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Full text of "Documentary journal of Indiana 1896"

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INDIANA 
STATE LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
isions of the Library Services and Technology Act; Lyrasis Members and Slo, 



http://www.archive.org/details/documentaryjour189602indi 



)0 

BIENNIAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



INDIANA UNIVERSITY 



Fiscal Years Ending October 31, 1895, and October 31, 1896. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE FEINTING AND BINDING. 
1897. 



1 



3 ' 



X 9 , -^x 



mmAliA STAfE LDBRABT 



THE STATE OF INDiAN.\, 

Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, Ind , December 26, 1896. 

Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, \ 
Indianapolis, Ind., December 30, 1896. i 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasurv, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 
Auditor of State. 



December 30, 1896. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of Indiana, December 30, 1896 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of Stale. 



Keceived the within report and delivered to the printer December 30, 1896. 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau, 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT, 



Bloomington, Inc., December 1, 1896. 
To the Hon. Claude Matthews, Governor of Indiana : 

Dear Sir — I have the honor of herewith transmitting to you 
the biennial report of the Board of Trustees of the Indiana 
University for the fiscal years ending October 31, 1895, and Oc- 
tober 31, 1896. 

The progress of the University during the past two years has 
been gratifying to all friends of higher education. This pro- 
gress has been not chiefly in the number of students, but much 
more in the increasing favorable recognition of the University 
among the educators of the country. The University is known 
to be one of the most progressive of our institutioms, and its 
peculiar organization of work has attracted wide attention and 
imitation. 

The matter of numbers is in itself no test of the value or the 
success of an institution of learning, for the most advanced 
students in any department of study are few. It can, however, 
be said that the best students will go where the best work is 
done, and the Indiana University will never lack for numbers 
so long as its instruction is thorough, and its work is abreast 
of modern thought and modern methods. 

More important than the fact of the increase of numbers is 
the fact of steady improvement in the quality of work done by 
professors and students. The reputation of the University, 
both within and without the State, has been constantly rising. 
No well-informed person now speaks with disrespect of the 
work done in the University, while among college men through- 
out the country, the Indiana University is regarded as one of 
the most promising schools in the United States. It may be 
further said that the Indiana University is especiallF a school 
for persons of limited means. The great majority o^ the stu- 



dents are not ricb, and fully three-fourths of them have earned, 
by their own work, much or all of the money spent on their 
education. Connected with this lack of money for lavish ex- 
penditures is the fact that in no institution are the students, as 
a body, more earnest, or their moral tone higher, than in the 
State University. 

Nineteen departments of work are now organized, each de- 
partment representing some great subject in which three or 
four or more years of work are offered. The scope of these 
subjects, as illustrating the great fields of knowledge open to 
young men and women of Indiana, is indicated by the follow- 
ing enumeration : (1) Greek, (2) Latin, (3) Romance Languages, 
(4) Germanic Languages, (5) English, (6) European History, (7) 
American History, (8) Economics and Social Science, (9) Phil- 
osophy, (10) Pedagogics, (11) Pure Mathematics, (12) Mechanics 
and Astronomy, (13) Physics, (14) Chemistry, (15) Geology, 
(16) Zoology, (17) Botany, (18) Fine Arts, (19) Law. With this 
presentation of the subjects it is evident that our young people 
can have a very wide range of choice in training. It is con- 
sidered no longer a tenable proposition that all kinds of minds 
demand the same kind of training. There is the greatest diver- 
sity of gifts, and this must be provided for in any rational sys- 
tem of education. 

The purpose of education is to develop power, and this can 
be developed by the proper study of any subject, but is much 
aided if that subject has the consent of the pupil's taste. The 
widest liberty is, therefore, given by the University in the se- 
lection of subjects. However, there are groups of subjects 
which prominently stand for culture, and a certain amount of 
selection from these groups is required. 

It is shown that distorted courses are practically unknown ; 
that the proportion among subjects is practically what it was 
under prescription; that such studies as English, language, 
history and economics attract a far larger student body than' 
do either the physical or biological sciences; that very few 
students graduate with only the minimum requirement. Bet- 
ter results than these which have been tabulated are those 
which show that this policy has improved the whole student 
body, by developing self-reliance and that interest which comes 
from responsibility, and has wonderfully improved teaching 
through the stimulus of interested learners. 



It is these methods and results which have called attention 
to the University. It will be remembered that Indiana Uni- 
versity no longer maintains any preparatory department. The 
work begins where that of the commissioned high school ends 
and it is constantly becoming more intimately connected with 
these schools. That this relationship is becoming more widely 
recognized throughout the State is testified by the fact that 
during the present year ninety of our ninety-two counties have 
sent pupils from their schools to the University. 

In comparing the attendance at the University with that of 
other institutions it must be remembered that the University 
maintains no preparatory or professional schools of any kind, 
except that of law, and that in these various schools will be 
found the largest part of the attendance of the universities that 
maintain them. 

A tabulated view of the attendance for the last fourteen 
years will show the development of the University within 
recent years : 

No. Students. Graduates. 

1884 , 144 21 

1885 156 26 

1886 202 20 

1887 263 22 

1888 275 39 

1889 300 41 

1890 321 49 

1891 394 75 

1892 497 66 

U93 576 81 

1894 633 95 

1895 771 90 

189G 879 117 

1897 929* 124 

It will be noticed that the attendance has been nearly 
doubled within the last five years, and this has necessitated a 
large increase in force of instruction and an overwhelming 
demand for room. 

In everything that goes to make a University, such as num- 
bers in college classes, variety of subjects presented, method of 

'•'Estimated from those now in attendance. 



work, opportunities for advanced and original work, Indiana 
University stands very high among the universities of neigh- 
boring States ; but in the matter of income it stands very low. 
A study of the statistics will show that the State of Indiana 
can show more for every dollar it has invested in its Univer- 
sity than any neighboring State ; and it will also indicate what 
results the State may hope for when it takes a financial inter- 
est in the University commensurate with its own resources. 

I desire to call careful attention also to the following extract 
from the President's report to the Board of Regents of the 
University of Michigan for 1891. President Angell by his 
long service is more competent than any other man to speak 
of the position of State Universities in the West : 

" While we can not but be gratified at the growth of this 
University during the last twenty years, we also observe with sat- 
isfaction that there has been rapid development of the State 
Universities generally throughout the West. Their progress, 
and we may say in the case of almost every one, their assured 
success, are proofs that the principle upon which the institu- 
tion was founded is sound, and makes it reasonably certain 
that the great universities of the West and Southwest are, as a 
rule, to be those established and supported by the State. They 
have all frequently and gratefully testified to the helpful influ- 
ence of this University upon their life. They have, in a large 
degree, followed our methods. In their success and in their 
promise we can heartily rejoice. From their increasing strength 
we also draw strength. Every State from Ohio to California 
and from North Dakota to Texas now has its State University. 
Some of these institutions have encountered great difficulties 
and bitter opposition. Bat in almost every State of the West, 
the State University is the best endowed, the best equipped 
and the most universally attended institution of higher educa- 
tion in the State. The objections raised to them in the outset 
have proved to be in the main groundless. The States are 
committed to their support by the large expenditures already 
made upon them and by the power of public sentiment, which 
naturally looks with favor on the universities that offer the 
best type of higher education in arts, in technology and in the 
professions, almost without money and without price, to every 
young man and every young woman. While in the East the 
higher education will continue to be furnished by institutions 



9 

resting on private endowments, in the West and Southwest, 
though similarly endowed colleges will flourish and do a useful 
work, the great universities will almost exclusively be those 
sustained by the States." 

The pressing needs of Indiana University are as follows : 

1. Additional Buildings and Grounds. — Four of the depart- 
ments have their work wholly or part in basements. Two of 
the professors have their rooms in an attic, and eight of the 
teachers have their classes in the library. No assembly room 
is to be found on the grounds of the University. The chapel 
exercises and other assemblages are held in the men's gymna- 
sium. The University needs an assembly room, a science 
building, a building for history and political science and En- 
glish, a general heating plant and an administrative building. 
These should cost not less than $250,000. The campus needs 
to be enlarged. 

2. Additional Annual Income. — It goes without saying that 
the doubling of the number of students in the last five years 
makes an increase in our appropriation for maintenance neces- 
sary very soon. Not only will additional teachers be necessary 
soon, but the great demand for our teachers in other institu- 
tions makes it invaluable that we should pay some of our fac- 
ulty more money. The best men are the cheapest in the long 
run. During the past six years Indiana University has lost fif- 
teen professors, who are now getting outside the State $!,000 
more than twice the salaries received in Indiana University. 

8. Additional Library Funds. — The entire work of the Uni- 
versity depends upon its library more than upon any other one 
kind of equipment. It will be remembered that the library 
was completely destroyed in 1888. Since that time the attempt 
has been made to keep up with current publications, and to 
complete a few sets of periodical publications. Special pro- 
visions should soon be made for a sufficient equipment of books 
and periodicals to make the library useful and attractive to ad- 
vanced students and investigators. 

Very respectfully yours, 

ISAAC JENKINSON, 

President Board of Trustees. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board oj Trustees of Indiana University : 

Gentlemen — As Treasurer of the University I present the 
following as my report for the year ending October 31, 1895 : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand |6,831 78 

Kirkwood Hall special appropriation ... 25,000 00 

Annual appropriation 40,000 00 

Interest on State bonds 7,200 00 

Interest on endowment 13,000 00 

College loans 6,000 00 

Fees 12,540 01 

Sundry receipts 2,027 06 

Total receipts $112,598 85 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Contingent expenses $8,224 00 

Professors' salaries 53,488 72 

Officers' salaries 4,883 52 

Trustees' salaries 1,902 00 

Library fund 3^051 67 

Chemistry 2,058 26 

Greek 51 73 

Zoology 663 37 

Mathematics 24 42 

J^otany I9I 07 

Geology 407 20 

Pliysics 702 12 

Philosophy 484 53 



11 

Buildings and grounds $1,896 06 

Men's gymnasium 45 06 

Ladies' gymnasium 7 89 

Indiana Student 150 00 - 

Y. M. C. A 25 00 

Kirkwood Hall 21,583 68 

Total paid $99,790 57 

Balance on hand 12,808 28 



Total $112,598 85 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER E. WOODBURN, 

Treasurer. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of Indiana University : 

Gentlemen — As Treasurer of the University, I present the 
following as my report for the year ending October 31, 1896: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand October $12,808 28 

Interest on Endowment Fund 23,550 00 

Interest on College Loans 9,450 00 

Interest on University Bonds 3,600 00 

Specific appropriation 18,000 00 

Direct tax, one-half 42,678 98 

Diploma Fees 620 00 

Contingent and Library Fees 9,358 00 

Conditioned Fees 1,421 50 

Laboratory 1,342 75 

Gymnasium 308 00 

Iowa Land Note 898 71 

Interest, Jasper County 14 70 

Summer School 47 35 

Total $124,098 27 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Professors' salaries $61,372 00 

Officers' salaries 5,667 47 

Trustees' salaries 2,702 50 

Contingent expenses 12,255 24 

Chemistry Fund 698 98 

Geology 600 00 



13 

Zoology $762 51 

Physics 399 37 

Mathematics 3 60 

Library 4,725 88 

Buildings and grounds 12,408 40 

Gymnasium Hall 6,333 80 

Women's Gymnasium 180 48 

Philosophy 452 70 

Latin 71 73 

Greek 100 00 

Total $108,684 70 

Balance on hand 15,413 57 



Total $124,098 27 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER E. WOODBURN, 

Treasurer. 



THE 



TWENTY-SECOND REPORT 



Purdue University, 



THE SAA\E BEING 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1896. 



INCLUDING A SUMMARY OF THE PRECED- 
ING REPORT. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

■iVM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATK PRINTING AND BINDING. 

1897. 



I 



STATE OF INDIANA, ) 

Executive Department, V 

Indianapolis, December 22, 1896. j 

Eeceived by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, ) 

Indianapolis, January 6, 1897. J 

The within I'eport, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



December 23, 1896, 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the oflice of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, January 
7, 1897. WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State^ 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 7th day ot 
January, 1897. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Terms Ending July 1, 1901. 

BENJAMIN HARRISON Indianapolis. 

CHARLES B. STUART LaFayette. 

WILLIAM A. BANKS LaPorte. 

Terms Ending July 1, 1899. 

JAMES M. BARRETT Fort Wayne. 

JOB H. VAN NATTA LaFayette. 

JOHN S. MARTIN Brookville. 

Terms Ending July 1, 1897. 

DAVID E. BEEM Spencer. 

SYLVESTER JOHNSON Irvington. 

WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN Lawrenceburg. 

Officers of the Board. 

CHARLES B. STUART President. 

EDWARD A. ELLSWORTH Secretary. 

JAMES M. FOWLER Treasurer. 

Executive Committee. 

BENJAMIN HARRISON, JAMES M. BARRETT, 

CHARLES B. STUART. 

Auditing Committee. 

SYLVESTER JOHNSON, WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN, 

DAVID E. BEEM. 

Farm Committee. 

WILLIAM A. BANKS, JOB H. VAN NATTA, 

JOHN MARTIN. 



PURDUE UNIVERSITY. 



CORPS OF INSTRUCTORS, 1896-97. 



JAMES HENRY SMART, A. M., LL. D., 

President of the University. 

WINTHROP ELLSWORTH STONE, A. M., Ph. D. 

Vice-President. 

STANLEY COULTER, A. M., Ph. D., 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



STANLEY COULTER, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Biology. 

JOSEPH CHARLES ARTHUR, D. Sc, Professor of Vegetable Physiology and 

Pathology. 
WINTHROP ELLSWORTH STONE, A. M., Pli. D., Professor of Chemistry and 

Director of Chemical Laboratory. 
PERCY NORTON EVANS, B. S., Ph. D., Associate Professor in Chemistry. 
KATHERINE ELIZA GOLDEN, M. S., Instructor in Biology. 
WILLIAM HENRY TEST, M. S., Instructor in Chemistry. 
SEVERANCE BURRAGE, B. S., Instructor in Sanitary Science. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

WILLIAM F. M. GOSS, M. S., Professor of Experimental Engineering. 
JOHN JOSEPH FLATHER, Ph. B., M. M. E., Professor of Machine Design. 
WILLIAM KENDRICK HATT, A. B., C. E., Associate Professor in Applied 

Mechanics. 
RICHARD ADDISON SMART, M. E., Instructor in Engineering Laboratory. 
JOHN HENRY KLEPINGER, B. M. E., Assistant in Engineering Laboratory. 
CLARENCE HOVEY ROBERTSON, B. S., B. M. E., Student-Assistant in 

Engineering Laboratory. 
RAYMOND CLARENCE EWRY, B. M. E., Student- Assistant in Mechanical 

Drawing. 
MARK DANA STROUT, Assistant in Engineering Laboratory. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



FRED MORLEY, B. S., C. E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 
DANIEL BENJAMIN LUTEN, B. S. (C. E.), Instructor in Architectural and 
Sanitary Engineering. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

WINDER ELWELL GOLDSBOROUGH, M. E., Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 

ALEXANDER WILMER DUFF, A. M., B. Sc. [Edin.], Professor of Physics. 

CHARLES PHILO MATTHEWS, M. E., Associate Professor of Electrical 
Engineering. 

SAMUEL NEWTON TAYLOR, Ph. D., Instructor in Physics. 

EDWARD ELLSWORTH REYNOLDS, M. E., Assistant Instructor in Dynamo 
Design. 

CLOYD MARSHALL, B. M. E., Student-Assistant in Electrical'Laboratory. 



AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

WILLIAM CARROLL LATTA, M. S., Professor of Agriculture. 

CHARLES SUMNER PLUMB, B. S., Professor of Animal Industry and Dairying. 

JAMES TROOP, M. S., Professor of Horticulture and Entomology. 

HENRY AUGUSTUS HUSTON, A. M., A. C, Professor of Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

ARVILL WAYNE BITTING, B. S., D. V. M., Professor of Veterinary Science. 

ALEXANDER A. RICE, Lecturer on Rural Law. 

WILLIAM BEECHER ANDERSON, B. S., Assistant Agriculturalist in Experi- 
ment Station. 

MATHEMATICS. 

CLARENCE ABIATHAR WALDO, A. M., Ph. D., Professor of Mathematics. 
MOSES COBB STEVENS, A. M., Professor of Higher Mathematics. 
THOMAS GREENE ALFORD, A. M., Professor of Mathematics. 
ERASTUS TEST, A. M., M. D., Professor of Mathematics. 
EDWIN MORTIMER BLAKE, E. M., Ph. D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

LITERATURE, HISTORY AND ART. 

MRS. EMMA MONT. McRAE, A. M., Professor of English Literature and Lady 

Principal. 
THOMAS FRANCIS MORAN, A. B., Ph. D., Professor of History and Political 

Economy. 
GLEN LEVIN SWIGGETT, A. M., Professor of German and Spanish. 
LAURA ANNE FRY, Professor of Industrial Art. 
PAULINE MARIOTTE-DAVIES, Ph. D., Professor of French. 
ANNA EMBREE BAKER, B. S., Instructor in Wood Carving. 
JOAKIM REINHARD, M. A., Instructor in German. 
MARY DOAN, B. L., M. S., Instructor in English Literature. 



ELEMENTARY MECHANICS AND DRAWING. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH GOLDEN, M. E., Professor of Practical Mechanics. 
WILLIAM PAYSON TURNER, Instructor in Machine Work. 
JAMES DAVID HOFFMAN, M. E., Instructor in Wood Shop. 
CHARLES PETERSON, B. C. E., Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 
JOHN ELMER KOLB, B. M. E., Assistant in Forge Room. 
PAUL WILLIAM COVERT, B. M. E., Assistant in Foundry. 
ALPHA PIERCE JAMISON, B. M. E., Student-Assistant in Wood Shop. 



PHARMACY. 

ARTHUR LAWRENCE GREEN, Ph. C, M. D., Ph. D., Dean and Professor of 

Chemistry in School of Pharmacy. 
JULIUS WILLIAM STURMER, Ph. G., Professor of Pharmacy. 
GEORGE SPITZER, Ph. G., Lectures in Operative Pharmacy. 
BENJAMIN HOAK, Ph. G., Instructor in Pharmacy. 
CLARENCE MELVILLE McKELLIPS, Ph. C, Ph. G., Student-Assistant in 

Chemistry. 
CHARLES EDWIN VANDERKLEED, Ph. C, Ph. G., Student-Assistant in 

Chemistry. 



SAMUEL WARREN MILLER, U. S. A., 1st Lieut. 5th Infantry, Professor of 

Military Science. 
FRANK HOMER CURTISS, Physical Director. 
ELIZABETH DAY SWAN, Librarian. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



Hon. Claude Maithews, Governor of Indiana : 

I herewith sobmit for your consideration the report of the 
President of Purdue University for the two years ending June 
30, 1896, together with a copy of his report to the Secretary of 
the Interior for the year ending June 30, 1896. To these 
reports are appended the financial reports of the Treasurer of 
the University and of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees 
for the year ending October 31, 1896. 

The report of the President of the University treats of the 
following subjects, namely : 

I. Attendance. 

II. Courses of Study and Faculty. 

III. Farmers' Institutes. 

IV. Purdue Publications. 

V. The Completion of the Engineering Laboratory. 

VI. The Value of Industrial Education to the State. 

VII. The State's Obligation to Purdue. 

VIII. The Needs of the Institution. 

You will notice that in paragraph 1, section VIII, the Pres- 
ident of the University refers to a controversy over a supposed 
appropriation by the Legislature to the University involving- 
|9,500. In this connection the Board desires to say that 
under a statute approved February 28, 1889, the University has 
been receiving for general purposes, for each fiscal year begin- 
ning JSTovember 1, the sum of $30,000. The general appro- 
priation bill has invariably carried with it this sum of $30,000, 
but in later years has prescribed that it should be paid in 
quarterly payments beginning January 1. 

What is known as the University tax law, approved March 
8, 1895, provided that the proceeds of a certain tax should be 
paid to the University on and after July 1. This supposedly 
provided for the current expenses of the University from and. 
after July 1, 1896, and not before. » 



The general appropriation bill, approved March 11, 1895, in- 
stead of carrying the usual appropriation of $30,000 to the 
University did carry with it an appropriation of $22,500, as 
might naturally have been supposed for the purpose of paying 
to the University the quarterly installments due January 1, 
April 1 and July 1, 1896, in order to carry the University from 
November 1 to July 1. 

Furthermore, the appropriation of $22,500 was marked 
" Specific," quite contrary to the usual custom of designating 
annual and continuous appropriations. 

The Attorney-General, in an opinion to the Auditor of State, 
however, &eemed to think that the question was involved in 
some doubt, and he advised the Auditor to protect the State 
by retaining $9,500 of the amount, and suggested that the 
Trustees of the University had a remedy in an application to 
the courts for a mandate. 

The language of the Attorney General in his opinion to the 
Auditor of State was, in part, as follows : 

" Your communication of April 18th presents questions that I can not answer 
to my own satisfaction. Inasmuch as the State will be remediless in the event 
you should pay to those institutions moneys that you are not authorized to pay, 
and on the other hand those institutions have a very complete and adequate rem- 
edy provided by way of mandate against you in the event you should not feel 
authorized to pay the amount claimed by them, I am of the opinion that you 
should resolve all doubts on the question submitted in favor of the State, in which 
case the representatives of those institutions, in case they feel aggrieved, can 
readily obtain relief in court." 

After learning of the Attorney-General's doubts the Board 
of Trustees, acting on the suggestion contained in the above, 
submitted the matter to competent attorneys who advised 
them that, in their opinion, the intention of the Legislature 
that Purdue University should have the $9,500 in question 
was plain. Under these circumstances the Trustees of Purdue 
University, in conjunction with the Trustees of Indiana State 
University, whose interest was also involved in the matter, 
believed it to be their duty to bring suit for the purpose of 
rendering effective what they believed to be the legislative in- 
tent. It is needless to say that this suit w^as not brought in 
any contentious spirit, nor for the purpose of obtaining money 
by taking advantage of a mere technicality. The Board felt 
that the money was rightfully due and that it was needed to 



10 

carry out proper and legitimate purposes for the benefit of the 
State. 

The Board desires to say that this statement is not made for 
the purpose of arguing the case in advance of any decision that 
may be rendered, but merely for the purpose of reporting to 
you their action together with the reasons therefor. 

The Board desires also to call the attention of yourself and 
the Legislature to the needs of the University as presented by 
its President. Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES B. STUART, 

President Board of Trustees of Purdue University, 



lo the Board of Trustees, Purdue University : 

I herewith submit the twenty-second annual report for the 
year ending June 30, 1896, as required by the acts of Congress 
under which the institution is organized, and also thebi-ennial 
report for the two years ending October 31, 1896, as required 
by the statutes of the State of Indiana. 

I preface this report with a verbatim copy of the annual re- 
port to the Honorable Secretary of Agriculture and the Hon- 
orable Secretary of the Interior, as required by the act of 
Congress of August 30, 1890. 

These two reports are made out on an entirely different 
basis, and hence show some apparent discrepancies, although 
such do not actually exist. Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES H. SMART, 

December 8, 1896. . President of the University^ 



REPORT TO THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE 
AND THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. 



Name of Institution, Purdue University ; Post-office, LaFay- 
ette ; State, Indiana. 

Report of the President of said institution to the Secretary 
of Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior, as required 
hy act of Congress of August 30, 1890, in aid of Colleges of 
Agriculture and tbe Mechanic Arts. 

I. Condition and Progress of the Institution, Year Ended 
.luNE 30, 1896, Especially Instancing 

1. Course of methods of instruction. 

2. Purpose, structural character and cost of new buildings 
or additions to buildings. 

It will be seen by this report that the number of students 
has not materially changed since last year. The Freshman 
class, however, numbered about forty more than the Freshman 
class of 1894-95. 

The front of the new engineering building has been com- 
pleted and was dedicated early in December, 1895. It is built 
of stone and brick in the most solid and substantial manner; 
is one hundred and fifty feet long, fifty feet wide and three 
stories high, with a tower one hundred and fifty feet high. It 
contains fifteen rooms, which are used for recitation rooms, 
drafting rooms and offices. This gives us an engineering plant 
worth about two hundred thousand dollars. 

On the first of July last the Board of Trustees of Purdue 
University was reorganized under an act of the Legislature. 
The following appointments were made by the Governor : 

Terms Endinc; July 1, 1901. 

BEN.JAM1N HARRLSON Indianapolis. 

CHARLES B. STUART LaFayette. 

WILLIAM A. BANKS LaPorte. 



18 



Terms Ending July 1, 1899. 

JAMES M. BARRETT Fort Wayne. 

JOB H. VAN NATTA LaFayette. 

JOHN MARTIN Brookville. 



Terms Ending July 1, 1897. 

DAVID E. BEEM Spencer. 

SYLVESTER JOHNSON Irvington. 

WILLIAM H. O'BRIEN Lawrenceburg. 

This Board was organized by the election of Charles B. 
Stuart, of LaFayette, as President, the other officers of the in- 
stitution remaining the same. 

The University has maintained a university extension course 
during the year, and has projected what may he known as the 
Purdue Mechanics' Institute, circulars concerning which are 
herewith enclosed. 

Four additions to the Faculty have been appointed for the 
coming year, as follows : Assistant in Physics, Assistant in the 
Department of Literature, Assistant in the Department of Ger- 
man, Assistant in the Department of Electrical Engineering. 

The University has projected a series of monographs on 
sanitary science, as follows : 

No. 1. The Nature of Sanitary Science and Its Value to the State. 
No. 2. Some Sanitary Aspects of Milk vSupplies and Dairying. 

In Preparation — 

No. 3. On the Purification of Water Supplies of Cities and Towns. 

No. 4. Typhoid Fever in Indiana and Its Possible Connection with Water 

Supplies. 
No. 5. Sewage Disposal in Cities and Towns. 

Two of these have been published, the other three are read}' 
for the printer. 

Station bulletins during the year have been as follows : 

No. 56. Field Experiments with Wheat. Potato Scab and Its Prevention. 

August. 
No. 57. The Improvement of LTnproductive Black Soils. November. 
No. 58. Hog Cholera and Swine Plague in Indiana. February. 
No. 59. Bacteriosis of Carnations.* March. 
No. 60. The American Persimmon. April. 

''■' Not for general distribution. 



14 

The annual report and nineteen newspaper bulletins have 
also been issued. 
II. Receipts for and During the Year Ended June 30, 1896. 

1. Balance on hand July 1, 1895, over and above all indebtedness 

(excluding funded debt, if any) 

2. State aid : (a) Income from endowment granted by State 

(6) Appropriation for current expenses $30,000.00 

(c) Appropriations for building or other special pur- 
poses 36,000.00 

3. Federal aid : (a) Income from land grant, act of July 2, 1862 . . . 17,000.00 

(b) For experiment stations, act of March 2, 1887 . . 15,000.00 

(c) Additional endowment, act of August 30, 1890. . 21,000.00 

4. Fees and all other sources 57,183.69 

Total $176,183.69 

III. Expenditures for and During the Year Ended 
June 30, 1896. 

Deficit $16,980.08 

1. Instruction in the subjects specified in Section 1, act of August 

30, 1890 * 121,327.19 

2. Experiment Station 16,308.62 

3. Instruction in all other subjects, if any, not mentioned in Ques- 

tion 1 of this series 17,211.16 

Total expenditures $171,827.05 

lY. Property and Equipment, Year Ended June 30, 1896. 

Value of all buildings, $325,000; of other equipment, $225,000. 

Value of above property (an estimate only is expected) not used for instruction 
in the subjects specified in Sec. 1 of act of August 30, 1890 — Buildings, 
$40,000; of other equipment, $5,000. 

Total number of acres, 190; acres under cultivation, 149; acres used for experi- 
ments, about 100; value of farm lands, $70,000; amount of all endowment 
funds (Land Grant Fund), $340,000. 

Y. Library, Year Ended June 30, 1896. 

1. Number of bound volumes, June 30, 1895 5,935 

2. Bound volumes added during year ended June 30, 1896 804 

Total bound volumes 6,739 

Pamphlets 2,797 

'■■" The answer to this question will include not only the amount received under the act 
of August 30, 1890 (" Morrill Act "), but also all amounts that are expended for the subjects 
specified in that act, irrespective of the character of the funds the amounts may be drawn 
from (State, tuition fees, or endowment, etc.). 



15 
YI. Faculty During the Year Ended June 30, 1896. 

Male. 'Female. 

1. College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts : 

(a) Preparatory classes. (Have none.) 

(6) Collegiate and special classes 44 5 

(c) Total, counting none twice 44 5 

2. Number in all other departments (excepting duplicates — 

Pharmacy) 5 

3. Number of staff of Experiment Station 10 

YII. Students During the Year Ended June 30, 1896. 

Male. Female. 
1. Colleges of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts : 

(a) Preparatory classes. (Pharmacy and Applied Chem- 
istry) 

(6) Collegiate and special classes 423 

(c) Post Graduate courses 13 1 



Total, counting none twice 436 1 

2. Number in all other departments — Art, Pharmacy and 

Science 138 68 

3. Number of students that pursued courses in agriculture, 64 ; mechanical 

engineering, 144; civil engineering, 71; electrical engineering, 158; mining 

engineering, ; architecture, ; household economy, ; 

veterinary science, 64 (all agricultural students take veterinary science) ; 
military tactics, 175. (It is not expected that the sum of these figures will 
equal the number of students given above.) 

4. What degrees and how many of each kind were conferred in 1895-'96 : 

On men— B. S., 6; B. S. (A.), 2; B. S. (C. E.), 8; B. S. (E. E.), 30; B. S. 

(M. E.), 25; M. S., 1 ; A. C, 3; M. E., 3; M. E. (E. E.), 1; Ph. G., 24; 

Ph. C, 10. 
On women— B. S., 10; M. S., 3; Ph. G., 1; Ph. C, 1. 

5. What and how many honorary degrees were conferred in 1895-'96 ? Not any, 

(Signed) JAMES H. SMAKT, 

(Title of officer reporting) President of Purdue University. 



THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT TO THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES. 



The law of the State requires the Trustees of Purdue Uni- 
versity to submit a biennial report concerning the operations 
of the University, and that report is due during the fall next 
preceding the biennial session of the Legislature. 

The report here presented is the report required by the laws 
of Indiana, and also includes the report called for by the acts 
of Congress. 

I. Attendance. 

ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR 1894-95. 

The whole number of students in attendance during the 
year ending June 30, 1895, was 630, classified as follows : 

Oradiiates 36 

Seniors 79 

Juniors 99 

Sophomores 125 

Freshmen 135 

School of Pharmacy 90 

Special Class in Agriculture 33 

Irregular and Special 37 

634 

Deduct for names entered twice 4 

Total 630 

ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR 1895-96. 

The whole number of students in attendance during the 
year ending June 30, 1896, was 635, classified as follows : 

Graduates 37 

Seniors .... 81 

Juniors 94 

Sophomores 114 

Freshmen 174 

School of Pharmacy .... 75 

Special Class in Agriculture 43 

Special 17 

Total 635 



The following tables give the number of students in the var- 
ious departments each year since its opening in 1874 : 



College and 
Special Schools. 


.1 . 

00 00 


L-^ CO 

00 OO 


QO 


o 

QO 


OO 
OO 


So X 

OO OO 


i 


00 


OO 


1-^ 00 

OO OO 


33 


i 


QO 


OO 


CO ^i< 
OO OO 


OO 


i 








1 

2 

6 

6 

23 

22 


3 

4 

5 

12 

28 

13 


1 

9 

14 
15 
34 
10 


2 

7 

11 

22 

36 

8 


2 
8 

13 
30 
39 
21 


1 
3 3 4 


2 3 


11 261 34 


34 


3? 


37 27 25 


1 

36 S7 




1 


1 
1 
6 

8 

1 


li: 15' 12' 121 ]h s -2^ ■•[) 29 
20 13' 14 ItV Kii u :;i :\-l 3k 


35 


45 46 73 79 81 




51 5fil 87i104 99 94 




3 
9 
2 


18 20 


20 16! 271 4'.i 4-J 52 66 


67 

151 

17 

66 

419 


104;138'119 T2"i 114 


Freshmen 

Elective and Special 
School of Pharmacy 
Winter School of 


47 
12 


37 
18 


42 
20 


67 

7 
7 


7-1 
14 
13 


91 
18 
19 


78 P2 
24 46 
28 28 

14 15 


105 
23 

48 

5 
348 


200,15ljl66 

24l 18l 25 
70j 87 85 

13 28 29 


135 
37 
90 

33 

630 


174 
43 


Total 


15 


17 


60 


65 


76 


s 


113 


111 


106 


112 


127 


159 230 


269 328 


549 582 626 


635 



Preparatory Depart- 
ment. 


00 OO 


t-^ 00 


OO 


i 


OO 


-00 


i 


OO 


i 


CO 
OO 


00 


88 

OO 


1889. 
1890. 
1891. 


OO 


OO 


i 


Senior preparatory 

Junior preparatory 


23 
26 


13 
22 
14 

49 


2^ 29 
33 45 

181 27 


35 
48 
36 

119 


46 
71 

117 


57 
58 
26 

li 


48 
38 
41 

127 


35 
34 
44 

113 


59 


96 


116117 74 


76 


84 87 


94 


85 


56 


42 
101 


361 40! 451 25 


35 


3i 27 
115 111 


94 


10 
95 




Total '. 


49 


79 


101 


132 




156 


162 


99 


111 


56 



COUNTIES REPRESENTED. 



]!!^ames of counties represented by one or more students 



Adams, 

A-Uen, 

Bartholomew, 

Benton, 

Blackford, 

Boone, 

Brown, 

Carroll, 

Cass, 

Clark, 

Clay, 

Clinton, 

Daviess, 

Dearborn, 

Decatur, 

DeKalb, 

Delaware, 

Dubois, 

Elkhart, 

Fayette, 

Ployd, 



Fountain, 

Franklin, 

Fulton, 

Gibson, 

Grant, 

Greene, 

Hamilton, 

Hancock, 

Harrison, 

Hendricks, 

Howard, 

Huntington, 

Jackson, 

Jasper, 

Jay, 

Jefferson, 

Jennings, 

Knox, 

Kosciusko, 

Lagrange, 

Lake, 



LaPorte, 

Lawrence, 

Madison, 

Marion, 

Marshall, 

Martin, 

Miami, 

Monroe, 

Montgomery, 

Morgan, 

Newton, 

Noble, 

Orange, 

Owen, 

Parke, 

Perry, 

Pike, 

Posey, 

Putnam, 

Randolph, 



Bush, 

St. Joseph, 

Shelby, 

Spencer, 

Steuben, 

Sullivan, 

Switzerland, 

Tip23ecanoe, 

Tipton, 

Union, 

Vanderburgh, 

Vermillion, 

Vigo, 

Wabash, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Wayne, 

Wells, 

White, 

Whitley. 

Total, 82. 



2 — Purdue. 



18 



STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES REPRESENTED. 

The states and countries represented in the institution dur- 
ing the present year are as follows : 



Arkansas, 


Kentucky, 


New Jersey, 


Virginia, 


California, 


Maryland, 


New York, 


Washington, 


Connecticut, 


Massachusetts, 


North Carolina, 


West Virginia, 


Georgia, 


Michigan, 


Ohio, 


Wisconsin, 


Illinois, 


Minnesota, 


Pennsylvania, 


Germany, 


Indiana, 


Missouri, 


South Dakota, 


Japan, 


Iowa, 


Montana, 


Texas, 


Nova Scotia, 


Kansas, 


Nebraska, 


Vermont, 


Ontario. Total, 32 



The attendance for the year 1895-6 shows but a slight gain 
over that of the previous year. We have simply held our own 
during a season of financial depression. 

1 may add that the enrollment at the opening of the present 
year shows a gain of fifty over that at the beginning of the 
year 1895-6. If this rate of increase is maintained we shall 
enroll over seven hundred students during the present year. 

It is also worthy of note that we have enrolled forty resident 
graduates since September 1, and that most of these are candi- 
dates for an advanced degree. 

The following table will show the growth of the institution 
in respect to attendance since its organization, the respective 
figures being for the year ending June 30, of the years named : 





Col- 
lege. 


Prepar- 
atory. 


Both. 


1875 


15 

17 

60 

65 

76 

86 

113 

111 

106 

112 

127 

159 

230 

269 

328 

348 

419 

549 

582 

626 

630 

635 


49 

49 

■ 79 

101 

119 

117 

141 

127 

118 

101 

132 

156 

162 

99 

111 

115 

111 

94 

95 

56 


64 


1876 


66 


1877 


139 


1878 


166 


1879 


195 


1880 


203 


1881 


254 


1882 


238 


1883 


219 


1884 


213 


1885 


259 


1886 


315 


1887 


392 


1888 


368 


1889 


439 


1890 


463 


1891 


530 


1892 


643 


1893 


677 


1894 


682 


1895 




1896 













19 



II. Courses of Study and Faculty. 

The courses of study have been considerably modified during 
the present year, the changes and additions being such as ex- 
perience has shown to be demanded by the students. 

The course in Architecture has been very much extended, 
and the courses in Modern Languages have been developed in 
such a way as to produce more satisfactory results than have 
heretofore been secured. 

A glance at the list printed herewith will show that some im- 
portant changes have been made in the faculty. Ten new 
names appear. Four of these fill vacancies produced by resig- 
nations, and the other six have been appointed to newly cre- 
ated positions, as follows: An associate professor in Applied 
Mechanics, an assistant in English, an assistant in Physics, an 
assistant in Electrical Engineering, an assistant in Agriculture 
and an assistant in German. 

These come to us from Cornell University, Columbia Col- 
lege, Clark University, Wesleyan University, and the universi- 
ties of Berlin, Copenhagen and Paris. They are filling their 
places most acceptably, and it is safe to say that at no time in 
the history of the University has the faculty been more har- 
monious, and at no time has it done such efficient work as it is 
doing to-day. 

III. Farmers' Institutes. 

The report of the Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes, held 
under the auspices of Purdue University, submitted in separate 
form, shows that the work is very successful and that it has 
been carried to a high degree of efliciency. It is, I believe, gen- 
erally recognized by the thoughtful farmers of the State that 
these institutes form one of the most powerful agencies for in- 
creasing the material resources of the State that has ever been 
inaugurated. The amount of money appropriated for these 
institutes has, however, been found to be inadequate. 

When these institutes were first organized we were able to 
carry on the work largely through voluntary eftbrts. Halls were 
provided without expense, a good deal of free advertising was 
secured and instructors in many cases volunteered their ser- 
vices. This condition of affairs did not long continue., and it 



20 

has become necessary, in order to secure the best results, to pay 
for what we get. We are obliged to pay for the services of 
two instructors at each institute in addition to the ordinar}' 
running expenses, and there is an ever increasing demand for 
the services of the best instructors that can be found in the 
country. This demand must be met or the interest in the^ 
subject, now so strong, will surely wane. 

For two years past, the annual appropriation of $5,000 hav- 
ing been found insufficient to meet the necessary expenses, 
Purdue University has been obliged to supplement the State 
appropriation by appropriations out of her own funds. She 
now provides a Superintendent, furnishes him with an office, 
conducts the general financial affairs of the Institutes and 
places her corps of professors upon call without compensation, 
in order to eke out the meager appropriation. These demands 
upon the resources of the University are rapidly increasing 
and can not longer be met. Purdue is willing to do a large 
share of the supervisory work of the Institutes without ex- 
pense to the Institute Fund, but more than this she is unable 
to do. The appropriation should, I think, be increased to 
$10,000. 

The following table will show something of the extent of the 
Institute work : 



Year. 


No. County 

Institutes 

Held. 


Average 

Attendance 

per 

Institute. 


Total 
Attendance. 


1S89-90 


50 
41 






1890-91 






1891-92 


90 






1892-93 .1 89 






1893-94 

1894-95 

1895-96 


92 
92 
92 


231 
218 

272 


21,252 
20,056 
25,208 



In explanation of the above it may be said that as a rule 
each Institute is in session two days and during that time 
holds five meetings. The attendance ehown in the third 
column is the average attendance for each of the five meetings, 
and since many persons attend a part of these only, it is safe 
to say that the aggregate attendance for the year 1895-6 was 
40,000. 



21 



IV. Purdue Publications. 

One of the objects of Purdue University is to afibrd the 
young men and young women of Indiana an opportunity to 
acquire a good collegiate education in Mathematics, Science, 
Literature and Art, and at the same time to secure instruction 
and practice in such lines of work as will fit them to engage 
in the productive industries. How well she is carrying out 
this purpose let our graduates testify. 

But Purdue has still another purpose. She has laboratories 
and trained scientists who are not only able to properly in- 
struct students, but who are also able to produce, through 
original investigation and research, information of value to the 
general public. 

The Experiment Station connected with the University has 
a trained corps of men engaged in research who, from time to 
time, send out bulletins upon subjects of special interest to the 
farmers. The professors in the College proper also prepare 
and publish information of a wide general interest upon San- 
itary Science, Public Health, Pure Foods, etc. 

The following list shows the publications of Purdue Uni- 
versity for the year 1896 : 

Station Bulletins. 

1. Bulletin No. 58, Hog Cholera and Swine Plague in Indiana. 

A. W. Bitting, B. S., D. V. M. 

2. Bulletin No. 59, Bacteriosis of Carnations. 

J. C. Arthur, D. Sc, and H. L. Bolley, M. S. 

3. Bulletin No. 60, The American Persimmon. 

Jas. M. Troop, M. S., and O. M. Iladley. 

4. Bulletin No. 61, Field Experiments with Wheat. 

W. C. Latta, M. S., and W. B. Anderson, B. S. 

5. Bulletin No. 62, The Udder of the Cow. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

6. Bulletin No. 63, Tuberculosis. A. W. Bitting, B. S., D. V. M. 

■ 7. Bulletin No. 64, The Delayed Germination of Cocklebur and Other 

Paired Seeds. .J. C. Arthur, D. Sc. 

Newspaper Bulletins. 

■ 8. No. 18, On the Winter Protection of Live Stock. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 
9. No. 19, Use of Commercial Fertilizers in Indiana. 

H. A. Huston, A. M., A. C. 

10. No. 20, Kafir Corn in Indiana. W. C. Latta, M. S. 

11. No. 21, Alfalfa Without Irrigation. W. C. Latta, M. S. 

12. No. 22, Oats and Field Peas for Green Fodder. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

13. No. 23, Spraying with Insecticides and Fungicides. James Troop, M. S. 



22 

14. No. 24, Prevention of Potato Scab. J. C. Arthur, D. Sc. 

15. No. 25, Artichokes as Stock Food. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

16. No. 26, Two Important Currant Insects. James Troop, M. S. 

17. No. 27, Preventing Chinch Bug Eavages. James Troop, M. S. 

18. No. 28, Destroying the Russian Thistle. J. C. Arthur, D. Sc. 

19. No. 29, The Use of the Hand or " Baby" Separator on the Farm. 

C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

20. No. 30, Killing the Horn Fly. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

21. No. 31, Crimson Clover in Indiana. W. C. Latta, M. S. 

22. No. 32, Stomach Worms in Sheep. A. W. Bitting, B. S., D. V. M. 

23. No. 33, Winter Oats in Indiana. W. C. Latta, M. S. 

24. No. 34, Notes from the Experiment Station. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

25. No. 35, Shredding Corn Fodder. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

26. No. 36, Hog Cholera; Suggestions to Swine Growers. 

A. W. Bitting, B. S., D. V. M. 

27. No. 37, Keeping Fall and Winter Apples. James Troop, M. S. 

28. No. 38, The Setting of Milk. C. S. Plumb, B. S. 

Series Relating to Public Health. Severance Burrage, B. S. 

29. No. 1, The Nature of Sanitary Science and its Value to the State. 

30. No. 2, Some Sanitary Aspects of Milk Supplies. 

31. No. 3, On the Purification of Water Supplies of Cities and Towns. 

32. No. 4, Typhoid Fever in Indiana, and Its Possible Connection with 

Water Supplies. 

33. No. 5, Sewage Disposal in Cities and Towns. 

Series Relating to Food. 

34. No. 1, Food Adulteration. Percy Norton Evans, Ph. D. 

35. No. 2, State Laws on Food Adulteration, with a Brief Bibliography. 

William Henry Test, M. S. 

36. Dietary Studies at Purdue University, LaFayette, Ind., in 1896. 

Winthrop E. Stone, Ph. D. 

37. The Carbohydrates of Wheat, Maize, Flour and Bread, and the Action of 

Enzymic Ferments on Starches of Different Origin. 

Winthrop E. Stone, Ph. D. 

Series Prepared by Engineering Department and Published in Trans- 
actions. 

38. Notes Concerning the Performance of the Purdue Locomotive "Sche- 

nectady." W. F. M. Goss, M. S. 

39. Tests of a Ten-Horse-Power DeLaval Steam Turbine. 

W. F. M. Goss, M. S. 

40. The Effects upon the Diagrams of Long Pipe-Connections for Steam- 

Engine Indicators. W. F. M. Goss, M. S. 

41. The Effect of High Rates of Combustion upon the Efficiency of Loco- 

motive Boilers. W. F. M. Goss, M. S. 

42. A Hydraulic Dynamometer. Jas. D. Hoffman, M. E. 



23 



Summary of the Work of the Faculty, Published by the Uuiveisity. 



Department. 



No. 



Pages 
in Each 
Edition. 



Editions 
of Each. 



Total 
Issue. 



Total 
Pages. 



Station 

Sanitary Science .... 

Food . 

Newspaper Bulletins. 

Totals 



o 

4 

21 



150 
92 

110 
21 



37 



373 



14,000 

2,000 

2,000 

600 



98,000 

10,000 

8,000 

12,600 



2,100,000 

184,000 

220,000 

12,600 



18,600 



128,600 2,516,600 



Published for the Faculty in Transactions. 


Department. 


No. 


Pages 
in Each 
Edition. 


Editions 
of Each. 


Total 
Issue. 


Total 
Pages. 


Engineering Laboratory .... 


5 


115 


2,000 


10,000 


230,000 


Grand totals 


42 


488 


20,600 


138,000 


2.746,600 











From the above it will be seen that Purdue sent out forty- 
two publications during the year, having an aggregate of 488 
pages, the sum of the editions amounting to 20,600, and caused 
to be put into circulation about 3,000,000 printed pages of 
scientific matter of high economic value, largely the result of 
original research. This is exclusive of many articles prepared 
by the faculty and published in various educational and scien- 
tific journals throughout the country, of the "Proceedings of 
the Purdue Society of Civil Engineering," which contains six 
addresses on scientific subjects, delivered at the University, 
and of many student publications of general or special in- 
terest. 

The research work of the Engineermg Laboratory has at- 
tracted very wide attention, and its results have appeared in 
many scientific publications, as well as in the transactions of 
scientific organizations. In addition to this the work of the 
laboratory has been reproduced and commented upon in seven- 
teen different scientific publications, two of them being Euro- 
pean ; there being eighty-five different references to Purdue 
and its work, the matter aggregating one hundred and fifty- 
seven columns. 



24 

The following extracts from the series of bulletins on Sani- 
tary Science and Food Adulteration will explain, more fully 
the purposes of these publications : 

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL, No. L 

Purdue University is a public institution supported in part by the State. The 
State has a right, therefore, to demand that the institution should make some 
substantial and adequate return for the money which it receives. It endeavors to 
perform this duty in two ways: 

1. By the education of young men and young women so that they may be- 
come not mei-ely good citizens, but that through their ability to apply knowledge 
they may build up the material resources of the commonwealth. 

2. By the dissemination of useful information among the people by lectures 
and various scientific publications. 

It has carried out this latter purpose for mau}^ years by the issuance of quar- 
terly bulletins which carry information to the farmer, the fruit grower and the 
live stock breeder. The number of these bulletins distributed amounts to 60,000 
annually. 

The University has recently established a Department of Sanitary Science, 
and is thus enabled to make its large and well equipped chemical, biological and 
sanitary laboratories directly available to the people by the issuance of bulletins 
pertaining to public health, a subject of vital importance to every citizen of the 
State. 

During tlie current University year it will publish, for general free distribu- 
tion, bulletins upon the following subjects: 

1. Nature of Sanitary Science and its Value to the State. 

2. Some Sanitary Aspects of Milk Supplies and Dairying. 

3. On the Purification of Water Supplies of Cities and Towns. 

4. Typhoid Fever in Indiana and Its Possible Connection with Water Supplies. 

5. Sewage Disposal in Cities and Towns. 

It is hoped that these bulletins will prove especially helpful to county com- 
missioners, city councils, county and city boards of health, and to the medical 
fraternity, and that through the kindly aid of the press their information may be 
brought to the attention of a very large proportion of the citizens of the State. 

So important and wide-spreading are the problems involved in Sanitary 
Science that the force of the Department and the University authorities feel that 
no higher duty rests upon them than the dissemination of such knowledge as will 
tend to the maintenance and protection of public health. The work is therefore 
done in addition to the regular University work in order that the institution may 
fulfill the high obligation of serving the State in its most vital interests. 

JAMES H. SMART, 

President of (he University. 

NoTR— This scries will Ije followed by a series of papers on Pure Foods. 



25 
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL, No. 2. 



To the Public : 



Food is at once the most costly and the most essential material thing for which 
man strives. A large proportion of all wages is spent for food, while its prepara- 
tion for the table is the chief care of the ordinary household, and finally, upon 
the character, quality and amount of food consumed, depends largely the physical, 
mental and moral condition of the race. 

The truth of these general statements will be conceded by all, and on this 
account it is the more surprising that popular information is so limited upon the 
questions of food adulteration and its prevention ; upon the comparative value 
and economy of foods; upon their proper use; upon the prevention of wastes, and 
many other equally important matters. 

One of the modern forms of practical philanthropy is occupied with the ques- 
tion of teaching economy in the purchase and use of food and the application of 
scientific principles to its preparation, and the choice of diet. To the student in 
these matters it is evident that there is great need of general popular information 
on the subject. The authorities of Purdue University believe, thprefore, that 
their policy of disseminating practical and useful information among the citizens 
of Jndiana can be applied to no more important matter than this. 

It is, therefore, proposed to issue a series of five or rnore brief bulletins upon 
foods, treating of the adulteration of food and its prevention ; of the use and econ- 
omy of foods ; and of special studies upon the preparation of foods and upon 
dietaries. These bulletins will in part give the results of special scientific investi- 
gations made at Purdue University and will also aim to present general informa- 
tion from other sources bearing upon the subject. They have been prepared under 
the general supervision of Professor Winthrop E. Stone, Director of the Chemical 
LaboratorV of the University. 

JAMES H. SMART, 

President of the Universify. 
November 1, 1896. 

V. The Completion of the Engineering Laboratory. 

As recited in a previous report, the Engineering Laboratory, 
representing a cost of $170,000, was almost completely de- 
stroyed by fire on the night of January 23, 1894. This hibo- 
ratory consisted of two portions — (1) a three-story front, not 
quite completed; (2) the rear portion of the structure consist- 
ing of extensive working laboratories, which, with equipment, 
cost about $123,000. 

As shown by that report, we had after the fire an available 
reconstruction fund, from insurance and other sources, of 
$47,754.30. We secured donations from private parties to the 
amount of about $30,000, and we borrowed from the general 
fund about $25,000. The entire engineering force was put to 
work to reconstruct some of the machinery, and students and 
faculty worked untiringly for many months. The result was 



26 

that the shops and some of the laboratories were restored and 
equipped with many additions and improvements, and when 
completed were valued at about $150,000. 

The General Assembly of 1895 appropriated $25,000 with 
which to restore the balance to the general fund referred to 
above. 

The front of the building, not then restored, originally cost, 
with the third story unfinished, $47,000. The General Assem- 
bly was asked to appropriate $50,000 for its reconstruction. 
It did appropriate $36,000. The Board decided, however, to 
proceed with the process of re-erection. The front was com- 
pleted, with the third story unfinished, and without the pro- 
posed lighting plant, for the sum of $45,348.07. In order to 
do this the Board was obliged to use $9,348.07 of the general 
fund — money which might properly have been used for other 
needed improvements. 

I wish to report that, chiefly through the generosity of the 
Ladies' Matinee Musicale of LaFayette, many of the graduates 
of the University and of a number of public-spirited citizens 
of LaFayette, a clock with a peal of four bells has been placed 
in the tower of the new Engineering Laboratory, the com- 
pletion of the installation being celebrated by appropriate 
exercises on April 8, 1896 

The clock was furnished by the E. Howard Watch and Clock 
Company, and the bells by Meneely & Co., of Troy, N. Y., 
through the agency of C. H. Ankeoy, of this city. The clock 
has proved an excellent time-keeper, but the bells, although 
fine in (|uality, were not found heavy enough to serve the pur- 
pose for which they were intended. The parties interested 
have agreed to change the present bells for others better 
adapted to the purpose without expense to the University. 
These will doubtless be in position before this report reaches 
the public. 

VI. The Value of Industrial Education to the State. 

One of the most significant features of recent educational 
movements is the prominence that has been given to the sub- 
ject of technical education. During the past twenty-five years 
a large number of institutions have been established for the 
purpose of educating young men, and young women also, in 



IWmAnA BTASfE UBRARY 



27 

such a way that they may make an application of scientific 
knowledge to the practical industries. These institutions have 
marked out new courses of study, have adopted new methods, 
and have made a somewhat remarkable illustration of the new 
education. They did not come into existence by accident, they 
came in obedience to a demand for them. The present age is 
an industrial age and calls for men who will use their knowl- 
edge in utilizing the great forces of Nature for the benefit of 
their fellow men. It wants men who can build better bridges, 
better houses and better machinery. It wants men who can 
grow better crops and can prevetnt the enormous wastage that 
comes from the diseases of plants and animals. It wants men 
who can give us better water supply and better systems of 
sewerage for our cities and towns. It demands men who un- 
derstand the principles of sanitary science, and who know how 
to protect the public from impure foods and contagious diseases. 

Men are needed to show us how to prevent the enormous 
wastage which is occurring in every department of human en- 
deavor. 

If the technical schools will turn out one man who through 
the application of sanitary science will add a year to the aver- 
age of human life, or one who will show us how to prevent in- 
sect ravages and fungus diseases in plants, or one who will 
show us how to U8e coal in a locomotive and develop twenty 
per cent, of its possible power instead of five per cent., as at 
present, they will produce a man who will be worth as much 
to the community as the cost of all the technical schools in the 
United States for the past twenty-five years. 

This is precisely what Purdue University is striving to do. 
The institution is not, however, pervaded by a purely com- 
mercial spirit, on the contrary its main purpose is to educate 
men and women, but to educate them in such a way that they 
will become directly and practically useful to the community. 
An effort is made from the beginning of their course to the 
end of it to give them a spirit of helpfulness and to teach them 
that their obligation to their fellows is limited only by their 
ability to serve. An eflfbrt is also made to inculcate in them a 
spirit of loyalty. and patriotism, and to imbue them with the 
idea that since the State has provided an education for them, 
they should, so far as in them lies, use that education for her 
benefit. 



28 

Surely if the State provides any money for higher education 
she can well afford to devote money to education of this sort. 

I wish now to reinforce the argument I have just made by 
calling your attention briefly to the experience of European 
countries in respect to the value of technical education. 

In 1851 England built a magniticent Crystal Palace, and in 
vited the civilized nations of the earth to make an exhibition 
of their natural resources, of the products of human ingenuity, 
and of the triumphs and trophies of modern civilization. 
"When that exhibition was over all England stood aghast. In 
all those departments of labor into which artistic design and 
decorative skill entered France had carried off the honors. 

A commission of inquiry was immediately formed, the result 
of which was that in less than twenty five years England had 
two hundred well equipped technical schools, one of which 
cost 16,000,000, and four thousand other schools in w^hich 
technical instruction formed a part of the curriculum. As a 
result England made such an advance in her commercial in- 
dustries as had never before been known. 

The following extract from a competent writer upon this 
subject will show something of the experiences of Francs in 
this matter. 

"That education has to do with manual training is a fact that has been rec- 
ognized in the educational systems of nearly all civilized nations, and the effect 
of it upon the useful arts and upon the greatness and happiness of a jjeople has 
not been better illustrated in modern times than in the industrial history of 
France. We know that the most thorough artisans in the world are found in 
France, and that the whole earth pays tribute to her art and taste. She has been 
devastated by mighty wars, her people have been sacrificed by millions, her ex- 
penditure has been almost beyond computation, and yet to-day she is, next to 
Great Britain, the richest of all nations, while perhaps her people are the hap- 
piest in Europe. 

"We can remember her spoliation in the Franco-Prussian War, and the 
heavy indemnity with which she was compelled to ransom her peace; and we can 
also remember how she arose as if by some supernatural influence from a pros- 
tration which would have indefinitely destroyed the industries of almost any other 
nation, and attained at a single step to the summit of prosperity. Just exactly how 
this -was managed puzzled those who did not consider her cultivated arts. She 
had a monopoly in the markets of the world for many kinds of commodities 
which depend upon design and finish, and in which she had scarcely a competitor. 
Her skilled labor brought in its account against the world, and every nation con- 
tributed to her prosperity. 

"The foundations of her success were laid when art schools were first estab- 
lished for the instruction of her children. Drawing and designing were taught to 
thousands of pupils, and their eyes and tastes were at the same time instructed by 
the beautiful statues and pictures of the masters. 



29 

"These schools have been multiplied until they exist in all the cities and 
manufacturing communities in France ; and the French workman has become the 
most accomplished artisan that the world has ever seen. 

"An annual importation into this country alone of millions' worth of the 
productions of French industrial art is evidence that it is not the pauper labor of 
Europe, but skilled labor of the highest order, that affects our own industries. 

"The establishment of these schools by the French accounts largely for their 
superiority in architecture, engraving, and pottery, as well as for the beauty and 
elegance of their silks, satins, muslins and brocades ; and perhaps it is not too 
much to say that in all the arts applied to industry the superior excellence of 
their fabrics is confessed by other manufacturing nations. It is not, therefore, 
surprising that France has given such a splendid example of industrial or art 
education." 

Such has been also the experience of Germany. It is worthy 
of note that in certain large districts the value of her agricul- 
tural products has nearly doubled within the past thirty years ; 
and Germany has seventy technical schools. 

YII. The State's Obligation to Purdue. 

In order to show that Purdue is a State institution, and that 
the State is under an obligation to maintain it, I quote the fol- 
lowing from our last annual catalogue, under the heading of 

ORIGIN OP PURDUE. 

Purdue University is an institution organized under an Act of Congress, 
approved July 2, 1862. This act appropriated publi'c lands to the several States 
for the purpose of aiding in the maintenance of colleges "where the leading 
objects shall be, without excluding other scientific or classical studies, and in- 
cluding military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agricultural and mechanical arts." This act provides that the State shall estab- 
lish and maintain not less than one college as described above. 

It also provides certain conditions under which this shall be done. Among 
these are: 

First — "No portion of said fund, nor the interest thereon, shall be applied 
directly or indirectly, under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, 
preservation or repair of an}' building or buildings. 

Second — "Any State which may take and claim the benefit of the provisions 
of this act shall provide within five years, at least, not less than one college, as 
described in the fourth section of this act, or the grant to such State shall cease; 
and said State shall be bound to pay the Ignited States the amount received of any 
lands previously sold, and that the title to purchase under the State shall be 
valid." 

The State of Indiana, by an act approved March 6, 1865, obligated itself as 
follows : 

"The State of Indiana accepts and claims the benefits of the provisions of the 
acts of Congress, approved .July 2, 1862, and April 4, 1864, and assents to all the 
conditions and provisions in said acts contained." 



30 

The State has accepted from John Purdue, and other citizens of Tippecanoe 
County, donations to the amount of $230,000, and pledged the faith of the State 
to the adequate and perpetual maintenance of the institution. Also from Amoa 
Heavilon the sum of $35,000 with similar pledge and guarantee. 

Location. — By act of the Legislature of 1869 the institution thus provided 
for was located in Tippecanoe County, and the faith of the State pledged that the 
location so made shall be permanent. 

The Name Purdue University was also established by legislative act 
of 1869, as follows: "In consideration of the said donation by John Purdue, 
amounting to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and of the further donation 
of one hundred acres of land appurtenant to the institution, and on condition 
that the same be made effectual, the said institution, from and after the date of 
its location as aforesaid, shall have the name and style of "Purdue University"; 
and the faith of the State is hereby pledged that such name and style shall be the 
permanent designation of said institution, without addition thereto or modifica- 
tion thereof." 

It thus appears that the University, while bearing the name of John Purdue,, 
is an institution exclusively under State control, and that Government aid was- 
originally extended not for establishing, but for aiding in the maintenance of a 
State college of a specific kind. This intention is again clearly intimated in the 
Morrill Act of 1890, by which the United States Government makes additional 
appropriation "for the more complete endowment and maintenance of colleges 
for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts." 

Purdue University was, therefore, not established by the 
United States Government, nor by John Purdue, but it wa& 
established by the State of Indiana; and not only so, but in 
accepting the donations from the Government and from John 
Purdue, the State obligated itself to adequately maintain the 
institution forever. 

While it is to be admitted that the State has so far dis- 
charged this obligation well, it is easy to show that for every 
dollar she has put into Purdue the institution has received 
two dollars from other sources. 

Purdue has received from various sources other than the 
State of Indiana donations, as follows : 

Original land grant $340,000'. 00 

United States Treasury, Hatch fund 127,500.00 

United States Treasury, Morrill act 148,000.00 

John Purdue and others 230,000.00 • 

Amos Heavilon 35,000.00 

Donations of machinery, apparatus, etc 50,000.00 

Total $930,500.00 

Since the organization of the institution the State of Indi- 
ana has appropriated for permanent improvements the sum of 



31 

$268,500, while the value of all the University property abso- 
lutely owned by the State, upon its present valuation, is 
$620,000. In other words, the State now has two dollars and 
thirty cents' worth of property for every dollar that she has 
appropriated for permanent improvements. In what way has 
the State ever received so much for so little ? Can not the 
State under these circumstances afford to deal with Purdue 
with a liberal hand? 



VIII. The Needs of the Institution. 

In order to place the front of the Engineering Laboratory 
under roof and finish the first and second stories we have been 
obliged, as has been stated in a previous section, to use money 
from the general fund which the Board had hoped to apply to 
other purposes. This deficit has placed a great burden upon 
the University. 

If the entire amount which we supposed was appropriated 
to us by the last General Assembly, for the eight months be- 
ginning November 1, 1895, and ending June 30, 1896, namely, 
$22,500, had been realized, this embarrassment would have been 
relieved, but $9,500 of that amount has not been received by 
the University, owing to some diversity of opinion as to the 
terms of the law\ 

It will be seen that there is a necessity that the Board should 
secure this amount of $9,500 from the Legislature if it should 
appear that it is not still due us under the statute. 

2. The history of the permanent improvements made at the 
University is a history of large enterprises successfully com- 
pleted, with but limited appropriations therefor. While, as a 
result of this, the State possesses a very large amount of 
tangible property as compared with the appropriations she has 
made, the process by which this result has been reached has 
been attended by some serious difficulties. For example, the 
Library has been neglected. 

The growth of scientific literature has been so rapid in re- 
cent years that constant additions must be made to the library 
of any institution which makes any pretense whatever of en- 
gaging in scientific research. A starved library makes starved 
professors, and starved professors make starved students. 



32 

Again, we have eighteen buildings, some of which are nearl}' 
twenty years old. These need thorough overhauling and ex- 
tensive repairs. 

Some of our machinery is antiquated and some of it is worn 
out and must soon be replaced. For the purposes named in 
this paragraph I should think S12,000 would be needed. 

3. The report of Professor Latta, in charge of the School of 
Agriculture, submitted herewith, presents the needs of the 
schools of Agriculture, Horticulture and Veterinary Science, 
You will observe that he asks for an appropriation of $17,000^ 
for the purposes of enlarging the veterinary hospital, building 
new green houses, enlarging Agricultural Hall and fitting up 
new laboratories therein. 

I fully sympathize with Professor Latta's expression of the 
needs of his department, and believe that it would be a wise 
expenditure of money if he could have all that he asks for. 

4. From the report of Professor Goss, in charge of the- 
School of Mechanical Engineering,- submitted herewith, it will 
be seen that we have added so much to our machinery that we 
have not the power to run it. We should, I think, have at 
once a new power-house with a boiler capacity of six hundred 
horse-power. Profeesor Goss estimates the cost of this at 
$16,300. 

He also estimates the cost of the completion and full equip- 
ment of the front of the Engineering Laboratory at $6,425, 
making a total cost for the Engineering Laboratory of $22,725. 
I think a part of this work only should be undertaken during 
the present year. It is my opinion that $15,000 would be a 
moderate amount to cover the improvements which it would 
be wise to attempt at this time. 

5. The Electrical Department has grown with great rapidity 
and therefore needs larger quarters. Furthermore it is well 
known that the rapid advance in the science of electricity re- 
quires a constant renewal of apparatus and as constant addi- 
tions thereto. In no department of our work do the apparatus 
and machinery become obsolete so quickly and in none is there 
such a demand for continued outlay. 

I hand you herewith a detailed report from Prof. Golds- 
borough, in charge of the School of Electrical Engineering, 
showing that he estimates the cost of the improvements which 
he desires at $17,500. I have thought it not wise to ask for 



33 

this amount at this time and would, therefore, recommend 
that we make but a portion of these improvements at present, 
and ask for but $10,000 for this purpose. 

These requests, amounting to $54,000, are I believe for neces- 
sities. They are not based upon estimates padded in view of 
having them cut in two. They are the result of the most care- 
ful computations made by men who understand what they want 
and how much it will actually cost. I should hope, therefore, 
that these facts could be so presented to the Legislature that 
the suggested appropriation would be made. 

6. I have in former reports urged upon you the necessity 
of providing for a Chapel. The one we now use is in the third 
story of the Main Building, and occupies room needed for 
other purposes. It seats but three hundred and fifty, and we 
have at the present time about six hundred and fifty students. 

For the past five years we have never been able to hold gen- 
eral chapel exercises, and of course commencement exercises 
and other general entertainments are, so far as this audience- 
room is concerned, entirely out of the question. 

7. If it were of any use to do so, I could present a very 
strong argument for the erection of a Gymnasium and Bath 
Rooms. Yale already has a gymnasium that cost $250,000, 
and the President of Columbia College has recently asked for 
$350,000 for a similar purpose. With these facts in view, if we 
were to ask for $25,000 it should not be regarded as an extrav- 
agant demand. Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES H. SMART, 

President. 



3 — Pdrdue. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



As Treasurer of Purdue University I hereb}' submit my re- 
port of all moneys received for the year ending October 31, 
1896: 

From the State of Indiana, interest on State bonds S17,000 00 

From State of Indiana, reimbursement 12,500 00 

From State of Indiana, for reconstruction of en- 
gineering laboratory . 6,000 00 

From State of Indiana, part of annual appropria- 
tion 15,000 00 

From State of Indiana, educational institution 

. tax 30,509 22 

From miscellaneous sources 23,380 88 

Total $104,390 10 

As Treasurer of Purdue University I hereby submit m}^ re- 
port of all moneys received for the year ending June 30, 1896: 

From the U. S. Government seventh installment 

Morrill Fund $21,000 00 

Total $21,000 00 

James M. Fowler, 

Treasurer. 



35 

Expenditures from General Fund for Year Ending Octoher 

31, 1896. 

Salary of Faculty $25,758 50 

Supplies 12,406 02 

Care of buildings 4,765 20 

Improvements 4,424 85 

Apparatus 2,025 43 

Furniture and fixtures , 2,040 98 

Care of grounds and greenhouse 1,600 65 

Labor ..^ 1,510 68 

Employes 1,320 00 

Books and periodicals 1,252 80 

Repairs 1,125 00 

Catalogues, envelopes and stamps 1,075 78 

Lectures, principally for short course in agricul- 
ture 838 60 

Insurance 777 74 

Advertising , 649 95 

Commencement expenses, including diplomas and 

tent 686 14 

Express, freight and hauling 587 39 

Printing and stationery 485 75 

Postage 363 61 

Rebate of fees 344 96 

Clock and chimes 361 51 

Trustee' mileage and per diem 311 25 

Traveling expenses to Institute and other meet- 
ings 262 81 

Expense securing Faculty 153 70 

a'elephones 106 45 

Dedication of Engineering Laboratory 103 86 

Publications, bulletins 115 58 

Trips of inspection with classes 68 20 

Telegrams 31 44 

Miscellaneous 20 50 

Total 165,575 33 

The above is a correct statement of expenditures from the 
General Fund for year ending October 31, 1896. 

E. A. Ellsworth, 
Secretary Board of Trustees. 



36 



Endowment Fund, Year Ending October 31, 1896. 

Salaries of faculty $13,725 04 

The above is a correct statement of expenditures from the 
Endowment Fund for year ending October 31, 1896. 

E. A, Ellsworth, 

Secretary Board of Trustees. 



Seventh Installmeyit of Morrill Fund. 

Paid salaries of professors and instructors $21,000 00 

The above is a true statement of expenditures from the 
seventh installment of the Morrill Fund. 

E. A. Ellsworth, 

Secretary Board of Trustees. 



K 



BIENNIAL REPORT 



INDIANA 



State Normal School 



-CONTAINIXG- 



Reports of the F*resid.en.t of ttie Board, of 

TTrtjLstees, tine Presid-erat of the Facility, 

the Secretary of the Board. 

and of the Treastarer, 



TWO YEARS ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 



TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 



I 



THE STATE OF INDIANA 

Executive Department, 
DiANAPOLis, December 12, 1896 



,1 



Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the'Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office op Auditor of State, 

Indianapolis, December 14, 1896. 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



December 14, 1896. 
Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, December 
14,. 1896. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer , 189. 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



CALENDAR FOR 1896-97. 



The Fall term begins Tuesday, September 15, and ends 
Wednesday, December 23. 

The Winter term begins Tuesday, January 5, and ends Fri- 
day, March 26. 

The Spring term begins Tuesday, March 30, and ends Fri- 
day, June 25. . . 

The holiday vacation extends from Wednesday, December 
23, 1896, to Tuesday, January 5, 1897. 

Other regular holidays observed by the institution are 
Thanksgiving and the following day and the afternoon of 
Decoration Dav. 



OFFICERS. 



Board of Trustees. 

*MUERAY BEIGGS, Sullivan, Indiana. 

WILLIAM H. ARMSTRONG, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Shelbyville, Indiana. 

COL. LEWIS B. MARTIN, Terre Haute, Indiana. 

DAVID M. GEETING, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

tCHARLES W. WARD, Newport, Indiana. 



OflS.cers of the Board. 

WILLIAM H. ARMSTRONG, President, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
COL. LEWIS B. MARTIN, Secretary, Terre Haute, Indiana. 
WILLIAM R. McKEEN, Treasurer, Terre Haute, Indiana. 



Committees. 



Teachers and Instruction — Messes. Tomlin, Geeting. 
Finance — Messrs. Armstrong, Ward. 
Library and Apparatus — Messrs. Ward, Parsons. 
Buildings and Grounds — Messrs. Martin, Armstrong. 



Board of Visitors for 1897. 

SUPT. JAMES F. SCULL, Rochester, Indiana. . 
SUPT. WILL H. SENOUE, Brookville, Indiana. 
JUDGE R. D. RICHARDSON, Evansville, Indiana. 



Clerk. 
MINNIE E. HILL. 

Assistant Clerk. 
MARY G. TAYLOR. 

Assistant Librarian. 
MARY L. E. JONES. 



* Died September 18, 1896. 
t Appointed October, 1896. 



FACULTY. 



William W. Parsons, President 634 Cherry Street. 

Professor History and Philosophy ot Education. 

Howard Sandison, Vice-President 43-1: N. Center Street. 

Professor Mental Science and Methods. 

Ellwood W. Kemp 438 N. Center Street. 

Professor History. 

Albert K. Charman 715 S. Seventh Street, 

Assistant Professor Mental Science and Methods. 

Mary J. Anderson (Leave of absence until April 1, 1897.) 

Assistant Professor English Grammar and Composition. 

Robert G. Gilli'm 49 S. Gilbert Ave. 

Professor Physics and Chemistry. 

Louis J. Eettger 35 S. Gilbert Ave. 

Professor Biology. 

Arthur Cunningham 6-10 Eagle Street. 

Librarian. 

Charles M. Curry 730 S. Fourth Street. 

Professor Reading and English Literature. 

Francis M. Stalker 668 Swan Street. 

Assistant Professor Mental Science and Methods. 

Charles R. Dryer 438 N. Center Street. 

Professor Geography. 

Mary Moran 323 S. Fourth Street. 

Assistant Professor Reading and English Literature. 

William T. Turmax -. 1123 S. Fourth Street. 

Professor Penmanship and Drawing. 

John B, Wisely 1241 N. Tenth Street. 

Professor English Grammar and Composition. 



Oscar L. Kelso 633 Chestnut Street. 

Professor Mathematics. 

Edith Whitenack 503 N. Eighth Street. 

Assistant Professor English Grammar and Compesition. 

Charles L. Pulliam 316 IST. Seventh Street. 

Assistant Professor Mathematics. 

Beatrice O. Sanders 413 N. Sixth Street. 

Professor Music. 

Elizabeth Eose 116 N. Eighth Street. 

Assistant Professor Latin and German. 

John J. Schlicher 911 Maple Avenue. 

Professor Latin and German. 

Charles F. Hoick 613 Mulberry Street. 

Assistant Professor Geography. 

Anna Sankey 649 Poplar Street. 

Assistant Professor Latin and German. 

Edward M. Bruce 518 Is. Sixth Street. 

Assistant Chemical and Physical Laboratories. 

Thomas Records 200 N. Fifth Street. 

Assistant Biological Laboratory. 

Kate Moran, Principal 323 S. Fourth Street. 

Grades Seven and Eight, Training School. 

Emma J. Batty 630 Cherry Street. 

Grades Five and Six, Training School. 

Anna Trueblood 41 S. Eleventh Street. 

Grades Three and Four, Training School. 

Gertrude Robinson 630 Cherry Street. 

(grades One and Two, Training School. 

May Manlove 817 Ohio Street. 

Kindero;arten. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



To the Honorable, the General Assembly of Indiana : 

In compliance with the provisions of Section 13 of the act 
creating a State IS^ormal School, approved December 20, 1865, 
I have the honor to transmit the report of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the Indiana State ISTormal School covering the two 
years ending October 31, 1896, for your consideration, and 
would respectfully refer to the attached report of the President 
of the faculty for a comprehensive statement of its scholastic 
condition, and to the itemized report of the Secretary and 
Treasurer for its exact financial status, both of which I hope 
justify the expectation that they may be found satisfactory. 

That the importance of this school and its value to the State 
in its educational progress and intellectual development may 
be brought to mind, it may be well to call attention to the fact 
that nearly 15,000 persons have received instruction there and 
that the schools of the State have largely received the benefit 
therefrom; that during the last j^ear 1,570 different persons 
were students in this school, and that ninety- one counties of 
the State were represented in this manner; that while the cost 
•per capita to the State is less than that of most other educa- 
tional institutions of similar character, the results attained are 
in the reverse ratio, the repeated testimony of the expert. 
Boards of Visitors having been that it is one of the best ex- 
amples of what a IlTormal School should be. 

The course of study is adapted to all who come possessed of 
the elements on which the education of a teacher should be 
built, and the highest incentives of self-government, character 
and proficiency are constantly maintained. 

That the school may continne to go forward in its usefulness 
and be able fully to meet the increasing demands for its ad- 
vantages made by the people of the State, the careful consider- 
ation of the General Assembly to the recommendations made 
by the President of the Facult}^ and the official Board of Vis- 
itors is respectfully invoked. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM H. ARMSTRONG, 

President Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
FACULTY. 



Hon. William H. Armstrong, 

President Board of Trustees Indiana State Normal School: 

I submit herewith a report of the scholastic condition of the 
State JSTormal School for the two years ending October 31, 1896 : 

THE FACULTY. 

There are at present thirtj-one members of the faculty, as 
follows : The President, who is also head of the Department of 
History and Philosophy of Education ; a Vice-President, who 
is head of the Department of Mental Science ; twelve additional 
heads of departments, twelve assistant instructors, five train- 
ing-school teachers and two laborator}^ assistants — thirty-one 
instructors in all. Owing to the larger attendance in the 
spring term of each year it is necessary to employ a number of 
additional teachers for this term. 

ISTo departments have been added since the report of two 
years ago, and no changes have been made in the organization, 
except that the Departments of Latin and German have been 
combined and have been placed under the direction of one 
professor. Besides effecting a considereble reduction in the 
cost of teaching these subjects, it was thought that to put the 
combined departments under the direction of one professor, 
with a sufficient number of assistants would unify more fully 
the work and make the two subjects mutuall}- helpful in a 
greater degree. Thus far there seems no reason for regretting 
the change. 

In former years many of the classes in the school were en- 
tirely too large to be properly instructed. I am glad to be 
able to say that, for the first time in several years, there are 
only a few classes that are considered too large to be taught 
efficiently as now organized. The increased revenue derived 
from the direct tax levied in accordance with the law enacted 
by the last General Assembly, has made it possible to employ 



9 

several additional teachers and thus divide many of the classes 
that would otherwise have been too large for satisfactory work. 
Nothing else could have been so great a gain to the school 
as this. In all successful teaching every individual class must 
be reached by the teacher and tested frequently enough to be 
kept in a state of active attention. In a Normal School it is 
of the highest importance that classes shall not be so large as 
to render this impossible. Every class exercise in a Normal 
School should be a model of its kind, and nothing more seriously 
interferes with this than classes unwieldy by reason of excess- 
ive numbers. 

THE STUDENTS. 

The table given on page 14 of this report shows that in the 
year ending October 31, 1895, 1,535 different students attended 
the school, and that in the past year 1,570 attended for a 
greater or less period. The average attendance per term is 
about 800. The school has grown very rapidly in recent years, 
notwithstanding the conditions of admission have been made 
somewhat stricter and the standard for graduation has been 
raised. 

Since the Normal School was organized and is maintained 
by the State "to prepare teachers for teaching in the common 
schools of Indiana,'" it has at all times limited its work to con- 
ferring a thorough, systematic, teacher's knowledge of the 
subjects taught in the elementary and high schools of the 
State, and such strictly professional subjects as are fitted to 
enable the teacher to understand the principles which underlie 
his vocation. The constant effort has been to make the work 
of the school thorough, fundamental and organic — to lead 
students to a mastery of the principles of the subjects studied 
and of the art of teaching. 

A long experience with the various classes of students who 
have attended the school has shown the necessity for a 
better grade of scholarship and for greater maturity on the 
part of those attempting the work. The average girl of six- 
teen or boy of eighteen who has onl}^ the general knowledge of 
the common school branches acquired in the district or grade 
school has been found unable to pursue the Normal School 
course to advantage. It has been found necessary to require 



10 

this class of students to spend a considerable time in prepara- 
tory study before undertaking the work proper of the iSTormal 
School. 

Township, town and city high schools, and other schools for 
secondary education, have so multiplied and increased in effi- 
ciency in recent years that the Normal School wishes no longer 
to duplicate the work of these schools. It will, therefore, ad- 
mit hereafter only such persons as give evidence of the ability 
and scholarship necessary to pursuing its course with a fair 
degree of success. 

Hereafter it will admit without examination only the follow- 
ing classes of new students : College and university graduates, 
graduates of commissioned high schools, and persons holding 
one or more three-year, two-year or one-year county li- 
censes. Persons not included in these classes will be required 
to pass such thorough examinations in the common school 
branches as will show their fitness to enter the school. It is 
strongly advised that all persons secure the grade of license re- 
quired before presenting themselves for admission. It is be- 
lieved that a strict adherence to these conditions will enable 
the school to accomplish in higher degree the object for which 
it was created. 

It is the testimony of most county and city superintendents 
and school trustees that there is a large surplus of teachers. 
Probably several thousand persons hold teachers' licenses in 
Indiana to-da}- and desire to teach who can not secure schools. 
The demand, therefore, is not for a larger number of teachers, 
but for a higher grade of abilit}', a larger scholarship and a 
more thorough professional training on the part of those who 
offer themselves as teachers. The State Normal School must 
justify its organization and maintenance by securing as students 
persons of good natural ability and fair attainments and by 
conferring on these persons a scholarship and professional pre- 
paration which shall constant!}' tend to elevate the standard of 
public school work in the state. With a reasonable standard 
of admission, the school can probably meet the demands on it 
for several years to come. 

THE NEW BUILDING. 

Realizing several years ago that the one large building occu- 
pied by the school would soon be insufficient to accommodate 



11 

the large number of students asking admission, the trustees 
purchased a piece of ground about 100 feet square adjoining 
the property already owned, with the view of erecting at some 
time an additional building thereon. The need of additional 
room became apparent very soon. It was seen that the library, 
although quite a large room, was entirely insufficient. The 
library, consisting of about 16,000 volumes, has been built up 
almost entirely by the library fees paid by students. 

It was deemed important, too, to have the chemical and phy- 
sical laboratories in a separate building, that the main building 
migbt be free from disagreeable odors arising from these, and 
that greater safety might exist. 

In 1893, a request was made for an appropriation with which 
to construct an additional building. The amount asked for 
was for the construction of the building alone, no furnishings 
of any kind being contemplated. It was thought that tempo- 
rary furniture could be used until the General Assembly might 
feel justified in making an appropriation for the proper fur- 
nishing of the building. An appropriation of |40,000 was 
made, which proved just about sufficient to enclose the build- 
ing. It lay idle, therefore, and of no use to the school until 
the last General Assembly met. A request was then made for 
$38,000, with which to complete and equip the building. This 
request was based on careful estimates as to the cost. An ap- 
propriation of $20,000 was made, and w^ith this, supplemented 
by several thousand dollars taken from other funds, the second 
and third stories of the building were completed and equipped 
for use. 

The first and fourth floors are entirely in the rough. It 
would be of the greatest advantage to the school if these could 
be completed and placed at the disposal of the school for every 
day use. The architect estimates that it would require about 
$15,000 to complete and furnish these two stories. 

It would also be a step in the line of economy, and of great 
advantage to the school as well, if a small lot for the enlarge- 
ment of the boiler house could be bought, a dynamo put in, 
the old building wired for electric lights, and the institution 
itself take charge of the lighting of its buildings. It is esti- 
mated that this could be done for about $5,000, making the total 
appropriation desired $20,000. 



12 



LIBRARY. 



The library is now comfortably situated in the new building. 
The entire floor above the basement is devoted to library pur- 
poses, thus giving ten thousand square feet to this department. 
Light, heat, ventilation, architectural beauty, and, above all, 
adaptability to the special purpose in view, have been prime 
considerations in its construction. 

The library at present contains sixteen thousand volumes. 
The old library having been entirely destroyed, the books we 
have are new and carefully selected with reference to the 
special needs of our school, so that the number alone gives no 
real conception of its working capacity. A special fund en- 
ables us to buy such books and periodicals as are needed in the 
regular work of the school, and the design is to build up grad- 
ually and steadily a large reference library especially strong in 
pedagogical literature. 

PURPOSE, AIM, METHODS. 

The library is the general laboratory, or workshop of the 
whole school. Text-books serve their more legitimate function 
as guides in the various subjects taught, and students are sent 
to the library with references more or less specific, according 
to their advancement and individual needs, to the leading 
authorities and sources of information. 

Instruction in the use of the library is both general and 
specific. The general instruction is given in the form of talks, 
explaining briefly (1) the nature and practical use of the card 
catalogue, the classification and shelf arrangement of the 
books, the rules and regulations; (2) the use of the title pages, 
prefaces, indexes, table of contents, etc. ; (3) the scope and 
special value of the general reference books, such as encyclo- 
pedias, dictionaries, atlases, periodicals and bibliographies. 
Besides instruction of this kind, individual assistance, so far 
as other duties of the librarian will permit, is rendered (1) 
in the search for the latest and best information upon par- 
ticular topics, (2) in the guidance and selection of material for 
collateral and general reading, and (3) in explaining the me- 
chanical contrivances of various authors, and in helping to 
answer the great number of (piestions that continually arise. 



13 

An immediate advantage of snch a method of instruction is 
the conversion of the routine and spiritless recitation of the 
old regime into a varied and animated presentation of subject- 
matter gleaned from many eminent authors and original docu- 
ments. There is here also an opportunity to meet those indi- 
vidual needs that are determined by the laws of heredity, 
physiological accidents, and previous training. A knowledge 
of books, a breadth of view, and an enthusiasm for truth are 
permanent and sure results of a right use of the library. By 
systematic training in scholarly habits of research, it is be- 
lieved that a pupil will leave this school greatly strengthened 
and enabled to pursue successfully his life work. 

NEEDS. 

Though much has been done the past year to furnish and 
equip this department in a manner befitting its importance to 
the school, much remains to be done even in a material way ; 
but our most urgent need is additional assistance for the care 
and cataloguing of books. The students themselves also need 
assistance which we can not at present render in any adequate 
manner. In the meantime, the library hours should be ex- 
tended, and provision made for opening in the evening. 



14 



STATISTICS. 



The following table exhibits the number enrolled during 
each term since the organization of the school, the average 
term enrollment for each year, and the whole number of dif- 
ferent students for each year. 



Year Ending. 





Enrollment. 




a 


Num- 
Diflfer- 
udents 
3 Year. 










^^5-a 


Winter 
Term. 


Spring 
Term. 


Fall 
Term. 


Total. 




Who 
ber 
ent 
for 


40 


66 


36 


142 


47 


98 


33 


84 


76 


193 


64 


141 


85 


131 


96 


312 


104 


224 


106 


197 


125 


428 


143 


286 


74 


279 


143 


496 


165 


304 


146 


218 


121 


485 


162 


322 


118 


183 


1"3 


404 


135 


382 


120 


246 


171 


537 


179 


329 


187 


413 


216 


816 


272 


592 


198 


385 


200 


783 


261 


530 


218 


372 


258 


848 


283 


578 


270 


478 


258 


1,006 


335 


732 


256 


424 


280 


960 


320 


694 


297 


539 


308 


1,144 


381 


773 


329 


542 


301 


1,172 


391 


777 


320 


583 


353 


1,256 


419 


868 


369 


612 


319 


1,300 


433 


909 


334 


639 


370 


1,343 


447 


942 


375 


629 


343 


1,347 


449 


936 


379 


689 


355 


1,423 


474 


968 


359 


671 


386 


1,426 


475 


1,009 


421 


800 


440 


1,661 


552 


1,086 


441 


957 


441 


1,839 


613 


1,160 


372 


930 


381 


1,683 


561 


1,084 


436 


1,183 


598 


2,227 


741 


l,4'i9 


680 


981 


528 


2,185 


727 


1,535 


534 


1,167 


454 


2,455 


818 


1,570 



October 31, 1870 

■■ 1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884, 
1885 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889 
1890. 
1891. 
1892, 
1893. 
1894, 
1895. 
1896. 



Other States have been represented during the past two 
years as follows : 



Arizona 1 Kansas 1 Nebraska, 1 

Idaho 1 Kentucky 2 North Carolina.. 1 

Illinois 53 Missouri 3 Ohio 7 



15 



Since the organization of the school in 1870, students have 
registered from the various counties of the state as ^follows : 



Adams 22 

Allen 27 

Bartholomew... 84 

Benton 143 

Blackford 20 

Boone 275 

Brown 38 

Carroll 255 

Cass 163 

Clark 129 

Clay 239 

Clinton 188 

Crawford 12 

Daviess 59 

Dearborn 78 

Decatur 59 

Dekalb 21 

Delaware 105 

Dubois.. 54 

Elkhart 37 

Fayette 69 

Floyd... 72 

Fountain 141 

Franklin 152 

Fulton 101 

Gibson 103 

Grant 91 

Greene 136 

Hamilton 61 

Hancock 136 

Harrison 37 



Hendricks 353 

Henry 246 

Howard 251 

Huntington 246 

Jackson 60 

Jasper 60 

Jay 34 

Jefferson 92 

Jennings 38 

Johnson 116 

Knox 216 

Kosciusko 115 

Lagrange 79 

Lake 17 

Laporte 19 

Lawrence 99 

Madison 175 

Marion 250 

Marshall 23 

Martin 31 

Miami 134 

Monroe 22 

Montgomery ....184 

Morgan 219 

Newton 92 

Noble 48 

Ohio 14 

Orange 52 

Owen 245 

Parke 385 

Perrv 36 



Pike 28 

Porter 1 

Posey 130 

Pulaski 72 

Putnam 328 

Randolph 88 

Ripley 44 

Rush 96 

Scott 42 

Shelby 84 

Spencer 100 

Starke 17 

Steuben 6 

St. Joseph 51 

Sullivan 233 

Switzerland 79 

Tippecanoe 183 

Tipton 69 

Union 20 

Vanderburgh 78 

Vermillion 235 

Vigo 2049 

Wabash 449 

Warren 120 

Warrick 173 

Washington 83 

Wayne. 275 

Wells 65 

White 107 

Whitley 35 



16 



WHENCE THEY COME. 



Durin^^ tlie past two years, ninet^^-one counties of the state 
have had representatives in the school as follows : 



Adams 11 

Allen 8 

Bartholomew... 15 

Benton 20 

Blackford 3 

Boone 53 

Brown 9 

Carroll 81 

Cass 21 

Clark 21 

Clay 46 

Clinton 35 

Crawford 1 

Daviess 13 

Dearborn 10 

Decatur 3 

Dekalb 1 

Delaware 11 

Dubois 13 

Elkhart 3 

Fayette 10 

Floyd 11 

Fountain 31 

Franklin 50 

Fulton 18 

Gibson 13 

Grant 11 

Greene 25 

Hamilton 6 

Hancock 37 

Harrison 10 



Hendricks... 51 

Henry 53 

Howard 71 

Huntington 46 

Jackson 13 

Jasper 14 

Jay 9 

Jefferson 5 

Jennings 10 

Johnson 20 

Knox 69 

Kosciusko 18 

Lagrange 18 

Lake 3 

Laporte 2 

Lawrence 22 

Madison 57 

Marion 36 

Marshall 5 

Martin 10 

Miami 14 

Monroe 1 

Montgomery 28 

Morgan 40 

I^ewton 16 

Noble 3 

Ohio 2 

Orange 18 

Owen 52 

Parke 50 

Perry 6 



Pike 4 

Porter 

Posey 13 

Pulaski 10 

Putnam 66 

Randolph 24 

Ripley 14 

Rush 24 

Scott 3 

Shelby 16 

Spencer 19 

Starke 5 

Steuben 3 

St. Joseph 5 

Sullivan 30 

Switzerland 7 

Tippecanoe... 26 

Tipton 14 

Union 5 

Vanderburgh 7 

Vermillion 23 

Vigo 310 

Wabash 67 

Warren 22 

Warrick 25 

Washington 16 

Wayne , 38 

Wells 18 

White 21 

Whitley 6 



The attendance from Vigo County includes many who have 
removed to Terre Haute from other counties to have the ad- 



vantages of the school. 



17 



Siuce the opening of the school, in 1870, other states and 
countries have been represented, as follows : 



Arizona 2 

Arkansas 2 

Canada 2 



Connecticut.... 

Florida 

Georgia 

Germany 

Idaho 

Illinois 383 

Iowa 3 



Kansas 11 

Kentucky 33 

Louisiana 1 

Massachusetts .. 2 

Michigan 7 

Minnesota 2 

Missouri 11 

Nebraska 5 

NewTork 3 

North Carolina. 4 



Oklahoma 1 

Ohio 71 

Pennsylvania 7 

South Dakota 1 

Texas 2 

A^ermont 1 

Virginia 2 

AYest Virginia ... 1 

Wisconsin 3 

Unknown 51 



Total number of different students since the organization of 
the School, 13,783. 

Of the 873 graduates and the 12,910 undergraduates of the 
institution, it is impossible to determine what proportion are 
now teaching, but a large majority, it is known, are actively 
engaged in the school work of the state. It is doubtful if there 
is a township in the state which has not, at some time, had one 
or more teachers from this institution, and probably the public 
schools of no county of the state are at this time without sev- 
eral representatives of the Normal School. Capable graduates 
and undergraduates experience no difficult}" in securing posi- 
tions at remunerative salaries. The supply of such persons, 
qualified for systematic, thorough school work, has for several 
years proved quite unequal to the demand. 



2 — State Normal. 



18 



FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 



Clj 


Term. 


G?oSpty. '^^-^-^- 


■■'Arithmetic. 


■'English 
Grammar. 


'■'Penmanship. 


0! 


2d 
Term. 


^'■'Physical 
Geography. 


•■'Reading. 


•■'Arithmetic. 


'■'English 
Grammar. 


Vocal Music. 


f^ 


Sd 
Term. 


Political 

Geography, 

with Map 

Drawing. 


'•'United 

States 

History. 


•■'Physiology. 


'^English 
Grammar. 


Vocal Music, 


< 


Term. 


'■'Educational 

Psychology. 

(Gen. Nature 

of Mind.) 


'■'United 

States 
History. 


'•'Physiology. 


Drawing. 


Vocal Music. 

Latin. 

German. 


Ed 

o 

S5 

o 


5th 
Term. 


^Educational 

Psychology. 

(Stages of 

Knowing.) 


Chemistry. 


Drawing. 


'■'Rhetoric 
and Compo- 
sition. 


Latin. 
German. 




6th 
Term. 


""Educational 

Psychology. 

(Feeling.) 


Chemistry. 


Drawing. 
Botany. 


Rhetoric 
and Compo- 
sition. 


Latin. 
German. 


d 


7th 
Term. 


''■'Educational 

Psychology'. 

(Will.) 


Chemistry. 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin . 
German. 


Q 

2 


8th 
Term. 


'•■Theory 
of the 
School. 


•■'Methods. 

(Language, 
Reading and 
Arithmetic.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
German. 


H 


9th 
Term. 


'•'History and 

Philosophy 

of Education. 


'^Methods. 
(Geography 
and History.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
German. 




10th 
Term. 


'■'History and 

Philosophy 

of Education. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 




nth 

Term. 


'•'History and 

Philosophy 

■of Education. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 


o 


12th 
Term. 


'•'Practice 

in Training 

School. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 



Fifty credits are necessary to complete this course. The subjects marked thus " are re- 
quired; the other subjects are elective. 

All students are required to present a satisfactory thesis before graduating. 



19 



COUKSE FOR GflADUATES OF COMMISSIONED HIGH SCHOOLS. 

(Three Years.) 



« 


Term. 


"Physical 
Geography. 


■•'Reading. 


'•'Arithmetic. 


'■■"English 
Grammar. 


'■'Penmanship. 


EH 


2d 


■'■■"Physical 
Geography. 


'■'Reading. 


'■'Arithmetic. 


'■'English 
Grammar. 


Vocal Music. 


f^ 


5d 
Term. 


Political 
Geography 
with Map 
Drawing. 


'■■'United 

States 

History. 


'■■"Physiology. 


'•'English 
Grammar. 


Vocal Music. 




4th 
Term . 


••■■Educational 
Psychology. 
(General Na- 
ture of Mind.) 


'■United 

States 

History. 


'■'Physiology. 


Drawing. 


Vocal Music. 

Latin. 

German. 


H 

X 

Q 
O 


5th 
Term. 


'•■"Educational 

Psychology. 

(Stages of 

Knowing.) 


Chemistry. 


Drawing. 


'•'Rhetoric 
and Compo- 
sition. 


Latin. 
German. 


CO 


6th 
Term. 


'■■"Educational 

Psychology. 

(Feeling.) 


Chemistry. 


Drawing. 
Botany. 


Rhetoric 

and Coaipo- 

sition. 


Latin. 
German. 


» 


7th 
Term. 


'■'Educational 

Psychology. 

(Will.) 


Chemistry. 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
German. 


o 


8th 
Term. 


'Theory of 
the School. 


'■'Methods. 

(Language, 

Reading and 

Arithmetic.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
German. 


H 


9th 
Term. 


'■•'History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


'■'"Methods. 

(Geography 

and 

History.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin 
German. 




10th 
Term. 


"■■'"History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 


n 


nth 

Term. 


'''History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 


o 


12ih 
Term. 


'■■"Practice 
Training 
School. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 



Thirty-eight credits are necessary to complete this course. 

The subjects marked '•' are required; the remaining subjects may be elected by the stu- 
dent. All students are required to present a satisfactory thesis before graduating. 



20 



COURSE FOR PERSONS HOLDING THREE YEARS' COUNTY LICENSE. 

(Three Years.) 





lit 

Term . 


tPhysical 
Geography. 


tReading. 


■(■Arithmetic- 


tEnglish 
(rrammar. 


tPenman- 
ship. 


00 


Term. 


tPhysioal 
Geography. 


tReading. 


fArithmetic. 


tEnglish Vocal 
Grammar. Music. 


£ 


Sd 
Term . 


Political 

Geography, 

with Map 

Drawing. 


tUnited 

States 

History. 


tPhysiology. 


tEnglish 
Grammar. 


Vocal 
Music. 


OS 

-<l 
e 

C 

z 

o 


hth 
Term. 


•■Edueational 1 fUnited ' 

Psychology. , g^^^^gg tPhysiology. Drawing. 
(General JNa- TTisfnrv 
ture of Mind.)l history. 


Vocal Music. 

Latin. 

German. 


.5th 
Term. 


"Educational 1 
Psychology. rhpTni'«t-rv 
(Stages of Chemistry. 

Knowing.) ! 


Drawing. 


'•'■Rhetoric 
and Com- 
position. 


Latin. 
German. 




6th 
Term. 


'■■■Educational 

Psychology. 

(Feeling.) 


Chemistry. 


Drawing. 
Botany. 


Rhetoric 
and Com- 
position. 


Latin. 
German. 


»i 


7th 
Term. 


"-■■■EducatioDal 
Psychology. 

(Will.) 


Chemistry. 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
German. 


H 
D 


Sth 
Term.. 


•■•'Theory 
of the 
School. 


'■•'■Methods. 

(Language, 
Reading and 
Arithmetic.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin 
German. 


H 


9th 
Term. 


'•■'History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


'■■'Methods. 

(Geography 

and 

History.) 


Algebra. 


General 
History. 


Latin. 
Germ-in. 


si 


10th 
Term. 


•■•■•History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Zoology 
Physics. . 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 


a 

OS 


mh 

Term. 


••■■History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 


O 


mh 

Term. 


'■■Tractice 
Trainin 

School. 


Zoology. 
Physics. 


Geometry. 


Literature. 


Latin. 
German. 



Fifty credits are necessary to graduation in this course. Fourteen of this number are 
given without examination or class study — the subjects marked thus t. The subjects marked 
thus'^' are required — twelve. The remaining twenty-four credits may be made in the elect- 
ive subjects. 

COURSE FOR COLLEGE GRADUATES. 

(One Year.) 



Educational 
First Psychology. 
Term. (General Nature 
1 of Mind.) 


Educational 

Psychology. 

(Will.) 


History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Observation 

in Training 

School. 


Second 
Term. 


Educational 

Psychology. 

(^^tages of 

Knowing.) 


Theory of 
the School. 


History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Methods. 

(Language, 

Reading and 

Arithmetic.) 


Third 
Term. 


Educational 
Psychology. 

(Feeling.) 


Practice in 
Training School. 


History and 

Philosophy of 

Education. 


Methods. 

(Geography 

and History.] 



EXPLANATION OF COURSES OF STUDY. 



The State ISTormal School maintains four courses of study, 
as follows: (1) A four years' course; (2) an abridgment of 
this course for graduates of commissioned high schools ; (3) an 
abridgment of the same course for persons holding one or 
more three years' licenses, and (4) a course for college graduates. 

The course of four years embraces all the subjects that are 
found in any and all the courses provided. It is designed to 
meet the needs of those persons that enter the school having 
the minimum scholarship. The object of this course is to give 
as thorough and complete a preparation for common school 
teaching as can be conferred in the period named. It will be 
noticed that the course includes much more work than can be 
done in four years; but the student of average ability, and 
who possesess a fair knowledge of the common school branches 
on entering can make credits enough in four years to graduate. 
Fifty credits are necessary to graduation. In this number 
penmanship and music are included, and may be taken as fifth 
studies. Four subjects carried successfully throughout the 
course, with music and penmanship two terms as fifth studies, 
give the required credits for graduation. The common school 
branches and the entire line of professional work are required 
— about two years. The remaining subjects necessar}^ to grad- 
uation may be elected by the student, with the advice of the 
faculty. 

The course of three years for graduates of commissioned 
high schools is the same as the four years' course, except that 
such graduates are given a credit of one year — twelve credits 
— and are thus enabled to graduate in three years. Such grad- 
uates are required to take the common school branches and 
the entire professional work of the course. The remaining' 
subjects may be elected by the student, with the advice of the 
faculty. Thirty-eight credits are necessary to graduation in 
this course. 



22 

High school graduates usually have only such knowledge of 
the common school branches as they have acquired at an early 
age and in the grades below the high school. For this reason 
they are required to spend one full year in a thorough, profes- 
sional study of these branches in the Normal School course. 

This credit of one year is given to graduates of commissioned 
high schools, not because they are supposed to have a teacher's 
professional knowledge of the subjects pursued in the high 
school, but on the ground that the high school course has con- 
ferred a general culture that fairly entitles them to this credit. 
The thirty- eight credits necessary to graduation in this course 
must all be made by actual class work in the institution, or by 
thorough, extended examinations on the subject-matter required 
for each credit. 

A second three years' course is provided for those persons 
who possess a thorough knowledge of the common school 
branches. Persons holding one or more three years' county 
licenses are credited with the common branches — fourteen 
credits — and are thus enabled to complete the course in three 
years. Thirty- six credits made in the School by actual class 
work, or by thorough and extended examinations on the sub- 
ject-matter required for the credits, are necessary to graduation 
in this course. Of these the eleven professional subjects, which 
are starred in the tabulated statement, are required; the re- 
maining twenty-five credits may be made in subjects elected by 
the student, with the advice of the faculty. 

The course of one year for college graduates has been organ- 
ized to meet the needs of those graduates of colleges and uni- 
versities who wish to enter the field of teaching and superin- 
tending schools, and who feel the need of professional training 
for this work. It w\\\ be noticed that the instruction is of a 
strictly professional character. In planning this course it is 
assumed that the student has a liberal and accurate knowledge 
of the subjects required to be taught in the public graded and 
high schools. It is further assumed that this academic knowl- 
edge and training, important and necessary as it is, does not 
alone qualify one for the delicate and responsible work of 
teaching and managing schools. It is sought, therefere, to 
give the student that professional knowledge and skill that 
belong peculiarly to the teaching profession. Only such per- 
sons are eligible to this course as have graduated from some 



23 

college or university maintaining a thorough college course of 
not less than four years. 

Persons holding a life state license to teach in Indiana are 
credited with two years on the course, and are thus enabled 
to graduate in two years. Such persons are required to take 
the eleven professional subjects of the course, and are permitted 
to elect the subjects in which to make the remaining thirteen 
credits required for graduation. 

The courses of study are planned for students of average 
ability and attainments. Persons of greater ability and attain- 
ments can complete the course in less than four years ; those 
of less ability and scholarship will need more than four years 
to graduate. 



24 



HIGH SCHOOLS. 



The following are the High Schools of the State whose grad- 
uates are entitled to a year's credit on the course : 



City or Town. 



County. 



SUPEKINTENDENT. 



Albion 

Alexandria . . . 

Amboy 

Anderson 

Andrews 

Attica 

Aubnrn 

Aurora 

Bedford 

Ben Davis .... 
Bloomfield .... 
Bloomington . . 

Blnffton 

Boonville 

Bourbon 

Brazil 

Brookville .... 

Butler 

Cambridge City 

Carthage 

Clinton 

Columbia City 

Columbus 

Connersville . . 

Converse 

Crawfordsville 
Crown Point . . 

Danville 

Decatur 

Delphi 

Dublin 

Edinburg 

Elkhart 

Elwood 

Evansville .... 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Fort Wayne . . . 

Fowler ." 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goodland 

Goshen 

Gosport 

Greencastle . . . 
Greenfield .... 
Greensburg . . . 
Hagerstown . . . 
Hammond .... 
Hnntingburs;. . 



Noble 

Madison 

Miami 

Madison 

Huntington . . 
Fountain . . . . 

Dekalb 

Dearborn . . . . 
Lawrence . . . . 

Marion 

Greene 

Monroe 

Wells 

Warrick 

Marshal] 

Clay 

Franklin . . . . 

Dekalb 

Wayne 

Rush 

Vermillion. . . 
Whitley . . . . 
Bartholomew. 

Fayette 

Miami 

Montgomery . 

Lake 

Hendricks . . . 

Adams 

Carroll 

Wayne 

Johnson 

Elkhart 

Madison 

Vanderburgh 

Clinton 

Johnson 

Allen 

Benton 

Dekalb 

Grant 

Newton 

Elkhart 

Owen 

Putnam 

Hancock 

Decatur 

Wayne 

Lake 

Dubois 



W. A. Fox. 

I. V. Busby. 

Philip M. Hoke. 

John W. Carr. 

J. C. Comstock. 

W. A. Millis. 

B. B. Harrison. 

J. R. Haston. 

W. E. Alexander. 

Michael Reiley. 

Walter T. Brown. 

W. H. Fertich. 

W. P. Burris. 

Charles E. Clark. 

B. McAlpine. 

John C. Gregg. 

Noble Barter. 

Harry E. Coe. 

Paul Wilkie. 

J. Edwin Jay. 

H. P. Leavenworth. 

(Miss) L. E. Melhintch. 

J. A. Carnagey. 

W. F. L. Sanders. 

H. S. Bowers. 

I. N. Wellington. 

Frank T. Heighway. 

P. V. Voris. 

A. D. Moffett. 
W. S. Almond. 
Samuel Plasket. 
Charles F. Patterson. 
D. W. Thomas. 
Thos. F. Fitzgibbon. 
W. A. Hester" 

B. F. Moore. 
Will Featheringill. 
Justin N. Study. 
Burton B. Berry. 
George M. Hoke. 
AY. O. Warrick. 

J. C. Dickerson. 
W. H. Simms. 
W. O. Hiatt. 
R. A. Ogg. 
George S. Wilson. 
Will P. Shannon. 
Lee Ault. 
W. C. Belman. 
J. T. Worsham. 



25 
HIGH SCHOOLS- 



-Continued. 



City or Town. 



County. 



Superintendent. 



Huntington 

Indianapolis 

Jeff'ersonville 

Kendailville 

Kentland 

Knightstown 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lagrange 

LaGro 

Laporte 

Lawrenceburg. . . . 

Lebanon 

Liberty 

Ligonier 

Ijima 

Logansport 

Madison 

Marion 

Martinsville 

Mishawaka 

Michigan City . . . 

Middletown 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Monticello 

Mooresville 

Mount Vernon . . . 

Muncie 

New Albany 

New Castle 

New Harmony . . . 

Noblesville 

North Manchester 
North Vernon. . . . 

Oakland City 

Orleans 

Oxford 

Pendleton 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Plymouth 

Portland 

Princeton 

Remington 

Rensselaer 

Richmond 

Rising Sun 

Roann 

Rochester 

Rockport 

Rockville 

Rushville 

Salem 

Seymour . . . . , 

Shelby ville 

South Bend 

Spencer 



Huntington . 

Marion 

Clark 

Noble 

Newton 

Henry 

Howard 

Tijopecanoe . 
Lagrange . . . 

Wabash 

Laporte 

Dearborn . . . 

Boone 

LTnion 

Noble 

Lagrange . . . 

Cass 

Jefferson .... 

Grant 

Morgan 

St. Joseph . . 

Laporte 

Henry 

Wayne 

Lawrence . . . 

White 

Morgan 

Posey 

Delaware . . . 

Floyd 

Henry 

Posey 

Hamilton . . . 
Wabash . . . . 
Jennings . . . 

Gibson 

Orange 

Benton 

Madison . . . . 

Miami 

Pike 

Marshall . . . 

Jay 

Gibson 

.Jasper 

Jasper 

Wayne 

Ohio 

Wabash . . . . 

Fulton 

Spencer 

Parke 

Rush 

W^ashington . 
.Jackson . . . . 

Shelby 

St. Joseph . 
Owen 



Robert I. Hamilton. 
David K. Goss. 
P. P. Stultz. 
D. A. Lambright. 
Ellis H. Drake. 
W. B. Van Gorder. 
Horace G. Woody. 
Edward S. Ayers. 
Charles H. Taylor. 
George Long. 
D. C. Seelye. 
R. E. Call. 
.James R. Hart. 
J. W. Short. 
W. C. Palmer. 
Herbert S. Gilhams. 

A. H. Douglass. 

C. M. McDaniel. 
W. D. Weaver. 
W. D. Kerlin. 

B. J. Bogue. 
Edward Boyle. 
Henrv N. Coffman. 
J. H.'Scholl. 

D. H. Ellison. 
J. W. Hamilton. 
G. B. Coffman. 
Edwin S. Monroe. 
yV. R. Snyder. 
W. H. Hershman. 
J. C. Wier. 
Hiram W^. Monical. 
.J. F. Haines. 
Walter S. Irwin. 
(Miss) Leva M. Foster. 
F. D. Churchill. 
Charles A. Freeman. 
M. F. Orear. 

E. D. Allen. 

W. R. J. Stratford. 
W. H. Foreman. 
Roscoe A. Chase. 

C. L. Hottle. 
Charles N. Peak. 
W. R. Murphy. 
W. H. Sauders. 
Thomas A. Mott. 
W. S. Rowe. 
Thomas Berry. 
James F. Scull. 

F. S. Morganthaler. 
J. F. Thornton. 
Samuel Abercrombie. 
Charles E. Morris. 
H. C. Montgomery. 
J. H. Tomlin. 
Calvin Moon. 

R. H. Richards. 



26 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued. 



City or Town. 


County. 


Superintendent. 


Sullivan 


Sullivan 


W. C. McCullough. 
William H. Wiley. 
A. E. Malsbarry. 
F. L. Jones. 


Terre Haute 


Vigo 


Thorn town 


Boone 


Tipton 

Union City 

Valparaiso 

Vevay 


Tipton 


Randolph 


W. 0. Bowers. 


Porter 


C. H. Wood. 


Switzerland 


Aime Trafellette. 


Vincennes 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Washington 

Waterloo 

Williamsport 


Knox 

Wabash 

Kosciusko 

Daviess 

Dekalb 

Warren 

Pulaski 

Randolph 

Greene 

Marion 

Boone 


Albert E. Humke. 
M. W. Harrison. 
.James H. Henry. 
W. F. Axtell. 
H. H. Keep. 
S. C. Hanson. 


Winamac 


C. W. Kimmell. 


Winchester 

Worthington 

West Indianapolis 

Zionsville 


Oscar H. Baker. 
(Miss) Frances Benedict. 
A. E. Martin. 
Henry F. Gallimore. 



CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



First. 
males. 
Second 
Third. 
Fourth 



Sixteen years of age, if females, and eighteen, if 



Good health. 
Satisfactory evidence of undoubted moral character. 
A pledge that the applicant will, if practicable, 
teach in the common schools of Indiana a period equal to 
twice that spent as a student in the Xormal School. 

Fifth. A fair knowledge of the following subjects : Spell- 
ing, Writing, Reading, English Grammar, Geography, United 
States History, Physiology and Arithmetic. 

The State Normal School has been at work for more than 
twenty- six years. In this period it has had nearly thirteen 
thousand different students. This number has included young 
men and women of nearly all grades of ability and scholar- 
ship. A considerable number of college graduates have taken 
the course provided for such persons; a large number of 
graduates of commissioned high schools and other schools of 
equal rank have pursued the course arranged for this class of 
students; by far the larger proportion of this number have 
been persons who had little or no scholarship beyond the eight 
legal or common branches. 



27 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 



Section 4557 of the school hiw of Indiana reads as follows : 
" The Board of Trustees is authorized to grant, from time to 
time, certificates of proficiency to such teachers as shall have 
completed any of the prescribed courses of study, and whose 
moral character and disciplinary relations to the school be sat- 
isfactory. At the expiration of two years after graduation, 
satisfactory evidence of professional ability to instruct and 
manage a school having been received, they shall be entitled to 
diplomas appropriate to such professional degrees as the Trus- 
tees shall confer upon them, which diploma shall be considered 
suflficient evidence of qualification to teach in any of the schools 
of the State." 

Graduates who make application for diplomas under the pro- 
visions of the law are required to produce certificates of their 
success in instruction and school management and as to the 
number of months taught, from both county superintendents 
and township trustees, if they have taught in the country, or 
from superintendents of graded schools of towns or cities and 
the trustees of such schools if they have taught in towns or 
cities. Such certificates should be sent to the president of the 
school at least one month before the close of the academic 
year. 

By a rule of the board of trustees, satisfactory evidence of 
twelve months' successful experience in teaching, after com- 
pleting the course of study, entitles the graduate to the diploma 
of the institution. 

As a means of promoting still greater thoroughness on the 
part of those nearing graduation from the school, the board of 
trustees, by a recent action, requires "that all candidates for 
graduation from the ISTormal School shall be required to hold a 
county license to teach for a period of not less than two years ; 
said license having been issued within the five years next pre- 
ceding the date of commencement for the given year. Or that 
such person shall receive a grade in an examination conducted 
by the faculty on the questions used in the county examination 
that would entitle them to a license for not less than two years^ 
if the examination were taken under a county superintendent," 



28 



DrSCrPLINE OF THE SCHOOL. 



The end of all school government and discipline, intelligently 
conceived and administered, is the rational self-control and 
self-direction of the pupil. This is to be the outcome in the 
pupil. The effort is made to derive all rules of government 
from the inherent nature and purposes of the organization 
itself. This is the true basis of such rules ; from this alone 
they derive their authority, and not from the teacher's will and 
utterance. A system of school regulations which aims only 
at arbitrary restraint, without leading the pupil to order his 
conduct by clearly conceived principles of right doing, lacks 
the most essential educative qualities The formation of cor- 
rect habits of thought and action, the development of worthy 
character — these are the true aims of school discipline. The 
discipline of the ISTormal School is administered in this general 
thought and spirit. Smdents are led to see the reasonableness 
of the requirements made of them, so that their obedience 
may be intelligent and educative. In respect to discipline, as 
in all other particulars, the ISTormal School seeks to make 
itself in fact what it must be by definition — a model school. 

EXPENSES. 

Board, including fuel and light, can be had in good families 
at $4 to |5 per week, according to quality of accommodations. 
There are good facilities for self-boarding and for club-board- 
ing in the city at a cost of $2 50 to |3.50 per week. Nearly 
all the students board in clubs, thus reducing their entire ex- 
penses to $3.50 per week for good accommodations. The 
expenses of many do not exceed |3 per week. The only charge 
made by the school is a library fee of $2 per term. 

The necessary expenses for a year in the Normal School will 
not vary greatly from the following estimate: 

Kooiu rent, 40 weeks, at .*L S40 00 

Board, 40 week?, at f2.50 100 00 

Fuel and lights 7 50 

Washing and incidentals 25 00 

Library fee, $2 per term 6 00 

Books and stationery 15 00 

Neces.sary expenses for one year, 40 weeks $193 50 



29 



ADVANCED STANDING BY EXAMINATION. 

The JSTormal School is authorized to give a formal credit on 
its course to four classes of students only, namely: (1) Col- 
lege graduates; (2) graduates of commissioned high schools; 
(3) persons holding one or more three years' licenses; (4) per- 
sons holding life state license to teach in Indiana. These are 
all admitted without examination. 

Persons not included in the above named classes, and wish- 
ing to he excused from the study of any subjects in the course, 
are required to pass thorough, satisfactory examinations in 
such subjects. ISiFort is made to give every person full credit 
for all knowledge of subjects possessed on entering, and to as- 
sist him to advance as rapidly and to graduate as soon as is 
consistent with a thorough, teacher's knowledge of the subjects 
studied. 

Examinations conducted for passing persons out of given 
subjects without detailed study of these in the school are made 
thorough, extended and professional in character. The object 
is not simply to test the applicant's knowledge of the subject 
in its academic aspects, but to ascertain what he knows of it 
from a teacher's point of view. The psychology of the sub- 
ject, its method and its educational value are considered in 
these examinations. 

Examinations for advanced standing will hereafter be con- 
ducted on the first and second days of each term. 

ELECTIVE WORK. 

Students are required to elect work by subjects, not by terms. 
AVhen a student elects a subject, he is required to take all the 
work offered in that subject, unless, for good reasons, he is 
permitted by the faculty to discontinue it and take up another 
line of study in its place. This rule does not apply to Latin 
and German, in which subjects the student is required to elect 
by years. 

LIMIT FOR ENTERING SCHOOL. 

It is important that all students enter the school at the be- 
ginning of a term. Persons who enter after the regular en- 
trance examinations have been conducted and the classifica- 
tion of the students has been made, take the time of the 



30 

faculty, which more properly belongs to the regular classes. 
Besides, experience has shown that in the great majority of 
cases persons entering several days or weeks after the term has 
begun find themselves unable to make up the lost lessons and 
are, therefore, crippled in their work throughout the term. 
Hereafter new students will not be admitted after the begin- 
ning of the fourth week of the term. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF VISITORS. 



The Board of Official Visitors to the JSTormal School for the 
academic year 1895-96 consisted of the following: Edward 
A3^res, Superintendent of Schools, Lafayette, Ind. ; W. H. 
Hershman, Superintendent of Schools, ISTew Alhany, Ind., and 
John O. Lewellen, Superintendent of Schools, Delaware County, 
Ind. The following is the Board's report: 

To (he Board of Trustees of the Indiana State Normal School : 

Gentlemen — In compliance with Section 4555 of the Revised Statutes of In- 
diana, the Board of Visitors for the school year 1895 and 1896 desires to make the 
following report : 

The 11th, 12th and 13th of March were spent by the Board in inspecting the 
various departments of the school ; during which time every facility for the fullest 
and freest examination of the work was offered by the President and Faculty. 

The time, though insufficient to furnish an insight into all the details of the 
work, was yet enough to reveal to the committee the excellent spirit which seems 
to prevail amongst the students and faculty of the entire institution. The man- 
agement can feel sure that the school has an earnest, efficient body of teachers and 
an equally earnest and faithful body of students, who are laboring with a definite 
purpose toward a definite end — the improvement of the common schools of the 
state. 

Your committee desires to commend in a special manner the action of the last 
Legislature in regard to the appropriation of funds by which your honorable 
Board of Trustees was enabled to construct the addition to the Normal School 
building, so as to give relief to the overcrowded condition of the school. 

The laboratories for physics, chemistry and biology constructed in this new 
building are commodious and well arranged for the very best work, and, when 
fully equipped with apparatus and appliances, as designed by the managers of the 
institution, the highest expectations of actual educative force may be realized. 

The increasing demands for teachers of accurate and scientific knowledge, 
such as can be obtained only by individual work in the laboratory, call for just 
such provisions on the part of the State Normal School, whose purpose is to give 
teachers the best and most complete preparation for their work. 

The committee notes with satisfaction the emphasis placed upon the library, 
as shown by accommodations provided for it in the recent addition to the building. 
The reading and consultation room is large and inviting, well-lighted and com- 
fortably arranged. The library itself is well selected and systematized, so as to 
be of the greatest convenience for students' use. 

The number of students availing themselves of the excellent opportunities 
thB library affords is satisfactory evidence of its appreciation, and a sufficient 
justification of the outlay required to equip and continue it. 



32 

It is dependent for ity support entirely upon librar}' fees paid by the students. 
It seems to the committee that direct support from the state is advisable. 

The basement of the addition is designed to contain two gymnasia for the 
students' use, the one for the males and the other for the females. It seems to the 
committee that the immediate establishment of these gymnasia by an appropria- 
tion for this purpose from the Legislature is a vital need of the institution. The 
influence of an intelligent, wisely directed department of physical training can 
not be overestimated; because tliis influence is exerted not only upon the teachers 
themselves, but through them upon the children of the State. The additional 
sum necessary to equip these gymnasia for the highest grade of physical training- 
is very slight when compared with the benefits to be derived. 

Another much needed improvement is the fitting up of the third story with 
accommodations for the various literary and debating societies of the school. 

When these improvements are completed as contemplated in the jjlan of the 
building, the school will be well equipped for the accomplishment of the best 
results. 

With reference to the character of the instruction, the committee finds little 
to criticize but much to commend. 

The serious illness of the head of the Department of Psychology and Methods, 
at the time of the committee's visit, impaired somewhat for the time the work in 
these subjects. It is a pleasure to know that Prof. Sandison will probably be able 
soon to resume the work of this department which is so well known and so highly 
appreciated by those who have had the benefit of his instruction. 

The size of the classes seems to justify an increase in the teaching force, so as 
to allow closer attention to the individual needs of students. 

In the opinion of the committee, the training school is inadecj[uate to provide 
all the observation and practice work advisable for all the students, and incom- 
plete in that at present it lacks the Seventh and Eighth Grades. The committee 
is gratified to learn, however, that these deficiencies will be corrected next year. 

The committee notes with pleasure that a Summer Course of six weeks has 
been provided for, so that during the vacation all teachers who wish to avail 
themselves of the advantages of the institution may do so at a very small expense. 
There are many teachers of the state who feel that they can not afford to leave 
their schools for the advantages of a noi'mal school course, especially when a 
course is likely to mean the loss of a position ; yet they are willing and anxious 
to spend a part or all of the summer vacation in such professional study as shall 
increase their efficiency as teachers. If this course of instruction could continue 
through the summer months, the advantages of the school might be enjoyed by a 
greater number of students, who, without loss of time or position, would in a few 
years complete the entire course prescribed by the institution. 

In general, the committee takes pleasure in expressing its entire confidence 
in the management of the school and in the efficiency of the work done in all 
the departments. It most heartily commends the State Normal School to the 
people of Indiana. Respectfully submitted, 

Edward S. Aykes, 
Siiperintendent Lafayette Schools. 

W. H. Hershman, 

Siipcrintevdent New Albany Schools. 

John O. Lewellen, 
Coiinti/ Supcrinlfiident, Delaware County, Tnd. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Indiana State Normal School, 

Terre Haute, Jnd , Nov. 1, 1895. 



Hon. Murray Brkjgs, President: 

Dear Sir — 1 herewith submit my report of the receij^ts and 
expenditures of the Indiana State Normal School for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1895 : 



TUITION FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 






November 1, 1894, balance in treasury 

•January 21, 1895, semi-annual apportionment 

May 31, 1895, semi-annual apportionment 


$3,418 12 
15,000 00 
15,000 00 




Total 




$33,418 12 


EXPENDITURES. 




Amount paid faculty 

Balance in treasury October 31, 1895 


132,334 96 
1,083 16 




Total 




$33,418 12 





3 — State Normal. 



34 



INCIDENTAL FUND. 



November 1, 1894, balance in treasury 

January 3, 1895, part of annual appropriation. . 

February '22, 1895, city expense returned 

April 16, 1895, for sale of old iron grates 

May 15, 1895, part of annual appropriation 

July 1, 1895, amount repaid from building fund . 
August 3, 1895, part of annual appropriation. . . . 
October 5, 1895, received from duplicate diploma. 
October 24, 1895, balance annual appropriation . . 



Total . 



EXPENDITUKES. 

Engineer, janitors, clerks and watchman 

Laboratory supplies 

Shop materials and supplies 

General supplies 

President's traveling expenses 

Drawing material and supplies 

Hauling ashes 

Laundry work 

Insurance 

Fuel, light and water 

Repairs 

Trustees and expenses 

Sundries 

Printing, postage and stationery 

Electric current 

Apparatus 

Office chair 

Balance 



Total 



$1,321 22 

2,500 00 

17 95 

7 00 

2,500 00 

283 56 

2,500 00 

1 40 

2,500 00 



P,147 96 

159 66 

31 32 

208 82 

287 50 

14 37 

61 75 

52 55 

311 25 

1,052 29 

337 57 

1,789 10 

669 70 

1,421 30 

25 00 

46 00 

4 50 

2,010 45 



$11,631 13 



$11,631 13 



LIBRARY FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance in treasury November 1, 1894. . 


$4,572 81 

2,695 00 

1 00 




Students' library fees 




Received for lo^t book 








Total 


$2,685 39 
1,437 68 
3,145 74 


$7 268 81 


EXPENDITURES. 

Amount transferred to building fund. . . . 




For books, periodicals and library supplies 




Balance in treasury October 31, 1895 




Total 




$7,268 81 





35 



BUILDING FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

August 3, 1895, on special appropriation 

August 30, 1895, on special appropriation 

Amount transferred from library fund 


$5,000 
5,000 
2,685 


00 
00 
39 




Total 


$10,000 

79 

40 

390 

120 

63 

1,700 

8 

283 


00 
30 
16 
62 
00 
00 
00 
75 
56 


$12,685 39 


EXPENDITURES. 

Paid the Jno. A. Schumacher Co. on contract 

Paid D. W. Gardiner, on contract 


Paid on advertising 




Paid Floyd & Stone, architects 

Paid William Venable, for typewriter 

Paid Havens & Geddes Co. for carpet 

Paid the Snead & Co. Iron works for library stacks. . . 
Paid Clift & Williams Co. for hat racks 




Amount repaid Incidental Fund 




Total 




$12,685 39 




SUMMAEY. 


Balance in treasury October 31, 1895 — 

Tuition fund 

Incidental fund 


$1,083 16 
2,010 45 
3,145 74 




Library fund 





Respectfully submitted, 



Lewis B. Martin, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Indiana State Normal School, 
Terre Haute, Ind., Nov. 1, 1896. 



Hon. William H. Armstrong, President: 

Dear Sir — I herewith submit my report of the receipts and 
expenditures of the Indiana State Normal School for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1896 : 



TUITION FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

November 1, 1895, balance in treasury 

January 8, 1896, semi-annual apportionment 


$1,083 16 
15,000 00 
15,000 00 




June 10, 1896, semi-annual apportionment 








Total 


$29,027 89 
2,055 27 


■$31,083 16 


EXPENDITURES. 

Amount paid faculty 




Transferred to general fund 




Total 


$31,083 16 





37 



INCIDENTAL FUND. 



November 1, 1895, balance in treasury 

January 3, 1896, received from duplicate diplomas . . 

February 6, 1896, for sale of old carpet 

February 6, 1896, cash State Treasurer 

April 21, 1896, cash State Treasurer 

June 30, 1896, city of Terre Haute one-half repairs, etc 

Total 

EXPENDITURES. 

Laboratory supplies 

General supplies 

Trustees, services and expenses 

Lectures 

Supplies for boilers, engines, etc 

Clerks, janitors and engineer 

President's traveling expenses 

Hauling ashes 

Laundry work 

Insurance 

Coal, gas and water 

Repairs 

Sundry bills 

Electric current 

Printing, postage and stationery 

Furniture 

Amount transferred to building fund 

Balance transferred to general fund 

Total 



$2,010 45 


2 


80 


6 


00 


3,000 


00 


4,500 00 1 


366 


46 


$122 


60 


141 


26 


956 


50 


145 


71 


75 


00 


2,559 


92 


300 


00 


69 


75 


64 


97 


100 


00 


1,011 


30 


885 


23 


141 


49 


25 


00 


393 


74 


442 


97 


1,399 


60 


1.040 


67 







^5 71 



19,885 71 



LIBRARY FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

November 1, 1895, balance in treasury, 

Students' library fees 

Received for lost books 

Amount repaid from building fund. . . . 

Total 

EXPENDITURES. 

For books, supplies and materials 

Balance in treasury 

Total 



13,145 74 

4,458 00 

3 00 

2,685 39 



13,322 12 
6,970 01 



$10,292 13 



$10,292 13 



^8 



BUILDING FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

November 8, 1895, cash from State Treasurer 

January 3, 1896, cash from State Treasurer 


$5,675 00 
4,325 00 
1,399 60 




June 30, 1896, Am't transferred from Incidental Fund 




Total 


$2,000 00 

100 00 

93 64 

28 00 

51 44 

1,021 50 

2,000 00 

150 00 

149 63 

1,675 00 

45 00 

1,400 00 

2,685 39 


$11,399 60 


EXPENDITURES. 

Paid The .Jno. A. Schumacher Co., on contract 

Paid Flovd & Stone, architects . 


Paid Library Bureau, for library cases 

Paid Central Manufacturing Co., for cases 




Paid W. A. Olmsted, for slate blackboards 




Paid A. Z. Foster, for linoleum , 

Paid The .Jno. A. Schumacher Co., on contract 

Paid Floyd & Stone, architects 

Paid Floyd & Stone, architects 

Paid The Jno. A. Schumacher Co., on contract 

Paid The Havens & Geddes Co., for window shades. . . 
Paid Baker & Smith Co., for boiler 




Amount repaid Library Fund 




Total 




$11,399 60 







GENERAL FUND. 



RECEIPTS. 

July 1, 1896, balance Tuition Fund 

July 1, 1896, balance Incidental Fund 

July 7, 1896, distribution state educational tax 

July 8, 1896, from sale of old iron grates 

July 8, 1896, laboratory fees 

Total 

EXPENDITURES. 

Louis J. Rettger, laboratory fees 

Laboratory supplies 

General supplies 

Trustees' services and expenses 

Lectures 

Supplies for boilers, etc 

Employes — Clerks, janitors, etc 

Improvements on buildings and grounds 

Teachers 

Hauling ashes 

Laundry work 

Coal, gas and water 

Repairs 

Supplies from Terre Haute Eleq. Light and Power Co 

Printing, postage and stationery 

Apparatus 

Sundries 

Furniture 

Balance 

Total 



$2,055 


27 




1,040 


67 




29,009 


22 

87 




99 


76 








$32,205 79 


$99 76 




106 


64 




242 


44 




301 


60 




30 


00 




24 


80 




1,189 


14 




892 


10 




4,741 


25 




7 


25 




12 


43 




173 


74 




1,673 


76 




8 


84 




655 


97 


. 


1,750 


31 




284 


19 




2,653 


50 




17,358 


07 





52,205 79 



SUMMARY. 



November 1, 1896, balance in treasury- 
General Fund 

Library Fund 



$17,358 07 
6,970 01 



Note. — Since July 1, 1896, the date on which the first installment of the 
proceeds of the educational tax was due, all funds received from the state are 
merged into one fund called the General Fund. Out of this all expenses of the 
institution are paid, except for books, periodicals and supplies for the library. 
The Library Fund is composed of library fees collected from students, and is 
devoted exclusively to library purposes. The institution has never received any 
money from the state for library purposes, the present large library having been 
purchased exclusively with money collected as library fees. 

Tiespectfully jours, 

Lewis B. Martin, 

Secretary. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Terre Haute, Ind., November 1, 1895. 



To Hon. Murray Briggs, President: 

The undersigned, Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the 
Indiana State Normal School, submits the following report for 
the year ending October 31, 1895 : 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1894 

Eeceived from school revenue of State 

Received appropriation for incidentals 

Received appropriation for building 

Received from other sources 


$9,312 15 
30,000 00 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 

2,722 35 




Total 


155,795 15 
6,239 35 


$62,034 50 


EXPENDITURES. 

Paid out on Secretary's orders 

Balance on hand October 31, 1895 


Total 




$62,034 50 





Respectfully submitted, 

W. R. McKeen, Treasurer 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Tbrre Haute, Ind., November 1, 1896. 

To Hon. William H. Armstrong, President: 

The undersigned, Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the 
Indiana State Normal School, submits the following report for 
the year ending October 31, 1896 : 



RECEtPTS. 

Balance on hand November 1, 1895 

Received from school revenue of State 

Received from appropriation for incidentals 
Received special appropriation for buildiog 

Received proceeds educational tax 

Received from other sources 

Total 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid out on Secretary's orders 

Balance on hand October 31, 1896 

Total 



$6,239 


35 


30,000 


00 


7,500 


00 


10,000 


00 


29,009 


22 


4,461 


(10 


$62,881 


49 


24,328 


08 







,209 57 



$87,209 57 



Kespectfully submitted, 

W. R. McKeen, Treasure)- 



4 — State Normal. 



<^ 



THE 



INDIANA INSTITUTION 



Education of the Deaf and Dumb 



FIFTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENT 



Fiscal year ending October 31, ii 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 
1897. 



STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, Dec. 23, 1896. 

Keceived by the Governor, examined, and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, ) 
Indianapolis, Dec. 26, 1896. j 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 
Auditor of State, 



Indianapolis, December 23, 1896. 

Keturned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the oflSce of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, December 
26, 1896. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 26th day of De- 
cember, 1896. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



The Indiana Institution 
For the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, 
Indianapolis, Dec. 23, 1891 



To the Hon. Claude Matthews, Governor of the State of Indiana : 

In compliance with the law, and by direction of the Board 
of Control, I have the honor to lay before you the annual 
report of the Board and Superintendent for the fiscal year end- 
ing October 31, 1896. Respectfully submitted, 

TARVIN C. GROOMS, 

Secretary. 



BOARD OF CONTROL. 



PRESIDENT. 

SAMUEL A. BONNER GREENSBURa. 

TREASURER. 

CHARLES E. HAUGH Indianapolis. 

SECRETARY. 

TARVIN C. GROOMS Greencastlf. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



SUPERINTENDENT, 

RICHARD O. JOHNSON. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

EvALYN.B. Heizer, Supervising Principal Manual Primary Grades. 
William H. DeMotte, Superintendent Sabbath School. 
Henry Bierhaus, Secretary Sabbath School. 



MANUAL CLASSES. 



William H. Latham, M. A , M. D. 

William H. DeMotte, M. A., LL. D. 

Sidney J. Vail. 

Henry Bierhaus. 

August Jutt. 

N. Field Morrow, B. A. 

Orson Archibald, B. A. 

Albert Berg, M. A. 



Charles Kerney, B. A. 
S. W. Gilbert. 
Anna Hendricks. 
Ida B. Kinsley. 
Frances S. Thompson. 
Sarah K. Marshall. 
Ida B. Westfall. 
Fannie B. Shideler. 



Lucy E. Robinson. 
Caroline R. Smith. 



oral classes. 

Tunis V. Archer, M. A. 
Edward J. Hecker. 
Nora V. Long. 



Edith Fulton. 
Jessie Underwood, 



KINDERGARTEN. 



Jennie Parrish. 
Lucia Hanna. 



ART. 

Mary Corwin. 



INDUSTRIAL CLASSES. 

Instructor in Printing — Edward J. Hecker. 
Foreman of Printing Cfl&ce — Charles M. Hecker. 
Instructor in Woodworking — John P. Baker. 
Instructor in Shoe and Leather Work — Louis Hildebrand. 
Instructor in Sewing, etc. — Kate Gorman. 



BUSINESS AND HOUSEHOLD. 



StJPEKINTENDENT, 

KICHARD O. JOHNSON. 



Superintendent's Clerk — S. Jean Cummings. 
Book and Storekeeper — William E. Todd. 
Matron — Sarah C. Peters. 
Housekeeper — Mary Coughlin. 
Physicians — John E. Lockridge, M. D. 

Martin H. Fields, M. D. 
Supervisors of Boys — Moses M. Clinton. 
James Vahey. 
Mary Elstrod. 
Supervisor of Girls— Maggie McCauley. 
Usher — Alice Wilson. 
Nurse — Mary Diffley. 
Watchman — Charles Kissling. 
Watchwoman— Sarah Brandenburg. 



INDUSTRIAL. 



Foreman Grounds— William Langstaff. 
Engineer — Louis Prinzler. 
Electrician — Charles Friedgen, 
Carpenter — Charles Howard. 



BOARD OF CONTROLS REPORT. 



To the Honorable Claude Matthews, 

Governor of the State of Indiana: 

Sir — The Board of Control lor the Institution for the Edu- 
cation of the Deaf and Dumb has the honor to submit the fol- 
lowing report for the fiscal year ending October 31, 1896: 

After several years of faithful and useful services rendered 
the State as a member of the old Board of Trustees, and for 
one year as a member of the Board of Control, the term of Mr. 
Thomas L. Brown expired on January 1, 1896, and Mr. Tarvin 
C. Grooms was, by the Governor, appointed to succeed him. 
Mr, Grooms at once qualified and entered upon the discharge 
of his duties as a member of the Board of Control. With 
this exception there has been no change in the official man- 
agement during the year. 

The school, in all its departments, has been moving along in 
very much the same lines as at the date of our last report. Its 
progress has been quite satisfactory to all concerned in its man- 
agement. It has for several years been advancing, until now 
we think it stands abreast of the best schools of like kind in 
the other States of the Union. 

For a full and detailed showing of the business and financial 
transactions of the Institution, as well as for a statement of the 
cost per capita during the year, and the estimated cost for this 
year and the two years succeeding ; also for improvements 
made, for value of property and products of farm and garden, 
amounts paid the Treasurer of State as earnings, amount of 
clothing furnished indigent pupils; also for what has been and 
is being done in the Educational and Industrial Departments of 
the Institution, and what is desired for the school in the future 
in all its departments, we desire to call your attention to the 
carefully prepared, comprehensive and able report of our 
competent and efficient Superintendent, which is filed herewith 



and made a part of this report. All of the recommendations 
therein contained are approved and submitted to you, and, 
through you, to the coming Legislature for your and their con- 
sideration. 

We much regret being compelled, after the most rigid econ- 
omy, to report a small apparent deficit in the maintenance ac- 
count for the year. We are, however, glad to say, with the 
Superintendent, that there has been paid out of the appropria- 
tion to the Institution during the past two years, for clothing, 
etc., for indigent pupils, and which has been, or will be, re- 
turned to the State, an amount considerably in excess of the 
apparent deficit (covering two years) reported by the Superin- 
tendent. This deficit might probably have been avoided in 
several ways : By shortening the school year (which is now 
less than nine months) ; or by cheapening the kind and quality 
of the food supplies; or by cutting down the salaries of the 
teachers, endangering the retention of the best of them, and 
thus lowering the grade of the school; or by arbitrarily limit- 
ing the number of pupils, thus lessening the necessary amount 
of food supplies and number of teachers. The Board did not 
think it well to adopt any of these methods; neither do we 
think that any member of the Legislature, or taxpayer of the 
State, would desire any of these courses to have been pursued. 

The citizens of the State are all proud of its large School 
Fund, of its common school system, and of its schools, and of 
the abundant provision made for the education, at public ex- 
pense, of every hearing child in the State. Should not every 
deaf child have the same privilege and opportunity given to 
him ? For this purpose, as we understand, was this Institution 
established, and for this purpose alone has it been liberally sus- 
tained. The report of the Superintendent shows that the 
number of pupils has been increasing gradually for several 
years, until the dormitories and diniog-room are now over- 
crowded. The questson as to what shall be done under the cir- 
cumstances forces itself upon us. If the number increases for 
the next two years as it has done for the last three, the time 
will come, before the meeting of the Legislature of 1899, when 
they can not be properly provided for in the buildings of the 
Institution as they are now arranged. We suggest, as the 
most economical remedy for these difficulties, the erection of a 
separate dwelling-house for the Superintendent and his family, 



at some point on the grounds of the Inetituiion, and their re- 
moval entirely ironi its main building. In this way, with 
slight changes in the rooms, the capacity for dining-room and 
dormitory purpose may be so enlarged as to accommodate the 
naturally increasing number of pupils tor the next two years, 
at least, if not longer. The Board much prefers this to asking 
for an appropriation to make additions to the old house, or for 
a separate dormitory building. An examination of the present 
building is all tht-t will be necessary, wo think, to make clear to 
any one the feasibility and economy of this plan. We, there- 
fore, earnestly recommend it, and respectfully ask an appro- 
priation with which to carry it out. 

The oral work in the Institution is increasing rapidly in in- 
terest and importance. If the non-speaking persons in the 
State can be reduced, even to a small extent, by the expendi- 
ture of a small amount of money, and the dumb be made to 
speak, who will begrudge this little increase of expense made 
necessary in order that these unfortunates may be benefited? 
We call the especial attention of all interested in this matter 
to what the Superintendent says in his report upon this subject. 

The Board is also in accord with the Superintendent in all 
his recommendations with reference to the sale of the farm 
lands belonging to the Institution, but we particularly wish to 
emphasize the propriety of selling the pasture land lying norih 
of Washington street, in the city of Indianapolis. The income 
from this land amounts to nothing of any consequence. The 
city has extended far to the east of it. If it could be sold for 
near its real value, the interest on the proceeds of the sale, we 
have no doubt, would much exceed the rise in value of the 
realty. In addition to this, we suggest, whether it is fair and 
just to the capital city of the State, for the State to allow itself 
to stand in the way of the progress and development of the 
city. The Board consequently strongly recommends that said 
ground be sold, that a sufficient amount of the proceeds be used 
in paying for such improvements as are recommended in this 
report, if the Legislature sees fit to order them as a whole, or 
in part; that a part of the remainder be used to purchase a 
dairy farm for the benefit of the institution, if that be thought 
best ; and whatever remains after such purchase is made, if one 
is made, and after the improvements are paid for, if any are 
ordered made, shall be placed in the hands of a trustee, to be 



10 

selected either by the Legislature or by the Governor, to be by 
him kept at interest and held for the benefit of this institution 
and to be used by it only under the direction of the Legislature. 
We further recommend that a committee be appointed to sell 
said realty, the same to consist of four State officials, say the 
Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary and Auditor of 
State, and one member of this Board. 

We urgently request the out-going and the in-coming Gov- 
ernor, the State officers, the members of the Legislature, and 
especially the gentlemen who are appointed on the Committees 
on Benevolent Institutions in the House and Senate, and of 
Ways and Means in the House, and on Finance in the Senate, 
to visit the Institution and see what has been and is being 
done therein, so that they may form their own conclusions as 
to what should be done for the unfortunate deaf children of the 
State, based upon actual knowledge, rather than information. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Samuel A. Bonner. 
Charles E. Haugh. 
Tarvin C. Grooms. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Control: 

Gentlemen — In accordance with law, and for your consider- 
ation, I submit tLe following statement concerning the financial, 
scholastic and other transactions of the Institution for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1896, it being my eighth annual report 
as Superintendent, and the fifty-third of the Institution. 

CHANGES IN ROSTER. 

There have been several changes in the corps of teachers 
during the year : Noble B. McKee, A, M., Principal of the 
Manual Primary Grades ; Sarah J. Corwin, Helen E. Bright 
and Letitia Booth resigned at the close of the year to accept 
positions elsewhere, Mr. McKee accepting the superintendency 
of the Missouri State School for the Deaf, and taking with him 
as teachers Mrs, Corwin and Miss Bright ; and Miss Booth 
taking charge of the kindergarten department in the Central 
New York Institution for the Deaf. Each of them had given 
years of faithful service to the Indiana school, and their going 
out from amongst us was a loss to our State. 

To fill the vacancies, Evalyn Heizer has been appointed 
Supervising Principal of the Manual Primary Grades, and 
Sarah K. Marshall, Fannie Shideler and Ida Westfall have been 
given classes in those grades. Edith Fulton has been given 
charge of the Kindergarten Department. Miss Heizer has had 
long experience in our own school as a teacher of the primary 
grades, and is admirably fitted in every way for the responsible 
position to which she has been appointed. Mrs. Shideler and 
Miss Westfall have been preparing themselves for this work 
for two years, and are entering upon their duties with com- 
mendable spirit. Miss Marshall comes to us with an experience 



12 

of two years in the profession, and thoroughly understands her 
work. Miss Fulton served, last year, as assistant to Miss Booth, 
with whose excellent methods she is thoroughly conversant. 

Charles Kerney, who was dropped from the rolls one year 
ago, because of ill-health, returns this year, much improved, 
and has resumed his work as teacher of one of the manual 
primary classes. Edward J. Hecker, who served last year 
during Mr. Kerney's absence, has been given a class in the oral 
department. 

Jennie Parrish, Lucia Hanua and Jessie Underwood, of the 
Indianapolis Kindergarten and Primary Normal Training 
School, have been given classes in the kindergarten depart- 
ment and are doing excellent work in their new field. 



THE PUPILS AND THE SCHOOL. 

The pupils in school-room and shop during the year have 
diligently applied themselves, and have made good progress in 
their work. The average of scholarship has advanced, like- 
wise the average of industrial skill. They have been obedient 
to all rules and regulations — have been contented and happy 
in their Institution life. 

The pupils of this school are not defective in mind, will 
or emotion. They are not insane, feeble-minded, paupers 
or criminals, and should not be classed as "defectives." 

This Institution is in no sense an asylum, a prison, a reform 
school, an almshouse or a hospital. Applicants who are idiotic, 
feeble-minded, afflicted with contagious or offensive disease, or 
who are invalids so confirmed as to prevent study, are not re- 
ceived. It is strictly an educational institution — a school in its 
widest and best sense, and as such should be in some degree 
under the supervision of the State Board of Education, and 
subject to State laws governing the common schools, of which 
it is a part. It should be forever removed from partisan con- 
trol and influence, which blights, warps and dwarfs an educa- 
tional work. The present management has conscientiously ad- 
ministered its trust without partisan fear or favor, being guided 
in the appointment and retention of officers, teachers and em- 
ployes by their competency, faithfulness and honesty — three 
requisite essentials in public servants. 



13 

During the past few years there has been a clearer perception 
on the part of the public of the causes of being of the Institu- 
tion, which stands oot only as a means of instruction and edu- 
cation for the deaf youth of Indiana, but which must also 
stand to them in loco fareniis for nine months of the year. We 
have to teach not only the material, but also the spiritual — not 
only nature, with language to express, mathematics to measure 
and ethical subjects to qualify, not only industrial occupations 
and obedience to civil laws, but also to assume that duty inci- 
dent to the home circle — the development of the innate moral 
nature necessary to life in conformity to divine law. 

The boys and girls who come to this school because they are 
not received into the common schools of the State on account 
of deafness, receive an education here not as a matter of charity ^ 
but as a niatter of right. 

THE HEALTH. 

The health of the Institution has been unusually good, and 
we have been free of the epidemics existing from time to time 
in the city surrounding us. This is remarkable when we con- 
sider the fact that hundreds of visitors pass through our build- 
ings every month, and the further fact that we have thirty - 
three pupils living in the city, who spend parts of two days at 
home every fortnight. There is constant vigilance on the part 
of all connected with the Institution, pupils included, who 
thoroughly believe that an ounce of prevention is worth many 
pounds of cure. 

The reports of the physicians, filed with the Superintendent 
at the close of each fiscal year, show that six hundred and 
thirty-eight pupils have received treatment at their hands in 
the infirmary during the past two years, as follows : 

1894-1895. 

Accidents 9 Pertussis 4 

Diphtheroid . 3 Pneumonia 8 

Epilepsy 1 Eheumatism 3 

Erysipelas 2 Scrofula 4 

Heart disease . ..... 1 Skin disease 3 

Influenza 49 Sore eyes 4 

Jaundice 3 Tonsilitis 7 

Malaria 35 

Measles 113 Total 250 

Neuralgia 1 



14 



1895-1896. 

Accident 10 Poisoned face 2 

Bilious attack 2 Kheumatism 8 

Bronchitis 3 Eoseola 4 

Catarrhal fever 1 Scrofula 1 

Erysipelas 4 Skin eruptions 5 

Glandular tumor 1 Sore eyes 10 

Heart disease 1 Stomatitis 7 

Influenza and colds ... 195 Tonsilitis 6 

Measles 110 

Neuralgia 10 Total 388 

Pneumonia 8 



THE ATTENDANCE. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Attendance, November 1, 1895 167 135 302 

New pupils received during the year ... 33 29 62 

Readmissions after absence of year or more 4 4 8 

Discharged during year and readmitted . . 1 1 

Total attendance 205 168 373 

Discharged during year 14 17 31 



Leaving enrolled 191 151 342 

In attendance October 31, 1896 177 135 312 



Showing absentees entitled to return . . 14 16 30 



CAUSES OF NON-ATTENDANCE. 

The causes of non-attendance are as follows : 

Quarrel between father and uncle (boy) 

Faith-cure treatment at home (girl) 

" Can make no further progress " (boy) 

" Didn't want to come " (girl) 

"Hard times" (girl) 

Married (girl) , 

Removal from State (1 girl, 1 boy) 2 

Working (boys) 4 

Poor health (4 girls, 2 boys) 6 

No cause assigned (7 girls, 5 boys) 12 

Total 30 



15 



DISCHARGES. 



The discharges and causes therefor will be shown by the fol- 
lowing table : 

Frequent absence 1 

Age 2 

Kemoval from State 2 

Serious cause 4 

Expiration of time 7 

Graduated 15 

Total 31 

NON-ATTENDANCE FOR TWELVE YEARS. 

The evil of non-attendance is a serious one and demands 
prompt and vigorous treatment by means of a compulsory- 
education law. The welfare of the child should be considered 
more sacred than the right of the parent to control its action. 
The writer has pressed this matter in annual reports since 1890, 
and is glad to say that the prospect for compulsory education 
in Indiana is brighter this year than ever. Twenty-six States 
now have compulsory-education laws, but, in nearly all of them, 
the laws are more or less inoperative because the responsibility 
and penalty are not placed upon parent and officer alike. The 
non-attendants of this school are of two classes: Those who 
enter, but do not remain as long as they should, and those who 
do not enter at all. So far as the former class is concerned, the 
records of the institution show that since iSlovember 1, 1884, 
186 pupils have entered, remained a year or two, or more, and 
then dropped out without discharge when entitled to longer 
continuance. A small per cent, of this number can be accounted 
for by deaths and removals from the State, but fully 90 per 
cent, of it must be charged up to the foolish whims of the child, 
or to the neglect or cupidity of the parent. The following 
table will show this part of the evil at a glance : : 

Enrolled November 1, 1884 319 

New pupils admitted since 517 

Total enrollment, twelve years , . 836 

Discharged since November 1, 1884 338 

Leaving enrolled 498 

Actual attendance October 31, 1896 312 

Showing non-attendants , . . . 186 



18 

Concerning the second class of non attendants, those who 
have cever entered the school, I believe they number 250 or 
more, between the ages of six and twenty-one. Adding this 
number to the non-attendants of the first class, we have 461, 
which represents the total number of non-attendants — 20 per 
cent, of the entire number of deaf-mutes in the State. 



RESIDENCE OF PUPILS. 

Your attention is called to a tabulated statement arranged 
by counties in a subsequent part of this report, showing the 
number of pupils received, the number discharged, and the 
number remaining and entitled to the benefits of the Institution. 
The number really entitled to its benefits is larger than the 
number shown at the end of any one year, for this statement 
refers only to those who have been in attendance at some time 
during the year, those of former years being dropped from con- 
sideration. An inspection of the statement will show that 
pupils have been received from seventy nine of the ninety-two 
counties, those not represented being Bartholomew, Benton, 
Brown, Fayette, Newton, Ohio, Park, Ripley, Scott, Stark, 
Warren, Wells, Whitley. 

Counties having five or more representatives are Boone, 5 
Carroll, 8; Cass, 8 ; Clay, 7 ; Dubois, 5 ; Elkhart, 7; Gibson, 8 
Grant, 7 ; Hamilton, 6 ; Hendricks, 10; Jackson, 5; Laporte, 8 
Lawrence, 5; Madison, 7; Marion, 35; Martin, 5; Perry, 6 
Pike, 6; Pulaski, 7; Rush, 5; St. Joseph, 5; Steuben, 6; Sul- 
livan, 10; Tipton, 5; Vanderburgh, 7; Vigo, 7; Wayne, 9. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

In the education of the deaf there are two methods and one 
system of instruction usually recognized : 

The Manual or French Method (ueing sign-language, man- 
ual alphabet and writing), of which there is a variety that 
may be called the " Alphabetic," wherein only the manual 
alphabet and writing are used. 

The Oral or German Method (using speech and speech-read- 
ing and writing), of which there is a variety that may be called 
the " Auricular," wherein special attention is given to the 



17 

development and training of the hearing, by nmeans of which 
instruction is given. 

The Combined System (a so- called combination of the two 
methods). 

Some of the leading German instructors, after long years 
of experience, favor the French Method ; some of the French 
schools have adopted the G-erman Method, but no country, 
other than America, has generally adopted the Combined 
System. 

The general system of instruction used in this Institution is 
known as the Combined (American) System, under which all 
known methods and their variations may be used for the attain- 
ment of an object common to all. Speech and speech- reading 
are regarded as very important, but mental development and 
the acquisition of language are regarded as still more import- 
ant. It is believed that with a majority of the new pupils now 
entering the necessary mental development and acquisition of 
language may be as well attained by the Oral Method, which 
results in speech and speech-reading, as by the Manual Method 
which precludes this mucb-to-be-desired result. So far as cir- 
cumstances permit such method (or methods) is chosen for each 
pupil as seems best adapted to his needs and capacity after 
thorough trial. 

The sign-language is an ideographic language, and its be- 
neficent results in the education of the deaf are difficult of over- 
estimation. Thousands and thousands of deaf-mutes have been 
uplifted and educated by means of it, and no one possesses 
greater regard for its real usefulness than does the writer, who 
believes that, if not a majority, then a great minority of the 
deaf must be educated wholly or partially by its means. Every 
teacher of the deaf, no matter by what method, will surely be 
better prepared for successful work with the deaf child if he 
possesses a knowledge of the sign-language, which is not so 
much misused as it is abused by those who are simply " signers" 
and nothing more. 

^Nevertheless, there is a great proportion of the deaf, mute 
or semi-mute, deaf or semi- deaf, cougenitally so or otherwise, 
who may not only be taught to speak and to read the speech of 
others by sight, but who may also be successfully educated by 
these means, and they should certainly be educated mainly by 
the oral method. It is not intended by this method to make 

2— P. and D. 



18 

" elocutionists " of our pupils, but it is intended, in addition to 
giving them an education, to (1) retain and develop the speech 
of any who may possess it in any degree; (2) to generate and 
develop speech in some degree in those who do not possess it; 
(3) with all, to generate and develop the power of speech-read- 
ing ; and (4) to give special attention to developing and restor- 
ing to use any fragmentary part of hearing which may be left 
a pupil. 

THE SCHOOL. 

The school at the present time is divided into five depart- 
ments — the Manual, the Oral, the Kindergarten, the Art, and 
the Industrial, the two latter, of course, being composed of 
pupils selected from the Manual and Oral, according to age and 
capacity. 

THE MANUAL. 

The Manual Department, consisting of 200 pupils, is divided 
into five primary, two intermediate, and three academic grades, 
the whole with sixteen classes; and a regular and well-graded 
course of study, given elsewhere, and covering ten years, is 
closely adhered to. Instruction is given in this department by 
means of the Manual or Sign Method. A few of the teachers, 
however, use speech and speech-reading in limited degree, in 
addition to the sign language and manual alphabet, as means 
of giving instruction. 

But practically, it may be said, almost total dependence is 
had upon the sign language, and pupils in this department may 
never hope to articulate words, nor to read by sight the speech 
of others so far as instruction in school is concerned. This 
is an injustice to many pupils now in the department, who 
would have made good talkers and good speech-readers had 
they been properly started in oral classes upon entering school 
and retained there. This opportunity, however, was not 
afforded until two years ago, and then it was limited to new 
pupils who should enter the school after that date, those already 
in attendance remaining in the manual classes. 



19 



TDE ORAL. 



The Oral Department, includiog the advanced or second year 
kindergarten classes, consists of 86 pupils and seven classes, 
and the regular course of study is followed as in the manual 
classes. Instruction is given by means of the Oral Method 
(speech, speech-reading and writing), the sign language and 
the manual alphabet being discarded except in limited degree, 
and during exercises of all kinds in the chapel. The pupils, 
however, are allowed to mingle freely with those of the Manual 
Method classes at all times outside of the class-room, and it 
goes without saying that they soon become ready and proficient 
sign makers. 

Do we use signs and the manual alphabet in the oral classes? 
We do. Conditions confront us, not theories, and the condi- 
tions are such that it is deemed expedient to be directed by 
them until such time as they shall be changed, i. e., until such 
time as there may be complete separation of the orally and the 
manually taught. 

I am decidedly in favor of the manual alphabet at all times, 
and under all circumstances, and under existing conditions in 
the Indiana school, I believe the use of natural signs and a lim- 
ited use of conventional signs for objects and actions, will be 
beneficial rather than harmful — that they will not only not 
retard, but, on the contrary, advance the cause of education in 
and by speech and speech reading, providing they be judi- 
ciously used, varying from much in the beginning classes to 
little, if any, in the more advanced. And even though the 
two classes should be completely separated, I would advocate 
the use of natural signs — gestures of body and limb, and facial 
expression — for man can no more separate himself from these 
than he can from his very nature, and the use of them must, 
therefore, be beneficial rather than otherwise. 

While the use of signs, natural and conventional, may render 
a little less rapid the advancement in speech and speech read- 
ing, they will, it seems to me, render more rapid the advance- 
ment in the use of language and in the acquisition of general 
knowledge during the first years. A little lost at the one end 
and a little gained at the other will probably result in the 
greatest good to the greatest number, and this, I take it, is the 
end in view in a public school. 



20 

While our classes in the speech and speech reading method 
may not be considered pure oral classes by the oralists, I am 
sure they are not considered manual classes by the manualists. 
If the advocates of neither are pleased to claim them, I see no 
other course than to let them stand by themselves, named and 
known as the Indiana manuoral classes, wherein the principal 
and most highly prized method of giving instruction is the oral 
method, but which is somewhat qualified by the use of any 
other method as existing conditions and the exigencies of each 
class may require. We simply hold to our school's motto, 
"Any method for good results — all methods, and wedded to 
none." 

PROGRESS OF ORAL WORK IN INDIANA. 

In this connection, and because of the very great interest 
shown in the matter by parents of deaf children now applying 
for admission into this school, and nearly all of whom are in- 
sisting upon their children being placed in the oral classes and 
"taught to speak and to read the lips," it will be of some 
interest to note the progress of the work since its inception 
here in 1869. The Oral, or German, method, was no new thing 
at that time, since it had been used in Europe, though princi- 
pally in Germany, since 1760, when Ileinicke first insisted upon 
using articulation as the sole means of instruction. At this 
same time the Abbe de 1' Epee, in France, devised and perfected 
the Manual, or French, method, and insisted upon using signs 
as the sole means of instruction. It was the latter method 
which was adopted by the founders of the American Asylum 
for the Deaf at Hartford, Conn., in 1817, the first institution 
for educating the deaf in the United States. As the work 
spread from this parent institution, and from State to State, the 
method in use at the American Asylum was most naturally 
adopted — the oral method obtained no foothold as a means of 
instruction, and was only incidentally used in rare cases for 
training in articulation as an accomplishment. But about 1868, 
one or two schools were started in l^ew England for the pur- 
pose of teaching all deaf persons, or deaf mutes, by the pre- 
viously condemned oral method. Much opposition to this 
method was expressed by the great body of the profession, and 
the following, taken from the report of the Superintendent of 



21 

the Indiana School in 1868, fairly illustrates the consensus of 
professional opinion at the time : 

"We have no sympathy with the theory, so urgently put 
forward in Massachusetts, of lale years, by a few influential 
gentlemen, by which articulation is made the basis of instruc- 
tion, and the language of natural signs is repudiated as injur- 
ious. Articulation never can become the chief instrument of 
instruction with the mass of the deaf and dumb, much less the 
sole instrument. * >}; ^ Heinicke believed that ' all methods 
other than his own (articulation) were useless and pernicious, 
and no less than delusive folly, fraud and nonsense.' But these 
extreme views have long since been abandoned by nearly every 
intelligent teacher in that country (Germany) as well as inmost 
others. It is the more surprising to us, therefore, that we find 
them taken up and adopted in the new school recently estab- 
lished in Massachusetts" [Northampton]. 

Prior to 1869, those pupils in the Indiana school who were 
only partially deaf, or semi-mutes who possessed more or less 
perfectly the power of speech, were placed in the regular man- 
ual, or sign, classes, uoder hearing speaking teachers, and were 
to be trained as best they could be, for it was considered that 
articulation and lip-reading were mere accomplishments not to 
be attained in any useful degree except at the sacrifice of the 
more important intellectual and moral training. But in 1869 
the first special teacher of articulation was employed in the 
person of Dr. Joseph C. Gordon, now of Gallaudet College. 
The plan adopted was to take certain pupils from the regular 
sign classes and give each of them a few minutes' training sev- 
eral times each week, taking only such as had lost their hearing 
after they learned to talk, and who retained in some measure 
the ability to articulate words. The number of pupils thus 
instructed was twenty five, who were all that "it seemed best 
to subject to the sacrifices necessary to attain in any useful 
degree this accomplishment." In 1873, Dr. Gordon retired to 
accept the professorship of Natural Sciences at Gallaudet Col- 
lege, and during the next three years no special teacher of arti- 
culation was employed, and if instruction was given in speech 
and speech- reading, it was under the old plan followed prior to 
1869, i. e., semi-deaf and semi-mute in regular classes taught 
by hearing- speaking teachers, who would give "occasional 
attention " to articulation. 



22 

la 1872, however, a young man, named Alexander Graham 
Bell, since famous as the inventor of the telephone, had been 
engaged by the American Asylum at Hartford, Conn., to pre- 
sent and teach " Philosophical Speech," the invention of his 
father, a^noted elocutionist of London. Success attending his 
work, the Indiana school, in 1875, selected and sent a teacher 
to the American Asylum to qualify herself for the work. Re- 
turning with flattering testimonials, she was given a class in 
1876. During her first year the plan adopted was the same as 
under Dr. Gordon, i. e., selected pupils from the regular classes 
for periodical drill in- speech. But it was found that the great- 
est inconvenience resulted from the interruption to the studies 
of the pupils in the regular classes by the withdrawal of the 
semi- mutes at certain intervals for training in articulation. It 
was also found that the instruction given by signs in the reg- 
ular classes greatly retarded the improvement of the semi-mutes 
in articulation. For these reasons, a difterent arrangement 
was made the second year, and a class formed wherein not only 
was instruction in articulation given, but, also, all the other 
studies of the course were carried on by the new method. This, 
the first oral class in Indiana, lasted for only one year, and at 
the next session there was a return to the first year method — 
selected pupils, special class, daily drill — an itinerant form of 
articulation teaching, a peripatetic folly, if it is possible to adopt 
other plans. 

This form of instruction in speech and speech -reading as a 
mere accomplishment continued until 1895, but all the while 
under painstaking and conscientious teachers, skilled in the 
work. However, in 1892, one distinct oral class was formed 
by the writer, and in the annual report for that year he said: 

" I believe the end of the year will demonstrate the wisdom 
of the 'innovation.' Every pupil entering the school should be 
educated by this method, and taught to speak and to read the 
lips, if it is possible so to do — it is his right and it is our duty. 
It remains, then, for us to ascertain who can, and who can not, 
be educated by it. To do this, each new pupil should be given 
a fair chance for speech and education by speech, first; after- 
ward, education by other methods if failure results. We must 
bear in mind that there are deaf and semi-deaf, mute and semi- 
niute — that a method beneficial to one may not be to another. 
To accomplish the greatest good for the greatest number, the 



23 

very broadest latitude must be allowed, and a school, to be 
successful, must not be bound down to any one or two methods." 

In 1894, it was recommended that two additional oral classes 
be formed, which was done, and it was then decided to place 
all new pupils, excepting those assigned to the kindergarten 
class (which is in large measure preparatory to the oral classes) 
in the Oral Department, and to keep them there one year, in 
the meantime making proper tests for a survival of the fittest. 
If, at the end of the year, it should be found that a pupil may 
be better educated by another method than the oral, he would 
be transferred to another class and department, and the time 
spent in the Oral Department not counted against him. In 
1895, it was further decided to abandon all efforts to teach 
speech and speech-reading to selected pupils from the Manual 
Department, the idea being to have all in either the one or the 
other distinct department. 

The following will show the admissions to, and discharges 
from, the Oral Department since the first regular class was organ- 
ized, in 1892 : 

Oral clas?, one, 1892-93 10 

New pupils admitted up to October 31, 1896 .... 103 

Admitted from manual classes 10 

Admitted from the kindergarten 17 

Total 140 

Discharged 1 

Not returned to school 9 

Transferred to special class 1 

Transferred to manual classes 43 

54 

Oral classes, seven, 1896-97 86 

If to this we should add the first year kindergarten class, 
numbering twenty-four, and which, as stated above, is in some 
measure preparatory to the Oral Department, we would have 
110 pupils representative of the department. 

At the close of the scholastic year in June last, eighteen 
pupils were transferred from the Oral to the Manual classes. 
Some of them were not susceptible of education in and by 
speech and speech-reading, while others were transferred in 
order to reduce the size of the Oral classes, financial conditions 
not warranting the employment of additional teachers — other- 
wise, a majority of the eighteen would have been retained in 
the Oral Department. 



24 

It is proper to remark here that. the percentage of new pupils 
who possess, in varying degree, either hearing or speech, or 
both, is much larger now than formerly, and as the school and 
its objects become better known to the people, I am confident 
that the number of semi-deaf with speech seeking admission 
will continue to increase, for it is a well-known fact that there 
are many hard-of-hearing pupils in the public schools who, not 
succeeding there, should certainly be in this special school for 
all too deaf to be educated elsewhere. 

KINDERGARTEN. 

This department was established in September, 189-i, with 
ten pupils, and has been a gratifying success in every way. 
Two years are given to the work, the advantages of which are 
particularly noticeable in such schools as ours, and difficult to 
over-estimate. During the first year, the pupils, from six to 
eight years of age, have corrected, their faults of standing, 
walking and sitting, are instructed in deportment and pro- 
priety, are trained in hand- skill, observation and imagination, are 
taught simple numbers in units, writing and the formation of the 
simplest of sentences, are drilled in proper breathing, in the 
exercise of the vocal organs by the utterance of sound and in 
speech- reading by the most natural of methods — constant 
repetition of spoken words and short sentences. Some atten- 
tion is also given to speech, more or less, according to the 
pupil. 

During the second year, these kindergarten pupils pass into 
the advanced kindergarten classes and become a part of the 
Oral Department. The first year work is carried on, and is 
merged into primary work, but especially is attention given to 
speech and speech- reading. 

With a properly equipped Kindergarten Cottage, we could 
take much better care of those now here and provide for an 
increased number of young deaf boys and girls who must now 
be refused admission. With proper equipment for taking care 
of them, children as young as four years of age should be re- 
ceived. There can be no question as to the great good to be 
accomplished by such procedure. 



25 

The following table will show the growth of the department 

Kindergarten class 1894-95 (one^ 10 

New pupils admitted up to October 3], 1896 40 

Total 50 

Not returned to school 3 

Transferred to oral classes 17 

Transferred to manual classes 6 

26 

Kindergarten classes, 1896-97 (two) 24 



DEPARTMENT ASSIGNMENT. 

During this and the four preceding scholastic years the school 
was divided into departments as follows: 

1892-3. 1893-4. 1894-5. 1895-6. 1896-7. 

Kindergarten 10 20 24 

Oral 10 13 51 60 *86 

Manual 260 256 228 225 200 

Special . . . . . 2 

Total enrollment . 270 269 289 305 312 

*Include8 two advanced, or second year, kindergarten classes, numbering 
twenty-three. 

ASSIGNMENT OF NEW PUPILS. 

New pupils received during this and the four preceding 
scholastic years, were assigned to departments as follows : 

1892-3. 1893-4. 1894-5. 1895^. 1896-7. 

Kindergarten 9 18 22 

Oral 5 2 33 34 34 

Manual 34 33 1 1 3 

Total 39 35 43 53 69 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

In this department commendable progress has been made by 
the girls of the advanced classes in the Oral and Manual De- 
partments. Twenty-one have received instruction in drawing, 
painting in oil and water colors, crayon sketching, pastel work, 
modeling, designing and wood-carving, and the walls of the art 
room bear evidence to the diligence and ability of the young 
ladies during the year. . 



26 

The art teacher not only directs and teaches the work out- 
lined above, but also teaches drawing to sixteen classes, num- 
bering 241 pupils. The Prang system of drawing is used, and 
many of the boys and girls are making excellent progress. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

A first-class industrial training is very frequently of more 
advantage to a young man or woman than intellectual training 
alone. While not decrying the latter in the least, it is meet 
that I should insist that the former shall be considered of equal 
importance with the latter. The hand and mind developed 
together results in strength — otherwise in weakness. This 
practical view of the matter may be a theory when applied to 
hearing-speaking youth — with the deaf it is a necessity. With 
this in view, we have tried in every way to increase the useful- 
ness of our Industrial Department, and the heads of the classes 
are teachers — not foremen ; the various trades have been taught 
thoroughly, and the shop room made to rank with the school- 
room. While we have made great advancement during the 
past few years, we have much advancement yet to make; but 
satisfaction goes with the thought that our Industrial Depart- 
ment rests upon the pro])er foundation, and that the work is 
aloug the right line. 

At the beginning of the school year assignments were made 
as follows : 

Printing office .22 

Cabinet shop 21 

Shoe shop 18 

Carpenter shop 1 

Cooking 3 

Baking 4 

Electrician . . 1 

Floriculture 1 

Barbering 1 

Instruction has been given to the girls in all kinds of house 
work and in plain and fancy sewing, dressmaking, needle work, 
etc.; in the higher grades they have been taught sketching, 
painting, designing, modeling and wood carving. Boys not 
assigned to regular trade courses and other places mentioned 
have been required to do police duty around the buildings and 
grounds and to labor on the farm. 



27 

With a willing hand and heart, no young man or woman 
need leave his Alma Mater without being possessed of that with 
which to gain a livelihood. This department is not self-sustain- 
ing, and not expected to be. The expenditures the past year on 
its account amounted to $2,999.46, its receipts and earnings, 
$1,121.83. The following statement will show the classified 
expenditures (including salaries) and receipts of the department : 



Expense. Earnings. 

Printing office $704 90 $215 29 

Cabinet shop 989 66 98 60 

Shoe shop 1,001 25 801 30 

Sewing room 353 65 1 54 

Miscellaneous 510 

Totals. $2,999 46 $1,121 83 



From which it will be seen the net expense is $1,877.63. It 
should be borne in mind, however, that the printing, wood- 
working and sewing classes do hundreds of dollars' worth of 
work for the Institution for which no payment is made — print- 
ing of lesson papers, blanks, diet tables, books, pamphlets, etc., 
the making of various articles of household furniture, and labor 
in repairs of furniture, buildings and fences, the making of 
bedding, clothing, etc. 

There should be an increase in the number of industries 
taught the pupils, and I would recommend cooking for the 
girls and harness making and metal work (iron and tin) for the 
boys. 

OCCUPATION OF FORMER PUPILS. 



The following table will show the various occupations of 250 
former pupils of the Institution who attended the Reunion of 
Graduates and Former Pupils, in the summer of 1894. Nearly 
all of the fifty-two marked " no occupation" are to be added 
to those (45) marked "housework," for the great majority of 
the ninety-seven are young women, who, if not married, are 
living at home with their parents, and are engaged in ordinary 
household duties. 



28 



Abstract clerk 1 

Artist 1 

Baker 1 

Barber 3 

Bill-poster 1 

Blacksmith 2 

Bolt and iron worker 1 

Bookkeeper 2 

Boxmaker 2 

Brewer 1 

Broommaker 1 

Burnisher 1 

Cabinetmaker 10 

Carpenter 2 

Carpenter and builder 1 

Carpet layer 1 

Carpet weaver 1 

Cigarmaker 1 

Clerk 1 

Cooper 2 

Dressmaker 13 

Engineer 1 

Engraver 1 

Farmer 32 

Florist 1 

Gunmaker 1 

Hairworker 4 



Harnessmaker 1 

Horse collar maker 1 

Hostler 1 

Housework 45 

Instrument maker 1 

Laborer 2 

Machinist 3 

Manufacturer 1 

Merchant 2 

Minister 2 

Packer 1 

Painter 2 

Printer ..... 10 

Saw-mill worker 4 

Section hand 1 

Shoemaker 6 

Stone cutter 1 

Supervisor in school 1 

Tailor 8 

Teacher 8 

Tinner 1 

Tubmaker 1 

Wheelmaker 1 

Woodcarver 3 

Woodturner 1 

Woodworker 1 

No occupation 52 



AGE OF ADMISSION AND SCHOOL PERIOD. 



The law provides that all the mutes (the deaf) of the State 
shall be entitled to education in the Institution free of charge, 
under such regulations as to age, capacity, character, punctual 
attendance and length of school period as the Board of Control 
shall adopt. Such regulations have been adopted by the Board, 
and are set out in a subsequent part of this report, to which 
your attention is called. In passing, it is interesting to note 
that Indiana has the proud distinction of having been the first 
State in the Union to throw open its educational doors to the 
deaf absolutely without cost to them. 

By reference to the regulations spoken of, it will be seen that 
the age of admission is fixed at from eight to twenty-one, but 
experience has demonstrated that deaf pupils who enter school 
for the first time when sixteen years of age or over rarely make 
satisfactory progress in the acquisition of language or general 
knowledge. Although the minimum age is given as eight, yet 



29 

because of surrounding circumstances, at the discretion of the 
Superintendent, pupils may be admitted as young as seven, or 
even six. This has been done in a number of cases with ad- 
vantageous results to those thus admitted. 

The number of years a pupil may remain in the school is 
regulated by a graded time schedule, and depends upon the 
mental ability, progress and conduct of the pupil himself. Al- 
lowance being made therein for kindergarten and oral trial 
work, a pupil, according to this schedule, may remain certainly 
five years, and as much looger up to thirteen years as his work 
and prooiotions from year to year may warrant. And even 
this time may be extended by the Superintendent in individual 
cases if he deems it for the best interest of the pupil. 

TEACHEES' MEETINGS. 

It is the resolve of everybody connected with our school that 
Indiana shall excel in its work, and no effort is spared to make 
its school work in the highest degree successful. With this 
result in view, teachers' meetings have been provided for, in 
three sections, during the present scholastic year. There will 
be, first, six general meetings of all the teachers, wherein will 
be papers read and discussions had upon ''Mind and Mind 
Growth ;" second, ten meetings of the manual primary teach- 
ers, wherein will be given practical exposition of school-room 
work in those grades, especial attention being given to the de- 
velopment of language work ; third, ten meetings of the oral 
teachers, for the consideration of subjects of interest to only 
oral teachers, and wherein attention will be given to school- 
room work and to the anatomy and physiology of the organs 
of hearing and speech. At the close of the year a final general 
meeting will be held, at which the Superintendent will sum up 
the year's work in all departments. During the year Professor 
Francis M. Stalker, of the State Normal School, Mrs. Eliza 
Blaker, Superintendent of the Indiana Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary Normal Training School, and others will make addresses 
at these meetings. 

INDIANA AT CONVENTIONS. 

During the past biennial term, three gatherings or National 
Conventions of the profession have been held, at all of which 
this school was represented by members ot the Board ot Con- 



30 

trol and corps of teachers, and by the Superintendent. In 1895 
the Fourteenth Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf 
was held at Flint, Michigan — likewise the Ninth Conference 
of Superintendents and Principals. In 1896 the Fifth Summer 
Meeting of the American Association to Promote the Teaching 
of Speech to the Deaf was held in Philadelphia. At the meet- 
ing of the Conference, the writer was honored by being elected 
a member of the Executive Committee — likewise, at the meet- 
ing of the Association in Philadelphia, by being elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors. At these various meetings, 
which were attended by trustees, superintendents, teachers and 
officers of schools for the deaf in all parts of the United States 
and Canada, there were discussions concerning the mental, 
moral and industrial education of the deaf, and a most profit- 
able interchange of practical experiences. 



THE NEED OF AN OCULIST AND AURIST. 

In this connection permit me to repeat what I said upon the 
subject in one of my former reports, for it is as applicable now 
as then : 

" Qaite a large percentage of the pupils of the school are de- 
cidedly hindered in their school work by defective eyesight. 
The various teachers have reported to me the names of a num- 
ber of pupils who have difficulty in seeing, or suffer from con- 
tinued use of the eyes. Some of them have error of refraction 
that may be corrected by the use of proper glasses; others are 
suffering from conjunctival inflammation, and some with de- 
fective eyesight, the result of the disease causing deafness. De- 
fective eyesight is a most serious matter to the deaf, who, bereft 
of hearing, must depend upon the eyes. 

"During the past four years, of all the new pupils received, 
only about one half have had any kind of an inspection of their 
ears with a view to a correct diagnosis, and I feel certain, from 
letters of parents concerning this matter, the greater part of 
the examinations made have been anything but scientific. It 
is very probable that we have in school quite a number of chil- 
dren whose hearing could be vastly benefited by the treatment 
of a skilled specialist. With improved hearing would come a 
better command of written and spoken language. 



31 

"From whatever cause defective eyesight or hearing may 
have resulted, the proper treatment of the child requires the 
services of an experienced oculist and aurist, and I hope some 
arrangement may be made for the employment of such a one, 
who should make careful examination and record of each new 
pupil entering the school." 

CAUSES OF DEAFNESS, 1890-1896. 

The causes of deafness and ages at which it occurred in the 
new pupils admitted during past two years — also the past six 
years — will be shown by two of the following tables, as will 
also the degree of deafness, the number to whom instruction 
was given previous to admission, and what power of articula- 
tion is possessed by them. The power of hearing in many of 
those marked partially deaf is very feeble indeed, as is also the 
power of articulation in many of those marked as speakiug a 
few words plainly, and need hardly be taken account of in the 
majority of cases. 

CAUSES OF DEAFNESS IN 2,067 CASES. 

Immediately following the above are two tables showing the 
causes of deafness of the entire number of pupils who have 
received instruction in the Indiana Institution since its organi- 
zation in 1844*; also, the ages at which deafness occurred. 
It will be noticed that the pupils are arranged in groups of 
300, so that the causes and their growth or diminution can be 
more readily seen. 



*Up to October 31, 1896. 



32 



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34 



CAUSES OF DEAFNESS, 1844-1836. 



CAUSES. 


oo 

T 
1 

'a 
s 
Ph 
o 


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s 

'a, 

o. 
o 


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I 

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QO 

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s 


3 



Born deaf 


147 

33 
3 

21 

14 
4 
4 

19 
9 
3 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
2 


136 
5 

40 
1 

26 
3 
5 
6 
8 
4 
4 
3 
2 

'5 
3 
3 
4 


101 

55 

35 

13 

12 

2 

7 

10 

3 

12 

7 

3 

1 

6 
2 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 


74 

117 

13 

26 

8 

6 

7 

7 

2 

5 

4 

2 

5 

3 

1 
2 
3 
3 

'2 


56 

107 

12 

48 

1 

8 

9 

6 

6 

2 

5 

3 

5 

4 

'3 
3 

"2 


79 

64 

15 

30 

7 

9 

13 

2 

2 

8 

4 

12 
6 
6 
1 
4 
1 

■ '2 
4 

1 


94 
28 
18 

23 

13 
6 
9 
4 
4 
8 
7 
3 

12 
1 
3 
2 

" '2 

I 

■5 
1 
1 

' '1 

1 

■ 'l 

■ 'i 

1 


687 
376 


Scarlet fever . ... 


166 
144 


Inflammation of brain and ear 

Catarrh and catarrhal fever 


75 
55 
51 




44 


Fever not named 


44 
44 




35 




31 


Scrofula 

Abscess in head or ear 

Intermittent or malarial fever 

Mumps 


23 
22 
18 
17 
14 




10 




9 






1 


9 


Erysipelas, or black tongue 


2 
2 


7 
6 




5 










2 


1 


"2 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


4 




3 




1 


1 
1 
1 

1 




■ 1 




2 




2 




1 


2 








1 


2 


Fright ... 




2 














2 


Cholera infantum, or summer complaint . 










1 


2 












2 
























1 


1 














Measles and diphtheria 












Measles and brain fever 




























1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




Chills and medicine 




























































Boils and swelling on head 


























1 

1 
1 
2 
12 


















Paralysis 
















Tetter 

Not deaf 


■ 28 


'37 


26 


6 


■ 16 


15 


134 






Totals 


300 


300 


300 


300 


300 


300 


267 


2,067 









*Cerebro-spinal meningitis, or spotted fever, etc. 



85 



AGES AT WHICH DEAFNESS OCCURRED, 1844-1896. 

The ages at, which deafness occurred arnoug these pupils will 
be seen from the following table : 



AGES. 


.1 
o 

oo 


CD 

s 

O 

i 


00 

o 


CO 

o 
to 

(30 


ro 
c» 
O 
oo 

00 


o 
ob 
o 

CO 

oo 


to 

o 

i 


o 
H 




147 

6 

24 

21 

10 

10 

8 

10 

3 

2 

3 

1 

1 

1 


136 

21 

15 

20 

12 

8 

8 

5 

4 

7 

3 

" 'l 


101 
15 
29 
24 
26 
23 
14 
14 
10 
5 
4 
4 
5 
2 


74 
36 
38 
29 
20 
16 
13 
10 
11 
2 
6 
3 
2 
3 


56 
32 
56 
37 
23 
17 
16 
4 
6 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 


79 

45 

57 

27 

10 

11 

11 

6 

4 

6 

3 

1 

' 3 
4 


94 
35 
45 
29 
17 
8 
8 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 

1 

1 
1 


687 
190 


Under one year 




264 
187 
118 
93 


Between two and three . ... 






Between fire and six 


78 




52 


Between seven and eight 

Between eight and nine 


40 
26 




24 


Between ten and eleven 


12 


Between eleven and twelve 

Between twelve and thii teen 

Between thirteen and fourteen 


10 
11 
6 


Between fourteen ar. d fifceen 






2 
1 
1 

20 




3 






2 
58 


1 
1 
1 
1 
33 




2 
1 


7 


Between si.xteen and seventeen 

Between seventeen an d eighteen 


' 53 


3 
1 


Between fighteen and nineteen 

Unknown 

Not deaf 


■ 42 

1 


' 26 


■ 15 
2 


1 

247 
7 














Total 


300 


200 


300 


300 


300 


300 


267 


2,067 



ANNUAL ADMISSION OF NEW PUPILS. 

Since the opening of the Institution in October, 1814, there 
have been admitted 2,067 pupils, as follows: 









^• 






.' 




YEAR. 


o 


■Z 




YEAR. 


>. 


'u. 


eS 




m 


23 


H 




« 


C5 


H 


1844 


13 


10 


23 1 


1871 


34 


15 


49 


1845 . 


















12 


4 


16 


1872 


31 


18 


49 


1846 


















ly 


4 


23 


1873 


35 


25 


60 


1847 . 


















2 


9 


33 


1874 


35 


21 


56 


1848 , 


















13 


11 


24 


1875 


34 


18 


52 


1849 . 


















14 


10 


24 


1876 


35 


19 


54 


1850 . 


















18 


6 


24 


1877 


28 


21 


49 


1851 . 


















3) 


19 


49 


1878 


21 


31 


52 


1852 . 


















20 


12 


32 


1879 


37 


24 


61 


1853 . 


















25 


12 


37 


1880 


29 


22 


51 


1854 . 


















18 


10 


28 


1881 


40 


34 


74 


1855 . 


















10 


12 


22 


1882 


32 


?5 


57 


1856 


















12 


10 


22 


1883 


25 


19 


44 


1857 . 


















5 


5 


10 


1884. 


36 


21 


57 


1858 . 


















16 


14 


?0 


1885 


?0 


15 


45 


1859 . 


















15 


8 


23 


1886 


33 


30 


63 


1860 


















27 
9 


25 

7 


52 
16 


1887 


11 

24 


14 
13 


25 


1861 


1888 


37 


18t2 


















9 
17 


11 

15 


20 
32 


1889 


15 
28 


16 
?1 


31 


1863 


1890 


49 


186 1 . 


















15 
11 
16 


U 
18 
14 


26 
29 
30 


1891 


14 
23 
18 


21 
16 
17 


35 


1865 . 


1892. 


39 


1866 . 


1893 


35 


1867 


















21 


11 


32 


1894 


29 


14 


43 


1868 . 

1869 . 


















26 
16 

27 


13 
23 
26 


39 
39 
53 


n<^5 

1896 


30 
31 


23 
28 


53 
59 


1870 










Total 


1,196 


871 


2,067 



36 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS. 



During the summer of 1889 the extension of Ohio street 
through our grounds left a strip of land 600 feet long and 126 
feet wide lying north of the street and south of the Indiana 
Reform School for Girls, which the latter enclosed and made 
part of their grounds. 

During the years 1894 and 1895 the city of Indianapolis con- 
structed in and along Washington street, along which the 
Institution has a frontage of 1,260 feet on the south side and 
611 feet on the north, a main sewer, an asphalt roadway and a 
cement sidewalk on the south side. 

During the past year the city has laid cement sidewalks on 
the east side of Randolph street, along which the Institution 
has a frontage of 1,265 feet, and on the east side of State street, 
along which the Institution has a frontage of 2,566 feet. 

AH of these improvements have been made by the city, 
acting under the provisions of its charter, and the Institution 
has had no voice in the matter at all. The work has been per- 
formed, and the contractors look to the General Assembly for 
payment for such improvements not paid for by the last Gen- 
eral Assembly. 

During the past year the Board of Public Works of the city 
has agitated the question of opening a new street fifty feet wide 
through the eastern part of our grounds, running from Wash- 
ington street south to the Michigan Road, a distance of 1,623 
feet. 

SIXTEEN ACRES NORTH. 

Lying north of Washington and south of Ohio streets the 
Institution owns sixteen acres, more or less, of pasture land. 
During the meeting of the last General Assembly a joint reso- 
lution passed the Lower House authorizing the city to take 
this ground for park purposes, the city to make all proper park 
improvements without cost to the State, and to return land to 
State use and benefit without expense for improvements made 
thereupon, when demanded by the Governor of the State. This 
resolution was passed to the Senate for concurrence therein, 
where it was amended by making the city liable for all street 
improvements surrounding the tract. After being returned to 



37 

the House it was not again acted upon. Nevertheless it appears 
in the Acts of 1895, page 368, as having been duly passed by 
the General Assembly. 

Since 1895, street improvenaents have been made upon two 
sides of the above tract of land — in Washington and Randolph 
streets. 

IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS. 

During the past two years many minor improvements have 
been made, and the ordinary repairs have been of daily occur- 
rence. Rooms have been papered or painted, new carpets laid, 
window shades hung, and the dormitories, hallways and cellars 
whitewashed. Painting has been done in all parts of the build- 
ings by our own force; and the interior of the school-bouse, 
wood-work, side walls and ceilings, and other work by con- 
tract. New floors have been laid in the small kitchen, and in 
part of the boys' lavatory. Two thousand feet of picket fence 
has been rebuilt, part of it requiring new material. The entire 
fencing on the farm was straightened up, part of it having to 
be rebuilt with new material. The two driveways leading into 
Washington street have been graded down and regraveled to 
conform to the level of the street, the bed of which was low- 
ered ; and the entire front along this street was sloped down 
and sodded. Roofs have been repaired in places; likewise, 
gutters and down spouts. The natural gas service pipes with- 
in the buildings have been replaced with larger pipe and the 
system changed. A new carriage and tool house has been 
built; likewise a new combined cattle and wagon-shed. Three 
stone gate posts have been placed at the main entrance to the 
grounds. The dynamo foundation has been rebuilt, and the 
electric light engine given a general overhauling. Cement 
walks (3,870 square feet), and brick walks (608 square feet) have 
been laid, and 4,700 square feet of sodding done. Some new 
plumbing has been done, and much of the old repaired. 

The buildings, excepting the school-house, are old, and the 
wear and tear increases each year. The engineer, the car- 
penter, and others, are kept busily engaged the year through 
making necessary repairs, changes and additions, and lumber, 
hardware and painters' supplies are ever in demand. Your 
attention is called to the classified list of expenditures on ac- 
count of current expenses and repairs in a subsequent part of 
this report. 



^8 



FINANCIAL. 



A brief outline of the business and financial transactions for 
the fiscal year is all that is necessary to be given in this place, 
and your attention is called to the very full and complete ex- 
hibit in a succeeding part of this report for all such further 
information as you may desire. 



PROPERTY. 



The value of real and personal property belonging to 

the Institution October 31, 1896 |586,098 30 



FARM AND GARDEN. 



Value of producls of farm and garden $1,736 21 



EARNINGS. 

Amount of money received from sales and 

from shops $1,202 41 

Less shop receipts credited to Maintenance 

' Fund, but paid Treasurer of State .... 1,121 83 

Balance paid General Fund $80 58 

MAINTENANCE FUND. 

Received from State $54,000 00 

Received from shop? 1,121 83 

Total receipts $55,121 83 

*0f this amount there was expended .... 55,119 04 

Balance returned to General Fund . . 2 79 

CURRENT EXPENSES AND REPAIRS FUND. 

Received from State $4,500 00 

tOf this amount there was expended .... 4,499 89 



Balance returned to General Fund . . 11 

*BiUs unpaid October 31, 1896, because of appropriation being exliausted, 82,433.77. See 
forward, under " The Fluctuation of a Deficit." 

t Bills unpaid October 31, 1896, beoause of appropriation being exhausted, 830.40. See for- 
ward, under " The Fluctuation of a Deficit." 



39 



INDUSTRIAL FUND. 



Received from State $3,000 00 

Of this amount there was expended .... 2,999 46 



Balance returned to General Fund . . $0 54 

CLOTHINU. 

Value of clothing, etc., furnished pupils, 
accounts for same being filed with State 
Treasurer, for collection from counties, 
and return to General Fund 1,771 55 



Total covered into General Fund . . . $1,855 57 



RECEIPIS, DISBURSEMENTS, DEFICIT. 

The following statement will show at a glance the receipts, 
disbursements, debits and bills unpaid for the fiscal year just 
closed : 

Appropriation maintenance $54,000 00 

Appropriation industries 3,000 00 

Appropriation C. E. and repairs 4,500 00 

Industrial earnings 1,121 83 

Ordinary earnings 80 58 

Deficit maintenance 2,433 77 

Deficit C. E. and repairs 30 40 

Total $65,166 58 

Deficit, 1894-95 $1,345 11 • 

Debits during year — 

Maintenance paid 55,119 04 

Industries paid 2,999 46 

C. E. and repairs paid 4,499 89 

Maintenance unpaid 1,088 66 

C. E. and repairs unpaid 39 40 

Returned to General Fund — 

Balance funds 3 44 

Ordinary earnings 80 58 

Total $65,166 58 

It will thus be seen that while the total deficit at the close of 
the year is $2,464.17, it includes the deficit for the year preced- 
ing (11,345.11), leaving the actual deficit for the past year only 
$1,119.06. 



40 

JS^ow, so far as actual cost to the State is concerned, this total 
deficit is more apparent than real. Daring the year clothing 
paid for out of the appropriation for maintenance, was furnished 
to pupils, indigent and otherwise, and accounts for same, 
amounting to $1,771.55, were presented to the Treasurer of 
State for collection from the counties from whence the pupils 
came. When collected, the money passes into the general fund, 
and does not return to Institution use and benefit. As set out 
above, the ordinary earnings, amounting to 680.58, were also 
paid into the general fund, and passed beyond Institution use 
and benefit. Another thing to be considered is this: We 
carry over into the new fiscal year |627 worth of unused sup- 
plies in our storerooms. 

In other words, with a nominal deficit of $2,464.17, the State 
has had returned by the Institution $1,855.57 of its year's re- 
ceipts, and the Institution has on hand $627 worth of supplies 
for use during the new year, the whole being $18.40 in excess 
of the deficit. 

THE FLUCTUATION OF A DEFICIT. 

A deficit is a thing to be avoided by good business manage- 
ment, and especially in the conduct of a public institution, and 
yet there are times and conditions when it is difficult to avoid 
it without serious injury to the cause for which an institution 
stands. The reason of our deficit this year dates back four 
years. The following table will serve to explain it: 

Deficit for fiscal year ending: *Pupils. AppropriafAon. Deficit. 

October 31, 1893 261 155,000 00 $2,378 08 

October 31, 1894 2 9 60,000 00 892 45 

October 31, 1895 293 60,000 00 1,345 11 

October 31, 1896 300^ 157,000 00 t2,433 77 

For a number of years prior to 1894, the annual appropriation 
for maintenance had been $55,000; for current expenses and 
repairs, $3,000. Previous to that date, however (in 1889), there 
was a demand made for increased efficiency in the work of the 
Institution. It was found that the number of teachers and de- 
partments was not sufficient; that the classes were too large 
for efficient work, and that in many of them were pupils who 

* Average daily attendance. 

t Including special fund, 13,000 for industries. 

J Deficit maintenance. 



41 

had practically accomplished sill the good that was possible for 
them, and who were using the Institution simply as an asylum. 
The Industrial Department was operated under the lease sys- 
tem, which prevented the perfect acquirement of a trade. This 
system was wron^" in principle, pernicious in practice and de- 
moralizing in results. Improvements and repairs were sadly 
needed. 

The change was radical. 

Old methods were discarded; the "bangera-on" were dis- 
charged; the number of teachers and classes was increased, 
and the latter reduced in size; the new school house was 
erected, all kinds of school apparatus provided, a new graded 
course of studies adopted. Kindergarten and Oral Departments 
established and an esprit de corps developed among officers, 
teachers, employes and pupils by judicious discipline. The 
management of the Industrial Department was changed, and 
it, with the school, placed upon a purely educational basis. 
Special appropriations were made for equipping the shops, and 
for improvements and repairs, which were pushed forward to 
the extent of the appropriation. 

In 1892, the annual appropriations were so inadequate for 
maintaining the increased efficiency of the Institution, that an 
increase for maintenance and for repairs was asked of the Gen- 
eral Assembly convening in 1893. We had reached the limit — 
should we go forward or backward ? We went forward, for the 
Assembly increased the appropriations to $60,000 for mainte- 
nance, and to ^5,000 tor repairs. At the time of the increase 
the daily average attendance was 261, and the deficit at the 
end of the year, $2,378.08. During the next year, with 269 
pupils, the deficit was reduced to $892.45. In the next year, 
with an increase in daily attendance of twenty-four, or 293 
pupils, the deficit increased to $1,345.11. For the next year, 
1895-96, the year just closed, we had available for expenses 
but $54,000 for maintenance, $3,000 for industries, and $4,500 
for repairs, the Assembly meeting in 1895 reducing the appro- 
priations to the amounts named. During the year, the average 
attendance was 300J, and, in spite of the very strictest economy 
and absolute denial along some lines, the total deficit increased 
to $2,464.17. 



42 

Had the appropriations not been reduced, there would now 
be no deficit — on the contrary, there would be $1,039.27 balances 
unexpended in spite of the rapid increase in the size of the 
school. 

CONCERNING ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

The annual appropriations for the biennial term ending 
October 31, 1897, are as follows: 

For mainienance $54,000 00 

Induf^tries 3,000 00 

Ciarrent expenses and repairs 4,500 00 

The amount for maintenance is not sufficient for the proper 
support of the Institution along its present lines, and with its 
increased enrollment of pupils — 312 at the present time, as 
■against 261 in 1893, when the appropriation for maintenance 
and industries combined was made $60,000. The present ap- 
propriation should be increased. 

The amount for industries is barely sufficient to cover the 
year, and should be increased $500 to properly maintain the 
department as it stands at present. If it is to be extended, as 
it certainly should be, by the teaching of other industries, the 
present appropriation should be increased $2,000. 

The amount for current expenses and repairs will be sufficient 
for the new biennial term and no increase should be asked. 

The annual appropriations for the biennial term ending 
October 31, 1899, should be: 

For maintenance $63,500 00 

Industries $3,500 00 or 5,C00 00 

Current expenses and repairs . 4,500 00 

WHY AN INCREASE IN MAINTENANCE. 

The greatest item of expense in a State school for the deaf 
is the salaries paid the teachers, who are required to be persons 
skilled in a peculiar art, and whose remuneration is in great 
degree regulated by salaries paid in similar schools throughout 
the United States. When one school falls below the general 
average, that school is very likely to lose some of its best pre- 
pared teacher?, who are offered positions in other States where 
better salaries are given. The demand for skilled teachers is 
great and the supply is not equal to the demand. 

In this school a maximum salary is established, and teachers 
are allowed a yearly increase of $50 until it is reached, and they 



43 

are usually employed with that understanding. This increase 
was refused to a number during the past year, and likewise for 
the present year, because of reduced appropriation. These 
amounts should in justice be maae up to such as are still with 
us and who are entitled to it, and the natural increase should 
be given during the years for which the new appropriations 
are to be made. 

Because of the great success attending our new oral depart- 
ment, wherein dependence is had upon speech and speech- 
reading, and in which there should be smaller classes than in 
the Manual Department where signs are depended upon, and 
because of the probable increase in enrollment during the com- 
ing biennial term, two or three additional teachers are needed. 

The number of pupils enrolled and in attendance at the pres- 
ent time is 812, all that will be received during this schoolastic 
year ending in June next. In this connection it may be stated 
that a number of both old pupils and new applicants have been 
refused admission, because of existing financial conditions. Of 
the thirty old pupils not returning this schoolastic year, one- 
half will probably wish to return next year, at which time the 
new pupils to be received will probably number fifty, thus 
making sixty-five to be added to the present enrollment, or 377 
in all. Now, deducting from this number the discharges in 
June next (about 27) and those who will not return at the next 
annual session of school (about 25), it will be seen that the 
enrollment will be about 325 — probably more. 

On this basis the following estimate has been made. The 
cost for the past year is given for comparison: 

For new bi- 
ennial term, Past year, 
325 pupils. 3(K)>^ pupils. 

Pay-roll ' $37,431 28 $33,581 33 -;,. 

Office expense 400 00 331 54 

Household equipment . 2,573 00 1,973 00 

School expense 700 00 546 79 

Heat, light and power 5,000 00 4,237 20 

Ground^ stock and stable 1,000 00 996 33 

Food supplies 13,00000 11,717 39 

Pupils' personal expanse 2,200 00 1,884 46 

Miscellaneous classifications 1,000 00 938 16 

Over payments 1 50 

Total $63,304 28 $56,207 70 

Per capita $191 78 $187 04 



44 



PCPILS PERSONAL EXPENSE. 



This item includes clothing, traveling expenses, etc., for pu- 
pils, and in connection with the estimate for support during 
the next biennial term, permit me to call attention to these ex- 
penses for pupils, indigent or otherwise, whose parents either 
can not,, will not or neglect to provide for them. The law pro- 
vides (Sees. '246J, 2465 R. S. 1881) that in all cases where suit- 
able clothing and means for defraying traveling expenses are 
not otherwise supplied to the pupils, the same shall be provided 
by the Superintendent, who shall make out and file with the 
Treasurer of State accounts therefor against the counties from 
whence the pupils come, not exceeding $40 per annum for every 
such pupil. These accounts are to be paid by the County 
Treasurer to the State Treasurer, and the receipts would be 
credited to the maintenance fund of the Institution for its ben- 
efit and use were it not for the provisions of the general ap- 
propriation bill, which provides that the appropriations therein 
made shall "include all '^ * -'^ receipts for clothing and 
maintenance repaid by counties and persons." In fixing the 
appropriations this account, for which I have asked $2,200, 
should be given consideration, and the fact not lost sight of 
that it is to be returned to the State by the counties. 

SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS NEEDED. 

Certain special appropriations should be asked for. Because 
of the rapid increase in attendance on the one hand, and the 
reduction in appropriations for the present biennial term on 
the other, which caused a deficit at the end of the past year, a 
special appropriation for maintenance is needed to complete 
the present year without injustice to the school. I recommend 
that the following be asked for: 

To cover deficit at close of year 1894-5 $1,345 11 

To cover deficit at close of year 1895-6 1,119 06 

For household equipment, badly needed 500 GO 

For increaeed attendance, 12 pupils at $187.04 2,244 48 

Total $5,208 65 

At the Ust session of the General Assembly a special appro- 
priation ivas asked for the purpose of purchasing and properly 
housing a new boiler, which was absolutely necessary for the 
purpose of properly heating the Institution. This special ap- 



45 

propriation of $2,000 was niide, aod, believing it available at 
any time after the passage of the bill, and during the biennial 
term for which the general appropriations were made, the pur- 
chase of a boiler, etc., was deferred until November, 1895, at 
which time it was found that by a mistake in the use of the 
word "shall," instead of "may," in the act, it was obligatory 
upon us to make use of said appropriation 'prior to October Sly 
1895. The wording of the act is as follows : 

" Said specific appropriations for the Institution for the Edu- 
cation of the Deaf and Dumb shall be paid daring the fiscal year 
ending October 81, 1895." 

The intent of the committee having the appropriation bill in 
charge was to use the word " may," instead of "shall," in the 
bill, as I was :nformed at the time, and since, by the chairman. 
(Hon. J. G. Allen, of Daviess). Through some error the phrase- 
ology of the bill was changed, and the result was an opinion of 
the Attorney-General of the State that the money could not be 
drawn, the same having reverted to the General Fund. 

I recommend that the same amount for the same purpose be 
again asked for. The cold weather of last winter again em- 
phasized the urgent need ior greater heating capacity. 

A brick addition should be built to the wash-house, to be 
used as an ironing- room. The room used for the purpose at 
the present time is inconveniently situated, too small, and is 
badly needed as a play-room for the small girls. Its only 
equipment consists of a few sadirons, two iron heaters almost 
worn out, and a number of ironing boards to be placed upon 
the backs of chairs, the whole forming the most primitive of 
arrangement. And yet, in this room is ironed the bed and 
table linen, toweling and wearing apparel for 365 persons, the 
most of it being unsatisfactorily done by the girl pupils, the 
great majority of whom are now too small to be placed at the 
work. A proper addition to the wash-house, equipped with 
collar, cuff and bosom ironer, body ironer and mangle, with 
proper steam connections, will cost about $3,500. 

On the boys' side there should be erected a plain wooden 
structure, 70x30x20 feet, which would provide the boys with a 
play and lounging room in inclement weather, and in which 
should be placed some of the gymnastic apparatus to be found 
in gymnasiums. At the present time the only place under 



46 

shelter for them during rainy or cold weather is their study- 
hall, filled with school desks. This improvement would cost 
$1,800. 

The beds of the pupils in use at the present time are heavy, 
clumsy affairs of wood, made years ago, jointed, glued and 
riveted together into one piece, without springs, difficult to 
move and uncomfortable to sleep upon. These should be re- 
placed by iron beds with woven wire mattresses for many rea- 
sons. The cost of this change will be $1,500. 

The ramshackle affairs that pass for green-houses were built 
years ago, mostly of old material, are beyond repair, and 
in imminent danger of falling down. The two are valued at 
$50. A new green-house with propagating rooms should be 
erected. This improvement would cost $2,500. 

In the main kitchen a new and enlarged equipment is needed 
— range, steam kettles, utensil rack, steam tables, etc. The 
bake-oven needs repairing, if not rebuilding. To make these 
improvements will cost $1,000. 

Some steps should be taken to increase the dining-room and 
dormitory capacity. At the present time 312 pupils are seated 
in a dining-room that will comfortably accommodate about 250. 
The dormitories are so crowded that in not a single one of the 
twelve is there sufficient room in which to place chairs, one for 
each bed, as should be the case, the occupants of the beds 
having to sit upon them to undress, and having to pile their 
clothing upon them at night. There must be a rearrangement 
of some kind to comply with sanitary requirements. The Sec- 
retary of the State Board of Health has visited and inspected 
the dormitories, and has pronounced them too crowded, there 
being but 514 cubic feet of breathing space for each pupil. 

If the attendance is not to be limited to 325, the probable 
number next year, then the school-room capacity must be also 
increased, for at present every room in the building excepting 
one is in use. Two additional rooms may be gained by reduc- 
ing the size of the art-room, and making a new school-room at 
either end thereof, but this would ruin the art-room. One 
additional room may also be gained by reducing the size of the 
library. 

It is hoped that the committees of the General Assembly 
having such matters in charge will visit the institution and 
make due and careful examination of its pressing needs. If 



47 

they will do thia, I am confident their recommendations for 
appropriations will be just and satisfactory. Actual inspection 
will present necessities much better than words. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Special appropriations for — 

Present year $5,208 65 

Boiler, etc 2,0(;0 00' 

Ironing- room addition 3,500 00 

Boys' play-room J, 800 00 

Change of beds 1,500 CO 

GreenhouFe 2,500 00 

Change in kitchen 1,000 00 

OTHER IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS. 

Other improvements and repairs should be made in the near 
future, if the school is to be placed in first-class condition and 
80 equipped as to properly and successfully fulfill its mission. 

The buildings should be repainted within the next two years, 
as the paint is scaling ofi'in many places, and the walls are be- 
ginning to look shabby. The slate roofs upon two of the build- 
ings are in very bad condition and need replacing, if not now, 
certainly within a short time. A detached hospital building 
should be erected, for at the present lime the sick-rooms are 
on the third floor immediately over the bake-shop, kitchen and 
dining-room, and are shut in by high walls on each side. A 
kindergarten cottage should be erected for small boys and 
girls, so as to prevent their association with the larger ones at 
all times, which is undesirable. A gymnasium building of 
brick should be erected and fully equipped, for the use of both 
boys and girls, so that proper attention could be given to 
physical culture. A store-house should be built, curbing should 
be placed along the driveways, the pond from which we get 
our ice supply cemented and its banks riprapped, and the light- 
ing capacity increased. 

SALE OF PRESENT LAND. 

The land belonging to the Institution amounts to *102 
acres, more or less, there being twenty-five acres in the main 
central tract, sixteen north of it and sixty- one to the south, the 
whole being valued at $270,840, and costing originally less than 
$6,000. As is well-known, the city has grown up to and far be- 

*This does not include the 1% acres enclosed hy the Reform Fchool for Girls, valued at 
$5,720, reference to which has been made. In the inventory this ground is included. 



48 

yond this land, which really constitutes a farm within the city. 
The land north and south is well worked out, and at its best is 
constantly open to depredation, so far as its crops are concerned. 

In view of the high value of our present holdings and the 
urgent need of improvements necessary for the Institution to 
work out its greatest good and place itself in the front rank 
of educational institutions for the deaf, a credit to the cause 
and to our State, would it not be advisable to sell as much of 
this land as may be necessary to make the necessary improve- 
ments? 

It was originally purchased for the benefit of this Institution 
by far-sighted Trustees, who foresaw the time when it would 
be valuable, and its equivalent in money needed by the Insti- 
tution for improvements. For the benefit of the Institution it 
was all deeded to the State " for the only proper use and behoof 
of the Trustees of the Indiana Asylum for Educating the Deaf 
and Dumb, and their successors and assigns forever," and the 
Institution has at least an equitable right to its proceeds, if it 
should be sold. And would it not be well to sell part of it, 
using the proceeds, first, to purchase a dairy farm of 160 acres 
farther out, at a ten- fold cheaper rate; and second, to make 
the necessary improvements? 

DAIRY FARM. 

If such a farm should be purchased, a man and his wife, with 
one assistant, living thereon, could raise nearly all the produce, 
provender, etc., that would be needed, at less cost than now, 
for more could be gathered, and at less cost than we would have 
to pay, if purchased in the open market. Slops would no longer 
prove a nuisance, and could be used for fattening hogs to be 
butchered each winter for our own tables, thus reducing the 
yearly cost of meat and lard. In many ways such a farm would 
be of great benefit to the Institution. While the yearly increase 
in the price of our present laud will be lost, will not the improve- 
ments made and yearly increase in the price of the land to be 
purchased ofisetit? The city is growing rapidly, and eastward, 
too, and the new land will certainly advance in value very rap- 
idly. Under all the circumstances, while being liberal to deaf 
mute education, would it not be an economic way in which to 
make absolutely necessary improvements, and also good policy ? 



49 

CHANGE IN LOCATION. 

Concurreut with the suggestion for a sale of part of the land, 
is the thought : Would it not be wise to sell all of it and move 
the Institution to another site, north of the city, containing 
two hundred or more acres, where a farm could be directly 
connected with the Institution? The present buildings are 
old, two of the main ones having been erected in 1850, and are 
not arranged agreeabl}' to modern thought and progressiveness. 
Two railroads pass through the grounds very near to the build- 
ings, the shops and yards of one company being at one end of 
the park, and the yards of the other at the other end. The 
regular trains and. tbe switch engines are constantly passing 
and repassing, and are a nuisance with their noise, smoke and 
dirt. And for many other reasons which will readily suggest 
themselves, this is not an ideal site for such a school as this, 
with over three hundred pupils. 

A PERMANENT FUND. 

If it should be deemed best to retain the present location, 
and unwise at the present time to either purchase a dairy farm 
or to use the proceeds arising from a sale of part of the land 
for improvements, then I suggest that part be sold, and that 
the proceeds constitute an endowment fund, the interest on 
which should be credited to the principal, and the whole held 
until some future time, when a change in location shall become 
imperative. 

PER CAPITA EXPENSE. 

Maintenance deficit, 18C4-95, brought forward 11,345 11 

Maintenance, 1895-96 £6,207 70 

Total maintenance $57,552 81 

Less deficit at end of year, 1895 96. 2,433 77 

Total payments, maintenance, 1895-96 $55,119 04 

Less value of clothing furnished pupils and to be re- 
funded to the State by counties $1,771 55 

And ordinary earnings paid general fund 80 58 1,852 13 

Balance total payments .■ . $53,266 91 

Average daily number of pupils, 300.5. 

l!^et per capita expense to State, payments $177 26 

Per capita, industries, payments 9 98 

Per capita, C. E. and repairs, payments 14 97 

Total net per capita expense to State, payments $202 21 

Per capita, maintenance, deficit $(1,(88.66) $3 62 

Per capita, C. E. and repairs, deficit ($30.00) 10 3 72 

Total net cost to the State for year $205 93 

4— D. and D. 



50 

In making comparison with other similar schools in other 
States (and this is the only fair comparison to make), the total 
net per capita payments for maintenance and industries ($! 87.24, 
excluding maintenance deficit) should be taken, for it has 
been found that other schools do not include repairs in their 
showing of per capita expense — they confine themselves to 
payments for ordinary expense (maintenance). Another thing 
should be borne in mind : We have taken as the divisor the 
average daily number of pupils present (300.5), and not the total 
number of those enrolled during the year (373), which latter 
number is most frequently used for the purpose of computing 
per capita expense. With 373 as a divisor, the net per capita 
would appear to be very much less than as given above. While 
this would not be correct, it is not as incorrect as one would 
suppose, if thought be given to the fact that a certain fixed 
number of officers, teachers and employes must be provided, 
whether the number of pupils during the year be more or less, 
as they are of both sexes and in or from twenty-five classes. 

In New York, which has seven schools for the deaf, the gen- 
eral average per capita expense for the past year was |2S1 56, 
exclusive of clothing. Several of the schools are sectarian, and 
the cost for the teachers is nominal, else the per capita expense 
would be still higher. In the Philadelphia school, which is the 
largest in the world, the per capita expense one year ago was 
$283. Investigation will show that in most schools which are 
well equipped and in the front rank, the per capita expense is 
far greater than in Indiana, and it is with such schools that 
Indiana files abreast. 

If comparison be made with benevolent, penal and reformatory 
institutions of Indiana, it should be borne in mind that this is 
purely a school in every sense of the term ; that a greater num- 
ber of teachers and smaller classes are required than in ordinary 
schools, and that teachers who must necessarily be skilled in a 
peculiar work command higher salaries than do teachers in any 
other line of work. 

Taking the entire number of literary teachers in all the 
benevolent, penal and reformatory institutions of the State, and 
considering salaries paid them, it is found that this Institution 
has 47 per cent, of the whole number, and pays 60 per cent, of 
the salaries. 



51 



CONCLUSION. 



I appreciate the uniform courtesy and kindness shown me at 
all times by your Board, and have been encouraged in the per- 
formance of my duties by your unselfish devotion to the cause. 
During my fourteen years' connection with the Institution, six 
in a subordinate position and eight as Superintendent, I can 
recall no year more successful or more pleasant in all its phases 
than the past one. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I submit the foregoing, and the 
tabulated statements, rules and regulations for the admission of 
new pupils, course' of study in detail, roster of pupils, and the 
various reports and exhibits hereinafter set out and hereof 
made a part, as my annual report lor the fiscal year ending 
October 31, 1896. 

Respectfully, 

Richard 0. Johnson, 

Superintendent. 



52 



COURSE OF STUDY IN DETAIL. 



At the beginning of each school year, review the last year's work until October 
15; then begin the regular grade cour-e. 

PRIMARY GRADES. 

Grade 1 — Lar»giiage — Past, present and future tenses of the 
active voice, including past, present and future of "to be"; these 
to be taught in the three sentence forms, positive, negative and 
interrogative. Arithmdic — Notation 1 to 10; mental addition. 
Penmanship — Instruction with slate pencil and crayon, followed 
by pen and ink exercises on paper. 

Grade 2 — 'Language — All tenses of the active voice and the 
verb " to be." Arithmelic — Notation 1 to 20 ; addition and sub- 
traction, mental and written. Penmanship — Copy-book work, 
Nos. 1 and 2. Drawing — First principles, using blackboard and 
slate; drawing book No. 1. Letter Writing. Ohjed and Observa- 
tion Lessons. 

Grade 3 — Language — All tenses, active, passive and pro- 
gressive; journal writing. Arithmetic — Notation 1 to 50 ; addi- 
tion and subtraction; dollars and cents; buying and selling; 
mental and written. Penm.anship — Copy-book work, Nos. 3 
and 4. Drawing — Drawing books, Nos. 2 and 3. Letter Writ- 
ing. Object and Observation Lessons. 

Grade 4 — Language — Verb forms and sentence models con- 
tinued, introducing idioms; journal writing. Arithmelic — Nota- 
tion 1 to 100 ; addition and subtraction ; multiplication and 
division, with single figure in multiplier and divisor; dollars 
and cents ; mental and written. Geography — Written by 
teacher, concerning Institution, city, county and State ; show 
principal towns, rivers, lines of railway, highlands and low- 
lands; map drawing. Penmanship — Copy-book work, Nos. 5 
and 6. Drawing — Drawing books, Nos. 4 and 5. Letter Writing. 
Object and Observation Lessons. 

Grade 5 — Language — Verb forms and sentence models com- 
pleted ; systematic instruction in idioms; journal writing. 
Arithmetic — Practical problems in the four fundamental rules, 
introducing properties of numbers, cancellation and fractions; 
United States currency. Geography — First lessons; general 



53 

division and features of land and water and form of the eartli ; 
map drawing. Penmanship — Copy-book work, special selection. 
Drawing — Drawing books, Nos. 6 and 7. Letter Writing. Ob- 
ject and Observation Lessons. 

INIERMEDIATE GRADES. 

B Grade — Language — General review of verb forms and sen- 
tence models; systematic instruction in idioms continued; 
journal writing. Arithmetic — Common fractions continued; 
denominate numbers begun ; practical problems in money. 
Geography — Geographical reading lessons, elementary mathe- 
matical, physical and political; map drawing. History — Sep- 
tember to January, written by teacher, concerning Institution, 
city, county and State; January to June, stories of American 
History. Drawiyig — Special selection. Object and Observation 
Lessons. 

A Grade — Language — General reading and idioms continued ; 
compositions. Arithmetic — Common fractions completed ; deci- 
mals ; denominate numbers completed ; exercises in commercial 
forms. Geography — World's mathematical and physical ; globe 
and map studies and map drawing. History — Elementary 
United States. 

ACADEMIC GRADES. 

'^ Junior Grade — Language — General reading and idioms con- 
tinued ; compositions. Arithmetic — Percentage; practical prob- 
lems in profit and loss, commission, insurance, taxes, duties, 
etc.; exercises in commercial forms. Geography — World's po- 
litical ; map drawing. History — September to January, Com- 
plete United States, beginning of Revolution to present; Janu- 
ary to June, selected General History; stories of both. 

'^^ Middle Grade — Language — Grammar and general reading; 
compositions. Arithmetic — Interest; discount; exchange; part- 
nership; ratio and proportion. History — English. Physiology — 

^During the present year the Junior and Middle Grades are combined into one, and the 
following shall be the course of study : 

Language- Grammar and general reading; compositions. Arithmetic— Percentige ; 
interest; discount; exchange; partnership ; ratio and proportion. History— September to 
January, Complete United States; January to June, English. Geography— World's Po- 
litical ; map drawing. Physiology and Anatomy— Elements of, and lectures, making use of 
anatcmical models, skeletons, etc. 

Books Used — As provided for in Middle Grade, adding Higginson's United States His- 
tory and Indiana Complete Geography. 



54 

Elemeuts of, and lectures, making use of anatomical models, 
skeletons, etc. 

Senior Gr4.db — Language — Grammar and literature. Arith- 
metic — Analysis; roots; mensuration; general review. Natural 
Philosophy — Lectures and experiments. Natural History — Ele- 
ments of, and lectures. Moral Philosophy — Lectures. Civics — 
Outline in general. United States in particular, by lectures, 

TEXT BOOKS USED. 

Grade 1 — No books; lesson-papers. 

Grade 2 — No books; lesson papers. 

Grade 3— First Reader (Cyr); lesson-papers. 

Grade 4 — Stories for Language Study (Kellogg), 

Elementary Arithmetic (Indiana). 

MS. Geography (Teacher). 

Lesson papers. 
Grade 5 — Stories of Great Americans (Eggleston). 

Elementary Arithmetic (Indiana). 

First Lessons in Geography (Monteith). 

Lesson papers, 
B Grade — Stories of American Life and Adventure (Eggleston). 

Elementary Arithmetic (Indiana). 

Elementary Geography (Indiana). 

MS. History (Teacher). 

First Book of American History (Eggleston). 
AGrade — Lessons in Language, Part I (Tarbell). 

Book of Tales (Ed. by Swinton). 

Complete Arithmetic (Indiana). 

Complete Geography (Indiana). 

Elementary History of the United States (Quack- 
enbos). 
Junior Grade — Lessons in Language, Part I (Tarbell). 

Old Stories of the East (Baldwin). 

Complete Arithmetic (Indiana). 

Complete Geography (Indiana). 

United States History (Higginson). 

General History (Anderson). 
Middle Grade — Lessons in Language, Part II (Tarbell). 

Ten Great'Events in History (Johonnot). 

Complete Arithmetic (Indiana). 

English History (Berard). 

Eclectic Physiology (Brown). 



55 

Senior G-rade — Lessons in Language, Part II (Tarbell). 

Primer of English and American Literature (Clarke). 
Shakespearean Primer (Institution edition). 
Complete Arithmetic (Indiana). 
Natural History of Animals (Tenny), 
Natural Philosophy, lectures and experiments. 
■ Moral Philosophy, lectures. 
Civics, lectures. 



Copy Books — Indiana Series. 
Drawing Books — Prang's. 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTION. 

Special instruction is to be given pupils by special teachers, 
as follows : 

Drawing — Grades 3, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5a, Tuesday and Thursday 
mornings ; grades 5b, 5c, Bl, B2, 1st oral, Monday and Wednes- 
day mornings ; grades 2a, 2b, 2d, 3d and 4th oral, Friday 
mornings. 

Painting — Girls of Academic and A grades, afternoons. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

Instruction will be given in this department to assigned 
pupils as follows : 

Carpentry, cabinet-making and turning 6 years' course. 

Shoe and leather work 6 " 

Printing — Composition, press- work, binding 6 " 

Tin work when added ,,.3 " 

Cooking when added 1 " 

Sewing, plain 3 " 

Dressmaking — Cutting, fitting, draping 2 " 

Sewing — Fancy needle-work 2 " 

Instruction will also be given to the girls in all kinds of house- 
work as may be arranged for by the Superintendent. Certain- 
boys will also be assigned to the bake-shop, kitchen, carpenter 
shop, greenhouse and farm. Boys not assigned to regular trade 
courses and other places mentioned shall be required to do 
police duty around buildings and grounds. 



56 

Admission to the regular trade courses for boys will be from 
Grade 5. 
Admission for the girls will be from Grade 3. 

In addition to the above, the girls in the Academic and A 
Grade will be taught drawing, designing, modeling and wood 
carving. Boys may be admitted to these classes. 

NOTES ON COURSE OF STUDY. 

The vocabulary of a class will be governed by the verb forms 
taught, and the daily incidents of each particular class-room. 
The general course in language is a graded one which must be 
closely adhered to as prescribed in " The Indiana Language 
Manual" prepared for use in this school by Noble B. McKee, 
formerly Principal of the Primary Grades, and in which are set 
out systematically the verb forms and sentence models for each 
particular grade. 

For journal writing, a good, substantial book will be pro- 
vided, which must remain in the possession of the teacher, ex- 
cept when pupils are writing therein. It must be explained by 
the teachers that the book is to be a four years' record of 
journal writing (third, fourth, fifth and sixth years) and must 
show neatness, tasteful arrangement and legible penmanship, 
otherwise it will be to their discredit when promotions are to 
be made. 

The journal record is intended to show progress in the use 
of language and in the assembling of ideas, and will largely 
qualify the " marking " upon which promotion will be based. 
The record must be submitted to the supervising principals for 
inspection at such times as they may direct. 

Compositions upon assigned subjects must be written by pupils 
in the A, Junior and Middle grades at least once every two 
weeks. At the end of every six weeks the' compositions last 
written must be submitted to the Superintendent for his 
inspection. 

In journal writing and composition, corrections must not be 
made upon the written page. The journals and compositions 
must be left and submitted just as written by the pupil. Com- 
mon errors, however, must be noted by the teacher, written 
upon the blackboard, and thoraughly explained to the class. 



57 

Reproduction of stories read and rearrangement of stories 
incorrectly written on the blackboard may occasionally be sub- 
stituted for journal writing and compositions. 

Letter writing will be done on alternate Mondays. If pupils 
be absent from class because of sickness, accident or similar 
cause, a card or envelope, properly addressed, must be sent to 
the Superintendent, who will write concerning the pupil. 
Letter writing in proper form must be taught by the teacher — 
it is not sufficient to see that it is done — it must be seen that it 
is properly done. 

When written lessons or lectures are to be prepared by the 
teacher, it is expected that the greatest care shall be taken in 
their preparation. A poorly written one is worse than none at 
all, and will work a positive injury to the child. 

Daily language lessons for the priuted lesson-papers must be 
written as directed by the supervising principals, and must be 
submitted to them not later than 12 o'clock each day. 

Concerning Object and Observation Lessons, it is desired 
that special attention be given this matter, and teachers must 
exercise their ingenuity as to what, where and when ; and, in 
the words of a noted educator of the deaf, if they have no 
ingenuity, " let them get some." 

While believing that of any given number of deaf pupils 
taken at random, many thereof must be educated by means of 
the sign language, it is nevertheless folly to persist in the use 
of signs upon any and all occasions, to the total exclusion of 
the manual alphabet — absolute folly. It is well known, and, 
in fact, conceded by all, that the use of the manual alphabet 
tends to more speedy acquisition of luord-language in grammat- 
ical form than do signs. A child must first possess ideas, then 
language to express. Let signs be used to generate or ex- 
plain ideas, abstract or otherwise — and in manual, oral, or 
auricular classes; let the manual alphabet and writing, and 
speech where possible, be used to teach word- language, for this 
is absolutely indispensable to the deaf-mute in either verbal or 
written form, unless he is intended for one of a "deaf-mute 
variety of the human race." ■ 

WHICH ALL MEANS— 

That officers, teachers, employes and pupils must make as 
great use of the manual alphabet during the year as may be 



58 

possible, and especially in school-room work daring and after 
the second year — more especially iu the upper grades. 

That the only way to know a word-language is to use such 
a one. 

That while the sign-language may and should be used, per- 
haps, for the awakening of ideas, and for lectures, demonstra- 
tion or explanation, and in social intercourse, it must be remem- 
bered that it is an ideographic one, and that its use all of the 
time becomes an abuse for which the pupil suffers. 

In the industrial classes the instruction must be thorough 
and systematic. Attention must be given to all branches of 
the work. It must be remembered that the shops are industrial 
class rooms, and are to be kept in orderly and cleanly manner, 
open to the inspection of visitors at all times. 

NOTICE. 

All plans for school-room work, preparations for lessons (ex- 
cepting the daily lesson paper), etc., must be made out of school 
hours. 



59 



RULES CONCERNING THE ADMISSION AND RETEN- 
TION OF PUPILS AND WHAT SHALL 
BE TAUGHT THEM. 

(Adopted by the Board of Truste's July 6, 1893.) 



1. This Institution is open to all the deaf of the State free 
of charge, provided they are of suitable age and capacity for 
receiving instruction, and are too deaf to be educated in the 
common schools. 

2. Pupils will be considered of proper age between the 
years of eight and twenty- one. No applicant who is idiotic, 
feeble-minded, afflicted with sore eyes or with a contagious or 
offensive disease, or who is an invalid so confirmed as to pre- 
vent study, will be received. 

3. This Institution is in no sense an asylum, neither is it a 
hospital. It is strictly an educational institution — a school. 

4. Applications for the admission of pupils must be made 
upon regular blanks of the Institution, which will be furnished 
the applicant by the Superintendent. All questions on these 
blanks must be fully answered, and the requirement of the cer- 
tificate of a Justice of the Peace on the back thereof (that the 
person seeking admission as a pupil is a legal resident of the 
county named), must be complied with. See section 2762, R. 
S. 1881. 

5. Pupils will be admitted on the following conditions: (1) 
The pupil, provided with clothing, must be brought to the 
Institution punctually at the beginning of each session, unless 
detained at home by sickness. (2) The pupil is to remain in 
school until the second Wednesday in June of each year. (3) 
No parent or guardian will be allowed to take a pupil out of 
the school during the session without some urgent reason. 
Pupils will not be allowed to go home during the holidays. 

6. The annual session of school begins on Wednesday of 
the week during which the State Fair is held {usually September 
20 to 24) and closes on the second Wednesday in June. Pupils 
must come promptly on or before the first day of the month. 



60 

7. No pupil, unless under extraordinary circumstances, can 
be received at any time other than at the beginning of the an- 
nual session*. 

8. The Institution will provide for each pupil regularly ad- 
mitted, boarding, lodging, washing, superintendence of conduct, 
manners and physical needs, instruction, school supplies, etc., 
but will not pay traveling expenses of pupils in coming to or 
going from the Institution, nor supply them with clothing, ex- 
cept under certain conditions mentioned in Paragraph 11. 

9. All traveling expenses of pupils to and from the Institu- 
tion must be defrayed by their parents or guardians. They are 
also required to furnish annually to each pupil sent by them, a 
sufficient quantity of suitable clothing to last until the close of 
the term. See Sec. 2763, JR. S. 1881. A good, stout trunk must 
also be supplied. The name of the pupil should be written with 
indelible ink upon the articles of clothing, as they are liable to 
be lost when not so marked. 

10. The applicant must deposit with the Superintendent, 
when the pupil is admitted, a sum not less than $5.00 to defray 
incidental expenses for said pupil during the year. If any 
part of said deposit should remain unexpended at the close of 
the annual session, it will be returned or carried forward to the 
next session, as the applicant may desire. 

11. When it is established that a person is in indigent cir- 
cumstances, and the parents or guardians are either unable or 
neglect to furnish the necessary clothing, or to pay the neces- 
sary traveling expenses, they, or either of them, will be sup- 
plied by the Superintendent in pursuance of the following 
legislative enactment: 

Sec. 2Ip6If, R. S. 1881. In all cases where suitable clothing 
and means for defraying traveling expenses are not otherwise 
supplied to the pupils, the same shall be provided by the Super- 
intendent, who shall make out and file with the Treasurer of 
State accounts therefore, separate in each case, against the re- 
spective counties from which such pupils are sent, in an amount 
not exceeding forty dollars per annum, for every such pupil, 
which accounts shall be severally signed by the Superintendent 
and attested by the seal of the Institution under his charge; 
and the Treasurer of State shall charge each account thus cer- 
tified to the county from which the pupil named therein was 
sent. 



61 

S(c. 2765, R. S. 1881. The Treasurer of State shall forward 
€ach account so filed with him to the Treasurer of the proper 
county, who shall cause it to be paid out of the County Treasury 
to the Treasurer of State; and such county shall, in the name 
of the county, and by suit, if necessary, collect the amount of such 
accouvt from the parents or estate of such pupil, as the case may be, 
ichere there is ability to pay : Provided, That at least three hundred 
dollars of the property of such parents shall be exempt from the pay- 
ment of such account. 

12. The course of study in the Institution is bo arranged as 
to cover ten years, and is divided into primary, intermediate 
and academic courses. The primary and intermediate courses 
embrace spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, geography, his- 
tory and grammar. The two courses are divided into seven 
grades, five primary and two intermediate, and the time required 
to complete them in seven years. The academic course com- 
prises a three years' course of advanced primary and inter- 
mediate work, and a study of the sciences. The number of years 
a pupil may remain in the school is regulated by a time-schedule, 
and depends upon che mental ability, progress and conduct of 
the pupil himself. lie may remain certainly five years, and as 
much longer up to thirteen years as his conduct and promotions 
from year to year may warrant. 

13. The Superintendent shall have the power at any time to 
discharge a pupil from the Institution for inability to receive 
an education, for failure to make the necessary progress, for 
violation of the rules of the Institution, or where his retention 
would prove a detriment to others or to the school. He may 
also, when he thinks the facts warrant it, extend the period of 
instruction in individual cases. 

14. It is the intention of the Trustees to render the pupils 
self-supporting in greater or less degree after leaving the Insti- 
tution, by requiring them to become proficient in some useful 
trade or occupation while in attendance at the Institution. In 
accordance with this design all the pupils will be required to 
labor a portion of each day, the girls performing the lighter 
kinds of house work and various kinds of needle work, such 
as plain and fancy sewing, dressmaking and tailoring; and the 
boys at various trades, such as printing, cabinet-making, car- 
pentry and wood turning, tailoring, shoemaking, farming, flori- 
culture and baking. Pupils will be assigned to one or more of 



62 

these occupations, or others, as the Superintendent may deem 
them most fitted for. In addition to the above, the girls in the 
Academic Department will be taught drawing, painting, mod- 
eling, designing and wood carving. Boys may be admitted to 
these classes. 

15. In the education of the deaf, there are two methods and 
one system of instruction usually recognized. 

The Manual or French Method (using sign language, manual 
alphabet and writing), of which there is a variety that may be 
called the " Alph:;betic," wherein only the manual alphabet 
and writing are used. The Oral or German Method (using 
speech and speech-reading and writing), of which there is a 
variety that may be called the "Auricular," wherein special at- 
tention is given to the development and training of the hear- 
ing, by means of which instruction is given. The combined 
syetem (a so-called combination of the two methods). 

The general system of instruction used in this Institution is 
known as the combined (American) system, under which all 
known methods and their variations may be used for the attain- 
ment of an object common to all. Speech and speech-reading 
are regarded as very important, but mental development and 
the acquisition of language are regarded as still more impor- 
taut. It is believed that with a great number of the new 
pupils now entering, the necessary mental development and 
acquisition of language may be as well attained by the Oral 
Method, which results in speech and speech reading, as by the 
Manual Method, which precludes this much-tobe-desired re- 
sult. So far as circumstances permit, such method (or methods) 
is chosen for each pupil as seems best adapted to his needs and 
capacity after thorough trial. In short, the rule will be, "any 
method for good results — all methods, and wedded to none." 

16. The Institution is non-sectarian, but thorough moral 
and religious instruction will be given, especially on the Sab- 
bath, the nature of it being general and such as is accepted by 
all churches and creeds. 

17. Those persons bringing pupils to or taking them away 
from thp Institution can not be furnished with board or 
lodging. 

18. The pupils will be sent home to spend the vacation on 
the day following the close of the School. 



63 

19. Being Sec. 2767, R. S. 1881. Whenever it shall be 
deemed necessary by the proper officers of the Institution in 
accordance with the by-laws and regulations, to have any pupil 
removed, either temporarily, 'or on account of ill health, or the 
vacation of the school, or permanently on account ol having 
completed his course of instruction, or been found disqualified 
from any cause for a longer continuence in the school, the 
parents or guardians of such pupil, if he have any, shall 
promptly remove him upon the requirement of said officers; 
and in case he shall not be thus provided for, it shall be the 
duty of the Superintendent of the Institution to cause him to 
be 80 removed and delivered to the Trustee of the Township 
where he resided before coming to the Institution ; and the 
expense of such removal shall be refunded to the Institution in 
the same manner as provided in Sections 2761 and 2765; and 
the County Treasurer shall charge the same to the proper 
township, and collect it in the manner as provided in aforesaid 
sections. 

20. All business letters or letters of inquiry in regard to 
pupils, or their concerns, or in regard to new pupils whom it 
may be designed to place in the Institution, must be addressed 
to the Superintendent and not to subordinates, otherwise no 
attention will be paid to such letters. 



64 



PUPILS BY COUNTIES. 



The Following Table Shows by Counties the Number of Pupils Ad- 
mitted and Dismissed From Each Daring the Year, and the 
Number Remaining^ Enrolled and Entitled to the Privileges of 
the Institution on the 31st of October, 1896 : 



COUNTIES. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams . . . 
Allen . . . 
Blackford . . 
Boone . . . 
Carroll . . . 

Cass 

Clark .... 
Clay. . . . 
Clinton . . 
Crawford . . 
Daviefs . . . 
Dearborn . . 
Decatur . . . 
Dekalb . . . 
Delaware . . 
Dubois . . . 
Elkhart. . . 
Floyd 

Fountain . . 
Franklin 
Fulton . . . 
Gibson . . . 
Grant . . . 
Greene ■ . . 
Hamilton . . 
Hancock . . 
Harrison 
Hendricks . 
Henry. . . . 
Howard 
Huntington 
Jackson . 
Jasper. . . . 

Jay 

Jefferson . . 
Jennings . . 
Johnson. . . 
Xnox . . 
Kosciusko. . 
Lagrange. . 
Lake . . . 



Laporte . . . . 
Lawrence • . . 
Madison . . . 
Marion . . 
Marshall . . . 
Martia . . . . 
Miama . . . . 
MoDroe • . . 
Montgomery . 
Morgan . . . . 

iSoble 

Orange . . . . 

Owen 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter . . . . 

Posey 

Pulaski . . . . 
Putnam . . . . 
Randoloh. . . 
Rush . . . . 
Shelby . . . 
Spencer . . . 
St. Joseph. . . 
Steuben . . . . 
Sullivan . . . 
Switzerland . . 
Tippecanoe . - 
Tipton . . . 
Union . . . . 
Vanderburgh 
Vermillion 
Vigo . . . . 
Wabish . . . . 
Warrick . . 
Washington . 
Wayne . . . . 
White 



Total 



372 



30 



5 
7 

35 
4 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
6 
6 
3 
3 
7 
2 
1 
5 
1 
4 

. 5 
6 

10 
1 
1 
5 
1 
7 
4 
7 
2 
3 
1 
9 
3 

342 



Number admitted during the year 372 

Number discharged during the year 30 

342 

312 



Number remaining on rolls ....... 

Number in attendance at the end of year 



Leaving enrolled and not in attendance 



30 



65 
CATALOGUE 



Of Pupils in Attendance During the Fiscal Year Ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1896. 



Name. 



POSTOFPICE. 



COUKTY. 



Able, Isola 

Adkins, George B. 
Alexander, Georgia M. 
Aldredge, Thomas D. . 

Arnot, Ida E 

Arnot, George W. . . 

Arnot, Harry A 

Ayden, John R . . . . 

Bagley, Grace D 

Barrett, 0. Dot . . . . 

Basinger, Ida M 

Baldwin, Isaac . . . 
Baldwin, Emma E. . , 

Barr, Estella 

Bashore, James W. . . 
Beck, Rose L. . . . 

Beckman, Susan K 
Beckman, Mary G. M. . 
Bellamy, Martha 
Bennett, Laughretta M 
Bennett, Harry P. . . . 

Berg, Benj 

Beyer. George ... 
Beyer, Maud M. . . . 
Binkley, Robert E. . . . 
Bippus, Wm. 0. . . . 
Bissey, Charles B. . . . 

BishofF, Wm 

Bly, Lawrence . . . . 
Blystone. Ada . . 

Boothe, Blanch B. . . 
Boardman, Fred. . . . 
Bollman, Robert . . . 

Bouham, Leon 

Bough, Charles . . . . 
Bozell, Julia M. . . 
Bradford. Burness . . . 

Brenton. Ethel 

Brink. Louisa . . . . 
Brittain, Mary E. . . . 
Brookbanks, Guy 
Brookb:inks, Alma G. . 
Brockwav, Oliver M. . . 
Bruner, Horace P. . . . 

Bruner. Josey V 

Brunning. Otto . - . 
Bruns, Frieda W. C. . . 

Bufnrd. Edna 

Buck, Mntthias . . . . 

Butlei-, John A 

Butler, Mary L. . . . 
Bye, Percy D. 
Caughell. Archibald G. 
Campbell, Monell . . . 
Chadwif-k, Mamie . . 
Chenowith, Bert. . . . 

Clark, Albert 

Clark, George E. . . . 
Cochran, Wm. . . 
Conner, Earl L. . . . 
Conwell. Estella E. 
Cooper, Nancy . . . 
Coulter. Mary A . . . . 

Craig, Charles 

Craig. Lillie , . 
Crawford. .Joseph H . . 
Crocker, Lulu . . 
Cummings, Susan G 
Curtis, Nellie 

5— D acd D. 



Montgome 

Hillsboro 

Evansville 

Grafton 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Clinton 

Walton 

Middletown . 

Ranger 

Jefifersonville 

Woodside 

Indianapolis 

Servia 

Tipton 

Fairfield ■ . 

Fairtield 

Leiiiastersville 

t-helby . . . 

Princeton . . 

Noblesville 

Seymour 

Seymour . . . 

East Gf-rmantow 

Terre Haute . 

Ireland ... 

Eck 

Kendallville . 

Boyleston . . 

Ashbiiro 

Unioa Center 

Arney 

Indianapolis . 

Silverville . . 

Tipton 

New Albany 

^ear Southport 

ladianapc lis 

O'Hkland rity 

Sharptville 

Sharpsville . 

Lebanon 

Kouts . . . 

Kouts . . . 

Holland 

Hamtn'nd . 

Fort Wayue 

Madi-on . . 

Huntington 

Huiitii.gton 

Indianapolis 

Idaville . . 

Marion 

Indianapolis 

Upland 

Fountain City 

Attica 

Veeder.-burg 

Pettvsville 

Mesbick 

Wheatland . 

Goshen 

Alum Cave 

Alum Cave 

Knitrhtstown 

Hamilton 

Hunting! urg 

Pike's Crossing 



Daviess. 

Fountain. 

Vanderburgh. 

Posey. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Vermillion. 

Cass. 

Henry. 

Perry. 

Clark. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Wabash. 

Tipton. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Pike. 

Lake. 

Gibson. 

Hamilton. 

Jackson. 

Jackson. 

Wayne. 

Vigo. 

Dubois. 

Marion. 

Noble. 

Clinton. 

Clay. 

Laporte. 

Owen. 

Marion. 

Lawrence. 

Tipton. 

Floyd. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Gibson. 

Tipton. 

Tipton. 

Boone. 

Porter. 

Porter. 

Dubois. 

Lake. 

Allen. 

JeB'er; on. 

Huntington. 

Huntington. 

Marion. 

White. 

Grant. 

Matron. 

Grant. 

Wayne. 

Fountain. 

Fountain. 

Miami. 

Henry. 

Knox. 

Elkhart. 

Sullivan. 

Sullivan. 

Henry. 

Steuben. 

Dubois. 

Boone. 



66 



CATALOGUE.— Continued. 



Name. 



Cutteridge. Robert J . . 
Dawson, Lizzie A . . . . 
Day, Sarah tC .... 
Decamps. Win. H . . . . 
Dehoflf. Mary J . . . . 

Derrick. Otto 

Dixon, John 

Dotson, Nellie 

Doudt, Eugene 

Doudt, Vernie . . . . . 
Draeger, Mary L . . . . 
Draeger, Fred . . . . 
Draves, Harry W . . . 
Drenning, Mary A . . . 

Dunn, Clyde 

Easterday, John H . . . 
Eiceman, Mary . . . . 

Ellis, Carl 

Engle, Wm. H . . . 
Englehart, Charles F . 
Englehart, Louis . . . . 

Evans, Victor 

Fahey, John 

Fausett, Chas. R . . . . 

Fellows, Ida 

Ferguson, Daisy D • . 
Finley. Robert L . . . . 

FlasTg, Omer E 

Flanders, Clyde. . . . 

Flinn, Dora L 

Fritsch, Agnes H - . . 
Friday, Anna I . . . . 

Fry, Wm. E 

Fouts, Iva L 

Fulton, Nellie 

Gardner, Edward N. . . 

Garlitch, Clara A. . . . 
Gatton, William . . . . 
Gatton. Minnie 

Gilbert, Earl R 

Goodpaster, Emma . . . 

Gootee, Mary Z 

Gowker, Earl D 

Goodson, Leve . . 

Graham, William J. . . 

Gram, Mary 

Gregg, Daisy . . . 

Grennert, Jennie A. . . 

Greenberg, Jacob . . . 

Greenbere, Nathan 

Griewank, Herman H. . 

Hadley, AnnaG 

Hagens, Ada 

Hall, Grace 

Hammons, Allie . . . . 

Harris, Estella P. . . . 

Harris, Gertrude M. . . 

Harlan, Eustace . . . 

Hawkins, Sarah A. . . . 

Heeb, Edna . . , 

Hedrick, Joseph J . . . . 

Heede, Louisa . . . • 

Heagie, William . . 

Helt, Estella . . . . 

Hendren, Mary L. 

Hendrixson, Sarah B. 

Henning, Lillian . . 

Hinkley. William . . 

Hogan, Myrtle .... 

Hochstettler, Emanuel 

Holmes, Winona . . 

Holler, Hannah E. . . 

Holler. Eva J. . . . 

Hook, Lawrence 

Hufnagle. Boydia H. 

Hughes, .James C. . . 

Hummel, James C. . . 

Inus, Lillie 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Boonville .... 
Lotus . . 

New Albany . . 
Evansville . . . 
Bryant. . . 

Wanatah. . . . 
Aylesvvorth . . 
Indianapolis . . 

Angola 

Angola . . - • . 
Indianapolis . . 
Indianapolis . . 
Laporte . . 

Pleasant Lake. . 
Converse . . . 
Seafield . . . 

Newtonville. . . 
Brownsburg . . . 
Richmond ... 
Harmony .... 
Vincennes .... 

Sullivan 

Cochran .... 
Sullivan .... 
Burlington . . . 

Marion 

Mitchell .... 
Argos . . . 

Fisher's Switch 
Ft. Rittner . . 
Lafayette . . . 
Medarysville . . 
Headlee . . 

Denver 

Williamsburg . . 
Hammond. . . 
Shelbyville . . 

Winslow 

Winslow. 
Galveston .... 
Aurora . . . . 
Loogootee . . . 
Goshen . . . . 
Kings . . . . 

Ellettsville . . . 
Ft. I ranch . . . 
Greenwood . . . 
Mishawaka . . . 
Evansville . . 
Evansville . . . 

Hanna 

Elwood . . 

Logansport . . . 
Cicero • • 

Indianapolis . . 
Amo . . . 

Staffordshire . . 
Coatesville . . . 
Sullivan . 
Blooming Grove 
Surprise . . . 
Indianapolis . . 
Floyd Knobs . . 
Hugo . . . 

Perkinsville . . . 

Delphi 

Cannelton . . . . 
Kleiner . ■ • • 
Indianapolis . . 
Nanpanee . . . 
Indianapolis . . 
Millwood . . . . 
Millwood . . . 
Washington . . . 

Ray 

Celina 

Sullivan 

Bremen . . . . 



Warrick. 

Ui'ion. 

Floyd. 

Vanderburgh. 

Jay. 

Laporte. 

Fountain. 

Marion. 

Steuben. 

Steuben. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Laporte. 

Steuben. 

Miami. 

White. 

Spencer. 

Hendricks. 

Wayne. 

Clay. 

Knox. 

Sullivan. 

Dearborn. 

Sullivan. 

Carroll. 

Grant. 

Lawrence. 

Marshall. 

Hamilton. 

Lawrence. 

Tippecanoe. 

Pulaski. 

White. 

Miami. 

Wayne. 

Lake. 

Shelby. 

Pike. 

Pike. 

Cass. 

Dearborn. 

Martin. 

Elkhart. 

Gibson. 

Monroe. 

Gihson. 

.Tohnson. 

St. Joseph. 

Vanderburgh. 

Vanderburgh. 

Laporte. 

.Madison. 

Cass. 

Hamilton. 

Marion. 

Hendricks. 

Sullivan. 

Hendricks. 

Sullivan. 

Franklin. 

Jackson. 

Marion. 

Fliyd. 

Gibson. 

Madi.son. 

Carroll. 

Perry. 

Posey. 

Marion. 

Elkhart. 

Marion. 

Koseiusk >. 

Kosciusko. 

Daviess. 

Steuben. 

Perry. 

Sullivan. 

Marshall. 



67 



CATALOGUE.— Continued. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Ingle, Elmer L. ... 

James, Benj. F 

James, William L. . . . 

James, Fred. 

Jameson, Robin . . . . 
Jett'ries,Cordia M . . 
Jeffrey, George ... 
Jerrell, Calvin . • . . , 
Johnson, C. Mabel . . 
Johnson, Earl A. . . . 
Johnson, Cleveland . . 
Johnson, Ethel L . . . 
Kelsey, James A. . . . 

Keys, Perry 

King, Elmer H . . . . 
Kingery, John .... 
Kirkwood, Milo ... 

Klein, John 

Knoke, Carl H. W. . . , 
Kriwitz, Pearl . . . . 
Kroener, August ... 
Kuehne, bred. ... 
Kuhlman, Jesse . . . 
Kuzteb, Alvin . . . 
Lake, Agnes 
Langford, James R . 
Lawson, Mark . . . . 
Layden, (ieorge . . . 
Layden, Mary B . . . 
Lee, Ger.rgia W 
Leazenby, Naomi. 
Ledwick, Ellen. 
Leonard, Thrs. Harry 
Leonard, Foster . . . 
Lidgrtrd, Mearle . . 
Little, KoUo B ... 
Lochamier, .Jay L . 
Locus, Mvrtle. . . . 
Lowrey, Wm. A . . . 
Lowrey, Geo. A . . . . 
Looney, Fred .... 
Lyster, Ktta V . . 

Lyster, Daisy 

McCarty, John J . . 
McClelland, Earl . . 
McCormaek, Arley 
McCrady, Maiy A . 
McGullough, albert E 
McCullougb, Joseph 
McElroy, Plymia . 
McEnderfer, Oscar C . 
McFadden, Bertha . . 
Mctiee, Grace 
McMullen, Walter 
Madden, .James .... 
Martin, Amy . . . 

Marer, Wm 

Marsh, George 

Meek, Luemma 

Mendenhall. Anna 
Merriman, Frances . . 
Miley. Elmer . . 
Miller, John C . . . . 
Miller, Wm D . . 
Miller, Peroilo . . 
Miller, Herscbel P 
Mitchell, Arley S . . 
Mutter. Henry .... 

Mock, Charles 

Mohler, Geo. D 
Montgomery, Horace . 
Morphew, Robert . . 
Morphew. Florence . 
Mosby, Walton W 
Mullen, Mnllie . . . 
Murphy, Wm .... 



Nappanee 

Shoals 

Linton . . . . . 

Charlottsville . . . . 

Logansport 

Wtstfield 

Marion . . . . . 

Fi.'her's Switch . . . 

Kokomo . 

Greensburg 

Elnora 

Reynolds 

Ligonier 

New Market 

Centreville 

Bringhurst . . . . 

Mauzy. 

Indianapolis . . . . 
Seymour. . . . . 

Kendallville . . . . 
Kvansville . . . . 

Evansville 

Huntington . . . . 
Indianapolis . . . 

Red Key 

Chandler 

Switz City 

Brightwood 

Brightwood 

Poseyville 

Royal Center . . . . 
South Bend . . . . . 
North Indianapolis 

Staunton 

Royal Center . . . . 

Cleveland 

Hiimilton ..••.. 

Koknuio 

Anderson 

An'ierson 

Indianapolis . . . . 

FraTiklin 

Franklin 

Whitfield . . . . 

Logansport 

Cadiz 

Corydon 

Butler 

Indianapolis . . 
•Jeffersonville . . . 

Huntington 

iVlarkland 

Richmond 

Knightstown . . . . 

Ft. vVayne 

Indianapolis . . . . 
Indianapolis . . . 
Indianapolis . . . . 
Shelbyville . . 

New Mt. Pleasant . 
Indianapolis . . . 
Indianapolis . . . 

Union Mills 

Middlebury 

Mt. Vernon 

Oatsville 

Linton 

Danville . . . . 

Oaklandon . . . . 

Winamae 

Princeton ■ . . . 

North Salem . . . . 
North Salem . . . . 
Bristow . . . . 

Lebanon . . . . . 

Hartford City . . . 



Elkhart. 

Martin. 

Greene. 

Hancock. 

Cass. 

Hamilton. 

Grant. 

Hamilton. 

Howard. 

Di catur. 

Daviess. 

White. 

Noble. 

Montgomery. 

Wayne. 

Carroll. 

Rush. 

Marion. 

Jackson. 

Noble. 

Vanderburgh. 

Vanderburgh. 

Huntington. 

Marion. 

Jay. 

Warrick. 

Greene. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Posey. 

Cass. 

St. Joseph. 

Marion. 

Clay. 

Cass. 

Hancock. 

Steuben. 

Howard. 

Madison. 

Madison. 

Marion. 

Johnson. 

Johnson. 

Martin. 

Cass. 

Henry. 

Harrison. 

Dekalb. 

Marion. 

Clark. 

Huntington. 

Switzerland. 

Wayne. 

Henry. 

Allen. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Shelby. 

Jay. 

Marion. 

Marion 

Laporte. 

Elkhart. 

Posey. 

Pike. 

Greene. 

Hendricks. 

Marion. 

Pulaski. 

Gibson 

Hendricks. 

Hendricks. 

Perry. 

Boone. 

Blackford. 



68 



CATALOGUE —Continued. 



Name, 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Meyers. Clyde . . . 
Myers, Raymond B . . 
Naugle, Mary M . . , 

Neff, Zora L 

Nelson, Edward . . . 
Nell, Wilbur . . 

Newby, Audie B . . . 
Norris, Arthur H . . 
Nohse. Lisette . . . . 
Okeley, Alra B . . , 
Okeley, Ross . . . . 
Osburn, Lucy E 
Ottenbacher, Samuel 
Overheiser, Howard 
Oyerholzer, Chas B . . 
Parmer, Rose B . . 
Patty, Bertfia B . . . 
Payne, Adda M , . . 
Peterson, Carl A . 
Pierce, Alexander C 
Plunkett, John H. . , 
Poik, Wain .... 
Prior. Philip W. . , 
Pridemore, Iva L . . 
Proctor, Edna T 
Pyburn, Fannie M . , 
Ralston. Mathew L . 
Ramsey Esther A . . 
Ransford Alta M . . 
Ransford, Chas. E . , 
Ray. Henry N . . . , 
Reed, Blanch ... 
Reedy, Nelie .... 
Reidel, Paul .... 

Rex, Laura 

Rich, Lura . 
Ricker, Adda M . 
Ritchey, Delia . . 
Roberts. Ethel F ■ . . 
Robertson, Anna . . 
Robinson, Wm ... 
Robinson, Ch')rles . 
Rogers, Wm. B . . . 
Rollings. Harley R , 
Rosenbaum, Chas . 
Rout nbush, Fred. E 
Runyon, Jake 
Rushton, Flora M . 
Rushton, Hattie . . 
Rusher, 8allie . . . 
Russell, Mabel . . . 
Russell, Claude B . 
Sackett, Fletcher. , 
Saokett, John L . . 
Sackett. Franklin D 
Saine. Delia. 
Saine, John B. G ■ . , 
Sanxay, Olive. . . 
Sarsfield, Francis . . 
Sattler, George 
Sattler, Edward P . 
Sattler, Frank X . . 
Schwartz, Clifford . 
Schenker, Odile A . 
Schneider, Ernest . 
Schultz, (ieorge . . . 
Schwinn, A ray . . 
Seagraves, Fannie . 
Seitz, John W . . . . 
Shelton,Fred . . 
Shideler, Maggie . . 
Shoptiiugh, Cordia 
Shock, Rose 
Simmons, Reuben . 
Simmons, Ella . . 
Small, Mary .... 
Smith, Larry E . . . 



Syracuse . 

New Brunswick . . 

Salem 

Lagrange 

Valparaiso 

Peru 

West Indianapolis 
Anderson . . . 
Uwensville .... 
Winamac .... 

Winatiiac 

Rockport .... 
Ashboro .... 
Indianapolis . . 

Kenzie 

New Point .... 
Winamac .... 

Harr.dl 

South Bend .... 

Kokomo 

Barnard 

Boonville . . 
Huntingburgh . . 
Huron ... 

(iuilford . ... 

New Albany . . . 

Mc'Jregor 

(-Jreenfield . 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 



.leffersonville . . 
Terre Haute . . 
Indianapolis . . 
Winamac ■ . 

Kirklin 

Maplewood . ■ . 
Shuals .... 
Birds Eye ... 
Clinton . . 
Petersburij . . . 
Petersbu'g • . . 
South Bend . . 
Reelsville .... 
Bristow 

New Middletown 
Burling'on 
Center V^illey 
Center Valley 
Indianapolis - . 
Frankfort . . . 

Sullivan 

Ligonier 

Lagrange . . . 
Lagrange . . 
Star City .... 
Winamac ■ . . 

Madison 

Terre Haute . . . 
Carthage .... 
Carthage .... 
Carthage .... 
Indianapolis 
Vincennes .... 
Evansville . . . 
Richmond . . . 

Gaston 

Logansport . . 
Havsville ... 
Vallona .... 
Muncie .... 
Rockport . . . 
Groomsville . . . 

Slate 

Hugo 

Linton 

Muncie 



Kosciusko. 

Boone. 

Washington. 

Lagrange. 

Porter. 

Miami. 

Marion. 

Madison. 

Gibson. 

Pulaski. 

Pulaski. 

Spencer. 

Clay. 

Marion. 

Kosciusko. 

Decatur. 

Pulaski. 

Jefferson. 

St. Joseph. 

Howard. 

Putnam. 

Warrick. 

Dubois. 

Lawrence. 

Dearborn. 

Flnyd. 

Jefferson. 

Haticock. 

Elkhari. 

Elkhart. 

Clark. 

Vigo. 

Marion. 

Pulaski. 

Clinton. 

Hendricks. 

Martin. 

Dubois. 

Vermillion. 

Pike. 

Pike. 

St. Joseph. 

Putnam. 

Perry. 

Harrison. 

Carroll 

Hendricks. 

Hendricks. 

Marion. 

Clinton. 

Sullivan. 

Noble. 

Lagrange. 

Lagrange. 

Pulaski. 

Pulaski. 

Jefferson. 

Vigo. 

Rush. 

Rush. 

Rush. 

Marion. 

Knox. 

Vanderburgh. 

Wayne. 

Delaware. 

Cass. 

Dubois. 

Jackson. 

Delaware. 

Spencer. 

Tipton. 

Jennings. 

Gibson. 

Greene. 

Delaware. 



69 



CATALOGUE —Continued. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Smith, Florence J . . . 
Snow. Liiwrence . . . . 
Sorrell, Louis . ... 

Sosomen, Verra A . . . 
Spitzfadden, Wm . . . 
Spitzffidden. John . . . 

Sprowl, Miiry A 

Stannard, 'irlando P . . 
Stafford, Elsie V . . . . 
Steele. John .... 

Steven?, Lottie A . . . . 
Stephens, Hiirry . . 
Stevick, Kliner L . . - . 
Stevick, vVm. V . . . 
Sfewart. Bertie . . . . 
Strean, liavid .... 

Stone, Cora R 

Stone, Vernon .... 
Stouder. Louella .... 

Stout, Uora E 

Stoltz, Walter .... 
Stoltz, Henry . . 
Stockberg-er, Delia L . . 
Strtet, Barney A ... 
Street, Minnie D . . . . 
Street, Mertia A . . . • 
Suite, Carrie .... 
Sullivan, Florence . . . 
Sumner, Lola F . ... 
Surber, .John .... 

Swan, I'aphne . . . . 
Tetnpleton, Vida P . . . 
Thompson, Roscoe . - , 

Tiffee, Harry 

Tolbert, Adda. . . 
Truax, Antoinette Gr . . 
Trueblood, Loise . . . 
Tubesin?. Lizzie M. E . 
Tuckey, Benha A . . 
Tuckey, Florence M . . 
Turner, Albert M . . . . 

Tygart. Nora F 

Uran, Noah H 

Vasbinder, Sida . , . 
Van Deavender, Russell 

Virsrin. John C 

Wallace. Charles .... 
Ward, Roscoe G . . . . 
Warden, Flora . . . . 

Watts. Fred. J 

Weakley, Carrie . . 
Weedman, .James . . . 
Webb, Bessi'^ ... 

Whnrton. John E. . . . 
White, Horace . . . . 
Whitehead, Lulu . . . 
Williams. Cecil E. . . . 
Wilson, H^ittie . . . . 
Wilson, Walter U. , . . 
Wilson, George E. . . . 
Witty, Maud B. . . . 
Worthman, Lizzie . . . 
Worthman, Sophia . . . 

Wright, James 

Wright, Jacob A 

Wright, Lillie , . . 

Wynn, Mary 

Wynans, Josie .... 
Yaryan, Alvin R. . . . 
Young, Aaron W. . 
Zimmerman, Vernon H. 
Zolman, Alice M. . . 



Avon .... 
Greentown . 
IndiiinipoUs 
South Bend 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Bearse . 
Springville . 
t'enterton 
Union Mills 
Nevptonville . 
Middletnwn . 
Plymouth . . 
Pl.vniouth 
Vedder . . 
Perrysville . 
Valeene . . 
Claytnn . . 
New Paris . 
Lewis 
Wanatah 
Wanatah . . 
Rnchester 
Monipelier 
Sweetsers 
Sweetsers 
Aurora . . 
Fontanet . . 
Huffman 
Swalls . . 
Anderson . . 
Silas. 

Indianapolis 
Br.izil 

i<jvansville . 
Alaska 
Bryantsville 
Richmond. . 
Kinzie . . . 
Kinzie .... 
Galveston 
Hackleman . 
Metz .... 
Florida . . . 

Dana 

MoCordsville 
Orleans . . . 
Laketon . . - 
Hymera 
Winchester 
Indianapolis 
Bri.'^tow . . 
Bhvood . . 
Bringhurst . 
Thorn town _ . 
Imlianapolis 
Terre Haute 
Indianapolis 
Moran . . 
Kewanna 
Brazil , . 

Magley . . , 
Magley . . . 
Sullivan , . 
Rensselaer . 
Brazil . . 

Brookville 
Jeffersonville 
La Otto . . 
Harrodsburg 
Priam . . 
Rochester . . 



Hendricks. 

Howard. 

Marion. 

St. Joseph. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Fulton. 

Lawrence. 

Morgan. 

Laporte. 

."spencer. 

Henry. 

Marshall. 

Marshall. 

Vigo. 

Vermillion. 

Orange. 

Hendricks. 

Klkhart. 

Vigo. 

Laporte. 

Laporte. 

Fulton. 

Blackford. 

Grant 

Grant. 

Dearborn. 

Vigo 

Spencer. 

Vigo. 

Madison. 

Blackford. 

Marion. 

Clay. 

Vanderburgh. 

Owen. 

Lawrence. 

VVayne. 

Ko-eiusko. 

Kosciusko. 

Cass. 

Grant. 

Steuben. 

.Madison. 

Vermillion. 

Hancock. 

Orange. 

Wabish. 

Sullivan. 

Randolph. 

Marion. 

Perry. 

Madison. 

Carroll. 

Boone. 

Marion. 

Vigo. 

Marion. 

Clinton. 

Fulton. 

Clay. 

Adams. 

Adams. 

Sullivan. 

Jasper. 

Clay. 

Franklin. 

Clark. 

Noble. 

Monroe. 

Blackford. 

Fulton. 



A CLASSIFIED, DETAILED AND ITEMIZED STATEflENT 



Beceipts and Expenditures 



BUSINESS TRAISrSAOTIOl^S 



Fiscal Tear Ending October 31, 1896. 



To the Superintendent : 

The following classified exhibits of the financial and business transactions of 
the year have been prepared by me from the books, bills and vouchers on file ifi 
this office, and are full and correct in detail and will be found to contain all the 
facts and information upon these subjects as required by law. 

WILLIAM E. TODD, 

Book and Storekeeper. 



71 



REFERENCE. 



Exhibit No. 1 — Condensed Financial Statement. 

" No. 2 — Classified Statement of Expenditures on Ac- 
count of Maintenance. 

" No. 3 — Classified Statement of Expenditures on Ac- 
count of Current Expense and Repairs. 

*' No. 4 — Classified Statement of Expenditures on Ac- 
count of Industries. 

" No. 5 — Products of Farm and Garden. 

" No. 6 — Itemized Account of Earnings. 

" No. 7 — Schedule of Orders Drawn on Account of 
Maintenance. 

" No. 8 — Schedule of Orders Drawn on Account of 
Current Expense and Repairs. 

" No. 9 — Schedule of Orders Drawn on Account of In- 
dustries. 

" No. 10 — Itemized Statement of the Expenditures on 
Account of Maintenance. 

" No. 11 — Itemized Statement of the Expenditures on 
Account of Current Expense and Repairs. 

" No. 12 — Itemized Statement of the Expenditures on 
Account of Industries. 

" No. 13 — Itemized Statement of Clothing, etc., Fur- 
nished Pupils. 

" No. 14 — Statement Showing Accounts Charged to 
Counties for Clothing, etc. 

" No. 15 — Inventory of Real and Personal Property, 
October 31, 1896. 

" No. 16— Recapitulation of Inventory. 



72 



EXHIBIT No. 1. 



Condensed Financial Statement for Fiscal Year Ending October 

SI, 1896. 



MAINTENANCE. 

Annual appropriation 

Industrial receipts 

Total available 

*■ Expended during year 

Balance general fund 

INDUSTRIES. 

Annual appropriation 

Expended during year 

Balance general fund 

CURRENT EXPENSES AND REPAIRS. 

Annual appropriation 

'■'Expended during year 

Balance general fund 

CLOTHING, ETC. 

Value of clothing, etc., furnished pupils during yeir, accounts for 
same being filed with State Treasurer for collection from various 
counties 

EARNINGS. 

Industrial and ordinary 

Less industrial credited to maintenance fund 

Balance general fund 

Total covered into general fund 

'■'LIABILITIES. 

Maintenance . . 

Current expenses and repairs 



154,000 00 
1,121 83 



$55,121 83 
55,119 04 



S3,000 00 
2,999 46 



S4,5n0 00 
4,499 89 



Sl,202 41 
1,121 83 



S2 79 



54 



11 



1,771 55 



80 58 



81,855 57 




2,4B4 17 



73 



EXHIBIT No. 2. 



A Classified Statement of Expenditures on Account of Maintenance 
for Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



MAINTENANCE. 



Attendance— 

Trustees' expenses 
OflBcers — S. and W 
Teachers ■ . . 

Attendants .... 

Artisans 

Domestics .... 
Watchman 



Office Expense— 



Blank books 

Postagre . 

Supprintendent's expense fund 
Stationery and printing . . . . 

Telegraphaga . . 

Teleiihone . 

Miscellaneous office expense . . 

Household Equipment— 

Bedding 

Br >oms, buckets, mops, etc . . 

Cutlery and spoons 

Carpets, shades, etc 

Di.^iiif^ctants, etc 

I). R. K metal and woodenware 
H use furniture and upholstery 

Laundry appliances 

Napery 

Queensw<)re. 

Soap. S. S. polishers, etc . . . . 
Storeroom fixtures, etc . . 

Towelling 

Toilet supplies 

Miscellaneous household. . . . 



School Expense— 



Annals of the deaf 

Art supplies . 

Library . 

Newsp ipers and periodicals 
School house furniture ... 
School supplies 



Heat, Light a!Jd Power — 



Engineer's supplies 

Electrician's supplies . . . 

Electric light 

Fuel 

Gas lisht ..... 

Misc. heat, light and power 



S92 40 


4 307 88 1 


19,387 80 


1,757 57 


4,428 33 


3,354 75 


345 00 


63 42 


76 93 


50 41 


13 79 


86 34 


. 40 65 


193 91 


120 94 


20 42 


36 40 


49 35 


91 FO 


68 78 


9 10 


144 00 


56 53 


898 30 


13 83 


59 31 


121 21 


89 42 


5 90 


109 25 


21 32 


42 90 


10 00 


357 42 


142 11 


21 64 


30 50 


3,585 80 


457 15 



Grounds, Stock and Stable— 

Farm and garden expense . . . 
Greenhouse and park expense . 

Live stock 

Provender. 

Stable expense 

Food Supplies— 

Beans, hominy, rice, etc . . . 

Breadsluffs 

Butter 

Canned fruits . . 

Canned meats and fish . . . . 

Canned vegetables 

Coffee and tea 

Dried fruits 

Eges. . . 

Fish and oysters ...... 

Green fruits 

Jce 

Jellies, preserves, etc. .... 

Lard 

Meats, fresh. . . 

Meats, smokeii, salt, etc . . . . 
Mackerel, codfish, herring . . . 

Poultry . . 

Pickles, kraut and vinegar. . . 
Sugar and syrup . . . . 

Sauces, extracts, spices and salt 

Vegetables 

Unclassed food supplies . . . . 

Pupils' Personal Expense— 

Uniforms or suits 

Shoes, etc 

Other clothing . 

Transportation, etc 

Misc. Classifications— 

Amusements 

Annual reports 

Drugs, medicines, appliances . 
Fire protection and insur mce . 
Mninten'ce reprs., overpaym'ts 
Misc. general expense . . . . 
Liabilities, 1894 and 1895 . . . . 

Total 

Less liabilities, 1896 . . . . 

Total 



S114 92 


166 63 


30 10 


588 38 


96 30 


126 78 


1,239 95 


1,235 76 


367 34 


44 32 


217 81 


642 01 


115 23 


411 88 


191 05 


370 99 


332 72 


28 72 


172 06 


3,040 59 


824 55 


82 87 


820 49 


64 72 


803 61 


91 95 


474 34 


67 65 


1,052 90 


398 35 


247 06 


186 15 


77 91 


306 11 


166 92 


50 88 


1 50 


243 94 


1,345 11 


$57,552 81 


2,433 77 



55,119 04 



74 



EXHIBIT No. 3. 



A Classified Statement of Expenditures on Account of Current Ex- 
penses and Repairs During Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



CURRENT EXPENSES AND REPAIRS. 



Cement, brick, stone, lime, etc. 

Engineer's supplies 

Electrical repairs 

Glass 

Hardware 

Lumber 

Plastering 

Papering 

Painting . . _ 

Painter's supplies ...... 

Plumbing and supplies 

Roof repairs, etc 

Tools 

Whitewashing 

Miscellaneous repairs 

Repairs, maintenance . . . 
Grading, graveling and sodding 

Carpets and shades 

Park and farm fences 

Total 

Less liabilities 

Grand total 



S739 42 

116 93 

119 51 

31 11 

85 90 

299 44 

31 00 

97 09 

893 00 

386 68 

449 42 

85 60 

7 21 

82 23 

273 69 

119 13 

127 64 

334 03 

251 26 



$4,530 29 
30 40 



$4,499 89 



EXHIBIT No. 4. 



A Classified Statement of Expenditures on Account of Industries 
lor Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



INDUSTRIAL EXPENSE. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Printing oiSce material. 
Cabinet shop material . 
Shoe shop material • 
Sewing room material . 

Printing office, S. and W 
Cabinet shop, S. and W. 
Shoe shop, S. and W 
Sewing room, S. and W. 

Total 



$238 23 
339 66 
461 25 
53 65 

466 67 
600 00 
540 00 
300 00 



$2,999 46 



75 



EXHIBIT No. 5. 



Products of the Farm and Garden During the Fiscal Year 
Ending October 31, 1896. 



Beans, 14^ bushels , 

Beets, 40 bushels . . . 

Beets, 16'4' dozen bunches . , 
Beets, cattle 41 bushels ... 
Cabbage, 2,'269 head .... 

Corn, 187 dozen 

Corn, 40.5 bushels .... 

Cucumbers, 394 dozen . . . 
Greens kale, 75,s bushels . . 

Grapes, 493 pounds 

Fodder, 300 shocks 

Hay, clover, 8 tons . . . . , 

Ice, 60 tons . . 

Ltttuce, 2fi5 pounds 

Milk, 6,0925^ gallons 

Onions, 3,3«7 bunches . . . . 

Oats, 524 bushels 

Peas, 19 pecks . ... 

Peppers, Mangoe, 57/^ dozen 
Peppers, Ceyenne, 9 dozen . 
Pie plant, 1,486 bunches . . 
Radishes, 573 bunches . . . 
Straw, 10 tons .... 

Tomatoes, 294 bushels . . , 
Tomatoes, green, 6 bushels . 

Turnips, 86V$ bushels 

Veal, 811 pounds . . . . ■ ■ 



Total 



84 59 


16 42 


1 35 


12 30 


25 69 


9 01 


89 10 


38 54 


1 50 


19 72 


15 00 


64 00 


150 00 


18 14 


913 88 


25 05 


83 84 


5 50 


142 


64 


11 33 


5 68 


50 00 


85 29 


1 20 


17 43 


69 59 



$1,736 21 



EXHIBIT No. 6. 



An Itemized. Account of All Cash Earnings Received. During Fis- 
cal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



Nov. 



1895. 

1 

1 

1 . 
1 
1 



Dec. 31 

" 31 . 

" 31 . 

" 81 

" 31 

" 31 

" 31 . 

1896. 
Jan. 31 . 
" 31 . 
" 31. 
" 31 
" 31 . 



Raugh & Son, 4 calf hides . 

Printing olBce (October and November), subscriptions 

Shoe shop (October and November), job work 

August J utt, 3I4; feet sas pipe. 

Farm and garden receipts 

B. Krukansky, 54 pounds rags 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, private account pupils . 
Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, county account pupils . 

Shoe .shop, shoes and repairs, outside work 

Printing office, subscri|>tioDS to Hoosier 

Printing office, advertising 

Farm and garden receipts 

Printing office, subscriptions 

Shoe shop, private account pupils 

Shoe shop, county account pupils 

Shoe shop, outside work 

Farm and garden receipts 



83 64 


22 00 


62 40 


20 


6 00 


SO 27 


64 05 


75 10 


7 50 


9 85 


20 20 


1 00 


$1 50 


33 90 


49 80 


4 40 


4 00 



$94 24 



177 97 



93 60 



7G 



EXHIBIT ^o. 6— Continued. 





1896. 




Feb 


5 . 


" 


22. . 




" 


29. . 




" 


29 . 




" 


29 . 




" 


29 . 




" 


29 




" 


29 . 




Mar 


7 . . 
7 . 

31 . 
31 . 
31 . . 
31 . 
31. . 




Apr. 


30. . 
30. . 
30. . 
30 . . 
30 . 
30 . 




May 


18 . . 
18 . 

30. . 
30. . 




June 


1. . 

1 . 

1 . . 

3 . . 

3. . 

3 . . 

3 . . 
11 . . 
30. . 




July 25 . 




Aug 


1 . . 

28. . 
31 . . 




Sept 


14 . 
14 . . 




Oct. 


24 . . 
24 . . 
24. . 





B. Krukansky. rags. . . 

InrtiKDHpolis Electric Co., bal. in trade for old copper 

Ffirm and PHrden receipts 

Printing oiBce. subscriptions 

Cabinet shop, job work . . .... . . . 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, private account pupils . 
Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, countv account pupils . 
Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, outside work 

B. Krukan^ky, 36 lbs. rags . ... , . . 

The Sinker-Davis Co., scrap iron and old machinery 

from cabinet shop . 

Printins oflir-e subscriptions . 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, private account 

Sh(ie shop, shoes and repairs, county account .... 

Shoe '■hop. shoes and repairs, outside 

W. E. Todd, three calf hides sold by him 

Printing office, advertising 

Cabinet shop, job work ... 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, private account 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, county account 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, outside account 

Farm and garden receipts 

E. Cooper. 40 lbs. rags 

Charles Bough, broken window 

Printing office, advertising . . . . ■ . 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, county pupils 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, county pupils 

Shoe shop, shoes and repairs, private pupils 

Shoe shf'p, shoes and repairs, outside account .... 

Cabinet shop, job work . . 

Printing office, subscriptions 

Unknown. 32 lbs. rags 

Farm and g^rden receipts 

A. Kinley, 58 Ibs.rags . . . . 

Farm and garden receipts 

Citiz'St.R.B. Co., leased ground, June 1 ,'96, to June 1,'9' 

BoTd of State Charities, two pigeon hole cases . . . 

N. Bowma,n,50 Ibs.raes 

Farm and garden receipts 

Unknown, one barrel 

Printing office, subscriptions 

Farm and garden receipts 

E. Schneifler, account railroad fare ... 

Printing office, subscription 

Total . . 

Account of Ordinary Earnings 

Account of Industrial Earnings 

Total 



m 20 

05 

2 00 

3 35 
60 

51 75 
31 25 
9 90 



17 

45 on 

75 

63 70 

43 80 

2 25 

2 29 



S62 64 

1 (0 

55 00 

46 40 

3 70 

5 00 



to 20 
15 

23 on 

71 25 



$55 65 
64 50 
5 00 

2 00 
75 
16 

3 00 
29 

2 CO 



$iO 00 

$i0 00 

25 

9 00 

SO 25 
54 00 


12 on 

5 10 

17 25 


S80 58 
1,121 83 



PAYMENTS BY TREASURER OF INSTITUTION TO TREASURER OF STATE. 



1896-7, 
Jan. 9 
Mar. 5 
Apr. 9 . 
Sept. 10 

" 10. 
Oct. 8 

" 30 



Paid Treasurer of State 
Paid Treasurer of State . 
Paid Treasurer of State 
Paid Treasurer of Stale 
Paid Treasurer of State 
Paid Treasurer ot State 
Paid Treasurer of State . 

Total 



$272 21 


192 TO 


157 9ri 


441 79 


59 15 


54 00 


24 60 



i i 



EXHIBIT No. 7. 



A Schedule of All Orders Drawn on Treasurer of the Institution 
by the Board of Control Thereof, and Paid by Said Treasurer 
on AccouiH of Maintenance JJiiring Fiscal Year Ending 
October 31st, 1896. 



Dec. 


5, 1895 . 


1 
2 
% 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
U 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
2^ 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 


"' 




39 
40 
41 
42 


Jan. 


9, 1896 . 


43 
44 

45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 



R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, November pay-roll . . 
R. 0. JohnFon, Sup't, miscellaneous expenses. 
Kingan & Co . tresh iind smoked meats . . . . 

Mr-Cune. Mfilott & Co., groceries 

Standard Oil Co.. luel oil 

Jolin O'Npill, flour and meal 

J. R. Hudd & tJo . poultry 

Elgin Dairy Co.. butterine ■ • 

Dunn <& Mankedick. bowldering gutters 
Louis Hiidebrand, Oct. and Nov., shoe rep'r'g 

George Hitz & On , produce 

Swift & Co . beef and smoked meats 

Murphy. Hibben & C'l., dry goods 

Arthur Jordan Co., eggs and cheese 

Cranston k Curt?, school supplies 

Irdianapolis G-as Co., gas 

M. O'Connor & Co., grocers' sundries 

E.C.Andrews, soap stock 

J. H. Ryan & Co., provender. 

John Scheid & Co., fish and oysters 

John Edwards, apples, etc 

A. Whitnpy, soddine 

Thf's. C. Warley, boiler comi'ound 

Mike Rush, boiler compound ...--.. 

Alb-<ny Perforated Paper Co.. toilet paper . . 

A.KieferCo., drugs and medicines 

Parrott & Taggait, crackers 

Hoosier M'f'g Co., soap stock, etc 

Indiana Pappr Co.. stationery 

Kipp Bros., brushes, combs, etc. ■ • ■ 

Frank G. Kanips. rabbits 

Baker & Randolph, stationery 

Mummenhoff& Co., apples, etc 

A. A. Helstern. stove, etc 

Indianapolis Brush Works, brushes. . . - . . 

H. Lieber & Co., art supplies 

Tiiomas P. Kean, clothing 

Yule & Hartman, shoeing . 

McElwaine. Richards Co.. packing 

Burris, Herzsch Co., riote books 

Indianapolis Basket Co., baskets 

Bowen-Merrill Co., school supplies 

Total bills allowed December 5, 1895 . . . 

R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, December pay-roll. . - 
R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, Dec. miscel's expenses . 

When Clothing Co., uniforms, etc 

Swift & Co., fresh and smoked meats . . 
McCune, Malott &. Co., groceries and sundries 

John O'Niel. flour and meal 

.standard Oil Co.. fuel oil 

Elgin Dairy Co.. butter and cheese 

Arthur -Jordan Co , poultry, etc 

Henry Syerup & Sons, produce 

J. R.Budd & Co., eggs 

Williams & Hunt, soap stock • ■ .• 

Louis Hiidebrand, Dec. shoe repairing . . . 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

G. R. Wysong & Co., candies 

W. B. Burford, stationery, etc 

McCoy, Howe Co., drugs and medicines . . . . 
Huntington Seed Co , seeds and decorations . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry goods 

Polar Ice Co.. ioe . . 

Hiidebrand Hardware Co., tinware, etc. . . . 



$2,805 28 


332 80 


4fifi 54 


28 1 37 


131 69 


126 83 


114 70 


102 31 


81 50 


75 10 


68 07 


53 72 


51 79 


46 91 


40 15 


36 50 


39 03 


38 02 


2t 00 


22 58 


22 00 


21 20 


20 70 


20 00 


18 00 


13 96 


13 80 


13 .36 


8 86 


7 95 


8 00 


7 00 


4 58 


3 97 


3 92 


3 60 


3 40 


3 OO 


2 80 


2 00 


2 00 


24 30 


12,820 28 


108 56 


489 52 


390 54 


264 88 


146 68 


139 20 


106 20 


76 56 


64 86 


«3 00 


56 52 


49 80 


47 50 


35 68 


34 50 


33 41 


30 94 


26 05 


23 17 


lo 83 



$5,171 79 



78 



EXHIBIT No, 7— Continued. 



Jan. 9,1896 



" ID 
" 2D 

" 3D 
" 4D 
■" 50 
" 6D 
" 7D 
" 8D 
" 9D 
"lOD 
"IID 
"12D 
"130 
"14D 
"15D 
"16D 
"17D 



Feb. 6, 1896 



93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
12 ^ 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 



Central Union Tel. Co., telephone rent . . . . 

Frank G. Kamps, fish and oysters 

John Edwards, apijles and pears 

Parrott & faggart, crackers 

Smith, Day & Co.. chairs . 

H . I'. Conde Co., Caligraph repairs 

W.& H.Walker, soap 

Indiana Paper Co., stationery, etc 

Central H. <te S. Co., rubber sheeting 

Mica Rnnfing Co., athajnon 

Yule Ji: Hartinan, shoeing 

Clemens Vonnegut, window cleaners, etc. . . 

Swift Bros., tresh and smoked meats 

Scbnull & Co , groceries . 

Western Electric Co., dynamo repairs 

Nutz (& Grosskopf, shoe shop repairs 

Williams & Hunt, soap chips 

McUune-Malott Co. grocers' sundries 

Murphy. Hibben & Co., dry goods . . . ; . . 

Bowen-Merrill Co., school supplies 

George Hitz & Co., produce 

W. B Burlord, stationery, etc 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

Frommeyer Bros., queensware 

Prang Educational Co.. art supplies 

American S. & C Co.Kleansall 

Kingan & Co., butterine . . 

Huntington Seed Co . se^ds . . 

A. Jordan Co., error in Voucher 417 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 . . . . 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., January pay-roll . . . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Supt.. January misc. expense 

Standard Oil Co., fuel oil 

Kingan & <Jo., fresh meat 

McCune-Malott Co , groceries 

Swift Bros , smoked meats 

John O'Neill, flour, etc 

Elgin Dairy Co., butterine 

A. Jordan Co., poultry, etc 

Frank G. Kamps, fish and oysters 

When Clothing Co.. uniforms 

Indianapolis Gas Co , gas 

George Hitz & Co., produce 

Indianapolis Water Co., hydrant rent 

M. O'Connor & Co., grocers' sundries . . . 

J. R. Budd & Co., eggs 

Hoosier Manuf. Co., soap chips, etc 

Louis Hildebrand, January shoe repairs . . . 

Indianapolis Electric Co., lamps 

Bowen-Merrill Co., school supplies 

Theo. C. Warley, boiler compound 

Journal Newspaper Co., subscription 

McCoy-Howe Co., drugs and medicines . . . . 

Peter F. Bryee, crackers 

0. tJ. Kuetemeyer, boiler compound 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry goods 

Clemens Vonnesrut. meat chopper 

W. B. Burfdrd, stationery, etc. 

Wayne & Brooking, tinware 

E. C. An'^rpws, soap chips 

H. A. Wright, mince meat . 

Indiana Paper Co., lesson papers, etc 

Burris-Hersch Co., stationery . 

E. A. Fay. annals . . - 

Frommeyer Bros., queensware 

Mica Roofing Co., athfenon 

Mummenhoff <t Co., apples 

A A. Hel'tern, stove repairs, etc 

Thos. P Kean, handkerchiefs, etc 

L T P. Zaiser, rubber stamps 

New York Store, dry goods, etc 

Frank Dell, tile 

Chas. J. Kuhn Co., cider, etc 

Kipp Bros., toilet soaps 

H. Lieber Co., art supplies 

Total bills allowed February 6, 1896 . . . . 



818 00 


17 85 


16 40 


13 20 


9 00 


8 80 


7 90 


5 74 


5 40 


5 00 


4 00 


2 77 


336 39 


297 13 


176 89 


101 45 


53 10 


45 13 


134 69 


44 92 


44 OS 


18 10 


52 25 


6 11 


19 40 


10 42 


4 60 


25 


20 


$2,820 28 


152 71 


459 01 


264 38 


250 44 


150 09 


108 25 


86 40 


74 89 


65 93 


56 35 


53 13 


50 76 


50 00 


47 46 


43 20 


42 86 


31 25 


21 84 


21 20 


20 10 


20 00 


18 83 


17 74 


15 00 


13 20 


11 93 


9 03 


8 40 


8 00 


6 71 


6 30 


5 92 


5 90 


5 18 


5 00 


4 50 


4 40 


4 12 


3 15 


2 40 


2 40 


2 30 


2 20 


2 16 



79 



EXHIBIT No. 7— Continued. 



March 5,1896 



April 9, 1896. 



138 

139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
I'M 
152 
153 
154 
165 
156 
157 
158 
15V) 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 



179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 



R 0. Johnson, Sup't, February pay-roll . . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, Pebrunry misc'l'n's exp 

Standard Oil Co., fuel oil 

Kin^an & Co., beef, etc 

M. O'Connor & Co., groceries 

Nelson Morris & Co , smoked meats 

A.Jordan Co.. butterine, etc 

Blanton Milling Co., flnur 

J. R. Budd & C'l., poultry, etc 

Henry Syerup & Co., produce 

When Clothing Co., uniforms 

SchnuU & Co., grocers' sundries 

E. C. Andrews, soap chips 

Frank G. Kamp.^. fish and oysters 

Louis Hildebrand. February shoe repairs . . . 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

Noel Bros., iirovender, etc. . 

Parrott & T^iggart, crackers . 

Albany P. W. P. Co.. toilet paper 

H. C. Wright & Co., apple butter 

0. C. Kuetemeyer, boiler compound . . . . . 

MeCoy-Hnwe Co., drugs, etc 

Murphy, Hibben & Co.. dry goods 

J. C. Tarkington, naptholine 

L. A. Griner, veterinary service 

Bowen-Merrill Co , toilet paper 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Jos. Gardner, tinware 

W. B. Burtord, check books, etc 

New York Store, dry goods 

Indianapolis Electric Co., shades 

Iniiiana Paper Co., catalogue papers 

Kipp Bros., hair brushes, etc 

Frommpyer Bros., queensware 

Yule & flartman, shoeing 

Baker & Thornton, ink. etc. . . 

H. Lieber Co., art supplies . . . . 

Hoosier Manufaeturiug Co., oil 

Austin & Son. meats 

Schweikle & Prange. wagon repairs 

Francke & Schindler, screw tips 

Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 

R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, March pay-roll 

R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, .March misc'l'n's exp . 

Consumers' Gas Trust Co , fuel gas 

Swift Bros., fresh and smoked meats 

Standard Oil Co., fuel oil 

Krag-Reynolds Co., groceries 

Elgin Dairy Co , butterine 

John O'Neill, flour 

Arthur Jordan Co., poultry, etc 

R. H. Rees, produce 

E. C. Andrews, soap chips 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry goods 

Louis Hildebrand, March shoe repairs . . . . 
.Mc'June-Malott Co., grocers' sundries .... 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

J. R. Budd ifc Co , eggs 

Huntington Seed Co., seeds, etc . . ..... 

New York Store, dry goods, etc 

J. R.Ryan & Co., provender 

Peter P. Bryce, crackers 

Central Union Telephone Co., telephone rent. 
<'has. J.Kuhn Co., miscellaneous groceries 

H. J. Heinz & Co., preserves 

McCoy, Howe Co , drugs and medicines. . . . 

0. C. Kuetemeyer, boiler comp 

Michigan Brush Co., brushes 

Frank G. Kamps, fish and oysters 

Frommeyer Bros., queensware 

Bowen-Merrill Co., school supplies 

Clemens Vonnegut, rakes, etc 

McElwaine, Richards Co., oil lubricator . . . 

H. Lieber Co., art supplies 

Thos. P. Kean, stockings 

Hildebrand Hardware Co., faucet, etc 

Indianapolis Electric Co., lamps 



82,820 28 


110 17 


416 95 


262 06 


237 01 


143 93 


136 67 


122 85 


102 51 


78 01 


67 90 


53 65 


51 04 


44 78 


43 80 


39 00 


24 25 


19 80 


18 00 


17 87 


15 00 


13 89 


12 82 


12 50 


10 00 


8 50 


8 16 


7 45 


7 15 


• 6 56 


5 85 


5 40 


4 95 


4 65 


4 25 


3 56 


2 88 


2 60 


2 25 


2 00 


1 43 


$2,820 28 


125 30 


1,331 64 


434 80 


414 81 


297 47 


161 28 


135 20 


81 66 


61 33 


53 80 


52 21 


46 40 


42 .34 


38 75 


31 02 


29 51 


28 36 


21 10 


20 22 


19 73 


18 04 


16 98 


16 42 


15 00 


14 37 


14 20 


9 10 


7 93 


6 73 


5 94 


5 73 


5 60 


3 00 


2 34 



84,952 38 



80 



EXHIBIT No. 7— Continued. 



April 9,1896. 



May 7, 1896 



June 9, 1896 



214 
215 
216 



217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
2*2 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 



252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
2H3 
261 
265 
26H 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
2Hl 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 



J. C. Hirschman, mattress ■ 

Laz. Noble & Co , books 

American Asylum for Deaf, school supplies 



Total bills allowed April 9, 1896 , 



R. 0. Johnson, Supt., April pay-roll . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Hupt., April misc. expenses 

Swift Bros., beef, etc 

Krag-Reynolds Co., groceries 

Indiana Butter Co , butterine 

C. .1. Gardner, smoked meats 

John U'Niell, flour 

R. H. Rees, produce ... 

McOune-Malott Co., grocers' sundries . . 
Louis Hildebrand, April shoe repair . . . 

Elgin Dairy Co., eggs and cheese 

E. 0. Andrews, soap chips 

Indianapolis (ias Co., gas 

H. A. Wright Co.. peach butter, etc .... 

Parrott & Taggart, crackers . 

Henry Russe, seed . . 

J. R. Ryan & Co., provender 

Danial Stewart Co., drugs, etc 

.Jos. Gardner, tin ware . 

Ohas. J . Kuhn Co., misc. groceries 

Frank G. Kamps, fish and oysters . .. . ■ • 
Badger Furniture Co., mattress repairs . . 
R. W. Griffith, sh irpening mowers .... 
G. W. Sloan, drug=i ........ 

New York Store, dry goods 

Bowen-Merrill Co , school supplies .... 

11 Lieber Co., art supplies 

Hildebrand Hardware Co , ice chest. . . . 

MummenhoffA Co.. produce 

McCoy-Howe Co.. drugs 

Consolidated Coal & Lime Co., sand . . . 

Thos. P. Kean, dry goods 

Indiana Paper Co., stationery 

Yule & H;irtman, shoeing 

Robt. R. Waldon & Son, post hole digger , 

Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 



R. 0. Johnson, Supt., May pay-roll 

R. 0. .Johnson, Supt., railroad fares, etc. . . . 

K. 0. Johnson, Supt., May misc. expenses . . . 

Swift Bros., fresh and smoked meats 

McCune Malott Co.. groceries . 

John O'Neill, flour, etc 

J. R. l')udd & Co.. poultry 

R. H. Rees, pro'luce 

A. .Jorian Co., poultry 

E. C. Andrews, soap caips 

Louis llildebrand. May >hoes and repairs . . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry goods 

M. O'Conner & Co , groceries and sundries 

Lee & Co., eggs . 

IndiHUipoUs Gas Co., giis 

A (■>. Harabaugh, boiler compound 

W. B. Burford, specificitions, etc 

Parroit & T;iggart, crackers 

Chas. .J. Kuhn & Co., miscellaneous groceries, 

Joseph Gardner, tinware 

H. Lieber Co., art supplies 

A. Kiefer Drug Co., drugs, etc 

I Indiana. Pa.per Co., nrograras, etc 

j Laz. Noble & Co.. Bibles, etc 

I H. Techentin <fc Co., harness repairs 

Sylvia McCormack, hats .... 

Ladies' Home, child's crib 

Brooks Oil Co . oil . . . 

Indiana, Butter ('o., butterine . . . . 

When Clothing Co.. caps, etc 

Yule & Hartman, shoeing 

New York Store, ribbons, etc 

Mummenhofiife Co , produce 

Central R. and S. Co., rubber bands, etc . . . 

Clemens Vonnegut, rope, etc 



82 20 
2 00 
4 38 



82,819 61 


106 61 


300 11 


221 49 


169 20 


96 89 


89 10 


86 78 


72 44 


71 25 


67 69 


56 00 


41 fiS 


24 51 


23 10 


20 23 


19 50 


14 77 


13 05 


12 59 


lu 38 


9 10 


9 00 


9 00 


8 94 


6 93 


6 30 


6 00 


4 50 


3 55 


2 75 


'> 32 


2 26 


2 25 


2 GO 



f2,838 34 
126 80 

30 01 
427 12 
245 91 
148 60 

80 67 
70 23 
63 38 
56 25 
55 65 
49 63 
41 61 
47 50 

31 88 
25 90 
22 40 
19 80 
19 71 
18 80 
17 88 
17 79 
14 6i 
14 25 
10 65 

9 13 
8 50 
6 24 
5 67 
5 00 
4 25 
4 20 
3 50 
2 45 
2 22 



3,397 17 



4,411 83 



81 



EXHIBIT No. 7— Continued. 



June 9, 1896 . 


287 




288 


11 11 


289 


11 11 


290 


11 1. 


291 




292 


July 15,1896. 


293 


11 11 


291 


11 11 


295 


11 11 


296 


11 11 


297 


11 11 


298 


11 ii 


299 


11 11 


HOD 


11 11 


m 


li 11 


302 


11 11 


303 


•1 '1 


301 


t< 11 


305 


11 11 


306 


11 ii 


307 


11 <i 


308 


11 11 


309 


11 ii 


310 


11 u 


311 


11 ll 


312 


11 11 


313 


11 11 


314 


11 1( 


315 


14 11 


316 


" " 


317 


11 11 


318 


11 11 


319 


11 11 


320 


" " 


321 


11 11 


322 


11 11 


323 


<l 11 


324 


" " 


325 


11 11 


326 




327 


Aug. 6, 1896 . 


328 


11 11 


329 


11 11 


330 


11 11 


331 


i< 11 


3« 


11 11 


333 


11 11 


334 


11 11 


33- 


" " 


336 


" " 


337 


ll 11 


338 


11 11 


339 


11 11 


340 


II 11 


341 


11 11 


342 


11 11 


343 


11 It 


3)4 


ll 11 


34^ 


ll 11 


346 


11 11 


847 


11 11 


348 


11 .1 


349 


11 11 


350 


11 11 


351 


" " 


352 


11 11 


353 


11 11 


354 


11 11 


355 


11 11 


3=i6 


11 11 


357 



Hoosier Mfg. Co., oil 

Prang Educational Co., art supplies . . 

Frommeyer Bros., queensware 

Tarvin C. Wrooms, expense as Trustee ... 

S A. Bonnor, exiiense as Trustee 

Friedman Mfg. Co., butterine 

Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 ...... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., June pay-roll 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., .June miscellaneous exp 

When Clothing Co , uniiorms, etc 

W. B. Burforil, annual reports, etc 

Consumers' Gas Trust Co., fuel gas ... 

Nelson Morris & Co., Iresh and smoked meats 

(!ity Ice Co., ice 

Krag-Reynolds Co , groceries 

J. R. Budd & Co , poultry 

R. H. Rees, produce 

M. U'Conner ife Co., grocers' sundries .... 

E. C. Andrews, soap chips 

Indianapoli= Gas Co., gus 

Frank Bird Transfer Co., transferage .... 

Elgin Dairy Co., butterine 

Central Union Telephone Co., telephone rent 
Chas. J. Kuhn Co., miscellaneous groceries . 

New York Storp, towels, etc 

Mummenhotf & Co , produce 

Iron City Chemical Co., bugine 

Hollweg & Reese, queensware 

J. R. Kyan & Co., provender 

A. Wiegand, flowers 

Henry Russe, oat^, etc .... 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., yarn, etc 

Indiana Paper Co., stationery 

Henry Edwards, berries 

N. S. Driggs, alcohol, etc . ■ 

Parrott ife Taggart, crackers 

Yule ai Hartman, shoeing 

H. Lieber Co., mirror ....... 

Schweikle & Prange, shaft, etc 

H. Techentin & Co , chamois skin 

Clemens Vonaegut, tucks, etc 

W. B. Todd, produce on market 

Total bills allowed July 15, 1896 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., Ju'y pay-roll ... 
R. 0. Johnson. Supt., July misc. expenses 
Saml. A. Bonner, miscellaneous expenses . 
Chas. B. Haugh, miscellaneous expenses 
Tarvin C. Grooms, mi.seellaneous expenses 
Nelson Morris & Co., fresh and smoked meats 
Consumers' Gas Trust Co., fuel gas ... 

Krag-Reynolds Co., groceries 

City Ice Co., ice 

M. Clune, rep.iirs on mattresses 

Iridmn ipolis (ji-as Co., gss 

Elsin Dairy Co., butterine 

Ge<i. Hitz & Co., produf-e . . 

.^. Jordon & Co., poultry ....... 

M (VConnir ife Co., grocers' sundries . . . . 

Willi.uns <fe Elunt, so.'tp chips 

John U'Niell, provender 

Mummenhoff & Co., produce 

.1. R. Budd & Co , eggs, etc 

D. P. Kt'^xu & Co., dry goods _ . 

Chas. J. Kuhn Co., miscellaneous groceries 
Bowen-Merrill Co., toilet paper ... 
E C. AndrevTS, toilet soap . . .... 

J. A. Grithn, a wnings 

W. B. Burford, ledger, etc 

New York Store, screens, etc 

H. Lieber Co.. picture frame 

Schweikle & Prange, sharpening picks . . 
Central Union Tel. Co., telephone rent . . 
Henry Syerup & Co , produce 



$2 20 


2 12 


2 00 


16 50 


15 30 


140 13 


$2,701 28 


75 42 


394 60 


306 48 


277 00 


147 55 


122 60 


121 36 


65 07 


55 36 


51 25 


50 25 


35 13 


35 00 


27 94 


22 50 


20 98 


14 32 


13 83 


11 25 


10 81 


9 00 


8 80 


6 90 


5 56 


4 Oi 


3 50 


3 35 


3 30 


3 25 


3 00 


2 90 


2 55 


2 29 


2 00 


12,656 34 


152 71 


97 37 


70 00 


18 fO 


138 75 


138 50 


81 72 


55 60 


37 40 


30 50 


27 50 


22 50 


20 23 


18 73 


17 02 


17 10 


16 80 


16 10 


15 80 


13 75 


12 40 


8 00 


6 00 


15 


4 53 


4 50 


3 50 


3 21 


2 95 



1,724 79 



4,620 41 



6— D. and D. 



82 



EXHIBIT No. 7— Continued. 



Augr. 6, 1896 . 



Sept. 10, 1 J 



Oct. 8, 1896 



Oct. 30 1896 , 



358 
359 
360 



361- 
362 
363 
364 

365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 



387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
413 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 



423 
424 



Yule & Hartman, shoeing 

Baker & Thornton, tape bands ...... 

Parrott & Taggart, crackers 

Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 .... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., August pay-roll . . . 
R. 0. .Johnson, Supt., Aug. misc. expenses . 
Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry sroods ... 
Kingan & Oo., fresh and smoked meats . . . 

• Consumers' Gas Trust Co., fuel gas 

M. O'Connor i& Co., groceries 

Polar Ice Co., Ice 

J. R. Budd & Co., poultry and eggs .... 

Henry Syerup Co., produce 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

E. C. Andrews, soap chips 

Frank C. Hood, seats 

Elgin Dairy Co., butterine 

C. L. Wayne & Co , fruit cans, etc 

John O'Niell. provender 

MummenhoiF & Co., produce 

Frommeyer Bros., queensware 

Bowen-Merrill Co., toilet paper 

Polar Ice Co., ice, Dec . . . 

H. Techentin & Co., harness repairing . . . 

Yule & Ilartman, shoeing 

Chas. J. Kuhn Co.. miscellaneous groceries . 

H. Lieber Co., picture frame 

Ceylon Tea Co., vinegar 

Parrott & Taggart, crackers 

Clemens Vonnegut, rope, etc 

Total bills allowed Sept. 10, 1896 .... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., September pay-roll . . 
R. 0. Johnson. Supt., Sept. misc. expenses . 
Krag, Reynolds & Co., groceries and sundries 

Switt Bros .fresh meats . . 

Indianapolis B. & S. Co., school supplies . . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., dry goods 

Blanton Milling Co., flour . 

A. Jordan & Co., poultry 

Friedman Mfg. Co., butterine 

C. L. Wayne & Co , tiQware, etc 

M. Clune. m stresses 

Nelson Morris & Co., smoked meats 

Geo. Hitz & Co., produce 

H. Lieber & Co.. art supplies 

Jos. Gardner, tinware 

E. C. Andrews, soap chips 

J. R- Budd & Co., eggs 

Kipp Bros., toilpt supplies 

Chas. J. Kuhn & Co., misc. groceries . . . . 

Thos. P. Kean, misc. clothing 

Hollweg & Rees, queensware 

Schweikle & Prange, gravel bed, etc .... 

N. B. GrofF& Son, butterine 

John O'Niell, provender 

Ij. A. Griner, veterinary service 

D. W. Rose, roach powder 

Yule & Hartman, shoeing 

Indiana P iner Co., school supplies . . . . 

Standard Oil Co., oil . _ ■ . 

Henry Syerap Co., green fruits 

Peter P. Bryce, crackers 

Elgin Dairy Co., fruits 

E.G. Hill, roses . . 

Austin cfe Son, misc. groceries 

W. G. Graham, peaches 

Clemens Vonnegut, moulding hooks .... 

Total bills allowed October 8, 1896 . . . • 
R. O.Johnson, Sup't, October pay-roll . . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Sup't, October misc. expenses 

Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 . . . . 



12 25 


1 80 


1 54 


$2,669 60 


79 77 


156 84 


138 60 


138 50 


98 82 


56 10 


35 98 


34 35 


27 88 


25 67 


25 00 


24 49 


12 08 


8 25 


7 25 


6 82 


6 00 


4 60 


4 20 


3 75 


3 30 


3 00 


1 85 


1 43 


1 05 


$2,763 18 


100 44 


208 65 


194 64 


90 89 


78 78 


56 05 


47 90 


43 20 


37 53 


32 80 


30 91 


21 35 


18 76 


18 60 


17 01 


16 80 


16 74 


11 75 


9 55 


9 15 


9 10 


8 04 


7 00 


6 00 


5 00 


4 75 


4 64 


4 00 


3 86 


3 74 


3 60 


3 00 


2 05 


1 40 


1 28 


12,101 58 


10 57 



83 



EXHIBIT No. 8. 



A Schedule of All Orders Drawn on Treasurer of the Institution 
by Board of Control Thereof and Paid by Said Treasurer 
on Account of Current Expense and Repairs During the 
Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



Dec. 5, 1895 



Jan. 9, 1896 



Feb. 6, 1896 



Mar. 5, 1896 



Apr. 9, 1896 



May 7, 1896 



R. 0. Johnson, Supt., bricks 

Fred. J. Mnck <fe Co., painting 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., paints, etc 

John F. Stephens, boiler repairs 

.J. C Dickson, lumber 

McElwaine-Riehards Co., engineers' supplies 
Indianapiilis Electric Co., electric supplies . . 
Wm. McWorkman, tin work 

Total bills allowed December 5, 1896. . . . 

Jerry Redding, dynamo foundation . . . . . 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Balke &, Krauss Co., lumber 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., painters' supplies. . 
McElwaine-Richards Co., engineers' supplies. 
Frank Dell, lime, etc. - . 

Indianapolis Electric Co., electric supplies . . 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 

McElwaine-Richards Co., engineers' supplies. 

Balke k Krauss Co., lumber 

Pioneer Brass Works, brass work 

Dean Bros., pump valves. . . . . 

Knight A' Jillson, repairs on heater 

Clemens Vonnegut, h'lrdware 

Hide, Leather & Belting Co., packing 

Total bills allowed February 6, 1896 .... 

Louis V. Prinz'er, Jr.. plumbing 

Indianapolis M. & 0. Union, lumber 

Pioneer Bras.* Works, brass work 

McElwaine-Richards Co., engineers' supplies. 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., glass 

y. Ittenbflch & Co.. sills 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 

R. 0. Johnson. Supt., advertising 

Balke & Krauss Co.. lumber 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., paint 

Jos Gardner, i-oot repairs . . 

Indianapolis Electric Co., electric supplies . . 

Total bills allowed April 9, 1896 

R. 0. Johnson. Supt., sod 

C. M. Kirkpatrick, cement work, etc 

Henry Coburn, lumber 

A. Burdsal Co., paints 

Cputral Rubber & Supply Co., hose . . . 
Mc El waine Richards Co., engineers' supplies 

J. A. GrifE-i, awnings 

Indianapolis M. ife C. Union, lumber 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Frank Dell, lime, etc 

A. A. flelstern, stove pipe 

Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 



SI 40 

810 00 

16 81 

16 30 

9 98 

7 89 

2 98 

2 50 



m 00 


33 38 


31 55 


15 02 


10 76 


3 15 


3 01 


S24 00 


20 00 


14 08 


6 20 


6 00 


4 78 


2 25 


S48 80 


15 00 


5 30 


4 95 


2 79 


2 45 


1 92 



S2 19 

76 10 

3 90 

2 95 

2 68 



84 00 

692 03 

130 00 

56 51 

30 00 

21 58 

22 00 
18 00 

5 41 
4 05 
2 00 



$867 86 



146 87 



77 31 



81 21 



87 82 



988 58 



84 



EXHIBIT No. 8— Continued. 



June 9, 1896 



July 15, 1896 



Aug. 6, 1896 



Sept. 10, 1896 



Oot. 8, 1896 



Oct. 30, 1896 



91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 



102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 



R. 0. Johnson, Supt., sod 

Henry Coburn, lumber 

A.Burdsal Co., paints 

Cleinems Vonnegut. hardware 

Philip Bridges, sodding 

Balke ife Krauss Co., lumber 

Prank Dell, lime 

Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 

R. O.Johnson, Sup't, June misc. expense . . . 

Wm. McWorkman, roof repairs, etc 

C. L. Wayne <& Co., painters' supplies . . . . 
C. W. Sullivan, plastering . 
McElwaine-Richards Co. engineers' supplies . 
A Burdsal t!o., painters' supplies .... 

Aldag P. and V. Co., white washers' supplies . 
Central Rubber and Supply Co., packing . . . 

Totalbillsallowed July 15, 1896 

A. Burdsall Co., painters' supplies ... 
Indianapolis P. and C. Co., painters' supplies . 
Hildebrand Hardware Co., lawn mower repairs 
McElwaine-Hichards Co., engineers' supplies 

Balke & Krauss Co.. lumber 

0. E. Schott. plumbing 

Consolidated C. and L. Co., tile 

Frank Dell, lime, etc ... 

Albert (iail, paperins 

Knight & Jillson, engineers' supplies . . . . 

C. L. Wfiyne & i.o , hardware 

Aldag P. and V. Co , bronze 

Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 

R 0. Johnson, Sup't, August misc. expenses . 
Albert (thII, carpets, shades, etc . . . 

W. G. MuDSon, plumbing 

M. H. Farrell, stone gate posts _ ■ 

A. Burdsal Co., painter.'^' supplies 

Fred J. Mack & Co., painting ... ... 

Indianai'olis Electric Co., electric supplies . . 

Home Stove Co., range, etc 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

1 'aniel Stewart Co.. glass, etc . . . . . . . 

Charles .Mankediek, gravel 

Balke & Krauss Co, lumber 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., painters' supplies . . 

Standard Oil Co., oil 

Frank Dell, tile 

Aldag P. and V. Co., glass, etc 

Jos. Gardner, lining tank 

McElwaine Richards Co., engineers' supplies . 

Total bills allowed September 10, 1896 . . 

Jerry Redding, engine repairs • 

Columtiia Incandescent Lamp Co., lam)>s . . 

Wm. Langsenkamp, tinning kettles 

Albert Gull, rugs, etc 

Home Stove Co , stove repairs _ _ . . 

Indianapolis Electric Co , electric supplies . . 

A.Burdsal Co., paints . • 

Aneshaensel & Prinzler. plumbing . . ... 
Indianapolis M. and C. Union, moulding . . . 
Elevator S. and R. Co., dynamo brushes . . . 
Clemens Vonnegut, rope, etc . . 

Total bills allowed October 8, 1896 

R. 0. .Johnson, Sup't, October misc. expense . 
Indianapolis M. and C. Union, lumber . , 
McElwaine-Richards Co., engineers' supplies 

Francke & Schindler, hardware 

A. Kiefer Drug Co., paints 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Balke & Krauss Lumber Co., lumber 

Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 



14 38 


32 80 


30 90 


20 63 


18 26 


6 40 


2 40 


S61 50 


106 65 


41 20 


31 00 


25 66 


17 85 


17 25 


7 15 


$68 06 


46 73 


21 50 


19 65 


17 00 


14 23 


7 20 


7 20 


8 60 


4 75 


3 20 


1 00 


$93 98 


399 51 


350 00 


100 00 


55 85 


27 50 


24 90 


23 50 


22 93 


20 24 


20 00 


17 77 


15 03 


8 84 


5 58 


4 76 


2 50 


1 75 


$60 00 


45 23 


26 60 


23 01 


18 60 


16 34 


5 00 


3 58 


1 80 


5 20 


5 51 


$7 71 


11 30 


9 07 


4 16 


3 25 


3 09 


163 00 



85 



EXHIBIT No. 9. 



A Schedule of All Orders Drawn on Treasurer of the Institution by 
the Board of Control Thereof and Paid by Said Treasurer on 
Account of Industries During the Fiscal Year Ending October 
31 1896. 



Dec. 5, 1896 



Jan. 9,1896 



Feb. 6, 1896 



Mar. 5, 1896 



April 9,1896 



May 7, 1896 



R. 0. Johnson, Supt., November pay-roll . . . 

Nutz ife Grnsskopf, shoe shop supplies 

Indiana Paper Co., Hoosier paper, etc 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., buttons, etc 

Francke ife Schiudler, hardware 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

J. C. Ltickson. lumber 

Indianapolis P.&C. Co., painters' supplies . 
R. 0. Johnson, Supt., November misc. expenses 

Total bills allowed December 5, 1896 . . . 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., December pay-roll . . . 
R. 0.. Johnson, Supt.. December misc. expenses 
Nutz k Grosskopf, shoe shop supplies . . . . 

IndianapolisM.it C. Union, lumber 

G. A. Roberg-, leather 

Clemens Vocnegut, hardware 

Kipp Bros., buttons 

Balke & Kruu.ss Co., lumber 

Journal Printing Co., rollers 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 .... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., January pay-roll .... 
R. U.Johnson, >upt., January misc. expenses 

Nutz & Grosskopf, shoe shop supplies 

Balke & Krauss, lumher 

Indiana Paper Co., Hoosier paper 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., thread, etc 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., paints, etc 

Total bills allowed February 6, 1896 . . . . 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt, February pay-roll . . 
R. f>. Johnson. Supt., February misc. expenses 
Indianapolis M. k C. Union, lumber .... 

Indiana Paper Co., Hoosier paper 

Clemens Vonnegut, hardware 

Daniel Stewnrt, wood filler, etc 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., sewing room supplies 

Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 ..... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., March pay-roll 

R. 0. Johnson. Supt., March misc. expenses . 

Taylor & Smith, shoe shop supplies 

G. A. Roberg, leather . . . 

Hildebrand Hardware Co., hardware 

Kipp Bro., butcons . . 

Total bills allowed April 9, 1896 ..... 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., April pay-roll . . . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Supt., April misc. expenses . . 

Indianapolis M. it C. Union, lumber 

Taylor <fc Smith, shoe shop supplies 

Indiana Paper Co., Hoosier paper 

J. C. Tarkington, advertising 

Francke k Schindler, hardware 

Kipp Bros., buttons 

Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 ...... 



8195 00 


50 59 


25 64 


17 75 


13 16 


3 12 


36 40 


10 90 


6 23 


1195 00 


11 84 


38 94 


32 40 


30 40 


20 09 


4 25 


7 00 


2 00 


$195 00 


1 80 


94 67 


54 25 


38 16 


10 59 


4 95 


S195 00 


4 78 


20 15 


7 53 


4 71 


2 40 


2 07 


.$195 00 


3 73 


85 20 


16 80 


12 84 


3 00 


$195 00 


1 63 


63 00 


40 99 


24 67 


2 J 45 


17 80 


3 00 



S358 79 



341 92 



399 42 



236 64 



316 57 



367 54 



EXHIBIT No. 9— Continued. 



June 9, 1896 . 


47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 

55 
56 
57 

58 

59 

60 

61 

62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 


R. 0. Johnson, Supt., May pay-roll 

R. O.Johnson, Supt., mailing Hoosier . •. . . 

Nutz & Grosskopf, leather, etc 

Clemens Vonnegiit, hardware 


S195 00 

2 08 
10 50 

3 63 
1 73 
1 67 
1 60 
1 44 




" '"' '. 


Wm. Laurie & Co., yarn 

Indianapolis Newspaper Union, ink 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., thread 

Daniel Stewart, ink 

Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 

R. O.Johnson, Supt., June pay-roll ..... 
R. 0. Johnson, Supt., June misc. expense . . 
J. C. Tarkington, advertising 

Total bills allowed July 15, 1896 

R. O.Johnson, Supt., July pay-roll 

Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 

R. 0. Johnson, Supt., August pay-roll . . . . 

Total bills allowed September 10, 1896 . . . 
R.O.Johnson, Supt., September pay-roll . . , 

Total bills allowed October 8, 1896 

R. O.Johnson, Supt., October pay-roll . . . . 
R. 0. Johnson, Supt., October misc. expense . 

Nutz & Grosskopf, shoe shop supplies 

Indianapolis M. & C. Union, lumber 

Francke & Schindler, hardware 

C. P. Lesh Paper Co., Hoosier paper 

C. L. Wayne & Co, paints, etc. 

Murphy, Hibben & Co., buttons^ etc 

Indiana Paper Co., paper wrappers 

C. P. Lesh Paper Co., Hoosier paper 

Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 




July 15,1896. 


S85 00 
17 62 
9 20 


$217 65 


Aug. 6,1896. 


m 00 


111 82 


Sept. 10, 1896 . 


S25 00 


25 00 


Oct. 8, 1896 . 


$195 00 


25 00 


Oct. 30,1896. 


8195 00 
19 27 
73 58 
18 00 
9 40 
5 20 
5 70 
3 86 
2 60 
71 50 


195 00 






404 11 



87 



EXHIBIT No. 10. 



A Detailed and Itemized Statement of All Expenditures on Account 
of Maintenance During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31st, 
1896. Original Vouchers Filed With Auditor of State. Dupli- 
cates on File in This Office. 



Bills Allowed Dee. 5, 1895. 

VOUCHEE No. 1. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. . 

Pay -Roll for November. 

R.O.Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Physician 22 00 

Wm. E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 25 00 

Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

Wm. H. Latham Instructor . 125 00 

N. B. McKee . Instructor 125 00 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor 83 33 

Henry Bierhaus-. Instructor 83 33 

August Jutt Instructor 83 83 

N. F. Morrow Instructor 83 33 

Orson Archibald Instructor 68 33 

Albert Berg instructor 75 00 

Albert Berg Librarian 8 00 

S. W. Gilbert . Instructor 75 00 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 50 00 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 79 16 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 58 33 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 50 00 

Ida Kinsley ... Instructor 50 00 

Eva Heizer Instructor 56 66 

Eudora Bright Instructor 52 50 

Letitia Booth Instructor 48 33 

Carrie Smith Instructor 48 33 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 58 33 

Nora V. Long Instructor 60 00 

Frances Thompson Instructor 40 00 

Mary Corwin Instructor 50 00 



VOUCHEE No. l-Continued. 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor $50 00 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor 20 00 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor 20 00 

Alice Wilson ... ... Usher 20 00 

Mary Diffley Nurse 25 00 

S. Brandenburg . Watchwoman 20 00 

Louis Prinzler Engineer ..... 65 00 

Thos. Marshall Engineer's assistant ... 30 00 

Charles Friedgen Electrician 40 00 

Chas. Howard Engineer 35 00 

Wm. Langstaff Florist and Gardener ... 75 00 

Wm, G. Falls Laborer , 20 00 

Eugene Yoatz Laborer 20 00 

Wm, Johanson Laborer 20 CO 

Henry Freeman Laborer 20 00 

Chas. Kissling Watchman 15 00 

John Boehm Baker 45 00 

Wm. Hallowell First Cook 40 00 

Jos. Skinner Second Cook ...... 25 00 

Bridget Wade ...... . Third Cook 15 00 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook ....... 16 00 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 14 00 

Kate Stratton Laundress ....... 12 00 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 12 00 

Ellen Cronin Laundress 12 00 

Anna Linhun Chambermaid 12 00 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid ...... 12 00 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 12 00 

Kate Linhun ......... Chambermaid ...... 12 00 

Julia Doherty Waitress 14 CO 

Lillie Kelley Waitress 14 00 

Kate Boehm Waitress 12 00 

Delia Colter Waitress 12 00 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress 12 00 

Julia Shea . Waitress •. 12 00 



Total $2,805 28 



VOUCHER No. 2. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Wm. Rogers, assisting in milking 6<t days 

John F.ihey, pupil, cutting hair 60 days 

Abbie Shugrue, laundress, 9 days 

Indianapolis Kindergarten Association, scholarship fees for 

Edith Fulton assistant Kindergarten teacher 

Western Union Tel. Co., October telegraphage ..... 

Oliver Leonard, 31| bushels coril 

Green fruits 

Vegetables 

Dried fruits 



$3 00 


4 00 


3 60 


40 00 


1 28 


7 86 


1 71 


3 35 


20 



89 

VOUCHER No. 2— Continued. 

Bread stuff $2 53 

Vinegar 60 

Miecellaneous groceries 2 75 

Canned meats 40 

Canned vegetables 2 20 

Canned fruits 1 93 

E. 8. & L., 7 yards creton for furnishing 2 10 

Baker & Thornton, 1 set cube roots 75 

100 postals for school use 1 00 

S. J. Winchester, 1 patent oil broom 1 00 

Subscription to Sun, 2 copies, October 20 to November 20 . 50 

Perforating and binding clothing books . 1 00 

Postage from printing office 1 04 

To be paid the Superintendent for the purpose of defraying 
incidental expenses from time to time during the year, the 
amount thus paid to be returned to State benefit at the 

close of fiscal year 250 00 

Total • • • • ^332 80 

VOUCHER No. 3. KINGAN & CO. 

6,118 lbs. beef 1305 90 

525 lbs. breakfast bacon 

387 lbs. sausage 

330 lbs. lard 

460 lbs. spare ribs 

177 lbs. ham 

56 lbs. pork backs 

53 lbs. bean pork . 

3 lbs. tenderloins 

TotHl 466 54 

VOUCHER No. 4. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 



25 


82 


23 


10 


25 


37 


18 


\5 


4 


21 


3 


18 




41 



75 lbs. Cal. peaches 

161 lbs. Cal. prunes 

1,097 lbs. ex. C. .-ugar .... 
697 lbs. granulated sugar . . . 
153 lbs green Golden Rio coffee 
155 lbs. Maracaibo coffee . . . 

62^ lbs. Imperial tea 

75 lbs. powdered sugar ... 

1 bbJ. hominy 

100 lbs. rice 

2 lbs. Brown's ex. lemon . . . 
1 lb. Brown's ex. vanilla . . . 

15 lbs. corn starch 

5 lbs. grd. allspice 

10 lbs. grd. pepper 



$5 


25 


6 


44 


48 


93 


34 


57 


30 


60 


31 


00 


13 


75 


3 


94 


2 


20 


4 


50 


1 


60 


1 


15 




75 




60 


1 


20 



90 

VOUCHER No. 4— Continued. 

25 lbs. dried currants $1 00 

15 lbs. citron 1 65 

3 boxes L. L. raisins 3 90 

17 pockets salt 50 

4 doz. Johnson pine apples 6 90 

2 doz. Cal. Bartlett pears 2 80 

16 doz. Marysville peaches 21 60 

28 doz. Yarmouth corn . 26 88 

2 doz. L. P. J pt. sauce 1 47 

54^ gal. silver drip syrup 8 18 

^ bbl. Dingee pickles 2 25 

^ bbl. No. 1 herring ■ ■> . 75 

660 lbs. beans 14 85 

34 lbs. Eex b. powder 4 76 

10 lbs. bulk soda 40 

Total $284 37 

VOUCHER No. 5. STANDARD OIL CO. 

6,041 gal. fuel oil $131 69 

Total 131 69 

VOUCHER No. 6. JOHN O'NEILL. 

30 bbls. White Rose flour $97 50 

8 bbls. Pillsbury flour 30 80 

500 lbs. corn meal 5 00 

50 lbs. buckwheat c • 1 13 

$134 43 

Less 38 empties returned 7 60 

Total 126 83 

VOUCHER No. 7. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

' 365 lbs. turkey ' $43 80 

292 lbs. chicks 32 18 

352 lbs. hens 38 72 

Total 114 70 

VOUCHER No. 8. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

1,078 lbs. butterine $102 31 

Total 102 31 

VOUCHER No. 9. DUNN & MANKEDICK. 

Excavating and hauling away 194 cubic yards of earth . . $49 00 

Bouldering gutters to north entrance 32 50 

Total 81 50 



91 



VOUCHER No. 10. LOUIS HILDEBRAND. 

3 pairs shoes for county pupils $6 75 

8 pairs shoes for county pupils 16 00 

10 pairs shoes for county pupils 17 50 

4 pairs shoes for county pupils 6 00 

78 pairs shoes repaired for county pupils . 29 85 

Total $76 10 

VOUCHER No. II. GEO. HITZ & CO. 

120J bu. potatoes $42 72 

3^ bu. 8. potatoes 3 35 

24 doz. celery 7 60 

3 bu. 0. berries 8 25 

1 bbl. ofiions 1 25 

1 bbl. turnips 90 

5 box lemons 2 25 

1 bbl. apples 1 75 

Total 68 07 

VOUCHEK No. 12. SWIFT BROS. 

678 lbs. beef ' $32 85 

80 lbs. lard 5 92 

100 Ibf. sausage 6 50 

77 lbs. bacon , 7 31 

13 lbs. pork loin 1 14 

Total 53 72 

VOUCHER No. 13. MURPHY HIBBEN & CO. 

57 yds. silesia $5 18 

26 yds. wigging 1 69 

108^ yds. cambric 4 34 

106 yds. canton flannel 7 95 

r.Oli yds. blue calico 4 81 

99| ydf". gingham 4 96 

56f Henrietta cloth 10 04 

80 yds. bird's eye cotton 4 80 

475 yds. ginyham 2 49 

2 boxes knitting cotton 65 

f doz. hose 88 

f doz. hose 95 

^ doz hose ." 25 

1 gross buttons 60 

1 doz braces 2 25 

Total 51 79 



92 
VOUCHEE No. 14. A. JORDAN & CO. 



178^ lbs. cheese 
180 doz. eggs . 



$17 21 
31 50 


148 71 
1 80 



Credit by overcharge on eggs 

Total $46 91 

VOUCHER No. 15. CRANSTON & CURTS. 

170 S. S. Advocates $31 88 

82 Intermediate Lesson Leaves 3 69 

35 Beginners' Lesson Leaves 1 58 

1 leaf cluster - 3 00 



Total 40 15 

VOUCHER No. 16. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

29,200 cubic feet gas at 11.25 per M $36 50 

Total 36 50 

VOUCHER No. 17. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 



3 boxes Babbitt's soap . . 
3 boxes 5c Ivory soap . . 

2 boxes Pearline 

1 doz. Sapolio 

1 doz. Electro Silicon . . 
100 lbs. Piel's Lump Starch 

2 doz. No. 1 brooms . . . 
1 doz. whisk brooms . . . 



$11 


25 


12 


00 


7 


00 




75 




75 


2 88 


3 


80 




60 



Total 39 03 

VOUCHER No. 18. E. C. ANDREWS. 

845 ft3. chip soap $38 02 

Total 38 02 

VOUCHER No. 19. J. R. RYAN & CO. 

2,000 lbs. bran $14 00 

1,600 lbs. feed meal 12 00 

Total 26 00 

VOUCHER No. 20. JOHN SCHEID & CO. 

16| gal. Standard oysters ' $15 11 

lA gal. Select oysters 1 44 

67 lbs. white fish 6 03 

Total 21 58 



93 

VOUCHEE No. 21. JOHN EDWARDS. 

15 bu. apples $7 50 

3 bu. pears 4 50 

20 bu. apples 10 00 

Total $22 00 

VOUCHER No. 22. A. WHITNEY. 
265 gq. yds. sod and sodding S21 20 



Total 21 20 

VOUCHER No. 23. THOS. C. WARLEY. 
207 lbs. boiler compound $20 70 



Total 20 70 

VOUCHER No. 24. MIKE RUSH. 
1 bbl. boiler compound $20 00 



Total 20 00 

VOUCHER No. 25. ALB\NY PERFORATED W. P. CO. 

1 case diamond toilet paper $j8 00 

Total 18 00 

VOUCHER No. 26. A. KIEFER DRUG CO. 



2 oz. sub. nit. bismuth . . . . 

5 oz. chlorate potash 

2 lbs. powdered borax . . . . 

1 lb. syr. wild cherry 

100 tablets nitroglycerin comp 

1 lb. syr. tolu 

i doz. listerine 

1 oz. antikamnia 

1 oz. antikamnia and quinine • 
10 oz. P. & W. quinine . . . . 
J doz. P. D. & Co. capsules . . 

^ gross 8X corks 

5 gross lOX corks 

i doz. C. H. probangs . . . . 

2 oz. calomel 

2 lbs. peroxide hydro 

1 lb. tinct. iron 

1 lb. muriate ammonia . . . . 

1 lb. carb. ammonia 

5 lbs. carb. ammonia 



$0 


20 




10 




20 




50 




15 




60 


2 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


3 


45 




55 




50 




79 




38 




20 


1 


00 




35 




14 




15 




70 



Total IS 96 



94 

VOUCHER No. 27. PAREOTT & TAGGART. 
240 lbs. crackers $13 80 



Total $13 80 

VOUCHER No. 28. HOOSIER MFG. CO. 

10 lbs. colored waste $0 60 

284 lbs. laundry soap 11 36 

5 gal. engine oil 1 40 

Total 13 36 

VOUCHER No. 29. INDIANA PAPER COMPANY. 

112 sli. 17x22—24, cherry, cut ... . ^ 

200 eh. 17x22—24, canary, cut j ^ 

84 sh. 17x22—24, Mystic cut 55 

12 eh. 3-ply white bristol, cut 59 

150 sh. 25x38—80, I tint, cut 1 54 

38 sh. antique cover 33 

200 sh. 17x22—20, amber, cut 1 46 

i M 1<^^ sh. bill heads 64 

860 Bh. 24x36—30 pt., cut 1 72 



Total 8 86 

VOUCHER No. 30. KIPP BROS. 

4 doz. dress combs $3 20 

2 doz. hair brushes 4 00 

1 doz. boxes tooth picks 75 



Total 7 95 

VOUCHER No. 31. FRANK G. KAMPS. 
8 doz. rabbits $8 I'O 



Total 8 00 

VOUCHER No. 32. BAKER & RANDOLPH. 
5 M ruled sheets $7 CO 



Total 7 GO 



VOUCHER No. 33. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

6 baskets grapes $1 08 

2 bbls. apples 3 50 

Total 4 58 



95 

VOUCHER No. 84. A. A. HELSTERN. 

1 No. 25 champion box . . $3 35 

5 joints pipe 62 

Total $3 97 

VOUCHER No. 35. INDIANAPOLIS BRUSH WORKS. 

2 doz. Capital pcrub brushes, No. 100 $1 60 

2 doz. Capital scrub brushes, No. 200 2 40 

$4 00 
Less 2 per cent 08 

Total 3 92 

VOUCHER No. 36. H. LIEBER CO. 

3 22x27 Academy boards $1 50 

6 22x27 Monarch boards 3 00 

$4 50 
Less 20 per cent 90 

Total 3 60 

i 

VOUCHER No. 37. THOS. P. KEAN. 

3 waists $0 75 

3hdks 15 

3 pair hose , 50 

2 shawls 2 00 

Total 3 40 

VOUCHER No. 38. YULE & HARTMAN. 
8 new shoes $3 00 

Total 3 00 

VOUCHER No. 39. McELWAlNE-RICHARDS CO. 

5| lbs. Rainbow packing |2 30 

Total 2 30 

VOUCHER No. 40. BURRIS-BERZSCH CO. 

5 gross No. 825 students' note books $2 00 

Total 2 00 



96 

VOUCHER No. 41. INDIANAPOLIS BASKET CO. 

4 No. 1 reed clothes baskets $2 GO 

Total $2 00 

VOUCHEE No. 42. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 gross Mammoth comp. books $4 50 

1 case Hoyt's toilet paper 8 50 

1 map Indiana 2 50 

1| gross No. 813 comp. books 8 00 

1 lb. No. 60 rubber erasers 95 

2 doz. boxes No. 11 slate pencils 3 00 

2 gross P. C. lead pencils 80 

^ gross pencils 25 

2 doz. mucilage 80 



$29 30 
By cr. on same 5 00 

Total 24 30 



Total bills allowed December 5, 1895 $5,171 79 



Bills Allowed January 9, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 43. R. O. .JOHNSON, SUPT. 

December Pay-Roll. 

R. O. .Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Phy-ician 22 00 

Wm. E. Todd Book-keeper 60 CO 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 25 00 

Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

Wm. H. Latham ...... . In-tructor 125 09 

W. B. McK-e Instructor 125 00 

Wm. H. DeMotte In.«tractor 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor 83 33 

Henry Bierhaus . Instructor 83 33 

August Jutt Instructor. .... 83 33 

N. F. Morrow ......... Instructor 83 33 

Orson Arch bald. - Instructor ....... 68 33 

Albert Berg. In.^tructor 75 CO 

Albert Berg Librarian ..... 8 00 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 75(0 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 50 00 

Tunis V. Archer Instrucior 79 16 



97 



VOUCHER No. 44— Continued. 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

Eva Heizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 

Nora V. Long Instructor 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Mary Corwin Instructor 

M.M.Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . . 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor. . . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor. . . . 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Mary Diffley Nurse 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman 

L. Prinzler Engineer 

Thos. Marshall Assistant Engineer . . 

Chas. Friedgen Electrician 

Chas. Howard Carpenter 

Wm. Langstaff Florist and Gardener . 

Wm. G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 

W. A. Johanson Laborer 

Henry Freeman Laborer 

Chas. Kissling Watchman 

•John Boehm Baker 

Wm. Hallowell First Cook 

Jos. Skinner Second Cook 

Bridget Wade Third Cook 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 

Kate Stratton Laundress 

Mary O'Connell Laundress. = 

Ellen Cronin Laundress 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid .... 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid ..... 

Julia Doherty Waitress 

Lillie Kelley " . . . Waitress ^ 

Kate Boehm Waitress 

Delia Calter Waitress 

Nellie Morarity Waitress 

Julia Shea Waitress 



$58 33 
50 00 
50 00 
56 66 
52 50 
48 33 
48 33 
58 33 
60 00 
40 00 
50 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
25 00 
20 00 
65 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
75 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
45 00 
40 00 
2a 00 

15 00 

16 00 
14 (0 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 

14 on 

14 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 



Total .... 
7— D. and D. 



$2,820 28 



98 
VOUCHER No. 44. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Month, as Follows : 

4 lbs. yeast, during November $1 00 

Miscellaneous breadstuff 85 

37Jbu.corn 10 11 

H^^T tons timothy hay 26 17 

l/oVd tons timothy hay 22 50 

l^Wff tons clover hay 15 24 

Canned vegetables 1 20 

Vegetables 1 40 

Green fruits o . . 1 70 

Butter 30 

Sugar 60 

Mince meat 1 00 

Honey 20 

Cove oysters 55 

Canned fruits 80 

500 postals for school use 5 00 

250 2c stamps 5 00 

50 Ic stamps 50 

Subscription Indianapolis Sun, 2 copies, November 20 to 

January 20 1 00 

W. U. Tel. Co., December telegraphage 86 

Christmas tree 6 00 

Rent Santa Clause suit 1 75 

Toilet soap 1 25 

John Fahey, barbering, Dec 2 00 

Wm. Rogers, assistant milking, Dec 1 50 

Hominy 08 

Total $108 56 

VOUCHER No. 45. WHEN CLOTHING CO. 

20 uniforms at $6.35 $127 00 

8 uniforms at $9.60 76 80 

10 uniforms at $11.60 116 00 

1 pair pants 4 00 

7 pair pants at $4.50 31 50 

1 cap 50 

Ivest 2 00 

8 uniform caps 4 00 

4 uniform suits at $9.60 38 40 

3 uniform suits at $6.35 19 05 

3 uniform suits at $11.60 34 80 

2 uniform coats at $6.00 12 00 

1 suit 11 S'^ 

1 pants and cap 5 00 

1 coat and cap 6 50 

Total 489 52 



99 
VOUCHER No. 46. SWIFT BEOS. 



5,634 lbs. beef . . 
56J lbs. pork loins 
460 lbs. sausage . 
505 lbs. bacon 
135 lbs. bologna . 
106 lbs. ham. . . 
224 lbs. short ribs 
220 lbs. lard . . . 
47 lbs. lamb . . . 



$280 


61 


3 


68 


26 


46 


35 


35 


6 09 


9 


54 


12 


32 


13 


20 


3 


29 



Total $390 54 



VOUCHER No. 47. McCUNE, MALOTT CO. 

2 doz. R. R. brushes $1 50 

1 box Babbitt's soap 4 00 

1 box 5c. Ivory soap 4 00 

3 boxes Pearline 11 25 

100 lbs. Piel's lump starch 2 37 

3 doz. shoe brushes 3 75 

1,059 lbs. ex. C sugar 44 80 

50 lbs. cut loaf sugar 2 74 

50 lbs. powdered sugar 2 55 

32 lb'\ Imperial tea 7 36 

129 lbs. Golden Rio coffee 25 80 

125 lbs. Maraciibo coffee 23 91 

1 bbl. hominy . 2 00 

482 bis. H. P. beans 9 64 

100 bis. Carolina rice 4 50 

75 lbs. evaporated peaches 5 25 

197 lbs. prunes 8 87 

36 lbs. Rex baking powder 5 04 

10 lbs. sage 1 CO 

10 lbs. ground pepper 1 00 

5 lbs. cinnamon 75 

10 lbs. citron 1 10 

20 lbs. bulk currants 80 

12 lbs. chocolate 4 08 

25 lbs. bakinjj soda 75 

50 lbs. table salt ■ 50 

2 doz. Brown's extract vanilla 3 00 

2 doz. Brown's extract lemon 1 60 

3 bbls salt 2 40 

3 boxes L. L. raisins 3 15 

5 doz. L. & P. sauce 1 45 

48 gals, cider vinegar 4 56 

53 gals, silver drip syrup 7 03 

6 doz. C. peaches 7 80 

2 doz B, pears 2 80 



100 
VOUCHER No. 47— Continued. 



28 doz. Yarmouth corn . 
10 doz. Stand, pumpkin 

4 doz. string beans . . 
^ bbl. ex. herring . . . 
6 lbs. shelled almonds . 

5 lbs. walnuts . . 
10 doz. 3-lb. peaches 

15 lbs. dried peaches . . 



26 


60 


5 


75 


2 


00 




75 


1 


92 




63 


13 00 


1 


13 



Total . $264 



VOUCHER No. 48. JOHN O'NIELL. 

39 bbls. flour $129 15 

400 lbs. corn meal . 3 60 

50 lbs. buckwheat flour . 1 13 

2,000 lbs. bran . 13 O'l 

1,000 lb?, feed meal 7 00 

$153 88 

Less 36 empties returned 7 20 

Total 146 68 



VOUCHER No. 49. STANDARD OIL CO, 
6,052 gal. crude fuel oil $139 20 



Total 139 20 



VOUCHER No. 50. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

960 lbs. butterine $86 40 

180 lbs. cheese ]9 80 



Total 106 20 



VOUCHER No. 51. A. JORDAN & CO. 

460 lbs. turkey $50 60 

236 lbs. 8. chickens 25 96 



Total 76 56 



101 



VOUCHER No. 52. HENRY 8YERUP & SONS. 



6,290 lbs. potatoes 
21 dozen celery . 
2 bble. onions 

1 bbl. s. potatoes . 
6 bbls. cabbage . 

2 boxes oranges . 
1^ bu. c. berries 
30 lbs. pop corn . 

Total . . . 



$28 31 


9 45 


3 00 


3 25 


5 10 


10 00 


5 00 


75 



$64 86 



VOUCHER No. 53. J. R. BUDD & CO. 



360 doz. eggs 
Total . 



$63 00 



63 00 



VOUCHER No. 54. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 



1,534 lbs. Borax soap 
Total . . . 



$56 52 



56 52 



VOUCHER No. 55. LOUIS HILDEBRAND. 



Repairing 52 pairs shoes for county pupils 
Making 15 pairs shoes for county pupils . 

Total 



$20 05 
29 75 



49 80 



VOUCHER No. 56. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

$47 50 



38,000 cubic feet gas at $1.25 per 1,000 
Total 



47 50 



VOUCHER No. 57. G. R. WYSONG & CO. 



150 lbs. conservative mixture 
120 lbs. A No. 1 creams . . . 
25 lbs. clear mixture .... 
25 lbs. French kisses .... 
10 lbs. mint lozenges .... 
70 lbs. old lime mixture . . 
12 21b. boxes fancy mixture 

Total 



$8 25 
12 00 

1 63 

2 25 
1 00 
4 55 
6 00 



35 68 



102 



VOUCHEE No. 58. W. B. BUKFOKD. 



TJ qr. Demy store-room ledger, printed and full bound . 

10 qr. full bound ledger, plain 

Patent binding 

Mem. vowel index 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 59. McCOY-HOWE CO 

2 lbs. elix. phos. I. Q. & S . . . . . 

5 doz. Fellows' syr. hypo 

i doz Fairchilil's ess. pepsin 

3 lbs. Listerine r • • 

2 oz. powdered antikamnia 

1 lb Ideal liquid cathartic 

1 lb. tinct. arnica . 

90 cathartic granuels L. D. . . 

2 lb. soap liniment 

1 pt. imported bay rum 

2 oz. calomel 

1 lb. glycerine 

2 lb. epsom salts 

1 oz. antifebrine 

1 doz. Benson's capsine plaster 

1 oz. phenacetine ........ 

1 yard S. and J. capsicum plaster 

^ doz. Mitchell's rheumatic plaster 

1 oz. oil cloves 

4 lbs. elix. 1. Q & S. Phosp 

2 lbs. elix. lactopeptine 

10 oz. P. & W. quinine 

600 Mt. capsule3 No. 2 

100 Mt. capsules No. 4 

1 gal. aqua ammonia 

1 gal. alcohol 

I lb. Benz oxide zinc ointment 

1 gal. whiskey 

1 lb. fluid extract wild cherry 

2 lbs. syrup wild cherry 

2 lbs. paregoric 

500 pills C. C. W 

5 oz, P. & W. quinine 

1,000 capsules No. 2 

1 lb. gum camphor 

1 pt. goose grease ' 

Cr. Fellows' syr. hypo 

Total 



$20 00 


12 00 


1 00 


1 50 



96 


1 34 


2 00 


1 9a 


62 


40 


13 


1 00 


45 


12 


17 


05 


15 


1 65 


95 


42 


88 


10 


2 15 


2 00 


3 45 


55 


10 


40 


2 60 


20 


1 75 


60 


80 


90 


65 


1 73 


75 


70 


60 


$34 37 
96 



$34 50 



33 41 



103 
VOUCHER No. 60. HUNTINGTON SEED CO. 



Onion sets 

100 double mixed Hys . . . . 
100 double mixed Koman Hys 
500 tulips, mixed, single \ 
500 tulips, mixed, double J 

75 Bermudas, 7x9 

Ij case Lye \ 
^ case Laurel J 
6 bunches Immortelles . . . . 

3 lbs. No. 22 wire 

10 balls twine 

3 lbs. heavy wire 

^ lb. colored capes 

24 pampas plumes 

100 Pompons mixed 

3 lbs. wire 



$1 


88 


3 00 


1 


20 


4 


50 


3 


75 


10 


00 


1 


50 




45 


1 


00 




20 


1 


00 




96 




90 




60 



Total $30 94 

VOUCHER No. 61. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 



6 doz. hose 

2 doz. hose 

1 doz. Princess corsets 

2 gross shoe laces . . 

3 bolts ribbon .... 
1 bolt garter webb . . 

4 doz. fine combs . 

3 doz. drt esing combs . 



$9 00 


3 50 


4 25 


1 00 


1 80 


50 


3 00 


3 00 



Total 26 05 

VOUCHER No. 62. POLA.R ICE CO. 
23,175 lbs. ice for November and December $23 17 



Total 23- 17 

VOUCHER No. 63. HILDEBRAND HAEDWARE CO. 

1 pair 6-in. Star shears |0 40 

J doz. 10-in. Wilson knives 

5 30-qt. dishpans 

6 6-in. ladles . . . . , 

2 15x13 J Russia iron pans 

2 doz. 9-in. vegetable dishes . 

2 doz. Rogers' tea spoons 

4 sets knives and forks 

1 doz. 10-in. granite pie pans 

4 only 5-in. pudding pans 

Cr. by Russia pans and ladles retarned 

Total • • 18 83 



3 


00 


1 


95 


1 


20 


2 


50 


5 


20 


3 


40 


2 60 


1 


40 




88 


S22 


53 


3 


70 







104 



VOUCHER No. 64. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

Rent of telephone January 1 to March 31 $18 00 

Total $18 00 

VOUCHER No. 65. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

10| gal. Standard oysters $9 68 

Si doz. rabbits 8 17 

Total 17 85 

t 

VOUCHER No. 66. JOHN EDWARDS. 

25 bn. apples $12 50 

3 bu. pears 3 90 

Total 16 40 

VOUCHER No. 67. PARROTT & TAGGART. 

240 lbs. butter crackers $13 20 

Total 13 50 

VOUCHER No. 68. SMITH, DAY & CO. 

^ doz. No. 409 chairs $4 75 

1 doz. No. 136 chairs 4 25 

Total 9 00 

VOUCHER No. 69. H. T. CONDE CO. 

To repairs on Caligraph : 

1 new platetn $3 00 

1 new yoke 2 10 

2 springs 20 

Time cleaning and adjusting 3 50 

Total 8 80 

VOUCHER No. 70. W. & H. WALKER. 

1 box family soap • . .... $3 75 

1 box Water Lily soap 3 65 

Notarial service 50 

Total 7 90 



105 

VOUCHER No. 71. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

1 roll 20 lb. manilla paper $0 75 

12 sb. tbin cbina . . 12 

6 sb fawn bristol 18 

122 sb. 17x22x24 asst. flats, cut . . 90 

52 sb. 17x22x24 asst. amber, cut 45 

25 sb. trans, bristol .... 1 85 

1 roll 20 lb. manilla, 35 lbs 1 75 

170 sb. 24 lb. folio, O. B 1 55 

Less cr. memo ... $0 56 $7 05 

Less 1 roll manilla returned 75 

1 31 

Total $5 74 

VOUCHER No. 72. CENTRAL R. & S. CO. 

10 yds. 4-4 wbite sbeeting $4 50 

^ lb. assorted bands 90 

Total 5 40 

VOUCHER No. 73. MICA ROOFING CO. 

50 lbs. athaenon $5 00 

Total . 6 00 

VOUCHER No. 74. YULE & HARTMAN. 

4 new shoes $1 50 

4 new shoes and 4 old shoes reset 2 50 

Total 4 00 

VOUCHER No. 75. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

J doz. 16-inch window cleaners $1 05 

1 ring for No. 22 cutter 75 

1 can opener 10 

12 sets No. 40 S. Phil, casters 87 

Total 2 77 

VOUCHER No. lD-76. SWIFT BROS. 

4,951 lbs. beef $239 59 

474 lbs. B. bacon ... 45 ( 5 

240 lbs. lard 17 76 

106 lbs. bam 10 07 

332 lbs. sausage . , 19 63 

49 lbs. P. loins 4 29 

Total 336 39 



1106 



VOUCHER No. 2D— 77. SCHNULL & CO. 

1,040 Ibe. Ideal C. sugar . $44 85 

673 lbs. fine granulated sugar , 31 70 

75 lbs. powdered sugar 

121 lbs. golden Rio coffee 

133 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 

67 lbs. Imperial tea 

655 lbs. H, P. beans 

1 bbl. hominy 

125 lbs. California prunes 

75 lb?. California peaches 

100 lbs. Carolina rice . . 

5 lbs. nutmegs 

10 lbs. ground pepper 

10 lbs. ground mustard 

1 lb. Brown's extract lemon 

1 lb. Brown's extract vanilla 

5 lbs. ground ginger 

5 lbs. ground cloves 

2 doz. L. & P. sauce 

15 lbs. cocoanut 

3 bbls. salt 

9 cases Y. C. peaches 

1 case 3 lbs. F. B. pears 

2 cases Johnson pine apple < . 

10 cases Yarmouth corn 

2 cases imported sardines 

49 gals, cider vinegar 

56 gals. N. O. molasses 

565 gals. Ruby drip syrup 

2 Rex ^ B. powder 

6 Rex ^ B. powder 

1 case Yarmouth corn 

Total $297 13 



VOUCHER No. 3D— 78. WESTERN ELECTRIC CO. 

1 set H. lead wires - $2 50 

Rewinding 1 H. armature and furnishing and putting new 

commutator on same 

35 hours' time repairing bearings and quadrant, etc. . . 

37 cast iron for bearings 

Brass castings, screws, etc 

Recalibrating armature 

Freight charges 

Total 176 89 



3 75 


25 


41 


27 


26 


15 


41 


19 


66 


2 50 


5 


63 


5 


63 


5 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


1 


20 




90 


1 


15 




60 




75 


1 


38 


2 


25 


2 


55 


28 


80 


3 


10 


7 


40 


22 


00 


2 


50 


4 


90 


13 44 


9 


60 




40 


1 


22 


2 


20 



150 


00 


17 


50 


1 


60 




90 


1 


35 


3 04 



107 

VOUCHER No. 4D— 79. NUTZ & GROSSKOPF. 

37|^ ft. Kangaroo calf 

40f ft. DoDgola calf 

25 yds. men's lining 

25 ydc. women's lining 

6 bolts gaiter webb 

6 spools silk 

1 M. lace hooks 

2 M. eyelets 

11 lbs. clinch nails 

12 lbs. iron nails 

2 lbs. chanel nails 

2 lbs. chauel | nails 

1 lb. tacks, 5 oz 

1 lb. tacks, 1 oz 

1 lb. tacks, I5 oz. 

1 lb. tacks, 2 oz 

1 doz. knive-! 

3 pieces tar felt 

25 ft. nappa skins 

126 lbs. oak fole leather 

110 lbs. California oak sole leather 

Total . . $101 45 



VOUCHER No. 5D— 80. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1,180 lbs. Borax soap |53 10 



$5 63 


7 34 


3 00 


2 25 


90 


3 30 


85 


20 


1 32 


48 


50 


40 


38 


27 


24 


21 


95 


30 


2 13 


37 80 


33 00 



Total 53 10 



VOUCHER No. 6D— 81. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 

3 bxs. Babbitt's soap 

2 bxs. 5c Ivory soap , 

2 doz. 14-oz. mops 

100 lbs. lump starch 

.2 bxs. Pearline. 

6 doz No. 4 blacking 

2 doz. dust pans 

1 doz large tampico brushes 

1 bx. Brooks soap 

1 doz. No. l*i turkey feather dusters 

3 lbs. bees wax 

1 lb. mixed spices 

^ lb. mustard seed . 

Total 45 13 



$12 00 


8 00 


2 90 


2 50 


7 50 


1 50 


1 70 


65 


3 75 


3 15 


1 20 


20 


08 



108 



VOUCHER No. 7D— 82. MUEPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

4 B. & W. knitting cotton $1 20 

2 Brown knitting cotton 70 

1^ thousand needJes 1 50 

3 doz. towels. 4 50 

151|^ yds. table damask 64 28 

198| yds. bleached muslin 14 91 

2 bales S. I. baits 10 50 

64J yds. bleached muslin 6 10 

200 yds. crash 13 00 

227^ yds. checked crash 17 C6 

40 yds. crash. 1 60 

210 yds. crash , 13 65 

51 yds. brown muslin 4 85 

201J yds. Dwight muslin 15 11 

8 B. & S. darning cotton 1 90 

1 doz. mitt« 2 25 

3 doz. mitts 6 00 

$179 11 

Credit by merchandise returned 44 42 

Total 1134 69 



VOUCHER No. 8D— 83. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 gross P. C. lead pencils $0 40 

1 250-page journal 50 

18 Montieth's First Lessons Geog 4 05 

5 Tenny's Natural Histories 5 40 

5 doz. B. B. erasers 2 25 

3 doz. B. B. erasers • • . . 1 35 

500 letter head treasury 1 20 

4 Webster's Academic Diet 5 40 

^ doz. No. 813 comp. books 1 00 

^ doz. No. 814 comp. books 1 00 

2^ doz. No. 814 comp. books 4 34 

12 Montieth's First Lesfons Geog 2 70 

6 Tenny's Natural Histories 6 48 

5 gross comp. books 2 25 

2 gross Carter's ink 6 6) 

Total 44 92 



109 



VOUCHEE No. 9D— 84. GEO. HITZ & CO. 

1 bbl. apples $2 00 

40 bu. potatoes 16 00 

1 bbl s. potatoes 3 00 

6 baskets grapes 1 08 

3 baskets peaches 1 00 

^ box lemons 4 00 

38 bu. potatoes . 15 20 

4 doz. celery 80 

1 bu. s. potatoes 1 00 

Total 144 08 



VOUCHER No. lOD— 85. W. B. BURFORD. 

3 stenographic note books $0 25 

1 box crown file bands 50 

Binding 5 vol. newspapers 8 75 

150 page demy quarto 40 

1 annual register 5 50 

500 page 10x12 letter book 2 10 

24 legal wrappers 60 



Total 18 10 

VOUCHER No. llD-86. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

41,800cubicfeetof gas, $1.25 M $52 25 



Total 52 25 



VOUCHER No. 12D— 87. FROMMEYER BROS. 

3 doz. hotel tumblers $1 05 

^ doz. 1 gal. pitchers 1 63 

1 doz. handled cups and saucers 73 

1 doz. hotel goblets 50 

1 doz. individual butteries 20 

1 doz. salt shakers 40 

2 doz. fruit saucers 60 

1 doz. pie plates 40 

2 doz. vinegar bottles 30 

5 doz. pepper bottles 30 



Total 6 11 



110 



VOUCHER No. 13D— 88. PRANGE EDUCATIONAL CO. 

4J doz. No. 1 Western $5 00 

1 doz. No. 2 Western 1 20 

3i doz. No. 4 Western 4 00 

4J doz. No. 6 Western 5 40 

1 copy C. C. Manual No. 1 50 

1 copy C. C. Manual No. 2 50 

1 copy C. C. Manual No. 3 50 

117 10 

Less 25 per cent 4 27 

$12 83 

1 copy C. C. Manual, part 4 . $0 75 

Less 25 per cent 18 

57 

8 4-12 doz. No. 9 comp $8 00 

Less 25 per cent 2 00 

6 00 

Total $19 40 



VOUCHER No. 14D— 89. AMERICAN S. & C. CO. 

150 lbs. Kleansall $11 25 

Less freight 83 

Total 10 42 



VOUCHER No. 15D— 90. KINGAN & CO. 

40 lbs. Reliable butterine $4 60 

Total 4 60 

VOUCHER No. 16D— 91. HUNTINGTON SEED CO. 

Seeds $0 25 

Total 25 

VOUCHER No. 17D— 92. A. JORDAN CO. 

Error writing check No. 417 $0 20 

Total 20 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 $6,485 85 



Ill 

Bills Allowed February 6, 1896. 

VOUCHEE No. 93. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

January Pay-Roil. 

E. O. Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Physician 22 00 

Wm. E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 25 00 

Jean Cummings ....... Clerk 30 00 

William H. Latham ..... Instructor 125 00 

N. B. McKee Instructor 125 00 

William H. DeMotte Instructor 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor 83 33 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor 83 33 

August Jutt ........ Instructor 83 33 

N.F.Morrow Instructor 83 33 

Orson Archibald Instructor 68 33 

Albert Berg Instructor 75 00 

Albert Berg Librarian 8 00 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 75 00 

E, J. Hecker Instructor 50 00 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 79 16 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 58 33 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 50 00 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 50 00 

Eva Heizer Instructor 56 66 

Eudora Bright Instructor 52 50 

Letitia Booth Instructor 48 33 

Carrie Smith Instructor 48 33 

Lucy Eobinsou Instructor 58 33 

Nora V. Long Instructor 60 00 

Francis Thompson Instructor 40 00 

Mary Corwin Instructor 50 CO 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor 50 00 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor 20 00 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor 20 00 

Alice Wilson Usher ......... 20 00 

Mary Diffley , . . Nurse 25 00 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman 20 00 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 65 00 

Thomas Marshall Assistant Engineer .... 30 00 

Charles Friedgen Electrician 40 00 

Charles Howard Carpenter 35 00 

William Langstaff Florist and Gardener. . . 75 00 

Wm. G. Falls Laborer .' 20 00 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 20 00 



112 



VOUCHER No. 93— Continued. 

W. A. Johanson Laborer $20 00 

Henry Freeman Laborer 20 00 

Chas. Kissling Watchman 80 00 

John Boehm Baker 45 00 

Wm. Hallowell First Cook 40 00 

Joseph Skinner Second Cook 25 00 

Bridget Wade Third Cook 15 00 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook 16 00 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 14 00 

Kate Stratton . Laundress 12 00 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 12 00 

Ella Cronin Laundress 12 00 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid ...... 12 00 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 12 00 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid 12 00 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 12 00 

Julia Doherty Waitress 14 00 

Lillie Kelley Waitress 14 00 

Kate Boehm Waitress 12 00 

Delia Colter Waitress 12 00 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress 12 00 

Julia Shea Waitress 12 00 



Total 12,820 28 



VOUCHER No. 94. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Mordh as Follows: 

4^ lbs. yeast, December $1 13 

3 S, R. bread 30 

6 lbs. buckwjieat . .... 75 

500 postals for school use 5 00 

513 2-cent stamps 10 26 

Tabbing 112 blocks S. R. orders 2 24 

Binding 1 book President's orders 50 

l^^^V t""^*^ clover hay 17 73 

h%%% toni clover hay 15 40 

l^nsVV to°8 clover hay • . 14 42 

36 jij bu. of corn 9 01 

1,720 lbs. straw 4 30 

U%% tons timothy hay 20 45 

Sub. to Indianapolis News, 2 copies, Jan. 1 to Mar. 31 . . . 2 60 

1 turkey 1 35 

6 lbs. lettuce ' • 1 50 

2 qts. C. berries 28 



113 



VOUCHER No. 94— Continued. 



1 bunch rhubarb 

Sassafras 

3 bottles olives 

3 bottles malt vinegar 

2 doz. cans crabs 

1 doz. oranges 

I doz. French peas 

Postal guide, 1896 

Geo. E. Little, lecture 

4 lbs. butter 

2J lbs. muriatic acid 

1 Allen Temp, in Education 

1 Welsh Talks on Phychology 

1 Welsh Teacher on Phychology 

1 Hall's Contents of Child's Mind 

1 Sully Teacher's Psychology 

Diff. in trade with B. King, 1 bull and 3 cows for same . . . 

1 anti rattler for carriage 

2 faucets 

W. U. telegraphage for January 

Wm. Rogers, asst. in milking for January 

John Fahey, barbering for January . . 

Membership fee Supt. American Convention Instructors for 

Deaf to January, 1897 

Total 



10 30 


10 


1 20 


60 


75 


45 


1 20 


2 50 


5 00 


1 00 


15 


45 


45 


1 09 


23 


1 28 


20 00 


15 


20 


1 89 


1 50 


2 00 


3 00 



$152 71 



VOUCHER No. 95. STANDARD OIL CO. 

19,957 gal. fuel oil $459 01 

Total 



459 01 



VOUCHER No. 96. KINGAN & CO. 



For error in bill Nov. 23, 2 lbs beef = . . . SO 10 

4 591 lbs. beef 224 98 

386 lbs. veal 27 02 

96 lbs. sausage 6 72 

68 lbs. mutton 3 74 

33 lbs. pork loin 1 82 

Total ; 

8— D. and D. 



264 38 



114 



VOUCHER No. 97. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 

1,094 lbs. Ideal C sugar $47 59 

336 lbs. gran, sugar 16 30 

128 lbs. Golden Rio coffee 25 60 

134 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 25 13 

64 lbs. Imperial tea 14 08 

466 lbs. H. P. beans 9 32 

1 bbl. hominy 2 00 

150 lbs. Carolina rice 6 75 

24 lbs. Rex b. powder 3 36 

2 lbs. Brown's extract lemon 1 60 

2 lbs. Brown's extract vanilla 2 30 

150 lbs. Cal. prunes 6 75 

140 lbs. evap. peaches 11 20 

4 cases stand. 3 lbs. pumpkin 4 40 

14 cases Yarmouth corn 26 60 

8 cases Gilt-edge peaches 21 60 

1 case Bartlett pears 2 80 

2 cases Bahama p. apples 7 00 

2 cases Stand, gooseberries 2 70 

1 doz. L. & P. sauce 2 90 

I bbl. herring 72 

53i gal. silver drip syrup 7 49 

^ bbl. Dingee pickles . • • 2 25 

Total $260 44 

VOUCHER No. 98. SWIFT BROS. 

618 lbs. bacon $43 26 

482 lbs. spare ribs 24 10 

235 lbs. ham 21 15 

374 lbs. sausage 21 84 

275 lbs. lard 16 5© 

390 lbs. bologna 19 50 

40 lbs. p. loin 2 20 

25 lbs. d. beef 2 50 

Total $151 05 

Less difference paid Kingan on 96 lbs. sausage 96 

Total 150 09 

VOUCHES No. 99. JOHN O'NEILL. 

1,200 lbs. feed meal $7 80 

2,300 lbs. bran 13 80 

500 lbs. corn meal 3 75 

20 bbls. winter wheat flour 65 00 

6 bbls. spring wheat flour 23 10 

Total . . $113 45 

Less 26 empties returned 5 20 

Total 108 25 



115 



VOUCHER No. 100. ELGEN DAIRY CO. 
960 lbs. butterine 186 40 



Total $86 40 

VOUCHER No. 101. A. JORDAN CO. 

522 lbs. chicken 152 22 

28 Ibe. turkey 3 09 

178 1bs. cheese . ... • 19 58 

Total 74 89 

VOUCHER No. 102. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

670 lbs. white fish $51 30 

17^ gals. Standard oysters . 14 63 



Total 65 93 

VOUCHER No. 103. WHEN CLOTHING CO. 

4 uniform suits $38 40 

1 uniform suit . . 11 60 

1 uniform suit , 6 35 



Total 66 35 

VOUCHER No. 104. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
42,500 cubic ft. gas, at $1.25 per 1,000 $53 13 



Total 53 IJ 



VOUCHER No. 105. GEO. HITZ & CO. 

6,300 lbs. potatoes $29 41 

6 doz. celery 2 10 

8 bbls. cabbage 8 00 

1 bbl sweet potatoes 3 00 

2 bbls. onions 2 50 

1 bbl. apples • . • 2 25 

1 box lemon-i 2 75 

1 bunch bananas 75 

Total 50 76 

VOUCHER No. 106. INDIANAPOLIS WATER CO. 

Use of fire hydrants from October 31, 1894, to October 31, 

1895, as per agreement $50 00 

Total 50 00 



116 



VOUCHER No. 107. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

2 boxes Babbitt's soap 

3 boxes 5c. Ivory soap . . . . 

1 box Brook's crystal soap 

2 boxes pearline 

1 doz. R. S. stove polish 

1 doz. 14 oz. cotton mops 

2 doz. No. 1 brooms 

1 doz. 3 hoop pails 

2 doz. fiber pails 

6 doz. Mason's No. 4 blacking 

100 lbs. lump starch , 

1 box red seal lye 

Total $47 46 



VOUCHER No. 108. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
240 doz. eggs , $43 20 



$7 50 


12 00 


3 50 


7-50 


50 


1 75 


3 30 


1 30 


1 58 


2 28 


2 50 


3 75 



Total 43 20 



VOUCHER No. 109. HOOSIER MFG. CO. 

10 gal. dynamo oil $2 80 

1,202 lbs. laundry soap 39 06 

10 lbs. white cotton waste . . 1 00 

Total 42 86 

VOUCHER No. 110. LOUIS HILDEBRAND. 

1 pair shoes for county pupil $2 25 

5 pair shoes for county pupils 10 00 

5 pair shoes for county pupils 8 75 

33 pair shoes repaired for county pupils 10 25 

Total 31 25 

VOUCHER No. 111. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

24—25 C. P. lamps $5 28 

24—16 C. P. lamps 4 68 

24—32 C. P. lamps 7 92 

12—32 C. P. lamps series 3 96 

Total 21 84 



117 

VOUCHER No. 112. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

2J doz. Prang's No. 3 Drawing $2 50 

2f doz. Prang's No. 5 Drawing 2 75 

3J doz. Prang's No. 7 Drawing 7 00 

5 sheets 30x40 50-lb. paper 10 

1 gross No. 428 tablets 3 75 

12 gross Spencerian pens 8 64 

6 gross Ladies' FaJcon 2 70 

6 doz. No. 54 tablets 2 40 

$29 84 

Cr. by Spencerian pens returned , 8 64 

Total $21 20 

VOUCHER No. 113. THOS. C. WARLEY & CO. 

206 lbs. boiler compound $20 60 

Less drayage 50 

Total 20 10 

VOUCHER No. 114. JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 

Subscription daily and Sunday Journal, October 31, 1895, to 

October 31, 1896 $20 00 

Total 20 00 

VOUCHER No. 115. McCOY-HOWE CO. 

1 oz. antikamnia tl 00 

5 oz. P. & W. quinine 1 85 

1,000 capsules No. 2 75 

2 lb. powder«^d borax 20 

1 oz. oil cloves 10 

5 lbs. White Petrolateum 80 

2 lbs. castor oil • 35 

2 lbs. absorbent cotton 60 

1 lb. chloroform 68 

1 lb. carbonate ammonia ■ 15 

1 lb. F. E. squills 55 

1 lb. muriate ammonia 18 

J doz. Steam's cascara arom , 3 60 

2 lbs. elix. purgans 1 42 

1 lb. syr. dovers powder 57 

2 lbs. syr. tolu 75 

2 gal. rock candy syr 45 

1 lb. syr. ipecac 60 

2 lbs. syr. squills 85 

^ doz. chloride lime 18 

1 lb. golden liq. hydrastis 1 25 

2 lbs. sulphur 08 

6 ozs. P. & W. quinine 1 87 

Total 18 83 



118 



VOUCHEE No. 116. PETER F. BRYCE. 
338 lbs. butter crackers |17 74 

Total $17 74 

VOUCHER No. 117. O. C. KUETEMEYER. 
200 lbs. boiler compound $15 00 

Total 15 00 

VOUCHER No. 118. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

2 doz. mitts $4 00 

3 gross shoe laces 1 35 

4 doz. hdks 1 60 

1 bale cotton batting . . 3 75 

40 yds. brown canton • 2 50 

Total 13 20 

VOUCHER No. 119. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

5 doz. Monroe ax handles $1 25 

2 doz. O. K. pairers 75 

1 American meat chopper 9 00 

1 No. 36 brass oil can 85 

3 harness snaps 08 

Total 11 93 

VOUCHER No. 120. W. B. BURFORD. 

1 mem. vowel index $1 50 

6 sheets carbon 36 

200 page condemage book 5 00 

1 rubber ruler 20 

1 book, 120 receipts 30 

1 bill head holder 50 

Wiring, stitching and trimming 150 pamphlets 39 

Folding, stitching and trimming histories 78 

Total 9 03 

VOUCHER No. 121. WAYNE & BROEKI>fG CO. 

^ doz. 4 qt. granite tea pots |2 60 

2 sq. pans for steam table 3 00 

2 14-in. frying pans 2 80 

Total 8 40 



119 

VOUCHER No. 122. E. C. ANDREWS. 

200 lbs. granulated soap chips $8 00 

Total 18 00 

VOUCHER No. 123. H. A. WRIGHT. 

60 lbs. home-made mince meat $5 71 

6 lbs. Imperial home made mince meat 1 00 

Total 6 71 

VOUCHEE No. 124. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

300 No. 1 chromo folders $8 75 

li ream 24x36—30 pt 1 00 

22 sheets 50 drab cover 23 

625 sheets 24x36—30 pt 1 27 

8 sheets 50 assorted cover 5 

Total 6 30 

VOUCHER No. 125. BURRIS-HERZSCH CO. 

idoz. No. 766 journals $0 67 

1 doz. No. 822 index 10 

2 reams 14 foolscap paper 4 50 

100 school sponges 65 

Total 5 92 

VOUCHER No. 126. E. A. FAY. 

To Amer. annals for year 1896 $90 90 

Less 170 pts. annals sent E. A. F 85 00 

Total 5 90 

VOUCHER No. 127. FROMMEYER BROS. 

i doz. bowls $0 68 

1 doz. butter plates 45 

1 doz. pickle dishes 1 20 

2 doz. fruit saucers 60 

1 doz. vegetable dishes , 2 25 

Total 6 18 



120 

VOUCHEE No. 128. MICA ROOFING CO. 
50 lbs. Athsenon $5 00 



Total $5 00 

VOUCHER No. 129. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

2 bbls. apples $4 50 

Total 4 80 

VOUCHER No. 130. A. A. HELSTERN. 

1 long T. center $1 20 

4-1-6 boom 2 35 

4 joints stove pipe, 1 elbow and collar 65 

1 damper . 20 

Total 4 40 

VOUCHER No. 131. THOS. P. KEAN. 

2 suits underwear $1 00 

12 pair suspenders 1 20 

48 handkerchiefs 1 92 



Total 4 12 

VOUCHER No. 132. L. T. F. ZAISER. 

4 stamps |1 40 

1 pad ■ 35 

1 set rubber dates 1 00 

4 line stamps 40 

Total 3 15 

VOUCHER No. 133. NEW YORK STORE. 

2 chamois skins $0 59 

10 yards muslin 1 90 

Total 2 40 

VOUCHER No. 134. FRANK DELL. 

5 pieces 6-inch flue pipe $1 75 

1 piece 6-inch top 65 

Total « 40 



121 



VOUCHER No. 135. CHAS. J. KUHN CO. 

5 gal. cider $1 30 

3 chickens 1 00 

Total |2 30 

VOUCHER No. 136. KIPP BROS. 

1 lot beads $1 00 

3 doz. toilet soap 1 20 

Total 2 20 

VOUCHER No. 137. H. LIEBER CO. 

6 bunches charcoal $0 90 

1 box pastel 60 

Total $1 50 

Less 20 per cent 30 

4 doz sheets charcoal paper $1 20 

Less 20 per cent 24 

96 

Total 2 16 

Total bills allowed February 6, 1896 $5,055 30 



$1 20 



Bills Allowed March 5, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 138. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



February Pay-Roll. 

R. O. Johnson Superintendent 

John E. Lockridge Physician . 

M. H. Fields Phytiician . 

Wm. E. Todd Bookkeeper 

Sarah C. Peters Matron . . 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 

Jean Cummings ........ Clerk . . . 

Wm. H. Latham Instructor. 

N. B. McKee Instructor . 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor . 

S. J. Vail Instructor . 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor . 

August Jutt Instructor . 

N. F. Morrow Instructor . 

Orson Archibald Instructor . 

Albert Berg Instructor . 

Albert Berg Librarian . 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor. 



$166 66 

22 00 

22 00 

60 GO 

33 33 

25 00 

30 00 

125 00 

125 00 

125 00 

83 33 

83 33 

83 33 

83 33 

68 33 

75 00 

8 00 

75 00 



122 



VOUCHER No. 138- Continued. 



E. J. Hecker Instructor 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S.J. Corwin Instructor 

Ida Kinsley. . Instructor 

Eva Heizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor 

Letitia Booth . Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 

Nora V. Long. ........ Instructor 

Frances Thompson. ...... Instructor 

Mary Corwin . . Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . 

James Vahey Boys. Supervisor. . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor. . . 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Mary Diffley Nurse. - 

S. Brandenburg ,..,.... Watchwoman . . . . 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 

Thos. Marshall Assistant Engineer . . 

Chaa. Friedgen Electrician 

Chas. Howard Carpenter 

Wm. Langstaff Florist and Gardener 

Wm. G Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer. ..••.. 

W. A. Johaneen Laborer 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

Chas. Kissling Watchman 

John Boehm Baker. 

Wm. HoUowell First Cook 

Jos. Skinner Second Cook 

Bridget Wade Third Cook 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 

Kate Stratton Laundress 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 

Ella Cronin Laundress 

Anna Linhun Chambermaid . . . . 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid . . . . 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid . . . . 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid . . . . 

Julia Doherty Waitress ...... 

Lillie Kelley Waitress 

Kate Boehm Waitress 

Delia Calter Waitress 

Ella Morarity Waitress 

Julia Shea Waitress 



$50 00 


79 


16 


58 


33 


50 


00 


50 


00 


56 


66 


52 


50 


48 


33 


48 


sa 


58 


33 


60 00 


40 


00 


50 00 


50 00 


20 


00 


20 00 


20 00 


25 00 


20 00 


65 


00 


30 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


75 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 00 


30 


00 


45 00 


40 


00 


25 00 


15 


00 


16 


00 


14 00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 00 


14 00 


14 00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 00 



Total 



$2,820 28 



123 



VOUCHER No. 139. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Month as Follows : 

4:h lbs. yeast, January 

4 loaves bread . . 

T. L. Brown, 2 bedstead?, 2 mattresses 

T. C. Grooms, expenses as Trustee, 3 meetings, 1-2, 1-31, 2-6 
S. A. Bonnor, 5 meeting?, 10-31, 12-5, 1-9, 1-31, 2 6 .... 

C. Staut, l^'u%"^ tons mix. hay 

H. Holtzhausen, HJPrf tons timothy hay 

W. G. Dawson, 40^ bu. corn 

14 boys (pupils) for working on ice 

Indianapolis city directory, 1896 

4 lbs. butter on market 

500 postals for school use 

50 Ic. stamps 

100 2c. envelopes 

Subscription to Sun, 2 copies, 1-20 to 3-20 

Subscription to Independent, 1 copy, 1 year 

5 hanks clock cord ... 

Electrotyped small form letter head . . 

W. U. Tel. Co., February telegraphage 

William Rogers, assistant milking, February 

Paid balance due on books as follows : 



H. Techentin & Co., harness repairs .... 

Institute for Blind, 2 brooms 

Dedrick & Sudbrock, hooda 

H. P. Wasson, fascinators . ... 

Eastman, Schleicher & Lee, window brackets 

E. Keller, bluing 

F. G. Carter, medicine 

N. S. Driggs, roach powder 



Total . 



$1 


12 




20 


2 


00 


7 


20 


14 


50 


11 


45 


23 


62 


10 91 


10 


50 


5 


00 


1 


00 


5 


GO 




50 


2 


16 


1 


00 


4 


00 




15 




50 




46 


1 


50 




75 




50 


1 


75 


1 


00 




30 


1 


00 


1 


25 




85 



LIO 17 



VOUCHER No. 140. STANDARD OIL CO. 

18,128 gallons fuel oil $416 95 

Total 



416 95 



VOUCHER No. 141. KINGAN & CO. 



4,683 lbs. beef $229 58 

448 lbs. veal 32 48 

Total 



262 06 



124 

VOUCHER No. 142. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

1,096 lbs. Ideal C sugar $50 42 

336 lbs. fine granulated 17 57 

50 lbs. powdered sugar 2 74 

40 lbs. imperial tea. . . 8 80 

303 lbs. H. P. beans 6(6 

2 bags hominy 1 85 

50 lbs. J. peaches. 2 38 

125 lbs. 90s California prunes 5 31 

100 lbs. rice 4 75 

36 lbs. Rex baking powder 4 50 

15 lbs. B. soda 30 

10 lbs. black pepper 1 00 

10 lbs. ground mustard 1 00 

10 sacks salt ;0 

2 lbs. Brown's extract lemon . 1 60 

1 lb. Brown's extract vanilla 1 25 

9 ca-es Yarmouth corn 18 00 

7 cases Sunset peaches 21 00 

2 cases Bartlett pears 5 80 

4 cases 3-lb. pumpkins 4 40 

2 cases Johnson pineapple 7 00 

^ doz. L. & P. pauce , 1 35 

2 doz. imported sardines 2 80 

^ bbl. No. 1 herring 75 

2 half bbls. Dingee pickles 4 20 

45 gals, vinegar 4 05 

55i gals. Rose syrup 7 77 

1 bbl. lake salt 85 

132 lbs Golden Rio coffee 25 08 

127 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 24 13 

Total $237 01 

VOUCHER No. 143. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

360.1bs. lard $26 10 

585 lbs. breakfast bacon 49 75 

54 lbs. dried beef 5 40 

377 lbs. S. ribs 22 62 

69 lbs. pork loins 5 18 

400 lbs. sausage 26 00 

96 lbs. ham . 8 88 

Total 143 93 

VOUCHER No. 144. A. JORDAN CO. 

970 lbs. butterine $87 30 

151 lbs. cheese 16 61 

252 doz. eggs 32 76 

Total 136 67 



125 



VOUCHEE No. 145. BLANTON MILLING CO. 

39 bbls. flour $131 55 

Less 36 empties returned 8 70 



Total $122 85 

VOUCHER No. 147. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

159 lbs. turkey . $23 85 

655i lbs. chicken 78 66 



Total 102 51 

VOUCHER No. 148. HENRY SYERUP CO. 

7 bbls. cabbage ... 

2 bbls. onions 

1 bbl. 8. potatoes 

3 bbls turnips 

3 bbls apples 

6,430 bu. potatoes 

^ box lemons 

172 bunches bananas 

2 doz. celery 



$12 


25 


3 


15 


3 50 


2 


25 


7 


50 


30 


01 


1 


25 


17 


50 




60 



Total 78 01 

VOUCHER No. 148. WHEN CLOTHING CO. 

1 pair pants 

2 uniform suits 

2 uniform suits 

2 coats, vests and caps 

11 caps 



14 50 


19 


20 


23 


20 


15 


50 


5 


50 



Total 67 90 

VOUCHER No. 149. SCHNULL & CO. 

1 doz. 8 oz. dressing 

2 boxes Bab. soap 

3 boxes 5c Ivory soap ... 

3 boxes Pearline 

1 Red Seal lye 

100 lbs. lump starch 

3 gross Home safety matches 

2 doz. 14-oz. mops 

4 doz. carpet brooms . 

1 doz. carpet brooms , 



$1 


35 


8 


00 


12 00 


11 


25 


3 75 


2 


50 


1 


95 


3 


60 


7 


00 


2 


25 



Total 53 65 



126 



VOUCHER No. 150. E. C. ANDREWS. 

1,276 lbs. borax flake soap $51 04 

Total $51 04 

VOUCHER No. 151. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

475 lbs. white fish $37 60 

10|^ gal. standard oysters .... 7 18 

Total 44 78 

VOUCHER No. 152. LOUIS HILDEBRAND. 

4 pair shoes for county pupils $7 00 

6 pair shoes for county pupils . . . 12 00 

1 pair shoes for county pupil 2 25 

61 pairs shoes repaired for county pupils 22 55 

Total 43 80 

VOUCHER No 153. INDIANAFOLIS GAS CO. 

31,200 cubic ft. gas at $1.25 per M $39 00 

Total 39 00 

VOUCHER No. 154. NOEL BROS. 

2,000 lbs. bran $12 00 

1,000 lbs. feed meal 7 00 

500 lbs. corn meal 5 25 

Total 24 25 

VOUCHER No. 155. PARROTT & TAGGART. 

360 lbs. butter crackers $19 80 

Total 19 80 

VOUCHER No. 156. ALBANY PERF. WRAPPING PAPER CO. 

1 case Diamond toilet paper $18 00 

Total 18 00 

VOUCHER No. 157. H. C. WRIGHT CO. 

30 lbs. mince meat $2 85 

231 lbs. apple butter 15 02 

Total 17 87 

VOUCHER No. 158. O. C. KUETEMEYER. 

1 bbl. boiler compound $15 00 

Total 15 00 



/ 



127 



VOUCHER No. 159. McCOY-HOWE CO. 

1 lb. tincture ginger $0 40 

10 oz. P. & W. quinine 3 70 

1 lb. bay rum 45 

1 lb. oil sweet almond 50 

1 lb. carbolic acid 27 

500 compound cathartic pills 42 

1 doz. medicine droppers 25 

3 doz. Benson's capsine plasters 3 50 

4 doz. 1-oz. rd. vials ... 53 

4 doz. ^-oz. rd. vials 47 

4 doz. 2-oz. rd. vials 67 

5 lbs. white petrolatum 80 

1 gal. whisky 1 75 

3 lbs. Tripoli 18 

Total 



$13 89 



VOUCHER No. 160. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 



1 doz. shirts . . . . 
1 doz. socks . . . . 
41J yds. glass cloth 
52^ yds. ticking . . 

' Total . . . . 



$2 75 

70 

2 87 

6 50 



12 82 



VOUCHER No. 161. J. C. TARKINGTON. 

10 gal. chloronaptholine $12 50 

Total 



12 50 



VOUCHER No. 162. L. A. GRINER. 

To medicine 

Visit and medicine 

Horse to infirmary and return • • 

Total 



II 00 
1 50 
7 50 



10 00 



VOUCHER No. 163. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 case Hoyt toilet paper $8 50 

Total 



8 50 



128 



VOUCHER No. 164. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1 10-inch Wilson knife $0 51 

1 12-inch butcher chopper 83 

2 28- inch saw blades 88 

2 22-inch saw blades 65 

1 22-inch poplar chopping bowl 75 

2 can openerg IS 

1 8-ft. shelf ladder 2 00 

50 lbs. of crow bars 2 38 

Total $8 16 



VOUCHEE No. 165. JOS. GARDNER. 

New bottom in boiler, etc $1 00 

New bottom in large pan 75 

Putting handles on boilers 10 

2 30-qt. di^h pans 1 60 

1 4x vegetable boiler 2 60 

2 granite iron sauce pans 1 40 

Total 7 45 



VOUCHER No. 166. W. B. BURFORD. 

1 book 300 lith. checks . . ! $5 00 

10 qr. cap journal, plain 1 90 

1 index 25 

Total 7 15 



VOUCHER No. 167. NEW YORK STORE. 

4 chamois skins $1 40 

18 yds. P. C. muslin $2 25 

10 yds. P. C. muslin 1 80 

8 yds. muslin 68 

$4 73 

Less 10 per cent 47 

4 26 

15 yds. calico 90 

Total 6 56 



VOUCHER No. 168. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

4 doz. 8in. shades . . $4 80 

30 2^-in. shade holders 1 05 

Total 5 85 



129 

VOUCHER No. 169. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

275 sh. 32x44 80 1 tint, cut $2 74 

140 sh. 22x32 40 2 book ... 66 

1 rm. 28x42 cherry poster 1 70 

17 sh. 120 tag, cut 30 



Total $5 40 



VOUCHER No. 170. KIPP BEOS. 

2 doz. No. 426 hair brushes $4 00 

2f doz. domino masks 85 

i doz. assorted masks . 10 



Total 4 95 

VOUCHER No. 171. FROMMEYER BROS. 

1 doz. veg. dishes 

3 doz. heavy tumblers 

1 yellow bowl 

1 doz. knives 

Total 4 65 

VOUCHER No. 172. YULE & HARTMAN. 

8 new shoes $3 00 

2 new shoes and 4 old reset 1 25 



12 


25 


1 


05 




50 




85 



Total 4 25 



VOUCHER No. 173. BAKER & THORNTON. 

2 pkgs. parquetry No. 2018 $0 70 

2 pkgs. parquetry No. 2128 •■ 70 

3 pkgs. folding, 210-440 36 

3 qts. Haley's ink 1 80 



Total 3 56 



VOUCHER No. 174. H. L LEBER CO. 

6 Monarch boards |3 60 

Less 20 per cent 72 



Total . . . 
9 D. and D. 



130 

VOUCHER No. 175. HOOSIER MFG. CO. 

5 gal. engine oil $1 40 

3 gal. Ex. B. cylinder oil . . 1 20 

Total $2 60 

VOUCHER No. 176. AUSTIN & SON. 

20J lbs. sausage $2 05 

2 lbs. pork chops 20 

Total 2 25 

VOUCHER No. 177. SCHWEIKLE & PRANGE. 

Clips, hooks and fitting double-tree $1 00 

2 new platform clips 75 

Welding tongue, iron 25 

Total . . . 2 00 

VOUCHER No. 178. FRA.NCKE & SCHINDLER. 

J gross screw tips $1 43 

Total 1 43 

Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 $4,952 38 



Bills Allowed April 9, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 179. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

March Pay- Roll. 

R. O. Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Physician 22 00 

William E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin ....... Housekeeper ...... 25 00 

Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

William H. Latham Instructor 125 00 

N. B. McKee Instructor 125 00 

William H. DeMotte Instructor 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor. . 83 33 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor . 83 33 

August Jutt Instructor 83 33 

N. F. Morrow Instructor 83 33 

Orson Archibald Instructor ....... 68 33 

Albert Berg , Instructor 75 00 

Albert Berg Librarian 8 00 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 75 00 



181 



VOUCHER No. 179— Continued. 



E. J. Hecker Instructor 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

EvaHeizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 

Nora V. Long ........ Instructor 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Mary Corwin Instructor 

M M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor . . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor . . 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Mary Ditfley Nurse 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman . . . 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 

Thomas Marshall Engineer assistant . . 

Charles Friedgen Electrician . . . . 

Charles Howard ....... Carpenter 

William Langstatf Florist and Gardener 

W. G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 

W. A. Johanson Laborer 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

Charles Kissling Watchman 

John Boehm Baker 

William Hallowell First Cook 

Jos. Skinner Second Cook . . . . 

Bridget Wade Third Cook 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook . . . . 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 

Kate Stratton Laundress . . . . . 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 

Ella Cronin Laundress . . . . . 

Anna Linhun Chambermaid . . . . 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid . . . . 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid . . . . 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid . . . . 

Julia Doherty ....... Waitress 

Lillie Kelley Waitress . . - . . . 

Kate Boehm Waitress 

Delia Caller . Waitress 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress 

Julia Shea Waitress 



$50 


00 


79 


16 


58 


33 


50 


00 


50 


00 


56 


66 


52 


50 


48 


33 


48 


33 


58 


33 


60 


00 


40 00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 


OO 


25 


00 


20 


00 


65 


00 


30 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


75 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 


06 


20 


00 


30 


00 


45 


CO 


40 00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


16 


00 


14 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


14 00 


14 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 



Total $2,820 28 



132 

VOUCHER No. 180. E. O. JOHNSON, SQP'T. 

Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Month as Follows: 

2 lard cans |0 50 

8^ Iba. yeast, February and March 2 13 

3 lbs. hops 1 05 

8 lbs. malt 40 

Asst. cakes ; 68 

15 oz. flavoring ext. powder 1 66 

l|ff § tons clover hay , . 17 76 

laWo tons clover hay 15 23 

1^0 00 tons clover hay 17 76 

1^q\% tons timothy hay 17 68 

33x\ bu. corn 9 29 

40f bu. corn II 40 

150 2-cent stamps 3 00 

200 double postals for close of school 4 00 

2 castings for cutting box 50 

Express on castings 25 

500 postals for school use 5 00 

W. U. telegraphage, March 1 75 

4 garden rakes 2 00 

2 garden rakes 80 

Paris green for florist. . . 15 

Screws for florist 06 

B. King, difference in exchanging cows 10 GO 

Car-fare. . 10 

Freight on soap from Pittsburg 25 

2 gal. cider 30 

2 pounds baking soda 10 

Freight on toilet paper and fixtures from Chicago 61 

2 Clipper springs 10 

2 bottles machine oil 20 

2 stable brooms 60 

Total 1125 80 

VOUCHER No. 181. CONSUMERS' GAS TRUST CO. 

Fuel gas under 4 boilers from October, 1895, to April 30, 

1896—7 months $1,939 00 

For same in grates, ranges, etc., for year ending September 

30, 1896 535 00 

Total $2,474 00 

Less credit — 
For fuel oil, 38,102 gal., paid for by the Institution 

for November 1, 1895, to February 2, 1896 . . . $869 10 
For fuel oil, 23,183 gal., i paid for by the Institu- 
tion for February 2 to March 15, 1896 273 26 

1,142 36 

Total 1,331 64 



133 



VOUCHER No. 182. SWIFT BROS. 

4,393 Ibp. beef $234 41 

720 lbs. B. bacon 57 60 

330 lbs. lard 21 45 

511 lbs. veal 37 04 

516 lbs. S. ribs 33 55 

365 lbs. sausage 23 73 

200 lbs. ham 18 00 

39 lbs, dr. beef 3 51 

50 lbs. pork loin 4 51 

5 lbs. tenderloins 1 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 183. STANDARD OIL CO. 

17,141 gal. fuel oil $414 81 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 184. KRAGREYNOLDS CO. 

54 lbs. Rex B. powder $7 20 

1,425 lbs. Ideal C sugar 64 69 

338 lbs. gran, sugar 17 62 

50 lbs. powd. sugar 2 83 

127 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 23 50 

65 lbs. Imperial tea 11 70 

75 lbs. head rice 3 75 

174 lbs. Cal. prunes 6 96 

64 lbs Cal. evap. peaches „ . 3 20 

287 lbs. H. P. beans 5 74 

200 lbs. hominy 2 00 

15 lbs. grd. pepper '...., 1 50 

12 lbs. Baker's chocolate 3 96 

2 lbs. Brown's ex. lemon 2 00 

2 lbs. Brown's ex. vanilla 2 00 

10 lbs. Pearl barley 30 

10 lbs. grd. sage 1 50 

50 lbs. table salt 30 

7 cases Cal. peaches 16 80 

2 cases Cal. pears 6 00 

9 cases Yarmouth corn 17 10 

1 case pine apples - 3 80 

1 doz. L & P. sauce 2 65 

1 case Keystone dressing 2 70 

1 doz. imp. sardines 1 50 

10 lbs. boneless codfish , 60 

53 gal. N. O. molasses 14 84 

5I2 gal. honey syrup 7 73 

2 ^-bbls. Dinges pickles 4 00 



$434 80 



414 81 



i;>4 

VOl'c'HKK No. 1 SI— Continued. 

A bbl, ex, iiu-As uiaokoivl $;^ 7o 

■: bbW. hiko s;ilt 1 90 

b o.-ist-s u.'iUon .'tpple,-! 10 'Hi 

loO lb;--. Cioldon Kio L'ortVe 26 35 

i^ CflSOS g:\]. pio po:u'hos 12 50 

S lb#, In-own'sox, vanilbi 3 00 

'2 lbs. Rrown'^ ox. louion '2 00 

rot.'il $:197 47 

VOrCUKK No. 155. El.iUN PAIHY CO. 

l,WS1b* bnlterino -fltU 'JS 

Total 191 2? 

VOl'CHKK No, ISb. JOHN O'NKILL. 

:>P bbls. dour -^141 90 

j bb!. Pillsburv dour 1 10 

Toi;il $14S 00 

l,e?.s 39 empties returued 7 80 

Total 1S5 20 

VOl'CHKK No. is:. A, JORDAN CO. 

52'- lb?, ohioken fti2 (^4 

47 lb,*, turkey 7 Or. 

114 lb?, cheese 1 1 97 

Total SI 66 

VOL'CHKR N'o. ISS. K. H. KKES. 

S bbls. oabbaoe S14 00 

2 bbls. spi les 6 50 

1(1 buu. ban-inas 16 CO 

2 bb's. turnips 1 20 

1 bbl. s. potatoes 3 25 

1 bbl. ouious 1 75 

■; box leuions 1 oS 

b9 bu. potatoes 17 25 

Total 61 33 

VOUCHEK No. 1S9. E, C. ANDREWS. 
1.345 lbs, gran, soap chips $53 80 

Total 53 SO 



185 



VOUCHER No. 190. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1 gross shoe laces $0 43 

3 doz. combs . 2 70 

1 doz, napkins 3 00 

7 doz. napkins 13 30 

19 yds. bleached damask 19 00 

18s yds. bleached damask 13 78 



$7 50 


8 75 


14 00 


16 15 



Total • • • $52 21 



VOUCHER No. 191. LOUIS HILDEBRA-ND. 

5 pairs shoes for county pupils 

5 pairs shoes for county pupils 

7 pairs shoes for county pupils 

43 pairs shoes repaired for county pupils 

Total 46 40 



VOUCHER No. 192. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 

2 doz. Electro Silicon 

1 doz. Sapolio 

2 boxes Pearline 

2 boxes Babbitt's soap 

3 boxes 5c Ivory soap 

40 lbs. Star candles 

1 doz. R. R. Rcrub brushes 

2 doz. brooms 

1 doz. 14-oz. cotton mops 

2 doz. whisk brooms 

100 lbs. lump starch 

Total 42 34 



VOUCHER No. 193. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

31,000 cubic feet gas at $1.25 M $38 75 

Total 38 75 

VOUCHER No. 194. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

282 doz, eggs $31 02 

Total 31 02 



$1 60 


83 


7 50 


8 00 


12 00 


3 30 


50 


3 00 


1 25 


1 60 


2 76 



136 



VOUCHEE No. 195. HUNTINGTON SEED CO. 



1 lb. sweet peas 

300 tuberoses 

50 calladiums 

1 doz. Impomea Pondurate . 
1 qt. stringless beans . . . . 
1 qt. Golden Wax beans . . 
1 lb. beets . . . . . 

4 lbs. Mangelwurzel beets . . 
8 oz. cabbage ...... 

^ lb. cabbage 

3 pbg. carrots 

1 gal. corn 

1 qt. corn 

1 lb. cucumbers ....... 

1 pkg. egg planf, 

8 oz. lettuce 

2 pkgs. muskmelon . . . . 
1 bu. bottom onion sets . . . 

1 bu. bottom onion sets, red . 

2 pk. peas 

3 pkgs peppers 

1 lb. parsnip 

1 lb. pumpkin 

1 lb. radish 

8 oz. squash ........ 

8 oz. tomato seed 

45 pkgs. assorted flower seed 

4 oz. assorted flower seed . . 



Total 



10 75 


2 40 


2 50 


50 


35 


60 


45 


1 20 


85 


1 13 


10 


40 


15 


50 


5 


40 


7 


3 00 


2 50 


2 00 


12 


30 


40 


50 


20 


80 


2 94 


4 35 



129 51 



VOUCHEE No. 196. NEW YOEK STOEE. 



2 chamois skins 

1 cocoa mat 

1 cocoa mat 

3 pair lace curtains 

1 pair lace curtains 

2f yds. linen 

12 yds. P. Casino muslin $1 56 

8 yds. muslin 80 



Total $2 36 

Less 23 



6| yds. cheese cloth 
9 doz. safety pins 



|0 48 
1 35 
1 35 

18 00 

3 00 

94 



2 13 

62 
49 



Total 



28 36 



137 
VOUCHER No. 197. J. R. RYAN & CO. 



2,000 lbs. bran . . . 
1,000 lbs. feed meal. 
200 lbs. corn meal . 



$13 00 


6 50 


1 60 



Total $21 10 

VOUCHER No. 198. PETER F. BRYCE. 
385 lbs. butter crackers $20 22 



Total 20 22 

VOUCHER No. 199. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

J rental of inetrnment, March 18 to June 17, 1896 $22 50 

Less credit for refunded rental 2 77 



Total 19 7:^ 

VOUCHER No. 200. CHAS. J. KUHN CO. 

Oranges $0 80 

Bread 15 

Honey 40 

Salmon 50 

Lettuce 30 

Pieplant 30 

Cherries 30 

Wafers 18 

Horseradish 60 

Plum pudding 60 

Lettuce 50 

Cakes 10 

Buckwheat 75 

Crabs 15 

Onions 30 

Cakes 15 

Chips . ... 30 

Olives 40 

Peaches 38 

Pineapple - 35 

Maple sugar 10 

Bread 15 . 

Parsnips . . 35 

Oranges 40 

Cakes 25 

Pieplant 25 

Cracked wheat 20 

Vinegar 60 

Horseradish 20 

Peas .... 60 

Peaches 75 

Crabs 15 

Oranges 55 



138 

VOUCHER No. 200— Continued. 

Lettuce $0 60 

Hominy 08 

Kraut 25 

Oniona • 15 

Parsnips 25 

Pieplant 25 

Radishes 10 

Cranberries 15 

Olives '80 

Plum pudding 60 

Bread 15 

Salmon . 50 

Oysters ... 20 

Sassafras • 10 

Rolled oats 50 

Horseradish 40 

Cakes 10 

Oranges < 70 

Bread 10 

Total $18 04 

VOUCHER No. 201. H. J. HEINZ. 

3 doz. 2- lb. preserves, asst 

1 doz. 10-oz. olives 

J doz. 2-lb. India relish 

J doz. 12-oz. celery sauce 

Total 16 98 

VOUCHER No. 202. McCOY-HOWE CO. 

1 lb. tinct. myrrh 

1 lb. tinct. iodine 

1 lb. gum camphor 

^ doz. bromo selzer 

1 lb. chloroform 

1 lb. quinine masque 

5 oz. P. & W. quinine . 

1,000 capsules, No. 2 

■j\ doz. Tilden's Firwein 

1 gal. alcohol 

3 cz. boracic acid 

4 oz. F. E. veratrum 

4 oz. F. E. gelseminum 

4 oz. F. E. aconite 

2 lb. elix. salicylic acid comp 

i doz. tongaline 

I doz. Merritt's prep, wool 

^ doz. Pond's Extract 

5 lbs. grd. fish berries 

Total 16 42 



$12 CO 


2 35 


1 50 


1 13 



$0 


50 




90 




65 


1 


00 




65 




50 


1 


85 




75 




80 


2 


60 




10 




25 




22 




21 


1 


50 


1 


34 


1 


20 




65 




75 



139 

VOUCHER No. 203. O. C. KUETEMEYER. 
1 bbl. boiler compound . . $15 00 



Total $15 00 



VOUCHER No. 204. MICHIGAN BRUSH CO. 

1 18-in. floor brush $3 00 

3 No. 21 wall brushes 6 00 

4 Deck scrub brushes 3 00 

2 straight closet brushes 1 50 

3 stair dusters 2 25 

1 hearth duster 1 00 

$16 75 

Less 25 per cent 4 19 

$12 56 

1 doz. Palmetto brushes 1 15 

3 extension handles 66 



Total 14 37 



VOUCHER No. 205. FRANK G. KAMFS. 

25 lbs. sturgeon $3 13 

11 gal. Standard oysters 9 81 

18 lbs. white fish 1 26 



Total 14 20 



VOUCHER No. 206. FROMMEYER BROS. 

6 1 pt. cream pitchers $0 48 

1 doz. Rogers' table spoons 4 25 

3 ewers and basins 2 50 

2 carving knives ... 1 87 

Total 9 10 



VOUCHER No. 207. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 gross 428 tablets $3 75 

3 doz. 8x12 slates 1 28 

2 gross P. C. lead pencils 80 

100 sponges 60 

1,200 slate pencils 1 50 

Total 7 93 



140 



VOUCHER No. 208. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1 parlor bellows $0 35 

2 Shnell shovels 80 

4 Shnell spades 1 60 

2 garden trowels 38 

1 doz. lawn rakes 3 60 

Total . . $6 73 

VOUCHER No. 209. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

1 2 pt. engine lubricator $5 94 

Total 5 94 

VOUCHER No. 210. H. LIEBER CO. 

6 22x27 Monarch boards |3 60 

3 doz. charcoal paper 90 

1 pastel canvass 1 10 

$5 60. 
Less 20 per cent . 1 12 

14 48 
1 ream practice paper 1 25 

Total 5 73 

VOUCHER No. 211. THOS. P. KEAN. 

28 pair hose . $5 60 

Total 5 60 

VOUCHER No. 212. HILDEBRAND HDW. CO. 

1 pat. measuring faucet .... $2 35 

1 ship scraper • 25 

2 Wileon butcher knives 40 

Total 3 00 

VOUCHER No. 213. INDPLS. ELECTRIC CO. 

8 16 c. p. 110 volt lamps $1 56 

4 16 c. p. 104 volt lamps 78 

Total 2 34 



141 

VOUCHER No. 214. .J. C. HIRSCHMAN. 
1 cotton mattress $2 20 



Total $2 20 

VOUCHER No. 215. LAZ. NOBLE CO. 

1 copy " Poor Girls Who Became Famous" 

1 copy " Notable Types of Womanhood " 

Less one-third 

Total 2 00 

VOUCHER No. 216. AMERICAN ASYLUM FOR DEAF. 

6 copies " Primer of English and American Literature " . . $3 90 

Express prepaid to secure book postage 48 

Total 4 38 



$1 50 
1 50 


$3 00 
1 (JO 



Total bills allowed April 9, 1896 $6,397 17 



Bills Allowed May 7, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 217. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

April Pay-Roll. 

R.O.Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H, Fields Physician . 22 00 

Wm. E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper ■ 25 00 

Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

W. H. Latham Instructor 125 00 

N. B. McKee Instructor 125 00 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor 83 33 

H. Bierhaus Instructor 83 33 

August Jutt Instructor 83 33 

N. F. Morrow Instructor 83 33 

Orson Archibald Instructor 68 33 

Albert Berg Instructor 75 00 

Albert Berg Librarian 8 00 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 75 00 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 50 00 



142 



VOUCHER No. 217— Continued. 



Tunis V. Archer Instructor 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S. J. Corwin . Instructor 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

Eva Heizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith ......... Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 

Nora V. Long Instructor 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Mary Corwin Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor . . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor. . . 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Mary Ditiiey Nurse 

S. Brandenburg Watch woman . . . , 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 

Thomas Marshall Engineer's Assistant . 

Charles Friedgen Electrician 

Charles Howard Carpenter 

William Langstaff. Florist and Gardener. 

William G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer . , 

W. A. Johanson Laborer. ...... 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

■Carl Brumfield Laborer . 

Charles Kissling Watchman 

John Boehm Baker 

Wm. Hallowell First Cook .... 

Joe Skinner Second Cook .... 

Bridget Wade Third Cook ..... 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook .... 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 

Kate Stratton Laundress ..... 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 

Kate Sullivan Laundress 

Anna Linhun Chambermaid .... 

Sarah R^ian Chambermaid .... 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid . . . 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid .... 

Julia Doherty Waitress 

Lilly Kelley Waitress 

Kate Boehm Waitress 

Delia Calter Waitress 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress 

Julia Shea Waitress 



$79 16 


68 


33 


50 


00 


50 00 


56 


66 


52 


50 


48 


33 


48 


33 


58 


33 


60 


00 


40 CO 


50 


00 


50 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


25 


00 


20 


00 


65 


00 


30 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


75 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


20 00 


20 00 


5 


33 


30 


00 


45 


00 


40 00 


25 00 


15 


00 


16 00 


14 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


ou 


12 


00 


14 


00 


14 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 00 



Total 



,819 61 



143 



VOUCHER No. 218. K O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid miscellaneous expense during month as follows : 

Central Union Tel. Co., toll $0 40 

Sub. Indpls. Newe, 2 copies, April 1 to June 30, 1896 ... 2 60 

Sub. Indpls. Sun, 2 copies, March 20 to May 20, 1896 ... 1 00 

Wm. Rogers, asst. milking, 50 days 2 50 

Ella Cronin, laundress, wages 1-14 5 60 

Mary White, special nurse, March 8 to April 28 52 00 

2 doz. Easter dyes 1 00 

Clipping horse 2 00 

1t(JoV tons timothy hay 19 58 

12 yds. black calico 60 

1 stove lid and lifter 15 

1 pull and screws 18 

Chloride lime 30 

Samuel Henry, 1 comb table 2 50 

1 doz. oranges 30 

1 doz. toilet soap 1 25 

500 postals for school use 5 00 

Postage stamps 1 50 

500 postals for office 5 00 

1 bottle gold paint, art room 10 

Exp. on drawing material, Chicago 55 

Car fare sending for mdse 50 

Silent Hoosier ball club 2 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 219. SWIFT BROS. 

5,630 lbs. beef 1294 41 

76 lbs. veal 5 70 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 220. KRAG-REYNOLDS CO. 

1,079 lbs. Ideal Ex. C sugar |49 74 

330 lbs. standard gran, sugar 17 69 

50 lbs. powd. sugar 2 87 

132 lbs. Golden Eio coffee 25 74 

129 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 23 22 

58 lbs. Imperial tea 8 70 

54 lbs. Rex baking powder 7 20 

10 lbs. ground ginger 1 00 

20 lbs. Pearl barley 60 

10 lbs. ground pepper 1 00 

10 lbs. rye flakes 50 

326 lbs. H. P. beans 6 52 

172 lbs. 908 California prunes 6 88 

50 lbs. Carolina rice 2 50 

63 lbs. California evap. peaches 3 16 



$106 61 



300 11 



144 



VOUCHEE No. 220— Continued. 

8 doz. Yarmouth corn $7 60 

12 doz. Stand. Cal. peaches 14 40 

4 doz. Stand. Cal. B. pears 6 00 

2 doz. Johnson pineapples 3 80 

2 doz. Stand, gallon apples , 3 50 

2 doz. Stand, gallon pie peaches 1 40 

63^- gal. syrup 8 03 

1 bbl. lake salt 95 

50 lbs. table salt , . . . 30 

2h bbls. Sq. Dingee pickles 4 00 

15 lbs. boneless codfish 90 

2 doz. Imp. sardines . . 3 00 

1 doz. Lion oysters 85 

1 doz. Moore & Brady oysters 85 

4 doz. Yarmouth corn 3 80 

4 doz. Valley peaches 4 80 



Total $221 49 

VOUCHER No. 221. INDIANA BUTTER CO. 

1,128 lbs. butterine $169 20 

Total 169 20 

VOUCHER No. 222. C. J. GARDNEE. 

91 lbs. P. loin . $6 37 

303 Jbs. saut-age 19 71 

564 lbs. B. bacon 42 31 

203 lbs. lard 13 20 

145 lbs. ham 13 05 

15 lbs. lamb 2 25 

Total ■ 96 89 

VOUCHER No. 223. JOHN ONEILL. 

26 bbls. flour $92 60 

Less 26 empties retd 5 20 

$87 40 

200 lbs. corn meal ... 1 70 

Total 89 10 



145 

VOUCHER No. 224. R. H. REES. 

6,530 lbs. potatoes $28 52 

1 bbl, onions 1 75 

12 bbl. kale 12 00 

20 bun, bananas 20 00 

1 bbl. H. potatoes . . 3 25 

9 bbls. cabbage 18 00 

1 box lemons ; 2 76 

5 lbs. lettuce 50 



Total 186 78 

VOUCHER No. 225. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 

100 lbs. lump starch 

3 boxes Babbitt's soap 

8 boxes 5c. Ivorj soap 

1 box Brook's crystal 

1 box Pearline 

6 doz. Mason blacking . 

1 doz. sho9 brushes 

J doz. fiber buckets 

1 doz. brooms 

2 doz. 14 oz. mops 

1 doz. 1776 soap powder 

343 lbs. gran, sugar 

54i gal. syrup 

Total 72 44 

VOUCHEE No. 226. LOUIS HILDEBRAND. 



$2 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


3 


75 


3 


75 


2 28 


1 


35 


1 


57 


1 


75 


2 


00 


3 


25 


19 


65 


7 


09 



5 pair shoes for county pupils 

6 pair shoes for county pupils 

15 pair shoes for county pupils .... 
5 pair shoes for county pupils .... 
32 pair shoes repaired for county pupils 



$7 


50 


10 


50 


30 


00 


11 


25 


12 


00 



Total 71 25 

VOUCHER No. 227. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

59 lbs. cheese S6 49 

612 doz. eggs . . 61 20 



Total .... 67 69 

VOUCHER No. 228. E. C. ANDREWS. 
1,400 lbs. Borax soap chips $56 00 



Total 56 00 

VOUCHER No. 229. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
33,300cubicft, gas at $1.25 per 1,000 $41 63 



Total 41 63 

10— D. and D. 



146 



VOUCHER No. 230. H. A. WRIGHT CO. 

SOO lbs. apple butter • $19 51 

50 gal. cider vinegar 5 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 231. PARROTT & TAQGART. 

420 lbs. butter crackers $23 10 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 232. HENRY RUSSE. 

2 bu. Kentucky blue grass $2 20 

30 bu. seed oats • 8 40 

2 bu. timothy 3 80 

2 bu. yellow seed corn 1 50 

1 bu. Kentucky blue grass 1 10 

I2 bu. timothy 2 85 

5 bu. seed corn 38 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 233. J. R. RYAN & CO. 

2,000 lbs. bran $13 00 

1,090 lbs. feed meal 6 50 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 234. DANIEL STEWART CO. 

2 lbs. tincture arnica $0 60 

6 oz. elix. vitrol 15 

1 lb. sweet spirits niter 30 

1 lb. menderera 30 

2 lbs. soap liniment 60 

2 bottles Steam's cascara sag 2 40 

1 yd. S. & J. plaster 38 

1 lb. muriatic acid 05 

1 lb. uva ursa 12 

2 lb. glycerine 50 

500 compound cathartic pills 93 

200 lapactic pills 76 

4 oz. cor. sub 35 

200 tablets nitro glycerine 30 

10 oz. P. & W. quinine 3 70 

1,000 capsules. No. 2 75 

2 oz. antikamnia 2 00 

1 yd. S. & J. capsine plaster 38 

Dif. exchange uva ursa 50 

Total 



$24 51 



23 10 



20 23 



19 50 



14 77 



147 



VOUCHER No. 285. JOS. GARDNER. 

New wire in strainer $0 30 

1 20 qt. porcelain kettle 1 20 

12 heavy tin milk pans 6 00 

1 potato fryer . . 4 65 

1 galv. iron drip pan 90 

Total $13 05 

VOUCHER No. 236. CHAS. J. KUHN CO, 

Apples $0 50 

Peas 1 63 

D. crabs 2 75 

Horseradish . 15 

Lettuce 20 

Radishes 25 

Pieplant ... 12 

Onions 10 

Tomatoes 35 

Oranges 50 

Radishes 25 

Almonds 28 

Apples 50 

Rye bread 10 

Boiled ham 1 38 

Pretzels 15 

Cakes 40 

Nuts - 40 

Clam chowder 50 

Bread 20 

Peaches 1 08 

Honey 20 

Pineapple 35 

Wafer crackers 25 

Total 12 59 

VOUCHER No. 237. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

10} gal. oysters $10 38 

Total 10 38 

VOUCHER No. 238. BADGER FURNITURE CO. 

Repairing spring mattress $4 45 

Repairing spring mattress 4 65 

Total 9 10 



148 

VOUCHER No. 239. R. W. GRIFFITH. 
Sharpening and repairing 2 hand lawn mowers .... 



Sharpening and repairing 1 one-horse mower '^ 

Total $9 00 



VOUCHER No. 240. G. W. SLOAN. 

2 lbs. ingectoline $1 50 

Antitoxine 5 00 

1 syringe 2 50 

Total 9 00 



VOUCHER No. 241. NEW YORK STORE. 

Shoes II 19 

Lace . . . . 50 

Lace 25 

1 pair mits - 35 

1 pair hose 25 

1 vest 17 

12 yards P. lawn 4 80 

Ij yds. ribbon 38 

IJ yds. ribbon ^3 

2^ yds. embro 72 

Total 8 94 



VOUCHER No. 242. BO WEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 lb. No. 30 erasers $1 00 

^ gross Eagle Academy pencils 1 35 

i gross No. 428 tablets 1 88 

6 gross No 181 pens 2 70 

Total 6 93 



VOUCHER No. 243. 

3 boxes water colors $1 95 

1 Whatman block 10-14 1 10 

1 doz. C. H. brushes 1 00 

Frames for oil paintings and pastel 2 25 

Total 6 30 



VOUCHER No. 244. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 

1 ice chest |6 00 

Total 6 00 



149 



VOUCHER No. 245. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

27 lbs. lettuce $2 70 

2 doz. cucumbers 1 80 

Total $4 50 

VOUCHER No. 246. McCOY-HOWE CO. 

1 qt. glycerine $0 60 

1 lb. dif^t. witch hazel 30 

1 gal. alcohol 2 65 

Total 3 55 

VOUCHER No. 247. CONSOLIDATED C. & L. CO. 

2 bbls. white sand $2 50 

Drayage . 25 

Total 2 75 

VOUCHER No. 248. THOS. P. KEAN. 

15 ydp. cambric $1 50 

Ih yds. lace 12 

7 ydp. lace 70 

Total 2 32 

VOUCHER No. 249. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

2 sh. 3-ply 1 Bristol cut $0 17 

18 sh. thick China 56 

15 sh. 25x38, 60, 2 book 40 

20 sh. No. 140 tag 38 

1,000 tags 30 

2^ lbs. cotton twine 45 

Total 2 26 

VOUCHER No. 250. YULE & HARTMAN. 

6 new shoes $2 25 

Total 2 25 

VOUCHER No. 251. ROBT. R. WALDEN & SON. 

1 Eureka post hole digger $1 00 

1 Leed's post hole digger 1 00 

Total 2 00 



Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 $4,411 83 



150 



Bills Allowed June 9, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 



252. R. O. JOHNSON, SU 

May Pay -Roll. 



R. O. Johnson 
John E. Lockridge 
M. H. Fields . . . 
Wm. E. Todd . . . 
Sarah C. Peters . . 
Mamie Coughlin . 
Jean Cummings . . 
Wm. H Latham . 
N. B. McKee . . . 
Wm. H. DeMotte . 
S. J. Vail .... 
Henry Bierhaus . . 
August Jutt . . . 
N. F. Morrow . . . 
Orson Archibald . 
Albert Berg. . . - 
Albert Berg .... 
S. W. Gilbert . . . 
E. J. Hecker . . . 
Tunis V. Archer . 
Anna Hendricks . 
S. J. Cor win . . . 
Ida Kinsley . . . 
Eva Heizler • . 
Eudora Bright . . 
Letitia Booth . . . 
Carrie Smith . . . 
Lucy Robinson 
Nora V. Long. . . 
Frances Thompson 
Mary Corwin . - . 
M. M. Clinton. . . 
James Vahey . 
Maggie McCauley . 
Alice Wilson . . . 
Mary Diffley • • 
S. Brandenbarg . . 
Louis Prinzler . . 
Thomas Marshall . 
Charles Friedgen . 
Charles Howard. . 
William Langstaff 
W. G. Falls. . . . 
Eugene Yontz. . . 
W. A. Johanson. . 
H. C. Freeman . . 



Superintendent . . . 

Physician 

Physician 

Bookkeeper 

Matron 

Housekeeper .... 

Clerk 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Librarian 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

. Instructor 

Instructor 

Instructor 

Boys' Supervisor . . . 
. Boys' Supervisor . . . 

Girls' Supervisor. . . 

Usher 

Nurse 

. Watchwoman .... 

. Engineer 

. Engineer's assistant 
. Electrician .... 

Carpenter 

. Florist and Gardener . 

. Laborer 

. Laborer 

. Laborer 

. Laborer 



PT. 



$166 66 
22 00 
22 00 
60 00 
33 33 
25 00 
30 00 
125 00 
125 00 
125 00 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
68 33 
75 00 
8 00 
75 00 
50 00 
79 16 
58 33 
50 00 
50 00 
56 66 
52 50 
48 33 
48 33 
58 33 
60 00 
40 00 
50 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
25 00 
20 00 
65 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
75 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 



151 



VOUCHER No. 252— Continued. 

Carl Brumfield Laborer $:0 00 

Charles Kissling Watchman 30 00 

John Boehm . Baker 45 00 

William Hallowell First Cook 40 00 

Joe Skinner Second Cook 25 CO 

Nora Murphy Third Cook 13 06 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook 16 00 

Mary Elstrod Laundress 14 00 

Kate Stratton. Laundress 12 00 

Mary O'Connell Laundress. . 12 00 

Kate Sullivan. Laundress 12 00 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid 12 00 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 12 00 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid ...... 12 00 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 12 00 

Julia Doherty Waitress 14 00 

Lillie Kelley Waitress 14 00 

Kate Boehne Waitrees 12 00 

Delia Calter Waitress 12 CO 

Nellie Morarity Waitress 12 00 

Julia Shea Waitress 12 00 



. Total $2,838 34 

VOUCHER No. 253. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Railroad Fares Pupils Going Home June 4, 1896, and Persons in Charge. 

Benj. Berg, Noblesville $1 65 

Lillie Imus, Plymouth 3 55 

Luemma Meek, Plymouth 3 55 

Bessie Webb, part Elwood 20 

Frank Sackett, Lagrange 5 00 

Ledger Sackett, one-half Lagracge 2 50 

Barney Street. Montpelier 2 45 

Bert Chenowith, Jonesboro 1 90 

Minnie Street, Marion 2 05 

Mertia Street, Marion 2 05 

Daisy Ferguson, Marion 2 05 

Mary Coulter, Goshen 4 25 

William Rogers, South Bend 4 25 

Arley McCormack, Kennard's . 1 05 

Lillie Wright, Brazil 1 70 

Nellie Reedy, Terre Haute 2 25 

W. O. Bippus, Terre Haute 2 25 

Charles Wallace, one-half Orleans 1 50 

Victor Evans, part Sullivan 55 

Ernest Schneider, Evansville , 5 10 

Adda Tolbert, part Evansville 75 



152 



VOUCHEE No. 253-Continued, 

N. Greenberg, one-half Evansville 

Thos. Aldredge, Erwin Station 

Wayne Polk, one-half Evansville 

Wayne Polk, cash in envelope 

Harry Arnot, Delphi 

Geo. Arnot, Delphi 

Ida Arnot, Delphi 

Wm. Gatton, Petersburg 

Minnie Gatton, one-half Petersburg 

Delia Saine, pt. Star City 

Koss Okeley, Winamac 

Josie Winans, part JeflFersonville 

Blanch R^ed, half Jeffersonville 

Iva Pridemore, Huron 

Chas. Bough, Shoals 

John Fahey, pt. Cin'ti 

Robert Morphew, North Salem 

Florence Morphew, one-half North Salem 

John Plunkett, Bernard . 

Fletcher Sackett, Ligonier 

Persons in Charge. 

W. B. McKee, K. T. Laporte 

L. Hildebrand, 1 Evansville 

O. Archibald, 1 Monon 

E. J. Hecker, E. T. Louisville 

H. Bierhaus, E. T. Vincennes 

N. F. Morrow, E. T. Milford 

Total 



$2 .55 



5 


65 


2 


55 




75 


2 


15 


2 


15 


2 


15 


3 


90 


1 


95 




10 


3 


10 


1 


25 


1 


65 


3 


40 


3 


70 


2 


80 




80 




40 




90 


4 70 


4 


40 


5 


10 


2 


85 


6 


50 


6 


50 


4 


25 



$126 80 



VOUCHEE No. 254. E. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid Miscellaneous Expenses During Month as Follows: 

W. U. Tel. Co., April telegraphage $0 75 

Printing cards for art room 1 00 

Perf. and binding book, Pres. orders 1 00 

Transportation kindtrgarten picnic 4 00 

30 Ic stamps 30 

500 2c Hlamps 10 00 

6 5c stamps . . . 3ft 

John Fahey, for Bervice as barber, February to May, 4 mos. 8 00 

Flei'^chmann, 4^ lbs. yeast, April . 113 

Fleischmann, 4^ lbs. yeast. May 1 13 

12 pkg. Housekeepers' Pride 75 

2 harness snaps 15 

Car fare account pupils and mdse 1 50 

Total 



30 01 



153 



VOUCHER No. 255. SWIFT & CO. 

6,294 lbs. beef $334 83 

575 lbs. bacon 43 19 

294 lbs. ham 26 46 

275 lbs. lard 16 50 

94^ lbs. pork loin 6 14 



Total $427 12 



VOUCHER No. 256. McCUNE-MALOTT CO. 

1,043 lbs. Ideal C sugar $53 19 

100 lbs. powd. sugar 6 98 

95 lbs. Golden Rio coffee 19 00 

122 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 21 96 

41 lbs. Imperial tea 9 02 

200 Ibo. hominy 1 SO 

3J bu. H. P. beans 3 34 

75 lbs. Carolina rice 3 38 

131 lbs. California evap. peaches 6 55 

20 Ibf-. California prunes 1 50 

54 lbs. Rex baking powder 7 56 

10 lbs. ground pepper 1 00 

3 lbs. Brown's extract vanilla 3 45 

3 lbs. Brown's extract lemon 2 40 

20 lbs. cocoanut 2 60 

10 lbs. codfish 45 

2 bbls. salt 1 90 

h doz. L. & P. sauce 1 38 

3 doz. imp. sardines 3 15 

2^ bbls. Dingee pickles 4 30 . 

9 cases Marjsville peaches 24 30 

1 case Marysville Bartlett pears 2 80 

2 cases Johnson pineapples 7 00 

9 cases Yarmouth corn 16 92 

8 cases Polk's tomatoes 12 00 

8 cases gal. apples 6 60 

2 caees cove oysters , 5 00 

I bbl. mess mackerel 3 f'O 

10 lbs. cocoanut 1 30 

50 lbs. granulated sugar 2 87 

50 lbs. green Golden Rio coffee H 00 

22 lbs. Maracaibo coffee . 3 96 . 

$250 66 

Less mdse. returned 4 75 

Total 245 91 



154 



VOUCHER J^o. 257. JOHN O'NEILL. 

2,000 lbs. bran , $13 00 

1,000 lbs. feed meal 6 50 

38 bbl. flour $136 70 

Less 88 empties returned 7 60 

129 10 

Total $148 60 



VOUCHER No. 258. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

621 lbs. hens |65 27 

70 lbs. duck 10 50 

20 spring cbickens 4 90 



Total 80 67 



VOUCHER No. 259. R. H. REES. 



2 bbl. kale . . . 
1 box lemons . . 
8 bbls. cabbage . 
142 qts. 8. berries 
16 bun. bananas . 
5,552 lbs. potatoes 
1 doz. cucumbers 



$1 20 


3 00 


16 00 


17 75 


16 00 


15 38 


90 



Total 70 23 



VOUCHER No. 260. A. JORDAN CO. 

18| lbs. s. chickens $2 21 

485 lbs. hens 55 77 

36 lbs. ducks 5 40 



Total 63 38 

VOUCHER No. 261. E C. ANDREWS. 
1,600 lbs. Borax chip soap S56 25 



Total 56 25 



155 



VOUCHER No. 262. LOUiS HILDEBRAND. 

2 pair shoes for county pupils $4 50 

16 pair shoes for county pupils 32 00 

3 pair shoes for county pupils 5 25 

1 pair shoes for county pupils 1 50 

34 pair shoes repaired for county pupils 12 40 

Total $55 65 



VOUCHEE No. 263. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1 doz. suspenders $1 50 

1 piece webb 45 

Total • |1 95 

Less 4 per cent 7 

$1 88 

4 trunks 8 00 

8 boys' waists 2 80 

3 doz shirts • , . . . 12 00 

1 doz. socks 65 

4 doz. socks 3 00 

1 doz. corsets . - 4 25 

1 gross collar buttons 30 

1 doz. suspenders 85 

5 doz. handkerchiefs 2 25 

4 doz. handkerchiefs 1 60 

3 pieces ribbon 1 80 

2 pieces webb 90 

2 pieces hat rubber 70 

1 gross shoe laces 50 

4 doz. thread 1 60 

1 gross corset laces 60 

3 doz. hose . 4 50 

1 doz. hose 1 75 

1 doz. socks 70 

3 doz. handkerchiefs 1 35 

1 doz. suspenders 2 25 

4 pieces ribbon 96 



$65 19 

Less thread $1 60 

Overcharge, 4 times 3 00 

Dif. in ribbon 96 

— = 5 56 

Total 49 63 



156 

VOUCHER No. 274. M. O'CONNEE & CO. 

2 boxes Pearline . , 

3 boxes Ivory soap 

2 boxes Babbitt's soap 

100 lbs. lump starch 

1 doz. carpet brooms 

1 doz. 3-hoop pails 

10 doz. spring clothes pins 

34 lbs. cheese 

41 lbs. cheese 

50 lbs. starch ..... 

Les3 overcharge on starch $0 37 |42 41 

Less overcharge on cheese 43 

80 





00 


12 00 


7 50 


2 


25 


2 


25 


1 


30 




50 


3 


91 


4 


20 


1 


50 



Total $41 61 

VOUCHER No. 265. LEE & CO. 
500 doz. eggs $47 60 



Total . . 47 50 

VOUCHER No. 266. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
25,500 cubic feet gas at $1.25 M $31 88 



Total 31 88 



VOUCHER No. 267. A. G. HARABAUGH. 

370 lbs. boiler compound $29 60 

Less freight and allowance 3 70 



Total 25 90 



VOUCHER No, 268. W. B. BURFORD. 

300 copies abstract of books $4 30 

1 arm rest 05 

Binding 100 4 8 p. sig. of catalogues . . 1 00 

500 page 10x12 letter book 1 70 

1,500 specifications 10 85 

25 requisition books 6 00 

$23 90 

Less deduction on condemage book (see Voucher No. 120) . 1 50 



Total 22 40 



157 



VOUCHEE No. 268. PAKROTT & TAGGART. 

360 lbs. butter crackers §19 80 

Total 



$19 80 



VOUCHER No. 269. CHAS. J. KUHN CO. 



Apples . . . 
Clam chowder 
Deviled crabs 
Asparagus 
Oranges . . . 
Radishes . . 
Almonds - . 
Rje bread 
S. beans . . 
Peas .... 
Cakes .... 
Pineapple . . 
Wafers . . . 
Nuts .... 
Clarate phos 
Walnuts . . 
Olives . . . 
Beans .... 
Apples . . . 
Tomatoes . . 
Beets .... 
Radishes . . 
Catsup . . . 
Oranges . . . 
Bread. . . . 
Horseradish . 
Spinach. . . 
Asparagus . 
Pineapple . . 
Tomatoes . . 
Bread . . . 
Peas .... 
Ginger ale . 
Wafers . . . 
Cakes .... 
Beans. • . . 
Apples . . . 
Jasamine . . 
Chicken . . . 



$0 60 
1 38 
3 75 
30 
1 00 
15 
30 
30 
20 
1 13 
60 
35 
25 
45 
25 
35 
40 
80 
60 
20 
25 
10 
25 
60 
10 
20 
20 
10 
30 
60 
25 
40 
75 
25 
25 
50 
30 
15 



Total 



19 71 



158 

VOUCHEE No. 271. JOS. GARDNER 

4 30-qt. dish pans $3 20 

1 3-gal. tin bucket 65 

4 heavy iron oven pan 8 00 

1 hotel eggbeater 1 25 

3 hotel skimmers 1 50 

3 hotel ladles 1 20 

New bottom, faucet and strainer in coffee boiler 2 05 

New bottom and rep. faucet in boiler 95 

Total $18 80 

VOUCHER No. 272. H. LIEBER CO. 

1 ream paper $1 25 

2 water colors 28 

Framing 24 pastels ... 15 60 

2 boxes wire and hooks 75 



Total 17 88 

VOUCHER No. 273, A. KIEFER DRUG CO. 

1 lb. gum camphor 

1 gal. ammonia 

1 lb. chloroform 

2 lbs. firwein 

10 oz. P. & W. quinine 

500 P. D. capsules, No. 2 

500 compound cathartic pills 

^ doz. listerine . , 

2^ lbs. glycerine 

2 lbs. soap liniment 

1 lb. tincture benzoine 

2 gals. Howard whisky 

1 lb. fluid hydrastus 

5 oz. Mex. sponge 

1 bottle ungentine 

Total 17 79 

VOUCHER No. 274. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

100 sh. 32 Ibp. amber D. C. cut 

1 M. 6J 50 lb. envelopes 

2 rma. 12 Hendson cap 

200 sh. 18x23-40 Burk cut 

800 5| bank envelopes , 

1 M. 17 lb cards 

20 sh. 6 ply Bristol cut 

20 sh. 6 ply Bristol cut 

30 sh. 25x38-60 enam. Burk cut 

Total 14 62 



$0 65 


50 


65 


1 60 


3 70 


75 


63 


1 34 


44 


90 


60 


3 00 


1 40 


63 


1 00 



m 97 


66 


3 84 


2 50 


2 40 


2 00 


1 00 


85 


40 



159 
VOUCHER No. 275. LAZ. NOBLE & CO. 

15 Bibles $9 75 

Lettering same 30 lines 4 50 

Total $14 25 

VOUCHER No. 276. H. TECHENTIN & CO. 

1 can harness dressing $0 50 

1 can carriage top dressing . 40 

1 5 ring halter 1 00 

1 can castorine 50 

4 1-inch, hames straps 70 

2 |-inch. hames straps 25 

^ doz. line snaps 25 

2 Covert breast strap snaps , 20 

IJ. I. C. bit 75 

2 new fronts in bridle 45 

2 throat ledges 30 

Eepairs on 3 bridles 75 

New ends on traces and repairs 80 

Repairing lines and crupper 30 

2 bridle bits 50 

3 bridle reins 1 50 

1 horse brush , . . 1 00 

Strap on hitching weight 50 

Total ... 10 65 

VOUCHER No. 277. SYLVIA McCORMACK. 

1 hat, Carrie Weakley $0 75 

1 hat, C. Shoptaugh 70 

1 hat, A. Hagens 1 00 

1 hat. I. Pridemore. 1 00 

1 hat, L. Imus ; . . 1 10 

1 hat, A. Ransford 70 

1 hat, A. Martin 75 

1 hat, M. Gatton 1 05 

1 hat, N. Cooper 1 08 

1 hat, M. Coulter 60 

1 hat, D. Ferguson 40 

Total 9 13 

VOUCHER No. 278. LADIES' HOME. 

1 No. 944 child's crib f8 50 

Total 8 50 



160 

VOUCHEE No. 279. BROOKS OIL CO. 

52 gal. White Seal oil $6 24 

Total 16 24 

VOUCHEE No. 280. INDIANA BUTTEE CO. 

42 lbs. butterine $5 67 

Total 5 67 

VOUCHEE No. 281. WHEN CLOTHING CO. 

1 pair pants f 1 00 

1 pair pants 50- 

7 caps 3 50 

Total 5 00 

VOUCHER No. 282. YULE & HAETMAN. 

8 new shoes $3 00 

2 new shoes and 2 old reset 1 25 

Total 4 25 

VOUCHER No. 283. NEW YORK STORE. 

18 yds. crash $1 80 

2 pieces ribbon 2 40 

Total 4 20 

VOUCHER No. 284. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

20 lbs. lettuce $1 90 

3^ doz. encumbers 1 60 

Total 3 50 

VOUCHER No. 285. CENTRAL R. & S. CO. 

1 yd. 4-4 sheeting $0 45 

4 ft. l-in. S. H. tubing 20 

1 lb. elastic bands 1 80 

Total 2 45 

VOUCHER No. 286. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

4 lbs. fin. manilla rope $0 42 

1 par. knife 40 

1 pruner 80 

^ doz lemon squeezers . . . . ^ 60 

Total 2 22 



161 



VOUCHEE No. 287. HOOSIER MANUF. CO. 

5 gals, dynamo oil $1 40 

2 gals. ex. cylinder oil 80 

Total $2 20 



VOUCHER No. 288. PRANG EDUCATIONAL CO. 

20 sh. Gray mounting board $1 40 

1 pkg. 5x5 assorted S $0 30 

1 pkg. 6x9 leading 20 

1 pkg. 6x9 intermediate 20 

1 pkg. 6x9 greys 20 

Total $0 90 

Less 20 per cent 18 72 

Total 2 12 



VOUCHER No. 289. FROMMEYER BROS. 

1 basin $0 60 

2 10 gal. jars . . , 1 40 

Total 2 00 



VOUCHER No. 290. TARVIN C. GROOMS. 

Expense as member of Board of Control February 28, 

March 5, 18, 27, April 9, 24 $16 50 

Total „ 16 50 



VOUCHER No. 291. SAMUEL A. BONNER. 

Expense as member of Board of Control March 5, 18, 27, 

April 9, 24 . . $15 30 

Total ] 5 30 



VOUCHER No. 292. FRIEDMAN MANUF. CO. 

1,118 lbs. butterine $150 93 

Less 80 lbs. returned to N. B. Groff 10 80 

Total 140 13 

Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 $4,724 79 

11— D. and D. 



162 



Bills Allowed July 15, 1896. 



VOUCHEE No. 293. R O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



June Pay- Roll. 

E. (). Johnson Superintendent . . . 

John E. Lockridge ...... Physician 

M. H. Fields Physician 

William E. Todd Bookkeeper 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper • . . . 

Jean Cummings Clerk 

W. H. Latham Instructor 

N. B. McKee Instructor 

William H. DeMotte Instructor 

S. J. Vail Instructor 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor ...... 

August Jutt ......... Instructor 

N. F. Morrow ......... Instructor 

Or^on Archibald - Instructor 

Albert Berg Instructor 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 

Anna Hendricks ...... Instructor 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

Eva Heizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Icstructor 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 

Frances Thompson ...... Instructor 

Mary Corwint Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor . . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor . . 

Mary Diffley Nurse 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman . . . . 

L. Prinzler Engineer 

Thomas Marshall Assistant Engioeer . , 

Charles Friedgen Electrician . . . . , 

Charles Howard Carpenter 

William LangstaflF Florist and Gardener , 

William G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 

W. A. Johanson Laborer ■ 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

Carl Brumfield Laborer 

Charles Kissling AVatchman 

John Boehm Baker 



$166 66 
22 00 
22 00 
60 00 
33 33 
25 00 
30 00 
125 00 
125 00 
125 00 
83 38 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
68 33 
75 00 
75 00 
50 00 
79 16 
58 33 
50 00 
50 00 
56 66 
52 50 
48 33 
48 33 
58 33 
40 00 
50 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
25 00 
20 00 
65 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
75 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
45 00 



163 



VOUCHER No. 293— Continued. 



Joe Skinner First Cook . 

Nora Murphy Second Cook 

Mary White Third Cook . 

Mary Elstrcd Laundress . 

Kate Stratton Laundresa . 

Mary O'Connell Laundress . 

Kate Sullivan Laundress . 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 

Julia Doherty Waitress . . 

Lillie Kelley Waitress . . 

Delia Calter Waitress . . 

Nellie Morarity Waitress . . 

Julia Shea Waitress . . 



$30 00 
15 00 
12 00 
14 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
14 00 
14 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 



Total 



2,701 28 



VOUCHER No. 294. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscellaneous Ex'penses During Month as Follows: 

Picture frame for M. Coulter $1 00 

Screw eyes 12 

6 tin cups 15 

Edw. Hart, 1 if ^§ tons hay 19 44 

C. Francke, 36^1 bu. corn 10 29 

C. Schwier, 2 bu. corn 70 

Fletcher Sackeit, county pupil, for railroad expense .... 50 

Car fare to station for pupils 20 

Paid expenses of persons in charge of pupils going home : 

E. J. Hecker 55 

N. B. McKee 2 00 

O. Archibald 95 

500 postals for opening school 5 00 

Paid Mary Kelly, wages, cook, .June 1 to 6 3 20 

Paid W. Hallowell, wages, cook, June 1 to 6 8 00 

Paid K. Boehm, wages, waitress, June 1 to 6 2 40 

Alice Wilson, wages, usher, June 1 to 21 14 00 

Horse nozzle 10 

Balance Due on Books : 

C. L. Wayne, churn 75 

Kipp BroH., tooth picks 75 

Bannon & Co., water cans 50 

G. W. Hoffman, metal polish 1 00 

French Chemical Co., blueing 50 

William Laurie, needles, etc. 20 

Austin & Son, berries 1 00 



164 



VOUCHER No. 294— Continued. 

H. T. Conde Co., typewriter ribbon $0 75 

McCoy-Howe Co., chloride lime 40 

L. T. F. Zaiser, repairs on seal 75 

Francke & Schindler, bull ring 22 

Total $75 42 



VOUCHER No. 295. WHEN CLOTHING CO. 

1 uniform, coat and cap • $4 35 

1 uniform and cap 50 

1 uniform, coat, vest and cap 6 75 

4 uniform pants 17 50 

12 uniform suits 9o 25 

7 uniform suits 67 20 

16 uniform suits 185 60 

1 hat 47 

1 hat • 50 

1 coat 2 25 

1 coat 3 48 

1 coat and vest 9 75 

2 overalls and jackets 1 00 

Total 394 60 



VOUCHER 296. W. B. BURFORD. 

1 box paper fasteners |0 17 

I qr. trial bal. paper 20 

900 annual reports, short ed. ; 100 annual reports, long ed. ; 

23 pp. small pica, 34,684 ms; 244 pp. brevier, 621,224 ms, 

655,908 ms 236 13 

20 pp. nonpariel, rule and figure, 90,000 ms 36 00 

4 rms., 18J qr., 60 tint, book 14 76 

54-100 press work 4 32 

lOJ qr., 60 sh., ant. cover 1 58 

10-100 press work on cover 80 

II hours correcting alterations 5 50 

Binding 54-100 sig 7 02 

Total 306 48 



VOUCHER No. 297. CONSUMERS' GAS TRUST CO. 

Fuel gas under boilers for May and June, 1896 1277 00 

Total 277 00 



165 



VOUCHER No. 298. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

2,053 lbs. beef $100 11 

108 lbs. pork loin 7 30 

196 lbs. veal 15 16 

105 lbs. bacon 7 88 

120 lbs. ham 10 80 

120 lbs. lard 6 30 

Total $147 55 



VOUCHER No. 299. CITY ICE CO. 

44,000 lbs. ice from /o to /^ $66 00 

28,300 lbs. ice from jV to g^ 56 60 



Total 122 60 



VOUCHER No. 300. K RAG-REYNOLDS CO. 

338 lbs. granulated sugar 

330 lbs. granulated sugar 

25 lbs. cut loaf sugar 

100 Ib:^. powdered sugar 

34 lbs. best imperial tea 

75 lbs. golden Rio coffee 

75 lbs. Maracaibo coffee 

25 lbs. Carolina rice 

12 lbs. Baker's chocolate 

50 lbs. table salt 

9 lbs. Rex. B. powder 

10 lbs. boneless cod fish 

6 doz. 3-lb. California peaches 

4 doz. Johnson pine apples 

6 doz. Yarmouth corn 

2 doz. Bartlett pears ... • 

3 doz. imported sardines 

1 bbl. lake salt 

2 doz. Heinz' salad dressing 

J bbl. ex. mess mackerel 

20 lbs. ex. fancy prunes 

1 lb. ex. vanilla 

Total 121 36 



$18 


56 


18 


12 


1 


56 


6 


00 


5 


10 


13 87 


13 


50 


1 


25 


3 


36 




40 


1 


17 




60 


8 


10 


7 


20 


5 


70 


3 


00 


4 


32 




90 


2 


70 


3 75 


1 


20 


1 


00 



166 



VOUCHER No. 301. J. R. BUDD & CO. 



355 lb?, hens . . . . 
631 lbs. spring chicks 
120 doz. eggs . . . . 

Total 



$39 10 
13 97 
12 00 



$65 or 



VOUCHER No. 302. R. H. REES. 



85 boxes lemons 
5 bbls. Cabbage . . 
200 qts. strawberries 
3^ bu. new potatoes 
20^- bu. old potatoes 
4 bunches bananas . 
24 qts. blackberries 
3 doz. onions . . . 

Total .... 



$14 00 


7 50 


16 67 


2 80 


8 44 


4 00 


1 50 


45 



55 36 



VOUCHER No. 303. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 



3 boxes Babbitt soap 

2 boxes 5c. ivory soap 

100 lbs. lump starch 

3 boxes Pearline 

1 box Brook's Crystal soap 

1 doz. dust pans 

2 doz. counter brushes 

2 doz. No. 1 brooms 

4 doz. red seal lye 

2 doz. 14 oz. mops 

1 doz. counter brushes 

Lees 2 doz. counter brushes returned 
Total 



$11 25 



8 CO 


2 25 


11 25 


3 25 


75 


6 00 


4 00 


4 00 


3 50 


3 00 


$57 25 


6 00 



51 25 



VOUCHER No. 304. E. C. ANDREWS. 
1,340 lbs. granulated soap $50 25 



Total 



50 25. 



167 

VOUCHER No. 305. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

28,100 cubic feet gas, at $1.25 M $35 13 

Total $35 13 

VOUCHER No. 306. FRANK BIRD TRANSFER CO. 

To hauling passengers and baggage to depot $35 00 

Total 35 00 

VOUCHER No. 307. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

168 lbs. butterine $21 84 

61 lbs. cheese 6 10 

Total 27 94 

VOUCHER No. 308. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

Kent of telephone June 1 to September 30, 1896 $22 50 

Total 22 50 

VOUCHER No. 309. CHARLES J. KUHN CO. 

I. C. molds $0 30 

Tomatoes 60 

Vinegar 60 

Bread 20 

Pineapple 25 

Cakes 50 

Wafers 13 

Chips 50 

Salmon 1 00 

Currants 10 

Raspberries 25 

Biscuits . . 30 

Catsup 25 

Almonds 40 

Tomatoes 50 

Bread 20 

Peas 50 

gooseberries 10 

Raspberries 25 

Blackberries 30 

Onions 20 

Asparagus 10 



168 



VOUCHEE No. 309— Continued. 

Watermelon 

Cakes 

Macaroons 

Raspberries 

Salmon 

Blackberries 

Tomatoes 

Bread , . . . . 

Graham crackers . 

Cakes 

Currents 

Onions 

Cakes 

Graham crackers 

Bread 

Olives 

Peaches .... 

Berries 

Corn 

Vinegar 

Cakes 

Salmon 

B. turkey • 

D. ham 

Dressing 

Crackers 

Clarate phosphate 

Bread 

D. berries . . 

Ginger ale 

Phosphates 

Melon 

Peas 

Corn 

Raspberries 

D. berries . . • - 

Celery 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 310. NEW YORK STORE. 

1 porch curtain 

1 porch curtain 

18 yds, ticliing 

24 towels 

12 towels 

1 porch curtain 

3 yds. carpet 

Total 



$0 60 
25 
50 
20 
50 
25 
40 
20 
20 
25 
10 
10 
25 
20 
20 
80 
20 
25 
20 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
10 
25 
30 
50 
1 50 
50 
30 
20 
30 
30 
25 
20 



$1 90 



50 
88 
00 
04 
50 
50 



120 98 



14 32 



169 



VOUCHER No. 311. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

2 baskets cherries $2 00 

2 drawers currants 

3 cases raspberries 

3 cases tomatoes 

12 watermelons 

5 doz. celery 

Total $13 83 



VOUCHER No. 312. IRON CITY CHEMICAL CO. 
5 gals, bugine $11 25 



2 


80 


4 30 


1 


00 


2 


58 


1 


15 



Total 11 25 



VOUCHER No. 314. HOLLWEG & REESE. 

4 doz. extra heavy 10-in. plates $3 20 

5 doz. extra heavy tumblers 2 00 

2 doz. No. 823 knives . • 2 10 

2 doz. No. 823 forks 

2 1 gal. pitchers 

1 1 qt. pitcher 

1 doz. 1 pt. Mason jars 

Total 10 81 



VOUCHER No. 315. J. R. RYAN & CO. 

1,000 lbs. bran $6 00 

500 lbs. feed meal 3 00 



1 


70 




64 




13 


1 


04 



Total 9 00 



VOUCHER No. 316. A. WIEGAND & SON. 

2 bbls. moss . $2 00 

20 ladies' bouquets 5 00 

18 gents' bouquets 1 80 



Total 



170 



VOUCHER No. 316. HENEY RUSSE. 

7 lbs. yellow corn . . . . • $0 10 

4 qts. sugar corn °^ 

25 bu. oats 6 00 

Total ^6 90 

VOUCHER No. 317. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

4 pieces No. 2 ribbon $0 96 

50 yds. bleached crash 2 00 

1 lb. Saxony yarn 75 

1 lb. H. C. yarn 85 

I M. needles • . . . 1 00 



Total 

VOUCHER No. 318. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

1 bundle 3 S. B. sacks . ; SO 38 

125 sh. 17x22-24, pink, cut 92 

500 9xx, 152, envelopes 71 

45 sh. 6 ply 1 white bristol • 2 02 

Total 



Total 

VOUCHER No. 321. PARROTT & TAGGART. 

60 lbs. butter crackers $3 30 

Total 



5 56 



4 03 



VOUCHER 319. HENRY EDWARDS. 

2 cases raspberries |3 50 

Total 3 50 

VOUCHER No. 320. N. S. DRIGQS. 

1 qt. whisky $0 90 

1 qt. alcohol ^^ 

J gal. alcohol 1 50 

1 lb. insect powder 45 



3 35 



3.80 



171 



VOUCHER No. 322. YULE & HAETMAN. 

■6 new shoes $2 25 

4 old shoes reset 1 00 

Total $3 25 

VOUCHER No. 323. H. LIEBER CO. 

1 plain German plate glass, 22x24 $3 00 

Total 3 00 

VOUCHER No. 324. SCHWEIKLE & PRANG E. 

2 large eye bolts and rings • . . . , $0 75 

1 neck yoke clip 40 

Tightening-up carriage 75 

1 new shaft 1 00 

Total 2 90 

VOUCHER No. 325. H. TECHENTIN & CO. 

1 can harness dressing fO 50 

1 can carriage top dressing 35 

1 IJ-in. snap 10 

4 chamois skins 1 60 

Total 2 55 

VOUCHER No. 326. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

6 tack claws $0 30 

10 lbs. tacks - 59 

2" doz parers 75 

10 ft. 30-in. drab wire 38 

6 ft. 36-in. drab wire 27 

Total 2 29 

VOUCHER No. 327. W. E. TODD. 

4 doz. cucumbers $1 40 

5 doz. onions 60 

Total 2 00 

Total bills allowed July 15, 1896 $4,620 41 



172 



Bills Allowed August 6, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 328. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



July Pay -Roll. 

R. O. Johnpon Superintendent . - . 

John E. Lockridge Physician 

M. H. Fields Physician 

William E. Todd Bookkeeper 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper .... 

Jean Cummings Clerk 

William H. Latham Instructor. . • . . . 

N. B. McKee Instructor 

W. H. DeMotte Instructor 

S. J. Vail Instructor 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor 

August Jutt Instructor 

N. F. Morrow Instructor ...... 

Orson Archibald Instructor 

Albert Berg Instructor 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 

Tunis V. Archer ....... Instrucior 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S. J. Corwin Instructor 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

Eva Heizer Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor. . . . : . 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy RobiBson Instructor 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Mary Corwin Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . . 

James Vahey Boys' Supervisor . . . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor . . 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 

Thomas Marshall Assistant Engineer . . 

Charles Friedgen Electrician 

Charles Howard Carpenter 

William Langstaff ...... Florist and Gardener . 

William G. Falls Laborer 

Euge:.e Yontz Laborer 

W. A. Johanson Laborer 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

Carl Brumfield Laborer 

Charles Kiesling Watchman 

John Boehm Baker 



$166 66 
22 00 
22 00 
60 00 
33 33 
25 00 
30 00 
125 00 
125 00 
12 > 00 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
68 33 
75 00 
75 00 
79 16 
50 00 
58 33 
50 00 
50 (lO 
56 66 
52 50 
48 33 
48 33 
58 33 
40 00 
50 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
65 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
75 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
45 00 



173 



VOUCHEE No. 328— Continued. 



Joe Skinner First Cook . 

Nora Murphy Second Cook 

Mary White Third Cook . 

Mary Elstrod Laundress . 

Kate Stratton Laundress . 

Mary O'Connell Laundress 

Kate Sullivan Laundress 

Anna Linhun Chambermaid 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 

Julia Doherty Waitress . . 

Lillie Kelley Waitress . . 

Delia Calter Waitress . . 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress . . 

Julia Shea- Waitress . . 



130 00 


15 


00 


13 


06 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 00 


12 


00 


15 


00 


14 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


CO 



Total 



2,656 34 



VOUCHER No. 329. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscelloneous Expense During Month as Follows: 

W. U. Telegraph Co., June telegraphage $0 83 

Subscription to Indianapolis Sun, 2 copies, May 20 to July 20 1 00 

Subscription to Indianapolis News, 2 copies, July 1 to Oct. 1 2 60 

100 1 cent stamps 1 00 

291 2 cent stamps 5 82 

100 4 cent stamps 4 00 

1 vol. of Smith on Child's Diseases 4 68 

1 vol. Essential Diseases of Children 85 

1 vol. Mother's Help 85 

1 vol. Hartshorn's Essentials of Medicine 2 34 

S. Brandenburg, watchwoman, wages July 1 to 25 ... . 16 67 

Julia Doherty, waitress, account error June pay-roll ... 1 00 

Mary Diffley, nurse, wages July 1 to 25 20 75 

Albert Berg, librarian, account error June pay-roll .... 8 00 

Binding 100 copies Shakesperian primers 1 00 

Burnt alum for stable use ■ 10 

2 doz. sewing machine needles 50 

Ex. on roach powder, Cinti . - , 35 

Superintendent's expense as delegate to American Manual 

Training Association, New York, June 27 to July 1 ; Fifth 
Summer Meeting American Association to Promote the 

Teaching of Speech to Deaf, Philadelphia, July 1 to 11 . 80 37 



Total 



152 71 



174 



VOUCHER No. 330. SAMUEL A. BONNER. 

Expense as delegate in attending National Meetings Manual 

Training Association, New York; American Association 

to Promote the Teaching of Speech to Deaf, Philadelphia, 

June 27 to July 1 $77 37 

Expense as trustee attending meetings of board held May 1 

to 7 6 00 

June 3, 10 and 26 . . 8 00 

July 15 and 31 5 50 

Car fare 50 

Total $97 37 



VOUCHEE No. 331. CHARLES E. HAUGH. 

Expense as delegate in attending meeting American Asso- 
ciation to Promote the Teaching of Speech to Deaf, Phila- 
delphia, July 1 to 11 ... $70 00 

Total 70 00 



VOUCHER No. 332. TARVIN C. GEOOMS. 

Expense as trustee attending meetings held May 7 and 29, , 

June 3, 10 and 26, July 15 and 31 $18 90 

Total 18 90 



VOUCHER No. 333. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

1,943 lbs. beef $98 89 

120 lbs. lard 6 16 

97 lbs. pork loin 6 06 

187 lbs. ham 17 58 

71 lbs. bacon 5 96 

55 lbs. lamb 4 10 

Total 138 75 



VOUCHEE No. 334. CONSUMEES' GAS TEUST CO. 

Fuel gas under boilers, July $138 50 

Total 138 50 



175 

VOUCHER No. 335. KRAG-REYN0LD8 CO. 

300 lbs. granulated sugar $15 33 

50 lbs. powdered sugar 2 75 

50 lbs. green Golden Eio 9 50 

50 lbs. green Maracaibo 9 50 

33J lbs. imperial tea 5 03 

2 lbs. Brown's extract lemon 2 00 

2 lbs. Brown's extract vanilla 2 00 

20 lbs. prunes 1 30 

5 lbs. B. codfish 35 

3 cases Crawford peaches 8 40 

2 cases Yarmouth corn 1 90 

1 case Bartlett pears ... 3 20 

2 cases Johnson pineapple 7 60 

2 doz. imported sardines 2 88 

47 gals, cider vinegar 4 23 

15 lbs. prunes . 1 05 

10 lbs. rice 60 

J bbl. mackerel . - 3 75 

5 lbs. codfish 35 

Total $81 72 

VOUCHEE No. 336. CITY ICE CO. 

11,700 lbs. ice $23 40 

18,400 lbs. ice 32 20 

Total 55 60 

VOUCHER No. 337. M. CLUNE. 

30 husk mattresses made over, add 10 lbs. husks $18 00 

7 husk mattresses made over, new ticks 9 10 

11 hair mattresses made over 5 50 

4 hair mattresses made over, new ticks 4 80 

Total 37 40 

VOUCHER No. 338. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

24,400 cubic feet gas, at $1.25 ... $30 50 

Total 30 50 

VOUCHER No. 339. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

210 lbs. butterine $27 30 

1 basket peaches 20 

Total 27 50 



176 

VOUCHER No. 340. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 

9 bbls. potatoes $11 25 

Ij box lemons 5 25 

3 bbls. cabbage 2 25 

2 bunches bananas 1 50 

1 bbl. melons 1 25 

1 case berries 1 00 

Total $22 50 

VOUCHER No. 341. A. JORDAN CO. 

45 lbs. hens $5 08 

95^ lbs. spring chicks 15 58 

$20 66 

Credit by overcharge on chicks .... 43 

Total 20 23 

VOUCHER No. 342. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

100 lbs. lump starch $2 38 

1 doz. No. 1 brooms 1 85 

1 doz. 14 oz. mops 1 75 

1 box Pearline 3 75 

2 boxes Babbitt's soap 7 50 

2 doz. K. R. brushes 1 50 

Total 18 73 

VOUCHER No. 343. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 

532 lbs. borax chip soap $17 02 

Total 17 02 

VOUCHER No. 344. JOHN O'NEILL. 

2,000 lbs. bran . $11 00 

1,000 lbs. feed meal 6 00 

Total 17 00 

VOUCHER No. 345. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

4 crates tomatoes $2 05 

4 crates blackberries , . . . . 4 50 

10 doz. celery 1 90 

30 watermelons . 5 10 

6 doz. corn 50 

5 crates peaches 1 50 

1 doz. cucumbers 25 

5^ doz. onions 50 

1 drawer grapes 50 

Total 16 80 



177 



VOUCHER No. 346. J. R. BUDD & CO. 



7 lbs. chicks . 
150 doz. eggs 

Total . 



$1 10 
15 00 



$16 10 



VOUCHER No. 347, D. P. ERWIN & CO. 



2I85 yds. bleached muslin 
2 doz. thread 

Total 



$14 20 
1 60 



15 80 



VOUCHER No. 348. CHARLES J. KUHN CO. 



Peaches 

Vanilla 

D. berries . . . . 

Bread 

Corn 

Tomatoes . . . . 

Melons 

Apples 

Raisins 

Bananas . . . . 

Melons 

Corn 

Onions 

Bread ..... 
S. beans . . . . 

Bread 

Raspberries . . . 
Berries . . , . 
Ginger root . . 

Olives 

Salmon . . . . 

C. Chowder . . . 

D. ham . . . . . 
Bread . . . . . 

Cheese 

Graham crackers 

Cakes 

Brownies . . . . 
Strawberries . - . 
Watermelon . . . 



4. 
50 
50 
20 
30 
20 
30 
40 
20 
20 
00 
25 
10 

30 
5 

30 
20 
35' 
4U 
25 
92 
38 
30 
35 
40 
25 
20 
10 
25 



Total .... 
12 -D. and D. 



13 75 



i7S 

VOUCHER No. 349. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 case Hoyt toilet paper |8 50 

f case Dandy toilet paper 3 90 

Total 112 40 

VOUCHER No. 350. E. C. ANDREWS. 

1 gross Sweet Clover soap $8 00 

Total 8 00 

VOUCHER No. 351. J. A. GRIFFIN. 
Manufacturing and hanging 2 awnings ......... $6 00 

Total 6 00 

VOUCHER No. 352. W. B. BURFORD. 

200 commercial envelopes $2 25 

1 doz. Hill's copy pads 40 

^ ream typewriter's paper 70 

5 quires Crown ledger, full bound 2 80 

Total 6 15 

VOUCHER No. 353. NEW YORK STORE. 

2 yds. crepe $0 38 

1 serene 3 25 

Filling 90 

Total 4 53 

VOUCHER No. 354. H. LIEBER CO. 

Framing diploma $4 50 

Total 4 50 

VOUCHER No. 355. SCHWEIKLE & PRANGE. 

Sharpening 5 picks $0 75 

4 new frames in cart 1 50 

1 hook, 2 clips and 8 bolts 1 25 

Total 3 50 



179 

VOUCHER No. 356. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

To telephone rental from June 1 to 30, 1896 $3 21 

Total 13 21 

VOUCHER No. 357. HENRY SYERUP CO. 

3 baskets melons $1 85 

3 lbs. horse radish 10 

8 melons 1 00 

Total 2 95 

VOUCHER No. 358. YULE & HARTMAN. 

6 new shoes $2 25 

Total 2 25 

VOUCHER No. 359. BAKER & THORNTON. 

2 boxes Crown file bands . $1 80 

Total 1 80 

VOUCHER No. 360. PAKROTT & TAGGART. 

14 lbs. reception flakes f 1 54 

Total 1 54 



Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 $.3,720 05 



Bills Allowed September 10, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 361. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

August Pay-Roll. 

E. O. Johnson Superintendent |166 66 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Physician 22 CO 

"W. E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 25 00 

Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

Wm. H. Latham Instructor 125 00 



180 



VOUCHER No. 361— Continued. 



N. B. McKee Instructor 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor. . . . 

S. J. Vail Instructor 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor 

August Jutt Instructor 

N. F. Morrow Instructor 

Orson Archibald ....... Instructor 

Albert Berg Instructor 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 

S. J. Corwin Instructor ..... 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 

Eva Heizer ' . . . Instructor 

Eudora Bright Instructor 

Letitia Booth Instructor 

Carrie Smith Instructor 

Lucy Robinson Instructor ..... 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Mary Corwin Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor . . 

Jas. Vahey Boys' Supervisor. . 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor . . 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Louis Prinzler Engineer 

Thos. Marshall Engineer's assistant 

Chaa. Friedgen Electrician .... 

Chas. Howard .... I Carpenter 

Wm. Langstaff Florist and gardener 

Wm. G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 

W. A. Johanson Laborer 

Henry Freeman Laborer 

Carl Brumfield Laborer 

Chas. Kissling Watchman .... 

John Bo^hm ....... Baker .... 

Joe Skinner First Cook . . . 

Mora Murphy Second Cook . . . 

Mary Kelley Third Cook .... 

Mary Elstrod Laundress .... 

Kate Stratton Laundress .... 

Mary O'Connell Laundress .... 

Kate Sullivan Laundress .... 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid . . . 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid . . . 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid . . . 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid . . . 

Julia Doherty Waitress 



1125 00 
125 00 
83 83 
83 33 
83 33 
83 33 
68 33 
75 00 
75 00 
79 16 
50 00 
58 33 
50 00 
50 00 
56 66 
52 50 
48 33 
48 33 
5S 33 
40 00 
50 00 
50 00 
20 00 
20 00 
15 48 
65 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
75 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
30 00 
45 00 
.30 00 
15 00 
6 19 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
15 00 



181 



VOUCHER No. 361— Continued. 



Lillie Kelley Waitress 

Delia Calter Waitress 

Nellie Morarity Waitress 

Julia Shea Waitress 

Mary Strattman Waitress 



Total 



$14 00 

12 00 

12 CO 

12 00 

4 65 



3,669 60 



VOUCHEE No. 362. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Month as Follows : 



Expense on plants from Richmond 

Bridget Wade, fourth cook, wages May 1-3 

Sarah Summons, labor in canning 

Nellie Wade, labor in canning 

33 \% bu. corn, W. C. Robinson 

lUU tons hay 

Threshing 524 bu. oats 

Wm. Argus, assisting in threshing . 

Wm. Klein, assisting in threshing 

Can pine tar 

3 Climax fasteners for buggy 

12 screw knobs 

Subscription to Sun, 2 copies, from July 20 to September 20 

Postage 

1 doz. paper pencils 

1 leather letter book 

Traveling expense to Columbus, Ohio, and return 

2 lb. Pond's extract 

2 copies proceedings second meeting American Association . 
Products on market 

Total 



$0 25 

1 50 

4 75 

6 50 

8 12 

12 16 

15 72 

1 00 

1 50 

10 

60 



16 



00 
00 
50 
75 
20 
50 
76 
50 



79 77 



VOUCHER No. 363. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 



47J yds. brown muslin $4 25 

465J yds. Utica muslin 58 19 

1 doz. O. N. T. thread 42 

181 yds. bleached damask 95 03 

$157 89 

By shortage 2 yds. damask 1 05 

Total 



156 84 



182 
VOUCHER No. 364. KINGAN & CO. 



110 lbs. lard . . 
104 lbs. B bacon 
131 lbs. ham . . 
78 lbs. pork loin 
118 lbs. veal . . 
1,681 lbs. beef , 
64 lbs. lamb . . 
1 tongue . . . 



$5 22 


11 


44 


13 


43 


6 


24 


8 


85 


88 


27 


4 


80 




35 



Total . 1138 60 

VOUCHER No. 365. CONSUMERS' GAS TRUST CO. 
Fuel gas under boilers, August $138 50 



Total 138 50 



VOUCHER No. 366. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

2 doz. L. C. peaches $3 30 

5 lbs. corn starch 25 

344 lbs. granulated sugar 16 68 

75 lbs. powdered sugar 3 83 

75 lbs. Golden Rio coffee 15 00 

75 lbs. Maracaibo coffee . . 15 00 

10 lbs. ground mustard . 80 

5 lbs. ground cinnamon 75 

20 lbs. rice 1 00 

20 lbs. Cal. prunes 1 40 

2 lbs. Brown's extract vanilla 2 50 

2 lbs. Brown's extract lemon 1 60 

20 lbs. cod fish 1 00 

6 doz. 3 lb. Cal. peaches • 9 90 

4 doz. Yarmouth corn 3 60 

4 doz. pine apples 7 00 

2 doz. Ca). Bart, pears 3 20 

^ bbl. ex. Mess mackeral 3 40 

5 lbs. mix spices 60 

3 gross fusee matches 3 75 

15 lbs. Zabian wax 60 

3 doz imp. sardines 3 00 

9 lbs. Zubian wax 36 

1 lb. mustard seed 15 

^ lb. Cayenne pepper 15 

Total 98 82 



183 



VOUCHER No. 367. POLAE ICE CO. 

6,600 lbs. ice $11 55 

29,700 Iba. ice 44 55 

Total $56 10 

VOUCHER No. 368. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

150 doz. eggs $16 50 

150^ lbs. chicken 19 48 

Total . 35 98 

VOUCHER No. 369. HENRY SYERUP CO. 

40 water melons ■ $5 95 

7 baskets grapes 1 60 

6 bbls. potatoes 4 70 

3 bbls. apples 4 50 

5 bbls. c. melons 4 75 

16 crates peaches 4 95 

2 bun. bananas 2 15 

1 bu. s. potatoes 75 

2 box lemons 2 75 ' 

1 bu. onions 60 

2 drawers plums 1 75 

Total 34 35 

VOUCHER No. 370. INDPLS. GAS CO. 

22,300 cubic feet gas, at $1.25 M $27 88 

Total 27 88 

VOUCHER No. 371. E. C. ANDREWS. 

790 lbs. granulated soap $25 67 

Total 25 67 

VOUCHER No. 372. FRANK C. HOOD. 

6 12 ft. ch. seats, oak $15 00 

10 5 ft. ch. seats, oak 10 00 

Total 25 00 



184 

VOUCHEE No. 373. ELGIN DA.IKY CO. 

168 IbH. butterine ^21 84 

4 crates peaches 1 40 

1 bbl. apples 1 25 

Total $24 49 

VOUCHER No. 374. C. L. WAYNE & CO. 

2 gross 2 gal. fruit cans $11 00 

4 doz. 1 qt. fruit cans 1 08 

Total 12 08 

VOUCHER No. 375. JOHN O'NIELL. 

1000 lbs. bran $5 50 

500 lbs. feed meal 2 75 

Total 8 25 

VOUCHER No. 376. MUMMENHOFF & CO. 

4 boxes peaches $0 60 

5 box lemons 1 75 

1 bun. bananas 75 

5 bu. onions 35 

1 drawer grapes ■ 40 

1 bbl. apples 1 00 

2 bbls. potatoes 1 50 

6 melons 90 

Total 7 25 

VOUCHER No. 377. FROMMEYER BRO. 

4 qt. milk bottles $0 45 

4 doz. pt. Mason jars ... 2 08 

2 doz. qt. Mason jars 1 08 

1 ^ gal. Mason jir 71 

4 doz. ^ pt. jelly glasses 1 00 

6 doz. ^ pt. jelly glasses 1 50 

Total 6 82 

VOUCHER No. 378. BOWEN-MERRILL CO. 

1 case toilet paper $6 00 

Total 6 00 



185 



VOUCHER No. 379. POLAE ICE CO. 

4,600 lbs. ice, December $4 60 

Total 14 60 

VOUCHER No. 380. H. TECHENTIN & CO. 

New end on trace, repairing back band $1 00 

1 whip 1 00 

New shafting 40 

1 new belly-band 35 

Repairing harness 80 

1 new shafting, with billet 50 

Repairing harness 15 

Total 4 20 

VOUCHER No. 381. YULE & HARTMAN. 

10 new shoes |3 75 

Total 3 75 

VOUCHER No. 382. CHARLES J. KUHN CO. 

Bread $0 20 

Chips 40 

Pretzels 15 

Celery 35 

Olives 1 30 

Melons 50 

Beans ... 30 

Onions 10 

Total 3 30 

VOUCHER No. 383. H. LIEBER CO. 

Framing class group, 1896 $3 00 

Total 3 00 

VOUCHER No. 384. CEYLON TEA STORE. 

7 gal. vinegar |1 85 

Total 1 85 



186 

VOUCHER No. 385. PAEROTT & TAGGART. 

13 lbs. Reception flakes 11 43 

Total $1 43 

VOUCHER No. 386. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

4J lbs. Manilla rope $0 3:5 

jij- doz. Ger. halter snaps 13 

2 window cleaners 54 

Total 1 05 



Total bills allowed Sept, 10, 1896 $3,575 18 



Bills Allowed October 5, 1898. 
VOUCHER No. 387. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

September Pay-Roll. 

R.O.Johnson Superintendent $166 66 

W. E. Todd Bookkeeper 60 00 

S. Jean Cummings Clerk 30 00 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 33 33 

Mamie Coughlin Housekeeper 25 CO 

John E. Lockridge Physician 22 00 

M. H. Fields Physician 22 00 

Wm. H. Latham Instructor 125 00 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor . 125 00 

S. J. Vail Instructor 83 33 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor 83 33 

August Jutt Instructor . 83 33 

N. F, Morrow Instructor 83 33 

Orson Archibald ...,.,. Instructor 68 33 

Albert Berg lustructor 75 00 

Albert Berg Librarian 800 

S. "W. Gilbert Instructor 75 00 

Chas. Kerney Instructor 83 33 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 79 16 

E. J. Hecker Instructor . 60 00 

Anna Hendricks Instructor 58 33 

Ida Kinsley Instructor . 50 00 

Mary Cor win Instructor 50 00 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 58 33 

Eva Heizer Instructor 70 83 

Carrie Smith Instructor 48 33 



187 

VOUCHER No. 387— Continued. 

Frances Thompson Instructor 

Nora V. Long . . Instructor 

Sarah Marshall Instructor 

Edith Fulton Instructor 

Fannie Shideler Instructor 

Ida Westfall Instructor 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supervisor 

Jas. Vahey Boys' Supervisor 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supervisor .... 

Mary Dilfley Nurse 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman ...... 

Alice Wilson Usher 

Wm. Langstaff Floristand Foreman F.&G. 

Louis Piinzler Engineer . . 

Thos. Ma: shall Engineer's Assistant . . . 

Chas. Friedgen Electrician 

Chas. Howard Carpenter . 

Wm. G. Falls Laborer 

Eugene Yontz . . Laborer ... 

W. A. Johanson Laborer. . 

H. C. Freeman Laborer 

Chas. Kissling Watchman 

John Boehm Baker 

Wm. Hallowell . First Cook 

Jos. Skinner Second Ccok 

Nora Murphy Third Cook 

Mary Kelly Fourth Cook 

Ella Lawhead Laundress 

Kate Stratton Laundress 

MaryO'Connell Laundress 

Kate Sullivan Laundress ....... 

Mary Elstrod , . . Laundress 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid 

Sarah Ryan Chambermaid 

Ella W^elsh Chambermaid 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 

Julia Doherty "Waitress 

Lillie Kelley Waitress 

Delia Caller . . .... Waitress 

Nellie Moriarity Waitress ........ 

Julia Shea Waitress 

Mary Strattman Waitress 



$40 00 


60 


00 


48 


33 


37 


50 


33 


33 


33 


33 


50 


00 


20 00 


20 


00 


15 00 


10 


67 


20 


00 


75 


00 


65 


00 


30 


00 


40 


00 


35 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


. 20 


00 


20 


00 


30 


00 


45 


00 


22 


67 


30 00 


15 


00 


16 


(0 


1 


40 


12 00 


12 00 


12 


00 


12 


■DO 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


GO 


12 


00 


15 


00 


14 00 


12 


00 


12 


CO 


12 


00 


12 


00 



Total $2,763 18 



188 



VOUCHER No. 388. E. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid Miscellaneous Expense During Month as Follows: 

Nellie Wade, wages, 4 days' canning 

C. Dehuny, wages, 3 days' canning 

Carl Brumfield, wages for September - 

W. U. Telegraph Co , Augiast telegraphage 

W. U. Telegraph Co., September telegraphage ...... 

James Chalmers, cutting and shocking 298 shocks corn . . 

1,930 tons timothy hay , . . . . 

1 pkg. cineraria seed 

D. Green, New York, 8 Articulation Manuals ....... 

Ex. on school books from Hartford 

Ex. on school books from Cinti 

Binding 100 copies outlines 

500 postals for school use .......... 

1 paste cup for art room 

500 2-c. stamps 

100 1-c. stamps 

25 3-c. stamps ^ 

Sewing machine needles 

Expressage on dynamo brushes, Chicago 

3 photographic views Amer. Asso 

16 lbs. sealing wax 

2J bu. peaches, 1 bu. plums 

Vegetables 

Spices 

Yeast during June, July, August and September — 

13i doz $1 99 

IJlbs 23 

Repairs on delivery wagon wheel 

Car fare, account merchandise 

Transfer W. Polk's trunk 



Total 



$2 00 

1 50 

20 00 

52 

5 45 

14 90 

12 45 

50 

8 00 

70 

1 40 

1 00 

5 00 

10 

10 00 

1 00 

75 

25 

25 

4 70 

80 

4 00 

1 30 

20 



22 
35 
85 
25 



$100 44 



VOUCHER No. 389. KRAG & REYNOLDS. 



352 lbs. Ideal C sugar. . . 
349 lbs. gran, sugar. . . . 
50 lbs. powdered sugar . . 
132 lbs. Golden Rio coffee. 
150 lbs. Maracaibo cofiee . 
67 lbs. best Imp. tea . . . 
300 lbs. H. P. beans . . . 
20 lbs. fancy prunes . . . 

25 lbs. rice 

10 sacks salt 

10 lbs. ground pepper - . 
15 lbs. Piel's corn starch . 



$16 19 

17 38 

2 75 

23 76 

27 00 

10 05 

4 50 

1 00 

1 13 

30 

1 00 

60 



189 



VOUCHEE No. 389— Continued. 



3 cases yellow peaches $8 40 

1 case Bartlett pears 3 20 

2 cases Johnson's pine-apple 7 60 

3 cases Yarmouth corn 5 70 

3 bbls. Lake salt 2 70 

^ bbl. ex. mess mackerel 3 75 

3 doz. imported sardines 4 32 

3 boxes Babbitt's soap 12 00 

3 boxes 5c. Ivory soap 12 00 

1 box Pearline 3 75 

2 doz. 14 oz. mops 3 20 

3 doz. dust pans 2 25 

1 doz. parlor brooms 1 80 

1 doz. No. 1 brooms 1 65 

2 doz. 3-hoop pails 2 50 

1 doz. scrubbing brushes 90 

1 doz. electro silicon 80 

100 lbs. Piel's starch 2 25 

2 doz. shoe brushes 3 00 

1 22-in. wooden bowl 40 

5 doz. No. 1 brooms 8 25 

3 doz. counter brushes 6 00 

18 lbs. B.soda 54 

6 lbs. Zubian wax 21 

12 lbs. Zubian wax 42 

3 doz. Mason's blacking 1 65 

10 lbs. B. soda 40 

50 lbs. hominy 75 

30 lbs. prunes 1 50 

20 lbs. dr. peaches 1 10 

Total 

VOUCHEE No. 390. SWIFT & CO. 

3,667 lbs. beef $181 52 

68 lbs. p. loin 5 44 

36 lbs. sausage 2 88 

60 lbs. lamb 4 80 

Total 

VOUCHEE No. 391. INDPLS. B, & S. CO. 

2 gross No. 428 tablets $7 40 

9 doz. Anderson Cotton Erasers 3 60 

2 lb. wedge erasers 1 90 

2 gross P. C. lead pencils 80 

6 doz. 7x11 W. B. slates 3 60 



$208 65 



194 64 



190 
VOUCHER No. 390— Continued. 



300 sponges 

6 waste baskets 

12 blackboard pointers .... 

6 inkstands 

1 case yellow crayon 

12 c. 5 in. slate pencils .... 
1 gross Universal writing books 
6 qt. Arnold's ink , 

1 ink vent 

12 gross No. 182 pens 

6 c. 5J in. elate pencils .... 

2 gross No. 613 penholders . . 

4 waste baskets 

^ doz. Carter's 2 oz. red ink . . 
32 complete Geog. Ind. Ed. . . 
24 Elementary Geog. Ind. Ed . 

24 copy books, No. 1 

12 copy books, No. 3 

30 copy books. No. 5 

I gross No. 17 com p. books . . 

1 doz. No. 608 comp. books . . 

2 gross No. 2490 penholders . . 

1 waste basket . 

i gross No. 53 tablets 

•J doz. blank books 



Less error on penholders 

Total $90 89 

VOUCHER No. 392. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

84| yds. Utica muslin 

180 yds. crash 

1 doz. dusters 

3 doz. towels 

10 doz. towels , . . . . 

2 pieces tape . . 

42f yds. Pepperill bleached 

20 doz. towels ' 

2 gross buttons 

1 doz. overalls 

2 gross P. buttons 

Total 78 7g 



11 80 


2 


10 


1 


20 




35 


7 


25 


1 


44 


3 


60 


2 


50 




20 


5 04 




72 




70 


1 


40 




19 


24 


00 


7 


20 


1 


20 




60 


1 


50 


3 


60 


2 


00 


2 


50 




30 


2 


25 




67 


91 


lil 




72 



117 69 


14 40 


2 75 


2 70 


12 50 


58 


4 49 


18 00 


48 


3 75 


1 44 



191 



VOUCHER No. 393. BLANTON MILLING CO. 

19 bbls. W. & S. flour $59 85 

Less 19 empties ret'd 3 80 



Total 156 05 

VOUCHER No. 394. A. JORDAN CO. 
368* lbs. chicken $47 90 



Total 47 90 

VOUCHER No. 395. FRIEDMAN MFG. CO. 
360 lbs. butterine $43 20 



Total 43 20 



VOUCHER No. 396. C. L. WAYNE & CO. 

4 gross |-gal. fruit cans $24 50 

J doz. No. 12 drinking cups . . 

4 ex. heavy dishpaas 

3 6-in. heavy tinned ladles 

4 doz. 9-in. pie pans 

4 doz. 9-in. deep pana 

1 20- qt. porcelain kettle 

1 3-gallon tin bucket - . 

^ doz 6-quart tin water cans - . 

5 doz. tin candle sticks 

2 doz. 12-inch galv. wash pans 

4 water pots 

2 water pots 

^ doz. granite drinking cups 

1 24quaTt pore, kettle 



Less J doz tin water cans retinned 

Total 37 53 

VOUCHER No. 397. M. CLUNE. 

4 hair mattresses made over $1 80 

16 husk mattresses 34x6 28 00 



1 13 


2 64 


1 05 


1 08 


1 32 


65 


25 


1 63 


25 


1 76 


80 


60 


75 


75 


$39 16 


1 63 



Total 32 SO 



192 



VOUCHER No. 398. NELSON M0ERI8 & CO. 

Ill lbs. ham $10 99 

120 lbs. lard 6 24 

171 lbs. B. bacon IS 68 

Total $30 91 

VOUCHER No. 399. GEO. HITZ & CO. 

34J§ bu. potatoes |8 55 

1 bbl. sweet potatoes 3 50 

5 bbls. potatoes 3 75 

2 bbls. apples 3 00 

1 bbl. musk melons 60 

6 water melons 60 

2 doz. celery 50 

8 baskets grapes 85 

Total 21 35 

VOUCHER No. 400. H. LIEBER CO. 

200 ft. IHn- oak moulding $4 00 

5 doz. 12x20 Amer. mirrors 2 00 

1 stick each of yellow, blue, pink, gray and brown pastel. . 2 25 

2 sticks white pastel . 90 

2 doz. tubes silver white 1 30 

1 di z. tubes brilliant white Nord ^ 90 

4 boxes water colors 2 08 

4 LaCroix Chinese white 40 

3 doz charcoal paper. 72 

2 doz. med. German pa^er 64 

6 Academy boards, 18x24 1 20 

1 doz. Bristol brushes 90 

1 doz. Russian brushes . 75 

2 doz. Wbatman's imp. paper 72 

Total 18 76 



VOUCHER No. 401. JOS. GARDNER. 

14 one-gal. coffee pots $5 60 

2 4X tin vegetable boilers 3 85 

2 4X tin soup boilers 3 65 

2 Perfection bottom steamers 3 00 

2 steam sinks 2 50 

Total 18 60 



193 



VOUCHER No. 402. E. C. ANDREWS, 

540 lbs. granulated soap $17 01 

Total $17 01 

VOUCHER No. 403. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

120 doz. eggs $16 80 

Total 16 80 

VOUCHER No. 404. KIPP BROS. 

1 doz. boxes tooth picks |0 40 

A doz. palm baskets « 1 34 

5 doz. hair brushes 10 00 

5 doz. E. T. combs 5 00 

Total 16 74 

VOUCHER No. 405. C. J. KUHN. 

Cakes $0 05 

Onions 20 

Peaches 30 

Apples 30 

Melons 50 

Bread 30 

Celery 25 

Cakes 05 

Peaches . 35 

Pumpkin 15 

Beans 25 

Lettuce 10 

Vinegar 60 

Olives 80 

Oats 25 

Corn meal 20 

Chips 50 

Peaches 40 

Watermelons 1 50 

Corn 10 

Onions 10 

Bullion 50 

Peaches 1 00 

Apples 25 

Celery 25 

Cranberries 10 

Oranges 60 

13— D. and D. 



194 

VOUCHER No. 405— Coatinued. 

Pretzeh $0 15 

Hominy 15 

Horse radish 40 

Spices 15 

Apples 25 

Bread 20 

Pears 50 

Total $11 75 

VOUCHER No. 406. THOMAS P. KEAN. 

5 pair hose $1 25 

2 waists 70 

2 Union suits 1 00 

2 suits underwear 1 40 

2 shirts 1 00 

4 shirts 1 00 

6 handkerchiefs • 50 

2 vests 25 

2 undersuits 1 00 

3 pair hose 75 

1 cap 25 

1 bolt netting 45 

Total 9 55 

VOUCHER No. 407. HOLLWEG & REESE. 

1 yellow bowl $0 45 

1 doz, Meakin cups 50 

1 doz. Meakin saucers 35 

1 doz. cup plates 21 

1 doz. R. R. goblets . . 55 

1 doz. 12-in. Meakin steaks 47 

^ doz. covered soap dishes 1 50 

^ doz. ewers and basins 3 25 

2 doz. pint Ma?on jars 84 

1 doz. quart Mason jars 58 

^ doz. gas chimneys 13 

Total 9 15 

VOUCHER No. 408. SCHWEIKLE & PRANGE. 

1 new cart piece and 4 bolts $0 60 

New gravel bed 4 00 

New doubletree irons 2 50 

1 large clip and hook 1 00 

2 large open rings 50 

1 new axle nut 50 

Total 9 10 



195 



VOUCHER No. 410. N. B. GEOFF & SON. 

65 lbs. butterine $S 04 

Total $8 04 

VOUCHER No. 410. JOHN O'NEILL. 

1,000 lbs. bran $4 50 

500 lbs. feed meal 2 50 

Total 7 00 

VOUCHER No. 411. L. A. GRINER. 

Professional service to cow $5 CO 

Medicine 1 00 

Total 6 00 

VOUCHER No. 412. DANIEL ROSE. 

5 lbs. insect powder $5 00 

Total 5 00 

VOUCHER No. 413. YULE & HARTMAN. 

10 new shoes, 3 old reset , . . $4 75 

Total 4 75 

VOUCHER No. 414. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

200 sh. 25x38— 80-lb. tint, cut $1 92 

26 sh, elite cover, cut 49 

8 sh. 3-ply No. 2 white bris., cut 24 

11 sh. 3-ply No. 2 white bris., cut . . 33 

100 sh. 24-lb. folio, asst., No. 1, cut 63 

4 cuts on above 40 

100 sh. 24-lb. folio, asst.. No. 1 63 

Total 4 64 

VOUCHER No. 415. STANDARD OIL CO. 

5 gal. Capitol cyl. oil $1 90 

10 gal. Renown eng. oil 2 10 

Total ' 4 00 



196 



VOUCHER No. 416. HENRY SYERUP & CO. 



12 water melons 
9 baskets grapes 
1 bbl. apples . . 



Total 



$1 44 
1 17 
1 25 



65 lbs. crackers , 
Total . . 



VOUCHER No. 417. PETER F. BRYCE. 



74 



3 74 



VOUCHER No. 418. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 



15 baskets grapes 
1 bbl. apples . . 



Total 



f2 10 
1 50 



3 60 



VOUCHER No. 419. E. G. HILL. 



50 roses, pearl des jardines 
Total . 



VOUCHER No. 420. AUSTIN & SON. 



Melon . . . 

Berries . . . 

Melon . . . 

1 tub ... . 
Corn meal . . 

2 lbs. crackers 
Sausage . . . 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 421. W. G. GRAHAM. 



4 crates peaches 
Total . . 



$3 00 



$0 30 
15 
25 
75 
10 
20 
30 



$1 40 



VOUCHER No. 422. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 



5| lbs. Manilla rope . 

1 snap 

i doz. hanks cord . . 
3 doz. moulding hooks 



$0 50 
15 
33 
30 



Total 

Total bills allowed October 5, 1896 



3 00 



2 05 



1 40 



1 28 
5,892 14 



197 

Bills Allowed October 30, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 423. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

October Pay-Roll—1 to 24. 

R. O. Johnson Superintendent $124 99 

Wm. E. Todd Bookkeeper 45 00 

S. Jean Cummings Clerk 22 50 

Sarah C. Peters Matron 25 00 

Mamie Coughlin Houskeeper 18 75 

John E. Lockridge Physician ........ 16 50 

M. H. Fields Phyeician 16 50 

Wm. H. Latham Instructor 93 75 

Wm. H. DeMotte Instructor 93 75 

S. J. Vail Instructor 62 50 

Henry Bierhaus Instructor 62 50 

August Jutt Instructor 62 50 

N. F. Morrow Instructor H2 50 

Orson Archibald Instructor 51 25 

Albert Berg ... Librarian 62 25 

S. W. Gilbert Instructor 56 25 

Chas. Kerney Instructor 62 50 

Tunis V. Archer Instructor 59 37 

E. J. Hecker Instructor 37 50 

Anna Hendricks . Instructor 43 74 

Ida Kinsley Instructor 37 50 

Mary Corwin Instructor 37 50 

Lucy Robinson Instructor 43 74 

Eva Heizer Instructor 53 1 2 

Carrie Smith Instructor 36 24 

Frances Thompson Instructor 30 00 

Nora V. Long Instructor 45 00 

Sarah Mart»hall Instructor 36 24 

Edith Fulton Instructor 28 12 

Fannie Shideler Instructor 24 99 

Ida Westfall Instructor 24 99 

M. M. Clinton Boys' Supvervisor .... 37 50 

Jas. Vahey Boys' Supvervisor .... 15 00 

Maggie McCauley Girls' Supvervisor .... 15 00 

Mary Ditiiey Nurse 18 75 

S. Brandenburg Watchwoman 15 00 

Alice Wilson Usher 15 00 

Wm. Langstaff Florist and foreman, F.&G. 56 25 

Louis Prinzler Engineer , 48 75 

Thomas Marshall Engineer's assistant ... 22 50 

Chas. Friedgen ........ Electrician 30 00 

Chas. Howard Carpenter 26 25 

Wm. G. Falls Laborer 15 00 

Eugene Yontz Laborer 15 00 

W. A. Johanson Laborer 15 00 



198 



VOUCHER h'o. 423— Continued. 



Henry Freeman Laborer. . . 

Chas. Kissling Watchman . 

John Boehm Baker. . . . 

Wm. Hallowell First Cook. 

Joe Skinner Second Cook. 

Nora Murphy Third Cook. 

Mary Kelley Fourth Cook. 

Ella Lawhead Laundress. . 

Kate Stratton Laundress . . 

Mary O'Connell Laundress. . 

Kate Sullivan Laundress. . 

Mary Elstrod Laundress . . 

Annie Linhun Chambermaid 

Sarah Ryan. Chambermaid 

Ella Welsh Chambermaid 

Kate Linhun Chambermaid 

Julia Doherty Waitress. . . 

Lillie Kelley Waitress. . . 

Delia Calter Waitress. . . 

Nellie Morariety Waitress. . . 

Julia Shea Waitress. . . 

Mary Strattman Waitress. . . 



$15 00 


22 


50 


33 


75 


30 00 


18 


75 


11 


25 


8 


04 


10 


50 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


90 


11 


25 


10 50 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 



Total $2,101 58 

VOUCHER No. 424. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscellaneous Expenses During Month as Follows, Balance Due from Pupih' 

Cash Book; 

Otto Brunning — 

Shoe repairing |0 70 

Pants and cap 5 00 

New shoes 2 25 

Suspenders - 25 

Ida Fellows, bal. due on shoes 90 

Edward Gardner — 

May uniform 1 1 60 

Sho? rep 06 

Mary Hendren, shoe rep 85 

Lawrence Hook — 

Bal. May uniform 4 60 

New shoes, 1 pair 2 00 

Shoe repairs 1 00 

Bal. on shoes, 2d pair 22 

Lillie Imus — 

New shoes 1 75 

Shoe rep 35 

Bruce Myers, bal. on May uniform 3 65 

Horace Montgomery — 

January uniform 11 60 

2 shirts 1 00 

1 tie 25 



199 

VOUCHER No. 424— Continued. 

3 pair hose 

Pants and cap, May 

Laura Rex — 

Balance on shoes and rep 

Misc. clothing 

Pair slippers 

Aaron Young — 

May uniform 

Bal. on shoe rep 

Mearle Lidgard, shoe rep 

Ben Berg, shoe rep 

Mary Corn — 

2 pair shoes 

Bal. R. R. fare 

Maud Alexander, bal. R. R. fare 

James Wright, shoe rep 

John Plunkett, coat and cap, Feb 

John Easterday — 

Shoe repairs 

R. R. fare 

Sarah Hendrixson, bal. shoe rep 

Wm. Dekamps — 

Shoe repairs, November 11 

Pants and cap, December 15 

Shoe repairs . . 

Railroad fare 

Herschel P. Miller- 
Balance December uniform 

May uniform 

- Shoe repairs 

Cap 

Handkerchiefs and shirt 

4 teachers' class books 

1 school lamp and i pt. alcohol 

1 copy Articulation Manual 

1 copy Morals and Manners 

1 copy Experiments 

Exp. on lead pencils from Chicago 

Freight on books from Chicago 

5 lbs. hops 

10 lbs. malt 

Bread and cakes 

Pickles 

Green fruits 

Sausage 

Beans 

Coffee 80 

Subscription to News, 2 copies, October 1 to December 31 . . 2 60 

Subscription to Catholic Record, 1 year, February, 1896, to 

February, 1897 2 00 

Subscription to Sun, 2 copies, October 10 to November 10 . . 1 00 



$0 25 


5 00 


2 25 


67 


1 50 


6 35 


11 


1 26 


68 


4 00 


50 


2 45 


83 


6 50 


45 


2 55 


35 


20 


5 00 


1 00 


5 10 


4 55 


9 60 


1 70 


50 


74 


1 00 


45 


1 00 


1 00 


52 


40 


32 


1 25 


50 


1 45 


10 


15 


30 


25 



200 



VOUCHEE No. 424-Continued. 

Nellie McHugh, waitress, 14 days 

40 2c. stamps ... 

Freight on electric lamps from St. Louis 

Freight od linen from Chicago 

Cost of money order to Lafayette . . 

1 return ticket from Terre Haute, acct. F. M. Stalker . . . 

Freight on two bales of blankets from Cleveland 

Paid balance due on general books as follows account 
maintenance — 

American Asylum for Deaf, books ^ . 

American Book Co., Cincinnati, book 

A. Flanigan, Chicago, books 

Ginn & Co., Chicago, books 

L. P. Ayers, drilling and cutting oats 

Baker & Thornton, school supplies 

N. S. Driggs, roach powder 

Paragon Oil Co., gasoline 

French Chemical Co., bluing 

C. L. Wayne & Co., kitchen supplies 

Jos. Pflueger, machine oil 

Ceylon Tea Co., vinegar 

Mica Eoofing Co., athanon 

A. Kiefer Co., indelible ink 

Parrott & Taggart, crackers 

SchnuU & Co., bal. groceries 

McCoy-Howe Co., drugs, etc 

R. Armstrong, misc. groceries 

Huntington Seed Co., misc. seeds . 

Schweikle & Prange, misc. rep 

Techentin & Co., harness rep 

Kingan Co., sausage 

R. H. Rees, pumpkins 

W. E. Todd, vegetables 

New York Store, oil cloth 

H. Lieber Co, mirror 

A. Burdsall Co., glass. . • 

H. Syrup & Co., grapes 

Elgin Dairy Co., produce 

C. Vonnegut, twine 

Yule & Hartman, shoeing 

Less credit by cash paid R. O. Johnson, Supt., by 
Board of Control, December 5, 1895, to be used by 
him in making cash payments from time to time, 
the same to be accounted for and returned to State 
use and benefit at end of fiscal year, as herewith done. 



7 


00 




80 




47 




88 




03 


4 


30 


1 


60 


16 


80 


16 


32 


7 


85 


16 


97 


26 


10 


2 


02 




45 


1 


60 


1 


50 




72 




40 


1 


50 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


30 




60 




84 


1 


55 


1 


28 


2 


00 


1 


05 




26 




25 




30 


1 


00 




55 




75 




60 


1 


60 




62 


3 


00 



$260 57 



250 00 



Balance due ... - 

Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 



10 57 
$2,112 15 



201 



EXHIBIT No. 11. 



A Detailed and Itemized Statement of- all Ex-penditures on Ac- 
count of Current Expense and Repairs During the Fiscal 
Year Ending October 31, 1896. Original Vouchers Filed 
with Auditor of State, Duplicates on File in this Office. 



Bills Allowed December 5, 1895. 

VOUCHER No. 1. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid for by Superintendent — 
200 brick for boiler house repairs . $1 40 

Total $1 40 

VOUCHER No. 2. FRED J. MACK & CO. 

Contract for painting outside of school building, tinting ceil- 
ings and walls of all rooms, corridors and entrance, and 
varnishing all woodwork $810 00 

- Total 810 00 

VOUCHER No. 3. INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 

25 lbs. Eagle lead |1 38 

50 lbs. French ochre ' 2 00 

2 gal. dark drab paint 2 50 • 

6 gal. boiled oil 2 30 

5 gal. liquid drier 1 75 

5 gal. liquid benzine 63 

5 gal. Ex. No. 1 coach varnish 61:8 

Total 16 81 

VOUCHER No. 4. JOHN F. STEPHENS. 

2 men, 10 hours each $10 00 

2 men, 8 hours each 5 60 

10 lbs. rivets 70 

Total 16 30 



202 



VOUCHER No. 5. J. C. DICKSON. 



8 pieces 4x4x12 in., 128 ft $2 56 

1 piece hickory, 12 ft 42 

200 ft. 1 1 in. poplar 7 00 

Total $9 98 



VOUCHER No. 6. McELWAINE, RICHARDS & CO. 

4 2x1 C. I. ells $0 37 

6 l-in. iiange unions 84 

12 l-in. R. and L. couplings 35 

12 l-in. street tees 45 

6 f-in. street tees 20 

12 I in. street tees 25 

12 5-in. street tees 15 

6 j-in. American unions 67 

12 I in. tees 18 

12 |xj-in. tees 18 

3 ^-in. L. S. angle valves and keys . 90 

3 Ixi-in. S. S. mixers 25 

1 10-inch round burner 50 

1 14-in. P. O. basin 60 

4 f in. Jenkens angle valves." 2 00 

Total 7 89 



VOUCHER No. 7. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

11 lbs. Xo. 12 W. P. wire $2 40 

2 K. W. cleat roseltts 30 

2 K. W. concealed rosettes 28 

Total 2 98 



VOUCHER No. 8. VVM. McWORKMAN. 

Repairing sink, etc $2 50 

Total 2 50 

Total bills allowed Decembers, 1895 $867 86 



208 



Bills Allowed January 9, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 9. J EERY REDDING. 

Foundation for djnamo, with blocks and bolts . $50 00 

Total 



$50 00 



VOUCHER No. 10. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 



Nov. 6. Ix8-in. hinge hasp 

1 V. B. post hole auger 

1 No. 77 brass pad- lock 

Dec. 2. 1 keg 8d. wire nails 

1 keg 8d. cut nails 

1 keg lOd. cut nails 

1 keg Sd. steel nails 

1 keg 20d. steel nails .... 

2 gross each 2x4-in., fx6-in., fx8-in., IxlO-in., 

Ixl2in., llxlO-in., Iixl2-in., l^xlO-in., 

2xlO-in., 1^x12- in. bright heal screws. , . 

1 gross each rd. head, blued screws, lx8-in., 

Iix8 in., I|xl0-in 

1 doz. 4-in. No. 377 door bolts 

2 doz. 5x16 bolts 

2 doz. 22-in. gate hooks and eyes 

1 doz. each, hinges, hooks, hasps and staples . . 

1 doz. No. 634 cabinet keys 

] bide cutting plyers 

3 IJ A. E. bell-faced hammers 

1 No. 75 tool handle 

1,000 No. 10 gilt nails 

1 No. 13 Stanley plumb level 

1 No. 30 Stanley plane 

1 No. 26 Stanley plane 

1 2 fi. bound rule 

3 lbs. 8 oz. tacks 

30 5xl4-in. machine bolts 

30 |x5 carriage bolts 

144 |x7-in. carriage bolts 

Nov. IS. 6 machine bolts, |x5 inches 

335 lbs. cast washers 

30 carriage bolts, |x42 inches 

Nov.5^18.j^^ doz. No. 240 3-in. chandelier hooks 

" 20. i doz. bolts 

§ doz, W. W. brushes 

Total 



12 
68 
74 
15 
90 
80 
75 
65 



2 99 

69 
51 
16 
17 
•11 
08 
48 

1 <4 
78 
65 
56 

1 16 
87 
22 
83 
75 
27 

1 37 
21 

1 18 
30 
25 
50 

1 80 



33 38 



5 50 


4 


80 


3 


64 




65 


3 


15 




56 


3 


30 


1 


13 


2 35 


3 67 



2U4 



VOUCHER No. 11. BALKE & KRVUSS CO. 

Dec. 10. 25 pieces 2x4x12, 200 ft |2 80 

100 ft. IJ-in. flooring 

20 oak posts, round 

10 pieces 2x6x12, 10 pieces 2x6x14, 260 ft. pine . 
Dec. 18. i M. shingles 

7 pieces 2x10x18, 210 ft. pine 

2 pieces 2x10x12, 40 ft. pine 

9 pieces 2x4x18, 108 ft.; 3 pieces 2x4x12, 24 ft.; 
132 ft 

6 pieces 2x8x10, 78 ft. pine 

12 pieces 2x6x14, 168 ft. pine 

6 pieces 2x12x18, 214 ft 

Total $31 55 



VOUCHER No. 12. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO. 

Dec. 14. 3 gal. silver gray paint, 2 gal. sky blue paint, 1 

gal. lead color paint $7 50 

Dec. 16. 1 light 15|x35 glass 31 

^ gal. maroon paint 35 

10 gal boiled oil 3 91 

5 gal. turpentine 1 60 

25 lbs. Eagle lead 1 35 

Total 15 02 



VOUCHER No. 13. McELWAlNE-RICHARDS CO. 

1 3-in. C. I. tee $0 45 

1 3-in. plug 15 

1 6-in. combination plyers 1 00 

42 ft. 3-in. asbestos pipe covering 8 40 

2 3-in. ells 46 

1 3-in. tee 30 

Total 10 76 



VOUCHER No. 14. FRANK DELL. 

2 bu. lime $0 4n 

2 pieces flue pipe 70 

1 piece top pipe 65 

2 bu. lime 40 

2 bu. lime 4) 

3 bu. lime 60 

Total .; 15 



Oct. 


29. 


Nov. 


9. 


Dec. 


19. 


(1 


24. 


11 


30. 



205 



VOUCHER No. 15. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Nov. 21. 2 doz. pkgs salamoniac $0 20 

^ doz. zincs 20 

Dec. 6. 2 bells 80 

2h lbs. annunciator wire 65 

1 battery 35 

1 5 amp. paste switch 22 

Dec. 24. 16f yds. lamp cord 44 

2J lbs. salamoniac 25 

Total 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 .... 



Bills Allowed February 6, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 16. McELWATNE-RICHARDS CO. 



S3 01 



$146 87 



Jan. 15. 3 No. 5 Draper steel oiier^ $0 70 

lOJ lbs. bar tin. . . 1 99 

1 lb. copper rivets, Jxi; . . . i;3 

2 lbs. graphite 25 

64 lbs. flax packing Ibl 

12 lbs. asbestos packing 2 40 

1 sheet xV"i°- asbestos hoard 35 

3 2-inch flange unions, 12 1-inch cast iron ells, 

12 2-inch cast iron ells 79 

Jan. 16. 2 H-inch closet repairs 2 00 

2 No. 7 Ricketts elbows 1 00 

Jan. 20. 168 lbs. lead pipe. . . 8 40 

1 14-inch P. O. M. P. basin 50 

18 i-inch plugs . 20 

Jan. 29. 12 No. 1 basin clamps 75 

17 lbs. wiping solder 1 87 

6 lbs. bar tin 1 26 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 17. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 

200 ft. 1 J-inch oak $7 50 

300 ft. t-inch poplar 10 50 

500 ft. quarter round 2 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 18. PIONEER BRASS WORKS. 

64 brass tail pieces for water faucets $14 08 

Total 



$24 00 



20 00 



14 08 



206 

VOUCHEE No. 19. DEAN BEOS. 

Jan. 20. 4 only No. 8 valve springs |0 80 

4 only No. 8 rubber valves 5 GO 

4 only No. 5 valve springs 40 

Total J6 20 

VOUCHEE No. 20. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 

6 only f-in.xl^-in. patch bolts $0 90 

1 lb. Eainbow packing 60 

6 hours' time for H. Davis 3 00 

6 hours' time for F. Gallon 1 50 

Total , , . 6 00 

VOUCHEE No. 21. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

Jan. 2. 2 lbs. fin. 18 wire brads , $0 15 

2 lbs. 1-in. 18 wire brads 12 

2 lbs. li-in. 18 wire brads 12 

2 lbs. IJ-in. 14 wire brads 10 

2 lbs. If-in. 14 wire brads ... 10 

2 lbs. 2-in. 14 wire brads 10 

1 only No. 3 Wentworth saw vise 1 00 

1 keg 6d common cut nails 2 65 

Jan. 10. 4J lbs. finch rope 44 

Total 4 78 

VOUCHER No. 22. HIDE, LEATHER & BELTING CO. 

1 lb. only l^-in. packing, 1-^ lb. only |-in. packing. $2 25 

Total 2 25 



Total bills allowed February 6, 1896. . . . $77 31 



Bills Allowed March 5, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 23. LOUIS PEINZLEE. 

Eepairing washstands in girls' and boys' wash 

rooms, and closet in girls' side, 122 hours at 40c $48 80 

Total 48 80 

VOUCHEE No. 24. INDIANAPOLIS M. & C. UNION. 

200 ft. H-in. drepsed poplar $7 50 

200 ft. l|-in. dressed poplar 7 50 

Total 15 00 



207 



VOUCHER No. 25. PIONEER BRASS WORKS. 

20 tail pieces for faucets at 22c $4 40 

3 new handles 90 

Total $5 30 



VOUCHER No. 26. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

36 1-in. rubber plugs $2 40 

36 ft. No. N. P. basin chain 2 55 

Total 4 95 



VOUCHER No. 27. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO, 

Jan. 15. 2 lights 36x36 D. S $171 

Feb. 8. 2 lights 36x36 D. S 171 

$3 42 
Cr. by glass returned 63 

Total 2 79 



VOUCHER No. 28. G. ITTENBACH & CO. 
2 window sills 3 ft. 6x5 in. x 7 in ...... . $2 45 

Total 2 45 

VOUCHER No. 29. CLEMENS VON N EG UT. 

Feb. 4. 1 each 7 and 8 B. B. sash cord $1 17 

1 doz. papers 2-oz. tacks 16 

Feb. 8. 1 chair seat 10 

1 lb. |-in. copper rivets 23 

Feb. 24. 2 clipper springs 10 

2h lbs. spring wire 16 

Total 1 92 



Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 $81 21 



208 
Bills Allowed April 9, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 30. R. O. .JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid for advertising improvement notice, Indian- 
apolis News, 3 times |2 19 

Total $2 19 

VOUCHER No. 31. BA.LKE & KRA.USS CO. 

336 boards 1x6x12=1,596 ft 130 32 

66 boards 2x4x12=528 ft > 7 86 

130 No. 1 posts 29 90 

2 pieces 8x8x8=86 ft. oak 2 58 

3 pieces 6x6x16=144 ft. ^ 

3 pieces 6x6x10= 90 ft. I =297 ft 5 64 

3 pieces 4x4x16= 63 ft, 3 

Total 76 10 

VOUCHER No. 32. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO. 

6 gal. red paint |3 90 

Total 3 90 

VOUCHER No. 33. JOS. GARDNER. 

Repairing roof, down spouts and pipe for steam 

cooker $2 95 

Total 2 95 

VOUCHER No. 34. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Jan. 25. 2 10-amp. paste switches $0 60 

" 29. ^ lb. competition tape 20 

Mar. 4. 1^ lbs. No. 8 W. P. wire 23 

6 only Edison China sockets 1 38 

" 30. 1 10-amp. S. P. paste switch 27 

Total 2 68 



Total bills allowed April 9, 1896 $87 62 



209 



Bills Allowed May 7, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 35. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Isaac Allen for 2 loads sod $4 00 

Total $4 00 

VOUCHER No. 36. C. M. KIRKPATRICK. 

3,870 feet cement walk $464 40 

8 feet steps 6 00 

608| feet brick ariaway 73 05 

476 feet in engine house . . 38 08 

Grading and graveling driveway ....... 10 00 

Grading lawn on Washington street 5 00 

Building wall at steam trap 15 00 

Sodding 4,700 feet 52 50 

Grading and graveling east drive 13 50 

Catch basin in ariaway 10 00 

Difference in top for steam trap 1 50 

Building walls in windows 3 00 

Total 692 03 

VOUCHER No. 37. HENRY COBURN. 

104—2x4x12 pine=832 ft $12 48 

100— 1x6x16 pine=800 ft 12 80 

100—1x6x12 pine=600 ft 9 60 

60 ^ -round cedar posts 7 20 

32 2x4x12, 256 ft. pine . . 3 84 

1,400 poplar pickets 56 00 

104 oak posts, No. 1 28 08 

Total 130 00 

VOUCHER No. 38. A. BURDSAL CO. 

April 8. 2 gal. No. 105 Homestead paint $2 80 

" 13. 5 gal. benzine 50 

1 gal. walnut stain . 85 

20 lbs. Wheeler's dark wood filler 1 35 

700 lbs. Wood rufTlead 31 50 

30 gal. boiled oil 12 00 

5 gal Japan 2 75 

} doz. No. 25 Adams' stucco brushes 2 38 

1^ doz. No. 25 Adams' stucco brushes 2 38 

Total 56 51 

14— D. and D. 



210 

VOUCHER No. 39. CENTRAL RUBBER & SUPPLY CO. 

300 ft. fin. 3-ply hose ami couplings $30 00 

Total $30 00 

VOUCHER No. 40. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

2 only 2-in. flange unions $0 36 

215 ft. black iron pipe 5 61 

106JS ft. galv. iron pipe 4 15 

12 only jj in. lock nuts 07 

12 Jenkens disk globe valves 471 

6 only |-in. comp. bibbs - . 2 50 

1 J lbs. |-in. Garlock packing 83 

11 lbs. block tin 1 98 

3 only Chapman gate valves 3 62 

3 only Globe valves 75 

Total 24 58 

VOUCHER No. 41. J. A. GRIFFIN. 

Manfg. and hanging 8 awnings S22 00 

Total 22 00 

VOUCHER No. 42. INDPLS. M. & C. UNION. 

2,400 ft. 2-in. batting $ 8 00 

Total 18 00 

VOUCHER No. 43. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1 doz No. 4280 drawer pulls. . $0 45 

1 only Home Spring 1 00 

2 doz. carriage bolts 16 

I doz 7-in. Daisy W. W. brushes 3 80 

Total 5 41 

VOUCHER No. 44. FRANK DELL. 

30 lbs. N. A. plaster $0 45 

II bu. lime 1 60 

50 ft. 4-in. drain tile 2 00 

Total 4 05 

VOUCHER No. 45. A. A. HELSTERN. 

4 joints Russia iron pipe f 2 00 

Total 2 00 

Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 S988 5S 



211 

Bills Allowed June 9, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 46. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid for 3^ loads sod |4 38 

Total $4 38 

VOUCHER No. 47. HENKY COBURN. 

400 pickets l|xlf in. 4-ft. poplar |16 GO 

40 oak posts,' dressed 10 80 

50 2x4 in. 12-ft. pine, 400 ft 6 00 

Total 32 80 

VOUCHER No. 48. A. BURDSAL CO. 

400 lbs. Woodruflf white lead $18 00 

30 gal. boiled oil ] 2 00 

1 qt. pure orange shellac 90 

Total 30 90 

VOUCHER No. 49. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

2 only 2^1 4 in. set screws |0 06 

1 keg lOd cut finish nails 2 95 

1 keg lOd cut com. nails = . . 2 80 

1 keg lOd wire nails 3 05 

1 keg 8d com. cut. nails 2 90 

1 keg 8d com. wire nails 3 15 

10 hanks No. 2 chalk line 40 

1 hank each Nos. 9 and 10 sash cord 1 32 

2 lbs. only l^-in. trunk nails 12 

2 lbs. only ll^-in. trunk nails 12 

1 gross pairs wrought trunk hinges 63 

2 gross assorted trunk keys 50 . 

1 each Morse drills, s=/2 — 1\ — k ii' • • . . . 42 

2 9-oz. riveting hammers 42 

2 sets hinges 36 

1 doz. jgxli in. stove bolts 08 

1 doz. No. 740 trunk locks ] 35 

Total 20 63 

VOUCHER No. 50. PHILIP BRIDGES. 

234 sq. yds. sodding $18 26 

Total 18 26 

VOUCHER No. 51. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 

8 pieces 4x6x8-128 ft. oak ■ . $3 20 

25 pieces 2x4x12-200 ft. pine 3 20 

Total 6 40 



212 

VOUCHER No. 52. FRANK DELL. 

12 bu. Hunt, lime 

Total 

Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 



$2 40 



Bills Allowed July 15, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 53. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscellaneous Expense During June as Follows: 

Paid W. W. Freeman, white washing as 

per contract • • $72 00 

Less material furnished by Institute . 13 50 

$58 50 

Paid balance due on books as follows: 

Indianapolis Elect. Co., Salamoniac ■ 40 

W. J. Holliday, hoop iron 1 00 

William Langsenkamp, valve repairing . 1 60 

Total $61 50 

VOUCHER No. 54. WM. McWORKMAN. 

210 slate, 10x20 $12 60 

15 slate, llx2i. 1 05 

10 slate, 1-2x24 80 

10 lbs. nails • ■ ■ 50 

8 lbs. solder 2 00 

6 sheets tin 1 50 

Charcoal 50 

15 ft. 4-in. down spout 3 00 

15only4in hooks 1 50 

130^ hours' time 52 20 

Lining sink 7 00 

Corrugated csiling 17 00 

7 galvanized iron strainers 7 00 

Total 106 65 

VOUCHER No. 55. C. L. WAYNE & CO. 

.300 lbs. Empire white lead $13 50 

20 gal. boiled oil 8 40 

lOO lbs. Eagle lead 5 35 

20 gal. boiled linseed oil 8 40 

10 gal. turpentine 3 30 

25 lbs. French zinc 2 25 

Total 41 20 



$25 00 


1 50 


4 £0 



213 



VOUCHER No. 56. C. W. SULLIVAN. 

Repairing columns on veranda and plastering — 

Plasterers' time, 50 hours 

Hauling 

Material furnished 

Total $31 00 



VOUCHER No. 57. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

50 ft. Ig in. 3-ply rubber hose $9 45 

125 gas hooks, assorted 58 

25 ft. oak tanned 2-in. belting . . . . ^ 
25 ft. oak tanned 1^-in. belting . . . j 
2 2-in Chapman gate valves . 
2 I in. Chapman gate valves . 

1 14-in. P. O. basin . 75 

Handles and stems for McShane bibbs 2 00 

2 only 2x4 in. nipples . . 30 



:} 



3 78 
8 80 



Total 25 66 



VOUCHER No. 58. A. BURDSAL CO. 

5 gal. No. 178 H. S. paint ... $6 25 

1 gal. No. 81 H. S. paint 1 10 

10 gal. special floor paint 10 50 



Total 17 85 



V')UCHER No, 59. ALDAG P. c^ V. Co. 



June 12. 2 g^l- bronze liquid . . 

2 camel hair brushes . . 

2 gal. aephaltum .... 

1 sash brush ... 
June 13. 2 whitewash brushes . . 

100 lbs. Spanish whiting 

10 lbs. flake white glue . 
June 16. 150 lbs. whiting . . 

1 doz. W. W. brush. . . 

50 lbs. putty 

100 lbs. whiting .... 



$1 


00 




30 


1 


00 




20 


4 


50 


1 


60 


1 


50 


2 


25 


2 


25 


1 


25 


1 


50 



Total 17 25 



214 



VOUCHER No. 60. CENTRAL RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO. 



12y\;^ lbs. J-in- Oarlock packing . . . 
7^ lbs. fin. pure gum 

Total 

Total bills allowed July 15, 1896 



n 71 

5 44 



$7 15 



$308 26 



Bills Allowed August 6, 1898. 



VOUCHER No. 61. A. BURDSAL CO. 



.July 1. 1 box- 13^x17, D. S. A. . . . 
1 box 12 xl8, D. S. A. . . . 
1 box 13ix22, D. S. A j" 

1 box 14^x24, D. S. A j 

100 lbs. Eagle lead . 

50 lbs. V. M. B. zinc in oil . . . 

2 gal. Damar varnish 

5 lbs. pure lamp black 

|- doz. No. 120 putty knives . . . 

1 gal. japan 

^ doz. sash brushes 

^ doz. No. 25 stucco brushes . . . 
^ doz. car and panel paint brushes 

July 8. 1 gal. No. 178 Homestead paint . 
'« 15. 15'J lbs. Eagle lead 

2 gal. No. 178 Homestead paint . 
1 gal. japan 

1 lb. No. 6000 P. G. bronze . . . 

4 gal. special lloor paint .... 
July 17. 50 lbs. Mineral paint, dry . . . . 

" 18. 1 only No. 1 wall stippler , . . . 
" 21. 10 gal. turpentine 

5 gal. special floor paint .... 

2 gal. pure white shellac .... 
July 27. 25 lbs. ochre in oil 

25 lbs. Crown vermilion red . . . 

5 lbs. pure Prussian blue .... 

July 28. I gal. bronze liquid 

Total . 



10 


50 


3 


25 


2 


50 




65 




34 




50 




31 


2 


35 


1 


58 


1 


25 


7 


88 


2 


50 




50 


1 


75 


4 


20 


1 


25 


1 


50 


3 


50 


5 


25 


1 


75 


1 


00 


1 


25 


2 


00 




75 



$68 06 



215 

VOUCHER No. 62. INDFLS. P. & C. CO. 

800 lbs. Eagle lead 1 

100 lbs. putty I 

10 gal. turpentine [ $46 73 

50 lbs. plaster paris I 

1 gal. dryer J 

Total 146 73 

VOUCHER No. 63. HILDEBEAND HDW. CO. 

May 2. 1 30-in. revolving mower knife ...... $15 00 

1 30-in. bottom knife 5 00 

7 bottom screws 50 

July 28. 1 oil Btove 1 00 

Total 21 50 

VOUCHER No. 64. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

July 27. 4 16x16— lOM, 359 $7 00 

" 29. 2 2- in. P. & C. swing checks 9 38 

1 14-in. P. &C. swing checks 3 19 

1 2x3-in. nipple 08 

Total . 19 65 

VOUCHER No. 65. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 

500 ft. dressed poplar . . S17 00 

Total 17 00 

VOUCHER No. 66. C. E. SCHOTT. 

July 8. 2 lbs. solder $0 60 

1 ft li-in. lead pipe 18 

1 2-in. combination ferrule 35 

8 hours' time 4 80 

July 10. 5 ft. |-in. ex. strong lead pipe 75 

1 |-in. compression faucet 65 

4 lbs. solder 1 20 

2 balls for bath cock 20 

1 ball for basin cock 10 

9 hours' lime 5 40 

Total 14 23 

VOUCHER No. 67. CONSOLIDATED C. & L. CO. 

144 ft. 6-iD. drain tile $7 20 

Total 7 2) 



$0 99 


3 50 


60 


1 20 


66 


25 



216 

VOUCHER No. 68. FRANK DELL. 

June 10. 3 pieces 6-in. ells 

July 8. 1 barrel cement 

3 bii. Huntington lime 

July 17. 6 bu. Huntington lime 

" 24. 2 pieces 6-in. ells 

1 piece 5 in. ells 

Total $7 20 

VOUCHER No. 69. ALBERT GALL. 

Papering as per contract f 8 60 

Total 8 60 

VOUCHER No. 70. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 

April 30. 1 frame for 24-in. Stilison wrench $0 40 

July 3. 1 2i-in. I. B Jenkins Globe valve 4 00 

" 25. 2 ^-in. L burner cocks 30 

1 ixl-in. tee t'5 



Total 4 75 

VOUCHER No. 71. C. L. WAYNE & CO. 

2 doz. No. 4832 cupboard turns $1 90 

2 doz. No. 40 3- in. gate hooks and eyes 15 

1 doz. No. 723 wardrobe locks 1 15 



Total 3 20 

VOUCHER No. 72. ALDAG P. & V. CO. 
lib. No. 6000 bronze $1 00 



Total 1 00 



Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 $219 12 



Bills Allowed September 10, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 73. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid Miscellaneous Expense During August, as 
Follows : 
John Baker, for services as painter, July 20 to 

August 31—37 days |55 50 

Henry Allen, whitewashing 1 50 

Sallie Cantrell, housecleaning, August 17 to 28 . 9 17 

Reuben Cantrell, housecleaning, August 17 to 28 9 17 

Samuel Martin, housecleaning, August 17 to 28 9 17 

Pauline Keller, housecleaning, August 17 to 28 . 9 17 

Carfare sending for supplies 30 

Total $93 98 



217 



VOUCHER No. 74. ALBERT GALL. 

28J yds. ingrain carpet 

46,!j yds. tapestry Brussels carpet 

IO2 yds. linoleum 

772 y<^8. tapestry border 

35 yds. tapestry border 

27 yds. ingrain carpet 

Papering girls' study 

10 pieces hall 

3 pieces border 

Hanging 

Papering officers' dining-room 

3 pieces border 

Hanging 

Papering boys' study 

Papering hall stairway 

Papering 2 rooms 

92 yds. tapestry Brussels 

12 pair Hartshorn brackets 

4 doz. shade knobs 

33 yds. linoleum 

6 yds. tapestry Brussels 

15 yds. lining 

14 shades 

3 shades ... 

3 shades 

3 shades 

1 shade 

17 shades 

4 shades 

2 doz. slats . . 

2 doz. pair brackets 

^ gross cord 

Total 



$18 30 
36 16 

5 00 
58 13 
26 25 
17 55 
23 64 

1 00 

1 50 

2 10 
14 50 

45 

30 

23 64 

7 16 

14 20 

82 80 

60 

1 00 

14 50 
4 50 

1 05 

15 40 

2 67 
1 95 

3 72 
1 05 

15 98 

3 28 

20 

50 

43 



$399 51 



VOUCHER No. 75. W. G. MUNSON. 



To plumbing work — changing service lines, 
grates, range, stoves and ovens for natural gas, 

as per contract 

Less amt. to be paid January 7, 1897, or be- 
fore if work is satisfactory 



Total 



$450 00 



100 00 



350 00 



VOUCHER No. 76. M. H. FARRELL. 

3 gate-posts, 9 ft. by 14 in., stone $100 00 

Total 



100 00 



218 



VOUCHER No. 77. A. BURDSAL CO. 

Aug. 19. 100 lbs. Eagle white lead 

1 gal. Damar varnish 

5 gal. floor oil 

Aug. 21. 20 gal. floor oil 

2 gal. No. 178 Homestead paint 

5 gal. turpentine 

10 gal. floor oil 

Aug. 25. 2 gals, slating 

" 26. 1 gal. asphaltuQi 

" 29. 1 gal. elating 

5 lbs. lampblack 

Aug. 31. 10 gals, boiled oil 

150 lbs. Eagle lead 

1 gal. No. 178 H. S. paint 

5 gals, special floor paint 

Credit on price floor oil, 35 gals., at 3 cents 
Total 



$5 50 


1 50 


2 25 


9 00 


2 50 


1 75 


4 50 


7 00 


40 


3 50 


65 


3 60 


8 25 


1 25 


5 25 


$56 90 


1 05 



$55 85 



VOUCHER No. 78. FRED J. MACK & CO. 

Painting ceiling and walls Superintendent's bath 

room $12 00 

Touching up walls in library and shoe shop . . 12 50 

Painting lower part of columns, front of building 3 00 

Total 27 50 

VOUCHER No. 79. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Aug. 20. 152 ft. lamp cord $1 52 

1,200 ft. No. 14 W. P. wire 4 80 

50 K. W. rosettes 4 50 

36 Edison's sockets. No. 5,664 9 72 

24 gas attachments 1 20 

24 horseshoe cutouts 1 68 

2 inch black tape 38 

Aug. 25. 1-25 Amp. Bryan D. P. switch 1 10 

Total 24 90 



VOUCHER No. 80, HOME STOVE CO. 

1 — 8 No. 24 Art Royal Range, Russian pipe and 

zinc 

3 drip pans 

Total 



$22 00 
1 50 



23 50 



219 



VOUCHER No. 81. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 



July 
Aug. 



18. 
6. 



Aug. 


8. 


Aug. 


19. 


(( 


20. 


(< 


26. 


July 


1. 


July 


6. 



,', doz. No. 90 door bolts 

1 doz. A. E. hammer handles .... 

1 doz. 4- in. slim taper files 

1 doz. 5-in. slim taper files 

1 keg 10 d. cut nails . 

1 keg 3 d. cut nails 

1 keg 10 d. wire nails 

1 keg 6 d. wire nails . . .... 

5 lb?, i-inch No. 16 brads 

12 pkgs. 8-oz. tacks 

4 6x18 blk. registers 

1 i^ doz. foot rests 

2 doz. 937J shutter bars . . 

1 gross |-in. No. 4 rd. hd. brass screws 

2 doz. machine screws . 

1 doz. pore, hat knobs 

3 pair spring hinges 

1 set Yale castors 

Total 



34 

35 
35 
48 
97 
67 
22 
47 
40 
10 
80 
99 
50 
30 
10 
18 
38 
33 



622 93 



VOUCHER No. 82. DANIEL STEWART CO. 



July 1. 5 pound red sanders . . 
^ gal. alcohol 

Aug. 29. 5 boxes 10x12 d. s. glass 
2 boxes 8x10 d. s. glass 
300 lbs. putty 

Total 



$0 10 
75 

19 39 



20 24 



VOUCHER No. 83. CHAS. MANKEDICK. 

20 loads concrete gravel |20 00 

Total 



20 00 



VOUCHER No. 84. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 



200 ft. U in. oak 

6 pieces 4x6x12 in.^144 ft. pine 
25 pieces 2x4x12 in.=200 ft. pine 

100 ft. Y. P. flooring 

^ M shingles 

Total 



$7 00 

4 32 

3 00 

2 70 

75 



17 77 



220 



VOUCHER No. 85. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO. 

250 lbs. Eagle lead | 

1 gal. Damar varnish j- $15 03 

1 gal, turpentine i 



Total . 115 03 



VOUCHER No. 86. STANDARD OIL CO. 

28 gal. Per. oil and pkg $3 83 

52^ gal. Per. oil 5 76 

$9 59 

Cr. by bbl. returned 75 

Total 8 84 



VOUCHER No. 87. FRANK DELL. 

4 pieces 8-inch sewer pipe $0 90 

1 piece 8x6-inch Y 2-8-inch curves 95 

1 piece 6-inch curve 28 

1 bbl. cement 3 25 

1 bu. H. lime 20 

Total 5 58 



VOUCHER No. 88. ALDAG P. & V. CO. 

Aug. 18. 1 lb. white glue $0 15 

3 lbs. whiting 06 

4 lbs. yellow ochre 12 

AHg. 21. 1 light 43x48 inches 2 11 

1 light 31x48 98 

1 light 31x54 1 34 

Total 4 76 



VOUCHER No. 89. JOS. GARDNER. 

Lining water closet flush tank $2 50 

Total 2 50 

VOUCHER No. 90. McELWAIN-KICHARDS CO. 

1 No. 00 oak seat $1 75 

Total 1 75 

Total bills allowed September 10, 1896 . . $1,194 64 



221 



Bills Allowed October 8, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 91. JERRY REDDING. 



Boring cylinder, planing valve and seat ; 1 set new 
packing rings; 1 valve and 1 piston rod ; engine 
otherwise repaired 



Total 



160 00 



$60 00 



VOUCHER No. 92. COLUMBIA INCANDESCENT LAMP CO. 



36 16 C. P. 110 volt lamps 
72'25 C. P. 104 volt lamps 
12 32 C. P. 104 volt lamps 
60 16 C. P. 110 volt lamps 
12 25 C. P. 110 volt lamps 
12 32 C. P. 110 volt lamps 
Bbl. and pkg 

Total 



$7 20 


15 84 


3 60 


12 00 


2 64 


3 60 


35 



45 23 



VOUCHER No. 93. WM. LANGSENKAMP. 



June 10. Repairing check valve 

" 18. 5 nickle plated strips 

Aug. 5. Turning jacket kettle 

1 li-inch round way stop-cock 

Repairing valve 

Repairing and tinning lid of jacket kettle 

Repairing and tinning copper coffee urn . 

Eegrinding bibb- cock 

Total 



$0 35 
2 75 
8 00 
4 00 

50 
2 50 
8 00 

50 



26 60 



VOUCHER No. 94. ALBERT GALL. 



1 antique square . . . . 
1 miter rug 

1 velvet rug 

2 mats 

4i yds. linoleum . . . . 
425 yds. Napier matting 
1 rug 

Total 



18 50 


1 00 


1 50 


2 00 


1 13 


6 38 


2 50 



23 01 



222 

VOUCHER No. 95. HOME STOVE CO. 

4 full sheets zinc $5 00 

2 pieces, 4 ft. by 18 inches 1 25 

4 5-inch Russia elbows 1 60 

4 J-joiats 5-inch Russia pipe , . . . 1 50 

3 lbs. galvanized iron 30 

2 5-inch dampers 20 

22 hours' labor 75 

Steel top on laundry stove 8 00 

2 ft. 5-inch Russia pipe 60 

Total $18 60 



VOUCHER No. 96. INDIANAPOLIS ELECTRIC CO. 

Sept. 10. Repairing armature $4 36 

" 23. 3 2J-inch bells 1 65 

2 5-inch bells 5 00 

2 bronze pushes 50 

11 lbs. annunciator wire 1 88 

4 LaClanche batteries 2 20 

\ lb. staples 05 

Sept. 29. 3 lbs. sal ammoniac 30 

8 pencil cincs 40 

Total 16 34 

VOUCHER No. 97. A. BURDSAL CO. 

Sept. 4. 1 lb. No. 60OO bronz $1 75 

1 pt. blk. enamel 45 

1 5-in. brush 15 

Sept. 5. ^ pt. wine color enamel 20 

" 12. 1 gal. chair red 2 00 

" 16. 1 pt. wine color enamel 45 

Total 5 00 



VOUCHER No. 98. ANESHAENSEL & PRINZLER. 

1^ lbs. solder $0 40 

3 hours plumber's labor 1 50 

21 lbs. sheet lead 1 68 

Total 3 58 



VOUCHER No. 99. INDIANAPOLIS M. & C. UNION. 
200 ft. oak cove $1 80 

Total 1 80 



223 

VOUCHER No. 100. ELEVATOR SUPPLY AND REPAIR CO. 

4 best dynamo brushes, y'iyxl J x6 in $5 20 

Total $5 20 

VOUCHER No. 101. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

Sept. 3. 59 lbs. IJ-in. manilla rope $4 72 

" 5. 25 ^x 2 carriage bolts 14 

4 lbs. |-in. manilla rope 35 

Sept. 22. 4 doz. screw eyes 15 

2 lbs. 1^-in. tin trunk nails 15 

Total 5 51 

Total bills allowed October 8, 1896 $210 87 



Bills Allowed October 30, 1896. 



Sept. 



17. 



VOUCHER No. 102. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Repairs on check valve $1 40 

Paid Balance Due on Books, as Follows: 

W. H. Armstrong, hard rubber 1 88 

Sinker-Davis Co., repairs dynamo 1 25 

Frank Dell, lime 80 

Indianapolis Electric Co., electric supplies ... 90 

Pioneer brass works, repairs 25 

Knight & Jillson, gas tips 60 

Indianapolis P. & C. Co., polish 63 

Total $7 71 

VOUCHER No. 103. INDIANAPOLIS M. & C. UNION. 

8 ft. 4-inch crown moulding -i 

V 'flio fin 

24 ft. 1^x1 2-inch crown moulding j 

2 pieces, 8x8-inch by 10 feet 1 90 

120 ft. ceiling 4 80 

7 pieces l|x5-inch by 10 feet, poplar -^ 

1 piece ltx8-inch by 10 feet, poplar / ^^ ^^^' ' " ^ ^^ 

100 ft. drop siding 1 80 

Total 11 30 



$0 75 


85 


21 


25 


1 80 


1 88 


2 05 


35 


93 



224 

VOUCHER No. 104. McELWAINE-RICHA_RDS CO. 

1 box N. P. safety chain 

4 only .}-inch angle valves 

12 only ^-inch couplings 

12 only 2-inch C. I. tees 

4 only 1-inch globe valves, loose disks . . 
11 lbs. No. 12 copper wire 

2 i*s-inch garlock packing -, 
-, ° . ■, 11 1 • > 3 lbs., 6 oz . . . 

1 jjj-inch garlock packing J ' 

6 only |-inch hose couplings 

2 only f-inch compression bibbs 

Total $9 J07 



VOUCHER No. 105. FKANCKE & SCHINDLER. 

1 lb. only |-in. blind staples $0 07 

1 lb. only No. 2 zinc glazier points. .... 10 

2 lbs. each wrt. iron washers for ^, |, 2 and fin. 

bolts - 30 

^ doz No. 800 putty knives 30 

1 only No. 1 Bordman comb wrench 55 

2 each No. 10 and 13 bright wire screw eyes. . . 19 

6 doz. No. 070 drawer pulls . 1 68 

1 doz. No. 6300 elbow catches 25 

1 gross each fit. head bright screws 1-5, |-6, |-6, 

1-8, i-6, t-10, 1-10, l|-8, 1-5 66 

2 only No. 10 scratch awls 06 



Total 4 16 



VOUCHER No. 106. A. KIEFER DEUQ CO. 

5 gals, turpentine $1 75 

1 gal. French green 1 60 



Total 3 25 



VOUCHER No. 107. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

Oct. 4. '7t lbs. manilla binding twine $0 00 

" 17. 4 lbs. assort, sheet brass 80 

1 gross ^-in. No. 4 brass screws 26 

Oct. 21. 5 doz. champion pearers 75 

1 padlock 58 

Oct. 24. 1 No. 58 desk lock 70 



Total 3 09 



225 



VOUCHER No. 108. BALKE & KRAU8S CO. 

9 pieces 4x6x10 pine, 180 ft $2 34 

24 pieces 4x6x16 pine, 768 ft 

26 pieces 2x6xl8-pine, 368 ft 

100 pieces 2x4x14 pine, 900 ft. 
75 piece8^2x4xl2 pine, 600 ft. 

1,500 ft. . . 

1,500 ft. 1 X 3 sheeting 

19 M. ex. A. shingles 

2,000 ft. drop siding 

1,000 ft. flooring 

300 pieces IjxlJ hickory 

6 pieces 2x4x12 

Total $163 00 



8 


83 


4 


41 


16 50 


16 


50 


39 


90 


38 


00 


18 


00 


18 00 




52 



Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 .... $201 58 



15— D. and D. 



226 
EXHIBIT No. 12. 



A Detailed and Itemized Statement of all Expenditures on Ac- 
count of Industries During the Fiscal .Year Ending October 
31, 1896. Original Vouchers Filed with Auditor of State — . 
Duplicates on File in this Office. 

Bills Allowed December 5, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 1. E. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O $25 00 

Charles Hecker, in charge P. O 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C, S 60 00 

Louis Hildebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 00 

VOUCHER No. 2. NUTZ & GROSSKOPF. 

1 doz. 2-oz. rubber cement $0 70 

1 doz. 2-oz. leather cement 90 

6 balls wax 04 

2 lbs. No. 12 Barbour thread 2 40 

2 lbs. No. 8 Barbour thread 2 00 

6 oz. bristles 3 90 

B. P. harness needles 21 

6 spools No. 50 linen thread 1 50 

1 pt. machine oil 40 

3 gross I cord laces 90 

2 gross I tubular laces 1 10 

9 doz. sewing awls • ■ 1 35 

1 doz. knives 95 

3 sand stones 30 

6 doz. men's steel shanks - , , . . 60 

12 doz. women's steel shanks 84 

2 doz. sewing hafts 30 

3 pkgs. No. 2 heel plates 45 

3 pkgs. No. 4 heel plates 66 

3 toe stretchers 1 95 

Ij lbs. beeswax 75 

4 doz. white heel balls 60 

60^ ft. Kangaroo calf skin 10 89 

84 ft. Nappa skins 7 14 

4 doz. Singer sewing machine needles 1 00 

1 doz. nail drivers 1 00 

6 doz sand paper 50 

1 doz. buffers 85 

39 ft. oil grain leather 6 24 

1 box button-hooks 17 

Total 50 59 



227 



VOUCHEE No. 3. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

15 rms. 20x26— 26J No. 1 Berkshire $23 85 

i-1,000 14^ sh. bill heads 24 

1 quire 40x45 — 150 No. 1 drab express 33 

387 sh. 25x38 cherry poster, cut 1 06 

2 sh. press board 16 

Total $25 64 

VOUCHEE No. 4. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1 gross pearl buttons $0 70 

2 gross pearl buttons 1 20 

2 spools silk 50 

24 darning needles 72 

2 gross thimbles 3 60 

1 gross each 90 — 7, 90 — 9 buttons 65 

4 Barbour flax 3 20 

2 spools silk 80 

1 box twist 38 

15 doz. thread 6 00 

Total 17 75 



VOUCHEE No. 5. FRANCKE & iSCHINDLER. 



1 pair 3-ft. adj. cab clamps 

1 pair 5-ft. adj. cab clamps 

1 doz. No. 84 2-ft. rules 

1 only No. 513^ 2-ft. rule 

1 only 2 ft. steel square 

5 lbs. l^-in. wire brads. No. 15 

5 lb?. 1-in. wire brads No. 11 

5 lbs. IJ-in. wire brads. No. 16 

5 lbs. l|-in. wire brads, No. 14 

-]: gross No. 6300 elbow catches 

1 doz. adz eye hammers 

i doz. Be atty hatchets . 

Total 

VOUCHEE No. 6. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

4 gross f-in. No. 6 screws 

12 No. 703 wardrobe locks 

6 No. 623 desk locks 

5 No. 260 pulls 

Total 



$2 80 

3 45 

1 65 

18 

55 

28 

31 

29 

25 

85 

1 55 

1 CO 



44 
44 
84 
40 



13 16 



3 12 



228 



VOUCHER No. 7. J. C. DICKSON. 



500 ft. 1-in. poplar 
.500 ft. 1-in. oak . 
200 ft. 2-in. oak . 



$15 00 

15 00 

6 40 



Total 



VOQCHER No. 8. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO. 



5 gal. Berry Bros, hard oil 
5 gal. turpentine .... 
25 lbs. dark filler . . . . 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 9. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



$7 50 


1 65 


1 75 



Paid for by Superintendent account of printing office — 

5 lbs. ink 

1 lb. ink 

Cost of draft for payment 

3 gals, gasoline 

Postage ... 

Mailing Silent Hoosier, 9 times, October and November . 

Total 

Total bills allowed December 5, 1896 



$1 25 


50 


5 


35 


32 


3 76 



$36 40 



10 90 



6 23 



$358 79 



Bills Allowed January 9, 1896. 

VOUCBER No. 10. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O $25 00 

Charles Hecker, in charge P. 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. S 60 00 

Louis Hildebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 00 

VOUCHER No. 11. R. O. .JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Miscellaneous expense incurred and paid for by Superin- 
tendent on account of printing office — 

Express on printing ink from New York $0 80 

Postage on Hoosier, 5 times, December 1 to January 3 . . • 2 36 

Gasoline for office use 10 

Paid J. C. Tarkington, 40 per cent., on receipts advertising 

in Hoosier ($20.20) as per contract 8 08 

Account cabinet shop, grinding planer bits 50 

Total 11 84 



229 

VOUCHEE No. 12. NUTZ & GROSSKOPF. 

28^ lbs. dongola calf skin $22 60 

45f ft. kangaroo calf skin . 8 24 

1 doz. lip knives 90 

1 gr. buttons 05 

1 gt. gr. peninsular fasteners 40 

3 doz. 2 soles 6 75 

Total $38 94 

VOUCHEE No. 13. INDIANAPOLIS M. &. C. UNION. 

150 ft. U-in. xl2xl6 resaw and dr. to I $6 60 

350 ft. IJ-in. X 12x14 resaw and dr. to| 15 40 

100 ft |-in. common poplar 2 65 

100 ft. |xl2xl6 common poplar 3 75 

100 ft. oak 4 00 

Total 82 40 

VOUCHEE No. 14. G. A. ROBERG. 

74^ ft. glazed dongola skins $14 85 

73| ft. glazed dongola skins . 15 55 

Total 30 40 

VOUCHEE No. 15. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

2 gross, each, flat-head bright screws, j-in. No. 3, f-in. No. 4, 

|-in. No. 5, |-in. No. 7, 1-in. No. 8, IJ-in. No. 9, IJ-in, 

No. 10, 2-in. No. 12, 2A-in. No. 14 $2 62 

1 doz. hand scroll saws, 5-in. No. 16 29 

1^ doz. hand scroll saws, 3in. No. 8 28 

25 lbs. noodle glue 2 88 

5 doz. 10-in. rd. edge Barnet files 55 

2 pairs P. S. &. W. 8 in. dividers 60 

^ ream Ij N. E. sand paper 1 02 

5 lbs. pumice stone, fine 23 

3 pair Cinti. T. C. Adg. clamps 8 31 

6 Colt's excentric clamps . 2 80 

1 No. 80 boxwood M. clamps '51 

Total 20 09 

VOUCHEE No. 16. KIPP BROS. 

lx\ gross Indiana buttons $4 25 

Total 4 25 



230 

VOUCHER No. 17. BALKE & KEA.US8 CO. 

200 ft. dressed poplar $7 00 

Total $7 00 

VOUCHER No. 18. JOURNAL PRINTING CO. 

4 press rollers cast $2 00 

Total 2 00 

Total bills allowed January 9, 1896 $341 92 



Bills Allowed February 6, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 19. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O. . . $25 00 

Charles Hecker, in charge P. O 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. S 60 00 

Ivouis Hildebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 00 



VOUCHER No. 20. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid postage, etc., mailing Silent Hoosier, 4 times in January $1 80 

Total 1 80 

VOUCBER No. 21. NUTZ & GROSSKOPF. 

12 lbs. iron nails $0 48 

30 lbs. wire nails 3 60 

9 lbs. channel nails 1 08 

1 great gross buttons 25 

6 spools silk 3 30 

2 doz. wax 10 

80 ft. Dongola calf skin 12 80 

1 patent leather skin 2 50 

6-oz. gum trag . . 35 

6 oz. oxolic acid 10 

123 lbs. oak sole leather . 33 21 

1272 lbs. California sole leather 35 70 

8 lap lasts 1 20 

Total 94 67 



231 

VOUCHER No. 22. BALKE & KRA.USS CO. 

500 ft. 1-in. oak $18 00 

300 ft. l^in. oak 11 25 

200 ft. 2 in. oak 7 50 

500 ft. fin. poplar 17 50 

Total $54 25 

VOUCHER No. 23. INDIANA PAPER CO. - • 

24 reams 20x26—26^ book paper $38 16 

Total 38 16 

VOUCHER No. 24. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

I gross buttons 10 90 

1 gross collar buttons 45 

3 gr. gross agate buttons 2 68 

10 doz. thread 4 20 

2 gross buttons 1 50 

1 doz. Barbour's thread 86 

Total 10 59 

VOUCHER No. 25. INDIANAPOLIS P. & C. CO. 

50 lbs. dry French ochre $0 75 

5 gals, turpentine 1 60 

5 gals, benzine 60 

5 gals, boiled oil 2 00 

Total 4 95 



Total bills allowed February 6, 1896 $399 42 



Bills Allowed March 5, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 26. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. $25 00 

Chas. Hecker, in charge of P. O 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. S 60 00 

Louis Hildebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 00 



232 

VOUCHER No. 27. R O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid miscellaneous expense during month as follows : 

Postage and car fare on Hoosier, 4 times $1 70 

Paid balance due on books as follows: 

McCune-Malott Co., tin boxes for S. S . . . 28 

Paragon Oil Co., gasoline for P. O 1 20 

Wm. Laurie & Co., yarn for S. R 1 60 

Total $4 78 



VOUCHER No. 28. INDIANAPOLIS M. AND C. UNION. 

100 ft. fin. oak ecotia $0 80 

100 ft. l-in.x 1 Jin. oak moulding 1 10 

10 pieces 3-in. x 3-in. x 14 ft oak . ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ 

14 pieces 4-in. x 4-m. x 10 ft. oak j 

100 ft. quartered oak, 14 ft 6 00 

Total 20 15 



VOUCHER No. 29. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

7.390 reams 24x36—30 pt. book $7 53 

Total 7 53 

VOUCHER No. 30. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

5 lbs. each wire brads, fin. No. 19, |-in. No. 18, 1-in. No. 17, 

11-in. No. 16, IJ-in. No. 15 $1 65 

5 lbs. each flat wire brads, f-in. No. 18, 1-in. No. 16, 1^-in. 

No. 14 91 

2 gross No. 20 mal. hooks and eyes 23 

1 Roman O. G. W. No. 1 plain 33 

1 Scotia O. G. W. No. i plain 33 

1 doz. No. 140 pulls 36 

3 only No. 311 locks 45 

1 No. 4852 pulls 15 

3 pair If-in. desk butts 30 



Total 4 71 



VOUCHER No. 31. DANIEL STEWART. 

^ doz. Payson indelible ink $1 00 

10 lbs. Wheeler's wood filler 1 40 



Total 2 40 



233 

VOUCHER No. 32. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

li M needles , $1 69 

1 gross coat buttons . .38 

Total 

Total bills allowed March 5, 1896 



$2 07 



$236 64 



Bills Allowed April 9, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 33. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O. . . 
Chas. Hecker, in charge P. O. . . 
J. P. Baker, in charge C. S. . . . 
Louis Hildebrand, in charge S. 8. 
Kate Gorman, in charge S. R. . . 



$25 00 
25 00 
60 00 
60 00 
25 00 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 34. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Mailing Silent Hoosier, and car fare 4 times, March . ... $1 68 

12 window shades for shoe shop 1 00 

Express on leather from Cincinnati 3 times 1 ('5 



Total 



$195 00 



3 73 



VOUCHER No. 35. TAYLOR & SMITH. 



30 yds. brown drilling 

1 gross G. C. laces, | 

1 gross tubular laces, f 

3 doz. wax 

3 doz. round sewing awls .... 
3 doz square sewing awls .... 

1 gross pegging awls 

1 doz. leather cement . . 

1 doz. Brazilian gum 

2 round point Harrington knives 

2 hawk bill Harrington knives • 

1 doz. knife sharpeners .... 
582 ft. oil grain leather .... 
71^ ft. Nappa kid skins .... 

3 doz. sand paper 

500 lace hooks. No. 2 

2 boxes eyelet", B long 

127 lbs. oak sole leather .... 
6 doz. hemlock taps 

3 boxes Star plates, No. 4 ... 
3 boxes Star plates. No. 3 ... 

1 eyelet set 

22 pairs plated lasts 



rs 


15 




30 




55 




15 




36 




45 




60 




85 




70 




2i) 




20 




75 


8 


19 


5 


70 




30 




45 




18 


33 


02 


12 


00 




75 




45 




50 


15 


40 



Total 



86 20 



234 

VOUCBER No. 36. G. A. KOBERG. 

84 ft. glazed Dongola skins $16 80 

Total i$16 86 

VOUCHER No. 37. HILDEBRA.ND HARDWARE CO. 

12 I inch tang and firmer chisels $0 95 

12 |-inch tang and firmer chicels 1 00 

12 ^-inch snail auger bits 1 08 

12 |-inch snell auger bits 1 20 

12 assorted slim taper files 52 

1 10-inch cab. rasp 27 

1 lOinch cab. file 22 

8 No. 29 Bailey planes 7 60 

Total 12 84 

VOUCHER No. 38. KIPP BROS. 

1 gross Indiana buttons $3 00 

Total 3 00 

Total bills allowed April 9, 1895 $316 57 



Bills Allowed May 7, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. .39. R. O. .JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O $25 00 

Charles Hecker, in charge P. O 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. S 60 00 

Louis Hildebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 OO 

VOUCHER No. 40. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid postage on Silent Hoosier, and car fare, four times in 

April $1 63 

Total 1.63 

VOUCHER No. 41. INDIANAPOLIS M. & C. UNION. 

80'"! It. 1-in clear white oak $28 00 

80O ft. 1 in clear poplar 28 00 

lOU ft. 1-in. quartered sjcimore 3 50 

100 ft. 1-in. gum 3 50 

Total 63 00 



235 



VOUCHER No. 42. TAYLOR & SMITH. 

6 doz. boys' hemlock tap soles $10 50 

6 lbs. gin. clinch nails 66 

6 lbs. f-in. clinch nails 66 

3 lbs. I5-0Z. shoe tacks 36 

3 lbs. 2-oz. shoe tacks 36 

3 spools black pilk 1 80 

1 gr. gross Penn's fasteners 40 

1 gr. gross No. 2 buttons 25 

40 lbs. calf skin 26 00 

Total 140 99 

VOUCHER No. 43. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

1 lb. ink $1 13 

14 16-20 rms. 20x26—26^ 1 book 23 54 

Total 24 67 

VOUCHER No. 44. J. C. TARKINGTON. 

For securing advertisements in Silent Hoosier, as per con- 
tract $21 45 

Total 21 45 

• VOUCHER No. 45. FRANCKE &]SCHINDLER. ' ' 

3 doz. No. 475 locks and keys $1 80 

3 doz. No. 4432 cupboard turns 3 30 ... 

1 gross 77 W. shelf supports 40 ' , 

1 doz. No. 5 nickle escutcheons . 10 \. r 2 

1 doz. No. 5 nickle escutcheons - I't 

1 No. 16 Stanley miter square ... 40 

1 ream 1^ N. E. sandpaper 2 CO 

12 doz. 840 I5 butts and | screws 3 60 

12 doz. 837 2h butts and f screws 6 00 

i doz. 10-in. Black Diamond files 65 

$18 35 

Less 55 

Total 17 80 

VOUCHER No. 46. KIPP RROS. 

1 gross Indiana buttons $3 00 

Total 3 00 



Total bills allowed May 7, 1896 $3^7 54 



236 

Bills Allowed June 9, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 47. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

E. J. Hecker, in charge P. O $25 00 

Chas. Hecker, in charge P. O 25 00 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. S 60 00 

Louis Hiliiebrand, in charge S. S 60 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total $195 00 

VOUCHER No. 48. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Paid for mailing Silent Hoo8ier5 times in May $2 08 

Total 2 08 

VOUCHER No. 49. NUIZ & GROSSKOPF. 

1 gross f tubular laces • • . . . $0 50 

1 gross I cord laces 35 

1 spool silk 55 

1 doz. sewing awls 15 

5 pairs lasts 1 75 

500 lace hooks 50 

20 Ibs.Oak sole letther 5 20 

7 ft. kid skins 1 33 

2 doz, shanks 17 

Total 10 50 

VOUCHER No. 6('. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

2 No. 70 Umbrella pans $0 20 

2 umbrella arms 26 

6 hat pins 1 50 

1 pair brass butts 08 

1 doz. No. 437 drawer pulls 60 

1 doz. No. 4331 drawer pulls 08 

IJ pair brass butts 12 

2 quires sand paper 30 

1 crank and shaft 35 

li doz. N. P. screws 08 

1 pull 06 

Total 3' 63 



237 

VOUCHER No. 51. WM. LAURIE. 

12 balls knitting cotton $1 7.3 

Total II 73 

VOUCHER No. 52. INDIANA NEWSPAPER UNION. 
1 lb. ink $1 67 

Total 1 67 

VOUCHER No. 53. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
4 doz. thread $1 60 

Total 1 60 

VOUCHER No. 54. DANIEL STEWART. 
8 bottles Payson's ink |1 44 . 

Total . • 1 44 



Total bills allowed June 9, 1896 $217 65 



Bills Allowed July 15, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 55. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

J. P. Baker, in charge C. 8 160 00 

Kate Gorman, in charge S. R 25 00 

Total 185 UO 

VOUCHER No. 56. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 

Mailing " Silent Hoosier," 1 time $0 55 

C. M. Hecker, printer's wages — June 1 to 20 16 67 

Indianapolis Electrotype Foundry, ba!. on books 40 

Total 17 62 

VOUCHER No. 57. J. C. TARKINGTON. 
To contract on advertising for the "Silent Hoosier " . ... $9 20 

Total 9 20 

Total bills allowed July 15, 1896 $111 83 



238 

Bills Allowed August 6, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 58. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 
Kate Gorman, in charge S. R $25 00 

Total 125 GO 

Total bills allowed August 6, 1896 |25 00 



Bills Allowed September 10, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 59. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 
Kate Gorman, in charge S. R $25 00 

Total $25 00 

Total bills allowed September 10, 1896 * $25 00 



Bills Allowed October 8, 1896. 

VOUCHER No. 60. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



E. J. Hecker Instructor P. O 

Charles Hecker Foreman P. O . 

J. P. Baker Instructor C. S . 

Louis Hildebrand Instructor S. S . 

Kate Gorman Instructors. R. 



Total 

Total bills allowed October 8, 1896 



$25 00 


25 


00 


60 


00 


60 


00 


25 


00 



$195 00 



195 UO 



Bills Allowed October 30, 1896. 
VOUCHER No. 61. R. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



E. J. Hecker Instructor P. O. 

Charles Hecker Foreman P. O . 

J.P.Baker Instructor C. S. 

Louis Hildebrand Instructor S. S. 

Kate Gorman Instructor S. R. 



$25 00 


25 


CO 


60 


00 


60 


00 


25 


00 



Total 



$195 ho 



239 



VOUCHER No. 61. E. O. JOHNSON, SUPT. 



Paid miscellaneous expenses in Octobtr, o.s follous . 

Expressage on leather from Cincinnati 

Paid balance due on books, as follows : 

H. Lieber & Co., paper . 

Wni. Laurie & Co., yarn 

G. A. Roberg, leather 

Total 



35 



26 

1 76 

16 90 



$19 27 



VOUCHER No. 63. NUTZ & GROSSKOPF. 



120 lbs. oak sole leather . . 
6 doz. men's half soles . . . 
6 doz. boy's half soles . . . 
8 doz. women's half soles . . 
18 lbs. clinch nails . . . 
12 lbs. iron nails 

2 lbs. Barbour's linen thread 
12 doz. sewing awls . . . . 
6 ppools black silk 

3 spools linen thread .... 
1 gross f cord laces .... 
1 gross * tubular laces 

1 botile oil 

374 feet dongola skins . ■ 
48;^ feet kangaro calf . . . . 

'25 yds. lining 

1 doz pints ink 

o doz. wax 



Total 



$26 


40 


8 


40 


8 


10 


2 


70 


1 


62 




48 


2 


40 


1 


80 


3 


00 




66 




30 




55 




05 


6 


00 


7 


72 


2 


CO 


1 


25 




15 



73 58 



VOUCHER No. 64. INDIANAPOLIS M. & C. UNION. 



Grinding planer knives 
30U feet |-in. oak . . 
200 feet 1 J-in. oak . . 

Total 



$0 50 


10 50 


7 00 



IS 00 



240 

VOUCHER No. 65. FRANCKE & SCHINDLER. 

1 doz. extra Washata oil stones, 6 in $2 75 

1 doz. extra Washata oil slips 1 00 

^ doz. No. 2 adz eye hammers 1 55 

2 only No. 730 Sanderson scoop shovels 1 40 

1 doz. asst. Black Diamond files 65 

^ doz. rd. edge B. D. files 65 

75 ft. raw hide lace leather 45 

1 doz. No. 3715 drawer pulls 21 

1 doz. No. 33 drawer locks 38 

1 gross 2-in. rd. head blued screws 36 

Total $9 40 

VOUCHER No. 66. C. P. LESH PAPER CO. 

4 reams 20x26—26 tint No. 1 book paper $5 20 

Total 5 20 

-. . VOUCHER No. 67. C. L. WAYNE & CO. 

5 gal. turpentine $1 60 

2 gal. Berry Bros. hd. oil finish 3 10 

2 only 3-in. O. K. varnish brushes 1 00 

Total , 5 70 

VOUCHER No. 68. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1 box silk twist $0 30 

1 gross buttons 40 

^ gross buttons 35 

1 box linen thread 41 

€ doz. thread 2 40 

Total 3 86 

VOUCHER No. 69. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

2 reams 25x30 Cherry poster $2 40 

Cutting, 6x9 20 

Total 2 60 

VOUCHER No. 70. C. P. LESH PAPER CO. 
55 reams 20x26—26 No. 1 S. S. C. Book $71 50 

Total 71 50 

Total bills allowed October 30, 1896 ......... $4u4 11 



241 



EXHIBIT No. 13. 



A Detailed and Itemized Statement of Clothing, Railroad Fares, 
etc., Furnished Pupils During the Fiscal Year Ending October 
31, 1896, and Charged to their Respective Counties, the Accounts 
Being Filed with the Treasurer of State for Collection. 

Allen County. 



JAMES MADDEN. 

1895. 
Nov. 3. 1 pair suspenders 

" 25. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

JDec. 6. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

" 15. Uniform suit 

1896. 
.Jan. 10. Shoe repairs. . . , 

" 24. New shoes 

Feb. 8 1 cap 

Mar. 20. Shoes half-soled 

May 11. 2 shirts 

" • 20. 2 pair socks 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 30. Uniform pants 

Sept. 25. 2 shirts 

Total 

Total Allen County 



$0 19 
60 
60 

11 60 

15 
2 00 

50 
50 
66 
12 
07 
4 50 
1 00 



S22 49 



$22 49 



Blackford County. 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 

" 18. 
3. 
2W. 
14. 

21. 

16- 



Nov. 
-Dec. 



WM. MURPHY. 

New shoes $1 75 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

1 pair garters 05 

2 pair hose 24 

New shoes 1 75 

Shoes half-soled 40 

Uniform suit 6 35 

-D. and D. 



242 

1896. 

Jan. 28. 2 handkerchiefs §0 08 

1 pair suspenders 10 

Feb, 7. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

" 8. 1 cap 50 

" 21. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

2 shirts 45 

Mar. 13. 2 pair drawers 46 

" 22. 2 pair hose 40 

Shoes half-soled 35 

Apr. 1. Shoes half-soled 40 

May 11. 2 shirts 68 

" 12. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

" 13. 2 pair hose . 12 

" 26. 1 pair suspenders 10 

" 30. Uniform suit 6 35 

New shoes 1 75 

Sept. 21. 1 pair suspenders 10 



1895. 


Oct. 


11. 


Nov. 


1. 


11 


II. 


'■ 


29. 


Dec. 


20. 


" 


27. 


1896. 


« 


13. 


" 


28. 


Apr. 


]. 


11 


17. 


11 


21. 


May 

u 


8. 
20. 


11 


26. 


1 . 


30. 


June 


4. 



Total $23 66 



BARNEY A. STREET. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled $0 50 

Shoe repairs 10 

Shoe repairs 10 

Shoe repairs 15 

1 shoe half- soled 30 

Shoe half-soled and heeled 55 

Uniform pants and cap, November 5 00 

Shoe repairs 10 

Uniform coat, vest and cap 7 75 

Shoe repairs 10 

Shoes half-soled and heeled On 

Shoes repaired 10 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 60 

1 pair suspenders 12 

Shoe repairs 10 

2 pair socks 13 

2 handkerchiefs 07 

Suit clothes and hat 10 25 

Railroad fare, Montpelier 2 45 

Total $29 07 



Total Blackford County f52 73 



243 



Boone County. 



1895. 
Oct. 11. 



Dec. 



13. 
31. 



1896 
Jan. 31. 



Feb. 28. 



Mar. 18. 



189 
■Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 



18. 
15. 
13. 

27. 



189 

Jan. 

(( 

Feb. 

April 

May 



Oct. 



24. 
28. 

7. 

1. 

1. 
12. 
12 
15. 
27. 
10. 



MOLLIE MULLEN. 

New shoes . ■ . 

New shoes . 

11 yds. gingham 

12 doz. buttons. . . 

1 spool thread 

1 hood . . ..... 

J yd. elastic 

2 pair hose 

2 yds. ribbon 

4^ yds. H. cloth •. . . 

5 yds. cambric 

f yd. silesia 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

3 handkerchiefs 

2 pair hose 

12^ yds. calico 

1^ yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

New shoes 

Total 

BRUCE MYERS. 

Shoes half- soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit and cap, Nov 

Shoe repairs 

2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

2 pairs hose , 

2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

1 pair suspenders 

Bal. on May uniform 

Total 

Total Boone County 



$1 
1 



75 
75 
55 
08 
04 
35 
03 
30 
10 

72 
20 
07 
10 
04 
O'l 
12 
30 
63 
14 
08 
10 
CO 



go 35 
40 

1 75 
40 

6 35 

15 

08 
40 

1 75 
40 
13 
08 
40 
10 

3 65 



$9 50 



$16 39 

$25 89 



244 



Carroll County. 



1895. 


Oct. 


4. 


K 


11. 


11 


25. 


Nov. 


25. 


Dec. 


15. 


1896. 


Jan. 


10. 


Feb. 


21. 


Mar. 


13. 


April 


6. 


(1 


17. 


May 


11. 


" 


11. 


a 


30. 


June 


4. 



GEORGE W. ARNOT. 

Shoe repairs. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

Uniform suit, Nov 

Shoes half-soled . . . . , 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoes half-soled 

1 pair suspenders 

New shoes 

2 shirts 

2 handkerchiefs 

Uniform suit 

Railroad fare, Delphi 

Total 



10 
50 
00 
50 
60 

40 
50 
40 
18 
00 
68 
07 
60 
15 



1895. 


Oct. 


11. 


Dec. 


6. 


189fi. 


Feb. 


7. 


II 


13. 


April 


1. 


" 


24. 


May 


15. 


<i 


26. 


11 


30. 


June 


4. 



HARRY ARNOT. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit 

Shoe3 half-soled 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

2 pair socks 

2 handkerchiefs . 

Uniform suit 

Railroad fare, Delphi 

. Total 



$0 50 
50 



11 



50 
60 
50 
25 
50 
24 
08 
60 
15 



30 42 



1895. 
Oct. 25. 
Nov. 29. 
Dec. 31. 



IDA ARNOT. 

New shoes $2 00 

Shoe repairs 10 

2 yds. ribbon 10 

2 pairs hose 30 

^ vd. elastic 03 



245 

1896. 

Jan. 24. New shoes . $ .; 00 

Feb. 21. Shoes half-soled 35 

April 3. New shoes 2 00 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

2 yds. ribbon. . . 12 

I yds. elastic. 03 

June 4. Kailroad fare, Delphi 2 15 



Total 



JOHN KINGERY. 
1895. 

Nov. 1. Shoes half-soled and heeled 10 60 

Dec. 20. Shoe repairs 10 

Uniform suit and cap 1 ) 60 

1896. 

Feb. 21. Shoe repairs 10 

May 1. Shoes half-soled and heels 60 

" 20. 2 pairs socks 12 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

'■ 30. Uniform suit 11 60 



1895. 


Nov. 


21. 


Dec. 


6. 


<< 


15. 


1896. 


Jan. 


28. 


Mar. 


13. 


" 


31. 


May 


11. 


a 


12. 


(I 


20. 


May 


26. 


u 


30. 



Total 24 79 



JAKE RUNYON. 

1 pair suspenders JO 19 

Shoes half-soled and repaired oU 

Uniform suit, November ... 9 60 

2 handkerchiefs (ig 

2 pairs drawers 46 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 45 

2 shirts 66 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

1 trank 1 25 

2 pairs socks 13 

1 pair suspenders 19 

Uniform suit 9 60 



Total 23 19 



ID.\ FELLOWS. 
1896. 
Oct. 10. Bal. due on shoes fO 90 

Total CO 



246 



SARAH HENDRIXSON. 
1896. 
Oct. 10. Bal. due on shoe repairs 

Total 

Total for Carroll County 



$0 35 



$0 35 



$119 85 



Cass County. 

ADA HAGENS. 

1895. 

Oct. 11. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Nov. 22. Shoe repairs 

" 30. 6J yds. C. flannel 

62 yds. C. flannel, brown 

2 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

1 shawl 

New shoes 

Dec. 31. 11 yds. gingham .... 

1 spool thread 

2 doz. buttons . 

5 yd. elastic 

1896. 2 pairs hose 

Jan. 17. New shoes ..... 

" 31. 8 yds. H. cloth 

95 cambric ■ 

IJ silesia 

2 doz. buttons 

2 spools thread 

3 spools twist 

3 handkerchiefs 

Feb. 28. 12 yds. calico 

I5 yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

Mar. 13. Shoes half-soled 

April 3. New shoes 

May 15. 2 pair hose 

2 handkerchiefs 

May 22. 1 hat 

^ yd. elastic 

Total 

NAOMI LEAZENBY, 
1895. 
Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled 

Total 



$0 35 


20 


50 


39 


05 


04 


50 


2 00 


55 


(14 


10 


03 


30 


1 75 


1 44 


38 


14 


20 


('8 


C8 


12 


60 


14 


C8 


10 


30 


1 75 


26 


08 


1 00 


03 



13 58 



$0 35 



35 



247 



ALBERT TURMER. 



1895. 
Nov. 7. 



Nov. 25. 
Dec. 13. 

" 15. 

1896. 
Jan. 17. 

" 28. 
Feb. 14. 
Mar. 20. 
April 1. 
May 



12. 



May 



13. 
15. 
16. 

27. 
80. 



1895. 
Nov. 30. 



Dec. 31. 



3 waists 

3 pairs hose 

3 handkerchiefs .... 
2 suits underwear . - 
Shoes half-soled 

New shoes 

Uniform suit, November 



Shoes half-soled and heeled 

2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half soled and heeled 

2 pairs hose 

Shoes half-foled 

2 waists 

2 handkerchiefs .... 

2 pairs ho?e 

Shoes half-soled 

1 trunk 

Uniform coat and pants . 
1 cap ...... ... 



Total 



GRACE BAGLEY. 



6 yds C. flannel . . . 

1 spool thread 

2 yds. Birds' Eye cotton 

2 pairs hose 

1 corset . 

1 yd. elastic 



1896. 



Total 

MEARLE LIDGARD. 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs, Supt. cash book 

Total 

Total in Cass County 



iO 75 

50 

15 

1 00 

40 

1 75 

6 35 

35 

08 
40 
40 
40 
70 
08 
12 
35 
1 25 
5 85 
50 



$0 45 
04 
12 
30 
36 
05 



51 26 



$21 38 



1 32 



1 26 



$37 89 



1895. 
Oct. II. 
Nov. SO. 



Clark County. 

BL/^NCH REED. 

New shoes $1 50 

6^ yds. C. flannel 50 

6^ yds. C. flannel, brown . 39 

2 doz. buttons 05 

1 spool thread 04 



248 



Dec. 30. 1 1 yds. gingham 

1 ppool thread 

Ij doz. buttons , 

^ yd. elastic 

2 pairs hose 

1896. 

Jan. 31. 6 yds. H. cloth , 

8 yds. cambric 

I2 yds. silesia , 

2 doz. buttons 

2 spools thread . 

3 spools twist 

3 hdks 

Feb. 28. 12 yds. calico 

IJ yds. silesia , 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

New shoes 

April 3. New shoes , 

May 15. 2 pairs hose , 

2 hdks 

May 22. ^ yd. elastic 

•Tune 4. Railroad half fare Jeffersonville 



■ $0 55 


04 


08 


03 


30 


1 08 


32 


15 


20 


08 


08 


]2 


60 


11 


(8 


]0 


1 50 


1 5> 


26 


08 


03 


1 65 



Total $11 42 



JOSIE WYNANS. 
1895. 

Oct. 11. New shoes $2 00 

Nov. 30. 6 yds. C. flannel . 45 

1 spool thread 04 

2| yds. bird's-eye cotton 17 

1 corset 38 

1 shawl 50 

Dec. 20. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

" 31. 9 yds. gingham 45 

1 doz buttons 05 

1 spool thread 04 

7 yds. H. cloth 1 26 

6 yds. cambric 24 

2 yds. silesia 18 

2 spools thread 08 

1 corset 36 

2 pairs hose 30 

1 yd. elastic 05 

2 yds. ribbon 10 

1 fascinator 25 

1896. 

Jan. 31. 3 handkerchiefs 12 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

" 21. New shoes 2 00 





26 




03 




08 




12 


2 


00 


1 


25 



$0 10 

1 00 

05 






1 15 


$26 61 



249 

May 15. 1 corset $0 38 

2 pairs hose 

f yd. elastic 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 yds. bird's eye cotton 

New shoes 

June 4. Railroad fare Jeflfersonville, part 

Total $14 04 

ISAAC BALDWIN. 

1896. 
Sept. 21. 1 pair suspenders 

" 30. 2 suits underwear 

Oct. 6. 1 pair garters 

Total 

Total Clark County ' 



Clay County. 

HAERY TIFFEE. 

1895. 

Nov. 3. 1 pair suspenders 

" 25. Shoes half-soled, heeled and repaired . . . 

Dec. 15. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Jan. 17. New shoes 

" 28. 2 handkerchiefs 

Mar. 6. Shoes half-soled 

April 21. 1 pair suspenders 

May 1. New shoes 

" 11. 2 shirts 

" 12. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 21. 2 pair socks 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total $27 55 

LILLIE WRIGHT. 
1896. 
June 4. Railroad fare Brazil . $1 70 



$0 19 


60 


9 60 


2 00 


08 


50 


13 


2 00 


66 


07 


12 


11 60 



Total 1 70 



Total Clay County $29 25 



250 

Clinton County. 

LURA RICH. 

1896. 
Oct. 10. Miscellaneous clothing, Supt. cash book .... $0 67 

1 pair slippers 1 50 

Total S2 17 



1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled and heeled . 

Apr. 1. New shoes 

June 4. R. R. fare Cincinnati. . . . 

Total 

Total Dearborn County . 



Total Clinton County $2 17 

Daviess County. 

LAWRENCE HOOK. 

1896. 

Oct. 10. Balance on May uniform, Supt. cash book ... $4 60 

New shoes, first pair 2 CO 

Shoe repairs 1 00 

Balance on shoes, eecond pair 22 

Total , . . . $7 82 



Total Daviess County $7 82 



Dearborn County. 

EMMA GOODPASTER. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 6 yds. C. flannel $0 45 

1 spool thread ................ 04 

Dec. 31. 1 corset 36 

2 pairs hose 30 

2 yds. ribbon 10 

1896. 

Jan. 31. 3hdk8 12 

1 pair shoes 2 00 

Apr. 3. 1 pair shoes 2 00 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

1 corset 38 

1 yds. elastic 03 

2 hdks 08 

2 yds. Bird's Eye cotton 12 

1 shoe half-soled 35 



Total $6 59 

JOHN FAHEY. 



$0 60 
2 25 
2 80 






5 65 


$12 24 



251 

Dubois County. 

OTTO BRUNNING. 
1895. 

Nov. 25. Shoe repairs $0 10 

Dec. 27. New shoes 2 25 

Uniform coat, November 6 00 

1896. 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs 70 

Pants and cap 5 00 

New shoes 2 25 

Suspenders 25 

Total $17 05 



Total Dubois County $17 05 



Elkhart County. 

ELMER L. INGLE. 
1895. 

Oct. 4. Shoes half-soled $0 45 

Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled 30 

" 29. 2 pairs hose 22 

Dec. 14. New shoes 1 75 

" 15. Uniform suit, November 6 35 

1896. 

Jan. 31. Shoe repairs 10 

Feb. 8. 1 cap 50 

Mar. 13. Shoes half-soled and heeled 30 

April 3. New shoes 1 50 

May 12. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 12 

" 20. 1 pair garters 05 

" 26. 1 pair suspenders 10 

" 30. Uniform suit 6 35 



Total $18 1& 

MARY COULTER. 
1895. 

Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled and heeled $0 40 

Nov. 3. 2 yds. bird's-eye cotton 12 

" 22. New shoes 2 25 

Dec. 31. 1 corset 36 

2 pairs hose 30 

2 yds. ribbon . i • • 10 



252 



1896. 
April 3. 
May 15. 



May 
June 



30. 

4. 



New shoes 

15 yds. Lonsdale cambric 

7 yds. lace 

I2 yds. lace . . . 

1 pair slippers 

2| yds. embroidery. . . 
12 yds. Persian lawn . . 

3J yds. lace 

1 yd. lace 

1^ yd. ribbon 

I5 yd. ribbon 

1 pair mitts 

1 pair hose 

1 vest 

1 corset ' 

2 pairs hose 

2 yds. ribbon 

2 handkerchiefs .... 

I yd. elastic 

1^ yd. lace 

1 hat 

Railroad fare Goshen . 

Total 



$2 25 

1 50 
70 
12 

1 19 
72 

4 80 
50 
25 
38 
33 
35 
25 
17 
38 
26 
12 
08 
03 
19 
90 

4 25 



$23 25 



ALTA M. RANSFORD. 



1895. 
Nov. 29. 
" 30. 



Shoes half- so led . 
4^ yds. C. flannel. 
1 doz. buttons . . 
1 spool thread . . 

1 shawl 

Dec. 31. 82 yards gingham 
I5 dozen buttons . 
1 spool thread . . 

1 hood .... 

2 pairs hose . . . 



1896. 
Mar. 13. 
April 10. 

May 22. 



New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

1 hat • • . . . 

2 handkerchiefs • 

2 pairs hose 

^ yard elastic 



10 25 
26 
03 
04 
50 
43 
08 
04 
45 
30 

1 50 
30 
70 
08 
26 
03 



Total 



5 25 



253 

CHARLES RANSFORD. 

1895. 

Dec. 2. 1 cap $0 50 

1896. 

Jan. 1. New shoes 2 00 

1 pair suspenders. 10 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

Feb. 7. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

" 8. 1 cap 50 

ApriljlO. 1 pair suspenders 10 

May 12. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

" 30. Suit and hat 3 95 



Total $7 81 

WM. D. MILLER. 

1895. 

Dec. 15. 1 cap $0 50 

Uniform pants, Nov 4 50 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled and heeled 60 

Mar. 20. Shoes half- soled . 50 

May 26. 2 handkerchiefs 07 



Total 6 17 

EMANUEL HOCKSTETTLER. 
1896. 
Feb. ] 3. Uniform suit $9 60 



Total 9 60 



Total Elkhart County $70 24 



Floyd County. 

FANNIE PYBURN. 

1895. 

€)ct. 18. Shoes half-soled $0 30 

Dec. 31. 2 yards ribbon 10 

2 pairs hose 30 

1 yard elastic 04 

1896. 

Jan. 17. Shoe repairs 20 

April 1. Shoes half-soled 35 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

2 yds. ribbon 12 

I yd. elastic 03 

New shoes 2 00 

Total $3 78 



254 



1895. 


Dec. 


31. 


1896. 


Jan. 


10. 




31. 


Feb. 


14. 


Mar. 


13. 


Apr. 


1. 


May 


26. 



WILLIAM HEAQIE. 

Uniform coat and cap 

Shoe repairs 

Shoe repairs 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

Shoe repairs 

1 pair suspenders 

Total 

Total Floyd County 



$6 50 

20 
10 
50 
50 
10 
18 



$8 OS- 



Ill 86 



1896. 
Feb. 26. 
May 26. 

" 27. 



Fountain County. 

JOHN DIXON. 

Uniform suit . 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 cap 

Total 

Total Fountain County 



$11 60 
08 
50 



$12 18 



$12 18 



Franklin County. 



1895. 
Nov. 30. 

Dec. 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 



MAEY WYNN. 

4 yds. C. flannel 

1 spool thread 

8^ yds. gingham 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

1 corset 

2 pairs hose 

f yd. elastic 

2 yds. ribbon 

3 handkerchiefs 

1 yd. elastic .... 

Total 

Total Franklin County 



$0 30 
04 
43 
05 
04 
36 
30 
03 
10 

12 

05 



$1 82 



$1 82 



255 

Fulton County. 

GEORGE WILSON. 
1895. 

Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled $0 50 

Dec. 27. New shoes 2 25 

" 31. Uniform pants and cap, November 5 00 

Uniform coat 6 00 

1896. 

Feb. 5. 1 pair pants 4 50 

Mar. 20. Shoes half-soled 50 

April 10. Shoes half-soled = 50 

1 pair suspenders 18 

May 26. 2 pairs socks 24 



Total : $19 67 

ALICE ZOLMAN. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 2 J yds. bird's-eye cotton $0 16 

Dec. 20. Shoe repairs 10 

'• 31. 2 pairs hose . 30 



Total 56 



Total Fulton County $20 23 

Gibson County. 

LEVE GOODSON 

1895. 

Oct. 18. Shoe repairs $0 20 



Total $0 20 

HORACE MONTGOMERY. 

1895. 

Oct 18. Shoes half-soled and heeled , 

Dec. 27. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

1896. 

Jan. 24. Shoe repairs 

April 1. New shoes , 

" 20. 1 pair suspenders 

May 1. Shoes half-soled and heels 

Oct. 10. January uniform 

2 shirts 

1 tie 

8 pairs hose 

Pants and cap in May 

Total 22 22 



$0 60 




60 




20 


2 


00 




12 




60 


11 


60 


1 


00 




25 




25 


5 


00 



256 



HAKRY P. BENNETT. 
1896. 
Sept. 30. 3 pairs hose $0 75 

Total $0 75 

Total Gibson County $23 17 



Grant County. 

MINNIE STREET. 
1895. 

Oct. 11. Shoes half-soled and heeled • $0 40 

Nov. 30. 2 yds. C. flannel 12 

Dec. 31. 2 pairs hose 30 

1 yds. elastic 04 

1896. 

Jan. 17. Shoes half-soled and heeled 46 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

1 yds. elastic 03 

2 yds. ribbon 12 

Shoes half soled 35 

June 4. Railroad fare Marion 2 05 



Total $4 15 

MEETIA STREET. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 2f yds. Bird's-eye cotton $0 16 

Dec. 31. 2 pairs hose 30 

1 yd. elastic 04 

1896. 

Feb. 14. Shoe repairs 20 

April 1. Shoe repairs 20 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

f yd. elastic 03 

June 4. Railroad fare to Marion 2 05 



Total 3 32 

DAISY FERGUSON. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 21 yds. Bird's-eye cotton $0 16 

New shoes 2 25 

Dec. 31. 1 corset • . . . . 36 

2 pairs hose 30 



257 



1896. 
April 24. 
May 15. 



May 
June 



Shoes half- soled . . . 

1 corset 

2 pairs hose . . . . 

f yd. elastic 

2 handkerchiefs . . . 

1 hat 

Railroad fare Marion 

Total 



$0 40 
38 
26 
03 
08 
40 
2 05 



$6 67 



1895. 
Nov. 29. 
Dec. 14. 

1896. 
Jan. 17. 

" 31. 
April 1. 

" 3. 
May 11. 

" 12. 

" 20. 

" 27. 
June 4. 



BERT CHENOWETH. 

Shoes half-soled 

New shoes 

Shoe repairs 

Uniform suit 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

1 pair suspenders 

2 shirts 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs socks 

I cap 

Railroad fare Jonesboro 

Total 

Total Grant County 



SO 50 
2 00 

20 

9 60 
50 
19 
66 
07 
13 
50 

1 90 



16 25 



$30 39 



Greene County. 



1895. 


Oct. 


11. 


Dec. 


21. 


1896. 


Feb. 


13. 


<( 


28. 


Apr. 


17. 



MARK LAWSON. 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

Uniform pants, November 

Uniform coat, vest and cap 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

1 pair suspenders 

Total 

Total in Greene County 



$2 25 

50 

4 50 

7 75 
60 
50 
13 



$16 23 



$16 23 



17— D. and D. 



258 

Hamilton County. 

GRACE HALL. 

1895. 

Nov. 30. 2 yds. Bird's-eye cotton $0 12 

Dec. 20. Shoes half soled 40 

" 31. 2 pairs hose 30 



Total $0 82 

BENJ. BEEG. 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled and heeled $0 50 

Mar. 18. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

Apr. 1. New shoes . 2 00 

May 20. 1 pair suspenders 13 

" 22. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

" 30. Uniform suit 9 60 

June 4. Railroad fair, Noblesville. 1 65 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs 68 

Total 15 56 

JOHN C VIRGIN. 
1896. 

Sept. 25. 2 waists. $0 70' 

3 pairs hose 75 

3 handkerchiefs 25 

2 suits underwear 1 00 

Oct. 3. 1 cap 25 

" 6. 1 pair suspenders 10 

Total 3 05 



Total Hamilton County . $19 43 

Hancock County. 

FRED. JAMES, 

1895. 

Nov. 29. Shoes half-soled $0 50 

Dec. 15. Uniform suit, Nov 9 60 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled 40 

" 24. Shoe repairs 10 

Feb. 21. Shoes half-soled and heeled 60 

Apr. 1. New shoes 2 00 

May 26. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

" 30. Uniform suit 9 60 



Total $22 88 



Total Hancock County $22 88 



259 

Hendricks County. 

ROBERT MORPHEW. 
1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half- soled $0 50 

Mar. 16. Shoes half-soled 50 

Apr. 1. 1 shoe half- soled 25 

June 4. Railroad fare North Salem 80 



Total $2 05 

ADDA RICKER. 
1896. 

May 15. 2 pairs hose $0 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 



Total 34 

FLORENCE MORPHEW. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 4 yds. C. flannel $0 30 

1 spool thread 04 

June 4. Railroad fare, North Salem, one-half 40 

Total 74 



Total Hendricks County .' $3 13 



Henry County. 

ARLEY McCORMACK. 

1895. 
Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled and heeled $0 50 

1896. 

May 22. Shoes half-soled 

June 4. Railroad fare, Kennards 

Total • • 

Total Henry County 

Howard County. 

MYRTLE LOCUS. 
1895. 

Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled $0 35 

Dec. 31. 7| yards gingham 38 

1 dozen buttons 05 

1 spool thread 04 



40 
1 05 






$1 95 


$1 95 



Total $0 82 



260 

LAWRENCE SNOW. 
1895. 

Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled $0 35 

Dec. 6. Shoes half-soled, heeled and patched 50 

" 20. Shoes half-soled, heeled and patched 40 

Uniform suit and cap, Nov 6 35 

New shoes 1 75 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 35 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

1 cap 50 

Shoes half-soled 30 

1 pair suspenders 10 

New shoes 1 75 

2 handkerchiefs • . 07 

1 pair suspenders 10 

Uniform suit 6 35 



1896. 


Feb. 


7. 


11 


8. 


Mar. 


13. 


April 


6. 


May 


8. 


" 


12. 


" 


27. 


i( 


30. 



IS 96. 
Sept. 25. 2 shirts 



Total $19 27 



Total Howard County $20 09 



Jackson County. 

FRED SHELTON. 
1895. 

Dec. 15. Uniform suit, November $9 60 

1896. 

Jan. 28. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

Shoes half- soled 50 

Mar. 20. Shoes half-soled 50 

April 3. 1 pair suspenders 18 

" 12. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 20. 2 pairs socks ^ . . . . 12 

" 22. New shoes 2 00 

" 30. Uniform suit 11 60 



Total $24 65 

JOSEPH J. HEDRICK. 



2 suits underwear 

3 handkerchiefs 

Total 2 15 



$0 50 
1 40 
25 



Total Jackson County $26 80 



261 



Jefferson County. 



MATTHIAS BUCK. 
1895. 

Oct. 18. New shoes 

" 25. Shoes half-soled 

Nov. 1. Shoes half-soled 

" 15. Shoe repairs 

" 29. 2 pairs hose 

Dec. 27. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit, November ....... 

1896. 

Jan. 17. Shoe repairs 

" 28. 2 handkerchiefs 

Feb.",! 7. Shoes half-soled and repaired 

" 8. 1 cap 

" 21. Shoe repairs , 

Mar. ^20. 2 pairs hose 

Shoes half -soled and patched 

Apr. 17. New shoes , 

Shoe repairs , 

May^l2. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 27. 1 pair garters , 

1 pair suspenders , 

May 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

Total Jefferson County 



$1 75 
35 
35 
10 
24 
40 
6 35 

10 
08 
45 
50 
10 
40 
40 

1 75 
10 
07 
05 
10 

6 35 



$19 99 



$19 99 



1895. 
Oct. 25. 


Johnson County. 

VERNON STONE. 
New shoes 


$2 00 


Dec. 31. 

1896. 
May 30. 


Uniform suit, November 

Uniform suit 


11 60 
11 60 


Total 










Total Johnson County 





$25 20 



$25 20 



262 



Knox County. 



1895. 



Oct. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Mar. 

(C 

Apr. 
May 



4. 
22. 
31. 
20. 
10. 
24. 
15. 
26. 
30. 



1895. 
Not. 30. 
Dec. 13. 

" 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 
April 3. 

" 24. 
May 15. 



May 22. 



LOUIS ENGLEHART. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit, November 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoe repairs 

1 pair suspenders 

Shoes half- soled 

2 handkerchiefs 

Uniform suit . 

Total 

NANCY COOPER. 

2| yds. Bird's-eye cotton 

New ghoes . 

1 corset 

2 yds. ribbon 

2 pairs hose 

f yd. elastic 

3 handkerchiefs 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled 

1 corset 

2 pairs hose 

1 yd. elastic 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 yds. bird's-eye cotton 

1 hat 

Total 

Total Knox County 



$0 60 
60 
9 60 
40 
10 
13 
40 
08 

11 60 



$0 16 
2 00 
36 
10 
30 
04 

12 
2 00 
35 
38 
26 
©3 
08 
12 
1 08 



$23 51 



7 38 



$30 89 



Kosciusko County. 

HANNAH HOLLER. 
1896. 
Oct. 10. 2 pairs hose 

Total 

BERTHA HOLLER. 
1896. 
Oct. 10. 2 pairs hose 

Total 

Total Kosciusko County 



$0 26 



$0 26 



10 26 



26 



$0 52 



263 



Lagrange County. 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 

Nov. 29. 

Dec. 13. 

" 15. 

1896. 

Jan. 10. 

" 24. 

5. 

27. 



Feb. 
Mar. 

Apr. 
May 



17. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
15. 
30. 
4. 



JOHN L. SACKETT. 

Shoes half-soled , 

2 pairs hose 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit, November 

Shoe repairs 

New shoes. 

2 shirts , 

2 pairs hose 

New shoes , 

New shoes , 

2 shirts , 

2 handkerchiefs . . . 

2 pairs hose 

Shoes half-soled 

Uniform suit 

E. R fare (half) Lagrange 

Total 



$0 35 

24 

40 

6 35 

15 

1 75 
46 
40 

1 75 

2 00 
68 
07 
12 
40 

6 35 
2 50 



m 97 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 
Nov. 3. 
Dec. 6. 

1896. 
Jan. 31. 



Mar. 13. 

Apr. 1. 

" 20. 

May 1. 

" 8. 

" 21. 

" 26. 

" 30. 

June 4. 



FRANKLIN D. SACKETT. 

Shoe repairs 

1 pair suspenders 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

Uniform suit 

2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

2 pairs drawers 

New shoes 

2 shirts 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoes half-soled 

2 pairs socks 

2 handkerchiefs 

Uniform pants 

New shoes 

Railroad fare, Lagrange 

Total 

Total Lagrange County 



$0 10 
19 
40 

9 60 
08 
50 
46 

2 00 
46 
50 
50 
13 
08 

4 00 
2 00 

5 00 



26 CO 



$49 97 



264 

Lake County. 

EDWAED GARDNER. 
1896. 

Oct. 10. May uniform $11 60 

Shoe repairs 06 



1895. 


Oct. 


4. 


(( 


18. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


6. 


(( 


15. 


1896. 


Jan. 


10. 


Feb. 




Mar. 


20. 


(C 


31. 


April 


1. 



Total $11 66 



Total Lake County $11 66 

Lawrence County. 

CHARLES BOUGH. 

1895. 

Oct. 11. Shoe repairs $0 25 

Dec. 15. Uniform suit, November 1160 

1896. 

Jan. 24. Shoes half-soled and heeled 60 

Apr. 17. New shoes 2 00 

May 26. 1 pair suspenders 13 

" 30. Uniform suit 11 60 

June 4. Railroad fare, Shoals 3 70 



Total $29 88 

LOIS TRUEBLOOD. 
1895. 
Oct. 18. Shoe repairs $0 05 



Total 05 



Total Lawrence County $29 93 

Madison County. 
WILLIAM LOWREY. 

Shoes half-soled and repaired $0 50 

Shoes half-soled 50 

2 pairs hose 25 ^ 

Shoes half -soled and heeled 50 

Uniform suit, November 6 35 

Shoe repairs 10 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 40 

1 pair suspenders 10 

2 pairs hose 40 

New shoes , 175 

Shoes half-soled 40 



265 



May ] 1. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 

" 22. Shoes half-soled 

" 26. 1 pair garters 

" 27. 1 pair suspenders 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

SIDA VASBINDER. 
1895. 
Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled and repaired 

Total 

MARY HENDREN. 
1895. 

Nov. 1. New shoes 

" 30. 6J yds. C. flannel, brown 

3i yds. C. flannel 

1 spool thread 

I5 doz. buttons 

Dec. 31. 6| yds. gingham 

1 doz. buttons 

2 yd. elastic 

2 pairs hose 

1896. 

Jan. 31. 3 hdks 

Feb. 28. 10 yds. calico 

IJ yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

April 3. New shoes 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 

1 shoe half-soled 

2 hdks 

May 22. ^ yd. elastic 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs 

Total 

GEORGE LOWREY. 

1895. 

Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

" 29. 2 pairs hose 

Dec. 6. Shoes half-soled 

" 15. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Jan. 17. New shoes 

" 28. 2 hdks 

Feb. 17. 1 pair suspenders 

Mar. 20. 2 pairs hose 



$ 07 
12 
40 
05 
10 

9 60 



$0 40 



$1 75 
39 
25 
04 
04 
34 
05 
03 
80 

12 
50 
11 

08 
10 
1 50 
26 
15 
08 
03 
35 



;o 


50 




23 




30 


6 


35 


1 


75 




08 




10 




40 



S21 59 



40 



6 4: 



266 



April 1. New shoes 

" 10. Shoes half-soled 

May 12. 2 hdks . . . / 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 

" 26. 1 pair garters 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

BESSIE WEBB. 

1895. 
Oct. 11. Shoes half-soled 

1896. 
June 4. Railroad fare, pt., Elwood 

Total 

Total Madison County 



75 
40 
08 
13 
05 
35 



$0 45 
20 



fl8 47 



65 



$47 58 



Marion County. 



1895. 


Oct. 


4. 


Dec. 


15. 


1896. • 


Jan. 


10. 


i( 


28. 


Feb. 


6. 


Mar. 


20. 


May 


11. 


" 


12. 


" 


13. 


a 


30. 


Oct. 


6. 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 

" 24. 

1896. 
Jan. 10. 
Feb. 3. 
Apr. 1. 
May 8. 



FEED. 

Shoes half-Boled and repaired 

New shoes 

Uniform suit, Nov . . . 

Shoes half-soled .... 
2 handkerchiefs .... 

2 shirts 

2 pairs hose 

1 pair shoes 

Shoes half-soled .... 

1 pair suppenders. . . . 

2 handkerchiefs .... 

2 pairs hose 

Uniform suit 

1 pair suspenders. . . . 

Total 

JOHN SPITZFADEN. 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoe repairs 

Total . 



LOONEY. 

1 


.«0 4.^ 


1 75 


: . . 6 35 


40 


OS 




46 




40 




1 75 




40 
10 


08 

12 


6 35 

10 







$0 40 
50 

50 
50 
-10 

10 



;i8 79 



41) 



267 

JOSEPH McCULLOUGH. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. New shoes f 2 00 

Nov. 14. 1 pair suspenders 19 

Dec. 6. Shoes half-soled 45 

" 15. Uniform suit, Nov 9 60 

1896. 

Jan. 28. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

*' 31. Shoe repairs 10 

Feb. 6. 2 pairs socks 06 

" 14, Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

Mar. 20. 1 pair suspenders 19 

April 1. New shoes 2 00 

May 11. 2 shirts 68 

" 12. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 20. 2 pairs socks 13 

" 22. New shoes 2 00 

" 30. Uniform suit 11 60 

Total $29 65 

JOHN KLEIN. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. New shces $2 25 

Nov. 25. Shoes half-soled 50 • 

Dec. 15. 1 cap 50 

Uniform pants, November 4 50 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoe repairs 20 

" 24. New shoes 2 25 



Total 10 20 

CLIFFORD SCHWARTZ. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. New shoes $1 75 

Nov. 3. 1 pair suspenders , 10 

Dec. 20. Shoes half-soled and heeled 45 

" 27. Shoes half-soled 40 

Uniform suit, November 6 35 

Jan. 28. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

" 18. 1 pair suspenders 10 

April 1. New shoes 1 75 

Shoes half-soled 40 

May 8. Shoes half-soled 40 

" 12. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

1 pair garters 05 

May 13. 2 pairs hose 13 

" 27. 1 pair suspenders 10 

" 30. Uniform suit 6 35 

Sept. 30. 1 pair suspenders 10 



Total 18 ^9 



268 



1895. 
Oct. 11. 
Nov. 30. 



Dec. 30. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 



Feb. 28. 



Mar. 20. 
April 17. 
Mav 15. 



May 22. 



Oct. 10. 



1896. 
Oct. 1 1. 

Nov. 30. 



Dec. 31. 



AMY MARTIN. 

New shoes $1 50 

6^ yds. C. flannel 50 

6J yds. C. flannel, brown 39 

2 doz. buttons 05 

1 spool thread 04 

10 yds. gingham = . 50 

1^ doz. buttons 08 

1 spool thread 04 

^ yd. elastic 03 

2 pairs hose 30 

6 yds. H. cloth 1 08 

8 yds. cambric • • 32 

1^ yds. silesia 15 

2 doz. buttons 20 

2 spools thread . . 08 

2 spools twist . 05 

3 handkerchiefs • . 12 

2 pairs hose 30 

10 yds. calico 50 

1^ yds. silesia 11 

2 spools thread 08 

2 doz. buttons 10 

New shoes 1 50 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 35 

New shoes 1 50 

2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

2 yds. ribbon 08 

1 hat 75 

I yd. elastic 03 

1 trunk 2 00 

2 pairs hose ... 26 

Total 

CARRIE WEAKLEY. 

New shoes $1 

7} yds. C. flannel 

7i yds. C. flannel, brown 

2 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

5^ yds. H. cloth 

5| yds. cambric 

1 yd. silesia 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 



75 
54 
45 
05 
04 
90 
23 
09 
10 
04 
05 



$13 33 



269 



Dec. 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 



Feb. 



7. 
28. 



Mar. 
Apr. 

May 



13. 

3. 

15, 



May 22. 



ISs yds. gingham 
] J doz. buttons 
1 spool thread . . 
f yd. elastic . . . 
1 hood 

1 corset 

2 yds. ribbon . . 
2 pairs hose . . . 



5 yds. H. cloth 

5 yds. cambric 

1 yd. silesia 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

3 handkerchiefs 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 

12^ yds. calico 

I5 yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

2 yds. Bird's Eye cotton . 

Shoes half-soled, heeled and patched. 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose ■ . . . 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 yds. ribbon 

1 hat 

f yd. elastic 



Total 



$0 68 
08 
04 
03 
35 
36 
10 
30 

90 
20 
09 
10 
04 
05 
12 

2 00 
30 
63 
14 
08 
10 
]2 
50 

2 00 
26 
08 
12 
75 
04 



$14 80 



1895 
Nov. 30. 
Dec. 13. 

" 31. 

1896. 
Jan. 17. 



HATTIE WILSON. 



2f yds. Bird's Eye cotton 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 



Shoe repairs 
Total 



HOWAED OVERHEISER. 
1895. 

Nov. 29. Shoes half-soled 



Total 



$0 16 


2 00 


30 


10 



$0 50 



2 56 



50 



1895. 
Dec. 15. Uniform suit. 



ELMER MILEY. 



LI 60 



Total 



11 60 



270 

PAUL RIEDEL. 

1895. 
Dec. 15. Uniform suit, November $6 35 

1896. 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

May 12. 1 pair garters 05 

Total $6 90 

ALLIE HAMMONS. 

1895. 

Dec. 31. 1 fascinator $0 25 

1896. 

Feb. 21. New shoes 2 00 

" 28. 2 pairs hose 30 

Mar. 6. Shoes half-soled 35 

May 15. 2 yards Bird's Eye cotton . . 12 

Total 3 02 

LOUIS SORRELL. 
1897. 

Jan. 31. Uniform suit $9 60 

May 30. Uniform pants and cap 4 50 

Total 14 10 



Total Marion County $146 84 

Marshall County. 

LILLIE IMUS. 
1895. 

Nov. 30. 2 yards Bird's Eye cotton $0 12 

Dec. 31. 1 corset 36 

2 yards ribbon 10 

2 pairs hose 30 

1 yard elastic 05 

1896. 

Jan. 31. 3 handkerchiefs 12 

May 15. 1 corset . - 38 

2 pairs hose 26 

f yard elastic 03 

2 handkerchiefs . , 08 

2 yards Bird's-eye cotton 12 

May 22. 1 hat 1 10 

April 24. New shoes 2 00 

June 4. Railroad fare, Plymouth 3 55 

Oct 10. New shoes 1 75 

Shoe repairs 35 

Total $10 67 



271 



WILLIAM STEVICK. 

1895. 

Dec. 31. Uniform suit, November 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-eoled and heeled 

Mar. 20. Shoe repairs 

May 12. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

ELMER STEVICK. 

1895. 
Dec. 31. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Feb. 21. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

April 3. New shoes ... 

Total 

Total Marshall County 



35 
40 
10 
08 
12 
35 



LI 60 

50 
2 25 



$13 40 



14 35 



42 



Martin County. 



1895. 
Nov. 22. 
Dec. 13. 

" 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 
Feb. 28. 
Mar. 6. 
May 15. 



May 
June 



1896. 
May 1. 
" 26. 
" 30. 



IVA PRIDEMORE. 

New shoes = ■ 

Shoes half soled and heeled 

1 coreet 

2 yds. ribbon 

2 pairs hose 

f yd. elastic 

2^ yds. Bird's-eye cotton 

Shoe repairs 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 yds. ribbon 

f yd. elastic 

1 hat 

Railroad fare, Huron 

Total 

BEN J. JAMES. 

New shoes 

2 pairs socks 

Uniform pants 

Total 

Total Martin County 



$2 00 
40 
36 
10 
30 
04 



15 
10 
CO 
26 
08 
12 
O:] 
00 
40 



$2 00 

24 

4 50 



110 34 



6 74 



$17 08 



272 



Miami County. 



1895. 
Nov. 1. 
Dec. 15. 

1896. 
Jan. 24. 
Apr. 1. 
May 11. 

" 26. 

" 27. 

" 30. 



WILBER NELL. 

New shoes 

Uniform suit 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

New shoes 

2 shirts 

2 pairs socks 

1 pair suspenders 

Uniform suit 

Total Miami County 



$2 CO 
11 60 

50 
2 00 
66 
22 
19 
11 60 



$28 77 



Monroe County. 



WILLIAM GRAHAM. 

1895. 

Dec. 10. New shoes ' 

Shoe repairs 

Dec. 13. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

" 15. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Jan. 23. 2 handkerchiefs 

Feb. 7. Shoes half-soled and repaired 

" 8. 1 cap 

" 24. Shoe repairs 

Mar. 20. 1 shoe half-soled 

Apr. 17. 1 shoe half -soled and heeled 

May 12. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 13. 2 shirts 

2 pairs hose 

" 22. Shoe repairs 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

AARON YOUNG. 
1896. 

Oct. 10. May uniform 

Balance due on shoe repairs 

Total 

Total Monroe County 



U 75 
10 
40 

6 35 

08 
40 
50 
20 
25 
50 
08 
68 
13 
10 
6 35 



$6 35 
11 



$17 87 



6 46 



$24 43 



273 



Noble County. 
JAMfiS KELSEY. 



1895. 
Nov. 1. 

" 29. 

1896. 
Feb. 5. 



Shoe repairs 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 



Uniform suit 
Total . . 



10 10 
60 

9 60 



FLETCHER SACKETT. 



1895. 
Dec. 31. 
June 4. 


Suit and hat 

Railroad fare Ligonier 


. . $11 97 
4 70 




Total 








1895. 
Dec 31. 


LAWRENCE ELY. 

Uniform suit, November 


. . $11 60 




Total 










Total Noble County 





1895. 
Oct. 11. 

Nov. 29. 
Dec. 27. 

1896. 
Jan. 24. 

" 28. 
Feb. 7. 

" 8. 
Mar. 1. 

Mar. 13. 
April 3. 

May 11. 

" 12. 

" 13. 

" 26. 

" 30. 

June 4. 



Orange County. 
CHARLES WALLACE. 



New shoes 

Shoes half-eoled and heeled 
Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoe repairs 

Uniform suit, November . 



$1 75 



Shoes half-soled and patched 

2hdks 

Shoe repairs 

1 cap 

Shoe repairs 

Shoes half-soled 

2 pairs drawers 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

2 shirts 

2hdks 

2 pairs hose 

1 pair suspenders 

Uniform suit 

1 pair garters 

Railroad fare, half, Orleans . 



35 


40 


10 


6 35 


40 


08 


15 


50 


15 


30 


46 


1 75 


45 


66 


07 


12 


10 


6 35 


05 


1 50 



Total 



Total Orange County 
18— D. and D. 



$10 30 



16 67 



11 60 



$38 57 



$22 04 



$22 04 



274 
Perry County. 



1895. 
Dec. 15. 


JAMES C. HUGHES. 
1 cap 


$0 50 

4 50 

50 

50 

2 00 




Jan. 10. 
Feb. 21. 


Uniform pants, November 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoes half-soled 




April 1. 


New shoes 




Total 

Total Perry County 








$8 00 






$8 00 




Pike County. 









WILLIAM GATTON. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled $0 60 

Shoe repairs 05 

Shoe repairs 10 

1 pair suspenders . 18 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

Uniform pants, November 4 00 

Uniform suit 11 60 

New shoes 2 00 

Shoe repairs 10 

2 pairs shoes half-soled and heeled 80 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

1 cap 50 

June 4. Railroad fare Petersburg 3 90 



1895. 


Oct. 


4. 


i( 


25. 


Nov. 


11. 


" 


14. 


Dec. 


13. 


(1 


15. 


1896. 


Jan. 


31. 


i< 


24. 


Feb. 


14. 


May 


1. 


« 


26. 



Total $24 41 



WILLIAM ROBINSON. 

1895. 

Oct. 25. Shoes half-soled $0 40 

1896. 

Jan. 17. New shoes 2 25 

" 31. Uniform suit 9 60 

Feb. 28. Shoes half-soled, heeled and repairs 50 

Apr. 17. Shoes half-soled 40 

May 22. Shoes half-soled and heeled 50 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 30. 2 shirts 68 

Total 14 40 



275 



MINNIE GATTON. 
1895. 

Nov. 29. Shoe repairs $0 15 

Dee. 31. 2 yds. ribbon 10 

2 pairs hose 30 

1 yd. elastic 04 

1896. 

Feb. 7. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

" 28. 2 pairs hose 30 

Mar. 20. New shoes 2 00 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

2 yds. ribbon 12 

4 yd. elastic 03 

May 22. 1 hat • 1 05 

June 4. Railroad fare Petersburg (one-half) 1 95 



Total |6 78 



CHARLES ROBINSON. 
1895. 

Dec. 15. Uniform suit, November 

Jan. 31. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Mar. i:-5. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

April 17. New shoes 

May 26. 1 paij; suspenders 

2 pairs socks 

2 handkerchiefs 

May 30. Uniform suit . 

Total 26 85 



HERSCHEL P. MILLER. 
1896. 

Oct. 10. Balance on December uniform $4 55 

May uniform , . . 9 60 

Shoe repairs 1 70 

Cap 50 

Handkerchiefs and shirts 74 



$11 


60 




60 




60 


2 


00 




13 




24 




08 


11 


60 



Total 17 09 



Total Pike County $89 53 



276 

Porter County. 

EDWAED NELSON. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. Shoes half-Boled and heeled $0 50 

Nov. 25. Shoes half-soled 45 

1896. 

Feb. 6. 1 cap 50 

" 24. 1 pair suspenders 18 

April 3. Shoe repairs 10 

May 11. 2 shirts 66 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 08 

New shoes 2 00 



1895. 

Dec. 6. Shoes half-soled .... 

" 15. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Jan. 24. Shoes half-soled .... 

April 17. Shoe repairs 

June 4. R. R. fare, Erwin Station 



Total $4 47 



Total Porter County $4 47 

Posey County. 
THOMAS ALDRIDGE. 



$0 50 


11 60 


50 


20 


5 65 



Total $18 45 



Total Posey County $18 45 

Pulaski County. 

ROSS OK E LEY. 
1895. 

Oct. 11. Shoes half-soled $0 40 

Nov. 29. Shoe repairs 20 

Dec. 6. Shoes half-soled 40 

'• 13. Shoes patched 20 

" 27. Shoes patched 10 

Uniform suit, November 9 60 



277 



1896. 
Jan. 17. 



Jan. 

Mar. 

ti 

Apr. 
May 



June 



28. 

6. 
13. 

3. 
12. 
20. 
22. 
30. 

4. 



Shoe repairs . 

New shoes 

2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

Shoes half-soled 

Shoes half-soled 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 shirts 

Shoe repairs 

Uniform suit 

R. R. fare Winamac .... 



Total 



15 


2 00 


08 


40 


30 


40 


08 


66 


20 


9 60 


3 10 



g27 87 



JOHN SAINE. 



1895. 

Oct. 25. 

Nov. 1. 

Dec. 2. 

Dec. 4. 

" 14. 

" 27. 

" 30. 

1896. 

Jan. 28. 

Feb. 7. 

" 8. 

'■■ 21. 

Mar. 27. 

May 11. 

May 13. 

" 15. 

" 16. 

" 27. 

" 30. 

Oct. 6. 



Shoe repairs . . . 
Shoe repairs . . . 
1 pair suspenders , 
1 pair garters . . 
Shoes half-soled . 
1 pair garters - . 
New shoes . . . 
Uniform suit . . 



2 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled 

1 cap 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

2 pairs hose 

2 waists 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs hose 

Shoes half soled and heeded 

1 pair garters 

1 pair uniform pants . . . 
Uniform coat and cap . . 
1 pair suspenders .... 
1 pair garters 



Total 



$0 10 
15 
10 
05 
35 
05 
1 50 
6 35 



35 
50 
35 
40 
70 
08 
12 
40 
05 
00 
35 
10 
05 



18 18 



ALVA OAKLEY. 



1895. 


Oct. 


15. 


Dec. 


20. 


Jan. 


17. 


11 


24. 



28. 



Shoes half-soled and heeled . . . 
Shoes half-soled and patched . . 
Uniform suit and cap, November 

Shoe repairs 

Shoes half-soled ........ 

1 pair garters 

2 handkerchiefs 



$0 40 
35 
6 35 
20 
40 
05 
08 



278 

Feb. 14. Shoes half-soled $0 40 

2 shirts 46 

Mar. 20. 2 pairs hose 40 

Shoes half-eoled 30 

April 1. Shoes half-soled 40 

" 17. 1 shoe half-soled . 35 

1 pair suspenders 10 

May 8. Shoe repairs 10 

» 12. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 13 

" 22. Shoe repairs 10 

" 30. Uniform suit 6 35 



Total 

DELLA SAINE. 

1895. 

Nov. 30. 2 yds. Bird's-eye cotton $0 12 

Dec. 31. 2 pairs hose 30 

1896. 

May 30. 1 corset 23 

June 4. Kailroad fare Star City, part 10 



$2 00 
2 25 






4 25 


168 04 



Total . . 75 

LAURA REX. 

1895. 
Dec. 13. New shoes 

1896. 
Oct. 10. Balance due on shoes and repairs 

Total 

Total Pulaski County 

Putnam County. 

JOHN PLUNKETT. 

1895. 

Dec. 15. 1 cap $0 50 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoe repairs 10 

Mar. 6. Shoe half-soled 50 

May 26. 1 pair suspenders 19 

Shoes half -soled and heeled ... 50 

June 4. Railroad fare Barnard 90 

Oct. 10. Coat and cap in February 6 50 

Total $9 19 



Total Putnam County $9 19 



279 

Rush County. 

JAMES CRAWFORD. 
1896. 

Jan. 10. New shoes $1 75 

" 24. Shoes half-soled 40 

Mar. 20. Shoes half-soled 40 

Apr. 10. Shoes half-soled 40 

May 11. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 13 

" 15. Shoes half -soled and repaired .35 

" 27. 1 cap 50 



Total $4 00 



Total Rush County 14 00 

I. 
Shelby County. 

LUEMMA MEEK. 

1895. 

Nov. 80. 4 yds. C. flannel 10 30 

1 spool thread 04 

2 yds. Bird's-eye cotton 12 

Dec. 31. 8 yds. H. cloth 1 44 

6 yds. cambric 24 

2 yds. silesia 18 

2 yds. wigging 14 

2 spools thread 08 

1 yd. elastic 05 

2 pairs hose 30 

1 corset 36 

1896. 

Jan. 3. Shoes half-soled, heeled and patched 50 . , 

" 31. 2| yds. gingham 13 

Feb. 21. New shoes 2 00 

April 3. New shoes 2 25 

May 15. 1 corpet . . 88 

2 pairs hose 26 

i yd. elastic 03 

2 hdks 08 

2 yds. Bird's-eye cotton 12 

June 4. Railroad fare Plymouth 3 55 



Total $12 55 



Total Shelby County $12 55 



280 



1895. 
Nov. 30. 



Dec. 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 



Feb. 28. 



April 3. 
May 15. 

May 22. 



Spencer County. 

COKDIA SHOPTAUGH. 

6^ yds. C flannel 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

lOj yds. gingham 

1 spool thread 

1 doz. buttons 

1 hood 

2 yd. elastic 

2 pairs hose 

3 yds. H. cloth 

4 yds. cambric 

f yd. silesia 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

1 doz. buttons • 

3 handkerchiefs 

1 pair hose 

10 yds. calico 

IJ yds. silesia 

2 doz. buttons 

2 spools thread 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 hat 

^ yd. elastic 

Total 

Total Spencer County 



$0 39 
03 
04 
53 
04 
05 
35 
08 
30 

54 
16 
07 
04 
05 
10 
12 
30 
50 
14 
10 
08 
1 50 
26 
08 
70 
03 



16 53 



16 53 



St. Joseph County. 

WM. B. ROGERS. 

1895. 

Oct. 18. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled 

Dec. 15. Uniform pants and vest, November . . . 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled (second pair) 

Mar. 13. Shoe repairs 

April 17. New shoes 

June 4. Railroad fare South Bend 

Total 

Total St. Joseph County 



$0 60 


50 


6 50 


60 


50 


10 


2 25 


4 25 



$15 30 



$15 30 



281 



Steuben County. 



VERNIE DOUDT. 

1895, 

Oct. 4. New shoes 

Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled 

" 29. 2 pairs hose 

Dec. 20. Shoes half-soled and patched 

Uniform suit, Nov 

1896. 

Feb. 8. 1 cap 

Mar. 27. 2 pairs hose 

" 30. New shoes 

1 shoe half-soled 

May 1. Shoes half-soled 

" 12. 2 waists 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs hose 

May 27. 1 pair suspenders 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 



$1 



50 
35 
22 
40 
6 35 

50 
40 

1 50 
25 
35 
70 
07 
12 
10 

6 35 



$19 16 



EUGENE DOUDT. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. New shoes 

Nov. 2^^. 2 pairs hose 

Dec. 13. Shoes repaired 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoes half-soled, heeled and patched . . 

" 31. Uniform suit 

Feb. 7. Shoes half-soled 

" 21. Shoes repaired 

Mar. 27. 2 pairs hose 

April 17. New shoes 

May 11. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 

" 27. 1 cap 

Total 

Total Steuben County 



II 50 
22 
15 

45 
6 35 
35 
15 
40 
1 50 
08 
13 
50 



11 78 



$30 94 



282 



Sullivan County. 



1895. 
Nov. 1. 
Dec. 13. 

" 27. 

1896. 
Jan. 10. 
" 24. 
" 28. 



CHARLES R. FAUCETT. 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

Shoes patched . . , , . . 

Shoes half-soled 

Uniform suit, November 

1 pair garters 

Shoes half-soled . . •, 

2 handkerchiefs 

Total < . . . . 



$0 40 

20 

40 

6 35 

05 

40 

08 



$7 88 



1895. 
Nov. 30. 



Dec. 30. 



Dec. 31. 

1896 
Jan. 31. 



Feb. 28. 



Apr. 
May 



8. 

22. 



LILLIE CRAIG. 

7i yds. C. flannel 

71 yds. C. flannel, brown 

2 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

4^ yds. H. cloth 

5 yds. cambric 

I yd. silesia 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

11 yds. gingham . . , 

Ij doz. buttons 

1 spool thread . 

1 yd. elastic 

2 pairs hose 

4 yds. H. cloth 

5 yds. cambric 

I yd. silesia 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

1 doz. buttons . , 

3 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs hose 

12^ yds. calico 

li yds. silesia 

1 spool thread . 

1 doz. buttons 

New shoes 

I yd. elastic 

Total 



$0 54 
45 
05 
04 
81 
20 
07 
10 
04 
05 
55 
06 
04 
03 
30 

72 
20 
07 
04 
05 
10 
12 
30 
63 
14 
04 
05 
2 00 
04 



83 



1896. 


Dec. 


15. 


1896. 


Feb. 


11. 


May 


11. 


« 


12. 


u 


22. 


« 


26. 


if 


30. 


June 


4. 



283 

VICTOR EVANS. 

Uniform suit, Nov $6 35 

New shoes 2 00 

2 shirts 66 

2 pairs hose 13 

Shoes half-soled ' 40 

2 handkerchiefs 07 

Uniform suit. - . 6 35 

Railroad fare, part, Sullivan 55 



Total $16 51 

JAMES WRIGHT. 
1896. 

Jan. 24. Shoes half-soled and patched $0 45 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

Feb. 5. 1 cap 50 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs 83 



Total $1 86 



Total Sullivan County $34 08 

Tipton County. 

ROSE L. BECK. 
1895. 
Dec. 31. 1 yd. elastic $0 05 

Total $0 05 



Total Tipton County $0 05 

Vanderburgh County. 

JACOB GREENBERG. 
1896. 

Oct. 11. Shoes half -soled and heeled $0 60 

Nov. 29. Shoes half-soled 40 

Dec. 31. Uniform suit 9 60 

1896. 

Jan. 10. Shoe repairs 15 

April 1. New shoes 2 00 

" 21. 1 pair suspenders . 12 

May 11. 2 shirts 66 

" 18. New shoes .' . 2 00 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 07 

" 30. Uniform suit 11 60 



Total $27 20 



284 

ADDA TOLBERT. 
1895. 

Oct. 25. New shoes $2 00 

1896. 

Jan. 81. Shoes half-soled and heeled 40 

New shoes 2 CO 

Mar. 20. Shoes half-soled 40 

April 3. New shoes 2 00 

May 15. 2 pairs hose 26 

" 22. 1 hat 45 

I yd. elastic 04 

June 4. Railroad fare, part, Evansville 75 



1895. 



Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


31. 


Feb. 


5. 


u 


27. 


Mar. 


20. 


May 


11. 


(I 


26. 


u 


30. 


June 


4. 



Total $8 30 



NATHAN GREENBERG. 

Shoes half-soled $0 40 

Uniform suit, Nov 9 60 

1 pair suspenders 10 

2 undershirts 50 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 60 

2 shirts 68 

2 handkerchiefs 08 

Uniform coat, vest and cap 6 75 

Railroad fare (one-half ), Evansville 2 55 



Total 21 26 



MAUD ALEXANDER. 
1896. 
Oct. 10. Bal. on railroad fare $2 45 



Total 2 45 



WILLIAM Decamps. 

1896. 

Oct. 10. Shoe repairs, November 16, 1895 $0 20 

Pants and cap, December 15, 1895 5 00 

Shoe repairs 1 00 

Railroad fare 510 

Total 11 30 



Total Vanderburg County $70 51 



285 



Vermillion County. 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 

Dec. 15. 

May 11. 

" 12. 

" 16. 

" 30. 



RUSSELL VAN DEVENDER. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

New ehoee 

Uniform suit, November 

2 shirts 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 trunk 

Uniform suit 

Total 



$0 50 
2 00 
9 60 
66 
08 
1 25 
9 60 



$23 69 



1895. 

Nov. 30. 



Dec. 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 17. 
" 31. 



Feb. 28. 



Mar. 
May 



22. 



ANNIE ROBERTSON. 

7 yds. C. flannel 

7 yds. C. flannel, brown 

2 doz, buttons 

1 spool thread 

7| yds. gingham , . 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

I yd. elastic . 

1 hood 

2 pairs hoge 

2 yds. ribbon 

New shoes 

4 yds. H. cloth 

5 yds. cambric 

I yd. silesia 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

3 handkerchiefs 

12^ yds. calico 

IJ yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 

2 yds. ribbon 

2 handkerchiefs 

f yd. elastic 

Total 



$0 53 
42 
05 
04 
38 
05 
04 
03 
45 
30 
10 

2 00 
72 
20 
07 
10 
04 
05 
12 
63 
14 
08 
10 

1 75 
26 
12 
08 
04 



89 



1895. 
Dec. 15. 

1896. 
Apr. 21. 
May 1. 

" 30. 



286 

DAVID STREAN. 

Uniform suit, Nov 

1 pair suspenders 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit and cap 

Total 

Total Vermillion County 



$11 60 

12 

60 

11 60 



$23 9^ 



$56 50 



1895. 
Oct. 4. 
Nov. 1. 
Dec. 13. 

" 15. 

1896. 
Feb. 21. 
Apr. 1. 

" 3. 
May 30. 
June 4. 



1895. 

Oct. 11. 

Dec. 14. 

" 15. 

1896. 

Jan. 2S. 

Feb. 5. 

" 14. 

Mar. 27. 

Apr. 3. 

May 12. 

May 13. 

" 15. 

" 27. 

Sept. 25. 

Oct. 6. 



Vigo County. 

WM. O. BIPPUS. 

Shoes half-soled . ■ 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Uniform suit, November 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

New shoes 

Shoes half-eoled 

Uniform suit 

R. R. fare Terre Haute 

Total 

FRANCIS SARSFIELD. 

New shoes . 

1 pair suspenders 

Uniform suit, November 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 shirts 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

2 pairs hose 

New shoes 

Shoes half-soled 

2 handkerchiefs 

1 pair garters ... 

2 pairs hose 

Shoes half-Holed and heeled 

1 cap 

2 shirts 

2 pairs hose 

1 pair suspenders 

Total 



$0 50 

2 25 

60 

11 HO 

60 

2 25 

50 

U 60 

2 25 



$1 75 

10 

6 35 

08 
46 
40 
40 
1 75 
40 
08 
05 
12 
40 
50 
50 
50 
10 



15- 



13 94 



287 



1895. 



BERTIE STEWART. 

Oct. 11. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Total 



$0 50 



$0 50 



1895. 
Oct. 18. 

Nov. 3. 
Dec. 15. 

1896. 

Jan. 24. 

" 28. 

8. 

14. 

27. 

1. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

15. 

24. 

30. 



Feb. 

Mar, 
Apr. 
May 



JOHN SURBER. 

Shoe repairs 

New shoes 

1 pair suspenders 

Uniform suit, November 

New shoes 

2 handkerchiefs . 

1 cap 

Shoes half-soled and repaired 

2 pairs hose 

Shoe half-soled 

2 waists 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs hose 

Shoe repairs 

1 cap . . . 

1 suit clothes 

1 pair suspenders 

Total 



10 05 

1 75 

10 

6 35 

1 75 
08 
50 
35 
40 
25 
70 
07 
13 
10 
50 

2 25 
10 



15 43 



1895. 
Nov. 30. 

Dec. 31. 



1896. 
Jan. 31. 
Feb. 21. 
Apr. 3. 
May 15. 



June 4. 



NELLIE REEDY. 

1| yds. Bird's-eye cotton 

1 shawl 

2 yds. ribbon 

1 fascinator 

2 pairs hose 

3 handkerchiefs 

Shoes half-soled .' . 

New shoes 

2 pairs hose 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 yds. ribbon 

f yds. elastic 

2 yds. Bird's-eye cotton 

Railroad fare Terre Haute 

Total 



$0 09 
50 
10 
25 
30 

12 
35 

1 75 
26 
08 
12 
03 
12 

2 25 



6 32 



288 



HENRY RAY. 

1895. 

Oct. 11. Shoe repairs 

Nov. 21. 1 pair suspenders 

Dec. 27. New shoes 

Uniform suit, November 

1896. 

Jan. 17. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

" 31. Shoe repairs 

Feb. 28. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

May 1. New shoes 

" 20. 2 pairs socks 

" 21. 1 pair suspenders . . 

" 26. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

CECIL WILLIAMS. 
1896. 
Oct. 6. 1 pair suspenders 

Total 

Total Vigo County 



$0 20 
19 



2 
11 



11 



25 
60 

50 
10 
50 
00 
12 
19 
07 
60 



$0 10 



$29 32 



10 



197 76 



Wabash County. 



1895. 



Oct. 


4. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


4. 


i( 


27. 


1896. 


Jan. 


24. 


(1 


28. 


Feb. 


6. 


Feb. 


7. 


u 


21. 


a 


27. 


Mar. 


6. 


a 


13. 


May 


30. 



JAMES BASHORE. 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoe repairs 

Uniform suit, November 

Shoe repairs 

2 handkerchiefs 

2 pairs socks 

1 cap 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Shoes half-soled and heeled 

1 pair suspenders 

Shoe repairs 

Shoe repairs 

Uniform suit . .- 

New shoes 

Total 

Total Wabash County ...... 



$0 40 

40 

40 

20 

9 60 

10 
08 
06 
50 
40 
50 
10 
15 
10 
9 60 
2 00 



24 59 



$24 59 



289 



Warrick County. 

WAYNE POLK. 

1895. 

Oct. 25. Shoes half-soled 

Nov. 29. 2 pairs hose . . 

Shoes half-soled and patched 

Dec. 6. Shoes half -soled and patched 

" 15. Uniform suit, November 

1896. 
Jan. 10. New shoes 

Shoe repairs 

Jan. 28. 2 handkerchiefs 

1 pair suspenders 

1 pair garters 

Feb. 8. 1 cap 

Mar. 14. 1 pair shoes 

Shoes half-soled 

Mar. 27. 2 pairs hose 

May 12. 2 handkerchiefs 

" 13. 2 pairs hose 

" 30. Uniform suit 

1 pair suspenders 

June 4. Railroad fare Evansville (one-half) . . 

Cash in envelope 

Sept. 30. 1 pair suspenders 

Total 



$0 30 

22- 

40 

40 

6 35- 

1 75 
10 

Os- 
lo 

05 
50 

1 50 
35 
40 
07 
13 

6 35 
10 

2 55 
75 
10 



$22 55i 



MARY L. CORN. 

1896. 

Oct. 10. 2 pairs shoes (Superintendent's cash book) . 
Bal. railroad fare . 

Total 

ROBERT CUTTERIDGE. 

1896. 

Oct. 6. 1 pair suspenders 

Total 

Total Warrick County ........ 



$4 00 
50 



$0 10 



4 50' 



W 



$27 15 



Wayne County. 

ALBERT O. CLARK. 

1895. 

Oct. 4. Shoes half-soled 

Dec. 20. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

1 cap 

Uniform pants, November 

19— D. and D. 



$0 50 

60 

50 

4 50 



290 



1896. 

Feb. 28. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Apr. 1. New shoes 

" 21. 1 pair suspenders > 

May 26. 2 pairs sock 

" 30. Uniform suit 

Total 

GEORGE SCHULTZ. 
1895. 
Nov. 11. Shoes half-soled and heeled 

Total 

NELLIE FULTON. 

1895. 
Nov. 30. 6J yds. C. flannel 

1 doz. buttons 

Dec. 31. 10 yds. gingham . 

I5 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 pairs hose ■ 

^ yd. elastic • . 

1896. 
Jan. 31. 3 yds. H. cloth 

3 yds. cambric - . 

f yds. silesia . . , 

1 doz. buttons 

1 spool thread 

2 spools twist 

3 handkerchiefs 

Feb. 10. 10 yds. calico 

Ij yds. silesia 

2 spools thread 

2 doz. buttons 

May 22. 2 yd. elastic 

" .30. 1 hat 

Total 

Total Wayne County 



$0 60 

2 00 

13 

22 

11 60 



$0 60 



39 
03 
50 
08 
04 
30 
03 

54 
12 
07 
10 
04 
05 
12 
50 
11 
08 
10 
03 
25 



$20 65 



60 



3 48 



124 73 



1896. 
Oct. 10. 



White County. 

JOHN EASTERDAY. 

Shoe repairs 

Railroad fare Monticello 

Total 

Total White County 



$0 45 
2 55 



$3 00 
$3 00 



291 



EXHIBIT No. 14. 



A Recapitulation of Clothing Accounts^ Showing the Amount 
Charged to Counties for Clothing and Other Expenses for 
Pupils for the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. Ac- 
counts for Collection Have Been Filed with the Treasurer of 
State, 

Allen $22 49 

Blackford 52 73 

Boone 25 89 

Carroll 119 85 

Cass 37 89 

Clark 26 61 

Clay 29 25 

Clinton 2 17 

Daviess 7 82 

Dearborn 12 24 

Dubois 17 05 

Elkhart 70 24 

Floyd 11 86 

Fountain 12 18 

Franklin 1 82 

Fulton 20 23 

Gibson 23 17 

Grant 30 39 

Greene 16 23 

Hamilton 19 43 

Hancock 22 88 

Hendricks 3 13 

Henry 1 95 

Howard 20 09 

Jackson 26 80 

Jefferson 19 99 

Johnson 25 20 

Knox 30 89 

Kosciusko 52 

Lagrange 49 97 

Lake 11 66 

Lawrence 29 93 

Madison 47 53 

Marion 146 84 

Marshall 38 42 

Martin 17 08 

Miami 28 77 

Monroe 24 33 



292 



EXHIBIT No. 14— Continued. 

Noble $38 57 

Orange 22 04 

Perry 8 CO 

Pike 89 53 

•Porter 4 47 

Posey 18 45 

Palaski 68 04 

Putnam 9 19 

Rush 4 00 

Shelby 12 55 

"Spencer 6 53 

■St. Joseph 15 30 

Steuben 30 94 

:Su!livan 34 08 

Tipton 05 

Vanderburgh 70 51 

Vermillion 56 50 

Vigo 97 76 

Wabash 24 59 

Warrick 27 15 

Wayne 24 73 

White 3 00 

Total 



$1,771 55 



EXHIBIT No. 15. 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



Academy boards 6 $1 20 

Book case 1 5 DO 

Brushes, asst 36 3 10 

•Casts 2 7 50 

€hairs. 18 18 00 

Carving tools, lot 1 16 00 

Drawing boards 36 14 00 

Drawing paper, lot 1 112 

Easels 26 21 60 

Frames, walnut 4 4 00 

Models, get = 1 ^ 85 

Mallets 6 1 15 

Material case 1 4 50 



293 



ART DEPARTMENT— Continued. 

Oil cups , 18 $1 08 

Palleltes 12 2 40 

Pallettes, knives 12 3 0) 

Pastel crayons, lot 1 6 00 

Paintings, oil, lot 1 65 00 

Paintings, pastel, lot 1 55 00 

Studies, asst.,lot 1 6 00 

Tables 3 6 00 

Tubes, asst. ; paints, lot 1 4 00 

Wood, carved 1 10 00 

Water-color paints 1 2 60 

Water-color paper 1 72 



Total S264 82 



BAKE SHOP. 

Bench moulding 1 $1 00 

Box, mixing 1 

Box, ice, old 1 

Buckets, sugar 2 

Buckets, wooden 1 

Buckets, tin 1 

Boiler, fruit 1 

Box, proof 1 

Box, wood 1 

Bowls, yellow 2 

Basin, tin .... 1 

Brooms 2 

Bowls, wooden 3 

Brown bread pans 12 

Cupboard . 1 

Cake pans, round 39 

Cake pans, flat 32 

Cake pans, jelly 24 

Cup cake forms 135 

Cake cutters 6 

Cups, tin 2 

Clock 1 

Chairs 2 

Dippers 2 

Egg beaters 2 

Flour shovel , 1 

Flour, bbls. of 6^ 

Flour sieve 1 

Funnels 1 

Jar, stone 1 

Kettles, iron 2 

Kett'es, brass 2 



3 00 


4 00 


.50 


25 


30 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 00 


20 


50 


4 00 


75 


3 00 


9 00 


9 00 


3 00 


3 00 


60 


15 


1 (10 


50 


50 


50 


50 


23 75 


90 


10 


50 


2 50 


2 00 



294 



BAKE SHOP— Continued. 



Spoons, iron . 2 

Pie pans • 269 

Pair scales 1 

Pans, bread 40 

Peels 2 

Kolling pin 1 

Small scraper • 1 

Strainers, yeast 2 

Small range 1 

Tables 3 

Tub, yeast 1 

Total 

BED-KOOMS AND HALLS. 

Awnings 8 

Bedsteads, double . . 14 

Bedsteads, single 19 

Bed springs, sets . / 17 

Bed-room sets 5 

Feather beds 2 

Blankets 22 

Bolsters 17 

Bolster cases • 33 

Bureaus 1^ 

Bookcase 1 

Boxes, trash • 3 

Buckets, fiber, fire, doz 3^ 

Chamber sets 33 

Chairs, plain 70 

Chairs, rocking 58 

Chairs, rocking, willow 3 

Chairs, plain, willow 2 

Chairs, cane-seated 9 

Chairs, plain 17 

Chairs, armed, large 3 

Chairs, rocking, upholstered 3 

Chairs, upholstered • 4 

Couches 2 

Chiffoniers. 1 

Cedar chest 1 

Curtains, lace 14 

Curtains, Swiss 4 

Clock 1 

Cottons, double 1^ 

Cottons, single 23 

Comforts single 1° 



$0 


20 


6 


50 


1 


50 


8 


CO 


1 


00 




50 




10 


1 


50 


22 


GO 


3 


00 


2 


50 



$56 00 
98 00 
71 00 
35 00 

305 00 
18 00 
66 00 
17 00 
16 50 
88 00 
50 00 

1 00 
12 00 
81 00 
77 00 
56 00 

4 50 
3 00 

3 00 
8 50 

4 50 
20 00 
25 00 
22 00 
29 00 
15 00 
25 50 

2 00 
18 00 
18 00 

17 25 

18 00 



$127 30 



295 



BED-KOOMS AND HALLS— Continued. 

Comforts, double 18 $27 00 

Chamois 2 80 

Carpets, Brussels, yds 463 J 341 16 

Carpets, Brussels, yds 88^ 80 00 

Carpets, Brussels, yds 43^ 25 00 

Carpet, ingrain, yds 400 200 00 

Carpet, ingrain, yds 12§ 133 71 

Carpet, ingrain, yds 28J 18 30 

Carpet, ingrain, yds 13^ 6 48 

Carpets, Ptair, yds 32 20 00 

Carpet pads, doz 4f 4 00 

Carpet rods, doz If 2 80 

Carpet paper, yds 875 80 00 

Carpet stretchers 4 3 50 

Dressing cases 13 204 00 

Drinking cup, silver 1 1 50 

Dustpans 25 2 50 

Drop lights 2 10 00 

Feather dusters 14 7 00 

Fire extinguishers, doz IJ 185 00 

Gas lighters 6 3 00 

Hat racks 1 5 00 

Hand grenades, lot 1 50 00 

Hammers o 9 1 40 

Hampers, clothes 3 3 75 

Lounges 8 70 00 

Linoleum, yds 12f 6 00 

Mattresses, double husk '6 16 80 

Mattresses, double hair 18 55 80 

Mattresses, single hair 15 30 00 

Mattresses, single husk 15 20 00 

Mattresses, spring 5 90 00 

Matting, yds 75 26 38 

Mats, wire 1 4 00 

Mops 10 2 50 

Oilcloth, yds 11 3 96 

Portieres and poles, set 1 20 00 

Pictures, lot 1 90 00 

Pillows Ill 210 00 

Pillowcases 210 136 50 

Bugs 16 13 00 

Settees 6 13 00 

Sofas 7 49 00 

Screens 17 8 50 

Sheets, double 96 76 80 

Sheets, single 61 30 50 

Spreads, single 36 27 45 

Spreads, double 32 32 00 

Stands, marble top 4 50 00 



296 



BED-KOOMS AND HALLS- Continued. 



Stands, plain top 29 $29 00 

Stands, square top 6 6 25 

Step-ladders, 8 ft 2 4 00 

Step-ladders, 6 ft 2 2 50 

Stools 8 3 00 

Sweepers 2 5 50 

Shades and fixtures 27 19 00 

Shovels, pokers, etc., sets 1 5 00 

Tables, small 2 3 50 

Table, toilet 1 2 00 

Tables, plain 8 2 25 

Table covers 3 3 50 

Transom rods and curtains 22 4 00 

Towels, hand . 237 47 40 

Towels, bath 28 5 04 

Towels, roller 4 1 40 

Tack claws, doz 1^ 3 38 

Wash stands 24 91 50 

Wardrobes 26 128 00 

Water pitchers 15 9 75 

Water cans 17 21 25 

Water cooler, stationary 1 40 00 

Wall brushes 3 3 00 

Total 



1,169 06 



BOILER HOUSE. 



Anvil 1 $1 CO 

Brace 1 1 00 

Boilers and connections .- . 4 3,000 00 

Bench and vice 1 5 00 

Bibbs 12 9 00 

Compass 1 50 

Cold chisels 5 1 00 

Calipers 2 1 00 

Drills 12 3 00 

Dies and stocks 4 30 00 

Engine and belting 1 400 00 

Flue brushes 1 2 00 

Fuel oil, gallons 5,000 87 50 

Gas pliers 1 1 00 

Hammers 8 1 50 

Hose rubber, feet 50 10 00 

Iron pipe, feet 800 15 00 

Monkey wrenches 4 2 00 

Nippers 1 1 00 

Oilers 4 60 



297 



BOILER HOUSE-Continued. 



Oil tank and connections . . 
Oil tank for machine oil . . 

Oil, gallons 

Packing, lot 

Packing, hooks 

Punches 

Pipe cutters 

Pipe tongs 

Pipe wrenches 

Pails 

Ratchet 

Steam fittings, lot 

Soldering irons 

Solder pot and ladle . . . . , 

Screw drivers 

Step ladder 

Steam pumps and connections 

Tinner shears 

Taps . . . , 

Valves , 

Water tanks 

Wood saw 

Wrenches, S 



Total 



1 


$1,000 on 


3 


12 00 


8 


4 00 


1 


8 00 


2 


30 


2 


] 00 


2 


4 00 


12 


12 00 


3 


4 00 


2 


30 


1 


3 00 


1 


50 00 


2 


1 00 


1 


50 


2 


40 


1 


1 00 


5 


800 00 


1 


75 


10 


7 00 


18 


12 00 


3 


175 00 


1 


3 00 


4 


1 50 




So,672 85 



BUILDINGS. 



Main front building , 

Middle building . 

Rear building 

School buildings 

Cabinet shop and machine room . . . 
Shoe shop and printing office building 

Repair shop 

Boiler-house and smokestack 

Lighting station 

Cold storage building 

Wash-house building 

Barn, horse and cow stable 

Carriage and tool-house 

Green houses 

Other outbuildings . . 

Total 



1 195,000 00 


1 45,000 00 


1 40,000 00 


1 50,000 00 


1 3,500 CO 


1 3,100 CO 


1 600 CO 


1 3,400 00 


1 900 00 


1 2,100 00 


1 2,300 00 


1 1,500 00 


1 300 00 


2 50 00 


50 0!i 


$247,800 00 



298 



CABINET SHOP. 

Awls, brad 12 

Auger bits, sets J to 1 in 23 

Belting, lot 1 

" old, lot 1 

Brace bits 23 

Brooms, whisk 6 

" large 6 

Buffers 5 

Belt binder 1 

Benches, cabinet, work 25 

Commode 1 

Cases, tool 34 

" sample 1 

" cabinet 2 

Chisels, sets J to 1 in. . 23 

" turning, stts ^ to I5 in 10 

Calipers, pairs 10 

Compasses, pairs 2 

Chisels, carving 26 

Carvers, set . 1 

Clamps, veneering set 1 

" wood 8 

" eccentric 10 

" cabinet, screw 4 

" " iron 8 

Cupboards .■ 3 

Cabinet blacking •. . . . 10 

Fan exhaust 1 

Glue, lbs 4 

Guages, marking 26 

Hammers, adz eye 20 

Hardware, lot 1 

Jardiniere . . 1 

Knives, drawing 22 

Lumber, oak, ft 1,000 

Lumber, scrap lot 1 

Lathes, wood-turning — No. 5, 20-in 1 

" " No. 4, 18-in 1 

No. 3, 16-in 2 

" No. 2, 14-in 2 

No. 1, 12-in 4 

Machine, mortice, old 1 

" planing, old . 1 

" moulding. Rex 1 

Mallets 18 

Oil cans 12 

" " shipping 4 

Pots glue 4 



$0 


50 


23 00 


105 00 


1 


00 


10 


00 




50 


1 


00 




50 


7 


50 


100 


00 


2 


00 


15 


00 


2 


00 


2 00 


20 00 


65 00 


4 


00 




50 


5 


00 


3 


00 


1 


00 


2 00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


12 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 




60 


2 


00 


5 


50 


5 


CO 


1 


00 


15 


00 


;^5 


GO 


5 


00 


104 


00 


63 


00 


105 


00 


90 


00 


105 


00 


3 00 


10 00 


25 


00 


5 00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


CO 



299 



CABINET SHOP— Continued. 

Planes, iron block 18 $2 70 

" jack 24 12 00 

" fore 24 18 00 

" smoothing 24 8 00 

" rabbet, 1^-in 6 3 00 

" rabbet, 1-in 6 2 40 

" dado, l-in 6 2 50 

" dado, Hn 6 2 00 

" bits, jack 6 1 tiO 

" " fore • . . . . 4 2 00 

*^ " smoothing. . . , 4 1 00 

" handles, fore 6 60 

" " jack 2 20 

" ■ stocks, old 16 3 00 

" wedges, fore 3 15 

*' " jack 4 25 

" •' smoothing 4 20 

" Chamfer. 1 1 50 

" scraping , 1 2 00 

" Scotia 1 60 

" O G 1 60 

Kules, 2-ft 12 1 25 

Saws, double, revolving 1 206 00 

scroll 1 75 00 

hand 23 16 00 

rip 6 5 00 

tenon 20 5 00 

swinging 1 10 00 

Sandpaper, lot 1 1 50 

Shovels, scoop 2 1 50 

Screwdrivers. , 24 3 00 

Shears for wood lathes 6 36 00 

Shafting and pulleys, lot 1 159 00 

Squares, bevel 22 4 00 

" try 22 3 00 

2-ft 1 1 25 

" miter 1 50 

" drafting 2 2 00 

Spoke shaves 20 2 00 

Stoves. 3 15 00 

Stones, grinding 2 4 00 

" emery 1 1 00 

" oil 12 4 00 

" " slips 12 2 00 

" pumice, lot 1 15 

Stands, wash 6 12 00 

" center 2 5 00 

" old 4 1 00 

Stools, foot 87 6 09 



300 



CABINET SHOP— Continued. 

Sets, nail 10 

Trestles, pair 25 

Tools, misc. lot 1 

Tables, old 4 

Taborete 2 

Varnish, lot 1 

Wrenches 12 

Wardrobes, old 6 

1 

t 

Total 



$0 20 


5 00 


2 00 


1 75 


2 00 


2 00 


6 00 


18 OO 


14 00 



$1,689 09 



SUPERINTENDENT'S DINING EOOM. 



Bowls, silver 1 

" cracker • 1 

" gravy 2 

" soup 8 

" finger 3 

Bell call 1 

Basket, silver cake 1 

Bucket, milk • 1 

Blinds, window 3 

Boxes, bread 3 

Castor, silver 1 

Carvino; knife and fork 1 

Castor, pickle 1 

Cruetp, syrup, silver 1 

" vinegar 1 

Cups, afternoon tea . 9 

" egg 24 

" handled 18 

Cloths, table 20 

" bread 8 

Clock 1 

Chairs 9 

China cupboard 1 

Cooler, water 1 

Dishes, sauce 26 

" glass, fruit 12 

" vegetable 6 

Doilies 18 

Forks, silver 21 

Gliisses 27 

Goblets 23 

Hampers, clothes 1 

Knives, pilver 21 

" butcher 1 



%2 00 


50 


30 


75 


60 


1 00 


2 00 


50 


75 


75 


3 00 


3 00 


1 00 


1 00 


50 


1 00 


1 50 


1 50 


25 00 


2 50 


10 00 


9 00 


3 00 


6 00 


2 00 


2 50 


2 10 


2 00 


6 30 


1 20 


2 00 


2 00 


6 00 


20 



301 



SUPERINTENDENT'S DINING ROOM— Continued. 



Napkins 51 

Plates, dinner , 10 

" oyster 10 

" bread and butter 2S 

" pie 14 

" soup 6 

Platters, meat 3 

Pitchers, silver cream 1 

" water 2 

Pictures 8 

Stands, salt ... 12 

" pepper 12 

" cake 2 

" marble top 2 

" old 1 

Spoon holder, silver 1 

Spoons, table, " 23 

" tea, " 25 

" dessert ... 8 

" orange, silver 6 

Sideboard 1 

Steel ; . . . 1 

Saucers 32 

Tea trays 1 

Table, extension 2 

Tureen, soup 1 

Tooth-pick holder 1 

Total 



$6 00 


1 60 


85- 


1 50 


1 25 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 50' 


12 00* 


60 


60 


60 


9 00 


50 


1 00 


3 86 


5 25 


I 00 


1 50 


9 ro 


6Q 


1 25- 


60- 


18 00 


40-- • 


20k 


$186 11 



OFFICERS' DINING ROOM. 



Bread bo^es . • . 
Brushes, counter . . 

" scrub . . • 
Bucket, wooden . . 

" garbage . . 

Broom 

Butters 

Bowls, sugar . . . 

" soup .... 
Cellars, salt .... 
Carvers, sets .... 
Creams, individuals 

Castors 

Chairs 



3 

17 

22 
4 

12 
2 

18 



II 50 

25 

2» 

20 

50 

20 

80' 

60 

2 00 

1 50 

4 75 

50 

4 00 

20 00 



302 



OFFICERS' DINING EOOM— Continued. 

Cruets, syrup 3 $0 75 

" mustard 3 

" vinegar. • 3 

Cloths, table 20 

Cups 30 

Cupboard 1 

Celery glasses 3 

Dishes, pickle 5 

" vegetable. . 5 

Duster, feather. 1 

Forks, silver 38 

Glasses, jelly 141 

Goblets 28 

Knives, silver, butter 5 

" " ... 26 

Ladles, soup 2 

Mop 1 

Napkins 72 

Pans, dust 1 

" dish 2 

Plates, dinner 24 

" pie 20 

Platters, meat 6 

Pitchers, water 1 

" cream 3 

Pots, coffee 1 

" tea 1 

Saucers 30 

" fruit 46 

Stands, cake 8 

Spoons, dessert 15 

Stand, toothpick 1 

Spoons, silver tea 40 

" table 24 

Stands, pepper 3 

Spoon holders 3 

Screen 1 

Steels 2 

Tureen, soup 1 

Tables 5 

Towels, tea , . 12 

Trays, " 2 

Hat rack 1 

Total $155 45 



30 


30 


34 50 


1 75 


1 50 


75 


75 


90 


25 


11 25 


4 50 


1 60 


1 00 


7 00 


30 


20 


5 00 


15 


1 00 


1 60 


90 


90 


30 


45 


30 


30 


1 25 


1 00 


3 20 


2 50 


20 


3 25 


3 75 


30 


75 


3 00 


1 80 


40 


16 00 


75 


80 


1 00 



303 



EMPLOYES' DINING ROOM. 

Bread knife 1 

" box 1 

Bowls, soup 17 

" sugar o 3 

Bread board 1 

Brooms ' 2 

Brushes, scrub 2 

Buckets, wooden 1 

Castors 2 

Carvers 2 

Chairs 24 

Cups 26 

Dishes, cracker 2 

" fruit, glass 2 

" vegetable 4 

" pickle ' 2 

" racks 1 

Forks 20 

Knives 20 

Ladles 1 

Pans, dish 2 

Pitchers, cream . . 2 

" water I 

Plates 23 

Platters, meat 2 

Plates, butter 2 

Pots, coffee . . . , , 1 

" tea 1 

Saucers 20 

" fruit 20 

Spoons, table 20 

" tea 20 

" holders 2 

Stands, cake . 2 

Salt cellars 2 

Syrup cruets 2 

Safes 1 

Tables 3 

Tea trays 2 

Tumblers . 20 

Table cloths 10 

Tea towels 5 



$0 50 


60 


2 80 


1 00 


25 


50 


25 


25 


3 00 


3 50 


12 00 


2 00 


1 50 


70 


80) 


30 


4 oa 


2 00 


2 00 


15 


1 CO 


30 


60 


1 60 


1 50 


20 


30 


25 


1 50 


60 


4 GO 


3 50 


40 


1 00 


20 


50 


4 00 


18 00 


50 


75 


18 no 


80 



Total $97 60 



304 



PUPILS' DINING ROOM. 

Brushes, crumb 4 $0 80 

Buckets 4 1 00 

Bowls, soup 230 19 65 

Brooms 4 80 

Brushes, scrub 4 1 00 

" counter 4 1 00 

Castors 27 24 00 

Carvers, sets 21 18 00 

Can, large milk 1 3 (JO 

Chairs 307 148 CO 

" large 2 5 00 

■Clock ] 2 50 

Cupboard, linen 1 3 00 

dish 2 6 00 

Cups 270 14 00 

•Celery glasses 6 1 00 

Dishes, vegetable ; . . . 80 15 00 

Drainers, tumbler 27 24 00 

Dish racks 2 6 00 

" fruit 1 30 

Dishes, pickle 27 2 50 

Forks 308 32 50 

Goblets . - 36 2 25 

Jars, stone 4 1 00 

Jugs, " 4 75 

'Knives 312 32 50 

Liadles, soup 26 4 00 

Mops 4 80 

Napkins 724 19 25 

Napkin rings 100 9 00 

Pans, dish 16 8 00 

' dust 4 1 00 

" milk 6 1 50 

Plates, butter 30 90 

" bread 30 1 20 

" 312 15 50 

-' pie. 24 1 90 

" cheese 8 50 

Platters, meat 45 18 00 

Pitchers, water 27 9 25 

" glass 8 2 00 

Baucers 284 15 00 

old 217 4 00 

Salt cellars 30 1 50 

Spoc.ns, tea 210 6 dO 

" table 148 6 50 

Spoon -holders 26 4(0 

Step ladder 1 1 00 

Strainer, milk 2 80 



305 



PUPILS' DINING ROOM— Continued. 

Syrup cruetB 32 $9 50 

Tables 32 186 00 

Tureens 27 15 00 

Tablecloths 58 175 00 

Tumblers 315 9 00 

Tea trays 27 4 50 

Towels 19 1 90 

" roller 18 3 60 

Vinegar cruets 6 30 



Total 1901 95 



Total dining rooms $1,341 11 



DORMITORIES. 

Bureaus 8 18 00 

Bedsteads, single 288 753 00 

Bedsteads, single, iron 33 116 25 

Blankets, single 314 403 92 

Brooms 27 5 00 

Boxes, trash 8 3 00 

Basins, tin 5 75 

Cotton, single 302 226 50 

Comforts, single 187 101 75 

Chairs 44 6 70 

Dustpans 14 1 60 

Glasses . . 4 L' 00 

Mattresses, single, hair 72 198 00 

Mattress(^s, single, husk 244 390 40 

Pillows 319 271 15 

Pillow cases 600 150 00 

Pictures 4 2 00 

Sheets, single 1,249 600 00 

Spreads, single 436 392 40 

Tables 3 1 50 

Wardrobes 55 590 00 

Window shades 12 6 00 

Total $4,229 92 



ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 

Belting, ft 49J $50 00 

Combination switch-board 1 90 00 

Chairs 2 3 00 

Dynamo, 600-light 1 1,200 00 

Desk 1 2 00 

Electric and gas fixtures, lot 1 760 00 

Engine, 50 horse power 1 1,000 00 

20— D. and D. 



306 



ELECTRIC LIGHT PL A. NT— Continued. 

Lamp Clipboard 1 $3 00 

Magneto bell 1 3 00 

Miscellaneous supplies in use, lot 1 35 00 

Portable stands 2 7 00 

Sockets and lamps in use 659 615 00 

Safety devices, switches, etc., lot .... 1 175 00 

Shades and holders, gas and electric 275 110 00 

Tool cupboard 1 1 50 

Tool^, assorted lot 1 5 00 

yifire, lbs 2,950 1,005 00 

Miscellaneous supplies not in use: 

Attachments, standard wall-plug, lot 1 25 

Brackels/electric 1 75 

China cleats 87 1 35 

Ceiling rosettes, K. W 23 2 07 

Ceiling rosettes, plain 45 1 05 

Electroliers, 2-light 5 25 00 

Electroliers, 1 light 8 24 00 

Engine room supplies, lot 1 12 00 

Glass door . 1 1 50 

Gas tips 50 1 75 

Lamp cord, yds 20 60 

Lamp=, 32 C. P., new 20 6 00 

Lamp-, 25 C. P., new 23 5 06 

Lamps, 16 C. P., new 17 3 40 

5 70 



Lamps 32 C. P., old 18 

Lamps, 25 C. P, old 33 6 60 

Lamps, 20 C. P., old . 40 8 00 

Lamps, 16 C P., old 33 6 60 

Oil, cylinder, gal 0^ 19 

Oil, engine, gal 1 23 

Step ladder, 16 ft 1 4 65 

Step-ladder, 4 ft 1 1 25 

Steam coil 1 20 00 

Shade reflectors 3 90 

Shade holders 3 20 

Sockets 23 6 21 

Socket holders 24 1 20 

Wire, water-proof line, ft 50 1 25 

Wire, 50-amp., fuse, ft 2 20 

Wire, 40-amp., fuse, ft 2 20 

Wire, 20-amp., fuse, ft 5 25 

Wire, 15-amp, fuse, ft 5 20 

Wire, 10-amp., fuse, ft. . . 5 20 

Wire, 5-amp., fuse, ft 2 10 

Total $5,213 41 



307 



FARM AND GARDEN PRODUCTS. 



Beets, bu 31 

Cabbage, heads 1,524 

Corn, bu 405 

Fodder, ehocke 300 

Hay, clover, tons 8 

Oats, bu 500 

Mangel-wurtzels 39 

Straw, tons 10 

Turnips, bu 75 

Total 



$12 40 




15 24 




89 10 




15 00 




64 00 




80 00 




11 70 




50 00 




15 00 






$352 44 



GREENHOUSE. 



Bulbs, tulip, hyacinth, etc., lot 1 

" canna, lot 1 

" crocus, lot 1 

" tuberose, lot 1 

Cuttings, lot 1 

Cupboard 1 

Dahlias, lot , 1 

Flower pots, empty 7,000 

Hanging baskets 6 

Hose, garden, ft 300 

Ladder, old 1 

Plants 12640 

Shears, garden . . . • , 2 

Seeds, lot 1 

Table, old 1 

Trowels, old .... 3 

Thermometers, old 3 

Vases, wire 5 

" iron 4 

Wheelbarrow, old , . • . . 1 

Watering cans 2 

Total 



$29 30 


40 00 


8 00 


2 00 


5 00 


50 


8 00 


65 00 


1 00 


20 00 


25 


1,290 00 


1 00 


1 00 


25 


50 


30 


5 00 


20 00 


50 


1 00 


$1,498 60 



INFIRMARY. 



Basins 3 $0 30 

Bath tub 1 2 00 

Bed pans 2 1 25 

Bedsteads 10 30 00 

Bedstead, folding 1 4 50 

Blankets 6 10 00 

Brooms 5 1 25 



308 



INFIRMARY— Continued. 
Books — 

Smith's Diseases of Children 

Powell's Essentials of Children's Diseases 

Hartshorn's Essentials of the Practice of Medicines. 

Dictionary, Medical 

Dispensatory, U. S 

Witiker's Practice of Medicine • 

Bureau 

Chairs 

Chambersets 

Clocks - 

Comforts 

Cots 



Cots, wire ....... 

Cuspidores 

Dish closet 

Dishes, lot 

Douchep, nasal 

Drugs and medicines, lot 

Dntt pans 

Dusters, feather .... 

Funnels 

Handkerchiefs ..... 

Lamps 

Lancet 

Lounges 

Linoleum 

Mattresses, hair .... 
Mattresses, husk .... 

Medicine case 

Mirror 

Mop 



Mortar 

Paris 

Pictures 

Pillows 

Pillow slips . . . . 
Scales and weights, set . 
Scissors, surj;eons' . - , 

Sheets 

Spatula ... . . 

Spreads 

Stoves, gas 

Syringes 

Table cover 

Tables 

Thermometers, common. 
Thermometer, fever . . 
Tongue depresters . . . 
'I'owels ... . . . 





$5 50 




1 00 




2 75 




6 00 




5 00 




5 00 




4 00 


20 


20 00 


2 


1 50 


3 


3 00 


15 


22 50 


11 


16 50 


6 


6 9 


3 


75 


1 


2 00 


I 


■J. 41) 


1 


75 


1 


35 00 


3 


30 


1 


50 


2 


1 (10 


12 


50 


2 


1 50 


1 


1 50 


3 


18 00 




41 00 


10 


25 50 


11 


24 75 


1 


75 00 


1 


1 00 


1 


51) 


1 


50 


10 


5 00 


12 


10 00 


30 


22 50 


68 


13 60 


1 


10 ( 


1 


1 50 


Qi 


15 50 


I 


50 


25 


2> 50 


2 


4 00 


2 


1 25 


1 


50 


14 


8 40 


4 


1 00 


1 


1 90 


6 


3 00 


41 


6 15 



309 

INFIRMARY— Continued. 

Washstands 

Water bottles, rubber 

Wardrobes - 

Total 

KITCHEN. 

Basin 

Broiler 

Broom 

Bell, old 

Boilers, vegetable 

" soup 

" tea 

Box, tea, old 

Buckets, tin 

fiber 

" wooden 

Bowls, wooden 

" yellow 

Boiler, meat 

Bucket, coffee 

Barrel, " 

Board, dough 

Brush, table .... 

Beaters, eggs 

Buckets, sugar and cracker 

Chopper, meat 

Cleavers 

Cutters 

Cupbjard 

Cullenders 

Clock 

Coffee urn, 40-gal., copper 

" " 8-gal., tin 

Chair 

" (stoob) 

Cake cutters 

Cups, tin 

Can-", lard 

Freezers, ice cream, old 

Fryers, potato 

Frame diet table 

Forks 

Gridiron 

Graters, nutmeg . . 

" lemon 

Grinder, coffee, old 

Galvanized hoods 



$3 00 

2 75 

25 00 



$1) 40 

2" 00 

-20 

40 

3 00 

2 50 

1 00 

10 

1 00 

20 

40 

35 

65 

20 00 

1 00 

75 

25 

20 

1 50 
90 

7 00 

2 20 

1 50 
20 00 

2 00 

3 :0 
25 00 

3 00 
25 
75 
20 
20 

1 25 
11 50 

75 
20 
75 
75 
10 
20 

2 5 I 
35 00 



1539 45 



810 



KITCHEN— Continued. 



Ice pick 

Jug, 2-gal J 

Jar, 10-gal - • • ^ 

Knives, butcher ^^ 

" chopping ^ 

Kettles, brass 

" porcelain lined ^ 

Ladles, tin " 

" iron ....... .... 2 

" soup ^ 

" brass ^ 

Mop ^ 

Potato mashers ^ 

1 % 

Pans, roasting ^^ 

" sauce ■ 

" padding ^^ 

" frying ' 

" dust 1 

" dish 13 

" muffin . . . • ^ 

" mixing • ^ 

Pumps, iron ^ 

Potato peelers ... 12 

Pots, coflfee 37 

Potato mashers 

Pin, rolling 1 

Pans, meat ^ 

" corn bread 1*^ 

" pie, granite iron " 

flange ^ 

Eefrigerator 1 

Kope and elevators 2 

Squeezers, lemon 3 

Saws, meats * 

Spoons, iron ^ 

" tin 6 

Steam table and vessels 1 

Steels 2 

Sinks, galv. lined 2 

Scoops * 

Steamer, tin 1 

Sausage grinder 1 

Scrapers ■^ 

Tables 2 

" zinc covered 1 

Turners, cake 3 

Toasters, old 3 

Water tank 1 

Total 



$0 20 


20 


65 


2 00 


75 


1 50 


2 25 


1 50 


1 00 


1 00 


90 


20 


20 


18 00 


1 35 


1 75 


2 20 


10 


3 25 


1 00 


2 CO 


12 00 


1 50 


7 40 


10 


35 


1 00 


14 00 


50 


325 00 


100 00 


12 00 


75 


1 75 


25 


50 


40 00 


1 00 


15 00 


50 


25 


4 00 


95 


8 00 


3 00 


60 


25 


18 00 



$784 05 



311 
SUPERINTENDENT'S KITCHEN. 



Bell, call . . . 

Bread pans . . 

" toaster . 
Buckets, sugar. 

Bread knife . . 
Bucket, tin 

" milk. , 
Biscuit cutters 
Basins, tin . 

Bowls, yellow . 

Box, salt . . . 

" pepper . 

Bread board . . 



" boxes . . . 
Box, trash .... 
Butcher knife . . 
Colander .... 
Cake pans .... 
Coffee pot, earthen 
" tin . . 
Cake turners . . . 
Can openers . . . 

" tea 

" coffee .... 
Chopper, hash . . 

Chairs 

Cupboards. . . 
Egg beaters . . . 
Flour chest . . . 
Frying pans . . 
Fruit strainer . . 

Fork 

Gridirons .... 

Graters 

Garbage bucket . 
Jugs ..... 
Kettles, iron . . . 
" porcelain . 
Ladle, soup . . - 
Milk crocks . . . 
Potato mashers - 

Pie panp 

Refrigerator . . . 

Safe 

Steel 

Swinging shelf . . 
Steamer?. .... 
Strainers 



1 


$0 90 


10 


2 00 


1 


25 


2 


75 


1 


50 


1 


30 


1 


30 


2 


20 


2 


30 


3 


1 05 


1 


20 


1 


10 


1 


20 


1 


75 


3 


1 00 


1 


30 


1 


40 


1 


40 


6 


1 80 


1 


80 


1 


30 


2 


30 


2 


20 


] 


25 


1 


25 


1 


75 


3 


1 50 


3 


25 00 


7 


35 


1 


2 00 


6 


2 10 


1 


30 


1 


10 


2 


1 00 


1 


10 


1 


40 


4 


80 


4 


2 00 


6 


2 50 


1 


15 


6 


90 


2 


30 


10 


35 


1 


84 10 


I 


2 00 


1 


60 


1 


60 


2 


50 


2 


30 



312 

SUPERINTENDENFS KITCHEN— Continutd. 

Spoons, tea 4 $0 30 

" iron 2 60 

Spice cabinet 1 75 

Tea towel rack 1 50 

Tables 2 5 00 

Towels, tea 35 3 50 

" roller 5 80 

Ringp, muffin sets 3 1 00 

Rolling pins 2 30 

Rangp, «?mall 1 20 50 

Waffle irons 2 75 

Total $176 00 

Total for kitchen S960 05 

LAUNDRY. 

Baskets 6 $4 20 

Belting, lot 1 15 00 

Brooms 6 1 50 

Buckets 7 1 16 

Clothes racks 4 50 

Clothes bins 2 5 00 

Clothes pins, doz 10 50 

Curtain frames, pairs 2 3 00 

Chnirs • . 9 1 15 

Dust pans 2 20 

Dry racks 260 00 

Engine and water tank ] 250 00 

Fluters 1 2 00 

Hammers 1 50 

Heaters 2 69 00 

Ironing tables and covers 6 15 00 

Ironing boards and covers 6 3 00 

Ironing stands 48 7 50 

Irons, pounds 695 83 40 

Kettles, starch 2 1 75 

Steam pumps 1 75 00 

Soap chests 1 50 

Soap tanks 3 25 00 

Stools 4 20 

Tables, small 3 1 50 

Tubs, small 3 76 

Tubs, stationary 2 3 00 

Trucks 3 7 00 

Washing machines, rotary 3 1,050 00 

Wringer, centrifugal 1 180 00 

Wash-boards 4 1 00 

Total $2,058 80 



313 



LA.VA.TOKIES, BATH-ROOMS AND WATER CLOSETS. 

Bath-room and water closet system for pupils .... 

Bath-tubs, small 9 

Brushes, blacking 16 

" hair 12 

Bowls and slabs 46 

Comb cases 6 

Chairs 20 

Hampers, clothes 5 

Mirrors 11 

Soap dishes 46 

Towels, bath 373 

roller 125 

Towel rollers for towels 15 

Urinals 5 

Water closets 16 

Yards linoleum 21 

Total 



LIBRARY. 

Book cases 17 $425 00 

Book case 1 20 00 

Catalogues, library (old) 75 7 50 

Chairs . . 5 10 00 

Ladders, step 2 2 00 

Pamphlets, magazines, etc. (unbound), lot 1 75 00 

Paper cases for school reports 32 16 00 

Table 1 5 00 

Volumes in library 3,208 4,390 25 

Wash stand and vessel 1 2 00 

Total $4,952 75 



$2,620 60 


246 


00 


1 


75 


J 


25 


679 


00 


1 


40 


10 


00 


12 50 


6 


60 


9 


20 


29 


84 


31 


25 


3 


00 


62 50 


568 


80 


10 


50 




$4,294 19 



LIVE STOCK. 

Bull 1 

Cows 10 

Calves 2 

Colt 1 

Horses 3 

Total 



$20 00 




350 00 




18 00 




30 00 




120 00 






$538 00 



314 



OFFICES. 

Arm rests 3 

Atlases 2 

Blanks, lot 1 

Blank books, lot 1 

Burners, Argand 2 

Bill paper, large lot 1 

Binding tape box , . . . 1 

Book rack 1 

Books — 

American Encyclopedia Britannica, vols . ... 10 

Academic Dictionary, vol 1 

Dynamo Tenders' Hand Book, vol 1 

Electricity in Modern Life, vol 1 

Essays on Heredity, vol 1 

Evolution of Disease, vol 1 

Exercises in Wood-Working, vol 1 

Manual Training, vol 1 

Institution Eeports, bound, 1844 to 1886, vols. . 5 

Acts and Legislative Eeports, vols 10 

Eevised Statutes, 1881, vol 1 

Wood- Worker, vol 1 

Incandescent Lighting, vol 1 

Water Closets, vol 1 

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, with stand, vol. 1 

School books, lot 1 

Blacking case 1 

Bill-head boxes 5 

Caligraph 1 

Clock 1 

Carpet, Brussels, yds 147 

Chairs 12 

Compasses, pair 1 

Card racks 2 

Copying presses with stand 2 

Cuspidors 3 

Drop-lamp with tubing 1 

Desks 3 

" Wooten. 1 

Dusters, feather 2 

Erasers, single blade 2 

File case for blanks 1 

" " " vouchers 1 

" " " papers 1 

" racks for books 1 

Fasteners, box 1 

Fire screen 1 

Gas burners, automatic 4 

Hammers 2 



$1 00 


15 00 


15 00 


2 00 


50 


60 


90 


50 


136 00 


1 50 


60 


1 50 


1 50 


1 00 


75 


1 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


1 25 


60 


90 


13 50 


5 00 


50 


1 60 


50 00 


15 00 


90 CO 


10 00 


15 


50 


8 00 


1 00 


1 00 


40 00 


50 00 


50 


50 


2 00 


75 00 


50 00 


50 


15 


25 


2 OO 


1 00 



315 



OFFICES— Continued. 



Hardware, lot 

Hat rack 

Ink, black, qt 

Inkstands, single 

double 

" glass 

Key case 

Moistener 

Paper rack and paper . . . 
Letter clips 

" basket 

" scales 

Maps of Indiana 

Mirrors . 

Postage, lot 

Paste cup 

Paper and envelopes, lot . . 

Paper weights, lot 

Penholders, common, lot . . 

Pin cups 

Pen cleaners 

Pens, boxes 

Paper cutters 

" tearers 

Pencils, lead, doz 

Pictures lot 

Pen rack 

Eule, drawing 

" foot 

" rubber 

Rugs 

Ruling pens 

Rubber stamps, lot 

" bands, assortment, lot 

Safe, combination 

Seal, notarial 

" Institution 

Sofa 

Stool 

Scissors, pair 

Statuary, pieces 

Step-ladder 

Stands 

Stoves, gas, open 

Tables 

Thermometers 

Tools and holder, set .... 
Tape line, 50 ft 





$0 50 




25 




70 




75 




2 00 




25 




1 00 




50 




1 00 




70 




50 




1 00 




3 CO 




5 00 




6 00 




10 




10 00 




1 50 




35 


3 


60 


2 


25 


1 


76 


2 


60 


2 


50 


6 


2 50 


1 


5 00 


1 


20 


1 


35 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


2 00 


2 


25 


I 


2 00 


1 


50 


1 


175 00 


1 


7 00 


1 


7 00 


1 


1 00 


1 


50 


1 


10 


2 


50 


1 


50 


4 


5 00 


1 


5 00 


3 


25 OO 


3 


50 


1 


15 


1 


50 



316 



OFFICES— Continued. 



Umbrella stand 1 $0 60 

Waste paper baskets 3 1 50 

Wasb stand 1 10 00 

Wash bowl and pitcher 1 1 50 

Watchman electric clock and connections 1 172 00 

Wardrobes 2 12 00 

Total 



$988 90 



FEINTING OFFICE. 



Bellows, 10-inch 

Bible 

Blanket, 8 col. felt 

Book-case 

Books, blank. 

Books, receipt 

Brackets 

Brooms 

Brush, scrubbing 

Brush blacking • 

Bucket, fiber 

Carpet, yards 

Case, type, blank ........ 

Cases, italic 

Cases, news, pairs 

Case, lead, labor-saving 

Case, rule, labor-saving 

Chairs 

Cbaee, job, 12^x16 

Chase, 5 col. double 

Chase, 8 col. double 

Chest, for paper 

Chisel 

Clock, eight-day 

Composing stick, 12-inch .... 
Composing stick, 24-inch .... 
Composing sticks, 6-inch .... 

Cupboard 

Cuts, wood, stereo, and electro. . 
Cuts, half-tone ........ 

Cutter, Elm City 

Dead-bank 

Desk 

Dictionary, Webster's Academic. 
Dictionary, Webster's Unabridged 
Files of The Silent Hoosier, bound 
Filing- box for The Silent Hoosier 



1 


$1 25 


1 


1 00 


1 


3 00 


1 


10 00 


3 


3 00 


2 


2 00 


2 


30 


2 


50 


1 


10 


1 


30 


1 


40 


20 


3 00 


1 


50 


26 


19 50 


22 


33 00 


1 


1 00 


1 


1 00 


2 


2 00 


1 


1 10 


1 


8 00 


1 


11 00 


1 


5 00 


1 


10 


1 


2 00 


1 


1 00 


1 


1 00 


26 


13 00 


1 


1 00 


13 


10 00 


12 


60 00 


1 


12 00 


1 


10 00 


1 


4 00 


1 


1 00 


1 


6 00 


3 


15 00 


1 


1 00 



317 • 

FEINTING OFFICE— Continued. 

Furniture, metal, lbs. . 

Furniture, wood, lot 

Galleys, all brass, single 

Galleys, brass-lined, single 

Galleys, 6-in,, brass-lined 

Galleys, 6-in., wood 

Galley-rack 

Galley-stand 

Gauge- pins, doz 

Heading for The Silent Hoosier 

Imposing stones, 28x50 in., in coffins, on frames . . . 

Ink, printing, cans 

Ink-stone, 18x24 in 

Leader boxes 

Leaders, braee, 8-pt., lbs 

Leads, 2-pt., 13 em, lbs 

Leads*, 2-pt, 24 em, lbs 

Leads, 2-pt., 20-em, lbs 

Leads, 2 pt., labor-saving, lbs 

Letter file 

Lye pot 

Malltt 

Mops 

Paper, lot 

Picture and frame 

Planer 

Planer, proof ... . 

Press, No. 3 Campbell Improved Country, with roll- 
ers, extra roller cores, delivery table and 

wrenches 

Press, Nonpareil jobber, 9x12, with fountain, roller, 

extra roller cores, chases and wrenches 

Motor, 3-horse power, with shafting, hangers, pulleys 

and belts 

Proof press, with roller and blanket 

Proof roller, 4-in 

Quoins — Boxwood 

Maple 

Steel, Hempel's, with key, doz 

Rack for metal furniture 

Rules — Composing, 1 doz. 24-em, 1 doz. 20, l^doz. 13. 

Imposing 

Brass — Col. rule, 8 pt., 8 col., with pieces 

Col. rule, 8 pt., 5 col 

Labor-saving, 8 pt., goL, lbs 

Labor-saving, 6 pt., parallel, lbs 

Labor-saving, 2 pt., single, lbs 

Head, 6 pt 

Double advertising 



50 


$10 00 


1 


1 50 


4 


8 00 


13 


22 85 


4 


9 00 


3 


3 00 


1 


6 00 


1 


5 00 


1 


50 


1 


18 00 


2 


30 00 


4 


•3 00 


1 


3 30 


8 


2 06 


5 


6 00 


62 


9 30 


40 


6 00 


20 


3 00 


15 


2 25 


1 


25 


1 


25 


1 


50 


2 


40 


1 


9 00 


1 


75 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


825 00 


1 


170 00 


1 


293 00 


1 


22 50 


1 


i 80 


50 


50 


200 


1 00 


2 


4 50 


1 


1 50 


42 


6 30 


1 


25 


9 


14 00 


18 


9 00 


2 


1 75 


3 


3 90 


5 


6 50 


5 


2 00 


20 


1 00 



318 



FEINTING OFFICE— Continued. 

Brass — Parallel advertising 10 $0 50 

Single advertising 20 70 

Double dash 50 3 50 

Single dash 5D 3 00 

Scissors 1 5 

Shooting stick, iron 1 25 

Side sticks for galleys 20 1 00 

Slate and easel 1 7 00 

Slugs, 6 pt. labor-saving, lbs 10 1 50 

6 pt. 13 ems, lbs 25 3 75 

1 2 pt. 44 ems, lbs 15 2 25 

18 pt. (foot) 13 ems 32 1 60 

Numbered 80 8 80 

Lettered 11 1 10 

Sponge 1 15 

Sprinkler 1 50 

Stands— news 11, job 1 12 36 75 

Stapler • 1 2 00 

Stoves 2 26 do 

Stool 1 75 

Tables 2 4 50 

Tweezers 1 45 

Waste basket 1 01 

Type- 
Apollo, 10 pt., font 1 3 25 

Bold face, 6 pt., fonts 3 6 00 

Border, 6 pt., font 1 2 60 

Brevier italic, lbs 20 10 00 

Brevier Koman, lbs 650 227 50 

Celtic lightface condensed, fonts 2 3 80 

Charms, font 1 6 50 

Critic, 18 pt., font 1 5 30 

Geometric, 6 pt., font 1 2 75 

Gothic, No. 7, fonts 4 11 50 

Gothic, No. 6, 6 pt., font 1 1 85 

Gothic, Cond., fonts 3 10 50 

Law Italic, 8 pt., font 1 2 95 

Leaders, 8 pt, lbs 16 7 00 

Nonpareil Eoman, lbs , 100 58 00 

Norman, Cond., fonts 4 8 00 

Pencraft, font 1 6 80 

Pica Roman, with accents and arithmetical signs, lbs. 88 38 00 

Poster Roman, lbs 25 15 00 

Script, 24 pt., font 1 6 00 

Script, Steel-plate, 80 pt., font 1 7 20 

Signet, 18 pt , font 1 3 85 

Total $2,319 86 



319 



EEAL ESTATE. 

*1 8 acres at $3,840 $69,120 00 

125 acre8 at 3,360 84,000 00 

i61 acres at 2,040 124,440 00 

3 lots in Crown Hill ],100 00 

Total $278,660 00 



EECEPTION ROOMS. 

Art Fquares 1 

P. O. boxes 6 

Baskets, waste 2 

Carpet, brussels, yds 189 

Carpet, velvet, yds 94^ 

Chairs, rockers 4 

Chairs, plain 11 

Chairs, leather 4 

Curtains, lace 8 

Divans ....•• 1 

Hassock 1 

Hat rack 1 

Inkstands, bankers 1 

Kettles, brass 3 

Mirrors 3 

Oil cloth, yds 5J 

Pictures. 28 

Eugs 7 

Sofa 1 

Settees, leather 3 

Settees, wooden 1 

Sweepers 1 

Sea shells 2 

Tables, marble top 2 

Tables, plain 3 

Window shades and fixtures 8 

Total 



■'On a basis of six lots to the acre and including 1% acres enclosed by Reform School 
for Girls. Average price per lot, S800. 

tOn a basis of six lots to the acre. Average price per lot, S700. 
I On a basis of six lots to the acre. Average price per lot, Si25. 
Less 20 per cent, on the whole for cost of platting, etc. 



$5 (lO 




2 00 




1 00 




179 80 




124 00 




23 00 




10 50 




12 00 




36 00 




56 00 




85 




5 00 




1 00 




3 00 




83 00 




2 50 




76 00 




23 50 




6 00 




120 00 




1 75 




2 00 




50 




11 00 




15 00 




8 40 






$802 80 



320 



EEPAIR SHOP. 



Adz 1 

Bit, expansive 1 

Bits and braces, lot 1 

Benches, work 2 

Box, miter 1 

Clamps, cabinet 2 

" eccentric 4 

Cans, shipping 6 

Drill, Chicopee 1 

Glass cupboard 1 

" cutting-board 1 

" boxes of 15 

Hardware cupboards 2 

lot 1 

Hatchet 1 

Hammers 2 

Knives, putty 4 

Ladders 3 

Lumber, poplar, lot 1 

" scrap, " . 1 

oak, " 1 

" pine, " 1 

Naib, kegs 10 

Paints and brushes, lot 1 

Putty, lot 1 

Planes, fore 2 

" dado 1 

" smoothing 1 

Pot, glue 1 

Rack, nail I 

Saw, cross-cut 1 

" hand 3 

Screws, lot 1 

Seats, chair 6 

Stove 1 

Trestles 4 

Tool case 1 

Tools, miscellaneous lot 1 

Vise 1 

Total- 



$0 26 
1 50 

1 CO 



5 00 


4 00 


5 60 


2 00 


3 00 


1 00 


8 00 


5 00 


30 00 


7 00 


20 00 


50 


1 00 


40 


3 OO 


4 00 


5 00 


10 00 


2 00 


24 00 


8 00 


3 00 


1 50 


50 


2 50 


25 


12 00 


1 00 


3 00 


2 00 


60 


5 00 


I 00 


10 00 


3 00 


3 25 



$199 25 



321 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Books, text, in use 769 

" " not in use 286 

" old 665 

" copy 48 

" exercise 59 

Belle, dumb, lot 1 

Baskets, waste paper 22 

Chairs 138 

" chapel 10 

" teachers 36 

" kindergarten 47 

Clocks 8 

Cases, cabinet 5 

" World's Fair and contents 1 

book 25 

Desks, single 464 

" old 2 

" ■ double 42 

" old ... 57 

" rear 75 

" teachers , 24 

Dictionaries (5 with stands) 10 

Erasers . 278 

Ink, Arnold's, qts 5 

" Carter's, small bottles 15 

Tables, kindergarten, large 11 

small 3 

Tablets . SO 

Geographical Apparatus — 

Globes, old lot. 1 

Maps and charts, old 30 

Hemispheres, maps in case 2 

European maps = 2 

Asia maps 2 

Africa maps 2 

United States, maps of 2 

America, " " 1 

Definition chart maps 3 

United States blackboard outlines 2 

Maps, set of 7, 50x42, in case 1 

" of Palestine 1 

" " United States, relief 20 

Perfection maps , 450 

Globes, 8- in., plated stands 2 

" 12-in., " " 1 

" 18-in., slated " 1 

Planispheres 2 

Lunar tellurians . - 2 

Miscellaneous supplies, old lot 1 

Mortar and pestal 1 

21— D. and D. 



S20 00= 
65 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 

7 50 

4 00 

24 30 

10 00 
6 00 

11 75 

8 00- 

9 00' 
6 50 

5 00 

25 00 
1 00 
1 50 



$384 50 

143 GO 

133 00 

2 40 

1 77 
6 00 

11 00 

69 00 

10 00 

26 80 

15 51 

35 00 

175 CO 

150 OO 

75 00 

742 40 

2 OO 
94 50 
99 75 

112 50 
96 00 
90 CO 
25 12 

2 00 
30 

110 OO 

3 00 
1 20 



$252 55 



322 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT— Continued. 



Natural History Apparatus — 

Johnson's Natural History plates 58 

Prang's Natural History, large set, 14 packages 

small cards 1" 

Supplement to above series, set 1 

Pictures, old lot 1 

Trades and occupations object charts 60 

Blotters, lot - • 1 

Sponges 1 

Penholders, gross H 

Pictures and engravings, lot • 1 

Pointers 20 

Mucilage, qt 1 

Philosophical Apparatus — 

Scales, pairs 2 

Gyroscope 1 

Meter and yard stick 1 

Capillary tubes, set 1 

Centrifugal hoop 1 

Set 5 collision balls 1 

Inertia apparatus 1 

Prince Rupert drops, doz 1 

Air pump 1 

Receiver for air pump (1 gal.) . 1 

Fountain in Vacus, Guinea and feather tube com- 
bined 

Magdenburg Hemispheres 

Barometer tubes, glass cup and mercury pipette for 

filling above 

Oil bottle of ... 1 

Sheet of rubber 1 ft. square, for experiments ... 

Bursting squares 3 

Microscope 1 

" small 1 

Magic latern and slides 1 

Concave and convex mirror 1 

Prism solid flint glass 1 

Set 6 demonstrative lenses 1 

Iceland spar section 1 

Equilibrium tube (set of 6 forms), base of tin, neatly 

Japanned 1 

Hydrometer, for taking the specific gravity of liquids 1 

Hydrometer jar 1 

Bottle imp. and bottle 1 

Svphon glass 1 

Water hammers 2 

Lifting pump, all of glass, with conical valve . . 1 

Force pump, all of glass, with conical valve ... I 



J-34 80 


6 66 


6 00 


1 50 


143 80 


3 50 


15 


t 2 25 


38 00 


2 00 


50 


4 50 


2 00 


40 


1 00 


2 80 


3 60 


80 


40 


30 00 


1 20 


4 80 


5 20 


1 60 


40 


40 


45 


15 00 


4 00 


150 CO 


2 40 


40 


2 00 


80 


2 80 


40 


40 


80 


35 


! 1 60 


1 60 


2 00 



148 96 



323 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT— Continued. 



Hand and bladder glasB 

Ball and ring 

Pulse glass (Franklin) 

Air thermometer 

Mercurial thermometer 

Spirit lamp 

Compound bar 

Glass tubing, asst., lb 

Glass flask 

Geissler tube 

Geissler tube, large 

Inductive coil (Ruhnskroff ) 

Magnet horseshoe 

Magnetic needle 

Electro magnet, supporting from 10 to 20 lbs 

Bar magnet 

Galvanic battery . 

Magnets 

Electrical machine 

Telegraphic instrument 

Electric pen 

Set of electric bells and standard 

Layden (jar, 1 qt.) 

Electrical discharger, rubber bandies. • . . 

Pair of image plates 

Brass chain, lot 

Insolated wire, lot 

Glass friction rod 

Stick sealing wax 

Chemical jars, lot 

Ketorts and stands, 



lotl 



Set of 4 charts, in case 



Physiological apparatus — 

Set of Kellog's charts, in case . . . 

Manikin 

Set of Bocksteiger models 

Set of Bocksteiger models, ear extra 
Set of charts, old 



Specimens, models, etc. — 

Minerals, lot 

Deep sea invertebrates, lot 
Miscellaneous, lot .... 
Ornithological, lot ... 

Prehistoric implements, lot . 



$0 80 

1 40 

60 

25 

40 

40 

1 20 

30 

40 

60 

1 20 

6 40 

50 

1 60 

1 20 

40 

50 00 

3 00 

50 00 

25 00 

10 00 



50 

20 

00 

20 

15 

15 

20 

08 

5 00 

2 50 

15 00 



1 


$20 00 


1 


5 00 


1 


95 00 


1 


5 00 


1 


5 00 


1 


$50 00 


1 


50 00 


1 


25 00 


1 


75 00 


1 


25 00 



$520 93 



130 00 



•225 00 



324 



SCHOOL DEPAKTMENT— Continued. 

Step ladders, 8 ft 3 $5 00 

Speaking tube 1 8 00 

Settees 20 32 00 

Wall slates 334 1,336 00 

Hand slates 324 19 44 

Curtains 187 235 50 

Study-room tables 15 90 00 

Thermometers 16 4 00 

Wardrobes 9 90 00 

Crayon boxes 98 6 86 

Bible 1 15 00 

Foolscap paper, lot 1 3 50 

Table sand 1 10 00 

Miscellaneous school supplies, lot 1 5 00 



1,860 30 



Total $5,654 49 



SEWING-KOOM. 

Buttons, dress, doz 9 

" agate, " 26 

■ " pants, " 14 

Cloth, Henrietta, yds 38 

Calico, yds. . 28 

Canton flannel, yds. 70 

Cambric lining, yds 40 

Cotton thread, spools 48 

Clothes baskets 2 

" hampers 2 

Clock 1 

Chairs 55 

Frames, quilting 3 

" fancy work 10 

Gingham, yds , 14 

Knitting cotton, balls 12 

Linen thread, spools 12 

Needles, papers ]2 

Pieces fancy work 7 

Silesia, yds 19 

Show-case 1 

Sewing-machines 3 

Shears, pairs 8 

Tape measures 2 

Wardrobes 2 

Yard sticks 1 

Total $,71 35 



$0 


30 




26 




48 


6 


84 


1 


40 


7 


00 


1 


20 


1 


92 


1 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


27 


50 




75 


5 


00 




66 


1 


32 




65 




15 


2 


00 


1 


52 


15 


00 


75 


00 


2 


00 




20 


5 00 




30 



525 



SHOE SHOP. 



Awle, pegging, doz 5h 

Awls, sewing, doz 14 • 

Awls, 8trip 8 

Aprons 24 

Benches 22 

Burnishers, heel 4 

Bristles, ounces Of 

Brooms 4 

Bones 5 

Buffers, doz O2 

Boot trees 2 

Boot crimping blocks (pairs) . 2 

Buttons, box 1 

Button fasteners, box 1 

Button fastening, machine 1 

Chalky box 1 

Clamps, sewing 7 

Crimper, boot . 1 

Compasses, pairs 6 

Cupboards 3 

Drilling, bolts 2 

Dust pans 2 

Eyelets, boxes •. 2 

Floats, counter 2 

Fitters, block 1 

Gaiter crimping block (pairs) 2 

Hammers 38 

Hafts, sewing awl 40 

Hafts, pegging awl 40 

Hooks, lace, boxes 2 

Hooks, last 10 

Irons, edge 30 

Ink, shoemakers', bottles, doz i 

Jacks, shoemakers' 3 

Jack tables '• . 2 

Knives 35 

Knives, lip 23 

Lace, shoe, lot . 1 

Leather, scrap lot 1 

Leather, oak sole (sides) . 3 

Leather, cut oak half-sole (doz.) < . . . . 7 

Leather, calf skins, lbs 11 

Leather, grain, ft 19 

Leather, nappa kid ( piece) 8 

Leather, kid, ft 54-2 

Leather, dongola, ft 12 

Leather, kangaroo, calf, ft 19 2 

Lasts, pairs 139 



$1 


00 


•) 


00 




80 


2 


50 


30 


CO 


1 


15 




50 


1 


00 




30 




30 


1 


00 


1 


00 




30 




35 


7 


00 




05 


3 


00 


10 


00 




50 


3 


00 


4 


50 




25 




25 


2 


00 




25 




70 


4 


25 


1 


25 


1 


25 




75 




75 


5 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


10 


00 


2 


25 


2 


00 




65 


2 00 


16 


00 


14 


00 


7 


15 


3 


42 


6 


00 


10 90 


2 


18 


3 


51 


40 


00 



1 25 


2 25 


4 00 


30 


20 


6 50 


50 


75 


40 


10 00 


2 00 


2 00 


100 00 


25 


25 


4 00 


4 50 


75 


1 50 



326 



SHOE SHOP— Continued. 

Measure, stick and line 1 $0 20 

Nippers, Hall's, pairs 2 

Nippers, steel, pairs 15 

Nails, lbs 40 

Opener, channel 3 

Patching material, lot 1 

Pincers, pairs - ■ • 20 

Pails, water 3 

Peg?, boxes ' 

Sprinkler 1 

Rack, last 1 

Kackj pattern 1 

Easps 25 

Sewing machines 3 

Splitting machine 1 

Stitch dividers 3 

Shaves, heel 9 

Stands, iron 7 

Sharpeners, knife 15 

Sticks, long ■ '. 11 

Sticks, shoulder 11 1 00 

Stretcher, shoe ... 4 2 00 

Shoes, ladies', pairs 2 3 00 

Shoes, men's, pairs 12 

Show case 1 

Stoves 2 

Tub 1 

Thread, silk, spools 5 

Thread, linen 3 

Thread, flax, boxes 2 

Trimmers, welt 12 

Wheels, edge 5 

Whetstones 5 

Total 



STABLES. 

Blankets, old horse 

Carriage 

Dusters, lap 

Gravel bed 

Halters 

Harness, single set 

" double set 

" carriage set 

Hay knife 

Horse collars 



22 50 




5 00 




8 00 




25 




2 00 




60 




2 50 




3 00 




35 




25 






$404 (16 



1 


$1 00 


1 


125 00 


4 


3 00 


1 


4 00 


4 


1 50 


5 


50 00 


2 


40 00 


1 


20 00 


1 


5 to 


4 


2 00 



327 



STABLES— Continued. 



Phaeton 1 

Step ladder 1 

Spring wagon 1 

Wagon poles 2 

Wagon, 2-horse, old 1 

" 2 " 1 

" 1 " old ■, . . . 1 

" jack 1 

Wheelbarrows 2 

Water-trough, old 1 

Total 

STEAM HEATING APPARATUS. 

Pipes, radiators, valves and fittings, lot 1 

Total 

STORE-EOOM. 

Beans, lbs. 28 

Brushes, counter 6 

" shoe 12 

hair 13 

" scrub 27 

" deck Fcrub 1 

" stair 1 

wall 2 

Butter, lbs 38 

Bluing, lbs 5 

Braid, dress, boxes 2 

Bones, whale, boxes 12 

Brooms 18 

'• whisk 14 

Buttons, doz., misc < 481 

Baccilene, boxes 12 

Boxes 1776 36 

Blankets 1 

Bands, celluloid 3 

Binding, stay 12 

Bachelor buttons, gross 1^ 

Buttons, collar, gross 1 

Buckets, fiber 12 

" wooden 2 

Barley, lbs 20 

Cans, milk 6 

Celery salt, bottles of 2 

Clothe bread 8 



$150 00 

50 

100 00 

2 00 

20 00 

30 00 

10 00 

50 

2 00 

50 



$9,600 00 



$0 56 



1 


40 


1 


25 


3 


25 


2 


16 




35 




50 


2 


25 


4 


66 


5 


00 




40 


3 


60 


2 


55 




75 


4 43 


4 


00 


1 


45 


1 


52 




15 




10 




75 




25 


3 


15 




30 


1 


05 


1 


50 




3a 




32 



32 50 



$9,600 OO 



328 



STORE-ROOM —Continued. 

Curtains, chapel, lot 1 

Crash for slate rags, yds 6 

Chloro Naptholine, gal 5 

Candle-sticks 4 

Combs, back ^ 

" side • 3 

Citron, lbs 85 

Cups, new 44 

" old 274 

" tin 2 

Christmas decorations, lot 1 

Cocoa, lbs Pi 

Cloths, table 2 

Oocoanut, lbs. 1 

Catsup, gal 13 

Chili sauce, gal 2 

Chow-chow, gal 2 

Chocolate, lbs 6 

Cloves, ground 7 

Cinnamon, ground 3 

Candles 201 

Corsets 6 

" fastenerg 13 

Cloth, grey, yds 3| 

Crimper 1 

Crackers, lbs 14 

CoflFee, lbs 143 

Chimneys, lamp 13 

Cotton, darning, balls of 56 

Cuspidors 2 

Dishes, soap 3 

Duster, feather 1 

Decorating flags, lot 1 

Delaine, yds 112 

Elastic, for hats, yds 36 

Eggs, doz . 36 

Fascinator 1 

Ginger, ground, lbs 5J 

Gooseberries, cans 4 

Globea 5 

Ham, lbs 35 

Hominy, lbs 70 

Hose, pairs 22 

Hooks and eyes, doz 8 

Handkerchiefs 4 

Iron holders 74 

India relish, bottles 2 

Jars, slop 1 

Extracts, bottles 3 



115 00 




24 


6 


25 




20 




25 




30 


1 


30 


6 


16 


5 


48 




25 


4 


CO 




23 


3 


25 




15 


5 


20 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


22 




89 




45 


2 


99 


2 


88 




39 


7 


50 




75 




70 


15 


02 


1 


30 


1 


68 




30 




30 




25 


20 


60 


11 


20 




34 


5 


76 




35 


1 


05 




20 


1 


00 


3 


50 


1 


05 


2 


86 




32 




20 


1 


48 




70 




65 


3 


00 



329 



STORE-ROOM— Continued. 

Forks 3 

Facing, jds 16 

Jelly, glasses of 188 

Lye, boxes of 6 

Mangoes, doz 53^ 

Meal, corn, lbs 100 

Matches, boxes of - 222 

Milk, gals ISf 

Mustard, lbs 11^ 

Molasses, gals 4 

Mops 12 

Measures, tape 2 

Neckties 23 

Needles, darning, pkgs 38 

Nutmegs, doz 13 

Napkins 14 

Overalls, pairs 2 

Paper, toilet, bunches 18 

Polish, shoe, boxes 36 

" metal • 4 

Peaches, dried, lbs 33 

" cans 17 

Pearline, boxes 246 

Pepper, lbs 17J 

Pillow cases 57 

Potatoes, bu 14 

Pickles, small, gals 9^ 

" green tomato, gals 2 

" Lilly, gals 5| 

Pickles, mixed, gal 10 

Pans, bread 3 

" dust 2 

Powder, baking, lbs 24 

Preserves, assorted, pts 92 

Pears, canned 24 

Pineapple, canned 54 

Polish, stove, cakes . -• 12 

Potatoes, sweet, bu 2j 

Pitchers, cream 2 

" water . 3 

Powder, roach ^ 

Pins, hair, gross 7f 

Picks, tooth, boxes 5 

Raisins, lbs 10 

Rice, lbs . 23 

Skids, pair . 1 

Salt, bbl 1 

Silicon, boxes 13 

Silesia yds 2^ 

Spices, mixed, lbs 1 



$0 


15 


1 


60 


11 


28 




60 


13 38 


1 


00 


4 


44 


2 


67 


1 


73 


1 


12 


1 


60 




13 


3 


85 


1 


90 




66 




42 




70 


1 


44 


1 


08 




80 


1 


98 


1 


98 


9 


09 


1 


75 


6 


84 


3 


92 


7 


40 


2 


00 


5 


75 


5 00 


2 


16 




30 


3 36 


11 


04 


3 20 


8 


55 




50 


1 


58 




20 




65 




25 




15 




33 




55 


1 


04 


1 


90 




90 


1 


00 




18 




20 



330 

STORP>-ROOM— Continued. 

Sage, Jbs 8 

Soda, baking, lbs 20 

Soap, Babbitt's and Ivorj 327 



scouring 



63 



Sauce, half pints 12 

Scoops, old lot 1 

Scales, platform, old • 1 

" " new 1 

" " counter 1 

Sardines, boxes 30 

Saucers 11 

Starch, laundry, lbs 5 

Suspenders, pairs ^ 9 

Starch, corn, lbs 9 

Slate, rags 44 

Shirts, under 4 

Sugar, cut loaf, lbs 2 

" powdered, lbs 48 

" granulated, lbs 456 

Ex. C, " 253 

Sheets 58 

Syrup, gals 24 

" maple, gals 4 

Soap, toilet, doz 9 

Spoons, tea 316 

" table 54 

Twine balls 4 

Thimbles, gross 1 

Thermometers 2 

Traps, mouse and rat 3 

Tea, lbs 26 

Towels, roller 9 

bath 31 

" buck., doz 5 

Trucks 1 

Trunk . 1 

Taper torch 1 

" boxes 7 

Twist, silk, spools • 50 

Thread, O. N. T., doz 24f 

Tumblers 3 

Tomato cans 908 

Vermicelli, lbs 10 

Vinegar, gals 1^ 

Water cans 2 

Wash pans 18 

Wicks, lamp, pkgs 23 

Wash bowl and pitcher 2 

Miscellaneous articles, lot 1 

Total • $627 00 



$1 20 


60 


12 68 


1 89 


2 75 


70 


10 00 


25 00 


5 00 


3 60 


55 


10 


1 18 


45 


22 


1 00 


15 


2 64 


21 81 


11 63 


17 98 


3 24 


5 00 


6 48 


6 32 


2 25 


40 


1 25 


30 


30 


4 52 


1 80 


2 15 


6 79 


3 00 


2 00 


40 


84 


2 00 


\ 11 39 


09 


90 80 


50 


30 


1 00 


1 62 


40 


2 50 


12 50 



831 



TOOL HOUSE. 

Axes 5 $4 00 

Buckets 2 50 

Corn knives 7 1 25 

Double trees 3 6 00 

Feed cutter 1 10 00 

Forks, hay and dung 6 3 00 

Hoes, garden, old 7 1 25 

Harrow 1 10 00 

" teeth, lot 1 1 00 

Hay bed. . . 1 5 00 

Haek cart . 1 5 00 

Hot-bed sash 40 40 00 

Ice plow 1 15 00 

" saws 3 5 00 

" tongs 6 3 00 

" splitting bar 1 1 50 

'■ marker 1 5 00 

" jack 1 5 00 

Lawn mowers 2 6 00 

" mower, horse 1 75 00 

Log chain 1 25 

Lumber, old, lot I 3 00 

Mowing machine 1 30 00 

Picks 5 3 00 

Plow, 2-horse 1 10 00 

" l-horse 1 3 00 

" shovel 1 3 00 

Pesthole diggers 2 2 50 

Pulleys 4 2 00 

Pike poles . 4 3 00 

Platform scales, 1,000 lbs 1 75 00 

Eakes, garden 17 8 00 

Rake, hay 1 20 00 

Eope and hay fork 1 15 00 

Scoop scrapers 2 4 00 

" shovels 3 1 50 

Shovels . , 4 1 25 

Spades . . 2 75 

Scythe and snath 1 1 00 

Slop tank 1 10 00 

Seed drill 1 5 00 

Surface grader 1 50 

Sickles 6 1 00 

Single trees, sets 2 1 50 



Total $406 75 



332 

LIABILITIES. 

R O. Johnson, Superintendent, October pay-roll, bal. . . . $700 53 

Krag- Reynolds Co., groceries and sundries 

Swift ik Co., fresh meat 

Friedni'an Mfg. Co., butterine 

John O'Neill, flour and meal 

Consumers' Gas Trust Co., fuel gas 

J. R. Budd & Co., poultry and eggs 

Nelson Morris & Co., smoked meats 

Polar Ice Co., ice 

Indianapolis Gas Co., gas 

George Hitz & Co.. produce 

Prang Educational Co., art supplies 

W. B. Burford, stationtry, etc 

E. C. Andrews, soap stock 

Murphy, Hibben cV- Co., dry goods 

Central Union Telephone Co., telephone rent 

Hollweg & Reese, queensware 

Daniel Stewart Co., drugs, etc 

J. R. Ryan & Co., provender 

Huntington Seed Co., bulbs, etc 

N. B. Groff & Son, cheese 

Frank G. Kamps, oysters 

Chas. J. Kuhn Co., miscellaneous groceries 

Chas. Mayer & Co., chairs 

W. F. Rupp, vinegar 

Indianapolis B. & S. Co., school supplies 

American Asylum for Deaf, school supplies 

Indiana Paper Co., paper 

Parrott & Taggart, crackers 

R. Armstrong, miscellaneous groceries 

Adolph Sherer, architect's services 

Frank Dell, lime 

Total $'2,464 17 



EXHIBIT No. 16. 



308 


32 


299 


90 


153 


00 


134 


90 


138 


50 


139 


77 


92 46 


60 


15 


75 


25 


54 90 


33 


47 


30 


62 


34 97 


23 


.69 


22 50 


15 


67 


15 


22 


15 


00 


14 


84 


13 


31 


15 


25 


10 05 


8 


00 


6 


00 


5 


80 


4 


80 


3 


20 


3 


30 




40 


30 00 




40 



A Recapitulation of Inventory of All Ileal and Personal Property 
Belonging to the Indiana Institution for the Education of the 
Deaf and Dumb on October 31, 1896. 

Art department $264 82 

Bake shop 127 30 

Bed rooms and halls 4,169 06 

Boiler house 5,672 85 



333 
EXHIBIT No. 16— Continued. 

Buildings $247,800 CO 

Cabinet shop 1,689 C9 

Dining rooms ],34l 11 

Dormitories . 4,229 92 

Electric light plant 5,213 41 

Farm and garden products 352 44 

Green house 1,498 60 

Infirmary 539 45 

Kitchens 960 05 

Laundry 2,058 30 

Lavatories, bath rooms and water closets 4,294 19 

Library 4,952 75 

Live stock 538 00 

Offices 988 90 

Printing office 2,819 86 

Eeal estate 278,660 00 

Keception rooms 802 80 

Kepair shops 199 25 

School department 5,654 49 

Sewing room 171 35 

Shoe shop 404 06 

Stables 562 50 

Steam heating apparatus i 9,600 00 

Store rooms 627 00 

Tool house 406 75 



Total $586,fi98 30 



Liabilities • $2,464 17 

To the Board of Control: 

Gentlemen — I submit the foregoing Exhibits 15 and 16 as an itemized state- 
ment and inventory of all resources and liabilities of the Indiana Institution for 
the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, on October 31, 1896. 

EICHARD O. JOHNSON, 

Superintendent. 
State of Indiana, \ 
Marion County, f 

Personally appeared before me, a Notary Public in and for the said State and 
county aforesaid, Richard O. Johnson, Superintendent of the Indiana Institution 
for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, who, being duly sworn, upon his oath, 
says, that the foregoing exhibits are a complete inventory of all the property, real 
and personal, belonging to the State of Indiana and connected therewith, or in 
use in or about the same on the 3l8t day of October, 1896. 

RICHARD O. JOHNSON. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 15th day of November, 1896. 

WILLIAM E. TODD, 

Notary Public. 



I*' 

INDIANA INSTITUTE 



FOR THE 



EDUCATION OF THE BLIND 



FIFTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Control and Superintendent 



FOR THE 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

WM. B. BUEFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING 

1896. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, . 

Executive Department, I 

Indianapolis, Ind., November 21, 1896. J 

Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, "t 
Indianapolis, Ind., November 25, 18t6. > 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treaeurv, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



November 25, 1896. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 

Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 

of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

■ ' ■ Private Secretary. 



Filed in the oflBce of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana November 
25, 1896, 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 25th day of No- 
vember, 1896. 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



OFFICERS AND INSTRUCTORS, 



BOARD OF CONTROL. 

NELSON BRADLEY, President, Greenfield. 
JOHN F. HENNESSEY, Treasurer, Indianapolis. 
JAMES L. ALLEN, Secretary, Covington. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 
WILLIAM H. GL.\SCOCK. 

LITERARY TEACHERS. 

RUSSELL RATLIFF, LAURA HILL, 

BELLA BRUCE, JESSIE HAMILTON, 

NELLY LOVE. 

MUSIC TEACHERS. 

ROBERT A. NEWLAND, ADELAIDE CARMAN, 

WILL SHANNON. 

INDUSTRIAL TEACHERS. 

JAMES FULLER, ANDREW J. COCHRAN 

SARA STARK. 

TEACHER OF PIANO-TUNING. 
B. FRANK SMITH. 

TEACHER OF GYMNASTICS. 
GRACE GILMAN. 

OFFICERS. 

FRANK A. MORRISON, Physician. 
JAMES W. KING, Book-keeper. 
BELLE CAMPBELL, Housekeeper. 
KATE CASEY, Governess for Oirls. 
LIZZIE EVANS, Governess for Boys. 
GEORGE GRAHAM, Florist. 
AMOS HELTZEL, Engineer. 
KATE DOHERTY, Laun^lress. 
MOLLIE DEE, Nighl-waich. 



INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND. 

INDIANA-POLIS, INDIANA. 



INFORMATION. 



1. The purpose or this Institute is purely educational, and it is in no sense 
tin asylum or home for the aged or helpless. The aim is to give a practical edu- 
cation to the young blind of both sexes residing in the State. All the common 
school branches are taught, besides several industrial trades, such as broom and 
mattress-making, carpet- weaving, cane-seating chairs and piano-tuning. The girls 
learn sewing, by hand and machine, knitting, crocheting, bead and fancy work. 
The idea is to make the pupils useful, contented, self-supporting citizens. An ex- 
tensive course in music is available to all who have talent in this direction. In- 
struction is given on the piano- forte, organ and brass band instruments, while for 
purposes of vocal training the pupils are divided into two choirs. A gymnasium 
is equipped and a special teacher drills the pupils in systematic physical exercises- 
Pupils while out of recitations are in charge of a governess. Neatly furnished hos- 
pitals are provided for the sick. 

2. The school year commences on the second Wednesday of September, and 
continues in session forty weeks. There is no vacation during the session. 

3. As a rule, applicants who are under six or over twenty-one years of age, 
are not admitted, but exceptions are sometimes made in favor of those who are 
over age, at the discretion of the Board of Control. 

4. No person of imbecile or unsound mind, or of confirmed immoral char- 
acter, will be knowingly received into the Institute; and in case any pupil shall, 
after a fair trial, prove incompetent for useful instruction, or disobedient to the 
regulations of the Institute, such pupil will be thereupon discharged. 

5. The Institute is maintained by the State, and tuition, board and washing 
are furnished free of cost to all pupils residing in Indiana. The parents or friends 
of pupils are expected to supply them with comfortable clothing, suitable for 
summer and winter wear, in such quantity as will admit of necessary changes. 
Each article of clothing should be distinctly marked with the owner's name, and 
must be sent in good condition. The traveling expenses of pupils must be de- 
frayed by parents or friends. 

6. It is positively required that every pupil shall be removed from the Insti- 
tute during the annual vacation of the school, as well as at any other time when 
such removal may be deemed necessary by the proper officers thereof ; and in case 
of the failure of the friends of any pupil to comply with this requisition, pro- 
vision is made by the law for the sending of such pupil to the Trustee of the town- 
ship in which he or she resides, to be by him provided for at the expense of the 
county. 



6 

7. Persons bringing pupils to the Institute or visiting them while there, can. 
not be accommodated with boarding and lodging during their stay in the city. 

8. All letters to the pupils should be addressed in the care of the Institute in 
order to insure their prompt delivery. 

9. Parties desiring the admission of a pupil are required to fill up the re- 
quired form of application and forward the same to the Superintendent of the 
Institute, giving truthful answers to the interrogatories therein contained, and 
procuring the signature of a justice of the peace to the certificate thereunto at- 
tached ; and the pupil must in no case be sent until such application shall have 
been received and favorably responded to by the Supprintendent. 

10. The Superintendent will cheerfully give information in regard to the 
Institute, and will thankfully receive any information concerning those who 
should be receiving its benefits. 

That the work of the institution may be done to the highest good of all, it is 
necessary that every pupil shall be present at the opening of the term, faithful 
work and prompt and regular attendance are essential to advancement and pro- 
motion. No pupil who is tardy at the beginning of the term, is irregular in at- 
tendance, or drops out before the close of the term, can hope to do acceptable 
work and receive promotion. Unless there is an excellent reason for doing other- 
wise every pupil should be present on the first day and remain throughout th& 
term. 

Each pupil before entering the institution should be supplied with the follow- 
ing clothing of good quality: 

BOYS — Two hats, two suits of clothes, two extra pairs of pants, four pairs of 
socks or six pairs of stockings, four shirts, two suits of underwear, two pairs of 
shoes, six handkerchiefs, two pairs of suspenders, a tooth brush, a clothes brush, 
and a comb and hair brush. Small boys need no suspenders, but should be sup- 
plied with an extra suit of underwear. 

GIRLS — Two woolen and two cotton dresses, four aprons, three night dresses, 
two suits of summer and three of winter underwear, two dark and two light skirts, 
six pairs of stockings, six handkerchiefs, a wrap, a hat, rubbers, two pairs of shoes, 
a tooth brush, a clothes brush, a comb and hair brush. 

This amount of clothing will be necessary within the year, that the children 
may be kept clean and comfortable. When parents are not able to furnish the re- 
quired clothing they should not hesitate to call upon the Township Trustee, who 
will cheerfully provide for the needs of those who are worthy. All clothing should 
be marked with indelible ink. 

The appropriation for this institution has been materially reduced, making it 
necessary for us to reduce the cost of maintenance in like proportion. To this end 
it will be necessary for parents, guardians, etc., to provide for all incidental expenses 
of pupils. It will likewise be necessary for all persons sending children to the 
institution to furnish them transportation to their homes at the close of the term,^ 



REPORT OF BOARD OF CONTROL. 



Honorable Claude Matthews, Governor: 

In presenting the fiftieth annual report of the Indiana Insti- 
tute for the Education of the Blind we are pleased to state that 
the past year has been one of unusual prosperity in the insti- 
tution. The general health of the pupils has been good. One 
case of scarlet fever developed in the institution, but the prompt 
action of our physician prevented the spreading of the disease. 
One death occurred within the year — that of a pupil who was 
ill when sent to the institution. The pupils have made com- 
mendable progress under the systematic and unified efforts of the 
ofiicers and teachers of the institution. We desire to call your 
attention to the report of the State Board of Charities concern- 
ing this institution and to our appended financial report for 
the year just closed. The General Assembly of 1895 mate- 
rially reduced the appropriation for the maintenance of this in- 
stitution, yet we are pleased to report that we have been able 
to bring our expenses within the appropriation and at the same 
time to keep the buildings and grounds in a good state of re- 
pair. 

One hundred and thirty-nine pupils were enrolled last year. 
Of these ten graduated from the literary department and two 
from the industrial departments. Two of those who graduated 
from the literary department also received diplomas from the 
music and tuning departments, and two were granted diplomas 
from the industrial departments. Number of pupils in attend- 
ance at the present time, 126. 

The new green-house has been completed and is now occu- 
pied. The ventilation of the building has been much improved 
by cementing the basement of the new part of the building. 
The air entering the radiators formerly passed over the loose 
dirt, thrown out in digging the trenches for the foundation 
walls. This loose dirt has been removed and the entire base- 
ment cemented, so that the air now passes over a clean smooth 



8 

surface. The barn has been repaired and the floor cemented ; 
the dining-rooms and pupils' sitting-rooms have been repaired 
and papered ; and considerable whitewashing, calsomining, and 
painting has been done throughout the building. 

We have shown our appreciation of the earnest and faithful 
service of the officers and teachers of the institution by re- 
employing them for another year. 

The following is a statement of all moneys received and ex- 
pended during the year : 

RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for maintenance $27,000 00 

Appropriation for repairs 2,500 00 

Appropriation for industrial departments 1,000 00 

Appropriation for library 500 00 

Maintenance receipts from industrial departments 1,089 49 

Total $82,089 49 

EXPENDITURES. 

Maintenance account $28,089 49 

Repair account 2,498 46 

Library account 500 00 

Industrial account 995 12 

Total $32,083 07 

Unexpended balance for work shor? $4 88 

Unexpended balance for repairs I 54, 

Miscellaneous receipts paid State Treasurer 38 20 

Receipts from counties for clothing paid State 

Treasurer 90 68 

Total amount returned to State Treasurer.. $185 26 

Respectfully submitted, 

NELSON BRADLEY, 
JAS. L. ALLEN, 
JOHN F. HENNESSEY, 

Board of Control. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Control: 

Gentlemen — I hereby submit to you my second annual report 
as Superintendent of the Indiana Institute for the Education 
of the Blind. In doin^^ so, I am pleased to report that in all 
departments there has been satisfactory progress and that there 
has been perfect harmony and cooperation among the officers 
and teachers of the institution. In all my efforts I have met 
with a most sympathetic and loyal support from all the em- 
ployes. The spirit of unity prevailing, we have been able to 
expend all our energies for the good of the institution. 

The changes made at the close of last year have proven very 
satisfactory. The Broom Department has never been more 
prosperous, and an equal number of pupils has never done a 
greater amount of satisfactory work in this department than 
has been done during the past year. The girls' workroom has 
more than met my expectations. The work in this depart- 
ment is practical and well organized. In the light of these 
favorable conditions I thought it wise to retain the same corps 
of officers, teachers and other employes. 

The institution has been blest with excellent health through- 
out, though one pupil died in the institution. W. C. Hobbs 
entered the institution September 2(^ and died October 10. He 
was ill when he came to us and grew worse until his death oc- 
curred. Though his application, signed ten days before the 
opening of the term, stated that he was in good health, it was 
afterward ascertained that his health had been failing for sev- 
eral weeks before the application was made. 

One of our pupils also died at his home. Park Giles went 
home in usual health October 18, 1895, and died December 18. 
Every one in the institution loved Park. He was always hope- 
ful and always kind, never causing the officers and teachers any 
trouble nor his schoolmates any pain. 



10 

There was one case of scarlet fever in the institution, bat the 
prompt action of our physician prevented the spreading of the 
disease. In this connection I desire to commend Dr. Frank 
A. Morrison for the faithful and skillful manner in which he 
has performed his duties as attending physician. 

EXHIBIT. 

An exhibit of the work done during the year was made at 
the close of the term of 1895-6. The assembly room was put 
in order and in the room was arranged the work of the various 
departments. The arrangement of the work was completed on 
Friday afternoon and on Saturday morning the room was 
opened to the public and remained open until Tuesday even- 
ing. Though it rained almost the entire time, many visitors 
were present both from the city and from out of the city. The 
city papers sent representatives and published full reports of 
the work on exhibit. 

I feel justified in saying that this exhibit will be of much 
educational value both in and out of the institution. Each 
teacher, busy with his own work, could know but little of what 
other departments were doing. It was possible for the Super- 
intendent only to know the system of organization and the 
relation of the various departments. The bringing of the work 
of the whole institution together and correlating it enabled 
the officers and teachers more fully to understand and appre- 
ciate the work of each department and the relation of each de- 
partment to the others. In this manner effort was stimulated 
and the organization emphasized In like manner the pupils 
were encouraged when the}" saw brought together in one dis- 
play the work of their hands. Through the press and those 
who visited the exhibit we hope the work and purpose of the 
institution will be rightly interpreted to others. 

THE FnZPATRICK FUND. 

Amount on hand November J, 189^ $630 27 

Interest one year at 6 percent 37 82 



Amount on band November 1, 1896 $668 09 



11 



KECOMMENDA'IIO.VS. 



It is a, cause tor congratulation tbat our expenses have been 
brought within the appropriation made by the last General As- 
sembly without injury to any of the departments of the insti- 
tution. While the scope of the work remains the same as it 
now is, and provisions remain at present prices, the appropria- 
tion for maintenance need, not be increased. I would respect- 
fully recommend the following annual appropriations: 

For maintenance $27,000 00 

For industrial departmeuiB 2,000 00 

For library and museum 500 00 

For repairs 2,500 00 

Total.. 182,000 00 

While the institution continues to occupy only its present 
field and to work with the same facilities, our present appro- 
priation for maintenance is sufficiently large; but there are 
new lines of work which we have not essayed to take up, and 
there are possibilities along old lines which we have not 
reached and can not reach with our present appropriation. 
Hence, when I recommend an appropriation of $27,000, I do so 
knowing that the Indiana institution can not, with such an 
amount do its highest work, nor will it be able to take rank 
with the best institutions of the country. 

I have recommended an appropriation of $2,000 for the in- 
dustrial departments because such an amount is necessary for 
their proper maintenance. 

The salaries for four teachers in these departments 

are $1,425 00 

Supplies and materials lor the paot year 887 62 

Total $2,yi2 62 

In this estimate no allowance has been made for replacing 
worn out machinery and apparatus. 

The appropriation of $600 annually for a library and mu- 
seum is proving a profitable iuvestmt-ut. The literature for 
the blind is yet very limited, hence blind pupils are greatly de- 
pendent upon their teachers, who read to them daily from cur- 
rent and general literature, science, history, etc., and must 
supply them with information supplementing the text- books 



12 

studied. It is evident that a good, general library is essential 
to the highest development of the pupils. The museum is 
constantly drawn upon for general lessons and regular class 
work, and its usefulness will grow as it is enlarged. I doubt 
whether any other investment of a like amount has brought to 
our pupils more of pleasure and profit. 

The appropriation for repairs has already been reduced from 
^3,000 to ^2,500, and the buildings and grounds can not be 
kept in a proper condition for a less amount. I would also ask 
for a special appropriation of $2,800, made available at once, 
with which to purchase an iron fence, to replace the old wooden 
one around the northern half of the Institute grounds. The 
boards and posts of the old fence are much decayed, making 
necessary a new fence of some kind, and an iron fence will be 
the more economical as well as more ornamental. The institu- 
tion is in the main resident portion of the city, and should not 
be enclosed by a fence that is objectionable to the citizens liv- 
ing near. The City Board of Public Works recently called 
the attention of the Superintendent to a number of complaints 
made concerning the wooden fence to which I have referred. 
A committee of prominent citizens also called upon the Super- 
intendent and urged the replacement of the old fence with one 
more in harmony with the surroundings. It will require 1,200 
feet of fence to replace the one now in use. On Meridian and 
Pennsylvania Streets, 800 feet at $2.50 per foot, $2,000; across 
the north end of the grounds, 400 feet at $2 per foot, $800; 
making a total of $2,800. 

GENERAL DISCUSSION. 

Though classed as a benevolent institution, the Indiana In- 
stitute for the Education of the Blind is in spirit and purpose 
a part of the public school system of the State. In some re- 
spects its course of study is more inclusive than the courses of 
our secondary schools and higher institutions, but it does not 
contain any subject which is not taught somewhere in our sys- 
tem. The institution maintains three departments — Literary, 
Industrial and Musical. The Literary Department embraces a 
twelve-years' course, as follows: 

Reading, writing and spelling — six years. 

Arithmetic — eight years. 



13 



Language aud Grammar — eight years. 

Geography — three years. 

U. S. History — two years. 

Physiology — one year. 

Composition and Rhetoric — two years. 

Algebra — two years. 

Geometry — two years. 

Physics — one year. 

General History — two years. 

Civil Government — one year. 

Literature — two years. 



The text-book study in geography is preceded by the reading 
of "Seven Little Sisters," "Each and All," "World and Its 
People, No. Ill," and " Brooks and Brook Basins." The read- 
ing of " Stories of Our Country," " From Colony to Common- 
wealth " and " Eggleston's History of the United States " pre- 
cedes the text-book study of history. Much kindergarten 
work is done in the lower grades. 

The course of study is so arranged that promotions are made 
and graduations occur biennially. Last year in this depart- 
ment 128 pupils were enrolled and a class of ten was graduated. 

The institution also maintains an Industrial Department, 
in which trades are taught, that the pupils may become more 
self- helpful and be able better to serve the State. A depart- 
ment of this kind is not common to the schools of the State, 
yet work of this nature is done by Purdue University aud the 
Indianapolis Training School, in both of which tuition is free. 
There is no good reason why the idea of charity should attach 
to the State's effort in educating a broom-maker or a piano 
tuner in the Institute for the Blind than to its effort in edu- 
cating an electrician or machinist in Purdue University or the 
Indianapolis Training School. In both cases the State is alike 
serving its own interests. 

The Industrial Department really embraces four depart- 
ments under the management of different teachers. The Tun- 
ing Department is under the direction of a former pupil of 
the school. In this department pupils are taught to tune, 
repair, repolish and restring pianos. Eight pupils received in- 
struction in tuning last year, three of whom received diplo- 
mas. 



14 

The Broom Department is likewise under the direction of a 
graduate of the institution. Here are made all kinds of 
brooms. Last year this department enrolled 21 pupils and 
graduated four. Two others were sufficiently advanced to en- 
able them to open broom shops for themselves. During the 
past year this department made 7,724 brooms, as follows : 7,312 
house, 242 factory, 7 ceiling and 163 whisk-brooms. 

In the Cane and Mattress Shop the pupils are taught to do all 
kinds of cane seating, and to make husk, cotton, hair and 
moss mattresses. They are also taught to weave hammocks, 
repair chairs and make mops, dusters and brushes. In this de- 
partment last year thirty two pupils were enrolled and four 
completed their trades and received diplomas. The work done 
in this department is as follows: Chairs reseated, 397; mat- 
tresses made, 115; dusters and brushes, 103; mops, 102. 

The Sewing Room is chiefly for the girls, though the small 
boys also spend a portion of their time here. The girls are 
expected to spend at least one hour each day in this depart- 
ment, where they are taught bead and fancy work, crocheting, 
and sewing by hand and on the machine. Each girl is taught 
to thread her own needle and as far as possible to mend her own 
clothing. This department enrolled eighty pupils, and made 
and mended the following articles last year : 

Articles mended 170 

Articles crocheted 17 

Number pieces of bead work made 290 

Aprons made 15 

Dresses made 5 

Scrap bags made 8 

Towels hemmed 76 

Table clothes hemmed 34 

Side-board covers hemmed 4 

Bed spreads hemmed 21 

Sheets hemmed 120 

Napkins hemmed 383 

Skirts made 4 

Tea towels hemmed 50 

Pillow cases made 50 

Pairs of curtains hemmed 7 



15 

Three teachers devote their entire time to the teaching of 
music. Though this subject does not receive the same atten- 
tion in the seeing schools that it here receives, yet in the pub- 
lic schools of the towns and cities and in the colleges of the 
State to some extent pupils and students are given instruction 
in music, tuition free. lu this the Institute for the Blind is 
unlike the seeing schools only in the emphasis it places upon 
the teaching of music. In this department last year live pupils 
received instruction on the pipe organ, fourteen were instructed 
in baud music, fifteen were given special voice culture, and 
fifty received instruction on the piano. There were two grad- 
uates only. The school is divided into two choirs in which the 
pupils are given class instruction and are trained in chorus 
singing, A class in theory and harmony is also sustained and 
pupils are taught to read and transcribe their own music in 
the point system. 

There is nothing contained in the course of study that is not 
found in the public school system, and nothing that marks the 
Institute for the Blind as a benevolent institution more than 
other departments of our public school system. However, the 
pupils of the institution are furnished board and lodging and 
the pupils of the public schools are not. But the State does this 
as a matter of economy. The State has acknowledged its ob- 
ligation to furnish its children opportunities for an education. 
In establishing and maintaining this institution it is simply 
giving to the blind what it gives to the seeing. To discharge its 
obligation to its blind children the State would be compelled 
to furnish them special teachers, as the work can not be welL 
done in the seeing schools. It is more convenient and eco- 
nomical to the State to bring them all into one institution and 
provide for them special teachers than to educate them at 
home. In leaving their homes they must sacrifice home in- 
fluences, home training and home association — greater sacrifices 
for themselves and the State than the State makes for them. 
Considering the sacrifices, when the State has provided in this 
way for them, it has done no more for them than for the seeing 
children. 

The objection to the "asylum" idea in connection with this 
institution is not based on sentiment, but is a legitimate objec- 
tion. This idea is a real hindrance in educating the blind. 
Many parents are slow to send their unfortunate children away 



16 

from home while they are yet young and commit them to the 
care of strangers. They are even more loth to send them as 
subjects of charity to be educated as "inmates" of an "asylum." 
A seeing boy usually points with pride to his alma mater, but 
few boys of merit and spirit would proudly claim to have been 
educated in an ' asylum." The boy who acquiesces in the idea 
that he is a subject of charity is half unfitted for development 
and life, and is more than half fitted for mischievous things. 
We can not expect to find in such a boy very high and worthy 
aspirations, nor can he be brought fully to understand the 
value of property and the rights of other people. It is an un- 
fortunate thing for any child to be impressed with the idea 
that he is a subject of charity. It is an unfortunate thing for 
the blind children of the State that their school should be de- 
nominated an " asylum " and themselves considered " inmates." 

All instruction in the institution is based upon the pedagog- 
ical principles underlying the teaching in seeing schools, though 
the method of presentation must be varied to suit the prevail- 
ing conditions. As soon as the pupils learn to read, which is 
not a very difficult task for many of them, the work of instruc- 
tion proceeds chiefly as it does in seeing schools. The system 
of reading is the New York Point, which consists of six em- 
bossed points arranged in such manner as to represent the 
letters of the alphabet, punctuation marks, ten combinations of 
letters and numbers. 

The materials used in the kindergarten work are the same 
as those used in seeing kindergartens. The typewriters used 
in the institution are the same as those used by seeing people, 
and the forms and figures used in mathematics are the same as 
used in the public schools. The kleidograph is an instrument 
for writing point, made after the plan of a typewriter. In 
geometry the figures are constructed on heavy paper by means 
of a common ruler and a simple device used to indent the paper 
that the figure may be presented through the sense of touch. 
The slate used by the pupils is a tablet of wood on which is 
placed a double plate of brass or steel called a guide. In the 
upper plate are cut a number of cells, and on the lower are 
indentures to correspond to .the six points in the system. The 
paper is placed between the plates and pressed into the inden- 
tures with a pointed steel stilus. The maps are carved out of 
wood, and on them are represented all the physical features 



17 

of the different countries. The maps are also cut into sections 
to represent the countries. For class use embossed paper maps 
are used. To present to the pupils the musical characters and 
notation as it appears to the seeing, one of the teachers in the 
Music Department has prepared a board on which are repre- 
sented the lines and signatures of staffs. The musical charac- 
ters and signs have been cut from wood and mounted on small 
pins. The pupils are taught to write music on the board by 
inserting the pins in the small holes made in the board. The 
physical apparatus is the same as used in the high schools of 
the State. 

Culture and discipline are the chief ends in view in the edu- 
cation of the blind. With a memory strong from necessity it 
is easy for a blind child to become the possessor of a great 
mass of facts and render himself a mere machine. It is diffi- 
cult for the best teacher to prevent such a condition. Careful 
and skilled effort is necessary to so control the acquisition of 
knowledge as to bring to the child growth as, well as informa- 
tion. Paramount to this is the tone of the information ac- 
quired. Hence the culture side of all studies is earnestly em- 
phasized. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

The officers, teachers, and pupils of the institution desire to 
express their appreciation of the many courtesies that have 
been extended during the year. 

The Chapel exercises have been conducted by Dr. Dewherst 
ot the Plymouth Church, Dr. Sims of the Meridian Street M. E. 
Church, President Parsons of the State l!^ormal School, Dr. 
Roudthaler of the Tabernacle Church, Dr. Haines of the First 
Presbyterian Church, Dr. Ellison of the First Baptist Church, 
Rev. Shannon of the United Brethren Church,'Mrs. Ratliff, Dr. 
Fellows of Chicago University, Dr. Carstensen of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, Mr. C. E. Newlin, Dr. Shepardson of Chi- 
cago University, and Superintendent H. B. Jacobs of the West- 
ern Pennsylvania Institution for the Blind. 

Lectures have been delivered in the Chapel by President 
Parsons of the Indiana State Normal School, Mrs. McRae of 
Purdue University, Dr. Fellows of Chicago University, A. 0. 
Samuels of Persia, Dr. Bryan of Indiana University, Elia L. 
Yovtchef of Bulgaria, and Dr. Mary Wood- Allen of Ann Arbor. 
2— Blind. 



18 

Tickets have been furnished the pupils of the institution 
gratis to lecture courses, recitals and concerts by the following 
persons and organizations : Mr. Pierce and Mr. Hanson to 
their recitals, the Schliewen Quartet to their concerts, Dixon 
& Talbott to all the operas given in the English and Grrand 
Opera Houses during the winter, the Directors of the May 
Festival thirty season tickets, and the Damrosch Opera Com- 
pany twenty season tickets. 

Superintendent Glraham, with a quartette of young ladies 
from the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home, gave a delight- 
ful recital in the Chapel of the institution, and the Cunning- 
ham Quartette of Paris, Illinois, also gave an enjoyable concert 
in the Chapel. 

Mr. Carl Schneider very generously invited all the pupils of 
the institution to attend the concert given at the Grand Opera 
House by the Symphony Concert Company. 



ANNUAL CONCERT. 

CONCERT PROGRAM. 

Part First. 

1. Joj ! Joy! Freedom Today Benedict 

Chorus. 

2. Piano Duet — Spanii-h Dance. Mo'zkowski 

Harry Monroe and Chap. Parker. 

3. Blow, Ye Winter Winds Arranged 

Girls' Chorus. 

4. Piano Solo — Le Papillon La Vallke 

Nellie Ebersole. 

5. Vccal Solo— It Was Not So To Be Nes?ler 

Chas. Parker. 

6. Piano Trio — Festival March Behr 

Rose Pryor, Nellie Clark, Margurite Alleman. 

7. Off for Philadelphia Smith 

Boys' Chorus. 

8. Organ Solo — Coronation March Meyerbeer 

Frank Topmiller. 

9. The Sea Hath Its Pearls . Pinsuti 

Chorus. 



19 

Part Second. 

1. Trio (Brass) — Serenade Geibel 

Frank Reese, John Snaith, Alphonso Johnson. 

2. Sweet May Barnby 

Girls' Chorus. 

3. Piano Solo — March from Tannhauser Liszt 

Alphonso Johnston. 

4. Mixed Quartette — Stars of the Summer Night Hatton 

5. Dust (Piano and Organ) — Doux Espior Nocturne Battmann 

Harry Monroe and Lillie Ball. 

6. The Old Canoe Root 

' Boys' Chorus. 

7. Piano Trio— Overture — Barbier de Savilla Rossini 

Frank Reese, Frank Topmiller, Alphonso Johnston. 

8. Gaily O'er the Ocean Abt 

Chorus. 



COMMENCEMENT. 

The bienuial commencement exercises were held in the in- 
stitution chapel at 10 a. m., Tuesday, June 9, 1896. The class, 
consisting of four girls and six boys, was an unusually strong 
one. The pleasure of the occasion was marred by the sudden 
death of the father of Ida Powell, a member of the class. She 
was called home on Friday, and could not return to deliver her 
address, which, at the request of the class, was read by the 
Superintendent. 

Governor Matthews was present and addressed the class. I 
regret that I am unable to insert his address in full, as every 
thought was loftly and full of inspiration, 

PROGRAM. 

March — Enquirer Club Brandt 

Montani Bros.' orchestra. 

Invocation Dk. C. N. Sims 

Overture — Fast Latann 

Orchestra. 

'• The Value of Music as an Educator " Frank Heinrich Topmiller 

"John Milton" Phebe Isabelle Clark 

"Reality of Thought" Charles Ellsworth Parker 

" Laurels Longed for Should Be Earned" Pearl Ettie Howell 

Gavotte— Viola Hill 



20 

Orchestra. 

" The Marvel of Nations " Lewis Edsar Peak 

"Down Ere 8, Up Mars!" Lillie Isabel Ball 

"Should the United States Government Kecognize the Cuban Insurgents as Belig- 

erents?" 

Affirmed by Moses Joshua Denny. 

Negatived by Charles Carroll Green. 

Cornet solo— Colina Polka Libeeati 

Master Nicholas Montani. 

" The Power that Moulds" Anna Ida Powell 

"Ideals" Frank Hart Reese 

Spanish waltz • Espanita-Eosy 

Orchestra. 

Eemarks Governor Matthews 

Presentation of diplomas. 

Orchestra. 

Class motto: Excelsior. Class colors: Blue and Gold. 

Very respectfully, 

W. H. GLASCOCK, 

Superintendent. 



21 

ENROLLMENT OF PUPILS FOR THE SESSION 

OF 1895-6. 



BOYS. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Baird. John 

Breadine, Paul 

Brodbeok, Rutus 

Brodbeck, Urla 

Brumbaugh, Clarence-. • 

Burrows, Alphonso 

Bales, Goldy 

Casso, Frank 

ColemMn, Robert 

Clow, Robert 

Campbell, Eugene 

CI irk, Clarence 

Christainsen, Charles---. 

Cranmer, George W 

Collins, Charles 

Chapman. Oscar 

Delsney, Thomas 

Da\ is, Willi im 

Denny, ;M . J 

Duvall, Clyde 

Euliss, Robbie 

Fleming, Richard 

Gorrell, Clarence 

Giles, Park ■ 

Green, Charles C 

Huebner, Reinhardt 

Hall, Charles 

Harvey, Jesse 

Hawley, Roscoe 

Irving, Washington 

Ingram, Oliver 

Jacobs, Willie 

Johnston, Alfonso 

Johnson, Floyd 

Kisling, Henry 

Kreutzman. Fred 

Ledbetter, Clyde 

Lindsay, Harry 

Mcintosh, Albert 

McClain, William 

McGraw, Thomas 

Miller, Warren 

Miller, Robert 

Musser, Geo 

Morrow, <^arl 

Monroe, Harry 

Martin, Lewis 

Moore, Jesse 

McCartney, Fred 

McCoy, Benj. F 

Nicholson, Thos 

0'Connell,Chas 

Peek. Edgar 

Parker, Chas.E 

Pierson, Roy 

Reese, Frank H 

Robbins, Cyrus 

Raper, Geo. W 

Smith, John 

Smith, Oliver 

Seldomrldge, Adelbert - 

Starr, Chester 

Stover, Samuel 

Sellers, Ezra 

Stevenson, Howard 

Stark, Frank 

Tannehill, Jas 

Topmiller. Frank 

Thomas, Chauncey 

Tucker, Oscar 

Von Dissen, Fred 

Wilmuth, Fred 

Wagner, Frank 



Petersburg 

Warsaw 

Bobo 

Bobo 

Churubusco 

Indianapolis -.- 

Brightwood 

Ft. Wayne 

Elkhart 

Advance 

Evansville ---- 
Crawfordsville 

Oleo 

Anderson 

Middletown 

Bedford 

Indianapolis - 

Windfall 

Shoals 

Ridgeville 

Brownsburff -- 
Iniianapolis .. 
Brownstown -.. 

Red Key 

Salem 

Ft. Wayne 

Indianapolis- 
Indianapolis- - 

Columbus 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Indianapolis-- 

Chicago 

Ft. Wayne 

Muncie 

Magley 

Oak Grove 

Shelbyville 

Indianapolis- 

Wabash 

Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis-.. 
Indianapolis-. 

DixoD 

Ft. Wayne 

Indianapolis- 
Washington-... 

Lewisville 

Edwardsport- 

Fulton 

Boonville 

Indianapolis... 

Shoals 

Knightstown- 
Indianapolis.... 

Mishawaka 

New Albany .. 

Muncie 

Brownsburg ... 
Brownsbure.--. 

Muncie 

Albany 

Hartford City- 
Frankfort 

Indianapolis -- 

Cory 

Laporte 

New Point 

Muncie 

Tipton 

Hanover 

Frankfort 

Washington --- 



Pike. 

Kosciusko. 

Adams. 

Adams. 

Whitley. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Allen. 

Elkhart. 

Boone. 

Vanderburgh. 

Montgomery. 

Hamilton. 

Madison. 

Henry. 

Lawrence. 

MMrion. 

Tipton. 

Martin. 

Jay. 

Hendricks. 

Marion. 

Jackson. 

Jay. 

Washington. 

Allen. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Bartholomew^ 

Vanderburgh. 

Vanderburgh.. 

Marion. 

Allen. 

Delaware. 

Adams. 

Jay. 

Shelby. 

Marion. 

Wabash. 

Marion. 

.Marion. 

Marion. 

Greene. 

Allen. 

Marion. 

D iviess. 

Henry. 

Knox. 

Fulton. 

Warrick. 

Marion. 

Martin. 

Henry. 

Marion. 

St- Joseph. 

Floyd. 

Delaware. 

Hendricks. 

Hendricks. 

Delaware. 

Delaware. 

Blackford. 

Clinton. 

Marion. 

Clay. 

Laporte. 

Decatur. 

Delaware. 

Tipton. 

.lefferson. 

Clinton. 

Daviess. 



22 

ENROLLMENT OF PUPILS-Continued. 
GIRLS. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Allison, Nora 

Armstrong, Jessie 

Acton, Pearl 

Anthony, Minnie 

Alleman, Marguerite 

Ball.Lillie 

Bell, Amie 

Black, Maud 

Biddle, Maud 

Brinamer, Emma 

Bramme, Leona 

Brown, Maggie 

Cutsinger, Alma 

Caster, Clara 

Clark, Nellie 

Clark, Phebe 

Cain, Mattie 

Gary, Amanda 

Cain, Mary 

Dudley, Mary 

Ebersole, Nellie 

Edwards, Cassie 

Edwards, Lillie 

Endsley, Jennie 

Ernselif, Coy 

Foreman, Josei>hine •. 
Franklin, Marian..,-- 

Ferguson, Alice 

Garr, Minnie 

ttoldy, May 

Gillintt, Alice 

Hayden, Marie 

Harmon, Anna 

Howell, Pearl 

Hook, Lennie 

Hay, Z;>a 

Heil, Katie 

Harvey, Minnie 

Hendren, Ellen 

Jacobs, Crystal 

Johnson, Florence 

Keys, Nora 

Kisling. Rosanna 

Krack, Tracy 

Knotts, Gertie 

Letstnger, Gay 

Minthorn, Nettie 

Maden, Grace 

Martin, Minnie 

Murphy, Pearl 

McGibbons, Pearl 

Morris, Laura 

Pryor, Rose 

Postlethw.iite, 

Powell, Idii 

Pittsford, Delia 

Robbins, Julia 

Rocket. Delia 

Smith, Bertha 

Snow, Nora 

Swanger, May 

Swanger, Myrtle 

Thornbure, Essie 

Wratten, Minnie 

Wishard. Myrtle 

Young, Aletha 



Hall 

Brazil 

Bluffton 

Montpe lier 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Fredericksburg 

Carbon 

Michigan City .. 

Muncie 

Wabash 

Shelburn 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Petersburg 

Redkey 

Muncie 

Cumback 

Sullivan 

Indianapolis 

Rockport 

Raccoon 

Indianapolis 

Crawfordsville.. 

Madison .. ■• 

Seymour 

Shoals 

Hartford City .. 

Windfall 

Plainville 

Strawns 

Brooklyn 

Koleen 

Newbern 

Elkhart 

Brightwood 

La'ayette 

Perkinsville 

Indianapolis-.. 
Bloomington .. 

Logansport 

Muncie 

Center Point 

Indianapolis 

Worthington 

Royal Center ■■• 

Danville 

Etna Green 

Amfricus 

Shelbyville 

Edwardsville . 

Noblesville 

Petersburg 

Evansville 

Selma 

Paris Crossing.. 

Vincennes 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Mishawaka 

Mishawaka 

(-arthage 

Washington 

Mt. Auburn 

Manilla 



Morgan. 

Clay. 

Wells. 

Blackford. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Howard. 

Washington. 

Clay. 

Lnporte. 

Delaware. 

Wabash. 

Sullivan. 

Tippecanoe. 

Tippecanoe. 

Pike. 

Jay. 

Delaware. 

Daviess. 

Sullivan. 

Marion. 

Spencer. 

Putnam. 

Marion. 

Montgomery. 

Jefferson. 

Jackson. 

Martin. 

Blacktord. 

Tipton. 

Daviess. 

Henry. 

Morgan. 

Greene. 

Bartholomew. 

Elkhart. 

Marion. 

Tippecanoe. 

Madison. 

Marion. 

Monroe. 

Cass. 

Delaware. 

Clay. 

Marion. 

Greene. 

Cass. 

Hendricks. 

Kosciusko. 

Tippecanoe. 

Shelby. 

Floyd. 

Hamilton. 

Pike. 

V^anderburgh. 

Delaware. 

Jennings. 

Knox. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

St. Joseph. 

St. Joseph. 

Rush. 

Daviess. 

Shelby. 

Rush. 



23 



NEW PQPILS ENROLLED FOR 

1896-7. 



THE FALL TERM^ 



BOYS. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICE. 



County. 



Blue, Ralph 

Bauer, Henry ■••■ 
Dalrymple, Earl 
Fleener, Ennis-- 
Fox, William .... 
Ferguson, Jesse- 
Gui.ss, Albert .... 

Hobbs, W.C 

James, Scott 

Sellars, Ben H ... 
Wamb-gans, Ja-' 
Wiles, Wm 



Muneie 

Rockville 

Philadelphia... 

Mioma 

Bruceville 

Crawfnrdsville 

Napanee 

iVluncie 

Koro 

Frankfort 

Greensburg .... 
Groomsville ... 



Delaware. 

Parke. 

Hancock. 

Gibson. 

Knox. 

Montgomery. 

Elkhart. 

Delaware. 

Carroll. 

CliQton. 

Decatur. 

Tipton. 



GIRLS. 



Cunningham, Ad 

Jenks, Fern 

Morelan, Dora... 

Melick, Gail 

Stiles, Rosetta •• ■ 
Willett, Mattie •. 



West Indianapolis Marion. 

North Manchester Wabash. 

Washington Daviess. 

Cuba Owen. 

Monon White. 

Newburg ] Warrick. 



CLASSIFIED AND ITEMIZED STATEMENT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



As Shown by the Books and Papers Belonging to the Institution. 
The Same is Correct in Detail as Made Out and Arranged by the 
Bookkeeper for the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 





$27,000 00 
1,0-9 49 
















S28,089 49 




28,1.89 49 








Si, 500 00 
■-',^98 46 




Total expenditures for repairs of buildings lor 1896 








$1 54 








Sl.COO 00 
995 12 
















81 88 








351 00 
500 00 


















Balance of appropriation for repairs of buildings un»xpendcd for 1896 
Balance of appropriation for work shops unexpended for IHyrt 


$1 54 

4 88 

R8 20 

90 63 




Cash from clothiug accounts collecttid by Treasurer of State for 1896.. 




Total amount turned into the State Treasury for the fiscal year 
ending October 31, 1896 




S135 25 







25 



Classification of Expenses for the Fiscal Year Ending October 

31, 1896. 



On Account of Maintenance. 



Amount. 



Total. 



Salaries of Superintendent and subordinate ofiRcers 

Salaries of teachers 

Salaries of employes 

Salary of physician 

Expenses of the Board of Control 

Salaries of industrinl teachers 

Butter, eggs and. poultry 

Fuel, gas and coal 

Meat and lard 

Furniture and house goods 

Tea, sugir and eoflfee 

Fruits and canned goods 

Vegetables 

Milk. 



Provisions (not classified) 

Kitchen and home goods 

Fish and oysters 

Breadstuff's 

Stable and provender 

Traveling expenses 

Telephone, telegraphage and postage . 

Gaslight 

Water rent 

Supplies for pupils 

Laundry supplies 

Ice- 



Stationery and printing- 
Green-house expenses ■■■ 

Vinegar and syrup 

.Clothing for pupils 

Drugs and medicines 

Repairs (common) ■• ■ — 
Tools 



Total expsnditures for maintenance, year ending Oct. 31, 1896 

Total expenditures for repairs of buildings, year ending Oct. 31. 
1896 



Total expenditures for library, year ending Oct. 31, 1896 

Total expenditures for the work shops, year ending Oct. 31, 1896.. 

Total expenditures for the fiscal year ending Oct. 31, 1896 



$3,180 00 

4,425 00 

6,222 88 

300 00 

348 00 

1,017 50 

] ,325 53 

2,420 02 

1,715 22 

1,390 79 

973 77 

548 39 

461 86 

519 12 

259 23 

346 :U 

164 78 

604 36 

136 48 

116 47 

106 23 

394 53 

135 17 
113 23 

136 24 
173 50 
288 01 

46 58 
44 50 
34 45 
66 61 
61 74 
13 00 



S28.0S9 49- 



$52,083 07 



26 



REPOET OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD. 



Showing all Receipts and Disbursements for the Fiscal Year 
Ending October 31, 1896; from Whom Money was Received, 
and on What Account. 



Date. 


Receipts on Account o« Maistenance. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 
Dee. 4 

1896. 
Jan 8 


Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Nov., 1895 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Dec, 1895 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Jan., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Feb.. 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury (or March, 1896. .. 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for April, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for May, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for June, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for July, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Aug., 1893 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Sept., 1896 -- 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Oct., 1896 

Total amount drawn from State Treasury for main- 
tenance for 1896 


§2,507 69 

2,554 56 
2.251 29 
2,465 85 
2,651 77 
2,414 63 
2,760 66 
1,406 26 
1,326 H7 
899 79 
2,222 70 
4,627 62 




Feb 5 




Mar. 4 

April 8 












July 1 




Aug 5 




Sept 8 




Oct " 7 • 




Oct 30 












$28,089 49 



REPORT OF TREASURER— Continued. 



Date. 



Disbursements (.Monthly- on Acc.)UNt of Mainte- 
nanck F(ir the Year 1896. 



Total. 



1895. 

December 

1896. 

January . 
February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August-. .. 
Septembei 
October ■■ 
October ... 



Paid out by the Treasurer of the Board for Nov., 1895- 



$2,507 69 



Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 
Paid 



out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 



the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 
the Treasurer of 



the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 
the Board 



for Dec, 
for Jan., 
for Feb., 
for Mar., 
for Apr., 
for May, 
for June, 
for July, 
fur Aug., 
for Sept. 
for Oct., 



1895 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
. 1896. 
1896 
1896. 
, 1896. 
1896.. 




Total amount paid out on account of maintenance 
f )r 1S96 



$28,0?9 49 



27 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD— Con. 




Dec. 4 

1896. 

Jan. 8 

Feb. 5 

Mar. 4 

April 8 

May 6 

June 8 

July 1 

Aug. 5 

Sept. 8 

Oct. 30 



Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Nov., 1895.-. 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Dec, ]895.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Jan., 1896.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Feb., 1896 ... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Mar., 1896.. .. 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury tor April, 1896.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for May, 1S96.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for June, 1896-.. 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for July, 1886.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Aus-., 1896.... 
Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Oct., 1896 ... 

Total amount drawn from State Treasury for re 
pairs of buildings for 1896 



S86n 44 



43 05 
916 24 

10 43 
8 12 

27 16 

19 83 
387 9? 
175 40 

45 46 
4 40 



82,498 46 



D.4TE. 



Disbursements on Account of Repairs of 
Buildings fob 1896. 



Amount. Total. 



1895. 

December Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Nov., 1895.. 

1896. 



January Paid 

February Paid 

March | Paid 

April j Paid 

May [ Paid 

June j Paid 

July I Paid 

August ' Paid 

September ... Paid 
October Paid 



out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 
out by 



Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 
Treasurer 



of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 
of the 



Board for Dec, 
Board (or Jan , 
Board for Feb., 
Board for Mar., 
Board for April, 
Board for May, 
Board for June, 
Board for July, 
Board for Aug., 
Board for Oct., 



1895.. 
1896.. 
189*5.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 
1896.. 



Total amount paid for repairs of buildings for year 
ending October 31, 1896 



I860 44 



43 05 
916 24 

10 43 
8 12 

27 16 

19 83 
387 93 
175 40 

45 46 
4 40 



82,498 46 



28 



EEPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD— Con. 



Date. 


Rkceipts on Account op Workshops. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 
Dec 4 


Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Nov., 1895 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Dec, 1^95 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for .Jan., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Feb., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Ireasury for Mar., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for April, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for May, 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Aug., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Sept., 1896 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Oct., 1896 

Total amount drawn from State Treasury for the 


m 33 

42 22 

86 80 
24 25 

120 81 

87 86 
15 74 
58 82 

377 34 
!01 95 




1896. 
Jan 8 




Feb 5 








April 8 

May 6 

June 8 . 

Sept. 8 

Oct 7- . . 




Oct 30 












$995 12 









Date. 


DiSBURSRMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF WORKSHOPS FOR 1896. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 

December 

1896. 

January 

February 

March- 

April 

May 

June 

September •■■ 

October 

October 


Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Not., 1895-. 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Dec, 1895- 
Paid out by treasurer of the Board for Jan., 1896- 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Feb., 1896- 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Mar , 1896- 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for April, 1896.. 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for May, 1896.. 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Aug., 1896.. 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Sept., 1896- 
Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Oct., 1896.. 

Total amount paid out on account of workshops 
the year ending Oct 31, 1896 




$79 33 

42 22 

86 80 
24 25 

ISO 8r 

87 86 
15 74 
58 82 

377 34 
101 95 












for 








S995 12 













29 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD— Con. 



Date. 



Receipts on Account of Library. 




Total. 



1895. 

Dec. 4.. 

1896. 

Jan. 8.. 
Feb. 5 . 
Mar. 5-- 
April 8.. 
May 6.. 
June 8.. 
July 1.. 
Sept. 8- 
Oct. 7.. 
Oct. 30.. 



Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for Nov , 1895 



Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 
Auditor 



's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 
's warrant on 



State Treasury for Dec, 
State Treasury for Jan., 
State Treasury for Feb., 
State Treasury for Mar., 
State Treasury for April, 
State Treasury for May, 
State Treasury for June, 
State Treasury for Au?., 
State Treasury for Sept., 
State Treasury for Oct., 



1895 
1896 
l-!98 
1896 
1<^96 
18J6 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1893 



Total amount drawn from State Treasury for Li 
brary for year 1896 




S500 00 



Date. 


Disbursements on Account of Library for 1896. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 

December.... 

1896. 

January 

February 


. Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Nov , 1895 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Dec, 1895 

■ Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Jan., 1896 

j Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Feb., 1896 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Mar., 1896 


113 04 

86 15 
27 06 
20 87 
100 33 
11 36 
72 66 

51 83 
18 40 

52 26 
46 04 




April 

May 

June 

July 

September .. 

October 

October 




.1 Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for May, 1896 

• Paid out by Treasurer of the B lard for June, 1896 

. Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Aug , 1896 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Sept., 1896 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for Oct., 1896 

Total amount paid on account of Library for year 
ending Oct 31 1896 ••• . • ■ 








8500 00 







30 



REPORT OF TFIE TREASURER OF THE BOARD.— Con. 



On Account of Receipts and Earnings from the Greenhouse and 

Miscellaneous. 



Date. 



Receipts from Gteeenhouse and Miscellaneous 



Amount. 



Total. 



1895 
Dec. 4. 

1896 
.Jan. 8. 
Feb. 5. 
April 8. 
May fi. 
.June 8. 
.July 1. 
Oct. 30. 



From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for November, 1895 

From W. H Glascock, Supt., for December, 1895 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for January, 1896.. 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for March, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for April, 1H96 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for May, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for June, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., for October, 1896.. 

Total receipts from greenhouse and miscellaneous 



to 35 



7 50 


2 50 


1 65 


4 00 


13 35 


5 fiO 


3 25 



$38 20' 



Disbursements on AccouJit of Receipts from Greenhouse and 
Miscellaneous. 



Date. 


Disbursements on Account of Receipts from 
Greenhouse and Miscellaneous. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 




$0 35 

7 50 

2 50 
1 65 

4 00 
13 35 

5 60 

3 25 




1896. 


















May 












July 














Total greenhouse and miscellaneous receipts turned 








S38 20 







31 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD— Con. 



O/i Account of Receipts from the Work Shops. 



Date. 



Receipts from Work Shops of the Institution. 



Amount. 



Total. 



1895 

Dec. 4 

1896 

Jan. 8- 

Feb. 5. 

Mar. 4. 

April 8. 

May 6. 

June 8. 

July 1. 

Aug. 5. 

Sept. 8. 

Oct. 7. 
Oct. 30. 



From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for November, 1895. 



From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for December, 1896.. 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for January, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for February, 1896... 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for March, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for April, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, .Supt., sale^ for May, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for June, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for July, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales for August, 1896 

From W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales f )r September, 1896 
Fr )m W. H. Glascock, Supt., sales Jnr Uctober, 1893 

Total receipts from work shops to the credit of 
maintenance 

Legislative appropriation for maintenance, year 
ending October 31, 1896 

Total appropriation and receipts for maintenance 
for 1896 

Total appropriation for repairs of buildings for 1896.. 

Total appropriation lor work shops for 1896 

Total appropri ition f ir library for 1896 

Receipts from green-house and miscellaneous for 
1896 

Receipts from clothing accounts collected by Treas- 
urer of State 

Total amount of all appropriations and receipts 
for 1896 



?115 45 


70 55 


185 57 


61 72 


144 67 


110 60 


57 48 


lot 15 


26 80 


105 60 


57 40 


49 50 



SI, 089 49 
27,000 00 



$28,089 49 

2,-500 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

38 20 

90 63 



$52,218 32 



32 



EEPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD— Con. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



On Account of Beceipts jrom Work Shops of the Institution, Re- 
ceived from the Saperbdendent and Paid to the Treasurer of 
State by the Treasurer of the Institution. 



Date. 



Disbursements on Account of Work Shops. 



Amount. 



Total. 



1895 

Dec. 4. 

1898 

Jan. 8 
Feb. 5. 
Mar. 4 
April 8 
May 6 
June **■ 
July 1 
Aug:. S- 
Sept. 8 
Oct. 7. 
Oct. 3u. 



Paid over to Treasurer of Statf 



Paid over to Treasurer ©f Stat.-.. 
Paid over to Treasurer of State- 
Paid over to Treasurer of State.. 
Paid over to Treasurer of State-- 
Paid over to Treasurer of State.- 
Paid over to Treasurer of State-. 
Paid over to Treasurer o' Stnte... 
Paid over to Treasurer of Sttite - 
Paid over to Trensurer of State 
Paid over to Treasurer of State - 
Paid over to Treasurer of State-. 



Total paid into the State Treasury from workshops 

to credit of maintenance appropriat on for 1896 

Appropriation lor maintenance expended for 1896.-- 

Total expenditures on account of maintenance for 

1896 

Total expenditures for repairs of buildings for 1896. 

Total expenditures for vrork shops 

Total expenditures for library 

Total receipts from green-house and miscellaneous 

paid into Stnte Treasury 

Unexpended balance from vpork shops paid into 

State Treasury 

Unexpended balance from repairs of buildings paid 

into State Treasury 

Clothing accounts turned into State Treasury 



Total amount expended and turned into State 
Treasury for 1896 



SI 15 45 



70 55 
185 57 

61 72 
144 67 
110 60 

57 48 

104 15 
26 80 

105 60 
67 40 
49 50 



SI ,089 49 
27,000 00 



S28,089 49 

2,498 46 

995 12 

500 00 

38 20 



1 54 
90 63 



$32,218 32 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



On Account of Pupils' Clothing, Charged to Their Respective Coun- 
ties with Itemized BUls of Same, to Whom Furnished and on 

What Account, Turned Over to the Treasurer of State for Collec- 
tion, and by Him Presented to the Various Counties and Collected. 

We Omit the Names of Pupils Furnished with Clothing and 
Dependent Upon the Counties in Which They May Reside from 

This Publication as a Matter of Right, for the Reason ihat They 
are Not Responsible for Their Inability to Pay Their Way, and 
are Sensitive Upon the Subject. 



EXPENDITURES OF PUPILS, CHARGED TO THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTIES, FOR 
THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 



Clay County 

Clinton County 

Delaware County 

Daviess County 

Floyd County 

Lawrence County 

Montgomery County-. 

Marion County 

Martin County 

Pike County 

Spencer County 

Shelby County 

Vigo County 

Vanderburgh County . 
Warrick County 



Total expended for pupils' clothing and traveling expenses for 
the fiscal year ending Uct. 31, 1895 




$34 15 



? — Blind. 



34 



RECAPITULATION. 



Showing the [Monthly) Receipts from the Different Workshops Be- 
longing to the Institution for the Fiscal Year Ending October 
31, 1896. 



Date. 


Receipts from Cane-seating and Mattress Dept. 


Amount. 


Total. 


1895. 
November ... 
December 

1896. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 


For the month of November, 1895 

For the month of December, 1895 


«43 15 
13 80 

50 20 
21 00 
24 00 
12 30 
43 34 
10 20 
1 50 
12 10 
28 70 












For the month of April, 1896 

For the month of May, 1896 








July 

September ... 
Oetober 


For the month of July, 1896 

For the month of September. 1896 

For the month of October, 1896 

Total amount of receipts from cane-seating and 






. 


S260 29 




Total amount paid out to pupils for overwork 


14 70 






S245 59 







35 



RECAPITULATION 



Of Receipts (Monthly) from the Work Shops. 



Date. 



Ekckipts from Bkoom Shop. 



Amount. 



Total 



1895. 

November 
December. 

1896. 

January 
February . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October .-.. 



1895. 

November 
December. 

1896 

January .. 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

September 
October ■•. 



For the month of Nov., 1895 

For the month of Dec, 1895 

For the month of Jan., 1896 

For the month ot Feb., 1896 

For the month of Mar., 1896 

For the month ot April, 1896 

For the month of May, 1896 

For the month of June, 1896 

For the month of July, 1896 

For the month ot Aug., 1896 

For the month of Sept.. 1896 

For the month of Oct., 1896 

Total amount of receipts from broom shop 

Total amount paid out to pupils for overwork ■• 

Total amt. of net receipts from broom shop 



Receipts from the Girls' Work Room. 



For the month of Nov., 1895 

For the month ot Dec, 1895 

For the month of Jan., 1896 .'. 

For the month of Feb.. 1896 

For the month of Mar., 1893 

For the month ot April, 1896 

For the month of May, 1896 

For the month of June, 1896 

For the month of Sept., 1896 

For the month of Oct , 1896 

Total net receipts ot girls' work department 

Total from cane seating and mattress department 

Total net receipts from work shops for 1896 



$99 2?. 




51 95 




131 27 




58 72 




115 25 




89 10 




20 92 




90 10 




25 30 




105 60 




37 65 




15 60 






$840 69 




51 89 


$788 80 


85 20 




4 80 




4 10 




3 86 




5 42 




9 20 




5 82 




3 85 




7 65 




5 20 






55 10 




245 59 


$1,089 49 



36 



ESTIMATED VALUE 



Real Estate and Personal Property Belonging to the Indiana Insti- 
tute for the Education of the Blind, Made October 31, 1896. 



Personal Property. 



Amount. 



Total. 



MRchinery, boilers, tools and materials in engine house 

Mattress and Uane-seating Department 

Broom Department 

ttirls Work Deiiartment 

Piano-tuning Department 

Gymnasium 

Bakery 

Furniture and house goods 

.School appiiratus, books, etc 

Groceries, provisions and flour 

Green house, plants and tools 

Carriage, buggy, spring wagon and harness 

One horse 

Total value of personal property 



,559 60 
320 00 
240 00 
250 00 

•25 00 
100 00 

25 00 
,105 00 
,470 00 
775 70 
300 00 
250 00 

5U 00 



$27,490 30 



Real Estate. 



Amount. 



Total. 



1,6S0 feet front on Meridian and Pennsylvania streets, at S225 per 

front foot 

Main building, including heating apparatus, plumbing and walks -.. 

Work shop building 

Engine house, laundry and smoke stack 

Stable 

Bakery building 

Green house and heating fixtures 

Three lots in Crown Hill Cemetery 

Total value of real estate 

Total value of personal property and real estate, with improve- 
ments 




«52V381 GO 



$548,871 30 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Trustees and Officers 



INDIANA 

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' 

ORPHANS' HOME 



FISCAL YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIAXAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRISTING AND BINDING. 

1896. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, November 7, 1896. 

Keceived by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, \ 

Indianapolis, November 7, 1896. j 

The within report, so far as the same relates to the moneys drawn from the 
State Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



Indianapolis, November 7, 1896. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Piivate Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the Slate of Indiana, November 
7, 1896. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer November 7, 1896. > 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA, G. A. R. 

Col. James B. Black Indianapolis. 

Benjamin Starr Richmond, 

Thomas Boyd ..Noblesville. 

Chas. H. Myerhoff Evansville. 

W. J. HiLLiGoss Muncie. 

Theo. Wilkes Shelby ville. 

Jas. Liggett Ft. Wayne. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA, W. R. C. 

Mrs. Josephine Thomas Danville. 

Mrs. Minnie Brown ..Wabash. 

Mrs. Mary McElvaine Terre Haute. 

LADIES OF THE G. A. R. 

Mrs. Olive Allison Logansport. 

Mrs. Toland Logansport. 

Mrs. Theo. Sample Logansport. 



OFFICERS. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Ben L. Smith, President Rushville. 

Mrs. Julia S. CoNKLiN, Secretary Westfield. 

Dr. J. H. BoGART, Treasurer Clinton. 

A. H. Graham Superintendent. 

Chas. 0. ISTixoN Financial Officer. 

O. E. HoLLOWAY Physician. 

Mrs. N". T. Graham Matron. 



SCHOOLS. 



LAURA A. WACHTSTETTER, Principal 

TEACHERS. 

Miss Belle A. Powers, Miss Elizabeth Jane, 

Miss Frances L. Banta, Miss Margaret Fodrba, 

Miss Ella Shannon, Miss Stella C. Reed, 

Miss Anna L. Duncan, Miss Marie Jackson, 

Miss Ella F. Yickery, Miss Alice T. Salter, 
Miss Jessie E. Spann. 

Miss M. May Woods Stenographer and Typewriter. 

Mrs. Mary K. Branham Music. 

Miss Emma A. Mueller Cooking School. 

Mr. J. B. Yandaworker Band Instructor. 



governesses. 

Miss Katb Fribl, Mrs. Mary Wildasin, 

Mrs. JST. H. Webb, Miss Ollie Chandler, 

Miss Laura McConnell, Miss Margaret Rankin, 

Miss Kate Bogle, Miss Jennie Roach, 
Mrs. Kate Sloan, '' Miss Fannie Sheppard, 

Mrs. Annie Davis, Miss Lucy Broadbent, 

Mrs. Belle Williamson, Miss Ella Harrison, 

Miss Hannah Texton, Miss Ida Seitz, 

Miss Bertha Langston, Miss Sadie Weir, 
Mrs. S. M. Gillinqham. 

heads of departments. 

Mrs. Harriett A. Forbes. Hospital Matron. 

Mrs. a. C. Schilling Dining-Room Matron. 

James H. Rounds Printing. 

Jacob Routson Carpenter. 

Kixon H. Gang Florist. 

William Caseley Engineer. 

MoRT Edwards Store-Keeper. 

William Perkey Baker. 

D. F. Copper Shoemaker. 

J. H. Kochman Tailor. 

Clara Richardson Sewing. 

Flora Witt Laundry. 

James Smiley Farm. 

Jacob Bodmer Garden. 

Edward Berry Dairy. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



To His Excellency Claude Matthews, Governor of Indiana : 

At the close of another fiscal year we have the honor to sub- 
mit to you the eighteenth annual report of the Board of 
Trustees of the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 

With reverence we acknowledge our deep obligation to Him 
who " doeth all things well," for His protecting care and many 
mercies that have surrounded this institution and its inmates 
during the year of its history just closed. 

The very full and comprehensive report of Professor A. H. 
Oraham, which, with the reports from the various departments, 
is herewith submitted, renders it entirely unnecessary to repeat 
the details of the year's work ; briefly summarized, the work 
of the year has been entirely satisfactory in every department, 
to the Trustees. Harmony and good will have prevailed dur- 
ing the entire year among the Trustees, various officers and 
employes, and good order and discipline among our pupils. 

In June last, twenty-two of our wards, having satisfactorily 
completed the school course, were graduated. During the year 
the Trustees have discharged from the Home, for various 
causes, 121, and admitted 110. We had, October 31, 1896, 623 
orphans, and near two hundred applicants for admission. 

The resignation of Major H. H. Woods, our financial officer, 
January 1, 1896, made it necessary to select and elect his suc- 
cessor. This office is one of great importance to the Home, 
and the qualifications of this office might be properly listed as 
follows : 

First. He must be an honorably discharged Union soldier. 

Second. The duties of his office require that he should be 
an accurate book-keeper and accountant ; also with sufficient 
experience, judgment and knowledge to enable him to purchase 
the food, clothing, farm supplies, materials for repairs, and in 



fact everything used by a colony ot from 620 to 650 people, and 
keep the expenses within the bounds of a limited appropriation. 

Third. His duties and his association with the other em- 
ployes and the pupils make it essential that he should be a man 
of good morals and the strictest integrity. We soon learned 
that all discharged Union soldiers were not eligible, and that 
of those who were fitted for the office, they had employment 
more congenial and far better paid. A salary of six hundred 
dollars per year is, in our judgment, an inadequate compensa- 
tion for the financial officer, and we respectfully suggest that, 
if your judgment confirms this, you ask the General Assem- 
bly to increase the pay of the financial officer to nine hundred 
dollars per annum. 

The Board elected Charles 0. Nixon to succeed Major 
Woods, and have had no cause to regret the appointment. 

We desire to call your attention to the reduced appropria- 
tion of the last General Assembly for maintenance, which was 
reduced from $100,000 to $90,000, but there was appropriated 
$6,000 for the purchase of additional land. It could scarcely 
be expected that $10,000 per annum could be derived from 
$6,000 worth of real estate, and during the year we have been 
compelled to refuse admission to children entitled to the full 
benefits of the Home, on account of our inability from a lack 
of a sufficient appropriation to feed, clothe and instruct the 
maximum number of inmates. 

It has been suggested, if not urged, that we might reduce 
the number of employes by having their duties performed by 
our children. Answering this we say : It is necessary that our 
wards should receive the benefits of our school and be trained 
and fitted for some trade or vocation in life, and both of these 
must be accomplished before the child attains the age limit of 
discharge, sixteen years. At the age of thirteen, which i& 
fi.xed by law, each child becomes a member of the industrial 
school ; one-half day devoted to acquiring a trade, the other 
half to obtaining an education. About two hundred of our 
children have arrived at the age of thirteen. Any of the rou- 
tine work would necessarily have to be done by children under 
the age of thirteen years. For this reason a per capita com- 
parison of the Home with other State institutions is to the dis- 
advantage of the former, as their inmates are retained to a 
more advanced age. 



It is our judgment that the appropriation for maintenance 
should be $100,000 per annum, that of the library $300 per an- 
num, and for all repairs on farm and buildings should be in- 
creased to $3,000. The cost of the buildings amount to near 
$200,000; many of them have been built nine years and the 
present appropriation is inadequate to keep up the buildings 
and farm in a good husbandable manner. We do not deem it 
necessary to make any argument upon this subject; a state- 
ment of the existing facts should be all that is necessary to ob- 
tain the desired relief. 

We have the most gratifying reports from our graduates 
and ex- pupils who have left the fostering care of the State and 
commenced the battle of life in earnest for themselves; they 
are all taking a front rank in their several chosen vocations, 
and to be a graduate of the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Orphans' Home is now a mark of distinction and a badge of 
honor. The annual reunions of the ex-pupils, held at the close 
of each school year on the Home grounds, are well attended 
by ladies and gentlemen of polished manner and address, who 
owe all their early training and education to the generous pro- 
vision made by our State for the children of our country's de- 
fenders on battle plain and tented field, and manifest by their 
gratitude and conduct that the seed sown and money expended 
at this institution has not been in vain, but returns more than 
" an hundred fold." 

Again renewing our thanks to you and the General Assem- 
bly of the State for the interest manifested in this institution 
this report is 

Respectfully submitted, 

BEN. L. SMITH, 
JULIA S. CONKLIIS, 
JOHN H. BOGART, 

Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF TREASURER. 



Board of Trustees' Account With State of Indiana, Showing Be- 
ceipts and Expenditures of Funds Appropriated for Current 
BepairSy Etc. 

STATEMENT OF CURRENT REPAIR FOND. 



1895, 
Dec. 3 . 

1896, 
July 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Oct. 1 . 
Oct. 31 . 



1895, 
Dec. 3 . 

1896. 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
July I . 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
July 1 
July 1 . 
July 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug.l . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept.l . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept.l . 
Sept. 1 . 
Sept.l . 
Sept.l . 
Sept.l . 
Oct. 1 . . 
Oct. 1 . . 
Oct.l . . 
Oct. 1 . . 
Oct.l . . 
Oct. 31 . 
Oct. 31 . 
Oct. 31 . 
Oct. 31 . 



To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer . . 

By amount paid out as per vouchers herewith filed, 
viz.: 
Harry Watts & Co 

Harry Watts & Co 

Daniel Stewart & Co 

Bert Wilson 

(Samuel Bird 

Austin Edwards 

J.F.Parker 

Mattix & Shafer 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Knight & Jillson 

W. S. Weaver 

Chas. A. Daniel 

Harry Watts & Co 

William Mitchell 

Knight & Jillson 

Bert Wilson 

Samuel Bird 

Watts & Parker 

George Tolen 

Billings, Taylor & Co 

Erneck & Salestine 

C.I. Lemon 

Dovey Bros .... 

Harry Watts & Co 

C. I. Lemon 

L.W. Fargo 

William Mitchell 

Samuel Bird 

T. Parker 

John Brocius 

Bert Wilson 

Gleorge Tolen 

Singer Mfg. Co 

Mattix k Shafer 

P.G.Nay 

Harry Watts & Co 

Samuel Bird 

William Mitchell 

Watts & Parker . 

Mattix & Shafer 

N. W.C.Reeves 

Harry Watts & Co 

Bert Wilson 

Samuel Bird 



Dr. 

$610 13 

329 63 
308 20 
538 57 
123 45 
90 02 



Cr. 



$610 13 

100 11 
87 33 

50 00 

32 50 

18 00 

16 35 
8 00 
7 32 
5 14 

■ 2 75 

2 13 
53 52 
56 00 

51 58 
42 50 

33 75 
20 00 

17 50 
15 00 
12 50 

5 85 
214 19 

99 90 
45 29 
40 00 
40 00 
28 75 
20 27 

19 00 
15 00 

6 25 

5 92 

3 00 
1 00 

42 97 
31 25 
30 00 
12 48 

6 75 

4 75 

52 48 
22 50 
10 29 



,000 00 82,000 00 



11 



LIBRARY FUND. 



1896. 

Oct. 31 .... To warrant to J. H. Bogart, Treasurer 

Oct. 31 .... By amounts paid out as per vouchers herewith 

filed, viz.: 

Oct. 31 .... Bowen-Merrill Co 

Oct. 31 .... Bowen-Merrill Co 

Oct. 31 .... The Allison-EnosCo 

Oct. 31 ... . Baker & Thornton 

Oct. 31 .... A. H. Graham 

Oct. 31 .... George F.Bas 



8300 00 



Dr. 


Cr. 


8300 00 






8108 34 




76 14 




57 50 




31 00 




15 16 




11 86 



8300 00 



MAINTENANCE FUND. 



1895. 
Dec. 3. 

1896. 
Jan . 3 . 
Feb. 1. 
Mar^h 2 . 
April 1 
May 1 . 
June 1 
Julyl 
Aug.l 
Sept.l 
Oct. 1 . 
Oct. 31 



To amount received of Treasurer of State 



To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State 
To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State 
To amount received of Treasurer of State 
To amount received of Treasurer of State . 
To amount received of Treasurer of State 
To amount received of Treasurer of State 
By disbursements as per vouchers herewith filed 



Dr. 


$9,571 60 


9,674 45 


7,804 18 


6,817 68 


8,318 63 


7,700 16 


5,996 73 


7,66S 26 


5,597 58 


4,103 21 


9,166 10 


7,581 42 


89,000 00 



Cr. 



89,000 00 
89,000 00 



J. H. BOGART, 

Treasurer. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT^ 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees: 

In compliance with your requirement, I have the honor to 
submit the Eighteenth Annual Report of the Indiana Soldiers' 
and Sailors' Orphans' Home for the year ending October 31, 
1896. 

The year throughout has been one of prosperity. After a 
careful review of the work accomplished in the education of 
these children, the good health that has prevailed, and the 
happy escape from any casualty to life or property, we must 
acknowledge our debt of gratitude to the Giver of all good. 

POPULATION. 

The following tabular statement exhibits the present enroll- 
ment, and the changes that have occurred during the year 
beginning November 1, 1895, and ending October 31, 1896: 

Boys. 

Number present November 1, 1895 378 

Number admitted during the year 64 

Total 442 

Discharged at age limit 43 

Discharged upon request of friends 17 

Discharged on account continued absence 7 

Number indentured 2 

Sent to Plainfield 3 

Died 2 

Total 74 

Total enrolled October 31, 1896 368 



Girls. 


Total. 


258 


636 


46 


110 


304 


746 


25 


68 


13 


30 




7 


7 


9 




3 


4 


a 


49 


123 


255 


62a 



14 

The enrollment is somewhat smaller at this date than usual 
for the reason that during the past two months (September 
and October) applicants now on file and waiting for admission 
have not been called in to take the place of children discharged 
during these months. As is well known, diphtheria in very 
malignant form prevails at this time in every quarter of the 
State. Fearing the introduction of it here, where its ravages 
would be so hard to control, we have deferred calling in any 
to fill vacancies until the dread disease abates. 

HEALTH. 

^e have had no reason to complain during the year in the 
matter of health. While our mortality list exceeds the number 
of the year before, the deaths, except in one case, were due to 
consumption. In the months of February and March a light 
form of scarlet fever or scarlatina prevailed, but it was success- 
fully controlled by our physician and the hospital attendants, 
and left us without serious results. 

The closest attention has been constantly given to the sani- 
tary condition of all the buildings and their ventilation, to 
drainage, proper care of grounds and driveways, sewerage, etc. 
We have been richly rewarded in seeing the children bright 
and happy and in the enjoyment of vigorous health. 

I can not speak too highly of the care exercised by Dr. Hol- 
loway, our physician, in his responsible duties; of Mrs. Forbes, 
the hospital matron, in her care of the sick and the manage- 
ment of that department. For the details of the health condi- 
tions, I respectfully refer you to the report of the physician. 

THE HOME SCHOOLS. 

To educate, in the broadest sense, the children placed here 
as the wards of the State is justly the prime purpose of this 
institution. That poverty and ignorance lead to crime is indis- 
putable. It is therefore the highest type of economy and an 
exhibition of truest wisdom for any State to provide for its 
destitute children and furnish them the opportunity of instruc- 
tion. Our great State has dealt bountifully with these chil- 
dren in this regard. A handsome and well furnished school 
building of fourteen rooms, capable of seating all the children 



15 

the Home can accommodate, occupies a central place. The 
regular school work of the year just closed has been very suc- 
cessful. We were quite fortunate in the selection of teachers 
for the different grades. They were not only well qualified 
for the work, but were painstaking and industrious in the dis- 
charge of duty. In this connection it is becoming to an- 
nounce in the annual report the death of Miss Mary W. Hitt, 
teacher of the second grade. Her sudden death from heart 
disease occurred on March 6. Bright and happy socially, 
earnest in her work, desirous to help others, her death brought 
sorrow to all hearts. The vacancy in the corps of teachers 
was filled by Miss Stella Reed. Details of the year's work in 
the schools, with the course of study, will be found in another 
place and need not be presented here. 

The educational report would be incomplete without men- 
tion of the moral and religious development of the children. 
Every eflFort to promote the better emotions of the child is put 
forth. Religious services are held regularly, to which all are 
encouraged to come. The meetings of the Christian Endeavor 
societies, organized two years ago, are very generally attended, 
and the results have been marked by great improvement in the 
daily deportment of the children. Enjoying the State's gen- 
erous provisions, and surrounded by such benign influences, 
we may confidently predict that a great number at least of 
these children will prepare to meet manfully the trials of life 
and to fulfill the duty of intelligent citizens. 

LIBRARY. 

Our library now contains 1,330 volumes of miscellaneous 
books, selected with all possible care to interest and instruct 
the readers. The appropriation, three hundred dollars, has en- 
abled us to considerably overcome the wear from use of the 
books and periodicals, and to build up the library. The read- 
ing-room is accessible to employes and to children who are old 
enough to enjoy and appreciate reading. In addition to the 
miscellaneous books the library is supplied with books of ref- 
erence, periodical literature, daily, weekly and monthly papers. 
The room is open every day. 



16 



THE INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENTS. 



The work in the different departments of the Home has 
been set forth from month to month in the brief reports of the 
respective foremen. The food producing departments, the 
farm and garden, have had a successful season. The crops 
have been above the average. The draining of the new land, 
begun last year, was finished this spring, and there is now 
scarcely a square yard of the arable land of the Home farm 
that is not productive. Some portions yet need fertilizing, 
ivhich is being done from time to time. 

The boys who assist in producing and gathering the crop 
are taught by the foremen in all the details of the work, and 
are thus prepared to become useful men in this very important 
industry. 

In all the remaining industrial branches, the work has been 
carried on in the nature of a school, and the instruction given 
by the foremen has served the double purpose of educating 
the pupil and serving the Home at the same time. That the 
instruction is thorough, and gives the pupil the requisite quali- 
fication for carrying on the work alone after leaving the Home, 
the great number of our boys and girls in printing offices, shoe 
shops, bakeries, engine rooms, sewing rooms, greenhouses, and 
in offices requiring stenographers and typewriters, must attest. 
They are found in all parts of the State. In addition to the 
course of instruction in cooking the girls are taught the 
various duties of housekeeping, mending, setting and serving 
tables, etc., work with which they should be familiar. 

Children are assigned to these industrial pursuits upon the 
decided preference of the pupil himself, his fitness and taste 
being duly considered by the Superintendent. The following 
table presents the number of children in each industrial de- 
partment : 

Boys. Girls. 

Farming 3 

Gardening 10 

Floriculture 16 

Printing 30 

Carpentry 6 

Engineering 11 



17 

Boys. Girls. 

Baking 16 

Shoemaking 14 

Tailoring 2 13 

Sewing 32 

Cooking 17 

Stenography and Typewriting 15 14 



Total number in trades 123 76 



199 



BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

For the information of the general reader, I herewith present 
the principal buildings of the Home and the dimensions of 
each : 

Main building, frontage 152 feet, and a width of 64 feet; 
two wings (north), 89 by 43 feet; (south) 100 by 45 feet — all 
three stories high. 

School building, 105 by 113 feet. 

Dining-room and W. R. C. Hall, 141 by 75 feet; two stories. 

Six cottages for boys, each 67 by 58 feet ; two stories. 

Industrial building, 100 by 78 feet ; two stories. 

Laundry and bakery, 80 by 68 feet, two stories. 

Storeroom, 43 by 43 feet, one story. 

Hospital, 85 by 85 feet, two stories. 

Lincoln Hall, 96 by 77 feet. 

Power house, 70 by 50 feet. 

These buildings are all of brick, with slate roofs, mainly 
heated by steam and lighted with electricity. Most of the pri- 
vate rooms are furnished with hot and cold water, as are also 
the bath-rooms. To keep the buildings in perfect condition, 
and make repairs incident to natural wear, to hail and wind 
storms, to unavoidable accident and thoughtless acts of chil- 
dren, is a constant drain upon our repair fund. In many cases 
we are compelled to repair so cheaply that it can only be called 
a temporary patching. Work of that kind soon needs atten- 
tion again. It is economy to take best possible care of build- 
ings and all other property in time. The present appropriation 
for repairs is not adequate to keep roofs, gutters, doors, break- 
age of glass, electric light plant, heating apparatus, streets, 
2— S. AND S. O. Home. 



18 

curbing, sewerage, etc., in perfect order. There is much paint- 
ing that now needs to be done ; our boiler-house must be re- 
covered ; some of our pumps which have been in constant use 
for several years need overhauling, and much graveling of 
streets must be done soon. A small room, built by our car- 
penter and his force of boys, was lately added to the laundry. 
In it was placed the iron heater. By this means the volume of 
heat was taken out of the ironing-room. This proved a great 
relief to the women and girls of that department. A small 
room was also built back of the wash-room and adjoining, in 
which is now stored the barrels of soap. This gave much- 
needed additional space in the wash-house. 

The work of regraveling our streets has been begun and car- 
ried on from time to time as rapidly as our teams could be 
spared from the farm work. 

The frame cottage occupied by our engineer as a family resi- 
dence was moved from the garden grounds to its present place, 
thoroughly repaired, and set upon a brick foundation. By this 
we gained considerable garden ground, saved the building from 
further injury, and made its occupants comfortable. 

The wood floors of our store-room were so worn out as to 
necessitate repairs. They were replaced with cement, and we 
now have a building which is fire-proof, and in which it is dif- 
ficult for rats or mice to find way. 



OUR NATURAL GAS PLANT. 

The Home has eight gas wells at this time. Our gas supply 
during the last winter was somewhat diminished by the ac- 
cumulation of water in several of our wells. During the 
month of July we placed a siphon in each well thus affected, 
and have greatly improved the flow of gas by removing the 
water as fast as it collects. We hope the improvement will 
continue to overcome the difliculty. To guard against a short- 
age in fuel, we drilled four gas wells during the year. These 
fully supply the loss from three wells which have failed. 



19 



POWER, LIGHT AND HEATING. 



For your information I present herewith a detailed statement 
made from a careful survey by Mr. Caseley, our engineer, of the 
present condition of this department. We have four boilers — 
two of the Babcock & Wilcox water-tube safety of 120 horse- 
power each and two tubular boilers, each 100 horse-power, 
making a total of 400 horse-power. They are sufficient to fur- 
nish power for our machinery and steam-heating apparatus. 
Our engine is a 14x20 automatic cut-off Atlas, rated at 93 horse- 
power. It gives good satisfaction. Oar dynamo is of Thomson- 
Houston make, a continuous current machine, 110 volts. We 
have 563 indoor-lamps 16 candle-power, 3 outdoor-lamps each 
300 candle-power. The dynamo is not equal to this demand. 
When we use the chapel-lamps we are compelled to cut out the 
division-rooms and outdoor-lamps to lighten its load. 



OUR VISITORS. 

The past year has been noted in the history of the Home for 
kind calls of friends of the school from all parts of the State. 
They came in answer to a deep interest in the education of 
these children and to satisfy themselves as to the extent and 
condition of the Home. The Boards of Visitors of the G. A. R., 
W. R. C, and Sons of Veterans have given in the reports to 
their respective organizations the most gratifying declarations 
of their approval. These bodies remembered the children at the 
holidays by sending and distributing to every child in the Home 
suitable and pleasing presents. This custom was bountifully 
observed on the last Christmas. A very touching and unex- 
pected gift to augment the fund for presents came from the old 
soldiers in the National Military Home at Marion. These kindly 
remembrances at that happy season of the year made it an oc- 
casion of gladness that will be cherished by these children so 
long as life shall last. 



20 



CONCLUSION. 



In closing the report I desire to express my gratitude to all 
who have labored here with me during the past year in caring 
for these children. A spirit of patriotism is manifest in all 
their labors, and I feel sure that a great majority of those who 
perform any part in the education of the youth under their care 
are impelled by charity that is born of strong desire to help 
others. 

I remember with much pleasure the unchanging kindness of 
each member of your Board throughout the year. Your meet- 
ings from month to month have been like resting places to me 
when responsibilities and lesser cares weighed heavily. Ex- 
pressing my grateful appreciation, I respectfully submit this 

report. 

A. H. GRAHAM, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE FINANCIAL OFFICER. 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the Indiana Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Orphans' Home: 

I have the honor to submit to you the following report of 
the receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year ending 
October 31, 1896. 

CHARLES 0. KIXON. 

Financial Officer. 



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25 
MONTHLY EXPENDITURES FOR MAINTENANCE. 



NOVEMBER. 
1895. 

For Support |2,457 58 

Furnishing 222 84 

Clothing 1,354 41 

Fuel and light 1,905 35 

Farm and garden 446 30 

Employes 2,180 50 

Contingent 91 75 

School 280 48 

Office 70 25 

Laundrj 141 43 

Hospital 62 02 

Transportation 53 09 

Repairs 293 28 

Greenhouse 10 37 

Printing office 2 00 



Total $9,571 60 

DECEMBER. 



1895. 

For Support 

Furnishing 

Clothing..,.. 

Fuel and light ... 
Farm and garden 

Employes 

Contingent 

School 

Office 

Laundry 

Hospital 

Transportation ... 

Repairs 

Greenhouse 

Printing office 

Officers' salaries .. 



$3,619 00 


516 


15 


654 


35 


915 


94 


178 


95 


2,182 


35 


60 


00 


103 


79 


106 


97 


98 


43 


78 


96 


32 


05 


128 


94 


57 


85 


40 


72 


900 


00 



Total 19,674 45 



26 



JANUARY. 

1896. ' 

For Support $3,377 46 

Furnishing 170 24 

ClotMng 276 20 

Fuel and light 818 49 

Farm and garden 256 49 

Employes 2,187 85 

Contingent 47 32 

School 265 14 

Office 78 85 

Hospital 72 04 

Transportation 14 71 

Repairs 177 54 

Grreenhouse 52 35 

Printing office 10 00 

Total $7,804 18 



FEBRUARY. 

1896. 

ForSupport $2,575 24 

Furnishing.. 241 91 

Clothing 639 17 

Fuel and light 122 93 

Farm and garden 850 29 

Employes 2,179 19 

Contingent 816 15 

School 92 47 

Laundry 65 71 

Hospital 102 86 

Transportation 28 78 

Repairs 77 47 

Greenhouse 8 00 

Printing office 22 51 

Total $6,817 68 



27 



MARCH. 

1896. 

For Support 

FurnishiDg 

Clothing 

Fuel and light 

Farm and garden 

Employes 

Contingent 

School 

Office ..,,..,... 

Laundry 

Hospital 

Transportation 

Repairs 

Greenhouse 

Printing office 

Officers' salaries 



$2,963 


33 


53 


30 


1,097 


54 


64 


42 


211 


97 


2,189 


58 


151 


00 


56 


81 


42 


00 


143 


43 


46 


45 


43 


72 


258 


72 


7 


11 


89 


25 


900 


00 



Total $8,318 63 



APRIL. 

1896. 

For Support $3,279 93 

Furnishing 428 26 

Clothing 940 89 

Fuel and light '.. 10 07 

Farm and garden 351 24 

Employes 2,173 81 

Contingent ■ 6 75 

School 60 09 

Office 57 00 

Laundrj 116 45 

Hospital 96 44 

Transportation 29 68 

Repairs 136 65 

Greenhouse 5 20 

Printing offic 7 70 

Total $7,700 1 6 



28 



MAT. 

1896. 

For Support $1,957 15 

Furnishing 42 60 

Clothing 1,041 96 

Fuel and light 15 00 

Farm and garden 126 88 

Employes 2,179 45 

Contingent 76 37 

School 10 97 

Office 46 25 

Laundry Ill 55 

Hospital 73 94 

Transportation 11 14 

Repairs 278 29 

Greenhouse 6 88 

Printing office 18 30 

Total $5,996 78 



JUNE. 

1896. 

ForSupport $2,320 10 

Furnishing 413 33 

Clothing 685 25 

Fuel and light 35 59 

Farm and garden 370 06 

Employes 2,156 43 

Contingent 532 00 

School 33 95 

Office 40 25 

Laundry 85 00 

Hospital 50 84 

Transportation 31 01 

Greenhouse 14 45 

Officers' salaries 900 00 

Total $7,668 26 



29 



JULY. 

1896. 



ForSupport $1,698 22 

Furnishing 160 08 

Clothing 1,035 53 

Fuel and light 455 44 

Farm and garden 239 02 

Employes 1,539 51 

Contingent 188 20 

School 19 80 

Office 28 33 

Laundry 99 50 

Hospital 32 35 

Transportation 35 70 

Kepairs 35 00 

Greenhouse 26 40 

Printing office 4 50 

Total $5,597 58 



\ 



AUGUST. 

1896. 

For Support $1,611 00 

Furnishing 104 01 

Clothing 327 10 

Fuel and light 20 39 

Farm and garden 90 40 

Employes 1,628 58 

Contingent 135 00 

School 17 80 

Office 35 60 

Hospital 72 34 

Transportation 54 94 

Greenhouse 2 00 

Printing office 4 05 

Total $4,103 21 



30 



SEPTEMBEE. 
1896. 

For Support $3,068 57 

Furnishing 246 16 

Clothing 1,635 48 

Fuel and light 95 85 

Farm and garden 389 42 

EmployeP 2,175 35 

Contingent 131 96 

School 264 60 

Office 87 77 

Laundrj 20 53 

Hospital 41 25 

Transportation 29 03 

Repairs 52 19 

Greenhouse 24 34 

Printing office 3 60 

Officers' salaries 900 00 



Total . $9,166 10 



OCTUBEK. 

1896. 

For Support 

Furnishing 

Clothing 

Fuel and light 

Farm and garden 

Employes 

Contingeni 

School 

Office 

Hospital 

Transportation 

Repairs 

Greenhouse 

Printing office 



^Ci 



$3,199 


61 


205 


96 


726 


95 


675 


43 


93 


03 


2,158 


25 


153 


75 


36 


90 


49 


24 


107 


41 


14 


73 


74 


76 


57 


f)0 


27 


90 



Total $7,581 42 



31 

Disbursements during the months, as shown by vouchers on 
"file with the Auditor of State, and numbered from 1 to 935, 
inclusive : 

1895. 

November 

December 

1896. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 



Total .. 



$9,571 


60 


9,674 


45 


7,804 


18 


6,817 


68 


8,318 


63 


7,700 


16 


5,996 


73 


7,668 


26 


5,597 


58 


4,103 


21 


9,166 


10 


7,581 


42 


$90,000 


00 



RECAPITULATION. 

For Support $32,127 14 

Furnishing 

Clothing 

Fuel and light 

Farm and garden 

Employes 

Contingent 

Schools 

Office 

Laundry 

Hospital : 

Transportation . . 

Repairs 

Greenhouse 

Printing office 

Officers' salaries 

Total $90,000 00 



2,804 


84 


10,414 


83 


5,134 


90 


3,104 


05 


24,930 


35 


1,890 


25 


1,242 


80 


642 


51 


882 


03 


836 


90 


373 


58 


1,512 


84 


272 


45 


230 


53 


3,600 


00 



32 



SUMMARY. 



Received from Treasurer of Board 190,000 00 

Disbursements 90,000 00 

Total 190,000 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. 0. NIXON, 

Financial Officer. 



MATRON^S REPORT, 



To A. H. Graham, Superintendent 

Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home: 

I herewith submit my report for the part of the year I have 
served as Matron : 

Mrs. Woods, our estimable Matron, left the work, on January 
1, 1896, in as near a perfect condition as possible, and it has 
been my earnest endeavor to keep the different branches of the 
work up to this high standard. 

If there is one predominating object to be attained in the 
general housework of the Home, it is cleanliness. In my weekly 
inspection visits to division rooms, dormitories, bath-rooms and 
closets, I have found no reason for criticism in this regard. 

The different dining rooms are well managed and kept in a 
cleanly, attractive condition. Due regard is paid in the chil- 
dren's dining-room to teaching the children table etiquette. 

An abundance of well-cooked food has been prepared in the 
kitchens. 

I feel that all departments are trying to be as economic, 
possible. 

The responsibility of the children's moral training is felt by 
all who have personal oversight of them. The Senior, Inter- 
mediate and Junior Endeavor Societies are doing good work, 
and more than half of the children enrolled are workers in one 
of these societies. This work is not compulsory. 

The general deportment of the children has been good. 

An unusual amount of work has been done in the sewing 
and tailoring departments. Last June saw the largest number 
of age-limit discharges in the history of the Home. This ne- 
cessitated additional work in making outfits in both these de- 
partments. The children learning these trades are doing well 
and like their chosen trades. 
3— S. AND S. O. Home. 



34 

The laundry work this year has been very satisfactory, both 
as to promptness and quality of work done. 

The cooking- school is full to overflowing with bright, inter- 
esting girls, who are fully convinced that we may exist without a 
great many things, but not " without cooks." 

The general health of the children can not well help being 
good, with the regular bathing, hours of sleep, exercise and 
regular, well- cooked meals they are constantly receiving. 

I am greatly indebted to all the employes for cheerful, con- 
scientious effort to please. They have been the means of mak- 
ing my duties pleasant to me, for which I am truly grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MRS. N. T. GRAHAM, 

Matron. 



PHYSICIAN^S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent and Board of IVustees of the 

Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home: 

In comparing the health record of the past year with those 
of former years, I find that we have had less acute illness among 
the children of the Home than for several of the preceding 
years. 

We have had a marked increase of those disorders due to 
malarial influences, but those conditions have also prevailed in 
the surrounding country. We have had to deal with a greater 
number of those children who have come to us bearing the 
evidences of hereditary taints than is usual and the mortality 
record shows that the large per cent, of deaths was due to 
these causes. 

While we have cared for all those suffering from acute 
troubles in the hospital we have also arranged during the past 
year to take care of the crippled and deformed children in that 
building, thus giving them better care as to diet and their gen- 
eral health and allowing them greater liberties regarding their 
coming and going than they could possibly have under the 
rules and regulations necessary in the division rooms. The 
large roomy veranda with which the hospital is now provided 
allows these children nearly every day in the year, sunshine, 
fresh air and exercise, without exposure or undue exertion. 

We have also made it the rule to take care of the babies and 
very small children in this building, as we can in these cases as 
in the above, guard better their diet and give them greater 
liberties than the division rooms afford. We have as a result 
less sickness among them than was noticed in previous years. 

On two different occasions during the past year we were 
threatened with what gave promise of being severe epidemics 
of scarlet fever and of diphtheria, but early recognition and a 



37 

vifi^orous system of quarantine prevented it. Never have we 
had so fully demonstrated the value of our quarantine system 
as during this critical time. The advance of the exposed chil- 
dren from the general ward to the suspect ward and then to 
the sick ward, if occasion required, worked to perfection, and 
resulted in the rapid stamping out of the contagion. We had, 
in all, sixteen cases of scarlet fever and three cases of diph- 
theria, all of which recovered without sequella. The benefits 
of the antitoxine treatment in diphtheria as an abortive, as well 
as a curative means, was fully demonstrated. 

The effort has been continued to maintain the almost perfect 
sanitary condition of the Home and its surroundings. The 
only two conditions which in any way menace the good health 
of the children, from a sanitary point of view, are the limited 
supply of pure water and the imperfect system of disposing of 
the sewerage. The need of a larger supply of pure water, not 
only for domestic purposes but as a protection in case of fire, is 
clearly evident, thereby doing away entirely with the necessity, 
under any circumstance, of turning the water of the lake or 
reservoir into the mains which carry the water for domestic 
uses. 

The lake of stagnated water maintained solely for fire protec- 
tion, and so often turned into the mains, is a constant source 
of danger. It should be drained and abolished. 

There should also be devised some means of emptying the 
sewerage at a greater distance from the Home grounds or de- 
stroying it in some safe and perfect manner. 

The following is the mortality record of the past year, with 
dates and causes of death : 

Retta Fair, age 13; consumption ; November 9, 1895. 

Delia Fellers, age 6; membranous croup ; January 15, 1896. 

Julius Allen; age 13; consumption; March 17, 1896. 

Marina Keemer, age 17; consumption; May 4, 1896. 

Zema McAlister, age 5; tuberculosis; June 29, 1896. 

Blaine Keemer, age 11 ; consumption ; July 12, 1896. 

To the oflicers, nurses and governesses of the Home I am 
under many obligations for the aid and assistance extended to 
me. Respectfully submitted, 

O. E. HOLLOWAY, 

Physician. 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



To Prof. A. H. Graham, Superintendent 

Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home: 

The immediate application the pupils of the Home school 
must make of the education received here, necessitates the 
instruction to be most practical. 

This characteristic of their education has been most con- 
stantly kept in view during the past year. The training in the 
industrial departments contributes much to the consummation of 
this very important feature. 

To enable the pupils to engage in the ordinary business pur- 
suits, to lay the foundation of a thoughtful, well regulated life^ 
and to stimulate them to further educate themselves, is the. 
constant effort of the school. 

The work in the special departments of music, stenography,, 
and domestic economy showed marked importance at the close 
of the school year. 

The recital of the music pupils bore evidence of thorough,, 
conscientious work in that department. 

The fact that stenography and type-writing pupils secure 
good positions upon leaving the Home is a sufficient recom- 
mendation for any department. 

The Cooking School exhibition given during commencement 
week demonstrated the fact that the girls taking the course 
are taught scientific and practical cooking. 

The school property receives good care. All necessary sup- 
plies are furnished for the school and used economically. 

A class of twenty-two pupils graduated at the close of the 
school year, 1896. The following is a list of the class and 
themes : 

Mollie Kiehl "History of the Violin." 

Lucien Husted "Get Thy Spindle and Thy Distaff 

iieady, and God will send Thee Flax."^ 
Grace Stockwell "Mary Queen of Scots." 



39 

■John Humphries " The Silver Dollar." 

Estella Heaton "The Bicycle Craze." 

Grace Kennedy " Class History." 

Margaret Ransdell "The Necessity of Observing Little 

Things." 

Delia Walters " The Love of Fame." 

Eva Gough "Echoes." 

William Austin " We Plant a Rose." 

Cora Means ," Progress of the Colored Race." 

Fanny Roll " lofluence of Music." 

Lenora Purdy '• Response." 

Bert Herbert , '• Progress of Floral Culture." 

William I^orth " A Place for Every Man." 

-Jay Moore " Which Shall It Be?" 

Frank Metsker " The Star Spangled Banner." 

John Douglas " Immortality of Influence." 

Ottabine Muckley " The Vanity of Human Grandeur." 

Agnes Gilbert .- " Our'Goverment and Cuba." 

Garfield Walker "Now and Afterward." 

The school entertainment, in which all the pupils of all ages 
and grades were represented, consisted of the beautiful cantata, 
"Queen Esther." 

A concert by the Home Band was highly satisfactory. 

An oration by a member of the class on the planting of the 
*' Class Rose," and the " Class History," were interesting fea- 
tures of the commencement week. 

The following days were observed with appropriate exercises : 
Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, George Washington's Birthday, 
and Easter Sunday. 

School reopened September 7, 1896, with an enrollment of 
607 children and sixteen teachers in charge. 

The following course of study, with but few changes, is the 
same as used last year. 

Credit is due to the corps of able and faithful teachers for the 
degree of merit the school has attained. 

With grateful acknowledgment of their earnest co-operation, 
and your assistance and encouragement, this report is 

Respectfully submitted. 

LAURA A. WACHTSTETTER, 

Principal. 



SCHOOLS. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



KINDERGARTEN. 

By means of stories and general talks and the use of the 
Froebel Gifts and Occupations are taught : 

I. Number — General. 

II. Position and Direction. . 

III. Color — Tint and shade. . , 

IV. Lines — Straight, curved, slanting. 

V. Geometrical Figures — Square, triangle (isosceles, equa- 
lateral, obtuse, right angled, scalene), cube, sphere, 
cylinder, circle, semi-circle, beauty and symmetry of 
form. 
VI. HiSTCRT — General. . 

VII. Geography — General. 

FIRST primary. 

Spelling. — Words of First Reader and Appleton's Chart, oral 
and written. 

Heading. — Appleton's Chart; First Reader completed with 
supplementary reading; drill in sight reading and diacritical 
marks. 

Writing. — On ruled slates and paper; all small and capital 
letters; copy single sentences from blackboard; analysis of 
letter. 

Numbers. — Counting of objects to 100; writing numbers to 
100 ; Roman numerals to XX ; ideas of i, i, i ; all combinations 



42 

to 12 ; measures to a gallon and a yard ; coins to a dollar ;: 
analysis to original problems ; counting by I's, 2'8, S's, 4's, 5's 
to 100. 

Language. — Description of objects ; reproduction of stories ;. 
simple forms of letter-writing; composition on general topics; 
Long's First K,eader work. 

History. — The early discoveries and settlements of our 
country. 

Drawing. — Prang's systems of forms and models. 

Music. — Blackboard models and Music Primer. 

General. — Calisthenics; talks on morals and manners; talks 
on hygiene and scientific temperance work ; description of 
plants and animals; memory gems; the cardinal and semi- 
cardinal points; the Home grounds; hills, mountains, rivers, 
lakes, etc., on sand table ; talks on formation and motion of 
the earth and general outline ; clay modeling. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Spelling. — Words of Second Reader, oral and written ; names 
of the days, weeks and months, and of the county and State;, 
diacritical marks. 

Beading. — Second Reader completed, with supplementary 
reading ; the poetry of the lesson committed to memory. 

Writing. — Reading lessons and stories written on slates ; les- 
sons on analysis of small and capital letters ; Indiana Copy- 
book, No. 1. 

Numbers. — Combinations to 30; ideas of fractional units con- 
tinued ; measures of liquids, distance and weight ; rapid addi- 
tion ; mental work ; original problems ; and Mrs. Cropsy's third- 
year work. 

Language. — Memory gems committed ; reproduction of sto- 
ries ; letter-writing. 

History. — Stories of Indians and mound builders ; early settle- 
ments; Pilgrims and Puritans. 

Geography. — County, township, with review of sand table- 
work of the first year. 

Drawing. — Prang's system of forms and models. 

Music. — Board models and Music Reader, No. 1. 

General. — Calisthenics ; talks on neatness, self-control, hy-- 
giene and scientific temperance work. 



43 



THIRD GRADE. 



Spelling. — Words selected from reading lessons, together with 
special list ; diacritical marks. 

Reading. — Third Reader completed ; reproduction of lesson, 
oral and written; attention given to reading at sight; general 
reading encouraged. 

Writing. — A lesson each day with pen and ink; analysis of 
small and capital letters taught; movement drills; Indiana 
Copy-book, No. 3. 

Numbers. — Elementary arithmetic to page 114 ; analysis of 
problems ; rapid work in fundamental principles ; supplemen- 
tary work in Mrs. Cropsy's fourth year work. 

Language. — Description of pictures and objects; letter- writ- 
ing; narrations. 

Geography. — Review of work taught in second year ; stories 
from " Seven Little Sisters ;" Indiana. 

History. — " Stories of American History," Vol. I, by Miss 
■Pratt. 

Music. — Board models and Music Reader, No. 2. 

General. — Lessons on common objects ; gems, poems, conduct ; 
talks on hygiene and scientific temperance work ; calesthenics; 
nature studies. 

FOURTH GRADE. ■ 

Spelling. — Selected words from readers, geographies and 
special lists; diacritical marks; use of dictionary taught. 

Beading. — Fourth Reader to page 116, with supplementary 
reading and choice selections committed and recited. 

Writing. — Special attention given to analysis of letters, posi- 
tion and movement; special drills on exercise paper; Indiana 
Copy Book, No. 4. 

Arithmetic. — White's Arithmetic; rapid calculations in funda- 
mental principles; L. C. M. and G. C. D.; common fractions to 
decimals. 

Geography. — Elementary to page 32 ; United States oral 
geography of Indiana, embracing location of principal cities, 
streams and routes of travel ; its productions, occupations and 
schools. 



45 

Language. — Description of objects; letter- writing and study 
of words; Mary F. Hyde's Lessons in English, Part II and III. 

History. — " Stories of American History," Vol. II, by Miss 
Pratt. 

Music. — Board Models and Music Reader No. II. 

General. — Exercises in declamations; talks on the history of 
our country, flag and forefathers; study one author and take a 
selection from his work each month; talks on hygiene and 
scientific temperance work; nature studies. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

Spelling. — Selected words ; diacritical marks and use of dic- 
tionary. 

Reading. — Fourth Reader completed ; general reading under 
the direction of the teacher. 

Writing. — Special attention given to movement drills ; Indi- 
ana Copy Book, N^o. 5. 

Arithmetic. — White's Elementary Arithmetic; review common 
fractions; begin decimals and continue to percentage. 

Geography. — Elementary completed; oral instruction and out- 
line maps of foreign countries. 

Language. — Reed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English, 
page 95; letter writing and description. 

History. — " Stories of American History," Vol. Ill, by Miss 
Pratt. 

Drawing. — Prang's system of forms and models. 

Music. — Board Models and Music Reader No. III. 

General. — Talks on home, city. State and U. S. government ; 
Lessons from " Nature Readers ; " general work from poets 
and national heroes ; talks on physiology and scientific temper- 
ance. 

SIXTH GRADE. 

Spelling. — Selected words; diacritical marks; use of dic- 
tionary. 

Reading. — Fifth Reader, part I; general reading under direc- 
tion of teacher. 

Writing. — Analysis of letters ; position and movement exer- 
cises observed ; Indiana Copy Book, No. 6. 



46 

Arithmetic. — White's Elementary completed; White's com- 
plete to denominate numbers. 

Geography. — No. 2 completed, with supplementary work from 
library. 

Language. — Reed and Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English, 
completed : letter and sketch writing. 

History. — "Stories of American History," Vol. IV, by Miss 
Pratt. 

Music. — Board Models and Music Reader No. 4. 

General. — Talks on government; lives of heroic men and 
women of the age; Longfellow; Hawthorne; Lamb's "Tales 
of Shakespeare" and stories from general history; talks on 
hygiene and scientific temperance work. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 

Spelling. — Selected words ; diacritical marks and use of dic- 
tionary. 

Beading. — Fifth Reader, part II, and general reading under 
direction of teacher. 

Writing. — Special attention given to analysis of letters ; Ec- 
lectic Copy Book, No. 4. 

Arithmetic. — White's complete from denominate numbers to 
partial payments ; selected examples and business forms. 

Geography. — Text-book No. 2, to page 64. 

Language. — Reed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English 
to page 187 ; letter-writing. 

History. — Barnes' to Revolutionary period. 

Music. — Board models and Music Reader No. 4. 

General. — Talks on Physiology; scientific temperance work; 
morals; study of "Whittier; Bryant, Tennyson, and Lamb's 
Tales of Shakespeare. 

EIGHTH GRADE. 

Spelling. — Selected words in use by the class ; care given to 
secure correct spelling in all manuscript work ; use of diction- 
ary. 

Beading. — Poetry, biology and stories of American progress. 

Writing. — Practical writing; correct arrangements of manu- 
scripts ; Eclectic Copy Book No. 5. 



47 

Arithmetic. — The book completed and reviewed ; work from 
supplementary arithmetic. 

Language. — Reed and Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English 
completed. 

History. — United States History completed ; Declaration of 
Independence and Constitution read and discussed. 

Physiology. — Jenkins' Advanced Lessons in Human Physi- 
ology; use of manikin. 

Music. — Board models and Music Reader JSTo. 5. 

NINTH GRADE. 

Spelling. — Selected words ; use of dictionary. 

Heading. — Selections from various authors. 

Arithmetic. — Topically reviewed. 

Algebra. — Ray's Elementary throughout the year. 

Physical Geography. — During six months of the year. 

Civil Government. — Townsend's Shorter Course, throughout 
the year. 

Literature. — Review of authors of seventh and eighth grades; 
Merchant of Venice. 

Music. — Board models; G. F. Root's Repertoire with exer- 
cises; supplementary singing from Book 5; Glee and Chorus 
Book. 



MUSIC. 



PIANO. 



Grade I. Mason's Touch and Technic, Book I, Major Triads 
and one octave scales, and first grade pieces. 

Grade 11. Mason's Book I, Mathews' Book II, Major Triads 
in three positions, two octave scales and second 
grade pieces. 

Grade III. Mason's Grade I and II, Mathews' Book III, 
dominant 7th chords in all positions, slow 
arpeggios without notes, and third grade pieces. 

Grade IV. Mason's Book I, II and III, Mathews' Book IV, 
fast scales and arpeggios without notes, com- 
mon and seventh chords in all positions and 
fourth grade pieces. 



48 



Grade V. Mason's I, II, III and IV, Mathews' Book V, study 
of chords and their resolution continued and 
fifth grade pieces/ 

Grade VI. Mason's Technic IV, Mathews' Book VI, minor 
scales and minor chords studies with special 
care and sixth grade pieces. 

Grade VII, VIII, IX and X. Mathews' Studies, Mason's 
Technic with regard to the pupils' particular 
deficiencies, collateral studies, Concone, Heller, 
Kuhlan, Mohr, Czerny, Clements; pieces by 
classic and modern writers. 

VOICE DEPARTMENT. 



'Grade I. Concone's Studies with English words, Concone's 

Scales. 
Grade IL Vaccai with English words. 
Grade III. Marches!. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



HOW TO SECURE THE ADMISSION OF CHILDREN TO THE HOME. 

When it is desirous to secure the admission of a child to the 
Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home blank application 
papers may be obtained for the purpose by addressing the Su- 
perintendent. These are to be filled out in accordance with the 
instructions given and to be returned to the Superintendent. 
At the meeting of the Board of Trustees next after applications 
are received they will be submitted for approval or rejection. 
In either event official notice will be given by the Superin- 
tendent as to the action of the Board of Trustees, and if the ac- 
tion thereupon has been favorable, the date will be fixed on 
which the child may be brought to the Home. 

No fund has been provided for defraying the railroad ex- 
penses of children that have been admitted to the Home. If 
friends have not the means, aid can generally be obtained from 
the Township Trustees or the County Commissioners. 

Family relatives are allowed to visit the children once every 
six months and to remain twenty-four hours on each visit. 

Children may be taken away during vacation, but the Home 
can not bear any part of the expenses of transportation, and 
they must be returned in due time to enter school at the open- 
ing of the session. 

Whenever parents desire to take the permanent custody of 
their children application for discharge, in writing, should be 
made through the Superintendent to the Board of Trustees. 



51 



LAWS GOVERNING THE ADMISSION OF CHILDREN. 

Section 9. The Trustees and (under regulations and a form 
of application which they shall prescribe) the Superintendent 
are authorized and required to receive, as pupils of the Indiana 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home, orphans and children re- 
siding in this State, under the age of 16 years, who may be 
destitute of the means of support and education, in the follow- 
ing order : 

First. Orphans, children of deceased Union soldiers or sail- 
ors in the army or navy of the United States in the late civil 
war, said orphans not having mothers living. 

Second. Orphans, children of such deceased soldiers or sail- 
ors, said orphans having mothers living. If there be not ap- 
plications for admission of persons of said two classes sufficient 
to fill said Home, then, in like manner, there shall be admitted : 

Third. Children of permanently disabled or indigent sol- 
diers or sailors of said service, residing in this State, or in Na- 
tional Military Homes, having been admitted thereto from this 
State. 

All children admitted to said Home, as pupils thereof, shall 
be supported and educated therein until they shall be 16 years 
of age, unless for good cause sooner discharged. Any of said 
pupils who, by reason of physical disability or other cause, may 
be, in the judgment of said Board, unable to earn a livelihood, 
shall be retained as pupils of said home until they shall be 18 
years of age. 

Sec. 10. Each county in this State shall be entitled to have 
in said Home a number of pupils proportionate to the number 
of soldiers furnished by it to the Union service in said war, 
which proportionate number shall be fixed by said Board 
according to the capacity of said Home. Applicants from a 
county already having its full quota in said Home shall be ad- 
mitted, if the Home shall not be filled at the time of making 
application ; but in the admission of applicants, when all ap- 
plying can not be accommodated, preference shall be given to 
those from counties not then having in the Home as many 
pupils in proportion to their quotas, as fixed by said Board, as 
other counties from which applications may be pending shall 
have therein. 



52 



RULES GOVERNING THE HOME. 



For the information of the public and those personally inter- 
ested the rules governing- the Home are here inserted: 

1. All employes are under the supervision of the Superin- 
tendent, and must give implicit obedience to his orders. 

2. In the absence of the Superintendent the Financial Offi- 
cer will be in full charge and obedience to his orders is re- 
quired. 

3. The Superintendent is responsible for the proper use, care 
and disposition of the property belonging to the Home, and for 
the due administration of its affairs, but the hearty co-opera- 
tion of all officers and employes is expected, and a ready and 
cheerful compliance with all orders and regulations is required. 

4. No one will be knowingly employed or continued in ser- 
vice who does not possess the necessary qualifications or fitness 
for the particular duties to be performed. 

5. Cordiality of feeling among the employes is the basis of 
co-operation, hence no one will be continued in service who 
can not heartily unite with all for the good of all. 

6. Any fact prejudicial to the moral character or standing 
of any officer or employe coming to the knowledge of another 
should at once be communicated to the Superintendent, but 
espionage, tattling and tale-bearing are forbidden. 

7. Governesses, teachers and heads of departments must 
acquaint all under their charge with the rules and regulations 
of the institution, and will be held accountable for the efficient 
and faithful performance of the duty that devolves upon them 
respectively. 

8. 1^0 case of discipline must be referred to the Superin- 
tendent unless beyond the control of the governess. Corporal 
punishment may be administered when other remedies have 
failed, but excessive punishment is not to be inflicted at any 
time. Children deprived of their play hours as a penalty shall 
be entitled to the liberties of the other children on all interven- 
ing holidays and Sundays. 



53 

9. It shall be the dutj of every officer and employe to re- 
port to the governess of the child any misdemeanor or irregu- 
larity of conduct coming to their knowledge, and such informa- 
tion must be received and given in a spirit of kindness, and 
with a view to the best interests of the institution. 

10. Under no circumstances will an employe be allowed to 
apply to the children any language or epithet calculated to irri- 
tate, humiliate, or degrade them. No rough expressions or 
slang phrases must be employed; but, on the other hand, a cor- 
rect and discreet use of language in the presence of the children 
must be observed. 

11. The heads of each department shall see that the indus- 
try conducted by him is taught and practiced in a thorough 
and comprehensive manner, so that each pupil shall obtain, as 
far as possible, a practical knowledge of the same in all its 
parts. He shall be at his post of duty at the beginning of busi- 
ness hours, preserve good order among his pupils, and secure 
close and constant application to the work in which they are 
engaged. 

12. Smoking upon the grounds or in the presence of the 
children by employes is strictly forbidden. 

13. Heads of departments and governesses shall return to 
the storekeeper remnants of articles broken or worn out by use, 
as vouchers. 

14. Employesareexpected to attend Sunday services. Habi - 
ual neglect of this duty will be regarded as a lack of proper 
interest in the religious training of children under their care. 

15. Leave of absence will be granted by the Superintendent 
or Financial Officer when the Superintendent is not present. 

16. In urgent cases relief from duty will be granted. 

17. In case of severe illness, or death of relatives or friends^ 
reasonable leave of absence will be granted. 

18. In case of absence on the part of an employe, a substi- 
tute satisfactory to the Superintendent must be provided. 

HOURS. 

19. All persons residing in the institution are expected to 
be in their rooms by 10 p. m., at which hour the building will 
ordinarily be closed. 

20. Lights in private rooms, dormitories and division rooms 
must be extinguished at 10 p. m., except by special permission. 



54 

21. Ladies may receive gentlemen in the public parlor, 
which will be open to public use until 10 p. m. Except in the 
€ase of relatives, ladies will not entertain gentlemen in their 
private or division rooms. When ladies are appraised of the 
coming of gentlemen, the Superintendent or Matron must be 
informed and consent obtained. 

22. Willful violation of the foregoing rules will subject the 
offender to a forfeiture of position. 

VISITORS 

23. Are heartily welcome, and all employes are required to 
«how every possible courtesy to all persons who may wish to 
pass through the various buildings and about the "grounds of 
the institution. 

24. Visitors are not allowed to go through the buildings 
without an attendant. 

25. The buildings will be open to visitors every day in the 
week except Sunday. 



f*' -(A 




^t*'-- 




HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE INDIANA SOL- 
DIERS^ AND SAILORS^ ORPHANS^ HOME. 



The site of this institution was known for many years before 
the war as the "Knightstown Springs," and was visited as a 
health resort by many. The spot dow known as Spring Valley 
was dotted with tents during the summer months, and the oc- 
cupants made a business of drinking the water, bathing in it 
and believing themselves greatly benefited. Bath houses were 
finally erected, and so well were these patronized that a Mr. 
Aaron Aldrich built a hotel on the west of the road and directly 
above the larger springs. This afforded new and substantial 
conveniences for health seekers, and the place soon began to 
enjoy a general reputation. 

But greater and grander history than all this could make 
was destined to be written of the "Knightstown Springs." 
The fame the place then boasted only served to attract the pub- 
lic attention when its healthful location and its springs of pure 
water were wanted for a higher and nobler purpose. 

Early in the summer of 1865 a meeting was called in the 
office of Governor Oliver P. Morton to devise ways and means 
to establish a State Soldiers' Home. About fifty gentlemen 
responded to the call. At the suggestion of the Governor, a 
Board of Directors was appointed and incorporated with this 
end in view. At first the city hospital building at Indian- 
apolis was used, but early in 1866 the "Knightstown Springs," 
with fifty- four acres of ground, including the aforesaid hotel 
and several other buildings, was purchased as a Soldiers' Home. 
The money to effect this purchase ($8,500) was raised by pri- 
vate gifts, and many patriotic hearts went in all parts of the 
State asking for donations. Among these persons may be 
mentioned Rev. Armstrong, Captain Atkinson, and Chaplain 
John Hogarth Lozier, who is sometimes spoken of as the 
"financial father" of the Home. 



57 

The Directors soon found they could not rely upon volun- 
tary contributions to meet all the necessary expenses, and the 
property passed into the hands of the State, and was placed 
under officers appointed by the Legislature. 

On the Ist day of March, 1867, the Home for Disabled Sol- 
diers became one of the institutions of the State, for the main- 
tenance not only of sick and disabled soldiers and seamen, but 
also of their widows and orphans. It was formally opened 
June 15, 1867. 

Now to return to the meeting in the Grovernor's office in 
1865. One of the patriots attending that meeting was George 
Merritt, now of Indianapolis, He stood as the first advocate 
of a home for soldiers' orphans. Before any decision was 
reached he addressed the meeting in behalf of the orphans of 
the soldiers who had given their lives for their country. He 
related to the meeting some of his experiences during the war, 
in hospitals and on the battlefields where it was his privilege 
and duty to care for the wounded and dying. He pictured to 
them the one unsatisfied and overmastering anxiety of the 
dying soldier for his children when he was gone. He declared 
to the meeting that he had always given tne assurance, in such 
cases, that thee ountry would provide for their children, and to 
make good that pledge he ofi"ered, if the meeting would include 
the soldiers' orphans in their scheme, to give five thousand 
($5,000) dollars for their benefit. 

After a long discussion it was decided by a majority vote 
that to combine the two would be so great an undertaking as 
to endanger the success of the enterprise, and that it was best 
to undertake first the Soldiers' Home. 

This decision left Mr. Merritt free to fulfill, at least, his share 
of the country's obligation and his promises. His wish was 
that the orphans might be divided into families of ten, that 
were to be given to one woman, to whom a fixed monthly al- 
lowance should be given in money, to be expended as, in her 
judgment, would best promote the welfare of the children. He 
expected to find these foster mothers among the soldiers' wid- 
ows and maiden ladies whom the war had left alone, and thus 
he thought to provide, in a measure, for both classes. 

In Miss Susan Fussell he found a woman well qualified and 
willing to undertake the care of ten orphans in the manner in- 
dicated. On the 24th day of November, 1865, she commenced 



58 

her work ia two rooms in the Military Hospital at Indianapo- 
lis, with four soldiers' orphans, taken from the Orphans' Asylum 
of that city. In a short time she had the full number (ten), 
from different parts of the State, all without friends to care for 
them. In April, 1866, Miss Fussell moved to the Knightstown 
Springs, and, with her little family, occupied the little cottage 
on the hill on the east side of the road, and here we find the 
first Soldiers' Orphans' Home at this place, while the Soldiers' 
Home had just been located, by private enterprise, in the hotel 
on the opposite side of the road. 

When the State assumed control of the Home, in March, 
1867, the Legislature appointed Henry B. Hill, Charles S. Hub- 
bard and William Hannaman Trustees, and the following classes 
were admitted to the Home: 

1. Totally disabled soldiers and seamen. 

2. Partially disabled soldiers and seamen. 

3. Orphans, under fifteen years of age, of deceased soldiers 
(neither father nor mother living). 

4. Orphans of the same class whose mothers are living. 

5. Widows of deceased soldiers. 

The Trustees appointed Dr. M. M. Wishard, long identified 
with this Home, the first Superintendent. Here, however. 
Miss Fussell lived for ten years with her charge of ten orphans, 
independent of the State Home, except that they attended the 
schools established by the State. They maintained a separate 
family life, wherein they so nearly forgot that they were 
orphans that they often spoke of the others as "the orphans." 
Miss Fussell has passed over the river to her rest and reward, 
but she lived long enough to see most of her children happily 
married and in homes of their own, all blessing her for the 
care and helpful influence she had exerted ou their young 
lives, 

Mr. Merritt, who is reliable authority for these statements, 
bears witness ''to the faithfulness and unselfishness of that 
noble band of men and women who during the time he was an 
observer of the work, had charge of the Soldiers' Orphans' 
Home." In a short time the number of admissions was so 
great that more room was required, and five acres of ground 
east of the road and directly opposite the Hotel Home, were 
purchased and a new building erected thereon at a cost of fifty- 
six thousand dollars ($56,000). To this new building the old 



59 

soldiers were transferred, and the children were left in the 
hotel. 

In 1870, however, the children so far outnumbered the old 
soldiers that they exchanged quarters, the children taking the 
new Honae and the soldiers returning to the hotel. 

Early on Christmas morning, 1871, the old hotel was burned, 
and soon thereafter the soldiers were removed to the National 
Military Home at Dayton, Ohio. This left the orphans in full 
possession of the Home, until, in 1879, an asylum for the 
feeble-minded children was attached to the institution. This 
continued until the Legislature of 1887 separated them, send- 
ing the feeble-minded (May 17) to Richmond, leaving the 
orphans sole possessors of the ground again, which arrange- 
ment still continues. 

The Orphans' Home has been twice burned. First, on the 
8th of September, 1877, at about eleven o'clock p. m.. the build- 
ing was discovered to be on fire. Although nearly all were 
sleeping soundly when the alarm was given, those in charge 
gave themselves so energetically to the work of saving the 
children that no one was lost. With commendable zeal the 
Trustees began to build at once, so that in September, 1878,. 
the new building was again occupied. The second fire occurred 
on July 21, 1886, at two p. m. There was no loss of life, but 
the building and most of its contents were consumed. Tempo- 
rary shelter was immediately provided for the children, making 
them as comfortable as possible under the circumstances. In 
September, the Trustees rented the Valley House in Knights- 
town, and the soldiers' orphans were removed there, while the 
feeble-minded children were assigned temporarily to the framfr 
school building upon the Home grounds. 

The contract for rebuilding was let at once, and with char- 
acteristic promptness the Trustees pushed the work to com- 
pletion. 

The corner-stone was laid on the 17th day of November,^ 
1886, and June 28, 1887, the south wing was completed and 
occupied. The remaining part of the administration building 
was oecupied as rapidly as the halls and rooms were completed. 

The new school building was completed in January, and on 
the 6th day of February, 1888, the children took possession. 
The present industrial building was erected in the year 1888. 
The three cottages on the east side of " Cottage Park" were 



61 

built in the year 1889, and the three on the south side were 
added in the year 1891. 

Lincoln Hall was begun in October, 1891. The corner- 
stone was laid on November 3d of the same year, and it was 
dedicated June 23, 1892. 

The following purchases of land for the use of the Home 
have been made, and together constitute the Home farm : 

Acres. 

March 1, 1867 5i 

,1869 5 

April 20, 1887 (Murray estate) 75 

April, 1895 (Morris estate) 80 

April, 1895 (Eamsey estate) 36 

Total Home farm 247 

The following are the names of Superintendents who have 
had charge of the Home from its beginning : 

Term. Began. Term ijncUd. 

M. M. Wishard bept. — , 1865. Feb. 14, 1877. 

Eev.R.F.BrewingtoD (acting).. Feb. 14,1877. Nov. 11, 1&77. 

W. B. McGavern,M. D .....Nov. 1,1877. May 29, 1879. 

John Hunt, M. D xVlay 29, 1879. Nov. 1, 1879. 

B.F. Ibach Nov. 1,1879. April 1, 1881. 

J. W. White, D. D. S April 1, 1881. May 1,1885. 

Rev. T. M. Smith May 1,1885. Aug. 5,1885. 

Eev. A. H. Morris Aug. 5,1895. Marchl, 1890. 

Rev. J, W. Harris Marchl, 1890. June 11, 1891. 

H. H. Woods (acting) June 11, 1891. July 1,1891. 

A. H. Graham, A. M July 1,1891 

The following legislative acts are worthy of a place in this 
record : 

ACTS OP 1867. 

March 11. The General Assembly passed a law establishing 
the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 

ACTS OF 1869. 

Made no further change than to make Trustees legal guard- 
ians of the children and permitted them to indenture them. 



62 



ACTS OF 1871. 



Made a specific appropriation of five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
to pay debts and maintenance from January to April 1, 1871. 

ACTS OF 1873. 

Made an appropriation of thirty- eight thousand dollars 
($38,000) for each. 

ACTS OF 1875. 

Made an appropriation of thirty-five thousand dollars ($35, 000) 
from 1875 to 1876. 

Made an appropriation of thirty-eight thousand dollars 
($38,000) from 1876 to 1877. 

ACTS OF 1877. 

Made an appropriation of twenty thousand three hundred 
dollars ($20,300) for 1877. 

Made an appropriation of thirty-four thousand dollars 
($34,000) for 1878. 

Made an appropriation of three thousand four hundred dol- 
lars ($3,400) for 1879. 

ACTS OF 1879. 

March 15, 1879, an act established an Asylum for Feeble- 
Minded Children, located at the Soldiers' Orphans' Home. It 
abolished the Trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home and 
makes the Trustees of the Feeble-Minded Institution to have 
charge of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home. 

ACTS OF 1883. 

Amended act of 1879. 

ACTS OF 1885. 

Creates the Soldiers' Orphans' Home and makes it a corpora- 
tion. The Board of Trustees to be composed of two men, one 
from each of the two leading political parties, and one lady. 

ACTS OF 1887. 

Creates the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 
The law locating the Asylum for Feeble-Minded Children at 
the Home repealed. The purchase of seventy-five acres of land 



63 

authorized. Appropriations authorizing the erection of build- 
ings costing, in the aggregate, one hundred and sixteen thou- 
sand dollars (|116,000.) The office of Steward was created and 
the fifteen dollar ($15) per capita law passed. 

ACTS OF 1889. 

February 23 the Legislature made the following appropria 
tions : 

For dining- room $10,000 

For six cottages 24,000 

For hospital 10,000 

For improvement of grounds 6,000 

For library for 1890 200 

For current repairs for year 1890 500 

For maintenance for year 1891 72,000 

For current repairs for year 1891 2,000 

For deficiency for year 1888 55,530 

ACTS OF 1891. 

For the year ending November 1, 1892 : 

For maintenance $95,000 

For current repairs 2,000 

For library 200 

For salaries of trustees and officers 3,600 

For assembly hall or chapel 1 3,000 

For addition to hospital 3,000 

For six cottages 18,000 

For additions to shops 6,000 

For addition to school building 5,000 

For farm cottage 500 

For completing dining-hall 1,000 

For water supply 2,000 

For gymnasium 1,500 

For electric light 2,000 

For water closet 3,000 

For library 300 

For maintenance for year ending October 31, 1893 95,000 

For salaries of trustees and officers for year ending Oc 

tober 31, 1893 3,600 

For library for year ending October 31, 1893 200 



64 



ACTS OF 1893. 



For maintenance $100,000 

For current repairs of buildings, premises and inci- 
dental expenses 1,000 

For library and reading- room 200 

For putting down two wells, making connection of 
same with the water supply, and for the extension of 
sewer and decoration of grounds 5,000 

ACTS OF 1895. 

For maintenance $90,000 

For current repairs 2,00Q 

For library and reading-room 300^ 

For purchase of land 6,000 

For fencing and rebuilding 1,000 

Since the creation of the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Or- 
phans' Home by the Legislature of 1887, the following enroll- 
ment on the Slst day of October, of each year, as presented by 
reports of Superintendents, will show the growth of the insti- 
tution : 

Year 1887. 1888. 

Enrollment 167. 340. 

Year 1892. 1893. 

Enrollment 624. 644. 

The foregoing sketch of the Home is gathered from different 
persons yet living, from articles which have appeared from time 
to time in dilierent papers of the State, and from the annual 
reports of the Trustees and Superintendents. The purpose ha& 
been to present briefly the steps that have been taken in the 
growth of this institution from the first thought to the present 
time. Nothing more. Of the loyalty and liberality of our 
noble State, of the faithful men and women who devoted, their 
best days to service in the Home, history may make little note, 
but their praise shall be sung by those who, as soldiers' orphans, 
inherited the State's special protection and were helped and 
guided in orphaned childhood by teachers and governesses of 
the Home. 

A. H. GRAHAM. 



1889. 


1890. 


1891 


448. 


574. 


592. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896 


644. 


636. 


623. 



COUNTY REPRESENTATION IN THE HOME. 



Adams 2 

Allen 8 

Bartholomew 16 

Benton .... 2 

Blackford 7 

Boone 6 

Brown 7 

Carroll 8 

Cass 10 

Clark 6 

Clay 7 

Clinton 4 

Crawford 9 

Daviess 1 

Dearborn 15 

Decatur 7 

Dekalb 3 

Delaware 9 

Dubois 5 

Elkhart 4 

Fayette 4 

Floyd 1 

Fountain 13 

Franklin 12 

Fulton 1 

Gibson 19 

Grant 19 

Greene 3 

Hamilton 14 

Hancock 13 

Harrison 5 

Hendricks 2 

Henry . 12 

Howard 11 

Huntington 7 

Jackson 2 

Jasper 1 

Jay 11 

Jefferson 11 

Jennings 5 

Johnson 1 

Knox 6 

Kosciusko 12 

Lagrange 

Lake .... 5 

Laporte 1 

Lawrence 2 

5— P. AND S. O. Home 



Madison 12 

Marion 51 

Marshall 6 

Martin 2 

Miami 8 

Monroe 4 

Montgomery 

Morgan 8 

Newton 1 

Noble 11 

Ohio 

Orange . 2 

Owen 8 

Parke 14 

Perry 2 

Pike 14 

Porter 2 

Posey 4 

Pulaski 

Putnam 15 

Randolph 7 

Eipley 7 

Eush 14 

Scott 

Shelby 9 

Spencer 4 

Starke 

Steuben . 5 

St. Joseph 2 

Sullivan 6 

Switzerland 2 

Tippecanoe 4 

Tipton 7 

Union 3 

Vanderburgh 9 

Vigo 3 

Vermillion 4 

Wabash 9 

Warren 4 

Warrick 3 

Washington 3 

Wayne 13 

Wells 4 

White 3 

Whitley 5 

Total 623 



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INDEX. 



Board of Visitors 

Officers and Employes 

Report of Board of Trustees . 
Report of Treasurer .... 
Report of Superintendent of Home 
Report of Financial Officer . . . 

Report of Matron 

Report of Physician ....... 

Report of Principal of Schools . . 

Course of Study . . . 

General Information .;.... 
Rules Governing the Home . . . 
Reprecei tation by Counties . . . 



Descriptive Roll of Children received into the Home from November 1, 
1895, to November 1, 1896 

Descriptive Roll of Children discharged from the Home from November 1, 
1895, to November 1, 1896 

Descriptive Roll of Children in the Home October 31, 189Q 



PAGE. 

4 
5 

7 
10 
13 
21 
33 
36 
38 
41 
50 
52 
65 

67 

70 
73 



1 



INDIANA 



State Soldiers' Home 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES. 



1896 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 

1896. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, ] 

Executive Department, I 

Indianapolis, November 19, 1896. j 

Received by tbe Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of Slate for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, ) 

Indianapolis, November 25, 1896. / 

The within report, so far as tlie same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of Slate. 



Indianapolis, November 25, 1896. 

Eeturned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYRON D. KING, 

Piivate Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, November 
25, 1896. 

^ WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer November 25, 1896. 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



TRUSTEES^ REPORT. 



Indiana State Soldiers' Home, 
Near Lafayette, November 1, 1896. 

To His Excellency^ Claude Matthews, 

Gorernor of Indiana : 

Under the provisions of the act establishing the Indiana 
State Soldiers' Home, it is made the duty of the Board of Trus- 
tees to make report to you of the condition of the Home, and 
a full and detailed statement of the transactions of the Board 
of Trustees, such report to be made annually, on the 31st day 
of October. 

The first report of this Board was for October 31, 1895. At 
the time of filing our report for 1895, the buildings were not 
then completed, and we were busy in the work of their erec- 
tion and completion, and clearing out of the grounds. We, 
at that time, could not do much more than report progress. 

That the matters properly belonging to our report for the 
year 1896 may be fully understood, it is necessary that we refer 
to the leading subjects embraced in the report of 1895, these 
principal subjects being: 

First. The passage of the act creating the Soldiers' Home, 
and the appropriation therefor. 

Second. The appointment of the Board of Trustees and their 
entry upon the discharge of their duties. 

Third. The official acts of the Board in making the con- 
tracts for, and the erection of, the buildings specified in the 
act and included in the appropriation of the sum of $75,000, 
for the erection of the same. 

No act, fraught with such grave and great responsibilities, 
and at the same time promising so much good to a very large 
and deserving class of the citizens of the State of Indiana, ever 
found a more generous and patriotic response and support in 



6 

the Legislature of Indiana. The act was adopted upon the af- 
firmative vote of every member of both houses of the General 
Assembly. The Governor approved the bill and it became a 
law February 23, 1895. 

Under the law creating the Indiana State Soldiers' Home, a 
Board of Trustees, to consist of five members, was to be ap- 
pointed by the Governor, from the two great political parties 
in the State. The Board was appointed by the Governor im- 
mediately after his approval of the bill, and consisted of James 
R. Carnahan, of Indianapolis; Isaiah B. McDonald, of Colum- 
bia City; David N. Foster, of Ft. Wayne; Christopher J. 
Murphy, of Evansville, and James B. Wallace, of Lafayette. 

The appointees convened at Indianapolis February 28, 1895, 
and organized the Board of Trustees by the unanimous election 
of the following officers : 

President, James R. Carnahan. 
Secretary, David N. Foster. 
Treasurer, James B. Wallace. 

The law required that the term of the first members of the 
Board should be determined by lot, and at the first meeting of 
the Board February 28, 1895, the lots were cast, which resulted 
in giving the one-year term to James B. Wallace, the two-years' 
term to James li. Carnahan and Isaiah B. McDonald, and the 
three-years' term to David N. Foster and Christopher J. Mur- 

The Board of Trustees, having organized and determined the 
term of each member, as required by law, were ready to begin 
the work tor which it was created. 

The law required that the Board of Trustees should contract 
for and erect certain buildings on certain lands in Tippecanoe 
County that had been donated to the Department of Indiana 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

Before the erection of the buildings could be commenced and 
before any portion of the appropriation for buildings could be 
made available for that purpose it became necessary, by the 
provisions of the law, to have the lands transferred by the De- 
partment of Indiana Grand Army of the Republic to the State 
of Indiana by a clear and unimpeachable title. These lands 
had been donated and deeded to the Grand Army of the Re- 
public by Tippecanoe County, the city of Lafayette, and by 



Colonel Richard P. DeHart — three separate tracts of land on 
the west bank of the Wabash River, about four miles north- 
west of the city of Lafayette. 

The Grand Arnay of the Republic had pledged itself to trans- 
fer the lands to the State of Indiana in consideration of the 
passage of a law whereby the State should create and provide 
for the maintenance of a Soldiers' Home. The first thing nec- 
essary, therefore, was to secure the transfer of the lands to the 
State. 

The lands in question were historic grounds, in part known 
as " The Tecumseh Trail," and other lands that had been the 
camping grounds of that famous Indian warrior and his braves 
before the battle of Tippecanoe, and were afterward deeded by 
the General Government to members of the Indian tribes that 
had lived along the Wabash River. 

These lands had been sold and transferred by the Indians, 
and it was deemed best by the Attorney-General that a full 
and complete abstract should be had of them, and also that, in 
addition to the abstract, there should be a legal opinion of 
some competent lawyer as to the legality of each and all the 
transfers from the original grant by the General Government 
to the date of the proposed transfer to the State of Indiana by 
the Grand Army of the Republic. The descriptions of the 
lands in the various transfers were long and intricate, and re- 
quired a very careful analysis, and it became necessary, in the 
opinion of competent attorneys, to procure two additional deeds 
to complete a perfect chain of title. All this was done, and the 
titles were, in the opinion of the Attorney-General, complete 
and perfect in the Department of Indiana Grand Army of the 
Republic, and that body was found to be duly incorporated 
under the laws of the State and qualified to execute a deed to 
the State of Indiana for the lands in question. These questions 
having all been settled satisfactorily to the officers of the State, 
the Encampment of the Department of Indiana held at the 
city of Muncie on the 28th day of March, 1895, by resolution 
unanimously adopted, instructed the officers of that body to 
convey said lands by warranty deed to the State of Indiana, for 
the purposes of a Soldiers' Home. 

Upon securing the transfer of the lands to the State, the 
appropriation embraced in the act establishing the Home be- 
came available, and the Board of Trustees was able to begin 



the work of improving the grounds and also to commence the 
preparations for the erection of the buildings specified in the 
act. No time was lost by the Board in this matter. 

The appropriation by the State was $75,000, and with this 
sum it was provided that the following improvements should 
be made and buildings should be erected : A headquarters 
building, a kitchen and dining-room, a hospital, cottages and 
dormitories, a laundry and power house, heating and lighting 
plant, a stable, storeroom, ice house and other necessary build- 
ings, water-works, sewers, grading walks and roads, and im- 
proving grounds, and for miscellaneous expenses. 

In addition to the sum of $75,000 appropriated by the State 
there was in the hands of the proper officers of the Department 
of Indiana Grand Army of the Republic, an unexpended 
balance of $8,945.80, which had been donated by Tippecanoe 
County at the same time the lands were donated, to aid in the 
erection of the Home, or for the improvement of the grounds. 
This sum of $3,945.80, in conformity with the act establishing 
the Soldiers' Home, was paid into the State Treasury and be- 
came available in the work before us, giving in all the sum of 
$78,945.80. 

The lands on which the buildings were erected were heavily 
timbered, and it was therefore necessary that the lands should 
be cleared and a sufficient space should be opened up for the 
erection of the buildings. The matter of having the grounds 
judiciously laid off' and platted was fully considered and deter- 
mined upon. To secure the proper result, William K. Eldridge, 
an experienced civil engineer and landscape gardener, was em- 
ployed to lay out the grounds and locate the sites for the various 
buildings, the plat thus to be laid ofi' and platted being sixty- 
five acres of the lands lying west of the Lafayette and Battle 
Ground road and extending west up the hill, and covering the 
level ground at the top of the bluff, which, when fully com- 
plete, will give a magnificent view of and from the buildings 
for a number of miles to the east and south. The work done 
by this Board in improving these grounds has thus far been 
limited to clearing this portion of the lands sufliciently to per- 
mit the erection of the buildings named in the act, and for 
the cottages which have been erected, and those now in con- 
templation which are to be built from donations, provided for 
in the act, and for the building of such roadways, walks and 



sewers as were absolutely necessary for immediate use. The 
great and ultimate work of beautifying and completing the 
work according to the designs-adopted, as a matter of necessity 
being left to the future provisions of the State for that purpose. 

It was apparent that the appropriation was not sufficient to 
erect and complete all the buildings originally contemplated, 
and after full consultation and advice with the Attorney-Gen- 
eral, it was decided to erect and complete the buildings herein- 
after named. 

In order to secure the best possible designs and plans for the 
proposed buildings, it was decided to invite competitive designs 
therefor, and this was done. The invitation for designs brought 
out the genius and skill of a number of the very best architects 
of the State — men of experience in the profession, both as 
designers and builders. Before the time fixed, however, for 
the submitting ot the plans and designs, this Board visited 
several of the National and State Homes for the purpose of 
seeing the plans and designs then constructed and in use, the 
better to know the plans in actual use, and to avoid, as far as 
possible, any errors that might have been committed by others, 
and to learn of any improvements that might be suggested by 
officers who were experienced in the management of similar 
institutions. The visitations proved of great value when we 
came to an examination of the plans that were afterward pre- 
sented for our consideration. 

At the time fixed for receiving plans and for their examina- 
tion, alter giving careful consideration thereof, the plans and 
designs of James F. Alexander & Son, architects, of Lafayette, 
men of large experience and judgment, were adopted, and the 
contract was awarded to them for the plans and specifications 
and for the superintendence of the erection of the buildings. 

The Board having adopted the plans and specifications, ad- 
vertised for bids for the construction in leading papers of the 
larger cities throughout the State, and put the plans and speci- 
fications on file in Indianapolis, Lafayette, Ft. Wayne and 
Evansville for inspection by contractors and builders. 

It was imperatively necessary that the Water- Works plant 
for the Home should be put up and fully completed before the 
work could be successfully begun on the main buildings, and 



10 

bids for the construction and completion were asked for in ad- 
vance of the bids for the others. The contract for the Water- 
Works plant was let May 3, 1895, and the work was begun im- 
mediately thereafter. 

The water plant consists of a brick and stone building, in 
which are the boilers, engines and pumps for the lifting of the 
water. The supply of water is derived from three six-inch 
driven wells just at the low water mark of the Wabash River. 
These wells are in fact artesian wells, from which the water 
pours in greatest abundance when the pipes are uncapped. The 
temperature of the water as it flows at the wells is only 48 de- 
grees. No surface or river water, in case of the rise of the 
river, can enter the wells, and the Home is certain of an 
abundant supply, both for domestic and tire purposes, of as 
near pure water as is possible to be obtained anywhere. Pro- 
fessor H. A. Huston, of Purdue University, after a careful 
analysis of the water from these wells, reported that "it could 
not be improved on." 

The present pumping capacity is 6,000 gallons per hour. 

The pumping- house has been built large enough to admit of 
increased pumping facilities when<iver such increase may be 
needed. 

The water is raised from the low- water mark of the river to 
the level ground of the Home, a height of 185 feet, and from 
that level 90 feet higher into a 40,000 gallon steel tank, and 
from thence conducted through iron water-mains to the build- 
ings and fire-hydrants in front of each of the principal buildings 
and elsewhere about the grounds for the protection of the cot- 
tages and other uses as it may be needed. 

The entire cost of the water-works plant of the Home, as 
now completed and in use, was $10,661.74. 

On July 8, 1895, the time fixed to receive bids for the con- 
structicn of the various buildings, the Board convened in the 
city of Lafayette for that purpose. Bidders came from a num- 
ber of the larger cities of Indiana, and some few from outside 
the State. A sufficient time had been allowed for all bidders 
to make careful estimates, and the competition was in all cases 
sharp and strong. The bids all came in sealed, and each bidder 
was present when they were opened, and as each was opened 
it was read aloud in the presence and hearing of each and every 



11 

competitor. The highest and lowest bid on each building is 
given herewith for your infornaation, to wit: 

Old People's Building— Highest, bid $26,310; lowest bid, 
$13,924. 

Dining Hall and Widows' Home— Highest bid, $18,708 ; low- 
est bid, $9,297. 

Hospital— Highest bid, $16,475 ; lowest bid, $8,740. 

Quartermaster's Building — Highest bid, $8,995 ; lowest bid, 
$2,343. 

Power House, Electric-Light House and laundry Building 
Combined— Highest bid, $5,690; lowest bid, $2,693. 

The lowest bid in each case was made by the firm of Camp- 
field & Harrison, of Richmond, Indiana, men of large experi- 
ence in erection of large public buildings, and the contracts 
were awarded to this firm on their bids. 

The State is to be congratulated upon securing the contract 
for the erection of the buildings at her Soldiers' Home at such 
low figures at the hands of men so thoroughly competent and 
responsible as was the firm named. The contract thus awarded 
for the six buildings, to wit : The old people's home, the din- 
ing-hall and widows' home, the hospital, the quartermaster's 
building, the commissary building, the power-house, electric 
light building and laundry, combined, was $41,937, and adding 
thereto the cost of the water plant as fully completed, $10,- 
664.74, we had as the aggregate for the construction, $52,601.74. 

These figures, however, it must be borne in mind, are only 
for the buildings and not for the equipment of any of them, 
except for the water plant. 

In connection with the power-house, electric light building 
and laundry, we have added an electric lighting plant. The 
contract for this plant was awarded to the Ft. Wayne Electric 
Corporation, for the sum of $4,448.47. We think we state 
truly when it is said, that no better electric light machinery 
can be made than that which is in our Home. We now have 
all of the buildings on the ground wired and lighted in a com- 
plete and substantial manner, as also are the grounds on which 
the buildings stand, also the roadway leading up from the 
public highway to the grounds. 

The main buildings are all heated by steam, and the cooking 
is done, in a great measure, in the same manner. The steam 
heating plant cost $4,737. The plumbing contracts for all of 



12 

the main buildings cost $1,966.80. The cooking apparatus and 
bake oven, which includes the cooking apparatus for the main 
dining-hall and for the old people's home, and for the hospital, 
cost $1,585. The laundry machinery, complete, was put in at 
a cost of $1,'250. The barn, $200. 

An ice plant, as provided for in the act establishing the 
Home, has also been added to the commissary building, and we 
now have an ice machine capable of manufacturing a ton of 
ice every day, and, in addition thereto, furnishing the large 
cold storage appartments that are built in connection with the 
commissary building. The cost of the ice plant was $3,600, 
exclusive of the building. 

We submit herewith an itemized statement of the amounts 
expended by this Board in tha erection of the buildings, and 
the appliances connected with the construction of the build- 
ings and their equipment, together with estimated cost of work 
on the grounds. See Exhibit ''A." For full financial state- 
ment see Treasurer's report. Exhibit " B." 

In the act establishing the Home no appropriation was made 
for furnishing the Home after the buildings were erected, so 
that it could be occupied by those for whom the Home was in- 
tended. As the time approached for the completion of the 
buildings, the Board of Trustees, after full consultation on the 
subject, decided to solicit bids for the equipment of the Home, 
for its occupancy. For this work, as has been said, there was 
no appropriation, and the only thing left for this Board to do, 
in the premises, was to go ahead and on their own individual 
responsibility purchase such furniture as would be necessary 
to thoroughly equip the buildings. Bids were received for 
furniture and bedding. The Board, after careful examination 
of the bids and examination of the furniture and bedding, 
which were submitted as samples, finally procured furniture 
for most of the rooms in the Home. The furniture and bed- 
ding so purchased cost $12,000.00, and for the payment of this 
sum, together with interest thereon, the Board of Trustees, in 
their own individual names, borrowed the money, executed 
their notes and paid for the same. In addition to the furni- 
ture thus purchased quite an amount of furniture was supplied 
by the Woman's Relief Corps Auxiliary to the Glrand Army of 
the Republic and the Ladies of the Grand Army of the Republic 
of Indiana. The contributions made by these two patriotic 



13 

organizations were part in money and part in bedding and 
rugs necessary for the equipment of the rooms. A detailed 
statement of the money so furnished for furniture is filed here- 
with, Treasurer's Report, marked "Exhibit B." The value of 
the articles furnished by these organizations we are not able to 
estimate, but the money contributed aggregates |1,074.94. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY. 

As the Home is situated four miles from the city of Lafay- 
ette, it became necessary that some means of transit should be 
obtained to the city and the Home for the convenience of the 
occupants of the Home and the general public The Lafayette 
Electric Street Kailway Company proposed to build an electric 
line from the city of Lafayette to the Home without expense 
to the State or to the Home, provided that a right of way on 
to the grounds should be given by the Board of Trustees. 

The Board accepted the proposition made by the Lafayette 
Electric Railway Company, and gave a right of way for the 
company through the grounds, from the west line of the 
grounds extending across the grounds eastward to the brow of 
the hill overlooking the Lafayette and Battle Ground gravel 
road, commonly known as the '' River Road." This railway is 
now completed and ready for operation, and will be of very 
great service and convenience to the Home. 

The Electric Railway Company have agreed to erect a hand- 
some depot upon the grounds at their own expense, without 
cost to the State. The plans for this depot have already been 
made by the Home architect, and have been accepted and ap- 
proved by the Board. The electric railway is now completed 
ready for travel to the city of Lafayette and the Home grounds, 
and the depot will be erected in the near future. 

The building of this electric line of road will add materially 
to the value of the Home grounds, not only by reason of the 
convenience furnished thereby, but will add to the money 
value of the Home grounds also. 



14 



COTTAGES. 



In addition to the buildings that were erected under the 
appropriation made by the State, the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, the Woman's Relief Corps and the Ladies of the Grand 
Army of the Republic contributed money for the erection of 
cottages on the grounds. These organizations having taken 
up the work of raising funds for the erection of cottages, 
brought the matter before the County Commissioners of the 
several counties of the State. 

Twenty- six cottages have been erected, completed and fur- 
nished, and are now occupied. A complete schedule of the 
amounts contributed for cottages, and by whom contributed, is 
tiled here with Treasurer's report, marked " Exhibit B." From 
this schedule it will be seen that the sum of $26,172.11 has 
been paid in and added to the appropriation made by the State 
for cottages for the proper care of the disabled and needy sol- 
diers of the Republic, their wives and widows. 

Of the sum of $5,000 donated by the Grand Army of the Re- 
public in notes and mortgages we have received $3,488.09 ; 
there is yet due to the State from said appropriation, the sum 
of $1,500 with interest. This sum, which yet remains unpaid, 
is secured by note and first mortgage on real estate, now in our 
hands, which is now due and it is expected will soon be paid. 
From the amount already received from the Grand Army fund, 
four double cottages have been erected, and the balance of the 
fund, when collected, will also be used for the erection of other 
cottages on the grounds. 

The construction of all of the main buildings herein named, 
and also the erection of the cottages, was carried on simul- 
taneously, so that the whole matter of furnishing, both of the 
main buildings and of the cottages, was in progress at one and 
the same time. 

Each of the cottages bears on its front an inscription show- 
ing by whom, or by what county, such cottage was donated. 



15 



HOME OFFICERS. 



Prior to the opening of the Home, and upon nearing the 
completion of the buildings, our Board felt that it was neces- 
sary to secure for the Home, a competent person for Com- 
mandant of the Home, and also some one who was thoroughly 
capable of discharging the duties of Adjutant of the Home. 

At a meeting of the Board, held in the city of Lafayette, 
October 3, 1895, the applications for these two positions were 
received and opened for consideration. All of the applicants 
for these two positions had been requested to appear before the 
Board at that time, to present their requests for the position in 
person, and that the Board might know, personally, as to the 
fitness of each applicant. This examination of applicants re- 
quired almost a whole night's work. There was no lack of 
applicants who were, in most cases, competent to take charge 
of the work. 

The Board, after an examination and thorough inquiry into 
the merits of each applicant, selected Captain John P. Megrew 
as Commandant, and Captain Wilbur F. Havens as Adjutant. 
The Board at that time felt that it was especially fortunate in 
being able to secure the services of Captain Megrew for the 
very important and responsible position of Commandant. They 
were fortunate not only because he was a man of great integ- 
rity, but because of his character and eminent fitness, from ex- 
perience in such duty, for the position. He had had nearly three 
years of experience as Commandant of the State Soldiers' Home 
of South Dakota, and added to this were recommendations and 
endorsements as to his character and as to the efficient manner 
in which he had discharged his duties in the South Dakota 
Home. 

The Board has been fully convinced, since Captain Megrew 
entered upon his duties as Commandant of the Indiana State 
Soldiers' Home, that they made no mistake, whatever, in select- 
ing him for the position which he has filled so competently 
and well since the opening of the Home. As to his services 
as a soldier, he was one of the early enlistments of Indiana 
boys in 1861, as a private, in the Eleventh Indiana Infantry. 
During all of the years of the war, from April, 1861, until the 
close of the contest. Captain Megrew saw active service in the 



16 

field. From the rank of private he rose for meritorious service, 
to Sergeant, from that to Lieutenant, then Adjutant, and then 
Captain, in his old regiment, and served throughout with great 
credit to himself and honor to his regiment and State. 

Captain Megrew gave most valuable service to this Board 
in the equipment and furnishing of the Home. He entered 
upon his duty the 1st of December, 1895, and, under his expe- 
rienced hand, order was brought into every detail of the work 
necessary to place the Home in condition to receive members. 
He superintended the cleaning up of the buildings, receiving 
the furniture, placing it in position, and, in short, took charge 
of everything that was necessary to be done in connection with 
the opening of the Home. Since that time he has given his 
undivided attention, his energy and intelligent oversight to 
everything connected with the management and government 
of the institution. 

It was especially fortunate for us, in the opening of the Home, 
that we had one who had had experience with the United States 
Government in the managementof a State Soldiers' Home. Had 
it not been for his knowledge in this last subject, the Home 
might have been involved in trouble and delay in getting 
matters into such shape that the State of Indiana could draw 
from the General Government the sum allotted by the United 
States, for each soldier that was to be a member of the Home. 
We are glad to state that so thoroughly was the work done by 
Commandant Megrew that the State of Indiana has drawn the 
allowance from the General Government, to assist in maintain- 
ing this Home, from the time at which the Home was formally 
opened, until the present time, without clash or friction in 
any way. 

In regard to the Adjutant selected. Captain Wilbur F. 
Havens, we have found him to be a man thoroughly compe- 
tent in every respect to discharge the multitudinous duties that 
pertain to this office, as defined in the statute governing the 
position. Captain Havens is also an Indiana soldier who 
rendered distinguished service during the entire War of the 
Rebellion. His books and accounts are open to investigation 
and inspection, and this Board would be glad if the Legislature 
of this State would appoint a committee to make a careful in- 
spection and examination of the books of the Home, and ascer- 
tain for itself, and for the people of the State, how carefully 



17 

and well the duty has been discharged, both by Commander 
Megrew and Adjutant Havens. 

The office and clerical work connected with these two offices, 
and especially that of Adjutant, is, under the law, both intri- 
cate and difficult, but in this work no mistakes have yet oc- 
curred. 

The Indiana State Soldiers' Home in all of its departments, 
and also the office books, accounts and reports of the Com- 
mandant and Adj utant have been examined by General Averill, 
the Inspector of Soldiers' Homes, appointed and acting under 
the laws of the United States, and it has been pronounced by 
him most perfect and complete in every respect. 

OPENING OF THE HOME. 

On July 8, 1885, as hereinbefore stated, the contracts for the 
erection of the permanent buildings were made and the work 
was pushed as rapidly as possible. In January, 1896, the 
buildings were sufficiently completed to begin the admission of 
ex soldiers and their wives or widows; but the Home was not 
formerly opened until the 1st day of February, 1896. The 
Home was rapidly filled by worthy though destitute or crippled 
soldiers. Since the opening there has been admitted to the 
Home, 250 men, 97 women, and there was on the 31st day of 
October, 1896, men, 191; women, 83; total, 274. We submit 
herewith an exhibit showing the names of all who have been 
admitted to the Home since it was first opened, giving not 
only the names, but the counties from which they entered the 
Home, and also a statement of their service. See Exhibit "C' 
There have been five deaths at the Home since it was opened. 
Four of those who died have been buried on the Home grounds, 
and one was returned to his friends in Vanderburgh County. 

There are 42 applications for admission approved, on which 
applicants have not yet reported. 

MAINTENANCE. 

By the act of the Legislature establishing the Indiana State 
Soldiers' Home it was provided that, to meet the current ex- 
penses of such Home, there should be appropriated annually out 
of any moneys in the State treasury, not otherwise appropri- 
ated, a sum equal to $10.50 per month for each inmate, officer 
2—1. S. S. Home. 



18 

and employe residing at the Home. This amount of |10.50 
per month, for maintenance, was a compromise amount, the 
original draft of the bill specified $12.50 per month for each 
member, officer and employe at the Home By some it was 
thought that the Home could exist on $10.50 per month for 
maintenance, and the friends of the bill consented to the 
change to the sum now named for maintenance, believing that 
if this was not a sufficient amount to meet the expenses of the 
Home, the next General Assembly of the State of Indiana 
would provide adequate means for maintaining the Home. 

In the management of the Home, up to the present time, the 
most rigid economy has been practiced both by the Board of 
Trustees and by the Commandant of the Home, yet, with all 
of this careful and economical management, it has been found 
that a per capita of $10.50 per month is not suflacient to meet 
the necessary expenses of maintaining and conducting the 
Home in a manner creditable to the State of Indiana. 

The employes at the Home who must be paid out of this 
maintenance fund are the Assistant Surgeon, the Matron, the 
Assistant Matron, the chief cook and chief baker, the laun- 
dryman, the engineers at the electric light and power house, 
and one engineer at the pumping station. Besides this, it is 
necessary to have an electrician, who must also be paid in the 
same way. The Quartermaster- Sergeant, the Commissary- 
Sergeant, the Book-keeper, thQ Stenographer and Typewriter 
are to be paid, under the law, from this maintenance fund. 
There are other minor employes that are required about the 
Home, and these must also be paid from the same fund. 

In addition to the employes, all repairing, painting and 
whatever necessary work there is to be done must be paid 
from the maintenance fund; but none of this can interfere 
with the proper supplying of food to the members of the Home. 
In addition to the food expense that must be provided, we 
must also provide clothing to such of the members ot the Home 
as do not draw sufficient pensions to pay for their clothing. 
Under the rules of the Home we require that all who draw 
in excess of $6.00 per month must pay for their own cloth- 
ing; but there is a very large number of the members of the 
Home, both male and female, who draw no pensions, have no 
income of any kind, and must therefore be supplied by the 
State with such clothing as is needed. We must also provide 



19 

the medicines and surgical appliances that must be used in 
the hospital. 

Also, from this maintainance fund must be provided the fuel 
for the Home. In short, every expense connected with the 
management of the Home ; also additional furniture and bed- 
ding for additional buildings must be paid, under the law, out 
of this fund. We found, on the 31st day of October, 1896, the 
date at which, under the law, the financial statement of the 
Home must be made, that we lacked $1,512.55 of having suffi- 
cient to meet these expenses. 8ee Adjutant's Report, "Ex- 
hibit D." 

We wish to call your attention to the one item of fuel alone. 
The fuel used for the Home during the first year was provided 
altogether from the timber that was cleared from the land in 
order that the buildings might be erected, and in the clearing 
up of the grounds. The supply of fuel, however, from this di- 
rection is now about exhausted, and the Home will have to 
look to another source for its fuel supply. 

The fuel used during the first year came, in a great measure, 
from the appropriation by the State for the erection of the 
Home, for the reason that, in order to prepare the grounds for 
building, we were compelled to cut the timber, and that tim- 
ber, so cut, in preparation for the buildings, did not come out 
of the maintenance fund. Had we been compelled to purchase 
fuel at market prices during this first year, the $10.50 per cap- 
ita for maintenance would not have met the expenses necessary 
to maintain the Home, and our deficiency would have been in- 
creased. 

We can not in the future look for any more free fuel; we 
must purchase our fuel. This supply of fuel must be obtained 
either through the purchase of coal for running the furnaces 
for supplying the necessary heating of the buildings and cot- 
tages, and also for the pumping-station, the electric light and 
power house, or it must be done by piping natural gas from 
the city of Lafayette to the Home grounds. In either event 
the maintenance fund as now provided will not be sufficient to 
furnish the fuel and keep up the other necessary expenses at- 
tendant upon the Home. If natural gas should be used — and 
that would be the cheapest fuel — perhaps then it will be neces- 
sary to have a specific appropriation for the purpose of laying 
the pipes for the gas from the city of Lafayette to the Home, 



20 

a distance of at least four miles. In the judgment of this 
Board it would be far better for the State, and much more eco- 
nomical after the pipes are laid, to use natural gas; and we 
would respectfully recommend that the pipes be purchased and 
laid for natural gas. 

In addition to the matter of fuel as an expense, as the Home 
has grown, additional expense is required in order to properly 
take care of those who are admitted to the Home. Quite a 
number of those who have been admitted have been absolutely 
helpless, and it has required the service of special attendants 
for each one, in order that they might be properly cared for. 
Such service can not be obtained without compensation to those 
who render the service. As the years go by there will be more 
and more who will require this special attention. jS^ot only 
this ; under the law there is no way whereby this Board or the 
State can collect the cost of burial of deceased members of the 
Home, who have died at the Home, from the counties from 
which such persons may have been admitted. Special provi- 
sion, in addition to the mere maintenance fund, should be pro- 
vided for burials. 

At the opening of the Home, and during its first few months 
of existence, the Board was able to have the necessary clerical 
work, and such other work as required constant attention, done 
by a few persons; but now th^t the Home has grown the du- 
ties have increased and the work has grown in like proportion 
and requires more help than we are at present able to employ. 

We have been able, up to this time, to procure the services 
of a home surgeon at a merely nominal sum, but his duties have 
grown so fast that they now require all of his attention and time, 
and we recommend that a fixed salary should be established by 
the Legislature for the services of such home surgeon. Those 
who come to the Home crippled and broken down from 
wounds or disease are in need of constant and skilled atten- 
tion. This can only be had by the State paying a reasonable 
amount for such professional service. 

The State of Indiana to day is paying less for the care of 
her destitute and needy soldiers than is being paid elsewhere. 
The State is now paying annually, under the present appropria- 
tion for maintenance, ^126 per year for each soldier and mem- 
ber of the Home, but out of this amount so paid should be 



21 

deducted .^100 paid by the General Government to the State for 
each veteran who is a member of the Home. 

A careful examination of the reports of fifteen of the State 
Soldiers' Homes now established in various States shows that 
there is being paid an average of $189.86 for each inmate of 
those fifteen homes. The maintenance in these various homes 
ranges all the way from $141.19 to $228.58, as against $126 an- 
nually appropriated by the State of Indiana. 

With this showing of cost required in other States, the Board 
of Trustees of the Indiana Home believe that the sum already 
appropriated is too small, and our experience has established 
this as a fact. This Board is of the opinion that if the sum for 
maintenance should be increased from $10.50 per month to 
$12.50 per month per capita, for the next two years, that that 
sum would be sufficient to meet all of the expenses for food, 
clothing, medical attendance, for fuel, and additional expense 
of all employes. 

We sincerely trust. Governor, that, in your message to the 
Legislature, you will give attention to the necessity of increas- 
ing this appropriation. 

One other matter in connection with the expense of the 
Home: Under the present law, the only two officers that are 
paid salaries out of the general funds of the State are the Com- 
mandant and Adjutant, The salary of the Commandant, 
under the present law, is $1,000 per year, and the salary of the 
Adjutant is $800 per year. For the amount of work required 
and the responsibility that must be borne by these two officers, 
we feel that the salary is altogether inadequate, and we would 
recommend that the salary of the Commandant should be 
raised to $1,500, and that the salary of the Adjutant should be 
raised to $1,000. It requires all of their time and attention, 
from morning until night, and late into the night, to con- 
duct the affairs of the Home in a proper manner, the Adjutant 
discharging the duty of Adjutant and Quartermaster. They 
are held responsible to the State for the preservation of its 
property and for the honest expenditure of all funds that may 
come into their hands by reason of their official positions. 
The care and anxiety attendant upon their duties in properly 
providing for the inmates of the Home is by no means light, 
and their responsibility for the men and women entrusted to 
their keeping is very great. For all of this they should be 
compensated in a manner worthy of their service. 



22 



ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS REQUIRED. 



Applications for admission to the Home have been carefully 
scrutinized, and none have been admitted except in full com- 
pliance with the law. Guarding this admission, however, as 
carefully as the Board may, there is forced upon us the fact 
that the Home, as it is at present constructed, is not nearly 
adequate to meet the wants and necessary requirements in- 
tended to be met by the act establishing the Soldiers' Home. 
At this time every room in the permanent buildings and in the 
cottages is filled. There is not room or space for another in- 
dividual except as vacancies are made by death or removal of 
those already admitted. 

The Quartermaster's building is now used as the headquarters 
building and offices tor the Commandant and Adjutant. No 
more space can be occupied in that building than is now used, 
and it is not nearly adequate to the demands. 

It is absolutely necessary that an administration building 
should be erected — one in which the Commandant can have his 
oflice and place of business, and in which there can be a proper 
ofiice or room for the transaction of the business of the State, 
in looking after the Home, by the Board of Trustees. This 
building should also be made the home or residence of the 
Commandant. 

The Old People's Home was originally intended to be used 
simply for married men and their wives, but we have been 
forced to use it not only for married, but for unmarried mem- 
bers — old men. This building is overcrowded, and we should 
carry out the original intention of the Home in the erection of 
an Old Men's Home. 

An additional dining hall should also be erected to accom- 
modate the growing needs of the members of the Home. 

There is no chapel or assembly room, and no provision was 
made in the act creating the Home whereby one could be 
erected. This Board earnestly recommends that such a chapel 
or assembly room should be built, so that the members of the 
Home may have the privilege of having sacred worship and a 
place where they can have lectures and addresses for the benefit 
of the members ot the Home. 

We shall have to put in an additional dynamo, as the build- 
ings are completed and new cottages are erected. 



23 

There should be, also, much improvement in the grounds of 
the Home in the way of drives and walks. Additional sewers 
should be put in to meet the growing and increased demand of 
the Home. 

The cottages are now heated with stoves. While this is the 
best and cheapest manner that is at present possible for heating 
these cottages, there should be erected upon the grounds at 
least two heating plants large enough to heat all of the cot- 
tages that are now built or that shall hereafter be built upon 
the grounds.- We have already referred to the matter of put- 
ting in pipes and piping the buildings for natural gas. 

At present, the engineer at the pumping station has no cot- 
tage or place for keeping his family, save and except in the 
pumping house, and we recommend that a cottage be built near 
to the pumping station for the benefit and use of the engineer. 

The Home also needs fire protection in the way of hose and 
fire apparatus. 

For the purpose of erecting these buildings named and for 
furnishing them and making the necessary improvements on 
the grounds the State should appropriate not less than $125,- 
000. In asking for this appropriation we wish to call your at- 
tention to what the State has already received by donations and 
from the General Government in the care of its needy soldiers. 
The State has expended $75,000 in the erection of the Home. 
For that $75,000 she has received for her permanent use unin- 
cumbered real estate, two hundred forty- seven acres of as fine 
land as can be found in the State of Indiana; she has perma- 
nent buildings erected on these lauds that to-day can not be 
duplicated for less than 50 per cent, additional to that it has 
already cost the State. The State has received by way of do- 
nations for cottages the further sum of $26,172.11. While the 
State has paid $10.50 per month for each soldier and employe in 
the Home it has and will receive from the General Government 
the sum of $100 per year for each soldier now or who may 
hereafter be an inmate of the Home ; so that in truth and in 
fact it has cost the State of Indiana only $26 per year for each 
veteran that is now in the Home or that may hereafter come to 
the Home. 



24 



TREASURER S RECEIPTS. 



We submit herewith the report of the Treasurer of the Board 
of Trustees for all sums of money received by him and expendi- 
tures thereof, from all sources, since he entered upon his duties 
as Treasurer of this Board, up to and including October 31, 1896, 
said report, marked "Exhibit B," showing a total amount of 
$108,862.57. ' ' , . 

adjutant's receipts and EXPENDITURES. 

Under Section 15 of the act creating the Indiana State Sol- 
diers' Home the Adjutant is required annually, on the 31st of 
October, to make a complete and full report of all receipts and 
expenditures for and on account of the Home; and we submit 
herewith the official report of the Adjutant of the Home for the 
term ending October 31, 1896, showing that there has been re- 
ceived by the Adjutant of the Home, from ail sources, the total 
amount of $19,993.64, with expenditures of $21,506.19. See 
"Exhibit D" herewith. 

In the matter of clothing it should be stated that there are a 
large number in the Home who must be provided with clothing 
at the expense of the State, and this clothing has to be paid 
for out of the maintenance fund. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

The law establishing the Home required that rules and regu- 
lations should be devised by this Board for admission to the 
Home. These rules and regulations have been prepared and a 
copy of the same is filed herewith for your information and the 
information of the General Assembly of the State of Indiana. 
Exhibit "E." 

In concluding this, our second annual report, this Board 
wishes to extend to you, as Governor of the State and as an in- 
dividual, an expression of our high appreciation of the interest 
which you have taken in the Home, from the time it was first 
brought to your attention by petitions to the Legislature for 
its establishment, and for your active and hearty cooperation in 
all that has been done by this Board to build up an institution 



25 

that should be not only a refuge for the poor and disabled 
soldier and his wife, and the widow of the deceased soldier, but 
an institution which should be in truth and in fact a home for 
those men who dared all in the defense of the nation in its 
hour of peril, and who now, in their old age, are broken by 
disease and wounds, and should be and are the honorable and 
worthy wards of the great State of Indiana. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES R. CARNAHAN, 
DAVID N. FOSTER, 
JAMES B. WALLACE, 
C. J. MURPHY, 

ISA.IAII B. McDonald, 

Trustees 



26 



EXHIBIT A. 



COST OF PERMANENT BUILDINGS. 



PUMPING STATION. 

Pumping station $1,275 00 

Extra stone and excavation $130 85 

Inscription stone setting, etc 21 00 

151 85 



WATERWORKS. 

Water works plant, including wells, one boiler, smoke- 
stack and pumps, pipe work, valves, excavations, and 
all work and material to complete water-works plant 

from wells to water tower 

Extra for larger pump $25 00 

Water supply from tower to buildings and 
grounds, including fire hydrants and valves, 
etc $1,742 89 



,470 CO 



1,767 



Cellar drainage to all buildings . . 

Sewerage 

Steam heating 

Furnace in Quartermaster Building . 
Plumbing in five main buildings. . 
Laundry machinery .... 

Cooking apparatus 

Bake oven 

Hospital, contract price 

Commissary ..... ... 

Laundry and electric light building 

Quartermaster 

Old People's Home. ... 
Dining hall and Widows' Home . . 
Ice and cold storage machinery . . 
Stable 



Extra on all buildings to date, about 

Cold storage buildings and rooms 

Labor on cold storage 

Architects' plans and services 

Services of civil engineer, about 

For clearing grounds, making roadways necessary for erection of 
buildings 



1,426 85 



9,237 89 

402 10 

733 86 

4,737 00 

486 00 

1,966 80 

1,250 00 

1,285 00 

350 00 

8,740 00 

2,343 00 

2,693 00 

4,940 00 

13,924 00 

9,297 00 

3,600 00 

200 00 

200 00 

600 00 

468 98 

3,000 00 

900 00 

3,500 00 



Total 



3,281 48 



27 
EXHIBIT B. 



EEPORT OF TREASUKER OF INDIANA STATE SOLDIERS' HOME. 



LaFayette, Ind., November 1, 1896. 

RECEIPTS. 

1895. 

May 16. State Auditor $552 38 

June 15. State Auditor 1,543 05 

July 18. State Auditor 3,136 97 

Aug. 8. State Auditor 5,901 81 

Sept. 5. State Auditor 8,486 37 

7. State Auditor 2,831 18 

Oct. 10. State Auditor 13,610 27 

Nov. 8. State Auditor 12,061 13 

Dec. 6. State Auditor 7,705 24 

1896. 

Jan. 8. State Auditor 5,800 54 

Feb. 8. State Auditor 15,126 06 

18. State Auditor 2,103 09 

Mar. 10. State Auditor 80 00 

Total 178,938 09 

Amount turned over by G. A. R. Committee 3,9l5 80 

Total, less amount from G. A. R. Committee .... 174,992 29 

Of the above, $3,945.80 was turned over to the State by the G. A. R. Commit- 
tee, £0 that $7.71 is still unexpended of the $75,000 appropriated by the State of 
Indiana. 



DISBURSEMENTS OF MONEY RECEIVED FROM STATE AUDITOR. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

out on vouchers sent to Auditor — - 



Paid 


189 


5. 


April 24. 
June 3. 


July 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 


10. 
3. 
3. 

4. 


Nov. 


6. 


Dec. 


4. 


1896. 


Jan. 


3. 


Feb. 


6. 




18. 


Mar. 


6. 



No3. 1 to 20 inclusive . 
Nos 21 to 48 inclusive . 
Nos. 49 to 72 inclusive ■ 
Nos. 73 to 105 inclusive 
Nos. 106 to 130 inclusive 
Nos. 131 to 160 inclusive 
Nos. 161 to 193 inclusive 
Nos. 194 to 224 inclusive 

Nos. 225 to 267 inclusive 
Nos. 268 to 348 inclusive 
Nos. 349 to 352 inclusive 
Nos. 353 to 356 inclusive 



$552 38 


1,543 05 


3,136 


97 


5,901 


81 


11,317 


55 


13,610 


27 


12,061 


13 


7,705 


24 


5,800 


54 


15,126 


06 


2,103 09 


80 CO 



Total c . . $78,938 09 



28 



EXHIBIT B— Continued. 



MONEYS RECEIVED FOR COTTAGES. 



1895. 
April 9. 
Oct. 

Nov. 



Dec 

1896. 
April 
May 4 

4. 

June 2. 

2. 



9. 

15. 

1. 

2. 
5. 



July 

Aug. 



W. R. C, Dept. of Ind 

John A. Logan W. R. C, No. 191 

Dept. of Ind., G. A. R 

Jolin A, Logan Circle, No. 7, Ladies of the G. A. R 

Marsh B. Taylor, W. R. C , No. 142 

Wabash County 

Spencer County 

Montgomery County 

Lawrence County 

Starke County 

Tippecanoe County 

Porter County 

Vigo County 

Warren County 

White County 

Newton Cjunty . . 

Floyd County , 

Laporte County 

Vanderburgh County 

Lake County ...'.... . . , 

Hendricks County 

Benton County 

Total 



$587 76 


400 00 


3,488 09 


450 00 


339 26 


500 00 


500 00 


535 00 


500 00 


500 00 


3,000 00 


500 00 


2,500 00 


2,000 00 


2,100 00 


700 00 


700 00 


1,100 00 


2,100 00 


2,100 00 


572 00 


l.OOO 00 



,172 11 



MONEYS PAID OUT FOR COTTAGES. 



1895. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Department of Indiana, G. A. R., paidCampfield & Harri- 
son for four double cottages, as per contract |3,310 00 

John A. Logan W. R. C, No. 191 450 00 

Marsh B. Taylor W. R. C, No. 142 . 315 00 

Stark County .... 498 03 

Lawrence County 498 00 

Montgomery County 510 00 

Spencer County 498 flO 

Wabash County 515 40 

Tippecanoe County 2 783 37 

Vigo County 2,384 37 

Porter County 552 00 

Warren County 3 306 47 

White County 2,057 00 



29 



EXHIBIT B— Continued. 
1895. 

Newton Connty $538 00 

Floyd County 583 00 

Laporte County ],188 02 

Vanderburgh County 2,042 50 

Hendricks County 533 00 

Benton Connty. 945 00 

John A. Logan Circle 

Ladies of G. A. K., No. 7 450 00 

W. R. C, Department of Indiana 450 00 

Lake County 2,035 50 

Total $25,442 63 



MONEY RECEIVED TO FURNISH ROOMS. 
1895. 

Dec. 4. Fahler W. R. C, No. 81 

6. Delong W. R. C, No. 2 

10. George W. Stough W. R. C, No. 59 

10. Hardzog W. R. C, No. 36 

10. John Murry W. R. C, No. 140 

10. Judson Kirkpatrick, No. 58 

10. Howell W. R. C, No. 32 

19. A. L. Seaforth W. R. C, No. 159 

24. Isham Keith W. R. C, No. 199 

28. Auten W. R. C, No. 14 

28. Deacon W. R. C, No. 48 

31. Sim S. Bass W. R. C , No. 7 

1896. 

Jan. 2. Shiloh Field W. R. C, No. 5 

2. Joseph R. Gordon, No. 43 

2. George H. Thomas, No. 20 

7. Patton, No. 16 

10. Major Robert Anderson, No. 44 

10. Pap Thoma?, No. 113 

10. Samuel Reed, No. 160 

10. Ben North, No. 89 . . 

10. Samuel Stewart, No. 150 

10. Morgan, No. 146 

10. Gettysburg, No. 106 

15. Meade, No. 91 

H. G. Fisher, No. 104 

Feb. 4. Geo. H. Chapman W. R. C, No. 10 

4. Henry Chapman W. R. C, No. 162 

8. Lookout W. R.C, No. 72 

Mar. 10. Perryville W. R. C, No. 75 

19. Nelson Trusler W. R. C, No. 46— for Library . . . . 

25. Martin W. R. C, No. 130 

30. H. G. Fisher W. R. C, No. 104 



$5 00 


5 00 


50 00 


12 25 


5 00 


1 00 


50 00 


2 00 


10 00 


15 00 


5 00 


50 00 


50 00 


37 69 


50 00 


15 00 


50 00 


50 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


5 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


5 00 


50 00 


50 00 


20 00 



1896. 


April 10. 


10. 


10. 


10. 


May 2. 


2. 


2. 


2. 


2. 


2. 


11. 


11. 


Aug. 3. 



$5 oa 


25 00 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


35 00 


10 00 


5 00 


10 00 


25 00 


8 00 


5 00 


50 00 


50 00 


10 00 


50 00 



30 



EXHIBIT B— Continued. 

Ben. North W. E. C, No. 89 

Elmer W. E. C, No. 15 

Cambridge City W. E. C, No. 151 

Frank Jones W. E. C, No. 116 

Moses Heron W. E. C, No. 137 ^-. • . 

Sedgerwick AV. E. C, No. 13 p' 

Sam Henry W. E. C, No. 41 

Nevins W. E. C, No. 205 

Blinn W. E C, No. 144 . , 

E. T. Wood W. E. C, No. 33 ... 

Ja?. K. Slack W. E. C, No. 42 

Frank Beitzel W. E. C, No. 194 

E. C. Newland W. E. C, No. 135 — to furnish Lawrence Co, 

cottage 

Catherine E. Hirst, National Pres't Ladies of the G. A. E . 

Marsh B. Taylor W. E. C, No. 142 

Fairfax W. R. C, No. 71 

Total $1,074 94 



MISCELLANEOUS EECEIPTS. 
1895. 

July Sale of wood $15 00 

Aug. Sale of wood and posts 19 00 

Sept. Sale of wood 327 44 

Oct. Sale of logs 200 00 

Nov. Sale of logs 232 00 

Dec. Sale of posts 15 00 

Jan. Interest 52 00 

Feb. Vouchers 311, 312, 313, recovered into Treasury .... 1,543 75 
Soldiers' and Sailors' Eeunion Association of Central Indi- 
ana — to furnish parlor of Old People's Home 273 18 

Total $2,677 37 



DISBUESEMENTS OF MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 
1896. 

Mar. 6. Freeman Hopper, No. 36S $21 00 

6. Michael Cassidy, No. 369 . . 9 00 

6. A. H. Anstiss, No. 370 25 62 

6. LaFayette Lumber and Mfg. Co., No. 371 42 i4 

6. M. C. Meigs, No. 372 13 07 

6. J. D. Woods & Son, No. 373 . . 7 50 

6. Lemuel Carson, No. 374 12 00 

6. Lewis Eeplogle, No. 375 36 25 

6. F. A. Eeplogle, No. 376 8 75 



31 



EXHIBIT B— Continued. 

1896. 

Mar, 6. William Wilson, No. 377 |12 00 

6. Eli CoeD, No. 378 38 00 

6. H. Cassel & Sod, No. 379 10 00 

6. Geo. W. Henderson, No. 380 3 75 

6. H. H. Howard, No. 381 50 00 

6. W. V Sharp, No. .382 21 25 

6. Steveu. & Bedwards, No. 383 576 00 

6. O. P. Benjimine Mfg. Co., No. 384 70 09 

6. O. P. Benjimine Mfg. Co., No. 385 124 31 

6. Lloyd Jolly, No. 386 12 60 

6. J. F. Alexander & Son, No. 387 150 00 

6. Stevens & Bed ward?, No. 388 143 30 

6. Henry Taylor Lumber Co., No. 389 112 86 

6. Campfield & Harrison, No. 392 139 95 

6. Campfield & Harrison, No. i94 • 595 84 

6. S. B. Carr 9 00 

6. M.McCoyjTreae. Nat. Home, for Books 134 78 

A ril 6. Freeman Hopper 13 48 

6. Lloyd Jolly . 7 70 

- 6. H. H. Howard 52 00 

6. J. F. Alexander & Son 125(0 

6. S. H. Anstifs - - 12 83 

6. J. F. McBeth 6 00 

May 6. Stevens & Bedwards 249 15 

6. A. C. Sale 39 02 

6. Seeger Transfer Co 1 00 

6. A.C. Sale 41 62 

6. S. H. Anstriss . . 3 12 

6. Wells, Yeager, Best Co 43 38 

6. Albert Bryan 2 25 

6. H. H. Howard 14 00 

6. Jas. H. Ward 83 69 

6. Wallace Mfg. Co 10 00 

6. J. D. Wood & Son 11 00 

June 5. Wm. Armstrong & Co . . 229 73 

11. Jas. M. KoUinger ... 8 00 

11. E. J. Hammer 3 50 

.1. Campbell & Moore 11 54 

l1. Godman & Kirkpatrick 16 00 

11. Fort Wayne Electric Co ... 87 45 

1. Wm. B. Burford 68 60 

20. Postage 6 00 

July 25. Ft. Wayne Electric Co., int 18 26 

Aug. 4. E. B. Moore & Co 49 60 

4. Beilstein & Gerlach 87 70 

4. Freeman Hopper 14 00 

4. H. Cassel & Son 5 25 

4. C. M. Bartlett 6 85 



32' 



1896. 
Aug. 12. 
Sept. 23. 
Oct. 3. 



EXHIBIT B— Continued. 

J. D. Kichardson • • 

Troy Laundry Co., int . . . . 

M. L. Smith, int . . 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Keunion Association of Central In- 
diana to furnish parlor of Old People's Home .... 

Total 



127 50 

43 75 

8 17 



S3,786 70 



273 18 



$4,059 88 



EECAPITULATION. 



RECEIPTS. 

From Auditor of State 178,938 09 

For cottages • • • 26,172 11 

For furnishing rooms - '. 1,074 94 

From all other sources ... . 2,677 37 

Total receipts $108,862 51 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid on vouchers Nos. 1 to 356 inclusive $78,938 09 

Paid on construction of cottages by order of Trustees 25,442 63 

Paid for general expense by order of Trustees 4,059 88 

Total amount paid out . . . $108,440 60 

Cash on hand November 1, 1896 ... 421 91 

Total $108,862 51 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES B. WALLACE, 

Treasurer Ind. State Soldiers' Home, 



33 



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EXHIBIT D. 



ADJUTANT'S KEPORT OF EXPENDITURES OF INDIANA STATE SOL- 
DIERS' HOME FOR YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 

For quarter ending March 31, 1896 — 

Current expenses SI, 071 77 

Subsistance 847 79 

Clothing 60 19 

Household 265 01 

Hospital K^7 63 

Construction 9 00 

Farm 70 90 

$2,462 29 

For quarter ending June 30, 1896 — 

Current expenses §1,531 45 

Hospital 403 32 

S'lbsistence 2 301 65 

Clothing 501 87 

Household 1,101 35 

Construction 32 53 

Farm 201 65 

For quarter ending September 30, 1896— 

Current expenses SI, 556 31 

Subsistence 2,847 56 

Clothing 1,059 08 

Household 2,237 33 

Hospital ' 558 72 

Construction 116 28 

Farm 195 45 

For the month of October, 1896— 

Current expenses $395 06 

Subsistence 1,290 52 

Clothing 391 39 

Household 1 647 81 

Hospital. 113 46 

Construction. ... 100 91 

Farm 160 20 

4,399 35 

Aggregate $21,506 19 



6,073 82 



8,570 73 



47 

ADJUTANT'S REPORT OF RECEIPTS OF INDIANA STATE SOLDIERS' 
HOME FOR THE YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31, 1896. 

For the quarter ending March 31, 1896— 

By State appropriations $2,402 10 

By clothing (sales) 60 19 

*2,462 29 

For the quarter ending June 30, 1896 — 

By State appropriations $5,886 82 

By pensions retained 187 00 

6,073 82 

For the quarter ending September 30, 1896 — 

By State appropriation?. . . $7,267 05 

By pensions retained 115 35 

Sale of logs 100 00 

Barbershop 28 40 

Olothing. 1,059 93 

8.570 73 

Total $17,106 84 

For the month of October, 1896— 

Maintenance fund 2,886 80 

Total receipts $19,993 64 

To balance 1,512 55 

Total $21,506 19 

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct state- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures of the Indiana State 
Soldiers' Home from the 2d day of January, 1896, to October 
31, 1896. 

W. F. HAVENS, 
Adjutant and Quartermaster. 



48 
EXHIBIT E. 



KULES GOVERNING ADMISSION TO THE INDIANA STATE SOLDIERS^ 

HOME. 



WHO MAY BE ADMITTED. 

1. All honorably discharged soldiers, sailors and marines, 
who have served the United States in any war, and who have 
been residents of the State for one year immediately preceding 
the date of application, who may be disabled or destitute. Also 
the wives of such disabled or destitute soldiers, sailors and 
marines; and destitute widows over forty-live years of age, of 
such soldiers, sailors and marines, and who have been citizens 
of the State one year immediately preceding the date of ap- 
plication, and who are, at the time of making such application 
bona lida residents of the State. Provided, That such wives 
or widows shall have entered into the contract of marriage 
prior to February 23, 1895. 

2. Each applicant before being admitted will be required to 
execute before an officer having a seal, a formal application,, 
giving (if a male) domestic and military history, nature and 
degree of disability, which will be attested by a practicing 
physician in good standing, certificate of identification of at 
least two persons, as to citizenship. If the applicant is a wife, 
proof of marriage. If a widow, proof of service of her husband, 
and her widowhood must accompany the application, as also 
evidence as to her identity and citizenship. On receipt of 
these, due notice will be returned as to acceptance or otherwiseo 
This must not, however, be taken as an assurance of admission,, 
as this can only be definitely determined by the medical exam- 
ination of the Home surgeon. Discharge papers and pension 
certificates must accompany the application and will be re- 
tained in the office of the Home during membership. 

3. No person will be admitted who may be receiving a pen- 
sion in excess of twelve ($12.00) dollars per month: Provided^ 
hoivever, That such applicant may by reason of advanced age 
or other infirmities, be admitted, conditioned upon paying out 
of such pension such sum as may be required for his or her 



49 

special care and attention : It is further provided^ That such 
application shall, before being accepted, be referred to the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Board of Trustees for their action. 

4. Members receiving a pension of six ($6.00) dollars or up- 
wards will be required to pay for all clothing, tobacco, etc., 
but such member will not be bound by this rule if he is pro 
viding for dependent family. 

5. Insane persons will not be admitted, and the surgeon of 
the Home shall be the sole judge of the fitness of such appli- 
cants. 

6. Non-pensioners, having requisite qualification for mem- 
bership, will in the event of being crowded be given prefer- 
ence in the order of admission, and members who are in re- 
ceipt of pensions may, in the discretion of the Board of Trus- 
tees, be discharged or granted leave of absence to make room 
for those who are without pension and other means of support. 

7. Discharged members of the National Home (Marion 
Branch) will not be admitted until the expiration of two 
months from the date of such discharge, except as otherwise 
ordered by the Board of Trustees. 

8. It is expected that all persons admitted to the Home will 
cheerfully accord the management their support in the enforce- 
ment of such rules as may be laid down for their guidance, and 
to perform such reasonable service as may be required and is 
warranted by their physical condition. 

All necessary blanks will be furnished on application to 
James R. Carnahan, President Board of Trustees, Indianapolis, 
Indiana, to whom all correspondence relative to admission 
should be addressed. These rules shall be in force until such 
time as they may be changed by the Board of Trustees of the 
Home. 

By order of the Board of Trustees Indiana State Soldiers' 
Home. JAMES R. CARNAHAN, 

D. i^. FOSTER, President Board of Trustees. 

Secretary. 



4—1. S. S. Home. 



I 



% 1 



FORTr-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Boord of Control ond Superintendent 



CENTRAL INDIANA HOSPITAL FOR INSANE, 



Fi6caf Year Endino October 31, 1896. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 
1897. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 
Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, December 21, 1896. 

Keceived by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, 

Indianapolis, December 21, 1896. 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



December 21, 1896. 

Eeturned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

MYEON D. KING, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, December 
22, 1896. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 22d day of De- 
cember, 1896. 

THOMAS J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 



MEMBERS BOARD OP CONTROL. 

J. L. CARSON, President. 

JOHN OSTERMAN, - - - - Treasurer. 

D. H. DAVIS, Secretary. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

GEO. F. EDENHARTER, M. D. 

MATRON. 

MARION E. EDENHARTER. 

ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS — DEPARTMENT FOR MEN. 

P. J. WATTERS, M. D. 
FRANK M. WILES, M. D. 

ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS — DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

HARVEY W. RAINEY, M. D. 

MARY SMITH, M. D. 
FRANKLIN E. RAY, M. D. 

PATHOLOGIST. 

FRANK A. MORRISON, M. D. 

STEWARD. 

SIMON P. NEIDIGH. 

SECRETARY. 

CORNELIUS MAYER. 

RECORD CLERK. 

EVANGELINE M. SMITH. 

BOOKKEEPER. 

WILLIAM H. WILHELM. 

STOREKEEPER. 

JAMES E. SPROULE. 

PHARMACIST. 

JAMES C. JAMISON. 

CHIEF CARPENTER. 

WILLIAM E. COBB. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

EDWARD E. FROST. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF CONTROL. 



To the Honorable Claude Matthews, Governor of Indiana : 

Sir — In accordance with the requirement of the laws of Indi- 
ana governing the benevolent institutions, we, the members of 
the Board of Control for the Central Indiana Plospital for the 
Insane, hereby respectfully submit our report for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1896, setting forth in detail our var- 
ious acts relating to the management of said Hospital for the 
year, and suggesting such changes and appropriations as the 
necessities of the same demand for the period covered by the 
appropriations that will be made by the next General Assem- 
bly. Many of the much needed changes and improvements 
the Board had anticipated making daring the year just past 
had to be abandoned on account of the great reduction made 
by the last General Assembly in the appropriations for the 
various funds constituted for the support of the institutions. 

The value of the property belonging to the Hospital is, upon 
a careful appraisement, estimated as follows : 

Real estate $1,534,177 70 

Personal property 228,668 57 

Total $1,762,846 27 

For the support of the institution during the last year, the 
following sums were appropriated to the various funds by the 
last General Assembly, to wit: 

General Appropriations. 

Maintenance $240,000 00 

Clothing 10,000 00 

Repairs 10,000 00 

Special Appropriations. 

Painting 5,000 00 

Plumbing 5,000 00 

Laundry 8,000 00 



All of the above sums have been expended during the year, 
which is not surprising when we consider that they are many 
thousand dollars less than the appropriations made for the 
institution during each of the ten preceding years. A report 
in detail showing the expenditures from the various funds 
above mentioned is submitted herewith, the monthly allowance 
and expenditures being shown at the beginning thereof. 

The waste and discarded material sold from the institution 
during the fiscal year amounted to |1,719.51, which sum has 
been paid into the State Treasury. 

During the year both departments of the Hospital have con- 
tinued in that overcrowded condition of which we spoke in 
our last report, and some step should be taken by the General 
Assembly io give relief in this respect, thereby greatly adding 
to the health and comfort of the unfortunate individuals within 
the institution. To this end we wish to call special attention 
to the suggestions made by the Superintendent in his report 
to us, which is submitted herewith. 

The number of patients at the Hospital during the year is 
as follows : 

Total number at beginning of year 1,543 

JSTumber received during year 483 

Number discharged during year 306 

ITumber died during year 134 

Total number treated during year 2,026 

Number on rolls at close of year 1,586 

Daily average number on rolls 1,578.4 

The per capita cost for maintenance during the year esti- 
mated upon the total expenditure of the Maintenance Fund, 
was $152.05. But their having been expended from the fund 
the sum of $11,777.70 for permanent improvements, this should 
be deducted in estimating the per capita cost, thus leaving the 
true amount expended for purely maintenance purposes 
$228,822.80, making the actual per capita cost for maintenance 
$144.97. 

It is on account of the abundant supply of vegetables raised 
on the farm land during the season, which was very favorable, 
coupled with the exceedingly low market price prevailing for 
provisions of all kinds, that we have been able to maintain 
those iu the institution at this low per capita cost. 



The new kitchen into which we were moving at the time 
of filing our last report was entirely completed and equipped 
during the early part of the year. It has been furnished 
with the most modern equipments, so that now, with its 
abundant facilities for ventilation, the labor of those employed 
therein is greatly lightened, and the work can be done with 
a much smaller force than was required in the old one. We 
have also constructed in connection therewith, large ice chests, 
in which supplies and edibles are kept, thus keeping them 
fresh and wholesome. We have also erected email elevators 
leading from the kitchen to the tunnels through which the 
edibles are distributed to the various departments. 

The young trees set out to take the place of the forest 
trees killed by the drouth of two years ago are growing rap- 
idly and will, in a few years, add much to the shade and 
beauty of the grounds. 

The special appropiation of $5,000 made by the last Gen- 
eral Assembly for painting has been used in painting the 
gutters and outside woodwork of the two main buildings. 
Before the gutters could be painted it was necessary for us 
to make many repairs upon the tin and metal work connected 
therewith. 

The inside woodwork of the two main buildings is suffering 
for want of paint. Much of this has never been painted, 
and in many places that which was originally painted has 
worn entirely bare. An appropriation of $10,000 should be 
made for this purpose. 

The special appropriation of $5,000 made for plumbing has 
been used in repairing a portion of the plumbing in the main 
building of the Department for Men. But with this small 
sum only a portion of the work needed in this building could 
be done. The condition of the old plumbing remaining in 
this building, together with much of that in the main build- 
ing of the Department for Women, is such as to require im- 
mediate repair. For this purpose we would ask that an ap- 
propriation of $10,000 be made. 

During the summer, the boilers supplying the steam and 
heat for the institution have been repaired and put in good 
condition. 

During the summer we added some new and improved ma- 
chinery to the carpenter shop of the Hospital, by which all 



8 

the molding and carved woodwork used is now made by the 
carpenters' force, thus saving much mone}' to the institution, 
as the purchase heretofore of this material has been very 
expensive. 

The new building for the pathological department has now 
been fully completed, and equipped with all the necessary 
means for scientific research and study, for which this depart- 
ment was intended. Much credit is due the Superintendent 
for the services rendered by him in the erection and equip- 
ment of this building. This new department will be formally 
opened in a few weeks by appropriate ceremonies, conducted 
by the Marion County Medical Society. 

Many cement walks have been built during the past year, 
adding much to the beauty and convenience of the grounds 
immediately surrounding the buildings. 

There should be constructed a tunnel leading from the power 
house to the Department for Men. This is necessary in order 
that the pipes conveying steam and heat to this department 
may at all times be easy of access, and any breaks can be 
quickly discovered and repaired. For this purpose, a special 
appropriation of $4,000 should be made. 

A new fence is badly needed along the east, south and west 
sides of the Hospital grounds. To the low fence now existing 
on these sides of the grounds is due many of the escapes of 
patients. from the institution. For this purpose an appropria- 
tion of $5,000 is necessary. 

It is necessary that two new dining rooms be erected, one 
on each side of the wing in which is located the new kitchen. 
By this the present dining rooms would be moved from the 
close proximity to the patients' wards, where they are now 
located, and be entirely relieved from unpleasant odors and 
foul air coming from said wards. We would also by this 
arrangement be enabled to equip the present dining rooms so 
that the same could be used for patients, thus relieving in part 
the crowded condition of the institution. To accomplish this 
an appropriation of $20,000 is necessary. 

We would again renew the recommendation so often made 
for an appropriation of $5,000 to construct a new greenhouse. 
The great comfort derived by the patients from the flowers 
cultivated during the winter months, when their confinement 
is close, should, without further argument, cause this request 



to be granted. The dilapidated condition of the old green- ' 
house greatly detracts from tlie beauty of the grounds, being 
located near the front of the nriain building of the Department 
for Men, and it also requires great additional labor to preserve 
only a few flowers during the winter season. 

The special appropriations asked above for paintinsr, plumb 
ing, tunnel, greenhouse, fence and dining rooms, are absolute 
necessities, and the welfare of the institution demands that 
they receive favorable consideration at the hands of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. 

The needs of the entire institution demand that the appro- 
priations for the general funds constituted for the suyjport of 
the Hospital should be restored to the old figure at which they 
had been maintained for ten years prior to this year, viz.: 
Maintenance, $260,000; repairs, $15,000, and clothing, $12,000. 
Words can not too strongly express the necessity for the resto- 
ra'ion of these appropriat ons to the old amounts. Every 
argument that can be advanced demands it. The increased 
number of those demanding admission, together with the fact 
that all the buildings and personal property belonging to the 
institution need more care each year, requires an increased, 
rather than a decreased appropriation. 

The excellent service rendered during the past year by the 
Superintendent, Steward and all the officers and employes, and 
the exce lent discipline maintained throughout aU the depart- 
ments of the institution merits special mention. 

In closing, permit us to again urge that the requests herein 
made for new appropriations and the restoration of those 
regular funds to the old amounts, are not mere idle requests, 
but are made with the utmost earnestness, and every need of 
the institution demands that they be granted; and we invite 
the Committees on Benevolent Institutions that may be ap- 
pointed by the General Assembly to visit this institution and, 
by personal inspection, judge of the merits of our request. 

In managing the affairs of the institution, it has been our 
constant aim to add to the welfare and comfort of the unfor- 
tunate beings confined thei'ein, keeping in mind, also, the duty 
we owe to the people of the State, the expenditure of whose 
money has been entrusted to us. We have endeavored in all 



10 

things to do our full duty in the performance of this trust, 
rendering due service to each one concerned. 

J. L. CARSON, 
JOHN OSTERMAISr, 
D. H. DAVIS, 

Board of Control. 
Indianapolis, Ind., October 31, 1896. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT, 



To the Board of Control of the Central Indiana Hospital for the 
Insane : 

GfiNTLEMi-N — In accordance with the usual custom, the fol- 
lowing abstract from the statistical tables embodied in the 
report is arranged for your convenience: 

At the beginning of the year there were enrolled 1,543 
patients, 705 men and 838 women. At the close of the year 
we have remaining 1,586 patients, 711 men and 875 women. 

Four hundred and eighty-three patients, 251 men and 232 
women were admitted during the year. Discharged were 306 
patients, 167 men and 139 women; of these, two women were 
discharged as having been not insane. One hundred and 
thirty four patients, 78 men and 56 women, died during the 
year. 

Of the 251 men admitted, 240 were white and 11 colored. 
Of the 232 women admitted, 227 were white and five colored. 

Total number of patients under treatment 2,026; 956 men 
and 1,070 women. The daily average number under treatment 
was 1,578.4; 712.8 men and 865.6 women. 

One hundred and fifty patients, 80 men and 70 women, were 
discharged as recovered. Of the 483 patients admitted during 
the 3^ear, 71 men and 59 women recovered ; 37 men and 39 
women were discharged as improved, and 29 men and 16 women 
died. 

Percentage of recoveries to the total number of patients 
under treatment, 7.45. Percentage ot recoveries to daily av- 
erage number under treatment, 9.5. Percentage of recover- 
ies to the total number admitted during the year, 31.05. 

Percentage of deaths to the total number patients enrolled, 
6.69. Percentage of deaths to the daily average number under 
treatment, 8.43. 



12 



Two women were discharged to be transferred to the North- 
ern Indiana Hospital for the Insane. There are yet seven men 
and forty-six women in care of this Hospital who belong to 
other districts of Indiana Insane Hospitals. 



MEDICAL STAFF. 



The same physicians constitute our Medical stafi as in pre- 
vious years of our administration. 

ESCAPES. 

During the year there were seventeen escapes, all but two of 
these were recaptured. 

CASUALTIES. 

None to report this year. 



IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS. 



Outside of those especially mentioned in this report, we were 
not able (financially) to inaugurate any. 

BOILER HOUSE. 

This department has been repaired in its entirety, all boilers 
and pumps being placed in good condition. 

PLUMBING AT DEPARTMENT FOR MEN. 

The plumbing at this department has been partially remod- 
eled ; there yet remains a great deal to do before this depart- 
ment is in a sanitary condition. 

KITCHENS. 

The " Officers' " and the " Night " kitchens at D. F. W. have 
been supplied with new ranges, the old ones being absolutely 
beyond repair. 



13 

NEW KITCHEN AT D. F. M. 

This kitchen is now in successful operation, and its removal 
from the basement has added greatly to the sanitary condition 
of the Department for Men. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The facilities for fire services are now in very fair condition ; 
quite a number of fire extinguishers were purchased during the 
year. 

CEMENT WALKS. 

The policy of constructing cement walks has been continued. 

SHADE TREES AND SHRUBBERY. 

Quite a large number of shade trees were planted, most of 
them in the grove adjoining the Department for Women. 

AMUSEMENTS. 

These have been continued as opportunity ofifered, consisting 
mainly of entertainments, dancing and base ball. 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 

There has been an apparent increase in the attention given 
these services. ■ • x- 

GENERAL LIBRARY. . 

A number of new books were purchased. In addition ta 
these the Library received the usual donation of twenty-five 
dollars for the purchase of books from P. H. Jameson, M. D.^ 
whose interest in the patients is very praiseworthy. 

CHAPEL. 

This has been thoroughly overhauled, being repainted and 
refloored. 

SURGERY AND DINING ROOM. 

The surgery and dining-room on the "sick" ward at the 
Department for Men have been repainted and provided with 
new furniture. They are now in as good condition as the 
building will permit. 



14 



PAINTING. 



During the year the wood work on exterior of both main 
buildings has been painted. 



TIN WORK. 

This class of work on both buildings has been repaired and 
is now io good condition. 

PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

This department is now practically complete. It is a great 
■credit not only to the State, but reflects the greatest wisdom 
upon the part of the Board of Control. The benefits to the 
people will be very great. Personally I can not command 
language sufficiently strong to express my full appreciation of 
your progressive conduct in the matter. 

For the information of the Board of Control, and also for 
those who do not receive our large report, I have included in 
this an invoice of our working facilities in this department. 

This will enable other persons (professional and otherwise) 
to correctly estimate whether our claim made in former reports 
is justifiable. 

In connection with this department it is with pleasure that 
we acknowledge a donation to the Medical Library of fifty-five 
volumes from William Wood & Co., New York. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

It is to be hoped that the coming General Assembly, upon a 
full and complete investigation of the actual condition of our 
property will see the necessity for sufficient appropriations to 
retrieve the same frona the decay into which it has fallen, and 
without attempting to indicate to you just what sums should 
be asked for, I trust that for the sake of humanity you will 
make the strongest appeal possible. 

KITCHEN DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

This kitchen and its entire outfit, with the exception of the 
range, is a disgrace to the institution and should be removed. 
The old boiler house presents the best location for this purpose. 



15 



SLEEPING ROOMS. 



Sleeping rooms should be provided to accommodate all the 
employes who are now occupying rooms upon the wards. 



BAKERY. 



A separate building should be constructed for this purpose^ 
as it is at present not only inadequate, but a constant menace 
to the Hospital and the lives of its inmates. 



TUNNEL. 



A tunnel of sufficient diameter to carry all pipes, etc., from 
the Power House to the Department for Men should be con- 
structed. 



GREEN HOUSE. 



The present structure is a blot upon the grounds of the in- 
stitution. It is absolutely dangerous to life as well as unsightly. 



FENCE. 



I again call your attention to the necessity of constructing a. 
fence on the north and west side of our grounds. 



FURNITURE. 



An especial effort should be made the coming year to replace 
the greater portion of our furniture, much of which is abso- 
lutely beyond repair and unfit for use. 



GARBAGE. 



In awarding the next contract for the removal of garbage it 
is essential to demand that the contractor provide air-tight 
vessels for its storage and removal. 



16 



HOSPITAL. 



The Legislature should be asked to provide additional room 
for the patients of our district. We are not only greatly over- 
crowded, but have a great many cases awaiting admission. I 
would urge that the proper action under the circumstances is 
to provide a hospital with a capacity for 100 beds, thus reliev- 
ing the " sick" wards in our present buildings and utilizing the 
room thus secured for our patients. 

It is unnecessary for me to argue to you that I believe this 
building should be absolutely modern in its construction and 
facilities, fully equipped to meet all legitimate requirements. 

NEW DINING ROOMS, D. F. M. 

In addition to the room secured by the construction of the 
Hospital there should be provided at the Department for Men 
two new buildings for dining-room purposes. This will permit 
the vacation of wards now used and will give us an additional 
space for patients. It is absolutely necessary for sanitary rea- 
sons to remove these dining rooms from the building. 

DETENTION DEPARTMENT. 

I will once more call your attention to a building that is es- 
sential for the proper conduct of Hospital service. This is a 
department for the detention of acute cases, where they may 
be individually studied and treated and their proper place in 
the Hospital determined. 

PAVILIONS FOR CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

In my previous report I also called attention to the great 
need of p:ivilions for the treatment of contagious diseases. 
The necessity for the same has not passed away. 

BUILDINGS FOR CONVALESCENTS. 

A building at each department should be provided for con- 
valescents. This would greatly enhance the prospect of re- 
covery in many patients 



17 



PAINTIN(!. 



The entire interior of tlie Hospital needs painting for sani- 
tary reisons. Some of the wards have never been painted. 



PLUiMBING. 

The plumbing at°both departments needs attention, the work 
so well begun at the Department for Men should be com- 
pleted, and that at the Department for Women entirely re- 
modeled. 

FIRE SERVICE. 

I most respectfully but urgentl}^ recommend to the Board 
that a contract be entered into with the Indianapolis Water 
Company to provide a line of water pipe encircling both main 
buildings for fire use only. In addition to the above I repeat 
my request for several fire-escapes, especially at the Depart- 
ment for Men. 

PAVILIONS. 

A number of pavilions for patients should be constructed in 
the grove adjoining the Department for Women ; they are 
absolutely necessary for the proper protection of our patients. 

EMPLOYES. 

The employes have, as a rule, been faithful and prompt in 
the discharge of their duties. 

In conclusion, I again acknowledge myself under obligations 
to the Board for many acts of kindness, but above all for 
their great interest and hearty cooperation in all that pertains 
to the welfare of the institution and the patients therein. 

Very respectfully, 

G. F. EDENHARTER, 

Superintendent. 



2 — Cent. Insane. 



18 



Movement of Population Fiscal Year 1895-1896. 



GENERAL RESULTS. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Remaining at beginning of the year 

Admitted during the year 

Whole number treated 

Discharged as recovered 

Discharged as improved 

Discharged as unimproved 

Discharged as not insane 

Died 

Remaining at close of the year ._......, 

Per cent, recovered of vrhole number treated during the year 
Per cent died of whole number treated during the year . . . 
Average daily number under treatment 



705 

251 

956 

80 

68 

19 



78 

711 
8.36 
8.15 

7128 



232 
1,070 
70 
51 
16 
2 
56 
875 
6.54 
5.23 
865.6 



1,543 
483 
2,026 
150 
119 
35 
2 
134 
1,586 
7.45 
6.69 
1,578.4 



Admissions^ Discharges and Deaths from Beginning of the Hos- 
pital. 



RESULTS. 



Men. 


Women. 


10,016 


9,015 


4,413 


3,908 


1,309 


1,520 


1,305 


1,408 


36 


27 


1,512 


1,268 


8,575 


8,131 



Total. 



Admitted 

Discharged as recovered. . 
Discharged as improved . . 
Discharged as unimproved 
Discharged as not insane . 

Died 

Total discharged and died. 



19,031 
8,321 
2.829 
2,713 
63 
2,780 

16,706 



19 



Age and Marital Condition of Those Admitted, Discharged and Died. 

















DISCHARGED. 










AGE. 




Restored. 


Otherwise. 




Men. 


Wom'n. 


Men. 


Wom'n. 


Men. 


Wom'n. 


Men. 


Wom'n. 




S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


Under 15 years 
15 to "20 years 
20 to 25 years . 
25 to 30 years 
30 to 40 yenrs 
40 to 50 years 
50 to 60 years 
60 to 70 years 
70 to 80 years . 






23 
28 
23 
18 

1 
1 
1 

108 


1 

9 

30 

39 

35 

16 

2 

2 

9 

143 


1 

15 

11 

14 

17 

7 

4 

2 

71 


2 

13 

14 

46 

84 

29 

11 

7 

2 

3 

161 


1 

9 

7 
9 
5 
5 
2 

38 


6 
11 
15 

6 

4 

42 


1 
9 
1 
4 
2 
1 

1 
19 


1 
3 
1 

17 
12 
13 
4 
2 

53 


3 
7 
12 
14 
6 
2 
1 

2 
47 


' i 
9 

12 
9 
3 
3 

40 


5 
6 

5 
5 

4 

2 
27 


1 
2 
5 
8 
11 
4 
7 
2 

40 


2 

7 
5 
4 
2 
2 

5 
27 


2 
1 
7 

12 
19 
7 
3 

51 


5 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 

8 
29 


1 

1 
5 
10 
5 
2 


Over 80 years 
Unknown . . 

Total . . . 




3 

27 



Of the number above recorded as married were : 

Admitted— Twelve widowers, 38 widows, 13 divorced. 

Di>charged — Four widowers, 20 widows, 9 divoiced. 

Died— Three widowers, 11 widows. 

Of the number above recorded as restored, two were discharged as not insane. 



Duration of Treatment of Those Discharged and Died. 



TIME. 



DISCHARGED. 



Restored. Otherwise 



DIED. 



Under 1 month. ■ . 
From 1 to 2 months 
From 2 to 3 months 
Krom 3 to 6 months 
From 6 to 9 months 
From 9 to 12 months. 
From 1 to 2 years. . 
From 2 to 3 years. . 
From 3 to 4 years. . . 
From 4 to 5 years. 
Over 5 years 



Total. 



fO 72 



67 



20 



Admissions, Discharges and Deaths by Counties During the Year. 



..' : r -. ...-, \.:-r. • 


Admitted. 


Dis- 
charged. 


Died. 


. ■ COUNTIES. 




!3 

a 

o 


a 


a 

a 





a 

a 




7 
4 
4 
3 
2 
4 
8 
2 
1 

10 
4 

'9 
3 
2 
9 

7 


9 

■3 
3 
6 
6 
7 

10 
3 
7 

■ '4 
2 
5 
4 
2 

■5 
1 
3 


4 
2 

1 

' "1" 

2 
2 

■4 
5 

■ '6 

5 
4 
5 
6 

■ '3 

3 

1 

" '6 


4 

■ 'i 

'3 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

1 

2 
3 
1 
1 

' 'i 

3 

■ '3 

1 
2 
1 

38 
3 
7 
3 

■3 

■ "2 

3 

2 
4 
3 
1 

1 
4 

1 

' 12 

1 
2 
3 

1 


1 
1 

2 
1 

4 
1 
2 
3 
5 
1 

■ '1 

1 

2 
2 


3 








1 




1 






Clark 


1 


day 






1 




2 


ployd 


2 






Franklin 










1 
















5 
1 


1 

■ '2 

' '3 

22 

1 
2 

'l 
2 

■ "l 

■ 'l 


4 




1 














5 


5 








Marion ... 


8fi 
8 
3 


71 
3 

8 
3 

1 
1 
3 

■ '6 

3 
2 
3 

3 
12 

1 

■ 21 


56 
4 
4 
1 

'2 
3 

'4 
■3 

■fi 

'2 
12 


18 








2 


Ohio 




1 




3 

5 




Parke .... 




Pike 


1 




1 
5 


3 


Ripley , . 


2 




1 




6 


1 








1 
9 
6 
3 
15 






'3 
2 
3 
6 


1 




3 












4 








5 
5 


3 
3 


3 

5 








1 


2 




















251 


232 


167 


139 


78 


56 







21 



Occupation of Those Admitted During the Year. 



OCCUPATION. 



Men. 



Women. 



Architect 

Barber 

Bartender 

Bricklayer 

Butcher 

Carpenter 

Cigar dealer 

Cigarmaker 

Clerk 

Coal miner 

Cook 

Cooper. 

Domestic 

Dressmaker 

Druggist 

Electrician 

Engineer 

Farmer 

Gasdriller 

Hammerman . . . . 
Harnessmaker . . . 
Heading joiner , . . 

Hostler 

Hotelkeeper 

Housekeeper . . . . 

Housewife 

Ironworker 

Laborer 

Lawyer 

Miller 

Machinist 

Mechanic 

Milliner 

Moulder 

Musician 

Newspaper man. . . 
Oil peddler . . 

Painter 

Paperhanger . . . . 

Physician 

Policeman 

Porter 

Preacher 

Printer 

Kailroad clerk . . . 
Railroad engineer . 
Real estate agent . . 

Salesman 

Saloonkeeper . . . . 
School girl . . . . 
School teacher . . . 

Seamstress 

Servant 

Shoemaker . . . . 
Stenographer . . . . 

Student 

Tailor 

Teamster 

Tinner 

Traveling salesman. 
Upholsterer . . 
Washerwoman . . . 
Watchmaker . . . . 
Wood carver . . . 
Wood turner . . . . 

None 

Unknown 



Total 



1 
1 
1 

16 
23 

251 



38 

108 



232 



22 



Cause of Insanity of Those Admitted During the Year. 



CAUSE OF INSANITY. 



Abandoned by children . . 
Burning of his home . . . 
Cerebro hemorrhage . . . . 

Child-birth 

Death of wife 

Death in family 

Death of father and sister . 
Defect of vision ._ - , 

Disappointment in love 

Disease of skin 

Domestic trouble 

Epilepsy . . . . 

Excessive use of alcohol 
Excessive use of morphine , 

Financial trouble 

Fracture of cranium . . . 
Fright. 



Hereditary 

Ill health _. 

Inflammation of brain 

Injury 

Insolation 

Intemperance 

Jealousy 

Kicked by horse ... 

LaGrippe 

Law suit 

Loss of child . . 

Loss of employment . . 

Loss of property . . . 

Malaria fever 

Masturbation 

Meningitis 

Menopausa . . . 

Menstrual trouble . - . 
No cause (not insane). 

Old age 

Overheated . . . • . 

Overstudy 

Paralysis . , 

Political excitement 
Puerpal condition . . . 
Railroad accident 
Relieious excitement. . 
Shock . . 
Seduction of daughter . 

Sunstroke 

Syphilis 

Typhoid fever 

Unknown. 



Total 




Women. 




23 

Number of Attacks and Duration Before Admission of Those Ad- 
mitted. 



ATTACKS AND DURATION. 


Men. 


Women. 




55 
43 
30 
19 


23 




35 


First attack, 3 to 6 months' duration 

First attack, 6 to 9 months' duration 


29 

19 

6 




28 
10 
15 

27 
5 


19 


First attack, 2 to 3 years' duration 


8 


First attack, over 3 years' duration 


11 

44 


Third attack 


14 




2 




5 
14 


3 




19 






Total 


251 

37 


232 


Of the above were recommitted 


62 



Cause of Death. 



CAUSE. 



Men. 



Woi 



Aortic insufficiency 

Apoplexy ■ • 

Cerebro congestion 

Cerebro hemorrhage 

Cerebro softening 

Consumption 

Congestion of the lungs . . . 

Convulsions 

Convulsions and exhaustion , 

Convulsions, paretic 

Diarrhoea, chronic 

Dysentery 

Dysentery, acute 

Epilepsy 

Exhaustion 

Exhaustion of dementia . . . 
Exhaustion of epilepsy . . . 
Exhaustion of mania 
Exhaustion of melancholia . 

(iastritis 

General paralysis 

Heart, fatty degeneration . . 
Heart, valvular disease ■ ■ 
Inflammation of the bowels . 

Meningitis 

Myelitis, chronic 

Nephritis, chronic 

Old age 

Ovarian tumor 

Paresis 

Pachymeningitis 

Peritonitis 

Phthisis 

Pneumonia . . 

Pulmonary hemorrhage . . . 
Pulmonary tuberculosis . . . 
Rheumfttism, chronic . . . , 

Senile debility 

Spinal sclerosis 

Sufi'ocation 

Tuberculosis 

Typhoid fever 



Total 



78 



24 



Movement of Population by Months for the Year. 



MONTHS. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



Kecov- 
ered. 



Im- Unim- 
prov'd. prov'd. 



Not 
Insane. 



Died. 



November, 1895 
December, 1895 
Janmry, 1896 
February, 1896. 
March, 1896 . 
April, 1896. . . 
May, 1896 . . 
June, 1896 . . 
July. 1896 . . 
August, 1896. 
September, 1896 
October, 1896 . 

Total . . . 



251 



232 



80 70 



68 51 



19 



16 



78 



56 



Form of Insanity of Those Admitted During the Year. 



FORM OF INSANITY. 


Men. 


Women. 


Alcoholism, acute 


7 
5 
10 
7 
3 
9 
6 




Alcoholism, chronic 




Dementia 




Dementia, primiry 




Dementia, parnlytic 




Dementia, isenile 


7 


Dipsomania 


3 


Epileptic insanity 


1 


Feeble-minded ... 




1 
2 


Imbecile 




Mania, acute 


55 
12 
19 


38 


Mania, chronic 


25 


Mania, epileptic 


g 


Mania, hysterical 


1 


Mania, periodic 


7 
23 

1 
53 

5 
12 

7 




Mania, recurrent 


27 


Melancholia . . ' 


2 


Melancholia, acute 


78 


Melancholia, agitata 

Melancholia, chronic 


' ' 8 


Melancholia, recurrent 


29 


Not insane 


2 


Morphomania 


3 
1 
6 

251 




Paranoia . 




Paresis 




Total 


232 







25 



Nativity of Those Admitted During the Year. 



NATIVITY, 


Men. 


Women. 


United States 


200 
3 

1 
1 
3 
13 
3 
1 


199 






























Poland 




Scotland 


1 
1 
24 

251 










18 


Total ... 


232 







Education of Those Admitted During the Year. 



EDUCATION. 


Men. 


Women. 


Collegiate 


14 

215 
17 

5 


8 




195 




20 


Unknown 


9 








Total 


251 


232 







Color of Those Admitted During the Year. 



COLOR. 


Men. 


Women. 


White 


240 
11 


227 


Colored 


5 








Total 


251 


232 







26 



EXHIBIT No. 1. 



Statement of Revenues and Disbursements of the Central Indiana 
Hospital for Insane for the Fiscal Year ending October 31, 
1896: 

Maintenance fund $240,000 00 

Expended November, 1895 $19,247 43 

Expended December, 1895 19,674 69 

Expended January, 1896 19,625 43 

Expended February, 1896 20,150 99 

Expended March, 1896 - 18,305 81 

Expended April, 1896 20,782 32 

Expended May, 1896 18,563 61 

Expended June, 1896 18,778 17 

Expended July, 1896 19,651 48 

Expended August, 1896 21,042 23 

Expended September, 1896 . 17,377 98 

Expended October, 1896 26,799 86 

Total $240,000 00 $240,000 00 



Repair fund $10,000 00 

Expended November, 1895 

Expended December, 1895 

Expended January, 1896 

Expended February, 1896 

Expended March, 1896 

Expended April, 1896 

Expended May, 1896 - 

Expended June, 1896 

Expended July, 1896 

Expended August, 1896 

Expended September, 1896 

Expended October, 1896 

Total $10,000 00 



$715 21 


948 


28 


1,066 


75 


616 


41 


763 52 


762 


20 


687 


41 


640 05 


577 


90 


1,013 


10 


1,004 28 


1.204 89 


$10,000 00 



27 



Clothing fund $10,000 00 

Expended November, 1895 

Expended December, 1895 

Expended January, 1896 

Expended February, 1896 

Expended March, 1896 

Expended April, 1896 

Expended May, 1896 

Expended June, 1896 

Expended July, 1896 

Expended August, 1896 

Expended September 1896 

Expended October, 1896 

Total $10,000 00 



Laundry fund $8,000 00 

Expended November, 1895 $8,000 09 



1536 2b 


1,060 56 


697 


65 


564 


23 


661 


47 


577 


95 


2,010 


51 


509 


55 


417 


88 


1,062 


27 


649 


19 


1,252 49 


$10,000 00 



Plumbing fund $5,000 00 

Expended September, 1896 • . . . $4,324 42 

Expended October, 1896 675 58 



Total $5,000 00 $5,000 00 



Painting fund $5,000 00 

Expended May, 1896 $2,489 03 

Expended June, 1896 2,120 60 

Expended July, 1896 390 37 



Total $5,000 00 $5,000 00 



Eecapitulation : 

Maintenance fund $240,000 00 

Kepairfund 10,000 00 

Clothing fund 10,000 00 

Laundry fund 8,000 00 

Plumbing fund 5,000 00 

Painting fund 5,000 00 



Total $278,000 00 



EXHIBIT No." 2. 



Stattment of Vouchers of Expenditures from Maintenance Fund 
Daring the Fiscal Year Ending October 31^ 1896. 



No. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



George F. Edenharter, Supt . 
Rev. W. A. Hendrickson . . . 
Swift Bros. ... . . . . . 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

3. R. Budd &, Co 

Indianapolis Journal 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

J. L. Keach 

The Singer Manufacturing Co 

John O'Neill 

V. Bachman. . . . - . 

Indiana Butter Co 

J. M. Nelson 

Cin. Gis Fixture Co 

John Van Range Co. 

E. C. Andrews 

H. A. Wright Co 

A. W. Williams 

M.J. O'Reilly 

Willi tms & Hunt 

General Electric Co 

Kipp Bros. Co . . . 

Fred (ioepper 

Artificial Ice Co 

J. Trost k Son 

Frank McCaslin 

Fleischinann & Co 

Collier & Murphy 

Laakmann & Sherer 

W. C. Frazee 

L B. Webb 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 

C. W. Sullivan 

Indiana Paper Co 

Wayne & Broeking . . . . 
Hildebrand Hardware Co . . . 

Francke & fechindler 

Severin, Ostermeyer & Co . . 

D. P. Erwin k Co 

Joseph Gardner 

John Scheid <& Co 

Burris-Herzseh Co 

J. R. Ryan k Co 

Arthur Jordan Co . 

Geo. Hitz & Co 

H. Syerup & Sons 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Brook' Oil Co 

Danl. Stewart 

Wm. B. Burlord 

H. Techentin ct Co 

Indianapolis News 

McElwaine-Richards Co . . . 
Frommeyer Bros . . . 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co . . . 

J.E.Bell 

Mans. Natural Gas Co . . . . 

A.Bruner&Co 

Geo. T. Evans 

John O'Neill 

Indjanapolis Sentinel Co . . . 

Indianapolis News 

Indianapolis Journal 

C. J. Gardner 



Contingent fund. . . 

Sermons 

Beef 

Hams 

Lard 

Poultry 

Advertising 

Gas 

Apples • 

Needles 

Flour . 

Flour 

Butterine 

Tea 

Reflectors 

Potato peelers. . . . 

Chip soap 

Mince meat 

Making carpet. . . . 

Smithing 

Sal soda 

Lamps 

Pipes, etc 

Coke 

Ice 

Cider ........ 

Hay 

Yeast 

Coffins 

Cement walk . . 

Milk 

Smithing 

Contingent expenses 
Main pay-roll .... 

Plastering 

Toilet paper. . . . . 
Pots and covers . . . 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Groceries 

Dry goods 

Tinners' supplies . . 

Oysters ■ 

Hair brushes . . . . 

Meal, etc 

Eggs 

Potatoes, etc . . . . 

Cider 

Telegrams 

Oil 

Drugs 

Stationery 

Blankets 

Advertising 

Engineer's supplies. 
Queensware . . . . 
Advertising . . . . 
Legal services. . . . 

Fuel gas 

Sewers 

Flour 

Flour 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Advertising. . . . . 
Beef and veal . . . . 



29 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 



Switt Bros 

J.L.Kench 

Geo. Hitz &Co 

H. Syerup Ji: Sons 

Indiana vVire Works . . . . 
Mans. Natural Gas Co. . . 
Con. Coal and Lime Co . . . 

Francis Bergman 

D.P.Erwin & Co 

Arthur Jordan Co 

Elgin Dairy l!o 

Indiana Paper Co 

P. G. Kamps 

Frommeyer Bros 

Chas. Mayer & Co. 

A. Kiefer Drug Co. . . . . 
Goth & Co ... . 
Indiana Institute for Blind 
Wm. H. Armstrong & Uo . . 

J. R. BuddifeCo 

Murphy. Hibben & Co. . . . 

J.T.Smith & Co 

John Zimmerman 

CoMier & Murphy . . . 

n.U. Telephone Co 

M.J. O'Reilly 

Kipp Bros Co 

H. A. Wright Co 

Williams it Hunt 

Indianapolis Chemical Co . 
Rev. W. A. Hendrickson . . 

P'red Goepper 

Polar Ice Co 

Middleton & Logsdon . . 
Joseph Gardner . ... 

John Van Range Co ... - 

Hollweg & Reese 

J. C Hirschman. 

W. C. Frrtzee 

Indianapolis Gas Co ... . 

J. E. Bell 

Dageett & Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co. 

Fleisch'iian & Co 

Kirkhoff Bros 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Francke & Schindler . . . . 
Hildebrand Hardware Co . 
Parrott & Taggart. . . 

Severin. Ostermeyer & Co. 
Dodd. Werner & Co . 
Geo. F. Krlenharter, Supt . - 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . 

J. H. Ballman 

Wm. Robinson 

L. E Webb 

Wm. L.Elder 

Wm. B. Burford 

Brooks Oil Co 

J. L. Carson 

D. H. Davis 

John Osterman 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Swift Bros . ...... 

Arthur Jordan Co 

John O'Neill 

Blanton Milling Co 

Bernhard Stern & Son . . . 
Rev. W. A. Hendrickson . . 

A. A. McCray 

Williams & Hunt 

J. E. Bell 

Friedman Mfg. Co . . . . 
Murphy, Hibben & Co . . . 
Kipp Bros. Co 



Hams and lard ... 

Apples 

Apples 

Potatoes, etc 

Window guards .... 

Fuel gas 

Coal 

Sal soda 

Dry goods 

Poultry 

Butterine 

Paper bags 

Oysters 

Queensware 

Pipes, etc 

Drug:! 

Letters on slab .... 

Brooms 

Surgeon's silk, etc . . 

Eggs. 

Blankets, etc 

Meal 

Dumb waiters 

Coflfins, etc. .... 

Rent of telephones, etc 

Smithing 

Balls, etc 

Mince meat 

Soap . ... 

Boiler compound . . . 

Sermons . 

Coke 

Ice , 



Brooms 

Tinners' supplies . . 

Roasters 

< ups, etc 

Husks 

Milk. . . . . 

Gas 

Legal services .... 
'■•andy and nuts . . . 

Telegrams 

Yeast 

Plumbing 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Hardware 

i-rackers 

Groceries 

Electric fixtures. 
Contingent expenses 
Main pay-roll . . . 
Painting, etc .... 

Straw 

Smithing 

Chairs 

Stationery 

Oil 

Necessary expenses . 
Necessary expenses . 
Necessary expenses . 

Beef, etc 

Lard ... 

Poultry 

Meal, etc 

Flour 

Flour ....... 

Sermon 

Coal 

Soap, etc 

Legal services .... 

Butterine 

Blankets, etc .... 
Brushes, etc . . 



8545 87 

48 18 

41 25 
281 01 

10 .50 

257 69 

1,131 20 

31 23 
624 11 
302 72 
453 fiO 
8 52 
210 40 

59 84 

47 50 

74 23 
16 00 

87 50 
6 75 

231 00 
412 95 

8 00 
140 00 

20 00 
85 25 

4 50 

57 37 
45 00 

381 73 

75 00 
25 00 

9 00 

88 39 
10 00 

138 53 

8 50 

10 34 

53 44 

558 00 

94 38 
50 00 

110 75 
1 25 

15 13 
673 00 
452 12 

4 89 

4 50 
131 ?A 

1,588 75 
2'09 85 
2f^2 13 

6,916 35 

58 95 

16 42 
16 25 

30 00 

49 09 
33 47 

42 75 
45 50 

21 75 
2,387 S9 

198 05 
108 87 

31 25 
393 75 
418 75 

5 on 

20 00 

382 90 

50 00 
468 00 

81 75 

95 15 



30 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 



Indianapolis Gas Co 

Manlrs. Natural Gas. Co 

Sanders & Recker 

F. G. Kamps 

A.Steffen 

McCurdy & Smith 

VVm. H. Armstrong & Co 

D.P. Erwin & Co 

Hide, Leather & Belting Co .... 

Joseph Gardner 

Frommeyer Bros 

Burris-Herzseh Co 

L. E. Morrison 

Indianapolis Light & Power Co . . 

VV.C.Frazee 

Collier &: Murphy 

H. Lieber Co 

H. Teehentin & Co ... . .... 

Francke ife Schindler 

J. L Keach . 

Indianapolis.Journal 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Indianapolis News 

H Lauter . 

Eastman, Schleicher & Lee .... 

Severin, Ustermeyer & Co 

Parrott & Taggart 

P.F.Bryee 

Daniel Stewnrt Co 

Geo. J . Mayer . . 

Chas. Mayer & Co - . 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent 

City Ice Co 

L. E.Webb 

Wm B. Burford 

Jos. P. Flack : . ■ • 

Clemens Vonnegut 

John Wncher 

Brooks Oil Co 

J. M. Nelson 

Hollweg & Reese 

Francis Bergman 

Hoosier Manufacturing Co 

Indianapolis Journal 

Indiana|iolis Seniinel Co 

Indianapolis News 

Elgin Dairy Co . . 

Arthur Jordan Co 

M. 0'<'onn' r & Co 

Chas. Mayer & Co 

Baike & Krause Co 

Albert Gall . 

H. Lieber Co 

Huntington Seed Co .... 

Singer Manufacturing Co 

Coons & Witty 

Whitall. Tatum & Co 

Blanton Milling Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

General Rlectric Co 

McCray Rpfrigerator Co . 
American Laundry Machine Co . . 

Reedy Elevator Co 

Edward Mueller 

Indianapolis Chemical Co 

Indiana Institute for Blind . . 

J.B.Bell 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Burris-Herszsch Co 

Kipp Bros. Co 

Goth & Co 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

G. A. Carstensen 

M.J. O'Reilly 



Gas 

Fuel gas 

Chairs, etc 

Oysters 

Tobacco 

Wire, etc 

Syringes, etc . . . . 

Ticking, etc 

Laces 

Iron, etc 

Queensware 

Bible ...... 

Rubber blankets . 
Carbons, etc . ■ . . 

Milk 

Coffins, etc 

Pictures, etc ... 
Harness, etc . . . . 
Hardwre .... 
Pot itoes, etc . . . . 
Advertising . . . . 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Tables 

Carpets, etc 

Groceries 

Crackers 

Crackers 

Drugs, etc 

Stamps, etc 

Hat racks, etc . . . . 
Coi tingent expenses 
Main pay-roll . . . 

lee 

Smithing 

Stationery 

Eggs 

Hardware 

Insurance 

Oil 

Tea ...... 

Cuspidors, etc . . . 
Salsoda ...... 

Soap 

Advertising . . . . 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Butterine 

Epgs 

Tobacco 

Brushes, etc . . . . 

Lumber 

Shades 

Pictures, etc 

Labels 

Oil 

Fire extinguishers . 
Glassware, etc. . . 

Flour 

Oil 

Wire, etc . . . 

Cooling rooms . . . 
Springs . . . . 

Follower, etc . . . 
Seeds, etc 
Boiler compound 

Brooms 

Legal services . . . 

Hardware 

Brushes, etc . . . . 
Brushes, etc ... 

Radiator 

Hams 

Sermons 

Smithing 



31 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 


89 80 


85 31 


1 05 


18 00 


116 79 


44 03 


522 00 


227 24 


1 68 


18 10 


14 20 


132 39 


10 00 


223 23 


182 75 


68 50 


200 00 


12 00 


23 13 


105 40 


1,872 80 


1,388 89 


3 25 


6 00 


175 90 


225 10 


36 70 


1,651 38 


1,065 54 


6,950 60 


12 25 


88 25 


25 50 


30 38 


102 60 


690 00 


105 15 


177 90 


5 00 


91 40 


1,673 42 


296 00 


161 70 


138 20 


397 62 


1,992 02 


353 28 


2 34 


2 85 


30 41 


4 25 


1,388 89 


111 00 


34 35 


2 00 


437 50 


82 58 


16 39 


226 35 


sas 65 


l:-!5 39 


25 fO 


1 00 


110 00 


1 50 


96 50 


16 80 


52 51 


558 00 


50 00 


421 72 


5 00 


85 00 


135 54 


275 54 



Grinding razors, etc 

Muslin, etc 

Bran. 

Meal. 



Charles G. Grab 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

J. R. Ryan & Co 

J.T.Smith & Co 

J. R. Budd & Co ! Poultry 

Frommeyer Bros ! Queensware ... 

W. C. Frazee Milk . 

Daniel Stewart <& Co ! Drugs, etc 

W. U. Telegraph Co i Telegrams 

A.BardsalCo [ Glass, etc 

Sinker- Davis Co Brackets, etc .... 

Parrott & Taggart j Crackers 

Pioneer Brass Works | Angle pieces .... 

J. L.Kpach . I Potatoes, etc .... 

Kothe, Wells & Bauer I Soap, etc 

Wm H. Armstrong & Co | Skull, etc 

Indiana Wire Works ' Wire protectors . . . 

Collier & Murphy i Coffins, etc .... 

McBlwaine-Kichards Co Fountains, etc . ■ . 

Joseph Gardner Tin. etc 

Nelson Morris & Co ' \ Beef, etc 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co ... ^ Fuel gas 

Geo. J. Mayer . . ! Stnmps 

Eastman. Schleicher &: Lee j Netting 

O'Brien & Mills i Oysters, etc 

Sander & Recker Chairs, etc 

J. A. Schumacher Co | Stairs, etc 

Krag-Reynolds Co Groceries . - . 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt Contingent expenses 

Geo F. Edenharrer, Supt Main pay roll. . . . 

L. E. Webb , Smithing 

Indianapolis Gas Co i G:is 

KirkhoflF Bros I Plumbing 

Fleifclimnnn »t Co 

Laz. Noble & Co 

Fertig & Keevers 

Fr:(ncke k Schindler 

J. L. Keach ■ - 

H. Syerup & Co 

Severin, Ostermeyer & Co. . . . 

Krag-Reynolds Co 

M. U'rionnor & Co • . 

J R. Rudd A- Co. 

Arthur .Jordan k Co 

Elgin D.iiry Co 

Swift Bros . ■ 

Coffin. Fletcher & Co 

Indianapolis News 

rndianapolis Journal 

HoUweg <fc Reese 

Frommeyer Bros 

Manut. Natural Gas Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

J.T Smith & Co 

J. R. Ryan & Co 

John O'Neill 

Clemens Voanegut 

Franeke & Schindler 

Hildebrand Hardware Co . .... 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Wm. B. Burford 

G. A. Carstensen .... 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

City Ice Co 

Huntington Seed Co ...... 

Sanders <& Recker • 

Kipn Bros. Co 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

W.C. Frazee 

J. E.Bell 

Williams & Hunt 

Fred Goepper . . 

L. E. Morrison 

O'Brien & Mills 

J. C. Hirschman. 



Yeast 

Book.'* 

Paiiitiog 

Hardware . . 
Potatoes, etc . . 

Lemons 

Grocers' sundries 
Groceries . . . . , 

Peaches 

Eggs 

Poultry , 

Buttenne .... 
Beef, etc . . 

Hams and bacon 
Advertising . . . 
Advertising . . . 
Queensware . , 
Queensware . . . 

Fuel gas 

Gas 

Meal, etc .... 
.>tock food . . . 

Fl.)ur 

Hardware . . . 
Hardware ... 
Hardware . . . 
Quilts, etc .... 
Stationery. . . . 

Sermons 

Messages .... 



Cane stakes . 
Chairs, etc. . 
Books, etc . . 
Drugs, etc . . 
Milk. . . . 
Legal service 

Soap 

Coke 

Blankets. . . 
Oysters . . . 
Husks, etc . . 



32 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAMK. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



292 
293 
291 
295 
296 
297 
'298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
301 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
316 
317 
318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
312 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
319 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 



Balke & Krauss Co 

Joseph Gardner. . . 

Brooks Oil Co 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

C. U. Telephone Co 

H. Lauter 

VVm. L. Elder 

Charles Mayer & Co 

Furman Stout - . 

George F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 
George F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 

Pioneer Brass Works 

Fleischmiinn & Co . . ... 

P. F. Bryce 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co ..... 

J. C.P. wer 

Board of Public Safety 

L.E.Webb 

J. L. Carson 

D. H.Davis 

John Usterman . . 

Troy Laundry Mach. Co 

Standard Carbon Co 

h*. A. Clum & Co. . 

Columbus Butter and Cheese Co . 
Friedman Manufacturing Co. . . 

Bernhard Stern & Son 

John O'Neill 

J. T. Smith & C 

Indianapolis M. and C. Union . . 

E. C. Andrews 

Williams & Hunt 

CofBn. Fletcher & Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

Ind anapolis Chemical Co . . . 

W. 6. Munson 

Middleton & Logsdon 

Wm. B.Burtord 

J. R.Budd & (Jo 

BurrisHerzsoh Co 

M.O'Connor &Co 

W. C. Frazee 

Mans. Natural Gas Co 

Hollwrgifc Reese 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Indianapolis Journal 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co . . . . 

Indianapolis News 

SchnuH &Co 

J. L. Keach . 

Parrott & Taggart 

ArthiT Jordan Co 

F.G.Kamps 

A. Schiffling & Son 

McCurdy & Smith 

Joseph Gardner 

G. Ittenbach & Co 

Gordon & Harmon 

City Ice Co 

Fleischmann & Co 

Chag.G.Grah 

Amer. Laundi-y Mach. Co . - 
Indianapolis Light and Power Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

D. P.Erwin & Co 

Knight & Jillson 

Wm. H. Armstrong & Co . . . 
Hildebrand Hardware Co ... 

Daniel Stewart Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

Frommeyer Bros 

H. Techentin & Co ■ 

Indpls. Cabinet Makers' Union 

Sander & Recker 

Albert Gall 



Lumber ■ 

Tin, etc 

Oil. 

Advertising . . 

Kent of telephones, etc 

Table, etc 

Chairs, etc. . . 
Pipes, etc . . . . , 

Hay and straw ... 
Contingent expenses . , 
Main pay-roll. . . . . 

Brass castings , 

Yeast 

Crackers 

Scales 

Sewer 

Fire alarm 

Smithing . . 

Necessary expenses . . 
Necessary expenses . . 
iNecessary expenses . . 
Blankets, etc .... 

Carbons 

Oil injector 

Butterine 

Butterine 

Flour 

Flour 

Meal 

Lumber 

Soup 

Sal soda 

Lard. 

Oil 

Boiler compound . . 
Fire front, etc . ... 

Whisk brooms 

Stationery 

Eggs. 

Brushes 

Tobacco 

Milk 

Fuel gas 

Queeiisware 

Hardware 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Groceries 

Potatoes, etc 

Crackers 

Poultry 

Fish . 

Repairing mowers . . 

Wire 

Tinner's supplies . . . 

Stone bases 

Plow points 

Ice 

Yeast 

Repairing razors, etc . 

Trucks 

Carbons, etc 

Gas 

Dry goods 

Engineers' supplies . . 

Svringes 

Water cooler 

Drugs 

Gasoline, etc 

Queensware 

Harness 

Tables 

Chairs, etc 

Carpets, etc 



3} 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMUUJNT. 


S118 50 


476 28 


lU 00 


215 66 


6,987 15 


172 53 


250 59 


40 90 


45 00 


2,310 68 


50 00 


13 70 


152 00 


33 15 


19 57 


35 70 


1 20 


1 50 


210 38 


184 30 


1 89 


2 85 


87 50 


1 25 


4 50 


43 50 


9 00 


33 50 


390 00 


118 09 


84 76 


185 49 


18 00 


56 50 


105 33 


321 28 


745 20 


75 00 


3 00 


50 00 


141 40 


20 00 


176 16 


291 00 


18 00 


47 26 


1,388 89 


237 04 


420 27 


27 40 


112 35 


16 25 


6 00 


2 00 


15 85 


2,282 29 


2,491 06 


6 00 


19 00 


497 17 


6,928 40 


558 00 


14 38 


25 00 


1,812 97 


232 '99 


1,854 83 


544 25 


22 25 


1,388 89 


10 74 


383 79 


4 13 


32 68 


10 00 



Wm. L. Elder 

Laakman & Sherer 

F. J Mack & Co 

Geo. F. HJdenharter, Supt . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 

J. A. Is'chumacher Co 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 

The H.LieberCo 

H. Lauter 

Swift Bros . . . . 

.1. E.Bell 

L.E.Webb 

General Electric Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

Francis Bergman 

Balke & Krauss Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

M.J. O'Reilly 

George W. Budd 

Syfers, McBride & Co 

Indianapolis News 

Indianapolis Journal 

Indiana Institute for Blind . . 

Burris-Herzsch Co 

A. Schiffling & Sons 

Charles Bailey 

Albert Gall 

John O'Neill 

Blanton Milling Co 

D.P. Erwin&Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

A. Kieter Drug Co 

Kipp Bros 

Hollweg & Reese 

P. F.Bryce 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 
Friedman Manufacturing Co 
Indianapolis Chemical Co . . . 
Indianapolis Sentinel Co . . . . 

J.E.Bell 

Lee & Co . • ■ 

Collier & Murphy 

J. L. Keach 

Geo. Hitz & Co 

Sander & Rscker 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

City Ice Co 

Williams & Hunt 

Wm. B. Burford 

Knight & Jillson 

Fleischmann & Co 

Wm. Robinson . . . 

Western Union Telegraph Co 
Joseph <ilardner ... . . . 

Swift Bros ... 

SchnuU & Co . . . . . 

Hildebrand Hardware Co . - . . 

L.B.Webb 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . 

W. C.Frazee 

Indianapolis Gas Co . . . . 

G. A. Carstensen 

M. O'Connor & Co 

SchnuU &Co 

Nelson, Morris & Co. 

Coffin. Fletcher & Co . . . . , 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Mans Natural Gas Co . . . . 
Francke & Schindler . . . . . 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Huntington Seed Co 

McCurdy & Smith 

R. R. Rouse 

3 — Cent. Insane. 



Chairs 

Cement walks. . . . . 

Painting 

Contingent expenses . . 
Main pay-roll. . 
Remodeling rooms, etc 

Carpets, etc 

Pictures 

Tables 

Beef, etc 

Legal services 

Smithing 

Lamps, etc 

Oil 

Sal soda 

Lumber 

(iasoline 

Smithing 

Fish 

Tea 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Brooms 

Paper file 

Repairing movers . . . 

Hay and straw 

Carpet sweepers 

Meal, etc 

Flour 

Dry goods 

Scrim, etc 

Drugs 

Balls, etc 

Queensware 

Crackers 

Hams 

Butterine 

Boiler compound . . . . 

Advertising 

Legal services 

Eggs 

Coffins 

Potatoes, etc 

Berries 

Settees 

Hardware ...... 

Fuel gas 

Ice 

Soap 

Stationery 

Engineers' supplies . . . 

Yeast 

Labor 

Telegrams 

Tinners' supplies . . . . 

Beef, etc 

Groceries 

Hardware 

Smithing 

Contingent expenses . . 

Main pay-roll 

Milk 

Gas 

Sermons 

Groceries 

Tobacco, etc . 

Beef, etc 

Hams and lard 

Gas . . . 

Fuel gas 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Beans . 

Wire, etc 

Pump 



34 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



Hide, Leather and Belting Co ... . 

J. 0. Hirschman 

Collier & Murphy 

Williams & Hunt 

Brooks Oil Co 

Kingan &Co . ■ 

William B. Burford 

W. C.Frazee 

C. Off A Co 

John O'Neill 

J. R. Budd&Co. ■ • . 

American Laundry Machine Co . . 

Charles Mayer & Co 

Burris-Herzsch Co 

Daniel Stewart Co. ... 
Indianapolis Brush Manufacturing Co 

Balke & Krauss Co . 

Fleischmann & Co 

Charles Bailey . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Frommeyer Bros 

C. L. vVayne & Co 

J. E.Bell 

John Scheid & Co • 

Joseph ttardaer 

C. tt.Grah 

Parrott & Taggart 

Knight <fe Jillson 

McElwaioe-Richards Co 

Syerup & Co 

Geo. Hitz & Co 

Indiauapolis J mrnal 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

H.T. Conde & Co 

Bauoh & Lamb Opt. Co 

G. A.Carstensen 

J. i:. Tarkington 

McCormickH.M. Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt ... 

S.R.Holt 

L.E.Webb 

Not issued. 

D.H.Davis 

Peter Nutz 

Blanton Milling Co 

John O'Neill 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

Dai y <& Pfeffer 

Wm.B. Burford 

Robt. Tomlinson . 

Troy Laundry Machine Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

D. A. Bruner & Co 

Fleischmann & Co 

Williams & Hunt 

J.E.Bell 

J. M. Nelson 

Geo. D Hardin 

W. C.Frazee 

Laakmann & Sherer 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

Syerup & Co 

J. R. Budd & Co 

Indiana Institute for Blind 

Kipp Bros. & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co . 

Manfaeturors' Natural Gas Co ... . 

Geo. Hitz & Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

P. F.Bryce 

Specialty Mfg Co 

Gordon & Harmon 

Knight & .Jillson 



Belt 

Husks 

(loffins 

Soap, etc 

Oil 

Butterine 

Stationery 

Milk 

Tin roof 

Flour, etc 

Eggs 

Springs 

H'lags, etc 

Brushes 

.Mirrnrs 

Brushes 

Lime, etc 

Yeast 

Hay 

Dry goods 

Queensware 

Buckets, etc 

Legal services. . . . 

Fish 

"'opper 

Soap, etc 

Crackers ..... 
Engineers' supplies. 
Engineers' supplies. 

Cherries, etc 

Potatoes, etc 

Advertising 

Drugs 

Telegrams 

Wagon-bed, etc . . 

Microscopes 

Sermons 

Disinfectant 

Mower 

Contingent expenses 
Main pay-roll .... 

Ice 

Smithing 



Necessary expenses 

Cobbling 

Flour 

Flour and meal 

Hims 

Painting 

Stationery 

Corn 

Blankets 

Oil 

Eggs 

Yeast 

Soap. . . 

Legal service . . . 

Tea 

Hay and straw . . 
Milk ..... 

Cement floor . . . 

Butterine 

Berries, etc .... 

Chickens 

Brooms 

Sponges, etc. . . . 
Muslin, etc .... 
Fuel gas ...... 

Berries 

Groceries 

Crackers 

F;i 



Shares 

Engineer's supplies 



35 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 


S510 97 


1 £0 


303 25 


18 27 


154 93 


53 85 


5 70 


142 40 


4 50 


325 68 


22 25 


16 25 


177 26 


42 50 


22 65 


2 70 


6 OO 


2,135 49 


77 64 


7 40 


98 71 


116 66 


79 41 


311 55 


7,066 85 


26 75 


16 00 


5 73 


72 00 


17 85 


74 48 


200 00 


117 CO 


47 50 


35 CO 


137 16 


84 00 


82 10 


lot 25 


22 75 


282 20 


27 08 


287 50 


468 75 


75 00 


150 00 


50 00 


231 33 


21 62 


579 eo 


151 80 


]0 OO 


428 88 


1 88 


72 OO 


30 25 


1,918 38 


1,408 65 


493 4» 


415 74 


278 59 


16 90 


92 18 


5 04 


9 00 


5 70 


28 50 


371 50 


468 95 


83 75 


1.388 89 


22 75 


314 60 


16 ro 


1 50 



J. L. Keach 

M.J. O'Reilly 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Sehnull & Co 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 

Francke & Sehindler 

U. P. ErwiB &Co 

Carr & McFeeley 

S.R.Holt . 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

H.Techen'in & Co 

L. C. O'Brien 

Indiannpolis Ligtt and Power Co 

McCurdy <fe Smith 

Huntington Seed Co 

Sander & Recker 

Swift Bros 

Joseph Gardner . • 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

E.T. Heifer 

Collier & Murphy 

Chas. Mayer <& Co 

George Ohleyer 

Albert Gall 

HoUweg tt Reese 

Reedy Elevator Co 

C.J.Truemper 

J. L Carson 

W.D.Engle 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

Laakman & Sherer 

Wm.B.Burford 

Wm. H.Thomas A- Co 

John Martin 

Specialty Manufacturing Co . . . 

Wm.Ehrieh 

Richmond Chair Co 

Bernhard Stern & Sons 

Indianapolis Chemical Co ... . 

Coons & Witty 

J.E.Bell 

E. C. Andrews 

Williams & Hunt . . 

Friedman Manufacturing Co . . . 

J. R. Budd i- Co 

Middleton & Logsdon 

John Van Range Co 

J. B. Clow & Sons 

Indianapolis M. and C. Union . . 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Swift Bros. ... 

Sehnull <fe Co 

Severin, Ostermeyer & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

D.P.Erwin & Co 

Franke & Schindler 

C.L.Wayne & Co 

Indianapolis News . . . . 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Indianapolis Journal 

J. R. Ryan & Co 

E.B. McComb 

Qeo.Hitz & Co 

J. L. Keach 

Man. Natural Gas Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Arthur Jordan Co 

Collier & Murphy . 

M.J. O'Reilly 



Melons, etc 

Smithing 

Lumber, etc 

Shaft, etc 

Soap, etc 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Muslin, etc 

Repairing mowers . 

Ice 

Gas 

Harness 

Fish 

Carbons, etc 

Electric supplies . . 

Steels 

Chairs 

Beef, etc 

Tinners' supplies . . 

Scales, etc 

Whiskey, etc .... 

Paints 

Drugs 

Contingent expenses 
Main pay-roll .... 
Repairing buggy . . 

Coffins 

Quoits, etc 

Baskets 

Shades 

Queensware 

Elevator 

Awnings 

Necessary expenses . 

Sermons 

Lard 

Cement drive, etc . . 

Stationery 

Blankets 

Brick work 

Electric fans .... 
Repairing ranges, etc 

Chairs 

Flour 

Boiler compound . . 
Fire extinguishers . 
Legal services .... 

Chip snap 

Sal soda 

Butterine 

Eggs 

Whisk brooms . . . 

Ranges, etc 

Sink 

Lumber 

Hardware 

Beef, etc 

Groceries 

Grocers' sundries . . 

Damask, etc 

Dry goods 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Advertising .... 

Oats, etc 

Flour, etc 

Fruit, etc 

Peaches, etc 

Fuel gas 

Gas 

Chickens ... . . 

Coffins 

Smithing 



36 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 



592 

595 

594 

595 

59rt 

597 

598 

599 

600 

601 

602 

603 

604 

605 

606 

607 

60S 

609 

610 

611 

612 

613 

614 

615 

616 

617 

618 

619 

620 

621 

622 

623 

624 

625 

626 

627 

628 

629 

630 

631 

632 

633 

634 

635 

636 

637 

638 

639 

640 

641 

642 

643 

644 

645 

646 

647 

648 

649 

650 

651 

652 

653 

654 

655 

656 

657 

658 

659 

660 

661 

662 

663 

6fi4 

665 

666 



Daniel Stewart Co 

Albert Gall 

P. G. Kemps 

Sander & Recker 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 

Indianapolis Drug Co 

.1. C. Tarkington 

Kipp Bros. Co 

J. C. Hirschman 

S. R. Holt 

C.S. Tarleton 

Chas. G. Grab 

Wm. H. Armstrong & Co . . . 

Joseph Gardner 

Parrott & Taggart. ... 

The H. Lieber Co 

Chas. Mayer & Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

W.D.Allison Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

Hoi Iweg & Reese 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Hildebrand Hardware Co. . . • 
Amer. Laundry Mach. Co. . . . 

W.C. Prazee 

Pleisohmann & Co 

Richards & Co 

Geo. P. Edenharter, Snpt. . . . 
(leo. P. Edenharter, Supt. . . . 
Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co .... 

L.O. O'Brien 

C. J. Gardner ■ 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Coffin. Fletcher & Co 

P. h\ Bryce 

Blanton Milling Co 

E.B.McComb 

Fleischman & Co 

J rommeyer Bros 

Albert Gall 

Sanders & Recker. 

Indianapolis Journal 

Indianapolis News 

H. Techentin & Co 

Kipp Bros. Co 

Geo. J. Mayer 

Wm. H. Armstrong & Co . . . . 

Chas. Mayer <fe Co 

L. B. Morrison 

Singer Mfg. Co 

Henry Ooburn 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Laakmann & Sherer 

C. U. Telei)hone Co 

General Electric Co 

Indianapolis Light & Power Co 

Indianapolis Gjis Co 

Mans. Natural Gas Co 

Williams & Hunt 

J.R. Budd &Co 

Kingan & Co 

G.E.Bursley & Co 

Brooks Oil Co 

J.E.Bell 

Indpls. District Telegraph Co. . 

M. O'Connor <fe Co 

SchnuH &Co 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

J. L. Carson 

D. H. Davis 

John Osterman 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. . . . 
Gei. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

Geo. Hitz & Go 

Clemens Vonnegut 



Drugs 

Linoleum 

Fi-h 

I'ables, etc 

Mats 

Balances 

Disinfectant 

Matches, etc 

Husks 

Ice. 

Wire, etc 

Razors, etc 

Needles, etc 

Cans . . 

Crackers 

Picture frames .... 

Balls, etc 

Telegrams 

Table 

Oil 

Queensware 

I. umber 

Refrigerators, etc . . . 

Trucks 

Milk 

Yeast 

Balances, etc 

Contingent expenses . 
Main pay-roll .... 
Microscope, etc .... 

Fish 

Beef 

Hams, etc 

Lard 

Crackers 

Flour 

Meal, etc 

Yeast 

Queensware 

Window shades, etc. . 

Chairs, etc 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Harness 

(Corkscrews 

Stamps ....... 

Glass tubes, etc .... 

Brushes, etc 

Foot balls, etc 

Oil, etc, 

Lumber 

Oak Lumber. . . 

Cement walk, etc . . 
Rent of telephone, etc 

Lamps 

Carbons, etc 

Gas 

Fuel gas 

Soap, etc 

Egg^ 

Butterine 

Tea 

Oil 

Legal services 

Wire, etc 

Groceries 

(ilrocers' sundries . . . 
Telegrams . 
Necessary expenses 
Necessary expenses . . 
Necessary expenses . . 
Contingent expenses . 

Main pay-roll 

Peaches, etc 

Hardware 



37 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 


S3 40 


3 00 


352 64 


] 50 


143 12 


273 52 


8 00 


5 68 


249 41 


247 67 


42 70 


112 44 


510 00 


19 90 


3 00 


250 44 


575 00 


885 23 


30 97 


12 00 


68 81 


137 13 


97 00 


150 CO 


111 12 


1,908 53 


10 15 


50 00 


47 86 


75 00 


408 00 


740 00 


1,388 89 


220 63 


20 00 


47 45 


19 20 


263 93 


129 36 


131 45 


169 29 


11 40 


260 65 


184 55 


10 46 


28 13 


93 09 


26 20 


1,386 62 


719 10 


450 00 


7 73 


230 40 


115 08 


4 08 


150 00 


93 87 


440 38 


374 08 


1,357 23 


201 98 


22 53 


65 98 


1 25 


13 20 


3 60 


802 21 


355 37 


693 93 


134 00 


87 56 


477 78 


558 00 


1,490 95 


122 75 



Huntington Seed Co . . . . 
Indianapolis sentinel Co . . . 

Crystal Ice Co 

M.J. O'Reilly 

J. L. Keach 

Arthur Jordan Co 

J. R. Ryan & Co 

Hollweg & Reese 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Hildebrand Hardware Co . . . 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Joseph Grardner 

W.C.Frazee 

L. E.Webb 

Indiana Institute for Blind . 

Wm. B. Burford 

Wm. H.Thomas & Co. . . . 
Chas. Truax, Greene & Co . . 

Richards it Co 

Chas. Mayer & Co 

Sander & Recker 

Wm. H. Armstrong & Co . . . 

J. A. Schumacher Co 

Maurice Quill 

Swift & Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

I'roy Laundry Machinery Co. 

J.E.Bell 

Brooks Oil Co 

Indianapolis Chemical Co . . 

John O'Neill 

Wm. E. English 

.Manuf. Natural Gas Co. . . . 

J. E. Isenhour 

Fred Goepper 

Hollweg & Reese 

C. L. Wayne & Co 

Williams & Hunt 

Wm.B. Burford 

L.C. O'Brien 

Daniel Stewart & Co 

H. Techentin & Co 

Arthur Jordan Co 

J. L. Keach 

Hildebrand Hardware Co. . . 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Artificial Ice Co 

Peter Nutz , 

Kirkhofi' Bros 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

F. J. Mack & Co 

Fleischmann & Co 

J. R. Budd & Co 

(jeo. Hitz & Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Vonnegut & Bohn 

C OflF & Co 

Henry Aufderheide 

Laakmann & Sherer 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Albert Gall • 

Francke & Schindler 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 

Geo. J. Mayer 

A.Burdsil Co 

Pioneer Brass Works 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Bausch & Lomb Opt. Co . . . 
Murphy, Hibben & Co . . . . 
Emil Wulschner & Son . . . . 

Whitall.Tatum&Co 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

W. C.Frazee 

John Martin 

Parrott & Taggart 



Seeds 

Advertising . . . . . 

Ice . 

Smithing 

Apples, etc 

Poultry 

Rye 

Jars 

Quilts, etc 

Hardware 

Drugs 

Tin, etc 

Milk 

Smithing 

Mops 

Stationery 

Blankets 

Manikin, etc 

Forceps, etc 

Barometer 

Oak cases 

Chairs, etc 

Building one room . . 

Trees 

Lard ......... 

Groceries 

Canvas 

Legal services 

Oil 

Boiler compound . . . 
Flour and meal .... 

Rent of farm 

Fuel gas 

Potatoes 

Coke 

Queensware 

Tin, etc 

Soap, etc 

Stationery. 

Fish . . 

Drugs 

Harness 

Poultry 

Grapes, etc 

Hardware 

Gas 

Cobbling' ..'.'. '. '. '. 

Plumbing 

Butterine . 

Painting 

Yeast 

Eggs 

Apples 

Telegrams 

Plans, etc., for plumbir 
Slate roof, etc . . 
Floors, etc . ... 
Cement floors, etc . . 
Boiler repairs, etc . . 
Linoleum, etc .... 
hardware 



Linoleum 
Type, etc .... 
Glass, etc .... 
Air cocks ... 
Blankets, etc . . 
Camera, etc . . . 
Blankets, etc . . 
Organs . . 
Jars, etc . 

Hams and bacon 

Milk 

Brickwork, etc . 
Crackers . . . . 



.38 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 


NAME. 


CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 


AMOUNT. 


749 




Wine 


$62 50 


74^ 




Beef 

Carving machine, etc 

Contingent expenses 


1,782 95 


714 


J. A. Fay & Egan Co 


333 75 


745 

746 


Geo. P. Edenharter, Superintendent. 
Greo. P. Edenharter, Superintendent. 

Total . 


936 42 
7,013 10 










$242,000 00 








2,000 00 












1240,000 00 











39 



EXHIBIT No. 3. 



Statement by Vouchers of Expenditures from Bepair Fund During 
the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1896. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 


83 00 


3 20 


11 50 


601 50 


96 01 


15 50 


12 05 


7 50 


112 80 


19 00 


21 70 


24 35 


6 50 


11 90 


559 90 


2 00 


155 08 


20 90 


333 00 


3 45 


8 40 


537 10 


6 00 


34 00 


123 90 


90 46 


525 95 


73 03 


106 24 


558 00 


7 50 


18 75 


3 89 


17 90 


24 00 


93 00 


66 06 


557 35 


81 76 


1 80 


8 25 


30 60 


565 00 


10 80 


27 50 


22 50 


13 75 


4 00 


561 50 


2 60 


12 90 


562 40 


188 00 


73 94 


20 00 


108 15 


6 15 


5 00 


19 36 


10 70 


550 75 


31 05 


6 07 



Balke & Krauss Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

Indiana Wire Works 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent, 

Knight ife Jillson 

AVm-Ehricli 

Knight & Jillson '. 

A. Burdsal Co 

Balke k, Krauss Co 

A.B.Meyer & Co 

W. H. Chamberlain 

Laakmann & Sherer 

H. W. Laut&Co 

Sinker, Davis Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent. 

Pioneer Brass Works 

McElwaine-Richards Co 

Indianapolis Paint and Color Co . . 

Balke & Krauss Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

Indianapolis Water Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent, 

McElwaine-Richards Co 

KirkhoffBros 

Knight & Jillson 

Knight & Jillson . . 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Superintendent, 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

McElwaine-Richards Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

Reedv Elevator Co 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Hide, Leather and Belting Co . . . . 

Balke & Krauss Co 

KirkhofF Bros 

Sinker-Davis Co 

A. Kiefer Drug Co . 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

Hide, Leather and Belting Co ... . 

Pioneer Brass Works . . 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. 

Indiana Wire Works 

Clarke & Sons 

Reedy Elevator Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

McElwaine-Richards Co 

Pioneer Brass Works 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

Dean Bros. . 

Knight & Jillson 

McElwaine-Richards Co 

Kirkhoff Bros 

A. Burdsal Co 

Reedy Elevator Co 

Hide, Leather and Belting Co ... . 

Pioneer Brass Works 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt 

L.E.Webb 

A, Burdsal Co 



Lime 

Asphalt, etc 

Wire door . . . 

Repair pay-roll . , 
Engineer's supplies, 
Repairing range. . . 

Clean-outs 

Glass, etc 

Lumber , 

Cement, etc . . . . , 
Repairing scales . . 
Cement basin . . . . 

Roof light 

Repairing flues . . . 
Repair pay-roll . . , 

Valve stem 

Engineer's supplies, 

Glass 

Lumber 

Gasoline, etc . . . . 
Water pipe . ■ . . . 
Repair pay-roll . . . 

Screws, etc 

Brass railing . . . . 
Engineer's supplies, 
Engineer's supplies. 
Repair pay-roll . . . 

Paint, etc 

Engineer's supplies, 
Repair pay-roll . . . 

Leathers 

Boiler repairs, ete , 

Pulley, etc 

Cement, etc 

Iron pipe, etc . 
Engine repairs, etc . 

Paints 

Repair pay-roll . . . 

Paints 

Asbestos 

Castings 

Flanges, etc 

Repair pay-roll . . , 
Window guards . . . 

Plumbing 

Leathers, etc . . . . 

Paint, etc 

Repairing shaft . . , 
Repair pay-roll . . . 

Tees, etc 

Stop cocks, etc . . . 
Repair pay-roll . . , 
Repairing pump . . 
Engineers' supplies 

Sink 

Pipe covering . . . , 

Paint, etc 

Automatic gate, etc. 

Belts 

Castings 

Repair pay-roll . . . 

Smithing 

Paint, etc 



40 



EXHIBIT No. 3— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



McEIwaine-Richards Co . . . 

Knight & Jillson 

Sinker-Davis Co 

Pioneer Brass Works 

Indianapolis Stove Co . . . 
Geo. P. Edenharter, Supt . . 

J. A. Schumacher Co 

P.M.Pursell 

Dean Bros 

Indianapolis M. and C. Union 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

McEIwaine-Richards Co . . . 

L. E. Webb 

C.Ofif &Co 

Geo. P. Edenharter, Supt . . 



Total from Repair Pund 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



Engineers' supplies. 
Engineers' supplies. 

Arches, etc 

Screws, etc 

Cistern rings, etc . . 
Repair pay-roll . . . 
Carpenter work . . . 
Tile work . . . . 
Repairing pump . . 

Lumber 

Oil, etc 

Hardware 

Engineer's supplies 

Smithing 

Slate roof, etc . . . 
Repair pay-roll . . . 



AMOUNT. 



186 57 
5 04 
38 50 
3 GO 
2 00 
600 25 
15 45 
47 40 

200 00 
97 00 
29 97 

106 95 

149 84 

15 00 

201 13 
605 00 

810,000 00 



41 



EXHIBIT No. 4. 



Statement by Vouchers of Expenditures from Clothing Fund dur- 
ing the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 



Ehrensperger &, Emmerich. . . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Geo.F. Edenharter.Supt . . . . 

D.P.Erwin & Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co . . . . 
J. A. Ehrensperger & Co . . . . 

R. S. Camplin 

D.J. Leathers 

L. E. Morrison 

Geo.F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

Peter Nutz 

D.P. Erwin & Co 

D. J. Leathers 

Geo.F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

Wm. H. Thomas & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Peter Nutz 

Frank Aldag 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

R. S. Camplin 

L. Selig 

Murphy, Hibben & Co .... 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

L. Selig 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Peter Nutz 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt . . . . 

L. Strauss . 

When Clothing Co 

Kantrowitz Bros 

L. Mayer 

Hendrickson, Lefler & Co. . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. ■ 
Seasongood, Stix, Krause & Co. 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Hendrickson, Lefler & Co. . . . 
Ehrensperger & Emmerich . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. . . . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Ehrensperger & Emmerich . . . 

D.P.Erwin & Co 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. . . . 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Ehrensperger & Emmerich . . . 

Frank Aldag 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. . . . 

Peter Nutz 

Murphy, Hibben & Co. ..... 

Hendrickson. Lefler & Co. . . . 

Ehrensperger k Emmerich . . . 
Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. • . . 

L. Mayer 

Frank Aldag . . 

iMurphy, Hibben & Co 

L. E. Morrison 

Geo. F. Edenharter, Supt. , . . 
D.J. Leathers 



Shoes 

Shirts, etc . . . . , 
Clothing pay-roll 
Dry goods . . , . , 

Vests 

Dry goods .... 

Sboes 

Shoes 

Shoes ■ - 

Mitts 

Clothing pay-roll 
Cobbling . . . . , 
Dry goods .... 

Slippers 

Clothing pay-roll 
Half-hose .... 

Dry goods 

Cobbling 

Slippers ■ 

Clothing pay-roll 

Shoes 

Shoes 

Dry goods .... 
Clothing pay-roll , 

Shoes 

Dry goods . . . . , 

Cobbler 

Clothing pay-roll . 

Clothing 

Pants 

Suits , 

Suits 

Hats 

Clothing pay-roll 

Suits 

Dry goods 

Dry goods 

Hats 

Shoes 

Clothing pay-roll . 

Hose, etc 

Slippers 

Dry goods 

Clothing pay-roll , 

Hose, etc 

Shoes 

Slippers 

Clothing pay-roll . 

Cobbling 

Dry goods 

Hats 

Boots 

Clothing pay-roll . 

Pants 

Shoes 

Dry goods 

Boots 

Clothing pay-roll . 
Shoes 



Total from Clothing Fund 810,000 00 



$140 40 
38 85 
195 00 
162 00 
52 79 
409 52 
91 50 
72 50 

204 00 
3 60 

203 50 
23 15 

325 80 
86 40 

205 45 
80 00 

209 78 
33 60 
100 50 

220 35 
65 00 
60 00 

316 97 
219 50 
126 25 
205 20 

23 50 
223 00 
325 00 
200 00 
337 50 
281 00 

45 00 
217 90 
357 75 
246 36 
158 40 

10 00 

124 20 
216 95 

17 69 
14 40 
164 39 

221 40 
431 67 
300 80 

85 00 
221 50 

23 30 
285 69 
132 06 

12 00 
219 50 
100 00 

125 00 
668 04 

25 65 
212 30 
121 50 



42 



EXHIBIT No. 5. 



Statement by Vouchers of Expenditures from Laundry Fund 
Daring the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



No. 


NAME. 


CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 


AMOUNT. 


1 


American Laundry Machine Co . . 

General Electric Co 

Troy Laundry Machine Co 

Jungclaus & Schmacher 

Total 




$673 21 


2 


Dynamo, etc 

Mangle, etc 

Building laundry (part pay) .... 


1.193 25 
2 620 64 
3.512 90 




$8,000 CO 











EXHIBIT No. 6. 



Statement by Vouchers of Expenditures from Painting F'und Dur- 
ing the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



No. 


NAME. 


CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 


AMOUNT. 


1 


A.Kiefer Drug Co 

Daily & Pfetfer 

COffcfe Co 




$189 03 


9. 




1,200 00 


3 


Painting, etc., gutters 

Painting, etc., gutters 


800 00 


4 


C.Off&Co 


825 00 


5 




295 60 


6 


Daily & Pfeffer 




1,000 00 


7 


Daily & Pfeffer . . 


Painting 


390 37 




Total 






$5,000 00 











43 



EXHIBIT No. 7. 



Siaicmerit by Vouchers of Expenditures from Plumbing Fund 
During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1896. 



No. 



NAME. 



CHARACTER OF CLAIM. 



AMOUNT. 



KirkhoflFBros i Plumbing . . . 

Henry Aufderheide Carpenter work 

Vonnegut & Bohn H)ans, etc . . . 

KirshofFBros Plumbing . . . , 



Total 



$3,700 00 
424 42 
200 00 
675 58 



S5,000 00 



EXHIBIT No. 8. 



Balance Sheet, October SI, 1896. 



Earnings 

Subsistence 

House furnishing 

Repairs to permanent improvements 

Painters' supplies 

Medical supplies 

Engineer's supplies 

Laundry supplies 

Ward supplies 

Housekeeping supplies 

Hardware 

Clothing 

E|ectrie light 

Tinners' supplies 

Incidental expenses 

Salaries and wages 

Kitchen furniture 

Painting 

Plumbing 

Farm 

Garden 

Fire department and supplies 

Library 

Florist's supplies 

Library 

Vehicles and harness 

Stationery 

Electric . 

Sundry counties, account clothing and undertakin? 

Fuel 

Newspapers 

Gas 

Provender 

Smithing 

Permanent improvements 

The State treasury 

Central Indiana Hospital for Insane 

Real estate 

Personal property 

Insurance 

Total 



1,714 51 



S85,132 17 




10,871 84 




1,527 03 




658 88 


- is 


4,518 15 




2.938 40 




4,624 22 




2,941 05 




637 78 




2,046 42 






3,545 15 


931 86 




639 52 




5,826 86 




94,110 75 




528 88 




5,000 00 




5,000 00 




785 05 




87 20 




360 00 




155 55 




48 10 




1,737 80 




115 85 




1,705 94 




354 37 




5,561 70 




16,040 79 




88 88 




645 53 




550 10 




237 65 




11,177 70 




1,714 51 






1,996,756 54 


1,513,000 00 




219,343 17 




372 50 




82,002,016 20 


$2,002,016 20 






44 



EXHIBIT No. 9. 



Schedule of Accounts With Sundry Counties for Clothing and 
Undertaking Issued to Patients During the Fiscal Year 
Ending October 31, 1896. 

Adams $12 60 

Allen 10 85 

Bartholomew 387 80 

Benton 115 10 

Boone 2^5 65 

Brown 134 95 

Carroll 118 05 

Clark 387 50 

Clay 353 50 

Clinton 156 95 

Crawford 12 65 

Dearborn 432 90 

Dubois 4 10 

Floyd 334 30 

Fountain 218 70 

Franklin 23 70 

Fnlton 7 85 

Greene 10 95 

Hamilton 181 15 

Hancock 137 45 

Harrison 26 55 

Hendricks. 216 70 

Howard 158 60 

Huntington 29 55 

Jackson 279 55 

Jefferson 249 40 

Jennings 139 95 

Johnson 226 35 

Knox 11 80 

Lagrange 3 25 

Laporte 13 60 

Lawrence 178 00 

Marion 2,455 40 

Marshall 11 85 

Martin 27 00 

Monroe 209 70 

Montgomery 199 60 

Morgan 151 45 

Noble 19 25 

Ohio 78 50 



Owen . . . 
Parke . . . 
Perry . . . 
Pike . . 
Pulaski . . 
Putuam . . 
Randolph . 
Eipley . . 
Scott . . . 
Shelby . . 
Spencer . . 
Steuben . . 
St. Joseph . 
Sullivan. . 
Switzerland 
Tippecanoe 
Tipton . . 
Vermillion 
Vigo . . . 
Wabash . . 
Warren . . 
Washington 
Whitley. . 



^5 



EXHIBIT No. 9— Continued. 



$178 


00 


241 


50 


8 


35 


15 


90 


7 


85 


179 


45 


4 


60 


228 


70 


98 


85 


223 


60 


34 


20 


55 


35 


14 


25 


16 


85 


147 


75 


556 


35 


109 


10 


92 


10 


614 


15 


11 


00 


76 


75 


237 


90 


9 


80 



Total $11,095 10 



46 



EXHIBIT No. 10. 



Value of Hospital Products Issued During the Fiscal Year End- 
ing October 31, 1896. 

1,052 bbls. cabbage, at 30c 

2,060 bu. tomatoes, at 20c 

4,827 doz. green corn, at 5c 

105 bblp. beans, at $1 

12 bbls. peas, at $1 

30 bbls. rhubarb, at Si, 50 . 

26 bbls. onions, at $1.50 

57 bbls. beets, at $1 

49 bbls. cantaloupes, at |1 

200 bbls. kraut, at $5 

100 lbs. sage, at 20c 

1,501 bu. turnips, at 20c 

1,867 pumpkins, at 3c 

30 bu. onion sets, at $2 

200 bu. lettuce, at 40c 

50 bu. radishes, at 50c 

600 bu. corn, at 21c. 

Total $2,943 16 



$315 60 


412 00 


241 


35 


105 00 


12 00 


45 


00 


39 


00 


57 


00 


49 


00 


1,000 00 


20 00 


300 20 


56 


01 


60 00 


80 


00 


25 


00 


126 


00 



47 



EXHIBIT No. 11. 



Heport of Discarded Property Sold and Proceeds Paid into State 
Treasury During the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1896. 



DATE. 


PURCHASER. 


PROPERTY SOLD. 


.\MOUNT. 


Nov 


1895. 

11 ■ ■ 
14. . 
15 . . 
18 

19. . 
27 . . 
28. . 
28. . 
28. . 

6. . 

9. . 
11 . 
15 . 
16. . 

16. . 

27. . 

28. . 
30. . 

1 . . 
30. . 
30. . 
30. . 

2 . . 
3. . 
4 . . 
6. . 
9. . 

10 . 

n . . 
ifi . . 

17. . 

27. . 

28. . 
28. . 
21 . . 
26. . 

4 

6. . 

4 . . 

30. . 


H.Foster 


1 load wood 

1 load wood 

3 barrels 

1 rake 


SO 75 




W. S. Patterson 


75 


:: 


Wm. Robinson 

M. E. Barger 

H. Spear. 

\V. Hess 

John Thompson 


1 25' 
10- 
45' 


jj 


1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

3 boxe? 

100 b^irrels 


IS- 

1 75 

75 


I" 


D. Gladden 


85 


I' 


E.D. McComb 

D.Clark. 


15 a^ 


" 




2 25 


" 


D.Bannaman 

H. Coh^n 




7:50' 


•' 




1 00" 


i» 


H.Neal 


1 box 


25- 


11 


C.Ousler 

Wm. Robinson 

D. H. Darnell 

D.Craig 


75 


•' 




50' 


" 




1 25 


I' 




'■ 75' 


" 


1 load wood 


\ 75' 


" 


J. Stewart 

M. Moody 

0. Ulery 

M. Miller 


1^ 


" 




\ 75 

! 7S 

75 

50 

75 


•» 




•' 


1 load wood 


11- 


C. Nun 


•' 


Wm. Doerre 

H. Fultz 


1 load wood 


" 




70 
4 95 


" 


D. J. Baker 




" 


126 barrels 


1 18 90 


" 


Gus. Stortz . 


3 barrels 


75 

75 

5 50 

75 


" 


W. S. Patterson 


1 load of wood 

Making clothing ^ . 


\\ 


Mattie Shubert 


•' 






25 

25 

3 00 

.3 00 

1 50 

80 


>' 


Ira Montgomery 

Elizabeth Furniss 

Mary E. Elmore 

Ann Mussman 

Ira Montgomery 




1; 


Making one dress 

Making clothing . 

Making two wrappers 

Telegram 


» 


Making two dresses 

Slops for November, 1895 .... 
Slops f r December, 1895 .... 


2 00 
50 00 
50 00 
26 15 


jj 


Darnell & Cossell 

Darnell k Cossell 

H. Cohen 


Dec. 


H.Cohen 

D.J. Baker 


l.jyO pounds rags 


23 25 

3 75 

75- 

2 00 




Chas. Ousler 

H. Kaiser 

H. ''ohen . 

J. H. Stewart 


1 load wood 

Old shoes 


" 


11 barrels 


3 7& 


" 




75 
4 00 


" 


D. Bannaman 

C. Bishop 


27 barrels 


" 


1 load wood 

1 load wood .... 


50 
75 


• I 


W.S. Patterson 


•« 


H. Cohen 


3 CO 

75 

75 

11 26 


" 




1 load wood 

1 load wood 

75 b irrels 


•• 


F. Stickan 


" 


B. D. McComb 


" 


23 barrels ... 


3 45 


" 


B. G. Wysong 




25 


" 


H. Cohen 


'.'^SO pounds rags 

937 pounds grease 

801 pounds grease 

Slops for January, 1896 


21 45 


Nov 


B. C. Andrews 


18 70 


Dec 


E. C. Andrews 


16 02 




Darnell & Cossell 


50 00 



48 



EXHIBIT No. 11— Continued. 



DATE. 



PURCHASER. 



PROPERTY SOLD. 



Fet 



1896. 
Jan. 7 
10 
13 
13 
16 
16 
22 
27 
27 
7 
10 

u 

29 

9 

13 

7 

2S 

31 

1 

3 

4 

5 

6 

6 

7 

8 

13 

18 

25 

25 

29 

5 

5 

5 

6 

8 

29 
29 
29 
29 
29 

March 2 
3 
4 

5 , 
6 
9 
11 
19 
21 
21 
26 
28 
31 
5 

10 
10 

n 

19 
22 
24 
31 
31 
31 
1 
4 
8 
13 
14 
20 
21 
21 
22 
24 



April 



A.Dillingham . . 

Jos. Hart 

tt. Toler 

W. S. Patterson . . 
G. Toler . . 

H. Cohen. 

E.D.McComb. . . 
H.Hall ASon . . . 
L. H. Carpenter . . 
Miss N.J. Ollis . . 
Miss Katie Bowen . 
Miss M.Clark. . . 
Jane Shirley . . . 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen . . 

K. C. Andrews . 
E. C. Andrews . . . 
Darnell & Cossel . 
W.S.Patterson . . 
B. Logrsdon . . 

D. H. Darnell . . . 
George Pierson 
H. Cohen 

A. Dillingham . . . 

H. Piercy 

M.R.Raybolt. . . 
Ed. Forrest .... 

L. Hudson 

R. Tomlinson . . . 
J. H. Stewart . . . 

H. Cohen 

H. riohen 

H. Cohen . . ... 

H. Cohen 

J. H. Stewart . . . 

E. K. Frost. . . . 
H. D. Edwards 
Kate Vanderpool . 
H. Cohen .... 
H. Cohen. . . 
Darnell & Cossel . 
W. S. Johnson . . 
W.S.Johnson . . 
W. S. Patterson . . 
Fred. Goepper . . 
W.H.Neal . . . . 

B. Bishop .... 

J. Tolen 

T. Caplinger . . 
Fred. Goepper . . 
W. S. Johnson . . 
P.F. Bryce .... 
John Tellas .... 
H.Cohen . . . . 
G. W. Mullis . . 
Martha Sprague . 
Elizabeth Furniss 
Olive Whole. . . . 
J.C. Webb .... 
R. Smith .... 
Cora Arnold. . . . 
H.f'ohen ... 
H.Cohen .... 
Darding & Darnell 

H. Hess 

J. Caplinger . . . 
W. S. Patterson . . 
A. Dillingham . . 

J.Tolin 

Ed. Derry . . . 
J. H.Stewart . . . 

J.Tolin 

Ed. Franklin . . . 
M. Miller 



1 load wood ....... 

1 load wood 

4 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 load boxes 

16 barrels 

iO barrels 

96 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 hat. 

Telegram 

Making clothing 

.Making 3 dresses . . . 
3,100 pounds bones at 40c 
2,100 pounds rags at SI 30 . 
1,057 pounds grease at 2o. 
1,208 pounds grease at 2c . 
Slops for February, 1896 . 

1 load wood 

2 boxes . 

1 load wood 

125 bo.xes 

10 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

ICO boxes 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

30 pounds iron 

1 load wood 

16 biirrels ... 
1.075 pounds rags at $1.30 . 
3,380 pounds bones at 40o . 
217 pounds tea lead at 3c . 

Telegrams 

Telegrams 

Telegrams 

1 pair shoes .... 

2,940 pounds bones ■ . . 
1,400 pounds rags . . . 
Slops for March, 1896 . . 

142 barrels 

(Jld shoes 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

40 pounds old iron .... 
1 load wood 



4 barrels , 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

140 barrels 

69 barrels . . 

1 load wood 

9 barrels 

Telegram 

Making one wrapper . . . 
Making one wrapper . . . 
Making two dresses . . . 
298 pounds old brass . . . 

Telegram 

Telegram 

1 ,450 pounds rags at 81.30 . 
3,325 pounds bone at 40c . 
Slops for April, 1896 .... 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

6 b irrels 

150 p unds iron 

1 load wood 

8 barrels 

1 stand 

1 load wood 



49 



EXHIBIT No. 11— Continued. 



DATE. 



PURCHASER. 



PROPERTY SOLD. 



AMOUNT. 



April 



May 



July 



Aug. 



30. 

2. 

7. 
16. 
25 . 
30. 
30. 
30 . 

5 . 

5 . 

7 . 

7. 

8 
15 

15 . 

16 . 
16. 
20. 
20. 
21. 
28. 

28 . 
15 . 
15. 
26. 
26. 
30 . 
30. 
30. 
27. 
24. 
15 . 
24 . 
30 . 
30. 
30. 

3. 
3. 
3. 

3 . 

5 . 
9. 

10. 
26. 
29, 
29. 
30. 
1. 

4 . 

6 . 
9. 

11. 
13. 
14 . 
16. 
16. 
23. 
28. 
28. 

29 . 
30. 

30 . 
23. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
31 
31. 

3 . 

4 . 
8. 

11. 
14. 
14. 
19. 
24. 



H.Cohen 

Williams & Hunt . . 
Williams & Hunt . . 
Ada Miller . . 

Maggie Holmes . . 

H.Cohen 

H. Cohen . . 

Harding & Darnell 
Charles Ousler . . 
W. S. Patterson . . 

J.Tolin 

Fred Sticken . . . 
Frank Hulsopple 

D. Gladden .... 
H. Cohen . . 

W.Wilson 

A. Copel. .... 
iJeorge Craig . . . 
Charles Ulery . . . 
A. Dillingham . . 
P. F.Bryce .... 
W. S. Johnson . . 
Mary Elmore . . . 

E. C. Andrews 
Williams & Hunt . 
Williams & Hunt . 
Darnell & Harding 

H.Cohen 

H.Cohen 

Williams & Hunt . 
Williams & Hunt . 
Williams & Hunt . 
Williams & Hunt . 
Harding & Darnell 

H.Cohen 

H.Cohen 

W.S.Johnson. . . 
W.S.Johnson. . . 
W.S.Johnson. . . 
H.Cohen . . . 

Ed Atherton. . . . 

Jos. Hart 

D.H.Darnell . . . 
J. M. Barton. . . . 
A.Dillingham. . . 
H.Cohen .... 
F.M. Roby 

W. 8. Patterson . . 
J.H.Stewart . . . 
E.C. Bishop. . . . 
.John Sheridan. . . 

F. Hulsopple . . . 

J. Brown 

W.S.Johnson. . . 
P. F.Bryce .... 
M. Moody .... 
John Feller .... 

Ed Forrest 

John Sheridan. . . 

H. Cohen 

F. Stickan 

Harding & Darnell 
Mary Brown. . . . 
Ann Mussman. . . 
Lizzie Dunbar. . . 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen ... 
Williams & Hunt . 
F. Hulsopple , . . 

H. Wilson 

W. S. .Johnson. . . 
D. H. Darnell . . . 
Wm. Robinson . . 
J. M. Robinson 

E Bishop .... 
Chas. Ousler .... 



4 barrels 

945 pounds grease . . . . 

30 kegs at 5c 

Making clothing . . . . 
Telegram . . . . . 

1,900 lbs. rags, at $1.30. . 
3,580 lbs. bones, at 40c . . 
Slops for May, 1896 . . . 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

3 barrels 

1 load wood 

2 loads wood 

1 box 

5 barrels 

1 load wood 

50 lbs. grease 

1 load wood 

1 load wood . . . . 

40 berry crates .... 

61 barrels 

140 barrels 

Making clothing . . . . 

1,314 lbs. grease 

2,745 lbs. grease 

40 kegs 

Slops for June, 1896 . . . 
3,125 lbs. bones, at40e. . 
2,025 lbs. rags, at $1.30. 

8 kegs 

13 kegs . . 

1,325 lbs. grease 

435 lbs. grease 

Slops for July, 1896 . . . 

2,500 lbs. bones 

1,300 lbs. rags 

130 barrels 

1 load old shoes 

1 load wood . 

6 barrels . ■ 

200 butter tubs 

1 load wood 

1 barrel 

10 barrels and 200 boxes . 
103 berry crates 

7 barrels . 

100 grape baskets . . . . 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load weod 

1 load wood 

140 barrels 

60 barrels 

1 load wood 

Meat block 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

8 barrels 

1 load wood . . 
Slops for August, 1896 . 
Making 2 dresses . . . , 
Making 2 wrappers . . . 
telegram. .... 

3,180 lbs. bones 

1,275 lbs. rags 

1,350 lbs. grease . , 

2 sacks . . 

1 load wood ...... 

2 loads wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 



81 00 
14 18 

1 50 

5 70 
25 

24 70 

14 30 
33 75 

75 
75 
75 
75 

2 00 
25 

1 00 
75 
75 
75 
75 

2 00 

15 25 

14 00 

15 00 
19 71 
41 17 

2 00 
33 00 

12 50 
26 30 

40 

65 

19 87 

6 53 
33 00 
10 GO 

16 90 

13 00 

1 00 
75 

2 00 

2 00 
75 
25 

4 00 

5 15 

3 00 
75 
75 
75 



1 00 


1 00 


75 


14 00 


15 00 


50 


2 00 


75 


75 


2 00 


75 


33 00 


2 00 


1 M) 


25 


12 72 


16 57 


20 25 


50 


50 


1 50 


75 


75 


75 


50 


75 



4 — Cent. Insane. 



50 



EXHIBIT No. 11— Continued. 



DATE. 



PURCHASER. 



PROPERTY SOLD. 



Aug. 



Sept.. 



Oct. 



Wm. Farley 

D. Bannaman . . . 

E. D. McComb . . . 
Geo. Castteter. . . . 

L.E. Webb 

D.J. Baker 

H Carey 

W. McNeeley .... 
Laakmann & Sherer 
M. Prather .... 
1>.H. Darnell . . . . 
H. Cohen . , . . 

0. (i. Clark . . . 

Kate Sweeney .... 
Eliz. Furniss . . . . 

Ella Lauer 

Offilia Hedge .... 
W. McNeeley .... 

J. C. Conder 

W.Dunn 

H. Cohen 

Harding & Darnell . 
D. Bannaman . . . 
D. Gladden . . . . 
W. S Johnson . . . 

B. Rhodes 

H.Cohen 

W. McNeeley .... 

D.J.Baker 

H. Carey 

M. Miller 

P. F. Bryce 

W. Farley 

D. Bannaman .... 
D.J.Baker 

E. Bishop 

D. Gladden 

W. Merritt 

Ella Gillman .... 
L. E. Richarson . . . 
R. b\ Sherrard . . . 
Williiims &Hunt . 
Harding & Darnell . 
H.Cohen . . . 

W. McNeeley .... 

Ed Brown 

H. Cohen .... 

Gei^rge Wagner . . . 

D. Bannaman .... 

F. Goepper ..... 
Jos. Hart 

E. P. McComb . . . 
Chas.Uusler . . . . 
George Craven . . . 

H. Barter 

D. Gladden 

A. Co.=sel 

S.A.Hall 

W. S. Johnson . . . 
Fred (Toepper .... 
W. S. Johnson . . . 

J.Foltz 

S. A.Hall 

M. Burke 

S. A. Hall 

Williams & Hunt . . 
Williams & Hunt . . 

H.Cohen 

H.Cohen 

Hattie Parsley . . . 
George Pugh ... 
Surah Hawkins . . . 
Theresa Burgett . . 



10 jugs 

46 barrels 

62 barrels 

1 load wood ....... 

1 load wood 

7 barrels 

100 boxes 

1 load wood 

2 barrels 

1 box 

Old nails 

13 barrels 

170 pounds iron 

Telegram 

Making clothing .... 
Making clothing .... 
Telegrams 

2 bushels corn 

Telegram 

Telegram 

1,250 pounds rags at $1.30 
Slops for Sept., '96 . . . 
24 barrels 

2 boxes 

140 barrels 

1 load wood 

3 barrels 

3 boxes . . 

3 boxes 

12 barrels 



1 load wood 

25 barrels 

1 load wood 

25 barrels 

4 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 load wood and 1 box 

Refused paint 

Telegram 

Telegram 

Telegram 

2,340 lbs grease at F-^c 
Slops for October, 1896 
3,450 lbs. bones at 40c . 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

10 barrels 

1 load wood 

27 barrels 

2 boxes 

1 load wood 

70 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 load wood 

45 boxes 

1 box 

1 old ice-box 

20 barrels 

45 barrels 

1 load wood 

1 load old shoes .... 

2 boxes 

16 barrels 

3 boxes 

20 barrels 

48 kegs at 5c 

2,525 lbs. grease .... 
1,500 lbs. rags at 81 .00 . 
3,900 lbs. bones at 35c 

Telephone 

Telegram 

Making clothing . . . 
Making clothing . . . 



Total sales discarded property. 



51 



EXHIBIT No. 12. 



Recapitulation oj Inventory, October 31, 1896. 



Housekeeper's Department for Women $6,742 25 

Housekeeper's Department for Men 3,932 90 

Housekeeper's Department, fire and store houses 1,197 55 

Kitchen, Department for Men 4,203 99 

Kitchen, Department for Women . . . . 2,390 10 

General dining-room. Department for Men 227 25 

General dining-room, Department for Men (new) 235 00 

General dining-room, Department for Women 365 40 

Ward property. Department for Men 17,045 43 

Ward property. Department for Women 18,362 56 

Supervisor's office. Department for Men 36 00 

Marking room, Department for Men 35 05 

Marking room, Department for Women 342 35 

Sewing room 3,088 17 

Laundry 8,404 36 

Police Department 49 55 

Barber shops 143 00 

Eeading and club rooms 27 05 

Chapel, school, etc 302 55 

Fire Department 3,924 60 

Paint shop 668 40 

Carpenter shop 6,820 27 

Engineers' Department 87,550 47 

Electric-light plant 35,419 68 

Store-room and stock 3,792 23 

Butcher shop - 266 16 

Upholsters' shop 622 00 

Bakeshop 639 45 

Plasterers' shop 103 05 

Tin shop 447 88 

Road Department 31 75 

Oflacers' barn 1,369 25 

Farm and stable vegetables 2,327 40 

Florist's Department 8,686 75 

Dispensary and laboratory 933 CO 

Surgical instruments 714 70 

Library 1,196 00 

Pathological Department 6,025 02 

Total inventory $228,668 57 



52 



EXHIBIT No. 13. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Maintenance 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending October §1, 1896. 



VOUCHER No. 1. GEO. F. EDENHARTER, SUPT. 
1895. 
Nov. 1. For a Contingent Fund $2,000 00 



Total 



$2,000 00 



VOUCHER No. 2. REV. W. A. HENDRICKSON. 

Nov. 25. Services as Chaplain November 3, 10, 17, 24 . . $20 00 

Total 20 0(V 

VOUCHEE No. 3. SWIFT BROS. 

Nov. 1. 5,403 lbs. beef at $4.69 $253 40 

" 4- 3,091 lbs. beef at $4.89 144 98 

" 7. 4,260 Ibe. beef at $4.69 199 80 

" 12. 3,750 lbs. beef at $4.69 175 88 

" 15. 6,092 lbs. beef at $4.69 238 81 

" 20. 4,176 lbs. beef at $4.69 195 85 

" 23. 4,325 lbs. beef at $4.69 202 84 

" 26. 4,204 lbs. beef at $4.69 197 17 

Total . 1,608 73 

VOUCHER No. 4. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

Nov. 1. 1,010 lbs. hams at 8|c $87 11 

" 8. 1,000 lbs, hams at 8gc 86 25 

" 13. 1,001 lbs. hams at ^c 86 84 

" 22. 995 lbs. hams at 8|c 85 82 

" 29. 942 lbs hams at 8f c 81 25 

Total 426 77 

VOUCHEE No. 5. COFFIN, FLETCHER & CO. 

Nov. 4. 4,003 lbs. lard at 5.90 $236 17 

Total 236 17 



53 



VOUCHER No. 6. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

Nov. 2. 505 lbs. chickens at lO^c $53 03 

" 9. 513 lbs. chickens at lO^c 53 87 

" 9. 53 lbs. turkeys at lie 5 83 

" 16. 46 lbs. turkeys at lie 5 06 

" 16. 443 lbs. chickens at lO^c 46 52 

" 23. 528 lbs. chickens at lOJc 55 44 

" 23. 75 lbs. turkeys at lie 8 25 

" 27. 1,654 lbs. turkeys at lie . . 181 94 

" 27. 4 lbs. chickens at lO^e 42 

" 30. 540 lbs. chickens at lO^c 5670 

" 30. 59 lbs. turkeys at He 6 49 

Total $473 55 

VOUCHER No. 7. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL. 

Advertising 12 lines 3 times $2 85 

Total ■ 2 85 

VOUCHER No. 8. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

Nov. 30. 66,700 cubic feet gas at $1.25 per M |83 38 

" 30. 2 outside lamps at $1.50 3 00 

Total 86 38 

VOUCHER No. 9. J. L. KEACH. 

Nov. 1. 5,260 lbs. apples, at 40c per bu $42 08 ' • 

" 7. 5,675 lbs. apples, at 40e per bu . 45 40 

" 15. 5,675 lbs. apples, at 50c per bu 56 75 

" 22. 4,025 lbs. apples, at 50c per bu 40 25 

" 30. 3,750 lbs. apples, at 50c per bu . . 37 50 

Total 221 98 

VOUCHER No. 10. THE SINGER MFG. CO. 

Nov. 2. 600 needles . $6 60 

Total 6 €0 

VOUCHER No. 11. JOHN O'NEILL. 

Nov. 2. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at $3.25 65 00 

" 7. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at 3.25 65 00 

" 13. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at 3.25 65 00 

" 19. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at 3.25 65 00 

" 20. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at 3.25 65 00 

" 25. 20 bbls. w. w. flour, at 3.25 65 00 

Total 390 00 



54 



VOUCHER No. 12. V. BACHMAN. 



Nov. 1. 17 bbls. 8. w. flour, at $3.60 $61 20 

" 1. 3>bls. rye flour, at $2.90 8 70 

" 16. 2 bbls. rye flour, at $2.90 5 80 

",. 16.«:: 13 bbls. patent s. w. flour, at $3.60 46 80 



Total $122 50 

' VOUCHER No. 13. INDIANA BUTTER CO. 

Nov. 1. 31 tuba Empire butterine, 1,240 lbs., at 9|c . 

" 8. 1,200 lbs. Empire butterine, at 9|c 

" 15. 1,200 lbs. Empire butterine, at 9fc 

" 27. : 800 lbs. Empire butterine, at 9|c 

Total 432 90 

VOUCHER No. 14. J. M. NELSON. 
Nov. 29. 705^ lbs. Imperial tea, at 15c $105 83 



$120 90 


117 


00 


117 


00 


78 


00 



Total 105 83 

VOUCHER No. 15. CINCINNATI GAS-FIXTURE CO. 

Nov. 23. 6 6-light reflectors, 36 key sockets $126 00 

" 23. 20 feet lengthening, at 25c 5 00 



Total 131 00 

VOUCHER No. 16. THE JOHN VAN RANGE CO. 
Nov.' 22. 6 doz. Boss peelers, at $1.50 $9 00 



Total 9 00 

VOUCHER No. 17. E. C. ANDREWS. 

Nov. 2. 1,471 lbs. chip soap 
" 6.^1,877 lbs. chip soap 
" 9. 1,836 lbs. chip soap 
" 13. l,889^1bs. chip soap ■ ■■ ' •. 

" 19. 1,775 lbs. chip soap 
" 27.^ 1,549 lbs. chip soap 

10,397nbs., at $3.90 405 48 

VOUCHER No. 18. H. A. WRIGHT CO. 

Nov. 26. 400 lbs. mince meat, at 10c $40 00 

la 

Total 40 00 

VOUCHER No. 19. A. W. WILLIAMS. 
Nov. 20. 60 yds. rag carpet, at 26c $15 60 



Total 15 60 



55 



VOUCHER No. 20. M. J. O'REILLY. 

Not. 13. 8 horseshoes $3 00 

Total $8 00 

VOUCHER No. 21. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 

Nov. 1. 3,750 Ib^ salsoda, at 80c $30 00 

Total 30 00 

VOUCHER No. 22. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 

Nov. 20. 400 2Cc, Ed. lampp, at 18c ... . $72 00 

Total 72 00 

VOUCHER No. 23. KIPP. BROS. CO. 

Nov. 12. 3 boxes Shaker pipes $1 20 

" 21. 1 wool duster 50 

Total 1 70 

VOUCHER No. 24. FRED. GOEPPER. 

Nov. 29. 100 bu. lump coke , . $9 00 

Total 9 00 

VOUCHER No. 25. ARTIFICIAL ICE CO. 

Nov. 6. 11,000 lbs. ice. 

" 13. 11,875 lbs. ice. 

" 15. 11,825 lbs. ice. 

" 20. 14,650 lbs. ice. 

" 27. 15,025 lbs. ice. 

64,375 lbs. at $2.00 per ton 64 38 

VOUCHER No. 26. J. TROST & SON. 

Nov. 21. 283 gals, cider, at 15c . $42 45 

Total 42 45 

VOUCHER No. 27. FRANK McCASLIN. 

Nov. 30. 18,835 lbs. hay, at 90c. cwt $169 51 

Total 169 51 • 

VOUCHER No. 28. FLEISCHMAN & CO. 

Nov. 30. 70 lbs yeast, at 25c $17 50 

Total 17 50 



56 



VOUCHER No. 29. COLLIER & MURPHY. 

Nov. 1. 1 coffin and box $4 00 

" 12. 1 coffin and box 4 00 

" 17. 1 coffin and box 4 00 



Total $12 00 

VOUCHER No. 30. LAAKMANN & SHERER. 
Kov. 29. 284 ft. cement walk, at 14g |39 76 



Total 39 76 

VOUCHER No. 31. W. C. FRAZEE. 
Nov. 30. 4,500 gals, fresh milk, at 12c. . $540 00 



Total 540 00 



VOUCHER No. 32. L. E. WEBB. 

Nov. 4. Setting 1 tire $0 50 

4. 8 pipe hooks 2 GO 

4. Repairing meat cart . 1 25 

4. Repairing fire poker . 25 

10. 8 horse shoes 3 00 

11. 8 horse shoes 3 00 

11. 7 fire pokers 4 00 

18. Repairing wagon 1 50 

30. Repairing tire 50 

30. 4 doz. hoops for tubs . 24 00 



Total 40 00 



VOUCHER No. 33. GEO. F. EDENHARTER, SUPERINTENDENT. 

Cash paid. 

Nov. 5. To Arthur Scott, for carpenter work $8 15 

" 5. To W. H. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 6. To Pitcher & Munda, for seeds 1 00 

" 5. To Jungclaug & Schumacher, for interest on laun- 
dry indebtedness 53 23 

" 8. To H. Beiser, for music - 11 25 

" 9. To Arthur Scott, for carpenter work 8 15 

" 9. To W. H. Merritt, for labor 10 00 

" 13. To Amer. Laundry Mach. Co., for freight paid on 

machinery 18 75 



57 



VOUCHER No. 33— Continued. 

Nov. 16. To W. H. Merritt, for labor 

16. To Arthur Scott, for carpenter work 

20. To Wykoff, S. & Benedict, for repairing type- 
writer 

20. To John Feller, for postage stamps 

22. To Henry Beiser, for music 

23. To W. H. Merritt, for labor 

23. To Arthur Scott, for carpenter work 

29. To Arthur Scott, for carpenter work 

29. To W. H. Merritt, for labor 

30. To Henry Beiser, for music 

29. To Supt., for expenses, two trips, to Cincinnati . 

Total $282 78 

VOUCHER No. 34. GEO. F. EDENHARTER, SUPERINTENDENT. 
Nov. 30. Main pay-roll for November, 1895 $6,898 75 



$10 00 


8 


15 


1 


00 


25 


00 


11 


25 


10 


00 


8 


15 


8 


15 


10 00 


39 


75 


30 


80 



Total 6,898 75 

VOUCHER No. 35. C. W. SULLIVAN. 

Nov. 30. Plaotering and repairing brick walls and parti- 
tions in kitchen $92 00 



Total 92 00 

VOUCHER No. 36. INDIANA PAPER CO. 
Nov. 7. 1 case toilet paper $7 50 



Total 7 50 



VOUCHER No. 37. WAYNE & BROEKINO 

Nov. 30. 2 stove pots, at 60c $1 20 

" 30. 2 covers, at 5c 10 



Total 1 30 

VOUCHER No. 38. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 

Nov. 8. 1 No. 9 riddle $0 50 

" 16. 1 doz. pocket shears 4 00 

Total 4 50 

VOUCHER No. 39. FRANCKE & SCHINDLER. 

Nov. 14. 1 grindstone $5 75 

" 23. 1 doz. hacksaw blades and handles ... . . 1 00 

Total 6 75 



58 



VOUCHER No. 40. SEVERIN, OSTERMEYER & CO. 



Nov, 8. 10,026 lbs. gran, sugar, at $4.83 $484 25 

8, 4,020 lbs. G. R. coffee, at 19ic 773 85 

8. 2,104 lbs. beans, at $1.30 45 59 

8. 1,160 lbs. rice, at 4fc '. . . 78 85 

8. 1,365 lbs. cheese, at lie 150 15 

8. 130 lbs. pepper, at 5^c 7 15 

8. 230 gals, vinegar, at 10c 23 00 

8, 12 gals, mustard, at 35c 4 20 

8. 15 bbls. salt, at 8c 12 00 

8. 108| gals. N. D. syrup, at 20c 21 70 

8. 54J gals, molasses, at 40c 21 80 

8. 10 boxes Crystal soap, at $3.50 35 00 

8. 8 doz. mop-sticks, at $7.50 gross 5 00 

8. 12 doz. silicon, at $8.50 gross 8 50 

8. 3 doz. No. 4 M. blacking, at 40c 1 20 

8. 1 doz. 18-oz. mops 2 25 

8. 75 lbs. Greenback tobacco, at 27c 20 25 

20. 226 lbs. starch, at 2ilc 6 22 

20. 10 bbls. oatmeal, at $3.80 38 00 

20. 1 gross silicon 8 50 

20. 1 bundle 2 bags 47 

20. 1 bundle 4 bags 69 

20. 1 bundle 20 bags 2 37 

20. 10 lbs. cotton twine, at 20c 2 00 

20. 1 box L. L. raisins 1 50 

20. 10 lbs. citron, at 15c 1 50 

20. 10 lbs. currants, at 5c 50 

20. 25 lbs. No. 5 sugar, at $3.78 95 

20. Half-barrel small pickles . 3 50 

27. IJ lbs. cocoanut, at 27c 40 

Total 



,761 34 



VOUCHER No. 41. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 



Nov. 1. 888| yds. M. muslin, at 7 Jc • . 

1. 424| yds. 4 X oil prints, at 7c . 

1. 201 yds. French plush, at 12^c. 

1. 100| yds. standard plush, at 16c 

1. 108 yds. oil cloth, at lO^c . . . 

8. 1,200 yds. A crash, at 5^c. . . 

Total 



$66 65 
29 73 
25 13 
15 04 
11 34 
66 00 



213 



59 



VOUCHER No. 42. JOSEPH GARDNER. 



Nov. 30. 1 bundle No. 4 coppered iron wire 

" 30. 1 bundle No. 6 coppered iron wire 

" 30. 1 bundle No. 7 coppered iron wire 

" 30. 1 bundle 30x96 galv. iron No. 20. 

'• 30. 1 bundle 30x96 galv. iron No. 22. 

" 30. 1 bundle 30x96 galv. iron No. 27. 

" 30. 4 only soldering coppers, 2 lbs. . 

" 30. 1 box 20x28 bright tin 4X. . . , 

" 30. 1 set hollow punches 

Total 



$2 


20 


2 


20 


2 


20 


6 


50 


7 


00 


7 


75 


2 


15 


23 75 


7 


75 



$61 50 



VOUCHER No. 43. JOHN SCHIED & CO. 



Nov. 7. 55J gals. Standard oysters, at 75c $41 44 

" 14. 56 gals. Standard oysters, at 75c 42 00 

" 21. 59 gals. Standard oysters, at 75c . . , 44 25 

" 27. 64* gals. Standard oysters, at 75c 48 38 

" 27. 7 gals. Select oysters, at $1.75 12 25 

Total $188 32 

Less 1 per cent 1 88 

Total 



186 44 



Nov. 12. 5 doz. hair brushes 
Total .... 



VOUCHER No. 44. BURRIS-HERZSCH CO. 

.... $10 00 



10 GO 



VOUCHER No. 45. J. R. RYAN & CO. 



Nov. 6. 
" 6. 
" 7. 
" 19. 



1,000 lbs. corn meal, at 90c 
1 bbl. cider, 46 gals., at 28c 
100 lbs. buckwheat, at 3c . 
500 lbs corn meal, at 90c . 

Total ........ 



$9 00 
12 88 

3 00 

4 50 



29 38 



VOUCHER No. 46. ARTHUR JORDAN CO. 



Nov. 1. 360 doz. eggs, at lOJc 

" 9. 360 doz. eggs, at 16*0 

" 16. 360 doz. eggs, at 16*c 

" 23. 300 doz. eggs, at 16^c 

Total 



$59 40 


59 


40 


59 


40 


49 


50 



227 70 



60 



VOUCHER No. 47. GEO. HITZ & CO. 



Nov. 



2. 

7. 
13. 
14. 
21. 
21. 
26, 
26. 
26. 
26. 
27. 
27. 
27. 



65^f bu. sweet potatoss, at 85c . . . 
8 bbls. crackers, 556 lbs. at 5c . . . 

635|§ bu. potatoes, at 28c 

568 lbs. city crackers, at 5ic . . . . 
578 lbs. city crackers, at 5i . . . . 
2 bbls. sweet potatoes ... . . 

1,550 lbs. sweet potatoes, 85 bu. . . 

6 bbls. cranberries, at $8 

18 doz. celery, at 50c 

1 box oranges 

8 doz. celery 

1 bbl. apples 

589 lb3. city butter crackers, at 5^0 , 



$56 02 

30 58 
178 06 

31 24 

31 79 
4 50 

23 96 
48 00 
9 00 
4 00 
4 00 
3 00 

32 40 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 48. HENRY SYERUP & SONS. 

Nov. 1. 4 bbls. cider, at $4.50 $18 00 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 49. W. U. TELEGRAPH CO. 

Nov. 30. Telegraphing, as per Nov. bills 5 

Total 



14 



VOUCHER No. 50. BROOKS OIL COMPANY. 



Nov. 



7. 51 gals. D. Cylinder oil, at 85c. 
30. 52 gals. D. Cylinder oil, at 85c. 



Total . . . 
Less 25 per cent 



$43 35 


44 


20 


$87 


55 


21 


89 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 51. DANIEL STEWART. 



Nov. 



3 lbs. F. E. stillingia comp . . 
3 lbs. F. E. burdock root . . . 
2 lbs. F. E. P. ash bark .... 
2 lbs. F. E. poke root .... 
5 lbs. F. E. sarsap. comp . . . 

1 lb. F. E. eucalypt . . . . 

2 lb. F. E. nux vomica 

1 lb. acetate potassium .... 
5 lbs. bromide potassium, at 39c 

2 lbs. iodide potassium .... 

5 lbs. bromide sodium 

5 lbs. bromide ammonia. . . . 
25 lbs oxalic acid 



$2 58 



71 
86 
14 
00 
69 
41 
35 
95 
60 
45 
50 
00 



$456 55 



18 00 



4 14 



65 66 



61 



VOUCHER No. .51— Continupd. 



16. 



2 lbs. cinchonida bark 

3 lbs. arnica 

1 lb. red aniline 

1 lb. green aniline 

1 lb. tannic acid 

25 lbs dal. insect powder . . . 

1 lb. powd. ipecac 

5 lbs. magnesia. . . . . 

5 lbs. alum 

15 lbs. parafBne 

^ doz. Peters* peptic essence . . 

1 oz. powd. ox gall 

6 0Z8. scale pepsin, Armour's . 
25 ozs. quinine 

2 lbs. bismuth, at 11.10 . . . . 
2 lbs. chlor. potassium . . . . 

1 oz. caffein ... 

5 yds. mustard plaster . . . . 

5 yds. bellad. plaster 

5 gals, alcohol 

1,000 pills, aloin., B. & S . . . 

2 doz. medicine glasses . . . . 
2 doz Peters' Peptic Essence. . 
1 doz. 4-q^^. water bottles. . . . 

Less error peptic essence, etc 
Total 



$0 


70 




30 




75 


1 


50 


1 


10 


4 


25 


1 


50 




10 




15 


1 


50 


4 


00 




21 


4 


50 


6 


75 


2 


20 




24 




65 


1 


58 


1 


58 


12 


50 


1 


56 




80 


4 00 


9 


50 


$90 16 


7 


22 



$82 94 



VOUCHER No. 52. WM. B. BURFORD. 



1. 10 doz. tabs 

1. 1 10-qr. cap record, J bd . . 

12. 1 inkstand 

12. 2 doz. penholders 

12. 1 8in. boxwood ruler. . . . 

12. 1 qt. Carter crimson ink. . . 

12. 1 ruling pen . 

12. 1 ream 18-lb. legal cap . . . 

12. 300-page cap ledger 

12. 400-page cap ledger 

12. 2 Crown records, 400 page. . 

12. 1 medium vowel index . . . 

12. 1 box, 100 rolls, toilet paper. 

12. 2,000 No. 10 envelopes . . . 

Total 



$8 40 


2 00 


75 


1 00 


25 


80 


50 


5 50 


1 05 


1 40 


4 00 


2 50 


8 00 


3 00 



39 15 



62 

VOUCHER No. 53. H. TECHENTIN & CO. 

Nov. 14. 2 wool blankets $10 50 

" 23. 6 cakes harness soap 75 

" 23, 6 1^-in. steel snaps 50 

" 23. 1 ball sboe thread 15 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 54. THE INDIANAPOLIS NEWS. 
Nov. 25. Advertising 61 words 3 times $1 83 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 55. McELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 

Nov. 6. 2 3x2^ bushings $0 30 

" 6. 2 3^x2^ bushings 40 

" 6. 1 3x2^xlJ c. i. tee 45 

" 9. 60 ft. 8-in. soil pipe ] 

" 9. 2 joints 8-in. soil d. h. pipe 

'' 9. 6 8x6 soil pipe reducers 

" 9. 2 6 in. double hubs 

" 9. 2 8-in. double hubs 

" 9. 1 8-in. -I bend 

" 9. 1 8 double Y branch !" ^^ ^^ 

" 9. 2 8x6 Y branch 

" 9. 5 6x4 reducers 

" 9. 3 8-in. traps 

" 9. 1 6-in trap 

" 9. 400 lbs. pig lead 

" 9. 32 lbs. pig lead 



Less credit. 
■ Total . . 



1 12 


$81 29 
13 20 



Nov. 


30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 



VOUCHER No. 56. FROMMEYER BROS. 

13 doz. cups, at 32c $4 16 

10 doz. saucers, at 32c 

5 doz. soup bowls, at 65c 

1 doz. 1-gal. pitchers 

I doz. soup tureens, at $9 

10 doz. tumblers, at 33c 

12 doz. tablespoons 

12 doz. teaspoons 

17 doz. cups, at 32c 

^ doz. soup tureens, at |9 

Total 



3 20 


3 25 


3 00 


6 00 


3 30 


4 75 


3 60 


5 76 


3 00 



63 



VOUCHER No. 57. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 

Nov. 26. Advertising I2 squares 3 times $3 00 

Total $3 00 

VOUCHER No. 58. J. E. BELL. 

Nov. 30. Legal services for Nov. '95 $50 00 

Total 50 00 

VOUCHER No. 59. MANS. NATURAL GAS CO. 

Nov. 30. Fuel gas service for Nov $1,388 89 

Less coal used for lack of gas 688 89 

Total 700 00 

VOUCHER No. 60. A. BRUNER & CO. 

Nov. 30. Sewer work as per coutract for Engine House . . $30 00 

" 30. Sewer work as per contract for New Building . 110 00 

" 30. 22 ft. 4 in. and 2 ft. 4 in. extra sewer 5 70 

Total 155 70 

VOUCHER No. 61. GEO. T. EVANS. 

Dec. 28. 120 bbls. Aurora flour, at $3.15 $378 00 

Total 378 00 

VOUCHER No. 62. JOHN O'NEILL. 

Dec. 3. 15 bbls. Pillsbury flour, at $3.85 $57 75 

" 13. 5 bbls. Pillsbury flour, at $3.85 19 25 

" 17. 15 bbls. Pillsbury flour, at $3.85 57 75 

Total . , 134 75 

VOUCHER No. 63. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 

Dec. 24. Advertising 1^ sqrs. 3 times $3 00 

Total 3 00 

VOUCHER No. 64. INDIANAPOLIS NEWS. 

Dec. 23. Advertising 63 words 3 times $1 89 

Total 1 89 



64 

VOUCHER No. 65. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL. 

Dec. 26. Advertising 12 lines 3 times f2 85 

Total $2 85 

VOUCHER No. 66. C. J. GARDNEK. 

Dec. 2. 3,710 lbs. beef. 

5. 3,678 lbs. beef. . 

" 9. 3,725 lbs. beef. 

" 12. 4,507 lbs. beef. 

" 16. 3,855 lbs. beef. 

" 20. 2,000 lbs. beef. 

" 21. 1,855 lbs. beef. 

" 23. 3,516 lbs. beef. 

" 27. 3,040 lbs. beef. 

" 30. 2,994 lbs. beef. 

32,880 lbs., at $4.95 - $1,627 56 

" 14. 632 lbs. veal. 
'■■ 28, 592 lbs. veal. 

1,224 lbs., at 8c 97 

Total 1,725 48 

VOUCHER No. 67. SWIFT BROS. 

Dec. 5. 1,035 lbs. hamp, at $8.48 $87 76 

" 5. 1,044 lbs. lard, at $5.73 59 82 

" 12. 1,000 lbs. hams, at $8.48 84 80 

" 19. 53 lbs. bacon, at $10 5 30 

" 19. 1,002 lbs. hams, at $8.48 84 97 

" 19. 1,399 lbs. lard, at $5.73 80 16 

" 27. 1,010 lbs. hams, at $8.48 85 65 

" 27. 1,002 lbs. lard, at $5.73 57 41 

Total 545 87 

VOUCHER No. 68. J. L. KEACH. 

Dec. 13. 22 bble. apples, 4,380 lbs,, at 55c $48 18 

Total 48 18 

VOUCHER No. 69. GEO. HITZ & CO. 

Dec. 6. 4,125 lbs. apples, at 50c $41 25 

Total 41 25 



65 



VOUCHER No. 70. H. SYflRUP & SONS. 
488^ bu. potatoes, at 25c $122 08 



Dec. 6. 

12. 282;V bu. potatoes, at 2oc. . 

19. 170 lbs, rice pop corn, at 4c 

21. 2 bbls. apples 

21. 1 bbl. onions 

23. 18 bunches celery 

23. 1 bunch bananas 

23. 6 bbls. cranberries, at $9.25 

23. 1 box lemons 

23. 1 box oranges 



Total 



70 


58 


6 


80 


9 


00 


1 


25 


6 


30 


1 


50 


55 


50 


4 


00 


4 00 



$281 01 



VOUCHER No. 71. INDIA.NA WIRE WORKS. 
Dec. 31. 4 wire window guards $10 50 



Total 



10 50 



VOUCHER No. 72. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

Dec. 31. Fuel gas service for Dec $1,388 89 

Less coal used acc't shortage gas 1,131 20 



Total 



257 69 



VOUCHER No. 73. CONSOLIDATED COAL & LIME CO. 

Dec. 31. 646f tons block coal, at $1.75 $1,131 20 

Total 



1,131 20 



VOUCHER No. 74. FRANCIS BERGMAN. 
Dec. 31. 4 003 lbs. sal soda, at 78c $31 23 



Total 



31 23 



VOUCHER No. 75. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 



Dec. 



749^ yds. 10-4 Pepp. muslin, at 17c. 
627f yds. App. ticking, at lOJc. . . 
250 cotton batts, at 4|c .... 
811 yds. 58 in. Utica muslin, at 12^c 

15 doz. vests, at $3.50 

IdO 10-4 Randolph blankets, at 90c. 
24 boxes knitting cotton, at 52c . . 

999^ yds. scrim, at 4^c 

tV doz. vests, at $3.50 



$127 37 
65 92 

11 88 
101 38 

52 50 
90 00 

12 48 
42 48 

29 



5 — Cent. Insane. 



66 



VOUCHER No, 75— Continued. 



Dec. 2. 1 Randolph blanket $0 90 

7. 32 doz. napkins, at 11.35 43 20 

" 7. 1,000 yds. A. B. crash, at 6ic 62 50 

" 7. 1,200 yds. A. brown crash, at 5|c 66 00 

Total $676 90 

Less 15y'2 doz. vests to clothing acc't, at |3.50 . . 52 79 

Total $624 11 

VOUCHER No. 76. ARTHUR JORDAN CO. 

Dec. 7. 504 lbs. chickens, at lie $55 44 

7. 50 lbs. turkeys, at lie 5 50 

21. 43 lbs. turkeys, at He 4 73 

21. 482 lbs. chickens, at lie ... 5302 

24. 1,611 lbs. turkeys, at lie 177 21 

31. 62 lbs. turkeys, at lie 6 82 

Total 302 72 

VOUCHER No. 77. ELGIN DAIRY CO. 

Dec. 1. 40 lbs. butterine, at 9c $3 60 

" 2. 1,200 lbs. butterine, at 9c 108 00 

" 9. 1,200 lbs. butterine, at 9c 108 00 

" 16. 1,200 lbs. butterine, at 9c 108 00 

" 23. 1,400 lbs. butterine, at 9c 126 00 

Total 453 60 

VOUCHER No. 78. INDIANA PAPER CO. 

Dec. 17. 3,000 No. 2 paper bags $1 80 

" 17. 3,000 No. 4 paper bags 2 64 

" 23. 2,000 No. 2 paper bags .... 1 20 

" 23. 2,000 No. 8 paper bags 2 88 

Total 8 52 

VOUCHER No. 79. F. G. KAMPS. 

Dec. 6. 58 gals. Standard oysters $46 40 

" 12. 65f gals. Standard oysters 52 60 

" 19. 651 gals. Standard oysters 52 20 

" 24. 8 gals. Select oysters 12 00 

" 26. 61^ gals. Standard oysters 49 20 

Total . . . • $212 40 

L^ss discount 2 00 

Total 210 '40 



67 



1895, 


Dec 


31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 



VOUCHER No. 80. FROMMEYER BROS. 

1 4-gal. jar $0 25 

10 doz. cups, at 33c 3 30 

13 doz, saucers, at 32c 4 16 

5 doz. plates, 10 in., at 7Cc 3 50 

5 doz. soup bowlp, at 65c 3 25 

1 doz. wash pitchers 3 25 

1 doz. cov'rd butter dishe" 3 35 

4 doz. teaspoons, at $2,25 9 00 

11 doz. tumblers, at 33c 3 63 

3 doz. cruets, at 55c 1 65 

3 doz. pepper cruets, at 65c 1 65 

5 doz. vinegar cruets, at 55c 2 75 

2 doz. cream pitchers, at |1 2 00 

1 doz. slop jars 9 00 

1 doz. teaspoons 2 25 

20 doz. cups, at 33c 6 60 

1 sauce boat 25 

Total $59 84 



VOUCHER No. 81. CHAS. MAYER & CO 
1895, 

Dec. 16. 8 doz. dolls, at $3.75 

" 17. 14 doz. pipes, at $1.25 

Total 



130 00 
17 50 



47 50 



1895. 
Dec. ! 



VOUCHER No. 82. A. KIEFER DRUG CO. 

2. 2 lbs. gran. phos. soda, at 15c 

2. 5 lbs. bromide potash, at 39c 

2. 2 lbs. pyrophosphate iron, at 60c 

2. 5 lbs. mur. ammonia 

2. 2 lbs nitric acid and bottle 

2. 5 lb. iodide ammonia 

2. 2 lbs. acetate lead 

2. 1 lb. red aniline 

2, 10 lbs. glycerine and jug 

2. 1 lb, F. E. eucalyptus .... 

2. 2 lbs. Hayden's vib. compound 

2. 10 lbs. soluble blue, at 40c 

2. 3 lbs. iodide potash 

2. 1 lb. sol. cit. iron 

2. 5 lbs. Rochelle salts. . 

2. '} doz. tumbler graduates, 32 oz 

2. ^ doz. tumbler graduates, 8 oz 

2. + doz. tumbler graduates, 4 oz 

2. ^ dcz. tumbler graduates, 2 oz 

2. 2 doz. boxes capsules 



$0 


30 


1 


95 


1 


20 




50 




40 


2 


25 




24 




50 


1 


55 




70 


2 85 


4 


00 


8 


40 




63 


1 


05 


1 


50 


1 


34 




70 




50 


2 


00 



68 



18 '5. 



Dec. 



2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

4. 

5. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
17. 



VOUCHER No. 82— Continued. 

J doz. alpha syringes , . . . . 

25 ozs. quinine 

4 0Z3. ichthyol 

6 ozs. antikamnia 

8 ozs. phenacetine 

6 ozs. chloralamid . . . . 

5 gro. 4XX corks 

2 gal. D. E. witch hazel 

1,000 pills, quinine and strychnine 

J lb. hypophos. soda 

2 doz. medicine glasses, at 60c 

1 lb. F. E. grind, rob 

1 lb. F. E. wild cherry 

1 lb. F. E. yerba santa 

1 lb. yerlazine 

jij doz. listerine 

Total 



$4 50 


6 75 


1 69 


5 40 


7 60 


4 50 


85 


1 40 


3 00 


70 


1 20 


1 08 


60 


1 20 


50 


70 



$74 23 



1895. 



VOUCHER No. 83. GOTH & CO. 



Dec. 10. 100 letters on slab, at 16c 
Total 



fl6 00 



16 00 



VOUCHER No. 84. INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR BLIND, 
1895. 
Dec. 31. 50 doz. brooms, at $1.75 $87 50 

Total 87 50 

VOUCHER No. 85. WM. H. ARMSTRONG & CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 23. 3doz. surgeon's silk, at $1. CO $3 00 

" 28. J doz. T. catgut, at $9 4 50 

$7 50 
Less discount 10 per cent 75 

Total 6 75 

VOUCHER No. 86. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 4. 300 doz. eggs, at 17^c $5250 

" 11. 300 doz. eggs, at 17^c 52 50 

" 18. 360 doz. eggs, at 17^c 63 00 

" 26. 360 doz. eggs, at 17^c 63 00 

Total 231 00 



69 

VOUCHER No. 87. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

101 quilts, at 75c 175 75 

200 blankets, at $1.25 250 00 

100 rubber blankets, at 80c 80 00 

8 Christmas greetings, at 50c 4 00 

71 yds rabbit prints, at 4oC 3 20 

Total $412 95 

VOUCHER No. 88. J. T. SMITH & CO. 

1895. 
Dec. 31. 1, COO lbs. meal, at 80c $8 00 



1895. 


Dec. 


12. 


(( 


12. 


It 


12. 


II 


12. 


II 


12. 



Total 8 00 



VOUCHER No. 89. JOSH ZIMMERMAN. 

1895. 
Dec. 31. 2 dumb waiters and well, complete $140 00 



Total 140 00 

VOUCHER No. 90. COLLIER & MURPHY. 

1895. 

Dec. 2. 1 coffin and box 

" 7. l.coffin and box 

" 21. 2 coffins and boxes , . . . 

" 31. 1 coffin and box 

Total 20 00 

VOUCHER No. 91. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

1895. 



85 25 



$4 00 


4 00 


8 00 


4 00 



Dec. 31. 


Exchange service 3 months to March 31, 1896 • 


$83 50 


" 31. 


Toll and messenger service Oct. and Nov., 1895 . 


1 75 




Total 






VOUCHER No. 92. M. J. O'REILLY. 




1895. 






Dec. 27. 




$3 00 


" 31. 




1 50 










Total 





4 50 



70 



VOUCHEE No. 93. KIPP BROS. CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 10. 2 doz. No. 45 Christmas balls, at 75c $1 50 

" 10. 2 doz. No. 46 Christmas ball?, at 70c 1 40 

" 10. 4 doz. No. 38 Christmas balls, at 35c 1 40 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 52 Christmas balls 1 20 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 41 Christmas balls 75 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 51 Christmas balls 1 25 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 47 Christmas balls 80 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 48 Christmas balls 1 00 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 49 Christmas balls 1 20 

" 10. 1 doz. No. 50 Christmas balls 1 25 

" 10. 2 doz. Christmas ornaments, at 75c . 1 50 

" 10. 2 doz. Christmas ornaments, at 40c 80 

" 10. 2 doz. Christmas ornaments, at 40c 80 

" 10. 4 doz. Christmas ornaments, at 35c 1 40 

" 10, 2 doz. No. 206 Christmas balls, at 35c 70 

" 10. 2 doz. No. 33 Christmas balls, at 35c 70 

" 10. 5 doz. No. 29 Christmas balls, at 30c 1 50 

" 10. 4 doz. No. 26 Christmas balls, at 25c 1 00 

" 10. 3 doz. No. 43 Christmas balls, at 40c 1 20 

" 10. 1 gro. tinsel 4 50 

" 10. 1 gro. tinsel 4 00 

" 10. 500 balls, No. 13 1 00 

" 10. 500 balls, No. 16 2 50 

" 10. 500 balls, No. 17 2 50 

" 10. 4 boxes silver tinsel, at 75c 3 00 

" 10. 1 gro. pin flags 60 

" 17. 8 reams tissue paper, at 90c 7 20 

" 18. J doz, tin trays, at $2 1 00 

" 18. ?v doz. silver trays, at $6.75 1 12 

" 18. ?; doz. silver trays, at $9 . 1 50 

" 19. 4 reams tissue paper, at 90c 3 60 

" 23. i gro. birds, at $3 - 75 

" 23. h doz. birds, at $1.20 60 

" 23. 1 doz. birds 40 

" 23. 1 doz. Santa Claus 1 75 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 94. H. A. WEIGHT CO. 

1895. 

Dec. 23. 450 lbs. mince meat, at 10c $45 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 95. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1895. 

Dec. 4. 2,497 lbs. chip soap, at $3.85 $96 13 

" 9. 2,561 lbs. chip soap, at $3.85 98 60 

" 17. 2,616 lbs. chip soap, at $3.85 100 72 

" 23. 2,241 lbs. chip soap, at $3.85 86 28 

Total 



$57 37 



45 00 



331 78 



71 

VOUCHER No. 96. INDIANAPOLIS CHEMICAL CO. 
1895. 
Dec. 3. 1,000 lbs. acme boiler compound, at 75C .... $75 00 

Total $78 00 

VOUCHER No. 97. REV. W. A. HENDRICK80N. 

1895. 
Dec. 30. Services as chaplain, Dec. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 ... . $25 OO 

Total 25 00 

VOUCHER No. 98. FRED GOEPPER. 
1895. 
Dec. 7. 100 bu. lump coke $9 00 

Total 9(0 

VOUCHER No. 99. POL\R ICE CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 3. 45,600 lbs. ice, at si. 98 per ton $45 14 

" 26, 4,100 lbs. ice, at $1.98 per ton 4 05 

" 27. 39,600 lbs. ice, at S1.98 per ton 39 20 

Total 88 39 

VOUCHER No. 100. MIDDLETON & LOGSDON. 
1895. 
Dec. 31, 10 doz. whisk brooms, at $1.00 $10 00 

Total 10 00 

VOUCHER No. 101. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1895. 

Dec. 31. 3 chimney tops for laundry $29 85 

" 31. 1 gross can handles. 1000 

" 31. 1 gross bucket woods 50 

" 31. 3 doz. saucepan handles 1 35 

" 31. J gross kettle ears 75 

" 31. 1 doz. grater blanks 25 

" 31. 6 links Ix^in. iron 1 40 

" 31, 1 pair 12-in. wire nippers 175 

•' 31, 12 doz. granite buckets 92 68 

Total 138 53 

VOUCHER No. 102. THE JOHN VAN RANGE CO. 
1895. 
Dec. §1. 5 Royal roasters $8 50 

Total 8 50 



72 

VOUCHER No. 103. HOLLWEG & EEESE. 
1895. 

Dec. 16. 2 doz. cups and saucers, at $1.40 $2 80 

*' 16. 3 doz. deep cups, at $1.17 3 51 

16. 2 doz. tumblers, at $1.80 3 60 

16 1 doz. tumblers 43 

Total $10 34 

VOUCHER No. 104. J. C. HIRSCHMAN. 
1895. 
Dec. 2. 2,375 lbs. husks, at $45 $53 44 

Total 53 44 

VOUCHER No. 105. W. C. FEAZEE. 
1895. 
Dec. 31. 4,650 gals, milk, at 12c $558 00 

Total 558 00 

VOUCHER No. 106. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 31. 73,100 cu. ft. gas, at $1.25 per M $91 38 

" 31. 2 outside lamps, at $1.50 3 00 

Total 94 38 

VOUCHER No. 107. J. E. BELL. 
1895. 
Dec. 31. Legal services for December, 1895 $50 00 

Total 50 00 

VOUCHER No. 108. DAGGETT & CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 21. 615 lbs. peanuts, at 5c $30 75 

" 21. 80 lbs. Imp'l candy, at 10c 8 00 

" 21. 90 lbs. mint candy, at 10c 9 00 

21. 50 lbs. mixed candy, at 12c 6 00 

21. 1,000 lbs. common candy, at 5c 50 00 

23. 40 lbs. cinnamon candy, at 10c 4 00 

23. 30 lbs. mint candy, at 10c 3 00 

Total 110 75 

VOUCHER No. 109. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 

1895. 

Dec. 31. Telegraphing as per December bills $1 25 

Total 1 25 



. 73 

VOUCHER No. 110. FLEISCHMANN & CO. 

1895. 

Dec. 31. 60^ lbs. yeast at 25c $15 13 

Total $15 13 

VOUCHER No. 111. KIRKOFF BROS. 

1895. 

Nov. 16. Contract plumbing |643 00 

" 8. 2 sacks mineral wool 4 00 

" 21. 1 ll-'m. off-get valve 2 75 

" 21. 4 l-}-in. C fittings 40 . 

" 21. 2 11-in. nipples 10 

" 21. Connecting radiator 1 50 

Dec. 14. 1 1 J-N. P. angle valve 3 75 

" 14. 1 automatic air valve 75 

" 14. 1 38-in. radiator section 1 50 

" 14. Cutting radiator for section 4 75 

" 24. 4 ft. fin. E. S. lead pipe 1 CO 

" 24. 6 lbs. solder " 50 

" 24. Putting on hose bibbs 6 50 

Total 673 00 

VOUCHER No. 112. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 
1895. 

Dec. 3. 52 lbs. 12 A. B. twine at 23c $11 96 

" 5. 2" gross braes buttons at $6.33 , 3 17 

" 5. i gross braes buttons at $1.84 92 

" 5. 5 gross W. Hooks at $1.32 6 60 

" 5. 20,000 braf=s head nails at 30c 6 00 

" 5. 50 lbs. 12 A. B. twine at 23c 11 50 

" 5. 10 lbs. 7 A. twine at 12c 1 20 

" 5. 1 dozen white linings 7 00 

" 5. 1 dozen tack hammers 1 10 

" 5. 1 dozen tack claws 1 03 

" 5. 1 bolt 3-inch webbing . = 55 

" 5. 5 lbs. 18-oz. tacks 26 

" 5. 5 lbs. 4-oz. tacks 94 

" 5. 1 doz. 16-inch mattress needles 70 

" 5. 1 lath hatchet 35 

" 5. 12 10x12 registers \ 

" 6. 12 10x16 registers I 

" 5. 12 8x10 registers | ^^ ^*^ 

" 5. 12 6x 8 registers I 

" 6. 1 emery grinding machine 9 75 

" 6. 12 lbs. No. 12 Am. wire at 7ic 90 

" 13. 6 pairs 2^x2i butts at 30c 1 80 

" 13. 9 pairs 3x3 butts at 40c 3 60 

" 13. 3 pairs 4x4 butts at 50c 1 50 

" 16. 22 sets trans, centers at 5c 1 10 

'■ 16. 18 sets sash locks at 25c 4 50 

" 16. 1 set ixf reamer 4 00 



74 

VOUCHER No. 112— Continued. 
1895. 

Dec. 16. 1 reamer Jxi f 1 07 

" 16. 1 reamer 1 i 1 50 

" 16. 12 machine bolts at 5c 60 

" 16. 2 master keys at 25c 50 

" 16. 33 blank keys at 5c 1 65 

" 19. Hardware as per contract 106 00 

" 24. 17 bronze cupboard turns at 30c 5 10 

" 24. i doz. axle pulleys at $1.50 1 00 

'' 24. Ijl doz. B. knobs 37 

" 26. 1 car pusher 3 85 

" 26. 50 doz. fibre chambers at $4.50 225 00 

$456 62 

Less 1 J doz. sash locks returned at $3.00 .... 4 50 

Total $452 12 

VOUCHER No. 113. FRANCKE & SCHINDLER. 
1895. 

Dec. 31. 50 -f\;x2 lag screws at 65c $0 33 

" 31. i doz. files at $2.25 56 

" 31. 1 ticket punch 2 CO 

" 31. i doz. nut crackers at $4.00 2 00 

Total 4 89 

VOUCHER No. 114. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 23. ^ doz. wire rat traps, at $9 $4 50 

Total ... 4 50 

VOUCHER No. 115. PARROTT c^ TAGGART. 
1895. 

Dec. 5. 507 lbs. T. B. crackers, at 5^c $27 89 

" 12. 491 lbs. T. B. crackers, at 5Jc 27 01 

" 12. 89 lbs. square crackers, at 4^c 4 01 

" 19. 89 lbs. equate crackers, at i^c 4 01 

" 19. 649 lbs. T. B. crackers, at 5^c 35 70 

" 26. 518 lbs. T. B. crackers, at 5|c 28 49 

" 26. 94 lbs. square crackers, at 4^c 4 23 

Total 131 84 

VOUCHER No. 116. SEVERIN, OSTERMEYER & CO. 
1895. 

Dec. 13. 10,017 lbs. gran, sugar, at $4.79 $479 81 

" 13. 2,133 lbs. beans, at $1.20 42 66 

" 13. ], 660 lbs. rice, at 4^0 76 78 

" 13. 5bbl8. hominy, at$2 10 GO 

" 13. 120 lbs. currants, at 4^c , 5 10 



1895. 


Dec. 


'!13. 


(1 


13. 


II 


13. 


11 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


It 


13. 


fi- 


13. 


ll 


13. 


11 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


13. 


II 


20. 


11 


20. 


11 


30. 



1895. 


Dec. 


31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




13. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 




31. 



75 

VOUCHER No. 116— Continued. 

1 box baking soda $3 25 

200 doz. Yar. corn, at 92ic 185 00 

200 doz. peaches, at $1.50 300 00 

229 gal. vinegar, at 10c 22 90 

12 gal. mustard, at 35c 4 20 

10 bbls. gait, at 85c 8 50 

1 bbl. lOOp