiii : 26. 'This congrega- 
tion appears well. The people have much feeling for my brother in his trials. 
Rode home at evening and attended the meeting at the Hill. Mr. Bissell 
informed me, when I got to his house, that Alden had had his trial and been 
honorably acquitted. 



' Some private house. peal from the Judgments of Great Britain 

^ Robert Walsh, LL. D., born in Balti- respecting the United States. 
more, 1784, and died in Paris, 1859. He ^ This we suppose to be the little boat 

studied law, but abandoned it for literature. which for several jears v/as used on the 

He was an extensive writer and editor of river between Hartford and Springfield, 
periodicals. In 1819 he published A}t Ap- * Rev. Horace Hooker. 



[826.] 



PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR, 



33 



20. Last evening received a letter from Mr. Mitchell,' editor of the 
Spectator. Rode to Wethersfield and engaged a place for two of my Norfolk 
nieces at Mr. Emerson's school. The North Society in Hartford have given 
a call to Mr. Spring,^ of Abingdon, to settle with them. At evening attended 
our interesting inquiring meeting. Nine young females were present. Read. 
The account of Alden's acquittal is favorably mentioned in the New York 
paper. 

21. We had some scattering snow the most of the day. Mr. Strong, 
of Somers, called here. Wrote. At evening attended the meeting. Visited. 

22. Looked over three spelling-books. There is a prevalent inclination 
to introduce new elementary works and Walker's pronunciation.^ At evening 
performed a marriage.* Wrote on an inscription for a tombstone. Visited. 

23. It snowed considerably. The ground is covered. Cold and tedious. 
Visited. Vv'orked at pamphlets. At evening my brother and his wife came 
here and tarried, on their return from New York. Their son was honorably 
acquitted, but the expenses of the affair amounted to about $1,000.^ The 
prosecution was totally unfounded. Preached in the evening at Mr. Burn- 
ham's on Matt, xi : 30. Took a cold. 

24. Cold. The ground hard frozen. Read. Mr. Wolcott's sister. Miss 
Eunice,^ who has ever been a member of this family, died today at Pine 
Meadow, with the decline of age, aged seventy-six. She has long been quite 
feeble and has been taken good care of by that kind family. At evening 
attended the prayer-meeting. We are about to remove the up-street meeting '' 
to another house, having been at one house, Mr. L. Bissell's, about twelve 
years. We had a contribution — $1. Was up late. Read Winthrop's 
jfournal. 

25. Visited. Wrote. Afternoon rode to Windsor and up to Pine Meadow. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wolcott went up. The roads are bad. 

26. Attended the funeral of our good friend. Miss Eunice, in the forenoon. 
Did not go with the mourners to the grave, but came home and attended our 
afternoon meeting. Preached an old sermon on John viii : 24. Preached 
at the funeral without notes on i Cor. xvi : 22. The afternoon and evening 
quite rainy. The storm pretty violent. Had no conference. Read. Received 
of my collector $50. On the 24th received a church letter from Suffield. 
Mr. Mann is expected to be installed there. 



' Rev. John Mitchell, editor of Christian 
Spectator, 1824-1829, was born in Chester, 
Ct., 1794, and graduated at Yale, 1821. Was 
pastor at Newtown, Ct., Fairhaven, Ct., and 
Northampton, Mass. Author of Priticiples 
and Practices of the Congregational Churches 
of New England, and of several other vol- 
umes. 

2 Dr. Samuel Spring, brother of Dr. Gar- 
diner Spring, of New York. Dr. Samuel 
Spring's longest ministry was at East Hart- 
ford, where he died, 1877. He was a man of 



choice character and an excellent preacher, 
a graduate of Yale, 181 1. He was a son of 
Dr. Samuel Spring, of Newburyport, Mass. 

^ We still meet occasionally some relics of 
Walker in men who say dhuty for duty, etc. 

* Between Joseph N. Newbury and Jane 
E. Mills. 

5 One of the incidental wrongs perpetrated 
by law, which cannot very well be helped. 

' Miss Eunice Tudor. 

^Neighborhood meeting held in private 
house. 



34 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

27. Rode to Wapping and attended the funeral of an aged man. The 
roads very wet. Visited there. Afternoon attended our inquiry meeting. 
Rode out. Have a good deal to do for Eveline. Cold. Received a letter 
from Mr. Bartlett. Wrote to him and to my brother. 

28. Rode to Hartford. Paid the bank $150. Did errands. At evening 
attended our meeting. Had a sermon read. Am oppressed with labor. 

29. Have a good deal to do in connection with the wedding. Rode 
to Hartford in haste. Paid for oats, five bushels, $2.25. Grain is unusually 
high. At evening married Edgar Bissell ' to Eveline Wolcott. I came to 
this family when she was four years old, and have had considerable care 
of her education. She seems to me much like a daughter. We had a very 
pleasant wedding — above forty guests. 

30. We have ver\' pleasing weather this week, though it has been 
a rainy month. Eveline went away. She has very good furniture. Visited 
a private gramrpar school. The performance was very good. Preached at 
Mr. Burnham's on 2 Peter iii : 11. Meeting full. Read Dryden's Virgil. 

December. 

1. Wrote. Rode to the Hill and dined at Mr. Bissell's. Assisted 
in putting up some of their furniture. Dr. N. Dwight ^ is now there practicing 
for the cure of stammerers. At evening attended the prayer-meeting. Quite 
full. 

2. Am pretty feeble. Worked at my things. Wrote the most of a 
sermon on Luke xix : 43, 44. Wrote more easily than usual. 

3. Very cold. In the forenoon we had no fire in the meeting-house. 
Put on my flannel. Expounded on Luke xi : 37 to the end, and finished 
and preached the sermon begun yesterday. At evening had a full and 
solemn conference. We seem to wonder why it is that God is, to such 
a degree, passing by us in the influence of his grace. 

4. Walked and visited. The ground is hard frozen. Visited a school. 
At evening attended the monthly prayer-meeting. Had the assistance of 
Dr. Dwight. The work of God is great in the North Society. 

5. Rode to Wapping and visited their two schools. Attended our 
evening meeting. Met with the school visitors, and they resolved to intro- 
duce a new spelling-book in our schools — much to my regret. We have 
winter weather. 

6. Worked at my chamber ; gave testimony before the court of probate. 
Attended our inquiry meeting. It appears encouraging. Wrote. The ther- 
mometer has been as low this week as 14°. The ground is hard frozen. 
Received of my collector $150. 

7. Began to write a sermon on 2 Tim. iii: 16 for the installation at 
Suffield, if I should be called to preach on the occasion. Rode to the upper 
part of East Hartford and attended the funeral of a child, visited a sick man, 



" Son of Capt. Aaron Bissell, of East ^ Dr. Nathaniel Dwight, a younger brother 

Windsor Hill. He (Edgar) was born in of Pres. Timothy Dwight — a minister and a 
iSoo, and his wife in 1804. physician. 



1826.] PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR. 35 

and preached at Mr. Burnham's in the evening on John v: 25. During 
sermon I became ver)' weak and feeble at the lungs. 

8. Walked and visited. People are reluctant about joining our society. 
Visited a school. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Heard of the death 
of Mr. Ep. Bissell ' at Genesee. Warm. Thermometer at temperate. 

9. Quite rainy. Wrote on my sermon for installation. It requires much 
labor. Worked some. Was up late. 

10. Preached with old notes on Matt, xxvi : 56. Dr. Dwight^ preached 
for me in the afternoon. At evening had a full meeting. The meeting-house 
is well lighted with the new lamps. Read the President's Message. Received 
of my collector $209. Paid Mr. Wolcott's and Tudor's taxes — $93.94. Paid 
Waterman for two book-cases $22.50. For repairs of my sulky $24.65. 
To Mr. Haskell $16.94. Paid taxes, including the highway tax, $18.14. 

11. Wrote what I could on my sermon for ordination. Had to consult 
the works of the fathers. Our society had their annual meeting. It did 
better than I feared. Wrote late. Warm and pleasant. , 

12. My cousin, Francis Alden, called on me. Rode to Suffield and met 
with the council, quite respectable, for Mr. Mann's installation. Mr. Vernon,^ 
the expected preacher, arrived in the evening and released me of the burden. 
My sermon could not well have been finished. Mr. Gay acted badly before 
the council. The examination in the meeting-house was before a large 
assembly. Dr. Dwight rode up with me. Bad riding. 

13. We had a pleasant installation. I gave the charge. Had no time 
to write more than short notes. The people are very much united and 
appeared very happy. I never saw Suffield appear so well. Quite warm. 
Rode to West Springfield and spent the night with Mr. Sprague.* He went 
on a little before me. Got something wet in a squall. 

14. Mr. Sprague gave me near an hundred valuable pamphlets. Rode 
to Suffield and home. Suffield people appear quite sensible of what I have 
done for them. . At evening preached at Mr. Burnham's on John xv : 7. 
Quite cold and tedious. 

15. Rode out. Conversed with E. Wolcott. Looked over pamphlets. 
Attended our evening prayer-meeting. 

16. Assorted pamphlets. Wrote. Paid a blacksmith $1.51. Wrote the 
most of a sermon on Ezek. xxxvii : 1-4. Wrote six and a half pages in the 
evening. Very warm and pleasant. Thermometer at 60°. 

17. Last evening received pamphlets and printed letters by mail. 
Expounded on Luke xii : 41. Finished and preached my sermon on 
Ezek. xxxvii : 1-4. Thermometer at 62°. At evening had a very full 
conference. I trust we are not forsaken of the Lord. 



' Epaphras Bissell, whose wife was Jerusha ^ Rev. Thomas Vernon, a native of New- 

Wolcott, daughter of Mr. Samuel Wolcott, port, R. I., a graduate of Brown University, 

removed from East Windsor, some years 1816, pastor at Rehoboth, Mass., 1826-1827. 

before, to New York State. ■* William B. Sprague, D. D. Dr. Robbins 

^ Nathaniel Dwight was educated for the and Dr. Sprague had tastes, literary and his- 

ministry, but followed the medical profession. torical, very much in common. 



36 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1826. 

18. Visited a sick man. Our people sold their pews. They did not 
do very well. Attended our inquiry meeting. Received of my collector 
$50. Was up late. Visited. 

19. Rode to Hartford. Paid $15.09 — the amount of our collections 
at the monthly concert for the year — to the Hartford County Auxiliary 
Society. Gave to the same object $5 for a New Year's gift. Bought books. 
Have now almost a complete set of the Panoplist. Got the thirty-seventh 
and last number of Clarke's Bible, which has been publishing about fifteen 
years. Cold and tedious. Attended our evening meeting. Paid my sub- 
scription for lamps in the meeting-house $4. Read in Eulogies on Adams and 
yefferson. 

20. Thermometer in the morning 18°. Wrote. Wrote to Bangs & Emor\', 
New York. Looked over books. Read. At evening preached at Mr. Burn- 
ham's on 2 Cor. iv : 3, 4. Full meeting. Quite cold. 

21. Rode out and visited a school. Read the Bible. At evenins: 
performed a marriage.' Cold and rainy. 

22. The ground and trees covered with ice, which soon perished before 
the sun. Wrote letters to the directors of the Ministers' Annuity Society. 
Wrote to Mr. Cooke, of Hartford. Wrote on my libraiy catalogue. Attended 
our evening prayer-meeting. Mr. A. Gaylord^ came here and tarried. My 
mother is well. 

23. Wrote the most of a sermon on Ezek. xviii : 32. Wrote six pages 
in the evening. Have many hindrances. I am not so much troubled with 
a tremor as I have been. 

24. Thermometer about 15° in the morning, and did not rise above about 
20°, with a clear sun. Thin meeting. Finished and preached all day my 
sermon on Ezek. xviii: 32. Had a full conference. Read. The cold 
is tedious. 

25. Thermometer at 10°. Wrote on my catalogue of books. I have 
added much more to my library this year than any former one. A severe 
cold day. At evening performed a marriage.^ Read. 

26. Thermometer in the morning up to freezing. Snow and rain. Wrote 
on my catalogue of books. Rode out. At evening a hard rain. Our evening 
meeting was prevented by it. Read the Bible. 

27. Rode to Manchester and attended the dedication of the new meeting- 
house. Received a letter from Mr. Burt for that purpose on the 24th. They 
have a fine house built for about $3,000. Mr. Hawes * preached and Mr. Burt 
made the dedicatory prayer. Towards night it grew cold and tedious. On my 
way home performed a marriage,' Thermometer at midnight at 6°. Read the 
Bible. 



■ The parties united were Cliarles R. Bel- already coming to have a good degree of 

knap, of Ellington, and Elenora Stoughton. that power and influence which he held 

^ Rev. Asahel Gaylord, of Norfolk. through a long life. 

^ The persons married were Joseph Cheney ' The parties united in marriage were 

Simpson and Mary Alexander. Leavitt Denslow, of Windsor, and Rhoda 

* Dr. Joel Hawes, of Hartford. He was Gillett. 



1826.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 37 

28. Thermometer at i°. My ink is frozen. Thermometer at 9°, at noon, 
and did not exceed 13°. Kept house the most of the day. At evening rode 
to Mr. Burnham's and preached on Luke ii : 48. Read the Bible. Wrote 
on my library catalogue. Read. 

29. Thermometer at 1°. It rose in the course of the day to 19°. Visited 
sick persons. Visited a school. The ground very hard frozen and something 
icy. It is said to be good sleighing at the northward. Attended the evening 
prayer-meeting. Paid for oats $2.10. Wrote. 

30. Thermometer at 12°. It snowed lightly the most of the day. Read. 
Wrote a sermon on Jer. ix : i. Wrote late. Thermometer up to 25°. 

31. It snowed moderately the most of the day. Thermometer about 24°. 
People went to meeting in sleighs. Preached with old notes on Num. xiv : 8, 
and the sermon written yesterday. Had no conference. Thin meeting. 
At evening visited. We have several sick persons. Thanks be to God 
for the mercies of another year. 



18 2 7'. 

January. 

1. It snowed Steadily through the day. Cold and tedious. Thermometer 
about 20°. Met with the civil authority. Their meeting appeared better than 
usual for a few years past. Afternoon rode out and performed a marriage.' 
At evening visited. Our monthly prayer-meeting was omitted on account 
of the storm. Endeavored to commit myself to the keeping of God for the 
coming year. 

2. Thermometer about 10°. Walked and visited. The snow is much 
blown. We have a number of sick. The evening meeting quite solemn. 
Read. 

3. Thermometer about 20°. Rode to Hartford with Mr. Wolcott. Ver\^ 
good sleighing. Crossed on the ice. Paid for a penknife $1.50. Broke 
the one I have used for a good while on Monday. At evening walked out 
and performed a marriage.^ 

4. Thermometer in the morning a little below zero. Wrote. Visited 
a school. There is a great deal of sleighing. At evening preached at 
Mr. Burnham's on Rev. xxii : 12. Made this almanack. Am fatigued with 
care and labor. 

5. Filed my letters for two years past. Yesterday Mr. Mann/ of Sufifield, 
called here. Thermometer this morning at 1°. Afternoon preached a pre- 
paratory lecture with old notes on Ps. iv : 6. Very fine sleighing and much 
improved. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Very frosty. Thermom- 
eter at bed-time at zero. 

6. Thermometer at 3° below. W^rote. Wrote a sermon on i Cor. vii : 31. 
Six pages by candle-light. Read. We have had twenty deaths in the past 
year. There have been at Wapping thirteen — more, I believe, than any year 
since I have lived here. 

7. Thermometer at 4°. Full meeting. Preached with old notes on 
Rom. vii: 22, and my sermon on i Cor. vii: 31. Administered the sacra- 
ment. Had a full conference. I trust we had a good day. 

8. Thermometer about 15°. Visited Mr. Rowland. Fine sleighing and 
good crossing. Read. Hindered by company. It thawed and injured the 
sleighing some. Paid for dressing cloth sixty-seven cents. 

9. Thermometer almost up to freezing. Rode to Hartford. Paid a bank 
debt. Saw a fire which appeared dangerous for a time, but did no great 
damage. Paid for oats $1.25. Afternoon and evening it snowed hard. 
Our evening meeting was quite thin. Read. 



' The parties to the marriage were Hiram ^ Between Nathaniel Wales, of East Hart- 

Buckland, of Springfield, and Harriet Grant, ford, and Betsey Hosmer, of East Windsor, 
of Wapping, ^ Rev. Joel Mann. 

39 



40 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

10. We have a pretty heavy body of snow. Kept in. Wrote on my 
library catalogue. Thermometer in the morning about io°. At evening 
had an inquiry meeting; pretty thin. I think the Divine Spirit is still with 
us. Wrote. Read the Bible. 

11. Thermometer about 4°. Mr. Pratt,' agent of the American Tract 
Society, called on me. Rode down to see Mr. Fairchild. Walked out. 
At evening rode with company to Pine Meadow and returned. Verj^ good 
sleighing. Three of my neighbors went to Mr. Burnham's and attended 
the meeting for me. 

12. Thermometer at 12°. Walked and visited. Rode to Hartford to see 
Mr. Linsley. At evening we had a hard snow. Went to the school-house, 
but we had no meeting. Wrote. 

13. Thermometer about up to freezing. The body of snow is about fifteen 
inches deep and very heavy. Paid a tailoress seventy-five cents. On the nth 
received a letter from my cousin, Joseph Battell, now in Hartford studying 
Spanish.^ Wrote to Mr. Sprague, of West Springfield. Paid for the Mirror 
newspaper for a year $2. Received a letter from Mr. Linsley, of Hartford. 
Read. 

14. Thermometer about 16°. Rode early to East Hartford to exchange 
with Mr. Fairchild, He rode to East Windsor and returned after meeting:. 
Cold and windy. The sleighing not good on account of the quantity of snow. 
Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4 and Ezek. xviii : 32. At evening rode home 
and attended conference. 

15. Thermometer 12°. Worked some. Rode to Mr. Bartlett's. The snow 
in some places quite drifted. Read. Thermometer in the evening at 7°. 

16. Rode out and visited. Mr. Bidwell, from college,' called here. Read 
• Dr. Channing's new and able Unitarian sermon.* Attended our evening 

meeting. Cold and tedious. Thermometer in the morning at 15°, in the 
evening at 6°. Wrote. 

17. Observed by my people as a special fast on account of the present 
state of religion here, in which we have but little of the divine influences, 
which are abundant in the adjacent places. In the forenoon we had a prayer- 
meeting; afternoon Mr. Linsley, of Hartford, was here and preached. The 
meetings were unexpectedly full and very solemn. The people appear tofeel 
their wants. The coldest day we have had. Thermometer at sunrise 04°.' 
It rose to 13°, and no higher through the day, with clear sun. At evening 
we had a solemn and full conference, notwithstanding the cold. In the 
evening thermometer at 2°. I bless God for this day, and hope it may have 



' Rev. Miner G. Pratt, graduated at Mid- them with facility. As a boy he was sent to 

dlebury College, 1823, and in 1826 and 1827 Canada to learn French, 
was agent of the American Tract Society. ^ Walter H. Bidwell. He was to graduate 

After being settled in two or three places, he the following September, 
became agent of the American Colonization '' The particular sermon here referred to 

Society, making his home at Andover, Mass. we do not find it easy to identify. 
He died in 1884, in his eighty-fifth year. ^ With a cipher before the figure he 

^ He had a love of languages and acquired means below zero. 



1827.] PASTOR m EAST WINDSOR. 41 

a divine blessing. A Mr. Chapin,' of West Springfield, a candidate, came 
here and tarried. 

18. The cold seems to be terrifying. Thermometer at sunrise 07°. It 
then sunk, and at eight o'clock it was 1 1° below zero. At noon it was at 9°, 
but rose no higher in a clear day. Worked at my wood. Wrote. At evening 
thermometer at zero; rode to Mr. Burnham's and preached to a small audi- 
ence on John i : 39. At my return suffered much from cold ; thermometer 
at 03°. At bed-time it was at 06°. 

19. Thermometer at sunrise, viewed carefully, was 20° below zero. 
I believe I have had this instrument eight or nine years, and I think it has 
never been so low. It rose to 9° and no higher, with clear sun. Read. 
Afternoon rode to Mr. Rowland's. At evening attended the prayer-meeting. 
The cold very severe. It makes our meetings less useful. Mr. A. Gaylord 
and his niece came here and tarried. Thermometer at bed-time zero. 

20. Thermometer at sunrise, same as yesterday, 20° below zero. Am 
almost overcome with the cold. The thermometer rose no higher than 7°, 
with clear sun. W^orked some. Could not write a sermon as I intended. 
Read the Bible. Wrote. Thermometer at bed-time at 06°. 

21. Thermometer a little after sunrise was almost 24° below zero.^ It was 
more than 23 1-2°. Greater cold than at any time since I have kept an 
instrument. There is an immense quantity of snow north, east, and west 
of us, and it has been a verj- cold season at the south. The mercury rose 
very slow, though with a clear sun, but in the afternoon it was at 1 1°. The 
meeting-house in the forenoon was ver}- cold. Preached an old sermon on 
John XV : 25. Meeting full for such a day. Had a pretty full and serious 
conference. Thermometer in the evening about zero. 

22. Thermometer in the morning at 6° below zero. Visited. Was in at 
Col. Grant's. Rode to Wapping and visited. In the evening preached there ' 
on Mark v: 25-27. Had a very attentive meeting. There is a considerable 
seriousness there. Much fatigued by labor and the severity of the season. 
The weather moderates. 

23. Rode to Hartford. The sleighing very fine. The late cold is thought 
to have been equal to any since 1780. Saw my cousin J. Battell.^ Paid for 
socks $1.17. Afternoon and evening it snowed considerably. Our meeting 
was omitted. Wrote. Thermometer in the morning at 15°, and did not vary 
much through the day. Had books bound. 

24. Thermometer about 15°. Wrote. Attended to my books. A full 
series of the Fanoplist* etc., makes a valuable addition to my library. Visited. 
A woman ^ died with a child-bed fever. At evening attended our anxious 
meeting, which appeared well. Wrote to Mr. Burt, of Manchester. 



' Rev. Chester Chapin jjrobably. He had ^ His nephew, Joseph Battell, Jr. 

been a candidate for some years. He was * Sixteen volumes, beginning with 1S06, 

settled in Ohio in 1S31. when it was merged in the Missionary Ilcr- 

- The writer of this note once, and only ahi, in which it continues and is likely to 

once, in his life has seen the thermometer continue. 
24° below zero, twenty miles west of Boston. ' Mrs. Sylvia Bissell, aged twenty-six. 



42 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1827. 



25. Thermometer 14° below zero. Wrote to Gen. Howe, of New Haven. 
Rode to Wapping and visited. The snow very deep and heavy. Preached 
at Mr. Burnham's on 2 Cor. v: 17. Had company. Read the Bible. 

26. Thermometer at 20°. Walked and visited. Wrote. Attended the 
funeral of the woman lately deceased. At evening our prayer-meeting was 
quite full and solemn. Thermometer rose above 40°. There is nearly two 
feet of snow on the ground, and very heavy, 

27. Thermometer nearly at freezing. Paid for barley for my horse $3.30. 
Rode to Hartford. Very pleasant. Thermometer up to about 45°. Paid 
for thirteen volumes of Judge Trumbull's' old books $5. Received a letter 
from Gen. Howe, of New Haven, and one from Rev. Mr. Ludlow,^ of New 
York. 

28. Thermometer about freezing. Rode early to Windsor and made an ex- 
change with Mr. Rowland. Wet and some rain. Preached on Prov. xxiii : 26 
and Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4. Thin meeting. They have very good singing here. 
After meeting attended the funeral of a child. Rode home and attended 
a very full conference. 

29. Thermometer about 27°. Read Robinson's Abridgment of Huine^s 
History. Rode to Wapping and visited. At evening preached there on 
Ps. XXV : 1 1 to a full meeting. The Baptists are making a good deal of 
effort here. The snow is thawed some, but the weight not much dimin- 
ished. 

30. Thermometer about 26°. Rode out and visited. Went into the 
academy. Attended our evening meeting. I have many things to try and 
discourage me. I hope in God. 

31. Thermometer 28°, Yesterday received a letter from Dr. Woodward, 
of Wethersfield.^ It snowed moderately the most of the day. Wrote to 
Mrs. Porter, of Augusta, N. Y., and to Rev, Mr. Ludlow, of New York. 
Read in the English History abridged. Did not go out of our yard during 
the day, 

February. 

1. Thermometer about 15°, Walked and visited. We have considerable 
addition to our bed of snow. Wrote questions on the English History.* 
At evening rode to Mr. Burnham's and preached on i Thess. v: 3. Very 
cold. Meeting pretty thin. 

2, Thermometer at 2°, Last night at midnight it was 05°. Read and 



' Judge John Trumbull. 

^ Rev. Henry G. Ludlow, an evangelist, 
afterwards settled at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., 
and at the College Street Church in New 
Haven. He was father of Fitz Hugh Lud- 
low, a prominent magazine writer. 

' Samuel Bayard Woodward, a native of 
Torrington, settled in 1809 in Wethersfield, 
became physician to the State Prison, and 
was one of the founders of the Retreat for 



the Insane at Hartford. Afterward super- 
intendent of the State Lunatic Asylum at 
Worcester. His last years were at North- 
ampton. A very eminent man in his profes- 
sion. 

* This Abridgment of Hume's History had 
been prepared for schools, and Dr. Robbins 
appears to have been employed simply in 
preparing for it a full and fitting set of ques- 
tions. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



-t-J 



wrote on my history. It snowed some. Attended the evening pn.yer- 
meeting. Was out late. Am fatigued with my labors. 

3. Thermometer about 34°, and rose to 47°. The snow settles. Rev. 
Mr. Parsons,* of Vermont, called on me. He is visiting in this town. Wrote. 
Read the Bible. Read expositors. My active labors make it something 
difficult for me to study closely. 

4. Thermometer about 15°. Mr. Parsons preached for me in the fore- 
noon, and in the afternoon at Wapping. Preached in the afternoon an old 
sermon on i Thess. v : ig. At evening preached at the conference without 
notes on Isa. v : 4. Visited a sick woman. 

5. Thermometer 16°. It snowed the most of the day. Very cold. 
The thermometer rose very little. Rode to Hartford. Paid $5 for charity. 
Attended our monthly prayer-meeting. Quite thin. Mr. Parsons was with 
us. 

6. Thermometer 15°. Rode to Manchester and met with the association. 
Mr. Parsons went with me and was much pleased. We licensed Mr. Justin 
Marsh.^ The snow is deep, covered with crust, and very solid. It is pretty 
bad traveling. 

7. We had a pretty full and important session. Rode home. Visited 
at Wapping. At evening attended our inquiry meeting. Pretty thin. Ther- 
mometer this morning was at 02°. We had company. 

8. Thermometer nearly at freezing. Wrote to Mr. Hooker,^ of Hartford, 
and to Mr. Benedict,'' of Vernon. Received a letter from him on the 6th. 
Walked to the mill neighborhood and preached in the evening on 
Mark v: 25-27. Had a pretty full meeting. Some of my people conduct 
badly. Received a letter from my brother James, one from Bangs & Emory, 
of New York, and one from W. H, Bidwell, at college. 

9. Walked and visited. We have several sick. Have severe trials. 
At evening attended our prayer-meeting. Read. Am quite feeble. Ther- 
mometer in the morning about 12". Yesterday 25°. 

10. Thermometer 24°. Last night we had a good deal of snow. It is now 
said to be in the woods about thirty inches deep. Rode out and visited. 
Conversed with E. Wolcott. Read. Read the Bible. • It grew cold all day. 

11. Thermometer about 16°. Windy. A very tedious day. Preached an 
old sermon on Ex, xxxii : 9-14. The roads quite bad. Had no conference. 
Read. 

12. Thermometer 04°. Read English History. We have the pleasing 
intelligence that Frances Haskell yesterday had a son. Wrote off my 
biographical sketch of Dr. Tudor' for Dr. Woodward,* of Wethersfield. 
At evening rode to Wapping with difficulty, attended a meeting, and preached 



' Rev. Justin Parsons, a native of North- ^ Rev. Horace Hooker, 

ampton, Mass., and settled at Pittsfield, * Rev. Amzi Benedict. 

Rutland County, Vt., 1814-1831. ' Dr. Elihu Tudor, who, as we have seen 

^ Rev. Justin Marsh, a graduate of Am- in previous notes, had a very peculiar his- 

herst College, 1824. A native of Montague, tory. 
born 1796, died at Portland, Mich., 1872. '' Dr. Samuel B. Woodward. 



44 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

on Isa. v: 4. Meeting thin. I was not much expected on account of the 
cold and bad going. People have been out much breaking paths. Late 
in the evening Mr. and Mrs. Battell came here. 

13. Mr. Battell went away and left Sarah. Attended the funeral of a 
child. Read. Wrote. At evening attended our meeting. Warm and thawy. 
Thermometer about 25°. Sent to my mother $5. Paid towards my window- 
shutter $1.25, and have paid $2 before. Visited a sick woman. 

14. Thermometer 24°. Walked and visited all day. I have severe trials.* 
Great complaint of the depth and weight of the snow. 

15. Walked out. Read and wrote on my history. Afternoon and evening 
it snowed and rained a good deal. Thermometer in the morning about 25°; 
during the rain about freezing. 

16. Thermometer about freezing. Walked and visited. Attended our 
evening prayer-meeting. It thaws and the snow is almost full of water. 

17. It is warm and the going is very bad. The snow settles. Last 
evening Miss Susan McClure^ died of a consumption. Visited the family 
after I returned from our meeting. Visited them today. She died quite 
unexpectedly. Wrote a sermon on Job xvi : 22. Am poorly able to write. 
Got along better than I feared. 

18. Expounded on Luke xii : 41 to xiii : 10, and preached the sermon 
written yesterday. Attended the funeral of Miss McClure. At evening had 
a meeting and long conversation with several members of the church.^ 
Very bad walking and riding. Last evening the thermometer was at 20°, 
but this morning near freezing. It rose to 50°. 

19. Read. Rode to Mr. Fairchild's and with him to Hartford, and 
attended the meeting of the committee of association on the subject of 
schools. Very blustering and tedious. 

20. I am quite feeble. Thermometer about 12°. Wrote. Wrote to 
Dr. Chapin* and Judge Welles,' of Wethersfield. Walked and visited. 
I think our commotion here is subsiding. At evening attended our meeting, 
I conclude not to continue this meeting any further at present. I am not 
able to attend so many meetings as I have done for some months past. 

21. Read. Walked and visited. I think my visits had better be more 
exclusively of a religious nature. At evening it was rainy and bad going, 
and we had no inquiry meeting. 

22. It is warm and thawy constantly, but the snow subsides very slow. 
In the morning Mr. Battell's children came here on their return home. 
Rode out and visited. Preached at the mill neighborhood in the evening 
on John iv : 29. 

23. Rode to Pine Meadow. Eveline with me from her house, and visited 



' His repeated reference to trials now ' Probably with reference to troubles aris- 

may be due to what was going on in his ing in the church and parish, which were 

parish. taking on a more and more disagreeable and 

^ Dr. McClure had five daughters, and disturbing form, 

this we suppose to be one of them. She ' ■* Dr. Calvin Chapin, Rocky Hill, 

was thirty-eight at her death. ' Judge Martin Welles. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 45 

at Mr. Haskell's. They have a ver>' promising infant son, and Mrs. Haskell 
appears to be recovering verj' favorably. I hope the blessing of God will 
be upon them. Wet and poor sleighing, but no bare ground. At evening 
attended our prayer-meeting. Received a letter from Mr. Porter, of Farm- 
ington, and one from J. Holbrook,' dated at Brooklyn. 

24. Am quite feeble. Concluded not to attempt to write a sermon. 
Wrote. Wrote to Tutor Badger," of Yale College, and to John Holbrook. 
Esq., of Pomfret. It rained considerably. Read the Bible. Am much 
troubled with dissipated thoughts. 

25. Wrote notes and preached on Luke vii : 42, and an old sermon on 
Matt, xxvi.: 35. Warm and wet. At evening attended the conference. 
Bad going. Visited. 

26. Read. Wrote to H. Olmsted, Esq., Wilton. Paid $5 for ten bushels 
of oats. Worked, draining off the water from the road. Rode to Wapping 
and preached in the evening on Gen. xxxii : 26. The ground begins to 
appear a little. 

27. Walked out. Read. Visited a school. Read and wrote on my 
historical questions. 

28. Rode to Enfield and attended a little while the Ministers' Meeting 
of that vicinity. The ground begins to be bare. Ver^^ bad sleighing. An 
aged man^ died suddenly this morning. Visited the family. 

March. 

1. Walked out and visited. Read and wrote questions on my histor}-. 
At evening rain and snow prevented me from attending an appointed meet- 
ing. 

2. Rode out and visited. Am quite feeble. The difficulties here give 
me great anxiety."* Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

3. Am unable to do much in study. Rode to Scantic and visited a sick 
man. Attended the funeral of the late Mr. Grant. Read. Am much 
oppressed with gloom. The Lord be my helper. 

4. Preached with old notes on Isa. Ixi : 2. Wrote an addition to an old 
sermon, and preached it, on Ps. Ixxiii : 24. Sleighing as good as for some 
time past. Thermometer this morning about 5°. Attended the evening 
conference. My troubles dissipate my mind. 

5. Rode to Hartford. Thermometer about 10°. The roads bare towards 
Hartford. The crossing on the ice is about done. Paid Gleason for two 
years of the Spectator and two of the Observer, pamphlets, etc., $13.31. 
Exchanged $8 in old Eagle Bank bills for eighty cents. Attended the meeting 
of the committee on schools. We formed ourselves into a society for the 
promotion of the object. I was appointed the chairman. Cold. Attended 



I 



John R. Holbrook, of Pomfret, Ct. 1S2S-1835. Secretary of American Home 

^ Tutor Badger was afterwards Milton Missionary Society, 1S35-1S72. 
Badger, D. D., a native of Andover, Ct., a ^ Mr. Aaron Grant, aged seventy-one. 

noble hearted, able, and very useful man, * A serious opposition to Dr. Robbins 

pastor at South Church, Andover, Mass., was growing up in the parish. 



w 



46 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

our monthl}- concert, \^'e formed an Auxiliary Foreign Missionary Associa- 
tion. I hope it may do good. Read late. 

6. Wrote. Walked and visited. It rained considerably. Got something 
wet. The snow goes very slowly. 

7. Rode to Scantic and attended a funeral with Mr. Bartlett. Better 
sleighing than wheeling. Walked out and visited. Read and wrote on my 
historical questions. 

8. Wrote on my questions. Cold. Walked out. Preached in the 
evening at Mr. Burnham's on John i: 12. Rode in a chaise, but much 
worse than in a sleigh. 

g. Rode out. I know not what God designs for me. My trials are 
great. Some of my people act very badly. At evening had a full prayer- 
meeting. Bad going, muddy and wet. I can get but little sleep. 

10. Devoted the day to private duties. Read the Bible. Am feeble and 
unable to bear but little labor. 

11. Expounded on Luke xiii : 11 to the end, and preached an old sermon 
on I Peter i: 17. The road is very muddy and hard traveling. Some sleighs 
yet appear. There is still a hea\7 weight of snow on the ground. Attended 
the evening conference. Very tired. 

12. Read rn the Adams and Jefferson Eulogies.'^ Read and wrote on my 
historical questions. Read late. We had considerable rain. 

13. Walked and visited all day. The river is breaking up. I hope we 
may have an addition to our church. Many efforts are made against me, but 
I hope the Lord is my stay. . 

14. Rode to Wapping and visited. Conversed with persons respecting 
a religious profession. The frost is getting out of the ground. Am quite 
feeble. 

15. Cold. Walked and visited the sick and others. Find it fatiguing. 

1 can perform but little. 

16. Wrote. Wrote on my questions. Rode out and visited. I have 
always found it a great labor to bring on persons for a religious profession. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Was out late. 

17. Received a letter a few days since from Tutor Badger, at Yale College. 
Walked out. Afternoon assisted the church committee in examining some 
persons for our communion. Read the Bible. Am unable to study much. 

18. Preached with old notes on Gen. xxii : 13, and an old sermon on 

2 Sam. vii : 14. Wet. At night we had a hard rain. Read. Am quite 
nervous. Sleep very poorly. Propounded six persons for our communion." 
I hope we are not wholly forsaken. 

19. Wrote to John R. Landon,^ Esq., of Litchfield. I think I am in the 



" This was an octavo volume published ^ John R. Landon, Esq., vi'as one of the 

in Hartford in 1826, entitled Eulogies on official men of Litchfield. The Landon fam- 

Adams and Jefferson. ily was one of the ancient families of Litch- 

^ These were Olive Johnson, Minerva field, and from generation to generation fur- 

Risley, Tirzah Filley, Eveline Rollo, Juli- nished men for the service of the town, in 

ette Loomis, and Almena W. Grant. various capacities. 



1827.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



47 



way of my duty. Rode to Hartford. The riding verj' bad. Attended the 
meeting of our School Society. It appears well. The river rises. Read late. 

20. Wrote. Read the Bible. Rode to Wapping and visited a school. 
Paid a tailor $10.22. Quite cold. Visited the sick. 

21. Rode to Hartford and attended the installation of Mr. Spring.' 
The council was quite small. The parts were well performed. Dr. Spring 
preached one hundred and two minutes.^ Attended a meeting of the 
president, secretar}^ etc., of the Retreat. Paid for continuation of Rapin 
Thoyras,^ three folios procured some time since, $25. Paid for a pair of shoes, 
water-proof, $3. Much ice running in the river. 

22. Wrote to Mr. McLean,"* of Simsbury. Visited at the poor-house. 
The roads begin to be settled. Am quite languid. Paid $1, my subscription, 
to our Foreign Missionaiy Association. At evening preached at Mr. Burn- 
ham's on Luke xxiv : 32. Thermometer rose to 60°. 

23. Wrote on my historical questions. Mr. Bartlett called and spent some 
time with me. Hindered by company. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

24. Began and wrote a part of a sermon on Ps. li : 17. Received an 
unexpected request from Mr. Hawes to exchange tomorrow. Am quite 
nervous. Read. 

25. Rode early to Hartford. Mr. Hawes rode up with my sulky, and 
returned after meeting. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23 and i Thess. v : 3. Saw 
Mr. Battell. Veiy glad of the opportunity. Returned and attended the 
conference. There has been a bad accident in one of the Hartford steam- 
boats. 

26. Wrote. Rode out. Visited a school, which performed ver^- well- 
Had no one of the visitors with me. Thermometer above 60°. I get fatigued 
easily. 

27. Left home early and rode to Brooklyn-' — forty-two miles. Some 
of the way the ground is not settled and the riding quite bad. Very warm. 
Rode a part of the time without an out-coat. There has been a meeting here 
today of school visitors from most of the School Societies in the county. 
I came here to attend it, but I did not know the hour and it was too late. 
They did very well. They have much zeal and unanimity for the improve- 
ment of the common schools. Conversed with several gentlemen on the 
subject. Tarried with Rev. Mr, May,^ by whom I was very kindly treated. 



' Rev. Samuel Spring, D. D., son of Rev. 
Samuel Spring, D. D., of Newburyport, born 
in Newburyport, graduated at Yale, 181 1, 
settled at Abington, Mass., 1822-1826, at 
the North Church, Hartford, 1827-1833, at 
the church in East Hartford from 1833 till 
his voluntary retirement from the ministry — 
but still lived in the town, and died there, 
in 1877, at great age, honored and beloved. 

^ Dr. Gardiner Spring, of New York. 
His sermon was too long, but the charm of 
his eloquence would make it seem shorter. 



^ Paul de Rapin Thoyras, author of a 
famous English History, before mentioned.. 

■* Rev. Allen McLean. 

s Brooklyn, Ct. 

* Rev. Samuel J. May, born in Boston, 
1797, was pastor of the Unitarian church in 
Brooklyn — the only one of that order in the 
State. Rev. Mr. May died at Syracuse, 
N. Y., where he was settled in the ministr}', 
July I, 1S71 — a most genial, able, and cul- 
tivated man, and prominent as a wise Chris- 
tian reformer. 



48 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

28. In the morning rainy. Went into the county court.' Called on 
Rev. Mr. Edson.^ I am glad that I came here on this occasion. Warm. 
Afternoon rode to Mansfield. 

29. Last night tarried at the tavern. Yesterday Mr. May gave me three 
volumes of old and valuable books. The weather changed yesterday after- 
noon and became quite cold. Afternoon visited the south school — in fine 
order. Veiy tired. 

30. Yesterday, after I got home, received a letter from Rev. Mr. May, 
of Brooklyn. Rode out and visited. Afternoon preached a preparatory 
lecture, with old notes, on i Cor. v: 8. Attended the evening prayer- 
meeting. We have the highest flood in the river, I think, that has been 
since I have lived here. It appears to be almost wholly from melted snow. 
The snow here has been almost wholly gone for some days. On my late 
journey people plowing. 

31. Wrote. Looked over some books. Wrote a sermon on John xxi : 15. 
I think my health is improved by my late journey. Vegetation begins to 
start. Wrote late. 

April. 

1. Preached with old notes on Luke xxii : 15, 16, and my sermon on 
John xxi: 15. Administered the sacrament. Received some women to the 
church. Full and solemn meetings. I hope God was with us. Had a full 
conference. Not so much fatigued as I expected. 

2. Opened the electors' meeting with prayer. The meeting was thin, 
and but little interest seemed to be felt. I left it soon. Visited. Wrote. 
Wrote a church letter to Mr. Calhoun,^ of Coventr}^ At evening had an 
interesting meeting at the monthly concert. Read. 

3. Rode to Hartford. Quite warm. Visited the Wyllys family." 
Col. Hezekiah Wyllys, the last male member of that memorable family, 
lately died, aged eighty. Looked over many old papers there and received 
a number as a present. The late high water has done considerable damage. 
Traded. $5. Have many things to attend to. 

4. Rode to Vernon and attended the dedication of their very fine new 
meeting-house.' Mr. Benedict preached very well. Attended a meeting 
of the directors of the Ministers' Annuity Society. Broke my sulky. Visited 
a sick woman in Wapping. 



' Brooklyn was the shire town of Wind- retary, 1712-1734. George, son of Hezekiah, 

•ham County. was Secretary, I734-I795- Samuel, son of 

^ Rev. Ambrose Edson was pastor of the George just mentioned, was a Revolutionary 

Congregational church in Brooklyn, 1824- general, and died in Hartford, 1823. The 

1830. Hezekiah mentioned in the diary was proba- 

^ George A. Calhoun, D. D. bly a brother of Gen. Samuel. It was on the 

* George Wyllys was one of the chief old Wyllys estate that the famous oak stood 

men of Hartford in the very infancy of the in which the charter was hidden. 
town — was Assistant, Deputy Governor, and ^ xhe writer of this note was there, as a 

Governor. His son Samuel was Assistant. boy of twelve years, living in Vernon with an 

Hezekiah, son of Samuel, was Colonial Sec- uncle, after his father's death. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 49 

5. Looked over old manuscripts. Wrote. Visited Tudor's school. 
It appeared remarkably well. A great number of branches have been 
studied. Wet and rainy. This prevented my attending an evening meeting, 
which I had appointed. Mr. and Mrs. Haskell' came here with their infant 
son. 

6. Visited the Hill school. It has done better than usual. There was 
a great Methodist meeting here, and four young persons were baptized by 
immersion. Wrote letters respecting the school business to Rev. J. Marsh, 
of Haddam, Rev. S. J. May,^ Brooklyn, J. Alsop, Esq.,* Middletown, and 
Mr. J. P. Brace, Litchfield. Yesterday the thermometer was at 76°, today 
at 70°. The water is quite high again, but not equal to last week. Attended 
the evening prayer-meeting. The ground has become green with grass. 

7. V.'rote. Wrote a letter to Mr. H. Olmsted,' of Wilton, and one 
to Orestes Wilson, of Yale College. We expect to make him our principal 
beneficiar}^ of the Everest fund. VvTote the remainder of a sermon begun 
a fortnight ago on Ps. li : 17. Vv'rote with little tremor. 

8. Expounded on Luke xiv, and preached my sermon on Ps. li : 17, 
latter part. Visited a sick woman. At evening had a full conference. Last 
evening received a letter from Rev. Mr. May, of Brooklyn. Visited. 

9. Rode to Hartford. Did errands. Dined with Mr. Gallaudet.* 
Looked over papers at the Wyllys house. Wet. The rain prevented me 
from attending the appointed meeting in the evening. Paid for the last 
year's Missionary He7-ald $1.50. Wrote. 

10. Read manuscripts. Visited. Vv^rote to Rev. C. A. Goodrich,^ New 
Haven, and J. Plall, Esq.,^ Ellington. The school business takes a good deal 
of my time. Thermometer at summer heat. 

11. Rode to Hartford and attended the dedication of the South Meeting- 
house. I think it is the best house in the State.' Mr. Linsley'° preached 



' Mr. and Mrs. Harris Haskell, of Pine born in Philadelphia, and a pioneer in the 

Meadow (Windsor Locks). work of the education of the deaf and dumb. 

- John Marsh, D. D. He began this work in 1817. He was edu- 

^ Rev. Samuel Joseph May, just before cated for the ministry. His middle name 

noticed. was from his mother, who was descended 

■* This was John Alsop, brother of Rich- from one of the early settlers in Hartford, 

ard — both poets and literary men, though He was graduated at Yale in 1S05, and from 

Richard was the more distinguished. They Andover Theological Seminary, 1814. He 

were sons of John y\.lsop, of Middletown, a died in 1851, at the age of si.xty-four. 
wealthy merchant and member of Continental ^ Prof. Chauncey A. Goodrich, D. D., 

Congress. Yale College. 

5 Hawley Olmsted, LL. D., then teaching ^ Graduate of Yale, 1802, afterwards tu- 

at W-ilton, afterwards the very successful tor, but now at the head of the Ellington 

teacher for several yeaft of the Hopkins Academy, which he founded, 
grammar school. Orestes Wilson, the pro- ^ That church edifice is now nearly sixty 

posed beneficiary, had probably been a mem- years old, but fair, large, commodious, much 

ber of his school at Wilton. Mr. Olmsted better for the purposes of worship than many 

died very suddenly in New Haven, in 1868. costly and splendid churches recently built. 
He had a most excellent reputation. '° Joel H. Linsley, D. D., the pastor, after- 

* Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, LL. D., wards. pastor of Park Street Chiu-ch, Boston. 



50 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

well. Brought home a large quantity of the Wyllys MSS. There are some 
valuable articles. 

12. Looked over MSS. Visited. Warm, Visited our academy. The 
pupils are rather few, but they performed well. Have no time to prepare 
for Fast. Received a letter from A. Holt, of Hartford. Saw blossoms on 
the daffas, and some on a fruit-tree. 

13. Fast. Preached an old sermon on Deut. vii : 7, 8. There was 
a Baptist meeting and one person immersed. Our meeting rather thin. 
At evening preached at Long Hill on Titus ii : 14. Our society matters 
give me much anxiety. 

14. Sat in my chamber without a fire. We had a good cutting of 
asparagus. Looked at the Wyllys papers. Walked out and visited. At 
evening rode to Mr. Bartlett's to exchange. Attended a private prayer- 
meeting in the evening at the Hill. 

15. Mr. Bartlett rode down with my horse and returned after meeting. 
Wet. Meeting rather thin. Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4 and Ps. li : 17. 
Returned in the evening and attended the conference. Much fatigued. 

16. Wet, but we get but little rain. Looked over old papers. The grass 
is so forward as to be blown by the wind, and has been so for two or three 
days. Towards night rode to Pine Meadow. Received a letter from my 
brother, informing me of the melancholy death of his good neighbor, 
Esq. Potter.' 

17. Rode home. Received a letter from Mr. Hyde,^ of Bolton. Had 
a good visit at Pine Meadow. Read. Wrote. Visited. 

18. Walked in the meadow and concluded to lea^e my land. The water 
is getting down, after being up an unusually long period. Rode to Enfield 
and returned. My brother is much afflicted with the death of Esq. Potter. 
He has much to do. The revival there appears well. In the neighboring 
towns there is a great dislike of the abuse I receive from two or three of my 
people.^ Paid for repairs of my sulky $4.50. Visited. Cold and high winds. 
We have had two hard frosts. 

19. Cold. I think it is quite favorable on account of vegetation." Rode 
to Hartford. Had my Clarke's Bible well bound.' It makes a valuable 

.addition to my library. Walked and visited. Preached in the evening at 
Mr. Burnham's on Matt, xx : 30. Quite dusty. 

20. Wrote. Rode out and visited. There seems to be more talk about 
our society matters than there has been. Attended the evening prayer- 
meeting. 



' Elam O. Potter, Esq. It is natural to too rapidly and afterwards be injured by 

conclude that he was a son of Rev. Elam frosts. 

Potter, who was a former pastor of the En- ' Dr. Adam Clarke's Comiiiattary on the 

field Church. Bible, which had been issued in numbers 

^ Rev. Lavius Hyde. from 1810 to 1S26, making eight volumes. 

3 This nanows the difficulty which before The work was now completed. Dr. Adam 

has only been spoken of in the general. Clarke was born in Moybeg, Ireland, 1760, 

"* That is, lest vegetation should advance and died in London in 1832. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 5T 

21. Had a long conversation with Dr. Reed. Wrote a part of a sermon 
on Isa. iii : lo, ii. Much hindered. Wrote late. 

22. Finished and preached my sermon on Isa. iii: 10, 11. Last night 
we had a favorable rain. Received a good letter from my sister. Attended 
the evening conference. Much fatigued. 

23. Walked out. Gave Horace Martin a lease of my land for five years, 
for thirty dollars a year. Paid seventy-five cents for the lease. W'role. 
Rode to Hartford. Attended a meeting of the Society for Schools. Met 
with the committee of the Convention of the Clergy. At evening had a few- 
brethren of the church at my chamber. Paid for linen $3.22. 

24. Wrote. Rode out and visited. Was prevented attending an evening 
meeting by the rain. Wrote a plan for the improvement of our school system. 
Read. 

25. Last night we had a ver)' hard rain. Rode to Wapping and attended 
the funeral of a colored man. Cold and tedious. The roads ver^' wet. Rode 
to Bolton. The Female County Society for the Promotion of Revivals ' met 
there. The meeting was thin. Mr. Patterson,^ who has been employed by 
them in the Western countr)^ was there and preached in my stead. I assisted 
in the exercises. Rode to Hebron. Tarried at Dr. Strong's.^ 

26. Had considerable conversation with Dr. Peters'* respecting our school 
business. Rode to Coventr}' and dined with Mr. Calhoun/ and rode with 
him to Tolland and attended a large meeting of school visitors and others. 
They passed some important resolutions. Rode home after, near sun-down. 
Quite cold. 

27. Wrote. The water is again high. Blossoms appear considerably. 
W^rote on a plan for the improvement of the schools. Visited the sick. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. My health is good. 

28. Paid $1.33 towards the window-shutter at the meeting-house. Wrote 
on a sermon on Heb. xi : 6. Finished it in good season. Quite wet. Read. 

29. It rained moderately, but without intermission, all day. Preached 
with old notes on i Kings xxii : 28, and the sermon written yesterday, 
Meetings very thin. Read the Bible. 

30. Worked at our shade-trees. Am quite languid. Wrote to my sister. 
Walked out. Received a letter from Mr. May, of Brooklyn. Visited the sick. 

May. 

I. Wet and rainy the most of the day. Cold. Looked over the Wyllys 
manuscripts. Read the Bible. The commotion among my people seems 
to revive. In God alone is our help. Walked out. 



■ This was an organization which existed ^ Rev. Lyman Strong (not Dr.) was settled 

for some years. in Hebron, 1825-1830. He was a graduate 

^ This Rev. Mr. Patterson was a man, of Williams College, 1802. 
probably, who belonged at the West, and ^ John S. Peters, M. D., LL. D. The for- 
was very likely a Presbyterian. No Congre- mer title came from Yale, 18 18, and the latter 
gational minister of the name Patterson seems from Trinity College, 1S31 ; Governor of Con- 
to have been settled in Connecticut, and none necticut, 1831-1S33, and died in 1858. 
of the name raised up there. ^ Dr. George A. Calhoun. 



52 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

2. Rode to Hartford and attended the election. The new Governor' 
does not make a very ihteresting appearance. Attended the meeting of the 
Connecticut Bible Society. Attended the meeting of the Convention of the 
Clergy. Quite cold. The Hartford streets are very muddy. Mr. Lewis ^ 
preached very well. Have a good deal to do about the school business. 

3. This morning there was a good deal of frost. Wrote. Walked out. 
Rode to Hartford and attended our School Society. I hope the Lord will 
give a blessing upon our exertions. At evening several of our people had 
a meeting relative to our ecclesiastical matters. 

4. Spent the most of the day looking over the returns from the School 
Societies. Received a paper from the meeting of last evening. My nervous 
system is much affected.^ y\.ttended our evening prayer-meeting. Cold. 

5. Attempted to write a sermon on Heb. vii : 25. Am so feeble and 
my nervous system is so much affected that I could write but little. Walked 
out. Rode and visited a sick woman. Warm. 

6. Warm. Had no fire in my chamber and went to meeting without 
a great coat. Expounded on Luke xv. Preached an old sermon on 
Luke xi : 13. We had our missionary contribution and collected $24.25. 
The meeting last Sabbath was very thin, and many were uninformed 
respecting it. Baptized a child.'' Attended the conference. Pretty thin. 

7. Had a poor night. My nerves much affected. The apple-trees are 
in blossom. Dined and prayed with two military companies. Wet. The 
companies went into the meeting-house. Attended the monthly concert. 
Very thin. 

8. Rode to Hartford. Signed a memorial to the General Assembly 
respecting the schools. Cold and tedious. Looked over the school returns. 
Had company. 

9. Rode to Enfield to consult my brother. Great are my trials. Warm. 
Gave a man who has sustained a loss $5. 

10. Spent the most of the day in preparation, and at evening met with 
an informal meeting of the most of the members of the society, and replied 
to written statements a certain man had presented against me. They 
were unsupported by proof, and the meeting voted that no order could be 
taken on them. We had a hard rain. 

1 1 . Am quite feeble. Rode out. Conversed with a man who I hope has 
recently been made a subject of grace. Worked at the school returns. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Visited a sick woman very low. 
Wrote to my brother. 

12. On the loth rode quite early to Hartford, and attended to the business 
of the annual meeting of the Ministers' Annuity Society. My nervous system 



' Gov. Oliver Wolcott, of Litchfield, after " Rev. Isaac Lewis, Jr., colleague with his 

eleven successive years of service, gives place father. Dr. Isaac Lewis, of Greenwich, Ct. 
now to Gov. Gideon Tomlinson, of Fairfield. ^ -phe missive evidently a disagreeable 

Whatever his personal appearance, he made one, but what was the nature of the difficulty 

a good and able Governor. He was in office we do not know, 
three years. '' Jerusha, daughter of Benjamin Gillett. 



1827.] PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR. 53 

is much affected. Wrote and finished a sermon which I began on the 5th. 
Visited a sick woman. The blossoms are very full. Received a letter from 
Mr. Hawes and others — a committee of our clerical" convention. 

13. Wrote notes and preached on John iii: 7, and the sermon mostly 
written yesterday on Heb. vii : 15. Baptized two children of Mr. Birge,' 
of Hartford. Very pleasant. Attended the evening conference. 

14. Was employed laboriously making a digest of the school returns. 
Had Tudor's assistance all day. At evening preached at the mill on 
John ix : 25. Had quite an interesting meeting. 

15. This morning there was some frost. Wrote and finished my digest. 
Rode to Hartford. Called on the Governor. He is an agreeable man.* 
At evening attended the meeting of our Society for Schools, and made my 
report. The society was reorganized and adopted a constitution. Saw 
Mr. Battell. The Assembly do but little. 

16. Rode out. Conversed considerably with Capt. Bissell. Quite warm. 
Rode to Hartford. Saw Mr. and Mrs. Battell. Met in the evening with the 
managers of our School Society. I fear we shall not effect much. Rode home 
late. The season very favorable. 

17. Last evening received a note from Prof. Doane ' informing me that 
he is to preach in our academy next Sabbath. Wrote to him in reply. 
Mrs. Wolcott was taken ver}- unwell yesterday raising blood. Today she 
has had another ver}- bad turn, and is ver)' low. I think in both cases not 
much less than two quarts. The thermometer rose to 83°. Went into the 
meadow and run out my land. Took off my flannel. Wrote to my brother. 
Wrote on the school papers. 

18. Last night Mrs. Wolcott had another turn of raising blood. She is 
very low. Wrote. Occupied with company. Had a full prayer-meeting. 

19. Rode to Wapping, etc., and visited the sick and others. Cool and 
dusty. Wrote. At evening rode to Hartford to exchange with Mr. Spring. 

20. Mr. Spring rode to East Windsor with my horse and returned after 
meeting. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23 and Isa. iii: 10, 11. This congregation 
is large. At evening rode home. Mrs. Wolcott is some better. Mr. Doane 
preached today at our academy. The first Episcopal meeting here, I believe, 
since I have lived in town. I know not what God designs for us.* 

21. On the 1 6th received a letter from B. Ely, Esq., of Simsbury. Have 
now written to him in reply. Visited the sick. Towards evening rode to 
Hartford and attended a meeting of the managers of our Society for Schools. 

22. Am quite languid. Read the Bible. Afternoon rode to Hartford 



' Henry Warner and Martha Ripley, chil- minister and rector of Trinity Church, Bos- 

dren of Mr. Backus W. Birge, of Hartford. ton, 182S-1832. 

- In spite of what was said a little while ■* There had been an Episcopal society at 

before about his personal appearance. Warehouse Point for many years, as \vt have 

^ Prof. George W. Doane, D. D., LL. D., seen, but no other one was formed until a 

afterwards Bishop of New Jersey, but now small society grew up in that part of East 

Professor of Rhetoric in Washington (Trin- Windsor known as Broad Brook, which still 

ity) College, Hartford. He was assistant continues. 



54 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROEBINS, D. D. [1827. 

in the rain. At evening appeared before the committee of the Assembly with 
Mr. Gallaudet, and exphained and argued the subject of our Memorial in 
Behalf of the Schools., We were well treated by the committee. It rained 
steady and hard. Paid $i to the treasurer of the Society for Schools. Tarried 
with Mr. Gallaudet. 

23. We have had a hard rain and it was much wanted. Conversed with 
members of the Legislature. Wrote a form of a bill for them on the subject 
of our application, by particular request. At evening visited Col. Grant's. 
Performed a marriage.' 

24. Yesterday Mr. Wolcott found and secured a good swarm of bees.° 
Wrote. Looked over the Wyllys papers. Afternoon rode to Enfield. 
Preached in the evening to a good meeting on Ps. li : 17. There is a good 
work of grace here. 

25. Rode home. Visited the sick. Warm. A very fine season for vege- 
tation. Afternoon attended the funeral of the late Mrs. Grant. Read the 
Bible. Wrote. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

26. Wrote a sermon on Num. xxiii : 19. Was called in the afternoon 
to see Mrs. Moore — in a very low state. She died soon after I left her.^ 
Warm. The heat oppressive. Thermometer at 88°. 

27. Expounded on Luke xvi, and preached the sermon written yesterday. 
Thermometer at 86°. After the meeting attended the funeral of the late 
Mrs. Moore. At evening attended the conference. Very tired. 

28. Last night much troubled with nervous affections. Wrote. Read. 
On Saturday received a letter from W. W. Ellsworth/ of Hartford. Afternoon 
Mrs. Robbins, wife of my cousin Chandler Robbins, of Boston, came here. 
Walked out. 

29. Had along talk with Dr. Reed. I think the prospect of my continu- 
ing here is doubtful. Wrote to Mr. Battell. I can do but little. Rode out 
and visited. Got home late. 

■ 30. Rode to Hartford with Tudor. He has gone on a journey in poor 
health. Saw members of the Assembly. Am considerably unwell. Walked 
out with Mrs. Robbins. Rode to the Hill and conversed with four men 
respecting the state of our society. Was out late. I hope to know my duty. 
31. Walked and visited the most of the day. At evening preached at the 
poor-house on Heb. iv : 9. Quite cool. Troubled with a bad diarrhoea. 
Got home late. On the 30th Orestes Wilson,' our principal Everest beneficiary, 
called on me. He appears well. 

June. 

I. Had a fire in my chamber. Wrote. Mr. Anderson,* of Hartford, 



' The parties united were Jason Sage, of ' He has been named once before in this 

Hartford, and Sarah W. Birge. connection. 

- Wild bees, which he succeeded in hiv- * Rev. James Anderson, of Hartford, grad- 
ing, uated at Andover in 182S. He was yet in the 

^ Mrs. Anne Moore, aged seventy-six. seminary when he called upon Dr. Robbins, 

■* Afterwards Governor, and Judge of the but was also employed in this Sabbath-school 

Superior Court — a son of United States agency. He was settled in Manchester, Vt., 

Chief-Justice Oliver Ellsworth. 1829-1858, and died in that town, 1S81. 



iS27.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



55 



an agent for Sabbath-schools, called on me. I can do nothing on the 
subject on account of the unsettled state of our society. Read. Walked 
out. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

2. Rode to Hartford. The Assembly rose yesterday, after a very poor 
session. The business of the schools was continued to the next session. 
We much feared a frost this morninjr, but I believe there was none. I am 
poorly able to do any business. Wrote. 

3. Preached with old notes on Mai. iii : 2, and an old sermon on 
I Thess. V : 3. Full meeting. Attended the funeral of an aged woman 
at the poor-house. Had a full conference. Very tired. 

4. Rode to Wapping and visited. We have some tokens of the grace 
of God. Warmer. A very fine season. Am much debilitated. Wrote. 
At evening had a good meeting at the monthly concert. My cousin, 
Mrs.- Robbins,' went to Enfield. 

5. Rode to West Suffield and attended association. We had an addition 
of four new members to our number. We have now, by the addition of 
Suffield, twenty-two societies, and all supplied with ministers.^ We were 
much occupied with business. In the morning paid $1 on my highway 
tax. Very warm. 

6. The association were ver)' busy and adjourned in the afternoon. 
Warm and dusty. Rode home. They are beginning to work at the canal 
at Enfield Falls. ^ Things grow no better among my people. 

7. Rode to Hartford and attended the interment of the remains 
of Mr. Wilson, who died at Danbury. Had an interview with Mr. Fair- 
child and heard some unexpected intelligence."* Wrote. The season very- 
fine. I have done but little lately. Received a letter from my sister 
Battell. 

8. Wrote a report of the Everest fund for General Association. 
Wrote to Col. Talmadge,^ of Litchfield. I pray for divine guidance and 
favor. Am ver}^ languid. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Thermom- 
eter 84°. 



' Wife of Chandler Robbins. This Chand- 
ler Robbins, it may be remembered, was the 
oldest son of Rev. Chandler Robbins, D. D., 
of Plymouth, and was born in 1762. He was 
a graduate of Harvard College, 1782, and had 
lived in Hallowell, Me., where he had been 
judge of probate. His last years were in 
Boston, where he died. May 18, 1S34, at the 
age of seventy-two. His wife, then visiting 
at East Windsor and Enfield, was Harriet 
Lothrop. The Dr. Chandler Robbins, Uni- 
tarian minister of Boston, a man greatly 
l^eloved, who has recently passed away, was 
the son of Peter Oilman Robbins, M. U., and 
was born in Lynn, Mass., 1810, but his fam- 
ily soon removed to Ro.xbury. 



^ This was the Hartford North Associa- 
tion. 

^ The canal which, after being used for 
navigation for some twenty years or more, 
now supplies the water power for Windsor 
Locks, that village owing its existence largely 
to this canal. 

* Perhaps relating to what was passing in 
Dr. Robbins's own parish. 

5 Col. Benjamin Tallmadge, born at Setau- 
ket, L. L, 1754. He was a Revolutionary 
officer, and was graduated at Yale, 1773. He 
died at Litchfield, 1835. His father was 
Rev. Benjamin Tallmadge, and a son of his 
was Col. William S. Tallmadge of the war of 
1812. 



S6 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1827. 



9. Mr. Fairchild called on me. Wrote to Rev. Stephen Peet,' of Euclid, 
New Connecticut. Afternoon wet and rainy, which prevented me from riding 
to Enfield, as I designed. Read the Bible. 

10. Rode quite early to Enfield' to exchange with my brother. A verj' 
warm and sultry morning, but it grew cool all day. Preached on Num. 
xxiii : 19 and Isa. iii : 10, 11. Full meeting. There is a good work of grace 
here. Propounded fifteen persons for the communion of the church. At 
evening preached without notes on i Thess. v: 9. Quite cool. Much 
fatigued. 

11. Rode home. Afternoon rode to Hartford and settled with Mr. Tal- 
cott, of Marlborough, the lawsuit between him and the Ministers' Annuity 
Society. It would otherwise have been tried this week at the court of errors. 
He acceded to the propositions I made and stopped the suit. Received a 
letter from Rev. Mr. Robbins,^ of Berlin. Paid in our missionary contribution. 
Paid $5 — my annual payment to the Ministers' Annuity Society. Had $15.42 
paid back to me by the treasurer of that society, which I had advanced for 
expenses. 

12. Walked out. Warm. Thermometer 86°. Wrote. My care of public 
objects makes me a good deal of labor. At evening rode out and conversed 
with persons relative to our society matters. They do not know what to do. 
Our association agreed to observe this day, individually, as a day of fasting, 
etc., before God. I think I have had some enlargement and submission 
in pleading with him for my dear brethren and myself, for our churches and 
societies, that we may be upheld, sustained, prospered by the grace of God ; 
that he would sustain the vine of his own planting and plead his own cause. 
It is a day of rebuke and threatening, but Jesus is mighty, I do leave all with 
him. I am not my own, etc. 

13. Walked and visited. Visited a family greatly afflicted. Thermometer 
87°. Wrote on the business of the Ministers' Annuity Society. Rode out. 

14. I have received of the society since May ist, by the Day fund, $30. 
Worked on the complicated calculations of the Annuity Society. Rode to 
Hartford and assisted in procuring a Sabbath-school Union for the county. 
Paid $4. — my annual payment to the Retreat. 

15. Wrote for the Annuity Society. Wrote to Mr. Talcott, of Marlborough, 
and to Rev. Royal Robbins, of Berlin. Looked over the Wyllys papers. 
Attended our evening prayer-meeting. Rainy. 

16. Rode out and visited at Wapping. Am little able to study. I fear 
divine judgments are coming upon this town in divisions and animosities. 



' Stephen Peet was a native of Sandgate, 
Vt., 1795, w^® graduated at Yale, 1823. After 
his seven years' pastorate at Euclid, O., he 
went to "Wisconsin, and became one of the 
great organizers in the early history of that 
State. A very useful man. He died in 

1855- 

^ Rev. Royal Robbins, a native of Weth- 

ersfiekl, and a graduate of Yale, 1806, was 



pastor at Kensington parish, Berlin, Ct., 
1816-1859. He was the author of some 
popular books for schools, and was a prom- 
inent public writer. He was the father of 
Royal E. and Henry A. Robbins, of the firm 
of Robbins, Appleton & Co., of Boston, 
owners and managers of the American 
Watch Company, Waltham, Mass., whose 
watches are scattered all over the earth. 



i827.] 



PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR. 



57 



17. Expounded on Luke xvii, and preached an old sermon on Gen, 
xxvii : 38. There was an Episcopal meeting at the Hill. Wet and rainy. 
Had a full conference. Examined and propounded a young woman for the 
church. 

18. Am much fatigued. Rode out. Read. I do but little. At evening 
rode down and saw Mr. Fairchild. 

19. Attended a funeral in Scantic. Received a letter from Rev. R. R. 
Gurley,' secretary of the American Colonization Society, and wrote him in 
answer. Wrote for the Observer. 

20. Wrote. Worked some. Rode out and visited. Read Pitkin's 
statistics.^ At evening walked out. 

21. Wrote on the papers for the Society for Common Schools. Walked 
out. Wet. I am able to do but little. At evening rode out. 

22. Finished writing on the school papers. Rainy. My nervous system 
is feeble. At evening attended the prayer-meeting; pretty full. 

23. Wrote the most of a sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19. We have had a good 
visit from Mrs. HaskelP and her little son. Quite cool. Had a fire the most 
of the day. Wrote better than I feared I could. 

24. Preached with old notes on Luke xxii : 46, and finished and preached 
the sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19. Examined and propounded a man for the 
church. Assisted in commencing our Sabbath-school. Attended the evening 
conference. 

25. Had a poor night last night. Wrote. Worked a little. Rode to 
Hartford. Paid to be a life member of the Sabbath Union $5. Paid for 
a pair of shoes $2.25. Called on Mr. Fairchild. Attended to the business 
of the Society for Schools. Got home late. 

26. Wet. Walked out. Paid for the window-shutter at the meeting-house 
$3. Mrs. C. Robbins came down yesterday from Enfield, and is now at 
Dea. Reed's. Afternoon set out on a journey to Norfolk. Wet and rainy. 
Purchased a new umbrella. Was quite incommoded by the wet. Rode to 
the south part of Canton and tarried at a tavern. 

27. Rode early to Litchfield — sixteen miles. Rainy the most of the time. 
Called on Col. Talmadge. Conversed with him respecting Mr. Fairchild.* 
They have a young Mr. Carroll ^ preaching here, whom they think of settling. 



' Rev. Ralph Randolph Gurley, son of 
Rev. John Gurley, first pastor in Exeter par- 
ish, Lebanon, Ct., 1775-1812, to his death. 
Ralph R., his son, was graduated at Yale in 
1818. He died in 1S72. Throughout nearly 
the whole of his ministerial life he was secre- 
tary of the American Colonization Society at 
Washington. 

^ Statistical View of the Commerce of the 
U. S., by Timothy Pitkin, LL. D., first pub- 
lished in 1816, and a revised edition in 1835. 

3 Mrs. Frances (Wolcott) Haskell. 



* The Litchfield pulpit, made vacant by 
the departure of Dr. Lyman Beecher to Bos- 
ton, had not yet been filled, and it is probable 
that Dr. Robbins spoke a word in behalf of 
Mr. Fairchild, which did not prove effectual. 

5 Afterwards Rev. Daniel Carroll, D. D., 
who was settled in Litchfield the following 
October. He was a graduate of Jefferson 
College, Pa. His stay in Litchfield was 
short, 1827-1829, but he was a man of con- 
siderable note, though his chief work was 
done in the Middle States. 



58 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

Called and dined at Mr. Deming's.' Afternoon rode to Norfolk. Shower}^, 
but did not get much wet. Found my good mother in a very comfortable 
state at her own home. I have not been there since last fall. She spent 
the winter at Mr. Battell's. There is a good work of grace here. Today 
has been observed here as a fast. At evening attended a meeting with 
Mr. Emerson^ and Mr. Beach/ of Winsted. The season here is wet and 
later than with us. 

28. Made calls. Am much fatigued. My cousin, Eliza Gridley,* and 
her daughter are here. Mr. and Mrs. Battell are gone to New Connecticut. 
There is a public meeting, a conference of churches, yesterday and today at 
Torrin'^ord. The revival seems to be through Litchfield North Association. 
Mr. Battell's family are hopeful sharers in the work. At evening preached 
at a full and solemn meeting on Isa. iii : lo, ii. Gave my mother $5, to 
Sally Lawrence $1, and traded ^2.25. Mr. Battell has given up the store 
in part to William* and Joseph.^ 

29. Conversed with several friends on divine things. It is evidently 
a time of God's special presence. Rode home. Called at brother Ammi's. 
His daughter lives in the house with her parents and has an infant son, 
Mr. Fairchild preached my preparator}^ lecture. Met him a little before 
I got home. ■ He is a little disappointed with regard to'Litchfield.^ Attended 
our evening prayer-meeting. A very pleasant day. 

30. Am much fatigued. Last night was ver)^ nervous. Have been much 
deprived of sleep this week. Wrote the most of a sermon on Luke xxii: 15. 
Received by mail a number of valuable pamphlets respecting the American 
Colonization Society from Mr. Gurley, at Washington. Received a letter 
from Col. Talmadge, of Litchfield, written some time since. Thermometer 89°. 
My tremor is troublesome. 

July. 

1. Finished and preached my sermon on Luke xxii: 15. Afternoon 
preached an old sermon on Ps. xl : 4. Administered the sacrament. The 
church ver}' full. Received two members * to the church. There was a 
Baptist meeting and an Episcopal meeting at the Hill. We are in a painful 
state. Much oppressed with the heat. Thermometer 91°. Attended the 
evening conference. 

2. The heat severe. Scarcely able to go out. Thermometer 93°. 
Afternoon we had a pretty hard shower, with much thunder. 'Wrote. 
Attended the monthly concert. 

3. Wet. Read the publications of the Colonization Society. That is 



' Stephen Deming, Esq. ^ Their oldest son. 

- Rev. Ralph Emerson, D. D., pastor. ^ The conjecture just before made was 

' Rev. James Beach. doubtless correct. 

■• Formerly Mrs. Olmsted. ^ Caroline Parmalee and Russell Rock- 

5 William Lawrence, adopted by Mr. and well were the persons admitted to the 

Mrs. Battell. church communion. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 59 

an important institution.' Rode to East Hartford and Hartford. Wrote, 
by desire of Mr. Fairchild, to Mr. Osgood,^ of Springfield. His prospects 
are peculiar. 

4. Wrote all the forenoon, under severe heat and much debility, for the 
afternoon service. Afternoon we had a meeting for the anniversar}- occasion. 
Delivered an address, principally on the subject of the (Colonization Society. 
Rainy and the meeting thin. We made a collection which, I think, will be 
made up to $io. Visited. Heard a good deal of firing. People have a very 
unfavorable time for haying. 

5. Rode to Pine Meadow. Read in the chaise on the way. The river 
is quite high. Afternoon a shower most unexpectedly. Much hay was wet. 
We have a very wet season. At evening rode to Wapping and performed 
a marriage.^ 

6. Wrote. Walked and visited. Afternoon attended the funeral of 
a woman at the poor-house. Conversed with Mr. Haskell. Attended the 
evening prayer-meeting. Was out late and took some cold. 

7. Had a poor night. Do not feel able to write a sermon for tomorrow. 
Read the Bible. Made a short visit to a school about to change teachers. 
Wrote on my historical questions. Read. 

8. Expounded on Luke xviii : 1-18, and preached an old sermon on 
Deut. xviii : 19. It began to rain about meeting-time and rained hard till 
near night. Thin meeting. We have a very wet season. Had no con- 
ference. 

9. I sleep poorly nights. Rode to East Hartford and Hartford. 
Mr. Fairchild thinks of leaving his people. Called on ministers. Had 
a good visit with Mr. Hawes. Did errands. 

10. Read. Wrote. Wrote on my historical questions'* the most of the 
day and finished them. At evening rode to Wapping and tarried. The heat 
oppressive. Thermometer 88°. 

11. Rode and visited in Wapping the most of the day. Poor hay weather. 
The crop of grass is very great. Received a letter from Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. 
I can bear but little labor. 

12. Read the History of Florence by Machiavel.' Afternoon rode to 
Mr. Rowland's and saw him. Visited. The most of my people appear more 
than ever attached to me. 



' In those years great interest was felt in ^ Between Harding Stoughton and Anna 

this society, from very different reasons. Grant. 

Many good men, especially at the North, ■• It will be remembered that Dr. Robbins 
regarded it mainly as a great missionary was simply preparing questions on Robin- 
society for the evangelization of Africa. sorCs Abridgment of Hunters History of Eng- 
Many planters at the .South regarded it land, to be used as a school-book, 
mainly as an agency for taking away the ^ Niccolo Machiavelli, called Machiavel in 
free blacks of the South, who made their English. He was born in Florence in 1469, 
slaves uneasy and rebellious. and died in 1527. He is a man who has a 

^ Rev. Samuel Osgood, D. D., pastor of reputation for cunning zwA finesse somewhat 

First Church, Springfield, 1809-1863. worse than the facts warrant. 



6o DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

13. Wrote to Mr, Ely, of Simsbury, and Col. Humphreys,' of Canton, 
Reviewed manuscripts. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Warm. 

14. Looked over manuscripts. Walked and visited. I am too languid 
to perform much business. People are beginning their harvest. Rode to 
Windsor to exchange. Read, Thermometer 90°. 

15. Mr. Rowland rode to East Windsor. The heat very oppressive. 
Preached on Numb, xxiii : 19 and Isa. iii : 10, 11. The singing here is 
very good. Rode to Pine Meadow, Attended a meeting in the evening and 
preached without notes on Luke xv : 10, 

16. Am very languid. Rode to my brother's. He returned from an 
exchange at Southampton.^ He thinks it best for me to leave my people. 
Visited Mr. Bartlett and returned home. Read. I am greatly tried with 
regard to my duty. 

17. Wrote. Am quite feeble. Rode to harvest field and carried dinner. 
The harvest generally is unusually good. Reviewed manuscripts. Mr. Fair- 
child called to see me. He appears resolved to leave his people, though they 
are unwilling for it. 

18. Wrote to Mr. Hawes and others — a committee of our clerical 
convention. People are much hurried with their labor. Worked at my 
manuscripts. Walked out and visited. I think I am called in divine 
providence to leave my people. It is a subject of almost constant reflection 
and prayer with me. 

19. Walked and visited. Very fine weather. Not very warm. Attended 
to my studies. On the 14th received a letter from Rev. Mr. May, of Brooklyn. 

20. Tried to work some. Am quite feeble. Looked over manuscripts. 
I do but little. Attended the evening prayer-meeting, 

21. Walked and visited. Many people are much concerned at the 
prospect of my leaving here. Studied some. Read. At evening rode 
to East Hartford to exchange with Mr. Fairchild. 

22. Mr. Fairchild rode to East Windsor and returned after meeting. 
Cool. Preached on Eph. ii : 14 and Isa. iii: 10, 11. The singing here, 
as well as with us, is poor. Rode home and attended the conference. 
Am feeble with my complaint. I think Mr. Fairchild will find some difficulty 
in getting away from his people. 

23. On Saturday received a letter from my brother James. Wrote. Am 
quite feeble. Set out on a journey to Amherst. Rested at Pine Meadow.^ 
Rode to West Springfield and tarried with Mr. Sprague.* He is considerably 
unwell, 

24. Rode on a good road to Northampton. Dined at Judge Lyman's, 
with considerable company. Walked to the Round Hill school. A flourish- 
ing institution. Called at Judge Howe's. This is a flourishing town. Saw 



s 



'■ Probably Arnold P. Humphreys. * William B. Sprague, D. D. 

= Southampton, Mass., where Rev. Vinson ^ Judge Joseph Lyman, who married for 

Gould was pastor, 1801-1832. his second wife Miss Robbins, of Milton, 

3 With his friends, Mr. and Mrs. Haskell. Mass, 



i8>7.] 



PASTOR IX EAST WINDSOR. 



6l 



Mr. Hall,' the Unitarian minister. Called on old Mr. Williams.' Tarried 
at Judge Lyman's. 

25. Had a poor night. Rode to Amherst to Dr. Gridley's. My cousin 
Eliza is well settled here.^ The doctor is an intelligent and deserving man.* 
Saw Mr. Perkins.' Attended the examination of a young ladies' school. 
At evening attended a meeting with Mr. Perkins, and preached without notes 
on Luke xv: 10, There has been a good work of grace here for a consider- 
able time. People are generally harvesting. 

26. We had a hard rain till after noon. Concluded not to ride today. 
Mr. Perkins called in. Visited Gen. Mattoon.* At evening attended an 
anxious meeting. This town is unhappily divided into too many societies. 
The college is flourishing. 

27. Rode home — forty miles. There is a ver}' fine manufacturing village, 
wholly new, on Chicopee River, in Springfield. The rain yesterday was 
extensive. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Concluded with my brother 
to make a communication to my society next week. Have had a prosperous 
journey. 

28. Read. Am unable to study. Mr. Fairchild called on me. Mr. and 
Mrs. Haskell are here. Walked out. In the forenoon rode to Long Hill 
and visited the school there. 

29. Expounded on Luke xviii : 18 to the end, and preached an old sermon 
on John i: 10. Full meeting. Warm. Attended the evening conference. 
The prospect of parting with this people is most painful. 

30. Took a decisive step with regard to my connection with this people, 
I trust in the fear of God and from a deep sense of duty. Wrote and sent 
to the society committee a request that they would warn a society-meeting 
for the purpose of receiving a communication from me. Myself, this society, 
and the church I have endeavored to commit to the holy wisdom and infinite 
mercy of God. Walked out. Rode to Hartford. Called on Mr. Hawes. 
That city is much improving. Received a letter from my brother and wrote 
him in reply. Paid for a whip $1.25. Made a donation — $5. Read. 

31. Am troubled with a stiff neck. Received of Horace Morton the 
payment of some money lent him in April. Read in Robertson's ^ History of 
Ame7-ica. Wrote. Am very languid. Rev. Mr. Pitkin,^ of New Connecticut, 
came here and tarried. Thermometer 90°. 



' Rev. Edward B. Hall, native of Medford, 
graduate of Harvard, 1820, pastor at North- 
ampton, 1826-1829. 

" Rev. Solomon Williams, born in East 
Hartford, Ct., 1752, graduated at Yale, 1770, 
pastor at Northampton, 1778-1834. 

^ The fears of Dr. Robbins and others 
about this marriage proved idle. 

* Timothy J. Gridley, M. D. 

^ Rev. Nathan Perkins, pastor of First 
Church, Amherst, 1S10-1842. 



* Gen. Ebenezer Mattoon, before noticed; 
a Revolutionary officer. 

' Dr. William Robertson, of Scotland, an 
extensive historical writer. His History of 
America was published in 1777. He was 
born at Bothwick, Mid-Lothian, 1721, and 
died in Edinburgh, 1793. 

° Rev. Caleb Pitkin, a native of New 
Hartford, Ct, and a graduate of Williams 
College, 1817. He was sent to Ohio by the 
ConnecticufMissionary Society. 



6» DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1827. 

AuCiUST. 

1. Gave Mr. Pitkin my small globe, and Hopkins's System,^ Witsius's 
Covenant,^ Butler's Analogy, Parish's Sacred Gazetteer,^ and Watts's On the 
Afind, seven volumes, the whole estimated at $ii, for his college.'* The heat 
ver)' oppressive. Thermometer 92°. Read Robertson's America. At evening 
walked out. Wrote. 

2. Rode to Hartford and attended the first Commencement of Wash- 
ington College. Ten graduates. A numerous audience. The performances 
were good. A few of our ministers were present, and politely treated. There 
was a splendid entertainment. The heat very severe. Carried to the book- 
seller my questions on Robinson's Abridgment of Hiwie, etc., for which I am 
to receive $50. Thermometer, I conclude, about 91°. 

3. Wrote. Am very languid. Read Robertson's History. Walked out. 
The crop of hay is very great. Attended our evening prayer-meeting. 
Thermometer 93°. 

4. Read. Revised manuscripts. My mind is greatly burdened with my 
own prospects and situation of my people. Hindered by company. Ther- 
mometer 95°. 

5. W^rote notes and preached in the forenoon on Rom. viii : 6. Preached 
an old sermon on Ex. iii : 24, 25. ' The heat very oppressive. Our Sabbath- 
school does well. Thermometer 94°. 

6. The heat very severe all day. Thermometer 98 1-2°. We had a 
sudden shower about two o'clock, or, I think, it would have been a little 
higher. Read Robertson's History. Can do but little. Attended the 
monthly concert. Pretty thin. People are much oppressed with labor and 
the heat. Received a letter from my cousin C. Robbins, of Boston. 

7. Read. Mr. Fairchild called on me. His society voted yesterday, 
at his request, to vniite with him in calling a council, to whom should be 
submitted the expediency of his dismission, which he will desire. We have 
a better air than for some days past. Thermometer but 85°.' Wrote letters 
to Solomon Stoddard, Esq.,^ Northampton, Mr. May, of Brooklyn, my brother 
James, and Mr. Battell. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Clarke,* of Bland- 
ford. 



' 5)/j-/«« ^ Z)<7rfw/^, by Dr. Samuel Hop- Stoddard, minister at Northampton, 1672- 
kins, in two volumes. 1729, made a name so grand and honorable 



2 



Economy of the Covenants betiveen God that it was very natural to perpetuate it. 

aiid Man, by Herman Witsius, an able Dutch The Solomon Stoddard here mentioned, and 

divine, 1 636-1 708, three volumes. whose father of the same name was yet liv- 

^ Sacred Geograpliy or Gazetteer of the ing, was born in 1 771, and was graduated at 

Bible, 1813, by Elijah Parish, D. D. Yale in 1790. He was a public man, and 

■• Western Reserve College, at Hudson, several times represented the town in the 

O. (now Adelbert College, Western Reserve General Court. He died in 1S60. 
University, at Cleveland, O.), was formed in * Rev. Dorus Clarke, D. D., born in West- 

1826, so that Rev. Mr. Pitkin's agency in its hampton, Mass., 1797, was graduated at WMll- 

behalf was in its early infancy. iams College, 1817, pastor at Blandford, 1823 

= Solomon Stoddard, Jr., Esq., justice of -1835, for many years after an editor, died in 

the peace and of the quorum. Solomon Boston, 1884, aged eighty-seven. 



t827.] 



PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 



63 



8. Walked and visited all day. People feel very anxious at the appre- 
hension of my leaving them. Performed a marriage.' Thermometer 88°. 

9. I sleep poorly nights. Rode to Hartford. Called on Mr. Hawes. 
I beseech of God to remember me in his great mercies, and make me thankful 
for every token for good. Read. People are finishing their great ingathering 
of hay. Seldom so great. Thermometer about 87°. Wrote to Mr. Clarke, 
of Blandford. 

10. Revised manuscripts. Read Robertson's America. Attended the 
evening prayer-meeting. Have some favorable intelligence from the Seneca 
Indians."^ Thermometer 86°. 

11. Fifty years of age. Great is the mercy and long-suffering of a holy 
God. Wrote a communication to be made to the society, requesting them 
to consent to a dissolution of my ministerial connection with them. I think 
it is best that it should be done, and that it is my duty to propose it. After- 
noon we had a hard and very' seasonable rain. Read. 

12. Rainy through the night and the morning. Forenoon meeting quite 
thin. Preached an old double sermon on Acts xv : 9. The ground is quite 
wet. Sultr}'. Attended the evening conference. 

13. Rode to Enfield and visited my brother. His wife is gone to the 
eastward. Received several pamphlets by mail. Read. 

14. Wrote. Our society had a meeting and I sent to them a communica- 
tion stating that, in view of the circumstances of the societ)', I considered 
it my duty to request them to consent to a dissolution of my pastoral relation. 
They voted twice on the question of concurrence, and could not get a vote. 
I am disappointed. Cool. 

15. Last evening received a letter from Mr. Silliman, of New Haven.^ 
Mr. Fairchild called on me and brought me a letter for the church to attend a 
council for his dismission. Wrote to Dr. Ely, of Philadelphia. Added to my 
coins $4. Rev. Messrs. David Sherman* and Elam Clarke^ called and dined 
here. Looked over manuscripts. Read the Bible. 

16. Walked and visited. Afternoon a hard rain. The society held an 
adjourned meeting and got a vote of eleven to eight ^ to comply with my 
request for a dismission, and some who were present did not vote. Read 
Robertson. My condition is solemn and critical. I am soon to be without a 
home. 

- 17. Revised manuscripts. There is a Methodist camp-meeting at Man- 



' The parties were Otis Hayes and Eliza 
Ann Strong. This was Dr. Robbins's last 
marriage service during his ministry in 
East Windsor. Since his ministry there 
began, he had united one hundred and sev- 
enty-three couples, besides a very consider- 
able number of wedding services performed 
by him outside of his own parish, in East 
Hartford, Manchester, Scantic, etc. 

- The American Board was th(:n main- 
taining a preacher. Rev. Thompson S. Har- 



ris, and three or four lay helpers among the 
Seneca Indians, of New York. 

^ Prof. Benjamin Silliman, LL. D., Yale 
College. 

* David A. Sherman, graduated at Yale 
in 1S02, and tutor at Yale, 1S04-1810. After- 
wards President of East Tennessee College. 

5 Rev. Elam C. Clarke, a graduate of 
Williams College, 1S12. 

* A very small vote on so important a 
matter. 



64 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

Chester. Wrote to my brother. At evening had a full and affecting prayer- 
meeting. The people are tender and solemn. Had fire in my chamber the 
most of the day. 

18. Walked and visited. The poor people are alarmed at the prospect of 
my leaving them. Read. Warm. 

19. Expounded on Luke xix : 28, and preached an old sermon on Nahum 
i: 15. Many people are gone to the camp-meeting. Had a full evening 
conference. Was out late. 

20. Am very languid. Walked out. Mr. Fairchild called on me. Rode to 
Hartford. Had some coins given me. Visited Mr. Hawes. Got home late. 

21. Wrote to Mr. Fairchild. Read the Spectator} Am very languid. 
Rode out and visited. The Methodists make some commotion here. Wrote 
letters respecting the Everest fund. 

22. Revised manuscripts. Rode out. Went into the water. Have paid 
lately, to Benjamin Skinner, $104.94, and taken up a note which I gave him, 
last fall, for W. Tudor. At evening rode to Hartford. Called on Mr. Fair- 
child. Was out late. Visited a sick family. 

23. Wrote a communication for the church, similar to the one which I pre- 
sented last week to the society, requesting them to consent to a dissolution of 
my pastoral connection. Had company. Attended the church meeting in 
the afternoon and presented my communication. I retired, and they voted 
six afiftrmative and nine negative. There were twenty-four members present. 
The others declined voting, and are understood to be in the negative. And 
some of the afBrmative votes were in consequence of my explicit request. 
The number in favor of my leaving the society is very small.^ It is a gloomy 
time. 

24. Wrote. Mr. Battell and three of his children called here on their 
return from Amherst, dined, and made me a pleasant visit. Attended the 
funeral of an aged woman. ^ Visited a small private school. Attended fhe 
evening prayer-meeting. We have cool nights. 

25. Read the Bible. Revised manuscripts. Had company. Vv''rote. I 
have felt very poorly able to write sermons this summer, 

26. Wet. Thin meeting. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on 
Matt, iii : 8. Afternoon preached an qld sermon on i Cor. ii : 9. Towards 
night quite rainy. Read. We have the pleasing account of a public treaty 
between Great Britain, France, and Russia, in favor of the Greeks.'' 

27. Last night and during the forenoon we had a hard rain. Revised 
manuscripts. Walked out and visited. People are greatly distressed at the 
prospects of my leaving them. I think, however, it is unavoidable. 



' Not Addison's, but the Christia7t Specta- but they do betray a certain apathy and in- 

tor, published at New Haven, now in its difference. 

ninth year, and completed in twenty volumes ^ Widow Anna Roberts, aged seventy- 

in 1S38. four. 

- The votes taken, both in the parish •* This was called the Treaty of London, 

meeting and in the church, do not indicate and was signed by these three powers July 6, 

positive dissatisfaction to any large extent, 1S27. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 65 

28. Rode to East Hartford and met with the couricil ; which, after much 
deliberation and hesitation, decided unanimously to dismiss Mr. Fairchild. 
The people appear to believe, under the existing state of things, that it is best. 
Wrote. We have latterly frequent northern lights. We have cool nights. 

29. Rode to Enfield and made a short visit with my brother. Judge Terry* 
there is thought to be near his end. We had an adjourned church meeting. 
I renewed my request that they would consent to my dismission. But eight 
members were present, and they concluded to adjourn without taking any 
vote. I am quite disappointed. I know not what the Lord designs for me. 
Two of the brethren called on me in the evening:. 

30. Wrote. Rode to Hartford. Did errands. Preached a sacramental 
lecture for Mr. Fairchild on Luke xxii : 15. He read me his farewell sermon. 
Got home late. Mr. Gaylord, of Norfolk, came here and tarried. 

31. Yesterday wrote to Mr. Battell. Wrote. Mr. Bacon, of New Haven, 
called and spent the afternoon with me. Quite warm. At evening we had 
a shower, which prevented my attending the prayer-meeting. Esq. Brockway,^ 
of New Connecticut, called here and tarried. 

September. 

1. Walked out and visited a school. Thermometer about 85°. Rode out 
and visited. The state of feeling among my people is very trying. 

2. Expounded on Luke xix : 28 to the end, and preached an old sermon- 
on Hab. iii : 17, 18. Many of our people went to East Hartford.^ The heat 
oppressive. Thermometer 86°. At evening, on account of my expected 
absence tomorrow, we had our monthly concert of prayer. Pretty full. Quite 
tired. 

3. Received a letter from Simeon Loomis,* of Lansingburgh. Attended 
the funeral of an infant child in the hither part of East Hartford. Rode 
to Canton and met with the committee of the Everest fund. All the debtors 
there paid their interest. We made appropriations. The heat very oppres- 
sive. I think the thermometer must have been about 90°. Rode home in the 
evening. 

4. On Friday last gave Mr. Bacon a large number of pamphlets. Wrote 
on the records of the Everest fund. Afternoon the church had their third 
meeting, and I renewed my request that they would consent to a dissolution 
of my pastoral relation. I went out, and it was voted. Nine in the affirmative, 
six negative, and three withheld their votes — which would have been negative 
if they had voted. Visited a sick woman. I feel relieved from much anxiet}' 
respecting my situation. 



' Judge Henry Terry. * There were two or three .Simeon Loom- 

^ The name Brockway was not common. ises, belonging to the very numerous Loomis 

He was probably of the kindred of Rev. family of Windsor and East Windsor, and 

Diodote Brockway, of Ellington. there was a constant movement of popula- 

3 Probably to hear Rev. Mr. Fairchild tion from Connecticut westward. This man 

preach his farewell sermon. He was a pop- at Lansingburgh was probably an emigrant 

alar preacher and drew large audiences. or the son of an emigrant from East Windsor. 



66 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1827. 

5. Rode to Hartford and returned soon. Sent 5200 of public money 
to Mr. Birge. Dined and prayed with a company of cavalry. At evening 
met with the committees of the church and society and fixed on the council 
and the time for my dismission. Quite harmonious. 

6. Rode to Pine Meadow and returned. Mr. Haskell's little son has had 
a hurt in his shoulder. Quite warm. Saw Gen. Jenks. 

7. Wrote on the church records. Visited a family in the upper part 
of East Hartford very sick. Dr. Reed paid me $51.70 and took up a note — 
the property of my brother's wife. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

8. Read the Bibl?. Wrote the letters to convoke the council. Wrote 
to Rev. Mr. Jenks/ of Boston. Walked out. Received a letter from 
Mr. Bartlett. Mrs. Doud, from New Connecticut, called to see me. Mr. Lane, 
from New Connecticut, called and look three folios which he had left in my 
possession. 

9. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on Heb. iv : 11 and an old 
sermon on Matt, vi : 13. Full meeting. This morning there was a little frost, 
but vegetation does not appear to be injured. Attended the conference. 

10. Rode and visited sick persons. A very sick family in the upper part 
of East Hartford. Visited the south school. Visited a family about to 
move to St. Louis. A severe loss to this place. Received of my collector, 
A. L. Reed, $150. Quite busy. 

J I. Left home at a little after 3 o'clock a. m., and rode to New Haven 
"before noon. Heard the oration and poem before the P. B. K. Society, and 
'dined with the society. Heard speaking for premiums. Paid $95 to the 
"beneficiaries of the Everest fund. At evening attended a meeting of the 
.alumni of the college, who formed a society.^ Much fatigued. Quite warm. 

12- Yesterday afternoon saw the remarkable performances of the scholars 
-in their gymnastic exercises. On Monday evening heard of the unexpected 
death of the first of the European statesmen — Mr. Canning.' Attended 
;the Commencement. The exercises pretty good. They were very long. 
Attended the Concio ad Cknim hy Mr. Punderson. Have a convenient place 
to sleep in a private house. Attended a little while an Episcopal meeting. 
A cool and very pleasant day. 

13. There was no morning prayer-meeting. Attended the meeting of the 
Education Society. Procured a few old books. Paid Mrs. Tucker for them 
$1.50. Paid Gen. Howe for books and quills, $6.25. Left New Haven at ten 



' Rev. William Jenks, D. D., LL. D., born Association of Yale, which was formed largely 

in Newton, Mass., 1778; graduate of Harvard through Dr. Robbins's influence. 

College, 1797 ; pastor at Bath, Me., 1S05- ^ George Canning, born in London, April 

1823, during which time he acted as profes- 11, 1770, lost his father when an infant, and 

sor at Bowdoin College, 1815-1818; pastor was educated by an uncle. His life was 

of Green Street Church, Boston, 1S26-1845; passed amid the excitements of politics, but 

author of Comprehensive Cotnmentary, of he was constantly taking steps upward. In 

which 120,000 copies were sold; died in February, 1827 (the year of his death), he 

1866, aged eighty-eight. was made prime minister, and was greatly 

^ This was the beginning of the Alumni vexed by opposition. He died Aug. 8, 1827. 



1827.] PASTOR IN EAST WINDSOR. 67 

o'clock and rode home. Called on Mr. Fairchild. Warm and very dusty. 
Got home well. 

14. Wrote. Afternoon visited a school. Quite warm. Caught a cold. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. After met with the committees of the 
church and society, and concluded to send for more ministers to our council, 
as some are likely to fail. It is a business in which they do not like to be 
concerned. Got home late. 

15. Wrote to Mr. Porter, of Farmington. Rode to Wapping and visited 
a school. Visited there. Capt. Hall is in deep afifliction. Read. At evening 
set out to ride to Scantic. It was quite dark and I staid at Mr. Bissell's.' 

16. Rode to Mr. Bartlett's, and he rode to my people in my sulky. 
Preached on Heb. vii : 25 and Isa. iii : 10, 11. Had a large and affected 
audience. At evening rode home. Had no conference. Quite burdened 
with my cold. The prospect of my leaving this town, where I have received 
so much kindness, is affecting. 

17. Rode to Hartford. Cool and dusty. Paid Seth Terry $8.50 — 
collected here for the Colonization Society. Rode to Pine Meadow. 
Called on Mr. Rowland. Rode to Enfield. My brother's wife has lately 
returned from a journey to the eastward. They have a great deal of company. 
Rode home in the evening. I believe it increased my cold. 

18. On the 14th Edwin Olmsted paid me $14 and took up a note he gave 
me for my grass last year. Spent the most of the day in a contemplation 
of my condition and prospects in view of my separation from my people, 
which I expect to take place tomorrow. I think I have committed all my 
interests to a holy God, and rejoice to be wholly at his disposal. The pros- 
pect is painful and gloomy, but God has ever been my helper. 

19. Quite rainy. My brother and Mr. Linsley came to attend our 
council, and no others. "^ They adjourned to Thursday of this week. Divine 
Providence evidently throws many obstacles in the way of my removal. 
At evening wrote to my sister. 

20. Rainy and wet all day. Wrote. Attended the funeral of an intem- 
perate man who died suddenly. Began a sermon on Acts xx : 26, 27, for my 
farewell. By cares and neglect of writing my mind becomes dissipated. 

21. Read. Wrote on my sermon. Mr. Fairchild called on me. Wrote 
to Dr. Perkins. Preached a preparatory lecture with old notes on Ps. xxii: 11. 
Paid for oats, $2. Rainy and we had no evening prayer-meeting. 

22. Visited a woman very sick. Wrote. Rev. Mr. Bliss,^ from the Black 
River country, called on me. Wrote to Mr. Porter, of Farmington. Warm. 
The ground is very wet. Paid a merchant seventy-five cents. 

23. Mr. Bliss preached for me in the forenoon. Administered the sacra- 
ment. The church was full. I spoke of the prospect of our separation. 



' Capt. Aaron Bissell, on the Hill. Connecticut Missionary Society in New 

^ It is quite unusual that a council so York and Pennsylvania. He was graduated 

called should be so poorly attended. at Williams College in 1808. He died in 

3 Rev. John F. Bliss, employed by the 1874, at the age of eighty-six. 



68 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1827. 



• o 



It was ven' affecting. The church evidently feel the dangers before them. 
Preached in the afternoon an old sermon on Luke xvii : 22. Meetings quite 
full ; some expected it would be my last sermon. The Methodists are making 
considerable exertion here. At evening attended the conference. Mr. Bliss 
preached. 

24. Visited several sick persons. Dined with a military company. Read. 
It is painful to see many of my afflicted people. Wrote. 

25. Rode to Wintonbury and met with the consociation. I was scribe. 
Saw Mr. Battell in Hartford. The consociation rather thin. Mr. Fairchild 
preached well. Rev. Seth Williston preached in the evening. We examined 
and licensed Mr. James B. Wilcox. The members had to go an vmusual 
distance for lodgings. 

26. The consociation were busily occupied till afternoon. Dea. Reed and 
I were well accommodated at Capt. Filley's. Rode to Hartford. The Hart- 
ford County Auxiliary Foreign Missionary Society had their annual meeting. 
Delegates from the board were expected to address the meeting, but failed. 
Mr. Marsh,* of Haddam, and I spoke extempore. Rode home late with my 
brother. 

27. A solemn and gloomy day. The council met — six ministers — and 
soon decided on the expediency of dissolving my pastoral relation to this 
people on the ground of mutual agreement. Nothing unpleasant appeared. 
I amr liberally recommended in the result of the council. I commit myself 
and my all to the God of my fathers, who has ever been to me a most merciful 
God and Saviour. At evening visited two sick women. Yesterday paid a 
merchant for my umbrella, $4. 

28. Wrote. Am poorly able to attend to business. Mr. Fairchild called 
on me. Wrote some on my sermon. Afternoon attended the funeral of an 
infant child in East Hartford. At evening attended our prayer-meeting. 

29. Cool. Have a steady fire. Wrote and finished my sermon on 
Acts XX : 26, 27. It is long. This is a work which I never expected. 
The Lord is righteous and holy. 

30. Preached in the forenoon an old sermon on Heb. xii : 2. Afternoon 
preached my farewell sermon on Acts xx : 26, 27." The scene was exceeding 
solemn and affecting. The quarter part of the people are much distressed. 
The meeting-house was very full. The day very pleasant. I was carried 
through the exercises better than I feared. At evening had a full conference. 
I leave this people and myself entirely with God. All of this worthy and 
beloved family were together.^ 



' John Marsh, D. D. 

^ Text — " Wherefore I take you to record 
this day that I am pure from the blood of all 
men. For I have not shunned to declare 
unto you all the counsel of God." The 
inspired apostle could utter these words, 
doubtless, with perfect propriety. It is a 
little different when they are taken as the 



text of an uninspired minister, however faith- 
ful, as he is about to leave his people. 

3 He means the family of Mr. Abiel Wol- 
cott, where, through all the years of his min- 
istry in East Windsor, he had boarded. Dr. 
Robbins came there in 1808, so that his stay 
was about nineteen years. For him to re- 
move with his large library was a great task. 



1827.] 



DISMISSED FROM EAST WINDSOR. 



69 



October. 

1. Walked and visited sick persons. Wrote considerably. Made up my 
accounts with the society. At evening, by particular request, attended the 
monthly prayer-meeting. It had no public appointment. Spent the most 
of the day in the duties of retirement, in view of my present afflictive state. 
I think I rejoice to be in the hands of a holy God and Saviour. 

2. Wet and rainy. Engaged in writing the most of the day. Hindered 
by company. Completed the church records. The deaths in this place have 
been about one in seventy-five persons annually during my ministry. 

3. People went to the cattle-show. I think not so many as in years past. 
Worked at my library'. Attended a funeral in the upper part of East Hartford. 
Shower}'. 

4. Worked at my library the most of the day. Warm; had no fire. 
Visited a family where a woman ' (;Jied last night. 

5. Was engaged laboriously at my library. It is a long time since 
I looked it over, and I believe no books are. lost. Attended the funeral. 
Quite warm. I am greatly afflicted, but it is all of God. 

6. Wet. Employed in setting up my books. Have in the whole about 
1,600. I have been much prospered in making this collection. The whole, 
including pamphlets, coins, and furniture, have cost as much as $3,200.^ 
Afternoon rode in a high wind to Enfield. My brother was expecting my 
assistance for tomorrow. 

7. This morning there was a slight frost; the first we have had. The 
leaves have been falling for some days. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23 and 
I Cor. XV : 56, 57. After meeting my brother rode and preached at the east 
part of the town. Attended an evening meeting and preached without notes 
on Matt, xvi : 26. Had full and attentive meetings. 

8. Rode to Pine Meadow and home. Mr. Gallaudet preached here 
yesterday. The society had a meeting today and laid a tax to hire preaching. 
Several certificates have been given in. Read. 

9. Rainy all day. We have had a wet season through the year. Finished 
setting up my books. Last week took a number of volumes from the collec- 
tion of S. P. Waldo,^ now in this house, for which I paid $22.25 several years 
ago, and have now added the most of them to my librar\'. Read. An elderly 
woman "• died near here this morning. Wrote. Visited Dea. Reed, who has 
received intelligence today of the death of his son' at Genneseo. On the 
6th received a valuable letter on education from Amos B. Alcott, of Wolcott. 



' Miss Sarah Olcott. 

- His bound volumes, by statements made 
in the diary from time to time, cost as much 
as they would now, perhaps more. His pam- 
phlets, especially his choice ones, v.'ere com- 
paratively cheap. The demand for historical 
pamphlets had not then set in with force. 

^ S. P. Waldo was Samuel Putnam Waldo, 
who died the year before at Hartford. He 
was a well-known and popular writer, author 



of that book RoH>ins''s Jouriial, a story of 
Algerine captivity, which has stirred many a 
boy's heart in the olden time ; author also of 
Lives of Jackson and Decatur, etc. He was 
grandson of Gen. Israel Putnam. Two or 
three books prepared about this time, on 
statements made by Algerine captives, were 
very popular. 

■* Mrs. Anna Newbury, aged sixty-six. 

^ Waldo Raynsford Reed. 



7° 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBIN6, D. D. 



[1827. 



10. The rain continued last night and through the forenoon, some of 
the time verj' hard. Wrote to Simeon Loomis, of Lansingburgh. Wrote. 
Attended the funeral of the late Mrs. Newbury. The ground is very wet. 
Walked out. 

11. Walked Out. Afternoon set out on a journey to Norfolk, etc. Rode 
to Simsbury. The Farmington River very high. A great quantity of cider 
is made this year. The roads quite muddy. 

12. Tarried last night at Mr. McLean's. Rode to Colebrook and stopped 
at my brother's. Quite cool. The frosts have kept oiif this fall remarkably. 

13. Rode to Norfolk. My mother is quite well. Mr. and Mrs. Battell 
are absent. Called on Mrs. Emerson. Wrote to Maj. S. Pitkin,' of East 
Hartford. 

14. Preached for Mr. Emerson on Ps. cvi : 23 and Num. xxiii : 19. This 
is a very good congregation. There has been a good work of divine grace 
the present year. At night quite rainy. Tarried and had an interesting visit 
with Mr. Emerson. 

15. Made calls. Wrote to Prof. Dewey,^ of Pittsfield. Read considerably 
in Scott's Life of Napoleon? 

16. Visited the lower and upper schools in this district with Mr. Emerson. 
Cold and blustering. Visited. Gave my mother $5. 

17. This morning we had a very hard frost. There has been but little 
before. Paid for cloth to line my great coat, ^4.69. Paid a tailor $1. Rode 
through Goshen and Milton to Warren. My aged Uncle Starr is quite well 
and cheerful.'* I witness the changes of twenty years. 

18. Rode to Danbury.* Called on Mr. Eliot,* of New Milford. There 
is a good work of divine grace there. And there has been something of it in 
most places in this quarter the present season. The conference of the 
churches seems to have been much blessed. Warm. Kindly received at 
Mr. Whittlesey's.' 

19. Wrote, Walked and visited old acquaintance. Find some of my 
pupils here in the year 1800, but a majority of them are gone. A Mr. Gil- 
bert,^ a worthy young man, is now preaching here. Paid $8 to a hatter for 
a hat sent me about a year ago. 



' Maj. Samuel Pitkin, a most dignified 
and worthy gentleman, and one of the lead- 
ing citizens of East Hartford. 

^ Prof. Chester Dewey, D. D., LL. D., 
widely known and honored for his varied 
learning. He was graduated at Williams in 
1806, and died in 1867. He was a native of 
Sheffield, Mass., born in 1781 ; of the same 
general family as Orville Dewey, D. D. 

^ Where a good many of us received ideas 
about Napoleon which we have had to mod- 
ify. It was not in human nature that a Brit- 
ish subject of that generation should say 
exactly the right things about Napoleon. 



■* He had then been in the ministry at 
Warren fifty-five years. For two years he 
had had the assistance of a colleague. Rev. 
Hart Talcott having been settled in this rela- 
tion in 1825. 

5 Where he taught and preached twenty- 
seven years before. 

^ Rev. Andrew Eliot. 

^ His old boarding-place, and yet the 
given name of this Mr. Whittlesey we have 
not yet learned. There were other families 
of Whittleseys in Danbury. 

* He was simply supplying the pulpit, but 
was never settled there. 



1827.J PREACHING I\ NORWALK. 7 1 

20. Walked and visited all day. This town seems to be improving. 
Quite warm for the season. Read. 

21. Preached in the forenoon on Isa. iii : lo, ii. Mr. Gilbert preached 
in the afternoon, and I in the evening to a full house on Ps. cvi : 23. The 
congregation here much injured by their late ecclesiastical contentions. 

22. Wet and rainy, and concluded not to go on my journey as I had 
designed. Wrote. Read. Wrote a part of a long letter to my brother 
James. Walked out. Friends called to see me. 

23. Left Danbury and rode to Saugatuck. The roads quite wet. Last 
night we had a hard rain. Dined at Wilton with Mr. H. Olmsted.' Tarried 
at the aged Dr. Ripley's.^ He is about eighty-five and his wife ninety. 
They have lived together more than sixty years. Looked over pamphlets. 

24. Dr. Ripley advised me to go to Norwalk, which is now vacant. 
Called on Mr. Hooker.' He rode with me to Norwalk. The society com- 
mittee called and requested me to delay my journey home till Friday. 
Concluded to do so. Returned with Mr. Hooker to his house. W>ote. 
In the morning paid Dr. Ripley for books, $5. I love to have time for 
meditation. I look forward with anxiety. God does not suffer me to 
despond. I think I trust in him. He has never forsaken me, as he did 
not my fathers. Read. This is a pleasant family. 

25. Rode through Norwalk to New Canaan. Attended the meeting of the 
conference of churches. It appeared better than I expected. Above thirty 
churches were represented. The delegates spoke well. Cold and windy. 
Tarried at the request of Mr. Bonney,* and preached in the evening on 
Num. xxiii : 19. The conference was concluded a little after noon. There 
has been a recent and good revival here. 

26. Rode to Norwalk — live miles. The society committee requested me 
to be here on next Sabbath. I conclude to stay, notwithstanding I had 
calculated to be at home this week. In the afternoon attended a church 
prayer-meeting. This church and society are large. In the evening gentle- 
men called on me. Visited a sick and afflicted family. Read. 

27. I keep at a Mr. Benedict's, a worthy family. This place is populous 
and flourishing. Constant intercourse with New York. Wrote. I think 
it is well not to be able to calculate on my prospects that I may witness daily 
the salvation of God. Wrote on my letter to my brother James. Walked out 
and took a view of the town and harbor. The lower part of the town is quite 
pleasant. Visited the sick family. Read. 

28. Preached on Heb. vii : 25 and Isa. iii: 10, n. This congregation 

' Havvley Olmsted, LL. D., noticed in a and died there in 1S31 — four years after 

previous paragraph), a wise and distinguished this visit, 
educator. 3 j^^y Edward W. Hooker, D. D., who 

^ This place was kno^vn as Green's Farms was then preaching at Green's Farms. 
andnowWestport. Dr. Hezekiah Ripley had * Rev. William Bonney was pastor at 

been there since 1767 — about sixty years. Xew Canaan, 1808-1831. He was a gradu- 

Hut in 182 1 he gave up the pastoral office, ate of Williams College, 1805. 



72 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROEBINS, D. D. 



[1827. 



is large and appears well. The meeting-house is a good one. At evening 
Mr. Hinman,' a candidate, preached. 

29. My health is very good. I think in consequence of change of air. 
Wrote. Finished my letter to ray brother James, and vi^rote to Mr. Wolcott 
and to Mr. Fairchild, of East Hartford. Had company. I find the want 
of my chamber for study. Walked out. 

30. Wrote considerably. Read. Walked out and visited. Had thought 
of going to New York in a packet, but the weather was quite unfavorable and 
did not go. Rainy. 

31. Rode with Mr. Benedict to Wilton and back. Called on Mr. Olmsted^ 
there. Many people here are much engaged in opening a canal from this 
town up the Housatonic River. Saw the engineer and his assistant running 
out the route. Read. Wrote to Edgar Bissell/ of East Windsor. Had com- 
pany. Quite cold. 

November. 

1. Wrote on a piece for the newspaper printed here, at the request of the 
printer, respecting the proposed canal. Afternoon rode to the south part of 
the town, visited, and in the evening preached without notes in a school-house 
on Matt, xvi : 26. There is a great population in this town. Saw the steam- 
boat come in. Quite cold. 

2. We had a hard frost. Wrote. Walked out and visited. The people 
here appear anxious to have me return if I go home next week. Read. 

3. Wrote a second piece for the paper. Walked and visited. Yesterday 
called on Mr. Sherwood,'' the Episcopal clergyman. His society here is 
ancient' and large. Warm. 

4. Wet, Preached on Heb. xi : 6 and Num, xxiii : 19, Afternoon 
pleasant and full meeting. At evening preached at the Old Well* without 
notes on Num. x : 29. Tired. 

5. Expected to have set out for home today, but am detained. Wrote. 
Read Dr. Beecher's excellent missionary sermon.^ Paid a tavern-keeper 
$1.25 for oats for my horse for five days. At evening attended the monthly 
concert. A good meeting. This has been much neglected here. 

6. Set out for home. Rode through New Haven to Wallingford. From 
Norwalk to New Haven thirty-one miles. A raw, chilly day. My horse 
traveled poorly. Paid for a book forty-four cents. Tarried at a tavern. 



' Mr. Chester Hinman, a graduate of Mid- 
dlebury College in 1822. 

^ Hawley Olmsted, then tea(*hing the 
academy there. 

3 Who married Eveline Wolcott. 

* Rev. Reuben Sherwood, D. D., a gradu- 
ate of Yale College, 1813. He received his 
degree of D. D. in 1840, from Hobart Col- 
lege, Geneva, N. Y. 

* The Episcopal society at Norwalk, Ct., 
was among the very few Episcopal churches 



in Connecticut existing before the Revolu- 
tionary War. The old Episcopal meeting- 
house was burned, along with the Congrega- 
tional, by the British, in 1777. 

* A quaint name given to a certain local- 
ity in the south part of the town. The " Old 
Well " was about a mile and a half south of 
Norwalk Centre, on fhu west side of the creek. 

^ This was the sermon preached before 
the American Board, at its annual meeting in 
the autumn of 1827, in the City of New York. 



1827.] PREACHING IN NORWALK. 73 

7. It began to rain last evening and rained moderately, without intermis- 
sion I suppose, till noon today, and from that time to sun-down it snowed 
constantly and pretty hard. The storm was very severe. Did not leave my 
tavern. Read North American Reincio'^ and other things. Wrote. Well 
accommodated. 

8. The snow here about three inches. Rode home. Hard traveling. 
Warm. Afternoon the roads very wet. The snow here this morning was 
nine or ten inches. Found things all well, by the divine blessing. There 
has been preaching here on the Sabbath since I have been absent. Received 
a letter from Mr. Linsley,^ of Hartford, one from Mr. Ely,^ of Mansfield, and 
one from Dr. Ely,* of Philadelphia, with a valuable bundle of pamphlets and 
two bound volumes as a present. My home is dear to me. 

9. In the short time allotted for my stay I am unable to attend to the 
various things I would be glad to. Looked over papers, etc. Rode to the 
upper part of East Hartford and dined with Mr. Fairchild. He is about 
removing to Boston, with pleasing prospects.' I think some persons here 
have taken much pains to injure me at East Hartford. Walked out. This 
society appears to be in a bad state. Put up my things. In the evening 
took an anxious leave of home. Mr. Wolcott rode with me to Hartford. 
Cold and very bad going. Tarried at the stage-house. 

10. Left Hartford earlj^, in the stage, and arrived at Norwalk in the 
evening — sisty-five miles. A rough, wintry day. Had but little company 
in the stage. Fare, $4.25. Kindly welcomed. My mind is gloomy; I have 
no helper but the Lord. 

11. Preached on Ps. cxxx : 3. At noon Mr. Hooker,* of Saugatuck, came 
here and preached in the afternoon on the objects of the Education Society. 
At evening attended a meeting with Mr. Hooker on the same subject. 
He is an agent for that society. Quite cold. We much needed the stove 
at meeting. 

12. Walked and visited the sick and others the most of the day. The 
air more mild. Read Dwight's Travels. 

13. W'et and showery all day. At night the storm quite severe. Wrote 
on a piece for the newspaper. Looked over some of the early town records. 
Read. The New York election has gone very bad.' 

14. Wrote. Very blustering. Afternoon attended the funeral of an infant 
child. Walked out and visited. At evening attended a small stated meeting. 
Read the Bible. 

15. Read the Bible. Wrote. Wrote to Mr. Wolcott.' Walked out and 



' He was probably reading out of the ^ Rev. William Ely. 

Ofctober number of the N^orth American * Ezra Stiles Ely, D. D. 

Review for 1827. This was the twenty-fifth ^ Dreadfully clouded afterwards, 

volume (sixteenth of the new series). Two * Edward W. Hooker, D. D. 

quarterly numbers made a volume. One of ' De Witt Clinton, who had been Gov- 

the attractive articles in that number was ernor for eight years at two different periods, 

entitled, " Who Wrote Gil Bias ? " was elected again. 



2 



Joel H. Linsley, D. D. * Abiel Wolcott. 



74 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

visited. At evening walked out and attended a meeting, and preached with- 
out notes on Mark i : 40. 

16. Wrote to my brother Frank and to Mr. Hooker, of Saugatuck.' 
Visited two schools. Had company. Read. 

17. Read. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Hooker,^ Hartford. Finished my long 
letter to brother Frank. We have pleasant weather, but cold. I suppose 
there is sleighing at the northward. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Hooker, 
of Saugatuck. Wrote. Read the Bible. 

18. Preached on Ps. cxxx: 4 and John iii : 3. Full meetings. The 
congregation large and attentive. At evening attended a meeting at a school- 
house and preached without notes on i Thess. v: 19. Quite tired. Many 
here pretend to keep Sabbath evening.^ 

19. Walked two miles and visited sick persons. Cold and rough weather. 
Walked out and visited. 

20. Put on my flannel. Rode with Mr. Hooker, of Saugatuck, to North 
Stamford,"* and attended a Ministers' Meeting. This meeting includes the 
members of the association. Seven were present. I preached on Ps. Ixxxiv: 2. 
They did considerable business and finished late in the evening. 

21. Rode home. A pretty rough tract of countr}\ We have steady winter 
weather. Visited a school. Attended an evening meeting. Read. 

22. Wrote. Mr. Filley, of East Windsor, called on me. Wrote to Edgar 
Bissell, of East Windsor. Rode to the eastern part of the town and attended 
a meeting in the evening, and preached without notes on Matt, xvi : 26. 
Tarried out. 

23. Walked and visited. Walked home — three miles. In the e.vening 
wrote a piece for the newspaper. There is much ministerial labor to be done 
in this town. 

24. Walked out and visited. Afternoon attended the funeral of a young 
child. Read. The ground has become hard frozen. Wrote. Read the 
Bible. 

25. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23 and Ps. Ixxxiv: 2. Meetings full and 
attentive. The stove in the meeting-house is put up.' Attended an evening 
meeting and preached without notes on 2 Tim. iii: 15. Quite tired. Had 
long exercises. Quite pleasant. 

26. Walked and visited. Severe cold. Wrote. Visited a child very sick. 
Read. At evening began a sermon on Dan. xii : 8-10 for Thanksgiving. 
It is a good while since I wrote a sermon. Am in want of books. 

27. The severe cold continues. Quite unusual for the season. I want 
my thermometer. Wrote on my sermon. Read newspapers. I have too 



' Saugatuck, it will be remembered, is now * Rev. Henry Fuller was pastor at North 

Westport. Stamford, 181 2-1844. He was a graduate of 

* Rev. Horace Hooker. Middlebury College, 1812. 

3 Instead of Saturday evening. They ' They had had a stove in former years, 

adopted the New York City ways. Through but it had been taken down for the summer 

Connecticut, as a general rule, Saturday and they were late in putting it up. It ^\as 

evening was kept. now the last of November. 



1827.] PREACHING IN NORWALK. 75 

many of them before me. Visited the sick child. The ground is hard 
frozen. 

28. Wrote and finished my sermon on Dan. xii : 8-10. It is long. 
Walked out and visited. The weather is more mild. Many people here 
are ignorant and vicious. They are in great want of a laborious and faithful 
ministry. 

29. Thanksgiving. Something wet. Preached the sermon finished last 
evening. People pretty well out. A Thanksgiving without a home makes 
a gloomy day to me.' Holy is the Lord. At evening visited. An appointed 
meeting was prevented by the rain. My times are in the hands of God. 

30. Last night and this forenoon we had a hard rain. Warm. Wrote. 
Looked over the ancient records of the town. Wrote on a piece for the 
newspaper. 

December. 

1. Finished my last number for the newspaper on the subject of the 
proposed Housatonic Canal. Walked and visited. Received a request from 
Mr. Hooker to exchange tomorrow. Concluded to set out on my journey 
to East Windsor.^ Saw Mr. Birge/ of Hartford. Took the stage in the 
evening and rode to Saugatuck. 

2. Preached on John iii : 3 and Isa. iii : 10, 11. Mr. Hooker went 
to Norwalk and returned after meeting. This congregation appears well, 
but is not so large as the one at Norwalk. At evening attended a meeting 
with Mr. Hooker, and preached without notes on Ps. iv : 5. A very pleasant 
day for the season. ' At noon went home with Dr. Ripley." 

3. Last evening took the stage at Saugatuck at eight o'clock, and rode 
to New Haven and Hartford at eight this morning. A very pleasant night. 
Some of the way the stage was very full. I slept a little. We could not 
stop for supper. Walked home. Not greatly fatigued. There has been 
preaching here every Sabbath. At evening rode to Hartford. Mr. Birge^ 
is gone away and supposed to have failed. I fear the Everest fund will suffer 
in consequence of it. The river at Hartford had a great deal of ice in it last 
week, but it did not close, though it did above Springfield and at Middletown, 

4. Wrote. Made several calls. Dea. Reed is holden as indorser for 
Birge to a large amount. I fear he will be seriously injured. The society 
matters here are in a critical state. Read. 

5. Rode to Hartford. Paid the collectors of out monthly concert for 
foreign missions before I left here, for this year, $12.25. r*^id to the same 
charity, my New Year's gift, $5. Engaged Mr. Ellsworth' to do the best 
he could with the claims of the Everest fund against Birge. Conversed with 



' A pleasant home at Norfolk, and a pleas- ' Saw him at Norwalk. 

ant home for nineteen years just past at East ■• Hezekiah Ripley, D. D., already noticed, 

"Windsor, made a contrast to his present con- now very old. 
dition. ' Backus W. Birge. Dr. Robbins had just 

^ That is, he was going to exchange with seen him at Norwalk, probably on his way to 

Mr. Hooker and then pursue his journey to New York. 
East Windsor without returning to Norwalk. '' W. W. Ellsworth, Esq. 



76 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1827. 

some gentlemen in East Hartford. At evening saw the society committee 
and settled with them. They gave me an order of 5693.38. Received on 
the same order $100.' Wet. 

6. Rode. Have time to visit but little. Settled with Mr. Haskell and 
owe him his stove amount — $30.24; post office, $6.19 — which is to be paid 
by Capt. Bissell. Received a diploma of membership from American Educa- 
tion Society, of which I have been a member for several years. Received 
a letter from E. B. Perkins, Esq.,^ of Pomfret. Took several pamphlets from 
the post office. The society had their annual meeting. Their prospects are 
poor. Paid Mr. Wolcott $4.0. At evening left home. Mr. Wolcott rode 
with me to Hartford. Very dark and muddy. 

7. Was called up early at the stage-house. Left Hartford before sunrise 
and rode to Norwalk. Some of the way the roads were quite bad. The stage 
was heavily loaded. Got along slowly. Saw people making cider.^ Some 
at East Windsor were plowing. 

8. Wet and rainy all day. . Read. Fatigued with my journey. Brought a 
number of books from home. Wrote. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Burt, 
of Manchester. 

9. Last evening and this morning read expositors. Expounded in the 
forenoon on the fourth chapter of Matthew. It is a new exercise here. 
The forenoon wet. Afternoon preached on i Thess. v : 3. At evening 
attended a meeting and preached without notes on Ps. iv : 5. Walked a 
considerable distance. Very tired. 

ID. Wet and warm. Had company. Read. Wrote.. Wrote to Mr. Por- 
ter, of Farmington, and Mr. McLean, of Simsbur}^ 

11. Walked out. Read. Visited a sick woman. Visited a school. The 
sun appears, after a long turn of wet and thick weather. Visited. Some 
worthy families here. 

12. Clear and pleasant. Wrote to Mr. Battell and to Mr. Ellsworth, 
of Hartford. Walked out and visited. At evening attended a Bible class 
meeting. Read. 

13. Wrote. Afternoon visited a school. At evening preached at the Old 
Well, with short notes, on Rev, xxii : 12. Baptized a child. Very pleasant 
for December. Quite tired. 

14. Wrote on a piece for a newspaper. Visited a school. At evening 
walked out and visited. I have to visit the schools alone. Warm and muddy 
going. 

15. Wrote. I find myself more occupied here than I expected. Wrote 
to Mr. Burt, of Manchester. Received a letter from my brother Francis. 
Read the Bible. This I am apt to neglect. Paid for a pair of shoes, ^2.25. 

16. We had a little snow. Preached on Ps. iv : 3 and Rev. iii : 18. 
I think the congregation increases. At evening walked out. Read. 



' Leaving $593.38 still due him. ^ In December. The apples must have 

^ Elisha Backus Perkins, a lawyer of been housed from freezing. Cider was gen- 

Pomfret, Ct., and graduate of Dartmouth erally made in September and October, and 

College, 1813. was one of the great industries. 



c827.] 



PREACHING IN NORWALK. 



77 



17. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott.' Walked out. Wet and cold. The society 
committee called on me and requested me to continue to supply them for 
some time to come. To which I agreed. No time fixed. Visited. 

18. Yesterday and this morning wrote a long letter to my brother 
Francis L. Rode to Fairfield with a delegate from this church, and was 
with the consociation — quite thin — who dismissed Mr. Hewitt^ to be the 
agent of the American Society for the Promotion of Temperance. Tarried 
with Mr. Osborne. Wet and cold, and bad riding. 

19. Rode home. Much fatigued. Walked out. At evening attended 
a small meeting. Wrote. 

20. Walked and visited at the south-west corner of the society. Had 
a long walk. Warm and muddy. Afternoon visited a school. At evening 
had a meeting in the same school-house and preached without notes on 
Eph. ii : 8. Much fatigued. Tarried out. We have a great deal of dark, 
and wet, and cloudy weather.' 

2 1. Walked and visited. Read the Bible. Walked out. When I was 
absent week before last the School Society here had their annual meeting 
and appointed me one of their school visitors. Wrote. 

22. Did not go out of the yard. Read. Looked over ancient records 
of this town and made extracts. Studied for tomorrow. Read the Bible. 
Quite cold. During this week we have had the intelligence of a great naval 
action in Greece,'' in which the allies have nearly destroyed the Turkish 
marine. It is a most important and wonderful event. 

23. Last night and this forenoon very cold. I much want my thermom- 
eter. Preached all day on Acts xiii : 2. Afternoon meeting quite full. 
At evening attended a meeting and preached without notes on Eph. ii : 8. 
A full meeting. Last evening received a long and good letter from my 
brother and sister Battell. 

24. Walked out. Read early records of this town and societ}\ The 
society here had a meeting ; they find it difficult to lay a tax. Nothing done 
relative to me. Wrote. 

25. By invitation of Mr. Sherwood, the Episcopal clerg^^man here, I 
attended his Christmas meeting and dined with him. Kindly treated.^ 



' Samuel Tudor Wolcott, who in the diary 
has generally gone by the name of Tudor. 
He was son of Mr. Abiel Wolcott, and now 
twenty-eight years of age. He had for some 
time been teaching. 

^ Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D., pastor at Fair- 
field, 1818-1827, a man of strongly conserva- 
tive tendencies and somewhat stern, but a 
powerful preacher and lecturer. 

^ This seems to have been mild for De- 
cember even in that locality, but the winters 
were much more open and broken along the 
southern line of New England, on the sound, 
than in Centra! and Northern Connecticut. 



■♦ This was the battle of Navarino, fought 
Oct. 20, 1827, between the united fleets of 
England, France, and Russia and the Turk- 
ish navy, when the latter was almost totally 
annihilated. More than thirty Turkish ships 
— many of them of great size — were burnt 
up or blown up, many of them by the Turks 
themselves, to prevent them from falling into 
the hands of their enemies. 

5 Dr. Robbins was not nearly so apt to 
regard the Episcopalians with disfavor as he 
was the Methodists and Baptists. The for- 
mer had the dignity of age, while the latter 
were more new and uncultivated. 



78 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROEBINS, D. D. [1827. 

I united with them in the communion. Wrote to Prof. Kingsley,' of Yale 
College. Read newspapers. The late naval victory over the Turks excites 
great attention and rejoicing. 

26. Rode out with Mr. St. John and visited a school. Dined with him. 
The schools here have been much neglected. Visited. Cold and windy. 
At evening attended a meeting. 

27. It snowed all day. Read. Read ancient records. Had company. 
Received a letter from S. T. Wolcott, of East Windsor. 

28. Warm. The snow thaws very much. Rode out and visited the 
Saugatuck school. Visited. Very bad going. Received a bundle of books 
from East Windsor, which came safe by the stage. Such as I have been 
much in want of. 

29. Having had an intimation that a New Year's sermon may be expected 
on Tuesday next, began a sermon for the occasion on Ps. xc : 12. At evening 
studied on an exposition. Find the want of expositors. Read the Bible. 
The ground mostly bare. 

30. Very pleasant for the season. Expounded on the first chapter of 
Romans, and preached on Ps. li : 17. Full meeting. At evening rode 
out and preached with short notes on Luke xix : 27. The Methodists have 
considerable of a congregation here. 

31. Wrote laboriously and finished a long sermon on Ps. xc : 12. Wrote 
late. Hindered by company. A year of holy chastisements and great mercies 
has closed. Bless the Lord, O my soul, for all his goodness. . 



' Prof. James L. Kingsley, LL. D. 



18 2 8- 

Januarv. 

1. Endeavored to devote myself and all my interests to the disposal 
of a holy God for the coming year. Attended public worship, according 
to a usage which has been observed here for a number of years, and preached 
a New Year's sermon and preparatory lecture on Ps. xc : 12.' The sermon 
mostly written yesterday. We had a good meeting. Baptized a child. Much 
fatigued. Received a valuable letter from Prof. Kingsley.^ 

2. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott.^ Visited. Dined out. Afternoon quite 
rainy. Wrote. Find it difficult to procure an almanack. Read newspapers. 
Wrote on the church records * of this town. 

3. Walked to the east part of the town. Warm. Very bad going. 
Visited families. Saw a sick child. At evening preached at a school-house 
without notes on John vi : 66-68. Tarried out. 

4. Visited. The frost seems to be mostly out of the ground. This town 
is not bad for mud. Walked out. We have almost constant dark and cloudy 
weather. Read the Bible. 

5. Read ancient records. Received a letter from Mr. Hewitt,' of Fair- 
field. Wrote to W. A. Hallock,^ of New York. The society committee 
informed me that they wish to have me continue here till spring, and that 
it is the wish of the people tliat I should consider myself on probation. 
Called on a Mr. Betts,^ a candidate just come home. His parents live near 
here. Warm and foggy. 

6. Preached in the forenoon on Luke xxii : 15. Administered the sacra- 
ment. The church is large. It is the practice here for the congregation not 
to be dismissed. The most of them remained at the ordinance. In the 
afternoon Mr. Betts preached. Afternoon and evening quite rainy. Had 
no evening meeting. 

7. Warm and wet. Walked out and visited. Wrote. At evening 
attended the monthly concert. Rather thin. It has not been observed here 
with great interest. 



' This was on Tuesday, which began the of Rev. Moses Hallock, of Plainfield, Mass.; 

year 1S28. The usage here referred to, pastor at Plainfield, 1792-1837. The son was 

though fitting and appropriate, was uncom- born in 1794; was graduated at Williams in 

mon. 18 19, and at Andover in 1822. He was sec- 

^ Prof. James L. Kingsley, LL. D., of Yale retary of the American Tract Society of New 

College. York, 1S25-1S70, and honorary secretary from 

^ Samuel Tudor Wolcott, of East Wind- 1870 to his death, in 1880 — aged eighty-six. 
sor. ^ Rev. Alfred H. Betts, a native of Nor- 

* In whatever place he preaches he usu- walk. In the summer of this same year, 

ally finds employment on the church records. 182S, he was settled over the church in Ber- 

5 Rev. Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D. lin, in New Connecticut, O. Many young 

^ William A. Hallock, D. D., was the son ministers in Connecticut went to Ohio. 

79 



8o 



DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D, 



[1828. 



8. Read. I do much less than I ought. Visited, At evening attended a 
praying-circle designed for the assistance of the American Education Society.' 
Read late. 

g. Walked and visited. Have to walk considerable distances. Read 
the Bible. This family had an evening circle of very respectable company. 

10. Last night we had a little snow. It thaws fast. Wrote. Began 
a sermon, which will probably be long, on John ix : 7. Walked out and 
visited. 

11. Wrote the most of the day on my sermon. Walked out and visited. 
The roads quite wet. Read. The countr}' are anxiously waiting for news 
from the Turkish divan.^ 

12. Wrote laboriously till late at night on my long discourse, and got half 
through. It will contain four sermons instead of two. 

13. Quite warm. Preached both parts of the day on the subject of the 
means of grace, from John ix : 7. It appeared to be interesting to the 
audience. We have some difificulty about the singing. At evening preached 
at a school-house with short notes on Luke xix : 27. The meeting quite full. 
Very tired. Had a ride to the meeting and back. Last evening received 
from East Windsor a large bundle of my books, which I sent for ; brought 
by the stage. I am very glad of them. 

14. Read in a volume of my Universal History. Made this almanack.' 
Wrote. Afternoon wet and rainy. On the 9th received an excellent letter 
from mv brother and sister Battell. On the loth received a letter from 
Rev. C. G. Lee,"* at Fairfield. My friends at Norfolk seem to be pleased 
with my present location here. Wrote to Mr. Lee, of Fairfield. 

15. Wrote to Mr. Battell. Visited. Walked down town and visited. 
Had a long walk. There are a great many people in this town. Read. 

16. Walked out. Have a rheumatic pain in my back. I think I took 
cold yesterday. Read the Bible. Afternoon rainy and freezing. Walked 
out and attended a small meeting in the evening. 

17. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Afternoon visited the grammar 
school. It ought to be in a better state. Visited. 

18. Resumed the writing on my long discourse on the means of grace. ^ 
Wrote the third sermon. In the evening the pain in m\ back which has 
troubled me for some days came on very severe. Was up late. Wrote nine 
pages. On the i6th received a letter from Williams & Co., Hartford. 

ig. Ver}' unwell. Had a poor night. The pain in my back this morning 



' The American Education Society had 
then a very strong hold upon the churches. 

- The divan was the Turkish court, or 
council of State. The war for Grecian inde- 
pendence was then going on. 

= That is, prepared it for keeping his 
diary. 

■i Rev. Chauncey G. Lee, son of Rev. 
Chauncey Lee, D. D., of Colebrook. He 



had been settled, 1821-1S26, at what is now 
Monroe, Ct., and in after years was settled 
over other churches, but just then was with- 
out charge. 

' The idea then prevailing with regard to 
divine sovereignty made the subject of means 
an interesting one and difficult to handle con- 
sistently. Dr. Robbins regarded it as a very 
important topic. 



1828.] 



PREACHING IX NORWALK. 



8t 



very hard. Had it bathed with opodeldoc. Did not leave my bed till near 
eleven o'clock. Am quite feeble and have constant pain. Able to read but 
very little. 

20. Very feeble, but relieved, through divine mercy, from my severe pain of 
yesterday. Attended meeting and preached in the forenoon on Ex. iii : 24, 25. 
Spoke quite feebly. Afternoon jDreached in continuance of my long discourse 
on John ix : 7. Not so much fatigued as I expected. Very full meeting. 
Did not go out in the evening. 

21. Am better than yesterday, but my rheumatic affection does not leave 
me. Very cold. The coldest day we have had this winter. . Cannot study 
much. Walked out and visited. 

22. I think the mercur}' this morning must have been near zero. I much 
want my thermometer. Wrote. Walked out. Received of the society 
committee here an order for $80. Rev. Mr. Noyes,' of Weston, called on me. 
Received a letter from S. T. Wolcott.^ Read. Am quite feeble. We have 
a little snow. 

23. Began to write a sermon on intemperance on Prov. xxiii : 29, 30.^ 
Can vi^rite but little. Walked out. At evening attended our Bible meeting. 
Very cold. Read. 

24. Wrote on my sermon. My rheumatic pains continue. Afternoon 
walked to the Old Well *.; visited and attended a meeting in the evening, and 
preached with short notes on John v : 40. Baptized three children. Coming 
home very cold. The harbor is closed. Visited late. 

25. Vv'rote and finished my sermon on intemperance. It is long, and 
I fear not as well written as it should be. I cannot bear study very well. 
I am greatly favored on account of my tremor. Yesterday or last evening I 
took a cold. My head is very much oppressed. Wrote to Mr. Bonney,^ of 
New Canaan. 

26. Warm and the top of the ground ver}' wet. Wrote the last sermon 
of my long discourse on the means of grace on John ix: 7. A kind Prov- 
idence has assisted me in my studies this week beyond what I could have 
expected. My cold is quite oppressive. 

27. We had a severe north-east storm of snow and rain all day. Few 
at meeting, yet as many as were expected. Omitted the sermons I expected 
to have delivered. Much oppressed with my cold and hoarseness. Preached 
all day on Ezek. xviii : 32. Got through better than I feared. There is 
some difficulty here about the singing. 



' Rev. John Noyes, a graduate of Yale 
College in 1779, who died sixty-seven years 
after graduation, in 1846. He was not then 
settled in Weston, but supplied the pulpit 
there from 1823 to 1836. He had, however, 
been the installed pastor there from 17S6 to 
1807. 

^ Samuel Tudor Wolcott. 

3 " Look not thou upon the wine when it 
is red," etc. 



■♦ The locality of the Old Well, as it was 
called, as already stated, was about a mile 
and a half from the village, southerly, on the 
west side of the creek. Many Connecticut 
towns had localities with quaint names. 

^ Rev. William Bonney, who was pastor 
at New Canaan, 1808-1831. He was a grad- 
uate of Williams College in 1S05, and died 
in 1839, at the age of sixty. He was a native 
of Cornwall, Ct. 



82 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

28. Wrote. It is cold again. We have many and sudden changes of 
weather. Walked out. Visited the Episcopal Academic School with Mr. 
Sherwood." It is in good order. Visited. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. 

29. Walked and visited the most of the day. My visiting seems to be quite 
acceptable. I hope it may do good. Received a letter from Mr. Bonney. 

30. Rode to the upper part of the town and visited some aged people and 
other families. Some parts of this town are rough, but it has a numerous 
population. At evening had a full and interesting meeting. 

31. Looked over newspapers. Walked to the Old Well. Visited divers 
families, the sick, and others. Tarried out. The winter is very moderate and 
open. I find less time here for study than I expected. 

February. 

1. Visited several families. Visited a school. Not in the best state. 
Wet, with snow and rain. Walked home in the wet. Received a good letter 
from my brother Francis. Wrote. I am, through mercy, better of my cold. 

2. Wrote. 'Looked ov&rthQ Connecticut History.^ Wet and rainy. Wrote 
to Mr. Porter,^ of Farmington. Am affected with rheumatic pains. We have 
a very wet season. 

3. Warm and wet. The ground is very wet. Had a good number at 
meeting. Preached the last sermon of my discourse on the means of grace, 
from John ix : 7, and the sermon lately written on intemperance on 
Prov. xxiii : 29, 30. V/e had a collection for the Society for the Promotion 
of Temperance and got $6. At evening attended a meeting at a school-house 
and preached without notes on Matt, xix : 17, last clause. 

4. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Walked out and visited. Traded, 
$2. At evening attended the monthly concert. We had a good meeting. 
This has been much neglected here. 

5. Wrote to my brother Francis L. Mr. Piatt •* called here from Darien. 
Walked out and visited. Attended the stated prayer-meeting for the Educa- 
tion Society. 

6. Wet and rainy. We have a very unpleasant winter. Attended the 
funeral of a man who died suddenly. Buried by the Masons. Walked out 
and visited. Very bad going. Read newspapers. Congress act almost 
contemptibly. Tarried out, 

7. Visited. Received a letter from Mr. Hooker, of Saugatuck.' Wrote. 
At evening attended a meeting of the officers of the Norwalk Bible Society. 
They have done well. 

8. Walked to Saugatuck and dined at Mr. Hooker's. Mr. and Mrs. 
Noyes* were there. Visited families. 



2 



' The Episcopal rector before noticed. ' Saugatuck was the Indian name for a 
Probably Trumbull's History, the first part of Westport. The Mr. Hooker who 
volume of which appeared in 1797, and the was there was Dr. Edward W. Hooker, be- 
second in 1818. fore mentioned. He was afterward to be 

3 Noah Porter, D. D. settled at East Windsor, as one of Dr. Rob- 

* Rev. Ebenezer Piatt, pastor at Darien, bins's successors. 

51825-1833. * Rev. and Mrs. John Noyes, of Weston. 



1S2S.] PREACHING IN NORWALK. 83 

g. Walked out and visited sick persons. People are beginning to plow. 
Attended the funeral of a colored man. There is a large number of blacks 
here. I\Ir. Bonnev ' came to exchanjre. Rode his horse to New Canaan." 
Wet and rainy. Roads \cry muddy. 

10. Preached on John iii : 3 and Isa. iii : 10, ii. Afternoon meeting 
quite full. This is a very good society. The good work of grace they have 
had here still continues. Delegates were appointed to attend the public 
conference. Am somethincr hoarse. At eveninjr rode a distance and attended 
a meeting. Preached without notes on Ps. iv : 5. Meeting full and serious. 
Others spoke. Walked about a mile — muddy and ver\- dark — and tarried 
out. Not uncommonly tired. 

11. Visited a woman who has been confined in a dark room three years 
with disease in the eyes. Visited. Rode to Mr. Bonney's. Cold and 
blustering. Rode home a horse procured at Norwalk for Mr. Bonney. 
He was unwell here yesterday and had some assistance in the exercises. 
Received a letter from Mr. Porter, of Farmington, inclosing a vote of our 
association ^ designed as a recommendation for me. It was kind. Attended 
the annual meeting of the Auxiliary Tract Society of this town. Gave them 
the usual annual rate — fifty cents — but declined becoming a member. The 
society conimittee have been renewing a negotiation which they had last fall 
with a INIr. Halsey, of New Jersey.* It was done privately and has produced 
a strong sensation. It is trv-ing to my feelings. The Lord be my helper. 

12. Walked and visited. Saw some persons ver}' sick. Conversed with 
some gentlemen on their society matters. Received a letter from my brother 
James. Read. 

13. Walked a distance and visited a sick man. Paid a merchant tailor 
$9.24. Wrote. Quite cold. The ground pretty hard frozen. At evening 
attended a full meeting. I receive many tokens of the attachment of this 
people. 

14. Read. Had company. Cold. Walked and visited. W'rote notes 
and preached at an evening meeting on Deut. xxxii : 18, 19. My labors 
are unremitted. 

15. Wrote. Wrote to Mr. Haskell/ of ^^'indsor, and to Gen. Howe, 
of New Haven. Walked out and visited. Hindered by company. 

16. Walked and visited several sick persons. I have the unexpected 
news of the sudden death of Gen. Clinton,* of New York. A great man has 
fallen. Paid for a horse to go the other day to New Canaan seventy-five 
cents. Read the Bible. 



■ Rev. William Bonne)'. *■ Gov. De Witt Clinton, born in Little 

- New Canaan touched Norwalk on the Britain, X. Y., March 2, 1769, died in Albany. 

north-west, and was itself bounded westerly N. Y., Feb. 11, 1S2S. A grand public mar. 

by the New York line. He was Go%-ernor of New York, 1817-1822, 

^ Hartford North Association. and again, 1S24-1S27. In the presidential 

"• The plan seems to have miscarried, but contest of 1S12, he received 89 of the 2.17 

the double-dealing was none the less disa- electoral votes, James Madison being then 

greeable. on his second election, receiving the reaiaii>- 

5 Harris Haskell. ing 12S. 



84 * DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

17. Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4 and T.uke xix : 43, 44. A mild and 
pleasant day and very full meetings. Rode out and attended a meeting in 
the evening and preached with short notes on Matt, viii : 2. The meetings 
appeared well. We have an account of a great work of grace in Milford. 

18. Wrote an obituary for Gov. Clinton. Dea. Kellogg called on me 
to know if I would consent to have a church meeting called to take some 
measures relative to my settlement with them. There are some parties 
among the people without particular reference to me. I engaged to give him 
an answer soon. Read the Bible. Wrote. Afternoon and evening we had 
a hard rain. Read the Bible. 

19. Walked and visited the most of the day. Visited a mourning family 
— the woman died last evening. Conversed with several persons respecting 
the society concerns. Last evening wrote to Gen. Terr}'^,' of Hartford. 

20. Walked a distance and visited a sick man. Attended the funeral 
of the woman lately deceased. At evening attended the evening meeting 
and baptized six children, of as many different families. Much fatigued. 
Informed Dea. Kellogg^ that I was willing to have them do as they thought 
proper about a church meeting. 

21. Wrote. The boys play ball in the streets. Afternoon walked to the 
east part of the town and visited. Warm and languid weather. The roads 
are considerably settled. Preached in the evening with short notes on 
Deut. xxxii: 18, 19. Very full meeting. Tarried out. 

22. Walked and visited the sick and others all day. Crossed the Sauga- 
tuck ^ and called on Mr. Hooker. At evening was carried home. Received 
a letter from Mr. Emerson, Mr. Battell, and Mrs. Battell* on one sheet. 
Read. 

23. Last evening received a letter from Gen. Howe, of New Haven. 
Am fatigued by my late labors. Wrote a sermon on Ps. cvi : 15. Walked 
out. Wrote five pages in the evening. I have many anxieties about the 
state of things here. 

24. Preached on Ps. cvi: 15 and Ps. 1: 5. Afternoon and evening we 
had a violent storm of rain and snow. The church here have some divisions. 
The Lord is holy in all his dispensations. I bear labor pretty well. 

25. Wrote an article for the paper. Sleighs move some. Visited. Read 
Knickerbocker's History of New Vork.^ 

26. Rode out and visited sick persons and others. There are many 
people here very negligent of gospel ordinances. Read. At evening attended 
the meeting of the directors of the Auxiliary Bible Society. Performed a 



' Gen. Nathaniel Terry. tuck to the district where was the church 

^ Dea. Kellogg seems not to have been of Green's Farms, over which Rev. Edward 

a deacon of the Norwalk church, but had W. Hooker, D. D., was settled from 1821 to 

probably moved there, bringing his title from 1829. 

some other place. '' All in his old home at Norfolk. 

^ The Saugatuck was a small stream run- ' Washington Irving's rollicking and 

ning along the edge of what is now the town graphic history of the Old Dutch settle- 

of Westport, and so gave the name Sauga- ments in New York. 



i828.] 



PREACHING IN NORWALK. 



8S 



marriage in a pretty private manner. From the New York Spectator of 
Feb. 26 : " Died in Becket, Mass., on the 19th ult., Mr. Sylvanus Snow,* 
aged ninety-seven years, a Revohitionary pensioner. He served several 
campaigns in the French war, and tlirough nearly the whole War of the 
Revolution. He was engaged in fourteen different battles, in all of which 
he was but once wounded, and that at Bunker Hill; and the ball which 
he then received has been carried in his body to the grave. He lived with 
his wife (who died at the age of ninety-one) seventy-two years, and has left 
a numerous posterity and an exemplary reputation." 

27. Read newspapers. Much is said and done in honor of Gov. Clinton. 
Rainy and warm. Visited. Attended our evening meeting. A county 
meeting was held here to nominate senators. 

28. Walked out and visited. Wrote. Afternoon we had a season of 
prayer, which is observed extensively to implore the blessings of divine 
grace upon our colleges.^ At the same meeting we had our preparatory 
lecture; preached with short notes on Ex. xvii : 11. Mr. Platt,^ of Darien, 
came for me, and I rode there in the evening and preached on Ps. 1 : 5. 
Quite tired. 

29. Walked and visited with Mr. Piatt. The family of the former 
Dr. Mather ■• are numerous and respectable. Cold and blustering. Had 
a few old pamphlets given me. Paid for a book fifty cents. Read. An inter- 
esting and, I hope, not unprofitable winter has closed. 

March. 

1. Wrote. On Thursday, 28th ult., I received a letter from my brother 
Ammi requesting me to go to Colebrook to preach, Dr. Lee' having been 
dismissed. I am at the divine disposal. Same day wrote to Mr. Emerson, 
of Norfolk. Visited an aged and sick woman. Wrote a short sacramental 
sermon on i Peter i: 11. Paid a woman for sewing work, $1.50. 

2. It snowed and rained the most of the day. Afternoon the storm was 
quite violent. Had a good number of people at meeting. Preached on 
I Peter i: 11 and Prov. xxiii : 26. Administered the sacrament. Had no 



evening meeting. 



Walked out. 



' Forty-four years old in 1775. 

- This day of public prayer for colleges, 
on the last Thursday of February, was first 
set apart for this purpose in the year 1822, and 
came to be very generally observed. Within 
a few years the day has been changed to the 
last Thursday of January, and is still ob- 
served, though not so generally as in former 
years. 

■' Rev. Ebenezer Piatt. 

■* The first minister of the church in 
Darien was Rev. Moses Mather, D. D., one 
of the descendants of the celebrated Richard 
Mather, of Dorchester, father of Increase 
and grandfather of Cotton. Moses Mather 
was a native of Lyme, Ct. ; was graduated at 



Vale, 1739; was sole pastor at Darien, 1744- 
1806 — sixty-two years. He was in his gen- 
eration one of the leading divines of Connec- 
ticut, and well known as a public writer. 

* Chauncey Lee, D. D., had been the min- 
ister at Colebrook from February, iSoo, to 
January, 1828. He had been previously set- 
tled, 1790-1797, at Sunderland, Vt. He was 
afterwards settled, 1827-1S35, at Marlbor- 
ough, Ct. He was born in Salisbury, Ct., 
1763, graduated at Yale College, 17S4, and 
died in Hartwick, N. Y., 1842. His father 
was Rev. Jonathan Lee, pastor at Salisbury, 
Ct., 1 744-1 788. Dr. Lee was a man of con- 
siderable genius, and well known as a 
preacher and writer. 



86 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1828. 

3. Warm. Wrote to my brother Ammi. Walked and visited. At even- 
ing attended the monthly concert at the Old Well. We met in the Methodist 
meeting-house. Quite cold. 

4. Walked and visited. Had a conversation with a member of the 
society committee. Read. Walked out and visited. At evening attended 
the prayer-meeting for the Education Society. 

5. Walked and visited. Afternoon rode to Saugatuck and visited 
Mr. Hooker and Esq. Sherwood. Cold. 

6. Rode to Poplar Plain. My neighbors supply me with the means 
of riding. Visited. Afternoon visited a school ; in better order than 
I expected. At evening attended a meeting, quite full, and- preached 
without notes on Num. x : 29. Very dark and tarried out. The outer 
parts of this town have been very much neglected. 

7. Rode home. The roads have got mostly settled. Mr. Clark,' of 
Milford, and Mr. Hooker" called on me. Wrote. Walked a distance and 
visited. The situation of the ecclesiastical interests here appears precarious. 

8. Read the Bible. A holy God tries me in such a way as he sees fit. 
Walked out. Wrote. Do not feel able to write a sermon. 

9. Preached on Luke ii : 7. At noon rode to Saugatuck and sui^plied 
Mr. Hooker; preached on Ps. Ixxxiv : 2. Mr. Hooker supplied me. Re- 
turned after meeting. Attended the evening conference and preached without 
notes on Acts viii : 5. Meetings quite full. A worthy woman died here last 
evening very suddenly. 

10. Wrote. Walked out and visited. Received of this society ^75, 
Wrote to Romulus Barnes,^ of Yale College, and sent $25 to him and $60 
to Orestes Wilcox," as beneficiaries of the Everest fund. Walked out and 
conversed about the society prospects here. 

11. Very rainy all day. Read. Afternoon attended a funeral with 
Mr. Sherwood, of one of his people. Visited. Read newspapers. Received 
a letter from my brother Samuel, now at Wilton, one from J. Wood, Esq., 
of Bridgeport, and one from Bailey Birge, of Norfolk. 

12. Two gentlemen of this society called to confer with me. Read. 
Received yesterday at the funeral a good linen scarf and a pair of black 
gloves. Wrote to Mr, Wood, of Bridgeport. Walked out. Attended the 
evening meeting. 

13. Read. An anxious day. Read the Bible. The society have had 
a meeting and voted to send for Mr. Halsey,^ of New Jersey, who has lately 



' Rev. John Clark. bury ; a young man of excellent character 

* Rev. Edward W. Hooker, D. D. and great promise, but he was not able to 

^ Romulus Barnes was a native of Bristol, finish his studies at Yale in his class of 

Ct. After graduation he studied theology at 1828, by reason of ill health, and died in 

the Yale Seminary in the class of 1831 ; was November, 1829, of consumption. 

commissioned as a missionary and minister, ' Job F. Halsey, D. D., a native of Sche- 

and died in Illinois in 1846. nectady, N. Y. ; graduate of Union College, 

'' Orestes Wilcox, who has been several 1816. He was pastor at Freehold, N. J., 

times mentioned as the principal beneficiary 1826-1828. The plan, for some reason, rais- 

of the Everest fund, was a native of Sims- carried. 



i828.] 



PREACHING IN NOKWALK. 



87 



informed them that he would come if thev wished. The committee desired 
me to supply for the present. I made no engagement. Walked out. The 
Lord be my helper. The society voted to pay me $9 per week instead of $8, 
the sum they have usually given. 

14. Am quite feeble. Wrote to my brother Francis, and to R. M. Sher- 
man, Esq.,* of Fairfield. Walked out. Attended our evening meeting and 
preached with short notes on Luke xiv : 18. Finished reading Knickerbocker's 
Nnv York. 

15. It snowed hard all day. Began to write a public lecture, to be 
delivered before a literary association of Bridgeport. Did not go out of 
the house through the day. It is the greatest fall of snow of the present 
season. Not cold. Read expositors. 

16. Expounded on Rom. ii., and preached on John i : 18. A good many 
sleighs at meeting. Very bad going. Attended an evening meeting and 
preached with short notes on Heb. iv : 11. Well attended. 

17. Borrowed a horse and rode on horseback to Fairfield and. Weston. 
At Fairfield visited Mr. Sherman^ and Mr. Hewitt.^ At Miss Osborne's, 
at Weston, found brother Samuel."* Had a good visit. They are wishing 
to dispose of their place at Weston. The snow wastes fast. 

18. Rode home. The roads very wet. Fatigued with my ride. Wrote 
to Mr. Whittlesey, of Danbur}-. Read. This society is in a precarious 
state. 

19. Wrote to Mr. Vail,' of Bridgeport. Wrote on my lecture. Have 
hindrances. Old Esq. Battell ^ called on me. Walked out. Attended an 
evening meeting. On Monday paid Mr. Hewitt, of Fairfield, $6, contributed 
here for the Temperance Society. 

20. Wrote steadily and nearly completed my lecture. The most of the 
snow is gone. Walked out. Read. 

21. Finished and revised my manuscript. Walked out. Afternoon rode 
to Bridgeport in the stage. Put up with Mr. Wood. At evening delivered 
my public lecture before the high school and a great collection of people. 
Spoke an hour. There was speaking by the pupils after me. Much effort 
has been made here for their public school. Cold. 

22. This town is quite flourishing. Visited Mr. Vail. Saw a small 
building burnt. The committee of the school paid for my stage-fare yesterday, 
and procured- a chaise for me to ride to Green's Farms. Mr. Wood sent his 



' Roger Minot Sherman, Esq., one of the 
most able lawyers of his time, was born in 
Woburn, Mass., in 1773; graduated at Yale 
College in 1829; settled in Fairfield, Ct., and 
died there, 1844. 

^ Roger Minot Sherman, Esq. 

3 Rev. Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D. 

* His brother Samuel's wife was an Os- 
borne, of Weston. 

5 Rev. Franklin Y. Vail does not appear 



as a Connecticut pastor except for two years, 
1826-1828, at Bridgeport. 

* \Villiam Battell, Esq., of Torrington, 
whose second wife was Mrs. Martha (Sher- 
man) Mitchell, daughter of Rev. Josiah 
Sherman and sister of Roger Minot Sher- 
man, Esq. William Battell was the father 
of Joseph, of Norfolk, who married Dr. Rob- 
bins's sister Sarah, and the Torrington and 
Norfolk families were intimate. 



88 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [l825. 

son with me. Quite cold. Called on Dr. Ripley.' Paid him, including $5 
paid to him last fall, $10.31 for books and $1.69. for pamphlets. He brought 
me with my bundles to Saugatuck, and one of my people brought me home. 

23. Preached on Heb. xii : 13 and Luke xvi : 25. Full meeting. After 
meeting rode to the north part of the town and performed a marriage. 
Visited and had a short meeting. 

24. Rode out and visited two schools. \\'arm and wet. Last night 
we hr.d a hard rain. The waters are high. Wrote a little. Visited. 
Received a letter from Dr. Knight," of New Haven. 

25. Visited two schools, each of more than fifty scholars. Get ver}' little 
assistance. The visitors are ver\' remiss. Preached in the evening with 
short notes on Jer. xxix : 13. Visited. Much fatigued. 

26. Visited two schools. Cold. At evening preached on Jer. xxix: 13 
in another part of the town. Visited. In the afternoon rode. Received 
a good letter from S. T. Wolcott.^ 

27. Rode to Stamford and attended the conference of the churches. 
The performances were good. Had company. There is a prospect that 
Mr. Lew^is," of Greenwich, will be dismissed. 

28. Received an excellent letter from my sister. Visited two schools. 
The schools here have done better during the season than I expected. But 
they much need improvement. The visiting is much neglected. In visiting 
eight this week at three I had one visitor with me, at two some other persons, 
and three I visited alone. Wrote. Visited. People are beginning to garden. 
Read. Very warm. 

29. Wrote to my sister and to S. T. Wolcott. Received a letter from 
Mr. Whittlesey, of Danbury. Paid for a new vest, $5, Visited. At evening 
rode to Darien to exchange with Mr. Piatt. 

30. Mr. Piatt rode to Norwalk and returned after meeting. Preached on 
Ps. cvi : 15 and Heb. vii : 25. This congregation is rather small. Attended 
an evening meeting and preached without notes on Ps. iv : 5. 

31. Paid an old lady of a Gorham family, formerly from Barnstable, for 
an old Bible, which, I believe, is the Bishops' Bible,^ $4. Rode home with 

' Hezekiah Ripley, D. D., pastor at = The Bishops' Bible, so called, came a 

Green's Farms (Saugatuck), 1767-1S21. He few years after the Geneva Bible. This 

died in 1831. Geneva version was so called because the 

^ Jonathan Knight, M. D., of New Haven, work upon it was done at Geneva, Switzer- 

was a native of Norwalk, born there in 1789. land, by eminent divines and scholars who 

He was graduated at Yale in 180S, and from were exiled from England during the reign 



'£>■ 



1813 to 1864 was connected as professor with of the bloody Mary. It was published in 

the Yale Medical School. He was one of 1557, and was largely in use among the Puri- 

the most eminent physicians of the State. tans, and many copies of it were brought to 

He died in New Haven, 1864. New England by the Pilgrims and Puritans. 

3 Samuel Tudor Wolcott. It is also known as the Breeches Bible. The 

''This was Rev. Isaac Lewis, Jr., son of Bishops' Bible, in 1568, was so named be- 

Dr. Isaac Lewis, who was pastor at Green- cause it was prepared by eight bishops, 

wich, 17S6-1818. The son was dismissed assisted by seven other able scholars. King 

that year, according to the suggestion made James's version, which has been in common 

in the diary. use now for 2^0 years, appeared in 161 1. 



X. 



l528.] PREACHING IN NORWALK. S9 

Mr. Morgan, of the bank. Wet. Began a sermon for the Fast on Joel ii : 
12-14. Hindered by company. Looked over my old Bible. It appears 
to have been printed in 1578. 

April. 

1. Wrote on my Fast sermon. Afternoon rode in the stage to Danbury. 
Had a pleasant visit at Mr. Whittlesey's.' He requested me to come here 
next week with an expectation of being employed to supply them.' The 
society here continues in a broken state. Saw some blossoms on the daffas. 

2. Rode early and returned to Norwalk. Cold. Quite fatigued. Wrote 
some. At evening attended a meeting. Much of this county is rough. 

3. Wrote laboriously on my Fast sermon, double and long, and finished 
it. The weather is cold. 

4. Fast. Wet. Prof. Goodrich^ called on me and attended meeting 
with us in the forenoon. It snowed considerably in the course of the day. 
Preached on Joel ii : 12-14. Thin meeting. Evening meeting prevented 
by the unfavorable weather. 

5. Walked out. Much fatigued. Received a letter from brother Francis. 
Walked out and visited. Cold and snow squalls. Received a letter from my 
good Uncle Starr. My nerves are considerably affected. 

6. Preached on Eph. ii : 14 and Hab. iii : 17, 18. W'rote notes and 
preached, by request, in the evening on the doctrine of the saints' persever- 
ance, on I Peter i : 5. After ministering to this people laboriously five and 
one half months it is painful to leave them. I commit all my ways to a holy 
God. 

7. Rode to Saugatuck and visited Mr. Hooker. Visited. Afternoon 
rode to New Canaan to Mr. Bonney's.* Attended the monthly concert in 
the evening'. A Mr. Perry,^ agent for the A. B. C, F. M., preached. Verj- 
cold and tedious. 

8. Rode home. Wrote. Preparing to remove. Visited. The prospects 
of this society are pretty poor. 

9. Rode and visited. Neighbors kindly favor me with a horse. It grows 
warmer. Have many calls to make. Paid a post office bill, $1.66. Visited 
a young woman low in a consumption. 

10. Walked and made calls. Paid for washing $2.35, which, with $1.44 
paid before, makes $3.79 to be paid me by the society. Paid a tailor seventy- 
five cents. I conclude to leave the most of my things here. I have been 
here twenty-four Sabbaths ; have been laborious in my business ; have been 
treated with much kindness and respect, and I think the state of the society 
has much improved. I am once more committed to the holy guidance of the 



'Where he boarded twenty-eight* years * Rev. William Bonney. 

before. ' Very likely this was John M. S. Perry, 

^ The First Church in Danbury had been of Sharon, who was graduated at Yale Col- 
vacant since Rev. William Andrews resigned lege the year before and was now studying 
in 1826. theology in New Haven. He went to Ceylon, 

^ Prof. C. A. Goodrich, D. D., of Yale and died there in 1838. Missionaries are 

College. often the most successful agents. 



90 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

God of my fathers. Left Norwalk to return or not, as infinite wisdom shall 
see fit. Rode in the stage to Danbury. Kindly received. This society 
is in a perplexed and divided state. Tarried at Mr. Whittlesey's. 

11. Walked out and called on old acquaintance. This town has 
increased very much in a few years. Afternoon rode to Ridgebury and 
saw Rev. Mr. Burton,' who is convalescing from a long and severe sickness. 
Returned. At evening a meeting was held here for the benefit of the Greeks. 
Mr. Hull,^ the Episcopal clergyman, delivered a good address. I prayed. 
There was a full and respectable meeting and a collection of $60. Tarried 
at Judge Cooke's.^ 

12. Walked and visited. Warm. Afternoon a man came with a wagon 
and carried me to Ridgebury. Mr. Davies," of Reading, supplies here 
(Danbury) temporarily. 

13. Preached for Mr. Burton on John i: 18 and Heb. vii : 25. He was 
able to attend meeting. This society is quite small and has assistance from 
the Domestic Missionary Society. Mr. Burton was raised up among them 
and is a very worthy man. The church is relatively large. I preached here 
considerably in 1800. A cold, rough east wind. Was brought back to 
Danbury and preached in the evening to a full meeting on Ps. Ixxxiv : 2. 
Mr. Bartlett,' of Reading, preached here today. 

14. Quite cold and uncomfortable. Walked and visited. Heard of the 
death of Ard Hoyt,* principal of the Cherokee Mission, a native of this town. 
Individuals desire me to continue here, though I have had no formal request 
from the committee. At evening attended a small meeting, the Sabbath- 
school concert. Tarried at Dea. Cooke's. 

15. Visited various places. Am treated with much kindness. Read. 
My situation is something unpleasant. I think I rejoice to be in the hands 
of a very holy God. 

16. Wrote. Visited. Read. Wrote to my brother Francis. At evening 
the society committee called on me and requested me to sujjply them a few 
Sabbaths. They are expecting a Mr. Winslow after some time. I bless God 
that I may be employed. 

17. Wrote to my sister Battell. Read the Life of Luther J Walked out. 
At evening attended a conference. 



' Rev. Nathan Burton, pastor at Ridge- 1810. The son was associate pastor, 1796- 

bury, 1821-1S41. He received his A. M. from 1809, but through ill health retired from the 

Yale College, in 1835. He died in Danbury, pastoral office and supplied vacant pulpits. 

Ct., Aug. 24, 1859, aged seventy-nine. He was one of those invalids that died at 

^ Rev. Lemuel B. Hull, rector of Episco- last in his ninety-fourth year, 
pal church at Danbury. * Rev. Ard Hoyt, though not educated for 

^ Judge Daniel B. Cooke, of the county the ministry, became an earnest Christian 

court. teacher and preacher. He was a native of 

'' Rev. Thomas F. Davies, a native of Danbury, Ct., born about 1778. In 1817 he 

Redding, and a graduate of Yale in 1813. went on his mission to the Cherokees. 
He died in 1865. ^ There were many lives of the great re- 

^ Rev. Jonathan Bartlett, son of Rev. former, even then, and we cannot tell which 

Nathaniel Bartlett, pastor at Redding, 1775- one he was reading. 



1828. J PREACHING IN NORWALK. QI 

18. Read Hope Leslie} Visited. Have many calls to make on old 
acquaintances. Am kindly treated. The weather is ver)^ dry and the season 
advances slowly. I hope I may be enabled to do a little good here. 
Prejudices are obstinate. 

19. Read my novel. Made calls. Wrote to Backus W. Birge.^ I feel 
relieved that I have a regular employment. I have never been forsaken 
in divine mercy. 

"20. A tedious storm of wind and rain all day. Few people at meeting. 
Preached on Ps. iv : 3 and Heb. vii: 25. Had no evening meeting on 
account of the rain. Read the Bible. 

. 21. Read in my novel. It gives a pleasing view of early times in Massa- 
chusetts. \^'rote. Wet and rainy. Afternoon set out on a journey to East 
Windsor. Hired a horse and chaise. Rode through Newtown to Woodbur}-. 
Tarried at a tavern. Got something wet. 

22. Rode to Hartford and home.^ From Danbury to Hartford is fifty- 
eight miles. At Hartford did several errands. Received a dividend of $45 
from the Phoenix Bank, declared in March. Paid for a silver can, bought 
two years since and the debt forgotten, $20 and $1.75 for interest. Paid 
$3.75 for a ream of paper. On the i6th of Januaiy I received a letter from 
Williams, of Hartford, informing me that he had a charge against me of $10. 
This was for things for Mr. Wolcott. I sent him an order for the sum on 
Hartford Bank. This he took, which was the amount of the dividend then 
due me, recently declared. The prospect of getting anything for the Everest 
fund from Birge is poor. I fear he will have his father's nervous depression. 
Mr. Whelpley '* was installed here last week. It was a matter of party violence. 
No opposition was made. He has an expensive family and is verj' poor. 
There is much division of feeling. 

23. Made a number of calls. Ver}- kindly received. The people are 
anxious about their society prospects. Rode to Enfield. My brother is much 
afflicted with his nervous headache. He thinks of taking a journey for his 
health. The weather is cold and the season advances very slowly. 

24. Had a good visit with my brother. Rode home. Crossed and made 
a visit at Pine Meadow. Mr. Haskell's little Thomas^ is a fine son. Called 
on Mr. Whelpley. He appears well in conversation. "Visited friends. Am 
unable to collect moneys as I hoped to do. Paid Mrs. Robbins $22 on a note 
that I owe her. My time here is much too short. The pecuniary burdens on 
this society are very great. 

25. Could not get away till late. Set out on my return. Hindered in 



' Hope Leslie, or Early Tij)ies in America, ^ When he says home in this place he 

\>y i\\C2i\xihor oi lie dwood. New York : White, means East Windsor, where he had lived 

Gallacher & White, 2 vols., i2mo, 1S27, by nearly twenty years, and not Norfolk. 

Catharine M. Sedgwick. Redwood and Hope * Rev. Samuel Whelpley, who was pastor 

Leslie were both published in 1S27. 1S2S-1S30. 

^ Of Hartford, whose children he had re- ^ Little Thomas Robbins Haskell was then 

cently baptized, and who was owing money about fourteen months old, and Dr. Robbins 

on a note belonging to the Everest fund. took pleasure in his namesake. 



92 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

Hartford. Rode to Plymouth.' Rode some time in the evening. My horse 
travels slowly. Paid in Hartford for my last year's Observer, %2 ; and for a 
pair of shoes for a donation, $2.25. Was spoken with- by individuals in East 
Hartford about going there as a supply. 

26. Wet and rainy all day. Quite cold. Rode to Danbury. Kindly 
received. Much fatigued, principally from w-ant of sleep. Received a letter 
from my brother Francis, which has arrived here in my absence. My cousin 
W. Le Baron, of Rochester, writes that he wishes me to go and supply a good 
parish in Plymouth County. 

27. A Mr. Condit^ was here from New York State and preached in the 
afternoon and evening. Preached in the morning on Eph. ii : 14. Mr. Condit 
is triangular^ in sentiment. Meetings not very full. We had a very interest- 
ing report from the conference which sat the last week at New Haven. 
There is a powerful work of grace among the convicts of the State Prison, 
at Wethersfield. 

28. Walked out. Paid $8 for my horse and gig last week. Attended 
the funeral of a young child. Read. Went into the meeting of the ladies 
in the court-house, who have been at work several days making garments for 
the Greeks. They have made five hundred and seventy garments, and over 
$60 and some other articles have been given in addition. It is a noble 
Christian charity.'' 

29. Wrote. Walked out. The population and wealth of this town have 
much increased in a few years. On the 24th Mr. O. Tudor paid me ^10, 
with interest, which he borrowed of me last September. Wrote to my cousin 
Capt. W. Le Baron, of Rochester. At evening preached at the house of 
a sick man, with short notes, on Rom. xiii : 12. 

30. Wrote to Rev, Mr. Bacon,* of New Haven, and Rev. H. Hooker,* 
of Hartford. I am poorly able to study. Walked out. A worthy woman 
in the neighborhood died suddenly of an apoplexy. Visited the afiflicted 
family. 

May. 

I, Walked out. Began a sermon in reference to the death of Mr. Ard 
Hoyt,' late missionary to the Cherokees, a native of this town, on Ps, xii : i. 
Afternoon attended the funeral of the woman who died yesterday. It was 
large and solemn. At evening attended a conference. Am much occupied. 



' Plymouth, Ct, ley, father of the minister just then settled 

^ This was, without much doubt, Rev. at East Windsor. 
Jonathan B. Condit, a native of Hanover, 4 it shows, too, especially, how strong and 

N. J., who was graduated at the College of wide-spread was the interest in the Greeks in 

New Jersey in 1S27, and was settled in Long- their struggle for independence, 
meadow, Mass., 1831-1837, when he was s d^. Leonard Bacon, 

called to a professorship in Amherst Col- * j^gy_ Horace Hooker, 

lege. 7 A somewhat extended notice of Rev. 

^ This term as here used is theological. Ard Hoyt may be found in the volume of 

It is derived from a theological treatise called the Missionary Herald for 182S (May num- 

7%^ TV/a;?^/^, written by Rev. Samuel Whelp- ber), p. 163. 



i82S.] 



PREACHING IN NORWALK. 



93 



2. Wrote. Read the Bible. Wrote on my funeral sermon. Afternoon 
preached a preparator>- lecture on John xv : 9. Walked out and visited. 
Shower}\ Baptized a child. 

3. Warm and wet. Wrote laboriously and finished my sermon on 
Ps. xii : I. It is long. Mr. Hoyt was a very valuable missionar\-. Am pretty 
feeble and something nervous. 

4. Warm and ver)- pleasant. Preached on Luke xxii : 15 and the sermon 
on Ps. xii : i on the death of Mr. Hoyt. Received a woman into the church. 
Administered the sacrament at the close of the afternoon exercise. Much 
fatigued. At evening attended the conference. Did but little. Full and 
solemn meeting. 

5. Am pretty feeble. Vegetation advances rapidly. Read. Attended 
a training and dined with a company. Wrote. On the 2d a woman was 
received into the church here by letter. At evening attended the monthly 
concert. This has been too much neglected here. 

6. Am fatigued and feeble. Rode to New Haven — thirty-five miles. 
Some of the road pretty bad. A way new to me. The entrance of the 
Governor ' appeared well. At evening attended the meeting of the Coloniza- 
tion Society. Am hospitably entertained at Esq. Daggett's.^ Was inquired 
of by yir. C. Olmsted/ of East Hartford, by desire of the committee there, 
whether I could be obtained for a supply. Mr. Olmsted appears very desirous 
to have me go there. We had a thunder-shower. 

7. Attended the Convention of the Clerg}% The collection of clergy 
is small. Many are gone to the anniversaries in New York. Mr. Wheaton " 
preached very well, but too short. The clergy treated ver}^ politely by the 
sheriff. The exercises were in the Episcopal church. The convention 
finished their session toward evening. Saw Mr. Battell. Gave Mr. Emerson, 
for my mother, $10. Gave the Society of the Alumni' of Yale College $25 
and became a life member. Mr. Boardman * preached at a meeting for the 
Domestic Missionary Society. 

8. Made various calls. Received a letter from Rev. H. Hooker, of 
Hartford. On Tuesday saw several apple-trees in blossom. Paid Gen. Howe 
$11.50 for Oriental Bibles. Paid thirty-five cents for old pamphlets. Rode 
home. Attended an evening meeting. The conference of the churches was 
at Ridgebur}^ today. Two of the delegates attended our meeting. The House 
of Representatives is said to be more respectable than for several years. 
j\Iuch fatigued. 



' The Governor that year was Gideon 
Tomlinson, of Fairfield, by re-election. 

^ Judge David Daggett, born in Attle- 
borough, Mass., 1764; graduated at Yale, 
17S3; died in New Haven, 1851 ; an eminent 
la-^^yer and judge, and for many years a lec- 
turer in Yale College. 

^ Charles Olmsted, Esq. 

■* Dr. Nathaniel S. Wheaton, of Christ 



Church, Hartford, afterwards President of 
Trinity College. 

-' Then a new organization formed largely 
through Dr. Robbins's influence. 

* There were two ministers named Board- 
man then settled in Connecticut — William 
J., of North Haven, and Charles A., of 
New Preston. The former was probably the 
preacher on this occasion. 



94 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

9. Wrote. Quite cool. Walked out and visited. Wrote to Lieut.-Gov. 
Peters," at New Haven. A great blowth on the fruit-trees. 

10. Wrote to Rev. H. Hooker, of Hartford, and to Hawley Olmsted, 
at the Assembly. Read the Governor's Message. A very good one. Paid 
for my horse and carriage to New Haven, $4.50. Read Lewis's' Bible Trans- 
lations. 

11. Preached on John iii : 3 and Ps. 1: 5. Attended the Sabbath-school, 
which appears well. This congregation is not as large as Norwalk. There 
was a full Universalist meeting at the court-house. At evening had a full 
conference. There are many quite serious people here. 

12. Walked and visited. Visited a school, in a pretty low state. The 
spring advances rapidly. The ground is becoming quite dry. At evening 
attended the Sabbath-school concert, 

13. Wrote. Visited. Visited a school. The duty of school visitors here, 
as in other places, has been much neglected. Read the Bible. My reading 
has been too much neglected. 

14. Read History of Bible Translations. Walked out and visited. Quite 
cool. At evening rode to Bethel and performed a marriage. Rev. ^Nlr. Lowe ' 
there is now absent. That place increases. 

15. Read the Bible. Finished the reading of it in course. It is some 
years since I began it. Improperly long. Read in Bible Translations. 
A valuable work. Visited a good school. Rainy. Our evening meeting was 
prevented. 

16. Walked and visited. Visited a female school. I hope the ecclesias- 
tical matters here are in a state for improvement. Read Edwards on the 
Freedom of the Will. 

17. Wrote to Mr. Elisha Whittlesey, formerly my pupil here, now a member 
of Congress. '' Warm and very unpleasant. Nature appears in its greatest 
beauty. Wrote. Began to read my Bible again in course. I hope to read 
it through, and sooner and better than heretofore. 

18. Attended the Sabbath-school before meeting. Warm. Preached on 
2 Cor. i: 12 and Luke xi : 13. Rode to Bethel and preached at a third 
meeting on Isa. iii: 10, 11. That society is increasing. Mr. Lowe is absent 
on a journey. Towards night and in the evening we had a good deal of rain. 
Quite tired. We had no evening meeting. 



' John S. Peters, of Hebron. He sue- ^ Rev. John G. Lowe was pastor at Bethel, 

ceeded Gov. Tomlinson as Governor, and Ct., 1822-1829. 
held the office, 1831-1833. •• A verj' honorable and useful public man. 

- Rev. John Lewis, 1675-1746. He was He was born in Washington, Ct., Oct. 19, 

born in Bristol, Eng. ; was preacher in sev- 1783; removed to New Connecticut in 1806; 

eral places, but far better known by his was Representative to Congress from Ohio, 

learned authorship. Among other works he 1823-1839; was general's aid in the War of 

wrote the Life of folui Wukliffe, and an edi- 1812; was appointed by President Harrison 

tion of Wickliffe's Translation of the Bible, Auditor of the Post Office Department, and 

prefaced by the history of the different trans- by President Taylor First Comptroller of the 

lations of the Bible into English. This was Treasury. He was an excellent specimen of 

published in 1731, folio. an old-time office-holder. 



1828.] PREACHING IN DANBURY, 95 

19. Set out early with others in a public carriage and rode to New Haven. 
Found many acquaintances among the members of the Assembly. Attended 
to the business of common schools. Quite cool. 

20. Visited the Governor. Sat a little while in the respective Houses. 
The House of Representatives this year is unusually respectable. They 
do business with dispatch. Made several calls. At evening attended the 
annual meeting of the Society for the Improvement of Common Schools. 
I think the Assembly will do something on the subject. 

21. Breakfasted with Prof. Olmsted.' Mr. Battell is here. Had various 
things to attend to. Wet and rainy. Afternoon rode in the stage to Norwalk. 
Cold and wet. The ecclesiastical matters here are in a poor state. Tarried 
at Mr. Benedict's. 

22. Last nisfht and this forenoon it rained hard the most of the time. 
Last evening received a letter from my brother James, and one from 
Mr. Bacon, of New Haven. Made a number of calls. People here feel 
unpleasantly. Mr. Halsey, of New Jersey, has treated them badly. After- 
noon rode in the stage to Danbury. Have been prospered on my journey. 
My professional prospects rise and fall. I hope to leave all with a holy God. 
At evening attended the conference. 

23. The late rain has been a great blessing. Wrote. On the 20th bought 
some books of Gen. Howe. Read the Bible. Began to read Mr. Pitkin's " 
new History of the United States. Walked out and visited. 

24. Read my History. It is a valuable work. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Crocker,^ 
at New Fairfield, and received a letter from him. Visited Dea. Hoyt, quite 
low in a consumption. Had a new coat and vest made of fine cloth. 

25. Preached on Ps. cvi : 15 and Mark x: 21. I think the congregation 
here increases. Attended the Sabbath-school as usual. At evening showery 
and the conference was thin. 

26. Visited Dea. Hoyt. He appears like a ripened saint. Wrote to 
Mr. Timothy Pitkin and Charles H, Olmsted, of General Assembly. Occupied 
with company. Read. At evening the committee of the society requested 
me to continue to supply them for the present. They have some expectation 
of Mr. Winslow. I desire to commit my ways all to a holy and a faithful God, 
full of compassion and of great mercy. 

27. Rode with Mr. Crocker, of New Fairfield, to Tnmibull and attended 
Fairfield East Association. This body is small, but the churches are better 
supplied than in western district. Mr. Kent,"* the minister here, is a Scotch- 
man. Had no meeting till evening. Mr. Leavitt,^ of Stratford, preached on 
intemperance. I made an address. Very cool. 



' Denison Olmsted, LL. D., professor at * Rev. James Kent, pastor at Trumbull, 

Yale from ^825 to his death, in 1S59. 1S25-1835. 

- Timothy Pitkin, LL.D., a native of Farm- ^ Joshua Leavitt, D. D., afterwards so 

ington. famous as an anti-slavery editor and leader, 

^ Rev. Daniel Crocker, minister at New was settled at Stratford, 1825-1S2S. He was 

Fairfield, 1827-1831. He was a graduate of often much abused by those who did not 

Yale, 1782. know him, but he held a steady course. 



96 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

28. We had to go a distance to sleep. The association licensed a young 
man to preach.' They finished their business after noon. Rode home. 
Quite tired. In the evening saw Prof. Stuart.^ 

29. Walked out and made calls. Traded, $1.54. Wrote. Rode out with 
company and visited. Attended the evening conference. Mr, Lowe, of , 
Bethel, called on me. 

30. Read Pitkin's History. It is a work of much labor and value. Wet 
and rainy. Walked out and visited. I do not labor as much as I ought 
to do. 

31. Read. Quite cool for the season. Read expositors. Am much 
troubled with dissipated thoughts. Received some books from New Haven, 
I have closed an anxious spring and have not been forgotten in the great 
mercies of the Lord. 

June. 

1. In the forenoon expounded on Rom. i : 1-26. Preached in the 
afternoon on Luke xvi : 25. At evening had a full conference. There was 
a large Universalist meeting in the day and evening at the court-house. 
My walk to meeting is something tiresome. 

2. Read. The late session of Congress has been low and not honorable 
to the nation.^ Wrote. Turned over my inkstand, as appears."* Paid for 
a pair of shoes, $2.25. At evening had a pretty full meeting at the concert. 
This meeting has been too much neglected here. 

3. V/rote to my sister Battell and to S. T. Wolcott. Rainy. Read, 
'Walked out and visited. We have a very wet season. 

4. Visited a numerous district school. Warm and sultr}-. Dined out. 
Visited a young woman in a very serious state of mind. I hope God will 
remember us in his great mercy. At evening performed a marriage. 

5. Visited a private school. Very warm. Was at a funeral attended 
by a Methodist preacher. Read Pitkin's History. Last evening received 
a letter from Mr. Pitkin. Attended the evening conference. 

6. ■ Wrote. Left off my flannel. Read the Bible. I am too negligent 
in business. We have warm summer weather. Read the Bible, Visited the 
sick and others. 

7. Vegetation is very rapid. Read Pitkin's History. Read the Bible. 
The heat is severe. We had a pretty hard shower. Walked out. Received 
a circular-letter from Williams College. 

8. Very pleasant. Preached on John i: 18 and Ps. li : 17. Meetings 
full and attentive. Had a good conference. A young woman here has 
hopefully got religion within a few days. 



' Rev. Ransom Hawley. Adams. It was, on the whole, a prosperous 

- Rev. Moses Stuart, of Andover Semi- period of our history, tliough party spirit, on 

nary, the tariff and other questions, ran high. 

^ This was the first session of the Twenty- ■• What the evidence that he turned over 

first Congress, which was the second Con- his inkstand, /;-£? and con, was, does not ap- 

gress during the presidency of John Quincy pear. 



[828.] 



PREACHING IN DANBURY. 



97 



9. Read. Visited the sick. Cool weather. Walked and visited. At 
evening attended the Sabbath-school concert. 

10. Read the Bible. Wrote to Mr. Mallory,' of Norwalk. Rode to Long 
Ridge.'' Visited families and a small school. Some parts of this town are 
rough. Cool. Wrote. 

11. Wrote a report for the Everest fund for General Association, and 
another paper respecting consociational rules for the same body. Walked 
out. Take tea out the most of the days. 

12. Walked and visited. Warm and sultry. Visited Dea. Hoyt.^ Much 
worse and very low. Visited a sick child. People very little instructed. 
Walked out. Attended our evening meeting. We have to be quite short. 

13. Rode with company to Miry Brook.* Visited families, and a school, 
and Mr. Burton,' of Ridgebury. Visited Dea. Hoyt in the morning, in a 
senseless state, and toward night he died. A great loss to the church and 
society. Eat strawberries. 

14. Rode to the north part of the town and visited. Many UniversaliSts 
in that quarter. Very warm. Saw persons getting hay. Walked out. 
Wrote. Get a little time for study. Paid for dressing my hat, fifty cents.* 

15. Preached on Heb. xii : 14 and i Cor. xv : 56, 57. Attended at noou 
the funeral of Dea. Hoyt. Verj^ warm. Attended the evening conference. 
Meetings quite full. This church and people have sustained a great loss 
in the death of Dea. Hoyt. 

16. Set out pretty early on my journey. Rode to Bridgeport with a horse 
and wagon which a gentleman here wished to send down. He gave me $1. 
Cool. Called on Mr. Hamlin. Mr. VaiP here is like to be dismissed. 
Am much fatigued. In the evening rode in the stage to New Haven. 
Tarried there and rested a while. 

17. Paid Mr. Maltby $4.80 for a dozen Village Hymns.^ For those which 
I have sold here I get $3.75. Delivered to Mr. Bacon my reports for the 
General Association, which is to sit here today. Saw sundry ministers. 
'Rode in the stage to Hartford. Hot and sultry. Rode to East Windsor, 
my good home. Tudor' is absent on a journey in poor health. Rode in the 
evening to Mr. Bissell's.'" Eveline " has a son '^ three weeks old. Great are 
God's mercies. There is a good deal of religious attention here. Dr. Reed 



' Mallory was not a common name in 
Norwalk, but we find there the names of 
Alfred Mallory and Lewis Mallory. 

^ One of the out districts of Danbury. 

^ Dea. Amos Hoyt. There were three 
deacons of the name Hoyt in this First 
Church of Danbury during its history. 

■* Miry Brook is one of the local districts 
in the town of Danbury. The town was 
large, with many local names. 

5 Rev. Nathan Burton, already noticed. 

* They made nice hats in Danbury, and 



Dr. Robbins, it will be' remembered, had 
often ordered a new hat there. 

' Rev. Franklin Y. Vail. 

* Dr. Asahel Nettleton's book, Village 
Hymns, was issued in 1827. From 1S27 on 
to 1850, or i860, it had an immense circula- 
tion. It was used chiefly for conference and 
neighborhood meetings. 

9 Samuel Tudor Wolcott. 
•° Edgar Bissell. 

" Mrs. Eveline (Wolcott) Bissell. 

'- Tudor Bissell. 



98 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBEINS, D. D. [1828. 

paid me, in a note against Mr. Wolcott which I indorsed on his note, $117. 
Was up late. 

18. Put up my things. Walked out. Ecclesiastical matters here are 
in a critical state. Rode with Ursula' to Hartford. Called at East Hart- 
ford. Rode in the stage to New Haven. Hot and a little showery. At 
Hartford received a dividend of $10 of Hartford Bank. At evening 
attended a meeting of ministers, relative to measures to restore the funds 
for Dr. Taylor's^ professorship. 

19. Attended the General Association. Had to speak considerably to 
vindicate the committee of the Everest fund. The business concluded well. 
Saw Orestes Wilcox, one of our beneficiaries, in ver}^ poor health. I am very 
anxious about him.' Afternoon rode in the stage to Bridgeport. This town 
is improving. Tarried at Mr. Hamlin's.* Paid at New Haven for a clothes- 
brush, eighty-three cents. Much feel the want of sleep. 

20. Called on Mr. Wood,' and others. Saw young Mr. Waterman, now 
of Providence. Rode in a mail wagon to Danbury. Quite dusty. Have 
had through great mercy, a prosperous journey. Read the declaration 
of war of Russia against Turkey. 

21. Wrote. Am not much fatigued with my journey. Gave to an agent 
for the sufferers by a late fire at Bridgeport, $2. Paid for a pair of shoes, 
$2.25. My feet are quite tender, a new comj^laint with me. Walked out. 
Received a kind letter from Mr. E. Whittlesey,'' member of Congress, New 
Connecticut, and one from E. N. Sill,' of Windsor. Mr. Da}-,^ of Greenfield, 
called here. Warm and dusty. 

22. Attended the Sabbath-school as usual. Preached a part of my long 
sermon on the means of grace, on John ix : 7, and on John iv : 29. Attended 
the evening conference. A good many people here from abroad. 

23. Walked out. Wrote. People are beginning their haying. Wrote 
to Mr. Sill, of Windsor. Afternoon rode to Pembroke district; visited their 
school, and at evening had a full and good meeting. Preached on Ps. iv : 5. 
Got home late. 

24. Walked out. Quite warm. Afternoon rode .to Miry Brook district, 
visited, and at evening had a meeting in the Baptist meeting-house. Mr. 
Benedict,' the preacher, attended me. Mr. Burton assisted in the meeting. 



' Miss Ursula Wolcott was then thirty- Mr. Hamlin were law partners in Bridge- 

.two years old. port. 

^ Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor, who had been * Hon. Elisha Whittlesey, already noticed, 

settled as successor to Prof. Moses Stuart, in ^ Elisha N. Sill, son of Dr. Elisha Sill, of 

181 2, as pastor of the Center Church, New Windsor. 

Haven, was dismissed in 1S22 to be the theo- * Rev. Richard V. Dey (not Day), pastor 

logical professor in Yale Seminary. The at Greenfield parish (Fairfield), 1823-182S; 

word "restore," used in .the diary, implies of Columbia College, New York, 1818. Re- 

that some of the funds had been lost. ceived the honorary degree of A. M. from 

3 It has already been stated that he died Yale, 1823. 
in 1829. 9 Rev. George Benedict. Another Bap- 

* Alanson Hamlin, Esq. tist minister then at Danbury was Rev. 

* Joseph Wood, Esq. Mr. Wood and Nathan Bulkley. 



1828.] PREACHING IN DANBURY. 99 

Preached on Num. x : 29. About the close of the meeting it began to rain, 
and we had a heavy shower. The thunder was very near and hard. The heat 
oppressive. Vv'as carried out and brought home by friends. Quite late home. 

25. A very hot day. I'he thermometer at 90°, probably more. Read the 
Bible. Mr. and Mrs. Whittlesey rode away. Visited. Was requested to 
deliver an address at the approaching anniversary of independence. The 
ground much refreshed by the rain. 

26. Made calls. Wrote. Cooler, Wrote to Mr. McEwen,' of New 
London. The effects of the ecclesiastical contentions here still remain. 

27. Began to write my address for Independence. Wrote slow. Walked 
out and visited. Many people here from New York, A great crop of grass. 
A very fine time for vegetation. 

28. Very warm and sultry. Got medicine for a degree of strangury- 
complaint. Can do but little from the langour of the season. Wrote on my 
address. Read Pitkin's History. 

29. The heat very severe and oppressive. Preached the second and third 
parts of my long sermon on John ix : 7. Meeting rather thin. At evening 
a shower prevented our conference. We have had a great deal of thunder 
the present season. 

30. Read newspapers. The presidential contest is much the most severe 
that it has ever been except in 1800.^ The opening war in the East excites 
much attention,^ Wrote, The heat continues. Walked and visited. 

July. 

1. Wrote diligently on my address. It requires more labor than I ex- 
pected. The heat is something abated. Walked considerably for exercise. 
My health is not quite as good as it has been. 

2. Wrote. Afternoon attended a meeting of the deacons usual before 
the sacrament. Conversed with a church member who absents from the 
sacrament. Received a letter from my good Uncle Starr. 

3. Wrote and finished my Independence address. Considerably fatigued 
with the writing. Mrs. and Miss Whittlesey returned from their journey. 
Attended the evening conference. 

4. Walked. Firing and music were heard early. We had our public 
service in the afternoon, A great collection of people. Was about an hour 
in the delivery of my address. Had no assistance, which I expected, from 
the other ministers of the town. Judge Cooke read the Declaration. The 
people drank toasts and fired cannon. Towards night we had a severe 
storm of rain and hail. Walked out. Saw Judge Kent.'' In the evening 
the taverns were still. 



' Dr. Abel McEwen. *■ There can be little doubt that the Judge 
^ Andrew Jackson was elected that year, Kent whom he saw was James Kent, LL. D. 
but it seems they were wont then to point He was at that time law professor in Co- 
back to the first election of Jefferson, when lumbia College, New York, and was deliver- 
party spirit was fearfully high. ing those courses of lectures which were the 
^ War between Turkey and Russia, dc- basis of Kent's Commentaries, 4 vols., pub- 
clared April 26, 182S. lished 1S26-1S30. 



lOO DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

5. Wrote. Walked out and visited. The hail-storm has done consid- 
erable damage to crops and windows. Afternoon attended a preparator\- 
lecture and preached with short notes on Matt, iii : 8. Baptized five children. 
Am fatigued with my late labors. Read the Bible. 

6. Cool. Preached the last part of my long discourse on John ix : 7 and 
on I Peter i: 11. Administered the sacrament. Baptized a child. Meet- 
ing quite full. At evening held our conference in the meeting-house. Had 
read the first of Mr. Hawes's Lectures to Young Men} 

7. Read newspapers at the printing-office. Wrote. At evening attended 
the monthly concert of prayer. Not as well attended as it should be. 

8. Wrote a letter to the South Church in New Marlborough. Wrote to 
Mr. Battell. Walked out and visited. We had a hard shower. An unfavor- 
able time for getting hay. The late hail-storm has done injury to the crops. 

9. Wrote to Mr. David Leavenworth,^ of Great Barrington, respecting 
the proposed Housatonic Canal. Afternoon, Mr. Winslow,^ the candidate 
whom this people have long had in view, came here as an agent soliciting 
donations for the theological institution of Yale College. Unsettled weather. 

10. Walked with Mr. Winslow. Afternoon, rode with him to Bethel and 
called on Mr. Lowe.* That place greatly needs a devoted minister. At even- 
ing attended our conference. Mr. Winslow assisted. Paid $2.25 for the 
volume of the Remains of Air. C. IVilcox} 

11. Showery. There is a good deal of hay and grain out. Mr. Winslow 
was here the most of the day. This family have a number of friends here 
from New York. Called on my Uncle Starr, who is here on a visit to his 
friends. He is quite smart, in his eighty-fourth year. Walked out. 

12. Walked and visited an aged sick woman. Visited. My feet are ten- 
der for walking. Cool and very pleasant. My good uncle spent the after- 
noon with me. Am very much taken up. Wrote. Yesterday gave Mr. 
Winslow, for the Yale College Theological Institution, $5. Read my Bible. 

13. We had a hard rain the most of the day. Uncle Starr assisted in the 
forenoon exercise very well. Preached on 2 Cor. v : 19. Mr. Winslow came 
here from Bethel and preached in the afternoon on the subject of his agency. 
Thin meeting. Had no conference. Walked out with Uncle Starr. 



' This book was published in 1828, and ' This was Rev. Hubbard Winslow, D. D., 
the sale of it was immense. There was who was graduated at Yale College in 1825 
something in the awakening seriousness of and at the Yale Seminary in 1828. Instead 
those times, and something in Dr. Hawes's of going to Danbury he went to Dover, N. H., 
peculiar style of thought and speech, which where he was settled in December, 1S28. He 
contributed to its extraordinary circulation afterwards made quite a record for himself 
at home and abroad. One hundred thou- as a popular preacher in Boston, at the Bow- 
sand copies are estimated to have been sold doin Street Church. He was a native of 
in this country, and a still larger number in Williston, Vt., and died in that town in 1864, 
Great Britain. One Scotch publisher issued aged sixty-five years, 
fifty thousand copies. ^ Rev. John G. Lowe. 

^ Dr. David Leavenworth was a promi- ' Rev. Carlos Wilcox, of the North 

nent citizen and magistrate of Great Barring- Church, Hartford, whose brilliant beginning 

ton, Mass. was so soon clouded. 



1828.] PREACHING IN DANBURY. lOI 

14. Wrote. People are very anxious for clear weather. Walked out and 
visited. Towards night we had a hard shower. Our Sabbath-school concert 
was prevented by the rain. Tarried out with Mr. Winslow. Wrote to my 
brother Francis. 

15. Walked with Mr. Winslow on his agency. Read. Visited. Crops 
are suffering with the wet. 

16. Mr. Winslow went away. He has procured nearly $100 here. Wrote 
to W. W. Ellsworth, of Hartford. Walked to the Bogs ' and visited families. 
Sectarianism has done great injury in this town. Got quite wet. People are 
much alarmed at the growing of their grain. 

17. Walked and visited. Read Pitkin's History. Pleasant, yet we had 
some light showers on the grain and hay. Attended the evening meeting. 
We prayed particularly for a favorable season for the gathering of the 
crops. 

18. Very fine weather. The people very laborious. Read the Bible and 
Pitkin's History. Visited. I have many calls for that duty. The ground is 
ver)^ wet. Visited sick persons. Paid a merchant $2.47. 

19. Read the Bible. Wrote. Walked out. Towards evening rode to 
Bethel to exchange with Mr. Lowe. Much grain has been injured by grow- 
ing. 

20. Tarried last night at Esq. Taylor's.* Mr. Lowe rode to Danbur)^ and 
returned after meeting. Went early to a district Sabbath-school. Preached 
on 2 Cor. v: 19, and Luke xvi : 25, This is, in size, a good congregation. 
This society has been very unfortunate. After meeting rode home. Quite 
warm. At five o'clock preached by desire in the Methodist meeting-house, 
without notes, on Ps. iv: 5. Their preacher was with me. Attended the 
evening conference. Poor hay weather. 

21. Am better today than I expected. Wrote to my cousin J. Battell, Jr. 
Read newspapers. Read the Bible. At evening visited. Poor hay weather, 

22. Spent the most of the day at a neighbor's, looking over writings of 
Dolley E. Hoyt, deceased, who belonged to the Arkansas Mission. We had 
a very hard rain. At evening performed a marriage. A splendid wedding. 
Visited a man severely sick with a bilious colic. 

23. Wrote on a piece for the newspaper. Read Pitkin's History. Read 
the Bible. Visited the sick man, apparently better. At evening was at a 
party, the second part of the wedding. Things very decorous. 

24. Walked out and visited. Very warm. We now have pretty good 
weather for farmers. Read. Attended the evening conference. Received a 
letter from my Uncle Starr. 

25. Worked at Miss Hoyt's papers. The heat \&xy severe. Occupied 
with company. Visited. Many people are in town from New York. We 
have hot nights. 

26. Walked out. Wrote. Am quite debilitated with the heat. Read 



" Probably the same general locality that * Edward Taylor, Esq., of Bethel parish, 

is called Miry Meadow. Danbury. 



I02 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

Colden's ' valuable Memoirs on the New York Canals. Am not able to study 
closely. 

27. The heat appears to abate a little. Last night we had some rain and 
a great deal of thunder. It has been a remarkable year for thunder. Ex- 
pounded on Rom. i : 26 to ii : 17, and preached on Num. xxiii : 19. Meeting 
rather thin. At evening attended the conference. Mr. Hull,^ the Episcopal 
clergyman, read one of Mr. Hawes's lectures for us. We had a contribution 
for the Sabbath-school library. 

28. Read newspapers. The hostile movements in the East are very tardy. 
Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. Walked out and visited. Received a letter from W. 
W. Ellsworth. The Everest fund is not likely to save anything from B. \\\ 
Birge.^ 

29. Wrote on a piece for the newspaper. Looked over the papers of D. 
E. Hoyt."* Visited. Cooler. Fine weather for business. 

30. Walked and visited the most of the day. Read the Bible. There has 
been a great deal of damage the present year by tempests. 

31. Shower}-. Wrote on a piece for the newspaper. Wrote. Walked 
out. Attended the evening conference. Rev. Mr. Christmas,' of Montreal, 
was present and assisted. 

August. 

1. Wrote. Visited. I fear my mind will get into an inactive state and 
be disinclined to study. Visited Mr. Christmas. He does much good in his 
important station at Montreal. Read late. 

2. Rode into the field with Mr. Whittlesey. Read Encydopoedia on 
the subject of my numbers for the newspaper. Am pretty languid. Wrote. 
Visited the sick, 

3. Mr, Christmas preached in the forenoon very well. His health is 
poor. Preached in the afternoon on Luke xix : 43, 44. Attended the even- 
ing conference. Meetings quite full. There does not appear to be much 
labor here on the Sabbath, but too much walking and riding. 



' David Cadwallader Colden, a lawyer April 10, 1803; was graduated at Washing- 
born at Flushing, L. I., 1769, died at Jersey ton College, Pa., 1821, eighteen years 6ld 
City, 1834. He was closely associated with and the first scholar in his class, and was 
DeWitt Clinton in the great enterprise of graduated at Princeton Seminary in 1824. 
the Erie Canal. He was also author of The He was licensed to preach, and went to 
Life ofRobert Fulton, published in 1817. Montreal, where he preached for a time with 

^ The Episcopal minister of Danbury, great acceptance. He married a very choice 

already noticed. and refined lady and had two children. He 

^ Backus W. Birge, of Hartford. left Montreal because of ill health in 1828. 

■* Dolly E. Hoyt. His two children and his wife died not long 

' Rev. Joseph Stibbs Christmas. The after. He was settled over the Bowery Pres- 

story of this young preacher was brilliant byterian Church, and after five months died, 

but exceedingly sad. He was descended March 14, 1830. A sermon, able and elo- 

from Catholic ancestors, though his father, quent, occasioned by his death, was preached 

who came to this country from England, was by Dr. Gardner Spring, and afterw^ards pub- 

rather inclined to break away from his Ro- lished. While seeking health in Bolton, 

man Catholic association. The son was Mass., he preached at the Hillside Church, 

born in Georgetown, Beaver County, Pa., and was asked to settle there. 



iSsS.] PREACHING IN DANBURY. IO3 

4. Rainy and wet. Walked out. We get no intelligence from the east 
of Europe. Read. Mr. Christmas visited here. Attended the monthly 
concert of prayer. 

5. Read the Bible. Wrote letters to my brother F. L., to my Uncle 
Starr, Esq. Betts, of Norvvalk, and Col. Darius Humphreys, of Canton. 
Walked out and visited. Received a letter from Mr. Leavitt,' of Stratford. 
I fear I do not improve my time in the best manner. There has recently 
been a great and unhappy commotion at Yale College.^ 

6. Walked out and visited the sick. Wrote letters to Rev. Messrs. 
Leavitt, of Stratford, Porter, of Farmington, McLean, of Simsbury, and to 
Col. Niles,' of Windsor. To the latter I resigned my chaplaincy in the First 
Regiment. A Mr. Isham,* a candidate, formerly a resident in this town, 
came here. We had a meeting in the evening and he preached. Visited. 

7. Read Encydopcedia on the subject of canals. Read the Bible. 
Visited. Received a letter from my brother at Enfield. Attended our even- 
ing meeting. On the 4th donated seventy-five cents. 

8. Walked and visited. Very warm. Read Encydopcedia. My pros- 
pects are trying. All my hope is in the mercy of a gracious God. Wrote. 

9. Rode with company to Stratford. Called at Bridgeport. Met Mr. 
Leavitt on the way ; he goes to Danbury to preach on the subject of intem- 
perance. The heat very oppressive. A part of the road quite bad. Kindly 
entertained at Mr. Judson's. Mr. Leavitt's family are unwell. 

10. A Mr. Vandyke,' a young candidate, preached in the forenoon. I 
preached in the afternoon on Isa. iii : 10, 11. This congregation is not large, 
yet respectable. Attended an evening meeting at the academy and preached 
without notes on Ps. iv : 5. The mosquitoes verj' tedious. 

11. The heat continues very sultry. Called on Mr. Wood^ at Bridgeport. 
Rode home. Quite fatigued. Prevented by a shower from attending even- 
ing meeting. Mr. Whittlesey's young son is quite sick. 

12. Rode in the stage to Norwalk. The consociation met to attend to the 
installation of Mr. Benedict.^ The examination was slight. Mr. Benedict 



' Joshua Leavitt, D. D. Isham raised up in Connecticut, Chester 

=" This was the famous Bread and Butter Isham, who died at Taunton, Mass., after a 

Rebellion, so called, which took place in the brief ministry there, in 1825, and Austin 

summer of 1828, after the senior class had Isham, graduated in 1836, who is still living, 

left to prepare for Commencement. It re- The person here mentioned must have been 

suited at last in the expulsion of four stu- Rev. Warren Isham, who appears in the list 

dents and the rustication of a great number, of Presbyterian ministers in 1S30. 

most of whom, after a time, returned with ' This must have been Mr. John B. Van 

apologies, and were taken back. Dyck, a graduate of Amherst in 1826, who 

3 Col. Richard Niles. He was born in afterwards became a physician in the State 

1785, and was two years older than his of New York, 

brother, Hon. John M. Niles, the able Demo- * Joseph Wood, Esq. 

cratic United States Senator. They were ^ Rev. Henry Benedict, who was pastor 

sons of Moses and Naomi (Marshall) Niles, at Norwalk, 1828-1832. He was graduated 

who lived in the Poquonnoc district of Wind- at Yale in 1822, was licensed by the P'airfie'd 

sor, Ct. West Association in May, 18^5, and, after 

■* There were two ministers of the name being settled in several places, died in 1868. 



I04 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1828. 

appears well. The people here are pretty well united. The association sat 
on the business of Mr. Dey.' At evening preached, by desire of Mr. Bene- 
dict, on 2 Cor. i : 12. Tarried at S. W. Benedict's. 

13. Attended the installation. The parts were well performed. Dr. 
McAuley^ preached very well. The association sat long on the painful 
business of Mr. Dey. Made calls. Dr. Miller^ is very low. Quite warm. 
There is a new newspaper here, 

14. Visited families. Received of the society here $^i, and $3.79 which I 
had paid out for washing. They paid $S each for ten Sabbaths and $9 for 
fourteen Sabbaths.'* The heat is severe. Paid for nine volumes of books, 
$5. Some of them I am very glad to procure. Rode home. The dust 
severe. Went late to our evening meeting. Received a letter from Mr. 
Punderson,^ of Huntington. 

15. Much fatigued. Wrote. Put up my things. Wrote on a piece for 
the newspaper. Hindered by company. 

16. Paid a merchant tailor $27.46. Paid for a horse to go to Stratford, 
$2. The failure of banks seems to have become frequent. Wrote. Visited 
a family who had a family visit — the parents, nine children, and twenty-five 
grandchildren. No child has died.* Some of them live at a distance. All 
were present. 

17. Preached on Prov. i: 31; Matt, xxv : 6. Meetings quite full. At 
evening had the last of Mr. Plawes's Ledm-es to Yowig Men read at our meet- 
ing.^ They are very good. There are many strangers here from New York. 
The Universalists had a full meeting. 

18. Visited the sick and others. Wrote on a piece for the newspaper. 
Wrote to Dr. Reed of East Windsor. Received a letter from Esq. Betts,^ of 
Norwalk. Attended the Sabbath-school concert. 

19. Walked out and visited. Read. The weather has become cool. I 
find my time much occupied. 

20. Walked and visited. Wrote. My pieces in the paper on canals' 
require more labor than I expected. Have many hinderances. 



' Rev. Richard V. Dey, of Greenfield whole, people in this country live longer 

parish (Fairfield). now than they did a hundred years ago. 

^ Rev. Thomas McAuley, D. D., LL. D., ^ This was one of the good uses to which 

pastor of Rutgers Street Church, New York Dr. Hawes's little book was put. 

City, 1822-1829. * Esq. Betts, who has been before men- 

3 Dr. Phineas Miller. tioned in the diary, was Hon. Thaddeus 

■♦ In the early years of the diary, it will Betts, Lieutenant-Governor of Connecticut 

be remembered, the pay used to be about and United States Senator. He died in 

five dollars a Sabbath. Washington, while Senator, in 1S40. He 

5 Rev. Thomas Punderson, pastor at Hunt- was a graduate of Yale, 1807. 

ington, 1818-1844. He was graduated at Yale « The age of railroads was near, but not 

in 1804 and died in 1848. yet perceived. The wisdom of the wise was 

* In some of the old New England fam- then expending itself on canals, and Dr. 

ilies the record of health and long life was Robbins seems to have taken much interest 

remarkable. In others the record of disease in the subject and wrote much upon it. His 

and early death was as remarkable. On the interest was philanthropic. 



1828.] PREACHING IN DANBURY. IO5 

21. Finished a laborious number for the paper. Warm again. Attended 
our evening meeting. 

22. Set out early and rode to New Haven, on account of young W., ' of 
this town, lately expelled from college. Saw the president and some of the 
professors. Some of the scholars who lately left college have returned. Saw 
Mr. Mills, of Northampton, in very poor health. College appears very still 
for term time. Saw my cousin P. Battell ^ here in a law office. Our benefi- 
ciary, Wilcox, is in poor health. Sent him $5. 

23. Left New Haven early. Rode to Danbury. The carriage was quite 
full. Verj' warm. The ground has become dry and the dust very tedious. 
Called on Mr. Mitchell,* of Newtown. We traveled very slow. About 
twelve hours on the way. Much fatigued. 

24. Preached a double sermon on Acts xiii : 2. The heat very severe 
and oppressive. The Sabbath-school appears well. Had a full conference. 
Wrote an application to the faculty of Yale College for H. H. W.* Much 
fatigued. 

25. Walked out and visited. Much oppressed with the heat. The ground 
is dry and hot. Wrote. Read Douglass's History. Wrote to Prof. Silliman, 
of New Haven. Took a bad cold ; I believe by changing clothes. 

26. Walked out. Am quite feeble. Received a letter from my brother 
James, one from brother F. L., one from Mr. Leavitt, of Stratford, and two 
from S. T. Wolcott. Wrote to my brother F. L., and to Col. Solomon 
Olmsted, of East* Hartford. The postmaster here is negligent. There is 
little or no abatement in the heat. Visited a sick man and witnessed his will. 
Paid the post office fifty-two cents. The w-ar on the Danube appears to be 
slowly and sternly advancing.' 

27. I cough a good deal and pretty hard. Walked to the Bogs and 
visited. The ground very dry and hot. The heat a little abated. Read. 
The prospects of the President ^ appear favorable in the Western country. 

28. Rode to Great Plain ^ and visited the sick and others. A good many 
persons are sick. I am quite hoarse. Still warm and very dry. Attended 
our evening meeting. Pretty thin. 

29. I hope I have not labored in vain for the young man here that has 
been expelled from college. Read. In the afternoon Mr. Punderson and 
Mr. Vaill came here as missionary agents and we had a meeting. Pretty 
thin. Two associations for foreign missions here have contributed, the 
present year, $135. Wrote. The heat appears rather to increase. 



' One of the young men expelled on ac- effectual. W.'s name is not found among 

count of the Bread and Butter Rebellion, the Yale graduates, 
before noticed. ' There had been several actions in which 

^ His nephew, Philip Battell. the Russians had been generally successful. 

^ Rev. William Mitchell, pastor at New- ^ He is hoping for the re-election of Presi- 

town 1825-1831. He was graduated at Yale dent John Quincy Adams, but is to be dis- 

College in 1818, and at Andover Seminary appointed. 
182 1. ^Another of the local districts of Dan- 

■♦ His letter does not seem to have been bury. 



io6 



DIARY OK REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1828. 



30. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Nearly as warm as the fore part of 
the week and very dry. Mr. Hawley,* a candidate, called here. A woman 
died in the neighborhood ; sick a good while. Wrote. 

31. Expounded on Rom. ii : 17 to the end, and two verses of the next 
chapter. Afternoon preached on Jer. xiv : 8. The heat very severe, I 
believe equal to last Sabbath. Had a good conference. The heat, long and 
severe, is very debilitating. 

September. 

1. Set out early on a journey to East Windsor. Rode with a top-sulky. 
No apparent abatement of the heat. The ground is very dry and vegetation 
almost expiring. The dust very tedious. Traveled quite slow. At evening 
it came on dark and windy suddenly, and I tarried at a private house in 
Plymouth. Rode thirty-eight miles. 

2. Last night slept very poorly. Wet and a little rainy. Very grateful. 
Rode to East Windsor. Mrs. Wolcott is feeble. Yesterday my thermometer 
Avas at 98°,^ the highest of this year. The Monday before it was at 97°. 
Walked out. There is some religious attention here, but the society is in a 
poor state. Received $130 of Dea. Reed, for the society, and paid the 
same to Mrs. Wolcott. 

3. Rode to Canton on the business of the Everest fund. Wet, with some 
very hard showers. The payments were well made. Mr. Ely and Mr. 
McLean were with me. The fund is now completed at. ^4,000.' May the 
blessing of God be long upon it. Rode to Simsbury and tarried with Mr. 
McLean. Yesterday received a letter from Z. G. Whitman,'' of Boston. Got 
considerably wet. 

4. Rode home. Stopped in Hartford. Frequent showers and ver)' hard. 
Received a dividend of $45 of the Phoenix Bank. Cannot get the payment of 
my debts here. In the evening and night the rain was very powerful. 
Looked over my things. 

5. The ground is almost inundated. Quite pleasant. Set out on my 
return. Dined with Col. Olmsted,^ of East Hartford. At request of him and 
his officers I concluded to accept the chaplaincy of his regiment.^ The -waters 
rise very rapidly and are over the meadows. Had to ride through a deep 
place. In the morning made several calls. Missed of seeing some persons 
in East Hartford for whom I called. Between Hartford and Farmington had 
to ride far around on account of high water. The roads are badly gullied. 
We have not had such a rain for several years. Tarried at Farmington. 



' Rev. Ransom Hawley, licensed by the 
Fairfield East Association, May 28, 1S28. 
He seems never to have been settled in Con- 
necticut. 

^ Again the hot weather of early Septem- 
ber. 

^ He means, as we suppose, that some 
losses which the fund had sustained had 
been made up. 

* Zechariah Gardner Whitman, Esq., be- 



fore mentioned, a lawyer in Boston, and 
author of T/ie History of the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company. He was a 
graduate of Harvard, 1807, and died in 1S40. 

5 Col. Solomon Olmsted, a prominent 
man in East Hartford, living near the north 
end of East Hartford Street. 

* He had just resigned the chaplaincy in 
Col. Richard Niles's regiment, and it was 
singular that he should accept another. 



i828.] 



PREACHING IX DANBURV. 



107 



6. Clear and very pleasant. Rode to Danbury. Over fifty miles. Had 
to go out of my way several times. Many bridges are gone. The rain was 
not as hard here as at the eastward. Much fatigued- 

7. Preached on Heb. xi : 6, and 2 Cor. v: 10. The Sabbath-school 
begins to diminish. Had a good evening meeting. Baptized a child, I 
think my sight continues to decline. 

8. Wrote. The care of the Everest fund makes me a good deal of labor.' 
Visited a young family about to move to New Connecticut. At evening 
attended the Sabbath-school concert. Received from a widow a donation of 
$25 for the Domestic Missionary Society. Received of young W. $5, for my 
late expenses on my late journey to New Haven. 

9. Rode with company to New Haven. Wet and rainy. Found the 
road in some places very bad. The Housatonic has been very high. Got to 
New Haven late. Attended, a short time, the meeting of the alumni. Saw a 
committee of the corporation. 

10. A pleasant day. We had a good Commencement. The collection of 
people not greater than usual. Dr. Taylor* preached the Concio ad denim. 
There was a rather unpleasant meeting of the clergy after the sermon.^ Paid 
Gen. Howe $5 for books. Am kindly treated by friends. 

11. In the morning went before the corporation and requested them to 
restore W., lately expelled. Rode home by way of Bridgeport. Got home 
late. Paid for an ancient volume of Calvin's Works, $7.50. This completes, 
I suppose, my set. Vegetation much revived by the late rains. Got home 
too late to attend our evening meeting. 

12. Looked over my accounts. Paid $5 for a horse to go to East Windsor 
last week.* Walked out. Afternoon preached a preparatory- lecture with 
short notes on Rom. viii : 35. Wrote. Put off our sacrament last week 
because I was gone. 

13. Wrote on the accounts of the Everest fund. Wrote to Col. Hayden, 
of Hartford. Received a letter from Mr. Goodrich, of New Haven, informing 
me that the corporation of college refused to restore W., of this place, to his 
standing. I think they have done wrong.' Visited. 

14. Preached on John vii : 37, and afternoon, with short notes, on Matt, 
xxvi : 29. Administered the sacrament. Meeting and church very full. At 
evening had a full and solemn conference. 



' We have had abundant illustrations of 
this fact. There are always many men kept 
laboriously busy in labors that have no pay 
attached to them, except what arises from the 
consciousness of doing useful service. 

2 Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor, of the Yale 
Divinity School. 

^ It is probable that the difficulty in the 
meeting of the clergy had reference to Dr. 
Taylor and his sermon. Already there 
began to be that opposition to Dr. Taylor 
and the New Haven theology which resulted 
in the founding, a few years later, of the 



Theological Institute of Connecticut, at East 
Windsor. The plan of it was formed in 
1833, and the corner-stone of the building 
was laid in May, 1834. 

•* Here was a journey, out and back, of 
160 miles or more, an absence of eight days, 
and his horse (which may or may not have 
included the sulky) cost hitn $5. 

' It is easy for an outsider to think so. 
But when men liave the burden of a college 
upon their shoulders, they have sometimes 
to act with promptness and decision, and 
then hold firmly to their action. 



Io8 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

15. Rode to the Bogs and visited. Wet. Wrote. Have a painful sore 
on my right thumb. Walked out. Read. 

16. Rode early with Dea. Cooke ' to New Canaan. Attended the meeting 
of the County Bible Society. The receipts are small. Paid $i. At evening 
Mr. Bouton,^ of New Hampshire, preached very well. Much fatigued. 

17. Attended the County Conference of the churches. But little business 
was done. Mr. Benedict/ of Norwalk, preached. Afternoon rode home. 
My sore is quite painful. 

18. At New Canaan received a letter from Rev. Mr. Punderson.* Read 
Memoirs of the late Fres. Holley} He was a fine genius, but a poor Christian. 
Have to poultice my hand constantly. Walked out. Read. The war on the 
Danube progresses gradually. 

19. My hand is painful. Read Holley's Memoir. Called on Rev. Mr. 
Christmas, who is now here in poor health. The weather begins to feel like 
autumn. Read Paradise Lost. Walked out. My prospects are trying. 

20. Read the Bible. Wrote a little, though my hand does not gain much. 
Walked out. Have the constant attention of a physician to my hand. 

21. Preached a double sermon on Ezek. xviii : 32. Meeting rather thin. 
Attended the evening conference. The brethren speak pretty freely. It is a 
relief to me. Had my hand wholly covered with a handkerchief. 

22. Warmer. Walked out. Mr. Kniffen,^ of Redding, called here and 
dined. Rode to the Bogs and visited a school, and preached in the evening, 
without notes, on Matt, ix : 9. Full meeting. Very tired. Received a letter 
from Leonard Pitkin, of East Hartford, wishing my assistance in military 
business. 

23. Read. We have many accounts of the desolations of the great rains 
the first week in this month. The Superior Court convened their session 
here. Was invited by the sheriff to open the court. The judge began busi- 
ness before I got in. But little was done. Wrote for W. Visited. Received 
a letter from Dea. Obadiah Mead, of North Greenwich. 

24. Prayed at the opening of the court in the morning. Attended the trial 
of three criminals — young, uninstructed, and vicious. Read. Wrote. 

25. Spent little time in the court. Saw Prof. Silliman. Walked out. 
Received a letter of military orders to attend the review of the Second Artil- 
lery Regiment at Wethersfield. Received a letter from Dr. Nott,'' of Sche-- 

' Dea. Joseph P. Cooke, Jr. and was, 1809-1818, pastor of Hollis Street 

^ Rev. Nathaniel Bouton, D. D., pastor of Church, Boston. Later he was at the head 

First Church at Concord, from 1825 to his of a seminary in Louisiana, where he died 

death in 1S78, fifty-three years. Was a na- in 1827. His wife, Mary Austin, wrote his 

tive of Norwalk, Ct., born in 1799, graduated Memoirs. 

at Yale, 1S31. He was a solid and able min- ^ Rev. William C. Kniffen, pastor at Red- 

ister and scholar. ding, Ct, 1825-1828. 

3 Rev. Henry Benedict. ' Eliphalet Nott, D. D., LL. D. Born in 

* Rev. Thomas Punderson, of Hunting- Ashford, Ct., 1773, died in Schenectady, 

ton, Ct. N. Y., 1866, aged ninety-two; graduated at 

^ Rev. Horace Holley, a native of Salis- Brown University, 1795. For more than 

bury, Ct. ; born in 17S1, graduated at Yale, fifty years he was President of Union Col- 

1803. He studied theology with Pres. lege, holding the oiBce longer, probably, than 

Dwight, but afterward became a Unitarian any other college president. 



[328.] 



PREACHING IX DANBURY. 



109 



nectady, and one from Dea. Reed, of East Windsor. They are expecting a 
large addition to the church there. Wrote to Dea. Reed and sent him a copy 
of their Confession of Faith and Church Covenant.' \\>ote to Dr. Nott and 
to Dea. Mead, of Greenwich. We had no evening conference, on account of 
a shower. 

26. Sat a little while in the court. Rode out. Wrote to S. L. Pitkin,- of 
East Hartford. Read. Hindered by company. Cool. 

27. No frost appeared this morning, though expected. I have prayed with 
the court each morning of the session. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. 
Received a letter from mv brother F. L., inclosing one to him from a Mr. 
Goodrich, of Brunswick, near Troy, wishing me to go there to preach. Re- 
ceived Castalio's ^ Latin Bible from New Haven, a valuable volume. 

28. Expounded on Rom. iii : 3 to the end. Preached on i Thess. v: 3. 
\\"ent to the place of the evening meeting, but had none on account of the 
rain. Walked out. 

29. Prayed at the opening of the court. Wrote. Rode to Great Plain 
and visited a school ; in good order. 

30. Attended a little time in court. Afternoon rode to BetheP and 
attended a church meeting, at which I presided, by' the desire of Mr. Lowe * 
and the church. Their difficulties are bad. We sat late in the evening. 

October. 

1. Rode home. The church could not go on with their business, as I 
wished. I suspect it will be long. Attended the trial of a man indicted for 
poisoning three wells. Mr. Z. G. Whitman called here from Boston. Gave 
him a few pamphlets. Wrote to Maj. Wolcott. 

2. Rode with company to attend the annual meeting of the Auxiliary 
Foreign Missionary Society at Newtown. Mr. Yale and Mr. Waterbury were 
present as delegates from the board.* The meeting well attended. I spoke, 
v.'ith others. Mr. Yale came home with me. Attended our evening meeting. 

3. After opening the court, rode to Bethel and attended the church meet- 
ing till late in the evening. We did not get through with the testimony. 
Adjourned to the 20th inst. Many spectators attended. There are strong 
parties. The meeting was orderly. This society has suffered much for the 
want of a good minister. 



' This is an illustration, like many that a parish in the town of Danbury, now a 



might be found, showing how the churches 
of that day trusted all matters pertaining to 
the church to their ministers. It would be 
regarded at the present day as odd if a 
church had to send away to their last min- 
ister to get a copy of their own Confession 
and Covenant. 

^ Samuel L. Pitkin. 

' Sebastian Castalio (or Castellio), 1515- 
1563, author of a valuable Latin and French 
version of the Bible. 

* Bethel, it will be remembered, was then 



separate town. 

* Rev. John G. Lowe, pastor at Bethel 
since 1822, left in the following year (1829), 
probably because of these difiiculties. 

^ Probably Rev. Cjtus Yale, of New 
Hartford, Ct., and Dr. Jared B. Waterbury, 
then in the vicinity of New York. They 
were asked by the board to do this service, 
for the sake of giving interest to this local 
meeting. It was a common custom of the 
board for years to ask corporate and honor- 
ary- members to attend such local meetings. 



no DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

4. Rode home. Read. The court finished their session yesterday and 
seiit six criminals to the State Prison. Cool, but we have had no frost. 
Wrote to G. B. Goodrich, of Brunswick, N. Y. It is a place of which I have 
not before heard. 

5. Preached my two sermons on Ps. cxxx : 3, 4. Wet and rainy. A 
good congregation for the weather. Had no conference. Mr. Christmas is 
pretty feeble. My sore thumb is not yet healed. Wrote. 

6. Rode early with Col. Gregory, on a journey to Hartford. He carried 
me in his wagon. Fine weather. Rode to Farmington. Tarried at a tavern. 

7. Rode early to Hartford. Saw Maj. Wolcott and others going to the 
training. Warm and pleasant. Rode to Wethersfield. Attended the review 
of Col. Olmsted's regiment of artillery. Mr. Wolcott brought my former 
horse and uniform, and I rode as chaplain. The appearance and performance 
of the regiment were very good. A great collection of people. , At the firing, 
in the afternoon, I dismounted, and, while standing near the spectators, one 
of the guard rode over me. I was thrown down with great violence, jarred 
and bruised, but not greatly injured.' 'It was a merciful preservation of God. 
Was carried in a carriage to East Windsor. Mrs. Wolcott is quite feeble. 
Bore the ride better than I expected. 

8. My shoulders and neck were washed last night with vinegar and worm- 
wood and I put on a flannel, and am, through rich mercy, pretty comfortable. 
Made some calls. Mrs. McClure ■ is here. Agreed to buy a small piece of 
land, thirty rods, adjoining mine, of William Tudor, at the rate of $So an acre. 
Paid him $10. Afternoon rode to Plartford with Tudor. I think Mr. Brace ^ 
will be settled at East Hartford. The dissatisfaction with Mr. Whelpley at 
East Windsor appears to increase. Thirty-four persons were received into 
the church there last Sabbath.* Found at Hartford that Col. Gregory had 
just started for home. He concluded that I should not be able to go. Quite 
warm. Found Sheriff Starr and Mr. Seeley, of Danbury, who brought five 
criminals to the State Prison, just ready to set out for home. A providen- 
tial favor. I got into their wagon, taken very kindly, and came on to Farm- 
ington. Went into a meeting a little time in the evening. Walked home 
with Mr. Porter. Tarried at a tavern. I am confident that I lost a $2 bill 
yesterday at a tavern in Hartford. 

9. Rode home. Very warm for the season. Yesterday morning we had 
our first frost. It was light. We overtook Col. Gregory a little beyond New- 
town. Rode with him a few miles ; have paid the most of his expenses. Did 
not feel much inconvenience from my hurt. 



' This was a more warlike experience the State of New York. He was graduated 

than chaplains usually passed through. at Hamilton College, 181 5. In 1S28 he was 

- This was the second wife of Dr. Mc- dismissed from his church in Utica. 
Clure (Mrs. Betsy Martin, of Providence). * This sentence does not seem to harmon- 

^ This reference is probably to Rev. Sam- ize very well with the previous one, yet both 

uel W. Brace, who was connected with the were probably true, as Mr. Whelpley's min- 

class of 1818 at Andover .Seminary, and in istry was short. He was dismissed a year 

1819 appears as a Presbyterian minister in and a half after this. 



1828.] 



PREACHING I.V DANBURV, 



III 



10. The criminal here that was sentenced to the State Prison for life took 
opium on Sabbath evening and died Tuesday night.' His body was carried 
to Darien for burial. Read. Walked out. Attended the examination of our 
academy. A good performance. Wrote. 

11. On the 5th received a letter from Pres. Nott.^ Wrote a sermon on 
Ps. .\ix : 12. I have been too long without writing one. Wrote pretty easy. 
Walked out. Have lately had a hat made for me, the best, I suspect, I have 
ever had, at the price of $10.^ It grows cooler. 

12. Preached on Rom. vi : 23, and the sermon written yesterday on 
Ps. xix: 12, 13. A full meeting. At evening attended a marriage, after 
which went for a litde time into the conference. It was quite full. Last 
evening received a letter from Mr. Ely, of Simsbur)\ Quite cool. 

13. This morning we had a liard frost. Vegetation has not been much 
affected before. Walked out. Wrote. Wrote to Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. 
Afternoon set out for the meeting of the Consociation of Fairfield West. 
Rode to New Canaan. Tarried at Mr. Bonney's." A high southwest wind. 

14. Rode to Greenwich. The Consociation met at the house of a Mr. 
Henr}-. This is an ancient society very much run down.' The Consociation 
ordained Mr. X. Betts,^ of Norwalk, as an evangelist. I preached on 
Ps. cxxii : 3, 4, 5. The meeting-house very poor. The Consociation was 
employed in the evening on the business of Mr. Dey.^ They did but little, 
but sat till after one o'clock. The session was finished. I was assistant 
scribe. The Consociation adjourned for the trial of Mr. Dey. They are not 
well agreed. 

15. Slept a small part of last night, at Mr. Butler's* — a sickly man, who 
preaches here a part of the time. There has been a great work of grace 
among this small people the present year. Took a bad cold last night. 
Rode to West Greenwich and visited Dr. Lewis.' A very venerable, re- 
spectable man. Called at Col. Mead's.'° Cold and tedious. Rode to Nor- 
walk. Tarried at Mr. Benedict's. 

16. Paid Mr. Benedict" $2.38 for the Church Spectator, in numbers, for the 
present year. Brought my things from his house. Made some calls. A very 



' Yet he would, without much doubt, have 
regarded it as a far more terrible punish- 
ment if he had been sentenced to undergo 
the death penalty. 

^ Pres. Eliphalet Nott, of Union College. 

3 Dr. Robbins always liked his Danbury 
hats. He paid a good price for them, but 
they lasted well. 

■* Rev. William Bonney. 

^ It was organized in 1670, and was far 
less prosperous than the Second Church, 
organized in 1705. 

* Rev. Xenophon Betts, who became a 
preacher among the Presbyterians. He died 
in 1872. 



^ Rev. Richard V. Dey. This business 
had been on hand for some time and was 
not easily finished. 

^ Rev. Charles F. Butler, who supplied 
the pulpit there 1S24-1835. He was a grad- 
uate of Yale in 1816 and died in 1S66. 

9 Isaac Lewis, D. D., pastor of the Second 
Church, Greenwich, 17S6-1S1S. He died in 
1S40. 

'° The name Mead was more common in 
Greenwich than any other. 

" This was probably Seth Williston Bene- 
dict, with whom Dr. Robbins had boarded, 
and who was afterwards connected with the 
New York Evangelist. 



112 DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

hard frost. Rode home. Visited Mr. Haight ' at Wilton. At evening at- 
tended our conference. The room ver}- cold. Much fatigued and ill with my 
cold. 

17. We had a cold night and severe frost. Walked out. Visited a school. 
Afternoon walked to Great Plains. Visited, and at evening preached to a 
good audience, without notes, on Matt, ix : 9. Rode home. My cold is 
burdensome. 

iS. Wrote. I believe I have left my valuable penknife at Greenwich. I 
find little time for myself. Walked out. Visited a young woman in poor 
health ; I fear declining. Dea. Vrhittlesey and wife, from Salisbury, came 
here. 

19. Preached all day on James i : 23, 24. Quite cool. Meeting pretty 
full. Had a full conference. Dea. Whittlesey attended with us. 

20. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Butler,- of Greenwich. Was carried in the morn- 
ing to Bethel. Attended the church meeting. Continued all day hearing 
testimony. There is a good deal of bitterness in the jDarties. I have to take 
down the testimony. 

21. We continued the testimony and finished in the afternoon. Last night 
wrote quite late. The church appointed a committee to make a summary of 
the evidence and adjourned. Wrote. Was brought home. Attended a little 
while at a wadding part}'. Quite tired. 

22. Rode to Stratford. The delegate appointed here did not go. Mel 
with the Consociation. Mr. Leavitt^ was dismissed to be the general agent 
of the Seamen's Friend Society, whose center is at New York. A very 
important institution. The society and church had voted their willingness 
that the pastoral relation should be dissolved. In the evening rode to Trum- 
bull and tarried. 

23. Yesterday and today very pleasant and warm. Rode home. At 
Bethel called on a young man who yesterday had an eye couched. Rode to 
Long Ridge and performed a marriage. Attended the evening conference. 

24. Wrote. Paid for a sulky, with which I rode to East Windsor Sept. i, 
$2.60.'' For a horse to Greenwich last week, $2.31. For the same to Strat- 
ford, $1.62. Have had Mr. Whittlesey's chaise. Warm and windy. Wrote 
on a report for the committee of the church at Bethel. Walked out. Visited 
an aged sickly woman. Wrote quite late. 

25. Wrote on my Bethel report. Rode down there and met with the 
committee and nearly finished our report. Returned. This week has been 
remarkably pleasant; warm and almost without a cloud. Read expositors. 
Much fatigued. 

26. Attended the Sabbath-school as usual. Visited a sick young woman. 
Expounded on Rom. iv. A very interesting chapter. Preached on Amos iv : 



* Rev. Sylvanus Haight, pastor at Wil- * This was the journey when he paid $5 
ton, 1810-1831. for the horse, and the sulky, as now appears, 

* Rev. Charles F. Butler. was a separate bill, but all very cheap for a 

* Joshua Leavitt, D. D. journey of such length. 



i828.] 



PREACHING IN' DANBURY. 



"3 



12. Dea. Benedict,' of Ridgebun-. a ver)' valuable man, was buried. Full 
meeting. Had a solemn conference. 

27. Wrote on the committee's report. Rode to Bethel. Met with the 
committee and in the afternoon attended the church meeting. The church 
decided, with great unanimity, that most of the charges against Dr. Banks ^ 
were supported. They agreed to pass light censure, but he would not acqui- 
esce in the decision. The result expressed a gentle reproof of Mr. Lowe,' in 
which he acquiesced. The doctor appears obstinate. We had a long and 
fatiguing meeting. 

28. Visited Mr. Lowe and others, tr)-ing to restore harmony among them. 
Afternoon was carried home. After which walked to the Bogs and visited. 
\Ye have several sick. In the evening got something lost. Very tired. 

29. Rode to Brookfield and visited Mr. Brundage,* sick with a light fever. 
Preached a preparatory lecture there on Luke xxii : 15. Returned. Visited 
two sick persons, very low. In the morning visited a family where the man 
had just died. 

30. Walked out. Wrote. Have had very little time for study lately. 
Very pleasant. Afternoon attended a funeral. Attended the evening confer- 
ence. Quite thin. Wrote to S. B. Goodwin, of Wethersfield. Read. 

31. Walked and visited. Preached a preparatory lecture, with notes, on 
Rom. viii : 14. The old party feeling in this society seems to continue. The 
Turks appear to be making a great effort in the present war. It looks like 
the last struggle of Islamism.^ 

November. 

1. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Am pretty languid. Hoped to 
have been able to w-rite a sermon this week. Visited a sick woman. I do 
but little to what I ought to. Read. 

2. Wet and rainy all day. Preached on Heb. xii : 2, and with notes on 
Zech. xiii : 7. Administered the sacrament. The church pretty well out. 
Thin meeting.* Had no evening meeting. Wrote. 

3. Last night it rained quite hard. Rainy and wet through the day. 
Read Pollock's Course of Time.'' The people have had their town meeting to 



■ In Ridgefield, of which Ridgebury was 
a part, four men of the name Benedict served 
as deacons during its history, and the church 
in Ridgebury also had its Dea. Benedict. 

" Dr. Samuel Banks. 

^ Rev. John G. Lowe. 

■* Rev. Abner Brundage, pastor at Brook- 
field, 1821-1S39. He received the degree of 
A.M. at Yale, 1826, and died in 1877. In 
the later years of his ministry he was a Pres- 
byterian. 

^ The times of nations and of religious 
sects are long, and the prophecies respecting 
them are apt to be premature. 



* The meaning of these two brief sen- 
tences seems to be that, while the members 
of the church were generally there at the 
communion, the congregation, as a whole, 
was small. 

' Robert Pollok was born in Muirbouse, 
Eaglesham parish, about eleven miles from 
Glasgow, Scotland, Oct. 19, 179S. He died 
Sept. 18, 1827. His Course of Time was not 
published till after his death, and Dr. Rob- 
bins was reading it not long after its publica- 
tion. It had a wide circulation and was 
popular. Its religious character and his 
own early death helped to give it currency. 



114 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D. 



[1828. 



choose electors and vote for the amendment of the State Constitution.' 
Votes for electors: Adams, 181 ; Jackson, 69. ■ A small vote on the amend- 
ment, and a small majority against it. The Turks appear to resist the 
Russian invasion with unexpected vigor.^ Our monthly concert was pre- 
vented by the wet. 

4. Rainy all day, some of the time quite hard. Wrote to my brother 
Francis, Mr. Marshall, of Hartford, and Gen. Howe, of New Haven. At 
evening walked out. Got wet. Warm. Read. Received a letter from Rev. 
Mr. Saunders, of South Salem.* 

5. Expected to have gone to Bethel yesterday, but was not sent for on 
account of the rain. Read Pollock's ' Course of Time. Wrote on a piece for 
the newspaper. At evening walked out. Visited a sick man. 

6. Finished my newspaper numbers. Walked out. Attended the con- 
ference. Visited a sick woman. Read the Bible. 

7. Visited at a sick house. Rode to Bethel. Made calls. Afternoon 
and evening attended a church meeting. It is hard to bring their difficulties 
to a close. Late and dark, and I tarried there. 

8. Rode home in the rain. Wrote on the Bethel minutes. Attended the 
funeral of a child. Paid for a new hat, lately procured, $10; more than I 
ever paid for one before. Paid for a good pair of boots, $6.50. Received 
from New Haven a valuable English Atlas. Walked out. Read the Bible. 

9. Mr. Baird,^ a candidate who has friends here, preached in the fore- 
noon. Afternoon preached on John xxi : 15. Full meeting. Had a full 
conference. Mr. Baird was with me. Gave notice for the commencement of 
a Bible class. Walked out. 

10. Visited sick persons. We had this morning a hard frost. Wrote. 
Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. Attended the Sabbath-school concert. Read. 

n. Walked out. Traded considerably. Rode to Redding and attended 
the ministers' meeting. There appears to be a real work of grace here. 
Four of the ministers were born in Great Britain.^ Rode on horseback. 

12. In the morning it snowed and the ground was covered. Did not close 
our meeting till noon. Rode home. Very cold and blustering. Read. The 
contest in the country for the Presidential election is very ardent. 

13. Walked out and made calls. Wrote. At evening commenced a Bible 



' The proposed amendment related to 
the rearrangement of the senatorial districts 
of the State. The amendment prevailed in 
the State, and the new order went into opera- 
tion in 1830. 

^ This was the vote in the town of Dan- 
bury, but in the country at large Andrew 
Jackson received 178 electoral votes and 
John Quincy Adams the other 83. 

2 The Russians in general were victorious 
in this war of invasion, though they some- 
times met with stout resistance and defeat. 

* Rev. Stephen Saunders was a native of 



Norwalk, Ct., and was a Presbyterian minis- 
ter. South Salem was in New York. 

5 The true spelling was Pollok, but the 
popular way was Pollock. 

^ Not Baird, but Rev. Spencer Field 
Beard, who was graduated at Amherst 1824, 
and Andover 1S27. He was a native of 
Brookfield, Mass., and died in Andover, 
Mass., 1876. 

" That is, of those present at that minis- 
ters' meeting. This was a remarkable cir- 
cumstance, one of those coincidences not 
likely to be repeated. 



iS28.] 



PREACHING IN DANBURY. 



"5 



class. Our Thursday evening meeting has been an exposition of the Sabbath- 
school lesson. The object is now to be changed. 

14. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. At evening walked out and visited. 

15. Rode very early, in a cold stage, to South Salem, to exchange with 
Mr. Saunders.' He rode in the afternoon to Danbury. Read H. ?Iorne's- 
new valuable work on the Scriptures. Began a letter to my mother. 

16. Quite cold. Preached on Ps. cvi : 15 and Amos iv : 12. This is 
quite a good congregation, with a fine new meeting-house. The evening 
was wet ; prevented a meeting. Read the Bible. Wrote on my letter. 

17. Mr. Saunders returned. Walked out and visited. I preached here a 
few Sabbaths in the year 1800. In the evening rode home. Read. Fin- 
ished my long letter to my mother. The late elections in New York have gone 
bad.^ 

• 18. W^e have severe frosts. In the morning I was informed by the com- 
mittee that it was thought not best for me to supply here much longer. It 
was quite unexpected. It seems to arise from their old party animosities. I 
concluded to remain two Sabbaths more. Dined with the judges and prayed 
at the opening of the county court. Wrote. Afternoon rode to Bethel and 
attended the church meeting. Finished their long proceedings. Dr. Banks 
was excommunicated. The church are pretty well united. I have been there 
eight days on this subject.* Got home late. Quite cold. 

19. It snowed and rained the most of the day. It appears that Gen. Jack- 
son will be President,' much to my disappointment. Afternoon rode out and 
visited a sick woman. Wrote on the records of Bethel church. 

20. Spent some time in the court. Wrote to Col. Green,* of New London, 
suggesting several things for his next Register. Yesterday afternoon Rev. Mr. 
Haight called on me. He is much taken up in preparing for Mr. Dey's trial. 

"Spent some time with him. The rain this evening prevents the meeting of 
our Bible class. W'alked out. 

21. Sat a little while in court. It appears pretty well. Walked out. 
Afternoon rode to Beaverbrook ' and attended a funeral. The people here 
express much regret at the prospect of my leaving them. Visited. 



' Rev. Stephen Saunders, just before 
mentioned. 

^ Rev. Thomas Hartwell Home. Intro- 
duction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of 
the Scriptures. This work was first published 
in England in 1818. 

^ They went for Gen. Jackson. 

^ It takes a long time for a church to out- 
live the effects of such a controversy. 

5 As already stated, Gen. Jackson received 
178 of the 261 electoral votes in this, the 
eleventh Presidential election. 

* The first printing-press in Connecticut 
was set up in New London, in 1709. In 1713, 
Timothy Green, a descendant of Samuel 



Green, the early printer at Cambridge, Mass., 
was invited by the State to come to Xew 
London. When the Connecticut State Regis- 
ter was first printed in Connecticut, it was 
done by Thomas Green of this same family, 
afterwards by Thomas Green & Son, and 
then for many years by Col. Samuel Green. 
The State Register was in the care of this 
Green family from 1795 till 1848, when it 
went to Brown & Parsons, of Hartford. 
This Col. Samuel was the son in the firm of 
Thomas & Son. 

^ Another of the local designations within 
the town of Danbury, which seem to have 
been numerous. 



Il6 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

22. Have prayed and dined with the court each day of their session. 
They adjourned this forenoon. Read. The war in the East grows something 
favorable to the Turks. The world are greatly disappointed in their energy. 
Read expositors. Wrote. Wrote to my mother. Did not send the letter 
that I wrote a week ago. Sent to my mother $5. 

23. Expounded on Rom. v. Mr. Baird ' was here again and preached in 
the afternoon and evening. Attended the Sabbath-school. Quite cold and 
blustering. This people are in a critical state. 

24. Read. Walked out and visited. Visited Mr. Baird. At evening 
attended our Bible class. It appears well. _ The ground is much frozen. 
I hope I rejoice that all my ways are at the divine disposal. I feel anxious 
about employment. The Lord has ever been good to me. 

25. Began a sermon for Thanksgiving on Rev. xi : 15. Kept at Dr. Bots- 
ford's.° Well accommodated. W' rote above eight pages. Not fatigued. 

26. AVrote. Had hindrances. Had a very valuable new surtout made. 
Finished my sermon begun yesterday. Walked out. Read. Quite pleasant. 
Wrote late. 

27. Thanksgiving. Wet and misty. Thin meeting. People here have 
not been much accustomed to attend meeting on this anniversar)\ Preached 
on Rev. xi : 15. Mr. Whittlesey had a pleasant family circle. Donations, 
$2.50. 

28. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott, and to Rev. Mr. Haight, of Wilton. Dined 
at Dr. Botsford's with company. Kept there. Visited. Wet and rainy. 
Did but little. 

29. Wrote a family register for Capt. Rider. Walked out. Received two 
volumes of my University History from home and a letter from S, T. Wolcott, 

30.. Preached on 2 Kings vii : 3, and Hab. iii : 17, 18. Quite pleasant. 
The Sabbath-school is now held in the intermission. Attended the evenins: 
conference. Full and solemn rheetings. 

Dbcbmber. 

I. Wrote. Wrote to George Barber, of this place. Employed in making 
preparations for my removal. My help is in the mighty God. Settled with 
the society's committee. Received from them $264. I have been here thirty- 
eight Sabbaths. They say they have not paid over $8 per Sabbath. Paid 
a merchant, $23 ; a merchant tailor, $9.46 ; a tailor, $4.25. My new surtout 
cost a little over $30. Attended the monthly concert. Received a letter 
from R. Barnes^ at New Haven. Made calls. Was up late. Endeavored 
to commit my case to him who has always been my holy keeper and merciful 
benefactor. 



' Rev. Spencer F. Beard. Haven Seminary, where he was graduated in 
^ Dr. Russell B. Botsford, a graduate of 1S31. He entered upon ministerial service 
Yale Medical School, 1S16. that same year, under the direction of the 
^ Romulus Barnes was graduated that Home Missionary Society, and died in New- 
year at Yale and was, at the time of writing ark, 111., in 1S46. He was probably helped 
this letter, studying theology in the New in his education from the Everest fund. 



1828.] PREACHING IN STRATFORD. II7 

2. Rode early with Mr. Whittlesey's son to Fairfield. Cold and windy. 
Met with the Consociation on the trial of Mr. Dey. We were much 
embarrassed by objections on preliminaries. No other progress was made. 
Am kindly entertained at Mr. Osborne's.' 

3. We had to wait for Mr. Dey. Gave E. Whittlesey iVij. Paid the 
tavern, $69. Mr. Dey came, and, finding he could get no more delay, he 
said he abandoned his defense. He was then solemnly deposed from the 
ministry. At evening rode in the stage to Stratford. Tarried at Mr. 
Judson's."" 

4. Rode out with Mr. Judson. Concluded to preach here on the next 
Sabbath. Read. Returned by stage to Fairfield. The decision respecting 
Mr. Dey produces much consternation. Weather moderate and pleasant. 

5. Wrote. My circumstances are trying; holy is the Lord. Wrote 
to Mr. Haight,^ of Wilton. Made some calls. At evening rode to Saugatuck. 
Quite pleasant. 

6. Wrote to my brother Francis. Had a pleasant visit with Mr. Hooker.'* 
Walked out. Read. Towards evening rode to Stratford. Stopped at Bridge- 
port. 

7. Wet and shower)'. In the morning thin meeting.' Preached on 
Ps. cvi : 15, and Eph. ii : 14. This society appears to be not large, and 
in arrears in money matters. At evening preached at the conference without 
notes on Num. x : 29. Well attended. 

8. Walked out. This town is very pleasant. Read. Wrote. Read the 
President's Message.* Very well written. A pity that he cannot be rechosen. 
At evening rode out and visited. Read the Bible. 

9. Made some calls. Am kindly treated. Concluded to supply here 
two Sabbaths more. Wrote to Esq. Sherwood,' of Saugatuck, and to Maj. 
Wolcott, of East Windsor. I believe I took a cold last evening. Walked 
to the north part of the town. Visited. 

ID. Very pleasant. In the morning the fog appeared on the river. This 
is a fine neighborhood lying on the Housatonic. Am quite unwell with my 
cold. Have a bad ague in my face and am disordered at the bowels. Kept 
house almost entirely through the day. Kindly accommodated. Have not 
had so sick a day in a long time. 

II. Am a little better. Walked to Esq. Tomlinson's,* the father of the 
Governor.^ Rainy. My face is somewhat painful. At evening the people 
collected in a school-house and I preached without notes on Ps. iv : 5. 
Spoke with difficulty. Made applications for my cold. 



' Thos. B. Osborne, clerk of the court * This was the last Presidential message 

^ Daniel Judson, Esq. of John Quincy Adams. 

^ Rev. Sylvanus Haight. ' Samuel B. .Sherwood, Esq. 

* Rev. Edward W. Hooker, D. D. » Jabez H. Tomlinson. He died in 1849, 

5 It will be remembered that Rev. Joshua aged eighty-eight. 
Leavitt, D. D., had only a very little time ' Gideon Tomlinson, Governor of Connec- 

before been dismissed from this church in ticut, 1S27-1831. He died in 1S54, aged 

Stratford. seventy-four. 



Il8 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

12. Visited the surviving part of the family of Rev. Mr. Birdseye,' who 
died q few years since at the age of one hundred and three. They have but 
a few old pamphlets. Paid them for a few, $i. It is a remarkable family. 
Walked and was carried to the lower part of the town. Made a number 
of calls. Am still considerably unwell. 

13. Put on my flannel. I have delayed it too long. Wrote. Read. 
Wrote to Romulus Barnes, of the Theological Institute of Yale College. 
Walked out. Called on Judge Fairchild,'' an old acquaintance. At evening 
attended a small prayer-meeting. There are a number of active good people 
here. 

14. I am still quite hoarse with my cold. Spoke with difficulty. The 
"vVeather quite moderate and afternoon quite pleasant. Full meetings. In the 
afternoon, I believe, as large a congregation as I have ever had in this 
county. Attended the evening conference — very full — and preached without 
notes on Matt, ix : 9. Much fatigued. Preached on Heb. xii : 14, and Heb. 
vii: 25. 

15. Changed my place of lodging. Have many invitations. A member 
of the society's committee informed me that he thought it was the wish of the 
people here to have me return and supply them after I shall have been 
to East Windsor. Others spoke to me in a similar manner. I hope for 
divine guidance and teaching. My cold, by divine favor, is better. My jaw 
is something sore. Visited. Dined with Mr. Linsley,^ a teacher of youth. 
Spent the evening with considerable company. Read. We have the 
important account of the surrender of Varna to the Russians.* 

16. We have remarkably mild weather for the season. Wrote. Afternoon 
rode to Fairfield, with company, to attend the ordination. Met with the 
Consociation. Mr. Hunter^ appeared very well on examination. 



■ Dr. Robbins would very naturally have eighty-two years and about eight months 

a desire to see the family of a man whose after graduation. He was the son of Pres. 

life had been so remarkable. He was the Edward Holyoke, was graduated at the age 

son of Joseph and Sarah (Thompson) Birds- of eighteen, and was one hundred years and 

eye, was born in Stratford, Aug. 19, 1714, eight months old at his death, 

was graduated at Yale, 1736, and died in the " Robert Fairchild, Esq. 

same town, Jan. 28, 1818, having attained the ^ Rev. James Harvey Linsley, a graduate 

extraordinary age of one hundred and three of Yale in 1817, was nominally a Baptist 

years, five months, and nine days. His wife minister, but by reason of ill health gave 

was Dorothy Hawley, of Ridgefield, Ct., who himself to teaching and scientific pursuits. 

was the mother of twelve children — six sons He obtained a good reputation as a writer 

and six daughters. She died at the age of on scientific topics. He died in Stratford, 

eighty-eight. At the time of his death there in 1843. He was a native of Northford, Ct. 

were 206 of his descendants living. He was * Varna was surrendered to the Russians, 

eighty-two years and six months out of col- Oct. 15, 1828. 

lege before his death. The only graduate ' Rev_ John H. Hunter was pastor at 

that we remember in our New England col- Fairfield, as successor to Rev. Nathaniel 

leges who lived as long after graduation was Hewitt, D. D., from 1828 to 1S34. He was 

Edward Augustus Holyoke, LL. D., of Sa- afterwards pastor of the First Church in 

lem, Mass., who was graduated at Harvard Bridgeport, 1839-1845, and still later was a 

in 1746, and died in Salem, March 31, 1829, Presbyterian minister. 



1S28.] PREACHING IN STRATFORD. I19 

17. In the morning the Consociation observed a season of prayer with 
fasting. The parts of the ordination were performed decently. This large 
society is much united. Mr. Baldwin,' of New York, preached. The Conso- 
ciation sat in the afternoon on an application from Mr. Dey for a new trial. 
They did not hear the petition. Very kindly treated at Mr. Osborne's. 
Made calls. Tired, 

18. Returned to Stratford. Quite cold. On Tuesday received a letter 
from Mr. Butler, of Greenwich, with my valuable penknife, which I feared 
was lost. Walked out and visited. At evening attended a meeting and 
preached without notes on Mark i : 50. The people here appear well. 

19. A cold winter day. Walked out. Afternoon wrote notes and 
preached a sacramental lecture on Luke x.xii : 19. Well attended. The 
meeting-house very cold. At evening the committee of the society called 
on me. Took tea at Judge Johnson's.^ 

20. Yesterday baptized two children. Wrote. Walked and visited. 
There are some quite aged people here. Read the Bible. Was up late. 

21. Moderate weather and a favorable day. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, 
and Ps. 1 : 5. Administered the sacrament. The church is pretty large. 
We had a solemn season. Meetings quite full. Preached at a very full 
evening meeting, without notes, on Isa. xxviii : 17. An interesting day. 
Quite tired. 

22. Cold. Walked and visited all day. Have many invitations. This 
society has been for some time in a pretty poor state. Preparing for my 
journey. At evening visited with company. 

23. Visited and made short calls. Tired. Individuals manifest much 
anxiety to have me return. At evening between seven and eight o'clock 
I took the stage and rode to Hartford. The latter part of the night severe 
cold. From New Haven to Middletown I was alone in the stage. Very good 
traveling. Arrived at Hartford about five o'clock in the morning. 

24. Left Hartford pretty soon after my arrival and walked to Mr. Wol- 
cott's. The thermometer was at 14°. A good deal of ice in the river. 
Quite fatigued. Mrs. Wolcott is better than when I was here last. Read. 
Received a letter from Z. G. Whitman,^ of Boston. 

25. Thermometer 27°. Wrote. Received a letter from my brother, at 
Enfield. His headache is afflictive. Had company. Did but little. Read. 



' Rev. Elihu Whittlesey Baldwin, D. D., in 1744, and became an eminent judge. He, 

pastor of Seventh Presbyterian Church, New also, was President of Columbia College. 

York City, 1820-1835. He was graduated at Another William S. Johnson, from Stratford, 

Yale in 181 2, and died in 1840. He was- was graduated at Union College, and is per- 

President of Wabash College, Indiana. haps the one here called judge, though it is 

^ Samuel Johnson, D. D., a native of Guil- not unlikely that Dr. Robbins spoke of the 

ford, and a graduate of Yale, 1714, was the place where Judge William S., 1727-1819, 

earliest Episcopal minister in Connecticut, had so long lived as Judge Johnson's, not- 

and was settled in Stratford. He was made withstanding he was now dead, 

the first President of King's, now Columbia, ^ Zechariah G. Whitman, Esq., before 

College. His son, William Samuel, LL. D., noticed, who wrote the History of the Ancient 

1727-1819, was educated at Yale, graduating and Honorable Artillery Compatty. 



I20 DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1828. 

26. The weather more mild. Rode to Edgar Bissell's. Eveline rode 
down with me. I weighed one hundred and thirty-six. I never before, 
I believe, exceeded one hundred and thirty-three. Looked over a year's 
newspapers.' They have been veiy well taken care of. Wrote. 

27. Had company. Employed in my study. Afternoon rode in my sulky 
to Enfield. Crossed over to Pine Meadow. Very dusty. My brother's 
health is poor. His chronic complaint, I fear, is increasing. A small 
Universalist ^ or Unitarian society has lately been formed among his people. 

28. Preached for my brother on Ps. cvi : 15, and Heb. vii : 25. This 
is a large and good congregation. At evening attended one conference 
and my brother another. Preached without notes on Isa. xxviii : 17. Walked 
a good deal and pretty tired. 

29. Had much conversation with my brother. Conclude to spend next 
Sabbath with him. Paid his wife $32.07, and took up a note she has held 
against me. Rode to Pine Meadow. Little T. R. Haskell ^ is a fine child. 
Looked at the canal and locks. It is a great work. I think this must be 
a fine site for manufactures. Rode home. Very good riding. Received 
a good letter from Esq. Booth, of Stratford, containing a vote of the society 
directing the committee to employ me, if they could, for ten Sabbaths from 
Feb. ist. The letter is very satisfactory. "What shall I render unto the 
Lord for all his mercies?" On the 26th had a pair of pantaloons made; 
Mrs. Wolcott gave me the cloth. Took a large bundle of pamphlets from 
the post office. Read. 

30. Wrote and attended to my papers. Paid Mr. Knight $4 for two years 
of the Connecticut Mirror. Very windy and tedious. Wrote to my mother. 
The dust fiies very much. Walked out. Hindered by company. 

31. Rode to Hartford. Find many friends and acquaintances. Did 
errands. Dined with Mr. Hawes." Cold. Thermometer this morning at 8°. 
Much ice in the river. East Hartford is ecclesiastically in an unsettled state. 
Had company. There is a good work of grace at Wapping. The work here 
appears to have mostly subsided. God be thanked for the great mercies 
of this year. 



' They had been gathering at East Wind- ■* Dr. Joel Hawes had, by this time, be- 

sor since his dismission, in 1827. come one of the leading Congregational min- 

* This society was Universalist, but was, isters in Connecticut. His Lectures to Young 

we think, of short duration. Men had made him widely known. He had 

3 Little Thomas Robbins Haskell was been pastor of the First or Center Church 

now nearly two years old. nearly eleven years. 



18 2©- 

January. 

1. I endeavored during the past night to begin my year with God. 
I hope in his mercy to see the end of it, and to record his great mercies 
to his Zion. Looked over newspapers and periodicals. In the forenoon 
attended meeting. Mr. Whelpley preached a New Year's sermon. He says 
much of the late revival here. Walked out. 

2. Cold and blustering. Attended a sacramental lecture. Mr. Whelpley 
preached well. Wrote to Esq. Booth,' of Stratford. Received of the collector 
of this society, $26.30. Paid him $24.52 for taxes, and $1.78, a blacksmith's 
bill. Wrote. We had some snow. 

3. The thermometer in the morning was 2° below zero, and did not 
exceed 6° above through the day, with a clear sun. Towards night rode 
with Mr. Wolcott to Enfield. The cold is severe. My brother appears 
to be some better than he has been. 

4. The cold continues. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, and Rev. iii : 2, 3. 
My brother administered the sacrament. No fires in the meeting-house.^ 
The exercises were short. The people were well out for the season. 
Attended a full conference at evening and preached without notes on Matt, 
ix : g. The ground is very hard. 

5. Read. Wrote. Afternoon set out with my brother on a journey 
to Norfolk. Rode to East Windsor, The thermometer yesterday morning 
was at zero, and last evening at 2° below zero. We rode to a tavern on 
Talcott Mountain and tarried. The weather moderates. Good traveling 
for the winter season. 

6. Rode to Colebrook. Moderate weather and very good going. Made 
a visit at brother Ammi's. His son is at home. In the evening went to 
Norfolk. Important improvements have been made on this road. Found 
brother James and wife and brother and sister Battell at mother's.^ She 
appears, I think, better than when I was here last. I have now been absent 
from her longer (nearly fifteen months) than at any previous period of my 
life except when on my mission. The divine blessing rests on my friends 
here. 

7. I think I have too much neglected visiting my friends. People here 
and at Lenox have done much in the way of temperance. Mr. Batteli's 



' Elijah Booth, Esq. ^ His mother had now entered upon her 
^ We do not understand him to mean that eighty-fourth year. Her eighty-third birth- 
no stoves had been put in the church, though day had occurred the previous month. She 
he may mean this. Most of the church-build- was born in Plymouth, Mass., Dec. 21, 1745. 
ings in that region had stoves some years and lived with her husband in the married 
before this. state fifty-two years. . 

121 



122 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1829. 

children are finely educated.' Saw Mr. Emerson. Received a letter from 
S. T. Wolcott, written at the desire of the committee of East Hartford, 
requesting me to supply their pulpit. O that my soul may be more and 
more devoted to the service of the Lord. Had much conversation with 
brothers and sister concerning my duty and prospects. Was up late. I think 
our family grows in seriousness. Gave my mother $5, as a part of my annual 
stipend. 

8. It rained and snowed the most of the day. The rain freezes. Dined 
at mother's. The religious state of this town is very good. Mr. Emerson 
is a very useful minister. Traded, $2.27. Paid for a large Testament for 
mother, eighty-three cents. Gave Sally Lawrence $2. Brother Francis did 
not set out for home on account of the storm. 

9. Rode to Hartford in the stage. The ground is generally covered 
with snow and ice. My brother started first and I found him at Hartford. 
He went home. Drank tea at Dr. Strong's'' with nieces Urania BattelP and 
Elizabeth Olmsted,* and a large number of Miss Beecher's' school. Walked 
to East Hartford. They regret my engagements. Engaged to supply there 
two Sabbaths after the next. It grows cold. The river is closed. Was 
carried home.* 

10. Thermometer in the morning, 5°. It was about 10° the most of the 
day. Walked and visited. Find warm friends. Mr. Whelpley requested 
me to preach tomorrow. The trees are much loaded with ice. Wrote. 

11. Thermometer 4°, and rose to but 14° with a clear sun. Preached on 
Ps. cvi : 15, and Eph. ii : 14. Full meeting. The occasion was interesting 
and solemn. There has been a good work of grace here. At evening 
attended a church prayer-meeting with Mr. Whelpley. Well attended. The 
church here has done much in the late work. The meeting-house was well 
warmed. 

12. Thermometer at 2°. Wrote. Afternoon visited at Mr. Whelpley's. 
He appears pretty well. , Visited at Edgar Bissell's. The weather moder- 
ates. 

13. Thermometer in the morning, early, up to freezing. Wrote on my 
accounts. I owe too much. Received a letter from Esq. Booth, of Stratford. 
They expect me to return there. Walked out and visited. 

14. Rode to East Hartford to make a short stay. I keep at Esq. White's.' 



■ The children of Joseph and Sarah (Rob- ' Third daughter and fifth child of Joseph 

bins) Battell, nine in number, were then all Battell. 

born and all living, the youngest, Ellen, being * Daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Law- 

nearly four years old. The two older sons rence) Olmsted. 

had been graduated, one at Yale and one at ' Miss Catharine Beecher had her well- 

Middlebury, and a younger son was to grad- known school for young ladies at Hartford 

uate at Yale some years later. The older from 1S22-1S32. 

daughters had been at the best schools at * He cannot help calling Maj. Abiel Wol- 

Hartford and New Haven. cott's house his home. Except in his father's 

^ Nathan Strong, M. D., son of Nathan house in Norfolk, he never apparently felt so 

Strong, D. D., who was a practicing physi- much at home as at East Windsor, 
cian in Hartford. ' Lemuel White, Esq. 



lS2g.] PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. I23 

Am well accommodated. Walked out. Wet and something rainy. Read. 
The ground is deep frozen. 

15. It rained hard the most of the day. The ground is almost covered 
with water. Wrote considerably. .\t evening attended meeting and preached 
without notes on Mark i : 40. A good number of hearers. Read. 

16. Walked to Hartford and back. Witnessed the magnificent scene 
of the running of the ice soon after it began to move.' It is about eight 
or ten inches thick and very- strong. It has been sufficient for good crossing. 
The river was entirely full. Warm. Wrote to my brother Samuel. Walked 
out and visited. Paid for the Missionary Herald, $1.50. 

17. Wrote. Rode to East Windsor and back. Bad riding. Visited. 
Quite muddy. Was kept out too late. People appear to be pleased that 
I am here. 

18. In the morning it snowed. Wet and bad going all day. Rode to 
meeting in a sleigh. Preached on John iii : 3, and Heb. vii : 25. Thin 
meeting. Had no evening meeting. Had company. Yesterday paid $1.50 
for a small map of the United States. 

19. Read. Occupied with company the most of the day. Wrote. The 
snow mostly gone. At evening walked out and visited. Have many invita- 
tions. This society is in an unsettled state. The committee regret that 
my time with them must be so short, 

20. Rode with the school visitors and visited two schools. They appear 
pretty well, but are quite numerous.^ Read. Visited. 

21. Wrote. Visited a sick man; very low. Walked and visited. We 
have some snow, but moderate weather. Afternoon visited the grammar 
school ; in excellent order. At evening rode to the north part of the town 
and performed a marriage. The riding ver}'^ bad. 

22. Rode to the village at the mills. ^ The paper manufactories are very 
fine. Cold. Visited. At evening attended a full meeting and preached 
on Matt, ix : 9. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Ely,* of North Mansfield. 

23. Walked to the south part of the town. Visited. Visited two schools 
in one house, containing one hundred scholars. Was called to see a sick 
woman, who died soon after. At evening attended a meeting and preached 
without notes on Luke xvi : 13. Full meeting. Tarried out. 

24. Cold and blustering. Visited. Read. Afternoon attended the funeral 
of the woman who died last evening. Was carried to my residence. Rode 
to East Windsor. Returned in the evening. Considerably fatigued. 

25. Cold, but pleasant. The ground pretty hard frozen. Preached on 
Ps. cvi : 23, and Heb. xii : 14. Had a great congregation. Some people 
down from East Windsor. At evening had a meeting in the hall and 



' To stand near the opening of the Hart- * Then called Scotland, but now Burn- 
ford Bridge and see the ice tumbling down side. 

the river is a sight worth seeing, as the writer * Rev. William Ely, formerly of Vernon, 

can personally testify. pastor at North Mansfield, 1S25-1841. He 

^ In that age of large families the district was a lame man, but remarkably bright and 

schools were apt to be large. sparkling in his public addresses. 



124 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

preached a written sermon on 2 Cor. i: 12. Meeting very full. Quite tired. 
Yesterday received a letter from Mr. Tenney,' of Wethersfield, in behalf 
of some printers who wish me to write a history of New England. 

26. Walked and visited. Warm. Afternoon attended a funeral. The 
father of the deceased and two brothers were present, at the age of seventy- 
eight, eighty, and eighty-six. Rode out and visited. Wrote to Esq. Brooks,^ 
of Stratford. 

27. Walked a distance and visited a school. Afternoon attended an 
examination of the grammar school. Read. The war in the East is a 
terrible conflict. Afternoon and evening quite rainy. Wrote. 

28. I have been here two weeks and have been very busy. Was carried 
to East Windsor. There is considerable snow and it is very tedious. After- 
noon rode to Wapping and visited. Very cordially received. At evening 
preached without notes, at a full meeting, on Isa. xxviii : 17. There is a good 
work of grace here. Greater, I believe, than has been at any former period. 
Tarried at Wapping. 

29. Visited expeditiously in Wapping and the Street the most of the day. 
Pretty good sleighing. Settled some accounts. Capt. BisselP has paid 
at the store and post office the sums I owed Dec. 6, 27, and he has now 
given me a note of $26.43, the residue of what he owed me after paying 
for me today at the post office $1.81. Shall not at this time get a dollar 
of the hundreds due me,'' At evening attended a conference and heard 
Mr. Wlielpley. Well treated. Am quite fatigued. Had a late talk with 
Dea. Reed. 

30. Thermometer this morning at 10°. Conversed with Tudor. Paid him 
$27. Mr. Wolcott carried me to Hartford in a sleigh. Afternoon rode 
in a crowded stage to New Haven. Got in late. The roads very rough. 
I go to be disposed of as God shall please. 

31. Rode early to Stratford, Cold. Much affected with stomach sick- 
ness. Kindly received. The Connecticut and Housatonic are frozen. Much 
fatigued with incessant labor. Read. Wrote. From a Bridgeport news- 
paper, March 25 : "Died at Stonington, in the poor-house, Joseph Cook, aged 
102. He came to this country at the age of 28, and was in Braddock's 
defeat.^ He served under Gen. Washington during the Revolutionary War." 

February. 

1. Quite cold. Preached on John iii: 3, and Amos iv : 12. The house 
in the forenoon very cold. People well out. I am kindly welcomed. There 
have been several deaths here in my absence ; one a man of 90. Preached 
at the evening conference without notes on Ezek. ix : 4. Very full. Quite 
tired. Have some distance to walk, 

2, It snowed steadily all day. Prepared this almanack, which I have 



' Rev. Caleb J. Tenney, D. D. just debts, than now, though this evil is great 

^ Abijah Brooks, Esq. even yet. 

^ Capt. Aaron Bissell. ' By this reckoning the time of his com- 

■• There was in that generation more slack- ing would have been in 1755, at the opening 

ness, or a greater want of uprightness in paying of the French and Indian War. 



IS29.] 



PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 



125 



not been able to do before.' Wrote diligently. Arranged my things. The 
state of this society is not the most favorable. The monthly concert was 
omitted on account of the storm. 

3. Wrote letters to Rev. Mr. Ely, of Mansfield, my brother at Enfield, 
and S. T. Wolcott. The snow is about six inches deep and it is good going. 
Wrote. At evening attended and instructed a Bible class. Read. 

4. Ver)' cold. I suspect my thermometer'' descends to zero. Read the 
most of the day. Visited a sick man. It is good sleighing and well improved. 
Looked over the church records of this ancient place. They are better than 
are usually found. 

5. Read the Bible. Wrote to the printers in Wethersfield.^ Pleasant 
and fine sleighing. Walked out and visited. At evening attended a meeting 
and preached without notes on John x : 14. 

6. Looked over manuscripts. Have conveniences for study. Afternoon 
rode out in a sleigh and visited. Read. 

7. Rode to the north part of the town and visited. The snow thaws 
considerably. Read Buck's * Theological Dictionary. Received a letter from 
Mr. Kingsbury,' of Hartford. 

8. Rode to meeting in a sleigh, but the going became bad before night. 
Preached on Acts iv : 12, and i Cor. xv : 56, 57. There have been six deaths 
of grown persons in the town the present year. At evening we had a hard 
rain. No evening meeting. Read. Have some cold. 

9. Walked out and visited sick persons. The snow is mostly gone. 
Wrote. Read. There has been good sleighing from here to New York. 
Traded, $1.70. Wrote to Mr. Strong,* of Somers. Visited. 

10. Looked over and wrote on the records of the Ministers' Annuity 
Society. Wrote to Rev. H. Loomis,' of Willington. Rode out and visited. 
At evening instructed the Bible class. 

11. Looked over the accounts of the Everest fund. Wrote to my brethren 
of the committee, Dr. Porter, of Farmington, and Mr. McLean, of Simsbur}\ 
Read the Bible. Walked out. We have light snows. 

12. Received manuscripts. Read the Bible. Visited. Severe cold. 
At evening attended a conference and preached without notes on Mark 
x: 47. 



' This was generally done about the first 
of January, but he had been so broken up 
and wandering during the month that he had 
not been able to attend to it. He kept his 
record all the same and transferred it to the 
interleaved almanac. 

- He is thinking of his thermometer at 
East Windsor. 

' Probably declining to write a history for 
them. 

■♦Rev. Charles Buck, of England, 1771- 
181 5, an Independent minister. His diction- 
ary was very valuable and had a great circu- 



lation. He wrote, also, a work on Religious 
Experience in one volume, and a work on the 
Beauties and Harmonies of Nature in three 
volumes. 

^ Andrew Kingsbury, from 1808 to 1818 
Connecticut State Treasurer. His plain and 
quiet home was at 12 Temple Street. 

* Rev. William L. Strong. 

' Rev. Hubbel Loomis, afterwards Presi- 
dent of Shurtleff College, Illinois, a Baptist 
institution receiving its name from its princi- 
pal founder, Dr. Benjamin Shurtleff, of Bos- 
ton. 



126 DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

13. Read. Very' cold. I have neglected reading the Bible too much. 
Walked out and visited. Wrote. At evening attended an astronomical 
lecture,' a short course of which is now giving here. 

14. Read the Bible. Wrote. Attended the funeral of an infant child. 
Very cold and blustering. Had company in the evening. Am very well 
accommodated. 

15. Still cold and hard wind. Preached both parts of the day on Ps. 
Ixxxiv : 2. Afternoon meeting quite full. At evening preached at the 
conference without notes on Luke xiii : 5. Our Sabbath evening conference 
is unusually full and solemn. 

16. Set out in the morning and rode in a wagon with company to Dan- 
bur)\ Had a comfortable day. The traveling very good, Mr. Lowe, of 
Bethel, has been lately dismissed. The society in Danbury have given a call 
to Mr. Rood^ to settle with them. Took tea at Col. White's. 

17. Prayed in the morning at the opening of the court. Dined with the 
judges. Paid for horse-hire when I left here, ^1.38. Received an excellent 
letter from Mr. Ely, of Simsbury, on the subject of the Everest fund. Received 
one from Mr. Strong, of Somers, and one from my kind friend, S. T. Wolcott. 
Made calls. Had quite, a task in putting up my books. The bundle is very 
heavy. Mr. Whittlesey had the judges and a number of the lawyers here 
at tea. Was up late. 

18. Left Danbury and rode to Stratford. Cold, but the wind favorable 
for me. Received ^4 at Bethel, in consideration of the assistance afforded 
the church last fall. Brought all my things from Danbury. Read. 

19. On my late journey I was earnestly requested by several people 
in Bethel to supply them after the present term of my engagement here. 

20. It snowed hard all day. Severe cold and tedious. Scarcely went 
out of the house. Wrote on my preaching account. Read Douglass's ' his- 
torical Summary. Wrote. 

21. The snow blew with violence through the day. Very few persons 
abroad. Wrote on my preaching account. It has been long neglected. 
Read the Bible. I have not been in the street these two days. The cold 
is severe. Trying to prepare for the holy day. 

22. Severe cold. The meeting-house is poorly warmed. Rode to meeting 
in a sleigh. Very bad going ; the snow is almost wholly in heaps. Preached 
on Heb. xi : 6, and Num. xxxv : 15. Had no evening meeting. The congre- 
gation quite thin. Walked out. The stages have been much obstructed 
by the storm. 

23. As cold, I believe, as any day this winter. It scarcely thaws at all 
in a clear sunshine. Walked out. Received a letter from Dr. Porter, of 
Farmington. Read. 



' This was probably given by Rev. James ^ William Douglass, M. D. The title of 

Harvey Linsley, the teacher before noticed, \\\^2i}o\&viox\i^zs,, A Summary, Historical and 

who was a man of fine scientific attainments. Political, of the First Planting, Progress in, 

" Rev. Anson Rood, who was pastor at and Present State of the British Settlements 

Danbury, 1S29-1S37. He was a graduate of in North America. Dr. Douglass was a na- 

Middlebury College, 1825. tive of Scotland, but came to America in 1716. 



[829.] 



PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 



127 



24. The weather a little moderated. Wrote to Esq. Ely, of Simsbury, 
Walked and visited. Called on Mr. Steele,' the Episcopal preacher now 
here. At evening attended the Bible class. 

25. Read the Bible. Wrote on my preaching account. This is much 
in arrear. Walked and visited in the lower part of the town. Afternoon 
it snowed considerably. Tarried out. 

26. Last night we had a hard and violent rain. The ground is covered 
with snow and water. Very bad going. Visited. Read. It is said there 
has been good sleighing on the North River" from Newburgh to Troy. 
At evening attended a small meeting. Read the Bible. 

27. The ground considerably bare. Walked out and visited. Paid for 
my wagon last week to Danbury, $1.25. Wrote. Attended a preparatory 
lecture and preached with short notes on John xv : g. Cold. At evening 
attended the astronomical lecture. 

28. Received a letter from Esq. Ely, of Simsbury, and one from ]\Ir. 
Loomis, of Willington. Wrote a sermon on Matt, v: 16. Hindered by 
company. W^e have a very close, cold February. Wrote late. It thaws 
very little. 

March. 

1. Preached on i Peter iv : 11, and the sermon written yesterday on 
Matt, v: 16. Administered the sacrament.^ The members of the church 
generally present. Cold and windy. The audience very attentive. After 
meeting rode to Oronoke " and preached in the evening to a full meeting, 
without notes, on Acts viii : 5. Quite tired. Tarried out. 

2. Was brought home. Wrote. Read McEwen* on the Types. It 
thaws considerably. Read Du Pin's ^ Church History. At evening attended 
the monthly concert. This has been much neglected here. Visited a sick 
family. 

3. Rode to Oronoke. A good deal of water on the ground. Afternoon 
visited a full school, taught by a young lady,'' in fine order. A good many 
people present. At evening attended a conference. This is a verj- good 
neighborhood. 

4. Visited a small school with the visitors. Warm. The snow goes fast 
and the going is bad. The river not yet broken. At evening attended 
a meeting and preached without notes on Luke vii : 23. A full meeting, 
notwithstanding the bad walking. Baptized a child. Quite tired. 



' Rev. Ashbel Steele, settled for a time 
in Middle Haddam, Ct. 

^ On the ice covering the river. 

^ This church at Stratford, where Dr. 
Robbins is how preaching, was the fifth 
church planted in Connecticut; those older, 
in the order of their age, being the churches 
at Windsor, Hartford, New Haven, and Mil- 
ford. 

•* Oronoke was one of the outlying dis- 
tricts of Stratford. 



' Rev. William McEwen, of Scotland, 
died 1762. His work was entitled, Attempt 
to Explain the most Remarkable of the Types, 
Figures, and Allegories of the Old Testament. 
Edinburgh, 1753. 

^ Louis Ellis Dupin, 1657-1719, an eccle- 
siastical historian. 

' In those days the winter town schools 
were seldom taught by ladies. This was, 
doubtless, one of the winter schools now 
drawing to a close. 



128 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBDINS, D. D. [1829. 

5. Yesterday we heard considerable firing in honor of Gen. Jackson.' 
Have visited a number of families in this neighborhood. Rode home in the 
rain. The road very wet and muddy. Wrote to Romulus Barnes,^ at New 
Haven. Read. It rained steadily through the day. 

6. In the morning it snowed considerably. Cold and tedious. Visited. 
Looked over a few old pamphlets. Read Du Pin's Church History. The 
Council of Trent ^ appears rather better than I have heretofore supposed. 

7. Cold. Walked out and visited. Read President Jackson's inaugural 
speech. Pretty lean. Read the Bible. Began a sermon for the Tract 
Society here on Isa. xviii : 27. 

8. It thaws some. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23, and 2 Cor. v : 10. People 
quite attentive. At evening met in the meeting-house and preached without 
notes on Matt, xv : 25. Full meeting. Afternoon received a letter from 
my sister and one from S. T. \\'olcott. Mrs, Battell writes that our dear 
mother is quite feeble and apparently declining. The Lord be her God and 
ours. I think I must visit her. Tudor's letter is very pleasing. Very tired. 
Walked to meeting. 

9. Read the Tract Magazine. A pleasant spring day, yet we have a cold 
air from the great body of snow said to exist at the north. Wrote to my 
sister Battell and to S. T. Wolcott. Walked out and visited. The surface 
of the ground is becoming very wet. 

10. Wrote the most of the day on my sermon on Isa. xviii: 2-7. At 
evening attended the Bible class; much fuller than it has been. Visited. 
Wrote late. The ground thaws. 

11. The snow is mostly gone. Rode out and visited a sick woman. 
Afternoon attended a funeral. Finished my sermon and preached in the 
evening in behalf of the Tract Society here, composed of Presbyterians and 
Episcopalians," on Isa. xviii : 2-7. The roads are very muddy. Much 
fatigued. 

12. Read. Rainy and wet the most of the day. Towards night walked 
out. Visited a sick man. Had company. Had a good meeting in the 
evening and preached without notes on 2 Cor. iv : 10. Wrote. 

13. Rode to Oronoke and, with the visitors, visited a small school. The 
roads are much improved by the rain. Visited. In the evening the com- 
mittee of the society asked for my terms for supplying them six months 
or a year. I told them I could make no such engagement. It seems 
to have been a measure adopted by the society without reflection. 

14. Wrote a communication for the society's committee. Walked out. 



' The 4th of March, Inauguration Da}-. "■ In those days in Connecticut it was not 

^ The young man already noticed, then in an uncommon thing to call a Congregational 

Yale Theological Seminary. church Presbyterian. The American Tract 

^ He had been reading out of Dupin's Society, then fifteen years old, was supported 

History of the Council of Trent (in the Aus- by all the chief religious denominations, and 

trian Tyrol), whose first session was Dec. 13, those in Stratford were Congregational isls 

1545, and the closing session Dec. 4, 1563. and Episcopalians. 



1S29.] PREACHI-VG IN STRATFORD. I29 

Called on Mr. Plant,' lately from Congress. Received a letter from Mrs. 
Battell. Mother is a little better. Received a letter from Seth Seelye,^ 
of Bethel, wishing me to go there to preach. Wrote to him in reply. Cold 
and blustering. Read the Bible. 

15. Quite cold. Preached all day on Ezek. xviii : 32. Meeting pretty 
full. Towards night set out on a journey to Norfolk. Mr. Lovejoy sent 
a stage for me to New Haven. ^ The mail has been carried lately in a wagon. 
Saw some charity scholars. Tarried with Mr. Mitchell.'' The roads from 
Stratford to New Haven are considerably settled. 

16. Made a donation from the Everest fund to R. Barnes^ and S. C. Brace.* 
Made some calls. In the morning there was a little snow, and it snowed 
moderately all day. Rode in the stage to Litchfield. From Watertown we 
traveled in a sleigh. Rough and bad traveling. Tarried at Mr. Deming's.' 

17. Rode to Goshen on wheels and from thence to Norfolk in a sleigh. 
The drifts in some places are very high and the going is difficult. It snowed 
a good part of the day.. Found my mother comfortable,- but quite feeble. 
She is better than she has been. Walked out. The snow is probably one 
and one half feet deep on an average. 

18. A high wind and the snow flies very much. I do not know that 
I have seen higher drifts here than there are now. Wrote. Made my 
mother my winter donation of $5. In the afternoon visited a school with 
Mr. Emerson and others. The district school here is divided. At evening 
received a letter from S. T. Wolcott, giving me the painful information that 
Dea. and Dr. Reed,^ of East Windsor, have failed. They owe me con- 
dderably. I. think I must return that way. Mrs. Battell and her daughter 



' Hon. David Plant, a native of Stratford Stratford, seems to have been the local man- 

md a graduate of Yale, 1804. He had been ager on this line ; and, as it was the muddv 

Speaker of the Connecticut House of Rep- season, they were sending passengers and 

resentatives, a member of the State Senate ; mail in a lighter open wagon, but out of 

from 1S23 to 1S27 Lieut.-Governor, and from regard to Dr. Robbins he sent a regular 

1S27 to 1829 was member of Congress. He stage that day. Now, several thousand peo- 

died in 1851. pie day by day go over this same route on 

^ Bethel parish, in Danbury, was the the New York, &_ New Haven Railroad, 
native place of Rev. Samuel T. Seelye, * Rev. John Mitchell, at that time editor 

D. D., Julius H. Seelye, D. D., and Laurens of the Christian Spectator. Born at Chester, 

C. Seelye, D. D. It was also the native Ct., 1794,- graduated at Yale, 1S21; died at 

place of Laurens P. Hickok, D. D., LL. D. Stratford, Gt., 1870. 

Seth and Abigail (Taylor) Seelye were the ^ This shows our conjecture to have been 

parents of the three brothers just named. correct. 

3 This was a part of the great stage line * Seth C. Brace, son of Rev. Joab Brace, 

between New York and Boston. It was first of Newington, who was then in his sopho- 

etarted in 1772, with the arrangement for run- more year at Yale College; afterwards tutor 

aing a stage each way once a fortnight, the in the college, and Professor of Mathematics 

journey occupying four days. In 1802 mat- in Delaware College, 
ters had greatly advanced, and a stage was ^ Stephen Deming, of Litchfield, 

started each day from Boston and one from ' Dea. Abner and Dr. Elijah Fitch Reed. 

New York; and the time of the journey They were brothers and sons of Mr. Ebenezer 

through was seventy-four hours, including Reed. They were honest but unfortunate, 

the night stops. In 1829, Mr. Lovejoy,. of perhaps unwise managers. 



''\ 



130 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

went yesterday to Warren. They are probably prevented from returning 
today by the deep snow. 

19. I hope my good mother may get some better. Left Norfolk pretty 
early and rode in the stage to Hartford. At Hartford took wheels. Was 
conveyed by friends to East Windsor. The family well. Saw Dr. Reed. 
He is prett)' gloomy. I fear he is wholly insolvent. Principally by means 
of his brother. Received of the Phoenix Bank a dividend of $45. The 
ground here is mostly covered with snow. 

20. Walked out. Spent a good deal of time with the Reeds. I hope 
I shall get some security for my claims. I cannot get away today, as I hoped. 
Received $55 for the rent of my land for two years, gave in interest. Paid 
$1, highway tax. Left $42 with Mr. Wolcott for A. L. Reed,' with an order 
for $258 on the society, on condition of his getting security for the Everest 
fund notes. 

21. Left East Windsor. Called at East Hartford. Rode in the stage 
to New Haven. At Hartford received a letter from my sister Battell. Rode 
to Stratford in the mail wagon. Got here near midnight. Much fatigued. 
The thermometer has been about 12° several mornings this week. 

22. It snowed the most of the forenoon. Meeting quite thin. Preached 
with short notes on i Cor. i: 17, and a written sermon on Matt, vi : 13. 
At evening preached at the conference without notes on Luke xiii : 7. Bad 
going. Conference well attended. 

23. Read. Wrote a good deal. Wrote to Maj. Wolcott. Yesterday 
we had sleighs at meeting. Rode out and visited. Quite cold and windy. 
We have constant cold north winds. 

24. Wrote to Mr. Seth Seelye, of Bethel.^ Read the Z/fe of Cardi- 
nal Wolsey} A great but corrupt man. Visited. At evening had a full 
and attentive Bible class. The society had a meeting and voted, with 
two dissenting votes, to give me a call to settle with them in the 
ministry. 

25. Read in the Life of Williajn Caxton.^ At evening a large committee 
of the society called on me. They wished me to fix a sum for salary, which 
I declined. Their views are not liberal. Visited two schools. I hope for 
divine teachinG:. 

26. Wrote to W. W. Ellsworth, of Hartford. Finished reading the Life 
of Caxton. Visited. Preached at our evening meeting without notes on 
Matt, xiii: 58. Cold. 

27. Quite cold. The little snow that we have goes verj' slowly, though 



' Abner Loring Reed, son of Dea. Abner dalen College, Oxford. He was one of the 

Reed. most distinguished men of the times of 

- In answer to his letter requesting Dr. Henry VHI. 
Robbins to preach at Bethel. ■* William Caxton. born about 1412, was 

3 Thomas Wolsej', Cardinal, 1471-1530. the first to introduce printing into England 

He was a native of Ipswich, England, of from the Low Countries, where he lived for 

poor parents, but a brilliant student of Mag- the purposes of trade. 



1829.] 



PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 



131 



with clear sun. Visited a school ; in good order. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Field,' 
of Stockbridge. Walked out and visited. 

28. Walked out. It looks a little like spring. Received a letter from 
Rev. Mr. Loomis,'' of Willington, and one from John Stoughton, etc., a com- 
mittee of Wapping, wishing me to preach there. Wrote to them in reply. 
Gave to the Tract Society here, $1. Visited the poor-house; two aged people 
have died there today. Read the Bible. 

29. Mild and pleasant. The first spring day we have had. Preached 
on Prov. i: 31, and i Thess. v: 3. Full meetings. Attended a funeral 
at the poor-house. Preached in the evening, without notes, to a very full 
conference, on John xv : 22. Very tired. Received a letter from Mr. and 
Mrs. Battell, and one from my cousin H. Gilman,' of New York. Read the 
Bible. 

30. Wrote to Rev. Mr. McLean, of Simsbury. Walked out. Read. 
Began a letter to President Adams* to request him to write a history 
of our country. We had a little rain. 

31. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Pinneo,' of Milford, and wrote 
to him in reply. Wrote on my letter to President Adams. Spring weather. 
Walked out. At evening attended the Bible class. Read. The society 
held an adjourned meeting and voted unanimously, in a full meeting, 
to give me a call to settle with them, the connection dissoluble at the 
pleasure of either party. And they voted $450 salary. I conclude to con- 
sider the matter, but I think it cannot be my duty to accept of such terms. 

April. 

1. Copied and finished my long letter to President Adams. Mr. Plant, 
M. C, wrote an addition to introduce me to the President. Walked and 
visited. Wrote to my cousin,* Mrs. Oilman, of New York. Read Pitkin's 
History. 

2. A cold rain through the day. Read Pitkin's History. Had no even- 
ing meeting. Received a copy of the society votes respecting me. I think 
it cannot be my duty to accept the call. I pray for divine direction. The 
church gave me a unanimous call on Tuesday. Yesterday wrote to S. T. 
Wolcott. 

3. Read. Walked out. Visited an aged man apparently near death. 
Received a letter from Dea. Judson,' of Fairfield, and one from my brother 



' Rev. David Dudley Field, D. D.,born in 
Guilford, Ct., 1781 ; graduated at Yale, 1S02; 
minister at Haddam, Ct., 1S04-1S18, and at 
.Stockbridge, Mass., 1S19-1837, and again at 
Haddam, 1S37-1S51. He was the father of 
Hon. David Dudle}- Field, Cyrus W. Field, 
and Henry M. Field, D. D. 

^ Rev. Hubbel Loomis. 

^ .Son of Benjamin I. Oilman, Marietta, O. 

* John Quincy Adams, now about to leave 
the presidency, but destined to a life of activ- 



ity, as a public man, for many years to come. 
Dr. Robbins's plan did not bear fruit. 

^ Rev. Bezaleel Finneo. 

* His cousin. Chandler Robbins Oilman, 
son of Benjamin I., of Marietta, O., a gradu- 
ate of the University of Pennsylvania, had 
established himself in New York as a physi- 
cian. It may have been his wife to whom 
he wrote, though probably the wife of Henry 
Oilman, just before mentioned. 

' Dea. Daniel Judson. 



132 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBIMS, D. D. [1829 

at Enfield, informing me that the committee of South Wilbraham have applied 
to him for me to supply them. Afternoon rode to Bridgeport. Bad riding. 
Saw Mr. Wood.' Ecclesiastical matters there are in a bad state. 

4. Read the Bible. Wrote. Wrote to Mr. Joseph Morris, of Wilbraham. 
Rode out. Visited. The aged man I visited yesterday died. Received 
a letter from S. T„ Wolcott. Paid a tailor seventy-five cents. 

5. Preached on John i: i8, and 2 Kings vii : 3. At evening wet and 
we had no meeting. Read the proclamation for Fast in presence of the 
Governor's father.^ Meeting pretty full. Preparing for my journey. Wrote. 

6. Walked out. The Electors' Meeting appeared pretty numerous. 
There is a good deal of drinking here. Prepared for my journey and 
engaged a passage in the stage. But it went off and left me. Attended 
the evening concert of prayer. Received $80 of the society for the ten 
Sabbaths that I have been here. The committee called on me and I stated 
my objections to the terms of the call. They appear desirous to have me 
return. Paid the post office, seventy-one cents. Cold. The river here is 
high. 

7. Read Pitkin's History. The people appear quite anxious about my 
leaving them. Attended the funeral of an aged man. He has had his coffin 
in his house more than twenty years. Have been very kindly accommodated 
in Esq. Booth's^ family. Made calls. Left Stratford in the mail stage, and 
rode to Hartford from five o'clock to one. From New Haven to Hartford, 
in the night, rode with the mail-driver in an open wagon. Paid the stage, 
$3. Slept at the stage-house. The night ride was not very uncomfortable. 
Some of the way quite muddy. ^ 

8. Rose , early. Walked to East Hartford and was carried to East 
Windsor. Conversed a long time in the day and evening with Dr. and 
Dea. Reed. They do not give me much security for my claims against 
them. A committee-man from Wapping called on me. Was up late. Much 
fatigued. 

9. Reckoned with Tudor and paid him to balance, $7.25. Paid for a map, 
$1.50. Rainy and wet all day. At evening we had some thunder. Looked 
over accounts. Read. Wrote to Mr. Battell. 

10. Conversed with Dea. Reed respecting my claims. Rode to Hartford. 
Very muddy. Conversed with W. W. Ellsworth and left notes with him. 
Settled a long account, since 1823, with Barber «& Robinson, for books, 
binding, etc., $129.13. Had credit by former payments of $50. And for 
Questions on English History, which I prepared for them, $50. Paid them 
$29.13. Wrote to Gen. Howe, of New Haven. The river is high. Called 
at Esq. White's,* of East Hartford. 

11. Wrote. Have too many unsettled accounts. Wrote to W. W. Ells- 
worth. Rode to Enfield. Visited at Edgar Bissell's. They have a fine little 



' Elijah Wood, Esq. ^ Elijah Booth, Esq. 

^ Jabez H. Tomlinson, Esq., before men- ■* Lemuel White, Esq., where he boarded 

tioned. a few weeks before. 



1829.] PREACHING IN WAPPING. 133 

son,' Shower)\ Muddy. Some places In the roads verj' bad. My brother 
is still afflicted with the headache. Mr. Morris/ of South Wilbraham, came 
to my brother's to get me to go there. I cannot engage. 

12. Pleasanter weather. Meeting rather thin. Preached on John i: i8, 
and I Thess. v : 3. This congregation is in a very good state. Attended 
a conference in the evening and preached without notes on John xv : 22. 
My brother attended another conference. Was up late. 

13. Consulted respecting my answer to Stratford. Rode to East Windsor. 
Quite pleasant. Examined the town records. At evening had a meeting 
with the society committee and treasurer. They are in difficulty, ^^'as out 
quite late. 

14. Wrote. Had a writ of attachment served on Dr. Reed in behalf 
of the Everest fund. Fine spring weather. Read. Occupied with company. 
Vegetation advances, though it is backward. 

15. Worked at my librar}-, moving book-cases, etc. The expected change ^ 
in this family renders this necessar}'. Took some books and a pair of tine 
globes of Dea. Reed on my claim. Rode to Hartford. The traveling is 
pretty good. 

16. Yesterday the first warm day we have had. In the morning performed 
a marriage in the neighborhood. Received a letter from my brother, inform- 
ing me that the new society in Longmeadow are very desirous to have me 
go to preach for them. I hope for divine teaching and guidance. Worked 
at my library. Wrote to J. W. Edwards,* Esq., Hartford, and Prof. Goodrich, 
New Haven. At evening rode to Wapping to preach for a short time. 
Received pamphlets by the post office. 

17. Fast. Had fuller meetings, I think, than I have ever before seen 
in this place. Preached on Lev. xxiii : 26-31, and Lam. iii : 18-21. A num- 
ber of people out from the Street. The prospects of this people are 
encouraging. They have had a good work of grace here. Attended an 
evening conference and preached without notes on John xv : 22. Much 
fatigued. 

18. Walked and visited all day. The people appear desirous that I would 
continue with them. The roads are dr}'. Procured, fortunately, a copy 
of the first American Bible excepting Elliott's, published in Philadelphia. 
1781.' 

19. Had a large congregation. Preached on John iii: 3, i Thess. v: 3. 

Assisted in organiziftg the Sabbath-school. Preached in the evening without 



' Tudor Bissell. college. He was one of the descendants of 

^ The man with whom he had before cor- William Edwards, of Hartford. He was, at 

responded on the same subject. this time, on the Board of Aldermen in 

3 The expected diangc was probably the Hartford, 
marriage of Samuel Tudor Wolcott, so that ^ What is called Elliott's is no other than 

two families would need accommodation in John Eliot's Indian liible, which has now 

the house. become scarce. The ne.xt American Bible 

■* Jonathan Walter Edwards, A. M., a was published by Robert Aikman, a Scotch- 
graduate of Yale, 1789, and tutor in the man, in Philadelphia, 1782. 



134 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

notes on Matt, xv : 25. Have many invitations to places. The Methodist 
influence still exists here in a degree, and I fear will be injurious. Osborn's ' 
last preaching was very strange. 

20. A little showery. Walked and visited. I think there is some prospect 
of a pretty good church and society here." There are some efforts to procure 
a division of this town. At evening rode home. Was informed that the 
society in East Hartford have voted today to have me employed with them 
for three months. I would bless God for his mercies and implore the 
teachings of his Spirit. Very tired. 

21. Wrote an answer to my call from Stratford, in the negative, and sent 
it. On account of the terms I think my duty is plain. Wrote to the com- 
mittee of Wapping and informed them I cannot supply them any more 
at present. It is on account of the peculiar situation of this society.^ The 
committee of East Hartford called here and agreed with me to supply them 
for three months. Called on Mr. Whelpley. Was out late. Read. The 
late election in this State has issued favorably.** 

22. Wrote to Dea. Ebenezer Burt, of Longmeadow,' to decline an appli- 
cation to preach in the new society in that town. Wrote. Afternoon rode 
to Hartford. The water runs over the most of the causeway in the meadow. 
Saw Mr. Edwards respecting the Everest fund. Did errands. Got home late. 

23. Concluded to take some additional articles of Dea. Reed. I have 
never seen the water but a little higher than now. Almost wholly, I conclude, 
from snow.* Thermometer at 70°. Received of Dea. Reed a note, by him and 
his son, of $60, a note against Silas Andrews of $34.40, and $6.12 in money, 
and gave him a receipt of $100 for the society. Wrote to my brother at 
Enfield. Received a letter from Prof. Goodrich, of Yale College. The 
Wapping committee called on me. That people appear much disappointed, 
but I cannot think I have done wrong.'' 

24. Received from Dea. Reed a pair of globes at $25, and books at $10, 
for which I agreed with him on the 9th inst. Have now taken cabinet and 
some other articles, with which I am to do as well as I can. Rode to Scantic 
and visited Mr. Bartlett. Afternoon rode to East Hartford, to reside as long 
as God shall see fit. The water very high. Read. 

25. Walked out. Afternoon attended two funerals, one at the east part 
of the town. There have been five deaths of grown persons this week. The 



' Rev. Renselaer Osborn. ' This was the East Parish in Long- 

^ There was a church organized there in meadow, Mass., which had then just been 

1830, which is now known as the Second organized. It dates from 1829. 

Congregational Church in South Windsor ^ Snow melting on the slopes of the White 

(still called Wapping), but it has always and Green Mountains, 

been a rather small church. ' Under all the cira^mstances it would 

^ Having been a pastor so long in the old have been wrong, rather than right, for Dr. 

church, it would seem that he was trying to Robbins to have settled in Wapping. He 

create a division if he settled at Wapping. would, undoubtedly, have drawn a number 

■* That is to say, Gov. Gideon Tomlinson of families from the old society that were 

was re-elected. needed there. 



1829.] 



PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. 



^35 



water falls a little. Yesterday saw blossoms on the dafifas, and had a good 
cutting of asparagus. 

26. Quite cool. The soutli people ' have to cross the water in a boat. 
Preached on Ps. cvi : 15, and 2 Kings vii : 3. Meetings not very full. 
At evening preached, without notes, at a full conference, on Matt, xv : 25. 
Conversed with the deacons about some church matters. 

27. Read. Visited sick persons and others. Afternoon went over to 
Hartford with Mr. Wolcott and indorsed a note for him of $900 at the Phoenix 
Bank. Called again on Mrs. Newbur}-. Rode to East Windsor. Sent Mr. 
Wolcott $150, and took his note. Received of the society committee, $255.55, 
completing what they owed me. Have had interest from the time of my 
dismission. Paid the post office, sixty-one cents. Received an excellent 
letter from President Adams.^ Received a letter from my brother Francis, 
which has been to Stratford. In the morning we had a hard frost. The 
water falls. It has been up an unusual time. 

28. Paid Mrs. Wolcott, $150, including my carpet, which she takes at $25. 
Worked some. Rode to East Hartford. Wrote. Paid Esq. White ^ on my 
board-bill, $15. Wrote to Capt. Morris, of Wilbraham, in answer to a letter 
received from him yesterday. I cannot comply with their earnest desire 
to supply them. Saw, at East Windsor, peach-blossoms. Afternoon walked 
out. People fish in the meadows. Conversed with church members between 
whom there are difficulties. Tarried out. Warm. 

29. Conversed further concerning the church difficulties. They are bad. 
Very warm and dusty. Walked to the mills.'* Am disappointed respecting 
the establishment of a Bible class there. Read Tasso. 

30. Walked out. Read. Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture, with 
short notes, on John xv : 9. Conversed considerably with the church com- 
mittee. Visited. Wrote to Rev. S. E. Dwight,' of New Haven, At the 
meeting baptized three children. 



Mav. 



I. Walked to Hartford. Settled an old account with Silas Andrews, 
mostly in 1820. Paid him for books and some binding, $40. He allowed 
me for my sermons on the Divinity of Christ in 1820, $25. And for writing 
a preface, etc., for Mather's Mag/ia/ia, in 182 1, a copy of the work at $5 and 
$2 in addition. Paid him now, $10. The town appears very active. The 
water has much fallen. Visited. Read Tasso.* 



' The people of East Hartford south of 
the Hockanum River. The back water from 
the Connecticut River had made the roads 
impassable. 

^ He did not promise, probably, to write 
the history of this country, though if he had 
undertaken it, it would doubtless have been 
a valuable work. 

' Lemuel White, Esq. 

•* Paper mills at Scotland, now Burnside. 

^ Rev. Sereno Edwards Dwighi, D. D., 



from 1817 to 1826 pastor at Park Street 
Church, Boston; author of the I,i/e of Pres- 
ident Jonathan Edwards, and editor of his 
works. Afterwards, 1833-1835, President of 
Hamilton College, N. Y. He died in Phila- 
delphia, 1S50. 

* Torquato Tasso, one of the great Italian 
poets, was born at Sorrento, 1 544, and died at 
Sant' Onofrio, near Rome, in 1595. It does 
not appear what translation Dr. Robbins was 
reading. 



136 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

2. Walked and visited. Warm. People are beginning their gardens. 
Wrote. Read the Bible. Find but little time for study. 

3. Wet. Afternoon quite rainy and cold. Preached on i Peter i : ii, 
and Matt, v: i6. Attended the sacrament. This church is large. Meeting 
rather thin. Had no evening meeting. Walked out. 

4. Read newspapers. Wrote. Prayed and dined with a military com- 
pany. They appear very well. Something showery. Attended in the even- 
ing the concert of prayer. Quite thin. Read Tasso. 

5. Read. Pleasant. Afternoon walked to Hartford. Saw the entrance 
of the Governor. The military performance very fine. Saw Judge Fairchild, 
of Stratford. He says they are much disappointed there at my answer to 
their call. They are willing to do something more. At evening attended 
the interesting meeting of the young men's Domestic Missionary Society 
of Plartford. An interesting meeting. They are doing good. Saw Mr. 
Emerson, of Norfolk. Got home late. 

6. Attended the election. Very pleasant, but warm. The sermon Was 
good ; much better than I expected. The military appeared very finely. 
A great collection of people and a good number of the clergy. Attended 
in the morning the Connecticut Bible Society, the Ministers' Annuity Society, 
and the Convention of the Clergy. Afternoon, a meeting took some measures 
for the promotion of a temperance society. Rode with my brother to Podunk 
and performed a marriage. Rode to East Windsor. Received a letter from 
Esq. Brooks,' of Stratford, expressing an earnest desire of the people there 
that I would return there. They would put my salary at $500, but retain 
the right of separating at pleasure.^ 

7. Mr. Wolcott paid me ^122 on the note he gave me last week. 
Conversed with Tudor. He feels unpleasantly. He conveyed me to East 
Hartford. Read. Most people appear to be at their labor. At evening 
rode to Podunk again and performed a marriage. 

8. Walked to Hartford. Conversed with members of the Assembly. 
Paid for a half-ream of letter paper, ^1.50. Sent a donation from the Everest 
fund to the Domestic Missionary Society. Wrote. Read Tasso. At evening 
walked to Hartford again and conversed with Representatives on the subject 
of the common schools. The business is laborious. Got home late. 

9. Wrote to A. T. Judson,^ of the House of Representatives. Wrote 
to D, Brooks," Esq., of Stratford. I cannot yet think it my duty to go there. 



' David Brooks, Esq. ^ Hon. Andrew T. Judson, a n;itive of 

^ This condition of ministerial settlement Eastford, Ct., born in 1784. He had only a 

has now become more common than it was common school education, but became one 

then. It was generally opposed by ministers, of the prominent public men of the State; 

as making them seem simply like hired men was a member of Congress, 1S35-1839, and 

and detracting from the dignity of the pro- was made Circuit I'nited States Judge for 

fession. It was favored often by parishes to the Southern District of New York. He 

avoid a conflict, such as often arose in the died, 1853. 

dismission of a minister. ■* David Brooks, Esq. 



[829.] 



PREACHING IX EAST HARTFORD. 



137 



They do not appear to feel right toward the ministry. Wrote to Mr. Booth,* 
of Coventr}'. Read Tasso. 

ID. Quite rainy the most of the day. Preached a double sermon on 
Ezek. xviii : 32. Meetings quite thin. At evening preached in a thin 
conference, without notes, on John xv : 22. Read the Bible. The ground 
very wet. 

n. Wrote to Elisha Phelps,* Esq., Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives. Read Tasso. Wrote for the Clerical Convention to Rev. C. Wilcox,^ 
of Greenwich, and Rev. W. Mitchell,* of Newtown. Expected to have had 
a Bible class in the evening, but was prevented by the rain. Visited. 

12. Walked to Hartford and was about town the most of the day. Saw 
my cousin G. Starr and many acquaintances. Consulted about the Society 
for the Improvement of Schools. Prepared a petition to be presented to the 
Assembly for the Ministers' Annuity Society. Made my two last annual 
payments to the same, $10.30. Paid for the petition, seventy-five cents. 
Attended the annual meeting of the Society for the Schools. Quite cool. 
Got home late. 

13. Walked to the south part of the town. Visited families. At evening 
preached in the school-house on John xv : 22. Tarried out. In the morning 
there was considerable frost. 

14. Visited. Some frost this morning. The apple-blossoms appear con- 
siderably. Rode home. Attended the funeral of an aged woman. Read. 
At evening met with the officers of the Sabbath-School Society. After the 
funeral visited a school. 

15. Walked to Hartford in the morning and met with the Committee 
of the Assembly on Schools. Left with them a petition to be presented 
to the Assembly on that subject. Warm. The season is very fine. Read. 
The law for the relief of the Irish Catholics has passed the two Houses 
of Parliament by great majorities.* Saw Mr. Battell at Hartford. Sent 
to my mother, $5. Wrote. Hostile movements appear to be beginning 
in the east of Europe.* In the evening had the first meeting of our proposed 
Bible class. Well attended. 

16. Walked to Hartford in the morning, by request, and prayed with 
the House of Representatives. Showery. Wrote the most of a sermon on 
Deut. vi : 6, 7. Wrote late. Read. We had a good deal of rain. 

17. Finished and preached in the afternoon my sermon on Deut. vi : 6, 7. 



' Rev. Chauncey Booth, a native of East 
Windsor; a graduate of Yale, 1810; pastor 
of the First Church in Coventry, 181 5-1844. 
lie died in 1851. 

^ Hon. Elisha PhelpS, born in Simsbury, 
Ct., 1779; a graduate of Yale, 1800; often in 
the Connecticut Legislature; six years in 
Congress, State Comptroller, and Commis- 
sioner to Revise the Statutes. lie died in 
Simsbury, 1847. 



^ Rev. Chauncey Wilcox, graduate of Yale, 
1824; pastor at North Greenwich, 182S to 
1846. He died in 1S52. 

* Rev. William Mitchell. 

5 The Roman Catholic Relief Bill, as it 
was called, passed April 13, 1829. 

* The war between Russia and Turkey 
had been quiet during the winter, and no 
great battle was fought until June, but prep- 
arations were going forward. 



138 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D. [1829. 

Preached in tlie morning on Heb. xi : 6. Very pleasant. Full meeting. 
At evening attended the annual meeting of the Sabbath-School Society here. 
We had an annual contribution for the Connecticut Missionary Society and 
collected about $^t,. Read. 

i8. Visited. Walked and rode to East Windsor. Warm. Mr. Filley' 
has kindly brought a part of my books from Stratford. Made calls. 

19. Vegetation appears in its highest beauty. Paid a highway tax of 
$2.10. Left $90 with Mr. Wolcott to be loaned to Abner Morton. Rode 
home. Quite warm. Visited. Wrote. Married two persons, one belonging 
to Vernon and one to Berlin. Rode down street and attended a funeral 
of a woman, a widow of three successive husbands, brothers. Walked out. 
Walked to Hartford at evening and saw the Committee of the Assembly 
on Schools. Rainy, and they had no quorum. Got something wet. Much 
fatigued, 

20. Walked early to Hartford and met with the Committee on Schools. 
I fear they will do but little. Borrowed $100 of the Phoenix Bank and lent 
it to J. W. Edwards for the Everest fund. Received seventy-seven cents. 
Very warm. Received a letter from Esq. Ely, of Simsbury. Wrote. Left 
off my flannel. Walked to Scotland and attended a meeting in the evening 
at the school-house, and preached without notes on Matt, xv : 25. Tarried 
out. 

21. Visited. Walked home. Fatigued with labor and the heat. Read 
Tasso. Gave the Sabbath-School Society here, $1. Rode with Capt. Stewart 
to East Windsor. At evening performed a marriage at Mr. King's. Returned 
late. 

22. We have an account of the death of Gov. Jay.^ I think he will stand 
next to Washington in our history. Walked to Flartford and prayed with 
the House of Representatives. Wrote a plan of an act, by desire, for the 
improvement of common schools. A very growing season. The blossoms 
of a great blowth are falling. Wrote. Had company. At evening attended 
my Bible class. It appears well. 

23. Something cooler. Hindered by company. Wrote to Mr. Brace, 
of Newington, and Mr. Bacon, of New Haven, and Mr. Button, of Guilford.' 
Walked out and called on Mr. Stebbins," of West Haven, now in town. 

24. Received a letter from my brother James. Our good mother is quite 
feeble, and I fear declining. Mr. Stebbins preached in the forenoon and 
evening. Preached in the afternoon on i Thess. v : 3. Very warm. The 
Sabbath-school was organized. Wrote to Mr. McEwen, of New London. 



' Mr. Horace Filley, probably. The name four years of age. As a patriot, a wise leg- 

Filley was a common one in Windsor, and islator, and a diplomatist, his name is clear 

there were a few of the name in East Wind- and shining, though we might not now say, 

sor. They were descendants of William Fil- perhaps, that he stands next to Washington, 

ley, who was in Windsor as early as 1642. ^ Rev. Joab Brace, D. D., Rev. Leonard 

^ Gov. John Jay, of Huguenot descent, an Bacon, D. D., and Rev. Aaron Button, 

illustrious statesman, died at Bedford, West- * Rev. Stephen W. .Stebbins, pastor at 

Chester County, N. Y., May 17, 1829, eighty- West Haven, 181 5-1843. 



IS29.] 



PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. 



139 



25. Walked out and visited. Read. Mr. Field,' of Stockbridge, called 
on me, and I rode with him to East Windsor and back in a severe heat and 
dust. He wants documents for his history of Berkshire. At evening walked 
out. My thermometer was at 90°. 

26. The forenoon quite rainy. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Hart, of Plymouth, 
Mr. Parsons, of East Haddam, and Mr. Ely, of Mansfield.^ The Assembly 
have appointed two good judges.^ Read. The ground is much refreshed. 

27. Walked to Hartford and attended the exhibition of the infant-school. 
Very interesting. Paid a tailor, $3. Very warm and sultry. Walked out 
and visited. \\'rote to Rev. David Perry, of Sharon. Much oppressed with 
the heat. 

28. Walked to Hartford and prayed with the House of Representatives. 
Called on Mr. Linsley. Had some conversation with him. Hear that my 
good Uncle Starr is some better of his severe illness. The heat very 
oppressive. Wrote to Rev. Samuel Backus,* of Woodstock — making twelve 
letters that I have written as secretar)^ of the Convention of the Clergy. 
At evening attended our Bible class. Full and interesting. May God give 
his blessing. 

29. Received a letter from my cousin William Lawrence.^ Read Picture 
of London!' We had several hard showers and one of them was accompanied 
with powerful hail. It hailed about twenty minutes ; the stones quite large, 
but the wind not violent. Attended a lecture at the north school-house ; 
preached without notes on John xvi : 27. The ground almost covered with 
water. Visited. Baptized two children. 

30. Walked a distance and visited the most of the day. A cool air after 
an unusual sultry turn. The hail-storm has been severe and destructive 
at the east of us. Read. 

31. Something showery. Preached on John ix : 7, and 2 Cor, v: 10, 
Afternoon full meeting. Attended a conference in the evening and preached 
without notes on Matt, vii : 24. Baptized a child. 

June. 

I. Cool. Went over the river and prayed with the House of Repre- 
sentatives. Looked at the new Episcopal church ^ that is building. It is 



' Dr. David Dudley Field. He was given 
to historical writing. His History of Berk- 
shire, published in 1829, is an exceedingly 
good book for ready reference. 

* Rev. William Ely, and Elijah Parsons. 

^ The judges appointed for that year were 
most noble and excellent men : Hon. Thomas 
S. Williams, of Hartford, and Hon. Clark 
Bissell, of Norwalk. 

"* Rev. Samuel Backus was pastor at East 
Woodstock, 181 5-1830. 

5 William Lawrence, the son of Grove 
and Elizabeth (Robbins) Lawrence, born 
June 8, iSoi, and adopted by Mr. and Mrs. 



Joseph Battell, of Norfolk, when a little 
child. He was, at the time of writing this 
letter, twent)--eight years old. 

* Picture of Lotidon was a work by John 
Britton, who wrote the Beauties of Wiltshire, 
and some other w'orks of this general char- 
acter. 

^ Christ Church on Main Street, Hart- 
ford. The corner-stone of this edifice was 
laid May 13, 1S2S, and it was consecrated by 
Bishop Hobart, Dec. 23, 1829. It was 121^ 
feet long, 76 feet wide. This building, with 
some changes and additions, still stands in 
dignity and strength. 



140 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

magnificent. Paid a shoe-maker, $2.16. We have many accounts of the 
devastation of the late hail-storm in crops and glass. Wrote. Attended 
in the evening the monthly concert. Pretty thin. 

2. Set out early and rode to West Hartland, and met with our Associa- 
tion.' Glad to do it again. Rode in my sulky. A long way and some 
of the road very bad. Mr. Crosby'' preached. About half of the members 
present. We had a good deal of business. 

3! Paid for a book, to Mr. Woodbridge, where I slept, $1. Wrote a 
report of the state of religion for General Association. Made a motion, 
which was adopted, to take measures to form a new association out of this 
and Litchfield North.^ My brother went on to Norfolk. Returned through 
Simsbur}'. Visited Esq. Ely and received another note from him, not 
expected, which completes the Everest fund at $4,101.12. Got home late. 
Cool and dusty. 

4. Quite fatigued. Rode to East Windsor and back with M. Stewart. 
Assisted Tudor in some of his work. Warm. Wrote. Visited. Attended 
the Bible class in the evening ; attentive and increasing. Received a letter 
from Esq. Ely, of Simsbury. 

5. Rode out with company and visited. The heat oppressive. At even- 
ing preached in an out neighborhood, without notes, on John xvi : 27. Very 
much fatigued. The Assembly rose today, having done but little. 

6. Walked to Hartford and did some errands. Last evening, after 
the meeting, assisted the deacons in examining two young women for the 
communion of the church. I hope the first fruits of a good ingathering. 
Wrote on the Everest fund accounts. Read. 

7. Preached on John ix : 7, and Eph. ii : 14. The heat quite oppressive. 
Baptized a child. Propounded two young women to the church. My good 
friend S. T. Wolcott was published for marriage.* At evening had a full 
conference. Preached without notes on Ps. cxxxvii : i. Much fatigued. 

8. Wrote. Walked out and visited. Rode out and attended the funeral 
of an infant child. Baptized a child in the same family. At evening attended 
the Sabbath-school concert. We had a hard shower and the meeting was thin. 

9. Rode to Wrapping, and Manchester, and East Windsor, trying to 
purchase a horse. Saw the desolating effects of the late hail-storm. People 
are plowing in the fields of grain. Cooler. Was out late. Yesterday eat 
strawberries. 

10. Last evening received a letter from B. Ely, Esq., of Simsbury. Quite 
cool. Read. The manufacturing interests in England are much depressed. 
Wrote. Saw my brother's wife. Visited. Walked to Hartford. Paid for 
a bed.stead, $9.25. For two mattresses, $g. Stockings, $2.75. Had green 
peas. 



' Hartford North Association. association contemplated seems not to have 

^ Rev. Stephen Crosby, pastor at East been formed. 
Granby (Turkey Hills), 1826-1832. ♦ This confirms the supposition made a 

3 Though the motion was passed, the new little way back. 



1829.] PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. 14I 

11. Wrote to Mrs. Porter, Augusta, N. Y. Visited. Had a new coat 
made ; a very good one. Attended to the repairing of my sulky. At evening 
married my near friend, Samuel Tudor W'olcott, to Maria Stewart." of this 
town. I bless God for this connection. We had a splendid and very pleasant 
wedding. June iith, 1808, I went to live in Mr. Wolcott's family. Tudor 
gave me two sovereigns, the first I have seen, which cost $10.^ 

12. Walked and visited. Paid thirty-eight cents for recording marriage 
certificates. Yesterday made a donation, $1. Some bad difficulties exist 
here in the church. Read. Wrote to my brother. Wrote on a report 
of the Everest Fund Committee for General Association. Attended the 
Bible class. Quite serious. 

13. Finished my report. Very fine summer weather. Paid a tax of $1.83 
to an East Windsor collector. Rode to the mills ^ and agreed with the 
proprietors of the Methodist meeting-house there to hold a weekly Bible 
class in it. They appear cordial. A merciful God seems to favor this 
object. 

14. Preached both parts of the day on John ix : 7, and finished my long 
discourse on the means of grace. It has appeared interesting. May God 
give his blessing. At evening rode to the south school-house and preached 
without notes on Acts viii .-5. A storm was rising and the meeting was 
short. Soon after I got home it rained powerfully. The thunder and 
lightning were near and very hard. This evening the horse which I lately 
bought at East Windsor was sent down. 

15. Set out on a journey to Stratford. The shower last night was heavy. 
At Hartford had a conversation with Mr. Hawes. Paid for a whip, $1.50. 
Rode to New Haven, Fine traveling. Towards night we had a shower and 
concluded to go no further. Called on Dr. Taylor.'* Looked at the new 
State House ^ in building. 

16. Rode early to Stratford. Put up such clothes and books as I can 
carry. There has been no preaching here since I left them. The people ap- 
pear disappointed very much that I declined their call. I cannot think I did 
wrong. Saw a few people. Rode to New Haven. Called at Mr. Stebbins's,* 
at West Haven, and saw Miss Pitkin, of East Hartford. Paid Gen. Howe, 
$11.25, fo'' books. Rode in the evening to Wallingford and tarried at 
a tavern. 

17. Rode early to the center of the town and attended the morning prayer- 
meeting. Attended the session of the General Association. My brother is 
a member. The report of the Everest Fund Committee was well received. 
Mr. Tenney ' preached well for the Domestic Missionar}' Society. Contrib- 



' Maria Stewart, the bride, was the daugh- ■' Dr. Nathaniel W. Taylor, of the Yale 

ter of Capt. Allen Stewart, of East Hartford. Seminary. 

- The real value of the English sovereign ^ j^g Q^g „Q^y standing on the Common, 

was $4.84, but something was paid for ex- though no longer used as a State House, 
change, and in round numbers a sovereign * Rev. Stephen W. Stebbins. 

was $5. 7 Rev. Caleb J. Tenney, D. D., of Weth- 

' Scotland, where the paper mills were. ersfield. 



142 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D. [1829. 

uted $1 for that object. Was appointed on a committee and made a report. 
Afternoon rode home. Something dusty. My horse has performed well. 
Quite fatigued. The late hail-storm did much damage in Meriden and 
vicinity. 

18. Put up my things. Read. Visited a child ver}^ sick. Afternoon rode 
to the mills and commenced a Bible class. Had a good number for the first. 
By mistake it was held before evening. Yesterday the committee of supply 
here met and agreed to employ another preacher after my term has expired. 
The committee now find they were under some mistake, and that the people 
disapprove of the measure. 

19. The committee concluded to recall their step and not to apply to the 
man they had in view. Rode to East Windsor. Paid Mr. Porter $65 for 
my horse. Visited. Much hindered by company. Mr. Ludlow,' of New 
York, and Mr.. Gillet,^ formerly of Gilead, called on me. Yesterdaj'- Mr. 
Strong, ^ of Somers, called on me, and I wrote some votes for his church 
to pass, as he is about to be dismissed. Saw my brother returning from 
General Association. A Mr. Pease, of Somers, called on me with an appli- 
cation to preach there after I have done here. I could not, at present, 
engage. Attended in the evening our Bible class. Held late. 

20. Walked out and visited. I pray for divine direction with regard 
to my Somers application. Read. Wrote. Paid for the use of a horse 
several times, $3.50. For four bushels of oats, $2. Wrote on a paper for 
General Association. Read the Bible. In the evening we had a pretty hard 
showier. 

21. Cool. Preached on Prov. i : 31, and Num. xxxv : 15. At the evening 
meeting preached without notes on Ps. Ivi : 11. The Sabbath-school is much 
increased. Meetings quite full. Proposed to the people to observe, in 
a suitable manner, the anniversary of Independence. Propounded a young 
woman to the church. 

22. Paid for an ancient piece of gold for my cabinet, $5.50. Rode to 
Hartford and saw Mrs, Vv'hittlesey,'' of Danbury. Mr. Bulkley' gave me 
an ancient trammel^ from the Wyllys family, brought to this countr}- by 
George Wyllys 'in 1638. It belonged to his mother, a daughter of Mr. Smith, 
of Stratford-upon-Avon.* Mr. Bulkley has greatly improved the ancient Wyllys 
residence. Gave Miss Whittlesey for the Sabbath-school library in Danbuiy, 
$1. Wrote. Purchased a few old books. Visited. At evening rode to East 
Windsor and returned. 



' Rev. Henry G. Ludlow. hooks by which kettles were hung over the 

^ Rev. Nathan Gillet. fire. The gift was, in itself, rude, but its 

^ Rev. William L. Strong, often men- value was in its antiquity and its historical 

tioned, who had been pastor at Somers associations. 

since 1805. ' George Wyllys, the founder of the Wyl- 

■• Of the family where he made his home lys family in Connecticut, and one of the 

when in Danbury. chief men of the infant colony. The " Wyllys 

^ Stephen Bulkley. papers " are of much historical value. 
^ The word trammel has a variety of ^ Shakespeare himself might have seen 

meanings, but here it probably refers to the this ancient relic. 



1829.] PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. I43 

23. Read Life of Legh Ruhmoml} A valuable piece of biography. Spent 
a part of the day at Capt. Stewart's. Tudor is about taking home his new 
wife. Visited two sick children. Wet. Gave Dr. Skinner, of New Haven,^ 
§5. He is soliciting donations for the erection of a hospital in that town. 

24. Went in the morning to Capt. Stewart's. Tudor and Maria and her 
mother went to East Windsor. I pray that they may be a family for the 
praise of God. Visited families. Wrote. At evening preached at the north 
brick school-house, without notes, on Acts viii : 5. Full meeting. 

25. Visited the sick. Read Richmond's Life. Quite cool. Visited the 
grammar school. It appears well. Rode to the mills, visited, and attended 
in the evening the Bible class there. It appears well. Was out late. 

26. Have received this week a letter from Rev. Mr. Hart,^ of Plymouth. 
Rode to Hartford and saw a vounof woman who wishes to unite with this 
church. Visited sick persons. Read Richmond's Lfe. A committee of the 
people here requested me to deliver an address on the 4th of July. Wrote. 
At evening attended the Bible class. Such a number that I cannot go round. 

27. Walked and visited. People are haying. Read. Visited sick chil- 
dren. At evening received a letter from my sister Battell with the painful 
intelligence that my brother Samuel is very sick. She wishes me to go there. 
The Lord be our helper. Read the Bible. 

28. The forenoon very rainy. A most grateful supply to the dr}- ground. 
Thin meeting. Afternoon pleasant and a good congregation. Preached all 
day on Acts xiii : 2. Propounded a young woman to the church. Wrote. 
Towards night shower}^; visited sick persons. In the evening went to Hart- 
ford. Tarried at the stage-house. 

29. Rode about two o'clock in the morning in the stage, and got to Norfolk 
about nine. Considerably unwell. Mrs. Battell and Joseph went on in the 
stage for Camillus,* expecting to find brother Samuel very low, if living. She 
wished me to go, but I cannot at present. In the afternoon a passenger 
in the stage informed us that he came through Camillus, and brother Samuel 
was a little better, and they were encouraged. Mother is quite comfortable. 
Cousin Philip Battell has come home from New Haven, having just taken 
the attorney's oath. Urania is apparently recovering from a long and severe 
illness. Quite cool. 

30. Visited Mr. Emerson. A little before I left Norfolk brother James 
came there prepared, if necessar}', to go on to Camillus. Soon after sister 
Battell returned in the stage from Albany. She there met a letter informing 
her that brother Samuel is hopefully beginning to recover. It becomes us to 
praise the Lord and live ever to his service. James concludes not to go on. 
Returned home. Got home late. There has been a hard rain here this 



' Rev. Legh Richmond, 1772-1S27, best *• It was not far from 150 miles from Nor- 

known as the author of the Dairyman's folk, Ct., to Camillus, Onondaga Countv, 

Daughter, a religious story which was im- X. V. It shows a great kindred respect 

mensely popular. that members of the family should at once 

^ Dr. Aaron N. Skinner. undertake a journey of this length. Fami- 

^ Rev. Luther Hart, pastor at Plymouth, lies differ greatly in the love and honor shown 

Ct., 1810- 1834. among their members one toward another. 



144 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

afternoon and evening, though I saw little on my way. Have had a journey 
of great mercies. 

July. 

1. Wet and cool. Rode to Hartford and met Mr. Ely,' and gave a deed 
for the Everest fund. Received a letter from brother F. Began to write 
an address to be delivered on the 4th instant.^ The ground is very wet. 
S. T. Wolcott called to see me. 

2. Wrote to brother F. Wrote on my address what time I could get. 
Preached a preparatory lecture with short notes on Rom. viii : 35. Attended 
my Bible class at the mills.' Wet and showery. 

3. Wrote on my address and finished it late at night. At evening 
attended my Bible class. Wet, cloudy, and cold. My address is long. 

4. Wet and cold. People have hay out that was mowed last Saturday. 
Delivered my address to the Sabbath-school and for the Colonization Society. 
The school well out. Not many others. Our collection for the Colonization 
Society was deferred. Afternoon went to Hartford and heard addresses from 
Mr. Linsley* and Mr. Gallaudet,' in behalf of the Colonization Society.* 
Rainy. The Jacksonians are very violent. Much fatigued. 

5. ,Wet and dark. Preached with short notes on John i: 11, and on 
Ex. xxxii : 26. Received four young women into the church. There had 
been no addition for two years. Administered the sacrament. Church rather 
thin. Baptized four young communicants and a child. Had no evening 
meeting. A Mr. Gorham and his sister, from Stratford, were at meeting 
in the morning. 

6. Pleasant. Read. Much affected with a stiff neck. Afternoon rode 
to Hartford. Visited a Mrs. Hale, from Stratford. Attended the monthly 
concert in the evening. A Mr. Tyler,' of Griswold, an unsettled minister, 
came here and tarried. 

7. Warm. People are getting hay that has been out a week. Am quite 
feeble. Society matters here are not in a good state. Mr. Ely, of Simsbury, 
came here and paid me some money for the Everest fund. Wrote by Mr. 
Tyler to J. Stoughton,' of Wapping. Visited. At evening rode to East 
Windsor. Am unable to get green peas to send to my mother.' 



' Benjamin Ely, Esq., of Simsbury. of Griswold, Ct. ; a graduate of Brown Uni- 

^ Dr. Robbins is now in East Hartford, versity, 1S23, and of Andover Theological 

but wherever he happens to be preaching he Seminary, 1826. He preached at various 

is likely to be called upon for a Fourth of places in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massa- 

July address. chusetts, and New Hampshire, and died in 

^ The mills already spoken»of, about two 1844. 
miles east of East Hartford Street, at what ^ John Stoughton. The letter to him was 

is now called Burnside. probably one introducing Rev. Mr. Tyler, 

* Joel H. Linsley, D. D., of the South thinking the Wapping people might like to 
Church, Hartford. hire him to preach for them. 

5 Rev. Thomas H. Gallaudet, of the Deaf ' The gardens were earlier in the Connec- 

and Dumb Asylum. ticut Valley than on the Norfolk hills, and 

* The Colonization Society was then very Dr. Robbins was trying to find some green 
popular. peas to send to his aged mother, but his 



7 



Rev. Joseph Punderson Tyler, a native search proved vain. 



1829.] PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. I45 

8. Rode out. Am disappointed of selling my grass. It is very plenty. 
The crop in the meadow is great. Looked at my library.' Considerably 
unwell. Afternoon returned to East Hartford. At evening attended a 
numerous meeting, which took measures for the formation of a temperance 
society. On the 6th received of the State Treasurer $6, for my late services 
for the House of Representatives ; and paid fifty cents for a copy of a Resolve 
of the Assembly iox the Ministers' Annuity Society. 

9. Fine weather. Wrote. Went to Hartford and renewed a note at the 
bank. Paid a merchant, $8.94. Wrote papers for the Temperance Society. 
Read the Bible. Walked out. Attended the funeral of a child. At evening 
attended my Bible class at the mills. 

ID. Had a long conversation with a committee-man here. The committee 
have managed very improperly. Rode out and visited. People are getting 
in hay very fast. Eat new potatoes and cucumbers. Attended at evening 
the Bible class. A committee-man from Somers requested me to go there 
for a supply when I leave here. 

11. Walked out. Read the Bible. Wrote to Charles Gorham,^ of Strat- 
ford. Preached at the house of a sick woman, without notes, on John x : 10. 
It has been a very fine week for business. 

12. Quite warm. Rode to meeting. Preached on Matt, vi : 13, and 
John vii : 37. Full meeting. Had a contribution for the Colonization 
Society and collected $20.71. A shower prevented our evening meeting. 
Walked out. 

13. Rode to Hartford. Paid in our yesterday's contribution. People are 
beginning their harvest. Read. We are anxious for intelligence from the 
East. Wrote to my sister Battell. Walked out. At evening attended 
the Sabbath-school concert. Wrote to Mr. Sprague,^ of West Springfield, 

14. Rode out and visited. People here are disappointed by the prospect 
of my leaving them. Received a letter from the committee of Somers request- 
ing me to be there the first of August. Wrote to brother Francis. Walked 
out. Quite warm. ^ 

15. Walked out. Examined collections of old papers in two garrets. 
The heat very severe. Read. The harvest is ver}' good. Very little spirit 
is drank by laborers.* Visited. 

16. Received a good letter from brother and sister Battell. Brother 
Samuel, through great mercy, is hopefully recovering. Looked at the books 

f old Dr. Williams,^ of this town. Wrote. Rode to the east part of the town. 



V 



I 



His ride took him to East Windsor, that strong drink was absolutely necessary 

where his choice library was yet stored. for men during haying and harvesting. 

^ This was the Mr. Gorham, doubtless, ' Dr. liliphalet Williams, pastor at East 

who, with his sister, was present in the con- Hartford, 1748-1803, son of Dr. .Solomon 

gregation at East Hartford a week before. Williams, pastor at Lebanon, Ct., 1722-1776, 

The Stratford people were planning to give grandson of Rev. William Williams, pastor 

Dr. Robbins a call. at Hatfield, Mass., 1685-1741. A son of Dr. 

3 Dr. William B. Sprague. Eliphalet, of East Hartford, was Solomon, 

■* The temperance reformation was now pastor at Northampton, Mass., 1778-1S31. 

well under way. In years before men thought It would be hard to match this fact. 



146 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1829. 



visited, and baptized a sickly infant. Attended the Bible class. Got home 
late. 

17. A very fine season for harvesting. The heat is a little abated. Rode 
to Hartford, Paid a merchant tailor, $38.25. Too much. For the Spectator^ 
for 1827, $3. For the Observer- for last year, $1.50. Visited. At evening 
had a full Bible class. Got home late. 

18. Cooler. Walked and visited. Paid for repairing my sulky, etc., $6. 
Wrote. Read the Bible. 

19. Preached on Ps. cxxx : 3, and Ps. cxxx : 4. In the morning wet. 
Afterwards quite warm. After meeting rode to the east part of the town and 
attended the funeral of the aged Mr. Spencer.^ Rode to the south district 
and attended our evening meeting; preached without notes on 2 Peter iii : g. 
Much fatigued. Tarried out. 

20. Visited. People express much regret at the prospect of my leaving 
here. Very warm. People generally at their harvest. Rode to Long Hill.'' 
Visited. At evening had a meeting and preached without notes on Matt. 
XV : 27. Tarried out. 

21. Visited a number of families. Rode to East Windsor and home. 
Quite dusty. The harvest, excepting the ravages of the hail, very good ; 
no rust ; the wheat good. Read. At evening walked out. 

22. Wrote. Mr. Torrey,* of Ashford, called on me, soliciting donations 
for the erection of a meeting-house. Gave him $2. Ver}' warm. Afternoon 
rode to Hartford and attended a public Bible meeting. Drs. Milnor^ and 
McAuley,' of New York, delivered very good addresses. I moved a vote 
of thanks and said a little. At evening attended a meeting of the Temper- 
ance Society here, and was requested to preach on the subject next Sabbath. 
Received a letter from Mr. Sprague, of West Springfield. 

23. Warm and languid. Rode to East Windsor; carried some of my 
books. ° Visited. Wrote. Read. Wet. At evening had a very good Bible 
class at the mills. Was out late. It is painful to leave the people here, with 
their anxiety for my continuance. 

24. Rode to Hartford to procure some documents respecting temperance. 
Paid a merchant tailor, %\. Sent Mr. Crosby,' of Turkey Hills, some books 
and pamphlets. Mr. Hyde, of Bolton,'" called on me. Saw in a New York 



' Christian Spectator, New Haven. 

^ Connecticut Observer, Hartford, pub- 
lished by P. B. Gleason. 

^ Mr. Solomon Spencer. 

* In the southeast part of East Windsor. 

^ Rev. Reuben Torrey, pastor, 1S20-1S40, 
in the Eastford parish, Ashford. Mr. Torrey 
was graduated at Brown University in 1816. 

^ Dr. James Milnor, at first a practicing 
lawyer, but from 1816 to his death, in 1S45, 
was rector of St. George's Church, New York. 

' Thomas McAuley, D. D., LL. D., from 



1S22 to 1S29 pastor of Rutgers Street Pres- 
byterian Church, New York; afterward of 
the Murray Street Church. 

' He carried back some books which he 
had taken from his library for his use in Ea^t 
Hartford. He is getting ready to remove. 

9 Rev. Stephen Crosby, pastor at East 
Granby (Turkey Hills), 1S26-1832. 

'° Rev. Lavius Hyde, pastor at Bolton 
from 1823 to his death, 1830. He had 
been previously settled at Salisbury, Ct., and 
Ellington, Ct. 



[829-] 



PREACHING IN EAST HARTFORD. 



147 



paper the account of the death of my good Uncle Starr.' He was nearly 
eighty-five. Visited. A worthy woman in this neighborhood has hopefully 
got religion in a few days. At evening had a full and solemn Bible class. 

25. Wrote a supplement to my sermon on intemperance. Afternoon had 
a small meeting at the head of the street ; preached without notes on Matt. 
.\i : 30, and baptized a child. Saw a young joiner that had fallen from 
a building; badly hurt. 

26. Very pleasant. Preached in the morning on Acts iv : 12; afternoon 
on the subject of intemperance, on Prov. xxiii : 29, 30. At evening preached 
without notes on Ex. xvii : 11. All the meetings unusually full. Many 
people appear to be quite tender. I think my labors here have not been 
without a divine blessing. Quite tired. 

27. Had company. Rode to East Windsor and carried a number of 
things." Quite dry and dusty. Paid for five volumes to Miss Sophia Pitkin, 
$2.50. She gave me one quite ancient. Made calls. At evening rode out 
and visited. Quite warm. 

28. Rode over the river. Paid Miss Abigail Williams' twenty-five cents 
for one small volume, and she gave me four others. People here say a good 
deal about my returning to them. I pray for the guidance and keeping 
of my father's God. Visited. At evening had a private conversation with 
three of the church members. Out late. 

29. Warm and sultry. Made calls. Paid Esq. White towards my board. 
$10. Paid Mr. Phelps for horse-keeping, $8. Donations, sixty-three cents. 
Left East Hartford, where I have been laborious for fourteen weeks, to be 
disposed of as God shall see fit. Rode to East Windsor. Left a part 
of my things. Mr. Wolcott's two daughters, with each a little son, are here.'* 
Had some tailor-work done. 

30. Attended to my things. Wet and shower}-. Walked out and made 
some calls. Hot and sultry. At evening attended a meeting, by desire 
of Mr. Whelpley,' and preached without notes on Matt, xi : 30. 

31. Wet in the morning. Bad weather for hay and things that are out. 
Rode to Pine Meadow. Had a pleasant visit at Mr. Haskell's. Quite sultr}-. 
There was a violent shower here yesterday. Looked at the new canal.* At 
evening rode to Enfield, My brother in better health than usual. 

August. 

I. Rode to Somers. A pretty lonely road. Showery. There is a good 



' Rev. Peter Starr, whose name has so 
often appeared in this diary, was settled in 
Warren, 1 772-1829, fifty-seven years. For 
four years previous to his death, Rev. Hart 
Talcott had been his colleague. 

- He regards East Windsor as his home. 

^ Daughter of Dr. Eliphalet Williams. 

'' Mrs. Harris Haskell, from Pine Meadow, 
Windsor, and Mrs. Edgar Bissell. Mrs. Has- 



kell's son is Thomas Robbins Haskell, now 
two years and a half old, and the other is 
little Tudor Bissell, still younger. 

5 Rev. Samuel Whelpley, Dr. Robbins's 
successor at East Windsor. 

* The canal around Enfield Falls, which 
was many years used for navigation, now 
supplies the water-power for the mills at 
Windsor Locks. 



148 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1829. 



deal of hay and grain out. I am quite a stranger here.' Read Camoens's 
Liisiad^ Am to board with Mrs. Pease. ^ Am quite weary. 

2. A pleasant day. Preached on Ps. cvi : 15, and Acts iv : 12, This 
is a good congregation." The Sabbath-school is quite large. Had a third 
meeting at a school-house before evening, and preached without notes on 
Matt, xi : 30. Read the Bible. Mr. A. Gaylord,' of Norfolk, is here. Bap- 
tized a child. 

3. Read Josephus. Wrote. \\'arm and languid. Wrote a communica- 
tion for the Connecticut Counvit. At evening attended the monthly concert. 
Had assistance. Thinly attended. 

4. Wet and rainy through the day. Some of the time quite hard. Read 
Josephus and Camoens. Wrote. The war in the East begins to grow active 
and raging.* An unfavorable time for getting in crops. 

5. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. Rode out and visited. Made calls. Visited 
the aged Mrs. Backus.'' There appear to be a good number of good people 
here. Read Josephus. Warm and sultr}\ 

6. Read Camoens. Wrote to W. W. Ellsworth. Walked out. The heat 
very oppressive. Read Josephus. His narrative is ver}^ feeble in comparison 
with the Mosaic history. 

7. Read the Bible. Read in Marsh's Ecclesiastical History.^ Afternoon 
attended a stated weekly prayer-meeting. The heat is enervating and severe. 
Am quite languid, 

8. Wrote on my preaching and pecuniary accounts. These have been 
too much neglected, Mr. Calhoun,' of Coventr)', called on me to address 
this people tomorrow in behalf of the Bible Society. Wrote. The heat 
seems not to abate. 

9. Preached on Heb. vii : 25. Afternoon Mr, Calhoun preached in 
behalf of the American Bible Society, to aid them in the great object 
of supplying the whole United States with the Bible, We had a meeting 
in the evening principally occupied in the Bible business. About $80 '° were 
subscribed, and the papers directed to be circulated. Heat much the same. 

10. Spent some time with Mr. Calhoun. Gave for the Sabbath-school 



' He had often been to Somers during 
his twenty years' ministry at East Windsor, 
but he had not become personally acquainted 
with the people. 

^ The Lusiad, by Luis de Camoens, is the 
epic poem of Portugal. The classical name 
of the Portuguese is Liisitaniatis. Hence the 
title of the poem. 

^ The name Pease was and is common in 
Somers. 

"* This was the congregation to which the 
famous Dr. Charles Backus ministered for 
many j-ears, and from which Rev. William 
L. Strong had just been dismissed. 

5 Rev. Asahel Gavlord. 



^ In battles fought in Silistria and Kainly 
in June and July, 1S29, the Turks were badly 
beaten by the Russians. 

' About twenty years before he called on 
Mrs. Backus with his uncle, Rev. Peter Starr. 
She was then not far from fifty years old ; 
now about seventy. 

^ Compendium of Ecclesiastical History, by 
Dr. John Marsh, D. D., of Haddam, Ct. 

' George A. Calhoun, D. D., pastor at 
North Coventry, 1819-1867. For the last 
five years of his ministry Rev. William J. 
Jennings was his colleague. 

'■^ A large sum for a plain country parish 
to subscribe. 



1829.] 



PREACHING I.V SOMERS. 



149 



here, $1. Read Camoens. Mr. Strong and my brother' called on me. 
At evening attended the Sabbath-school concert. The first time in this 
place. ^ Well attended. 

11. Had a convenient opportunity to spend my birthday by myself. Fine 
weather. Wrote. I am no longer my own. Wrote to my brother Samuel. 
At evening walked out and visited. 

12. Sent to my brother Samuel/ S5. Walked and visited the most of the 
day. Read. We get but little intelligence from the east of Europe. 

13. Wrote. Read a Sabbath-school book. Read Josephus and the Bible. 
Walked out and visited. 

14. Visited a sick grandchild of the aged Dea. Collins. His parents* 
lived in the married state seventy years. Rode and visited. Read the 
Bible. Attended the stated prayer-meeting. Quite thin. Walked out. 

15. Read Josephus and Camoens. My brother called here on his way 
to Stafford to exchange. We have an account of an important victory of the 
Russians over the Turks.' They fight desperately. 

16. Preached on John iii : 3, and i Thess. v: 3. Full meeting. Mr. 
Sheldon,* a candidate belonging here, preached at the third meeting. At 
evening the society committee requested me to continue to supply them 
for the present; to which I agreed. 

17. I believe I caught cold last evening. Had quite a poor night. My 
brother called here. Am quite gloomy. My whole trust is in God. He has 
never forgotten me. Yesterday received a letter from Esq. Ely, of Simsbury. 
Wrote to him. Read. Wrote to my sister Battell. 

18. Wet and rainy. The forenoon quite hard. Read. Finished the fine 
poem of Camoens. Walked out and visited. 

19. A great camp-meeting is held this week in the lower part of this town. 
Rode to East Windsor. A pretty good road. Looked over books and papers. 
Occupied with company. Read. Mrs. Wolcott unusually well. Quite cool. 

20. Rode to Hartford. Saw several of my Norfolk cousins.' Dined with 
them. Attended to my law case. Called in East Hartford. Saw Mr. Hyde,° 
the preacher. They are in a divided state there. I pray God to order all 
wisely and in mercy. At evening had company. Melons plenty. 

21. Rode to Somers. Very warm. Had a long and useless talk with 
Dr. Reed. Passed near the camp-meeting. Yesterday and today very 
numerous. Attended our stated prayer-meeting. Much fatigued. We have 



' Rev. William L. Strong, the pastor 
recently dismissed, and Rev. Francis L. Rob- 
bins, of Enfield. 

^ He means that it was the first Sabbath- 
school concert ever held in Somers. 

^ Who had been seriously sick out in 
Central New York. 

-* The parents, not of the child, but of 
Dea. Collins. 

5 This, doubtless, was the battle of Kainly, 
already referred to, fought July i, 1829. 



* Rev. Anson Sheldon. He became a 
Presbyterian minister, and labored many 
years at the West. 

' We conjecture that he still uses cousins 
for nephews and nieces. He has more of 
the latter than of the former in Norfolk. 

* Rev. Charles Hyde, a native of Frank- 
lin, afterward settled in Ashford and South 
Coventry. He died in Hartford, July 27, 
187 1, aged seventy-four. He was a man of 
culture and abilit}'. 



150 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1829. 

the pleasant intelligence of the capture of Silistria, and other successes of the 
Russians.' 

22. The camp-meeting broke up this morning. I think the effect, on the 
whole, is injurious. It becomes a scene of dissipation. Yesterday paid 
at the post office for pamphlets, fifty-seven cents. Read the Bible. Assisted 
Mr. Strong in revising the proof-sheets of his farewell sermon. 

23. Quite warm. Preached on Matt, vi : 13, and Eph. ii : 14. Attended 
a third meeting and preached without notes on Matt, xv : 25. At evening 
visited. Much fatigued. Meeting not full. 

24. Warm and sultry. Rode out and visited. Read Wall on Infant 
Baptism. A very valuable work. Wrote. Yesterday baptized a child. At 
evening walked out. 

25. Rode out and visited. Looked over the remains of Dr. Backus's 
librar}\ Wrote. I fear the Christian nations of Europe will not consent 
to the conquest of the Turks. '^ 

26. Rode out and visited most of the day. Saw an aged man very low 
with a cancer. I fear this society is not in a good state. Am at times quite 
gloomy. The holy God be my merciful helper. 

27. Quite cool. Read the Bible. Have to do the most of my own work. 
Wrote on my pecuniary accounts. Mr. D. Phelps,^ of Norfolk, called on me. 
Wrote to my mother and sent her $5. The officers and collectors of the 
foreign missionary associations met here. They do well. Gave them $1. 
Received a letter from W. W. Ellsworth,* of Hartford. 

28. Wrote on my pecuniary accounts. Assisted the deacons in settling 
a case of some difficulty in the church. Had a good prayer-meeting. Had 
company. Cool. 

29. Rode out and visited in the northeast part of the town. Saw a woman 
with a dreadful cancer. Wrote on my documents. Read the Bible. x\fter- 
noon wet. 

30. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23, and Jer. xiv : 8. Towards night had 
a meeting in the north part of the town, and preached without notes on 
Num. X : 29. There are a number of Universalists here. 

31. Visited a sick man. An afflicted family. Read. Afternoon set out 
on a journey to Canton.^ My brother is gone to New Haven to attend the 
college examination. Rode to Scotland,* in Simsbury, and tarried at a tavern. 

September. 

I. Rode early over the mountain to Mr. McLean's, and with him 
to Canton. Mr. Ely was with us. The heat very severe and oppressive. 



' These are the victories already noticed, ^ This journey, doubtless, was on the 

and it is plain that Dr. Robbins's sympathies Everest fund business, which cost him much 

are on the Russian side. labor and anxiety. 

^ Lest it should break the balance of * Scotland was one of the parishes in 

power and give Russia an undue preponder- Windham. The village now called Burn- 

ance. side, in East Hartford, used to be called 

^ Darius Phelps, afterward town treasurer Scotland. There was a locality called Scot- 

in Norfolk. land in Bloomfield, and still another in Ridge- 

■* Afterwards Gov. William W. Ellsworth. field. 



1829.] 



PREACHIXG IN SOMERS. 



151 



The debtors paid their interest to the Everest fund very well. Our bene- 
ficiary, O. Wilcox, was with us, apparently low in a consumption. Rode 
to East Windsor. Rode late. My expenses on this journey are charged 
to the fund.' 

2. The heat, perhaps, greater than yesterday. Thermometer at 92". 
Gave Ursula, $6.50, which, with what I paid for her bedstead and mattress, 
amounts to $20, for the silver coin, now my own, which I gave her at the 
time of my dismission.^ Towards night set out for Somers. At dusk a hard 
thunder-shower came on, and I tarried in the upper part of East Windsor. 

3. Rode home. A great change in the weather. Quite cool and windy. 
Afternoon rode to Enfield and preached a preparatory lecture, without notes, 
on Rom. viii : 35. Visited. Am ver}' anxious for my brother's step-son. 
Am quite gloomy. 

4. Frost was expected this morning, but I do not hear of any. Rode 
home. Visited the sick. The ground is dry. Connecticut River is very 
low. Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture, without notes, on Rom. 
viii : 35. Well attended. Had company. Received a good letter from 
my sister Battell. 

5. Still cool, but no frost. Rode out and visited. Wrote a piece for 
the Connecticut Observer on the sentiments of the Catholics. 

6. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, and Matt, xxv : 6. Administered the 
sacrament. The church appears large. Attended a third meeting in the 
third district and preached without notes on Isa. xxviii : 17. The Methodists 
are making exertions there. Very tired. 

7. Read. The society committee informed me that a few of the people 
here wished to hear Mr. Hyde ^ further, and they expected him to be here 
the first of October. I think they are getting into difficulty. Dined with 
a military company. Attended at evening the monthly concert. 

8. Rode early and arrived at New Haven — fifty-five miles — at eight 
o'clock in the evening. Hindered at Hartford. Quite cool. The roads 
very dusty. Not mucn fatigued. 

g. Commencement.'* A great collection of people. The exercises very 
good. A favorable day. Two of the senior class have died since the July 
examination. Mr. Button,' of Guilford, preached the Concio ad Cleriim. 

Made various calls. The old Education Society is much neglected. 



10. 



* From the fact that he makes special 
mention of this here, we conclude that in 
previous journeys, which have been many, 
though shorter, he paid the expenses him- 
self. 

^ If we understand this sentence, he bought 
back of Ursula Wolcott a silver coin he had 
given her, paying her $20 for the same. 

3 Rev. Charles Hyde, whom Ur. Robbins 
found at East Hartford a few days before, 
had also been preaching as a candidate in 
Somers, and they were expecting to hear 
him farther. 



*■ The Commencement at Yale has been 
on the second Wednesday of September ever 
since the diary started, in 1796. But it will 
not remain so many years more. 

* Rev. Aaron Button, pastor of First 
Church at Guilford, 1806-1S42. From 1825 
to 1S49, the year of his death, he was a mem- 
ber of the College Corporation. He was 
father of Rev. S. W. S. Button, B. B., pas- 
tor of the North Church, New Haven, 1S3S- 
1866. The father was a man of good culture 
and broad sympathies, well known in his gen- 
eration. 



152 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

Attended to the Everest charity. Visited the gymnasium.' Mr. Dwight' 
is laborious. Left New Haven towards evening and rode to Durham. 
Kindly entertained at Mr. Smith's. 

11. There was some frost this morning. Mrs. Goodrich/ relict of the 
doctor, is living, and has a great great grandchild. Rode to East Windsor. 
Cool and ver}' dry. Wrote. Things are unpleasant at East Hartford. Vege- 
tation seems not to be injured by the frost. 

12. Yesterday received a letter from Seth Seelye,* and others of Bethel. 
Wrote. Attended to my library. Wrote to Mr. S. E. Dwight, New Haven. 
Afternoon rode to Somers. Something fatigued. 

13. Preached both parts of the day on Isa. iii : lo, ii. Full meeting. 
At the third meeting, in an out district, preached without notes on Matt, ix : g. 
The dust is tedious. The Methodists are making efforts in the west part 
of the town. Tired. 

14. Last night we had some rain. Ver}^ grateful. Wrote. Visited a sick 
man. The society had a meeting and did nothing. At evening attended 
the Sabbath-school concert. Read. 

15. Read Dr. Taylor's' metaphysical pamphlet. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Row- 
land, and to Seth Seelye, of Bethel. Afternoon rode out and visited. 
Mr. Gaylord was with me. I am sorry he does so little. 

16. Walked out and visited. Read. Capt. Morris, of Wilbraham, called 
here and requested me to preach there when I have done at this place. 
Rode out and performed a marriage. Afternoon and evening we had a hard 
rain. Was prevented from attending an appointed meeting. 

17. Rode to Enfield and saw my brother. Am gloomy, but the Lord 
is my stay. Walked out and visited. Cool. 

18. Looked over Mrs. Backus's books and procured a few and a good 
many pamphlets. Attended the usual prayer-meeting. At evening walked 
out. Read. 

19. Rode to Ellington on horseback and visited Mr. Brockway.* He is 
feeble. Attended to my old pamphlets. Wrote. 

20. In the forenoon expounded on Matt, xvii. It was a new exercise 
here. Preached on Heb. xii : 14. Attentive meeting. The evening meeting 
was prevented by rain. Had company. 

21. Rode out and visited. Paid Mrs. Backus for books, $5.50; for pam- 
phlets, $4.50 ; got some valuable original works. Warm. Had company. 



' The first gj'mnasium which Yale had * Nathaniel W. Taylor, 1>. D., professor 

was established in 1826 in the open air, and in Yale Theological Seminary. This meta- 

$300 a year were voted to sustain it. physical pamphlet was probably the sermon 

^ Some one of the Dwight family who which he preached the year before (1S2S) as 

had charge of the gymnasium. his Concio ad Cleriim, on Human Depravity, 

^ The widow of Elizur Goodrich, D. D., which had been published. 
pastor at Durham, 1756-1797, who, it maybe * Rev. Diodate Brockway had then been 

remembered, died suddenly while on a jour- pastor at Ellington thirty years, but he was 

ney in Norfolk, in 1797. to be in office twenty years longer. He was 

^ Father of Pres. Seelye, of Amherst. a man much beloved. 



1829.] 



PREACHING IN SOMERS. 



153 



Traded, $2.30. Wrote on my library catalogue. Read. The intelligence 
from Europe indicates a gradual progress of the Russians in their war. 

22. People here are anxious about their ecclesiastical matters. Rode 
to Tolland and saw the aged Mrs. Williams and other acquaintance. Mrs. W. 
is healthy and active at the age of ninet>--t\vo.' A good turnpike road is 
making between here and Tolland, At evening walked out and visited. 
Quite cool. 

23. Read. Packed up pamphlets. Rode to the northeast part of the 
town and visited ; early in the evening performed a marriage, after which 
attended a meeting and preached without notes on Luke xix : 42. Tarried 
out. This is an industrious and serious neighborhood. 

24. Visited. Rode home. Very fine weather. Wrote. Occupied with 
company. Walked out. 

25. Wrote on my pecuniary accounts. Wet. Attended the stated prayer- 
meeting. Miss Reynolds,^ of Longmeadow, was with us, expecting soon 
to go to Greece as a missionary teacher. 

26. Rode out and visited. Cool ; yesterday we had considerable thunder. 
Wrote. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott, and E. Swift, Esq. 

27. Cold and windy. Wore my cloak to meeting. Preached on Hab. 
xi : 6, and Hab. iii : 17, 18. Meetings full and solemn. The people appear 
to be much concerned at the prospect of my leaving them. Attended an 
evening meeting in an out district and preached without notes on John 
iv : 29. Visited an aged man very low. 

28. Read. Very pleasant. Afternoon rode out and visited on the mount- 
ain. At evening a messenger came from Norfolk and informed me that 
my dear mother was dead.^ She became unwell last Friday, and died this 
morning at five o'clock. A most affectionate mother and exemplary Christian. 
"The Lord gave," etc. Had a short letter from Mr. Battel!. Wrote to Mr. 
Brockway, of Ellington, and to Capt. Morris, of Wilbraham. I had engaged 
to attend two marriages here this week and to preach at Wilbraham next 
Sabbath. 

29. In the forenoon we had a violent rain. The committee called on me. 
They regret that Mr. Hyde has been engaged to preach here. About noon 
set out with Mr, Seymour'' for Norfolk. Rode to Enfield and Hartford. 
My brother overtook us at East Windsor. His wife arrived at Hartford, 



'.Her husband, Dr. Nathan Williams, had 
died four months before, in his ninety-fourth 
year, and after a ministry of sixty-nine years. 
The wife was Mary Hall, daughter of Capt. 
Eliakim Hall, of Wallingford, Ct. They were 
married in the year of his settlement in Tol- 
land, and so had lived together not far from 
sixty-nine years. 

^ Miss Mary Reynolds, who afterwards 
married Rev. William G. Schauffler, mission- 
ary to Constantinople. 

3 His mother, Elizabeth Le Baron, was 



born in Plymouth, Mass., Dec. 21, 1745, and 
died .Sept. 28, 1S29, aged eighty-three years, 
nine months, and seven days. She had out- 
lived her husband sixteen years. She was 
married in her seventeenth year, and had been 
the mother of thirteen children. Though her 
husband died so many years before, yet his 
public ministry in Norfolk continued fifty- 
two years. 

* Truman R. Seymour was probably the 
messenger who had brought this news, and 
with whom Dr. Robbins returned. 



154 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

from the eastward, soon after us, and went on with us. We rode late in the 
evening to Northington. Roads very wet. 

30. We rode early and arrived at Norfolk about noon. Brother Ammi, 
at Colebrook, was very unwell and not able to go with us. Found a house 
of mourning. The corpse retained the countenance. Attended the funeral. 
Mr. Emerson preached very well. A great collection of people. A pleasant 
day. A very affecting scene. Brother James, and wife, and two sons here, 
also Ammi's wife, and daughter, and son-in-law. We had a solemn evening, 

October. 

1. Mr. Bradford,' of Sheffield, and Mr. Beach,^ of Winsted, were here 
yesterday and assisted in the exercises. Saw a good deal of company at the 
paternal mansion and at Mr. Battell's. This house to receive my mother in 
1762, now goes out of the name. Cold and blustering. O that the God of 
our fathers would have this broken family in his holy keeping. Attended to 
our parents' wills. Paid $5, my last quarterly donation to my mother. She 
has given the most of her property to my niece Sally Lawrence,^ very wisely. 

2. My two brothers and their wives, after an affecting parting, went 
away for home. Brother James went to Colebrook yesterday and found 
brother Ammi better. Afternoon wrote. I have now no parents' house, 
no settlement in the ministry, and no fixed employment. My engagement 
at Somers expired with last Sabbath. I desire to cast my all upon a com- 
passionate Saviour. Wrote to my uncle, Lemuel Le Baron. The only uncle 
I now have. 

3. Called on Mr. Emerson. He has just received an appointment 
to a professorship at Andover.'' Afternoon rode to my brother Ammi's. 
He is apparently gaining, though quite weak. Last Monday evening we had 
a hard frost ; the first that materially affected vegetation. 

4. Preached for Mr. Emerson on Heb. vii : 15, and i Cor. xv : 56, 57. 
Meetings solemn and tender. Afternoon we had our case mentioned for 
prayers. Towards evening we had a third meeting. This is a very good 
congregation. Our family are sorely broken. 

5. Wrote. I have kept at the old house. Sister Battell came here early 
and tarried till I left. Towards noon left Norfolk and rode through Goshen 
to Warren. Had a good visit at my cousin Starr's. My good uncle died 
July 17th, aged nearly eighty-four. 

6. Rode to Danbury. At New Milford looked over the books of the late 
Mr. Eliot.^ A part of them, with a large collection of pamphlets, are sold. 



' Rev. James Bradford, a native of Row- " Rev. Ralph Emerson, D. D. He was 

ley, Mass., graduate of Dartmouth, iSii, was called to be Brown Professor and Lecturer 

settled in Sheffield, 1813, and died there in on Pastoral Theology at Andover. He ac- 

1858, aged seventy-two. cepted the office and remained in it until 

^ Rev. James Beach, graduate of Williams 1853. He died at Rockford, 111., in 1S63, in 

College, 1804, pastor at Winsted, 1806-1842. his seventy-sixth year, 

^ Sally Lawrence (Mrs. Newcomb) is, at ' Rev. Andrew Eliot had been pastor at 

this writing (Aug. 7, 1885), in good health, at New Milford from 1808-1829, and had just 

the age of eighty-seven. died. 



1829.] 



PREACHING IN NEW MILFORD. 



155 



Had a pleasant visit at Mr. Whittlesey's. At evening attended a meeting, and 
sat a little while with the Consociation at their annual meeting. Mr. Rood' 
appears well. Warm and pleasant. 

7. Wrote an obituary notice of my mother and sent it to Hartford- 
Rode with members of the Consociation to Bethel. They met on an appeal 
from the decision of the church last fall, when I was with them. The Conso- 
ciation decided not to proceed on minutes of testimony on the former trial. 

8. Last evening the committee of the church concluded, after much 
hesitation, to go on with the trial, and agreed with Mr. Button,^ a lawyer 
of Newtown, and me to assist them as council. The day was spent in hearing 
testimony. Esq. Sanford, a delegate, was moderator. 

9. The testimony closed early in the afternoon, and the council agreed 
not to argue the cause. The Consociation resulted at dusk and affirmed 
the decision of the church. Attended an evening prayer-meeting. I hope 
this trial will do good to this broken people. 

10. Received from the people here, $15, a liberal donation for my jour- 
ney and assistance. Rode to Danburj'. Paid for books, Si. Walked out. 
Warm. Rode to New Milford to supply tomorrow in behalf of Mr. Lowe. 

11. Preached on Acts iv : 12, and Heb. vii : 25. This is a good congre- 
gation. Afternoon rainy. At evening had company. 

12. Pleasant. Wrote. My horse is quite lame; difficult to ascertain 
the cause. Walked with company and made calls. Am requested to supply 
here next Sabbath. 

13. Set out to ride to Stratford. My horse was so lame that I had to 
leave him at Brookfield and get another. Mr. Brundage ^ assisted me. 
Looked over his collection of pamphlets, late Mr. Eliot's.* Rode to Bethel 
and tarried with Mr. Lowe.' Dr. Banks, condemned by the Consociation 
here last week, has made an ample confession and is restored by the church. 

14. Mr. Lowe gave me an original edition of Young's Night Thoughts. 
Rode to Stratford. At Monroe paid for a book, twenty-five cents. At even- 
ing rode out and saw the deacons. This people have not been supplied half 
of the time since I left them.* They are verj- negligent. 

15. \^'rote to my brother F. and to S. T. Wolcott. Walked out. Was 
requested by the committee, and by several of the people, to come here and 
supply. At evening had a good meeting in the meeting-house and preached 
without notes on John iv : 29. Wrote an article for the newspaper relative 
to R. V. Dey.' Had a present of a good Dutch book from Mr. Vandyke. 



' Rev. Heman Rood was preaching at 
New Milford as a candidate, and was settled 
in Mr. Eliot's place the following year (1830). 

^ He was afterwards Judge Henry Button, 
LL. D. Law-professor in Yale, 1S47-1869; 
Judge of the Connecticut Superior Court and 
Supreme Court of Errors. 

^ Rev. Abner Erundagc, pastor at Brook- 
field, 1821-1839. 



* Rev. Andrew Eliot. 
^ Rev. John G. Lowe. 

* He is writing now of the church in Strat- 
ford. 

^ Rev. Richard V. Day, who had recently 
been dismissed from the church in Greenfield 
parish (Fairfield). This is the church where 
Pres. Timothy Dwight was settled, 1 793-1 795, 
when he left for his duties at Yale College. 



156 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1829, 

16. Rode to Bridgeport. Their ecclesiastical matters are very bad. 
Warm. Rode on a good turnpike to Brookfield. Tarried at Mr. Peck's, 
where I once lived.' 

17. My horse is much better of his lameness. Paid Mr. Peck for keeping 
him, and for the use of his, $1.50. Called on Mr. Brundage ; paid him for 
a book, $1, and for eleven ancient pamphlets, $1. Rode to New Milford. 
Quite warm. Paid a blacksmith, twenty-one cents. 

18. Dark and cloudy, but no rain. Preached on Ps. cvi : 23,* and i Thess. 
v: 3. Meetings not full. Had good singing. At evening had company. 
Saw Mr. PI. Canfield, of Canfield, O. 

19. My prospects seem to be quite confused, though not without favorable 
aspects. The Lord be my helper. Read. Wrote. Warm. Walked out and 
visited. Changed my lodging-place, 

20. Yesterday wrote to my sister, and saw my cousin George Starr here. 
Walked out. Read newspapers. Visited. Looked over Mr. Eliot's books. 
Had company. 

21. Rode early to Danbury and attended a public meeting, which formed 
a county temperance society. It appeared well. Saw Mr. Isaac Brunson. 
Cold and tedious. My horse continues lame. 

22. We had a severe frost. Returned to New Milford. Read. Wrote. 
Traded, thirty-four cents. Wrote to my sister. Had company. 

23. Read Josephus's and Paley's works. Rode to the west part of the 
town and visited 'a family. Much pains are taken here in the temperance 
cause. They are late in the work. 

24. Read the Bible. Rode to the north part of the town and attended 
a funeral in a Baptist meeting-house. A Baptist from Litchfield preached. 

25. Preached on Heb. xii : 14, and Eph. ii : 14. Full meeting. This 
congregation is large, but they live very much scattered. At evening went 
into a singing-school. 

26. Read. Walked out. Called on Mr. Huntington," the Episcopal 
clergyman. Rode out. At evening preached in a small neighborhood 
without notes on Matt, v : 6. Tarried out. Had a good evening meeting. 

27. Rode to the Straits.^ Visited through the day. A good neighborhood 
at the Straits. Most of them go seven miles to meeting. There is quite 
a number of good families. Cold. 

28. Rode to Washington and attended the installation of Mr. Hayes.'' 
Mr. Hawes,' of Hartford, preached and the services were well performed. 
Toward evening returned. New Milford and Washington are very hilly. 
Received a letter from my sister Battell. There seems to be a prospect 



' This was when he was supplying at here, 1829-1851. This is the church from 

Brookfield, in the first years of this century. which Rev. Ebenezer Porter, D. D., went in 

" Rev. Enoch Huntington graduated at 181 1 to be professor at Andover Seminary. 

Yale, 1821, and was for some years Episco- ^ Rev. Joel Hawes, D. D., who was called 

pal minister at New Milford. He died, 1876. upon largely for such public services. For 

^ A locality in New Milford. many years hardly any minister in the State 

* Rev. Gordon Hayes, who was pastor was more conspicuous. 



1829.] PREACHING IN NEW MILFORD. 157 

that Mr. Emerson will leave Norfolk. Heard from East Hartford. Things 
are in a bad state there. 

29. Wrote notes for a public address. Afternoon there was a public 
meeting, quite full, on the subject of temperance. Mr. Huntington, the 
Episcopal clergyman, and I delivered addresses. They took measures 
to form a temperance society. There is considerable opposition to the 
measure. At evening walked out. 

30. Read the Spectator.^ Wrote notes and preached a preparatory lecture 
on John xii : 23, 24, Meeting pretty thin. Wrote to my sister Battell. 

31. Read the Bible. Wrote a public address on sacred music. A cold 
storm of rain all day. I have too much neglected writing. My boarding- 
place is very accommodating. On the 29th saw an account of peace having 
taken place between Russia and Turkey.^ I was in hopes the time had come 
for the fall of that Mahometan power. 

November. 

1. Wet and dark through the day. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, and 
Amos iv : 12. Administered the sacrament. This church is pretty large. 
We had a solemn and I hope a profitable day. At evening Mr. Smith and 
his singing-school had a public singing. The performance was very good. 
I delivered the address written yesterday. Many people attended. On Friday 
I baptized a child. 

2. Walked out. Received a letter from my sister Battell. Read. Mr. 
Hendricks, a Dutch clergyman, called on me. At evening attended a monthly 
concert of prayer. Thin meeting. That has been much neglected here. 

3. Walked out and made calls. Traded, $2.58. Received a letter from 
Esq. Booth,^ of Stratford, and wrote to him in return. Afternoon rode to 
Warren. The aged Mrs. Starr* is quite feeble. Cold. Roads wet. 

4. Looked over my Uncle Starr's pamphlets and manuscripts. There 
is a large number of them. My cousin George, gave me what I wished for. 
Afternoon rode to Bethlehem' over rough road. Cold and windy. Tarried 
with Mr. Langdon.* He is quite feeble. 

5. Had an interesting visit with Mr. Langdon. Rode to Washington, 
called on Mr. Hayes,^ and to New Milford. A ver}^ hilly road. Read. 
At evening walked out. Wrote. Mr. Langdon gave me a few. valuable 
manuscripts. 

6. Walked and visited the most of the day. Read the Bible and the 
Spectator. Agreed to take a number of Mr. Eliot's books. 



' Christian Spectator of New Haven, then ' More commonly in old times written 

in the eleventh volume. Bethlem. 

^ The treaty of peace was signed Sept. 14, * Rev. John Langdon was son of Rev. 

1829. Timothy Langdon, who died in iSoi, when 

' Elijah Booth, Esq., noticed in conncc- pastor in Danbuiy. The son was graduated 

tion with Dr. Robbins's previous labors in at Yale in 1S09; was tutor, and was settled 

this parish. in Kethlem in i8i6. He died in 1S30. 

■* This was the second wife. The first wife ^ Rev. Gordon Hayes, just settled in 

died in 1810. AVashington. 



158 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [1829. 

7. Received a letter from D. Brooks,' Esq., of Stratford. I do not know 
what to do with regard to that people. O for divine teaching. Wrote to my 
brother Francis. Wet and cold. 

8. Preached both parts of the day on Isa. iii : lo, ii. Cold and windy, 
but we had full meetings. At evening attended a conference and preached, 
without notes, on Matt, xv : 25. Well attended. Received a letter from 
brother Francis. Considerably unwell. Took physic. Read. Was up late. 

g. Am quite feeble. Wrote. Afternoon rode to the hither part of 
Bridgewater and attended a funeral. The interment was here. Changed 
my place of boarding again. I go from one good place to another. Walked 
out. We are very anxious to hear from the East.^ 

10. Rode to the south part of the town and visited a young woman very 
sick. Was out the most of the day. Got wet in the rain. Visited. 

11. Received a letter from S. T. Wolcott, and wrote to him and to 
D. Brooks, of Stratford. Quite cold. At evening walked out and visited. 
Read. 

12. The ground much frozen. Rode to the Straits. Visited. At even- 
ing had a good meeting, well attended, and preached without notes on 
Matt, xi : 30. There are a number of excellent people here. 

13. Visited. Some families here are about seven and one half miles 
from meeting. Afternoon rode home. Pleasant but cold. At evening had 
company. Paid for flannel and stockings, $4. ; procured at Bridgeport. 

14. In the morning the ground was covered with snow three inches deep. 
The first of the season. Received two letters from brother and sister Battell. 
The Consociation at Norfolk judged it inexpedient to dismiss Mr. Emerson.^ 
Wrote to Mr. Battell. I think they decided right. Read. 

15. A pleasant day, with bad walking. It is said there is a good deal 
of snow at the North and West. Preached on John iii : 3, and John vii : 37. 
Had no conference, as the town-house was occupied with the Episcopal 
singing-school. Had company. Read the Bible. 

16. Read the Journal of Humanity,'^ a very valuable jDaper. Rode five 
miles and visited a sick woman. The snow mostly gone. Wrote. Gave 
to an Auxiliary Bible Society, lately formed here, $1. 

17. Expected to have gone today on a journey to East Windsor and 
Enfield. Prevented by the rain, which was steady the most of the day. 
The committee called and informed me they are expecting a preacher who 
was sent to before I came here. I engaged to stay a little longer. They 
wish me to stay if he fails. I make no such engagement.' 



' David B. Brooks, Esq., a justice of the Temperance originated in the year 1829, and 
peace, and a prominent citizen of Stratford, was published in Andover, Mass. It con- 
before noticed. tinned for several )-ears. Justin Edwards, 

- About the results of the war between D. D., whose home was in Andover, Mass., 

Russia and Turkey. was from 1829 to 1836 secretary of the Amer- 

^ This only made it necessary for that ican Temperance Society, 

body to meet again. ^ His self-respect would not permit him 

'• 1\\Q Journal of Humanity and Herald of to play this subordinate and secondary part. 



1829.] PREACHING IN NEW MILFORD. I59 

18. It rained hard the most of the night. The ground very wet. Rode 
on my journey through Litchfield to Canton. Very muddy. Warm. Tarried 
at a tavern. 

19. Rode to Hartford and East Windsor. Northington is much increas- 
ing at the canal.' Did errands in Hartford. Attended to my suit against 
Dr. Reed. The people of East Hartford have given up Mr. Hyde and 
are trying to recall Mr. Brace. Got home about dark. All things well. 
Quite pleasant and muddy. 

20. Found here a letter from D. Brooks, Esq., Stratford.^ Put up a few 
things. Hoped to have gone on this journey to Enfield and Somers, but 
I cannot. Wrote to my brother F. and Mr. Hawes, of Hartford. On the 
17th received a letter from S. W. Benedict,' of Norwalk, and wrote to him. 
Afternoon set out on my return. Cold. Better traveling. Rode to Canton 
and tarried at the same tavern. The ground quite frozen. 

21. Rode to New Milford. Have been greatly favored on account of 
the weather and have had a prosperous journey. All of God. Received 
an urgent letter from D. Brooks, Esq., of Stratford, that I would return there. 
I think it my duty to go. Received a letter from my sister. Mr. Emerson 
is still determined to leave there. Wrote. 

22. Preached both parts of the day on Ps. Ixxxiv: 2* Meeting full for 
unfavorable weather. At evening preached at the conference without notes 
on Ps. iv: 5. After which attended the singing. Quite tired. 

23. Rainy and wet. Wrote. We had considerable thunder. Wrote to 
Mr. Brooks, of Stratford, and to my sister Battell. Began a sermon for 
Thanksgiving on Rev. xi : 16, 17. I have too much neglected writing. 

24. Wrote considerably on my sermon. Walked out. Received a letter 
from Mr. Battell. Hindered by company. Was up late. Read the impor- 
tant and extraordinary treaty of peace between Russia and Turkey. 

25. Wrote and finished my sermon on Rev. xi : 16, 17. Considerably 
unwell. In the morning a hard frost. Wrote to B. W. Birge,' of Phila- 
delphia. 

26. Thanksgiving. Preached the sermon finished yesterday. Long. It 
snowed the most of the day. Meeting pretty thin. Dined at Mr. I. Can- 
field's. He has a very worthy family. The peace in the East and the 
humiliation of the Mahometan power gives a great interest to this Thanks- 
giving.* 

27. Read. Walked out. Attended in the bur}-ing-ground the funeral 
of a child. The snow is about three inches deep. Sleighs move some. 
Wrote. Visited. 



' The Northampton Canal ran through ■♦ This Sabbath he preached at New Mil- 

Northington (Avon), and gave a new impulse ford, 
to the place. 5 Backus W. Birge, who owed him money 

- This letter, doubtless, offered him again on the Everest fund, 
the pulpit at Stratford, which he was inclined '" Neither power was just and righteous 

to accept. enough to create much enthusiasm in its 

^ Seth W. Benedict, Esq. behalf. 



l6o DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBDINS, D. D. [l82g, 

28. Rode out and visUed. Out the most of the day. Bad riding. Am 
ver)' kindly treated by the people. The members of the society are very 
much scattered. Read. 

29. Dark and damp weather. The snow wastes away. It is said yester- 
day was the only day of clear weather, through the day, we have had this 
month. Preached on Heb. xii : 16, and 2 Cor. viii : 9. Meeting well 
attended for the weather. Had no evening conference ; the town-house 
occupied by the Episcopalian singing-school. Had company. 

30. Wrote. Read in La Voise's great Atlas? Wet and very changeable 
weather. Walked out and visited. The Russian autocrat appears to be very 
haughty after his victories. The Turkish power is effectually bridled. 

December. 

1. Walked out and visited. People appear to be desirous to have 
me return here. Pleasant for the season. Was out with company. Read 
History of Redemption.^ Always instructive. 

2. Walked out. Rode and visited. At evening had a good meeting 
in the east part of the town ; preached without notes on John iv : 29. 
Tarried with a good family. Weather ver^- changeable. A great quantity 
of pork produced in this town. 

3. Cold. Visited. Purchased of Mr. Eliot's^ administrator twenty-one 
volumes, and gave my due-bill for $23.70. Paid a merchant, %\. Paid for 
grain given my horse, $1.75. Put up my things. Saw an account of the 
death of Judge Washington.* Am treated very kindly here. Received a 
letter from my sister Battell. Wrote. 

4. Left New Milford, where I have lived nearly two months very 
pleasantly, and I hope usefully. Have been requested to return, but have 
made no engagements. Quite cold and the ground hard frozen. Rode 
to Stratford through Monroe and Huntington.' Kindly received. The ride 
was fatiguing. 

5. Went to Mrs. Thompson's to board. In the morning rainy. Have 
been expected here for a good while, and to appearance earnestly. Read. 
Am in a good family. Am something unwell. Was up late. 

6. Wet and dark. Meeting not full. Preached all day on 2 Cor. viii : 9. 
At evening had a good conference and preached without notes on Luke 
XX : 17, 18. Left the meeting before it was finished, and rode out and 
performed a marriage. Took medicine. 

7. Warm and pleasant. Walked out. Yesterday put on my flannel. 



' C. V. Lavoise and C. Gros were the ■* Bushrod Washington, LL. D., associate 

authors of A Genealogical, Historical, and judge of the Supreme Court of the United 

Chronological Atlas, first published in Lon- States. He was born in Westmoreland 

don, folio, in 1807. County, Va., June 5, 1762;. graduated at 

2 Jonathan Edwards's celebrated treatise, William and Mary College, 1778, and died 
first published in Edinburgh in 1777, nine- in Philadelphia, Nov. 26, 1S29. 

teen years after his death. -' New Milford to Stratford was a journey 

3 Rev. Andrew Eliot, as before mentioned, of thirty miles or more, through a hilly and 
had died only a short time before. romantic country. 



1829.] 



PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 



161 



Wrote. Read newspapers. At evening attended the monthly concert. This 
has been much neglected here. 

8. Quite warm. Read. Walked and visited. Yesterday wrote to my 
sister. Saw Mr. Hunter,' of Fairfield. At evening attended the Bible class. 
It has been continued since I was here. But it is small. 

9. It snowed and rained moderately the most of the day. Read Pierce's 
Vindkatioii of the Dissenters!" Walked out and visited. Tarried out. 

ID. Very pleasant. Visited. Kq^lH Life of I. Neuiton? Wrote. Hindered 
by company. Walked out. 

11. Saw the President's long Message* and read a part of it. It has been 
carried along with a childish rapidity. He speaks abusively of the Indians. 
Rode to Oronoke ^ and visited. At evening attended a meeting and preached 
without notes on Matt, iv : 21, 22. Paid for soling my boots, $1.67. 

12. Visited. Rode home. Wet and a little rainy. Bad riding. Wrote. 
In the evening we had a violent rain. Read. 

13. Windy and cold. Full meeting. Preached on Heb. xii : 6, and 
Isa. v : 4. At evening had a full conference and preached without notes 
on Matt, iv : 21, 22. 

14. Walked out. Quite warm. Rode to Bridgeport \vith company. Very 
muddy. Ecclesiastical matters there are very bad. At evening set out 
on a journey. Rode in the stage to New Haven. The mail is carried from 
here in a wagon, and I could not get a passage. Read. Was up late. 

15. Was all day getting to Hartford in the stage. Came through Middle- 
town. Some of the way very bad. Crossed to East Hartford. The society 
here have given another call to Mr. Brace. ^ They are not unanimous. Was 
brought late to East Windsor. Mrs. Wolcott is unusually well. Warm. 

16. Rode to Enfield. Visited at East Windsor Hill and at Pine Meadow. 
In the morning Mr. Ely,' of Mansfield, called on me and borrowed several 
books. He is writing a historical work. My brother is much afflicted with 
his nervous headache. Windy and cold. 

17. The ground is hard frozen. Rode to Somers. The people here 
are in a broken state. Cold. Paid for work, etc., $1. Put up my things 
remaining here and rode in my wagon to East Windsor. The society here 



' Rev. John H. Hunter, pastor at Fair- 
field, 1828-1834. He was afterwards pastor 
of Bridgeport, 1839-1848. A minister of the 
same name was, at a later date, settled among 
the Presbyterians, probably the same man. 

- James Pierce, 167 3-1726. Vindicice Fra- 
truvi Dissentientium Anglice adv. Gulielm. 
Nichols^ London, 1710, 8vo, English, 17 17. 

' This was the Life of Sir Isaac A^ewton 
by Sir David Brewster, first published in the 
Family Library in 1820; afterwards issued 
in far better style. 

* Gen. Jackson was inaugurated for his 
first term March 4, 1829. The Message here 



referred to was the one given on the assem- 
bling of the Twenty-first Congress, Dec. 7, 
1S29. Dr. Robbins did not like Gen. Jack- 
son well enough to speak kindly of him. 
With all his faults, people now think well 
of him. His two administrations fill an hon- 
orable place in our history. 

* Oronoke, as before stated, was one of 
the local districts of the town of Stratford. 
There was a locality in the town of Water- 
bury, Ct., with the same name. 

* Rev. Samuel William Brace, before no- 
ticed. 

' Rev. William Ely. 



l62 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1829. 

have had their annual meeting today. The society is much diminished. 
They think Mr. Whelpley cannot continue with them long. Read. 

18. Had much to do in putting up my things. Had tailor-work done. 
Walked out. Had company. \\'as up late. 

19. The ground is covered with snow. Rode to Hartford. Took the 
stage through Farmington to New Haven." Rode late in the mail-stage 
to Stratford. The roads rough, but not bad traveling. At Hartford received 
a letter and a dozen of Mr. Emerson's sermons at mother's funeral. Sister 
Battell and Urania have gone on to Plymouth. My letter and sermons were 
from Mr. Battell. At Hartford traded, $2.50. Much fatigued. Expenses 
of my journey to East Windsor, $8.90. 

20. Pleasant and full meeting. Preached on Ps. cxxx : 3. Afternoon 
Mr. Vandyke,- of the State of New York, preached for me. At evening 
had a serious conference, and preached without notes on Matt, viii : 25. 
Have much assistanc'e in this conference. Tired. 

21. Put up my things.^ Read. Traded, $1, Walked to the river. 
A man was drowned here today by the upsetting of a boat. Wrote. Judge 
Johnson" and Rev. Mr. Shepard^ called on me. 

22. Read the Bible. Plindered by company. Visited. At evening 
attended our Bible class. It is not large, but does well. We are in the 
book of Joshua. 

23. Rode to North Milford*; attended the installation of Mr. Parsons,^ 
The prospects are favorable. The parts were well performed. Prof. Fitch ^ 
preached well. Returning, called on Mr. Pinneo,' at Milford, confined by 
a wound ; and attended in the evening a large temperance meeting. 
Delivered a long address. Rode home late. Quite dark. Last night 
and the forenoon quite cold. 

24. Received a letter from Mr. Strong, of Somers, at New Haven, and 
wrote him in reply. Gave my consent for him to go to New Milford. Rode 
to Oronoke and visited. Preached in the evening, without notes, on Matt, 
viii : 25. Rainy and warm. Tarried out. 

25. Quite warm and mild. Attended a meeting and the communion 
at the church. Mr. Shepard performed well. The services long. Read, 
Wrote. Occupied with company. 

26. Have caught a cold, which is quite oppressive. Received a letter 



' Going from New Haven to Hartford he friendly terms. He was on similar terms of 

took the eastern road through Middletown. intimacy and friendship with Rev. Nathaniel 

In returning he went through Farmington. Huse when at East Windsor. 

^ Rev. John B. Vandyke, of Coxsackie, * North Milford is now known as Orange. 

N. Y., who turned from the ministry to med- ' Rev. Horatio Adams Parsons, pastor at 

icine. Orange, 1829-1S32. He was graduated at 

3 Arranged them at his boarding-place. Williams College, 1820; at Andover Semi- 

* Judge William S. Johnson, LL. D. nary, 1S23; and died at Niagara, N. Y., 1S73. 

^ Rev. George C. Shepard, at that time ^ Prof. Eleazar T. Fitch, D. D., pastor of 

Episcopal minister of Stratford. He and the Yale College Church. 

Dr. Robbins seem to have been on very ' Rev. Bezaleel Pinneo, 



1829.] PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 163 

from B. W. Birge,' of Philadelphia, with good promises. I fear I shall get 
nothing more. Wrote to D. S. Boardman, Esq.,^ of New Milfoird. Received 
a valuable map of this town, a present from the author, J. H. Linsley.^ Read 
the Bible. Wrote. 

27. Wet and dark through the day. At times it rained hard. Preached 
on Titus ii : 4, and Ps. cxx.\ : 4. Afternoon meeting quite thin. Had no 
conference. Quite oppressed with my cold. Read Lewis's Bible Translations. 
Warm for winter. 

28. Ver}' pleasant. Walked and visited. Read. The ground has been 
but little frozen. Wrote. Last week the boys played ball. On Saturday 
saw a man plowing. Read the annual Treasury Report. Reform is the 
hobby. 

29. Wrote. Much hindered by company. Visited a school with Mr. 
Shepard and others. At evening attended the Bible class. Read the Bible. 

30. Walked and visited without an out-coat. Read. At evening attended 
a meeting in a new school-house and preached without notes on Mark .\ii : 7. 
A full meeting. Traded, sixty-three cents. 

31. Wet. Walked out. Wrote to Mr. Linsley, of this town, and to 
B. W. Birge, of Philadelphia. Visited. At evening had a long conversation 
with some of the principal men here respecting a settlement with them. 
I pray for divine direction. 



' Backus W. Birge, indebted to the Ever- uating was offered a tutorship, but declined, 

est fund. He was a strong and original thinker, and 

'^ David S. Boardman, of New Milford, lived to great age, dying in 1864, more than 

was a graduate of Yale College in the class ninety years old. 

of 1793. Though not well prepared, he soon * This was Rev. James Harvey Linsley, the 

made his mark as a scholar, and after grad- teacher and scientific man already noticed. 



1 8 30 . 

January. 

1. Endeavored early to devote myself, with all my powers and wants, 
to the mercy, guidance, and keeping of a holy God for the ensuing year. 
Very pleasant and mild weather. Walked out and called, by invitation, 
on a lady who kept open house for the day.' Preached a preparatory lecture 
with short notes on John xii : 23, 24. Well attended. Walked. Visited. 

2. Wrote a sermon on 2 Kings xx : i. I have written but little for some 
time past. Had to walk considerably for exercise. Finished, by divine 
favor, in good season. There have been thirty-three deaths in this town the 
year past. About half belonging to this society. Ten over seventy years.' 

3. Preached with short notes on Zech. xiii : 17, and the sermon written 
yesterday. Administered the sacrament. Very pleasant, and the church and 
congregation very full and solemn. At evening attended the conference 
and preached on Luke xiv : 23. Much fatigued. In future I shall not 
mention my preaching at extra meetings as " without." It will be a matter 
of course. Received a letter from S. T. Wolcott. 

4. Am affected with labor. Read. Wrote to S, T. Wolcott. At evening 
attended the annual meeting of the Tract Society, in this place, and the 
monthly concert together. The services of the latter were quite short. 

5. Read the Bible. Quite cold. Wrote. Made this almanack.^ Walked 
out. Had a conversation with the society's committee. Read. 

6. Winter weather. Read the Bible. Visited a family who have just 
lost a little child. The society here had a meeting and voted to give me 
a call to settle with them. Salary, $500. In their existing state it seems 
no more is to be expected,'* 



' This was a New York rather than a 
New England custom, but Stratford, and the 
other southwestern towns of Connecticut, are 
natural neighbors to New York. 

^ Another illustration of the fact that more 
people live beyond the age of seventy than is 
commonly supposed. 

^ Interleaved it. For a long course of 
years Dr. Robbins used the almanacs pub- 
lished by Isaiah Thomas, of Worcester. 
For a few years he had used what was 
known as the Christian Almanack, published 
by John P. Haven, of New York. His cop- 
ies for 1S26, 1827, 1S28, were of this kind. 
But the one used for 1830 (as also for 1829) 
was as follows: "AVw England Farmer's 
Almanack for the year 1830. By Thomas 



G. Fessenden, Editor of New England Far- 
mer. Boston : Published by Carter & Hen- 
dee [proprietors of the copyright], corner 
of Washington and School Streets. Sold 
also by John B. Russell, at the Seed Store 
connected with N'e-uj England Farmer Office, 
No. 52 North Market Street. Sold also 
wholesale and retail by D. F. Robinson 
& Co., Hartford, Ct. ; Chauncey Goodrich, 
Burlington, Vt. ; Horatio Hill & Co., Con- 
cord, N. H. ; John Pi^entiss, Keene, N. H. ; 
John W. Foster and Nathaniel March, Ports- 
mouth, N. H., " etc. 

* Dr. Robbins, under the circumstances, 
is disposed to accommodate himself to their 
necessities. He liked Stratford for its inter- 
esting historical associations. 



165 



i66 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1830. 



7. Walked and visited. The weather is niild. Attended the funeral 
of the child deceased yesterday. Received a letter from Mr, Vandyke,' 
of Coxsackie. Attended the Bible class. Mr. Mitchell,^ a candidate con- 
verted here, was with me. The committee of the society called on me. 
They state that there is much solicitude in the society and the town that 
I would accept the call, and that they consider nothing threatening in the 
small minority of yesterday. Engaged to consider the subject. 

8. Walked out. High winds. Wrote. Concluded to exchange with 
Mr. Mitchell for the next Sabbath and go to Killingworth.'- Visited. 

9. Cold. Rode to Killingworth. The riding very good. Stopped at 
New Haven. Traded. 

10. A hard steady rain all day. Thin meeting. Preached on Titus ii : 14, 
and Isa. v : 4. There is a great work of divine grace here. The society 
has been in a very broken state, but is hopefully improving. Mr. Mitchell 
is much liked and very useful. At evening attended a meeting and preached 
on John iv : 29. Saw old acquaintance. 

11. Very cold and tedious. Rode facing a severe wind to Middletown. 
Froze a part of my face. Rode to East Windsor. The ground very hard. 

12. Thermometer yesterday about 10°; today about 17°. Rode to Enfield. 
My horse performs very well. The river almost full of ice. My brother 
is quite ill with his headache. He and his wife approve of my call." Rode 
home. Visited. 

13. Wrote. A sheriff had Dr. Reed's real estate prized off on my claim 
for the Everest fund.' Visited. Looked over my things. 

14. The weather moderates. Rode to East Hartford and got some 
of my things there. There is a prospect that Mr. Brace will accept their 
call, though they are not united. Visited. Paid Ursula, $4.50, and took 
back a mattress which I let her have. Received sundry pamphlets from 
the post office. 

15. Saw Dr. Reed early. I expect to lose by him and his brother. 
Rode to New Haven. Hindered at Hartford. Paid Mr. Wadsworth,* the 
sheriff, $10. Paid for a pair of gloves, $1.50. For wine, eighty-four cents. 
Towards evening it rained. Very good traveling. Rode when it was quite 
dark. 



' John B. Vandyke, M. D. 

- John Mitchell was a native of Chester, 
Ct. ; was graduated at Yale, 1821, and at 
Andover, 1824; was editor of Christian Spc-c- 
tator at New Haven, 1823-1828 ; was ordained 
Dec. 8, 1830, and was pastor at Fairhaven, 
Ct., and Northampton, Mass. He was the 
author of a valuable little volume entitled, 
A Guide to the Principles and Practice of the 
Congregational Churches of A'ezu England, 
Northampton, 1838. He died in Stamford, 
Ct, April 28, 1870. 

^ Mr. Mitchell was supplying the pulpit 



at Killingworth, which was thirty iniles east 
of Stratford. 

■• That is, they approve of his accepting 
his call to Stratford. 

5 Dr. Robbins had been a great friend of 
Dr. Reed and hia brother, Dea. Reed. But 
he felt obliged to do everything he could to 
recover the money belonging to. the- Everest 
fund, while he might not have been disposed 
to take the same steps to recover money of 
his own. While Dr. Robbins was thrifty, he 
was also very generous. 

* Horace Wadsworth. 



1830.] 



PREACHING IN STRATFORD. 



167 



16. We had a steady rainy night. Rode to Stratford. Muddy, but not 
deep. Have had a prosperous journey. Tlie church here had a meeting 
and voted to give me a call. They balloted, and there were four negative 
votes. The minority is said to be produced by a man that is a Baptist. 
Wrote. Warm. The sum paid to Wadsworth was $10. The charge for 
yesterday was $1.08. Today, ^r.yi. Conversed with several persons relative 
to my call. Received a letter from Esq. Ely,' of Simsburj-. 

17. Wet. Forenoon meeting thin. Afternoon we had a good number 
of singers. Preached on i Peter i : 15, 16, and Matt, xxv : i, 2. At evening 
the committee of the church called and presented me their call. There 
appears to be much engagedness among the people relative to my settlement ; 
unexpectedly so. The small minority is in the church, and evidently from 
external, Baptist, influence. Had much conversation with the committee. 
Promised to give an answer soon. 

18. Wrote answers of acceptance to the calls of the church and society, 
and in the evening delivered them to the committees. Signed the contract 
with the society committee. The event is committed all to God ; may 
it please him to give his blessing. Wrote to my brother Francis. In the 
morning the ground was covered with snow. Cold and tedious all day. 
Read the Bible. Wrote to Esq. Ely, of Simsbury. 

19. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Stebbins,^ of Orange. Visited an afflicted family. 
Rev. Mr. Blatchford ^ called on me ; likely to be installed at Bridgeport. 
The morning severe cold, but it moderates. Read. 

20. Read the Bible. V/rote to S. T. V/olcott. Walked out and visited. 
Two or three persons here give me some trouble. The Lord is infinitely 
wise and good. Read. 

21. Severe cold. The ground is very hard frozen and rough. This 
is a very pleasant winter town. Dined at Judge Johnson's with Mr. Shepard. 
Read Patrick's Exposition.'' Walked a distance and visited. At evening 
attended the Bible class. 

22. Spent the day at Esq. Booth's,' my former boarding-place, where 
I receive much kindness. At evening visited. The prospects of this people 
improve. 

23. Severe cold. Wrote. Walked out. Read the Bible and the Christian 
Observer!' Am burdened with the cold. 

24. No abatement of the cold. Meeting pretty full. Some new hearers. 
Preached with notes on Luke xxiv : 47, and a sermon on John vii : 37. 



' Benjamin Ely, Esq. 

^ Rev. Stephen W. Stebbins in the parish 
of West Haven (Orange). Mr. Stebbins was 
graduated at Yale, 1791, and had been settled 
over the Congregational church in Stratford, 
17S4-1813, and was pastor at West Haven, 
iSi 5-1843, making him one of the half-cent- 
ury ministers of Connecticut, with several 
years over. 

3 Rev. John Blatchford, son of Rev. Sam- 



uel Blatchford, D. D., who had been pastor 
at Bridgeport, 1 797-1804. The son was or- 
dained in 1S30, and was pastor till 1836. 

* Rev. Samuel Patrick, Bishop of Ely, 
who died 1707. Among many other works, 
he wrote an Exposition of the Command- 
ments. 

5 Elijah Booth, Esq. 

^ The Hartford religious paper, which con- 
tinued from 1825 on almost twenty years. 



1 68 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROI5BINS, D. D. [1830. 

At the evening meeting preached on Ps. i : 2. Received a letter from brother 
Francis. The attention among this people increases. 

25. Last night it snowed. Wrote a draft of a church letter to call the 
council for my installation. Wrote to my brother F. Received of the society 
treasurer here, $32 ; my dues to the commencement of the present year. 
Read the Christum Observer. 

26. We have some more snow. Blustering. The society meeting yester- 
day completed the arrangements for my settlement. The treasury accounts are 
settled, and it is in advance. Visited. Wrote to Mr. Battell and to Mr. Par- 
sons,' of North Milford. At evening attended the Bible class. Severe cold. 

27. Rode to Huntington. Visited at Oronoke.- Tedious cold. Had 
a good visit with Mr. Punderson.^ Read. 

28. Rode with Mr. Punderson to Bridgeport, and assisted him and others 
in organizing the new church of one hundred and eighteen members. The 
occasion was interesting and solemn. The new church voted to call Mr. Stan- 
ton^ to be their pastor. Afternoon rode to Fairfield and saw Mr. Hunter, 
and returned to Stratford. At evening preached at a school-house on 
Matt, xi : 28. Thermometer at Huntington this morning, 8°; yesterday, 6°. 
Mr. Bowe, of East Windsor, has been here and left a citation for me to 
the Circuit Court at Hartford, in Dr. Reed's -case. Quite fatigued. 

29. Yesterday wrote to Judge Hill,^ of Greenfield. Wrote to Dr. Taylor,* 
of New Haven, and to Mr. Kent,^ of Trumbull. Still very cold. Afternoon 
we had a solemn season of prayer, well attended, preparatory to the expected 
installation. Wrote to Mr. Pinneo,^ of Milford, and Esq. Tomlinson,' of this 
town. At evening attended, awhile, a singing-school. Quite large. 

30. The most severe day we have had. Very tedious. Assisted some 
ladies who are making a new cushion for the pulpit. Wrote. Towards 
evening rode to Bridgeport to exchange with Mr. Blatchford.'° It seems 
as if I never rode in a colder time. It was facing a heavy wind. The 
thermometer about zero. 

31. Last evening the thermometer was 05°; this morning 03°. Preached 
on John iii : 3, and Heb. vii : 25. The morning meeting thin and 
very cold. Both parts of this divided congregation attended meeting. 
I think it well that they are divided." Rode home. The cold abates but 



' Rev. Horatio A. Parsons, just settled in byterian minister, and in 1831 appears again 

Orange, then North Milford. as a Presbyterian minister. He died in 1843. 

^ The district called Oronoke seems to ^ Judge Henry Hill, graduated at Yale, 

have been in the northern part of the town 1772. 

of Stratford, on the way to Huntington, two '' Nathaniel W. Taylor, D. D., of Yale 

miles or more from the center. • Theological Seminary. 

3 Rev. Thomas Punderson, pastor at Hunt- ''Rev. James Kent, pastor in Trumbull, 

ington, 1818-1844. He died in 1848. 1825-1835. 

'■ Rev. Benjamin F. Stanton, who had been ^ Rev. Bezaleel Pinneo. 

dismissed the year before in Bethlem. He « Jabez H. Tomlinson, Esq. 

was a native of Stonington, but for some '° Rev. John Blatchford. 

reason was not settled in Bridgeport. He " That is, he thought there were people 

had been, before settling at Bethlem, a Pres- enough for two congregations. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 169 

little. Stratford and Bridgeport harbors are both closed. At the evening 
meeting preached on Phil, iii : 8. Thin. It snowed. 

February. 

1. Last night we had a considerable fall of snow of four or five inches. 
Tt rained through the forenoon, but did not appear to diminish the snow. 
Wrote to Ellsworth' and Holland,' of Hartford. Worked a little at the 
meeting-house. On account of the weather the monthly concert was omitted. 

2. Read. Sleighs move considerably. Spent some time preparaton,- 
to the great scene before me.^ Towards evening the council assembled. 
My good brother Francis came in his sleigh. My sister Battell came with 
her children, Joseph and Irene. ■• Good sleighing from Norfolk to East 
Windsor. Some of the council failed. But four ministers and two delegates 
present. After some hesitation they resolved to proceed. I was examined, 
and they made arrangements for tomorrow. The council sat late. 

3. I was solemnly installed pastor of the First Church and Society in 
Stratford. The day very pleasant and the sleighing very fine. The exercises 
very well performed and very acceptable. A great collection of people. 
The singing very good. My brother preached exceeding well. Gov. Tom- 
linson present. S. T. Wolcott and Mr. Filley^ here from East Windsor. 
At evening visited with my friends. They are kindly entertained in this 
family. Received a letter from Mr. Batteil. My brother is much affected 
with his nervous headache. 

4. Walked with my brother and made several calls. In the morning 
my sister, with her son and daughter, set out for home. Dined out. After 
dinner my brother went away. The snow thaws some. A great deal of 
sleighing. ]\Ir. Wheelock,^ agent of the Home Missionary Society, called 
on me. Received a letter from Mr. Birge, of Philadelphia, and a church 
letter to convene the Consociation at Bridgeport. Hindered by company. 
Read. 

5. Rode out and visited a school. Dined out. Yery cold. Wrote 
to Mr. Holland, of Flartford, and Mr. Boardman, of New Milford. Received 
a letter from Dr. Porter, of Farmington, and wrote to him in reply. Last 
night there was a light snow and the sleighing is very fine. 

6. The cold is very severe. Wrote a sermon on Ezek. iii: 17-19. 
W'rote slow and pretty indifferently. Much oppressed with the cold. 

7. The thermometer in this neighborhood this morning was at 04°; last 
Sabbath, 03°. Morning meeting thin ; afternoon thin. Severe cold through 



' Hon. William W. Ellsworth. ' Samuel Tudor Wolcott, Esq., and Mr. 

- William M. Holland, a Hartford law7er. Horace Filley. 

3 His installation at Stratford. * Rev. James Ripley Wheelock was born 

■* Joseph Battell, Jr., was then twenty- at Hanover, N. H., 1790, and was graduated 

three years old, and six years out of college, at Dartmouth College. He had been settled, 

while Irene, his sister, afterwards wife of 1S27-1S29, over the Congregational church in 

Prof. William A. Earned, of Yale College, Canterbury, Ct. He preached also at New- 

was then seventeen years old. These three port, N. H., and Lancaster, N. H. He died 

are now all dead. in 1S41. 



170 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [183O. 

the day. Preached with short notes on Rom. viii : 14, and the sermon written 
yesterday. A solemn season. Had no evening meeting. 

8. Last night we had a heavy fall of snow. Worked considerably shovel- 
ing paths. Wrote to Mr. Holland, of Hartford. Read. At evening attended 
the Bible class. Thin. 

9. Walked out. Rode with a delegate to Bridgeport and met with 
the Consociation. They have not a good knowledge of our ecclesiastical 
system. Mr. Blatchford appeared well on examination. Kindly entertained 
at Mr. Thacher's. 

10. Mr. Blatchford was installed. The exercises good. I made the 
installing prayer. A very pleasant day and a large audience. The snow 
thawed considerably. Returned. Read. Our meeting-house seats have sold 
well this week. 

11. Read the most of the day in the Encydopczdia. Walked out and 
visited. An aged respectable man died suddenly last night. Visited the 
(Episcopal) family.' Cold and tedious. 

12. Read the Bible. Wrote. Walked out. Icy and slippery. Rode out 
in a sleigh with company and visited. Very fine sleighing. 

13. Read the Christian Observer. Read the Bible. W^rote to S. T. Wol- 
cott. Still severely cold. Did not go out. 

14. Preached a double sermon on Eph. ii : 5. Attended with Mr. Shepard 
the funeral of the late Gen. Nichols.^ At evening meeting preached on Heb. 
X : 31. Mr. Mitchell/ a candidate here, was present and assisted. 

15. Read a periodical. Called on Mr. Mitchell. It snowed. We have 
a severe winter. Yesterday had a present of a good scarf.* Wrote. At 
evening attended the Bible class. 

16. Walked and visited. It thawed considerably. Find it difficult to 
procure a place for permanent boarding. Read North American Review. 
Rev. !\Ir. Kent^ called and dined with me. Wrote. Read the Bible. 

17. Rode with company to New Haven. Very good sleighing. It thaws. 
Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Brundage,* of Brookfield. Went to the col- 
lege and fixed on four beneficiaries of the Everest fund.^ Called on Mr. Mer- 
win. Friends here appear to be quite glad that I am in Stratford. Paid for 
a book, $1. The streets wet. 

18. Did errands. Saw an ancient Bible. Am something unwell. Rode 
home. The sleighing begins to fail. Visited. The papers have many 
accounts of the late severe cold. 

19. Walked and visited. The roads quite wet. Visited our grammar 
school. Am unexpectedly offered a good place for boarding. Received 
a letter from Dea. Reed, of East Windsor, and one from H. Davidson, 



' This betokens that the Congregational- '• Probably from the family of Gen. Nicoll, 

ists and Episcopalians in Stratford maintained whose funeral he had just attended. 
Christian intercourse and civility, which was ^ Rev. James Kent, of Trumbull, 

not always the case. ^ Rev. Abner Brundage. 

^ Gen. Matthias Nicoll, not Nichols. ^ This fund yielded not far from ^240 a 

^ Rev. John Mitchell, before noticed. year, being about $4,000. 



1830.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



171 



of Waldo, Me. Read the American Almanack. \\'rote. At evening called 
on Mr. Shepard. Visited an elderly woman quite sick. 

20. Wrote to Mr. Brundage, of Brookfield, and to Dea. Reed, of East 
Windsor. Walked out. Very wet in the streets. The snow goes very fast, 
though a foundation of ice. Read the Bible. 

21. The sleighing is about done, after a good turn of three weeks. 
The traveling very bad. People well out. In the morning expounded on 
Matthew from the beginning to the ii : 19. Preached on John iii : 19. Had 
a thin conference and preached on James i: 15. Visited. The ground 
almost covered with water. 

22. Read Mr. Hayne's' eloquent, unprincipled speech in the United 
States Senate. Walked and visited. Warm and pleasant. At evening 
attended my Bible class. Well attended. 

23. Rode to Bridgeport. The roads are getting to be' very muddy. 
Wrote. Read the Bible. Made calls at Bridgeport. The harbors broke 
up about Saturday and Sabbath-day. 

24. Wrote to my brother F., to S. T. Wolcott, and to Rev. Mr. Freeman,* 
of Vveston. Rode and visited. The frost begins to break through. Visited 
an aged man ver}' low. Tarried out. 

25. Rode to Oronoke and visited. Very bad riding. Saw several aged 
people. The ice yet on the river. Spent the day in visiting. Tarried out. 

26. Pleasant. Visited. Rode home. The ground very soft. Wrote. 
Mr. Shepard and his wife called here. At evening walked out. 

27. Read the Bible. Rode to Fairfield to exchange with Mr. Hunter.^ 
Passed him on the way. The mud deep and the riding very bad. Rode 
on horseback. Some places begin to be settled. Stopped at Bridgeport 
and saw some of the members of the new society, Mr. Hunter and wife 
live as boarders. 

28. ' Cold but pleasant. Preached on John iii : 3, and Eph. ii : 14. This 
is a fine congregation. The largest, I think, in the county. The Governor* 
and several others were down from Greenfield.' They have no meetings 
there. Drank tea with Rev. Mr. Lee,* now keeping school here. At evening 
was at Mr. Osborne's.^ Kindly treated. 

March. 

I. Called at Mr. Sherman's.* Rode home. Cold and rough east wind. 
The ground hard frozen. Walked out. Read. At evening attended the 
monthly concert. 



' Robert Young Hayne, born near Charles- 
ton, S. C, Nov. 10, 1791, died at Asheville, 
N. C, Sept. 24, 1S39. The speech here re- 
ferred to was that audacious oration in the 
Senate which called out the famous reply 
from Daniel Webster. 

^ Rev. Nathaniel Freeman, a native of 
Lebanon, Ct., a graduate of Yale, 1S05, was 
pastor in that part of Weston now known as 
Easton, 1S19-1S32. He died 1854. 

^ Rev. John H. Hunter 



■* Gov. Gideon Tomlinson. 

^ Greenfield parish, on the high lands north, 
of Fairfield Center, is in the town of Fairfield. 
That parish was now vacant. After the dis- 
missal of Rev. Richard V. Dey, in 1829, they 
had no regular minister until 1833. 

* Rev. Chauncey G. Lee. 

'' Thomas B. Osborne, Esq., clerk of the 
court. 

* Hon. Roger Minot Sherman, who made 
his home at Fairfield. 



172 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBIXS, D. D. [1830. 

2. Received a letter from B. Ely, of Simsburj', and one from S. T, Wol- 
cott. \\'rote answers to them both. We had a severe snow-storm through 
the day. Read a part of Mr. Webster's very able speech in the United States 
Senate.' The Bible class prevented by the storm. 

3. Wrote to my brother James. Received a letter from W. M. Holland, 
of Hartford. The snow of yesterday the deepest we have had this year. 
Quite tedious. Rode to Oronoke and preached a lecture on 2 Cor. v : 9. 
Ten aged people in a small neighborhood. At evening attended a singing- 
school. Tarried out. 

4. Visited. The snow thaws and the sleighing is poor. Read Pitkin's 
History?^ Have much visiting to do. Read the remainder of Mr. Webster's 
noble speech. 

5. Read the Bible. Cold. Wrote. Yesterday received a printed letter 
from Rev. C. A. Goodrich.^ Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture on 
Rom. viii : 35. Pretty thin. This family had company. Very bad going 
for this place. 

6. Wrote a sermon on Matt, v : 13. Finished before nine. Walked out. 
The snow thaws and the ground is very wet. 

7. Preached with notes on John i : 11, and the sermon written yesterday. 
Quite wet and rainy. The church prett}' well out. Administered the sacra- 
ment. Had no conference. In the evening we had a hard rain and thunder. 
Walked out. 

8. We have many accounts of a very severe winter in Europe. The 
rivers frozen in Spain. Wrote to Mr, Battell. At evening had a full Bible 
class. Quite cold. 

9. Walked and visited. The ground quite frozen. Assisted in visiting a 
school. Read the Bible. At evening was out in a large party ; very decorous. 

10. Read Ivanhoe^ Walked and visited several places where I have not 
been. The ground settles but little. Reading periodicals occupies much time. 

11. Rode to the north part of the town and visited two schools. One of 
them well instructed. Visited families. Had considerable conversation with 
Mr. Curtis,^ the antinomian Baptist preacher. Still bad riding. Got home late. 

12. Received a letter from Dea. Reed, of East Windsor. Received two 
packets from W. W. Ellsworth,^ and one from N. Barber,^ members of Con- 



' Nothing which Daniel Webster ever did necticut ministers of that year, and probably 

in his life gave him more fame than this mas- had no parish, 
terly reply to Senator Hayne. ' Hon. William W. Ellsworth was in Con- 

^ Timothy Pitkin's Political mtd Civil His- gress, 1S29-1S73. 
tory of the United States. This work was pub- ''Hon. Xoyes Barber was a native of 

lished in two volumes in 1828. Groton. He was both a merchant and a 

3 Prof. Chauncey Allen Goodrich, D. D., lawyer. He was a Member of ('ongress, 

of Yale College. 1821-1835. Lanman, in his Dictionary of 

* Dr. Robbins reads some novels, but not Congress, says of him : " He was a man of 

very many. He read Scott's Atitiguary a ability, and while in Congress accomplished 

good many years before. Ivanhoe is often much good for his native State, where he was 

the first one read. universally respected as a man and a states- 

^ Rev. Mr. Curtis is not among the Con- man." 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 1 73 

gress. Read. Attended a funeral with Mr. Shepard of a child that died 
in New York. Had a communication relative to a place of living. I know 
not how I am to be provided for. The deacons called on me. Cold. 

13. Am called unexpectedly to a severe trial. Intended to write today, 
but am unable. Walked out. Read. Read the Bible. Made calls. 

14. Preached a double sermon on i Tim. iii: i6. Warm. The ground 
settles. Attended the evening conference and spoke on Luke xvi : 30. The 
principal men here act a very friendly part towards me. 

15. Am quite feeble. Walked out and visited. Saw an afflicted family. 
Read, Read Patrick's Ccmwicntary. On the 13th let Mrs. Thompson have 
$16. Wrote. At evening had a good Bible class. Much fatigued. 

16. Walked out. Wrote. Afternoon rode to Milford and attended the 
meeting of the County Temperance Society. Good addresses were made. 
At evening attended a large Bible class for Mr. Pinneo. He is still 
feeble. 

17. A steady rain all day. Tarried at Mr. Pinneo's till towards night 
and rode home. Got something wet. The frost mostly out of the ground. 
Read. 

18. Walked and visited. Visited an aged man very low. Received 
a letter from my brother James, and one from J. W. Huntington,* Member 
of Congress. Wrote to him in reply. Was up late. I pray that I may 
be profited by all my trials. 

19. Assisted in visiting two schools. They do pretty well. Pleasant 
spring weather. Read. At evening walked out. 

20. Have a hoarseness contracted on the 17 th. Read the Bible. A Mr. 
Riggs,^ a young minister, called on me. Wrote by him to Dea. Barnum,' of 
Bethel. Wrote notes for preaching. Am much burdened and pretty feeble. 

21. In the morning shower)-. Preached with notes on Matt, iii: 8, and 
a written sermon on i Cor. x : 9. Spoke with much difficulty on account 
of my hoarseness. Mr. Mitchell prayed in the forenoon and performed 
the most of the service at the evening conference. By request, warned 
a church meeting. 

22. Am very feeble and languid. Walked out. Can do but little. 
Warm. Wrote. People are beginning to plow and garden. Assisted in 
visiting a school. At evening attended the Bible class. Am much occupied. 

23. Last night we had a hard thunder-shower. Wet and cold. Afternoon 
we had a church meeting. Am much relieved, through the divine blessing, 
from painful anxieties. Had kind assistance from Mr. Mitchell. 



' Hon. Jabez W. Huntington was a native wards preached at several places in New 

of Norwich, but residing in Litchfield; a England and New York, and died at Glens 

graduate of Yale, and Member of Congress, Falls, N. Y., July 9, 18S0. 
1829-1S34, when he was appointed Judge of ^ Dea. Ephraim Barnum, of Bethel parish, 

the Supreme Court of Errors. Danbury ; doubtless introducing Mr. Riggs to 

^ Rev Thomas Riggs, a native of 0.\ford, him as a 

Ct. ; a graduate of Hamilton College, 1823, vacant by 

and of Andover Seminary, 1826. He after- G. Lowe. 



^ Rev Thomas Riggs, a native of 0.\ford, him as a candidate, the pulpit being then 
Ct. ; a graduate of Hamilton College, 1823, vacant by the recent dismissal of Rev. John 



174 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBIVS, D. D. [1830. 

24. Wrote to B. W. Birge, Philadelphia, Read. Assisted in visiting 
a school. Walked out and visited. Am treated with much kindness. 

25. Read the Bible. Walked far and visited two aged sick men. Read 
the Quarterly RevieuK^ W^alked out and visited. 

26. A hard storm of rain and snow began last evening, and continued 
through the night and, with some intermissions, through the day. Some 
of the time cold and violent. Read the Bible and the Quarterly. Walked 
out. Wrote. I do but little important business. 

27. Read Ivatihoe. In the morning there was a body of snow on the 
ground, but the most of it went off during the day. Mr. Turner,^ a candidate, 
called on me. I let him take my sulky to ride to Norwalk. Walked out. 
Received a letter from my brother F. L., and one from S. Babcock, New 
Haven. Read the Bible. 

28. Preached with notes on Luke ix : 31, and a sermon on Matt, xxv : 6. 
Full meeting. After meeting rode to the north part of the town and 
performed a marriage. At evening attended a meeting at Oronoke, and 
preached on Matt, xiv: 2>Z- Tarried out, 

29. Assisted in visiting a school. Attended a funeral of an aged man. 
Am considerably unwell. Read. Had company. 

30. Last evening Mr. Linsley ^ called and conversed with me considerably. 
Walked and visited. Quite warm. Afternoon attended a church meeting. 
But little done. At evening attended the Bible class. Much fatigued, 

31. Wrote to the cashier of the Hartford Bank, and to Mr. Mead, 
of Greenwich. Walked out. Had company. Finished reading Ivanhoe. 
Read the Bible. 

April. 

1, Warm and pleasant. Walked and visited. Am considerably unwell. 
Took physic. Read La Fayette in America.^ Vegetation is beginning. 

2. Received a letter from Mr. Merwin, of New Haven, and one from 
Pres. Day. Wrote to Mr. Merwin,* and to Mr. Davies,' of Saugatuck. Read. 
Am much unwell and debilitated. Took medicine. Cold and wet. Visited. 
Assisted in examining a school-teacher. 



* He was reading the number of the Quar- ^ Rev. James Harvey Linsley, the teacher 

lerly Review probably for January, which was and scientist before noticed, 

the beginning of the forty-second volume, "* La Fayette, General Memoirs of, with an 

two numbers making a volume, so that there account of his visit to America, and of his 

are two volumes a year. reception by the people from his arrival, 

^ This was, without much doubt, Rev. Asa Aug. 15, to the celebration at Yoiktown, 

Turner, long known as Father Turner, who Oct. 19, 1S24. Boston, 1S24. 

was just then closing his studies at the Yale ' Rev, Samuel Merwin, of the North 

Seminary. He was graduated at the college Church, New Haven. 

(Yale) in 1827, and at the seminary, 1830. * Rev. Thomas F. Davies, who had suc- 

He was ordained an evangelist in September ceeded Dr. Edward W. Hooker as pastor at 

following at New Haven, and has since done Green's Farms (Saugatuck). Mr. Davies was 

a great work in the West, where he is still a graduate of the University of North Caro- 

living in his old age. His present residence lina in 1822. He was pastor at Saugatuck, 

is Oskaloosa, Iowa. 1829-1839. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 1 75 

3. Am some better, through divine favor, but feeble. Walked out. 
Wrote. Read the Bible and an expositor. Received a proclamation for 
Fast after much delay and difficulty. 

4. Expounded on Matt, ii : 19 to the end of chapter third. Preached 
on Prov, xxiii : 26. Full meetinji. Much difference between mornin<jc and 
afternoon. Had a full conference ; spoke on Eph. iv : 30. Much fatigued. 

5. Rode a distance and visited a sick woman. People begin to take 
shad. The electors' meeting appeared to be numerous. I like the districting 
for senators.' Parties cannot be so strong. At evening attended the monthly 
concert. Quite thin. Read. 

6. Walked out and visited. Find it very difficult to procure a place 
to live. Wrote to my brother at Enfield. Read the Bible. Rode to the 
north part of the town and attended in the evening a temperance meeting. 
Some gentlemen were down from Derby. Was out late. 

7. Wrote to my cousin, Mrs. Oilman,^ at New Haven. Began to write 
a sermon on Dan. x: 12 for the Fast. At evening had a good Bible class. 

8. Wrote and finished, late in the evening, the sermon begun yesterday. 
Walked out. Have hindrances. At evening the deacons called to see me. 
There appear to be here a few restless people. 

9. Fast. Preached on Joel ii : 12-14, ai^d Dan. x: 12. Quite warm. 
Saw daffas in full blossom. Much fatigued. Had company. Afternoon 
meeting quite full. 

10. Rode to New Haven. Wet. My horse is considerably lame. Mr. 
Merwin took my horse and sulky and rode to Saugatuck. Mr. Hunter' 
is to supply me tomorrow. Walked out. Looked at the new State House. 
It will be a noble building. Saw various acquaintance. 

11. Very rainy all day. Preached in the forenoon for Mr. Merwin. 
Addressed the Sabbath-school. Afternoon exchanged and preached for the 
new Third Society.* A fine new house and good congregation. Mr. Board- 
man* is out of town. Preached on i Tim. iii : 16, and Isa. iii : 10, 11. Thin 
meetings. At evening called on Prof. Fitch. The ground almost covered 
with water. 

12. Wet and cold. Made calls. Paid John M. S. Perry,* for the Everest 



' This refers to the new law for shaping * Rev. Charles A, Boardman was settled 

the senatorial districts of the State, referred over the church just mentioned in March, 

to in a previous note. The law had been 1S30. He had been previously settled, iSiS 

accepted by the popular vote. -1S30, over the church in New Preston. 

^ Mrs. Hannah Oilman, wife of B. I. Gil- * Mr. Perry had graduated at Yale Col- 
man, formerly of Marietta, O. lege in 1S27, and was, when Mr. Robbins met 

^ Rev. John H. Hunter, pastor in Fair- him, in the middle class of Yale Seminarv. 

field. He was licensed by the Litchfield North 

* The Third Church in New Haven was Association, June 8, 1830. He died in 1S3S. 

the one which last year (1S84) united with the The trustees of the Everest fund seem to 

North Church, making the present Union have been unfortunate thus far in taking up 

Church. It was formed in 1S26, and until men destined to an early death. This was 

1830 was supplied by Dr. Nathaniel W. Tay- not true of the later beneficiaries, and the 

lor, of the Yale S 'minary. men aided were generally cf tiiae abilities. 



176 



DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1830. 



fund, $10. Attended Mr. Merwin's Bible class. At evening heard a lecture 
on ecclesiastical history from Dr. Murdock.' Afternoon went with Dr. Taylor 
to one of his theological lectures. Found, late at evening, that I have lost 
my valuable gold watch-key. Paid for books, $1.75. 

13. Looked for my watch-key and directed to have it advertised. Rode 
to East Windsor. Last night it rained again, and the riding is quite bad. 
Quite cold and rough. Mrs. Wolcott has been quite unwell, but is now 
better. Tired. 

14. Put up a large bundle of clothes for my brother James's family. 
Read. I fear I have lost articles from my library. Received of J. Hill for 
grass, $4. Walked out. 

15. Rode to Hartford. Received of Mr. Cook, for writing for him some 
years ago, $6.82. Saw various acquaintance. Saw people in East Hartford. 
Their ecclesiastical matters are in a poor state. Paid for pamphlets, $2.13. 
Pleasant but still cold. At evening attended, awhile, Mr. Whelpley's meet- 
ing. Spoke a little. 

16. Wrote. Had company. Visited. Cool, and the season advances 
but slowly. Attended to my things. 

17. Maj. Hayden paid me $28, and took up a note I have long held 
against him. Rode to Hartford. Received of the Phoenix Bank a dividend 
of $45. Paid Hartford Bank, $75.20, and took up my note. Paid a mer- 
chant, $3.46 ; and for Mr. Wolcott, eighty-four cents. Rode to Windsor and 
Pine Meadow and visited friends. Rode to Enfield. I think my brother 
is as well as for some time past. 

18. Preached for my brother on i Tim. iii : 16, and John vii : 37. We 
had meetings in the school-house, as the meeting-house is repairing. There 
has been a good work of grace here for some months past. The Methodists 
have made great efforts. At evening attended a conference in the north 
part of the town and preached on Eph. iv : 30. It grows warmer. Meetings 
quite full. 

19. Looked at the meeting-house. It will be much improved. Rode 
to Somers. The people have lately called a Mr. Dennis^ to settle with them. 
Got nothing of my dues.^ Rode to East Windsor. Visited. Got home late. 

20. Made a donation, $2. Worked at my books and papers. Wrote. 
The thermometer was above 80°. Rode out. Received $14.34, the rent 



' James Murdock, D. D., a native of West- 
brook, Ct., and a graduate of Yale, 1797. He 
was a man of large learning. In 1802 he 
was ordained minister of the Congregational 
church in Princeton, Mass., where he was 
pastor, 1802-1815. In 181 5 he was chosen 
Professor of Ancient Languages in the Uni- 
versity of Vermont. From 1S19 to 1S28 he 
was Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and Eccle- 
siastical History in Andover Seminary. In 
1S29 he removed to New Haven, and was 
engaged in revising and publishing his works. 



He was an eminent scholar. He died in 
1856. 

' Rev. Rodney G. Dennis, who was pastor 
at Somers, 1830-1S39. He afterwards lived 
many years at Grafton, Mass., and South- 
boro', Mass., supplying pulpits. He died in 
the last-named town Sept. 28, 1865, aged 
seventy-four. He was a graduate of Bow- 
doin College, 1816. 

^ It was very hard work in those years to 
collect debts, however just. In this respect 
the present age is much better. 



1830.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



177 



of one half of niy land for the last year. Mr. Rockwell engaged to take 
the whole for the present year at the same rate, 

21. Worked, putting up books and other things. It is quite fatiguing. 
Walked out and made several calls. Am treated very kindly. Thermometer 
at 82°. Paid for a large box, $2.25 ; and taxes, forty-four cents. The ground 
has become quite dry. 

22. Engaged, putting up my things. Called at several places. Ther- 
mometer 84°. Wrote. We had a large cutting of asparagus. Called on 
Mr. Robbins,' the Baptist preacher here. Mr. and Mrs Whelpley visited 
at Mr. Wolcott's. At evening attended a meeting with Mr. W. in the meeting- 
house, and preached on Luke ix : 30, 31. 1 fear the Everest fund will sustain 
a severe loss by the Reeds. 

23. Tudor agrees to go to Stratford with my things.^ Paid him towards 
expenses, $5. Set out on my return. It seems like leaving home. Quite 
warm and dusty. Received my dues from the society of East Hartford, 
S185.25. Paid Esq. White for boarding, $15. Received of Silas Andrus, 
of Hartford, money lent last year to Dea. Reed, $35.52. Paid him for books 
and binding, $9.50. Paid H. Wadsworth for legal services for the Everest 
fund, $10. Left Hartford, afternoon, and rode to Wallingford. Tarried, 
at a tavern. 

24. Last night it rained a good deal and it has become quite wet and 
cold. Rode early to New Haven. Made calls. Paid Mr. Twining,^ for 
four college beneficiaries of the Everest fund, $66. My gold watch-key has 
been found. Paid for the advertisement for it, seventy-five cents ; and the 
promised reward, $1* Rode home. Received a letter from B. W. Eirge, 
of Philadelphia, and one from B. Ely, Esq., of Simsbur}'. Wrote to Birge. 

25. Cold and wet. Our people are painting the inside of the meeting- 
house, and we had meeting in the town-house. Well accommodated. 
Preached a double sermon on James i: 23, 24. Received and read to the 
church a letter from the Consociation, desiring the church to send a delegate 
to attend the proposed installation at New Milford. The pastor was not 
mentioned. The church appointed me to go.' Visited a woman very sick. 
Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. The evening meeting was prevented by the wet. 

26. Paid Mrs. Thompson on my board-bill, $20. Wrote. Walked and 
visited. Saw the sick woman; a little better. Read. At evening attended. 
the Bible class. Prettv thin. 



^ Rev. Gurdon Robbins was the Baptist 
minister at East Windsor. He was only very 
distantly related, if at all, to Dr. Thomas 
Robbins. He does not seem to have been 
a man of college education. 

^ As he was now settled again in the min- 
istry, he wanted many of his books and other 
articles with him. Since his dismission at 
East Windsor they had been chiefly left in 
that town, stored at his old home. It was 
some years before they were all taken away. 



^ Stephen Twining, steward of the college, 
1819-1832. 

* Dr. Robbins maintained a valuable 
watch-key if he could afford to pay such 
sums for its recovery. Most men now carry 
one costing from five to ten cents. 

' The committee did not apparently re- 
member that a minister had recently been 
settled in Stratford. However, the Stratford 
church got over the difficulty- very handsomely 
by appointing their />asior their delegate. 



I.7S DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1830. 

27. Set out early and rode to New Milford. Quite cold. Frost in the 
morning. My horse is mostly free from lameness. Attended the examination 
of Mr. Rood. He appears pretty well, but the examining was indifferent. 
The Consociation considered my standing. 1 refused to sit as a correspond- 
ing member or delegate. I presented the minutes of the council that installed 
me and gave a brief summary of my doctrinal faith, and was voted a member 
of the body. I was such, as pastor of this consociated church.' Tarried 
at Mr. Canfield's. 

28. Find very cordial friends. Received of this society', $56. Paid for 
books from Mr. Eliot's librarj^, $23.70. Paid a blacksmith, seventy-five 
cents. Set out for home, and rode late in the evening to a tavern in 
Trumbull. In the morning there was a pretty hard frost, but we had 
a verj' pleasant day. Apple-tree blossoms appear. The council had a very 
good dinner, with no drink but common beer and water,^ 

29. Rode home early, Mr. S. T. Wolcott came with a load of my things 
from East Windsor. They came with much care and without injury. After- 
noon he set out on his return. Worked at my things. Think of changing 
my lodgings. At evening visited Esq. Booth. He has been much misled.^ 

30. Wrote. Engaged a new place to live. I move for the sake of having 
more house room. Wrote to Charles T. Hillyer, of Granby. Warm. On the 
23d paid $1.50 at East Hartford for old newspapers. Afternoon rode to 
Oronoke and visited. Was out late. On the 26th wrote to Mr. Ely, of Sims- 
bury. 

May. 

1. Wrote a report for the Convention of the Clergy."* Wrote to Mr. 
Hooker,' of Hartford. Visited the sick. Mr. Hunter, of Fairfield, called 
on me unexpectedly to exchange tomorrow. Paid the man that keeps my 
horse, $10. Have many avocations. Warm. 

2. Rode early to Fairfield. Preached on i Tim. iii : 16, and John vii : 37. 
There is considerable commotion in this society on account of a sermon 
preached by Mr. Hunter on Fast Day.* Saw friends. At evening Mr. Hunter 
returned. Quite warm. 

3. Conversed with Mr. Hunter and others. I think the difficulties here 
will subside. Rode home. Trees are generally in blossom. Worked at my 
things. Walked out. Saw a military company. Wrote. At evening attended 

.the monthly concert. Wet, and the meeting thin. 

4. Conversed with the deacons. Wrote to Nathan Wells, of this town. 



' Altogether, this whole business, from the '' Convention of the Congregational min- 

beginning to the end, was curious and disa- isters, such as occurred each year in the 

greeable. month of May, during what was called Elec- 

^ The temperance cause was making prog- tion Week, 
ress. ' Rev. Horace Hooker. 

3 There were inharmonious elements stir- * Preachers on Fast and Thanksgiving 
■ ring in Stratford when Dr. Robbins was set- days were apt to take up political and kin- 
tied there. dred themes. 



1830.] 



PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 



179 



Afternoon rode to New Haven. Quite warm. The Governor' got in late, 
but made a good display. Saw many acquaintance. Received a letter from 
Chester Chapin." Called on Mr. Merwin. 

5. In the morning attended the Ministers' Annuity Society. Then the 
Convention of the Clergy. We had to wait very long for the public exercises. 
Mr. Boardman^ preached very well. The new State House, I think, will 
be more magnificent than convenient.* Kindly accommodated at Mr. R. Sher- 
man's. Saw my sister, and Col. Lawrence ' and wife on their way to New 
York. At evening attended a meeting relative to the Domestic Missionary 
Society. Its funds are declining. 

6. Called on my cousin, Mrs. Gilman,* lately come here from New York 
to reside. Paid Gen. Howe for books, $6.81. Received communications for 
the convention. Rode home. My horse is lame. Visited. At evening 
attended the Bible class. Mrs. Ogden,' of Southington, was with me. 

7. Wrote. Walked out. Afternoon rode to Putney,^ visited, and in the 
evening attended a Bible class for the first time in that part of the town. 
Got home late. 

8. This morning there was considerable frost. Read. Wrote to Mr. 
Brace,' of Newington, and Mr. Edson,'° of Brooklyn. The painting and 
repairs of the meeting-house are completed and ver^' well done. 

9. Quite cool. Preached with notes on John xv : 22, and a sermon 
on 2 Chron. vi : 41. Made a sort of new dedication of the meeting-house. 
It has been closed three Sabbaths. It appears very well. At evening had 
a full conference and spoke on Heb. x : 26. 

10. Considerable frost. Took a long walk. A great blowth of the apple- 
trees. Wrote. Carried some of my books and papers to my new place 
of living. Attended the Bible class. Read the Governor's message. A ver\' 
good one. 

11. Frost again this morning. Began to write a public address for the 



' Hon. Gideon Tomlinson, LL. D., was 
Governor of Connecticut, by re-election, from 
1S27 to 1S31. 

^ Rev. Chester Chapin, whom we met fre- 
quently in the earlier years of the diary, was 
now, if we mistake not, laboring on the West- 
ern Reserve. 

'" Rev. Charles A. Boardman, who, two 
months before, had been dismissed from the 
church in New Preston and .settled over the 
Third Church in New Haven. He wa!i a 
native of New Milford, and a graduate of 
Yale, 1819. 

'' It was also more showy than solid. 

5 This was William Lawrence, son of 
Grove and Elizabeth (Robbins) Lawrence. 

^ Mrs. Hannah (Robbins) Gilman, the 
wife of Judge Benjamin Ives Gilman, was 



now sixty-two years old, having been born in 
Plymouth, 1768, the daughter of Chandler 
Robbins, D. D. She was married to Mr. 
Gilman in 1790, and she and her husband 
were among the earliest settlers in Ohio. 
She and her husband had been living in 
Philadelphia and New York since leaving 
Marietta, but now had located at New Haven. 

' Wife of Rev. David L. Ogden, gradu- 
ate of Vale, 1S14, and pastor at Southington, 
Ct., 1S21-1S36. Mr. Ogden was afterward 
settled in the State of New York and in the 
town of Marlborough, Mass. He died in 
1S63. 

^ Another of the special localities. 

9 Rev. Joab Brace, D. D. 

'° Rev. Ambrose Edson, pastor at Brook- 
lyn, Ct., April, 1S24, to December, 1S30. 



l8o DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [i8 



O, 



Temperance Society. Walked out and visited. Saw a garden of about 
10,000 tulips. 

12. Carried three loads of books and other things in my sulky to the 
place of my expected residence. Wrote. Attended a church meeting, A few 
were present and did poorly. Made calls. 

13. Removed my residence from Mrs. Thompson's, where I have been 
very kindly accommodated, to Mr. Southard's. Two New York ladies are 
fellow-boarders. My moving makes a good deal of labor. Had the assist- 
ance of a man and team. Rainy. 

14. Visited. Called on sick persons. Read. Rode to Oronoke and 
attended in the evening a Bible class. It was held late. Tarried out. 
The season is very promising. 

15. Wrote on my temperance address. It requires a good deal of labor. 
I have been too much out of the way of writing for some time past. Am 
burdened with the bad conduct of some of my people. The Lord be my 
helper. 

16. Preached on Heb. xii : 2. In the afternoon Mr. Mitchell' preached 
for me, serious and well. At evening we had a full conference ; attentive 
and solemn. Spoke on Luke xii : 20, and had assistance. Full meetings. 
Wrote. 

17. Wrote and finished my address on intemperance. Rainy and cold. 
Sat below by a fire. Had no Bible class. Read. Am perplexed with the 
conduct of some church members. 

18. We have had a great deal of rain. Rode on horseback to North 
Milford. Expected to have met with the New Haven Count}' Temperance 
Society, but found that the meeting had been postponed. Visited Mr. Pinneo. 
The ground very wet. 

19. Visited. Received a letter from Mr. Hoffman, of New York, inform- 
ing me that he has bought some volumes of Dr. Mason's^ library for me. 
Wrote to Mr. Hoffman, and to Rev. Mr. Fervf,^ of Sharon, and to Rev. 
Mr. Wilcox,'' of Greenwich. Last Sabbath I married two persons from 
Milford, who came here and were published, and attended meeting, then 
came to this house and were married. The society here had a meeting 
and appointed a committee to attend to their difficulties. Visited. 

20. Last night took medicine, and am quite feeble. Walked out. Am 
much burdened. Wrote. Read the Bible. 

21. Read. Am very feeble. The j^eople of my society are divided and 
in an unpleasant state. The Lord be our helper. Attended our Bible class 
at Putney. Was out late. Our Assembly do poorly. They appear to lo\e 
ungodliness. A beginning of the new State House. 



' Rev. John Mitchell, before noticed. ^ John M. S. Perry, yet a member of 

' Dr. John M. Mason, who died Dec. 26, Yale Theological Seminary, was a native 

1S29. He had been one of the foremost of Sharon. 

clergymen in the country, and Dr. Robbins * Rev. Chauncey Wilcox, pastor at North 

would naturally desire to possess some of Greenwich, 1828-1S46. He was a graduate 

his books. of Yale, 1S24, and died in 1852. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 181 

22. Walked and visited. Received a letter from Henry Birge, of Phila- 
delphia, with a most acceptable remittance of $131.50, due from B. W. Birge 
to the Everest fund.' This morning there was a little frost. 1 desire 
to rejoice that I am wholly in the hands of God. Wrote. 

23. Mr. Mitchell preached for me in the morning. Afternoon preached 
on I Thess. v : 3. Quite cool. I am quite feeble. At the conference spoke 
on Phil, iii : 8. Was out late. The Lord is most holy in all his chastenings. 
Tired. 

24. \\'alked out and made calls. Saw the deacons. Afternoon attended 
a church meeting. They received a report of their committee and adjourned 
without day. The church is in an unpleasant state, but I hope now it will 
be better. 

25. Am some better of my complaint. Rode with Mr, Mitchell to Hunt- 
ington and met with the Association. I sat with the body, but did not join 
them. No business done but matters of course. But six members present. 
Had a steady fire. Collected some things for the convention. 

26. We adjourned in the morning. Rode home by Bridgeport. Called 
at the bank. Yesterday received a good letter from my brother James. 
Received a valuable newspaper from Mr. Ellsworth,^ at Congress. Took 
medicine. Read. Visited. A\'rote. The Indian question ^ excites great 
interest at Congress. Wrote to Dr. Tenney,* at Wethersfield, and to Mr. 
Hooker,* of Hartford. 

27. Wrote. Walked out and visited. The season grows more mild. 
Wrote on the business of the Everest fund. Mr. Pinneo, of Milford, called 
on me. The society here had a meeting, which terminated favorably. 

28. Wrote. Walked out. My health is better than it ,has been. Rode 
to Oronoke and attended in the evening my Bible class. Well attended. 

29. Made calls. Rode home. Got wet with rain. A part of the day 
it rained hard. Refreshing to the ground. Received a box of books from 
New York, fourteen volumes purchased from Dr. Mason's library, for $45. 
There are eleven very valuable folios. A valuable addition to my librar)-. 
Paid for my books, $45.* Read. 

30. Expounded on Matt. iv. Preached on Ps. li : 17. Some people 
are absent from meeting. Wet. Attended the burying of a poor colored man 
who was drowned. Had been drinking. At evening attended a marriage. 
We have some sick. 

31. Visited a sick woman. Read. Afternoon walked with Mr. Shepard ^ 
and saw the raising of the Globe House. It will be a good building. At 
evening had a good Bible class. Paid for a book, $1.50. Wrote to Rev. 



' That money was thus happily rest9red ■• Dr. Caleb J- Tenney. 

to the fund. -' Rev. Horace Hooker. 

" Hon. W. W. Ellsworth, M. C. * This was the purchase which Mr. Hoff- 

3 The Indian questions arising at that man had made for him from Dr. John M. 

time pertained to the Southern rather than Mason's library. 

the Western Indians. The Seminoles were ^ Rev. George C. Shepard, rector of Epis- 

the tribe especially under consideration. copal church in Stratford. 



l82 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1830. 

Mr. Leavitt, of New York, with a dismission and recommendation of William 
Russell from this church. Received a letter from H. Davidson, of Waldo 
in Maine. 

June. 

1. Walked and visited the sick and others. Afternoon we had a ver}' 
hard shower. Wrote to Mr. Ilawes, of Hartford. Congress has passed 
the fatal Indian Bill.' An indelible disgrace to our country. 

2. Rode to New Haven with company and returned. Had a pleasant 
visit with Mr. Gilman and his family. Saw members of the Legislature. 
The Assembly do poorly. Quite warm. We ha\e had no warm day in May. 
Vegetation appears very well. 

3. Am pretty feeble. Read. Afternoon walked a distance and visited. 
I find much to be done here. The people have not been ecclesiasticised." 

4. Walked out. Received a letter from Mr. Ogden, of Southington. 
Wrote to Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. Wet. Had no Bible class on account 
of the rain. Read Fuller's ^ Ecclesiastical History of BritaiTi. 

5. Rode out and visited. Warm. Vegetation advances rapidly. Paid 
a blacksmith, %\. Had my sulky well repaired, for which I paid $7.87. 
Read Brewer's Turkey.*' 

6. Preached a double sermon on John vi : 44. Wet and rainy. Thin 
meetings. We organized our Sabbath-school. It has been too long 
neglected. Received a letter from Mr. Brace, of Newington, and one 
from my sister. Wrote to her. Had no evening meeting. 

7. Pleasant, after a great deal of wet. Wrote. Read Brewer's inter- 
esting book. Walked and visited. At evening attended the monthly concert. 
Very thin. 

8. Showery and warm. Walked and visited. Read the Bible. Prepar- 
ing for my journey. At evening had a full Bible class. 

9. Left home early and rode with company to Southington. Made 
a short visit at Mr. Ogden's, and left my company. Rode to Farmington 
and Northington. Tarried at a tavern. A very pleasant road from New 
Haven near the canal. Northington is now a town — Avon. 

10. In the morning h^rd showers. Rode early to Esq. Ely's, in Simsbury. 
Mr. McLean and his wife are hard sick. Mr. Ely and I attended to the 
business of the Everest fund. Mr. Porter' and Mr. McLean could not 
attend with us. We had much to do. Near noon set out on my return. 



' This was the beginning of that unjust which was, The Clnuxh History of Britain 

policy looking toward the removal of the from, the Birth of fesus CJirist until the Year 

Southern Indian tribes, against their own 1648. This was published in folio in 1655. 

will, west of the Mississippi River. It cost He j^vas author, also, of other well-known 

much treasure and many lives. works, and was a very racy and entertaining 

^ That is a somewhat new word, but bears writer, 

its meaning plainly upon its face. * Brewer's Travels in Ttirkny, by Rev. 

3 The famous Thomas Fuller, 1608-1660, Josiah Brewer, a foreign missionary. The 

who wrote the Worthies of England, and his book was published in New Haven in 1S30. 

Ecclesiastical History, the more e.xact title of ' Dr. Noah Porter, of Farmington. 



r830.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



183 



Rode to Southington. Looked with Mr. Ogden at his elegant new meeting- 
house. Rode to Hamden late and tarried at a tavern. 

It. Rode early to New Haven and home. Fine weather. Have had, 
through mercy, a prosperous journey. Much fatigued. On the 9th left 
off my flannel, and removed from my hat the crape which I have worn since 
my mother's decease.' Wrote. (Considerably unwell with a bowel complaint. 
Dined at Mr. Johnson's. Had green peas. Rode to Oronoke. At evening 
had a good Bible class. 

12. Visited. Rode home. Wrote a report on the Everest fund for 
General Association. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Button,^ of Guilford. 
Am much employed. 

13. Very rainy through the forenoon. Preached with notes on Ps. li : 10, 
and a sermon on Num. xxiii : 19. Morning meeting very thin. Wrote 
to Rev. Mr. Thompson,^ of Humphreysville. Evening meeting full ; spoke 
on John ix : 4. Prepared for my journey. 

14. Rode to East Windsor. It rained the most of the way from Meriden 
to Hartford. Called on Mr. Hawes. Mrs. Wolcott is quite well for her. 
The earth is very wet. Am much fatigued with labor and want of sleep. 

15. Warm. Almost the first summer day. Walked out and made calls. 
Saw Mr. S. Bancroft,* aged nearly ninety-three. My brother came here and 
dined. We had green peas. Rode to Wethersfield. The General Associa- 
tion in session. The Clerical Convention met towards evening, did a little, 
and adjourned. At evening heard an excellent sermon on intemperance 
from Dr. Edwards,^ of Boston. Thermometer when I left East Windsor, 86°. 

16. My brother and I tarried together at Mr. S. B. Goodwin's. Presented 
the report of the Everest fund to the General Association, which was accepted. 
Rode to Southington. Very warm. Went into the meeting w^hile Mr. Ogden 
was delivering his dedication sermon. A great collection of people. But 
few ministers. The most of them are at Wethersfield. A great collection 
there.^ Afternoon attended a public singing and addressed the singers. 

17. Rode home. The heat very oppressive. Traveled slow. People 
are beginning a little to mow. My horse performs well. At evening saw 
my cousin. Dr. Oilman,' of New York. 

18. Yesterday received a church letter to convene the Consociation 
at Redding. Vegetation advances rapidly. Wrote on the accounts of the 
Everest fund. Not as warm as it has been. Had a good Bible class in the 
evening at Putney. Was out late. 



' His mother died Sept. 28, 1829, about 
eight months and a half before. 

- Rev. Aaron Dutton. 

^ Rev. Charles Thompson, pastor in Hum- 
phreysville (now Seymour), 1830-1833. 

* This was Mr. Samuel Bancroft, son of 
Nathaniel and Ann (Wolcott) Bancroft. He 
was born Oct. 29, 1737, and would have been 
ninety-three the following October. 



^ Dr. Justin Edwards, who had just re- 
signed his pastorate at Salem Street Church, 
Boston, to become Secretary of the American 
Temperance Society. 

* Probably the arrangement was made for 
this dedication at Southington without the 
thought that the General Association was to 
meet at the same time. 

' Son of Judge Benjamin I. Oilman. 



184 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1830. 

19. Walked out and visited. Ecclesiastical matters here are in an 
unpleasant state. I pray for divine teaching and guidance. Read. Rev. 
Mr. Condit ' called on me. 

20. In the morning quite rainy, and thin meeting. Afternoon meeting 
well attended. Towards night \-ery wet again. Had no conference. Walked 
out. We have a very wet season. E.xpounded on Matt, v : 1-3, and preached 
on Ex. xxxii : 26. 

21. Rainy and wet. Read. Wrote. Our Bible class was prevented 
in the evening by rain. 

22. Very cool for the season. Rode by way of Oronoke and Huntington 
to Redding. My delegate failed. A bad road. Met with the Consociation. 
The examination was nearly through when I arrived. I hope this Conso- 
ciation may be strengthened. Tarried at Mr. Battell's. 

23. Mr. Strong^ was installed. Mr. Nash,^ of Tolland, preached well. 
I gave the right hand. A good season. Rode home by Fairfield. Got 
home late. Had a light shower. Tired. 

24. Wrote. Walked and visited. Dr. Tomlinson is very low. Received 
a letter from Mr. Thompson, of Humphreysville, Wrote to Mr. Pinneo, 
of Milford. At evening attended our Bible class. 

25. Walked and visited. Wrote to my brother Francis. Rode to Oronoke 
and attended a good Bible class. Tarried out. Visited a sick man. 

26. Visited at Oronoke. Rode home. A fine season. Received a letter 
from Mr. Pinneo, of Milford, and one from my sister. Paid Mr. Southard, 
$10. Wrote to Mrs. Battell. Towards night Mr. Pinneo came here to 
exchange. Read. 

27. Rode early to Milford. Preached on Num. xxiii : ig, and John vii : 37. 
Quite warm and sultry. This is a large and fine congregation. After meeting 
there was a hard shower. Rode home. Got something wet. Had no confer- 
ence. Mr. Pinneo remained here. 

28. Warm and sultry. Am quite languid. Read. Hindered by company. 
A hard thunder-shower. An unfavorable time for haying. Have a trouble- 
some irruptive complaint. Wrote. 

29. Looked over the old library of Dr. Johnson. ■* It has many valuable 
works. Received a letter from Mr. Blatchford, of Bridgeport. Mr. Frost, 
agent of the Temperance Society, called on me. Walked and visited. Was 
requested to assist in the celebration of Independence. Read. Warm. 

30. Read the African Repository. Mr. Thomas Eggleston, of New York, 
called on me. Wrote. At evening we had a pretty numerous meeting in the 
meeting-house, and Mr. Frost made a very good temperance address. But 
few additional signers to the paper were procured. Some measures were 
adopted towards the formation of a society. 



' Prof. Jonathan B. Condit. ^ Rev. Ansel Nash. 

^ Rev. William L. Strong, late pastor at "* Dr. Samuel Johnson, first president of 

Somers, was installed at Redding, and re- Columbia College, and the first Episcopal 

mained pastor, 1830-1835. minister in Connecticut. 



[830.] 



PASTOR I\ STRATFORD. 



185 



July. 

1. Rode early and went to Wallingford,' and met with the New Haven 
County Temperance Society. Interesting reports were received from the 
delegates. Afternoon there was a full public meeting and I delivered my 
address. Prof. Silliman spoke after me, very well. I think the meeting 
was useful. Returned to New Haven. Quite warm. Kindly entertained at 
Mr. Oilman's.^ 

2. Rode home. Ver}^ warm. Conversed with persons respecting Inde- 
pendence. Rode to Putney' and attended our Bible class. Quite thin. 
Tarried out. 

3. Visited. Rode home. Read. Walked out. Sultrj' and shower}-. 
Wrote. 

4. A warm and very pleasant day. I believe we have had several 
Sabbaths more or less wet. Meeting very full. There was no church.'* 
Expounded on Matt, v : 38 to vi : 9, and preached on Luke xvi : 25. At 
evening attended meeting with the Methodists at their meeting-house, and 
after the meeting arrangements were made for the proceedings of tomorrow. 

5. Read. Dined out. Afternoon we had a public exercise at our 
meeting-house. I delivered a part of my address written last year and 
addressed a large number of children who were present. Mr. Peck, a 
Methodist minister, spoke on the subject of the Colonization Society, for 
which we had a collection, and Mr. Sherman,' a Methodist minister, prayed. 
A good assembly. At evening attended the monthly concert ; very thin. 
A very pleasant day. Saw r}'e cut. 

6. Wrote. Walked out and visited. Wrote to.S. T. Wolcott. At even- 
ing attended our Bible class Rather thin. 

7. Yesterday afternoon we had a severe shower, which has considerably 
prostrated the corn. W^arm. Afternoon set out on a journey. Rode to 
Humphreysville. Tarried with Mr. Thompson.* A rough road from Strat- 
ford to Derby. 

8. Rocje about three miles and stopped on account of rain, and remained 
at a private house till afternoon. Read the Bible. Rode to Woodbury and 
Washington. Was hindered by a shower. Tarried with Rev. Mr. Hayes. ^ 
A great deal of rain fell. 

9. Rode to Warren. Washington is a ver)' hilly town. The roads are 
much washed by the rains. Had a pleasant visit at my cousin Starr's. 



■ It was a ride of about twenty-five miles 
from Stratford to Wallingford. 

- Judge Benjamin I. Oilman and his wife, 
Mrs. Hannah (Robbins) Gilman, were now, 
as will be remembered, living in New Haven. 

' Part of the town of Stratford. 

* Dr. Robbins means by this that there 
was no public service at the Episcopal church. 
It seems to us, by this use of language, that 
he gratuitously yields the question as between 
that church and all dissenting churches. 



Doubtless he does not so intend, but it is 
an infelicitous way of speaking. 

' Rev. Charles Sherman, Bridgeport. 

* Rev. Charles Thompson had been or- 
dained the previous April and settled at 
Humphreysville (now Seymour). He re- 
mained three years, and was then settled in 
Salem, Ct., where he preached till 1855, the 
year of his death. 

' Rev. Gordon Hayes, pastor at Washing- 
ton, Ct., 1829-1851. 



i86 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1830. 



Called on Rev. Mr. Talcott.' He is quite unwell and has not preached 
since last November. In the evening we had a meeting at his house and 
preached on Matt, xiv : 2;^. 

10. Conversed a good deal with cousin Starr. Rode to New Milford. 
Took my books bought last fall from Mr. Eliot's library, a valuable collection 
and well bought, and rode to Southbury and Oxford. It grew dark and 
I stojDped and tarried at a tavern. 

11. Rode early to Humphreysville. Mr. Thompson went yesterday to 
Stratford. Preached on Num. xxiii : 19, and John vii : 37. This is a small 
new society, but appears well. Attended a third meeting at five o'clock and 
preached on Ps. i: 2. In the evening married a couple; received a dollar 
and gave it to Mrs. Thompson.^ 

12. Wet and something rainy. Rode home. Dr. Tomlinson^ died on 
Saturday evening. Attended his funeral. Got something wet. Had no Bible 
class. 

13. Rainy ; in the forenoon very hard. There is a good deal of grain 
out. The whole season has been very wet. Wrote. Read Brewer's "* Turkey. 
Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Train,^ of Milford. Walked out. 

14. Read the Bible. Attended to my library. Clear weather. Had 
company. The French expedition to Algiers* is inexplicable. Visited. 

15. Quite warm. Good harvest weather. Walked and visited. Looked 
over a collection of old books. Wrote. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Ely, of Mansfield. 
At evening had a good Bible class. 

16. The heat severe and oppressive. People are very laborious in their 
harvest. The harvest is* abundant. Can do but little on account of the heat. 
Rode^to Putney and attended a Bible class. Read the Bible and expositors. 
Paid a blacksmith, seventy-five cents. 

17. The heat still severe. Received a letter from my brother Francis. 
Read the Bible and Brewer's Turkey. Visited. 

18. The heat much the same. People appear much oppressed with it. 
Meeting quite thin. Preached on Eph. ii : 12. At evening conference spoke 
on Heb. xii : 25. Much fatigued. 

19. Our nights are as unusually warm as are the days. Wrote. Read 
the Bible. At evening had a good Bible class. Walked out. 

20. No apparent abatement of the heat. Walked and visited. Am 



' Rev. Hart Talcott, who had been settled 
as colleague with the aged Rev. Peter Starr 
in 1825, and remained till his own death in 
1836. He had previously been settled, 1817- 
1824, in Clinton, Ct. He was a graduate of 
Dartmouth College, 1812, and of Andover 
Seminary, I816. 

^ That was according to the law of minis- 
terial courtesy in such cases. 

^ Dr. Charles Tomlinson. 

'' Rev. Josiah Brewer's work, of which we 
have already taken notice. 



' Rev. Asa M. Train, pastor of Plymouth 
Church, Milford, 1828-1850. He was a grad- 
uate of Amherst College in 1825, and of An- 
dover Seminary, 1829. He was a native of 
Enfield, Mass. ; born in 1800, and died in 
Milford, Ct., in 1863. 

* The French had been at war with Algiers 
since 1827. On the 5th of July, 1830, they 
took Algiers. The Algerines had a facility 
in making enemies. We took our turn with 
the Barbary States in the early years of the 
present century. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 187 

languid and can do but little. A fine time for gathering some crops and 
the growing of others. Read Brewer's Turkey. Conversed with some of my 
people. The ground is heated. 

21. Walked out and visited. Occupied with company. I go very thinly 
clad. Was out late in the evening. 

22. Walked and visited. The people are laborious, though they complain 
much of heat. Mr. Tinsley ' is evidently laboring to introduce Baptists here. 
Read ^x^L^ioxdiS- Massachusetts. We had considerable thunder, but very little 
rain. Wrote. 

23. Procured a good pair of thin pantaloons. Something cooler. Worked 
at the meeting-house, planning the new communion table and Sabbath-school 
book-case. I give the latter, at the cost of $12. Paid towards it, $5.' Rode 
to the north part of the town and attended the Bible class. Tarried out. 

24. Visited at Oronoke. The harvest is generally in and very good. 
Read. Warmer. Towards night Mr. Kent* came here, unexpectedly, to 
e.xchange. Mr. Cushman' came here and baptized two persons, looking 
probably to a future increase. 

25. Rode early to Trumbull. Preached on Ex. xxxii : 26, and Heb. vii : 25. 
The heat severe and oppressive, about the same as during the past week. 
This congregation is not large, but appears well. The society, I think, 
is improving. Towards evening returned. Met Mr. Kent. Attended our 
evening conference and spoke on John i: 11, 12. We had a light shower 
in the afternoon. The ground is becoming dry. Very tired. 

26. Wrote. Cooler. Afternoon visited a school, with others. At evening 
attended the Bible class. Visited. 

27. Rode to Oronoke. Very warm. The ground is dry. Rode out with 
company and visited. Read the Bible and the Life of Christopher Wren!' 
An eminent man. Received a letter from my sister Battell. 

28. Wrote. Walked out and visited. Received a letter from Joseph 
Goodwin, of East Hartford. 

29. Wrote to Dea. A. Pettibone,^ of Norfolk. Rode to Bridgeport and 
Fairfield. Paid $4.45 for six volumes of Mr. Eliot's books. Visited Mr. 



' James H. Linsley, the teacher and sci- more prominent Baptist ministers in the 

entist, but educated for the Baptist ministry, State, 

is introduced in a new character. * Sir Christopher Wren was the son of 

^ Alden Bradford, LL. D. He was Mas- the parish rector at East Knovle, Wiltshire, 

sachusetts Secretary of State, 1812-1824, and Eng., where he was born in 1632. He was 

was also Clerk of the Supreme Court of graduated at Oxford in 1650, and became a 

Massachusetts. He was born in Duxbury, learned professor of astronomy. From such 

Mass., 1765; graduated at Harvard, 17S6, an education it was not to be expected that 

and died in 1843. His History of Massaclni- he should become the most remarkable archi- 

setts reached from 1764 to 1820. tect in England, as he was. St. Paul's Church, 

^ That is, he paid down $5, and was to London, is only one of many magnificent 

pay the $7 afterwards. structures in England erected under his care. 

■* Rev. James Kent, of Trumbull. He died at Hampton Court in 1723. 

* Rev. Elisha Cushman, then of Bridge- ' Amos Pettibone, deacon of the Congre- 

port, but formerly of Hartford ; one of the gational c)iurch in Norfolk, 1825-1845. 



1 88 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1830, 



Blatchford.' Wet and cool. But we get but little rain. Returned. Received 
a letter from Mr. Ely/ of Mansfield. 

30. Wrote. Walked and visited. Read expositors. Rode to Oronoke 
and attended my Bible class. Tarried out. 

31. Visited. People are much hurried with their labor. Read. We have 
some sick. Received a letter from Joseph Parker, of Philadelphia, with two 
numbers of Encydopcedia, after an interruption of four or five years. 

August. 

1. Expounded on the Lord's Prayer, Matt, vi, and preached on Jer. ix : i. 
Full meeting. At evening spoke at the conference on Matt, xviii : 26, 27. 
We had a contribution for the Sabbath-school library ; got but $5. Sultry. 

2. Wrote. Walked out. Dined with friends at Mrs. Ploffman's. Set 
out on a journey. Got into the stage at five o'clock and rode to Hartford. 
Slept at Hartford about three hours. It was a pleasant night. 

3. Rode early in the stage to East Windsor. Mrs. Wolcott is pretty 
feeble. Looked over my library^ and papers. At evening rode out with 
Mr. Wolcott. 

4. Walked out. Saw Dr. and Dea. Reed. I fear the Everest fund debt 
which they owe will be lost. Made calls. Took pamphlets at the post office 
and paid sixty-three cents, 

5. Walked and rode out. Quite warm. This society is in a critical 
state. Mrs. Haskell and her little son came down. Attended to my books 
and papers. I fear some are lost. 

6. Rode to Hartford. There is a prospect of the settlement of a mmister 
at East Hartford."* Paid at the post office there for pamphlets, forty-five cents. 
Paid for a book, $1. Paid a debt to a merchant, $5.82. Traded, $1.75. 
Got into the stage at about three o'clock and rode home. Rode the most 
of the way alone. Got home about eleven o'clock. Very tired. 

7. Yesterday received at Hartford Bank a dividend of $15. Wrote. 
Walked out. The heat very oppressive. Heard of the death of the British 
King,' who died June 26th. Am quite languid. 

8. Sultry hot. Preached on Matt, v : 18. Meetings well attended. 
Much oppressed with the heat. Spoke at the conference on Deut. xxxii : 18. 
The ground is dry and nights are warm. 

9. Visited a sick child. Read. I do much less than I ought. At even- 
ing had a good Bible class. 



' Rev. John Blatchford, pastor at Bridge- 
port. 

^ Rev. William Ely. 

* His library was still at East Windsor, 
though he had removed to Stratford a few 
books such as he more especially needed. 

■♦ Rev. Asa Mead was settled there in 
1830, but died in 1831. He was the father 
of that saintly child, James Mooney Mead, 
whose record was widely circulated and read 



fifty years and more ago. Mr. Mead was a 
native of Meredith, N. H. ; was graduated at 
Dartmouth, 1S18, and at Andover Seminary, 
182 1 ; was pastor at Brunswick, Me., 1S22- 
1829; then at East Hartford, 1830 to his 
death, 1831. 

5 George IV, sarcastically called " the 
first gentleman of Europe." His father, 
George IH, died in 1820, after the longest 
reign but one in the whole history of England. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 189 

10. Read the Bible. Walked and visited. Called on Mr. Mitchell,' 
who is invited to preach at Norfolk. Wrote to Col. Olmsted,^ of East 
Hartford. The British nation appear to have highly respected their late 
monarch.^ Paid $7, the remainder for the Sabbath-school book-case. 

11. Read. Vegetation begins to suffer with drouglit. But nothing in my 
mouth for about ten hours. At evening walked out and visited. 

12. Visited a sick man. Read Christian Spectator. *■ Wrote to my sister 
Battell. Flies and insects are troublesome. .Vt evening walked out. 

13. Wrote. Began a sermon on Matt, .xxiv : 32, n- Walked out and 
visited. Read. Rode to Putney and attended the evening Bible class. 
Quite thin. Tarried out. Vegetation suffers much from the drought. 

14. Rode home. Hot and sultry. Wrote the most of the sermon begun 
yesterday. I have neglected this duty too much. 

15. Finished and preached my sermon on Matt, xxiv: 32, ■i)2)- Morning 
preached with notes on Ps. xl : g. Warm and appearances of rain, but 
we had none. Had our last prayer in reference to the drought. Had 
no evening meeting. Walked out. 

16. Rode with company to Bridgeport. Visited there. Very dusty and 
the flies tedious. At evening attended our Bible class. 

17. Rode to New Haven and returned. Signs of rain fail. Dined at 
Mr. Oilman's. Did errands. The dust very severe. The drought is said 
not to be extensive. At evening walked out. Received letters from 
Mr. Crosby' and Mr. Hillyer, of East Granby. 

18. Clear weather returns without having had any rain. Received a letter 
from Dea. Amos Pettibone, of Norfolk. Wrote to Mr. Ely, of Simsbur}', and 
Horace Cowles, Esq., of Farmington. On the i6th paid Mr. Booth towards 
my horse-keeping, $10. The air \&vj clear and dr}-. Walked and visited. 
Read. 

19. Rode and made calls the most of the day to give notice of the 
meeting we have appointed for tomorrow\ Went to the north part of the 
town. Everything seems to suffer with the drought. Got home late. 

20. Received a letter from Rev. G. Barrett.* Wrote to my neighbor, 
Mr. Shepard,'' and received a reply. Walked and made calls. In the after- 
noon we had a season of prayer on account of the drought. It was w-ell 
attended. Mr. Shepard and Mr. Sherman, and numbers of their people 
were with us. The former took no part. Mr. Mitchell was with us and 
assisted. The people appear to feel their want. May God hear our prayer. 
At evening called on Mr. Mitchell. He is going to preach at Norfolk. 



' Rev. John Mitchell, before noticed. monthly issues, ten more of quarterly, and 

' Col. Solomon Olmsted. the publication ceased in 1838. 

^ People say kind things even when bad ' Rev. Stephen Crosby was pastor at East 

men die. George IV, living or dead, was Granby, 1826-1S32. 

never greatly admired, and yet, with all his * This was Rev. Gerrish Barrett, a Pres- 

faults, he had some virtues. byterian minister. 

* C)\jidL.r\.Q\-\y Christian Spectator. It began ^ Rev. George C. Shepard, already men- 

in 1S19, and ten volumes were made up of tioned, Episcopal rector in Stratford. 



IQO DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1830. 

2 1. Am considerably unwell. Visited sick persons. Diy and hot. 
Wrote. Attended the funeral of a child that died with a short illness. 

22. Expounded on Matt, vi : 14 to the end, and preached on Rev. iii : 2. 
Mr. Barrett, agent of the Prison Discipline Society, came here and preached 
in the evening on that subject.' Our meetings were full. Gave Mr. Barrett 
$2. 

23. A holy God w^ithholds the rain. Visited. The ground is becoming 
brown. Read. Received a valuable present of two old folios and two 
curious ancient pamphlets from friends in Coxsackie, N. Y. At evening 
had a good Bible class. Ver^' warm. 

24. Wrote. Saw young Mrs. Gilman,' of New York. Walked out and 
visited. Read. 

25. Wrote to my brother Battell. Walked and visited. We have some 
sick. Cloudy, but no rain. Visited Mr. Linsley.' We are anxious for 
intelligence from Algiers.* 

26. We had a hard storm of wind and a little rain. This is a great mercy, 
but we need much. I have worn thin pantaloons every day for six weeks. 
Cool. Had some lettering done on books. Read the Bible. Walked out. 

27. Mr. CogswelF called on me, an agent of the American Education 
Society. Wrote. Read. Afternoon we had a church prayer-meeting in view 
of our low state. I hope we had a good season. Our Bible class was 
omitted. Evening walked out. The little rain of yesterday seems to be gone. 

28. Wrote the most of a sermon on Prov. xxix : i. Cannot write long 
at a time. Walked out. The appearance of the earth is very gloomy. 
"The rain is powder and dust." 

29. Finished and preached my sermon on Prov. xxix : i. In the forenoon 
preached with notes on Ex. xvii : II. Quite warm. Solemn meetings. After 
a short recess in the afternoon Ave had a serious and good season of prayer 
for rain. It was well attended. Our only help is* in God. Attended the 
conference. We are returned to the academy. It was pretty thin. Very 
tired. Spoke on Luke xii : 51, 53. 

30. Wrote. Afternoon rode to Oronoke and visited a school. Visited 
several families. The school performed well. Got home late. Much of the 
corn appears to be dead. The ground is very hard. In the morning we had 
a light shower. Small but grateful. 

31. Rode to Farmington. Quite warm and very dusty. Attended a little 
while, at Southington, at a missionary meeting. Spoke a little. Heard the 



' This reveals the object of his letter re- 1832-1841,115 secretary. He was born in At- 

ceived two days before. kinson, N. H., 17S7, and was graduated at 

- Wife, probably, of Benj. I. Gilman, Jr. Dartmouth College, iSii. He was pastor 

^ James H. Linsley. at South Dedham, Mass., 181 5-1S29, when he 

'' Algiers was taken by the French more was called into the service of the Education 

than six weeks before, but the news had not Society. After leaving that society, in 1S41, 

arrived. he was professor in Dartmouth College and 

'Dr. William Cogswell, then agent of Gilmanton Theological Seminary. He died 

the American Education Society; afterwards, in Gilmanton, N. H., 1850. 



t83o.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



191 



important and pleasing intelligence of the capture of Algiers by the French.' 
It fell with less resistance than was expected. Kindly accommodated at 
Mr. Horace Cowles'. 

Septembcb. 

1. Rode with Mr. Cowles^ to Canton and met with Mr. McLean and 
Mr. Ely. of the committee of the Everest fund. I resigned the treasury 
and Mr. Ely was appointed. We did a good deal of business. Mr. Cowles 
is a valuable addition to our committee. Returned to Farmington. It is drj^- 
here, but not like Stratford. Paid for Webster's Dictionary, $20.^ 

2. Cool. Rode by Plymouth, Waterbur)-, and Derby, to Stratford. Five 
or six miles further than by New Haven, and much worse road. Got home 
late. Very dusty. Much fatigued. 

3. Wrote. Fatigued by my journey. Afternoon preached a preparatory 
lecture with notes -on Rom. xiii : 12. Received a letter from my cousin 
George Starr,* one from Mr. Battell, and one from A. R. Plumley, an agent 
of the American Colonization Society. At evening rode to Oronoke and 
attended a temperance meeting. We had a moderate and refreshing shower. 
Was out late. Attended the examination of a ladies' school. 

4. Walked out and made calls. We have the unexpected and important 
intelligence of a sudden revolution in France. Received a letter from my 
brother Francis. Wrote to Mr. Battell. Called on Mr. Halsey,^ a candidate 
from New Jersey. Mr. Plumley, the agent, came here and tarried. 

5. Mr. Halsey preached for me, very well. Administered the sacrament. 
Some members of the church were absent. I have severe trials. Yet the 
church was pretty full. In the evening we had a meeting, quite full, and 
Mr. Plumley delivered an interesting address for the Colonization Society.* 
Yesterday morning we had a pretty hard thunder-shower. The ground has 
not been truly wet before in more than fifty days — since July 13th. 

6. Cool. Leaves fall considerably ; I conclude from the drought. 
Walked and visited. Wrote. Visited with Mr. Halsey and other company. 
Had his assistance at the monthly concert. Our people are quite slack 
in attending this meeting. After the concert attended a little time at 
a splendid party. Let Miss Southard have $1. 

7. Rode to New Haven. Have had a pair of elegant gold spectacles 
made for me. Paid for them, $21.^ Attended the meeting of the Phi Beta 



' The news of the taking of Algiers has' 
arrived. 

- Mr. Horace Cowles, of Farmington. 

■' A much larger price than is paid now 
for a fa' more valuable work under the same 
title. 

'' This was probably the cousin at War- 
ren whom he had recently visited. 

^ Very likely this was Rev. Job Y. Halsey, 
D. D., who had, two or three years before, 
been e.vpected to settle at Norwalk. 



* The Colonization .Society then had a 
very large place in the thoughts and plans 
of Christian people. It still lives and doubt- 
less is still doing some good work, but the 
range of its activity is limited as compared 
with what it was forty and fifty years ago. 

' Though money was scarce and worth 
more, in general, then than now, yet some 
things cost more actual money then than at 
present. A very nice pair of gold spectacles 
can be bought now from ten to fifteer dollars. 



192 DIARY OF REV. THONfAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1830. 

Kappa Society. Quite interesting. The society dined together. Mr. Grimke,' 
of South Carolina, delivered a verj' fine oration before the society, which was 
written at Stratford. Attended a little while at a meeting of teachers of 
schools. In the evening we had an interesting meeting of the Society of the 
Alumni. Wet the most of the day. . At evening it rained hard. 

8. Wet and rainy. Very refreshing to tlie dry ground. The streets 
very wet. The exercises about as usual. The speaking good ; drank tea 
at Mr. Silliman's."^ Dr. Tenney^ preached the Concio. After which we had 
a meeting of the Convention of the Clergy, It was held late. Had a pleasant 
meeting of many acquaintance. 

9. The morning rainy. Paid Mr. Twining/ $66, for four beneficiaries 
of the Everest fund. Dined at Mr. Oilman's. Rode home. The ground 
is quite wet. At evening Mr. Rutledge ' delivered a good address to the 
Bible Society here in the church. 

10. Wrote. Dined with Mr. Rutledge at Mr. Johnson's.^ Rode to Putney. 
The Bible class here has been omitted for two weeks past, and I found no one 
was expected. Vegetation is greatly revived. Tarried out. People now 
have a good seed-time. 

11. Visited families. Rode to the lower part of Huntington and visited 
a school, and returned home. A fine season. Much fatigued. 

12. Preached on Rom. viii : 6 with notes, and a written sermon on 
I Thess. v : 3. A serious meeting. Wrote to my brother Francis. Attended 
the evening conference and spoke on Mark viii: 36. On the loth gave 
$3 to the Bible Association. Today spoke in public in favor of that object. 

13. Visited a woman very sick, in the morning and late in the evening. 
Read. Cool. At evening had a good Bible class. Paid my subscription 
for foreign missfons, $3. Wrote to my cousin George Starr, of Warren. 

14. Read the Bible. Visited the sick woman. A very valuable woman. 
I fear she will not live. Read. Afternoon rode with Mr. Punderson' to 
Bridgeport. Walked the most of the way home. The new society there 
have given a call to Rev. Mr. Hewitt.^ Wrote to Capt. H. L. Dekoven,' 
of Middletown. 



' Thomas Smith Grimke, LL. D., a dis- He probably came to New Haven that year 

thiguished scholar and ])hilanthropist. He because of Mr. Grimke's address. Bishop 

was born in Charleston, .S. C, 17S6, and was Rutledge was a native also of Charleston, 

graduated at Yale in 1807. It was on the S. C. 

occasion of his giving this Phi Beta Kappa ^ Samuel William Johnson, of Stratford, 

oration, in 1830, that the college conferred Judge of Probate, and son of William Sam- 

on him the degree of LL. D. He died of uel Johnson, LL. D. 

cholera in 1834. ' Rev. Thomas Pundcrson, of Huntington. 

^ Prof. Benjamin Silliman, LL. D. * Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D., who left his 

^ Caleb J. Tenney, D. D., of Wethersfield. church in Fairfield in 1S27. He was settled 

* Stephen Twining, Esq., steward of the over this Second Church in Bridgeport in 

college. December, 1830, where he continued till Sep- 

^ This, without much doubt, was Francis tember, 1S53. 
H. Rutledge, D. D., afterwards Bishop of ' Capt. H. L. Dekoven was at that time 

Florida. He was a graduate of Yale, 1S21. one of the selectmen of Middletown. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. I93 

15. On the i2th received a church letter from Mr. Blatchford. Read the 
Bible. Wrote. Walked and visited. Visited a school. Our district schools 
are in a pretty low state. Read. 

16. Walked and visited the most of the day. We have several sick. 
Read. We have much news from France. I fear that country is to be again 
visited with the judgments of heaven.' Wrote. 

17. In the morning there was some frost. The first this season. Wrote 
a part of a sermon on i Thess. v: 25. Quite cold and windy. Walked to 
Putney and visited a school, and to Oronoke and preached in the evening 
on Mark viii : 36. Tarried out. 

18. We had a cold night. Considerable frost. Was brought home. The 
woman severely sick I hope is gaining. I need a fire in my chamber. Wrote 
and finished my sermon begun yesterday. I have too much neglected writing. 

19. Quite cool but pleasant. Expounded on Matt, vii, and preached 
on I Thess. v: 25. Afternoon meeting quite full. At evening spoke at the 
conference on Prov. i: 27-29. In the afternoon meeting spoke plainly and 
was much affected. 

20. Walked out and visited. Warmer. Received a letter from Capt. De- 
koven, of Middletown. At evening attended the Bible class. 

21. Rode early on a journey to Norfolk and arrived in the evening 
at Warren — about forty-seven miles. I have lent my horse lately and he 
has been hardly used, and he travels poorly. Very dry and dusty. Cool. 

22. Have had a pleasant visit with my good cousin Starr. Visited 
Mr. Talcott. He is quite lame and feeble. Rode through Goshen to Norfolk. 
Put up at my mother's old mansion, now occupied by two families. Found 
my brothers, James, Francis, and Ammi, at Mr. Battell's. Saw Mr. Mitchell, 
the candidate. Have a pleasant visit, but my parents are gone. 

23. Walked with Mr. Mitchell to the burying-ground. My brothers went 
off near noon for their homes. My cousin W. Lawrence^ here has been 
lately married. Afternoon attended, by desire, a church meeting. An 
unpleasant case of discipline was happily disposed of. Paid for a pair 
of hose, $2.25. Streams and springs here are very low. The last week frost 
appears to have been extensive. 

24. Walked out and made calls. Quite warm. Mr, Battell and a part 
of his family went off for New York. Afternoon rode to Warren. The most 
of the road is pretty good. Conclude to stay here over the Sabbath. 

25. We have seen frequent appearances of an equinoctial storm, but have- 
had none. Wrote. Read Christian Spectator. Wrote to my brother Francis. 
Had a quiet day. Took tea at Mr. Hartwell's. 

26. Cloudy, but little wet. Preached on Heb. xii : 16, and Heb. vii: 25. 
Mr. Talcott is absent on a journey. He has preached but a few times 



' This news pertained to tiie revolution - William Lawrence, son of Grove and 

of July, 1830, which led to barricades and Elizabeth (Robbins) Lawrence, had now 

fightings in the streets, to the expulsion of grown to manhood, and was with Mr. Joseph 

Charles X, and the bringing in of Louis Battell in his store. The business centering 

Philippe. about that store was very large. 



194 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D. I183O. 

in ten months. This is a good congregation. At evening attended a meeting 
and preached without notes on Luke ix : 30, 31. Was assisted by Mr. Sacket,' 
a candidate. An interesting day. 

27. Had a conversation with my cousin Starr. Have had a pleasant visit. 
Rode to New Milford and Danbur}\ Tarried at Mr. Whittlesey's. The roads 
are very dry and the earth generally. 

28. Walked out and called on Mr. Rood,° and others. Afternoon prayed 
at the opening of the Superior Court ; Judge Daggett. Rode to Bethel and 
met with the Consociation for the installation of Mr. Cole.' He passed 
a good examination. We had a good deal of other business. We sat late 
in the evening. 

29. Mr. Cole was installed. I made the first prayer. The people here 
are well united. I was here last year and the year before at this season 
on ecclesiastical trials. We deferred our consociational business. Rode 
home. Cool. Have had a prosperous journey. Have had but small 
traveling expense. 

30. Last evening received a letter from Rev. Mr. Leavitt/ of New York. 
Today received one from W. Newell/ at New Haven. Visited the sick 
woman, who remains very low. Walked and visited. In the morning there 
was considerable frost. At evening had a good Bible class. Some boarders 
in this family are gone. 

October. 

1. Read. Mr. Ufford/ the teacher here, supplied my pulpit last Sabbath 
by exchange with Mr. Train,' of Milford. We have remarkably pleasant days 
and evenings. Wrote. Walked and visited. 

2. Rode to Putney and made calls. Quite warm. Read. I think there 
is a prospect of troubles in France, and I fear of war in Europe. Read the 
Bible. My feet are tender and something sore. 

3. Preached on John ix : 7, on the means of grace. After meeting rode 
out and performed a marriage. At evening attended the conference; pretty 
thin. Meeting well attended. 

4. Walked out and visited the sick. There are several. Worked at my 



' Rev. Seth Sacket, a graduate of the and was doubtless one of the Everest bene- 

Yale TheoJogical School, 1831. He was far ficiaries. He was graduated at Andover in 

enough advanced in his studies to be allowed 1833, and became a well-known Presbyterian 

to preach. minister. He was a native of South Natick, 

^ Rev. Anson Rood, settled over the First Mass. A son of his, of the same name, is 

Church in Danbury in 1829, where he re- also a Presbyterian minister. The father 

mained until 1837. was living in 1SS3. 

^ Rev. Erastus Cole, pastor at Bethel, ^ Hezekiah G. Ufford was graduated at 

1830-1S37. He received from Yale College Yale in 1806, and was licensed to preach 

the honorary degree of A. M. in 1834. He by the Fairfield East Association, Oct. 15, 

died in 1S64. 1807. He was a teacher rather than a min- 

-i Dr. Joshua Leavitt, formerly of Strat- ister. We do not discover that he was ever 

ford. settled. But he was a man of culture and 

5 Afterwards William Whiting Newell, was accustomed to preach occasionally. 

,D. D. He was a graduate of Yale in 1830, ' Rev. Asa M. Train. 



1830.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 195 

books. Have changed my chamber.' Attended the monthly concert. We 
had a good meeting. 

5. Rode to Fairfield. Dought of Miss Eliot a very fine ancient folio 
Bible, her grandfather's, for $6.50. Paid her $1.50 for a few more small 
volumes from her late brother's* library. There is some prospect that 
Mr. Hunter^ will leave Fairfield. Mr. Hewitt is expected to be settled 
at Bridgeport. Was present at the funeral of an aged man who died 
yesterday. The Methodist minister read a burial service. Was invited 
out to tea. Quite warm and very dusty. 

6. Wrote. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Leavitt, of New York, and to my brother 
Battell. Visited. My great Bible is very valuable. 

7. Visited. Worked some. Paid for light wood and labor, seventy-five 
cents. Paid for two books, $1.50. Had some valuable pamphlets given me. 
Visited the sick. Read the Quarterly Register'^ of the Education Society. 
Cool and very dry, 

8. Gave Mr. Ufford, in consideration of his supplying me Sabbath before 
last, $4. Yesterday paid for cutting wood, sixty cents. Attended to my 
library. Walked out and visited. I think I have taken some cold. Received 
a letter from my sister. 

9. Oppressed with my cold. Wrote on my catalogue of books. It rained 
the most of the day. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Boardman,' of New Haven, and to 
W. Newell,* of Boston. Finished reading my Bible in course, which was 
begun too long ago.^ 

10. Preached on John ix : 7, and finished my quadruple sermon. Wet 
in the morning and in the forenoon meeting thin. At evening spoke at the 
conference on Deut. xxxii : 35. Was out late. 

11. Walked out. Read. Read Patrick's* Exposition. At evening had 
a good Bible class. 

12. Quite warm. Wrote. Received a letter from Mr. Boardman, of New 
Haven. Rode to Bridgeport and attended a meeting of school-teachers. 
I was appointed to write some essays for the newspapers on the condition 
of common schools. Rode to Fairfield, and in the evening to Green's Farms. 
Tarried at Dea. Hyde's. 

' A change of room, but not of boarding- ■* The American Quarterly Register, in fif- 

place. teen volumes, 1827-1S42, contains the statis- 

^ Miss Eliot's late brother was Rev. An- tics of the Congregational churches in this 

drew Eliot, who died the year before, having countrj' more fully than any other work. It 

been pastor at New Milford, Ct., 1S08-1829. also contains, in large measure, ecclesiastical 

Her father was Rev. Andrew Eliot, a native statistics of all kinds. As a work for refer- 

of Boston, a graduate of Harvard College, ence it is invaluable, and ought to be in all 

1762, who was pastor at Fairfield, 'Ct, 1774- public libraries. 

1805. Her grandfather, from whom the folio ' Rev. Charles A. Boardman, pastor of 

Bible came, was Rev. Andrew Eliot, born the new Third Church in New Haven, 
in Boston, a graduate of Harvard, 1737, * William Whiting Newell, noticed in pre- 

pastor at the New North Church, Boston, vious note (see Sept. 30). 
1742-1778. Her great grandfather was An- ' He used to give the dates, showing when 

drew Eliot, a merchant of Boston. the process began and when it ended, but he 

^ Rev. John H. Hunter. He had only prefers now to leave it in general, 
been settled there two years. * Bishop Simon Patrick, 1626-1707. 



196 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[183c 



13. We had, unexpectedly, a steady hard rainy day. Kindly entertained 
at Dea, Hyde's. ■ He and Mr. Davies ' absent at Consociation. Read. Read 
an ancient black-letter Bible. 

14. Left my hospitable friends. Called at Mr. Davies's. He has erected 
a new house. Called on aged Dr. Ripley.^ He and his wife have lived 
together sixty-five years. Paid him for books, $6. Rode to Bridgeport, and 
to Huntington and attended a missionar)' meeting. Mr. Kirk,' of Albany, 
spoke very well. Rode home in the evening. Quite dark. 

15. Wrote. Wrote on the catalogue of my library. At evening visited 
at Esq. Booth's. 

16. Wrote a piece for the newspapers in this county on the improvement 
of common schools. Wrote to Mr. Hunter, of Fairfield. 

17. Expounded on Matt, viii : 1-22, and preached on Rev, iii : 18, The 
Methodists had no meeting and our meeting was full. Immediately after 
meeting I went to the church and heard Bishop Brownell.^ Several were 
confirmed. In the evening Mr. Young,* agent of the Education Society, 
preached in my pulpit. Yesterday received a letter from Joseph Parker, 
of Philadelphia, 

18. Rainy all day. Attended the funeral of Philo Blakeman, Read. 
Received a letter from M. B. Whittlesey, of Danbury, Wrote to my brother 
Francis and S, T, Wolcott, 

19. Wrote. Visited a sick man. Rode to Bridgeport with Mr. Linsley 
and attended the meeting of the Temperance Society, Mr. Sherman ' and 
Mr. Button ^ spoke very well. At evening had company. Read, 

20. Began to read my Bible again in course. ' Paid Mrs, Thompson, 
$6.50, and closed my boarding-bill. Gave Mr, Young $2 for the American 
Education Society. Afternoon we had a hard shower. Wrote a second 
paper for the printer. 

21. Had no Bible class on Monday evening on account of the rain. 
Wrote to Mr, Whittlesey, of Danbur)^, and to Rev, Mr, Bacon,* of New 
Haven. Walked and visited the most of the day. Read, Received an 
invitation to marry my cousin, Eliza Gilman,' at New Haven next week, 

22. Visited. Warrii, A fine young man was killed yesterday at Oronoke, 
by a gun, by accident. Rode to Bridgeport, Paid for a small stove and 
pipe for my chamber, $8,70. A candlestick and candles, fifty-five cents. 
A whip, sixty-three cents. Read the Bible, ^^'rote to Mr. Oilman. 



' Rev. Thomas F. Davies, pastor at 
Green's Farms, 1829-1839. 

^ Hezekiah Ripley, D. D., former pastor 
at Green's Farms, 1767-1821. He died in 
the following year (1831), between eighty- 
five and ninety years of age. 

' Rev. Edward N. Kirk, D. D., from 182S 
to 1836 pastor at Albany; then an evangelist, 
and, 1842 to his death, pastor of Mount Ver- 
non Church, Boston ; a man of remarkable 
pulpit power and usefulness. 



■• Thomas Church Brownell, D. D., was 
made Bishop of Connecticut in 1S19. 

' Rev. George D. Young, afterwards a 
missionary of the Connecticut Missionary 
Society on the Western Reserve. 

* Possibly Hon. Roger Minot Sherman, of 
Fairfield, but probably it was the Methodist 
minister of Bridgeport. 

^ Rev. Aaron Button, of Guilford. 

' Dr. Leonard Bacon. 

9 Daughter of Judge Benjamin I. Gilman. 



1830.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



197 



23. Wrote. Rode to Oronoke and was present at the melancholy funeral 
of the young man killed by a gun. Mr. Rossiter,' an Episcopalian from 
Monroe, performed the service. Towards night Mr. Hunter came from Fair- 
field unexpectedly, and I rode there in the evening to exchange. Quite cool. 

24. Preached on i Tim. iii : 16, and John vii : 37. The congregation 
was large. Had no evening meeting. Visited Mr. Lee'' and Mr. Sherman.^ 
Mr. Hunter's difficulties here are likely to be adjusted. 

25. Made calls. Rode home. Cold. Received a letter from Mr. Oilman, 
of New Haven. Read e.xpositors. At evening attended the Bible class. 
Mr. Mitchell* informed me that he has received a call at Norfolk. They 
are not quite united. He now supplies at Fair Haven. 

26. Wrote. Wrote notes for preaching. Rode to Oronoke. Visited the 
afflicted and others. At evening we had a full and solemn meeting. Preached 
on Isa. xl : 6-8. I hope the late afflictive dispensation here may be the 
means of good. Rode home. 

27. Rode to New Haven. Dined at Mr. Oilman's. Flad a very pleasant 
visit there. Did errands and made calls. Procured some new books. Took 
tea with Pres. Day. 

28. Breakfasted with Prof. Ooodrich. In the forenoon I married Mr. Mar- 
tin Hoffman, of New York, to my cousin, Eliza H. Oilman. No company 
but some of the family connections. Rode to Stratford and dined at Mrs. 
Hoffman's. Quite fatigued. Warm and damp. 

29. Had my stove set with additions, which cost fifty-eight cents. 
Received a letter for the church from Mr. Punderson. Yesterday Mr. Hoff- 
man made me a present of $20. Last evening read in a new volume of 
Hutchinson's History,^ just received from England. Worked considerably. 

30. Last evening and today wTOte a piece for the newspapers. Warm 
and very pleasant. Visited Esq. Ufiford. He is very low. Wrote to 
J. Barnes, Esq., Middletown. At evening my cousin Oilman and his family 
came here to Mrs. Hoffman's.* Wrote a conclusion to an unfinished sermon, 

31. Expounded on Matt, viii : 23 to ix : 18, and preached on Ps. x: 13. 
My friends here were at meeting. At evening had a good conference. 
Contributed for the room. 



■ Rev. Rodney Rossiter, of Stratford. 

^ Rev. Chauncey G. Lee. 

3 Hon. Roger Minot Sherman. 

* Rev. John Mitchell. 

' The third volume of Gov. Thomas 
Hutchinson's History of Massachusetts. He 
had published two volumes between 1764 
and 1767. When he was compelled to leave 
the country in 1774, because of the hatred of 
the patriots, his work was unfinished. The 
third volume, covering the period from 1749 
to 1774, was left by him in manuscript when 
he died in England, 1780, and was published 
by his grandson, Rev. John Hutchinson, of 



Trentham, Eng., London, 1S2S. Dr. Robbins 
had the volume in 1S30. 

* Mrs. Hoffman was doubtless of the kin- 
dred of Mr. Martin Hoffman, Jr., the bride- 
groom. She may have been his mother, the 
wife of Martin Hoffman, Sr., of New York. 
There was a double tie by marriage between 
the Gilman and the Hoffman families. Frof. 
Chandler Robbins Gilman, M. D., married 
Serena, daughter of Martin Hoffman, Sr. 
This Chandler R. Gilman was professor in 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
New .York city, and died in 1S65. He was 
a graduate of Pennsylvania University. 



198 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[183c 



November. 

1. Read. Walked out. Rode with Mr. H. G. Ufford to Oronoke, and 
attended in the evening the monthly concert. We have a warm fall, favorable 
to late vegetation. 

2. Walked out and made calls. Read Greppo' on Egyptian Hieroglyphics. 
Read expositors, and had at evening a good Bible class. Spent some time 
with my friends at Mrs. Hoffman's. 

3. Set out early and rode to Newtown. Mr. Kent'' went with me from 
Tru nihil 11. Met with the Consociation. I was scribe. Attended to the 
request of Mr. Mitchell for a dismission. Had a long hearing and discus- 
sion. The Consociation quite full. At evening there was a hea\y rain. 
Contributed $1 for the benefit of Mr. Crocker,^ of New Fairfield. 

4. Could not leave till the question was taken. We voted not to dismiss 
Mr. Mitchell.* Left the session and rode home. Mr. and Mrs. Gilman and 
son, Mrs. Hoffman, and Mr. Hoffman and wife, dined and took tea here.^ 
We had a pleasant day and visit. At evening attended a meeting of the 
school visitors. Three teachers were examined and approved. Received 
a letter from Mr. Battell. 

5. Mr. and Mrs. Gilman and son went to New York. We have had 
bad news from Europe. Various insurrections and commotions. I expect 
a sanguinary war. May God in his mercy prevent. On Tuesday afternoon 
attended the funeral of the late Esq. Ufford ; Mr. Shepard * performed the 
service. Preached a preparatory lecture with short notes on Jer. xxix : 13. 
In the evening wrote a number for the newspaper. 

6. Wrote to the postmaster at Fairfield. Wrote a sermon on Luke vii : 
40-43. Am troubled with smoke from my stove. Wrote half of my sermon 
in the evening. Warm. 

7. Preached with notes on Matt, xxvi : 29, and the sermon written 
yesterday. Administered the sacrament. Some members were absent, but 
we had a good number. At evening we had a good conference ; spoke on 
Acts xxvi : 28. Called on Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman, expecting to leave here 
tomorrow. Last evening received a letter from Mr. Bulkley, of Fairfield. 

8. Sent $8 to J. Parker, of Philadelphia, for two numbers of the 
Encydopcedia. Paid for meat, ninety cents.' Paid an old subscription to the 
Tract Society here, $1. Read. Received a letter from Jona. Barnes,^ 



' J. G. H. Greppo on the Hieroglyphic Sys- 
tem of Chmnpollion, Jr., translated by I. Stu- 
art, Boston, 1830; i2mo. 

^ Rev. James Kent, then preaching in 
Monroe. His name was sometimes spelled 
Kant, but usually Kent. 

^ Rev. Daniel Crocker was settled from 
1809 to 1824 in Redding, and from 1829 to 
his death in the small parish of New Fair- 
field. He was in feeble health and died in 
1831. 



■* But, as in other cases, it only made it 
necessary to call the Consociation together 
again the next year, when he was dismissed. 

^ These were the people that had been at 
the wedding. 

* Rev. George C. Shepard, the Episcopal 
rector of Stratford. 

^ He was a boarder, and he had probably 
paid for the meat used when he had his re- 
cent company to dinner. 

* Jonathan Barnes. 



1830.] PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 1 99 

of Middletown. Visited a sick man very low. Wrote to Mr. Bulkley, 
of Fairfield. 

9. Wrote on the catalogue of my library. Attended the funeral of 
Mr. Philip Fairchild. Visited. Mr. Mitchell called on me. He has received 
a call at Fair Haven and concludes to give a negative answer to Norfolk. 

10. Wrote to Mr. Battell. Received a letter from Mr. Bulkley, of Fair- 
field. Walked out and visited. Mr. Young,' the agent, came here. Visited 
with him. At evening assisted in examining a school-master. 

11. Paid for coal and carrying it, si.\ty-nine cents. Rode with Mr. Young 
to Oronoke. Visited. Tarried there. Some people there have been misled. 

12. Rode home. Cold and rough. Read. Walked out. On the loth 
received a letter from Mr. Dikeman, of Bridgeport. At evening assisted 
in examining two school-masters. 

13. Last night we had a hard rain, and it continued moderately, without 
intermission, through the day. Visited a sick woman. Rode to Bridgeport 
to meet the Committee on Schools. None came. Rode on horseback in a 
steady rain to Monroe^ to exchange. Found Mr. Jones ^ gone to Stratford. 

14. Wet and rainy all day. Had a small meeting. Preached on i Tim. 
iii : 16. Went at noon and after meeting to Mr. Beardsley's. This societ}', 
I think, is improving. We have very dark nights. Read. 

15. Rode home. Foggy and warm. Prepared for my journey. After 
sundown took the stage and rode to Hartford in about eight and one half 
hours. Quite dark. Went very comfortably. 

16. Rode about five o'clock to East Windsor. Slept again. Mrs. Wolcott 
is better than she has been. Mr. Wolcott is preparing his old house for 
Tudor. Warm and pleasant. Called on Dea. Reed. My prospects of pay 
from him are poor. Rode out. Mr. Whelpley has given notice here that 
he shall leave the people."* Made calls. 

17. Conclude to return home today. Rode to Hartford. Paid for books, 
$1.50. Made a visit to Mr. Hawes. Warm and pleasant. Roads very wet. 
Took the stage at half-past two and rode home in nine hours. Have had 
a prosperous journey. 

18. Fatigued by my journey. Read. Received a letter from Mr. Bulkley, 
and wrote to Mr. Hunter and Mr. Dikeman. Wrote. Visited. Mrs. Bunker, 
of this family, came from New York. 

19. Wrote. Walked out. Spent some time in Dr. Johnson's librar}-.' 
Wrote a piece for the newspapers. Visited a sick person. 



' Rev. George D. Young, agent of Ameri- ' This, as we understand, and as has been 

can Education Society. before suggested, was the library of the elder 

^ Monroe was anciently the parish of New Dr. Johnson, first rector of the Episcopal 

Stratford. church in .Stratford, and I'resident of Colum- 

^ Rev. Daniel Jones, pastor at Monroe, bia College. His library, in a good measure, 

1828-1835. had been kept together, and was now with 

■* Rev. Samuel Whelpley was settled there his grandson, Judge Samuel W. Johnson, 

in April, 1828, and he left the next month, whom we shall have still further occasion to 

December, 1830. notice. 



zoo 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1830. 



20. Rode to Bridgeport. Dined with Mr. Hewitt.' Met with a committee 
on the subject of schools. Wrote. 

21. Preached with sliort notes on Gen. xxii : 13, and i Cor. ii : 9. Full 
meeting. The evening conference rather thin. 

22. Mrs. Bunker and her child went off for New York. A hard rain 
the most of the day. Wrote. Read the Episcopal Review of Mr. Hawes's 
Lectures. At evening walked out. 

23. Rode to Bridgeport and returned my little stove and got a large one. 
Paid $6.80, which, with $8.70 for the former, makes $15.50. Had it set 
up. Read an interesting number of the Register of the Education Society.^ 

24. Yesterday wrote to Mr, Punderson, of Huntington. Wet and rainy 
the most of the day. Had a severe rheumatic pain in my back. Was quite 
confined for some hours. Put on my flannel. At evening wrote an addition 
to my last Thanksgiving sermon. 

25. A violent storm of rain. Am feeble, though better than yesterday. 
Preached on Rev. xi : 16, 17. Had a few at meeting. At evening visited 
at Mr. Plant's. 

26. Read. Worked at my books. Walked out. Wrote a piece for the 
newspaper. Am requested to preach my Thanksgiving sermon again next 
Sabbath. 

27. Cold. Received from Mrs. Bunker, of New York, a present of 
a gallon of wine ^ and a piece of carpet for my pulpit. Rode to Oronoke 
and visited. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Punderson. Paid for a load 
of wood and cutting, $3.25. Have various trials. 

28. In the forenoon Mr. Mitchell preached for me. Afternoon preached 
again my Thanksgiving sermon on Rev. xi : 16, 17, by request of a number 
of people. There was no church nor Methodist meeting. I think I never 
saw the meeting-house so full.* The day was pleasant. At evening had 
a full conference. Spoke on Luke ii : 48. 

29. Wet and rainy all day. Bible class again prevented. Read. Much 
confined. Wrote a long letter to Mr. Hawes, of Hartford. 

30. Made a draft of a constitution for a society for the improvement 
of common schools. Rode to Bridgeport and attended the dedication of the 
new meeting-house.' Mr. Hewitt preached very well. It is a very neat 
house. The roads very wet. At evening Mr. Mann ^ preached. Sat with 
the West Consociation. The examination was omitted. Paid Mr. Booth 
for my horse-keeping, $10. 



' Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D. 

^ This was one of the numbers of the third 
volume of the American Qnarlerly\Kcgistcr. 

^ Temperance principles had not yet so 
far progressed but that a friend might make 
a minister a present of a gallon of wine. 

'' That was certainly a graceful Christian 
courtesy, and a handsome compliment to 
Dr. Robbins. 



5 This was the meeting-house of the Sec- 
ond Church, which was organized in January, 
1S30. 

' Rev. Joel Mann, who had recently been 
set over the Second Church in Greenwich. 
At this meeting preparation was made for 
installing Dr. Hewitt the next day. The ded- 
ication of the house and the installation of the 
pastor were thus brought close together. 



[830.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



201 



December. 

1. Last evening it rained and snowed to such a degree that I did not 
get home. The snow disappeared this morning. Attended the installation 
of Mr. Hewitt. Dr. Woods ' preached remarkably well. The parts well 
performed. At evening assisted in forming a society to promote the improve- 
ment of common schools. The weather became clear. Paid for the Auxiliary 
Foreign Missionary Society, $5. Rode iiome. 

2. Walked and visited. Read. Wrote to Mr. Ed. C. Herrick,^ of New 
Haven. Assisted in examining a school-master. Visited a sick woman. 

3. Wrote the most of a piece for the newspaper. Walked' and visited. 
Read the Bible. At evening attended a meeting of school visitors and 
teachers. Assisted in examining two teachers. Read Hawes's Lectures. 

4. Walked and visited. Received a letter from my sister. Read. Read 
expositors. 

5. Expounded on Matt, ix : 18 to x: 11. Afternoon Mr. Mitchell 
preached for me. Meetings well attended. Attended the conference and 
spoke on Matt, xxi : 40, 41. Visited. Read late. 

6. It rained and snowed all day. Very tedious. Wrote on my library 
accounts all day. I have about three hundred folios and quartos.^ A man 
in this neighborhood died suddenly last night. Received a letter from 
my brother F. L., and one from Mr. Hooker/ of Hartford, 

7. There are three or four inches of snow, and sleighs move considerably. 
Wrote. Wrote to Mr. Hooker, of Hartford. Read the Bible, Attended 
a funeral. The streets very wet. At evening had a good Bible class. 

8. Rode early in the cold to Danbury. Some snow all the way. Met 
with the Consociation at a special meeting to adopt a system of permanent 
rules. Attended closely to the business. Kept at Mr, Whittlesey's.' At 
evening we had a meeting for religious worship, 

9. Rainy, and freezing, and wet. We were close at business all day 
and finished late at night. Tarried at Dr. Botsford's,^ This town increases. 



' Rev. Leonard Woods, D. D., Abbot Pro- 
fessor at Andover Theological Seminary, 1808 
-1846. 

^ Edward Claudius Herrick, who was not 
a graduate of the college, but received from 
it the degree of A. M. in 183S, was a man of 
remarkable learning and of delightful char- 
acter. His father, Rev. Claudius Herrick, a 
graduate of Yale, 1798, was a native of South- 
ampton, L. I., and was pastor, 1802-1806, at 
Woodbridge, Ct. Because of ill health he 
left the ministry and established a young 
ladies' school in New Haven, which was 
highly successful. Here his son, Edward C, 
was born, Feb. 24, 181 1. So enthusiastic was 
he in literary and scientific studies, so thor- 
oughly acquainted with books, that in 1843 ^^ 
was made the college librarian, which office 



he held till 1858. In 1852 he was also made 
college treasurer, and this office he held till 
his death in 1862. During all this official 
connection he was an honor and an ornament 
to the institution. In the October number of 
the New Englander for 1862 (Vol. XXI) 
may be found Prof. Thomas C. Thacher's 
beautiful and touching tribute to his mem- 
ory. 

' Large, ponderous books were more fash- 
ionable then than now. 

* Rev. Horace Hooker. 

^ Kept was used then where we should say 
stayed. Mr. Whittlesey's is, as we understand 
it, his old boarding-place of thirty years be- 
fore, when he was teaching in Danbury. 

' Russell Botsford, M. D., graduate of the 
Yale Medical School, 1816. 



202 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D, D, [1830. 

10. Rode home — about twenty-five miles. It thaws some. Bad riding. 
Mr. Oilman,' from New York, is in town and called on me. Much fatigued. 
Walked out. 

11. Walked out. Wrote. Afternoon rode to Trumbull to exchange with 
Mr. Kent." Met him on the way. Cold and bad riding. 

12. Clear and pretty cold. The snow does not get off. Preached a 
double sermon on i Tim. iii : 16. Rode home. The Trumbull Society, 
I think, is improving. Attended our evening conference, quite full. Spoke 
on John i : 36. Called on Mr. Oilman. 

13. An aged woman died in the neighborhood by her clothes taking fire. 
Read the President's long Message.^ Read expositors, and at evening had 
a good Bible class. 

14. Rode to the north part of the town and visited two schools. Rainy. 
Oot pretty wet. Read. 

15. We have had a hard rain for more than twenty-four hours. Wrote 
to my brother F. L., Esq. Ely, of Simsbury, and Mr. Blatchford, of Bridgeport. 
Visited a school. Visited. Read the Bible. 

16. Walked out. Conversed with some of my people. I think I shall 
leave this place,* The Lord is most holy in all his dealings. Wrote my 
eighth and last essay for the newpaper on the improvement of common 
schools. Was up late. 

17. Received of the society treasurer, $20, and paid Mr. Southworth, $10. 
Rode to Oronoke and visited. This people are in considerable agitation. 
Cold. Tarried out. 

18. Rode home. It snowed some. Conversed with the deacons. Read 
the Bible. Very dark weather. 

19. Snow and something stormy. Preached with notes on Deut. xxxii : 18, 
and a sermon on Hab. iii : 17, 18. Thin meeting. Had no evening meeting. 
Walked out. 

20. Read. Received a letter from S. T. Wolcott. The ground is icy. 
Mr. Whelpley was dismissed from East Windsor week before last. Attended 
the Bible class. 

21. Last night we had a fall of snow of five or six inches. Sleighs move 
a good deal. Wrote a long letter to S. T. Wolcott. Looked over my accounts. 
At evening walked out. Cold. 

22. Winter cold. Oood sleighing. There was very little thawing with 
a clear sun. Read. Walked out and visited. Have a smoky chamber. 



' B. I. Oilman, Jr., a physician in New had been eight ministries, including Dr. Rob- 
York. He was graduated at Brown Univer- bins's, none of which was terminated by death, 
sity, 1813, and died, 1866. If we mistake not, the same is true of the 

^ Rev. James Kent. eight or ten ministries in the Congregational 

^ President Andrew Jackson's Message at church at Stratford which followed that of 

the opening of the second session of the Dr. Robbins. It is pleasant for an old church 

Twenty-First Congress, Dec. 6, 1830. to have the graves of its ancient ministers 

^ It is a little noticeable that since the near at hand, that the people may see their 

death of Rev. Israel Chauncey, in 1703, there monuments and be reminded of their services 



IS30.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



203 



23. Last evening the thermometer was below zero. Mr. Condit ' called 
here, late from Longmeadow. More snow that way than here. Read 
Hutchinson's third volume. Visited. Read the Bible. 

24. Wrote on the church records.' The weather moderates. Sleighs 
go well. Read Hutchinson. Walked out and saw friends from New York. 

25. Rainy and wet. Warm and the snow is mostly gone. Attended the 
public service in the Episcopal church. A thin meeting and no communion. 
Dined at Judge Johnson's. Am something unwell ; took physic. 

26. Very warm and pleasant. The frost seems to be out of the ground. 
Preached a double sermon on Isa. ix : 6, 7. At evening attended a public 
meeting at the Methodist meeting-house, and Mr. Linsley delivered an 
address on temperance. One hundred and si.xteen members in our Tem- 
perance Society. 

27. Wrote. Walked out. Wet and rainy. Dined out. Had no Bible 
class. Read Hutchinson. 

28. Visited a school ; pretty poorly regulated. Visited. Looked at a fine 
comb factory. Read. 

29. Rode to Bridgeport. Called on Mr. Hewitt. His wife is very low. 
Ver^- pleasant, and bad riding. Read. The European nations are in great 
commotion.' Wrote. The society's committee called on me. 

30. Read. Received of the society treasurer, $100. The society had 
their annual meeting. Sent a writing to the meeting that I design to ask 
for a dissolution of my connection with the society within three months. 
I think I am called in Providence to do this.* The meeting did well. 
Visited. 

31. W^alked and visited. Warm and showery. Read the Bible. After- 
noon and evening a very hard rain. Our preparatory lecture was prevented. 
Received some valuable Congressional documents from Mr. Senator Foote.^ 
Received a letter from J. A. Whittlesey, of Danbur}-. Wrote to my cousin, 
P. R. Starr,* of New York. In the evening walked out. Endeavored to close 
the year as in the presence of God. To him be all praise. 



' Rev. Jonathan B. Condit, before noticed, 
was a native of Hanover, N. J., and a gradu- 
ate of the College of New Jersey in 1S27. 
He was pastor at Longmeadow, Mass., 1831- 
1837, though he had been preaching there a 
considerable time before. He was afterwards 
professor at Amherst College. 

^ He would be likely to leave the church 
records in good shape. 

' The principal commotions in Europe at 
that time grew out of the recent revolution 
in France, but these troubles altogether were 
small in comparison with those which grew 
out of the French Revolution of 1793. 



■* The motives compelling him to do this 
must have been strong, for Ur. Robbius was 
not a man loving change. 

5 Samuel Augustus Foote, LL. D., United 
States Senator from Connecticut, 1S27-1S33. 
He was son of Rev. John Foote, of Cheshire, 
Ct., and a graduate of Yale, 1797. 

* His name stands in the Williams Col- 
lege Triennial as Hon. Peter Starr, LL. D. 
The R here introduced may mean that he 
had taken the name Robbins to do honor to 
his mother, Sarah, daughter of Rev. Philemon 
Robbins, of Branford, and who had now been 
dead many years. 



18 3 1. 
January. 

1. Endeavored early to bless God that I may see a new year, and 
to commit my ways, my cares and burdens and wants to his infinite mercy, 
and to- confide in all his will. Had some New Year's calls. Wrote. Spent 
some time in appropriate duties. Walked out. At evening wrote an addition 
to a New Year's sermon. The deaths in this town for the year past have 
been but twenty-two.' 

2. The day ver)- pleasant. Preached with notes on Col. ii : 6, and 
a sermon on i Cor. vii : 31. Administered the sacrament. The church 
full. We had a good season. At evening attended a serious and full 
conference. Spoke on Gen. vii: 16. Quite tired. Five members of the 
church were dismissed and recommended.^ 

3. Visited. Wrote. Visited a most distressed maniac. At evening 
attended the annual meeting of our Tract Society. Subscribed and paid 
to it, as before, $1. Had a short service for the monthly concert. 

4. Wrote on the church records. Visited. Read. At evening had 
a good Bible class. Wet. 

5. We had a hard rain through the day. \\'rote to J. A. Whittlesey, 
of Danbury. Read Fuller's Church History} At evening walked out. 

6. Rode to New Haven. Bad traveling. Did errands. Looked over 
the remains of Dr. Dana's* librar)-. Paid a book-binder, $3.50. Called 
on Mr. Merwin. Gave Dr. Percival' and E. C. Herrick* a number of old 
election sermons. 

7. Called on . Rode home. Last evening saw the beneficiaries 

of the Everest fund. The ground is ver}- little frozen. The streams have 
lately been ver)' high. At evening visited. Read Mr. Stuart's very valuable 
essay on intemperance.^ 

8. Walked and visited the sick and others the most of the day. Carried 
in wood. The springs are said to be very high. Wrote. Read expositors. 

9. It snowed steadily all day. But few at meeting. Preached a double 



' The population of Stratford, as given for a short time Professor of Chemistry and 

by the census of 1830, was 1,814, so that the Mineralogy at West Point; poet and scien- 

deaths were only a little above one per cent. tist. He died in Wisconsin in 1856. 

^ To other churches. ^ See note, Dec. 2, 1830. 

^ Dr. Thomas Fuller, before noticed, 1608 ^ Essay on the question whether the use 

-1660. of distilled liquors, or traffic in them, is com- 

*• James Dana, D. D., pastor of First patible at the present time with making a 

Church, New Haven, 1789-1805. profession of religion. By Prof. Moses Stu- 

5 James Gates Percival, M. D., born in art, of Andover, 1830. The temperance cause 

Berlin, Ct., 1795; graduated at Yale, 1815; early found a home at Andover. 

205 



2o6 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [183I. 

sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19. No evening meeting. Received a good letter from 
my cousin P. R. Starr, of New York. Read. 

10. Shoveled paths. The snow is eight or nine inches deep. Read 
the Christian Spectator. Read expositors and attended my Bible class. liad 
walking. 

11. I am too late nights and mornings. Visited sick persons. Walked 
a distance and visited. The ground is unfrozen and it is not good sleighing. 
Received a letter from Esq. Ely, of .Simsbury. Received some newspapers 
from Hartford. Received of the society treasurer, $108. Paid a merchant's 
bill of $1.86, and a post office bill for a year of $5.93. Paid Mr. Southard,' 
$50. Read late. 

12. Wrote to Mr. Ely, of Simsburj-, and to T. T. Merwin,^ of Norwalk. 
Read Fuller's Church History. Assisted in examining a school-master. 
Visited. It grows cold. 

13. Read the Connecticut Observer. The Episcopal controversy is warm 
in Hartford. Attended the funeral of a woman who died of insanity. Visited 
a sick man. Read Fuller. Very cold ; the thermometer this morning about 
zero. 

14. The cold about the same as yesterday. George Rockwell,' of East 
Windsor, called on me. Rode with him to see a sick man. Good sleighing. 
Mr. Peck, Methodist preacher, spent the day and night here. Read. Walked 
out. The cold is oppressive. 

15. A very tedious snow-storm through the day. Went but once out 
of the house. Cold. Hard snowing. Wrote to Mr, Hooker, of Hartford. 
Read. Spent the evening in the consideration of important interests. 

16. It snowed some, and the snow blew violently, with severe cold, 
through the day. Had no meeting. Do not recollect to have spent such 
a Sabbath for some vears. Had a sort of reliijious service at home. 
Mr. Peck is still here. Walked out, but all thought it best to have no meet- 
ing. Called on Mr. Shepard. Read the Bible. At evening walked out. 

17. The snow is deep, drifted, and very solid. Shoveled paths. Drifts 
are high as the fences. Walked and visited. Gave poor Gaylord" a new 
blanket. Had no Bible class. Wrote. 

18. Rode in a sleigh to Norwalk. Difficult traveling on account of the 
drifts. A few bare places. A very cold morning. ]Met with the County 
Temperance Society. But few attended and there were no public services. 
Called on former acquaintance. All the harbors are frozen. Tarried with 
Rev. Mr. Benedict.' 



' The man with whom he boarded. ■• Some man, sick and poor, who he feared 
^ Timothy Taylor Merwin, Esq., a gradu- was suffering from the severe cold. Dr. Rob- 
ate of Yale in the class of 1S27. bins had a thoughtful Christian kindness, and 
^ George Roclvwell was the son of Nathan- we shall find other references to this Mr. Gaj'- 
iel and Anna (Bullen) Rockwell. His earli- lord. 

est American ancestor was William Rockwell, ^ Rev. Henry Benedict, pastor at Norwalk, 

of Windsor, one of the early founders of the 1S2S-1S32. He was a native of Norwalk, and 

town. graduated at Yale, 1822. He died in 1S6S. 



r83i.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



207 



19. Made calls. The wealher moderates. Rode home. The paths are 
made better. At Fairfield looked over books. Read. 

20. Wrote. Walked out. But little use of the sleighing here compared 
with other parts of the country.' Read Mr. Grimke's excellent oration.^ 
Mr. Southard's son ' and wife came here. Read the Bible. 

21. Thermometer this morning at 01°. Gaylord is quite low. Walked 
and visited. Saw Mr. Ogden, of Southington. Read. It is cold and I do 
but little. An Indian preacher of the I'equot tribe called on me. Gave him, 
and paid for a little book, $1. 

22. We have an addition to our snow. Paid for my sleigh to Norwalk, 
si.xty-two cents. Read. Walked out and saw Gaylord. Severe cold. Read 
expositors. 

23. Severe cold and very tedious. Expounded on Matt, x: 11 to 30. 
Preached on Mark x : 23. Thin meeting and short exercises. Meeting- 
house pretty cold. At evening walkerl out. 

24. Yesterday received a letter and today a pamphlet from the editors 
of the Student's Companio/i* Yale College. Read the Bible and expositors, 
and had a good Bible class. Very fine sleighing. It appears to be verj- 
extreme. 

25. Thermometer this morning 06°. Wrote to the editors of the Student's 
Companion. Walked out and visited. It thaws verj' little with a clear sun. 
Looked over pamphlets. 

26. Went with Mr. Shepard to the funeral of Mrs. Ufford. Wrote. Rode 
to Oronoke and visited. It is good crossing the river ^ on the ice. The cold 
ver}^ uniform. 

27. Wrote. Looked over old pamphlets. Attended the funeral with 
Stephen Curtis. Visited. Was called late to see Gaylord. Very low. 

28. Rode in a sleigh to New Haven. Pretty good sleighing, with deep 
drifts and bare places. Saw young Mr. Bacon, a principal editor^ of the 
Student' s Companion. Did errands. Received of Mr. Linsley, of Hartford,' 
a copy of his able report to the Clerical Convention. Traded, $4.60. Re- 
turned. 

29. Mr. Southard is quite feeble. The New Haven harbor is frozen 



' Stratford lying on the Sound, her snows 
were apt to melt speedily. 

^ Two volumes at least were published 
containing Addresses and 0)-ationshy Thomas 
Smith Grimke, LL. D. 

^ Son of the man with whom he was board- 
ing. 

■* The*" Studeitfs Companion was the fa- 
mous Yale periodical beginning in January, 
1S31, and ending in the following April, four 
numbers. It purported to be the work of 
nine stAidents (each having a department of 
his own) calling themselves, " Knights of the 
Round Table." But the secret leaked out at 



last that it was all the work of David Francis 
Bacon, of the class of 1S31, brother of Dr. 
Leonard Bacon. While the secret remained, 
it was a matter of great curiosity to know who 
these nine gifted young editors were. Dr. 
Robbins, minister at Stratford, seems to have 
caught the curiosity. When the matter was 
known, it was a great surprise that one stu- 
dent could have personated nine writers and 
played his part so effectually. 

5 The river there might be called a creek, 
sharing in the ebb and tlow of the tide. 

* As already .stated, he was sole editor. 

7 Joel H. Linsley, D. D. 



!08 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1831. 



beyond the light-house. Ours is beyond the two points of hind. Wrote 
to T. G. Fessenden,' of Boston. Walked and visited. The weather moder- 
ates. Read. 

30. Cold, but a pretty pleasant doy. People well out. Expounded on 
Matt, x: 30 to the end, and preached on Luke xvii : 22. At evening had 
a good conference; spoke on Acts xxiv : 25. Made calls. Mr. Linsley " 
holds regular meetings at the usual times of worship on the Sabbath, at an 
old store on the wharf. He began on the 9th instant. In the morning 
visited a young woman very low ; in the afternoon she died. 

31. Visited the afflicted family and others. Read. Carried in wood. 
At evening had a good Bible class. It began to snow in the evening very 
fast. There are many accounts of the sufferings in the storm of the 15th. 
In Pennsylvania it was very severe. The snow thawed some on the 2Sth and 
2gth, but the sleighing continues. 

February. 

1. The snow is now quite deep and heavy. Wrote. Mr. Gaylord died 
this morning. Afternoon attended the two funerals. Difficult gettmg about. 
Much fatigued. 

2. Quite cold. About noon set out in a sleigh with Mr. Gorham ' on 
a journey to East Windsor. The roads not well trod, and an abundance 
of snow. Rode to Middletown. We have an account of an expected 
revolution in Poland."* Tarried at a tavern. 

3. Rode early to Hartford. Very cold and frosty. The river very hard 
frozen. Received a dividend of the Phoenix Bank of $45, and one from 
Hartford Bank of $15. Rode to East Windsor. Mrs. Wolcott is quite well. 
Rode to Pine Meadow and returned in the evening. The river is good 
crossing. The mercury here has been about 10° below zero. 

4. Last night it snowed and then rained some, and the mercury this 
morning was about 40°. Mr. Wolcott has repaired his old house and Tudor 
occupies it. Looked over books and papers. I fear I have lost some 
important manuscripts. Made some calls. Mr. Gorham returned from 
Enfield and we set out on our return. Traded at Hartford, $5. Paid 
for soap, $1.13. Called on the Miss Bowdens, from Stratford. It grew 



' Thomas Green Fessenden, born in Wal- 
pole, N. H., 1771, was graduated at Dart- 
mouth, 1796, and died in Boston, 1837. He 
was nominally a lawyer, but better known for 
his literary abilities. He was a witty poet 
and a general writer. From 1822 to his death 
he published the New England Farmer, a pop- 
ular and valuable periodical. 

'^ James Harvey Linsley, already men- 
tioned, educated for a Baptist minister. 

^ We know not who this Mr. Gorham was, 
but he seems to have had relatives in En- 
field, or business that carried him there, so 
that the journey was a joint one. 



■• Poland went through a long and terrible 
struggle for liberty and independence, Ijut 
was at last swallowed up by the overmaster- 
ing power of Russian despotism. For a time 
Poland had been a kingdom, nominally sepa- 
rate, but the Emperor of Russia was king. 
In January, 1831, the Polish Diet declared 
the throne vacant, and the Poles fought bat- 
tle after battle during the year to make that 
declaration good, but all in vain. Before the 
year closed Poland became an integral part 
of the Russian Empire, and so has remained 
until this day, and seems likely to do so for 
years to come. 



tS3i.] 



PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 



209 



colder all day. Rode to Meriden. The sleighing not injured. Bad turning 
out. 

5. Rode home against a ver)' severe southwest wind. Have had a pros- 
perous journey. No bare ground. Much fatigued. Wrote. 

6. The coldest forenoon, I believe, that we have had. Thin meeting. 
Preached on i Tim. iv : 16. Meeting-house made comfortable. Had no 
conference. Visited. 

7. The cold abates a little. Carried in wood. Read. Visited. Had 
an excellent Bible class on the dedication of the Temple. Congress have 
put down nullification very well." 

8. Wrote. Received newspapers from Hartford. Read. Wrote to Maj. 
Wolcott. Attended a funeral with Mr. Shepard. Walked and visited. 

9. We have clear and pleasant days, but little diminution of the cold. 
Very good sleighing. Read. Walked and visited. The roads very slippery. 

10. Wrote to Eli Drake, of Fredonia, N. Y. Considerably unwell, and 
kept my chamber the most of the day. Looked over old pamphlets and 
papers. Clear and still, but ver}^ cold. Received a letter from Mr. Calhoun,^ 
of Coventry. At evening visited. 

11. Rode to Oronoke and spent the day in visiting. The weather 
moderates and it thaws some. There is a good deal of sleighing on the 
river, down to the beach. The snow is nearly two feet deep in the woods 
and very solid. The ice on the river is nearly as thick. Got home late. 

12. Read. There seems to be a commotion in France. A very clear 
day, by a kind Providence, and we had a fine opportunity to observe the 
eclipse.^ There was a great diminution of light and a severe chill in the air. 
One star was veiy visible. Wrote. Quite cold. Paid for cutting a load 
of wood, sixty-seven cents. Called on ^Ir. Mitchell ; too unwell to assist 
me tomorrow. 

13. Pleasant but severe cold. Preached with notes on Esther iv : 13, and 
a sermon on 2 Cor. i : 12. Had no conference, but had our Bible class in the 
evening, which was well attended. Was up late and wrote to Mr, Hooker^ 
and Mr. Comstock,^ of Hartford. Sent Mr. Hooker four folios. 



' In the putting down of nullification, Gen. 
Jackson, the President, is to be credited more 
than Congress. 

^ George A. Calhoun, D. D. 

* Several years before this eclipse, one of 
the almanacs published the following lines. 
The writer, then a boy, committed them to 
memory, and, as well as he can, he now quotes 
them from memory : 

" In the year eighteen hundred and thirty-one 
There will be a very large eclipse of the sun, 
And, if our atmosphere should at that time be clear, 
The largest stars no doubt will then appear; 
Although this does not happen very soon, 
'Twill be on Saturday, in the afternoon. 
Spectators who behold it then will plainly see 
Eleven digits' obscuration, very certainly." 



In the Nev) England Farmer's Almanack for 
1831, published by Carter & Hendee for 
Thomas G. Fessenden, of Boston, this eclipse 
is thus described as it would appear at Bos- 
ton : 

Beginning of the eclipse, 
Greatest obscuration, 
End of the eclipse. 
Duration of the eclipse, 
Digits eclipsed, 11 deg., 29m., 12s., on sun's 
south limb. 

* Rev. Horace Hooker. 

5 John L. Comstock, M. D., at that time a 
prominent man in Hartford, author of many, 
school-books and other volumes. 



H. 


M. 


S. 


II 


49 


30-3 


I 


21 


10.5 


2 


46 


55-4 


2 


57 


25.1 



2IO DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1831. 

14. Rode to New Haven. The morning ver}' cold. Very fine sleighing. 
It is thought there has not been so much ice in the Sound for a long period, 
perhaps since 1780. Water can hardly be seen from the mouth of the New 
Haven harbor. Carried to New Haven several bundles of pamphlets. 
Did errands. Returned. It thawed a little. In the evening visited. My 
horse performs ver)' well. 

15. Wrote. Had company. Great distress in New York for wood and 
some other necessaries. Read the Bible. Afternoon and evening visited. 

16. It rained steadily the most of the day. Mr. Calhoun,' of Coventry-, 
agent of the Home Missionary Society, came here. On account of the wet 
our appointed meeting was not holden. Read. Was up late. Received 
a letter from W. W. Ellsworth, at Congress. 

17. Warm. The ground has a great deal of water upon it, but the most 
of the snow remains. Mr. Calhoun went to Huntington. Mr. Wolcott and 
Mr. Filley came here from East Windsor. Mr. Vv'olcott brought me some 
books and paper, for which I had sent. Rode with him to Esq. Wood's.- 
Afternoon they returned to New Haven. The sleighing is injured. Read. 
At evening visited. Wrote. 

18. Wrote to Mr. Fessenden,^ of Boston, and sent him $1. Read the 
Bible. Walked and visited. Quite cold and the roads icy. My people 
are not in a good state. 

19. Carried in wood. Read. In an anxious deliberation endeavored to 
seek divine guidance in the path of duty. At evening rode on horseback 
to Milford to exchange with Mr. Train. The sleighing has become poor, 
yet the cold continues and the harbor remains firm. 

20. Mr. Train went to Stratford and returned at evening. Severe cold. 
Preached on Heb. xii : 16, and Heb. vii : 25. The congregation is not large. 
No stove in the meeting-house.'' The house is old. No evening meeting. 

21. The last night was very cold. Had an anxious night. Rode to New 
Haven. The road very hard. The thermometer here this morning was at 
10°. Traded, $3.50. Rode home. Mr. Whittlesey, of Danbury, called on 
me. Had a very full Bible class. Was out late with Mr. Whittlesey and his 
son from Ohio. 

22. Walked out. Read. Mr. Train was well liked here. Had company. 

23. It rained moderately the most of the day. The snow thaws, but 
it is very solid. Wrote to my brother Francis. Received this almanack 
from Boston. I have not been able to get one sooner. Wrote. Read the 
long, unworthy correspondence between the President and the Vice-President.* 



^ Dr. Calhoun had evidently oljtained = John C. Calhoun was then Vice-Presi- 

leave of absence from his people for a time dent, and his views on State rights and nulli- 

to present this cause before the churches. fication were in direct antagonism to those 

We have already noted the large contribu- of President Jackson. Dr. Robbins calls 

tion taken by him in Tolland for this object. this correspondence unworthy, without any 

" Elijah Wood, Esq. qualification. Yet he must have respected the 

3 Thomas Green Fessenden. views of Gen. Jackson on this point, though 

■'' Greatly behind the times. they may have been expressed with some heat. 



i83i.] 



PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 



II 



24. Wrote, copying this diary. Cold again. Read. Things in Europe 
appear to be in a ver)f unsettled state. I fear that a holy God is about 
to "give them blood to drink." \'isited. 

25. Wrote. Have something of a tremor in my hand. Pleasant, but 
winter weather. Paid a tailor, $2.50. Visited. 

26. Wrote a sermon on John iii : 36. I have too much neglected writing 
sermons. The snow thaws fast and the ground becomes \ery wet. Received 
pamphlets at the post office, 

27. Pleasant, and very wet and bad walking. Full meeting. We have 
had seven successive Sabbaths of unfavorable getting to meeting. Preached 
with notes on Acts v : 20, and the sermon written yesterday. At evening 
had a serious conference. The work of divine grace in New York is great 
and prosperous. O that it might extend in proportion to the influence of that 
great city. Much fatigued. 

28. Am feeble. Read. Europe is in a very unsettled state, and prepar- 
ing, I fear, for the terrible judgments of heaven. At evening had a large 
and interesting Bible class. Patrick's ' Commentary is my principal guide, and 
highly valuable. I pray for a blessing of grace on the dear youth. 

March. 

1. Wrote to Mr. Hooker, of Hartford. It looks like spring, but the 
snow departs slowly. Read. Wrote to Baldwin & Treadway, New Haven. 
Visited. 

2. Troubled with a headache. Married a couple who came here from 
Milford. Warm. The traveling said to be very bad. At evening began 
to write a long letter. I pray to be under the entire guidance of heaven. 

3. Rode to Oronoke. But little frost in the ground. Visited a sick 
man ver}- low, and sundry families. Kindly received. At evening saw the 
sick man again, in a dying state. Many connections in. 

4. Mr. John Curtiss died last night at my own age. 
Preached a preparatory lecture with notes on Deut. xxiii : 21. 
Received a letter from my brother James, and one from T. 
Norwalk. Visited at Mr. H. G. Ufford's.* 

5. Rode again to Oronoke. Visited and attended the funeral of Mr. Cur- 
tiss. A large collection of people. The riding improves. Drank tea at 
Esq. Booth's.' 
Much fatigued. 



' Rode home. 
Well attended. 
T. Merwin,^ of 



Conversed a good deal with him. 



At evening wTOte some. 



' Bishop Simon Patrick. 

" That is, fifty-four. 

^ Timothy T. Merwin, Esq. 

'' Rev. Hezekiah Gold Ufford, who has 
once or twice been mentioned, was the son 
of Samuel and Abigail (Gold) Ufford, and 
was Ijorn in Stratford, April 14, 1779. His 
father, Samuel, was the Esq. Ufford whose 
funeral Dr. Robbins attended a few months 
before in company with Rev. George C. .Shep- 
ard, the Episcopal rector. The son studied 



for the ministry, but became a fine classical 
teacher, pursuing this profession in New York 
city and then in Stratford. He was gradu- 
ated at Yale, 1S06, and died in Stratford, 
Jan. 23, 1863, aged eighty-four. 

' Elijah Booth, Esq. There were at that 
time two other men in Stratford, justices of 
the peace, of the name Booth. These were 
Stephen and Isaac G. Booth. But the diary 
seems to point to Elijah, who probably had 
more to do in church matters. 



212 



DIARY OF REV. THO^rAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1831. 



6. Wet and rainy. Preached with notes on Luke xxii : iq, 16, and 
a sermon on Luke xix : 43, 44. Administered the sacrament. The church 
and congregation thin. Had no conference. At evening walked out. 

7. Read. Rode to Bridgeport. Did errands and visited Mr. Blatch- 
ford.' The roads muddy, but not very deep. At evening had a good 
monthly concert. 

8. Read. Wrote. The snow is now generally gone. Wrote on a letter. 
Read Patrick's Commeiitary, and had in the evening a larger Bible class than 
on any former occasion. Was out late. 

9. Wrote, transcribing. Walked and visited. The walking has become 
pretty good. At evening attended a meeting in the church. 

10. Visited a sick woman ver^- low. Finished a long letter to ^ 



I think I have done what appeared to be my duty ; the event is committed 
entirely to the divine disposal. Received pamphlets from Congress. Read. 
Was out late. Have many hindrances. 

11. Visited the sick woman, who died in the afternoon. Walked a dis- 
tance and visited. My people are in an unsettled state. 

12. Received a letter from my brother Francis. Visited a school. Rode 
with company to New Haven. Some bad places on the road. Made calls. 
Rode to Fair Haven. Something showery. 

13. Preached for Mr. Mitchell,' who supplies me, on Heb. xii : 16, and 
John vii : 37. This is a fine pleasant congregation and an excellent new 
meeting-house. Their prospects are very good. Attended the evening 
conferencQ with a theological student. Towards night a hard snow-squall. 

14. Looked at the village, which appears very well. All risen in a few 
years. Cold. Rode to New Haven. Procured Vv'atts's * JFbr^'j-. Did errands. 
A great revival in the college and very encouraging appearances in the town. 
There is to be a public "four days' meeting"' here this week. I pray that 

it may have a divine blessing. Called * and borrowed Irving's' 

Life of Cohmibus. Rode home. Was quite cold. At evening had a larger 
Bible class than ever before. 

15. Wrote. Mr. E. G. Welles' called on me and spent much time. 



' Rev. John Blatchford. 

^ This dash represents silence. 

^ Rev. John Mitchell was settled in Fair 
Haven, a part of New Haven, in December, 
1830, and remained here until 1836. 

" Isaac Watts, D. D., 1674-1748. The 
most important works of Dr. Watts were 
his Psalms a7id Hymns, and On the Maui. 
As a sacred versifier and hymn-writer, he 
holds a foremost place in English literature. 

' For a few years, about that time, these 
"four days' meetings," devoted to exhorta- 
tion, preaching, and personal inquiry, were 
common in all parts of New England and 
beyond. 



* By some oversight this place was not 
filled. 

^ Washington Irving's Life of Columbus 
was published in 1828. He was then in the 
full activity of authorship, and volumes from 
his pen were making their appearance very 
frequently. He did not awaken so wide an 
enthusiasm as did Sir Walter Scott at an ear- 
lier date, but he was a very popular author. 

^ Rev. Elijah G. WeJles, a graduate of 
Williams College, 1805. He had preached 
at Voluntown, Ct., and in Scotland parish 
(Windham). He was licensed to preach by 
the Hartford North Association, June 3, 
1S06. He died in 1855. 



1 83 1.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 213 

He goes about lecturing on history, etc. At evening attended at the 
academy and heard him. The boys made a noise.' Visited a sick man. 
Read in Irving's Colmnbus. 

16. Wrote to Mr. Bacon, of New Haven. Walked out. Rode and 
visited. Read Irving. Very good. Wet. 

17. Rode to the north part of the town and visited two schools. Cold 
and some snow. At evening attended a meeting at a private house ; preached 
on John x : 10, and baptized two children. Our schools have done pretty well 
the present season. 

18. Rode early to New Haven to attend the "four days' meeting.'"' 
At nine o'clock attended public worship, and Dr. Taylor^ preached remark- 
ably well. A great assembly and verj' solemn. At two o'clock Prof. Fitch* 
preached; the Center Church very full. More than five hundred staid after 
the service to be addressed as particularly an.xious. About one hundred 
in college have hope. The work is great and increasing in the town. Rode 
home. Suffered with the cold. 

19. We had snow and rain. Read Irving. Walked and visited. Received 
a letter from Gov. Peters.' Wrote. Read expositors. 

20. Expounded on Matt, xi : 1-15, and preached on Hag. i : 5. Attended 
the evening conference. Cold. People from New York are much impressed 
with the religious attention there. 

21. Walked out. Conversed with persons on society matters. Wrote 
and gave to the society committee a request that they would call a meeting 
to receive a communication from me. Visited a school well kept. At even- 
ing had a good Bible class. 

22. Read a long account of one of the Morgan* trials. A miserable and 
wicked business. Afternoon visited a school. It grows warmer. Visited. 

23. Wrote. Read. Walked a distance and visited. There is a good 
deal of electioneering in the State, but they are happily broke up into a great 
number of parties. 

24. Warm and wet. Walked and visited. Visited a school. At evening 
visited. I am apt to be out late. Read Irving. 

25. Our schools have done much better this season than the last. Last 
night considerable rain, but verj- moderate for the equinoctial storm.' Quite 
warm and vegetation commences. Walked and visited the most of the day. 
At evening attended a meeting and preached on Matt, xx : 30. A good 
meeting. Received a letter from Dea. Reed, of East Windsor. 



' Boys and iioise have always rhymed in believed, was murdered at Fort Niagara in 

the English-speaking world. 1826 for revealing the secrets of Freema- 

^ These occasions were then novel and sonry. 

excited a wide-spread interest. ' Northeast storms are apt to come in 

3 Nathaniel W. Taylor, D. D. March and September, not very far from the 

'' Eleazar T. Fitch, D. D. time when the sun crosses the equinoctial 
^ John S. Peters, Governor of Connecti- line, though that fact, taken alone, has proba- 

cut, 1S31-1833. bly very little to do with these storms. They 



6 



William Morgan, who, as is generally belong rather to these seasons of the year. 



214 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^831. 

26. Walked and visited. Had considerable conversation respecting soci- 
ety matters. Wrote. People begin to plow and garden. 

27. Preached a double sermon on Ps. xiv : 2, 3. Warm. At evening had 
a good conference. After which rode out and performed a marriage. 

28. Paid for a good pine chest, $3. Rode to Oronoke and visited. 
There is much conversation about our approaching society meeting. Saw 
the society committee. Visited an aged woman quite poor. At evening had 
a good Bible class. 

29. Walked and visited. Worked at my books. Wrote. Afternoon rainy. 
Walked a distance in the evening in a hard rain. My deacons are a little 
awr}'. 

30. Quite rainy all day. My people had a society meeting. I went 
in and spoke considerably. I believe it did good. The meeting was thin 
and they adjourned. Read Irving. Am pretty feeble. 

31. Warm after the rain. Wrote letters to Dea. Reed, of East Windsor, 
Gov. Peters, and Baldwin & Treadway,' of New Haven. Read. Walked 
out. Received a letter from Mr. Ely, of Simsbury. Received of the society 
treasurer, $75. Read. I believe my speaking yesterday in the society meet- 
ing did good. 

April. 

1. Fast. Preached on Lev. xiii : 45, and Jer. v : 9. Afternoon meeting 
quite full. The day is very poorly observed here. At evening attended 
a meeting and preached on Ps. iv : 5. Much fatigued. Was out late. 

2. Rode to Bridgeport. Unable to procure an exchange for tomorrow. 
Warm and spring weather. Wrote. Received a letter from Mr. Pinneo,^ 
of Milford. Am quite languid. 

3. Expounded on Matt, xi : 16 to xii : 14, and preached on Heb. xii : 24. 
Full meeting. At evening had a full conference. Spoke on John ix : 4. 
Very tired. 

4. Wet. Visited an aged sick woman. Wrote. The electors' meeting.^ 
Less interest appears to be excited in the State than usual. At evening 
the deacons and part of the society committee called on me. Had no concert 
meeting. Saw blossoms on the daffas. Wrote to Mr. Pinneo. 

5. Last night- we had a hard rain. Walked and visited. People are 
quite anxious about our society matters. I am much burdened. The Lord 
be my helper. Read. At evening had a large Bible class. 

6. Rode to Oronoke and visited. The most of the people there act very 
badly. Visited the sick. We had our first shad.'* A number have been 
taken yesterday and today. 



' Baldwin & Treadway, a business firm Connecticut was when the Legislature came 

in New Haven. together in May. 

^ Rev. Bezaleel Pinneo. * The shad in the spring went up all the 

^ State election in Connecticut, the voting rivers emptying into the Sound, but the larg- 

day, came in the month of April. But what est and best were taken in the Connecticut 

was called technically " Election Day " in River. 



I 



1831.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD, 215 

7. Walked and saw a number of people. We had a society meeting. 
I requested of the society that my connection with them might be dissolved, 
to take place at some time within six months. They acceded to the request. 
A few are violent ' and otiiers thniii^ht it best to acquiesce. The best people 
are very friendly. I submit to the divine disposal. I am glad that Jehovah 
reigns ; I commit myself and my all to his disposal. 

8. Mr. Southard's family removed about half a mile, and I go with them. 
It is very troublesome." Got much fatigued. My things appear not to have 
been injured. Quite warm. 

9. Last night we had a severe storm of wind and rain. The wind 
continued a severe gale through the day. Much damage is expected. 
Visited a family where an aged woman died last night. Wrote notes of an 
address for a Bible Society. Cold. 

10. The wind high, but not equal to yesterday. Preached a double 
sermon on Isa. Iv : 6. People well out. Attended a funeral. Rode to 
Milford and delivered an address to their Bible Society. That does well. 
Tarried at Mr. Pinneo's. 

11. Cold. Rode to New Haven. Did errands. The work of grace 
continues here with great power. Towards evening the society committee 
called on me and talked rather poorly. Attended the Bible class. Preparing 
for my journey. An eventful day with me. I desire to rejoice that in all 
things Jehovah reigns. 

12. Set out early on a journey for New York. Rode in a tedious cold 
wind to Norwalk. Had company. Attended the meeting of the County 
Temperance Society. Well attended. In the afternoon meeting Mr. San- 
ford ^ and Mr. Leavitt,* of New York, and Dr. Hewitt ' made addresses. 
The cause advances well in the county. Made calls. Am kindly treated 
at Mr. Stiles Curtiss's. 

13. In the morning took the steamboat with numerous passengers. Were 
much hindered in getting out of the harbor. The first time I have traveled 
in this manner.* Quite cold. The prospects on the Sound are pleasant. 
Arrived at New York in the afternoon. Ver)' kindly received and accommo- 
dated at Mr. Bunker's.' Walked out. Saw some acquaintance. The city 
appears very different from what it did when I was here last, ten years ago. 

14. Walked out. Saw my cousins, P. R. and C. Starr. Mr. Battell and 
two daughters are here. Walked a long distance and saw Dr. Oilman and 
other connections. Wrote. Drank tea at Mr. Thompson's,* from Enfield, 



' The grounds of their violent opposition ' Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D., of Bridgeport, 

are not stated, and very likely were not well ^ That is, his first ride on a steamboat, 

defined even to themselves. ' Mr. ]5unker was a connection of Mr. 

^ This smaller breaking up was the more Southard, where he boarded in Stratford, 
disagreeable because the larger change was * Orin Thompson, of Enfield, who carried 

to come so soon. on the carpet factory in Thompsonville. He 

' Mr. Sanford was probably not a minis- gave the name to this village in Enfield, 

ter. He resided part of the time in New York, 

* Joshua Leavitt, D. D. usually passing his winters there. 



2l6 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [l^SI- 

with Rev. Mr. Rice.' Great news from Europe. Polish war, etc. Much 
warmer. I see many curiosities. Read the papers. 

15. Walked up town with Mr. Bunker and called on Rev. Mr. Phillips.^ 
The modern buildings, some of them, are very splendid. Called on Dr. Mat- 
thews.^ Wrote and sent a piece to Norwalk for the newspaper. Afternoon 
rode a distance with Mr. and Mrs. Bunker and attended a funeral. It was 
very well conducted. At evening attended a meeting with Rev. Mr. Rice. 
Spoke considerably. Was out late. Wet. 

16. A hard rainy day. Wrote. Walked out, made calls, and did errands. 
Dined with my cousin P. R. Starr.* At evening attended a small meeting 
in the rain with Dr. Matthews. Spoke on Matt, xv : 22, etc. Called on my 
cousins, S. and I. Battell.' Read. 

17. Warm and pleasant. In the morning attended meeting with Mr. 
Bunker and heard Mr. Phillips. Afternoon preached for him on Eph. ii : 14. 
The church (Wall Street) is very large and elegant, and hard for speaking. 
The house not full. At evening attended a full meeting in Dr. Matthews's 
vestry-room, and preached on John vii : 37. The revival is pretty great 
in this congregation. Called on Mr. Battell, with his son and daughter. 

18. Walked out and made calls. Mr. Battell purchased cloth for a coat 
for me at $8.50 a yard, for which I paid $15.94, said to be sold at a low rate.^ 
Rode with Mr. Bunker in all the upper parts of the city, and witnessed 
its great progress and increase. Quite warm. Called on Dr. Matthews. 
He is much engaged with his university.' Mr. Johnson,^ from Stratford, very 
kindly went with me to the Exchange and other public buildings. Saw 
Mr. Haskell,' from East Windsor. At evening attended the opening of the 
Presbytery of New York. Mr. Carroll,'" of Brooklyn, preached very well. 

19. Attended an early morning meeting with Dr. Matthews. Walked 
about town. Went with Mr. Bunker and saw some of the principal steam- 
boats. We then crossed the river to Hoboken, an elegant retreat, and 
returned. There is a fine company of boarders and lodgers at Mr. Bunker's. 
Visited acquaintance. At evening went with cousin P. R. Starr and visited 
Mr. Snodgrass," and preached in his church on John vii : 37. Much fatigued. 
Find much employment. 

20. Took a long walk to Mr. Oilman's.'" Quite warm. Made calls on 



' Benjamin Holt Rice, D. D., a native of ° Judge William S. Johnson. 

Virginia, pastor of Pearl Street (Presbyterian) ' Eli B. Haskell. 

Church, New York, 1829-1832. '° Daniel L. Carroll, D. D., who succeeded 

' W. W. Phillips, D. D., of the Wall Street Dr. Lyman Beecher in Litchfield, Ct., but 

Church. after a three years' ministry resigned, and, 

3 Dr. James D. Matthews, of the Dutch 1829-1S35, was pastor in Brooklyn. Then 

Reformed Church. for three years he was President of Hampden 

■* Now a prominent and successful lawyer. Sydney College. Then for six years after- 

5 Samuel and Irene Battell. wards he was a pastor in Philadelphia, and 

^ It would be extraordinary cloth now afterwards Secretary of the New York Colo- 

that should cost $8.50 a yard. nization Society. 

' The University of the City of New York, " William D. Snodgrass, D. D., pastor of 

which had then just come into existence, hav- the Murray Street Presbyterian Church, 

ing been chartered in 1S30. '- Dr. Benjamin I. Oilman. 



:83i.] 



PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 



217 



acquaintance. Looked at Mr. Bunker's house, with its many conveniences. 
Afternoon rode with Mrs. Bunker' and visited their friends. Read. 

21. Mr. Battell and his daughters left town yesterday. Walked and made 
calls. My cousin Joseph Battell has some valuable ancient Bibles. Dined 
at Mr. Oilman's with P. R. Starr and Rev. Mr. Baldwin.^ Had a pleasant 
visit. Mr. Hoffman gave me a valuable ancient Bible. Rainy. 

22. Rose early. The servants of this house are very good. Have 
experienced great kindness from Mr. Bunker and family, and great mercies 
from God. Walked a distance to the steamboat, and came to Norwalk. 
Cold. Got acquainted with Rev. Mr. Schroeder.' Rode home in the stage. 
The society had a meeting last week and did poorly. Received a letter from 
Rev. J. H. Linsley, of Hartford, and one from my brother Francis. Visited 
a family that have lost a child in my absence and have one hard sick. Have 
had a prosperous journey and small expense. 

23. Wrote to Mr. Bunker, of New York, and Mr. Linsley, of Hartford. 
Received a letter from P. B. Gleason & Co., of Hartford. Walked out. 
Am fatigued with my journey. We have news of the unprecedented fact 
that our four secretaries at Wasliington have resigned their offices.* Wrote. 
Visited a sick child. At evening attended awhile at a Methodist four days' 
meeting. 

24. Preached with notes on Gal. ii : 16, 17, and a sermon on Jer. ix : i. 
Afternoon meeting pretty full. The evening conference thin on account 
of the great Methodist meeting. This people are in a very bad state. Some 
of them appear to feel it. Spoke at the conference on Luke xviii : 13. 

25. Walked and made calls. Did errands. The good people here are 
much grieved at the prospect of my leaving them. Warm. People are garden- 
ing. Peach blossoms are out. At evening had a good Bible class. Paid 
a tailor, $2.25. Wrote. Wrote to my brother Francis, and to P. B. Gleason 
& Co., of Hartford. 

26. Paid Mr. Josiah Booth, $20. Set out on a journey. Rode to New 
Haven. Have had some copying of a long report to our Clerical Convention 
well done by my college beneficiaries. Paid for two pair of chest-handles, 
$3. Rode to Humphreysville and Southburj-. Tarried with Rev. Mr. Ship- 
man.' A four days' meeting began today at Milford. 



' Mrs. Bunker, as we understand it, was 
daughter of the Mr. Southard with whom he 
boarded in Stratford. 

^ Rev. Elihu W. Baldwin, pastor of the 
Seventh Presbyterian Church, New York. 

^ John Frederick Schroeder, D. D., born 
in Baltimore, 1800; graduated at College of 
New Jerse}', 1819; for fourteen years assist- 
ant minister at Trinity Church, New York. 
He was a popular preacher and a somewhat 
extensive and well-known writer. He died 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., 1857. 

* The four secretaries were Martin Van 



Buren, of New York, Secretary of State; 
Samuel D. Ingham, of Pennsylvania, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury ; John Ii. Eaton, of Ten- 
nessee, Secretary of War ; and John Branch, 
of North Carolina, Secretary of the Navy. 
They were succeeded in the order above given 
by Edward Livingston, Louis McLane, Lewis 
Cass, and Levi Woodbury. 

^ Rev. Thomas L. Shipman was pastor at 
Southbury, 1826-1836. He is still living, of 
great age, but well preserved, at Jewett City, 
Ct. He is the father of Judge Nathaniel 
Shipman, of Hartford. 



2l8 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [l83I- 

27. Rode to Warren. Kindly received. Tlie roads have become dr\'. 
Called with my cousin Starr on Mr. Talcott.' He remains feeble. Attended 
a stated prayer-meeting. Concluded unexpectedly to continue here till after 
the next Sabbath. Cold and rough east wind. 

28. It rained and snowed all day. Kept almost entirely shut up. It was 
a very tedious day. Wrote on a set of rules of proceeding in church disci- 
pline, by desire of our Association. Read. The season is considerably more 
backward here than at Stratford. 

29. Wrote on my church rules and finished them. Called on Mr. Talcott. 
The present period of revivals is unusually great and extensive. It is peculiar 
in the great towns and colleges. Rainy. Afternoon attended a preparatory 
lecture and preached on Matt, xxv : i, 2. Well attended for a wet day. 
At evening walked out. 

30. Expected to have rode today to Kent, but was prevented by wet. 
Copied my church rules. Yesterday drank tea at Mr. Lyman's ; today 
at Mr. Talcott's. My cousin Starr has a good deal of company.^ 

May. 

1. Cold and cloudy, but not wet. Mr. Talcott not able to attend meet- 
ing. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, and Isa. iii : 10, 11. Administered the 
sacrament. This is a good church. Full meeting. At evening attended 
a conference and spoke on Matt, xv : 22, etc. Conversed with my cousin 
Starr on their society matters. The Lord be my helper. 

2. Left my kinsman's early, on my return. Dined at Brookfield with 
a military company and Mr. Brundage.^ Rode home — about forty-eight 
miles. A four days' meeting is to begin tomorrow at New Milford. Very 
tired. An insane woman here has drowned herself in my absence. Mr. 
Southard is quite feeble. 

3. Walked out and made calls. My people begin to have a little sense 
of their fearful danger. Received of the society treasurer, $90. Had much 
to do in preparing for my journey. Quite warm. Afternoon left home and 
rode to New Haven and Meriden. My horse travels slow. Tarried at 
a tavern. Much fatigued. 

4. Rode early to Hartford. The forenoon wet and rainy. Attended 
the election, such as it was. The first, I presume, in this State, without 
divine worship.'' But few people present and very few ministers. A general 
dissatisfaction was felt and expressed. Attended the Ministers' Annuit}' 
Society. Saw many acquaintance. Rode to East Windsor. Am glad to have 
this home. Mr. and Mrs. Haskell ' here and their two children.* Saw apple- 
tree blossoms. 



' Rev. Hart Talcott, pastor at Warren Peters, of Hebron, as Governor. He suc- 

from 1825 to his death in 1836. ceeded Gov. Tomlinson. 

^ His father's house had been a hospita- ' Mr. and Mrs. Harris Haskell, from Pine 

ble house during the long reach of his minis- Meadow (Windsor), 
try — 1772-1S29 — fifty-seven years. * Thomas Robbins Haskell, now four years 

3 Rev. Abner Brundage. old, and Elizabeth Bissell Haskell, three 

* This was the first year of Hon. John S. months old. 



I S3 I.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 219 

5. Quite cold. Wrote. Looked over my librar}-. Am feeble after my 
late fatigues. At evening rode out with Mr. W'olcott. 

6. Rode to F'.nfield. My brother has sold his place and has a family 
living with him in his house. The season is forward. My brother is prepar- 
ing to go to Philadelphia. Mr. Hazen,' of Agawam, came here and tarried. 

7. My brother having engaged to supply at Norfolk tomorrow, I con- 
cluded to go in his stead. Crossed at Warehouse Point, '^ and rode through 
Simsbury to Colebrook. Sent word to Norfolk and tarried at brother Ammi's. 
Warm. Apple-trees are much in blossom on the road. 

8. Rode early to Norfolk. It soon began to rain and was a rainy day. 
Found brother Samuel at Mr. Battell's. Preached on Luke xxii : 15, and 
John vii : 37. Administered the sacrament. The church well out for a wet 
day. The congregation rather thin. Had no evening meeting. We had 
some fine instrumental music. My brother Samuel is quite feeble, and has 
been long unwell.^ 

9. Wet. We had snow-squalls occasionally through the day. Wrote. 
Gave to m.y brother Samuel a paper, relinquishing to him as executor a legacy 
of my father, now due, amounting to about $85.'* Visited the aged Mr. 
Nathaniel Roys and his wife ; he is nearly ninety-eight, she, ninety ; married, 
November, 1760;' and he had lived four years with a former wife. Wrote 
to David Brooks, Esq., Stratford. Conversed considerable with Mr. Battell. 
Towards night rode to New Hartford. Cold and tedious wind. Tarried 
at a tavern. 

ID. In the morning the ground was m.ostly covered with snow. There was 
ice. Breakfasted at Mrs. Everest's,' at Canton. Rode to Hartford. Many 
of the apple-trees are in full bloom. Found Mr. Hazen ' in Hartford, waitinni- 
for my brother Francis. He and his wife came about noon and went off 
in the steamboat^ for New York and Philadelphia ; Mr. Hazen for New York. 
Rode to East Windsor. Mr. Wolcott's three grandchildren ^ and their mothers 
are here. Tudor has repaired and much improved the old house. 

II. Rode to Ellington and saw Mr. Brockway. He expects to supply 

' Rev. Reuben S. Hazen, a native of West * Widow of Mr. Solomon Everest, who 

Springfield, and a graduate of Yale, 18 18, and died in 1822 and left the Everest fund. In 

pastor at Agawam, 1821-1830. all he left for benevolent purposes about 

^ On the ferry-boat. After using a ferry $16,000, which was a notable sum of money 

at Warehouse Point from the beginning, it is for that day. 

stated now, in the year 18S5, that arrange- ' Rev. Reuben S. Hazen, of Agawam 

mcnts are made for building a bridge at this (West Springfield), 
point. ^ The first steamboat plying between 

^ He was alarmingly ill, it may be remem- Hartford and New York was the Oliver 

bered, after his removal to Central New York, Ellsworth, which ran from 1824 to 1S43. 

where was still his home. Before 1S31 other boats, the McDonough, 

^ There was a very kindly feeling in this Commerce, and Victory, had been placed on 

family one towards another. this same line. 

5 By this it appears that he and his wife ' The two children of Harris and Frances 

had lived together seventy-one years, and she (Wolcott) Haskell (see May 4), and Tudor 

was a second wife. He died during 1832, in Bissell, infant son of Edgar and Evelina 

his one hundredth year. (Wolcott) Bissell. 



220 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1831. 

some longer at Norfolk.' Rode to Enfield. Kindly entertained at Mr. Par- 
sons's. In the afternoon attended the weekly prayer-meeting. After which 
rode to East Windsor. I had my brother's horse to go to Norfolk, and 
he nov/ lets me have him to go to Stratford. Warm. Wrote to Mr. Battell. 

12. Rode to Stratford. Did not leave Hartford till after ten o'clock. 
Received a letter from Mr. Ely, of Simsbur}-. Warm and something dusty. 
Vegetation advances rapidly. A full blowth on the apple-trees. Got home 
late. At the bridge^ found that the elder Mrs. Lacey has died today. 
Visited a family in which a young child has just died. 

13. Am fatigued with my late exertions. Did errands. Warm. Attended 
the funeral of the late Mrs. Lacey. She was buried at Bridgeport and I did 
not go there. Mr. Hewitt was with me. Wrote. I am, in the holy provi- 
dence of God, without a home. I hope in him. 

14. Received a large cherry chest made for me. It is a very good 
one. Worked at my books, putting them down and preparing for removal. 
Attended the funeral of a child. The society committee called to see me 
and did but little. Rode out with Mrs. Bunker. Her husband came from 
New York. 

15. Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4, and i Cor. i: 23. There was no 
church^ and our meeting was full. An interesting day. Attended the even- 
ing conference ; quite thin. A very fine season. Attended a funeral at the 
poor-house. There have been twenty deaths in the town the present year."* 

16. Worked at my books and other things. Made calls. Visited an aged 
black man very sick. Got wet. The prospects of this people are poor and 
painful. 

17. Walked and made calls. Paid a cabinet-maker for my chest, $6.75. 
The whole cost is $8.75. Warm. Rode to Fairfield and procured twenty 
volumes from Mr. Eliot's library, for which I paid $11. Paid a tailor, $5.50. 
Preparing for my journey. Friends here appear to be pained at the prospect 
of my leaving them. 

18. Rode to East Windsor. Had a heavy load of baggage. Some of the 
way warm and very dusty. Rode late in the evening. Heard of Mr. and 
Mrs. Battell in Hartford, but did not see them. 

19. Wet and rainy. A very fine season for vegetation. Worked at my 
books and other things. My library has become considerably disordered. 
Am fatigued with late labors. 

20. Rode to Enfield to supply my brother during his absence at Philadel- 
phia. The roads wet. Last night considerable thunder. Wrote. Read. 



' It appears from this entry that Rev. ^ The bridge across the Housatonic River, 

Diodate Brockway, of Ellington, was em- which separates Milford from Stratford, 

powered for a time to send preachers for the ^ Another instance of awkward expres- 

supply of the pulpit at Norfolk, made vacant sion in the use of the word church (see July 

in 1S29 by the dismissal of Dr. Emerson, who 4, 1S30). 

went to Andover. Norfolk was out of the *■ The year before there were only twenty- 
way, and ministers were less numerous there two during the whole year, and now we are 
than along the river. in the middle of the fifth month of 183 1. 



I 



1831.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 221 

2T. Spent much of the clay reading Woodruff's Tour to Greece} Walked 
out and made calls. This town is much improving. The canker-worms are 
beginning their spoliations on the apple-trees.' Read. 

22. A pleasant day and a large assembly. Preached on Heb. xii : i6, 
and Luke xix : 43, 44. This meeting-house appears much better by the 
alterations. The galleries very full. Preached in the evening on Matt. 
XV : 21, etc. On the iSth paid to Mr. Southard, Sio. Left off my flannel. 

23. Rode to Thompsonville and looked at the carpet manufactory.' 
It is ver)' extensive and in the best order. Read Hitchcock's Lectures 
on dyspepsia.'* We have favorable news for the Poles in their arduous 
struggle.' Wrote. My situation is full of anxieties. 

24. Read Hitchcock's Lectures. They have some good things and some 
that are puerile. Wrote to Esq. Ely, of Simsbun,-. Wet and rainy. Was 
prevented from attending an evening meeting. 

25. Rode to Somers. The roads ver)' wet. Made several calls. They 
do not pay my claim on the society here, nor give encouragement of doing 
it for some time. Returned. Attended the weekly prayer-meeting. Read. 
Cool. 

26. Finished Hitchcock's Lectures. Received a letter from Dr. Welch,* 
of Norfolk, requesting me to supply there for a time.' I thank God for this 
prospect of employment. Rode out and visited. At evening attended 
a temperance meeting. They have a good temperance society here. Was 
out late. 

27. The forenoon quite rainy. Read Magee ' on the atonement. A ver)' 
.valuable work. Afternoon rode to East Windsor. Saw various old friends. 
At evening attended a*^ a meeting. Mr. Goodyear' spoke well. Sold my 
horse to Abiezer Porter, of whom I bought him two years ago. He gives 
me $55 and the use of a good wagon for a journey. We call it $60. I paid 
him for the horse, $65. Wrote to Dr. Welch, of Norfolk. 



' Tour to Malta, Greece, Asia Mhior, etc. Albro, D. D., afterwards, 1835-1865, pastor 

Hartford, 1831. i2mo. S.Woodruff. of First Church, Cambridge, Mass.; Rev. 

- In that region they generally finished John Mitchell, who had virtually accepted 

their work about the loth or 15th of June. his call at Fair Haven, Ct., before the Nor- 

^ This manufactory had been then only a folk call reached him; and Rev. Theophilus 

few years in existence. Smith, afterwards, 1831-1S53, pastor at New 

^ Edward Hitchcock, D. D., professor in Canaan. The latter declined his call to Xor- 

Amherst College, 1S25-1845, and president folk because of the difficulty of finding such 

of the college, 1845-1854. Lectures on Diet, a house as he desired. They have a nice 

Kcc^iinen, and Employment, was the work parsonage house there now. 
which Dr. Robbins was reading. ® Rev. William Magee, a prominent divine 

5 It was only a temporary advantage. of Ireland, 1765-1831. His work was, Dis- 

The power of Russia was too overwhelming, courses on the Scriptural Doctrine of the Atcme- 

and little Poland must fail in the unequal mejit and Sacrifice. 
contest. ' Rev. George Goodyear graduated at 

^ Dr. Benjamin Welch. Yale, 1S24, and at Yale Theological Sem- 

' Since Dr. Emerson's dismission in De- inary, 1S37. He was a candidate seeking a 

cember, 1829, the church at Norfolk had settlement, and supplying at Dr. Robbins's 

given calls to three ministers : Rev. John A. old parish, but was not settled there. 



222 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^^3^- 

28. Rode to Hartford. Did errands. The Senate have refused to restore 
the practice of a religious service at the election. An act of public hostility 
to the religion of Christ. Quite warm. I still have my trials. I commit 
all my ways to the keeping of God. Rode to Enfield. The Poles appear 
to be most une.xpectedly successful in their conflict with the Russians.' 

29. Preached on Ezek. xx.xvii : 3, 4, and i Cor. i : 23. Very warm and 
the heat oppressive. After meeting rode to the east part of the town ; had 
a good meeting and preached on John ix : 4. Rode to the north part of the 
town and attended the evening conference, and preached on Luke xviii : 13. 
Very much fatigued, but spoke in the evening easier than I expected. The 
church chose delegates to attend an installation and two public meetings 
of worship and prayer. 

30. Rode out and looked at three horses, but made no purchase. The 
heat very severe. Received a letter from Mr. Brockway. Am able to do but 
very little. Wrote. Towards night left this worthy family and rode to East 
Windsor. Took a large number of pamphlets and papers from the post 
office, which had been long accumulating, and paid for them, $1.13. The 
mercur}' rose today to 95°. People complain very much of the heat. 

31. Assisted in trimming trees. Mr. Brockway^ called on me on his 
return from Norfolk ^.nd informed me they wished me to be there on the next 
Sabbath. Wrote to D. Brooks, of Stratford. The thermometer rose again 
to 95°. On the Sabbath it was 93°. Rode to Hartford. Paid the Annuity 
Society two annual contributions, $10.30. Paid for a verj^ fine pair of shoes, 
$2. People are much oppressed with the heat. Visited. 

June. • 

1. Rode out, did some errands, and made calls. The prospects of this 
society ^ are not encouraging. Have difficulty in collecting debts. Paid 
a tax of sixty-nine cents. Worked at my books and prepared for my journey. 
At evening set out on a journey to Norfolk. I am once more committed 
to the entire disposal of the God of my fathers. 1 rejoice to be in his hands. 
Thermometer 94°. Put up at the stage-house.** 

2. Was called before one o'clock and rode in the stage to Norfolk. 
Had a comfortable time, though a full stage. The roads are getting dusty. 
Much fatigued. Stopped at Mr. Battell's. He is gone to the westward. 
Brother Samuel is here and much better than he has been. Went to board 
at Dr. Welch's.' The heat about the same as for several days. Walked out. 

3. Rode out and visited two sick persons. Read a pamphlet on the 
project of a national railroad from the Hudson to the Mississippi. It is 
thought to be a warmer day than any other this week. Wrote to my cousin 
Starr, of Warren. Read. 



' This good news will not bear the test of ^ His old parish in East Windsor, 

time. * He spent the night in Hartford, in order 

^ Rev. Mr. Brockway, of Ellington, had that he might be ready to take the stage for 

supplied at Norfolk in person on that Sab- Norfolk early in the morning, 
bath. 5 Benjamin Welch, M. D. 



183 1.] PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 2^^ 

4. Wrote. Last evening attended a small prayer-meeting ; quite thin. 
Traded, $1.08. Have to procure various necessary things. The heat not 
much diminished. Very dusty. Read the Bible. 

5. Cloudy, but little or no rain. I'he heat abates some. Read the 
Bible. Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3. 4, and Luke xi.v : 43, 44. A pretty 
large congregation. Very good singing. Spent the evening and night \vi:h 
brother Samuel at Mr. Battell's. Much fatigued. The walk from my boarding- 
house, Dr. Welch's, is rather severe. 

6. Read. The ALay anniversaries at New York and Boston ' excite greet 
attention. It is a time of great and very many revivals. Brother Samuel 
went off for home.' Gave him a Testament, for which I paid $1.50. The 
committee wish me to continue to supply here for the present. Wrote to 
the committee of Stratford, and to Miss Southard. At evening attended 
the monthly concert. Traded, $4.75. 

7. Wrote to Mr. Hooker,' of Hartford, and Mr. Hotchkiss,* of Saybroo!;. 
Read. We have cooler weather, but no rain. Occupied with company. Our 
national administration is in a low state. 

8. Rode to Winsted, with company, to attend a four days' meeting.^ 
A number of ministers were present. Various exercises were attended. A 
large collection of people. 1 preached in the evening at the west vill.i.ge. 

9. Quite warm and dusty. Kept at Mr. Higley's. Am much fatigued. 

10. After two prayer-meetings I preached in the forenoon on John vii : 37. 
The meeting full and verj- solemn. Some addresses followed and the services 
were closed. The heat and dust very oppressive. Much fatigued. Some 
of Mr. Battell's family were down. Rode home with them. 

11. Almost as warm as last week. Rode and visited the sick. Read. 
Can do but little. Wrote. Vegetation begins to suffer with the drought. 

12. Preached on Heb. xii : 16, and Matt, xxv : 6. Attended the Sabbath- 
school ; ver}' large. Baptized a child, and did the same last Sabbath. Peo- 
ple suffer a good deal with the heat. Attended a third meeting and spoke 
on I Kings xix. Much fatigued. Read the Bible. 



' The New York anniversaries were held Secretary of the Connecticut Missionary Soci- 

in the second week in May, and the Boston ety, and in 1S31 Secretary of the Connecticut 

anniversaries in the last week in May, some- Home Missionary Society, which offices he 

times reaching into June. held till his death. He was an extensive 

^ In Central New York. writer of books, and, with Dr. Ellsworth Dag- 

3 The name of Rev. Horace Hooker has gett, he was especially employed in preparing 

very frequently come before us in this diary, the Connecticut hymn-book, entitled Psalms 

and some fuller notice of him than we have and Hymns. He was a man of choice cul- 

yet given is his rightful due. He was boin ture and choice Christian spirit, 
in Kensington parish, Berlin, in March, 1793, * Rev. P'rederick W. Hotchkiss, pastor at 

a direct descendant from Thomas Hooker, of Old Saybrook, 1783-1844. 
Hartford. He was graduated in Yale Col- ' The v.riter well remembers a four days' 

lege in 1815, was tutor there, 1S17-1822, was meeting held in the north parish of East 

pastor a short time in Watertown. He then Windsor during the winter of 1831 and 1S32. 

became the editor of the Connecticut Ob- It was just about this time that this religious 

server, of Hartford. In 1826 he was made agency was so common. 



224 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBRINS, D. D. 



[1831. 



13. Rode to the south part of the town. Vrsited several places. Saw 
a man very low with a broken limb. Wrote. Tr}-ing to buy a horse ; a ver}' 
disagreeable business. Quite warm. There have been many changes in this 
town in thirty years, 

14. Rode with Mr. Marsh,' of Winchester, to Salisburj^, in heat and dust, 
and met with the Association. Nearly half of the members were absent. 
Almost every society has more or less of a revival. Norfolk, probably, the 
least. The Association had much business. Mr. Powers,^ of Goshen, 
preached. Afternoon and evening wet and rainy. Very grateful. 

15. The Association licensed Eleazar Holt,^ of Norfolk, and ordained as 
an evangelist a Mr, Loring,* of New York State. I preached at the ordina- 
tion service on i Cor. i : 23. The other services were well performed. The 
ministers are in a veiT good state. Wet. Afternoon a long shower. The drv 
ground is greatly refreshed. Rode home with Mr. Marsh. He tarried with 
me. Got considerable wet. 

16. Wrote on the records of the Clerical Convention. Afternoon attended 
a church prayer-meeting. It was serious and interesting. A very solemn 
fact that this town should be passed over, while the grace of God descends 
all around us. Looked at two horses. Wrote late. 

17. Wrote the annual report of the Everest fund for General Association. 
Afternoon walked and visited. At evening attended a meeting in the west 
district and preached on John ix : 4. Read late. 

18. Visited. Wrote to James Skinner, of Wirnsted. Rode out with my 
sister and visited a sick man. We had a thunder-shower. Sultry hot. 
I lose too much time from want of mental application. Wrote. 

19. Preached in the morning on John iii : 3. Attended the Sabbath- 
school. Afternoon Mr. Holt preached. His first sermon and a good per- 
formance. Spoke at the third meeting on Acts xxiv : 25. Warm and languid. 
Baptized two children. Prepared for my journej'. 

20. Set out early on my journey. Mrs. Battell went with me to Winsted 
and gave me a conveyance. Rode in a public conveyance to Hartford. 
Very hot, and we were obliged to travel slow. The steamboat had been gone 
half an hour.' Rode with Mr. Filley ^ to East Windsor. Paid Pludson & Co. 
a charge, $1.50. Attended to my things. 

21. Dea. Reed paid me $30, and I paid the same to Maria Burnham.' 
Rode in a wagon, with much dust, to Hartford. Took the steamboat for 



' Rev. Frederick Marsh. 

^ Rev. Grant Powers, pastor at Goshen 
from 1829 to his death — 1841. He was grad- 
uated at Dartmouth College, 1810. 

^ Eleazar Holt was graduated at Yale, 
1823, but his ministerial life was short. He 
died in 1835. 

* Rev. Joseph B. Loring, who was licensed 
by the same Association (Litchfield North), 
June 9, 1829. 



^ He was on his way to the General Asso- 
ciation at Saybrook, and lost his connection. 

^ Mr. Horace Filley, who seems to have 
made frequent journeys from East Windsor 
to Hartford. 

^ Maria Burnham was the daughter of 
William and Emeline (Parsons) Burnham, of 
East Windsor, but how this money belonged 
to her we do not know, though probably it was 
money she had loaned. 



i83i.] 



PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 



225 



Saybrook at two o'clock. About one hundred and forty passengers. Landed 
at Saybrook near nine o'clock. Almost two hours later than was promised. 
\\'alked to the meeting-house and went into a meeting. The Convention met 
in the evening and adjourned on account of my absence.' In the afternoon 
we had a shower on the river. 

22. Kindly entertained at Mr. Sanford's. The General Association is very 
thin of members and visiting ministers, because they cannot leave home. 
I think there is at this time a greater revival of religion in this State and this 
country than was ever before.'^ Not less than one hundred congregations 
in this State, and nine hundred in the United States, have been mercifully 
visited the year past. Presented to the General Association the annual 
report of the Everest fund, which was approved. In the afternoon Mr. Absa- 
lom Peters ^ preached, and the sacrament was administered. A solemn season 
and a large collection of people. It is said the General Association has never 
sat in this society before.* At evening had a meeting of the Convention. 
But little was done. Attended awhile on a sermon by Pres. Day. 

23. Rode in a small stage with Pres. Day to New Haven. In the after-, 
noon we had a hard rain. Made some calls. Paid a book-binder, $5.94.. 
Rode late in the evening in the stage to Stratford. Much fatigued by labor 
and want of rest. Quite cool. 

24. Paid Mr. Southard, $20. Made some calls. This society have done 
nothing towards effecting my dismission. Took the stage after four o'clock 
and rode to New Haven, and thence to Hartford. It was quite a cool night. 

25. Stayed at Hartford about an hour and took the stage and rode 
to Norfolk. Left Hartford about two o'clock. Had no sleep except in the 
stage. Have had, by divine favor, a prosperous journey. The committee 
of the church and societv here iiave received from Mr. Smith ^ a negative 
answer to their late call. Received a letter from my cousin G. Starr, 
of Warren. Very tired. Put up my things in part. 

26. Have had a good rest. Preached on Isa. v : 4,^ and i Thess. v : 3. 
A full and solemn meeting. Gave some account of the state of religrion 
in the State and the countr}-. Read, by request, Mr. Smith's letter to the 
committee. It is not ver\- well received.* Spoke at the third meeting 
on Ps. xxiii : 3. At evening walked out. 



' He was the scribe, and had the records 
of the Association and the schedule of busi- 
ness. 

' Elderly people, who were born and 
brought up in New England, retain very 
vivid recollections of the scenes that were 
then passing. 

' Absalom Peters, D. D., son of Gen. Ab- 
salom and Mary (Rogers) Peters, was born 
in Wentworth, N. H., though his ancestry be- 
longed to Connecticut. He was a distin- 
guished Presbyterian minister, and, 1S25- 
i.':37, was Secretary of the American Home 



Missionary Society. He was a graduate of 
Dartmouth (as was his father before him) in 
1816, andof Princeton Seminary in 1819. He 
died in New York in 1S69. 

■♦ Saybrook was the place where the Gen- 
erat Association of Connecticut was born, in 
1708. 

' Rev. Theophilus Smith, who has already 
been mentioned in connection with his call to 
Norfolk. 

* He had had his call under consideration 
for some months, and the delay had been tire- 
some, as well as inconvenient. 



226 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^83 1. 

27. Read. Wrote the eight preceding days of my diary. Afternoon rode 
and visited the sick and others. Am kindly treated by old acquaintance. 
The tillage of this town is much neglected for grazing. 

28. Read. Rode to the north part of the town. Visited. Preached 
a lecture on Acts xxiv : 25. Wet and rainy. The meeting rather thin. 
Rode to the northwest neighborhood and preached in the evening in the 
Baptist meeting-house on Matt, xv : 22, etc. A Baptist preacher, Mr. Ellis, 
resides here. There is considerable religious attention in this neighborhood. 
Tarried at Esq. Knapp's. 

29. Visited a man hard sick. Rode home. Afternoon preached a pre- 
paratory lecture with notes on John xv : 29. Full and solemn meeting. 
Visited a distressed paralytic man. Showery. 

30. Rode early to Goshen to attend the four days' meeting. Mr. Andrews' 
preached in the forenoon; I, in the afternoon, on Isa. iii : 10, 11. And in the 
evening without notes on Luke xviii : 13. The attention of the people appears 
to be increasing. We have frequent prayer-meetings. Kindly entertained at 
Esq. Lyman's.^ 

July. 

1. Attended the morning and other prayer-meetings. Mr. Andrews 
preached in the forenoon. Mr. Norton,^ from Illinois, in the afternoon, and 
Mr. Carrington"* in the evening. An anxious meeting was prevented by 
a shower. Mr. Lyman is deeply impressed and solemn. 

2. Preached in the forenoon on John vii : 37. Attended an anxious 
meeting. About thirty were present. The feeling has been evidently increas- 
ing through the meeting, and now there are manifest tokens of the divine 
presence. The meeting is to be continued through tomorrow. Rode home. 
Quite warm. Much fatigued. Mr. Battell returned from his western journey. 

3. A warm day. Preached on Matt, v : 16, and Ps. x : 31. Administered 
the sacrament. The church appears very large. The season was impressive. 
For our third meeting we attended at David Roys's,' long confined, and had 
the Lord's Supper. He is very helpless. A good number were present. 
At evening visited a family about to remove. Quite tired. 

4. Read. The proceedings of the members of the Government at Wash- 
ington are very disgraceful.^ Wrote, The heat is very oppressive. I have 
to do something in instructing a young man in Latin. At evening attended 
the monthly concert. The people come late. 

5. Wrote. Rode to South End and preached a lecture on John ix : 4. 
Well attended. I think there are evidences of increasing thoughtfulness. 



' Rev. William Andrews, pastor in Corn- * Rev. George Carrington, pastor at North 

wall, 1827-1S38. The latter was the year of Goshen, 1829-1S33, a native of Huntington, 

his death. He had been previously, 1813- Ct., and a graduate of Yale, 1822. 
1826, pastor at Danbury. * David W. Roys died in 1S32, at the age 

- Erastus Lyman, Esq. of fifty-seven. 

3 Rev. Augustus T. Norton, who received ^ It was a critical time in our national 

the degree of D. D. from "Wabash College in affairs, but we emerged from it safely. There 

.1868. He was a native of Goshen. have been disgraceful proceedings since. 



183 1.] PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 227 

Visited sick persons. Very warm. Towards night we had a violent thunder- 
shower. Find inconvenience in being destitute of a horse, 

6. Very little has been done in this vicinity in reference to Independence. 
In the morning we had a hard shower. Read. Rode with company to the 
nortli part of the town, visited a sick man, and rode to North Canaan and 
attended at the four days' meeting. A number of ministers were present. 
Mr. Bradford' preached. Returned. 

7. Rode to Canaan. The meeting becomes more numerous and solemn. 
I preached in the forenoon on Isa. iii : lo, ii. There was very little inter- 
mission in the meeting. Mr. Fletcher" preached in the afternoon, and a large 
num.ber took the anxious seats. A number of Norfolk people were there. 
Returned. Heard of the death of President Monroe,^ like two of his prede- 
cessors, on the Fourth of July. 

8. Read. Wrote. Regan a sermon on Ps. Ixviii : 31, on the subject 
of African colonization. Looked over documents on that subject. Afternoon 
rode to Winchester and preached a lecture for Mr. Marsh on Matt, xxv : 6. 
Well attended. Saw old acquaintance. Drank tea at Mr. Hurlburt's. Quite 
wet and rainy. Addressed the church on the subject of their unhappy 
difficulties. At evening preached again in the meeting-house without notes 
on I\Iatt. XV: 21, etc. There is some religious attention here. . The ground 
very v.-et. 

9. Visited. Rode home. Shower}-. Considerably fatigued. Wrote on 
the sermon begun yesterday. 

10. Finished and preached in the morning my sermon on Ps. Ixviii : 31. 
Afternoon preached on 2 Kings ix : 3. Spoke at the third meeting on 
Mark x: 51. We had a contribution for the Colonization Society and 
collected $34. My lungs are fatigued with so much preaching. Quite cool. 
Baptized a child. 

11. Almost a frost this morning. Read. Wrote. People are beginning 
haying, with a great crop of grass. Afternoon attended a church conference, 
r.nd the church resolved to have a four days' meeting, to commence on the 
1 6th of August."* Gave a poor man, $1. Walked and visited. Find my feet 
tender for walking. 

12. Wrote. Occupied with company. Afternoon rode to the north part 
of the town, visited, an"d preached in the Baptist meeting-house on Luke 
xviii : 31. The awakening in that quarter evidently increases. The Lord 
be our helper. Got home late. Quite cool. Some people are beginning 
harvest. 

13. Read. Wrote to my brother Francis. Walked and visited. Went 



' Rev. James Bradford, of Sheffield, Mass., ' James Monroe, President of the United 

son of Rev. Moses Bradford, of Francestown, States, 1S17-1S25, was born in Westmoreland 

X. II. County, Va., April 28, 1759, and died in New 

- Rev. Thomas Fletcher, a native of New York city, July 4, 1S31. 
Ipswich, X. H., a graduate of Middlebury •* A very large number of the parishes of 

College, 1825, afterwards settled in South- Connecticut had four days' meetings during 

wick, Hampshire County, Mass. the years 1S31 and 1S32. 



228 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^83 1. 

into the burying-ground. Some wheat is raised here. 1 am in mucli want 
of a horse. Wrote. 

14. Find it very inconvenient to be up so late at night. Rode and visited 
the most of the day. 1 think the prospects here for a work of divine grace 
are encouraging. Received a letter from Mr. Beach, of Winsted, and wrote 
him in return. Quite cool for the season. 

15. Wrote to Prof. Fitch, of New Haven. Walked out. Afternoon 
attended a Bible class for the first time. It was well attended and the 
members appeared quite intelligent. At evening attended a small prayer- 
meeting. 

16. Read. Shower}^. Afternoon rode to South Canaan to preach for 
Mr. Prentice,' in behalf of Mr. Holt," who is to be here tomorrow. Called 
on Mr. Holt at his father's. A very good road to South Canaan. People 
are generally harvesting. An unusual quantity of wheat. Mr. Prentice 
is pleasantly situated. 

17. Preached on 2 Kings vii : 3, Matt, xxv : 6, and at a third meeting 
on Matt. XV : 21, etc. This is a pretty good society; much improved 
in a few- years. There is a good work of divine grace here. Mr. Prentice 
has a worthy family. 

18. Rode by Meekertown^ home. Got a little wet. Called at Dea. 
Minor's.* Am still laboring to purchase a horse. Read. Visited. 

19. Wrote. Read. Walked out and visited. People here are evidently 
expecting a work of divine grace. 

20. Quite warm. Read the Bible. Our four days' meetings have some 
resemblance to the Jewish fasts. Afternoon rode to North End and preached 
on John xv : 22. Showery; much hay wet. The general seriousness in the 
town evidently increases. Tarried out. 

21. Rode and visited. Afternoon had a full and solemn church confer- 
ence. A very busy season. At evening preached at the south (Minor) 
school-house on John xv : 22. \\'ell attended. Was out late. Much 
fatigued. 

■ 22. Rode a number of miles, with my cousin W. Lawrence,' in pursuit 
of a horse. Attended the Bible class. Was sent for to visit a man in the 
northwest part of the town in great distress of mind. A number of persons 
were in. A solemn evening. Tarried out. 

23. There is a powerful work in the northwest quarter. Rainy and wet. 
Vv^rote. Am much employed. The season for hay and harvest has not been 
good. Under the pressure of fatigue began a sermon on the subject of the 
Jewish fasts, on 2 Chron. xxx : 26, 27. Had to talk about buying a horse. 



' Rev. Charles Prentice, pastor at Canaan * Dea. Noah Minor, holding the office from 

(commonly called South Canaan, in distinc- 1817 to 1843, when he resigned through age 

tion from North Canaan), 1S04-1838. and infirmity. 

- Rev. Eleazar Holt. ' William Lawrence, then associated with 

3 A portion of Norfolk was known as Mr. Joseph Battell in his extensive business. 

Meekertown. There was also a district in He was brother of Mrs. Eliza Olmsted, so 

the town of Goshen with the same name. often mentioned in this diary. 



183 1.] PASTOR IX STRATFORD. 229 

24. Finished and preached my sermon on 2 Chron. xxx : 26, 27, and 
in the afternoon on Ps. li : 17. Meeting a little diminished by a number 
of the north people gone to the Daptists to attend a baptizing. Attended 
the third meeting and had a sermon read. At evening attended a conference 
in the Phelps district, with a number of distressed souls, and preached 
on Heb. x : 26. Ver)^ tired. The man 1 was called to see on Friday has 
hope. 

• 25. Am quite languid. Walked out. Wrote. Read. Warm. Yesterday 
I baptized a child. Got a horse for present use. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Hickok,' 
of Litchfield, and to Mr. Josiah Booth and Miss Eliza Southard, of Stratford. 
Visited. 

26. Wrote to my brother Francis. The forenoon quite rainy. Afternoon 
rode to North End. Visited several families. Find increasing evidence of 
divine influences. Called on ^Ir. Ellis,^ the Baptist preacher. At evening 
preached in his meeting-house on Acts viii : 21, 22. Had a full and attentive 
meeting. The work of grace in this neighborhood is very great ; scarcely 
a house is passed over. Tarried out. 

27. Rode and visited serious and awakened families entirely. Saw some 
much distressed. Afternoon attended a conference. Much fatigued. Read. 

28. My pupil occupies considerable of my time. Received a letter from 
brother Francis, one from Prof. Fitch, and one from Mr. Hickokj of Litchfield. 
Afternoon attended the church conference. Full and quite interesting. 

29. At evening attended a prayer-meeting. We certainly have a revival. 
May God carry on his work and have all the praise. 

30. Walked out. Wrote the most of a sermon on Zeph. i: 12. Find 
it difficult to get sufficient rest. Am too much fatigued for study. Quite 
warm, 

31. Finished and preached my sermon on Zeph. i: 12. Preached on 
Ps. 1:5, At evening preached in the Phelps district on Matt, xviii : 11. 
Tarried out in a family in a very serious state. Sultry hot. Much fatigued, 

August. 

1. Rode and visited. Sultry warm. Am quite languid. Read. We 
have a full exposure of the late proceedings at Washington, which have 
been very disgraceful.^ My cousin Arthur Gilman'* is here. Visited a sick 
child. 

2. Rode to Canaan Mountain and attended a funeral. A large number 
of people were present. Preached on the occasion on Matt, xviii: 11. 
Afternoon visited a young ladies' school. They performed very well. Read. 
Oppressed with the heat. 



' Rev. Laurens P. Hickok, D. D., LL. D., lege, 1820. He was an eminent thinker and 

pastor at Litchfield, 1S29-1836. Afterwards scholar, 

he was Professor of Theology in Western - Rev. Hermon Ellis. 

Reserve College, professor in Auburn Theo- ^ There was apt to be a disgraceful state 

logical Seminary, and professor and president of things at Washington whenever there was 

in Union College. He was a native of Dan- a Democratic President there, 

bury, Ct., 179S; was graduated at Union Col- * Son of Judge Benjamin L Gilman. 



230 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^83 1- 

3. Last night we had a hard rain. Wrote. The society committee 
informed me, very unexpectedly, that they expected another preacher here 
soon. I commit my way all to God and his infinite grace. Afternoon 
attended the funeral of a young child. Rode to the east part of the town 
and preached in the evening on Acts viii : 21, 22. People are much embar- 
rassed with bad hay weather. Had a full meeting. 

4. Visited. Last night tarried at Loon Meadow.' Afternoon attended 
the church conference. At evening preached in the west district on Acts 
vii : 51. Much oppressed with want of sleep. 

5. Walked out. Traded, $3.17. Paid the post office, twenty-six cents. 
Attended my Bible class. Rode to South End and preached in the evening 
at a full meeting on Acts vii : 26. Quite cool. Tarried out. 

6. Visited. Saw a youth in deep distress of mind. Rode home. My 
new horse (contracted for) has a bad sore back, which requires constant 
attention. Paid a tailor, $1. Began a sermon late in the afternoon and 
wrote six pages. Not up very late. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Clark,'' of Colebrook. 

7. Finished and preached in the afternoon the sermon begun yesterday 
on Matt, xvii : 4-17. Preached in the morning on Matt, xxv : i, 2. My 
cousin, Mrs. Oilman,^ came to Mr. Battell's last evening from New York. 
Had a full evening meeting and preached on Ps. cxli : 8. At the close 
of the afternoon service gave a full statement of the manner in which we wish 
to have the four days' meeting observed. Baptized a child. 

8. Quite cool. Attended to my horse. My sister and Mrs. Oilman went 
to Warren. Received a box by stage from Stratford, which I sent for, with 
various articles, for which I paid $1. Received a letter from Miss E. South- 
worth, and one from Mr. Josiah Booth, of Stratford. Mr. Cowles, of Canaan, 
came and performed a marriage in this neighborhood ; I attended with him. 
We have an account of the sudden death of the Russian general, Marshal 
Diebitsch.* Wrote to Mr. Lathrop,' of Salisbury. 

9. We had a hard rain. Looked over my accounts. On the i6th 
received a letter from Mr. Goodman,* of Torringford. Walked out and 
visited. 

10. Something wet and shower}'. Rode to the north part of the town and 
visited at a number of places. Am very affectionately received. At evening 
had a meeting on Goshen road and preached on John v : 40. A very good 
meeting. Tarried out. 



■ One of the local designations for a part bury, Ct., 1825-1S36, He was graduated at 

of Norfolk. Middlebury College, 1815. 

' Rev. Azariah Clark, pastor at Colebrook, * Rev. Epaphras Goodman, pastor at Tor- 
1830-1832. He was a graduate of Williams ringford, 1S22-1836. He was^ settled as col- 
College, 1805. league with Father Mills, and continued in 

3 Wife of Dr. Benjamin I. Oilman, Jr. office three years after Mr. Mills's death, 

* Marshal Diebitsch Zabalkanski, a Rus- which took place in 1833, at the age of ninety, 

sian general in great favor with the Czar Al- Mr. Goodman was graduated at Dartmouth 

exander, and the commander of the Russian College, 1816. He was a native of West 

army in its victories over the Poles in 1S30. Hartford, and studied theology with Dr. Na- 

5 Rev. Leonard E. Lathrop, pastor in Salis- than Perkins and Dr. Eleazar T. Fitch. 



183 I.] PASTOR IN STRATFORD. 23 I 

11. Rode to my brother Amnii's and made them a short visit. His 
daughter is hopefully a subject of the work of grace here. In the afternoon 
attended my Bible class. Rode to Loon Meadow and preached in the 
evening on John v : 40. People are much driven with their work. Got 
home late and ver)- tired. My birthday finds me in a state of much anxiety 
and solicitude. Am so much occupied that I cannot attend to the usual 
appropriate duties of the day. Endeavored to take a brief view of my most 
important interest, and to commit all to the infinite mercy and faithfulness 
of (jod. I am without a home, but have never been forsaken. 

12. Am unhappily occupied with my horse. He has a very bad back, 
and I think I must return him. We had a season of fasting and prayer 
preparatory to our public meeting. Well attended. Mr. Cowles,' of Canaan, 
and Mr. Pettibone," a candidate, preached and spoke in the forenoon. 
Mr. Cowles preached and Mr. Clark,^ of Colebrook, spoke in the afternoon. 
A serious meeting. Visited a sick child. At evening preached in the west 
district on Rom. ix : 20. Many people are very thoughtful. 

13. Wrote. Walked out. There is a considerable dissatisfaction here with 
regard to a change of ministers.'* Afternoon rode to Salisbury to exchange 
with Mr. Lathrop.' Met him on the way. Quite warm and sultry. People 
get in hay very fast. Traded, $1.83. 

14. Verj'warm. Preached on Matt, xxv : i, 2, and Zeph. i : 12. Addressed 
the Sabbath school. I think this congregation is not quite as large as the 
one at Norfolk. At evening preached on Matt, xv : 21, etc. Suffered 
considerably with the heat. Mr. Lathrop returned, Mr. Mitchell,* late 
of Newtown, came to Norfolk last evening to supply there. Mr. Lathrop 
is an intelligent man. 

15. Rode to Norfolk. The heat very oppressive. Found Mr. Mitchell 
here. He and Mr. Lathrop both preached yesterday. Had my horse 
returned to the owner at Torringford on account of his diseased state. 
At evening attended a prayer-meeting. 

16. Our four days' meeting commenced. Attended the morning prayer- 
meeting at sunrise. Wrote. In the forenoon Mr. Mitchell and I, with 
a good number of the church and others, attended a public meeting for 
prayer. Afternoon Mr. Bradford ' preached. At evening Mr. Powers * 
preached. I preached in the evening at the east school-house on 2 Cor. 
vi : 2. Ver}' warm. Received a letter from my brother Francis. Several 
ministers came here. 

17. Mr. Linsley' preached forenoon and afternoon. Mr. Lathrop in the 



' Rev. Pitkin Cowles, pastor at North ' Leonard E. Lathrop, D. D. 

Canaan, 1805-1833. He was a native of * This was Rev. William Mitchell, who 

Southington and a graduate of Yale, 1800. had been dismissed at Newtown the previous 

- Rev. Roswell Pettibone, probably a grad- May. He was a graduate of Yale, 1818. 

uate of Middlebury College, 1820. ' Rev. James Bradford, of Sheffield, Mass. 

^ Rev. Azariah Clark. ' Rev. Grant Powers, of Goshen. 

* That is, letting Mr. Robbins go and in- ' Joel H. Linsley, D. D., of the South 

viting some other man to fill the pulpit. Church, Hartford, 



232 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1S3I. 

evening. The house very full and crowded. We have constant prayer- 
meetings whenever there is opportunity. Afternoon a moderate grateful 
^ shower. At evening Mr, Clark ' went and preached at South End, and 
Mr. Mitchell at North End. The congregations very solemn. 

i8. Not quite as hot as yesterday. Tlie house overflowing. Mr. John 
Mitchell- preached in the forenoon and evening, and Mr. Bradford in the 
afternoon. A great many people from out of town. After the afternoon 
sermon the anxious ones took their seats and the members of the church 
retired for a season of prayer. The anxious, about two hundred and fifty, 
were addressed by several ministers. Perhaps thirty of the number were 
from out of town. At evening I preached at the lower school-house on 
Goshen road. 

19. Rode home. Quite feeble. Still warm and sultry. Mr. Lathrop 
preached in the forenoon. Spent the intermission in a prayer-meeting. 
Afternoon Mr. Mitchell delivered an address ; then the anxious ones took 
their seats, about three hundred, and were addressed by Mr. Bradford, while 
the members of the church retired for prayer. Then all were re-seated, and 
I made an address, recapitulating the instructions and scenes ^ of the meeting, 
and concluded the whole indescribable solemnity.'' At evening we had a full 
prayer-meeting. Most of the ministers left town. 

20. Am much fatigued. Wrote some. Have no time for myself. After- 
noon rode out and visited distressed and rejoicing souls. We had an anxious 
meeting in the evening in the meeting-house, which Mr. Mitchell and I 
addressed, while a prayer-meeting was held in the school-house — divided 
in two on account of the number. Tarried at Mr. Battell's. 

2 1. Preached in the morning on Isa. iii : lo, ii, Mr. Mitchell preached 
in the afternoon and evening. The committee chose that I should not preach 
in an out part of the town. They do rather poorly. 

22. The committee paid me for ten Sabbaths, $80, As they have paid 
Mr, Mitchell for the two last Sabbaths, I made no charge for them. It 
appears that a few persons wish me to leave the town, while a large majority 
wish me to stay. Wrote, Made calls. Afternoon rode, by desire, to Canaan 
Mountain, and preached in the evening to a good number on 2 Cor. vi : 2, 
One person here got a hope at our public meeting last week. Sultry and 
showery. Got something wet. 

23. Rode home. Quite showery all day. Conversed with several anxious 
persons. Afternoon rode, by request, to the South End, visited a school, and 
preached in the evening to a full meeting, suddenly collected, on Ps, li: 16, 17. 
After sermon made an address to the anxious ones. Tarried out. 

24. Visited and conversed with distressed and serious persons all day. 
The people generally are very desirous to have me continue here in this 

' Rev. Azariah Clark, of Colebrook. the scenes which had been witnessed during 

^ Rev. John Mitchell, of Fair Haven. He the meeting, 
had been recently invited to settle at Norfolk, ^ The feeling, as was not uncommon in 

but was pre-engaged at Fair Haven. these four days' meetings, had risen to a great 



3 



The arrangements made beforehand and hight before the close. 



183 1.] AT NORFOLK. 233 

critical time. Rode in the evening to Mr. Battell's, where I now stay. 
My brother's wife, of Enfield, and her eldest son have been here today. 
I am at a loss what course to take. The Lord be my helper. 

25. Made calls. Wrote to my brother Francis. Heard of the afflictive 
death of my cousin William Le Baron.' A camp-meeting at Canaan excites 
much attention. Wrote. Ha\e liad very little time for myself for a good 
while. Showery. At evening attended a meeting and preached on Ps. li : 
16, 17. My cousins, P. R. and G. Starr," came here. Left with W. Lawrence, 
$5, to pay for horse-hire, etc., that 1 have had. 

26. Sultry hot. Made calls. Put up my things. Afternoon took the 
stage late and rode to Hartford. Donations, etc., ninety-six cents. Arrived 
at Hartford at midnight. Shower}' and wet. Walked to East Windsor.' 
Got considerably wet. 

27. Slept this morning till after ten o'clock. My things were brought 
in the stage considerably wet and injured. A number of papers are wet. 
Attended to my things. Towards evening rode to Enfield. My brother 
is gone to Turkey Hills and Mr. Crosby* is here. My cousin F. Alden and 
wife, and their two little children are here. 

28. Preached in the forenoon on Zeph. i: 12. Mr. Crosby preached 
in the afternoon and the evening at the north school-house. In the even- 
ing I preached at the meeting-house on Matt, xxv : i, 2. There has been 
a public meeting here and there is some religious attention, but not great. 
Quite cool. Have taken a cold and am considerably hoarse.' 

29. Am oppressed with my cold. My brother returned. He has a house 
building. The situation is very good. Had much conversation with him. 
Towards evening rode to East Windsor. Received the payment of a note, 
$90, with interest, amounting to $102.15. 

30. The payment of my note last evening was from Henry Hills. Wrote. 
W'orked at my things. Rode out and engaged a horse for a few weeks. 
Am kindly treated here. 1 find my pecuniary circumstances better than 
I supposed.^ All of the rich mercy of God. At evening walked out. Read. 
Fine weather. Summer crops very forward. 

31. Received the payment of a note from Capt. Bissell, made to Mr. Wol- 
cott in May, $30. Received from Levi Rockwell, for one half of my grass 
the present season, $12.34. Have a little difficulty with Dea. Reed about 
his debt. Procured a horse on hire for a few weeks. Paid towards the hire, 
$5. Afternoon rode to Simsbury. At Hartford received a dividend of $15 
from the Hartford Bank. Yesterday received some pamphlets from the post 
office. Postage, thirty-nine cents. Tarried at Mr. McLean's.^ 



' Capt. William Le Baron, of Rochester, ■* Rev. Stephen Crosby, pastor at East 

Mass. Granby, Turkey Hills. 

^ Peter R. and George Starr. ' Probably from that midnight walk in the 

^ Five good miles, for a lonely, wet, mid- rain, 

night walk, by an overworked man of tifty- * With all his changes from place to place 

four years, made a tough journey, and was he had hardly lost a Sabbath for many years, 

not a wise one to make. ^ Rev. Allen McLean. 



234 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[183I. 



September. 

1. Looked at the new meeting-house.' A very fine one. Attended the 
annual meeting of the Committee of the Everest Fund. Paid them a debt 
of $139.76, including interest. The fund is something in arrear. Rode 
home.^ Quite warm. Wrote. 

2. Hindered in the morning. Rode to New Haven. Sultry hot and 
dusty. My horse does not travel well. Got in rather late. In the evening 
walked out. In the morning Col. Olmsted^ requested me to attend his 
regimental review on the 6th of October. 

3. Paid Gen. Howe a charge for books, $23.75. Rode to Stratford. 
Very hot and sultry. Much fatigued. Towards evening we had a refreshing 
thunder-shower. Made calls. Called on Mr. Bushnell,^ a candidate. He 
is not willing to have me preach a part of the day tomorrow, as I proposed. 
There has been a public meeting here and a considerable revival. Some 
extravagances in the work. 

4. Rode early to Huntington and spent the Sabbath with Mr. Punderson.' 
He had an appropriate sermon in the morning ; afternoon we had the sacra- 
ment, and thirty persons were received into the church, the first fruits of the 
present revival. The greatest addition this church has ever had. Nine (two 
blacks) were baptized. I assisted in the services and preached in the evening 
on John vii : 37. Quite cool. 

5. Returned to Stratford. Afternoon attended a church meeting, which 
I had warned yesterday, and communicated a request that they would consent 
to a dissolution of my pastoral relation, and would unite with me in calling 
the Consociation for that purpose. They voted to consent to the first request, 
but chose not to act on the second. I have, therefore, to call the Consocia- 
tion myself. Wrote to Mr. Rood,* of Danbury, for the purpose. Settled with 
the society committee and received from them, $277.80. Paid a merchant, 
$5.15 ; the post office, $2.49 ; a shoe-maker's bill, $3.80. Am treated kindly. 
I consented to close my claims on the society at the third of May last 
Called at Mrs. Hoffman's. Received a letter from my cousin, Mrs. Gilman. 
On the 3d received one from Rev. Mr. Cole,' of Bethel. 

6. Worked, putting up my things. Painful is the thought of removing. 
I rejoice that I may put my trust in the Lord. Made a number of calls. 
People much regret the necessity of my leaving them. They are in a very 
divided state. Wrote to Mr. Olmsted, of Wilton. ° Got quite fatigued. Paid 



' The new meeting-house in Simsbury. 

^ This, as we understand, was his East 
Windsor, and not his Norfolk, home. 

^ Col. Solomon Olmsted, of East Hart- 
ford. 

* Rev. William Bushnell, a native of West- 
brook, Ct., a graduate of Yale, 182S, and of 
Yale Seminary, 1832. He was afterwards 
settled in North Killingly (now East Putnam), 
and was for many years agent of the Seamen's 



Friend Society. He died in East Boston in 
1879, and the writer of this note officiated at 
his funeral. 

5 Rev. Thomas Punderson. 

^ Rev. Anson Rood. 

' Rev. Erastus Cole, pastor at Bethel, 1S30 

-1837- 

° Harvey Olmsted, LL. D., before noticed, 
afterwards at the head of the Hopkins Gram- 
mar School at New Haven. 



r.Ssu] 



AT NORFOLK. 



235 



Mr. Southard, $5, and $2.50 in wood, which T left there. I have boarded 
with them about fifty weeks, and have paid them, $108.50. They are well 
satisfied. Low for this town. Tarried at Mr. J. Booth's. 

7. Rode early. A comfortable day. Have a pretty heavy load in my 
wagon. Traveled diligently and got to East Windsor in the evening. The 
crops are unusually forward. My horse does pretty well. My things came 
very safely. 

8. Occupied with attention to my books and other things. Wrote. 
Preparing for my journey. I know not when a holy God will give me 
a home. 

9. Rode to Norfolk. Deposited in Hartford Bank, $400, to be loaned 
to Mr. E. \\'. Bull ' if he shall call for it. Paid for a ver\' good pair of boots 
and pair of shoes, $g. Had a good visit at brother Ammi's. Got to Mr. Bat- 
tell's rather late. The work of grace continues here. Saw Mr. Mitchell. 
My horse performed rather poorly. 

10. In the morning shower}-. Received of Edmund Akins,^ for instruc- 
tion, $2. Paid for an umbrella, $2.75. Rode to Warren. Very hot and 
sultry. Found a young Mr. Griswold,' from South Hadley, at Mr. Talcott's. 
Got to Mr. Starr's in the evening. 

11. Mr. Griswold preached in the forenoon, and I preached in the 
afternoon and evening on Zeph. i: 12, and John vii : 37. Mr. Talcott's 
health is much improved. Oppressed with the heat.'* 

12. Cool. Rode, in company with Mr. Griswold and wife, to New Haven 
— about forty-three miles. Some of the road pretty bad. Arrived in the 
evening. 

13. Conversed with some of the tutors respecting the admission of Akins 
into the college. Met with the Phi Beta Kappa Society. They voted to 
abolish their secrets. We had a most excellent oration from Judge Kent.^ 
The society dined together. Saw Mr. Ed. Everett,* Pres. Wayland,^ and 
others. Afternoon and evening there were two interesting meetings of the 
alumni. An uncommon number of them in town. 

14. In the morning attended a meeting of the Convention of Ministers. 
We had a good exhibition. The speaking was better than usual. The 
Conao's preacher failed and Dr. Fisher,* of New Jersey, preached. The Min- 
isters' Convention appointed a committee to make new arrangements. Am 



much fatigued. 



' Eben W. Bull. 

^ This was the young man that Dr. Rob- 
bins assisted in his Latin. He never gradu- 
ated at college, but was an attorney in Nor- 
folk in after years. 

' Rev. Flavel Griswold, a graduate of 
Yale, 1S21 ; settled over the Second Church 
in South Hadley in 1828. 

* The hot weather of early September had 
come again. 

^ Judge James Kent, eminent in jurispru- 



dence. Born in Phillips, Putnam County, 
N. Y., a graduate of Yale, 17S1. 

* Hon. Edward Everett, 1825-1S35 Mem- 
ber of Congress, afterwards United States 
Senator, Minister to England, Secretary of 
State, and President of Harvard College. 

^ Francis Wayland, D. D., LL. D., from 
1827 to 185s the eminent and honored Presi- 
dent of Brown University. 

* Dr. Samuel Fisher, a graduate of Will- 
iams College, 1799. 



236 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [183I. 

15. Paid for keeping a horse, $3.25. Rode early to Stratford. The 
Consociation met here about noon. But four ministers and one delegate. 
I was dismissed from my pastoral charge. We had a hard rain. I expected 
to have preached in the evening, but was prevented by the rain. Many of 
this people appear to regret the event of my removal deeply. Mr. Jones,' 
of Monroe, and delegate tarried with me. I now commit my all to him who 
has long been my God and God of my fathers. 

16. Have several things to attend to. Wrote the eight preceding days 
of diary. Paid Mr. Judson a merchant's bill, $15. Had clothes repaired. 
Made calls. I experience much kindness. 

17. The morning rainy. Wrote to my cousin Philip Battell. I hope 
he will go to reside at Danbur}'. Settled with Mr. Josiah Booth. He had 
kept my horse from Jan. i, 1830, to May 3, 1831 — seventy weeks. Fifty-one 
at hay, deducting four = forty-seven, at .875 is $41.13. Nineteen at pasture, 
deducting two = seventeen, at .50 is $8.50. Oats, about forty bushels, at $13. 
Total, $62.63. I paid him $12.63, having paid $50 before. I paid him for 
a box, which he procured and sent to Norfolk for me, $1 ; and stage fare, 
.25, which he paid to New Haven, $1.25. He was quite liberal in the 
settlement. Left Stratford without regret in regard to my own comforts, for 
I have had many trials here, and set out on my journey under the guidance 
of heaven. Rode to Branford.^ Visited the burying-ground and saw various 
persons. 

18. Kept at Mr. Gillett's.^ Very kindly entertained. A Mr. Moody,* 
of Granby, Mass., came here last evening, staying a few days in this town 
for health. Preached in the morning on Zeph. i : 1,2. Addressed the 
Sabbath school. Mr. Moody preached in the afternoon. I preached in 
the evening on John vii : 37, and afterwards delivered an extempore ad- 
dress to the Temperance Society. A full meeting. Find many old friends 
of my father's. Cool. 

19. An aged Mr. John Whitney gave me an ancient chair, in which my 
grandfather died, brought from England and kept by the Howe family. His 
first wife was of that family. The man is poor, and I gave him $1. Last 
evening found three aged persons who said my grandfather married them 
severally. He died in August, 1781. Made calls. Looked at the house 
of Rev. Mr. Russell,^ in which Yale College was founded in 1700. Engaged 
a man to re-erect my grandfather's tombstone, and others of the family. 
Dined at Gen. Fowler's, in the east part of the town. Rode to Westbrook. 
Tarried at Mr. Selden's.* 



' Rev. Daniel Jones, pastor at Monroe, pastor of the West Church in Granby, 1S30- 

1828-1835. 1836. 

2 Where his grandfather, Rev. Philemon ^ Rev. Samuel Russell, pastor at Branford, 
Robbins, preached for a life-time. 1687-1731. Mr. Russell was a graduate of 

3 Rev. Timothy Phelps Gillett, who had Harvard College, 1681. At his house the 
been settled at Branford since 1808, and re- ten Connecticut ministers, in the year 1700, 
mained there till his death in 1866, fifty-eight came with their books to found a college, 
years. ^ Rev. Sylvester Selden, pastor at West- 

■* Rev. Eli Moody, a native of Granby and brook, 1812-1834. 



i83i.] 



VISITING ROCHESTER, MASS. 



237 



20. Yesterday drank tea at Gen. Elliott's, at Killingsworth. Find old 
acquaintance whom I knew when I preached here in 1803. Rode on, crossed 
the river at Essexborough, to Norwich, and to Jewett City; about thirty-three 
miles. Yesterday about twenty-one, and Saturday twenty-two. Tarried at 
a tavern. Came through a pretty rough country. Warm. 

21. Rode early to Plainfield. Was applied to by the society committee 
to supply them immediately. Engaged to do it after two Sabbaths. Rode 
on to Pawtucket ; forty-one miles. A good road. My horse travels heavily. 
Tarried at a tavern. Have great reason to bless God that so soon after 
my dismission I am called to employment. 

22. Rode early. Cold. My horse goes slow and heavy. Rode to Taun- 
ton and Mattapoisett ; forty-three miles. Found my good Uncle Le Baron' 
and other friends well. Arrived in the evening. Put up with the family 
of my cousin William,'^ lately deceased. A very aflflictive death. Am much 
fatigued . 

23. Looked at a fine ship on the stocks. This village has increased verv- 
much since I was here in 1824. My uncle has left his own house and resides 
with his daughter Mayhew.- Spent the most of the day with him. Wrote 
some. There is a noisy three days' meeting here of Free-will Baptists. 
At evening we had a refreshing shower. 

24. Wrote. Have had little time for myself since I left Norfolk. Uncle 
Le Baron was taken unwell last night and is quite ill. Walked out. Visited 
a sick man. Wrote to my brother Francis. In the evening attended a small 
prayer-meeting. Was called late to visit again the sick man ; apparently near 
his end. 

25. The man w'hom I visited last evening died in the night. Preached 
on Heb. vii : 25, and Isa. iii : 10, 11. This congregation is rather small, but 
appears well. At evening, at a private house, preached on Matt, xv : 22, 
etc. My uncle is somewhat better, but is unable to be out. Warm and very 
pleasant. Have a number of cousins here. 

26. Spent considerable time with my uncle. Wrote to my cousin Chandler 
Robbins," of Boston. Read. Had company. A large ship is building here. 

27. We have a hard equinoctial storm. Wrote to Mr. Eaton, of Plainfield. 
Attended a funeral. Quite wet. Read. But little to be heard from Europe. 

28. Rode to Fairhaven and saw my friends there. That town is much 
improving. Returned. At evening preached a preparatory lecture on Luke 
xxii : 15. The society committee here requested me to supply them for some 
time. Conclude to think of it. 



' Rev. Lemuel Le Baron, then fifty -nine 
years pastor at Mattapoisett (Rochester, 
Mass.). 

^ Capt. William Le Baron, whose death 
has already been mentioned. 

^ Lucy Le Baron, born, 177S, married 
Thomas Mayo (or Mayhew). 

* He may mean his own cousin, Judge 
.Chandler Robbins, son of Dr. Chandler Rob- 



bins, minister of Plymouth, and who died in 
Boston in 1834; or he may' mean his second 
cousin, Chandler, son of Dr. Peter Oilman 
Robbins. This Chandler was graduated at 
Harvard, 1829, and was the Dr. Chandler 
Robbins of pleasant memories, pastor of the 
Second (Unitarian) Church, Boston, who died 
in 18S2, after passing some of his later years 
in blindness. 



23? DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [l^Sf- 

29, My uncle gets better. Cool. I believe we have a little frost, but 
it is light. Had company. Dined with my cousin Lazarus ' and looked 
at his extensive salt works. Toward evening rode to Fairhaven. 

30. Walked to New Bedford. My cousin Francis Alden ^ walked with 
me to view the town. It is large and very flourishing. In this town and 
Fairhaven there are owned one hundred and sixty ships ; nearly all in the 
whaling business. My cousin brought me back in a boat. Spent the after- 
ternoon with Mr. Gould. Walked and visited. At evening preached for 
him on John vii : 37. The meeting-house here has been much altered and 
improved. Gov. Bradford's Bible said to be in the family of Waters, in 
Sharon, Norfolk Co., Mass. 

October. 

1. Rode to Mattapoisett. Wrote. At evening attended a prayer-meeting. 
There seems to be some special seriousness here among professors. 

2. Preached on Matt, v: 16. Administered the sacrament. My uncle 
was with me and made the concluding prayer. This church is small, but 
appears well. Gave my cousin Polly, $1. Rode to Fairhaven.^ Mr. Gould" 
went to Mattapoisett. Preached on 2 Chron. xxx : 26, 27. This is a hand- 
some house and good congregation. Preached on the subject of the four 
days' meetings, by Mr. Gould's desire.^ At evening rode to New Bedford 
and preached on Eph. ii : 14. Mr. Holmes* is absent. The meeting-house 
is large and hard for speaking. The congregation is large. Kindly attended 
by my cousin Francis Alden. Tarried at Mr. Coggeshall's. 

3. Rode to Fairhaven and put up my things for my journey. Warm. 
Left my friends and rode through New Bedford and Fall River to Providence. 
Arrived in the evening. There have been some fatal riots here of late. 
At Fall River called on Rev. Mr. Fowler.' 

4. Last night was quite unwell. Am pretty feeble. Rode to Plainfield. 
Was informed by a committee man that they have received a letter, unexpect- 
edly, from Samuel Rockwell,^ that he will be here this week, and that he had 
written to me to that effect. I am, therefore, not wanted, as they feel bound 
to receive Mr. Rockwell. Cool.' Rode to West Canterbury. Got along 
better than I feared. 



' Lazarus Le Baron, son of Rev. Lemuel, wanted his people to hear and know about 

was born in 1789. them. 

^ Priscilla Le Baron, born 178 1, married * Rev. Sylvester Holmes, pastor at North 
Gideon S. Alden, of New Bedford. This Church, New Bedford, from 181 r, and after- 
Francis was a son of this marriage. wards of the I'acific Church. He was a na- 

' Fairhaven was in Bristol County, Mass., tive of Plymouth, Mass. 
and Mattapoisett in Plymouth County, but ' Orin Fowler, Yale, 1S15; afterwards a 

they both touched the county line and were Member of Congress from Massachusetts, 
near together. ^ Samuel Rockwell was a native of Win- 

'' Rev. William Gould had been pastor at sted, a graduate of Yale, 1825, and was pas- 

Fairhaven since 1S22. He was a native of tor at Plainfield, 1832-1S41. 
Salem, Mass. ' Whether this word at this point refers 

^ Dr. Robbins had had much experience to the weather, or the doings of the church 

of late in these meetings, and Mr. Gould at Plainfield, does not clearly appear. 



i83i.] 



AT EAST WINDSOR. 



239 



5. Last night and the morning rainy and wet. Called at Scx)iland on 
Mr. Devotion. Rode to East \\indsor. My horse has traveled slow. Have 
been much prospered in my long journey since Sept. 9th, May God be 
praised. Mr. Wolcott and two hired persons arc sick with a fever. 

6. My brother came down early in the morning to go to the training 
in my stead. He returned. Rode to Wethersfield and attended the review 
of the regiment of artillery. They performed remarkably well. Was received 
ver}- gratefully.' Returned. Quite cool. 

7. Wrote to my uncle Le Baron. Rode out wiili Mr. Wolcott for the 
first time in his sickness. Eveline has a second son.^ Born on the 5th. 
Paid Maria Burnham, $10.^ There is a great crop of corn here. Wrote. 
Received pamphlets from the post office, 

8. Looked over my things. I conclude I have lost some valuable arti- 
cles in my unsettled state. Am quite poor with a cold. Afternoon rode to 
Simsbury to assist Mr. McLean tomorrow. 

9. Mrs. McLean is sick with a fever. A hard rain last night and through 
the forenoon. Preached on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4, and Zeph. i: 12. There 
is a great work of grace here. Meetings large for so stormy a day. Am 
considerably hoarse and feeble. Mr. McLean has a young candidate to assist- 
him in the revival — Mr. Humphrey.* At evening rode to Avon and tarried 
at a tavern. The ground very wet. Read. 

10. Was called early, and rode to Norfolk in the stage to get some articles 
for my journey eastward, A hard rainy day. The stage full, and leaky, and 
slow. The work of grace continues here, and is great. Mr. Mitchell is still 
here, but expected to leave soon. Mr. Battell's family all at home but Joseph. 
Designed to return in the stage, but it w-as full. Let W. Lawrence have 
$5 for a concern' in horses. Read. 

11. Wet and rainy all day. Attended the morning prayer-meeting very 
early. Read. The waters are high. The western stage did not come 
on. They have much company at Mr. Battell's. 

12. Attended the morning prayer-meeting; soon after which took the stage 
and rode to Avon. I hope Mr. Battell, and two daughters, and a servant girl 
have become subjects of grace. Yesterday a man near my own age, with 
a recent hope, called to see me. A reformed intemperate. Great is the 
grace of God. Cold. The roads very wet. Rode to East Windsor. Paid 



' It had been now some time since he had 
seen the regiment of which he was chaplain. 

- Her first son was Tudor, and this one 
was Henry Bissell. 

^ This is a second payment of money to 
Maria Burnham. It is not unlikely that Dr. 
Robbins had borrowed money of her, or the 
payment may be by him for some one else. 

* Rev. Chester Humphrey, settled at Ver- 
non, 1S32-1S43, the latter the year of his 
death. Mr. Humphrey was a native of Can- 



ton, and was graduated at Amherst, 1S28. 
The fact that he assisted Rev. Mr. McLean 
probably led to his settlement in Vernon, as 
Vernon was the native place of Mr. McLean. 
5 This is about as definite a use of the 
word concern as that of the witness in a liquor 
case, who, being asked whether he saw any 
ardent spirit drank on the premises, could 
not tell. He simply saw something liquid 
poured into a glass from a concern, but as to 
what it was he knew nothing. 



240 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1831. 

at Hartford for a trunk, $3; for gloves, $1. Took a note of E. W. Bull' 
for $400 ; lent money, dated September 21. The waters are over the meadows 
and yet rising. Mrs. Wolcott is hard sick. She has had another bad turn 
of raising blood. Mr. Wolcott is getting better, ■\^■rote, Received of Phoeni.x 
Bank a dividend of $45. 

13. Mrs. Wolcott had another turn of raising blood last night and is very 
feeble. Concluded to defer my eastern journey for this week, and wrote 
to my Uncle Le Baron to that effect. Paid $5 more for the use of my poor 
old horse on my late journey. Abiezer Porter paid me $56.23, and took 
up his note. Gave my order on the society of Somers to Esq. Dixon,' 
of Enfield, to collect ; $72 and interest.' There was a light frost this morning. 
At evening rode to Hartford and back. The water has fallen a little ; it has 
been over the most of the causeway. Worked at my things. 

14. Rode to Pine Meadow and back. Mr. Haskell and his family are 
prosperous. Eveline is quite feeble. Traded, $1.13. Received a ver}- valua- 
ble large pamphlet, public document, from Ed. Everett, M. C," of Boston. 
Read. 

15. Looked over past diaries. Wrote. Had company. At evening rode 
to Manchester. Tarried at Mr. Northrop's.' 

16. Preached for Mr. Northrop on Zeph. i: 12, and Matt, iv : 17. This 
is a good congregation and larger than it was a few years ago. There has 
been a good work of grace here througli the summer, and they are to have 
a public meeting this week. At evening preached on Matt, xv : 21, etc. 

17. Last evening was requested and urged to continue here to attend 
the public meeting. I think I cannot. Mr. Northrop appears to be a worthy 
man, but his health is very poor and he preaches but little. Made some 
calls. Rode to East Hartford and home. Very warm. Thermometer at 80°. 
Mrs. Wolcott appears to be some better. The water has fallen. At evening 
walkqd out and visited. Wrote. 

18. Employed in preparing for my journey. Mr. and Mrs. Haskell were 
here. Read. My way is once more committed to the merciful guidance and 
keeping of heaven. At evening Mr. Wolcott rode with me to Hartford. 
Did some errands. 

19. Took the stage about four o'clock and rode seventy miles, to Provi- 
dence. Warm and pleasant. Stage not full. Paid fare, $4. The Ashford 
road, I think, not so good or so pleasant as the Windham.^ Much fatigued. 
Read. 



. ' Eben W. Bull. Manchester, 1829-1850. Mr. Northrop was 

' Judge William Di.\on, and father of a native of Brookfield, Ct., and was giadu- 

United States Senator James Dixon. ated at Yale, 1S24. After leaving Manches- 

^ That money had been due between two ter he was settled in Griswokl, 1853-1870. 

and three years. He died in 1875. He was a good and faith- 

* This would be gratifying not only for its ful minister. 
own value, but for the source from which it * Whichever way he went he would pass 

came. through the Bolton notch, through which the 

'Rev. Bennett F. Northrop, pastor at New York & New England Railroad now runs. 



iS3i.] 



PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 



241 



20. Last night rested ver^-well. Rode rapidly by Attleborough to Taunton 
and Fairhaven, at least fifty miles. Fare but $2. Cool and dusty. Kindly 
received. Capt. Gibbs ' is part owner of a whale-ship, lately arrived from 
a good voyage. Fatigued with my journey, 

21. Walked about the town with Mr. Gould.* One wharf is almost covered 
with casks of oil. Was carried to Mattapoisett. Found friends well. The 
people here have been anxiously expecting me. Walked out. Read. 

22. A large fine ship was launched here this morning. It did not go off 
well. Wrote. I should have written on the i8th that Mrs. Wolcott, though 
quite low, appears, I think, likely to recover. Read Stackhouse's ^ History 
of the Bible. At evening attended a praj'er-meeting. 

23. Preached on Ps. li : 17, and Zeph. i: 12. At the evening meeting, 
well attended, preached on Acts xxiv : 25. Considerably fatigued. Yester- 
day Capt. Freeman ■* informed me that the committee would wish mfe to supply 
them for some time, and invited me to board with him. 

^24. Went to board with Capt. Freeman. Unpacked my things. They 
came well. Wrote to Mr. Battell. At evening rainy. Looked over old 
accounts. Read. 

25. Rode in the stage to Wareham and met with the Old Colony Asso- 
ciation at Mr. Nott's.^ They got in rather late in the afternoon. The body 
is small, but appears well. Mr. Holmes* preached in the evening. An 
elegant new meeting-house. 

26. This town is greatly improved and increased by hardware manufac- 
tures. The Association finished their session. Wrote to Capt. Freeman. 
Afternoon the auxiliary Domestic Missionary Society for this Association 
district had their annual meeting. Mr. Storrs,' secretary of the State society, 
preached. I made an address, by desire. Preached to a good evening 
meeting a sermon on Heb. vii : 25. Called on Mrs. Everett^ and her family. 
Contribution, $1. 

27. Capt. Freeman sent a wagon for me yesterday afternoon. Rode 
home. Spent considerable time with Mr. Storrs. Rode out and attended 
a funeral of a child. Another was attended yesterday from the same house. 
Both of canker-rash. Read. Rainy. 

28. Read the Bible. For a number of months past have had very little 



' Capt. Anselm Gibbs, in the year iSoo, 
married Lucy Le Baron. 

- Rev. William Gould, of Fairhaven. 

^Thomas Stackhouse, 1680-1752, was a 
learned English divine and extensive writer, 
the author of several large works. But his 
most important work was the History of the 
Bible, in two volumes, folio. 

* Capt. Seth Freeman. 

' Rev. Samuel Nott, Jr., son of Dr. Samuel 
Nott, of Franklin, Ct., a graduate of Union 
College, where his uncle, Dr. Eliphalet Nott, 



was president. Mr. Nott was settled in Ware- 
ham in 1829. 

^ Rev. Sylvester Holmes, of New Bed- 
ford. 

' Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D. D., of Brain- 
tree, who, without his being unsettled at 
Braintree, served the Home Missionary So- 
ciety in this way for severa' years. 

^ Widow of Rev. Noble Everett, a native 
of Woodbury, Ct., who was pastor at Ware- 
ham, 1782-1819, when he died. He was a 
graduate of Yale College 1775. 



242 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[if^3i- 



time to do this. Walked out. Called on my uncle. Wrote. Wrote to 
Dr. Swift, of Hartford. Received a letter for the church from North 
Rochester. At evening walked out. 

29. Quite cold. W'alked a distance and visited sick persons. Read. 
There are many sectarians here. Read the Bible. At evening attended 
the prayer-meeting. 

30. High and chilly winds. The Sabbath-school was closed." It has 
done very well the present season. Preached on i Tim. iii : 16. At the 
evening meeting spoke on Mark x: 51. Well attended. Quite fatigued. 
Rode to meeting. 

31. Read. Rode to Fairhaven and returned. Mr. Freeman purchased 
a fine horse. Had company. Read the Bible. Wrote. 

November. ^ 

1. Read the Bible. Walked and visited. Had company. Took cold 
and am something unwell. 

2. Wrote a large addition to my sermon on i Cor. i : 23, for ordination. 
Afternoon rode to North Rochester and met with the ordaining council.^ 
Attended to the usual business. The examination rather desultory. Kindly 
treated for the sake of parents and friends.^ Am burdened with my cold. 

3. Mr. Utley'' was ordained an evangelist, with reference to present 
labors with this people. I preached on i Cor. i : 23. The church and 
congregation are small. Rode home. This town is extensive. Roads pretty 
good. Wrote. Warm for the season. 

4. Walked out and made calls. Wrote to Mr. Holmes,^ of New Bedford. 
Afternoon rode out with Mr. Freeman^ and visited. Read. Am still 
oppressed with my cold. 

5. Read the Bible. We have a painful account of the capture of Warsaw 
by storm -.by the Russian army, and the probable subjugation of the Poles.' 
Wrote to Rev. Mr. Bartlett,* of East Windsor. Attended the evening prayer- 
meeting. Well attended. Yesterday morning we had our first hard frost. 

6. Preached on i Kings vii : 3, and Matt, xxv : i, 2. At evening spoke 
on Ps. iv : 5. Very pleasant and full meetings. Uncle Le Baron attends 
in the day-time, but not at evenings. 



' For the winter. It was the common 
practice among the country churches of New 
England at that time to suspend the school 
during the cold months of the year. 

' We are out of Connecticut now, and 
during the remainder of Dr. Robbins's public 
ministry we shall hear of councils and not of 
consociations. 

^ Dr. Robbins's kindred, both on his 
father's and his mother's side, abounded in 
Southeastern Massachusetts. 

•♦ Samuel Utley, a native of Dalton, Mass., 
a graduate of Union College, 1823. He was 



afterwards for many years in New Hamp- 
shire, preaching a short time at Epping, and 
then resident at Concord. 

' Rev. Sylvester Holmes. 

* Capt. Seth Freeman, with whom he 
boarded. 

^ This, as has been intimated, was to be 
the final outcome of all the good news which 
Dr. Robbins had been hearing. This battle 
of Warsaw was fought Sept. 6-8, 1831. The 
Poles fought heroically, but they were few 
against a great host. 

^ Rev. Shubael Bartlett. 



■831.] 



PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 



^43 



7. Read History of Greek Rrrolutbn^ Walked and visited the most 
of the day. Kindly received. At evening attended the monthly concert. 
It has not had great attention here. 

8. Wrote. Read. Rode out and visited. Looked at the new ship 
lately built here, now nearly completed. It is a very fine one — three hundred 
and sixty tons. This family has friends come from the Cape. 

9. Read past diary. Hindered by company. At evening we had a good 
prayer-meeting. The success of the Russians is confirmed, but Warsaw made 
an honorable capitulation. 

10. Walked and visited. Read. Something unwell. Do not find as 
much time for study as I could wish. 

11. In the forenoon we had a hard rain. Looked over geographical facts. 
Afternoon rode in the stage to New Bedford. Found Mr. Holmes absent 
from home. Traded, $1.58. Paid for a book, seventy-five cents. Tarried 
with my cousin Alden.^ Looked at an extensive spermaceti works.' 

12. Walked about town. It is rich, but not greatly improved in the arts. 
Went into the Supreme Court. Read in the public readmg-room. • Afternoon 
rode home with a friend. Yesterday got a bad addition to my cold. Am 
much oppressed with it. 

13. Cold. Am quite hoarse. Spoke with difficulty. Preached on Heb. 
xii : 16, and John vii : 37. At evening spoke poorly on Matt, ix : 9. I think 
there is an increasing attention to our meetings. Very tired. 

14. Read Hoyt's Antiquarian Researches.* Yesterday put on my flannel. 
Wrote. At evening attended a Bible class, now commenced. Mr. Cobb' 
had one during his ministr}- here. A good number were present. The annual 
State election was held. This people seem to take but little interest in it. 

15. Rode to New Bedford. Cold and windy. Met with the church 
conference of this vicinity, and an ecclesiastical council for the purpose 
of organizing a new church. They put me in the chair. In the afternoon 
I preached on Zeph. i: 12. In the evening the new church was formed* — 
sixt}--one members dismissed from Mr. Holmes's church, leaving over tvv'o 
hundred in the parent church. The sacrament was administered to the 
tw'o churches in union. There was a large assembly and the occasion wa.'-. 
very solemn. Much oppressed with my cold. 

16. Closed the business of the ecclesiastical council. Attended to the 



' There was a History of the Greek Revo- 
lution, 1S29, prepared by Dr. John L. Com- 
stock, of Hartford, and published in New 
York. There was a Historical Sketch of the 
Greek Revolution, 1S28, prepared by Dr. Sam- 
uel G. Howe, of South Boston, published 
also in New York. It was probably the first 
named which Dr. Robbins was reading. 

^ Francis Alden. 

^ The wealth of New Bedford at that time 
was chiefly connected with whaling and oil 
business. 



■* Antiquarian Researches, by Gen. Epa- 
phras Hoyt, born in Deerfield, Mass., 1765, 
and dying there, 1850. He was known also 
as a writer on military tactics and discipline. 

^ Oliver Cobb, D. D., who was settled in 
Rochester in 1799. He died in 1849. ^^ 
was a graduate of Brown University, 1796. 
and was a well-known minister. 

^ The church thus formed is known as the 
Trinitarian Church of New Bedford, of which 
Rev. Matthew C. Julien is now, for several 
years, pastor. 



244 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1831. 



church conference. Mr. Davis' preached in the afternoon, and Mr. Nott* 
in the evening. The semi-annual conference was closed. A number of young 
missionaries were expected here early this week. At evening a part of them 
arrived. Attended a little while at a capital trial before the Supreme Court. 

17. Rode home early in the stage. Much fatigued. Read Hoyt's Re- 
searches. A good work, with some prejudice against the Puritans. Find less 
time for study than I hoped for. 

18. Read Hoyt's account of Philip's War. I think he was not inferior 
to the early Grecian heroes.^ Afternoon rode to New Bedford. Paid for 
candles and candlestick, $1.33. At evening the missionary family, eight 
preachers and wives, one doctor and wife, and one printer, received their 
public instructions from the Prudential Committee for the Sandwich Islands. 
An impressive and solemn scene.'' 

ig. Rode home early. Paid stage fare, $1. Wrote. Read the Bible. 
At evening attended the prayer-meeting. 

20. Cold. Preached with notes on Ps. li : 10, and a sermon on i Thess. 
i: 5. Had a full evening meeting and spoke on Num. x: 29. Have yet 
some hoarseness and cough. Our assemblies seem to increase. 

21. Read Hoyt's Researches. Walked out. Went into the ship-yards. 
Afternoon rode with a delegate to New Bedford and attended the ordination 
of Ephraim Spaulding,' one of the missionaries. I presided and made the 
consecrating prayer. The service was in the evening and very solemn. 
Dr. Fay gave the charge, and gave them all an affectionate farewell. Carried 
over some valuable articles for the missionaries, donations from the people 
here. We were disappointed in not having one of them with us yesterday, 
as I expected. Rode home late. 

22. Last night and this morning a severe storm. There was hard thunder. 
Wrote. Read. Wet and rainy. The Bible class in the evening was pre- 
vented by the weather. Walked out. 

23. Read Hoyt. Cold and blustering. Afternoon rode to the Neck. 
Had a meeting there in the evening, of a few people, and preached on 
Mark i : 40. Tarried there. 

24. Visited. Read. Paid for one and one fourth cords of wood, $5.63. 
I believe that wood is dearer here than at Stratford. At evening attended 
the Bible class, which was large and performed well. 

Read. I lament that I can do no more. The tide here on Tuesdav 



-:)• 



' Rev. Timothy Davis, probably, who was 
settled in Wellfleet, on the Cape, in 1S04, and 
had recently (1S30) been dismissed. 

^ Rev. Samuel Nott, Jr., of Wareham. 

^ It may not be generally known that the 
General Court at Plymouth, out of kind re- 
gard to Massasoit, gave to his two sons the 
names of Philip and Alexander, after the old 
Macedonian warriors. Alexander died early, 
but Philip, having such a mighty name, seemed 



to think he ought to do something to illustrate 
and justify it. 

'' This company sailed in a New Bedford 
vessel, bound out probably on a whaling 
voyage. 

^ Rev. Ephraim Spaulding, native of Lud- 
low, Vt., a graduate of Middlebury College, 
1S2S, and of Andovcr Seminary, 1831. He 
labored at the Sandwich Islands, 1S31-1836, 
and died in Westborough, Mass., 1840. 



183I.] PREACHIXG IN MATTAPOISETT. 245 

morning was higher than at any time since the "September gale,"' in 1815. 
Rode out and visited. 

26. There appears to be great disappointment in England on the failure 
of the Reform Bill in the House of Lords. Poland seems to be subdued. 
Mr. Gould, of Fairhaven, called in the afternoon, and attended the evening 
meeting with me. He is soliciting aid for the poor church of W'estport.' 
Gave him $1. Paid for cutting wood, forty-two cents. 

27. Wet and rainy all day. Afternoon it was quite hard. Preached 
on Acts xiii : 2. Afternoon meeting very thin. Had no evening meeting. 
Read. The missionary ship sailed yesterday. 

28. Read Hoyt's Researches. This morning there was snow. Walked and 
visited. Read the Bible. At evening had thirty at the Bible class, besides 
spectators. Find myself much occupied. 

29. Took some cold last night and am quite unwell. Walked out. 
Wrote. It is a winter day. Had a new great coat sent from Bedford, made 
for me. It sets poorly. Read. 

30. Wrote an addition to a Thanksgiving sermon. My chamber is ver^' 
comfortable, with a fine prospect. Finished Hoyt's Researches. A ver^- valua- 
ble collection of facts. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. Cold. 

December. 

1. Thanksgiving. Cold and tedious. Preached on Rev. xi : 16, 17. 
But few at meeting. It snowed the most of the day. I have not been out 
of Connecticut, Thanksgiving, before now, since 1805.^ Am pretty gloomy. 
Read. There was a contribution for the poor. A usual practice here. 

2. Rode with Mr. Freeman to New Bedford. The cold is severe. 
Carried my new great coat to be altered. Paid for the American Ahnanack,* 
ninety-two cents; for India-rubber overshoes, $1.33. Traded, $1.98. The 
ground hard frozen. Read. Wrote. I do but little. 

3. Read my new Almanack. It contains much valuable matter. Was 
called to see young Mr. Southworth, very sick. Visited. Attended the 
evening meeting; quite thin. It snowed considerably. The doctor's case 
appears very critical. 

4. It snowed and rained all through the day. Preached with notes 
on Rom. viii : 14, and a sermon on Acts iv : 12. Thin meeting. Dr. South- 
worth is some better. Read. Had company. 

5. Severe cold and blustering. Did not go into the street. Sleighs 
move some. Winter commences uncommonly early and severe. Read my 



' The September gale was a notable event •* This was not the New England Farm- 

in New England history. er's Almanack, by Thomas G. Fessenden, 

^ Westport is in Bristol County. No min- which he used for his diary, but the larger 

ister was ever settled there till some years American A-linanack, full of various infor- 

after this entry, and it remains a very feeble mation. This last named work, continued 

church to this day. through a long range of years, has gathered 

3 That w-as the last year of his missionary up and preserved an immense amount of val- 

service out on the Connecticut Reserve. uable statistics. 



246 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^SSI- 

Almanack. Looked over tlie new census. Had no monthly concert on 
account of the weather. 

6. Walked and visited the sick. I think the mercury this morning must 
have been ahuost zero. Read. Last evening wrote to S. T. Wolcott. 
At evening had a full Bible class. Very good sleighing. 

7. There aj^pears to be no abatement of the cold. Read. Wrote a piece 
for the newspaper. Wrote to F. L. AldenJ' of New Bedford. At evening 
attended the prayer-meeting. 

8. Read the Bible. Wrote. Began a sermon on the subject of the 
Sabbath. One of the deacons requested me to preach on this subject, 
in consequence of the loose sentiments of some of the Baptists here respect- 
ing it. Capt. Freeman was requested to take the command of a good ship 
at New York for Europe. At evening had company. 

9. Wrote some on my sermon. Have no books to assist me. Wrote 
slow. Capt. Freeman concludes, on account of ill health, not to go to sea.^ 
The cold abates very little. Good sleighing. At evening walked out. 

10. Wrote diligently on my sermon on Isa. Iviii : 13, 14. It is like to 
extend much further than I expected. Very clear, and it thaws a little. 

11. Pleasant and a little mild. Preached on Isa. Iviii: 13, 14. Did not 
finish the subject. I think there will be two more sermons. Meeting full. 
At the evening meeting spoke on Luke xiii : 6, etc. Quite tired. 

12. The cold seems to return. The shipwrights here work steadily in their 
yards. Read the President's Message.' Written better and very differently 
from any preceding one* He is determined to abandon the Indians. Visited. 
Attended the Bible class. 

13. Wrote. Severe cold and rough. The good sleighing appears to be 
ver\' extensive. Read the Bible. Walked out and visited. Read. 

14. Little abatement of the cold. It scarcely thaws at all. Read the 
Bible. Wrote to my brother Francis. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 

15. Last night we had considerable' addition to our snow. Wrote on 
my sermon on Isa. Iviii : 13, 14. Rode out in a sleigh and visited. Severe 
cold. The committee informed me that it is the wish of the people here that 
I would continue with them for a length of time, with the right of separation 
reserved to either party. They advised me to send for my books. Have 
good accommodations in the cold season. 

16. Wrote on my sermon. Wrote to Mr. Thacher, of Bridgeport, Ct. 
At evening walked out. I write slow.' Paid $2 for a Columbia gold coin 
fof preservation. 

17. It snowed considerably. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Bartlett, 
of East Windsor. Finished my long discourse on the Sabbath; it contains 
four sermons. Fatigued with writing. 



' Francis L. Alden. ■* He is beginning to like Tiesident Jack- 

* He was then forty-seven years old. son better than he did at first. 
^ This Message was given at the first ses- ' The reader has had occasion to notice 

sion of the Twenty-Second Congress, Dec. 5, how Dr. Robbins, after the old style, leaves 

1S31. his adverbs in the adjective form. 



183 1.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT, 247 

iS. Extreme cold. Preached with i^tes on Gal. i: 8. Few at irijeling, 
and the weather so tedious that we concluded to dismiss at noon. Had no 
other meeting. I think the mercury must have been but little above zero 
through the day. Read the Bible. 

19. Wrote to Mr. Battell. The weather moderates a little. Studied my 
Bible lesson, and had a good class in the evening. Rode out. The snow 
quite drifted. Visited. 

20. Rode in a poor stage-sleigh to Plymouth. Clear and very cold. 
\\'e went some of the way in fields, on account of drifts in the highway. 
Kindly received at Mr. Russell's.' Looked at the new meeting-house. Not 
as large as the former one, but very elegant. I regret that it is of wood. 
Mr. Russell went with me and called on Mr. Kendall,^ and other friends. 
The harbor here is hard frozen. 

21. Looked at the fine new court-house, and at the Pilgrim HalP and 
its collections. These are not very extensive, but valuable. The building 
is very good. My cousin Russell has a fine family. Read. There are some 
riotous proceedings in England. Drank tea at Dr. Thacher's.'* He is engaged 
in writing a history of this town. I fear a little how he will succeed. Find 
many friends and former acquaintance. This town improves moderately. 

22. Anniversary.^ The cold returns with all its severity. Attended the 
exercises in Mr. Kendall's meeting-house. Mr. Brazer,* of Salem, had a very 
good sermon, excepting its Unitarianism. The Saviour was almost over- 
looked in the sermon and the prayers. Six ministers were present. I alone 
in the faith of the fathers. The house was very cold. Dined at Mr. Ken- 
dall's. Went to Mr. Freeman's ' and sat awhile with the Pilgrim Association. 
Dr. Codman * preached today in his meeting-house. A new society has been 
lately formed here by the division of Mr. Freeman's. At evening attended 
the County Temperance Society. Mr. Russell presided. The cause has 
been much prospered in this county, but they fear it is not now advancing. 
Suffered much by the cold. 



' Nathaniel Russell, in the year I Soo, mar- stable. In 1824 he published his Military 

ried Martha Le Baron, daughter of Isaac Le Journal of the Revolution, which is regarded 

Haron, and therefore own cousin of Dr. Rob- as important historical authority in Revolu- 

bins. tionary matters. He published several other 

- Rev. James Kendall, D. D., it will be re- volumes. His History of Plymouth appeared 

membered, was the successor of Rev. Chand- in 1S32. 

ler Robbins, D. D., who died in 1799. Dr. s forefathers' Day. 

Kendall was settled, Jan. i, iSoo, and was ^ Rev. John Brazer, native of Worcester, 

now nearly thirty-two years in the ministry graduate of Harvard, 1S13. Settled in Salem 

here, but was to remain twenty-seven years over the North Unitarian Church, 1S20. 

more, till his death, 1S59, making a ministry ^ Rev. Frederick Freeman was pastor of 

of iift)'-nine years. the Third Church, Plymouth, 1824-1833. 

3 This Pilgrim Hall has, within a few ' Dr. John Codman, pastor at Dorchester 

years, been renovated and improved, at the from iSoS to his death, 1S47. He was agrad- 

expense of J. H. Stickney, Esq., of Baltimore, uate of Harvard, 1S02, and a native of Bos- 

a native of Brookfield, Mass. ton. He inherited large wealth from his 

■» James Thachcr, M. D., a native of Barn- father's estate. 



248 DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^83 1. 

23. Last night the thermometer was oi ; this morning, zero. Rode home 
in an open stage-sleigh. I think I have not taken cold, though I have been 
repeatedly much chilled. Read. Had company. This harbor is frozen, and 
to appearance across the bay. 

24. -Wet and a cold rain the most of the day. Read. Mr. Russell and 
his family gave me some old books, and some small new works which are 
valuable. Wrote. A great change in the atmosphere. 

25. Colder. Preached the remainder of my long discourse on the Sab 
bath, on Isa. Iviii : 13, 14. Meeting pretty full. The stove in the meeting- 
house smoked very bad. At evening preached with notes the remainder 
of my sermon of last Sabbath, which was not then finished, on Gal. i : 8. 
Visited a young child very sick. 

26. Cold. A small addition to the snow, so that the sleighing continues. 
Read. I find I have had considerable expense since I have been here. 
The sick child died last night. Visited the afflicted family and others. Read 
the Bible. Attended the Bible class. Have some additional cold, with cough. 

27. Severe cold again. Wrote. Read the Bible. Wrote to Miss South- 
worth, of Stratford. Visited my uncle ; considerably affected with the influ- 
enza. This is very prevalent. At evening went into a singing-school. 

28. Read in Dr. Thacher's MS. History of the Church of Ply7}iouth} 
Received a letter from my brother Francis. Read Sullivan's" Discourse 
at Flyinouth in 1829. Afternoon and evening a hard snow-storm. Capt. 
Freeman gave me a Prussian ducat, of the value of $2, for my collection 
of coins. 

29. On the 27th attended the funeral of a child. The new snow is ten 
or twelve inches deep. Read. Looked over pecuniary accounts. Attended 
the funeral of an infant. Preached a preparatory lecture on Deut. xxiii : 21. 
Wrote. The cold abates. 

30. Very cold and blustering. Set out to ride to New Bedford with 
Mr. Freeman. Found the weather so tedious and the drifts so deep that 
we returned. Wrote. I find my pecuniary accounts with Mr. Wolcott, which 
have not been settled since I left East Windsor, in a better state than I had 
supposed. Read. Occupied with company. Walked out and visited sick 
persons. 

31. Last night, I conclude, was as cold as any one of this winter we have 
yet had. Wrote the most of the day on pecuniary accounts. It ought to 
have been done some time ago. Looked over manuscripts. Read the Bible. 
People are mostly shut up with the cold and snow. The bay appears to be 
wholly frozen over. A year of severe anxieties and trials, and of great 
mercies, is closed. I bless God that he reigns and will reign forever. 



'Contained, doubtless, in his History of Me., 1774; graduated at Harvard College, 

Ply mouth, ]\xsX\\QWctA. 1792; died in Boston, 1839. An elegant 

- William Sullivan, LL. D., an eminent scholar and finished orator. He was one in 

lawyer of Boston. He was born in Saco, the long line of Pilgrim orators at Plymouth. 



le 3 2- 

January. 

1. Pleasant, and some abatement of the cold. Last night we had some 
addition to our snow. There is a heavy body. Endeavored early to commit 
my all to God for the coming year, and to renew my engagements for his 
service. Preached with notes on Col. ii : 6, and a sermon on Eph. v: 14. 
At evening preached on Luke xviii : 13. Meetings well attended and solemn. 
There are a good many sleighs here. Administered the sacrament. Uncle 
Le Baron was not able to attend. 

2. The morning extreme cold. Read. Prepared this partial diary.' 
Wrote. Visited the sick. There is a good deal of influenza and canker- 
rash. At evening attended the monthly concert of prayer. Well attended. 
We contribute with it. 

3. It snowed and rained a little. The weather more moderate. Walked 
and visited. Wrote on my preaching account. It has been long neglected. 

4. Rode with company to New Bedford. Extreme cold. Paid a mer- 
chant tailor for my new great coat, $;^;^. Quite too much. I believe it is the 
most costly garment I have ever had. Paid for other things, $2. Very 
fine sleighing. At evening attended our meeting. Pretty full. Spoke on 
Eph. ii : 4, etc. 

5. Yesterday called at Capt. Gibbs's,^ at Fairhaven, and found his little 
grandchild hard sick. At their request rode over this forenoon to see them. 
Their child, an only child and grandchild, is very sick with a bad canker- 
rash. Concluded to stay till tomorrow. It thawed considerably. Read. 
The little son appears to be in a very critical state. Called on Mr. Gould.' 
Yesterday left with F. L. Alden, New Bedford, $1, to pay for postage, etc., 
for me. 

6. It rained moderately and thawed all day. Did not go out. The child 
very low. In the evening he appeared to be dying, but revived. Occupied 
with company. Read. The cholera spreads extensively in Europe and 
produces great mortality. It seems to have proceeded, regularly, westward 
from India.* 

7. In the forenoon rode to Mattapoisett, and returned to Fairhaven. 
At the request of my friends here, and Mr. Gould, concluded to return and 
be here tomorrow. The snow is considerably gone from the fields, but the 



' That was a temporary arrangement until cholera first reached this country, coming in 
the almanack could be interleaved and made by way of Montreal. The laws of its move- 
ready, ment and action have always been mysteri- 
^ Capt. Anselm Gibbs. ous, but they are better understood now than 
3 Rev. William Gould. they used to be. The cholera has threatened 
•♦ This year, 1832, was the year when the us this year (1885), but has not prevailed. 

249 



250 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

roads are very icy. Wrote. The harbors remain closed. The little child 
lives, but Mr. Jenney * appears to be getting sick himself. Read the Bible. 
Was up late. 

8. Rainy and wet the most of the day. Mr. Gibbs has a sick horse. 
Many people there are sick. Mr. Gould rode to Mattapoisett.^ Preached 
on Luke xxii : 15, and Matt, .xxv : 12. Administered the sacrament. This 
church is pretty large. A number were absent. At evening preached on 
Eph. ii : 4, etc. Quite rainy and but few present. 

9. This morning, about daylight, a new barn near Mr. Gibbs's was burnt. 
Other buildings were providentially preserved. Visited the family. Mr. Jen- 
ney is hard sick, and the child, I think, is a little better. Rode home. It 
thaws and the ground is mostly bare. At evening had a large Bible class. 
Fatigued for want of sleep. 

10. Read. Wrote. Looked at pecuniar}^ matters. Have now on hand, 
$61. At evening walked out and visited. 

11. Began to write a sermon on Isa. Iviii : 13, 14, an abridgment of my 
long discourse on the Sabbath, by request. An unpleasant business. Visited 
a large school. The schools here have been generally neglected. At even- 
ing attended our meeting and preached on Acts viii : 5-8. It was at Dr. 
N. Southard's, and very full. We had some snow. Paid for sawing wood, 
thirty-eight cents. Last evening heard of the death of Mr. Jenney's child 
at Fairhaven. 

12. Most severe cold. Wrote on my sermon. In the morning visited 
Esq. Meigs,^ quite sick. This family had company. 

13. Wrote. The weather moderates. Wrote laboriously on my sermon. 
Visited the sick. A number of children and some grown people are hard 
sick with the canker-rash. Wrote late. 

14. Set out to ride to Fairhaven and New Bedford. Received two letters 
from Mr. Holmes,* desiring to have our exchange deferred for a week. Wrote 
to him. Received a very good letter from sister Battell. Read. There 
is much alarm in England and in Europe respecting the cholera. 

15. Mild weather and very pleasant. Preached with notes on i Cor. i: 17, 
and a sermon on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4, Meetings quite full. At evening spoke 
to a full meeting on Mark x : 51, 52. The surface of the ground quite wet. 

16. Visited the sick. Dined at my cousin John's.' Spent the afternoon 
with my good uncle. He has been quite feeble during the cold weather. 
At evening attended the Bible class. Quite tired. The frost gets out of the 
ground. 

17. Wrote. Pleasant and warm for the season. Rode with Dr. Southard 
and visited sick families. Bad riding. At evening attended the annual 



' Mr. Levi Jenney was the father of the ^ Joseph Meigs, Esq. 

child, having married one of Capt. Gibbs's * Rev. Sylvester Holmes, 

daughters. ' John Allen Le Baron, son of Rev. Lem- 

- For exchange Dr. Robbins stayed and uel. This cousin John was born in 1782, and 

IDreached in Fairhaven. was now fifty years old. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 251 

meeting of the Temperance Society here. I think it has done much good. 
\\'rote to Mr. Goodwin,' of Hartford, to send me the Courant'' newspaper. 

18. Wrote a long letter to Mrs. Battell. Wet and rainy. Rode to the 
Neck. At evening had a meeting and preached on ]Matt. .w : 21, etc. But 
few attended. Tarried out. 

19. Visited. Rode home. The frost is getting out of the ground. Read. 
I fear I am neglecting necessary exercise. 

20. Wrote to D. Brooks/ Esq., Stratford. The last of a very heavy body 
of ice went out of our harbor. Visited the sick. Very bad going. 

21. Yesterday finished my abridged sermon on Isa. Iviii : 13, 14. In the 
morning we had considerable snow. Read. Attended the funeral of an aged 
woman, member of the church, aged ninety-two. Rode to Fairhaven. Quite 
cold. Much chilled with the cold. They are quite sick yet at Capt. Gibbs's. 
Their little child was buried today. Rode to New Bedford. Tarried at 
Mr. Holmes's. Mrs. Holmes is hard sick. 

22. Mr. Holmes rode to Mattapoisett, and returned early in the evening. 
Cold but pleasant. \\'ent to my cousin Alden's. Breached on Ezek. xxxvii : 
3, 4, and my abridged sermon in the afternoon, and the latter part of the 
long one in the evening on Isa. lix : 13, 14. Preached on this subject of 
the Sabbath by request of Mr. Holmes. Full meetings. The house is hard 
for speaking. 

23. Walked to Fairhaven. It thaws some. Got a ride home in the 
afternoon. At the urgent request of Mr. Holmes, engaged to return to assist 
him in religious services this week. In the morning did errands and traded, 
$3.63. At evening had a large Bible class. Much fatigued. 

24. Mr. N. Crosby* let me have his horse and chaise to ride. Rode 
to Bedford, ^^'arm and wet, and the ground thaws fast. Walked with 
Dea. Kempton ' and made short visits to a good many families. We were 
very kindly received. At evening Mr. Mason,^ of Nantucket, preached in the 
vestr}\ Well entertained at Mr. Coggeshall's.'' Was up late. Read. 

25. Attended the early prayer-meeting. Walked and visited families the 
most of the day. Warm. The snow is gone and the ground apparently 
wholly thawed. Towards night rode to Mattapoisett. The mud very deep. 
It became very dark before I stopped. Had no accident, though with a wild 
colt. Attended the evening meeting and preached on 2 Cor. iv : 3. Few 
present. Baptized a child.* Tarried out. 

26. Last evening it began to snow, and became very tedious. Considera- 
ble snow. Blustering and severe cold. Visited a sick woman. Walking 
home, froze one of my ears. Read. Towards evening a messenger came 



' George Goodwin. tucket, 1S30-1S35. He was a graduate of 

* Connecticut Cc«ra«^. Dr. Robbins could Williams College in 181 2. He diedin Marsh- 
not get along without a Hartford paper. all, Mich., in 1870, aged eighty-two. 

3 David Brooks, Esq. ' Mr. Charles Coggeshall, New Bedford. 

* Dea. Nathaniel A. Crosby. ^ Daughter of Dea. Nathaniel A. Crosby, 
^ Dea. William W. Kempton. at home sick. It was then deemed of great 
^ Rev, Stephen Mason, pastor in Nan- importance that children should be baptized. 



252 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

for me from Mr. Holmes. Rode with him to New Bedford. The cold verv 
severe. -My nose, I think, was partly frozen. Last evening Mr. Holmes had. 
four deacons ordained.' Six ministers were present. The most of them have 
left today. In the evening Mr. Seabury^ jircached. Tarried at Mr. Alden's. 
After the evening meeting attended a little while at a musical concert. 

27. Attended a prayer-meeting at nine o'clock. Walked with Dea. Kemp- 
ton and visited families. In the morning the thermometer was at zero ; late 
last evening at 02°. There is a great population in this town. Afternoon we 
had a meeting and I preached on Ps. 1 : 5. Visited again. The most of the 
families in this great congregation have been visited this week. At evening 
I preached on Ps. cvi : 1-5. This concluded, mostly, the appropriate services 
of the week. The public meetings have been thin, but I think the visiting 
has been useful. I do not perceive much evidence of special divine influ- 
ences. The conclusion of the meeting was quite solemn. Much fatigued. 

28. Thermometer this morning at 02°. The two past nights are thought 
to have been the coldest we have yet had this winter. Rode home in the 
stage. The fare was paid at New Bedford. The harbors are firmly frozen 
again. An elderly woman died here, night before last, ver^- suddenly. Vis- 
ited the family. Read. Have received this week from Hartford four num- 
bers of the Connecticut Courant, from the beginning of the year, which I have 
ordered to be sent. Wrote. 

29. Preached on i Tim. i: 15. Attended the funeral of the woman lately 
deceased. Weather moderates. At evening had a full meeting and preached 
on Acts xi : 21. Tired. 

30. Wet and rainy all day. Read. The Legislature of Virginia are in an 
ardent debate on the subject of slavery. The massacre of Southampton ^ 
may be the means of great good. W^rote to my cousin W. Lawrence, of Nor- 
folk. Had no Bible class. 

31. Read the Bible. Wrote to Gen. Howe,"' of New Haven. At evening 
attended a temperance meeting. They did not do very v/ell. .Walked and 
visited. 

February. 

1. Wrote on my preaching account. Visited the sick and others. 
Attended the evening meeting. Uncle Le Baron assisted and is quite well. 
Read. 

2. Wrote. Visited a large Woman's School ; not in the best state. Vis- 
ited families. It thaws. The walking bad. My visiting appears to be kindly 
received. 



" It appears by the general records of this Bedford, 1S30-1S35, was a native of Tiverton, 

church in New Bedford that, strictly speak- R. I. 

ing, there were but three ordained. Joshua ^ xhe Southampton massacre, frightful in 

Barker had been deacon for some years. itself, was more frightful in what it might 

The new deacons were, William W. Kemp- have been. It revealed a widely extended 

ton, just mentioned, William Little, and John plot for the murder of the white people. 
F. Emerson. " Gen. Hezekiah Howe, who has been very 

^ Rev. Pardon G. Seabury, pastor in New often mentioned. 



1S33.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 253 

3. \\rote on my preaching account. Received a very kind letter from 
D. Brooks,' Esq., of Stratford. Read. At evening attended a singing-school. 
Wet and very muddy. 

4. Read. Wrote. Last night the ice went out of this harbor again. 
Two or three vessels sailed today. Received a Connecticut Register'' h^- mail. 
Wet and rainy. Read the Bible. 

5. Last evening it began to snow, and continued about twenty-four hours. 
Cold and tedious. Few people at meeting. Preached with notes both parts 
of the day on Gal. ii : i6, 17, and Matt, viii : 2. Rode in a sleigh. The 
longest snow, I think, of this season. Had no evening meeting. Read, 
Am much in want of books. 

6. Cold and good sleighing. Read the Bible. Wrote. Visited. Had 
a Bible class. Find it fatiguing. 

7. Visited a sick woman very low. Wrote on my preaching account. 
Received a good letter from my sister. Had company, 

8. Read. The cholera seems to be spreading in England. Wrote. 
Afternoon rode in a sleigh to New Bedford and back. Saw my brother 
Francis's wife at her soji's.^ Very good sleighing. Our meeting was observed 
as the monthly prayer-meeting, 

9. It snowed steadily all day. Cold, Wrote on my preaching account. 
Did not leave the house. Read. 

10. Severe cold. There is a heavy body of snow on the ground. The 
rejection of Mr. Van Buren is a noble act of the American Senate.* Walked 
and visited. Mrs. Dexter is very low. Spent some time with Uncle Le Baron. 
He is very well. Wrote. Read. 

11. Wrote on my preaching account. It had got far in arrear. Visited 
Mrs. Dexter. I think she cannot live. Very good sleighing. Read the 
Bible. Have a fire in my own chamber but a small part of the time,' 

12. Warm and wet and rainy through the day. The going ver}' bad. 
The meeting very thin. Preached with notes twice on i John v : 9, and 
Luke xiv : 18. At evening we had considerable thunder. Read. 

13. The heavy body of snow is nearly gone. Wrote. Read my Bible, 



' David Brooks. Secretary of State, as Minister to England, 

^ The Connecticut ^S'/fl/'^ i^^^/i-i'^r was pub- and the Senate would not confirm the ap- 

lished in New London by the Green family. pointment ; and Dr. Robbins thought it was 

3 Francis L. Alden. His mother, Priscilla a noble act, and the old Federalists perhaps 

Le Baron, was married in 1803 to Gideon S. generally thought so. But when the presiden- 

Alden. After his death she married Rev. tial election came round, in the fall of this 

Francis Le Baron Robbins, of Enfield. Her same year (1832), Gen. Jackson was re-elected 

son, Francis L. Alden, was married in 182S to President, and Martin Van Buren was chosen 

Eudora, daughter of Zabdicl Sampson. Vice-President by 1S9 of the 286 electoral 

* Such is the nature of mere party preju- votes. Four j'ears later he was elected Pres- 

dice that almost all the leading statesmen of ident. And now his reputation, if not the 

the earlier years in this country have now an highest, is at least fair and good 

honorable record, however bitter was the ' Along the south shores of New England 

prejudice against them in their day. ■ Presi- the winter breaks much earlier than in the 

dent Jackson nominated Mr. Van Buren, then middle and northern parts. 



254 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

I am in mucli want of expositors. Visited tlie sick. Had a full Bible class. 
The service is laborious. 

14. Wrote on my preaching account. Read. Revised the ecclesiastical 
part of Dr. Thacher's History of the Toivn of PlymontJi} Made a number 
of alterations. It is pretty well written. 

15. Wrote. Walked and visited. Warm and the roads muddy. Mrs. 
Dexler continues, though very low. Attended the evening meeting. Well 
attended. 

16. Read. The cholera seems to be spreading in England. Wrote to 
Judge Daggett,^ of New Haven, and to Gov. Tomlinson,^ at Congress. Cold 
and the ground again frozen. At evening walked out and visited. I do not 
do as much as I ought. 

17. V\'rote on my preaching account. The forenoon very cold; about 
equal to any we have had. Walked and visited the sick and others. Read. 
Was up late. 

18. Wrote. Received a letter from my cousin W. Lawrence, of Norfolk. 
Read the Bible. Preparing for my journey. Mrs. Dexter is very low. 

19. Rainy and wet. Preached on i Tim. iv : 8. Bad going. Thin meet- 
ing. Towards night rode to Fairhaven. Preached in the evening for 
Mr. Gould, to a good audience, on Ezek. xxxvii : 3, 4. Mrs. Robbins, 
brother F.'s wife, is here, and paid me $60,'' received from the society in 
Somers. 

20. Was called early by the stage ; rode to Boston. Came by Taunton, 
a road I was little acquainted with. Kindly entertained by my kinsman, 
Dr. Chandler Robbins.' The traveling not bad. Had good company in the 
stage. Went with my cousin in the evening and attended a good literary 
lecture. 

21. Walked out. Called on my cousin Chandler.^ The city is much 
improved since I was here in 1824. The Legislature are in session. ALide 
some calls. Purchased this sharp metallic pen. Last night it snowed some 
and is cold. Good sleighing in and about the city. Walked to South Boston 

' This work, mentioned before, was now the life-long minister of Plymouth, who was 

drawing near publication. graduated at Yale College in 1756. This 

' David Daggett, LL. D. He was a native Dr. Chandler, whom Dr. Thomas Robbins 

of Attleborough, Mass. was visiting, received his degree of M. D. 

^ Gov. Gideon Tomlinson, of Fairfield. froth Harvard in 1818. 
Having finished his four years, 1827-1S31, <" A second cousin. Chandler Robbins, 

as Governor of Connecticut, he was, 1831- D. D., son of Dr. Peter Gilman Robbins, of 

1837, in the United States Senate. Roxbury. This Chandler was graduated at 

■• That bill, it will be remembered, was Harvard College, 1829, and was pastor of 

put into the hands of Esq. Dixon, of Enfield, the Second Church, P>oston (Unitarian), 1833 

for collection, and Mrs. Robbins, coming -1S75. ^^^ <^l'cd in 1SS2. In the last fev,- 

from Enfield, brought the money. years of his life he was blind. His father 

5 This is Chandler Robbins, M. D., a sec- lived in Lynn before moving to Roxbury-, 

ond cousin, graduated at Bowdoin College, and there his son Chandler was born, Feb. 

1815, son of Judge Chandler Robbins, living 14, 1810. As a man and as a minister he was 

in Maine, who was graduated at Harvard, greatly beloved durir.g his whole ministry of 

17S2; grandson of Chandler Robbins, D. D., more than forty years. 



i832.] 



PREACHING IX MATTAPOISETT. 



25s 



and visited Rev. Mr. Fairchlld." Preached In the evening in his vestry with- 
out notes on Mat*, xv : 21, etc. lie has lately had a public meeeting and 
there is some attention among his people. 

22. Centennial celebration.' (]rcat firing and bells in the morning. 
Returned to the city. At the State Mouse was introduced to various ministers 
and otlier gentlemen. Heard a good oration of one hundred and fifteen 
minutes. The prayers were poor.^ Attended a splendid dinner at Faneuil 
Hall, given by the city to about six hundred guests. It was mostly in th.e 
evening. The day was pleasant and the occasion much favored by a good 
Providence. Had many friendly invitations. 

23. Wet. Went into the House of Representatives. Treated politely. 
The House is respectable, but quite too numerous. Became unwell and had 
to leave the House. Dined with mv cousin Chandler. Towards night rode 
in a passage sleigh" to Dr. P. G. Robbins's, at Roxbury. Am quite feeble. 

24. Had a pleasant visit at my cousin Peter's. His two sons' are in the 
theological institution at Cambridge. Afternoon returned to the city. Severe 
cold. Did errands. Paid for books, $7. At evening called on Dr. Wisner. 

25. Slept at the stage-house and rode early. The forenoon ver)' cold. 
Suffered much from it. Rode to Fairhaven. Rode home at dark in the rain. 
Mrs. Dexter has died in my absence. Mr. Gould attended her funeral. 
My cousin Eliza's' youngest son is hard sick. Have had, by divine favor, 
a prosperous journey. 

26. The ground very wet, but not thawed through. Preached with notes 
on Ps. li : 10, and a sermon on Pleb. x: 26. At evening spoke at the con- 
ference on Mark xvi : 14. Meetings well attended for such bad walking. 
We have not had a pleasant Sabbath this month. My sister, Mrs. Robbins, 
is here. Much fatigued. 

27. Read. Looked over books. Am fatigued by my journey. Received 
a letter from D. Brooks, Esq., of Stratford, informing me that my things left 
there had been sent to New York. My cousin F. L. Alden, of New Bedford, 
called and informed me that a box of books, etc., sent me from Norfolk by 
sta.o-e, has arrived at his store. Walked and visited. I fear Mrs. Le Baron's ' 
little son will not live. Attended the Bible class. 

28. It snowed and rained some. Wrote ten days of diar}-. Read. Had 
company. 

29. Rode to New Bedford with Mr. Freeman and brought my box lately 



' His old neighbor and friend in Connec- 
ticut, settled in East Hartford while he him- 
self was in East Windsor. 

- Washington's Birthday. 

^ When Dr. Robbins came into the vicin- 
ity of Eoston he was apt to find fault with 
the public prayers. 

* A public sleigh, as we understand it. 
Twenty years later there used to be an omni- 
bus running to Dorchester once an hour. A 
lady, a stranger, asked a gentleman in Boston 



how she should get to Dorchester. His reply 
was, " Take the owly, mum," which sentence 
she turned over in her mind and studied in 
vain, but which, being interpreted, meant, 
"Take the hourly, madam." 

' Chandler, already mentioned, and Sam- 
uel Dowse Robbins. 

^ This cousin Eliza, daughter of his Uncle 
William, married her cousin William, son of 
Rev. Lemuel, iSio. 

^ His cousin Eliza, just noticed. 



256 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



sent from Norfolk. The roads very muddy. Received a letter from Dr. Rob- 
bins, and one from Mrs. Adams, both of Boston. My things have come very 
well. Received with them a letter from my sister Battell. Read. Attended 
the evening prayer-meeting. God in mercy has brought me through a very 
cold winter. 

March. 

1. Wrote a long letter to my sister Battell. Received a letter from 
Gen. Howe, of New Haven. Capt. Freeman got badly hurt by a kick 
from his horse. Hindered by company. Wrote late. 

2. Walked and visited the sick and others. Cold. Mrs. Robbins ' and 
other friends were here. At evening attended a singing-school. Read. 

3. Visited sick persons. One of our best women is very sick. Read. 
Wet and very bad going. Read the Bible. 

4. Very pleasant, though bad going. Preached on Rom. ii : 6-1 1. At 
evening had our monthly concert of prayer, and preached without notes 
on Ps. Ixxiv : 20. Mrs. Le Baron's little son is very low. Full meetings. 
Visited the sick. Much fatigued. 

5. Wrote. Read the Life of Sir Isaac Newton^ Rainy all day. After- 
noon and evening very hard. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott.^ The annual town- 
meeting was held. Some effort was made against the temperance cause, but 
it failed. 

6. Visited the sick. They appear a little better. Read Newton. 

7. Wrote to Mrs. Adams, of Boston. Quite cold. Visited. At evening 
preached a lecture at a distance on Luke xiv : 16-18. Walked home late. 

8. Wrote diligently on my preaching account. At evening walked out. 

9. Walked and visited the sick and others all day. Afternoon visited 
a school, and in the evening attended the singing-school. The ground begins 
to settle, 

ID. Went early and visited Mrs. Barstow, very low. Mr. Freeman has 
procured a new horse, which appears to be a very good one. Read. We 
have highly gratifying intelligence that, in the case of the imprisoned mission- 
aries, the Supreme Court have declared the law of Georgia unconstitutional 
and void.'' In the evening my cousin Chandler Robbins,' bJ: Boston, came 



' Mrs. Francis Robbins, of Enfield, Ct. 

^ Life of Sir Isaac Newton, by Sir David 
Brewster. London, 1831. 

' His old friend, whose name has so often 
occurred, Samuel Tudor Wolcott, still living 
in East Windsor at this writing (18S5), eighty- 
six years old. 

* The case of the missionaries, Rev. S. A. 
Worcester, Rev. John Thompson, Elizur ISut- 
ler, M. D., and some others, who were arrested 
and thrown into prison in Georgia in the 
j-ear 1S31, excited great feeling throughout 
the whole land. Georgia wished to get the 
Cherokee Indians removed from her territo- 



ries, and the missionaries were a hindrance. 
Georgia therefore framed a law forbidding 
white men to reside among the Indians with- 
out license from the State. The missiona- 
ries, seeing the wicked intent of this law, 
would not retire, but allowed themselves to 
be arrested and thrown into the Georgia pen- 
itentiary. It was this law that the Supreme 
Court of the United States pronounced un- 
constitutional and void. 

^ There were two men of the name Chand- 
ler Robbins in Boston whom he calls cousins, 
and which it was that was visiting him we 
do not know. 



iS32.] 



PREACHING IN' MA TTAPOISETT. 



257 



here and tarried. Wrote on my preaching account. Yesterday an aged 
woman died. Visited the family before and after her decease. 

11. Preached with notes on Heb. iv : 11, and a funeral sermon on i Cor. 
-'^'^' • 5^» 57- Attended the funeral of the late Mrs. Meigs. Meetings verj' 
lull. Mv cousin Robbins went ofif at noon to Fairhaven. Preached at the 
evening meeting on John xxi : 17. Much fatigued. 

12. Wet and rainy. Wrote on my preaching account. Visited the sick 
At evening had a full Bible class. The ground settles. 

13. Read the Bible. Began a letter to Dr. Taylor, of New Haven. 

14. Received a good letter from my sister Battell. Rode and walked 
to the Neck. Tedious cold and some snow. At evening preached to a good 
Qumber on Luke xiv : 16-18. Tarried out. 

15. Walked and visited all day on the two necks.' Had a long walk. 

16. Read. The decision of the Supreme Court in favor of the Indians 
gives great satisfaction. Wrote the remainder of my long letter to Dr. Taylor. 
Last evening saw Mrs. Robbins. Visited. Attended in the evening a public 
singing. 

17. Wrote the most of a sermon on Rom. ii : 4. Read. Had a long 
walk. 

18. Very cold and tedious, with some snow. Meeting quite thin. Preached 
a sermon on John viii : 24. Had no evening meeting. Read the most of 
Mr. Clay's long and ver^- able speech on the American System.^ 

19. Severe cold. It thawed very little in a clear sun. Wrote on my 
preaching account. Read. Read Guise's^ Paraphrase. At evening had 
a full Bible class. I need a good deal of exercise. 

20. Rode with Mr. Freeman to New Bedford. The wharves there are 
almost covered with great casks of oil. Saw sister Priscilla.* Paid for 
a book, sixty-three cents. Called on Mr. Holmes. Read. At evening 
walked and visited a sick person. 

21. Quite stormy, rain and snow. Wrote on my preaching account. 
Walked out. Evening meeting prevented by the weather. Read the Court 
of Biionapart:} 

22. Read the Bible. Wrote on my preaching account, and finished it, so 
far as I could with the materials I have with me. It has taken much time. 
Cold, and I did not go into the street. Read late the Court of Buonaparte. 

23. Walked and visited the most of the day. The society had their. 



' The two necks are the peninsulas on 
each side of Mattapoisett harbor, running 
out as protectors of the harbor. 

^ Henry Clay, who had before been a 
member of the House, was chosen Senator 
in 1831, and was re-elected, so that be had 
a continued connection with the Senate, 1S31 
-1842. The American system here spoken of 
was the system of protection to American 
mdustries. 



3 William Guise, a learned English divine> 
1653^1684. 

'' She was cousin Priscilla until she mar 
ried Rev. Francis Le Baron Robbins, of En- 
field, Ct., and then, by marriage, she became 
sister. 

' Cozi/t and Camp of Biwnapartc, one of 
the volumes of Harper's Family Library 
This scries of valuable books, extending to 
many volumes, was then very popular. 



258 



DIARY OF RKV. 



THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



annual meeting. Am informed that there is considerable solicitude mani- 
fested to give me a call. Read. 

24. Took no food or drink for near ten hours. Received a letter from 
S. T. W'olcott. He informs me that one of his neighbors wishes to buy 
my land. Wrote and finished my sermon begun last Saturday. 

25. Preached with notes on John v : 40, and on Rom. ii : 4. At evening 
spoke on Matt, xi : 30. Meetings unusually full. Much fatigued. 

26. Wrote a long letter to S. T. Wolcott, and sent for a trunk with clothes 
and books. Wet and rainy. Bible class prevented. Read Bonj's Couri} 
The seat of corruption. 

27. Read. Read Guise's Paraphrase. Wrote. Paid a donation of $2 
for the singing-school here. Had at evening a serious and full Bible class. 
Quite cold and severe wind. 

28. Wrote to my cousin W. Lawrence. Walked and visited. Attended 
the evening meeting with my Uncle Le Baron. Had a long walk. 

29. Read. Looked over papers. My papers are in different places. 
Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture on Rom. viii : 35. Thin meeting. 
Wet. A reformed intemperate man was restored to good standing in the 
church. Visited. Read. 

30. Wrote diligently on my former pecuniary accounts. At evening walked 
out. 

31. Received a letter from Gen. Howe, of New Haven. Wrote to him, 
to my brother Francis, and to Rev. Mr. Cobb, of Sippican.^ Sent little books 
to Mr. Wolcott's two grandsons. Took some cold last evening, had a poor 
night, and have not felt able to write a sermon today, as 1 had designed. 
Read the Bible. We have had a cold and uncomfortable month. 

April. 

1. Am rather feeble, but better than yesterday. Preached with notes 
'on John i: 11, and a sermon on Ps. cvi : 15. Attended the sacrament. 

Uncle Le Baron assisted in an interesting manner. Spoke at the evening 
.meeting on Isa. lix : i, 2. Meetings full and attentive. Much fatigued. 

2. Received from Stratford, by New York, the various articles of furni- 
ture and books which I had there. They came without injury. Rode with 
Mrs. Le Baron to Bedford.^ Saw Mrs. Robbins. She expects to go tomorrow 
for home.'* Eliza Le Baron ^ sfoes with her. Saw Mr. Holmes. The new 



^ The book just mentioned. 

^ Sippican is the Indian name of a por- 
tion of the town of Rochester, embracing 
one of the chief harbors of Rochester, while 
Mattapoisett is the name of the other. Sip- 
pican River empties into Sippican Bay. 
This Sippican Bay, or harbor, is four or five 
miles northeast of Mattapoisett, and these 
are the chief harbors of the town of Roches- 
ter. 

^,It seems to have been the custom in 



Mattapoisett, fifty years ago, to speak of New 
Bedford, for short, as Bedford. We have in 
several instances added the word " New." 
But as Dr. Robbins continues to call it Bed- 
ford, we will indulge him in so doing, only 
the reader will understand that he means 
New Bedford. 

" Enfield, Ct. 

5 Daughter of William and Eliza (Le 
Baron) Le Baron, then sixteen years old. 
Her parents were own cousins. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 259 

society here do ver)' little.' At evening attended the monthly concert. Well 
attended. Gave my cousin Eliza,^ $2. 

3. A cold snow and rain storm. Worked laboriously, putting up my 
things. Some of the books and cabinet work are a little chafed, but they 
have been well preserved. Read. 

4. Took some cold yesterday and am considerably unwell. Worked 
at my books and other things. Am not able to write a sermon for Fast. 
Quite cold. Kept house the most of the day. Read the Bible, 

5. Fast.^ A severe and tedious wind. Preached with notes on Isa. i : 2, 
and a sermon on Dan. x : 12. People suffered much with the cold. Meetings 
well attended. Attended the evening meeting and preached on 2 Cor. v: 18. 
Am something hoarse. Bore the fatigues better than I expected. 

6. Walked out. Paid for the freight of my things, $3.75. Went into 
the ship-yards. Pleasant, but cold. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. The committee 
of the society called on me and informed me that the society, at their late 
annual meeting, expressed their desire by a unanimous vote that I would 
become their minister. I think it best that the matter should rest for the 
present. Made this almanack. Having waited for this paper,'* it has been 
deferred. 

7. In the morning there was a good deal of ice in the harbor. Wrote. 
Received a letter from my cousin Chandler Robbins. Rode to Sippican 
to exchange with Mr. Cobb.^ The population of this town is considerably 
in detached parts. 

8. Still cold and a tedious wind. Mr. Cobb rode to Mattapoisett, and 
returned towards evening. Preached on Heb. xii : 16, and Rom. ii : 4. And 
at evening on Matt, xv : 21, etc. Rode home late with company. Much 
oppressed with fatigue and cold. 

9. Can do but little. Read. Worked at my books. Have about two 
hundred and thirt}' volumes here.* Read expositors. Attended the Bible 
class. 

10. Wrote. This morning water was hard frozen. Walked out and 
visited. Some families here have measles. 

11. Wrote, transcribing the former parts of this diar}-. Read geography. 
Attended the evening prayer-meeting. The population of the village here 
much increases. Read late. 

12. Wrote on my transcribing. Wrote to Rev. Wm. Ely, of Mansfield, 
Ct., respecting our Ministers' Annuity Society. I have had almost the sole 
care of that institution since its commencement in 18 11. Walked and visited. 



■ The Trinitarian church and society of of course, from which we are now copj-ing 

New Bedford, then recently formed. this very entry. It is very choice paper ot 

^ His second cousin. the olden style. 

^ He was in Massachusetts now, w-hcrc ' Oliver Cobb, D. D., pastor of South 

Fast Days were on Thursdays, with no re- Church, Rochester (Sippican Village), 1799- 

gard to Good Fridays, as in Connecticut. 1849. 

* The writing-paper with which he inter- ^ Only a very small portion of his library 

leaved his almanack — the identical paper, had as yet been moved from East Windsor. 



26o DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^832. 

Have procured a good new bonnet for my cousin Polly Le Baron.' Sister 
Battell will pay one half of the cost. One of our new ships was launched. 
It went off well ; a fine one of three hundred and eighty tons. A pleasant 
spring day. Almost the first we have had. 

13. Wrote. Quite warm. Walked and visited. People are sowing their 
early grains. Visited families which I have not before. Worked at my 
books. 

14. Wrote on my libraiy catalogue. Wrote on a sermon on Ps. cxxxvii : i. 
Was not able to finish it. Read the Bible. Had to walk considerably for 
e.xercise. 

15. We had a rough east wind, but no rain. Preached a sermon on 
John vi : 39, 40. Quite cold. At the evening meeting spoke on Ps. xvi : 8. 
Mr. Freeman^ is considerably unwell. 

16. Worked at my librar}-, looking over and writing. I conclude I have 
lost some books. Visited. Cold and a little wet. At evening attended the 
Bible class. Rather thin. 

17. Visited the sick; there are several. Dea. Crosby^ and his family are 
quite sick. Wet and rainy; afternoon and evening hard. Wrote on my 
catalogue of books. 

18. Last night and for the most of the day the storm was violent. Wrote 
on my library catalogue, and copying a part of this diary. Was very busy 
in my chamber. Read the Bible and Bonfs Court.'' The evening meeting 
was prevented. 

19. Still wet and dark. Visited. Did some err.ands. Received a letter 
from S. T. Wolcott. Mr. Freeman's son has lately sailed mate of a ship for 
Marilla. Sent $10 by him for a venture.' Wrote on my library catalogue. 
I have not been able to attend to it for a long time. 

20. Wet and dark and cold weather. It snowed some. Attended the 
funeral of a child; the fifth lost by the family in about sixteen months. 
They have one remaining. Visited. Vv'rote on my preaching account. 
Wrote late. 

21. Am considerably unwell. Partly, I believe, from want of exercise. ■ 
Read. Afternoon and evening wrote and finished a sermon begun on the 
14th. Not as good as 1 hoped for. Wrote late. 

22. Preached with notes on Ex. xvii : 11, and the sermon finished last 
evening on Ps. cxxxvii : i. A pleasant day, but still cold. Yesterday 
it became clear weather, after seven days of east wind, cold, dark, and wet. 
At evening spoke on Luke xix : 10. Much fatigued. Was up late. 

23. Received a trunk from East Windsor, with books, clothes, etc., by way 
of New York. Paid fifty cents, a charge upon it, but the packet-master gave 



' Polly was Mary Le Baron, daughter of ^ pga. Nathaniel L. Crosby, 

his Uncle William. She was born 177S, and " Court and Canip of Buonaparte. 

was then fifty-four years old. She seems not = dj-. Robbins in his earlier days used to 

to have married. buy lottery tickets, as other good people did. 

2 Capt. Seth Freeman, with whom he But this matter here referred to was a fair 

boarded. and regular business venture. 



1832.] 



PREACHING IX MATTAPOISETT. 



261 



me the freight. He had a long passage. Visited the sick and afflicted. 
A promising son of three years, an only child, died this afternoon. Several 
children are sick. Attended the Bible class. Received of the society, $92. 

24. Mr. Cobb,' the late minister here, now of Sandwich, came here last 
evening. He appears to be a worthy man. Walked out. People are sowing 
a little, but the season is very late. Attended the funeral of the child that 
died yesterday. Rode to the Head-of-the-River^ and met with the Associa- 
tion ^ at Mr. Seabury's.* I became a member of the body. Quite cold. 

25. This morning there was a very hard frost. The Association had 
considerable business. In the afternoon the auxiliary Foreign Missionary 
Society had their annual meeting. An agent of the Board, Mr. Bardwell,' 
was present. Returned home. At evening performed a marriage.* The 
persons came here. Could not give wine.' 

26. Wrote. Wrote a short piece for the newspaper. Paid $3.92, for my 
cousin Polly Le Baron's bonnet. Walked a distance and visited. Warmer, 
and the grass begins to grow. Got home late. 

27. Read. Found a letter from S. T. Wolcott, which came the other day 
with my books. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. Attended the funeral of an infant 
child. At evening walked out. 

28. Wet and cold again. W^rote to Samuel Terry, of Plymouth, Ct. Read. 
The cholera seems to increase in England. Wrote to E. W. Bull,^ of Hart- 
ford. Rode out and visited an aged woman, quite low. Am troubled with 
a stiff neck. Omitted going to Rochester, as I intended, on account of the 
weather. Wrote. Read the Bible. In my trunk, lately brought, received 
a good new hat, made for me at Hartford. On Tuesday of this week a num- 
ber of the brethren of the church here, with the pastor, requested that I would 
act as co-pastor of the church. They consider this as giving me the legal 
authority to celebrate marriages.' On Monday morning the ground was hard 
frozen, and ice continued in some places the most of the day. 

29. In the morning Mr. Bigelow '° came here in the rain, and I went 



' Rev. Asahel Cobb, a native of Abing- 
ton, Mass., and a graduate of Hamilton Col- 
lege, N. Y., 1823, was pastor of the Trinita- 
rian church. Sandwich, 1831-1842. He was 
never settled in Rochester, but had probably 
preached there for a time as assistant to Rev. 
Mr. Le Baron. 

^ This seems to have been a mode of des- 
ignation for the upper end of the long New 
Bedford harbor. 

^ The Old Colony Association. 

■• Rev. Pardon G. Seabury. 

^ Rev. Horatio Bardwell, D. D., who had 
been a missionary of the American Board at 
Bombay for several years, but was then serv- 
ing the Board as a traveling agent. He was 
afterwards settled at O.xford, Mass., in 1836, 
where he remained till 1863. He died in 



1866. He was a man of noble mind and 
heart. 

^ The parties united were Weston Robin- 
son, of Fairhaven, and Mary Loring, of Mat- 
tapoisett. 

" As he used to Ho, because the temper- 
ance reform was well under way. 

« Eben W. Bull. 

9 As he had performed one marriage, it 
was well to make his authority sure. 

'° There were three churches in the town 
of Rochester, as it then was. Rev. Jonathan 
Bigelow, a native of Boylston, Mass., and a 
graduate of Brown University, 1S17, was the 
pastor of the oldest church. Mattapoisett, 
which was then a part of Rochester, is now a 
separate town, and has been so about thirty 
years. 



262 



DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



to Rochester. There was not much rain after eight o'clock. Cold. Preached 
on Ps. 1 : 5, and Heb. xii : 16. I conclude this congregation is about as large 
as the one at Mattapoisett. Returned after meeting, as did Mr. B. Attended 
the evening meeting and spoke on Luke xvi : S. 

30. Wet and rainy. Wrote. Read. Attended to my things. Attended 
at evening the Bible class. W^e have a good many sick. 

May. 

1. Walked and visited the sick and others through the day. Walked 
a distance. A number of people are hard sick. Quite tired. 

2. Pleasant, but still cold. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Strong,' of Redding, Ct. 
Looked over temperance papers and began an address on the subject. At 



evening we had 



a good meeting. 



3. Wrote and finished my address, and delivered it in the evening before 
the Mattapoisett Temperance Society. We had a full meeting. Received 
a letter from Gen. Howe, of New Haven. Visited a woman that has hope- 
fully got religion since I have been here. 

4. In the morning was called to see a sick woman very low. It grows 
warmer and the season advances slowly. Looked over old newspapers 
at Capt. Le Baron's.^ Wrote. Rode a distance and visited a sick family. 
Read. 

5. Rainy and dark during the forenoon, which prevented any opportunity 
to see the transit of Mercury across the sun.^ Read the Bible. Wrote to 
S. T. Wolcott relative to my library. Read. Did not feel able to write 
a sermon. Yesterday Mr, Le Baron attended the funeral of an infant child 
in my stead. 

6. Wrote notes and preached in the forenoon on i Cor. vii : 23. After- 
noon a sermon on Ps. 1 : 5, Quite pleasant. The fullest meeting, I think, 
that I have seen here. After meeting performed a marriage. Preached 
at the evening meeting. Preached on Luke xix : 13. A good woman died 
this morning. Our Sabbath-school began. We had a good collection for the 
library. 

7. Rode and visited the sick. One very low. Read. Walked out. 
Attended the monthly concert. Warmer. 

8. Received a box of books from New Haven. It includes the Universal 
Magazine, of London, from 1747 to 1783, seventy-one volumes,'' at the cost 



' Rev. William L. Strong, formerly pastor 
at Somers, Ct, 1805-1829. He was pastor 
at Redding, 1830-1S35. 

^ Capt. William Le Baron. 

' This transit is thus described in the 
almanack for the year 1832, from which this 
diary is copied : " The transit of Mercury will 
happen on Saturday, May 5th. Nearly the 
whole of the transit will be visible in New 
England. . . . Viewed through a telescope 
(the eye being carefully protected from the 



sun's light), Mercury will appear as a round 
dark body passing across the sun's disk." 
The time occupied in the transit was from 
sunrise till after eleven o'clock. 

•• The work made two volumes a year, 
and he received the volumes for thirty-five 
and one half years. It started in 1747, and 
continued at least until ninety-one volumes 
were published. Its real title was The Uni- 
versal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleasure. 
It was quite largely illustrated. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 263 

of $50. It is a very valuable work. Some bundles of pamphlets which I had 
lent at New Haven were sent most shamefully injured and abused. Walked 
and visited. At evening had a good Bible class. The season begins to 
advance. 

9. Wrote to Gen. Howe, of New Haven, and sent him a bill of $50. 
Attended a funeral ; the third in Capt. De.xter's ' house in less than two 
months. Attended the evening meeting. Quite full. Warmer. Traded, 
ninety-three cents. 

10. Wrote. We now have spring weather. On Monday morning there 
was a hard frost and ice. Read. Great excitement in England respecting 
the Reform Bill." Walked and visited the most of the day. Am pretty 
languid. 

11. In the morning considerable frost. Walked and visited sick persons 
and others. Wrote to B. Ely,' Esq., of Simsbur}', to resign my place on the 
Committee of the Everest Fund. Visited a number of families. 

12. Wrote. Have many parochial calls. Afternoon rode to the Neck 
and attended the funeral of a promising boy of ten years old. Warm. 
Am quite languid. Visited a sick person quite low. 

13. Quite warm and pleasant. Meetings very full. Preached with notes 
on Matt, iii : 8, and a sermon on Luke xix : 43, 44. At the evening meeting 
found myself very hoarse and my head severely oppressed. Spoke a little 
with much difficultv on Heb. xii : 2. Mv voice seemed to be sone. Received 
a letter from F. L. Alden, of New Bedford, informing me that I shall be 
desired to dedicate their new meeting-house this week. Very unexpected. 

14. Last night was very poor. Am quite ill. I see not that I can avoid 
the Bedford labor, and have no sermon with me that will answer. Wrote 
to Alden. Began to write a sermon for the dedication on Hag. ii : 9. 
Wrote slow and poorly. My sole help is in the God of helpless ministers. 
Toward evening Dr. Mayhew, of Bedford, called on me with a letter from 
Simeon Bayley, in behalf of the committee, wishing me to dedicate their 
house on Thursday. The peach-blossoms begin to appear. My cold affects 
my eyes. 

15. Wrote pretty diligently, as far as I was able, on my sermon. I regret 
that it must be so imbecile. At evening, though something wet, was obliged 
to walk out for exercise. Am quite anxious about Dea. Crosby. My eyes 
are so affected that I cannot study in the evening. Received a letter from 
Dr. Mayhew. 

16. Warm and very fine weather for vegetation. Wrote as well as I could 
and finished my long sermon for the dedication. My inliuenza seems not 
to abate much. Applications appear to have but little effect. Walked out. 



' Dexter was a common name in Roches- the House of Lords, Oct. 7, 1S31. This led 

ter, and captain there meant, ordinarily, not on to the terrible Bristol riots, and the ex- 

a military man, but the commander of a ves- citement was kept up until, at length, the 

sel, larger or smaller. Reform Bill was passed, June 7, 1S32. 

- The Reform Bill, which had been under ^ Benjamin Ely, Esq., treasurer of the 

consideration for some years, was rejected by Everest fund. 



264 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



Am much fatigued by my writing. It is all I have done in three days. 
Wrote to Alden. 

17. Mr. Freeman carried me to New Bedford. Warm and very pleasant. 
Kept at Dr. Mayhew's. Am quite hoarse and feeble. Saw Mr. Holmes. 
On account of some unpleasant occurrences he declined taking any public 
part in the services, and chose that no other one should assist.' In the 
afternoon we attended the dedication. I preached on Hag. ii : g. I was 
alone in the pulpit. A large assembly of the people and a fme house. 
A good many ministers were present of our denomination and others. Spoke 
with difficulty and feebly. At evening was at a meeting in Mr. Holmes's 
vestry.^ 

18. Made a number of calls. Very kindly treated. I believe I am no 
worse for speaking yesterday. Dr. Mayhew brought me home. Am quite 
languid. Received a letter from Mr. Barnes/ of Middletown, and wrote 
to him. Walked out. Saw a very sick child. There has been another 
disgraceful assault at Congress.'* 

19. Rode in the stage to Wareham to exchange with Mr. Nott. He 
walked in the afternoon to Mattapoisett.' At evening rainy. Read. 

20. A steady rainy day. Preached on 2 Kings vii : 3, and Ps. cxxxvii : i. 
Thin meeting. An elegant but not a commodious house. Some of the time 
it has rained hard. Spoke with much difficulty. Am hoa-rse and my voice 
is feeble. Read some. 

21. The ground was quite dry and is greatly refreshed by the abundant 
rain. The apple-tree blossoms began to appear about Thursday and Friday 
of last week. Very late. Called on Mrs. Everett.* Rode home in the stage. 
Quite cool. Mr. Nott was here in the afternoon and went home. Read 
expositors and attended the Bible class. The evenings are short for us. 
Received a letter from Dea, Kempton/ of New Bedford. I fear there will 
be some unpleasant things between those two societies. There was preaching 
yesterday in their new house. Was out late. 

22. Wrote the preceding ten days of the diary. Am feeble and my eyes 
are weak, so that I can do but little. Read. Kept in on account of the 
cold. Read in the English History. 

23. Walked and visited. Quite cold. This morning there was some 
frost. Wrote. At evening we had our meeting at this house. Well attended. 
Read the Bible. 



" "Tantsene animis celestibus irae.' " 

' Returning good for evil. 

^ Jonathan Barnes, Esq. 

■* This encounter was between the famous 
Samuel Houston, of Texas, and William 
Stanberry, of Ohio. Mr. Stanberry accused 
Houston of taking bribes, which was untrue ; 
for Houston, though strong and rough, was 
honorable. The two men met on Pennsylva- 
nia Avenue, and Mr. Houston punished his 
adversary severely. He was brought before 



the bar of the House and reprimanded by the 
Speaker. He was also fined $500 in the Dis- 
trict Court, but Gen. Jackson remitted the 
fine. 

5 About seven miles from Mattapoisett to 
Wareham. 

* Widow of Rev. Noble Everett, who had 
been pastor at Wareham from 17S2 till his 
death, 1S19. He was a native of Woodbury, 
Ct., and a graduate of Yale, 1775. 

^ Dea. William W. Kempton. 



1832.] 



PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 



265 



24. Walked and visited the sick and others. Wet and ver)- cold for the 
season. Afternoon rode a distance and attended a splendid wedding of 
blacks." Got considerably wet. Read. The cold of the season is alarming. 

25. Yesterday received a letter from Gen. Howe. Wrote. Walked and 
visited. Have a good deal of call for visiting. Vegetation adVances very 
little. Wet. 

26. Wrote on my preaching account. Read. Wrote a "relation"^ for 
a woman, to be read before the church. Read the Bible. Visited the sick. 
Pleasant but cold. 

27. Rainy and cold through the day. Thin meeting. Expounded on 
Matt, i and ii to verse 19. The first time I have done it here. Preached 
a sermon on Eph. vi : 12. Had no evening meeting. Read. Wrote to 
Rev. Mr. Bacon and Gen. Howe/ of New Haven. Was up late. 

28. It appears some like favorable weather. Read the Bible. Received 
a box with valuable articles from East Windsor and Hartford. They came 
well. The captain here charged no freight. Read expositors. Wrote. 
Yesterday propounded a woman to the church.'* At evening had a full Bible 
class. Was out late. 

29. Capt. Freeman rode with me early to Bedford. Took the stage and 
rode to Boston.^ Stage very full. Warm and pleasant through the day. 
Apple-trees at Mattapoisett are coming out; in Middleborough and Bridge- 
water in full blowth. Stopped with Mr. Fairchild at South Boston. Carried 
the Wyllys papers, received yesterday from Connecticut, for several years in 
my possession, to Mrs. Adams, of South Boston.* Hope she will give me 
some of them. In the evening walked with Mr. Fairchild and attended the 
Unitarian Association. Kindly entertained. 

30. In the morning attended the Pastoral Association. Saw Prof. Emer- 
son ' and a number of friends. Attended the annual meeting of the Ameri- 
can Temperance Society. Dr. Hewitt * spoke very well. A steady cold rain 
all day. Dined at Mr. Edwards's ' in Faj^ette Street. Attended the meeting 
of the Convention of Ministers.'" About one hundred and fifty present. 
They appeared well. Did errands. At evening returned to Mr. Fairchild's. 
Very wet and bad walking. 

31. Rainy and wet and cold all day. Made calls. Paid for second-hand 
books, $5.95. Was fortunate in the procurement. Attended the public meet- 



' He united in marriage Richard J. Mat- 
thews and Mary Smith, colored people. 

^ A statement of her religious experiences. 

3 Dr. Leonard Bacon and Gen. Hezekiah 
Howe. 

* The one, doubtless, whose " relation " 
he had written out. 

5 This was anniversary week in Boston. 

^ The only Mrs. Adams mentioned in the 
Boston Directory of that year (1S32) as living 
in South Boston was " Susan Adams, widow." 
She was probably the person referred to, and 



was most likely a Wyllys, or at least a de- 
scendant of George Wyllys, of Hartford 
(1640), who had married an Adams aad was 
heir to these Wyllys papers. 

^ Prof. Ralph Emerson, D. D., of Andover, 
formerly settled in Norfolk, Ct. 

* Nathaniel Hewitt, D. D., of Bridgeport, 
Ct. 

9 Thomas Edwards, Esq., portrait painter. 
'° This Convention embraced both the Trin- 
itarian and Unitarian Congregational minis- 
ters of Massachusetts. 



>66 



[1832. 



ing of the Convention. Dr. Jenks preached." Dined at Dr. Robbins's.' 
Made calls. Visited at Mr. Hastings's. Saw Mr. Shepard,^ of Stratford. 
In the morning rode into the city. Paid for a pamphlet, twenty-five cents. 
Contributions, $1.25. Have some cold. 

June. 

1. Slept last night at Dr. Robbins's. The morning very cold. Most 
people have on out-coats. Called to see Mrs. Oilman," but failed of seeing 
her. Walked to Dr. Robbins's,' of Roxbur}\ He rode with me in the after- 
noon to Cambridge. His two sons are theological students,* and I fear will 
be Unitarians. Did errands. Drank tea with cousin Chandler. Paid for 
letter-paper, $1. Repairing my watch, $1.25. Marking the key, seventy-five 
cents. New glasses to my spectacles, fifty cents. Tarried at the stage-house. 

2. Took the stage early and rode by Taunton to Fairhaven. Mr. Barstow 
brought me home. Have had a prosperous journey, through God's great bless- 
ing. Received a letter from Samuel Terry, of Bristol, Ct. Am much fatigued. 
Read. Our sick are generally getting better, 

3. We had steady cold east wind through last week, excepting Tuesday. 
Preached with notes on Esther iv : 13, 14, and on Jer. xvii : 5, 6. Good 
weather and full meeting. Quite cool. At the evening meeting spoke on 
Phil, iv : 5. My hoarseness and cough still continue in a degree. 

4. Am quite feeble. Wrote. I need a steady fire. Read. Visited sick 
persons. Attended the monthly concert. Vegetation advances ver}'^ little. 

5. Rode and walked to the end of the Neck' to visit a sick family. 
Can bear but little labor. Received a letter from Mr. Gould, ^ of Fairhaven. 
At evening attended the Bible class. 

6. Wrote to Mr. Gould. The apple-trees at this late period are in full 
bloom,' and the blowth is great. Walked out. Have a constant fire. Wrote 
on my preaching account. Our evening meeting was thin on account of the 
wet. Spoke on Luke xviii : 13. Have some cough. 

7. Read in Smollett's History of Eiigland}° Wrote. Am quite languid. 
I much doubt whether the passing of the Reform Bill will be a benefit 



' William Jenks, D. D., author of Compre- 
hensive Commentary. 

^ Chandler Robbins, M. D. 

^ Rev. George C. Shepard. 

■♦ Mrs. Hannah (Robbins) Oilman, proba- 
bly of New Haven. 

5 Peter Oilman Robbins, M. D., of Rox- 
bury. 

* Chandler and Samuel Dowse Robbins, 
whose names have been before mentioned. 
Chandler was the well-known and beloved 
pastor of the .Second (Bedford Street) Church, 
Boston. Samuel Dowse Robbins was pas- 
tor of the Unitarian church, Chelsea, 
Mass., and of the Unitarian church, Fram- 
ingham, Mass., and spent his last years in 



Concord, Mass. Chandler died in 18S2, aged 
seventy-two, and Samuel Dowse in 1S84, very 
nearly of the same age. 

' The extreme point of land on one side 
of the harbor. 

^ Rev. William Oould. 

9 This indicates a very late season, for 
even about Boston the full week for apple- 
blossoms is usually the third week in May. 
'° Published often as a sequel or continu- 
ation to Hume's History. Tobias Smollett, 
1721-1771, was known more as a writer of 
questionable novels. His concribution to 
English history reached from the Revolu- 
tion, 1688, when James H was driven from 
the throne, to the death of George H, 1760. 



1S32.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 267 

to Great Britain. The cholera is very bad in Paris. At Boston last week 
I visited two aged women, daughters of Dr. Byles.' They and their house 
are a great curiosity. Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture on John xv : 9. 
Had a new study table brought me. 

8. \\'orked at my books and pamphlets. Paid for my study table, ^3. 
The painter, who has given it a fine green, charged me nothing. Visited. 

9. \\'rote and nearly completed a sermon on Ps. i : 4. Do not write 
very easy. Read. Congress are in strong parties. Have a steady fire. 
V^egetation suffers from the cold and the constant dark, cloudy weather. 

10. Finished and preached in die afternoon my sermon on Ps. i: 4. 
In the morning preached with notes on Zech. .xiii : 7. Administered the 
sacrament. Uncle Le Baron assisted. Cold and something wet. The church 
pretty full. Am still afflicted with my cough. Had a full evening meeting. 
I had a sermon read. 

11. Rode with Mr. Freeman to Bedford. Called on Mr. Roberts,^ the 
new minister. He appears much like a foreigner. The apple-blossoms are 
yet full on the trees. Paid for a book, $1.50. Am quite languid. Read. 
Visited. Attended the Bible class. Was put late. 

12. Worked at my books. Have about three hundred and thirty volumes 
here. A very warm day, and the first that we have had. Kept ver>- steady 
in my chamber. Wrote. Read Cox's Adventures on Columbia River? At 
ev'cning walked out. 

13. Wrote a short piece for the newspaper. Wrote on my preaching 
account and completed the arrears. Attended the evening meeting. 

14. Not so warm as the 12th, but summer weather, to our great joy. 
Walked and rode and visited through the day. Was at Tripp's Mills * for the 
first time. Quite tired. Read. 

15. Wrote to Gen. Howe, of New Haven, in answer to a letter received 
from him yesterday. Yesterday purchased some books from the aged widow 
Hammond, for which I paid %ia2). Traded, $1.13. Afternoon attended the 
funeral of a young child. Quite warm. Took off my flannel. Visited with 
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson, from Plymouth.' The warm weather is very grateful. 

16. Not quite as warm as yesterday. Wrote the most of a sermon on 
Luke xix : 41, 42. I make many inaccuracies in writing. Read. Our national 
union and peace seem to be truly threatened. 



' Dr. Mather Byles, pastor of Hollis Street Trowbridge, Eng. He was then preaching 

Church, a preacher, poet, and wit, but a strong at the Trinitarian church, New Bedford, but 

Tory in the Revolutionary period. A son of not actually settled there until the month of 

his, an Episcopal minister, died in 1814. The November following. 

two daughters here mentioned were Mary ' Ross Cox's Adventures on Columbia 

and Catharine Byles, and their home was at River. 8vo. New York, 1832. 

Nassau' Green, Tremont Street. So the en- * A manufacturing village in the town of 

try stood in the Boston Directory for 1S32. Rochester. 

In the next year's Z>/>^f^£?;'^ Mary had dropped ' Thomas Jackson, of ri3mouth, married 

out, and the name Catharine stood alone, Sarah Le Baron in 1S05. Sarah, born in 

with the same residence. 1776, daughter of William Le Baron, of Fair- 

^ Rev. James A. Roberts, a native of haven, was Mr. Jackson's second wife. 



268 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

17. Preached with notes on Luke xix : 41, 42. Rode to the neighborhood 
of Tripp's Mills and preached at five o'clock on Matt, xv : 21, etc. Had 
a good meeting. Warm, and much fatigued. 

18. Rode out. Read in my books lately procured. Visited a sick family. 
Visited a school. Attended the Bible class. We had a shower. Tarried 
out. 

19. Rode to the Neck and visited an aged woman. Rode to Fairhaven, 
to attend and assist at the four days' prayer-meeting.' Afternoon preached 
on John iii : 3. Meeting pretty thin. At evening Mr. Utley "" preached. Kept 
at Capt. Gibbs's.^ We have the fearful intelligence that the cholera has com- 
menced with violence at Quebec and Montreal.* Brought by emigrants from 
Europe. Read. 

20. Attended the early prayer-meeting. Prayer-meetings precede the reg- 
ular exercises. Towards night rode home. At our evening meeting (quite 
full), read the Narrative of the State of Religion of the General Assembly.^ 
Highly valuable. At Fairhaven Mr. Seabury * preached in the forenoon and 
evening, and Mr. Roberts' in the afternoon. He appears very well. Was 
out late. 

21. Returned to Fairhaven. Quite warm. Mr. Utley preached in the 
forenoon, and Mr. Holmes* in the afternoon, and I in the evening on 
Matt, iv : 17. A good number of people w-ere here from Mattapoisett. 
The meetings increase in number and seriousness. May God add his 
blessing. Am much fatigued with labor and care. 

22. Did not feel able to attend the early prayer-meeting. Mr. Roberts 
preached in the forenoon, and I in the afternoon on Isa. iii: 10, 11. The 
meetings were full and solemn. I trust the Spirit of God was present with 
us. At evening w'e had the sacrament, with a large number of communicants. 
It was a solemn season. I pray God to grant his blessing. The meeting 
was concluded. Rode home late. Much fatigued. 

23. The newspajDcrs are much occupied with accounts of the cholera. 
There is great and extensive alarm. Rode in the stage to Plymouth. Warm 
and very dusty. Kindly entertained by my friends. Passed Mr. Freeman ' 
on the way, going to exchange. Found at Plymouth a notice in the news- 
paper that I am expected to deliver a public temperance address here 



' These four days' meetings had not, ap- the fear and alarm attendant upon that re- 
parently, been common in Eastern Massa- port. It was a vague and mysterious sensa- 
chusetts. It may be remembered that Rev. tion of something dreadful. 
Mr. Gould, some months before, asked Dr. ' Presbyterian General Assembly. 
Robbins to give an account of them to his * Pardon G. Seabury, of New Bedford, 
people, and this meeting at Fairhaven very ' Rev. James A. Roberts, of New Bed- 
likely grew out of that fact. ford, from England, just before noticed. 

^ Rev. Samuel Utley, of the Third Church, ^ Rev. Sylvester Holmes, of New Bed- 
Rochester, ford. 

3 Capt. Anselm Gibbs, who married Dr. ' Rev. Frederick Freeman, a native of 

Robbins's cousin, Lucy Le Baron. Sandwich, pastor of the Third Church in 

* The wrtter of this note remembers well Plymouth, 1824-1S33. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 269 

tomorrow evening. The first information T have had about it. Called 
on Mr. Thacher ' and others. 

24. Preached to Mr. Freeman's congregation on Ps. cvi : 15, and Rom. 
ii : 4. The congregation, I think, is rather larger than mine at Mattapoisett. 
Warm. Some of my cousins went with me. In the course of the day wrote 
some notes and in the evening delivered a temperance address. A great 
collection of people. Mr. Kendall * was present. Much fatigued. There 
is a good deal of excitement here about the cholera. 

25. Rode home. Had good company in the stage. Met Mr. Freeman. 
He was well liked here yesterday. Received a letter from him respecting 
the temperance address, which came last week and lay some days in our 
post ofiice. Ver}' tired. Attended the Bible class. Was poorly prepared. 
Read. 

26. Wrote. Have not been able to write diar}^ since the i6th. Rode 
to Fairhaven. At evening attended the wedding of William and Adeline 
Gibbs. Mr. Gould performed the service, A large and splendid wedding. 
Tarried at my cousin Gibbs's.^ 

27. In the forenoon wet. Was expecting some person from Mattapoisett 
all day to call for me. No one did. Read. The cholera is the leading 
subject of the newspapers. Read a volume of the Dutchman's Fireside.* 
At evening attended a meeting with Mr. Gould. The public meeting here 
last week appears to have had a blessing. 

28. Rode home in the morning in the stage. Read. Towards evening 
two fine ships were launched here, and a third was attempted and failed.^ 
Visited. We have no hot weather. 

29. Rode to the Neck and visited an aged sick woman. Finished the 
other volume of the Dutchman's Fireside. Capt. Freeman is quite unwell with 
the complaint in his head. Wrote to my sister Battell, and to Dr. Thacher, 
of Plymouth. At evening the other large ship was launched. V/alked out. 

30. Consulted with several persons about the Sabbath-school, etc. It 
appears to be doing well. Had a tooth extracted that has given me consid- 
erable trouble. The first taken from my under jaw. Wrote on a small 
catechism designed for the Sabbath-school. Read, Did not feel able to 
write a sermon. 

July. • 

I. Am quite languid. In the morning expounded on the latter part 
of the second and third chapters of Matthew. Afternoon preached on 
John iii : 3. Attended a third meeting at six o'clock in the meeting-house, 



* James Thacher, I\I. D., before noticed, lightful writer. This work, first published 
author of a History of Plymouth. in 1831, in two volumes, by J. & J. Harper, 

^ Rev. James Kendall, D. D., of the First went through several editions, and was re- 
Church, Plymouth. published in England, 1852. 

^ Capt. Anselm Gibbs. s in these active seaport towns the launch- 

* The Dutchman'' s Fireside was one of the ing of ships was one of the. entertainments 
popular works of James K. Paulding, 1779- for the people. Large crowds were often 
i860. He was a voluminous as well as de- gathered on such occasions. 



270 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

and preached on Ps. cxxx : 5, 6. In the evening performed a marriage.' 
A warm summer day. Much fatigued. Had a pleasant wedding. 

2. Rode early with Mr. Freeman to Bedford. Saw Mr. Barber,^ from 
Hartford. Walked about the town with him. Yery warm. The accounts 
respecting the cholera are more favorable. The ground is become dry and 
dusty. Rain is much wanted. Attended at evening the monthly concert. 

3. Visited. The heat is oppressive. Read. Mr. Freeman's son, who 
lives in New York, came home, and brings the painful intelligence that 
cholera has just commenced in that city, and produces great alarm. 

4. Wrote some addition to an Independence address which I have, and 
delivered it in the afternoon to a good audience. The mechanics generally 
laid aside their labor. The Sabbath-school was well out. We had a collection 
for the Colonization Society.^ Attended the evening meeting. Collected $13, 

5. Went out with a small sailing and fishing party. Pleasant but cool. 
Was landed in the afternoon at the lower end of the Neck. Attended 
a meeting at the aged Capt. Haskeirs,* and preached on John xi : 25, 26. 
Tarried out.^ Received a letter from Gen. Howe, of New Haven. The 
cholera in New York produces much alarm ; extraordinary measures are 
adopted in most of the seaports. 

6. In the course of the night past I was taken with an ague in the face. 
This morning it increased. Was carried home. My pain became very 
violent and continued through the day. Took fifty drops of laudanum. 
Had a physician. 

7. My ague and pain returned with severity. Took seventy-five drops 
of laudanum,* which abated the pain, but did not produce sleep. Read 
a little. Took other medicine. 

8. Am much overcome with disease and medicine. Unable to go out 
at all. Uncle Le Baron conducted public worship and preached once.' 
Am much affected with a strangury. Have not been prevented from preach- 
ing on the Sabbath by illness since December, 1822. Took medicine and 
applications and was up late. My local pain subsides. 

9. Last night got relief through divine mercy. Took medicine, jalap 
and calomel, which made me very sick. Have not been so low for some 
years. ° In God alone is all my trust. 



' The parties united in marriage were ■* Haskell was a name in his parish at 

John V. Turner, of New Bedford, and So- Rochester, as in his former parish at East 

phronia Durham, of Rochester. Windsor, Ct. 

' John Warner Barber, who prepared and ' He spent the night at Capt. Haskell's, 

published the Historical Collections of so or with some family in that vicinity, 

many States. This was the business proba- ^ A very doubtful, if not dangerous ex- 

bly that brought him to Rochester. The laeriment. 

Historical Collections of the Massachusetts ' His uncle. Rev. Lemuel Le Baron, was 

towns were published in 1S39. then eighty-five years old. 

3 It seems to have been a fashion of those ^ They were reckless in those days in the 

days, both in Connecticut and Massachusetts, use of powerful drugs. Homeopathy, whether 

to take collections for the Colonization Soci- founded in reason or not, has done good in 

ety on the Fourth of July. lessening the quantity of medicine taken. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 27 1 

10. Last night had a watcher through the night. Got more rest than 
I expected. Am very weak. Read a little. Am steadily attended by 
Dr. N. Southard. Capt. Freeman is considerably unwell. Cannot go out. 

11. Wet and bad hay weather. The cholera appears to increase in New 
York. Am better, through divine mercy, but get strength slowly. Some 
friends called to see me. How little have I expected such a sickness. Most 
holy is the Lord. Quite cool. Wrote a little. 

12. Uncle Le Baron called to see me. Received a letter from my sister 
Battell and one from S. T. Wolcott. Important letters. It seems our good 
brother James is in poor health. I think his case is quite alarming. Rode 
out. Read. Suffered much from debility. The newspapers are principally 
occupied with accounts of the cholera. 

13. ^^'rote considerably. Walked out. We had a hard shower. People 
have a bad time for getting hay. The society had a meeting and voted 
unanimously to desire me to become, their minister, with a salar)^ of S450. 
I hope for divine direction. More than fifty voters.' Wrote to Isaac Mans- 
field, Esq., Boston. Read. 

14. Rode to the village. Made a few calls. Read. Walked out. My 
strength seems to increase but slowly. 

15. Attended meeting and performed the regular services. Spoke feebly. 
My strength held better than I expected. Full meeting. Ver}- pleasant, but 
we have no hot weather. Did not attend an evening meeting. Preached 
a double sermon on 2 Peter iii : 9. Conversed on the subject of a Fast.^ 

16. Read in my Universal Magazine Cornwallis's account of the surrender 
of his army.^ Wrote to Gen. Lincoln. Good hay weather. Wrote. I am 
still feeble as to strength. 

17. Walked out and visited. A young woman died last night of a con- 
sumption. Visited the family. Visited a school. Towards evening attended 
my Bible class. Read. Quite warm. 

18. Read. The President has refused his assent to the bill to renew the 
charter of the United States Bank.* Walked and visited. Paid for tailor 
work, S1.42. Attended the funeral of Miss Cummings and preached without 
notes on Prov. viii : 17. Attended the evening meeting. Tarried out. 

19. Read. The pestilence in New York seems to increase, and great 
numbers have left the city. Warm and good hay weather. Wrote. Wrote 
to Gen. Fowler, of Branford, and to my sister Battell. Attended the funeral 
of a seaman who died soon after the vessel came into the harbor. At evening 
performed a marriage.^ 



' That is, more than fifty voted in giving from the United States Bank, on the part of 

him this call. Gen. Jackson, and his veto of the bill for the 

^ This contemplated Fast was in conse- renewal of the bank charter roused great 

qence of the cholera. indignation at the time, but it passed away 

^ This was a view of the battle of York- like other public excitements, 
town from the English side. ' Moses H. Davis and Mary Hammond 

* The removal of the national deposits were the persons married. 



272 



DIARY OK REV'. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



20. Quite warm. Visited a school. Read in the Universal Magazine} 
It has many historical documents. Was up late. 

21. Read. Received a letter from Isaac Mansfield, of Boston. I am still 
affected with debility. Wrote. Am not able to study much. Afternoon we 
had a hard and ver\^ refreshing: shower. 

22. Very pleasant, but cool air. Expounded on Matt, iv. Preached on 
Ps. Ixxviii : 38, At the third meeting spoke on Titus ii : 14. All the meet- 
ings quite full. Very tired. Read. 

23. Read Universal Magazine. Visited. Fine hay weather. Towards 
evening attended the Bible class. Am fatigued with labor. 

24. Wrote. Wrote to Theodore Dwight,^ Esq., New York. Walked a dis- 
tance and visited. Visited a school. Quite cool. The cholera seems to 
increase in New York, and appears in other places. Was out late. Wrote 
to Mr. Ab. Tinkum. 

25. Am quite languid. Wrote. Visited a school. Some of our schools 
are pretty small. Visited. Attended the evening meeting. Congress has 
failed in an attempt to recommend a general Fast. 

26. Last evening received a letter from Dr. Mayhew, of Bedford. Wrote 
to him. Rode with Mr. Freeman to Bedford. Sent $13 to the treasurer 
of Auxiliary Colonization Society,^ Boston, our collection on the 4th. Did 
errands. Quite warm. People are beginning their harvest ; so late. Wrote. 
Visited a child very sick. At evening performed a marriage.'' 

27. Walked out. Quite warm. Am very languid. Read. The commit- 
tee of the society called and presented me their late call. There appears 
to be a great unanimity among the people. Visited. 

28. Read in the Universal Alagazine. Find many valuable facts. Walked 
out. Attended the funeral of the child lately deceased. The accounts from 
New York are alarming. Most places on the Sound are alarmed. 

29. Read the Bible. Preached with notes on Rom. viii : 6, and a sermon 
on Eph. ii : 14. Full meeting. Made an appointment of a Fast on Thursday 
next.' Attended the third meeting at Tripp's Mills and preached on Ps. iv : 5. 
Tarried out. Bore the fatigue better than I expected. At evening walked 
out. 

30. Visited. Rode home. Warm. Wrote. Attended the Bible class 
towards evening. Quite full. 



' This, it will be remembered, was the 
Universal Magazine of Knowledge and Pleas- 
tire, of which he had recently purchased sev- 
enty-one volumes. 

^ This was the son of Theodore Dwight, 
Esq., of Hartford, Secretary of the Hartford 
Convention. The son was born in Hart- 
ford in 1796; graduated at Yale, 1814; was a 
man of learning and a brilliant writer; also 
a teacher and editor ; and died in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1866. 



3 The collection taken up on the Fourth 
of July. 

"• The persons united in marriage were 
Walter J. Heyer and Deborah Bacon. 

^ They had been consulting about a local 
church fast, in view of the prevalence of 
cholera. But there had been talk about a 
national fast on this account. That having 
failed, this local fast is appointed. But soon 
comes notice of a State fast, a week later, 
and this local fast is put off to that day. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 273 

31. A proclamation of the Governor appears in the newspapers, appointing 
a Fast on Thursday of next week. ConsuUed Mr. Le Baron and others, and 
conchided to defer our appointment till that time. My proposed journey 
must be delayed accordingly. Paid for a silk hat-case, ninety-two cents. 
Rode to Bedford. Quite warm and dusty. Met witli the Association. 
Mr. Holmes has a fine new house. A large meeting-house is raising today 
in Bedford, and one in Fairhaven ; both for the Free-will Baptists. At even- 
ing preached the Associational sermon on Rom. ii : 4. Much fatigued. Was 
up late. 

AUCUIST. 

1. The Association attended to their ordinary business. Warm and 
sultry. Looked at the foundation of Mr. Parker's magnificent house. After- 
noon left the Association and rode home. We had a refreshing shower. 
Got a little wet. Purchased a large sun-dial for $2, to be placed on our 
meeting-house. It is a very good one. Attended our evening meeting. 

2. Very fine weather for vegetation. Conversed with Mr. and Mrs. 
N. Crosby ' respecting living with them if I should continue here, and looked 
at their house. Afternoon preached a preparatory lecture with notes on- 
Rom. xiii : 12. The church had a meeting and voted unanimously to desire 
me to become their collegiate" pastor. The people here procured a bell,, 
made for them, 724 pounds, and raised it to its station, it appears to be 
a very good one. The first church bell in town. Read. The cholera 
continues very bad in New York and lightly in many other places. Had 
company. 

3. Wrote to my brother Francis and to Mr. Battell. Visited a sick 
woman. Read. The weather is hot. Just as we need. Wrote on the 
family-piece of the Tudor family.' Walked out. 

4. Wrote on my family-piece. Read. Rode a distance in a rough way 
and attended the funeral of an aged sick woman. The heat oppressive. 

5. Preached with notes on Jer. xxix : 13, and a sermon on John xxi : 15. 
Attended the sacrament. Uncle Le Baron performed a part of the admin- 
istration. Towards night we had a copious and very refreshing shower. . 
This prevented our third meeting. Our new bell does very well. Had. 
company. 

6. Visited the sick. Read. Sultrv hot. The cholera seems to be 
extending over the country, yet in most cases it is light. Attended the 
monthly concert. Visited a sick woman ; very low. 

7. Wrote some in reference to the approaching Fast. Read the procla- ' 
mation of the Governor last Sabbath from the newspaper. Yesterday called 
on the new Baptist preacher here, by desire, and invited him and his people 
to unite with us at the Fast. Preparing for my journey. The sick woman 
died last night. Visited the family. Visited another one very sick. Attended 
the Bible class. Finished the book of the Acts. Read. 



' Dea. Nathaniel A. Crosby and wife. ^ Of the Tudor family in Windsor and 

We should now say, " colleague pastor." East Windsor, Ct. 



2 



274 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



8. Wrote a large addition to a Fast sermon on 2 Sam. iii : 18-21. Sultry 
hot. Attended the funeral of Mrs. Jones. We had a small shower. Am 
quite languid. A very growing season. Received of the society treasurer, 
$150. Wrote late. 

9. Fast on account of the cholera. Very well attended. All labor seems 
to have been laid aside. Preached in the afternoon on 2 Sam. iii, etc., with 
the addition written yesterday. We had a prayer-meeting at nine o'clock, 
and the forenoon exercises consisted in prayer and singing and addresses. 
Mr. Le Baron assisted. Visited a sick woman. Expected to have rode 
to Bedford in the evening to go on my journey. A steady, moderate rain 
prevented. Read. ' Put up my things. 

10. The rain continued through the night and this morning was very 
violent. It prevented my going to Bedford to take the stage. Read. Wrote 
on the Tudor family-piece. Wrote to brother Francis and to F. L. Alden. 

11. Walked out. Went on board the new ship Gideon Barstow,' which 
is to sail soon. Read. Towards evening Mr. Roberts' came here from 
Bedford to exchange tomorrow. Rode out and visited a family. Rode with 
Capt. Coggeshall to Bedford and set out on my journey. Not able to pay 
much attention to the appropriate duties of my birthday. 

12. Preached on Ps. cvi : 15, and Heb. vii : 25. At the third meeting 
preached on Ps. iv : 5. This congregation is not large. They are hesitating 
about giving Mr. Roberts a call. Had much conversation on the subject. 
W^arm. 

13. WTOte to Capt. Freeman and to Mr. Gould, of Fairhaven. Rode 
in the stage to Providence. Called on Pres. Wayland ^ and Prof. Goddard.* 
The cholera seems to be spreading over the country. 

14. Rode to East Hartford and walked to East Windsor. Mr. Wolcott's 
family are quite well. Am disappointed in not being able to get to New 
Haven to attend the Commencement tomorrow.' Am a good deal affected 
with fatigue. The stage was full. 

15. Attended to my library. Can do but little. Rode to Hartford. 
Warm. Did some business. Returned. 

16. Called on Mr. Lee,' lately settled here. I think he will do much 
better than Mr. Whelpley. Mr. and Mrs. Haskell, and Mrs. Bissell, and the 
four grandchildren were here.^ Had company. 



' Named after Gideon Barstow, Esq., one 
of the leading men of Rochester. 

^ Rev. James A. Roberts. 

3 Francis Wayland, D. 1)., LL. D., Presi- 
dent of Brown University, 1S27-1855. 

' William E. Goddard, Professor of Moral 
Philosophy and Metaphysics, 1825-1S42. 

^ Here, after a long stretch of years, we 
reach a change in the Commencement Day 
at Vale College. From 1796, when this diary 
opened, until 1832, the Commencement at 
Yale had been on the second Wednesday of 



September. Now it falls back to the third 
Wednesday of August. There it continued 
for some years, but has since, by different 
steps, settled back to the last Wednesday of 
June. 

* Rev. Chauncey G. Lee, son of Chauncey 
Lee, D. D., of Colebrook. He was just set- 
tled in this East Windsor church (August, 
1832), and remained till 1S36. 

' A family meeting at the house of Mr. 
Abiel Wolcott, his old boarding-place, in his 
honor. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 275 

17. Had boxes made to carry a part of my books. Employed in putting 
them up. Rainy. Wrote. I cannot bear much fatigue. I fear some of my 
books are lost. Reckoned with Tudor. Paid him in accounts, $8, in addition 
to $5 before for carr)-ing my things to Stratford. 

1 8. Have some difficulty in procuring a horse to use. Rode to Pine 
Meadow. Had a pleasant visit. Rode to Enfield, My brother and wife 
have been sick, and he is quite feeble now. He has not preached for two 
Sabbaths past. Quite cool. 

19. Wet. Preached on Ps. cxxxvii : i, and Rom. ii : 4. My brother 
attended meeting. His nervous system is much affected. At evening we 
had a hard rain and no meeting. 

20. Made some calls with my brother. He has a fine new house. Rode 
to East Windsor. Had a good visit at Mr. Bartlett's.' At evening preached 
for Mr. Lee on Rom. ii : 4. Had a full meeting. Think of selling my land, 

21. Paid a tax of fifty cents. Wrote. Attended to my things. Rode 
to Hartford. Called on Rev. Mr. Linsley.'' He has been dismissed today. 
Saw Secretary Day.^ Carried to the book-binder my volumes of Encydopczdia. 
Procured a number of my books and pamphlets that have been long lent. 
Got home late. A ver}^ fine stone bridge is building in Hartford ; the length 
of the arch, one hundred feet, and the cord, ninety-seven.* Wrote letters to 
brother Francis, Mr. Ely, of Mansfield, and Capt. Freeman, of Mattapoisett. 
Paid for books, $1.25. Received a large dividend of $20 from Hartford 
Bank. 

22. Set out for New Haven and Stratford. At Hartford found a New 
Bedford vessel, and concluded to send some of my things by it to Mattapoi- 
sett. Returned home.' Worked laboriously, packing and arranging books 
and preparing furniture for removal. Walked out. Quite warm. I. know 
not when my library will get together. Had kind assistance. 

23. Set out on my journey. Tudor carried a large wagon-load of my 
things to Hartford. Saw them on board the vessel. Hot and sultry. 
Rode in my sulky with a hired horse. Paid for a halter, $1. Received of 
E. W. Bull* a dividend of the Phoenix Bank, $45. Paid him for articles 
he had sent me, $5.82. After dinner rode to New Haven. My little horse 
performs well. 

24. Called on Mr. Bacon and Dr. Taylor. Did errands. Rode to Bran- 
ford. Found that my, grandfather's' tomb-stone had not been repaired, as 
I expected. Left with Mr, Phineas Foot," $4, to have it done. Called on 
Mr. Gillett.' Returned to New Haven. We had a hard shower. Rode 
to Stratford. Tarried at Mr. J. Booth's.'" 



' Rev. Shubael Bartlett. ^ Eben W. Bull. 

^ Joel H. Linsley, D. D. ' Rev. Philemon Robbins. 

3 Thomas Day, Secretary of State. ^ Rev. Mr. Robbins's first wife was Han- 

•* This was the bridge over the Little nah Foot, and Phineas Foot very likely was 

River, as it is called. of her kindred. 

5 Back to East Windsor, which he calls ' Rev. Timothy Phelps Gillett. 

bis home. '° Joseph Booth. 



276 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

25. Walked out. Mr. and Mrs. Oilman and most of their family are here. 
Am very kindly treated. Finding that no supply is expected here tomorrow, 
conclude to comply with many requests and continue here over the Sabbath, 
though contrary to my calculations. Paid Mr. Burritt, $5.50, for boxes and 
sending off my things that were here last February. Made calls. Dined 
at Mrs. Thompson's,' with Mr. Gilman. Took some pamphlets from the post 
ofifice. Yesterday left with Mr. Bacon, of New Haven, the records and papers 
of the Ministers' Convention." Since the shower yesterday it has been cool. 
Saw Judge Kent.^ 

26. Last night was quite cold, but I believe there was no frost. Preached 
on Ps. cxxxvii : i, and Rom. ii : 4. A pleasant day. All classes of people 
here attended meeting. There was no meeting at the church. A great 
number of New York people are in town. I think I never saw this meeting- 
house so full. There was great attention. Did not attend an evening 
meeting. Made some calls. Am considerably at Mr. Southard's.* There 
is a prospect of a young Mr. Chapman^ being settled here. The people are 
much disunited. 

27. Rode early to New Haven. Paid in the morning, $1.50, for the freight 
of my things to New York last winter. Received of Gen. Howe, to be sent 
to Mattapoisett, a large number of books and pamphlets, which he purchased 
for me of the library of Dr. Dana.^ There are some valuable articles. Paid 
him for them, $28.41. Paid for a ver}^ elegant copy of Stephens's' Greek 
Testament, of 1550, $10; and quills, $1. Paid for a gold watch-key, $3; and 
a spectacle-case, twenty-five cents. Rode in the afternoon to East Windsor. 
Warm and dusty. Got home before ten o'clock. 

28. Wrote the seven preceding days of diary. Attended to my things. 
Made calls. Kindly treated by old friends. Wrote to my brother Francis. 
Read. . 

29. Rode to Coventry and attended a meeting of the Ministers' Annuity 
Society at Mr. Calhoun's. I fear its concerns are not likely to be managed 
as prudently as they have been. Saw Mr. Ely, of Mansfield. He wishes 
to retain my books still longer. There is a public temperance meeting here 
today. Very warm. Rode to Hartford. Mr. Wolcott came to East Hartford 
and took home my horse and sulky. Did errands. 

30. Took the stage in the night and rode to Norfolk. Found friends well. 
Young Joseph Battell went off for New York, having been at home some 



' Where for a time he boarded while in * James Dana, D. D., pastor of First 

Stratford. Church, New Haven, 17S9-1S05. 

^ Or General Association. ^ Henry Stephens, of Paris, horn about 

' Judge James Kent, LL. D., of the Co- 1470, was father of a celebrated race of 

lumbia College Law School. scholars and printers. His son Robert first 

* His other boarding-place. published this Greek Testament in 1549, and 

' Rev. Frederick W. Chapman was set- Dr. Robbins had purchased a copy issued a 

tied in Stratford in September, 1S32, and year later, in 1550. This work of the Ste- 

remained till 1839. He was a graduate of phensfamily was in opposition to the Roman 

Yale, 1828, and of Yale Theological Sem- Catholic sentiment which prevailed about 

inary, 1832. them, and they suffered in consequence. 



1832.] 



PREACHING IX MATTAPOISETT. 



277 



time on account of the cholera. Am quite fatigued. Mr. Eldridge,' recently 
settled here, called on me. Rode with Mr. Battell to his dairy farm. People 
have not done haying. 

31, Wrote to my brother Francis. Rode with my sister Battell to Lenox. 
Very warm and dusty. In Barrington we were hindered some time by a hard 
shower. My brother James has been very unwell several months with 
dangerous complaints, but is hopefully getting better. I was here twenty 
years ago today at his wedding. He lost his first child and now has eight. 
Did not arrive till dark. 

September. 

1. Saw Mr. Samuel Cowles, of the State of Ohio.^ My brother and his 
wife conclude to accompany us to Norfolk.^ Gave their children, $1.50. 
Rode the river road" to Barrington,* and to Norfolk. People are getting 
hay. Brother James is feeble, but does not appear to have much disease. 

2. Preached for Mr. Eldridge on i Pet. i: 11, and Rom. ii : 4. A very 
pleasant day and full meeting. Assisted in the administration of the sacra- 
ment. The church is very large. I left here just a year ago. The revival 
was then in a very favorable state, but it progressed verj- little after that 
time. Receive many kind greetings from Christian friends. At the evening 
meeting Mr. Eldridge preached without notes. He appears to have a good 
mind and disposition, and is well liked. He is not fluent in speaking. Was 
up late. My health is very good. 

3. My nephew Philip Battell* gave me an early conveyance to W'insted. 
Took a stage to Hartford. Came by Collinsville,^ a wonderful new village. 
Received of the Phoenix Bank a new dividend of $45. Received of interest 
on a note of E. W. Bull, $22.80. Paid for a very good pair of thick boots 
and a pair of shoes, $10. For a ream of writing-paper, $3.50. A ream 
of letter-paper, $4.. A half ream of gilt letter-paper, $2.50. Made my 
annual payment to the Annuity Society, $5. Paid for the stage, $1 ; and 
for a conveyance in a wagon to East Windsor, $1. Am glad to return here. 
Received a letter from brother Francis. 

4. Rainy. Engaged in looking over my things and preparing for my 
journey. Had considerable conversation. Rode to Hartford and returned. 
Paid what I owed to Maria Burnham, $42.* For two bandana handkerchiefs. 



' Rev. Joseph Eldridge, D. D., a native of 
Yarmouth, Mass., a graduate of Yale, 1S29, 
was settled in Norfolk in April, 1S32. Four 
years later, 1836, he married Sarah Battell, 
eldest daughter of Mr. Joseph Battell. Dr. 
Eldridge was an able minister, and remained 
here forty-three years, till his death in 1S75. 
For twenty-eight years before his death he 
was a member of the Yale College corpora- 
tion. 

^ There were several men from Connecti- 
cut of the name Cowles who were among the 
early settlers of Ohio. 



^ His brother James and wife. 

* By the Ilousatonic River, 
^ Great Barrington. 

* Philip Battell, now of Middlebury, Vt., 
was then twenty-five years old. 

^ Collinsville was in the town of Canton; 
It was new then. The Congregational church 
was organized there that very year — 1S32. 

* From the several payments made to 
Maria Burnham, it is probable that Dr. Rob- 
bins had borrowed money of her, perhaps 
because she wished to lend it to him for safe 
keeping. 



278 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

$2.67. Procured a bundle of the Wyllys papers of Ch. Olmsted.' Am 
burdened with busuiess. Have not been able to settle accounts with 
Mr. Wolcott. At evening eat watermelons at Mr. Tudor's,'' with Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee.' Very little green fruit is eaten this year on account of cholera. 

5. Paid Mr. Rider for the use of his horse, $5. For a box to carry 
on my journey, sixty-seven cents. Rode to Enfield. Met my brother and 
wife, just set out on a journey to Guilford, They went back, and afterward 
rode with me to East Windsor. Mr. Dixon paid me $20, the amount due 
me from Somers." Made calls on the Hill. Paid Mrs. Wolcott on a note 
she holds against me, 5i-5o- Left East Windsor. Mr. Wolcott rode with 
me to Hartford. Paid for that and his horse to Enfield, $1. Carried to 
Mr. S. Tudor' the draft I have lately made of the Tudor family. Paid for 
books, $1. My brother appears but little better than he did a fortnight since. 

6. Rode in the stage to Providence. Left my best cane at Windham. 
Had good company. Arrived in the evening. Wrote to Mr. Gray,* of 
Windham. Saw an account of the death of young Napoleon.^ Quite tired. 
Fare, $4. 

7. Rode to New Bedford. Fare, $2. Find my things here, which I 
shipped from Hartford, all safe. Found no conveyance to Mattapoisett. 
Attended an evening meeting with Mr. Holmes. Tarried at my cousin 
Alden's. 

8. In the morning rode home in the stage. Find many welcomes. 
Have been gone four weeks, and, in God's great mercy, have ha4 a verj^ 
prosperous journey. Read. Received a letter from Samuel Terrj-. Am 
much fatigued. 

9. Preached with notes on Ps. xl : 9, and a sermon on Luke xviii : 13. 
At the third meeting spoke on Rev. xvii : 14. For the three Sabbaths that 
I have been absent a Mr. King^ has preached here. Uncle Le Baron has 
preached once and conducted the other meetings. A Baptist minister' 
has been installed here in my absence. 

ID. Rode with Mr. Freeman to Bedford. Unable to get a conveyance 
of my things. Paid for the freight from Hartford, $5. Read. At evening 
attended the Bible class. Out late. 

II. Wrote. Attended to the business of preparing my room at Mr. 



' Charles Olmsted, Esq., of East Hart- * About the lost cane. 

ford. 7 Napoleon II (Napoleon Joseph), son of 

* Oliver Tudor. Napoleon I and Maria Louisa, of Austria, 

■* Rev. Chauncey G. Lee and wife. died at the palace of Schoenbrunn, July 22, 

'' James Dixon, Esq., had already paid 1832, at the age of twenty-one. This was 

him about $80, and this was the balance of the child of Napoleon's ambitious hopes and 

the debt. dreams. 

' Mr. Samuel Tudor was the son of Sam- * Rev. Jonathan King, a native of Roches- 

uel, who died some ten years before at the ter, who had been settled in the ministry at 

age of eighty-five. This Samuel, Jr., was the Dartmouth, 1S23-1829. 

brother of Oliver Tudor and of Mrs. Abiel « The Baptist minister settled in Roches- 

Wolcott. ter was Rev. Eleazar Savage. 



1832.] PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 279 

Crosby's.' Read Lander's Discovery of the Niger."" Have written today 
fourteen days of my diary. Walked out. It is quite cool. I think the crop 
of corn must be light. 

12. My books and furniture .vere brought from Bedford in a vessel. 
They have sustained but very little injur)- in their passage from East 
Windsor. Took them to Mr. Crosby's. Had a laborious task. Rode with 
company to Sippican, and attended in the evening a large temperance 
meeting. Got home late. 

13. Worked diligently, unpacking and putting up my books and other 
things. Had assistance. The joiners commenced their work in doing off 
a large chamber for me at Mr. Crosby's. Visited. At evening attended a 
meeting with Mr. Bronson/ the Calvinistic Baptist, of Bedford. He preached. 
He is greatly opposed to the Free-will Baptists. I know not which are the 
best. 

14. Worked at my library. Have to attend to the work at my chamber. 

15. Visited. Read. Wrote. Wrote a paragraph for the newspaper. 
Read expositors. Visited an afflicted family. 

16. In the morning attended the funeral of an infant child. Expounded 
on Matt, v: 1-16, and preached on John iii : 36. Quite warm and languid. 
At the third meeting spoke on Hgb. iv : i. Much fatigued. 

17. V\'alked out. Attended to the work at my chamber. The heat severe 
and oppressive." Had company. Had a full Bible class. Was out late. 

18. Thought to walk a distance, but was unable to on account of the heat. 
Rode with a cabinet-maker to Bedford and procured mahogany to make 
a new book-case. Paid for the boards, at about twenty cents a foot, $8.92. 
Paid for a knob, lock, $1.50. Visited Uncle Le Baron. 

19. Read. Rode to Sippican' and attended a funeral, in the absence 
of Mr. Cobb. Quite overcome by the heat. Attended our evening meeting. 
Considerably unwell. Tarried out. 

20. Visited. Read. Am quite languid. The ground is dr)- and dusty. 
Wrote. Wrote on pecuniary accounts. On my late journey I paid off debts 
that I owed, $197. For books, $41.66. Articles purchased, $26.67. Freight 
and boxes, $7.67. Donations, $5.75. Stage and horse hire, $22.50. Ordinary 
expenses, $i8.86 = $320.ii. Brought home, $40.27 = $360.38, Received in 
my absence, $146.98. This deducted from the preceding sum leaves $213.40. 
I carried with me, $214. Leaving a deficiency of .60. This is to be added 
to expenses. Tudor received a dividend of Hartford Bank in the spring, 
of $15 ; and paid $S for my hat, and $6.60 for other things, and .40 to me. 
Mr. Bull received a dividend of $45 of Phoenix Bank, and, reserving $5.82 



' Dea. Nathaniel A. Crosby. ^ Rev. Asa Bronson. 

^ Richard Lander was at the head of an * Here we have the September heat in the 

expedition that left England in 1830 to ex- last half of the month. 

plore the river Niger. On returning to Eng- ^ -phe village of Sippican w-as within the 

land there was published a Joiu-nal of an territory of the South Church, Rochester, 

Expedition to Explore the Course and Ter- where Rev. Oliver Cobb, D. D., had been set- 

minationof the Niger. 3 vols. London, 1832. tied since 1799. 



28o DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

for articles he sent me on my order, paid me, as noted August 23d, $39.18. 
My journey was a very expensive one. ^Vrote to Samuel Terry, of Bristol, Ct. 

21. Wet, but not much rain. Read Prince's Chronology.^ Attended to 
my books and the work at Mr. Crosby's. That work is like to cost more 
than I expected. Read African Repository!' 

22. It is a year this day since I came to this place. A most merciful 
God has given me a prosperous year. Wrote. Received a letter from 
Mr. G. A. De Witt, of Providence, with the grateful intelligence that he has 
received from Windham my cane.^ Read. Attention to the work at my 
room takes considerable of my time. Wet, but little rain. We have had 
a warm and sultry week. Read the Bible. 

23. Preached with notes on John xv : 22, and a sermon on Mark x: 21. 
At the third meeting spoke on Luke xvii : 5. Meetings well attended. 
A ship was launched here in the evening, unnecessarily, I think, and a good 
deal of work done during the day. 

24. Had to move my books at Mr. Crosby's."* He is doing a good deal 
at his house. Mr. Nott,' of Wareham, called. Attended the Bible class. 

25. Showery. Am quite oppressed with a cold. Read Cox's N'arrative!' 
We have accounts of much injury done by frost at the northward and west- 
ward about the 13th instant. Mr. Freeman had a severe turn of colic 
He got some relief in the evening, after severe and increasing pain of about 
nine hours. Walked out. Wrote to Hezekiah Howe & Co., New Haven. 

26. Visited. Mr. Freeman is better. Paid for the freight of my things 
from Bedford here, $2.13. W'e had company. At evening attended our 
meeting. We had with us a Mr. Lovell,' a Baptist, preaching at Fall River. 

27. Read, Dined out. Attended the funeral of a young colored child. 
Visited. Began to write on a subject proposed in the New York Observer. 
Yesterday Mr. E. Jenney,^ of Fairhaven, was here, and requested me to 
deliver a temperance address there next Tuesday evening. Wrote late. 

28. Rode with Mr. Freeman to Fairhaven and New Bedford. Paid for 
a gallon of good wine, $2.50. For a little box to preserve valuable articles, 
$1.25. Warm. Rev. Mr. Cobb,' of Sandwich, came here. Read. 



' Rev. Thomas Prince, pastor of the Old general movement of the books, even for a 

South Church, Boston, 171S-175S, published, short distance, involved much labor. For 

partly in 1736 and partly in 1756, his Cliro- four years he had been separated from his 

7iology, reaching from the creation down to library, which had remained at East Windsor. 

A. D. 1633. But now, in the prospect of his settlement at 

" The periodical published in behalf of Mattapoisett, the library has been largely 

the American Colonization Society. This brought hither, 
society was organized in 1817, and in 1S23 ' Rev. Samuel Nott, Jr. 

was begun the publication of the African * Ross Cox's Adventures on the Columbia 

Repository. It is still continued, and is now River, before mentioned. 
(1SS5) passing its sixty-second volume. ^ Rev. .Shubael Lovell. 

3 Dr. Robbins set a great value upon all ^ He married a daughter of Mr. Francis 

such possessions. Hence his trouble at their Alden, of Fairhaven. 
loss, and his joy on their restoration. ' Rev. Asahel Cobb, pastor of the Trinita- 

* His library was now so large that any rian church, Sandwich, 1S31-1842. 



1832.] 



PREACHING IN MATTAPOISETT. 



281 



29. Rainy the most of the day. Rode a distance and visited an aged 
sick woman. Visited a school. Wrote. Mr. Cobb thinks he cannot assist 
me tomorrow on account of ill heahh. Began to write a temperance address 
for Fairhaven. I find it necessary to write anew. 

30. Wet. In the morning expounded on Matt, v: 17-43. Afternoon 
Mr. Lovell, the Baptist, preached. Rode out and preached at a small 
meeting in the evening on Matt, xii : 50. 

October. 

1. Rainy the most of the day. Mr. Cobb continues with us. His health 
is poor. Wrote the most of the day on my temperance address. I bore the 
labor better than I expected. Had no concert meeting. Wrote late. 

2. Revised and finished my address. Rode to I"airhaven. Visited. 
At evening delivered my address to a good audience. Several ministers 
were present. Attended the Temperance Society meeting. The object 
labors here. Read. We have some favorable accounts of the decline of 
Jacksonianism.' 

3. Walked out with Mr. Gould and looked at some of their new build- 
ings. The building here this year is astonishing.^ Rode with Mr. Crosby 
to Bedford. Paid for paper for my chamber, $6.75. Returned home. 
Attended the funeral of the aged Mrs. Cushman.^ Wrote answers of 
acceptance of the calls of the church and society* here. 

4. Am quite burdened with labor. Read. Gave my answer to the 
society committee. Rode to the Neck and visited. At evening preached 
to a good number on Matt, xii : 50. Tarried out. Our meeting last evening 
was omitted. 

5. Rode home. Warm. Gave my answer to the church to Mr. Le Baron. 
Preached a preparatory lecture on Ps. li : 12. Much fatigued with labors. 

6. The church and society called on me, and we fixed on the 17th instant 
for my installation and the churches to be sent for the council. Wrote. 

7. In the morning rode to Pine Islands' and attended the funeral of 
a child. Preached with notes on i Thess. ii : 10, and a sermon on Matt, v : 13.^ 
Attended the sacrament. Full meeting. Had no evening meeting. 

8. Assisted my uncle in writing letters for our council. Warm. Read. 
At evening had a full Bible class. 



' It was in this very year, 1832, that Pres- 
ident Jackson quelled the boisterous spirit 
of nullification. The decline of that style of 
Jacksonianism was not desirable. But Dr. 
Robbins, like most of the old Federalists, 
was always ready to say, " Can any good 
thing come out of Democracy .' " Gen. Jack- 
son was headstrong, and did some rash and 
wrong things. But in general his administra- 
tion was healthy, and his name now is honor- 
able. 

^ At that time Fairhaven and New Bed- 



ford were on the high tide of prosperity from 
the whale fisheries. 

^ We do not find her name among the 
church members at Mattapoisett. 

"* It had been several weeks since this 
call was made, but from the peculiar circum- 
stances of the case it was doubtless well un- 
derstood that Dr. Robbins was to accept it. 
He received the call on the 13th of July. 

5 Another of the localities in his vicinity. 

* He used to preach a kind of sermon from 
a text at almost all, if not all, funerals. 



:S2 



DIARY OK REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



g. Last evening read quite late in the Universal Magazine. The work 
is of great value. Read. Afternoon rode over and visited. Wrote Mrs. Bat- 
tell. 

10. Quite unwell with severe headache. I conclude I have taken cold. 
Could do but little. Did not attend the evening meeting. I believe no 
election of the President has produced such deep solicitude in this country, 
unless perhaps in 1800, as the one now approaching. And never have fears 
been so well grounded. Read. 

11. Rainy. My ill health continues. Have a bad diarrhoea. Walked 
out. Am quite feeble. Received a letter from my brother F. He is hope- 
fully gaining in health. 

12. Wrote. My poor health continues. Afternoon was invited out. 
Read. The country is full of solicitude on account of Jacksonianism. It 
appears more dangerous than Jeffersonianism did in 1800.' 

13. Am very little able to study. Walked out. Find exercise beneficial. 
Visited. Looked at the meeting-house. The people are much engaged in 
improving it. It is painted inside, and a fine new cushion, etc., in the pulpit. 

14. Am better, through divine mercy, than I have been. Preached 
a double sermon on Isa. i.x : 6, 7. My answers to the calls of the church 
and society were read in public and notice given of the installation."^ Had 
our evening meeting at this house. Spoke on John v: 25. 

15. Was carried through the labors of yesterday much better than I ex- 
pected. We had this morning a pretty hard frost. The first we have had.' 
Walked out. Looked at a fine new ship of live oak, built in four months. 
Afternoon attended a church prayer-meeting in reference to the jDroposed 
installation. It was a solemn season. At evening had a full Bible class. 

16. A hard frost. Received a box of books and pamphlets from New 
Haven. Looked at some of them. Spent a part of the day in serious 
meditation and duties, being about to engage in the work of the ministry. 
Wrote. 

17. I was solemnly installed the collegiate* pastor of this people. All 
things appear favorably. All proceedings have been unanimous.' The 
meeting-house has been much improved. There were eight ministers and 
their delegates present, all of this Association. Mr. Holmes* preached very 
well on Isa. xxiv : 2. The meeting-house was very full and the singing fine. 



' The dangers then were slight in com- 
parison with the horrible fears which were 
abroad in New England, and it will be the 
same in this case. 

- While the interval had been unusually 
long between the giving and the acceptance 
of the call, the interval between the accept- 
ance and the installation was unusually short. 

3 This was the middle of October, but the 
place was the south New England shore. 

'' As already explained, this was an old 
form for what we now call colleague. 



' Dr. Robbins was licensed to preach by 
the Litchfield North Association of Connec- 
ticut, Sept. 25, 1798, thirty-four years before. 
While he mingled teaching with preaching 
in the early years after that license was 
given, yet on the whole his preaching had 
been very frequent and constant, and the 
sermons preached by him would be counted 
by thousands. The sermons preached by him 
as a missionary in Ohio would count by sev- 
eral hundreds. 

* Rev. Sylvester Holmes, of New Bedford. 



[832.] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



283 



At evening we had a public temperance meeting. Mr. Gould ' delivered 
a good address. Fine weather. 

18. Have recently received a letter from Thomas Gray, Esq., of Windham, 
and one from Rev. Mr. Holmes, of New Bedford. Walked and visited. 
Attended to my new room. Paid for articles for it, door-hangings, $2.05. 
Read. Wrote. Had company. Paid for freight. 

19. Looked at a new ship soon to sail. Wrote a long extract from my 
late temperance address for Mr. Graham.^ Afternoon rode to Bedford. 
Attended in the evening on Mr. Graham's temperance lecture. He is 

Tarried at Mr. Alden's. 
Rode home. Received a letter from sister Battell. Brother James 



interesting and amusing 



20. 



is better, through divine mercy. Received a present of $6 from Esq. Meigs.' 
Warm. Read. Wrote an addition to a sermon. 



21. Preached with notes on Luke xxiv 



47, 



and a sermon on Ezek. iii 



17-19. Meeting full and solemn. At evening meeting spoke on John xvii : 5. 
It is thought the prospects of this society have at no time been better. But 
our dependence is all of God. 

23. Wrote. The schooner Laurel, anxiously expected, came in with 230 
barrels of sperm oil. All well. Read. Rainy, which prevented my Bible 
class. Made a plan for my new book-case. 

23. Wrote to my sister Battell. Attended to my chamber. Carried some 
things. Last night we had a hard rain. Visited with company. 

24. In the morning attended the launch of a fine live-oak ship, over 400 
tons. It did not go clear. Carried things to Mr. Crosby's and worked 
considerably. Attended the evening meeting. 

25. Received a letter from my brother Francis. He is apparently getting 
better and expecting to come down here. Engaged in my moving. Read. 
Made calls. Get fatigued easily. 

26. Walked and visited. Visited our grammar school. I trust it will 
do well. Cold. The prospects of the presidential election are alarming.* 
The Lord be our helper. 

27. Wrote. Walked out. My cousin Eliza Le Baron* returned from 
Enfield and left my brother, who came with her, at Bedford. Afternoon rode 
to Bedford and brought him with me. He chooses to stay at Mrs. Le Baron's. 
Read. 



' Rev. William Gould, of Fairhaven. 

^ Sylvester Graham, the well-known lect- 
urer and vegetarian. He was born in Suf- 
field, Ct., 1794, and studied awhile for the 
ministry. He was a man of popular address, 
and forty and fifty years ago his name was 
very familiar. Notwithstanding his wise and 
reformed rules of living, he died in North- 
ampton, Mass., in 1851, at the age of fifty- 
seven. 

^ Joseph Meigs, Esq. 

* In his first presidential election, 1S28, 



Gen. Jackson had 178 of the 261 electoral 
votes. In his second election, 1832, he re- 
ceived 219 of the 286 electoral votes. The 
country evidently did not regard him, on the 
whole, as a very dangerous man. 

* His cousin Eliza Le Baron had married, 
as may be remembered, her cousin, Capt. 
William Le Baron, son of Lemuel. She had 
not, therefore, changed her name. She was sis- 
ter of Priscilla, who married Rev. Mr. Rob- 
bins, of Enfield, and had just returned with 
him from her visit to Enfield. 



284 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

28. In the morning expounded on Matt, v: 43 to vi : g. Our Sabbath- 
school was closed. It has done well this season. My brother preached. 
His health is poor, though he is evidently convalescing. His lungs are sound. 
Quite cold ; there was a considerable snow-squall. Attended the evening 
meeting and spoke on John ix : 4. 

29. My brother spent the most of the day here. His complaints are 
mostly nervous. Quite cold. Wrote. At evening had a full Bible class. 
My brother attended a part of the time. 

30. Removed the most of my things to Mr. Crosby's. Had two wagon- 
loads. Warm. Mr. Gould called on me on his way to Association. Regret 
I cannot go. Worked a good deal on my things. At evening had a meeting 
and preached on Acts ix : 18. Baptized two children.' 

31. Worked, putting up my things. My chamber appears very well. 
Warm and pleasant. Paid a tailor, $1.37. A merchant. $3.63. Paid Mr. 
Crosby, $20, and gave him an order on the society treasurer for $30; both for 
the work on my chamber. Paid another tailor, $1.25. Paid for a roll of room- 
paper, seventy-five cents. At evening set out on my journey. Mr. Crosby 
rode with me to Bedford. Tarried at a tavern. 

November. 

1. Took the stage and rode to Fall River and Providence. Saw Capt. 
De Wolf and his family.^ Found my cane, which I left at Windham on my' 
last journey. Called on Mr. De Witt.' Saw Haydon's splendid painting, 
Christ riding into Jerusalem.'* The Assembly of this State are in session here 
and do poorly. Read. Tarried at a tavern. Wrote to my brother^ at 
Mattapoisett. 

2. Rode quite early to get to Flartford in the evening. Much fatigued. 
The presidential election * is almost the only subject of conversation or solici- 
tude. There has been in this town recently a great fire. Tarried at the 
stage-house. 

3. Rode early to Enfield. Have had unusually good health on this 
journey. Wrote. Read. The people here have been very destitute of 
ministerial labor for three months, though generally supplied on the Sabbath. 

4. Preached on i Peter i : 11, and Luke xix : 41, 42. Administered the 
sacrament. The church large and mostly present. Preached long. At 
evening rode out and attended a meeting and preached on John ix : 4. The 



' The two children baptized at this even- He was born in Plymouth, Eng., a man of 

ing nitcting were Deborah Loring, daughter genius, but of ill-regulated mind. He painted 

of Mr. James I'arstow, and Priscilla Cush- many remarkable pictures, but died at last 

man, daughter of Calvin Cannon. by his own hand. His "Christ's Entry into 

^ Capt. James De Wolf, of ]5ristol, R. I., Jerusalem " was painted in 1S20, and its e.\- 

mentioned in the earlier days of this diary. hibition alone brought him ;^3,ooo. Yet he 

He was now advanced in life, but he did not died at last penniless, 
die till 1S37. 5 His brother. Rev. Francis Le Baron, 

^ Mr. De Witt was the man who had re- whom he had left there, on an exchange of 

ceived the cane from Windham. pulpits. 

^Benjamin Robert Haydon, 1786-1846. * This is the first week in November. 



1832.] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 285 

people here appear to be very anxious about my brother's health. Much 
fatigued. 

5. Read. This week must be ver}' eventful to this country. I do not 
think it has been in so great danger since the foundation of the government.' 
May the God of our fathers be our deliverer. Wrote. Attended the monthly 
concert. Usually thin here. Walked and looked at the new bridge here.^ 
It is nearly completed and is a good one. This town had their meeting for 
the choice of electors and did rather poorly. 

6. Wet all day. Was prevented from riding away. Read. The present 
political contest in our countr)- is evidently one between virtue and ungodli- 
ness.^ Wrote. At evening walked out. 

7. Rode to East Windsor and Hartford. The election has gone well 
in this State, but there is much concern about Pennsylvania.* Engaged the 
freight of some things in a New Bedford vessel. Saw friends. Paid for 
the Connecticut Coura?it iox a year, $2 ; for a donation, fifty cents. Returned 
to East Windsor. The roads very wet. Mrs. Wolcott has been quite low 
with another turn of bleeding. She is slowly convalescing. 

8. Looked over books and papers. Conclude to carrj' another book-case 
to Mattapoisett.' Returned to Enfield. Quite cold. At evening attended 
a Bible class. Persons answered sensibly. 

9. Rode out and saw the carpet-factorj-.^ Engaged a carpet to be made 
for my chamber. Last night we had a ver)' hard frost. Wrote. Rode to the 
east part of the town, and preached in the evening to a full meeting on 
Matt, xii : 5. Tarried out. 

10. Rode home. Wrote to brother Francis. Read. Walked out and 
visited. The ministerial labors in this society are great. 

11. Pleasant and full meetings. Preached on Ps. i: 4, and Matt, v: 16. 
Baptized three children, and two last Sabbath. At evening rode to the 
southeast part of the town and preached to a full meeting on Matt, xv : 22, 
etc. The evening cold and frosty. 

12. Read. Have considerable pain and soreness in my jaw. I think 
I took some cold last evening. Wrote. At evening attended the Bible class. 
But few were present. 

13. Last night was quite ill. Sweat some and am better. Rode to East 
Windsor. The town meeting here yesterday did well. My friend S. T. Wol- 
cott was chosen selectman. Rode to Hartford and back. Carried to the 
vessel some things for Mrs. Robbins ^ to go to New Bedford. It seems that 



' That was certainly a needless alarm. ^ He had moved only a part of his library, 

- The Enfield bridge over the Connecticut and now concludes to take another case. 
River — the same that is now standing. * At Thompsonville, so named, as already 

^ Considerable virtue and considerable stated, from Mr. Orin Thompson, who had 

ungodliness on both sides. then recently started these mills. The trav- 

^ As Pennsylvania then had 28 votes, and elers on the New York, New Haven & Spring- 
Gen. Jackson was to receive, of the whole field Railroad pass these mills about eight 
284, all but 67, Pennsylvania could not turn miles south of Springfield, 
the scale. " His brother's wife, of Enfield. 



286 DIARY OF REV. THOM\S ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

Pennsylvania and New York have gone for Jackson. I believe a majority 
ot the voters in the United States choose to have wicked rulers.' Paid for 
a lock to give Capt. Freeman, $i. Rode home in the evening. 

14. Rose early and worked laboriously. Paid $1.50 for a large box made 
for me. Filled it with books, papers, etc. Tudor carried it with a book-case 
and my sulky to Hartford, and we put them on board the vessel. Paid the 
man for freight, $6. Cold and windy. Purchased forty volumes of Harper's 
Family Library,^ and paid for them, $18. Rode in a cold evening. Called 
on Mr. Lee. Good people are depressed and the wicked rejoice at the 
prospect of Jackson's election. 

15. Had a laborious task in putting up my books. About half of the 
bound volumes, the most valuable part, and the most of the pamphlets remain 
here.' Rode to Enfield. Suffered with the cold. At evening attended a thin 
Bible class. 

16. Last evening received a letter from brother Francis. Wrote. Walked 
and visited. Wrote to my brother and to F. L. Alden, New Bedford. 

17. Read. The prospects of our country are verj' painful. Our hope 
is in the God of our fathers. Paid a woman for a quantity of excellent 
stocking yarn, $1.50. Read the Bible. 

18. Rainy through the day. Thin meeting. Preached a double sermon 
on Isa. ix : 6, 7. No evening meeting. Wrote Mr. N. Crosby, Mattapoisett. 

ig. Read Christian Spectator. Rode to Pine Meadow and visited at 
Mr. Haskell's. Returned. Bad riding. That village ■* is much increasing. 
Attended a Bible class. 

20. Wrote. Walked a distance, visited, and preached in the afternoon 
to a good number on Ps. Ixxxvi : 15, 16. Cold and blustering. Was brought 
home in a dark evening. Received a short letter from brother Francis. 

21. Walked to the factory. The ground is frozen. Our countrv is gone 
dreadfully for Jackson. Quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat.' We have 
accounts of the death of Sir Walter Scott* and Charles Carroll.'' Read. 
Afternoon attended the prayer-meeting at this house. Had company. 

22. Wrote articles of association for a library company for my own library. 
Wet and rainy all day ; afternoon and evening very hard. \N'alked to the 
Ville,' and preached in the evening to a Scotch meeting on Gen. xvii : 
I, 2, 7. Baptized five children. Had wine, etc., in connection with the 
meeting. Tarried out. Got considerably wet. 



' " In your patience possess ye your souls." destroyed, he probably did not make it " mad " 

^ This popular series of books, fifty cents in 1S32. 

a volume, retail, grew unto an immense num- ^ Sir Walter Scott died at Abbotsford, 

ber of volumes and embraced much valuable Sept. 21, 1S32. 

literature. " Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, one of 

' This paragraph shows clearly the con- the signers of the Declaration of Independ- 

ditions of the removal. ence, died at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 14, 1832, 

'' Now Windsor Locks. in his ninety-sixth year. 

5 Which, being translated, means, "Those ^ Thompsonville. The carpet weavers at 

whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes that time in New England were generally 

mad; " and as the nation is yet far from being Scotch. 



1832.] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



287 



23. Read Christian Spectator. Wrote. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. 
At evening attended a public supper nt Thompsonville in true Caledonian 
style. Left at nine o'clock. 

24. Read. Walked and visited. Read the Bible. Visited sick persons. 

25. Preached with notes on Gal. ii : i6, 17, and a sermon on Ps. c.xxxvii : i. 
Baptized three children. At evening rode out and preached on Ps. Ixxxvi : 
15, 16. All meetings quite full. 

26. Rode with Mr. Prudden ' to the east part of the town and visited 
an aged sick man. Visited a family in which a young man died this morning. 
Rode in the stage to East Windsor. Three Congressmen in the stage on the 
way to Washington." 

27. Rode to Hartford. Did errands. Paid for a pair of blankets, $4.50; 
for flannel, $3 ; books, ninety cents ; pamphlets, twenty-five cents ; donation, 
fifty cents. Warm and pleasant. Looked at the new stone bridge.^ Proba- 
bly the first in this countr}\ I much fear that I shall not get Mr. Wolcott 
to settle our accounts. 

28. Yesterday wrote to Hezekiah Howe & Co., New Haven, and sent 
them $20. Rode to Enfield. Attended the funeral of the young man lately 
deceased. W'rote an addition to a Thanksgiving sermon. Rev. ]\Ir. Wood- 
ruff,* of New Connecticut, called on me. Wrote late. 

29. Thanksgiving. A very pleasant day. A good number at meeting. 
Preached on Zech. xiv : 16. We have a small family; but three at dinner. 
At evening performed a marriage, with a large company. Read. 

30. Wrote. ^'&?iA Christian Spectator. Wet and rainy. At evening walked 
out. On the 27th paid at Hartford, for cousin Eliza, $2.37. 

December. 

1. Cold. It snowed a considerable part of the day. Rode to the east 
part of the town and visited an aged sick man. Quite tedious. Mrs. Rob- 
bins and I received a letter from brother Francis. He is, through divine 
favor, evidently mending. Read. 

2. Quite cold. There is no stove in this meeting-house.^ Preached on 
Isa. Iviii : 17, 18. Made calls. 

3. My health, by divine mercy, is unusually good. Rode in a sleigh 
to the factory village and procured the carpet they have made for me. 
It appears to be, as they say it is, a ver}' good one. There are thirty-five 



' Son of Rev. Nehemiah Prudden, pastor 
at Enfield, 17S2-1S15. 

- Without a further clew it would be diffi- 
cult to tell who these three Congressmen 
were. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Mas- 
sachusetts stand as the sources of supply. 

' The bridge before noticed over the Lit- 
tle River. 

■* This may have been Rev. Simeon Wood- 
ruff, of Strongsville, O., or Rev. Ephraim T. 
Woodruff, of Williamsfield, O. 



5 Enfield, too, was behind the times. In 
the north, or Scantic parish, of East Wind- 
sor (Rev. Shubael Bartlett, pastor), which 
adjoined Enfield, the following vote was 
passed, Jan. 2, 1S27 : " Voted. To raise three 
fourths of a cent on a dollar to defray the ex- 
penses of putting up stoves and pipes into 
the meeting-house, to provide fuel for the 
same, and a man to attend to the stoves." 
The stove-pipes required for the proper warm- 
ing of a meeting-house were of great length- 



288 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBRINS, D. D. 



[1832. 



yards, amounting to $43.75,' for which I gave them my note. Read. The 
monthly concert was prevented by the rain. Visited. 

4. Wrote. Wrote to brother Francis. Visited at Esq. Dixon's."^ Warm. 
The snow is mostly gone. Assisted in examining a school-master. Read the 
Christian Spectator. I fear that different sentiments on gospel doctrines are 
growing among the ministers of this State. ^ Read late. 

5. Rode to East Windsor. Visited Mr. Bartlett. Purchased of Mr. Has- 
kell black cloth for a suit of clothes, at §5.50 per yard. Reckoned with Mr. 
Wolcott and balanced accounts.* 

6. Assisted in looking over Mr. Wolcott's accounts with his daughters 
that are married,* the most of which I had. Returned to Enfield. Moderate 
weather. At evening there was a temperance meeting here and I delivered 
a public address. This temperance society is large. Read. 

7. Attended the funeral of Maj. Jones. Bad riding. Rode to the north- 
east part of the town, and preached in the evening to an intelligent meeting 
on Matt, ix : 9. The little district were most all present.* Visited. 

8. Rainy. Wrote. Read the President's Message. It is written with 
ability, and yet very boastful, with several pernicious opinions.^ Received, 
with Mrs. Robbins and Eliza, a letter from brother Francis. Prevented from 
riding down to Scantic by the rain. Read the Bible. 

9. Rain}^ and wet all day. Rode to Scantic and exchanged with Mr. Bart- 
lett. Very bad riding. Thin meeting. Preached on Ps. i : 4, and Rom. ii : 4.* 
Mr. Bartlett is much blessed in his family.^ At evening returned. Preached 
on the way at Weymouth school-house '° on Matt, ix : 9. 

10. Wrote to brother Francis. Read. Rode to East Windsor. Was 
employed in the evening till late with Tudor, making out Mr. Wolcott's old 
charges to Frances and Eveline. Mrs. Wolcott is more feeble than she has 
been. The roads ver^' muddy. 

11. Mr. Wolcott procured for me, of Levi Rockwell, $22, for the rent 
of my land for the past season. Rode to Hartford. The streets very wet. 
Received of the Phcenix Bank, $44.31, and gave them an order for my next 
dividend of $45. Paid for a Bible for Mr. Crosby," $2; candles, $1.13; 
a book, sixty-three cents ; to a shoe-maker, eighty-five cents. Made calls. 
Rode back. Settled my accounts with Mrs. Wolcott. 



' A dollar and a quarter a yard. 

'^ Judge William Dixon, father of James 
Dixon, LL. D., United States Senator. At 
that time this James Dixon was a member of 
Williams College. 

^ He might have said, properly enough, 
that theological controversy in Connecticut 
was already active and wide-spread. 

* This was something which he had long 
desired to do. 

* Mrs. Frances (Wolcott) Haskell and 
Mrs. Eveline (Wolcott) Bissell. 

* That is, the people of the district. 



^ He softens a little in his estimate of 
President Jackson. 

* That afternoon sermon the writer of this 
note heard, and distinctly remembers for its 
tender and winning spirit. 

9 Years before he used to say that Mr. 
Bartlett was much burdened with the care 
and support of his large family. This was 
true, but the children were well grown now, 
and made a bright and cheerful household. 

'° This was in Enfield. 
" Dea. Nathaniel A. Crosby, of Mattapoi- 
sett. 



1832.] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 289 

12. Read. The proceedings of the people of South Carolina are most 
unaccountable and serious. I hope God will save the country from civil war.' 
Wet and rainy through the day. Settled accounts with Dea. Reed. I paid 
$20 to the Everest fund on his debt, which he would not allow me. I allowed 
him $10 for 2,000 copies of my name which he has engraved ;'' and he paid 
me $6.56, and I gave up his note. Put up my things. 

13. Rode to Enfield. I feel anxious about Mrs. Wolcott. The riding 
very bad. Our evening Bible class was prevented by a singing-school. 
Read. Paid Mr. Haskell for my black cloth, three and one half yards, $19.25. 
Gave him an order on Hartford Bank for my dividend just declared, $15. 
Paid for cloth for a sack, fifty cents. The accounts from South Carolina are 
worse and worse. 

14. The weather is warm and wet. Walked out. Read Prof. Fitch's 
Theology in the Christian Spectator. Pretty poor.' Walked to Thompsonville, 
visited, and preached in the evening to a good audience on Ps. iv : 5. Very 
dark and muddy. Paid Mr. Thompson for my carpet, thirty-five yards, $43.75. 
And for an imported piece, about two yards, for a hearth-rug, $1.75. Visited 
a sick woman. 

15. Preparing for my journey. Read. Wrote. Visited the sick and 
others. Read the President's proclamation relative to the events in South 
Carolina. It is well done.* Paid Mrs. Robbins $8 for four volumes of the 
Christian Spectator in numbers. I think the work is growing less valuable.' 

16. The weather moderate and very pleasant. Full meeting. Preached 
on Mark x: 21, and John iii : 36. At evening preached on Job xlii : 5, 6. 
Quite tired. The people here are pleased with the prospect of my brother's 
return. 

17. In the morning it snowed some. Rode in snow and rain to East 
Windsor. My new carpet was much liked at Mr. Wolcott's. Rode in a hard 
rain to Mr. Woodbridge's, Manchester, in an open wagon ; got considerably 
wet. My things got wet. The roads very wet and deep. 

18. Left my brother's horse and wagon at Mr. Woodbridge's * and took 
the stage early and rode to Providence. Got in late. Missed of finding 
my brother, which I expected. The stage came light. Was up late. Read. 

19. Rode to New Bedford and found Mr. Crosby with his wagon, and 
rode home. At Fall River found that my brother went there today and took 
the steam-boat to Providence. By which means I missed him. Am kindly 
welcomed. Not much fatigued. Cold and the ground something frozen. 

' He will begin now to see the uses of •♦ Now he begins to find actual comfort in 

such a man as Gen. Jackson. old Gen. Jackson. 

^ It was stated in the earlier years of this ^ Perhaps because it was growing more 

diary that Dea. Abner Reed was an engraver. controversial. 

3 In the theological discussions then go- * This was Woodbridge's tavern, Man- 

ing on Dr. Robbins naturally took sides with Chester. He had gone there to take the 

the Old School men against the New Haven stage, and leave his brother's horse for him 

School. He had gone from the State, how- to take on his return from Mattapoisett. 

ever, just in season to be out of the thick of Such arrangements were common in those 

the contest. days, when traveling facilities were few. 



290 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1832. 

20. Walked out. Cold. My people appear ver).' glad of my return. 
Visited a young man verj' sick. Attended to my things. Walked out. 
Uncle Le Baron and friends are well. Brother F.'s health was much 
improved. 

21. Worked at my chamber and books. My things are in a very unsettled 
state. My expected book-case is not yet done. Attended at a funeral, with 
Mr. Wood, of a child accidentally killed in a ship-yard. Dined at cousin 
J. Le Baron's,' 

22. My health is unusually good. Rode with Capt. Freeman ^ to Bedford. 
Very cold and the ground hard frozen. Paid for glass for my book-case, 
$5.13; for carpet-binding, sixty-three cents. My brother did considerable 
labor here ; his preaching was very acceptable, and he was much liked by 
the few with whom he became acquainted. Read. 

23. Severe cold. There was no stove in the meeting-house and I was 
obliged to shorten the exercises. Preached on Titus ii : 11-14. Read a letter 
from the church in Plymouth, Mr. Freeman's,^ requesting our assistance in 
council ; and the church chose a delegate. Preached in the evening on Job 
xlii : 5, 6. 

24. Attended to the work of my new book-case. A most troublesome 
delay. Wrote. Attended tJie Bible class. Pretty full. 

25. Rode in the stage with my delegate and Rev. Mr. Gould to Plymouth. 
Dined at Mr. Freeman's. Went to Mr. Russell's ■* to stay. The council 
formed. About twenty members. A committee was appointed, I one, to 
desire the Robinson Church^ to make this a mutual council. We went 
to them and attended a meeting with them, and I preached on Ps. iv : 5 ; 
but they declined uniting or attending on the council. We began the hearing 
in the meeting-house, with a great audience, and continued till nine o'clock. 

26. We continued hearing Mr. Freeman and his church committee till 
near night. There has been a long and sharp contention between them and 
the party that has separated and formed the Robinson Church. The council 
deliberated in the evening and appointed a committee to draw up a result. 
Mr. Cleaveland,* of Salem, is an excellent scribe. Returned late to my 
lodgings and began to write, and continued till after three o'clock. Last 
night was up late, and read newspapers and the most of three of Dr. Chan- 
ning's able, elegant, miserable sermons.^ Much fatigued. 

27. The committee reported their result in the forenoon ; the council 



' James Le Baron, son of Rev. Lemuel, members that had become dissatisfied with 

born 1794, his youngest child. Rev. Mr. Freeman's church. 

^ Capt. Seth Freeman. * John P. Cleaveland, D. D., pastor of the 

^ Rev. Frederick Freeman, pastor of Third Tabernacle Church, Salem, 1827-1834. He 

Church, Plymouth, 1824-1833. was settled also in Providence, Lowell, and 

* Nathaniel Russell, who married Martha, other places. He was a graduate of Bow- 
daughter of Isaac Le Baron. doin, 1821, and died in Newburyport, March 

5 The Robinson Church, so called (having 7, 1873, aged seventy-three, 
taken the honored name of John Robinson, ' A short and comprehensive criticism 

of Leyden), was a new formation, composed of from the Orthodox stand-point. 



1832.] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 29 1 

deliberated laboriously till evening, when the result was published. The 
council were unanimous and censured both churches. Mr. Freeman was 
acquitted of fault. We closed about nine o'clock. Warm and wet. Had 
no time to call on a single friend. Dr. Thacher called on me and gave 
me a copy of his History of Plymouth. 

28. Took the stage early and rode home. Cold. Find myself much 
fatigued. Took some cold. Read. 

29. Read. Attended to my things. Had my new book-case brought 
in, but it is not quite done. Read. My chamber is cold. The prospects 
at the South are gloomy and alarming. ■• 

30. Last night and this morning severe cold. Our meeting-house stove 
has been repaired and put up. The house was finely warmed. Preached 
with notes on Deut. xxxii : 18, and a sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19, At evening 
preached on Rom. vii : 9. Full meetings. 

31. Worked at my librar}'. It is much deranged. The weather moder- 
ates. Read the Bible. At evening had a very full and serious Bible class. 
I bless God for the great mercies of this year. When I left Mr. Wolcott's 
at East Windsor, on the 17th instant, Mrs, Wolcott handed to me $50, which 
I am to pay her on demand, with interest. 



1833- 

January. 

1. Endeavored early to commit my way to God and to his great grace 
for the coming year. And O that he would permit me to record in this diary 
great mercies to his Zion. The past year has been with me a year of great 
mercies. Worked at my chamber, assorting and putting up my things. 
Wrote to my brother Francis. 

2. Very warm and pleasant. Read. Rode out and visited. Attended 
the evening meeting ; full and attentive. There appears to be an increasing 
seriousness among our good people. The Governor of South Carolina has 
issued a proclamation counter to the President's.' 

3. Worked at my library and my new book-case. The latter is not the 
best workmanship. Had company. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Ely,^ 
of Mansfield, and one from Rev. Mr. Davis,^ of Green's Farms. The country 
is much agitated by the Carolina business. Wrote late. 

4. Gave my cousin Eliza for keeping brother F., in addition to $2.38 
to her daughter at Enfield, $^1.* Rode to Bedford. Quite muddy. Very 
little frost in the ground. Paid an addition to the price of my book-case 
glass, in consequence of a mistake, $2. Visited. Much fatigued. Read. 

5. Had my cabinet-maker here and worked at my library. My new 
settling is attended with much expense. Mr. Crosby has paid for materials 
and work in doing off my chamber, $80. For paper, door-trimmings, etc., 
I have paid about $10 more. I have paid him $50, and owe him $30. 
Unusually warm. The grass grows. I fear some of my books are lost.^ 

6. Expounded on the Lord's Prayer, and preached on Ps. xc : 10. Many 
people wore no out-coat. At evening preached at a full and serious meeting 
on Ps. xcv, part of 7 and 8. 

7. Had my cabinet-maker. He has at length got my book-case nearly 
completed. Walked out. Read. Attended at evening the monthly concert ; 
full and serious. 

8. Much cooler. Attended to my library. Dined at Capt. Freeman's.* 
At evening attended the singing-school. It is large. 

9. Worked, assorting and putting up my books. Read. Visited. Saw 



' The Governor of South Carolina then is apt to spell this name Davis, but it stands 

was Hon. Robert Y. Ilayne, known especially in the records as Davies. 

for his debate with Daniel Webster. He it *• Eliza Le Baron was the wife of William 

was who, as a member of the "Union and Le Baron. His brother's stay in Mattapoi- 

State Rights Convention " in 1832, reported sett had been for some weeks, as they were 

the Ordinance of Nullification, and upon that on a long exchange of pulpits, 

record was elected Governor. ' The old story, not only with him but 

" Rev. William Ely. with almost every one owning many books. 

^ Rev. Thomas F. Davies. Dr. Robbins * Capt. Seth Freeman. 

293 



294 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^833. 

a young woman in deep distress of mind. Attended the evening meeting. 
Last night it snowed, and sleighs move briskly. 

10. Warm and wet. Employed in my chamber. Afternoon visited 
Mr. Anthony's school; doing well. Read Gov. Lincoln's ' excellent speech. 
Received a letter from brother Francis. Read late. 

11. Ver)' cold. Made this almanack. Wrote. Visited. 

12. Read. Worked at my books. Walked out. The ground is very hard 
frozen. Read the Bible. 

13. Very cold, but the meeting-house is quite comfortable. Preached 
with notes on Prov. v: ii, 12, and a sermon on Matt, xxv: 6. At the 
evening meeting, quite full, preached on 2 Thess. i : 6, 7. We have evidently 
an increasing attention to meetings. 

14. Walked out. Paid a blacksmith for work, fifty cents. Dined out. 
Paid for half a cord of wood, $3. Had a full Bible class. Read quite late. 

15. Still severe cold. Was called to see a sick woman very low. Dined 
out. Walked and visited. At evening attended the quarterly meeting of our 
Temperance Society. I joined the society, with many others, the most of them 
women. 

16. Last evening a snow-storm commenced, which turned to a violent 
rain. Wrote. Yesterday gave my cousin Polly Le Baron ^ $1, by desire 
of brother Francis. Walked out and visited. Attended our evening meeting. 

17. It is again severe cold and tedious. Had a small pine book-case 
brought in, made by my cousin Samuel Le Baron. It is very good work, but 
does not hold all m.y periodicals. Afternoon we had my Uncle Le Baron,^ 
and my cousins, and other company here. They much admired my chamber, 
library, etc." At evening walked out. Read late. Paid a subscription of 
$3.50 for painting the inside of the meeting-house. Paid ^2.31 for setting 
the glass in my large book-case and finding three extra panes. 

18. Read reviews, etc. Have now the most of my books set up. I have 
about 1,000 volumes. Walked out. At evening attended a singing-school. 
Visited Mrs. Southworth ; very low. 

19. Extreme cold. Walked out. Mrs. Southworth died last night. Wrote. 
Kept below. Read the Bible. 

20. The cold abates a little. Preached a double sermon on Matt, vii : 
13, 14. Attended the funeral. Full meeting. At the evening meeting had 
a sermon read. Much fatigued. Read late. Our country is much agitated.'* 

21. Attended to the arrangement of my old newspapers. Attended the 
Bible class. The ground thaws. Worked at my newspapers very late. 

22. Finished the job with my Courant papers. Wrote. Wrote to E. W. 



' Hon. Levi Lincoln was Governor of Mrs. Battell, presented a bonnet a little while 

Massachusetts, 1825-1834. The speech here before. She was about fifty-five years old, and 

referred to was his address at the oj^ening of unmarried. 
the Massachusetts Legislature of 1S33. ^ Rev. Lemuel Le Baron. 

^ Polly stands for Mary. This was the ■• In respect to the South Carolina Ordi- 

cousin to whom Dr. Robbins and his sister, nance of Nullification. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 295 

Bull' of Hartford, confideniially. I fear I shall have a trial about my 
boarding. 

23. Rode to Bedford. Did errands and made calls. The roads muddy. 
Paid $1 for half a gallon of neat's-foot oil. The President has transmitted 
a long Message relative to the South Carolina business.^ Attended the 
evening meeting. Received a letter from Mr. Gould, of Fairhaven, and one 
from Rev, Mr. Hart,^ of Plymouth, Ct. 

24. Yesterday let Mr. Taber, of Bedford, have a ream of fine English 
letter-paper for $7.50, to be paid in books. I paid Gen. Howe for the same, 
$9. On the 2 2d wrote to Mr. Davies, of Saugatuck."* Attended to my studies. 
Wrote to Rev. Mr. Ely, of Mansfield. 

25. Last night we had a good deal of rain. The ground very wet. Walked 
and visited all day. Many complain of my not visiting them. 

26. Blacked three pairs of boots and three of shoes with my excellent 
leather-preserving blacking. Prepared to go to Fairhaven, and received 
a note from Mr. Gould that he cannot exchange tomorrow. Visited. Wrote. 
Read the Bible. Quite cold and tedious. 

27. Preached both parts of the day with notes on Jer. xxiii : 6. Full and 
attentive meetings. At evening preached on Luke viii : 18. Much fatigued. 
Was up quite late. 

28. Read in the new History of Lidia, in the Family Library.^ Rode out 
and visited a sick woman very low. Attended the Bible class ; very attentive. 

29. Wrote to Mr. Gould, of Fairhaven, Mr. Huntington,' Member of 
Congress, Mr. Huntington, bookseller in Hartford, and my sister Battell. 
Walked out and visited. Paid $5 for a new Universal Gazetteer^ which I had 
subscribed for. I fear it is not quite as valuable as I hoped to find it. 
Esq. Willis made me a present of $5. 

30. Read in the History of India. Am burdened with parochial duties. 
Dined at Capt. Freeman's. At evening meeting preached on Matt, iii : 8, 9. 
Read in my new Gazetteer. Warm and wet. Read late. 

31. It snowed and was quite tedious. Worked, assorting my pamphlets. 

' Eben W. Bull. of Congress, 1829-1834. He died in the year 

^ This was not his annual Message given 1847. 

at the opening of Congress, but a special ^ The Universal Gazetteer was one of the 

Message on this one point. The session of useful works prepared by Jedediah Morse, 

Congress that year began Dec. 3, 1S32. D. D., of Charlestown, Mass., the fatiier of 

3 Rev. Luther Hart, pastor at Plymouth, American geography, as he has been called. 

Ct., 1810-1834. It began with the American Gazetteer, of 

■• The Indian name for what was then the which the first edition was published in 1797, 

parish of Green's Farms, and now the town and the second in 1S04. After a time he pre- 

of Westport, Ct. pared a supplementary volume, entitled, Gaz- 

5 History of Britisli India, with engrav- etteer of tlie Eastern Continent. When the 

ings. In three volumes. By Hugh Murray, two were brought together, as in the edi- 

James Wilson, Prof. Jameson, and other writ- tions of 182 1 and 1823 (the third and fourth 

ers. New York: J. & J. Harper. 1S32. editions), it was then called The Universal 

* Hon. Jabez Williams Huntington, of Gazetteer. It seems to have been published 

Litchfield, Ct., a native of Norwich, Ct. ; a separately in London, and to have had a 

graduate of Yale, 1806. He was a Member large circulation in England. 



296 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[^833. 



I have collected a large number of them since I left East Windsor. Wrote 
to Absalom Peters,' of New York, and to Hez. Howe & Co., New Haven. 
The storm prevented my going out to an appointed meeting. 

February. 

1. Severe cold. W^alked out and visited. There appears to be less 
concern about the South Carolina commotions. "^ Wrote to Rev. Mr. Gould. 

2. The cold continues, but our harbor is not frozen. Wrote. Walked 
out. Last evening received a letter from Dr. Robbins, of Boston.^ 

3. Preached with notes on Ps. cxi.\ : 97. After which rode some distance 
and attended a funeral, and preached without notes on Heb. ix : 27. Began 
our third meeting at four o'clock, and preached a sermon on Ps. cvi : 23. 
There were many at the funeral who hear but little preaching. No abatement 
of the cold. Very tired. 

4. Read in old pamphlets. Walked out and visited. Steady cold. 
Attended the monthly concert. Quite full. Read late. 

5. Read. Began a long writing. Dined at Capt. Freeman's. In the 
afternoon became quite unwell, and had a sick evening and night. Cannot 
ascribe it to any definite cause. Took medicine. The weather moderates. 

6. Am quite feeble, yet, through divine mercy, better than yesterday. 
It snowed and was quite stormy. Worked at my pamphlets. Took a new 
chamber, much smaller than mine. Read. 

7. Severe cold and tedious. The carpenters are obliged to leave their 
yards. Worked, arranging my pamphlets. Received a letter from Mr. Gould, 
and wrote to him. Wrote to Dr. Robbins, of Boston. My chamber is a good 
one, but it is difficult to keep comfortable. 

8. It scarcely thaws at all in a clear sun. Worked at my pamphlets. 
Had company. Received a letter from Mr. James L. Belden," of Wethersfield. 
Read. They do poorly at Congress. 

9. Am something unwell with stomach affections. For the three days 
past I have not been into the street. Wrote. Rode out and attended the 
funeral of a child. Received a letter from H. Howe & Co., New Haven. 
Rode to Fairhaven to exchange. 

ID. I keep at Capt. Gibbs's.' Mr. Gould went to Mattapoisett. Preached 



' Absalom Peters, D. D., Secretary, 1825- 
1837, of the American Home Missionary So- 
ciety, a graduate of Dartmoutli College, 1816. 
He was born in Wentworth, N. H., 1793, ^'^^^ 
in New York city, 1869. 

^ He should have added, " thanks to Gen. 
Jackson." In the Lives of the Presidents, 
published in Boston in 1882, the following 
sentences respecting Gen. Jackson will com- 
mend themselves to almost all readers: "It 
is undeniable that many of the acts of his 
administration, which were at the time most 
unsparingly denounced, are now generally 



commended. Every year the judgment of the 
whole community is settling into the convic- 
tion that, with all his glaring faults of char- 
acter, he was a true patriot, honestly seeking 
the good of his country." 

3 Chandler Robbins, M. D. 

'' James L. Belden was a prominent man 
in Wethersfield, and was at that time one of 
the justices of the peace. 

^ Capt. Anselm Gibbs, who, in the year 
1800, married Lucy Le Baron, Dr. Robbins's 
cousin. " I keep " stands for I stay, or, I am 
stopping. 



1833O PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 297 

both parts of the day with notes on Jer. xxiii : 6. At the evening meeting 
a sermon on Ps. cvi : 23. It thaws considerably. 

11. Saw Mr. Gould. A new congregation has lately been established 
here — Free-will Baptist Unitarian." Rode home. Some snow, but good 
wheeling. We have a painful account that the captain and a boat's crew 
of a whale-ship belonging here is lost. Visited. At evening had a full and 
laborious Bible class. 

12. It thaws and the roads are wet. Visited. Paid towards my mahogany 
book-case, $16.50. For my new pine book-case, $8.50. A merchant's bill, 
hardware, 58.90. A post office bill, $5.24. The whole cost of the mahogany 
book-case is about $38. Read. Wrote to H. Hov/e & Co., New Haven, 
and to Clapp & Benton, Hartford. Wrote late. 

13. Wrote to James L. Belden, Esq., Wethersfield. Yesterday received 
a valuable packet from Mr. Huntington at Congress. Dined and made a long 
visit at Uncle Le Baron's. A cold freezing rain. The evening meeting was 
prevented. Read History of Plymouth.^ 

14. Began again to write a long letter to Mr. Hart,^ of Plymouth, Ct. 
Walked out. Cold, and the roads very icy. Read. Read the Bible. 

15. Wrote the most of the day on my letter. It requires an examination 
of various documents. Walked and visited. It is pretty good sleighing. 
Read late. 

16. Visited the sick and others. The ice thaws. Wrote. Read expos- 
itors. 

17. Expounded on Matt, vi : 14 to the end, and preached on Is. xliii : 13. 
The roads are getting wet. At evening rode to Capt. Southworth's and 
married three couples,* two of his daughters. We had a pleasant wedding. 
The evening meeting was held without me. 

18. Read. Walked out. Bad going, and had a thin Bible class. The 
Epistle to the Romans requires a good deal of preparation. 

19. Walked out. Traded, $1.13. Read. Wrote laboriously on my long 
letter. Wrote late. 

20. Walked and visited. Spent a part of the day with my uncle.' Roads 
very muddy. Attended the evening meeting. Pretty thin. Read late. 

21. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Holmes.* Walked a distance and visited. Cold 
and the ground hard frozen. Out through the day. 

22. Spent the day again in visiting, and people complain much that I visit 
no more. Visited a school. Pretty well instructed. Read late. I have 
to do a good deal of my reading between nine and twelve o'clock in the 
evening. 

23. It thaws again. Walked out. On the 20th received a letter from 



' A singular compound for a church or- were George Briggs and Lois Southworth ; 

ganization. Alfred M. Wright, of Fairhaven, and Sarah 

^ History 0/ Plymouth,hy James Thacher, H. Southworth; Samuel Haskins and Lydia 

M. D., published in 1832. Gifford — the last couple from New Bedford. 

^ Rev. Luther Hart. ■' Rev. Lemuel Le Baron. 

* The three couples united in marriage * Rev. Sylvester Holmes. 



298 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^833. 

E. W. Bull, and one from Clapp «S: Benton, of Hartford. Wrote and finished 
my long letter to Rev. Mr. Hart,' of Plymouth, Ct. It has cost me much 
labor. Read the Bible. 

24. Preached a double sermon on 2 Thess. ii : 13. Warm and wet. At 
ev'ening rainy, and we had no meeting. Read old pamphlets. 

25. Severe cold; thought to be equal to any we have had. Read. Wrote 
to Clapp & Benton, Hartford. Walked out and visited. Put off my Bible 
class on account of the cold. 

26. The cold abates a little. Rode to New Bedford and attended the 
annual meeting of the Bristol County Temperance Society. I became 
a member. At evening there was a public meeting, which did well. I was 
requested to speak, unexpectedly, and performed indifferently. Tarried at 
Mr. Alden's. 

27. Walked to Fairhaven. Capt. Gibbs gave me a conveyance home. 
Walked a distance and attended a meeting in the evening, and preached on 
Luke xix : 10. It thaws and the roads are quite muddy. 

28. Wrote. Read, The public have been looking at the proceedings 
of Congress during their present session with great interest and solicitude. 
I trust God will mercifully carry them through their perplexing dangers. 
The presidential office and its dependencies seems to be overlooked. 
Afternoon we attended the annual season of prayer, extensively observed, 
for the blessings of divine grace on the colleges.^ Severe cold. Visited. 
My cousin, Mrs. Eliza Le Baron, is quite feeble. 

March. 

1. We had a good deal of snow. Wrote to S. T. Wolcott. Walked out 
and attended in the evening the Bible class. Quite thin. The cold seems 
not to abate. Received a letter from J. S. Lyon,' of New Jersey. Read 
late. 

2. We have more snow. Pretty good sleighing. Received of my 
collector, $37, which, with what I have before received, amounts to $450; 
and gave him a receipt for the pay for a year's ministerial labor, beginning 
Sept. 22, 1831. Paid for some materials for my book-case, $1.23. Rode 
in the stage to Bedford. Did some errands. Towards evening it became 
extreme cold ; the wind blew and the snow flew with great violence, 
Mr. Holmes went to Mattapoisett, Paid Mr, Crosby $10." 

3. The coldest day we have had this year. The mercury was at 02°. 
Thin meetings. The house well warmed. Preached on i Cor, i : 23, 
Ps. cxxxvii : i, and in the evening on Ps, cvi : 23. The harbor here is hard 
frozen. 



' The nature and object of his long and ^ We have no clew to this J. S. Lyon, 

laborious letter to Rev. I.uther Hart, of wflose name has been before mentioned, or 

Plymouth, do not yet appear. to the nature of the business calling for the 

^ This was the last Thursday of February, correspondence, 
the day then observed among the churches ■* Dea. N. A. Crosby, on account of board 

for this object. and expenses in preparing chamber. 



^^33-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



:99 



4. Am disappointed of some books I expected to procure of Mrs. Samp- 
son.' Purchased some others. Rode home in the stage. The snow is very- 
much drifted. Read. Attended the monthly concert. Our contributions 
at this meeting increase. 

5. This morning, I believe, is as cold as any we have had. Walked out. 
Wrote. Read in the History of Ireland^ Our harbor is firmly frozen, and 
has not been before during the winter. Mrs. Crosby is quite unwell. Paid 
Mr. Crosby $20, which makes the amount of §80 that he has paid for doing 
off my chamber. Had company. 

6. We have considerable addition to our snow, but the cold abates. 
My wine (Madeira), in a chamber without fire, is frozen. Wrote. I fear 
I have lost some valuable papers. Attended the evening meeting and 
preached on John x: 14. Baptized a child.^ The night very cold and frosty. 

7. Last evening I think I took some cold and am considerably unwell. 
Kept at home. It is very good sleighing. Read the Bible. Read the most 
of the day in Hales's Chronology. It is a work of much learning and labor, 
but I do not v/ell like his system.* 

8. Warm and snow thaws fast. Read the Bible. Wrote a piece for 
the newspaper. The session of Congress, after great anxiety, has issued 
favorably. I think there has been a signal interposition of Providence 
in favor of our country.' 

9. Read the Bible. Warm ; the sleighing is done, and the snow gone 
except the drifts. Visited. Wrote. 

10. Preached with notes on Rom. ii : 5, and a sermon on i Kings xix : 9. 
The ground very wet and muddy. Preached at the evening meeting on 
John x: 10. Quite tired. Meetings full for such going. 

11. Wrote, \^'alked out. Read the Bible. The ground very wet.. 
Attended the Bible class. Much fuller than I expected. 

12. Mrs. Crosby is some better. Yesterday read Hales's Chronology; 
it is very valuable. Worked, sawing wood. Visited a school. Read History 
of Ireland. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Visited. 

13. \\'e had a pretty hard rain. The ice went out of our harbor, after 
lying about nine days. Visited a sick woman. Attended the evening 
meeting and preached on Acts ii : 37. Read late. 

14. Quite cold. Walked to the east part of the society and visited 



' The w-idow, probably, of. Hon. Zabdiel 
Sampson, a native of Plympton, Mass., a 
graduate of Brown University, and a Mem- 
ber of Congress, 1S17-1819. He died in 
1S28. 

^ In two volumes, of the Harper's Family 
Library series. 

3 Abigail, daughter of Jonathan Dexter, 
at an evening meeting. 

*■ William Hales, D. D., rector of Kille- 
sandra, Ireland. His work was entitled, A 
New Analysis of Chronology. It was pub- 



lished, three volumes in one, from 1809 to 
1814. The best edition was the second, in 
four volumes, published in 1S30, and this was 
the edition, doubtless, that Dr. Robbins 
was reading. He does not altogether like 
it, but it was regarded by scholars as far in 
advance of any previous work. It was val- 
ued especially for the full and minute atten- 
tion given to the fixing of Biblical events. 

' It is gratifying to notice that already 
Dr. Robbins begins to take more cheerful 
views of our public affairs. 



300 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1833. 

a school, and visited families. That quarter' shows a great want of gospel 
privileges. Read the history of long-afflicted Ireland. 

15. Read. At the late inauguration of the President there was less 
interest felt in the scene, probably, than on any former occasion. Began 
to write a sermon on i John i : 7. Wrote a little and had to consult various 
books. At evening walked to Uncle Le Baron's. My cousin Eliza* has had 
a letter from her sister Robbins^ informing that my brother Francis is quite 
unwell ; his former complaints return. A most afflictive event. The annual 
society meeting was holden ; very harmonious. They voted me a kind donation 
of three cords of wood. 

16. Wrote on my sermon, but made small progress. It requires much 
investigation. Spring weather. Received a good letter from my sister. 
She says brother James is getting better and Francis is feeble. Mr. N. Roys,^ 
of Norfolk, is dead, aged ninety-nine last June. 

17. Expounded on Matt, vii, and preached on Luke xiii : 8, 9. There 
was a Universalist meeting last Sabbath in the school-house, and today 
in the larger Baptist meeting-house. The audience is pretty small. At the 
evening meeting preached on i Thess. v: ig. Not as full as usual. 

18. Worked some, sawing wood, etc. Went into the ship-yard. Read. 
Visited. Had a full Bible class. Was out late. The country seems to be 
much gratified and relieved at the favorable termination of the late session 
of Congress. 

ig. Warm. The frost is getting out of the ground. Walked out. Had 
a large load of seasoned maple wood brought me, at the rate of $6 per cord. 
Wrote a long letter to my sister Battell. Visited. 

20. Wrote to my brother Francis. I feel for him in his feeble state and 
pray God to be his holy helper. Wrote to Clapp & Benton, of Hartford. 
Read in the History of Mary Queen of Scots? Read late. Evening meeting 
prevented by the rain. 

21. Walked out. Quite wet. There is much complaint about the deep- 
ness of the roads. Visited our grammar school. It has done well for two 
quarters, and I regret that Mr. Anthony is to leave. Visited. 

22. Yesterday received a letter from Mr. Hart,* of Plymouth. Walked 
and visited the most of the day. Dined with Uncle Le Baron.' Wrote to 
F. L. Alden,^ of Bedford. The ground is becoming settled. 

23. Last night took physic and am quite feeble. Wrote. Walked out 
and visited. Read. 

24. Very pleasant and spring weather. Preached with notes on Isa. Ixiv : 
8, and a sermon on Luke vii : ig, etc. Have some difficulty in finding con- 
venient places for evening meetings. Walked to meeting. Very tired. 



1 Of the town. ' Two volumes in the series of Harper's 

2 Wife of William Le Baron. Family Library, by H. G. Bell. 

3 Priscilla (Le Baron) Robbins, wife of ^ Rev. Luther Hart, of Plymouth, to whom 
Rev. Francis Le Baron Robbins. he wrote his long and laborious letter. 

''Nathaniel Roys, in his one hundredth ^ Rev. Lemuel Le* Baron, 

year. ' Francis L. Alden. 



1 833'] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 30 1 

25. Wrote on a second letter to Mr. Hart, of Plymouth, Ct.' Read 
expositors. Full Bible class. Read late in History of Mary Queen of Scots. 

26. Two promising young men of this place have been lost at sea from 
a whale-ship.'' Visited one of the families. Walked to Pine Island and 
visited, and preached in the evening to a full meeting on i Thess. v: 19. 
Quite cool. Read. Received a letter from Clapp & Benton, of Hartford. 

27. Finished my letter to Mr. Hart, Visited. I write slow. Wrote. 
Attended the evening meeting. Read. Was out late. 

28. Read. Walked to the Neck and visited. Quite cold. At evening 
attended a meeting, rather thin, and preached on John x : 10. Tarried out. 

29. Rode in a cold morning to Bedford bridge. Walked over and did 
errands. Returned to Fairhaven. Was disappointed by the stage, and in the 
evening walked home. 

30. Read. Walked a distance and visited one of the families that has 
lately lost a son at sea. Missed my way and had a fatiguing tour. Visited 
other places. We have some unpleasant things in the church. Am much 
fatigued with the labors of the week. 

31. Last evening and this morning wrote a large addition to a sermon, 
and preached the sermon on Job xxix : 2-5. Spoke in reference to the loss 
of the two young men at sea. A solemn season. At evening rode and 
attended our meeting at Isaac Bolles's, and preached on Luke xix : 10, 
We have very pleasant weather. Baptized a child. ^ 

April. 

1. Received of the society treasurer, ^30, Wrote a sepulchral inscription 
for my Aunt Gould.'' Rode with Capt. Freeman to Rochester. Called on 
Mr. Bigelow.^ Engaged a pair of grave-stones. Went into the town meeting. 
The meeting last Monday appointed me one of the school committee. Very 
warm. The ground is dry and dusty. Attended the monthly concert. 
Our contributions for foreign missions increase. Received a letter from 
my brother Ammi. 

2. Read in the Catholic Controversy now going on in New York.^ It is 
low. Dined out. Visited. Read in Queen of Scots? We have the painful 
intelligence that brother Francis is more unwell. 



* We may reach some explanation of the ^ Rev. Jonathan Bigelow, pastor of the 

nature of this correspondence. Old Church, Rochester. He was a native of 



2 



This is one of the sad experiences in Boylston, Mass., a graduate of Brown Uni- 

sea-faring communities. versity, 1817, and was settled in Rochester 

3 Elizabeth Allen, daughter of Matthew in 1827. 

Mayhevv. ^ This was the Roman Catholic contro- 

^ His Aunt Gould came into notice in the versy carried on between John Breckinridge, 

early years of the diary. She was Rcbekah D. D., Secretary of the Presbyterian Board 

Hannah Robbins, daughter of Rev. Philemon of Education, and John Hughes, D. D., after- 

Robbins, of Branford, Ct., who married Will- wards Bishop of New York, and later Arch- 

iam Gould, of Manchester, Vt. When she bishop. These discussions were carried on 

died we do not know, but as she was the in 1S30, and again in 1834. 

youngest child in her father's family she had ^ Another of the Harper's Family Library 

probably passed away recently. series, in two volumes, by H. G. Bell. 



302 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1833- 



3. Paid sixty cents, for thirty, in a series of years, to be preserved.' 
Wrote, Am considerably languid with the relaxing season. Wrote a large 
addition to a Fast sermon on Jer. xxix : 12, 13. Wrote, by divine favor, 
with a good degree of correctness and rapidity. 

4. Fast. Meetings well attended. Afternoon Mr. W'ood" attended with 
us and made the last prayer. Preached on Jer. xxix: 12, 13. A part of the 
people were off playing ball, according to their usual practice here. At 
evening rode a distance and preached to a good number on John iv : 29. 
Am very much fatigued. The afternoon exercise was very long. Read. 

5. Am quite languid and feeble. Worked a little, piling wood. Walked 
out. Read newspapers. The Catholic controversy in New York is conducted 
almost with vulgarity. I think the Catholics will get the advantage. 

6. Wrote to Clapp & Benton, of Hartford, and sent them $10. Wrote 
to my brother Francis. I feel very anxious about him in his feeble state. 
Had a new coat and pantaloons made. They are done better than 
I expected. 

7. Pleasant and dry. Full meetings. Preached written sermons on 
I Peter i: 11, and Prov. i: 31. United with Uncle Le Baron in adminis- 
tering the sacrament. At evening preached on i Thess. iv : 8. The meeting 
thin. Much fatigued. 

8. A severe storm of wind and rain all day. Read Mr. Webster's most 
noble speech on nullification.^ Read the History of Mary Queen of Scots. 
I think she is fully vindicated from the aspersions that have been cast upon 
her character.'' 

9. The storm yesterday did some damage in our harbor. W^alked out. 
Wrote to my brother Ammi. Visited with Mr. and Mrs. Crosby. Read 
in Lfe and limes of George IV^ Traded, ji5i. 

10. Read the Bible. Worked at my wood. Walked and visited. At- 
tended the evening meeting. Preached on i Cor. xvi : 22. I am consider- 
ably languid. 

11. Wrote in an album. Read the Bible. Walked out and visited. 
Rode to Bedford. Good riding. Paid for wine, ^1.25 ; a psalm book, 
seventy-five cents; other things, $1.38, Cold winds. Visited. 

12. Removed back to my own chamber. Read the Bible. Worked 
a good deal at my wood. W'rote. I think I get some strength by muscular 
labor. Read. 

13. Rode in the forenoon to Rochester to exchange with Mr. Bigelow. 



■ That is, preserved as coins. 

^ This may have been Rev. Elijah Wood, 
before mentioned, who was traveling as a 
public lecturer. 

^ Mr. Webster's great speech against 
Hayne was given in 1830, but this was his 
luminous argument on the relation of the 
States to the Federal Government, and vice 
versa, made in harmony with Gen. Jackson's 



action in putting down the South Carolina 
nullification. 

'' A good many years have passed since 
Dr. Robbins wrote that sentence, but the 
subject of Mary Queen of Scots and Eliza- 
beth of England is still open for debate. 

* George Croly's Life and Times of George 
IV. 1831. In the Harper's Family Library 
series of publications. 



I833-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



303 



Visited families. Got some account of tlie family history of the Haskells.' 
Spent the most of the afternoon with flie aged Esq. Holmes. He has a great 
knowledge of the history of this town. Quite cold. 

14. Mr. Bigelow rode to Mattapoisett, and returned in the evening. 
Preached on i Cor. i : 23, and Heb. vii : 25. This congregation, I think, 
is not so large as mine. At the evening meeting preached on Matt. .\v : 
22, etc. 

15. Made calls. Rode home in the stage. Took some cold. The air 
is very chilly. Paid a tailor's bill, $10.25. ^^^ company. Attended the 
Bible class. Am quite unwell. 

16. Read Z/fc of George IV. A pretty poor life. Am very languid. 
Wrote. Wrote to H. Howe & Co., New Haven. Worked, getting in and 
piling my wood. At evening walked out. 

17. Walked out. Received a letter from Joseph Benton, of Hartford. 
Read. Am much affected with my cold. Wet. The evening meeting thin. 
Baptized a child. 

18. Rode to Wareham and back. Purchased books and pamphlets 
of Mrs. Everett.^ Her collection was less valuable than I expected. Paid 
for books, $2.62 ; pamphlets, $3.68. Called on Mr. Nott.^ Warm and 
pleasant. 

19. Wrote. Read in the Catholic letters of New York.'* Dined out. 
Visited the sick and others. My cousin Eliza Le Baron returned home from 
Enfield. My brother continues quite feeble. A Mr. Porter, a minister 
from the Vineyard,^ came here and tarried. 

20. Rode to Bedford and procured two boxes, brought in a vessel from 
Hartford. My Encyclopaedia is well bound, and makes an important addition 
to my librar)\ The volumes are not quite as large as I expected. Paid 
for freight, seventy-five cents. Dry and dusty. Put up my books. Visited 
a sick woman. Wrote. 

21. Expounded on' Matt, viii, and preached on Prov. viii : 4. Preached 
at the evening meeting on Matt, x: 32. Our Sabbath-school commenced 
with favorable prospects. Uncle Le Baron has the superintendence.^ Gave 
for the library, $1. Am much fatigued. Was up late. 

22. Looked at a show of a great caravan of wild animals, mostly from 



' Doubtless he was trying to discover 
whether there was any connection between 
them and his good friends at East Windsor 
of that name. 

^ Widow of Noble Everett. Her husband 
died in 1819. 

3 Rev. Samuel Nott, Jr. 

* The discussion between Drs. Breckin- 
ridge and Hughes, already noticed. 

' The churches at the Vineyard were 
those of Chilmark, Tisbury, and Edgartown. 
Many ministers preached for a time at the 



Vineyard. This, without much doubt, was 
Rev. Reuben Porter, who was a student for 
a time in Dartmouth College, and studied 
theology with Dr. Nathan Perkins. He was 
a native of West Hartford, Ct. His minis- 
try was chiefly in New Hampshire, but he 
preached both in Nantucket and Martha's 
Vineyard. 

* The senior pastor, then eightj'-five years 
old. That was the old style of doing things, 
when there was more ministerial authoritj- 
than now. 



304 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1833. 

Asia. The people of this place seemed to be all collected.' At evening 
had a Bible class in my chamber. It* was thin; by means, I believe, of the 
public day. 

23. Wrote to Josiah Booth, of Stratford, and to Joseph Benton, of Hart- 
ford. Read in my Encydopcedia. \\'et and cold. Vegetation advances but 
little. 

24. Worked at my books. They have been in a deranged state for some 
years." Attended the evening meeting. Visited a sick child. 

25. We had a hard frost. Visited a school. Worked at my books. 
Some of them are lost. At evening married Mr. N. Freeman. They came 
here and we had a pleasant wedding.^ 

26. Walked and visited. We have an unusual number of sick persons. 
On the 24th sent a ten dollar bill ($io) to Joseph Benton, of Hartford, my 
book-binder. Called on Uncle Le Baron. Was out late. 

27. Was carried in a boat across the harbor, and visited families on the 
hither Neck.'' Walked home. Not greatly fatigued. Visited a sick child. 

28. Preached a double sermon on Acts xiii : 2. Full meeting. Cool. 
At the evening meeting preached on Gen. vii : 16. Full and attentive. 
Quite tired. 

29. Wrote. Received of Capt. Freeman, $55. He has indorsed $25 
on a note he holds against me, and he paid me $30, April ist. Gave him 
a receipt of $110. Visited. Rode out with Mrs. Crosby. Attended the 
Bible class. 

30. Visited a sick man and an afflicted family. Rode in my sulky to 
Bedford. Purchased some books and left them with the binder. Returned 
to Fairhaven and met with the Association. At evening Mr. Seabury' 
preached. Quite warm and dusty. Saw peach-blossoms. 

May. 

1. The Association had a good session. Left with Mr. Gould, $50, 
to be paid to the treasurer of the Auxiliary Foreign Missionary Society, to 
be here today. Could not remain to attend that meeting. The Association 
closed at twelve o'clock. Rode home and attended the affecting funeral 
of a promising child. Much fatigued. At evening attended the quarterly 
meeting of the Temperance Society. 

2. Walked out. Looked at a new ship, which was well launched, 
towards evening. Rode out and visited. At evening preached in an out 
neighborhood on Luke xix : 10. Meeting well attended. 

3. Yesterday received a letter from my brother Francis. He is still 
feeble, but better than he has been. Began a sermon on John i : 29. I write 



' Menageries, not so common then as now, ' Nathaniel PYeeman and Sophia A. Doty 

though they were then far more common than were the persons married, 

in the earlier years. ■* There were two necks, as already sug- 

° He had the major part of them now at gested — the points of land running out on 

Mattapoisett, but many were yet at East both sides of the Mattapoisett harbor. 

Windsor. His library was a pleasure to * Rev. Pardon G. Seabury, of New Bed- 

him, but also a burden. ford, pastor of old church revived. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 305 

pretty slow. Rode out with Mrs. Crosby. Quite cool. Walked out and 
visited. 

4. Wrote on my sermon. The nature of Christ's purchase is a critical 
subject. Received a letter from J. Benton, of Hartford. Read. Walked 
out. 

5. Finished in the morning my sermon on John i: 29. But the day was 
wet and I did not preach it. Preached a double sermon on Ex. xx : 5, 6. 
Thin meeting. Had no evening meeting. Walked out. We had but little 
rain. The ground is dry. Yesterday finished sowing my asparagus bed.' 

6. Worked at my books, inserting my name.^ My last impression by 
Mr. Reed was not as good as a former one. Rode out. At evening attended 
the monthly concert. Visited a man badly hurt in the ship-yard. 

7. Visited the sick man. He is badly broken. Worked at my books. 
They have been much neglected since I left East Windsor. Dined out. 
Walked and visited. 

8. Visited the sick and a school. Read. Mr. Barrows,^ our Andover 
student, spent some time with me. Attended the evening meeting. Thin, 
on account of the appearance of a shower. We had vivid lightning, but 
very little rain. I fear we shall have a dry season. 

9. Worked at my library. Had assistance. Visited. Went into a ship- 
yard. We have clear and pleasant weather, but cool. Walked out. Seldom 
spend an evening at home. 

10. My work at my books holds on. On the 7th received of my collector, 
$13. Read. Visited the sick. The man who was very much hurt appears 
to be better. Visited, 

11. Considerably warm, but we have cold winds from the water, which 
retard vegetation. Put up my books. Read. There seems to be a great 
dearth of divine influences through our country, 

12. Preached with notes on Matt, vii : 26, and the sermon finished last 
Sabbath on John i : 29. Attended a third meeting at Tripp's Mills and 
preached on Luke xix : 10. Much fatigued. Our evening meeting was 
attended by Mr. Barrows, 

13. Am very languid. Had some work done for me. Read. Yesterday 
saw apple-tree blossoms ; some trees out full. Attended the Bible class. 
Pretty thin. My people are very stupid.* 

14. Wrote a piece for the newspaper. Rode with company to New 
Bedford. My brother is expected there, but has not arrived. Purchased 
some books and directed them to be sent to Hartford for binding. Paid 



' He cultivates an asparagus bed at Mat- dover Seminary, 1834, and settled in several 

tapoisett, as he had done through all the years places. He died in Andover, 1S81. He was 

of his settlement at East Windsor. assisted from the Everest fund. 

' The printed card or label which he ■* Here we have the old adjective which 

pasted into his books. Dr. Robbins was wont to use very frequently 

^ This was Rev. Homer Barrows (a native in the earlier years of his ministry, by which 

of Wareham, near at hand), who was gradu- he meant, not intellectually weak, but spirit- 

ated at Amherst College in 1S31, and at An- ually dull. 



305 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1833. 

towards them, $io. A great blowth on tlie fruit-trees. Visited an afflicted 
family. 

15. Rainy. Very grateful to the earth. Wrote. Had a tailoress to work 
for me. Read. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. We are in a pretty 
low state. 

16. It rained moderately through the day. Worked, putting up my books. 
Read. Wrote to my brother Ammi, and to Mr. Battell. 

17. Read the Bible. Wrote to Joseph Benton, and to Hutchinson c: 
Driver, Hartford, and inclosed $7 for Mr. Benton. Walked a distance and 
visited. I am apprehensive of a trial in the church. 

18. Began a sermon, and wrote attentively, on 2 Thess. ii : 16. At noon 
Esq. Robbins ' came here from Plymouth, with an earnest desire that I would 
go there and spend the Sabbath. I consulted Uncle Le Baron and som.e 
others, and concluded to go. Rode with him.^ Quite warm. A great blowth 
is falling from the fruit-trees. 

19. A very warm day. Took off my flannel. Mr. Freeman ' is dis- 
missed, and preached his farewell sermon last Sabbath. Preached on John 
i: 29, and Ps. cxxxvii : i. Much oppressed with the heat. This congre- 
gation is not larger than mine. Said considerable to them relative to. their 
trying situation. At evening had a meeting and preached a sermon on 
Ps. cvi : 23. Much fatigued. Kept at Esq. Robbins's. 

20. Cooler and wet. Called on Dr. Kendall,* Dr. Taylor,' and others. 
Resumed my flannel. Attended some time in the Supreme Court ; Judge 
Wilde.* Took tea at Mr. Thomas's.' This town is much improving. 

21. Wet and rainy. Saw some persons of the Robinson Society.* I think 
there is little prospect of a union between them and the Third Church. Rode 
out to Mr. Jackson's.' There is much improvement in the north part of the 
town. There are two very fine rope-walks here. Visited. At evening 
attended a serious and interesting church meeting. Gave them my best 
advice. Mr. Freeman was with us, but would take no part. Was out late. 

22. Took the stage early and rode home. Mr. Robbins gave me $3 for 
stage fare, and I paid for that, $1.50. Quite warm. Am much fatigued. 



' Josiah Robbins, Esq., chosen deacon of jurist. He was Judge of the Massachusetts 

the Third Church in Plymouth in 1831. Superior Court, 1815-1850. He died in Bos- 

^ Plymouth, in a straight line, was a little ton, 1855. He was a member of the Hart- 

•.more than twenty miles from Mattapoisett. ford Convention. 

3 Rev. Frederick Freeman, of whose ' John B. Thomas, of Plymouth, married 

troubles witli his parish we have previously Dr. Robbins's cousin, Mary Howland Le 

heard. He was a native of Sandwich, and Baron, daughter of his Uncle Isaac. She 

had been settled in the Third Church of was born in 17S6. 
Plymouth since 1S24. ^ The new society that broke away from 

* James Kendall, D. D., pastor of First the Third Church and society because of 
Church, Plymouth, since 1800. dissatisfaction with Rev. Mr. Freeman. 

5 Dr. Tavlor, physician. ^ Thomas Jackson, in 1805, married, for 

* Samuel Sumner Wilde, LL. D., born in his second wife, Sarah Le Baron, daughter 
Taunton, Mass., 1771, graduated at Dart- of William Le Baron, of Fairhaven, another 
mouth College in 1789, became an eminent cousin of Dr. Robbins. 



'833-1 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



307 



Uncle Le Baron conducted the meetings here last Sabbath. Attended the 
evening meeting. 

23. Wrote. Attended the launching of the finest ship, probably, that was 
ever built here. It did not float actively. Read. Visited. Attended the 
Bible class. Pretty thin. 

24. Yesterday left off my flannel. Wrote to William H. Stowell, of Bed- 
ford, in answer to a letter received from him on the 17th. Read. Walked 
a distance and visited. We have an unpleasant case in the church. 

25. Read. Wrote and finished the sermon begun last Saturday on 
2 Thess. ii: 16. I write slow. Walked out and visited the sick. Cold, 
and east wind. 

26. Wet and rainy. Expounded on Matt, ix, and preached the sermon 
written yesterday. Thin meeting. At evening preached on 2 Sam. vii : 27. 
Fatigued with speaking. Some of our meetings lately have been thin. 

27. Was told j-esterday that my brother had arrived at Bedford. Wrote 
to F. L. Alden. Walked out and visited. Preparing for my journey. 
Wrote. Towards evening my brother came here. He is feeble, but better 
than he has been. Plad a good Bible class. 

28. Mr. Crosby rode with me early to Bedford. Took the stage and 
rode to Boston.' Called at Mr. Fairchild's. Carried Wyllys papers to 
Mrs. Adams. ^ Very kindly entertained at Mr. Weld's. Went with him 
in the evening and attended the annual meeting of the Unitarian Associa- 
tion. It appeared much better than it did last year. Much fatigued. Warm. 
Vegetation appears finely. 

29. Attended the annual meeting of the Pastoral Association. It was 
interesting. Saw many friends and acquaintance. Attended the semi-annual 
meeting of the Antiquarian Society.^ Highly respectable. Dined, with most 
of the members, at Gov. Winthrop's.* A splendid dinner. Wet. The 
Common here has been much improved and is very beautiful. Attended 
the annual meeting of the Convention of the Clergy. They act to a consid- 
erable extent by part}'.^ Did some errands. Attended in the evening the 
meeting of the Tract Society. Had some good speeches. Went home with 
Mr. Fairchild. 

30. Heard a part of a public discussion on the subject of African 



' To attend the anniversaries, this being 
the last week in May. 

^ The same journey, with the same object, 
as the year before (see note, May 29, 1S32). 

^ The meeting was held in Boston for 
convenience, though the home of the society 
is in Worcester. 

■• Hon. Thomas Lindall Winthrop, LL. D., 
not Governor, but Lieut.-Governor of Massa- 
chusetts, father of Hon. Robert C. ^Yinthrop. 
Hon. Thomas L. Winthrop was born in Xcw 
London, Ct., March 6, 1760; graduated at 



Harvard College, 1784, and died in Boston 
Feb. 22, 1841. At the time mentioned in the 
diary he was President of the American An- 
tiquarian Society. Though not Governor (as 
the diary calls him), he was descended from 
illustrious governors of the early New Eng- 
land generations — John Winthrop, Sr., of 
Massachusetts, and John Winthrop, Jr., 
of Connecticut. 

' The Convention embraces both the Trin- 
itarian and Unitarian Congregational minis- 
ters. 



3cS 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[x833- 



Colonization : not very able. Heard the public Convention sermon, by 
Dr. Osgood.' Pretty good. Dined, by invitation, with the clergy. Few 
present except Unitarians. Find but little time to call on friends. Saw 
Eber L. Clark and my niece, his wife. At evening attended a very interesting 
meeting of the Auxiliary Foreign Missionary Society. They had a large 
Hindoo idol. After ten o'clock walked to Dr. Robbins's,^ at Roxbury. 
Contributions, $1.25. Book, fifty cents. 

31. Saw my cousin S. P. Robbins,' of Marietta; a promising young man, 
now residing at Andover. My cousin Peter rode with me to Cambridge. 
Saw his two sons ; both soon to become preachers, and, I fear, Unitarians.* 
Talked plainly with them. Warm. 'J'reated kindly. Paid for books, mostly 
old, $35. Made several calls on friends. Am fatigued with labors and want 
of sleep. 

June. 

1. Walked early with Mr. Weld, and took an extensive view of the town 
on the margin of the water. Great improvements are making. Took the 
stage and rode to Fairhaven ; found Mr. Crosby's wagon and rode home. 
Have had, by divine favor, a prosperous journey. P'ound my brother at 
Fairhaven. Much fatigued. An evening meeting of a few brethren was 
held here. 

2. My brother came from Fairhaven last evening and was with us. 
He preached the preparatory lecture on Thursday. Preached with notes 
on John xvi : 2^, and a sermon on Gen. v : 24. United with Mr. Le Baron 
m the administration of the sacrament. At evening preached on John vi : 48. 
The evening was wet and the meeting thin. 

3. Received a letter from brother Ammi, one from sister Battell, and 
one from Dea. Churchill,* of Plymouth. Read newspapers. Visited with 
my brother and relatives. At evening had an interesting monthly concert ; 
gave some account of the public meetings at Boston. My brother is feeble, 
but 1 hope convalescing. 

4. Wrote to Mr. Thomas Burnham,* and to Crocker & Brewster,' of 
Boston. Walked out. Dined out with my brother and wife, and others. 
Wrote eight days' diary. Read. Vegetation is rapid. ' 

5. Wrote to Esq. Robbins, and to Dea. Churchill, of Plymouth. Rode 
out. A number of new houses are building here. Visited. Read. Had 
a good evening meeting. 



' Samuel Osgood, D. D., of Springfield. 
- Peter Gilman Robbins, M. D. 

* Son of Rev. Samuel Prince Robbins, 
whose ordination sermon Dr. Robbins had 
preached at Marietta, O., in 1805. This son 
was graduated at Ohio University, 1830, and 
at Andover Seminary, 1835. He became a 
foreign missionary. 

* Chandler and Samuel Dowse Robbins, 
before mentioned. 



* Dea. Solomon Churchill. 

'' Thomas Burnham, at the antiquarian 
bookstore, 58 Cornhill ; father of the present 
Thomas O. H. P. Burnham in the same busi- 
ness. 

' Crocker & Brewster had, at that time, 
one of the chief bookstores and publishing 
houses in Boston, and it is a remarkable 
circumstance that both these men are still 
alive, and near ninety. 



t833.] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



309 



6. Received of my collector, $23. Quite cool. Read. Walked cut 
and visited. The air is quite cool. Wrote. 

7. Read authorities on the doctrine of the Trinity. Wrote on the same 
subject. There are difficulties on the passage of i John v: 7, but I believe 
it is genuine.' Wrote to my sister Battell. Yesterday sent $15 to Boston, 
by Mr. Briggs, for books and other things. At evening walked out. Had 
fire in my chamber. 

8. Had a steady fire through the day. Wrote a sermon on Job viii : 13. 
I have not done this before in a single day for a good while. I have been 
too negligent.'' Received a present of a valuable box from young Elizabeth 
Barstow. I write less accurately than I have done. 

9. Preached with old notes on Ps. iv : 2, and the sermon written 
yesterday. We have a cold, dry wind. The roads quite dusty. Rode 
to Tripp's Mills and preached at a third meeting on Matt, xx : 30-34. 
Tarried in that neighborhood. Very tired. 

10. This morning there was a little frost. Walked and made calls. 
Visited a school ; well instructed. Afternoon rode home. The evening 
showery, and the Bible class was thin. 

11. Wrote. Made calls. Worked some at my books. At evening rode 
and visited Dea. Hammond. He is hard sick. 

12. Rode to Bedford. Saw my brother. He returned yesterday from 
Nantucket and is pretty feeble. The morning cold. Found at Bedford 
a large glass and a box of books which I purchased at Boston. Brought the 
books home. They make a valuable addition to my library. Received 
a letter from Thomas Burnham, of Boston. Had the evening meetmg at this 
house. 

13. Wrote to brother Ammi. Received of Capt. Freeman, $40. Received 
a letter from Dea. Churchill, of Plymouth. Walked out. Read. My brother 
and wife came here. Had returns from Boston. A messenger has paid for 
me there, $io towards my looking-glass, and $3.75 for books. Went into the 
ship-}'ards with my brother. Rode in the evening and visited Dea. Ham- 
mond.^ He is still hard sick. 

14. Last night we had a hard thunder-shower. Worked at my books. 
Received a letter from Dea. Churchill, of Plymouth, with nine volumes of 



' Clergymen generally at that time would 
probably have said the same. But in the 
late revision the words, " For there are three 
that bear record in heaven,"' etc., are left out, 
and the sixth verse, immediately preceding, 
is divided into two parts, to keep the num- 
bering of verses in the chapter the same. 
The revisers, however, would not admit 
that the doctrine taught in this verse is not 
a Bible doctrine, but the Biblical writers 
are not wont to put their truths into such 
systematic shapes. The very form of lan- 
guage in the verse is suspicious, because it is 



set and fixed as if to secure a technical end, 
which is not the Scriptural fashion. 

^ That is, in writing so rapidly. A man 
can write rapidly in a wakeful condition of 
mind, and when his subject has been thor- 
oughly considered, and yet write well. But 
in general rapid writing is apt to be negligent 
writing. 

^ Dea. Amittai B. Hammond, chosen to 
his office in 1825. The senior deacon at that 
time was Nathan Cannon, chosen in 1S21, 
and the junior deacon was Nathaniel A. 
Crosby, chosen in 1829. 



3IO DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1833. 

the Boston Recorder newspapers, which he has procured for me. Wrote to 
Iiim. Rode with my brother to the Neck and visited. 

15. Sent a volume to Mr. J. Thomas,' of Plymouth, with a letter to 
Dea. Churchill,- inclosing §3. Warm. Wrote a sermon on Luke ix : 30, 31, 

16. Expounded on Matt, x : 1-33, and preached the sermon written 
yesterday. The subject of the transfiguration is very interesting. At even- 
ing preached on Rom. vii : 25. Much fatigued. In the evening my brother 
came here from Fairhaven. 

17. Rode to Bedford and back with my brother, and brought the glass 
lately sent from Boston. An old French glass and a very fine one. The 
plate is 37 1-2 inches by 25, and very thick. It cost at Boston, $15.^ 
At Capt. Gibbs's ; ■* had green peas at dinner. Warm. A new ship was 
launched here and went well. Had a good ]]ible class. 

18. My brother went to Bedford. Had company. Worked at my library. 
Wrote. Another ship was launched here successfully. All whalers. 

19. Read a long, tedious manuscript on Universalism. Looked over the 
nine volumes of the Recorder lately procured. They are well preserved. 
Walked and visited. Attended the evening meeting. 

20. Walked and visited all day. Dea. Hammond is convalescing. 
Visited a school. Received a letter from Hutchinson & Driver, Hartford. 
In the evening read late. 

21. Added to my coins, to the cost of $6. Read. The country of Syria 
seems likely to become subject to Egypt. ^ Read old authors on the doctrine 
of the Trinity. 

22. Read Bishop Pearson on the Creed.' Hoped to have written a ser- 
mon today, but find myself otherwise occupied. Walked and visited. We 
have several sick persons. 

23. Preached with notes on i Peter i : 9, and a sermon on Matt, vi : 24. 
In the morning attended the Sabbath-school. Uncle Le Baron does much 
good in it. Quite warm. Rode to Randall neighborhood and had a good 
meeting. Preached on Matt, x : 32, t^t^. Tarried out. 

24. Visited families and a school. This neighborhood has been too much 
neglected. Rode home. Visited with cousins ; Mrs. Robbins and Mrs. Jack- 
son, of Plymouth, are here. At evening had a good Bible class. Was out 
late. Rev. Mr. Porter^ came here and tarried over night. 

25. Rainy the most of the day and quite cold. Had a steady fire. 
Worked, putting papers with my name in books. At evening walked out. 
Read late. 



'John B.Thomas. Turkey and bring matters to a general ad- 

^ Dea. Solomon Churchill. justment, but the final settlement was not 

^ If Dr. Robbins were a married man such reached at that time, 

a purchase would have seemed altogether * John Pearson, 1612-16S6, a learned Eng- 

natural. lish bishop, who wrote Exposition of the Creed, 

* Capt. Anselm Gibbs. published, 1650. 

^ May 6, 1833, the European powers inter- ' Rev. Reuben Porter, mentioned in a pre- 

vened to stop the war between Russia and vious note. 



•S33.] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



311 



26. On the 23d received a letter from Rev. Mr. Mason,' of Nantucket, 
requesting me to visit him and his people. Visited. My cousin Mary Ham- 
mond" is quite low. Sent off my Aunt Gould's tombstones for Branford,^ 
by way of New York. \\'rote to Dea. Churchill, of Plymouth, and sent him 
$15 for the Rcconlcr newspapers. Wrote. Walked a distance; visited 
Dea. Hammond, still quite ill, and preached in the evening on John vi : 
28, 29. Had a good number. On my return, late, I found Mr. Frost, the 
temperance agent, here. Received a letter from Esq. Robbins,'* of Plymouth. 

27. Cold and showery. Have fire in my chamber. Walked with Mr. 
Frost. Paid Dea. Thomson, at the center of the town, $16 for my Aunt 
Gould's tombstones. Worked some at my books. Had company. At even- 
ing we had a full temperance meeting. Mr. Frost delivered a ver^- excellent 
address, and above fifty members were added to the society. 

28. Rode a distance and visited a young woman in consumption and 
a man near gone with intemperance. Visited other sick persons and a school. 
My brother came, having been at Boston. He continues feeble. Read late. 

29. Wrote. Considerably occupied with my brother. He rides and 
exercises a good deal. Read. Attended the evening prayer-meeting. 
Concluded to have a meeting on Independence Day. Called on Mr. Wood.^ 

30. Warm. Expounded on Matt, x: 34 to xi : 15, and preached on 
Pleb. xii : 14. My brother took no part in the service. Had a full evening 
meeting and preached on John xx : 27, last clause. Tired and sat up late. 

July. 

1. Rode with my brother to Fairhaven and New Bedford. Am quite 
languid. People are beginning their haying. At evening attended the 
monthly concert. My brother was with me and spoke very well. 

2. Am quite languid and do but little. Read. I fear my brother is not 
improving much in health. Preparing for Independence.* Read late. 

3. Wrote an addition to my sermon in behalf of the Colonization Soci- 
ety,' and an address for our Sabbath-schools. Read. Walked out and 



' Rev. Stephen Mason was a pastor at 
Nantucket, 1830-1S35. He was a native 
of Litchfield, Ct. ; born, 17SS; a graduate of 
Williams College, 181 2, and of Andover 
Seminary, 1S15. He preached in man}' places 
besides Nantucket, but his closing years were 
spent at Marshall, Mich., where he died, Nov. 
8, 1S70, eighty-two years old. 

^ Abraham Hammatt (Hammond) mar- 
ried Priscilla Le Baron in 1774. This Mary 
Hammond is probably of that kindred. 

' They were to be set up not in Manches- 
ter, Vt., where her married life had been 
passed, but in her native town of Branford, 
where Rev. Philemon Robbins, her father, 
was so long the minister. 

^ Dea. Josiah Robbins. 



' Possibly Rev. Francis Wood, who, from 
1S23 to 1826, had been settled at Barrington, 
R.I. 

* At the time of the opening of this diary, 
in the closing years of the last century, com- 
paratively little attention was paid to the 
Fourth of July in the country towns of New 
England. The habit of observing the day 
grew more general from the beginning of 
this century. 

' We have already noticed the custom of 
making the Fourth the occasion of aiding the 
Colonization Society. It had been the cus- 
tom in Connecticut and was so here. Col- 
lections were taken sometimes on the day 
itself, and sometimes on the following Sab- 
bath. 



3i: 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[iS 



00- 



visited. Dined at my cousin Eliza's.' Our evening meeting prevented 
by rain. 

4. The day very fine. We had a good meeting in the Baptist meeting- 
house ; well attended. I preached on Ps. l.xviii : 31, and made an address 
to the two Sabbath-schools. About a hundred and twenty children were 
present. Mr. Wood and my brother prayed. Mr. Le Baron was with us. 
Esq. Robbins, of Plymouth, and his wife came here. I rode with him and 
inspected the water-power near us. I hope it may be turned to some good 
account. Visited. Got much fatigued. 

5. Wrote to my cousin P. G. Robbins, of Roxbury, in answer to a letter 
received from him on the 3d, My brother^ arranged newspapers for me. 
He is at a loss what to do. I have considerable solicitude about Esq. Robbins's 
business, which is kept secret. We have in the family good sound apples. 

6. Received three Recorder papers from Dea. Churchill, so that there 
is now but one missing in eight years. My brother and wife left here for 
Bedford, expecting to set out for home next Monday. His case appears 
discouraging; I pray God to be his helper. Quite warm. The third day 
of fine hay weather. Rode out and visited. Wrote. The President ^ has 
set out on his return, unable to continue his journey from ill health. 

7. The morning rainy ; meetings rather thin. Preached a double sermon 
on Ps. xiv : 2, 3. Had a collection for the Colonization Society and got but 
$11.30. Last year we had $13. It was not sufficiently known. Had the 
third meeting at the meeting-house at six o'clock, and preached on i Cor. ii : 
1-5. The air warm and faint. Quite tired. 

8. On the 6th received a letter from the aged Esq. Holmes of this town. 
Rode out with Mrs. Crosby. Very warm. Am very languid. Wrote. At 
evening attended the Bible class. 

9. Read. Warm and showery. We had a good deal of rain. Wrote 
to Mr. Phineas Foot,"* of Branford, Mr. Mason, ^ of Nantucket, and Mr. Gould, 
of Fairhaven. Read in Rollin's Roman History!' 



' Mrs. William Le Baron. 

^ Rev. Francis Le Baron Robbins. 

3 From the second volume of James Par- 
ton's Life of Ajidrcw Jackson we take the 
following passage: "The President early in 
June (1833), accompanied by Mr. Van Buren, 
Gov. Cass, Mr. Woodbury, Major Donelson, 
Mr. Earl, and others, began that famous tour 
which enabled the North to express its detes- 
tation of nullification, and its approval of the 
President's recent action. Baltimore, Phila- 
delphia, New York, Newark, Elizabeth, Bos- 
ton, .Salem, Concord, Newport, Providence, 
each received the J''rcsident with every dem- 
onstration of regard which ingenuity could 
devise. Every one in the United States 
knows how these things are done. . . . At 
Boston the President, overcome by fatigue, 



had a dangerous attack of his malady, bleed- 
ing at the lungs, which confined him to his 
room for several days. At that point he 
suddenly turned his course homeward, \'isit- 
ing Providence and Newport, and steaming 
by New York without stopping, and making 
the best of his way to the seat of govern- 
ment." 

•• Doubtless concerning the placing of the 
stones for his aunt, Mrs. William Gould, 
which he had shipped by way of New York. 
His grandmother, Mrs. Philemon Robbins, 
was Hannah Foot, and Phineas Foot was 
probably of the kindred. 

^ Rev. Stephen Mason. 

'' That is, in that part of Rolliii's Ancient 
History pertaining to the Roman Empire. 
His work embraces many ancient nations. 



'833-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



3^3 



10. Rode a distance and visited sick persons. Fine hay weather, but this 
vicinity produces but little grass. Wrote to Messrs. D. Appleton & Co., New 
York. I hope to be able to procure a polyglot Bible. Walked out. Am 
affected with a pain in my jaw.' Received of my collector, $40. Attended 
the evening meeting with Uncle Le Baron. 

11. Read. A prospect of peace \n the east of Europe. I think the 
Pasha of Eg}pt becomes a more powerful monarch than the Sultan. 
The Turkish Empire seems to be hastening to its close. Perhaps the 
Mahometan dominion will be continued in Egypt. "^ Received a letter from 
Mr. Gould, of Fairhaven. Paid a merchant, $3.27. Wrote. 

12. Wrote to my sister Battell. Very warm. Am almost too languid 
to read. Have taken lately too little exercise. Walked out. 

13. Walked and made calls. Read. Rode to Fairhaven to make an 
exchansre. Crossed the ferrv to Bedford and returned. A fine steamboat 
for the ferry is soon to run. Looked at its machinery, etc. Warm and ver\' 
fine weather. Mr. Gould went to Mattapoisett. 

14. Preached on Job viii : 13, and Luke ix : 30, 31. This society, I think, 
is improving. Very warm. Attended a third meeting and preached without 
notes on John viii : 29. Very languid and much fatigued. Kept at Capt. 
Gibbs's.^ 

15. Am quite feeble. Crossed the ferry to Bedford and returned. Paid 
W. Howe for books and binding, $7.70. His binding is quite satisfactor}-. 
Made calls with Mr. Gould. Had to pay $1.25 for a carriage and boy 
to bring me home. Studied the lesson and attended in the evening the 
Bible class. Tarried out. 

16. Rode in the stage to Plymouth. Saw Esq. Robbins. Made calls. 
People are beginning their harvest. At evening attended, with Mr. Robbins, 
a church conference and preached on John viii : 29. The prospects of this 
society, I think, are improving. Saw Mr. Washburn,"* a valuable young man 
preaching with them. Tarried at Mr. Russell's. Was up late. 

17. Was out early, and went with Esq. Robbins to his rope-walk. I hope 
he will be able to do something at Mattapoisett. Saw Mr. Kendall. Last 
evening saw my cousin W. Hammatt,' now residing at Howland,^ Me. 
Took the stage and rode home. The dust very severe. Much fatigued. 
Read. The evening meeting at this house. 



' The complaint from which he suffered 
grea.lly in early life. 

- These sentences were written more than 
fifty years ago, but the checkered and chang- 
ing condition of that whole Turkish and 
Egyptian history still continues. 

* Capt. Anselm Gibbs, who married Lucy 
Le Baron. 

* This must have been Rev. Samuel Wash- 
burn, who liad been graduated the year be- 
fore (1832) at Andover Theological Seminary. 



He was afterwards agent of the American 
Sunday-School Union, and pastor of Congre- 
gational and Presbyterian churches. He 
died in New York city, 1853. 

5 William Hammatt (Hammond), whose 
mother was Priscilla Le Baron. 

* This William Hammatt's grandfather, 
Abraham, married Consider Howland, and 
there can be little doubt from the coinci- 
dence of name that Howland, Me., received 
its name from this Howland family. 



3H 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1833. 



18. Wrote to Mr. Fowler,' of Fall River. Received a letter from my 
brother Ammi, and one from D. Appleton & Co., New York. Read. Dined 
out. The hay here is mostly in ; a good crop, and in the best order. Wrote. 

19. Walked out. My cousin, Mrs. Mary Hammond," long very feeble, 
died suddenly this morning. Esq. Robbins, of Plymouth, and Mr. Washburn, 
their preacher, came here and made some stay. I earnestly hope Mr. R. may 
establish a cordage manufactory here. Mr. W, appears to be a valuable man. 
Visited the sick and afiflicted. At evening attended a temperance meeting. 
We have 280 members. I do but little business. Warm. 

20. Wrote to F. L. Alden, and sent a volume of my Universal Magazine 
to the printer. Read. Visited a sick man very low. Late in the evening 
Mr. Farnsworth,^ agent of the American Education Society, came here and 
tarried. Was up late. 

21. In the morning attended the funeral of Mrs. Hammond. Preached 
on Job xvi : 22, a funeral discourse, and on John iv : 29. The meeting-house 
very full. Very warm and dusty. Had a third meeting at Pine Islands, 
and preached on John viii : 29. Mr. Farnsworth went in the morning to 
Fairhaven, and returned and preached here in the evening in behalf of the 
American Education Society. Much fatigued, 

22. The heat severe and oppressive. Am very languid. Troubled with 
a toothache. Mr. Farnsworth continued here. Last evening and this morn- 
ing visited the sick man, dying with intemperance and Southern fever. Could 
do but little. Read expositors. At evening had a good Bible class. Paid 
for freight, seventy cents. 

23. Attended the funeral of the man deceased yesterday. The heat 
continues and the ground is very dry. People are generally harvesting. 
Mr. Farnsworth left us."* Read the Bible. At evening rode out and visited 
Dea. Hammond. He gets better, but is feeble. 

24. Wrote to Esq. Robbins, of Plymouth, Afternoon and evening very 
warm. Can do but little. Read the Bible. Walked out. The evening 
meeting was short. The ground is parched. 

25. We have some hot nights. Walked and visited. We have a number 
of people in feeble health. My tooth is troublesome, with a steady, moderate 
pain. Visited Uncle Le Baron. Wrote to brother Francis. 

. 26. Had my tooth extracted ; entirely sound to appearance, probably 



' Rev, Orin Fowler, ^ native of Lebanon, 
Ct., graduate of Yale College^ 1S15, after- 
wards Member of Congress from Massachu- 
setts. He was settled in Fall River in 1831. 
He was in Congress from 1S49 to his death, 
in Washington, D. C, Sept. 3, 1S52. 

^ Mrs. Mary Hammond, born Aug. 27, 
1778, was the daughter of William and 
Sarah (Churchill) Le Baron. She married 
Mr. Wyatt Hammond, of Rochester, March 
12, 1810, and died, as it appears by the diary, 
July 19, 1833. 



^ Rev. James Delah Farnsworth, a gradu- 
ate of Harvard College, 1818. He was a 
native of Groton, and was acting as agent 
for the American Education Society in Plym- 
outh County. 

"• This was Tuesday. It was customary 
then for the traveling agents of benevolent 
societies to live during the week in the fami- 
lies of ministers. They could not afford to 
return from distant places to Boston every 
week, and so were quartered, generally, with 
the ministers' families. 



^^33-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



315 



some disease at the root. Visited sick persons. Wrote. Visited. At 
evening went with several members of the church to Dea. Hammond's,' 
and settled, I hope judiciously, a difficulty of nearly a year's standing. 
It has given me much anxiety. 

27. Am quite feeble. Prepared for my ride. Set out to go to Fall River 
to exchange. Met Mr. Fowler. On the way was taken sick with a cholera- 
morbus, and stopped at a private house and could proceed no further. Sent 
to the village, three miles, that I was there sick. Kindly taken care of. 
Very weak and restless. 

28. Got a little rest the latter part of the night, but am very weak and 
diseased. Some gentlemen came for me from Fall River, and I rode with 
them. Kept at Dr. Durfee's." Attended the usual services, though very 
weak, and preached on Ps. cxxxvii : i, and Luke ix : 30, 31. In the 
afternoon spoke with nearly a natural voice. This is a very fine congre- 
gation, with a noble stone meeting-house. Declined attending the third 
meeting. Kept my bed considerably. Gave Mr. Waddell, where I staid 
last night, $1. 

29. Looked a little at this flourishing village. Walked with some difficulty 
to Mr. Fowler's. He returned. He is very active. Rode to Bedford and 
home. Called on Mr. Holmes. The dust very oppressive. It has been 
so for several days. Vegetation seems to be stationary. Cool. At six 
o'clock attended our Bible class. Quite too feeble to do it. 

30. Walked out and visited a sick woman, very low. We had a most 
grateful shower. Read. Can do but little of anything. Am again deprived 
of the privilege of attending our Association. 

31. Am a little better, through divine mercy. Visited the sick. A num- 
ber here are unwell. Am feeble to walk. Wrote a little. Attended our 
evening meeting, but did but little. My days are wasting away.^ God has 
done much for me. 

August. 

1. Wrote. Walked out and visited. Preached a preparatory lecture 
on Ps. Ixviii : 18. A woman was received into the church by letter. 
Communicated to the church the account of the late settlement of a diffi- 
culty. The meeting thinly attended. A good woman, a Baptist, died this 
afternoon. I think, through divine goodness, my strength increases. 

2. Read. Received a good letter from my cousin S. P. Robbins,'' at 
Andover. Visited the afflicted and others. Read late. I find I need 
a good deal of exercise. Received of my collector, $9. 



' Dea. Amittai Hammond. We do not 
understand whether this difficulty was be- 
tween Dea. Hammond and the church, but 
probably his house was the place where 
other parties met to adjust some existing 
difficulties. 

^ Nathan Durfee's, one of the wealthy and 
hospitable homes of Fall River, where many 



long 



course of years, 



ministers, through a 
were entertained. 

^ He was then nearly fifty-six years old, 
but he was to live twenty-three years more 
before his earthly course would be ended. 

'' His second cousin, who was graduated 
at Andover in 1S35, and became a foreign 
missionary, as before stated. 



3l6 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D, [l833- 

3. Walked out. Wrote. Atterded a funeral with Mr. Wood. Rode 
and visited a young woman very low in consumption. Attended the evening 
meeting of the brethren in this house. Received of my collector, $9. The 
drought has become very severe. 

4. Preached with notes on Luke xxii : 14, 15, and a sermon on Luke 
.wii : 22. United with Uncle Le Baron in the administration of the sacra- 
ment. Very warm and sultry. Made an appointment for a Mr. Haskett 
to deliver a lecture in the evening on luxur}', etc. Had no third meeting. 
At evening we had a moderate and very grateful rain. Did not go out to the 
lecture. 

5. Wrote to my brother Francis. Walked out. Very warm. Some 
of the carpenters got overdone with the heat and hard labor. Wrote. 
Read. Attended the evening concert ; pretty thin. We had a light shower. 

6. Wrote to my cousin S. P. Robbins. Rode a distance and visited 
a ver^' poor family w'here a young man died last night. Got a little wet. 
Walked and visited several sick families. Read late. 

7. Rode and attended a funeral. Preached at the house on Heb. ix : 27. 
Very hot and the flies severe. Much fatigued. Wrote to Isaac Mansfield,' 
of Boston, and sent him $12 for the Colonization Society. Added to our 
collection, seventy cents. Wrote to Hardy Ropes," of Boston, and sent him 
$9 for the Education Society. Added to what was collected here July aSth, 
in my absence, $1.09. Rode and attended our evening meeting, and preached 
on Mark xii : 30. Was out late. 

8. Rode to Bedford and Fairhaven. Carried a chest with books, etc., 
for the binder, to go to Hartford. Made calls. Paid for a whip, eighty-eight 
cents. Am fortunate in procuring a horse for my contemplated journey. 
Esq. Robbins and wife, from Plymouth, came here and went to Bedford. 
I am in great hopes he will make an important purchase here for a cordage 
manufactory. Wrote. At evening visited a woman hard sick. 

9. Wet and cold. We get but little rain, but the ground is greatly 
revived. Wrote to sister Battell, and to Hutchinson & Driver, Hartford. 
Received a letter from brother Francis. Visited. 

10. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Holmes, and to F. L. Alden, of New Bedford. 
Rode and visited a sick person very low. Read. Esq. Robbins returned 
to Plymouth. He seems to be likely to procure the water site here. Visited 
the sick. There are an vuiusual number with measles and other complaints. 
Paid for shoeing my hired horse, $1. Took medicine on account of sick 
rooms. 

11. My birthday. Am unable to devote it as I could wish. Very 
pleasant and full meetings. Expounded on Matt, xi : 16 to the end, and 



' Treasurer of the Massachusetts branch had been settled in Exeter, N. H., but who 

of the American Colonization Society. This died in Boston in 1826. It is not unlikely 

Isaac Mansfield was of the firm of Isaac that he was the father of the Boston mer- 

Mansfield and Francis R. Bigelow, dry goods, chant of the same name. 
in Liberty Square. There was a Rev. Isaac ^ Hon. Hardy Ropes, Treasurer of the 

Mansfield, a native of Marblehead, Mass., who American Education Society, 1830-1845. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 317 

preached on i Cor. x: 9. Preached at the third meeting on Mark x: 51. 
1 am not as strong for labor as before my ill turn. 

12. Visited the sick and others. Dined out. Preparing for my journey. 
Attended the P.ible class early. Visited. Am pretty feeble and fatigued. 
Was up late. 

13. Quite rainy. Very much wanted. Am obliged to defer my journey. 
Wrote to my brother Ammi. Received of Abner Harlow, $40, to carry 
to him.' Visited a sick child very low. Wrote. Read Universal Magazine. 
At evening visited the afflicted family. The child is dead. 

14. Set out early on my journey. Called at Bedford^^ Rode by Fall 
River to Providence. A good air, but ver)- warm. My horse travels rather 
poorly. Tarried at a tavern. 

15. Rode to Plainfield. Most of the way in a severe heat. Great 
prospects of fruit. Called on Mr. Rockwell. ■ He is pleasantly situated 
here. Much excitement in this county about the colored school.^ Tarried 
with Mr. Rockwell. 

16. Rode early. The morning very sultr}\ My horse travels heavily. 
Rode to Lisbon, to the house of the late Dr. Lee.* Kindly treated by the 
family. Procured of them 150 pamphlets, and gave them $3.^ The pam- 
phlets are not ver^- valuable. Mr. Judson, late of Ashford, is settled here.* 
Rode to North Mansfield and tarried with Mr. Ely.^ He is very active and 
laborious. A very hot day. Rode over a pretty uneven part of the countr}'. 

17. Mr. Ely is not yet willing to part with the books he has borrowed 
of me. Rode to Tolland. Procured of Dr. Williams's ^ family a large 
quantity of old books and pamphlets, and paid them $17. Paid for a box 
and transportation to Hartford, $r. Afternoon rode to Enfield. Have had, 
by divine favor, a prosperous journey. I think my brother is something 
better than when he left Mattapoisett. 

i8. Preached on Job viii : 13, and Luke ix : 30, 31. Quite warm. The 
congregation here is large. My brother assisted some in the services. 



' To xVmmi Ruhamah Robbins, of Cole- colored girls alone. This caused a great 

brook. It is idle at this point to conjecture commotion in the town and county (Wind- 

what business transactions had passed be- ham County), which continued until at length, 

tween Abner Harlow, of Mattapoisett, and under a law of the State, Miss Crandall was 

Ammi Robbins, so far away. condemned and imprisoned. This strife and 

" Rev. Samuel Rockwell, pastor at Plain- litigation covered several years, and furnishes 

field, 1S32-1S41. one of the disagreeable and disgraceful chap- 

^ Miss Prudence Crandall, in the autumn ters of the old pro-slavery days, 
of 1S31, had, with the co-operation of the "■ Dr. Andrew Lee, of Hanover parish, 

leading people of Canterbury, Ct., estab- Lisbon, pastor there from 1768 to his death, 

lished a young ladies' school in tiiat town. in 1832, sixty-four years. 
It was regarded as a valuable acquisition. ' Pamphlets, two cents apiece. 

At length she decided to admit a colored ^ Rev. Philo Judson was settled there in 

girl into the school as a day scholar. This 1S33, but remained only till 1834. 
created a storm, and the white girls, board- ' Rev. William Ely, often mentioned, 

ers, were taken bv their parents and guard- ° Dr. Nathan Williams, whose ministry 

ians to their homes. Then Miss Crandall at Tolland had reached from 1760 to 1S29, 

undertook to continue her school as one for si.xty-nine years. 



3l8 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^^33- 

At evening attended a meeting without him, and preached on John viii : 29. 
The peope here are very quiet and harmonious under their privations. 

19. Set out for New Haven. Stopped some time at East Windsor. Did 
errands at Hartford. Rode to Meriden and tarried at a tavern.' Have my 
brother's horse. The roads very dusty. 

20. Rode early to New Haven. Met with the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 
Mr. Everett^ delivered before them an oration worthy of all his fame. Did 
errands and made calls. Am treated with much kindness. Hope to get 
some historic collections from the Davenport family.' At evening attended 
the society of the alumni, and had a good address from Judge Daggett.* 

21. Attended the Commencement.' Sultry hot. The performances were 
good, with a want of variety and humor.'' I think I never saw th-e house 
so full. There are many temporary residents in the town. Mr. Dow preached 
the Coticio ad Chrum in the evening. Not well attended. Meet with many 
friends. Visited the very fine gallery of paintings.^ Mr. Battell and Joseph 
are here. 

22. Bought some valuable books of Gen. Howe. Paid him, to settle 
the former account, 1:22.50. Left two bundles of books and my ancient 
great chair, sent from Bfanford, at Thompson's store, to be sent to New 
Bedford. Made calls. Rode to Branford. Very dusty. My grandfather's 
tombstone has been re-erected, and the stones for Aunt Gould's grave, which 
I sent on, are set up. Received back %\ of $4 left here last year for 
expenses. Mr. Foot, has been faithful and kind. Called on Mr. Gillett." 
Rode to Durham and tarried at Mr. Smith's.' 

23. Rode to East Windsor. Stopped in the forenoon by a shower; very 
grateful. Was some time at Wethersfield. Dr. Tenney '° is in poor health. 
Looked at some old books and pamphlets. Did errands at Hartford. Paid 
Dr. Smith, of Durham, for books, $1.25. My health, I think, improves by my 
journeying. A great prospect of fruit. Found a chest at Hartford which 
I sent on from New Bedford. Book, fifty cents. 

24. Put up the greater part of my pamphlets, and in the afternoon Tudor 
carried them, with two large book-cases and other things, to Plartford. 



' It was about eighteen miles from Enfield ^ The Trumbull Gallery was a new feat- 

to Hartford, and not far from the same dis- ure in the Yale College history. It was 

tance from Hartford to Meriden. in 1S31 that the arrangement was made be- 

- Hon. Edward Everett. He was at that tween Yale College and the artist, Col. John 

time Mernbcr of Congress. Trumbull, by which his pictures were to be 

3 The descendants of the celebrated John gathered and preserved at the college. After 

Davenport, first minister of New Haven. the bargain was concluded it took some tim.e 

■• Judge David Daggett, of New Haven. to make ready the building for their recep- 

'- Commencement then was on the third tion ; and so, at this Commencement of 1833, 

Wednesday of August. it is likely that Dr. Robbins had his first 

* Humor, in the shape of dialogues, po- sight of them, 
ems, and amusing addresses, was then one ^ Rev. Timothy Phelps Gillett. 

of the attractive features of Commencement ' Dr. David Smith. 

Day. '° Dr. Caleb J. Tenney. 



I833-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



319 



Rode to Hartford and put my things on board a vessel.' Did errands. 
Returned, and rode to Enfield in the evening. Took a pretty hard cold. 
Last Saturday evening received a letter from my cousin S. P. Robbins, 
at Andover. Have had my brother's horse on this journey, 

25. My brother improves a little, I think, in his health. He assisted 
in the exercises. Preached on i Thess. ii : 16, and John i : 29. Labored in 
speaking on account of my cold. Was called to see a dying man. Rode 
out and attended the evening meeting, and preached on Luke .xviii : 38-43. 

26. My brother cannot go to Norfolk as we expected, today, on account 
of the funeral to be attended tomorrow. Rode to Pine Meadow. There 
has been a good religious revival in this neighborhood. Very hot and am 
very languid. Towards evening rode to East Windsor. Paid for oats, $1. 

27. Worked, collecting and putting up books for removal. Rode out 
and visited. A good w'oman died this morning in this neighborhood. 
Mr. Nettleton ^ is here. Saw Dr. Spring,^ of New York. There is a prospect 
of a large meeting of ministers in this place, about which I feel some anxiety/ 
Towards evening my brother came here. Paid a tax, $1.19. 

28. We started early and rode to Norfolk. Called at brother Ammi's. 
The dust very oppressive. Cool. We rode in a wagon. 

29. Brother F. remained last night at brother Ammi's, and they two 
came here today. But three of Mr. Battell's children are at home. In the 
morning rode with Mrs. Battell to North Canaan. Visited at Mrs. Cowles's.' 
Mr. Henr)^ Woodbridge * and wife board there, he supplying the people 
as a candidate. Conversed with him about going to Plymouth. Was not 
able to procure any of the study furniture of Pres. Edwards,' as I hoped. 
Returning, got something wet with rain. The ground is dry and the orchards 
are breaking with their burden. Wrote. Did not go to the paternal mansion. 
Saw Mr. Eldridge.^ Wrote. 

30. Took breakfast with my cousin Lawrence.' There was a light frost. 
Took some articles from the post office and paid twenty-five cents. Mrs. Bat- 
tell gave me $3, the amount of what I have paid for re-erecting our grand- 



' This entry shows that he had as yet 
taken only a portion of his library to Matta- 
poisett. 

- Rev. Asahel Nettleton, D. D., evangelist. 

-'' Dr. Gardner Spring. 

"* This meeting was probably composed 
of those who were dissatisfied with the New 
?Iaven theology, and they were taking the 
incipient steps toward the founding of a new 
theological seminary. Rev. Chauncey G. Lee, 
then settled in Dr. Robbins's old parish at 
Ea=t Windsor, was one of the active workers 
in this movement, and afterwards an agent in 
its behalf. 

5 Mrs. Cowles was the widow of Rev. Pit- 
kin Cowles, who had been pastor at North 



Canaan from 1S05. He had died in the pre- 
vious February. 

^ Rev. Henry H. Woodbridge, just settled 
there, was a graduate of Yale, 1S23. 

' The younger Edwards, Dr. Jonathan 
Edwards, had been settled in Colcbrook 
before he went to Union College to die. 
Dr. Robbins does not tell us exactly where 
he e.vpecttd to find these Edwardian relics. 
There were such relics in existence. The 
writer has seen in Stockbridge Pres. Ed- 
wards's writing-desk, which is probably still 
there. 

■^ Dr. Joseph Eldridgc, then recently set- 
tled in Norfolk. 

^ Mr. William Law \.iice. 



320 DIARV OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1833. 

father's tombstone at Branford, and $2 for one half of a bonnet I procured 
by her direction for our cousin Le Baron. She leaves me to pay for Aunt 
Gould's tombstones, as she procured Aunt Thompson's. Rode with my 
brother' to New Hartford. He stopped there to take the stage. Rode 
through Wintonbury to Hartford. Can find nothing of some books which 
I suppose I have lent. Did errands for my brother. In the evening rode 
with him to East Windsor. Cool. 

31. Worked laboriously, putting up my books, etc. In the forenoon 
it rained some. My brother went home. He bore our journey well. 
I think he is convalescing. Rode out. Am not able to ride to Wethersfield 
today, as I expected. At evening visited an afflicted family. Fatigued with 
constant labor, though my health is much improved, through divine mercy, 
by my journey. Paid for black cloth, $5. 

September. 

1. Rode early to Wethersfield to assist Dr. Tenney in his feeble state. 
He is about as unwell as my brother. Preached on 2 Thess. ii : 16, and 
Luke ix : 30, 31. Administered the sacrament to the largest church, I think, 
that I have ever done.° Quite windy. Attended the evening meeting in the 
meeting-house, and preached on John viii : 29. Dr. Tenney attended meeting, 
but performed no part. 

2. Made calls. The wives of Mr. James L. Belden ^ and Dr. Cook, 
daughters of the late Col. E. P. Belden, gave me volumes of ancient books; 
some of them highly valuable. The widow of Joseph Belden gave me some 
old classical books and about thirty Green's Registers. The whole constitute 
a very valuable present. I suppose the old books were brought from England 
by Rector Williams.* Afternoon rode to Hartford ; put up my books for 
transportation, did errands, etc. Paid for new books, $5.25. Made my 
annual payment to the Annuity Society, $5. Received a dividend of the 
Hartford Bank, $22.50. Traded, $1.92. Rode to East Windsor. Attended 
the monthly concert. Mr. Lee present ; very thin. 

3. Finished putting up my things and books to be left, and did some 
necessary errands. Dea. Reed acknowledges his obligation to make up my 
loss in my name-papers I had of him, but I get very little from him. Paid 
for a large box for books and papers, $3. Left my old good home. Dined 
at Esq. White's,* East Hartford. Received of S. T. Wolcott of the rent 
of my land the present year, $20. The whole rent was $24. Had a good 
deal to do at Hartford. Received of the Phoenix Bank a dividend of 
$45. Received of E. W. Bull, interest on my note, $24. Paid him for arti- 



' Rev. Francis Le Baron Robbins. ** Rev. Elisha Williams, son of Rev. Will- 

^ The population of the town of Wethers- iam Williams, of Hatfield, was called in 1726 

Seld, by the census of 1830, was 3,853. This from the Newington parish, in Wethersfield, 

population very largely centered about the to be Rector of Yale College, as the office 

Congregational church of the town, and of president was then called. For ability he 

the church membership was large. stood among the leading men of his time. 

3 One of the official men of Wethersfield. ^ Lemuel White, Esq., where he boarded. 



IS33-] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOTSETT. 



321 



cles received now and before, :r.S.25, Of this last sum, $3 is charged to 
Mr. Crosby. Paid my book-binders, $15. Paid for books, $2.23. Rode 
in a tedious dust to Pine Meadow and tarried at Mr. Haskell's.' Called 
at Mr. Rowland's.^ He has recently lost his wife.^ He was absent from 
home. At Hartford took up some of the articles which I had deposited 
for the Historical Society. Yesterday at Wethersfield called on the aged 
Judge Mitchell,'* near ninety. Very tired. 

4. Last night we had a very refreshing shower. The morning wet. 
Yesterday morning there was some frost. Rode to Enfield. My brother 
preached once last Sabbath and administered the sacrament. He is evidently 
gaining health and strength. After dinner set out for home. Rode through 
Somers and Stafford, and tarried at a tavern in a corner of Willington. 
The road pretty good. Sultry hot. My horse travels slow. 

5. Rode to Woodstock. Dined with the aged Rev. Mr. Lyman.' Paid 
him $1.50 for fifty pamphlets. He had none that were ancient. Rode on 
towards Providence and tarried at a tavern in Greenville.* I think this 
road is better than those at the south of it.' Rode slow. Much oppressed 
by the heat. Fruit of all kinds is very plenty, especially apples and peaches. 
The drought is great ; a great portion of the streams are dry. Traveled 
but thirty-three miles. 

6. Rode early. Made but a short stay at Providence. The thermometer 
there yesterday was at 89°.* The heat not quite as severe as today. Rode 
forty-one miles. Tarried at a tavern at Hicks's Meeting-house.' 

7. Rode to New Bedford and breakfasted at Mr. Alden's.'° Found 
my things here which have been sent from New Haven and Hartford. 
Paid a freight bill of $5.50. Rode home. Have had, through divine mercy, 
a ver^' prosperous journey. My health has been much improved. But one 
death in my absence ; the young woman with the consumption. Mr. Le Baron 
has preached once and held meetings, but there has been no other preaching. 
Am considerably fatigued. At evening had to attend a meeting. 

8. The morning rainy, but we got but little. The ground is dr}--. Many 
wells fail. Yesterday afternoon rode and visited an aged good woman quite 
low. Preached a double sermon on 2 Cor. v: 19. Meeting thin. At the 
evening meeting spoke on Matt, xxi : 41. 

9. Attended to my things. Read. Wrote on my diar}% which had got 
much in arrear. Attended the Bible class. Pretty thin. Read late. 



' Harris Haskell. 

^ Rev. Henry A. Rowland, of Windsor. 

^ His wife was Elizabeth Newbury, daugh- 
ter of Gen. Roger Newbury, of Windsor. 

* Judge Stephen Mix Mitchell, born in 
Wethersfield, Dec. 20, 1743; graduated at 
Yale, 1763; died in his native town, Sept. 
30, 1S35, in his ninety-second year. He had 
filled many high offices, State and national. 

^ Rev. Eliphalet Lyman, a native of 
Lebanon, graduated at Yale, 1776; pastor 



in Woodstock, 17-6-1S24. He resided in 
Woodstock until his death in 1836. 

* Greenville was an outside district of 
Providence, R. L 

^ The chief road south of this was the 
one leading through Bolton Notch and North 
Coventry, Ct. 

^ We are again in early September. 

9 Hicks's Meeting-house, or Hicksville, is 
in the northwest corner of New Bedford. 
*° Francis L. Alden. 



322 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1833- 



10. Wrote on my diary. Wet, but very little rain. Walked and visited. 
Visited a family who have lost a son, a seaman, by sickness in New York. 
Yesterday wrote to Hutchinson & Driver, Hartford, and S. P. Robbins, 
Andover. Read. 

11. Wrote. On the 9th received of my collector, $51. Looked over late 
pecuniar}' accounts. Walked and visited. Warm. My book-cases and other 
things v.-hich had arrived at Bedford were brought here in a vessel. Worked 
hard getting them in. Attended the evening meeting. Paid for carting, forty 
cents. Read in Guicciardini's ' History. A valuable work. 

12. Wrote to Mr. Josiah Robbins, Plymouth. Wrote. Paid in my absence, 
lately, for books, pamphlets, and binding, $69.23; freight and box, $8.50; 
purchases, $15.17; debt, $6.19; expenses, $27.76. Find a deficit of .55. 
Worked at my pamphlets and putting up my book-cases. 

13. ^^'orked at my library. Walked and visited aged sick persons and 
others. Have a fire in my chamber. Read late. The revolution in 
Portugal gives great and extensive joy.^ 

14. Paid for a new stove procured at Boston, including freight, $21. 
For freight of things from Bedford, $1.25. A merchant's bill, $3.46. Read. 
This morning there was a pretty hard frost. Wrote. 

15. Expounded on Matt, xii : i to 31, and preached a sermon on Prov. 
ix : 12. At evening had a full meeting, and spoke on Ps. cxix : 6. Mr. Bar- 
rows^ assisted. In the morning went into Sabbath-school. Pleasant day 
and a full house. 

16. Worked at my pamphlets. They have, become much deranged.'* 
Late last evening visited a sick child. Attended the Bible class. Quite 
cool. Visited the sick child again. Read late. 

17. Last evening received a letter from Esq. Robbins. Just as I was 
setting out on my journey my cousin S. P. Robbins came here from Andover 
to make some stay. Took the stage and rode to Plymouth. Found 
Esq. Robbins absent. Mr. Russell's family are greatly afflicted with the 
loss of a daugliter-in-law and a very promising son. Met the committee 
of the Third Society, who desired me to write to Henry Woodbridge ^ to come 
and supply them. Yesterday wrote to H. W. &: S. Brastow, of New York, and 
sent them $25 to procure some cloth. Paid last evening fifty cents to our 
Temperance Society. Paid today for stage fare, both ways, $3. I believe 
I took a good deal of cold last evening. 



' Guicciardini Francesco, 1482-1540. He 
was distinguished as a historian and as a 
diplomatist. 

' There had been long strife and confu- 
sion in Portugal over the question of the 
roval succession. But in July, 1S33, Donna 
Maria, in whose favor Doni Pedro resigned 
the throne in 1S26, was proclaimed Queen. 

^ Rev. Homer Barrows. 

'• To keep a library of the size to which 



Dr. Robbiijs's had now grown, even when 
kept securely in one place, is no small care. 
Much more when it has to be moved from 
place to place. Dr. Robbins moved his from 
East Windsor to Mattapoisett in sections. 

5 This was the Rev. Henry H. Woodbridge 
whom Dr. Robbins found supplying the pul- 
pit at North Canaan, Ct. The effort to draw 
him to Plymouth did not avail, as he was set- 
tled that year (1S33) ^' North Canaan. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT, 323 

18. Left my afflicted friends and rode home. Am quite unwell ; constant 
headache and some fever. Attended the funeral of Dr. Southworth's child. 
Something rainy, but we get but little. Had to take my bed when I could. 

19. Quite ill; took physic. My headache remains. Mr. Robbins is here 
and is about to commence the study of systematic theology.' At evenin;; 
walked to a near neighbor's and performed a marriage." Quite warm. 

20. Am quite feeble and distressed. My light physic seems to do no 
good. Wrote with much difficulty to Mr. Henry Woodbridge, at Canaan, Ct.. 
in behalf of the Third Society at Plymouth. Visited a school. 

21. I think I need powerful physic, but conclude to delay that I may 
go out tomorrow. Kept my bed considerably. My physician thinks I am 
not likely to be much sick ; I fear otherwise, but holy is the Lord. 

22. Attended meeting and preached with much difficulty a double sermon 
on Isa. Iv : 6. The exercises were short. Could do no more. I submit 
all to the divine will. 

The three latter days were written after my sickness.^ 

October. 

2 1. Through God's great mercy I now once more take my pen to write 
a little in my diary. Am quite feeble. Wrote by my amanuensis to Eli B. 
Haskell, of East Windsor. The rain of yesterday and today is greater than 
we have had this fall, and seems to saturate the ground, long dry. 

22. It is still dark and wet weather. Unfavorable for invalids. Read 
in the Bible. Can read but little. Went down twice and ate with the 
family. Have considerable company. My appetite is good, but not strong. 
Eat none but light food. 

23. Pleasant and cool. The ground is very wet and I do not go out. 
A merciful God helps me from day to day, though my progress is slow. 
Wrote a little. Read the Bible. 

24. Received a letter from brother Francis, and wrote to him by Mr, Rob- 
bins ''as amanuensis, in reply. He has been negligent in writing. Expected 
to have rode out today, but there is a rough wind, though it is pleasant, and 
I am advised not to attempt it. Walked out for the first time and went 
to the barn. Read. Conversed but little. Sent to F. L. Alden to pay 
for freight, $6, Mr. and Mrs. Crosby returned from their journey, after 
an absence of a week. 

25. Mild weather. Rode out in a chaise. I think to my benefit. Wrote 
myself to Esq. Robbins, of Plymouth. My cousin concludes to return to 
Andover.* He has been a great benefit to me in my sickness. Gave him 



' Samuel Prince Robbins, who was after- whole time, from 1796 to 1833, has been cov- 

ward graduated at Andover, and became a ered by daily entries, 
foreign missionary. * Ilis nephew from Ohio. 

- The persons joined in marriage were ' He came, apparently, intending to study 

Lot Jones and Melintha Cannon. theology with Dr. Robbins. But this sick- 

^ Here occurs the first gap since his ness had interfered with his plans, and it was 

sickness in Ohio, in the months of July and uncertain when he would be able to give his 

August, 1804. With these exceptions the attention to teaching. 



324 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



b^33- 



$io and some articles of use. Read the Bible. I have to spend a good 
deal of time idly. My eyes are weak. 

26. My cousin S. P. Robbins went off for Plymouth and x'\ndover. He 
seems to be attached to this place. Rode to Uncle Le Baron"s. Was out 
considerably. Read. I fear a very great stupidity with regard to divine 
things is pervading our land. 

27. A pleasant day and my people had no preaching. They attended 
meeting, however, pretty well. There was a Universalist meeting. We have 
an account of the death of Mrs. Hannah More.' She was about the age 
of my mother. At evening had company. Did not go out. Read the 
Bible. 

28. Walked in the street some. Afternoon rode a good distance. Wrote. 
Am something rheumatic. 

29. I believe I took some cold yesterday ; I have a severe rheumatism. 
Kept my chamber through the day. Put on my flannel. Received of my 
collector, $30. In the evening there was a good temperance meeting, with 
an address from Mr. Corydon, of New Bedford. 

30. I am very lame in my back, but I think I am better than yesterday. 
It is quite cold. Read the Bible. Wrote to F. L. Alden. I read, perhaps, 
more than is best for me, as it is hard to be idle. 

31. My rheumatism and crick in my back seemed in the morning to be 
v/orse than before. Got some better in the course of the day. Read the 
Book of Daniel. I take some medicine. Received a letter from Esq. Rob- 
bins, of Plymouth. This is the third day that I have been out of the house. 

November. 

1. Through divine mercy my rheumatism abates some. Rode to my 
cousin J. Le Baron's ^ and spent the most of the day there. Wrote. We 
have had a very cold turn for the season. 

2. Quite ill, with much pain. Kept the house mostly. Read some. 
I have read this week a large pamphlet addressed to the churches of 
Connecticut.^ I fear they are getting into serious divisions and errors. 
The God of our fathers mercifully prevent. Had strong expectations of 
seeing brother Francis here today, but am disappointed. 

3. After an absence of five Sabbaths was permitted once more to go 
to the house of worship. Cool, but pleasant. Had my case mentioned 
for public thanks. Dea, Hammond prayed very well. In the forenoon 
had a sermon read. I made some remarks and closed the service. After- 



' Mrs. Hannah More was born in Staple- 
ton, England, 1744, and died near Bristol in 
September, 1833, not far from eighty-nine 
years old. She was accounted the ablest 
female writer of her time on moral and reli- 
gious subjects. 

- John A., the fourth child of Rev.- Lem- 
uel Le Baron. He was born in 1782. 



^ This pamphlet was the outcome of that 
meeting of ministers in East Windsor, about 
which Dr. Robbins had much anxiety. There 
was already, and was to be in larger degree, 
a serious division among the Congregational 
ministers and churches of Connecticut. The 
sharp theological conflict which sj rung up at 
that time divided the churches for many years. 



1 833-1 PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 325 

noon the Sabbath-school was closed, the report read, and Mr. Le Baron 
and I each made an address. We had no sermon. During the summer, 
till now, the people have been nine vSabbaths without preaching. This has 
sensibly affected the Sabbath-school. I think I am not the worse for going 
out. 

4. The people manifest kind pleasure that I can again be out. Quite 
cold. Am quite stiff and feeble with my rheumatism. Was out but little. 
Had company. The people are tr}ing to procure a vestry. Wrote to 
Mr. Tr}on Edwards,' of Hartford, a candidate, in behalf of the people 
of Plymouth. 

5. Spent the most of the day at Capt. Freeman's. Last night had 
much pain. We have hard frosts. Received a letter from Hutchinson 
& Driver, Hartford. Wrote. 

6. Walked out a little way, but am quite weak. Received a letter 
from Charles E. Abbott, of Plymouth, with a number of a new magazine 
printed at Boston. Paid a lad for cutting and piling wood, 5i. Wrote to 
P. B. Gleason & Co., Hartford, and sent them $5. At evening attended 
the meeting held here and spoke considerably. I think I took some cold. 
Read. 

7. Have much pain with my rheumatism during the night. Very pleas- 
ant. Received a letter from Thomas Burnham,^ of Boston. Paid a peddler, 
$1.21, Wrote. Had some boxes and a book-case brought from Bedford, 
which came from Hartford, the same I prepared for removing before I left 
Connecticut. They have been long in coming. Paid for carting, $2. 

8. Had assistance in opening my books. Can do but little myself. 
Rode to Capt. J. Le Baron's,^ dined, and spent the afternoon and night. 
Warm and pleasant. My flesh increases, but my rheumatic pains and 
attendant weakness are nearly stationary'. Read. 

9. Rode home. Worked a little at my things. They have come very 
well. I have not room for the books or pamphlets. Received a letter from 
Esq. Holmes,* of Rochester. Paid for pine wood, $1.75. Read. Attended 
to my studies. 

10. We had rain last night, but now a pleasant day. Preached with notes 
on 2 Sam. iii : 39, and a sermon on Jer. ix : i. Suffered some with rheumatic 
pains, but performed services, by divine assistance, better than I expected. 
Have great reason to bless God, infinite in mercy, that I am restored 
to my ordinary ministrations. For six Sabbaths past I have not preached. 
The longest term I have been prevented from preaching in thirty-five years, 
excepting in the summer of 1804,' by a still more severe sickness. O that 
I may profit by this holy visitation. At evening had company. 



■ Tryon Edwards, D. D., was a great ^ Antiquarian book-merchant, 58 Corn- 
grandson of the first Jonathan. lie was hill, Boston, 
a graduate of Yale College, 1S2S, was first ' John A. l.e Baron, 
settled at Rochester, N. Y., in 1S34, and in •♦ Abraham Holmes, Esq. 
New London, Ct., in 1845, where he remained * His severe sickness in Ohio, before no- 
till 1857 ticed. 



DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



[1833. 



11. The people generally went to Rochester to attend town meeting. 
The State seems to be in se\eral political parties.' Worked what I could 
at my books and pamphlets. Had some help. My people had a meeting 
and concluded, with much harmony, to do off a room for a vestry. Wrote. 
Quite warm. 

12. Walked out. Had a tailoress^ to work for me. Worked consider- 
ably at my books and pamphlets. My collector paid me $20, and I gave 
him a receipt in full for my last salar}\ I get fatigued easily. 

13. A schooner belonging here came in from whaling, having made a very 
profitable voyage. Wrote to Esq. Holmes, of Rochester, and to Manchester 
is: Thompson, Bedford. Received a letter from my brother Francis, and one 
from Mr. Tryon Edwards,^ Hartford. Walked out and attended a meeting 
in the evening, and preached on Rom. xv : 29. Baptized a child.'* Cold and 
windy. Paid a tailoress. 

14. Have had a tedious night with my rheumatism. Attended at a 
funeral of a Baptist woman in the neighborhood. Rode out. Had company. 
Worked some at my books. Looked at pecuniary matters. Have, in bills, 
$94. I easily get fatigued. 

15. Examined a schoolmaster. Paid a merchant's bill, too old, seventy- 
five cents. W'rote to Hutchinson & Driver, Hartford, and sent them $5. 
Find difficulty in stowing away many of my books and pamphlets. Wrote 
on my library catalogue. 

16. Read. Wrote to Esq. Robbins, of Plymouth. Received a letter 
from S. P. Robbins, at Andover. There is a good work of divine grace 
in that place. Worked a good deal, arranging books, clothes, etc. I believe 
this domestic work done this week has been beneficial to my health. Read 
expositors. Walked out. 

17. Cold, but pleasant. Expounded on Matt, xii : 31 to the end, and 
preached on John x : 27, 28. At evening rode some distance and performed 
a marriage.' Our meetings were full. I am very w-eak as to muscular 
strength and suffer a good deal from my steady rheumatism. 

18. Feel the fatigues of yesterday. Walked out. Read. Wrote to my 
brother Francis. I can do but little. 



' There were no divisions such as caused 
any change in the State administration. 
Gov. Levi Lincoln, who had been in office 
since 1825, was re-elected again in 1833. 

^ The country custom in New England at 
that time was to have a tailoress come to the 
house and do the tailoring for the household. 
Dr. Robbins was a bachelor, but employed a 
tailoress, who probably worked at her home. 

3 Tryon Edwards, D. D., already briefly 
noticed, was the son of Jonathan W. Ed- 
wards, Esq., of Hartford, who was the only 
son of Dr. Jonathan Edwards (called the 



younger Edwards). Dr. Tryon Edwards, 
who is still living, was born in 1809, and, 
after his graduation at Yale in 182S, married 
a lady in Baltimore of the family name of 
Tryon. 

* Martha Olena, daughter of Henry 
Young, baptized at an evening meeting, 
which seems to have been a somewhat com- 
mon custom at Mattapoisett. It was regarded 
as more regular to have the baptism in the 
public Sabbath service. 

' The parties married were Ivory Snow 
and Martha Snow. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 327 

19. Wrote to my cousin S. P. Robbins, at Andover. Walked out to see 
my cousin, Dr. Lemuel Le Baron,' who has come to his father's after an 
absence of five years at the westward. Read Davila." Read hitc. 

20. Arranged newspapers. Afternoon spent some time with Uncle Le 
Baron. He is ill with rheumatism, much like myself. I have much pain. 
The doctor' appears well. Attended the evening meeting and preached on 
Hosea xiii : 9, 10. Well attended. Quite cold. Read Davila, an excellent 
historian. 

21. Rode with Capt. Mayhew to Fairhaven. Visited friends. Mr. Alden* 
has removed there from BedforS. Crossed to Bedford. My box left at 
Hartford does not come. Returned. At evening walked out. Last night 
it froze quite hard. Paid for freight and storage, $2. 

22. Wet. My rheumatic pains are tedious. Read the Bible. Wrote. 
Afternoon and evening a hard rain. Feel the want of exercise. Read 
Davila. 

23. Walked out and exercised a good deal. Received a fine present 
from several ladies — a good puff' for my bed. Received a letter from 
P. B. Gleason & Co., Hartford. Attended to preparations for the Sabbath. 

24. Pleasant ; the meeting quite full. Preached on Isa. lix : 17. Attended 
a ver}' full evening meeting. My cousin. Dr. Le Baron, spoke in the meeting, 
and very well. He has hopefully been made a subject of grace the present 
year. Much fatigued. 

25. It snowed and rained the most of the day. Went out to see about 
the stove in the vestry. It smokes badly. My rheumatic pains are at times 
severe. Read a good deal in Davila. 

26. Walked out. Find exercise very necessary for my complaint. Had 
company. Wrote. The civil wars of France show much retributive justice 
in divine Providence. 

27. W^alked out. The ground is very wet. Read. Wrote a small addi- 
tion to a Thanksgiving sermon. Had to attend to my stove. Paid a man 
for sawing and getting in wood, $1. 

28. Thanksgiving.* Meeting rather thin. Preached on Zech. xiv : i. 
The village was quiet. In the evening attended a public lecture in the 
school-house by Mr. Randall, the teacher. We had our usual contribution 
for indigent widows, and collected $9.28. 



■ Dr. Lemuel, son of Rev. Lemuel Le ' We understand this to mean a comforter 

Baron, was born in 1780, and was three years made of down, though we do not remember 

younger than Dr. Robbins. ever meeting the word used in this way be- 

^ Enrico Caterino Davila, an eminent fore. 

Italian historian, 1 576-1631. The Italian ^ The last Thursday in November, which 

title of his chief work is Storia delle Guerre is now the established day for Thanksgiving 

Civili di Francia: Venice. 1630. The work throughout the country, was the usual, though 

might be properly entitled, the Religious not the uniform, day in Massachusetts fifty 

Wars of France. .years ago. Other States appointed different 

' Lemuel Le Baron, M. D. days, if it so pleased them. The present 

* Francis L. Alden. custom is more satisfactory. 



328 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [^^33- 

29. Walked a distance. Settled with Mrs. Hammond' for her horse, 
which I had to go my journey last August. Paid her $2, in addition 
to $6 before. Rode to Fairhaven in the stage. Crossed to Bedford. Paid 
Dr. Mackie for visiting me six times in my sickness, $16." He did well, 
but I think his charge was high. Paid Mr. Taber, the bookseller, $10. 
Received from a coaster a small box sent from Hartford. Tarried at Fair- 
haven. My rheumatic pains are severe. 

30. The stage left me in the morning, in violation of its promise. 
It rained last night and through the day. Called on Mr. Gould. A ship 
has come into Bedford with 4,300 barrels of sperm oil. The greatest cargo 
known to have been procured in this country.^ Rode home.. Paid for the 
conveyance, $1.25. My candles and other things from Hartford have come 
well. 

December. 

1. Wet and rainy. Meetings thin. Preached with notes on Ps. cxxx : 7, 
and Acts iii : 26. Spoke in behalf of the Home Missionary Society. Admin- 
istered the sacrament with Uncle Le Baron. Had no evening: meeting. 
Read the Evangelical Magazine,* published at Hartford. I hope it will do 
good. 

2. Still wet and very chilly. Bad weather for my complaint and I suffer 
a good deal. Received a good letter from my sister. Our esteemed friend, 
Mr. Oilman,' has died at Alton, on the Mississippi. Read. Visited. At 
evening we had the monthly concert ; short ; after it the adjourned annual 
meeting of our Auxiliary Home Missionary Association. We have collected 
^31.75. Met at the meeting-house. 

3. Carried up wood. I cannot bear much sitting. Wrote. Walked 
out. Read Evangelical Magazine. I can write but little. 

4. Visited. This is the fifth day that we have scarcely seen the sun. 
The ground is very wet and cold. Wrote to Thomas Burnham, of Boston, 
and sent him by Mr. Hammond, $11.25, '^"'^ the imperfect copy of Smollet's 
History which I had of him. Read Livy. Yesterday I conferred with 



'The name Hammond, as already inti- a weekly Old School paper, called the A'cr/'/^- 

mated, was a common one in the town of erii Watchman, edited by Rev. Joseph Har- 

Rochester. vey. Under this name it ran till 1S39, when 

^ This charge was higher than it would the name was again changed to The Congre- 

have been, probably, because of the distance gationalist, and with this title it continued 

which the doctor had to travel. two years more. 

^ Those were the stirring days of New ' The Mr. Oilman here mentioned must 

Bedford and Fairhaven. be Mr. Benjamin Ives Oilman, Sr., who was 

■* The Evangelical Magazine, here named, born in Exeter, N. H., 1766, married Hannah 
was published in Hartford for four years, Bobbins in 1790, and went to Ohio. His son, 
1832-1836. It was designed especially to of the same name, who was graduated at 
oppose the theological teachings of the New Brown University in 1813, had become con- 
Haven School. It was edited by Rev. S. nected with a business firm at Alton, and so 
H. Riddel, who was pastor in Glastonbury, it happened that his father's death occurred 
1827-TS37. In 1836 it was transformed into there. 



1833-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 329 

Dr. I. N. Southworth, and he refused to take any pecuniary compensation 
for all that he did for me in my sickness. An unexpected liberality. 

5. We have at length clear weather. Walked and visited. My rheu- 
matic pains are severe. Was out pretty late in the evening. Read. 

6. Walked out. Visited a school. Had some new flannels prepared 
for my complaints. At evening was in a little while at the singing-school 
in the new vestry. Wrote to my sister Battell. 

7. Tried to work a little abroad. Last evening read the President's 
Message.' It is better than we have sometimes had. Read the Bible. 
Wrote. 

8. Wet and unpleasant. Meetings pretty well attended. Preached 
a sermon on Ps. cxiii : 6, and with notes on i Cor. vii : 29. At night 
we had a violent storm of wind and rain. Expected to have had our first 
meeting in the vestry. The rain prevented. 

9. My rheumatic pains are steady, and at times severe. Walked out. 
W'orked some. Wrote. Read. The President has a difficult job with the 
United States Bank.^ He shows a bad temper. Visited. 

10. Wrote. Worked, carrying up wood, etc. Visited a school. Weather 
mild for the season. Visited. Read the Bible. 

11. Paid for a large load of oak and maple wood, a cord and a half, 
$8.44. Dined and spent considerable time with Uncle Le Baron. I can 
bear but little labor. At evening we had a good meeting in our new vestry- 
room and dedicated it. The room is a good one, and we had a serious and 
pleasant occasion. Received a letter from brother Ammi. 

12. Received a pleasing letter from S. T. Wolcott, and one from Mr. 
Gould, of Fairhaven. Walked a distance and visited a school. Got much 
fatigued. Visited several families. Was out late. Cold. 

13. Had one of the windows in my chambers nicely closed. Wrote. 
Worked some, but I labor in pain. Quite cold. Wrote the most of a letter 
to S. T. Wolcott. 

14. Rode to Fairhaven to exchange. Crossed to Bedford. Paid Taber, 
$9.50, and balanced his account of $37. I have had a number of valuable 
books of him. Mr. Gould rode with my sulky to Mattapoisett. A very cold 
and rough east wind. Went to Capt. Gibbs's. 

15. In the morning there was a little snow. Preached on Ps. cxiii: 6, 
and Ps. cxxxvii : i. Meeting rather thin. My rheumatism quite painful. 
After meeting Mr. Crosby brought Mr. Gould and carried me home.^ 
Attended the evening meeting in the vestry and spoke on Luke xii : 50. 



' This was the first session of the Twen- ^ President Jackson's contest with the 

ty-Third Congress. Dr. Robbins not only United States Bank is regarded very differ- 

likes this Message better than some, but, ently now than it was at the time. He was 

what is more, he likes the President himself moved by a sense of justice, 
much better just now than he did awhile ^ Dea. Crosby kindly let Dr. Robbins's 

before. His prompt action on the subject horse rest after his morning journey, and 

of nullification made him popular at the with his own horse and carriage took Mr. 

North. Gould home and brought Dr. R. back. 



33° 



DIARV OK REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. 



b^33- 



Was quite feeble. On Wednesday evening at the dedication of that room 
preached on Acts xvi : 13.' 

16. Am very feeble and unwell. Carried up wood. I must have exer- 
cise. At evening walked. Do but little of anything. Read y^oan of Arc' 

17. Read the Bible. After three days of rough east wind we have 
a violent storm of rain. Read the papers. Congress must be in a state 
of much anxiety. Wrote. Have much pain. At evening walked out. 

18. Am troubled with night sweats. Still wet and rainy. Read yoan 
of Arc. Had company. The evening meeting prevented by the rain. 
Read the Bible. 

19. The ground very wet and the roads much washed. Can do but very 
little. I am evidently not as well as I was last week. Rode with Mr. and 
Mrs. Crosby to Sippican, and married Joseph Meigs. ^ Returned. Found 
the going much better than I expected. It grew cold. 

20. Quite cold, but pleasant. My pains pretty bad. Read. Walked 
out feebly. On the i8th finished and sent my letter to S. T. Wolcott. 
Wrote. The death of Dr. Hyde/ of Lee, is a solemn admonition. He was 
sixty-six. He has a good biography in the New York Observer. 

21. Walked to Uncle Le Baron's. Got something fatigued and, I believe, 
took some cold. Read. The iSth sent Dea, Crosby, $10. 

22. In the morning felt quite feeble and was suddenly taken with a severe 
crick in the back. I was entirely confined through the day. The meeting 
was held without me. The forenoon we had a hard rain. The even- 
ing meeting at the vestry, they said, was quite full and interesting. God 
is very wise and holy in his righteous chastisements. Am very helpless. 

23. I was mostly confined to the house. Read a little. My cousins, 
John and Samuel Le Baron, called on me. Looked at accounts with Mr, 
Crosby. By advice of friends I wrote to Esq. Holmes, of Rochester, that 
I shall not be able to deliver a temperance address there next week, as I 
had undertaken to do. I am very weak. Have just read Mr. Hotchkiss's, of 
Saybrook,^ half-century sermon. His people have been a prodigy of union and 
harmony. 

24. The forenoon we had a hard rain. Removed to the south chamber 
of the house. My complaint alters but little. Received a letter from 
cousin S. P. Robbins, at Andover. Wrote. 



' He goes back to give the text used on 
the dedication of the vestry, which he forgot 
to put down at the time. 

'^ Robert Southey's poem, Joan of Arc, 
w'as first published in 1794, and there were 
later editions. This was the book, probably, 
which Dr. Robbins was reading. 

^ Joseph Meigs, Jr., was united in mar- 
riage with Mary Holmes. 

* Rev. Alvan Hyde, D. D., LL. D., whose 
name has many times appeared in the earlier 
pages of this diary. He was one of the solid 



divines and theological teachers of Massa- 
chusetts. He was born in Franklin, Ct., 
176S, graduated at Dartmouth College, 1788, 
settled for life at Lee, Mass. 

5 Rev. Frederick William Hotchkiss, who 
was settled in Old Saybrook, Ct., 17S3. This 
year, 1833, brought him to his half century, 
but he remained there eleven years longer, 
till his death, 1844. He was graduated at 
Yale in 1778, when students with two given 
names were as rare as students with only one 
now. 



l833-J PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 33 1 

25. Read in Unitarian publications.' I gain of my complaints very little. 
Holy is the Lord, but great are my trials.' 

26. The pain in my back was severe the most of the day. A considerable 
part of the time I kept my bed. At evening had company. Paid for the 
Recorder for the coming year, $2. Cold. 

27. Am something relieved of my pain, through mercy, but am very weak. 
Have pleasant weather, after much dark and wet. Read my Bible. Had 
considerable company. 

28. In the forenoon rode to the meeting-house and back. The first time 
I have been in the street this week. The ground is hard frozen. Something 
interrupted by company. 

29. In the forenoon kept house. Afternoon, by God's great mercy, went 
once more to his house and preached on Acts xxiv : 25. A pleasant day 
and quite full meeting. Spoke feebly, and have great debility. Near the 
close of the meeting took a little cold, which produces its natural effects. 
At evening Solomon R. Eaton and Maria S. Rogers came here and were 
married. Went to bed quite ill. 

30. Rose late. My back is very stiff and weak, but am spared the severe 
pain. Read the Bible. Cannot put on my boots without assistance. Read 
some of the interesting things done in Congress. Nothing can sustain the 
President but the obstinacy of party.^ 



' From 1830 to 1835 a good many of the dent than of party that sustained him, but 

old Congregational societies in the country his obstinacy was not found to be wholly 

towns of Massachusetts went over to the on the side of wrong. 

Unitarians. In Boston the change had taken Here sickness again intervened to break 

place earlier. the continuity of the diary. December 31 

^ A reverential but comprehensive sen- has no entry, and the whole of January, 

tence. i834) is left blank. In February he takes 

3 It was more the obstinacy of the Presi- his pen again, but is obliged to lay it aside. 



18 34- 

Fbbruary. 

1. It grows warm. Mr. Utley' came here in the forenoon to spend 
the Sabbath. Dr. Mackie says my state and prospects are good, and he 
shall not visit me any more unless sent for. Am mostly free from pain. 

2. Mr. Utley preached very acceptably. The committee of the society, 
having conferred with me, requested him to supply us for a time. I hope he 
will. The meetings were full, though bad walking. We have hardly had 
a pleasant Sabbath before in two months. My young lad takes care of me 
by day and night. Had rather a feeble day. 

3. Have pains in my back, but think I am better than yesterday. Am 
able to read some. The hard ground thaws fast. Paid a subscription for 
singing, $2. Paid Mr. Crosby, $6. Like the rest of the country, I have got 
quite low in funds.* The monthly concert was well attended. 

4. Began to write a little in my diar}-. A little mental exertion wearies 
me. Read some. Have considerable company.^ 

6. Experience much kindness from friends. Wrote with my own hand 
to my brother and sister Battell. A preacher was expected from Fairhaven 
at the evening meeting, but they were disappointed. The traveling is very 
bad. The meeting was said to be very full and solemn. 

March. 

1. Rode out twice. Called on Uncle Le Baron. We sent to Bedford, 
but can get no preacher for tomorrow. Wrote. My large plaster gives me 
ver}- restless nights. Paid for wine, $2. 

2. Rainy. We had no preaching. Meetings were regularly attended. 
Read the most of the Book of Acts. A young man called on me in a very 
serious |State of mind. At evening wrote to Mr. Breed,"* now at Bedford. 

3. A young man called on me early to converse on divine things. 
The Spirit of God is with us of a truth. Read. Had a good deal of 



' Reference has before been made to Rev. an entry for February- 6, the pen stops over 

Samuel Utley, whose ministerial life was till March. 

spent mainly in New Hampshire. He was a * William James Breed, a graduate of 

native of Dalton, Mass., and a graduate of Yale, 1831, and then in his senior year at 

Union College in 1S26, being then twenty- Andover. He was ordained in 1835, and 

eight years old. He was ordained as an made pastor of the Congregational church 

evangelist at Rochester, Mass., Nov. 2, 1831, in Nantucket, where he remained four years, 

and supplied the Third Church in Rochester He wis born in Lynn, Mass., in 1809, and 

for some years. died in West Taunton, Mass., i86g. He was 

^ Dr. Robbins does not often joke, even a man of good abilities, and was for five years 

in good health, but this may pass as a the successful financial agent of Yale College, 

jocose expression. He was, for a time. District Secretary of the 

^ Here again a day drops out, and after American Board in the Mississippi Valley. 

333 



334 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1834. 

company. Quite cold. The cold affects my complaint. The monthly con- 
cert was attended. 

4. Still cold. Feel much want of exercise. Read. Congressional 
proceedings are very important. Great and numerous petitions are pouring 
upon them from all parts of the country. The President degrades his office.' 
Had another young man to converse with me on divine things. Have little 
time or strength for study. Arranged newspapers. 

5. Rode out and made two calls. Saw Mr. Breed. He came and 
preached last evening, but must return today. His health is poor. The 
Baptists continue their meetings and make great efforts. Our hope is in 
infinite grace. The weather is like spring. 

6. Received a letter from Gorham D. Abbott, of Boston,^ requesting 
historical information. Made this almanack, which I have not been able 
to do before. Wrote the above. The air was damp, and did not go out. 
A young woman called on me with a recent hope. 

7. Rode out and spent the most of the day. Conversed with several 
persons in a serious state of mind. The Baptists are making great exertions 
to get recent converts into the water. Read late. 

8. Wrote. My health now seems to be pretty good, with the exception 
of a very weak and lame back. We had a hard rain. Began a letter to 
Mr. Abbott, of Boston, Can write but little. 

9. Cold and windy. We had no minister, though one was expected. 
Afternoon, through the great mercy of God, went to meeting, after an absence 
of nine Sabbaths. Spoke a good deal and performed the most of the ser- 
vice. The merciful work of grace evidently increases with us. Not greatly 
fatigued. 

10. Walked out twice and made calls. Saw a new burdened soul. 
Wrote. The cold continues and affects my back. Received of Capt. Free- 
man, my collector, $9.13. 

11. Wrote. Rode out and visited. The religious attention among us 
becomes a subject of common conversation. Conversed with Uncle Le Baron 
about our having a j^rotracted meeting. 



' We copy from Haydn's Dictionary of son's course was already beginning to take 

Dates an outline of what was then going on place. 

at Washington : " An act of Congress, 1832, ^ Gorham D. Abbott, son of Rev. Jacob 

rechartering it (United States Bank) was ve- and brother of Jacob and John S. C. Abbott, 

toed by President Jackson. He also caused was born in Brunswick, Me., Sept. 3, 1S07 ; 

the United States funds to be withdrawn graduated at Bowdoin College in 1826, and 

from it in September, 1S33. This act pro- died in South Xatick, Mass. (the native place 

duced a violent partisan feeling throughout of his wife), Aug. 3, 1874. Like the brothers 

the Union, and strong movements were made above named, he held the pen of a ready 

to impeach the President. A resolution of writer, and was the author of several books, 

censure was passed by the United States but his principal life-work, in connection 

Senate in March, 1834. It was expunged by with his brother Charles, was to found and 

the order of the Senate in 1S37." The last carry forward the Spingler Institute in New 

sentence of the above quotation shows that a York, for young ladies, more than 1,300 of 

great change of opinion touching Gen. Jack- whom were connected with the school. 



l834-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 335 

12. Read. Very pleasant. Walked out and made calls. Afternoon rode 
out and \isited. Have serious visits. In the evening rode to the vestry and 
attended a ver)- full and solemn meeting. How does it become me to bless 
the Lord for what he has done for me, and for what he is doing for my 
people. Mr. Lovell,' a Baptist minister, assisted at the meeting. 

13. Rode out and visited. My friend Capt. Freeman called on me 
in deep distress of mind. Afternoon we had a church meeting, and the 
church adopted a confession of faith and voted to renew covenant and have 
a public meeting. Quite fatigued. 

14. Wrote to my brethren, Holmes^ and Gould.' Walked and made 
calls. Went as far as the post office. Rode out and wrote a relation for 
a woman to be propounded to the church. Conversed with distressed 
persons. 

15. W^rote. Read. There seems to be no diminution of the sufferings 
and alarm of the country. Divine things seem to be a common object 
of attention and conversation among us. Studied some, but am quite weak. 
Had company. Cold and rainy. 

16. A pleasant day; attended the morning meeting, prayed, etc., and 
had a sermon read. Afternoon preached, with notes, on renewing covenant, 
on Deut. xxvi : 16-18. Received a kind letter from Mr. Gould. 

17. Wrote to Mr. Cobb"* and Mr. Bigelow.' The work of God, in his 
adorable mercy, seems to increase with us. The people have very good 
and profitable meetings without a minister. Visited Uncle Le Baron. 
W'alked from there home. Received a good letter from sister Battell. 

18. Rode out. Visited anxious persons. Paid a post office bill, for 
about eleven months, of $10.10. The largest I ever paid. Received a letter 
from Rev. Mr. Holmes. In the afternoon William S. White,* of Boston, and 
Eliza Willis, of this place, came to my chamber, very unexpectedly, and were 
married. Her two sisters were the only persons present. Wrote. At even- 
ing went into the meeting at the vestr}' late and assisted some. It was very 
solemn. One man was very much affected. Began a letter to sister Battell. 

19. Visited houses of seriousness. Wrote to Rev. Messrs. Eaton and 
Richmond. Read. Anxious persons called on me. Attended the evening 
meeting. Numbers had to leave for want of room. A good number arose 
at the special call for prayer and address. The Spirit of God is with 
us in great power. The late efforts of the Baptists seem to have effected 
but little. 

20. I find my complaints rather increased by my labors. I am very 
feeble. \\'rote to Rev, Messrs, Holmes and Roberts.' Visited, and was 



' Rev. Shubael Lovell. ^ Rev. Jonathan Bigelow, of the First 

- Rev. Sylvester Holmes, of New Bed- Church, Rochester, 
ford. ^ William S. White, in the Boston Direct- 

^ Rev. William Gould, of Fairhaven. ory for 1S34, bears the title of captain, and 

"* Rev. Oliver Cobb, D. D., of the South has a son of the same name. 
Church, Rochester, known as the Church in ' Rev. James A. Roberts, of New Bed- 

Sippican. ford. 



336 DIARY OF REV, THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [1834. 

visited. Divine things form the principal topic of conversation in this place. 
Paid for cutting and getting in a cord of wood, $i. Finished my letter 
to Mrs. Battell. Uncle Le Baron attended the evening meeting. 

21. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Utley. Read the Bible. Walked out. March 
winds ; I got quite chilled. Had company. Read. 

22. Wrote to Mr. Cobb,' of Sandwich. Received a very pretty present 
of fruit. Quite cold. Did not go out. Paid a public tax of $1.25. Finished 
my long letter to Gorham D. Abbott, of Boston, I am now daily bathing my 
back and hips with new rum. Read. 

23. Attended meeting and, through God's great mercies, once more 
performed the regular services. Preached a sermon on 2 Chron. xxx : 
26, 27, and without notes on Matt, xv : 22. Bore the labor quite as well 
as I expected. Uncle Le Baron attended the evening me'eting in the 
meeting-house. Gave notices relative to our protracted meeting. 

24. Received a letter from Rev. Mr. Utley. Wrote to Rev. Mr. Rich- 
mond.^ Visited. Read, 

25. Wrote in a lady's album. Find a new case of hopeful conversion ; 
an important character. Afternoon rode out and was caught in a sudden 
snow-squall. Got a little wet. We had a prett}' hard rain. I think I took 
some cold. 

26. Visited. My rheumatic pains are something worse than they have 
been. Attended to an old church difficulty. Traded, $1.67. Paid the 
barber who shaved me in my sickness, $2. Had the evening meeting at 
the meeting-house and preached on Luke xvi : 19, etc. Very tired. Prepar- 
ing for our public meeting. 

27. Am able to do but little. Read, Afternoon preached a preparatory 
lecture with notes on Ps. li : 10. Cold and windy. Had company. 

28. Wrote to Mr. Gould.' Endeavored to keep in on account of my 
complaints. One called on me with a new hope. Read the Bible. Read, 
Have considerable pain. 

29. Made calls. Dined out. Rode to Uncle Le Baron's. People appear 
to be preparing in various ways for our public meeting. Am pretty feeble. 
The Lord be my helper. 

30. An eventful day. Last evening and this morning wrote notes and 
preached in the forenoon on Matt, xii : 30. Afternoon the church renewed 
their covenant with great solemnity. After which we had the sacrament. 
No sermon in the afternoon. The church and congregation were very full. 
I trust we had the divine presence. These services commenced our pro- 
tracted meeting.* Mr. Gould came and preached in the evening at the 
meeting-house. I did not go out. 



' Rev. Asahel Cobb, before mentioned, ♦ Dr. Robbins, as we have before sug- 

settled at Sandwich, 1831-1842. gested, seems to have carried into that neigh- 

2 Rev. Thomas T. Richmond, pastor at borhood the idea of a four days' or protracted 
Dartmouth, 1832-1837. meeting. He had been in several in Con- 

3 Rev, William Gould, of Fairhaven. necticut before he went to Mattapoisett. 



I S3 4-] PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 337 

31. Our meetings were full and solemn. Business appears to be laid 
aside, and it seems like a continuance of the Sabbath. The usual seasons 
of prayer were observed. Mr. Utley preached in the forenoon, and Mr. Cobb 
in the afternoon, and Mr. Utley in the evening. Did not go out in the 
evening. We have increasing evidence of the divine presence. 

April. 

1. Mr. Ligelow preached in the morning, and Mr. Holmes in the after- 
noon. Mr. Gould addressed the children. Distressed souls get relief. 
The house full and very solemn. It began to rain in the morning and 
continued, at times quite hard, through the day. We concluded to have 
no evening meetjng. A good number of people present from out of the 
place. 

2. The rain continued through the day. The people have, I believe, 
attended as well, but we should have had more from abroad had the weather 
been pleasant. I had to preach in the forenoon, though feeble, no other 
minister except Mr. Le Baron' being present. Preached on Luke xviii : 13. 
Mr. Roberts ^ preached in the afternoon and evening. Mr. Gould addressed 
the youth. The rain abated towards evening, but I did not go out. About 
forty arose for special prayers. 

3. Fast. We conclude the regular continuance of our protracted meet- 
ing will be a proper method of observing the Fast. Mr. Roberts preached 
in the morning and went home at noon. Afternoon I made an address to 
the cliildren, then received the instructions and transactions of the meet- 
ing, and concluded the solemn, joyful scene. All seemed to be satisfied 
and to find their expectations surpassed. The divine favor seemed remarka- 
bly to rest upon the meeting. My health was mercifully sustained. In the 
evening attended a very full meeting at the vestry, while another was attended 
on the Neck. All praise is due to God.^ 

4. Walked and visited as much as I could. All are ready to speak 
on divine things. Many are deeply impressed. We have a rough east 
wind, and I took some cold. At evening had company ; anxious souls. 

5. Rode out and visited a distressed man. Am much pained with my 
maladies. Read. Had company. Great is the responsibility in directing 
anxious inquirers. We had, perhaps, fifteen hopeful conversions before the 
public meeting. God this week, in great mercy, has about doubled this 
number. Get no time to study or write. 

6. Am quite feeble and unwell, but rely on the great physician to carry 
me through the labors of the day. The sunrise prayer-meetings I do not 
attend. In the morning preached with notes on John iii : 7. Afternoon 
without notes on Jer. viii : 20. Attended the evening meeting at the vestry, 



' The senior pastor, too old to take any was a "four days'" meeting. At that time 

very active part in the meetings. these two modes of designation were essen- 

^ Rev. Jas. A. Roberts, of New Bedford. tially of the same meaning. The period of 

' This " protracted " meeting began on four days was chosen that the Sabbath duties 

Monday and ended on Thursday, so that it of ministers might not be interfered with. 



338 DIARY OF REV. THOMAS ROBBINS, D. D. [l834- 

overflowing full, and preached without notes on .Heb. iv : 7. Very tired 
and much pained in my back. The evening meeting verj' solemn. 

7. It is thought our meeting-house was never fuller than on the last 
Thursday.' \Vrote to Rev. Mr. Bigelow. Wrote the preceding eight days 
of diar}-." Walked out. Am very feeble and can do but little. May the 
Lord help me, when there is so much to be done. I was reappointed on 
the school committee at the town meeting. Attended the monthly concert, 
having been absent the three preceding. Received a letter from Mr. Bigelow. 
Meeting full, and the collection, $8.74. Much fatigued. 

8. I believe I took cold by being out yesterday. We have rough 
easterly winds. Walked out, but kept house the most of the day. Read. 

9. Read history. Visited. My pains are considerably severe. The 
evening rainy, and I did not go out. Received of Capt. Dexter, my collector, 
$30. Paid Mr. Crosby, $10, Wrote, 

ID. Walked out. I am quite feeble and get fatigued with a little exertion. 
Attended the evening meeting and preached without notes on Acts xiii : 46. 
Very full and solemn. It is a great self-denial that I must do so little. 

11. Vv'alked and visited. Find many thoughtful, burdened souls. At- 
tended a meeting in the evening. Gave my friend Jesse, fifty cents. Have 
a good deal of pain. Dined out. Read. 

12. Last night had pretty hard rheumatic pains. Very warm. Walked 
out. Wrote. Gave a poor man, fifty cents. Wrote notes for preaching. 

13. In the morning my pains were considerably severe. Very pleasant 
and warm. Preached a sermon on Rom. i : 18, and with notes on Matt. 
xvi : 26. Had the evening meeting in the meeting-house and preached 
without notes on Luke xv : 7. Full meetings and divine influences seem 
to continue with us. Was carried through the services better than I feared. 

14. Rode to New Bedford. It is nearly four months since I have been 
out of my parish. Very favorable political intelligence from Connecticut 
and the city of New York.^ Read. My malady is better than for some days 
past. Wrote. 

15. Wrote to my brother Francis. Was out the most of the day visiting 
serious ones. At evening attended a meeting. Quite warm. • The work 
of God with us is still encouraging. 

16. Read. Dined out. Warm like summer. Am very languid. There 
was much violence at the late New York election. Attended the evening 
meeting and preached on Luke xix : 44. Find some new instances of hope. 

17. Visited. Rode to the Neck and preached in the evening on 



' The last day of the protracted meeting. Democratic Member of Congress and United 

^ In such cases he wrote probably from States Senator, was chosen Governor instead 

brief hints or memoranda set down as the of Henry W. Edwards, who had also been a 

days were passing. Democratic Member of Congress and Sen- 

^ Wc do not discover the nature of this ator, and the year before had been elected 

favorable intelligence from Connecticut and Governor. Mr Foot, after holding the ofifice 

New Vork c;ty. In Connecticut, that spring, of Governor for one year, gave place again 

the Hon. Samuel A. Foot, who had been a to Mr. Edwards. 



i834.] 



PASTOR AT MATTAPOISETT. 



339 



Isa. xxl : II. The weather changed suddenly and became quite cool. Very 
tired and have considerable pain. 

i8. Read. Wrote. Rev. Mr. King,' of Tiverton, called on me. Visited. 
Attended the evening meeting. Mr. King assisted. 

ig. Quite cold. Rode out with company and visited serious persons. 
The mercy of God toward us is very great. Read the Bible. 

20. The forenoon quite wet ; did not go out. Afternoon preached a ser- 
mon on Ps. xl : 4. Had a very full evening