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THE DOCTOR, 



r« ' 



4rc. 



There is a kind of Physiognomy in the titles of books no less 
than in the faces of men, by whMi a eldlfal observer 'will as 
well know what to expect from the one as the other. 

Butler's Remains. 



THE DOCTOR. 




^iC I v't ,L- ( '/ 






lillivl) MiLiU 



VOL. I. 



I.ONDOaN 

LONT. MAN ^. 



LONDON : 
PRINTED BY W. MICOL, 60, PALL-MALL. 



IX 



POSTSCRIPT. 

There was a certain Pisander whose name has 
been preserved in one of the proverbial sayings 
of the Greeks, because he lived in continual fear 
of seeing his own ghost. How often have I seen 
mine while arranging these volumes for publi- 
cation, and carrying them through the press ! 

Twenty years have elapsed since the inten- 
tion of composing them was conceived, and the 
composition commenced, in what manner and 
in what mood the reader will presently be made 
acquainted. The vicissitudes which in the 
course of those years have befallen every 
country in Europe are known to every one; 
and the changes, which, during such an interval, 
must have occurred in a private family, there 
are few who may not, from their own sad ex- 
perience, readily apprehend. 

Circumstances which when they were touched 

VOL. I. b 



168796 



upon in these volumes were of present impor- 
tance, and excited a lively interest, belong now 
to the history of the past. They who were 
then the great performers upon the theatre of 
pubHc life have fretted their hour and disap- 
peared from the stage. Many who were living 
and flourishing when their names were here 
sportively or severely introduced, are gone to 
their account. The domestic circle which the 
introduction describes has in the ordinary 
course of things been broken up ; some of its 
members are widely separated from others, 
and some have been laid to rest. The reader 
may well believe that certain passages which 
were written with most joyousness of heart, 
have been rendered purely painful to the 
writer by time and change : and that some of 
his sweetest thoughts come to him in chewing 
the cud, like wormwood and gall. — But it is a 
wholesome bitterness. 

He has neither expunged nor altered any 
thing on any of these accounts. It would be 
weakness to do this on the score of his own re- 
membrances, and in the case of allusions to 



XI 



public affairs and to public men it would be 
folly. The Almanack of the current year will 
be an old one as soon as next year begins. 

It is the writer's determination to remain un- 
known ; and they who may suppose that 

By certain signs here set in sundry place, 

they have discovered him, will deceive them- 
selves. A Welsh Triad says that the three 
unconcealable traits of a person by which he 
shall be known, are the glance of his eye, the 
pronunciation of his speech, and the mode of his 
self-motion ; — in briefer English, his look, his 
voice, and his gait. There are no such charac- 
teristics by which an author can be identified. 
He must be a desperate mannerist who can be 
detected by his style, and a poor proficient in 
his art if he cannot at any time so vary it, as to 
put the critic upon a false scent. Indeed every 
day's experience shews that they who assume 
credit to themselves, and demand it from others 
for their discrimination in such things, are con- 
tinually and ridiculously mistaken. 

On that side the author is safe ; he has a 



Xll 



sure reliance upon the honour as well as the 
discretion of the very few to whom he is na- 
turally or necessarily known ; and if the various 
authors to whom the Book will be ascribed by 
report^ should derive any gratification from 
the perusal^ he requests of them in return that 
they will favour his purpose by allowing such 
reports to pass uncontradicted. 



• •• 

XUl 



CONTENTS. 



PRELUDE OF MOTTOES.— Page v. 



POSTCRIPT.— p. ix. 



CHAPTER VII. A. I.— p. 1. 



A FAMILY PARTY AT A NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOUR'S. 



Good Sir, reject it not, although it bring 
Appearances of some fantastic thing 
At first unfolding I 

George Wither to the King. 



XIV 



CHAPTER VI. A. I.— p. 6. 

SHEWING THAT AN AUTHOR MAY MORE EASILY BE 
KEPT AWAKE BY HIS OWN IMAGINATIONS THAN PUT 
TO SLEEP BY THEM HIMSELF, WHATEVER MAY BB 
THEIR EFFECT UPON HIS READERS. 



Thou sleepest worse than if a mouse should be forced to 
take up her lodging in a cat's ear ; a little infant that breeds 
its teeth, should it lie with thee, would cry out as if thou 
wert the more unquiet bedfellow. Webster. 



CHAPTER V. A. I.— p. 10. 

SOMETHING CONCERNING THE PHILOSOPHY OF DREAMS, 
AND THE author's EXPERIENCE IN AERIAL HORSE- 
MANSHIP. 



If a dream should come in now to make you afear'd. 
With a windmill on his head and bells at his beard, 
Would you straight wear your spectacles here at your toes. 
And your boots on your brows and your spurs on your nose ? 

Ben Jonson. 



CHAPTER IV. A. I.— p. 15. 

A CONVERSATION AT tHE BREAKFAST TABLE. 



Tel condamne mon Coq-h'Vdne qui un jour en juatifiera ie 
bon sens. La Pretieuse. 



XV 



CHAPTER III. A. I.— p. 18. 

THE UTILITY OF POCKETS. A COMPLIMBNT PROPERLY 

RECEIVED. 



La tasca ^ proprio cosa da Chrittiani, 

Benkdbtto Varcui. 



CHAPTER II. A. I.— p. 25. 

CONCERNING DEDICATIONS^ PRINTERS TYPES AND 

IMPERIAL INK. 



// y aura des clefs, et des ouverturet de met secrets. 

La Prbtieusf. 



DEDICATION.— p. SI. 



CHAPTER I. A. I.— p. 33. 

NO BOOK CAN BE COMPLETE WITHOUT A PREFACE. 



I see no cause but men may pick their teetb, 
Though Brutus with a sword did kill himself. 

Taylor, the Water Poet. 



XIV 



CHAPTER VI. A. L— p. 6. 

SHEWING THAT AN AUTHOR MAY MORE EASILY BE 
KEPT AWAKE BY HIS OWN IMAGINATIONS THAN PUT 
TO SLEEP BY THEM HIMSELF, WHATEVER MAY BE 
THEIR EFFECT UPON HIS READERS. 



Thou sleepest worse than if a mouse should be forced to 
take up her lodging in a cat's ear ; a little infant that breeds 
its teeth, should it lie with thee, would cry out as if thou 
wert the more unquiet bedfellow. Webster. 



CHAPTER V. A. I.— p. 10. 

SOMETHING CONCERNING THE PHILOSOPHY OF DREAMS, 
AND THE author's EXPERIENCE IN AERIAL HORSE- 
MANSHIP. 



If a dream should come in now to make you afear'd, 
With a windmill on his head and bells at his beard, 
Would you straight wear your spectacles here at your toes. 
And your boots on your brows and your spurs on your nose ? 

Ben Jonson. 



CHAPTER IV. A. I.— p. 15. 

A CONVERSATION AT tHE BREAKFAST TABLE. 



Tel condamne mon Coq-a-Pdne qui unjour enjusti/iera ie 
ban sens. La Pretieuse. 



XV 



CHAPTER III. A. I.— p. 18. 

THE UTILITY OF POCKETS. A COMPLIMBNT PROPERLY 

RECEIVED. 



La tasca I propria cosa da Christiani. 

Benkdbtto Varcui. 



CHAPTER II. A. I.— p. 25. 

CONCERNING DEDICATIONS^ PRINTERS TYPES AND 

IMPERIAL INK. 



// y aura des clefs, et des ouverturet de mes secrets. 

La Prbtieuse. 



DEDICATION.— p. SI. 



CHAPTER I. A. I.— p. 33. 

NO BOOK CAN BE COMPLETE WITHOUT A PKBFACE. 



I see no cause but men may pick their teetb, 
Though Brutus with a sword did kill himself. 

Taylor, thb Water Poet. 



XVI 



ANTE-PREFACE.— p. 35. 



I here present thee with a hive of bees, laden some with 
wax, and some with honey. Fear not to approach 1 There 
are no Wasps, there are no Hornets here. If some wanton 
Bee should chance to buzz about thine ears, stand thy ground 
and hold thy hands : there's none will sting thee if thou 
strike not first. If any do, she hath honey in her bag will 
cure thee too. Quarles. 



PREFACE._p. 37. 



Oh for a quill plucked from a Seraph's wing ! 

Young. 



INITIAL CHAPTER.— p. 43. 



E^ ov drj rd. Trpdra, — Homer. 



XTU 



THE DOCTOR, 



EccoH il libro ; mettivi ben cura 

Iddio f (nfuii e dia buona ventura. 

Orl. Innam. 



CHAPTER I. P. I.— p, 45. 

THE SUBJECT OF THIS HISTORY AT HOME AND AT TEA. 



If thou be a severe sour complexioned man then I here dis- 
allow thee to be a competent judge. Izaak Walton. 



CHAPTER II. P. I.— p. 47. 

WHEREIN CERTAIN QUESTIONS ARE PROPOSED CON- 
CERNING TIME^ PLACE AND PERSONS. 



Quis? quid? ubi? quibits auxiliis^ cur? quomodof quando f 

Technical Verse. 



h2 



XVUl 



CHA.PTER III. P. I.— p. 51. 

WHOL£SOMB OBSERVATIONS UPON THE VANITY OF 

FAME. 



Whosoever shall address himself to write of matters of in- 
struction, or of any other argument of importance, it behoveth 
that before he enter thereinto, he should resolutely determine 
with himself in what order he will handle the same ; so shall 
he best accomplish that he bath undertaken, and inform the 
understanding, and help the memory of the Reader. 

GwiLLtM's Display of Heraldry. 



CHAPTER IV, P. I.— p. 56, 

BIRTH AND PARENTAGE OF DR. DOVE, WITH THE 
DESCRIPTION OF A Y£OMAN*S HO^SE IN THE WEST 
RIDING OF YORKSHIRE A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 



Non possidentem multa vocaveris 
Recte beatum ; recHus occupat 
Nomen beati, qui Deorum 
Muneribus sapienter utif 
Duramque collet pauperiem pati, 
P^fusque letho Jiagiiium timet, 

Horace, L. 4, Od. 9. 



XIX 



CHAPTER V. P. I.— p. 64. 

EXTENSION OF THE SCIENCE OF FHTSIOGNOMTj WITH 
SOME BEMARKS UPON THE FRACTICAL USES OF 
CRANIOLOGT. 



Hofic ergo scientiam biande ejccipiamus, kilariterque amplec^ 
tamur, ut vere nostram et de nobismet ipsis traetantem ; quam 
qui non amttt, quam qui non amplectitur, nee philosophiam 
amatf neque sua vUm discrimina curat, Baptista Porta. 



CHAPTER VI. P. I.— p. 72. 

A COLLECTION OF BOOKS NONE OF WHICH ARE IN- 
CLUDED AMONGST THE PUBLICATIONS OF ANY 
SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF KNOWLEDGE 

RELIGIOUS OR PROFANE. HAPPINESS IN HUMBLE 

LIFE. 



Felix ille animi, divisque nmillimut ipsis, 
Quern non mordaci resplendens gloria fuco 
Solicitatf non fastosi mala gaudia hums, 
Sed tacitos sinit ire dies, et paupere cultu 
Bxigit innocucB tranquilla sUentia vit€B, 

POLITIAN. 



XX 



CHAPTER VII. P. I.— p. 84. 

RUSTIC PHILOSOPHY, AN EXPERIMENT UPON MOONSHINK. 



Quien comienza enjuventud 
A bien obrar, 
Serial es de no errar 
En senetud. 
Proverbios del Marques de Sa.ntillana. 



CHAPTER VIII. P. I.— p. 93. 



A KIND SCHOOLMASTER AND A HAPPY SCHOOL BOY. 



Though happily thou wilt say that wands be to be wrought 
when they are green, lest they rather break than bend when 
they be dry, yet know also that he that bendeth a twig because 
he would see if it would bow by strength may chance to have 
a crooked tree when he would have a straight. 

EUPHUES. 



xxi 



INTERCHAPTER I.— p. 98. 

REMARKS IN THE PRINTING OFFICE. THE AUTHOR 
CONFESSES A DISPOSITION TO GARRULITY. PRO- 
PRIETY OF PROVIDING CERTAIN CHAPTERS FOR THE 
RECEPTION OF HIS EXTRANEOUS DISCOURSE. 
CHOICE OF AN APPELLATION FOR SUCH CHAPTERS. 



Perque vices aliquid, quod tempora longa viiieri 
Nonsinat, in medium vacuas referamus ad aures. 

Ovid. 



CHAPTER IX. P. I.— p. 106, 



EXCEPTIONS TO ONE OF KING SOLOMON'S RULES A 

winter's EVENING AT DANIEL's FIRE-SIDE. 



These are my thoughts; I might have spun them out into 
a greater length, but I think a little plot of ground, thick 
sown, is better than a great field which, for the most part of it, 
lies fallow. Norris. 



xxu 



CHAPTER X. P. L— p. 113. 

ONE WHO WAS NOT SO WISE AS HIS FRIENDS COULD 
HAVE WISHED^ AND YET QUITE AS HAPPY AS IF HE 
HAD BEEN WISER. NEPOTISM NOT CONFINED TO 
POPES. 

There are of madmen as there are of tame, 

All humoured not alike. Some 

Apish and fantastic ; 

And though 'twould grieve a soul to see God's image 

So blemished and defaced, yet do they act 

Such antic and such pretty lunacies. 

That spite of sorrow, they will make you smile. 

Dekker. 



CHAPTER XI. P. I.— p. 121. 

A WORD TO THE READER, SHEWING WHERE WE ARE, 
AND HOW WE CAME HERE, AND WHEREFORE j AND 
WHITHER WE ARE OOINO. 



'Tis my venture 
On your retentive wisdom. 

Ben Jonson. 



h 



ZXUl 

CHAPTER XII. R L— p. 129. 

A HISTORY NOTICED WHICH IS WRITTEN BACKWARD. 
THE CONFUSION OF TONGUES AN ESPECIAL EVIL 
FOB SCHOOL BOYS. 



For never in the long and tedious tract 
Of slavish grammar was I made to plod ; 

No tyranny of Rules my patience rackt ; 
I served no prenticehood to any Rod ; 

But in the freedom of the Practic way 

Learnt to go right, even when I went astray. 

Dr. Bbaumont. 



CHAPTER XIII. P. I.— p. 136. 

A DOUBT CONCERNING SCHOOL BOOKS, WHICH WILL 
BE DEEMED HERETICAL : AND SOME ACCOUNT OF 
AN EXTRAORDINARY SUBSTITUTE FOR OVID OR 
VIRGIL. 



They say it is an ill mason that refuscth any stone ; and 
there is no knowledge but in a skilful hand serves, cither posi- 
tively as it is, or else to illustrate some other knowledge. 

Herbert's Remains. 



XXIV 



CHAPTER XIV. P. I.— p. 149. 

AN OBJECTION ANSWERED. 



Is this then your wonder ? 
Nay then you shall under- 
stand more of my skill, Ben Jonson. 



CHAPTER XV. P. I.— p. 154. 

THE AUTHOR VENTURES AN OPINION AGAINST THE 
PREVAILING WISDOM OF MAKING CHILDREN PRE- 
MATURELY WISE. 



Pray you, use your freedom ; 
And so far, if you please allow me mine. 
To hear you only ; not to be compelled 
To take your moral potions. 

Massinger. 



CHAPTER XVI. P. I.— p. 159. 

USE AND ABUSE OF STORIES IN REASONING^ WITH A 
WORD IN BEHALF OF CHIMNEY-SWEEPERS AND IN 
REPROOF OF THE EARL OF LAUDERDALE. 



My particular inclination moves me in controversy especi- 
ally to approve his choice that said, fortia mallem quam 
formosa. Dr. Jackson. 



XXV 



INTERCHAPTER II.— p. 165. 

ABALLIBOOZOBANGANORRIBO. 



/o*/ dico dunque, e dicol che ognun nVode. 

Benedetto Varchi. 



CHAPTER XVII. P. I.— p. 17^2. 

THE HAPPINESS OF HAVING A CATHOLIC TASTE. 



There's no want of meat, Sir ; 
Portly and curious viands are prepared 
To please all kinds of appetites. Massinqer. 



CHAPTER XVIII. P. I.— p. 179. 



ALL*S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. 



Td ^ civ kirifivrie^C}, — l7r6 tov \6yov LKavayKaKSfiU'og 
lirifivfiff^yffofiai. Herodotus. 

CHAPTER XIX. P. I.— p. 184. 

A CONVERSATION WITH MISS GRAVEAIRS. 



Operi suscepto inserviendum fuit; so Jacobus Mycillus 
pleadeth for himself in his translation of Lucian's Dialogues, 
and so do I ; I must and will perform my task. 

Burton. 



XXVI 



CHAPTER XX. P. 1.— p. 192. 

HOW TO MAKE GOLD. 



VAlchimiita mm travaglia a voto ; 
Bi cerca ? oro, ei cerca P oro, io dico 
Ch*ei cerca Poro ; e s* ei giungesse in porto 
Fora hen per se stesto e per altrui, 
L'oro e somma posama infra mortali ; 
Chiedine a Cavalier, chiedine a Dame, 
Chiedine a tutto il Mondo, 

Chiabrera. 



CHAPTER XXI. P. I.— p. 201. 

A DOUBT CONCEBNINO THE USES OF PHILOSOPHY. 



El comiemo de talud 
ea el sober, 
diitinguir y amocer 
qual es virtud. 

Proyerbios del Marques de Santillana. 



CHAPTER XXIL P. L— p. Ji^5, 



OfeHoe coiui, eke imienJfr pttcie 
Leeagum de U com di mttmra, 
Che ai pim di qtu^ eke n'ron »no ignoie ; 

S MttQ il pi^si tmette agni pamna 
De/ati^ ede la tmnie^ ck* i jt frirfo, 
Ne di culgo gU col, n^ if «//rv A<t (*imi. 

Tamsillo. 



CHAPTER XXIII. P. L— p. 213. 

ROWLAND DIXON AND HIS COMPANY OF PUPPBT8. 



AUi $e re tan ^/icaz el llanto, 
Uufabulas y historiaa retratadas, 

que parece verdad, y es dulce encanto, 

• • • • 

Y para el rulgo rudOf que ignorante 
aborrece el mofyar costoto, gtU»a 
el plato del gracioso extravagante ; 

Con que let hartas de contento y rita, 
gustando de mirar sayal groisero, 
mas que sutil y Candida catnita, 

Joseph Ortis di Vilucna. 



XXVlll 

CHAPTER XXIV. P. I.— p. 226. 

QUACK AND NO QUACK^ BEING AN ACC0T7NT OF DR, 
GREEN AND HIS MAN KEMP. POPULAR MEDICINE^ 
HERBARY, THEORY OF SIGNATURES, WILLIAM DOVE, 
JOHN WESLEY, AND BAXTER. 



Hold thy hand 1 health's dear maintain er ; 
Life perchance may burn the stronger : 
Having substance to maintain her 
She untouched may last the longer. 
When the Artist goes about 
To redress her flame, I doubt 
Oftentimes he snuffs it out. 

QUARLES. 



CHAPTER XXV. P. I.— p. 254. 
Hiatus valde lacrymahilis. 



Time flies away fast, 
The while we never remember 
How soon our life here 

Grows old with the year 
That dies with the next December ! 

Herrick. 



XXIX 

CHAPTER XXVI. P. I.— p. 256. 

DANIEL AT DONCA8TER ; THE REASON WHY HE WAS 
DESTINED FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION^ RATHER 
THAN HOLY ORDERS 3 AND SOME REMARKS UPON 
SERMONS. 



Je ne vous dissimuler^ amy Ijecteur, que je rCaye hien prSveu, 
et me Hens pour deuement adverty, que ne puis eviter la repre- 
hension d* aucuns, et les calomnies de plusieurs, ausquels cest 
Sscrit desplaira du tout, 

Christofle dk Hericourt. 



CHAPTER XXVII. P. I.— p. 272. 

a passage in procopius improved. a story con- 
cerning urim and thummim ; and the elder 
Daniel's opinion of the profession of the law. 



Here is Domine Picklock 
My man of Law, soUicits all my causes, 
Follows my business, makes and compounds my quarrels 
Between my tenants and me ; sows all my strifes 
And reaps them too, troubles the country for me. 
And vexes any neighbour that I please. 

Ben JoNSOif. 



XXX 



CHAPTER XXVIII. P. I.— p. 278. 

PETER HOPKINS. EFFECTS OF TIME AND CHANGE. 
DESCRIPTION OF HIS DWELLING-HOUSE. 



Combien de changemens depuis que mis au monde. 
Qui n'est qu* un point du terns 1 

Pasquier. 



CHAPTER XXIX. P. I.— p. 284. 

A HINT OF REMINISCENCE TO THE READER. THE 

CLOCK OF ST. George's, a word in honor of 

ARCHDEACON MARKHAM. 



There is a ripe season for every thing, and if you slip that 
or anticipate it, you dim the grace of the matter be it never so 
good. As we say by way of Proverb that an hasty birth brings 
forth blind whelps, so a good tale tumbled out before the time 
is ripe for it, is ungrateful to the hearer. 

Bishop Hac&ett. 



CHAPTER XXX. P. I.— p. 289. 

THE OLD BELLS RUNG TO A NEW TUNE. 



If the bell have any sides the clapper will find 'em. 

Ben JoNsoN. 



XXXI 



CHAPTER XXXI. P. I.— p. 302. 

MORE CONCERNING BELLS. 



Lord, ringing changes all our bells hath marr'd ; 

Jangled they have and jarr'd 
So long, they're out of tune, and out of frame ; 

They seem not now the same. 
Put them in frame anew, and once begin 
To tune them sp, that they may chime all in. 

Herbert. 



CHAPTER XXXII. P. I.— p. 308. 

AN INTRODUCTION TO CERTAIN PRELIMINARIES 
ESSENTIAL TO THE PROGRESS OF THIS WORK. 



Mcu demos ya el asiento en lo importante. 
Que el Hempo huye del mundo por la posta. 

Balbuena. 



PRELUDE OF MOTTOES. 

Now they that like it may : the rest may chuse. 

G. Wither. 

Je veuxctface descouverte qu'on spache que je fay lefol. Et 
pourquoy ne me le sera-Uil permis, ti le grand Solon dans 
Athene9,ned(mta de le fair e pour apporter un grand bien ct sa 
JRepublique f La Republique dont fay charge, est ce petit 
monde que Dieu a estably en moy ; pour la conservation diujuel 
Je ne scay meilleur moyen que de tromper mes affiictions par 
quelques honnestes jeux d* esprit ; appellez-les bouffonneries si 
ainsi le voulez, Pasquieb. 

• 

If you are so bold as to venture a blowing-up, look closely 
to it I for the plot lies deadly deep, and 'twill be between your 
legs before you be aware of it. — ^But of all things have a care 
of putting it in your pocket, for fear it takes fire, or runs away 
with your breeches. And if you can shun it, read it not when 
you are alone ; or at least not late in the evening ; for the ve- 
nom is strongest about midnight, and seizes most violently 
upon the head when the party is by himself. I shall not tell 
you one line of what is in it ; and therefore consider well what 



VI 



you do, and look to yourself. But if you be resolved to meddle, 
be sure have a care of catching cold, and keep to a moderate 
diet ; for there is danger and jeopardy in it besides. 

Dr. EIachard. 

— ^For those faults of barbarism, Doric dialect, extemporanean 
stile, tautologies, apish imitation, a rhapsody of rags gathered 
together from several dung-hills, excrements of authors, toyes 
and fopperies, confusedly tumbled out, vdthout art, invention, 
judgement, wit, learning, harsh, raw, rude, phantasticall, ab- 
surd, insolent, indiscreet, ill-composed, indigested, vain, scur- 
rile, idle, dull, and dry : — I confess all ; ('tis partly afifected;) 
thou canst not think worse of me than I do of myself. 'Tis 
not worth the reading I I yield it. I desire thee not to lose 
time in perusing so vain a subject. I should be peradventure 
loth myself to read him or thee so writing; 'tis not operte pre^ 
Hum. All I say is this, that I have precedents for it. 

BURTONt 

A foolish extravagant spirit, full of forms, figures, shapes, 
objects, ideas, apprehensions, motions, revolutions ; these are 
begot in the ventricle of memory, nourished in the womb of 
pia mater, and delivered upon the mellowing of the occasion. 
But the gift is good in those in whom it is acute, and I am 
thankful for it. Love's Labour's Lost. 

If the world like it not, so much the worse for them 

COWPBR. 



Vll 



*-iin boichetto, 
Donne per quello givan fior cogliendo. 
Con diletio, a/ quel, co^quel dicendo ; 
Eccoh, eccd I . . che d f — Ifiordalito i 
Va laperle viole ; 
PiiiL colhper le rose, cole, cole, 
Vaghe amorose, 
me, ch^l prun mi punge I 
Quell' altra me v* aggiunge, 
IP, ii, 0, ch* ^ quel che talta T 
Un grillo I un grillo ! 
Venite qua, correte, 
Ramponzoli cogliete ; 
£' non con essi I 
Si, son I — colei o colei 
Vien qua, men qua per funghi, un micoHno 
Piii colh, pii^ cola per sermollino, 

UoouNO Ubaldini or 
Franco Sacchitti. 



If the particulars seem too large or to be over tediously in- 
sisted upon, consider in how many impertinent and trifling 
discourses and actions the best of us do consume far more hours 
than the perusal of this requires minutes, and yet think it no 
tediousness : and let them call to mind how many volumes this 
age imprints and reads which are foolish if not wicked. Let 
them be persuaded likewise, that I have not written this for 
those who have no need thereof, or to shew my own wit or 



VIU 



compendiousDess but to instruct the ignorant ; to whom I 
should more often speak in vain, if I did not otberwhile by re- 
petitions and circumlocutions, stir up their affections, and 
beat into their understandings the knowledge and feeling of 
those things which I deliver. Yea, let them know that I know 
those expressions will be both pleasing and profitable to some 
which they imagine to be needless and superabundant ; and 
that I had rather twenty nice critics should censure me for a 
word here and there superfluous than that one of those other 
should want that which might explain my meanings to their 
capacities, and so make frustrate all my labour to those who 
have most need of it, and for whom it was chiefly intended. 

G. Wither. 

Tempus ad hoc mecum kUuitf portugue resedit, 

Nee fuit audaces impetus ire vicu. 
Nunc animi venere ; juvat nunc denique funem 

Solvere : 

j4ncora sublata est ; terrtp, portusque valete I 

Imus ; kabet ventos nostra carina suos. 

Wallius. 



THE DOCTOR, 

&;c. 



CHAPTER Vn. A. I. 



A FAMILY PARTY AT A NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOUR'S. 



Grood Sir, reject it not, although it bring 
Appearances of some fantastic thing 
At first unfolding 1 

Gboroi Wither to the King* 



I WAS in the fourth night of the story of the 
Doctor and his horse^ and had broken it off^ not 
like Scheherezade because it was time to get 
up^ but because it was time to go to bed. It 
was at thirty-five minutes after ten o'clock^ on 
the ^th of July in the year of our Lord 1813. 
I finished my glass of punchy tinkled the spoon 

VOL. I. B 



against its side^ as if making music to my medi- 
tationsy and having my eyes fixed upon the 
Bhow Begum, who was sitting opposite to me 
at the head of her own table, I said, '' It ought 
to be written in a Book !'* 

There had been a heavy thunder-storm in 

the afternoon ; and though the thermometer 

had fallen from 78 to 70, still the atmosphere 

was charged. If that mysterious power by 

which the nerves convey sensation and make 

their impulses obeyed, be (as experiments 

seem to indicate) identical with the galvanic 

fluid ; and if the galvanic and electric fluids 

be the same (as philosophers have more than 

surmised;) and if the lungs (according to a 

happy hypothesis) elaborate for us from the 

light of heaven this pabulum of the brain, and 

material essence, or essential matter of genius, 

— it may be that the ethereal fire which I had 

inhaled so largely during the day produced the 

bright conception, or at least impregnated and 

quickened the latent seed. The punch, reader, 

had no share in it. 

I had spoken as it were abstractedly, and the 



look which accompanied the words was rather 
cogitative than regardant. The Bhow Begum 
laid down her snuff-box and replied, entering 
into the feeling, as well as echoing the words, 
" It ought to be written in a book,-»certainly it 
ought." 

They may talk as they will of the dead lan- 
guages. Our auxiliary verbs give us a power 
which the ancients, with all their varieties of 
mood, and inflections of tense, never could 
attain. " It must be written in a book,** said I, 
encouraged by her manner. The mood was the 
same, the tense was the same ; but the grada- 
tion of meaning was marked in a way which a 
Greek or Latin grammarian might have envied 
as well as admired. 

'* Pshaw ! nonsense ! stuff! " said my wife's 
eldest sister, who was sitting at the right hand 
of the Bhow Begum ; *^ I say write it in a book 
indeed!" My wife's youngest sister was sitting 
diagonally opposite to the last speaker; she 
lifted up her eyes and smiled. It was a smile 
which expressed the same opinion as the late 
vituperative tones ; there was as much of in- 




credulity in it ; but more of wonder and less 
of vehemence. 

My wife was at my left hand, making a cap for 
her youngest daughter, and with her tortoise- 
shell-paper work-box before her. I turned to- 
wards her and repeated the words, " It must be 
written in a book !" But I smiled while I was 
speaking, and was conscious of that sort of 
meaning in my eyes, which calls out contradic- 
tion for the pleasure of sporting with it. 
" Write it in a book ? " she rephed, " I am 
sure you wo'nt ! " and she looked at me with a 
frown. Poets have written much upon their 
ladies' frowns, but I do not remember that they 
have ever described the thing with much accu- 
racy. When my wife frowns, two perpendicular 
wrinkles, each three quarters of an inch in 
length, are formed in the forehead, the base of 
each resting upon the top of the nose, and 
equi-distant from each other. The poets have 
also attributed dreadful effects to the frown of 
those whom they love. I cannot say that I 
ever experienced any thing very formidable in 
my wife's. At present she knew her eyes 



would give the lie to it if they looked at me 
steadily for a moment ; so they wheeled to the 
left about quick, off at a tangent, in a direction 
to the Bhow Begum, and then she smiled. 
She could not prevent the smile ; but she tried 
to make it scornful. 

My wife's nephew was sitting diagonally with 
her, and opposite his mother, on the left hand 
of the Bhow Begum. " Oh !" he exclaimed, 
*' it ought to be written in a book ! it will be a 
glorious book ! write it, uncle, I beseech you !*' 
My wife's nephew is a sensible lad. He reads 
my writings, likes my stories, admires my sing- 
ing, and thinks as I do in politics : — a youth of 
parts and considerable promise. 

" He will write it !" said the Bhow Begum, 
taking up her snuff-box, and accompanying the 
words with a nod of satisfaction and encourage- 
ment. " He will never be so foolish !" said my 
wife. My wife's eldest sister rejoined, " he is 
foolish enough for any thing." 



h 



CHAPTER VI. A. I. 

SHEWING THAT AN AUTHOR MAY MORE EASILY BE 
KEPT AWAKE BY HIS OWN IMAGINATIONS THAN PUT 
TO SLEEP BY THEM HIMSELF^ WHATEVER MAY BB 
THEIR EFFECT UPON HIS READERS. 



Thou sleepest worse than if a mouse should be forced to 
take up her lodging in a cat's ear ; a little infant that breeds 
its teeth, should it lie with thee, would cry out as if thou 
wert the more unquiet bedfellow. Webster. 



When I ought to have been asleep the " unborn 
pages crowded on my soul." The Chapters 
ante-initial and post-initial appeared in delight- 
ful prospect " long drawn out :" the beginning, 
the middle and the end were evolved before 
me ; the whole spread itself forth, and then the 
parts unravelled themselves and danced the 
hays. The very types rose in judgment against 
me, as if to persecute me for the tasks which 



during so many years I had imposed upon them. 
Capitals and small letters, pica andlong-primer, 
brevier and bourgeois, english and nonpareU, 
minion and pearl, Romans and Italics, black- 
letter and red, past over my inward sight. The 
notes of admiration ! ! ! stood straight up in 
view as I lay on the one side; and when I 
turned on the other to avoid them, the notes 
of interrogation cocked up their hump-backs??? 
Then came to recollection the various incidents 
of the eventful tale. " Visions of glory spare 
my aching sight!" The various personages, 
like spectral faces in a fit of the vapours, stared 
at me through my eyelids. The Doctor op- 
pressed me like an incubus ; and for the Horse, 
— he became a perfect night-mare. " Leave 
me, leave me to repose !" 

Twelve by the kitchen clock ! — still restless ! 
— One ! O Doctor, for one of thy comfortable 
composing draughts! — ^Two! here's a case of 
insomnolence ! I, who in summer close my lids 
as instinctively as the daisy when the sun goes 
down ; and who in winter could hybernate as 
well as Bruin, were I but provided with as much 



8 



fat to support me during the season^ and keep 
the wick of existence burning : — I, who, if my 
pedigree were properly made out, should be 
found to have descended from one of the Seven 
Sleepers, and from the Sleeping Beauty in the 
Wood! 

I put my arms out of bed* I turned the 
pillow for the sake of applying a cold surface 
to my cheek. I stretched my feet into the cold 
corner. I listened to the river, and to the 
ticking of my watch. I thought of all sleepy 
sounds and all soporific things: the flow of 
water, the humming of bees, the motion of a 
boat, the waving of a field of corn, the nodding 
of a mandarine's head on the chimney-piece, a 
horse in a mill, the opera, Mr. Humdrum's 
conversation, Mr. Proser's poems, Mr. Laxa- 
tive's speeches, Mr. Lengthy*s sermons. I tried 
the device of my own childhood, and fancied 
that the bed revolved with me round and round. 
Still the Doctor visited me as perseveringly as 
if I had been his best patient; and, call up 
what thoughts I would to keep him off, the 
Horse charged through them all. 



9 



At last McMrpheus reminded me of Dr. Tor* 
pedo's diTinity lectures^ where the voice» the 
manner, the matter, even the very atmosphere, 
and the streamy candle-light were all alike aom- 
nific; — ^where he who by strong effort lifted 
up his head, and forced open the reluctant 
eyes, never failed to see all around him fast 
asleep. Lettuces, cow8li|>-wine, poppy-syrup, 
mandragora, hop-pillows, spiders'-web pills, 
and the whole tribe of narcotics, up to bung 
and the black drop, would have failed: but 
this was irresistible; and thus twenty years 
after date I found benefit from having at- 
tended the course. 



h2 



10 



CHAPTER V. A. I. 

SOMETHING CONCERNING THE PHILOSOPHY OF DREAMS, 
AND THE AUTHOR*S EXPERIENCE IN AERIAL HORSE- 
MANSHIP. 



If a dream should come in now to make you afear'd, 
With a windmill on his head and bells at his beard, 
Would you straight wear your spectacles here at your toes. 
And your boots on your brows and your spurs on your nose ? 

Ben Jonson. 



The wise ancients held that dreams are from 
Jove. Virgil hath told us from what gate of 
the infernal regions they go out, but at which of 
the five entrances of the town of Mansoul they 
get in John Bunyan hath not explained. Some 
have conceited that unembodied spirits have ac- 
cess to us during sleep, and impress upon the 
passive faculty, by divine permission, presenti- 
ments of those things whereof it is fitting that 



11 



we should be thus dimly forewarned. This 
opinion is held by Baxter^ and to this also doth 
Bishop Newton incline. The old atomists 
supposed that the likenesses or spectres of 
corporeal things, (exuvue scilicet rerum, rel 
effluvia, as they are called by Vaninus, when 
he takes advantage of them to explain the Fata 
Morgana) the atomists I say, supposed that 
these spectral forms which are constantly 
enutted from all bodies, 

Omne genus quoniam passim simulacra feruntur* 

assail the soul when she ought to be at rest ; 
according to which theory all the lathered faces 
that are created every morning in the looking- 
glass, and all the smiling ones that my Lord 
Simper and Mr. Smallwit contemplate there 
with so much satisfaction during the day, must 
at this moment be floating up and down the 
world. Others again opine, as if in contradic- 
tion to those who pretend life to be a dream, 
that dreams are realities, and that sleep sets 
the soul free like a bird from a cage. John 

* Lucretius. 



12 



Henderson saw the spirit of a slumbering cat 
pass from her in pursuit of a visionary mouse ; 
— (I know not whether he would have admitted 
the fact as an argument for materialism) ; and 
the soul of Hans Engelbreeht not only went to 
hell, but brought back from it a stench which 
proved to all the bystanders that it had been 
there. — ^Faugh ! 

Whether then my spirit that night found its 
way out at the nose, (for I sleep with my mouth 
shut) and actually sallied out seeking adven- 
tures ; or whether the spectrum of the Horse 
floated into my chamber ; or some benevolent 
genius or daemon assumed the well-known and 
welcome form; or whether the dream were 
merely a dream,— 

sifu^ en espiritu, hfu^ 
en cuerpo, no sh ; que yo 
solo s^, que no lo sh ; * 

SO however it was that in the visions of the 
night I mounted Nobs. Tell me not of As- 
tolfo's hippogrifF, or Pacolet's wooden steed ; 
nor 

♦ Caloeron. 



13 

Of that wonderous horse of brass 
Whereon the Tartar king did pass ; 

nor of Alboraky who was the best beast for a 

night-journey that ever man bestrode. Tell 

me not even of Pegasus ! I have ridden him 

many a time ; by day and by night have I ridden 

him; high and low, far and wide, round the 

earth, and about it, and over it, and under it. 

I know all his earth-paces, and his sky-paces. 

I have tried him at a walk, at an amble, at a 

trot, at a canter, at a hand-gallop, at full gallop 

and at full speed. I have proved him in the 

manege with single turns and the manege with 

double turns, his bounds, his curvets, his 

pirouettes, and his pistes, his croupade and his 

bdlotade, his gallop-galliard and his capriole. 

I have been on him when he has glided through 

the sky with wings outstretched and motionless, 

like a kite or a summer cloud ; I have bestrode 

him when he went up like a bittern with a 

strong spiral flight, round, round and round, 

and upward, upward, upward, circling and 

rising still ; and again when he has gone full 

sail, or full fly, with his tail as straight as a 



14 

comet's behind him. But for a hobby or a 
night horse, Pegasus is nothing to Nobs. 

Where did we go on that memorable night ? 
What did we see? — What did we do? — Or 
rather what did we not see ? and what did we 
not perform ! 



16 



CHAPTER IV. A. I. 



A CONVERSATION AT THE BREAKFAST TABLE. 



Tel condamne mon Coq-tt-Vdne qui un jour en jwtifiera le 
bon sens. La Pretieusk. 



I WENT down to breakfast as usual overflowing 
with joyous thoughts. For mirth and for music 
the skylark is but a type of me. I warbled a 
few wood notes wild, and then full of the un- 
born work, addressed myself to my wife's eldest 
sister, and asked if she would permit me to de- 
dicate the Book to her. " What book ?" shie 
replied. « The History," said I, '* of Dr. 
Daniel Dove of Doncaster, and his Horse 
Nobs." She answered, " No indeed ! I will 
have no such nonsense dedicated to me!" — 
and with that she drew up her upper lip, and 
the lower region of the nose. I turned to my 
wife's youngest sister : *' Shall I have the plea- 



16 



sure of dedicating it to you ?" She raised lier 
eyes^ inclined her head forwards with a smile 
of negation, and begged leave to decline the 
honour. " Commandante/* said I, to my wife 
and Commandress, '' shall I dedicate it then to 
you?" My Commandante made answer, ** not 
unless you have something better to dedicate." 
" So Ladies!" said I; " the stone which the 
builders rejected," — and then looking at my 
wife's youngest sister-" Oh, it will be such a 
book !" The manner and the tone were so much 
in earnest that they arrested the bread and 
butter on the way to her mouth ; and she ex- 
claimed, with her eyes full of wonder and in- 
credulity at the same time, " Why you never 
can be serious?" " Not serious?" said I; *' why 
I have done nothing but think of it and dream 
of it the whole night." " He told me so," re- 
joined my Commandante, '^ the first thing in 
the morning." " Ah Stupey !" cried my wife's 
eldest sister, accompanying the compliment 
with a protrusion of the head, and an extension 
of the lips, which disclosed not only the whole 
remaining row of teeth, but the chasms that 



17 



had been made in it by the tooth drawer ; hi- 
atus valde lacrymabiles. 

'^ Two volumeS}** said I, ** and this in the title- 
page !*' So taking out my pencil, I drew upon the 
back of a letter the mysterious monogram, 
erudite in its appearance as the digamma of 
Mr. A. F. Valpy. 




It past from hand to hand. " Why he is not in 
earnest?" said my wife's youngest sister. ** He 
never can be," replied my wife. And yet begin- 
ning to think that peradventure I was, she 
looked at me with a quick turn of the eye, — " a 
pretty subject indeed for you to employ your 
time upon ! You, — vema whehaha yohu almad 
otenba twandri, athancodT I have thought 
proper to translate this part of my Comman- 
dante's speech into the Garamna tongue. 



18 



CHAPTER III. A. I. 



THE UTILITY OF POCKETS. A COMPLIMENT PROPERLY 

RECEIVED. 



La tasca ^ propria cosa da Christiani, 

Benedetto Varchi. 



My eldest daughter bad finished her Latin les- 
sons, and my son had finished his Greek ; and 
I was sitting at my desk, pen in hand, and in 
mouth at the same time, (a substitute for biting 
the nails which I recommend to all onygopha- 
gists ;) when the Bhow Begum came in with 
her black velvet reticule, suspended as usual 
from her arm by its silver chain. 

Now of all the inventions of the Tailor (who 
is of all artists the most inventive) I hold 
the pocket to be the most commodious, and 
saving the fig leaf, the most indispensable. 



19 



Birds have their craw ; ruminating beasts their 
first or ante-stomach ; the monkey has his 
cheek, the opossum her pouch ; and, so neces- 
sary is some convenience of this kind for the 
human animal, that the savage who cares not 
for clothing makes for himself a pocket if he 
can. The Hindoo carries his snuff-box in his 
turban. Some of the inhabitants of Congo 
make a secret fob in their woolly toupet, of 
which as P. Labat says, the worst use they 
make is — ^to carry poison in it. The Matolas, 
a long haired race who border upon the CafFres, 
form their locks into a sort of hollow cylinder 
in which they bear about their little imple- 
ments ; certes a more sensible bag than such 
as is worn at court. The New Zealander is 
less ingenious ; he makes a large opening in 
his ea7, and carries his knife in it. The Ogres 
who are worse than savages, and whose igno- 
rance and brutality is in proportion to their 
bulk, are said, upon the authority of tradition, 
when they have picked up a stray traveller or 
two more than they require for their supper, 
to lodge them in a hollow tooth as a place of 



20 



security till breakfast ; whence it may be in- 
ferred that they are not liable to tooth ache, 
and that they make no use of tooth-picks. 
Ogres, Savages, Beasts and Birds aU require 
something to serve the purpose of a pocket. 
Thus much for the necessity of the thing. 
Touching its antiquity much might be said ; 
for it would not be difficult to show, with that 
little assistance from the auxiliaries must and 
have and been which enabled Whitaker of 
Manchester to write whole quartos of hypo- 
thetical history in the potential mood, that 
pockets are coeval with clothing : and, as 
erudite men have maintained that language 
and even letters are of divine origin, there 
might with like reason be a conclusion drawn 
from the twenty-first verse of the third chapter 
of the book of Genesis, which it would not be 
easy to impugn. Moreover Nature herself 
shows us the utility, the importance, nay the 
indispensability, or, to take a hint from the 
pure language of our diplomatists, the sineqva- 
nonniness of pockets. There is but one organ 
which is common to all animals whatsoever : 



2\ 



some are without eyes, many without noses ; 
some have no heads, others no tails ; some nei- 
ther one nor the other ; some there are who 
have no brains, others very pappy ones ; some 
no hearts, others very bad ones ; but all have 
a stomach, — and what is the stomach but a live 
inside pocket? Hath not Van Helmont said of 
it, " saccus vel pera est, ut ciborum olla ? " 

Dr. Towers used to have his coat pockets 
made of capacity to hold a quarto volume, — a 
wise custom ; but requiring stout cloth, good 
buckram, and strong thread well'waxeJ. I do 
not so greatly commend the humour of Dr. 
Ingenhouz, whose coat was lined with pockets 
of all sizes, wherein, in his latter years, when 
science had become to him as a plaything, he 
carried about various materials for chemical ex- 
periments : among the rest so many composi- 
tions for fulminating powders in glass tubes, 
separated only by a cork in the middle of the 
tube, that, if any person had unhappily given 
him a blow with a stick, he might have blown 
up himself and the Doctor too. For myself, 

four coat pockets of the ordinary dimensions 



22 



content me ; in these a sufficiency of conveni- 
ences may be carried^ and that sufficiency me- 
thodically arranged. For mark me^ gentle or 
ungentle Reader ! there is nothing like method 
in pockets, as well as in composition : and what 
orderly and methodical man would have his 
pocket-handkerchief, and his pocket-book, and 
the key of his door (if he be a bachelor living 
in chambers) and his knife and his loose pence 
and half-pence, and the letters which peradven- 
ture he might just have received, or peradven- 
ture he may intend to drop in the post-office, 
two-penny or general, as he passes by, and his 
snuff, if he be accustomed so to regale his ol- 
factory conduits, or his tobacco-box, if he 
prefer the masticable to the pulverized weed ; 
or his box of lozenges if he should be troubled 
with a tickling cough ; and the sugar-plumbs 
and the gingerbread nuts which he may be car- 
rying home to his own children, or to any 
other small men and women upon whose hearts 
he may have a design ; — who I say would Mke 
to have all this in chaos and confusion, one ly- 
ing upon the other, and the thing which is 



2S 



wanted first fated alway to be undermost ! — (Mr. 
Wilberforce knows the inconvenience ; — ) the 
snuff working its way out to the gingerbread^ 
the sugar-plumbs insinuating themselves into 
the folds of the pocket-handkerchief, the pence 
grinding the lozenges to dust for the benefit 
of the pocket-book^ and the door key busily 
employed in unlocking the letters ? 

Now, forasmuch as the commutation of fe- 
male pockets for the reticule leadeth to incon- 
veniences like this^ (not to mention that the 
very name of commutation ought to be held in 
abhorrence by all who hold day-light and fresh 
air essential to the comfort and salubrity of 
dwelling-houses,) I abominate that bag of the 
Bhow Begum, notwithstanding the beauty of 
the silver chain upon the black velvet. And 
perceiving at this time that the clasp of its sil- 
ver setting was broken, so that the mouth of 
the bag was gaping pitiably, like a sick or de- 
funct oyster, I congratulated her as she came 
in upon this farther proof of the commodious- 
ness of the invention ; for here, in the country, 
there is no workman who can mend that clasp. 



24 

and the bag must therefore either be laid aside, 
or used in that deplorable state. 

When the Bhow Begum had seated herself I 
told her how my proffered dedication had been 
thrice rejected with scorn, and repeating the 
offer I looked for a more gracious reply. But, 
as if scorn had been the influenza of the female 
mind that morning, she answered, ^' No ; in- 
deed she would not have it after it had been 
refused by every body else." " Nay, nay," said 
I ; ''it is as much in your character to accept, 
as it was in their's to refuse." While I was 
speaking she took a pinch of snuff*; the nasal 
titillation co-operated with my speech, for when 
any one of the senses is pleased, the rest are 
not likely to continue out of humour. " Well," 
she replied, '' I will have it dedicated to me, 
because I shall delight in the book." And 
she powdered the carpet with tobacco dust as 
she spake. 



25 



CHAPTER 11. A. I. 

CONCERNING DEDICATIONS^ PRINTERS TYPES AND 

IMPERIAL INK. 



// y aura des clefs, et det ouvertures de mes secrets. 

La Pretieuse. 



Monsieur Dellon^ having been in the Inquisi- 
tion at Goa, dedicated an account of that tribu- 
nal, and of his own sufferings to Mademoiselle 
Du Cambout de Coislin, in these words : 

Mademoiselle 

J'aurois tort de me plaindre des 
rigueurs de r Inquisition, et des mauvais traite^ 
mens que fay eprouvez de la part de ses mi- 
nistres, puisquen me Jburnissant la mati6re de 
cet ouvrage, ils mont procurt Vavantage de 
vous le dedier, 

VOL. I. c 



26 



This is the book which that good man Clau- 
dius Buchanan with so much propriety put into 
the hands of the Grand Inquisitor of India, 
when he paid him a visit at the Inquisition, and 
asked him his opinion of the accuracy of the 
relation upon the spot ! 

The Frenchman's compliment may truly i)e 
said to have been far-fetched and dearly bought. 
Heaven forfend that I should either go so far 
for one, or purchase it at such a price ! 

A dedication has oftentimes cost the unhappy 
autho^ a greater consumption of thumb and fin- 
ger-nail than the whole book besides, and all 
varieties of matter and manner have been re- 
sorted to. Mine must be so far in character 
with the delectable history which it introduces 
that it shall be unlike all which have ever gone 
before it. I knew a man, (one he was who would 
have been an ornament to his country if me- 
thodism and madness had not combined to over- 
throw a bright and creative intellect) who, in 
one of his insaner moods, printed a sheet 
and a half of muddy rhapsodies with the title 
of the " Standard of God Displayed : " and he 



27 



pre&ced it by saying that the price of a per- 
fect book, upon a perfect sabject, ougbt to be 
a perfect sum in a perfect coin ; tbat is to say 
one guinea. Now as Dr. Daniel Dove was a 
perfect Doctor, and his horse Nobs was a per- 
fect horse, and as I humbly hope their history 
will be a perfect history, so ought the Dedica- 
tion thereunto to be perfect in its kind. Perfect 
therefore it shall be, as far as kalotypography 
can make it. For though it would be hopeless 
to exceed all former Dedications in the turn of 
a compliment or of a sentence, in the turn of 
the letters it is possible to exceed them all. It 
was once my fortune to employ a printer who 
had a love for his art ; and having a taste that 
way myself, we discussed the merits of a new 
font one day when I happened to call in upon 
him. I objected to the angular inclination of 
a capital italic A which stood upon its pins as 
if it were starting aghast from the next letter 
on the left, and was about to tumble upon that 
to the right ; in which case down would go the 
rest of the word, like a row of soldiers which 
children make with cards. My printer was too 



28 



deeply enamoured with the beauties of his font, 
to have either eye or ear for its defects ; and 
hastily waving that point he called my attention 
to a capital R in the same line, which cocked 
up its tail just as if it had been nicked; that cock 
of the tail had fascinated him. " Look Sir," saicl 
he^ while his eyes glistened with all the ardouf 
of an amateur ; " look at that turn ! — that's 
sweet, Sir ! " and drawing off the hand with the 
forefinger of which he had indicated it, he de- 
scribed in the air the turn that had delighted 
him, in a sort of heroic flourish, his head with a 
diminished axis, like the inner stile of a Pente- 
graph, following the movement. I have never 
seen that R since without remembering him. 

y 

i 9 

read the stars, may read in them the secret 
which he seeketh. 

But the turns of my Dedication to the Bhow 
Begum shallnot be trusted to the letter founders, 
a set of men remarkable for involving their 



29 



craft in such mystery that no one ever taught 
it to another^ every one who has practised it 
having been obliged either surreptitiously to 
obtain the secret, or to invent a method for 
himself. It shall be in the old English letter, 
not only because that alphabet hath in its curves 
and angles, its frettings and redundant lines, a 
sort of picturesque similitude with Gothic ar- 
chitecture, but also because in its breadth and 
beauty it will display the colour of the ink 
to most advantage. For the Dedication shall 
not be printed in black after the ordinary 
fashion, nor in white like the Sermon upon the 
« Excise Laws, nor in red after the mode of Dr. 
Dibdin's half titles, but in the colour of that 
imperial encaustick ink, which by the laws of 
the Roman Empire it was death for any but 
the Roman Emperor himself to use. We Bri- 
tons live in a free country, wherein every man 
may use what coloured ink seemeth good to 
him, and put as much gall in it as he pleases, or 
any other ingredient whatsoever. Moreover 
this is an imperial age, in which to say nothing 
of M. Ingelby the Emperor of the Conjurors, 



30 



we have seen no fewer than four new Emperors. 
He of Russia who did not think the old title of 
Peter the Great good enough for him : he of 
France, for whom any name but that of Ty- 
rant or Murderer is too good ; he of Austria 
who took up one imperial appellation to cover 
over the humiliating manner in which he laid 
another down ; and he of Hayti, who if he be 
wise will order all public business to be carried 
on in the talkee-talkee tongue, and make it high 
treason for any person to speak or write French 
in his dominions. We also must dub our old 
Parliament imperial forsooth ! that we may not 
be behindhand with the age. Then we have Im- 
perial Dining Tables! Imperial Oil for nourish- 
ing the hair ! Imperial Liquid for Boot Tops ! 
Yea, and, by all the Caesars deified and damni- 
fied. Imperial Blacking ! For my part I love to 
go with the stream, so I will have an Imperial 
Dedication. 

Behold it Reader. Therein is mystery. 



Co 



die BfiotD Besitm 



I > 

■■ I 



4 



:ri- ; I 



. I ^, ^. 



I ■ 






••.* 

>;-. 









r I • 



N 






33 



CHAPTER I. A. I. 



"SO BOOK CAN BR COMPLETE WITHOUT A PRRFACR. 



I see no cause but men may pick their leeth 
Though Brutus with a sword did kill himself. 

Taylor, the ^'ater Poet. 



Who was the Inventor of Prefaces? I shall be 
obliged to the immortal Mr. Urban, (immortal, 
because like the king in law he never dies) if he 
will propound this question for me in his Maga- 
zine, that great lumber-room wherein small 
ware of all kinds has been laid up higgledy- 
piggledy by half-penny-worths or farthing- 
worths at a time for fourscore years, till like 
broken glass, rags, or rubbish it has acquired 
value by mere accumulation. To send a book 
like this into the world without a Preface 
would be as impossible as it is to appear at 



34 



Court without a bag at the head and a sword at 
the tail, for as the perfection of dress must be 
shown at Court, so in this history should the 
perfection of histories be exhibited. The book 
must be omni genere absolutum ; it must prove 
and exemplify the perfectibility of books : yea 
with all imaginable respect for the *^ Delicate 
Investigation,'" which I leave in undisputed pos- 
session of an appellation so exquisitely appro- 
priate, I conceive that the title of the Book, 
as a popular designation icar c^o^viv, should be 
transferred from the edifying report of that In- 
quiry, to the present unique, unrivalled and 
unrivable production ; a production the like 
whereof hath not been, is not, and will not be. 
Here however let me warn my Greek and 
Arabian translators how they render the word, 
that if they offend the Mufti or the Patriarch, 
the offence as well as the danger may be theirs: 
I wash my hands of both. I write in plain En- 
glish, innocently and in the simplicity of my 
heart : what may be made of it in heathen 
languages concerns not me. 



35 



ANTE-PREFACE. 



I here present thee with a hive of bees, laden some with 
wax, and some with honey. Fear not to approach ! There 
are no Wasps, there are no Hornets here. If some wanton 
Bee should chance to buzz about thine ears, stand thy ground 
and hold thy hands : there's none will sting thee if thou 
strike not first. If any do, she hath honey in her bag will 
cure thee too. Quarlss. 



Prefaces^ said Charles Blount, Gent., who 
committed suicide because the law would not 
allow him to marry his brother's widow,— (a law 
be it remarked in passing, which is not sanc- 
tioned by reason, and which instead of being in 
conformity with scripture, is in direct opposi- 
tion to it, being in fact the mere device of a 
corrupt and greedy church) — "Prefaces," said 
this flippant, ill-opinioned and unhappy man, 
" ever were, and still are but of two sorts, let 
other modes and fashions vary as they please. 



36 



Let the profane long peruke succeed the godly 
cropt hair ; the cravat^ the ruff; presbytery, 
popery ; and popery presbytery again, yet still 
the author keeps to his old and wonted method 
of prefacing ; when at the begining of his book 
he enters, either with a halter about his neck, 
submitting himself to his reader's mercy 
whether he shall be hanged, or no ; or else in 
a huffing manner he appears with the halter in 
his hand, and threatens to hang his reader, if 
he gives him not his good word. This with 
the excitement of some friends to his under- 
taking, and some few apologies for want of 
time, books, and the like, are the constant and 
usual shams of all scribblers as well ancient as 
modern." — This was not true then, nor is it 
now ; but when he proceeds to say, " for my 
part I enter the lists upon another score," — 
so say I with him ; and my Preface shall say 
the rest. 



87 



PREFACE. 



Oh for a quill plucked from a Seraph's wing ! 

Young. 

So the Poet exclaimed; and his exclamation 
may be quoted as one example more of the 
vanity of human wishes ; for in order to get a 
Seraph's quill it would be necessary^ according 
to Mrs. Glasse's excellent item in her directions 
for roasting a hare, to begin by catching a Se- 
raph. A quill from a Seraph's wing is, I confess, 
above my ambition ; but one from a Peacock's 
tail was within my reach ; and be it known unto 
all people, nations and languages, that with a 
Peacock's quill this Preface hath been penned 
— literally — truly, and bona-Jidely speaking. 
And this is to write, as the learned old Pasquier 
says, pavonesquementy which in latin minted 
for the nonce may be rendered pavonick and in 
English peacockically or peacockishly, which- 
ever the reader may like best. That such a pen 
has verily and indeed 6een used upon this 



38 



occasion I affirm. I affirm it upon the word of a 
true man ; and here is a Captain of his Majes- 
ty's Navy at my elbow^ who himself made the 
pen, and who, if evidence were required to the 
fact, would attest it by as round an oath as ever 
rolled over a right English tongue. Nor will the 
time easily escape his remembrance, the bells 
being at this moment ringing, June 4, 1814, to 
celebrate the King's birthday, and the public 
notification that peace has been concluded with 
France. 

I have oftentimes had the happiness of seeing 
due commendation bestowed by gentle critics, 
unknown admirers and partial friends upon my 
pen, which has been married to all amiable epi- 
thets: — classical, fine, powerful, tender, touch- 
ing, pathetic, strong, fanciful, daring, elegant, 
sublime, beautiful. I have read these epithets 
with that proper satisfaction which when thus 
applied they could not fail to impart, and some- 
times qualified the pride which they inspired by 
looking at the faithful old tool of the Muses be- 
side me, worn to the stump in their service ; the 
one end mended up to the quick in that spirit 



39 



of oeconomy which becomes a son of the Lack- 
land family^ and shortened at the other by the 
gradual and alternate processes of burning and 
biting, till a scant inch only is left above the 
finger place. Philemon Holland was but a 
type of me in this respect. Indeed I may be 
allowed to say that I have improved upon his 
practice, or at least that I get more out of a 
pen than he did, for in the engraved title-page 
to his Cyrupaedia, where there appears the Por - 
trait of the Interpres marked by a great D in- 
closing the Greek letter ^ (which I presume de- 
signates Doctor Philemon) cBtatis suae 80. A**. 
163S, it may be plainly seen that he used his pen 
only at one end. Peradventure he delighted 
not, as I do, in the mitigated ammoniac odour. 
But thou, O gentle reader, who in the exer- 
cise of thy sound judgment and natural be- 
nignity wilt praise this Preface, thou mayest 
with perfect propriety bestow the richest epi- 
thets upon the pen wherewith its immortal 
words were first clothed in material forms. 
Beautiful, elegant, fine, splendid, fanciful, will 
be to the very letter of truth : versatile it is 



40 



as the wildest wit ; flexible as the most mon- 
key-like talent ; and shouldst thou call it ten- 
der, I will whisper in thine ear — that it is only 
too soft. Yet softness may be suitable ; for of 
my numerous readers one half will probably 
be soft by sex, and of the other half a very 
considerable proportion soft by nature. Soft 
therefore be the Pen and soft the strain. 

I have drawn up the window blinds (though 
sunshine at this time acts like snufF upon the 
mucous membrane of my nose) in order that 
the light may fall upon this excellent Poet's 
wand as I wave it to and fro, making cuts five 
and six of the broad-sword exercise. Every 
feather of its fringe is now lit up by the sun ; 
the hues of green and gold and amethyst are 
all brought forth ; and that predominant lustre 
which can only be likened to some rich metallic 
oxyd; and that spot of deepest purple, the pupil 
of an eye for whose glorious hue neither metals 
nor flowers nor precious stones afford a resem- 
blance: its likeness is only to be found in ani- 
mated life, in birds and insects whom nature 
seems to have formed when she was most pro- 



41 



digal of beauty : I have seen it indeed upon the 
sea, but it has been in some quiet bay when the 
reflection of the land combined with the sky 
and the ocean to produce it. 

And what can be more emblematic of the work 
which I am beginning than the splendid instru- 
ment wherewith the Preface is traced? What 
could more happily typify the combination of 
parts each perfect in itself when separately 
considered, yet all connected into one harmo- 
nious whole; the story running through like 
the stem or back-bone, which the episodes and 
digressions fringe like so many featherlets, lead- 
ing up to that catastrophe, the gem or eye-star, 
for which the whole was formed, and in which 
all terminate. 

They who are versed in the doctrine of sym- 
pathies and the arcana of correspondences as 
revealed to the Swedish Emanuel, will doubt- 
less admire the instinct or inspiration which 
directed my choice to the pavonian Pen. The 
example should be followed by all consumers 
of ink and quill. Then would the lover borrow 
a feather from the turtle dove. The lawyer 



42 



would have a large assortment of kite^ hawk^ 
buzzard and vulture : his clients may use pi- 
geon or gull. Poets according to their varieties. 
Mr. the Tom Tit. Mr. the Water- 
wagtail. Mr. the Crow. Mr. the 

Mocking-bird. Mr. the Magpie. Mr. 

the Sky-lark. Mr. the Eagle. Mr. 

-— — the Swan. Lord the Black Swan. 

Critics some the Owl^ others the Butcher Bird. 
Your challenger must indite with one from the 
wing a game cock : he who takes advantage of 
a privileged situation to ofier the wrong and 
shrink from the atonement will find a white 
feather. Your dealers in public and private 
scandal, whether Jacobins or Anti-Jacobins, 
the pimps and panders of a profligate press 
should use none but duck feathers, and those 
of the dirtiest that can be found in the purlieus 
of Pimlico or St. George's Fields. But for the 
Editor of the Edinburgh Review, whether he 
dictates in morals or in taste, or displays his 
peculiar talent in political prophecy, he must 
continue to use goose quills. Stick to the goose 
Mr. Jeffrey, while you live stick to the goose ! 



■ s 



43 



INITIAL CHAPTER. 



£| ov ^i) rd irpwra.— •Homer. 



They who remember the year 1800 will re- 
member also the great controversy whether it 
was the beginning of a century, or the end of 
one ; a controversy in which all Magazines, all 
Newspapers, and all persons took part. Now 
as it has been deemed expedient to divide this 
work, or to speak more emphatically this 
Opus, or more emphatically still this Ergon, 
into Chapters Ante-Initial and Post-Initial, a 
dispute of the same nature might arise among 
the commentators in after ages, if especial care 
were not now taken to mark distinctly the be- 
ginning. This therefore is the Initial Chap- 
ter, neither Ante nor Post^ but standing be- 



44 



tween both ; the point of initiation, the goal of 
the Antes, the starting place of the Posts; 
the mark at which the former end their ca- 
reer and from whence the latter take their 
departure. 



4j 



THE DOCTOR, 



Eccoti il libro ; mettivi ben cura 
Iddio t* ajuti e dia buona ventura. 

Orl. Innam. 



CHAPTER I. P. I. 



THE SUBJECT OF THIS HISTORY AT HOME AND AT TEA. 



If thou be a severe sour complexioned man then I here dis- 
allow thee to be a competent judge. Iza ak Walton. 



The clock of St. George's had struck five. 
Mrs. Dove had just poured out the Doctor's 
seventh cup of tea. The Doctor was sitting 
in his arm-chair. Sir Thomas was purring 
upon his knees; and Pompey stood looking 
up to his mistress, wagging his tail, sometimes 



46 



whining with a short note of impatience, and 
sometimes gently putting his paw against her 
apron to remind her that he wished for ano- 
ther bit of bread and butter. Barnaby was 
gone to the farm : and Nobs was in the stable. 



47 



CHAPTER n. P. I. 



WHEREIN CERTAIN QUESTIONS ARE PROPOSED CON- 
CERNING TIME, PLACE AND PERSONS. 



Quisf fuidf ubi? quUnu oitxiHisI curf quomodo? quandof 

Technical Verse. 



Thus have I begun according to the most ap- 
proved forms; not like those who begin the 
Trojan War from Leda's egg, or the History of 
Great Britain from Adam, or the Life of General 
Washington from the Discovery of the New 
World ; but in conformity to the Horatian pre- 
cept, rushing into the middle of things. Yet 
the Giant Moulineau's appeal to his friend the 
story-telling Ram may well be remembered 
here ; Belter mon ami, si tu voulois commencer 
par le commencement tu me ferois grand plaisir. 
For in the few lines of the preceding chapter 



48 



how much is there that requires explanation ? 
— Who was Nobs? — Who was Barnaby? — 
Who was the Doctor? — Who was Mrs. Dove? 
The place, where? — The time, when? — The 
persons, who? — 

I maie not tell you all at once ; 
But as I maie and can, I shall 
By order tellcn you it all. 

So saith Chaucer ; and in the same mind,yaet- 
lius discimus quce congruo dicuntur ordine quam 
quce sparsim ei confusim, saith Erasmus. Think 
a moment I beseech thee, Reader, what order 
is ! Not the mere word which is so often voci- 
ferated in the House of Commons or uttered 
by the Speaker ore rotundo, when it is ne- 
cessary for him to assume the tone of Zevg 
vxpi^pefilrrtg ; but order in its essence and truth, 
in itself and in its derivatives. 

Waving the Orders in Council, and the Order 
of the Day, a phrase so familiar in the disorderly 
days of the French National Convention, think 
gentle Reader of the order of Knighthood, of 
holy orders, of the orders of architecture, the 
Linnaean orders, the orderly Serjeant, the or- 



4d 



dinal numbers, the Ordinary of Newgate, the 
Ordinary on Sundays at 2 o'clock in the environs 
of the Metropolis, the ordinary faces of those 
who partake of what is ordinarily provided for 
them there; and, under the auspices of Govern- 
ment itself and par excellence, the Extraordi- 
nary Gazette. And as the value of health is 
never truly and feelingly understood except in 
sickness, contemplate for a moment what the 
want of order is. Think of disorder in things 
remote, and then as it approaches thee. In 
the country wherein thou livest, bad; in the 
town whereof thou art an inhabitant, worse ; in 
thine own street, worser ; in thine own house, 
worst of all. Think of it in thy family, in thy 
fortune, in thine intestines. In thy affairs, dis- 
tressing; in thy members, painful; in thy con- . 
duct, ruinous. Order is the sanity of the mind, ^l ^ * 
the health of the body, the peace of the city, 
the security of the state. As the beams to a 
house, as the bones to the microcosm of man, 
so is order to all things. Abstract it from a 
Dictionary, and thou mayest imagine the inex- 
tricable confusion which would ensue. Reject 

VOL. I. D 



50 



it from the Alphabet, and Zerah Colbume 
himself could not go through the chriscross 
row. How then should I do without it in this 
history ? 

A Quaker by name Benjamin Lay (who was 
a little cracked in the head though sound at 
heart) took one of his compositions once to 
Benjamin Franklin that it might be printed 
and published. Franklin having looked over 
the manuscript observed that it was deficient 
in arrangement; it is no matter, replied the 
author, print any part thou pleasest first. Itf any 
are the speeches and the sermons and the trea- 
tises and the poems and the volumes which are 
like Benjamin Lay's book; the head might 
serve for the tail, and the tail for the body, and 
the body for the head, — either end for the 
middle, and the middle for either end ; — nay if 
you could turn them inside out like a pol3rpus, 
or a glove, they would be no worse for the 
operation. 

When the excellent Hooker was on his death- 
bed, he expressed his joy at the prospect of 
entering a World of Order. 



51 



CHAPTER III. P. I. 

WHOLESOMB OBSERVATIONS UPON THE VANITY OP 

FAME. 



Whosoever sb«ll address himself to write of matters of in- 
struction, or of any other argument of importance, it behoveth 
that before he enter thereinto, he should resolutely determine 
with himself in what order he will handle the same ; so shall 
he best accomplish that he bath undertaken, and inform the 
understanding, and help the memory of the Reader. 

Gwillim's Display of Heraldry. 



Who was the Doctor ? 

We will begin with the persons for sundry 
reasons, general and specific. Doth not the 
Latin grammar teach us so to do, wherein the 
personal verbs come before the impersonal, 
and the Propria qtuB maribus precede all other 
nouns ? Moreover by replying to this question 
all needful explanation as to time and place 
will naturally and of necessity follow in due 
sequence. 



52 

Truly I will deliyer and discourse 
The sum of all.* 

Who was the Doctor ? 
Can it then be necessary to ask? — ^Alas the 
vanity of human fame ! Vanity of vanities, all is 
Vanity ! " How few," says Bishop Jeremy Tay- 
lor, " have heard of the name of Veneatapadino 
Ragium! He imagined that there was no man in 
the world that knew him not : how many men 
can tell me, that he was the King of Narsinga ?" 
When I mention Arba, who but the practised 
textualist can call to mind that he was " a great 
man among the Anakim,*' that he was the father 
of Anak, and that from him Kirjath-Arba took 
its name ? A great man among the Giants of 
the earth, the founder of a city, the father of 
Anak! — and now there remaineth nothing more 
of him or his race than the bare mention of 
them in one of the verses of one of the chapters 
of the Book of Joshua : except for that only 
record it would not now be known that Arba 
had ever lived, or that Hebron was originally 
called after his name. Vanitas Vanitatum / 

* G. Peels. 



53 



Omnia Vanitcts. An old woman in a village in 
the West of England was told one day that the 
King of Prussia was dead, such a report having 
arrived when the great Frederic was in the 
noon-day of his glory. Old Mary lifted up her 
great slow eyes at the news, and fixing them in 
the fullness of vacancy upon her informant, re- 
phed, " is a ! is a ! — The Lord ha' marcy ! — 
Well, well ! The King of Prussia ! And who's 
he ?"— The " Who's he" of this old woman 
might serve as a text for a notable sermon upon 
ambition. " Who's he" may now be asked of 
men greater as soldiers in their day than Fre- 
deric, or Wellington; greater as discoverers 
than Sir Isaac, or Sir Humphrey. Who built 
the Pyramids? Who ate the first Oyster? 
Vanitas Vanitatumf Omnia Vanitas. 

Why then doth flesh, a bubble-glass of breath. 
Hunt after honour and advancement vain. 

And rear a trophy for devouring Death, 
With so great labour and long-lasting pain. 
As if his days for ever should remain ? 

Sith all that in this world is great or gay. 

Doth as a vapour vanish and decay. 

Look back who list unto the former ages. 
And call to count what is of them become ; 



54 



Where be those learned wits and antique saget 
Which of all wisdom knew the perfect sum ? 
Where those great warriors which did overcome 
The world with conquest of their might and main. 
And made one mear of the earth and of their reign ?* 

Who was the Doctor ? 

Oh that thou hadst known him, Reader! 
Then should I have answered the question, — if 
orally, by an emphasis upon the article, — the 
Doctor; or if in written words, THE DOCTOR 
— thus giving the word that capital designation 
to which, as the head of his profession within 
his own orbit, he was so justly entitled. But I 
am not jurriting to those only who knew him, nor 
merely to the inhabitants of the West Riding, 
nor to the present generation alone; — No! to 
all Yorkshire, — all England ; all the British 
Empire ; all the countries wherein the English 
tongue is, or shall be spoken or understood ; 
Yea to all places, and all times to come. Para 
todos, as saith the famous Doctor Juan Perez 
de Montalvan Natural de Madrid, which is, 
being interpreted, a Spanish Cockney — para 
todos; porque es un aparato de varias materias, 

* Spenser. 



55 



donde el Filosofo, el Cortesano, el Humanista, el 
Poeta, el Predicador, el Teologo^ el Soldado, 
el Devoto, el Jurisconsulto, el Matematico, el 
Medico, el SolterOy el Casadoy el Religiosoy el 
Ministro, el Plebeyo, el Senor, el Oficial, y el 
Entretenido, hallaran juntamente utilidad y 
gustOf erudicion y diver timiento, doctrina y 
desahogo, reereo y ensenanza, moreUideui y 
alivio, ciencia y descanso, provecho y ptMsor- 
tiempo, alabanzas y reprehensiones, y ultima- 
mente exemplos y donaires, que sin qfender 
las costumbres delecten el animoy y sazonen el 
entendimiento. 

Who was the Doctor ? 
The Doctor was Doctor Daniel Dove. 



56 



CHAPTER IV. P. I. 

BIRTH AND PARENTAGE OF DR. DOVE, WITH THE 
DESCRIPTION OF A Y£01fAN*S HOUSE IN THE WEST 
RIDING OF YORKSHIRE A HUNDRED YEARS AGO. 



Non pomdentem multa vocaveris 
Rede heatum ; rectius occupat 
Nomen beati, qui Deorum 
Muneribw sapienter uti, 
Durctmque collet pauperiem pati, 
Pejusque letho fiagitium timet, 

Horace, L. 4, Od. 9. 



Daniel, the son of Daniel Dove and of Dinah 
his wife, was born near Ingleton in the West 
Riding of Yorkshire, on Monday the twenty 
second of April, old style, 1723, nine minutes 
and three seconds after three in the afternoon ; 
on which day Marriage came in and Mercury 
was with the Moon ; and the aspects were 



57 



□ ^ ? : a week earlier, it would have been a 
most glorious Trine of the Sun and Jupiter ;-— 
circumstances which were all duly noted in the 
blank leaf of the family Bible. 

Daniel the father was one of a race of men 
who unhappily are now almost extinct. He lived 
upon an estate of six and twenty acres which his 
fathers had possessed before him5all Doves and 

Daniels, in uninterrupted succession from time 
immemorial, farther than registers or title deeds 
could ascend. The little church called Chapel le 
Dale, stands about a bow shot from the family 
house. There they had all been carried to the 
font ; there they had each led his bride to the 
altar; and thither they had, each in his turn, been 
borne upon the shoulders of their friends and 
neighbours. Earth to earth they had been con- 
signed there for so many generations, that half 
of the soil of the churchyard consisted of their 
remains. A hermit who might wish his grave to 
be as quiet as his cell, could imagine no fitter 
resting place. On three sides there was an irre- 
gular low stone wall, rather to mark the limits 
of the sacred ground, than to inclose it ; on the 

d2 



58 



fourth it was bounded by the brook whose 
waters proceed by a subterraneous channel from 
Wethercote cave. Two or three alders and 
rowan trees hung over the brook^and shed their 
leaves and seeds into the stream. Some bushy 
hazels grew at intervals along the lines of the 
wall ; and a few ash trees> as the winds had 
sown them. To the East and West some fields 
adjoined it, in that state of half cultivation 
which gives a human character to solitude : to 
the South, on the other side the brook, the 
common with its limestone rocks peering every 
where above ground, extended to the foot of 
Ingleborough. A craggy hill, feathered with 
birch, sheltered it from the North, 

The turf was as soft and fine as that of the 
adjoining hills ; it was seldom broken, so scanty 
was the population to which it was appropri- 
ated ; scarcely a thistle or a nettle deformed 
it, and the few tomb-stones which had been 
placed there were now themselves half buried. 
The sheep came over the wall when they listed, 
and sometimes took shelter in the porch from 
the storm. Their voices, .and the cry of the 



59 



kite wheeling above^ were the only sounds 
which were heard there, except when the single 
bell which hung in its niche over the entrance 
tinkled for service on the Sabbath day, or with 
a slower tongue gave notice that one of the 
children of the soil was returning to the earth 
from which he sprung. 

The house of the Doves was to the East of 
the Church, under the same hill, and with the 
same brook in front; and the intervening fields 
belonged to the family. It was a low house, hav- 
ing before it a little garden of that size and cha- 
racter which shewed that the inhabitants could 
afford to bestow a thought upon something 
more than mere bodily wants. You entered 
between two yew trees dipt to the fashion of 
two pawns. There were hollyhocks and sun- 
flowers displaying themselves above the wall ; 
roses and sweet peas under the windows, and 
the everlasting pea climbing the porch. Over 
the door was a stone with these letters. 

D 
D + M 

A.D. 

1608. 



60 



The A was in the Saxon character. The rest 
of the garden lay behind the house, partly on 
the slope of the hill. It had a hedge of goose- 
berry-bushes, a few apple-trees, pot-herbs in 
abundance, onions, cabbages, turnips and car- 
rots ; potatoes had hardly yet found their way 
into these remote parts: and in a sheltered spot 
under the crag, open to the south, were six bee- 
hives which made the family perfectly inde- 
pendent of West India produce. Tea was in 
those days as little known as potatoes, and for atl 
other things honey supplied the place of sugar. 

The house consisted of seven rooms, the dairy 
and cellar included which were both upon the 
ground floor. As you entered the kitchen there 
was on the right one of those open chimneys 
which afford more comfort in a winter's even- 
ing than the finest register stove ; in front of 
the chimney stood a wooden bee-hive chair, and 
on each side was along oak seat with a. back to 
it, the seats serving as chests in which the oaten 
bread was kept. They were of the darkest 
brown, and well polished by constant use. On 
the back of each were the same initials as those 
over the door, with the date 1610. The great 



61 



oak tableland the chest in thebest kitchen which 
held the house-linen, bore the same date. The 
chimney was well hung with bacon, the rack 
which covered half the ceiling bore equal marks 
of plenty : mutton hams were suspended from 
other parts of the ceiling ; and there was an 
odour of cheese from the adjoining dairy, which 
the turf fire, tho' perpetual as that of the Magi, 
or of the Vestal Virgins, did not overpower. A 
few pewter dishes were ranged above the tren- 
chers, opposite the door on a conspicuous shelf. 
The other treasures of the family were in an 
open triangular cupboard, fixed in one of the 
comers of the best kitchen, half way from the 
floor, and touching the ceiling. They consisted 
of a silver saucepan, a silver goblet, and four 
apostle spoons. Here also King Charles's Gol- 
den Rules were pasted against the wall, and a 
large print of Daniel in the Lions' Den. The 
Lions were bedaubed with yellow, and the Pro- 
phet was bedaubed with blue, with a red patch 
upon each of his cheeks : if he had been like 
his picture he might have frightened the Lions ; 
but happily there were no "judges" in the 



62 



family, and it had been bought for its name's 
sake. The other print which ornamented the 
room had been purchased from a like feeling, 
though the cause was not so immediately appa- 
rent. It represented a Ship in full sail^ with 
Joseph and the Virgin Mary, and the Infant 
on board, and a Dove flying behind as if to fill 
the sails with the motion of its wings. Six 
black chairs were ranged along the wall, where 
they were seldom disturbed from their array. 
They had been purchased by Daniel theGf and- 
father upon his marriage, and were the most 
costly purchase that had ever been made in 
the family ; for the goblet was a legacy. The 
backs were higher than the head of the tallest 
man when seated ; the seats flat and shallow, 
set in a round frame, unaccommodating in their 
material, more unaccommodating in shape; 
the backs also were of wood rising straight up, 
and ornamented with balls and lozenges and 
embossments; and the legs and cross bars 
were adorned in the same taste. Over the 
chimney were two Peacocks' feathers, some of 
the dry silky pods of the honesty flower, and 



63 



one of those large '* sinuous shells " so finely 
thus described by Landor ; 

Of pearly hue 
Within, and they that lustre hare imbibed 
In the sun's palace porch ; vhere, when unyoked. 
His chariot wheel stands midway in the wave, 
Shake one, and it awakens ; then apply 
Its polished lips to your attentive ear. 
And it remembers its august abodes. 
And murmurs as the ocean murmurs there. 

There was also a head of Indian corn there, 
and a back scratcher, of which the hand was 
ivory and the handle black. This had been a 
present of Daniel the grandfather to his wife. 
The three apartments above served equally for 
store-rooms and bed-chambers. William Dove 
the brother slept in one, and Agatha the maid, 
or Haggy as she was called, in another. 




04 



CHAPTER V. P. I. 

EXTENSION OF THE 8CIENCE OF PHYSIOGNOMY, WITH 
SOME REMARKS UPON THE PRACTICAL USES OF 
CRANIOLOGY. 



Hanc ergo scientiam blonde excipiamus, hilariterque amplec- 
tamur, ut vere nostram et de nobismet ipsis tractaniem ; quam 
qui rum amat, quam qui non ampleciHur, nee philosophiam 
amat, neque sua vita discrimina curat. Baptista Porta. 



They who know that the word physiognomy is 
not derived from phiz^and infer from that know- 
ledge that the science is not confined to the vis- 
age alone,have extended it to handwritings also, 
and hence it has become fashionable in this age 
of collectors to collect the autographs of remark- 
able persons. But now that Mr. Rapier has a- 
risen, " the Reformer of illegible hands/*he and 
his rival Mr. Carstairs teach all their pupils to 
write alike. The countenance however has 
fairer play in our days than it had in old times. 



65 



for the longheads of the sixteenth century were 
made by the nurses, not by nature. Elongating 
the nose, flattening the temples, and raising the 
forehead are no longer performed by manual 
force, and the face undergoes now no other ar- 
tificial modelling than such as may be impressed 
upon it by the aid of the looking-glass. So far 
physiognomy becomes less difficult, the data 
upon which it has to proceed, not having been 
falsified ab initio ; but there arises a question 
in what state ought they to be examined? Dr. 
Gall is for shaving the head, and overhauling it 
as a Turk does a Circassian upon sale, that he 
may discover upon the outside of the skull the 
organs of fighting, murder, cunning, and thiev- 
ing (near neighbours in his mappa cerebri^ of 
comparing colours, of music, of sexual instinct, 
of philosophical judgement, &c. &c. all which, 
with all other qualities, have their latitudes and 
longitudes in the brain, and are conspicuous 
upon the outward skull, according to the degree 
in which they influence the character of the 
individual. 

It must be admitted that if this learned Ger- 



66 



man's theory of craniology be well founded^ the 
Gods have devised a much surer^ safer and more 
convenient means for discovering the real cha- 
racters of the Lords and Ladies of the creation, 
than what Momus proposed^ when he advised 
that a window should be placed in the breast. 
For if his advice had been followed^ and there 
had actually been a window in the sternum, — ^it 
is I think beyond all doubt that a window-shut- 
ter would soon have been found indispensably 
necessary in cold climates^ more especially in 
England where pulmonary complaints are so 
frequent ; and, secondly, the wind would not be 
more injurious to the lungs in high latitudes, 
than the sun would be to the liver in torrid re- 
gions ; indeed every where during summer it 
would be impossible to exist without a green cur- 
tain, or Venetian blinds to the window; and after 
all, take what precautions we might, the world 
would be ten times more bilious than it is. An- 
other great physical inconvenience would also 
have arisen ; for if men could peep into their 
insides at any time, and see the motions and the 
fermentations which are continually going on. 



67 



and the rise and progress of every malady dis- 
tinctly marked in the changes it produced, so 
many nervous diseases would be brought on by 
frequent inspection, and so many derangements 
from attempting to regulate the machine, that 
the only way to prevent it from making a full 
stop would be to put a lock upon the shutter, 
and deliver the key to the Physician. 

But upon Dr. Gall's theory how many and 
what obvious advantages result ! Nor are they 
merely confined to the purposes of speculative 
physiognomy; the uses of his theory as applied 
to practice offer to us hopes scarcely less delight- 
ful than those which seemed to dawn upon man- 
kind with the discovery of the gasses, and with 
the commencement of the French Revolution, 
and in these later days with the progress of the 
Bible Society. In courts of Justice for instance 
how beautifully would this new science supply 
any little deficiency of evidence upon trial! 
If a man were arraigned for murder, and the 
case were doubtful, but he were found to have 
a decided organ for the crime, it would be of 
little matter whether lie had committed the spe- 



68 



cific fact in the indictment^ or not; for hanging 
if not applicable as punishment^ would be proper 
for prevention. Think also in State Trials what 
infinite advantages an Attorney General might 
derive from the opinion of a Regius Professor 
of Craniology ! Even these are but partial bene- 
fits. Our Generals^ Ministers^ and Diploma- 
tists would then unerringly be chosen by the 
outside of the head^ though a criterion might 
still be wanted to ascertain when it was too 
thick and when too thin. But the greatest 
advantages are those which this new system 
would afford to education; for by the joint 
effortsof Dr. Gall and Mr. Edgeworth we should 
be able to breed up men according to any 
pattern which Parents or Guardians might 
think proper to bespeak. The Doctor would 
design the mouldy and Mr. Edgeworth by his 
skill in mechanics devise with characteristic in^ 
genuity the best means of making and applying 
it. As soon as the child was born the profes- 
sional cap^ medical^ military^ theological^ com- 
mercial or legale would be put on^ and thus he 
would be perfectly prepared for Mr. Edgeworth's 



69 



admirable system of professional education. I 
will pursue this subject no farther than just 
to hint that the materials of the mould may 
operate sympathetically, and therefore that for 
a lawyer in rus the cap should be made of 
brass, for a divine of lead, for a politician of 
base-metal, for a soldier of steel, and for a 
saUor of heart of English oak. 

Dr. Gall would doubtless require the naked 
head to be submitted to him for judgement. 
Contrariwise I opine, — and all the Ladies will 
agree with me in this opinion, — that the head 
ought neither to be stript, nor even examined 
in undress, but that it should be taken with all 
its accompaniments, when the owner has made 
the best of it, the accompaniments being not 
unfrequently more indicative than the features 
themselves. Long ago the question whether a 
man is most like himself drest or undrest, was 
propounded to the British Apoilo; and it was 
answered by the Oracle that a man of God Al- 
mighty's making is most like himself when un- 
drest ; but a man of a tailor's, periwig-maker's, 
and sempstress's making, when drest. The 
Oracle answered rightly ; for no man can select 



70 



bis own eyes^ nose^ or mouth, — ^but his wig and 
his whiskers are of his own chasing. And to 
use an illustrious instance, how much of cha- 
racter is there in that awful wig which alway 
in its box accompanies Dr. Parr upon his visits 
of ceremony, that it may be put on in the hall, 
with all its feathery honours thick upon it, not 
a curl deranged, a hair flattened, or a particle 
of powder wasted on the way ! 

But if we would form a judgement of the in- 
terior of that portentous head which is thus 
formidably obumbrated, how could it be done 
so well as by beholding the Doctor among his 
books, and there seeing the food upon which 
his terrific intellect is fed. There we should 
see the accents, quantities, dialects, digammas, 
and other such small gear as in these days con- 
stitute the complete armour of a perfect scholar; 
and by thus discovering what goes into the head 
we might form a fair estimate of what was likely 
to come out of it. This is a truth which, with 
many others of equal importance, will be beau- 
tifully elucidated in this nonpareil history. For 
Daniel Dove the Father had a collection of 
books ; they were not so numerous as those of 



71 



his contemporary Harley, famous for his library, 
and infamous for the Peace of Utrecht ; but 
he was perfectly conversant with all their con- 
tents, which is more than could be said of the 
Earl of Oxford* 

Reader whether thou art man, woman or 
child, thou art doubtless acquainted with the 
doctrine of association as inculcated by the 
great Mr. Locke and his disciples. But never 
hast thou seen that doctrine so richly and so 
entirely exemplified as in this great history, the 
association of ideas being, in oriental phrase, 
the silken thread upon which its pearls are 
strung. And never wilt thou see it so clearly 
and delightfully illustrated, not even if the in- 
genious Mr. John Jones should one day give 
to the world the whole twelve volumes in which 
he has proved the authenticity of the Gospel 
History, by bringing the narratives of the Four 
Evangelists to the test of Mr. Locke's meta- 
physics. 

" Desultoriness," says Mr. Danby, " may 
often be the mark of a full head ; connection 
must proceed from a thoughtful one.' 



»♦ 



72 



CHAPTER VI. P. I. 



A COLLECTION OF BOOKS NONE OF WHICH ARE IN- 
CLUDED AMONGST THE PUBLICATIONS OF ANT 
SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF KNOWLEDGE 

RELIGIOUS OR PROFANE. HAPPINESS IN HUMBLE 

LIFE. 



Felix ille animi, divisqtte simillimus ipsis, 
Quem non mordaci resplendens gloria fuco 
Solicitatf nonfastosi mala gaxidia luxus, 
Sed tacitos sinit ire dies, et paupere cultu 
Exigit innocua tranquilla silentia vita. 



POLITIAN. 



Happily for Daniel^ he lived before the age 
of Magazines^ Reviews, Cyclopaedias, Elegant 
Extracts and Literary Newspapers, so that he 
gathered the fruit of knowledge for himself, in- 
stead of receiving it from the dirty fingers of a 
retail vender. His books were few in number, 
but they were all weighty either in matter or in 



73 



size. They consisted of the Morte d' Arthur in 
the fine black-letter edition of Copeland ; Plu- 
tarch's Morals and Pliny's Natural History, two 
goodly folios^ full as an egg of meat, and both 
translated by that old worthy Philemon, who for 
the service which he rendered to his contempo- 
raries and to his countrymen deserves to be 
called the best of theHollands, without disparag- 
ing either the Lord or the Doctor of that appel- 
lation. The whole works of Joshua Sylvester 
(whose name, let me tell thee reader in passing, 
was accented upon the first syllable by his con- 
temporaries, not as now upon the second); — 
Jean Petit's History of the Netherlands, trans- 
lated and continued by Edward Grimeston, an- 
other worthy of the Philemon order; SirKenelm 

Digby's Discourses; Stowe's Chronicle; Joshua 
Barnes's Life of Edward III.; " Ripley Revived 
by Eirenaeus Philalethes, an Englishman styl- 
ing himself Citizen of the World," with its mys- 
terious frontispiece representing the Domus 
Natur<E, to which. Nil deest, nisi clavis : the 
Pilgrim's Progress; two volumes of Ozell's trans- 
lation of Rabelais ; Latimer's Sermons ; and the 

VOL. I. E 



74 



last volume of Fox's Martyrs^ which latter hook 
had been brought hun by his wife. The Pil- 
grim's Progress was a godmother's present to 
his son: the odd volumes of Rabelais he had 
picked up at Kendal at a sale^ in a lot with 
Ripley Revived and Plutarch's Morals: the 
others he had inherited. 

Daniel had looked into all these books^ read 
most of them, and believed all that he read ex- 
cept Rabelais, which he could not tell what to 
make of. He was not however one of those per- 
sons who complacently suppose every thing to 
be nonsense, which they do not perfectly com- 
prehend, or flatter themselves that they do. His 
simple heart judged of books by what they ought 
to be, little knowing what they are. It never oc- 
curred to him that any thing would be printed 
which was not worth printing, any thing which 
did not convey either reasonable delight or use- 
ful instruction, and he was no more disposed to 
doubt the truth of what he read, than to question 
the veracity of his neighbour,or any one who had 
no interest in deceiving him. A book carried 
with it to him authority in its very aspect. The 



75 



Morte d'Arthur therefore he received for au- 
thentic historyjust as he did the painful chroni- 
cle of honest John Stowe, and the Barnesian la- 
bours of Joshua the self-satisfied : there was 
nothing in it indeed which stirred his English 
blood like the battles of Cressy and Poictiers 
and Najara ; yet on the whole he preferred it to 
Barnes's story, beUeved in Sir Tor, Sir Tris- 
tram, Sir Lancelot, and Sir Lamorack as entirely 
as in Sir John Chandos, the Captal de Buche 
and the Black Prince, and liked them better. 

Latimer and Du Bartas he used sometimes to 
read aloud on Sundays; and if the departed take 
cognizance of what passes on earth, and poets 
derive any satisfaction from that posthumous 
applause which is generally the only reward of 
those who deserve it,Sylvester might have found 
some compensation for the undeserved neglect 
into which his works had sunk, by the full and 
devout delight which his rattling rhymes and 
quaint collocations afforded to this reader. The 
silver-tongued Sylvester however was reserved 
for a Sabbath book ; as a week-day author 
Daniel preferred Pliny, for the same reason that 



76 



bread and cheese, or a rasher of hung mutton 
contented his palate better than a syllabub. He 
frequently regretted that so knowing a writer 
had never seen or heard of Wethercote and 
Yordas caves; the ebbing and flowing spring at 
Giggleswick, Malham Cove, and Gordale Scar, 
that he might have described them among the 
wonders of the world. Omne ignoium pro mng- 
nifico is a maxim which will not in all cases hold 
good. There are things which we do not un- 
dervalue because we are familiar with them, 
but which are admired the more the more tho- 
roughly they are known and understood; it is 
thus with the grand objects of nature and the 
finest works of art, — with whatsoever is truly 
great and excellent. Daniel was not deficient 
in imagination; but no description of places 
which he had never seen, however exaggerated 
(as such things always are) impressed him so 
strongly as these objects in his own neighbour- 
hood, which he had known from childhood. 
Three or four times in his life it had happened 
that strangers with a curiosity as uncommon in 
that age as it is general in this, came from afar to 



77 



visit these wonders of the West Riding, and 
Daniel accompanied them with a delight such as 
he never experienced on any other occasion. 

But the author in whom he deUghted most was 
Plutarch, of whose works he was lucky enough 
to possess the worthier half: if the other had 
perished Plutarch would not have been a popu- 
lar writer, but he would have held a higher place 
in the estimation of the judicious. Daniel could 
have posed a candidate for university honors, 
and perhaps the examiner too, with some of the 
odd learning which he had stored up in his me- 
mory from these great repositories of ancient 
knowledge. Refusing all reward for such ser- 
vices, the strangers to whom he officiated as a 
guide, though they perceived that he was an ex- 
traordinary person, were little aware how much 
information he had acquired, and of how strange 
a kind. His talk with them did not go beyond 
the subjects which the scenes they came to visit 
naturally suggested, and they wondered more at 
the questions he asked, than at any thing which 
he advanced himself. For his disposition was 
naturally shy, and that which had been bashful- 



78 



ness in youth assumed the appearance of reserve 
as he advanced in life ; for having none to com- 
municate with upon his favorite studies he lived 
in an intellectual world of his own, a mental so- 
litude as complete as that of Alexander Selkirk 
or Robinson Crusoe. Even to the curate his 
conversation, if he had touched upon bis books, 
would have been heathen Greek ; and to speak 
the truth plainly, without knowing a letter of 
that language, he knew more about the Greeks, 
than nine-tenths of the clergy at that time, in- 
cluding all the dissenters, and than nine-tenths 
of the schoolmasters also. 

Our good Daniel had none of that confidence 
which so usually and so unpleasantly charac- 
terizes self-taught men. In fact he was by no 
means aware of the extent of his acquirements, 
all that he knew in this kind having been ac- 
quired for amusement not for use. He had 
never attempted to teach himself any thing. 
These books had lain in his way in boyhood, or 
fallen in it afterwards, and the perusal of them 
intently as it was followed,was always accounted 
by him to be nothing more than recreation. 



79 



None of his daily business had ever been ne- 
glected for it ; he cultivated his fields and his 
garden, repaired his walls, looked to the stable, 
tended his cows and salved his sheep, as dili- 
gently and as contentedly as if he had possessed 
neither capacity nor inclination for any higher 
employments. Yet Daniel was one of those 
men, who, if disposition and aptitude were not 
over-ruled by circumstances, would have grown 
pale with study, instead of being bronzed and 
hardened by sun and wind and rain. There 
were in him undeveloped talents which might 
have raised him to distinction as an antiquary, 
a virtuoso of the Royal Society, a poet, or a 
theologian, to which ever course the bias in his 
ball of fortune had inclined. But he had not a 
particle of envy in his composition. He thought 
indeed that if he had had grammar learning in 
his youth Uke the curate, he would have made 
more use of it ; but there was nothing either 
of the sourness or bitterness (call it which you 
please) of repining in this natural reflection. 

Never indeed was any man more contented 
with doing his duty in that state of life to which 



80 



it bad pleased God to call him. And well he 
might be so, for no man ever passed through the 
world with less to disquiet or to sour him. Bred 
up in habits which secured the continuance of 
that humble but sure independance to which 
he was born, he had never known what it was 
to be anxious for the future. At the age of 
twenty-five he had brought home a wife, the 
daughter of a little landholder like himself, with 
fifteen pounds for her portion : and the true- 
love of his youth proved to him a faithful help- 
mate in those years when the dream of life is 
over, and we live in its realities. If at any 
tune there had been some alloy in his happiness 
it was when there appeared reason to suppose 
that in him his family would be extinct ; for 
though no man knows what parental feelings 
are till he has experienced them, and Daniel 
therefore knew not the whole value of that 
which he had never enjoyed, the desire of pro- 
geny is natural to the heart of man; and though 
Daniel had neither large estates, nor an illus- 
trious name to transmit, it was an unwelcome 
thought that the little portion of the earth which 



81 



had belonged to his fathers time out of mind, 
should pass into the possession of some stranger, 
who would tread on their graves and his own 
without any regard to the dust that lay beneath. 
That uneasy apprehension was removed after 
he had been married fifteen years, when to the 
great joy of both parents, because they had long 
ceased to entertain any hope of such an event, 
their wishes were fulfilled in the birth of a son. 
This their only child was healthy, apt and do- 
cile, to all appearance as happily disposed in 
mind and body as a father's heart could wish. 
If they had fine weather for winning their hay 
or shearing their corn, they thanked God for 
it; if the season proved unfavourable, the labour 
was only a little the more and the crop a little 
the worse. Their stations secured them from 
want, and they had no wish beyond it. What 
more had Daniel to desire ? 

The following, passage in the divine Du 
Bartas he used to read with peculiar satisfac- 
tion, applying it to himself: — 

O thrice, thrice happy he, who shuns the cares 
Of city troubles, and of state-afifairs ; 

e2 



8!2 



And, serving Ceres, tills with his own team. 
His own free tomi, left by his friends to him 1 

Never pale Envy's poisony heads do hiss 
To gnaw his heart : nor Vulture Avarice : 
His fields' bounds, bound his thoughts : he never sups 
For nectar, poison mixed in silver cups ; 
Neither in golden platters doth he lick 
For sweet ambrosia deadly arsenic : 
His hand's his bowl (better than plate or glass) 
The silver brook his sweetest hippocrass : 
Milk cheese and fruit, (fruits of his own endeavour) 
Drest without dressing, hath he ready ever. 

False counsellors (concealers of the law) 
Turncoat attorneys that with both hands draw ; 
Sly pettifoggers, wranglers at the bar. 
Proud purse-leeches, harpies of Westminster, 
With feigned-chiding, and foul jarring noise, 
Break not his brain, nor interrupt his joys ; 
But cheerful birds chirping him sweet good-morrows 
With nature's music do beguile his sorrows ; 
Teaching the fragrant forests day by day 
The diapason of their heavenly lay. 

His wandering vessel, reeling to and fro 
On th* ireful ocean (as the winds do blow) 
With sudden tempest is not overwhurled. 
To seek his sad death in another world : 
But leading all his life at home in peace. 
Always in sight of his own smoke, no seas 



83 



No other seas he knows, no other torrent. 
Than that which waters with its silver current 
His native meadows : and that very earth 
Shall give him burial which first gave him birth. 

To summon timely sleep, he doth not need 
iEthiop's cold rush, nor drowsy poppy -seed; 
Nor keep in consort (as Mecsenas did) 
Luxurious Villains — (Viols I should have said) ; 
But on green carpets thrum'd with mossy bever. 
Fringing the round skirts of his winding river. 
The streams mild murmur, as it gently gushes. 
His healthy limbs in quiet slumber hushes. 

Drum fife and trumpet, with their loud alarms. 
Make him not start out of his sleep, to arms ; 
Nor dear respect of some great General, 
Him from his bed unto the block doth call. 
The crested cock sings " Hunt-is up" to him, 
Limits his rest, and makes him stir betime. 
To walk the mountains and the flow'ry meads 
Impearl'd with tears which great Aurora sheds. 

Never gross air poisoned in stinking streets. 
To choke his spirit, his tender nostril meets; 
But th' open sky where at fiill breath he lives, 
Still keeps him sound, and still new stomach gives. 
And Death, dread Serjeant of the Eternal Judge, 
Comes very late to his sole-seated lodge. 



84 



CHAPTER VII. P. I. 



RUSTIC PHILOSOPHY, AN EXPERIMENT UPON MOONSHINE. 



Quien comienza enjuventud 
A bien obrar. 
Serial ea de no error 
En senetud. 
Provbrbios dxl Marques ds Santillana. 



It is not however for man to rest in absolute 
contentment. He is born to hopes and aspira- 
tions as the sparks fly upward, unless he has 
brutified his nature and quenched the spirit of 
immortality which is his portion. Having no- 
thing to desire for himself, Daniel's ambition 
had taken a natural direction and fixed upon 
his son. He was resolved that the boy should 
be made a scholar ; not with the prospect of 
advancing him in the world, but in the hope 
that he might become a philosopher, and take 



85 



as much delight in the books which he would 
inherit as his father had done before him. 
Riches and rank and power appeared in his 
judgement to be nothing when compared to 
philosophy ; and herein he was as true a phi- 
losopher as if he had studied in the Porch, or 
walked the groves of Academus. 

It was not however for this, — for he was as 
little given to talk of his opinions as to display 
his reading, — but for his retired habits, and 
general character, and some odd practices into 
which his books had led him, that he was com- 
monly called Flossofer Daniel by his neighbours. 
The appellation was not affixed in derision, but 
respectfully and as his due ; for he bore his fa- 
culties too meekly ever to excite an envious or an 
ill-natured feeling in any one. Rural Flossofers 
were not uncommon in those days, though in the 
progress of society they have disappeared like 
Crokers, Bowyers, Lorimers, Armourers, Run- 
ning Footmen and other descriptions of men 
whose occupations are gone by. But they were 
of a different order from our Daniel. They 
were usually Philomaths, Students in Astrology, 



86 



or the Coelestial Science, and not unfrequently 
Empirics or downright Quacks. Between twenty 
and thirty almanacs used to be published every 
year by men of this description, some of them 
versed enough in mathematics to have done 
honor to Cambridge, had the fates allowed; 
and others such proficients in roguery, that 
they would have done equal honor to the whip- 
ping-post. 

A man of a different stamp from either came in 
declining life to settle at Ingleton in the humble 
capacity of schoolmaster, a little before young 
Daniel was capable of more instruction than 
could be given him at home. Richard Guy was 
his name ; he is the person to whom the lovers of 
old rhyme are indebted for the preservation of 
the old poem of Flodden Field, which he tran- 
scribed from an ancient manuscript, and which 
was printed from his transcript by Thomas Gent 
of York. In his way through the world, which 
had not been along the King's high Dunstable 
road, Guy had picked up a competent share of 
Latin, a little Greek, some practical knowledge 
of physic, and more of its theory ; astrology 



87 



enough to cast a nativity^ and more acquaint- 
ance with alchemy than has often been possessed 
by one who never burnt his fingers in its pro- 
cesses. These acquirements were grafted on a 
disposition as obhging as it was easy ; and he 
was beholden to nature for an understanding so 
clear and quick that it might have raised him to 
some distinction in the world if he had not been 
under the influence of an imagination at once 
lively and credulous. Five and twenty years had 
taught him none of the world's wisdom ; they 
had sobered his mind without maturing it ; but 
he had a wise hearty and the wisdom of the 
heart is worth all other wisdom. 

Daniel was too far advanced in life to fall in 
friendship ; he felt a certain degree of attract- 
iveness in this person's company ; there was 
however so much of what may better be called 
reticence than reserve in his own quiet habitual 
manners, that it would have been long before 
their acquaintance ripened into any thing like 
intimacy, if an accidental circumstance had not 
brought out the latent sympathy which on both 
sides had till then rather been apprehended 



88 



than understood. They were walking together 
one day when young Daniel, who was then in 
his sixth year, looking up in his father's face 
proposed this question : '^ will it be any harm, 
Father, if I steal five beans when next I go into 
Jonathan Dowthwaites, if I can do it without 
any one's seeing me ?" 

" And what wouldst thou steal beans for ? " 
was the reply, " when any body would give 
them to thee, and when thou knowest there 
are plenty at home ? " 

" But it wo'nt do to have them given. Fa- 
ther," the boy replied. " They are to charm 
away my warts. Uncle William says I must 
steal five beans, a bean for every wart, and tie 
them carefully up in paper, and carry them to 
a place where two roads cross, and then drop 
them, and walk away without ever once look- 
ing behind me. And then the warts will go 
away from me, and come upon the hands of 
the person that picks up the beans." 

" Nay boyj" the Father made answer ; " that 
charm was never taught by a white witch ! If 
thy warts are a trouble to thee, they would be a 



89 



trouble to any one else ; and to get rid of an 
evil from ourselves Daniel^ by bringing it upon 
another, is against our duty to our neighbour. 
Have nothing to do with a charm like that ! " 

" May I steal a piece of raw beef then/* 
rejoined the boy, " and rub the warts with it 
and bury it ? For Uncle says that will do, and 
as the beef rots, so the warts will waste away." 

" Daniel," said the Father, " those can be 
no lawful charms that begin with stealing ; I 
could tell thee how to cure thy warts in a better 
manner. There is an infallible way, which is 
by washing the hands in moonshine, but then 
the moonshine must be caught in a bright sil- 
ver basin. You wash and wash in the basin, 
and a cold moisture will be felt upon the hands, 
proceeding from the cold and moist rays of 
the moon." 

" But what shall we do for a silver basin," 
said little Daniel ? 

The Father answered, " a pewter dish might 
be tried if it were made very bright ; but it is 
not deep enough. The brass kettle perhaps 
might do better." 



90 



" Nay," said Guy, who had now begun to 
attend with some interest, *' the shape of a ket- 
tle is not suitable. It should be a concave 
vessel, so as to concentrate the rays. Joshua 
Wilson I dare say would lend his brass basin, 
which he can very well spare at the hour you 
want it, because nobody comes to be shaved 
by moonlight. The moon rises early enough 
to serve at this time. If you come in this even- 
ing at six o'clock I will speak to Joshua in the 
mean time, and have the basin as bright and 
shining as a good scouring can make it. The 
experiment is curious and I should like to see 
it tried. Where Daniel didst thou learn it ?" 
" I read it," replied Daniel, " in Sir Kenelm 
Digby's Discourses, and he says it never fails." 

Accordingly the parties met at the appointed 
hour. Mambrino's helmet when new from the 
armourers, or when furbished for a tournament, 
was not brighter than Guy had rendered the 
inside of the barber's basin. Schoolmaster, 
Father and son retired to a place out of obser- 
vation, by the side of the river, a wild stream 
tumbling among the huge stones which it had 



91 



brought down from the hills. On one of these 
stones sate Daniel the elder^ holding the basin 
in such an inclination toward the moon that 
there should be no shadow in it : Guy directed 
the boy where to place himself so as not to 
intercept the light, and stood looking compla- 
cently on, while young Daniel revolved his 
hands one in another within the empty basin, 
as if washing them. ^' I feel them cold and 
clammy Father ! " said the boy. (It was the 
beginning of November) " Aye," replied the 
father, " that's the cold moisture of the moon!" 
** Aye ! " echoed the schoolmaster, and nodded 
his head in confirmation. 

The operation was repeated on the two fol- 
lowing nights ; and Daniel would have kept up 
his son two hours later than his regular time of 
rest to continue it on the third if the evening 
had not set in with clouds and rain. In spite 
of the patient's belief that the warts would 
waste away and were wasting, (for Prince 
Hohenlohe could not require more entire faith 
than was given on this occasion) no alteration 
could be perceived in them at a fortnight's end. 



92 



Daniel thought the experiment had failed be- 
cause it had not been repeated sufficiently 
often, nor perhaps continued long enough. 
But the Schoolmaster was of opinion that the 
cause of failure was in the basin : for that silver 
being the lunar metal would by affinity assist 
the influential virtues of the moonlight, which 
finding no such affinity in a mixed metal of 
baser compounds, might contrariwise have its 
potential qualities weakened, or even destroyed 
when received in a brasen vessel, and reflected 
from it. Flossofer Daniel assented to this 
theory. Nevertheless as the child got rid of 
his troublesome excrescences in the course of 
three or four months, all parties disregarding 
the lapse of time at first, and afterwards fairly 
forgetting it, agreed that the remedy had been 
effectual, and Sir Kenelm if he had been Uv- 
ing, might have procured the solemn attestation 
of men more veracious than himself that moon- 
shine was an infallible cure for warts. 



9S 



CHAPTER VIIL P. I. 



A KIND SCHOOLMASTER AND A HAPPY SCHOOL BOT. 



Though happily thou wilt say that wands be to be wrought 
when they are green, lest they rather break than bend when 
they be dry, yet know also that he that bendeth a twig because 
he would see if it would bow by strength may chance to have 
a crooked tree when he would have a straight. 

EUPHUES. 



From this time the two Flossofers were friends. 
Daniel seldom went to Ingleton without look- 
ing in upon Guy, if it were between school 
hours. Guy on his part would walk as far with 
him on the way back, as the tether of his own 
time allowed, and frequently on Saturdays and 
Sundays he strolled out and took a seat by 
DanieFs fire side. Even the wearying occupa- 
tion of hearing one generation of urchins after 
another repeat Or-b-ab^ hammering the first rules 



I 



94 



of arithmetic into leaden heads, and pacing like 
a horse in a mill the same dull dragging round 
day after day, had neither diminished Guy's 
good-nature, nor lessened his love for children. 
He had from the first conceived a liking for 
young Daniel, both because of the right prin- 
ciple which was evinced by the manner in which 
he proposed the question concerning stealing 
the beans, and of the profound gravity (worthy 
of a Flossofer's son) with which he behaved in 
the affair of the moonshine. All that he saw 
and heard of him tended to confirm this fa- 
vourable prepossession ; and the boy, who had 
been taught to read in the Bible and in Stowe's 
Chronicle, was committed to his tuition at 
seven years of age. 

Five days in the week (for in the North of 
England Saturday as well as Sunday is a Sab- 
bath to the Schoolmaster) did young Daniel 
after supping his porringer of oat-meal pottage, 
set off to school, with a little basket containing 
his dinner in his hand. This provision usually 
consisted of oat-cake and cheese, the latter in 
goodly proportion, but of the most frugal qua- 



95 



lity, whatever cream the milk afforded having 
been consigned to the butter tub. Sometimes 
it was a piece of cold bacon or of cold pork ; 
and in winter there was the luxury of a shred 
pie^ which is a coarse north country edition of 
the pie abhorred by puritans. The distance \ 

was in those days called two miles ; but miles of / 

such long measure that they were for him a 
good hour's walk at a cheerful pace. He never I 

loitered on the way, being at all times brisk in \ 

his movements, and going to school with a spirit 
as light as when he returned from it, like one 
whose blessed lot it was never to have expe- 
rienced, and therefore never to stand in fear of 
severity or unkindness. For he was not more 
a favourite with Guy for his docility and regu- 
larity and diligence, than he was with his 
school-fellows for his thorough good nature 
and a certain original oddity of humour. 

There are some boys who take as much plea- 
sure in exercising their intellectual faculties, as 
others do when putting forth the power of arms 
and legs in boisterous exertion. Young Daniel 
was from his childhood fond of books. William 



-^ 

/ 



96 



Dove used to say he was a chip of the old block; 
and this hereditary disposition was regarded 
with much satisfaction by both parents^ Dinah 
having no higher ambition nor better wish for 
her son, than that he might prove like his 
father in all things. This being the bent of his 
nature, the boy having a kind master as well 
as a happy home, never tasted of what old Lily 
calls (and well might call) the wearisome bitter- 
ness of the scholar's learning. He was never 
subject to the brutal discipline of the Udals 
and Busbys and Bowyers, and Parrs and 
other less notorious tyrants who have trod- 
den in their steps ; nor was any of that 
inhuman injustice ever exercised upon him to 
break his spirit, for which it is to be hoped 
Dean Colet has paid in Purgatory ; — to be 
hoped, I say, because if there be no Purgatory, 
the Dean may have gone farther and fared 
worse. Being the only Latiner in the school 
his lessons were heard with more interest and 
less formality. Guy observed his progress 
with almost as much delight and as much 
hope as Daniel himself* A schoolmaster who 



97 



likes his vocation feels toward the boys who 
deserve his favour, something Uke a thrifty and 
thriving father toward the children for whom 
he is scraping together wealth ; he is contented 
that his humble and patient industry should 
produce fruit not for himself, but for them, 
and looks with pride to a result in which it is 
impossible for him to partake, and which in 
all likelihood he may never live to see. Even 
some of the old Phlebotomists have had this 
feeling to redeem them. 



VOL. I. 



98 



" Sir," says the Compositor to the Correc- 
tor of the Press, " there is no heading in the 
Copy for this Chapter. What must I do ?" 

" Leave a space for it,** the Corrector replies. 
** It is a strange sort of book ; but I dare say 
the Author has a reason for every thing that 
he says or does, and most likely you will find 
out his meaning as you set up." 

Right Mr. Corrector ! you are a judicious 
person, free from the common vice of finding 
fault with what you do not understand. My 
meaning will be explained presently. And 
having thus prologized, we will draw a line if 
you please, and begin. 



Ten measures of garrulity, says the Talmud, 
were sent down upon the earth, and the women 
took nine. 



99 



I have known in my time eight terrific 
talkers ; and five of them were of the mascu- 
line gender. 

But supposing that the Rabbis were right in 
allotting to the women a ninefold proportion of 
talkativeness, I confess that I have inherited ^ 
my mother's share. 

I am liberal of my inheritance, and the Pub- 
lic shall have the full benefit of it. 

And here if my gentle Public will consider to 
what profitable uses this gift might have been 
applied, the disinterestedness of my disposition 
in having thus benevolently dedicated it to their 
service, will doubtless be appreciated as it de- 
serves by their discrimination and generosity* 
Had I carried it to the pulpit, think now how I 
might have filled the seats, and raised the prices 
of a private chapel ! Had I taken it to the bar, 
think how I could have mystified a judge, and 
bamboozled a jury ! Had I displayed it in the 
senate, think how I could have talked against 
time, for the purpose of delaying a division, till 
the expected numbers could be brought toge- 
ther ; or how efficient a part I could have borne 



1 



100 



in the patriotic design of impeding the business 
of a session, prolonging and multiplying the 
debates, and worrying a minister out of his 
senses and his life. 

Diis aliter visum. — I am what I was to be, — 
what it is best for myself that I should be, — 
and for you, my Public, also. The rough- 
hewn plans of my destination have been better 
shaped for me by Providence than I could have 
shaped them for myself. 

But to the purpose of this chapter which is 
as headless as the Whigs — Observe my Pub- 
lic, I have not said as brainless... If it were, 
the book would be worth no more than a new 
Tragedy of Lord Byron's ; or an old number 
of Mr. Jeffrey's Review, when its prophecies 
have proved false, its blunders have been ex- 
posed, and its slander stinks. 

Every thing here shall be in order. The 
digressions into which this gift of discourse may 
lead me must not interrupt the arrangement 
of our History. Never shall it be said of the 
Unknown that " he draweth out the thread of 
bis verbosity finer than the staple of his argu- 



101 



ment." We have a journey to perform from 
Dan to Beersheba, and we must halt occasion- 
ally by the way. Matter will arise contingent to 
the story, correlative to it, or excrescent from 
it ; not necessary to its progress, and yet indis- 
pensable for your delight, my gentle Public, 
and for mine own ease. My Public would not 
have me stifle the afflatus when I am labouring 
with it, and in the condition of Elihu as de- 
scribed by himself in the 18th and 19th verses 
of the xxxii. chapter of the book of Job. 

Quemadmodum etslator oculos diu intentos 
acfatigatos remittit at que avocat, et, ut did 
solet, pascit ; sic nos animum aliquando debe- 
mus relaxare et quibusdam oblectamentis refi- 
cere. Sed ipsa oblectamenta opera sint ; ex 
his quoque si observaveris, sumes quod possit 
fieri salutare.* 

But that the beautiful structure of this his- 
tory may in no wise be deranged, such matter 
shall be distributed into distinct chapters in the 
way of intercalation ; a device of which as it 
respects the year, Adam is believed to have 

* Seneca, Epist. 58. 



102 



been the inventor; but according to the Author 
of the book of Jalkut, it was only transmitted 
by him to his descendants, being one of the 
things which he received by revelation. 

How then shall these Chapters be annomi- 
nated ? Intercalary they shall not. That word 
will send some of ray readers to Johnson's Dic- 
tionary for its meaning; and others to Sheridan, 
or Walker for its pronunciation. Besides I 
have a dislike to all mongrel words, and an 
especial dislike for strange compounds into 
which a preposition enters. I owe them a 
grudge. They make one of the main 4iflScul- 
ties in Greek and German. 

From our own Calendars we cannot borrow 
an appellation. In the Republican one of our 
neighbours, when the revolutionary fever was 
at its height, the supplemental days were called 
Sans^ulottedee. The Spaniards would call them 
Dias DescanUsados. The holders of liberal 
opinions in England would term them Radical 
Days. A hint might be taken hence, and we 
might name them radical chapters, as having 
the root of the matter in them ; — Or ramal, if 



103 



there were such a word^ upon the analogy of 
the Branch Bible societies. Or ramage as the 
king of Cockayne hath his Foliage. But they 
would not be truly and philosophically designated 
by these names. They are not branches from 
the tree of this history^ neither are they its 
leaves ; but rather choice garlands suspended 
there to adorn it on festival days. They may 
be likened to the waste weirs of a canal^ or the 
safety valves of a steam engine ; (my gentle 
Public would not have me stifle the afflatus /) — 
interludes ; — sjrmphonies between the acts ; — 
voluntaries during the service ; — ^resting places 
on the ascent of a church tower ; angular re- 
cesses of an old bridge^ into which foot pas- 
sengers may retire from carriages or horsemen; 
houses-of-call upon the road ; seats by the way 
side^ such as those which were provided by 
the Man of Ross^ or the not less meritorious 
Woman of Chippenham^ Maud Heath of 
Langley Burrel, — Hospices on the passages of 
the Alps, — Capes of Good Hope, or Isles of 
St. Helena, — yea Islands of Tinian or Juan 
Fernandez, upon the long voyage whereon we 
are bound. 



104* 



• 

Leap-chapters they cannot properly be 
called; and if we were to call them Ha Has! 
as being chapters which the Reader may leap 
if he likes^ the name would appear rather 
strained than significant, and might be justly 
censured as more remarkable for affectation 
than for aptness. For the same reason I reject 
the designation of Intermeans, though it hath 
the sanction of great Ben's authority. 

Among the requisites for an accomplished 
writer Steele enumerates the skill whereby 
common words' are started into new significa- 
tions. I will not presume so far upon that 
talent ( — modesty forbids me — ) as to call these 
intervening chapters either Interpellations or 
Interpositions, or Interlocations, or Intervals. 
Take this Reader for a general rule, that the 
readiest and plainest style is the most forcible 
(if the head be but properly stored ;) and that in 
all ordinary cases the word which first presents 
itself is the best ; even as in all matters of 
right and wrong, the first feeling is that which 
the heart owns and the conscience ratifies. 

But for a new occasion, a new word or a 
new composite must be formed. Therefore I 



105 



will strike one in the mint of analogy, in 
which alone the king's EngUsh must be coined, 
and call them Interchapters — and thus endeth 



INTERCHAPTER I. 

REMARKS IN THE PRINTING OFFICE. THE AUTHOR 
CONFESSES A DISPOSITION TO GARRULITY. PRO- 
PRIETY OF PROVIDING CERTAIN CHAPTERS FOR THE 
RECEPTION OF HIS EXTRANEOUS DISCOURSE. 
CHOICE OF AN APPELLATION FOR SUCH CHAPTERS. 



Perque vices cUiquid, quod tempora longa videri 
Nonsinat, in medium vaewu referamusadaures. 

Ovid. 



E S 



106 



CHAPTER IX. P. I. 

EXCEPTIONS TO ONE OF KING SOLOMON*S RULES — A 
WINTBR^S EVENING AT DANIEL*S FIRE-SIDE. 



These are my thoughts ; I might have spun them out into 
a greater length, but I think a little plot of ground, liiick 
sown, is better than a great field which, for the moat part of it, 
lies fallow. Norris. 



*' Train up a child in the way he should go, 
and when he is old his feet will not depart 
from it." Generally speaking it will be found 
so ; but is there any other rule to which there 
are so many exceptions ? 

Ask the serious Christian as he calls himself, 
or the Professor (another and more fitting ap- 
pellative which the Christian Pharisees have 
chosen for themselves) — ^ask him whether he 
has found it hold good ? Whether his sons 
when they attained to years of discretion 



107 

(which are the most indiscreet years in the 
course of human life) have profited as he ex- 
pected by the long extemporaneous prayers to 
which they Ustened night and mornings the sad 
sabbaths which they were compelled to observe^ 
and the soporific sermons which closed the 
domestic religiosities of those melancholy days? 
Ask him if this discipline has prevented them 
from running headlong into the follies and 
vices of the age? from being bird-limed by 
dissipation? or caught in the spider's web of 
sophistry and unbelief? " It is no doubt a 
true observation," says Bishop Patrick, '^ that 
the ready way to make the minds of youth 
grow awry, is to lace them too hard, by deny- 
ing them their just freedom.*' 

Ask the old faithful servant of Mammon, 
whom Mammon has rewarded to his heart's 
desire, and in whom the acquisition of riches 
has only encreased his eagerness for acquiring 
more — ask him whether he has succeeded in 
training up his heir to the same service ? He 
will tell you that the young man is to be found 
upon race-grounds, and in gaming-houses, that 



108 



lie is taking his swing of extravagance and 
excess, and is on the high road to ruin. 

Ask the wealthy Quaker^ the pillar of the 
meeting — ^most orthodox in heterodoxy, — who 
never wore a garment of forbidden cut or 
colour, never bent his body in salutation, or his 
knees in prayer, never uttered the heathen 
name of a day or month, nor ever addrest him- 
self to any person without religiously speaking 
illegitimate English, — ask him how it has hap- 
pened that the tailor has converted his sons? 
He will fold his hands, and twirl his thumbs 
mournfully in silence. It has not been for 
want of training them in the way wherein it was 
his wish that they should go. 

You are about, Sir, to send your son to a 
public school; Eton or Westminster; Winches- 
ter or Harrow ; Rugby or the Charter House, 
no matter which. He may come from either an 
accomplished scholar to the utmost extent that 
school education can make him so ; he may be 
the better both for its discipline and its want of 
discipline ; it may serve him excellently well as 
a preparatory school for the world into which 



109 



he is about to enter. But also he may come 
away an empty coxcomb or a hardened brute 
— ^a spendthrift — a profligate — a blackguard 
or a sot. 

To put a boy in the way he should go, is 
Hke sending out a ship well found, well manned 
and stored, and with a careful captain; but 
there are rocks and shallows in her course, 
winds and currents to be encountered, and all 
the contingencies and perils of the sea. 

How often has it been seen that sons, not 
otherwise deficient in duty toward their parents, 
have, in the most momentous concerns of life, 
taken the course most opposite to that in which 
they were trained to go, going wrong where 
the father would have directed them aright, or 
taking the right path in spite of all induce- 
ments and endeavours for leading them wrong ! 
The son of Charles Wesley, born and bred in 
methodism and bound to it by all the strongest 
ties of pride and prejudice, became a papist. 
This indeed was but passing from one erro- 
neous persuasion to another, and a more in- 
viting one. But Isaac Casaubon also had the 



no 



grief of seeing a son seduced into the Romish 
superstition, and on the part of that great and 
excellent man, there had been no want of dis- 
cretion in training him, nor of sound learning 
and sound wisdom. Archbishop Leighton, an 
honor to his church, his country, and his kind, 
was the child of one of those firebrands who 
kindled the Great Rebellion. And Franklin 
had a son, who notwithstanding the example 
of his father (and such a father!) continued 
stedfast in his duty as a soldier and a subject; 
he took the unsuccessful side — but 

nunquam mccessum crescat hmutstum,* 

No such disappointment was destined to befal 
our Daniel. The way in which he trained up 
his son was that into which the bent of the 
boy's own nature would have led him; and all 
circumstances combined to favour the tendency 
of his education. The country abounding in 
natural objects of sublimity and beauty (some 
of these singular in their kind) might have im- 
pressed a duller imagination than had fallen to 
his lot ; and that imagination had time enough 

* LUCAN. 



Ill 



for its workings during his solitary walks to 
and firom school morning and evening. His 
home was in a lonely spot ; and having neither 
brother nor sister, nor neighbours near enough 
in any degree to supply their {dace as play- 
mates, he became his father's companion im- 
perceptibly as he ceased to be his fondling. 
And the effect was hardly less apparent in 
Daniel than in the boy. He was no longer the 
same taciturn person as of yore ; it seemed as 
if his tongue had been loosened, and when the 
reservoirs of his knowledge were opened they 
flowed freely. 

Their chimney corner on a winter's evening 
presented a group not unworthy of Sir Joshua's 
pencil. There sate Daniel, richer in marvellous 
stories than ever traveller who in the days of 
mendacity returned- from the East; the peat 
fire shining upon a countenance which weather- 
hardened as it was, might have given the painter 
a model for a Patriarch, so rare was the union 
which it exhibited of intelligence, benevolence 
and simplicity. There sate the boy with open 
eyes and ears, raised head, and fallen lip, in all 



113 



the happiness of wonder and implicit belief. 
There sate Dinah, not less proud of her hus- 
band's learning than of the towardly disposi- 
tion and promising talents of her son, — ^twirling 
the thread at her spinning wheel, but attend- 
ing to all that past; and when there was a 
pause in the discourse, fetching a deep sigh, 
and exclaiming " Lord bless us ! what won- 
derful things there are in the world !'* There 
also sate Haggy, knitting stockings, and sharing 
in the comforts and enjoyments of the family 
when the day's work was done. And there 
sate William Dove ; — but William must have 
a chapter to himself. 



lis 



CHAPTER X. P. I. 

ONE WHO WAS NOT SO WISE AS HIS FRIENDS COULD 
HAVE WISHED^ AND YET QUITE AS HAPPY AS IF HE 
HAD BEEN WISER. NEPOTISM NOT CONFINED TO 
POPES. 



There are of madmen as there are of tame. 

All humoured not alike. Some 

Apish and fantastic ; 

And though 'twould grieve acoul to see God's image 

So blemished and defaced, yet do they act 

Such antic and such pretty lunacies. 

That spite of sorrow, they will make you smile. 

Dekker. 



William Dove was DanieVs only surviving 
brother, seven years his junior. He was born 
with one of those heads in which the thin par- 
tition that divides great wits from folly is 
wanting. Had he come into the world a cen- 
tury sooner, he would have been taken nolens 
volens into some Baron's household, to wear 



114 



motley, make sport for the guests and domes- 
ticSy and live in fear of the rod. But it was 
his better fortune to live in an age when this 
calamity rendered him liable to no such oppres- 
sion, and to be precisely in that station which 
secured for him all the enjoyments of which 
he was capable, and all the care he needed. In 
higher life, he would probably have been con- 
signed to the keeping of strangers who would 
have taken charge of him for pay ; in a humbler 
degree he must have depended upon the parish 
for support ; or have been made an inmate of 
one of those moral lazar-houses in which age 
and infancy, the harlot and the idiot, the pro- 
fligate and the unfortunate are herded together. 
William Dove escapied these aggravations of 
calamity. He escaped also that persecution to 
which he would have been exposed in papu- 
lous places where boys run loose in packs, and 
harden one another in impudence, mischief and 
cruelty. Natural feeling, when natural feeling 
is not corrupted, leads men to regard persons 
in his condition with a compassion not unmixed 
with awe. It is common with the country 



115 



people when they speak of such persons to 
point significantly at the head and say *tis not 
ali there ,' — ^words denoting a sense of the mys- 
teriousness of our nature which perhaps they 
feel more deeply on this than on any other oc- 
casion. No outward and visible deformity can 
inake them so truly apprehend how fearfully 
and wonderfuUy we are made. 

William Dove's was not a case of fatuity. 
Though all was not there^ there was a great 
deal. He was what is called half-saved. Some 
of liis faculties were more than ordinarily acute^ 
but the power of self-conduct was entirely 
wanting in him. Fortunately it was suppUed 
by a sense of entire dependence which pro- 
duced entire docility. A dog does not obey his 
master more dutifully than William obeyed his 
brother ; and in this obedience there was no- 
thing of fear ; with all the strength and sim- 
plicity of a child's love^ it had also the charac- 
ter and merit of a moral attachment. 

The professed and privileged Fool was ge- 
nerally characterized by a spice of knavery, 
and not unfrequently of maliciousness : the un- 



116 



natural situation in which he was placed^ tended 
to excite such propensities and even to produce 
them. William had shrewdness enough for 
the character, but nothing of this appeared in 
his disposition ; ill-usage might perhaps have 
awakened it, and to a fearful degree, if he had 
proved as sensible to injury as he was to kind- 
ness. But he had never felt an injury. He 
could not have been treated with more tender- 
ness in Turkey (where a degree of holiness is 
imputed to persons in his condition) than was 
uniformly shewn him within the little sphere 
of his perambulations. It was surprizing how 
much he had picked up within that little sphere. 
Whatever event occurred, whatever tale was 
current, whatever traditions were preserved, 
whatever superstitions were believed, William 
knew them all ; and all that his insatiable ear 
took in, his memory hoarded. Half the pro- 
verbial sayings in Ray's volume were in his 
head, and as many more with which Ray was 
unacquainted. He knew many of the stories 
which our children are now receiving as novel- 
ties in the selections from Grimm's Kinder-und 



A^ 



117 



HauS'MarcheUy and as many of those which 
are collected in the Danish Folk-Sagn. And 
if some zealous lover of legendary lore, (like 
poor John Leyden, or Sir Walter Scott) had 
fallen in with him, the Shakespearian commen- 
tators might perhaps have had the whole story 
of St. Withold ; the Wolf of the World's End 
might have been identified with Fenris and 
found to be a relic of the Scalds : and Rauf 
CoUyer and John the Reeve might still have 
been as well known as Adam Bell, and Clym 
of the Clough and William of Cloudeslie. 

William had a great fondness for his nephew. 
Let not Protestants suppose that Nepotism is 
an affection confined to the dignitaries of the 
Roman Catholic Church. In its excess indeed 
it is peculiarly a Papal vice, — which is a de- 
gree higher than a Cardinal one ; but like many 
other sins it grows out of the corruption of a 
good feeling. It may be questioned whether 
fond uncles are not as numerous as unkind 
ones, notwithstanding our recollections of King 
Richard and the Children in the Wood. We 
jnay use the epithet nepotious for those who 



118 



carry this fondness to the extent of doting, and 
as expressing that degree of fondness it may 
be applied to William Dove: he was a nepotious 
uncle. The father regarded young Daniel 
with a deeper and more thoughtful, but not 
with a fonder affection, not with such a doting 
attachment. Dinah herself, though a fond as 
well as careful mother did not more thoroughly 

delight to hear 
Her early child mis-speak half-uttered words ; * 

and perhaps the boy so long as he was incap 
pable of distinguishing between their moral 
qualities, and their relative claims to his respect 
and love and duty, loved his uncle most of the 
three. The father had no idle hours ; in the 
intervals when he was not otherwise employed, 
one of his dear books usually lay open before 
him, and if he was not feeding upon the page, 
he was ruminating the food it had afforded 
Mm. But William Dove from the time that 
his nephew became capable of noticing and re- 
turning caresses seemed to have concentered 
upon him all his affections. With children af- 

* Donne. 



119 



fection seldom fails of finding its due return ; 
and if he had not thus won the boy's heart in 
infancy, he would have secured it in childhood 
by winning his ear with these marvellous stories. 
But he possessed another talent which would 
alone have made him a favourite with chil- 
dren, — the power of imitating animal sounds 
with singular perfection. A London manager 
would have paid him well for performing the 
cock in Hamlet. He could bray in octaves to 
a nicety, set the geese gabbling by addressing 
them in their own tongue, and make the tur- 
key-cock spread his fan, brush his wing against 
the ground, and angrily gob-gobble in answer 
to a gobble of defiance. But he prided him- 
self more upon his success with the owls, as an 
accomplishment of more difficult attainment. 
In this Mr. Wordsworth's boy of Winander 
was not more perfect. Both hands were used 
as an instrument in producing the notes ; and 
if Pope could have heard the responses which 
came from barn and doddered oak and ivied 
crag, he would rather, (satirist as he was,) have 



120 



left Ralph unsatirized, than have vilified one of 
the wildest and sweetest of nocturnal sounds. 

He was not less expert to a human ear in 
hitting off the wood-pigeon's note, though he 
could not in this instance provoke a reply. 
This sound he used to say ought to be natural 
to him, and it was wrong in the bird not to ac- 
knowledge his relation. Once when he had 
made too free with a lasses lips, he disarmed 
his brother of a reprehensive look, by plead- 
ing that as his name was William Dove it be- 
hoved him both to bill and to coo. 



Ul 



CHAPTER XI. P. I. 

A WORD TO TUE READER, SHEWING WHERE WE ARE, 
AND HOW WE CAME HERE, AND WHEREFORE ', AND 
WHITHER WE ARE GOING. 



'Tis my venture 
On your retentive wisdom. 

Ben J0N8ON. 



Reader, you have not forgotten where we are 
at this time : you remember I trust, that we are 
neither at Dan nor Beersheba ; nor any where 
between those two celebrated places ; nor on 
the way to either of them : but that we are in 
the Doctor's parlour, that Mrs. Dove has just 
poured out his seventh cup of tea, and that 
the clock of St. George's has struck five. In 
what street, parade, place, square, row, terrace 
or lane, and in what town, and in what county ; 
VOL. I. o 



12£ 



and on what day, and in what month, and in 
what year, will be explained in due time. You 
cannot but remember what was said in the se- 
cond chapter post initium concerning the im- 
portance and the necessity of order in an un- 
dertaking like this. ^^ All things," says Sir 
Thomas Brown, '^ began in order ; so shall 
they end, and so shall they begin again ; ac- 
cording to the ordainer of order, and mystical 
mathematics of the City of Heaven :" This awful 
sentence was uttered by the Philosopher of 
Norwich upon occasion of a subject less mo- 
mentous than that whereon we have entered, for 
what are the mysteries of the Quincunx com- 
pared to the delineation of a human mind ? Be 
pleased only at present to bear in mind where 
we are. Place but as much confidence in me as 
you do in your review, your newspaper, and 
your apothecary ; give me but as much credit 
as you expect from your tailor ; and if your 
apothecary deserves that confidence as well, it 
will be well for you, and if your credit is as 
punctually redeemed it will be well for your 
tailor. It is not without cause that I have gone 



123 



back to the Doctor'B childhood and his birth 
place. Be thou assured, O Reader! that he 
never could have been seated thus comfortably 
in that comfortable parlour where we are now 
regarding him, — never by possibility could have 
been at that time in that spot, and in those cir- 
cumstances ; — ^never could have been the Doc- 
tor that he was, — nay according to all reason- 
able induction, all tangible or imaginable pro- 
babilities, — never would have been a Doctor 
at all, — consequently thou never couldst have 
had the happiness of reading this delectable 
history, nor I the happiness of writing it for thy 
benefit and information and delight, — ^had it 
not been for his father's character, his father's 
books, his schoolmaster Guy, and his Uncle 
William, with all whom and which, it was there- 
fore indispensable that thou shouldst be made 
acquainted. 

A metaphysician, or as some of my contempo- 
raries would afiect to say a psychologist, if he 
were at all a master of his art bablative (for it is 
as much an ars bablativa as the Law, which was 
defined to be so by that old traitor and time- 



124 



server Serjeant Maynard) — a metaphysician I 
say, would not require more than three such oc- 
tavo volumes as those of Mr. Malthus's Essay 
on Population, to prove that no existing cir- 
cumstance could at this time be what it is, un- 
less all preceding circumstances had from the 
beginning of time been precisely what they 
were. But, my good Reader, I have too much 
respect for you, and too much regard for your 
precious time, and too much employment, or 
amusement (which is a very rational kind of 
employment) for my own, to waste it in demon- 
strating a truism. No man knows the value of 
time more feeUngly, than I do ! 

Man's life. Sir, being 
So short, and then the way that leads unto 
The knowledge of ourselves, so long and tedious. 
Each minute should be precious.* 

It is my wish and intention to make you ac- 
quainted with a person most worthy to be 
known, for such the subject of this history will 
be admitted to be : one whom when you once 
know him it will be impossible that you should 
ever forget: one for whom I have the highest 

* Beaumont and Fletcher. 



125 



possible veneration and regard ; (and though 
it is not possible that your feelings towards 
him should be what mine are) one who, the more 
he is known, will and must be more and more 
admired. I wish to introduce this person to you. 
Now, Sir, I appeal to your good sense, and to 
your own standard of propriety, should I act 
with sufficient respect either to yourself or him, 
if, without giving you any previous intimation, 
any information, concerning his character and 
situation in life ; or in any way apprizing you 
who and what he was, I were to knock at your 
door and simply present him to you as Doctor 
Dove? No, my dear Sir! it is indispensable 
that you should be properly informed who it is 
whom I thus introduce to your acquaintance ; 
and if you are the judicious person that I sup- 
pose you to be, you will be obliged to me as 
long as you live. " For why," as old Higgins 
hath it, — 

For why, who writes such histories as these 
Doth often bring the Reader's heart such ease 
As when they sit and see what he doth note, 
Well fare his heart, say they, this book that wrote ! 

Ill fare that reader's heart who of this book 



126 



says otherwise ! " Tarn suavia dieam/acinora, 
ut mali sit ei qui taHbus non delectetur /*' said 
a very different person from old Higgins, writ- 
ing in a different vein, I have not read his book, 
but so hx as my own is concerned^ I heartily 
adopt his malediction. 

Had I been disposed, as the Persians say, to 
let the steed of the pen expatiate in the pkins of 
prolixity, I should have carried thee farther 
back in the generations of the Doves, But the 
good garrulous son of Grarciktsso my Lord (Hea- 
ven rest the soul of the Princess who bote himy 
— for Peru has never produced any thing else 
half so precious as his delightful books,) — the 
Inca-blooded historian himself, I say, was not 
more anxious to avoid that &iling than I am. 
Forgive me, Reader, if I should have fallen into 
an opposite error ; forgive me if in the fear of 
saying too much I should have said too little. 
I have my misgivings : — I may have run upoQ 
Scylla while striving to avoid Chary bdis. Much 
interesting matter have I omitted ; much have I 
past by on which I '* cast a longing lingering 
look behind;" — much which might worthily find 



127 



a place in the History of Yorkshire ; or of the 
West Riding (if that history were tripartively 
distributed ;)— or in the Gentleman's Maga- 
zine ;— or in John NichoFs Illustrations of the 
Literary History of the Eighteenth Century : 
(I honor John Nichols^ I honor Mr. Urban !) 
much more might it have had place^ — much 
more might it be looked for here. 

I might have told thee^ Reader, of Daniel the 
Grandfather, and of Abigail his second wife, 
who once tasted tea in the housekeeper's apart^ 
ments at Skipton Castle; and of the Great 
Grandfather who at the age of twenty-eight 
died of the small pox, and was the last of the 
family that wore a leathern jerkin ; and of his 
father Daniel the atavus, who was the first of 
the family that shaved, and who went with his 
own horse and arms to serve in that brave 
troop, which during the wreck of the King's 
party the heir of Lowther raised for the loyal 
cause : and of that Daniel's Grandfather (the 
tritavus) who going to Kentmere to bring home 
a wife was converted from the popish supersti- 
tion by falling in with Bernard Gilpin on the 



1X!8 



way. That apostolic man was so well pleased 
with his convert, that he gave him his own 
copy of Latimer's sermons, — that copy which 
was one of our DanieFs Sunday books, and 
which was religiously preserved in reverence 
for this ancestor, and for the Apostle of the 
North (as Bernard Gilpin was called) whose 
autograph it contained. 

The history of any private family, however 
humble, could it be fully related for five or six 
generations, would illustrate the state and pro- 
gress of society better than could be done by 
the most elaborate dissertation. And the His- 
tory of the Doves might be rendered as inte- 
resting and as instructive as that of the Sey- 
mours or the Howards. Frown not. My 
Lord of Norfolk, frown not, your Grace of 
Somerset, when I add, that it would contain 
less for their descendants to regret. 



129 



CHAPTER XII. P. L 



A HISTORY NOTICED WHICH IS WRITTEN BACKWARD. 
THE CONFUSION OF TONGUES AN ESPECIAL EVIL 
FOR SCHOOLBOYS. 



For never in the long and tedious tract 
Of slavish grammar was I made to plod ; 

No tyranny of Rules my patience rackt ; 
I served no prenticehood to any Rod ; 

But in the freedom of the Practic way 

Learnt to go right, even when I went astray. 

Dr. Beaumont. 



It has been the general practice of historians, 
from the time of Moses, to begin at the begin- 
ning of their subject : but as a river may be 
traced either from its sources or its mouth, so it 
appears that a history may be composed in the 
reversed order of its chronology ; and a French 
author of very considerable ability and great 
learning has actually written a history of the 
Christian religion from his own times upwards. 

q2 



130 



It forms part of an elaborate and extensive work 
entitled ParaUele des Religions^ which must 
have been better known than it appears to be 
at present if it had not happened to be published 
in Paris during the most turbulent year of the 
Revolution. Perhaps if I h^ carried \>a4^ the 
memoirs of the Doye family, I might have fol- 
lowed his example in chusing thi9. up-hiU way, 
and have proceeded from son to father in the 
ascending line. But having resolved (whether 
judiciously or not) not to go farther back in 
these family records than, the year of our Lord 
1723, being the year of the Doctor's birth, I 
shall continue in the usual course, and pursue 
his history ab incunabulis down to that impor- 
tant evening on which we find hun now reach, 
ing out his hand to take that cup of tea which 
Mrs. Dove has just creamed and sugared for 
him. After all the beaten way is usually the 
best, and always the safest. '' He ought to be 
well mounted," say Aaron Hill, " who is for 
leaping the hedges of custom." For myself I 
am not so adventurous a horseman as to take 
the hazards of a steeple chace. 



131 



Proceeding therefore after the model of a 
Tyburn biography^ which being an ancient as 
well as popular form is likely to be the best^ — 
we come after birth and parentage to educar 
ticm. '^ That the world from Babel was scat- 
tered into divers tongues, we need not other 
proof,** says a grave and good author, '^ than 
as Diogenes proved that there is motion, — by 
walking ; — so we may see the confusion of lan- 
guages by our confused speaking. Once all 
the earth was of one tongue, one speech and 
one consent; for they all spake in the holy 
tongue wherein the world was created in the 
beginning. But pro peccato dissentionis hu- 
mafue (as saith St. Austin,) — for the sin of men 
disagreeing, — not only different dispositions 
but also different languages came into the 
world. — ^They came to Babel with a disagree- 
ing agreement ; and they came away punished 
with a speechless speech. They disagree 
among themselves, while every one strives for 
dominion. They agree against God in their 
Nagnavad km Liguda, — we will make our- 
selves a rendezvous for idolatry. But they 



132 



come away speaking to each other, but not un« 
derstood of each other; and so speak to no 
more purpose than if they spake not all. This 
punishment of theirs at Babel is like Adam's 
corruption, hereditary to us ; for we never 
come under the rod at the Grammar School, 
but we smart for our ancestor's rebellion at 
Babel." 

Light lie the earth upon the bones of Richard 
Guy, the Schoolmaster of Ingleton ! He never 
consumed birch enough in his vocation to have 
made a besom; and his ferule was never applied 
unless when some moral offence called for a chas- 
tisement that would be felt. There is a closer 
connection between good-nature and good sense 
than is commonly supposed. A sour ill-tempered 
pedagogue would have driven Daniel through 
the briars and brambles of the Grammar and 
foundered him in its sloughs; Guy led him gently 
along the green-sward. He felt that childhood 
should not be made altogether a season of painful 
acquisition, and that the fruits of the sacrifices 
then made are uncertain as to the account to 
which they may be turned, and are also liable to 



133 



the contingencies of life at least, if not other- 
wise jeopardized. '' Puisque le jour pent lui 
manqueVy laissons le un peujouir de VAurore /" 
The precept which warmth of imagination in- 
spired in Jean Jacques was impressed upon 
Guy's practice by gentleness of heart. He 
never crammed the memory of his pupil with 
such horrific terms as Prothesis, Aphaeresis, 
Epenthesis, Syncope, Paragoge, and Apocope; 
never questioned him concerning Appositio, 
Evocatio, Syllepsis, Prolepsis, Zeugma, Syn- 
thesis, Antiptosis, and Synecdoche ; never at- 
tempted to deter him (as Lily says boys are 
above all things to be deterred) from those faults 
which Lily also says, seem almost natural to 
the English, — the heinous faults of lotacism, 
Lambdacism, (which Alcibiades affected,) — 
Ischnotesism, Trauli'sm and Plateasm. But 
having grounded him well in the nouns and 
verbs, and made him understand the concords, 
he then followed in part the excellent advice of 
Lily thus given in his address to the Reader : 
** When these concords be well known unto 
them (an easy and pleasant pain, if the fore- 



184 



grounds be well and thoroughly beaten in) let 
them not continue in learning of the rules or- 
derly, as they lie in their Syntax^ but rather 
learn some pretty book wherein is contained 
not only the eloquence of the tongue^ but also 
a good plain lesson of honesty and godliness ; 
and thereof take some little sentence as it lieth, 
and learn to make the same first out of English 
into Latin, not seeing the book, or construing 
it thereupon. And if there fall any necessary 
rule of the Syntax to be known, then to learn 
it> as the occasion of the sentence giveth cause 
that day ; which sentence once made well^ and 
as nigh as may be with the words of the book, 
then to take the book and construe it ; and so 
shall he be less troubled with the parsing of 
it, and easiliest carry his lesson in mind/' 

Guy followed this advice in part} and in part 
he deviated from it, upon Lily's own authority, 
as '' judging that the most sufficient way which 
he saw to be the readiest mean ;" while there- 
fore he exercised his pupil in writing Latin 
pursuant to this plan, he carried him on faster 
in construing, and promoted the boy's progress 



185 



by gratifying his desire of getting forward. 
When he had done with Cordery, Erasmus 
was taken up, — for some of Erasmus's collo- 
quies were in those days used as a school book« 
and the most attractive one that could be put 
into a boy's hands. Afler he had got through 
this,' the aid of an English version was laid 
aside. And here Guy departed from the ordi- 
nary course, not upon any notion that he could 
improve upon it, but merely because he hap- 
pened to possess an old book composed for 
the use of Schools, which was easy enough to 
suit young Daniel's progress in the language, 
and might therefore save the cost of purchasing 
Justin or Phaedrus or Cornelius Nepos, or Eu- 
tropius, — ^to one or other of which he would 
otherwise have been introduced. 



1S6 



CHAPTER XIIL P. I. 

A DOUBT CONCERNING SCHOOL BOOKS^ WHICH WILL 
BE DEEMED HERETICAL ^ AND SOME ACCOUNT OF 
AN EXTRAORDINARY SUBSTITUTE FOR OVID OR 
VIRGIL. 



They say it is an ill mason that refuseth any stone ; and 
there is no knowledge but in a skilful hand serves, either posi- 
tively as it is, or else to illustrate some other knowledge. 

Hbkbert'8 Remains. 



I AM sometimes inclined to think that pigs are 
brought up upon a wiser system, than boys at 
a grammar school. The Pig is allowed to feed 
upon any kind of offal, however coarse, on which 
he can thrive, till the time approaches when pig 
is to commence pork, or take a degree as bacon ; 
and then he is fed daintily. Now it has some- 
times appeared to me that in like manner, boys 
might acquire their first knowledge of Latin 



137 



from authors very inferior to those which are 
now used in all schools ; provided the matter 
was unexceptionable and the Latinity good; 
and that they should not be introduced to the 
standard works of antiquity till they are of an 
age in some degree to appreciate what they 
read. 

Understand me. Reader, as speaking doubt- 
fully, — and that too upon a matter of little mo- 
ment; for the scholar will return in riper years 
to those authors which are worthy of being 
studied, and as for the blockhead — it signifies 
nothing whether the book which he consumes 
by thumbing it in the middle and dog-earing it 
at the corners be worthy or not of a better use. 
Yet if the dead have any cognizance of posthu- 
mous fame, one would think it must abate some- 
what of the pleasure with which Virgil and 
Ovid regard their earthly immortality, when 
they see to what base purposes their produc- 
tions are applied. That their verses should be 
administered to boys in regular doses, as lessons 
or impositions, and some dim conception of 
their meaning whipt into the tail when it has 
failed to penetrate the head, cannot be just the 



138 



sort of homage to their genius which they an- 
ticipated or desiredL 

Not from any reasonings or refinements of 
this kind, but from the mere accident of pos- 
sessing the booky Guy put into hb pupil's hands 
the Dialogues of Joannes llavisiusTextor. Jean 
Tixier, Seigneur de Ravisy, in the Nivem<H8, 
who thus latinized his name, is a person whose 
works, according to Baillet's severe censure, 
were buried in the dust of a few petty colleges 
and unfrequented i^ops, more than a century 
ago. He was however in his day a person of 
no mean station in tlie world of letters, having 
been Rector of the University of Paris, at the 
commencement of the 16th century ; and few 
indeed are the writers whose books have been 
so much used; for perhaps no other author 
ever contributed so largely to the manufacture 
of exercises whether in prose or verse, and of 
sermons also. Tex tor may be considered as 
the first compiler of the Gradtis ad Parnassum; 
and that collection of Apopthegms was origi- 
nally formed by him, which Conrade Lycos- 
thenes enlarged and rc^arranged; which the 
Jesuits adopted after expurgating it: and which 



139 



during many generations served as one of the 
standard common-place books for common- 
place divines in this country as well as on the 
continent. 

But though Textor was continually working 
in classical literature with a patience and per-> 
severance which nothing but the delight he ex- 
perienced in such occupations could have sus^ 
tainedy he was without a particle of classical 
taste. His taste was that of the age wherein 
he flourished^and these his Dialogues are Mora- 
lities in Latin verse. The designs and thoughts 
which would have accorded with their language 
had they been written either in old French or 
old EngUsh, appear when presented in Latinity, 
which is always that of a scholar, and largely 
interwoven with scraps from familiar classics, 
as strange as Harlequin and Pantaloon would 
do in heroic costume. 

Earth opens the first of these curious com- 
positions with a bitter complaint for the mis- 
fortunes which it is her lot to witness. Age 
(JEtiM) overhears the lamentation and enquires 
the cmiae ; and after a dialogue in which the 



140 



author makes the most liberal use of his own 
common-places, it appears that the perishable 
nature of all sublunary things is the cause of 
this mourning. jEtas endeavours to persuade 
Terra that her grief is altogether unreasonable 
by such brief and cogent observations as Fata 
Jubeniy Fata volunt, Ita Diis placitum. Earth 
asks the name of her philosophic consoler, but 
upon discovering it, calls her falsa virago, and 
meretrix, and abuses her as being the very 
author of all the evils that distress her. How- 
ever jEtas succeeds in talking Terra into better 
humour, advises her to exhort man that he 
should not set his heart upon perishable things, 
and takes her leave as Homo enters. After 
a recognition between mother and son, Terra 
proceeds to warn Hmno against all the ordinary 
pursuits of this world. To convince him of the 
vanity of glory she calls up in succession the 
ghosts of Hector, Achilles, Alexander and 
Samson, who tell their tales and admonish him 
that valor and renown afford no protection 
against Death. To exemplify the vanity of 
beauty Helen, Lais, Thisbe and Lucretia are 



141 



summoned^ relate in like manner their respec- 
tWe fortunes, and remind him that pulms et 
umbra sumus, Virgil preaches to him upon the 
emptiness of literary fame. Xerxes tells him 
that there is no avail in power, Nero that there 
is none in tyranny, Sardanapalus that there is 
none in voluptuousness. But the application 
which Homo makes of all this, is the very re- 
verse to what his mother intended : he infers 
that seeing he must die at last, live how he will, 
the best thing he can do is to make a merry life 
of it, so away he goes to dance and revel and 
enjoy himself; and Terra concludes with the 
mournful observation that men will still pursue 
their bane, unmindful of their latter end. 

Another of these Moralites begins with three 
Worldlings (Tres Mundani) ringing changes 
upon the pleasures of profligacy, in Textor's 
peculiar manner, each in regular succession say- 
ing something to the same purport in different 

words. As thus 

Primus Mundanus. 

Si breve tempus abit, 

Skcundus Mundanus. 

Si vita caduca recedit ; 



U2 



TERTIU9 MUNDANUS. 

Si cadit hora. 

Primus Mundanus. 

Secundus Mundakus. 

Perit Omne, 

Tertius Mundanus. 

Venit Mors, 
Primus Mundanus. 

Quidnamprodessetfati meminisse futuri f 
Secundus Mundanus. 

Quidnam prodesset lachrymis consumere vUamf 
Tertiu sMundanus. 

Quidnam prodesset tantis incumbere curis f 

Upon which an unpleasant personage who has 
just appeared to interrupt their trialogue ob- 
serves. 

Si breve tempus obit, si vita caduca recedit. 

Si cadit }u)ra, dies abeunt, perit omne, venit Mors, 

Quidnam lethifer<B Mortis meminisse nocebit ? 

It is Mors herself who asks the question. 
The three Worldlings however behave as re- 
solutely as Don Juan in the old drama ; they 
tell Death that they are young and rich and 
active and vigorous, and set all admonition at 
defiance. Death or rather Mrs. Death, (for 
Mors being feminine is called l^na, and me- 
retrixy and virago^) takes all this patiently, and 



143 



letting them go off in a dance, calls up human 
Nature who has been asleep meantime, and 
asks her how she can sleep in peace while her 
sons are leading a life of dissipation and de- 
bauchery? Nature very coolly replies by 
demanding why they should not? and Death 
answers, because they must go to the infernal 
regions for so doing. Upon this Nature, who 
appears to be liberally inclined, asks if it is 
credible that any should be obliged to go there? 
and Death to convince her calls up a soul from 
bale to give an account of his own sufferings. 
A dreadful account this Damnatus gives ; and 
when Nature, shocked at what she hears, en- 
quires if he is the only one who is tormented in 
Orcus, Damnatus assures her that hardly one in 
a thousand goes to Heaven, but that his fellow- 
sufferers are in number numberless ; and he 
specifies among them .Kings and Popes, and 
Senators and severe Schoolmasters, — a class of 
men whom Textor seems to have held in great 
and proper abhorrence — as if like poor Tho- 
mas Tusser he had suffered under their inhu- 
man discipline. 
Horrified at this. Nature asks advice of Mors , 



144 



and Mors advises her to send a Son of Thunder 
round the worlds who should reprove the na- 
tions for their sins, and sow the seeds of virtue 
by his preaching. Peregrinus goes upon this 
mission and returns to give an account of it. 
Nothing can be worse than the report. As for 
the Kings of the Earthy it would be dangerous, 
he says, to say what they were doing. The 
Popes suffered the ship of Peter to go wher- 
ever the winds carried it. Senators were won 
by intercession or corrupted by gold. Doctors 
spread their nets in the temples for prey, and 
Lawyers were dumb unless their tongues were 
loosened by money. — Had he seen the Ita- 
lians ? — Italy was full of dissentions, ripe for war 
and defiled by its own infamous vice. The 
Spaniards? — They were suckled by Pride. 
The English ?— 

Gens tacitis prcegnans arcani^, ardua tentans, 
Bdita tartareis mihi creditur esse tenebris. 

In short the Missionary concludes that he has 
found every where an abundant crop of vices, 
and that all his endeavours to produce amend- 
ment have been like ploughing the sea shore. 
Again afflicted Nature asks advice otMors, and 



145 

Mors recommends that she should call up Jus- 
tice and send her abroad with her scourge to 
repress the wicked. But Justice is found to be 
so fast asleep that no calling can awaken her. 
Mors then advises her to summon Veritas ; 
alas! unhappy Veritas enters complaining of 
pains from head to foot and in all the intei me- 
diate parts, within and without ; she is dying 
and entreats that nature will call some one to 
confess her. But who shall be applied to ? — 
Kings ? They will not come. — Nobles ? Veritas 
is a hateful personage to them. — Bishops, or 
mitred Abbots? They have no regard for Truth. 
— Some saint from the desert ? Nature knows 
not where to find one ! Poor Veritas therefore 
dies '' unhouseled, disappointed, unaneled ; '* 
and forthwith three Demons enter rejoicing 
that Human Nature is left with none to help 
her, and that they are Kings of this world. 
They call in their Ministers, Caro and Volup^ 
tas and Vitiuniy and send them to do their 
work among mankind. Tliese successful mis- 
sionaries return, and relate how well they have 
sped every where ; and the Demons being by 

VOL. I. H 



146 



this time hungiy^ after washing in due form, 
and many ceremonious compliments among 
themselves, sit down to a repast which their 
ministers have provided. The bill of fare was 
one which Beelzebub's Court of Aldermen 
might have approved. There were the brains 
of a fat monk, — a roasted Doctor of Divinity 
who afforded great satisfaction, — a King's sir- 
loin, — some broiled Pope's flesh, and part of a 
Schoolmaster ; the joint is not specified, but I 
suppose it to have been the rump. Then came 
a Senator's lights and a Lawyer's tongue. 

When they have eaten of these dainties till 
the distended stomach can hold no more. Virtus 
conies in and seeing them send off the frag- 
ments to their Tartarean den, calls upon man- 
kind to bestow some sustenance upon her, for 
she is tormented with hunger. The Demons 
and their ministers insult her and drive her 
into banishment ; they tell Nature that to-mor- 
row the great King of Orcus will come and 
carry her away in chains ; off they go in a dance, 
and Nature concludes the piece by saying that 
what they have threatened must happen, un- 



147 



less Justice shaU be awakened. Virtue fed, and 
Veritcts restored to. life by the sacred book. 

There are seTeral other Dialogues in a simi- 
lar strain of fiction^ The rudest and perhaps 
oldest specimen of this style is to be found in 
Pierce Ploughman, the most polished in Cal- 
deron, the most popular in John Bunyan's Holy 
War, and abeve all in his Pilgrim's Progress. 
It appears from the Dialogues that they were 
not composed for the use of youth alone as a 
school book, but were represented at College ; 
and poor as they are in point of composition, 
the oddity of their combinations, and the whole- 
some honesty of their satire, were well adapted 
to strike young imaginations and make an im- 
pression there which better and wiser works 
might have failed to leave. 

A schoolmaster who had been regularly bred 
would have regarded such a book with scorn, 
and discerning at once its obvious faults, would 
have been incapable of perceiving any thing 
which might compensate for them. But Guy 
was not educated well enough to despise a 
writer like old Textor. What he knew himself. 



\ 



148 



he had picked up where and how he could^ in 
bye ways and corners. The book was neither 
in any respect above his comprehension, nor 
below his taste; and Joseph Warton^ never 
rolled off the hexameters of Virgil or Homer, 
ore rotundoy with more delight, when expatiat- 
ing with all the feelings of a scholar and a poet 
upon their beauties, to such pupils as Headley 
and Russell and Bowles, than Guy paraphrased 
these rude but striking allegories to his de- 
lighted Daniel. 



149 



CHAPTER XIV. P. I. 



AN OBJECTION ANSWERED. 



Is this then your wonder ? 
Nay then you shall under- 
stand more of my skilly Ben Jonion. 



" This account of Textor's Dialogues," says a 
critical Reader, " might have done very well 
for the Retrospective Review, or one of the 
Magazines, or Disraeli's Curiosities of Litera- 
ture. But no one would have looked for it 
here, where it is completely out of place." 

" My good Sir, there is quite enough left 
untouched in Textor to form a very amusing 
paper for the journal which you have men- 
tioned, and the Editor may thank you for the 
hint. But you are mistaken in thinking that 



150 



what has been said of those Dialogues is out 
of place here. May I ask what you expected 
in these volumes ? " 
" What the Title authorized me to look for." 
" Do you know, Sir, what mutton broth means 
at a city breakfast on the Lord Mayor's Day, 
mutton broth being the appointed breakfast for 
that festival ? It means according to established 
usage — ^by liberal interpretation — ^mutton broth 
and every thing else that can be wished for at a 
breakfast. So,lSir, you have here not only what 
the title seems to specify, but every thing else 
that can be wished for in a book. In treating 
of the Doctor, it treats cfe omnibus rebus-et qui- 
busdam aliis. It is the Doctor &c., and that &c., 
like one of Lyttleton's, implies every thing that 
can be deduced from the words preceding. 

But I maintain that the little which has been 
said of comical old Textor (for it is little com- 
pared to what his Dialogues contain) strictly 
relates to the main thread of this most orderly 
and well compacted work. You will remember 
that I am now replying to the question proposed 
in the third chapter P.I. " Who was the Doctor?" 



151 



And as he who should undertake to edite the 
works of Chaucer, or Spenser^ or Shakespear 
would not be qualified for the task, unless he 
had made himself conversant with the writings 
of those earlier authors, from whose store* 
houses (as far as they drew from books) their 
minds were fed ; so it behoved me (as far as 
my information and poor ability extend) to 
explain in what manner so rare a character as 
Dr. Dove's was formed. 

Quo semel est imbuta recens, — you know the 
rest of the quotation, Sir. And perhaps you 
may have tasted water out of a beery glass, — 
which it is not one or two rinsings that can 
purify. 

You have seen yew trees cut into the forms 
of pyramids, chess-kings, and peacocka: — 
nothing can be more unlike their proper growth 
— and yet no tree except the yew could take 
the artificial figures so well. The garden passes 
into the possession of some new owner who 
has no taste for such ornaments : the yews are 
left to grow at their own will ; they lose the 
preposterous shape which has been forced upon 



152 



them without recovering that of their natural 
growth, and what was formal becomes grotesque 
— a word which may be understood as expres- 
sing the incongruous combination of formality 
with extravagance or wildness. 

The intellectual education which ydung 
Daniel received at home was as much out of 
the ordinary course as the book in which he 
studied at school. Robinson Crusoe had not 
yet reached Ingleton. Sandford and Merton 
had not been written, nor that history of Peck- 
sey and Flapsey and the Robin's Nest, which 
is the prettiest fiction that ever was composed 
for children, and for which its excellent au- 
thoress will one day rank high among women 
of genius when time shall have set its seal upon 
desert. The only book within his reach, of all 
those which now come into the hands of youth, 
was the Pilgrim's Progress, and this he read 
at first without a suspicion of its allegorical 
import. What he did not understand was as 
little remembered as the sounds of the wind, 
or the motions of the passing clouds ; but the 
imagery and the incidents took possession of 



153 



his memory and his heart. After a while 
Textor became an interpreter of the immortal 
Tinker, and the boy acquired as much of the 
meaning by glimpses as was desirable, enough 
to render some of the personages more awful 
by spiritualizing them, while the tale itself re- 
mained as a reality. Oh! what blockheads 
are those wise perspns who think it necessary 
that a child should comprehend every thing it 
reads. 



H S 



154 



CHAPTER XV. P. I. 

THE AUTHOR YENTURBS AN OPINION AGAINST THE 
PREVAILING WISDOM OF MAKING CHILDREN PRE- 
MATURELY WISE. 



Pray you, use your freedom ; 
And so hr, if you please allow me mine. 
To hear you only ; not to be compelled 
To take your moral potions. 

Massinger. 



" What, Sir," exclaims a Lady, who is bluer 
than ever one of her naked and woad-stained 
ancestors appeared at a public festival in full 
dye, — " what. Sir, do you tell us that children 
are not to be made to understand what they are 
taught ?" And she casts her eyes complacently 
toward an assortment of those books which so 
many writers, male and female, some of the 
infidel, some of the semi-fidel, and some of the 



155 

super-fidel schools have composed for the 
laudable purpose of enabling children to un- 
derstand every thing. — " What, Sir,** she re- 
peats, ^* are we to make our children learn 
things by rote like parrots, and fill their heads 
with words to which they cannot attach any 
signification ? " 

" Yes, Madam in very many cases.** 
" I should like. Sir, to be instructed why ? " 
She says this in a tone, and with an expres- 
sion both of eyes and lips which plainly show, 
in direct opposition to the words, that the Lady 
thinks herself much fitter to instruct, than to 
be instructed. It is not her fault. She is a 
good woman, and naturally a sensible one, but 
she has been trained up in the way women 
should not go. She has been carried from lec- 
ture to lecture, like a student who is being 
crammed at a Scotch University. She has 
attended lectures on chemistry, lectures on 
poetry, lectures on phrenology, lectures on 
mnemonics ; she has read the latest and most 
applauded essays on Taste : she has studied 
the newest and most approved treatises prac- 



156 



tical and theoretical upon Education : she has 
paid sufficient attention to metaphysics to know 
as much as a professed philosopher about mat- 
ter and spirit ; she is a proficient in political 
economy, and can discourse upon the new 
science of population. Poor Lady, it would 
require large draughts of Lethe to clear out all 
this undigested and undigestable trash, and fit 
her for becoming what she might have been ! 
Upon this point however it may be practicable 
to set her right. 

** You are a mother. Madam, and a good 
one. In caressing your infants you may per- 
haps think it unphilosophical to use what I 
should call the proper and natural language 
of the nursery. But doubtless you talk to 
them ; you give some utterance to your feelings; 
and whether that utterance be in legitimate 
and wise words, or in good extemporaneous 
nonsense it is alike to the child. The conven- 
tional words convey no more meaning to him 
than the mere sound ; but he understands 
from either all that is meant, all that you wish 
him to understand, all that is to be understood. 



157 



He knows that it is an expression of your love 
and tenderness, and that he is the object of it* 
*^ So too it continues after he is advanced 
from infancy into childhood. When children 
are beginning to speak they do not and cannot 
affix any meaning to half the words which they 
hear; yet they learn their mother tongue. 
What I say is, do not attempt to force their 
intellectual growth. Do not feed them with 
meat till they have teeth to masticate it. 

" There is a great deal which they ought to 
learn, can learn, and must learn, before they 
can or ought to understand it. How many 
questions must you have heard from them 
which you have felt to be best answered, when 
they were with most dexterity put aside ! Let 
me tell you a story which the Jesuit Manuel 
de Vergara used to tell of himself. When he 
was a little boy he asked a Dominican Friar 
what was the meaning of the seventh command- 
ment, for he said he could not tell what com- 
mitting adultery was. The Friar not knowing 
how to answer, cast a perplexed look round 
the room, and thinking he had found a safe 



158 



reply pointed to a kettle on the fire^ and said 
the Commandment meant that he must never 
put his hand in the pot while it was boiling. 
The very next day, a loud scream alarmed the 
family, and behold there was little Manuel 
running about the room holding up his scalded 
finger, and exclaiming " Oh dear, oh dear, I've 
committed adultery! I've committed adultery! 
I've committed adultery !" 



159 



CHAPTER XVI. P. I. 

USB AND ABUSE OF STORIES IN REASONING^ WITH A 
WORD IN BEHALF OF CHIMNEY-SWEEPERS AND IN 
REPROOF OF THE EARL OF LAUDERDALE. 



My particalar inclination moves me in controversy especially 
to approve his choice that said, fortia mallem quam formosa. 

Dr. Jackson. 



I ENDED that last chapter with a story, and 
though " I say it who should not say it," it is 
a good story well applied. Of what use a story 
may be even in the most serious debates may be 
seen from the circulation of old Joes in Parlia- 
ment, which are as current there as their ster- 
ling namesakes used to be in the city some 
threescore years ago. A jest though it should 
be as stale as last week *s newspaper, and as flat 
as Lord Flounder's face, is sure to be received 



160 

with laughter by the Collective Wisdom of the 
Nation : nay it is sometimes thrown out like a 
tub to the whale, or like a trail of carrion to 
draw off houDds from the scent. 

The Bill which should have put an end to 
the inhuman practice of employing children to 
sweep chimneys, was thrown out on the third 
reading in the House of Lords (having passed 
the Commons without a dissentient voice) by a 
speech from Lord Lauderdale, the force of 
which consisted in, literally, a Joe Millar jest. 
He related that an Irishman used to sweep his 
chimney by letting a rope down, which was 
fastened round the legs of a goose, and then 
pulling the goose after it. A neighbour to 
whom he recommended this as a convenient 
mode objected to it upon the score of cruelty to 
the goose : upon which he replied, that a couple 
of ducks might do as well. Now if the Bill be- 
fore the house had been to enact that men 
should no longer sweep chimneys but that boys 
should be used instead, the story would have 
been applicable. It was no otherwise appli- 
cable than as it related to chimney-sweeping : 



161 



but it was a joke, and that sufficed. The 
Liords laughed ; his Lordship had the satisfac- 
tion of throwing out the Bill, and the home 
Negro trade has continued from that time, now 
seven years, till this day, and still continues. 
His Lordship had his jest, and it is speaking 
within compass to say that in the course of 
those seven years two thousand children have 
been sacrificed in consequence. 

The worst actions of Lord Lauderdale's 
worst ancestor admit of a better defence before 
God and Man. 

Had his Lordship perused the evidence 
which had been laid before the House of Com- 
mons when the Bill was brought in, upon which 
evidence, the Bill was founded ? Was he aware 
of the shocking barbarities connected with the 
trade and inseparable from it ? Did he know 
that children inevitably lacerate themselves in 
learning this dreadful occupation ? that they 
are frequently crippled by it ? frequently lose 
their lives in it by suffocation, or by slow fire ? 
that it induces a peculiar and dreadful dis- 
ease ? that they who survive the accumulated 



162 



hardships of a childhood during which they are 
exposed to every kind of misery, and destitute 
of every kind of comfort, have at the age of 
seventeen or eighteen to seek their living bow 
they can in some other employment,-<-for it is 
only by children that this can be. carried on? 
Did his Lordship know that girls as well as 
boys are thus abused? that their sufferings 
begin at the age of six, sometimes a year 
earlier? finally that they are sold to this worst 
and most inhuman of all slaveries, and some- 
times stolen for the purpose of being sold to it? 
I bear no ill-will towards Lord Lauderdale, 
either personally or politically : far from it. His 
manly and honorable conduct on the Queen's 
trial, when there was such an utter destitution 
of honor in many quarters where it was believed 
to exist, and so fearful a want of manliness 
where it ought to have been found, entitles him 
to the respect and gratitude of every true Briton. 
But I will tell his Lordship that rather than 
have spoken as he did against an act which 
would have lessened the sum of wickedness and 
suffering in this country, — rather than have 



163 



treated a question of pure humanity with con- 
tempt and ridicule, — ^rather than have employed 
my tongue for such a purpose and with such 
success, I would — — - But no : I will not tell 
him how 1 had concluded. I will not tell him 
what I had added in the sincerity of a free 
tongue and an honest heart. I leave the sen- 
tence imperfect rather than that any irritation 
which the strength of my language might ex- 
cite should lessen the salutary effects of self- 
condemnation. 

James Montgomery ! these remarks are too 
late for a place in thy Chimney Sweepers' 
Friend: but insert them I pray thee in thy 
newspaper, at the request of one who admires 
and loves thee as a Poet, honors and respects 
thee as a man, and reaches out in spirit at this 
moment a long arm to shake hands with thee 
in cordial good will. 

My compliments to you Mr. Bowring ! your 
little poem in Montgomery's benevolent album 
is in a strain of true poetry and right feeling. 
None but a man of genius could have struck off 
such stanzas upon a such a theme. But when 



164 



you wrote upon Humanity at Home, the useful 
reflection might have occurred that Patriotism 
has no business abroad. Whatever cause there 
may be to wish for amendment in the govern- 
ment and institutions of other countries, keep 
aloof from all revolutionary schemes for amend- 
ing them, lest you should experience a far more 
painful disappointment in their success than in 
their failure. No spirit of prophecy is required 
for telling you that this must be the result. 
Lay not up that cause of remorse for yourself, 
and time will ripen in you what is crude, con- 
firm what is right, and gently rectify all that 
is erroneous ; it will abate your political hopes, 
and enlarge your religious faith, and stablish 
both upon a sure foundation. My good wishes 
and sincere respects to you Mr. Bowring ! 



165 



INTERCHAPTER II. 



ABALLIBOOZOBANGANORRIBO. 



I&l dico dunque, e dicol che ognun m'ode, 

Benedetto Varchi. 



Whether the secret of the Freemasons be 
comprized in the mystic word above is more 
than I think proper to reveal at present. But 
I have broken no vow in uttering it. 

And I am the better for having uttered it. 

Mahomet begins some of the chapters of the 
Koran with certain letters of unknown signi- 
fication^ and the commentators say that the 
meaning of these initials ought not to be en- 
quired. So Gelaleddin says^ so sayeth Taleb. 
And they say truly. Some begin with A.L.M. 
Some with K.H.I.A.S.: some with T.H. ; — 
T.S.M.;— T.S. orl.S. others withK.M.;— 
H. M. A. S. K. ; — ^N. M. ; — a single Kctf, a single 



166 



Nun or a single Sad^ and sad work would it be 
either for Kaffer or Mussulman to search for 
meaning where none is. Gelaleddin piously 
remarks that there is only One who knoweth 
the import of these letters ; — I reverence the 
name which he uses too much to employ it upon 
this occasion. Mahomet himself tells us that 
they are the signs of the Book which teacheth 
the true doctrine, — the Book of the Wise, — 
the Book of Evidence, the Book of Instruction. 
When he speaketh thus of the Koran he lieth 
like an impostor as he is: but what he has 
said falsely of that false book may be applied 
truly to this. It is the Book of Instruction 
inasmuch as every individual reader among the 
thousands and tens of thousands who peruse it 
will find something in it which he did not know 
before. It is the Book of Evidence because of 
its internal truth. It is the Book of the Wise, 
because the wiser a man is the more he wiH 
delight therein ; yea, the delight which he shall 
take in it will be the measure of his intellectual 
capacity. And that it teacheth the true doctrine 
is plain from this circumstance, that I defy the 



167 



British Critic, the Antijacobin, the Quarterly 
and the Eclectic Reviews, — aye, and the Evan- 
gelical, the Methodist, the Baptist and the 
Orthodox Churchman's Magazine, with the 
Christian Observer to boot, to detect any one 
heresy in it. Therefore I say again 
Aballiboozobanganorribo, 
and like Mahomet I say that it is the Sign of the 
Book ; and therefore it is that I have said it ; 

Non dimen ne^ la linf^ua degli Hebrei 
N^ la Latina, ne la Greca antica, 
Ne* quella forse ancor degli Aramei.* 

* 

Happen it may, — for things not less strange 
have happened, and what has been may be 
again; — for may be and has been are only tenses 
of the same verb, and that verb is eternally being 
declined : — Happen I say it may ; and perad- 
venture if it may it must ; and certainly if it 
must it will: — but what with indicatives and sub-, 
junctives, presents, praeterperfects and paulo- 
post-futura, the parenthesis is becoming too 
long for the sentence, and I must begin it again. 

* MOLZA. 



168 



A prudent author should never exact too much 
from the breath or the attention of his reader, 
— to say nothing of the brains. 

Happen then it may that this Book may out- 
hve LordCastlereagh's Peace, Mr.Pitt's reputa- 
tion (we will throw Mr. Fox's into the bargain) ; 
Mr. Locke's Metaphysics, and the Regent's 
Bridge in St. James's Park. It may outlive the 
eloquence of Burke, the discoveries of Davy, the 
poems of Words worth, and the victories of Wel- 
lington. It may outlive the language in which 
it is written ; and in heaven knows what year of 
heaven knows what era, be discovered by some 
learned inhabitant of that continent which the 
insects who make coral and madrepore are now, 
and from the beginning of the world have been, 
fabricating in the Pacific Ocean. It may be dug 
up among the ruins of London, and considered 
as one of the Sacred Books of the Sacred Island 
of the West, — for I cannot but hope that some 
reverence will always be attached to this most 
glorious and most happy island when its power 
and happiness and glory like those of Greece 
shall have passed away. It may be decyphered 



169 



and interpreted, and give occasion to a new 
religion called Dovery or Danieiism, which 
may have its Chapels, Churches, Cathedrals, 
Abbeys, Priories, Monasteries, Nunneries, Se- 
minaries, Colleges and Universities; — its Sy- 
nods, Consistories, Convocations and Councils, 
— its Acolytes, Sacristans, Deacons, Priests, 
Archdeacons, Rural Deans, Chancellors, Pre- 
bends, Canons, Deans, Bishops, Archbishops, 
Prince Bishops, Primates, Patriarchs, Cardinals 
and Popes ; — its most Catholic Kings, and its 
King most Dovish or most Danielish. It may 
have Commentators and Expounders — (who can 
doubt that it will have them ?) who will leave 
unenlightened that which is dark, and darken 
that which is clear. Various interpretations 
will be given and be followed by as many sects. 
Schisms must ensue ; and the tragedies, co- 
medies and farces, with all the varieties of tragi- 
comedy and tragi- farce or farcico-tragedy which 
have been represented in this old world, be en- 
acted in that younger one. Attack on the one 
side, defence on the other ; high Dovers and 
low Dovers ; Danielites of a thousand unima- 

VOL. I. I 



170 



ginedand unimaginable denominations; schisms, 
heresies, seditions, persecutions, wars, — the 
dismal game of Puss-catch-comer played by a 
nation instead of a family of children, and in 
dreadful earnest, when power, property and 
Ufe are to be won and lost ! 

But without looking so far into the future 

history of Dovery, let me exhort the learned 

Australian to whom the honour is reserved of 

imparting this treasure to his countrymen, that 

he abstain from all attempts at discovering the 

mysteries of Aballiboozobanganorribo ! The un- 

apocalyptical arcana of that stupendous vocable 

are beyond his reach ; — so let him rest assured. 

Let him not plunge into the fathomless depths 

of that great word, let him not attempt to soar 

to its unapproachable heights. Perhaps^ — and 

surely no man of judgement will suppose that 

I utter any thing Ughtly, — ^perhaps if the object 

were attainable, he might have cause to repent 

its attainment. If too " little learning be a 

dangerous thing," too much is more so ; 

// saper troppo qualche volta ntioce,* 

* MOLZA. 



171 



•* Curiosity," says Fuller, " is a kernel of the 
Forbidden Fruit which still sticketh in the 
throat of a natural man, sometimes to the dan- 
ger of his choaking." 

There is a knowledge which is forbidden be- 
cause it is dangerous. Remember the Apple ! 
Remember the beautiful tale of Cupid and 
Psyche! Remember Cornelius Agrippa's li- 
brary ; the youth who opened in unhappy hour 
his magical volume; and the choice moral which 
South ey, who always writes so morally, hath 
educed from that profitable story ! Remember 
Bluebeard ! But I am looking far into futurity. 
Bluebeard may be forgotten ; Southey may be 
forgotten ; Cornelius Agrtppa may be no more 
remembered ; Cupid and Psyche may be mere 
names which have outlived all tales belonging 
to them ; — Adam and Eve — Enough. 

Eat beans, if thou wilt, in spite of Pytha- 
goras. Eat bacon with them, for the Levitical 
law hath been abrogated: and indulge in black- 
puddings, ifthoulikestsuch food, though there 
be Methodists who prohibit them as sinful. 
But abstain from Aballiboozobanganorribo. 



172 



CHAPTER XVII. P. I. 

THB HAPPINESS OF HAVING A CATHOLIC TASTE. 



There's no want of meat. Sir ; 
Portly and curious viands are prepared 
To please all kinds of appetites. Massinger. 



A FASTIDIOUS taste is like a squeamish appetite; 
the one has its origin in some disease of mind, as 
the other has in some ailment of the stomach. 
Your true lover of literature is never fastidious. 
I do not mean the helluo librorum, the swinish 
feeder, who thinks that every name which is 
to be found in a title-page, or on a tomb- 
stone, ought to be rescued from oblivion ; nor 
those first cousins of the moth, who labour 
under a bulimy for black-letter, and believe 
every thing to be excellent which was written 
in the reign of Elizabeth. I mean the man of 
robust and healthy intellect, who gathers the 
harvest of literature into his barns, threshes the 



173 



straw, winnows the grain, grinds it at his own 
mill, bakes it in bis own oven, and then eats the 
true bread of knowledge. If he bake his loaf 
upon a cabbage leaf, and eat onions with his 
bread and cheese, let who will find fault with 
him for his taste, — not I ! 

The Doves, father as well as son, were blest 
with a hearty intellectual appetite, and a strong 
digestion : but the son had the more catholic 
taste. He would have relished caviare ; would 
have ventured upon laver undeterred by its ap- 
pearance — and would have liked it. 

What an excellent thing did Grod bestow on man 
When he did give him a good stomach 1 * 

He would have eaten sausages for breakfast 
at Norwich, Sally Luns at Bath, Sweet butter 
in Cumberland, Orange Marmalade at Edin- 
burgh, Findon Haddocks at Aberdeen, and 
drunk punch with Beef steaks to oblige the 
French if they insisted upon obliging him with 
a dejeHner a FAngloise. 

A good digestion tumeth all to health, f 

He would have eaten squab-pye in Devon- 

* Beaumont and Fletcher. f Herbert. 



174 



shire, and the pye which is squabber than squab 
in Cornwall ; sheep's head with the hair on in 
Scotland, and potatoes roasted on the hearth in 
Ireland ; frogs with the French, pickled her- 
rbgs with the Dutch, sour-krout with the Ger- 
mans, maccaroni with the ItaliaaSj aniseed with 
the Spaniards, garlic with any body; horse-flesh 
with the Tartars ; ass-^flesh with the Persians ; 
dogs with the North Western American In- 
dians, curry with the Asiatic £a8t Indians, 
birds* nests with the Chinese, oHitton xoasted 
with honey with the Turks, pismire cakes on 
the Oronoco, and turtle and venison with the 
Lord Mayor ; and tiie turtle and venison he 
would have prefS^red to all the other dishes, 
because his taste though catholic, was not in- 
discriminating. He would have tried all, tasted 
all, thriven upon all, and lived contentedly ^nd 
cheerfully upon either, but he would have liked 
best that which was best. And his intellectual 
appetite had the same happy Catholicism. 

He would not have said with Euphues, ^'if I 
be in Crete, I can lie ; if in Greece, I can shift ; 
if in Italy, I can court it :" but he might have 



175 



said with him, " I can carouse with Alexander; 
abstain with Romulus ; eat with the Epicure ; 
fast with the Stoic; sleep with Endymion; 
watch with Chrysippus.** 

The Reader will not have forgotten I trust, 
(but if he should I now remind him of it,) that 
in the brief inventory of Daniel's library there 
appeared some odd volumes of that *' book full 
of Pantagruelism," the inestimable life of the 
Great Gargantua. The elder Daniel could 
make nothing of this book ; and the younger, 
who was about ten years old when he began to 
read it, less than he could of the Pilgrim's Pro- 
gress. But he made out something. 

Young Daniel was free from all the isms in 
Lily, and from rhotacism to boot ; he was clear 
too of schism, and all the worse isms which have 
arisen from it : having by the blessing of Provi- 
dence been bred up not in any denomination 
ending in ist or inian^ or erian or arian, but as a 
dutiful and contented son of the church of Eng- 
land. In humour however be was by nature a 
Pantagruelist. And indeed in his mature years 
he always declared that one of the reasons 



176 

which had led him to reject the old humoral pa- 
thology was that it did not include Pantagruel- 
ism, which he insisted depended neither upon 
heat or cold, moisture or dryness, nor upon any 
combination of those qualities ; but was itself a 
peculiar and elementary humour ; a truth he 
said, of which he was feelingly and experiment- 
ally convinced, and lauded the Gods therefore. 
Mr. Wordsworth in that Poem which Mr. 
Jeffrey has said wont do — (Mr. Jeffrey is al- 
ways lucky in his predictions whether as a po- 
litician or a critic, — bear witness Wellington! 
bear witness Wordsworth and Southey ! bear 
witness Elia and Lord Byron !) Mr. Words- 
worth in that Poem which 

The high and tender Muses shall accept 
With gracious smile deliberately pleased. 
And listening Time reward with sacred praise : 

Mr. Wordsworth in that noble Poemobserves, 

Oh many are the Poets that are sown 
By nature ! 

Among the Emblems of Daniel Heinsius(look 
at his head, Reader, if thou hast a collection of 
portraits to refer to, and thou wilt marvel how 



177 



so queer a conceit should have entered it> for 
seldom has there been a face more gnarled and 
knotted with crabbed cogitation than that of 
this man^ who was one of the last of the 
Giants ;) — among his emblems, I say, is one 
which represents Cupid sowing a field, and 
little heads springing out of the ground on aU 
sides, some up to the neck, others to the shoul- 
ders, and some with the arms out. If the crop 
were examined I agree with Mr. Wordsworth 
that Poets would be found there as thick as 
darnel in the corn ; — and grave counsellors 
would not be wanting whose advice would be 
that they should be weeded out. 

The Pantagruelists are scarcer. Greece pro- 
duced three great tragic Poets, and only one 
Aristophanes. The French had but one Rabe- 
lais when the seven Pleiades shone in their 
poetical hemisphere. We have seen a succes- 
sion of great Tragedians from Betterton to the 
present time; and in all that time there has 
been but one Grimaldi in whom the Panta- 
gruelism of Pantomime has found its perfect 
representative. 

I 2 



178 



And yet the Reader must not ha&tily oon- 
clude that I think Pantagruelism a better thing 
than Poetry, because it is rarer ; that were im- 
puting to me the common error of estimating 
things by their rarity rather than their worth, 
an error more vulgar than any which Sir Tho- 
mas Brown has refuted. But I do hold this, 
that all the greatest Poets have had a spice of 
Pantagruelism in their composition, which I 
verily believe was essential to their greatness. 
What the world lost in losing the Margites of 
Homer we know not, we only know that Homer 
had there proved himself a Pantagruelist. 
Shakespear was a Pantagruelist ; so was Cer- 
vantes ; and till the world shall have produced 
two other men in whom that humour has been 
wanting equal to these, I hold my point esta- 
blished. 

Some one objects Milton. I thank him for 
the exception ; it is just such an exception as 
proves the rule ; for look only at Milton's 
Limbo and you will see what a glorious Panta- 
gruelist he might have been, — ^if the Puritans 
had not spoilt him for Pantagruelism. 



179 



CHAPTER XVIII. P. I. 



all's well that ends well. 



Tct ^ &v iTTtfiviicr^w,— tw^ rov \6yov l^avayKaZSfuvot 
iTTifjivijffdyeofjiai. Herodotus. 



If William Dove had been installed in office 
with cap and bells and bauble, he would have 
been a Professor of Pantagruelism, and might 
have figured in FlogeVs History of such Profes- 
sors with Tyll Eulenspiegel, PiovanO Arlotto, 
and Peter the Lion ; and in Douce's Illustra- 
tions of Shakespear with Muckle John, Rees 
Pengelding and Robin Rush. The humour lay 
latent till the boy his nephew, hit the spring by 
reading to him some of those chapters in Ra- 
belais which in their literal grotesqueness were 
level to the capacity of both. These readings 



180 

led to a piece of practical Pantagruelism^ for 
which William would have been wbipt if he 
had worn a FooFs coat. 

One unlucky day, Dan was reading to him 
that chapter wherein young Gargantua relates 
the course of experiments which he had made 
with a velvet mask, a leaf of vervain^ his mo- 
ther's glove, a lappet worked with gold thread, 
a bunch of nettles, and other things more or 
less unfit for the purpose to which they were 
applied. To those who are acquainted with 
the history of Grandgousier's royal family, I 
need not explain what that purpose was ; nor 
must I to those who are not, (for reasons that 
require no explanation) farther than to say it 
was the same purpose for which that wild 
enigma (the semi-composition of the Sphinx's 
Ghost) was designed, — that enigma of all 
enigmas the wildest, 

" On which was written P^y/iaowX." 

William had frequently interrupted him with 
bursts of laughter; but when they came to 
that crowning experiment in which Gargantua 
thought he had found the beau ideal of what 



181 



he was seeking, William clapt his hands, and 
with an expression of glee in his countenance 
worthy of Eulenspiegel himself exclaimed, 
*' thou shalt try the Goose, Dan ! thou shalt 
try the Goose !" 

So with William's assistance the Goose was 
tried. They began with due prudence, accord- 
ing to rule, by catching a Goose. In this mat- 
ter a couple of Ducks Lord Lauderdale knows 
would not have answered as well. The boy 
then having gone through the ceremony which 
the devotees of Baal are said to have performed 
at the foot of his Image, as the highest act of 
devotion, (an act of super-reverence it was;) 
and for which the Jews are said to have called 
him in mockery Baalzebul, instead of Baalze- 
bub ; — cried out that he was ready. He was 
at that moment in the third of those eight atti- 
tudes which form a Rik'ath. My Readers who 
are versed in the fashionable Poets of the day 
{this day I mean — their fashion not being in- 
sured for to-morrow) — such Readers, I say, 
know that a rose is called a ghul, and a night- 
ingale a bulbul, and that this is one way of dres- 



182 

sing up English Poetry in Turkish Costume. 
But if they desire to learn a little more of what 
Mahometan customs are, they may consult 
D*Ohsson*8 Tableau of the Ottoman Empire, 
and there they may not only find the eight 
attitudes described but see them represented. 
Of the third attitude or Rukeou as it is deno- 
minated^ I shall only say that the Ancients re- 
presented one of their Deities in it, and that 
it is the very attitude in which As in PrtBsenti 
committed that notorious act for which, he is 
celebrated in scholastic and immortal rhyme, 
and for which poor Syntax bore the blame. 
Verbum sit sat sapienti. During the reign of 
Liberty and Equality, a Frenchman was guil- 
lotined for exemplifying it under Marat's Mo- 
nument in the Place du Carousal. 

The bird was brought, but young Daniel 
had not the strength of young Gargantua ; the 
goose, being prevented by William from draw- 
ing back, prest forward ; they were by the 
side of the brook and the boy by this violent 
and unexpected movement was, as the French 
would say in the politest and most deHcate of 



183 



languages, culbutty or in sailor's English cap- 
sized into the water. The misfortune did not 
end there ; for falling with his forehead against 
a stone, he received a cut upon the brow which 
left a scar as long as he lived. 

It was not necessary to prohibit a repetition 
of what William called the speriment. Both 
had been sufficiently frightened ; and William 
never felt more pain of mind than on this occa- 
sion, when the Father with a shake of the head, 
a look of displeasure and a low voice told him 
he ought to have known better than to have 
put the lad upon such pranks ! 

The mishap however was not without its 
use. For in aftcur life when Daniel felt an in- 
clination to do any thing which might better 
be left undone, the recollection that he had 
tried the goose served as a salutary memento, 
and saved him perhaps sometimes from worse 
consequences. 



I8i 



CHAPTER XIX. P. I. 



A CONVERSATION WITH MISS GRAVEAIRS. 



Operi suscepto inserviendum fuit; so Jacobus Mycillus 
pleadeth for himself in his translation of Lucian's Dialogues, 
and so do I ; I must and will perform my task. 

Burton. 



" It does not signify, Miss Graveairs ! you may 
flirt your fan, and overcloud that white fore- 
head with a frown ; but I assure you the last 
chapter could not be dispensed with. The 
Doctor used to relate the story himself to his 
friends; and often alluded to it as the most 
wholesome lesson he had received. My dear 
Miss Graveairs, let not those intelligent eyes 
shoot forth in anger arrows which ought to be 
reserved for other execution. You ought not 
to be displeased ; ought not, must not, can not, 
shall not !" 



185 



" But you ought not to write such things, 
Mr. Author ; really you ought not. What can 
be more unpleasant than to be reading aloud, 
and come unexpectedly upon something so 
strange that you know not whether to proceed 
or make a fiill stop, nor where to look, nor 
what to do ? It is too bad of you, Sir, let me 
tell you ! and if I come to any thing more of 
the kind, I must discard the book. It is pro- 
voking enough to meet with so much that one 
does not understand! but to meet with any 
thing that one ought not to understand is worse. 
Sir, it is not to be forgiven; and I tell you 
again that if I meet with any thing more of the 
same kind I must discard the book." 
" Nay, dear Miss Graveairs!" 
" I must Mr. Author ; positively I must.'* 
" Nay, dear Miss Graveairs ! Banish Tris- 
tram Shandy! banish Smollett, banish Field- 
ing, banish Richardson ! But for the Doctor, 
— sweet Doctor Dove, kind Doctor Dove, true 
Doctor Dove, banish not him ! Banish Doctor 
Dove, and banish all the world ! Come, come, 
good sense is getting the better of preciseness. 



186 



That stitch in the forehead will not lc»g keep 
the brows in their constrained position; and 
the incipient smile which already brings out 
that dimple, is the natural and proper feeling.** 

'* Welly you are a strange Bian !" 

" Call me a rare one^ and I shall be satisfied. 
* O rare Ben Jonson' you know was epitaph 
enough for one of our greatest men." 

" But seriously why should you put any 
thing in your book^ which if not actually ex- 
ceptionable exposes it at least to that sort of 
censure, which is most injurious !" 

*^ That question, dear Madam, is so sensibly 
proposed that I will answer it with all serious 
sincerity. There is nothing exceptionable in 
these volumes ; ' Certes/ as Euphues Lily has 
said, ' I think there be more speeches here 
which for gravity will mislike the foolish, than 
unseemly terms which for vanity, may ofiend 
the wise.' There is nothing in them that I 
might not have ^ead to Queen Elizabeth if it 
had been my fortune to have lived in her golden 
days ; nothing that can by possibility taint the 
imagination, or strengthen one evil propensity, 



187 



or weaken one yirtuous principle. But they 
are not composed like a forgotten novel of Dr. 
Towers's to be read aloud in dissenting families 
instead of a moral essay^ or a sermon ; nor like 
' Mr. Rett's Emily to complete the education of 
young ladies by supplying them with an ab- 
stract of universal knowledge. Neither have 
they any pretensions to be placed on the same 
shelf with Coelebs. But the book is a moral 
book ; its tendency is good, and the morality 
is both the wholesomer and pleasanter because 
it is not administered as physic^ but given as 
food. I don't like morality in doses." 

" But why, my good Mr. Author, why lay 
yourself open to censure ?" 

" Miss Graveairs, nothing excellent was ever 
produced by any author who had the fear of 
censure before his eyes. He who would please 
posterity must please himself by chusing his 
own course. There are only two classes of 
writers who dare do this, the best and the 
worst, — for this is one of the many cases in 
which extremes meet. The mediocres in every 



188 



grade aim at pleasing the public, and conform 
themselves to the fashion of their age whatever 
it may be." 

My Doctor, like the Matthew Henderson of 
Burns, was a queer man, and in that respect 
I his friend and biographer, humbly resemble 
him. The resemblance may be natural, or I 
may have caught it, — this I pretend not to 
decide, but so it is. Perhaps it might have been 
well if I had resolved upon a farther designation 
of Chapters, and distributed them into Mascu- 
line and Feminine: or into the threefold ar- 
rangement of virile, feminile and puerile ; con- 
sidering the book as a family breakfast, where 
there should be meat for men, muffins for wo- 
men, and milk for children. Or I might have 
adopted the device of the Porteusian Society, 
and marked my Chapters as they (very usefully) 
have done the Bible, pointing out what should 
be read by all persons for edification, and what 
may be passed over by the many, as instruc- 
tive or intelligible only to the learned. 

Here however the book is, — 



189 

An orchard bearing several trees. 
And fruits of several taste.* 

Ladies and Gentlemen, my gentle Readers, one 
of our liveliest and most popular old Dramatists 
knew so well the capricious humour of an au- 
dience that he made his Prologue say 

He'd rather dress upon a Triumph-Day 

My Lord Mayor's Feast, and make them sauces too, 

Sauce for each several Mouth ; nay further go. 

He'd rather build up those invincible Pies 

And Castle- Custards that affright all eyes. — 

Nay, eat them all and their artillery, — 

Than dress for such a curious company, 

One single dish. 

But I, gentle Readers, have set before you a 
table liberally spread. It is not expected or de- 
sired that every dish should suit the palate of 
all the guests, but every guest will find some- 
thing that he likes. You, Madam, may prefer 
those boiled chicken, with stewed celery, — or 
a little of that fricandeau ; — the Lady opposite 
will send her plate for some pigeon pye. The 
Doctor has an eye upon the venison — and so 

♦ MiDDLETON and Rowley's Spanish Gipsey. 



190 



I see has the Captain. — Sir, I have not forgot- 
ten that this is one of your fast days — I am 
glad therefore that the turbot proves so good, 
— and that dish has been prepared for you. Sir 
John, there is garlic in the fricassee. The 
Hungarian wine has a bitterness which every 
body may not like ; the Ladies will probably 
prefer Malmsey. The Captain sticks to his 
Port, and the Doctor to his Madeira. — Sir John 
I shall be happy to take Sauterne with you. — 
There is a splendid trifle for the young folks, 
which some of the elders also will not despise : 
— and I only wish my garden could have fiir- 
nished a better dessert ; but considering our 
climate, it is not amiss. — Is not this entertain- 
ment better than if I had set you all down to a 
round of beef and turnips ? 

If any thing be set tx> a wrong taste 

'Tis not the meat there, but the mouth's 'displaced ; 

Remove but that sick palate all is wdl.* 

Like such a dinner I would have my book, 
— something for every body's taste and all 
good of its kind. 

* Ben Jonson. 



191 



It ought also to resemble the personage of 
whom it treats ; and 

If ony whiggUh whingin sot 
To blame the Doctor dare man ; 

May dool and sorrow be his lot 
For the Doctor was a rare man I* 

Some whiggish sots I dare say will blame 
him^ and whiggish sots they will be who do ! 

" En un mot ; mes amis^je n*ai entrepris de 
vous contenter tous en general^ ainsi uns et 
autres en particulier: et par special, moy- 
m6meJ*'f 

* Burns. t Pasquibr. 



193 



CHAPTER XX. P. I. 



HOW TO MAKE GOLD. 



UAlchimista non travaglia a voto ; 
Ei cerca I* oro, ei cerca I* oro, to dico 
Ch'ei cerca Voro ; e s' ei giungesse in porto 
Fora ben per se stesso e per altrui, 
Voro e somma posanza infra mortali ; 
Chiedine a Cavalier, chiedine a Dame, 
Chiedine a tutto il Mondo. 

Chiabrera. 



William had heard so much about experiments 
that it is not surprizing he should have been 
for making some himself. It was well indeed 
for his family that the speculative mind, which 
lay covered rather than concealed under the 
elder Daniel's ruminating manners, and quiet 
contented course of life, was not quickened by 
his acquaintance with the schoolmaster into an 



193 



experimental and dangerous activity^ instead of 
being satisfied with theoretical dreams. For 
Guy had found a book in that little collection 
which might have produced more serious con- 
sequences to the father than the imitation of 
Gargantua had done to the son. 

This book was the Exposition of Eirenaeus 
Philalethes upon Sir George Ripley's Herme- 
tico-Poetical works. Daniel had formerly set 
as little value upon it as upon Rabelais. He 
knew indeed what its purport was, thus much 
he had gathered from it : but although it pro- 
fessed to contain '* the plainest and most excel- 
lent discoveries of the most hidden secrets of 
the Ancient Philosophers that were ever yet 
published/' it was to him as unintelligible as 
the mysteries of Panta£;Tuelism. He could 
make nothing of the work that was to ascend in 
Bus and Nubi from the Moon up to the Sun, 
though the Expositor had expounded that this 
was in Nubibus ; nor of the Lake which was to 
be boiled with the ashes of Hermes's Tree, 
night and day without ceasing, till the Hea- 
venly Nature should ascend and the Earthly 

VOL. I. K 



194 



descend : nor of the Crowds bill^ the White 
Dove, the sparklmg Cherubim, and the Soul 
of the Green Lion. But he took those cautions 
simply and honestly as cautions, which were in 
fact the lures whereby so many infatuated per- 
sons had been drawn on to their own undoing. 
The author had said that his work was not writ- 
ten for the information of the illiterate, and illi- 
terate Daniel knew himself to be. " Our wri- 
tings/" says the dark Expositor, '' shall prove 
as a curious edged knife ; to some they shall 
carve out dainties, and to others it shall serve 
only to cut their fingers. Yet we are not to be 
blamed ; for we do seriously profess to any that 
shall attempt the work, that he attempts the 
highest piece of Philosophy that is in Nature; 
and though we write in English, yet our matter 
will be as hard as Greek to some, who will 
think they understand us well, when they mis- 
construe our meaning most perversely ; for is it 
imaginable that they who are fools in Nature 
should be wise in our Books, which are testi- 
monies unto Nature ?*' And again, ^^ make sure 
of thy true matter, which is no small thing to 



195 



know ; and though we have named it yet we 
have done it so cunningly, that thou mayest 
sooner stumble at our Books than at any thou 
ever didst read in thy life. — ^Be not deceived 
either with receipt or discourse; for we verily do 
not intend to deceive you ; but if you will be de- 
ceived, be deceived ! — Our way which is an easy 
way, and in which no man may err,— our broad 
way, our linear way, we have vowed never to 
reveal it but in metaphor. I, being moved with 
pity, win hint it to you. Take that which is not 
yet perfect, nor yet wholly imperfect, but in a 
way to perfection, and out of it make what is 
most noble and most perfect. This you may 
conceive to be an easier receipt than to take 
that which is already perfect and extract out 
of it what is imperfect and make it perfect, and 
after out of that perfection to draw a plusquam 
perfection ; and yet this is true, and we have 
wrought it. But this last discovery which I 
hinted in few words is it which no man ever 
did so plainly lay open ; nor may any make it 
more plain upon pain of an anathema.*' 

All this was heathen Greek to Daniel, except 



196 



the admonition which it contained. But Guy 
had meddled with this perilous pseudo-science, 
and used to talk with him concerning its theory, 
which Daniel soon comprehended^ and which 
like many other theories wanted nothing but a 
foundation to rest upon. That every thing had 
its own seed as well as its own form seemed a 
reasonable position; and that the fermental 
virtue, " which is the wonder of the world, and 
by which water becomes herbs, trees and plants, 
fruits, flesh, blood, stones, minerals and every 
thing " works only in kind. Was it not then 
absurd to allow that the fermentive and multi- 
plicative power existed in almost all other 
things, and yet deny it to Gold, the most per- 
fect of all sublunary things?" — ^The secret lay 
in extracting from Gold its hidden seed. 

Ben Jonson has with his wonted ability pre- 
sented the theory of this delusive art. His 
knavish Alchemist asks of an unbeliever. 

Why, what have you observed Sir, in our art 
Seems so impossible ? 

Surly. But your whole work, no more I 
That you should hatch gold in a furnace. Sir, 
As they do eggs in Egypt, 



197 



Subtle, Sir, do you 
Believe that eggs are hatch'd so f 
Surly, If I should? 
Subtle, Why I think that the greater miracle. 
No egg but differs from a chicken more 
Than metals in themselves. 

Surly, That cannot be. 
The egg's ordained by nature to that end. 
And is a chicken in^potentid. 
Subtle. The same we say of lead and other metals. 
Which would be gold if they had time. 

Mammon, And that 
Our art doth further. 

Subtle, Aye, for 'twere absurd 
To think that nature in the earth bred gold 
Perfect in the instant : something went before. 
There must be remote matter. 

Surly. Ay, what is that ? 
Subtle. Marry we say — 

Mammon. Ay, now it heats ; stand, father ; 
Pound him to dust. 

Subtle, It is, of the one part, 
A humid exhalation, which we call 
Materia liquida, or the unctuous water ; 
On the other part a certain crass and viscous 
Portion of earth ; both which concorporate 
Do make the elementary matter of gold ; 
Which is not yet propria materia, 
But common to all metals and all stones ; 



198 

For where it u foraaken of that iBoisture, 
And hath more dryness, it becomes a stone ; 
Where it retains more of the humid fotness. 
It turns to sulphur, or to quicksilver. 
Who are the parents of all other metals. 
Nor can this remote matter suddenly 
Progress so from extreme unto extreme. 
As to grow gold, and leap o'er ail the means. 
Nature doth first begst the imperfect^ then 
Proceeds -she to the perfect. Of that airy 
And oily water^ iriiercory is eagendered ; 
Sulphur of the fat -and earthy part ; the one. 
Which is the last, supplying the place of male* 
The other of the-feslide in- all oMtals; 
So^-so Mieve hermaphrodeity. 
That both do act and suffer. But these too 
Make the rest ductile* malleable, extensive. 
And even in gold they-^aie ; for we do find 
Seeds of them, by our fire, and gold in them; 
And can produce the- species of ^each metal 
More perfect thence than nature doth in •earth. 

I have no cause to say here with Sheik Mo- 
hammed Ali Hazin that ^^ taste for poetical and 
elegant cotnpoditi<m has turned the reins of my 
ink-dropping pen away from the road which lay 
before it :" For this passage of learned Ben lay 
directly in the way; and no where, Reader, 



199 



couldst thou find the theory of the alchemists 
more ably epitomized. 

" Father," said the boy Daniel one day, after 
listenuig to a conyersation upon this subject, 
" I should like to learn to make gold/' 

'* And what wouldst thou do, Daniel, if thou 
couldst make it?*' was the reply* 

*^ Why I would build a great house, and fill 
it with books ; and have as much money as the 
King, and be as great a man as the Squire.*' 

'* Mayhap, Daniel, in that case thou wouldst 
care for books as little as the Squire, and have 
as little time for them as the King. Learning 
is better than house or land. As for money, 
enough is enough ; no man can enjoy more ; and 
the less he can be contented with the wiser and 
better he is likely to be. What, Daniel, does 
our good poet tell us in the great verse-book? 

Nature's with little pleased ; enough's a feast : 
A sober life but a small charge requires : 
But man, the author of his own unrest. 
The more he hath, the more he still desires. 

No, boy, thou canst never be as rich as the 
King, nor as great as the Squire ; but thou 



200 



mayest be a philosopher, and that is being as 
happy as either.*' 

" A great deal happier," said Guy. " The 
Squire is as far from being the happiest man in 
the neighbourhood, as he is from being the 
wisest or the best. And the King, God bless 
him ! has care enough upon his head to bring 
on early grey hairs. 

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown." 

" But what does a Philosopher do ?'* rejoined 
the boy. " The Squire hunts and shoots and 
smokes, and drinks punch and goes to Justice- 
Meetings. And the King goes to fight for us 
against the French, and governs the Parliament, 
and makes laws. But I cannot tell what a Phi- 
losopher's business is. Do they do any thing 
else besides making Almanacks and gold?** 
Yes," said William, " they read the stars." 
And what do they read there ? " 

" What neither thou nor I can understand, 
Daniel," replied the father, " however nearly 
it may concern us I " 






201 



CHAPTER XXI. P. I. 



A DOUBT CONCBRNINO THE U8E8 OF PHILOSOPHY. 



El comienzo de saltul 
€S el saber, 
diitinguir y conecer 
qual es virtiid. 

Provbbbios del Marques db Santillana. 



That grave reply produced a short pause. It 
was broken by the boy^ who said returning to 
the subject, '^ I have been thinking. Father, 
that it is not a good thing to be a philosopher.'* 

** And what, my Son, has led thee to that 
thought ? " 

" What I have read at the end of the Dic- 
tionary, Father. There was one Philosopher 
that was pounded in a mortar." 

K 2 



«os 



"That Daniel," said the Father, "could 
neither have been the Philosopher's fault nor 
his choice.** 

" But it was because he was a philosopher, 
my lad," said Guy, " that he bore it so bravely, 
and said, b^at on^ you can oniy bruise the shell 
of Anaxarchus ! If he had not been a Philo- 
sopher they might have "potmded him just the 
same, but they would never have put him in the 
Dictionary. Epictetus in like manner bore the 
torments which his wicked master inflicted upon 
him, without a groany only saying,. ^ take care, 
or you will break my leg ; ' and when the leg 
was broken, he looked the wretch in the face 
and said, * I told you you would break it.' " 

" But,** said thfe ydutigster,^ there was one 
Philosopher who chose to live in a tub ; and 
another who that he Bfiigbt never again see any 
thing to withdraw his mind from' meditation, 
put out his eyes by looking upon a bright 
brass basin, such as I cured my warts in." 

" He might have been a wise man," said 
William Dove, "but not wondrous wise r for if 
he had, he would not have used the basin to 



208 



put his eyes out. He would have jumped into 
a quickset hedge, and scratched them out, like 
the Man of our Town ; because when he saw 
his eyes were out, he might then have jumped 
into another hedge and scratched them in again. 
The Man of our town was the greatest philo- 
sopher of the two." 

'' And there was one/' continued the boy, 
'' who had better have blinded himself at once, 
for he did nothing else but cry at every thing 
be saw. Was not this being very foolish ?" 

** I am sure," says William, " it was not 
being merry and wise." 

'^ There was another who said that hunger 
was his daily food." 

*^ He must have kept such a table as Duke 
Humphrey," quoth William ; " I should not 
have liked to dine with him." 

** Then there was Crates," said the perse- 
vering boy ; " he had a good estate and sold it 
and threw the money into the sea, saying, 
' away ye paltry cares ! I will drown you, that 
you may not drown me.* " 

" I should like to know," quoth William, 



S04 



'^ what the overseers said to that chap, when 
he applied to the parish for support/' 

" They sent him off to Bedlam, I suppose," 
said the Mother, " it was the fit place for him, 
poor creature." 

^^ And when Aristippus set out upon a jour- 
ney he bade his servants throw away all their 
money, that they might travel the better. Why 
they must have begged their way, and it cannot 
be right to beg if people are not brought to it 
by misfortune. And there were some who 
thought there was no God. I am sure they 
were fools, for the Bible says so." 

" Well Daniel," said Guy, " thou hast studied 
the end of the Dictionary to some purpose ! " 

" And the Bible too. Master Guy ! " said 
Dinah, — her countenance brightening with joy 
at her son's concluding remark. 

" It's the best part of the book," said the 
boy, replying to his schoolmaster ; " there are 
more entertaining and surprizing things there 
than I ever read in any other place, except in 
my Father's book about Pantagruel." 



^5 



CHAPTER XXII. P. I. 



Tov 8' a7ra/LC£(j3ofC£voc. 



felice coluif che intender puote 
Le cagion de le cose di natura, 
Che al piu di qiie* che vivon sono ignote ; 

E sotto Upi^ si mette ogni paura 
Defati, e de la morte, ch* I si trista, 
Ne di vulgo gli cal, nk d^altro ha cura. 

Tansillo. 



The elder Daniel had listened to this dialogue 
in his usual quiet way, smiling sometimes at 
his brother William's observations. He now 
stroked his forehead, and looking mildly but 
seriously at the boy addressed him thus. 

" My son, many things appear strange or 
silly in themselves if they are presented to us 
simply, without any notice when and where they 
were done^ and upon what occasion. If any 
strangers for example had seen thee washing 



206 



thy hands in an empty basin^ without knowing 
the philosophy of the matter, they would have 
taken thee for an innocent, and thy master and 
me for Kttle better; or they might have sup- 
posed some conjuring was going on. The 
things which the old Philosophers said and 
did, would appear, I dare say, as wise to us as 
they did to the people of their own times, if we 
knew why and in what circumstances they were 
done and said. 

" Daniel, there are two sorts of men in all 
ranks and ways of life, the wise and the foolish ; 
and there are a great many degrees between 
them. That some foolish people have called 
themselves Philosophers, and some wicked 
ones, and some who were out of their wits, is 
just as certain as that persons of all these des- 
criptions are to be found among all conditions 
of men. 

" Philosophy, Daniel, is of two kinds : that 
which relates to conduct, and that which relates 
to knowledge. The first teaches us to value all 
things at their real worth, to be contented with 
little, modest in prosperity, patient in trouble^ 



207 



equal-minded at all times. It teaches us our 
duty to our neighbour and ourselves. It is 
that .wisdom of which King Solomon speaks 
in our rhyme-book. Reach me the volume !'* 
Then turning to the passage in his favourite 
Du Bartas he read these lines : 

" She's God's own mirror; she's a light whose glance 
Springs from the lightening of his countenance. 
She's mildest heaven's most sacred influence ; 
Never decays her beauties' excellence. 
Aye like herself; and she doth always trace 
Not only the same path but the same pace. 
Without her honor, health and wealth would prove 
Three poisons to me. Wisdom from above 
Is the only mo(}eratriz« spring and guide 
Organ and honor of all gifts beside." 

'^ But let us look in the Bible ; — aye this is 
the place. 

'^ For in her is an understanding spirit, holy, 
one only, manifold, subtil, Uvely, clear, unde- 
filed, plain, not subject to hurt, loving the 
thing that is good, quick, which cannot be 
letted, ready to do good ; 

** Kind to man, steadfast, sure, free from care, 
having all power, overseeing all things, and 



208 



going through all understandings pure and 
most subtil spirits. 

" For wisdom is more moving than any mo- 
tion : she passeth and goeth through all things 
by reason of her pureness. 

" For she is the breath of the power of God, 
and a pure influence, flowing from the glory of 
the Almighty; therefore can no defiled thing 
fall into her. 

" For she is the brightness of the everlast- 
ing light, the unspotted mirror of the power of 
God, and the image of his goodness. 

" And being but one she can do all things ; 
and remaining in herself she maketh all things 
new : and in all ages entering into holy souls 
she maketh them friends of God, and prophets. 

" For God loveth none but him that dwelleth 
with wisdom. 

" For she is more beautiful than the Sun, 
and above all the order of Stars : being com- 
pared with the light she is found before it. 

" For after this cometh night: but vice shall 
not prevail against wisdom.*' 

He read this with a solemnity that gave weight 



209 



to every word. Then closing the book, after 
a short pause, he proceeded in a lower tone. 

" The Philosophers of whom you have read 
in the Dictionary possessed this wisdom only in 
part, because they were heathens, and there- 
fore could see no farther than the light of mere 
reason sufficed to shew the way. The fear of 
the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and they 
had not that to begin with. So the thoughts 
which ought to have made them humble pro- 
duced pride, and so far their wisdom proved 
but folly. The humblest Christian who learns 
his duty, and performs it as well as he can, is 
wiser than they. He does nothing to be seen 
of men : and that was their motive for most of 
their actions. 

" Now for the philosophy which relates to 
knowledge. Knowledge is a brave thing. I 
am a plain, ignorant, untaught man, and know 
my ignorance. But it is a brave thing when 
we look around us in this wonderful world to 
understand something of what we see : to know 
something of the earth on which we move, the 
air which we breathe, and the elements whereof 



^10 



we are made; to comprehend the tnotioas of 
the mooD and stars, and measure the distances 
between them, and compute tunes and seasons : 
to observe the laws which sustain the universe 
by keeping all things in their courses : to sewrck 
into the mysteries of nature, and discover the 
bidden virtue of plants and stones, and read 
the signs and tokens which are shown us, and 
make out the meaning of hidden things, and 
apply all this to the benefit of our fellow crea- 
tures. 

** Wisdom and knowledge, Daniel, make the 
difference between man and man, and that be- 
tween man and beast is hardly greater. 

^^ These things do not always go together. 
There may be wisdom without knowledge, and 
there may be knowledge without wisdom. A 
man without knowledge, if he walk humbly with 
his God, and live in charity with his neighbours, 
may be wise unto salvation. A man without 
wisdom may not find his knowledge avail him 
quite so well. But it is he who possesses both 
that is the true Philosopher. The more he 
knows, the more he is desirous of knowing ; and 



211 



yet the farther he advances in knowledge the 
better he understands how little he can attain, 
and the more deeply he feels that God alone 
caQ satisfy the infinite desires of an immortal 
soul. To understand this is the height and 
perfection of philosophy." 

Then opening the Bible which lay before 
him, he read these verses from the proverbs. 

*.* My son, if thou wilt receive my words, — 

*' So that thou incline thine ear unto wisdom 
and apply thine heart to understanding ; 

" Yea, if thou criest after knowledge, and 
liftest up thy voice for understanding ; 

^^ If thou seekest after her as silver, and 
searchest for her as for hid treasures ; 

^^ Then shalt thou understand the fear of 
the Lord and find the knowledge of God. 

" For the Lord giveth wisdom ; out of His 
mouth Cometh knowledge and understanding. 

'^ He layeth up sound wisdom for the righ- 
teous ; He is a buckler to them that walk up- 
rightly. 

** He keepeth the paths of judgement and 
preserveth the way of his Saints. 



212 



" Then shalt thou understand righteousness 
and judgementand equity; yea, every good path. 

^' When wisdom entereth into thine heart, 
knowledge is pleasant unto thy soul ; 

'' Discretion shall preserve thee, understand- 
ing shall keep thee^ 

" To deliver thee from the way of the evil. 

" Daniel, my son," after a pause he pursued, 
'* thou art a diligent good lad. God hath given 
thee a tender and a dutiful heart ; keep it so, 
and it will be a wise one, for thou hast the be- 
ginning of wisdom. I wish thee to pursue 
knowledge, because in pursuing it happiness 
will be found by the way. If I have said any 
thing now which is above thy years, it will 
come to mind in after time, when I am gone 
perhaps, but when thou mayest profit by it. 
God bless thee my child ! " 

He stretched out his right hand at these 
words, and laid it gently upon the boy's head. 
What he said was not forgotten, and through- 
out life the son never thought of that blessing 
without feeling that it had taken effect. 



SIS 



CHAPTER XXm. P. I. 



ROWLAND DIXON AND HIS COMPANY OF PUPPETS. 



MH se ve tan eficaz el llanto, 
lasfabuku y historiat retratadas, 

que parece verdad, y es duke encanto, 

• • • • 

V para el vulgo rudo, que ignorante 
aborrece el matyar costoso, guisa 
el plato del gradoto extravagante ; 

Con que les hartas de contento y risa, 
gustando de mirar sayal grossero, 
mas que sutil y Candida camisa. 

Joseph Ortiz de Villena. 



Were it not for that happy facility with which 
the mind in such cases commonly satisfies itself, 
my readers would find it not more easy to place 
themselves in imagination at Ingleton a hundred 
years ago, than at Thebes or Athens, so strange 
must it appear to them that a family should have 



214 



existed in humblebut easy circumstances, among 
whose articles of consumption neither tea nor 
sugar had a place, who never raised potatoes in 
their garden nor saw them at their table, and 
who never wore^ cotton garment of any kind. 
Equally unlike any thing to which my contem- 
poraries have been accustomed, must it be for 
them to hear of an Englishman whose talk was 
of philosophy moral or speculative not of poli- 
tics; who read books in folio and had never seen 
a newspaper ; nor ever heard of a magazine, re- 
view, or literary journal of any kind. Not less 
strange must it seem to them who if they please 
may travel by steam at the rate of thirty miles 
an hour upon the Liverpool and Manchester rail- 
way, or at ten miles an hour by stage upon any 
of the more frequented roads, to consider the lit- 
tle intercourse which in those days was carried 
on between one part of the kingdom and an- 
other. During young Daniel's boyhood, and for 
many years after he had reached the age of 
manhood, the whole carriage of the northern 
counties, and indeed of all the remoter parts was 
performed by pack-horses, the very name of 



which would long since have been as obsolete as 
their use, if it had not been preserved by the 
sign or appellation of some of those inns at which 
they were accustomed to put up. Rarely indeed 
were the roads about Ingleton marked by any 
other wheels than those of its indigenous carts. 
That little town however obtained consider- 
able celebrity in those days as being the home 
and head quarters of Rowland Dixon, the Ges- 
ticulator Maximus, or Puppet-show-master- 
general, of the North ; a person not less emi- 
nent in his line than Powel whom the Spec- 
tator has immortalized. 

My readers must not form their notion of Row- 
land Dixon's company from the ambulatory pup- 
pet shows which of late years have added new 
sights and sounds to the spectacles and cries of 
London. Far be it from me to depreciate those 
peripatetic street exhibitions, which you may 
have before your window at a call, and by which 
the hearts of so many children are continually 
delighted: Nay I confess that few things in that 
great city carry so much comfort to the cockles 
of my own, as the well-known voice of Punch ; 



216 

the same which in my school-boy days 

I listened to,— 

as Wordsworth says of the Cuckoo, 

And I can listen to it yet — 
And listen till I do beget 
That golden time again. 

It is a voice that seems to be as much in accord 
with the noise of towns, and the riotry of fairs, 
as the note of the Cuckoo, with the joyousness 
of spring fields and the fresh verdure of the 
vernal woods. 

But Rowland Dixon's company of puppets 
would be pitifully disparaged, if their size, uses 
or importance were to be estimated by the street 
performance of the present day. 

The Dramatis Personae of these modern exhi- 
bitions never I believe comprehends more than 
four characters, and these four are generally the 
same, to wit. Punch, Judy as she who used to be 
called Joan is now denominated, the Devil and 
the Doctor, or sometimes the Constable in the 
Doctor's stead. There is therefore as little va- 
riety in the action as in the personages. And 
their dimensions are such that the whole com- 



217 



pany and the theatre in which they are ex- 
hibited are carried along the streets at quick 
time and with a light step by the two persons 
who manage the concern. 

But the Rowlandian, Dixonian^ or Ingleto- 
nian puppets were large as life ; and required 
for their removal a caravan (in the use to which 
that word is now appropriated), — a vehicle of 
such magnitude and questionable shape, that 
if Don Quixote had encountered its like upon 
the highway, he would have regarded it as the 
most formidable adventure which had ever been 
presented to his valour. And they went as far 
beyond our street-puppets in the sphere of 
their subjects as they exceeded them in size ; 
for in that sphere quicquid agunt homines was 
included, — and a great deal more. 

In no country and in no stage of society has 
the drama ever existed in a ruder state than that 
in which this company presented it. The Drolls 
of Bartholomew Fair were hardly so far below 
the legitimate drama, as they were above that 
of Rowland Dixon ; for the Drolls were written 
compositions ; much ribaldry might be, and no 

VOL. I. L 



-218 



doubt was, interpolated as opportunity allowed 
or invited ; but the main dialogue was prepared. 
Here on the contrary, there was no other pre^ 
paration than that of frequent practice. The 
stock pieces were founded upon popular stories 
or ballads, such as Fair Rosamond, Jane Shore, 
and Bateman who hanged himself for love; 
with scriptural subjects for Easter and Whit- 
sun-week, such a^ the Creation, the Deluge, 
Susannah and the Elders, and Nebuchadnezzar 
or the Fall of Pride. These had been handed 
down from the time of the old mysteries and 
miracle-plays, having, in the progress of time 
and change, descended from the monks and 
clergy to become the property of such mana- 
gers as Powel and Rowland Dixon. In what 
manner they were represented when thus 

Fallen, follen, fallen, fallen. 
Fallen, from their high estate, 

may be imagined from a play-bill of Queen 
Anne's reign, in which one of them is thus 
advertised : 

" At Crawley's Booth, over against the Crown 
Tavern in Smithfield, during the time of Bar- 
tholomew Fair, will be presented a little Opera, 



219 



called the Old Creation of the World, yet 
newly revived; with the addition of Noab*s 
flood. Also several fountains playing water 
during the time of the play. The last scene 
does present Noah and his family coming out 
of the Ark, with all the beasts two and two, and 
all the fowls of the air seen in a prospect sit- 
ting upon trees. Likewise over the Ark is seen 
the Sun rising in a most glorious manner. 
Moreover a multitude of Angels will be seen 
in a double rank, which presents a double pro- 
spect, one for the Sun, the other for a palace, 
where will be seen six Angels, ringing of bells. 
Likewise machines descend from above double 
and treble, with Dives rising out of Hell, and 
Lazarus seen in Abraham's bosom; besides 
several figures dancing jigs, sarabands and 
country dances, to the admiration of the spec- 
tators ; with the merry conceits of Squire 
Punch, and Sir John SpendalL" 

I have not found it any where stated at what 
time these irreverent representations were dis- 
continued in England, nor whether(which is not 
unlikely) they were put an end to by the inter- 
ference of the magistrates. The Autos Sacra- 



220 



tnentales^vfhich form the most characteristic de- 
partmentof the Spanish drama, were prohibited 
at Madrid in 1763, at the instance of the Conde 
de Teba, then Archbishop of Toledo, chiefly 
because of the profaneness of the actors, and the 
indecency of the placesinwhich they were repre- 
sented : it seems therefore that if they had been 
performed by clerks, and within consecrated 
precincts, he would not have objected to them. 
The religious dramas, though they are not less 
extraordinary and far more reprehensible, be- 
cause in many instances nothing can be more 
pernicious than their direct tendency, were not 
included in the same prohibition ; the same 
marks of external reverence not being required 
for Saints and Images as for the great object 
of Romish Idolatry. These probably will long 
continue to delight the Spanish people. But 
facts of the same kind may be met with nearer 
home. So recently as the year 1816, the Sa- 
crifice of Isaac was represented on the stage 
at Paris: Samson was the subject of the ballet; 
the unshorn son of Manoah delighted the spec* 
tators by dancing a solo with the gates of 
Gaza on his back ; Dalilah dipt him during the 



221 



intervals of a jig ; and the Philistines sur- 
rounded and captured him in a country dance ! 
That Punch made his appearance in the pup- 
pet-show of the Deluge> most persons know ; 
his exclamation of ^^hazy weather, master 
Noah," having been preserved by tradition. In 
all of these wooden dramas whether sacred or 
profane. Punch indeed bore a part, and that 
part is well described in the verses entitled 
PupcegesticulanteSy which may be found among 
the Sehcta Poemata Anglorum Latina, edited 
by Mr. Popham. 

Ecce tamen subith, et medio discrimine rerum, 
Ridicultts vultu procedit HomunciOf tergum 
Cui riget in gibbum, immensusque protruditur alvus : 
PuNCHius huic nomen, nee erat pettilantior unqtiam 
Ulltts ; quinetiam media inter seria semper 
Importunus adest, lepidusque et garrulus usque 
Perstat, permiscetque jocos, atque omnia turbat. 
S<spe pueUarum densa ad subsellia tese 
Convertens, — sedet en I pulchras mea, dixit^ arnica 
Illic inter eas I Oculo simul improbus uno 
Connivens, aliquam illarum quasi noverat, ipsam 
Quceque pudens se signari pudefacta rubescit ; 
Totaque subridet juvenumque virumque corona. 
Cum vero ambiguis obscoenas turpia dictis 
innuit, effuso testantur gaudia risu. 



ea2 



In one particular only this description is unlike 
the Punch of the Ingleton Company. He was not 
an homuneio, but a full grown personage, who 
had succeeded with Uttle alteration either of 
attributes or appearance to the Vice of the old 
Mysteries^ and serred like the Clown of our own 
early stage^ and the Gracioso of the Spaniards, 
to scatter mirth over the serious part of the per* 
formance, or turn it into ridicule. The wife was 
an appendage of later times, when it was not 
thought good for Punch to be alone ; and when 
as these performances had fallen into lower 
hands, the quarrels between such a pair afforded 
a standing subject equally adapted to the ca- 
pacity of the interlocutor and of his audience. 

A tragic part was assigned to Punch in one of 
Rowland Dixon's pieces, and that one of the 
most popular, being the celebrated tragedy of 
Jane Shore. The Beadle in this piece after pro- 
claiming in obvious and opprobrious rhyme the 
offence which had drawn upon Mistress Shore 
this public punishment, prohibited all persons 
from relieving her on pain of death, and turned 
her out, according to the common story, to die 
of hunger in the streets. The only person who 



228 



ventured to disobey this prohibition was Punch 
the Baker ; and the reader may judge of the 
dialogue of these pieces by this Baker's wordsj 
when he stole behind her, and nudging her fur- 
tively while he spake, offered her a loaf, saying, 
'' iak itJetmyy tak UT for which act so little con- 
sonant with his general character, Punch died 
a martyr to humanity by the hangman's hands. 
Dr. Dove used to say he doubted whether 
Garrick and Mrs. Gibber would have affected 
him more in middle life, than he had been 
moved by Punch the Baker and this wooden 
Jane Shore in his boyhood. For rude as were 
these performances, (and nothing could pos- 
sibly be ruder,) the effect on infant minds was 
prodigious, from the accompanying sense of 
wonder, an emotion which of all others is at 
that time of life the most delightful. Here 
was miracle in any quantity to be seen for two- 
pence, and be believed in for nothing. No 
matter how confined the theatre, how coarse 
and inartificial the scenery, or how miserable 
the properties ; the mind supplied all that was 
wanting. 



224f 



" Mr. Guy," said young Daniel to the school- 
master, after one of these performances, ^'l 
wish Rowland Dixon could perform one of our 
Latin dialogues !" 

** Aye Daniel," replied the schoolmaster, en- 
tering into the boy's feelings ; ** it would be a 
grand thing to have the Three Fatal Sisters 
introduced, and to have them send for Death ; 
and then for Death to summon the Pope and 
jugulate him ; and invite the Emperor and the 
King to dance; and disarm the soldier, and 
pass sentence upon the Judge; and stop the 
Lawyer's tongue; and feel the Physician's 
pulse ; and make the Cook come to be killed; 
and send the Poet to the shades ; and give the 
Drunkard his last draught. And then to have 
Rhadamanthus come in and try them all ! Me- 
thinks Daniel that would beat Jane Shore and 
Fair Rosamond all to nothing, and would be 
as good as a sermon to boot." 

" I believe it would indeed !" said the Boy : 
" and then to see Mors and Natura ; and 
have Damnatus called up; and the Three 
Cacodaemons at supper upon the sirloin of a 



225 



King, and the roasted Doctor of Divinity, and 
the cruel Schoolmaster's rump! Would not it 
be nice Mr. Guy?" 

« The pity is, Daniel," replied Guy, " that 
Rowland Dixon is no Latiner, any more than 
those who go to see his performances." 

*^ But could not you put it into English for 
him, Mr. Guy?" 

" I am afraid Daniel, Rowland Dixon would 
not thank me for my pains. Besides I could 
never make it sound half so noble in English 
as in those grand Latin verses, which fill the 
mouth and the ears, and the mind, — aye and 
the heart and soul too. No, boy ! schools are 
the proper places for representing such pieces, 
and if I had but Latiners enough we would 
have them ourselves. But there are not many 
houses, my good Daniel, in which learning is 
held in such esteem as it is at thy father's ; if 
there were, I should have more Latin scholars ; 
— and what is of far more consequence, the 
world would be wiser and better than it is !" 



l2 



SS6 



CHAPTER XXIV. P. I. 

QUACK AND NO QUACK^ BEING AN ACC017NT OF Dl* 
GREEN AND HIS MAN KEMP. POPULAR MEDICINE, 
HERBARY> THEORY OF SIGNATURBR^ WILLIAM DOVE) 
JOHN WESLEY^ AND BAXTER. 



Hold thy hand I health's dear maintainer ; 
Lifid 'perchance may hum the stronger : 
Having sobstance to maintain her 
She untouched may last the longer. 
When the Artist goes about 
To redress her flame, I doubt 
Oftentimes he snuffs it out. 

QUARLES. 



It was not often that Rowland Dixon exhibited 
at Ingleton. He took his regular circuits to 
the fairs in all the surrounding country fisur and 
wide ; but in the intervals of his vocation, he, 
who when abroad was the servant of the public, 
became his own master at home. His puppets 
were laid up in ordinary, the voice of Punch 
ceased, and the master of the motions enjoyed 



227 



otium eum dignitate. When he favoured his 
fnends and neighbours with an exhibition, it 
was speciaii graiid, and in a way that rather 
enhanced that dignity than derogated from it. 
A performer of a very different kind used in 
those days to visit Ingleton in his rounds^ where 
his arrival was always expected by some of the 
community with great anxiety. This was a 
certain Dr. Green, who having been regularly 
educated for the profession of medicine, and 
regularly graduated in it, chose to practice as 
an itinerant, and take the field with a Merry 
Andrew for his aid-de-camp. He was of a 
respectable and wealthy family in the neigh- 
bourhood of Doncaster, which neighbourhood 
on their account he never approached in his 
professional circuits, though for himself he was 
far from being ashamed of the character that 
he had assumed. The course which he had 
taken had been deliberately chosen, with the 
twofold object of gratifying his own humour, 
and making a fortune ; and in the remoter as 
well as in the immediate purpose, he succeeded 
to his heart's content. 



228 



It is not often that so much worldly prudence 
is found connected with so much eccentricity 
of character. A French poetess^ Madame de 
Villedieu^ taking as a text for some verses the 
liberal maxim que la vertu depend autant du 
temperament que des loix, says, 

Presque toujours chacun suit son caprice ; 
Heureux est le mortel que les destins amis 
Out partagS (Pun caprice permis. 

He is indeed a fortunate man who if he must have 
a hobby-horse, which is the same as saying if he 
will have one, keeps it not merely for pleasure, 
but for use, breaks it in well, has it entirely un- 
der command, and gets as much work out of it 
as he could have done out of a common roadster. 
Dr. Green did this ; he had not taken to this 
strange course because he was impatient of the 
restraints of society, but because he fancied that 
bis constitution both of body and of mind re- 
quired an erratic life ; and that, within certain 
bounds which heprescribed for himself, he might 
indulge in it, both to his own advantage, and 
that of the community, — that part of the com- 
munity at least among whom it would be his lot 



229 



to labour. Our laws had provided itinerant 
Courts of Justice for the people. Our church 
bad formerly provided itinerant preachers; Und 
after the Reformation when the Mendicant Or- 
ders were aboUshed by whom this service used to 
be performed, such preachers have never failed 
to appear during the prevalence of any religious 
influenza. Dr. Green thought that itinerant 
physicians were wanted ; and that if practition- 
ers regularly educated and well qualified would 
condescend to such a course, the poor ignorant 
people would no longer be cheated by travelling 
quacks, and sometimes poisoned by them ! 
One of the most reprehensible arts to which 

the Reformers resorted in their hatred of popery, 
was that of adapting vulgar verses to church 
tunes, and thus associating with ludicrous 
images, or with something worse, melodies which 
had formerly been held sacred. It is related of 
Whitefield that he, making a better use of the 
same device, fitted hymns to certain popular 
airs, because, he said, *^ there was no reason why 
the Devil should keep all the good tunes to him- 
self." Green acted upon a similar principle 



230 



when he took the field as a Physician Errant, 
with his man Kemp, Uke another Sancho for 
his Squire. But the Doctor was no Quixote ; 
and his Merry Andrew had all Sancho^s shrewd- 
ness^ without any alloy of his simpleness. 

In those times medical knowledge among the 
lower practitioners was at the lowest point 
Except in large towns the people usually trusted 
to domestic medicine, which some Lady Boun- 
tiful administered from her family receipt book; 
or to a Village Doctress whose prescriptions 
were as likely sometimes to be dangerously 
active, as at others to be ridiculous and inert. 
But while they held to their garden physic it 
was seldom that any injury was done either by 
exhibiting wrong medicines or violent ones. 

Herbs, Woods and Springs, the power that in you lies 
If mortal man could know your properties 1* 

There was at one time abundant faith in those 
properties. The holy Shepherdess in Fletcher's 
fine pastoral drama, which so infinitely surpasses 
all foreign compositions of that class, thus apos- 
trophises the herbs which she goes out to cull : 

* Fletcher. 



831 

O yoQ best tons of ewth, 
Yoa only brood unto wfaoee happy birth 
Virtue was given, holding more of Nature 
Than man, her first-bom and most perfect creature, — 
Let me adore you, you that only can 
Hdp or km Nature, drawing out that span 
Of life and breath even to the end of time I 

So abundantly was the English garden stocked 
in the age of the Tadors^ that Tusser, after enu- 
merating in an Appendix to one of his Chapters 
two and forty herbs for the kitchen, fourteen 
others for sallads or sauces^ eleven to boil or 
butter, seventeen as strewing herbs, and forty 
" herbs branches and flowers for windows and 
pots/' adds a list of seventeen herbs " to still in 
summer/ and of five and twenty " necessary 
herbs to grow in the garden for physic, not re- 
hearsed before;" and after all advises his 
readers to seek more in the fields. He says, 

The nature of Flowers dame Physic doth shew ; 
She t/sacheth them all to be known to a few. 

Elsewhere he observes that 

The knowledge of stiUing is one pretty feat. 
The waters be wholesome, the charges not great. 

In a comedy of Lord Digby's, written more 



232 



than a hundred years after Tusser's didactics, 
one of the scenes is laid in a lady's laboratory, 
" with a fountain in it, some stills, and many 
shelves, with pots of porcelain and glasses ;" 
and when the lady wishes to keep her attendant 
out of the way, she sends her there, sa3dng 

I have a task to give you, carefully 
To shift the oils in the perfuming room. 
As in the several ranges you shall see 
The old begin to wither. To do it well 
Will take you up some hours, but 'tis a work 
I oft perform myself. 

And Tusser among " the Points of House- 
wifery united to the Comfort of Husbandry," 
includes good housewifely physic, as inculca- 
ted in these rhymes; 

Good housewife provides ere an sickness do come, 

Of sundry good things in her house to have some ; 

Good aqua composita, and vinegar tart. 

Rose water, and treacle to comfort the heart ; 

Cold herbs in her garden for agues that bupi. 

That over-strong heat to good temper may turn ; 

White endive, and succory, with spinage enow. 

All such with good pot-herbs should follow the plough. 

Get water of fumitory liver to cool. 

And others the like, or else go like a fool ; 



2<^ 

Conserves of barberry, quinces and such. 
With syrups that easeth the sickly so much. 

Old Gervase Markham in his "Approved 
Book called the English Housewife, containing 
the inward and outward virtues which ought to 
be in a complete woman/' places her skill in 
physic as one of the most principal ; " you shall 
understand/' he says, " that sith the preserva- 
tion and care of the family touching their health 
and soundness of body consisteth most in her 
diligence, it is meet that she have a physical 
kind of knowledge, how to administer any 
wholesome receipts or medicines for the good of 
their healths, as well to prevent the first occa- 
sion of sickness, as to take away the effects and 
evil of the same, when it hath made seizure 
upon the body." And " as it must be confessed 
that the depths and secrets of this most excel- 
lent art of physic, are far beyond the capacity 
of the most skilful woman,** he relates for the 
Housewife's use some "approved medicines and 
old doctrines, gathered together by two excel- 
lent and famous physicians, and in a manuscript 
given to a great worthy Countess of this land/' 



S34 



The receipts collected in this and other 
books for domestic practice are some of them 
so hypercomposite that even Tusser's garden 
could hardly supply all the indigenous ingr&- 
dients ; others are of the most fantastic kind, 
and for the most part they were as troublesome 
in preparation, and many of them as disgusting, 
as they were futile. That " Sovereign Water" 
which was invented by Dr* Stephens was conh 
posed of almost all known spices, and all savoury 
and odorous herbs, distilled in claret* With this 
Dr. Stephens ^'preserved his own life until such 
extreme old age that he could neither go nor 
ride ; and he did continue his life, being bed-rid 
five years, when other physicians did judge he 
could not live one year ; and he confessed a little 
before his death, that if he were sick at any time, 
he never used any thing but this water only. 
And also the Archbishop of Canterbury usedit, 
and found such goodness in it that he lived till 
he was not able to drink out of a cup, but 
sucked his drink through a hollow pipe of silver.'* 

Twenty*nine plants were used in the compo- 
sition of Dr. Adrian Gilbert's most sovereign 



235 



Cordial Water, besides hartshorn, figs, raisins, 
gilly-flowers, cowslips, marygolds, blue violets, 
red rose buds, ambergris, bezoar-stone, sugar, 
aniseed, liquorice, and to crown all, " what else 
you please." But then it was sovereign against 
all fevers; and one who in time of plague should 
take two spoonsful of it in good beer, or white 
wine, " he might walk safely from danger, by the 
leave df God/* — ^The Water of Life was distilled 
from nearly as many ingredients, to which were 
added a fleshy running capon, the loins and legs 
of an old coney, the red flesh of the sinews of 
a leg of mutton, four young chickens, twelve 
larks, the yolks of twelve eggs, and a loaf of 
white bread, all to be distilled in white wine. 

For consumption, there were pills in which 
powder of pearls, of white amber and coral, 
were the potential ingredients ; there was cock- 
water, the cock being to be chased and beaten 
before he was killed, or else plucked aUve! and 
there was a special water procured by distilla- 
tion, from a peck of garden shell-snails and a 
quart of earth worms, besides other things; this 
was prescribed not for consumption alone, but 



236 



for dropsy and all obstructions. For all faint- 
ness^ hot agues, heavy fantasies and imagina- 
tions, a cordial was prepared in tabulates, which 
were called Manus Christi : the true receipt re- 
quired one ounce of prepared pearls to twelve of 
fine sugar, boiled with rose water, violet water, 
cinnamon water, ^^or howsoever one would have 
them/' But apothecaries seldom used more than 
a drachm of pearls to a pound of sugar, because 
men would not go to the cost thereof; and the 
Manus Christi simplex was made without any 
pearl at all. For broken bones, bones out of 
joint, or any grief in the bones or sinews, oil of 
swallows was pronounced exceeding sovereign, 
and this was to be procured by pounding twenty 
live swallows in a mortar with about as many 
different herbs ! A mole, male or female accord- 
ing to the sex of the patient, was to be dried in 
an oven whole as taken out of the earth, and 
administered in powder for the falling evil. A 
grey eel with a white belly was to be closed in 
an earthen pot, and buried alive in a dunghill, 
and at the end of a fortnight its oil might be 
collected to " help hearing." A mixture of rose 



237 



leaves and pigeon's dung quilted in a bag, and 
laid hot upon the parts affected, was thought to 
help a stitch in the side; and for a quinsey, '^give 
the party to drink/' says Markham, '' the herb 
mouse-ear, steept in ale or beer ; and look when 
you see a swine rub himself, and there upon 
the same place rub a slick-stone, and then with 
it slick all the swelling, and it will cure it." 

To make hair grow on a bald part of the head, 
garden snails were to be plucked out of their 
houses, and pounded with horse-leeches, bees, 
wasps and salt, an equal quantity of each ; and 
the baldness was to be anointed with the mois- 
ture from this mixture after it had been buried 
eight days in a hot bed. For the removal and 
extirpation of superfluous hairs, a depilatory was 
to be made by drowning in a pint of wine as 
many green frogs as it would cover, (about 
twenty was the number,) setting the pot forty 
days in the sun, and then straining it for use. 
A water specially good against gravel or dropsy 
might be distilled from the dried and pulverized 
blood of a black buck or he-goat, three or four 
years old. The animal was to be kept by him- 



2S8 



self, in the summer time when the sun was in 
Leo, and dieted for three weeks upon certain 
herbs given in prescribed order, and to drink 
nothing but red wine^if you would have the best 
preparation, though some persons allowed bim 
his fill of water every third day. But there 
was a water of mans blood which in Queen Eli- 
zabeth's days was a new invention, ** whereof 
some princes had very great estimation, and 
used it for to remain thereby in their force, and, 
as they thought, to live long." A young man 
was to be chosen, in his flourishing youth, and 
of twenty-five years, and somewhat choleric by 
nature. He was to be well dieted for one month 
with light and healthy meats, and with all kinds 
of spices, and with good strong wine, and more- 
over to be kept with mirth ; at the month's end 
veins in both arms were to be opened, and as 
much blood to be let out as he could '^ tolerate 
and abide." One handful of salt was to be 
added to six pounds of this blood, and this was 
to be seven times distilled, pouring the water 
upon the residuum after every distillation, till 
the last. This was to be taken three or four 



239 



times a year, an ounce at a time. One has 
sight of a theory here ; the life was thought to 
be in the blood, and to be made transferable 
when thus extracted. 

Richard Braithwait, more famous since Mr. 
Haslewood has identified him with Drunken 
Bamaby, than as author of ** the English Gen- 
tleman and the English Gentlewoman, presented 
to present times for ornaments, and commended 
to posterity for precedents/' says of this Gen- 
tlewoman, ** herbals she peruseth, which she 
seconds with conference ; and by degrees so 
improves her knowledge, as her cautelous care 
perfits many a dangerous cure." But herbals 
were not better guides than the medical books 
of which specimens have just been set before 
the reader, except that they did not lead the 
practitioner so widely and perilously astray. 
'' Had Solomon," says the author of Adam in 
Eden, or the Paradise of Plants, '^ that great 
proficient in all sublunary experiments, pre- 
served those many volumes that he wrote in 
this kind, for the instruction of future ages, so 
great was that spaciousness of mind that God 
bestowed on him, that he had immediately 



^2iO 



under the deity been the greatest of Doctors 
for the preservation of mankind : but with the 
loss of his books so much lamented by the Rab- 
bins and others, the best part of this herba- 
rary art hath since groaned under the defects of 
many unworthy authors, and still remains under 
divers clouds and imperfections." Thia writer, 
*' the ingeniously learned and excellent Herba- 
rist Mr, William Coles," professing as near as 
possible to acquaint all sorts of people with the 
very pith and marrow of herbarism, arranges his 
work according to the anatomical application of 
plants," appropriating," says he, to "every part 
of the body, (from the crown of the head, with 
which I begin, and proceed till I come to the sole 
of the foot,) such herbs and plants whose grand 
uses and virtues do most specifically, and by sig- 
nature thereunto belong, not only for strength- 
ening the same, but also for curing the evil 
effects whereunto they are subjected:" — the sig- 
natures being as it were the books out of which 
the ancients first learned the virtues of herbs ; 
Nature, or rather the God of Nature, having 
stamped on divers of them legible characters to 
discover their uses, though he hath left others 



241 



without any, that after he had shewed them the 
way, they, by their labour and industry which 
renders every thing more acceptable, might find 
out the rest. It was an opinion often expressed 
by a physician of great and deserved celebrity, 
that in course of time specifics would be disco- 
vered for every malady to which the human frame 
is liable. He never supposed, (though few men 
have ever been more sanguine in their hopes 
and expectations,) that life was thus to be inde- 
finitely prolonged, and that it would be man's 
own fault, or his own choice, if he did not live 
for ever : but he thought that when we should 
thus have been taught to subdue those diseases 
which cut our life short, we should, like the Pa- 
triarchs, live out the number of our days, and 
then fall asleep, — Man being by this physical 
redemption restored to his original corporeal 
state. 

Then shall like four straight pillars, the four Elements 
Support the goodly structure of Mortality : 
Then shall the four Complexions, like four heads 
Of a clear river, streaming in his body. 
Nourish and comfort every vein and sinew : 
No sickness of contagion, no grim death, 

VOL. I. M 



S42 

Or deprWation of health's real blessings, 

Shall then affiight the creature, built by Heaven, 

Reserved for immortality.* 

He had not taken up this notion from any 
religious feeling ; it was connected in him with 
the pride of philosophy^ and he expected that 
this was one of the blessings which we were to 
obtain in the progress of knowledge. 

Some specific remedies being known to exist, 
it is indeed reasonable to suppose that others 
will be found. Old theorists went farther; and 
in a world which everywhere bears such unde- 
niable evidences of design in every thing, few 
theories should seem more likely to be favour- 
ably received than the one which supposed that 
every healing plant bears, in some part of its 
structure, the type or signature of its peculiar 
virtues : now this could in no other way be so 
obviously marked, as by a resemblance to that 
part of the human frame for which its remedial 
uses were intended. There is a fable indeed 
which says that he who may be so fortunate as 
to taste the blood of a certain unknown animal 

• FOBD, 



243 



would be enabled thereby to hear the voice of 
plants and understand their speech ; and if he 
were on a mountain at sunrise, he might hear the 
herbs which grow there, when freshened with 
the dews of night they open themselves to the 
beams of the morning, return thanks to the Cre- 
ator for the virtues with which he has indued 
them, each specifying what those virtues were 
le quali veramente son tante e tali che becUi i 
pastori che quelle capessero, A botanical wri- 
ter who flourished a little before the theory of 
signatures was started complains that herbal 
medicine had fallen into disuse ; he says, '^ an- 
tequam chemia patrum nosirorum memorid 
orbi restitueretur, contenti vivebant o? tC}v 
larpwv KOfi\l/oi Kai xapihrraToipharmacis ex vege^ 
tabilium regno accersitis parum solliciti de So' 
lis sulphure et oleo, de Lutue sale et essentid, de 
Saiurni saccaro, de Martis iincturd et croca, 
de vitriolo Veneris^ de Mercurio proecipitato, 
et Antimonii floribt^^ de Sulphuris spiritu et 
Tartari crystaUis : nihilominus mcLSCuli debel- 
labant morbos, et tuti et jucundi. Nunc sceculi 
nostri infelicitas est, quod vegetabilibus con- 
temptim habitis, plerique nihil aliud spirant 



244 



prmier metallica ista, et exits parata horribilia 
secreta.*'* The new theory came in timely 
aid of the Galenists ; it connected their practice 
with a doctrine hardly less mysterious than 
those of the Paracelsists^ but more plausible 
because it seemed immediately intelligible, and 
had a natural religious feeling to strengthen 
and support it. 

The Author of Adam in Eden refers to 
Oswald CroUius as " the great discoverer of 
signatures/* and no doubt has drawn from him, 
most of his remarks upon this theory of phy- 
sical correspondence. The resemblance is 
in some cases very obvious ; but in many more 
the Swedenborgian correspondences are not 
more fantastic; and where the resemblances 
exist the inference is purely theoretical. 

Walnuts are said to have the perfect signature 
of the head ; the outer husks or green covering 
represents the pericranium, or outward skin of 
the skull, whereon the hair groweth, — and there- 
fore salt made of those husks is exceeding good 

* Petri Laurembergii Rostochiensis Horticulturi^ — Prselo- 
quium, p. 10. 



245 



for wounds in the head* The inner woody shell 
hath the signature of the skull^ and the little 
yellow skin or peel^ that of the dura and pia 
mater which are the thin scarfs that envelope 
the brain. The kernel hath " the very figure 
of the brain, and therefore it is very profitable 
for the brain and resists poisons." So too the 
Piony, being not yet blown, was thought to 
have " some signature and proportion with the 
head of man, having sutures and little veins 
dispersed up and down, like unto those which 
environ the brain: when the flowers blow they 
open an outward little skin representing the 
skull:*' the piony therefore besides its other 
virtues was very available against the falling 
sickness. Poppy heads with their crowns 
somewhat represent the head and brain, and 
therefore decoctions of them were used with 
good success in several diseases of the head. 
And Lillies of the Valley, which in Cole's days 
grew plentifully upon Hampstead-Heath, were 
known by signature to cure apoplexy ; " for 
as that disease is caused by the dropping of 
humours into the principal ventricles of the 
brain, so the flowers of this lily hanging on the 



246 



plants as if they were drops, are of wonderful 
use herein.** 

All capillary herbs were of course sovereign 
in diseases of the hair ; and because the purple 
and yellow spots and stripes upon the flowers 
of Eyebright very much resemble the appear- 
ance of diseased eyes^ it was found out by that 
signature that this herb was very effectual 
'' for curing of the same.** The small Stone- 
crop hath the signature of the gums, and is 
therefore good for scurvy. The exquisite 
Crollius observed that the woody scales of 
which the cones of the pine-tree are composed, 
resemble the fore teeth; and therefore pine- 
leaves boiled in vinegar make a gargle which 
relieves the tooth-ache. The Pomegranate has 
a like virtue for a like reason.* Thistles and 
Holly leaves signify by their prickles that they 
are excellent for pleurisy and stitches in the 
side. Saxifrage manifesteth in its growth its 
power of breaking the stone. It had been found 
experimentally that all roots, barks and flowers 
which were yellow, cured the yellow jaundice ; 
and though Kidney beans as yet were only 
used for food, yet having so perfect a signature, 



247 



practitioners in physic were exhorted to take 
it into consideration and try whether there were 
not in this plant some excellent faculty to cure 
nephritic diseases. In pursuing this fantastic 
system examples might be shown of that mis- 
chief^ which^ though it may long remain latent^ 
never fails at some time or other to manifest 
itself as inherent in all error and falsehood. 

When the mistresses of families grounded 
their practice of physic upon such systems of 
herbary^ or took it from books which contained 
prescriptions like those before adduced^ (few 
being either more simple or more rational^) Dr. 
Green might well argue that when he mounted 
his hobby and rode out seeking adventures as 
a Physician-Errant, he went forth for the be- 
nefit of his fellow creatures. The guidance of 
such works, or of their own traditional receipts, 
the people in fact then generally followed. 
Burton tells us that Paulus Jovius in his des- 
cription of Britain, and Levinus Lemnius have 
observed, of this our island, how there was of 
old no use of physic amongst us, and but little 
at this day, except he says '^ it be for a few nice 



1 



24S 



idle citizens, surfeiting courtiers, and stall-fed 
gentlemen lubbers. The country people use 
kitchen physic." There are two instances among 
the papers of the Berkeley family, of the little 
confidence which persons of rank placed upon 
such medical advice and medicinal preparations 
as could be obtained in the country, and even 
in the largest of our provincial cities. In the 
second year of Elizabeth's reign Henry Lord 
Berkeley " having extremely heated himself by 
chasing on foot a tame deer in Yate Park, with 
the violence thereof fell into an immoderate 
bleeding of the nose, to stay which, by the ill 
counsel of some about him, he dipt his whole 
face into a bason of cold water, whereby," says 
the family chronicler, ^' that flush and fulness 
of his nose which forthwith arose could never 
be remedied, though for present help he had 
Physicians in a few days from London, and for 
better help came thither himself not long after 
to have the advice of the whole College, and 
lodged with his mother at her house, in Shoe- 
lane." — He never afterwards could sing with 
truth or satisfaction the old song, 



249 

Nose, Nose, jolly red Nose, 
And what gave thee that jolly red Nose? 
Cinnamon and Ginger, Nutmegs and Cloves, 
And they gave me this jolly red Nose. 

A few years later, " Langham an Irish footman 
of this Lord, upon the sickness of the Lady 
Catherine, this Lord's wife, carried a letter 
from Callowdon to old Dr. Fryer, a physician 
dwelling in Little Britain in London ; and re- 
turned with a glass bottle in his hand com- 
pounded by the doctor for the recovery of her 
health, a journey of an hundred and forty-eight 
miles performed by him in less than forty-two 
hours, notwithstanding his stay of one nijght at 
the physician's and apothecary's houses, which 
no one horse could have so well and safely per- 
formed." No doubt it was for the safer con- 
veyance of the bottle, that a footman was sent 
on this special errand, for which the historian 
of that noble family adds, ** the lady shall after 
give him a new suit of cloaths." 

In those days, and long after, they who re- 
quired remedies were likely to fare ill, under 
their own treatment, or that of their neighbours; 
and worse under the travelling quack, who was 

M 2 



S50 



always an ignorant and unpndent impostor, 
but found that human sufferings and human 
credulity afforded him a never-failing harvest. 
Dr. Green knew this : he did not say with the 
Romish priett popubis tmU deeipiy etdecipietur! 
for he had no intention of deceiving them; but 
he saw that many were to be won by buffoonery, 
more by what is called palaver y and almost all 
by pretensions. Condescending therefore to 
the common arts of quackery, he employed his 
man Kemp to tickle the multitude with coarse 
wit ; but he stored himself with the best drugs 
that were to be procured, distributed as general 
remedies such only as could hardly be mis- 
applied and must generally prove serviceable; 
and brought to particular cases the sound know* 
ledge which he had acquired in the school of 
Boerhaave, and the skill which he had derived 
from experience aided by natural sagacity. 
When it became convenient for him to have a 
home, he established himself at Penrith, in the 
County of Cumberland, having married a lady 
of that place; but he long continued his fa- 
vourite course of life and accumulated in it a 
large fortune. He gained it by one maggot. 



351 



and reduced it by many : neyertheless there 
remained a handsome inheritance for his chil- 
dren. His son proved as maggotty as the father, 
ran through a good fortune, and when confined 
in the King's Bench prison for debt, wrote a 
book upon the Art of cheap living in London ! 

The father's local fame, though it has not 
reached to the third and fourth generation, 
survived him far into the second ; and for many 
years after his retirement from practice, and 
even aft;er his death every travelling mounte- 
bank in the northern counties adopted the 
name of Dr. Green. 

At the time to which this chapter refers. Dr. 
Green was in his meridian career, and enjoyed 
the highest reputation throughout the sphere of 
his itinerancy. Ingleton lay in his rounds, and 
whenever he came there he used to send for the 
schoolmaster to pass the evening with him. He 
was always glad if he could find an opportunity 
also of conversing with the elder Daniel, as the 
Flossofer of those parts. William Dove could 
have communicated to him more curious things 
relating to his own art ; but William kept out 
of the presence of strangers, and had happily 



252 



no ailments to make him seek the Doctor's 
advice ; his occasional indispositions were but 
slight, and he treated them in his own way. That 
way was sometimes merely superstitious, some- 
times it was whimsical, and sometimes rough. If 
his charms failed when he tried them upon him- 
self, it was not for want of faith. When at any 
time it happened that one of his eyes was blood- 
shot, he went forthwith in search of some urchin 
whose mother, either for laziness, or in the belief 
that it was wholesome to have it in that state, 
allowed his ragged head to serve as a free war- 
ren for certain '' small deer.'* One of these hexa- 
peds William secured, and '' using him as if he 
loved him," put it into his eye ; when according 
to William's account the insect fed upon what 
it found, cleared the eye, and disappearing he 
knew not where or how, never was seen more. 
His remedy for the cholic was a pebble pos- 
set; white pebbles were preferred, and of these 
what was deemed a reasonable quantity was 
taken in some sort of milk porridge. Upon the 
same theory he sometimes swallowed a pebble 
large enough as he said to clear all before it ; and 
for that purpose they have been administered of 



253 



larger calibre than any bolus that ever came from 
the hands of the most merciless apothecary, as 
large indeed sometimes as a common sized wal- 
nut. Does the reader hesitate at believing this of 
an ignorant man, living in a remote part of the 
country? Well might William Dove be excused, 
for a generation later than his John Wesley pre- 
scribed in his Primitive Physic quicksilver, to be 
taken ounce by ounce, to the amount of one, two, 
or three pounds, till the desired effect was pro- 
duced. And a generation earlier, Richard Bax- 
ter of happy memory and unhappy digestion, 
having read in Dr. Gerhard ^^ the admirable 
effects of the swallowing of a gold bullet upon 
his father," in a case which Baxter supposed to 
be like his own, got a gold bullet of between 
twenty and thirty shillings weight, and swallowed 
it. " Having taken it," says he, " I knew not how 
to be delivered of it again. I took clysters and 
purges for about three weeks, but nothing stirred 
it ; and a gentleman having done the like, the 
bullet never came from him till he died, and it 
was cut out. But at last my neighbours seta day 
apart to fast and pray for me, and I was freed 
from my danger in the beginning of that day !" 



254 



CHAPTER XXV. P. I. 



Hiatus valde lacrymahilis. 



Time flies away fast. 
The while we never remember 
How soon our life here 

Grows old with the year 
That dies with the next December ! — Herrick. 



I MUST pass over fourteen years, for were I to 
pursue the history of our young Daniel's boy- 
hood and adolescence into all the ramifications 
which a faithful biography requires, fourteen 
volumes would not contain it. They would 
be worth reading, for that costs little ; they 
would be worth writing, though that costs 
much. They would deserve the best embel- 
lishments that the pencil and the graver could 
produce. The most poetical of artists would be 



£55 



worthily employed in designing the sentimen* 
tal and melancholy scenes ; Cruikshank for the 
grotesque ; Wilkie and Richter for the comic 
and serio-comic ; Turner for the actual scenery; 
Bewick for the head and tail pieces. They 
ought to be written; they ought to be read. 
They should be written — and then they would 
be read. But time is wanting : 

Eheu I fugaces Posthume, Posthume, 
Labuntur anni ! 

and time is a commodity of which the value 
rises as long as we live. We must be con- 
tented with doing not what we wish, but what 
we can, — our possible as the French call it. 

One of our Poets — (which is it ?) — speaks of 
an everlasting now. If such a condition of ex- 
istence were offered to us in this world, and it 
were put to the vote whether we should accept 
the offer and fix all things immutably as they 
are, who are they whose voices would be given 
in the affirmative f 

Not those who are in pursuit of fortune, or 
of fame, or of knowledge, or of enjoyment, or 
of happiness ; though with regard to all of 



256 



these, as far as any of them are attainable, 
there is more pleasure in the pursuit than in 
the attainment. 

Not those who are at sea, or travelling in a 
stage coach. 

Not the man who is shaving himself. 

Not those who have the tooth ache, or who 
are having a tooth drawn. 

The fashionable beauty might ; and the fa- 
shionable singer, and the fashionable opera 
dancer, and the actor who is in the height of 
his power and reputation. So might the al- 
derman at a city feast. So would the heir 
who is squandering a large fortune faster than 
it was accumulated for him. And the thief 
who is not taken, and the convict who is not 
hanged, and the scoflFer at religion whose heart 
belies his tongue. 

Not the wise and the good. 

Not those who are in sickness or in sorrow. 

Not I. 

But were I endowed with the power of sus- 
pending the eflFect of time upon the things 
around me, methinks there are some of my 



257 



flowers which should neither fall nor fade : de- 
cidedly my kitten should never attain to cat- 
hood ; and I am afraid my little boy would 
continue to " mis-speak half-uttered words ;" 
and never, while I live, outgrow that epicene 
dress of French grey, half European, half 
Asiatic in its fashion. 



^8 



CHAPTER XXVI. P. I. 

DANIEL AT D0NCA8TER ; THE REASON WHY HE WAS 
DESTINED FOR THE MEDICAL PROFESSION^ RATHER 
THAN HOLY ORDERS 3 AND SOME REMARKS UPON 
SERMONS. 



Je ne voits dissimuler, amy Lecteur, que je n'aye bien prSveu, 
et me Hens pour deuement €uiverty, que ne puis eviter la repre- 
hension dPaucuns, et les calomnies de plusieurs, ausquels cest 
Sscrit desplaira du tout. Chbistofle de Hericourt. 



Fourteen years have elapsed since the scene 
took place which is related in the twenty-se- 
cond chapter : and Daniel the younger at the 
time to which this present chapter refers was 
residing at Doncaster with Peter Hopkins who 
practised the medical art in all its branches. 
He had lived with him eight years, first as a 
pupil, latterly in the capacity of an assistant, 
and afterwards as an adopted successor. 



S59 



How this connection between Daniel and 
Peter Hopkins was brought about^ and the 
circumstances which prepared the way for it^ 
would have appeared in some of the non-exist- 
ent fourteen volumes, if it had pleased Fate 
that they should have been written. 

Some of my readers, and especially those who 
pride themselves upon their knowledge of the 
world, or their success in it, will think it strange 
perhaps that the elder Daniel, when he resolved 
to make a scholar of his son, did not determine 
upon breeding him either to the Church, or the 
Law, in either of which professions the way 
was easier and more inviting. Now though 
this will not appear strange to those other 
readers who have perceived that the father 
had no knowledge of the world, and could have 
none, it is nevertheless proper to enter into 
some explanation upon that point. 

If George Herbert's Temple, or his Remains, 
or his life by old Izaak Walton, had all or any 
of them happened to be among those few but 
precious books which Daniel prized so highly 
and used so well, it is likely that the wish of his 



260 



heart would have been to train up his Son for a 
Priest to the Temple. But so it was that none 
of his reading was of a kind to give his thoughts 
that direction ; and he had not conceived any 
exalted opinion of the Clergy from the speci- 
mens which had fallen in his way. A contempt 
which was but too general had been brought 
upon the Order by the ignorance or the poverty 
of a great proportion of its members. The per- 
son who served the humble church which Daniel 
dutifully attended was almost as poor as a Ca- 
puchine, and quite as ignorant. This poor 
man had obtained in evil hour from some easy 
or careless Bishop a licence to preach. It was 
reprehensible enough to have ordained one who 
was destitute of every qualification that the 
office requires ; the fault was still greater in 
promoting him from the desk to the pulpit. 

" A very great Scholar," is quoted by Dr. 
Eachard, as saying " that such preaching as is 
usual is a hindrance of salvation rather than the 
means to it." This was said when the fashion 
of conceited preaching which is satirized in 
Frey Gerundio, had extended to England, and 



^61 



though that fashion has so long been obsolete, 
that many persons will be surprized to hear it 
had ever existed among us, it may still reason- 
ably be questioned whether sermons such as 
they commonly are, do not quench more devo- 
tion than they kindle. 

My Lord ! put not the book aside in displea- 
sure ! (I address myself to whatever Bishop 
may be reading it.) Unbiassed I will not call 
myself, for I am a true and orthodox church- 
man, and have the interests of the Church zea- 
lously at heart, because I believe and know 
them to be essentially and inseparably con- 
nected with those of the commonwealth. But 
I have been an attentive observer, and as such, 
request a hearing. Receive my remarks as com- 
ing from one whose principles are in entire ac- 
cord with your Lordship's, whose wishes have 
the same scope aitd purport, and who while he 
offers his honest opinion, submits it with pro- 
per humility to your judgement. 

The founders of the English Church did not 
intend that the sermon should invariably form 
{I part of the Sunday services. It became so in 



S62 



condescension to the Puritans, of whom it has 
long been the feshion to speak with respect, in- 
Stead of holding them up to the contempt and in- 
famy and abhorrence which they have so richly 
merited. They have been extolled by their de- 
scendants and successors as models of patriotism 
and piety ; and the success with which this de- 
lusion has been practised is one of the most re- 
markable examples of what may be effected by 
dint of afFrontery and persevering falsehood. 

That sentence I am certain will not be disap- 
proved at Fulham or Lambeth. Dr. Southey, 
or Dr. Phillpots might have written it. 

The general standard of the Clergy has un- 
doubtedly been very much raised since the days 
when they were not allowed to preach without 
a license for that purpose from the ordinary. 
Nevertheless it is certain that many persons who 
are in other^ and more material respects well^ or 
even excellently qualified for the ministeris^l 
functions^ may be wanting in the qualifications 
for a preacher. A man may possess great learn- 
ing, sound principles and good sense, and yet be 
without the talent of arranging and expressing 



263 



his thoughts well in a written discourse: he may 
want the power of fixing the attention, or reach- 
ing the hearts of his hearers ; and in that case 
the discourse, as some old writer has said in se^ 
rious jest, which was designed for ^fication 
turns to /edification. The CTil was less in Addi- 
son's days when he who distrusted his own abili- 
ties, availed himself of the compositions of some 
approved Divine, and was not disparaged in the 
opinion of his congregation, by taking a printed 
volume into the pulpit. This is no longer prac- 
tised; but instead of this, which secured whole- 
some instruction to the people, sermons are 
manufactured for sale, and sold in manuscript, 
or printed in a cursive type imitating manu- 
script. The articles which are prepared for sucli 
a market, are for the most part copied from ob- 
scure books, with more or less alteration of lan- 
guage, and generally for the worse ; and so far 
as they are drawn from such sources they are 
not likely to contain any thing exceptionable on 
the score of doctrine : but the best authors will 
not be resorted to, for fear of discovery, and 
therefore when these are used, the congregation 



^64 



lose as much in point of instruction^ as he who 
uses them ought to lose in self-esteem. 

But it is more injurious when a more scrupu- 
lous man composes his own discourses, if he he 
deficient either in judgement or learning. He is 
then more likely to entangle plain texts than to 
unravel knotty ones ; rash positions are some- 
times advanced by such preachers, unsound ar- 
guments are adduced by them in support of 
momentous doctrines, and though these things 
neither offend the ignorant and careless, nor in- 
jure the well-minded and well-informed, they 
carry poison with them when they enter a dis- 
eased ear. It cannot be doubted that such ser- 
mons act as corroboratives for infidelity. 

Nor when they contain nothing that is actually 
erroneous, but are merely unimproving, are they 
in that case altogether harmless. They are not 
harmless if they are felt to be tedious. They are 
not harmless if they torpify the understanding : 
a chill that begins there may extend to the vital 
regions. Bishop Taylor (the great Jeremy) says 
of devotional books that " they are in a large 
degree the occasion of so great indevotion as 



265 



prevails among the generality of nominal Chris- 
tians, " being," he says, " represented naked in 
the conclusions of spiritual life, without or art or 
learning ; and made apt for persons who can do 
nothing but believe and love, not for them that 
can consider and love." This applies more for- 
cibly to bad sermons than to common-place 
books of devotion ; the book may be laid aside if 
it offend the reader's judgement, but the sermon 
is a positive infliction upon the helpless hearer. 

The same Bishop, — and his name ought to 
carry with it authority among the wise and the 
good, has delivered an opinion upon this subject, 
in his admirable Apology for Authorized and 
Set Forms of Liturgy. " Indeed," he says, "if I 
may freely declare my opinion, I think it were 
not amiss, if the liberty of making sermons were 
something more restrained than it is ; and that 
such persons only were intrusted with the liberty, 
for whom the church herself may safely be res- 
ponsive, — that is men learned and pious ; and 
that the other part, the vulgus cleri, should in- 
struct the people out of the fountains of the 
church and the public stock, till by so long ex- 

VOL. I. N 



266 



ercise and discipline in the schools of the Pro- 
phets they may also be intrusted to minister of 
their own unto the people. This I am sure was 
the practice of the Primitive Church." 

" I am convinced," said Dr. Johnson, " that 1 
ought to be at Divine Service more frequently 
than I am ; but the provocations given by igno- 
rant and affected preachers too often disturb the 
mental calm which otherwise would succeed to 
prayer. I am apt to whisper to myself on such 
occasions, ' How can this illiterate fellow dream 
of fixing attention, after we have been listening 
to the sublimest truths, conveyed in the most 
chaste and exalted language, throughout a 
liturgy which must be regarded as the genuine 
offspring of piety impregnated by wisdom !" — 
" Take notice, however," he adds, " though I 
make this confession respecting myself, I do 
not mean to recommend the fastidiousness that 
sometimes leads me to exchange congrega- 
tional for solitary worship." 
The saintly Herbert says, 

** Judge not the Preacher, for he is thy Judge ; 
If thou mislike him thou conceiv'st him not. 
God calleth preaching folly. Do not grudge 
To pick out treasures from an earthern pot. 



267 

The wont speak something good. If all want sense 
God takes a text and preacheth patience. 

He that gets patience and the blessing which 
Preachers conclude with, hath not lost his pains." 

This sort of patience was all that Daniel could 
have derived from the discourses of the poor 
curate ; and it was a lesson of which his meek 
and benign temper stood in no need. Nature 
had endowed him with this virtue, and this Sun- 
day's discipline exercised it without strength- 
ening it. While he was, in the phrase of the 
Religious Public, sitting under the preacher, he 
obeyed to a certain extent George Herbert's 
precept, — that is he obeyed it as he did other 
laws with the existence of which he was unac- 
quainted, — 

Let vain or busy thoughts have there no part ; 
Bring not thy plough, thy plots, thy pleasure thither. 

Pleasure made no part of his speculations at any 
time. Plots he had none. For the Plough, — 
it was what he never followed in fancy, patiently 
as he plodded after the furrow in his own voca- 
tion. And then for worldly thoughts they were 
not likely in that place to enter a mind, which 



268 



never at any time entertained them. But to that 
sort of thought (if thought it may be called) 
which Cometh as it listeth, and which when the 
mind is at ease and the body in healthy is the 
forerunner and usher of sleep, he certainly gave 
way. The curate's voice past over his ear like 
the sound of the brook with which it blended, 
and it conveyed to him as little meaning and less 
feeling. During the sermon therefore he re- 
tired into himself, with as much or as little edi- 
fication, as a Quaker finds at a silent meeting. 
It happened also that of the few clergy within 
the very narrow circle in which Daniel moved, 
some were in no good repute for their conduct, 
and none displayed either that zeal in the dis- 
charge of their pastoral functions, or that ear- 
nestness and ability in performing the service of 
the Church, which are necessary for command- 
ing the respect and securing the affections of 
the parishioners. The clerical profession had 
never presented itself to him in its best, which 
is really its true light ; and for that cause he 
would never have thought of it for the boy, even 
if the means of putting him forward in this 



269 



path had been easier and more obvious than 
they were. And for the dissenting ministry, 
Daniel liked not the name of a Nonconformist. 
The Puritans had left behind them an ill savour 
in his part of the country, as they had done 
every where else; and the extravagances of 
the primitive Quakers, vrhich during his child- 
hood were fresh in remembrance, had not yet 
been forgotten. 

It was well remembered in those parts that 
the Vicar of Kirkby Lonsdale through the ma- 
lignity of some of his puritanical parishioners, 
had been taken out of his bed — from his wife 
who was then big with child, and hurried awav 
to Lancaster jail, where he was imprisonea 
three years for no other offence than that of 
fidelity to his Church and his King. And that 
the man who was a chief instigator of this per- 
secution, and had enriched himself by the spoil 
of his neighbour's goods, though he flourished 
for a while, bought a field and built a fine house, 
came to poverty at last, and died in prison, 
having for some time received his daily food 
there from the table of one of this very Vicar's 



270 



sons. It was well remembered also that, in a 
parish of the adjoining county-palatine, the 
puritanical party had set fire in the night to the 
Hector's barns, stable, and parsonage; and 
that he and his wife and children had only as it 
were by miracle escaped from the flames. 

WilHam Dove had also among his traditional 
stores some stories of a stranger kind concern- 
ing the Quakers, these parts of the North having 
been a great scene of their vagaries in their 
early days. He used to relate how one of them 
went into the church at Brough, during the 
reign of the Puritans, with a white sheet about 
his body, and a rope about his neck, to pro- 
phesy before the people and their Whig Priest 
(as he called him) that the surplice which was 
then prohibited should again come into use, 
and that the Gallows should have its due! 
And how when their ring-leader George Fox 
was put in prison at Carlisle, the wife of Justice 
Benson would eat no meat unless she partook 
it with him at the bars of his dungeon, de- 
claring she was moved to do this ; wherefore 
it was supposed he had bewitched her. And 



271 



not without reason ; for when this old George 
went^as he often did, into the Church to disturb 
the people, and they thrust him out, and fell upon 
and beat him, sparing neither sticks nor stones 
if they came to hand, he was presently for all 
that they had done to him, as sound and as 
fresh as if nothing had touched him ; and when 
they tried to kill him, they could not take away 
his life ! And how this old George rode a great 
black horse, upon which he was seen in the 
course of the same hour at two places three- 
score miles distant from each other ! And how 
some of the women who followed this old 
George used to strip off all their clothes, and 
in that plight go into church at service time on 
the Sunday to bear testimony against the 
pomps and vanities of the world ; '' and to 
be sure," said William, " they must have been 
witched, or they never would have done this.'* 
" Lord deliver us !" said Dinah, ** to be sure 
they must !" " To be sure they must. Lord 
bless us all !" said Haggy. 



272 



CHAPTER XXVII. P. I. 

A PASSAGE IN PROCOPIUS IMPROVED. A STORY CON- 
CERNING URIM AND THUMMIM ', AND THE ELDER 
DANIEL*S OPINION OF THE PROFESSION OF THE LAW. 



Here is Domine Picklock 
My man of Law, sollicits all my causes, 
Follows my business, makes and compounds my quarrels 
Between my tenants and me ; sows all my strifes 
And reaps them too, troubles the country for me. 
And vexes any neighbour that I please. 

Ben Jonson. 



Among the people who were converted to the 
Christian faith during the sixth century were 
two tribes or nations called the Lazi and the 
Zani. Methinks it had been better if they had 
been left unconverted ; for they have multiplied 
prodigiously among us, so that between the 



273 



Lazy Christians and the Zany ones, Christianity 
has grievously suffered. 

It was one of the Zany tribe whom Guy once 
heard explaining to his congregation what was 
meant by Urim and Thummim, and in technical 
phrase improving the text. Urim and Thum- 
mim, he said, were two precious stones, or rather 
stones above all price, the Hebrew names of 
which have been interpreted to signify Light and 
Perfection, or Doctrine and Judgement, (which 
Luther prefers in his Bible, and in which some 
of the northern versions, have followed him) or 
the Shining and the Perfect, or Manifestation 
and Truth, the words in the original being ca- 
pable of any or all of these significations. They 
were set in the High Priest's breast-plate of 
judgement: and when he consulted them upon 
any special occasion to discover the will of God, 
they displayed an extraordinary brilliancy if the 
matter which was referred to this trial were 
pleasing to the Lord Jehovah, but they gave no 
lustre if it were disapproved. " My Brethren," 
said the Preacher, ** this is what learned Ex- 
positors, Jewish and Christian, tell me concern- 

n2 



274 



ing these two precious stones. The stones 
themselves are lost. But, my Christian Bre- 
thren, we need them not, for we have a surer 
means of consulting and discovering the will of 
God ; and still it is by Urim and Thummim if 
we alter only a single letter in one of those 
mysterious words. Take your Bible, my Bre- 
thren ; use him and thumb him — use him and 
thumb him well, and you will discover the wiU 
of God as surely as ever the High Priest did 
by the stones in his breast-plate !" 

What Daniel saw of the Lazi, and what he 
heard of the Zani, prevented him from ever 
forming a wish to educate his son for a North 
country cure, which would have been all the pre- 
ferment that lay within his view. And yet if 
any person to whose judgement he deferred had 
reminded him that Bishop Latimer had risen 
from as humble an origin, it might have awak- 
ened in him a feeling of ambition for the boy, 
not inconsistent with his own philosophy. 

But no suggestions could ever have induced 
Daniel to chuse for him the profession of the 
Law. The very name of Lawyer was to him a 



275 



word of evil acceptation. Montaigne has a plea* ' 
sant story of a little boy who when his mother 
had lost a lawsuit which he had always heard 
her speak of as a perpetual cause of troublci 
ran up to him in great glee to tell him of the 
loss as a matter for congratulation and joy ; the 
poor child thought it was like losing a cough, 
or any other bodily ailment. Daniel entertained 
the same sort of opinion concerning all legal 
proceedings. He knew that laws were neces- 
sary evils ; but he thought they were much 
greater evils than there was any necessity that 
they should be ; and believing this to be oc- 
casioned by those who were engaged in the 
trade of administering them, he looked upon 
lawyers as the greatest pests in the country — 

Because, their end being merely avarice. 
Winds up their wits to such a nimble strain 
As helps to blind the Judge, not give him eyes.* 

He had once been in the Courts at Lancaster, 
having been called upon as witness in a civil 
suit, and the manner in which he was cross ex- 
amined there by one of those '' young spruce 

* Lord Brooks. 



276 



Lawyers/* whom Donne has so happily charac- 
terized as being 

— ^— "all impudence and tongue" 

had confirmed him in this prejudice. What he 
saw of the proceedings that day induced him to 
agree with Beaumont and Fletcher, that 

Justice was a Cheese-monger, a mere cheese-monger. 
Weighed nothing to the world but mites and maggots 
And a main stink ; Law, like a horse-courser. 
Her rules and precepts hung with gauds and ribbands, 
And pampered up to cozen him that bought her, 
.When she herself was hackney, lame and founder'd.* 

His was too simple and sincere an understand- 
ing to admire in any other sense than that of 
wondering at them. 

Men of that large profession that can speak 
To every cause, and things mere contraries. 
Till they are hoarse again, yet all be law ! 
That with most quick agility can turn 
And re-turn ; can make knots and undo them. 
Give forked counsel, take provoking gold 
On either hand, and put it up. These men 
He knew would thrive ; — ^t 

but far was he from wishing that a son of his 
should thrive by such a perversion of his in- 

♦ Woman Pleased. f Ben Jonson. 



277 



tellectual powers, and such & corruption of his 
moral nature. 

On the other hand he felt a degree of respect 
amounting almost to reverence for the healing 
art, which is connected with so many mysteries 
of art and nature. And therefore when an op- 
portunity offered of placing his son with a res- 
pectable practitioner, who he had every reason 
for believing would behave toward him with 
careful and prudent kindness, his entire appro- 
bation was given to the youth's own choice. 



278 



CHAPTER XXVIII. P. I. 

PETER HOPKINS. EFFECTS OF TIME AND CHANGE. 
DESCRIPTION OF HIS DWELLING-HOUSE. 



Comhien de changemens depuis que mis au monde, 
Qui n*est qu* un point du terns ! 

Pasquier. 



Peter Hopkins was a person who might have 
suffered death by the laws of Solon, if that 
code had been established in this country ; for 
though he lived in the reigns of George I. and 
George 11. he was neither Whig nor Tory, 
Hanoverian nor Jacobite. When he drank the 
King's health with any of his neighbours, he 
never troubled himself with considering which 
King was intended, nor to which side of the 
water their good wishes were directed. Under 
George or Charles he would have been the 



279 



same quiet subject, never busying himself with 
a thought about political matters, and having 
no other wish concerning them than that they 
might remain as they were, — so far he was a 
Hanoverian, and no farther. There was some- 
thing of the same temper in his religion ; he 
was a sincere Christian, and had he been born 
to attendance at the Mass or the Meeting 
House would have been equally sincere in his 
attachment to either of those extremes* For 
his whole mind was in his profession. He was 
learned in its history; fond of its theories ; and 
skilful in its practice, in which he trusted little 
to theory and much to experience. 

Both he and his wife were at this time well 
stricken in years ; they had no children, and no 
near kindred on either side; and being both 
kind-hearted people, the liking which they soon 
entertained towards Daniel for his docility, his 
simplicity of heart, his obliging temper, his ori- 
ginal cast of mind, and his never-failing good 
humour, ripened into a settled affection. 

Hopkins lived next door to the Mansion 
House, which edifice was begun a few years 



280 



after Daniel went to live with him. There is 
a view of the Mansion House in Dr. Miller's 
History of Doncaster, and in that print the 
dwelling in question is included. It had under- 
gone no other alteration at the time this view 
was taken than that of having had its case- 
ments replaced by sash windows, an improve- 
ment which had been made by our Doctor, 
when the frame work of the casements had 
become incapable of repair. The gilt pestle 
and mortar also had been removed from its 
place above the door. Internally the change 
had been greater; for the same business not 
being continued there after the Doctor's de- 
cease, the shop had been converted into a 
sitting room, and the very odour of medicine 
had passed away. But I will not allow myself 
to dwell upon this melancholy subject. The 
world is full of mutations ; and there is hardly 
any that does not bring with it some regret at 
the time, — and alas, more in the retrospect! 
I have lived to see the American Colonies se- 
parated from Great Britain, the Kingdom of 
Poland extinguished, the republic of Venice 



^81 



destroyed, its territory seized by one Usurper, 
delivered over in exchange to another, and the 
transfer sanctioned and confirmed by all the 
Powers of Europe in Congress assembled ! I 
have seen Heaven knows how many little Prin- 
cipalities and States, proud of their indepen- 
dance, and happy in the privileges connected 
with it, swallowed up by the Austrian or the 
Prussian Eagle, or thrown to the Belgic Lion, 
as his share in the division of the spoils. I 
have seen constitutions spring up like mush- 
rooms and kicked down as easily. I have seen 
the rise and fall of Napoleon. 

I have seen cedars fall 
And in their room a mushroom grow ; 
I have seen Comets, threatening all. 
Vanish themselves;* 

wherefore then should I lament over what time 
and mutability have done to a private dwelling- 
house in Doncaster? 

It was an old house, which when it was built 
had been one of the best in Doncaster; and 
even after the great improvements which have 

♦ Habington. 



282 



changed the appearance of the town, had an 
air of antiquated respectability about it. Had 
it been near the church it would have been 
taken for the Vicarage ; standing where it did, 
its physiognomy was such that you might have 
guessed it was the Doctor's house, even if the 
pestle and mortar had not been there as his insig- 
nia. There were eight windows and two doors in 
front. It consisted of two stories, and was oddly 
built, the middle part having, something in the 
Scotch manner, the form of a gable end towards 
the street. Behind this was a single chimney, 
tall, and shaped like a pillar. In windy nights 
the Doctor was so often consulted by Mrs. 
Dove concerning the stability of that chimney, 
that he accounted it the plague of his life. But 
it was one of those evils which could not be re- 
moved without bringing on a worse, the alterna- 
tive being whether there should be a tall chim- 
ney, or a smoky house. And after the mansion 
house was erected, there was one wind which 
in spite of the chimney's elevation drove the 
smoke down, — so inconvenient is it sometimes 
to be fixed near a great neighbour. 



28S 



This unfortunate chimney, being in the mid- 
dle of the house, served for four apartments ; 
the Doctor's study and his bedchamber on the 
upper floor, the-kitchen and the best parlour 
on the lower, that parlour, yes Reader, that 
very parlour wherein, as thou canst not have 
forgotten, Mrs. Dove was making tea for the 
Doctor on that ever memorable afternoon with 
which our history begins. 



284 



CHAPTER XXIX. P. I. 

A HINT OF REMINISCENCE TO THE READER. THE 
CLOCK OF ST. OBOR6E*S. A WORD IN HONOR OF 
ARCHDEACON MARKHAM. 



There is a ripe season for every thing, and if you slip that 
or anticipate it, you dim the grace of the matter be it never so 
good. As we say by way of Proverb that an hasty birth brings 
forth blind whelps, so a good tale tumbled out before the time 
is ripe for it, is ungrateful to the hearer. 

Bishop Hackett. 



The judicious reader will now have perceived 
that in the progress of this narrative, — which 
may be truly said to 

bear 
A music in the ordered history 
It lays before us, 

we have arrived at that point which determines 
the scene and acquaints him with the local habi- 
tation of the Doctor. He will perceive also that 



285 



in our method of narration nothing has been 
inartificially anticipated ; that there have been 
no premature disclosures, no precipitation, no 
hurry, or impatience on my part ; and that on 
the other hand there has been no unnecessary 
delay, but that we have regularly and naturally 
come to this developement. The author who 
undertakes a task like mine, 

must nombre al the hole C3rrcum8taunce 
Of hys matter with brevyacion, 

as an old Poet says of the professors of the 
rhyming art, and must moreover be careful 

That he walke not by longe continuance 
The perambulate way, 

as I have been, O Reader ! and as it is my fixed 
intention still to be. Thou knowest, gentle 
Reader, that I have never wearied thee with 
idle and worthless words ; thou knowest that 
the old comic writer spake truly when he said, 
that the man who speaks little says too much, 
if he says what is not to the point ; but that he 
who speaks well and wisely will never be ac- 
cused of speaking at too great length. 



286 

Tbv fiij Xkyovra rSiV hovrwv firi^k ?v 
MaKpbv vdfii^t, KJiv dv iiiry trvWaftdc. 
Tbv ^ tif Xkyovra, firj vofii^ ilvai fiaicpbv, 
Mfj^ av a<ft6^p* tliry iroWd jcai ttoXvv xpovov.* 

My good Readers will remember that, as was 
duly noticed in our first chapter P. I. the clock 
of St. George's had just struck five when Mrs. 
Dove was pouring out the seventh cup of tea 
for her husband, and when our history opens. 
I have some observations to make concerning 
both the tea and the tea service, which will 
clear the Doctor from any imputation of intem- 
perance in his use of that most pleasant, salu- 
tiferous and domesticizing beverage: but it 
would disturb the method of my narration were 
they to be introduced in this place. Here I 
have something to relate about the Clock. 
Some forty or fifty years ago a Butcher being 
one of the Churchwardens of the year, and 
fancying himself in that capacity invested with 
full power to alter and improve any thing in or 
about the Church, thought proper to change the 
position of the clock, and accordingly had it 

* Philemon. 



287 



removed to the highest part of the tower, im- 
mediately under the battlements. Much beau- 
tiful Gothic work was cut away to make room 
for the three dials, which he placed on three 
sides of this fine tower ; and when he was asked 
what had induced him thus doubly to disfigure 
the edifice, by misplacuig the dials, and de- 
stroying so much of the ornamental part, the 
great and greasy killcow answered that by fixing 
the dials so high, he could now stand at his 
own shop door and see what it was o'clock ! 
That convenience this arrant churchwarden 
had the satisfaction of enjoying for several 
years, there being no authority that could call 
him to account for the insolent mischief he had 
done. But Archdeacon Markham (to his 
praise be it spoken) at the end of the last cen- 
tury prevailed on the then churchwardens to 
remove two of the dials, and restore the archi- 
tectural ornaments which had been defaced. 

This was the clock which, with few intervals, 
measured out by hours the life of Daniel Dove 
from the seventeenth year of his age, when he 
first set up his rest within its sound. 



288 



Perhaps of all the works of man sun-dials 
and church-clocks are those which have con- 
veyed most feeling to the human heart; the 
clock more than the sun-dial because it speaks 
to the ear as well as to the eye, and by night 
as well as by day. Our forefathers understood 
this, and therefore they not only gave a Tongue 
to Time, but provided that he should speak 
often to us and remind us that the hours are 
passing. Their quarter boys and their chimes 
were designed for this moral purpose as much 
as the memento which is so commonly seen 
upon an old clock-face, — and so seldom upon a 
new one. I never hear chimes that they do 
not remind me of those which were formerly 
the first sounds I heard in the morning, which 
used to quicken my step on my way to school, 
and which announced my release from it, when 
the same tune methought had always a merrier 
import. When I remember their tones, life 
seems to me like a dream, and a train of recol- 
lections arises, which if it were allowed to have 
its course would end in tears. 



289 



CHAPTER XXX. P^ 



THE OLD BELLS RUNG TO A NEW TUNE. 



If the bell have any sides the clapper will find 'em. 

Ben Jonson. 



That same St. George's Church has a peal of 
eight tunable bells, in the key E. b. the first 
bell weighing seven hundred, one quarter and 
fourteen pounds. 

Tra tutte qiuznte le musiche humane, 
Signor mio gentil, tra le piu care 
Oioje del mondOf h 7 suon delle campane; 
Don don don don don don, che ve ne pare f* 

They were not christened, because they were 
not Roman Catholic bells ; for in Roman Catho- 

* Agnolo Firenzuola. 
VOL. I. O 



290 

lie countries church bells are christened with 
the intention of causing them to be held in 
greater reverence, — 

— perb orditib n*un consistoro 

Un certo di quei buonpapi aW antica, 
Che non ci lavorcnjan di straforo, 

ChM la campana si, si benedica, 
Poi si battezzi, e se le ponga il nome. 
Prima che? in campanil V ufizio dica. 

OH organi, ch* anco lor san si ben come 
Si dica il vetpro, e le messe cantate, 
Nan hanno questo honor sopra le chiome, 

Che le lor canne non son battezzate, 
Ne* nome ha P una Pier, /* altra Maria 
Come hanno le campane prelibate.* 

The bells of St* George's, Doncaster, I say, 
were not christened, because they were Protes- 
tant bells ; for distinction's sake howeyer we 
will name them as the bells stand in the dirge 
of that unfortunate Cat whom Johnny Green 
threw into the well. 

But it will be better to exhibit their relative 
weights in figures, so that they may be seen 
synoptically. Thus then ; — 

* Aqnolo Firbnzuola. 



291 





Cwt, 




qr. 




lb. 


Bim the first 


7 


•• 


1 




14 


Bim the second 


8 


• • 







18 


Bim the third 


8 


• • 


2 




6 


Bim the fourth 


10 


•• 


S 




15 


Bim the fifth 


13 


•• 


1 







Bim the sixth 


15 


• • 


2 




16 


Bom 


gg 


• • 


1 







BeU 


29 


• • 


1 




SO 



I cannot but admit that these appellations are 
not so stately in appearance as those of the peal 
which the bishop of Chalons recently baptized, 
and called a " happy and holy family" in the 
edifying discourse that he delivered upon the 
occasion. The first of these was called Marie, 
to which — or to whom, — the Duke and Duchess 
of Danderville (so the newspapers give this 
name) stood sponsors. " It is you Marie/* said 
the Bishop, *' who will have the honor to an- 
nounce the festivals, and proclaim the glory of 
the Lord ! You appear among us under the 
most happy auspices, presented by those respect- 
able and illustrious hands to which the practices 
of piety have been so long familiar. And you 



292 

Anne/* he pursued, addressing the second belF, 
— " an object worthy of the zeal and piety of 
our first magistrate (the Prefect) and of her who 
so nobly shares his solicitude, — you shall be 
charged with the same employment. Your 
voice shall be joined to Marie's upon important 
occasions. Ah ! what touching lessons will you 
not give in imitation of her whose name you 
bear, and whom we reverence as the purest of 
Virgins ! You also Deodate, will take part in 
this concert, you whom an angel, a new-born 
infant, has conjointly with me consecrated to 
the Lord ! Speak Deodate ! and let us hear 
your marvellous accents." This Angel and 
Godmother in whose name the third bell was 
given was Mademoiselle Deodate Boisset, then 
in the second month of her age, daughter 
of Viscount Boisset. " And you Stephanie, 
crowned with glory," continued the orator, in 
learned allusion to the Greek word <r80avoc9 
" you are not less worthy to mingle your 
accents with the melody of your sisters. And you 
lastly Seraphine and Pudentienne, you will raise 
your voices in this touching concert, happy all 



293 



of you in having been presented to the bene- 
dictions of the Church, by these noble and 
generous souls, so praiseworthy for the liveli- 
ness of their faith, and the holiness of their 
example." And then the Bishop concluded by 
calling upon the congregation to join with him 
in prayer that the Almighty would be pleased 
to preserve from all accidents this " happy and 
holy family of the bells." 

We have no such sermons from our Bishops ! 
The whole ceremony must have been as useful 
to the bells as it was edifying to the people. 

Were I called upon to act as sponsor upon 
such an occasion, I would name my bell Peter 
Bell in honour of Mr. Wordsworth. There 
has been a bull so called, and a bull it was of 
great merit. But if it were the great bell, then 
it should be called Andrew, in honour of Dr. 
Bell ; and that bell should call the children to 
school. 

There are, I believe, only two bells in Eng- 
land which are known by their christian names, 
and they are both called Tom; but Great 
Tom of Oxford which happens to be much the 



294 



smaller of the two was christened in the femi- 
nine gender^ being called Mary, in the spirit of 
catholic and courtly adulation at the commence- 
ment of the bloody Queen's reign. Tresham 
the Vice-chancellor performed the ceremony, 
and his exclamation when it first summoned 
him to mass has been recorded : — *' O delicate 
and sweet harmony ! O beautiful Mary ! how 
musically she sounds! how strangely she 
pleaseth my ear !** 

In spite of this christening, the object of Dr. 
Tresham's admiration is as decidedly a Tom- 
Bell, as the Puss in Boots who appeared at a 
Masquerade (Theodore Hook remembers when 
and where) was a Tom Cat. Often as the said 
Tom-Bell has been mentioned, there is but one 
other anecdote recorded of him; it occurred 
on Thursday the thirteenth day of March 1806, 
and was thus described in a letter written two 
hours after the event : — " An odd thing hap- 
pened to-day about half past four, Tom sud- 
denly went mad; he began striking as fast 
as he could about twenty times. Every body 
went out doubting whether there was an earth- 



S95 



quake, or whether the Dean was dead, or the 
College on fire. However nothing was the 
matter but that Tom was taken ill in his bowels : 
in other words something had happened to the 
works, but it was not of any serious conse- 
quence, for he has struck six as well as ever, 
and bids fair to toll 101 to-night as well as he 
did before the attack." 

This was written by a youth of great natural 
endowments, rare acquirements, playful tem- 
per, and affectionate heart. If his days had been 
prolonged, his happy industry, his inoffensive 
wit, his sound judgement and his moral worth, 
favoured as they were by all favourable cir- 
cumstances, must have raised him to distinc- 
tion, and the name of Barre Roberts which is 
now known only in the little circle of his own 
and his father's friends, would have had its 
place with those who have deserved well of 
their kind and reflected honor upon their 
country. 

But I return to a subject, which would have 
interested him in his antiquarian pursuits, — 
for he loved to wander among the Ruins of 



296 



Time. We will return therefore to that cere- 
mony of christening Church Bells, which with 
other practices of the Holy Roman Catholic 
and Apostolic Church, has been revived in 
France. 

Bells, say those Theologians in issimi who 
have gravely written upon this grave matter. 
Bells, say they, are not actually baptized with 
that baptism which is administered for the re- 
mission of sins ; but they are said to be chris- 
tened because the same ceremonies which are 
observed in christening children, are also ob- 
served in consecrating them, such as the wash- 
ing, the anointing and the imposing a name; 
all which however may more strictly be said to 
represent the signs and symbols of baptism, 
than they may be called baptism itself. 

Nothing can be more candid ! Bells are not 
baptized for the remission of sins, because the 
original sin of a bell would be a flaw in the 
metal, or a defect in the tone, neither of which 
the Priest undertakes to remove. There was 
however a previous ceremony of blessing the- 
furnace when the bells were cast within the 



297 



precincts of a monastery^ as they most fre- 
quently were in former times, and this may 
have been intended for the prevention of such 
defects. The Brethren stood round the fur- 
nace ranged in processional order, sang the 
loOth Psalm, and then after certain prayers 
blessed the molten metal, and called upon the 
Liord to infuse into it his grace and overshadow 
it with his power, for the honor of the Saint, 
to whom the bell was to be dedicated and whose 
name it was to bear. 

When the time of christening came, the offi- 
ciating Priest and his assistant named every bell 
five times, as a sort of prelude, for some unex- 
plained reason which may perhaps be as sig- 
nificant and mystical as the other parts of the 
ceremony. He then blessed the water in two 
vessels which were prepared for the service. 
Dipping a clean linen cloth in one of these 
vessels he washed the bell within and without, 
the bell being suspended over a vessel wider in 
circumference than the belFs mouth, in order 
that no drop of the water employed in this 
washing might fall to the ground ; for the water 

o 2 



398 



was holy. Certain psalma were said or sung 
(they were the 96th and the four last in the 
psalter ;) during this part of the ceremony and 
while the officiating Priest prepared the water 
in the second vessel ; this he did by sprinkling 
salt in it| and putting holy oil upon it» either 
with his thumb, or with a stick ; if the thumb 
were used, it was to be cleaned immediately by 
rubbing it well with salt over the same water* 
Then he dipt another clean cloth in this oiled 
and salted water, and again washed the bell» 
within and without ; after the service Che cloths 
were burnt lest they should be profaned by 
other uses. The bell was then authentically 
named. Then it was anointed with chrism in 
the form of a cross four times on the broadest 
part of the outside, thrice on the smaller part) 
and four times on the inside, those parts being 
anointed with most care against which the 
clapper was to strike. After this the name 
was again given. Myrrh and frankincense 
were then brought, the bell was incensed while 
part of a psalm was recited and the bell was 
authentically named a third time ; after which 



^99 



the priest carefully wiped the chrism from the 
bell with tow, and the tow was immediately 
burnt in the censer. Next the Priest struck 
each bell thrice with its clapper, and named it 
again at every stroke ; every one of the assist- 
ants in like manner struck it and named it once. 
The bells were then carefully covered each 
with a cloth and immediately hoisted that they 
might not be contaminated by any irreverent 
touch. The Priest concluded by explaining 
to the congregation, if he thought proper, the 
reason for this ceremony of christening the 
bells, which was that they might act as pre- 
servatives against thunder and lightning, and 
hail and wind, and storms of every kind, and 
moreover that they might drive away evil 
Spirits. To these and their other virtues the 
Bishop of Chalons alluded in his late truly 
Gallican and Roman Catholic discourse. ^* The 
Bells," said he, ** placed like centinels on the 
towers, watch over us and turn away from us 
the temptations of the enemy of our salvation, 
as well as storms and tempests. They speak 



300 



and pray for us in our troubles ; they inform 
heaven of the necessities of the earth." 

Now were this edifying part of the Roman 
Catholic ritual to be re-introduced in the British 
dominions, — as it very possibly may be now 
that Lord Peter has appeared in his robes 
before the King, and been introduced by his 
title, — the opportunity would no doubt be 
taken by the Bishop or Jesuit who might direct 
the proceedings, of complimenting the friends 
of their cause by naming the first ^' holy and 
happy family'* after them. And to commemo- 
rate the extraordinary union of sentiment which 
that cause has brought about between persons 
not otherwise remarkable for any similitude 
of feelings or opinions, they might unite two 
or more names in one bell, (as is frequently 
done in the human subject,) and thus with a 
peculiar felicity of compliment, shew who and 
who upon this great and memorable occasion 
have pulled together. In such a case the names 
selected for a peal of eight tunable bells might 
run thus 



301 



Bim Ist. 


— 


Canning O'Connel. 


Bim 2d. 




Plunkett Shiel. 


Bim 3d. 


— 


Augustus Frederick Cobbet. 


Bim 4th. 


— 


Williams Wynn Burdett 
Waithman. 


Bim 5th. 




Grenville Wood. 


Bim 6th. 




Palmerston Hume. 


Bom 




Lawless Brougham. 


Bell 




Lord King, per se ; — 


— alone par excellence y as the thickest and thin- 


nest friend of the cause^ and moreover because 



None but himself can be his parallel ; 

and last in order because the base note accords 
best with him ; and because for the decorum 
and dignity with which he has at all times 
treated the Bishops, the clergy and the subject 
of religion, he must be allowed to bear the bell 
not from his compeers alone but from all his 
contemporaries. 



90S 



CHAPTER XXXI. P. I. 



MORE CONCERNING BELLS. 



Lord, ringing changes all our bells hath marr'd ; 

Jangled they have and jarr'd 
So long, they're out of tune, and out of frame ; 

They seem not now the same. 
Put them in frame anew, and once begin 
To tune them so, that they may chime all in. 

HiRBERT. 



There are more mysteries in a peal of bells 
than were touched upon by the Bishop of Cha- 
lons in his sermon. There are plain bob-triples, 
bob-majors, bob-majors reversed, double bob- 
majors, and grand sire-bob-cators, and there is a 
Bob-maximus. Who Bob was, and whether he 
were Bob Major, or Major Bob, that is whether 
Major were his name or his rank, and if his rank, 
to what service he belonged, are questions which 
inexorable Oblivion will not answer, however 



S03 



earnestly adjured. And there is no Witch of 
Endor who will call up Bob from the grave to 
answer them himself. But there are facts in 
the history of bell-ringing which Oblivion has 
not yet made her own, and one of them is that 
the greatest performance ever completed by one 
person in the world, was that of Mr. Samuel 
Thurston at the New Theatre Public House in 
the City of Norwich, on Saturday evening, 
July 1, 1809, when he struck all these intricate 
short peals, the first four upon a set of eight 
musical hand bells, the last on a peal of ten. 

But a performance upon hand-bells when 
compared to bell-ringing is even less than a 
review in comparison with a battle. Strength 
of arm as well as skill is required for managing 
a bell-rope. Samuel Thurston's peal of plain 
bob-triples was ** nobly brought round" in two 
minutes and three quarters, and his grandsire- 
bob-cators were as nobly finished in five mi- 
nutes and fourteen seconds. The reader shall 
now see what real bell-rifiging is. 

The year 1 796 was remarkable for the per- 
formance of great exploits in this manly and 
English art, — for to England the art is said to 



304 



be peculiar, the cheerful carrillons of the con- 
tinent being played by keys. In that year, and 
in the month of August the Westmoreland 
youths rang a complete peal of 5040 grandsire 
triples, in St. Mary's Church Kendal, being the 
whole number of changes on seven bells. The 
peal was divided into ten parts, or courses of 
504 each ; the bobs were called by the sixth, a 
lead single was made in the middle of the peal, 
and another at the conclusion which brought 
the bells home. Distinct leads and exact di- 
visions were observed throughout the whole, 
and the performance was completed m three 
hours and twenty minutes. A like performance 
took place in the same month at Kidderminster 
in three hours and fourteen minutes. Stephen 
Hill composed and called the peal, it was con- 
ducted through with one single, which was 
brought to the 4984th change, viz. 1267453. 
This was allowed by those who were conver- 
sant in the art to exceed any peal ever yet 
rung in this kingdom by that method, 

Paulo major a canamus. The Society of 
Cambridge youths that same year rang in the 
Church of St. Mary the Great, a true and com- 



305 



plete peal of Bob maximus, in five hours and 
five minutes. This consisted of 6600 changes^ 
and for regularity of striking and harmony 
throughout the peal was allowed by competent 
judges to be a very masterly performance. In 
point of time the striking was to such a nicety 
that in each thousand changes the time did 
not vary one sixteenth of a minute, and the 
compass of the last thousand was exactly equal 
to the first. 

Eight Birmingham youths (some of them 
were under twenty years of age) attempted a 
greater exploit, they ventured upon a complete 
peal of 15120 bob major. They failed indeed, 
magnis tamen ausis. For after they had rang 
upwards of eight hours and a half, they found 
themselves so much fatigued that they desired 
the caller would take the first opportunity to 
bring the bells home. This he soon did by 
omitting a bob and so brought them round 
thus making a peal of 14224 changes in eight 
hours and forty-five minutes, the longest which 
was ever rung in that part of the country, or 
perhaps any where else. 



306 



In that same year died Mr. Patrick the cele- 
brated composer of church-bell music, and 
senior of the Society of Cumberland Youths, — 
an Hibernian sort of distinction for one in mid- 
dle or later life. He is the same person whose 
name was well known in the scientific world 
as a maker of barometers ; and he it was who 
composed the whole peal of Stedman's triples, 
6040 changes, (which his obituarist says had 
till then been deemed impracticable, and for 
the discovery of which he received a premium 
of 50/. offered for that purpose by the Nor- 
wich amateurs of the art) ^^ his productions of 
real double and treble bob royal being a stand- 
ing monument of his unparalleled and super- 
lative merits." This Mr. Patrick was interred 
on the afternoon of Sunday, June ^6, in the 
church-yard of St. Leonard, Shoreditch ; the 
corpse was followed to the grave by all the 
Ringing Societies in London and its environs, 
each sounding hand bells with muffled clappers, 
the church bells at the same time ringing a 
dead peal ; 

*Olf oiy dfi^uwov rd^ov TlarpUcoQ Potiod&fioio, 



307 

James Ogden was interred with honours of the 
same kind at Ashton under Line, in the year of 
this present writing, 18^7. His remains were 
borne to the grave by the ringers of St. MichaeFs 
Tower in that Town, with whom he had rung 
the tenor bell for more than fifty years, and 
with whom he performed " the unprecedented 
feat'* of ringing five thousand on that bell (which 
weighed 28 cwt.) in his sixty- seventh year. 
After the funeral his old companions rang a 
dead peal for him of 828 changes, that being 
the number of the months of his life. Such in 
England are the funeral honors of the BcXre^oc. 

It would take 91 years to ring the changes 
upon twelve bells, at the rate of two strokes to a 
second; the changes upon fourteen could not be 
rung through at the same rate in less than 16575 
years ; and upon four and twenty they would 
require more than 117,000 billions of years. 

Great then are the mysteries of bell-ringing ! 
And this may be said in its praise, that of all 
devices which men have sought out for obtain- 
ing distinction by making a noise in the worlds 
it is the most harmless. 



308 



CHAPTER XXXII. P. I. 

AN INTRODUCTION TO CERTAIN PRELIMINARIES 
ESSENTIAL TO THE PROGRESS OF THIS WORK. 



Mas demos ya el asiento en lo importantej 
Que el tiempo huye del mUndo por la posta, 

Balbuena. 



The subject of these memoirs heard the bells of 
St. George's ring for the battles of Dettingen 
and CuUoden ; For Commodore Anson's return 
and Admiral Hawke's victory; for the conquest 
of Quebec; for other victories, important in 
their day, though in the retrospect they may 
seem to have produced little effect; and for 
more than one Peace ; for the going out of the 
Old Style, and for the coming in of the New ; 
for the accession, marriage and coronation of 
George the 3rd. ; for the birth of George the 



309 



4 th.; and that of all his royal brethren and 
sisters ; — and what was to him a subject of 
nearer and dearer interest than any of these 
events, for his own wedding. 

What s^d those bells to him that happy day? 
for that bells can convey articulate sounds to 
those who have the gift of interpreting their 
language, Whittington Lord Mayor of London 
Town knew by fortunate experience. 

So did a certain Father Confessor in the Ne- 
therlands whom a buxom widow consulted upon 
the perilous question whether she should marry 
a second husband, or continue in widowed 
blessedness. The prudent Priest deemed it too 
delicate a point for him to decide; so he directed 
her to attend to the bells of her church when 
next they chimed — (they were but three in num- 
ber) — and bring him word what she thought 
they said ; and he exhorted her to pray in the 
mean time earnestly for grace to understand 
them rightly, and in the sense that might be 
most for her welfare here and hereafter, as he on 
his part would pray for her. — She listened with 
mouth and ears, the first time that the bells 



310 



struck up; and the more she Hstened, the 
more plainly they said *' Nempt een man^ Nempt 
een man/ Take a Spouse, Take a Spouse!'* "Aye 
Daughter!*' said the Confessor, when she re- 
turned to him with her report, " If the bells 
have said so, so say I; and not I alone, but the 
Apostle also, and the Spirit who through that 
Apostle hath told us when it is best for us to 
marry !** Reader thou mayest thank the Leo- 
nine poet Gummarus Van Craen for this good 
story. 

What said the Bells of Doncaster to our dear 
Doctor on that happy morning which made 
him a whole man by uniting to him the rib that 
he till then had wanted ? They said to him as 
distinctly as they spoke to Whittington, and 
to the Flemish Widow, 

Daniel Dove brings Deborah home. 
Daniel Dove brings Deborah home. 




<5N 



Danid Dove brings Deborah home. 



311 



But whither am I hurrying ? It was not till the 
year 1761 that that happy union was effected ; 
and the fourteen years whose course of events I 
have reluctantly, yet of necessity, pretermitted, 
brings us only to 1748 in which year the Peace 
of Aix-la-Chapelle was made. Peter Hopkins 
and Mrs. Hopkins were then both living, and 
Daniel had not attained to the honors of his 
diploma. Before we come to the day on which 
the bells rung that joyful peal, I must enter 
into some details for the purpose of showing 
how he became qualified for his degree, and 
how he was enabled to take it ; and it will be 
necessary therefore to say something of the 
opportunities of instruction which he enjoyed 
under Hopkins, and of the state of society in 
Doncaster at that time. And preliminary to, 
as preparatory for all this, some account is to 
be given of Doncaster itself. 

Reader, you may skip this preliminary account 
if you please, but it will be to your loss if you 
do! You perhaps may be one of those persons 
who can travel from Dan to Beersheba, and nei- 
ther make enquiry concerning, nor take notice 
of, any thing on the way ; but, thank Heaven, 



312 



I cannot pass through Doncaster in any such 
mood of mind. If however thou belongest to a 
better class^ then may I promise that in what is 
here to follow, thou wilt find something to re- 
compense thee for the little time thou wilt em- 
ploy in reading it, were that time more than it 
will be, or more valuable than it is. For I shall 
assuredly either tell thee of something which 
thou didst not know before ; (and let me ob- 
serve by the bye that I never obtained any in- 
formation of any kind, which did not on some 
occasion or other prove available ;) — or I shall 
waken up to pleasureable consciousness thy 
nappingknowledge. Snuff the candles therefore, 
if it be candle-light, and they require it; (I hope, 
for thine eyes' sake, thou art not reading by a 
lamp !) — stir the fire, if it be winter, and it be 
prudent to refresh it with the poker ; and then 
comfortably begin a new chapter. 

Faciam ut ht^us loci semper memineris.* 
* Terence. 

END OF VOL. I. 



W.Nicol, 60, Pall Mall, 



:^ 



October, 1846« 



A CATALOGUE OF 

NEW WORKS AND NEW EDITIONS 

PRINTED FOB 

LONGMAN, BR(/WN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS, 

LONDON. 



ANALYTICAL INDEX. 



19 
19 
19 
19 



AGRICULTURE & RURAL AFFAIRS. 

Pages 

Bayldon on Valuing Rents, etc. • • 6 

Crocker's Land SurvcTlng ... 9 

Dafy's Agricnltural Chemistry - - 9 

Greenwood's (Col.) Tree-Lifter - - 12 
Hannam On Waste Manures - • -13 
Johnson's Farmer's Encyclopaedia - -16 

London's Encyclopaedia of Agriculture - 18 
„ Self • Instruction for Young 

Farmers, etc. - - - 18 

., (Mrs.) Lady's Country Companion 18 

Low^s Breedsofthe DomesticatedAnimals 

of Great Britain ... 

,, Elements of Agriculture 

„ On Landed Property 

„ On the Domesticated Animals 

Brande's Dictionary of Science, Litera- 
ture, and Art - - - - - - 7 

Budjre's Miner's Guide . • . . 7 

De Burtin on the Knowledge of Pictures 9 

Gwilt's Encyclopaediaof Arcnitecture . 13 

Havdon's Lectures on Painting & Design 13 
Holland's Manufactures in Metal . .18 
Loudon's Encyclopaedia of Cottage. Farm, 

and Villa Architecture and Furniture - 18 

Porter's Manufacture of Sillc . - - 24 

„ ,, Porcelain & Glass 24 

Reid (Dr.) on Warming and Ventilating 2S 

Steam Engine (The) , by the Artisan Club 28 
lire's Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, 

and Mines • . - . 31 
Recent Improyements in Arts, 
Manufactures, and Mines - -SI 

BIOGRAPHY. 

Aikin's Life of Addison . . • . fi 
Bell's Lives of the most Eminent British 

Poets 6 

Dover's Life of the King of Prussia . - 10 
Dunham's Lives of the Early Writers of 

Great Britidn - - . 10 

„ Lives of the British Dramatists 10 
Forster's Statesmen of the Commonwealth 

of England ...... H 

Gleig's Lives of the most Eminent British 

Muitary Commanders - • • .11 

Grant (Mrs.) Memoir and Correspondence 11 

James's Life of the Blacic Prince > - 16 
„ Lives of the most Eminent Foreign 

Statesmen . ■ - - 16 

Leslie's Life of Constable ... 17 
Mackintosh's Life of Sir T. More - .20 

Maunder's Biographical Treasury . 22 

Roberts's Life of the Duke of ftlonmouth 26 

Roscoe's Lives of Eminent British Lawyers 26 
Russell's Correspondence of the Duke of 

Bedford 26 

Shelley's Lives of the most Eminent Lite- 
rary Men of Italy, Spain, and Portugal 27 
„ Lives of the most Eminent 

French Writers . - - 27 

Sonthey's Lives of the British Admirals • 27 

Waterton's Autobiography and Essays > 81 



•* 



BOOKS OF GENERAL 

Acton's (Eliza) Cookery Book 
Black's "Treatise on Brewing * 
Collegian's Guide . . . 
Donovan's Domestic Economy 
Hand-Book of Taste 
Hints on Etiquette . 
Hudson's Parent's Hand-Book 
,. Executor's Guide 



UTILITY. 

Pages 
• . 6 
- 6 
• 8 
. 10 
. IS 
. 13 
. IS 
. 15 
. 16 
. 18 
21 
22 
22 
21 
22 
23 
24 



,, On Making Wills ... 
Loudon's Self Instruction . - . 
Maunder's Treasury of Knowledge • 

„ Scientific and LiteraryTreasury 

„ Treasury of History 

,, Biographical Treasury • 

„ Universal Class-Book 

Parkes*s Domestic Duties ... 
Pycroft's Couise of English Reading 
Riddle's English-Latin and Latin-English 
Dictionaries •-..•• 2S 

Short Whist 2/ 

Thomson's Domestic Management of the 

Sick Room ... 29 

„ Interest Tables - - .80 

Tomlins' Law Dictionary .... 80 
Webster's Enry. of Domestic Economy > 81 

BOTANY AND GARDENING. 

Abercrombie's Practical Gardener - . 6 
„ and Mam's Gardener's 

Companion - . > 6 
Callcott's Scripture Herbal ... 7 
Conversations on Botany ... 8 

Drummond's First Steps to BoUny ■ - 10 
Glendiuning On the Culture of the Pine 
Apple .......11 

Greenwood's (Col.) Tree-Lifter - -12 
Henslow's Botany . - ... 13 
Hoare On Cultivation of the Grape Vine 

on Open Walls - • • -13 
„ On the Management of the Roots 

ofVines . - - . - 18 

Hooker's British Flora - • - - 14 

„ and Taylor's MuscoIogiaBritannica 14 

Jackson's Pictorial Flora .... 16 

Knapp's Gramina Britannica • • ■ 16 
Undley's Theory of Horticulture - - 18 
Guide to the Orchard and Kitchen 
Garden - - - - . 18 

Introduction to Botany - .18 
Flora Medica - - • - 18 
Synopsis of British Flora > .18 
Loudon's Hortus Britannicus • . • 19 
,, Lignosus Londinensis . 19 
Encyclopaedia of Trees & Shrubs 18 
,, Gardening - 18 

,, „ Plants - .19 

Lindley's Suburban Garden and Villa Com- 
panion - * " - 19 
„ Self- Instruction for Young Gar • 

deners, etc. * - .18 

Repton's Landscape Gardening and Land- 
scape Architecture .... 25 

Rivera's Rose Amateur's Guide . .25 
Roberts on the Vine • ... 25 



I* 






»» 



»» 



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London: Printed by Manning and Mason, Ivy-Iane, St. Paul's 



1 ...:,.e.....„ 1 


■■THKlS-iJ. ; 

COMMERCE AND MERCANTILE 

AFFAIRS 

GEOGRAPHY AND ATLASES. 

,"™«Sf3tl'.i,V«3r!' : 1 

HBTORY AND CRITKISM. 

^^.»..,,.,„,,.,..„,. _ 

j^i,,,SS7.-3-„' :■:;!■ 






i!r.M&-i^....-.,.i.,.-..i' 


^_^ JUVENILE BOOKS, 

Bgr'. (■h.l Ih. B^k - '- 


- ■ 




tWSCELLANEOUS 






"-"-"sl 






rwrtl'A2aa;DRDrih«Kiifllah Poe 



NOVELS AND WORKS OF FICTION. 

DMU*c'ffb"' ''°"'' ' ■ 



■■ (H^r] DtaT^ 



W^.&™rtl.r. 



"^"SSBSkf*"" 



Copluil'i DIcUiiDUT ol Ilsilclu • - I 
LlllidDa'iKiirclii|illili>lirI^iIiBbrDbl II 






POETRY AND THE DRAMA. 

Bmdl^'i FulLr 9bibi;ciri - - - 3 



L. R- l\ yottini WdtIii 









4 ANjtl-TTICAL INDEX. 1 




Hsulcr'i F'Kllcal Ucchliilci - - 

BES.'B'n^™ : : : 

TOroORAPHY & GUIDE BOOKS. 

AUlHD'iHliloiyoIlhT'mTlrCbuik ■ 

TRANSACTIONS OF SOCIETeS. 

aSKSsStl- : : ! 

P.E™f,AK™iof%lo™Ar»« - - 
P..oo-.l*.A.,8^J.__^^- - - g 

lv:"5X'K'^'?.:.';;"^'d™. : : if 

VETERMARY MEDICINE 
HnrlDD'! Vilerlnarr ToiicDIoilcalCban 

„ C.tileHcllclao - . . 


H«a,^.''^rBlbU°""riHcl™; - 14 

Tb-b.,..C«^..^_K=L..^^^.__. _ g 

THE SCIENCES IN GENERAL, 
AND MATHEMATICS. 

B.l,«Ll'.Ia.™h.<-liop .0 0.01017 - i 

Ksxt;'£.T«Wr^5™iaa; " 
S^^±.-;,.o^b- i : 



f= 



;^ 



CATALOGUE. 



ABERCROMBIE.— ABERCROMBiE'S PRACTICAL GARDENER, AND 

IMPROVED SYSTEM OF MODERN HORTICULTURE, alphftbetically arranged. 4to. 
Editiou, with an Introductory TVeatise on Vegetable Physiology, and Plates by W. balUbory. 
12ino. 6t. boards. 

ABERCROMBIE AND MAIN.— THE PRACTICAL GARDENER'S COM- 
PANION; Or, Hortlcnltoral Calendar: to which is added, the Garden-Seed and Plant 
Estimate. Edited from a MS.of J.Abercrombie,by J.Main. 8th Edition. 32mo.8<.M. sewed. 

ACTON (MISS).— MODERN COOKERY, 

In ail its Branches, redaced to a System of Easy Practice. For the ose of PriTate Families. 
In a Series of Practical Receipts, all uf which have been strictly tested, and are given with 
the most minute exactness. Dedicated to the Youue Houselceepers uf England. By Elisa 
Acton. 2d. Editiou, improved. Foolscap 8vo. with Woodcuts, /'• M. cloth. 

** Uht Eliza Aeton may congratulate hertelf on having eompoted a work of great mtilitft 
«»tf one that i$ $peedilf finding it$ teaf to every 'dreuer^tn the kingdom. Her Cookerf-book 
it unqmettionablf the mo$t valuable compendium of the art that ha$ get been publithed." 

Morning Post. 

ADAIR (SIR ROBERT) —AN HISTORICAL MEMOIR OF A MISSION 

TO THE COURT OF VIENNA IN 1806. Br the Right Honorable Sir Robert Adair.G.C.B. 
With a Selection from his Despatches, poblished by permission of the proper Authorities. 
8to. 18*. cloth. 

ADAIR (SIR ROBERT) —THE NEGOTIATIONS FOR THE PEACE OF 

THE DARDA.NELLKS, in lflUS-9} with Despatches and Official Docaments. Bt the 
Right Honorable Sir Robert Adnir, G.C.B. Being a Sequel to the Memoir of hli Mission 
to Vienna in 1806. 2 vols. 8vo. 28«. cloth. 

ADDISON.— THE KNIGHTS TEMPLARS. 

By C.G. Addison, of the Inner Temple. 2d Edition, enlarged. Square crown 8to. with 
Illustrations, 18s. cloth. 

ADDISON.— THE TEMPLE CHURCH IN LONDON : 

Its Historr and Antiquities. By C.G. Addison, Esq., of the Inner Temple, author of **The 
History of the KnighU Templars." Square crown 8vo. with 6 Plates, b». cloth. 

Also, 
A FULL AND COMPLETE GUIDE, HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE, TO THE 
TEMPLE CHURCH. (From Mr. Addison's ** History of the Temple Church.") Square 
crown 8vo. 1«. sewed. 

AIKIN.-THE LIFE OF JOSEPH ADDISON. 

Illustrated by many of his Letters and Private Papers never befor* published. By Lucy 
Aikin. 2 vols, post 8vo. with Portrait from Sir Godfrey Kneller's Picture, I8s- cloth. 

AMY HERBERT. 

By a Lady. Edited by the Rev. William Sewell, B.D. of Exeter College, Oxford. A New 
Edition. 2 vols, foolscap 8vo. 9<. cloth. 

BAILEY.— ESSAYS ON THE PURSUIT OF TRUTH, 

And on the Piogress of Knowledge. By Samuel Bailey, author of "Essays on the Formation 
and Publication of Opinions," •' Bcrlceley's Theory of Vision," etc. 2d Edition, revised 
and enlarged. 8vo. i$. id. cloth. 

BAKKWELL.— AN INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGY. 

Intended to convey Practical Knowledge of the Science, and comprising the most important 
recent Discoveries ; with Explanations of the Facts and Phenomena which serve to csnfirm or 
invalidate various Geological Theories. By Robert Bakewell. Fifth Edition, considerably 
enlarged. 8vo.with numerous Plates and Woodcuts, 21«. cloth. 

BALMAIN.- LESSONS ON CHEMISTRY, 

For the Use of Pupils in Schools. Junior Students in Universities, and Readers who wish to 
learn the fundamental Principles and leading Facts : with Questions for Examination, 
Glossaries of Chemical Terms and Chemical Symbols, and an Index. By William H. Balmain. 
With numerous Woodcuts, illustrative of the Decompositions. Foolscap 8vo. 0«. cloth. 

BAYLDON.-ART OF VALUING RENTS AND TILLAGES, 

And the Tenant's Right of Entering and Quitting Farms, explained by several Specimens of 
Valuations; and Remarks on the Cultivation pursued on Soils in different Situations. 
Adapted to the Use of Landlords, Laud- Agents, Appraisera, Farmers, and Tenants. By 
J. S. Bayldon. 6th Edition, corrected and revised by John Donaldson, Land-Steward, author 
of a ** Treatise on Manures and Grasses.'* 8vo. 10*. 6<f. cloth. 



CATALOGUE OF MEW WORKS 



BEDFORD CORK BSPONDENCE. — CORRESPONDENCE OF JOHN, 

FOURTH DUKB f)F BEDFORD, selected from the Orinnals at Woburn Abbej: wfA 
IntroduetionB by Lord John RiuKell. Sto.toI. 1 (1742-48), 18«. cloth; toI. 3 (1749-40), Ifa.cL 

** The $eeond molmme tnelude$ a eorrenondenee having relation to the BeH»d from the 
Peace of Ait-la-Chmpelle to the death of George II. Its mott remarkable portion heett 
upon «M immortmnt ^mestion^ on which there ttitl esUt tome differences of opinion, oie.the 
intrigant which led to the Junction of the Duke of Neweaatle and Pitt, in IT&J. The letteri 
reepectimg the ttate of Ireland under the Ficerowaltw of the Duhe of Bedford •!«•> are net » 
little intereeting.'* -Uoming Hentld. 

*• * F'ol. III. to complete the worh, it in preparation. 

BELL— LIVES OF THE MOST EMINENT ENGLISH POETS. 

By Robert Bell, Esq. 3 vols, foolscap Sro. with Vignette Htlei, 1S«. cloth. 

BELL.— THE HISTORY OF RUSSIA, 

From the Earliest Period to the Treaty of Tilsit. By Robert Bell, Bsq. S toIs. fooUc^ 8vo. 
with Vignette Titles, 18*. cloth. 

BLACK— A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON BREWING. 

Baaed on Chemical and Economical Principles : with Formal* for Poblic Brewers, and 
Instructions for Private Families. By WUUam Black. Third Edition, revised and cor- 
rected, with considerable Additions. The Additions rerised by Professor Graham, of the 
London UniTcrsity. 8to. 10s. 6d. cloth. 

**Itahe occation, in concluding this article, to refer my readert to the * Prmctieal Treatite 
OM Brewing^ bp Mr. miliam Black, a gentleman of much esperience in the kutinett. TUt 
little work containt a great deal ofuteful information." 

Dr. Ure's Supplement to bis ** Dictionary." 

BLAINE.-AN ENCYCLOPiCDIA OF RURAL SPORTS : 

Or, a complete Account. Historical, Practical, and Descriptiye, of Hunting, Shooting, nshiiig. 
Racing, and other Field Sports and Athletic Amusements of the present day. By Delabere 
P. Blaine, Esq., author of^" Outlines of the Veterinary Art," "Canine Pathology," etc. etc. 
With nearly 600 Engravings on Wood, by R. Branston, from Drawings by Allien, T. Land- 
seer, Dickes, etc. 1 thick toI. 8to. 3f. lOs. cloth. 

BLAIR'S CHRONOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL TABLES, 

From the Creation to the present Time: with Additions and Corrections from the moatauthen' 

tic Writers ; including the Computation of St. Paul, as connecting the Period from the 

Ezode to the Temple. Under the reTisiou of Sir Henry Ellis, K.H., Principal Librarian of 

the British Museum. Imperial 8to. 31«. 6d. half-bound morocco. 

_ ** The ttudent of hiitoru, long aecuttomed to the Doctor*t ponderout and unmanageable 

olio, will rejoice over thu handtome and handv polume. It it the revival and enlargement, 

n afar more compact and available form than the original, of the celebrated * Chronological 

Tablet' of Dr. Blair. It compritet additiont to our own time, and correctiont from the mott 

recent authoritiet. The outline of the plan it faithfullg preterved and carried out, with 

everp improvement of which it wat tutceptible.'^ —K,x»mineT. 

BLOOMFIELD.— THE HISTORY OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR. 

Br Thucydides. Newly Translated into English, and accompanied with very copiovi 
Notes, Philological and Explanatory, Historical and Geographical. By the Rev. S. T. 
Bloomfield, D.O. F.S.A. 8 vols. 8vo. with Maps and Plates, SI. St. boards. 

BLOOMFIELD.— THE HISTORY OF THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR. 

By Thucydides. A New Recension of the Text, with a carefully amended Punctuation ; sad 
copious Notes, Critical, Philological, and Explanatory, almost entirely original, but partly 
selected and arraiired from the best Expositors : accompanied with nilllndexes, both of 
Greek Words and Phrases explained, and matters discussed in the Notes. The whole iliva- 
trated by Maps and Plans, mostly taken from actual Surveys. By the Rev. S.T. Bloomfield, 
D.D. F.S.A. 3 vols. 8vo.3S«. cloth. 

BLOOMFIELD.-THE GREEK TESTAMENT : 

With copious Rnrlish Notes, Critical, Philological, and Explanatory. By the Rev. 8. T 
Bloomfield, D.D. F.S.A. 6th Edit, improved. 3 vols. 8vo. with a Map of Palestine, 40«. cloth. 

BLOOMFIELD. -COLLEGE AND SCHOOL GREEK TESTAMENT; 

With English Notes. Bv the Rev. S.T. Bloomfield, D.D. Fourth Edition, enlarged 
and improved, accompanied with a New Map of Srria and Palestine, adapted to the 
New Testament and Josephus, and an Index of Greek Words and Phrases expluned in 
the Notes. ISmo. 10«. 6d. cloth. 

BLOOMFIELD.— GREEK AND ENGLISH LEXICON TO THE NEW 

TESTAMENT: especially adapted to the use of Colleges, and the Higher Classes in Public 
Schools ; but also Intended as a convenient Manual for Biblical Students in general. By 
Dr. Bioomfield. 3d Edition, gpreatly enlarged, and very considerably improved. IJhno.on 
wider paper, 10«. 6d. cloth. 

BOY'S OWN BOOK (THE) : 

A Complete Encyclopedia of all the Diversions, Athletic, Scientific, and Recreative, of Boy- 
hood and Youth. 30th Edition. Square ISmo., with many Engrarings on Wood, 6«. boards. 

BRANDE.-A DICTIONARY OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE, AND ART; 

Comprising the History, Description, and Scientific Principles of every Branch of Human 
Knowledge ; with the Derivation and Definition of all the Terms in general use. Edited by 
W.T. Brande,F.R.S.L.and E.; assisted by J.Caurin. The various departments are by Gentle- 
men of eminence in each. 1 very thick vol. 8vo. illustrated by Wood-engravings, al. cloth. 



{; 



3M 



m 



PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, BROWN, AND CO. 



(BRAY MRS.)— MRS. BRAY*S NOVELS AND ROMANCES, 

Rerlsed nnd corrected by Mrs. Bray. lu 10 vols, fcap 8vo., with Frontispieces and Vignettes 
from Designs and Slietclies by tlie late Thomas Stothard, R.A.j C. A. Stothard, F.S.A. ; 
Henry Warren, Esq. ; etc. 

Vol. I. •* The fykite Hoodt^' uttk portrait of the Author, m view of her retidewt. and 
Central Prejact to the Serie$;— Vol. II. **De Fol#;"- Vol. III. *^ The Protettant :"— 
Vol. IV. **F{tM of Fttz-Ford :"— Vol. V. •• The To/fto ;"-Vol. VI. " fFarieigh." 

*•* To be continued monthly ^ and completed in 10 volumei; each containing an entire 
fyorkj printed and embettiihed unl/ormtg with the ** Standard NooeU." 

Vols. 7, 8, 9 & 10 will contain— 
Not. 1.— TRELAWNEY. I Jan. l.-HENRY DE POMEROY. 

Dee. 1.— TRIAL! OF THE HEART. | Feb. l.-COURTENAY OF WALREDDON. 

BRAY.-THE PHILOSOPHY OF NECESSITY; 

Or, the Law of Consequences as applicable to Mental, Moral, and Social Science . By Charles 
Bray. 3 vols. 8to. I6«. doth. 

BRlEWSTER.— TREATISE ON OPTICS. 

By Sir David Brewster, LL.D. F.R.8. etc. New Edition, 
and 176 Woodcuts, 6s. cloth. 

BUDGE (J.HTHE PRACTICAL MINER'S GUIDE: 

Comprising a Set of Trigonometrical Tables adapted to all the purposes of Obliqae or 
Diagonal, Vertical, Horixoutal, and Traverse Dialling; with their application to the Dial. 
Exercise of Drifts, Lodes, Slides. Levelling, Inaccessible Distances, Heights, etc. By 
New Edition, considerably enlarged, Svo.with Portrait of the Author. i2«. cloth. 



Foolscap 8vo. with vignette title. 



J. Budge. 
BULL.-THE MATERNAL MANAGEMENT OF CHILDREN, 

In HEALTH and DISEASE. By Thomas Bull, M.D. 3d Edition, revised and enlarged. 
Foolscap 8vo. J*- cloth. 

BULL.-HINTS TO MOTHERS, 

For the Management of Health during the Period of Pregnancv and in the Lying-in Room ; 
with an Exposure of Popular Errors in connexion with those subjects. By Thomas Bull, M.D. 
Physician Accoucheur to the Finsbury Midwifery Institution, etc. etc. 4th Edition, revised 
•ad considerably enlarged. Foolscap 8vo. 7'. cloth. 

** Emcelfent gnideit and deserve to be generallg known.*' 

Johnson's MedicO'Chirnrgical Revievr. 

BUNSEN.— AN INQUIRY INTO THE HISTORY. ARTS AND SCIENCES, 

LANGUAGE, WRITING, MYTHOLOGY, and CHRONOLOGY of ANCIENT EGYPT: 
with the peculiar Position of that Nation in reference to the Universal History of Mankind. 
By the Chevalier C. C. J. Bunsen. Translated from the German, under the Author's super- 
intendence, by C. H. Cottrell,£8q. ; with additional matter, furnished by the Author. 3 vols. 
8vo. with numerous Plates.— Preparing /or publication. 

BURDER.-ORIENTAL CUSTOMS, 

Applied to the Illustration of the Sacred Scriptures. By Samuel Burder, A.M. 8d Edition, 
witn additions. Foolscap 8vo. 8«. 6tf . cloth . 

BURNS.— THE PRINCIPLES OF CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY: 

Containing the Doctrines, Duties, Admonitions, and Consolations of the Christian Religion. 
By John Bums, M.D. F.R.S. 5th Edition. 13mo. 7t. boards. 

BURNS.— CHRISTIAN FRAGMENTS ; 

Or, Remarlis on the Nature, Precepts, and Comforts of Eelig^on. By John Bums, M.D. 
F.R.S. Professor of Surgery in the University of Glasgow, autnor of "The Principles of 
Christian Philosophy." Foolscap 8vo. b». cloth. 

** The author mani/eitt throughout a sound judgment, a cultivated literary tatte^ and, be$t 
of all, a heart deeply imprented ttith the solemn realitiei of religion. Hit sentimentt are 
evangelical, and his spirit tf^voHf."— Watchman. 

BUTLER.— SKETCH OF ANCIENT AND MODERN GEOGRAPHY. 

By Samuel Butler, D.D., late Lord Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry ; and formerly Head 
Master of Shrewsbury School. New Edition, revised by his Son, 8vo. 9h. boards. 

Tke present edition has been care/ullf revised by tke author^s son, and such alterations 
in traduced as continualljf progressive discoveries and the latest information rendered necrs' 
$arf. Recent Travels have been eonstantlg consulted where any doubt or difficulty seemed to 
require iti and some additional matter has been added, both in the ancient and modern part. 

BUTLER.-ATLAS OF MODERN GEOGRAPHY. 

By the late Dr. Butler. New Edition ; consisting of Twenty-three coloured Maps, from .i 
New Set of Plates ; with an Index of all the Names of Places, referring to the Latitudes 
and Longitudes. 8vo. 12«. half-bound. 

BUTLER.-ATLAS OF ANCIENT GEOGRAPHY. 

By the late Dr. Butler. Consisting of sTwenty-three coloured Maps t with an Index of all 
the Names of Places, referring to the Latitudes and Longitudes. New Edition. 8vo. 13«. 
half-bound. 

*«* Tke above two Atlases may be kad,in One Folume,4to. 24s. half-bound, 

CALLCOTT.-A SCRIPTURE HERBAL: 

With upwards of 120 Wood Engravings. By Lady Callcott. Square crown 8vo. 1/. 5«. cloth. 



^ 



m 



■IS 
8' CATALOGUE OF NEW WORKS 

CATLOW.- POPULAR CONCHOLOCY; 

Or, the Shell Cabinet Arraaved : belof an introdnctionto the modem Sjstem of Coneholoay; 
vith a sketch of the Natnral HUtorr of the Animala, an account of the Formation of the 
ShrlU, and a complete Deirriptive List of the Families and Genera. By Agnes Catlov. 
Foolscap. 8ro. with 31i Woodcats, 10«. M. doth. 

CHALENOR. -WALTER CRAY, 

A Ballad, and other Poems ; including the Poetical Remains of Marj Cbalenor. Sd Edition, 
with Additions, fcp. 8vo. 6a. cloth. 

CHALENOR.-POETICAL REMAINS OF MARY CHALENOR. 

Fcp. 8to. 4*. cloth. 

CLAVER8.— FOREST LIFE. 

By Marj ClaTers. an Actual Settler; avthor of *' A New Home, Who'll Follow?" StoIs. 
fcap.Bro. 12«. cloth. 

COLLECIAN'S CUIDE (THE) ; 

Or, Recollections of College Days ; setting forth the Adrantages and Temptations of a 

University Education. By**** ******, I1.A., College, Oxford. Post 8to. Ite. M. 

cloth. 

COLTON— LACON ; OR, MANY THINCS 'IN FEW WORDS. 

By the Rev. C. C. Coltoa. New Edition, 8to. 12<. cloth. 

CONVERSATIONS ON BOTANY. 

IHh Edition, improved. Fooisei^) 8to. with 23 Plates, 7<> M. cloth ; with the Plates cokmred, 
12«. cloth. 

CONVERSATIONS ON MINERALOGY. 

With Plates, engraved by Mr. and Mrs. Lowry, from Original Drawings. SdEdiUoa, enlarged. 
2 vols. 12mo. 14«. cloth. 

COOLEY.-THE WORLD SURVEYED IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY; 

Or, Recent Narratives of Scientific and Exploring Expeditions (chiefly undertaken by com- 
mand of Foreign Governments). Collected, translated, and, where necessary, abridged, 
by W. D. Cooley, Esq., author of ''History of Maritime and Inland Discovery" in the 
Cabinet Cyclopedia, etc. 8vo. 

The First Volome of the Series eoutains '*The Ascent of Mount Ararat." By Dr. Friedrich 

Parrot, Professor of Natural Philosophyin the University of Dorpat, Russian ImperiidConn- 

dllor of Sutc, etc. 8vo . with a Map by Arrowsmith, and Wuodcuts, 14«. doth. 

«»« Bach volume KiUform^for the mott part^ a fFork complete in ittetf^ anil tkewkoU 

Serien will preient an accurate and luminous picture •/ alt the tnown partionB •/ tke 

earth. 

The Second Work of the Series will be ** Erman's Travels throggh Siberia.*' 8vo.— /n tke preu. 

««« On tM$ traveller t the Pretident of the Roifal Geographical Society ^ in ki$ anniver- 
sarf addrrtt la»t irear, bfttoverd the Jolloving encomium: ** Ifve regard U. Adolph Rrman 
at an attrunumical geographer and explorer of dittant lanat^ we mutt all admit that he 
stands in the verg highest rank." And in hi$ address delivered in Mag last, the President 
again made honourable mention of this traveller in the following terms: ** In announcinf 
to gou with pleasure that the ereellent work of gour distinfutshed foreign member and 
medallist, adolph Erman, is about to appear in Rnglisk, I must not lose the opportunitg of 
stating, that the last communication tent to us bg M. Erman is one of verg great im- 
portance." 

'* fVe hasten to apprise English readers that theg have now an opportunitg of making 
personal acquaintance with a book that has for gears been an European eelebritg ; and we 
cordiallg welcome the first of a series to which the able editorship of Mr. Cooley must ensure 
an extensive and distinguished reputation,"— Morning Post. 

** The commencement ofwhat promises to be a most adminicle series of bookst eondutted bg 
one of the most able andcompetent of living geographers.'*— Examiner. 

COOLEY.-THE HISTORY OF MARITIME AND INLAND DISCOVERY. 

By W. D. Cooley, Esq. 3 vols, foolscap 8ve. with Vignette Titles, I8t. cloth. 

COOPER (REV. E.) -SERMONS, 

Chiefly designed to elucidate spme of the leading Doctrines of the Gospel. To which iaadded, 
an Appendix, containing Serhions preached on several Public Occasions, and printed by 
desire. By the Rev. Eclward Cooper, Rector of Hamstall-Ridware, and of Yoxall, in the 
County of Stafford ; and late Fellow of All-Souls' College, Oxford. 7th Edition. 2 vols. 
12mo. 10(. boards. 

By the same Author. 

PRACTICAL AND FAMILIAR SERMONS, designed for Parochial and Domestic Instmc- 
tiou. New Editions. 7 vols. 12mo. 1/. 18«. boards. 

*.* f'ols. 1 to 4, 6s. eacht Vols.bto 7, 6«. each. 

COPLAND.— A DICTIONARY OF PRACTICAL MEDICINE : 

Comprising General Pathology, the Nature and Treatment of Diseases, Morbid Structures, 
and the Disorders especially incidental tu Climates, to Sex, and to the different Epochs of 
Life, with numerous approved Formulas of the Mediciues recommended. By James Copland, 
M.D., Consulting Physiciau to Queen Charlotte's Lying-in Hospital ; Senior Physician to the 
Royal Infirmary for Children ; Member of the Royal College of Phvsicians, London ; of the 
Medical and Chirurgical Societies of London and Berlin, etc. Vols. I and 2, 8vo. 3/. cloth : 
and Part 10, 4«. 6d. sewed. 

*m*To be completed in one more Volume. 

6 V' ■ ' ^^^^^^^^^^^^"^"^^^"^^^^ S^K 



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9 




COSTELLO (MISS)— FALLS, LAKES, AND MOUNTAINS OF NORTH 

. . Countrr. Bjr 

"APllgrlm- 
..... , with Vlewi, from 

Origiiuil Sketches by D. H. M'Kewaii, eni^raTed ou wood, and lithographed, hj T. aud E. 
Gilks. Square 8to. with Map, 14«. cloth, gilt edges. 

** We have visited ntanp of the placet here written of by Miss Costello, andean bear good 
testimonjf to the general excellence of her vork; to itt uaefulnett a» a ' Hand- Booh for 
Travellers in Wales;^ and to the truthful shetchet it contains, literary and pictorial. No 
one who intends visiting the falls, lakes, and mountains of North tyatetf should depart un- 
provided with this most admirable * I'ictorial Gh<(/«."*— Atlas. 

COSTELLO (MISS).— THE ROSE GARDEN OF PERSIA. 

A Series of Translations from the Persian Poets. By Miss lA>uisa Stuart Costello, author 
of ''Specimens of the Early Poetry of France," '* A Summer amongst the Borages and 
the Vines," etc. etc. 8to. with Borders printed in Gold and Colours. [/» October, 

CROCKER'S ELEMENTS OF LAND SURVEYING. 

Fifth Edition, corrected throughout, and considerably improved and modernized, br 
T. G. Bunt, Land Surveyor, Bristol. To which are added, TABLES OF SIX-FIGURE 
LOGARITHMS, etc., superintended by Richard Farley, of the Nautical Almanac Establish- 
ment. Post 8vo. 12*. cloth. 

%• The work throughout is entirely revised, and much new matter hat been added; there 
are new chapters^ containing 
Practice of Surveying, both wl 

of Plotting Estates, and casting or computing their Areas f 
chapter on Levelling also is new. 

CROWE.— THE HISTORY OF FRANCE, 

From the Earliest Period to the Abdication of Napoleon. By E. E. Crowe, Esq. 8 vols, 
foolscap 8vo. with Vignette Titles, 1U«. cloth. 

DAHLMANN.-HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. 

By F. C. Dahlmann, late Professor of Historv at the University of Gottingen. Translated 
from the German, by H. Evans Lloyd. 8vo. 1U«. M. cloth. 

** Professor Dahlmann's book is, in short, a rapid sketch of the whole of what we call the 
Modern History of England, from its start at the Coronatlou of Henry the Seventh, to itt 
intermediate settlement at the Coronation of lyUliam the Third. We have no English tum' 
mary of the history it relates so brief, compendious, and impartial. M. Dahlmann is a very 
earnest at well as intelligent writer; and the steady advance of the popular principle in 
Enffland, through an almost uninterrupted march of two centuries, isstartlingly reflected in 
his clear and transparent relation. Mr.Ltoyd*t translation is very well executed."— t.xum\ntr. 

DAVY(SIRIIUMPIIRY).-ELEMENTS OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

In a Course of Lectures. By Sir Humphry Davy. With Notes by Dr. John Davy. 
6th Edition. 8vo. with lU Plates, 16«. cloth. 



very full and minute Uirections relating to the modern 

lar instruments. 
is described^ etc. etc. 



'f ' - - 

eith and without the aid of angular instruments. The method 



The 



Animal Origin ; Manures of Mineral Origin, 
or Fossil Manures ; Improvement of Luids 
by Burning ; Experiments on the Nutritive 
Qualities of different Grasses, etc. 



Introduction; The General Powers of Matter 
which Influence Vegetation : the Organiza- 
tion of Plants ; Soils ; Nature and Constitu* 
tionof the Atmosphere, and its Influence 
on Vegetables ; Manures of Vegetable and 

DE BURTIN.— A TREATISE ON THE KNOWLEDGE NECESSARY TO 

AMATEURS OF PICTURES. Translated and abridged from the French of M. Flrancis 
Xavier de Burtiu, First Stipendiary Member uf the Royal Academy of Brussels In the Class 
of Sciences, etc. By Robert White, Esq. 8vo. with 4 Lithographic Engravings, 12t. cloth. 

**iSont. De Burtin's whole life has been devoted to the study and acquisition of works of 
art, and hit practical knowledge of every thinf connected with the subject is equal to hit 
entknsiatm. He treats of the several qualities that go to make up a good picture, of the 
ehvraeteristici of the different schools and leading masters, and the signatures and prices of 
their pictures t pointing out the way to Judge of their qualitv, condition, and originality ; 
and. describing the best methods of cleanini^ and preserving them. He also gives a glance at 
the principal public gatlerietf and uteful hintt towardt forming and arranging private 
eo//eedoR«.'*— Spectator. 

DE CUSTINE.— RUSSIA. 

By the Marquis De Custine. Translated from the French. 2d Edition. 3 vols, post 8vo. 
31«.6if. clotb. 

**A work which those who are detirout to know Ruuia at it really it^and not as it would fain 
impose itielf on the world to be, would do well to consult. We promise our readers equal 
turprise and pleasure from the perutal of Mont. DeCustine't very clever ioo*."— Gent.'s Mag. 

DE LA BECHB.-REPORT ON THE GEOLOGY OF CORNWALL. DEVON, 

AND WEST SOMERSET. By Henry T. De la Beche, F.R.S. etc.. Director of the Ordnance 
Geological Survey. Published by Order of the Lords Commissioners of H. M. Treasury. 
Bvo.with Maps, Woodcuts, aud 12 large Plates, 14«. cloth. 

DE MORGAN.— AN ESSAY ON PROBABILITIES, 

And on their Application to Life Contingencies and Insurance Offices. By Aug. De Morgan, 
of Trinity College, Cambridge. Foolscap 8vo. with Vignette Title, 6«. cloth. 



=m 



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••AtmlnUitmllt'mrwlrrwtri»t'0—ltr' tti tin rmirrtJ -r Id (tiprnnlaion-l. 
BiiDIhiii 1 •• HlMBlf^irl III /iwri<t*rl4 *r/>r'' "■ ''■' "'"'ii In iU »il'^^jUi!ilUI 

!DiilkT,.ti llu ftiu, u/flVlBnlkir >•••'' /"•"^ » ftt ,hi,wn It Jrmmirrin 
Ul9 U .1 ■ CKIrl^.tiri ilwimg ktr/mll uf t.rili /• i^n. 1^1 t,r luutn^ Iti Hltx." 
DODDRnmB.— THE FAMILY EXPOSITOR:"' '' I' '" ■"' *'°''™^'' 

DONOVAN.— TREATISE ON CHEMISTRY. 
DONOVAN.— A TREATISE ON DOMESTIC ECONOMY. 

DOUBLEDAY'S BUTTERFLIES. —THE CENERA OF DIURNAL LEP1- 



URUMMOND.— FIRST STEPS TO , 

D UN U AM, —TH EH I STORY OF THE^CERMANIC EMPIRE. 






BLLIOTBON.— HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY: 






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THE ENGLISHMAN'S GREEK CONCORDANCE OF THE NEW TESTA- 
MENT ; being an attempt at a Verbal Connexion between the Greek and the English Texts : 
including a Coucordance to the Proper Names, with Indexes, Greek-Engiish and English* 
Greek. 3d Edition, carefully rerised, with a new Index, Greek and English. Royal 8to. 42$. 
cloth. 

FAREY.-A TREATISE ON THE STEAM-ENGINE, 

Historical, Practical, and Descriptire. By John Farej, Engineer. 4to. illustrated by 
namerons Woodcuts, and 25 Copper*plates, 61. 5«. in boards 

FERGUS.— THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, 

From the Discoveij of America to the Election of General Jackson to the Presidency. By the 
Rer. H. Fergus. 2 vols, foolscap 8to. with Vignette Titles, 12«. cloth. 

FIELD.— POSTHUMOUS EXTRACTS FROM THE VETERINARY 

RECORDS OF THE LATE JOHN FIELD. Edited by his Brother, William Field, Vete- 
rinary Surgeon, London. 8to. 8«. boards. 

FITZROY (LADY).— SCRIPTURAL CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN 

CHARLES AND HIS MOTHER. By Lady Charles Fitzroy. Foolscap 8to. 4«. M. cloth. 

FORSTER.-STATESMEN OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF ENGLAND. 

With an Introductory Treatise on the Popular Progress in English History. By John Forster, 

Esq. 6 Tols. foolscap 8to. with Original rortruts of Pym, Eliot, Hampden, Cromwell, and an 

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FORSTER (REV. C.)-THE HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ARABIA; 

Or, the Pamarchal Evidences of Revealed Keligion. A Memoir, with illustrative Maps and 
an Appendix, containing Translations, with an Alphabet and Glossary of the Hamyaritic 
Inscriptions recently discovered in Hadramaut. By the Rev. Charles Forster, B.D., one of the 
Six teachers in the Cathedral of Christ, Canterbury, and Rector of Stisted, Essex; author of 
** Mahometanism Unveiled." 2 vols. 8vo. 80«. cloth. . 

FORSTER (REV. C.)— THE LIFE OF JOHN JEBB. D.D. F.R.S. 

Late Bishop of Limerick. With a Selection from his Letters. By the Rev. Charles Forster, B.D., 
Rector of Stisted. Essex, and one of the Six Preachers in the Cathedral of Christ, Canterbury, 
formerly Domestic Chaplain to the Bishop. 2d Edition. 8vo. with Portrait, etc. 16«. cloth. 

FOSBROEE.— A TREATISE ON THE ARTS, MANNERS, MANUFAC- 
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GERTRUDE. 

A Tale. By the author of *' Amy Herbert." Edited by the Rev. William Sewell, B.D., of 
Exeter College, Oxford. 2 vols, foolscap 8vo. 9«. cloth. 

** Ah^kt <Ae injlueneet cf which cannot fail to be talutary. Practice uithout pro/euionf 
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tleneu, and of $acr\/iee which it tojind in tttelf its recompense ; tuch are the themes here set 
forth in an agreeable $tjfle and an interesting story. Clear and discriminating glimpses of 
eharaetert and the absence of bitterness and offence^ constitute the great charm of this elegant 
writer, and warrants us in cordially recommending her *Oertrude* as pleasant and pro- 
Jitable recufiiif ."— Athencum. 

OLEIO.— LIVES OF THE MOST EMINENT BRITISH MILITARY COM- 
MANDERS. By the Rev. G. R. Gleig. 3 vols, foolscap 8vo. with Vignette Titles, 18s. cloth. 

GLENDINNING. — PRACTICAL HINTS ON THE CULTURE OF THE 

PINEAPPLE. By R. Glendinning, Gardener to the Right Hon. Lord RoUe, Bicton. 12mo. 
with Plan of Pinery, 5«. cloth. 

GOLDSMITHS POETICAL WORKS. 

Illustrated with Engravings on Wood, from Designs by the Etching Club. Uniform with 
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GOOD.— THE BOOK OF NATURE. 

A Popular Illustration of the General Laws and Phenomena of Creation. By John Mason 
Good, M.D. F.R.S. etc. 3d Edition, corrected. 3 vols, foolscap 8vo. 24«. cloth. 

GRAHAM.-ENGLISH; OR, THE ART OF COMPOSITION 

explained in a Series of Instructions and Examples. By G. F. Graham. 2d Edition, revised 
and improved. Foolscap 8vo. 7*. cloth. 

GRANT (MRS., OF LAGGAN).- MEMOIR AND CORRESPONDENCE 

of the late Mrs. Grant, of Laggan, author of *' Letters from the Mountains," etc Edited 
by her Son, J . P. Grant, Esq. 2d Edition. 3 vols, post 8vo. Portrait, If. 11«. M. cloth. 

GRANT (MRS.)— LETTERS FROM THE MOUNTAINS. 

Being tne Correspondence with her Friends, between the years 1773 and 1803. By Mrs. 
Grant, of Laggan. 6th Edition. Edited, with Notes and Additions, by her son, J. P. Grant, 
Esq. 2 vols, post 8vo. 21«. cloth. 



€^ 



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12 CATALOGUE OF NEW WORKS 

GRATTAN— THE HISTORY OF THE NETHERLANDS, 

From the I nvuion br the Romans to the Belfl^an Rerolntion in 1830. By T. C . GntUa, Esq. 
FooUcap 8to. with >rtgrnette Titles, 6«. cloth. 

GRAY.— FIGURES OF MOLLUSCOUS ANIMALS, 

Selected from Tarioas Aathon. Etched for the Use of Students. By Maria Emma Ony. 
Vol. I. 8to., with 78 plates of Flrnres, 12s. cloth. 

GRAY AND MITCHELL'S ORNITHOLOGY.— THE GENERA OF BIRDS; 

Comprising their Generic Characters, a Notice of the Habits of each Genoa, and an ezten. 
sive List of Species, referred to their sereral Genera. By Georgfc Robert Gny, Acad. Imp. 
Georg. Florent. Soc. Corresp. Senior Assistant of the 2k}oiogical Department, British 
Mnsenm ; and anthor of the " List of the Genera of Birds," etc. etc. lUostrated with 350 
imperial 4to. Plates, by David William Mitchell, B.A. 

Incourte of publication in Monthly Part$t 10$. M. eaehi each Part conaiating generaUf of 
Four tmjteriaf quarto coloured Platet and Three plaint "nd aeeonntanjfing Letter-preu; 
giving the Generic Charactert^ short Remarht on the Habits, and a £i»t of Speeiea of each 
Genus as complete as possible. The uucoloured Plates will contain the Characters of all the 
Genera of the various Sub-families^ consisting of numerous details of Heeutt, Wings^and Feet, 
as the case May require, for pointing out their distinguishing Characters. 
%* The Work tsiU not exceed 50 Monthlp Parts. No. 18 was pubH$ked on l$t of October. 

GRAY (J. E.)— THE GENERA OF MAMMALIA; 

Comprislni; their Generic Characters— a Notice of the Habits of each Genns— and a short 
Character of each of the well>eBtablished Species, referred to the several Genera. B^John 
Edward Gray, Esq., Keeper of the Zoologfical Collection of the British Moaenm. Imperial 4to. 
uniform with Gray and Mitchell's Ornithology; illustrated with 176 Plates. 
*«* To be published in Monthly Parts, 12*. each; each Part to consist of Four coloured and 

Three plain Plates, with accompanying Letter-press. The Work will not CMceed 3& Parts. 

Publication will commence when 150 Subscribers* Names have been received. 

GREENER.— THE GUN; 

Or, a Treatise nn the various Descriptions of Small Fire Arms. Br W. Greener, Inventor of 
an Improved Methodof Firing Cannon by Percussion, etc.Sro. with Illustrations, ISt.boards. 

GREENWOOD (COL.)— THE TREE-LIFTER; 

Or a New Method of Transplanting Trees. By Col. Geo. Greenwood. Syo.withan nias- 
trative Plate, 7«' cloth. 

GUEST.— THE MABINOGION, 

From the Llyfr Coch o Hergest, or Red Book of Hergest, and other ancient Welsh MSS. 
with an English Translation and Notes. By Lady Charlotte Guest. Royal 8vo. 8$. each. 

Part 1.— The Lady of the Fountain. 

Part2.— Pcrednr Ab Evrawc ; a Tale of Chivalry. 

Part 3.— The Arthurian Romance of Geraint, the Son of Erbin. 

Part 4. —The Romance of Kilhwch and Olwen. 

Part 6.— The Dream of Rhonabwy, and the Tale of Pwyll Prince of Dyred. 

Part 6. — Brauwen, the Daughter of LIvr : Manawyddan, the Son of Llyr : 
and Math, the Son of Mathonvy. 

GUICCIARDINI (F,>-THE MAXIMS OF FRANCIS GUICCIARDINI,THE 

HISTORIAN. Translated by Emma Martin, author of •• A Short Historr of Ireland." 
With Notes, and Parallel Passages from the Works of MachiaveUi, Lord Bacon, Pascal, 
Rochefoucault, Montesquieu, Burke, Prince Talleyrand, Guizot, and oth^. With a Sketch 
of the Author's Life. Square foolscap 8vo. [/n October. 

GWILT.^AN ENCYCLOP/EDIA OF ARCHITECTURE; 

Historical, Theoretical, and Practical. By Joseph Gwilt,Esq., F.S.A. Illustrated with 

upwards of 1000 Engravings on Wood, from Designs by J. S.Gwilt. In 1 thick vol. 8to. 

con tuning nearly 13(M closely-printed pages. 21. 12«. 6d. cloth. 

"Cwilt's Encjfclopadia ranks nigh as a work for professional students, containing the 

mathematics of architectHve , with copious details upon all the technicalities of the science. 

It is a work which no prof essed architect or builder should be wif Aon/."— Westnunster Review. 

HALL— NEW GENERAL LARGE LIBRARY ATLAS OF FIFTY-THREE 

MAPS, on Columbier Paper ; with the Divisions and Boundaries carefully coloured. Con* 
structed entirely from New Drawings, and engraved by Sidney Hall. New Edition, thoroughly 
revised and corrected ; including all the Alterations rendered necessary bv the recent Oflicial 
Surveys, the New Roads on the Continent, and a careful Comparison with the authenticated 
Discoveries published in the latest Voyu^es and Travels. Folded in half. Nine Giiiueas, half- 
bound in russia ; full size of the Maps, Ten Pounds, half-bound in russia. 
The following Ataps hare been re-engraved, Jrom entirely nev designs — Ireland, South 
Africa, Turkey in Asia ; the foUowinghave been materially improved— Switzerland, North 
Italy, South Italy, Egypt, Central Germany, Southern Germany, Greece, Austria, Spain, 
and Portugal; a new Map of China, corrected from the recent government survey of the coast 
from Canton to Nankin (to which is appended the Province oj Canton, on an enlarged scale, 
in a separate compartment) , has since Seen added. 

HALSTED— LIFE AND TIMES OF RICHARD THE THIRD, 

as Duke of Gloucester and Kin^ of England t in which all the Charges against him are care- 
fully investigated and compared with the Statements of the Cotemporary Authorities. By 
Caroline A. Halsted, author of '* The Life of Margaret Beaufort." 2 vols. 8vo. with P<Mrtrait 
from an Original Picture in the possession of the Right Honorable Lord Stafford, never 
before engraved, and other Illustrations, 11. 10s. cloth. 



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HANNAM.— THE ECONOMY OF WASTE MANURES: 

A Treatise on the Nature and Use of Neglected Fertilisers. B;r John Hannam. Written 
for the Yorlishire A^irultural Society, and published by permission of the Counsel. A new 
Edition. Fcap. 8to.— /n the pre$$. 

HAND-BOOK OF TASTE; 

Or, How to Obserre Works of Art, enpeclally Cartoons, Pictures, and Statues. By Fabius 
Pictor. 8d Edition. Foolscap 8to. 3«. boards. 

HANSARD.— TROUT AND SALMON FISHING IN WALES. 

B7 G. A.Hansard, 12mo. 6$.6d. cloth. 

flARRIS— THE HIGHLANDS OF iCTHIOPIA; 

Being the Account of Eighteen Months* Residence of a British Embassy to the Christian 
Court of Shoa. By Major Sir W. C. Harris, author of •• Wild Sports in Southern Africa," 
etc. 3d Edition. StoIs. 8vo. with Map and Illustrations, 2/. 2«. cloth. 

HAWES (BARBARA}.-TALES OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS, 

and Adventures of the Earlv Settlers in America; from the Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers 
in 1830, to the Time of the Declaration of Independence. By Barbara Hawes. FoulscapSro. 
with Frontispiece. 6«. cloth, 

HAWKER.— INSTRUCTIONS tO YOUNG SPORTSMEN 

In all thatrelatestoGunsandSho«iting. By Lieut.Col.P.Hawlier. 9th edition, corrected, 
enlarged, and improved, with Eighty-five Plates and Woodcuts, by Adlard andBranslon, 
from Drawings by C. Varley, Diclis, etc. 8vo. 21«. cloth. 

HAYDON (B. R.)— LECTURES ON PAINTING AND DESIGN, 

Delivered at the London Institution, the Royal Institution, Albermarle Street, to the 
University of Oxford, etc. By B. R. Haydon, Historical Painter. With Designs drawn on 
Wood by the author, and Engraved by Edward Evans. 8vo. 12«. cloth. 

HENSLOW. — THE PRINCIPLES OF DESCRIPTIVE AND PHYSIOLO- 
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and nearly 7U Woodcuts, 6«. cloth. 

HER8CHEL.— A TREATISE ON ASTRONOMY. 

BySirJohnHerschel. New Edition. Fcap. 8vo. Vignette Title, 6«. cloth. 

HERSCHEL. — A PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE ON THE STUDY OF 

NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. By Sir John Herschel. New Edition. Foolscap 8vo. with 
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HINTS ON ETIQUETTE AND THE USAGES OF SOCIETY: 

With a Glance at Bad Habits. By Ayo^yof. *' Manners malce the Man." 24thEdition, 

revised (with additions) by a Ladyof Ranli. Foolscap 8vo.2«.6tf. cioth, gilt edges. 

General Observations ; Introductions— Lettersof Introduction— Marriage— Dinners— Smoking} 
Snuflf— Fashion— Dress— Music— Dancing— Conversation-AdvicetoTradespeople—Visiting; 
Visiting Cards— Cards— Tattling— of General Society. 

HOARE.— A DESCRIPTIVE ACCOUNT OF A NEW METHOD OF 

PLANTING AND MANAGING THE ROOTS OF GRAPE VINES. Bv Clement Hoarc, 
author of '* A Treatise on the Cultivation of the Grape Vine on Open Walls." 12mo 6«. cl. 

HOARE— A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE CULTIVATION OF THE 

GRAPE VINE ON OPEN WALLS. By Clement Hoare. 3d Edition, 8vo. 7«-6tf. cloth. 

HOBBES.~ENGLISH WORKS OF THOMAS HOBBES, 

Of Malmesbury ; now first collected by Sir William Molesworth, Bart. The English Works, 
Vols. 1 to 6, and 8 to 10; and the Latin Works, Vols. 1 to 3, 10«. each. 

•«* Vols. 8 and 9, comprising the Translation of Thncydides, are not sold separately. 

HOLLAND.— PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION : 

Or, Considerations on the Course of Life. Translated from theFrench of MadameNeckerde 
Saussure. Bv Miss Holland. 8 vols, foolscap 8vo. \9». 6d. cioth. 

%• The Third Folumet being supplementary to thejlr$t two, teparately, 7$.6d. 

HOLLAND.— A TREATISE ON THE MANUFACTURES IN METAL. 

By John Holland, Esq. 8 vols, foolscap 8vo. with Vignette Titles, and about 3U0 Woodcuts, 
18«. cloth. 

HOLLAND.— MEDICAL NOTES AND REFLECTIONS. 

By Henry Holland, M.I). F.R.S. etc. Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Physician 
Extraordinary to the Queen, and Physician in Ordinary to His Royal Highness Prince Albert. 
Sd Edition. 8vo. 18«. cloth. 

HOOK (DR. W. F.)-THE LAST DAYS OF OUR LORD'S MINISTRY; 

A Coarse of Lectures on the principal Events of Passion Week. Bv Walter Farquhar Hood, 
D.D., Vicar of Leeds, Prebendary of Lincoln, and Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen. 4th 
Edition. Foolscap 8vo. 6«. cloth. 



14 CATALOGUE OF NEW WORKS 

HOOKER.— THE BRITISH FLORA. 

In S Tola. Vol. I. ; comprisinc the Phanonnowa or Flowerings Plants, and the Ferns. BySir 
William Jackson Hooker, K.H. LL.D. P.R.A. and L.S. etc. etc. etc. 6th Edition, whk 
Additions and Corrections ; and 173 Firures, illostratiTe of the Umbelliferous Plants, the 
Composite Plants, the Grasses, and the Ferns. Vol. I . Sro., with IS Plates, 14*. plain ; with 
the plates coloured, 24f. cloth. 

Vol. II. in Two Parts, comprislnir the Crrptooaiia and the Fungi, completing the British 
Flora, and forming Vol. V., Parts 1 and S. of Smith's Enf^h Flora, 2A$. boards. 

HOOKER AND TAYLOR.-MUSCOLOCIA BRITANNICA. 

Containing the Mosses of Great Britain and Ireland, systematically arranged and described ; 
with Plates, illustrative of the character of the Genera and Species. By Sir W.J. Hooker 
and T. Taylor. M.D. F.L.S. etc. 3d Edition, Sro. enlarged, 31«. M. plain ; 3/. 3s. coloured. 

HORNE (THE REV. T. H.)-AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CRITICAL 

STUDY AND KNOWLEDGE OF THE HOLY SCRIPTURES. Bt Thomas HaitweQ 
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the King and Martyr, and St. Nicholas Aeons, Lombard Street ; Prebendary of St. Paol'i. 
8th Edition, corrected and enlarged. Illustrated with numerous M^»s and Fac-similes of 
Biblical Manuscripts. 4 toIs. 8to. (Vol. S in 2 ParU) , 3i. 3«. boards. 

HORNE (THE REV. T. H.)-A COMPENDIOUS INTRODUCTION TO THE 
STUDY OF THE BIBLE. By Thomas Hartwell Home, B.D. of St. John's CoUmc, Cssi- 
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HORSLEY (BISHOP).— BIBLICAL CRITICISM ON THE FIRST FOUR- 
TEEN HISTORICAL BOOKS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT; AND ON THE HRST 
NINE PROPHETICAL BOOKS. By Samuel Horsley, LL.D. F.R.S. FJI.S. Lord Bishop of 
St. Asaph. Second Edition, containing Translations by the Author, nerer before pablished, 
together with copious Indexes. 3 rols. 8ro. 30«. cloth. 

Br the same Author, 
THE BOOK OF PSALMS ; translated from the Hebrew: with Notes, explaaatorr and critical. 
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HOWITT (MARY).— THE CHILD'S PICTURE AND VERSE BOOK, 

Commonly called <' Otto Speckter's Fable Book." Translated br Mary Howitt. Withn«nch 
and German on corresponding pages, and illustrated with idO Engrarings on Wood, by 
G. F. Sargent. 2d Edition. Square 12mo. 7«. M. boards. 

HOWITT (MARY).— THE H FAMILY: TRALINNAN; AXEL AND 

ANNA : and other Tales. Br Fredrika Bremer. Translated by Mary Howitt. 3 vols, post 
8to. with Portrait of the Author, 21«. boards. 

By the same Author and IVanslator. 



The NEIGHBOURS. A Story of ETerr-day 
Life in Sweden. 3d Edition, rerissa and 
corrected. 2 vols, post 8to. 18s. 

The HOME; or, Family Cares and Family 
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The PRESIDENT'S DAUGHTERS, includ- 
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A NEW SKETCH OF EVERY-DAY LIFE:- 
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PEACE. 3 rols. post 8to. 21s. 



HOWITT —THE RURAL LIFE OF ENGLAND. 

By William Howitt. Third Edition, corrected and revised. Medium 8ro. with Engrarings on 
Wood by Bewick and Williams, uniform with " Visits to Remarkable Places," SU. cloth. 



Life of the Aristocracy. 
Life of the Agricultural Population. 
Picturesque and Moral Features of the Country. 
Strong Attachment of the English to Country 
Life. 



The Forests of England. 

Habits, Amusements, and Condition of the 
People ; in which are introduced Two New 
Chapters, descriptive of the Rural Watering 
Places, and Education of Rural Population. 



HOWITT—VISITS TO REMARKABLE PLACES; 

Old Halls, Battle-Fields, and Scenes illustrative of Striking Passages in English History and 
Poetry. By William Howitt. New Edition. Medium 8vo. with 40 Illustrations by S. WilUams, 
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HOWITT.-THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF JACK OF THE MILLf 

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HOWITT.-THE RURAL AND SOCIAL LIFE OF GERMANY: 

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HOWITT.— GERMAN EXPERIENCES! 

Addressed to the English, both Goers Abroad and Stayers at Home. By William Howitt. 
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•^ 



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HOWITT.— WANDERINGS OF A JOURNEYMAN TAILOR, 

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HOWITT— THE STUDENT-LIFE OF GERMANY. 

From the Unpublished MS. of Dr. Cornelias. By William Howitt. Sro. with 24 Wood- 
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HOWITT.- COLONIZATION AND CHRISTIANITY: 

A Popular History of the Treatment of the Natiyes, in all their Colonies, by the Europeans. 
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HOWIIT.— THE BOY'S COUNTRY BOOK: 

Being the real Life of a Country Boy, written by Himself; ezhibitinjr all the Amusements. 
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** The Rural Life of England," etc. 2d Edition. Fcap. 8to. with 40 Woodcuts, 8*. cloth. 

HOWITT rRICHARD).— IMPRESSIONS OF AUSTRALIA FELIX, 

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Richard Howitt. Foolscap 8tu 7«> cloth. 

HUDSON.— THE PARENT'S HAND-BOOK; 

Or, Guide to the Choice of Professions, Emplovments, and Situations -, containing useful 
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Education with a riew to particular occupations. By J. C. Hudson, Esq., author of ** Plain 
Directions for Malting Wills." Fcap. 8to. 6«. cloth. 

HUDSON— PLAIN DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING WILLS 

In Conformity with the Law, and particularly with reference to the Act 7 Wm. IV. and 1 Vict. 
e. 96. To which is added, a clear Exposition of the Law relating to the Distribution of Per- 
sonal Estate in the case of Intestacy ; with two Forms of Wills, and much useful Information, 
etc. By J. C. Hudsun,Esq. 13th Edition, corrected, with Notes of Cases Judicially decided 
since the above Act came into operation. Fcap. 8vo. 2«. M. 

HUDSON.-^THE EXECUTOR'S GUIDE. 

By J. C. Hudson, Esq., of the Legacy Duty Office, London: author of ** Plain Directions 
for Maldng Wills," and *• The Parentis Hand-Book." 4th Edition. Foolscap 8T0.5«.cloth. 

%* T4« abov0 two works may he had in On* volume y price 7$. cloth. 

HUMPHREYS.— THE ILLUMINATED BOOKS OF THE MIDDLE AGES. 

A History of Illuminated Boolis, from the IVth to the XVI Ith Century. By Henry Noel 
Humphreys. Illustrated by a Series of Specimens, consisting of an entire Page, of the 
exact sixe of the Original, irom the most celebrated and splendid MSS. in the Imperial and 
Royal Libraries of Vienna, Moscow, Paris, Naples, Copenhagen, and Madrid;— from the 
Vatican, Escurial, Ambrosian, and other great Libraries of the Continent;— and from the 
rich Public, Collegiate, aod PriTate Libraries of Great Britain i superbly printed in Gold, 
SiWer, and Colours. 
In course of publication, in Parts. Parts land 2, each containingThree Plates, with Descrip- 
tions, Imperial Quarto, splendidly printed, in gold, silver, and colours, in imitation of toe 
originals, as accurate as can be produced by mechanical i 



means, price 12« 

folding the large 
^otir Volumes completing the work 

HUNT.— RESEARCHES ON LIGHT: 



Large Paper, on Half Imperial (2U in. by 16), to prevent folding the large Plates, 21«. 
Six Parts to form a Volume, Fo ~~ ' 



An Examination of all the Phenomena connected with the Chemical and Molecular Changes 
produced by the Influence of the Solar Rays; embracing all the known Photographic Pro- 
cesses, and new Discoveries in the Art. By Robert Hunt, Secretary of the Royal Cornwall 
Polytechnic Society. 8vo. with Plate and Woodcuts, 10«. 6tf. cloth. 

ILLUMINATED CALENDAR CTHE).-THE ILLUMINATED CALENDAR and HOME 
DIARY for 1846: containing 12 pages ot fae-timile from the Calendar of the rich Missal of 
the Duke of Anjou, styled King of Sicily and Jerasalem ; also 24 patres of Diary, each illu- 
minated with an elaborate Border taken nrom the same MS. ; and an Illuminated Title. The 
binding designed from the framework of one of the miniature pictures of the same MS. 
Imperial 8vo. 42«. bound in an appropriate ornamental cover.— In the press. 

*,* The elaborate Gothic traceries of this MS. form one of the finest monuments of the 
art of illuminating. It was executed towards the close of the fourteenth century ^more than 
a century earlier than the ** Hours of Anne of Brittnnyt" which Jormed the subject of the 
Calendar for 1844 ; and in style and ettecution it eshibits a totally different style of art from 
that work. 

%* The Illuminated Calendar and Home Diary, for 1845; copied from the Manuscript of 
the '* Hours of Anne of Brittany," Imp. Bvo. in embloKoned printing and binding, 4is. 

JACKSON —PICTORIAL FLORA; 

Or, British Botany Delineated, in 1500 Uthographlc Drawings of all the Species of Flowering 
Plants ludiffenous to Great Britain ; illustrating the descriptive works on English Botany of 
Hooker, Lindley, Smith, etc. By Miss Jackson. 8vo. 16«. cloth. 




16 CATALOGUE OF NEW WORKS 

JAMES. -A HISTORY OF THE LIFE OF EDWARD THE BLACK PRINCE, 

and of TariooB Kvents connected therewith, which occorred darings the Reign of Edmrd III. 
King of Knirland. BjG. P. R.James, Esq. 3d Kdition. SvoU. foolscap 8to. with Map, lfi«.cL 

JAMES.-LIVES OF THE MOST EMINENT FOREIGN STATESMEN. 

BfG.P. R. James. Esq., and K.E.Crowe, Esq. t rols. foolscap 8ro. writh Vignette Titles. 
M«. cloth. 

JEBB (BISHOP) .-PRACTICAL THEOLOGY: 

Comprisinff Ditcoorses on the Liturgy and Principles of the United Chnrch of England sad 
Ireland; Critical and other Tracts; and a Speech dellTered in the House of Peers in 18M. 
ByJohnJebb.D.D. F.R S., Bishop of Ldmerick.Ardfert, and Aghadoe. 2d Edition. Svolf. 
8to. 34f. cloth. 

By the same Author, 

PASTORAL INSTRUCTIONS, on the Character and Principles of the Church of England. 
Selected from his former Publications. A New Edition. Foolscap Sro. 6«. cloth. 

JEBB (BISHOP) AND KNOX fALEXANDER).-THIRTY YEARS' COR- 
RESPONDENCE between John Jebb, D.D.F.R.S., Bishop of Limerick. Ardfert, A^^sdoe, 
and Alexander Knox, Esq. M.R.I. A. Edited by the Rer. Charles Forster, B.D. Rector of 
Stisted, Essex, and one oi the Six Preachers in the Cathedral of Christ, Canterbury, formerij 
Domestic Chaplain to Bishop Jebb. 2d Edition. 2 vols. 8to. 28ff. cloth. 

LORD JEFFIIEY.— CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE EDINBURGH REVIEW. 

By Francis Jeffrey, now one of the Judges in the Court of Session in Scotland. 4 toIs.Sto. 
4Ss. cloth. 

JOHNSON.-THE FARMER'S ENCYCLOPEDIA, 

And DICTIONARY of RURAL AFFAIRS: embracing all the recent Discoreries In ARi* 
cultural Chemistry; adapted to the comprehension ot^unscientific Readers. By Cnthoert 
W. Johnson, Esq., F.R.S. Barrister-at-Law, Corresponding Member of the Agricultunl 
Society of KOnigsoerg, and of the Maryland Horticultural Society, author of sereral of the 
Priie Essavtof the Royal Agricultural Society of England, and other Agricultural Works ; 
Editor of tne ** Farmer's Almanack," etc. 1 thick toI. 8to. illustrated by Wood Engraringi 
of the best and most improTcd Agricultural Implements. 21. lOs. cloth. 

KANE. -THE INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES OF IRELAND. 

By Robert Kane, M.D. SecreUry to the Council of the Royal Irish Academy, Professor of 
Natural Philosophy to the Royal Dublin Society, and of Chemistry to the Apothecaries' 
Hall of Ireland. 2d Edition. Post 8to. 7« cloth. 

KANE.-ELEMENTS OF CHEMISTRY; 

Including the most Recent Discoreries and Applications of the Science to Medicine and 
Pharmacy, and to the Arts. By Robert Kane, M.D. M.R.l.A. Professor of Natural Philosophy 
to the Royal Dublin Society. 8to. with 236 Woodcuts, 24«. cloth. 

KATER AND LARDNER.— A TREATISE ON MECHANICS. 

By Captain Kater and Dr. Lardner. New Edition. Foolscap 8to. Vignette Title, and 
19 Plates, comprising 224 distinct figures, 6«. cloth. 

KEIGHTLEY.-OUTLINES OF HISTORY, 

From the Karlicst Period. By Thomas Keightley, Esq. New Edition, corrected and con- 
siderably improTed. Foolscap 8to., 6«. cloth ; or 6«. (>tf. hound. 

KEON (M. G.)— A HISTORY OF THE JESUITS, 

Literary, Social, and Political, from the Birth of Ignatius Loyola to the present time. By 
Miles Gerald Keen. Svo.— Prrparing for publieatioM. 

KIRBY AND SPENCE.— AN INTRODUCTION TO ENTOMOLOGY; 

Or, Elements of the Natural History of Insects: comprising an account of noxious and 
useful I nsectb, of their Metamorphoses, Food, Stratagems, Habitations, Societies, Motioni, 
Noises, Hybernation, Instinct, etc. By W. Kirby, M.A. F.R.S. & L.S. Rector of Barham ; 
and W. Spence, Esq., F.R.S. &L.S. 6th Edition, corrected and considerably enlarged. 
2 Tols. 8to. 1/. lis. 6rf. cloth. 

The Jir$t two volutnei of the ** Introduction to Entomologff** are now publUhed t$ a 
leparate leorh, di$tinct from the third and fourth votume$, and, though much enlarged, 
at a con$idrrable reduction of price, in order that the numerous elau of readers who confine 
their study of insects to that of thetr manners and economy, need not be burthened with the 
cost of the technical portion of the worh relating to their anatomp,phpsiologp, etc. 

KNAPP.— CRAMINA BRITANNICA; 

Or, Representations of the British Grasses: with Remarks and occasional Descriptions. By 
I. L. Knapp. Esq. F.L.S. 8c A.S. 2d Edition. 4to. with 118 Plates, beautifully coloured, 
3/. 16«. boards. 

KNOX (ALEXANDER). — REMAINS OF ALEXANDER KNOX, ESQ. 

Of Dublin, M.R.l.A.; containing Essays, chiefly explanatory, of Christian Doctrine; and 
Confidential LettcrK, with Private Papers, illustratlTe of the Writer's Character, Sentiments, 
and Life. 3d Kdition. 4 vols. 8vo. 21. 8s. cloth. 

LAING.— NOTES ON THE SCHISM FROM THE CHURCH OF ROME, 

called the GERMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, instituted by J. Ronge and I. Cxerxki, in 

(October 1844, on occasion of the Pilgrimage to the Holy Coat at T^Tes. By S. Laing, Esq., 
author of " Notes of a Trayeller," "The Chronicles of'^the Kings of Norway," etc. Fcap. 
8to. 5«. cloth. 



PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, BROWN, AND CO. 17 

LAINO.~THE CHRONICLE OF THE KINGS OF NORWAY, 

From the Earliest Period of the HUtoiy of the Northern Sea Klnia to the Middle of the 
Twelfth Century, eommonlj called the Heimshringla. Traaalated fron the IccUndlc of 
Bnorro Stnrleton, with Notes, and a Prelifldnarr tHsconne. hr Saaoel Laiiur. author of 
•* Notes of aTrareller," etc. 3 vols. 8to. 861. doth. 

LAING.— A TOUR IN SWEDEN 

In 1838 : comprising Obserrations on the Moral, PoliticalfMlA lewioadcal State of the SvsdUh 
Nation. By Samuel Laing, Esq. 8to. 13s. cloth. 

LAINO.—NOTES OF A TRAVELLER 

On the Social and Political State of France, Pnusia, Switzerland, Italy, and other parts of 
Europe, during the present Century. By Samuel Laing, Esq. 2d Edition. 8to. 16a. cloth. 

LAINO.-JOURNAL OF A RESIDENCE IN NORWAY 

During the years 1834, 1836, and 1836 ; made with a view to inquire into the Rural and Political 
Economy of that Country, and the Condition of its InhabitanU. By Samuel Laing, Eaq. 
3d Edition. 8to. 14s. cloth. 

LARDNER*S CABINET CYCLOPiCDIA; 

Compriainr a Series of Original Works on History, Biography, Literature, the Sciences, Arts, 
and MaauActures. Conducted and edited by Dr. Lsordner. 
The Series complete in One Hundred and Thirty-three Volumes, 891. 16«. (One Volnme 
remains to be published.) The Works separate, 6ff. per rolnme. 

LARDNER.-.A TREATISE ON ARITHMETIC. 

By Dr. Lardner, LL.D. F.R.S. Foolscap 8to. with Vignette Title, 6«. cloth. 

LARDNER AND WALKER.—A MANUAL ON ELECTRICITY, MAG- 
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LARDNER.— A TREATISE ON GEOMETRY, 

And iu Application to the Arte. By Dr. Lardner. Foolscap 8ro. with Vignette Title, and 
upwards of 300 figures, 6«. cloth. 

LARDNER.— A TREATISE ON HEAT. 

By Dr. Laraner, LL.D. etc. Fcm. 8to. with Vignette Title and WoodcuU, 6«. cloth. 
LARDNER.— A TREATISE ON HYDROSTATICS AND PNEUMATICS. 

By Dr. Lardner. New Edition. Foolscap bto. 6«. cloth. 

LECTURES ON POLARISED LIGHT, 

DeliTcred by Dr. Pereira, before the Pharmaceutical Society, and In the MedienI School of 
the London Hospital. 8vo. illustrated by above M Woonenca, b$. 64. cloth. 

L. E. L.— THE POETICAL WORKS OF LETITIA ELIZABETH LANDON. 

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LEE.— TAXI DERM Y; 

Or, the Art of Collecting, Preparing, and MounUnff Objects of Natural History. For the use 
of Museums and Travellers. By Mrs. R.Lee (formerly Mrs. T. E. Bowdieh), author of 
"Memoirs of Cuvier," etc. 6th Edition, Improved, with an account of a Visit to Walton 
Hall, and Mr. Waterton's method of Presening Animals. Fcap. 8vo. with Wood Engravings, 
7$. cloth. 
LEK-ELEMENTS OF NATURAL HISTORY. 

For the Use of Schools and Young Persons: comprising the Principles of Classification, 
interspersed with amusing and instructive original Accounts of the moat remarkable Animals. 
ByMrs. R. Lee (formerly Mrs. T. E. Bowdieh), author of "Taxidermy," ** Memoirs of 
Cuvier," etc. ISmo. with 66 Woodcuts, 7s. 64. bound. 

LEFEYRE (SIR GEORGE).— AN APOLOGY FOR THE NERVES8 

Or, their Importance and Influence in Health and Disease. By Sir George Lefevre, M.D. 
Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, late Physician to the British Embassv at the 
Court of St. Petersburgh, etc. ; author of *' The Life of a Travelling Physician/' *' Thermal 
Comfort," etc. Post 8vo. 9$. cloth. 

LEMPRIERE.— A CLASSICAL DICTIONARY; 

Containing a copious Account of all the Proper Names mentioned in Ancient Authors i with 
the Value of Coins. Weights, and Measures, used amongst the Greeks and Romans; and a 
Chronological Table. E^T. Lempritee, D.D. 30th Edition, corrected. 8vo. 9«. cloth. 

LESLIE (C.R.)— MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF JOHN CONSTABLE. ESQ. 

R. A. Composed chiefly of his Letters. By C. R. Leslie, R. A. Second Edition, with further 

Extracts from his Correspondence. Small 4to. with two Portndts fone from a new Sketch, 

hf Mr. Leslie, and a plate of " Spring," engraved by Lucas) . 31«. cloth. 

*< Got up la a peculiar, antifue, andnnndtome manner^ cengeniol to, and worthp o/*, the 

$ubject. The world at large wHlJtnd much to entertain and instruct in this interesting 

hiographjft artists and amateurs in particular will derive great instruction, and evern class 

of readers useful intelligence and agreeable amusement. Mr. Leslie has performed his task 

vith injnite taste and discrimination} giving the opinions of a competent authority upon 

the productions of his eontemporarji and friend , and bringing out the remarkable quaUties 

and estimable points of poor Constable's amiable private character in every relation of life 

with unaffected simplicitp and consequent (f^^ef.'*— literary Gazette. 



=* 



18 CATALOGUE OF NEW WORKS 

LIFE OF A TRAVELLING PHYSICIAN, 

From Ua irat Introdmctioii to Pnetice ; Inclndiof Tventr Tean* Waaderianthraaghovt 
tkc greater part of Kmropo. 8 vols, post 8to. witk eobmredyraatic^eeea. Sit. U. doth. 

UNDLEY.— INTRODUCTION TO BOTANY. 

Br Prof.J. Undlsf , Ph.D. F.R.S. L.S. etc. 8d EditloB (1S9), withCorrecdona aad eoofider^ 
able Additions, 8vo. with Six Plates aad numeroas Woodcats, Us. cloth. 

LINDLEY.— FLORA MEDICA ; 

A Botanical Aeeoont of all the most Important Plants msed In Medidae «in different Parts of 
the World. B7 John Undlej, Ph.D. F.R.S. etc. 8ro. 18t. doth. 

UNDLEY.— A SYNOPSIS OF THE BRmSH FLORA, 

Arranged according to the Natural Orders. By Professor John LIndlej, Ph. D.» F.R.S.,etc- 
Third Bditlon, witk nnmerons Additions. Corrections, and ImproTcments. ISmo. lOi. 6d. 
doth. 



UNDLEY.— THE THEORY OF HORTICULTURE; 




T*( . ,« - « ., . . 

tteur, torreetlfy with the ratiifum •/ the mitre imtportmut omermtiome e/ Httienltertt 
and the muthor h*$ endeamoured to preteut fe hi* remden mm imteUigible ewplmHatiem^/otiMdei 
umom wetl m$eertaimed/aet$t which thejf cm» judge •/ hy their mwm mteame of oheermmtienf 0/ 
the gemeral matmre of wegetahle metieme. mmd e/ the eamui whieh^ while they conirs/ the 
pmwer* of life in mlamte, are eapahle of oeimg rqpUmted hp ihemuelvea. 7%« posae^em •/ 
ameh hnowledge will neeeeemrilp temeh themi how to improme their method* 0/ cuff i»af {en, end 
lemdthemt to the diaeoverp of new and hotter mtode*, 

LINDLEY.--GUIDE TO THE ORCHARD AND KITCHEN GARDEN: 

Or, an Account of the most Taloable FndU and Vegetables enltivated in Great Britttni with 
Kalendars of the Work required in the Orchard and Kitchen Garden during ererr moath is 
the Year. Bj George Lindlej, C.M.H.S. Edited by Professor Undlej. 8to. 16s. boards. 

LLOYD.— A TREATISE ON LIGHT AND VISION. 

BjtheRev. H.Llo7d,M.A.,FeUowofTrln. CoU.Dnblin. Sro. 6s. boards. 

LORIMER.-LETTERS TO A YOUNG MASTER MARINER. 

On some Subjects connected with his Calling. Bj Charles Lorimer. So edition. ISmo. 
with an Appendix, bi. 6d. doth. 

LOUDON (MRS.)— THE LADY'S COUNTRY COMPANION; 

Or, How to EnJoT a Coontrj Life RationaUr. By Mrs. London, author of ** Gardening for 
Ladies," etc. Foolscap 8ro., with an Engraving on Steel, and Illnstrations on Wood, 7«.M. d. 
** A mtore intelligent and plemeamt Coumtrp ComtpanloH than Mr*. London** live* not even 
in thete day* of merpetual inetruetion mmd gmide* to emery thing. For a *troU in thejl«ld*% 
for a walh in the garden , for mtanagimg the dairy or moultry-ymrdf for raieimg thejimeet 
yower* and the he*t fruit* ^ for rural amiu*emtemt*f and for all ueeful employmimt* to oeempy 
time and produce projttahle retult*, we cordially recommend thia etecellent work to he tahen 
a* a con*tant companion.'* - -litetmrj Gaaette. 

LOUDON (J. C.)-SELF INSTRUCTION 

For Young Gardeners, Foresters, Bdllffs, Land Stewards, and Farmers; in Arithmetic, 
Book-keeping, Geometry, Mensuration, Practical Trigonometry, Mechanics, Land-Sorrey- 
ing, Lereling, Planning and Mapping, Architectnrd Drawing, and Isometrtcal Projection 
and PerspectWe ; with Examples shewing their applications to Horticultural and Agricul- 
tural Purposes . Br the late J. C. Loudon, FX.S. H.S. etc. With a Portrsit of Mr. London, 
and a Memoir by Mrs. London. 8to. In October. 

LOUDON.— AN ENCYCLOP/EDIA OF TREES AND SHRUBS; 

Being the '* Arboretum etFrutlcetum Britannlcum" abridged: containing the Hardy Trees 
and Shrubs of Great Britain, Natire and Foreign, scientifically and popularly described : 
with their Propagation, Culture, and Uses in the Arts ; and with EngraTiuffS of nearly all the 
Species. For the use of Nurserymen, Gardeners, and Foresters. ByJ.C. London, F.L.S. etc. 
1 large toI. 8to. with upwards of 2000 Engravings on Wood, Sf. Ids. cloth. 
The Original Work may be had in 8 vols. 8vo. with above 400 8vo. Plates of Trees, and upwards 
of 35W WoodcuU, 10/ . cloth. 

LOUDON.— AN ENCYCLOP>CDIA OF GARDENING; 

Presenting in one systematic view, the Histonr and Present State of Gardening in all Coub« 
tries, and Its Theory and Practice in Great Britain t with the Management of the Kitchen 
Crarden, the Flower Garden, Laying-out Grounds, etc. By J. C. Lon<fon, F.L.S. etc. A new 
Edition, enlarged and much improved. 1 large vol. 8vo. with nearly 1000 Rngravings on 
Wood, 3f. 10s. cloth. 

LOUDON.— AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF AGRICULTURE; 

Comprising the Theory and Practice of the Valuation, Transfer, Layin^-out, Improvementt 
and Management of Landed Property, and of the cultivation and eeondmy of the Aidmd and 
Vegetable productions of Agriculture, including all the latest improvements 1 a general 
History of Agfriculture in all coantries; a Sutistical view of its present stale, with 
suggestions for its future progress in the British Isles; and Supplements, brinring down 
the work to the year 1844. By J. C. Loudon^.L.G.Z. and H.S.etc. Fifth Edition. Bro. Illus- 
trated with upwards of 1100 Engrarings on Wood, by Branston. Sf. 10s. cloth. 
The Supplement, bringing down Improvements in the art of Fleld-Cultore from 18S1 to 1844 
inclus^e, 'comprising afl the previous Supplements, and illustrated with 86 Engravings on 
Wood, may hcnoAaeparatelyt ba. sewed. 



ar 



LOUDON.— AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF PLANTS; 

Incladlnf all the Plants which are now foand in, or hare been introduced iato.ONftlBritidn t 
rlring their Natural History, accompanied by such Descriptions, Engrared FlfilMS» and 
filementarj Details, as may enable a beginner, who is a mere Enriish reader, to Aeover the 
same of every Plant which he may find in flower, and acquire all the infomuulon respectiag 
It which is asefnl and interestinjr. The Specific Characters by an Eminent Botanist ; the 
Drawings by J. D. C. Sowerby. F.L.8. A new Edition (1841). with a new Svpplement, com- 
prising ereiy desirable particnlar respecUng all the Plants originated in, or introteeed Into, 
Britain between the first publication of the work, in 1SS9, and January 1840: with a new 
Oeaeval Index to the whole work. Edited by J. C. Loudon, prepared hr W. H. Baxter, Jun., 
and reriaed by George Don, F.L.S. ; and 800 new Figures of Plants, on Wood,from Dnmlngs 
by J. D. C. Sowerby, F.L.S. ] Tcry Urge vol. Sro. with nearly 10,000 Wpod BnpBrings, 
n, 13$. M. doth. 

*«• The last Supplement, $0parat0fy, 8ro. Us. cloth. 

LOUDON.— AN ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF COTTAGE, FARM, AND VILLA 

ARCHITECTURE and FURNITURE. Containing Designs for Cottages, Villas, Farm 
Houses, Farmeries, Country Inns, Public Houses, Parochial Schools, etc. ; with the requisite 
Fittiiura*op, Fixtures, and Furuiture, and appropriate Offices. Gardens, and Garden Scenery t 
each Desiga accompanied by Analytical and Critical Remarks iilustrative of the Principles 
of Arcldteetnral Science and Taste on which it is composed, and General Estimates of the 
Expense. By J . C. Loudon, F.L.S. etc. New Edition, corrected, with a Supplement contain- 
ing 180 addition^pages of letter-press, and nearly SOOnew engrarings. 1 very thick vol. Svo. 
wnk more than 9000 Engrarings on Wood, 8S«. cloth. 

•a* Tke Supplement, sfparafefjrf 8to. 7'« M. sewed. 

LOUDON.— HORTUS BRITANNICUS: 

A Catalogue of all the Planu indigenous to or Introduced into Britain. The 8d Edition 
(UBS), with a New Supplement, prepared, under the direction of J. C. Loudon, by W. H. 
Butter, and rerised l»y George Don, FX.S. 8vo. SU.M. cloth. 

TIm Supplement se/»ara<«/jr, Sro. S«.M. sewed. 

The later Supplement $0paratelg, 8to. 8«. sewed. 

LOUDON.— THE SUBURBAN GARDENER AND VILLA COMPANIONS 

Comprising the Choice of a Villa or Suburban Residence, or of a situation on which to form 
one; the Arrangement and Furnishing of the House; and the Laying-ont, Planting, and 
general Management of the Garden and Grounds ; the whole adapted for ••luuuds from one 
perch to filtT acres and upwards in extent ; intended for the instmctio-. oi those who know 
uttleof Garqenhig or Runl Affairs, and more particularly for the use of Ladies. ByJ. C. 
Loudon, F.L.8., etc. Sro. with above 800 Wood Engravings, 90f. cloth. 

LOUDON.-HORTUS UCNOSUS LONDINENSIS; 

Or. a Catalogue of all the ligneous Plants cultivated in the neighbourhood of London. To 
which are added their usual Prices in Nurseries. By J. C. Loudon, F.L.S. etc. 8vo. 7«. M. 

LOW.^ON LANDED PROPERTY, AND THE MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES; 

Compreheadingthe Relations between Landlord and Tenant, and the Principles ai<d Forms 
of Leases; of r arm-buildings. Enclosures, Drains, Embankments, Roads, and othT iiural 
Works, Minerals, and Woods. By David Low, Esq. F.R.S.E. etc., author of ** ii^lements 
of Practical Agriculture," etc. 8vo. with numerous Engravings, Sl«. cloth. 

LOW...ON'THE DOMESTICATED ANIMALS OF GREAT BRITAIN, 

eoauwehendlng the Natural and Economical History of the Species and Breeds; Illustrmtions 
of the ProperUes of External Form ; and Observations on the Principles and Practice of 
Breeding. By David Low, Esq., FJI.S.E. Professor of Agriculture in the Universltv of 
Bdlnbuigh; Member of the Royal Academy of Agriculture of Sweden; Corresponding 
Member of the Conseil Royal d' Agriculture de France, of the SocKtd Ro^al et Centrale, 
etc. ; author of ** Bleaseots of Practical Agriculture," ** Illustrations of the Breeds of 
the Domesticated Animals of the British Islands," '*On Landed Property and the Economy 
of Estates,'* etc 8vo. with Engravings on Wood. [In Ottoifr, 

LOW.— THE BREEDS OF THE DOMESTICATED ANIMALS OF GREAT 
BRITAIN described . By Darid Low, Esq. F.R.S.E., Professor of Agriculture in the Univer- 
sity of Edinburgh ; Member of the Roval Academy of Agriculture of Sweden ; Corresponding 
Member of the Conseil Royal d' Agriculture de France, of the SocMtd Royal et Centrale. 
' etc. etc. The Plates from drawings by W. Nicholson, R.8.A., reduced from a Series of Oil 
Paintings, executed for the Agricultural Museum of the University of Edinburgh bv W. Shiels, 
R.S.A. In 3 vols. atUs quarto, with 56 plates of Animals, beautifully coloured after Nature, 
W, 16f. half«bound in morocco. 

Or in four separate portions, as follow i— . . _ 

The OX. 1 vol. atlas quarto, with 33 Plates, The HORSE. 1 vol. atlas quarto, with 8 Plates, 
_wlce 61. 16e. 9d. half-bound morocco. price 8/. half-bound morocco. _, ^ , „, 

The SanCP. 1vol. atUs quarto, with 31 The HOO. 1vol. atlas quarto, with f Plates, 
Flutes, price 61. 16t.6ir. half-bound morocco. price 3/. 8«. half-bound morocco. 




M 



20 CATALOGUE OF NEW WOBKS 



MAC AULAY. -CRITICAL AND HISTORICAL ESSAYS CONTRIBUTEO TO 
The EDINBURGH REVIEW. B7 theRlgli( Hoa.ThomM Bablnffton Macavlafi M.P. 
Id Edition. B roU . 8to. 80«. cloth. 

BiACAULAY.-LAYS OF ANCCNT ROME. 

Br the Right Bononble TIumbm BaUi^toB Maeaulaj, M.P. Qtli Kditlon. Csowb Sro. 
l(b. M. cloth. 

MACKENZIE.*THE PHYSIOLOGY OF VISION. 

^ W. Maeke«sic, M.D.. Lectwer oa the Eje U th« Uuivenitj of OUagom. 8fO. with 
Woodc«U, lOf.M. bourds. 

MACKINNON.— THE H»TORY OF CIVIUSATION. 

B7 Wm. Alexander Mackinnon, F.R.8. M.P. for LTmington. 2 toIi. Sro. ilu Oett^tr. 

MACKINTOSH (SIR JAMES).— THE UFE OF SIR THOMAS MORE. 
B7 the Right Hon. Sir Jmms Machintoth. Refrinted frMn the Cabinet Cjdepiediai ud 
Intended for a Preeent-Book or School Prise. Foolscap 8vo. with Portrait, fig. cloth: or 
bonnd in Tellnin gilt (eld Hjr<«) , St. 

MACKINTOSH'S (SIR JAMES) MI8CEUANE0US WORKS; 

Indnding his Contrlbntloas to The EDINBURGH REVIEW. Cirilected and EdiUd hj 
Us Son . 8 rols . Svo.— in tkt ptMu. 

MACKINTOSH, ETC.— THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 

Bt Sir James Macldutosh; W.Wallace, Esq. I and Robert Bell, Esq. 10 rols. foolscap Sro. 
with Vignette Titles, 3f . cloth. 

M'CULLOCH.-THE LITERATURE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY; 

Being a Classified CatalQ«ve of the principal Worlds la the different departments of Political 
Kconomr, interspersed with Hfaiterieal, Critical, and Btocraphical Notices. Br J. K. 
M'CnUoch, Esq. Sro. 14*. cloU. 

M'CULLOCH.*A TREATISE ON THE PRMCIPLES AND PRACTICAL 
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Esq. Sro. 15«. doUi. 

M'CULLOCH.— A DICTIONARY. CEOGRAPHtCAL. STATISTICAL, AND 
HISTORIC ALte of the rarious Conntnes, Places, and Principal Natural Objects in the World. 
Bf J. R. M'CulIoch, Esq. A new Edition, 3 thick rols. Sro. with Six large Maps, 41. cloth. 

%• The new Ar Helen on the BritUh Empire, England, Ireland, and Seotland^ will *« 
printed temaratelp as a tupplemeut ta the_fiarmer Edition. Thep tomprtte a prettp/ull 
aeeaunt e/the preaent Uat* of the Britith Empire. 

M'CULLOCH.— A DICTIONARY. PRACTICAL, THEORETICAL, AND 

HISTORICAL, OF COMMERCE, AND COMMERCIAL NAVIGATION. B7 J. B. 
M'Cnlloch, Ese. An entlrel7 New Edition, corrected throaghout, enlarged, aad laprored. 
1 rerr thick rcl. Sro., Ulastrated wlthMiys and Plans, SO*, doth} ortSs.strongVl^Alf* 
bonod ia Russia, with flexible back. 

** JIfr. M*CuUeehU CemmerHat Dietitnary Has for eeneral peare teen a Tade meenm for 
merekantM, troderM,$hlp-oiBner$^ and »hip-ma$ter$, to guide gnd outft them in cotulneting the 
details of their respective oeenpatlons, we need not therefore expatiate upon the general 
merits of this well-knoien work, in announeing to the mercantile world m new, enlarged^ and 
improved edition. The subjects handled In a commercial dietionaru are net of a stationary 
but a progressive character ^ and those who mostlp use euch repertories are not eurious about 
historiear notices or theoretical dioeussione, but concern themselves solelv with practical 
details immediatelv connected with the present moment. The changes made in esir comrner- 
cial policy bp the Tarig Act o/'1842, and the late acts for regulating the com and colonial 
trades, are so multiform, so important, and agect so manp arUales and interests, that Mr. 
M^Cutloch despaired of introducing them into a supplement of a less sine than the original 
work, he hat therefore reconstructed his dietionarp altogether. We have earefutlv eramined 
this vast work, and are of opinion fkat the indefatigable autkor kas produce/ a digest of tke 
most use/ul and autkentfc information respecting the past and present state of the commerce 
ttf Europe and tke world at large, and tke laws and regulations under whick commercial 




. pages. 

From an article on Mr. M'Culloch's Dicti(Niar7 in the ** Timeg** n^wspsfer. 

MALTE-BRUN.— A SYSTEM OF UNIVERSAL GEOGRAPHY, 

Fonnded on the Works of Malte>Bmnand Balbl, embracing an Historical Sketch of the 
Progress of Geographical Discorer7, the Prindples of Mathematical and Fh7sical Geograph7, 
and a complete Description, from the most recent sources, of the Political and Social ConditioB 
of all the Countries in the World : with numerous Statistical Tables, and an Alphabetical 
Index of 12,000 Names. Sro. 80s. doth. wc"«:~ 

MARCET (MRS.)->CONVERSATIONS ON THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 

For the Use of Children. B7 Mrs.Marcet* author of* CoorersatioM on Cheadatrr." etc. 
3d Edition. 18mo.6«. cloth. " 



-m 



PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, BROWNy AND CO. 21 

MARCET.— CONVERSATIONS ON CHEMISTRY; 

Inwhieh the ElemenU of that Science are famillarlj Explained and lUneCrated by Ezpcri* 
menti. 14th Rdition, enlarged and corrected. SroU. foolscap 8ro.l4<. cloth. 

MARCET.— CONVERSATIONS ON NATURAL PHILOSOPHY; 

In which the Elements of that Sciecne are familiarly ezplatned, and adapted to the eomprc 
hension of Young Perion*. 10th Edition, enlarged and corrected by the Author. Fcap. 8ro. 
with 33 Plates, \9t. 6tf. cloth. 

MARCET.— CONVERSATIONS ON POLITICAL ECONOMY! 

In which the Elements of that Science are familiarly explained. 7th Edition, reriscd and 
enlarged. Foolscap 8to. 7t- M> cloth. 

MARCET.-4:ONVERSATIONS ON VEGETABLE PHYSIOLOGY; 

Comprehending the Elements of Botany, with their application to Agriculture. 8d Edition. 
Foolscap 8to. with Four Plates, 9b. doth. 

MARCET.— CONVERSATIONS FOR CHILDREN; 

On Land and Water. Sd Edition rerised and corrected. Foolscap 8TO.,wlth coloured Maps, 
shewing the comparative Altitude of Mountains, 6«. 6d. cloth. 

MARCET.-CONVERSATIONS ON LANGUAGE, 

For Children. By Mrs. Marcet, author of ** Mary's Grammar/' etc* 18Bio.4f.6ir. cloth. 

MARCET— THE CAME OF GRAMMAR, 

With a Book of Conrersations, shewing the Rules of the Game, and affording Eaamptes of 
the manner of playing at it. In a Tarnished box, or done up as a poet Sro. Tolnme, 8s. 

MARCET.-WILLY'S GRAMMAR; 

Interspersed with Stories, and intended for the Use of Boys. By Mrs. Marcet, Mikbor of 
*' Mary's Grammar," etc. New edition. 18mo.3s.6d. cloth. 

** A Bound «tnd ttmpU wthfor th» *arUe$t 4g-M."— Quarterly Review. 
MARCET.-LESSONS ON ANIMALS, VEGETABLES, AND MINERALS. 

By Mrs. Bfarcet, author of " CouTersations on Chemistry," etc. 13mo. 2s. cloth. 

** 0n4 of Mrt, Marcefa earefitUy wrUten books of imtruetionf in wkioh natural hhtorjf i$ 
outdo ploa$amt amd imteUigible for the jroKi^."— Athenaeum. 

MARRIAGE GIFT. 

By a Mother. A Legacy to her Children . Post 8to. 6«. cloth, gilt edges. 

MARRYAT (CAPT).— THE MISSION; 

Or, Scenes in Africa. Written for Young People. By Captain Marryat. G.B., author of 
<' Peter Simple," **Masternian Ready," *' The Settlers In Canada," etc. 3 vols. fcap. Sro. 
12«. cloth. 

**A deUrkt/ul hook for poungpeoplo, written with great truth and pointy and abounding 
in the natural but eseiting adventure, that Cape emirrantt are eure to encounter. The 




wMeA creates an interest that suntiues the taste for everp other hind of petitions marra- 
li»«."— Britannia. 

MARRYAT.— THE SETTLERS IN CANADA. 

Written for Young People. By Captain Marryat, C.B. author of "Peter Simple," 
** Masterman Reacfy,'' etc. 3 vols. fcap. 8ro. 12«. cloth. 

MARRYAT.-MASTERMAN READY; 

Or, the Wreck of the Pacific. Written for Young People. By C^tidn Marryat. 8 Tola, fools* 
cap Sro. with numerous Engrarings on Wood, 22«.M. cloth. 

•«* The volumes, ««paratff/jr, 7s.M. each, cloth. 

** The best of Robinson Crusoe's numerous descendants, and one of the most eaottfuting ef 
modem children's boohs. The onlp danger is, lest parents should dispute with their children 
the possession «yri<.»'— Quarterly Review. 

MARX AND WILLIS.— ON THE DECREASE OF DISEASE EFFECTED BY 

THE PROGRESS OF CIVILIZATION. By C. F. H. Marx, M.D. Professor of Medicine in 
the UniTersity of Oottingen, etc.i and R. Willis, M.D. Member of the Royal Collcg* of 
PhysicUinSy etc. Foolscap 8vo. 4s. doth. 

MAUNDER.— THE TREASURY OF KNOWLEDGE, 

And LIBRARY of REFERENCE. By Samuel Maunder. 16th Edition, revised throughout 
and enlarged. 1 thick vol. foolscap 8vo., with two engTaved Fhmtupleces, lOi. cloth i 
boond in roan, 12s. 

*«• The principal contents of this affw and thoroughly revised edition of** The Troasurp ef 
Knowledge," ate— a new and enlarged English DtcUonarp, with a Orammart Verbal DisttnO'- 
tions, and E*ercisest a new Universal Qasetteer f a compendious Classical Dictionarpi an 
Analvsis of History and Chronology t 9 DiefioMary of Law Terms f a new Synopsis of the 
Brituh Peerage 1 and various useful tabular addenda, 

u iii 



i 



M H 



22 CATALOGUE OP MEW WORKS 

MAUNDER.- THE OOCRAPHICAL TREASURY: 

CoBsisdnf of Meaoin, Sketches, «a«l brief Notices of abaifv lS,flOO Bmiaent Penoss of all 
Afes andNatioiu, from the Rariiest Period of Historj ; foraiag a new and coaflete Die* 
tlonaiy of UaiTenal Biofraphf. tth Edition, rcTised tlirouyliont, and containing acopiou 
Snppleaent, bronr ht down to December 1844. Foolscap Sro. witk enfisvcd Flontispeee, 
lOt. cloth J bonnd in roan, Uk. 

MAUNDER.— THE SCCNTIFIC AND LITERARY TREASURY: 

A New and Popular Kncjclopadia of Science and the Belles Lettres; inelvdinr all Braaehet 
of Science, ana ercry Snbioct connected with litentnre and Art. "The whole written in s 
familiar style, adapted to tnc comprehension of all persons desivoas MadpiiTiBg'iBformstioB 
on the subjects comprised in the work, and also adapted for • Manual «f cosirenieBt Refer* 
•nee to the more instructed. Br Samuel Maander. 8d Edition. 1 thick Tol. fcap. 8ro. with 
an enfraved Frontispiece, 10s. doth t bound in roun, 19>. 

BIAUNDER.— THE TREASURY OF H6TORY; 

Comprising a General Introductory Outline of UniTersal Hlstorr, Ancient and Hodem. sad 
a Series of separate Histories of ererr principal Nation tlmt eusts } derdLofing thdr Rise, 
Progress, and Present Condition, the Moral and Social Cliaraeter of the& respective 
Inlubitanta, their Religion, Manners, and Customs, etc. etc. By Snasuel Maunder. M Edit. 
1 thick vol. fcap. 8to. fOt. doth) bound in roan, 13t. 

MAUNDER.— THE UMVER6AL CLASS-BOOK: 

A new Series of Reading Lessons Joriginal and selected) for Ererr Day in the Tear; each 



Lesson recording 
on the day of the 



some important Brent in General Histo^, Btographr, etc., which luqipened 
wu tnc iwT wt »«c mouth under which it is placed, or detaiung, in famiUar language, interest- 
ing Heu in Science i also a variety of DescripttTe and Narratire Pieces, Interspersed with 
Poetical Gleanings t Questions for Ksamination being appended to each day's Lesson, sad 
the whole carefully adapted to Practical Tirition. By Samuel Mnoader, author Of "Ae 
Treasury of Knowledge.'' Sd Edition, rerised. ISaso. M. bonnd. 

MICHELET (J).— PRIESTS, WOMEN, AND FAMILIES. 

By J. Michelet. Translated from the French (third edition), with the Author's permisrioa, 

Sr C. Cocks, Bachelier-te-Lettrcs, and Professor (breTCt^ of the Uring Languages in the 
oyal Colleges of France. Post 8to. 9s. cloth. 

**A ieejk nniflfU" many eteeellenttt; t%» Interest of the memoir^ tke fervenem of m tkeoJo- 
rUal enqmirpf ami tke pungenejf tm4 forte of • 4i$$eetion of human nature. We reeemmeni 
it meet earnettlf to our reaien. as not onljf powerful and profound, bmt a$ written so eiearlw 
andarreeablf that the most volatile and inattentfme will oomprehend and enjop the remark- 
able iiselosures mnde in its pages,**— JemU *s Maga^ne. 

MILNER (RLV8. J. AND I.) — THE HISTORY OF THE CHURCH OF 
CHRIST. By the Rer. Joseph Milner, A.M. With Additions and Corrections by the hrte 
Rer. Isaac Milner, D.D. F.R.S., Dean of Carlisle, and President of Queen's Ccdlege, Cam- 
bridge. A New Edition. 4 toIs. 8to. 31. 8s. boards. 

MONTGOMERY'S (JAMES) POETICAL WORKS. 

New and onlr complete Edition. With some additional Poems and Autobiographical 
F^faces. Collected and edited by Mr. Montgomerr. 4to1s. foolscap Sro. with Portrait, and 
7 other beautifully engraved Plates, 90s. doth ; or bound in morocco, 1/. I6ff. 

MOORE'S POETTCAL WORKS; 

Containinr the Author's recent Introduction and Notes. Complete in one volume, uniform 
with Lord Bvron's Poems. With a New Portrait, bv George Richmond, eiwraved in the line 
manner, ano a View of Sloperton Cottage, the Restdence of the Poet, bv "Aomaa Creawick, 
AR.A. Medium 8to. If. It. cloth; or 42«. bound in morocco, in tae best manner, by 
Hayday. 
•«* Also, an Edition in 10 vols, foolscap 8vo. with Portrait, and 19 Plates, Sf. 10*. cloth; 

morocco, 4/. 10*. 

MOORE'S LALLA ROOKH. 

Twentieth Edition. Medium 8vo. illustrated with 18 Engravings, finished In the highest 
style of art. Sis. doth ; morocco, 85«.i or 48t. with India Proof Plates, doth. 

MOORE'S LALLA ROOKH. 

Twenty>first Edition. Foolscap 8vo. with 4 Engravings, from Paintings by Westell, lOs.M. 
cloth ; or 14s. bound in morocco. 

MOORE'S IRISH MELODIES. 

Illustrated by D. Maclise, R.A. Imp.Svo. with 160 Designs, engraved on Steel, 3f. 8s. 
boards ; proof Impressions, 6/. 6s. bound. [/n Octoher. 

*«» This worh has been some fears in preparation^ and will he readp for publication in 
October. The te»t^ with an ornamental border to each page, as well as the other Designs, 
are all engraved on steel ; and it is believed that the novelty of the mode of production, com- 
bined with the care bestowed in the ettecution of everp part of this elaborate work, wilt 
render it one of the most interesting volumes that have ever appeared. 

MOORE'S IRISH MELODIES. 

Fifteenth Edition. Fcap. Svo.with Eftgraved Title and Vignette, 10«. cloth f or 18«. 6d« 
bonnd in morocco. 

MOORE.— THE HISTORY OF IRELAND. 

By Thomas Moore, Esq. Vols. 1 to 8, with Vignette Titles, 18s. cloth. 

•«• The third and concluding volume, which also completes **The Cabinet Cyclopedia," 

f« nearly readp. 



PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, BROWN, AND CO. 23 



^^d Ed!Uon. RoTalSro. wfth 24 beantifalljeoloued EngnTlnir** !'• 10'* half>bowid. 

MORTON.— A VETERNARY TOXICOLOCICAL CHART, 

Containing: tbote Amenta known tocaoae Death In the Hone i with the Sjnptomit Antldotea, 
Action on the nasnea, and Teau. By W. J. T. Morton. Uno.8«.incaae; 8«.M.onroUen. 

MORTON.— A MANUAL OF PHARMACY, 

For the Student in Veterinanr Medicine ; containing the Snbatancea employed at the Roral 
Veterinary College, with an Attempt at their Ciasaiication, and the Pharmacopcela of that 
Inatitatlon. By W.J. T.Morton. 8d Edition. 12mo. lOw. cloth. 

M0SELEY.--ILLUSTRATIONS OF PRACTICAL MECHANICS. 

By the Rer. H. Moaeley, M.A., Profesaor of Natnral Philoaophyand Aatronomyln Kinf'a 
College. London ; beinf the First Volume of the Illnatratloni of Science by the Profesaora 
of King't College. Fcap. 8to. with nnmerons Woodents, 8a. cloth. 

MOSELEY.— THE MECHANICAL PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING AND 

ARCHITECTURE. By the Rer. H. Moseley, M.A. F.R.8., Profesaorof Natural Philosophy 
and Astronomy in King's College, London; and author of **IUuatratlonsof Mechanics/* etc. 
8to. with Woodcirtaaod Diagrams, lf.4«. cloth. 

MCjLLER.— INTRODUCTION TO A SaENTIFIC SYSTEM OF MYTHOLOGY. 

By C. O. Mailer, author of **The History and Antiquities of the Doric Race," etc. Traaa- 
lated from the German by John Leitch. 8ro. uniform with ** MtUler's Dorians," 13s. cloth. 

MURRAY.— ENCYCLOPAEDIA OF GEOGRAPHY; 

Comprising a complete Description of the Earth i exhibiting ita Relation to the HeaTcnly 
Bodies, its Physicsi Structure, the Natural History of each Ckiuntry, and the luduatry, Com- 
merce, Political Institutions, and Ciril and Social State of all Nationa. By Hugh Murray, 
F.R.S.B.t assisted in Astronomy, etc. by Professor Wallace: Geology, etc. by Professor 
Jameson; Botany, etc. by Sir W. J. Hooker; Zoology, etc. by W. Swidnson, Esq. New 
Edition, with Supplement, bringing down the Statistieal information contained in the Work, 
to December 1843: with 83 Maps, drawn by Sidney Hall, and upwards of 1000 other 
Engravings on Wood, from Drawings br Swidnson, T. Landseer, Sowerby, Strutt, etc. repre- 
senting the most remarkable Objects of Nature and Art in every Region of the Globe. 1 very 
large vol. 8vo. containing upwards of 1600 pages, 81. doth. 

NEWELL (REV. R.H.)— THE ZOOLOGY OF THE ENGLISH POETS, 

Corrected by the Writings of Modem Naturalist*. By the Rev. R. H. Newell, Rector of 
Little Hormead. 8vo. [In Ott^ktr. 

NICOLAS-THE CHRONOLOGY OF HISTORY, 

Containing Tables, Calculations, and Statements indispennble for aacertdning the Dates of 
HistoricaTEvents, and of Public and Private Documents, from the Earliest Period to the 
Present Time. By Sir Harris Nicoiaa, K.C. M.G. Second Edition, corrected throughout. 
Foolscap 8vo. with AHgnette Title, 6$. cloth. 

NISBET (JAMES).— THE FRENCH IN RHEINSTADT: 

A Romance of the Day. A Friendly Voice from the Avon's Banks to the Nations of Ger- 
many, and other Poems. By James Nlsbet. Post 8vo. 7«> 8<f • cloth. 

OWEN. -LECTURES ON THE COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND PHYSI- 
OLOGY OF the INVERTEBRATE ANIMALS, delivered at the Royal CoUege of Surgeons 
in 1843. By Richard Owen, F.R.S. Hunterian Professor to the College. From Notes taken 
by William White Cooper. M.RX;.S. and revised by Professor Owen. IfHth Glossary and 
Index. 8vo. with nearly 140 Illustrations on Wood, 14«. doth. 
••* A Seeoni and eeneluMng Volnmt^ being the Leetnrea ron Fertebrata) deUvered bp 
Prtffenor Omen dnring tke la$t tea$lon, U preparing for pnblication. 

The Parities of Our Lord, richly Dluminated with appropriate Borders, printed in ColourB, 
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mnd m vignette engraving of hi» re$idenee mt Ketwiek. Altogetker, it /ormu m ka mi itm t 
draieing-roomt or likrmrp hook, »kit$t H$ redntef price, m$ ewmpare^ with tke tern voUmu 
odilion, will render it kigklp mtmepteMe to • Urge Most. No lover of etegunt HtermtmrewiU 
now oontent kimuelf rnUkout potteoilmg a e»po of worke mkiek, k0wever vmriom tke opiniom 
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SPOONER.— A TREATISE ON THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTIONS. AND 

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and «dffR(i/fe."— Railway Chronicle. 

STEBBING (REV. H.)— THE HISTORY OF THE CHURCH OF CHRIST, 

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SUMMERLY (MRS. FELIX).-.THE MOTHER*S PRIMER : 

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TAYLER (REV. CHARLES B.>- MARGARET; 

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TAYLER (REV. CHARLES B.)— TRACTARIANISM NOT OF COD. 

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mm I . " T "■ ggHsag-gg I , 



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l^lkaB^^lKn.lkiUriBUknafM.I>nHVA>«rIillilaa.r>riHJ:<rilkH«n. 

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•Mrl b twa (Ihii to >»« «■ tf tt» ■•rl allb Ujl^ftonW aaiTfii Brnu^lt 

THOMBbMTfiEAKWB. 

■'■•ilirTiiiiil'SM^fiiri'iriiiiiT'fiiiil'"' '""'■'"" *'«°' """ 

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C.W.Cvfi: ).r Si^ C.SUEkiiui. T.WaUwi,A.i 

TbMHCnnriiik. t B.Rill^c, A.B^. I r.TnUr. I 

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TOHLtNE (BISHOP},— ELEMENTS OF CHRISTIAN fWOLOCYi 



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TOMLIN8™V^^IUW%"wD<CTKMffiY;" '"'"■ *"'*■*"*-"' 
TOOKE.— A HISTOr'y Of'pRICESi'""" " 

TRAliSACtlONt <X THE CEOLOCICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON. 

"«S^'^^^5^^^5^'^e£?.' ■'"'"■*" 
transacttom of the royal in&tttute of british architectl 

Winia, U.A. F-R-8. «tf.i AialnvM FojntHTi Hott HftUraiimD, omuoTeTi Dr. ran 
r. C.Tawl^ Boa. S«.) III. «. A. MiiMiDn, >( tlncolni uil ^i. J.F. Fur* 

TRANSACTIONS OF THE UNNEAN SOCIETY OF LONDON.