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V 



THE DICTATOR 



NEW LIBRARY NOVELS. 

WITNESS TO THE DEED. By Geo. Manville Fenn. 

3 vols. 

ROPES OF SAND. By R. E. Francii.i.on. 3 vols. 
THE DICTATOR. By Justin McCarthy, M. P. 3 vols. 
RUJUB, THE JUGGLER. By G. A. Henty. 3 vols. 
TIME'S REVENGES. By D. Christie Murray. 3 vols. 
LADY VERNER'S FLIGHT. By Mrs. Hungerford. 

2 vols 

A FAMILY LIKENESS. By M. B. M. Croker. 3 vols. 
THE MASTER OF ST. BENEDICT'S. By Alan St. 

AUBYN. 2 vols. 

MRS. JULIET. By Mrs. Alfred Hunt. 3 vols. 
GEOFFORY HAMILTON. By Edward H. Cooper. 

2 vols. 

London : CIIATTO & WINDUS, Piccadilly, W. 



THE DICTATOR 



BY 



JUSTIN McCarthy, m.p 



AUTHOR OF 'dear LADY DISDAIN ' DOXKA QUIXOTE* ETC. 




IN THREE VOLUMES 
VOL. I. 



1^0 lib on 
CHATTO & WINDUS, PICCADILLY 

1893 



PKINTKD nv 
SrOTTISWOODE AND CO., NKW STREET SQUARE 

LON UON 



V. I 



CONTENTS 



OF 



THE FIRST VOLUME 



CHAPTER PAGE 

I. AN EXILE IN LONDON 1 

. II. A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 13 


\ III. AT THE GARDEN GATE 25 

-- IV. THE LANGLEYS OO 

(V> V. 'MY GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' . . .95 

" VI. ' HERE IS MY THRONE — BID KINGS COME BOW TO IT ' 126 

;i VII. THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO . . . .170 

' VIIT. ' I WONDER WHY ? ' 194 

C IX. THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 219 

i 



c 





THE DICTATOR 

CHAPTER I 

AX EXILE IX LOXDOX 

The May sunlight streamed in througli tlie 
Avindow, making curious patterns of the 
curtains upon the carpet. Outside, the tide 
of hfe was flowing fast ; the green leaves of the 
Park were already offering agreeable shade 
to early strollers ; the noise of cabs and 
omnibuses liad set in steadily for the day. 
Outside, Knightsbridge was awake and active ; 
inside, sleep reigned with quiet. The room 
was one of the best bedrooms in Paulo's 
Ilotel ; it was really tastefully furnished, 
soberly decorated, in the style cf the fifteenth 
VOL. I. B 



2 THE DICTATOR 

French Louis. A very good copy of Watteaii 
was over the mantel-piece, the only picture in 
the room. There had been a fire in the 
hearth overnight, for a grey ash lay there. 
Outside on the ample balcony stco.l a laurel 
in a big blue pot, an emblematic tribute on 
Paulo's part to honourable defeat which might 
yet turn to victory. 

There were books about the room : a 
volume of Napoleon's maxims, a French novel, 
a little volume of Sophocles in its original 
Greek. A uniform-case and a sword- case 
stood in a corner. A map of South America 
lay partially unrolled upon a chair. The 
dainty gilt clock over the mantel-piece, a 
genuine heritage from the age of Louis Quinze, 
struck eight briskly. The Dictator stirred in 
his sleep. 

Presently there was a tapping at the door 
to the left of the bed, a door communicating 
with the Dictator's private sitting-room. Still 



AN EXILE IN LONDON 3 

the Dictator slept, undisturbed by the slight 
sound. The sound was not repeated, but the 
door was softly opened, and a young man put 
his head into the room and looked at the 
slumbering Dictator. The young man was 
dark, smooth-shaven, with a look of quiet 
alertness in his face. He seemed to be about 
thirty years of age. His dark eyes watched 
the sleeping figure affectionately for a few 
seconds. ' It seems a pity to wake him,' he 
muttered, and he was about to draw his head 
back and close the door, when the Dictator 
stirred again, and suddenly waking swung 
himself round in the bed and faced his visitor. 
The visitor smiled pleasantly. ' Buenos dias, 
Escelencia,' he said. 

The Dictator propped himself up on his left 
arm and looked at him. 

* Good morning, Hamilton,' he answered. 
' What's the good of talking Spanish here ? 
Better fall back upon simple Saxon until we 



4 lllE DICTATOR 

can see the sun rise again in Gloria. And as 
for the Excellency, don't you tliink ^ve had 
better drop tliat too ? ' 

' Until we see the sun rise in Gloria,' said 
Hamilton. lie had pushed tlie door open 
now, and entered the room, leaning carelessly 
against the door-post. ' Yes ; that may not 
be £0 far off, please Heaven ; and, in the 
meantime, I tliink we had better stick to tlie 
title and all forms. Excellency.' 

The Dictator laughed again. ' Very well, 
as you please. The world is governed by 
form and title, and I suppose such dignities 
lend a decency even to exile in men's eyes. 
Is it late? I was tired, and slept like a dog.' 

' Oh no ; it's not late,' Hamilton answered. 
' Only just struck eight. You wished to be 
called, cr I sliouldn't have disturbed you.' 

' Y^es, yes ; one must get into no bad 
habits in London. All right ; I'll get up now, 
and be Avith you in twenty minutes.' 



AX EXILE IX LOXDOX 5 

' Very well, Excellency.' Hamilton bowed 
as he spoke in Ins most official manner, and 
withdrew. The Dictator looked after him, 
langhing softly to himself. 

' L'excellence malgre lui,' he thought. ' An 
excellency in spite of myself. Well, I dare 
say Hamilton is right ; it may serve to fill my 
sails when I have any sails to fill. In the 
meantime let us get up and salute London. 
Thank goodness it isn't raining, at all events.' 

He did his dressino- unaided. ' The best 
master is his own man ' was an axiom with 
him. In the most splendid days of Gloria 
he had always valeted himself ; and in Gloria, 
where assassination was always a possibility, it 
was certainly safer. His body servant filled 
his bath and brought him his brushed clothes ; 
for the rest he waited upon himself. 

He did not take long in dressing. All his 
movements were quick, clean, and decisive ; 
the movements of a man to whom moments 



6 THE DICTATOR 

are precious, of a man who lias learnt by long 
experience liow to do everything as shortly 
and as well as possible. As soon as he was 
finished he stood for an instant before the 
long looking-glass and surveyed himself. A 
man of rather more than medium height, 
strongly built, of soldierly carriage, wearing 
his dark frock-coat like a uniform. His left 
hand seemed to miss its familiar sword-hilt. 
The face was bronzed by Southern suns ; the 
brown eyes were large, and bright, and keen ; 
the hair was a fair brown, faintly touched 
liere and there with grey. Ilis full moustache 
and beard were trimmed to a point, almost in 
the Ehzabethan fashion. Any serious student 
of humanity would at once have been attracted 
by the face. Habitually it wore an expression 
of gentle gravity, and it could smile very 
sweetly, but it was the face of a strong man, 
nevertheless, of a stubborn man, of a man 
ambitious, a man with clear resolve, personal 



AX EXILE IX LOXDON 7 

or otherwise, and prompt to back his resolve 
with all he had in life, and with life itself. 

He put into his buttonhole the green-and- 
yellow button which represented the order of 
the Sword and Myrtle, the great Order of La 
Gloria, which in Gloria was invested with all 
the splendour of the Golden Fleece ; the order 
which could only be worn by those w^ho had 
actually ruled in the repubhc. That, accord- 
ing to satirists, did not greatly limit the 
number of persons who had the right to w^ear 
it. Then lie formally saluted himself in the 
looking-glass. ' Excellency,' he said again, 
and laughed again. Then he opened his 
double windows and stepped out upon the 
balcony. 

London was looking at its best just then, 
and his spirits stirred in grateful response to the 
sunlight. How^ dismal everything would have 
•seemed, he was thinking, if the streets had 
been soaking under a leaden sky, if the trees 



8 THE DICTATOR 

luid been dripping dismally, if his glance 
directed to the street below had rested only 
npon distended umbrellas glistening like the 
backs of gigantic crabs ! Now everything was 
bri^^ht, and London looked as it can look some- 
times, positively beautiful. Paulo's Hotel stands, 
as everybody knows, in the pleasantest part 
of Kniohtsbridore, facing; Kensinoton Gardens. 
The sky was brilliantly blue, the trees were 
deliciously a'reen ; Knightsbridge below him 
lay steeped in a pure gold of sunlight. The 
animation of the scene cheered him sensibly. 
May is seldom summery in England, but this 
might have been a royal day of June. 

Opposite to him he could see the green-grey 
roofs of Kensington Palace. At his left he 
could see a public-house which bore the name 
and stood upon the site of the hostelry where 
the Pretender's friends gathered on the morn- 
ing when they expected to see Queen Anne 
succeeded by the heir to the Ilouse of Stuart. 



AN EXILE IN LONDON 9 

Looking from the one place to the other, he 
reflected upon the events of tliat morning 
when those gentlemen waited in vain for the 
expected tidings, Avhen Bolingbroke, seated in 
the council chamber at 3^onder palace, was so 
harshly interrupted. It pleased the stranger 
for a moment to trace a resemblance between 
the fallen fortunes of the Stuart Prince and 
his own fallen fortunes, as dethroned Dictator 
of the South American Eepublic of Gloria. 
' London is my St. Germain's,' he said to him- 
self with a laugh, and he drummed the 
national hymn of Gloria upon the balcony-rail 
with his fingers. 

His gaze, wandering over the green 
bravery of the Park, lost itself in the blue sk3^ 
He had forgotten London ; his thoiiglits were 
with another place under a sky of stronger 
blue, in the White House of a white square in 
a white town. He seemed to hear the rattle 
of rifle shots, shrill trumpet calls, angry party 



lo THE DICTATOR 

cries, the clatter of desperate charges across 
the open space, the angry despair of repulses, 
the piteous pageant of civil war. Knights- 
bridge knew nothing of all tliat. Danes may 
have fought there, the chivalry of the White 
Eose or the Eed Eose ridden there, gallant 
Cavaliers have spurred along it to fight for 
their king. All that was past ; no troops 
moved there now in hostility to brethren of 
their blood. But to that one Englishman 
•standing there, moody in spite of the sunlight, 
the scene whicli his eyes saw was not the 
tranquil London street, but the Plaza Nacional 
of Gloria, red with blood, and ' cut up,' in the 
painter's sense, with corpses. 

' Shall I ever get back ? Shall I ever get 
back ? ' that was the burden to which liis 
thoughts were dancing. Ilis spirit began to 
rage witliin him to think that he was here, in 
London, helpless, almost alone, when he ought 
to be out there, sword in hand, dictating 



AN EXILE IN LONDON ii 

terms to rebels repentant or impotent. lie 
gave a groan at the contrast, and then lie 
laughed a little bitterly and called himself a 
fool. ' Thin^TS mis^ht be worse,' he said. 
' They might have shot me. Better for them 
if they had, and worse for Gloria. Yes, I am 
sure of it — worse for Gloria ! ' 

His mind was back in London now, back 
in the leafy Park, back in Knightsbridge. lie 
looked down into the street, and noted that a 
man was loitering on the opposite side. The 
man in the street saw that the Dictator noted 
him. He looked up at the Dictator, looked 
up above the Dictator, and, raising his hat, 
pointed as if towards the sky. The Dictator, 
following the direction of the gesture, turned 
slightly and looked upwards, and received a 
sudden thrill of pleasure, for just above him, 
high in the air, he could see the flutter of a 
mass of green and yellow, the colours of the 
national flag of Gloria. Mr. Paulo, mindful 



12 THE DICTATOR 

of wliat was due even to exiled sovereignty, 
had liown tlie Gloiia flag iu honour of the 
illustrious guest beneath his roof. When that 
guest looked down again the man in the street 
had disappeared. 

' That is a good omen. I accept it,' said 
the Dictator, ' I wonder wdio my friend w\as ? ' 
He turned to go back into his room, and in 
doing so noticed the laurel. 

'Another good omen,' he said. ' ^ly 
fortunes feel more summer-like already. The 
old flai? still 11 vino- over me, an unknown friend 
to cheer me, and a laurel to prophesy victory 
— what more could an exile wish ? His break- 
fast, I think,' and on this reflection he Avent 
back into his bedroom, and, opening tlie door 
through which Hamilton had talked to him, 
entered the sittino'-room. 



CHAPTER II 

A GEXTLEMAX ADVEXTUEErw 

The room wliicli the Dictator entered was an 
attractive room, bright with flowers, which 
Miss Paulo had been pleased to arrange her- 
self — bright with tlic persevering sunshine. 
It was decorated, like his bedroom, with the 
restrained richness of the mid-eighteenth 
century. With discretion, Paulo had sliglitly 
adapted the accessories of the room to please 
by suggestion the susceptibilities of its 
occupant. A marble bust of Caesar stood 
upon the dwarf bookcase. A copy of a 
famous portrait of Xapoleon was on one of 
the walls ; on another an en^ravinfir of Dr. 
Francia still more delicately associated great 



14 THE DICTATOR 

leaders with South America. At a table in 
one corner of the room — a table honeycombed 
■with drawers and pigeon-holes, and covered 
with papers, letters, documents of all kinds — 
Hamilton sat writing rapidly. Another table 
nearer the window, set apart for the Dictator's 
own use, had everything ready for business — 
had, moreover, in a graceful bowl of tinted 
glass, a large yellow carnation, his favourite 
flower, the flower which had come to be the 
badge of those of his inclining. This, again, 
was a touch of Miss Paulo's sympathetic 
handiwork. 

The Dictator, whose mood had brightened, 
smiled again at this little proof of personal 
interest in his welfare. As he entered, 
Hamilton dropped his pen, sprang to his feet, 
and advanced respectfully to greet him. The 
Dictator pointed to the yellow carnation. 

* The way of the exiled autocrat is made 
smooth for him here, at least,' he said. 



A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 15 

Hamilton inclined his head gravely. ' Mr. 
Paulo knows what is due,' he answered, ' to 
John Ericson, to the victor of San Felipe and 
the Dictator of Gloria. He knows how to 
entertain one who is by right, if not in fact, 
a reigning sovereign.' 

' He hangs out our banner on the outer 
wall,' said Ericson, with an assumed gravity 
as great as Hamilton's own. Then he burst 
into a laugh and said, 'My dear Hamilton, it's 
all very well to talk of the victor of San Fehpe 
and the Dictator of Gloria. But the victor of 
San Felipe is the victim of the Plaza Xacional, 
and the Dictator of Gloria is at present but 
one inconsiderable item added to the exile 
world of London, one more of the many 
refugees who hide their heads here, and are 
unnoted and unknown.' 

His voice had fallen a little as his sentences 
succeeded each other, and the mirth in his 
voice had a bitter ring in it when he ended. 



1 6 THE DICTATOR 

Ills eye ranged from tlic bust to the picture, 
and from the picture to the engraving con- 
templatively. 

Something in tlie contemphition appeared 
to cheer him, for his look was brighter, and 
his voice had the old joyous ring in it when 
he spoke again. It was after a few minutes' 
silence deferentially observed by Hamilton, 
who seemed to follow and to respect the 
course of his leader's thoughts. 

' Well,' he said, ' how is tlie old world 
aettins: on ? Does she roll with unabated 
energy in her familiar orbit, indifferent to the 
fLill of states and the fate of rulers ? Stands 
Gloria where slie did ? ' 

Hamilton laughed. 'The world has cer- 
tainlv not c^rown honest, but tliere are honest 
men in her. Here is a telegram from Gloria 
wliich came tliis morning. It was sent, of 
course, as usual, to our City friends, who sent 
it on here immediately.' He handed the 



A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 17 

despatch to liis cliief, who seized it and read 
it eagerly. It seemed a commonplace message 
enough — the communication of one commer- 
cial gentleman in Gloria with another com- 
mercial gentleman in Farringdon Street. But 
to the eyes of Hamilton and of Ericson it 
meant a great deal. It was a secret com- 
munication from one of the most influential 
of the Dictator's adlierents in Gloria. It was 
full of hope, strenuously encouraging. The 
Dictator's face lightened. 

'Anything else ? ' he ashed. 

' These letters,' Hamilton answered, taking 
up a bundle from the desk at which lie had 
been sitting. 'Five are from money-lenders 
offering to finance your next attempt. There 
are thirty-three requests for autographs, 
twenty-two requests for interviews, one very 
pressing from " The Catapult," another from 
" The Moon " — Society papers, I believe ; ten 
invitations to dinner, six to luncheon ; an 

VOL. I. C 



i3 



1 8 THE DICTATOR 

offer from a well-known lecturing agency to 
run you in the United States ; an application 
from a publisher for a series of articles en- 
titled " Howl Governed Gloria," on your own 
terms ; a letter from a certain Oisin Stewart 
Sarrasin, who calls himself Captain, and signs 
himself a soldier of fortune.' 

' What does he want ? ' asked Ericson. 
' His seems to be the most interesting thing 
in the lot.' 

' He offers to lend you his well-worn 
sword for the re-establishment of your rule. 
He hints that he has an infallible plan of 
victory, that in a word he is your very man.' 

The Dictator smiled a little grimly. ' I 
thought I could do my own fighting,' he said. 
' But I suppose everybody will be wanting to 
help me now, every adventurer in Europe 
Avho thinks that I can no longer help myself. 
I don't think we need trouble Captain 
Stewart. Is that his name ? ' 



A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 19 

' Stewart Sarrasin.' 

' Sarrasin — all right. Is that all ? ' 

'Practically all,' Hamilton answered. ' A 
few other letters of no importance. Stay ; 
no, I forgot. These cards were left this 
morning, a little after nine o'clock, by a 
young lady who rode up attended by her 
groom.' 

'A young lady,' said EricsoD, in some 
surprise, as he extended his hand for the 
cards. 

' Yes, and a very pretty young lady too,' 
Hamilton answered, ' for I happened to be in 
the hall at the time, and saw her.' 

Ericson took the cards and looked at 
them. They were two in number ; one was 
a man's card, one a woman's. The man's 
card bore the legend ' Sir Eupert Langley,' 
the woman's was merely inscribed 'Helena 
Langley.' The address was a house at 
Prince's Gate. 

c 2 



20 THE DICTATOR 

The Dictator looked up surprised. ' Sir 
Eupert Langley, the Foreign Secretary ? ' 

'I suppose it must be,' Hamilton said, 
' there can't be two men of the same name. 
I have a dim idea of reading something about 
his daughter in the papers some time ago, 
just before our revolution, but I can't re- 
member what it was.' 

' Very good of them to honour fallen 
greatness, in any case,' Ericson said. ' I 
seem to have more friends than I dreamed of. 
In the meantime let us have breakfast.' 

Hamilton rang the bell, and a man 
brought in the coffee and rolls, which con- 
stituted the Dictator's sim])le breakfast. 
While he was eating it he glanced over tlie 
letters that had come. 'Better refuse all 
these invitations, Hamilton.' 

Hamilton expostulated. He was Ericson's 
intimate and adviser, as well as secretary. 

* Do you think that is the best thing to 



A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 21 

do ? ' he suggested. ' Isn't it better to show 
yourself as much as possible, to make as 
many friends as you can ? There's a good 
deal to be clone in that way, and nothing 
much else to do for the present. Eeally I 
think it would be better to accept some of 
them. Several are from influential political 
men.' 

' Do you think these influential political 
men would help me ? ' the Dictator asked, 
good-humouredly cynical. ' Did they help 
Kossuth? Did they help Garibaldi? What 
I want are war-ships, soldiers, a big loan, not 
the agreeable conversation of amiable poli- 
ticians.' 

' Nevertheless,' Hamilton began to pro- 
test. 

His chief cut him short. 'Do as you 
please in the matter, my dear boy,' he said. 
*It can't do any harm, anyhow. Accept all 
you think it best to accept ; decline the 



22 THE DICTATOR 

others. I leave myself confidently in your 
hands.' 

' What are you going to do this morning ? ' 
Hamilton inquired. ' There are one or tAvo 
people we ought to think of seeing at once. 
We mustn't let the grass grow under our 
feet for one moment.' 

' My dear boy,' said Ericson good- 
humouredly, ' the grass shall grow under 
my feet to-day, so far as all that is concerned. 
I haven't been in London for ten years, and I 
have something to do before I do anything 
else. To-morrow you may do as you please 
with me. But if you insist upon devoting 
this day to the cause ' 

' Of course I do,' said Hamilton. 

' Then I graciously permit you to work at 
it all day, while I go off and amuse myself in 
a way of my own. You might, if you can 
spare the time, make a call at the Foreign 
Office and say I should be glad to wait on 



A GENTLEMAN ADVENTURER 23 

Sir Eupert Langley there, any day and hour 
that suit him — we must smooth down the dig- 
nity of these Foreign Secretaries, I suppose ? ' 

' Oh, of course,' Hamilton said, peremp- 
torily. Hamilton took most things gravely; 
the Dictator usually did not. Hamilton 
seemed a little put out because his chief 
should have even indirectly suggested the 
possibility of his not waiting on Sir Eupert 
Langley at the Foreign Office. 

' All right, boy ; it shall be done. And 
look here, Hamilton, as we are going to do 
the right thing, why should you not leave 
cards for me and for yourself at Sir Eupert 
Langley's house ? You might see the 
daughter.' 

' Oh, she never heard of me,' Hamilton 
said_ hastily. 

' The daughter of a Foreign Secretary ? ' 

' Anyhow, of course I'll call if you wish 
it. Excellency.' 



24 THE DICTATOR 

' Good boy ! And do 5^011 know I liave 
taken a fancy that I slioukl like to see this 
soldier of fortune, Captain ' 

' Sarrasin ? ' 

' Sarrasin — yes. Will you drop him a 
line and suggest an interview — pretty soon ? 
You know all about my times and engage- 
ments.' 

' Certainly, your Excellenc}',' Hamilton 
replied, with almost military formality and 
precision ; and the Dictator departed. 



25 



CHAPTEE III 

AT THE GAEDEX GATE 

LoxDO^'ERS are so liabituated to hear London 
abused as an ugly city that they are disposed 
too often to accept the accusation humbh'. 
Yet the accusation is singularly unjust. If 
much of London is extremely unlovely, much 
might fairly be called beautiful. The new 
Chelsea that has arisen on the ashes of the 
old mieht well arouse the admiration even of 
the most exasperated foreigner. There are 
recently created regions in that great tract of 
the earth's surface known as South Kensino;- 
ton which in their quaintness of architectural 
form and braveness of red brick can defy the 
gloom of a civic March or Xovember. Old 



26 THE DICTATOR 

London is disappearing day by day, but bits 
of it remain, bits dear to those familiar witli 
them, bits worth the enterprise of the adven 
tiirous, which call for frank admiration 
and frank praise even of people who hated 
London as fully as Heinrich Heine did. But 
of all parts of the great capital none perhaps 
deserve so fully the title to be called beauti- 
ful as some portions of Hampstead Heath. 

Some such reflections floated lightly 
through the mind of a man who stood, on 
this May afternoon, on a high point of 
Hampstead Hill. He had climbed thither 
from a certain point just beyond the Eegent's 
Park, to which he had driven from Knights- 
bridge. From that point out the way was 
a familiar way to him, and he enjoyed 
walking along it and noting old spots and 
the changes that time had wrought. Now, 
having reached the highest point of the 
ascent, he paused, standing on tlie grass of 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 27 

the heath, and turniDg round, with his back 
to the country, looked down upon the 
town. 

There is no better place from which to 
survey London. To impress a stranger with 
any sense of the charm of London as a whole, 
let him be taken to that vantage-ground and 
bidden to gaze. The great city seemed to lie 
below and around him as in a hollow, tinged 
and glorified by the luminous haze of the 
May day. The countless spires which pointed 
to heaven in all directions gave the vast 
agglomeration of buildings something of an 
Italian air ; it reminded the beholder agree- 
ably of Florence. To right and to left the 
gigantic city spread, its grey wreath of 
eternal smoke resting lightly upon its fretted 
head, the faint roar of its endless activity 
coming up distinctly there in the clear wind- 
less air. The beholder surveyed it and 
sighed slightly, as he traced meaningless 



28 THE DICTATOR 

symbols on the turf with the point of his 
stick. 

' What did Ca3sar say ? ' he murmured. 
< Better be the first man in a viUage than the 
second man in Rome ! Well, there never 
was any chance of my being the second man 
in Rome ; but, at least, I have been the first 
man in mv villaij^e, and that is something?. I 
suppose I reckon as about the last man there 
now. Well, we shall see.' 

He shrucf^ed his shoulders, nodded a fare- 
well to the city below him, and, turning 
round, proceeded to walk leisurely across 
the Heath. The grass was soft and springy, 
the earth seemed to answer with agree- 
able elasticity to his tread, the air was 
exquisitely clear, keen, and exhilarating. He 
began to move more briskly, feehng quite 
boyish again. The years seemed to roll away 
from him as rifts of sea fog roll away before 
a wind. 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 29 

Even Gloria seemed as if it bad never 
been — aye, and things before Gloria was, 
events when he was still really quite a young 
man. 

He cut at the tufted grasses with his stick, 
swino^incs: it in dexterous circles as if it had 
been his sword. He found himself humming 
a tune almost unconsciously, but when he 
paused to consider what the tune was he found 
it was the national march of Gloria. Then he 
stopped humming, and went on for. a while 
silently and less joyousl3\ But the gladness 
of the fine morning, of the clear air, of the 
familiar place, took possession of him again. 
His face once more unclouded and his spirits 
mounted. 

' The place hasn't changed much,' he said 
to himself, looking around him while he walked. 
Then he corrected himself, for it had changed 
a good deal. There were many more red 
brick houses dotting the landscape than there 



30 THE DICTATOR 

had been when he last looked upon it some 
seven years earlier. 

In all directions these red houses were 
springing up, quaintly gabled, much veran- 
dahed, pointed, fantastic, brilhant. They 
made the whole neighbourhood of the Heath 
look hke the Merrie England of a comic opera. 
Yet they were pretty in their way ; many were 
designed by able architects, and pleased with 
a balanced sense of proportion and an impres- 
sion of beauty and fitness. Many, of course, 
lacked this, were but cheap and clumsy imi- 
tations of a prevailiug mode, but, taken all 
together, the effect was agreeable, the effect of 
the varied reds, russet, and scarlet and warm 
crimson against the fresh green of the grass 
and trees and the pale faint blue of tlie May 
sky. 

To the observer they seemed to suit very 
well the place, the climate, the conditions of 
life. They were infinitely better than suburban 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 31 

and rural cottages people used to build when 
he was a boy. His mind drifted away to the 
kind of houses he had been more famihar with 
of late years, houses half Spanish, half tropical, 
with their wide courtyards and gaily striped 
awnings and white walls glaring under a glar- 



ing sun. 



' Yes, all this is very restful,' he thought — 
' restful, peaceful, wholesome.' He found him- 
self repeating softly the lines of Browning, 
beginning, 'Oh to be in England now that 
April's here,' and the transitions of thought 
carried him to that other poem beginning ' It 
was roses, roses, all the way,' with its satire 
on fallen ambition. Thinking of it, he first 
frowned and then laughed. 

He walked a little way, cresting the rising 
ground, till he came to an open space with an 
unbroken view over the level country to Bar- 
net. Here, the last of the houses that could 
claim to belong to the great London army 



33 THE DICTATOR 

stood alone iii its own considerable space of 
ground. It was a very old-fashioned house ; 
it had been half farmhouse, half liall, in the 
latter days of the last century, and the dull 
red brick of its walls, and the dull red tiles of 
its roof showed warm and attractive through 
the green of the encirclino' trees. There was 
a small garden in front, planted with pine 
trees, through which a winding path led up to 
the low porch of the dwelhng. Behind the 
house a very large garden extended, a great 
garden which he knew so well, with its lengtlis 
of undulating russet orchard wall, and its divi- 
sions into flower garden and fruit garden and 
vegetable garden, and the field beyond, wdierc 
successive generations of ponies fed, and wdiere 
he had loved to play in boyhood. 

He rested his liand on the upper rim of 
the garden gate, and looked wdth curious 
affection at the inscription in faded gold letters 
that ran along it. The inscription read, * Bla- 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 33 

rulfsgarth,' and he remembered ever so far 
back asking what that inscription meant, and 
being told that it was Icelandic, and that it 
meant the Garth, or Farm, of the Blue Wolf. 
And he remembered, too, being told the tale 
from which the name came, a tale that was 
related of an ancestor of his, real or imaginary, 
who had lived and died centuries ago in a grey 
northern land. It was curious that, as he 
stood there, so many recollections of his child- 
hood should come back to him. He was a 
man, and not a very young man, when he last 
laid his hand upon that gate, and yet it seemed 
to him now as if he had left it when he was 
quite a little cliild, and was returning now for 
the first time with the feelings of a man to the 
place where he had passed his infancy. 

His hand slipped down to the latch, but he 
did not yet lift it. He still hngered while he 
turned for a moment and looked over the wide 
extent of level smiling country that stretched 

VOL. I. D 



54 THE DICTATOR 

out and away before him. The last time he 
had looked on that sweep of earth he was 
going off to seek adventure in a far land, in a 
new world. He had thought himself a broken 
man ; he was sick of England ; his thoughts 
in their desperation had turned to the country 
which was only a name to him, the country 
where lie was born. Now the day came vividly 
back to liim on which he had said good-bye 
to that place, and looked with a melancholy 
disdain upon the soft English fields. It was 
an earlier season of the year, a day towards 
the end of March, when the skies were still 
but faintly blue, and there was little green 
abroad. Ten years ago : how many things 
had passed in those ten years, what struggles 
and successes, what struggles again, all ending 
in that three days' fight and the last stand in 
the Plaza Nacional of Valdorado ! He turned 
away from the scene and pressed his hand 
upon the latch. 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 35' 

As lie touclied the latch someone appeared 
in the porch. It was an old lady dressed in 
black. She had soft grey hair, and on that 
grey hair she wore an old-fashioned cap that 
was almost coquettish by very reason of its 
old fashion. She had a very sweet, kind face, 
all cockled with wrinkles like a sheet of crum- 
pled tissue paper, but very beautiful in its age. 
It was a face that a modern French painter 
would have loved to paint — a face that a 
sculptor of the Eenaissance would have de- 
lighted to reproduce in faithful, faultless bronze 
or marble. 

At sight of the sweet old lady the Dic- 
tator's heart gave a great leap, and he pressed 
down the latch hurriedly and swung the gate 
wide open. The sound of the clicking latch 
and the swinging gate slightly grinding on the 
path aroused the old lady's attention. She 
saw the Dictator, and, with a little cry of joy, 
running with an almost girlish activity to meet 

D 2 



36 THE DICTATOR 

the bearded man who was coming rapidly 
along the pathway, in anotlier moment she 
had caught him in her arms and was clasping 
him and kissing him enthusiastically. The 
Dictator returned her caresses warmly. He 
was smihng, but there were tears in his 
eyes. It was so odd being welcomed back 
like this in the old place after all that had 
passed. 

* I knew you would come to-day, my 
dear,' the old lady said half sobbing, half 
laughing. ' You said you would, and I knew 
you would. You would come to your old 
aunt first of all.' 

' Why, of course, of course I would, my 
dear,' the Dictator answered, softly touching 
the grey hair on the forehead below the 
frilled cap. 

'But I didn't expect you so early,' the 
old lady went on. 'I didn't think you would 
get up so soon on your first morning. 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 37 

You must be so tired, my dear, so very- 
tired.' 

She was holding his left hand in her 
right now, and they were walking slowly side 
by side up by the little path through the fir 
trees to the house. 

' Oh, I'm not so very tired as all that 
comes to,' he said with a laugh. 'A long 
voyage is a restful thing, and I had time to 

get over the fatigue of the ' he seemed to 

pause an instant for a word ; then he went 
on, ' the trouble, while I was on board the 
" Almirante Cochrane." Do you know they 
were quite kind to me on board tlie 
*' Almirante Cochrane " ? ' 

The old lady's delicate face flushed 
angrily. ' The wretches, the wicked 
wretches ! ' she said quite fiercely, and the 
thin fingers closed tightly upon his and 
5hook, agitating the lace rufiles at her 
wrists. 



38 THE DICTATOR 

The Dictator laughed agam. It seemed 
too strange to have all those ^vild adven- 
tures quietly discussed in a Ilampstead 
garden with a silver-haired elderly lady in 
a cap. 

' Oh, come,' he said, ' they weren't so bad ; 
tliey weren't half bad, really. Why, you 
know, they might have shot me out of hand. 
I think if I had been in their place I should 
have shot out of hand, do you know, 
aunt ? ' 

'Oh, surely they would never have dared 
— you an Englishman ? ' 

' I am a citizen of Gloria, aunt.' 
' You who were so good to them.' 
' Well, as to my being good to tliem, 
there are two to tell that tale. The gentle- 
men of the Congress don't put a liigli price 
upon my goodness, I fancy.' He laughed a little 
bitterly. 'I certainly meant to do them 
some good, and I even thought I had sue- 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 39 

ceeded. My dear aunt, people don't always 
like being done good to. I remember that 
myself wlien I was a small boy. I used to 
fret and fume at the things which were done 
for my good ; that was because I was a child. 
The crowd is always a child.' 

They had come to the j)orch by this 
time, and had stopped short at the threshold. 
The little porch was draped in flowers and 
foliage, and looked very pretty. 

' You were always a good child,' said the 
old lady affectionately. 

Ericson looked down at her rather wist- 
fully. 

' Do you think I was ? ' he asked, and 
there was a tender irony in his voice which 
made the playful question almost pathetic. 
' If I had been a good child I should have 
been content and had no roving disposition, 
and have found my home and my world 
at Hampstead, instead of straying off into 



40 THE DICTATOR 

another hemisphere, only to be sent back at 
last like a bad penny.' 

' So you would,' said the old lady, very 
softly, more as if she were speaking to herself 
than to him. ' So you would if ' 

She did not finish her sentence. But her 
nephew, who knew and understood, repeated 
the last word. 

' If,' he said, and he, too, sighed. 

The old lady caught the sound, and with 
a pretty little air of determination she called 
up a smile to her face. 

' Shall we go into the house, or shall we 
sit awhile in the garden ? It is almost too 
fine a day to be indoors.' 

* Oh, let us sit out, please,' said Ericson. 
He had driven the sorrow from his voice, and 
its tones were almost joyous. ' Is the old 
garden-seat still there ? ' 

' Why, of course it is. I sit there always 
in fine weather.* 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 41 

They wandered round to the back by a 
path that skirted the house, a path all 
broidered with rose-bushes. At the back, 
the garden was very large, beginning with 
a spacious stretch of lawn that ran right up 
to the wide French windows. There were 
several noble old trees which stood sentinel 
over this part of the garden, and beneath one 
of these trees, a very ancient elm, was the 
sturdy garden-seat which the Dictator remem- 
bered so well. 

' How many pleasant fairy tales you have 
told me under this tree, aunt,' said the 
Dictator, as soon as they had sat down. ' I 
should like to lie on the* grass again and 
listen to your voice, and dream of Njal, and 
Grettir, and Sigurd, as I used to do.' 

' It is your turn to tell me stories now,' 
said the old lady. ' Not fairy stories, but 
true ones.' 

The Dictator lausrhed. ' You know all that 



42 THE DICTATOR 

there is to tell,' lie said. ' What my letters 
didn't say you must have found from the 
newspapers.' 

' ]3ut I want to know more than you 
wrote, more than the newspapers gave — 
everything.' 

' In fact, you want a full, true, and par- 
ticular account of the late remarkable 
revolution in Gloria, which ended in the 
deposition and exile of the alien tyrant. 
My dear aunt, it would take a couple of 
wrecks at the least computation to do the 
theme justice.' 

' I am sure tliat I shouldn't tire of listen- 
in<z,' said Miss Ericson, and there were tears 
in her bright old eyes and a tremor in her 
brave old voice as she said so. 

The Dictator laughed, but he stooped and 
kissed the old lady again very affectionately. 

' Why, you would be as bad as I used to 
be,' he said. 'I never was tired of your 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 43 

sagas^ and when one came to an end I a\ anted 
a new one at once, or at least the old one 
over again.' 

He looked away from her and all around 
the garden as he spoke. The winds and 
rains and suns of all those years had altered 
it but little. 

' We talk of the shortness of life,' he said ; 
' but sometimes life seems quite long. Think 
of the years and years since I was a little 
fellow, and sat here where I sit now, then, as 
now, by your side, and cried at the deeds of 
my forbears and sighed for the gods of the 
North. Do you remember ? ' 

' Oh, yes ; oh, yes. How could I forget? 
You, my dear, in your bustling life might 
forget ; but I, day after day in this great 
old garden, may be forgiven for an old 
woman's fancy that time has stood still, 
and that you are still the httle boy I love 
so well/ 



44 THE DICTATOR 

She held out her hand to liim, and he 
clasped it tenderly, full of an affectionate 
emotion that did not call for speech. 

There were somewhat similar thoughts in 
both their minds. He was asking himself if, 
after all, it would not have been just as well 
to remain in that tranquil nook, so sheltered 
from the storms of life, so consecrated by- 
tender affection. What had he done that was 
worth rising up to cross the street for, after 
all ? He had dreamed a dream, and had been 
harshly awakened. What was the good of it 
all ? A melancholy seemed to settle upon him 
in that place, so filled witli the memories of 
his childhood. As for his companion, she was 
asking herself if it would not have been better 
for him to stay at home and live a quiet 
English life, and be her help and solace. 

Both looked up from their reverie, met 
each other's melancholy glances, and smiled. 

' Why,' said Miss Ericson, ' what nonsense 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 45 

this is ! Here are we who have not met for 
ages, and we can find nothing better to do than 
to sit and brood ! We ought to be ashamed 
of ourselves.' 

' We ought,' said the Dictator, ' and for my 
poor part I am. So you want to hear my 
adventures ? ' 

Miss Ericson nodded, but the narrative was 
interrupted. The wide French windows at the 
back of the house opened and a man entered 
the garden. His smooth voice was heard 
explaining to the maid that he would join 
Miss Ericson in the garden. 

The new-comer made his way along the 
garden, with extended hand, and bhnking 
amiably. The Dictator, turning at his 
approach, surveyed him with some surprise. 
He was a larcre, looselv made man, with a large 
white face, and his somewhat ungainly body 
was clothed in loose hght material that was 
almost white in hue. His large and slightly 



46 THE DICTATOR 

surprised eyes were of a kindly blue ; his 
hair was a vague yellow ; his large mouth 
was weak ; his pointed chin was undecided. 
He dimly suggested some association to the 
Dictator ; after a few seconds he found that the 
association was with the Knave of Hearts in 
an ordinary pack of playing-cards. 

' This is a friend of mine, a neighbour who 
often pays me a visit,' said the old lady 
hurriedly, as the white figure loomed along 
towards them. ' He is a most agreeable man, 
very companionable indeed, and learned, 
too — extremely learned.' 

This was all that she had time to say before 
the white gentleman came too close to them to 
permit of further conversation concerning his 
merits or defects. 

The new-comer raised his hat, a huge, 
white, loose, shapeless felt, in keeping with his 
ill-defined attire, and made an awkward bow 
which at once included the old lady and the 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 47 

Dictator, on whom the blue eyes beamed for 
a moment in good-natured wonder. 

' Good morning, Miss Ericson,' said the 
new-comer. He spoke to Miss Ericson ; but 
it was evident that his thoughts were dis- 
tracted. His vague bkie eyes were fixed in 
benign bewilderment upon the Dictator's 
face. 

Miss Ericson rose ; so did Iier nephew. 
Miss Ericson spoke. 

' Good morning, Mr. Sarrasin. Let me 
present you to my nephew, of whom you have 
heard so much. JSTephew, this is Mr. Gilbert 
Sarrasin.' 

The new-comer extended both hands ; they 
were very large liands, and very soft and very 
white. He enfolded the Dictator's extended 
right hand in one of his, and beamed upon 
him in unaffected joy. 

' Not your nephew, Miss Ericson — not the 
hero of the hour ? Is it possible ; is it pos- 



48 THE DICTATOR 

sible ? My dear sir, my very dear and 
honoured sir, I cannot tell you how rejoiced I 
am, how proud I am, to have the privilege of 
meeting you.' 

The Dictator returned his friendly clasp 
with a warm pressure. He was somewhat 
amused by this unexpected enthusiasm. 

' You are very good indeed, Mr. Sarrasin.' 
Then, repeating the name to himself, he 
added, ' Your name seems to be familiar to 
me.' 

The white gentleman shook his head with 
something like playful repudiation. 

' Not my name, I think ; no, not my name, 
I feel sure.' He accent uatedthe possessive pro- 
noun strongly, and then proceeded to explain 
the accentuation, smiling more and more 
amiably as he did so. ' No, not my name ; 
my brother's — my brother's, I fancy.' 

' Your brother's ? " the Dictator said in- 
quiringly. Tliere was some association in 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 49 

his mind with the name of Sarrasin, but he 
could not reduce it to precise knowledge. 

' Yes, my brother/ said the white gentle- 
man. ' My brother, Oisin Stewart Sarrasin, 
whose name, I am proud to think, is familiar 
in many parts of the world.' 

The recollection he was seeking came to 
the Dictator. It was the name that Hamilton 
had given to him that morning, the name of 
the man who had written to him, and who had 
signed himself ' a soldier of fortune.' He 
smiled back at the white gentleman. 

'Yes,' he said truthfully, 'I have heard 
your brother's name. It is a striking name.' 

The white gentleman was dehghted. He 
rubbed his large white hands together, and 
almost seemed as if he might purr in the 
excess of his gratification. He glanced enthu- 
siastically at Miss Ericson. 

' Ah ! ' he went on. ' My brother is a 
remarkable man. I may even say so in your 

VOL. I. E 



50 THE DICTATOR 

illustrious presence ; he is a remarkable man. 
There are degrees, of course,' and he bowed 
apologetically to the Dictator ; ' but he is 
remarkable.' 

' I have not the least doubt of that,' said 
the Dictator politely. 

The white gentleman seemed much pleased. 
At a sign from Miss Ericson he sat down upon 
a garden-chai^, still slowly and contentedly 
rubbing his white hands together. Miss 
Ericson and her nephew resumed their seats. 

' Captain Sarrasin is a great traveller,' 
Miss Ericson said explanatorily to the Dictator. 
The Dictator bowed his head. He did not 
quite know what to say, and so, for the 
moment, said nothing. The white gentleman 
took advantage of the pause. 

' Yes,' he said, ' yes, my brother is a great 
traveller. A wonderful man, sir ; all parts of 
the wide world are as familiar as home to 
him. The deserts of the nomad Arabs, the 



AT THE GARDEN GATE sr 

Prairies of the great West, the Steppes of the 
frozen North, the Pampas of South America ; 
why, he knows them all better than most 
people know Piccadilly.' 

' South America ? ' questioned the Dictator ; 
* your brother is acquainted with South 
America ? ' 

'Intimately acquainted,' replied Mr. 
Sarrasin. ' I hope you will meet him. You 
and he might have much to talk about. He 
knew Gloria in the old days.' 

The Dictator expressed courteously his 
desire to have the pleasure of meeting Captain 
Sarrasin. ' And you, are you a traveller as 
well .P ' he asked. 

Mr. Sarrasin shook his head, and when 
he spoke there was a certain accent of plain- 
tiveness in his reply. 

' No,' he said, ' not at all, not at all. My 
brother and I resemble each other very 
slightly. He has the w^anderer's spirit ; I am 

E 2 



•u<^iTV OF U-UliUli 



5i THE DICTATOR 

a confirmed stay-at-home. While he thinks 
nothing of starting off at any moment for the 
other ends of the earth, I have never been 
outside our island, have never been much 
away from London.* 

' Isn't that curious ? ' asked Miss Ericson, 
who evidently took much pleasure in the 
conversation of the white gentleman. The 
Dictator assented. It was very curious. 

' Yet I am fond of travel, too, in my way,' 
Mr. Sarrasin went on, delighted to have found 
an appreciative audience. ' I read about it 
largely. I read all the old books of travel, 
and all the new ones, too, for the matter of 
that. I have quite a little library of voyages, 
travels, and explorations in my little home. 
I should like you to see it some time if you 
should so far honour me.' 

The Dictator declared that he should be 
delighted. Mr. Sarrasin, much encouraged, 



went on agam. 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 53 

' There is nothing I like better than to sit 
by my fire of a winter's evening, or in my 
garden of a summer afternoon, and read of 
the adventures of great travellers. It makes 
me feel as if I had travelled myself.' 

' And Mr. Sarrasin tells me what he has 
read, and makes me, too, feel travelled,' said 
Miss Ericson. 

' Perhaps you get all the pleasure in that 
way with none of the fatigue,' the Dictator 
suggested. 

Mr. Sarrasin nodded. ' Very likely we 
do. I think it was a Kempis who protested 
against the vanity of wandering. But I fear 
it was not h. Kempis's reasons that deterred 
me ; but an invincible laziness and uncon- 
querable desire to be doing nothing.' 

* Travelhng is generally uncomfortable,' 
the Dictator admitted. He was beginning to 
feel an interest in his curious, whimsical 
interlocutor. 



54 THE DICTATOR 

' Yes,' Mr. Sarrasin went on dreamily. 
* But there are times when I regret the 
absence of experience. I have tramped in 
fancy through tropical forests with Stanley or 
Cameron, dwelt in the desert with Burton, 
battled in Nicaragua with Walker, but all 
only as it were in dreams.' 

' We are such stuff as dreams are made 
of,' the Dictator observed sententiously. 

' And our little lives are rounded by a 
sleep,' Miss Ericson said softly, completing the 
quotation. 

' Yes, yes,' said Mr. Sarrasin ; ' but mine 
are dreams within a dream.' He was begin- 
ning to grow quite communicative as he sat 
there with his big stick between his knees, 
and his amorphous felt hat pushed back from 
his broad white forehead. 

' Sometimes my travels seem very real to 
me. If I have been reading Ford or King- 
lake, or Warburton or Lane, I have but to 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 55 

lay the volume down and close my eyes, and 
all that I have been reading about seems to 
take shape and sound, and colour and life. 
I hear the tinkling of the mule-bells and the 
guttural cries of the muleteers, and I see the 
Spanish market-place, with its arcades and its 
ancient cathedral ; or the delicate pillars of 
the Parthenon, yellow in the clear Athenian 
air ; or Stamboul, where the East and West 
join hands ; or Egypt and the desert, and the 
Nile and the pyramids ; or the Holy Land 
and the walls of Jerusalem — ah ! it is all very 
wonderful, and then I open my eyes and blink 
at my dying fire, and look at my slippered 
feet, and remember that I am a stout old 
gentleman who has never left his native land, 
and I yawn and take my candle and go to my 
bed; 

There was something so curiously pathetic 
and yet comic about the white gentleman's 
case, about his odd blend of bookish know- 



56 THE DICTATOR 

ledge and personal inexperience, that the 
Dictator could scarcely forbear smiling. But 
he did forbear, and he spoke with all gravity, 

* I am not sure that you haven't the better 
part after all,' he said. ' I find that the chief 
pleasure of travel lies in recollection. Yoii 
seem to get the recollection without the 
trouble.* 

* Perhaps so,' said Mr. Sarrasin ; ' perhaps 
so. But I think I would rather have had the 
trouble as well. Believe me, my dear sir, 
believe a dreamer, that action is better than 
dreams. Ah ! how much better it is for you, 
sir, to sit here, a disappointed man for the 
moment it may be, but a man with a glowing 
past behind him, than, like me, to have 
nothing to look back upon ! My adventures; 
are but compounded out of the essences of 
many books. I have never really lived a 
day ; you have lived every day of your life. 
Believe me, you are much to be envied.' 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 57 

There was genuine conviction in the white 
gentleman's voice as he spoke these words, 
and the note of genuine conviction troubled 
the Dictator in his uncertainty whether to 
laugh or cry. He chose a medium course 
and smiled slightly. 

' I should think, Mr. Sarrasin, that you 
are the only one in London to-day who looks 
upon me as a man much to be envied. 
London, if it thinks of me at all, thinks of me 
only as a disastrous failure, as an unsuccessful 
exile — a man of no account, in a word.' 

Mr. Sarrasin shook his head vehemently. 
' It is not so,' he protested, * not so at all. 
Nobody really thinks Hke that, but if every* 
body else did, my brother Oisin Stewart 
Sarrasin certainly does not think like that^ 
and his opinion is better worth having than 
that of most other men. You have no 
warmer admirer in the world than my 
brother, Mr. Ericson.' 



58 THE DICTATOR 

The Dictator expressed much satisfaction 
at having earned the good opinion of Mr. 
Sarrasin's brother. 

' You would like him, I am sure/ said 
Mr. Sarrasin. ' You would find him a kindred 
spirit.' 

The Dictator graciously expressed his 
confidence that he should find a kindred spirit 
in Mr. Sarrasin's brother. Then Mr. Sarrasin, 
apparently much delighted with his interview, 
rose to his feet and declared that it was 
time for him to depart. He shook hands 
very warmly with Miss Ericson, but he held 
the Dictator's hands with a grasp that was 
devoted in its enthusiasm. Then, expressing 
repeatedly the hope that he might soon 
meet the Dictator again, and once more 
assuring him of the kinship between the 
Dictator and Captain Oisin Stewart Sarrasin, 
the white gentleman took himself off, a pale 
bulky figure looming heavily across the grassy 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 59 

lawn and tlirougli the Frencli window into 
the darkness of the sitting-room. 

When he was quite out of sight the 
Dictator, who had followed his retreating 
figure with his eyes, turned to Miss Ericson 
with a look of inquiry. Miss Ericson 
smiled. 

' Who is Mr. Sarrasin ? ' the Dictator 
asked. ' He has come up since my time.' 

' Oh, yes ; he first came to live here about 
six years ago. He is one of the best souls in 
the world ; simple, good-hearted, an eternal 
child.* 

' What 18 he ? ' the Dictator asked. 

' Well, he is nothing in particular now. He 
was in the City, his father was the head of a 
•very wealthy firm of tea merchants, Sarrasin, 
Jermyn, & Co. When the father died a few 
years ago he left all his property to ^Ir. 
Gilbert, and then Mr. Gilbert went out of 
business and came here.' 



eo THE DICTATOR 

' He does not look as if he would make a 
very good business man/ said the Dictator. 

* No ; but he was very patient and devoted 
to it for liis father's sake. Now, since he has 
been free to do as he likes, he has devoted him- 
self to folk-lore.' 

* To folk-lore ? ' 

' Yes, to the study of fairy tales, of com- 
parative mythology. I am quite learned in it 
now since I have had Mr. Sarrasin for a 
neighbour, and know more about "Puss in 
Boots " and '' Jack and the Beanstalk " than I 
ever did when I was a girl.' 

' Eeally,' said the Dictator, with a kind of 
sigh. ' Does he devote himself to fairy tales ? ' 
It crossed his mind that a few moments before 
he had been thinking of himself as a small 
child in that garden, with a taste for fairy 
tales, and regretting that he had not stayed 
in that garden. Now, with the dust of battle 
and the ashes of defeat upon him, he came 



AT THE GARDE A' GATE 6i 

back to find a man much older than himself, 
who seemed still to remain a child, and to be 
entranced with fairy tales. ' I wish I were 
like that,' the Dictator said to himself, and 
then the veil seemed to lift, and he saw again 
the Plaza Nacional of Gloria, and the Govern- 
ment Palace, where he had laboured at laws 
for a free people. ' No,' he thought, ' no ; 
action, action.' 

' What are you thinking of ? ' asked Miss 
Ericson softly. ' You seem to be quite lost in 
thought.' 

' I was thinking of Mr. Sarrasin,' answered 
the Dictator. 'Forgive me for letting my 
thoughts drift. And the brother, what sort 
of man is this wonderful brother ? ' 

' I have only seen the brother a very few 
times,' said Miss Ericson dubiously. ' I can 
hardly form an opinion. I do not think he is 
as nice as his brother, or, indeed, as nice as 
his brother believes him to be.' 



62 THE DICTATOR 

' What is his record ? ' 

' He didn't get on with his father. He was 
sent against his will to China to work in the 
firm's offices in Shanghai. But he hated the 
business, and broke away and entered the 
Chinese army, I believe, and his father was 
furious and cut him off. Since then he has 
been all over the world, and served all sorts 
of causes. I believe he is a kind of soldier of 
fortune.' 

The Dictator smiled, remembering Captain 
Sarrasin's own words. 

' And has he made his fortune ? ' 

'Oh, no; I believe not. But Gilbert be- 
haved so well. When he came into the pro- 
perty he wanted to share it all with his 
disinherited brother, for whom he has the 
greatest affection.' 

* A good fellow, your Gilbert Sarrasin.' 

' The best. But the brother wouldn't take 
it, and it was with difficulty that Gilbert in- 



AT THE GARDEN GATE 63 

duced him to accept so much as would allow 
him a small certainty of income.' 

'So. A good fellow, too, your Oisin 
Stewart Sarrasin, it would seem ; at least in 
that particular/ 

' Yes ; of course. The brothers don't 
meet very often, for Captain Sarrasin ' 

' Where does he take his title from ? ' 

' He was captain in some Turkish irregular 
cavalry.' 

' Turkish irregular cavalry ? That must 
be a delightful corps,' the Dictator said with a 
smile. 

' At least he was captain in several services,' 
Miss Ericson went on ; ' but I believe that is 
the one he prefers and still holds. As I was 
going to say, Captain Sarrasin is almost always 
abroad.' 

'Well, I feel curious to meet him. They 
are a strange pair of brothers.' 

' They are, but we ought to talk of nothing 



64 THE DICTATOR 

but you to-day. All, my dear, it is so good 
to have you with me again.* 

' Dear old aunt ! ' 

' Let me see much of you now that you 
have come back. Would it be any use asking 
you to stop here ? ' 

' Later, every use. Just at this moment I 
mustn't. Till I see how things are going to 
turn out I must live down there in London. 
But my heart is here with you in this green 
old garden, and where my heart is I hope to 
bring my battered old body very often. I 
will stop to luncheon with you if you will let 
me.' 

' Let you ? My dear, I wish you were 
always stopping here.' And the grey old lady 
put her arms round the neck of the Dictator 
and kissed him again. 



65 



CHAPTEE lY 

THE LANGLEYS 

That same day there was a luncheon party 
at the new town house of the Langleys, 
Prince's Gate. The Langleys were two in 
number all told, father and daughter. 

Sir Eupert Langley was a remarkable man, 
but his daughter, Helena Langley, was a 
much more remarkable woman. The few 
handfuls of people who considered them- 
selves to constitute the world in London had 
at one time talked much about Sir Eupert, 
but now they talked a great deal more about 
his daughter. Sir Eupert was once grimly 
amused, at a great party in a great house, to 

VOL. I. r 



66 THE DICTATOR 

bear himself pointed out by a knowing yoiitli 
as Helena Langley's father. 

There was a time when people thought, 
and Sir Eupert thought with them, that 
Eupert Langley was to do great deeds in the 
world. He had entered political life at an 
early age, as all the Langleys had done since 
the days of Anne, and he made more than a 
figure there. He had travelled in Central 
Asia in days when travel there or anywhere 
else was not so easy as it is now, and he 
had published a book of his travels before 
he was three-and-twenty, a book which was 
highly praised, and eagerly read. He was 
saluted as a sort of coming authority upon 
Eastern affairs in a day when the importance 
of Eastern affairs was bec^innino* to dawn 
dimly upon the insular mind, and he made 
several stirring speeches in the House of 
Commons which confirmed his reputation as 
a coming man. He was very dogmatic, vciy 



THE LAXGLEYS .67 

determined in his opinions, very confident of 
his own superior knowledge, and possessed of 
a deo^ree of knowledge which justified his con- 
fidence and annoyed his antagonists. He 
formed a httle party of his own, a party of 
strenuous young Tories who recognised the 
fact that the world was out of joint, but who 
rejoiced in the conviction that they were born 
for the express purpose of setting it right. In 
Sir Ptupert they found a leader after their own 
heart, and they raUied around him and jibed 
at their elders on the Treasury Bench in a way 
that was qnite distressing to the sensitive 
organs of the party. 

Sir Eupert and his adherents preached the 
new Toryism of that day — the new Toryism 
which was to work wonders, which was to 
obliterate Eadicalism by doing in a practical 
Tory way, and conformably to the best tra- 
ditions of the kingdom, all that Eadicalism 
dreamed of Toryism, he used to say in those 



68 THE DICTATOR 

hot-blooded, hot-lieaded days of his youth^ 
Toryism is the triumph of Truth, and the 
phrase became a catchword and a watchword, 
and frivolous people called his little party the 
T.T.s— the Triumphers of Truth. People 
versed in the political history of that day and 
hour will remember how the newspapers were 
full of the T.T.s, and what an amazing re- 
juvenescence of political force was supposed 
to be behind them. 

Then came a general election which carried 
the Tory Party into power, and which proved 
the strength of Langley and his party. He 
was offered a place in the new Government, 
and accepted it — the Under-Secretaryship for 
India. Through one brilhant year he re- 
mained the most conspicuous member of the 
Administration, irritating his colleagues by 
daring speeches, by innovating schemes ; 
alarming timid partj^-men by a Toryism which 
in certain aspects was scarcely to be distin- 



THE LANG LEYS 69 

guished from the reddest Eadicalism. One 
brilliant year there Tvas in which he blazed 
the comet of a season. Then, thwarted in 
some enterprise, faced by a refusal for some 
darinor reform of Indian administration, he 
acted, as he had acted always, impetuously. 

One morning the ' Times ' contained a long, 
fierce, witty, bitter letter from Piupert Langley 
assailing the Government, its adherents, and, 
above all, its leaders in the Lords. That same 
afternoon members coming to the Chamber 
found Langley sitting, no longer on the 
Treasury Bench, but in the corner seat of the 
second row below the gangway. It was soon 
known all over the House, all over town, all 
over England, that Piupert Langley had re- 
signed his office. The news created no little 
amazement, some consternation in certain 
quarters of the Tory camp, some amusement 
among the Opposition sections. One or two 
of the extreme Eadical papers made overtures 



70 THE DICTA 1 OR 

to LaDgley to cross tlie floor of the House, and 
enter into alliance with men whose principles 
so largely resembled his own. These over- 
tures even took the form of a definite appeal 
on the part of Mr. Wynter, M.P., then a rising 
Eadical, who actually spent half an hour with 
Sir Eupert on the terrace, putting his case 
and the case of youtliful Eadicalism. 

Sir Eupert only smiled at the suggestion, 
and put it gracefully aside. ' I am a Tory of 
the Tories,' he said ; ' only my own people 
don't understand me yet. But they have got 
to fmd me out.' That was undoubtedly Sir 
Eupert's conviction, that he was strong enough 
to force the Government, to coerce his party, 
to compel recognition of his opinions and 
acceptance of his views. ' Tliey cannot do 
without me,' he said to himself in his secret 
heart. He was met by disappointment. The 
party chiefs made no overtures to him to re- 
consider his decision, to withdraw his resigna- 



THE LANG LEYS 71 

tion. Another man was immediately put in 
liis place, a man of mediocre ability, of 
commonplace mind, a man of routine, 
methodical, absolutely lacking in brilhancy 
or originality, a man who would do exactly 
what the Government wanted in the Govern- 
ment way. There was a more bitter blow 
still for Sir Eupert. There were in the Go- 
vernment certain members of his own little 
Adullamite party of the Opposition days, 
T.T.s who had been given office at his 
insistence, men whom he had discovered, 
brought forward, educated for political 
success. 

It is certain that Sir Eupert confidently 
expected that these men, his comrades and 
followers, would endorse his resignation with 
their own, and that the Government would 
thus, by his action, find itself suddenly 
crippled, deprived of its young blood, its 
ablest Ministers. The confident expectation 



72 THE DICTATOR 

was not realised. The T.T.s remained where 
they were. The Government took advantage 
of the shght readjustment of places caused by- 
Sir Eupert's resignation to give two of the 
most prominent T.T.s more important offices, 
and to those offices the T.T.s stuck like 
limpets. 

Sir Eupert was not a man to give way 
readily, or readily to acknowledge that he was 
defeated. He bided his time, in his place 
below the gangway, till there came an Indian 
debate. Then, in a House which had been 
roused to intense excitement by vague 
rumours of his intention, he moved a resolu- 
tion which was practically a vote of censure 
upon the Government for its Indian policy. 
Always a fluent, ready, ornate speaker, Sir 
Eupert was never better than on that despe- 
rate night. His attack upon the Government 
was merciless; every word seemed to sting 
like a poisoned arrow ; his exposure of the 



THE L ANGLE YS 73 

imbecilities and ineptitudes of the existing 
system of administration was complete and 
cruel ; his scornful attack upon ' the Limpets ' 
sent the Opposition into paroxysms of 
delighted laughter, and roused a storm of 
angry protest from the crowded benches 
behind the Ministry. That night was the 
memorable event of the session. For long 
enough after those who witnessed it carried 
in their memories the picture of that pale, 
handsome young man, standing up in that 
corner seat below the gangway and assailing 
the Ministry of which he had been the most 
remarkable Minister with so much cold 
passion, so much fierce disdain. ' By Jove ! 
he's smashed them!' cried Wynter, M.P., 
excitedly, when Eupert Langley sat down 
after his speech of an hour and a quarter, 
which had been listened to by a crowded 
House amidst a storm of cheering and dis- 
approval. Wynter was sitting on a lower 



74 THE DICTATOR 

gangway seat, for every space of sitting room 
in the cliamber was occupied that night, and 
he had made this remark to one of the Opposi- 
tion leaders on the front bench, craning over 
to call it into his ear. The leader of the 
Opposition heard Wynter's remark, looked 
round at tlie excited Eadical, and, smiling, 
shook his head. The excitement faded from 
Wynter's face. His chief was never wrong. 
The usual exodus after a long speech did 
not take place when Eupert sat down. It 
was expected that the leader of the House 
would reply to Sir Eupert, but the expec- 
tation was not realised. To the surprise of 
almost everyone present the Government put 
up as their spokesman one of the men who 
had been most alhed with Sir Eupert in 
the old T.T. party, Sidney Blenheim. Some- 
thing like a frown passed over Sir Eupert's 
face as Blenheim rose ; then he sat immov- 
able, expressionless, while Blenheim made 



THE LANG LEYS 75 

his speech. It was a very clever speech, 
dehcately ironical, sharply cutting, tinged 
all through with an intolerable condescension, 
with a gallingly gracious recognition of 
Langley's merits, an irritating regret for his 
errors. There was a certain languidness in 
Blenheim's deportment, a certain air of sweet- 
ness in his face, which made his satire the 
more severe, his attack the more telhng. 
People were as much surprised as if what 
looked like a dandy's cane had proved to be a 
sword of tempered steel. Whatever else that 
night did, it made Blenheim's reputation. 

Langley did not carry a hundred men 
with him into the lobby against the Govern- 
ment. The Opposition, as a body, supported 
the Administration ; a certain proportion of 
Eadicals, a much smaller number of men 
from his own side, followed him to his fall. 
He returned to his seat after the numbers 
had been read out, and sat there as com- 



76 THE DICTATOR 

posedly as if nothing had happened, or as 
if tlie ringing cheers which greeted the 
Government triumph were so many tributes 
to his own success. But those who knew, or 
thought they knew, Rupert Langley well said 
that the hour in which he sat there must 
have been an hour of terrible suffering. 
After that great debate, the business of the 
rest of the evening fell ratlier flat, and was 
conducted in a House whicli rapidly thinned 
down to little short of emptiness. When 
it was at its emptiest, Eupert Langley rose, 
lifted his hat to the Speaker, and left the 
Chamber. 

It would not be strictly accurate to say 
that he never returned to it that session ; but 
practically the statement would be correct. 
He came back occasionally during the short 
remainder of the session, and sat in his new 
place below the gangway. Once or twice he 
put a question upon the paper; once or twice 



THE LANGLEYS 77 

he contributed a short speech to some debate. 
He still spoke to his friends, with cold confi- 
dence, of his inevitable return to influence, to 
power, to triumph ; he did not say how this 
would be broui^ht about — he left it to be 
assumed. 

Then paragraphs began to appear in the 
papers announcing Sir Eupert Langley's in- 
tention of spending the recess in a prolonged 
tour in India. Before the recess came Sir 
Eupert had started upon this tour, which was 
extended far beyond a mere investigation 
of the Indian Empire. When the House met 
again, in the February of the following year. 
Sir Eupert was not among the returned 
members. Such few of his friends as were in 
communication with him knew, and told their 
knowledge to others, that Sir Eupert was 
engaged in a voyage round the world. Not 
a voyage round the world in the hurried 
sense in which people occasionally made then, 



78 THE DICTATOR 

and frequently make now — a voyage round 
the world, scampering, like the hero of Jules 
Verne, across land and sea, fast as steam- 
engine can drag and steamsliip carry them. 
Sir Eupert intended to go round the world 
in the most leisurely fashion, stopping every- 
where, seeing everything, setting no limit to 
the time he might spend in any place that 
pleased him, fixing beforehand no limit to 
chain him to any place that did not please 
him. He proposed, his friends said, to go 
carefully over his old ground in Central Asia, 
to make himself a complete master of the 
problems of Australasian colonisation, and 
especially to make a very profound and ex- 
haustive study of the strange civilisations of 
China and Japan. He intended further to 
give a very considerable time to a leisurely 
investigation of the South American Ee- 
pubhcs. ' Why,' said Wynter, M.P., when 
one of Sir Eupert's friends told him of these 



THE LANG LEYS 79 

plans, ' why, such a scheme will take several 
years.' ' Very likel3%' the friend answered ; 
and Wynter said, ' Oh, by Jove ! ' and 
whistled. 

The scheme did take several years. At 
various intervals Sir Paipert wrote to his 
constituents long letters spangled witli stir- 
ring allusions to the Empire, to England's 
meteor flag, to the inevitable triumph of the 
New Toryism, to the necessity a sincere 
British statesman was under of becoming a 
complete master of all the possible pro- 
blems of a daily-increasing authority. He 
made some sharp thrusts at the weakness 
of the Government, but accused the Opposi- 
tion of a lack of patriotism in trading upon 
that weakness ; he almost chaffed the leader 
in the Lower House and the leader in 
the Lords ; he made no allusion to Sidney 
Blenheim, then rapidly advancing along the 
road of success. He concluded each letter by 



8o THE DICTATOR 

offering to resign his seat if his constituents 
wished it. 

His constituents did not wish it — at least, 
not at first. The Conservative committee 
returned him a florid address assuring him of 
their confidence in his statesmanship, but 
expressing, the hope that he might be able 
speedily to return to represent them at West- 
minster, and the further hope that he might 
be able to see his way to reconcile his diffi- 
culties with the existing Government. To 
this address Sir Eupert sent a reply duly 
acknowledging its expression of confidence, 
but taking no notice of its suggestions. Time 
went on, and Sir Eupert did not return. He 
was heard of now and again ; now in the 
court of some rajah in the North-West Pro- 
vinces, now in the khanate of some Central 
Asian despot ; now in South America, from 
which continent he sent a long letter to the 
* Times,' giving an interesting account of the 



THE LAXGLEYS 8l 

latest revolution in the Gloria Eepublic, of 
Tvhicli lie had happened to be an eye-witness ; 
now in Java ; now in Pekin ; now at the 
Cape. He did not seem to pursue his idea 
of going round tlie world on auy settled con- 
secutive plan. 

Of his large means there could be no 
doubt. He was probably one of the richest, 
as he was certainly one of the oldest, baronets 
in England, and he could afford to travel as 
if he were an accredited representative of the 
Queen — almost as if he were an American 
Midas of the fourth or fifth class. But as to 
his large leisure people began to say things. 
It began to be hinted in leading articles that 
it was scarcely fair that Sir Eupert's con- 
stituents should be disfranchised because it 
pleased a disappointed politician to drift idly 
about the world. These hints had their 
effect upon the disfranchised constituents, 
who began to grumble. Tl:e Conservative 

VOL. I. G 



82 THE DICTATOR 

Committee was goaded almost to the point 
of addressing a remonstrance to Sir Eupert, 
then in the interior of Japan, urging him to 
return or resign, when the need for any such 
action was taken out of their hands by a 
somewhat unexpected General Election. Sir 
Eupert telegraphed back to announce his 
intention of remaining abroad for the present, 
and of not, therefore, proposing to seek just 
then the suffrages of the electors. Sidney 
Blenheim succeeded in getting a close per- 
sonal friend of his own, who was also his 
private secretary, accepted by the Conserva- 
tive Committee, and he was returned at the 
head of the poll by a slightly decreased 
majority. 

Sir Eupert remained away from England 
for several years longer. After he had gone 
round the world in the most thorough sense, 
he revisited many places where he had been 
before, and stayed there for longer periods. 



THE LANGLEYS ^-^ 

It began to seem as if lie did not really intend 
to return to England at all. His communica- 
tions with his friends grew fewer and shorter, 
but wandering Parliamentarians in the recess 
occasionally came across him in the course of 
an extended holiday, and always found him 
affable, interested to animation in home 
politics, and always suggesting by his manner, 
though never in his speech, that he would 
some day return to his old place and his old 
fame. Of Sidney Blenheim he spoke with an 
equable, impartial composure. 

At last one day he did come home. He 
had been in the United States during the 
closing years of the American Civil War, and 
in Washington, when peace was concluded, 
he had met at the English Ministry a young 
girl of great beauty, of a family that was old 
for America, that was wealthy, though not 
wealthy for America. He fell in love with 
her, wooed her, and was accepted. Chey 



84 THE DICTATOR 

were married in Washington, and soon after 
the marriage they returned to England. 
They settled down for a while at the old home 
of the Lr>ng'eys, the home whose site had 
been the home of the race ever since the 
Conquest. Part of an old Norman tower still 
held itself erect amidst tlie Tudor, Eliza- 
bethan, and Victorian additions to the ancient 
place. It was called Queen's Langley now, 
had been so called ever since the days when, 
in the beginning of the Civil War, Henrietta 
Maria had been besieged there during her 
visit to the then baronet by a small party of 
Soundheads, and had successfully kept them 
off. Queen's Langley had been held during 
the Commonwealth by a member of the family, 
who had declared for the Parliament, but liad 
gone back to the head of the house when he 
returned with his king at the Eestoration. 

At Queen's Langley Sir Ptupert and his 
wife abode for a while, and at Queen's 



THE LANGLEYS ^ 

Langley a child was born to tliem, a girl 
cliild, who was christened after her mother, 
Helena. Then the taste for wandering which 
had become almost a passion with Sir Eiipert 
took possession of Sir Eupert again. If he 
had expected to re-enter London in any kind 
of triumph he was disappointed. He had 
allowed himself to fall out of the race, and he 
found himself almost forgotten. Society, of 
course, received him almost rapturously, and 
his beautiful wife was the queen of a resplen- 
dent season. But politics seemed to have 
passed him by. The New Toryism of those 
youthful years was not very new Toryism 
now. Sidney Blenheim was a settled reac- 
tionary and a recognised celebrity. There 
was a Xew Toryism, with its new cave of 
strenuous, impetuous young men, and they, 
if they thought of Sir Eupert Langley at all, 
thought of him as old-fashioned, the hero or 
victim of a piece of ancient history. 



86 THE DICTATOR 

Nevertheless, Sir Eiqoert had his thoughts 
of entering pohtical hfe again, but in the 
meanthne he was very happy. He had a 
steam yacht of liis own, and when his httle 
girl was three years old he and his wife went 
for a lono^ cruise m the Mediterranean. And 
then liis happiness was taken away from him. 
His wife suddenly sickened, died, unconscious, 
in his arms, and was buried at sea. Sir 
Eupert seemed like a broken man. From 
Alexandria he wrote to his sister, who was 
married to the Duke of Magdiel's third son, 
Lord Edmond Herrino^ton, askinor her to look 
after his child for him — the child was then 
with her aunt at Herrington Hall, in Argyll- 
shire — in his absence. He sold his yacht, 
paid off his crew, and disappeared for two 
years. 

During tliose two years he was believed 
to have wandered all over Egypt, and to have 
passed much of his time the hermit-hke 



THE LANG LEYS 87 

tenant of a tomb on tlie lovely, lonely island 
of Phylie, at the first cataract of the Xile. 
At tlie end of the two years he wrote to his 
sister that he was returning to Europe, to 
England, to his own lionie, and his own 
people. His little girl was then five years old. 
He reappeared in England changed and 
aged, but a strong man still, with a more 
settled air of strength of purpose than he had 
worn in his wild youth. He found Iiis little 
girl a pretty child, brilliantly healthy, bril- 
liantly strong. The wind of the mountain, 
of the heather, of the woods, had quickened 
her with an enduring vitality very different 
from that of the delicate fliir mother for 
wlioni his heart still grieved. Of course the 
little Helena did not remember her father, 
and was at first rather alarmed when Lady 
Edmond Herrington told her that a new papa 
was coming home for her from across the seas. 
But the feeling of fear passed away after the 



88 THE DICTATOR 

first meeting between father and child. The 
fascination which in his younger days Eupert 
Langley had exercised upon so many men 
and ^vomen, which had made him so much 
of a leader in his youth, afFected tlie child 
po"werfully. In a Aveek she was as devoted to 
him as if she had never been parted from 
him. 

Helena's education was what some people 
would call a strange education. She was 
never sent to school ; she was taught and 
taught much at liome, first by a succession of 
clever governesses, then by carefully chosen 
masters of many languages and many arts. 
In almost all things her father w^as her chief 
instructor. He was a man of varied accom- 
plishments ; he was a good linguist, and his 
years of wandering liad made his attainments 
in language really colloquial ; he had a ricli 
and various store of information gathered even 
more from personal experience than from 



THE LANGLEYS 89 

books. His great purpose in life appeared to 
be to make his daughter as accomphshed as 
himself. People had said at first when he 
returned that he would marry again, but the 
assumption proved to be wrong. Sir Paipert 
had made up his mind that he would never 
marry again, and he kept to his determination. 
There was an intense sentimentality in his 
strong nature ; the sentimentality which led 
him to take his early defeat and the defection 
of Sidney Blenheim so much to heart, had 
made him vow, on the day when tlie body of 
his fair young wife was lowered into the sea, 
changeless fidelity to her memory. Un- 
doubtedly it was somewhat of a grief to him 
that there was no son to carry on his name ; 
but he bore that grief in silence. He 
resolved, however, that his daughter should 
be in every way worthy of the old line which 
culminated in her ; she should be a woman 
worthy to surrender the ancient name to 



90 THE DICTATOR 

some exceptional mortal ; she should be 
worthy to be the wife of some great states- 
man. 

In those years in which Helena Langley 
was growing up from childhood to woman- 
hood, Sh' Eupert returned to public life. 
The constituency in which Queen's Langley 
was situated was a Tory constituency wdiich 
had been represented for nearly half a cen- 
tury by the same old Tory squire. The Tory 
squire had a grandson who was as uncompro- 
misingly Eadical as the squire was Tory ; 
naturally he could not succeed, and would 
not contest the seat. Sir Eupert came for- 
ward, was eagerly accepted, and successfully 
returned. His reappearance in the House of 
Commons after so considerable an interval 
made some small excitement in Westminster, 
roused some comment in the press. It was 
fifteen years since he had left St. Stephen's ; 
he thought curiously of the past as he took 



THE LAXGLEYS 91 

his place, not in that corner seat below the 
gangway, but on the second bench behind 
the Treasury Bench. His Toryism was now 
of a settled type ; the Government, which 
had been a little apprehensive of his possible 
antao-onism, found him a loval and valuable 
supporter. He did not remain long behind 
tlie Treasury Bench. An important vacancy 
occurred in the Ministry ; the post of Foreign 
Secretary was offered to and accepted by Sir 
Eupert. Years ago such a place would have 
seemed the liighest goal of his ambition. 
Now he — accepted it. Once again lie found 
himself a prominent man in the House of 
Commons, although under very different con- 
ditions from those of his old days. 

In the meantime Helena grew in years and 
health, in beauty, in knowledge. Sir Eupert, 
as an infinite believer in the virtues of travel, 
took her with him every recess for extended 
expeditions to Europe, and, as she grew older, 



92 THE DICTATOR 

to other continents than Europe. By the 
time that she was twenty, slie knew much of 
the world from personal experience ; she knew 
more of politics and political life than 
many politicians. After she was seventeen 
years old she began to make frequent appear- 
ances in the Ladies' Gallery, and to take long 
walks on the Terrace with her father. Sir 
Eupert delighted in her companionship, she 
in his; they were always happiest in each 
other's society. Sir Paipert had every reason 
to be proud of the graceful girl who united 
the beauty of her mother with the strength, 
the physical and mental strength, of her 
father. 

It need surprise no one, it did not appear 
to surprise Sir Eupert, if such an education 
made Helena Langley what ill-natured people 
called a somewhat eccentric young woman. 
Brought up on a manly system of education, 
having a mim for her closest companion, 



THE LANGLEYS 93 

learning miicli of the world at an early age, 
naturally tended to develop and sustain the 
strongly marked individuaUty of her character. 
Now, at three-and-twenty, she was one of the 
most remarkable girls in England, one of the 
best known girls in London. Her indepen- 
dence, both of thought and of action, her 
extended knowledge, her frankness of speech, 
her slightly satirical wit, her frequent and 
vehement enthusiasms for the most varied 
pursuits and pleasures, were much commented 
on, much admired by some, much disapproved 
of by others. She had many friends among 
women and more friends among: men, and 
these were real friendships, not flirtations, 
nor love affairs of any kind. Whatever 
things Helena Langley did there was one 
thing she never did — she never flirted. 
Many men had been in love with her and 
had told their love, and had been laucrhed 
at or pitied according to the degree of their 



94 THE DICTATOR 

deserts, but no one of them could honestly say 
that Helena had in any way encouraged his 
love-making, or tempted him with false hopes, 
unless indeed the masculine frankness of her 
friendship was an encouragement and a treacli- 
erous temptation. One and all, she un- 
hesitatingly refused her adorers. ' My father 
is the most interesting man I know,' she once 
said to a discomfited and slightly despairing 
lover. ' Till I find some other man as interest- 
ing as he is, I shall never think of marriage. 
And really I am sure you will not take it in 
bad part if I say that I do not find you as 
interesting a man as my father.' The dis- 
comfited adorer did not take it amiss ; he 
smiled ruefully, and took his departure ; but, 
to his credit be it spoken, he remained Helena's 
friend. 



95 



CHAPTER V 

' MY GREAT DEED WAS TOO GEEAT ' 

The luncheon hour was an important epoch 
of the day in the Langley house in Prince's 
Gate. The Langley luncheons were an in- 
stitution in London life ever since Sir Rupert 
bought the big Queen Anne house and made 
his daughter its mistress. Ashe said himself 
good-humouredly, he was a mere Roi 
Faineant in the place ; his daughter was the 
Mayor of the Palace, the real ruling power. 

Helena Langley ruled the great house with 
the most gracious autocracy. She had every- 
thing her own way and did everything in her 
own way. She was a little social Queen, witli 
a Secretary of State for her Prime Minister, 



96 THE DICTATOR 

and she enjoyed her sovereignty exceedingly. 
One of the great events of her reign was the 
institution of what came to be known as the 
Langley kincheons. 

These kincheons differed from ordinary 
kincheons in this, that those who were bidden 
to them were in the first instance almost 
always interesting people — people who had 
done something more than merely exist, 
people who had some other claim upon human 
recognition than the claim of ancient name or 
of immense wealth. In the second place, the 
people who were bidden to a Langley luncheon 
were of the most varied kind, people of the 
most different camps in social, in political life. 
At the Langley table statesmen who hated 
each other across the floor of the House sat 
side by side in perfect amity. The heir to the 
oldest dukedom in England met there the 
latest champion of the latest phase of demo- 
cratic sociahsm ; the great tragedian from the 



'J/F GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 97 

Acropolis met the low comedian from the 
Levity on terms of as much equality as if they 
had met at the Macklin or the Call-Boy clubs ; 
the President of the Eoyal Academy was 
amused by, and afforded much amusement to, 
the newest child of genius fresh from Paris, 
with the slang of the Chat Xoir upon his lips 
and the scorn of les vieux in his heart. Whig 
and Tory, Catholic and Protestant, millionaire 
and bohemian, peer with a peerage old a 
Eunnymede and the latest working-man M.P., 
all came together under the regal republican- 
ism of Langley House. Someone said that a 
party at Langley House always suggested to 
him the Day of Judgment. 

On the afternoon of the morning on which 
Sir Eupert's card was left at Paulo's Hotel, 
various guests assembled for luncheon in 
Miss Langley's Japanese drawling-room. The 
guests were not numerous — the luncheons at 
Langley House were never large parties. 

VOL. I. H 



98 THE DICTATOR 

Eight, including the host and hostess, was the 
number rarely exceeded ; eight, including the 
host and hostess, made up the number in this 
instance. Mr. and Mrs. Selwyn, the dis- 
tinguished and thoroughly respectable actor 
and actress, just returned from their tour in 
the United States ; the Duke and Duchess of 
Deptford — the Duchess was a young and pretty 
American woman ; Mr. Soarae Eivers, Sir 
^Rupert's private secretary ; and Mr. Hiram 
Porringer, who had just returned from one 
^expedition to the South Pole, and who was 
said to be organising another. 

When the ringing of a chime of bells from 
a Buddhist's temple announced luncheon, and 
everyone had settled down in the great oak 
room, where certain of the ancestral Langleys, 
gentlemen and ladies of the last century, whom 
Eeynolds and Gainsborough and Eomney 
and Eaeburn had painted, had been brought 
up from Queen's Langley at Helena's special 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 99 

wish, the company seemed to be under the 
special survey. There was one vice-admiral 
of the Eed who was leaning on a Doric pillar, 
with a spy-glass in his hand, apparently wholly 
indifferent to a terrific naval battle that was 
raging in the background ; all his shadowy 
attention seemed to be devoted to the mortals 
who moved and laughed below him. There 
was something in the vice-admiral which re- 
sembled Sir Eupert, but none of the lovely 
ladies on the wall were as beautiful as 
Helena. 

Mrs. Selwyn spoke with that clear, bell like 
voice which always enraptured an audience. 
Every assemblage of human beings was to 
her an audience, and she addressed them 
accordingly. Now, she practically took the 
stage, leaning forward between the Duke of 
Deptford and Hiram Borringer, and addressing 
Helena Langley. 

* My dear Miss Langley,' she said, ' do you 

H 2 



loo THE DICTATOR 

know that something has surprised me to- 
day?' 

' What is it ? ' Helena asked, turning away 
from Mr. Selwjm, to wliom she liad been 
talking. 

' Why, I felt sure,' Mrs. Sehvyn went on, 
* to meet someone here to-day. I am quite 
disappointed — quite.' 

Everyone looked at Mrs. Selwyn with 
interest. She had the stage all to herself, and 
was enjoying the fact exceedingly. Helena 
o^azed at her with a note of interro^ifation in 
each of her bright eyes, and another in each 
corner of her sensitive mouth. 

' I made perfectly sure that I should meet 
him here to-day. I said to Harry first thing 
this morning, Vhen I saw the name in the 
paper, ''Harry," I said, " we shall be sure to 
meet him at Sir^Eupert's this afternoon. Now 
did I not, Harry ? ' 

Mr. Selwyn, thus appealed to, admitted 



*MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' loi 

that his wife had certainly made the remark 
she now quoted. 

Mrs. Selwyn beamed gratitude and affec- 
tion for his endorsement. Then she turned 
to Miss Langley again. 

' Why isn't he here, my dear Miss Langley, 
why ? ' Then she added, ' You know you 
always have everybody before anybody else, 
don't you ? ' 

Helena shook her liead. 

' I suppose it's very stupid of me,' she said, 
* but, really, I'm afraid I don't know who your 
" he " is. Is your " he " a hero ? ' 

Mrs. Selwyn laughed playfully. ' Oh, now 
your very words show that you do know 
whom I mean.' 

' Indeed I don't.' 

' \Yhy, that wonderful man whom you 
admire so much, the illustrious exile, the hero 
of the hour, the new Napoleon.' 

' I know whom you mean,' said Soame 



102 THE DICTATOR 

Elvers. ' You moan the Dictator of 
Gloria ? ' 

' Of course. Whom else ? ' said Mrs. 
Selwyn, clapping her hands enthusiastically. 
The Duke gave a sigh of relief, and Hiram 
Borringer, who had been rather silent, seemed 
to shake himself into activity at the mention of 
Gloria. Mr. Selwyn said nothing, but watched 
his wife with the wondering admiration which 
some twenty years of married life had done 
nothing to diminish. 

The least trace of increased colour came 
into Helena's cheeks, but she returned Mrs. 
Selwyn's smiling glances composedly. 

' The Dictator,' she said. ' Why did you 
expect to see him here to-day? ' 

' Why, because I saw his name in the 
'^ Morning Post " this very morning. It said 
he had arrived in London last niglit from 
Paris. I felt morally certain that I should 
meet him here to-dav.' 



'JfV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 103 

' I am sorry you should be disappointed,' 
Helena said, laughing, ' but perhaps we shall 
be able to make amends for the disappoint- 
ment another day. Papa called upon him 
this morning.' 

Sir Eupert, sitting opposite his daughter, 
smiled at this. 'Did I really?' he asked. 
' I was not aware of it.' 

' Oh, yes, you did, papa ; or, at least, I did 
for you.' 

Sir Eupert's face wore a comic expression 
of despair. ' Helena, Helena, why ? ' 

' Because he is one of the most interesting 
men existing.' 

'And because he is down on his luck, too,' 
said the Duchess. ' I guess that always 
appeals to you.' The beautiful American girl 
had not shaken off all the expressions of her 
fatherland. 

' But, I say,' said Selwyn, who seemed to 
think that the subject called for statesmanlike 



104 THE DICTATOR 

comment, ' lio^v will it do for a pillar of the 
Government to be extending tlie hand of 
fellowship ' 

' To a defeated man,' interrupted Helena. 
' Oh, that won't matter one bit. The affairs of 
Gloria are hardly likely to be a grave inter- 
national question for us, and in the meantime 
it is only showing a courtesy to a man who is 
at once an Em^lishman and a strami^er.' 

A slightly ironical ' Hear, hear,' came 
from Soame Eivers, who did not love enthu- 
siasm. 

Sir Rupert followed suit good-humouredly. 

' Where is lie stopping ? ' asked Sir 
Eupert. 

' At Paulo's Hotel, papa.' 

' Paulo's Hotel,* said Mrs. Selwyn ; ' tliat 
seems to be quite the place for exiled poten- 
tates to put up at. The ex-King of Capri 
stopped there during his recent visit, and the 
chiefs from Mash on aland.' 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 105 

' And Don Herrera de la Mancha, who 
claims the throne of Spain,' said the Duke. 

'And the Eajah of Khandur,' added Mrs. 
Selwyn, ' and the Herzog of Hesse-Steinberg, 
and ever so many more illustrious personages. 
Why do they all go to Paulo's ? ' 

' I can tell you,' said Soame Eivers. ' Be- 
cause Paulo's is one of the best hotels in Lon- 
don, and Paulo is a wonderful man. He 
knows how to make coffee in a way that wins 
a foreigner's heart, and he understands the 
cooking'of all sorts of eccentric foreign dishes ; 
and, though he is as rich as a Chicago pig- 
dealer, he looks after everything himself, and 
isn't in the least ashamed of having been a 
servant himself. I think he was a Portus^uese 
originally.* 

'And our Dictator went there?' Mrs. 
Selwyn questioned. 

Soame Eivers answered her, ' Oh, it is the 
right thing to do ; it poses a distinguished 



io6 THE DICTATOR 

exile immediately. Quite the riglit thing. 
He was well advised.' 

'If only he had been as well advised in 
other matters,' said Mr. Selwyn. 

Then Hiram Borringer, who had Intherto 
kept silent, after his wont, spoke. 

' I knew him,' he said, ' some years ago, 
when I was in Gloria.' 

Everybody looked at once and with in- 
terest at the speaker. Hiram seemed slightly 
embarrassed at the attention he aroused ; but 
he was not allowed to escape from explana- 
tion. 

' Did you really ? ' said Sir Eupert. ' How 
very interesting ! What sort of man did you 
fmd him ? ' 

Helena said nothing, but she fixed her 
dark eyes eagerly on Hiram's face and 
listened, with slightly parted lips, all expecta- 
tion. 

' I found him a big man,' Hiram answered. 



*J/F GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 107 

' I don't mean big in bulk, for lie's not that ; 
but big in nature, the man to make an 
empire and boss it.' 

' A splendid type of man,' said Mrs. 
Selwyn, clasping her hands enthusiastically. 
'A man to stand at Ca3sar's side and give 
directions.' 

' Quite so,' Hiram responded gravely ; 
' quite so, madam. I met him first just 
before he was elected President, and that's 
^^Q years ago.' 

'Eather a curious tliinor makinor an 
Englishman President, wasn't it ? ' Mr. Selwyn 
inquired. At Sir Eupert's Mr. Selwyn always 
displayed a profound interest in all political 
questions. 

' Oh, he is a naturalised citizen of Gloria, 
of course,' said Soame Eivers, deftly in- 
sinuatinor his knowleds^e before Hiram could 
reply. 

' But I thought,' said the Duke, ' that in 



io8 THE DICTATOR 

those South American Eepiibhcs, as in the 
United States, a man has to be born in the 
country to attain to its highest office.' 

'That is so,' said Hiram. 'Though I 
fancy his friends in Gloria wouldn't have 
stuck at a trifle like that just then. But as 
a matter of fact he was actually born in 
Gloria.' 

' Was he really ? ' said Sir Eupert. ' How 
curious ! ' To which Mr. Selwyn added, ' And 
how convenient ; ' while Mrs. Selwyn inquired 
how it happened. 

' Why, you see,' said Hiram, ' his father 
was English Consul at Yaldorado long ago, 
and he married a Spanish woman there, and 
the woman died, and the father seems to have 
taken it to heart, for he came home, bringing 
his baby boy with him. I believe the father 
died soon after he got home.' 

Sir Eupert's face had grown slightly 
graver. Soame Eivers guessed that he was 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 109 

thinking of liis own old loss. Helena felt a 
new thrill of interest in the man whose per- 
sonality already so much attracted her. Like 
her, he had hardly known a mother. 

'Then was that considered enough?' the 
Duke asked. 'Was the fact of his havincr 
been born there, although the son of an 
English father, enoiigli, Avith subsequent 
naturalisation, to qualify him for the office 
of President P ' 

'It was a pecuhar case,' said Hiram. 
' The point had not been raised before. But, 
as he happened to have the army at liis back, 
it was concluded then that it would be most 
convenient for all parties to yield the point. 
But a good deal has been made of it since by 
his enemies.' 

'I should imagine so,' said Sir Eupert. 
' But it really is a very curious position, and 
I should not hke to say myself off-hand how 
it ought to be decided.' 



no THE DICTATOR 

' The big battalions decided it in his case/ 
said Mrs. Selwyn. 

' Are they big battalions in Gloria ? ' in- 
quired the Duke. 

' Eelatively, yes,' Hiram answered. ' It 
wasn't very much of an army at that time, 
even for Gloria; but it w^ent solid for him. 
Now, of course, it's different.' 

' How is it different ? ' This question came 
from Mr. Selwyn, who put it with an air of 
profound curiosity. 

Hiram explained. ' Why, you see, he in- 
troduced the conscription system. He told 
me he was going to do so, on the plan of some 
Prussian statesman.' 

' Stein,' suggested Soame Elvers. 

' Yery likely. Every man to take service 
for a certain time. Well, that made pretty 
well all Gloria soldiers ; it also made him a 
heap of enemies, and showed them how to 
make themselves unpleasant. I thought it 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' in 

wasn't a good plan for him or them at the 
time.' 

' Did you tell him so ? ' asked Sir Eupert. 

' Well, I did drop him a hint or two of my 
ideas, but he wasn't the sort of man to take 
ideas from anybody. Not that I mean at all 
that my ideas were of any importance, but he 
wasn't that sort of man.' 

' What sort of man was he, Mr. Borringer ? ' 
said Helena impetuously. ' What was he like, 
mentally, physically, every way ? That's 
what we want to know.' 

Hiram knitted his eyebrows, as he always 
did when he was slightly puzzled. He did 
not greatly enjoy haranguing the whole 
company in this way, and he partly re- 
gretted having confessed to any knowledge 
of the Dictator. But he was very fond of 
Helena, and he saw that she was sin- 
cerely interested in the subject, so he went 
on : 



112 THE DICTATOR 

'Well, I seem to be spinning quite a yarn, 
and I'm not much of a hand at painting a por- 
trait, but I'll do my best.' 

' Shall we make it a game of twenty ques- 
tions ? ' Mrs. Selwyn suggested. ' We all ask 
you leading questions, and you answer them 
categorically.' 

Everyone laughed, and Soame Eivers sug- 
gested that they should begin by ascertaining 
his age, height, and fighting weight. 

' Well,' said Hiram, ' I guess I can get out 
my facts without cross-examination.' He had 
lived a great deal in America, and his speech 
was full of American colloquialisms. For 
which reason the beautiful Dudiess hked 
him much. 

' He's not very tall, but you couldn't call 
him short ; rather more than middling high ; 
perhaps looks a bit taller than he is, he carries 
himself so straight. He would have made a 
good soldier.' 



*MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 113 

' He did make a good soldier,' the Duke 
suggested. 

' That's true/ said Hiram thoughtftdly. 
'I was thiaking of a man to whom soldiering 
was his trade, his only trade.' 

' But you haven't half satisfied our curio- 
sity,' said Mrs. Selwyn. ' You have only told 
us that he is a little over the medium height, 
and that he bears him stiffly up. What of his 
eyes, what of his hair — his beard ? Does he 
discharge in either your straw-colour beard, 
your orange tawny beard, your purple-in-grain 
beard, or your French crown-coloured beard, 
your perfect yellow ? ' 

Hiram looked a little bewildered. ' I be^ 
your pardon, ma'am,' he said. The Duke 
came to the rescue. 

' Mrs. Selwyn's Shakespearean quotation 
expresses all our sentiments, Mr. Eorringer. 
Give us a faithful picture of the hero of the 
hour.' 

VOL. I. I 



114 THE DICTATOR 

'As for liis luiir and beard,' Hiram re- 
sumed, ' why, they are pretty mucli like most 
people's hair and beard — a fairish brown — and 
his eyes matcli them. He has very much tlie 
sort of favour you might expect from the son 
of a very fair-haired man and a dark woman. 
His father was as fair as a Scandinavian, he 
told me once. He vras descended from some 
old Danish Viking, he said.' 

'That helps to explain his belligerent Ber- 
serker disposition,' said Sir Paipert. 

'A fine type,' said the Duke pensively, and 
Mr. Selwyn cauglit him up with ' The fmest 
type in the world. The sort of men who have 
made our empire what it is ; ' and he added 
somewhat confusedly, for his wife's eyes were 
fixed upon him, and he felt afraid that he was 
overdoing his part, ' Hawkins, Frobisher, 
Drake, Eodney, you know.' 

'But,' said Helena, who had been very 
silent, for lier, during the interrogation of 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 115 

Hiram, ' I do not feel as if I quite know all I 
want to know yet.' 

' The noble thirst for knowledge does you 
credit, Miss Langley,' said Soame Pavers pertly. 

Miss Langley laughed at him. 

' Yes, I want to know all about him. He 
interests me. He has done somethincf ; he 
casts a shadow, as somebody has said some- 
where. I like men who do something, who 
cast, shadows instead of sitting in other people's 
shadows.' 

Soame Pavers smiled a little sourly, and 
there was a suggestion of acerbity in his voice 
as he said in a low tone, as if more to himself 
than as a contribution to the o:eneral conver- 
sation, ' He has cast a decided shadow over 
Gloria.' He did not quite like Helena's in- 
terest in the dethroned Dictator. 

' He made Gloria worth talking about ! ' 
Helena retorted. ' Tell me, Mr. Borringer, 
how did he happen to get to Gloria at all? 

I 2 



i:6 THE DICTATOR 

How did it come in liis way to be President 
and Dictator and all that ? * 

' Eebellion lay in his way and he found it,' 
Mrs. Selvvyn suggested, whereupon Soame 
Elvers tapped her playfully upon the wrist, 
carrying on tlie quotation witli the words of 
Prince Hal, ' Peace, chewit, peace.' Mr. Soame 
Elvers was a very free-and-easy young gentle- 
man, occasionally, and as he was a son of Lord 
Eiverstown, much might be forgiven to him. 

Hiram, always sliglitly bewildered by the 
quotations of Mrs. Sehvyn and the badinage 
of Soame Eivers, decided to ignore them 
both, and to address himself entirely to Miss 
Langley. 

' Sorry to say I can't help you much. Miss 
Langley. When I was in Gloria five years 
ao-o I found liim there, as I said, runninop for 
President. He had been a nationalised citizen 
there for some time, I reckon, but how he got 
so much to the front I don't know.' 



*J/F GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 117 

' Doesn't a strons^ man always c^ct to the 
front ? ' the Ducliess asked. 

' Yes,' said Hiram, ' I guess that's so. Well, 
I happened to get to know him, and we became 
a bit friendly, and we had many a pleasant 
chat together. He was as frank as frank, told 
me all his plans. " I mean to make this little 
old place move," he said to me.' 

' Well, he has made it move,' said Helena. 
She was immensely interested, and her eyes 
dilated with excitement. 

'A httle too fast, perhaps,' said Hiram 
meditatively. ' I don't know. Anyhow, he 
had thinofs all his own wav for a oroodish 
spell.' 

'What did he do when he had things his 
own way? ' Helena asked impatiently. 

'Well, he tried to introduce reforms ' 

'Yes, I knew he would do that,' the girl 
said, with the proud air of a sort of owner- 
ship. 



ii8 THE DICTATOR 

' You seem to have known all about liim,' 
Mrs. Selwyn said, smiling loftily, sweetly, as at 
the romantic enthusiasm of youth. 

' Well, so I do somehow,' Helena answered 
ahnost sharply ; certainly with impatience. 
She was not thinking of Mrs. Selwyn. 

' Now, Mr. BorriuG^er, ^o on — about his 
reforms.' 

' He seemed to have c^otten a kind of notion 
about making things Enghsli or American. 
He abolished flogging of criminals and all 
sorts of old-fashioned ways ; and he tried to 
reduce taxation ; and he put down a sort of 
remnant of slavery that was still hanging 
round ; and he wanted to give free land to all 
the emancipated folks ; and he wanted to have 
an equal suffrage to all men, and to do away 
with corruption in the public oflices and the 
civil service ; and to compel the judges not 
to take bribes ; and all sorts of things. I am 
afraid he wanted to do a good deal too much 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 119 

reform for what you folks would call tlie 
frovernin(? classes out tliere. I tliou^-ht so at 
the time. He was riglit, you know,' Hiram 
said meditatively, ' but, then, I am mightily 
afraid he was riglit in a wrong sort of 
way.' 

'He was right, anyhow,' Helena said, 
triumphanth'. 

• S'pose he was,' said Hiram ; ' but things 
have to go slow, don't you see ? ' 

' Well, what happened ? ' 

' I don't rightly know how it all came about 
exactl}" ; but I guess all the privileged classes, 
as you call them here, got their backs up, 
and all tlie officials went dead against 
him ' 

' ]\Iy great deed was too great,' Helena 
said. 

'What is that, Helena?' her father 
asked. 

' It's from a poem by iMrs. Browning, about 



I20 THE DICTATOR 

another dictator ; but more true of my 
Dictator than of hers,' Helena answered. 

' Well,' Iliram went on, ' tlie opposition 
soon be(][an to grumble ' 

'Some people are always giiiinbling,' said 
Soame Elvers. ' What should we do without 
them ? Where should we get our independent 
opposition ? ' 

' Where, indeed,' said Sir Eupert, with a 
sigh of humorous pathos. 

'Well,' said Helena, ' what did the opposi- 
tion do ? ' 

' Made themselves nasty,' answered Iliram. 
' Stirred up discontent against the foreigner, as 
they called him. lie found his congress hard 
to handle. There were votes of censure and 
talks of impeachment, and I don't know what 
else. He went right ahead, his own way, 
without paying them the least attention. 
Then they took to refusing to vote his neces- 
sary supplies for the army and navy. He 



MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 121 

managed to get the money in spite of them ; 
but whether he lost his temper, or not, I can't 
say, but he took it into his head to declare 
that the constitution was endangered by the 
machinations of uiiscrupidous enemies, and to 
declare himself Dictator.' 

'That was brave,' said Helena, enthusiast!- 
c-ally. 

' Eather rash, wasn't it?' sneered Soarae 
Eivers. 

' It may Iiave been rash, and it may not,' 
Hiram answered meditatively. ' I believe he 
was within the strict letter of tlie constitution, 
which does empower a President to take such 
a step under certain conditions. But the 
opposition meant fighting. So they rebelled 
against the Dictator, and that's how the 
bother began. How it ended you all 
know\' 

' Where were the people all this time .^ * 
Helena asked eagerly. 



122 THE DICTATOR 

' 1 guess tlie people didn't understand 
much about it tlien,' Iliram answered. 

' My great deed was too great,' Helena 
murmured once ai]^ain. 

' The usual thing,' said Soame Elvers. 
' Victory to begin with, and the confi- 
dence born of victory ; then defeat and dis- 
aster.' 

' The story of those tliree days' fighting in 
Yaldorado is one of the most rattlino; thin^^s 
in recent times,' said the Duke. 

' Was it not ? ' said Helena. ' I read every 
word of it every day, and I did want him to 
win so much.' 

' Kobody could be more sorry that you 
were disappointed than he, I should imagine,' 
said Mrs. Selwyn. 

' What puzzles me,' said Mr. Selwyn, 'is 
why when they had got him in their ]30wer 
they didn't shoot him.' 

' Ah, you see he was an Englisliman by 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 123 

family,' Sir Paipert explained; 'and tliongh, 
of course, he had changed his nationality, 
I think the Congressionalists ^vere a little 
afraid of arousing any kind of feeling in 
Eng^land.' 

' As a matter of fact, of course,' said 
Soame Eivers, ' we shouldn't have dreamed of 
making any row if they had shot him or 
hanged him, for the matter of that.' 

'You can never tell,' said the Duke. 
' Somebody might Jiave raised the Civis 
Romanus cry 

' Yes, but he wasn't any longer civis 
Eomanus,' Soame Pavers objected. 

' Do you think that would matter much if 
a cry was wanted against the Government ? ' 
the Duke asked, with a smile. 

'Xot much, I'm afraid,' said Sir Rupert. 
' But whatever their reasons, I think the vic- 
tors did the wisest thing possible in putting 
their man on board their big ironclad, the 



124 THE DICTATOR 

"Alinirante Cochrane/' and setting him ashore 
at Cherbourg.' 

' With a pohte intimation, I presume, that 
if he again returned to the territory of Gloria 
he would be shot without form of trial,' added 
Soame Eivers. 

'But he will return,' Helena said. 'He 
will, I am sure of it, and perhaps they may 
not find it so easy to shoot him then as they 
think now. A man like that is not so easily 
got rid of.' 

Helena spoke with great animation, and her 
earnestness made Sir Eupert smile. 

' K that is so,' said Soame Eivers, ' they 
would have done better if they had shot him 
out of hand.' 

Helena looked slightly annoyed as she 
replied quickly, 'He is a strong man. I wish 
there were more men like him in the world.' 

'Well,' said Sir Eupert, 'I suppose we 
shall all see him soon and judge for ourselves. 



'MV GREAT DEED WAS TOO GREAT' 125 

Helena seems to have made up her mind 
already. Shall we go upstairs ? ' 

' My great deed was too great ' held pos- 
session that day of tlie mind and heart of 
Helena Langley. 



126 THE DICTATOR 



CHAPTER YI 

' HERE IS MY THRONE — BID KINGS COME 
BOW TO IT ' 

London, eager for a lion, lionised Ericson. 
That ro^^al sport of lion-hunting, practised in 
old times by kings in Babylon and Nineveh, 
as those strancfe monuments in the British 
Museum bear witness, is the favourite sport 
of fashionable London to-day. And just at 
that moment London lacked its regal quarry. 
The latest traveller from Darkest Africa, the 
latest fugitive pretender to authority in 
France, had slipped out of the popular note 
and the favours of the Press. Ericson came 
in good time. There was a gaji, and he 
filled it. 



'HERE IS MY THRO.XE' 127 

He found himself, to his amazement and 
his amusement, the hero of the hour. Invita- 
tions of all kinds showered upon him ; the 
gates of great houses yawned wide to welcome 
him ; had he been gifted like Keliama with 
the power of multiplying Lis personality, he 
could scarcely have been able to accept every 
invitation that was thrust upon him. But he 
did accept a great many ; indeed, it might 
be said tliat he had to accept a great many. 
Had he Lad his ou'n way, he might, perLaps, 
have buried himself in Hampstead, and 
enjoyed the company of his aunt and the 
mild society of Mr. Gilbert Sarrasin. But 
the impetuous, indomitable Hamilton would 
hear of no inaction. He insisted, copying a 
famous phrase of Lord Beaconsfield's, that 
the key of Gloria was in London. ' We must 
make friends,' he said; 'we must keep our- 
selves in evidence ; we must never for a 
moment allow our claim to be foro:otten, or 



128 THE DICTATOR 

our interests to be ignored. If we are ever 
to get back to Gloria we must make the most 
of our inevitable exile.' 

The Dictator smiled at the enthusiasm of 
his young henchman. Hamilton was tremen- 
dously enthusiastic. A young Englishman of 
higli family, of education, of some means, he 
had attached himself to Ericson years before 
at a time when Hamilton, fresh from the 
University, was taking that complement to a 
University career — a trip round the world, at 
a time when Ericson was iust bes^innino^ that 
course of reform which had ended for the 
present in London and Paulo's Hotel. 
Hamilton's enthusiasm often proved to be 
practical. Like Ericson, he was full of great 
ideas for the advancement of mankind ; lie 
had swallowed all Socialisms, and had almost 
believed, before he fell in with Ericson, that 
he had elaborated the secret of social govern- 
ment. But his wide knowledge was of 



'HERE IS MY THROXE' 129 

service ; and his devotion to tlie Dictator 
showed itself of sterling stuff on that day in 
the Plaza Nacional when he saved his life 
from the insurgents. If the Dictator some- 
times smiled at Hamilton's enthusiasm, he 
often allowed himself to yield to it. Just for 
the moment he was a little sick of the whole 
business ; the inevitable bitterness that tino-es 
a man's heart who has striven to be 0^ 
service, and who has been misunderstc^od. 
had laid hold of him ; there were time.c' when 
he felt that he would let the whole thing go 
and make no further effort. Then it was tliat 
Hamilton's enthusiasm j^roved so useful, that 
Hamilton's restless energy in keeping in touch 
wuth the friends of the fallen man roused him 
and stimulated him. 

He had made many friends now in 
London. Both the great political parties 
were civil to him, especially, perhaps, the 
Conservatives. Being in power, they could 

VOL. I. K 



I30 THE DICTATOR 

not make an overt declaration of their inte- 
rest in him, but just then the Tory Party was 
experiencing one of those emotional waves 
which at times sweep over its consciousness, 
when it feels called upon to exalt the banner 
of progress ; to play the old Eoman part of 
lifting lip the humble and casting down the 
proud ; of showing a paternal interest in all 
i^ianner of schemes for the redress of wrong 
and suffering everywhere. Somehow or 
other it had got it into its head that Ericson 
was a man after its own heart ; that he was 
a kind of new Gordon ; that his gallant 
determination to make the people of Gloria 
happy in spite of themselves was a proof of 
the application of Tory methods. Sir Eupert 
encouraged this idea. As a rule, his party 
were a httle afraid of his advanced ideas ; 
but on this occasion they were willing to 
accept them, and they manifested the friend- 
liest interest in the Dictator's defeated 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 131 

schemes. Indeed, so friendly were they 
that many of the Eadicals began to take 
alarm, and think that something must be 
wrong with a man who met with so cordial 
a reception from the ruling party. 

Ericson himself met these overtures con- 
tentedly enough. If it was for the good of 
Gloria that he should return some day to 
carry out his dreams, then anything that 
helped him to return was for the good of 
Gloria too, and undoubtedly the friendliness 
of the IMinisterialists was a very im^Dortant 
factor in the problem he was engaged upon. 
He did not know at first how much Tory 
feeUng was influenced by Sir Eupert ; he did 
not know until later how much Sir Eupert 
was influenced by his daughter. 

Helena had aroused in her father some- 
tliing of her own enthusiasm for the exiled 
Dictator. Sir Eupert had looked into the 
whole business more carefully, had recognised 

K 3 



131 THE DICTATOR 

til it It certainly would be vei'y mujli better 
for the interests of British subjects under the 
green and yellow banner that Gloria should 
be ruled by an Englishman like Ericson than 
by the wild and reckless Junta, who at 
present upheld uncertain authority by 
martial law. England had recognised the 
Junta, of course ; it was the de facto Govern- 
ment, and there was nothing else to be done. 
But it was not managing its affairs well ; the 
credit of the country was shaken ; its trade 
was gravely impaired ; the very considerable 
English colony was loud in its protests 
against the defects of the new regime. 
Under these conditions Sir Eupert saw no 
reason for not extending the hand of friend- 
ship to the Dictator. 

He did extend the hand of friendship. 
He met the Dictator at a dinner-party given 
in his honour by Mr. Wynter, M.P. : Mr. 
Wynter, who had always made it a point to 



'HERE IS M\ THROXE' 133 

know everybody, and wlio was as friendly with 
Sir Piupert as with the chieftains of his own 
party. Sir Eupert had expressed to Wynter 
a wish to meet Ericson ; so when the dinner 
came off he found himself placed at the right- 
hand side of Ericson, who was at his host's 
right-hand side. The two men got on well 
from the hrst. Sir Paipert was attracted by 
the fresh unselfishness of Ericson, by some- 
thing still youthful, still simple, in a man who 
had done and endured so much, and be 
made himself agreeable, as he only knew how, 
to his neiglibour. Ericson, for his part, was 
frankly pleased with Sir Paipert. He was a 
little surprised, perhaps, at first to find that 
Sir Eupert's opinions coincided so largely 
with bis own ; that their views of govern- 
ment agreed on so many important par- 
ticulars. He did not at first discover that it 
was Ericson's unconstitutional act in en- 
forcing his reforms, rather than the actual 



■134 THE DICTATOR 

reforms themselves, that aroused Sir Eupert's 
admiration. Sir Eiipert was a good talker, a 
master of the manipulation of words, know- 
ing exactly how much to say in order to 
convey to the mind of his listener a very de- 
cided impression without actually committing 
himself to any pledged opinion. Ericson was 
a shrewd man, but in such delicate dialectic 
he was not a match for a man like Sir 
Kupert. 

Sir Eupert asked the Dictator to dinner, 
and the Dictator went to the great house in 
Queen's Gate and was presented to Helena, 
and was placed next to her at dinner, and 
thought her very pretty and original and 
attractive, and enjoyed himself very much. 
Ho found himself, to his half-unconscious 
surprise, still young enougli and human 
enough to be pleased with the attention 
people were paying him — above all, that he 
was still young enough and human enough to 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 135 

be pleased with the very obvious homage of 
a charming young woman. For Helena's 
homage was very obvious indeed. Accus- 
tomed always to do what she pleased, and 
say what she pleased, Helena, at three-and- 
twenty, had a frankness of manner, a straight- 
forwardness of speecli, which her friends 
called original and her detractors called 
audacious. She would argue, unabashed, 
with the great leader of the party on some 
high point of foreign policy ; she would talk 
to the great chieftain of Opposition as if he 
were her elder brother. People who did not 
understand her said that she was forward, 
that she had no reserve ; even people who 
understood her, or thought they did, were 
sometimes a little startled by her careless 
directness. Soame Pavers once, when he was 
irritated by her, which occasionally happened, 
though he generally kept his irritation to 
himself, said that she had a ' slap on the 



136 THE DICTATOR 

back' way of treating her friends. The 
remark was not kind, but it happened to be 
fairly accurate, as unkind remarks sometimes 
are. 

But from the first Helena did not treat 
the Dictator with the same brusque spirit of 
camaraderie which she showed to most of 
her friends. Her admiration for the public 
man, if it had been very enthusiastic, was 
very sincere. She had, from the first time 
that Ericson's name began to appear in the 
daily papers, felt a keen interest in the 
adventurous Englishman who was trying to 
introduce free institutions and advanced civili- 
sation into one of the worm-eaten republics 
of the New World. As time went on, and 
Ericson's doings became more and more con- 
spicuous, the girl's admiration for the lonely 
pioneer waxed higher and higher, till at last 
she conjured up for herself an image of heroic 
chivalry as romantic in its way as anything 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 137 

that could be evolved from tlie dreams of a 
sentimental schoolgirl. To reform the world 
— was not that always England's mission, if 
not especially the mission of her own party ? 
— and liere was an Englishman fighting for 
reform in that feverish place, and endeavour- 
ing to make his people happy and prosperous 
and civilised, by methods which certainly 
seemed to have more in common with the 
benevolent despotism of the Tory Party than 
with the theories of the Opposition. Bit by 
bit it came to pass that Helena Langley grew 
to look upon Ericson over there in that queer, 
ebullient corner of new Spain, as her ideal 
hero ; and so it happened that when at last 
she met her hero in the flesh for the first 
time her frank audacity seemed to desert 
her. 

Not that she showed in the slightest 
degree embarrassment when Sir Paipert first 
presented to her the grave man with the 



i38 THE DICTATOR 

earnest e^^es, whose pointed beard and brown 
hair were both shghtly touched with grey. 
Only those who knew Helena well could pos- 
sibly have told that she was not absolutely 
at her ease in the presence of the Dictator. 
Ericson himself thought her the most self- 
possessed young lady he had ever met, and to 
him, familiar as he was with the exquisite 
effrontery belonging to the New Castilian 
dames of Gloria, self-possession in young 
women was a recognised fact. Even Sir 
Eupert himself scarcely noticed anything that 
he would have called shyness in his daughter's 
demeanour as she stood talking to the 
Dictator, with her large fine eyes fixed in 
composed gaze upon his face. But Soame 
Eivers noticed a difference in her bearing ; he 
was not her father, and he was accustomed to 
watch every tone of her speech and every 
movement of her eyes, and he saw that she 
was not entirely herself in the company of 



'HERE IS MY THRO.\E' 139 

the ' new man,' as he called Ericson ; and 
seeing it he felt a pang, or at least a prick, at 
the heart, and sneered at himself immediately 
in consequence. But he edged up to Helena 
just before the pairing took place for dinner, 
and said softly to her, so that no one else 
could hear, ' You are shy to-night. Why ? ' 
— and moved away smiling at the angry 
flash of her eyes and the compression of her 
mouth. 

Possibly the words of Elvers may have 
affected her more than she was willing to 
admit ; but she certainly was not as self- 
composed as usual during that first dinner. 
Her wit flashed vivaciously ; the Dictator 
thought her brilliant, and even rather bewil- 
dering. If anyone had said to him that 
Helena Langley was not absolutely at her 
ease with him, he would have stared in 
amazement. For himself, he was not at all 
dismayed by the brilhant, beautiful girl who 



140 THE DICTATOR 

sat next to him. The lonj^ habit of intercourse 
with all kinds of people, under all kinds 
of conditions, had given him the experience 
which enabled him to be at his ease under 
any circumstances, even the most unfamiliar, 
and certainly talking to Helena Langley was 
an experience that had no precedent in the 
Dictator's hfe. But lie talked to her readily, 
with great pleasure ; he felt a little surprise 
at her obvious w^illinc^ness to talk to him 
and accept his judgment upon many things; 
but he set this down as one of the few agree- 
able conditions attendant upon being lionised, 
and accepted it gratefully. ' I am the newest 
thing,' he thought to himself, ' and so this 
child is interested in me and consequently 
civil to me. Probably she will have forgotten 
all about me the next time we meet ; in 
the meanwhile she is very charming.' The 
Dictator had even been about to suggest to 
himself that he might possibly forget all about 



'HERE IS MY THROXE' 141 

her ; but somehow this did not seem very 
likely, and he dismissed it. 

He did not see very much of Helena that 
night after the dinner. Many people came in, 
and Helena was surrounded by a little court 
of adorers, men of all ages and occupations, 
statesmen, soldiers, men of letters, all eagerly 
talking a kind of talk which was almost unin- 
telli<2^ible to the Dictator. In that bric^ht 
Babel of voices, in that conversation which 
was full of allusions to thinirs of which he 
knew nothing, and for which, if he had known, 
he would have cared less, the Dictator felt 
his sense of exile suddenly come strongly 
upon him like a great chill wave. It was not 
that he could feel neglected. A great states- 
man was talking to him, talking at much 
length confidentially, paying him the compli- 
ment of repeatedly inviting his opinion, and of 
deferring to his judgment. There was not a 
man or woman in the room who was not 



142 THE DICTATOR 

anxious to be introduced to Ericson, who 
was not delighted when the introduction was 
accorded, and when he or she had taken his 
hand and exchanged a few words with him. 
But somehow it was Helena's voice that 
seemed to thrill in the Dictator's ears ; it 
was Helena's face that his eyes wandered 
to through all that brilhant crowd, and it 
was with something like a sense of serious 
regret that he found himself at last taking 
her hand and wishing her good-night. Her 
bright eyes grew brighter as she expressed 
the hope that they should meet soon again. 
The Dictator bowed and withdrew. He felt 
in his heart that he shared the hope very 
strongly. 

The hope was certainly realised. So 
notable a lion as the Dictator was asked 
everywhere, and everywhere that he went 
he met the Langleys. In the high political 
and social life in which the Dictator, to his 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 143 

entertainment, found himself, the hostihties of 
warring parties had Httle or no effect. In 
that rarefied air it was hard to draw the 
breath of party passion, and the Dictator 
came across the Langleys as often in the 
houses of the Opposition as in Ministerial 
mansions. So it came to pass that some- 
thing almost approaching to an intimacy 
sprang up between John Ericson on the one 
part and Sir Eupert and Helena Langley on the 
other. Sir Eupert felt a real interest in the 
adventurous man with the eccentric ideas ; 
perhaps his presence recalled something of 
Sir Eupert's own hot youth when he had 
had eccentric ideas and was looked upon 
with alarm by the steady-going. Helena 
made no concealment of her interest in the 
exile. She was always so frank in her friend- 
ships, so off-hand and boyish in her air of 
comradeship with many people, that her 
attitude towards the Dictator did not strike 



144 THE DICTATOR 

any one, except Soame Elvers, as being in 
the least marked — for her. Indeed, most of 
her admirers would have held that slie was 
more reserved with the Dictator than with 
others of her friends. Soame Pavers saw 
that there was a difference in her bearing 
towards the Dictator and towards the courtiers 
of her little court, and he smiled cynically and 
pretended to be amused. 

Ericson's acquaintance with the Langleys 
ripened into that rapid intimacy which is 
sometimes possible in London. At the end of 
a week he had met them many times and 
had been twice to their house. Helena had 
always insisted that a friendship whicli was 
worth anything should declare itself at once, 
should blossom quickly into being, and not 
grow by slow stages. She offered the Dic- 
tator her friendship very frankly and very 
graciously, and Ericson accepted very frankly 
the gracious gift. For it dehghted him, tired 



'HERE IS MY THROXE' 145 

as he was of all the strife and struggle of the 
last few years, to find rest and sympathy in 
the friendship of so charming a girl ; the 
cordial sympathy she showed him came like 
a balm to the hiimiUation of his overthrow. 
He liked Helena, he liked her father ; though 
he had known them but for a handful of days, 
it always delighted him to meet them ; he 
always felt in their society that he was in tlie 
society of friends. 

One evening, when Ericson had been little 
more than a month in London, he found 
himsalf at an evening party given by Lady 
Seagraves. Lady Seagraves was a wonderful 
woman — ' the fine flower of our modern 
civilisation,' Soame Elvers called her. Every- 
body came to her house ; she delighted in 
contrasts ; life was to her one prolonged 
antithesis. Soame Pavers said of her parties 
that they resembled certain early Italian 
pictures, which gave you the mythological 

VOL. I. L 



146 THE DICTATOR 

gods in one place, a battle in another, a scene 
of pastoral peace in a third. It was an 
astonishing amalgam. 

Ericson arrived at Lady Seagraves' house 
rather late ; the rooms were very full — he 
found it difficult to get up the great staircase. 
There had been some great Ministerial 
function, and the dresses of many of the men 
in the croAvd were as bright as the women's. 
Court suits, ribands, and orders lent additional 
colour to a richly coloured scene. But even 
in a crowd where everybody bore some claim 
to distinction the arrival of the Dictator 
aroused general attention. Ericson was not 
yet sufficiently hardened to the experience to 
be altogether indifTerent to the fact that every- 
one was looking at him ; tliat people were 
whispering liis name to each other as he 
slowly made his way from stair to stair ; that 
pretty women paused in their upward or 
downward progress to look at him, and 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 147 

invariably with a look of admiration for his 
grave, handsome face. 

When he got to the top of the stairs 
Ericson found his hostess, and shook hands 
with her. Lady Seagraves was an effusive 
woman, who was always delighted to see any 
of her friends ; but she felt a special delight 
at seeing the Dictator, and she greeted him 
with a special effusiveness. Her party was 
chokiug with celebrities of all kinds, social, 
political, artistic, legal, clerical, dramatic ; 
but it would not have been entirely trium- 
phant if it had not included the Dictator. 
Lady Seagraves was very glad to see him 
indeed, and said so in her warm, enthusiastic 
way. 

' I'm so glad to see you,' Lady Seagraves 
murmured. ' It was so nice of you to come. 
I was beginning to be desperately afraid that 
you had forgotten all about me and my poor 
httle party.' 

i2 



148 THE DICTATOR 

It was one of Lady Seagraves' graceful 
little afTectations to pretend that all her 
parties were small parties, almost partak- 
ing of the nature of impromptu festivities. 
Ericson glanced around over the great 
room crammed to overflowing with a crowd 
of men and women who could hardly 
move, men and women most of whose faces 
were famous or beautiful, men and women all 
of whom, as Soame Elvers said, had their 
names in tlie play-bill ; there was a smile on 
his face as he turned his eyes from the 
brilliant mass to Lady Seagraves' face. 

' How could I forget a promise which it 
gives me so much pleasure to fulfd ? ' he 
asked. Lady Seagraves gave a little cry of 
delight. 

' ^ow that's perfectly sweet of you ! How 
did you ever learn to say such pretty things 
in that dreadful place .^ Oh, but of course ; 
I forgot Spaniards pay compliments to per- 



'HERE IS MY THROXE' 149 

fection, and you have learnt the art from 
them, you frozen Xortherner.' 

Ericson laughed. ' I am afraid I should 
never rival a Spaniard in compliment,' lie 
said. He never knew quite what to talk to 
Lady Seagraves about, but, indeed, there was 
no need for him to trouble himself, as Lady 
Seagraves could at all times talk enough for 
two more. 

So he just listened while Lady Seagraves 
rattled on, sending his glance hither and 
thither in that glittering assembl}', seeking 
almost unconsciously for one face. He saw it 
almost immediately ; it was the face of Helena 
Langley, and her eyes were fixed on him. 
She was standino- in the throm^ at some 
little distance from him, talking to Soame 
Elvers, but she nodded and smiled to the 
Dictator. 

At that moment the arrival of the Duke 
and Duchess of Deptford set Ericson free from 



I50 THE DICTATOR 

the ripple of Lady Seagraves' conversation. 
She turned to greet the new arrivals, and the 
Dictator began to edge his way through the 
press to where Helena was standing. Though 
she was only a little distance off, his progress 
was but slow progress. The rooms were 
tightly packed, and almost every person he 
met knew him and spoke to him, or shook 
hands with him, but he made his way steadily 
forward. 

' Here comes the illustrious exile ! ' said 
Soame Elvers, in a low tone. ' I suppose 
nobody will have a chance of saying a word 
to you for the rest of the evening ? ' 

Miss Langley glanced at him with a little 
frown. ' I am afraid I can scarcely hope 
that Mr. Ericson will consent to be monopo- 
lised by me for the whole of the evening,' she 
said ; ' but I wish he would, for he is certainly 
the most interesting person here.' 

Soame Pavers shrugiied his shoulders 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 151 

slightly. ' You always know someone who 
is the most interesting man in the world — for 
the time being,' he said. 

Miss Langley frowned again, but she did 
not reply, for by this time Ericson had 
reached her, and was holding out his hand. 
She took it with a bright smile of welcome, 
Soame Eivers slipped away in the crowd, 
after nodding to Ericson. 

' I am so glad that you have come,' 
Helena said. 'I was beginning to fear that 
you were not coming.' 

' It is very kind of you,' the Dictator 
began, but Miss Langley interrupted him. 

' Xo, no ; it isn't kind of me at all ; it is 
just natural selfishness. I want to talk to 
you about several things ; and if you hadn't 
come I should have been disappointed in my 
purpose, and I hate being disappointed.' 

The Dictator still persisted that any mark 
of interest from Miss Langley was kindness. 



152 THE DICTATOR 

* What do you want to talk to me about 
particularly ? ' he asked. 

'Oh, many things I But Ave can't talk in 
this awful crusli. It's like trying to stand up 
against big billows on a storm}^ day. Come 
with me. There is a quieter place at the 
back, where we shall have a chance of 
peace.' 

She turned and led the way slowly 
through the crowd, the Dictator following 
her obediently. Once again the progress was 
a slow one, for every man had a word for 
Miss Langley, and he himself was eagerly 
caught at as they drifted along. But at last 
they got through the greater crush of the 
centre rooms and found themselves in a kind 
of lull in a further saloon where a piano was, 
and where there were fewer people. Out of 
this room there was a still smaller one with 
several palms in it, and out of the palms 
arising a great bronze reproduction of the 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 153 

Hermes of Praxiteles. Lady Seagraves play- 
fully called this little room her Pagan parlour. 
Here people who knew the house well found 
their way when they wanted quiet conversa- 
tion. There was nobody in it when Miss 
Langley and the Dictator arrived. Helena 
sat down on a sofa with a sii^h of relief, and 
Ericson sat down beside her. 

'What a dehghtful change from all that 
awful noise and glare ! ' said Helena. ' I am 
very fond of this little corner, and I think 
Lady Seagraves regards it as especially sacred 
to me.' 

' I am grateful for being permitted to 
cross the hallowed threshold,' said the Dic- 
tator. ' Is this the tutelary divinity ? ' And 
he glanced up at the bronze image. 

' Yes,' said Miss Langley ; ' that is a copy 
of the Hermes of Praxiteles which was dis- 
covered at Olympia some years ago. It is 
the right thing to worship.' 



154 THE DICTATOR 

' One so seldom worships the right thing 
— at least, at the right time,' he said. 

' I worship the right thing, I know,' she 
rejoined, ' but I don't quite know about the 
right time.' 

' Your instincts would be sure to guide 
you right,' he answered, not indeed quite 
knowing what he was talking about. 

' Why ? ' she asked, point blank. 

' Well, I suppose I meant to say that 
you have nobler instincts than most other 
people.' 

' Come, you are not trying to pay me a 
compliment ? I don't want compliments ; I 
hate and detest them. Leave them to stupid 
and uninteresting men.' 

' And to stupid and uninteresting 
women ? ' 

' Another try at a compliment ! ' 

' No ; I felt that.' 

'Well, anyhow, I did not entice you in 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 155 

here to hear anythmg about myself; I know 
all about myself.' 

' Indeed,' he said straightforwardly, ' I do 
not care to pay compliments, and I should 
never think of wearying you with them. I 
believe I hardly quite knew what I was talk- 
ing about just now.' 

' Very well ; it does not matter. I want 
to hear about you. I want to know all about 
you. I want you to trust in me and treat me 
as your friend.' 

' But what do you want me to tell you ? ' 

' About yourself and your projects and 
everything. Will you ? ' 

The Dictator was a little bewildered by 
the girl's earnestness, her energy, and the 
perfect simplicity of her evident belief that 
she was saying nothing unreasonable. She 
saw reluctance and hesitation in his eyes. 

' You are very young,' he began. 

' Too young to be trusted ? ' 



156 THE DICTATOR 

* No, I (lid not say that! 

* But your look said it.' 

' My look then mistranslated my feeling.* 

' What did you feel ? ' 

' Surprise, and interest, and gratitude.' 

She tossed her head impatiently. 

' Do you think I can't understand .^ ' she 
asked, in her impetuous way — her imperial 
way with most others, but only an impetuous 
way with him. For most others with whom 
she was familiar she was able to control and 
be familiar with, but she could only be im- 
petuous with the Dictator. Indeed, it was 
the high tide of her emotion which carried 
her away so far as to fling her in mere im- 
petuousness against him. 

The Dictator was silent for a moment, and 
then he said : ' You don't seem much more 
than a child to me.' 

* Oh ! Why ? Do you not know ? — I am 
twenty-three 1 ' 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 157 

' I am twenty-three,' the Dictator mur- 
mured, looking at her with a kindly and 
half-melancholy interest. ' You are twenty- 
three ! Well, there it is — do you not see, 
Miss Langley ? ' 

' There what is ? ' 

' There is all the difference. To be 
twenty-three seems to you to make you 
quite a grown-up person.' 

' What else should it make me ? I have 
been of age for tw^o years. What am I but a 
grown-up person ? ' 

' Not in my sense,' he said placidly. ' You 
see, I have gone through so much, and lived 
so many lives, that I begin to feel quite like 
an old man already. Why, I might have had 
a daughter as old as you.' 

' Oh, stuff! ' the audacious young woman 
interposed. 

' Stuff? How do you know ? ' 

' As if I hadn't read lives of you in all the 



1 58 THE DICTATOR 

papers and magazines and I don't know what. 
I can tell you your birthday if you wish, and 
the year of your birth. You are quite young 
— in my eyes.' 

'You are kind to me,' he said, gravely, 
' and I am quite sure that I look at my very 
best in your eyes.' 

' You do indeed,' she said ferventl}^ grate- 
fully. 

' Still that does not prevent me from being 
twenty years older ilian you.' 

'All right ; but would you refuse to talk 
frankly and sensibly about yourself? — 
sensibly, I mean, as one talks to a friend and 
not as one talks to a child. Would you re- 
fuse to talk in that way to a young man 
merely because you were twenty years older 
than he ? ' 

' I am not much of a talker,' he said, ' and 
I very much doubt if I should talk to a young 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 159 

man at all about my projects, unless, of 
course, to my friend Hamilton.' 

Helena turned half away disappointed. 
It was of no use, then — she was not his friend. 
He did not care to reveal himself to her ; 
and yet she thought she could do so much to 
help him. She felt that tears were beginning 
to gather in her eyes, and she would not 
for all the world that he should see them. 

' I thought we were friends,' slie said, 
giving out the words very much as a child 
might give them out — and, indeed, her heart 
was much more as that of a little child than 
she herself knew or than he knew then ; for 
she had not the least idea that she was in love 
or likely to be in love with the Dictator. Her 
free, energetic, wild-falcon spirit had never as 
yet troubled itself with thoughts of such kind. 
She had made a hero for herself out of the 
Dictator — she almost adored him ; but it was 



i6o THE DICTATOR 

with the most genuine hero-worship— or fetish 
worship, if that be the better and harsher way 
of putting it — and she liad never thought of 
being in love with him. Her highest ambition 
up to this hour was to be his friend and to be 
admitted to his confidence, and — oh, happy 
recognition ! — to be consulted by him. When 
she said ' I tliought we were friends,' she 
jumped up and went towards the window to 
hide the emotion which she knew was only too 
likely to make itself felt. 

The Dictator got up and followed her. 
' We are friends,' he said. 

She looked brightly round at him, but 
perhaps he saw in her eyes that she had been 
feeling a keen disappointment. 

' You think my professed friendsliip mere 
girlish inquisitiveness — you know you do,' she 
said, for she was still angry. 

* Indeed I do not,' he said earnestly. ' I 
have had no friendship since I came back an 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' i6i 

outcast to England — no friendship like that 
given to me by you ' 

She turned round delightedly to^vards 
him. 

' And by your father.' 

And again, she could not tell why, she 
turned partly away. 

' But the truth is,' he went on to say, ' I 
have no clearly defined plans as yet.' 

' You don't mean to give in ? ' she asked 
eagerly. 

He smiled at her impetuosity. She 
blushed slightly as she saw his smile. 

' Oh, I know,' she exclaimed, ' yoii think 
me an impertinent schoolgirl, and you only 
laugh at me.' 

' I do nothing of the kind. It is only too 
much of a pleasure to me to talk to you on 
terms of friendship. Look here, I wish we 
could do as people used to do in the old 
melodramas, and swear an eternal friendship.' 

VOL. I. M 



i62 THE DICTATOR 

' I swear an eternal friendship to you,' she 
exclaimed, ' whether you like it or not,' and, 
obeying the wild impulse of the hour, she held 
out both her hands. 

He took them both in his, held them for 
just one instant, and then let them go. 

' I accept the friendship,' he said, with a 
quiet smile, ' and I reciprocate it with all my 
heart.' 

Helena was already growing a little alarmed 
at her own impulsiveness and effusiveness. 
But there was something in the Dictator's 
quiet, grave, and protecting way which always 
seemed to reassure her. ' He will be sure to 
understand me,' was the vague thought in her 
mind. 

Assuredly the Dictator now thought lie 
did understand her. He felt satisfied tliat her 
enthusiasm was the enthusiasm of a generous 
girl's friendship, and that she thought about 
him in no other way. He had learned to like 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 163 

her companionsliip, and to think much of her 
fresh, courageous intellect, and even of her 
practical good sense. He had no doubt that 
he should find her advice on many things 
worth having. His battlefield just now and 
for some time to come must be in London — in 
the London of finance and diplomacy. 

' Come and sit down again,' the Dictator 
said ; ' I will tell you all I know — and I don't 
know much. I do not mean to give up, Miss 
Langley. I am not a man who gives up — I 
am not built that way.' 

' Of course I knew,' Helena exclaimed tri- 
umphantly ; ' I knew you would never give 
up. You couldn't.' 

' I couldn't — and I do not believe I ought 
to give up. I am sure I know better how to 
provide for the future of Gloria than — than — 
well, than Gloria knows herself — just now. 
I believe Gloria will want me back.' 

' Of course she will want you back when 

M 2 



i64 THE DICTATOR 

she comes to her senses,' Helena said with 
sparkhng eyes. 

' I don't blame her for having a little lost 
her senses under the conditions — it was all 
too new, and I was too hasty. I was too 
much inspired by the ungoverned energy of 
the new broom. I should do better now if I 
had the chance.' 

' You will have the chance — you must 
have it ! ' 

' Do you promise it to me ?' he asked with 
a kindly smile. 

' I do — I can — I know it will come to 
you ! ' 

' Well, I can wait,' he said quietly. 
' When Gloria calls me to go back to her 
i wull go.' 

' But what do you mean by Gloria ? Do 
you want a 2?lehiscite of the whole population 
in your favour ? ' 

' Oh no ! I only mean this, that if the 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 165 

large majority of the people Avliom I strove 
to serve are of opinion they can do without 
me — well, then, I shall do without them. 
But if they call me I shall go to them,, 
although I went to my death and knew it 
beforehand,' 

' One may do worse things,' the girl said 
proudly, ' than go knowingly to one's 
death/ 

' You are so young,' he said. ' Death 
seems nothing to you. The young and the 
generous are brave like that.' 

' Oh,' she exclaimed, ' let my youth 
alone ! ' 

She would have liked to say, ' Oh, con- 
found my youth ! ' but she did not give way 
to any such unseemly impulse. Slie felt very 
happy again, her high spirits all rallying 
round her. 

' Let your youth alone ! ' the Dictator said, 
with a half-melancholy smile. ' So long" as 



l66 THE DICTATOR 

time lets it alone — and even time will do that 
for some years yet.' 

Then he stopped and felt a little as if he 
had been preaching a sermon to the girl. 

' Come/ she broke in upon his morahsings, 
' if I am so dreadfully young, at least I'll have 
the benefit of my immaturity. If I am to be 
treated as a child, I must have a child's 
freedom from conventionality.' She dragged 
forward a heavy armchair lined with the soft, 
mellowed, dull red leather which one sees 
made into cushions and sofa-pillows in the 
shops of Nuremberg's more artistic uphol- 
sterers, and then at its side on the carpet 
she planted a footstool of the same material 
and colour. ' There,' she said, ' you sit in that 
chair.' 

' And you, what are you going to do ? ' 
' Sit first, and I will show you.' 
He obeyed her and sat in the great chair. 
' Well, now ? ' he asked. 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 167 

* I shall sit here at your feet.' She flung 
herself down and sat on the footstool. 

' Here is my throne,' she said composedly ; 
' bid kings come bow to it.' 

'Kings come bowing to a banished 
Eepubhcan ? ' 

' You are my King,' she answered, ' and 
so I sit at your feet and am proud and 
happy. Now talk to me and tell me some 
more.' 

But the talk was not destined to go any 
farther that night. Eivers and one or two 
others came lounging in. Helena did not stir 
from her lowly position. The Dictator re- 
mained as he was just long enough to show 
that he did not rec^ard himself as haviuvT been 
disturbed. Helena flung a saucy little glance 
of defiance at the principal intruder. 

'I know you were sent for me,' she said. 
'Papa wants me?' 

' Yes,' the intruder replied ; 'if I had not 



i68 THE DICTATOR 

been sent I should never have ventured to 
follow you into this room.* 

' Of course not — this is my special 
sanctuary. Lady Seagraves has dedicated 
it to me, and now I dedicate it to Mr. Ericson. 
I have just been telling him that, for all he is 
a Kepublican, he is my King.' 

The Dictator had risen by this time. 

* You are sent for ? ' he said. 

' Yes — I am sorry.' 

' So am I — but we must not keep SirEupert 
waiting.' 

'I shall see you again — when ? ' she asked 
eagerly. 

' Whenever you wish,' he answered. Then 
they shook hands, and Soame Elvers took her 
away. 

Several ladies remarked that night that 
really Helena Langley was going quite beyond 
all bounds, and was overdoing her unconven- 
tionality quite too shockingly. She was 



'HERE IS MY THRONE' 169 

actually throwing herself right at Mr. Ericson's 
head. Of course Mr. Ericson would not think 
of marrying a chit like that. He was quite 
old enous^h to be her father. 

One or two stout dowagers shook their 
heads sagaciously, and remarked that Sir 
Eupert had a great deal of money, and that a 
large fortune got with a wife might come in 
very handy for the projects of a dethroned 
Dictator. ' And men are all so vain, my dear,* 
remarked one to another. ' Mr. Ericson 
doesn't look vain,' the other said meditatively. 
' They are all alike, my dear,' rejoined the 
one. And so the matter was settled — or left 
unsettled. 

Meanwhile the Dictator went home, and 
began to look over maps and charts of Gloria. 
He buried himself in some plans of street 
improvement, including a new and splendid 
opera house, of which he had actually laid the 
foundation before the crash came. 



F70 THE DICTATOR 



CHAPTEE YII 

THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 

Why did the Dictator bury himself in his maps 
and his plans and his improvements in the 
street architecture of a city which in all pro- 
babihty he was never to see more ? 

For one reason. Because his mind was on 
something else to-night, and he did not feel 
as if he were acting with full fidelity to the 
cause of Gloria if he allowed any subject to 
come even for an hour too directly between 
him and that. Little as he permitted himself 
to put on the airs of a patriot and philan- 
thropist — much as he would have hated to 
exhibit himself or be regarded as a professional 
patriot, yet the devotion to that cause which 
he had himself created — the cause of a regene- 



THE PRINCE AND CL AUDIO 171 

rated Gloria — was deep down in bis very 
heart. Gloria and her future were his day- 
dream — his idol, his hobby, or his craze, if 
you like ; he had long been possessed by the 
thoucfht of a redeemed and recrenerated Gloria. 
To-night his mind had been thrown for a 
moment off the track — and it was therefore 
that he pulled out his maps and was en- 
deavouring to get on to the track again. 

But he could not help thinking of Helena 
Langley. The girl embarrassed him — bevril- 
dered him. Her upturned eyes came between 
him and his maps. Her frank homage was 
just like that of a child. Yet she was not a 
child, but a remarkably clever and brilliant 
young woman, and he did not know whether 
he ought to accept her homage. He was, for 
all his strange career, somewhat conservative 
in his notions about women. He thought that 
there om?ht to be a sweet reserve about them 
always. He rather liked the pedestal theory 



172 THE DICTATOR 

about woman. The approaches and the devo- 
tion, he thought, ought to come from the man 
always. In the case of Helena Langley, it 
never occurred to him to think that her devo- 
tion was anything different from the devotion 
of Hamilton ; but then a young man who is 
one's secretary is quite free to show his devo- 
tion, while a young woman who is not one's 
secretary is not free to show her devotion. 
Ericson kept asking himself whether Sir 
Eupert would not feel vexed when he heard 
of the way in which his dear spoiled child 
had been going on — as he probably would 
fron. herself — for she evidently had not the 
faintest notion of concealment. On the other 
hand, what could Ericson do ? Give Helena 
Langley an exposition of his theories con- 
cerning proper behaviour in unmarried 
womanhood ? Why, how absurd and priggish 
and offensive such a course of action would 
be ! The girl would either break into 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 173 

laughter at him or feel herself offended by his 
attempt to lecture her. And who or what 
had given him any right to lecture her ? 
What, after all, had she done ? Sat on a foot- 
stool beside the chair of a public man whose 
cause she sympathised with, and who was 
quite old enough — or nearly so, at all events 
— to be her father. Up to this time Ericson 
was rather inchned to press the ' old enough 
to be her father,' and to leave out the ' nearly 
so.' Then, again, he reminded himself that 
social ways and manners had very much 
changed in London during his absence, and 
that oirls were allowed, and even encourao-ed, 
to do all manner of things now which would 
have been thought tomboyish, or even im- 
proper, in his younger days. Why, he had 
glanced at scores of leading articles and essays 
written to prove that the London girl of the 
close of the century was free to do things 
which would have brought the deepest and 



174 THE DICTATOR 

most comprehensive blush to the cheeks of the 
meek and modest maidens of a former genera- 
tion. 

Yes — but for all this change of manners it 
was certain that he had himself heard comments 
made on the impulsive unconventionality of 
Miss Langley. The comments were sometimes 
generous, sympathetic, and perhaps a little 
pitying — and of course they were sometimes 
ill-natured and spiteful. But, whatever their 
tone, they were all tuned to the one key — that 
Miss Langley was impulsively unconventional. 

The Dictator was inclined to resent the in- 
trusion of a woman into his thoughts. For 
years he had been in the habit of regarding 
women as trees walking. He had had a love 
disappointment early in life. His true love 
had proved a false true love, and he had taken 
it very seriously — taken it quite to heart. 
He was not enough of a modern London man 
to recognise the fact that something of the 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUD JO 175 

kind happens to a good many people, and that 
there are still a great many girls left to choose 
from. He ought to have made nothing of it, 
and consoled himself easily, but he did not. 
So he had lost his ideal of womanhood, and 
went through the world like one deprived of 
a sense. The man is, on the whole, happiest 
whose true love dies early, and leaves him with 
an ideal of womanhood which never can 
change. He is, if he be at all a true man, 
thenceforth as one who walks under the 
guidance of an angel. But Ericson's mind 
was put out by the failure of his ideal. Hap- 
pily he was a strong man by nature, with deep 
impassioned longings and profound convic- 
tions ; and going on through life in his lonely, 
overcrowded way, he soon became absorbed 
in the entrancing egotism of devotion to a 
great cause. He began to see all things in 
life first as they bore on the regeneration of 
Gloria — now as they bore on his restoration to 



176 THE DICTATOR 

Gloria. So he had been forgetting all about 
women, except as ornaments of society, and 
occasionally as useful mechanisms in politics. 
The memory of his false true love had long 
faded. He did not now particularly regret 
that she had been false. He did not regret it 
even for her own sake — for he knew that she 
has got on very well in life — had married a 
rich man — held a good position in society, and 
apparently had all her desires gratified. It 
was probable — it was almost certain — that he 
should meet her in London this season — and 
he felt no interest or curiosity about the 
meeting — did not even trouble himself by 
wonderinc^ whether she had been followiufr 
his career with eyes in which old memories 
gleamed. But after her he had done no love- 
making and felt inclined for no romance. His 
ideal, as has been said, was gone — and he did 
not care for women without an ideal to 
pursue. 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 177 

Every night, however late, when the Dic- 
tator had got back to his rooms Hamilton 
came to see him, and they read over letters 
and talked over the doings of the next day. 
Hamilton came this night in the usual course 
of thin^Tjs and Ericson was delif^hted to see 
him. He was sick of trying to study the 
street improvements of the metropolis of 
Gloria, and he w^as vexed at the intrusion of 
Helena Langley into his mind — for he did not 
suspect in the least that she had yet made 
any intrusion into his heart. 

'Well, Hamilton, I hope you have been 
enjoying yourself? ' 

' Yes, Excellency — fairly enough. Do 
you know I had a long talk with Sir Eupert 
Langley about you ? ' 

' Aye, aye. What does Sir Eupert say 
about me ? ' 

' Well,' he says, Hamilton began distress- 

VOL. I. N 



178 THE DICTA TOR 

edly, ' that you had better give up all notions 
of Gloria and go in for English politics.' 

The Dictator laughed ; and at tlie same 
time felt a little touched. He could not help 
remembering the declaration of his life's 
policy he had just been making to Sir Eupcrt 
Langley's daughter. 

' What on earth do I know about English 
politics ? ' 

' Oh, well ; of course you could get it all 
up easily enough, so far as that goes.' 

'But doesn't Sir Eupert see that, so far as 
1 understand things at all, I should be in tlie 
party opposed to him ? ' 

' Yes, he says that ; but he doesn't seem 
to mind. lie thinks you would find a field in 
English politics ; and he says the life of the 
House of Commons is the life to which the 
ambition of every true Englishman ought to 
turn — and, you know — all that sort of thing.' 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUD 10 179 

' And does he think that I have forgotten 
Gloria ? ' 

' No ; but he has a theory about all South 
American States. He thinks they are all 
rotten, and that sort of thing. He insists 
that you are thrown away on Gloria.' 

* Fancy a man being thrown away upon a 
country,' the Dictator said, with a smile. ' I 
have often heard and read of a country being 
thrown away upon a man, but never yet of a 
man being thrown away upon a country. I 
should not have wondered at such an opinion 
from an ordinary Englishman, who has no 
idea of a place the size of Gloria, where we 
could stow away England, France, and Ger- 
many in a little unnoticed corner. But Sir 
Eupert — who has been there ! Give us out 
the cigars, Hamilton — and ring for some 
drinks.' 

Hamilton brought out the cigars, and 
rang the bell. 

w 2 



tBo THE DICTATOR 

' Well — anyhow — I liave told you,' be 
said hesitatingly. 

* So you have, boy, with your usual indo- 
mitable honesty. For I know what you think 
about]^all this.' 

* Of course you do.' 

* You don't want to give up Gloria ? ' 
*Give up Gloria? Never — while grass 

grows and water runs ! ' 

' Well, then, we need not say any more 
about that. Tell me, though, where was all 
this ? At Lady Seagraves' ? ' 

' No ; it was at Sir Eupert's own house.' 

' Oh, yes, I forgot ; you were dining 
there ? ' 

' Yes ; I was dining there.' 

' This was after dinner ? ' 

' Yes ; there were very few men there, 
and he talked all this to me in a confidential 
sort of way. Tell me, Excellency ; what do 
you think of his daughter ? ' 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUD 10 i8r 

The Dictator almost started. If the ques- 
tion had come out of his own inner con- 
sciousness it could not have illustrated more 
clearly the problem which was perplexing 
bis heart. 

' Why, Hamilton, I have not seen very 
much of her, and I don't profess to be much 
of a judge of young ladies. Why on earth 
do you want my opinion ? What is your 
own opinion of her ? ' 

'I think she is very beautiful.' 

'So do I.' 

' And awfully clever.' 

' Eight again — so do I.' 

'And singularly attractive, don't you 
think ? ' 

'Yes; very attractive indeed. But you 
know, my boy, that the attractions of young 
women have now little more than a purely 
historical interest for me. Still, I am quite 
prepared to go as far with you as to admit 



182 THE DICTATOR 

that Miss Langley is a most attractive young 
woman/ 

' She thinks ever so much of you^ Hamil- 
ton said dogmatically. 

' She has great sympathy with our cause,' 
the Dictator said. 

' She would do anything you asked her 
to do.' 

' My boy, I don't want to ask her to do 
anything.' 

' Excellency, I want you to advise her to 
do somethinfT — for me! 

'For you, Hamilton? Is that the way?' 
The Dictator asked the question with a tone 
of mfinite sympathy, and he stood up as if he 
were about to give some important order. 
Hamilton, on the other hand, coHapsed into a 
chair. 

' That is the way, Excellency.' 

' You are in love with this child ? ' 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 183 

' I am madly in love with this child, if 
you call her so.' 

Ericson made some strides up and down 
the room, with his hands behind him. Then 
he suddenly stopped. 

' Is this quite a serious business ? ' he 
asked, in a low, soft voice. 

' Terribly serious for me. Excellency, if 
things don't turn out right. I have been hit 
very hard.' 

The Dictator smiled. 

' We get over such things,' he said. 

' But I don't want to get over this ; I 
don't mean to get over it.' 

' Well,' Ericson said good-humouredly, 
and with quite recovered composure, ' it may 
not be necessary for you to get over it. Does 
the young lady want you to get over it ? ' 

' I haven't ventured to ask her yet.' 

' What do you mean to ask her ? ' 



l84 THE DICTATOR 

' Well, of course — if she will — have me.' 

' Yes, naturally. But I mean when ' 

' When do I mean to ask her ? ' 

' No ; when do you propose to marry 
her?' 

* Well, of course, when we have settled 
ourselves again in Gloria, and all is right 
there. You don't fancy I would do anything 
before we have made that all right ? ' 

' But all that is a little vague,' the Dic- 
tator said ; ' the time is somewhat indefinite. 
One does not quite know what the young 
lady might say.' 

'She is just as enthusiastic about Gloria 
as I am, or as you are.' 

' Yes, but her father. Have you said 
anything to him about this ? ' 

' Not a word. I waited until I could talk 
of it to you, and get your promise to help 
me.' 

' Of course I'll help you, if I can. But tell 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 185 

me, how can I? What do you want me to 
do ? Shall I speak to Sir Eupert ? ' 

' If you would speak to him after, I 
should be awfully glad. But I don't so much 
mind about him just yet ; I want you to 
speak to her ! ' 

' To Miss Langley ? To ask her to marry 
you?' 

' That's about what it comes to,' Hamilton 
said courageously. 

' But, my dear love-sick youth, would you 
not much rather woo and win the girl for 
yourself? ' 

* What I am afraid of,' Hamilton said 
gravely, ' is that she would pretend not to take 
me seriously. Slie would laugh and turn me 
into ridicule, and try to make fun of the 
whole thing. But if you tell her that it is 
positively serious and a business of life and 
death with me, then she will believe you, and 
she must take it seriously and give you a 



i86 THE DICTATOR 

serious answer, or at least promise to give me 
a serious answer.' 

' This is the oddest v/ay of love-making, 
Hamilton.' 

' I don't know,' Hamilton said ; ' we have 
Shakespeare's authority for it, haven't we? 
Didn't Don Pedro arrange for Claudio and 
Hero ? ' 

*Well, a very good precedent,' Ericson 
said with a smile. ' Tell me about this 
to-morrow. Think over it and sleep over it 
in the meantime, and if you still think that 
you are wilhng to make your proposals 
through the medium of an envoy, then trust 
me, Hamilton, your envoy will do all he can 
to win for you your heart's desire.' 

' I don't know how to thank you,' Hamilton 
exclaimed fervently. 

'Don't try. I hate thanks. If they are 
sincere they tell their tale without words. I 
know you — everything about you is sincere.' 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 187 

Hamilton's eyes glistened with joy and 
gratitude. He would have liked to seize his 
chiefs hand and press it to his hps ; but he 
forbore. The Dictator was not an efiusive 
man, and effusiveness did not flourish in his 
presence. Hamilton confined his gratitude to 
looks and thoughts and to the dropping of 
the subject for the present. 

' I have been pottering over these maps 
and plans,' the Dictator said. 

' I am so glad,' Hamilton exclaimed, ' to 
And that your heart is still wholly absorbed 
in the improvement of Gloria.' 

The Dictator remained for a few moments 
silent and apparently buried in thought. He 
was not thinking perhaps altogether of the 
projected improvements in the capital of 
Gloria. Hamilton had often seen him in those 
sudden and silent, but not sullen moods, and 
was always careful not to disturb him by 
asking any question or making any remark. 



i88 THE DICTATOR 

The Dictator had been sitting in a chair and 
pulling the ends of his moustache. At 
once he got up and went to where Hamilton 
was seated. 

'Look here, Hamilton,' he said, in a tone 
of positive sternness, ' I want to be clear about 
all this. I want to help you — of course I 
want to help you — if you can really be helped. 
But, first of all, I must be certain — as far as 
human certainty can go — that you really 
know what you do want. The great curse of 
life is that men — and I suppose women too — 
I can't say — do not really know or trouble to 
know what they do positively want with all 
their strength and with all their soul. The 
man who positively knows what he does want 
and sticks to it has got it already. Tell me, 
do you really want to marry this young 
woman ? ' 

* I do — with all my soul and with all my 
strength ! ' 



THE PRINCE AND CLAUDIO 189 

'But have you thought about it — have 
you turned it over in your mind — have you 
come down from your high horse and looked 
at yourself, as the old joke puts it ? ' 

' It's no joke for me,' Hamilton said 
dolefully. 

' No, no, boy ; I didn't mean that it was. 
But I mean, have you really looked at yourself 
and her ? Have you thought whether she 
could make you happy .^— have you thought 
whether you could make her happy ? What 
do you know about her ? What do you know 
about the kind of life which she lives ? How 
do you know whether she could do without 
that kind of life — whether she could live any 
other kind of life ? She is a London Society 
girl, she rides in the Eow at a certain hour, 
she goes out to dinner-parties and to balls, 
she dances until all hours in the mornino-, she 
goes abroad to the regular place at the regular 
time, she spends a certain part of the winter 



I90 THE DICTATOR 

visiting at the regulation country houses. 
Are you prepared to Hve that sort of hfe — 
or are you prepared to bear the responsibihty 
of taking her out of it ? Are you prepared 
to take the butterfly to Hve in the camp ? ' 

' She isn't a butterfly ' 

' No, no ; never mind my bad metaphor. 
But she has been brought up in a kind of 
hfe which is second nature to her. Are you 
prepared to hve that hfe with her .^ Are you 
sure — are you quite, quite sure — that she 
would be willing, after the first romantic 
outburst, to put up with a totally different 
life for the sake of you ? ' 

' Excellency,' Hamilton said, smiling some- 
what sadly, ' you certainly do your best to 
take the conceit out of a young man.' 

' My boy, I don't think you have any self- 
conceit, but you may have a good deal of 
self-forgetfulness. Now I want you to call a 
halt and remember yourself. In this business 



THE PRINCE AXD CLAUDIO 191 

of yours — supposing it comes to ^vhat you 
would consider at the moment a success ' 

' At the moment ? ' HamiUon pleaded, in 
pained remonstrance. 

'At the moment — yes. Supposing the 
thing ends successfully for you, one plan of 
life or other must necessarily be sacrificed — 
yours or hers. "Which is it going to be ? 
Don't make too much of her present enthu- 
siasm. Which is it G'oiuG^ to be ? ' 

' I don't believe there will be any sacrifice 
needed,' Hamilton said, in an impassioned 
tone. ' I told you she loves Gloria as well as 
you or I could do.' 

The Dictator shook his head and smiled 
pityingly. 

'But if there is to be any sacrifice of 
any life,' Hamilton said, driven on perhaps by 
his chief's pitying smile, ' it shan't he hers. 
No, if she will have me after we have got 
back to Gloria, I'll live with her in London 



192 THE DICTATOR 

every season and ride with her in the Eow 
every morning and afternoon, and take her, 
by Jove ! to all the dinners and balls she 
cares about, and she shall have her heart's 
desire, whatever it be.' 

The Dictator's face was crossed by some 
shadows. Pity was there and sympathy 
was' there — and a certain melancholy pleasure, 
and, it may be, a certain disappointment. 
He pulled himself together very quickly, 
and was cool, genial, and composed, accord- 
ing to his usual way. 

' All right, my boy,' he said, ' this is 
genuine love at all events, however it may 
turn out. You have answered my question 
fairly and fully. I see now that 3'ou do 
know what you want. That is one great 
point, anyhow. I will do my very best to 
get for you what you want. If it only rested 
with me, Hamilton ! ' There was a positive 
note of tenderness in his voice as he spoke 



THE PRIXCE AND CLAUDIO 193 

these words ; and yet there was a kind of 
forlorn feeling in his heart as if the friend 
of his heart was leavhig him. He felt a 
little as the brother Yult in Eichter's ex- 
quisite and forgotten novel might have felt 
when he was sounding on his flute that final 
morning, and going out on his cold way 
never to see his brother again. The Irjlher 
Walt heard the soft, sweet notes, and 
smiled tranquilly, believing that his brother 
was merely going on a kindly errand to 
help him, Walt, to happiness. But the flute- 
player felt that, come what might, they 
were, in fact, to be parted for ever. 



VOL, I. 



194 ^^^ DICTATOR 



CHAPTER YIII 

'I WONDER WHY?' 

The Dictator had had a good deal to do 
with marrying and giving in marriage in the 
Eepnblic of Gloria. One of the social and 
moral reforms he had endeavoured to bring 
about was that wliicli should secure to young 
people the right of being consulted as to their 
own inclinations before they were formally 
and iinally consigned to wedlock. The 
ordinary practice in Gloria was very much 
like that which prevails in certain Indian 
tribes — the family on either side arranged for 
the young man and the maiden, made it a 
matter of market bargain, settled it by com- 
promise of price or otherwise, and then 
brought the pair together and married tliem. 



'/ WONDER WHY?' 195 

Ericson set his face against such a system, 
and tried to get a chance for the young 
people. He carried his influence so far that 
the parents on both sides among the official 
classes in the capital consulted him generally 
before taking any step, and then he frankly 
undertook the mediator's part, and found out 
whether the young woman liked the young 
man or not — whether she liked someone 
better or not. He had a sweet and kindly 
way with him which usually made both the 
youths and the maidens confidential — and he 
learned many a quiet heart-secret ; and where 
he found that a sucrg-ested marriai^e would 
really not do, he told the parents as much, 
and they generally yielded to his influence 
and his authority. He had made happy 
many a pair of young lovers who, without 
his beneficent intervention, would have been 
doomed to ' spoil two houses,' as the old 
saying puts it. 



196 THE DICTATOR 

Therefore, he did not feel much put out 
at the mere idea of intervening in another 
man's love affairs, or even the idea of carry- 
ing a proposal of marriage from another man. 

Yet the Dictator was in somewhat 
thoughtful mood as he drove to Sir Eupert 
Langley's. He had taken much interest in 
Helena Langley. She had an influence over 
him which he told himself was only the 
influence of a clever cliild — told himself of 
this again and again. Yet there was a 
curious feeling of unfltness or dissatisfaction 
with the part he was going to play. Of 
course, he would do his very best for 
Hamilton. There was no man in the world 
for whom he cared lialf so much as lie did 
for Hamilton. No — that is not putting it 
strongly enough — there was now no man in 
the world for whom he really cared but 
Hamilton. The Dictator's afiections were 
curiously narrowed. He had almost no 



'/ WONDER WHY?' 197 

friends whom he really loved but Hamilton — 
and acquaintances were to him just all the 
same, one as good as another, and no better. 
He was a philanthropist by temperament, or 
nature, or nerve, or something ; but while he 
would have risked his life for almost any man, 
and for any woman or child, he did not care 
in the least for social intercourse with men, 
women, and children in general. He could 
not talk to a child — children were a trouble 
to him, because he did not know what to say 
to them. Perhaps this was one reason why 
he was attracted by Helena Langley ; she 
seemed so like the ideal child to whom one 
can talk. Then came up the thought in his 
mind — must he lose Hamilton if Miss Langley 
should consent to take him as her husband? 
Of course, Hamilton had declared that he 
would never marry until the Dictator and he 
had won back Gloria ; but how long would 
that resolve last if Helena were to answer, Yes 



198 THE DICTATOR 

— and Now ? The Dictator felt lonely as liis 
cab stopped at Sir Eupert Langley's door. 

' Is Miss Langley at home ? ' 

Yes, Miss Langley was at home. Of 
course, the Dictator knew that she would be, 
and yet in his heart he could almost have 
wished to hear that she was out. There is a 
mood of mind in which one likes any post- 
ponement. But the duty of friendship had 
to be done — and the Dictator was sorry for 
everybody. 

The Dictator was met in the hall by the 
footman, and also by To-to. To-to was 
Helena's black poodle. The black poodle 
took to all Helena's friends very readil3\ 
Whom she liked, he liked. He had his ways, 
like his mistress — and he at once allowed 
Ericson to understand not only that Helena 
was at home, but that Helena was sitting 
just then in her own room,w]iere she habitu- 
ally received her friends. Tlie footman told 



'/ WONDER JV//Vr 199 

the Dictator that Miss Langley was at home 
— To-to told him what the footman could not 
have ventured to do, that she was waiting for 
him in her own drawing-room, and ready to 
receive him. 

Now, how did To-to contrive to tell him 
that ? 

Very easily, in truth. To-to had a keen, 
healthy curiosity. He was always anxious to 
know what was f^^oin^y on. Tlie moment he 
heard the bell ring; at the o-reat door, he 
wanted to know who was coming in, and he 
ran dowr the stairs and stood in the hall to 
find out. When the door was ojoened, and 
the visitor appeared, To-to instantly made up 
his mind. If it was an unfamiliar figure, To-to 
considered it an introduction in which he had 
no manner of interest, and, without waiting 
one second, he scampered back to rejoin his 
mistress, and try to explain to ]ier that 
there was some very uninteresting man or 



20O THE DICTATOR 

woman coming to call on her. But if it 
was somebody he knew, and whom he knew 
that his mistress knew, then tliere were two 
courses open to liim. If Helena was not in 
her sitting-room, To- to welcomed the visitor 
in the most friendly and hospitable way, and 
then fell into the background, and took no 
further notice, but ranged the premises care- 
lessly and on his own account. If, however, 
his mistress were in her drawing-room, then 
To- to invariably preceded tlie visitor up the 
stairs, going in front even of the footman, 
and ushered tlie new-comer into my lady's 
chamber. The process of reasoning on To-to's 
part must have been somewhat after this 
fashion. ' My business is to announce my 
lady's friends, tlie people whom I, with my 
exquisite inteUigence, know to be people 
whom she wants to see. If I know that she 
is in her drawing-room ready to see tliem, 
then, of course, it is my duty and my pleasure 



*/ WONDER IVUVr 20I 

to go before and announce them. But if I 
know, having just been there, that she is not 
yet there, then I have no function to perform. 
It is the business of some other creature — her 
maid very Hkely — to receive the news from 
the footman that someone is waitinc^ to see 
her. Tliat is a complex process with which 
I have nothing to do.' The favoured visitor, 
therefore — the visitor, that is to say, whom 
To-to favoured, believing him or her to be 
favoured by To-to's mistress — had to pass 
through what may be called two portals, or 
ordeals. First, he had to ask of the servant 
whether Miss Langley was at home. Being 
informed that she was at home, then it de- 
pended on To-to to let the visitor know 
whether Miss Langley was actually in her 
drawing-room waiting to receive him, or 
whether he was to be shown into the draw- 
ing-room and told that Miss Langley would 
be duly informed of his presence, and asked 



202 THE DICTATOR 

if he would be good enough to take a chair 
and wait for a moment. Never was To- to 
known to make the shghtest mistake about 
the actual condition of things. Never had 
he run up in advance of the Dictator 
when liis mistress was not seated in her 
drawing-room ready to receive her visitor. 
Never had he remained linf^erinc^ in the hall 
and the passages when Miss Langley was 
in lier room, and prepared for tlie recep- 
tion. Evidently, To-to regarded himself as 
Helena's special functionary. Tlie other at- 
tendants and followers — footmen, maids, and 
such like — might be allowed the privilege of 
saying whether Miss Langley was or was not 
at home to receive visitors ; but the special 
and quite peculiar function of To-to was to 
make it clear whether Miss Langley was or was 
not at that very moment waiting in lier own 
particular drawing-room to welcome them. 
So the Dictator, who had not much time 



'/ WONDER WHYV 203 

to spare, being pressed with various affairs to 
attend to, wasmucli pleased to find that To-to 
not merely welcomed him when the door was 
opened — a welcome which the Dictator would 
have expected from To-to's undisguised regard 
and even patronage — but that To-to briskly 
ran up the stairs in advance of the footman, 
and ran before him in througli the drawing- 
room door when the footman had opened it. 
The Dictator loved the dog because of the 
creature's friendship for him and love for its 
mistress. The Dictator did not know how much 
he loved the dog because the dog was devoted 
to Helena Langley. On tlie stairs, as he went 
up, a sudden pang passed through the 
Dictator's heart. It might, perhaps, have 
brouii^ht him even clearer warnincf than it did. 
' If I succeed in my mission' — it might have 
told him — ' what is to become of me ? ' But, 
although the shot of pain did pass through him, 
he did not give it time to explain itself. 



204 THE DICTATOR 

Helena was seated on a sofa. The 
moment she heard his name announced she 
jumped up and ran to meet him. 

' I ought to have gone beyond the thres- 
hold,' she said, blushing, * to meet my king.' 

* So kind of you,' he said, rather stiffly, 
* to stay in for me. You have so many 
engagements.' 

* As if I would not give up any engage- 
ment to please you ! And the very first time 
you expressed any wish to see me ! ' 

' Well, I have come to talk to you about 
something very serious.' 

She looked up amazed, her bright eyes 
broadening with wonder. 

' Something that concerns the happiness 
of yourself, perhaps — of another person cer- 
tainly.' 

She drooped her eyes now, and her colour 
deepened and her breath came quickly. 

The Dictator went to the point at once. 



'I WONDER WHYf 205 

' I am bad at prefaces,' he said. ' I come 
to speak to you on behalf of my dear young 
friend and comrade, Ernest Hamilton.' 

' Oh ! ' She drew herself up and looked 
almost defiantly at him. 

' Yes ; he asked me to come and see you.' 

' What have I to do with Mr. Hamilton ? ' 

' That you must teach me,' said Ericson, 

smihng rather sadly, and quoting from 

' Hamlet.' 

' I can teach you that very quickly — 
Nothing.' 

' But you have not heard what I was 
going to say.' 

' No. Well, you were quoting from 
Shakespeare — let me quote too. " Had I 
three ears I'd hear thee." ' She drew herself 
back into her sofa. They were seated on the 
sofa side by side. He was leaning forward — 
she had drawn back. She was waiting in a 
sort of docfcred silence. 



2o6 THE DICTATOR 

' Hamilton is one of the noblest creatures 
I ever knew. He is my very dearest friend.' 

A shade came over her face, and she 
shrugged her shoulders. 

' I mean amonc^st men. I was not thinkin^^ 
of you.' 

' No,' she answered, ' I am quite sure you 
were not thinking of me.' 

She perversely pretended to misunder- 
stand his meaning. He hardly noticed her 
words. 'Please go on,' she said, ' and tell me 
about Mr. Hamilton.' 

' He is in love with you,' the Dictator said 
in a soft low voice, and as if he envied the 
man about whom that tale could be told. 

' Oh ! ' she exclaimed impatiently, turning 
on the sofa as if in pain, ' I am sick of all this 
love-making ! Why can't a young man like 
one without making an idiot of himself and 
falling in love with one ? Why can't we let 
each other be happy all in our own way ? It 



'/ WONDER WHY?' 207 

is all SO horribly mechanical ! You meet a 
man two or three times, and you dance with 
him, and you talk with him, and perhaps you 
like him — perhaps you like him ever so much 
— and then in a moment he spoils the whole 
thing by throwing his ridiculous offer of 
marriage right in your face ! Why on earth 
should I marry Mr. Hamilton ? ' 

' Don't take it too lightly, dear young lady 
— I know Hamilton to the very depth of his 
nature. This is a serious thing with him — 
he is not like the commonplace young masher 
of London Society ; when he feels, he feels 
deeply — I know what has been his personal 
devotion to myself.' 

' Then why does he not keep to that de- 
votion ? Why does he desert his post ? 
What does he want of me ? What do I want 
of him? I liked him chiefly because he was 
devoted to you — and now he turns right 
round and wants to be devoted to me ! Tell 



2o8 THE DICTATOR 

him from me that he was much better 
employed with his former devotion — tell him 
my advice was that lie should stick to it.' 

' You must give a more serious answer,' 
the Dictator said gravely. 

' Why didn't lie come himself? ' she asked 
somewhat inconsequently, and going off on 
another tack at once. ' I can't understand 
how a man of any spirit can make love by 
deputy.' 

' Kings do sometimes,' the Dictator said. 

Helena blushed ac^aiii. Some thougrht was 
passing through her mind which was not in 
his. She had called him her king. 

' Mr. Hamilton is not a king,' she said almost 
angrily. She was on the point of blurting out, 
'Mr. Hamilton is not my king,' but she re- 
covered herself in good time. ' Even if he 
were,' she went on, ' I should rather be pro- 
posed to in person as Katherine was by Henry 
the Fifth.' 



'/ WONDER WHY?' 209 

' You take this all too lightly,' Ericson 
pleaded. 'Eemember that this young man's 
heart and his future life are wrapped up in 
your answer, and in ]joil 

' Tell him to come himself and get his 
answer,' she said with a scornful toss of her 
head. Something had risen up in her heart 
which made her unkind. 

' Miss Langiey,' Ericson said gravely, ' I 
think it would have been much better if 
Hamilton had come himself and made his 
proposal, and argued it out with you for 
himself I told him so, but he would not be 
advised. He is too modest and fearful^ 
although, I tell you, I have seen more than 
once what pluck he has in danger. Yes, I 
have seen how cool, how elate he can be with 
the bullets and tlie bayonets of the enemy all 
at work about him. But he is timid with 
you — because he loves you.' 

VOL. I. r 



210 THE DICTATOR 

' " He either fears his fate too much " ' 

she began. 

'You can't settle this thing by a quota- 
tion. I see that you are in a mood for quo- 
tations, and that shows that you are not very 
serious. I shall tell you why he asked me, 
and prevailed upon me, to come to you and 
speak for him. There is no reason why I 
should not tell you.' 

' Tell me,' she said. 

' I am old enough to have no hesitation in 
telling a girl of your age anything.' 

' Again ! ' Helena said. ' I do wish you 
would let my age alone ! I thought we had 
come to an honourable understandino- to 
leave my age out of the question.' 

' I fear it can't well be left out of this 
question. You see, what I was going to tell 
you was that Hamilton asked me to break 
this to you because he believes that I have 
great influence with you.' 



'/ WONDER WHY?' Ii2 

' Of course, you know you have.' 

' Yes — but there was more.' 

' What more ? ' She turned her head away. 

' He is under the impression that you 
would do anything I asked you to do.' 

'So I would, and so I will!' she ex- 
claimed impetuously. ' If you ask me to 
marry Mr. Hamilton I will marry him ! Yes 
— I will. K you, knowing what you do 
know, can wish your friend to marry me, and 
me to become his wife, I will accept his con- 
descendino^ offer ! You know I do not love 
him — you know I never felt one moment's 
feeling of that kind for him — you know that 
I like him as I like twenty other young men 
— and not a bit more. You know this — at 
all events, you know it now when I tell you — 
and will you ask me to marry Mr. Hamilton 
now ? ' 

' But is this all true ? Is this really how 
you feel to him ? ' 



212 THE DICTATOR 

' Zvvischen uns sei Walirheit,' Helena said 
scornfully. * Why should I deceive you ? If 
I loved Mr. Hamilton I could marry him, 
couldn't I? — seeing that he has sent you to 
ask me ? I do not love him — I never could 
love him in that way. Now what do you ask 
rae to do ? ' 

' I am sorry for my poor young friend 
and comrade/ the Dictator answered sadly. 
' I thought, perhaps, he might have had some 
reason to believe ' 

' Did he tell you anything of the 
kind?' 

' Oh, no, no ; he is the last man in the 
world to say such a thing, or even to think 
it. One reason why he wished me to open 
the matter to you was that he feared, if he 
spoke to you about it himself, you would only 
laugh at him and refuse to give him a 
gerious answer. lie thought you would give 
me a serious answer.' 



*/ WONDER WHY?' 213 

* What a very extraordinary and eccentric 
young man ! ' 

' Indeed, he is nothing of the kind — 
although, of course, Uke myself, he has lived 
a good deal outside the currents of Enghsh 
feeling.' 

' I should have thouglit,' she said gravely, 
* that that was rather a question of the 
currents of common human feehng. Do the 
young women in Gloria like to be made love 
to by delegation ? ' 

' Would it have made any difference if he 
had come himself ? ' 

' No difference in the world — now or at 
any other time. But remember, I am a very 
loyal subject, and I admit the right of my 
King to hand me over in marriage. If you 
tell me to marry Mr. Hamilton, I will.' 

' You are only jesting, Miss Langley, and 
this is not a jest.' 

' I don't feel much in the mood for 



214 THE DICTATOR 

jesting,' she answered. 'It would rather 
seem as if I had been made the subject of a 
jest ' 

«0h, you must not say that,' he inter- 
posed in an ahnost angry tone. ' You can't, 
and don't, think that either of him or of me.' 

' JN'o, I don't ; I could not think it of you 
— and no, I could not think it of him either. 
But you must admit that he has acted rather 
oddly.' 

' And I too, I suppose ? ' 

' Oh, you — well, of course, you were natu- 
rally thinking of the interest, or, at least, the 
momentary wishes, of your friend.' 

' Of my two friends — you are my friend. 
Did we not swear an eternal friendship the 
other night ? ' 

' Now you are jesting.' 

* I am not ; I am profoundly serious. I 
thought perhaps this might be for the hap- 
piness of both.' 



'/ WONDER WHY?' 215 

' Did you ever see anything in me which 
seemed to make such an idea hkely ? ' 

' You see, I have known you but for so 
short a time.' 

' People who are worth knowing at all are 
known at once or never known,' she said 
promptly and very dogmatically. 

' Young ladies do not wear their hearts 
upon their sleeves.' 

' I am afraid I do sometimes — too much,' 
she said. 

' I thought it at least possible.' 

'Xow you linow. Well, are you going to 
ask me to marry your friend Mr. Hamil- 
ton ? ' 

'Xo, indeed, Miss Langley. That would 
be a cruel injustice and wrong to him and to 
you. He must marry someone who loves 
him ; you must marry someone whom you 
love. I am sorry for my poor friend — this 
will hurt him. But he cannot blame vou, 



2i6 THE DICTATOR 

and 1 cannot blame you. He has some com- 
fort — he has Gloria to figlit for some day.' 

'Put it nicely — very nicely to him/ 
Helena said, softening now tliat all was over. 
' Tell him — won't you ? — that I am ever so 
fond of him ; and tell him that this must not 
make the least difference in our friendship. 
No one shall ever know from me.' 

' I will put it all as well as I can,' said the 
Dictator ; ' but I am afraid it must make a 
difference to him. It made a difference to 
me — when I was a young man of about his 
age.' 

'You were disappointed?' Helena asked, 
in rather tremulous tone. 

' More than that ; I think I was deceived. 
I was ever so much worse off than Hamilton, 
for there was bitterness in my story, and 
there can be none in his. But I have sur- 
vived — as you see.' 

' Is— she— still living ? ' 



'/ WONDER WHYf 217 

' Oh, yes ; she married for money and 
rank, and has got both, and I beheve she is 
perfectly happy.' 

' And have you recovered — quite ? ' 

' Quite ; I fancy it must have been an 
unreal sort of thing altogether. My wound 
is quite healed — does not give me even a 
passing moment of pain, as very old wounds 
sometimes do. But I am not going to lapse 
into the sentimental. It was only the 
thought of Hamilton that brought all this 
up.' 

' You are not sentimental ? ' Helena asked. 

' I have not had time to be. Anyhow, no 
woman ever cared about me — in that way, I 
mean — no, not one.' 

'Ah, you never can tell,' Helena said 
gently. He seemed to her somehow to have 
led a very lonely life ; it came into her 
thoughts just then; she could not tell why. 
She was relieved when he rose to go, for she 



21 8 THE DICTATOR 

felt her sympathy for him beginning to be a 
little too strong, and she was afraid of betray- 
ing it. The interview had been a curious 
and a trying one for her. The Dictator left 
the room wondering how he could ever have 
been drawn into talking to a girl about the 
story of his lost love. ' That girl has a 
strange influence over me,' he thought. ' I 
wonder why ? ' 



219 



CHAPTEE IX 

THE PRIVATE SECEETARY 

SoAME PiiVERS was in some ways, and not a 
few, a model private secretary for a busy 
statesman. He was a gentleman by birtli, 
bringing-up, appearance, and manners ; he 
was very quick, adroit, and clever ; lie had a 
wonderful memory, a remarkable faculty for 
keeping documents and ideas in order ; he 
could speak French, German, Italian, and 
Spanish, and conduct a correspondence in 
these languages. He knew the political and 
other gossip of most or all of the European 
capitals, and of Washington and Cairo just 
as well. He could be interviewed on behalf 
of his chief, and could be trusted not to 



220 THE DICTATOR 

utter one single word of which his chief 
could not approve. He would see any unde- 
sirable visitor, and in five minutes talk him 
over into the belief that it was a perfect grief 
to the Minister to have to forego the pleasure 
of seeing him in person. He was to be 
trusted with any secret which concerned his 
position, and no power on earth could sur- 
prise him into any look or gesture from 
which anybody could conjecture that he 
knew more than he professed to know. He 
was a younger son of very good family, and 
although his allowance was not large, it 
enabled him, as a bachelor, to live an easy 
and gentlemanly life. He belonged to some 
good clubs, and he always dined out in the 
season. He had nice little chambers in the 
St. James's Street region, and, of course, he 
spent the greater part of every -day in Sir 
Kupert's house, or in the lobby of the House 
of Commons. It was understood that he was 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 221 

to be provided with a seat in Parliament at 
the earhest possible opportunity, not, indeed, 
so much for the good of the State as for the 
convenience of his chief, who, naturally, found 
it unsatisfactory to have to go out into the 
lobby in order to get hold of his private 
secretary. Eivers was devoted to his chief in 
his own sort of way. That way was not like 
the devotion of Hamilton to the Dictator ; 
for it is very hkely that, in his own secret 
soul, Eivers occasionally made fun of Sir 
Eupert, with his Quixotic ideas and his senti- 
mentalisms, and his views of life. Eivers 
had no views on the subject of life or of 
anything else. But Hamilton himself could 
not be more careful of his chief's interests 
than was Eivers. Eivers had no beliefs and 
no prejudices. He was not an immoral man, 
but he had no prejudice in favour of morality ; 
he was not cruel, but he had no objection to 
other people being as cruel as they liked, as 



222 THE DICTATOR 

cruel as the law would allow them to be, 
provided that their cruelty was not exercised 
on himself, or anyone he particularly cared 
about. He never in his life professed or felt 
one single impulse of what is called philan- 
thropy. It was to him a matter of perfect 
indifference whether ten thousand people in 
some remote place did or did not perish by 
war, or fever, or cyclone, or inundation. Nor 
did he care in the least, exce|)t for occasional 
political purposes, about the condition of the 
poor in our rural villages or in the East End 
of London. He regarded the poor as he 
regarded the flies — that is, with entire indif- 
ference so long as they did not come near 
enough to annoy him. He did not care how 
they lived, or whether they lived at all. For 
a long time he could not bring himself to 
believe that Helena Langley really felt any 
strong interest in the poor. He could not 
believe that her professed zeal for their wel- 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 223 

fare was anything other than the graceful 
affectation of a pretty and clever girl. 

But we all have our weaknesses, even the 
strongest of us, and Soame Elvers found, when 
he began to be much in companionship with 
Helena Langley, where the weak point was to 
be hit in his panoj^ly of pride. To him love 
and affection and all that sort of thing were 
mere sentimental nonsense, encumbering a 
rising man, and as hkely as not, if indulged 
in, to spoil his whole career. He had always 
made up his mind to the fact that, if he ever 
did marry, he must marry a woman with 
money. He would not marry at all unless he 
could have a house and entertain as other 
people in Society were in the habit of doing. 
As a bachelor he was all right. He could 
keep nice chambers ; he could ride in the Eow ; 
he could have a valet ; he could wear good 
clothes — and he was a man whom Nature had 
meant, and tailor recognised, for one to show 



224 THE DICTATOR 

off good clothes. But if he should ever marry 
it was clear to him that he must have a house 
like other people, and that he must give 
dinner parties. He did not reason this out in 
his mind — he never reasoned anything out in 
his mind — it was all clear and self-evident to 
him. Therefore, after a while, the question 
began to arise — why should he not marry 
Helena Langley? He knew perfectly well 
that if she wished to be married to him Sir 
Eupert would not offer the slightest objection. 
Any man whom his daughter really loved 
Sir Eupert would certainly accept as a son- 
in-law. Elvers even fancied, not, perhaps, 
altogether without reason, that Sir Eupert 
personally would regard it as a convenient 
arrangement if his daughter were to fall in 
love with his secretary and get married to 
him. But above and beyond all this, Eivers, 
as a practical philosopher, had broken down, 
and he found himself in love with Helena 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 225 

Langley. For herself, Helena never suspected 
it. She had grown to be very fond of Soame 
Elvers. He seemed to fill for her exactly the 
part that a good-tempered brother might have 
done. Indeed, not any brother, however 
good-natured, would have been as attentive to 
a sister as Elvers was to her. He had a quiet, 
unobtrusive way of putting his personal atten- 
tions as part of his official duty which ab- 
solutely relieved Helena's mind of any idea 
of lover-like consideration. At many a 
dinner party or evening party her father had 
to leave her prematurely, and go down to the 
House of Commons. It became to her a 
matter of course that in such a case Elvers 
was always sure to be there to put her into 
her carriage and see that she got safely 
home. There was nothing in it. He was her 
father's secretary — a gentleman, to be sure ; 
a man of social position, as good as the best ; 
but still, her father's secretary looking after 

VOL. I. Q 



226 THE DICTATOR 

her because of his devotion to her father. 
She began to hke liim every day more and 
more for his devotion to her father. She did 
not at first hke his cynical ways — his trick of 
making out that every great deed was really 
but a small one, that every seemingly generous 
and self-sacrificing action was actually inspired 
by the very principle of selfishness ; that love 
of the poor, sympathy with the oppressed, 
were only with the better classes another 
mode of amusing a weary social life. ,But she 
soon made out a generous theory to satisfy 
herself on that point. Soame Eivers, she felt 
sure, put on that panoply of cynicism only to 
guard himself against the weakness of yielding 
to a futile sensibility. He was very poor, she 
thought. She had lordly views about money, 
and she thought a man without a country- 
house of his own must needs be wretchedly 
poor, and she knew that Soame Eivers passed 
all his holiday seasons in the country-houses 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 227 

of Other people. Therefore, she made out 
that Soame Elvers was very poor ; and, of 
course, If he was very poor, he could not lend 
much practical aid to those who, in the East 
End or otherwise, were still poorer than he. 
So she assumed that he put on the mask of 
cynicism to hide the flushings of sensibility. 
She told him as much ; she said she knew that 
his affected indifference to the interests of 
humanity was only a disguise put on to 
conceal his real feelings. At first he used to 
laugh at her odd, pretty conceits. After a 
while he came to encourage her in the idea, 
even while formally assuring her that there 
was nothing in it, and that he did not care a 
straw whether the poor were miserable or 
happy. 

Chance favoured him. There were some 
poor people whom Helena and her fatlier 
were shipping off to New Zealand. Sir 
Piupert, without Helena's knowledge, asked 

a 2 



228 7 HE DICTATOR 

his secretary to look after them the night of 
their going aboard, as he could not be there 
himself. Helena, without consulting her 
father, drove down to the docks to look after 
her poor friends, and there she found Eivers 
installed in the business of protector. He did 
the work well — as he did every work that 
came to his hand. The emigrants thought 
him the nicest gentleman they had ever 
known. Helena said to him, ' Come now ! I 
have found you out at last.' And he only 
said, ' Oh, nonsense ! this is nothing.' But he 
did not more directly contradict her theory, 
and he did not say her father had sent 
him — for he knew Sir Eupert would never say 
that of himself. 

Eivers found himself every day watching 
over Helena with a deepening interest and 
anxiety. Her talk, her companionship, were 
growing to be indispensable to liim. He did 
not Day her compliments — indeed, some- 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 229 

times they rather sparred at one another in a 
pleasant schoolboy and schoolgirl sort of way. 
But she liked his society, and felt herself 
thoroughly companionable and comrade-like 
with him, and she never thought of concealing 
her liking. The result was that Soame 
Eivers began to think it quite on the cards 
that, if nothing should interpose, he might 
marry Helena Langley — and that, too, before 
very long. Then he should have in every 
way his heart's desire. 

If nothing should interpose .^ Yes, but 
there was where the danger came in ! If 
nothing should interpose .^ But was it likely 
that nothing and nobody would interpose ? 
The girl was well known to be a rich heiress ; 
she was the only child of a most distinguished 
statesman ; she would be very likely to have 
Dukes and Marquises competing for her hand, 
and where might Soame Eivers be then.^ 
The young man sometimes thought that, if 



230 THE DICTATOR 

tbrougli her unconventional and somewliat 
romantic nature he could entangle her in a 
love affair, he might be able to induce her to 
get secretly married to him — before any of 
the possible Dukes and Marquises had time 
to put in a claim. But, of course, there 
would be always the danger of his turning 
Sir Eupert hopelessly against him by any 
trick of that kind, and he saw no use in having 
the daughter on his side if he could not also 
have the father. Besides, he had a sore con- 
viction that the girl would not do anything 
to displease her father. So he gave up the 
idea of the romantic elopement, or the secret 
marriage, and he reminded himself that, after 
all, Helena Langley, with all her unconven- 
tional ways, was not exactly another Lydia 
Languish. 

Then the Dictator and Hamilton came on 
the scene, and Kivers had many an unhappy 
hour of it. At first he was more alarmed 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 231 

about Hamilton than about the Dictator. He 
could easily understand an impulsive girl's 
hero-worship for the Dictator, and he did not 
think much about it. The Dictator, he 
assured liimself, must seem quite an elderly 
sort of person to a girl of Helena's age ; but 
Hamilton was young and handsome, of good 
family, and undoubtedly rich. Hamilton and 
Helena fraternised very freely and openly in 
their adoration for Ericson, and Elvers thought 
moodily that tliat partnership of admiration 
for a third person might very Avell end in a 
partnership of still closer admiration for each 
other. So, although from the very first he 
disliked the Dictator, yet he soon began to 
detest Hamilton a great deal more. 

His dislike of Ericson was not exclusively 
and altogether because of Helena's hero- 
worship. According to his way of thinking, 
all foreign adventure had something more or 
less vulgar in it, but that was especially 



232 THE DICTATOR 

objectionable in the case of an Englishman. 
What business had an EngHshman — one who 
claims apparently to be an English gentleman 
— what business had he with a lot of South 
American Eepublicans? What did he want 
among such people ? Why should he care 
about them ? Why should he want to 
jxovern them ? And if he did want to o'overn 
them, why did he not stay there and govern ? 
The thing was in any case mere bravado, and 
melodramatic enterprise. 

It was the morning after the day when 
the Dictator had proposed to Helena for poor 
Hamilton. Soame Eivers met Helena on the 
staircase. 

' Of course,' he said, w^itli an emphasis, 
* you will be at luncheon to-day ? ' 

' Why, of course ? ' she asked, carelessly. 

' Well — your hero is coming — didn't you 
know ? ' 

' I didn't know ; and who is my hero ? ' 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 233 

' Oh, come now ! — the Dictator, of course.' 

' Is he coming? ' she asked, with a sudden 
gleam of genuine emotion flashing over her 
face. 

' Yes ; your father particularly wants him 
to meet Sir Lionel Rainey.' 

'Oh, I didn't know. Well, yes— I shall 
be there, I suppose, if I feel well enough.' 

' Are you not well? ' Elvers asked, with a 
tone of somewhat artificial tenderness in his 
voice. 

' Oh, yes, I am all right ; but I might not 
feel quite up to the level of Sir Lionel Eainey. 
Only men, of course ? ' 

' Only men.' 

' Well, I shall think it over.' 

'But you can't want to miss your Dictator? ' 

' My Dictator will probably not miss me,' 
the girl said in scornful tones which brought 
no comfort to the heart of Soame Eivers. 

' You would be very sorry if he did not 



234 THE DICTATOR 

miss you,' Soame Elvers said blunderingly. 
Your cynical man of the world lias his feel- 
ings and his angers. 

' Very sorry ! ' Helena defiantly declared. 

The Dictator came punctually at two — he 
was always punctual. To-to was friendly, 
but did not conduct him. He was shown at 
once into the dining-room, where luncheon 
was laid out. The room looked lonely to the 
Dictator. Helena was not there. 

' My daughter is not coming down to 
luncheon,' Sir Eupert said. 

' I am so sorry,' the Dictator said. ' No- 
thing serious, I hope ? ' 

' Oh, no ! a cold, or something like that — 
she didn't tell me. She will be quite well, I 
hope, to-morrow. You see how To-to keeps 
her place ? ' 

Ericson then saw that To-to was seated 
resolutely on the chair which Helena usually 
occupied at luncheon. 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 235 

But what is the use if she is not 



coming ? ' the Dictator suggested — not to 
disparage the intelhgence of To-to, but only 
to find out, if he could, the motive of that 
undoubtedly sagacious animal's taking such a 
definite attitude. 

' Well, To-to does not like the idea of 
anyone taking Helena's place except himself. 
Now, you will see ; when we all settle down, 
and no one presumes to try for that chair, 
To-to will quietly drop out of it and allow 
the remainder of the performance to go un- 
disturbed. He doesn't want to set up any 
claim to sit on the chair himself; all he 
wants is to assert and to protect the right 
of Helena to have that chair at any mo- 
ment when she may choose to join us at 
luncheon.' 

The rest of the party soon came in from 
various rooms and consultations. Soame 
Elvers was the first. 



236 THE DICTATOR 

'Miss Langley not coining?' he said, 
with a glance at To-to. 

' No,' Sir Eupert answered. ' She is a 
little out of sorts to-day — nothing much — but 
she won't come down just yet.' 

' So To-to keeps her seat reserved, I see.' 

The Dictator felt in his heart as if he 
and To-to were born to be friends. 

The other guests were Lord Courtreeve 
and Sir Lionel Eainey, the famous English- 
man who had settled himself down at the 
Court of the King of Siam, and taken in hand 
the railway and general engineering and 
military and financial arrangements of that 
monarch ; and, having been somewhat hurt in 
an expedition against the Black Flags, was 
now at home, partly for rest and recovery, 
and partly in order to have an opportunity of 
enlightening his Majesty of Siam, who had a 
very inquiring mind, on the immediate con- 
dition of politics and housebuilding in England. 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 237 

Sir Lionel said that, above all things, the King 
of Siam would be interested in learning 
something about Ericson and the con- 
dition of Gloria, for the King of Siam read 
everything he could get hold of about politics 
everywhere. Therefore, Sir Eupert had under- 
taken to invite the Dictator to this luncheon, 
and the Dictator had willingly undertaken to 
come. Soame Elvers had been showing Sir 
Lionel over the house, and explaining all its 
arrangements to him — for the King of Siam 
had thoughts of building a palace after the 
fashion of some first-class and up-to-date 
house in London. Sir Lionel was a stout man, 
rather above the middle height, but looking 
rather below it, because of his stoutness. He 
had a sharply turned-up dark moustache, and 
purpling cheeks and eyes that seemed too 
tightly fitted into the face for their own 
personal comfort. 

Lord Courtreeve was a pale young man, 



238 THE DICTATOR 

with a very refined and delicate face. He was 
a member of the London County Council, 
and was a chairman of a County Council in 
his own part of the country. He was a strong 
advocate of Local Option, and wore at his 
courageous buttonhole the blue ribbon which 
proclaimed his devotion to the cause of 
temperance. He was an honoured and a 
sincere member of the League of Social Purity. 
He was much interested in the increase of 
open spaces and recreation grounds for the 
London poor. He was an unaffectedly good 
young man, and if people sometimes smiled 
quietly at him, they respected him all the 
same. Soame Eivers had said of him that 
Providence had invented him to be the chief 
living argument in favour of the principle 
of hereditary legislation. 

Sir Lionel Eainey and Lord Courtreeve 
did not get on at all. Sir Lionel had too 
many odd and high-flavoured anecdotes about 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 239 

life in Siam to be a congenial neighbour for 
the champion of social purity. He had a way, 
too, of referring everything to the lower 
instincts of man, and roughly declining to 
reckon in the least idea of any of man's, or 
woman's, higher qualities. Therefore, the 
Dictator did not take to him any more than 
Lord Courtreeve did ; and Sir Eupert began 
to think that his luncheon party was not well 
mixed. Soame Pavers saw it too, and was 
determined to get the company out of Siam. 

' Do you find London society much changed 
since you were here last. Sir Lionel ? ' he asked. 

' Didn't come to London to study society,' 
Sir Lionel answered, somewhat gruffly, for he 
thought there was much more to be said 
about Siam. ' I mean in that sort of way. I 
want to get some notions to take back to the 
King of Siam.' 

' But might it not interest his Majesty to 
know of anv change, if there were anv, in 



240 THE DICTATOR 

London society during that time ? ' Eivers 
blandly asked. 

' No sir. His Majesty never was in Eng- 
land, and he could not be expected to take 
any interest in the small and superficial 
changes made in the tone or the talk of 
society during a few years. You might as 
well expect him to be interested in the fact 
that whereas when I was here last the ladies 
wore eel-skin dresses, now they wear full 
skirts, and some of them, I am told, wear a 
divided skirt.' 

'But I thouorht such chancres of fashion 
might interest the King,' Rivers remarked 
with an elaborate meekness. 

' The King, sir, does not care about 
divided skirts,' Sir Lionel answered, with scorn 
and resentment in his voice. 

'I must confess,' the Dictator said, glad 
to be free of Siam, ' that I have been much 
interested in observing the changes tliat have 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 241 

been made in the life of England — I mean in 
the life of London — since I was living here.' 

'We have all got so Republican,' Sir 
Eupert said sadly. 

' And we all profess to be Sociahsts,' 
Soame Elvers added. 

'There is much more done for the poor 
than ever there was before,' Lord Courtreeve 
pleaded. 

' Because so many of the poor have got 
votes,' Elvers observed. 

' Yes,' Sir Lionel struck in with a laugh, 
' and you fellows all want to get into the 
House of Commons or the County Council, 
or some such place. By Jove ! in my time 
a gentleman would not want to become a 
County Councillor.' 

' I am not troubling myself about English 
politics,' the Dictator said. ' I do not care to 
vex myself about them. I should probably 
only end by forming opinions quite different 

VOL. 1. R 



242 THE DICTATOR 

from some of my friends here, and, as I have 
no mission for EngUsh political life, what 
would be the good of that? But I am much 
interested in English social life, and even in 
what is called Society. Now, what I want to 
know is how far does society in London re- 
present social London, and still more, social 
England?' 

' Not the least in the world,' Sir Eupert 
promptly replied. 

' I am not quite so sure of that,' Soame 
Elvers interposed. ' I fancy most of the 
fellows try to take their tone from us.' 

' I hope not,' the Dictator said. 

' So do I,' added Sir Eupert emphatically ; 
' and I am quite certain they do not. What 
on earth do you know about it. Elvers ? ' he 
asked almost sharply. 

' Why shouldn't I know all about it, if I 
took the trouble to find out ? ' Elvers answered 
languidly. 



'Yes, yes. Of course you could,' Sir 
Eupert said benignly, correcting his awkward 
touch of anger as a painter corrects some 
sudden mistake in drawing. ' I didn't mean 
in the least to disparage your faculty of ac- 
quiring correct information on any subject. 
Nobody appreciates more than I do what you 
are capable of in that way — nobody has had 
so much practical experience of it. But what 
I mean is this — that I don't think you know 
a great deal of English social life outside the 
West End of London.' 

' Is there anything of social life worth 
knowing to be knowm outside the West End 
of London ? ' Soame Elvers asked. 

' Well, you see, the mere fact that you 
put the question shows that you can't do 
much to enlighten Mr. Ericson on the one 
point about which he asks for some enlight- 
enment. He has been out of England for a 
great many years, and he finds some fault 

E 2 



244 THE DICTATOR 

with our ways — or, at least, he asks for some 
explanation about them.' 

'Yes, quite so. I am afraid I have for- 
gotten the point on which Mr. Ericson desired 
to get information.' And Elvers smiled a 
bland smile without looking at Ericson. 
' May I trouble you. Lord Courtreeve, for the 
cigarettes ? ' 

' It was not merely a point, but a whole 
cresset of points — a cluster of points,' Ericson 
said, ' on every one of which I wished to have 
a tip of liglit. Is English social life to be 
judged of by the conversation and the canons 
of opinion which we find received in London 
society ? ' 

' Certainly not,' Sir Eupert explained. 

' Heaven forbid ! ' Lord Courtreeve added 
fervently. 

'I don't quite understand,' said Soame 
Elvers. 

' Well,' the Dictator explained, ' what I 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 245 

mean is this. I find little or nothing prevail- 
ing in London society but cheap cynicism — 
the very cheapest cynicism — cynicism at a 
farthing a 3^ard or thereabouts. We all 
admire healthy cynicism — cynicism with a 
great reforming and purifying purpose — the 
cynicism that is like a corrosive acid 
to an evil system ; but this West End 
London sham cynicism — what does that 
mean ? ' 

' I don't quite know what you mean,' 
Soame Pavers said. 

' I mean this, wherever you go in London 
society — at all events, wherever I go — I 
notice a peculiarity that I think did not exist, 
at all events to such an extent, in my younger 
days. Everything is taken with easy ridicule. 
A divorce case is a joke. Marriage is a joke. 
Love is a joke. Patriotism is a joke. Every- 
body is assumed, as a matter of course, to 
have a selfish motive in everything. Is this 



246 THE DICTATOR 

the real feeling of London society, or is it 
only a fashion, a sliam, a grimace ? ' 

'I think it is a very natural feeling,' 
Soame Eivers replied, with the greatest 
promptitude. 

' And represents the true feeling of what 
are called the better classes of London ? ' 

' Why, certainly.' 

' I think the thing is detestable, anyhow,' 
Lord Courtreeve interposed, ' and I am quite 
sure it does not represent the tone of English 
society.' 

' So am I,' Sir Eupert added. 

'But you must admit that it is the tone 
which does prevail,' the Dictator said 
pressingly, for he wanted very mucli to study 
this question down to its roots. 

' I am afraid it is the prevailing social tone 
of London — I mean tlie West End,' Sir Rupert 
admitted reluctantly. ' But you know what a 
fashion there is in these things, as well as in 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 247 

others. The fashion m a Avoman's gown or a 
man's hat does not always represent the shape 
of a woman's body or the size of a man's 
head; 

' It sometimes represents the shape of the 
man's mind, and the size of the woman's 
heart,' said Eivers. 

' Well, anyhow,' Sir Eupert persevered, 
' we all know that a great deal of this sort 
of talk is talked for want of anything else to 
say, and because it amuses most people, and 
because anybody can talk cheap cynicism ; I 
believe that London society is healthy at the 
core.' 

' But come now — let us understand ? ' 
Ericson asked ; ' how can the society be 
healthy at the core for which you yourself 
make the apology by saying that it parrots 
the jargon of a false and loathsome creed 
because it has nothing better to say, or 
because it hopes to be thought witty by 



248 THE DICTATOR 

parroting it ? Come, Sir Eupert, you won't 
maintain that? ' 

' I will maintain,' Sir Eupert said, ' tliat 
London society is not as bad as it seems.' 

' Oil, well, I have no doubt you are right 
in that,' the Dictator hastily replied. ' But 
what I think so melancholy to see is that de- 
generacy of social life in England — I mean in 
London — which apes a cynicism it doesn't 
feel.' 

' But I think it does feel it,' Eivers struck 
in ; ' and very naturally and justly.' 

' Then you think London society is really 
demoralised ? ' The Dictator spoke, turning 
on him rather suddenly. 

'I think London society is just what it has 
always been,' Eivers promptly answered. 

' Corrupt and cynical ? ' 

' Well, no. I should rather say corrupt 
and candid.' 

' If that is London society, that certainly 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 249 

is not English social life,' Lord Courtreeve 
declared emphatically, patting the table with 
his hand, ' It isn't even London social life. 
Come down to the East End, sir ' 

' Oh, indeed, by Jove ! I shall do nothing of 
the kind ! ' Eivers replied, as with a shudder, 
* I think, of all the humbugs of London society, 
slumming is about the worst.' 

' I was not speaking of that,' Lord Court- 
reeve said, with a slight flush on his mild 
face. ' Perhaps I do not think very differ- 
ently from you about some of it — some of it 
— although, Heaven be praised, not about all ; 
but what I mean and was going to say when 
I was interrupted ' — and he looked with a cer- 
tain modified air of reproach at Eivers — ' what 
I was going to say when I w^as interrupted,' 
he repeated, as if to make sure that he was 
not going to be interrupted this time — ' was, 
that if you would go down to the East End 
with me, I could show you in one day plenty 

VOL. I. S 



250 THE DICTATOR 

of proofs that tlie heart of the Eiighsh people 

is as sound and true as ever it was ' 

' Very likely,' Pavers interposed saucily. 
' I never said it wasn't.' 

Lord Courtreeve gaped with astonish- 
ment. 

' I don't quite grasp your meaning,' he 
stammered. 

' I never said,' Soame Eivers replied 
deliberately, ' that the heart of the English 
people was not just as sound and true now as 
it ever was — I dare say it is just about the 
same — meme jeu, don't you know ? ' and he 
took a languid puff at his cigarette. 

' Am I to be glad or sorry of your 
answer ? ' Lord Courtreeve asked, with a 
stare. 

' How can I tell ? It depends on wliat you 
want me to say.' 

'Well, if you mean to praise the great 



THE PRIVATE SECRETARY 251 

heart of the Eiighsh people now, and at other 
times ' 



' Oh dear, no ; I mean nothing of the 
kind.' 

' I say, Eivers, this is all bosh, you know,' 
Sir Eupert struck in. 

* I think we are all shams and frauds in 
our set — in our class,' Eivers said, composedly ; 
' and we are well brought up and educated 
and all that, don't you know ? I really can't 
see why some cads who clean windows, or 
drive omnibuses, or sell vegetables in a 
donkey -cart, or carry bricks up a ladder, 
should be any better than we. Not a bit of 
it — if we are bad, they are worse, you may 
put your money on that.' 

' Well, I think I have had my answer,' the 
Dictator said, with a smile. 

' And what is your interpretation of the 
Oracle's answer ? ' Eivers asked. 



252 THE DICTATOR 

' I sliould have to interpret the Oracle 
itself before I could be clear as to the meaning 
of its answer,' Ericson said composedly. 

Soame Eivers knew pretty well by the 
words and by the tone that if he did not like 
tlie Dictator, neither did the Dictator very 
much like him. 

' You must not mind Eivers and his 
cynicism,' Sir Eupert said, intervening some- 
wdiat hurriedly ; ' he doesn't mean half he 
says.' 

' Or say half he means,' Eivers added. 

^ But, as I was telling you, about the police 
organisation of Siam,' Sir Lionel broke out 
anew. And this time the others went back 
w^ithout resistance to a few moments more of 
Siam. 

END OF THE FIRST VOLUME 



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In the iii i-c r Life. 

BY FREDERICK BOYLE. 

Camp NotHS. 
Savage Life. 

Chronicles of Xo-Man's Land. 
BY HAROLD BRYDGES, 

Uncle >aiii at ome. 

BY ROBERT BUCHANAN. 

The Shadow of the Sword. 

A Child of Nature. 

God and the Man. 

Annan Water. 

The Xew Abeiard. 

The Martyrdom of Madeline. 

Love Me for Ever. 

Matt : a Story of a Caravan. 

Foxglove Manor. 

The Master of the Mine. 

The Heir of Liune 

BY HALL GAINE, 

The Shadow o' a Crime. 
A Son of Hagar. 
The Deemster. 

BY COMMANDER CAM'RON. 

Cruise .f the • black Pjiuce.' 

BY MRS. LOVETT CAMERON. 

Deceivers Ever. 
Juliet's Guardian. 

BY AUSTIN CLARE. 

For the Love <.f h Lass. 

^ BY MRS. ARCHtR CLIVE. 

Paul Ferroll. 

Why Paul Ferroll Killed his 
Wife. 



BY MfiCLAREfJ C0J3AN, 

The Cure of -onl> 

BY C AiLSTON COLLI S. 

The Bar Sinister. 

BY WILKIE COLLINS. 

Armadale. 

After Dark. 

No Naue. 

A Rogue's Life. 

Antonina. 

Basil. 

Hide and Seek. 

The Dpad Secret. 

Queen of Hearts. 

My Miscellanies. 

The Woman in White. 

The Moonstone. 

Man and Wife. 

Poor Miss Finch. 

Sfiss or Mrs. ? 

The New Magdalen. 

The Frozen Deep. 

The Law and the Lady. 

The Tag Destinies. 

The Haunted Hotel. 

The Fallen Leaves. 

Jezebels Daughter. 

The Black RooC. 

Heart and Science. 

' I say No.' 

The Evil Genius. 

Little Novels. 

The Legacy of Cain. 

Blind Love. 

BY MORTIMER C0LLN9. 

Sweet Anne Page. 

Transmigration. 

From Midnight to Midn trht. 

A Fight with Fortune. 

MORT. AND FRANCES COLLINS. 

Sweet and Twenty. 

Frances. 

The Village Comedy. 

You Play Me False. 

Blacksmith and Scholar. 

BY M. J. COLQUHOUN. 
Every Lich a Soldier. 

BY DUTTON COOK. 

Leo. 

Paul Foster's Daughter. 



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Ailveiitures of a Fair RebeL 

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Pretty Mi>s Neville. 
Pro(7tr Pride. 
A Bird of Paspage. 
Diana Barriiigton. 

BY WIlL'AM CYPLES. 

Eeartsof G..J.1. 

BY ALPHONSE DAUDET. 

The Kva j-'^li-t. 

BY ERASMUS DAWSCN. 

The Fonn:a!i) of Youth. 

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A Castle in Sp^in. 

BY J. LEITH DERWENT. 

Onr Lady of Tears. 
Circe's Lovers. 

BY CHARLES DICKLNS. 

Skftcties by Boz. 
The Pi. -k wick Papers. 
Oliver Twist. 
Nicholas Nicklehv. 

BY DICK DONOVAN. 

The Mau-nunter. 

Caught at Last I 

Tracked and Taken, 

W ho Poisoned Hetty Duncan ? 

1 be Man from Manchester. 

A Detective's Triumphs. 

In the (irip of the Law. 

Wanted I 

From Information Received, 

Trncked to Doom. 

BY MRS. ANNIE EOWARDES. 
A P'iut of Honour, 
Archie LovelL 

BY M. BETHAM-EDMARDS. 

Felicia. 
Kitty. 

BY EDWARD E66LEST0N. 

Roxy. 

BY G. MANVILLE FENN. 

The New Mistress. 

BY PERCY FITZSERALD. 

B'lla Doniia. 

Polly. 

The .=econd Mrs. Tillotson. 

S^vent\-five Brooke Street. 

Never Forgotten. 

The Lady of Brantome. 

Fiital Zero. 



BY PERCY FITZGERALD, 

Btraiige Secrets. 



&C. 



BY ALBANK DE F0N3L-NQUE. 

Filthv Lucre. 

^, BY R. E. FRA?jCILLON. 

Olyiiipia. 
One by One. 
Qu en Cophetua. 
A Real Queen, 
Kirg or Knave. 
Romances of the Law. 

BY HAROLD FREDERIC. 

Peth's Brothe-'s Wife. 
The La«ton Girl. 

PREFACED BY BARTLE FRFRE. 

Pandurant^ TIari. 

BY KA!N FRISWELL. 
One of Two. 

BY EDWARD GARRETT. 

The Capel Girls. 

Bf CHARLES GIBBON. 

Robin Gray 

F-^r I ack of Gold. 

What will the World Say ? 

In Honour Bound. 

In Love and War. 

For the King. 

Queen of the Meadow, 

In Pastures Green. 

The Flower of ihe Forest, 

A Heart's Problem, 

The Braes of Yarrow. 

Tne Golden Shaft. 

Of High Decree. 

The Dead Heart. 

By Mead and Stream. 

Heart s Delight. 

Fancy Free. 

Loving a Dream. 

A Hard Knot, 

Blood-Money. 

BY WILLIAM GILBERT. 

James Duke. 

Dr. Auctin's Gnests, 

The Wizard of the Mountain. 

BY ERNEST GLANVILLE. 

The Lost Heiress, 
The Fossicker. 

BY REV. S. BARING GOULD. 

Eve. 

Re<l Spider, 

BY HENRY GREVILLE. 

A Noble Woman. 
Nikanor. 

BY JOHN HABBERTON. 

Bruetons Bayou. 
Country Luck. 

BY ANDREW HALLIDAY. 

Every -Day Papers. 

BY LADY DUFFUS HARDY. 

Paul Wjnter's Sacrifice. 



BY THOMAS H«RuY. 
Under the Green wooo Tree. 

BY BRET HARTE. 

An Heiress of Red Dogr 

The Luck of Ro>ir ng Camp. 

Calif' .rnian Stories. 

(Tabriel Conroy. 

Flip. 

Maruja. 

A Phyllis of the Sierras. 

BY J. BERWICK HARWCOD. 

The Tenth Earl. 

BY JULIAN HAWTHORNE. 

Garth. 

Ellice Quentin. 

Sebastian Strome. 

Dust, 

Fortune's Fool. 

Beatrix Randolph. 

Miss Cadogna. 

Love— or a Name. 

David Poindexter's Disap. 

pearance. 
The Spectre of the Camera, 

BY SIR ARTHUR HELPS. 

Ivan de Biron. 

BY HENRY HERMAN. 

A Lead:ng Lady. 

BY MRS. CASHFL HOEY. 

The Ljver's Creed, 

BY MRS. GEORGE HOOPER. 

The House of Ptaby. 

BY TIGHE HOPKINS. 

Twixt Love and Duty. 

BY MRS. HUNGERFORD. 

In Durarjce Vile. 

A Maiden all Forlorn. 

A Mental Struggle. 

Marvel 

A Modem Circe, 

BY MRS. ALFRED HUNT. 

Thoruicruft's M. del, 
Tlie L« aden Casket. 
heif-Coi.di-mned. 
That Other Person, 

BY JEAN INGELOW. 

Fated to be Frt-e. 

BY HARRIETT JAY. 
The Dark Colieen. 
The Que -n of Ccnnaught, 

BY MARK KERSHAW. 

Colonial Facts and Fiction*. 



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•The VTeariiig of the G-reeii.' 
Passiou's Slave. 
Bell Barry. 

BY JOHN LEYS. 

The Liiiata> s. 

BY E. LYNN LINTON. 

Pat'icia Kem-ali. 

Atonement of Leam Dundas. 

Ti e World Well L- st. 

Urder which Lord ? 

With a Silken Thread. 

The Pwebel of the Family. 

' My Love I ' 

lone. 

Puston Carew. 

Sowing the Wind. 

BY HENRY W. LUCY. 

Gideon Fleyoe. 

BY JUSTIN MCCARTHY. 

Dear Lady Disdai>.. 

The Waierdale iSeighbours. 

My Entmy's Daughter. 

A Fair Sax^.n. 

Linley Hochford. 

iliss Misau'hrope. 

Douua Quix. te. 

T. e Cou et of a Season. 

M:>id of Aihm-. 

Camiola : a Girl with Fortune. 

BY HUGH MacCOLL. 

Mr. Stranger's Seaie>i t'iicket. 

BY KRS. MACD0.4ELL. 

Quaker Cousiis. 

BY KATHARINE S, MACQUOiD. 

The Evil Eye. 
Lost Ptose. 

BY W. H. MALLOCK. 

The INew Republic. 

BY FLORENCE MARRYAT. 

Fighting the Air. 
Written in Fire. 
A Harvest of Wild Oats. 
Open I Sesame 1 

BY J, KASTERMAN. 

Ha1f-ad(.zpn Daughters. 

BY BHA:-JDER MATTHEWS. 

A Secvft <>i the Sea. 

BY LEONARD MERR'CX. 

The M;;ii «ho was Guud. 

BY JEA^ MIOCLEMASS. 

Tou< h ■^<.< Go. 
Mr. Dorillion. 

BY MRS, MOLESWCRTH. 

Hathex.j-U)i KuL-t ry. 



EY J. E. VUQDOCK. 

St-riec Weird wn- Wo derftll. 
The De d MauV Se. rtt. 
From the Bosom of the Deep. 

BY D. CHRISTIE MURRAY. 

A Life's Atouemeut. 

Joseph's Co -.t, 

Yal Strange. 

A Model Father. 

Coals of Fire. 

Heart-s. 

By the Gate of the Sea. 

The Way cf the World. 

A Bit of Human Nature. 

First Person Singular. 

Cynic Foitune. 

Old Blazer's Hero. 

BY D. CHR'STIE MURRAY AND 
HENRY HERMAN. 

Ore Traveler Ileturns. 
Faul Ji'ues's Aias. 
The Bisho}>s' Bible. 

BY HENRY MURRAY. 

A Game of bluff. 

BY KUME NISBET. 

'Bail Up! 

Dr. Bernard St. Vincent. 

BY ALICE O'HANLON. 

The Unforeseen. 
Chance ? or Face? 

BY EEORGES OHNET. 

Doctor Rameuu. 
A Laj;t Love. 
A W eird Gift. 

BY HfRS. OLIPHANT. 

Whiteladits. 

The Primrose Path. | 

Greatest Heiress in England. 

BY VRS. ROBERT O'RilLLY. 

Phoebe's Fun uues. 

BY CUiOA. 

Held in Bondage. 

Strathmore. 

Chai dos. 

Under Two Flags. 

Idaiia. 

Ceci ] Castlemaine's Gage. 

Tric..irin. 

Pu.!k. 

Foile Farina 

A Dog of Flanders. 

Pa^carfel. 

Sigua 

In a Winter City. 

Ariadn&. 

Motes. 

Friend-hip. 

Pijiistrello. 

Bimbi. 

In Aiaremma. 



BY Q\j\Qk-co}ilinued. 
Wanda. 
Frescoes. 

Piiucess Xapraxine. 
Two Little Wi oden Shces. 
A VUlage Comiuuue. 
Orbmar. 
Giiii eroy. 
Ruffiuo. 
Svrlin. 
"Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos. 

BY MARGARET A5NES PA.L. 

Gentle and Simple. 

BY JAMES PAYN. 

Lost Sir Massingherd. 

A Perfect Treasure. 

Bentinck's Tutor. 

Murphy's Master. 

A County Family. 

At Her Mercy. 

A Worn ai's "Vengeance, 

( "ecil's Tryst. 

TneCl>flfard- of Clyffe. 

The Family Scape, race. 

The Foster Brothers. 

The Best of Husbands. 

Found Dead. 

Walter's Word. 

Halves. 

Fallen Fortui es. 

What He Cosr Hpr. 

Humorous Stories. 

Gwendoline's Harvest. 

Like Father, Like -on. 

A Marine Re idence. 

Married Beneath Him. 

Mirk Abbey. 

Not Wooed, but Won. 

f -.'00 Reward. 

Less Black than Painted. 

By Proxy. 

High Spirits. 

1 nder One Ronf. 

Carlyon's Year. 

A Confidential Agent. 

Some Priva e Vi-^ •?. 

A Grape from a Thorn. 

From Exile. 

Kit : a Memory. 

>or t'a-h Only 

The Canon'- Ward. 

1 he Tak of the To.\n. 

Holidny Tasks. 

Glow-wurm Talp«. 

The Mjstery of Mirbri.'ge. 

The Bun t Million. 

Tne Word aiifi rre Will. 

A Prir.ce of the blood. 

Sunny Stories. 

BY C. L. PPKIS. 

Lady Lovelace. 

BY ECGAR A. PCE. 

The ilystery of Man.. R.>get. 



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Tne Uotiiance ' i ii biaiioii. 
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Mrs. Lancaster's Rival. 

The Fo Ml! vpv^. 

BY RICHARD PRYCE. 

Mis-; viaxwi IIV Attec^tions. 

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It is Never Too Late to Mend. 

Hard Cash. 

Peg Woffington. 

Christie Jotinstone. 

Griffir/n Gaunt. 

Put Y' ur.self in His Place. 

Tlie Double Marriage. 

Love Me Little, Love Me Long. 

Foul Plav. 

The C'oister and the Hearth. 

The Course of True Love. 

The Autobiography of a Tliief. 

A Terrible Temptation. 

Tne Wanrering Heir. 

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A Wnman-Hater. 

Singlehf-art and Doubleface. 

Good Stories of Men &c. 

The Jilt. 

A Perilous Secret. 

Rendiana. 

BY MRS. J. H, RIDDELL. 

Her Mother's Darling. 
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Weird Stories. 

Fairy Wa'er. [Party. 

Prince or Wales's Garden 
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The Nun's Curse. 
Idle Tales. 

BY F. W. ROBINSON. 

Women are Sti aog<i. 
The Hards of Jnsrice. 

BY JAMES RU.^CIMAN. 

Fkippers au'i tehellbacks. 

G race Balmaign's Sweetheart. 

Schools and Scholars. 

BY W. CLARK RUSSELL. 

Round the Gallev Fire. 
On the Fo'k'sle Head. 
In the Midd e Watch. 
A Voyage to the Cape. 
A Booli for the Hammock. 
Myst ry of the ' Ocean Star.' 
R )inauce of Jenny Harlowe. 
Am Ocean Tragedy. 
My Shipmare Louise. 
Alone on a Wide Wiiie Sea. 

BY ALAN ST. AUBYN. 
A Fellow ol Trinity. 
The Junior Dean. 



BY GEORGE AUGUSTUS SALA. 

Gaslight and Da\lii.'hn. 

BY JOHN SAUNDERS. 

Guy Waterman. 
Tiie Li<m in the Path. 
The Two Dreamers. 

BY KATHARINE SAUNDERS. 

Joan Merr3 weather. 
T' e High Mills. 
Margaret ana Elizabeth- 
Sebastian. 
Heart Salvnge. 

BY GEORGE R. SIMS. 

Rogues and Vagabonds. 
The Ring o* Bells. 
Mary Jane's Memoirs. 
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Tales of To-day. 
Dramas of Life. 
Til kletcp's Crime. 
Zeph : a Circus Story. 

BY ARTHUR SKETCHLEY. 

A Match in the Daik. 

BY HAWLEY SMART. 
Without Love or Licence. 

BY T. W. SPEIGHT. 

The Mysteries of Heron Dyke. 
The Golden Hoop. 
By Devious Ways. 
Hoodwinked. 
Back to Life. 

BY R. A. STERNDALE. 

The Afghan Knife. 

BY R. LOUIS STEVENSON. 

New Arabian Nights. 
Prince Otto. 

BY BERTHA THOMAS. 

Proud Maisie. 
The Violin-player. 
Cre.-sida. 

BY WALTER THORNBURY. 

Tales for the Marines. 
Old Stories Re-told. 

BY ANTHONY TROLLOPE. 

The Way We Live Now. 
Mr. Scarborough's Family. 
The Golden Lion of Granp^re. 
The American Senator. 
Frau Frohmann. 
Marion Fay. 
Kept in the Dark. 
The Land-Leaguers. 
John Caldigate. 



BY FRANCES E. TROLLOPE. 

Anne Furuess. 

Mafiel's Progress. 

Like Ships upon the Sea. 

BY T. ADCLPHUS TROLLOPE. 
Diamond Cut Diamond. 

BY J. T. TROWBRIDGE. 

Farnell's Folly. 

BY IVAN TURGENIEFF, &c. 

Stories from Foreign Novels. 

BY MARK TWAIN. 

Tom Sawyer. 
A Tramp'Abr^ad. 
The fcftolen White Elephant. 
Pleasure Trip on Continent 
The Gilded Age. 
Huckleberry Finn. 
Life on the Mississippi. 
The Prince and the Pauper. 
Mark Twain's Sketches. 
A Yankee at tbe Court of 
King Arthur. 

BY SARAH TYTLER. 

Noblesse Oblige. 
Citoyenre Jacqueline. 
The Huguenot Family. 
What She Came Through. 
Beautv and the Beast 
The Bride's Pass. 
Saint Muigo's City. 
Disappeared. 
Lady Bell. 
Buried Diamonds. 
The Blackball Ghosts. 

BY C. C. FRASER-TY'LER. 

Mistress Judith. 

BY ART:MUS WARD. 

Artemus Wa^d Complete. 

BY MRS. F. H. WILLIAMSON. 

A Child Widow. 

BY J. S. WINTER. 

Cavalry Life. 
Regimental Legends. 

BY H. F. WODD. 

Passenger ir< ni Sc >tiand Yard. 
Englishmnn of the Rue Cain. 

BY LADY WLOD. 
Sabina. 

BY CELIA PARKER WODLLEY. 
Raciiel Armstrong. 

BY EDMUND YATES. 

Ca-staway. 

The Forlorn Hope. 

Land at Last. 



London: CHATTO d WINDUS, 2U Piccadilly, W, 



[March, 1893. 




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LADY BELL. | THE BLA CKHALL GHOSTS. 

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WHAT SHE CAME THROUGH. 
CITOYENNE JACQUELINE. 
SAINT MUNGO'S CITY. 
NOBLESSE OBLIGE. 



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 

DISAPPEARED. 

THE HUGUENOT FAMILY. 



yiLLARL— A DOUBLE BOND. By Linda Villari. Fcap. Svo, picture 

cover. 1». 

WALT WHITMAN, POEMS BY. ' Edited, with Introduction, by 
Wil l iam M.Ross etti. Wit h Portrai t. Cr. Svo, hand-made pa per and bu ckram, fja, 

WALTON~AFDnjOTTON^S~^OMrcETE~^^ 

teraplative Man's Recreation, by Izaak Walton ; and Instructions how to Angle for a 
Trout or Grayling in a clear Stream, by Charles Cotton. With Memoirs and Notes 
by Sir Harris Nicol as, a nd 6 i Illustr ati ons. Crown Svo, cloth antique, 7s. 6«1. 

WARDlHERBERT), WORKS~^BY. 

FIVE YEARS WITH THE CONGO CANNIBALS. With 92 Illustrations by the 

Author, Victor Prrard, and W. B. Davis. Third ed. Roy. Svo, cloth ex., 14m. 

MY LIFE WITH STANLEY'S REAR GUARD. With a Map by F. S, Well^r, 

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WARNER.-A ROUNDABOUT JOURNEY. By Charles Dudley 

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26 



BOOKS Published by 



LISTS OF BOOKS C LASSIF IED IN SERIES. 

'*^* For fuller catalofj;uing, see alphabetical arrangement, pp. 1-25. 



THE MAYFAIR LIBRARY. 

A Journey Round My Room. By Xavier 

DE MaISTRE. 

Quips and Quiddities. By W. D. Adams. 
The Agony Column of "The Times." 
Melancholy Anatomised: Abridgment of 

" Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy." 
The Speeches of Charles Dickens. 
Poetical Ingenuities. By W. T. Dobson. 
The Cupboard Papers. By Fin-Bec. 
W. S. Gilbert's Plays. First Series. 
W. S. Gilbert's Plays. Second Series. 
Songs of Irish Wit and Humour. 
Animals and Masters. By Sir A. Helps. 
Social Pressure. By Sir A. Helps. 
Curiosities of Criticism. H. J. Jennings. 
Holmes's Autocrat of Breakfast-Table. 
Pencil and Palette. By R. Kempt. 
Little Essays: from Lamb's Letters. 



Post 8vo, cloth limp, 2*. 6d. per Volume. 
Forensic Anecdotes. By Jacob Larwood. 
Theatrical Anecdotes. Jacob Larwood. 
Jeuxd'Esprit. Edited by Henry S. Leigh. 
Witch Stories. By E. Lynn Linton. 
Ourselves. By E. Lynn Linton. 
Pastimes & Players. By R. Macgregor. 
New Paul and Virginia. W.H.Mallock. 
New Republic. By W. H. Mallock. 
Puck on Pegasus. By H. C. Pennell. 
Pegasus Re-Saddled. By H. C. Pennei.l. 
Muses of Mayfair. Ed. H. C. Pennell. 
Thoreau : His Life & Aims. By H. A. Page. 
Puniana. By Hon. Hugh Rowley. 
More Puniana. By Hon. Hugh Rowley. 
The Philosophy of Handwriting. 
By Stream and Sea. By Wm. Senior. 
Leaves from a Naturalist's Note-Book. 
By Dr. Andrew Wilson. 



THE GOLDEN LIBRARY. 
Bayard Taylor's Diversions of the Echo 

Club. 
Bennett's Ballad History of England. 
Bennett's Songs for Sailors. 
Godwin's Lives of the Necromancers. 
Pope's Poetical Works. 
Holmes's Autocrat of Breakfast Table. 



Post 8vo, cloth limp, 3s. per Volume. 
Jesse's Scenes of Country Life. 
Leigh Hunt's Tale for a Chimney 

Corner. 
Mallory's Mort d'Arthur: Selections. 
Pascal's Provincial Letters. 
Rochefoucauld's Maxims & Reflections. 



THE WANDERER'S LIBRARY. 

Wanderings in Patagonia. By Julius 

Beerbohm. Illustrated. 
Camp Notes. By Frederick Boyle. 
Savage Life. By Frederick Boyle. 
Merrie England in the Olden Time. By 

G. Daniel. Illustrated by Cruikshank. 
Circus Life. By Thomas Frost. 
Lives of the Conjurers. Thomas Frost. 
The Old Showmen and the Old London 

Fairs. By Thomas Frost. 
Low-Life Deeps. By James Greenwood. 



Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d. each. 
Wilds of London. James Greenwood. 
Tunis. Chev. Hesse-VVartegg. 22lllusts. 
Life and Adventures of a Cheap Jack. 
World Behind the Scenes. P.Fitzgerald. 
Tavern Anecdotes and Sayings. 
The Genial Showman. By E.P. Hingston. 
Story of London Parks. Jacob Larwood. 
London Characters. By Henry Mayhew. 
Seven Generations of Executioners. 
Summer Cruising in the South Seas. 

By C. Warren Stoddard. Illustratt-d. 



POPULAR SHILLING BOOKS. 



Harry Fludyer at Cambridge. 
Jeff Briggs's Love Story. Bret Harte. 
Twins of Table Mountain. Bret Harte. 
Snow-bound at Eagle's. By Bret Harte. 
A Day's Tour. By Percy Fitzgerald. 
Esther's Glove. By R. E. Francillon, 
Sentenced! By Somerville Gibney. 
The Professor's Wife. By L.Graham. 
Mrs. Gainsborough's Diamonds. By 

luLiAN Hawthorne. 
Niagara Spray. By J, Hollingshead. 
A Romance of the Queen's Hounds. By 

Charles James. 
Garden that Paid Rent, Tom Jerrold. 
Cut by the Mess. By Arthur Kkysek. 
Teresa Itasca. By A. MacAlpine. 
Our Sensation Novel. ]. H. McCarthy. 
Doom! By Justin H. McCarthy. 
Dolly. By Justin H. McCarthy. 



Lily Lass. Justin H. McCarthy. 
Was She Good or Bad? By W. Minto. 
Notes from the "News." i3y Jas. Paym. 
Beyond the Gates. By E. S. Phelps. 
Old Maid's Paradise. By E. S. Phklps. 
Burglars in Paradise. By E. S. Phelps. 
Jack the Fisherman. By E. S. Phelps. 
Trooping with Crows. By C. L. Pirkis. 
Bible Characters. By Charles Reade. 
Rogues. By K. H. Sherard, 
The Dagonct Reciter. By G. R. Sims. 
How the Poor Live. By G. R. Sims. 
Case of George Candlemas. G. R. Sims. 
Sandycroft Mystery. T. W. Speight. 
Hoodwinked. By T. \V. Speight 
Father Damien. By R. L. Stevenson. 
A Double Bond. By Linda Villari. 
My Life with Stanley's Rear Guard. By 
Herbert Ward. 



HANDY NOVELS. Fcap. 8vo, cloth boards, Is. 6d. each. 
The Old Maid's Sweetheart. A. St.Aubyn I Taken from the Enemy. H. Newbolt. 
Kcdest Little Sara. Alan St, Aupyn. | A Lost Soul. By VV. L. Alden. 
The Seven Sleepers of Ephesus. By M. £. Coleridge. 



CHATTO 8c WINDUS, 214. PICCADILLY. 



27 



MY LIBRARY. 

Choice Works, printed on laid paper, bound half-Roxburghe, 3s. 6d. each. 
Four Frenchwomen. ByAnsTiN Dobson. I Christie Johnstone. By Charles Reade. 
Citation and Examination of William I With a Photogravure Frontispiece. 

Shakspeare. By W. S. Landor. I Peg Woflington. By Charles Readr. 

The Journa l of Maurice de Guerin. I The Dramatic Essays of Charles Lamb. 

THE POCKET LIBRARY. Post 8vo, printed on laid paper and hf.-bd., 3s. each. 



The Essays of Elia. By Charles Lamb 
Robinson Crusoe. Edited by John Major 

Vv'ith 37 Illusts. I1V George Cruiksh\nk. 
Whims and Oddities. By Thomas Hood. 

With 8'i Illiistrations. 
The Barber's Chair, and The Hedgehog 

Letters. By Dout.las Jerrold. 
r.astronomy. By Brihat-Savarin. 
The Epicurean, &c. By Thomas Moore. 
Lei^h Hunt's Essays. Ed K Ollifp. 



White's Natural History of Selborne. 

Gulliver's Travels, and 'The Tale of a 
Tub. By Dean Swift. 

Th2 Rivals, School for Scandal, and other 
Plavs by Richard Dkinsley Sheriuan'. 

Anecdotes of the Clergy. T. Larwood. 

Thomson's Seasons. Illustrated. 

The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table 
and The Professor at the Breakfast- 
Table. Bv Ol'vep Wf.vpelt. HoL-.fEs 



THE PICCADILLY NOVELS. 

Library Editions of Novels, many Illustrated, crown 8vo, cloth extra, 3s. 6d. each 
By F. M. ALiL-EIV. MORT. & FRANCES COr.¥.IfV!. 



By F. M. 

Green as Grass. 



By GRAIVT A1.EEN. 



Philistia. 
Babylon 
Strange Stories. 
Beckoning Hand. 
In all Shades. 



The Tents of Shem. 
For Maimie's Sake. 
The Devil's Die. 
This Mortal Coil. 
The Great Taboo. 



Dumaresq's Daughter. | Blood Royal. 
The Duchess of Powysland. 

By EOWIiV li. ARIVOL.!). 

Phra the Phoenician. 

Bv Aa.4IV ST. ALBY'IV. 

A Fellow of Trinity. 

Bv RcT. S. BARINO GOLIAD. 

Red Spider. I Eve. 

By \\. BESANT & J. RICE. 



By Celia's Arbour. 
Monks of Thelema. 
The Seamy Side. 
Ten Years' Tenant. 



My Little Girl. 
Case of Mr.Lucraft. 
ThisSonofYulcan. 
Golden Butterfly. 
Ready-Money Mortiboy. 
With Harp and Crown. 
'Twas in Trafalgar's Bay. 
The Chaplain of the Fleet. 

By IVAI.TER BESANT. 

All Sorts and Conditions of Men. 

The Captains' Room. | Herr Paulus. 

All in a Garden Fa,ir 

The World Went Very Well Then. 

For Faith and Freedom. 

Dorothy Forster. j The Holy Rose. 

Uncle Jack. | Armorel of Lyon- 

Chiidrenof Gibeon. j esse. 

Bell of St. Paul's. I St. Katherine's by 

To Call Her Mine. | the Tower. 

By ROBERT BCCIIAIVAN. 

The Shadow of the Sword. | Matt. 



The Fallen Leaves. 
Jezebel's Daughter. 
The Black Robe. 
Heart and Science. 
"I Say No." 
Little Novels. 
The Evil Genius. 
The Legacy of Cain 
A Rogue's Life. 
Blind Love. 



A Child of Nature. 
The Martyrdom of 
God and the Man. 
Love Me for Ever. 
Annan Water. 



Heir of Linne. 
Sfadeline. 
The New Abelard. 
Foxglove Manor. 
Master of the Mine. 



By IIAEI. CAIIVE. 

The Shadow of a Crime. 

A Son of Hagar. | The Deerastajr. 



MORT. & FRANCES COL,T,INS. 

Transmigration. 

From Midnight to Midnight. 

Blacksmith and Scholar. 

Village Comedy. I You Play Me False. 

By AVUilCIE COiiEINS. 
Armadale. | The Frozen Deep. 

After Dark. The Two Destinies. 

No Name. | Lav/ and the Lady. 

Antonina. | Basil. , Haunted Hotel. 
Hide and Seek. 
The Dead Secret. 
Queen of Hearts. 
My Miscellanies. 
Woman in White. 
The Moonstone. 
Man and Wife. 
Poor Miss Finch. 
Miss or Mrs? 
New Magdalen. 

By LITTON C001&. 
Paul Foster's Daughter. 

By TIATT €:RI.lf. 
Adventures of a Fair Rebel. 

By B. Tl. CI^OKER. 
Diana Barrington. I PrettyMiss Neville. 
Proper Pride. | A Bird of Passa^a. 

By WlIiClA.Tl CV1»1.E."*. 
Hearts of Gold. 

By AL.PHOXSE BA LOE T. 
The Evangelist; or, Port Salvation 

By ekas:tius oawson. 

The Fountain of Vouth. 

By JA-tiES BE xlIIT.I.E. 

A Castle in Spain. 

By J. EEirii i>er^ve:vt. 

Our Lady of Tears. | Circe's Lovers. 

By BSCIi BOAOVAN. 
Tracked to Doom. 

By Urs. ANNIE EBWARDES. 
Archie Lovell. 

By G. -UANV1EI.E FENN. 
The New Mistress. 

By PERCV FITZGERALD. 
Fatal Zero. 

By R. E. FR.lNCII.ro V. 
Queen Cophetua. I A Real Queen. 
One by One. I King or Knave 

PreLbySSiBARTL-E FRERE. 
ir>andurang Hari. 



28 



BOOKS PUBLISHED BY 



The Piccadilly {3/O) KovEi^s— continued. 

By GDWAKU tJAKKKTT. 
The Capel Girls. 

Uy ClIARI^EH OIBBOIV. 

Fobin Gray. I The Golden Shaft. 

Loving a Dream. | Of High Degree. 
The Flower of the Forest. 

By E. GI.AIVVII.IiE. 
The Lost Heiress. | The Fossichcr. 

By CrECII. OKIFFITU. 
Corinthia Marazion. 

By TIlOMAiai HARDV. 
Under the Greenwood Tree. 

By BRET EIARTE. 
A Waif of the Plains. 
A Ward of the Golden Gate. 
A Sappho of Green Springs. 
Colonel Starbottle's Client. 
Susy. I Sally Dows. 

By JUIilAIV HAWTHORNE. 
Garth. I Dust. 

Ellice Qucntin. Fortune's Fool. 

Sebastian Strome. | Beatrix Randolph. 
David Poindexter's Disappearance. 
The Spectre of the Camera. 

By Sir A. HEI.PS. 
Ivan de Biron. 

By ISAAC IIEJ\»ERS01V. 
Agatha Page. 

By ITIrs. AliFREB HUNT. 
The Leaden Casket. 1 Self-Condemned. 
That other Person. 

By R. ASHE KIIVC}. 
A Drawn Game. 
"The Wearing of the Green." 

By E. I. ANN I.INTON. 
Patricia Kemball. I lone. 
Under which Lord? Paston Carew. 
"My Love!" I Sowing the Wind. 

The Atonement of Learn Dundas. 
The World Well Lost. 

By HENRY W. lilJCV. 
Gideon Fleyce. 

By JUSTIN I?IcCARTHY. 
A Fair Saxon. I Donna Quixote. 

Linley Rochford. Maid of Athens. 
Miss Misanthrope. | Camiola. 
The Waterdale Neighbours. 
My Enemy's Daughter. 
Dear Lady Disdain. 
The Comet of a Season. 

By ACJNES ]TIACI>ONEL.Ii. 
Quaker Cousins. 

By I>. CHRISTIE MURRAY. 
Life's Atonement. I Yal Strange. 
Joseph's Coat. Hearts. 

Coals of Fire. | A Model Father. 

Old Blazer's Hero. 
By the Gate of the Sea. 
A Bit of Human Nature. 
First Person Singular. I Cynic Fortune. 
The Way of the World. 

By MURRAY & HERMAN. 
The Bishops' Bible. 
Paul Jones's Alias, 

Bv BIUME NISBET. 
"Lail Up!" 

Bv GEORCJES OHNET. 
A Weird Gift. 

By Mrs. OL IP HA NT. 
Wliiteladies. 



The Piccadilly (3/6) Novels — continued. 

By OUIDA. 
Held in Bondage. \ Two Little Wooden 



Strathmore 

Chandos. 

Under Two Flags. 

Idalia. 

CecilCastlemalnc's 

Gage. 
Tricotrin. | Puck. 
Folic Farine. 
A Dog of Flanders. 
Pascarel. | Signa. 
Princess Naprax- 

ine. 

By MAROARET A. PAUI 
Gentle and Simple. 

By JAMES PAYN. 
Lost Sir Massingberd. 
Less Black than We're Painted. 
A Confidential Agent. 
A Grape from a Thorn. 
In Peril and Privation. 
The Mystery of Mirbridge. 
The Canon's Ward. 
Walter's Word. 



Shoes. 
In a Winter City. 
Ariadne. 
Friendship. 
Moths. I Rufflno. 
Pipistrello. 
A Village Commune 
Bimbi. | Wanda. 
Frescoes.' Othmar. 
In Mar'^mma. 
Syrlin.' Guilderoy. 
Santa Barbara. 



Talk of the Town 
Holiday Tasks. 
The Burnt Million. 
The Word and the 

Will. 
Sunny Stories. 



By Proxy. 
High Spirits. 
Under One Roof. 
From Exile. 
Glow-worm Tales. 

By E. €. PRICE. 
Yalcntlna. ] The Foreigners. 

Mrs. Lancaster's Rival. 

By RIC;iIABl> PRYC^E. 
Miss Maxwell's Affections. 

By CHARIiES RE ABE. 
It is Never Too Late to Mend. 
The Double Marriage. 
Love Me Little, Love Me Long. 
The Cloister and the Hearth. 
The Course of True Love. 
The Autobiography of a Thief. 
Put Yourself in his Place. 
A Terrible Temptation. 
Singleheart and Doubleface. 
Good Stories of Men and other Animals. 
Hard Cash. Wandering Heir. 

Peg Woffington. A Wonian-Hatcr. 
ChristieJohnstone. A Simpleton. 
Griffith Gaunt. Readiana. 

Foul Play. The Jilt. 

A Perilous Secret. 

By Mi'«*. .1. 11. RIDBEI.Ii. 
The Prince of Wales's Garden P&rty, 
Weird Stories. 

By F. \Y. ROBINSON. 
Women are Strange. 
The Hands of Justice. 

Bv W. ULARIi RUSSEI.Ii. 
An Ocean Tragedy. 
My Shipmate Louise. 
Alone on a Wide Wide Sea. 

By JOHN SAUNDERS. 
Guy Waterman. | Two Dreamers. 
Bound to the Wheel. 
The Lion in the Path. 
By ICATBIARINE SAUNDERS. 
Margaret and Elizabeth. 
Gideon's Rock. I Heart Salvage, 
The High Mills. | Sebastian, 



CHATTO 8c WINDUS, 214, PICCADILLY. 



29 



The Piccadilly (3/6) 'Sovei.s— continued. 

By I.UKE SHARP. 
In a Steamer Chair. 

By IIA\\T.EY SHAKT. 
Without Love or Licence. 

By B. A. STEK.>I>AJLE. 
The Afghan Knife. 

By BEBTIIA TflOITIAS. 

Proud Maisie. | The Yiolin-player. 

By I BAIVC'ES E. TKOELOPE. 

Like Ships upon the Sea. 
Anne Furness. | Mabel's Progress. 
Kv IVAN TURGEXIEFF, &c. 

Stories from Foreign Novelists. 



The Piccadilly (3/6) Novels— continued. 

By AIVTHOi^rV TROEI.OPE. 
Frau Frohmann. I Kept in the Dark. 
Marion Fay. | Land-Leaguers. 

The Way We Live Now. 
Mr. Scarborough's Family. 

By C. C. FRA8EB-TYTEER. 
Mistress Judith. 

By SAKAH TY'TEER. 
The Bride's Pass, j Lady Bell. 
Buried Diamonds. 
The Blackball Ghosts. 

By .HARK T^VAIIV. 
The American Claimant. 

By J. H. WIATEK. 
A Soldier's Children. 



CHEAP EDITIONS OF POPULAR NOVELS. 



Post 8vo, illustrated 
By ARTE:tiI S ^VARB. 

Artemus Ward Complete. 

By EI>?10:VI> ABOUT. 

The Fellah. 

By HA-1III.TOIV AIDE. 

Carr of Carrlyon. | Confidences. 
By MARY AEBERT. 

Brooke FInchley's Daughter. 

Bv ITIrs. AEEXAIVBER. 

Maid,Wife,orWidow? I Yalerie' Fate. 
By GRANT AEEEX. 

Strange Stories, I The Devil's Die. 
Philistia. This Mortal Coil. 

Babylon. I In all Shades. 

The Beckoning Haad. 
For Maimie's Sake. | Tents of Shem. 
Great Taboo. | Dumaresq's Daughter. 

By E. I.ESTER ARl\Ot.l>. 
Phra the Phoenician. 

By AEAN ST. AlBYN. 
A Fellow of Trinity. | The Junior Dean. 
By RcT. S. BARING GOVl^iP. 
Red Spider. | Eve. 

By FRANK. BARRETT. 
Fettered for Life. 
Between Life and Death. 
The Sin of Olga Zassoulich. 
Folly Morrison. Honest Davie. 
Lieut. Barnabas. A Prodigal's Progress. 
Found Guilty. I A Recoiling Vengeance. 
For Love and Honour. 
John Ford ; and His Helpmate. 
Little Lady Linton. 

Bv "W. BESANT & J. RICE. 
This'Son of Vulcan. By Celia's Arbour. 
My Little Girl. Monks of Thelema. 

CaseofMr.Lucraft. The Seamy Side. 
Golden Butterfly. Ten Years' Tenant. 
Ready-Money Mortiboy. 
With Harp and Crown. 
'Twas in Trafalgar's Bay. 
The Chaplain of the Fleet. 
BySMEESEE V BEALCHAITIP. 
Grantley Grange. 

By AMBROSE BIERt E. 
In the Midst of Life. 

Bv FREDERICK BOVEE. 
Camp Notes. 1 Savage Life. 

Qhronlcles of No-man's Lan^, 



boards, 2s. each. 

By AVAETER BES*NT. 

Dorothy Forster. I Uncle Jack. 

Children of Gibeon. | Herr Paulus. 

All Sorts and Conditions of Men, 

The Captains' Room. 

All in a Garden Fair. 

The World Went Very V/ell Then. 

For Faith and Freedom. 

To Call Her Mine. 

The Bell of St. Paul's. | The Holy Rose, 

Armorel of Lyonesse. 

St. Katherine's by the Tower. 

By BRET IIARTE. 
Californian Stories, j Gabriel Conroy. 
An Heiress of Red Dog. I Flip. 

The Luck of Roaring Camp. Maruja. 
A Phyllis of the Sierras. 

By IIAROED BRVBGES. 
Uncle Sam at Home. 

By ROBERT BECIIANAN. 
The Shadow of the The Martyrdom of 

Sword. Madeline. 

A Child of Nature. Annan Water. 
God and the Man. j The New Abelard. 
Love Me for Ever. | Matt. 
Foxglove Manor. ' The Heir of Linne. 
The Master of the Mine. 

By HAEE CAINE. 
The Shadow of a Crime. 
A Son of riagar. | The Deemster. 

By Comuiander CAMERON. 
The Cruise of the "Black Prince." 
By Mrs. EOVETT CAMERON. 
Deceivers Ever. \ Juliet's Guardian, 

By AISTIN CEARE. 
For the Love of a Lass. 

By Mrs. ARCHER CEIVE. 
Paul Ferroll. 
V/hy Paul Ferroll Killed his Wife. 

Br M ACE ARE N COBBAN. 
The Cure of Souls. 

By C. AEESTON COEEINS. 
The Bar Sinister. 

MORT. «Sc FRANCE.^ COEEINS. 
Sweet Anne Page, i Transmigration. 
From Midnight to Midnight. 
Fight with Fortune, i Village Comedy, 
Sweet and Twenty. | You Play me Falsa. 
BlacksmitU ana Scholar, | Frances, 



30 



BOOKS PUBLISHED BY 



Tvv j-Smillino Novels — continued. 

My Miscellanies. 



Woman in White. 
Thie Moonstone. 
Man and Wife. 
Poor Miss Finch. 
The Fallen Leaves. 
Jezebel's Dau?*hter 
The Black Robe. 
Heart and Science. 
"I Say No." 
The Evil Genius. 
Little Novels. 
Lofjacy of Cain. 
Blind Love. 



Armadale. 
After Dark. 
No Name. 
Antonina. I Basil. 
Hide and Seek. 
The Dead Secret. 
Queen of Hearts. 
Miss or Mrs? 
Hew Magdalen. 
The Frozen Deep. 
Law and the Lady. 
The Two Destinies. 
Haunted Hotel. 
A Rogue's Life. 

ISj Its. .B. C'«I.<|UlIOlJIV. 
Every Inch a Soldier. 

By B>3L'g"fi'0!V < «OIS. 
Leo. I Paul Foster's Daughter. 

By C E«BKKT CKABBOiK. 
Prophet of the Great Smoky Mountains. 

BylTiATT tlRIJTl. 
Adventures of a Fair Rebel. 

By B. M. CKOStEK. 
Pretty Miss Neville. I Bird of Passage. 
Diana Barrington. | Proper Pride. 
By IVIIililAM €\Pi.E8. 
Hearts of Gold. ^ 

By Ai-PHONSE BAUBET. 
The Evangelist; or, Port Salvation. 
By E14ASl?irS DAWSON. 
The Fountain of Youth. 

By JAIME S BE IfllEEE. 
A Castle in Spain. _ 

By J. I.E1TM BEKWENT. 
Our Lady of Tears. | Circe's Lovers. 

Br CllABLEN MfCIiEIVS. 
Sketches by Boz. I Oliver Twist. 
Pickwick Papers. Nicholas Nickleby. 

By BBC K BOIVOVAN. 
The Man-Hunter. 1 Caught at LastI 
Tracked and Taken. | Wanted I 
Who Poisoned Hetty Duncan? 
The Man from Manchester. 
A Detective's Triumphs. 
In the Grip of the Law. 
From Information Received. 
Tracked to Doom. 

By Mrs. ANIVBE EBWARBES. 
A Point of Honour. | Archie Lovell. 

By M. BETIIAIM-EBWAKOS. 
Felicia. I Kitty. 

By EBWAKB ECCJI.ESTON. 

^°By «. ITIAIVVIE1.E FENN. 

The New Mistress. 

By 1»EBC V FITZ«ERA1.B. 

Bella Donna. I Polly. 

Never Forgotten. I Fatal Zero. 
The Second Mrs. Tillotson. 
Seventy-five Brooke Street. 
The Lady of Brantome. 
By PER<'V If rz«EKAI.D 

ni!fl O til 4 !'»<). 

Strange Secrets. 

AI.b"%N\' be FOrVBI.AI\<|tiE. 

Filthy Lucre. 

By B. E. FKAI\C;iEE01V. 

Olvmpla. I Queen Cophetua. 

One by One. King or Knave? 

A Real Queen. | Romances of Law. 



Two- Shilling KovFi.s—coiiti>:titcl. 
By IIAROI.B FREBEBltK. 
Seth's Brother's Wife. 
The Lawton Girl. 

Pvei.hy (^ir BARTEE FRERE. 
Pandurang Hari. 

By IIAinr FRI!!»WEEI.. 
One of Ty/o. 

Bv lilBWARB CJARRETT. 
The Capel Girls. 

By C'llAREE!^ CJIBROIV. 
Robin Gray. In Honour Bound. 

Fancy Free. Flower of Forest. 

For Lack of Gold. Braes of Yarrow. 
What will the The Golden Shaft. 

World Say? Of High Degree. 

In Love and V/ar. Mead and Stream. 
For the King. Loving a Dream. 

In Pastures Green. A Hard Knot. 
Quoen of Meadow. Heart's Delight. 
A Heart's Problem. Blood Honey. 
The Dead Heart. 

By IVlElilAIVI OIEBERT. 
Dr. Austin's Guests. I James Duke. 
The Wizard of the Mountain. 

By ERNEST GEANVILEE. 
The Lost Heiress. | The Fcsslcker. 
By IIEIVRV OREVIEEE. 
A Noble Woman. | Nikanor. 

By JOIEN MABBERTOIV. 
Brueton's Bayou. | Country Luck. 

By AN BREW IIAEEIBAV. 
Every-Day Papers. 

By Eady BUFF US IIARBY. 
Paul Wynter's Sacrifice. 

By THOMAS IIARBY. 
Under the Greenwood Tree. 
By .r. BERWICK. ISARWOOO. 
The Tenth Earl. 

By JUEIAN HAWTHORNE. 



Sebastian Stroma. 

Dust. 

Beatrix Randolph. 

Love— or a Name. 



Garth. 

Ellice Quentin. 

Fortune's Fool. 

Miss Cadogna. 

David Poindexter's Disappearance. 

The Spectre of the Camera. 

By Sir ARTHUR HE EPS. 
Ivan de Biron. 

By U*:(^RV HERHIAN. 
A Leading Lady. 

By Mrs. (ASHEE HOEV. 
The Lover's Creed. 

By MrM. C^iEOROE HOOPER. 
The House of Raby. 

By TIOHE IflOPKINS. 
'Twixt Love and Duty. 

Bv Mrs. HUN<^ERFORB. 
A Maiden all Forlorn. 
In Durance Vile. I A Mental Struggle. 
Marvel. I A Modern Circe. 

By Mrs. AEFRF:B HUNT. 
Thornicroft's ModeL I Self Condemned. 
That Other Person. I Leaden Casket. 

By .1 E A N INOE ^0\V. 
Fated to be Free. 

By HARBCIETT JAV 
The Dark Colleen. 
The Queen of Connaught. 

By MARK KERSHAW. 
Colonial Facts and Fictions. 



CHATTO 8c WiNbUS, Si4, PICCADILLY. 



3t 



Two-Shilmng NovKi^s— continued. 
By R. ASHE KIIVQ. 
A Drawn Game. I Passion's Slave. 
'•The Wearing of the Green." 
Bell Barry. 

By JOHN LiEYS. 
The Lindsays. 

By K. I.YNiV I^INTOIV. 
Patricia Kemball. I Paston Carew. 
World Well Lost. "My Love!" 
UnderwhichLord? I lone. 
The Atonement of Leam Dundas. 
With a Silken Thread. 
The Rebel of the Family. 
Sowing the Wind. 

By IIE.NKV \%\ 1.11 Y. 
Gideon Flevce. 

By JrSTIIV ItlcCARTIlV. 
A Fair Saxon. I Donna Quixote. 

Linley Rochford. i Maid of Athens, 
Miss Misanthrope. ! Camiola. 
Dear Lady Disdain. 
The Waterdale Neighbours. 
My Enemy's Daughter. 
The Comet of a Season. 

By IirGIfl U.WCOIaJj. 
Mr. Stranger's Sealed Packet. 

By A«>ES JlACDONEI.fj. 
Quaker Cousins. 

k£ATIlABl.>E i§. ITIAC'QUOSB. 
The Evil Eye. I Lost Rose. 

By M\ Iff. .llA1.1.0CSfc. 
The New Republic. 

By FI.OKEx>t'E HARK VAT. 
Open! Sesame! | Fighting the Air. 
A Harvest of Wild Oats. 
Written in Fire. 

By J. tBASTERITIAIV. 
Half-a-dozen Daughters. 
By BBAM>ER lUATTIffEWS. 
A Secret of the Sea. 

Br litiONARU ITBEKRll'K. 
The Man who was Good. 

By JEAN ITIIBBI.E.^IASS. 
Touch and Go. | Mr. Dorillion. 

By Mrs. .^IOI.ES WORTH. 
Hathercourt Rectory. 

By J. E. iTILBBOC'K. 
Stories Weird and Wonderful. 
The Dead Man's Secret. 
From the Bosom of the Deep. 
Bv ». CHRISTIE ITIIRRAY. 
A Model Father. I Old Blazer's Hero. 
Joseph's Coat. I Hearts. 

Coals of Fire. V/ay of the World. 

Yal Strange. I Cynic Fortune, 

A Life's Atonement. 
By the Gate of the Sea. 
A Bit of Human Nature. 
First Person Singular. 

By IVCIRRAV and IIER^^AIV. 
One Traveller Returns. 
Paul Jones's Alias. 
The Bishops' Bible. 

By HENRY HIURRAY. 
A Game of Bluff. 

Bv Itt^lIE NISBET. 
««Ba)l Up!" 
Dr. Bernard St. Vincent. 

By ALICE 0'HAIVr.OIV. 
The Unforeseen. (Chance? or Fate? 



Two-Shilling Novels — continued. 

By OEORC^ES OHNET. 
Doctor Rameau. I A Last Love. 
A Weird Gift. | 

Bv firs. OI.IPHAIVT. 
Whiteladies. | The Primrose Path. 

The Greatest Heiress in England. 
By TIrsi. ROBERT O REII.I.V. 
Phoebe's Fortunes. 

By OL'IBA. 
Held in Bondage. Two Little Wooden 



Strathmore 

Chandos. 

Under Two Flags. 

Idalia. 

CecilCastlemaine's 

Gage. 
Tricotrin. 
Puck. 

Folle Farlne. 
A Dog of Flanders. 
Pascarel. 
Signa. 
Princess Naprax- 

ine. 
In a Winter City. 
Ariadne. 

VIAR«ARET 
Gentle and Simple. 

By JA-TIES PAYN. 
Bentinck's Tutor. £200 Reward. 
Murphy's Master. 
A County Family. 
At Her Mercy. 
Cecil's Tryst. 
Clyffards of Clyffe. 
Foster Brothers. 
Found Dead. 
Best of Husbands, 
Walter's Word. 



Shoes. 

Friendship, 

Moths. 

Pipistrello. 

A Village Com- 
mune. 

Bimbi. 

Wanda. 

Frescoes. 

In Maremma. 

Othmar. 

Guilderoy. 

Ruffino. 

Syrlin. 

Ouida's Wisdom, 
V/it, and Path.->&. 



Marine Residence. 
Mirk Abbey. 

I By Proxy. 

i Under One Roof. 
High Spirits. 

I Carlyon's Year. 

I From Exile. 

! For Cash Only. 

I Kit. 

Halves. I The Canon's Ward 

Fallen Fortunes. Talk of the Tov/n, 
Humorous Stories. Holiday Tasks. 
Lost Sir Massingberd. 
A Perfect Treasure. 
A Woman's Vengeance. 
The Family Scapegrace. 
What He Cost Her. 
Gwendoline's Harvest. 
Like Father, Like Son. 
Married Beneath Him. 
Not Wooed, but Won. 
Less Black than We're Painted. 
A Confidential Agent. 
Some Private Views. 
A Grape from a Thorn. 
Glow-worm Tales. 
The Mystery of Mirbridge. 
The Burnt Million. 
The Word and the Will. 
A Prince of the Blood. 
Sunny Stories. 

By C. I,. PIRitis. 
Lady Lovelace. 

By EBOAR A. POE. 
The Mystery of Marie Roget. 

By :TIi«. CAMPBEI.I. PBAE». 
The Romance of a Station. 
The Soul of Countess Adrian. 
By E. C. PRICE. 
Yalentina. | The Foreignerst 

Mrs. Lancaster's Rival. | GeraU. 



32 



BOOKS PUBLISHED 6Y CHATTO &c WINDUS. 



Two-SiuLLiNo Novels— cotitivued. 
ISy i«lCllLAKI> l>U\Cie. 

M'.ss Maxwell's Affections. 

By tllAItrKH KK.%1>E. 

It is Never Too Late to Mend. 

Ciiriatie Johnstone. 

Put Yourself in His Place. 

The Double Marriage. 

Love Me Little, Love Me Long. 

The Cloister and the Hearth. 

The Course of True Love. 

Autobiography of a Thief. 

A Terrible Temptation. 

The Wandering Heir. 

Singleheart and Doubleface. 

Good Stories of Men and other Animals. 

Hard Cash. I A Simpleton. 

Peg Wofflngton. Readiana. 

Griffith Gaunt. A Woman-Hater. 

Foul Play. I The Jilt. 

A Perilous Secret. 

By l?Ii«. J. II. KIBOEIili. 
V/eird Stories. | Fairy Water. 
Her Mother's Darling. 
Prince of Wales's Garden Party. 
The Uninhabited House. 
T'lie Mystery in Palace Gardens. 
The Nun's Curse. | Idle Tales. 
By F. W. KOBIIVSOIV. 
Women are Strange. 
The Hands of Justice. 

By JAITBKS I6CINCI1TIAIV. 
Skippers and Shellbacks. 
Grace Balmalgn's Sweetheart. 
Schools and Scholars. ^,^^, . 

By W. CI.A.KK RUSSEI.1^. 
Round the Galley Fire. 
On the Fo'k'sle Head. 
In the Middle Watch. 
A Voyage to the Cape. 
A Book for the Hammock. 
The Mystery of the "Ocean Star." 
The Romance of Jenny Harlowe. 
An Ocean Tragedy. 
My Shipmate Louise. 
Alone on a Wide Wide Sea. 

tf>}KOROE: AUGUSTUS SAIiA. 
Gaslight and Daylight. 

By JOIIIV SAUIVBEKS. 
Guy Waterman. | Two Dreamers. 
The Lion in the Path. 
By ICATIIABII^K SAUIVWERS. 
Joan Merryweather. I Heart Salvage. 
The High Mills. | Sebastian. 

Margaret and Elizabeth. 

By OEOKOE K. SIITI». 
Rogues and Vagabonds. 
The Ring o' Bells. 
Mary Jane's Memoirs. 
Mary Jane Married. 
Tales cf To-day. | Dramas of Life. 
Tinkletop's Crime. 
Zeph: A Circus Story. 

By ARTHUR SKETCIII.EV. 
A Match in the Dark. 

By IIAU I.KY SI?IABT. 
Without Love or Licence. 

By T. W. NPEIUIIT. 
The Mysteries of Heron Dyke. 
The Golden Hoop. I By Devious Ways. 
Hoodwinked, &c. | Back to Life. 



Two-Shilling KovhLS—conliinud. 

By R. A. STERIVUAliB. 
The Afghan Knifo. 

By R. T.oris STETE:V>iO:V. 
New Arabian Nights. | Prince Quo. 
RV BER'llIA TIIOYatJii^. 
Gressida. | Proud Maisle. 

The Violin-player. 

By ^VAI.TER TIIORIVBr R V. 
Tales for the Marines. 
Old Stories Re-told. 

T. ABOEPIirS TROriiOPE. 
Diamond Cut Diamond. 
Ry F. EEEANOR TROIil.OPE. 
Like Ships upon the Sea. 
Anne Furness. { Mabel's Progress. 

By AIVTilOIVV TROfliliOPE. 
Frau Frohmann. I Kept in the Dark. 
Marion Fay. | John Caldigate. 

The Way We Live Now. 
The American Senator. 
Mr. Scarborough's Family. 
The Land-Lcaguers. 
The Golden Lion of Granpere. 

By jr. T. TROWBlSIDtf^iF:. 

Parnell's Folly. 
By IVAJ\ TURCJEIVIEFF, Arc. 

Stories from Foreign Novelists. 
By JYlARli. TWA I IV. 

A Pleasure Trip on the Continent. 

The Gilded Age. 

Mark Twain's Sketches. 

Tom Sawyer. | A Tramp Abroad. 

The Stolen White Elephant. 

Huckleberry Finn. 

Life on the Mississippi. 

The Prince and the Pauper. 

A Yankee at the Court of King Arthur. 

By €. C. ERASE R-TVTL.Ii:R. 
Mistress Judith. 

By SARAH TYTI.ER. 
The Bride's Pass. I Noblesse Oblige. 
Buried Diamonds. | Disappeared. 
Saint Mungo'sCity. I Huguenot Family. 
Lady Bell. | Blackball Ghosts. 

What She Came Through. 
Beauty and the Beast. 
Citoyenne Jaquellne. 
Ry Mrs. F. II. AVII.I.IAlISOi'V. 
A Child Widow. 

By .¥. «. AVIIVTER. 
Cavalry Life. | Regimental Legends. 

By II. F. ^VOOI>. 
The Passenger from Scotland Yard, 
Tho Englishman of the Rue Cain. 

By Eady WOOD. 
Sab in a. 

CEl^IA PARKER WOO I. LEY. 
Rachel Armstrong; or, Love & Theology. 

By EBITIUNB YATES. 
The Forlorn Hope. | Land at Last. 
Castaway. 



OCDEN, SMALE AND CO. LIMITED. SRJMXERS. GREAT SAFFRON HILL, B.C. 



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