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Full text of "Instructions for mounting, using and caring for disappearing carriage L.F., model of 1905 MII and 6-inch guns, models of 1905 and 1908"

GIFT OF 





No. 1711 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR MOUNTING, 
USING, AND CARING FOR 

DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE 

L. F., MODEL OF 1905 Mil 

AND 

6-INCH GUNS 

MODELS OF 1905 AND 1908 



{EIGHT PLATES) 



JANUARY 14, 1914 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 



No. 1711 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR MOUNTING, 
USING, AND CARING FOR 

DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE 

L. F., MODEL OF 1905 Mil 

AND 

6-INCH GUNS 

MODELS OF 1905 AND 1908 



{EIGHT PLATES) 



[ ' ■ ^ ' ^- ^^•'y>- advice cslepi. , 
JANUARY 14, 1914 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

1917 









i ' « ^» ,>' ,,w, •^••S 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page. 

List of plates 5 

General description 7 

Emplacement 7 

Carriage 7 

Action of carriage 8 

Principal parts 8 

Base ring , 8 

Traversing roller system 8 

Racer 9 

Dust guards 9 

Azimuth circle and pointer 9 

Chassis and transoms 10 

Vertical guides 10 

Top carriage 10 

Recoil rollers and roller cages 11 

Counter-recoil buffers 11 

Buffer valve 12 

Gun levers and axle 14 

Crosshead and counterweight 14 

Recoil sylstem 16 

Retracting system 18 

Retracting clutch and brake 19 

Tripping gear 20 

Elevating system 20 

Traversing system : 22 

Sighting platforms 24 

Sight 24 

Electrical equipment 24 

Lighting circuits 25 

Firing circuits 25 

Shot trucks 27 

Shot tongs 27 

Grease cup 27 

Implements 27 

Instructions for asembling the carriage 28 

General remarks 28 

Instructions for assembling 29 

Base ring 29 

Leveling 29 

Distance ring and traversing rollers 29 

Racer 29 

Front clips 30 

Chassis and guide frames. . : 30 

Piston-rod beam 30 

Vertical guides 30 

Front and rear transoms 30 

Bottom plate 30 

(3) 



Instructions for assembling the carriage— Continued. Page. 

Recoil cylinder 30 

Counterweight 30 

Crosshead 30 

Retracting and tripping gear 30 

Piston rod and upper cylinder head 30 

Counter-recoil buffers and roller cages 30 

Top carriage 30 

Gun levers 30 

Gun with elevating band " 30 

Important points ^ 31 

Care of carriage '; 32 

General instructions ^i 32 

Cleaning hydraulic cylinders 32 

Removing packing from stuffing boxes. ..1. 33 

Repacking stuffing boxes V 34 

Filling cylinders : 34 

Service condition (lubrication, etc.) 34 

Condition "in ordinary " 35 

Oil holes 36 

Compression grease cups 36 

Oils and grease 36 

Painting 37 

List of implements furnished for 6-inch gun, models of 1905 and 1908 37 

Annual allowances of material for cleaning and preservation 37 

List of articles packed in armament chest 37 

Names of parts, location, and material 39 



LIST OF PLATES. 



Plate No. Drawing No. 

I. Platform 15-7K-1 

II. Longitudinal section 7-15-2 

III. Assembled views : . 7-15-2 

IV. Assembled mechanism 7-15-3 

V. Recoil cylinder and valve 15-0-18 

VI. Electrical equipment 7-15-22 

VII. Electrical equipment 7-15-23 

VIII. Wiring diagram ; 7-15-24 

(5) 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2007 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/disappearcarriaOOunitrich 



INSTRUCTIONS 

FOB 



MOUNTING, USING, AND CARING FOR DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, L F. 
MODEL OF 1905, Mil AND 6-INCH GUNS, MODELS OF 1905 AND 1908. 



(Eight plates.) 



(The parts in italics are of particular importance or concern the safety of the carriage 
and should be specially noted.) 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The Emplacement (Plate I). — Emplacements for these carriages 
are entirely of concrete, and can be arranged for a maximum field 
of fire of 170°. This limitation is not due to the inability of the car- 
riage to traverse through 360°, but to the requirements of parapet pro- 
tection for the material and cannoneers. The anchor bolts are set in 
the concrete during the construction of the emplacement, the depres- 
sions for the thrust plates being also provided in the top surface. 
Access to the counterweight well is given by a vertical shaft in the 
rear and outside of the base ring. 

The Carriage (Plates II, III, IV). — These carriages are num- 
bered from No. 20 up; they differ from models of earher dates for 
mounting the same cahber guns chiefly in having the following 
features, viz, a single vertical recoil cylinder, increased preponderance 
of counterweight, a counter-recoil system independent of the recoil 
system, gears on the recoil roUers. 

Stops can be arranged so as to permit traversing either 60, 70, 90, 
or 110° either side of the ^^ front" of the battery, and the piece can 
be elevated from 5° depression to 15° elevation, stops being arranged 
to limit the depression to either horizontal or 2.5° when the height 
of the parapet requires it. 

When, in the execution of mechanical maneuvers, it may become 
necessary to traverse the piece breech to the front, which can be done 
with the gun in battery, the fixed stops must be removed and care 
exercised that the weights do not foul the flexible conduit in the pit 
and that the carriage is traversed back to the same side so as to take 
out the half turn given by the breech to the front. 

(7) 



The elevating system is so constructed that the gun is at an angle 
of about 5° elevation when recoiled to the loading position from any 
angle of elevation in battery. 

Action of Careiage. — ^Upon firing the piece the gun-lever axle is 
moved to the rear by the recoiling energy of the gun, carrying the 
top carriage with it. The lower ends of the levers move vertically 
upward, being constrained by the crosshead and bottom plate travel- 
ing on the vertical guides. The trunnions of the gun move downward 
and to the rear in the arc of the ellipse. The energy of recoil is 
absorbed partly by raising the counterweight and partly by the 
movement of the masses up the inclined chassis rails, but principally 
by the resistance of the recoil cy Under; and when the gun comes to 
rest it has the proper loading angle. After loading, the pawls are 
released by the tripping gear, and the excess of the moment of the 
counterweight over the moment of the gun, etc., enables it to raise 
the gun to the firing position. 

Principal Parts. — The carriage consists of the following principal 
parts, namely, base ring, traversing roller system, racer, dust guards, 
azimuth circle and pointer, chassis and transoms, vertical guides and 
supporting brackets, top carriage, recoil rollers, counter-recoil buffers, 
buffer valve, gun levers and axle, crosshead and counterweight, 
recoil system, retracting gear, tripping gear, elevating system and 
counterbalance device, traversing system, sighting platforms, sight, 
lighting apparatus, firing apparatus, and grease cups. The acces- 
sories consist of shot trucks, shot tongs, and implements. 

Base Ring. — The base ring, 11 feet in diameter, is made of iron 
cast in one piece and is held in position on the foundation by twelve 
1.75-inch bolts. Twelve screws for leveling the base ring are set 
against steel plates through which the foundation bolts pass. 

The base ring, in addition to having the lower roller path on its 
upper surface, has an annular flange near its inner edge forming the 
pintle for the carriage. This flange has near its top edge a Up inward 
under which the three clips engage, and on its top edge the azimuth 
circle. The inner upper edge of the lip is rabbeted to receive the 
inner dust guard. The outer annular flange on the ring projects 
upward outside of the traversing roUers. The cavities on each side 
of the roller path are drained into the pit. 

Tapped holes can be found inside of the pintle flange for attaching 
the traversing stops in any required position. 

The base ring is marked ''front'' in raised letters cast on the outer 
annular flange. 

Traversing-roller System. — The racer rests, and is traversed, 
upon a circle of 24 live, conical traversing rollers whose axes are 
maintained in the radial position by bearings bolted to the distance 



ring. The rollers are of forged steel, solid, with a journal beyond 
each end and with flanges on their inner, small ends. 

The distance ring is of cast steel, in four sections, bolted together. 
The bearings for the traversing rollers are formed with a loop on 
top by means of which any roller with its bearings can be lifted out 
of the ring through the two holes in the top of the racer. 

The system is kept concentric with the pintle by the flanges on the 
rollers in centrifugal contact with the inner edge of the roller path 
on the base ring. The inner edge of the path on the racer is of a 
larger diameter so as not to come in contact with the flanges. 

Racer. — The racer is made of iron 10 feet 3 inches in diameter, 
cast in one piece. 

It is of box section, and in addition to having the upper roller 
path on its under surface, has an annular flange lined with bronze 
near its inner edge and fitting over the pintle, with 0.04 inch diam- 
etral clearance. 

Upon its top surface the chassis and transoms are bolted, doweled, 
and keyed. 

An opening sufficiently large for removing a traversing roller is 
provided at each side of the racer. These holes are habitually kept 
covered by steel plates provided for the purpose. Four oil holes, 
passing through the racer, are provided for oiling the pintle surfaces 
and 14 for oiling the traversing-roller bearings. 

Two steel clips secured to the racer near the front and one in the 
rear engage under the lip inside the pintle of the base ring to prevent 
possible overturning. The rear clip extends downward, forming 
also the stop lug engaging the traversing stops and providing a 
bearing for the traversing pinion shaft. 

Dust Guards. — The outer dust guard consists of a steel angle in 
four sections with its horizontal flange bolted to the outer part of the 
base ring. To the vertical flange is clamped a projecting strip of 
felt which bears against a finished surface on the underside of the 
racer. 

The inner dust guard is formed similarly by a strip of felt clamped 
to the inner upper portion of the base-ring pintle. 

These guards exclude dust from the traversing rollers and roller 
paths. The dust-guard sections with their felt strips are easily 
removed. 

Azimuth Circle and Pointer. — ^A brass azimuth circle, attached 
by countersunk screws to the top of the pintle of the base ring, is 
graduated in degrees, the numbers of which are to be added after the 
carriage is erected in its emplacement. The top of the racer is cut 
away on the right side to expose the azimuth circle and the microm- 
eter pointer and the subscale, fastened to the racer. The subscale 
has slotted holes to give it a lateral motion for adjustment, after 
9979—17 2 



10 

which it is fixed in position by two screws. It is graduated and 
stamped in decimals of a degree, the least reading being 0.1 of a 
degree. The micrometer screw, actuating the pointer, is graduated 
to a least reading of 0.01 of a degree. The subscale and pointer are 
protected by a hinged bronze cover. 

To adjust the azimuth pointer, point the gun by the bore sights 
on a target, the exact azimuth of which is known, set the pointer to 
read the hundredths of a degree in the azimuth reading, loosen the 
securing screws, move the pointer bodily until the reference mark on 
its moving part exactly coincides with a degree mark on the azimuth 
circle, then secure in position. The degree mark should be stamped 
with the number indicating the azimuth bearing in degrees and the 
remainder of the azimuth circle should be stamped with numbers 
from this point as a reference. 

Chassis and Transoms. — ^The chassis of cast iron are bolted, dow- 
eled, and keyed to the racer and are united at their front and rear 
ends by cast-steel transoms, also bolted to the racer. The rear tran- 
som carries the elevating slide and gearing. The upper surfaces of 
the chassis form the recoil-roller path and slope 1 degree and 20 
minutes to the front to facilitate the return of the piece to the firing 
position, thus reducing the necessary preponderance of the counter- 
weight. 

Four forged-steel racks, in which the gears on the recoil rollers 
engage, are secured to the upper surfaces of the chassis, one on each 
side of each roller path. These racks are not to he removed. 

The chasis also provide the necessary bearings or supports for all 
the mechanism and, with the racer, supports for all the minor attach- 
ments. 

Vertical Guides. — A cast-iron guide frame is bolted to the under- 
side of each chassis opposite the counterweight. The lower ends 
are joined by the piston-rod beam. The inner faces of the guide 
frames and chassis form continuous finished surfaces, to which are 
bolted two vertical guides for the crosshead and bottom plate, which 
extend above the chassis and are supported by brackets bolted to it. 

Top Carriage. — ^The top carriage is of cast steel, in one piece. It 
consists essentially of two side pieces, united by a transom. Two 
bronze-bushed bearings for the gun-lever axle are formed in the 
upper part, to which the axle caps are bolted. On the underside are 
two roller paths. Four steel racks, in which the gears on the recoil 
roUers engage, are secured by screws to the underside of the top car- 
raige, one on each side of each roller path. Tliese racks are not 
removable. 

Recesses are cast in each side of the top carriage near the front, 
in which pinch bars, inserted through openings in the guide brackets 



11 

can be engaged to force the top carriage forward against the stops, if 
for any reason it should fail to return fully into battery. 

Recoil Rollers and Roller Cages. — The top carriage rests on 18 
live recoil rollers on each side, held in alignment by steel roller cages. 
They move to the rear with the top carriage at half its speed. The 
recoil rollers are of forged steel and each alternate one has flanges 
which serve as guides. Each flanged roller is provided with gears 
which engage in the racks on the top carriage and chassis and which 
prevent skidding of the top carriage during recoil. 

Counter-Recoil Buffers. — ^A counter-recoil buffer is fitted to the 
forward end of each chassis roller path. The buffer cylinder is 
securely bolted to the chassis, and on the rear face of the cylinder 
casting a stop is machined, against which a corresponding machined 
surface on the forward end of the top carriage abuts when the gun 
is fully in battery. 

Each end of the counter-recoil buffer cylinders is closed by a stuff- 
ing box fitted with hydraulic packing. Twenty-four rings of pack- 
ing are furnished for each carriage, five for each stuffing box and four 
rings for replacements. 

Each cylinder is provided with a fiUing plug located on the top, 
in front of the piston head in its rear position. A bronze plate, with 
instructions as to filling the cylinder, is secured by screws near the 
filling plug. ' 

Two holes extend through the wall of the cylinder from the lowest 
element of the bore, at an angle of 45° downward. To these openings 
are coupled the pipes connecting with the buffer valve. 

The openings are located longitudinally, one just in front of the 
rear stuffing box, so that it is always in rear of the piston head; the 
other 2.125 inches in rear of the front stuffing box. 

The piston extends through both stuffing boxes. The piston head, 
located approximately in the middle of the piston rod, is bronze lined 
and has a diametral clearance in the bore of 0.008 inch,' which fact 
necessitates the passage of oil from one side of the piston head to the 
other during rapid movement, principally by way of the buffer valve, 
and very little directly past the piston head. 

On the exterior of the buffer cylinder at its forward end are cast two 
lateral horizontal lugs, one on each side. Annular projections are 
formed on their rear faces, centering and supporting the buffer-spring 
covers and buffer springs, which extend to the rear alongside the 
hydraulic cylinder. In the center of these projections are holes 
through which the buffer-spring rods pass. 

The buffer-spring rods, of steel, are both attached at their forward 
ends to a buffer yoke, of cast steel, which is attached at its middle 
to the forward end of the buffer piston. 



12 

The rear ends of the spring rods are attached to buffer-spring sup- 
ports, which consist of steel sleeves, inclosing the rods, with flanges 
at their rear ends fitting easily in the interior of the spring covers and 
supporting the rear ends of the springs. Collars are machined on the 
buffer-spring rods, which, by seating against the front face of the 
buffer-cylinder casting, limit the rearward movement of the piston and 
parts connected to it. A piston movement of 9 inches is provided for. 

The action of each- counter-recoil buffer is as follows : When the 
gun is out of battery, the buffer springs, acting against their fixed sup- 
ports in front, force the spring supports, spring rods, yoke, and piston 
rod to the rear until stopped by the collars on the spring rods. The 
buffer piston head in this position is 0.75 inch in front of the rear 
stuffing box. The rear end of the piston rod projects 9 inches in rear 
of the stop of the top carriage when in battery. 

When the gun rises into battery the top carriage strikes the pro- 
jecting end of each piston rod and forces it to the front, compressing 
the buffer springs. 

For the first 7.5 inches of piston movement the oil in front of pis- 
ton, being displaced, passes through the forward opening in the bot- 
tom of the bore to the buffer valve and returns to the cylinder through 
the rear opening. The forward opening is at this point closed by 
the piston head and for the remaining 1.5 inches of piston movement 
the cylinder acts as a dashpot, it being possible for oil to escape only 
around the piston head. Unless the energy of the top carriage, etc., 
is too great at the end of 7.5 inches of movement, due to the buffer 
valve not being correctly set, they will be brought to rest against the 
stops without jar to the carriage. 

If for any reason the retracting clutches should fail to retain the 
gun out of battery after recoil, it is necessary, to prevent jar to the 
carriage, that the buffer pistons reach their rearward position before 
the top carriage strikes them, in order that they may do the full 
amount of work of retardation. The buffer springs have been de- 
signed to accomplish this, assuming that the stuffing boxes do not offer 
an unreasonable frictional resistance. It is therefore important to 
screw up the glands only sufficiently to prevent lealcage. From the 
foregoing description it is evident that it will be necessary to tighten 
the front stuffing box more than the rear one. 

Buffer Valve. — Both counter-recoil buffers are joined to the 
bilffer valve, the different settings of which enable the energy of 
counter recoil to be absorbed without shock to the carriage under 
varying conditions affecting the velocity of counter recoil. Aside 
from mechamical difficulties and those due to differences in the ele- 
ments of loading, the following sources of variation may be mentioned: 
Atmospheric temperature, affecting the oil in both recoil and buffer 



13 

cylinders; specific gravit}^ of this oil (prescribed 0.85), and the load- 
ing position. 

The equalizing and throtthng pipes serve to connect the buffer 
valve to the buffer cylinders, to equalize the pressure in the buffer 
cylinders, and to facilitate filling them. Four plugs are furnished to 
close the buffer cylinders in case these pipes are damaged in action. 

The buffer valve is located at the top of the oval opening in the 
front transom, to which it is attached by two bolts. It is accessible 
^rom the front of the carriage. 

It consists essentially of a valve body, gland, disk, and handle of 
bronze, and a stem of steel and bronze. 

The body which supports the other parts and provides means for 
attachment to the front transom has two T-shaped chambers. The 
horizontal branches are coupled to the equalizing and throttling pipes, 
the upper leading to the forward ends of the buffer cylinders and the 
low^er to the rear ends. The vertical branches overlap, that of the 
upper chamber being in front of that of the lower chamber. A hori- 
zontal hole extends from the front of the body through the vertical 
branch of the upper chamber and through the wall between the two 
branches to the rear chamber. In the hole through the wall between 
the chambers is screwed a steel valve seat which has a central hole 
enlarging in the front face into a conical seat for the point of the 
valve stem. The larger part of the oil displaced in the counter-recoil 
buffers during counter recoil passes through this hole. 

Just in front of the front and upper chamber, the hole is threaded 
to receive a corresponding threaded portion on the valve stem. So 
that if the stem be turned clockwise, its conical point wiU bear on 
the valve seat and close the valve; if the stem be turned counter- 
clockw^ise, the opening about its point will increase and may reach a 
maximum of about 0.056 square inch. 

The disk is fixed to the body concentric with the stem. On the 
front face is an annular flange with 82 internal teeth, in which 3 corre- 
sponding teeth on the handle engage in order to retain the valve at any 
desired setting. The teeth on the disk are numbered counterclock- 
wise from to 80 at intervals of 5 teeth. A pin set in the face of the 
disk prevents the handle being turned more than 360 degrees. 

The handle is a bar with a rectangular hole in the middle which 
fits on a corresponding portion of the stem. At one end is a pointer 
with teeth which engage in the teeth of the disk. An index line on 
the handle permits accurate setting at any desired tooth. The rec- 
tangular portion on the stem is so laid out that the handle engages 
at of the disk w^hen the valve is closed. The handle can be moved 
along the stem to permit disengaging the teeth when changing the 
setting. A padlock is provided in order that the valve setting may 
not be tampered with by unauthorized persons. 



14 

When the carriage has been erected at the fortification and a thor- 
ough knowledge obtained of its characteristics in counter recoil, under 
all conditions, the disk should be stamped, under the direction of the 
Ordnance Department, at the proper points of the annular space 
provided for this purpose, with the words "Very hot," '^Hot," 
'^ Warm," "Medium," "Cool," "Cold," and "Very cold," to facilitate 
setting the buffer valve. 

A stuffing box is formed in the body around the stem, in which 
four rings of packing are placed. 

An emptying plug is located at the bottom of the valve body which 
serves to drain the buffer cyhnders. 

The setting of the buffer valve is best determined by trial. The 
setting of the recoil valve should be considered in setting the buffer 
valve. With a higher setting of the recoil valve, counter recoil will 
be more free, and consequently the buffer-valve setting should be 
lower. The following data are given as a rough guide in setting the 
buffer valve before more definite knowledge has been gained by trial: 

Atmospheric temperature, °F. Buffer-valve setting. 
to 30 80 to 45 

30 to 60 45 to 20 

60 to 80 20 to 15 

The counter recoil should he regulated hy settings of the counter-recoil 
buffer valve and not hy adding or removing counterweight. 

Gun Levers and Axle. — The gun levers support the gun at its 
trunnions in bronze-bushed bearings at their upper or rear ends; 
and the crosshead, counterweight, bottom plate, and recoil cyUnder 
in bushed bearings at their lower or forward ends. The arms of the 
axle pass through the bores in the gun lever, project beyond them, 
and rest in the bearings of the top carriage. 

Crosshead and Counterweight. — ^The crosshead is a steel casting 
which serves to attach the counterweight to the gun levers, and 
through the guide chps bolted to both sides of it, together with 
similar clips cast on the bottom plate, constrains the counterweight 
to move vertically, preserving the aUgnment of the recoil cylinder. 

The gun-lever pins of forged steel are inserted from the inside of 
the crosshead through the bearings in the gun lever. A key covers a 
segment of the inner end of each, and is secured at both ends to the 
face of the bearing in the crosshead, serving to prevent the gun-lever 
pin from working out of place. A tongue on this key rests in a 
groove in the gun-lever pin and prevents rotation. Each pin is 
tapped axially at its inner end to receive the extractor used to with- 
draw it. 

The guide chps are keyed longitudinally to the crosshead, and are 
secured by bolts pinned and permanently finished in place. 



15 

On the front face of each guide cUp is machined a rack in which 
pawls pivoted to the chassis rails engage, thus preventing the gun 
from returnmg to the firing position after recoiling or being retracted. 

There is a finished hole in the center of the crosshead in which the 
upper end of the recoil cylinder fits closely for alignment. 

In each comer of the crosshead are bored vertical holes through 
which the four suspension rods depend. These rods are secured to 
the crosshead by castellated nuts with split pins which draw the 
shoulders on the rods firmly against the finished under surface of 
the crosshead. In a similar manner there is attached to the lower 
ends of the rods the bottom plate, on which rests the counterweight 
and to which is attached the recoil cylinder. 

Guide clips are cast on the bottom plate which correspond to those 
attached to the crosshead. 

On the bottom plate is piled the counterweight, consisting, when 
mounting 6-inch gun, model of 1905, of eleven cast-iron weights; 
six are about 4,000 pounds each, forming the first six layers. The 
seventh layer consists of three weights, a total of about 2,000 pounds, 
the inner placed under the crosshead with an outline and upper sur- 
face corresponding to the rods on the crosshead, and two outer 
ones held in place by T slots, which engage over similar projections 
cast on the front and rear sides of the crosshead. The eighth layer 
of about 1,500 pounds consists of two weights in front and rear of 
the crosshead of the same shape as the outer weights of the seventh 
layer and held in place by projections on the bottom, which seat in 
depressions on the upper surface of the weights below. 

The eighth layer and the outer weights of the seventh layer can be 
removed without disturbing the crosshead; the others can not. 

It is not intended that counterweigJit should he removed or added to 
regulate counter recoil, and none is provided for this purpose. 

The total weight attached to the gun levers, including crosshead, 
counterweight, bottom plate, and recoil cylinder filled with oil, is 
about 35,000 pounds. The counterweight alone is approximately 
27,000 pounds. The preponderance of the weight of the counter- 
weight, etc., over the weight of the gun is approximately 14,000 
pounds. 

When 6-inch gun, model of 1908 (wire wrapped), is mounted, only 
four weights are used, viz., the first three layers, and a special layer, 
the latter having the snme outline but less depth. The fourth layer 
weighs about 2,800 pounds. 

The total weight attached to the gun levers, including crosshead, 
counterweight bottom plate, and recoil cylinders filled with oil, is 
about 22,600 pounds. The counterweight alone is approximately 
14,600 pounds. The preponderance of weight of the counterweight, 
etc., over the weight of the gun is approximately 10,000 pounds. 



16 

Recoil System (Plate V). — The energy of recoil is absorbed prin- 
cipally by a single vertical hydraulic cylinder moving with the coun- 
terweight and a piston and rod secured at its lower end to the middle 
of the piston-rod beam. 

Recoil is varied to meet varying conditions of atmospheric tem- 
perature, velocity of projectile, etc., by means of a recoil valve con- 
tained in the piston rod. 

The principal parts of the recoil system are: The recoil cylinder, 
the upper and lower cylinder heads with stuffing boxes, drain plug, 
filling plug, piston and rod, valve stem and body, locking disk, hasp 
and hasp bracket, piston-rod bracket, and recoil indicators. 

The recoil cylinder has two throttling bars bolted to its inner 
surface at opposite ends of a diameter. The bars are of variable cross 
section in order to oppose a constant resistance to the energy of 
recoil of the carriage. The piston is slotted to receive the throttling 
bars; the area of the orifice will vary with the position of the piston. 
The two ends of the cylinder are closed by the upper and lower cylin- 
der heads. 

Narrow copper gaskets ^ inch thick, seated in recesses at both 
ends of the cylinder, are compressed in securing the cylinder heads 
sealing the joints against oil pressure. 

Around the bore of each cylinder head a stuffing box prevents the 
escape of oil by the piston rod. Each stuffing box requires 6 rings 
of hydraulic packing 0.5 by 0.5 inch square. Eighteen rings are 
issued with each carriage, 6 being for reserve. 

In the lower cylinder head is a recess 5.25 inches in diameter. On 
the piston below the head is a corresponding enlargement which enters 
this recess with slight clearance. If at the end of recoil the energ}^ 
has not been normally absorbed, these parts, acting as a dash pot, 
provide a safeguard against possible injury to the carriage. 

The filling and drain holes are in the upper and lower cylinder 
heads, respectively. The filling plug is in the form of a tap bolt; 
one additional is supplied. The drain plug is so arranged that the oil 
can be withdrawn from the cylinder without unscrewing the plug 
more than a few turns. A brass gutter is bolted to the piston-rod 
beam under the plug for the purpose of conducting the oil within 
reach of the receptacle. 

The piston and rod are of forged steel in two pieces, the lower 
part of the rod being formed in one piece with the piston. ITie lower 
end passes through a hole in the piston-rod beam. Two nuts engage 
on threaded portions of the rod above and below the beam, cylin- 
drical portions on them seating in counterbores in the beam, thus 
aligning the rod. The upper nut is secured by a taper pin; the lower 
is castellated and secured by a split pin. 



17 

The upper end of the rod is bored axially to receive the stem and 
body of the recoil valve. At the piston two grooves surround the 
bore. Four holes radiate from each of these grooves, one set open- 
ing on each side of the piston. Oil can therefore pass from one side 
of the piston to the other in three ways, namely, by the outside of 
the piston head, through the diametral clearance of 0.02 inch, through 
the orifices between the throttling bars and the slots in the piston, 
and through the two sets of radial holes. 

Passage through the radial holes is restricted by the recoil valve 
body. This is a bronze bar fitting closely in the piston-rod bore 
opposite the piston. It has a diametral slot 0.4 inch wide, 1.625 
inches long, and 1.375 inches from the lower end. With the recoil 
valve open this slot reaches from one groove to the other. As the 
valve body is withdrawn upward the portion of the slot open to the 
lower groove decreases to zero, when the passage between the two sets 
of radial holes is closed. 

At the upper end of the piston a bronze valve-stem nut is screwed 
into the bore and secured by a nut-locking screw. A slot in the upper 
end of this nut affords means of removing and inserting it with the 
tit wrench provided for this purpose. 

The valve stem is a steel rod connecting the valve body with the 
valve-stem nut for the purpose of actuating the former. The upper 
end of the valve stem has a flatted portion, over which the locking 
disk is seated and on which the wrench for the recoil valve engages. 
This wrench is provided on one end of the tit wrench for the valve- 
stem nut. In order to remove the valve, the valve-stem nut must be 
taken out. 

The locking disk is of steel, 3.5 inches in diameter, and has 11 
notches on its circumference to indicate the open, closed, and nine 
intermediate positions of the recoil valve. The notch corresponding 
to the closed position of the valve is stamped ^^ Closed." The remain- 
ing 10 notches are equally spaced and numbered counterclockwise 
from 1 to 10. 

When the shoulder on the valve stem stops against the lower end 
of the valve-stem nut, the '' closed" notch is toward the front of the 
carriage and opposite the hasp and the bottom of the slot in the valve- 
stem body is 0.25 inch above the lower groove in the piston-rod bore. 
When the disk is turned clockwise 90°, the valve stem descends 0.25 
inch and brings the bottom of the slot to coincidence with the upper 
edge of the lower groove. A further movement of 18° uncovers the 
lower groove 0.05 inch, or an area of 0.02 square inch, and brings the 
first notch of the locking disk opposite the hasp. Similarly each 
additional notch opens the passage through the piston 0.05 inch. 
When the tenth notch is opposite the hasp, the lower groove is un- 
covered 0.5 inch, and the valve is open. 
9979—17 3 



18 

The upper end of the piston rod is flatted to retain it in a fixed 
position with respect to rotation. A piston-rod bracket of cast steel 
maintains the upper end of the piston rod in alignment. The hasp 
bracket is bolted to the piston-rod bracket in front of the piston rod, 
seating against the flatted portion on the latter. The hasp, by engag- 
ing in notches on the locking disk, retains the recoil valve at any 
desired setting. A flange on the top of it prevents the locking disk 
from moving vertically when the hasp is engaged. A slot in the hasp 
passes over a lug on the hasp bracket, after which a padlock is secured 
to the lug, preventing any unauthorized change in the setting of the 
recoil valve. 

A filling-plug instruction plate is secured to the crosshead near the 
filling plug, so as to be visible from the front of the carriage. 

The normal recoil is 47.8 inches; 4.2 inches additional recoil is 
provided for. During this additional recoil, the recoil buffer pre- 
viously described would act to bring the carriage to rest without 
shock. 

A bronze scale 32 inches long is secured to an angle iron on each 
side of the crosshead joining the guide clip with the bottom plate. 
Numbered graduations are cast upon it at intervals of 1 inch, from 
25 to 52, inclusive. A pointer to indicate the recoil is secured to the 
inside of each chassis. The pointers and scales are visible through 
round openings in each side of the chassis. 

The recoil valve is the only means provided for varying the length 
of recoil, arid no attempt should be made to use other means for this 
purpose. Although the setting of the recoil valve slightly affects counter- 
recoil, it should not he used to regulate the latter movement. 

When more definite data are not available, the valve setting for 
the first round at full charge should be: 

Atmospheric Recoil-valve 

temperature. setting. 

Below 30° F 9 

30° to 70° F 8 

Above 70° F 7 

A careful record should be kept of recoil-valve settings for each car- 
riage in a form convenient for their study for guidance in future 
firings. 

For firings with all charges, the recoil cylinder should he filled to the 
level of the filling hole with the oil issued for this purpose, and frequent 
inspections should he made of the lower stuffing box during firing to guard 
against lealcage of oil. If escape of oil occurs, the cylinder should be 
refilled and the cause of leakage remedied. 

Retracting System. — The retracting system enables the gun to 
be retracted from the firing to the loading position when desired. 
The effort required is least at the start and steadily increases. 



19 

Retraction is by hand power only, power being applied to cranks 
on each side of the carriage. The extremities of the shaft on which 
the cranks engage are flat on three sides, and the cranks are secured 
by two split-pin fastenings, making them easily removable. 

The retracting cranks should he removed and placed on the chassis 
hooks provided for them when they are not actually in use. 

The retracting crank shaft actuates, through a train of two pairs 
of spur gearing, two drums, to which are fastened by corrugated 
clamps two wire ropes, which wind upon the drums. A ratchet and 
pawl on the right end of the retracting crank shaft prevents the load 
from overhauling the gearing. From the drums these ropes pass 
around guide pulleys in the rear ends of the chassis, and are hooked 
to the upper end of the gun levers. These ropes remain with the 
carriage, and when not in use are wound upon the drums mitil the 
ropes project but a short distance beyond the guide-pulley brackets. 

In hauling down, care should be taken to see that the ropes are 
under equal tension. After taking up the slack in the ropes, and 
putting some strain on them, they should be vibrated slightly, and 
if found to be unequally loaded adjustment should be made at the 
rope clamps on the driuns. After the loop of the rope is passed over 
the hook on the upper end of the gun lever, and while winding up the 
slack, especial care should be taken that the rope is guided to the 
pulleys without any kinks or any slack and that the coils lie smoothly 
upon the driuns without crossing the ridges between the grooves. 

The wire ropes should always be detached from the gun-lever hooks 
before tripping. 

Bearings of the shafts of the retracting gearing are provided with 
roller bearings. Longitudinal motion is in general prevented by 
thrust collars pinned to the shaft and having grooves fitted with felt 
to protect the bearings from dust. Ample means of lubrication are 
provided, and it is important that parts of the retracting gearing be kept 
well lubricated. 

Retracting Clutch and Brake. — To permit the most rapid 
overhauling of the wire ropes possible there is provided a spring 
engaging claw clutch for rotating the drum shaft from the drum 
shaft gear in retracting. With the clutch disengaged the ropes can 
be drawn out quickly, revolving the drums and drum shaft rapidly 
in the drum -shaft gear. The clutch is disengaged by pushing in the 
loop handle on the left and giving it a quarter turn, which locks 
the clutch out with the spring compressed. 

In order to prevent overrunning and injury to the ropes a band 
brake is added, gripping a brake wheel keyed to the drum shaft 
upon lifting a brake lever. This is on the left of the carriage. When 
enough rope has been overhauled the brake handle is raised to stop 
the shaft, the loop handle is given a quarter turn back to permit the 



20 

clutch to engage, and the sprmg moves the clutch on its feathers in 
the drum shaft to engagement. 

Tripping Gear. — The tripping gear is for the purpose of releas- 
ing the pawls from the racks on the guide clips, permitting the gun 
to return to the firing position; of automatically holding the pawls 
released until the counterweight has descended sufficiently for the 
top of the racks on the guide clips to be below the pawls; and of 
automatically releasing the pawls, permitting them to reengage when 
the gun recoils or is retracted. 

The tripping gear consists of the following principal parts: Trip- 
ping lever and shaft; tripping crank and link; locking lever and 
link; tripphig-lever latch; safety latch; safety-latch dog (on front 
face of left guide clip, to right of rack); and pawls. 

The tripping lever is located outside of the front end of the left 
chassis, and is keyed on the end of the tripping-lever shaft. This 
shaft extends across the front of the carriage and rests in bronze 
bushed bearings in each chassis. Vertical rotation upward of the 
tripping lever is limited by the safety latch. Downward rotation 
of the tripping lever is limited by a stop bolted to the racer. 

To prevent injury to the carriage from tripping the gun when the 
buffer pistons have not been returned to the rear by the buffer springs, 
a tripping-lever latch is provided, which is connected through the 
locking lever and link to the buffer yoke. The latch engages the trip- 
ping crank and prevents lifting the tripping lever till the buffer yoke 
has completed 7 inches of the 9-inch movement to the rear, when 
the latch is disengaged and the gun may be tripped. To trip the 
gun the lever is moved upward as far as it will go, which will bring 
it about horizontal. This disengages the pawls from the racks, and 
the safety latch, catching the end of the pawl lever, holds the pawls 
away from the racks during the descent of the counterweight till 
released by the dog on the left guide clip. The safety latch is not 
released till the tops of the racks are below the pawls. When the 
dog releases the safety latch, the tripping lever is returned by its 
own movement to its normal position against the stop. The pawls 
are then ready to engage the racks when they again rise. 

The Elevating System (Plate VII). — The gun is moved in ele- 
vation by turning an elevating handwheel, located on the left side 
of carriage, which is connected through its shaft and bevel gears to 
a screw fixed to the rear transom. A moving nut on the screw is 
connected with the lower end of the elevating arm, whose upper 
end is attached to the gun 66 inches in rear of the trunnion. 

The elevating system consists of the elevating band and arms, 
slide, slide nut, slide spring, screw, shaft gear, shaft and handwheel; 
also pinions, intermediate gear, intermediate pinions, elevation disk 



21 

gear, elevation disk pointer, spiral spring, and the counterbalance 
device. 

The elevating band seats in a groove in the gun. On the extremi- 
ties of a horizontal diameter are band trunnions which are inserted 
after the elevating arm is in position. 

The elevating arm is connected at its lower end to the elevating 
slide by means of the elevating pin, which is inserted through bronze 
bushed bearings in the shde and through a hole in the elevating rod; 
at its upper end it is connected to the elevating band. 

The elevating slide consists of two side pieces connected by tran- 
soms. Along the lower edges are bronze-Hned flanges. In the rear 
transom are planed guideways for these flanges. The slide is held 
in place by two cast-steel gibs bolted to the rear transom. To the 
side of the right guideway is bolted the elevating stop. 

Due to the severe downward shock received through the elevating 
arm when the gun is fired, the thrust is transmitted from the elevat- 
ing slide to the slide nut by a helical spring surrounding the shde 
nut. It is compressed between the flange on the lower end of the nut 
and the upper transom of the elevating slide. In order that the ele- 
vating shde and slide nut shall have the same relative position at all 
times, except when the spring is compressed by firing, a spring-con- 
pressing nut is screwed into the lower transom of the slide, with its 
upper end bearing on the bottom of the slide nut. The spring-com- 
pressing nut is set up so as to give the spring an initial compression, 
which will positively return the compressing nut to a bearing against 
the slide nut after the spring is compressed by firing. This initial 
compression is given during the shop test of the carriage, and a 
taper pin is inserted in the elevating shde through a hole in the flange 
on the head of the compressing nut. In case the nut should later he 
removed, care must he exercised that it he returned to exactly its orig- 
inal position, as the of the elevation scale will otherwise he thrown 
out of adjustment. 

The elevating shaft is located at the rear and left side of the car- 
riage. It rests in three roller bearings, one in the left chassis and two 
in lugs cast on the middle of the top of the rear transom. To the 
outer extremity is keyed the elevating handwheel shaft of wrought 
iron with cast-iron hub. Between the two inner bearings of the shaft 
is keyed a forged steel elevating shaft bevel pinion engaging in the 
gear on the elevating screw. 

The elevation disk and pointer are for the purpose of indicating 
the elevation of the gun, both in degrees and yards of range, for a 
given weight of projectile and muzzle velocity. It consists princi- 
pally of a German silver disk, range and elevation scales, pointer 
base, pointer, and spring. 



22 

The elevation disk of German silver is graduated in yards of 
range, service velocity, on its outer circumference; on its inner cir- 
cumference appear graudations for yards of range with subcaUber 
ammunition; the elevation scale is graduated at 5° intervals, the 
graduations being between the two range scales. The interval of 
graduations for range scales is 20 yards; range scales to be gradu- 
ated after piece is mounted in emplacement, from data furnished by 
the Ordnance Department; elevation scale to be graduated in shop 
by use of cHnometer. 

The elevation disk is secured to the face of the elevation disk gear 
by 24 German silver screws, and is rotated by means of the train of 
gears upon changing the elevation of the gun. A spiral spring, 
assembled under tension, takes up all back-lash in the gears. 

The pointer base is bolted to the left chassis, and serves as a sup- 
port for the pointer. The latter is of bronze, with an approximately 
rectangular opening for viewing the scales. Three German silver 
strips for zero marks are dovetailed and pinned in place. A correc- 
tion screw with knurled head, turning in a seat in the pointer base, 
engages teeth on the outer circumference of the pointer, thus pro- 
viding a means of correcting the scale by shifting the index. 

The counterbalance device tends to equalize the force required for 
elevating and depressing, with the gun in the loading as well as in the 
firing position. A cast-iron cylindrical weight of 580 pounds is sus- 
pended by means of an equalizing bar fork extending through it axi- 
ally from the equahzing bar. To the extremities of the latter are 
attached the ends of the rope. Its bight passes over two pairs of 
guide sheaves to the upper end of the guideways of the rear transom, 
thence to the lower end of the elevating slide nut, to which it is 
secured by two clamps bolted to the slide nut. 

The weight descends vertically into the counterweight well as the 
gun is depressed. 

All gears of the elevating system are provided with cast-iron gear 
covers in halves bolted together. Oil plugs in them provide easy 
means of oiling the gears. Roller and other bearings are also pro- 
vided with ample means of lubrication. 

Traversing System. — The traversing system enables the racer 
and parts supported by it to be easily and quickly moved in azimuth 
on the traversing rollers, either from the working platform or from 
the sighting platform. 

Traversing is accomplished by rotation of the traversing pinion, 
which is attached to a vertical shaft at the rear of the carriage and 
engages in a steel rack fixed to the interior of the base ring. 

The traversing system consists principally of gearing for rapid 
movement from the working platform at the right side of the car- 
riage and of slow-motion gearing for smooth slow movement, as in 



23 

following a target. It is composed of traversing rack, pinion, pinion 
shaft, crank shaft, and gears. 

The traversing rack is of six sections joined in such a manner that 
they can be easily removed individually and secured to the base ring 
by 60 screws set below the surface of the bottom of the teeth. Trav- 
ersing pinion is keyed and secured by a castellated nut to the trav- 
ersing pinion shaft. The latter has two roller bearings and one 
ball-thrust bearing in the rear clip and traversing bracket, which is 
a steel casting bolted to the rear transom and to the racer. It also 
provides two roller bearings for the traversing crank shaft, to which 
is keyed a forged steel traversing crank shaft bevel pinion, which 
engages in a cast-iron gear keyed and secured by castellated nut to 
the upper end of the traversing pinion shaft. A traversing crank is 
secured by a split pin to the right extremity of the crank shaft out- 
side of the chassis. The traversing crank is easily removable, and 
hooks for it when not in use are provided on the chassis. 

The slow-motion traversing gearing consists essentially of a hand- 
wheel, shaft, and gears ; intermediate shaft; clutch gears, plunger, rod, 
fork, and fork lever; foot lever; spring stirrup and spring, and the 
necessary bearings. The handwheel is attached to the right end of 
its shaft, which is connected to the traversing intermediate shaft. 
The intermediate shaft is keyed to a bevel gear, which engages in a 
pinion secured to the handwheel shaft near the handwheel. The 
upper end of the intermediate shaft is supported by a ball-thrust 
bearing in the upper traversing bearing, which is bolted to the sight 
standard. The lower end of the intermediate shaft passes through a 
bushing in the lower traversing bearing which is bolted to the left 
chassis at the traversing crank shaft. There is keyed to its lower 
extremity a forged-steel clutch bevel pinion. The cast-iron gear in 
which it engages is bronze bushed and is free to rotate on the travers- 
ing crank shaft. The traversing clutch is a bronze collar having a 
sHding fit over two keys on the crank shaft to the left and outside of 
the clutch gear. Six 30° lugs on its right end engage between corre- 
sponding ones on the left end of the hub of the gear. 

The clutch mechanism is for the purpose of moving the clutch in 
and out of engagement with the clutch gear. When engaged the 
rotation from the sighting platform of the clutch gear is transmitted 
to the crank shaft and traversing pinion ; when disengaged the crank 
shaft can be rotated in the bushing of the clutch gear without move- 
ment of the slow-motion gearing. It is operated from the sighting 
platform by pressure of the foot on a plunger which actuates a series 
of levers, moving the clutch into engagement; releasing the foot pres- 
sure causes the disengagement under the action of the clutch-rod 
spring, which returns the plunger to its original position. 



24 

All gears of the traversing system are provided with gear covers. 
Oil holes are provided for lubrication. 

Sighting Platforms. — Two sighting platforms are provided, one 
on each side of the carriage. Means for traversing only are provided 
by a handwheel operated from the left platform. 

Sight. — The sight with which carriages Nos. 20 and 21 are equipped 
is the 3-inch telescope sight, model of 1904, which, together with 
its cradle and sight arm, is described in Form 1955. The sight arm 
is mounted on a sight-arm bracket, which is in turn mounted on the 
upper end of the sight standard. 

The sight standard is of cast steel. The upper end of the sight 
standard is turned to a diameter of 6.497 inches for a height of 6 
inches, below which is a flange with two set screws in front screwed 
into lugs 2.5 inches apart. The sight-arm bracket is of cast steel with 
a socket at the rear bored to fit the upper end of the sight standard. 
An arm projects to the front 25.44 inches, having at the extremity a 
double bearing for the sight-arm bracket pin which passes through 
the hole in the forward end of the sight arm. A lug at the base of 
the sight-arm bracket is engaged by the set screws of the sight stand- 
ard, which enables the Hne of sight to be brought into exact parallel- 
ism, with the bore of the gun with respect to azimuth. To make the 
adjustment, point the gun at a distant object (about 6,000 yards away, 
if practicable) by means of a bore sight, set the deflection scale of the 
telescopic sight at 0, then bring the sight on the target by means of 
the set screws. Four tap bolts are screwed into the sight standard 
through holes in the flange at the base of the sight-arm bracket. 
These holes are 0.188 inch in diameter larger than the bolts, which 
allows sufficient play to make the desired adjustment, after which 
the screws should be tightened and the adjustment verified. 

Two lugs project upward from the rear of the sight-arm bracket 
and afford a double bearing for a second sight-arm bracket pin pass- 
ing through the sight arm. In this case the cradle movement in 
elevation is merely for the purpose of bringing the target into the 
field of the telescope. 

Carriages after No. 21 are equipped with 3-inch telescopic sight,, 
model of 1912, described in pamphlet No. 1959. The cradle yoke is 
mounted on the sight bracket, which is in turn mounted on the sight 
standard. 

The sight standard for these carriages is capped by a round flange 
12 inches in diameter, to which the cast-steel sight bracket is bolted. 
The cradle yoke is bolted to the sight bracket, and adjustment in 
azimuth for bore sighting is provided for by elongated bolt holes 
in the rear end of the sight bracket. 

Electrical Equipment (Plates VI and VII). — Plates VI and VII 
show the plan of the electrical equipment and the wiring diagram. 



25 

Lighting Circuits. — The power for lighting is obtained from the 
power mains of the emplacement through lead-covered cables which 
enter a terminal box at the rear of the pit. From that point it is 
distributed by insulated wires with flexible metallic and insulated 
wrought-iron pipe conduits to four 8-candlepower lamps, one at the 
azimuth pointer, one at the elevation pointer, one at the recoil valve, 
and one at the buffer valve; to three 16-candlepower lamps, one on 
each chassis and one at the rear transom; to one portable 16-candle- 
power lamp at the rear end of the right transom; and to two 
2-candlepower lamps on the telescopic sight. The 2-candlepower 
lamps are for the illumination of the cross wires and the deflection 
scale. All lamps are 110 volts, in parallel. Where emplacements 
are equipped with power at 220 volts, lamps are placed in parallel 
series of two lamps each. 

The azimuth and elevation pointer lamps and the buffer and 
recoil valve lamps, as well as those for illuminating the sight, are 
controlled by a single snap switch on the lamp fitting of the elevation 
pointer lamp at the rear of the carriage; the chassis lamps and the 
lamp at the rear transom are provided with key sockets for their 
control. The portable lamp has a snap switch on its base. Cross 
wires of the sight are provided with a mechanical dimmer, by which 
the lamp is occulted to any desired degree. 

The portable water-tight lamp is for general use within the limit 
of its reach. The lamp itself is covered by a globe of heavy glass 
seated in a bronze base, to which is attached a handle. The flexible 
steel conduit containing the conductors passes through this handle. 
A substantial wire guard surrounds the globe and is attached to the 
base. 

Firing Circuits. — The gun may be fired either electrically or by 
lanyard. The current for firing electrically is obtained either from a 
battery of dry cells carried in a box supported in a bracket attached 
to the underside of the sighting platform, in which case the firing 
circuit is closed through a firing pistol mounted on a bracket bolted 
to the upper traversing bearing, above the left sighting platform, or 
from a hand-operated alternating current magneto mounted on the 
firing-pistol bracket in place of the firing pistol, the dry-cell battery 
being dispensed with. 

When using the battery the gunner may determine whether the 
circuit is complete without actually firing a primer by pressing a 
projecting button on the pistol, thereby closing the firing circuit 
through a coil of high resistance, which, with the voltage ordinarily 
used, permits the passage of sufficient current to operate a buzzer, 
but not sufficient to endanger the firing of the primer. 

A circuit breaker on the breech of the gun prevents the possible 
firing of the gun electrically except w^^en the breechblock is fully 
9979—17 4 



26 

closed whether the gun be in the loading or in the firing position. 
A safety firing switch on the carriage prevents the possible firing 
of the gun electrically except when fully into battery or nearly so. 
This device consists of a double-pole, single-throw switch, the parts 
of which are separated by the recoil, one part being attached to the 
chassis, the other part to the top carriage. The part attached to the 
chassis is so arranged that when the top carriage recoils it drops out 
of position, so that on counter recoil contact is not made until this 
part is raised into position by a lever on the outside of the left chassis. 

The gun is fired by lanyard from the loading platform. A safety 
device has been added to prevent the possible firing of the gun by 
lanyard except when fully in battery or nearly so. The device con- 
sists of a short lanyard running from the primer to a ring at the end 
of a copper cable wound on a reel. The reel is carried in a housing 
attached to the rear face of the elevating band on the gun. One 
end of the firing lanyard is attached to the ring on the copper cable^ 
the other is held by the cannoneer who is to fire the piece. The short 
lanyard can be pulled to the rear so as to fire the primer only by first 
imwinding the copper cable from the drum. This is prevented while 
the gun is from battery by the action of a pawl which engages a ratchet 
on the drum. When the gun rises into battery, this pawl is auto- 
matically tripped by a cam attached to the rear face of the elevating 
arm. This permits the reel to be unwound and the pull to thus come 
upon the short lanyard attached to the primer. 

The reel is provided with a spiral spring which causes it to rotate 
and wind up the copper cable as soon as the pull upon the lanyard 
is released. The initial tension of this spring should be such as to 
cause the copper cable to be wound up with certainty with the lan- 
yard attached. Should the initial tension be much in excess of the 
proper amount, the spring may become woimd solid before sufficient 
cable has been unwound to permit the firing of the primer. Too much 
tension on the spring is otherwise objectionable, since it brings un- 
necessary strains on the parts when the reel automatically winds up. 

Should the tension of the spring require adjustment, it may be 
done as follows: Loosen the nut on the spring shaft projecting from 
the center of the case; hold with a screw wrench the square end of 
the shaft to prevent the spring from unwinding; remove the spring 
shaft pin, and, by means of the wrench, turn the spring shaft in 
such direction as to increase or decrease the tension as required. 
Holes are provided wherein the pin may be inserted at any quarter 
turn of the shaft. 

A safety device on the firing mechanism proper prevents possible 
firing of the primer by lanyard until the breechlock is locked, whether 
the gun be in the loading or in the firing position. 



27 

Shot Trucks. — Four shot trucks are furnislied with eacli carriage 
for bringing projectiles to the gun. Each truck carries six projectiles. 
They are to be taken from the truck and inserted in the gun by hand. 
All shot-truck wheels are equipped with rubber tires, set in grooves 
on the wheels, and vulcanized in position. 

Shot Tongs. — Each battery is provided with one pair of shot 
tongs with each shot trolley installed, and a reserve of two pairs for 
the battery. In order to provide tongs having a small height over 
all and thus to increase the amount of possible hoist in the galleries 
of the emplacement, the tongs are designed with a lock which must 
be operated by hand before they will grip a projectile. This lock 
consists of a dog, the inner end of which presses against the top of 
the projectUe while the outer side is held by a U-shaped piece rotated 
into position after the tongs have been placed on the projectile. 

Grease Cups. — ^Ten grease cups are provided for lubricating the 
heavy bearings of the gun levers and the front and rear bearing sur- 
faces of the vertical guides, with the heavy grease necessary for this 
purpose. The grease cup consists essentially of a body for carrying 
the grease and a cap carrying a piston actuated by a coiled spring. 
When the cap is screwed down over the body of the cup, the piston 
bears against the grease. By further movement of the cap the spring 
in rear of the piston is compressed, thus putting a sustained pressure 
on the grease. This cap should habitually he Tcejpt screwed down so as 
to maintain a clearance of about 0.25 inch between its face and the face 
of the nut on the projecting piston, affording a visible indication that 
the grease is being forced into the bearing. 

Implements. — Each carriage is equipped with the wrenches, screw 
drivers, lifting hooks, pinch bars, and oil cans required for its mount- 
ing and care. These parts, except those too large, are stored in an 
armament chest, together with the necessary implements for the gun. 



INSTKUCTIONS FOR ASSEMBLING THE CARRIAGE. 



General Remarks. — ^The carriage is dismounted for shipment, the 
heavy parts being separated, the finished surfaces slushed and cov- 
ered with boards. The chassis and transoms are sometimes shipped 
assembled. The small parts are disassembled sufficiently for boxing 
them conveniently. Except where impracticable on account of the 
size or other characteristics, each part bears a piece mark shown on 
the drawing near the designation of the part. The first number of 
this piece mark indicates the drawing on which the part is detailed. 
Where it is possible to assemble the parts in more than one way, they 
are sometimes marked to indicate the way in which they were assem- 
bled during shop test — as, for instance, the two ends of two distance 
ring sections which adjoin are marked with the same number. The 
shipping list itemizes the contents of each box. 

The following approximate weights are given as a guide in assem- 
bling and handling the parts: 



Part. 



Weight. 



Base ring, with traversing rack 

Distance ring, four sections, without rollers 

Racer 

Chassis 

Front transom 

Rear transom 

Guide frame, each , 

Piston-rod beam 

Vertical guide, each 

Guide bracket, each 

Sight standard 

Top carriage 

One roller cage, with rollers 

Bottom plate 

Counterweight, largest piece 

Recoil cylinder, with cylinder heads 

Piston rod .' 

Crosshead, with guide clips 

Sighting platform 

Elevating arm 

Elevating band 

Gun levers, axle, yoke, etc 

Counter-recoil buffer, assembled 

Gears, shafts, brackets, cranks, and other parts not mentioned above, about 
Total weight (unboxed), about 



Pounds. 

8,000 

1,000 

6,000 

6,000 

925 

2,200 

1,000 

750 

600 

550 

1,050 

2,600 

350 

3,300 

4,200 

970 

350 

3,200 

550 

650 

320 

6,400 

350 

7,500 

92,000 



In assemhling the carriage no part sJiould he directly strucTc with a 
steel hammer or sledge. A wooden buffer should he used on the part 
to he struck, or soft-metal drifts or hammers should he used. In han- 
dling parts, care must he exercised that machined surfaces do not hecome 
hurred. All hearing surfaces should he clean, smooth, and well lubri- 
cated prior to being brought together. 

(28) 



29 

The assembling of the carriage requires the use of such blocking, 
way plank, hydraulic jacks, ropes, and pulleys as are usually found 
at seacoast forts. In addition to these a derrick or shears capable of 
safely lifting 4 or 5 tons will be found very useful. 

Instructions for Assembling. — Carriages should be mounted 
under the immediate supervision of an ordnance machinist famihar 
with the work, so that the following instructions are intended to be 
general only. 

Base Ring. — Move the base ring into position over the pit by 
means of the derrick or by skids and rollers, placing the part marked 
*' Front" in the axis of the emplacement. Place a thrust plate on 
each holding-down bolt in such position as to receive the thrust 
from the leveling screws. Clean and oil the threads of the holding- 
down bolts, then lower the base ring, exercising great care not to 
burr these threads. 

The base ring should be supported by the leveling screws so as 
to leave an opening underneath sufficiently wide for satisfactory 
grouting. 

Leveling. — The base ring should be carefully leveled by means 
of an accurate straightedge and a well-adjusted machinist's level. 
The straightedge should be used on the roller path by resting it on 
the inner edge with no blocks or other supports. The level should 
be reversed in every position and the mean position of the bubble 
taken as the correct one. 

Preliminary leveling may be done from the azimuth circle by sup- 
porting one end of the straightedge on blocking in the center of the 
pit, but the final adjustment should be verified by readings taken on 
the roUer path as described above. At the conclusion of the leveling, 
moderately tighten all holding-down bolts, verify the level, then add 
a grouting of neat Portland cement. Care must be exercised that 
this completely fills the entire space under the base ring. No weight 
should be added to the base ring until the grouting has thoroughly 
set. The leveHng screws should then be backed off two turns. 

Distance Ring and Traversing Rollers. — Carefully clean all 
parts, assemble the roUers in their bearings, with the distance ring 
in place, and run the system around by hand to see that aU parts 
operate freely. 

Racer. — ^Move the racer into position, clean the roller path and 
pintle surface, then carefully lower into position on the traversing 
rollers. Care should be exercised not to injuriously rub or cramp 
the pintle surfaces during the lowering. Assemble the outer and 
inner dust guards and the covers for openings in racer in order to 
prevent the possible entrance of dirt or metal chips. The racer 
should then be run around by hand to determine whether it be 
entirely free in its operation. 



30 

Front Clips may now be bolted in place. 

Chassis and Guide Frames. — Place either chassis in position, 
dowel, key, and bolt it to the racer. The rear of the racer may be 
identified by its being beveled for the rear transom. Lower its guide 
frame into position and bolt it to the underside of the chassis. Pro- 
ceed similarly for the other chassis and its guide frame. 

PiSTON-RoD Beam should then be attached to the lower ends of the 
guide frames. 

Vertical Guides are then added. A series of circles about J 
inch in diameter are located on the center of the right-hand guide 
about 2 feet apart, as measuring points for paraQelism of guides. 

The Front and Rear Transoms are bolted in place. 

Bottom Plate. — ^Place blocking in the counterweight well to 
within 18 inches of the base ring, being careful to leave the center of 
the bottom plate uncovered as well as the holes for the four suspen- 
sion rods. The bottom plate should be laid on this blocking, the clips 
on it engaging the vertical guides. It should be carefully leveled to 
prevent distortion of the bronze gibs. 

Recoil Cylinder, with the lower cylinder head, should be placed 
on the bottom plate and secured to it. 

Counterweight is then piled and the suspension rods inserted and 
secured to the bottom plate. 

Crosshead is then added from above. If the upper end of the re- 
coil cylinder 'is found not to be exactly in position with respect to its 
bore in the crosshead the bottom plate should be tipped slightly as 
necessary by means of jacks applied to its underside. 

Retracting and Tripping Gear. — The retracting and tripping 
gear are then assembled. After this is done, the crosshead may be 
attached to the counterweight by means of the suspension rods. 
No attempt should be made to lift the counterweight with the re- 
tracting gear before the gun is in place. 

Piston Rod and Upper Cylinder Head are then placed. 

Counter-Recoil Buffers and Roller Cages should now be 
added, the latter being so placed that the zero marks on rack teeth 
and recoil roUer teeth coincide. 

Top Carriage should be lowered into its forward position from 
above so that the gears will all engage properly. 

Gun Levers are then added, the top carriage being run rearward 
for this purpose, and the lower ends secured to the crosshead by the 
gun-lever pins. 

The Gun with Elevating Band attached is then put in place. 

The remaining parts of the carriage may now be assembled as con- 
venient, including the elevating arm, slide, etc. ; guide brackets, sight 
standard, piston-rod brackets, elevating and traversing gearing, sight 
platform, sights, electrical equipment, recoil and buffer valves. 



31 

After the gun and elevating arm are in place, the gun may be re- 
tracted slightly, freeing the blocking under the counterweight, the 
blocking removed, and the carriage run slowly into battery by means 
of the retracting cranks. This will permit the attaching of those 
parts which require the gun to be in battery. 

Important Points. — ^After the carriage has been completely as- 
sembled and the gun mounted, the recoil and buffer cylinders filled, 
and the valves set as indicated in the description of the carriage, the 
following points should be noted, namely: 

1. Traverse the carriage to the extreme position in both directions 
to see that it moves freely and that traversing stops are properly 
located. 

2. Elevate and depress the gun to the extreme limits to see that the 
parts operate freely and that the depression stop is properly located. 

3. Retract the gun while in its extreme positions against the azi- 
muth stops to determine whether there be any interferences for recoil 
in such positions. 

4. Examine and clean out all oil holes, noting that they have oil 
plugs. 

5. See that there is not a hard bearing between the rimbases of the 
gun and gun levers. 

6. See that the elevating arm and band are properly assembled, the 
clearances on each side being the same, and the arms not sprung or 
twisted. 

7. See that the chassis rails and guide clips have not been burred. 

8. See that the dust guard does not bear against the distance rings 
or racer. 

9. Adjust the buffer valve until the gun rises as promptly as pos- 
sible into battery without striking the stops with force. 

10. See that the pawls engage simultaneously and that the re- 
tracting gearing, tripping gearing, and the safety latches function 
properly. 

11. Set the elevation pointer by the use of a clinometer supported 
by a rest in the muzzle of the gun, dowel pin it in position, and verify 
the graduation. 

12. Orient the gun, add numbers to the degree marks on the azi- 
muth circle, adjust azimuth pointer to indicate correct azimuth, and 
dowel pin it in position. Muzzle at true south is degrees in azi- 
muth and numbers are placed around clockwise to include 359. 

13. Adjust the sight-arm brackets so that the telescope will be 
parallel to the bore of the gun, as described previously in connection 
with the sight. 

14. See that the electrical connections have been properly made, by 
trying the lights and firing the primer. 



CARE OF CARRIAGE. 



General Instructions. — Carriages should be traversed from time 
to time throughout their entire allowed movement. They should not 
be allowed to stand for long periods at a particular azimuth, as this 
might cause uneven settling of the platform. 

The habitual position of guns on disappearing carriages is '^from 
battery," but at intervals the gun should be allowed to rise to the 
firing position and be elevated and depressed within the limits of the 
stops. 

It is required that all parts of carriages he Icept free from rust at aU 
times. If this be allowed to accumulate, its removal from bearing 
parts, and especially piston rods, requires particular attention, in 
order that clearances may not be unduly increased. The use of sand- 
paper for this purpose is forbidden, and emery cloth No. 1 should be 
used, the rust being softened, if necessary, by kerosene. 

The retracing wire ropes should at all times be kept well oiled with 
raw linseed oil. 

If any leakage occurs from the hydraulic recoil system, it should 
be immediately remedied, calling if necessary upon the district arma- 
ment officer for the services of skilled labor. 

The repacking of stuffing boxes may be done, when necessary, by 
trained enhsted men under the supervision of an officer, but will 
preferably be done by skilled labor. 

Before removing a cylinder head containing a stuffing box, or 
drawing a piston rod through a stuffing box, the pressure of the pack- 
ing on the rod should be released by unscrewing the follower or gland 
several turns. 

The copper gaskets between cylinders and their heads should be in 
good condition, and consequently should be replaced whenever neces- 
sary in order to prevent leakage. 

Cleaning Hydraulic Cylinders. — Recoil and buffer cylinders 
should be emptied and refilled at least every three months, and thor- 
oughly cleaned every six months. For cleaning, a plumber's hand 
force pump is supplied to each Coast Artillery post, with about 10 
feet of suction hose and 15 feet of discharge tube. 

The following operations are outlined for cleaning the recoil 
cylinder : 

(a) Retract the gun sufficiently to afford room for working below 
the recoil cylinder, remove the oil from the cylinder and the glands 

and followers. 

(32) 



33 

(b) Kemove the piston-rod bracket, locking disk, and the upper 
cylinder head. Remove the lower piston-rod nut, screw the upper 
nut downward, raising the rod until the nut is removed. Allow the 
rod to rest on a block over its hole in the piston-rod beam. 

(c) Run the gun slowly into battery by means of the retracting 
cranks, raising the ratchet pawls, and give the gun its maximum 
elevation. Raise the piston rod vertically until its upper end strikes 
the gun, then incline it to one side and remove it from the cylinder. 

{d) Thoroughly clean the cylinder from its upper end with kero- 
sene oil forced in with the hand pump, then wipe dry with clean cotton 
waste. Clean also the cylinder heads, glands, and followers; and the 
piston rod inside and out, removing the recoil valve. 

(e) After the removal or evaporation of all kerosene oil, reassemble 
the parts and refill the cylinder with hydrolene oil, carefully inspect 
all parts which were dismounted, and complete the retraction of the 
gun. 

The following operations may be outlined for cleaning the buffer 
cylinders : 

(a) Remove the glands, stuffing boxes, and pistons; and also the 
gland, valve stem, and emptying plug of the buffer valve. 

(b) Clean the cylinders as described for the recoil cylinder. The 
equalizing and throttling pipes should also be thoroughly cleaned by 
forcing the oil into them with the pump, permitting it to run out 
through the emptying hole. 

(c) After the removal or evaporation of all kerosene oil, reassemble 
the parts and refill the cylinders with hydrolene oil, after which close 
the buffer valve to its normal setting. 

Removing Packing from Stuffing Boxes. — ^A packing extractor 
for removing packing from the stuffing boxes of the recoil cylinder is 
issued to each post at which these carriages are mounted. To use 
the extractor, the gun must be retracted sufficiently to afford access 
to the stuffing boxes. Close the extractor around the piston rod and 
insert the locking pin, turn the extractor counter-clock wise, pressing it 
against the packing until the needles are firmly engaged. Draw the 
packing out, turning slowly counter-clock wise. Extractor bars are 
provided for use in starting the packing from its seat by inserting 
the toes of the bars in the rack teeth and prying over the edge of the 
box, being careful not to injure it. 

The packing of the buffer cylinders and of the buffer valve can 
generally be removed with any pointed instrument by merely remov- 
ing the glands. In case of difiiculty, the stufiing boxes of the former 
can be removed and the packing taken out with the finger; and in the 
latter, the valve stem may be removed. 



34 

Repacking Stuffing Boxes. — ^Examine the old packing and dis- 
card all unfit for use. If any of the old packing is used, it should be 
put in after the new. 

To repack a stuffing box after the packing has been removed, insert 
one ring of packing and force it well to the bottom of the box by a 
wooden stick and mallet. Treat each layer of packing in a similar 
manner, being careful that successive rings break joints. Six rings 
of packing are required for each stuffing box of the recoil cylinder, 
five rings for each stuffing box of the buffer cylinders, and four rings 
for the buffer valve. 

In screwing up the glands or followers, no other tools should he 
used than those provided for the purpose, nor should excessive force 
he applied to them, such as the addition of a pipe to the handle of the 
wrench. Care should be exercised in tightening the glands to advance 
all of the bolts evenly so as not to throw the gland out of alignment. 
It will be found necessary to tighten the glands of the buffer cylinders 
but slightly. Attention is invited to the caution given in regard to 
this under the description of the counter-recoil huffers. 

It is to be expected that a slight amount of oil will soak through 
and drip from boxes of carriages when not in use. Also when 
tightening the followers a slight amount of oil will squeeze out of the 
saturated packing. This oil should be caught and not allowed to 
render the carriage unsightly. 

Filling Cylindeks. — To fill the recoil cylinder, remove the filhng 
plug and pour clean hydrolene oil into it through a funnel until the 
oil overflows. Allow any air that may he present to escape, then 
pour in more oil until the cylinder is again filled. About 7.5 gallons 
are required. The cylinder should be filled with the gun slightly out 
of the recoiled position. 

To fill the buffer cyfinders, remove both filling plugs and pour 
clean hydrolene oil through a funnel into one cylinder, allowing the 
air to escape from the other, until both cylinders are filled. AUow 
any air that may he present to escape and pour in more oil until the 
system is again filled. A full gallon of oil is required. 

Service Condition (Lubrication, etc.). — When the carriage is 
to be kept in readiness for service, and is in daily or frequent use, 
aU bearing parts must be kept thoroughly cleaned and lubricated. 
Especial attention should be given to the lubricating of trunnion 
beds, roUers, pintle surfaces, shaft bearings, and sliding surfaces; 
gun-lever axle beds, gun-lever pins, elevating screw, elevating band 
trunnions, crosshead guides, and the elevating, traversing, tripping, 
and retracting mechanisms, including the teeth of all gears. 

The ahove parts should he lubricated at frequent intervals, whether 
the carriage is maneuvered or not. When carriages are in use for 



35 

daily drills a thorougTi lubrication twice each weeJc should he sufficient 
for all hut the most severely used parts. 

Proper lubricating and cleaning of the traversing rollers and their 
paths are essential to free working of the carriage. The dust guards 
should be removed to clean the upper roller paths. By removing the 
cover plates on the racer the traversing rollers may be lifted out with 
their bearings for cleaning and for cleaning the lower roller path. 

Four oil plugs are screwed into steel tubes in the upper surface of 
the racer, outside of the front and rear of each chassis, which are 
provided with passages to the pintle surface. Eight oil plugs, two 
at each of the above points, are also provided, connected to brass 
tubes reaching down to the oil grooves of the distance ring, thus pro- 
viding lubrication for the bearings of the rollers. Six additional of 
such oil pipes are also provided, two each at the front, right, and 
left of the racer for exceptional use in lubricating the roller bearings. 
They are closed by countersunk screws. For oiling the rollers or 
pintle through these holes the carriage must he traversed in order to 
distribute the oil through the entire circumference. 

It will occasionally be necessary to examine all ball and roller 
bearings to see that the dust guards are in proper place and that 
the rollers themselves are clean. If they be found dirty, they may 
be flushed with kerosene oil; but care must be taken to fill the bear- 
ings with synovial oil after the kerosene has drained away. If the 
rollers have rusted, they must be well removed and cleaned. 

Condition '^In Ordinary'^ (Not Ready for Immediate 
Service). — If the carriage is to remain unused for a time, all un- 
painted surfaces should be covered with a thin coat of hght slushing 
oil. It can be applied as in painting, using sash tool No. 6, except 
in cold weather, when it should be applied by stippling, i. e., light 
tapping, with the brush held perpendicular to the surface to be 
covered. 

In all cases it should he applied in a thin coat, as this is all that is 
needed to give good protection. 

This oil is easily removed by the use of burlap or waste dipped in 
kerosene oil. In order to save oil, the thickest of the slushing oil 
should be well removed by a scraper before applying the kerosene. 

Before applying the slushing oil, the surfaces should be thoroughly 
cleaned, so as to be entirely free from rust, water, kerosene, or lubri- 
cating oil, as the first three would cause rusting underneath, and the 
latter would cause it to run off when heated. 

Rollers and roUer paths should be cleaned and slushed from time 
to time and the dust guards examined to see that the felt strips are in 
order and make the openings dust tight. 

Experience has shown that hydraulic cylinders should not remain 
empty, as in that case the interior waUs soon become rusty. 



36 

Oil Holes. — Oil holes should be cleaned out frequently to keep 
them free from sand and grit, and should habitually be kept closed by 
the screw plugs provided, except when in the act of oiling. 

Before removing the 'plug from any oil hole carefully wipe off any 
dirt or grit near the opening that might he carried into the hearing 
with the oil. 

Compression Grease Cups. — Where compression grease cups are 
provided similar precautions against dirt and grit must be observed. 
When adding grease to these cups do not fill them completely, but 
fill only to the bevel at the top of the cup; if too full, the leather 
packing will become inverted and will not act effectively. In putting 
on the cap see that the leather packing enters the cup without being 
caught or bent by the edge of the cup. 

Screw the cap down on the cup until the spring rod projects about 
0.25 inch above the top of the cap. The cap should be screwed down 
from day to day as required to maintain about this projection for the 
rod. When the cap is screwed nearly home the cup should be refilled. 

Oils and Grease. — The Vacuum Oil Co.'s No. 4^ lubricant is 
issued for use in the compression grease cups; it will not be used for 
lubricating any other parts, nor will any other oil be used in its place. 

Light slushing oil is provided for covering impainted surfaces on 
the gun and carriage, as well as the bore of the gun, when they are not 
in current use. 

Engine oil should be used to lubricate the bearings where oil holes 
and oil plugs are provided. It will also be used as a lubricant for 
breechblock threads. No other lubricant will be used on such threads 
during firings. 

Kerosene oil is issued by the Ordnance Department for cleaning 
purposes only. 

A special grade of neutral oil called ^^hydrohne," having a specific 
gravity of about 0.85, is furnished for filhng the recoil cylinders. A 
barrel of this oil should be kept on hand to replace leakage. 

The different kinds of oil, etc., will be kept in receptacles plainly 
marked with their contents. The enlisted men should be carefuUy 
instructed in the use of the several kinds of oil, grease, etc., and 
should be taught to distinguish one from another. 

Oils must always be kept in closed receptacles to prevent contami- 
nation by water, dirt, etc. 

Oils which have been used for any purpose should not be used 
again without being filtered or carefuUy strained. They should 
never be returned to receptacles containing new oils. 

A suitable receptacle should be kept by each battery in which oil 
from cylinders can be placed and allowed to stand undisturbed imtil 
all sediment in it has settled. In removing the oil great care should 
be taken that no sediment is included. 



37 

Mere discoloration does not affect the serviceability of the oil. 

Painting. — In general, three coats of paint will be given car- 
riages the first year; two coats annually thereafter will probably 
suffice, the actual needs depending somewhat upon the climate and 
local conditions. Before painting, surfaces should be rubbed smooth 
and made perfectly clean and dry. As soon as the carriage is com- 
pletely assembled and the piece mounted, all parts which have been 
marred in transportation will be primed, after which one complete 
coat of olive paint will be applied. 

All steel and iron nonbearing surfaces, both covered and exposed, 
will be painted. This includes the exposed parts of shafts (except 
squared ends), the exterior of the recoil cylinder, and springs. Large 
bronze pieces, including the web and spokes of wheels, and cylinder 
heads should also be painted. 

The following parts are not painted: All wearing or bearing sur- 
faces, including the handles of handwheels and cranks, teeth of all 
gears, the rollers and the surfaces on which they travel, the piston 
rods, and the vertical guides, etc. 

List of implements furnished for 6-inch gun, models of 1905 and 1908. 

1 rammer head and staff. 

1 sponge head and staff in three sections; head to be made to fit bore or chamber by 

wrapping with burlap. 
1 breech cover. 

1 combined tompion and muzzle cover. 
1 slush brush to connect with sponge staff. 
1 wire cleaning brush and coupling to fit sponge staff. 

For allowances of cleaning and preserving material, see Form 
No. 1869. 

TAst of articles packed in the armament chest for 6-inch guns, models of 1905 and 1908, on 
6-inch disappearing carriages, models of 1905, 1905 Mi, and 1905 Mii. 

[Note.— All articles marked * are carried loose in chest.] 

For guns, model of 1905-1908: 
1 box for firing mechanism.^ 
3 brushes, cleaning, for primer seat. 
1 cloth, emery, No. 00, 1 quire. 
1 drift, bronze, large. 
1 drift, bronze, small. 
1 drill, gunner's. 
3 files, pillar. No. 6, 6-inch.2 
3 files, three-cornered. No. 4, 6-inch. ^ 
3 files, half-round, smooth, 8-inch. ^ 
3 files, round, smooth, 8-inch. ^ 
1 file, flat, dead smooth, 8-inch. 
1 file, round, second-cut, 8-inch. 

1 For use only with 6-inch wire-wrapped gun, model of 1908. 

2 For use on bruised breechblocks. No other files to be used thereon. 



38 

For guns, model of 1905-1908— Continued. 

1 file, half-round, smooth, 8-inch. 

1 file, three-cornered, 8-inch. 

1 hammer, boilermaker's. 

1 hammer, copper. 
*1 lanyard, gunner's. 

1 mallet, hand. 

1 mallet, long handle. 

1 pliers, cutting, 7-inch. 
*1 pouch, gunner's. 

1 punch, gunner's. 

1 punch, pin. 

1 reamer, cleaning, for primer seat. 

1 scraper, metal, 
''''l pair sleeves, gunner's. 
*3 sponges, wagon. 
*4 balls twine, assorted. 
■^10 pounds cotton waste. 
*2 pounds wire, copper No. 12. 
*2 pounds wire, copper No. 16. 

1 wrench, monkey, 12-inch. 

1 wrench, monkey, 15-inch. 

1 wrench, tit, for obturator. 
*1 screw driver, bar, for spindle key, gear segment screws, etc.^ 
Implements for carriage: 

1 extractor, gun-lever pins. 

2 hooks, counterweight. 
2 hooks, traveling roller. 
2 oilers, half-pint. 

*1 oiler, locomotive — '1 quart. 

2 pinch bars. 

1 screw driver, commercial, 3-inch blade. 

1 screw driver, commercial, 5-inch blade, 
''^l screw driver and socket wrench. ^ 

1 wrench, double, 0.375 and 0.5 inch nuts. 

1 wrench, double, 0.625 and 0.75 inch nuts. 

1 wrench, double, 1 and 1.25 inch nuts.^ 

1 wrench, double, 1.5 and 1.75 inch nuts. 

1 wrench, double, 2.5 and 2.75 inch nuts. 

1 wrench, single, 3-inch nuts. 

1 wrench, single, 0.75-inch nuts. 

1 wrench, throttling valve, and nut. 
*1 wrench, buffer gland (for model of 1905 only). 
*1 wrench, single, piston rod. 

*1 wrench, spanner, for recoil and buffer followers (models of 1905-Mi and 
1905-Mii). 

1 extractor, piston rod and valve stem. 

2 extractors, cylinder, cylinder head and retraction clutch shaft. 
1 extractor yoke, cylinder and cylinder head. 

*1 wrench, "throttling bar bolts." (Model of 1905-Mii only.) 

1 For lanyard attachment. 

2 To be used for latch-plate screws on gtin. 

3 Wrench to be used on drain plug for models of 1905-Mi and 1905-Mji. 



39 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model ofl905-Mii, their piece marls, 
location, and material of which they are made. 

The parts are listed alphabetically under the following headings: Carriage proper; counter-recoil sys- 
tem; azimuth pointer; the electrical equipment; shot trucks; shot tongs; and grease cup. 
When referrmg to a part, always mention its piece mark, where given on the list. 

Meaning of the abbreviations in the column of material. 



A Ash. 

Br Brass. 

Bz Bronze. 

C Copper. 

CI Cast iron. 

CS Cast steel. 

F Felt. 

FS Forged steel. 

GI Galvanized iron. 

GS German silver. 

HR Hard rubber. 

SR Soft rubber. 

Mgl Magnet iron. 

MI Malleable iron. 

Comm Commercial. 

MM Molded mica. 



S Steel. 

SB Sheet brass. 

SS Sheet steel. 

SpS Spring steel. 

VF ^ Vulcanized fiber. 

VR Vulcanized rubber. 

WI Wrought iron. 

GWHP Garlock waterproof 

hydraulic pack- 
ing. 

FVF Flexible vulcanized 

fiber. 

PHBZ Phosphor bronze. 

GP Garlock packing. 

R Rubber. 



6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn. 



Piece 


Num- 


mark. 


ber. 


7A1 


2 








1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 


H6M 


1 


H6L 


1 


H23K 


1 


H23L 


1 


ni6H 


2 


H16P 


2 


H3D2 


1 


H4C1 


48 


9FA 


1 


H4L 


4 


6N 


2 


6Q 


2 


H6J 


8 


8R 


4 


9D 


6 


19M1 


2 


19N 


1 


H3C 


6 


H4K 


96 


H4M 


104 


H4N 


24 


4H 


14 


5D 


14 


H15E 


2 


H15F1 


24 


6A 


4 


6D 


8 


6T 


2 


6U 


18 


6X 


3 


7B 


8 


7B 


8 


7B 


8 


7T 


4 


8N 


4 


9A 


8 


9J 


18 


9S 


2 


lOE 


4 


H12P 


2 


H13B 


2 


IIR 


2 


13F 


4 


16A 


4 



Name of part. 



Location, 



Material. 



Remarks. 



Angles 

Angle (front).. 
Angle (inside). 

do 

Angle (rear)... 
do 



Angle (outside) 

do 

Axle cap (left) 

Axle cap (right) 

Ball thrust bearing 

do 

Band tnmnions 

....do 

Base ring 

Bearings 

Body 

Bolts, special with nuts. 

do 

....do 



On guide clips 

Right sighting platform . 

do 

Left sighting platform. . . 
Right sighting platform . 
Left sighting platform... 

do 

Right sighting platform . 

On top carriage 

do 



Traversmg gear 

....do 

Elevating band (H16J1) 

Elevating band (H16Q1) ... . 

On concrete platform 

On traversing rollers 

Interior of piston rod (9BA), 

Outer dust guard , 

In front transom 

....do 



Bolts, special. 
do 



Bolts, special tap 

Bolts, special with nuts. 

Bolt, special with nut.. . 

Bolts, tap 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



In axle caps (H6L) (H6M) . 

In cap squares (8K) (8L) . . . . 

In lower cylinder head 

through counterweight. 

In sight standard 

....do 



do. 

do- 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 

do. 



do.... 

do.... 
do.... 



In traversing stops 

In bearings (H4C1) 

Inner and outer dust guard. . 

Outer dust guard 

Inricht chassis 

In left chassis 

In piston-rod bracket 

In guides 

In elevating screw support. . 
In front clips and rear tran- 



In rear transom 

In elevating gibs 

In front transon 

In angles (7A1) 

In bottom plate gibs 

In guide cUps 

In keys (7M) 

In gun lever yoke 

In cylinder head (9Q) 

In recoil cylinder (9G) 

In oil gutter (9U) 

In recoil pointers 

In rope clamps (H12F) 

(H12G). 
Rear clip and traversing 

bracket. 

In pointer base (llQl) 

In trough brackets 

In upper traversing bearing. 



S 
S 
S 
S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

CSNo. 
CSNo. 

s 

s 

FSNo. 
FSNo. 
CI No. 
BzNo. 
BzNo. 

S 

S 

s 
s 
s 

S 



3 by 3.5 by 0.3125. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



0.5 by 1.375. 
1.25 by 9.625. 
1.25 by 12.875. 

1.5 by 6.5. 
1.125 by 5. 

1.5 by 10.0625. 
2 by 8.375. 

0.5 by 1.875. 
0.375 by 0.75. 
0.5 by 0.75. 
1.25 by 3. 

Do. 
0.75 by 2. 
1 by 6.75. 
0.75 by 1.5. 
\ 1.25 by 3. 

1.25 by 6.25. 
1 by 2.5. 
i 1.25 by 3.25. 
0.75 by 1.25. 

Do. 

Do. 
1 by 1.75. 
1.5 by 3. 
1 by 2.5. 
0.75 special. 
0.375 by 0.75. 
0.75 by 2. 
0.5 by 1.5. 

1.25 by 3. 



0.75 by 1.75. 



40 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-lNCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mil— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 



16Q 
17AA 
18V 
19A 
19G 
19J 
9V 
20D 
25B 
25C 
25E 

26C 
7J 

7K 
7L 

7V1 

H4P 

H4Q 

H15B 

H15P 

H15M 

6M 

6P1 

68 

6W 

8J 

H16M 

H16N 

H13F 

13E 

13G 
13V 
13Z 

H18R 

H18S 

16C 

16E 
16F 
16G 
16N 

16R 

17T 

17W 

19K 

19R 

19W 

19X 

20G 

20P 

20Q 

20V 

20DA 

20FA 

20GA 

20HA 

20JA 

20MA 

20A 

20BA 

20L 

20M 

18HA 

18EA1 

18J 

18H 

16V 

16M 
16J 
16B 

N18N 



Num- 
ber 



Name of part. 



Bolts, tap. 
do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 



.do. 



....do 

Bottom plate. 
Bottom plate i 
do 



Bottom plate liners . 
Bolts, with nuts — 



.do. 



....do 

....do 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Bolts, with nuts, counter- 
sunk. 

do 

Bolts, with nuts 

....do 



...do 

...do 

...do 



do 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 



Bolt, with crown nut. 

Bolts, with nuts 

do 

do 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

....do 

....do 



Braces, comer. 

do 

Brace feet 

Brace pins 

Bushings 

do 

do 

do 

do 



...do 

...do 



Location. 



In lower traversing bearing. 

In shoulder brackets , 

In tripping lever stop 

In sight arm bracket (19D). 

In guide brackets 

In racer plates 

In guide brackets 

In sighting platform frame . 
In spring retainer bracket . . 
-do. 



In spiral spring retainer 
(25D). 

In retracting drums 

Under counterweight 

On bottom plate (7J) 

do 



....do 

Distance ring. 
do 



In chassis 

In piston rod bracket 

In piston rod beam 

In rear transom 

In front transom , 

In rear transom 

In front transom , 

In gun levers 

Elevating band (H16Q1) . . . . 

Elevating band (H16J1) 

Rear clip and traversing 

bracket. 
In rope trough 



do 

Retracting shipper 

Retracting crank shaft 

bracket. 

In elevating gear cover 

do 

Traversing hand wheel shaft 

gear cover. 
Traversing clutch gear cover 

do 

.do. 



Traversing crank shaft gear 

cover. 
In lower traversing bearing. 

In shoulder brackets 

In firing pistol bracket 

In guide brackets 

do 

do 

In sight standard (19L1) ... 

Subcaliber platform 

In post feet (20N) 

do 

In ladder sides (20W) (20X) 
In sighting platform floor... 

In ladder brace (20E A) 

.do. 



In platform brackets 

do... 

In sisihting platform 

Sighting platform 

do 

Subcaliber platform 

In brace feet (20L) 

In tripping lever latches 

In locking levers ( 18C A2) .... 

In pawls (18K1) 

In pawl levers (18R2) (18Q2). 
In upper traversing bearing. . 

In lower traversing bearing.. 
In upper traversing bearing . 
U])per traversing bearing 
In traversing clutch gear . 



Material. 



S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 
S 

S 
CS No. 1 
Bz No. 4 
BzNo.4 



Bz 



No. 4 

S 



FS 
FS 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

Bz 
Bz 

[ BzNo.2 



Remarks. 



0.75 by 2.5. 
0.375 by 1.125. 
0.75 by 1.25. 
0.75 by 2.125. 
1 by 3.5, 
0.5 by 1. 
1 by 14.125. 
0.75 by 1.25. 
0.375 by 1.125. 
0.5 by 1.25. 
0.5 by 2.25. 



With oil grooves. 
Without o i 
grooves. 

0.875 by 3.625. 
0.875 by 2.625. 
1.25 by 5.375. 
0.75 by 3.875. 
1.25 by 4.875. 
1.25 by 7.625. 
1.25 by 11.125. 
1.25 by 9.875. 
1.25 by 7.875. 
1.5 by 6.375. 
1.75 by 11.75. 
1.75 by 13.875. 
1.25 by 4.125. 

0.75 by 1.375. 



0.75 by 3.8125. 

0.5 by 1.375. 
0.5 by 4.125. 
0.5 by 3. 

0.5 by 1.5. 
0.5 by 2. 
0.5 by 6.625. 
0.5 by 2.125. 

0.75 by 3.75. 
0.75 by 7.125. 
0.625 by 2.125. 
1.5 by 13.75. 
1.5 by 10.5. 
1 by 10. 
0.75 by 3. 
0.625 by 1.625. 
0.625 by 1.875. 
0.625 by 2.25. 
0.75 by 1.625. 
0.625 by 2.25. 
0.75 by 1.875. 
0.75 by 2.125. 
1.25 by 10.75. 
1.25 by 10.25. 
0.5 by 1.375. 

On right side. 



1.25 inside dij,rii 
eter. 



1 inside diameter. 



41 



Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L.F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, andmat£rial of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mil— Continued . 



Piece 
mark. 


Num- 
ber. 


Name of part. 


Location. 


Material. 


Remarks. 


13R 


2 
2 

1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
36 
36 

1 
2 

10 

6 

1 

1 

2 
2 

2 

1 

1 

6 

1 
2 

2 






S 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 
BZNo.4 

Bz 
BZ No. 4 
BZ No. 3 
BZ No. 3 

Bz 

Bz 
BZ No. 2 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 
BZ No. 3 
BZ No. 3 
FSNo.3 
CS No. 2 
CS No. 2 
CI No. 2 
CI No. 2 

s 

s 

FS 

FS 

FS 
S 

FS 
FS 

S 

s 
s 
s 

Bz 
Bz 

S 
Bz 

S 

S 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

S 

s 
s 

Bz 

Bz 

S 

Bz 
Bz 

Bz 
CI 

CI 

CI 

CI 

CI 

s 

FS 
FS 




12\A 


do 


In clutch sleeve 






do . 


Elevation disk gear 




H13H 


.. .do 


In upper guide sheave 

In lower guide sheaves 




H13G 


.do 




H16G 


do 




9GA 
H12E 


do 

do 


In lower cylinder head (9V).. 
In elevating slide 




9P 


do 


In upper cvlinder head (9Q) . 
In upper end of gun levers. . . 
In lower end of gim lever — 
In rollers (HeF) 




8G 


.do 


In halves. 


8A 


do . . 




H6C 


do 




H6B 


do 


In rollers (H6D) 




6L 


do . 


In transom cap (6K) 

In elevating screw support.. 




6C 
5A 


do 

.do 




4G 


do 


In right chassis 




4F 


.do 


.do 




H6S 






Right, in halves. 
Left in halves. 


H6T 


do 


.do 


H6W1 




On front of top carriage 

On upper end of gun lever... 




8K 


Cap square 


Right. 


8L 


.do 


Left. 


5C3 


Chassis, left 






4A 


Chassis, right 


.do 




H4E 






Hold section to- 


IIBA 


Clamping screw 


In pointer base .... 


gether. 




Clevises . 


For rope of counterbalance 
device. 

In guide clips 


Attaching rope to 
equalizmg bar 
(H13N). 

Long. 

Short. 


7R 


Clip bolts, with special 
nuts, 
do . 


7S 


do 


17N 


Clutch fork 


OnT)inQ6L') - 


Attached to clutch 


17L 


Clutch rod . . 


Attached to lever (17 J) 

On clutch rod (17L) 


rod. 


17M 


Clutch rod end: 




12Z1 


Clutch sleeve 


Retracting drum shaft 

Lower guide sheave axle 

On intermediate stud (IIF) . 
On stud (UG) 




H13L 


Collars 




HE 


do 




IIH 


do 




UN 


.do 






llU 


do 

do 


(Jo 




llDA 






12L 


.do 


Retracting intermediate 
shaft. 

Retracting drum shaft 

(Jo 




12M 


.do 




12W 


do 




12X 


do 


do 




12CA 


.do 


Retractmg crank shaft 

do 




12DA 


do 




13B 


.do 






13RA 


do 


On retracting brake lever 

stud. 
On traversing crank shaft . . . 
do 




14A 


.do : 




14C 


do 


Provided with felt 


14M 


do 


On traversing intermediate 

shaft. 
Onpin(16L) 


washers. 


16 P 


do 

do 




18Z 


On shaft (18X) .. . 




12J 


Collar, inner 


Retracting intermediate 
shaft, 
do 




12K 


Collars, outer 




7D 


Coimterweight pieces of 

eighth layer. 
Counterweight pieces, 

side, of seventh layer. 
Counterweight inside 

piece of seventh layer. 
Counterweight special 

layer. 
Counterweights, first to 

sixth layers, inclusive. 






7E 


do 




7F 


do 




7G 


do 


Used with model 


7H 


do - 


1908 gun. 


11L2 






12GA 


Crank hooks 


In chassis . . . 


For cranks when 


12HA 


Crank handle hooks 


do 


not in use. 



42 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mii, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 



Num- 
ber. 



Name of part. 



Location. 



Material. 



Remarks. 



20T 
7C 
7V 

7AA1 

7Q 



14F 

14L 

14P 
14T 

lis 

6V 
9V 

9Q 

H4A2 

H23W 

H23Z 

H23BA 

H23CA 
H23S 

H23T 

H23V 

9T1 

16U 

H4D 

H16F 

H16J1 

H16Q1 

11A2 

11D3 

H18T 

H18X 

6F 

6G 

IIZ 

H16E 

H12A 

6B 

IIY 

H18E 

H18F 

H12D1 

H12H 

H12J 

H12N1 

20R 

H13N 

H13D1 

H13P 

H13A 

8M 

H6Q 



9F 

17X 

H4H 

17D 



Crosshead 

Crosshead gibs . 

do 



Crosshead liners. 
Crown nuts 



.do. 
.do. 
-do. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Cylinder head, lower. 

Cylinder head, upper. 



Distance ring 

Direction plates 

do 

Direction plates, filling 
plug. 

do 

Direction plate, retracting . 

....do 



Direction plate, traversing. 

Drain plug 

....do 



Dust guard, outer. 
Elevating arm 



Elevating band 

do 

Elevation disk gear 

Elevation disk 

Elevating-gear cover 

do 

Elevating gib, right 

Elevating gib, left 

Elevating, handwhecl, 
commercial. 

Elevating pin 

Elevating screw 

Elevating-screw support. 

Elevating shaft 

Elevating-shaft gear 

Elevating-shaft pinion . . . 

Elevating slide 

Elevating-slide nut 

Elevating-slide spring 

Elevating-slide stop 

Elbows 

Equalizing bar 

Equalizing-bar fork 

Equalizing-bar pin 

Eyebolts 

do 

do 

Filler pieces 

do 

Filling plugs 

Firing pistol bracket 

Fish plates 

Foot piece 



6E 



2 Front clips. 



Sighting-platform railing 

Above coimterweight 

In guide clips rear surface, 

interior. 
In guide clips front surface, 

interior. 

In guide clips 

On sight arm bracket pins 

(19C). 
On retracting brake lever 

stud. 
On traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
On traversing intermediate 

shaft. 



On traversing pinion shaft. . 

On elevating shaft 

On suspension rods (7U) — 

On studs (6H) 

Lower end of recoil cylinder 

(9G). 
Upper end of recoil cylinder 

(9G). 
Between racer and base rmg 

On elevating handwheel 

....do 

On buffer cylinders 



On crosshead 

Retracting crank shaft 

bracket. 

do..: 

On right chassis 

In lower cylinder head (9V). . 
In traversing crank shaft 

gear cover. 
Attached to base ring outside 

roller path. 
Between elevating slide and 

band. 

On gun 

do 

On stud (IIG) 

On elevation disk gear 

Over elevating-shaft gears. . . 

do 

In rear transom 

do 

On elevating shaft 



Elevating arm 

In rear transom 

Bottom of rear transom 

In left chassis 

On elevating screw 

On elevating shaft 

In rear transom 

In elevating slide 

On elevating-slide nut 

On rear transom 

Platform railings 

On equalizing-bar fork 

In weight (H13E) 

In equalizing bar 

In weight (H13E) 

In cap squares (8L) (8K). . . 
In axle caps (HBL) (H6M). . 

Subcaliber platform 

Sighting platform 

In upper cylinder head (9 Q) 
On upper traversing bearing 
Outer dust guard (H4D) . . . 
Onshank(l7E) 



On racer over lips of base 
ring. 



MI 

CS No. 1 
BZ No. 4 

BZNo.4 

BZ No. 4 

S 



S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

FSNo.3 

S 

CS 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

Bz 
Bz 

Bz 
Bz 

FSNo.3 
Bz 



CS No. 2 

CSNo.1 
CS No. 1 

CI 

GS 

CI 

CI 

s 
s 

CI and 

WI 

FSNo.3 

FSNo.3 

CS 

FS 

CI No. 1 

FSNo.2 

CS No. 2 

BZNo.4 

S 

FS 
MI 
S 

FS 
FS 
S 

s 
s 

s 
s 

Bz 
Bz 
S 
Bz 

CS No. 2 



0.735 thick. 
0.485 thick. 



In 4 sections. 
Depress. 
Elevate. 

Ciu-ved for surface 
of cylinder. 

Right. 

Left. 



In 4 sections. 



For gun model 1905. 
For gun model 1908. 

Range scale. 
Upper half. 
Lower half. 



Spokes cast in hub. 



0.1875 thick. 
0.3125 thick. 
1 extra. 



Part of clutch 
plunger. 



43 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn— Continued. 



Piece 


Num- 


mark. 


ber. 


17B 


1 


20K 


2 




2 




18 


H6A1 


36 


9M 


1 


9N 


1 


19T 


1 


19S 


1 


7P1 


1 


7N1 


1 


H15N2 


1 


H15L2 


1 


H13K 


2 


HI 3 J 


2 


H13S 


1 


H13T 


1 


H15H1 


1 


H15J1 


1 


8H 


1 


8Q 


1 


8P 


1 


7Z 


2 


ST 


1 


9DA 


1 


9Y 


1 


13EA 


2 


13C 


2 


llBl 


1 


lie 


1 


IIF 


1 




2 




2 


HloQ 


2 


7M 


2 




1 




3 




1 




2 




2 




2 




2 


14V 


1 




2 




1 




2 


18Y 


2 




1 


12H 


1 


12P 


2 


12Q 


1 


12T 


1 


12V 


1 


20EA 


2 


20X 


2 


20W 


2 


20U 


8 


17G1 


1 


17BA 


1 


18LA 


2 


18W 


1 


17.T 


1 


H3E 


12 


9L 


1 



Name of part. 



Fulcnim . 



Fulcrum pins . 
Gaskets 



do :.. 

Gasket 

Gears 

Gland 

do 

Guide bracket, left . . . 
Guide bracket, right . 

Guide clip, left 

Guide clip, right 

Guide frame 

....do 

Guide sheaves, lower. 



Guide sheaves, upi)er 

Guide sheave axle, lower. 

Guide sheave axle, upper. 

Guide, vertical 

do 

Gun lever axle 

Gun lever, left 

Gun lever, right 

Gtm lever pins 

Gim lever yoke 

Hasp 

Hasp bracket 

Idler sheaves 

Idler sheave pins 

Intermediate gear 

Intermediate pinion 

Intermediate stud 

Keys 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do.: 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
-do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 



....do 

....do 

Key, square gib. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

-...do 

Ladder braces 

Ladder sides, left. . . 
Ladder sides, right. 
Ladder steps 



Latch 

Latch pedal.. 

Latch springs . 

I^ ver 



Leveling screws . 
Liner 



Location. 



Underneath left sighting 

platform. 
In platform fulcrums (20H) 

(20J). 
Under upper cylinder head 

(9Q). 

On bolts (9J) 

On lower cylinder head (9V) 

On rollers (H6D) 

In upper cylinder head (9Q) 
In lower cylinder head (9V). 

On left chassis 

On right chassis 

On crosshead 

do 



Under chassis 

do 

Rear clip and traversing 

bracket. 

Rear transom 

Rear clip and traversing 

bracket. 

Rear transom 

On chassis and guide frame. 

do 

On top carriage 

On gun lever axle 

do 

In crosshead 

Between gun levers 

On hasp bracket (9Y) 

On piston rod bracket 

In rope sheave brackets 

do 

On stud (IIF) 

do 

In left chassis 

In right chassis 

In left chassis 

In chassis and guide frame. 

On crosshead (7C) 

Elevating screw 

Elevating shaft 

Retracting intermediate 

shaft. 
Retracting drum shaft . . ^ . . 
do 



In rope sheave pins (13A) 
In traversing shaft pinion . . . 

In traversing crank shaft 

do 

In traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
In traversing intermediate 

shaft. 

In shaft (18X) 

do 

Retracting intermediate 

shaft. 

Retracting drum shaft 

....do 

Retracting crank shaft 

do 

For ladder sides (20W) (20X) 

Sighting platform 

do 

Between ladder sides (20W) 

(20X). 

In spring stirrup (17F) 

On latch (17G1) 



In spring bracket (18MA) 
(18NA). 

On shaft (18X) 

In fulcrum (17N ). 

In base ring 

In lower cylinder head (9V). 



Material. 



Bz 

FS 



C 

C 
FS No. 3 
BZNo.4 
BZNo.4 
CSNo.2 
CS No. 2 
FSNo.3 
FS No. 3 
CI No. 2 
CI No. 2 
CI No. 1 

CI No. 1 

FS 

FS 
FSNo.2 
FSNo.2 
CS No. 3 
CS No. 2 
CS No. 2 
FSNo.2 
CS No. 2 

S 

Bz 

CI 

FS 

CI 

Bz 



FS No. 3 
FS No. 2 

S 



FS No. 3 

S 

S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

s 

s 
s 



FSNo.3 
FSNo.3 

S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



SpS 

FS 

S 

S 

BZ No. 4 



Remarks. 



Riveted in. 



Right. 
Left. 



Right. 
Left. 



0.5 square, staked 

in. 
Riveted in. 
0.5 square, staked 

in. 
Staked in. 



Riveted in. 
0.5 square. 



Staked in. 



6.5 long. 
3.625 long. 



For operating 
latch. 



For tripping. 



44 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mii, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mu— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 



9W 
H12C 
H12B 

18S 

9CA 

18CA2 

18BA1 
18B 

18L 

18M 

18AA1 

9R 
13GA 

9B 

9C 

H12M 

H13C1 

H6X 
17R 



H6V 
9U 



Q3C 
Q3B 



18K1 

18G 

18R2 

18Q2 

20CA 

17K 

17H 

17C 

16L 

13MA 
13 KA 
13FA 
13CA 
13Y 



H16K 



Num- 
ber. 



125 

17 

1 



Name of part. 



Liners 

Liner, left 

Liner, right 

Link pins 

Locking disk. . 
Locking levers. 



Locking lever pins . 
Locking links 



Locking link pins . 
do 



Locking lever pin collars . 



Lock screw 

Loops 

Name plate No. 1 , 

Nut 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do.. 

do 

do 

do 

Oil gutter 



Oil plugs, 0.375 standard . 
Oil plugs, 0.25 standard . . 
Padlock, Yale, standard. 

No. 853. 
Pawls 



Pawl fulcrums . 
Pawl lever, left. 



Pawl lever, right. 



Packing rings . . . 
Pinch-bar hooks. 

Pins 

do 

....do 

do 

do 



Location. 



On piston and rod (9B A) 

Elevating slide 

do... 

In tripping links (18P) 

On top of piston rod (9BA). 
On locking lever pins 

(18BA1). 

In chassis 

Buffer Yokes (H7BA1) 

(n7CAl). 

In locking links (18B) 

do 

On locking lever pins 

(18BA1). 

In piston and rod (9B A) 

On retracting rope 

On top carriage 

On piston rod 

.....do 

Elevating slide stop 

EquaUzing bar fork 

On safety latch pin (18A) . . . 
On buffer rod cups (HeWl). 

On roll pins (17Q) 

On pawl fulcrums (18G) 

On locking lever pins (18BA1) 
On roller axles (H6K1). . . 
On piston rod beam 



For carriage 

do 

On hasp bracket . 



Material 



On pawl fulcrums (18G). 

In chassis 

On pawl fulcrum (18G).. 



.do. 



In recoil cylinder (9G) 

On side of sighting platform . 

In bushings (18HA) 

In bushings (18EA) 

In bushings (18.T) 

In bushings (18H) 

In lever (17 J) and clutch 

rod (17L). 

In latch (17G1) 

In fulcrum (17B) 

In bushings a6B) (16V) 

In bushing (161) 

In bushing (16M) 

In lower traversing bearing. . 

In bushings (H18N) 

In retracting rope 

In shipper handle 

In retracting shipper 

In retracting brake lever 

In retracting shipper 

Retracting drum shaft gear. . 

In bushings (12A) 

In strips on pointer (llPl) . . 

In pointer (11 PI) 

Instud(llG) 

In elevation disk gear and 

chassis. 
In intermediate gear (llBl). 
For rope of counterbalance 

device. 
In bushings (H13G) (H13H). 

In bushing (m6G) 

Elevating band 

Rope clamps (m2F) (H12G) 

Elevating slide stop 

In bushings (H12E) 



BZ No. 4 
BZNo. 2 
BZ No. 2 
BZ No. 3 

Bz 
FSNo. 

FSNo. 

S 

Bz 
Bz 



S 

FS 
Bz 
FSNo. 3 
FS No. 3 
S 
S 

s 

S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

Bi 

Bz 

Bz 

Comm 

FSNo. A 

FS No. 3 
[FSNo. 2 
i or 
|CSN0.2 
(FSNo. 2 
{ or 
CSNo.2 
GWHP 

FS 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
FSNo. 3 
Bz 

S 

S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

Bz 
GS 
Bz 



S 
S 

Bz 
Bz 

S 



Bz 



Remarks. 



Connecting yokes 
to locking lever. 

1.8125 long. 
0.5 by 0.75. 



For oil in recoil 

cylinder. 
Including extras. 

Do. 
For recoil valve. 



For racks on' 
head. 



extra. 



0.5 by 4. 



For spiral spring 
(IIM). 



45 

Names of 'parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage^ L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marls, 
location, ana material of ichich they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905-Mn— Continued. 



Piece Num- 
mark. ber. 



Name of part. 



Location. 



Material. 



Remarks. 



4C 

llJl 

9BA 

H15C 

H15G 

H14G 

20PA 

20NA 

20Z 

20LA1 

20KA1 

20C2 

20B 

20J 

20H 

20F 

20E 

20Y 

18QA 

18F2 
18PA 
IIP! 

IIQI 
20N 

9E 

H14A 

H14B 

19F 

19H 

19P 

4E 

H6H1 

4D 

H6G1 

H6E 

4B 



H13M1 

9G 

lOFl 

lOG 

13PA 

13SA 

iSTA 

13QA 

13NA 
12R1 

12S 
12G 

12FA 
. 12JA 

12EA 



Pins. . 
....do. 
....do. 
....do. 



.do- 
.do- 
.do. 
-do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Pinion 

Piston and rod 

Piston rod beam 

Piston-rod bracket 

Plates 

....do 

....do 

Platform braces 

Platform bracket, left . . . 
Platform bracket, right. 

Platform floor, left 

Platform floor, right 

Platform fulcrum, left. . . 
Platform fulcrum, right . 

Platform frame 

Platform plate 

Platform supports 



Plugs 

Plungers 

Plunger springs . 
Pointer 



Pointer base . 
Post feet 



Plug 

Racer 

Racer liner 

Racer cover plates . . . . 

Racer plate, right 

Racer plate, left 

Racks, left 

....do 

Racks, right 

do 

Rack retaining screws. 

do 

Railing pieces.. 



Railing posts 

Rear clip and traversing 
bracket. 

Recoil cylinder 

Recoil pointers 

Recoil scales 

Retracting brake lever — 

Retracting brake lever 

stud. 
Retracting brake lever 

stop. 
Retracting brake strap — 

Retracting brake wheel 

Retracting clutch 

Retracting clutch spring. . . 

Retracting crank shaft 
pinion. 

Retracting cranks 

Retracting crank fasten- 
ings. 

Retracting crank shaft 



Inbody (9EA) 

Inplug(9E) 

In bushings (H6C) 

For rack retaining screws 

(H6E). 

In gears (H6A1) 

In clip bolts (7R), (7S) 

In bushing (6L) 

In bushing (60) 

For bushing (5A) 

For bushing (4G) 

For bushing (4F) 

For rack retaining screws 

(4B). 

On elevating shaft ^ . . . 

In recoil cylinder (9G) 

Between guide frames 

On front transom 

In racer 

Sighting platform 

do 

Subcaliber platform 

On left chassis 

On right chassis 

Sighting platform 

do 

SubcaUber platform 

do 

....do 

....do 

Sighting platform 



In plungers (18F2) 

In pawl levers (18Q2), (18R2). 

On plungers (18F2) 

In pointer base 



On left chassis .• 

Sighting and subcaliber plat- 
forms. 

In upper cylinder head (9Q). 

On traversing rollers 

On racer 

do 

do... 

do 

On chassis 

On top carriage 

On chassis 

On top carriage 

In top carriage 

In chassis 

Sighting and subcaliber plat- 
forms. 

do, 

On racer 



In counterweight 

On chassis 

On guide clips 

On retracting brake lever 

stud. 
In left chassis 



.do. 



Bz 

S 
S 



S 

s 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
S 

s 

FSNo.3 
CS No. 2 

CS 

CI 



CS 
CS 

s 
s 

FS 
FS 

s 
s 



Bz 

S 

Bz 

CS or FS 

S 

CI No. 2 

Bz 

S 
S 

s 

FS No. 3 
FS No. 3 
FS No. 3 
FSNo.3 

S 

S 
WI 

WI 

CS No. 1 

FS No. 3 
Bz 
Bz 
FS 



Riveted. 



On retracting brake lever . 

On retracting drum shaft — i CI No. 2 
Retracting drum shaft j CS No. 1 




do. 
Retracting cranks. 

In chassis . 



SpS 



FS 



ps 
No. 



FS 
S 



FSNo.3 



Leaded in. 
Left side. 

Do. 
Complete. 



0.25 plate. 
Do. 



Complete. 
0.125 plate. 
For subcaliber 
platform. 



For elevation and 
range scale. 



In 4 sections. 

0.375 plate. 
Do. 



Around retracting 
brake wheel. 



Complete chain 
and pin. 



46 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mii, their piece marhSy 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mil— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 



13AA 

12U 

26A 

12Y 

26B 

12N 

12F 

12B 

13L 
13H 
13K 
13BA 
13X 

13JA 
13U 



H6D 
H6F 
17P 
H6K1 
H23B 
H23C 
H23E 
H23D 

H23H 

H23J 

H6N 

H6P 

17Q 

H13R 

13HA1 

26D 

H12G 

H12F 

13M 

13N 

13DA 

13A 

H13Q 

13P 

13Q 

18C 

7W 

18A 

llAAl 

IICA 

H23U 

19B 

17CA 



Num 
ber. 



2 
118 



Name of part. 



Retracting crank shaft 

brackets. 
Retracting drum shaft . . . 
Retracting drum., right. . . 

Retracting drum, right 

gear. 
Retracting drum, left 



Retracting intermediate 

shaft. 
Retracting intermediate 

shaft gear. 
Retracting intermediate 

shaft pinion. 

Retracting pawl 

Retracting pawl lever 

Retracting pawl shaft 

Retracting ratchet 

Retracting shipper 



Retracting shipper rod . . . . 
Retracting shipper swivel, 

Rivets 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 

.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



do 

do 

Rivets, countersunk . 

do 

do 

do 

Rollers 

do 

do... 

Roller axles 

Roller bearings 

do 

do 

....do 



.do. 
-do. 



Roller cage side frames. 

do 

Roller pins 

Rope 

Ropes 

Rope clamps 

Rope clamp, left 

Rope clamp, right 

Rope sheave bracket . . 

do 

Rope sheaves 

Rope sheave pins 

Rope socket pins 

Rope trough 

do 

Safety latch 

Safety latch dog 

Safety latch pin 

Screws 

do 

Screws, countersimk . . 

do 

do 



Location. 



On chassis . 



In chassis 

On retracting drum shaft 

Retracting drum shaft 



On retracting drum shaft — | CI No. 2 
In chassis FS No. 3 



Material. 



CI 



rSNo.3 
CI No. 2 



CI No. 2 



On retracting intermediate 

shaft. 
do 



On retracting pawl shaft 

do 

In right chassis 

On retracting crank shaft 

Attached to rear transom.... 



On retracting shipper 

Retracting shipper 

In retracting drum shaft 

In brake lever strap 

In traversing crank shaft 

In fulcrum (17B) and spring 

stirrup. 
In spring brackets (18MA), 

(18NA). 

In plungers (18F2) 

SubcaUber and sighting 

platforms. 
In ladder sides (20W), (20X) . 

Sighting platforms 

In railing post feet 

In subcaliber platform 

braces. 

In bottom plate liners 

Outer dust guard * . . . 

In liners (9W) 

Inhasp(9DA) 

In recoil scales 

In liners (H12B),(H12C).... 

Under top carriages 

Under top carriage 

On roller pins (17Q) 

In rollers (M6D), (H6F) 

Elevating gear 

Traversing gear 

do 

Retracting gear 



.do. 
.do. 



For roller imder top carriage . 
For rollers under top carriage 

In clutch fork (17N) 

For counterbalance device. . . 

For retracting 

On retracting drum? 

On elevating slide 

do 

On chassis 

do 

In rope sheave brackets 

Rope sheave brackets 

In clevises 

Inside chassis 

do 

On safety latch pin 

On guide clip (7P1) 

In left chassis 

Elevation disk 

In pointer base 

In direction plates 

In racer cover plates 

In latch pedal (17BA) 



CI No. 2 

FS No. 3 

FS 
FS 
S 

FS 
FS 

FS 
Bz 

S 
g 

s 
s 

Br 

Bz 

S 

S 
S 

s 



Bz 
WI 
Br 

S 

Bz 
Br 

FS No. 
FSNo. 

Bz 
FSNo. 

S 



S 

s 

s 
s 

FS No. 2 
FSNo. 2 

S 

s 
s 

FS 

s 
s 

CI 
CI 
CI 

FS 
FS 

s 
s 

cs 
s 

BzNo.3 

GS 
Bz 
Bz 

S 
S 



Remarks. 



Left-hand groov- 
ing. 



Right-hand groov- 
ing. 



For retracting 
clutch. 



For keys. 
0.375 diameter. 

Do. 

0.125 diameter. 
0.375 diameter. 

Do. 
0.5 diameter. 
0.25 diameter. 

Do. 



0.375. 



For clutch fork. 



Without sleeve on 
shaft. 

Do. 

Do. 
Inside. 
Outside. 



Right. 
Left. 



Right. 
Left. 

On left side. 
For safety latch. 
0.25 by 0.75. 
0.375 by 0.718. 
0.25 by 0.625. 
0.5 by 1. 
0.375 by 0.75. 



47 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are imade — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mil— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 



Num- 
ber. 



H16D 
9X 

8S 

8C 

H6R 

7BA 

7X 
H14F 
H14C 



9Z 

H18H 
H16A 

19E 
13W 
18X 
17E 

13LA 

17V 
17U 

17S 

19D 



19L 
19L1 

19C 

14J 
IIX 



Mamc of part. 



Location. 



Screws, countersunk. 

....do 

...-do 

....do 

....do 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Screw eyes . 



Screws, flat-head cap. 
Screws, fillister head . 

.do 



Washers (H16B), (H16C)... 

In hasp bracket (9Y) 

In bushings (8G). 

In washers (8B) 

In axle bed bushings (H6S), 

(H6T). 
In safety latch dog (7W) . . . 

In crosshead gibs 

In racer 

In racer liner 

Retracting cranks 



In name plate No. 1 

In upper end of piston and 
rod. 

In traversing rack 

Set screws i In lower end of elevating 

j arm. 

— do I In sight standard 

Special screws I Retracting shipper 

Shaft j Through chassis 

Shank In spring stirrup (17F) 



Shipper handle 

Shoulder bracket, left . . 
Shoulder bracket, right. 
Shoulder rest 



Sight-arm bracket. 



Sight standard On left chassis. 

do do 



Through chassis. 



On shoulder rest 

do 

In traversing handwheel 

shaft gear cover. 
On sight standard 



Sight-arm bracket pins j In sight-arm bracket (19D). 



Sleeve Traversing handwheel han- 
dle, 
do Elevating handwheel handle 



Split pins . 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

.-..do 

.--.do 



do. 

do. 

do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 

.do. 
.do- 
.do. 
-do. 
-do. 



....do 

..-.do 

....do 

..-.do 

..-.do 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



In crown nuts (6V). 
For crown nuts. 

Innut (9B) 

In taper pin — 
Innut(H12M). 
In taper pin 



;aper 



Inpin(H16K).. 
In nuts on bolts. 
In taper pins 



Innut(H13Cl) 

In equalizing bar pin 

In rope socket pin 

In taper pins 

Upper guide sheave axle 

(H13T). 
In taper pin 



..--do 

-.-.do 

In crown nuts (US) 

Elevating shaft 

Retracting intermediate 
shaift. 

Retracting crank shaft 

Retracting drum shaft 

In taper pins 

do 

..-.do 



Inpin(13Y) 

Inpin(13CA) 

Inpin(13FA) 

In retracting shipper rod . 



Material. 



Bz 
S 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

S 

Bz 



S 
S 

S 

s 
s 
s 

Bz 

Bz 
Bz 

FS 



CS No. 1 



cs 

CS 



Bz 

Bz 

S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



Remarks. 



0.375 by 1. 
0.5 bv 1.125. 
0.375 by 0.625. 
0.5 by 1.125. 

0.5 by 1.375. 

Do. 
To close oil holes. 
0.5 by 1. 
Holding chain o 

fastenings. 
0.25 by 0.375. 
0.375 by 0.5. 

0.5 by 1. 



0.75 by 2.75. 
For pivot. 

Part of clutch 
plimger. 

On retracting ship- 
per rod. 



Not used on car- 
riages after No. 
21. 

For carriages after 
No. 21. 

Not used on car- 
riages after No. 
21. 



In suspension rod. 

In nut (90). 

For elevating screw. 
For • spring com- 
pressor nut. 

For elevating bandt 
For band trun- 
nions. 



For collars (H13L). 



Rear clip and trav- 
ersing bracket. 
For collar (HE). 
For collar (IIH). 



For collars (13B). 
Idler sheave pins. 
Retracting pawl 
shaft. 



48 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappeariTig carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mii, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mil Continued. 



Piece 


Num- 


mark. 


ber. 




1 




1 




1 




6 




2 




1 




1 




2 




1 




2 




3 




1 




1 




1 




4 




2 




4 




1 




1 




2 




2 




2 




2 










IIM 




25D 




25F 




18NA 




18MA 




18KA 




25A 




17F 




17A 




H12K 






•2 




10 




12 


9EA 


1 


UV 


1 


UK 


1 


13J 


1 


17Z 


2 




3 


H4G 


1 


H4J 


1 




4 




1 


6H 


2 


IIG 


1 


8D 


4 


8E 


4 


8F 


4 


7U 


4 


4J 


2 


5B 


2 




1 




1 




2 




2 

1 



Name of part. 



Split pins . 



Location. 



In taper pin. 
do 



In retracting break lever 

stud. 
In taper pin 



In crown nuts (14F) 

In crown nut (14L) 

In taper pin 

In crown nut (14P) 

In crown nuts (14T) 

In taper pin 

In pin (170) 

Inpins(17K) 

In clutch-rod end (17M) 

In taper pin 

In crown nut 

In locking link pins (18L) 

(18M). 
In taper pin 



In link pins (18S) . 

In taper pin 

do 

do 



Spiral spring 

Spiral spring retainer 

Spiral spring retainer (for 
gear). 

Spring bracket, left 

Spring bracket, right 

Spring plungers 



Spring retainer bracket 

Spring stirrup 

Spring 

Spring compressing nut . . . 

Staples 

do 



In plungers (18F2) . . 
In crown nuts 

In brace pins (20M) . 
In taper pin 

do 



Material. 



do. 

Stem.. 
do. 



Stop.. 
Strips. 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Studs 

do 

Studs with nuts.. 

do 

do 

Suspension rods. . 
Taper dowel pins . 

do •- 

Taper pins 

do 

do.... 

do 

do 

do 



Elevation disk gear 

On spring retainer bracket . . 
On elevation disk gear 

On locking lever (18CA2).. . . 

do 

In spring brackets (18MA) 
(18NA). 

On left chassis 

Under left sighting platform. 

In spring stirrup (17F) 

In elevating slide 

For bottom plate (7J) 

For seventh and eighth lay- 
ers of weights (7E) (7F). 

For 6 large weights 

In piston rod (9BA) 

Elevating handwheel handle 

Traversing handwheel han- 
dle. 

In right chassis 

On shoulder brackets 



In pointer (llPl) 

Outer dust guard (H4D) 

Inner dust guard 

Outer dust guard 

Inner dust guard 

In rear transom 

In left chassis 

In gun levers 

do 

....do 

For counterweight 

In right chassis 

In left chassis 

Innut(9C) 

In elevating screw 

Spring compressor nut 

In band trunnions 

In collars (H13L) 

For rear clip and traversing 
bracket. 



Bz 

Bz 
Bz 



CS 
Bz 

S 
FSNo. 3 

FS 

FS 

FS 
S 
S 
S 

S 
Bz 

GS 

S 

s 

F 
F 

S 
S 

s 
s 
s 

FSNo. 3 

S 
S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



Remarks. 



For retracting 

brake wheel. 
For collar (13RA). 



For traversing 
crank shaft. 



For collar (14M). 
For collar (16P). 



For shoulder rest. 
For bolt (17T). 



For tripping 
cranks. 

For lever (18W). 
For collar (18Z). 
For locking lever 
pin collars. 

For sight arm 
bracket pins. 

For retracting 

drum (left). 
For footpiece 

(17D). 



For carriages Nos. 
20 and 21. 



With washer. 



Holding tube; 

(17Y). 
Pinned in place. 
In 4 pieces. 
In 4 sections. 



1.125 by 4.875. 

1.5 by 6.375. 
1.5 by 6.75. 
1.5 by 6. 



49 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carrmge, L. F., model of 1905 Mn, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn— Continued. 



Piece 


Num- 


mark. 


ber. 




1 




1 




6 




1 




1 




4 




2 




2 




2 




4 




2 


























































20S 




9H1 




H3F 


12 


H6U2 




6K 




6RI 




6J1 




14R 




MS 




H18A 




H18B 




H18Q2 




H18P 




H18W1 




16H 




16T 




16S 




16K 




16D 




H18V 




H18U 




14E 




14H 




14N 




14B 




H18G 




14U 




H18J 


1 


H3B 


2 


H3A 


18 


H4B 


24 


18N1 


2 



Name of part. 



Location. 



Material. 



Remarks. 



Taper pins . 

do 

....do 

....do 

-...do 

..-.do 



..--do 

-...do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

do 

.-..do 

....do 

Tees 

Throttling bars 

Thrust plates 

Top carriage 

Transom cap 

Transom, front 

Transom, rear 

Traversing crank 

TraA-ersing crank fasten- 
ing, complete. 

Traversing crank shaft 

gear. 
Traversing crank shaft 

pinion. 

Traversing clutch gear 

Traversing clutch pinion. . 



Traversing clutch 

Traversing clutch gear 

cover. 
Traversing crank shaft 

gear cover. 
Traversing bearing, lower.. 
Traversing bearing, upper. 
Traversing handwheel 

shaft gear cover. 
Traversing handwheel 

shaft gear. 
Traversing handwheel 

shaft pinion. 
Traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
Traversing handwheel 



Traversing intermediate 
shaft. 

Traversing crank shaft 

Traversing pinion 

Traversing pinion shaft . . . 



Traversing rack 

Traversing stops 

Traversing stop bolt hole 

plugs. 
Traversing rollers 



In collar (HE) 

In collar (IIH) 

Elevating shaft 

In pointer base 

In collar (IIDA) 

Retracting intermediate 
shaft. 

Retracting crank shaft 

Retracting drum shaft 

In collars (13 B) 

In idler sheave pin 

Retracting pawl shaft 

In retracting brake wheel 

In collar (13R A) 

In collars (14C) 



In collar (14M) 

In traversing crank shaft 

pinion. 
In traversing handwheel 

shaft pinion. 

In collar (16P) 

In shoulder rest 

In foot piece (17D) 

In tripping cranks (18N1) . . . 

In lever (18W) 

In collar (18Z) 

In locking lever pin collar . . . 

In retracting drum (left) 

Platform railings 

In recoil cylinder (9G) 

Under base ring 

On chassis 

On rear transom 

Between chassis 

do 

On traversing crank shaft . . . 
Traversing crank 



On tra\:ersing pinion shaft. 
On traversing crank shaft . . 
do 



On traversing intermediate 

shaft. 
On traversing crank shaft . . . 
Over traversing clutch gears. 

Over traversing crank shaft 

gears. 

On left chassis 

On sight standard 

Over traversing handwheel 

shaft gears. 
On traversing intermediate 

shaft. 
On traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
In upper traversing bearing. 

On traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
In traversing bearings 



Tripping cranks. 



Through chassis 

On traversing pinion shaft... 
In rear clip and traversing 
bracket. 

On base ring 

do 



In base ring 

Between racer and base ring. 
On shaft (18X) 



S 

S 
S 
S 

s 
s 

s 

s 

s 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 
s 

MI 

FS No. 2 

S 
CS No. 2 
CS No. 1 
CS No. 1 
CS No. 1 
FS 

S 



CI No. 1 

FSNo.2 

S 
FS No. 2 

BZNo.4 
CI 

CI 

CI 
CI 
CI 

CI No. 1 

FSNo.2 

FS No. 1 

Bz 

FSNo.l 

FS No. 1 
FSNo.2 
FS No. 1 

S 
S 

s 

FS No. 3 
FSNo.2 

or 
CSNo.2 



For traversing- 
crank shaft. 



Held in by split 
pin. 



Consisting of split. 

pin, chain, screw 

eye. 
Provided with felt 

washer. 



Do. 



In halves. 
' Do. 



Do. 



Provided with|felL 
washer 



Do. 

In 6 sections. 



50 



Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mii, their piece marls, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

e-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 


Num 
ber. 


Name of part. 


Location. 


Material. 


Remarks. 


18T 


1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

2 
12 
14 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

5 
3 

3 

2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
4 
4 
1 


Tripping crank stop 

Tripping links 


In left chassis 


S 

s 

FSNo.2 
FS No. 2 

%l 

C 
R 

Br 
Br 

S 

Br 
BZNo.4 

S 

s 
s 
s 

F 
F 

s 

F 
F 
Bz 

S 

Bz 
Bz 
F 
F 

F 

F 
F 
F 

F 
F 

F 

S 

F 

S 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

S 
CI 




18P 


Attached to tripping cranks 

(18N1). 
On locking lever pin (18BA1 
do 


Connecting to pawl 
levers. 


18GA1 
ISFAl 


Tripping lever latch, left. 
Tripping lever latch, right. 

Tripping lever stop 

Trough brackets 


18U 


On racer 




13D 


On chassis . 




9K 


Tubes 


In upper cylinder head (9Q). 
In shoulder brackets 




17Y 


do 


To rest shoulders 
against. 


14Q 


Tubings 


On traversing crank 


12BA 


do 






H14D 


Tubes, oil 


In racer 




HUE 


do 


do 




9AA 


Valve stem nut 


In piston rod (9BA) 




H12L1 


Washers 








do 


On pin (H16K) 




11 Kl 


do 


In correction screw 




IIW 


do 


Elevating handwheel handle 
Retracting intermediate 

shaft gear. 
In collar 






do 






do... 


Retracting drum 
shaft. 




do 


On retracting shipper rod . . . 
In retracting brake wheel . . . 

In retracting ratchet 

On traversing handwheel 

shaft. 
On traversing crank 




do 






do 






do 






do 

do 




H18C 


On traversing crank shaft . . . 


With felt washer. 


H18D 


do 


Do. 




do 


Traversing pinion (H18G)... 
Traversing clutch gear 

(H18Q2). 
Traversing handwheel shaft 

gear. 
In washer (H18C) 




do 






do 






do . . 






do 


In washer (H18D) 






do 


Traversing crank shaft gear 

(H18A). 
In collar (14C) 






.. ..do 






do 




Retracting crank 
shaft. 

Retracting inter- 
mediate shaft. 

Rivpfprl nn 




do 


....do 




.. . do 


On retracting cranks 




do 




llEA 


... .do 


On bolts (IIR) 




H16J 


....do 






H16B 


... do 


do 




8B 


....do 


In lower end of gun levers . . . 
Outer dust guard . 




H4F 


do 




H13E 


Weight 


For counterweight device . . . 











COUNTER RECOIL SYSTEM 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mn. 



lOD 


4 


lOE 


2 


H7P 


8 


H7M1 


1 


H7L1 


1 


H7D2 


4 


H7Z 


4 


H7J 


2 


H7H1 


2 


H7K 


4 


H7B 


4 


H7A 


4 


H7E 


4 


H7F2 


4 


H7C 


4 



Bolts, tap. 

do. 

do. 

Buffer cylinder, left 

Buffer cylinder, right . . 

Buffer followers 

Buffer glands 

Buffer piston liners 

Buffer pistons and rods. 
Buffer springs 



Buffer spring covers. 
Buffer spring rings . . 



Buffer spring rods 

Buffer spring supports . 

Buffer stuffing boxes. . . 



In clamps (IOC) 

In buffer valve body 

Buffer cylinders 

On chassis 
do 

Buffer stuffing boxes (H7C) . 

Inside buffer followers 

On buffer pistons 

In buffer cylinders 

On each side of buffer cylin- 
ders. 

Surrounding buffer springs 
(H7K). 

Inside buffer spring covers 
(H7B). 

In buffer springs (H7K) 

On end of buffer spring rods 
(H7E). 

In ends of buffer cylinders , . 



CS No. 1 
CS No. 1 
FS No. 2 
BZNo.3 
BZ No. 3 
FS No. 2 



Br 
FS 



FS 
FS 



BZ No. 3 



0.5 by 1. 
0.75 by 2. 
1.25 by 2.875. 



Riveted on. 



Seamless drawn 

tube. 
Provide a seat for 

buffer spring. 



51 



Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

COUNTER RECOIL SYSTEM 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mn-Contd. 



Piece 
mark. 



Num- 
ber. 



H7CA1 



H7BA1 
IOC 



H8D 
H7R 

H8C 

H8J 
lOA 

lOB 



H7Q 
H8E 

H8T 



H8K1 



H7AA 



H8G 
H8A1 
H8L 
H8B 
H8H 



Name of part. 



Buffer yoke, left... 

Buffer yoke, right. 
Clamps 



Collars.... 
Couplings. 



Cylmder plugs . 



Disk. 



Emptying plug 

Equalizing and throttling 
pipes. 

do 



Filling plugs . 
Followers 



....do 

Gaskets 

....do 

....do 

Gland 

Padlock, Yale standard, 
No. 853. 



Location. 



On buffer piston rod . 
....do. 



Inside front transom . 



Pipe connections 

Equalizing and throttling 

pipes to buffer valve. 
Buffer cylinders , 



Material. 



Buffer valve. 



.do. 



Connects buffer cylinders to 
buffer valve. 

....do 



Packing rings. 

....do 

Pins 

....do 

Rings 

Rivets 

Screw pins — 

Split pm 

do 

do 

.....do 



Studs, with nuts. 

Taper pins 

do 



-do. 



Valve body . . 
Valve handle. 
Valve seat — 
Valve stem... 
"Washer 



Buffer cylinders , 

Equalizing and throttling 

pipes. 
Around valve stem (H8B). . 

Pipe connections 

Filling plugs , 

Buffer stuffing boxes (H7C) 
Around valve stem (H8B). . 
Through hole in valve stem 

(H8B). 



Buffer valve 

Buffer cylinders 

Indisk(H8C) 

In buffer piston liners. 

Pipe connections 

In valve stem 

Indisk(H8C) 

In valve stem (H8B).. 

In taper pin 

do 

do 



CSNo.l 
CSNo.l 



C 
FSNo.l 



Buffer cylinders 

Buffer spring supports. 
In buffer yokes 



.do. 



On front transom 

Buffer valve 

do 

In valve body (H8G). 
do 



Remarks. 



Bz 



BZNo.2 

FSNo.l 
C 



Bz 
BZNo.4 

Bz 
FVF 

FVF 

C 

Bz 

Comm 



GWHP 
GWHP 

Bz 

Bz 

S 
Bz 

S 
S 

s 



BZNo.4 
BZNo.2 
FSNo.2 



Connected to buf- 
fer spring rods. 
Do. 

For holding equal- 
izing and throt- 
tling pipe. 



To replace equaliz- 
ing and throttling 
pipes to continue 
piece in action 
after their injury. 

Graduated to indi- 
cate valve set- 
ting. 

To empty counter 
recoil system. 

Each piece approx- 
imately 47 inches 
long. 

Each piece approx- 
imately 63 inches 
long. 

Including 2 extra. 

Connect to buffer 
cylinder. 



To prevent change 
in setting of buf- 
fer valve. 

1 extra. 

4 extra. 

Riveted in. 
Do. 

0.1875 diameter. 
0.25 by 0.625. 

Buffer yokes. 

Do. 
For buffer spring 

supports. 
1.25 by 4.5. 

Through piston 

rods. 
Through spring 

rods 



Seat for valve stem. 
1 shank BZ No. 4. 
1 tip FSNo.l. 



AZIMUTH POINTER 6-INCH DISAPPERAING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mn. 



I 



H5P 


1 


H5C1 


1 


H5J 


1 


H5G 


1 




1 


H5A 


1 




2 


H5F 


1 


H5E 


1 


H5S 


1 




1 


H5D 


1 


H5N 


2 



Azimuth circle j On top of base ring 

Azimuth pointer body j In opening of racer 

Collar j On screw (H5K) 

Coaming i On racer 

D owel For scale ( H5 D ) 

Index I In azimuth point body. 

Index marks ! Azimuth pointer body . 

Lid ! On coaming (H5G). 

Nut - - 

Pin 

do 

Scale 



Screws do 



On screw (H5K). 

In coaming ( H5G) 

In sleeve (H5L) 

In azimuth pointer body. 



Br 
Bz 
Bz 
CS 

GS 
GS 

GS 
CS 
Bz 

S 

GS 
GS 
Br 



In 6 sections. 
Graduated. 



Attached to slide 

(H5R). 
Soldered on covers. 
Azimuth pointer. 
Carries slide(H5R). 



0.5 by 1.125. 



52 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece markSy 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

AZIMUTH POINTER 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 1905 Mii-Contd. 



Piece 
mark. 


Num- 
ber. 


Name of part. 


Location. 


Material. 


Remarks. 


H5K 


1 
1 
12 
42 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Screws 


In azimuth pointer body 

In index (H5A) 


Bz 

GS 

Br 
GS 
GS 
Bz 

GS 




H5B 


Screw, countersunk 

.do 


0.25 by 0.625. 
0.5 by 1. 
0.25 by 0.75. 
Graduated 


H5H 


In coaming (H5G) 


H5Q 


do 

Sleeve, left 


In azimuth circle 


H5M 


On screw (H5K) , 


H5L 


Sleeve, right 


do.. 


Do 


H5R 


Slide 


In azimuth pointer body 

In sleeve (H5M) 






Taper pin 













ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRLA.GE, MODEL 1905 Mil. 



T88H 
V27K 
V27W 

V27T 
V27X 
V27H 
V27AA 
E20C 
T91R 

H24E 
V27G 
T91R 



T88F 
E12AA 
E14D 
T24T 
T24S 

T25CK 

T25C 

T25BL1 

T88C 
T88A 
T88B 

T25CH 
T88R 

H24M 

H24H 

T85S 

V23MM 

V23BM 

V23EM 

V23AM 

E12U 



E12X 
E13AJ1 



T85M 
T85U 



Azimuth lamp bracket. . . 

Base 

.....do 



Bolts 

Bolts, expansion. 

Bolts, tap 

do 

.....do 

....do...: 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Bolt, with nut. 
Bracket 



Bolts, with nuts. 
Bracket 



Braces, lower. 

Braces, upper. 
Bushing 



-do. 



....do 

On elbow (T85Q). 

In gun outlet box . 



Bushing, 1 by 0.5 In cross (V23Br) . . 

Bushings, 1 by 0.75 do 

Bushing, .75 by 0.5 j In plug box (E20B) . 

Bushings On 0.5 conduit 



In racer 

In terminal box 

Under condmt (V27R) . 



For terminals (V27S) . 

Inbase(V27W) 

For terminal box 

In strap (V27Y) 

Inplugbox(E20B).. 
In strap (T91E) 



For braces (H24H) (H24M). 

For terminal box 

In straps (T91L) (T91E) 

(T91J) (T91N) (T91Q) 

(T91C) (T91G). 

In bracket (T88R) 

For twisted hooks (E12Y)... 

For hook (E14C) 

Injunction box cover (T24Q) 

In junction box (T24V1) 

In conduit support (T24U). . 
In shade support (T25CJ) . . . 

In shades (T25BT2) 

In junction box (T25CB). . . . 

In brackets (T88B) 

....do 

In counterweight well on 

piston-rod beam. 

In shade (T25CG) 

On left chassis 



.do. 



Bolt, with nut > In conduit support (T24U). . 

Cable, lighting I From plug connection to 

lamps at sight. 

Cable thimbles ' On cable to sight 

Candelabra receptacles ' For lamps (E12NA) and 

(E9H). 
Attached by chain to elbow 

(T85Q). 
In plug casing (T85L) 



Cap 

Chuck, in halves. 



Conduit. 



-do. 
.do. 
.do. 



From flexible conduit in 
counterweight well to 
junction box (T24V1). 

From junction box (T24V1) 
to junction box (T25CB). 

From jimction box (T2D) to 
cross (V23BF). 

From coupling (V23BA) to 
junction box (T25CB) to 
coupling (V23BA) at Cross 
(V23BF). 



Bz 

Slate 

S 

Bz 

S 
S 



s 

Bz 



Comm 

Comm 

Comm 

Comm 

Bz 

S 

c 

GI 
Comm 

Bz 

Bz 

S 



Azimuth lamp. 

Part of conduit 

strap. 
0.25 by 2.125. 

0.625 by 1.75. 
0.625 by 1.125. 
0.25 by 0.875. 
For carriages with 

telephone. 
0.625 by 1.5. 

Do. 
0.5 by 1. 



Do. 
0.375 by 0.625. 
0.5 by 1.25. 
0.5 by 0.75. 
0.5 by 1.25. 
0.5 by 1. 
0.5 by 0.875. 
0.5 by 1. 
0.5 by 2.75. 
0.5 by 1. 
0.5 by 1.75. 



0.25 by 0.75. 

To support swntch 
(E13AE3). 

For carriages with 
telephone. 
Do. 

Part of plug con- 
nection. |Pi| 

For carriages with 
telephone. 



At buffer and re- 
coil valves. 
0.5 by 2. 



Part of plug con- 
nection. 
1 inch loricated. 



S Do. 

i 
S I Do. 

S I 0.75 inch loricated. 

i 



53 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F, model of 1905 _Mii, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are mac/e— Continued. 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mu— Contd. 



Piece 
mark. 



V27N 
V27R 
T24U 

V23AA 

V23BA 

V23JA 

E12V 

V23JA 

V27P 

V27C 

V23BF 

T85Q 

V23CL 
V23BJ 

T25BK 
E13P 
V27E 



Num- 
ber. 



Name of part. 



E14C 

T88U 

T2D 

T24V1 

T24Q 

T2B 

T25CB 

T24CA 
E12NA 



E20A 



E9H 
E13AK 

E13AL 

E13W1 

E9B1 

E9G1 

E12Q1 



Conduit. 



.do. 



.do. 



Conduit, in two pieces. 
do 



Conduit fittings 

Conduit, flexible metallic. 
Conduit support 



Couplings, 0.5. . 
Couplings, 0.75. 
Couplings,! — 
Couplings, 0.5. . 



Couplings,!... 

Coupling nuts. 

Cover 

Crosses,! 



Elbow. 



Elbows, side outlet. 
Elbow, 0.75 90° 



Location. 



From cross (V23BF) to 
coupling (V23BA) on left 

From elbow (V23CL) to tee 

(V23AE) on left chassis. 
From coupling (V23BA) at 

junction box (T24V) to 

coupling (V23B A). 
From cross (V23BF) into 

racer. 
From coupling (V23AA) on 

front transom to coupling 

(E!2U) on piston rod 

bracket. 
From coupling (V23AA) to 

plug connection on sight 

standard. 
From coupling (V23AA) at 

junction box (T25CB) to 

!6-candlepower lamp on 

rear transom. 
From coupling (V23AA) to 

coupling (E!2V) near ele- 
vation disk lamp. 
From tee (V23AC) on left 

chassis to tee (V23AC) on 

front transom. 
From junction box (T25CA) 

topiugbox(E20B). 
From tee (V23AE) to tee 

(V23AC) on left chassis. 

On conduit (V27R) 

In counterweight well 

On piston rod bracket 

(HISG). 

On 0.5 conduit 

On 0.75 conduit 

On 1 conduit 

On 0.5 conduit 



On ! conduit. 



Gasket 

do 

do 

Gun outlet box. 



On conduit (V27R) , 

For terminal box 

On left chassis and under- 
neath right chassis. 

On 0.5 conduit on sight 
standard. 

On left chassis 

Inside rear transom near 
junction box (T25CB). 

For junction box (T25CB).. 

For switch (E13AE3) , 

For terminal box , 

Onleft chassis — 



Hook I On right chassis 

Insulation tube I Inracernearazimuth pointer 

Junction box I On left chassis , 

do 1 LTnder right chassis 

Junction box cover ! For jimction box (T24V!) . . , 

do For junction box (T2D) 

Junction box and cover. . . On racerinfront of rear tran- 
som. 

do On right chassis , 

Lamps , candelabra At elevation scale, azimuth 

pointer and buffer and re- 
coil valves. 
Hung from right chassis 



Lamp and cable, portable. 



Lamps, 2-candlepower | At telescopic sight 

Lamps, l&-candlepower...j At right and left chassis and 
I inside rear transom. 

do I do 

Lamp fitting For switch (E13AE3) 

Lamp holders For lamps (E9H) 

Lamp holder springs I On lamp holders (E9B!) 

Lamp springs j For lamps (E12NA) 



Material. 


Remarks. 


s 


0.75 inch loricated. 


S 


Do. 


-S 


Do. 


s 


0.5 inch loricated. 


s 


Do. 



s 
s 

Bz 

S 

s 

Comm 

Comm 

Comm 

Bz 

Comm 

Bz 

CI 

Comm 

Bz 

Comm 
Comm 

SR 
SR 
GP 



Bz 
HR 
CI 
CI 
CI 
CI 
CI 

CI 
Comm 



Comm 
Comm 

Comm 

CI 

Bz 

Br 
PhBz 



Do. 



Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 



Right and left. 
Do. 
Do. 
At elevation scale 

lamp. 
For carriages with 
telephone. 



Part of plug con- 
nection. 



Fiu-nished by Sig- 
nal Corps. 
For portable lamp. 



8 candlepower. 

Furnished by En- 
gineer Depart- 
ment. 

For 110- volt main. 

For 220-volt main. 



54 

Names of parts of G-inch disappearing carriage, L. F , model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks ^ 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mn— Contd. 



Piece 
mark. 



Num- 
ber. 



Name of part. 



Location. 



I Material, 



V23AU 
V23KU 
V23LT 

V23UT 
V23MT 
V23AT 

V23BT 



V23HT 
V23HT 

V23FT 

V23GT 

E12T1 

E13H 
V27V 
E12T1 

V27D 

V27Q 
V23B 
V23C 

V23A 

V27L 



V27Z 

T85AA 

E20B 

T85L 

T85W 
E12P2 
T25BM 
T88J 
V27B 
V27M 

T25BM 
T85V 

T25CG 

T25BT2 

T25CJ 
T25BY 
T85BA 

E13AF 
E13AH 

E13AG 
T85X 

T91L 

T91J 

T91N 
T91Q 



Nipple, 2.5 long. 
Nipple, 3 long. . . 
Nipples, close... 



do 

do 

Nipples, short. 



.do. 



....do 

Nipple, short.. 

Nipples, short. 



Nuts. 



do 

....do 

..-.do 

Pad 

Pins 

Pipe fittings 

Pipe plugs, 0.75. 
Pipe plugs, 1 

Pipe plugs, 0.5. . 

Plate 



Plates, marking. . 



.do. 



Socket holders.. 
Socket insulator. 

Straps 

do 

do 

do 



Intee(V23AC) 

Intee(V23JC) 

In tee ( V23AC) and junction . 
box (T25CA). 

In elbow (V23CL) 

Intee(V23JC) 

In tees (V23AE) and junc- 
tion boxes (T2D) (T25CB). 

In elbows (V23BJ) and 
(V23CL) andcross 
(V23BF). 

In Junction box (T24V1) 

In bushing (V23MM) 



In junction box (T2D) and 
in coupling (V23AA). 

In cross (V23BF) and tees 
(V23.TC). 

Part of fittings of lamps 
(E12NA). 

For switch (E13AE3) 

On bolts (V27T) 

On bushing (T85S) 



For terminal box 

In pipe fitting (V27Q) 

On conduit (V27R) 

In tees (V23JC) (V23AE). . . . 

In cross (V23BF) and ter- 
minal box. 

In junction box (T25AC) 
and tees (V23AC). 

For terminal box 



Comm 
Comm 
Comm 

Comm 
Comm 
Comm 

Comm 



Comm 
Comm 

Comm 

Comm 

Bz 

Bz 
Bz 
Bz 

SR 
S 

Bz 
Comm 



...do. 



Plugs 

Plug box 

Plug casing 

Plug insulator 

Reflectors 

Screws 

Screws, fillister head 

Screws, round head 

do 

do 

do , 

Separator 

Shade 

Shades, complete , 

Shade support 

Sleeves , 

Sockets , 



On wire inside plug insula- 
tor (T85W). 

On right chassis for portable 
lamp. 

Innut(E12Tl) 



Comm 
Br 



Br 
Bz 



Bz 



In plug casing (T85L) ! HR 



For lamps (E12NA) 

In junction box (T25CA). . . . 

In azimuth lamp bracket . . . 

For terminal ])ox 

For plate ( V27L) 

Injunction-box cover (T2B). 
In junction box (T25CB). . . . 
In plug casing (T85L) 



For lamp inside rear transom 
On right and left chassis 



On rear transom 

Under junction box (T25CB) 

On wires inside socket insu- 
lator. 

For 16-candle power lamps . . 

Attached to candelabra re- 
ceptacle (E13AJ1). 

For 16-candle power lamps. . 

In bushing (T85S) 



On 0.75 conduit on left 

chassis. 
On 1-inch conduit on right 

guide frame. 
On 0.5 conduit on left chassis. 
On 0.5 conduit on front 

transom. 



Br 

S 

s 

Bz 
Br 

S 

S 

HR 



S 

CI 
Bz 

Comm 
Bz 

Bz 
HR 



Insulation lined. 

Do. 
Right and left. 
Insulation lined. 

Do. 



Right and left. 
For carriages with 

telephone. 
Right and left. 



Do. 



Part of plug con 
nection. 



Commercial. 



Marked Ordnance 
Department 
"wires" and 
Signal Corps 
"wires." 

Marked "L,""P," 
or "T." 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 

Furnished by En- 
gineer Depart- 
ment. 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 
Do. 

0.25 by 0.5. 

0.375 by 1.25. 

0.375 by 1. 

0.1875 by 0.375. 

0.25 by 0.75. 

0.25 by 0.5. 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 

Ends riveted in by 
0.25 rivets. 

Pro\ided with 
thumb nuts. 

Forshade(T25CG). 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 

For lamps 

(E12NA). 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 



55 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
Location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mn— Contd. 



Piece Num- 
mark. ber. 



Name of part. 



Location. 



Material. 



Remarks. 



T91G 

T91C 
T91E 
V27Y 
T91E 

E13M 

E13H 
E13J2 
E13A1 
E13Q1 
E13AE3 

T85T 

V23AC 

V23HC 

V23AE 



V27S 


12 


V27A 


1 


V27J 


1 


E12Y 


2 


E12Z 


2 


V27F 


2 


V27U 


12 


T85Y 


1 



Straps. 



-do. 
-do. 
-do. 
-do. 



Switch button, complete . 

Switch cover 

Switch key 

Switch, Perkins No. 2220. 

Switch, Russell 

Switch, watertight, com- 
plete. 
Taper sleeve 



Tees, 0.5 

Tees, 0.75 

Tees, reducing, 0.75 to 0.5. 
Telephone 



Terminals 

Terminal box 

Terminal-box fitting . 

Twisted hooks 

"Washers 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Wire, 200 feet . 



On 0.75 conduit on inside 

right chassis. 

For 0.5 conduit 

On 1-ineh conduit on racer . . 

On conduit (V27R) 

On 1-inch conduit from gun 

outlet box. 

For switch (E13AE3) 

Part of switch (E13.\E3) . . . . 

For swit-ch (E13AE3) 

Inside switch (E13AE3) 

On left chassis. 

....do 



In plug casmg (T85L) 

On 0.5 conduit on left chassis 

and front transom. 
On 0.75 conduit on right 

chassis. 
On front transom and left 

chassis. 
On left chassis 



For terminal box 

U nder base ring 

On conduit at terminal box. 
For holding cable thimbles. . 
For twisted hooks (E12Y)... 

For terminal box 

Onbolts(V27T) 

In elbow (T85Q) 

In conduit for lighting circuit 



rVFand 

Bz 

Bz 
Comm 
Comm 



Bz 
Comm 
Comm 
Comm 
Comm 



C 
CI 
Bz 

S 

s 

Bz 
Bz 
HR 



For carriage with 
telephone. 



For elevating scale 
lamp. 

Part of plug con- 
nection. 



Furmshed by Sig- 
nal Corps, car- 
riage No. 20 and 
above not equip- 
ped with tele- 
phone. 



Part of plug con- 
nection. 
Insulated. 



SHOT TRUCKS (4 PER CARRIAGE), 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 1905 Mn. 



AIL 

AIT 

AlU 

AlK 

AIJ 
AlP 

AlCl 
AIX 
AIS 



AIR 
AlB 
AlE 
AIQ 

Q3C 
AlF 



AlH 



Angles . 



....do 

--..do 

Angles, left . 

Angles, right 
AxU ' 



e brackets, main. 



Axle, main wheel. 
Bolts, with nuts. . 
Braces, left 



Braces, right 

Bushings 

do 

Handle 

Nuts, crown 

Oil phigs, 0.375 standard. 
Pins, caster wheel 



Rivets 

Rivets, round head. 
do 



Bolted above main axle 
brackets (AlP). 

Join angles (AIJ) and (AlK) 

at top of truck. 
Join angles (AIJ) and (AlK) 

above caster wheels. 
Front and rear vertical 

frames. 

do 

At middle of truck 



Shot support, left Top of truck 



On main axle brackets (AlP) 

In main axle brackets (AlP). 

Join front and rear vertical 
frames to main axle brack- 
ets. 

do 

Main wheels ( AlA) 

Caster wheels (AID) 

Rear end of truck 

On main wheel axle 

In wheel 

Supported in bearing in 
lower end of angles (AIJ) 
and (AlK). 

For handle 

Angles ( Al) to shot supports. 

At various joints 



S 

cs 

FS 
S 

S 



s 

Bz 
Bz 

Ash 
S 
Bz 

S 



1.75 by 1.75 by 
0.1875 inches, an- 
gles. 

1.5 by 1.5 by 0.1875 
inches, angles. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Bolted between 

(AIL). 



0.5 bv 1.625. 
1.5 by 1.5 by 0.1875 
inches, angles. 

Do. 



0.25-inch diameter. 
0.5-inch diameter. 
0.375-inch diam- 

2 by 2 by 0.25-inch 
angle. 



56 

Names of parts of 6-inch disappearing carriage, L. F., model of 1905 Mil, their piece marks, 
location, and material of which they are made — Continued. 

SHOT TRUCKS (4 PER CARRIAGE), 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL OF 

1905 Mil— Continued. 



Piece 
mark. 


Num- 
ber. 


Name of part. 


Location. 


Material. 


Remarks 


AIG 


1 

2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 


Shot support, right 


Top of truck 


S 

S 
S 

s 
s 
s 
s 

VR 
VR 

s 
cs 

CS 


2 by 2 by 0.25- 
inch angle. 




In caster wheel pins 




do 








do 


In crown nuts 


On main axle 


AIN 


Stop, left 






AIM 


Stop right . . 


do 








In main axle brackets 

Caster wheels 




AlW 


Tires .':':::':":':':': 




AlV 


do 








Washers 






AID 




On caster wheel pins. Front 

and rear of truck. 
On main axle 




AlA 


Wheels main 













SHOT TONGS, MODEL OF 1904 (7 PER CARRIAGE) 



A8N1 




ASP 




ASS 




AST 




A8Q 






3 




2 


A8R 


1 




2 




2 




1 




1 



Claw, inner . 
Claw, outer. 

Dog 

Pin, center. . 
Pin, shackle. 

Separators. . 

....do 



Shackle... 
Split pins . 

do 

Spreader . . 
do 



Opposite outer claw (ASP) . . 
Pivoted on center pin (AST) . { 

do 

For pivot of claws and dog . . . ; 
In upper of extremity of 

outer claw. j 

Between 2 parts of inner j 

claw. I 

Between 2 parts of outer 

claw. j 

On shackle pin (ASQ) ! 

In shackle pin i 

In center pm ! 

In iimer claw ( A8N1) i 

In outer claw (ASP) 1 



In two parts. 
Do. 



Riveted to claw. 



Do. 
Do. 



GREASE CUPS (10 PER CARRIAGE) 6-INCH DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE, MODEL 

1905 Mil. 



A2A 

A2B 

A2D1 



A2E1 
A2G 
A2H 



A2F 
A2C1 



Body 

Cap 

Cup, leather 
Gaskets 

Pin 

Plunger.... 
Plunger nut 
Screw 

SpUt pin — 

Spring 

Washer 



Screwed into carriage j Bz 

Onupperendofbody(A2A).| Bz 

Underneath plunger Leather . 

Between body (A2A) and C 

oil pipe when grease cup 

is seated. 

In plunger Bz 

Inside grease cup Bz 

Secures plungertocap(A2B). Bz 

Secures cup leather to * Bz 

plunger. ] 

In plunger nut j S 

Between cap and plunger ... 1 S 

Under cup leather : Bz 



0.125 by 0.5 driven. 



5 coils. 



War Department, 

Office of the Chief of Ordnance, 

Washington, January 14, 1914. 

Form No. 1711. 

Ed. Aug. 24-17—1,000. . 



*- J .. « .. 4l \ I 





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Makers 
Syracuse, N.Y. 

PIT. m 21 >is<« 



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