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Full text of "Documentary journal of Indiana 1898"

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ANNUAL REPORTS 



Officers of State 



State of Indiana, 



Administrative Officers, Trustees and Superintendents of the Several Benevo 

lent and Reformatory Institutions, as Required by Law 

to Be Made to the Governor, 



Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898, 



VOLUME II. 



BV AUXHORITV. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR KMR STATK PRINTINfi AND BIN»lNO. 
18«). 



-^ : ■ I 



jrffr 



7 



2_ 



PREFACE. 



STATE OF INDIANA, | 

Office of Secretary uf State, > 

Indianapolis, May 22, 1899. j 

In accordance with the requirements of an act, approved February :>, 1853, 
(1st G. & H., p. 538), the several administrative ofticers of the State, and the 
Trustees and Superintendents of the Benevolent, Reformatory and Educational 
Institutions thereof, have submitted to the Governor, and tiled in the Executive 
Department the reports re<iuired of them for the fiscal year ending October 31, 
1898, and the calendar year ending December 31, 1898, respectively, whicli have 
been entered of record in the order of their reception, and delivered to the Secre- 
tary of State for publication under the order of the Board of Commissioners of 
Public Printing and Binding. 

Six hundred copies of reports are now bound in two volumes, and issued to 

the officers and persons designated by law to receive them. The usual number of 

copies of each report have also been bound in pamphlet form, and delivered to the 

'responsible officer or Superintendent of each Institution for distribution in such 

manner as they may deem for tiie best interests of the State. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 
Clerl: Bureau Public Printing. 



(3 ii 



CONTENTS, VOL. 



Institution for the Education of the Blind. 

Scliool for Feeble-Minded Youth. 

Central Hospital for Insane. 

Northern Hospital for Insane. 

Southern Hospital for Insane. 

Eastern Hospital for Insane. 

Labor Commission. 

Fish Commissioner. 

Factory Inspection Department. 

Custodian of Public Buildings. 

Reform School for Girls and Woman's Prison. 

Indiana State Prison. 

State Normal School. 



INDIANA INSTITUTION 



Education of the Blind 



FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Trustees and Superintendent 



Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

ATM. B. BURFOED, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 
1898. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

ExKCUTivE Department, 

Indianapolis, November 2 



, 1898. J 



Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, ) 

Indianapolis, November 5, 1898. ( 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



November 5, 1898. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

CHAS. E. WILSON, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana Novem- 
ber 5, 1898. 

WILL [AM D. OWEN, 

■ Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this ")th day of 
November, 1898. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



Indiana Institution for the Education of the Blind. 



OFFICERS. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

NELSON BRADLEY, Presiuent, Greenfield. 
JOHN F. HENNESSEY, Treasurer, Indianapolis. 
JAMES L. ALLEN, Secretary, Covington. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 
GEORGE S. WILSON. 

FRANK A. MORRISON, Physician. 
BELLE KNISELL, Bookkeeper. 
BELLE CAMPBELL, Housekeeper. 
KATE CASEY, Governess for Girls. 
LIZZIE EVANS, Governess for Boys. 

TEACHERS. 

LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 

T. E. KINZIE, Principal. NANNIE CRAMPTON. 

LUNA LEWIS. JESSIE HAMILTON. 

JEANNETTE NEWLAND. JENNY^ WHEELING. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

ADELAIDE CARMAN, Principal. WILLIAM SHANNON. 

BERTHA CAMPBELL. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

ANDREW J. COCHRAN, Chair and 3IaUress Department. 
JAMES FULLER, Broom Department. 
SARAH STARK, Saving DepaHment. 

TUNING DEPARTMENT. 
FRANK SMITH. 

GYMNASTICS. 
MAY VAN WIE. 



Indiana Institution for the Education of 

the Blind, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



INFORMATION, 

1. The purpose of this Institution is purely educational. The aim is to 
give a practical ed^ication to the young blind of both sexes residing in the 
State. All the common school branches are taught. An extensive course 
in music is available to all who have talent in this direction. Instruction 
is given on the pianoforte, organ and brass band instruments, Avhile for 
purposes of vocal training the pupils are divided into two choirs. A thor- 
ough course is given in several Industrial trades, such as broom and mat- 
tress making, cane-seating chairs and piano tuning. The girls learn sewing 
by hand and machine, knitting, crocheting, bead and fancy work. The 
purpose is to make the pupils useful, contented, self-supporting citizens. 
A gymnasium is equipped and a special teacher drills the pupils in syste- 
matic physical exercises. Pupils when not in recitations are in charge of 
a governess. Neatly furnished hospitals are provided for the sick. 

2. The school year commences on the second Wednesday of Septem- 
ber, and continues in session forty weeks. There is no vacation during the 
session. 

3. Applicants who are under eight or over twenty-one years of age 
are not admitted. 

4. No person of imbecile or unsound mind, or of confirmed immoral 
charactei', will be knowingly received into the Institution, and in case any 
puiJii shall, after a fair trial, prove incompetent for useful instruction, or 
disobedient to the regulations of the Institution, such pupil will be there- 
upon discharged. 

5. The Institution is maintained by the State, and tuition, board and 
washing are furnished free of cost to all pupils residing in Indiana. The 
parents or friends of pupils must suppl.v them with comfortable clothing, 
suitable for summer and winter wear, in such quantity as will admit of 
necessai'y changes. Each article of clothing should be distinctly marked 
with the owner's name, and must be sent in good condition. The traveling 
expenses of pupils must be defrayed by parents or friends. 

6. It is positively required that every pupil shall be removed from the 
Institution during the annual vacation of the school, as well as at any 
other time when such removal may be deemed necessary by the proper offi- 



cers thereof; and in case of the failure of the friends of any pupil to com- 
ply with this requisition, provision is made by the law for sending sucli 
pupil to the Trustee of the township in which he resides, to be by him pro- 
vided for at the expense of the county. 

7. Pei-sons bringing pupils to the Institution or visiting them while 
here, can not be accommodated with board and lodging during their stay 
in the city. 

8. All letters to the pupils should be addressed in the care of the Insti- 
tution in order to insure their prompt delivery. 

9. Parties desiring the admission of a pupil are required to fill up the- 
required form of application and forward the same to the Superintendent 
of the Institution, giving truthful answers to the interrogatories therein 
contained, and procuring the signature of a justice of the peace to the 
certificate thereunto attached; and the pupil must in no case be sent until 
such application shall have been received and favorably responded to by 
the Superintendent. 

10. The Superintendent will cheerfully give information in regard to 
the Institution, and will thankfully receive any information concerning 
those who should be receiving its benefits. 

11. That the worli of the Institution may do the highest good to all,. 
it is necessary that every pupil shall be present at the opening of the 
term. Faithful work and prompt and regular attendance are essential to 
advancement and promotion. No pupil who is tardy at the beginning of 
the term, is irregular in attendance, or drops out before the close of the 
term, can hope to do acceptable work and receive promotion. Unless there 
is an excellent reason for doing otherwise, every pupil should be present 
on the first day and remain throughout the term. 

12. Each ptipil before entering the Institution should be supplied with 
the following clothing of good quality: 

BOYS— Two hats, two suits of clothes, two extra pairs of pants, four 
pairs of socks or six pairs of stockings, four shirts, two suits of under- 
wear, two pairs of shoes, six handkerchiefs, two pairs of suspenders, a 
tooth brush, a clothes brush, and a comb and hair brush. Small boys need 
no suspenders, but should be supplied with an extra suit of underwear. 

GIRLS— Two woolen and two cotton dresses, four aprons, three night 
dresses, two suits of summer and three of Avinter underwear, two dark and 
two light skirts, six pairs of stockings, six handkerchiefs, a wrap, a hat, 
rubbers, two pairs of shoes, a tooth brush, a clothes brush, a comb and 
hair brush. 

This amount of clothing will be necessary during the year, that the 
children may be kept clean and comfortable. When parents are not able 
to furnish the required clothing thoy should not hesitate to call upon the 
Township Trustee, who aaIII provide for the needs of those who are 
worthy. All clothing should be marked with indelible ink. 

13. The appropriation for this Institution has been materially reduced, 
making it necessary for us to reduce the cost of maintenance in like pro- 
portion. To this end it will be necessaiT for parents, guardians, etc., to 
provide for all incidental expenses of pupils. It will likewise be necessary 
for all persons sending children to the Institution to furnish them trans- 
portation to their homes at the close of the term. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



HONORABLK JaMES A. MoUNT, 

Go Of r nor of Indiana: 

AVe herein respectfully submit the Fifty-Second Annual Report 
of the operations and conditions of the Indiana Institution for the 
Education of the Blind. 

The financial condition is shown in the following exhibit: 

PROPERTY VALUES. 

Real estate $521,.381 00 

Personal 23,41.3 89 

Total $544,794 89 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Maintenance $27,000 00 

Repairs of buildings 1,500 00 

Industrial 1,500 00 

LibraiT 500 00 

RECEIPTS. 

Broom shop $534 54 

Caning shop 172 35 

Girls' sewing room 31 34 

Total $738 23 

EXPENDITURES. 

On account of maintenance $27,738 23 

On account of repairs of buildings 1,497 86 

On industrial account 1,499 37 

On account of library 499 85 

Total $31,235 31 

BALANCES. 

On maintenance 

On repairs $2 14 

On industrial 63 

On library 15 

By receipts from counties 28 25 

Miscellaneous receipts 1 80. 

Total converted into State treasury $32 97 



8 

An itemized exhibit of the above will be found in the appendix 
to this report. 

The enrollment is a little larger this year than usual. It would 
have been considerably more had not the age limit been raised from 
six to eight years. The capacity of the Institution is not now 
seriously overtaxed. The children may remain in the Institution 
from eight to twenty-one, thirteen years. This is as long a period 
as is generally desirable to accomplish the best results. Blind chil- 
dren under eight years of age require so much individual attention 
that they would seriously interfere with the general work unless 
the attendants were largely increased. The attendance of blind per- 
sons over twenty-one yeai"s of age is not generally desirable. Their 
habits have become so fixed that they seldom harmonize with the 
work of the Institution and their fingers do not have the delicacy 
of touch necessai-y to an education through the tactile sense. In 
many c-ases they have been immoral and have proven sources of 
irritation by corrupting the younger pupils. The enrollment for 
the last ten yeai-s has been as follows: 

1889 1.32 1894 152 

1890 124 1895 126 

1891 144 1896 139 

1892 139 1897 157 

1893 150 1898 162 

Taking the above enrollment, the per capita expense for each 
year of the above period is as follows: 

1,SS9 .'?208 35 1894 $217 98 

1890 235 68 1895 267 76 

1891 200 23 1896 2.30 81 

1892 217 51 1897 191 42 

1893 225 93 1898 192 80 

This calculation is made upon the aggi'egate expenses. The per 
capita for maintenance would be considerably les-s. The wide dif- 
ference is largely caused by the difference in cost of material and 
provisions and the variance in amount spent for repaire. 

This per capita may seem large, but the education of blind chil- 
dren is expensive and difficult. ]\ruch individual attention is re- 
quired, and they are not able to assist in many ways as children who 
have sight. Apparatus and literature for the blind are also very ex- 
pensive. A map of a State or country' for the blind costs $50. A 



9 

book wliicli can be purchased in ordinary type for 50 cents in Braille 
-or New York Point costs $12 or $15. We have this yeai* purchased 
a Braille Stereotype Maker, by which we can print our own music 
and supply much needed supplementary work. 

We have furnished the pupils' table with wholesome food well 
prepared and in sufficient quantity. AVe have purchased no inferior 
or cheap material. We have tried to supply the children not with 
luxuries but with plain, first-class provisions. The milk has all been 
good and the butter not butterine. The children have been sup- 
plied with sufficient to make them healthy and happy. 

The improvements the past year have been quite extensive. We 
have thoroughly cleaned the whole building and painted wherever 
it was needed. The interior and exterior are now in excellent sani- 
tary condition. Linoleum has been laid over the rough floors of the 
old building. AVe have just completed a first-class electric light 
plant without any additional appropriation. This is a better, cheaper 
and safer illumination than can be secured from oil or gas. We 
have guarded in every way against the danger of loss of life by 
fire. In a building like this the danger at best is considerable. The 
general use of matches and the leaky pipes made this danger very 
serious. We believe that it is now reduced to a minimum. The 
only thing now necessary to make the grounds the most attractive 
in the city is the continuation of the iron fence along the entire 
frontage on Meridian and Pennsylvania streets. This we are unable 
to do with our present means. The wooden fence is now unsightly 
anS rotten and should be removed. 

We are pleased to report the general good health of the pupils. 
During the past year there has been no contagious disease or serious 
sickness of any kind. The pupils have been contented, industrious 
and happy. jSTo serious immoral act has been committed by any of 
them. The work during the past year has been earnest and progres- 
sive. Respectfully, 

IS^ELSON BRADLEY, 

President, 

JAMES L. ALLEN, 

Secretary, 

JOHN F. HENNESSEY, 

Treasurer. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



Nelson Bradley, John F. IIinnessey, jAiMEs L. Allen, 

Board of Trustees: 

Gentlemen — In compliance with a provision of the Statutes of 
the State of Indiana I herein submit the Fiftv-second Annual Re- 
port of the Superintendent of this Institution for vour con- 
sideration. 

It is with pleasure I announce the past year a prosperous one. 
Little has occurred to mar the progress and usefulness of this Insti- 
tution. The pupils generally have been earnest, studious and moral 
in their deportment. They have been blessed with good health with 
few exceptions, l^o accident of a serious nature and no deaths have 
occurred. The financial provisions of the State have been sufficient 
for the reasonable care and attention of those in attendance. In the 
main the work has been pleasant and progressive. That this should 
be purely an educational institution we all agree. In no sense should 
it be made an asylum for the aged or infirm. Only those who come 
within reasonable requirements, physically, mentally and morally 
should be admitted. Xothing would be more disastrous to healthy 
progress than to admit the imbecile or immoral. It is a part of our 
grand system of public schools and was founded by wise legislation 
for the purpose of affording advantages and training in useful in- 
dustries to a class who could not receive such instruction in the 
common schools of the State because of a want of sight. This edu- 
cation is here given them that they may become self-supporting 
and happy. The value of this Institution in this work can not be 
questioned. Many of its graduates are successful and influential 
citizens. In trades, in professions, in art, the educated blind have 
demonstrated their ability to attain a high degree of excellence. In- 
stead of helpless recipients of charity, through education they have 
become not only self-supporting but also supporters of the State. 

You have restricted admission to children of this State between 
eight and twenty-one years of age, who are blind or whose sight is 
so impaired as to prevent an education in the common schools, and 



11 



"vvho are of reasonable physical, mental and moral strength. In my 
judgment these limits are as broad as you can make them consistent 
with the proper progress of the Institution. The present provisions 
of the State will not more than afford suitable accommodations for 
those who come Avithin the prescribed limits. To open the school 
to the blind indiscriminately would overcrowd the Institution and 
lower the moral and educational work without benefiting the blind 
in general except in rare cases. 

In the past thirty yeai*s it is probable that the number of blind 
children in this State has not materially increased. In 1868 the en- 
rollment in this Institution was 126; in 1895 it was the same. In 
1880 it was 127; in 1890, 124. With the rapid growth in popula- 
tion of the State there is no perceptible increase in the number of 
blind people. This is no doubt due to the better care of children at 
birth, and the higher skill in treating diseases of the eye. 

The following is a list of the pupils enrolled during the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1898: 

ROOM 6. T. E. KINZIE. 



Name. 



POSTOFFICK. 



COU.NTY. 



Washington I rving New Albany Floyd. 

Alphonso .Johnson Indianapolis Alarion. 

Theresa Krack Center Point Clay. 

John T. Smith Brownsburg Hendricks. 

N«rman Swain j Indianapolis Marion. 

Fred VonDissen i SwansviiJe I .leffevson. 

Rosfoe llawley | Columbus i Bartholomew. 

Oliver Ingram I Evansville i Vanderburgh. 

Harry Monroe i Indianapolis j Marion. 

Fred M. Powell New Castle 1 Henry. 

Howard Stevenson New Albany ' Floyd. 

Mattie Fritzer ' South Bend i St.. Joseph. 



Marie Hayden Strawns 

Maud Black Corydon 

Clara Castor Lafayette 

Mary Dudley Sullivan 

Nellie Ebersol>i i Indianapolis . 

Richard Fleming Indianapolis . 

Minnie Uarr Hartford City. 

Scott .James i Koro 

Gay Lctsinger I .Jasonville 

<Tiape Maiden : Danville 

Delia Pittsford ; Muncie 

Fred Reeves ; Hayden 

George Raper Muncie 

Nora Snow ; Indianapolis 



Henry. 

Harrison. 

Tippecanoe. 

Sullivan. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Blackford. 

Carroll. 

Greene. 

Hendricks. 

Delaware. 

.Jennings. 

Delaware. 

Marion. 



Myrtle Wishard Lewis Creek ! Shelby. 



12 



ROOM 5. LUNA LEWIS. 



Name. 



PuSTOPFICK. 



County. 



Marguerite Allman .. 

Orl;i Ijroatlbeek 

Clarence Brumbaugh. 

Maggie Brown 

Robert Coleman 

Charles Christiansen. 

Thomas Delaney 

■William Davis 

Cassie Edwards 

LilHe Edwards 

Mary Franklin 

Jesse Ferguson 

May Goldy 

Crystal .Jacobs 

Tillie Kurz 

Roxanna Kissling 

Harry Li ndsy 

Louis Martin 

Carl Morrow 

Pearl Murphy 

Geor^'e Musser 

Thomas .McGraw 

Maude Newcomb 

Rose Prior 

Oliver Smith 



Indianapolis Marion. 

Bobo Adams. 

Cherubuseo j Whitley. 

Wabash [ Wabash. 

Elkhart | Elkhart. 

Olio Hamilton. 

Indianapolis ■ Marion. 

W indfall Tipton . 

Evansville Vanderburgh. 

Raccoon ; Putnam. 

•Seymour ' Jackson. 

Crawfordsville I Montgomery. 

Windfall i Tipton. 

Indianapolis Marion. 

Evansville : Vanderburph. 

Muncie ; Delaware. 

Shelby ville Shelby. 

Washington Daviess. 

Ft. Wayne Allen. 

Americus { Tippecanoe. 

Dixon j Daviess. 

Indianapolis Marion. 

La fayettc Tippecanoe. 

Noblesville Hamilon. 

Browusburg Hendricks. 



ROOM 4. JEANNETTE NEWLAND. 



John Baird 

Paul Breading 

Rufus Broadbeck 

Alpbonso Burroughs 
Eugene Campbell ... 

Nellie Clark 

Clyde Duvall 

Earl Dalrymple 

Pearl Edwards 

William Fox 

Alice Gilliat 

Anna Harmon 

Katie Heil 

Fred Krutzman 

Nora Keys 

Pearl McGibbon 

Minnie .Martin 

Chas. O'Connell 

Wm. Wiles 

Fred Wilmuth 



Oatwell ' Pike. 

Warsaw i Kosciusko. 

Bobo Adams. 

Indianapnlis Marion. 

Evan.<viile 1 Vanderburgh. 

Lafayette j Tippecanoe. 

Ridgeville | Randolph. 

Philadelphia ' Hancock. 

Evansville Vanderburgh. 

Bruce ville Knox. 

Plain ville ' Daviess. 

Brooklyn j Morgan. 

Indianapolis ' Marion. 



I Magley 

I Logansport . . 

] Shelbyville .. 

! Etna Green. . 
Indianapolis 
Qroomsville . 
Frankfort.... 



Adams. 

Cass. 

Shelby. 

Kosciusko. 

Marion. 

Tipton. 

Clinton. 



13 



ROOM 3. NANNIE CRAMPTON. 



Namb. 



POSTOFFICK. 



CODNTY. 



Nora Allison 

Einmn Brimmer .. 

Amie Boll 

Mnry Cain 

Chas. Collins 

Viiiln Copiiyne 

Jennie Endsley. . . . 
Peter (irinyesir . . . . 
EUenllendren . . . . 
Minnie Ilarvey. . . . 

Willie. I :ic(ibs 

Net tic Mi II thorn. .. 

Dor;i Morelan 

Robert Miller...... 

Lizzie Postlewaite. 

Florella Roe 

Cyrus Robbins 

Minnie iStcvens . . . 
Chauncey Thomas. 
Minnie Wratten . . . 
James Wambsgans 
Frank Wagner . . . . 

Aletha Young 

Jesse Harvey 



Hall 

Michigan City 

Kokomo 

Cum back 

Mitldletown . . 
Cross Plains . . 
Indianapolis . 
Connersville .. 

Anders n 

Lafayette 

Indianapolis . 

Icjaville 

M'ashington . . 
Indianapolis . 

Oliphant 

Union City ... 
New Albany .. 

AVinamac 

Muncie 

Washington.. . 

Greensburg 

Washington .. 

Manilla 

Indianapolis.. 



Clay. 

Laporte. 

Howard. 

Daviess. 

Henry. 

Ripley. 

Marion. 

Fayette. 

Madison. 

Tippecanoe. 

Marion. 

White. 

Daviess. 

Marion. 

Pike. 

Randolph. 

Floyd. 

Pulaski. 

Delaware. 

Daviess. 

Decatur. 

Davie&s. 

Rush. 

Marion. 



ROOM 2. JESSIE HAMILTON. 



Pearl Acton 

Jessie Armstrong , 

Ralph hlue 

Henry Bauer 

Leono Bramme .. . . 
Alma Cutsinger ... 

Amanda Carey 

RS.^^e Daily 

Myrtle Dugger 

Roliert Eulis 

Ennis Fleener 

Bessie Garman 

Clarence (iorrell .. 

Josio Horton 

Harry Helms 

Roily Holman 

Fern .Jenks 

Florence Johnson . 
Leona .Jackman... 
Fred McCartney... 

Warren Miller 

Roy Pierson 

Delia Rockett 

Ashton Rayl 

Ezra vSellers 

Frank Stark 

Rosetta Stiles 

Myrtle Swanger... 
Blanch Sloniker .. . 
James Tannehill . . 
Essie Thornburg. . . 
Martha Willett. ... 
Marie Whitehead . 



BluflFton 

Brazil 

Muncie 

Clinton 

Muncie 

Shelburn 

Muncie 

Idlewild 

Summit Grove 

BrowDsburg 

Myoma 

Bloomington 

Brownstown 

Muncie 

Indianapolis 

Spencer 

North Manchester 

Bloomington 

Washington 

Bloomingt"n 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Vineennes 

Galveston 

Indianapolis 

Cory 

Monon 

Mishawaka 

Indianapolis 

Laporte 

Sheridan 

Newburg 

Anderson 



Wells. 

Clay. 

Delaware. 

Vermillion. 

Delaware. 

Sullivan. 

Delaware. 

Harrison. 

Vermillion. 

Hendricks. 

Gibson 

Monroe. 

Jackson. 

Delaware. 

Marion. 

Owen. 

Wabash. 

Monroe. 

Daviess. 

Monroe. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Knox. 

Cass. 

Marion. 

Clay. 

White. 

St. Joseph. 

Marion. 

Laporte. 

Hamilton. 

Warrick. 

Madison. 



14 



ROOM 1. JENNY WELLING. 



Name. 



POSTOFUCE. 



COU.STY. 



!Minnie Anthony . .. 

William Ackley 

George Blakely 

Goldy Bales 

Morton Brown 

Clarence Clark 

Ada Cunningham.. . 

Oscar Chapman 

Edna Davis 

Charles Ehnendorf . 

Mary Ewing 

Minnie (Jarinan 

Wheatley (Jlascock. 

William Gill 

Gussie Ilartwell 

Eliza Hartwell 

Esther Herron 

Arther Howell 

Maude Jones 

Katie Koewler 

Lydia Keller 

Annie Murray 

Thomas Nicholson . 

Earl Peffley 

Pearl Rouch 

Biiijamin Sellers . . 

Chester Star 

Mi ton Saxton 

May Swanfjer 

Raymond Summers 

Jessie Short 

Herman Wilson 



Montpelier 

New Albany... 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolie .. 

Haughville 

Crawfordsville 
India' apoHs . . 

Bedford 

Newtown 

Evansville 

Winaraac 

Collingwood .. 

Lafayette 

Rockport 

Oldtown 

Oldtown 

Greenwood 

Terre Haute. .. 

Lena 

Evansville ... 

Boonville 

Indianapolis . . 

Boonville 

New Carlisle . . 

Rochester 

Indianapolis .. 
Albany ........ 

Indianapolis .. 

Mishawaka 

Convenience. . . 

Carbon 

Parker City 



Blackford. 

Floyd. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Marion. 

Montgomery. 

Marion. 

Lawrence. 

Fountain. 

Vanderburgh. 

Pulaski. 

Allen. 

Tippecanoe. 

Spencer. 

Jennings. 

Jennings. 

.Johnson. 

Vigo. 

Park. 

Vanderburgh. 

Warrick. 

Marion. 

Warrick. 

St. -lojeph. 

Fulton. 

Marion. 

Delaware. 

Marion. 

St. Joseph. 

Harrison. 

Clay. 

Randolph. 



The attendance by counties is shown in the following: 



Adams 


... .•? 


Fulton 


.... 1 


Laporte 


... 2 


Sullivan 


... 2 


AllcM 





Greene 


.... 1 


Lawrence 


... 1 


Shelby 


...3 


]!.irtbolomew. .. 


... I 


Gibson 


.... 1 


Marion 


...29 


Spencer 


... 1 


151ii(kford 


9 




.... 4 




... 2 




... 6 


Clay 


. . . ■'i 


Henry 


.... 3 


iSIorgan 


... 1 


Tipton 


... 3 


(.'arroll 


... 1 


Harrison 


.... 3 


Madison 


... 2 


Vanderburgh . . 


... 8 


Ca,<s 


... 2 


Hamilton — 


.... 3 


Monroe 


...3 


Vermillion 


... 2 


Clinton 


... 1 


Hancock 


.... 1 


Owen 


... 1 


Vigo 


... 1 


Delaware 


.. . 9 


Howard 


.... 1 


Putnam 


... 1 


AVhitley 


... 1 


Daviess 


... 7 


Jpffer.«on 


.... 1 


Pike 


... 2 


Wabash 


...2 


Decatur, 


... 1 


Jennings 


.... 3 


Pulaski 


... 3 


White 


... 2 


Elkhart 


... 1 


Jackson 


2 


Randolph 


... 3 


Wells 


... 1 


Floyd 


... 4 


Johnson 


.... 1 


Ripley 


... 1 


Washington — 


... 1 


Fayette 


... 1 


Kosciusko — 


.... 2 


Rush 


... 1 


Warrick 


... 3 


Fountain 


... 1 


Knox 


.... 2 


St. Joseph 


... 4 







For the pui-pose of securing thoroughness, the work has been 
divided into three distinct departments : Literary, Musical, In- 
dustrial. 

The work in the Literary Department follows a similar course of 
study and is presented under similar methods as that of the com- 
mon schools. Certain adjustments and modifications are necessary 
because the pupils use four senses instead of five; but in the main 



15 

the piui50se and means are the same. Neither ai-e the results greatly 
different. The blind child loses somewhat in the extent of the edu- 
cation of his seeing brother, but he makes amends in being much 
more intensive. The width of his education is necessarily curtailed, 
but this is almost balanced by the greater depth. The loss of slight 
is an iiTeparable one, but the increased acuteness of smell, hearing, 
taste and touch does much to take the place. So do the better de- 
veloped memory, the higher ability in intensive reasoning go far to 
take the place of width of vision and copious illustration. 

The course planned for the present work in the Literary Depart- 
ment is the following: 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Reading.— New York Point.— Alphabet by groups of letters similar in form. 
Groups of simple words similar in form and sound selected from the 
first few pages of the First Reader. Pi'imer and First Reader com- 
pleted with supplemental work. 

Spelling.— All words in the First Reader spelled orally. Special attention 
given to syllabication. 

Numbers.— Numbers 1 to 20. Each number as a whole. Relations in the 
number. Numbers taken away. Fractional parts. All with objects 
real or imaginaiy. Drill in rapid combinations. 

Language.— Correction of errors in the pupil's language. All answers to be 
given in complete statements. Exercises on "a" and "an," "is" and 

• "are," "was" and "were." 

Geography.— "Seven Little Sisters." 

Form. — Plane and solid forms. 

Memorizing.— Simple selections from books and papers. 

General Lessons.— Lessons on familiar animals, on parts of the human 
body, and on the care of health. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Reading.— Third and P^'ourth Readers completed with supplemental work. 
Spelling.— Spell all new words found in the readers— both oral and written 

spelling. Attention given to syllabication. 
Wi'iting. —Point writing, begun with the Third Reader. 
Numbers.— Numbers 20 to 50, same as in the first year. Simple problems 

to illustrate each relation. Have pupils give simple fractional parts of 

numbers. Teach Roman numerals. Develop orders to ten thousands. 

Drill on rapid combinations. 



16 

Language.— Continued as in first year. Simple lessons on forms of verbs, 
nouns and pronouns. Forms of sentences. Exercises In changing from 
one form to another. Simple lessons in letter writing. 

Geographj'.— "Each and All." 

Form.— Modeling of solid forms, and of objects related in form. Designs 
with plain forms. 

Memorizing.— Simple selections from books and papers. 

General Lessons.— Lessons on common articles of food. Lessons on ani- 
mals continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Reading.— Fourth and Fifth Readers completed with supplemental work. 

Spelling.— Oral and written spelling— all new words found in the readers. 
Attention given to syllabication. General definitions of words as found 
in the readers. 

Numbers.— Review of previous year's work by miscellaneous rapid com- 
bination and subtraction work. Original problems. White's Elemen- 
tary Arithmetic, part I. 

Language.— Sentence work. Sentences using common verbs in both sin- 
gular and plural numbers. Common punctuation marks and abbrevia- 
tions. 

Writing.— Copy memory gems and selections read by the teacher in addi- 
tion to the writen work of other recitations. Letter wiiting. 

Geography.— "World and its People, No. 3." 

Memorizing.— Suitable selections from books, papers and magazines. 

General Lessons.— Lessons on the human body and on plants and animals. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Reading.— Sixth Reader completed with supplemental work. 

Spelling.- Same as in third year. 

Numbers.— White's Elementary Arithmetic, part II. 

Language.— Sentence work continued. Subject and predicate. Plurals and 
possessives. Piincipal parts of verbs in general use. Simple composi- 
tions on common subjects and about familiar objects. Letter writing. 

Writing.— Same as in the third year. 

Geography.- "Brooks and Brook Basins." 

Memorizing.- Same as in the third year. 

General Lessons.— The work of the third year elaborated. 

FIFTH YEAR. 

Reading.— Seventh Reader with supplemental work. 

Spelling.— Oral and written spelling— all new words in the reader. Defini- 
tions. 

Numbers.— White's Elementaiy Arithmetic, part III, to Denominate Num- 
bers. 



17 

Language.— Reed & Kellog's Graded Lessons in English to lesson 71. 
Writing.— Copy work indicated by the teacher in addition to spelling and 

language work. 
Geography.— Elementary Geography — Indiana Educational Series — to 

South America. United States studied with dissected map. 
History.— "Stories of Our Countiy." 

SIXTH YEAR. 

Reading.— Eighth Reader with supplemental work. 

Spelling.— Same as in the fifth year. 

Numbers.— White's Elementary Arithmetic from Denominate Numbers to 
page 183. 

Language.— Reed & Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English from lesson 71 
to page 15G. 

Writing.— Same as in the fifth year. 

Geography.— Elementary Geography— Indiana Educational Series, be- 
gin with South America and complete to lesson 50. Study continents 
of South America, Asia and Africa in. general, and Europe with dis- 
sected map. 

Histoiy. — "F'rom Colony to Commonwealth." 

SEVENTH YEAR. 
Arithmetic. — White's Complete Arithmetic from fractions to interest. 
Grammar.— Reed & Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English from lesson 10 to 

lesson 85. Much attention should be given to composition work. 
Geography.— Complete Geography— Indiana Educational Series — study 

South America and Asia with dissected maps and review the United 

States. 

History.— "Eggleston's History of the United States" read to the class dur- 
* ing the year. 

Note.— Spelling should be continued throughout the course in connection 
with other subjects. 

EIGHTH YEAR. 

Arithmetic— White's Complete Arithmetic from interest to the appendix. 
Grammar.— Reed & Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English from lesson 85 

to lesson 139. Composition work continued. 
History.— Barnes' History of the United States through the revolutionary 

war. 

NINTH YEAR. 
Composition.— "School English" one year. 
History.— Barnes' History of the United States completed. 
Algebra.— Peck's Algebra to chapter VI, supplemented with other texts. 

2 — Bund. 



18 

TENTH YEAR. 

Composition.— Reading, analysis, and review of sliort selections from 

standard authors. 
Physiology.— Text completed within the year. 
Algebra.— Peck's Algebra from chapter VI to chapter X, supplemented 

with work from other texts. 

ELEVENTH YEAR. 

English.— Brief history of the development of English Literature and a 

study of the literature from Shakespeare to the present. 
Geometry.— Wells' Elements of Geometry to Book IV. 
Physics.— Gage's Physics one year. 
General History.— Swintou's Outlines to the Feudal System. 

TWELFTH YEAR. 

English.— A brief history of American Literature and a study of the nine- 
teenth century literature. 

Geometry.— Well's Elements of Geometry completed. A review of the 
work done, with much original and supplemental work. 

Civil Government.— Fiske one year. 

General History.— Swinton's Outlines completed from the Feudal system. 

In the CMlucation of the blind, music must always be of supreme 
importance. Shut off from the pleasure of obsen^ation, with its 
myriad forms of delight and moral growth, the student M-ho can not 
see, turns with greater intensity to the harmony of external life pre- 
sented through the ear. He is not more gifted, but the longings of 
his nature find solace here which is denied him throtigh the means 
afforded the seeing student. 

It is the aim of the Department to educate pupils not alone that 
they may afford pleasure to themselves and friends, but that they 
may attain that general and technical knowledge of the subject 
which will enable them to stand with other cultured musicians of 
the day. Music is commenced when the pupil enters the primary 
gi'ade. Here he leams his first lessons in the realms of conscious 
tone-making. From simple exercises adapted to the range of the 
young voice, he goes to those charming songs prepared for child-life 
by the greatest teachers and child specialists. So far as possible, 
the pupils' games and lessons become a part of their songs, and their 
songs a part of their lessons. After one year in this work, the pupil 
enters the jimior choir, when he begins to group the idea of the 
greater world, where others live than himself and his one tone. This 



19 

is done by introducing simple harmonv. At the end of one year in 
this grade he is able to take part in and to appreciate two and three- 
part songs. 

Eveiy pupil is given a fair test and prolonged tiial in music, em- 
bracing the kind of work above mentioned. At the end of the sec- 
ond year, if he shows no musical ability, he is dropped from the De- 
partment. If he has a singing voice, and even medium ability, he 
enters the chorus work and remains there from this time through his 
school course, whether he specializes iu any other branch or not. In 
his third year, if he has sufficient ability, the pupil entei-s a theory 
class, where the rudimentary steps in piano music are taught. By 
means of a board and detachable characters he learns musical nota- 
tion as it is taught to a student with sight. By means of the Braille 
system — a system of six dots — he learns notation as he is to read it. 
After a considerable amount of preparatory work the pupil is given 
a test. If he shows the knowledge and intelligence necessary to suc- 
cessful study of the piano, he is then permitted to enter the piano 
department. For a few weeks he is confined to table exercises, after 
which he is taken to the piano and allowed to make as rapid progress 
as possible. Careful attention is given to teehnic at all times. The 
piano is used as the basis of all musical training, and not until the 
pupil evinces marked ability is he pemiitted to take up any other 
branch for special work. After sufficient teehnic is acquired to 
enable the student to play the simpler works of Heller, Mozart, 
Kohler, Clem en ti and others of equal difficulty with musical intelli- 
gence, and he has some expenence in ensemble playing, he is per- 
mitted to take up the organ, cornet, or voice, as his taste and ability 
dictate. Piano-tuning and work in theory and history of music are 
also taken up and made a part of the regiilar course in musical de- 
velopment. AVhile each pupil is expected to carry his work system- 
atically in this Depai-tment, occasional exceptions are made. 

In case an older pupil enters with some knowledge of music and 
some particular talent, he is taken at once into the Department and 
placed where his needs are best met. He is gradually brought up 
in all of the preparatory work. The purpose is to do the best possi- 
ble for each individual pupil, whether it is in accordance with the 
course of study or not. Below is given a synopsis of the course of 
study in this Department. The grades do not co-ordinate with the 
year in the Literary Department. 



20 
PIANO COUESE OF STUDY. 

FIRST GRADE. 
Table exercises. 
Technical exercises. 

Beginning etudes for finger legato and staccato, wrist and phrasing. 
Little pieces by Behr, Gurlitt, Lichner, Reinecke and Schumann. 

SECOND GRADE. 
Technical exercises. 
Exercises in phrasing by Heller. 
Etudes by Loeschhox'n. 
Sonatinas by Clementi and Kullak. 
Pieces by Lichner, Kullak, Spindler, Gade, Giese and Heller. 

THIRD GRADE. 
Technical exercises. 
Bach's Inventions. 

Easy Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 
Pieces by Jensen, Bohm, Gade, Bachman, Chaminade and Rafif. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

dementi's Gradus. 

Bach's Inventions. 

Field's Nocturnes. 

Etudes by Moscheles, Chopin, Kullak. 

Sonatas by Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart. 

Pieces by Saint-Saens, Mendelssohn, Henselt, Grieg, Chopin. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

Ensemble work. 

Advanced Etudes and pieces by classic and modern writers. 

ORGAN. 
The basis of organ technic is the piano method, supplemented by Stainer, 
Dudley Buck and other recognized authorities on the organ. 

VOICE. 
No prescribed course for the voice is followed. Special drill in vocal exer- 
cises and enunciation are given, also songs and part-work of moderate 
difficulty. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

The Industrial Department is a very important part of any insti- 
tution for the education of the blind. It is with difficulty, under 
the most favorable conditions, that a blind person attains sufficient 
skill to compete successfully in any line of business with seeing 
people. The gifted in music can receive remunerative employ- 



21 

ment; a few can succeed through literary pui*suits, but the great 
majority of the blind must look to manual labor as the source of 
independent livelihood. It is necessary then, that the greatest care 
be talven in the industrial trades. The blind children are naturally 
industrious. The tedium of long houi-s which seeing children may 
pass in observation is passed by the blind in some manual exercise. 

Our industrial provisions are none too liberal, and in several re- 
spects more generous appropriations might be of much advantage 
to the blind. The principal lines of industrial education here are 
broom-making, chair-caning, mattress-making, piano-tuning, sew- 
ing, crocheting and ornamental bcad-work. It is possible to add to 
these and to give the blind additional chances in meeting the fierce 
competition of his seeing neighbor. The folloAving articles have 
been manufactured in tlie Industrial Shops and work-room during 
the past yeai*: 

BKOOM SHOP. 

House brooms 3,361 

, Heavy brooms 254 

Whisk brooms 239 

Ceiling brooms 4 

Toy brooms 72 

CANE AND MATTRESS DEPARTMENT. 

NeAv mattresses 60 

Mattresses made over 72 

Chairs caned 281 

Mops 48 

• 

GIRLS' WORK-ROOM. 

Pillow cases 332 

Sheets 33 

Napkins 115 

Towels ; 168 

Aprons 12 

Skirts 6 

Gowns 4 

Dresses 10 

Fascinators 1 

Skirts (crocheted) 2 

Pairs slippers 6 

Pieces bead work 465 

Sideboard covers 5 

Mats 10 

Baby sacks 2 

Miscellaneous 50 



22 



ENTERTAINMENTS. 

The usual entertainments and exercises have been held during 
the past year. The Literary Club, composed of the larger pupils, has 
met regularly each month. All pupils assemble each morning in 
the chapel when moral and religious instruction is given. An hour 
each school evening is given in each grade to the reading of choice 
selections of history and literature. In this wa.j much is done to 
bring the best literature within the reach of the pupils. Exercises 
have been held on the national holidays. Birthdays of prominent 
statesmen and authors have been commemorated by suitable pro- 
grams. Monthly recitals by the music pupils have been given. The 
following programs of the closing recitals will serA^e to illustrate the 
nature of the work done by the music students: 

RECITAL.— MAY 31, 1898, 10 A. M. 

1. Trtiumeri Schumann 

Howard Stevenson. 

2. In the Hammock L. E. Orth. 

Katie Heil. 

3. Silent Reveries Denude 

Fred Reeves. 

4. The Rose Lichner 

Mary Franlvlin. 

5. Duet— Fandango Moszkowskl 

Fred Krutzmau. Oliver Smith. 

6. Cradle Song Denn6e 

Minnie Stevens. 

7. Dancing Lesson Gurlitt 

Henry Bauer. 

8. Etude Loeschhorn 

Willie Jacobs. 

9. Hobby Horse Ride Denn6e 

Nettie Mintlaorn. 

10. Etude Loeschhorn 

Fred McCartney. 

11. Gondolier Song Mendelssohn 

Cassie Edwards. 

12. Etude Kohler 

Scott James. 

13. Etude Loeschhorn 

Tillie Kurz. 

14. Etude Loeschhorn 

Lizzie Postlewait. 



23 



RECITAL.-.TUNE G, 1898, 10 A. M. 

1. Quick March Rollinson 

Brass Band. 

2. L'Avalancli Heller 

Grace Maiden. 

3. Impromptu Schubert 

Alphonso Burrows. 

4. Fair Snow White Reinecke 

Twelve Little Girls. 

5. Duet— Pensee Religieuse— Organ and Piano A. Lebaen 

Lewis Martin. Gay Letsinger. 

6. Sonata Mozart 

Clarence Brumbaugh. 

7. Valse Chopin 

Oliver Ingram 

8. Spinning Song Reinecke 

Twelve Little Girls. 

9. Confidence Mendelssohn 

Robert Coleman. 

10. Duet— Valse Lente Gillat 

Pearl McGibbons. Nora Keys. 

11. Scarf Dance 

Mattie Fritzer. 

12. Duet— From II Trovatore 

Marie Hayden. Mary Dudley. 

13. Consider and Hear Me Pflueger 

Solo and Chorus. 

14. Etude Op. 45 No. 13 Heller 

Chrystal Jacobs— Second Piano Accompaniment. 

15. Valse de Soiree L. E. Orth 

Pearl McGibbons. 

16. Sonata (first movement) Merkel 

Pearl Murphj\ 

17. Nocturn G minor Duet— Organ and Piano Chopin 

Alphonso .Johnson. Harry Monroe. 



24 



EVENING CONCERT— JUNE 7, 1898, 8 P. M. 

1. CoUingwood Quickstep Pattee 

Brass Band. 

2. The Birds 

Junior Clioir. 

3. Marclie aux Flambeaux Guilmont 

Alplionso Johnson. 

4. Flag of the Free (from Lohengrin) Wagner 

Chorus. 

5. Valse Impromptu— Duet for two Pianos Smith-Bachmann 

Harry Monroe. Oliver Ingram. 

6. Fairyland Waltz Veazie 

Senior Choir. 

7. Un Boen a la Bierge— Duo: Organ and Piano Battman 

Alphonso Burrows. Marguerite Allman. 

8. Come with the Gypsy Bride (Bohemian Girl) Balfe 

Solo— Chorus. 

9. (a) Postlude in G Rink 

(b) Gavotte from "Mignon" Thomas 

Harry Monroe. 

10. Piano Trio with Organ Accompaniment Arranged 

Peal McGibbons. Nora Keys. Katie Heil. 

11. Cradle Song Henry Smart 

Senior Choir. 

12. Etude Op. 25, No. 2— Arr. for two Pianos Chopin 

Suite: Prelude— Valse; Scherziuo, Epilogue; Nocturne, Finale 

V. J. Hlavac 

Alphonso Johnson. Miss Carman. 

13. Star-Spangled Banner 

Chorus. 

Incidental Solos. 
Maud Black. Mary Dudley. 

14. Valse Op. 42 Chopin 

Harry Monroe. 

15. America 

Band, Organ and Chorus. 



25 

The regular biennial commencement exercises were held in the 
chapel of the Institution on the morning of the 8th of June. An 
intelligent and appreciative audience was present to witness the 
closing work of the class of graduates. The exercises were well 
prepared and well rendered. No one present will deny that the 
blind are capable of receiving a thorough and comprehensive edu- 
cation. The following is the program in full: 



" The Nearest Duly First. 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES.— JUNE 8, 10 A. M. 
PROGRAM. 

1. Organ Solo— (a) Prelude and Fugue in C Bach 

(b) Serenade Schubert 

Harry Monroe. 

2. Invocation 

Rev. F. E. Dewhurst. 

3. Mattinata Tosti 

Mrs. Raschig. 

4. "Growth of Civilization in the West" 

Theresa Krack. 

5. The Gypsies Dudley Buck 

' Miss .Josephine Robinson. 

6. "Ethical Status of the World" 

Washington J. Irving. 

7. (a) Si raes vers Hahn 

(b) Love Me if I Live Foote 

Mrs. Raschig. 

8. "Time, the Artisan Supreme" 

W. Alphonso Johnson. 

Class Address— T. E. Kinzie. 

9. Remarks 

Governor James A. Mount. 

10. Presentation of Diplomas -. 

Benediction. 
Class Colors— Red, White and Blue. 



26 

In many cases pupils wlio graduate from this Institution have 
not sufficient means to commence business. The cost of equipments 
and suppHes for a broom shop is not great, but in many instances 
wholly beyond the reach of graduates. Several attempts have been 
made to establish a fund to obviate this difficulty. The following 
exhibit gives the sources, receipts and donations as shown by the 
reports of the Superintendents: 

From unknown, January 27, 1862 $100 00 

From Silas Bond, May 11, 1863 27 16 

From Mrs. Fit74>atrich, July 24, 1865 573 77 

From unknown, August 28, 1808 99 25 

Paid in by various Superintendents as interest to fund up to 

November 1, 1896 834 02 

Total $1,634 20 

Paid for machines for forty-three graduates at various dates . . . 966 11 

Balance November 1, 1896 $668 09 

Interest for year ending November 1, 1897 40 08 

Total $708 17 

Tools furnished Floyd Johnson 19 00 

Balance November 3, 1897 $689 17 

Interest for 1898 41 35 

Total $730 52 

Tools furnished John Smith 32 07 

Balance in fund November 1, 1898 $698 45 



For the purpose of affording data for comparison, I have com- 
piled the following table of enrollment, expenditures, balances and 
per capita expenses fi'om the organization of the Institution in 1847 
until the present: 



27 



Ykar. 



1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
18ti0 
1861 
1862 
186:^ 
IStU 
1865 
1866 
1867 

ism 

1869 
1870 
1871. 
1872, 
1873 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878, 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
19m. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
18SJ2, 
1893, 
1894, 
18a5. 
1896, 
1897. 
1898, 



Number 
Students. 


Expenditures. 


Balance. 


Cost 
Per Capita. 


25 


86,203 93 


S296 80 


8248 16 


28 


7,200 27 


430 .^3 


257 15 


38 


7,499 65 


1,267 92 


197 :?5 


52 


6,8(57 30 


19 11 


132 06 


52 


7,503 73 


190 49 


144 30 


51 


13,6:^1 79 


80 67 


267 29 


46 


10,t^95 31 


n,844 60 


232 50 


77 


13,978 34 


3,178 01 


181 53 


87 


19,794 31 


15,568 80 


227 52 


77 


24.663 59 


8 858 52 


316 41 


63 


17,597 89 


*14,675 96 


279 33 


53 


12,244 01 


-24,543 48 


231 01 


66 


18,251 28 


"'519 60 


276 53 


6:^ 


16,287 08 


W3 91 


258 54 


77 


18,013 07 


7,(149 99 


2.33 94 


95 


19,162 13 


3,806 07 


201 70 


93 


19,557 80 
20,773 65 


2 44 


210 29 


103 


*] 9,593 40 


201 10 


111 


29,751 01 


3,276 64 


268 02 


120 


33,340 08 


8,223 15 


277 83 


123 


33,822 36 


20,353 54 


274 98 


126 


33,076 65 


15,220 03 


262 51 


102 


47,646 40 


663 78 


4(57 10 


107 


36,244 97 


113 15 


338 73 


114 


34,640 72 


96(5 48 


303 86 


111 


34,087 06 


1,88? 54 


307 09 


105 


39,793 66 


2,381 23 


378 98 


113 


38,235 55 


46 70 


338 36 


116 


34,18? 79 


78 49 


294 68 


106 


31 ,,331 57 


1,246 92 


295 58 


110 


3. ',208 44 


1,853 83 


292 80 


117 


31,404 96 


1,395 52 


26S 41 


123 


26,307 48 


t6,781 40 


213 88 


127 


28,780 32 


tl,520 20 


226 61 


126 


31,362 34 


810 92 


248 90 


128 


28,696 06 


514 74 


2 4 10 


120 


28,682 70 


1,129 56 


239 02 


120 


24,919 22 


5 518 69 


207 66 


126 


26,617 44 


3,883 22 


211 25 


130 


25,888 67 


3,574 60 


199 14 


132 


28.142 90 


1,260 87 


213 20 


128 


24.014 61 


5,417 20 


187 61 


132 


27,502 f.6 


2,497 44 


208 35 


124 


29,225 19 


1,196 12 


235 68 


144 


28,833 71 


1.683 50 


200 23 


139 


30,244 15 


4,008 69 


217 51 


150 


33,889 66 


1,224 96 


225 93 


152 


33,133 38 


878 70 


217 98 


126 


33,738 15 


424 64 


267 76 


139 


S2,083 07 


135 25 


230 81 


157 


30,124 08 


1,963 70 


191 42 


162 


31,234 31 


32 97 


192 80 



'Deficit, t Returned to State. 



In conclusion I -wish to call the attention of the public through 
jou to a few observations on the education of the blind. In the 
first place, it is a mistake to regard them as inevitable objects of 
sympathy and commiseration. Many have known no other condi- 
tion or have become reconciled to the loss of sight, and have so de- 
veloped the other specifhl senses that they feel no limitation imless 
reminded of it by thoughtless persons. There is no need to be con- 
tinually solicitous about their safety or to distrust their capabilities. 
Hearing, touch, taste and smell may be so educated that they will 
fill the place of sight in almost every instance. 



28 

Blind children should be permitted to associate with other chil- 
dren as much as possible. J^othing can be more cruel to the sights 
less child than to hem it in on everj side and to anticpiate its every 
want. It should play, work, go on errands alone, and in fact be 
treated in every way as other children. It may receive a few more 
bruises, it may make a few more mistakes, but its body and mind 
will not be dwarfed by cruel isolation. It will become self-reliant, 
and at maturity will be capable of almost any task. Too often a 
child's future is ruined by a smypathetic but thoughtless parent, 
who suppresses all disposition and ability to become independent. 

The education of the blind may be complete. It is a slow and 
expensive process, but. may be thorough and comprehensive. How 
they reach results in many cases can not be understood, but their 
accuracy can not be questioned. They can traverse crowded streets 
without injuring others and without injury from passing vehicles. 

The solution of any problem of arithmetic, or the most complex 
proposition of geometry, without pencil is no impossible task. One 
who has been in successful business life for a decade of years tells 
me that he has kept in mind at one time without mistake more than 
one hundred orders for different materials in different quantities to 
be delivered to different parts of the city. With memories trained 
to such an extent by necessity much more is gained from sermons or 
lectures. Little, comparatively, is heard or read, but much is re- 
tained. 

The constant effort of the teacher in the public schools must be 
directed towards intensifying the work of the pupils. Extent of ob- 
servation and copiousness of illustration generally will need no 
assistance. But width may gain at the loss of thoroughness and 
depth. Few pupils in the public schools leam to think logically 
and intensively. The true teacher then must strive to develop fac- 
ulties which may remain dormant because of the range and attrac- 
tiveness of sight. 

Not such the work of the teacher of the blind. His problem is to 
have secured approximately as much material through four senses 
as is gained to the child with sight through five. He need have less 
care of memory and reason. They will generally take care of them- 
selves if other troubles be coiTected. The effort here is not to in- 
tensify but to amplify. 



29 

Many graduates of blind institutions wholly fail to become self- 
supporting. The most potent cause is the want of a stout heart 
because of a dependent environment. Xot unfrequently are want- 
ing habits of economy and morality. It is imperative that the blind 
who would be successful husband resources in every possible way. 
The road will be rough enough at best. But with liberal education, 
trained hands and strong will, they need not be solicitous about the 
result. 

One great disadvantage is yet before them which the future may 
change. The cost of literature is so great that few can purchase 
either for comfort or improvement. The numerous kinds of print 
is largely responsible for this. If one kind could be used instead 
of Braille, Improved Braille, Moon, Line, and 'New York Point, 
the difficulty would be past. 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE S. AYILSOK 



30 

KEPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE BOARD. 
Showing Monthly Receipts and Disbursements for the Year 1898. 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF MA.INTENANCE. 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for— 

1897. 

November $2,575 05 

December 2,554 82 

1898. 

January 2,397 45 

February 2,580 90 

March 2,554 52 

April 2,320 02 

May 2,767 16 

June 1,177 65 

July 1,173 30 

August 804 24 

September 3,512 56 

October 3,320 56 



Total amount drawn from State Treasury for 
maintenance for 1898 $27,738 23 



DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF MAINTENANCE. 

Paid out by the Treasurer of the Board for— 

1897. 

November $2,575 05 

December 2,554 82 

1898. 

January 2,.397 45 

February 2.580 90 

March 2.554 52 

April 2.320 02 

May 2.767 16 

June 1,177 65 

July 1,173 30 

August 804 24 

September 3.512 56 

October 3,320 56 

Total amount paid out on account of mainte- 
nance for 1898 $27,738 23 



31 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

Auditor's warrant ou State Treasury for— 

1897. 

November $146 91 . 

December 80 33 

1898. 

January 23 06 

March 22 30 

April 17 20 

May 1 95 

June 10119 

July 363 16 

August 489 96 

September 172 76 

October 78 77 

Total amount di*awn from the State Treasury 

for repairs of buildings for 1898 $1,497 59 



DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF REPAIRS OF BUILDINGS. 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for — 

1897. 

November $146 91 

December 80 33 

1898. 

January 23 06 

March 22 30 

April 17 20 

May 1 95 

June 101 19 

July 363 16 

August 489 96 

September 172 76 

October 78 77 

Total amount paid for repairs of buildings for 

1898 $1,497 59 



32 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF WORKSHOPS. 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for— 

1897.' 

November $136 70 

December 331 35 

1898. 

January 201 92 

February 105 00 

March 193 63 

April 125 94 

May 274 22 

September 60 06 

October 70 55 



Total amount drawn from the State Treasury 

for workshops for 1898 $1,499 37 



DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF WORKSHOPS. 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for — 

1897. 

November $136 70 

December 331 35 

1898. 

January 201 92 

February 105 00 

March 193 63 

April 125 94 

May 274 22 

September 60 06 

October 70 55 

Total amount paid out on account of workshops 

for 1898 $1,499 37 



as 



RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF LIBRARY. 

Auditor's warrant on State Treasury for— 
1897. 

November $51 21 

December 82 38 

1898. 

January 15 49 

February 8 75 

March 44 23 

April 19 27 

May 28 35 

June 8 80 

July 6 20 

August 8 55 

September 18 33 

October 208 29 



Total amount drawn from State Treasury for 

Library for 1898 $499 85 



DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF LIBRARY. 

Paid out by Treasurer of the Board for— 

1897. 

November $51 21 

• December 82 38 

1898. 

January 15 49 

February 8 75 

March 44 23 

April 19 27 

May 28 35 

June 8 80 

July 6 20 

August 8 55 

September 18 33 

October 208 29 

Total amount paid on account of Library for 

1898 $499 85 



3 — Blind. 



34 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

From Geo. S. Wilson, Superintendent, for— 

1898. 

May $0 75 

June 1 05 

Total miscellaneous receipts ^1 80 



MISCELLANEOUS DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid over to Treasurer of State for— 
1898. 

May $0 75 

June 1 05 

Total miscellaneous receipts turned into State 

Treasury $1 80 



Showing Monthly Receipts From the Workshops of the Institution 
for the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 

RECEIPTS FROM CANE-SEATING AND MATTRESS DEPT. 

1897. 
For the montla of — 

November $20 00 

December 15 45 

1898. 

January 15 15 

Februaiy 20 20 

March 21 65 

April 22 50 

May 25 35 

June 5 20 

September 6 80 

October 20 05 

Total amount of receipts from Cane-seating 

and Mattress Department $172 35 



35 



RECEIPTS FROM BROOM SHOP. 

1897. 

For the month of— 

November $62 53 

December 52 85 

1898. 

Januar J' 70 60 

February 24 10 

March 41 28 

April 105 35 

May 66 23 

June .' 27 55 

September 28 65 

October 25 85 

MisceHaneous— 

March 7 05 

J una 16 30 

October 6 20 



Total amount of receipts from broom shop. . . . $534 54 



RECEIPTS FROM THE GIRLS' WORKROOM. 

, 1897. 
For the month of— 

November $2 64 

December 4 05 

1898. 

January 2 80 

February 1 40 

March 7 90 

April 4 50 

May 1 90 

June 1 00 

September 2 00 

October 2 55 



Total amount receipts from girls' workroom . . . $31 34 



36 



TOTAL RECEIPTS ON ACCOUNT OF WORKSHOPS. 

1897. 

From W. II. Glascock, Superintendent, sales for— 

November $85 17 

December 72 35 

1898. 

George S. AVilson, Superintendent, sales- 
January 88 55 

February 45 70 

March 70 83 

April 139 40 

May 93 48 

June 50 65 

September 37 45 

October 54 65 

Total receipts from workshops to the credit of 

maintenance $738 23 



DISBURSEMENTS ON ACCOUNT OF WORKSHOPS. 

Paid over to Treasurer of State for— 
1897. 

November $85 17 

December 72 35 

1898. 

January 88 55 

February 45 70 

March 70 83 

April 139 40 

May ; 93 48 

June 50 65 

September 37 45 

October 54 65 

Total paid into the State Treasurj- from work- 
shops to credit of maintenance appropriation 
for 1898 $738 23 



37 



Recapitulation of Receipts and Expenses for 1898. 

APPROPRIATIONS AND RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation for maiutenance for 1898 $27,000 00 

Receipts from industrial departments 738 23 

Total appropriation and receipts for mainte- 
nance $27,738 23 

Appropriation for repairs of buildings for 1898 1,500 00 

Appropriation for workshops 1,500 00 

Appropriation for Library 500 00 

Miscellaneous receipts 1 80 

Receipts from counties for clothing, paid to State Treasurer. . . 28 25 



Total receipts for year ending October 31, 1898 $31,268 28 



Expenses for the Fiscal Year Ending October 31^ 1898. 

ON ACCOUNT OF MAINTENANCE. 

Salaries of officers ; $3,480 00 

Salaries of literary teachers 2,291 00 

Salaries of music teachers 1,800 00 

Salaries of industrial teachers 140 00 

Salaries of employes 5,617 48 

Expenses of Board of Trustees 174 50 

Fufl— gas and coal 2,4,30 .36 

Meat and lard 1,821 38 

Repairs (common) 1,785 83 

Butter, eggs and poultry 1,2.31 92 

Furniture and house goods 927 76 

Tea, coffee and sugar 826 43 

Milk 806 14 

Provisions 709 15 

Vegetables 693 66 

Breadstuffs 433 87 

Light— gas and electric 609 97 

Fruits and canned goods 375 03 

Engineer's supplies 204 05 

Ice 161 25 

Water rent 141 09 

Fish and oysters : . 146 02 

Supplies for pupils 118 67 

Kitchen goods 117 17 

Stationerj- and printing 118 90 



38 



ON ACCOUNT MAINTENANCE— Continued. 



Stable and provender 

Freight and transportation 

Laundry supplies 

Telegraph and postage.... 

Telephone 

Drugs and medicine 

Vinegar and sj-rup 

Greenhouse 

Clothing 

Night watch box rent 

Tools 

Insurance 



Total expenditures for maintenance. 

Expenses for workshops 

Salaries for industi'ial teachers 



103 


44 


85 


38 


75 


80 


71 


70 


62 00 


55 


51 


49 33 


32 47 


17 


15 


16 33 


5 


00 


2 


50 




$27,738 23 


$589 37 


910 


00 



Total expenditures for workshops 1,499 37 

Total expenditures for Library 499 85 

Total expenditures for repairs of buildings 1,497 86 



Total expenditures for year ending October 31, 1898 $31,235 31 



Total receipts for the year ending October 31, 1898 $31,268 28 

Total expenditures for the year ending October 31, 1898 ... 31,235 31 

Balance converted into State Treasui-y $32 9T 



Expenditures of Pupils Charged to ('ountifs for Fiscal Year 
Ending October 31, 1898. 

Clay County $1 20 

Decatur County 65 

Delaware County 2 00 

Lawrence County 3 70 

Madison County 1 40 

Monroe County 2 80 

Spencer County 3 35 

Warrick County 6 55 

Daviess County 75 

Pike County 5 50 

Rush County 35 

Total expended for pupils' clothing and traveling 
expenses for the fiscal year ending October 31, 
1898 $28 25 



39 



Estimated Value of all Real Estate and Personal Property lie- 
longing to the Indiana Institution for the Education of the 
Blind, Made October SI, 1898. 

REAL ESTATE. 

1,680 feet front on Meridian and Pennsylvania, 

including that occupied as city park $378,000 00 

Main building 130,000 00 

Workshop building 3,000 oO 

Engine house and laundry 4,000 00 

Stable 2,000 00 

Bakery building 1,479 00 

Greenhouse and fixtures 2,264 00 

Three lots in Crown Hill 638 00 

$521,381 00 



PERSONAL. 

Machinery, boiler, tools and machinery in engine 

house $5,91150 

Machinery materials, etc., in laundry 606 10 

Materials, apparatus, etc., in bakeshop 61 23 

Materials, machinery, etc., in broom shop 153 15 

Materials, tools, etc., in piano- tuning dep't 12 90 

Materials, tools, etc., in chair shop 94 80 

Materials, machines, etc., in girls' sewing rooms. .. 194 00 

Equipment in gymnasium 50 00 

Specimens in museum 65 00 

Tools and plants in greenhouse 300 00 

carriage, wagon, buggy and horse 350 00 

Furniture and household goods 6.393 71 

School apparatus 1,250 00 

Embossed books 3,182 00 

Printed books 836 00 

Provisions 223 50 

Pianos, organs, horns, music, etc 2,955 00 

Safe, books and ofl^ce equipments 425 00 

Typewriters 350 00 



$23,413 89 

Total value real estate and personal property. $544,794 89 



OFFICERS AND TEACHERS FROM 1847 TO 1898. 



Geo. W. Mears Feb. 16, 1847 

James M. Ray Feb. 16, 1847 

Calvin Fletcher. .. .Feb. 16, 1847- 
June 10, 

Seaton W. Morris 1847- 

Isaac Blackford 1853- 

James G. Reed 1853 

John H. Cook 1853 

E. W. Ellis 1853- 

John T. Carr 1853 

Wm. P. McCullough 1853 

Nathan B. Palmer 1855- 

W. H. Talbott 1859 

H. G. Hazelrigg 1859- 

M. Fitzgibbon 1859- 

Andrew Wallace 1861- 

John Beard 1861- 

Wm. M. Smith 1861- 



TRUSTEES. 

-1853 John S. Spann 1862-1870 

-1853 P. H. Jameson 1868-1878 

Cass Byfield 1870-1874 

1847 Cortez Ewing 1874-1878 

-1853 Daniel Mowrer 1874-1882 

-1855 John Fisher 1878-1882 

-1859 Wm. V. Wiles 1878-1884 

-1859 T. H. Harrison 1882-1888 

-1859 Howard Biggs 1882-1888 

-1859 Calvin Stodgill 1884-1888 

-1859 T. J. Ciillen 1888-1893 

-1859 John Riley 1888-1893 

-1861 John B. StoU 1888-1894 

-1861 Isaac R. Strouse 1893-1895 

-1861 John F. Hennessey 1893- 

-1868 James L. Allen 1895- 

-1874 Nelson Bradley 1895- 

-1862 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 

W. H. Churchman Oct. 1, 1847— Sept. 30, 1853 

George S. Ames Oct. 1, 1853— Sept. 30, 1855 

Wm. C. Larrabee Oct. 1, 1855 — Jan. 31, 1857 

James Mc Workman Feb. 1, 1857— Sept. 10, 1861 

W. H. Churchman Sept. 11, 1861— Aug. 31, 1879 

H. B. Wilson Sept. 1, 1879— Aug. 31, 1882 

H. B. Jacobs Sept. 1, 1882— Oct. 8, 1889 

E. E. Grittith Oct. 9, 1889— Oct. 31, 1894 

W. H. Glascock Nov. 1, 1894— Jan. 5, 1898 

George S. Wilson Jan. 6, 1898— 



PRINCIPALS OF LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



L. S. Newell 1847-1850 

B. F. Fay 1850-1854 

G. W. Hoss 1854-1855 

C. M. Walker 1855-1857 

G. M. Ballard 1857-1866 

M. M. Whiteford 1866-1867 

M. E. Hanna 1867-1869 

A. Stewart 1869-1870 



J. K. Stewart 1870-1871 

A. Stewart 1871-1875 

J. F. McElroy 1875-1879 

James C. Black 1879-1882 

N. D. Nelson 1882-1890 

Mary V. Mustard 1890-1893 

Russell Ratliff 1893-1898 

T. E. Kinzie 1898- 



41 



TEACHERS OF THE LITERARY DEPARTMENT. 



E. M. Curtis 1849-1853 

E. M. Hamilton 1849-1850 

M. C. Bennett 1 853-1854 

H. J. Hoss 1853-1854 

E. W. Bowman 1855-1861 

M. S. Lamed 1861-18(52 

H. A. Moore 1861-1864 

S. J. Larned 1862-1866 

P. W. Hawley 1864-1865 

C. L. Sawyer j^. .1864-1865 

M. E. Hanna 1865-1867 

M. L. Vance 1865-1866 

J. Cook 1866-1867 

S. A. Scofield 1866-1878 

E. D. Starr 1867-1869 

M. D. Naylor 1867-1870 

M. L. Scribner 1869-1870 

C. C. Wynn 1869-1878 

Hattie Carpenter 1869-1870 

Kate C. Landis 1870-1871 

Mary Maloney 1870-1872 

Elizabeth Green 1870-1882 

H. A. Daggett 1872-1887 

M. B. File 1878-1884 



Sarah E. Pearce 1878-1879 

Ida W. Black 1881-1883 

Jenny Scoiield 1882-1890 

Lizzie Hopkins 1883-1889 

Marie Robellaz 1884-1888 

(). H. .J. Harris 1887-1890 

Blanch Croxall 1888-1892 

Anna Dodd 1889-1892 

L. E. Jones 1890-1891 

George E. Henry 1890-1891 

Nellie Love 1S90-1898 

Russell Ratliff 1891-1892 

Laura Euricht 1891-1892 

Maud Van Zant 1892-1893 

Bella Bruce 1892-1898 

Mary Flannagan 1892-1894 

Harriet Turner 1893-1894 

Laura Hill 1894-1898 

Jessie Hamilton 1894- 

Luna Lewis 1896- 

Nannie Crampton 1898- 

Jeannette Newland 1898- 

Jenny Welling 1898- 



PRINCIPALS OF MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 



L. S. Newell 1847-1856 

L. M. Morley 1856-1858 

Gertrude McCuUough 1858-1859 

L. S. Newell 1859-1860 

L. S. Newell 1860-1862 



M. B. Clark 1862-1866 

W. J. Rabjohns 1866-1867 

C. H. Weegmann 1867-1868 

R. A. Newland 1868-1897 

Adelaide Carman 1897- 



MUSIC TEACHERS. 



M. E. Belcher 1856-1857 

A. A. Dyer 1861-1865 

Gus A. Dyer 1862-1863 

A. A. Howard 1865-1866 

G. B. Loomis 1866-1869 

R. A. Newland 1866-1868 

D. Newland 1868-1872 

M. Maloney 1872-1874 

S. F. Briggs 1872-1876 

H. A. Hanvey 1874-1891 



M. E. Churchman 1877-1878 

Nona Ryan 1878-1879 

Josephine Culbertson 1878-1883 

Adelaide Carman 1883-1888 

Blanch Donnahue . . . '. 1888-1890 

M. G. McKernan 1889-1890 

Hannah Pettit 1890-1891 

Adelaide Carman 1891-1897 

W. T. Shannon 1892- 

Bertha Campbell 1897- 



42 



PHYSICIANS. 



G. W. Mears 1847-1853 

T. Parvin 1853-1855 

L. Dunlap 1855-1861 

J. M. Kitchen 1861-1878 



C. E. Wright 1878-1882- 

R. F. Stone 1882-1889 

J, O. Stillson 1889-1890 

Frank A. Morrison 1890- 



BOOKKEEPERS. 

H. B. Ballard 1878-1879 Belle Knisell . 

J. W. King 1879-1897 



, 1897- 



MATRONS. 



M. G. Demoss 1847-1852 

C. B. Sisson 1852-1855 

M. E. Cook 1855-1856 



M. E. Dunn 1856-1857 

J. McWorkman 1857-1861 

J. L. Marshall 1861-1861 



HOUSEKEEPERS. 



E. J. Price 1861-1864 

L. D. Hawley 1864-1868 

A. C. Landis 1868-1874 

M. Sproule 1874-1884 

E. J. Tarlton 1884-1887 



T. A. Jacobs 1887-1886 

D. W. Nelson 1889-1891 

O. M. Baxter 1891-1892 

Ellen Fetherstone 1892-1894 

Belle Campbell 1894- 



GIRLS' GOVERNESSES. 



P. H. Hawley 1869-1870 

E. J. Ballard 1870-1879 

A. J. Loomis 1879-1888 

Annie E. Bryan 1888-1890 



Lizzie L. Weal 1890-1891 

Laura Eurich 1891-1892 

Olive M. Baxter 1892-1895 

Kate Casey 1893- 



BOYS' GOVERNESS. 



Lizzie Evans. 



. 1886- 



BROOM SHOP. 



Caleb Scudder 1847-1848 

S. McGiffin 1848-1858 

M. C. Holman 1858-1860 

L. McGiffin 1860-1865 



J. W. Bradshaw 1865-1871 

J. M. Richards 1871-1890 

C. S. McGiffin 1890-1894 

James Fuller 1894- 



43 



CANING DEPARTMENT. 



A. J. Cochran. 



,1884- 



PIANO TUNING. 



W. E. Reed 1883-1890 B. F. Smith . 

E. E. HoUoway 1890-1891 



.1891- 



GIRLS' WORKROOM. 



Sarah T. Marsh 1847-1849 

E. M. Curtis 1849-1853 

M. C. Bennett 1853-1854 

H. J. Hoss 1854-1855 

M. E. Dunn 1855-1856 

A. A. Paxton 1856-1857 

E. A. Dawson 1861-1862 



P. Ha wley 1862-1863 

L. D. Hawley 1 863-1869 

S. J. Ballard 1869-1879 

Lavona Mason 1879-1890 

Anna Sproule 1890-1894 

Sarah Stark 1894- 



GYxMNASIUM. 



Harriet E. Turner 1891-1894 

Grace Gilman 1894-1896 



Mav Van Wie 



.1896- 



44 



INSTITUTIONS FOE THE EDUCATION OF THE 
BLIND IN THE UNITED STATES. 



State. 


Location. 


Name. 


Superintendent. 


Alabama 

Alabama 

Alabama 


Talladego 

Talladego 

Talladego 

Little Rock 

Berkeley 

Colorado Springs 
Hartford 


Institution for Deaf, Dumb and 

Blind 

Academy for Blind 

School for Negro Deaf Mutes 


J. H. Johnson. 
F. Manning. 

J. S. Graves. 


Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 


School for Blind 

Institution for Education of 

Deaf, Dumb and Blind 

School for Deaf and Blind 

Institution and Industrial Home 

for Blind 

Blind and Deaf Mute Institution 

Academy for the Blind 

Institution for the Education 

of Blind 

Institution fur the Education 

of the Blind 

International School for the 

Blind 


O.C.Gray. 

• W. Wilkenson. 
D.C.Dudley. 


Florda 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Ter.... 


St. Augustine.... 


F. E. Cleveland. 
Frederick Pareo. 
W.D.Williams. 


Jacksonville 

Indianapolis 

Ft. Gibson 

Vinton 


Frank H.Hall. 
Geo. S.Wilson. 
Lura A. Rowland. 




College for the Blind • 

Institution for. the Education 
of the Blind 


Thos.F.McCune. 


Kansas 


Kansas City 

Louisville 

Baton Rouge 

Baltimore 


W.H.Toothaker. 


Kentucky 


Institution for the Education 
of the Blind 


B. 15.Huntoon. 


Louisiana 

Maryland 


Institution for the Blind 

School for the Blind 

School and Perkins Institution 

for the Blind 

School for the Blind 

School for the Bl ind 

Institution i or t lie Blind 

School for the Blind 

School for the Deaf and Blind.. 

Institution for the Blind 

Icstitution for the Deaf and 

Blind 

Institution for the Blind 

School for the Blind 


W. H.U.Magruder. 
F.D. Morrison. 


Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi ... 


Lansing 


M. Anagnos. 
N. Church. 


Faribault 


J. J.Dow. 
W. S. Sims. 




J.S.Sibley. 






Edward S. Tillinghart. 


Nebraska 


Nebraska City . . . 
Santa Fe 


William A.Jones. 


New York 

New York 

N. Carolina... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Oklahoma — 

Pennsylvania. 
Pennsylvania. 


New York 

Batavia 

Raleigh 

Columbus 


Lars W. Larsen. 
W. B. Wait. 
Gardner Fuller. 


Institution for the Deaf, Dumb 

and Blind 

Institution for the Education of 

the Blind 

Institution for the Blind 

Institution for the Deaf, Dumb 

and Blind 

Institution lor the Blind 

Institution for the Instruction 

of the Blind 


John E. Ray. 

R.W.Wallace. 
J.S.Carter. 


Guthrie 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia 

Cedar Springs ... 


H.C. Beamer. 
H.B. Jacobs. 

E.E.Allen. 


S. Carolina — 


Institution for the Education of 


U.F.Walker. 


rtah 


School lor the Blind 


J.W.Metcalfe. 


Tennessee — 
Texas 


Nashville 


School for the Blind 

Institution for the Blind 

Institution for the Deaf, Dumb 

and Colored Blind 

Institution for the Education of 

the Deaf, Dumb and Blind... 
Institution for Defective Youth 
Scliool for the Ueaf and Blind.. 


J. C. Armstrong. 
E.P.Becton. 


Texas 


Austin 




Virginia 

AVashincton .. 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin — 




S.J.Jenkins. 


Vancouver 

Roinney 

.Janesville 


W.A.Bowles. 
James Watson. 
Jas. T. Rucker. 
Howard F. Bliss. 







45 



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TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



INDIANA 



School for Feeble- iMinded Youth 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 



For the Fiscal Year Ending Ootober 31, 1898. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B.BURFORD, CONTBACTOR FOR STATK PRINTING AND BINDING. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Departmknt, 
November 



• 2, 1898. J 



Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, "i 

Indianapolis, November 2, 1898. / 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 

Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of Slatr. 



November 2, 1898. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certilicate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 

of Public Printing and Binding. 

CHAS. E. WILSON, 

Private Secretari/. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, Novem- 
ber 2, 1898. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretari/ of Slate. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 2d day of Novem- 
ber, 1898. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk of Printirtfj Bureau. 



(3) 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



E. A. K. HACKETT, President, Fort Wayne. 

JOHN M. SPANN, Treasurer, Indianapolis. 

MKS. MARY EOWAN HARPER, Secretary, Fort Wayne. 



OFFICERS. 

Alexander Johnson, Superintendent. 

Mrs. E. a. Johnson, Matron. 
Albert E. Carroll, Steward and Industrial Overseer. 
Charles Bock, M. D., Resident Physician. 
Chahles M. Lawrence, Principal. 
Miss Louise Schwabze, Bookkeeper and Stenographer. 
Miss La Vern Lester, Record Clerk and Stenographer. 
Walter C. Van Nuys, Storekeeper. 



(4) 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES. 



Fort Wayne, Ind., October 31, 1898. 

To Honorable James A. Mount, (it-ovcrtior of Indiana: 

"We present herewith the Twentieth Annual Report of the 
Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth, being for the fiscal year 
ending October 31, 1898. 

The year has been one of quiet and steady progi'ess. As the 
institution was crowded to its utmost capacity at the beginning of 
the year, there has been no increase of enrollment, but the average 
daily attendance is slightly larger than for the previous year. The 
only extension of accommodation possible is now being made, and 
we shall shortly admit about thirty boys to occupy "Spangler 
"Wing," built at the Colony Farm, partly by means of a small be- 
quest made by the late Mr. Lewis Spangler, of Dekalb County, the 
particulars of which are given in the report of the Superintendent. 

The small amount available for improvements, viz., $2,500, has 
been judiciously used, and the plant generally is now in fairly good 
order throughout. 

We would respectfully urge your attention to the condition of 
our application list as presented in the statistical tables. Many of 
these children who are debarred admittance because of the crowded 
condition of the institution, are most distressing and urgent cases. 
At our Tiiistees' meetings we are compelled to listen to letters from 
their parents and guardians, which are often couched in very affect- 
ing terms. Frequent letters are also received from public men and 
other good citizens making the most urgent appeals. Relatives of 
the children appear at our meetings to urge their claims. To most 
of them we must reply, "There is no room." Some of these appli- 
cations come from parents who are able and "willing to pay the full 
amount of tiiition fixed by law. They do not wish to burden the 

(5) 



6 

State. Many are from people who are impoverished by the burden 
of an unfortunate child to the extent that in some cases the whole 
family is pauperized. 

Besides these who under the present law are entitled to admit- 
tance, there is a large number for whom, more than for any other 
class of defectives, it would be good public policy for the State to 
provide. These are the idiotic and imbecile adult females of child- 
bearing age, many of whom are in our county poor asylums, most 
of whom are already the mothers of defective, illegitimate children; 
few of whom, under present conditions, will escape repeated moth- 
erhood until past the reproductive age. "\Ve should be derelict in 
our duty to the State if we did not call your attention to these facts, 
and ask of you, and through you of the State of Indiana, for the 
means to remedy them. 

In urging these consideratious upon your notice, we are not pro- 
posing a great additional burden upon the taxpayer. During the 
past six years the average per capita cost of this institution has 
steadily declined, until now it is less than three-fifths of what it 
was at the beginning of that period. This great reduction in cost 
has been accompanied by no lowering of the standard of efficiency 
of the institution. It is partly the residt of good business manage- 
ment, but chiefly of the fact that the inmates are being trained to 
useful labor, so that a very satisfactory proportion of them are en- 
tirely self-supporting, and a still larger number do some useful work 
even.' day. Many of those whom we think ought to be received 
are already a burden uix)n the taxpayer. Under the system of our 
institution, some of these would be made self-supporting, most of 
the others could be ke]>t at little, if any, more than their present 
cost wherever they are ke]it with decency and humanity, as a civ- 
ilized State would wish to keep its defective citizens. 

In our eighteenth annual rejvirt we presented a scheme of ex- 
tension at a veiy moderate rate of cost. Since that time we have 
developed one important industiy, by means of which we shall be 
able to considerably reduce the cost of new buildings. We are now 
using the labor of some of our older and stouter male inmates in the 
manufacture of bricks, with excellent results. This year, the second 
of our brickyard, our boys made 394,000 bricks. Next year we 
expect they will make 000,000 or more. "We have already a few 
boys able to assist at brick-laying, and a comj^etent force for mortar- 



mixing, hod-caiTyiug, and excavating. With the use of our avail- 
able hibor as above specified, the cost of simple, sub«^tanrial build- 
ings, equipped with all that is necessary for health and comfort, 
but avoiding costlv adornments, \v\]\ be very moderate. 

We believe that the estimate made by the Supenntendent in his 
report of $250 per capita for buildings and equipment is a conserva- 
tive one. If the Legislature will see fit to appropriate the sum of 
$100,000, half available during the fiscal year of ISOO, and the rest 
during the year 1900, we believe we can accommodate four hun- 
dred additional inmates, which would let us clear off the present list 
of suspended applications, and tnke in about half of the adult fe- 
males above mentioned by the end of the year 1900. 

The Superintendent's report, which appeai-s on another page, 
gives some facts with regard to the epileptic and custodial cases, 
wliich call for your earnest thought. If the extension asked be 
granted, we shall be able to make proper provision for these dis- 
tressing cases. Many similar institutions in other States are not 
allowed to receive epileptic inmates, believing that they seriously 
impair the management and detract from the benefits of the insti- 
tution to a greater extent than they are themselves benefited. Pos- 
sibly some day the State of Indiana will follow the example of the 
progTessive States of New York and Ohio, and will establish a spe- 
cial institution for epileptics; no one would welcome such an insti- 
tution more than those who now care for the epileptics among in- 
adequate and poorly arranged equipments. Until such a step shall 
be taken, it seems probable that we must continue to have their 
care, and we certainly need, most sorely, special buildings for them. 

Our present engineering department, which includes the heat- 
ing, lighting, water supply, sewerage and ventilation, is inadequate, 
and some additional machinery is urgently needed. The sum of 
$10,000 for a boiler, engine and dynamos, electric motors, and 
reserv'oirs, \\tl11 be needed and should be available in 1899. 

Should the extension now asked for be granted, the appropriation 
for maintenance and clothing for the year 1900 should be made 
$96,000 or $120 per capita of the then enrollment. For 1901 the 
appropriation for maintenance and clothing necessary wall be $115,- 
000, or $115 per capita of the enrollment for that year. Our ap- 
propriation for clothing and maintenance for the year 189S, of 
$75,000, was a little less than $134 per capita of enrollment, and 



8 

for 1899 it will be $125. Thus, although the gross amount asked 
for is increased, it will be seen that the per capita steadily decreases. 

An annual appropriation for repairs of $3,500 is also required, 
that amount being a minimum estimate of the annual expense of 
necessary repairs for so large a plant. 

The management of the Home meets our earnest approval. Mr. 
and Mrs. Johnson have made a great study of the needs of the insti- 
tution, and we heartily approve of all their efforts, and the results 
accomplished have been most satisfactoi*y to us. 

E. A. K. IIACKETT, President. 
JOIIN M. SPANN, Treasurer. 
MES. MARY R. HARPER, Sec'y. 
Trustees of the Indiana School for Feeble-Minded Youth. 



John M. Spann, Treasurer, in Account icith Indiana School for 
Fecblc-Minded Youth. 



Nov. 


1897. 

1 

1898. 
28 

1897. 
2 

1S98. 
3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

31 

.30 

30 

30 

8 

28 


Br. 

To appropriation for maintenance for fiscal year 
eudinKOoi..ber31,189X 

To ai'propriation for repairs for fiscal year ending 
October 31. Is98 : 


$75,000 00 
2,600 00 
2,500 00 

697 10 






To appropriatiim for improvementa for fiscal year 
ending October 31 , 1898 




Oct. 


To indu-trial proceeds for fiscal year ending October 
31,1898 • 






Cr. 
By maintenance approved vouchers 


$80,697 10 


Dec. 


$9,888 01 
157 64 
118 b8 

9,407 67 
14 70 
52:3 94 

7,779 65 
276 4.5 
59 29 

6,440 20 
8:3 97 

7.861 07 
501 -.'3 

6,1 9U 15 
664 99 
5fil 111 

5.889 86 
.367 84 
5^7 9 ! 

7,216 61 
292 16 
527 5:^ 

4,468 71 

14 02 

121 42 

3.974 80 

3.95.'i 84 

2,624 53 




By itiprov' ments approved vouchers 






By repairs approved vouchers 




Jan. 


By maintenance approved vouchers 






By iinprov ments approved vouchers 






By repairs approved vou('hers 




Fflb 








Bv improvements approved vouchers 






By repairs approved vouchers 




Mar. 


By inainte ance approved vouchers 






By improvemen s approved vouchers 




Apri 








By improvements approved vouchers 




lVf!i,v 


Bv maintenance approved vouchers 






By improvements approved vouchers 






By repair- approved vouchers 




May 


By maintenance approved vouchers 






By improvements approved vouchers 

By repairs a proved vouchers 




June 


By maintenance a pproved vouchers ... 






Bv improvements approved vouchers 






By repairs approved vouchers 


■ 


July 








By improvements api>roved vouchers 






Ky re airs approved vouchers 




AnK. 






Oct. 


I'y maintenance approved vouchers 




Oct. 


By maintenance approved vouchers 


$80,697 10 







REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Trustees: 

I herewith present the Twentieth Animal Keport of the Indiana 
School for Feeble-Minded Youth, bein^- the sixth report it has 
been my dnty to make. 

MOVEMENT OF POPULATION. 

The actual enrollment is 569, or almost exactly the same as at 
this date last year; but before this report Avdll api^ear in print, it 
■will be increased by about thirty-five boys, for whom acceptances 
have been issued, most of whom will probably be all in before the 
end of the calendar year, (^ur j^opulation, therefore, on the first 
of December, 189b, will be about 600, and this will be the utmost 
limit ix>ssible uiitil we have more house room. AVe are enabled to 
take this additional number by the building, at Colonia, of Spangler 
Wing, which will be ready for inmates in a few weeks, full par- 
ticulars of wliicli will l>e found under the heading of "Im- 
provements." 

During the year we have received fiftw^n boys and fourteen girls. 
We have had eighteen deaths, and twelve children have been with- 
drawn. The daily aAerage num])er actually present has been 544.5, 
which is 6.1 mr>re than during the previous fiscal year. 

APPLKATrONS FOR ADMISSIONS. 

Of these there are now pending, including those boys who have 
been accepted and not yet received, 206, of which 158 are for boys 
and 48 for girls. This number is larger than at any previous time 
in the history of the institution, and is more than 32 per cent, larger 
than at this time last year. The number of waiting applicants 
grows steadily year by year, and will undoubtedly continue to in- 
crease until something like due provision sliall be made. Accepting 

(10) 



11 

one or two children from a given district is nearly always followed 
by several new applications from the same county. This occurs, no 
doubt, from the fact that attention is called to the institution, and 
friends of defective children make application for them. 

The need of very greatly extending the capacity of the institu- 
tion is too apparent to need more than a brief mention. It has been 
strongly urged in all recent annual reports, and there is nothing 
to be said that has not already been made public, 

THE SCHOOL 

Continues to deserve your approval. During the year we lost our 
energetic and excellent principal, Mr. E, R, Johnston, who resigned 
to accept a similar position, but with a larger salaiy, in an Eastern 
State. Much of the success of the School during the past four years 
was due to his intelligent devotion. He was succeeded by Mr. C. 
M. Lawrence, whose interesting and instructive report appears on 
another page. We hope to maintain our high standard of educa- 
tional work, and, if possible, to surpass it in the future, 

THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, 

Here also we have a change to report, Dr, Delia E, Howe, ha\dng 
been succeeded by Dr. Chas. Bock, who was with ils as interae one 
year, ending April 1, 1898, and who came as resident physician on 
July 1st of this year. 

Our pleasant and mutually profital)lo relations with the Fort 
Wayne College of Medicine continue, and clinics are held every 
Saturday, the professors continuing as in the past to assist our resi- 
dent physician in operations, particulars of w^hich are given in the 
medical report. 

As will be seen in the physician's report, we have had the usual 
number of petty ailments, and a few cases of serious disease, A 
scrutiny of the mortuar^"- table will show that although we have had 
a larger number of deaths than usual, yet serious illness is almost 
confined to those afflicted with 

EPILEPSY AND TUBERCULOSIS. 

The number of epileptics now enrolled is 162, or nearly 28 per 
cent, of our total enrollment. To this number belong most of those 



12 

admitted to the hospital, and more than 70 per cent, of our deaths. 
The death rate for the year has been, of epileptics eight per cent., 
of non-epileptics one per cent. 

Of the eighteen deaths shown in the mortuary table, epilepsy 
appears as a chief cause in three insta,nccs, and as a contributing 
cause in ten more. Tuberculosis appears as the chief cause in seven 
eases, of which four were complicated by epilepsy. Chronic menin- 
gitis was the chief cause in four cases, with meningeal tuberculosis 
in one other; in all five epilepsy was a complication. Of the eigh- 
teen deaths, there were but two in which neither epilepsy nor tu- 
berculosis was a chief or contributoiy cause. Of these two, one was 
a case of hydrocephalus; the other was caused by capillary bron- 
chitis with an organic heart lesion complicating. All the deaths 
were among those of the lower intellectual gTades,' except that of a 
girl who died of consumption, and who was not feeble-minded, but 
was paralytic and epileptic, as well as tuberculous. There is noth- 
ing more necessar}^ for the well-being of the institution than such 
an increase of accommodation as will allow us to separate the epilep- 
tic and the lower grade custodials from other inmates, and lodge 
them in detached cottages, specially built and equipped for their 
care. Such a separation is demanded in the organic law of the in- 
stitution, but has so far been impossible for lack of facilities. 

THE INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENTS. 

There is nothing new to report in these. We continue to make 
by the use of the labor of the inmates, all the children's clothing 
and shoes, mattresses, pillows, funiiture (except beds and chairs), 
and to grow in our garden all the vegetables we can use, as well 
as a great deal of fruit. A few boys have learned to lay brick, and 
can give considerable help to the masons. The regular work of the 
house, the laundi-y, kitchens, etc., absorb the work of many of the 
trained inmates, so that we have not an idle boy or girl on the place 
who is able to labor. The useful and profitable employment of all 
our trained inmates continues to be our distinguishing feature. 

REPAIRS. 

The regular repairs have been kept up with diligence, mostly by 
the labor of the regular staff of employes. As the buildings get 
older, the cost of repairs inevitably increases. 



THE COLONY FARM. 

Year by year the farm shows steady iiuprovement, and the pro- 
duce received and used at the institution increases. The only new 
departure during the year has been in the direction of beef cattle, a 
number of young steers bought early in the spring having been fed 
and slaughtered for beef with fairly satisfactoiy results. The 
method of farming adopted, viz., soilinji' cattle upon green crops 
gTOwn for the pui-pose, supplemented by purchased feed, such as 
bran, gluten meal, etc., with a cai'eful and systematic use of the 
resulting manure, has the effect of rapidly increasing the fertility 
of the land. Most of the crops of the present year have been good, 
the only conspicuous failure having been the potatoes. The present 
population of the colony, including the brickyard boys, is forty- 
eight, to be increased to about seventy-five as soon as Spangler 
Wing is ready. The total value of the food products of the farm, 
brought down to the institution and consumed there during the 
year, has been $6,271.70. 

THE BRICKYARD 

Gives employment to ten of our stoutest boys. Owing to the wet 
season, the number of bricks made has not come up to our expecta- 
tion. The total output has been 394,000 brick, of which all but 
about 80,000 (in addition to 120,000 left over from the previous 
season) have been used, or will be used before winter, in the build- 
ing operations of the institution. Next spring we must double the 
drying capacity of our racks, and we shall then be able to make 
nearly twice as many bricks during the season of 1899. The actual 
cost of the bricks made this year has been about $1.15 per thousand, 
and the value of those used this year has been about $2,070. 

IMPROVEMENTS AT THE INSTITUTION. 

The legislative appropriation for the year included the sum of 
$2,500 for improvements. This was a much smaller amount than 
was asked for, but it has been used with the utmost care, and as 
we are making our own bricks at a merely nominal cost, we are able 
to show a few good improvements, even with the small amount 
available. The most important of these, next to Spangler "Wing — 



14 

which miist be described by itself — was a loug and lu'gently needed 
addition to the laundry and adjoining engine-room. This was made 
at a total cost of $1,372.17 (besides 98,000 home-made bricks, 
worth $490.00), and now gives ns a very convenient and adecjuate 
laundry. A new driven well, 475 feet deep, cost $562.50. A 
small brick pmnp-house, to cover an electric motor and pump, cost 
$117.21 (besides 18,000 brick, value $90.00). 

A useful addition to the cold storage and butcher shop cost 
$88.10, and used about 3,000 bricks. A porch to the hospital 
kitchen cost $102.22. A partition on the third floor hall of the 
main building gives us a pleasant additional reception room, and 
cost $98.89. Flooring and wainscoting of a hitherto unused base- 
ment, at a cost of $76.60, gives us two pleasant play-rooms in the 
southwest comer of the girls' wing, which will help out the over- 
crowded day-rooms during the bad weather of winter. 

A substantial root house, which will use about 95,000 bricks, and 
give us plenty of frost-proof room for all our potatoes and other 
Avinter roots, and also a large kraut room, is in process of construc- 
tion, the brick being on the ground, and about $100 worth of labor 
already expended upon it. Some minor improvements in the way 
of summer houses, etc., on the play gi-ounds, costing $69.26, bring 
our total cash expenditures for improvements on the Home grounds 
up to $2,586.95. If we add the value of the brick to this, it mil 
give $3,731.95, as the total value of our improvements at the main 
building. 

IMPROVEMENTS AT COLONIA. 

Here we have been able to make but few improvements, and sev- 
eral which are much needed remain for another year. Those com- 
pleted include an ice house, large enough for 400 tons of ice, costing 
$266.26. A bam for stock cattle and calves, costing $323.83. Sub- 
stantial maple floors in the house, both upstairs and down, costing 
$110. A sanitaiy and economical piggery* on an improved plan, 
with room for 150 swine of all ages, cost about $156.00 (most of the 
material being on hand from our last lumbering). Improvements 
at the brickyard consisting of a driven well, 118 feet deep, and ad- 
ditional racks and pallets, the whole costing $356.78. Two hun- 



*Thi8 is an iroprovement that has received special commendation from Dr. Ilurty, Sec- 
retary of the State Board of Health, and some of the staff of the Purdue Agricultural Col- 
iege. 



15 

dred nineteen rods of new w-ire fencing, worth $65.70. An orchard 
of 865 trees, apple, pear, phnn, peach, cherry and quince, occupy- 
ing about five acres, and costing $210.09. These altogether bring 
the total cost of fann improvements to $1,313.86. We still need 
three buildings to complete the farm equipment, namely, a milk 
house, a slaughter house and an implement shed. We have still 
some miles of fence to build, much road-making, tile-draining,, 
clearing and planting to do, so much, indeed, that we shall have 
plenty of rough work to keep our commoner class of laborers busy 
for many years to come. 

SP ANGLER WING. 

By the will of the late Lewis Spangler, of Dekalb County, there 
was devised to the Trustees of the Indiana School for Feeble- 
Minded Youth, a small parcel of real estate, subject to the life in- 
terest of the widow. A threatened contest of the will led to a con- 
ference of the persons interested, and to a compromise for $1,000 
cash, a settlement which was generally considered to be equitable 
to the State. The Trustees long considered how to expend this 
money, so as to gain the greatest good for the State and the feeble- 
minded children. They decided to use it as far as it w^ould go in 
the construction of a brick building at the Colony Farm, using 
bricks made by our boys on the place, and eking out the cost by us- 
ing a portion of the appropriation for improvements, which becomes 
Available on and after I^ovember 1, 1898. They accordingly ap- 
proved plans for a brick house, which should become eventually 
the w^est wing of a larger building, to be known as Spangler Wing, 
in memory of Mr. Spangler, who bequeathed the money which 
made it possible. The building, which will be completed in 
]^oveniber, will contain day-room and donnitory for 40 boys, with 
a room for attendants and necessaiy toilet rooms. It will be used 
in connection with the present frame building, the dining room of 
which is large enough to accommodate the additional inmates. The 
value of the house will be about $3,750, which is provided for as 
follows: Spangler bequest, $1,000; home-made bricks, $1,250; 
State's appropriation for improvements, $1,500. The excavating 
and much of the rough laboring work was done by the inmates 
working with our regular help. The class of boys who will be cared 
for in the new building ^vill be chiefly those of the middle and 



16 

upper custodial grades, non-epileptic. Many of this class can be 
usefully employed on the farm to some small extent, and the cost 
of keeping them, under the conditions of life at Colonia, is very 
much less than the average cost at the institution. 

EXTENSIONS NEEDED. 

The most urgent need of additional quartei-s is of some suitable 
and adequate building for the lower custodial classes and for the 
epileptics. This should be provided by the erection of cottages near 
the main building, where there are to be found several choice build- 
ing sites upon the grounds. Constructed upon simple plans, \vith- 
out any unnecessary expense in adornment, but with perfect sanita- 
tion in the matter of ventilation, etc., and using the brick made by 
the labor of our own inmates, cottages, in every way suitable for 
the pui-pose, may be built and furnished for $250 per capita. To 
provide two cottages for 100 inmates each, would cost about $50,- 
000. It would be well to build two such cottages in the next two 
years. At the same time the building at Colonia, of which Spangler 
"Wing is the beginning, should be extended. This can be con- 
structed still more cheaply per capita, being for a grade of boys who 
do not need quite such costly aiTangements as the lower custodial 
and epileptics. An appropriation for buildings of $100,000, of 
which half should be available in 1899, and half in 1900, would 
provide for not less than 400 additional inmates, and would enable 
us to clear off the suspended list, and receive most of those who will 
apply between the present time and the end of the year 1900. Even 
before that is done, the question of providing for the feeble-minded 
women under forty-five years of age, who are now inmates of the 
county poor asylums, should be considered. There is nothing the 
State can do which would pay so well in saving future cost to the 
taxpayer, as to segregate and cara for this unfortunate class of 
women. To take them in, however, the law must be broadened, 
and this I certainly think should be done at once. We have upon 
the farm a beautiful building site, admirably adapted for a colony 
of adult females. Upon this place could be erected a number of 
cottages with a central building, to accommodate all the imbecile 
women of child-bearing age now in the county poor asylums. A 
reasonable estimate of the first cost of such a colony is about $200 



17 

per capita, so that $70,000 would bouse them all. The expense of 
•caring for them afterwards would be no more to the taxpayer than 
their present cost in the poor asylums, which is about $75 per 
annum. 

OTHEK IMPROVEMENTS. 

A considerable extension of our mechanical department is very 
desirable. "We need one more boiler of not less than 125 H. P. An 
additional dynamo and engine to supplement the present equipment 
for lighting, also a dvnamo for power to nin our deep well pump 
and other machineiy, would promote both efficiency and economy. 
We also need to construct a reservoir to hold not less than 100,000 
gallons, to supplement our water supply. Electric motors are 
needed for the machinery in our wood-working and manufacturing 
department, and to run a system of fans to improve our very defec- 
tive ventilation. For these and similar purposes we need an appro- 
priation of about $10,000, to be used to improve the heating, light- 
ing, water supply, ventilation and power plant, which should be 
available during 1899. 

It is needless to say that should the Legislature see fit to grant 
the extension of the institution that is so greatly needed, an in- 
creased appropriation for maintenance will be required. It has 
been only by the strictest economy that w-e have got through the 
last fiscal year. During the coming year, for which the appropria- 
tion is already made, we shall have to care for fully 30 more chil- 
dren than for the past year, so that we shall have to exercise still 
more stringent economy. With 200 more inmates the maintenance 
should be increased by at least $20,000. If this is done, although 
the gToss expense will appear larger, the per capita cost will be con- 
siderably reduced. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks to the Board of Trus- 
tees for their uniform kindness and consideration ; to the officers and 
employes of the institution of every grade, I wish to express my ap- 
preciation of their constant devotion to duty, and their cheerful 
willingness at all times to carry out my plans for the benefit of the 
institution and of the feeble-minded children. 
Respectfully yours, 

ALEXAIS^DER JOHJsTSON", 

Superintendent. 

2 — Feeble Minded. 



REPORT OF PRINCIPAL. 



Mr. Alexaiuler Johnson, Supnintendent : 

Di'iir Sir — Following; is my re])ort : I silent the mouth of August 
ac4iuaintinp inyst-lf with the school work of thi;« iiLstitution. Tke 
chiklren were taken to tlie school rooms by classes, and an examina- 
tion of each child made. I am glad to report that the grading of the 
clftases was jl>^ nearly i>erfect as could be made ^^^th feeble-minded 
children, consi<lering the numljer of teachei*s we have and the school 
equipment at our disposal. Some changes, the need of which grew 
naturally out of the progi'ess of the School, were made. 

Perfect grading is impossible, especially with feeble-minded chil- 
dren, »(> that it is more advisable to transfer or promote a child dur- 
ing the school term any time his condition justifies it, rather than to 
havo a regidar examination day for that pui-pose. Following this 
plan wo shall constantly be on the lookout for changes that will 
make more profitable and pleasant the school work and the institu- 
tion life of each child. 

.\MUSEMENTS. 

The diviftions are supplic<l with blocks, balls, checkei-s, dominoes, 
etc, and the brighter one*; with pai-chesi and chess besides. Three 
nights i'uch we<'k the t<'achers devote one hour to amusing and en- 
tertaining the childivn. Those who work in the Industrial Depart- 
ment have singing and drills one night each week. There is a reg- 
ular ent«>rtainnn'nt for the children eveiy Tues<lay night. One 
night eaeh month is set ai)art for the celebration of the birthdays 
of all the children bf»m in that month. Here they have taffy-pull- 
ing and gam«t*. The dances have continued to be successful. The 
girl» (lanre everv AVednesdav and the lx)ys evers' Friday night. All 
of the f««ival.s Christmas, Thanksgiving, Harvest Day, Hallowe'en, 
eUs,, aro oelpbrated in an appropriate manner. 

•18> 



19 

The improvement made in the school-hou-sc', new blackboards, 
painting, calcimining, etc., have added gi-eatly to its comfort and 
appearance. 

MUSIC. 

The music is a very important factor in the iiistitiitiou life. Sing- 
ing is the most convenient and profitable means of entertaining the 
children, because nearly all can participate. Many who can not ut- 
ter a distinct articulate sound, will make their greatest effort to imi- 
tate the other children in sound and gesture while they are singing. 
Besides the rythm pleases them. It is impossible to overestimate 
the importance of music in the institution. This training nuist be 
largely done in the schools. For this purpose we have a girls' sing- 
ing class each morning. Twenty-five of the brightest primai-y girls 
assemble with 31 custodial girls in the school hall where they re- 
ceive instruction in vocal music. It is very necessary that the cus- 
todial girls sing with the primary girls, for the primaiy girls lend 
life and enthusiasm wliich the custodial girls do not have. Besides 
the imitative instinct is quite strong even in low grade feeble- 
minded children, so that they often do what they see others doing 
when they can be induced under no other circiunstances to do it. 

We also have a boys' singing class each moraing. SLxty-five cus- 
todial boys assemble in the school hall, where they are joined by 
28 of our brightest boys, to receive instruction in vocal music. Here 
again the brighter boys lend the life and impetus so lacking in the 
custodial class. 

Two days of each week the entire afternoon school (147 children) 
meet in the school hall for singing. Here our chapel songs and 
services are practiced. In addition to this general singing each 
afternoon school has class singing. Here our brighter children are 
taught the sentiments of the songs they sing. It is surprising how 
much reality they get out of them. In the kindergarten songs and 
games the children seem to feel that they are the real flowers and 
trees, and birds and animals they pretend to be. When they coddle 
and pet their classmate, made over for the moment by their fancy 
into doves and bluebirds, they are fonning habits of gentleness and 
developing a love for each other that will affect them all their lives. 
When they play the part of a blacksmith shoeing his horses, the 
horses are real, the forge and anvil and the hammer are real to 



20 

them. While they are learning the songs they also learn the habit 
of the birds and animals they pretend to be, they learn the story 
the coal and iron have to tell them about themselves. In short, the 
singing is turned in every possible way to teach the children obedi- 
ence, gentleness, good manners and morality. Much has been done 
in this direction and much can still be done. 

Besides the vocal music, we now have 12 girls taking piano les- 
sons, many of these can play for the girls' dances and at our special 
day entertainments. One girl plays for the morning singing, calis- 
thenics and kindergarten classes. This is a place of honor, and the 
girls take great delight in doing something of real importance and 
worth. 

Our band also continues to be of great value in entertainments, 
and is the only thing that seems to rouse our lowest grade children 
out of their habitual stupor. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE." 

We can not make soul. We can only repair the physical organ- 
ism through which the soul acts. The soul is always straggling to 
manifest itself even in the lowest grade children. This manifesta- 
tion differs from time to time for two reasons. First, the environ- 
ments change; second, the condition of the physical organism 
changes. Now when the environments remain the same, the out- 
ward expressions of this soul struggle will differ from day to day 
in the same child, because the physical organism through which it 
acts is in some way changed. Then if so much depends on the tone 
of the physical organism, our work clearly is to put the physical life 
of the child in the best possible condition. To this end their diet 
is carefully selected; their daily habits vigilantly watched; regular 
outdoor exercise given when weather is fit; and breathing exercises 
required. Good air, and plenty of it, is as essential to the health 
and vigor of our children as food and clothing. Other things re- 
maining the same, deep breathing of pure air makes our children 
more capable. With this central thought in mind, a graded course 
of exercises has been arranged running from the kindergarten, 
through calisthenics and inanual work, always adapting it to the 
special needs of the child, so that every side of every child's nature 
may bo brought out, and that side of his nature in which he is most 
capable specialized upon. In this way tlie school co-operates with 



21 

the Industrial Department. When the cliild lias learned to use his 
tands, he is put part of the day in one of the industries where he is 
most useful. 

SPECIAL SENSES. 

We may not know what the soul is, but we do know that the only 
way we can reach it is through the body. ISTow, if the bodily organ- 
ism be defective, the soul is less often and less effectively reached 
and proportionately less responsive. When these defects are in the 
peripheral organs, we place the child in special sense classes to 
strengthen the impaired sense. We now have 30 children receiv- 
ing tliis special attention. Many cases of marked improvement can 
be seen. But when the defect is in the nerve tissue leading from the 
sense organ to the brain center, or when the defect is in the cerebral 
centers themselves, special sense training will accomplish nothing. 
Of course we have no children with all the senses gone, so that when 
we find one sense that can not be improved, we direct our efforts to 
the training of the other senses. 

NATURE STUDY. 

I can not speak too highly of the results of nature study. A 
brief consideration of one or two fundamental, psychological truths 
will help to show its importance. It is now quite generally believed 
that each individual is an epitome of the race; that each individual 
experiences in a modified form every emotion and instinct de- 
veloped by the race in past ages, through its effort to preserve and 
perpetuate itself. For example, every boy has an instinct for a few 
, months, and perhaps years, to kill and destroy everything he can. 
This period in the boy's life probably corresponds to the centuries 
of struggle our ancestors experienced back in the German forests, 
where the enemy was always strong and ferocious, and against 
which they constantly fought in self-defense. Thus the instinct to 
kill is a remnant of that which once had utility in preserving life, 
and the child should not be condemned because he has it; every- 
thing should be done, however, to encourage the better instinct', 
and suppress the undesirable one. I shall indicate presently how 
nature study will help to do this. So all the instincts are or have 



22 

been useful. It is also true that every ripening instinct depends 
more or less upon the strength of those preceding it, and is modified 
by those that follow it. Then the bad, vicious instinct should be 
treated not only for its own sake, but for the sake of those which 
are sure to manifest themselves later. If the later instincts are 
strong enough, they may and often do change the habits formed 
from the earlier ones. For it must be remembered that the in- 
stincts themselves are transient; the habits formed while they are 
passing are more enduring. 

Now, if tbe sum of our habits depends upon the use we make of 
our instincts when they are ripe, we can readily see the importance 
of introducing the child to a new subject at the right time. We 
must catch the instinct when it is ripe, if we hope to have a habit 
formed as a result of it; we must suppress the instinct when it is 
ripe, if we wish to prevent the forming of a habit. But feeble- 
mindedness is a state of aiTested psychical development. Then we 
must take the child with the habits he fonne<l from the instincts 
he had at the time his psychic development was arrested, overcome 
these habits and encourage the ripening of better instincts. This is 
the guiding principle at the bottom of all sound teaching of the 
feeble-minded. In doing this work, nature study can be utilized to 
the gi'eatest advantage. It is real, live and concrete. It is the only 
thing that will interest our children any great length of time. The 
cliildren ai-e being taught that the life of a flower in the window 
garden and of the animals he knows and handles is just the same as 
his own. We provide as many live animals and birds as we can, 
teaching their nature and habits to the child while he holds them in 
his own hands or caresses them. Everything is done to make the 
child love nature. Along with this regard for the life of nature 
comes an increased regard for each other. A crippled child is very 
seldom imposed upon by his stronger companions. When the chil- 
dren have learned to love and help each other, greater numbers 
can be kept together, and in this and other ways reduce the cost of 
their support per capita. In this lies the hope for the complete care 
of the feeble-minded. 

• In closing I wish to thank the teachers for their genuine enthusi- 
asm, and you for your kind assistance in the school work. 



23 



SCHOOL ENROLLMENT. 



Boys. Girk. Total. 

Attending day sc-liool 152 ISO 332 

Night school 21 20 41 

P. M. scliool 54 91 145 

A. M. scliool— 

Calisthenics 38 30 68 

Sewing and fan<-y woi-k 14 21 35 

Kindergarten 26 39 65 

Nettmg 12 ... 12 

Manual 37 27 64 

Special sense 15 18 33 

Speech class 13 20 33 

Reading 12 10 22 

Singing 95 56 151 

Eespectfully submitted, 

C. M. LAWEENCE, 

Principal. 



REPORT OF PHYSICIAN. 



Mr. Alexander Johnson, Superintendent. 

Allow me to submit the following report of the Medical Depart- 
ment for the fiscal yeai* ending October 31, 1898. 

At present the general health of the children is good, also their 
apartments and surroimdings are in as perfect a sanitary state as 
may be obtained with the existing crowded condition. 

During the latter part of February and through March we were 
subjected to an epidemic of measles, which had been very prevalent 
in this vicinity for some time previous. Our cases numbered 133; 
they were cared for principally in the isolation hospital, which af- 
forded convenient accommodations. Fortunately no ill effects or 
sequelae followed in any except two epileptic cases, Mary Isaacs 
and Mars' Badger, who developed concurrent diseases and were sub- 
jects of hospital care until their death. In May there occurred six 
cases of epidemic parotitis. 

At the dispensary each day, are treated those cases which do not 
necessitate hospital care, the total number of dispensary treatments 
during the year being 11,594, of which 3,541 were of boys and 
8,053 were of girls, making an average of 9 boys and 22 girls 
treated daily. 

The number of different children received and cared for in the 
general hospital was 121 boys and 104 girls. The aggregate time 
of the boys in the hospital was 3,236 days, an average for each of 
26 days; of the girls was 3,830 days, an average for each of 36 days. 
In surgery the following is a list of the principal operations: 
One congenital cataract, by Dr. K. K, "Wheelock. 
One mastoiditis, by Dr. K. K. Wheelock. 
Tonsilotomy in four cases, by Dr. A. E. Bulson. 
Kemoval of post-nasal adenoids in several cases, by Dr. A. 

E. Bulson. 
One dislocation of elbow, with fracture of radius, reduced by 

Dr. M. F. Porter. 
One amputation of hand, by Dr. D. E. Howe. 

(24) 



25 

The remaining cases as follows were attended by your present 
resident physician: 

Fractured leg, 2 cases. 
Fractured ami, 2 cases. 
Fractured clavicle, 1 case. 
Dislocated radius, 1 case. 
Dislocated inferior maxilla, 1 case. 

Not to the sick alone, but to the well children also, are given care- 
ful attention and observation. iSTot infrequently the timely recogni- 
tion of an approaching illness or debility will make it possible to 
check its progTess by instituting the suitable prophylactic measures. 

Monthly weighings are talcen of each child separately, and to the 
more delicate oi^es, or those declining in health, a special diet is 
given in accordance with the requirements in the case. Twenty- 
one girls and twelve boys are now taking special diet. 

Owdng to the excellent daily care taken of the children's teeth 
throughout the year, the amount of work for the dental interne was 
much lessened. He examined and cleaned the teeth of all the chil- 
dren, placed 128 amalgam fillings, 41 cement fillings, 7 gutta- 
percha fillings, 2 gold fillings and extracted 167 teeth. 

Since entering upon my duties as physician to the institution^ 
July 1, 1898, we have made a careful scientific classification of our 
162 epileptic cases. This has required an extended amount of re- 
search into their histories and the physical, but especially mental, 
examination of each individual case. The accurate data thus ob- 
tained and formulized has brought to light many new and interest- 
ing features in many of the cases, and mil be valuable as reference 
and an insight to the proper care and medical attention of these 
unfortunates. 

Of the cases especially benefited by treatment, our attention is 
called to several. Two cases in particular, both being of idiopathic 
origin, the epilepsy manifesting itself in early life. Case No. 1, 
male, age 21 years, with an average of 8 epileptic attacks per month, 
each attack being preceded by the aura epilepsia procursiva, in 
which he would ran at great speed until the onset of the spasm 
proper. This patient was treated two years with the result that no 
epileptic manifestations have occurred for 2^ years. Case No. 2, 
male, age 21 years, with an average of 25 grandmal attacks per 
month, was treated 2^ years with the same result as in the above 



26 



case. The physical and mental condition of both has improved, and 
they are practically among the self-snpporting number. 

Mention should be made of the necessity for completion of the 
unfinished part of the general hospital. This would greatly en- 
liance our accommodations, affording ample room lor those requir- 
ing hospital care, and add very materially to the benefit of the in- 
creasing number of smaller, custodial children. 

In conclusion I wish to express my utmost ap})reciation for your 
most liberal provisions made to the medical department in every 
respect that would aid to the preservation of health, treatment of 
the sick and advancement of scientific investigations. 

The following is the mortality record for the year: 



Naub. 



Date of Death. 



Cause of Death. 



Complicating Disease. 



Cora Mabbitt 

WillFoasel 

Helen .Jones 

Alin:i Wilson 

Rullie McKinzie. 

Elmer Roach 

James Miller 

Emma Wiilmeyer 
Em ma Starrett . . 

Mary Isaacs 

Thos. Garrison . . 
Worth Acklcy . . . 

Frank Moore 

S rah Collins . . . . 

Rosa Pauley 

Sadie Blair 

Mary badger — 

Frank Peterson. . 



Nov. 
Dee. 



12, 1897. 
21,1897. 



Dec. 27, 1S97. 
Jan. 6,1898. 
Jan. 17,1895. 



Jan. 19, 

Feb. 7, 

Feb. r>. 

March 9, 

March 1:^, 

March 2<, 

March 2"), 

Apr.l 17. 

Juno 12. 

July 11. 

July 2f), 
August 15, 



1898. 
1898. 
1898 
1898 
1898. 
1898. 
189.-t. 
1898. 
189-I. 
1898. 
1898. 
1898. 



August 28,1898. 



Pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Tuberculoses of lungs, 

laryn.K and inte^tices. 

Epilepsy 

Chronic meningitis 

Chronic meningitis 



Pulmonary tuberculosis. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Epilepsy 

Pulm-'nary tuberculosis. 

Nepliri i.m 

Meningitis and nephritis 

Chronic meningitis 

CapilUry bronchitis 

Hydrocephalus 

Epilepsy 

Pulmonary tuberculosis. 
Meningeal tuberculosis . 

Pneumonia 



Hydrocephalus. 



Hydrocephalus. 
Epilepsy. 

E, ilepsy and hydro- 
cephalus. 
Epilepsy. 



Epilepsy. 
Epilepsy. 
Epi ep«y. 
Kpilcpsy. 
Organic heart lesion. 



Epilepsy. 

Epilepsy and low- 
rra<le idiocy. 

Epilepsy and low- 
grade idiocy. 



Yours very respectfully, 

CHAS. bock; 

Resident Physician. 



TABLE No. 1. 



Admitted During the Year. 



MOKTH. 


Male. 


Fem. 


Total. 


November, 1897 


1 
1 
1 


5 
1 
3 


6 


December. 1N97 


2 


January. 1898 


4 


February, 1898 




March. 1«98 


i 

3 

2 


2' 


1 


April, 1898 


3 


May. 1>^9S 


4 


June. 18^^8 




July. 1S98 , 


2 
2 

1 
1 


1 
1 

i' 


3 


Aupu>t,1898 


3 


September. 1898 


1 


October, 1898 


2 






Total 


15 


14 


29 







Discharged. During the Year. 

Males 

Females 

Total 

Died During the Year. 

Males 

Feujales 

Total 

Total number discharged and died 



10 



12 



Movement of Population. 



Male. Fem. 



Total. 



Number enrolled November 1, 1897 

Number admitted during the year 

Total number enrolled during the year . . 

Number d'.«ch.nrged during the year 

Number died during the year 

Total 

Number enrolled Octob"r 31, 1898 

Number absent temporarily October 31, 1898 . 

Number actually present October 31, 1898 



291 
15 



.306 

6 
8 

14 

292 
15 

277 



279 
14 



293 



277 
9 



268 



570 
29 



599 



30 



569 
24 



545 



2S 



TABLE No. 2. 



Inmates by Counties 



COUSTIKS. 




B 
1^ 


"3 


H 




S 


COI'NTIKS. 




■2 
"3 

a 


3 



H 


i 


Adams 


2 

23 

2 

1 

1 

1 


5 
13 
2 

2 
2 
5 
6 
3 

1 
4 


7 

36 
4 

1 
4 

3 
2 
7 
8 
5 

4 
4 


5 

15 
5 
3 
2 

a 

1 
3 
7 

7 

7 
6 
5 
6 
5 

4 
fi 

7 
5 
9 

3 
7 
4 
4 
4 

6 
7 
6 
6 
4 

5 
5 
5 
6 
6 

6 
3 
6 
6 
3 

5 
6 
7 

4 

5 
8 
5 
8 




28 
2 
2 
3 
2 

i 

2 


25 
2 
2 
5 

6 

2 
1 
3 


.53 
4 
4 
8 
2 

9 
3 
2 
4 
2 


32 


Allen 




5 


Bartholomew 




3 






6 






4 




Montgomery 


6 




4 


Carroll 


2 
2 

2 

3 




2 


Cass 


Niible 


5 


Clark 


Ohio . ... 


1 


Clay 




3 


Clinton 




2 
4 


2 
....„ 

2 
2 
3 
2 
3 

■3' 
5 

1 
2 
3 
2 
1 

4 

...... 

6 


4 
4 

1 
4 

4 
4 

5 
3 
6 

3 
6 
8 

1 
5 

1 
4 
6 
3 
3 

11 
1 
4 

13 


3 






Parke 


5 


Daviess 


2 
5 

1 
6 
4 

1 
8 

1 
3 
3 

1 
2 

3 
2 
4 

7 
3 

3 
3 
9 
1 
4 

4 

1 
4 
3 
3 

2 
1 
4 


...... 

5 

I 
1 
1 
6 

1 
4 
3 
1 

2 

1 

2 
3 
5 
3 

1 
5 
9 
5 
10 

2 

1 
2 

4 
5 

4 
3 
8 
1 

1 
6 

""s 


2 
6 

6 
7 
5 
2 
14 

2 
7 
6 
2 
4 

4 
4 

7 

12 

6 

4 

8 
18 

C 
14 

6 
2 
6 
7 
8 

6 

4 

12 

1 

4 

12 

1 

14 


Perry 


4 




Pike :... 


4 

2 

2 
2 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 
1 
2 


4 


Decatur 


Porter 


4 


Dekalb 




5 






3 


DuboiR 




.») 


Elkhart 




6 


Fayette 


Ripley 

Rush 


4 


Floyd 


4 


Fountain 


St. Joseph 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spe' cer 


10 


Franklin 


2 


Fulton 


6 


Gibson 


5 




Starke 


2 
3 

1 
2 

7 
1 
3 
7 


2 




3 


Hamilton 




5 




Switzerland 


3 


Parricon 


8 


Hendricks 




4 






2 


Howard 

Huntington 


Vanderburgh 


14 

3 






6 

4 


4 

3 
2 
4 
3 

3 

4 
1 


10 
7 
2 

8 
7 

12 
7 
3 
4 


12 


Jasper 


Wabash . 


6 


Jay 




3 


JefTerson 


Warrick 


4 

4 

9 
3 
2 
4 


5 


Jennings 


Washington 


4 




9 




Wells 

White 


5 


Kosciusko 


4 




Whitley . 


4 




3 
6 

1 
6 


Total 




Lake 


292 


277 


569 




Lap'Tte 










Idadison 









29 



TABLE No. 3. 



Applications. 



Counties. 


Applications Pending Not 
Accepted. 


Applications Accepted and Not In. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Grand 
Total. 




2 
3 

2 
1 

2 

3 

1 
2 
2 


1 
4 


3 

7 
2 
1 

2 

3 

3 
3 
3 










Allen 


3 
2 




3 

2 
















Blackford 
























Ciirroll 


2 
1 

1 










Ciiss 










ClHy -.. 












1 




1 




Clark 


1 

1 




1 
1 




Clinton 


— •, 












1 
1 




1 
1 






2 
2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 


1 


2 

....^...\ 

1 
1 
1 

} 


3 
2 

1 
3 
2 
5 
1 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

3 
8 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

2 

1 

5 

16 

1 
3 
2 
4 
4 






Lekalb 














Elkhart 










Floyd 










Fountain 












1 

1 




1 
1 




« 








1 
1 








1 
1 




1 
1 








Hendricks 








Henry 


3 
5 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 










Howard 


3 


1 

1 




1 
1 










•Ja.sper 


2 






.lay 


1 








Jefferson 


1 








Jennings 














2 

1 




2 
1 












Knox 


2 








Lae'ange 


1 








Lake 


2 

] 

3 

13 

1 
3 
2 
4 
3 








Lapurte 










Madison 


2 
3 


i 2 
3 




2 




Marion 




3 




Marshall 






Mnrtin 
















1 2 




2 




Monroe 








Montgomery 


i 


' i 




1 





30 



APPLICATIONS-Continued. 



CoUHTIBB. 


Applications Pending Not 
Accepted. 


Applications Accepted and Not In. 




Boys. 


Qirls. 


Total, 


Boys. 


Girls. 


ToUl. 


Orand 
ToUl. 




2 




2 










Newton .■. 




1 




1 




Noble 


1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
3 




1 
3 
2 

1 
1 
6 






Owen 


i 

1 










Pike 










Perrp 










Porter 












Randolph 


3 










Runh 


i 

2 




1 
2 




8cott 




1 


1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
6 

1 
4 
6 
3 
2 

3 
4 
3 
2 

1 






Shelby 


1 
1 
1 
2 
6 






Starke 










St. Joseph 












Ste'iben 




1 

1 




1 
1 












Uni«n 


1 

i' 






4 
5 
3 

1 

2 
3 

1 
2 


3 




3 




Vigo 






W,iba.«h 


1 




1 




Warrick 


1 

1 
1 

2 






Washington 










Wavne 










Wells 


2 




2 




Whire 






Whitley 


] 


















37 




Total 


122 


48 


170 


37 




20T 



FINANCIAL. 



EXHIBIT No. 1. 



Consolidated Statement of Revenues and Disbursenunts for the 
Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



REVENUES. 



MAINTBNANCK. 

Regular approprintion 

[D<lu.<trial proceeds deposited with State Treasurer and credited to 

M 111 rite nance Fund . 

Expenditures as per Exhibit No. 2 



REPAIR FUND. 



Appropriation 

Expenditures as per Exhibit No. H. 



IMPOVEMKST l-'UXD. 



Appropriation 

Expenditures as per Exhibit No. 4. 



TUITION FUND. 



Receipt? durinsc fiscal yenr ending October 31, 1898. 
Expenditures as per Exiiibii No. 5 



SPANGLRE FUND. 



Beque.at of Lewis Spansrler 

Expenditures as per Exhibit No. 6. 
Balance on hand 



Total 



875,000 00 
697 10 

2,500 00 

2,500 00 

3,141 91 

1,0 00 



884,839 Ul 



875,697 10 



2,500 CO 



2,500 00 



3,141 91 



989 44 
JO 56 



884,8.39 01 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



From Maintenance Fund . 

From Repair Fund 

From linpniveraent Fund. 

From Tuition Fund 

From Spangler Fund 



Total 



875.697 10 

25110 00 

2,5011 (X) 

3,141 91 

989 44 

884328 45 



(31) 



32 



EXHIBIT No. 2. 



Jiecapitida'ion by Vouchers of ErpevdHures from Mnintenavce 
Fund for Fiscal Ytar Ending October SI, 18V8. 



Datk. 



To Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



Dee. 2,1897 



Dec. 2, 1897 



Alexanfler .Johnson, Supt. .. 

Am. Launilry Maeh.Co 

B;>lloii l(a>ket Co 

S. Bash A' Co 

W. V Bohling. Tashier 

\Vm. n. Burlord 

G. E. Hurley A- Co 

1). F. Coin pa ret 

(iuy C'liiklin 

(Jeo. UeWald ACo 

W . M . Eg^e man 

Eric Uil Worhs 

C. .M.FIinn A- Bro 

Ft. Wayne Has Co 

M. Frank A- Co 

S Freiburger A' Bro 

(ilutting. Bauer A Uartnett. 

Ilolfman Bros 

Home Telei'hone Co 

.Jenkins liros 

\ym. Kanugh 

Kinjran A Co., Ltd 

Kit.-^eliiian Bros 

Dr. W. Langtry, V.S 

W.R. Litile 

.Mayfli.wer .Mills 

Me^er Br<is. A Co 

Moellering Bros. AM 

Mnssinan . Yarnelle A Co 

rharles F. Muhler A Son .... 

F. P..\..on A Co 

0. \\ Parker 

J C. I'eltier 

A. H Peifecr A Co 

John N. Pleiffer 

Pleiffer ASchl-iUer 

.1. (t. Plowman 

Root ACo 

Sandhop, Fritssch A Co 

Sfhrader A Wil.-on 

Peavcy Hani ■ a'C <'o 

Seymour Woiden Factory... 

Sieinon A Bro 

John Sione 

Southern Fi'jh Co 

SwiCt A f'o 

Armour Soan Works 

Bradford Belling Co 

Daily Fish .Market 

Die'her Lumber <'o 

•■ t. Wayne .Artifi.-ial Ice Co . 

Gros.x Cerea I • 'o 

E. Howard Wat h and C.Co 

J L. .M(.ti Iron Works 

C. A. Strelineer Co 

Thomas Tuflinger 

Tiirney A .lone." Co 

Wavne Baking Co 

P.P. Wilt A <o 

C.B.W..nd worth ACo 

L.C.Zollinger A Bro 



Salaries and wages 

Laundry machinery 

Laundry ba>kets 

Fruits, vegetables, etc 

Freight on coal 

Printing and stationery 

(iroceries, etc 

Eggs and poultry 

Tuning and repairing pianos 

I try goods, etc 

One cow and calf 

Oils 

Horse shoeing 

Gas luel and coal tar 

l)ry goods, etc 

Leather and tindings 

In urance 

Lumber 

Telephone rental 

Radiator keys 

Farm implements 

Butierine 

Rep irs lor fence machine.. 

Services '. 

Potatoes 

Flour and feed 

Paint--, oils. drug-" 

lirocerie-'. etc 

Hardware 

Land piaster 

Inspe<-ting meters 

Farm rent 

llndertaking 

(iMceries, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Hardware 

One endoscope, appliances. . 

Dry goods, etc 

Clinical therm meter.* 

Insurance 

Tinware and repairs 

Bl nkets and flannels 

School supplies 

Oats 

Fish 

Fresh meats and lard 

Chip sonp 

Electric lamps 

Oysters 

Lumber 

Ice 

Cereal coffee 

Clock dials 

Closet hoppers 

Hoisting crane 

One cow 

Lump coal 

Pretzels 

Tea 

Dentists' supplies 

Wagon repairs 



33 



EXHIBIT No. 2-Continu«d. 



Datk. 



No. To Whom Paid. 



Jan. 3, 1898... 


<)2 




(W 




<U 




65 




m 




«7 




m 




69 




70 




71 




72 




7'i 




74 












76 




77 




78 




79 




80 




«1 




82 




83 




84 




R5 




86 




87 




88 




89 




90 




91 




92 




93 




94 




95 




96 




97 




98 




99 




100 




101 




102 




103 




104 




];)5 


• 


1(6 




107 




108 




109 




110 




111 




112 




113 




114 




115 




IIH 




117 




118 




119 




120 




121 




122 




123 




124 




125 




126 




127 




128 




129 




130 




131 




132 


Feb. 1,1898... 


133 




134 



C'hariicter of Cliiim. 



Amount. 



Alexander Johnson, Supt. , 

E. A. K.Hiukett 

JohnM.Spann 

Mrs. Mary it. Harper 

Alexander .Johnson 

Mrs. E. A. .John.fon 

E. II. Johnston 

Amer. Laundry Mach. Co. . 

Armour Packing Co 

S. Bash & Co 

Bee Hive •... 

Joe W. Bell 

Bloominffdale Mills 

VV.F. Bohling 

Wm.B.Burford 

G. E.Bursley A-Co 

Chicago Rubber Clo. Co 

D. F. Couiparet 

Geo.DeWald&Co 

Dreier & Bro 

T. E. Ellison 

Fisher Bros 

Ft. Wayne Gas Co 

S. Freiburger A' Bro 

General Electric Co 

C. L. Greeno 

E.R.Griswold 

H' ffman Bros 

S.W.Hull 

M.F Kaag 

Karn Bros 

Sol.Kell 

Kingan A: Co., Limited 

Henry Kroemer 

Alex. Laurentz 

Mayflower Mills 

Wm. J.Mathc^on & Co 

Meyer Brcs. A: Co 

Moellering Bros. &Mi'l.... 
Mo^isman, Yarnelle & Cd . . . 

Neireitcr A; Gurapper 

W. A. Olmsted 

AV. D.Page, P. M 

A. H. Perfect & Co 

Geo.L. Pfeitfer 

PfeiflFerA- Schlatter 

James A. Reed 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Seymour Woolen Factory'.. 

Clark L.Sible 

Siemon & Bro 

Southern Fish Co 

H.T.Stapleford 

B. A. Stevens 

Swift ct Co 

Armour Soap Works 

Bradford Belting Co 

The Buiek-Sherwood Co . . . 

The Philip Carey Co 

The Daily Fish Market 

Diether L'lnilier Co 

D. N. Foster Furniture Co . 

(iross Creal Co i Cereal coffee. 

Indiana Inst, for Blind 
The Maltine Mfg. Co ... 

Pape Furniture Co 

Turney A' Jones Co 

John Van Range Co 

Wayne Baking Co 

James Wilding 

L. C. Zollinger A* Bro 

Alex. Johnson, Supt 

W.D. Allen A Co 



Salaries and wages 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Superintendent. . 

Salary as Matron 

Salary as Principal 

Miingle felt 

Butterine 

Fresh fruits 

Dry goods, etc 

Horse and wagon covers ... 

Flour and feed 

Freight on coal 

I'rinting and statioi ery. ... 

(Groceries, etc 

Rubber blmkets 

Eggs and poultry 

Dry goods 

Painter's supplies 

Gluten meal 

Toilet paper 

Gas fuel 

Leather, etc 

Eleftrical supplies 

Uiiholstcrer's supplies 

One cow 

Lumber and ashes 

Paper hanging 

Crockery 

Butterine 

Oats 

Butterine 

One cow 

One cow nnd calf 

Flour and feed 

Laundry blue 

Drugs, oils, etc 

(iroceries 

Hardware 

Insurance • 

Slate l)lackboards 

Stamped envelopes 

Groceries, etc 

One cow and calf 

Hardware, sewing machine 

Oats 

Tinware, utensils, etc 

Flannels 

Ore cow and calf 

School supplies 

Fish 

One cow 

Butchers' tools 

Fresh meats 

Chipped soap 

Hose, packing, etc 

Copper tank linings 

Pipe covering 

Oysters 

Lumber 

Couch 



Brooms 

Maltine preparations. 

Furniture 

Coal _. 

Kettle repairs 

Pretzels 

Coal 

One wagon gear 

Salaries and wages ... 
Door mats 



3 — Feeble Minded. 






EXHIBIT No. 2-Continued. 



Date. 



No. 



Feb. 1,1898 



To Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



March 1,1898. 



135 

i:i6 

137 I 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

143 

114 

145 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

153 

154 \ 

155 

156 

157 , 

158 , 
1.59 
160 . 
161 
162 
163 
164 
1&5 
166 I 
167 

168 t 

169 i 

170 i 

171 I 

172 I 
173 
174 
175 1 
176 
177 ! 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 j 
18:? I 
184 

185 I 

186 1 
187 
188 i 
189 

190 ! 

191 ! 
192 
l^Z 
194 
1"5 
196 
1H7 
198 
199 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
2*) 
207 I 



Armour Packing Co 

S.Bash JL' Co 

Bee Hive Dry Good.s House 

Bloomin(;ilalc Mills 

Martin Hruiek 

Wm.B. Burford 

(}. E. Burslcy i Co 

D. F. Coniparet 

Geo DeWald & Co 

Dreier & Bro 

Electric Appliance Co.- 

Erie Oil Co i 

Ft. Wayne Gas Co ! 

Ft. Wayne Urpan Co 

Freiburprer & Bro : 

A. Hatterslcy &. Son.'^ j 

Henderson tt Co | 

Home Telei'hone Co 

M.F.Kaag 

Geo. H Kuntz 

Langr. Evans Jc Co 

Dr. W. Langtry, V. S ; 

Lussky. Payn & Co 

Mayflower Mills ! 

Meyer Bros. A' Co 

Moellering Bros, it M 

Mossman, Yarnelle & Co 

Chas. F..Muhler & Son 

Chas. O'Brien ! 

J.C.Peltier 

A. H. Perfect* Co 

Preifi'er& Schlatter 

Rider-Ericsson Eng. Co 

Root <fc Co 

C. Schiefer & Son 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon & Bro 

Southern Fish Co 

Stod <ard Oil and Com. Co. . . 

Swift Jj Co , 

Armour Soap Works 

Bash Packing Co 

Daily Fish Market 

Diamond Pottery Co 

Diethcr Lumber Co 

Lull A Skinner Co • 

The Pape Furniture Co 

Strass Nl fg. Co 

Chas. A. Strelingcr Co 

Turney & Jone.« Co 

C. L. Tracy. Cashier 

C. Tresselt Jc Sons i 

James Wilding^ \ 

Alex. Johnson, Supt i 

Armour Packing Co ' 

5. Bash &Co I 

Becker Pai)er Co 1 

Hee Hive Dry Goods House .| 

A. Blume ; 

W. F. Bohling. Cashier ' 

Wm.B. Burlord 

6. E. Bur.-lcy & Co 

Wesley Caritenter 

Chicago Rubber Clothing Col 

D. F. (Niinparet 

Dean Bros 

Geo.DeWald & Co 

E. E. Dic'-inson & Co 

Dreier <k Bro 

Fisher Bros 

W.O. Ford 

Ft. Wayne Gas Co 

Ft. Wayne Warehouse Co 



Butterine 

Fresh fruits, etc 

Dry goods, etc 

Flour and feed 

Corn 

Printing and stationery. . 

Groceries 

Eggs and poultry 

Dry goods, etc 

Paints and oils 

Electric supplies 

ParafiBne 

lias fuel 

Horn repairs 

Shoe findings 

Eng'r's and elec. supplies 

Band uniforms 

Telephone rental 

Glassware and crockery. . 

Harness and repairs 

Toweling 

Services 

Casters " 

Flour and feed 

Drug-, oils, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Hardware 

Land plaster 

Oats 

Undertaking 

Grocerie.* 

Tools, hardware, etc 

Heaters, etc 

Dry goods 

Rubber boots 

'fin ware, repairs, etc 

Shade goods, etc 

Fish 

Boiler compound 

Fre.-^h meals , 

Chipped soap 

Fresh meat 

Oysters and fish , 

Flower pots 

Lumber 

Heater 

Chairs 

Jeans pants 

Engineer's supplies ...... 

Coal 

Freight on coal 

Bran 

Coal 

Salaries and wages 

Butterine , 

Fresh fruits 

Paper 

Dry goods 

Oats and corn 

Switching coal cars 

Printing, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Live chickens 

Rubber sheet? 

Eggs and poultry 

Pump repairs 

Dry goods, etc 

Witch ha/.cl 

Paints and oils , 

Toilet paper 

Making pants 

Gas fuel 

Flour and feed 



Amount. 



EXHIBIT No. 2-Continued. 



Date. 


No. 


To Wluim Paid. 


Character of Claim. 

1 


Amount. 


March 1, 1898. 


208 
209 
210 
211 
212 

2i;? 

214 
215 
21() 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
2'?2 
233 
234 
2S5 
236 
237 
238 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
24S 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 


S. FreiburKer & Bro 


Leather ami findings 


8108 .39 
25 00 




Joseph Fricke 






16 59 




A. Ilatterslcy &: Son» 

Indianiipolis Varnish Co ... 
M. F.Kaag 


Plumbers' supplies 


28 9t) 




\^arnish 


25 73 






5 40 






35 0) 








1.50 00 




Mayflower Mills 




92 50 




Meyer Bro.«. & Co 

Moelleringr Bro.s.A M 

Peck Bros. & Co 

J.C.Peltier 

A. II. Perfect .t Co 

John X. Pleiffer 

Pfeiffer it Schlatter 




67 34 




Groceries, etc 


280 -^9 




Plumbers' supplies 


18 1)0 






27 64 






102 62 




Canned fruits, etc 


6 36 






80 57 




Phelps, Dodge A Pal. Co 

llichards A Co 

Rider-Ericsson Ensr. Co 

C. H. Smith 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Sieinon A" Bro 

Swift ct Co 

The Bash Packing Co 

The Cudahv Packing Co 

The Daily Fish Market 

The Uiether Lumber Co 

The D.N. FosterFiirn.Co. . 

The Gross Cerral Co 

The Chas. A . Strelinger Co . . 
C. Tresselt & Sons 




16 38 




Laboratory supplies.... 


.38 .35 




Oil 






Harness oil 

Tinwiire, repairs, etc 


5 25 
48 23 
16 30 






213 26 




Meats 


119 .50 




Meats 


79 58 






18 90 




Lumber 

Carpets and mirrors 


53 28 
24 97 






8 12 






7 52 




Bran 


20 00 




A. R. Walter 

James Wilding 

F. P. Wilt ctCo 

Geo.H. Wilson k Sons 

Alex. Johnson. Supt 

Mrs. Mary R. Harper 

John M.Spann 

Alex. Johnson 

Mrs. E. A. Johnson 

E. R.Johnston 

Adams Express Co 

Dr. Chas. Bock 

Armour Packing Co 

S. Bash A' Co 


Eggs, poultry and syrup 

Coal 


21 55 
21 80 




Tea 


20 04 


Aprilil,lS98 . 


Tinware 

Salaries and wages 

Salary as Trustee 


8 20 

2,747 41 

75 00 






75 00 




Salary as Superintendent . . . 
Sol iry as Matron 


375 00 
125 00 




Salary as Principal 

Expressage 

Salary as Interne, 6 months. 
Butterine 


187 50 
27 90 

150 00 
62 00 




Fruits and seeds 

Oats 


25 32 
23 84 




A. Hlume 

AV.F.Bohling, Cashier 

AVm. BBurford 

U.E. B>irsley ACo 

City Carriage Works 

D. F. Comparet 

Geo DeWMld A Co 

Dreier & Bro 






330 29 




Printing 


7 85 






287 21 






9 35 






10 30 




Dry goods, etc 


166 03 




Paints, oils, etc 

Paraffine 

Maple syrup 


83 61 




Erie Oil Works 


14 59 




M. W. Fitch 

Ft. Wayne -as Co 

Ft. Wayne Warehouse Co... 

S. Freiburger A: Bro 

Friedman .Mfg. Co 

Henrv Greiner 

Haller. Winch & Co 

A. Hattersley & Sons 

Peter Henderson & Co 

A. L. Ide A" Sons 

Flovd .Johnson 


30 00 




Gas fuel 


127 09 






72 75 




Leather and findings 

Butterine 


32 as 

66 98 




Straw 


9 00 




Moving trees 

Phi in hers' supplies 


50 00 
10 12 




Garden seed-i 


45 40 






29 60 




H. Kohnstamm <fe Co 

H. W Kryder 

Geo. H. Kuntz 

A. McDaniels 


Caustic soda 

Clover hay 

Harness repairs 


19 01 

18 36 

7 10 






15 20 




Wm. J.Matheson & Co 

Mayflower Mills 

Meyer Bros. A Co 

Moellering Bros. & Millard . 


Laundrv blue 


12 00 




Flour and feed 


251 .39 




Drugs, paints and oil 

Groceries 


106 82 
145 45 



3C 



EXHIBIT No. 2-(;ontinued. 



No. 



To Wli m Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



281 

282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
29.-) 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
.301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
3lifi 
307 
308 
3(19 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
31fi 
.317 
318 
319 
320 
.321 
.322 
323 
.324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
.329 
330 
.331 
332 
.333 
.3.34 
335 
.3;i<> 
:}37 
:«8 

339 
MO 
341 
S12 

ai3 

344 
»15 
:M6 
^7 
.348 
.349 
.^50 

a5i 

.352 
353 



Mossmau, Yarnelie <& Go 

Henry C.Paul 

J. C. Peters ife Co 

Frank Pfeiffer 

Pfeiffer & Schlatter 

A. Racine 

Root & Co 

Sandhop. Fritsch & Co 

C. Sehiefer & Son 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon & J5ro 

Southern Fish Co 

Stoddard Oil & Com. Co 

Swift & Co 

Armour Soap Works 

Daily Fish Market 

The D. N. Foster F'urn. Co . 

Frank Dry Goods Co 

Chas. A. .Stre linger Co 

Turney ik .Jones Co 

C. Tresselt & Sons 

A. R.Walter 

Whitall.Tatum & Co 

Paul E. Wolf 

L. C. Zi)l linger & Bro 

Alex. Johnson, Supt 

W. D.Allen A: Co 

S. Bash & Co 

Joe W. Bell 

(}. E. Bursley & Co 

City Carriage Works 

D. F. Comparet 

W. F. DeVilbiss 

Geo. DeWald & Co 

Dreier & Bro 

Electric Appliance Co 

T. E. Ellison 

Ft. Wayne Found. & M. Co. 

Ft. Wayne Gas Co 

Ft. Wayne Warehouse Co. . 

Sam M . Foster 

Frank Dry(ioodsCo 

S. Frcihurger & Bro 

Friedman M'f 'gCo 

C. L. Greeno 

Home Telephone Co. 

E.F. Houghton & Co 

Jenney Elec. E. and P. Co . 

FI . Kohnstamm i Co 

(•eo. 11. Kunt/, 

Lang, Evans & Co 

Mayflower Mills 

Meyer Bros. A' Co 

Chas. Mills 

Mocllcring Bros, k Millard 
Mossman, Yarnelle <fe Co... 

Oliver P. Parker 

A. H. Perfect A- Co 

J.C. Peters \- Co 

John N. Pfeiffer 

Pfeiffer & Schlatter 

Schrader A' Wilson 

John H. Schwieters 

Seavey Ilardwa e Co 

Southern Fish Co 

Swift & Co 

Armour Soap Works 

Bradford Belting Co 

Cudahy Packing Co 

Rurode Dry Goods Co 

C.Tressclt & Sons 

Trov Steam Laundry 

A.R. Walters 



Hardware 

.36 head of cattle 

Shovels, rakes, etc 

One cow 

Hardware 

Horse collars 

Dry goods, etc 

Th rmometers, clin'cal ... 

Rubber boots 

Hardware, tinware, etc 

School supplies 

Fish 

Boiler compound 

Meats 

Chipped soap 

Oysters 

Rugs ., 

Dry goods 

Engine packing, etc 

Coal 

Bran 

Eggs and poultry 

Specimen jars 

Mattress makers' supplies 

Wagon and repairs 

Salaries and w ges 

Hose and couplings 

Seeds, fruit, etc 

Lap robes and rubber bl'k'ts 

(Groceries, etc 

Carriage repairs 

Eggs and poultry 

Fruit trees and hedge plants 

Dry goods, etc 

Paints and oils 

Electrical supplies 

(iluten meal 

Bolts 

(ias fuel 

Flour 

Farm rent 

Dry goods 

Leather and findings 

Butterine 

Husks and twine 

Telephone rental 

Odorless disinfectant 

Electric light 

Soai) and starch 

Harness supplies 

Table linen 

Flour 

Drugs, oils, etc 

Straw 

(Jroceries, etc 

Hardware 

Farm rent 

Groceries, etc 

Tools, etc 

Groceries 

Hardware, etc 

Insurance 

Bread 

T nware, etc 

Fish 

Fresh meats 

Chipped soap 

Garden hose 

Fresh meats 

Carpets, etc 

Bran 

Soap 

Eggs and poultry 



n2 37 
8.37 :v> 

19 68 
29 99 
43 18 
13 .50 
13 88 

7 00 
6 98 

10 45 

20 05 
22 50 
49 80 

370 21 
68 97 

8 10 
13 95 

52 95 

26 12 
248 54 

17 19 

29 40 

22 59 

550 

53 00 
2,54,3 73 

48 00 
60 14 

8 67 
93 97 
13 49 

11 30 
210 99 
101 42 

9» 49 

607 

90 00 

6 00 

125 3:i 

12 88 
275 00 

33 91^ 

126 2.i 
100 80 

51 50 

9 00 

52 50 
46 (5 
15 18 

9 10 

55 00 

206 01 

68 38 

10 46 
105 26 

7 10 
2.50 00 
305 42 

11 65 
6 a5 

64 74 

5 62 

142 20 

10 90 

27 40 
297 80 

84 74 
62 86 

85 02 
15 20 

69 97 
825 

66 a5 



37 



EXHIBIT No. 2-ContiniUMl. 



Date. 



No. 



To Whom Paid. 



Cliaracter of Cluiin. 



Amount. 



May 2, 1898 



May 31, 1898, 



June 30,1898. 



354 
3ft.5 
35ti 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
368 
369 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
3^-5 
396 
.397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
408 
409 
411 1 
411 
412 
413 
414 
415 
416 
417 
418 
419 
420 
421 
422 
423 
424 
425 
426 



Wayne Baking Co 

Wayne Works 

Geo. W WiLson & Sons . . . . 

Alex. Johnson, Supt 

Albert Bacon 

S. Bash A' Co 

Ba.«s Foundry and Mach. Co 

Bayne it Davison 

John Bruick 

Wm.B. Burford 

G K. IJursley ik Co 

Centlivre Brewing Co 

Louis Christman 

City Carriage Works 

D. F.Comparet 

Cudahy Packing Co 

Dean Bros 

Ueo. DeWald & Co 

Dreier & Bro 

Electric Appliance Co 

Ft. Wayne Gas Co 

Ft. Wayne R. and P. Co.... 

Frank Dry ( Joods Co 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

P. Henderson & Co 

Wm. Kaough 

H. Kohnstamm & Co 

Mayflower Mills 

Meyer Bros*, it Co 

Moellering Bros. & M 

Mossman, Yarnelle it Co... 

Pape Furniture Co 

J.C.Peltier 

A.H. Perfect & Co 

J.C. Peters it Co 

Pfeiffer & Schlatter 

John Poeppel 

Pottlitzer Bros 

E.R .=enthal 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon & Bro 

B. A. Stevens 

C. A. S relinger & Co 

Swift & Co 

C.Trcsselt it Sons 

A. R.Walter 

Wayne Baking Co 

Alex. Johnson, Supt 

Alex. Johnson 

Mrs. E. A. Johnson 

Mrs Mnry R. Harper 

John M. Spann 

E. A.K. Hackett 

Armour Packing Co 

S.Bash it Co 

AVm. B. Burford 

G.E. Bursley &Co 

D. F. Comparet 

Cudahy Pa^-king Co 

.J. P. Davies 

Geo.DeWald&Co 

Dreier it Bro 

Elect ic Appliance Co 

Erie Oil Co 

D. N. Foster Furniture Co 

Ft. Wayne (xas Co 

Frank Dr>' Goods Co 

S. Freiburger it Bro 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

Jenney Elect ic Co 

Glucose Sugar Refining Co 

A. Hattersley & Sons 

M. F. Kaag 



Crackers, etc 

Seat castings 

Milk cans 

Salaries and wages 

Corn 

Seeds and fruits 

Castings 

Coffee 

Oats 

Printing and stationery 

Groceries, etc 

Malt 

Oats 

Buggy repairs 

Eggs and poultry 

Meats and lard 

Pump repairs 

Dry goods 

Paints, oils, etc 

Electrical supplies 

Gas fuel 

Felt roofing 

Dry goods, etc 

Butterine 

Seeds and bulbs 

Attachment for cornplanter 

Mangle covering 

P'lour, e c 

Drugs, etc 

(groceries, etc 

Hardware 

Iron bed 

Undertaking 

Groceries 

Farm tools 

Hardware, etc 

Corn 

Fruit 

Wages 

Tinware, etc. 

School supplies 

Steam kettle _ 

Engineer's supplies 

Meats 

Bran and middlings 

Eggs and poultry 

Wafers and pretzels 

Salaries and wages 

Salary as Superintendent. . . 

Salary a^^ Matron 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Trustee 

Butterine 

Seeds 

Printing and stationery 

Groceries, etc 

Egg.< and poultry 

Fresh meats 

Chipped soap 

Dry goods, etc 

Paints, oils, etc 

Electric supplies 

ParaiBne 

Dresser 

Gas fuel 

Dry goods, etc 

Leather, etc 

Butterine — 

Electric supplies 

Gluten meal..... 

Plumbers' supplies 

Crockery 



38 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



Datk. 



No. 



To Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



427 

428 

429 

430 

431 

432 

4a3 

4^ 

4:36 

436 

437 

4.38 

439 

440 

441 

442 

443 

444 

445 

446 

447 

448 

449 

4=0 

4S1 

452 

453 

454 

455 

456 

457 

458 

459 

460 

461 

462 

463 

464 

46.5 

466 

467 

468 

469 

470 

471 I 

472 

473 

474 

475 

476 

4T7 

478 

479 

480 

481 

482 

483 

484 

485 

486 

487 

488 

489 

490 

491 

492 

493 

494 

495 

496 

497 

498 

499 



Wm.Kaough 

Nelson Leonard 

Mrs. Loma.« 

May flower .Mills 

^leyer Bros. & Co 

M' clleri g Bros. & M 

Muhler Sc Co 

I'eter Nuss-baum 

R. 8. Patterson 

A. H. Perfect i Co 

Pfeiflfer & Schlatter 

Chas. Pichon 

Pi.\lcy & Co 

Rider-Ericsson Co 

Rurode Dry (Joods Co 

8andhop, Fritsch & Co 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon k Bro 

Louis Soest 

Standard Oil Co 

Stoddard Oil and Comp.Co. 

C. A . Strelinger Co 

Swift & Co 

C. Tresselt & Sons 

A.R Walter 

Wayne Baking Co 

F. P. Wilt &Co 

C.B.Wood worth & Co 

E. Gilmartin 

(iross Cereal Co 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . 

F. W. Antrup 

Armour Packing Co 

Wm. N. Armstrong k Co... 

Assyrian Asphalt Co 

S. Bash & Co 

Bolyard & Rowe 

Wm.B.Burford 

G. E.Bursley A' Co 

J. P.Davies 

Geo.DeWald & Co 

Dreier it Bro 

Ft. Wayne (ias Co 

Frank Dry Goods Co 

(ierdinp & Aumann Bros.. . 

A. Hattersley & Sons 

W. D. Henilerson „ .. . 

Hercules Float Works 

Hoosier .Mfg. Co 

M. 1-". Kaag 

.Mayflower Mills 

Meyer Bros. & Co 

Moellering Bros. & M 

Mossman. Yarnelle & Co... 

A.H.Pe-fcct & Co 

Pfeiffcr A- Schlatter 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon & Bro 

C. Tresselt A- Sons 

John Van Range Co 

A.R.Walter 

Wayne Baking Co 

Alexander .John.oon, Supt. . 

Armour Packing Co 

E. M. Bakes A Co 

S. Bash A Co 

Wm. B. Burford 

<;. E. Burslcy ACo 

S. C. Chapman 

Cudahv PackingCo 

Geo.DeWald ACo 

Diether Lumber Co 

Dreier & Bro 



Mower and hay rack.> 

Dump cart 

Hay 

Flour and feed 

Drugs, oils, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Lime and flue lining 

Malt 

Uniform caps, etc 

(Troceries, etc 

Hardware 

Oats 

Coats 

Encrine oil 

Dry goods, etc 

Thermometers 

Tin n are 

School supplies, etc 

Services 

Engine oil 

Boiler compound 

Engineer's supplies 

Meats 

Bran 

Egg.«, poultry and berries , 

Crackers, etc 

Tea 

Dental supplies. 

Lumber 

Cereal coffee 

Salarie.-! and wages 

Clover hay 

Butterine 

Rubber sheeting 

Asphalt and paint 

Vegetables, seeds, etc 

Ice cream 

Printing and stationery. . . 

Groceries 

Chipped soap 

Dry goods 

Paints, oils, etc 

Gas fuel 

Dry goods, etc 

Rooflng 

Plumbers' supplies 

Oats and straw 

Copper floats. 

Soap 

Crockery 

Flour, etc 

Drugs, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Hardware 

Groceries 

Hardware 

Tinware, etc 

Shade goods, etc 

Bran 

Retinning kettle 

Berries and eggs 

Pretzels ;.. 

Salaries and wages 

Butterine 

Land plaster 

Potatoes and fertilizer 

Printing and stationery.. 

Groceries, etc 

Oats, etc 

Fresh meats 

Dry goods, etc 

Lumber 

Paints, oils, etc 



Amount. 



119 50 
12 00 
19 58 

259 78 

60 95 
96 41 
12 18 

12 50 
72 50 

136 60 

61 99 
31 38 

254 00 
1100 
28 33 

7 00 
28 96 

14 45 

15 00 
9 18 

52 Ti 

13 86 
11 18 
60 84 

103 01 

8 79 
858 
6 40 

437 57 

823 

2,312 72 

75 00 

142 40 

8 50 

13 00 

22 54 

18 00 

46 70 
82 98 
74 00 

118 09 
45.30 

244 23 
57 90 

129 87 

10 18 

19 65 

47 25 
31 73 

53 26 
229 21 

.39 45 
170 70 

13 96 
206 65 
118 81 

24 89 
17 75 
41 78 

11 86 
:«)20 
10 15 

2345 63 

62 00 
82 50 

14 55 
24 50 
.37 01 
56 63 
85 49 

48 32 

15 25 
88 10 



39 



KXIlir.lT No. J-Continu.Ml. 



Date. 



Aug. 30, 1898. 



Oft. 8,1898. 



Oct. 28,1898. 



No. 



500 
501 
502 
503 
504 
505 
50(5 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
5.32 
533 
534 
5:» 
536 



To \Vh( 



l>:.i.l. 



Ft. Wayne (^a.s Co 

Frank Dry Goods Co 

S. Freiburger A' Bro 

Mayflower Mills 

Meyer Bro.«. & Co 

Moellering Bros. & M 

Pfeifter & Sfhlattor 

J. M.E.Riedel 

Rurode Dry Goods Co 

Seavey Hardware Co 

D. Shordan & Co 

Swift &Cu 

Thompson-Chute Soap Co.. 

Trentinan Supply Co 

C. Tresselt & Sons 

Western Electric Co 

F.P. Wilt & Co 

Ale.xandcr Johnson, Supt. . 

K. A.K. Hackett 

John lAI. Spann 

Mrs. Mary R. Harper 

Ale.xander Johnson 

Mrs. E. A. .Johnson 

Blo«niingdale Mills 

Cudahy Packing Co 

Ale.xander Johnson, Supt. . 

City Carriage Works 

Fleischmann & Co 

Ft. Wayne Oil * Supply Co 

Fox B;i kery 

M. A. Hanna & Co 

P. Henderson & Co 

L.O.Hull 

Perry Shultz 

O.B.Smith 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

K.K.WheeIock,M.D 



Total . 



Character of Claiui. 



Gas fuel 

Dry goods, et(^ 

Leather and tindiogs 

Flour 

J)rugs, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Hardware 

Services as architect 

Dry goods 

Tinware, etc 

One horse mower 

Fresh meats 

Caustic soda, lime, etc.... 

Lime and cement 

Bran 

Lamps 

Tea 

Salaries and wages 

Salary as 'I rustee 

Sal ary as Trustee 

Salary as Trustee 

Salary as Superintendent. 

Salary as Matron 

Flour and bran 

Meats 

Salaries and wages 

Buggy repairs 

Yeast 

Packing 

Crackers 

Coal 

Seeds and bulbs 

Plastico 

Straw 

Services as dental interne 

Telegrams 

One pair glasses 



Amount. 



«308 44 

13 58 
128 87 
152 63 

29 44 
63 44 
60 33 
75 00 
23 21 

16 10 
35 OO 
94 07 
32 47 

14 61 
38 87 
11 50 

17 20 
2,526 41 

75 00 

75 00 

75 00 

375 00 

125 00 

270 01 

434 42 

2,473 76 

2 00 
4 50 

3 69 
51 

17 49 

4 70 
3 00 

35 00 

75 00 

2 38 

2 50 

$75,697 10 



40 



EXHIBIT No. 3. 



Recapitulation by Vouchers of Expenditures from Repair Fund 
for Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



Date. 



No. 



To Whom Paiil. 



Chanieter of Claim. 



Amount. 



Dec. 2, 1897 .. 
Jan. 3, 1898 . . 



Feb. 1, 1898 
May 2, 1898 



May 31, 1898 . 
.rune30, 1898. 
.luly 30, 1898 . 



A. Hattersley <fe Sons 

Pfeiffer k Schlatter 

Ft. Wayne F and M.Co ... 

A. Hattersley <& Sons 

Chas. A. Strelinger & Co . . . 

Geo. H. Wilson & Son 

A. Hattersley <fc Sons 

E. Gilmartin 

A . Hattersley & Sons 

Keller & Braun 

Muhler & Co 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Diether Lumber Co 

David Tagtmeyer 

Alexander .Johnson, Supt. . 
Alexander Johnson, Supt. . 
Empire Paint and Roof Co 

A. Hattersley & Sons 

Pfeiffer & Schlatter 

Pay-roll 

Ft. Wayne R. and P. Co. . . . 

Chas. A. Strelinger Co 

David Tagtmeyer 

Diether Lumber Co 

(lerding & Aumann Bros . . 
Pfeiffer & Schlatter 



Total. 



Pipe fittings, etc 

Glass 

Boiler repairs 

Plumbers' supplies 

Discs, valves, etc 

Roof repairs 

Repairs, heating. 

Lumber for repairs 

Plumbers' supplies, etc .. .. 
Coping for repair of floors . 

Lime 

Hardware and roof repairs 

Lumber for repairs 

Lumber for repairs 

Wages for repairs and imp. 
Wages for repairs and imp. 

Paint for felt roofing 

Plumbers' supplies for rep. 

Hardware for repairs 

For repairs and improvem. 

Felt roofing 

Shafting, collars, etc 

Lumber 

Lumber 

Skylights and metal work . 
Hardware 



8107 84 

11 04 
2.34 98 

79 69 

112 72 

96 55 

59 29 

51 00 

58 68 

2 80 

1 30 

3:5 00 

108 76 

62 90 

242 57 

459 58 

5 50 

93 88 

28 97 

408 72 

12 50 
34 40 
71 91 
48 17 
55 50 
17 75 

$2 ,.500 Of 



41 



EXHIBIT No. 4. 



Recapitulation by Vouchers of Expenditures from Improvement 
Fund for Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



Datk. 


No. 


To Whom Paid. 


Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


Dec. 2, 1897 . 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

1 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

21 
22 

24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 


Keller & Braun 




816 25 
83 97 

57 42 




Chas.F.Muhler & Son 

PfeifiFer ct Schlatter 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 
Kmpire Paint and Roof. Co. 

Chas.F.Muhler & Son 

Baltes Land, Stone k Oil Co. 
Empire Paint and Roof. Co. 

E. Gilmartin 

Pfeiffer k Schlatter 


Pipe, lime and cement 

Corrugated roofing 


J an. 3, 1898... 


Wages of brickmasons 

Felt roofing, etc 


45 90 
17 50 
19 80 


Keb. 1,1898.. 


Stone 

Felt roofing 


58 50 
8 75 




Lumber. 


227 50 




Glass, nails, etc 


40 20 


.March 1,1898. 


Keller & Braun 

Chas.F.Muhler & Son 

Ft. Wayne Roof. & Pav.Co. . 

Geo H. Wilson & Sons 

E. Gilmartin 


14 28 




Pipe, lime, etc 


8 35 
10 50 


Aiirill,1898.. 


Gutter and spouting 


50 84 
429 00 




Chas F.Muhler &Son 

J. C. Peters .fc Co 

Diether Lumber Co 


Pipe, lime and cement 

Hardware 


8 59 

8 75 






54 89 


May 2, 1898... 


D. L. Bauirher 


Drilling well . 


562 50 




Pfeiffer & Schlatter 


Hardware for improvements 
at dairy larm 






Diether Lumber Co 


52 43 




Lumber for improvements.. 

Lumber 

• 'ontract for stone 


50 06 


-May 31, 1898.. 




95 51 




Keller & Braun 


112 25 




Muhler & Co 


Lime, stone, cement, etc 

Porch roof and gutter 


110 68 




Seavey Hardware Co 

David Tagtmeyer 


23 00 
26 40 


June .30, 1898.. 


Diether Lumber Co 


Lumber 


112 OJ 




Pfeiffer & Schlatter 


Hardware 


62 16 




Robt. Spice 




118 00 


Jnly .30, 1898 . . 


A. Hatte sley & Sons 

Trentman Supply Co 

Total 


Plumber.s' supplies 

Lime and cement 


10 22 
3 80 










82,500 00 









42 



EXHIBIT Iso. 5. 



Recapitulation by Vouchers of Expenditures from Tuition Fund 
for Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



No. 



'Jo Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Aldine Printing House 

Joe W. Bell 

Thomas Charles Co 

City Carriage AVorks 

P. Dickinson 

Dreier & Bro 

Fleischmann &. Co 

Ft. Wayne Newspaper Union 

Ft. Wayne Organ Co 

Gross A: Pellens 

J. II. (xemrig & Sons 

Geo. Jacobs 

A. L.Johns & Co 

M. F.Kaag 

Karn Bros 

Nathan, Kircliheimer A Co. . 

Queen City Supply Co 

Sharp A: Smith 

Johns Hopkins Press 

The Ram's Horn 

J. P.Tinkham 

Western Union Tel. Co 

J.D.Williams 

Ale.vnnJer .Johnson, Supt. . . 

Aldine Printing House 

John Burchardt 

Thomas Charles Co 

City Carriage Works 

Curtis & Curtis 

Flei.'^ehman & Co 

A.Griffith 

A. Hattorsley & Sons 

M. L. .Jones 

James M . Kane 

Geo. U. Kuntz 

Lea Bros. & Co 

A. VV.Mumford 

Nathan, Kirchheimer & Co. . 

J.C.Peters&Co 

Root & Co 

F. M.Smith & Co 

Buckeye Electric Co 

Ft. Wiiyne Art.Ice Co 

Singer Mfg. Co 

J.M.Thornburn & Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

White Fruit Hou.«e 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Aldine Printing Co 

Bendell i Co 

Becker Paper Co 

Thomas Charles Co 

Chicago Medical Book Co... 

City Carriage Works 

J.B.Colt&Co 

Fleischmann A' Co 

Ft. Wayne BinderyA Box Co 
Ft. Wayne F'ndry AMach Co 

Fred (Jrnffe & Co 

Gross & Pellens 



Postage, freight, etc: — 
Printing and stationery. 

Horse covers 

School supplies 

Repairs 

Musiu 

Hospital supplies 

Yeast 

Paper 

Caster and music binder 

Clipper springs 

Surgical knives 

Music 

Axle (jrease 

Crockery 

Veal 

Paper 

Engine packing 

Stethoscope 

Subscription 

Subscription 

Smithing coal 

Telegrams 

Extracts 

Expressage, postage, etc 

Envelopes 

Corn 

School supplies 

Buggy repairs 

Vise repairs 

\east 

Copper cnn 

Electric supplies, etc — 
Photographers' supplies 

Rubber balls 

Harness repairs 

Subscription 

Subscription 

Paper 

Engine packing 

Sundry notions 

Hardware 

Lamps 

Ice 

Machine repairs 

Seeds 

Services 

Candles 

Incidentals 

Printing, etc 

Books 

Paper bags, etc 

School supplies 

Books 

Repairs 

Magic lantern 

Yeast 

Catalogue files 

Chain and sprocket 

I'locks and repairs 

Clipper plates 



43 



EXHIBIT No. 5-Continued. 



Date. 



Feb. 1,1898.. 



Mar. 1, 1898. 



Apujl 1,1898 



May 2, 1898 



No. 



62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

no 

111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
12.5 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
IS? 
134 



To Whom I'aid. 



Hoffman Bros 

M. L. Jones 

H. Kohnstamm & Co 

A. A. Lnwry 

J.C. Peters cfe Co 

Rickers .V Co 

Rockwell & Rupel Co 

The American S. S. Union . . 

Daily Gazette 

Ft. Wayne Art. lee Co 

Gross Cereal Co 

Singer Mfg. Co 

Wayne Baking Co 

Paul E. Wolf 

Alexander Johnson, Supt.. . 

Joe W.Bell 

Dr. Chas. H. Brown 

Aug. Bruder 

City Carriage Works 

J.B.Colt & Co 

P.Dickinson 

Educational Publishing Co. 

Fleisebmann it Co 

Ft.Wayne Newspaper Union 

FredGjaffe & Co 

Hoffman Bros 

M. L. J"nes 

James M. Kane 

Karn Bros 

Geo. H. Kuntz 

A. E. Melching 

Mossman , Yarnelle A: Co 

James Parker 

E. Steiger & Co 

Art Needle Work Co 

Ft. Wayne Artificial Ice Co. 

Indianapolis News 

Pape Furniture Co 

Singer Manufacturing Co . . . 

Wayne Baking Co 

Tower Ar Lyon 

Western Union TelegraphCo 
Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 
Asso.of Inst.for l.andF.M. 

Bancroft Bros. & Co 

H.H.Barcus 

Beadell & Co 

Becker Paper Co 

Thomas Charles Co 

Lawson & Campbell 

Electric Appliance Co 

Fisher Bros 

Fleisehmann & Co 

Ft.Wayne Newspaper Union 

Hoffman Bros 

Horlick Food Co 

M. L. Jones 

M. F. Kaag 

James M. Kane 

James Parker 

John Pfeiffer 

Charter (ias Engine Co 

Ft. Wayne Artificial Ice Co. 

Gross Cerea 1 Co 

Pape Furniture Co 

Ft. Wayne Baking Co 

Western Union TelegraphCo 

James Wilding 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Art Needle AVork Co 

Kilian Baker 

H.H.Barcus 

Becker Paper Co 



Character of Claim. 



Asbes 

Photographers' supplies . 

Ink and pens 

China 

A.x and handle 

Soap 

Typewriter ribbons 

(Quarterlies 

Subscription 

Ice i 

Cereal coffee 

Needles and repairs I 

Pretzels. I 

Renovating feathers, etc 

Incidentals 

Horse covers | 

Subscription j 

Tea spoons : 

Buggy re pairs ' 

Magic lantern slides } 

Music books i 

Subscription ' 

Yeast ! 

Paper I 

Clocks and repairs 

Ashes j 

Photographers' suppHes I 

Scissors ! 

Mutton I 

Harness repairs I 

Returning stray boys i 

Hardware I 

Horse, etc | 

School supplies | 

School supplies 

Ice 

Subscription 

Bed springs 

Needles, etc 

Pretzels 

Shackle 

Services 

Incidentals 

Proceedings and nssessm'ts 
Lessons Natural History... 

Oysters 

Toothbrushes 

Paper 

School supplies 

Smoked fish 

Blast torch 

Toothpicks 

Yeast 

Paper 

Ashes 

Malted milk 

Photographers' supplies ... 

Lamp burners 

Amusements 

Returning stray boy 

Fresh meats 

Engine repairs 

Coffeette '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'... '.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Bed and springs 

Crackers, etc 

Telegrams 

Smithing coal ....' 

Freight, expressage, etc. ... 

School supplies 

Manure and ashes 

Oysters 

Paper 



Amount. 



81 OO 

2 27 
5 00 

4 95 

1 50^ 

5 00- 
4 50 
4 50 

20 80 
4 OO 
4 63 

3 70 

2 60 

4 75 
47 09 

1 50 

3 00 
325 

3 70 
15 02 

2 85 
1 00 

3 00 
1 00 

13 60 
1 25 
7 27 

1 67 

4 3o 
15 

21 05 

4 68 
29 18 

2 73 
1 89 

3 60 

5 00 

3 00 
136 

4 12 
9 00 
4 54 

22 71 
15 00 
18 50 

4 50 
3 60 

1 40 

2 32 

3 20 

3 38 
2 75 
2 00 
2 80 

2 50 

4 00 

3 82 
75 

390 

5 00 

1 S 
66 

4 00 
4 20 
4 90 

25 31 

3 41 
85 

75 82 

2 64 

4 80 

5 00 
50 



44 



EXHIBIT No. 5-Continueil. 



i>ATE. 



No. 



To Wliom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



May 2, 1898 



:VIay31,189K 



Juno :50, 1893. 



135 

136 

137 

138 

139 

140 

141 

142 

14S 

144 

14.5 

146 

147 

148 

149 

150 

151 

152 

15:i 

1.54 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

1(52 

163 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

169 

170 

171 

172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 

186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

192 

193 

194 

195 

1% 

197 

198 

199 

200 

201 

202 

203 

2M 

205 

206 

207 



Wm.B.Burford 

Fleisehmann & Co 

Ft. AVayne Artificial Ice Co. 

Ft. Wayne Organ Co 

Henry Grciner 

Gross & Pellens 

M. L. Jones 

E. R. .Johnston 

M. F. FvaaK 

James M. Kane 

Dr. W. Langtry.V. S 

Nervine Coffee Co 

Pottlitzer Bros. Fruit Co. .. . 

Roach & Thompson 

Rockwell & Rupel Co 

Siemon k Bro 

Robt. Spice 

The Gross Cereal Co 

Waters Laundry Supply Co. 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

James Wilding 

Alexiinder .John.son, Supt. .. 

Aldine Printing House 

Baxter &, Tarmon 

Becker Paper Co 

Crandall Packing Co 

Fisher Governor Co 

Fleisehmann & Co 

Ft. Wayne Ice Co 

Ft. Wayne Elec. Corp 

Ft. W. Found, and Mach. Co 

S. Freiburger & Bro 

Globe Mills 

Adolph Grosjean 

Gross Cereal Co 

Ernest Henschen 

M. L. Jones 

James M. Kane 

•Geo. H. Kunts 

John N. Pfeiffer 

Rider Ericsson Engine Co ■■ 
Singer Mfg. Co 

B. W. -kelton Co 

E.StebbinsMfg.Co 

Troy Steam Laundry 

James Wilding — 

C. B. Wo.xlworth A- Co 

L.C. Zollinger &Bro^ 

.\lexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Art Needle Work Co 

Dean Bros 

P. Dickinson 

Fleisehmann & Co 

Ft Wayne Artificial Ice Co. 

Fred Graffe & Co 

Gross Cerenl Co 

Hummer .Mfg. Co 

James .M. Kane 

Kindergarten Literature Co. 

E.B. Kunkle & Co 

Mossman, Yarnelle A' Co 

N. Murray 

John N. PfeifTer 

R.L.Polk ctCo 

Pottlitzer Bros 

Quaker City Rubber Co 

Chns. W. Shearer 

Singer Mfg. Co 

B. W.Skelton Co 

Robert Spice 

W.U. Telegraph Co 

James Wilding 

Geo. H.Wilson iSc Sods 



Printing 

Yeast 

Ice 

Band music 

Straw 

Hair clippers 

Photographers' supplies .. 
Encyclopedia and stand .. 

Crockery 

Basi-balls and footballs.. .. 

Services 

Cereal coffee 

Bananas 

Wagon repairs 

Office supplies 

School supplies 

Pump repairs 

Cereal coffee 

Soai> 

Telegrams 

Smithing coal 

Incidentals 

Dater and stamp 

Horn repairs 

Paper 

Engine packing 

Repairing governor 

Yeast 

Ice 

Electrical supplies 

Boiler plate 

Findings 

Roasting coffee 

Oats 

Cereal coffee 

Oats 

Phot'igraphrcs' supplies .. 
Games, fishing tackle, etc. 

Stable blankets 

Fresh meat 

Piston packings _ 

Sewing machine repairs .. 

Strawberries 

Lawn sprinkler 

Laundering curtains 

Smithing coal 

Dental supi>lies 

Wagon repairs 

Incidentals 

School supplies 

Puuii> rejiairs 

Music 

Yeast 

Ice 

Watch and clock repairs.. 

Cereal coffee 

Baking powder 

Amusements, etc 

Sulj.'seription 

Valve repairs 

Hardware 

Subscription 

Fruit 

City Directory 

Bananas . . . .• 

Engine packing 

Picket fence 

Machine repairs 

Strawberries 

Pump repairs 

Telegrams 

Coal 

Milk can 



45 



EXHIBIT No.'S-Continued. 



Datb. 



To Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim . 



Amount. 



June 30, 1898. 
July 30, 1898 . 



Aug. .30, 1898. 



Oct 8,1898. 



208 
2n9 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
221 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
2.32 
233 
234 

2;^ 

2:36 
237 
a38 
239 
240 
241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
26.5 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 



Globe Mills 

B. A. Stevens 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . 

Dr. J.B. McKvoy 

Dr.D. E. Howe 

E. M.Baltes& Co 

Becker Paper Co 

Joe W. Bell 

D. F. Coinparet 

Cudahy Packing Co 

P. Dickinson 

F. Eckart Packing Co 

Electric Appliance Co 

Fisher Bros 

Fioischmann & Co 

Ft. Wayne Art. Ice Co 

Fred (Iraffe A: Co 

Uross Cereal Co 

Hummer Mfg. Co 

James M. Kane 

AVm. Kaoug-h 

Karn Bros 

E.B.Kunkle & Co 

John N. Pfeiffer 

Postal Telegraph Co 

Rider-Erics.-on Engine Co. 

Rurode Dry Goods Co 

Singer Mfg. Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Williams, Brown & Earle.. 

Paul E. Wolf 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . 

Aldine Printing House 

J hn Church Co. 

Citv Carriage Works 

E.H. Colgrove & Co 

D.F. Comparet 

Daily Fish Market 

Fleisehmann & Co 

Fred Graffe & Co. 

C. L. Greene 

Gross Cereal Co 

Gross it Pellens 

Hattersley & Sons 

Home Telephone Co 

Howard Watch & Clock Co. 

M. F. Kaag 

James M. Kane 

Wm. Kanugh 

N. Leonard 

Mossraan, Yarnelle & Co 

W.D.Page, P. M 

R. S. Patterson 

A.H. Perfect&Co 

Quaker City Rubber Co 

Siemon & Bro 

Singer Mfg. Co 

B. W.Skelton Co 

Robert Spice 

Chas. A . Strelinger Co 

David Tagtmeyer 

A. R. Walter 

Wayne Raking Co 

W. U. Telegraph Co 

Paul E. Wnlf ... 

Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Aldina Printing House 

Armour Packing Co 

Becker Pa per Co 

Bradford Belting Co 

City Carriage Works 

JD. F. Comparet 

Ft. Wayne Artificial Ice Co. 



Roasting coffee 

Bread slieer 

Incidentals, etc 

Services 

Salary 

Paper 

Bug>;y robes 

Poultry 

Veal 

Music 

Butterine 

Electrical supplies 

Paper napkins 

Yeast 

Ice 

Clock repairs 

Coffeette 

Baking powder 

Amusements 

Mower repairs 

Butterine and veal 

Pop valve repairs 

Yeast and fruit 

Servic es 

Piston packings 

Dry goods 

Repairs 

Telegrams 

Graduated tubes 

Tent cleats 

Incidentals 

Printing, etc 

Music 

Rubber sheeting 

Books 

Eggs and poultry 

Fish 

Yeast 

Clock repairs 

Husks 

Coffeette 

Hair clipper, etc 

Plumbers' supi lies. . . . 
Telephone rental, etc 

Keys, springs, etc 

Crockery 

Amusements 

Repairs for mower 

Honey 

Hardware 

Stamped envelopes. . . . 

Clothing 

Sundries 

Engine packing 

Office supplies 

Machine repairs 

Poultry, etc 

Pump repairs 

Engineer's supplies... 

Flag pole 

Eggs and poultry 

Pretzels. 

Telegrams 

Tent 

Incidentals 

Stamp pad and cards .. 

Butterine 

Paper 

Electrical supplies 

Buggy repairs 

Eggs, poultry, etc 

Ice 



40 



EXHIBIT No. 5-Coiitinue.l. 



Date. 



No. 



To Whom Paid. 



Character of Claim. 



Oct. 8, 1898 



Oct.28,'1898. 



281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
29H 
294 
295 
296 
297 
298 
2^9 
.SOO 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
316 
317 
.318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
.''25 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
.331 
33 i 
a33 
a34 
.335 
336 
337 



Frank Dry Ooods Co 

(iross Cereal Co 

Peter Henderson iV: Co 

Jenne.v Elec. Light & P. Co . 

M.L. .[ones..... 

M. F. Kaag 

James M. Kane 

Keller & Braun 

Koehlinger Bros 

H. Kohn.stamm & Co 

Lea Bros. & Co 

M'f 'rs Agents and Supply Co 
Mo.ssman, Yarnelle & Co. 

Pape Furniture Co 

Paul Manufacturing Co .. 

A. H. Perfects- Co 

John N. PfeifiFer 

Pfeitfcr A- Schlatter 

P.ittlitzer Bros. Fruit Co . 

Seavey Hardware Co 

Siemon it Bro _ 

Singer .ALanufaeturingCo. 

B. W.Skelton Co 

Standard Oil Co 

Chas. A. Strelinger Co 

Swift & Co 

Trentman Supply Co 

C. Tresselt & Sons 

A.R.Walter. 

M ayne Baking Co 

James Wilding 

Ale.xander Johnson, ,Sui)t. . . 
Baltimore &. Ohio Coal Co. . . 

W. F.Bohling, Cashier 

W.F. Bohling. Cashier 

Bradfonl Belting Co 

Columbus & HockingCoalCo 

.Jerome Q. Cook 

Ft. Wayne Book Bindery 

Ft. Wayne Iron Works 

Globe .Mills 

M. (Joldburgor 

East Goshen Coal Co 

( J ross Cerea 1 Co 

Indiana Furniture Co 

Wm.W. Ireland 

Fl yd Johnson 

Lussky, Payn Jk Co 

Jay Mc racken 

Osborn , Saeger A' Co 

John X. Pfeiffer 

Rain's Horn 

Rockwell it Uupel Co 

R. B. Rossington 

B.F.Waikel 

White Fruit House 

Henry Young 



Total. 



Dry goods, etc 

Coffeette 

Seeds 

Motor power 

Photographers' supplies .. 

Crockery 

Balls, etc 

Cut stone 

Shovels 

Felt 

Subscription 

Rubber tips 

Hardware 

Wardrobe and dresser hdls 

Pulleys 

Groceries, etc 

Groceries, etc 

Hardware 

Bananas 

Hardware 

Office and school supplies . 

Needles 

Fruit 

Cylinder oil 

Engineer's supplies 

Meats 

Pipe 

Middlings 

Eggs and poultry 

Pretzels and crackers 

Smithing coal 

Incidentals 

f'oal 

Freight on coal 

Freight on coal 

Electric supplies 

Coal 



(xrinding knives. 
Binding books. . . 
Repairing boiler. 
RoMSting coft'ee . . 
Mineral water . . . 

Coal 

Cereal coffee 

Cha'rs 

Books 

Brooms 

Bed casters 

Freight on coal. . 

Co 1 

Groceries, etc 

Subscription 

Copying book 

Laundry stove. . . 

Mason work 

Empty barrels. . . 
Tbresbing 



47 



EXHIBIT No. G. 



Re.capUidaiion by Vouchers of Exqjenditares from Spangler Fund. 



Date. 


No. 


To Whom Paid. 


Chara(:ter of Claim. 


Amount. 


Oct. 8, 1898.... 


1 

•7 

.3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 


Alexander Johnson, Supt. . . 

Peter Baltes 

Ale.xander John.son, Supt. .. 
E. M. Baltes Jt; Co 


Pay-roll 


$120 .50 


Oct. 28, 1898.. 


First payment on brick work 
Pay-roll 


].50 00 
207 81 




Flues 


31 8+ 




Peter Bnltes 


Final estimate 

Lumber 


270 00 




Diether Lumber Co 

Ft. Wayne Iron Works 


22 6.5 




Steel 


4 05 




Cut stone 


30 00 




A . Hattersley & Sons 

Keller & Braun 

Kerr-Murray Mfg. Co 

Trentman Supply Co 

Total 


Pit e, fittings, etc 

Cut stone ; . . . 


7 51 
51 13 




Iron beams, etc 

Pipe, lime, etc 


24 00 
69 9.5 




$989 44 











EXHIBIT Xo. 7. 



Balance Sheet of Colonia for Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



To inventory, 1697 

To expenditures for all purposes 

By receipts from farm and brickyard 

By inventory, 1898 

By permanent improvements — 

Ice house 

CAttl^■ barn 

New floors for farm building 

Piggery 

86.5 fruit trees 

219 rods wire fence 

Driven well at brickyard 

New racks, pallets, etc., at brickyard 
'1\) balance 



Balance brought down, being profit for year's farming 
making 



and brick 



J7,051 35 
7,084 59 



2,112 97 



$16,238 91 



Recapitulation of Recfipts from Colonia for Year Endina 
October 31, 1S9S. 

Milk, 200,568 lbs., at IKc $3,008 

Fresh beef, '25,.576 lbs ' 1,6:33 

Fre?h pork, 16,867 lbs 808 

Veal, 630 lbs , 56 

Beef sundries, tallow, tongues, livers, etc I 58 

Pelts 273 

19 

3 



Dre.«sed chicken, 208 lbs 

Dressed geese, 31>^ lbs 

Feathers, IV^ lbs 

Kggs,10iMdoz 

Pears, 'i% bu 

Potatoes, 280^ bu 

Ground corn and oats, 136 bu 

Timothy hay, 322n6j tons 

Oats,341>^bu 

Wheat, 4gsbu 

Bricks, 2-34,000, at $350, on the yard. 

Total 



13 

3 

81 

42 

196 

68 

4 

819 



$7,090 70 
7,658 65 

266 26 
323 83 
110 00 
156 00 
210 99 
65 70 
118 00 
238 78 



$16,238 91 



$2,112 97 



$7,090 70 



4S 



jMionrci-: of iio.mk (;aki)i:x von skasox of isos. 



Apples, biishels T-k 

Apples, crab, bushels 3|- 

Blackben-ies, quarts 2,305 

Cbeiritw, (|uai*t.s 77 

Currants, quarts 49 

Gooseberries, quarts 4-04 

Grapes, pounds 3,176 

AIulbeiTies, quarts 25 

Muskuielous 1,843 

Peaches, bushels 1 

Pears, bushels 4^, 

Tfas])berrics, black, (piarts 587 

Paspberries, red, (juarts 360^ 

Strawben-ies, (punts 1,003 

Watenuelons - 2,004 

Asparagiis, dozen 1,570 

Beans, string, busliels 125|- 

Beans, Lima, bushels 17 

Beets, busliels 215f 

(Cabbage, dozen 555 

Can-ots, bushels 57-} 

(Jaulitbiwcr, dnzcu 42 

Celery, dozen 223^ 

Com, sweet, ddzcii 2,537 

(^ucumbers, dozen 4,177 

Egg Plant, dozen 42|^ 

Ivraut, barrels 30 

Lettuce, bushels 1 39|^ 

Onions, green, dozen 3,260 

Peas, bushels 59 

l*epl)ers, bushels 44- 

Pumpkins, dozen 15^ 

Padishcs, dozen 1,691 

Kliubari), d<.zcn 3,022 

S]>inach, bnshcls . . ; 170 

S<|uash, summer, dozen 685 

Squash, winter, dozen 49 

Tomatoes, bushels 897 

Timii))s, bushels 427 

Parsnips, bush(^b; 250 



2 

FIFTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENT 



CENTRAL INDIANA 



Hospital for the Insane 



For the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFOBD, CONTRACTOR FOB STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 
1898. 



STATE OF INDIANA, 

Executive Department, 
Indianapolis, December 9, 1898 



I 



Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State for 
verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, \ 

Indianapolis, December 9, 1898. / 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasurv, has been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of Stale. 



December 9, 1898. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

CHAS. E. WILSON, 

Private Secretary. 



^ Filed in the office of the Secretary of htate of the State of Indiana, December 
13, 1>!98. 

WILLIAM D OWEJJ, 

Secretary of State. 



Rt-ceived the within report and delivered to the printer thi« 13th (Uy of De- 
cember, 1898. 

THOS. J. CAR! EH, 

Cle^k Printing Bureau. 



OFHCERS OF THE INSTITUTION. 



Members Board of Trustees. .DANIEL H. DAVIS, President. 

JOHN OSTERMAN, Treasurer. 
ALBERT O. LOCKRIDGE, Secretary. 

Superintendent GEO. F. EDENHARTER, M. D. 

Matron MARION E. EDENHARTER. 

Assistant Physicians, Department for Men — 

P. J. WATTERS, M. D. 
FRANK M. WILES, M. D. 

Assistant Physicians, Department for Women — 

EDMUND LUDLOW, M. D. 
FRED. L. PETTIJOHN, M. D. 

Pathologist ROBERT HESSLER, M. D. 

Interne MAX A. BAHR, M. D. 

Steward SIMON P. NEIDIGH. 

Secretary CORNELIUS MAYER. 

Record Clerk EVANGELINE M. SMITH. 

Bookkeeper EDMOND B. NOEL. 

Storekeeper .TAMES E. SPROULE. 

Pharmacist .JAMES C. JAMISON. 

Chief Carpenter WILLIAM F. COBB. 

Chief Engineer EDWARD E. FROST. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



Honorable James A. Mount, Governor of Indiana: 

Sir — Pursuant to law, we herewith submit to you our report for 
the year ending October 31, 1898. 

Appendant to our report, and made a part thereof, will be found 
the report of the Superintendent, giving in detail the items of ex- 
penditure showing how the appropriations for the various funds 
have been expended. It will be a waste of time and space to re- 
peat the detailed statements of that report. 

PROPERTY. 

The appraisement of the property belonging to the institution 
shows its value to be as follows : 

Real estate $1,550,412 00 

Personal property 235,373 86 

Total $1,785,785 86 

The sales of discarded property during the year amounted to 
|1,393.65. 

MAINTENANCE. 

The present Board of Trustees and the present management of 
the institution have been compelled to proceed during the past year 
upon an appropriation smaller than any appropriation made since 
1889, in which year the appropriation for maintenance was $260,- 
000. An appropriation for the year just closed was only $225,000, 
notwithstanding the fact that there have been more inmates con- 
stantly present at the institution and more patients treated than 
ever before in its history. It is clear that the same things cannot 
be accomplished with $225,000 that can be accomplished with 
$260,000. The original appropriation of $260,000, which was 
continued until and including the years 1894 and 1895, would 
give $160 as the amount for the maintenance of each inmate during 

(5) 



the past. year. AVlion it is considered that out of this appropria- 
tion nnist eonie all of the salaries and other necessities for the Main- 
tenance l)ci)artnicnt, and that the appropriation for repair is al- 
ways insntticient, and that tiie maintenance fund nuist be resorted 
to to keep up repaii-s, it becomes clear that the amount per capita, 
even on an appropriation of $260,000, is veiy small indeed, much 
smaller than will properly maintain 1,000 constant inmates and 
2,1 SI patients treatc<l. 

But your iJoard has not had $260,000 with which to provide for 
the maintenance of this institution. We have had during the past 
year only $225,000, which gave a gross amount of $140.50 for the 
maintenance of each inmate. Deduct now from this $225,000 the 
necessiiiy salaries, take from it the amount necesv'jary always to be 
takiMi for rej)air. wbieh must be constantly kept u]i to prevent the 
institution from degenerating, and the amount left us to maintain 
each of the 1,000 inmates of this institution is appallingly small.* 

AYe have done the beBt we could with the insufficient amount ou 
hand. The service of the institution has i)een kept at the highest 
point of efficiency. The quality of food has l)eeu maintained, 
though its variety has, of coui^se, been necessarily diminished. But 
at everv point the management has been hampered and embar- 
rassed. We have been confronted with the problem of accomplish- 
ing something without the means of properly accomplishing it. 
We do not desire to make an argument for a restoration of the old 
iipprojuintion of $260,000; we merely state the facts. That the old 
appropriation of $200,000 ought tx) be restored, and even increased, 
is so clear as to admit of no discussion. That the great State of 
Indiana fails to sufficiently provide for its insane is hardly credible; 
and yet that is the situation which an appropriation of $225,000 
for the maintenance of this institution reveals. We oaniestly rec- 
ommend that the ai)propriation be restored to $200,000 at the 
very lowest. As a matter of fact, it ought not to be less than 
$275,000. 

REPAIRS. 

The appropriation for re]iair fund for the year ending October 
31, 1898, wa-s $10,000. This amount was entirely insufficient. 
From 1889 to 1894 and 1895 the api>ropriation for this fund was 
$15,000. 'i'hc appropriation should be restored to that amount at 



least. K. 'pairs uiiisl he \wa(\v from day to day, or the institution 
will fall into a sUte of decay which will, in a very few years, en- 
tirely destroy its usefulness for the pui-poses for which it was 
("rcctcd. (Questions of repair admit of no argument, no delay, 
'riu-y must Ix" made when needed. If the fund for that purpose is 
not sutticient, then they must be made from some other fund. 
That it is inadequate, is shown by the great extent of this insti- 
tution. In the woman's department alone there are a quarter of a 
million feet more floorinii' space than in the entire State Plouse. 
The! men's department is nearly as large. The great number of 
accessory buildings must not be forgotten in these calculations. 
The flooring throughout the institution is of wood. The doors are 
of wood. The windows are of wood and glass. Some of the build- 
ings have now been erected for decades. Eepairs must constantly 
go forward, or, as we have stated above, the whole institution would 
soon degenerate into a state of ruiu and decay. AVe earnestly 
recommend an appropriation of $15,000 for this fund. 

CLOTHING. 

We were given for the year just closed the sum of $7,000 for 
clothing. For the years 1S95-1896 and 1896-1897, $10,000 was 
appropriated, and before that time, for a long series of yeai-s, $12,- 
000 was given by the Legislature for this purpose. For the year 
just ended, although the appropriation was $3,000 smaller than the 
preceding year and $5,000 smaller than the usual appropriation, 
the number of inmates was larger than ever before. Seven thou- 
sand dollars is $4.37 for the clothing of each inmate for a year. 
It is insufficient. Do the best that can be done, no proper clothing 
can be procured for $4.37 a year for each inmate. We recom- 
mend with all the emphasis which these facts give to our recom- 
mendation that the appropriation be placed at not less than $12,000 
a year, at which figure it stood for many years when the number of 
inmates was not so large as now. 

PLUMBING AND PAINTING. 

The appropriation of $5,000 for plumbing and of $5,000 for 
painting should be repeated at the same figures. The appropria- 
tion for plumbing was not sufiicient to complete the plumbing of 
the department for women. This is imperative, and it is neces- 



sary to call attention to the fact that the health of the inmates 
very materially depends upon it. In some instances, the bath 
tubs are twenty years old. The painting, of course, is a constant 
rcquircmont. Many of the wards have novor been painted at all. 

FIRE ESCAPES. 

We desire to call particular attention to the question of fire 
escapes. We do not believe that it is understood that in this enor- 
mous institution Mnth wooden floors, stair cases, and other wood 
woi'k incident to buildinijs constructed many years ago, there are 
no fire escapes, although 1,600 demented human beings are within 
its walls. This is a matter which should be attended to without 
the delay of a single unnecessary day. Should a fire occur, there 
is absolutely no way to rescue the inmates of a part of the men's 
department, and they would perish inevitably. The women's de- 
partment is better constructed in this respect on account of its 
wide stairways and other avenues of egress from the building. 
But none of the buildings have fire escapes and they should be 
instantly supplied. We have made a careful estimate and we 
believe that the lowest possible figure, $5,000, ought to be appro- 
priated to this end. We recommend this with all possible em- 
phasis. The lives of the unfortunates who are the wards of the 
State in this great institution may at any time depend upon this 
most essential improvement. 

GREENHOUSE. 

The Legislature made an appropriation of $3,500 for a green- 
house. We expended this to the very best of our ability, econo- 
mizing at every point and at every turn. The appropriation, how- 
ever, was so insufficient that we could not complete it. An addi- 
tional $4,000 is necessary for the completion of this invaluable 
adjunct to a hospital for the insane. All alienists agree upon the 
beneficial and quieting effects of flowers upon the insane. Violent 
patients will take a flower and become quiet. They will treasure 
it, hide it, care for it, as for nothing else. No greater blessing 
could be bestowed upon these poor people than the blessing of 
flowers. 



DINING ROOMS AT THE DEPARTMENT FOR MEN. 

Two dining rooms should be provided at this building; the 
estimated cost is $26,000. We ask an appropriation of this 
amount for this purpose. This plan will vacate wards now occu- 
pied and increase the Hospital capacity. 

We now come to the most important item of this report. It is 
a surprising statement, but a true one, that the sick among the 
1,600 inmates of the Central Indiana Hospital for the Insane have 
no separate hospital. They are treated and cared for in the build- 
ing in which the other inmates live. The disastrous effects of 
such a condition are best revealed by the bare statement. The 
condition of the inmates who are physically well unfavorably act 
upon those who are sick, and the physical condition of those who 
are sick unfavorably react upon the mental condition of those who 
are well. It is a condition anything but humane, scientific and 
right. 

GENERAL HOSPITAL FOR SICK. 

After the most careful investigation of this matter and after 
gi^'ing it extended and mature consideration, the Board is unani- 
mously of the opinion that a general hospital, entirely separate' 
from the main buildings, should be immediately constructed, in 
which the sick and infirm can be cared for and treated. Not only 
j^^ this the right thing to do, but it would have the further bene- 
ficial effect of increasing the capacity of the institution. The way 
to increase the capacity of the institution at present is not to 
enlarge the main buildings, but to provide a separate building for 
the sick and infirm, thus giving more room in the main building 
and at the same time separating those who are sick from those who 
are well. 

After reducing our estimates at every point where it was pos- 
sible to reduce them, our net estimate is that $150,000 is required 
for this hospital and its equipment. This sum should be appropri- 
ated, it seems to us, without hesitation. For the insane sick to be 
confined in the same building with the insane well is a condition 
intolerable and insuiferable. 

We respectfully call your attention to the fact that at every 
point we have taken into consideration to the very best of our 



r 10 

altility tlif (iiiestioii of economy. Our recoiniiuMidatioiis for in- 
creased appropriations are in the interest, not only of the patients 
and tlie inmates of this institution, but of economy as well. 

We are convinced that an inspection of the premises and an 
investi<:ation into the condition existing-, will demonstrate the cor- 
rectness of all the views al)Ove expressed. 

In closing, it is a great pleasure to this Board to call particular 
attention to the able supervision of the institution by Doctor Geo. 
F. Edeidiarter, the sujierintendent. He has maintained an effi- 
ciency in the service of tlie institution as remarkable as it is com- 
inendahlc. The discipline has been and is most excellent. The 
conditi(»n of the huildings and of the inmates is as nearly perfect 
as an intelligent and vigilant management, hampered by inade- 
• inatc means, can make it. The work of all the subordinate officers 
and the employes of the institution has been of the same high 
gradr. 1 Respectfully su])niitt('d. 

1). 11. DAVIS, President. 

A. O. L()( • K R 1 1 )( ; E, Secretary. 

JOHX OSTERMAN, Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the ir<)i)(i)'(t/>lc Board of Trustees: 

(icntlciiu'ii — We ])r('s<'nt the followinu' aKstract from the statis- 
tical tal.lcs: 

At tlic licuiimiuu- of tlif vear tlicre were enrolled 1,(513 pa- 
tients — 710 men and 903 women. At the close of the year we have 
reniainina' l,»iS(» patients — 739 men and 941 women. 

Five hnndred and sixtj-eight patients — 304 men and 2r)4 women 
— were admitted dnring the year; 363 patients — '10'2 men and 161 
women — were discharged (1 of this number was not insane); 134 
])atients — 73 men and 61 women — have died during the year. 

Total number of patients under treatment during the year, 
2,181 ; daily average number under treatment, 1,601.8. 

Percentage of recoveries to the total number of patients under 
trimtment, 6.36; percentage of recoveries to daily average number 
under treatment, 10.70; percentage of recoveries to number ad- 
mitted during the year, 30.32. 

Percentage of deaths to the total number of patients enrolled, 
5.16; percenta'ge of deaths to daily average number under treat- 
ment, 8.69. 
I Two men couniiittcd suicide dui'iug the year. 

Each and every report contains mention of the fact that the 
capacity of this institution is entirely inadequate to accommodate 
the patients of this district. 

We are not only over-crowded at this writing, but have at least 
260 cases in our counties for which room should be proA'ided. 

We earnestly trust that your recommendations in this matter 
will have sufficient weight with the Legislature as to residt in a 
correction of the evil. 

Our capacity is 1..526 

The nmuber of patients enrolled on October 31 is 1.680 

The number actually present 1,.545 

The number f urloughed (on trial visits) 13.5 

Outside of the Hospital, about 260 

(11) 



12 

Under this condition of att'airs, the State should take immediate 
steps to provide additional room. 

Should the autliorities determine to enlarge this institution, the 
fact must l)(' taken into consideration that we now have our "sick" 
confined and treated in the two main buildings. Thus not only 
exposing those who are well to the conditions which are naturally 
associated with hospital wards, but the "sick" to the always present 
disturbance caused by violent or excited patients. 

Therefore, I woidd most earnestly urge that the proper way to 
enlarge the capacity of this institution is not by enlarging the 
|)resent buildings f(iv tlie can^ of the patients, but in the two ways 
following: 

First. I>y llie construction of a general hospital entirely sep- 
arate, with suthcient accommodation for one hundred patients, 
fully e([uipped with the most modern facilities for the diagnosis 
and treatment of both medical and surgical cases. Extended argu- 
ment is certainly not necessary to demonstrate that this is the only 
i-ight and humane thing to do. Every interest of both the sick and 
well unite in appealing for tlus action. 

The i-o(tnis now occupied for sick wards could thus be utilized 
for other patients. 

In connection with this building two infirmary wards should be 
constructed for the crippled, aged and helpless insane patients 
with a capacity of fifty patients each. This would make a total 
provision for 200 patients. 

Second. At the department for men two dining rooms should 
be built, one each for the north and south wings. The present 
"wards," now used for dining room purposes, could thus be secured 
for patients. This would enable us to comfortably provide for an 
Increase additional of 60 or 70. 

In addition to the room thus provided for patients, the dining 
rooms, with all of their naturally unpleasant features, would be 
removed from the main building, a procedure that would greatly 
improve its sanitary condition. 

In my report of the preceding year 1 used the following lan- 
gnage: 

"In :i<i<lition to the lack of room, we have a condition which in 
c-nr jndgnient is worse staring us in the face, and that is a deficient 
II Itiiviijiriiifinii 111 nil (}rj)arlinrtils for the ensuing two vears. 



13 



"It wiU 1)0 iiiipossible to maintain the standard of the Hospital 
upon the amount granted, and this may resnlt in the further dis- 
charge of patients to counties for maintenance." 

The institution has been operated one year under these reduced 
appropriations and we now knoiv that with the utmost care and 
watclifnlness it is impossible to carry on the work in a proper man- 
ner with any such anunint — especialh', in the manner which the 
great State of Indiana would delight in holding up to the civilized 
world as her sftuidard. There should be none better within true 
economical lines. Extravagance is not wanted and should not be 
tolerated." 

Penuriousness, es])ecially in all charitable matters (no matter 
by what motive ju-omptcd) should be relegated to the rear, and 
the further back the better for all, directly or indirectly concerned. 

It has been well said (and repetition does not lessen its force) 
that, "I^^ations are never impoverished by the munificence of their 
charities'" and "The prosperity of a State and the culture of its 
citizens are easily judged by its charitable institutions." 

The following table shows the amount appropriated for each 
fiscal year, beginning with 1890, for maintenance, clothing and 
repairs, with the number of patients treated and the average num- 
l)er present during the year: 



YEAK.* 



Mainte- 
nance. 



Repair. 



Clothing. 



Total. 


Number 
Treated. 


$287,000 


2,221 


287,000 


2,144 


287,000 


1,940 


287,000 


1,904 


287,000 


1,964 


287,000 


1,977 


260,000 


2,026 


260,000 


2,108 


242,000 


2,181 



Average 
Number 
Present. 



1*89-90 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1894-95 
1895-96 
1896-97 
1897-98 



$260,000 
260,000 
260,000 
260,000 
260,000 
260,000 
240,000 
240,000 
225,000 



$15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



812,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
10,000 
10,000 
7,000 



1,540.5 

1,506.3 

1,527.5 

1,498.1 

1,512.8 

1,5.'^1 

1,578 

1,587 

1,601.9 



* Fiscal year begins November 1. 

Thus we see that in the fiscal year of 1897 and 1898 we were 
compelled to maintain more patients with $15,000 less in the main- 
tenance fund than in the fiscal years of 1895 and 1896, and 1896 
and 1897, and $35,000 less than in the maintenance fund of 1893 
and 1894, and 1894 and 1895. 

In connection with this it must be remembered that during the 
])ast year the prices of provisions were exceedingly high as com- 



14 

pared to toniK r vcais. The tablo also indicates a cut in the cloth- 
ing fund from twelve thousand dollars in 1895 to seven thousand 
dollai-s in the fiscal year of 1897-1898. The amount of these re- 
ductions compelled a cut in the service below the point of safety, 
and also deprived the patients to a certain extent of that variety of 
food and fruit essential to their proper treatment. The amount 
for clothing, viz., $7,UU0, is woefully insufti<-ieiit. 

The amusements were also cnrtailed. 

To recapitulate: The Legislature of 1895 reduced our appropri- 
ations in 

.Maintenance fund $20,000 

Repair fund 5,000 

Clothing full.! 2.000 

Making a total reduction of $27,000 

for each fiscal year following. 

The Legislature of 1897 made a still further reduction 

In our maintenance fund of $15,000 

In our clothing fund r»f 3,000 

.Making a total reduction of $18,000 

for each fiscal year following. 

It will thus be seen that the total reduction in our funds by the 
two Legislatures amounted to the sum of $45,000 for each fiscal 
year follomng the session of 1897, although the number of patients 
treated and present had greatly increased. 

It is to be hoped that the former ajipropriations for the institu- 
tion will 1)6 restored. 

MEDICAL STAFF. 

I >r. Harvey W. Kainey resigned liis jxisifion i»n Fel»ruarv 1, 
l.si»,s, and Dr. V. L. Pettijohn was apjiointed to the vacancy. 

Dr. ^lary Smith resigned her position on ^fay ol. 1898. and the 
vacancy remained during the fiscal year. 

Dr. Ma.x Bahr was appointe<l as interne on April 1. Is98. 

Dr. Sarah Stockton was appointed to succeed Dr. Sniith, service 
to comuH'iice on November 1, 1^98. 



15 



PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The ^ledical Start" of the institution have had a tlioronsvli conrse 
in liistology dnrinii' the j)ast year- — this Avill be followed by bac- 
teriolofi'y and jtathdlooy. 

In addition they are to he coinplimented not only npon the 
li'reat amonnt of original and individual "work accomplished, but 
also npon its admirable character. 

Dr. Hessler resigned his position as pathologist on October 31, 
1X98; he failed to present a record of Ids woi-k, therefore we can 
not incorporate it in this report. 



■ IMPROVEMENTS FROM SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS. 

KITCHEN AT D. F. W. 

The new kitchen at the department for women was completed 
and (Minipped. 

ROOMS FOR EMPLOYES. 

At this department rooms occupying the second and third floor 
of the neAv building for the kitchen were constructed for the em- 
ployes. They were partly furnished. 

GREENHOUSE. 

« 

The amount of money appropriated for this building was insuf- 
ficient to complete it. 

PTATMBING. 

The ]ihniil)ing at the department for men was completed. At 
the department for women we could only provide bath tubs for the 
south side of the building. We still lack bath tubs for the north. 
side and "slop sinks" for all of the bath rooms in the building. 

PAINTING. 

Quite a numlier of wards, all the dining and bath rooms in 
both of the main buildings Avere painted. 



16 



OTHER REPAIRS. 

The house containing our natural gas regulator was destroyed 
by fire. This had to be rebuilt. The natural gas mains were found 
to be very defective and had to be replaced in their entirety. 

Several boilers were completely overhauled. 

We were compelled to repair several of the large tanks in the 
attic which arc used for supplying water to Avards and fire pro- 
tection. 

At the 'Tower House" new Belts for the machines were pur- 
chased, the old ones being much Avorn and dangerous. 

LIBRARY. 

A small lunnbcr of books were purchased for our medical 
library. 

FURNITURE. 

Your attention is once more directed to the deplorable condition 
of the Hospital furniture: the most of it is worn out, beyond re- 
pair and unfit for use. 

NEEDS AND NECESSITIES. 

In compiling this list we wish to emphasize the fact that we rec- 
ognize the inahility of the State to provide for all that is needed 
in connection with its charitable work at once. In the very na- 
ture of things the work is one of gradual development. "We con- 
ceive it to be our duty, however, to mention such needs of the 
institution as will tend to place us upon a plane which will be rec- 
ognized as adet|uate and competent to properly care for our pa- 
tients and the property of the institution. Always endeavoring in 
our requests for construction. and expenditures to find that "happy 
medium" which should govern all concerned in the management 
of this work, viz.: That we must recognize the right of the persons 
who assume the l)urden of expense as well as the demands of our 
jiatients and property. 

Proceeding upon the al)0ve theory, we would respectfully sug- 
irest to your Honorable Board to ask: 

1. Larger amounts than the present appropriations for main- 
tenance, repair and clothing. 



17 

2. Additional room for patients to be provided bv the con- 
struction of a hospital and infirmary wards and dining rooms at 
the department for men, as lierein before outlined. 

3. An appropriation for plumbing. 

4. An appropriation for painting. 

."). An a})propriation for tire escapes, at the department for 
men. 

0. Provisions should be iuad(^ for encircling the main build- 
ings with water mains to be used for fire purposes only, 

7. An appropriation to complete the greenhouse. 

In addition to the above I would earnestly call your attention 
to the following suggestions contained in former reports, and the 
great desirability of having them, which would do much towards 
advancing and completing our institution: 

1. A detention department for acute cases. 

2. Pavilions for contagious diseases. 

3. Pavilions for the protection of the women patients when out 
on the grounds. . 

5. A cold storage system, with facilities for manufacturing- 
ice. 

Tn addition it must be borne in mind that if the Legislature 
determines upon the construction of new buildings they must also 
provide means to secure additional boiler capacity for heating pur- 
poses. 

Acknowledgment of appreciation is hereby made to the em- 
ployes, not only for faithful services and continued interest in the 
institution, but for the extra duty and work performed which was 
necessitated by our financial condition. 

The year just closed has been the one of greatest anxiety and 
arduous labor of any in my hospital experience. 

AVith an appropriation of forty-five thousand dollars less than 

in the fiscal year of 1894 and 1895, and eighteen thousand dollars 

less than in the fiscal years of 1895 and 1896, and 1896 and 1897— 

with an increased price for all supplies over former years — with 

more patients than ever in the history of the institution — yet we 

close the year without financial indebtedness. "Live within the 

appropriations'' has been our guide in the management of the 

Hospital and its affairs in the past and will continue to govern us' 

during our incumbency. 
2— Central Insane. 



1« 



In coiiclnsicii iKTiiiit me t<. tender to the inemhers of the Board 
my sincere tliank.s not only for their unifonn kindness, but for tlie 
many substantial words of assistance and encouragenuMit extended 
to me fhiriuii- tlie past year. 

\'ery respectfully submitted, 

(;K(). F. KDKXIlAliTER, 

Superintendent. 



19 



Movement of Population, Fisical Year 1897-98. 



GENERAL RESULTS. 



Men. 



Women. 



TotaL 



Number at lieKinning of the year. 

Admitted during the year 

Wliole number treated 

DiseharKt^d as recovered 

Discdiarged as improved 

DiSfharsred as unimproved 

Discharged as not insane 

Died 



RemaininK at close of the year 

Per cent, recovered of whole number treated during the year. 

Per cent, died of whole number treated during the year 

Average daily number under treatment 



710 
304 
,014 
74 
55 
7.3 



73 

739 
5.83 
5.59 

696.2 



903 
264 
1,167 
95 
55 
10 
1 
65 
941 
6.9 
4.74 
905.6 



1,613 
56« 
2,181 
169 
110 
S3 
1 
138 
1,680 
6.36 
5.16 
1,601.8 



^Ithin'ssloiis^ iJisclid i-<i(>: and Dcdt lis fi-oiit Bc(junii luj of the HospHal . 



RESULTS. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Admitted 

Diseliarged as recovered 

Discharged as improved 

Discharged as unimproved. . . 

Discharged as not insane 

Discharged as feeble minded 
Died 



10,808 

4,674 

1,483 

2,150 

37 



1,707 



Total discharged and died 



10,051 



9,511 
4,105 
1,613 
1,422 
30 
1 
1,.380 



8,551 



20 319 

8,779 
3.096 
3,572 
67 
1 
3,087 



18,602 



Ajjc ")nf Marital ('(iiiditiov of Those Adaiitted, Discha i-qcd 

and Died. 



« 










1 
Discharged. 










AGE. 




Recovered. 


otherwise. 


iJIED. 


Men. 


Women 


Men. 


Women 


Men. 


Women 


Men. 


Women 




S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


S. 


M. 


Under 15 years 


1 
13 

34 
28 
38 
22 
3 
2 


"e' 

5 
31 
50 
32 
20 
12 
1 
1 

158 


1 

7 




7 
8 

10 
3 


"i 
3 
10 
14 
10 
2 


1 
5 
8 

I 

3 
2 


■'8' 
6 
15 
18 
11 
4 


1 
6 
14 
13 
20 
8 
8 
















15 to 20 years 


■3' 
11 
13 
14 
4 
2 
1 
1 

49 


2 
3 
5 

7 
4 
1 

1 

23 


"2 
12 
10 
10 
5 

"2 

41 


2 
3 
4 
7 
3 
.... 

"2 

22 








20 to 25 years 

25 to 30 years 

30 to 40 years 

40 to 50 years 

50 to 60 years 


15 1 10 
24 1 18 
22 : 49 
8 1 .54 
3 '^s 


.... 

7 
13 
17 
6 
6 
1 

51 


5 
4 
3 
3 
1 

"2 

"2 

20 


"i 

4 

16 

g 


60 to 70 years 

70 to 80 years 


.... 


18 
2 
3 

1 

183 


3 


Over 80 years 














1 


Unknown 


5 
146 








1 


9 


5 


Total 


31 


43 


34 


45 



One patient (a woman) above included in the number discharged as recovered was dis- 
charged as " not insane." 



20 



Jjiiraf'o/i of Trentiuerit of T/io.<<e Dlfn-lmrgef/ and Died. 





DiSCHARGRD. 






TIME. 


Recovered. 


Otherwise. 


Died. 




Men. 1 Women. 


Men. 


Women. 


Men. Women. 


Under 1 month 






4 
1 
4 
7 

23 
13 
15 
11 
5 
5 
40 


1 

2 

4 

13 
9 
11 
6 
8 
3 
4 
3 


6 
3 
8 
8 
2 
3 
7 

12 
4 
4 

11 


2 


From 1 to 2 months 


6 
4 

23 
16 
10 
10 
4 
1 


4 

5 

32 

24 

8 

14 

4 

2 


3 


From 2 to •"> months 


2 


From .i to 6 months 

From 6 to 9 months 


5 
2 


From 9 to 12 months 


3 


From 1 to 2 years 

From 2 to 3 years 


5 
8 




8 


From 4 to ■'> years 


1 


Over 5 years 




4 


26 








Total 


74 


97 


128 


&4 


73 


65 







Movement of Populnfioii hi/ Monfhs for t/>r Year. 





Ad- 


Discharged. 






MONTHS. 


MITTKD. 


Recov- 
ered. 


Im- 
proved. 


Unim- 
proved. 


Not 
Insane. 


Died. 






a 

e 

s 

o 


fl 


B 

e 

s 

o 


B 


s 

o 

a 

o 




s' 
o 
S 

o 


o 


a 


a 

O 

a 

o 


November, 1897 


23 
17 
24 
22 
23 
29 
13 
33 
26 
38 
25 
31 

304 


14 
21 
20 
10 
21 
35 
23 
29 
18 
20 
36 
17 


9 

! 6 
! 8 
8 
7 
6 
1 


5 
8 
21 
6 
8 
11 
11 


3 

7 
7 
6 
2 
2 
7 
9 
1 
4 
3 
4 

55 


1 

10 

2 
5 
7 

I 

4 
6 

55 


13 
2 
8 
7 
9 
5 
7 
4 
6 
1 
7 
4 

IT 


2 






10 
6 
5 
8 
4 
6 
6 
3 
8 
3 
7 
7 

73 


4 

5 


De<-ember, 1897 


.(anuiiry, 1898 






1 


4 

4 


February, 1898 


March, 1898 








2 


April, 1898 








8 


May, 1898 


1 
2 
3 







6 
7 
5 
5 
6 
9 


lune, 1898 


i H 1 f 

1 1 9 

2 4 
10 5 

5 ' 1 

74 ^ 


July, 1898 


AuKUst. 1898 


September, 1898 


2 
10 




1 


October, 1898 


ToUl 









21 



Nmnhcf of Attacks fuid Dtirathm Before Ad/in 
of Thosr Ailmittcd. 



ATTACKS AND DURATION. 



First attack, under 1 month 

First attack, 1 to % months 

First attack, .'? to ti months 

First attack, 6 to 9 months 

First attack, 9 to 12 months. . . . 

First attack, 1 to 2 years 

First attack, 2 to 3 years 

First attack, over 3 years 

Second attack 

Third attack 

Fourth attack 

Five or more attacks 

Unknown 

Total 

Of the above were recommitted 



Men. 



Women. 



56 


49 


3+ 


29 


24 


25 


25 


23 


fi 


3 


3:^ 


28 


19 


18 


36 


29 


47 


40 


7 


10 


3 


1 


1 


4 


13 


■•> 


304 


2&t 


58 


55 



Admissions, Discharges and Deaths by Counties During the Year. 




9 



('(iKsi iif Iiisfiiiifi/ of TliDsc AiliiiHt<<l iJoriiKj the Year 



CAUSE. 



Men. 



Army diiabilitier 

Brain ami body, unsym metrical development of. 

Business depression 

Caries, vertebriil 

Catarrh . nasal 

Cerebritis 

Cheat i n horse trade 

CocMiine 

Death of husband 

Death iif mother 

Death of son 

Death of wife 

Do'^th of wife and child 

Disappointment in love 

Dissipation 

Domestic trouble 

Dy8menorrh(L'a 

Epilepsy 

Excess, venereal 

Kxoessi ve use of ciearettes 

Excessive use of tooacco 

Exi-itement, political 

Excitement, religious 

Exhaustion, nervous 

Female trouble 

Fevpr, brain _. 

Fever, intermediate 

Fever, puerperal 

Fever, typhoid 

Financial trouble 

Food, insufficient 

Friifhtened by a dog 

Friprht from high water 

Heart disease 

Hemiplegia .• 

Hereditary 

Horse, kicked by 

Husband, separation firom 

Ill health 

Intluen'/.a 

Injury 

Insobition 

Intemperance 

.Jealousy 

Loss of employment 

Loss of property 

Luetic infection 

MHStiirbiition 

Menopause 

>lenstrual epoch 

.Morphium habit 

Neuritis, optic 

Old ag- 

Overheated 

Overatudy 

Overwork 

Paralysis 

Parturition 

Poverty 

Puerperal condition 

I'uerperium 

Seduction of daughter 

."^enile decay 

Senility 

Shock from drowning child 

."Spinal trouble 

Stomach liisease 

Sunstroke. 

Surgical operation 

Syi.hilis. 

Tane.« ilorsalis 

I'teru-i I rouble 

Worry 

I'n known 



Total. 



29 
1 
1 
.3 
1 



1 
1 



304 



23 



Form of Iiisdnitij of 77/o.vr ^\(l iiiitltil Di'ri/ii/ Ihi Ycdi 



CAUSE. 



Men. 



Women. 



Alcoholism, acute._ 

Alcoholism, chronic 

Cocomiinia 

Delusional insanity 

Dementia 

Dementia, paralytic 

Dementia, primary 

Dementia, secondary ... 

Dementia, senile 

Dementia, terminalis. . . 

Dips mania 

Epileptic insanity 

Epilepsy, hysterical 

Idiocy 

Imbecility 

Mania 

Mania, acute _. 

Mania, chronic 

Mania, epileptic 

Mania, periodical 

Mania, puerperal 

Mania, recurrent 

Melancholia 

Melancholia, acute 

Melancholia, agitata ... 
Melancholia, chronic . .. 
Melancholia, recurrent . 

Morphomania 

Paranoia 

Paresis 

Pubescent insanity 

Senile insanity 



Total 



304 



3 

17 

1 

94 

"21" 

29 

2 

2 
1 
1 
1 

264 



24 



Cause of Death. 



CAUSE. 



Men. 'Women. 



Abspes."*. ischial 

Alcohulisin, acute 

Apoplexy 

Atheroma 

Bowel.«, perforation of 

Bronchitis, chronic 

Cancer of breast 

Cancer of stomach 

Catarrli, iptestinal 

Cerebro congestion 

Cerebro hemorrhage 

Cerebro softening. 

Cerebro thrombosis 

Convulsions 

Convulsions, paretic 

Colitis, sub-acute 

Cystitis 

Debility, (teneral^ 

Diarrho?ii, chronic 

l)yscntcry 

Dysentery, acute 

Dysentery, chronic 

Enteritis, chronic 

Enteritis, gastro 

Enterocolitis 

Epilepsy 

Exhaustion 

Exhaustion, dementia 

Exhaustion, epilepsy 

Exhaustion, mania 

Exhaustion, senile 

(Jangrene, senile 

<ta8tritis from mania 

Heart tliseasc 

Heart hypertrophy 

Heart, organic lesion 

Hemorrhage, intestinal 

Hemorrhage, pulmonalis 

Inanition 

Lungs, congestion of 

Nephritis, chronic , 

Nephritis, parenchymatous , 

<^>viuian cyst 

Paralysis of the heart 

I'aresis 

Periarthritis 

Pneumonia 

Pneumonitis 

Phthisis pulmonalis 

,'^enile dei-ay 

Senility 

SepticiiMnia 

.''hock , suritirsl 

Strangulation 

Suicide by strangulation 

Tuberculosis 



ToUl 



25 



OccLipiUio/t of Those Adiii.iitcil. 



OCCUPATION. 


Men. 


Women. 






1 

9 

1 

2 
4 

3 

1 
1 
3 

9 

1 

8 
1 
1 
9 
1 
1 
2 
3 




Baker 




Barber 
















Bottler 








Bricklayer 
















rarriage trimmer 








Clerk 








Commercial college, 
Cook 








1 


Cooper 




Domestic 


29 






3 


Druggist 


1 

4 




Engineer, railroad 






2 


Farmer 


102 






1 










1 

1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




Fireman 




(■Jardener 




Gasfitter 




Grain dealer 


I 




Grocer 












Horse doctor 




Housekeeper 


;36 






131 


Housework 




7 


Laborer ; 


.55 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 

i 

2 

1 
1 
3 
2 












Lumber dealer 




















Minister 




Molder 




Painter 









Photographer 












Plumber 






















3 






1 




2 

2 










1 




1 






1 




i 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 








Teacher 


2 












Theatrical man 







26 



Occupation — Coiitino.cd. 



OCCUPATION. 


Men. 


Women. 






1 






1 




2 
20 
16 






37 












Total 


304 


264 







Nativity of Those Admitted. 



NATIVITY. 



Men. Women. 



Indiana 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

Connecticut 

District of Colnmbia. 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Kentucky 

Maine 

Marylnnfl 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New .Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

.Atlantic Ocean 

Austriii 

Belgium 

Canada 

Denmark 

Englanil 

France 

Germnny 

Ireland 

Italy 

Scotland ;. . 

Switzerland 

Unknown 



194 



Total 



17 
304 



27 



Cic'd Condition of Those Admitted, Discharged and Died. 



CIVIL CONDITION. 


Admittkd. 


DiSOHAROKD. 


DlKD. 


Men. 


Women. 


Men. 


Women. 


Men. Women. 


Married 


141 

10 

5 

2 

146 


150 

29 
4 


78 
10 

1 
110 


81 
21 


48 
3 


31 


Widowed 


14 








2 

57 


1 






81 


22 


20 






Total 


304 


264 


202 


161 


73 


6:> 



Educcdion of Those Admitted. 



EDUCATION. 



Men. Women. 



Collegiate 

Common school 

None 

Unknown 



Total 



14 
263 

22 
5 

304 



14 

216 

25 

9 

264 



Color of Those Admitted. 



COLOR. 


Men. 


Women. 


White 


298 
6 


256 


Colored 


8 



Total 



304 



264 



28 



EXHIBIT No. 1. 



Sfatet/ir))f of Revenues and Disbursements of the Central Indiana 
Hospital for the Insane for the Fiscal Year Ending October 3U 
1898. 

Maintenance fund $225,000 00 

Expended November, 1897 $22,198 20 

Expended December, 1897 20,G19 8G 

Expended .January, 1898 17.522 84 

Expended February, 1898 18,139 55 

Expended March. 1898 18,092 46 

Expended April, 1898 20,183 09 

ExiH'nded May, 1898 19.108 09 

Expended June, 1898 19.377 62 

Expended July, 1898 18.047 20 

Expended August, 1898 16,292 39 

Expended September, 1898 16.339 27 

Expended October, 1898 18,418 83 

Total $225,000 00 $225,000 00 



Repairs fund $10,000 00 

Expended November, 1897 $857 40 

Expended December. 1897 701 85 

Expended January. 1898 682 10 

Expended Februaiy, 1898 1,002 41 

Expended, Marcti, 1898 678 36 

Expended April, 1898 824 65 

Expended May. 1898 699 25 

Expended June, 1898 1.059 12 

Expended July, 1898 1.027 14 

Expended August, 1898 1,320 99 

Expended September, 1898 559 00 

Expended October, 1898 587 73 

Total $10,000 00 $10,000 00 



Clothing fund $7,000 00 

Expt iidod November, 1897 $1,189 66 

Expended December. 1897 1.162 09 

Expended .lanuary, 1898 627 28 

Expended Fel»ruary, 1898 391 86 

Expended March, 1898 463 56 

Expended April, 1898 376 81 

ExpendiHl May. 1898 (597 97 

Exi>ended June, 1898 677 44 



29 



EXHIBIT No. 1— Continued. 

Expended July, 1898 • . . 

Expended August, 1898 

Expended September, 1898 

Expended October, 1898 

Total $7,000 00 



Plumbing fund, balance from 1897 $1,456 02 

Expended October, 1898 

Total $1,456 02 



Printing fund $5,000 00 

Expended May, 1898 

Expended June, 1898 

Expended July, 1898 

Expended August, 1898 

Expended September, 1898 

Total $5,000 00 



Kitchen and restoration of rooms fund $6,000 00 

Expended December, 1897 

Expended February, 1898 

Expended April, 1898 •. , 

Total $6,000 00 



Kitchen equipments fund $1,200 00 

« Expended April, 1898 

Total $1,200 00 



For furniture for restored rooms fund $500 00 

Expended April, 1898 

Expended May, 1898 

Expended August, 1898 

Expended October. 1898 

Total $500 00 



Greenhouse fund, balance from 1897 $2,540 00 

Expended December, 1897 

Expended June, 1898 

Expended August, 1898 

Total $2,540 00 



$407 55 
425 56 
280 87 
299 35 


$7,000 00 


$1,456 02 


$1,456 02 


$1,543 90 

651 96 

11 05 

373 01 

2,420 08 


$5,000 00 


$1,500 00 
2,500 00 
2,000 00 


$6,000 00 


$1,200 00 


$1,200 00 


$165 00 

195 00 

15 81 

124 19 


.$500 00 


$1,500 00 
961 60 

78 40 


$2,540 00 



no 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2. 



Sfiifcnn lit of VoKr/iirs of JiJxpciulitiircs fi'O'in Mnintcnniirf Fkik- 

JJnriny the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1808. 



No. 



3 ; 

^1 

6 I 
7 

8 ' 

9 i 
10 
11 

12 : 

13 
14 
15 
ItJ ' 
17 
18 ' 
l!i I 
2(» ' 
21 
22 
23 
24 

2;, 

26 ' 
27 
28 I 
2!) > 
30 , 
31 

32 , 

33 I 

34 1 
35 
36 I 
37 
38 ! 
3J' , 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
50 
6r» 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Gcorpt' F. Edenliarter, Supt ' Contingent fund 

"W. C. Frazee MlllJ 

Peter F. liryce Cracliers 

\V. H. .Vrinstroiiu & Co SiirKicnl instrunumts. 

Ariliur .Jordan Co F.frgs 

Indianapolis Journal Co Ailvertising 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co Advertising 

Iii(lianapi>lis News Co Advertising 

Charles Daile.v Hay and straw 

Kagsdale & Snow \ Casltet 

Charles Long Oysters 

Severin. Osteriueyer & Co I Tea 

Joseph Gardner 1 Tinner's supplies — 

Singer Mnfg. Co Needles, etc 

J. Trost & Son Cider 

John (»Nelll Flour and meal 

Wlllianis & Hunt Salsoda, etc 

Indianapolis Gas Co Gas 

Flelscliiiiann & Co Yeast 

Western Union Tel. Co Telegrams 

Hollweg A: lieese Queensware 

M. O'Connor iV: Co (Jroceries 

J. H. Uyan & Co Kye flour 

Fraulv c;. Kamps • Oysters 

Kipp IJros. Co Urushes. etc 

IJ. P. Frwin & Co 1 )ry goods 

J. U. Budd & Co Poultry 

Eniil Wulschner & Son (">rgan 

George Ilitz & Co Grapes, etc 

James I.. Keach i Potatoes, apples, etc. 

AV. <;. AVasson Co Coke 

The Holt Ice and Cold Stor. Co... lee 

H. Syerup & Co Apples, cider, etc — 

Daniel Stewart Co Drugs 

Clement Vonnegut Chambers, etc 

Swift iV: Co j Hani8, etc 

Nelson Morris & Co Beef, etc 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co Fuel 

Brooks Oil Co Oil 

G. A. Carsteusen j Services as chaplain. 

Bauseh & Loml» Optical Co 

Hlchards iV Co 

Colurnlius Butter Co 

Knighl A: Jlllson 

<}porge F. Kilenharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, .Supt 

Ilildehrand Hardware Co 

Martin J. Olteillv 

(ieneral lOleclrlc Co 

Standard Oil Co 

Fried ma nn iV- Co 

Francke \- Schindler 

Daggett \ Co 

Frank G. Kamps 

Frommeyer Bros I (^iieensware 

Teeheniin & Freiberg I Harness tixturos 

L. E. Morrison & Co Uublter boots .. 

J. U. Uyan \- Co j Bye Hour 

• Joorge W. Budd Oysters 

Williams A; Hunt I ciiip soap. etc.. 

.Albert Krull I Candy, nuts, etc 

Indiana Paper Co ' Paper bags 



For medical department > 

For medleal department 

Butlerine 

Dyn;imo oil, grease, etc 

For Ineblental expenses 

Main pay roil for month Nov...- 

Pans, etc j 

Shoeing horse ' 

Lamps 

Oil ; 

But ferine 

W;ilnui rosettes, etc ' 

Candy, nuts, etc 

Oysi. 



Amount. 


$2,000 00 


540 00 


121 60 


835 


280 80 


2 00 


3 (*) 


2 13 


63 94 


7 00 


153 25 


272 32 


88 65 


3 20 


42 57 


757 80 


322 89 


48 25 


19 38 


1 00 


92 11 


2,540 87 


18 75 


9 00 


16 45 


604 10 


699 28 


58 00 


205 26 


333 61 


9 00 


44 98 


59 20 


393 21 


425 72 


633 55 


1.908 24 


1,388 89 


33 79 


20 00 


32 57 


58 09 


456 48 


49 07 


153 60 


7.141 75 


1 00 


1 50 


72 l»0 


10 06 


543 60 


S 50 


93 25 


10 50 


54 62 


19 00 


12 75 


18 75 


216 00 


452 80 


57 10 


26 25 



31 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



63 I 

64 ! 

65 I 
66 

67 ! 

68 , 

69 i 

70 I 

71 I 
72 

73 ' 

74 1 



SI 
S2 
S3 
84 
85 
S6 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 

97 ! 

98 ' 

99 i 
100 i 
101 

102 I 

103 : 
VM 
105 
1(16 
107 1 
1«S i 
109 
110 

111 i 

112 1 

113 I 

114 ' 

115 ' 
116 
117 ' 

lis 

119 

120 ■ 

121 i 
122 
12.3 
12! ; 
125 
126 
127 
12S 
129 
13o 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 . 



Elliptical Carbon Co 

General Electric Co 

Brooks Oil <"o 

Ind. Institute for the Blind 

E. B. McComb 

Arthur .Ionian Co 

A. B. Meyer & Co 

G. A. rjnxtL'tisca 

The IndiMUMiiDlis News 

Indianapcilis Si-iitinel Co 

.Ti)urnal Newspaper Co 

Clemens Vonnejiut 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co.. 

Kipp Bros. Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

SchnuU & Co 

Flildebrand Hardware Co 

Chas. <T. Grab 

W. H. Armstrong & Co 

Indianapolis Stove Co 

George D. Hardin 

Wm. B. Burford 

Central Union Telephone Co 

Knight iV .Tillson 

Murphy. Hibhen iSc Co 

Ragsdale & Snow 

Peter F. Bryce 

George F. Edenbarter. Supt 

George F. Edenbarter, Supt 

W. C. Frazee 

Pioneer Brass Co 

Sy erup & Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Joseph Gardner 

J. R. Budd & Co 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Swift i<t Co 

James L. Keach 

The Vail Seed Co 

Samuel Gever 

The Holt Ice and Cold Storage Co 
Ind'p'l's District Telegraph Co... 

The Indianapolis Gas Co 

Simon P. Neidigh 

Fleischniann & Co 

Fleischmann & Co 

W. C. Frazee 

Techentin & Freiberg 

Chas. J. Gardner 

Indianapolis Light and Power Co. 

G. A. Carstenseu 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co... 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Martin J. O'Reilly 

Ragsdale & Snow 

J. E. Bell 

The Indianapolis News Co 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co i 

Indianapolis Journal Co ! 

Western I'nion Tel. Co ; 

Huntington & Page I 

AVni. P.. BurJord , 

Albert O. I^ockridge 

Kipp Bros. Co , 

.\cmc Milling Co 

Blanton Milling Co i 

It. P. Erwin S: Co ! 

Murphy. Hibben & Co | 

Frommeyer A: Bros i 

.\. Bnrdsal Co ' 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 1 

Syfers, McBride & Co I 

C. H. Swick & Co 



Ca rbons 

Electric lamps 

Oil 

Brooms 

l-'loiir and meal 

I'oultrv 

Cok." 

Services as clia|)lain 

Advertising 

Ailvertising 

Advertising 

Hardware 

Fuel 

Pipes, dolls, etc 

tJrocers' sundries 

(iroceries 

Bowls for the wards 

Sharpening razors, etc 

Surgical goods 

Stoves, etc 

Straw 

Stationery 

Telephone services 

Engineer supplies 

Drv goods 

Casket ; 

Crackers 

Incidental expenses 

Main pa.v roll for December, 

Milk 

Brass castings 

Cider 

Drugs 

Tinner supplies 

Eggs and turkeys 

Pork 

Beef, ham and lard 

Potatoes 

Holly for Christmas 

White oats 

Ice 

Electric supplies 

Gas 

Car fare for year 1897 

Yeast 

Yeast 

Milk 

Repairing harness 

Beef 

Current for arc lights 

Sendees as chaplain 

Fuel gas 

Gas 

Shoeing horse 

Caskets 



'97 



Legal services . . 

Advertising 

Advertising 

.Advertising 

Telegrams .• 

Flower pots, etc. 

Srationer.v 

Car fares, etc 

Si)ectacles. etc ... 

Flour 

Flour 

N.^kins 

Tiff,- goods, etc .. 

Qneensware 

Oil tinish. etc 

Hemp twine, etc 

Tobacco 

Oysters 



32 00 
54 00 

33 79 
43 75 

742 20 

554 67 

9 75 

20 00 

1 89 

3 00 

2 OO 

15 58 
1,388 89 

81 80 

158 80 

1,971 99 

4 00 
10 05 

4 50 

12 25 

6 40 
119 43 
105 76 
476 68 
227 30 

7 00 
167 35 
278 95 

7,072 10 
558 00 
25 50 

48 25 
104 20 

56 65 

282 00 

330 13 

2,676 27 

656 53 

16 00 
25 60 
30 70 

590 81 
43 13 
30 65 

16 38 

13 87 
558 00 

1 85 

1,602 55 

42 50 

25 00 

1,388 89 

38 00 

1 50 

14 00 
25 00 

1 89 

3 00 

2 85 
2 66 

28 00 

49 15 

17 45 

4 65 
273 00 
458 40 

34 50 
161 98 

47 05 

9 45 

4 05 

161 02 

185 80 



.S2 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



136 C. Aneshaensel & Co « — 

137 SohnuU & Co 

13S I KaiiU'l Stewart Co 

13!» ' Viinicy & McOuat 

mi Indianapolis Stove Co 

Ill ! John O'Neill 

14:' 1 J. K. Uynu & Co 

113 Swifl iV: Co 

141 The Holt Ice and Cold Storage Co.. 

14.". .IjiiiU's I.. Keach 

14t; • Th.- Illiz Itaklnj,' Co 

147 Kiik'lii iVc .Illlson 

14S Uausch & Lomb Optical Co 

14'.i Halke & Krauss Co 

l.» i Hrooks Oil Co 

151 Williams & Hunt 

1.52 Friedman Mnfg. Co 

153 ' L. K. Morrison & Co 

154 Coffin, Klelcher & Co 

155 i Perry Brooms* Mnfg. Co 

156 : J. n. Hudd & Co 

ir.7 ' Uic-liards & Co 

l.'.b I'ettls Dry (Joods Co 

150 ' Joseph Gardner 

160 D. II. Davis 

161 I George F. Edenharter, Supt 

162 1 George F. Edenharter, Sopt 

163 lUlward Mueller 

161 Imlianapolis Gas Co 

16.'. I-'roniiiieyer Rros 

166 Francis Hergnian 

167 ' Intlianapolls Chemical Co 

16S Friedman .Mnfg. Co 

16;» Whltall. Tatum & Co 

1,11 .Tohn O'Neill 

171 ' Brooks Oil Co 

172 Hoosler Manufacturing Co 

173 .Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

171 Indiatiapolis News Co 

175 i Daniel Stewart Co 

176 Murphy, Hibben & Co 

177 Wni. If. Armstrong & Co 

17S i Hollweg & Ucese 

17f" L. E. Morrison & Co 

180 ; r. II. Swick & Co 

181 I Indianapolis Dist. Tel. Co 

182 I Francke Hardware Co 

183 Schnull & Co 

184 ! Acme Milling Co 

185 I Kingan v<t Co.. Ltd 

186 I M. (»'<'onnor & Co 

157 ; Wm. IJ. Hurford 

ISS ' W. (". Frazee 

189 Fleischmann & Co 

190 O. I". Harnell. Agent 

191 Henry Coburn Lumber Co 

192 ' Advance Electric Co 

193 Clemens Vounegut 

19-1 Santlers & Keeker 

195 ' J. U. Kudd & Co 

196 , D. I'. Erwin & Co 

197 G. A. Carsfensen 

19N Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

]'.!'.' Wfstcrn Union Telegraph Co 

2tNi Knight & .Illlson 

L'Dl Ilildebrand Hardware Co 

3t12 Sverui) & Co ^ 

•203 I The HItz Haking Co 

201 George Illtz & Co 

2or> I'arrott-Tnggart Co 

20<; Wesley Gerard 

207 I liagsdale & Snow 

20« : rharles Bailey 



Electrolier, etc 

Groceries 

Drugs 

Electric light repairs 

Stoves 

Meal 

Bran 

Ilam and lard 

Ice 

Potatoes, etc 

Crackers 

Engineer supplies 

Camera, etc 

Lumber 

Oil 

Soap 

Butterine 

Rubber boots 

Pork backs 

Brooms 

Eggs, etc 

Generator, etc 

Book case, etc 

Tinner supplies 

Expenses as trustee 

Incidental expenses 

Main pay roil for January, 1898 

(ia rden seeds 

Gas 

Queensware 

Salsoda 

Boiler compound 

Butterine 

Reagents, etc 

Flour and meal 

Oil 

Chip soap 

Fuel gas 

Advertising 

Drugs, paints, etc 

Dry goods 

Medical appliances 

Oueensware 

Invalid rings 

Oysters 

Switch to order, etc 

Hardware 

Groceries, sundries 

Flour 

Hams, etc 

Groceries 

Stationery i 

Milk r 

Yeast I 

Spring wheat flour | 

Lumber I 

Carbons, etc I 

Cabinets, scrapers, fete 

Chairs 

Eggs, etc 

Dry goods 

Services as chaplain 

Advert Islng 

Telegrams 

Plumbing, etc 

Meat saws, etc 

Lemons, etc 

Crackers 

Potatoes, etc 

Cakes, etc 

Wliole wheat flour 

Caskets 

Straw 



33 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAMK. 



209 

210 

211 

212 

213 

214 

215 

21 tl 

217 

218 

219 

220 

221 

222 

223 

224 

225 

226 

227 

228 

229 

230 

231. 

232 

233 

234 

235 

236 

237 

238 

239 

240 

241 

242 

243 

244 

245 

246 

247 

248 

249 

250 

251 

252 

253 

254 

255 

256 

257 

258 

259 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

275 

276 

277 

278 

279 

280 

281 



George F. Edenlinrter, Supt 

S. G. Mark 

GQorge F. Fdeuharter, Supt 

Swift & Co 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Josepli Gardner 

The Holt Ice aud Cold Storage Co.. 

Tlie Wehb-Jamesou Co 

The Journal Newspaper Co 

Clarke & Sons 

Mauufat'turers' Natural Gas Co — 

Troy Laundry Machinery Co 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

J. R. Budd & Co 

John O'Neill 

The Thompson-Chute Soap Co 

G. A. Carstensen 

Blanton Milling Co 

Ind. Institute for Blind 

V. Bachman 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 

General Electric Co 

Balke-Krauss Co 

W. C. Frazee 

Wm. B. Burford 

Indianapolis News Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Chas. G. Grab 

Putnam County Milk Co 

Central Union Telephone Co 

Hollweg & Reese 

Syfers, McBride & Co 

Knight & Jillson 

James L. Keach 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Joseph Gardner 

Williams & Hunt 

Charles J. Gardner 

Syerup & Co 

The Holt Ice and Cold Storage Co.. 

Advance Electric Co 

Coflin, Fletcher & Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

JBrooks Oil Co 

Kipp Bros. & 'Co 

Kingan & Co., Ltd 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co 

Arthur Jordan Co 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 

Sanders & Recker 

Francke Hardware Co 

Swift & Co 

J. M. Sowders 

George W. Stout 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Ragsdale & Snow 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

The Indianapolis Journal Co 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

Peter F. Bryce 

"Western L'nion Telegraph Co 

Laakmann & Sherer 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Blanton Milling Co 

American Laundry Machinery Co.. 
Indianapolis Light and Power Co.. 
L. A. Waters Laundry Supply Co.. 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Arthur Jordan Co I 

Brooks Oil Co 

John O'Neill ' 



Character of Claim. 



Ammint. 



3 -Centr.jll Insane. 



Incidental expenses 
Hay 

Main pay roll for February, '98 

Beef 

Ham and pork 

Sheet iron, etc I 

Ice 

Work at store room 

Advertising | 

Pluinhiug, labor, etc i 

Material, labor furnished, etc... I 

2 sets of blankets, etc 

Fixing broken elbow iu tunnel.! 

Turkeys 

Corn meal 

Soap I 

Services as chaplain 

Flour 

Brooms 

Spring wheat flour.. 

Papering, etc 

Electric lamps 

Lumber 

Milk 

Stationery 

Advertising 

Gas 

Barbers' supplies . . 
Maple, syrup, etc... 
Telephone service . . 

Queensware 

Tea, etc i 

Engineer's supplies | 

Potatoes, etc 

Dry goods, etc... 
Tinner's supplies 

Salsoda 

Beef 

Apples, etc 

Ice I 

Globes, etc I 

Hams I 

Groceries 1 

Oil I 

Spectacles, etc I 

Butterine 1 

Pork loins I 

Eggs I 

Hardware | 

Chairs 

Hardware 

Lard 

Oysters 

Grocers' sundries, et< 

Drugs I 

Casket for patient I 

Advertising .-. I 

Yeast I 

Advertising , 

Fuel ! 

Crackers 

Telegrams 

Cement walk | 

Incidental expenses I 

Main pay roll fo^- March, 1898... I 

Winter wheat flour I 

Work on friction pulley, etc \ 

Electric light 

8 bbls. soap I 

Gas I 

Eggs I 

Oil I 

Meal 



417 76 

80 62 
7,027 70 
1,654 19 

507 40 

57 30 

48 00 

12 00 

2 00 

700 00 

134 75 

105 55 

4 34 

2 94 

12 75 

282 56 
20 00 

591 25 
83 50 

185 50 

60 23 
72 00 
99 50 

558 00 

61 90 
7 11 

40 63 

9 80 

24 80 

176 71 

32 96 
665 12 
280 46 
498 44 
171 73 

35 40 
18 48 

1,852 64 

29 25 

64 05 

14 52 

376 35 

1,365 92 

33 79 
9 80 

414 00 

333 88 

143 00 

38 37 

18 00 

79 38 
251 48 
185 30 
265 04 

81 63 
14 00 
10 00 

9 17 

7 20 
1,388 89 

203 58 
1 00 

80 64 
151 22 

7,033 95 
562 50 

8 25 

42 50 
38 89 

43 13 
171 30 

33 79 
12 75 



34 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2— Continued. 



AlllinMit. 




282 
283 

284 

285 

286 

287 

2S8 

289 

290 

291 

292 

293 i 

294 

295 

296 

297 

298 

299 

300 

301 

302 

303 

304 

305 i 

306 I 

307 I 

308 I 
309 
310 
311 
312 

313 I 

314 ! 

315 I 

316 1 
317 

318 ' 

319 ! 

320 ! 

321 I 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 



Joseph Gardner 

Indianapolis Stove Co 

Indianapolis Journal Co 

Indianapolis News Co 

Manufacturers' Natural Ga8 Co 

M. O'Connor &_Co 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co 

Speclalt.v Mnfg. Co 

The Webb-Jameson Co 

Fromnieyer Bros 

Gordon & Harmon 

Hide. Leather & Belting Co 

Indianapolis Water Co 

Friedman Mnfg. Co 

Henry Coburn Lumber Co 

J. M. Sowders 

Charles J. Gardner 

The Ammonia Soap Powder Co 

Schnull & Co 

Indianapolis District Telegraph Co 

Huntington & Page 

"W. C. Frazee 

D. H. Davis 

V. Bachuian 

Techentln & Frieberg 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Albert Gall 

Clarke & Sons 

George J. Mayer 

G. A. Carstensen 

Murphy. Hibben & Co 

George F. Edenharter. Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

George Hltz & Co 

Kipp Bros. Co 

Samuel Geyer 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Bailee & Krauss Co 

The Hltz Baking Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Swift & Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

nildebrand Hardware Co 

Francke Hardware Co 

Knight & Jillson 

Henry Aufderheide 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

Adolph Scherrer 

Wra. B. Burford 

The H. Lleber Co 

Kagsdale & Snow 

John Osterraan 

A. O. Lockrldge 

Bausch & Lomh Optical Co 

Wm. B. Burford 

Friedman Mnfg. Co 

James M. Sowders 

Laakmann vS: Sherer 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

Olds & Company 

Williams & Hunt 

Brooks Oil Co 

American Oil Co : 

Acme Milling Co 

Cabinet Makers' Un-ion 

Indianapolis Chemical Co 

Bianton Milling Co 

Syfers, McBrlde & Co 

George D. Hardin 

J. R. Budd & Co 

J. U. Ryan & Co 

W. H. Armstrong & Co 

Hide. Leather and Belting Co 



Tinner's supplies 

(ias stove 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Fuel gas 

Groceries, etc .. 

Beef 

Sharpening mowers 

Transferring furniture 

Queens ware, etc 

Plowshares, etc 

Belt 

Hydrants, etc 

Butterine 

Lumber 

Fish 

Ice 

Chip soap 

Peaches 

Key sockets, etc 

Florist's supplies 

Milk 

.Services as trustee 

Patent spring flour 

Collar, etc 

Advertising 

Rugs, etc 

Steamfitting new kitchen 

Stamps, etc 

Services as chaplain 

Dry goods, etc 

Main pay roll for April, 1898. 

Incidental expenses 

Potatoes, etc 

Hair brushes, etc 

Oats 

Drugs 

Hams 

Table legs, etc 

Crackers 

Carpet stretchers, etc 

Lard, etc 

Gasoline, etc | 

Refrigerator, etc 

Locks, etc.. etc I 

Engineer's supplies I 

Work on morgue, etc., etc 1 

Yeast I 

Services as architect ' 

Stationery I 

Molding 

Caskets 

Services as trustee 

Services as trustee 

Eye pieces, etc i 

Stationery I 

Butterine | 

Fish 

Cementing water table, etc 

Coal 

Chip soap 

Salsoda 

Oil 

Oil 1 

Winter wheat flour 

Kitchen tables • — | 

Boiler compound i 

Spring wheat flour 

Panned peaches 

Straw I 

Eggs 

Rye flour and meal ' 

Thermometers 

Belt 



3 

540 

38 

187 

5 

5 

106 

210 

2 

20 

307 

7,061 

218 

589 

21 

37 

190 

255 

10 

164 

12 

494 

7 

26 

11 

218 

799 

7 

380 

105 

18 

42 

39 

15 

13 

30 

318 

119 

12 

107 

408 

14 

34 

7 

642 

136 

75 

225 

300 

11 

151 

36 

12 

1 



35 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 
366 
367 
368 
360 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 
383 
384 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
395 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 

401 I 

402 I 
403 
404 
405 
406 I 
407 
408 
409 I 
410 

411 I 

412 I 

413 I 
414 

415 ! 

416 I 

417 I 

418 I 
419 
420 

421 I 

422 I 

423 I 

424 I 
425 
426 
427 

425 ! 
429 I 



NAME. 



CliJinicter of Claim. 



Amount. 



Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

W. C. Frazee 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Consumers' Ice Co 

Indianapolis News Co 

Journal Newspaper Co 

.Tames Collier 

Chas. G. Grab 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

Huntington & Page 

HoUweg & Reese 

M. O'Connor & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

H. T. Conde Implement Co 

Joseph Gardner 

Sander & Recker 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 

Knight & Jillson 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Parrott-Taggart Co 

Syerup & Co 

Swift & Company 

Kipp Bros. Co 

The H. Lieber Co 

Consolidated Coal and Lime Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co 

A. Kiefer Drug Co 

The McElwain-Richards Co 

Severin, Ostermeyer & Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co... 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

The Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

C. H. McDowell 

Ross W. Weir & Co 

Sam Marks 

C. H. McDowell 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

E. B. McComb 

Wm. B. Burford 

Brooks Oil Co 

Indianapolis Journal News Co.. 

rtidianapolis Gas Co 

Frommeyer Bros 

J. R. Budd & Co 

Huntington & Page 

The A. Burdsal Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

J. R. Ryan & Co 

The John Van Range Co 

Murphv. Hibben & Co 

L. E. Morrison & Co 

Joseph Gardner 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

W. C. Frazee 

Syerup vt Company 

George Hitz & Co 

James L. Keach 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 

Consumers' Ice Co 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

The Indianapolis News Co 

James Collier 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co 

Kipp Bros. Co 

O. P. Barnell, Agent 

Board of Public Safety 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co 

The Ammonia Soap Powder Co 
Nelson Morris Co 



Yeast 

Milk 

Dry goods, etc 

Ice 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Caskets 

Sharpening razors, etc 

Gas 

Fuel gas 

Grass seed, etc 

Queensware 

Groceries 

Dry goods 

Shovels for cultivator 

Tinner's stock 

Commode 

Twine, etc 

Engineer's supplies 

Hams 

Crackers 

Potatoes, etc 

Pork loins, etc 

Base balls, etc 

Photographic materials 

Cement 

Hardware, etc 

Beef 

Drugs 

Engineer's supplies 

Grocers' sundries 

Telegrams 

Incidental expenses 

Main pay roll for May, 1898. 

Advertising 

Services as chaplain 

Tea 

Hay 

Services as chaplain 

Butterine 

Flour 

Stationery 

Oil 

Advertising 

Gas 

Queensware, etc 

Eggs 

Lewis Pump Co 

Gasoline, etc 

Drugs 

Groceries 

Meal 

1 new galv. iron hot oven... 

Dry goods, etc 

Rubber blankets 

Wash sinks, etc 

Advertising 

Milk 

Strawberries, etc 

Blackberries, etc 

Potatoes, etc 

Ice box 

Ice 

Yeast 

Advertising 

Caskets 

Fuel gas 

Telegrams 

Cards, etc 

Spring wheat flour 

Fire alarm 

Beef 

Chipped soap 

Hams 



7 44 
558 00 
88 49 

147 21 
2 10 
4 00 

21 00 
7 90 

35 25 
1,388 89 

28 20 

58 61 
2,112 15 

70 35 
4 80 

124 11 
4 75 

7 05 

148 59 
294 02 

93 56 
655 88 
594 75 

20 84 
6 75 

22 50 
106 06 

1,892 67 
194 53 

49 55 
455 64 

2 25 
210 80 

7,078 15 

3 00 
10 00 

300 25 
40 50 
20 00 
423 50 
725 00 

125 01 
33 79 

2 00 
35 00 

•252 39 
151 20 

8 00 

3 60 
109 04 

1,721 29 

18 00 

55 00 

380 72 

90 00 

158 85 

3 00 

540 00 

156 90 

154 35 

618 92 

12 00 

415 41 

6 94 

1 83 

28 00 

1,388 89 

1 25 

32 50 

259 00 

50 00 
2,213 55 

561 17 
319 24 



36 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



(."liiiraotcr of Clitini. 



Amount. 



430 
431 

432 I 
433 
434 
435 

436 I 

437 I 

438 ! 

439 I 

440 I 

441 ; 
442 

443 ! 

444 I 
445 
446 

447 I 

448 I 

449 I 

450 I 

451 I 
452 
453 
454 
455 
456 
457 
458 
459 I 
460 

461 i 

462 ! 

463 1 
464 

465 I 

466 1 
467 

468 I 

469 ' 

470 I 

471 ; 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 
479 
480 
481 
482 
483 

484 1 

485 I 

486 I 

487 I 

488 [ 
489 

490 ' 

491 I 

492 I 

493 I 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 

499 I 

500 I 
501 
502 
503 ' 



Wni. H. Armstrong & Co 

Specially Mfg. Co 

Parrott-Taggart Co 

Swift & Company 

Schleiclier-Marten Co 

George F. Edeuharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co — 

.lolin O'Xeill 

General Electric Co 

American Oil Co 

Francis Bergman 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

V. Bachman 

The Thompson & Chute Soap Co.. 

E. B. McComb 

C. J. Truemper 

Brooks Oil Co 

A. O. Lockridge 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Murphy. Hibljen & Co 

Peter F. Bryce 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Swift & Company 

Huntington & Page 

Syfers. McBrlde & Co 

.7. K. Budd & Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

Consumers' Ice Co 

E. T. Smith 

Francke Hardware Co 

Chas. G. Grah 

Indianapolis Light and Power Co.. 

George Hltz & Co 

Indianapolis -Abattoir Co 

Fronimeyer Bros 

The Indianapolis New"s Co 

James Collier 

Wni. B. Burford 

W. C. Frazee 

C. H. McDowell 

Wni. H. Armstrong & Co 

.Tames Ij. Keach 

fJeorge F. Edenharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

Western Union Telegraph Co 

D. H. Davis 

Wm. B. Burford 

C. II. McDowell 

James Collier 

Samuel G. Marks i 

W. C. Frazee 

Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Co 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Parrott-Taggart Co 

George Hitz & Co 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co — 

Kipp Bros. Co 

Ilollweg & Ileese 

Indianapolis Ice Co 

G. Hank & Sowders 

Clemens Vonnegut 

J. U. Uvan & Co 

Nelson Morris & Co 

Indianapolis .Mjattolr Co 

Coffin. Fletcher & Co 

M. O'Connor & Co 

Olds & Company 



Water bottles, etc 

Fan brushes 

Crackers 

Pork and lard 

Table cloth 

Incidental expense 

Main pay roll for June, 1898. 

Fuel 

Flour and meal 

Lamps, etc 

Oil 

Salsoda 

Butteriue 

Uye flour 

ciiipped soap 

Winter wheat flour 

Awnings 

Oil 

Expenses as member Board. 

(ias 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Drugs 

Dry goods 

Crackers 

Hams 

Lard 

Seed beans, etc 

Canned Peaches 

Kggs 

Groceries 

Ice 

Fish 

Wire cloth, etc 

Grinding razors, etc 

Electric light 

Potatoes, etc 

Beef 

Queensware 

Advertising 

Casket 

Stationery 

Milk 

Services as chaplain 

Making truss 

Melons 

Incidental expense 

Maiu pay roll for July, 1898.. 

Yeast 

Telegrams 

Expense as member Board.. 

Stationery 

Services as chaplain 

Caskets 

Hay 

Milk 

.\dvertising 

Advertising 

Drugs 

Dry goods 

Butter crackers 

Potatoes, lemons, etc 

Fuel gas 

Spectacles, etc 

Queeusware 

Natural Ice 

Fish 

Chambers, etc 

Oats, etc 

Lard 

Beef 

Hams, etc 

Groceries 

Soap 



37 



EXHIBIT Xo. 2— ("ontinue.l 



No. 



NAME. 



Cbaractcr of Claim. 



Amount. 



504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 
525 
526 
527 
528 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 
536 
537 
538 
539 
540 
541 
542 
543 
544 
545 
546 
547 
548 
549 
550 
551 
552 
553 
554 
555 
556 
557 
558 
559 
560 
561 
562 
563 
564 
565 
566 
567 
568 
569 
570 
571 
572 
573 
574 
575 
576 
577 



Brooks Oil Co 

J. U. Budd & Co 

Acme Millinj^ Co 

Frances Smith 

V. Bachman 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

J. C. Tarklngfon 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

I Western Union Telegraph Co 

I Central Union Telephone Co 

George F. Edonharter, Supt ". . . . 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Kingan & Co., Ltd 

The Yalo & Towne Mfg. Co 

I George D. Hardin 

' C. H. McDowell 

I Indianapolis News Co 

I W. M. Langenskamp 

1 Kingan & Co., Ltd 

1 Pioneer Brass Works 

I J. R. R.ran & Co 

George J. Mayer 

I). P. Erwin & Co 

Murphy. Hibbeu & Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

The H. Lieber Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

I J. K. Budd & Co 

Acme Milling Co 

I Indianapolis Chemical Co 

I V. Bachman 

I Nelson Morris & Co 

; Crall & Meyer 

! George Hitz & Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

I Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Co 

j Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

I John Marsh & Co 

Wm. H. Armstrong «fc Co 

I Francke Hardware Co 

Daniel Stewart Co '. — 

1 SchnuU & Co 

I Ward Bros. Drug Co 

UJoseph Gardner 

! Swift & Company 

1 .The Sinker-Davis Co 

W. C. Frazee 

I Olds & Company 

I M. O'Connor & Co 

; Wm. H. Thomas & Co 

I Wm. B. Burford 

I James Collier 

! AVestern Union Tel. Co 

I Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

J. M. Sowders 

I Brooks Oil Co 

Williams & Hunt 

I Consumers' Ice Co 

1 Peter F. Bryce 

I Troy Laundry Machinery Co 

i Knight & Jillson 

I Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co 

I L. E. Webb 

; George F. Edenharter, Supt 

I George F. Edenharter, Supt 

I V. Bachman 

C. E. Coffin & Co 

Indianapolis Light and Power Co.. 
I Nelson Morris & Co 

! Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co — 
Chas. G. Grab 
Wm. B. Burford 
J. R. Ryan & Co 
Peter Nutz 



Oil 

Eggs 

Winter wheat flour 

Salsoda 

Spring wheat flour 

Yeast 

Chloro-naptholeum 

Gas 

Telegrams 

Telephone service 

Incidental expenses 

Main pay roll for August, '98| 

Butterine 

Locks, Iceys for repairs 

Straw 

Sermons 

Advertising 

Mending copper boiler 

Butterine 

Gate valve stem 

Corn meal 

Stamps 

Dry goods, etc 

Dry goods, etc 

Gasoline 

Mounted chromos, etc 

Wire rope, etc 

Eggs 

Winter wheat fiour 

Boiler compound 

Spring wheat flour 

Fresh beef 

Potatoes 

Lemons 

Gas 

Advertising ... 

Advertising ... 

Repair elevator I 

For truss 

Hardware 

Medical supplies ! 

Grocer's sundries I 

Drugs I 

Tin I 

Hams, bacon and lard 

Repairs on boilers — '. I 

Milk I 

Chipped soap I 

Groceries I 

Spectacles I 

Stationery I 

Caskets I 

Telegrams | 

Yeast • 

Fish 

Oil I 

Salsoda ' l 

Ice I 

Butter crackers 

Aprons for Duplex mangle 

Engineer's supplies I 

Fuel I 

Repairs, shoeing 

Incidental expenses 

Main pay roll, September, 1898.. 

Spring wheat flour 

R^t for the English farm 

Tlie electric current 

Lard 

Fuel gas 

Barber supplies I 

Stationery ' 

Meal, etc i 

Mending shoes ! 



33 79 
124 20 
421 25 

10 21 
173 25 

8 37 

12 50 
35 50 

1 44 

106 41 

.112 20 

6,959 95 

406 45 

119 91 

16 76 

20 00 

1 83 

4 50 

355 75 

1 25 

11 50 

2 70 

87 78 
43 43 

60 

72 17 

8 74 

187 20 

412 50 

75 00 

138 25 

2,158 89 

414 07 

10 00 

35 38 

2 00 

3 00 

6 70 
1 13 
3 23 
3 75 

96 95 

60 18 

39 00 

569 29 

203 50 

540 00 

299 65 

1,356 86 

3 67 

88 59 
14 00 

1 03 

7 88 
116 92 

33 15 

27 21 

173 61 

104 90 

24 00 

25 18 
1,388 89 

13 75 
140 00 

6,932 95 
138 25 
654 50 
42 50 
154 75 

1,388 89 

4 00 

29 70 
35 00 

30 50 



38 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



578 
579 
580 
581 
582 
583 
584 
585 
586 
587 
588 
589 
590 
591 
592 
593 
594 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
605 
606 
607 
608 
609 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
615 
616 
617 



G. A. Carstensen 

Brooks Oil Co 

E. B. McComb 

Coffin, Fletcher & Co 

L. E. Webb 

J. R. Budd & Co 

Elgin Dairy Co 

Indianapolis Gas Co 

Indianapolis Sentinel Co 

Central Union Telephone Co 

W. C. Frazee 

Ward Bros. Drug Co 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

Consumers' ice Co 

Holhveg & Reese 

M. O'Connor & Co 

James Collier 

Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Co 

The Indianapolis News Co 

Elliptical Carbon Co 

Chas. J. Gardner 

D. H. Davis 

J. M. Sowders 

Parrott-Taggart Co 

George Hitz & Co 

J. L. Keacli 

Sehuull & Co 

Teckentiu & Frieberg 

A. O. Lockridge 

Francke Hardware Co 

Lion Compressed Yeast Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Wm. H. Armstrong & Co 

Hildebrand Hardware Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Kipp Bros. Co 

Hide, Leather and Belting Co 

George W. Stout 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Total 

Less contingent cash 



Services as chaplain 

Engine oil 

Winter wheat flour 

Hams and bacon 

Blacksmlthlng 

Eggs 

Butterine 

Gas 

Advertisement 

Telephone service 

Milk 

Drugs 

Work on boilers 

Ice 

Queensware 

Groceries, sundries 

Caskets, burials 

Advertisement 

Advertisement 

Carbons 

Beef 

Expenses as trustee 

Fish 

Butter crackers 

Fruit, etc 

Potatoes, etc 

Groceries 

Harness 

Expenses as Trustee 

Wheelbarrows, etc 

Yeast 

Blankets, etc 

Surgical supplies 

Porcelain cups, etc 

Blankets, etc 

Ceiling brushes, etc 

Belts 

Groceries 

Incidental expenses 

Main pay roll for October, 1898. 



25 00 

33 79 
403 75 
233 50 

13 50 
216 00 
405 35 

40 50 

4 00 

106 36 

558 00 

55 20 

135 63 
123 75 

15 44 
182 50 

28 00 
2 00 
2 58 
8 00 

1,894 40 

48 25 

114 12 

87 55 

136 55 
343 21 

1,075 56 

23 75 
35 70 

29 50 
8 37 

1,107 82 

82 98 

46 08 

832 40 

24 80 

161 48 
2,254 87 

162 25 
6,878 25 



$227,000 00 
2,000 00 



Total from maintenance fund. 



$226,000 00 



39 



EXHIBIT X( 



StiitiiiKiif of Vouchers of ExponHtiiiu s Jram Rc/xn'r Kund I )ii r 
iny the Fiscal Year En<l'ni(j October Ji, LSO^S. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 


$4 75 


38 45 


110 20 


6 40 


45 11 


30 94 


20 70 


600 85 


52 25 


6 65 


30 30 


612 65 


28 50 


9 50 


2 60 


20 00 


33 40 


18 10 


570 00 


1 50 


26 39 


9 95 


22 05 


30 00 


20 70 


79 17 


184 30 


4 35 


596 00 


21 00 


7 00 


1 50 


45 56 


16 40 


614 90 


63 25 


5 25 


16 45 


10 00 


9 40 


21 40 


613 50 


4 40 


81 00 


1 50 


5 00 


42 00 


8 50 


602 90 


12 85 


26 50 


44 00 


5 20 


126 79 


61 68 


28 15 


7 90 


155 15 


14 00 


22 40 


593 85 


4 05 


155 28 



A. B. Me.ver &: Co 

Prancke & Scliindler 

Indianapolis M'l'g & Carp. Union 

A. Burdsal Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Indianapolis Paint & Color Co 

L. E. Webb 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

L. E. Webb 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

Balke-Krauss Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

A. B. Meyer & Co 

Francke Hardware Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

H. J. Reedy's Elevator Co 

Chas. F. Welking 

L. E. Webb 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

John W. Coons 

Alden Speares, Sons & Co 

The Simplex Electrical Co 

Schultz & Sommers 

John Marsch & Co 

Balke-Krauss Co 

Kirkhoff Bros 

The McElwaine-Richards Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Fertig & Kevers 

L. E. Webb 

Martin J. O'Reilly 

Daniel Stewart Co 

L. E. Webb 

George F. I'Menharter, Supt 

Wm. Muecke 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Wm. Ehrich 

Bernhardt & Dammel 

L. E. Webb 

Chas. F. Wehking 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Martin J. O'Reilly 

Lewis Jones 

Wm. Laugsenkamp 

Chas. Krauss 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

L. E. Webb 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Techentin & Frieberg 

Knight >& Jillson 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Consolidated Coal & Lime Co 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

Henry Coburn Lumber Co 

Chas. F. Wehking 

L. E. Webb 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

American Laundry Machinery Co. 
Balke & Krauss Co 



I..ime, etc 

Hardware, etc 

Lumber, etc 

Painters' stock 

Painters' supplies 

Painters' supplies 

Blacksmithiug 

Repair pay-roll for Nov., 1897.. 

Repairing, shoeing, etc 

Repairing shaft, etc 

Lumber for stairs 

Repair pay-roll for Dec, 1897.. 

Cement, etc 

Door bell, etc 

Ornaments, etc 

Repairing elevator 

Repairing morgue, etc 

Repairing wagons, etc 

Repair pay-roll for Jan., 1898.. 

Repairing fire extinguisher 

Paint 

Repairing western wing 

Repairing Trustees' office 

Repairing elevator 

Lumber, etc 

Pipe, plumber's time 

Engineer's supplies | 

Paint, etc 

Repair pay-roll for Feb., 1898... 

Touching up frescoing | 

Repair bill | 

Shoeing horse I 

Paints for repairs | 

Repairs on wagon, etc ! 

Repair pay roll for March, 1898.. I 

Painting walls, etc 

Lime, etc., for repairs 

Repairing kitchen range 

Crushed stone for walks 

Repairs and horse shoeing I 

Brickmason work 1 

Repair pay roll for April, 1898... 

A new cutter per old one 

Glass for repairs | 

Shoeing horse ' 

Sand for repairs | 

Repairs on kettle I 

Repairing pumps 

Repair pay roll for May, 1898 I 

Repairing machinery I 

Repairing wagons, etc I 

Lumber for repairing 1 

Repairing harness | 

Plumbing material for repairs...] 

Hardware for repairs 

Cement, etc., for repairs I 

Repairing machinery I 

Lumber for repairing I 

Brick for repairs 1 

Repairing and shoe bill I 

Repair pay roll for June, 1898... 

1 new hinge for old one i 

Lumber | 



40 



EXHIBIT Xo. 3— Continued. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 



Indianapolis Paint & Color Co... 

The Sinker-Davis Co 

Pioneer Brass Works 

Joseph Gardner 

The A. Burdsal Co 

Knight & Jillson 

Techentin & Frieberg 

Anderson Bruner 

L. E. Webb 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Balke & Krauss Co 

Knight & Jillson 

Joseph Gardner 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

L. E. Webb 

Manufacturers' Natural Gas Co. 

Jos. R. Adams 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Balke & Krauss Co 

The Singer M'f 'g Co 

Clemens Vonnegut 

Francke Hardware Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Total from repair fund 



Paints, etc 

Repairing machinery 

Repairing whistle 

Tinner supplies 

Repairs and gasoline 

Engineer supplies 

Repairing harness 

Repairing building sewers 

Repairing wagons, etc 

Repair pay roll. July, 1898 

Lime for repairing 

Engineer repairs 

Solder for repairs 

Repairing wagon scale 

Repair pay roll, August, 1898 — 

Repairing wagons, etc 

Replping natural gas line 

Painting gate house, etc 

Repair pay roll, September, 1898. 

Fire clay for repairs 

Repairs on sewing machines 

Iron rope for elevator 

Hardware 

Repair pay roll for October, 1898 



115 11 

75 

2 50 

21 05 

2 20 
73 65 

3 75 
43 95 
23 85 

581 00 

3 00 

39 34 

11 00 

1 60 
547 65 

18 40 
700 00 

19 50 
539 50 

2 50 
5 70 

3 90 
60 98 

514 65 



$10,000 00 



41 



EXHIBIT No. 4 



Stdtcnu-hf of Voucher!> of JExpt'iu/ifm-cs from, Clothing Fiiml 
I)iu-h(<i the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 189S. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Amount. 


$148 50 


56 10 


213 00 


549 96 


222 10 


31 65 


810 19 


115 00 


205 25 


318 28 


115 00 


194 00 


52 20 


52 50 


3 40 


89 76 


194 00 


5 10 


75 00 


189 96 


193 50 


140 36 


190 75 


45 70 


187 00 


97 50 


150 00 


69 72 


193 75 


338 46 


104 00 


1 88 


1 30 


194 00 


37 80 


126 80 


88 00 


191 00 


1 75 


7 36 


81 70 


44 00 


66 00 


193 25 


33 25 


76 32 


10 80 


193 75 


19 45 


101 15 


178 75 



Hendrickson Lefler & Co 

L. E. Morrisou & Co 

Nathan Plant & Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

George P. Edenharter, Supt 

Peter Nutz 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Manuf actors' Shoe Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

Manuf actors' Shoe Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Peter Nutz 

Nathan Plant & Co 

The Singer M'f'g Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

L. E. Morrison & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt 

Peter Nutz 

J. A. Ehrensperger 

Salis & Co 

The C. B. Cones & Son M'f'g Co. 



George F. Edenharter, Supt.. 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

J. A. Ehrensperger «& Co 

Hendrickson, Lefler & Co 

The Singer M'f'g Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt.. 

Peter Nutz 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

J. A. Ehrensperger & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt.. 

Christian Busch 

The Singer M'f'g Co 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

J. A. Ehrensperger & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt. 

Peter Nutz 

D. P. Erwin & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt. 

L. E. Morrison & Co 

Murphy, Hibben & Co 

George F. Edenharter, Supt.. 



Hats, etc 

Rubber coats, etc 

Shoes 

Dry goods, etc 

Clothing pay roll for Nov., 1897. 

Repairing shoes 

Dry goods and notions 

Ladies' shoes 

Clothing pay-roll for Dec, 1897. 

Dry goods, etc 

Ladies' shoes 

Clothing pay-roll for Jan., 1898. 

Repairing shoes 

Ladies' shoes 

Needles 

Dry goods, etc 

Clothing pay-roll for Feb., 1898. 

Rubber boots 

Shirts, collars, etc 

Dry goods, etc. 

Clothing pay-roll for Mar., 1898. 

Dry goods, etc 

Clothing pay-roll for Apr., 1898. 

Mending shoes 

Shoes 

Slippers 

Pants 

Shirting , 

Clothing pay-roll for May, 1898. , 

Clothing, .etc 

Shoes, etc 

Caps 

Oil 

.Clothing pay-roll for June, 1898. 

Repairing shoes 

Dry goods, etc 

Shoes 

Clothing pay-roll for July, 1898. 

Repairing shoes 

^Repairing machines 

Dry goods, etc 

Ladies' shoes 

Hose 

Clothing pay-roll for Aug., 1898.. 

Mending shoes 

Dry goods, etc 

Dry goods, etc 

Clothing pay-roll for Sept., 1898. 

Rubber coats, etc 

Dry goods, etc 

Clothing pay-roll for Oct., 1898.. 



Total for clothing fund 



$7,000 CO 



42 



EXHIBIT Xo. 5. 



Statinii lit iif Vinirhers of E.ipi'ii(Jitiirts from Plainhiiiy i^iml 
iJiirimi flu Fisral Year Endinfi (Mohcr 31, 1898. 



No. 


NAME. 


Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


5 


Joseph Gardner 

George W. Keyser 

V-nSaYi* X. Jillonn 




$93 00 


6 


Bath tubs, etc 


1,250 00 


7 




113 02 


1 """"" '^ " 








Total 


$1,456 02 







EXHIBIT X^o. G. 



Statement of Vom-licrs of Expenditures from Pointing Fund Dm- 
in;/ Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1898. 



No. 



NAME. 



Character of Claim. 



Indianapolis Paint and Color Co.. 

Jenkins & Davi.s 

Indianapolis Paint and Color Co.. 

Jenkins and Davis 

Indianapolis Paint and Color Co.. 
Indianapolis Paint and Color Co.. 
Indianapolis Paint and Color Co.. 
Jos. U. Adams 

Total 



Paint 

Painting wards 

Paints, etc 

Balance for painting 

Paints, etc 

Paints 

Paints 

For painting wards .. 



Amount. 


$543 90 

1,000 00 

151 96 

500 00 

11 05 

373 01 

70 08 

2,350 00 



$5,000 00 



EXHIBIT Iso. 7. 



Statement of Vouchers of Expenditures from Kite/on <(nd Restora- 
tion of Booms Fund During tlu- Fiscal Year Ending October 31. 
1898. 



No. 


NAME. 


Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


1 

9 


Henry Aufderhelde 

Henrv Aufderhelde 


Materials furnished, etc $1,500 00 

Materials, labor, etc | 2,500 00 

Materials, labor, etc 2,000 00 


3 


Henry Aufderhelde 




Total 




$6.000 00 









43 



EXHIBIT No. 8. 



Statement of Voariiers of ExpciKlituns from Kifc/nn Eqai/pmcnt 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1898. 



No. 


NAME. 


Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


1 


The John Van Range Co 




$1,200 00 










Total 


$1,200 00 



EXHIBIT Xo. 9. 



Statement of Vouchers of Expenditures from Fii.rnitun for Re- 
stored Rooms Fund During flic Fiscal Year Ending Ocfober 31, 
1898. 



No. 


NAME. 


Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


1 


Sander & Recker ^0 iron hpds nnd sririn^.s 


$165 00 


•> 


J. C. Hlrschman Co 

Albert Gall 


Hair 


195 00 


? 




15 81 


4 


Albert Gall 


Matting 

Clocks 


67 80 


t; 


Kipp Bros Co 


14 00 


B 


Sander & Recker 


Rocking chairs 


42 39 










Total 




$500 00 


« 







EXHIBIT Xo. 10. 



Statement of Vouchers of Expenditures from Greenhouse Fund. 
During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



No. 


NAME. Character of Claim. 


Amount. 


2 


The John A. Schumacher Co 

The John A. Schumacher Co 

Adolph Scherrer, architect 




$1,500 00 


3 


For material, etc 


830 00 


4 


Services rendered 


131 60 


5 


F. J. Mack & Co 


Painting greenhouse 


78 40 




1 






1 

1 Tfitnl 




$2,540 00 




1 







44 



EXHIBIT No. 11. 



Balance Sheet, October o'l, 1898. 

Earnings $1,393 65 

Subsistence $93,439 99 

House furnistiings 8,378 99 

Repairs to permanent improvements 2,114 47 

Painters' supplies 387 13 

Engineers supplies 2,555 02 

Clotliing • 4,255 90 

Electric light 1,204 77 

Tinners' supplies 419 61 

Incidental expenses 3,352 30 

Salaries and wages 93,867 10 

Ward supplies 1,494 60 

Medical supplies 1,848 81 

Laundry supplies 4,969 56 

Smithing 248 25 

Gas 471 90 

Hardware 639 02 

Fuel 16.792 48 

Permanent improvement 12,400 16 

Farm 677 05 

Florist supplies 88 36 

Lumber 808 04 

Newspapers _ 107 02 

Vehicles and harness 59 25 

Stationery 1.216 02 

Electric 508 69 

Provender 375 72 

Jno. Osterman, treasurer 1.393 65 

Central Indiana Hospital for Insane 2,012,367 04 

Real estate 1,534,177 70 

Personal property 228,668 57 

Garden 209 35 

Painting account 5,000 00 

Fire department 50 00 

Plumbing account 93 00 

Total $2,018,016 59 $2,018,016 59 



45 



EXHIBIT No. 12. 



.1 Sc/ic(Ih/c of ^[ccounts irifh Sxiulrij Counties fur ClothiiKj o/kI 
Ui((lcrtakuig, Issued to Patients During the Fisrol Year Eml- 
ing October SI, 1898. 

Adams .150 35 

Allen 7 65 

Bartholomew 288 05 

Benton 145 50 

Boone 152 35 

Brown Ill 45 

Carroll 127 90 

Clarke 270 55 

Clay 269 85 

Clinton 175 50 

Crawford 38 90 

Dearborn 247 60 

Dubois 9 10 

Daviess 16 55 

Floyd 251 60 

Fountain 245 60 

Franklin 14 90 

Fulton 15 70 

Greene . 4 45 

Hamilton 162 30 

Hancock 134 00 

Harrison 16 SO 

Hendricks 152 70 

Howard 152 65 

Huntington 23 10 

. Jackson 261 45 

Jefferson 224 70 

Jennings 121 20 

Johnson 147 05 

Lake 1 90 

Lawrence 117 10 

Martin 16 75 

Monroe 190 90 

Montgomery 187 40 

Morgan 144 20 

Noble 32 65 

Ohio 53 90 

Owen 139 25 

Parke 209 35 

Periy 10 50 



46 



E:XHIBIT Xo. 12— Continued. 

Pike 2 05 

Posey <> 05 

Pulaski 2 75 

Porter 20 

Putnam 1)7 25 

Randolph 1 50 

Ripley 216 80 

Scott 49 15 

Shelby 188 15 

Spencer 23 25 

Sl^uben 38 55 

St. .Joseph 32 55 

Sullivan 14 90 

Switzerland 110 35 

Tippecanoe 432 20 

Tipton 128 20 

Vermillion 34 10 

Vigo 537 25 

Warren 33 80 

Washington 21G 05 

Whitley 10 00 

Knox 2 50 

Laporte 10 00 

Wabash 1 20 

Marion 2,093 05 

Total $9,175 25 



47 



EXHIBIT Xo. 13. 



Value of HospitiiJ Pi-ndiirts IssiikI JJh/'i'ik/ tin Fiscal Y(((r Eml-^ 
ing 0<-tnhrr SI, 1S98. 

290 barrels green beans $362 50 

290 barels cabbage 116 00 

3,914 dozen gTeen corn on cob 195 70 

1S5 barrels cantelonpe 185 00 

187 barrels beets 233 75 

1,(jOO bushels turnips 320 00 

490 bushels onions 294 00 

59 barrels rhubarb 7 59 00 

200 bushels lettuce 80 00 

25 barrels radishes 31 25 

35 barrels cucumbers 43 75 

375 bushels turnips 187 50 

100 barrels kraut 600 00 

14 barrels pickled beans 70 00 

3.328 pumpkins 166 40 

1.781 bushels tomatoes 712 40 

30 bushels onion sets 60 00 

760 bushels new corn 212 80 

Total $3,930 05 



4.S 



EXHIBIT Ko. 14. 



Rejwrt nf JJi.scardcd Propcrt;/ Solil <in<l Proccnis Paid into Strife 
Treasury During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 



Date. 



1897. 
Nov. 1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

3. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

5. 

5. 

5. 
11. 
12. 
15. 
17. 
17. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
19. 
20. 
23. 
24. 
24. 
25. 
25. 
30. 
30. 
30. 

2. 
30. 
26. 
30. 
30. 

1. 

1. 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 
11. 
23. 
23. 
29. 
30. 
10. 
20. 
21. 
31. 
31. 
31. 
1898. 
Jan. 3. 

3. 

6. 



Dec 



PURCHASER. 



Property Sold. 



D. H. Darnell 

G. W. Christie 

P. Bauman 

Fred Goepper 

David Gladden 

A. Baumann 

C. Busch 

H. Cohen 

John Tolen 

M. Jones 

W. M. Robinson 

E. Osborn 

E. B. McComb 

L. E. Snider 

H. Cohen 

Frank Hulsopple 

Charles Oursler 

A. C. Cossel 

A. Williams 

H. Cohen 

John Tolen 

E. B. McComb 

P. Baumann 

W. M. McNealy 

L. E. Webb 

P. Tomlinson 

Peter Miller 

Joe Busch 

P. Baumann 

Mrs. Youngerman 

Mrs. L. Swamstedt 

George Werner 

Darnell, Pence & Robertson.. 
Darnell, Pence & Robertson. 

Mrs. Lavonia Keyle 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

E. B. McComb 

Williams & Hunt 

H. Cohen 

P. Baumann 

John Tolen 

P. Tomlinson 

John Sheridan 

W. S. Johnson 

P. Brown 

G. W. Christie 

D. Gladden 

Ella NMklri£ 

D. H. Darnell 

Nancy C. Wells 

Henry Pence \ 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 



Wood 

9 barrels 

26 barrels 

Load of wood 

2 barrels 

2 barrels 

Wood and barrels 

17 barrels 

50 boxes 

1 bos 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

20 barrels 

1 box 

6 barrels 

2 coal buckets 

2 loads wood 

20 barrels refused corn 

2 barrels refused corn and wood 

10 barrels and bottles 

25 boxes 

22 barrels 

14 barrels 

Wood 

1 window sash 

Wood 

Wood 

Wood 

25 barrels 

Wood 

Making three wrappers 

Telegram 

Slops, month of November, 1897. 
Slops, month of December, 1897. 

Making two dresses 

2.214 pounds rags, $1.50 

2,600 pounds bones, at 40c 

100 barrels, at 15c 

1.750 pounds grease, l%c 

49 barrels 

30 barrels 

45 boxes 

Load of wood 

1 box 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

15 barrels 

1 old bucket 

Telegram 

Vi slops, month of Jan., 1898 — 

Making two dresses 

14 slops, month of Jan., 1898 

135 pounds rags, at $1.50 

1.000 pounds bones, at 40c 



Amount. 



Arthur Younger 1 load of wood 

John Tolen 3 barrels and 25 boxes 

Charles Oursler Load of wood 

George Starz 1 barrel 

Ed Dillon Load of wood 

H. Cohen 13 barrels 

C. Atherton 200 boxes 



$0 15 

1 35 

3 90 

75 

20 

30 

90 

1 05 

50 

10 

35 

15 

3 00 

10 

1 45 

30 

1 50 
5 20 

85 

2 35 
35 

3 30 
1 40 

25 
15 



3 75 
75 

2 15 

25 

27 00 

27 00 

2 00 
33 20 
10 40 
15 00 
26 25 
. 5 60 

4 50 
45 

•75 
15 
75 
75 

2 25 

05 

25 

13 50 

2 00 

6 75 
19 25 

4 00 



15 

50 

2 50 

2 25 



49 



EXHIBIT No. 14— Continued. 



Date. 



Feb 



1898. 
Jan. 27.. 
27.. 
28.. 
28.. 
28.. 
28.. 

3.. 

5.. 

5.. 
10.. 
27.. 
28.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 

1.. 

2.. 

4.. 



23.. 
23.. 
23.. 
23.. 
23.. 
23.. 
24.. 
24.. 
24.. 
24.. 
24.. 
24.. 
24.. 
26.. 
26.. 
26.. 
26.. 
26.. 
28.. 
28.. 
28.. 
28.. 
30.. 
28.. 

1.. 

4.. 

4.. 

5.. 

5.. 

7.. 

9.. 

9.. 
11.. 
14.. 
17.. 
24.. 
24.. 
25.. 
25.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 
31.. 

1.. 

2.. 

7.. 

9.. 

9.. 
22.. 
22.. 



Mar 



Apr. 



rriuciiASER. 



John Storz ..'. 

O. G. Clark 

H. Cohen 

A. C. Garrison 

E. B. McComb 

L. E. Webb 

H. Cohen 

Charle.s Robertson ... 

S. S. Smith 

W. S. Johnson 

Miss Amelia Gordon . 

D. H. Darnell 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. CoKen 

H. Cohen 

Charles Robertson . . . 

J. Jones 

H. Cohen 

\V. AI. Jenkins 

W. M. McNeelv 

D. H. Darnell 

D. H. Darnell 

Henry Pence 

Charles Robertson . . . 
Mrs. Eliz. Fnrniss . . . 

Franlj Reanvere 

J. McCurdy 

John Tolin' 

John Tolin 

Wm. Jenl^ins 

E. B. McComb 

O. G. Clark 

Miss Nancy C. Wells. 

John Barker 

John Tolen 

George Baker 

C. Sheridan 

H. Cohen 

Henry Pence 

H. Cohen 



H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

Charles Oursler ... 
H. Cohen 

C. Sheridan 

W. M. McNeely ... 

George Baker 

John Toler 

John Sheridan 

H. Dana 

W. H. McNeeley .. 
E. B. McCombs ... 

H. Cohen 

Thomas Garet 

Thomas McNutt .. 
Wm. J. Jlnkam . . . 

John Jones 

Pat Dillon 

Adeline Hartman . 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

D. H. Darnell 

H. Cohen 

Pat Dillion 

Charles Long 

Angeline V. Green 

W. S. Johnson 

Charles Oursler . . . 
John Jones 



I'roperty Sold. 



1 barrel , 

2 old screens 

6 barrels 

16 barrels 

48 barrels 

Load of wood 

1,500 pounds bones, 40e 

1/4 slops, month of Jan., 1898 

3 telegrams, Jan. 9, 12 and 15... 
72 barrels 

1 wrapper 

■i/j slops, month of Feb., 1898 

2,620 pounds bones, at 40c 

1,545 pounds grease, at l%c 

5.765 pounds old iron, at 25c 

1.225 pounds rags, at $1.50 

Vi slops, month of Feb., 1898.... 

Load of wood 

9 barrels 

Load of wood ." 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

1/2 slop for March, 1898 

1/4 slop for March, 1898 

14 slop for March, 1898 

Making one dress 

13 barrels, at 15c 

130 butter tubs 

50 boxes 

6 barrels 

Old lumber 

74 barrels, 15c 

25 pounds old iron 

Making one dress 

Load of wood 

18 barrels 

Load of wood 

35 butter tubs 

5 barrels 

14 slops for March, 1898 

3,075 pounds bones 

3,350 pounds old iron 

900 pounds grease 

S25 pounds rags 

222 pounds tea lead 

2 loads of wood 

24 barrels 

2 loads of wood .., 

Load of wood 



4-^Central Insane. 



Load of wood 

50 small boxes 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

bushel refused corn 

23 barrels 

411/. pounds coffee 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

1 old sash 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

2,575 pounds bones 

1,400 pounds grease 

1.200 pounds rags 

Slop, month of' April, 1898 

12 barrels 

Wood 

Wood 

Making three dresses 

372 brls. and 3 brls. old shoes 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 



Amount. 



$0 15 
25 

1 30 

2 40 
7 20 

75 
6 00 

6 75 
75 

7 20 
1 00 

13 50 

10 48 
23 18 

14 41 
18 38 

6 75 
75 

1 35 
30 
25 
75 

13 50 
6 75 
6 75 

2 00 
1 95 

65 

50 

1 20 

50 

11 10 
10 

1 25 
35 
90 
70 
35 
85 

6 75 

12 30 
10 05 

13 50 
12 35 

4 45 
1 50 
4 40 
1 60 
1 00 

1 00 
50 
75 
75 
60 

3 45 
3 32 

75 

50 

25 

75 

75 

75 

10 30 

21 00 

18 00 

27 00 

2 50 
30 
75 

2 25 

35 00 

75 

75 



50 



EXHIBIT Xo. 14— Continued. 




Property Sold. 



Amount. 



William E. Watson . 

H. Cohen 

Pat Dillon 

E. B. McComb 

John Tolen 

H. Spears 

E. B. McComb 

Scott Smith 

Heurv Pence 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

J. H. Stewart 

H. Cohen 

Fred Sticken 

P. Baumaun 

D. H. Darnell 

R. E. McKeown 

C. A. Atherton 

Sam. Brown 

Fred Miukner 

D. Gladden 

Scott Smith 

A. C. Cossell 

R. S. Campbell 

W. M. Renter 

D. H. Darnell 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

W. F. Cobb 

W. M. Farley 

R. S. Camplin 

H. Cohen 

P. Baumann 

John Toler 

Charles Clyster 

Scott Smith 

G. W. Dunn 

H. Cohen 

C. A. Atherton 

Pat Dillon 

Ed Orme 

Frank Hulsopple — 

Fred Minkner 

H. Cohen 

P. Baumaun 

Eliza J. Furniss — 

H. M. Brooks 

W. M. McNeeley .... 

Wm. E. Watson — 

J. H. Stewart 

Mrs. Jane Shirley .. 

D. H. Darnell 

Henry Pence 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

W. M. McNeeley 

Fannie Drum 

C. A. Atherton 

Pat Dillon 

H. Cohen 

R. S. Campbell 

Fred Miukner 

Leon Webb 

AVllliam Renter 

William Peterson ... 
Mrs. Eliza J. Furniss 
Charles Robertson .. 



Load of wood 

10 barrels 

Wood 

20 barrels 

15 barrels 

1 box 

20 barrels 

Wood 

Slops for month of May, 1898.... 

2,225 pounds bones, 40c 

1,675 pounds rags, $1.50 

1,500 pounds grease, l^^c 

1 box 

24 barrels 

Load of wood 

56 barrels 

1 old table 

1 old box 

Load of boxes 

Load of wood 

Load of wood , 

Old trough 

Load of wood 

3 barrels 

Load of berry boxes 

Load of wood 

Slops for month of June, 1898.., 

2,515 pounds bones, 40c 

2.725 pounds old iron, 30c - 

1,350 pounds grease, li4c 

1,525 pounds old rags, IV2C ■ 

2,600 pounds old iron, 25c 

I box 

Box and wood 

Old steps .* 

Old barrels 

27 barrels 

10 boxes 

Wood 

Load wood 

10 berry crates 

10 barrels 

200 berry crates 

Wood 

Old table 

Old lad'r and 1 old I'n mower., 
Wood 

II old barrels 

28 barrels 

Making 1 dress and 4 gowns 

1 old lown mower , 

1 old lawn mower and 5 bushels 

refused corn 

I old lawn mower , 

1 old lawn mower 

Making three dresses 

Vi slops, month of June, 1898.... 

14 slops, month of June, 1898 — 

1.000 pounds grease, 1^40 

2,700 pounds bones. 40c 

1.700 pounds old rags, IV^-c 

Wood and refused corn 

3 barrels and boxes 

70 boxes , 

Load of wood 

20 barrels 

15 berry boxes 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

Load of wood 

Making one dress 

1/4 slops, month of July, 1898.... 



51 



EXHIBIT No. li— Continued. 



Date. 



I'UUCHASEU. 



ixyi 


. 


July 


20.. 


" 


2V.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


Aug. 


2.. 
2.. 
2.. 


•• 


"' 


9.. 


*' 


12.. 


" 


IS.. 


" 


20.. 


<' 


20.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


30.. 


" 


31.. 


" 


31.. 


" 


31.. 


" 


3.. 


" 


31.. 


" 


31.. 


Sept 


. 1.. 
1.. 
3.. 


.< 


" 


5. 


" 


7. 


" 


7. 


" 


8. 


<' 


9. 


" 


14. 


" 


16. 


<' 


23. 


" 


27. 


41 


6. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


*' 


30. 


*' 


30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


Oct 


1. 


'• 


4. 


•' 


7. 


" 


7. 


" 


10. 


" 


13. 


" 


14. 


" 


14. 


" 


18. 


•' 


20. 


<' 


£1. 


" 


24. 


" 


24. 


" 


10. 


<' 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


24. 


" 


25 


" 


25 


" 


25 



Mrs. Cath Grady ... 
E. B. McComb ..... 

D. H. Darnell 

Henry Pence 

W. S. Johnson 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

Robert Tomlinson . 
William J. Curry . 

Scott Smith 

A. C. Cassell 

H. Spears 

Herman Doerre ... 
Charles Oursler — 
William Pierson . . 
W. H. Merritt .... 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

Charles Robertson . 
Charles Robertson 

D. H. Darnell 

William Pierson ... 
Scott Smith 

E. F. Culbertson . . 

Pat Dillon 

Robert Tomlinson . 

C. A. Atherton — 

H. Cohen 

W. J. Carry 

William Jamison .. 

Joe Funk 

A. Long 

A. Williams 

Henry Pence 

Henry Pence 

D. H. Darnell 

Charles Robertson 

E. B. McComb 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

H. Cohen 

Pat Dillon 

H. Cohen 

H. Neal 

Richard Rossberg 
Pauline Rothes ... 
P. Baumann 

D. Gladdin 

Ed Ormes 

Thomas Craig — 
L. H. Carpenter . . 
Kennan Davie — 

E. Snyder 

C. Jones 

Mrs. Ada Miller . 
W. S. Johnson 

D. H. Darnell 

E. B. McComb ... 
H. Cohen 

Cohen 



Property Sold. 



Amount. 



H. Cohen 



Making two wrappers 

62 barrels, at 17c 

V, slops, month of July, 1898. 

14 slops, month of July, 1898. 
490 barrels and old shoes — 

1,000 pounds grease 

3,000 pounds bones 

1,500 pounds old rags 

26 barrels 

45 grape baskets 

1 load of wood 

1 load of wood 

10 barrels 

1 load of wood 

1 load of wood and 2 barrels — 
1 load of wood 

15 grape baskets 

Bottles 

2,425 pounds bones : 

1,500 pounds grease 

1,500 pounds rags 

1/4 slops for August, 1898 

% slops for September, 1898.... 
V- slops for September, 1898 — 

300 baskets 

1 load of wood 

15 old bags 

1 load of wood 

50 grape baskets 

200 grape baskets 

15 barrels 

Wood 

Wood 

1 barrel 

18 barrels and 38 boxes 

1 barrel 

% slops for September, 1898... 

14 slops for October, 1898 

1/2 slops for October, 1898 

14 slops for October. 1898 

75 barrels 

2,675 pounds bones, 40c 

1,000 pounds grease, H4c 

1.200 pounds rags, IV2C 

80 pounds tea lead, 2c 

Wood 

23 barrels 

Wood 

Wood and barrel 

1 box 

15 barrels 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

Wood and barrel 

Wood 

Wood 

1 box 

1 box 

Making two dresses 

374 barrels and old shoes 

1/2 slops for November, 1898 

116 barrels 

2,000 pounds bones 

995 pounds rags 

900 pounds grease 



150 

10 54 
13 50 

6 75 
50 00 
12 50 

12 00 
22 50 

7 05 
90 
75 
25 
50 
30 

1 00 
60 
35 
10 

9 70 
18 75 
22 50 

6 75 
6 75 

13 bo 

2 25 
50 
75 
45 

35 

2 00 

4 40 

25 

25 

25 

2 55 

10 

6 75 

6 75 

13 50 

6 75 

11 25 

10 70 

12 50 
IS 00 

1 60 
15 

6 25 
05 

1 00 
10 

2 25 
10 
25 
85 
75 
75 
10 
10 

2 00 
38 40 

13 50 
17 40 

8 00 

14 90 

11 25 



Total 



$1,393 65 



52 



EXHIBIT 'No. 15. 



INVOICE OF THE CEXTRAL INDIANA HOSPITAL 
FOR THE IXSAXE 



For the Fiscal Year Eialing October SI, 1898. 

Housekeeper's department, D. F. W $6,573 25 

Housekeeper's department, store bouse 878 55 

Housekeeper's department, D. F. M 5,435 10 

Ward property, D. F. M 18,500 02 

"Ward property, D. F. AV 18,464 02 

General kitchen, D. F. M 3,972 70 

General kitchen, D. F. W 5,463 15 

Dining department 981 95 

Marking room, D. F. M 1,783 01 

Marking room, D. F. W 263 45 

Sewing room .• 2,366 69 

Laundry 7,847 78 

Chapel, school, amusements 245 00 

Store 5,937 04 

Engineer's department 89,224 52 

Electrical department 36,162 44 

Carpenter shop 6,702 80 

Paint shop 331 40 

Plaster shop 146 50 

Fire department 4,487 50 

Police department 98 25 

Tin shop 592 20 

Upholster shop ' 641 21 

Bake shop 303 35 

Barber shop and club room 161 00 

Butcher shop 314 11 

Florist's department 4,022 46 

Garden and farm 2,175 65 

Officers' barn 1,133 00 

Library 1,400 00 

Surgical instruments 752 17 

Dispensary 868 22 

Pathological department 7,145 37 

Grand total $235,373 86 



EXHIBIT No. 16. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Maintenance 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending. October 31^ 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. GEORGE F. E'DENHARTER, Supeiintendent. 
1897. 
Nov. 1. For a contingent fund $2,000 00 

Total $2,000 00 

VOUCHER No. 2. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. For 4..500 gallons fresh milk, at 12c $540 00 

Total $540 00 

VOUCHER No. 3. PETER F. BRYCE. 

1897. 

Nov. 4. 600 pounds butter crackers, 5c .$30 00 

" 11. 585 pounds butter crackers, 5c 29 25 

•' 18. 600 pounds butter crackers, 5c .30 00 

•• 24. 647 pounds butter crackers, 5c 32 35 

Total $121 60 

VOUCHER No. 4. W. H. ARMSTRONG. 
1897. 

Nov. 10. 1/2 doz. Peau's P. C. artery forceps $4 50 

" 10. 1 fine razor 1 00 

" 10. 1 large B. & W. pan 75 

" 10. 1 medium B. & W. pan 60 

" 10. 1 small B. & W. pan : 50 

" 10. 2 B. & W. basins 1 00 

Total $8 35 

VOUCHER No. 5. ARTHUR JORDAN CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 1. 360 doz. eggs, at 19i4c $70 20 

8. 360 doz. eggs, at lOVaC 70 20 

" 15. 360 doz. eggs, at 191/2C 70 20 

" 22. 360 doz. eggs, at 19yoC ! 70 20 

* Total .$280 80 



54 



VOUCHER No. 6. THE JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. For advertising daily 10 lines three times. .. $2 00 

Total $2 00 



VOUCHER No. 7. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINE7L CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. For advertising V/y squai'es three times $3 00 

Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. S. INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. For advertising daily 71 lines three times .... $2 13 

Total $2 13 



VOUCHER No. 9. CHAS. BAILEY. 

1897. 

Nov. 30. 16,025 pounds hay, 37y2C $60 09 

" 30. 1,925 pounds straw. 20c 3 85 

Total 1163 94 



VOUCHER No. 10. RAGSDALE & SNOW. 
1897. 
Nov. 11. Casket $7 00 

Total $7 00 



VOUCHER No. 11. CHARLES LONG. 

1897. 

Nov. 4. 55 gallons oysters, 75c $41 25 

" 11. 52 gallons oysters, 75c 39 00 

" 18. 50 gallons oysters, 75c 37 50 

" 25. 50 gallons oysters, 75c 37 50 

$155 25 

Less rebate 2 00 

$153 25 

Total $153 25 



55 

YOUCIIKR No. 12. SEVEKIX, OSTERMEYER & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 3. SMi chests imp. tea., 311 pounds, 23c $71 53 

" 11. 141/0 chests imp. tea, 873 pounds, 23c 200 79 



Total $272 32 

VOUCHER No. 13. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1897. 

Nov. 30. 400 12x18 shite .$24 00 

30. 100 pounds Blatchford solder 

30. 2 pounds half-inch copper belt rivets .... 

30. 1 box 4x N. & G. Taylor brilliant tin 

30. 1 box Ix best bright tin 

30. 1 box Ic N. & G. Taylor old-style tin 

30. 10 sheets 14x20 No. 3 perforated tin . . . 

30. 1 gross No. 6 mall, tinned iron ears .... 

30. 24 links 1x1-16 band iron 

Total $88 65 

VOUCHER No. 14. THE SINGER MANUFACTURING CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 11. 200 Nos. 2 and 3 I. M. R. S. needles $2 00 

•• 11. 100 No. 1/0 I. F. F. S. needles 120 



10 


00 




70 


22 


00 


14 


00 


13 


50 


1 


20 


1 


45 


1 


80 



Total $3 20 

VOUCHER No. 15. J. FROST & SON. 
1897. 
Nov. 24. 2361/2 gallons cider, 18c $42 57 



Total 

VOUCHER No. 16. JOHN O'NEILL. 
1897. 

Nov. 26. 120 barrels winter wheat flour, $4.64 $556 80 

'' 26. 35 barrels spring wheat flour, $5.40 189 00 

■' 26. 1,500 pounds bolted meal, 80 12 00 



Total $757 80 

VOUCHER No. 17. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1897. 

Nov. 2. 3,898 pounds sal soda, 55c $2143 

4. 2,153 pounds chip soap, 2%c 59 20 

•• 13. 3,172 pounds chip soap, 234c 87 23 

•• 19. 2,412 pounds chip soap, 2%c 66 33 

•• 23. 3,226 pounds chip soap, 234c 88 70 

Total $322 89 



56 

VOUCHER No. 18. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1897, 

Nov. 30. 36,200 cubic feet art. gas, $1.25 $4,5 25 

" 30. 2 outside lamps, each $1.50 3 00 



Total $48 25 



VOUCHER No. 19. FLEISCHMAN & CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. 7714 pounds yeast, at 2oc $19 38 



Total $19 38 



■ VOUCHER No. 20. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 

1897. 

Oct. 2.5. To Tborntown, Ind .$0 25 

" 17. To Cincinnati, Ohio 25 

Nov. 10. To Columbus 25 

" 10. To Columbus 25 

Total ... $1 00 



VOUCHER No. 21. HOLLWEG & REESE. 
1897. 

Nov. 1. 35 doz. teacups, 33c $11 55 

1. 14 doz. saucers, 33c 4 62 

1. 14 doz. 10-inch plates, 75c 10 50 

1. 3 doz. creams, $1 3 00 

" 1. 5 doz. soup bowls, 67c 3 35 

" 1. 4 doz. desserts, 24c 96 

1. 10 doz. 1847 Rogers tablespoons? $4 40 00 

*' 1. 5 doz. 5 gas globes, $1.55 7 75 

" 1. 5 doz. tumblers, 35c • 1 75 

" 10. % doz. 1-gal. glass jars, $4.50 2 25 

" 10. V2 doz. half-gal. glass jars, $2.75 1 38 

" 24. 1 only Ross gold chamber set 5 00 

Total $92 11 



VOUCHER No. 22. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 3. 5.078 pounds granulated sugar. .$5.33 $270 66 

3. 3,035 pounds beans. 80c 40 47 

3. 120 doz. Yarmouth corn, 83c 99 60 

*' 3. IVL' gill. Durham eocoanut. 27f 41 

" 3. 5 pounds Baker's chocolate. 34c 1 70 



1 

VOUCHER No. 2ii— Coiitiimod. 
1897. 

Nov. 3. 1 doz. cr. dressing $0 85 

" 3. 25 pounds Pearl tapioca, 2i,i>c 63 

6. 4,504 pounds Golden Rio coffee, MVoc 041 82 

6. 10 ban-els Scluunaclier's oatmeal, .$3.40 34 00 

" 10. 1,500 pounds lump starch, 2c 30 00 

" 10. 720 pounds Battle Axe, 171/2 126 00 

" 10. 150 pounds smolving tobacco, 26c 39 (X) 

" 10. 25 boxes Lenox soap, $2.70 67 50 

" 10. 10 boxes Brooks Crystal soap, $3.40 34 00 

" 10. 10 boxes Ivory soap, $4 40 00 

" 10. 150 pounds B. currants, 6c 9 00 

•' 10. 10 boxes B. L. L. raisins, $1.25 12 "50 

" 10. 80 doz. Yarmouth corn, 83c 66 40 

" 10. 12 doz. 78 scrub brushes 9 00 

" 10. 3 doz. Mason's blacliing, 35c 1 05 

" 10. 2,000 pounds apricots, 7c 140 00 

" 11. 1,013 pounds New Yorli cheese, 9%c 98 78 

" 11. 240 pounds Church soda, 5c 12 00 

" 11. 285 gallons vinegar, 7c 19 95 

" 11. 25 pounds macaroni, 5c 1 25 

" 11. 30 pounds citron, lie 3 30 

" 11. 1091/2 gallons syrup, 23c 25 19 

" 11. 51 gallons molasses, 34c 17 34 

" 11. 10 barrels salt, 70c 7 00 

" 11. 5,090 pounds granulated sugar, $5.33 271 30 

" 11. 32 gallons oil, IO1/2C 5 46 

" 11. 12 gallons prepai-ed mustard, 25c 3 00 

" 11. 2,919 pounds rice, 5c 145 95 

" 11. 50 pounds powdered sugar, $5.28 2 64 

" 11. 50 pounds Pearl barley, 2%c 1 25 

" 11. 141 pounds grain pepper, 7c 9 87 

" 11. 100 boxes boneless sardines, 21c. 21 00 

" 16. 2,000 pounds evaporated apples, 91/2C ,. 190 00 

" 23. 6 barrels, 1,200 pickles, $3.50 21 00 

" 23. 2 gross silicon, $7 14 00 

" 23. 1 gross mop sticks 6 00 . 

Total $2,540 87 



VOUCHER No. 23. J. R. RYAN & CO. 

1897. 
Nov. 4. 5 barrels rye flour, $3.75 $18 75 

Total $18 75 



58 

VOUCHER Xo. 24. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

1897. 
Nov. 24. G gallons extra select oysters. .$1.50 .$9 00 



Total $9 00 



VOUCHER No. 2o. KIPP BROS. CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 3. 5 doz. No. 333 hair brushes. $2 $10 00 

" 11. 1 Ansonia watch 1 15 

'• 11. V^ doz. clocks, $9 4 50 

" 17. 2 boxes Shaker pipes, 40c 80 

Total $16 45 



VOUCHER No. 26. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 

1897. 

Oct. 30. 807 yards 58-inch muslin. llVsC $92 81 

" 30. 65214 yards 42-inch muslin. 714c 47 31 

•• 30. 4071/0 yards oil prints, 7c 28 53 

" 30. 720 yards crash, 6%c 48 60 

" 30. 4211/2 yards Damask, 3214c 136 99 

" 30. 100 quilts, 7.5c 75 00 

" 30. 24 gross cotton knitting. 55c 13 20 

" 30. 50 doz. thread, 36c 18 00* 

Nov. 27. 150 pounds cotton batten, 5c 7 50 

" 27. 939 yards ticking, uyoc 136 16 

Total $604 10 



VOUCHER Nx). 27. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

1897. 

Nov. 1. .558 pounds chickens, 12l.:.c $69 75 

6. 573 pounds chickens, 12i-;C 71 62 

'• 13. 558 pounds chickens, 12i/oc 09 75 

• 19. 559 pounds chickens, 121/oc 69 87 

•• 24. 2.162 pounds turkeys, 16c 345 92 

27. 579 jx^unds chickens, 1214c 72 37 

Total $6&9 28 



VOUCHER No. 28. EMIL WULSCHNER & SON. 

1897. 
Nov. 17. 1 Ann Arbor organ 58 00 

Total $58 00 



59 

VOUCHER No. 29. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 2. 200 baskets grapes, 10c $20 00 

3. 110y2 bushels sweet potatoes, 73c 80 97 

6. 200 baskets grapes, 10c 20 00 

" 28. 115M bushels sweet potatoes, 73c 84 29 

Total $205 26 



VOUCHER No. 30. JAMES L. KEACH. 
1897. 

Nov. 5. 658.45 bushels potatoes, at 47c $309 61 

" 13. 1 box lemons 2 50 

"• 17. 10 barrels apples, at $2.25 22 50 

$334 61 

Less rebate, potatoes 1 00 

$338 61 

Total $338 61 



VOUCHER No. 31. THE W. G. WASSON CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. 100 bushels lump coke $9 00 



Total $9 00 



VOUCHER No. 32. THE HOLT ICE AND COLD STORAGE CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 3. 64,000 pounds ice, 65c $20 80 

" 15. 74,400 pounds ice, 65c 24 18 

Total $44 98 



VOUCHER No. 33. SYERUP & CO. 

1 barrel apples, $2; 1 barrel onions, $1.75. ... $3 75 

1 barrel apples, $2; 1 barrel onions, $1.75. ... 3 75 

1 barrel apples, $2; 2 barrels onions, $3.50. .. 5 50 

1 barrel cider 5 00 

6 barrels cranberries. $6 36 00 

16 doz. celery ; 3 20 

1 barrel apples 2 00 

Total $59 20 



18£ 


>7. 


Nov. 


2. 


" 


9. 


" 


11. 


" 


12. 




23. 


" 


23. 


" 


23. 



60 

VOUCHER No. 34. DANIEL STEWART CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 1. 5 pouiuls aruicji flowers $0 50 

" 1. i/> pound iodide ammonia 2 00 

■' 1. Vj pound sulpho cart zinc 33 

"' 1. i) pounds seidlitz mixture 1 00 

" 1. 4 pounds stronger aqua ammonia 38 

1. ]■> pound salol 1 78 

1. 2 iMjuuds flexible collodion 2 10 

1. 2 pounds Hayden viburnum comp 3 00 

" 1. 5 pounds absorbant cotton 1 35 

" 1. 25 pounds vaseline 1 G3 

" 1. 1 pound potassium acetate 27 

" 1. 5 pounds carbolic acid 1 15 

" 1. 10 pounds soluble blueing 3 30 

" 1. 5 pounds bromide of potassium 2 25 

" 1. 5 pounds bromide of soda 2 50 

" 1. 5 pounds gran, chloride ammonia 45 

1. 3 lbs. hypo, sulphite soda 11 

" 1. 2 pounds iodide potassium 5 00 

" 1. 2 pounds nitric acid 42 

" 1. 3 poimds mercury 1 65 

" 1. 100 pounds sidphate copper 4 25 

" 1. 5 jars malted milk 15 00 

1. 2 pounds aloes sacrotine 50 

1. 2 ix)unds acetate of lead 20 

" 1. 1 poimd lump alum 13 

1. nas pounds cream tartar. 24c 91 92 

1. 2 pounds F. E. Yerba Santa fer. syrup 1 96 

1.1 pound F. E. Verba squills comp. syrup 98 

1. 1 pound F. E. Verba spicac syi'up 2 70 

1. 4 ounces beechwood creosote 30 

1. 3 ounces ammom'l 2 85 

1. 8 ounces nitrate silver 3 68 

1. 2 ounces salicin 48 

1. 6 ounces pheuacetine 5 40 

1. 6 ounces autikamnia 5 40 

1. 6 ounces chloralamid 4 32 

" 1. 25 ounces sulphate quinine 7 75 

1. 10 gallons alcohol 24 00 

1. 5 gallons wood alcohpl 4 60 

1. 5 gallons paraffine oil 1 35 

1. 5 gallons acijua ammonia 1 55 

1. 2 gross sliding powder boxes 1 20 

1. 1 gross assorted jug corks 55 

1. 1 doz. one-ounce medicine glasses 30 

1. 2 doz. boxes No. 1 empty capsules 2 00 

1. 2 doz. boxes No. 2 empty capsules 2 00 

1. 6 doz. medicine droppers 90 

1. ^A doz. Alpha syringes 4 50 



61 



1897. 
Nov. 1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

1. 

6. 

8. 

8. 

S. 

9. 
11. 
11. 
12. 
12. 
12. 
13. 
17. 
19. 
19. 
19. 
30. 
30. 



1897. 
Not. 3. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 



VOUCHER No. 34— Continued. 

1,000 hypodermic tablets morphia sulphite... $2 00 

200 hypodermic tablets strychnia sulphite. ... 36 

500 phota iodide of mercury 46 

5 yards belladonna plasters, 7-iuch 2 48 

2 gross 4-drachm vials 2 30 

2 gross No. 29 pill boxes 90 

2 gross No. 30 pill boxes 90 

2 oz. menthol 58 

500 H. T. Conine, 1-100 gr. 1 20 

1 gross 12XX superfine corks 59 

1 gross 14XXX superfine corks 1 46 

2 pounds 8%-inch Mexican vanilla bean 22 50 

3 one-ounce graduates, 12c 36 

5 gals. Tromer's malt and C. L. oil, $2.80 14 00 

500 grains squibb powdered opium 5 63 

1 only Magic atomizer 1 25 

1 bottle listerine 75 

!•{ doz. qulne chocolates 1 67 

1 doz. maphline 9 00 

20 pounds sulphuric acid and jug 1 20 

% doz. cash. boq. soap 1 28 

i-o doz. Pears' soap 85 

1 pound green kaime 2 50 

4 oz. menthol 1 60 

2 cases Merks' chemicals 95 45 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 35. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

145 ft. % 19 wire rope, $3.85 $5 59 

20 gross IVi— 11 ft. screws 2 16 

20 gross lyo— 11 rh. bit. screws. 

20 gross 1%— 11 rh. bl. screws $6 75 6 75 

12 only 6 hand-bast files, 1 sq. edge, 

B. D 

12 only 10 haud-bast files, 1 sq. edge, 

B. D ; 

12 only 12 hand-bast files, 1 sq. . edge, 

B. D 

12 only 6 hand-bast files, smooth edge. 
12 only 10 hand-bast files, smooth edge 
12 only 12 hand-bast files, smooth edge 

3 only 4 knives, smooth 

3 only 6 kniAes, smooth 

3 only 4 knives, bast 

3 only 4 knives, bast .^1 04 11 04 

1 only % self-feeding hand reamer flute. 
2 in 



$393 21 



62 

VOUCHER -No. :{.">— ContinuLMl. 
1897. 
Nov. 4. 1 only % self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

" 2*2 in 

" 4. 1 only 5-lG self-feeding hand reamer 

flute, 214 in 

" 4. 1 only 7-16 self-feeding hand reamer 

flute, 2% in 

" 4. 1 only Y2 self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

3 in 

" 4. 1 only 9-16 self-feeding hand reamer 

flute. 314 in 

" 4. 1 only % self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

3V2 in 

" 4. 1 only 11-16 self-feeding hand reamer 

flute. 3 13-16 in 

" 4. 1 only % self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

4 3-16 in 

" 4. 1 only 13-16 self-feeding hand reamer 

flute, 4% in 

" 4. 1 only % self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

4 13-16 in 

" 4. 1 only 15-16 self-feeding hand reamer 

flute, 5% in • 

" 4. 1 only 1 self-feeding hand reamer flute, 

5 7-16 in $19 73 19 73 

" 4. 6 only cast steel round punches, 7-16, 14. 9-16. 

11-16, 13-16, ■% in 

" 4.1 lb. %-8 cap belts rivets axid brows 

" 4. 1 lb. 1/^-8 cap belts rivets and brows 

4. 50 lbs. No. 12 A. B. Valley Falls Flax Mills 

twine. 23c 

" 4. 50 ha-nks A binding cane 

4. 1 only Xo. 3 Goodell Aut. drill 

" 4. 1 lb. 3 SteAvet's sp. screws, Mic. in ease 

4. 51 lbs. A. B. twine at 23c 

" 8. 1 doz. sheep linings 

" 9. 5 doz. No. 3 dusters, 3x5 

" 10. ,'".0 doz. No. 2 fibre chambers at $4.35 

•" 17. 5 doz. 126 shoe brushes at $4.81 

" 24. 1 12-ft Excels, step ladder 

" 25. 11 lbs. K. S. hand punches at 2<ic 

" 30. 18 12x14 S. B. registers 

" 30. 18 10x12 S.. B. registers 

" 30. 18 12x18 S. B. registers 

" 30. 6 16x16 S. B. registers 

•' 30. 18 8x10 S. B. registers 

" 30. 18 12x16 S. B. registers $67 80 67 80 





2i^ 




18 




18 


11 


50 


11 


00 


1 


18 


4 


88 


11 


73 


r> 


75 


17 


25 


:i7 


50 


24 


05 


3 


00 


2 


20 



Total $425 72 



IS! 


97. 


Nov, 


. 3. 




5. 




10. 




15. 




17. 




22 




24. 




29. 



63 

A'OTTIIEr. No. ?>C,. SWIFT & CO. 

1,044 lbs. hams at $7.35 .$70 74 

1,022 lbs. pork at $7.05 78 IS 

1,021 lbs. hams at $7.35 75 04 

1,077 lbs. pork at $7.65 82 3!) 

1,070 lbs. hams at $7.35 78 (m 

1,068 lbs. pork at $7.65 Si 70 

1,081 lbs. hams at $7.35 79 45 

1,064 lbs. pork at $7.65 81 40 

Total $633 55 



VOUCHER No. 37. NELSON MOREIS ,fc CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 2. 4,089 lbs. beef at $6.09 $249 02 

2. 1,752 lbs. lard at 4%c 81 03 

5. 3,801 lbs. beef at $6.09 231 48 

9. 1,760 lbs. lard at 4%c 81 40 

9. 3,943 lbs. beef at $6.09 240 14 

" 10. 54 lbs. bacon at 10c 5 40 

" 12. 3,947 lbs. beef at $6.09 240 37 

" 18. 3,828 lbs. beef at $6.09 2.33.12 

" 24. 4,065 lbs. befef at $6.09 247 56 

" 26. 715 lbs. lard at 4%c 33 07 

" 27. 4,.362 lbs. beef at $6.09 265 65 



Total $1,908 24 



TOrCHER No. 38. THE MANUFACTI'RERS" NATURAL GAS CO. 

1897. 
Nov. 30. Gas services for the month ending November 

30, 1897 $1,388 89 



Total $1,388 89 



VOUCHER No. 39. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 29. 1 bbl. Col. Drake Cyl. oil, 53 gals, at 85c $45 05 

" 29. Less 25 per cent, discount 11 26 

Total $33 79 



64 

yOUCIIEK No. 40. (i. A. CARSTENSEN. 
1897. 

Nov. 7. Services ms <li:i|il:iiii $5 00 

" 14. Services as cliai)l;ilii 5 00 

" 21. Services as cliaplaiii 5 00 

" 28. Services as clia plain 5 0% 



Total $20 OO 



VOUCHKli No. 41. BAUSCH & LOME OPTICAL CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 10. 2 055. squares, Vs in., No. 7410, at 80c .$1 GO • 

" 10. 1 oz. squares, % in., No. 7415 GO 

" 10. 2 oz. each 7435 circles, % in. and % in., at 

$1.25 5 00 

■' 10. 1 oz. 7445 circles, % in 80 ' 

" 10. 2 oz. 74G5 covers, %xli4 in., at $1.05 2 10 

" 10. 1 oz. 2540 mica tame 12 00 

" 10. 1 oz. 2620 knives . . .• 3 25 

•' 10. 144 9200 cases 72 

" 10. 24 7500 rubber cells asst'd at 15c 30 

" 10. 1 eacb 2605 Iml. boxes, 10-20-30 mps., at 45c. 1 35 

" 10. 12 1910 Bristol board, 13x16 '. . . 90 

" 10. 1 quire 1915 tracing paper 1 20 

•' 10. 12 1920 Cran. quill pens GO 

" 10. G 1925 Cran. quill pen holders 40 

" 10. 2 bottles 1935 drawing ink at 35c 70 

" 10. ,12 each 1940 and 1945 camel hair pencils at 

$1.40 2 80 

" 10. 2 1950 sponge rubbers at 35c 70 

" 10. 12 sheets 5315 cork 1 GO 

'• 10. 12 1955 thumb tacks 10 

•• 10. 3 each G0<X»-60n5 6010 nee<lles at 40c 3 60 

" 10. 12 1960 C. IT. pencils asst 65 

•■ 10. 200 sheets 7550 \m\wi\ 180 and 275 50 

" 10. 12 sheets 1997 card board 30 

" 10. 1 11). 7849 catlar meal 40 

'• 10. 1 cake 2697 soap 25 

" 10. 1 gum 7913 Sedun ('ainiiuate 30 

" 10. 1 5420 knife 35 

• 10. 1 5435 scalpel 35 

$43 42 

" 10. Less 25 per cent 10 85 

Total $32 57 



65 



VOUCHER No. 42. RICHARDS & CO. 

1897. 

Nov. 12. 3 Nests beakers, 1-6. at $1.00 .$3 00 

" 12. 1 blow pipe with trumpet mouth-piece, at 

$3.25, less 10 per cent 2 93 

" 12. 1^ doz. brushes for Burettes at 40c 10 

" 12. 6 only brushes, 12 in., at 25c 1 50 

" 12. 3 only brushes, 15 in., at 30c 90 

" 12. 2 Bunsen burners at $1.50 3 00 

" 12. 2 Hoff clamps, improved, at 40c 80 

" 12. 3 crucibles, No. 000, R. B., at 12c 36 

" 12. 3 crucibles. No. 0, R. B., at 25c 75 

" 12. 3 crucibles, No. 1, R. B., at 30c 90 

" 12. 3 crucibles. No. 2, R. B., at 40c 120 

" 12. 3 crucibles. No. 3, R. R., at 50c 150 

" 12. 1 file, round, 3 in 12 

•' 12. 100 filters, S. & S., No. 589, Yehow Rib, 51/2 

C. M., at 60c, less 10 per cent 54 

" 12. 100 filters. No. 9, C. M., at 90c, less 10 per ct. 81 

" 12. 3 flasks, 32 oz., at 35c 1 05 

" 12. 3 flasks, 48 oz., at 40c 120 

" 12. 3 flasks, 16 oz., at 25c 75 

" 12. 3 flasks, 32 oz., at 35c 105 

" 12. 3 flasks, 48 oz., at 40c 120 

" 12. 1 separatory funnel, 6 in 1 25 

'• . 12. 1 separatory funnel, 8 in 1 50 

" 12. 1 hot water funnel on legs 4 00 

" 12. 2 Thistle tubes, 10 in., at 10c 20 

" 12. 2 Thistle tubes, 20 in., at 20c 40 

" 12. 1 Manometer, mounted 5 00 

" 12. 1 measure (inches and C. M.) 50 

•" 12. 5 ft. rubber tubing, heavy, 3-16 in., at 16c 80 

" 12. 5 ft. rubber tubing, % in., at 18c 90 

•• 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, % in., at 5c 50 

•• 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, 3-16 in., at 10c 1 00 

•• 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, ^4 in., at 12c 1 20 

" 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, 5-16 in., at 14c 1 40 

•' 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, % in., at 17c 1 70 

" 12. 10 ft. red rubber tubing, % in., at 26c 2 60 

•• 12. 1 support table, 9 in 1 25 

'■ 12. 1 support table, 15 in 1 75 

'■ 12. 1 pr. crucibles, tongs, brass double head 75 

" 12. 1 doz. triangles, plain, assorted 50 

" 12. 1 doz. triangles, pipe stem, assorted 75 

" 12. 6 wire gauges, 4x4, at 6c 36 

■• 12. 6 wire gauges, 5x5, at 8c 48 

" 12. 6 wire gauges, 6x6, at 10c 60 

• " 12. 6 wire gauges. 8x8, at 20c 1 20 

'* 12. 1 still and condenser, 3 gals 15 00 

5 — Cent. Ins. 



66 



VOUCHER No. 42— Continued. 
1897. 

Nov. 12. 1 Inirner blow i)ipe tube $0 20 

" 12. 1 burner blow pipe tube 20 

" 12. 1 burner chimney 20 

" 12. 1 burner crown 45 

" 12. 1 burner fork 50 

" 12. 1 burner gauge top 30 

" 12. 1 burner plate, porcelain 60 

" 12. 1 burner star 20 

" 12. 1 burner tripod 25 

" 12. 1 burner wing top 25 

•■ 12. 1 file, round, 4 in 15 

•• 12. 1 file, round, 5 in 20 

" 12. 1 file, round. 6 in 25 

" 12. 1 file, round, 8 in 35 

Less 25 per cent 

No discount on 

Boxing and cartage 

Total 



$69 07 
17 26 


$51 81 
4 28 
2 00 





$58 09 



VOUCHER No. 43. COLUMBUS BUTTER CO. 

1897. 

Oct. 30. 30 lbs. butterine at QVsC $2 85 

Nov. 4. 1,200 lbs. butterine at OV^c 114 00 

'• 11. 1.200 lbs. butterine at 91/h- 114 00 

'• 18. 1,175 lbs. butterine at 9V2C 11163 

" 24. 1.200 lbs. butterine at OVic 114 00 

Total 



$456 48 



189 


7. 


s'ov. 


3. 




3. 




3. 


•• 


3. 




3. 



VOUCHER No. 44. KNIGHT & .HLLSON. 

200 U fiber bibb washers $0 35 

200 % fibre bibb washers 35 

2(t0 % fibre bibb washers 35 

12 % L. S. angle valves and keys 2 20 

12 y^ L. S. angle valves and keys 2 50 

x2 ^o L. S. Globe valves and keys 2 50 

2 2 Jenkins' Globe valves 4 30 



67 

VOUCHER No. 4l-Continu("(l. 

1897. 

Nov. 3. 6 3xi/i C. I. Tees $1 44 

3. 6 3x2 C. I. Tees 1 44 

3. 24 %xi/2X% 0. I. Tees €6 

" 3. 24 McVey basin clamps 40 

3. Balls' for Peier basin box 20 

3. 12 li/i Rickets' Ells 4 00 

3. 521/2 gal. Crescent dynamo oil 18 38 

3. 100 lbs. Crescent grease 10 00 



Total $49 07 

VOUCHER No. 45. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1897. 
Nov. 4. Standard Publishing Co., Sunday school sup- 

pUes from October, 1897 to January, 1898. $26 75 

" 5. Henry Reiser, for music 11 25 

6. W. L. Men-itt, for whitewashing 10 00 

• '• 13. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 18. Peter Henderson Co., for flower bulbs 4 35 

'• 19. Henry Beisei', for music 11 25 

'• 20. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 22. Wm. Robinson, for labor and team 17 25 

" 25. Henry Reiser, for music 32 75 

" 27. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 27. John B. Wendrew, 1 week's work as butcher. 10 00 



Total $153 60 

VOUCHER No. 46. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1897. 
Nov. 30. Main pay roll for month of November, 1897. .$7,141 75 



Total $7,141 75 

VOUCHER No. 47. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 20. 1 stew pan $0 50 

•' 20. 1 stew pan 30 

" 20. 2 coffee strainers at 10c .• 20 

Total $1 00 

VOUCHER No. 48. MARTIN J. O'REILLY. 
1897. 
Nov. 4. 4 new shoes $1 .50 

Total $1 50 



G8 . 

VOUCHER No. 49. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 
1897. 
Nov. 22. 400-20-109-31 No. 1 Ed. lamps at 18c $72 00 



Total $72 00 



VOUCHER No. .".(» STANI).VRI> OIL CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 18. 1 bbl. Rouowu engine oil, 50.3 gals., at 2Uv. . . $10 06 



1897. 


•ec. 1. 


'' G. 


'• 13. 


" 20. 


" 27. 



Total $10 06 



VOUCHER No. 7)1. FRIEDMAN .MFG. CO. 

1,240 lbs. butterine, 9c $111 60 

1,200 lbs. butterine, 9c 108 00 

1,200 lbs. butterine, 9c 108 00 

1,200 lbs. butterine, 9c 108 00 

1,200 lbs. butterine, 9c 108 00 

Total $543 60 



VOUCHER No. 52. FRANCKE iV SCHINDLER. 

1897. 

Dec. 18. 1 D. 5-in. 40 walnut rosettes $0 70 

" 18. 1 D. 5 in. 503 walnut rosettes 65 

" 18. 1 D. rail screws 35 

•• 21. 1 each Carv. tool Nos. 5, 6, 7. at 30c 90 

•• 21. 1 each Carv. tool Nos. 14, 15, 16. 17, 26, 27. 28. 

29, 8, at 35c 2 80 

" 21. 1 each Carv. tool Nos. 39, 41, at 40c 80 

" 21. 1 each Carv. tool Nos. 40. 42. 43, 44. at 45c. . . 1 80 

'• 21. 1 Ark oil slip 50 



Total $8 50 



VOUCHER No.. 53. DAGGETT & CO. 

1897. 

Dec. 30. 700 lbs. mixed candy at 5y2C $38 50 

" 30. 200 lbs. Cin. imp. candy at 7i.jc 15 00 

" 30. 695 lbs. peanuts, raw, at 5c 34 75 

" 30. 50 lbs. mixed nuts at 10c 5 00 



Total $93 25 



69 



1S97. 



VOUCHER No. 54. FRANK G. KAMPS. 

Dec. 24. 7 gallons select oysters at $1.50 .«10 .!iO 

Total $10 50 



VOUCHER No. 55. FROMMEYER BROS. 

1897. 

Dec. 30. 35 doz. cups at 33c 

" 30. 10 doz. saucers at 33c 

" 30. 8 doz. dinner plates, 10 in., at 75c 

" 30. 3 doz. vegetable dishes at $1.80 

" 30. 1 doz. wash basins 

" 30. 1 doz. wash ewers 

" 30. 1 doz. slop jars 

" 30. 1 doz. covered butter dishes 

" 30. 17 doz. tumblers at 35c 

'• 30. 12 1-gallon pans at 6c 

'■ 80. ^2. doz. cuspidores at $5.00 

Total 



$11 


55 


3 


30 


G 


00 


5 


40 


3 


60 


3 


60 


9 


00 


3 


00 


5 


95 




72 


2 


50 



$54 62 



1887. 

Nov. 18. 
•• 18. 
•' 18. 
" 18. 



VOUCHER No. 56. TECKENTIN & FRIEBERG. 

2 Baker sirsingle blankets $9 00 

2 hoi'se brushes 6 50 

2 cun-y combs 50 

4 French oiled dressed chamois 3 00 

Total 



$19 00 



1897. 



VOUCHER No. 57. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 



Dec. 30. 3 pairs rubber boots at $4.25. 
Total , 



$12 



$12 75 



1891 



VOUCHER No. 58. .L R. RYAN & CO. 

Dec. 7. 5 bbls. rye flour at $3.75 $18 75 

Total $18 75 



'^0 

VOUCHER No. 59. GEORGE W. BUDD. 
1897. 

Dec. 2. 54 gals, oysters, 85c $45 90 

" 9. 54 gals, oysters, 85c 45 90 

" 16. 46 gals, oysters, 85c 39 10 

" 23. 55 gals, oysters, 85c 46 75 

" 30. 51 gals, oysters, 85c 43 35 

$221 00 

Less rebate 5 00 

$216 00 



Total $216 00 



VOUCHER No. 60. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1897. 

Dec. 1. 2,713 lbs. Borax Flake chip soap at 314c ' $88 36 

1. 3,750 lbs. Crystal sal soda at 55c 20 62 

8. 3,516 lbs. Borax Flake chip soap at 3i/4c 114 27 

" 11. 3,547 lbs. Borax Flake chip soap at 3^c 115 28 

" 22. 3,517 lbs. Borax Flake chip soap at 3i/4c 114 27 

Total $452 SO 



VOUCHER No. 61. ALBERT KRULL. 
1897. 

Dec. 20. 700 lbs. mixed candy at 6c $42 00 

" 20. 120 lbs. Star mixed lozenges at 10c 12 00 

" 23. 31 lbs. Star mixed lozenges at 10c 3 10 

Total $57 10 



VOUCHER No. 62. INDIANA PAPER CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 20. 6 bundles 4 Eagle bags .$8 70 

" 20. G bundles 8 Eagle bags 14 40 

•• 20. 6 bundles 12 Eagle bags 18 90 

.$42 00 
Less 50 per cent 21 00 

$21 00 
" 20. 7 rolls assorted tissue 5 25 

Total $26 25 



71 

VOUCHER No. 63. ELLIPITICAL CARBON CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 10. 2,000 7-16x%xl2 PI. sperry, at 16c $32 00 

Total $32 00 

VOUCHER No. 64. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 15. Ciu. 24501-200-32-10931 No. 1 Ed. lamps at 27c. $.54 00 

Total • .$54 00 

VOUCHER No. 65. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 22. 1 bbl. It. Col. Drake oil, 53 gals., at 85c $45 05 

Less 25 per cent discount 11 26 

Total $33 79 

VOUCHER No. 66. INDIANA INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND. 
1897. 
Dec. 28. 25 doz. parlor brooms at $1.75 $43 75 

Total $43 75 

VOUCHER No. 67. E. B. M'COMB. 
1897. 

Dec. 28. 155 bbls. flour at $4.74 $7.34 70 

" 28. 1,000 lbs. bolted meal at 75c 7 50 

« 

Total $742 20 

VOUCHER No. 68. ARTHUR JORDAN CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 4. 575 lbs. chickens at 12c $69 00 

" 11. 555 lbs. chickens at 12c 66 60 

" 18. 626 lbs. chickens at 12c 75 12 

" 24. 2,219 lbs. turkeys at 15y2C. 343 95 

Total $554 67 

VOUCHER No. 69. A. B. MEYER & CO. • 
1897. 
Dec. 29. 100 bu. coke $9 75 

Total $9 75 



72 

VOUCHER Xo. 70. G. A. CARSTENSEN. 
1897. 

Dec. 5. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 12. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 19. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 26. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total '. $20 00 



VOUCHER No. 71. THE INDIANAPOLIS NE^VS. 
1897. 
Dec. 27. 63 words, 3 times, advei'tising $1 89 

Total $1 89 



VOUCHER No. 72. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 

1897. 
Dec. 28. Advertising 3 times 1% squares .$3 00 

Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. 73. THE JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 28. Advertising 1 square 3 times $2 00 

Total $2 00 



VOUCHER No. 74. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 
1897. 

Dec. 8. 1 set 246 Fox ca.sters $0 28 

8. 6 prs. 5^2x61^ real bronze butts at $1.50 9 00 

8. 4 36x8 real bronze bolts at $1.15 4 60 

" 8. No. 1 M 51/2-in StaiTCfs nippers 1 70 

Total $15 58 



VOUCHER No. 75. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1897. 
Dec. 31. Gas service for the month ending December 

31. 1897 $1,388 89 

Total $1,388 89 



VOUCHER No. 76. KIPP BROS CO. 
1897. 

Dee. 16. 13 doz. pipes at $2.00 $26 00 

" 16. Y2 gross Christmas tree balls at $9.00 4 50 

" 16. 12 doz. dolls at $4.00 48 00 

" 23. 3 doz. Christmas glass ornaments at 50c 1 50 



23. 1 doz. cones 



40 



23. 6 boxes gold tinsel at 20c 1 20 

23. 1 pipe 



20 



Total $81 80 



• VOUCHER No. 77. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

1897. 

Dec. 6. 1,000 lbs. lump starch at 2c $20 00 

" 6. 25 boxes Lenox soap at $2.70 '. 67 50 

6. 10 boxes Ivory soap at $4.00 40 00 

6. 12 doz. mop sticks for brushes 4 50 

6. 12 doz. mop sticlis for rags 6 00 

" 6. 3 doz. No. 4 Mason blacliing at 35c 1 05 

6. 1 bid. 20 imp. A bags, less 50 per ct., at $5.00. 2 50 

6. 1 bid. 30 imp. bags, less 50 per ct, at $6.50. . 3 25 

" 8. 24 doz. silicon at 70c 14 00 



Total $158 ^ 



VOUCHER No. 78. SCHNULL & CO. 

1897. 

Dec. 6. 1121/0 gals, syrup at 18c $20 25 

6. 10,024 lbs. granulated sugar at $5.33 534 28 

6. 1,665 lbs. rice at 4%c 79 10 

6. 1,229 lbs. beans at lyoc 18 44 

6. 2,003 lbs. evap. apricots at 6%c 135 21 

6. Barrels hominy at $1.85 9 25 

6. 3,565 lbs. Golden Rio coffee at 13%e 490 19 

6. 941 lbs. N. y. cheese at 8i^ 79 99 

6. 5 bbls. B. oat meal at $3.90 19 50 

6. 2 boxes Church soda, No. 1, at $3.15 6 30 

6. 30 lbs. candied citron at lOi/oC 3 15 

" 6. 239 gals, vinegar- at 7c 16 73 

" 6. 12 gals, prepared mustard at 25c 3 00 

" 6. 6 bbls. Binges' (1,200) pickles at $3.60 21 60 

6. 10 bbls. salt at 75c 7 50 

6. 1 bbl. salt, 100 pkt 150 

6. 8 boxes L. L. raisins at $1.30 10 40 

6. 100 cases L. C. peaches, 200 doz., at $1.65 330 00 

" 10. 2,000 lbs. evap. apples at 91/20 190 00 

" 15. 1 bbl. P. W. oil, 52 gals., at 7c 3 64 



74 

VOUCHER No. 78— Continued. 
1897. 

Dec. 21. 5 lbs. cream chocolate at 38c $1 90 

" 21. 1^ lbs. Dunham's cocoanut 41 

" 21. 150 lbs. cleaned currants at 7c 10 50 

$1,992 M 
Cr. by bill returned 20 85 

Total $1,971 99 

VOUCHER No. 79. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1897. 
Dee. 30. 2 doz. gran, soup bowls at S2.00 $4 00 

Total $4 00 

VOUCHER No. SO. CHAS. G. GRAH. 

1897. 

Nov. 5. Grinding 3 razors, 2 pair clippers $2 75 

" 12. Grinding 3 razors, 2 pair shears 1 80 

" 19. 2 plates for clippers, 2 razors ground, etc .... 3 75 

Dec. 3. Grinding 2 razors 1 00 

■' 17. Grinding 1 razor and new handle 75 

Total $10 05 

VOUCHER No. 81. WM. H. ARMSTRONG & CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 30. 1 24-in. Kelly surgical cushion $4 00 

•' 30. 1 doz. white twisted silk on card-s 1 00 

$5 00 
Less special discount of 10 per cent 50 

Total $4 50 

VOUCHER No. 82. INDIANAPOLIS STOVE CO. 
1897, 
Dec. 15. 1 No. 19 Nation Cannon stove, 8 joints pipe 

and elbow $11 50 

•' 15. 1 10-in. Rd. G. L. burner 75 

Total $12 25 

VOUCHER No. 83. GEORGE D. HARDIN. 
1897. 
Dec. 30. 3,200 lbs. straw at 20c $6 40 

Total $6 40 



75 

VOUCHER No. 84. WM. B. BURFORD. 

1 rm. IS-in. legal cap $4 25 

4-6 qr. cap records 2 88 

2,500 10 manilla env 4 25 

1,000 B. L. eVs Litt. env 4 50 

10 rm. ward paper 17 50 

6,000 Bio manilla env.. plain 4 50 

100 blotting pads 4 00 

1,000 Litt. letter heads 4 30 

10 boxes Esterbrook pens 7 50 

6 gross Esterbrook pens. 442 4 50 

5,000 Supervisors' Synopsis of Daily Reports. 42 90 

2,000 Requisitions for Ward Property IS 35 

Total $119 43 



VOUCHER No. 85. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 30. Teleplione exchange services from January 1. 
1S9S. to March 31, 1898, inclusive for bills 
rendered $105 76 



1897. 


Nov 


11. 


" 


13. 


" 


13. 


" 


19. 


" 


22. 


" 


22. 


" 


23. 


" 


23. 


•' 


23. 


Dec. 


S. 




11. 


" 


14. 



Total $105 76 



VOUCHER No. 86. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 
1897. 

Dec. 6. 2 11^ Galvin gate valve 

6. 1 1^4 Galvin gate valve 

6. 1 1^4 mall, union 

6. 1 1^^ mall, union 

6. 1 114 C. I. tee 

6. 1 lyo C. L tee 

6. 1 y2 C. I. ell 

6. 2 114 nipple 

6. 1 1^2 nipple 

6. 3 lioxlO nipple 

6. 1 18 Crane trap 

6. 4 3 flange unions $23 05 $23 05 

6. 2 29 D. Globe's valves 6 40 

6. 2 3 1. B. angle valves 

6. 2 3 Crane gate valves 

6. 4 210x2 C. I. ells 

6. 6 2 C. I. ells 

6. 3 3 galv. ells 

6. 4 2I2 nipples 

6. 12 3 nipples 

6. 12 2 nipples 



76 

VOUCHER No. 86— Continued. 

1897. 

Dec. 16. 4 2-rtanye imiou.s .$23 2G 23 26 

" 6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

6. 8 hours' time helper 2 00 

6. 8 hours' time helper 2 00 

6. 8 hours' time helper 2 00 

" 6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

G. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

•' 6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

" 6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 1 4x3 bushing, 3 2 C. I. tees, 1 2x11/2 reducer. 65 

6. 1 piece 3-in. 9 am. 4 ft 96 

G. 1 3 flange union 45 

G. 18 9-12 ft. 3 galv. pipe 4 50 

6. 2 3 threads 40 

" G. 7 hours' time steam fitter 3 50 

G. 8 hours' time, helper 2 00 

6. 8 hours' time, helper 2 00 

6. 8 hours' time, helper 2 00 

6. 3 3 galv. ells 

6. 1 3x2 C. I. tee 

" 6. 1 3xli/o C. I. tee 

6. 1 li/o nipple 

6. 2 2x11/^ C. I. ells 

G. 2 3x4 nipples 

6. 2 2 brass gate valves $8 13 8 13 

" 6. 1 2 Crane metallic disc Globe valves 3 20 

G. 1 3x6 galv. nipples 

6. 2 3x12 galv. nipples .$1 22 1 22 

G. 2 pieces 2 pipe, 2 ft., 4 31 

6. 2 2x12 nipples, 2 21/2x41/2 nipple 52 

G. 2 pieces 21/2 pipe, 2 4 ft 46 

6. 40 ft. 2 pipe 3 08 

G. 50 ft. No. cojl chain 2 50 

G. 2 3x2 galv. tees 

6. 1 3xiy2 galv. tees 

• 6. 1 2 C. I. tee '. 

6. 2 2 flange unions $3 42 3 42 

6. 2 pieces 3-in. galv. pipe, 314 and eVs 1 48 

0. 17 2-12 ft. 2-in. blk. pipe 1 32 

G. 2 li/i-in. C. I. ells 12 

6. 2 2-in. P. & C. check valves 8 75 

6. 1 1/2-in. T. H. air cock 18 

6. 1 %-in. steam cock 51 

G. 1 can Crane cement 25 

G. 58 7-12 Jio-iii. black pipe 3 35 

G. 4 3 threads 80 

G. 2 lbs. hinge nails 30 

6. 4 12-in. plugs 6 00 



77 

VOUCHEK No. Sfj— Continued. 

1897. 

Dec. 6. 2 2-ln. holes drillcil and tapix'd in idnys .**! of) 

6. 4-iu. threads 40 

6. 4 21/o-in. threads 00 

" 6. 3 4-in. galv. tees 

6. 1 4-in. galv. ell .' 

" 6. 2 4-in. plugs 

" 6. 4 3x2-in. galv. tees 

6. 7 3-in. galv. ells ST.", !»<j 15 OU 

6. 4 4x3-in. bushings 

G. 2 21/o-in: C. I. ells 

6. 4 2-in. nipples 

" 6. 1 3-in. galv. 4o0 ell 

6. 2 21/2 Crane gate valves .SO 41 it 41 

6. IGO ft. 3-in. galv. pipe 38 40 

6. 21 3-in. threads 4 20 

" 6. 4 hours' Ume, 2 men, 1 machine, putting on 

fittings 4 00 

6. 2 3-in. plugs 

" 6. 1 3-in. galv. tee ."pi 05 1 05 

6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 1 2i/4x3-in. C. I. tee 

6. 2 3-in. galv. tees 

6. 1 3-in. galv. 450 tee .$3 2G 3 26 

6. 20 5-12 ft. 3-in. galv. pipe 4 90 

6. 1 2x6-in. flange 36 

6. 1 2-in. Crane metalic disc valve 3 20 

6. 1 4x2-in. bushing 15 

6. 16 hours' time steam fitter 8 00 

6. 17 hours' time helper 4 25 

• " 6. 17 hours' time helper 4 25 

6. 2 lV2-in. B. & L. safety valves 

6. 2 li^xl-in. reducers .$5 57 5 57 

6. 14 ft. No. coil, chain 70 

6. 25 S. hooks 35 

" 6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 2o 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 1 No. 2 Forkit & Bishop trap 2100 

6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

6. 9 hours' time helper. 2 25 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 8 hours' time steam fitter 4 00 

6. 9 hours' time helper 2 25 

6. 2 pipe coils as follows: 9 pieces 2-in. pipe 5 
ft. 6 in.. 49.06 ft.-; 1 piece 2-in. pipe 5 ft. 
10 in.; 1 piece 2-in. pipe 116. 80.06 ft.; 1 
piece 2-in. pipe 11 ft. 10 in.: 147.8-12 ft. 

—7.70 11 37 



78 



VOUCHER No. 86- Continued. 
1897. 

Dec. G. 7 L'-in. C I. <". r. It. K. n'turn bends... 

6. 9 2-in. C. I. C. P. R. A: L. return bends. . 

6. 4 2xl-in. C. I. ells $3 36 3 36 

6. 25 2-iu. threads 2 50 

6. 4 stands for eoils as follows: 

6. 05 lbs. wrought irons 1 95 

0. 16 V-..\4-iu. bolts 80 

6. 32 %-iu. holes drilled 1 60 

6. 4 hours' time blacksmith and helper making 

stand • 3 00 

6. 3Y2 hours' time fitter and helper putting coil 

together 2 63 

6. 8 114x12x12 C. I. plates, 360 lbs 10 80 

6. For putting in and setting up 2 Berrymore 

heaters in basement 45 00 

6. 1 4x2-iu. saddle 72 

6. 12 %-iu. union ells 1 25 

6. 12 %-in. female union ells 1 25 

6. 12 i/l>-in. female union ells 95 

6. 24 1-in. mall, caps 15 

6. 24 %-in. plugs 11 

6. 24 i/l.x%-in. bushings 15 

6. 24 i/o-in. plugs 07 

G. 24 i/L'XG-iu. nipples 34 

6. 24 Vi;x4-in. nipples 26 

6. 12 1-in. brass unions finished 2 85 

6. 12 1-in. brass ells finished 2 28 

6. 12 1-in. brass tees finished 3 42 

6. 12 i4x%-in. bushings 32 

6. 12 %xi/4-in. bushings 28 

6. 12 %xiA-in. bushings 48 

6. 12 lx%-in. bushings 87 

6. 6 %-in. fin. brass union ells for H. W 1 64 

6. 6 1-in. fin. brass union ells for H. W 2 02 

6. 6 IVi-in- fin- t^Hs for H. W 2 69 

6. 6 IVo-in. fin. brass union ells for H. W 3 60 

6. 200 ft. %-in. R. H. cut lacos 45 

6. 30 ft. 1-in. C. U 3 38 

6. 30 ft. IVi-in. C. U 4 05 

6. 10 lbs. %-in. Eclipse packing 5 50 

6. 15% lbs. %-in. sq. duck packing 2 50 

6. 15 lbs. %-in. sq. flax packing 3 00 

6. 2 1-ln. L. II. plain bibb V. V 1 65 

6. 6 %-in. hose bibb S. B. I. P 2 81 

6. 6 2-in. Raymond fen-ules 60 

6. 6 iyix8-in. Raymond solder nipples 1 03 

6. n lVjx8-in. Raymond solder nipples 1 22 

6. 12 '-i-in. Boston S. ('. bibbs fig. I. T*. N. P 9 00 



79 

VOUCHEK Xi). S(;-- rv.ntiiuKMl. 
1897. 

Dec. 6. 12 i/o-iii. solder nipplos $0 .-^7 

6. 2 2x%-iu. D. S. saddles 72 

6. 2 lM!X%-iu. D. S. saddles 42 

6. 2 l^xVa-iu. D. S. saddles 40 

'• 6. 6 No. 2 Victor air valves 75 

6. 24 basin chain and snaps 50 

6. 24 bath chain and snaps 90 

6. 521/^ gaJs. Crescent oil, "dynanio" 18 38 

•• 31. 2 3-in. I. B. A. D. Globe valves, yoked 13 40 

•• 31. 1 No. 3 B. W. Ind. closet 3 85 

" 31. 2 No. 8 rubber connections 1 30 

$482 25 

Cr. by 2 IV^-in. safety valves returned 5 57 

Total $476 08 



VOUCHER No. 87. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 6. 1,000 yds. Stevens crash at $5.88 $58 80 

6. 18 Seymour white blankets at $2.871^ 51 75 

6. 10 pieces white net at 30c 3 00 

6. 20 pieces H. C. net at 35c •. 7 00 

6. 48 boxes tidy cotton at 54c 25 92 

6. 1 gr. steel crochet needles 50 

6. 40^3 doz. towels at $2 SO 33 

Total $227 30 



VOUCHER No. 88. RAG SD ALE & SNOW. 
1897. 
Dec. 14. Casket for Ariel Wadsworth S7 00 



Total $7 00 



VOUCHER No. 89. PETER F. BRYCE. 
1897. 

Dec. 2. 664 lbs. butter crackers at 5c $33 20 

" 9. 659 lbs. butter crackers at 5c 32 95 

■' 16. 676 lbs. butter crackers at 5c 33 80 

•• 23. 679 lbs. butter crackers at 5c 33 95 

" 30. 669 lbs. butter crackers at 5c .33 45 

Total $167 35 



so 



VOUCHER No. «J0. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Supt. 
1897. 

Dec. 2. Cathcart, Cleland & Co.. for medical book.s. . .$17 70 

" 2. Chas. J. Gardner for sausages and meat 3 55 

" 3. Chas. J. Kubn & Co., for groceries, produce. . 8 39 

4. W. L. Merritt for whitewashing 10 00 

" 4. John Windrin for help to butcher 10 (K) 

4. Gutenberg Co., for 7 copies Telegraph, from 

July 1 to Dec. 31, '97 27 30 

'* 6. J. C. Webb for postage stamps 25 00 

" 9. J. F. HiUsopple for Sentinel and Journal from 

Sept. 9 to Dec. 9, '97 16 80 

" 9. Paid India Alkali Avorks for 5 kegs sorogi*an. . 29 50 

" 10. Henry Beiser for music 11 25 

*' 11. W. L. Merritt for whitewashing 10 00 

" 11. John B. Windrin for helping butcher 1 week. 10 00 

11. Carl Rummel 3 days' labor as carpenter 3 50 

*' 18. W. L. Merritt for whitewashing 10 00 

" 18. Jno. B. Windi-iu for helping butcher 10 00 

" 18. Paid Carl Rummel for 1 week's work 8 15 

" 21. Edward A. Eickhoff, Christmas tree 7 00 

" 25. W. L. Merritt for whitewashing 10 00 

" 25. Carl Rummel for work as cai*penter 8 15 

" 25. Paid Henry Beiser for music 15 75 

" 27. Paid A. Steffan for cigars 20 00 

" 29. Paid Otis Clark for express chax'ges 6 37 

Total 



$278 95 



VOUCHER No. 91. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Supt. 



1897 



Dec. 30. Main pay roll for December, 1897 $7,072 10 

Total 



$7,072 10 



VOUCHER No. 92. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1897. 
Dec. 31. For 4,650 gals, milk at 12c $558 00 



Total 



$558 00 



VOUCHER No. 93. PIONEER BRASS WORKS. 
1897. 

Dec. 23. 30 lbs. brass castings at 25c $7 50 

" 29. 72 lbs. blass castings at 25c 18 00 

Total 



$25 50 



81 



VOUCH KK No. 04. SYERUP & CO. 

1897. 

Dec. 24. 1(» ban-els cidor at $4.65 $46 50 

24. 1 bunch bananas 1 75 

Total $48 



VOUCHER No. 95. DANIEL STEWART & CO. 

1897. 

Dec. 2. 1 lb. blk. cohosh $0 15 

2. 2 lbs. C. P. sulph. zinc 22 

2. 2 lbs. cavb. magnesia 32 

2. 1 lb. oil lemon, Sanderson 1 25 

2. ^ lb. subgal bismuth 70 

2. 5 lbs. green soap 75 

2. 5 lbs. white wax 1 40 

2. 5 lbs. select gum arable 2 25 

2. 5 lbs. carbolic acid 1 20 

2. 15 lbs. dalmation insect poAvder 3 75 

2. 2 lbs. pyrophosphate of iron 1 10 

2. 1^ lb. resorcin 58 

2. 10 lbs. glycerine 1 40 

2. 100 lbs. oxalic acid 7 25 

2. Vs lb. F. E. sarsaparilla comp 3 80 

2. 4 oz. oil peppermint 33 

2. 4 oz. salicine 75 

2. 4 oz. antikamnia 3 40 

2. 6 oz. amonal 5 40 

2. 6 oz. phenacetine. 5 40 

2. 8 chloralamid 5 76 

2. 10 gals, alcohol, can COc 24 10 

2. 10 gals, wood alcohol, can 60c 8 60 

2. 4 doz. bxs. P. D. capsules, 384 

2. 2 doz. bxs. P. D. capsules, 2 

2. 2 doz. bxs. P. D. capsules, 1 $3 84 3 84 

2. 1 doz. bottles Peters petlc essence 8 00 

2. 1 sack 4 XX corks 

2. 1 sack 3 XX corks $1 17 1 17 

2. 1,500 H. T. 1-60 hypodermic tablets 73 

3. 4 doz. P. D. capsules. 4 3 84 

6. 4 doz. O. G. Po. Ext. opium 2 92 

Total $104 20 



6 — Cent. Ins. 



82 

VOUCHER Xo. 9G. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1897. 

Dec. IG. 1 sheet No. 10 brass 14x24 $1 80 

" 16. 1 sheet No. 14 brass 14x24 1 50 

" 16. 12 (loz. tinned handles 1 85 

" 16. 24 links l^xl-in. band iron 1 50 

" 24. 2 No. 16 galv. iron wash sinks 50 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 97. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 2. 300 doz. eggs at 19c $68 40 

9. 300 doz. eggs at 19c. 68 40 

" 16. 360 doz. eggs at 19c 68 40 

" 23. 360 doz. eggs at 19c 68 40 

" 28. 60 lbs. tnrlveys at 14r 8 40 

Total 

VOUCHER No. OS. NELSON, MORRIS & CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 8. 1,067 lbs. pork at $6.35 67 76 

" 15. 1,027 lbs. pork at $6.35 65 21 

" 23. 1,038 lbs. pork at $6.35 65 91 

" 28. 1,091 lbs. pork at $6.35 69 28 

" 28. 59 lbs. bacon at 10c 5 90 

" 31. 883 lbs. pork at $6.35 56 07 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 99. SWIFT & CO. 

5,074 lbs. beef at $6.73 $341 98 

5,076 lbs. lard at $4.30 218 27 

1,039 lbs. ham at $7.20 74 81 

3,912 lbs. beef at $6.73 263 28 

1,065 lbs. hams at $7.20 76 68 

2,410 His. beef at $6.73 162 80 

1,778 lbs. beef at $6.73 119 66 

1,025 lbs. hams at $7.20 73 80 

4,216 lbs. beef at $6.73 283 74 

4,543 lbs. beef at $6.73 305 74 

1,087 lbs. hams at $7.20 78 26 

4,408 lbs. beef at $6.73 296 65 

4,518 lbs. beef at $6.73 304 06 

1,070 lbs. hams at $7.2o 77 04 

Total $2,676 77 



1897. 


Dec. 1. 




1. 




2. 




3. 




9. 




10. 




14. 




16. 




16. 




20. 




23. 




24. 




30. 




30. 



83 

VOUCHER No. 100. JAMES L. KEACH. 
1897. 

Dec. 2. 1 bbl. apples $2 25 

2. 573.25 bu. potatoes at 57c; less $1.00 325 85 

4. 1 bbl. apples at $2.25, V2 bu. onions at 35c 2 GO 

8. 1 box lemons 3 00 

11. 1 bbl. apples 3 00 

18. 12 bbls. apples, $45.00; Ci bbls. cranbeiTies. 

$41.70 86 70 

18. 20,870 lbs, potatoes at 57c 198 26 

23. 1 bbl. apples, $3.75; 1 bx. oranges. $4..50 8 25 

23. 16 doz. celery 3 20 

24. 2,150 lbs. potatoes at 57c 2o 42 

27. 1 bx. lemons 3 00 



Total $656 53 



VOUCHER No. 101. THE VAIL SEED CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 24. 4 cases bolly at $4.00 '. . $16 00 



Total $16 00 



VOUCHER No. 102. SAMUEL GEYER. 
1897. 
Dec. 28. 98.14 bu. white oats at 26c $25 6p 



Total $25 60 



VOUCHER No. 103. THE HOLT ICE COLD STORAGE CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 13. 12,200 lbs. ice r 

" 17. 10,225 lbs. ice 

" 20. 72,000 lbs. ice— 94,425 lbs. at 65c $.30 70 30 70 



Total $30 70 



VOUCHER No. 104. INDIANAPOLIS DISTRICT TELEGRAPH CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 31. 1,980 ft. 1-in. iron conduit $187 11 

31. 3 junctions for 1-in. condt 90 

31. 3 elbows, boxes for 1-in. condt .• . . . 42 

31. 3 elbows boxes for lxlx%-in. condt 2 52 

31. 110 ft. %-in. iron condt 4 58 

31. 6 ft. %-in. iron elbow 43 

31. 2,112 ft. O. R. C. standard wire 238 97 



84 



VOUCHER No. 104— Continued. 
1897. 

Dec. 31. 2,500 ft. 12 R. C. solid wire $29 71 

" 31. 125 ft. 6 standard R. C. wire 4 11 

" 31. 1,000 ft. %-in. circular loom .^3 20 

" 31. 2 Upton arc lamps 30 00 

'* 31. 48 plain tireless ceiling buttons 1 08 

" 31. 36 D. P. ceiling cutouts for molding 6 30 

" 31. 72 G. Ed. key sockets 14 40 

" 31. 72 S. R. socket bushings 36 

" 31. 2 3-in. wire main cutouts, 7.5-amp 1 10 

" 31. 8 3 wire to 2 Avire cutouts 4 (>4 

" 31. 300 yds. lamp cord 9 90 

" 31. 6 lbs. tape 96 

'' 31. 5 lbs. Cbattertons comp 6 50 

'' 31. 1 gal. carbon bi sulphid 1 30 

" 31. 400 ft. twine cond 5 20 

" 31. 125 ft. 34-in. circular loom 7 12 

Total .$590 81 

VOUCHER Xo. 105. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 31. To 32.100 cubic feet gas at $1.25 per M $40 13 

" 31. To 2 outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total $43 13 

VOUCHER No. 100. SIMON P. NEIDIGH. 
1897. 

Jan. 31. Street car fare for month of .Ian., '97 $1 15 

Feb. 28. Street car fare for month of Feb., '97 1 20 

Mar. 31. Street car fare for month of March, '97 1 65 

Apr. 30. Street car fare for month of April. '97 1 15 

May 31. Street car fare for month of May, '97 2 75 

June 30. Street car fare for month of June. '97 3 20 

July 31. Street car fare for month of July, "97 3 05 

Aug. 31. Street car fare for month of Aug., '97 2 40 

Sept. 30. Street car fare for month of Sept., '97 3 75 

Oct. 31. Sti-eet car fare for month of Oct.. '97 4 00 

Nov. 30. Street car fare for month of Nov.. '97 3 15 

Dec. 31. Street car fare for month of Dec.. '97 3 20 

Total $30 65 

VOrCHKR No. I<i7. FLEISCHMANN <S: CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 31. 051.. lbs. yeast at 25c for the month $16 38 

Total $16 38 



85 

VOUCHER No. 108. FLEISCHMANN & CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 4. 51/2 lbs. yeast at 25c $1 37 

6. 3 lbs. yeast at 25c 75 

8. 51^ lbs. yeast at 25c 138 

" 11. 5y2 lbs. yeast at 25c 137 

" 13. 3y2 lbs. yeast at 25c 88 

" 15. 5 lbs. yeast at 25c 125 

" IS. 41/3 lbs. yeast at 25c 1 12 

" 20. 41/2 lbs. yeast at 25c 1 13 

" 22. 4y2 lbs. yeast at 25c 1 12 

" 25. 51/2 lbs. yeast at 25c 1 38 

" 27. 3 lbs. yeast at 25c 75 

" 29. 51/2 lbs. yeast at 25c 1 37 

Total $13 87 

VOUCHER No. 109. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1898. 
Jan. 31. 4,650 gals. milk at 12c for the month ending 

Jan. 31, '98 $558 00 



Total ». $558 00 

VOUCHER No. 110. TECHENTIN & FREIBERG. 
1898. 

Jan. 10. 1 %-in. hitch rein $0 35 

" 20. 1 114-in. heavy halter 1 50 



Total $1 85 

VOUCHER No. 111. CHARLES J. GARDNER. 
1*898. 

Jan. 6. 4,194 lbs. beef at $6.40 $268 42 

11. 4,578 lbs. beef at $6.40 292 99 

14. 4,297 lbs. beef at $6.40 275 00 

19. 3,742 lbs. beef at $6.40 239 49 

24. 4,007 lbs. beef at $6.40 256 45 

28. 4,222 lbs. beef at $6.40 270 20 



Total $1,602 55 

VOUCHER No. 112. INDIANAPOLIS LIGHT AND POWER CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 31. To current for arc lights 3 months ending 

January 31 $31 90 

" 31. Carboning for arc lights, 3 months ending 

January 31 10 60 

Total .$42 50 



86 

VOUCHER No. 113. C. A. CARSTENSEN. 
1898. 

Jan. 2. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 9. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 16. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 23. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 30. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total $25 00 



VOUCHER No. 114. MANUFACTURERS NATURAL GAS CO. 

1898. 
Jan. 31. Gas service per contract for the month end- 
January 31, 1898 $1,388 89 

Total $1,388 89 



VOUCHER No. 115. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 31. To 28,000 cubic feet gas at $1.25 per :\r $35 00 

" 31. Two outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total $38 00 



VOUCHER No. 116. MARTIN J. O'REILLEY. 

1898. 
Jan. 31. To 4 new shoes $1 50 

Total $1 50 



VOUCHER No. 117. RAGSDALE & SNOW. 
1898. 

Jan. 6. Casket for John B. Olges $7 00 

8. Casket for Hannah Maxwell 7 00 

Total $14 00 



VOUCHER No. lis. J. E. BELL. 
1898. 
Jan. 31. For legal services rendered in preparing an- 
nual report of trustees 25 00 

Total $25 00 



87 

VOUCHER No. 119. INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 24. Advertising 63 words 3 times $1 89 



Total $1 89 



VOUCHER No. 120. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 25. Advertising 1^2 squares 3 times $3 00 



Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. 121. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL CO. 

1S9S. 
Jan. 25. Advertising 12 lines 3 times $2 85 



Total $2 85 



VOUCHER No. 122. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 

. 1897. 

Dec. 10. To Washington $0 25 

" 12. To Paxton 31 

1898. 

Jan. 7. To Crawfordsville 35 

", 7. To Bloomingdale 25 

" 9. To Bloomington 25 

•' 12. To Bloomington 25 

" 15. To Bloomington 25 

" 14. To Terre Haute 25 

" 14. To Terre Haute 25 

"• 20. To Jeffersonville 25 



Total $2 66 



VOUCHER No. 123. HUNTINGTON & PAGE. 
1898. 

Jan. 31. 7,000 2-in. pots $21 00 

•' 31. 200 6-in. saucers 4 00 

•• 31. 1 bale jadoo 3 00 

Total $28 00 



88 



1897. 


Dec. 


17. 


" 


17. 


" 


24. 


1898. 


Jan. 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


5. 


" 


7. 




i . 
7. 




10. 


•• 


11. 


•• 


11. 



VOUCHER No. 124. WM. B. BURP^ORD. 

5 M prescription blanks $3 00 

Tabbing same 2 50 

1 fountain pen 3 00 

3 pad calendars 75 

1 waste basket 50 

1 waste basket 50 

1 box toilet paper 6 00 

1 gross 000% band, i/o-in 1 40 

1 gross %-in. bands 60 

1 gross %-in. bands 20 

1 gross A. W. Faber's pencils 7 20 

10 R. M. ward paper 17 50 

5 M eVo Avhite envelopes G 00 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 125. ALBERT O. LOCKRIDGE. 
1897. 

Oct. 30. Balance due from last settlement $3 45 

Nov. 8. Railroad fare 2 40 

8. Carfare 40 

8. Hotel fare 1 10 

" 26. Railroad fare 1 20 

" 26. Hotel 75 

" 26. Car fare 20 

Dec. 30. Transfer Greencastle 10 

" 30. Railroad fare 2 40 

" 30. Car fare 10 

1898. 

Jan. 5. Railroad fare 2 40 

5. Car fare 10 

" 28. Railroad fare 2 40 

" 28. Transfer 20 

" 28. Car fare 10 

'• 28. Lunch 15 

Total 



1898. 
Jan. 11. 1 

" 10. 1 



VOUCHER No. ^2r,. KIPP BROS. CO. 

New York watch $1 15 

doz. spectacles 3 50 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 127. ACME MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 8. 10 bbls. White Rose flour at $4.55 $45 50 

8. 50 bbls. White Rose flour at $4.55 227 50 

Total $273 00 

VOUCHER No. 128. BLANTON MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 31. 35 bbls. Spring Wheat flour at $5.40 $189 00 

" 31. 60 bbls. Winter Wheat flour at $4.49 269 40 

Total $458 40 

VOUCHER No. 129. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1897. 
Dee. 31. 30 S60 napkins at $1.15 $84 50 

Total $34 50 

VOUCHER No. 130. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1897. 

.Tan. 4. 1 case 58-in. Bro. muslin, 813 yds at lie $89 43 

" 4. 9 pieces marble oil cloth, 108 yds 10 SO 

" 3L 94 quilts at 65c 6110 

" 31. 1 quilt del 65 

Total : $161 98 

VOUCHER No. 131. FROMMEYER BROS. 
1898. 

.T^n. 31. 45 doz. cups at 33c ' $14 85 

" 31. 15 doz. saucers at 33c 4 95 

" 31. 12 doz. plates, 10-in at 75c 9 00 

" 31. 6 doz. veg. dishes at $2.40 14 40 

" 31. 11 doz. glass tumblers at 35c 3 85 

Total $47 05 

VOUCHER No. 132. A. BURDSAL CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 16. 4 gals, gasoline at 15c $0 60 

189S. 

.Tan. 7. 1-1 Sal. B. B. walnut hd. oil finish 165 

7. 2-1 Sal. B. B. white hd, oil finish at $3.00 6 00 

" 18. 2 lbs. steel wool 1 20 

Total .$9 45 



90 



V0UCHE7K No. 133. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 3. 10 lbs. hemp twine at 25e ?2 50 

" 10. 1 butcher's knife 12-in 60 

" 13. 3 rolling pins at 20 60 

" 18. 1 mal. gate 35 

Total f4 05 



VOUCHER No. 134. SYFERS, M'BRIDE & CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 11. 708 lbs Battle Ax tobacco at 19c $134 52 

" 11. 100 lbs. Greenback smoking tobacco at 26yoc. 26 50 



Total $161 02 



VOUCHER No. 135. C. H. SWICK & CO. 

1898. 

Jan. G. 50 gals, oysters at SOc $40 00 

" 13. 57 gals, oysters at SOc 45 GO 

" 20. 65 gals, oysters at SOc 52 00 

" 27. 661/2 gals, oysters at SOc 53 20 

$190 80 

Less rebate 5 00 

$185 80 

Total $185 80 



VOUCHER No. 136. C. ANESHAENSEL & CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 12. 1 1st electrolier, B. G., No. 399 .1;7 00 

" 12. 1 9x9x31/4 blue opalescent globe 1 00 

Total $8 00 



VOUCHER No. 137. SCHNULL & CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 6. 114yo gals, syrup, 18c $20 61 

" 6. 55 gals, molasses, 35c 19 25 

6. 25 lbs. ground ginger, IGo 4 00 

6. 25 lbs. N. O. sugar, 4%c 119 

6. 2 gross R. R. scrub-brushes, No. 780, at 8c 16 00 

6. 7,809 lbs. granulated sugar, -1:5.59 551 68 

6. 1.952 lbs. apricots, 6V2C 126 88 

6. 1,012 lbs. N. Y. cheese. 9c 9108 



91 

VOUCHER No. 137-Continuod. 
1898. 

Jan. 6. 150 lbs. eurrauts, 7c $10 50 

. " 6. 200 doz. Yarmouth corn, 85c 170 00 

6. 2 gross Electric silicon, $8.50 17 00 

6, 12 gals, prepared mustard, 30c 3 GO 

6. 10 bbls. lake salt, 75c 7 50 

6. 200 doz. canned peaches, $1.65 330 00 

6. I,210y2 lbs. imp. tea, 23c 278 42 

" 13. 10 lbs. ground ginger, 16c 1 60 

" 13. 8 boxes raisins, $1.30 10 40 

" 13. 109 lbs. No. 43 apricots (no charge; short on 

former bill) .... 

" 13. Half doz. No. 1 tubs, $5.50 ' . . 2 75 

Total $1,662 46 



VOUCHER No. 138. DANIEL STEWART CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 3. 3 lbs. boracic acid $0 33 

3. 3 lbs. tartaric acid 1 05 

" 3. 3 lbs. comp. licorice powd 75 

3. 5 lbs. F. E. cas-sag, 1887 3 50 

" 3. 2 lbs. commercial sulphuric acid • 13 

" 3. 5 lbs. bromide of soda 2 50 

" 3. 2 lbs. carbonate of ammonium 20 

3. 5 lbs. bromide of potassium 2 25 

" 3. 3 lbs. iodide of potassium 7 44 

3. 2 lbs. sugar of milli 28 

'■ 3. 5 lbs. arsenious acid powd 30 

3. 4 lbs. spirits of nitrous ether 1 26 

," 3. 1 lb. balsam pern 2 20 

3. 1 lb. hypophosphite of lime 1 18 

3. % lb. hypophosphite of soda 60 

" 3. ^ lb. hypophosphite of potassium 31 

3. 4 lbs. stronger aqua ammonia 47 

3. 10 lbs. glycerine 1 36 

3. 10 lbs. gum camphor 3 70 

3. 25 lbs. insect powder 6 00 

3. 4 oz. hypophosphite of mangonese 76 

3. 8 oz. nitrate of silver 3 50 

3. 25 oz. sulphite quinine 6 75 

" 3. 4 oz. resorcin 1 30 

3. 1 oz. citrate caffeine 30 

3. 3 oz. chloralamid 2 16 

3. 8 oz. phenacetine 7 20 

3. 4 oz. antikamnia 3 40 

3. 4 oz. sulfonal 5 12 

3. 2 gross 29 pill boxes 90 



$0 90 


1 


30 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 




73 




46 


1 


25 


5 


58 


4 


00 




50 



92 

VOUCHER No. 138-Continued. 

1898. 

Jan. 3. 2 gross No. 30 pill boxes 

3. 2 gi'oss assorted sliding powder boxes 

3. 1 doz. boxes peptonising tubes 

3. 4 oz. P. D. capsules 

3. 1 doz. bottles Peters' peptic essence 

3. 500 H. T. sulph., 1-00 gr 

3. 500 pills prota iodide of raercuiT. %-gr. . . . 

4. 1 gal. castor oil 

G. 5 lbs. sulph. ether squibbs, 14 

G. 4 doz. P. D. capsules 

10. 2 lbs. Canary seed 

10. 2 lbs. 28x36chips 

10. 2 lbs. 31x3G chips $7 38 7 38 

12. 2 lbs. 28x36 chips 

12. 1 lb. 31x36 chips $5 44 

14. % doz. 16-oz. tumblers, graduates 

14. % doz. 32-oz. tumblers, graduates 

14. 5 lbs. synthetic carbolic acid 

15. 1-5 yd. 7-in. bell, plaster 

15. 5 oz. chloi'alamid, 72c 

Total $125 O; 

VOUCHER No. 139. VARNEY & M'OUAT. 

1898. 

Jan. 18. 3 16-c. p. 1,102 E. B. lamps, 32c $0 96 

" 26. 1 doz. La. Clanche zincs 50 



5 44 


2 


00 


3 


00 


3 


25 


2 


48 


3 


60 



Total 



VOUCHER No. 140. INDIANAPOLIS STOVE CO. 

1898. 
Jan. 4. 2 No. 19 Nation stoves and pii>es at $11.50 23 00 



Total 

VOUCHER No. 141. JOHN O'NEILL. 

1898. 
Jan. 8. 1,500 lbs. corn meal, loc $11 25 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 142. J. R. RYAN & CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 11. 1(K» lbs. bran $0 70 

Total 



93 



1898. 
Jan. 5. 
" 7. 
•' 12. 
" 20. 
" 27. 



VOUCHER No. 14H. SWIFT &: CO. 

1,040 lbs. ham, ."j^T.O.j .S;73 32 

5,011 lbs. lard, !?4.1(t 205.45 

1,04G lbs. hams, $7.05 7P, 74 

1,075 lbs. hams, $7.05 75 7!) 

1,040 lbs. hams, $7.05 73 32 

Total 



$501 62 



VOUCHER No. 144. THE HOLT ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 6. 77,G00 lbs. ice, 70c $27 IG 

" 29. 54,000 lbs. ice, 70c 18 90 

Total $46 06 



1898. 
Jan. c 



VOUCHER No. 145. JAMES L. KEACH. 

1 bbl. apples, $3.75; 1 bbl. onions, $2.25 $0 00 

13,615 lbs. potatoes, 63yoC 144 09 

1 bbl. apples 3 75 

627.10 bu. potatoes, 63y2C 398 25 

2 bbls. onions 5 00 

1 bbl. apples, $3.75; 1 box lemons, $3.10 6 85 

2 bbls. apples, $7..50; 1 bu onions, 90c 8 40 

1 bbl. apples 3 75 

Total 



$576 09 



1898. 
Jan. 0. 
" 13. 
" 20. 
" 27. 



VOUCHER No. 14G. THE HITZ BAKINB CO. 

654 lbs. butter crackei-s, 5c $32 70 

684 lbs. butter crackers, 5c 34 20 

726 lbs. butter crackers, 5c 36 30 

652 lbs. butter crackers, 5c 32 60 

Total 



$135 80 



1898. 
Jan. 8. 
S. 
" 11. 
" 6. 
" 18. 



VOUCHER No. 147. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 

1 2-in. coil 14 ft. long, 8 pipes high $16 25 

1 2-in. coil 10 ft. long, 9 pipes high 15 55 

1 No. 1 Nasons steam trap 5 60 

1 2-in. pipe coil 20 ft. high with wall straps. . 19 77 

209 6-12 ft. Byers iron pipe 34 04 



94 

VOUCHER No. 147-Continued. 
1898. 

Jan. 18. 24 1/2 lip uiiiuiirs , $0 95 

" 18. 24 % lip unions 117 

" 18. 24 1 lip unions 1 43 

" 18. 24 2 lip unions 3 24 

" 18. 24 % R. & L. C. I. ells 41 

" 18. 12 2 R. & L. couplings 50 

" 18. 12 iL' R. & I^. couplings 40 

" 18. 12 11/4 R. & L. couplings 28 

" 18. 12 1 R. & L. couplings 18 

'* 18. 12 2-in. female union ells 3 72 

" 18. 24 li/^-in. female union ells 5 04 

■■ 18. 12 2x3 nippers 41 

'• 18. 12 2x211. nippers 28 

" 18. 12 2x4 R. & L. nippers 52 

'• 18. 12 2x3 R. & L. nippers 41 

" 18. 24 iyox4 R. & L. nippers 65 

" 18. 24 1/^x3 R. & L. nippers 65 

•• 18. 24 11/4x4 R. & L. nippers 52 

'• 18. 24 11/4x3 R. & L. nippers 52 

'• 18. 24 1^x21/2 R. & L. nippers 39 

•• 18. 24 1x314 R. & L. nippers 39 

•• 18. 24 1x31/1. R. H. nippers 39 

" 18. 24 iyoxli/4 bushings . ,35 

'• 18. 24 1x11/4 bushings 27 

" 18. 12 2-in. plugs 20 

" 18. 24 114-in. plugs. 27 

*' 18. 24 2 caps 60 

" 18. 24 11^ caps 50 

" 18. 24 34 caps 20 

•• 18. 24 % caps, 10 10 

" 18. 24 1x21/4 R. & L. nipples 39 

" 18. 24 each %x2i/l.-in. 31/2 nipples 60 

•' 18. 24 each i,2x2x3 nipples 44 

" 18. 24 each 1/2x3% R. & L. nipples and V2X2Y2 

nipples GO 

•• 18. 24 11/2 close nipples 43 

•• 18. 4 2 A. D. Globe valves 9 00 

• 18. 4 each Z, !?9.00; IVj. •'FG.OO A. D. angle valves. . 15 00 

'• 18. 4 each Z, $15.00. and I1/2, $10.50, and I14. ?T.50 

gate valves 33 00 

" 18. 24. angle valves with keys 3 00 

'• 18. 30 lbs. each 1-16. $10.80, and %, $10.80, rain- 
bow packing 21 00 

•' 18. 15 lbs. sq. duck T^, $2.55; 10 lbs. % rainbow 

packing, $2.20 4 75 

" 18. 121,2 lbs. % Chesterton sect sq. flax packing. . 5 25 

" 18. IGiv. lbs. % Chesterton sect. sq. flax packing. . 93 

" 18. 2 18 Stillson wrenches 2 80 



$1 


30 


5 


52 


45 


00 


8 


25 




30 


5 


00 


3 


12 


2 


25 


3 


00 


1 


50 


3 


20 


1 


35 



95 

VOUCHER No. 147— Continued. 
1S98. 

Jan. 18. 100 %x2i/-. niachiuo bolts 

" 18. 24 12 Incl. burners C. I. 1-in ' 

" 18. 3 No. 2 F. & B. steam traps 

" 18. 3 copper balls for traps 

" 18. 24 rubber cups for prior basin cox 

'• 18. 214 pint mlch. S. F. Cyclone lubricator 

" IS. 24 Ixi/o L. P. Kittg mixer 

" 18. 12 2-ft.xl 4-fol(i brass boxwood rules 

" 18. 50 lbs. caustic soda 

" 18. 15-in. stal. hemp 

" 18. 1 20x.'50xl2 fig. ST5 stop sinlv 

'■ IS. 1 frame for sinlc 

Tot.-il $299 73 



VOUCHER No. 14S. BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 29. 1 GV2 8I/2 Carlton camera 

■' 29. 1 61/2 8^2 Feiss lens la. No. 76079 

" 29. Amp. Diapp shutter No. 14939 

" 29. 3 plate holders $94 37 $94 37 

" 29. 1 Hemperly mag. flash-light wp. 2 oz. mag. . 3 02 

" 29. 1 inside kit 3.4 4.4 

" 29. 1 inside kit ■% 

" 29. 1 inside kit .5-7 

'• 29. 1 inside kit % $112 112 

" 29. 2 agate ware pans for toning, 10 and 12 2 55 

" 29. 1 printing frame fiat 3.4 4.4 

" 29. 1 printing frame % 

•' 29. 1 printing frame, 5-7 

" 29. 1 printing frame, flat, % 

" 29. 1 printing frame, flat, 6.2, 8.2 $2 09 2 09 

" 29. 1 vulcanite rubber tray, shallow, 4-5. . . . 

■• 29. 1 vulcanite rubber tray, 6.2, S.2 

■• 29. 1 vulcanite rubber tray, deep, 4-5 

" 29. 1 vulcanite rubber tray, deep, 6.2. 8.2. .$1 92 1 92 

" 29. 2 Derclaping tongs, Nos. 1 and 2 94 

•■ 29. 1 camel's hair brush, 2% 51 

" 29. 1 focussing cloth gossamer 51 

•• 29. 3 ferretype plates, 10-14-in 38 

*' 29. 1 squeezer roller. 12-in 1 28 



Total $108 09 



3: 



96 

VOUCHER No. 149. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 7. 500 ft. 2-in. ash lumber $17 50 

7. 500 ft. li/a-in. oak lumber. .* 17 50 

7. 1,000 ft. y2-in. 10 lumber 18 75 

7. 1,200 ft. No. 14 P. flg. lumber 19 80 

TotaJ $73 55 



VOUCHER No. 150. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 15. 1 bbl. Ex. Col Drake cyl. oil, 53 gals. 

at 85c $45 05 

Less 25 per cent, dis 11 26 

.?33 79 



Total . .• $33 79 



VOUCHER No. 151. WILLL\MS & HUNT. 
1898. 

Jan. 11, 3,381 lbs. borax flake chip soap at 3%c $105 66 

•' 17. 3,435 lbs. borax flake chip soap at 3%c 107 34 

Total $213 00 



VOUCHER No. 152. FRIEDMAN MFG. CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 1. 1 tub butterine, 40 lbs., S'ic $3 55 

4. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., 8%c 106 50 

" 10. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., 8%c 106 50 

" 17. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs.. 8%c 106 50 

" 24. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., 8%c 106 50 

Total $429 55 



VOUCHER No. 153. L. K. MORRISON & CO. 
1898. 

.liin. 11. 2 prs. rubber boots, $2.85 $5 70 

•• 22. 1 pr. rubber boots 2 85 

Total $8 85 



97 



VOUCHER No. 154. COFFIN, FLETCHER & CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 8. 95 pork backs, 1,105 lbs., 6c .$G6 30 

" 15. 187 pork backs, 1,100 lbs., Gc 6G 00 

" 22. 114 pork backs, 1,107 lbs., Gc GG 42 

" 29. 115 pork backs. 1.107 lbs., Gc G6 42 

Total $265 14 



VOUCHER No. 155. PERRY BROOM CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 8. 10 doz. brooms, $1.G5 $1G 50 

" 8. 5 doz. whisk brooms, .'?1,00 5 00 

" 15. 15 doz. brooms, $1.G5 24 75 

" 15. 5 doz. whisk brooms, $1.00 5 00 

Total $51 25 



VOUCHER No. 156. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 5. 360 doz. eggs, 17c $61 20 

" 8. 59 lbs. turkeys, 14c 8 26 

" 13. 360 doz. eggs., 17c. 61 20 

" 15. 44 lbs. turkeys, 14c 6 16 

" 21. 360 doz. eggs, 17c 61 20 

•; 22. 40 lbs. turkeys, 14c '. 5 60 

' 29. 51 lbs. turkeys, 14c 7 14 

Total $210 76 



VOUCHER No. 1.57. RICHARD & CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 15. 3 crucibles R. B. No. 0<>, 18c .$0 .54 

" 15. 1 tube for water analysis, 2 ft 2 50 

" 15. 1 Kipp generator, 1 pt 4 00 

$7 04 

Less 25 per cent 1 76 

— $5 28 

Total $5 28 

7 — Cent. Ins. 



98 

VOUCHEIl No. 158. PETTIS DRY GOODS CO. 



1898. 

Jan. 19. Laying old carpet. 

'• 21. 26 tile, 45c 

" 21. 26 hung, 20c 

" 21. Scraping 

" 21. Painting 

•• 21. Soizing 

Feb. 1. 1 book case 



$2 50 


11 


70 


5 


20 


4 


00 




50 


1 


(X) 


11 


00 



Total $35 90 

VOUCHER No. 159. JOSEPH GARDNER. 

1898. 

Jan. 1. 1 box 4x20x28 N. G. Taylor tin ^22 00 

1. 1 gi'oss 4 X tin 414-in. tin covers .3 00 

1. 3 hand groovers 1 20 



Total $26 20 

VOUCHER No. 160. D. H. DAVIS. 
1S97. 
Oct. 29. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indianaix)lis 

and return $3 40 

Nov. 3 and 4. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indian- 
apolis and return 3 40 

'• 25 and 26. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indian- 
apolis and return 3 40 

Dec. 7 and 8. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indianapolis 

and return 3 40 

" 30 and 31. Railroad fare from Braail to Indian- 
apolis and return 3 40 

1898. 
Jan. 4 and 5. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indianapolis 

and return 3 40 

" 18 and 19. Railroad fare from Brazil to Indian- 
apolis and return 3 40 

" 27 and 28. Itailroad fare from Brazil to Indian- 
apolis and return 3 40 

Street car fares during the above dates. ... 1 00 

Meals and lodgings as ]>or bills nttached. . . 11 00 



Total $39 20 

VOUCHER No. 161. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Supt. 
1898. 

Jan. 1. W. L. Merritt for whilf washing .$10 00 

" 1. Carl Rumniel for work as cariHMiter 8 15 

" 1. Henry Reiser for music 22 00 

• 4. Chas. J. Gardner, for sausaircs 1 83 



99 



VOUCHER No. 161— Continued. 
1808. 

Jan. 6. Chas. J. Kuhil. for groceries .$2 40 

" 6. William Warner, copy Therapeutics Gazette, 

1898 2 00 

And 1 copy Bulletin of Pharmacy 1 00 

" 7. Standard Publishing Co., Sunday School sup- 
plies, January to April. 1898 26 75 

" 7. Hem-y Beiser for music 11 25 

" 8. Carl Rummel, work as carpenter 8 15 

8. W. L. Merritt for white washing 10 00 

" 13. J. C. Webb for postage stamps 25 00 

" 15. W. L. Merritt for white washing 10 00 

" 15. Carl Rummel. work as carpenter 8 15 

" 20. Henry Beiser for music 11 25 

" 22. W. L. Merritt for white washing 10 00 

" 22. Cai-1 Rummel, work as carpenter 8 15 

" 22. Wm. Kuhlman, '97 subscription, 4 copies. Die 

Glocke 8 00 

" 22. Joe A. Downey, 1 copy '98 Postal Guide 2 50 

" 22. Wm. Robinson, digging dry well new bakery 8 25 
" 27. George L. Knox, for 2 copies The Freeman. 

1897 and 1898 3 00 

" 27. Samuel Mark for 1 horse 125 00 

" 29. W. L. Merritt for white washing 10 00 

" 29. Carl Rummel, work as carpenter 8 15 

Total 



$340 98 



VOUCHER No. 162. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Supt. 



1§98. 



Jan. 31. Main pay roll for January. 1898. 
Total 



.§7.1.33 70 



$7,133 70 



VOUCHER No. 163. EDWARD MUELLER. 
1898. 

Bill garden seeds as follows: 

Feb. 14. Beans % bu. seeds, $10.36 $5 18 

" 14. Beans, % bu. seeds, $3.56 178 

" 14. Beans, % bu. seeds, $6.00 1 50 

" 14. Beans % bu. seeds, $5.00 125 

" 14. Beans, 14 bu. seeds, $3.76 94 

" 14. Beets, 5 lbs. Eclipse seed, 35c 1 75 

" 14. Beets, 2 lbs. long red seed. 30c 60 

" 14. Beets, 2 lbs., blood red seed. 40c 80 

" 14. Cabbage, 6 lbs. cabage seed. .$3.00 18 00 

" 14. Cabbage, 1 lb. cabbage seed 2 20 



100 

VorcHKK \n. lO:?— ContimuHl. 
1898. 

Feb. 14. Cal)bage, Vj 11>. cahbafro sood, i<;i.!M) 

14. ('abbaj,'e, Vii lb. calibage seed, -S^.Ou. 

14. Onions, G lbs. onion .seed, ^^.(mi 

14. Onions. 2 lbs. onion soe<l, $1.70 

14. Onions, 4 ll)s. onion seed, $1.7r> 

14. Onions. 1 lb. onion sei'<l 

14. Parsnips, 8 lbs. Hollow Crown seed. (Mic. .. 

14. Eadishes, 2 ll)s. radish seed, 50c 

14. Radishes. 1 lb. radish seed 

14. lladishes. 1 lb. radish seed 

14. lladishes. i j lb. radish .seed, (JOc 

14. liadislu's. ^i lb. radish seed 

14. liadislies, % lb. radish see<l 

14. Kadislies, 14 lb. radish seed, .$l.(io 

14. Lettnce. 2 lbs. black seed, 80c 

14. Peas, 14 bu. early seed, ii;4.00 

14. Teas. 14 bn. Pride seed. $5.00 

14. Peas, % bn. Telephone seed, $4.80 

14. Peas, % bu. Telegraph seed, $4.00 

14. Cuonmlx^rs, y^, lb. Landreth seed, $1..5(i.... 

14. Cuennibers, ^1. lb. Tiu'kish seed, 5o 

14. Cucumbers, 1 lb. early seed 

14. I'umpkins, 1 lb. yellow seed 

14. Squash, i/4 lb. early seed, 40c 

14. Squash, 14 lb. jiolden seed, 40c 

14. Squash, 14 lb. extra earlj' seed. 40c 

14. Parsley, Ys lb. Moss curled seed. 8f»c 

14. CaulifloAver. 1 oz. Giltedge seed 

14. Egfiplant, 1 oz. Pun)le seed 

14. Turnips. 10 lbs. Puri»le seed. ."'.Oc 

14. 1/2 lb. salsify, $1.00 

14. 14 lb. tomatoes, $l.so 



Total 



$0 95 


1 


CM) 


12 


00 


:5 


40 


7 


(X) 


2 


45 


4 


80 


1 


00 




45 




50 




15 




15 




15 


1 


on 


1 


11(1 


1 


2."> 




00 




50 




75 




25 




35 




55 




10 




10 




10 




10 


3 


00 




20 





tK» 




50 




45 



NOICIiKi: N... ir.J. IMHANAi'dl.lS O.VS CO. 



1898. 



Feb. 28. To .'^..-'ih) .uliic fi. a1 $1.25 per .M ((insinmvl. . .?41 88 
" 28. Two nuisidi' l.iini.s :if ."iL.'.O <.;i<]i 3 00 

Total 



101 
vouciiEu No. !«.-). fh():m.mi:yi-:k hkos. 

1898. 

Feb. 28. 55 doz. cupis, 33e .$1S 15 

" 28. 10 doz. saucers, 33c 3 30 

" 28. 5 doz. soiip howls, (Joc 3 25 

" 28. 4 doz. pitchei-s, .$3.25 13 00 

" 28. 5 doz. tumblers, 35e 1 75 

" 28. 10 doz. tea spoons, $2.50 i^ lit 

'• 28. 10 doz. table spoons, $5.00 4. 20 



Total $45 75 

VOUCHER No. 160. FIIANCIS BERGMAN. 
1898. 
Feb. 4. 24 kegs sal soda. 4.190 lbs at 55c .$23 05 



Total • $23 05 

VOUCHER No. 107. INDIANAPOLIS CHEMICAL CO. 

1898. 
Feb. 11. 1,(MX) lbs. Acme boiler compound, 7yoC .$75 00 



Total $75 00 

VOUCHER No. 168. FRIEDMAN MFG. CO. 

1898. 

Jan. 31. 31 tubs butterine, 1,240 lbs. at SygC $110 05 

Feb. 7. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs. at 8%c 106 50 

" 14. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs. at SygC 106 50 



Total $323 05 

VOUCHER No. 169. WHITALL. TATUM & CO. 
1898. 
Jan. 24. Qt. Reagents 2 doz. at $8.00 per doz. . .$16 00 
" 24. rt. Reagents, 1 doz 6 50 



$22 50 
Less 50 per cent, rebate 11 25 



$11 25 

" 24. Caps for reagents, 3 doz at 60c $1 80 

" 24. Box and packing 20 

" 24, Affirmation 50 



$13 75 
Less freight allowed 54 



.*13 21 



Net amount $13 21 



102 

VOUCHER No. 170. JOHN O'NEILL. 
1898. 

Feb. 25. 5 bbls. lye flour, $4.00 .$20 00 

" 25. 1,500 lbs. B meal, 75c 11 25 



Total $31 25 

VOUCHER No. 171. BROOKS OIL CO. 

1898. 
Feb. 17. 1 bbl. It Col. Drake cyl. oil, 52 gals. 

at 85c $44 20 

" 17. 1 bbl. Corliss oil, 52 gals, at 37c 19 24 



$63 44 

Less 25 per cent, dis 15 86 

$47 58 

Total $47 58 

VOUCHER No. 172. HOOSIER MAXIFACTURIXG CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 4. 993 lbs. chip laundi-y soap, 3%c $35 74 

" 6. 1,805 lbs. chip laundry soap, 3%c 67 69 

" 12. 2,541 lbs. chip laundry soap, 3%c 95 10 

'• 18. 3,257 lbs. chip laundry soap. :VYic: 122 13 

" 24. 3,125 lbs. chip laundry soap. :V'4c 117 18 



Total $437 84 

VOUCHER No. IT.;. .MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 28. Gas service for month ending Feb. 28, '98 $1..388 89 



Total $1,388 89 

VOUCHER No. 174. THE INl >I A NA I'oI.lS NEWS CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 21. Advertising 61 woids :] times $1 S3 



Total $1 83 

VOUCHER No. 175. DANIEL STEWART CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 3. 15 lbs. parafine $135 

" 3. 2 lbs. orange yellow .inilim' 1 00 

" 4. 1 lb. soda salicylate 50 

" 4. 25 lbs. epsom salt 44 

" 4. 2 lbs. cocoa butter 76 

" 4. 1 lb. powderi'il (•jinlamnu sfcd 1 10 



103 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 175— Continued. 

2 lbs. red aniline .$() !Xi 

32 lbs. com'l sulphite acid 1 02 

1 lb. Rosemary oil 5.j 

10 lbs. caustic soda 50 

2 lbs. submitrate bismuth 2 40 

2 lbs. Hayden viburnum comii :; no 

3 lbs. quassia chips 15 

2 lbs. carbonate of soda 30 

10 lbs. glycerine 1 3G 

5 lbs. powdered borax 40 

5 lbs. i>ex-ox-hydrogen 14 S. Mlkt '. 2 00 

M2 lb. iodide of ammonia 2 00 

5 lbs. F. B. Stillingia Comp.L 3 80 

5 lbs. Biu'dook root L 2 45 

2 lbs. poke root L ; 1 OS 

1 lb. Socratine aloes 30 

1/2 lb. Salol 1 78 

Yz doz. alpha syi'inges 4 50 

25 oz. sulphite quinine 6 50 

8 oz. ichthyol 3 10 

1 oz. codeine sulphite 4 15 

6 oz. phenacetine 5 40 

6 oz. antikamnia 5 10 

8 oz. Chloralamid 5 76 

8 oz. Sulf onal 10 80 

10 gals, alcohol 24 50 

500 H. T. nitro glycerine 1-100 gr 73 

1,000 strychnine pills. G. C. 1-30 92 

500 T. T. Hysocine hydro bromate, 1-100 1 25 

25 lbs. flaxseed meal 75 

500 H. T. sulph. strychnine, 1-60 gr 73 

1 carboy 1 5ri 

131 lbs. hydrochlorin acid 1 64 

5 lbs. sulp. soda, 2c. 10 

2 lbs. wild cherry bark, ground .24 

52% gals, lard oil 20 53 

^2 lb. salicylic acid 25 

1 doz. infant syringes 1 .50 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 176. MURPHY. HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 2. 8 pes. Damask drapery, 8 yds. each, 

64 yds 

" 2. 1 pc. Damask drapery, 6 yds., 70 yds. 

at ISc $12 60 S12 60 

Total 



4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 



$129 09 



$12 60 



104 



VOUCHER No. 177. WM. IT. An:siSTROXG & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. y-2 doz. S. R. nasal feeding tubes §6 00 

" 1. 1 only half-pint glass funnel 15 

$6 15 

Less 10 per cent 61 

$5 54 



Total $5 54 



VOUCHER No. 178. HOLLWEG & REESE. 

1898. 

Feb. 18. 6 doz. cups and saucers, 95c $5 70 

" 18. 6 doz. desert dishes, 36c 2 16 

" 18. 2 doz. sugar bowls, $2.85 5 70 

" 18. y-i doz. cream pitchers, $1 19 59 

" 18. 6 doz. 7-in. plates, 77c 4 62 

" 18. 12 doz. 1847 knives, .$3.00 36 00 

" 18. 12 doz. 1847 forks, $3.00 30 00 

" 18. 12 doz. 1847 teaspoons, $2.00 24 00 

" 18. 12 doz. 74 tumblers, 35c 4 20 

" 23. 12 doz. 11-in. platters, $2.70 .32 40 

" 23. 2 doz. 500 celeries, .$1.20 2 40 

" 23. 1 only fount 00 

Total $153 77 



VOUCHER No. 179. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 10. 2 No. 3 invalid rings, $1.50 $3 00 

" 150. 2 N(.. 7 invalid rings, .$1.75 3 50 

Total $6 50 



VOUCHER No. 180. C. H. SWICK & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 3. GO gals, oysters $45 00 

" 10. 65 gals, oysters 48 75 

" 17. 66 gals, oysters 49 50 

" 24. 61 gals, oysters 45 75 

Total , $189 00 



105 



VOUCHER No. 181. INDIANAPOLIS DIST. TELEGRAPH CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 23. 24 8c P lamps, 20c $4 SO 

1898. 

Feb. 5. 1 3 P. J. K. switch to order 22 75 

" 16. 3 T. Ed key sockets, 15c 45 

" 16. 1 18-in. pore, shade 55 

" 10. 1 3 L cluster 00 

" 10. 1 deep canopy 35 

Total $29 50 



VOUCHER No. 182. FRANCKE HARDWARE CO. 

1898. 

Feb. 19. 1 100-ft. metal sheet tape $3 25 

" 19. 1 set %-inch steel letters 5 75 

" 19. 1 set Vo-iuch steel figures 2 00 

" 24. 1/2 doz. coat and hat hooks, $4.75 2 38 



Total $13 38 



VOUCHER No. 183. SCHNULL & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 5. 20 boxes, 1,000 lbs., Piel's lump starch, 2c $20 00 

5. 10 boxes Ivory soap, 5c per bar, $4.00 40 00 

5. 1 box Star candles, 40 lbs., 7c 2 80 

5. 2 gr. Electric silicon, $8.50 17 00 

15. 1 bbl. Bourbon oil, 52 gals., lie 5 72 

16. 2 lbs. Dunham cocoanut, 27c 54 

Total • $86 06 



VOUCHER No. 184. ACINIE MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 31. 25 bbls. White Rose flower, $4.70 $117 50 

Feb. 4. 50 bbls. White Rose flour, .$4.70 2.35 00 

9. 25 bbls. White Rose flour, $4.70. 117 50 

" 10. 20 bbls. White Rose flour, $4.70 94 00 

Total $564 00 

VOUCHER No. 185. KINGAN & CO., LTD. 
1898. 

Feb. 26. 45y2 lbs. Cal. hams, My^c $6 60 

" 26. 15 lbs. smoked tongues, 50c 7 50 

" 26. 21 lbs. bologna, 6c 1 26 

Total $15 36 



106 



VOUCHER No. 186. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

1898. 

Feb. 5. 4,626 lbs. Golden coffee, Rio, at 13%c $624 51 

" 9. 5,086 lbs. granulated sugar at 5.47c 278 20 

" 20. 3,270 lbs. beans, at l%c 54 50 

" 20. 5,126 lbs. granulated sugar at 5.47o 282 36 

" 20. 2,000 lbs. rice at r.Vjc 105 00 

" 20. 2,000 lbs. evaporated apyles at 'Jc 180 00 

" 20. 1,000 lbs. hominy at %c 7 50 

" 20. 200 lbs. corn starch at 4c 8 00 

" 20. 150 lbs. currants at 714c 1125 

" 20. 200 doz. Yarmouth corn at STk- 170 00 

" 20. 8 boxes raisins at $1.25 10 00 

" 20. 10 bbls. salt at SOc 8 00 

" 20. Ill gals, syrup at 2.">c 27 75 

" 20. 4 bbls. B. uatnical. NdO lbs., at $4 16 00 

" 20. 12 gals, prepared mustard at 30c 3 60 

" 20. 1,028 lbs. cheese at 9c 92 52 

" 20. 4 cases 10-oz. G. E. olives at $2.75 11 00 

" 20. 1 case Blue Ribbon raisins. 36 lbs., at 10c. . . 3 60 

" 20. 2 cases peas, 4 doz.. at $1.50 6 00 

•' 20. 1 case pineapples, 2 doz.. at $2 4 00 

" 20. 1 case prunes, 20-30, 25 lbs., at ICc 4 00 

•' 20. 1 bbl. German dill pickles 6 00 

" 28. 6 bbls. Dingee piclvles at $4.75 28 50 

" 28. 1 bbl. B. oatmeal 4 00 

Total $1,946 29 



VOUCHER No. 1S7. \VM. K. BURFORD. 
1898. 

Jan. 19. 3 T. W. riblH)ns $2 85 

" 24. 1 mem. book 40 

" 29. 1 roam 6(»-lb. Manila wrap 2 40 

" 29. 1 ream journal paper, cap, ruled 5 00 

" 31. 5,00(» printed mem. heads, linen 7 80 

Feb. 8. 100 rolls toilet paper 6 00 

" 9. 10.000 lea ve-of -absence blank.-* 5 00 

9. Tabbing lOT) tabs 2 50 

Total $31 95 



VOUCHER No. ISS. W. ('. FKAZKE. 
1898. 
Feb. 28. 4.2«X> >;als. milk at 12p .$504 00 

Total $504 00 



107 

VOUCHER No. 189. FLEISCHMANN & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. 5Mi lbs. yeast , . 

3. 2 lbs. yeast 

" 5. 5^2 lbs. yeast 

8. 51/2 lbs. yeast 

" 10. 3 lbs. yeast 

" 12. 5V2 lbs. yeast 

" 15. 6V2 lbs. yeast 

" 17. 4 lbs. yeast 

" 19. 5M> lbs. yeast 

" 22. 5 lbs. yeast 

" 24. 4 lbs. yeast 

" 26. 51/2 lbs. yeast $14 13 

561^ lbs. yeast at 25c .i;i4 1^ 



Total $14 13 

VOUCHER No. 190. O. P. BARNELL. Agent. 
1898. 
Feb. 28. 35 bbls. Gold Med. spring Avheat flour at $5.50. $192 50 



Total $192 50 

VOUCHER No. 191. HENRY COBURN LUMBER CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. 1,000 ft. 1x12-16 No. 1 com $18 00 

1. 500 ft. 2-m. clear oak at $3.50 17 50 

1. 50 2x12-16 pine, 1,600, at $1.60 25 60 

" 10. 500 ft. 1x12-16 pine at $1.80 9 00 

• Total $70 10 

VOUCHER No. 192. ADVANCE ELECTRIC CO. 
1898. 

Feb. — . 500 1/2x12 solid arc carbons $6 48 

" — . 500 1/2x0 solid arc carbons 3 50 

" — . 250 % circular loom 10 50 

" — . 36 iron clamps, comp 8 10 

" — . 9 soldering connections 2 70 

" — . 3 ell junction bows for No. 1. J. A. conduit. . . 2 25 

" — . 2 straight junc. bows for No. 1 J. A. conduit. 1 50 

" — . 6 lbs. friction tape 2 16 

" — . 2 lbs. 2-amp. fine wire 1 00 

" — . 2 2% telephone cords .50 

" — . 2 2V> telephone cords 50 

Total $39 19 



108 

von 'HER No. 193. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

189S. 

Feb. 2. ^2 doz. «\vau-iieck cabt. scrapers at .$1.34 $0 G7 

2. 1/2 doz. 21/2x5 cabt. scrapers at $1.61 .' 80 

2. 1/0 doz. 3x.5 cabt. scrapers at iF1.61 80 

T(.tal $2 27 

VOUCHER No. 194. SANDER & RECKER. 

1898. 

Jan. 22. 1 reed rocker $4 75 

" 22. 1 reed rockor 6 50 

" 22. 1 reed chair 6 50 

Total $17 75 

VOUCHER No. 195. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 4. 360 doz. eggs at 14c $50 40 

5. 52 lbs. turkeys at 14c 7 28 

•' 10. 360 doz. eggs at 14c 50 40 

■' 12. 50 lbs. turkeys at 14c 7 00 

•• 17. 360 doz. eggs at 14c 50 40 

• 19. 80 lbs. turkeys at 14c 1120 

•' 24. 360 doz. eggs at 14c 50 40 

" 26. 328 lbs. turkey at 14c 45 92 

" 26. 53 lbs. chickens at 12c 6 36 

$279 36 

Less rebate 1 00 

$278 36 

Total $278 36 

VOUCHER No. 196. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 

1898. 
Feb. 1. 617«4 yds. P(>iMi- muslin at 6.3c $41 70 

Tnial $41 70 

VOUCHER No. 197. G. A. CARSTENSEN. 

1898. 

Feb. 6. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 13. Services sxg chaplain 5 00 

•' 20. Services as chaplain 5 00 

'■ 27. Serviees as cliaplain 5 00 

Total $20 00 



100 

VOL'CHER No. lOS. IXOIAXAI'ULIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 22. Advert i/.in.u- li^. s(iu;ires :'. tiiiics .$3 00 



TotMl .?3 OO 

VOUCHER No. Itiil. WESTERN UNION TEL. CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 3. From .Aladison, lucl ipO 25 

3. To Madison, lud., two 50 

" 10. To Danville, Ind 25 

" 14. To Kendallville, Ind 25 

■■ 18. To Rockville, Ind 25 

■• 22. To Kendallville, Ind 25 

Total .$1 75 

VOUCHER No. 200. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 

1898. 

Feb. 5. 54i/l> gals. Crescent oil at 19c $10 36 

" 12. 28 9-12 ft. 6-iu. pipe at 40c 11 50 

" 12. 1-6 blk. conpling .'f;2 40 

" 12. 2 6 flge. unions 7 90 

" 12. 1 6 C. I. 45 ells 3 45 

" 12. 1 6 C. I. ells 2 75 



$16 50 
Less 70 per cent 11.55 



12. 1 % hole drilled and topped in ell 

12. 5 6-in. threads at 70c 

12. 3 5-in. nipples at $1.40 .$4 20 

Less 70 per cent 2 94 



12. 15 hours' time, D. Cook, at 50c. ... 

12. 15 hours' time, Thurston, at 25c. . , 

12. 15 hours' time, Schildmeyer. at 25c. 

12. 15 hours' time, Bush, at 25c 

12. 15 hours" time. Lanii>n, at 25c 



4 


95 




25 


3 

) 


50 


1 


26 


7 


50 


3 


75 


3 


75 


3 


75 


3 


75 



Total $54 32 

VOUCHER No. 201. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1S9S. 

Feb. 5. 2 24-in. meat saws at $1.75 

9. Mica 

" 23. 1 water cooler and stand 

■' 23. 1 pr. shears 

" 25. 1 doz. 18-in tea trays 

" 2.5. 1 doz. 22-in. tea travs 



$3 


50 




15 





00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


4 


50 



Total $18 15 



110 



VOUCHER No. 202. SYERUP & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 2. 1 box lemons $3 00 

9. 1 bbl. cider 4 75 

" 12. 1 box lemons 3 00 

" 26. 1 bbl. cider 4 75 

" 26. 1 bunch bananas 1 25 

" 26. 1 box oranges 3 25 

" 26. 10 gals, cranberries 3 75 

" 26. 12 bunches celerj' 6 00 

" 26. 8 bunches celery 3 20 

Total $32 95 



VOUCHER No. 203. THE HITZ BAKING CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 3. 612 lbs. butter crackers at eVoC $39 78 

" 10. 651 lbs. butter crackers at 6y2C 42 32 

" 17. 644 lbs. butter crackers at 614c 41 86 

" 24. 621 lbs. butter crackers at 6V2C. 40 37 

? , Total $164 33 



VOUCHER No. 204. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 2. 1 bbl. apples . $3 50 

" 5. 1 bbl. apples 3 50 

" 5. 1 bbl. onions 2 75 

8. 654 bu. potatoes at 63c 412 02 

" 12. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 17. 2 bbls. onions at $2.75 5 50 

" 22. 1 bbl. apples 4 GO 

Total $435 27 



VOUCHER No. 205. PARROTT-TAGGART CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 1. 10 lbs. Piirisian van wafers at $2.20 i)er doz. . $1 83 

1. xO lbs. white cake at 20c 2 00 

1. 10 lbs. nut cake at 20c 2 00 

" 1. 10 loaves long rye at 4c 40 

" 1. 10 loaves London Cream at 4c 40 

1. 10 lbs. reception flakes at lie 1 10 

1. 10 lbs. macaroons at 30c 3 00 

1. 30 lbs. lady fingers nt 2<ic 2 00 

Total $12 73 



Ill 

VOUCHER No. 20(:. WESLEY (GERARD. 
1898. 

Feb. 28. 280 lbs. whole wheat flour at .fo.TS per bbl. . -fS 21 

Total -$8 21 



VOUCHER No. 207. RAGSDALE & SNOW. 

1898. 

Feb. 5. Casket for Mrs. Mary Cummins $7 00 

•' 11. Casket for Mrs. Jennie Davis 7 00 



Total $14 00 



VOUCHER No. 208. CHARLES BAILEY. 
189& 
Feb. 28. 4,925 lbs. straw at 20c $9 85 



Total $9 85 

,1 
I 

VOUCHER No. 209. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. R. L. Polk & Co., for 3 City Directories at .$5. .$15 00 
" 1. Dr. J. C. Culbertson. for 1 copy American 

Lancet Clinic, 1898 2 50 

" 1. J. N. Hurty Pharmacy Co., for 5 gals, anti- 
septic dressing 3 25 

1. Peter Lindei*son Co., for flower seeds 5 85 

3. Walter L. Houghton, for 250 magazines .... 5 00 

•' 3. Chas. J. Kuhn Co., for produce, etc 8 30 

'" 3. Chas. J. Gardner, for meat 1 48 

3. Cathcart, Cleland & Co., for medical books. . 13 50 

3. Wm. Westfall, Sheriff, for returning .T. W. 

Poole, escaped 18 75 

4. H. P. Newman, Treasurer, for 1 copy '98 .Jour- 

nal Am. Med. Ass'n 5 00 

" 4. Henry Beiser, for music 11 25 

" 4. W. L. Merritt; for whitewashing 10 00 

" 4. Carl Rommel, for work as carpentering 8 15 

" 9. Wm. Rosslyn, for entertainment 10 00 

" 12. Wm. Wood Co., for copy '98 Medical Record. 5 00 

" 12. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 12. Carl Rommel, for work as carpentering 8 15 

" 14. Albert Sahm. for postage stamps 25 00 

" 14. The Catholic Record for "97 and 'S. copy (2) 

Record 4 00 

" 16. John B. Wendrim. for help to butcher 10 00 

" 17. Henry Beiser, for music 11 25 



112 



VOUCHEIt No. 200— Continued. 
1898. 
Feb. 18. Lea Bros. Co., for 1 copy '98 Medical News 

Journal Medical Sciences .$7 50 

" 19. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 19. Carl Itonimel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

"• .19. The John Hopkins Press, for 1 copy '97 and 

'98 Am. Journal of Insanity 5 00 

" 23. Louis P. Seebinjrer, for return of Cris Piel. 

eloped patient 15 75 

" 24. C. R. Hanger, for return of Hume Britton. 

eloped patient 75 

" 25. Duncan. Smith & Hornbrook, for considtation 

as to right to iise maintenance fund for 

permanent improvement 150 00 

" 25. Otis Clark, for freight charges and exjjress- 

age 5 03 

" 26. W. L. Merritt, for wliitewashing 10 00 

" 26. Carl Kummel, work as caipenter 8 15 

Total $417 76 



voucHEi: No. 210. s. G. :makk. 

1898. 
Feb. 28. 10% tons hay at .S7.."i<» $80 62 



Total ?80 62 



VOUCHER No. 211. (JEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 
Feb. 28. Main pay roll for month of February, 1898. .$7,027 70 



Total .$7,027 70 



VOUCHER No. 212. SWIFT & CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. 5,615 lbs beef at $6.17 $346 44 

8. 3.818 lbs. beef at $6.17 235 57 

10. 5.156 lbs. beef at $6.17 318 13 

16. 2,598 lbs. beef at $i;.17 160 30 

17. 4.670 lbs. beef at $6.17 2&8 14 

23. 2.503 lbs. beef at $6.17 1.54 44 

25. 2.450 lbs. beef at $6.17 151 17 

Total $1,654 19 



113 

A'OUCIIEH No. 121:;. NKLSOX. MORRIS & CO. 
1898. . * 

Feb. 4. GO lbs. b;ic..ii at lUc $G 00 

4. 3,000 lbs. ham at $7.23 72 30 

4. 1,122 lbs. pork backs at $0.38 71 58 

•• 10. 1.140 lbs. pork backs at $0.38 72 73 

•• 10. 1.000 lbs. hams at $7.23 72 30 

•• 18. 1.142 lbs. pork backs at $0.38 ' 72 85 

•• 21. 1,011 lbs. hams at $7.23 73 10 

'• 25. 1,043 lbs. pork backs at $0.38 66 54 

Total $507 40 

VOUCHER No. 214. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 

Feb. 4. 4 sheets 14-oz. 30xG0-iu. copper $8 00 

4. 1 sheet cold-rolled copper 5 00 

4. 1 bale No. 27 30x96-in. galv. irou 5 00 

4. 8 only solid puuches 80 

•■ 15. 35 sheets No. 22 30x9G-iu..galv. irou 38 50 

Total $57 30 

VOUCHER No. 21.1. THE HOLT ICE AND COLD STORAGE CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 28. G,40O lbs. ice $48 00 

Total $48 00 

VOUCHER No. 216. THE WEBB-JAMESON CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 11. To sprint;- up store-room $12 00 

Total $12 00 

VOUCHER No. 217. THE JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 
1898. 
Feb. 22. Advertising 10 lines 3 times $2 00 

Total .' .$2 00 

VOUCHER No. 218. CLARKE & SONS. 
1898. 
Mar 8. Estimate No. 1: 

To materials furnished and labor performed 
for the plumbing and steam heating for 
the new kitchen and sleeping-rooms, on 
account $700 CK) 

Total.. $700 00 

ApprovetL— Scherrer. 
8 — Ins. Voithers. 



114 



VOUCHER No. 219. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

Material furiiisht'd and work done in iiuiliin;: repairs after explosion of 
March 16. 1808: 

1898. 
Mar. 24. Matcrijii. 117 9-12 ft. 6-in. wrought iron pipe 

32100 .$38 27 

" 24. 1 G-in. all-iron extra heavy gate valve 11 70 

" 24. 1 &-m. long dresser patent sleeve 8 20 

" 24. 1 G-in. short dresser patent sleeve 4 .50 

" 24. 1 6-in. extra heavy C. I. tee, 167 lbs., 2% 3 70 

" 24. 2 6-in. nipples, short 87 

" 24. 8-12 ft. of 4-in. W. I. pipe, cut to length 74 

" 24. 2 4-in. thread 35 

" 24, 1 4x2-in. C. I. tee 45 

" 24. 1 4x3-in. C. I. reducer , 46 

" 24. 1 gate box and C. I. frame and cover 5 50 

" 24. 3 trips hauling the above 1 50 

" 24. Henry Shade, digger, time lu hours, at 1.5c.. 1 50 

•' 24. James Bates, digger, time 10 hours, at 15c. . . 1 50 

•' 24. Abe Talcott. digger, time 18 hours, at 15 2 70 

•* 24. Wm. Weaver, digger, time 10 hours, at 15c. . 1 50 

•• 24. Hardy Ham. digger, time 10 hours, at 15c. . . 1 50 

" 24. Rufus Weaver, digger, time 10 hours, at 15c. . 1 50 

" 24. George Benuet. helper, time 28 hours, at 15c. . 4 20 

" 24. Joe Reardon, helper, time 19 hours, at 15c. . 2 85 

" 24. J. H. Marsh, helper, 23 hours, at 15c 3 45 

" 24. Ernest May. helper, time IGi^. hours, at 15c. . 2 47 

". 24. Charles Cook, helper, time 19 hours, at 15c. . 2 85 

" 24. E. Davis, helper, time Si\(j hours, at 15c 5 18 

" 24. A Campbell, pipeman. 35 hours at 2.5c 8 75 

*' 24. C. Emerine, foreman. P,~ houx's at 50c 18 50 

Total $134 75 



VOUCHER No. 220. TROY LAUNDRY MACHINERY CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 21. 2 sets of blankets for dui)lex mangle. 159 lbs.. 

at 60c .?95 40 

" 21. 2 sots canvas for duplex mangle, 29 yds., at 

3.5c 10 15 

Total $105 55 



115 



VOUCHER No. 221. MANUFACTIKKKS- NATURAL (iAS CO. 
1S9S. 

Mar. 24. 1 piece 4-in. pipe 2 ft. 4 in. long $0 45 

" 24. 2 4-in. C. I. ells 54 

" 24. 2 4-in. threads ; 35 

" 24. 4 hours' time by A. Campbell 1 00 

" 24. 4 hours' time by C. Emerine 2 00 

Total $4 34 

VOUCHER No. 222. J. R. BUDD A: CO. 

189S. 
Mar. 5. 21 lbs. dressed turkeys at 14c .^2 94 

Total • $2 94 



VOUCHER No. 223. JOHN O'NEILL. 
1S9S. 
Mar. 26. 1,500 lbs. bolted meal at Soc $12 75 

Total $12 75 



VOUCHER No. 224. THE THOMPSON & CHUTE SOAP CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 21. 35 bbls. standard soap chips, 8,073 lbs. net, 

at 31 2C ,$282 56 

Total $282 56 



VOUCHER No. 225. G. A. CARSTENSEN. 
1898. 

Mar. 6. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 13. Services- as chaplain 5 00 

" 20. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 27. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total $20 00 

VOUCHER No. 226. BLANTON MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 12. 100 bbls. C. J. flour at $4.73 .$473 00 

" 21. 25 bbls, C. J. flour at $4.73 118 25 

Total $591 25 



116 

VUlCllKli -No. JJT. I.MMANA INSTiri IK inK TlIK HLIND. 
1898. 

Mar. 2. 25 doz. No. 1 brooms at :^UM) HO tX) 

" 26. 25 doz. No. 1 brooms at $1.00 40 00 

26. 7 doz. whisk JuiKdiis at ."»<•<• .*i 50 

Tuial $83 50 

VOUCH Kit N... I'JS. V. HACH.MAN. 
1898. 
Mar. 2. 18 bbls. spring wheat patent Hour at .<."..:;n. . ,s;*j5 40 
" 7. 17 bbls. spring wheat patent flour at .$."..:'.it. .. . 90 10 

T(.tal $185 50 

VOUCHER Xu. 220. rETTIS 1»HY (JOODS CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 20. 16 wall pai.er $2 00 

" 20. 12 ceiling 1 50 

•' 20. 3 border 1 50 

" 20. 28 sizing 1 40 

•• 20. 16 hang 1 00 

•• 20. 31 scraping 3 10 

•• 20. Painting 2 00 

•• 20. 15 hang 1 88 

•• 20. 32 linoleum 42 40 

•' 24. 3 shades . . .* 2 85 

Total .$60 23 

VOTClIKIl X<.. 2:'.(i. (;i:.\KKAL ELKCTUIC CO. 
1898. 
Mar. 17. cc-2<>493 4(io.L'<i-]n!t :'..! No. 1 Ed. lamps at ISc .$72 ihi 

Total $72 00 

VOT'f'IIEK N... :.':',1. HAEKK \ Klt.VTSS CO. 
18i>8. 

Mar. 24. 1,000 2-14 U; lumber .$."50 00 

" 24. l.OfKt l-r_' K; lundu-r 40 50 

Total $99 .•:." 

VOUCH EK No. 2:52. W. C. EKAZEE. 
1898. 
Mar. ."'.l. 4Xu<() galluiis mill< at 12r .$.>"58 00 

Total $558 00 



11 



VOUCHER \i). 2.!:!. W M. H. liURFORD. 
1898. 

Feb. IG. 1 nil. '1\ \V. \Ki\n'v .$1 (iO 

" IG. 2 doz. (Jlobe tilos 10 80 

" IG. 1 1-G (loz. iiulexos 3 50 

■' IG. 1 qr. stencil pnpt'i', T. ^^' 1 ~7> 

•' IG. 1 tube black Mine's ink (io 

" IG. 1 tube piiriilo Mine's ink 90 

" 17. 1 iloz. nieni. books, 1770 4 00 

•• 17. 1 box McGill No. 2 fasteners 25 

■■ 24. 1 calendar pad 25 

■* 22. 500 labels, path, dept, not gummed.... 
" 22. 250 labels, microscop. dept., gummed... 

■• 22. 2,000 labels prepared by, gummed 

" 22. 2,000 labels, path, dept, ginnmed .'?4 75 4 75 

Mar. 2. 5,000 dictation slips 5 00 

2. Tabbing 5,000 tabs, 50 1 25 

8. 3,000 form 12, acct. clothing furnished 21 25 

•' 12. 100 rolls toilet paper G 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 234. INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 21. Advertising 158 words 3 times .$4 74 

" 28. Advertising 158 words 3 times. 2 37 

Total 



$61 90 



$7 11 



1898. 
Mar. 31. 

« 

" 31. 



1898. 


Jan. 


14. 


" 


14. 


" 


21. 


Feb. 


4. 


" 


11. 


Mar, 


.17. 




17. 




17. 




29. 



VOUCHER No. 235 INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 

To gas consumed during the month of March, 

1898, 30,100 cubic ft., at .$1.25 .$37 63 

Two outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total .$40 63 

VOUCHER No. 236. CHAS. G. GRAH. 
• 

Grinding 3 razors .$1 .50 

Repairing 2 clippers 1 25 

2 razors grd. and 2 handles 1 70 

Grinding 2 sliears 30 

Grinding 3 razors, and 1 handle 1 .30 

Grinding 4 clippers and fixed 2 55 

Grinding 2 shears 30 

Grinding 1 razor 50 

Grinding 2 shears 40 

Total .$9 80 



118 



V0UCHE7R No. 237. PUTNAM COUNTY MILK CO. 

1898. 

Mar. 1. 3 gallons sweet cream at 80c $2 40 

" 10. 20 gallons maple syrup at $1.12 22 40 

Total 



$24 80 



VOUCHER No. 238. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 29. Telephone exchange service from April 1 to 
June 30, 1898, inclusive, as follows: Con- 
tract 5491, Supt.'s office $21 38 

" 29. Contract 5492, steward's office 21 38 

" 29. Conti-act 5493, gate 9 00 

" 29. Contract 5494, Supt.'s office 9 00 

" 29. Contract 5495, private 9 00 

" 29. Contract 549G, men's dept 9 00 

'• 29. Contract 5497. store 9 00 

" 29. Contract 5498, pathological 9 00 

" 29. Contract 5499, store 9 00 

" 29. Use toll lines during month of October, 1897. 55 

" 29. Use toll lines during mouth of November. '97. 60 

'■ 29. Use toll lines during month of .January, 1898. 45 

" 29. Use toll lines during month of February, 1898 35 
'■ 29. Rental Gl hand telephones. 4 transmitters. 

from April 1, 1898, to April 1. 1899 t;9 00 



Total 



$176 71 



VOUCHER No. 239. HOLLWEG & REESE. 
1898. 

Mar. 1. 1/2 doz. cuspidores at $3.50 $175 

1. 60 doz. tea cups at 33c 19 80 

1. 17 doz. saucers at 33c 5 61 

1. 5 doz. dess. dishes at 24c 1 20 

1. 2 doz. plates at 55c 1 10 

1. 8 doz. tumblers at 35c 2 80 

23. 2 doz. tumblers at 35c .* 70 

Total 



$32 96 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 240. SYFERS, M'BRIDE & CO. 



Mar. 5. 100 cases Lemon Cling peaches, 200 doz.. at 

$1.60 $320 00 

" 14. 22 chests Vj chests Imp'l t.-M. 1.4:'.S lbs., at 24c 345 12 



Total 



$665 12 



no 



VOUCHER No. 241. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 
1898. 

Mar. 4. 99 10-12 ft. 3VL> Byer's iron pipe $12 78 

4. 5 lengths 4 s. h. soil pipe 1 90 

" 4. 15 lbs. % square cluck packing 2 70 

4. 15 lbs. 2 7-16x414 Garlock packing 7 50 

" 4. 6 lbs. Crane cement 75 

" 4. 6 31/0 C.I. ells 114 

4. 6 31/2 C. I. tees 162 

" 4. 6 314 flange unions 1 62 

4. 12 1 .Tenkins' Globe valves 9 07 

" 4. 12 11.0 hose clamps 75 

" 4. 24 % C. I. ells 35 

4. 24 % galv. ells 50 

" 4. 24 % C. I. plugs 10 

" 4. 24 Vo C. I. plugs 07 

♦' 4. 24 % C. I. plugs 07 

4. 24 1 C. I. plugs 14 

4. 24 % caps 10 

" 4. 24 1 female union ells 3 02 

4. 24 11/4 female union ells 4 32 

4. 24 lxlx% C. I. tees 73 

" 4. 24 %x%xl C. I. tees 73 

4. 24 Ii4xli4x% C. I. tees 1 17 

4. 100 1 fibre bibb washers 10 

" 4. 6 2 asbestos discs 1 08 

" 4. 6 liA asbestos discs 75 

" 4. 6 11^ asbestos discs 54 

" 4. 6 31/0x21/0 bushings .• 36 

" 4. 6 3 flange unions 1 35 

4. 6 3 C. I. ells 81 

4. 6 3 C. I. tees 119 

** 9. 100 %x2% hex. nut machine bolt 34 

9. 10 No. 1 tind. sti-aps 2 00 

" 19. 1 No. 10 Mercury gauge 2 25 

" 21. 28 wrought iron hangers made to order 42 00 

" 22. 1 14 P. O. R. P. basin 58 

" 26. 14 hours, Callen 7 00 

" 26. 14 hours, helper 3 50 

" 29. 60 ft. 5 S. H. soil pipe 

" 29. 6 5x2 Sant. tees 

" 29. 6 5x4 Sant. tees 

" 29. 3 5x4 S. P. reducers 

" 29. 3 5x4 creasers .SIG 79 16 79 

" 31. Covering steam pipes with asbestos molded 

covering per agreement 148 00 

" 31. 24 1^ C. I. ells 69 

Total 



.$280 46 



120 

VOUCHER No. 242. JAMES L. KEACH. 
1898. 

Mar. 1. 535 bu. potatoes at 68c, $3&3.80, less $2 $361 SO 

9. 3,001 lbs. potatoes at 6Sc 34 69 

9. 2,981 lbs. potatoes at 68c 33 78 

" 10. 1 box lemons 2 75 

" 16. 3,030 lbs. potatoes at 68c 34 34 

" 16! 2,500 lbs. potatoes at 68c 28 33 

" 26. 1 box lemons 2 75 

Total §498 44 



VOUCHER No. 243. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 3. 429 yds. Anchor muslin, i/^ bleach., at 6c.... .$25 74 

3. 639% yds. Mason muslin, bleach., at 6c 38 36 

3. 800 yds. crash at 6c $48 00 

3. 425 yds. crash, bleach., at &nc 28 09 

$70 69 

Less 2 per cent 1 53 

75 16 

3. 150 lbs. cotton batting at 3c 4 50 

3. 1,017 yds. screen at 2%c 27 97 

Total $171 73 



VOUCHER No. 244. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 

Mar. 31. 25 lbs. roofing nails, 1-in $1 00 

" 31. 10 lbs. 11/2 in. slating nails 85 

" 31. 1 gross 4-in. Inickets, wood 70 

" 31. 1 gross 3i/l.-in. buckets, wood 60 

" 31. 1 No. 3 Gem soldering pot 6 00 

" 31. 3 boxes No. 10 20x28 Beldan roofing tin 24 00 

" 31. 3 rolls of roofing folt 2 25 

Total $35 40 



VOUCHER No. 245. WILT JAMS \- HUNT. 
1898. 
Mar. 9. 22 kgs.. 3.300 ll)s.. sal soda $18 48 

Toial $18 48 



1898. 


Mar. 2. 




4. 




7. 




12. 




16. 




21. 




24. 




29. 



121 

VOUCHER No. 246. CHAS. .T. GARDNER. 

3,683 lbs. beef at .$6.10 $224 66 

3,643 lbs. beef at $6.10 222 22 

3,891 lbs. beef at .$6.10 237 35 

8,513 lbs. beef at $6.10 214 30 

4,103 lbs. beef at $6.10 250 28 

3,913 lbs. beef at $6.10 238 70 

3,789 lbs. beef at $6.10 231 13 

3,836 lbs. beef at $6.10 2.34 00 

Total ; $1,852 64 



VOUCHER No. 247. SYERUP & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 1. 1 bbl. apples $4 00 

" 3. 2 bbls. onions 5 00 

" 5. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

8. 1 bbl. apples 4 25 

" 19. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 24. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 26. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

Total $29 25 

VOUCHER No. 248. THE HOLT ICE AND COLD STORAGE CO. 

1898. 

Mar. 21. 73,200 lbs. ice at $1.75 $64 05 



Total $64 05 

« 

VOUCHER No. 249. ADVANCE ELECTRIC CO. 
1898. , 

Mai'. 31. 48 6x8 Crown-foot zincs at 24c $11 52 

" 31. 12 arc globes, clear, 3ysx8y2Xl2 3 00 



Total $14 52 

VOUCHER No. 250. COFFIN, FLETCHER & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 3. 54 hams, 1,000 lbs., at 7%c $73 75 

" 10. 50 hams, 1,015 lbs., at 7%c 

" 10. 8 bacon, 53 lbs., at 10c 

" 17. 48 hams, 1,003 lbs., at 7%c 

" 25. 48 hams, 1,000 lbs, at 7%c 

" 30. 46 hams, 1,013 lbs., at 7%c 

Total $376 35 



74 


86 


5 


30 


73 


98 


73 


75 


74 


71 



122 

\ 

VOUCHER No. 251. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

1898. 

Mar. 10. i'.,41G lbs. gran, sugar at ijio.SO $190 95 

" 10. 3,423 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.59 19135 

" 10. 150 lbs. currants at 7c 10 50 

" 10. 1 bbl. salt, 100 pkgs., 3 150 

" 10. 6 boxes L. L. raisins at $1.10 60 

" 10. 6 bbls. Dingee pickles at $4.85 29 10 

" 10. 12 gals, prepared mustard at 30c 3 GO 

" 10. 551/2 2 531/0 gals. N. O. molasses at 35c 18 72 

" 10. 112V'2 gals, syrup at 25c 28 13 

" 10. 25 lbs. yellow C sugar at $4.75 119 

" 10. 1 tub mackerel 4 75 

" 10. 3 lbs. Baker choc, at 35c 105 

" 10. 3,995 lbs. Golden Rio coftee at 13c 519 35 

" 10. 1,050 lbs. N. Y. cream cheese at 9c J>4 50 

" 10. 5 bbls. B. oatmeal at $4.00 20 00 

" 20. 3.407 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.59 190 45 

" 20. 3,295 lbs. beans at lM>c 49 43 

" 10. 1 tub mackerel 4 75 

Total $1,365 92 

VOUCHER No. 2.j2. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1898. 
Mar. 18. 1 bbl. Col. Drake cyl. oil, 53 gals., at 

85c $45 05 

Less dis. 25 per cent 11 26 

$:i3 79 

Total $33 79 

VOUCHER No. 253. Kll'l' BROS. CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 14. 1 doz. wax tapers $0 75 

Mar. 12. 2 doz. spectacles, 10, 11. 13. 15, at .$3.5t» 7 00 

" 14. 3 boxes Shaker pipes at 45c 1 35 

" 28. 1 doz. wax tapers 70 

Total $9 80 

VOUCHER No. 2."4. KIXci.VN \ CO.. LTD. 
1898. 

Mar. 2. 30 tubs B. B. solid. 1.2(m» lbs., at 8%c $103 50 

9. 30 tubs B. B. solid. 1.2(»0 lbs., at 8%c in.", .",0 

" 16. 3(» tubs B. B. .xolid. 1.2(Mi lbs., at SV 1<>3 50 

" 24. 30 tubs B. B. solid. 1.2ih) Ihs. at S-Vsc 103 50 

Tcl.1l $414 00 



123 

VOUCHER No. 255. INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIK CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 5. 1,155 lbs. pork loins at "V^c $83 74 

" 12. 1,150 lbs. pork loins at 714c 83 38 

" 19. 1,138 lbs. pork loins at 714c 82 51 

" 26. 1,162 lbs. pork loins at 714c 84 25 

Total $383 88 



VOUCHER No. 256. ARTHUR JORDAN CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 5. 360 doz. eggs at 10c $36 00 

" 15. 360 doz. eggs at 10c 36 00 

" 19. 360 doz. eggs at 10c 36 00 

" 26. 360 doz. eggs at 10c 36 00 

$144 00 
Less rebate 1 00 

$143 00 



Total $143 00 



VOUCHER No. 257. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 16. 1 doz. 10-iu. planer knife files $1 35 

" 16. 1 doz. 6-in. round, bastards 55 

" 16. 1 doz. 3-in. round, smooth 72 

" 16. 1 doz. 4-in. round, smooth 72 

", 16. 1 doz. 6-in. round, smooth 80 

*" 16. 2 doz. 73 coil door springs 2 60 

" 16. 1 pr. 6-in. Stubbs' side cutting pliers 1 50 

" 16. 1 doz. 5-in. pocket scissors 4 50 

" 16. 6 doz. iron-handle table knives at 75c 4 50 

" 16. 414 lbs. sheet brass at 25c 1 13 

" 16. 4 doz. 22-in. trays at $3.50 14 00 

" 23. 1 10-ft. Excelsior ladder 3 50 

" 28. 25 lbs. hemp twine at 10c 2 50 

Total $38 37 



VOUCHER No. 258. SANDER & RECKER. 
1898. 
Mar. 23. 1 doz. Vienna chairs $18 00 

Total $18 00 



VOUCHEi: No. -'.V.I. JUANCKL; HAKDWAliE CO. 
189S. 

Mar. 8. I/2 doz. padlocks at ^6.(MJ $3 00 

8. V. doz. hasps at 60c 30 

" 24. IOV2 pi'. 4I/2 bronze steel butts. D. F. W . 
" 24. G sets 3 Tumbler Mortise locks, 2 keys. 

D. F. W 

'• 24. 1st tloor, 6 Master keys 

" 24. 1 each, 12x24, top and bottom bolt .... 

" 24. 2 pr. 84G Bommer spring hinges 

" 24. 8 2215 flush lifts 

" 24. 8 sash sockets and 3 7x% transom lifts 
" 24. 2 and 3 floors, 28 pr. 41/. bronze steel 

butts 

" 24. 19 set 3-tumbler mortise locks, 2 keys. 

" 24. 18 5x5-16 transom lifts 

" 24. 9 pr. 3\i> bronze steel butts 

" 24. 8 3-ln. bronze cased bolts 

" 24. 8 dble. clothes hooks and 6 Master 

keys $54 (mi 54 00 

" 31. 11/2 doz. No. 2 Ames" pat. pole shovels at $12..-.(i 18 75 
" 31. Vj doz. picks and handles at .<;6.65 3 33 



Total $79 38 



VOI'CHI-:il No. liCd. SWIFT \- CO. 
1898. 
Mar. 2. 4,931 lbs. lard at $5.10 $251 48 

Total $251 48 



VOUCHER No. 2tn. .T. M. SoWDEUS. 
1898. 

Mar. 3. 61 gals, fresh oysters at 70c' $42 70 

" 10. 58 gals, fresh oysters at 70c 4ii 6(i 

" 17. 46 gals, fresh oj'sters at 7iic 32 20 

" 24. 48 gals, fresh oysters at 70c 33 60 

" 30. 56 gals, fresh oysters at 70c 30 20 



$188 30 
Eess rehatf 3 OC 



$185 30 



Total $185 30 



125 



1898. 
Mar. 2. 



2. 

18. 



VOUCHER No. 262. GEORGE W. STOUT. 

20 box's. I.OOO ll)s.. <'linnii)"ii .yloss starch at 2c .i;20 00 

25 boxes Lenox soap at .^2.70 per box G7 50 

24 doz. Silicon, per doz. at OOc 10 56 

20 boxes. 720 lbs., Battle Ax tobacco at 18c. . 129 60 

100 lbs. Greenback smoking tobacco at 28c. . 28 00 

1 bbl. prime white oil. 52 gals., at GVoC 3 38 

Total 



.1;265 04 



VOUCHER No. 2(;:>.. DANIEL STEWART CO. 



5-100 H. T. Codie's hydrobromate '\^'yeth . . . 

1 lb. F. E. Bucha 

i/o lb. belladona 

1 lb. veg. cathartic pills 

25 lbs. petrolatum 

1 lb. oxide zinc 

5 lbs. bromide potissium at 47c 

5 lbs. bromide sodium at 48c 

5 lbs. bromide ammonia at 56c 

2 lbs. granular phosphate soda at 13c 

2 lbs. hydrophosphate lime at .$1.20 

1 lb. hydrophosphate soda 

5 lbs. acetate lead at 10c 

1 lb. acetate potassium 

2 lbs. iodide potassium 

2 lbs. pyrophosphate of iron 

1 lb. phosphate of iron 

2 lbs. purified chloroform at 62c 

1 lb. chrome alum 

2 lbs. hyphosulphate soda at 10c 

2 lbs. sulphite soda at 9c 

10 lbs. lump alum 

5 lbs. carbolic acid at 23c 

2 lbs. green aniline at .$1.15 

2 lbs. violet aniline at .$1.40 

1 lb. balsam Peru 

25 oz. quinine, "one can" 

1 oz. strychnia, i/s 

8 oz. phenacetine at OOc 

8 oz. subgallate bismutli 

2 oz. oil -wintergreen 

4 oz. ammonal at 90c 

4 oz. chloralamid at 72e 

2 gross 29 pill box at 45c 

2 gross 30 pill box at 45c 

2 gross assorted powder boxes at 60c 

2 gross 4 dr. homp. vials at $1.25 



■$1 


20 




81 




38 


1 


40 


1 


50 




40 


2 


35 


2 


40 


2 


80 




26 


2 


40 


1 


22 




50 




28 


5 


00 


1 


00 




50 


1 


24 




12 




20 




IS 




25 


1 


15 


2 


30 


2 


80 


2 


20 


6 


50 


1 


15 


7 


20 




75 




15 


3 


60 


2 


88 




90 




90 


1 


20 



2 50 



126 

VOUCHER No. 263— Continued. 
1898. 

Mar. 2. 5 gals, alcohol at $2.40 $12 00 

■ " 2. 5 gross 3-XX corks 

2. 5 gross 4-XX corks $1.30 130 

2. 2,000 A.. B. & S. and Cascara 108 

" 14. 1-5 yd. 7-in. Belladonna plaster 2 70 

" 14. 1-5 yd. 5-in. mustard plaster 1 58 

" 21. 1 lb. Hubbard oxide zinc 40 

Total $81 63 

VOUCHER No. 264. RAGSDALE & SNOW. 
1898. 

Mar. 9. 1 casket, Isaac Z. Anderson $7 00 

" 24. 1 casket. Andrew P. Vaughn 7 00 

Total $14 00 

VOUCHER No. 265. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 22. Advertising l^o squares 3 times $3 00 

" 22. Advertising 2 squares 3 times 4 00 

" 29, Advertising IV^y squares 3 times 3 00 

Total $10 00 

VOUCHER No. 266. LION COMPRESSED YEAST CO. 
1898. 
Mar. 31. For the month of March. 1898, 65V^ lbs. of 

yeast at 14c $9 17 

Total $9 17 

A^OUCHER No. 267. THE INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 22. Advertising 16 lines 3 times $3 20 

" 22. Advertising -10 lines 3 times 2 00 

" 29. Advertising 10 lines 3 times 2 00 

Total $7 20 

VOUCHER No. 268. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 31. Gas service for the month ending March 31, 

1898 $1,388 89 

Total $1,888 89 



127 

VOUCHER No. 269. PETER F. BRYCE. 
1898. 

Mar. 3. 630 lbs. butter crackers at 6V2C $40 95- 

10. 616 lbs. butter crackers at 6V2C 

17. 629 lbs. butter crackers at 6V2C 

24. 630 lbs. butter crackers at 6y2C 

31. 627 lbs. butter crackers at QVoc 

Total $203 58 

VOUCHER No. 270. WESTERN UNION TELEGHAPH CO. 

1898. 

Mar. 2. To ilartinsville $0 25 

'• 23. To Dayton 25 

" 25. To Dayton 25 

" 30. To Attica 25 



40 


04 


40 


88 


40 


95 


40 


76 



Total $1 00 

VOUCHER No. 271. LAAKMANN & SHERER. 

18!»S. 
Mar. 31. For laying the cement walk in front of the 
cold storage room, near the new kitchen. 576 
superficial feet, by agreement, at the rate of 
14c per square foot $80 64 



Total $80 64 

VOUCHER No. 272. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 



Paid Cash as follows: 

Chas. J. Gardner, for sausages $2 36 

Chas. T. Kuhn Co., for produce, fruit 6 35 

Gertrude Roger, for entertainment 10 00 

W. L. MeiTitt, for whitewashing 10 00 

Carl Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

J. L. Hulsopple, 5 D. and 6 S. Sentinels; 2 D. 

and S. Journals, to March 9, 1898 16 80 

Henry Reiser, for miisic 11 00 

W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

Carl Rommel, work as caiiieuter 8 15 

John Hopkins, press. 1 copy Hospital Bulletin 

for 1898 1 00 

Henry Beiser, for music 11 25 

Wm. Johnson, for firing coal, uiglit March 16. 

1898 1 80 

W. L. Merritt. for whitewashing 10 00 

Carl Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 



1898. 


M!ir 


. 3. 




3. 




4. 




4. 




5. 




5. 




9. 




11. 




12. 




12. 




14. 




18. 




18. 




19. 




19. 



128 

VOUCIIKTt No. L'Tli ("uniiimcd. 
1898. 
Mar. 19. Juiir's Barbee, fur liiiujr coal. ni;jclit March IG, 

1898 $1 80 

" 19. Chas. E. Foltz. for firing coal, nifrlit March IT. 

1898 1 80 

" 19. Herbert Foltz, for firii^ coal, night March 17. 

1898 1 80 

" 19. C Bronson, for firing coal, night March 17. 

1898 ■ 1 80 

" 19. Ilobt. Johnson, for firing coal, night Manli 17. 

1898 1 80 

" 23. Fort Wayne Gazette, 1 copy for year 1898. . . 5 20 

•' 20. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

•' 26. Carl Komniel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

" 29. Otis Clark, for express and freight digs 3 86 

Total $151 22 

A'OUCHKB No. 273. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Superintendent. 

1898. 
Mar. 31. Main pay roll for month of March. 189S .$7,033 95 

Total .$7,033 95 

VOUCHER No. 274. BLANTOX MILLING CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 26. 125 bbls. Crown Jewel flour at .$4..50 (flour in 

flat hoop barrels) .$.562 50 

Total -$562 50 

VOUCHER No. 27."). AMERICAN LAUNDRY :MA( IHNERY CO. 

1898. 
Mar. 28. Repairing friction on pulley for extractor 
counter shaft: 13% hours' time machinist 

at 50c .$6 50 

" 28. 1 ll-16x22-in. shaft 75 

'* 28. 3 lbs. brass castings at 25c 75 

" 28. 12 ^KiXlOi-in. D. P. set screws 25 

Total $S 25 

VOUCHER No. 27tK TNDIANArOLIS LIGHT .VND TOWER CO. 

1898. 
Apr. 27. To current for arc light 3 iiiontlis cii<liiig 

April 30. 1898 -S.-.l 90 

" 27. Arc light carboning. 3 months, ending April 

30, 1898 10 60 

Total $42 50 



129 



VOUCHER No. 277. L. A. WATERS LAUNDRY SUPPLY MFG. CO. 

1898. 
Apr. 28. 8 bbls. Boikuiz;! white lauudry soap. 3,00.") lbs., 

at .$1.1(1: Indiauapulis .$38 80 

Total $38 89 



VOUCHER No. 278. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 28. To lias consumed during the month of April, 

1898. .32,100 cubic feet at .$1.2.5 .$40 1.3 

" 28. Tavo outside lamps at $1..50 each 3 00 

Total $43 13 



VOUCHER No. 279. ARTHUR .JORDAN CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 2. 4.50 doz. eggs at 9e $40 50 

9. 810 doz. eggs at 9c 72 90 

" 21. 3(30 doz. eggs at 9c .32 40 

" 27. 300 doz. eggs at 9c 27 00 

$172 80 
Less rebate 1 50 

$171 30 

Total $171 30 

VOUCHER No. 280. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 16. 1 bbl. Ex. Col. Drake cyl. oil. .53 gals.. 

at 85c .$45 05 

Less 25 per cent, discount 11 26 

$33 79 

Total $33 79 



VOUCHER No. 281. .JOHN O'NEILL. 

1898. 
Apr. 12. 1..500 lbs. bolted meal at 8.5c .$12 75 

Total $12 75 

9— Ins. Vouchees. 



130 



VOUCHEK No. 282. JOSEPH GARDNER. 



1898. 



Apr. 29. 1 wiring machine $12 50 



' 29. 100 lb.s. Blatehford .solder 

• 29. 280 lbs. No. 22 30x9G galv. iron. 

' 29. 500 VoxS-lG stove bolts 

' 29. 100 %x3-lG stove bolts 

' 29. 1 steel-faced square head 



10 50 

8 40 

1 50 

50 



Total 



$35 65 



VOUCHER No. 283. INDIANAPOLIS STOVE CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 24. To 1 33-33 Acme zinc $0 75 

Apr. 25. To No. 21 Puritan gas stove I 00 



Total 



$1 75 



VOUCHER No. 284. INI H.VNAPOLIS .lOlUNAL CO. 



1898. 



Apr. 26. Advertising 10 lines 3 times. 
Total 



$2 00 



$2 00 



VOUCHER No. 285. THE INDIANAPOLIS NEWS. 
1898. 

Apr. 19. Advertising 58 words 3 times $1 74 

" 25. Advertising 61 words 3 times 1 83 



Total 



$3 57 



VOUCHER No. 286. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1898. 
Apr. 27. To gas for the month ending April 20, 1898, 

per contract $1,388 89 



Total 



$1,388 89 



1898 
Apr. 



VOUCHER No. 287. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 



2.0fMl Ills. cvap. apples at 8%c. 
2.01." lbs. No. !) peaches at 7c. 
1..">(M» lbs. lump starch at 2c. . 
10 boxes Ivory soap at $4.00. 
100 doz. caunetl corn at 85c. . 



$175 00 

141 05 

30 00 

40 00 

85 00 



131 

VOUCHER No. 287— Contiuued. i 

1898. 

Apr. 4. 5 bbls. B. oatmeal at .$4.00 .1(20 00 

5. 100 doz. canned corn at 85o 85 00 

4. 10 bajis hominy, l.OOO lbs., at SOc 8 00 

" 4. 120 lbs. Churcb's soda at oc 6 00 

" 4. 110 sals. v. syrup at 25c 27 50 

" 4. ^2 gi"oss stove polish at $5.88 2 94 

" 4. 3 doz. Mason's blacking at 35c 1 05 

4. 2 gross Silicon at $7.50 15 00 

" 4. 100 lbs. grain pepper at 8c 8 00 

4. 974 lbs. cheese at 814c 80 36 

6. 3,532 lbs. Golden Rio coffee at 12%c 450 33 

6. 2% doz. brush holders at 50c 1 17 

" 11. 5,134 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.47 280 83 

" 11. 3,452 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.47 188 82 

" 11. 12 doz. mop sticks at SOc 6 00 

" 11. 12 doz. brush holders at SOc 6 00 

" 28. 1.706 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.47 93 32 

" 28. 10 lbs. Pearl tapioca at 6y2C 65 

" 28. 3 lbs. Dunham's cocoanut at 27c 81 

" 28. 1 ease sardines 19 50 

Total $1,772 3E 

VOUCHER No. 288. INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIR CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 1. 6 beef, 3.880 lbs., at $6.24 $242 11 

5. 6 beef, 4,018 lbs., at $6.24 250 72 

•' 11. 6 lieef . 3,805 Ihs.. at $6.24 237 43 

" 14. 6 beef, 3,896 lbs., at $6.24 243 11 

", 18. 6 beef, 4,034 lbs., at $6.24 251 72 

" 22. 3 beef, 1,775 lbs., at $6.24 110 76 

" 23. 6 beef, 3,830 lbs., at .$6.24 2.38 99 

" 27. 51/2 beef, 4,215 lbs., at $6.24 263 02 

Total $1,837 86 

VOUCHER No. 289. SPECIALTY MFG. CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 13. Repairing and sharpening 6 lawn mowers. ... $6 50 

Total $6 50 

VOUCHER No. 290. THE WEBB-JAMESON CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 5. To transfer and place kitchen furniture in 

new kitchen, D. F. W $25 00 

Total $25 00 



132 



VOUCHER No. 291. FROM MEYER BROS. 
1898. 

Apr. 27. .">(» (l(»z. No. 2 tihn- chanilMn-s. at $4.25 $212 50 

27. 45 doz. lea cups at IVAc 14 85 

27. 10 iloz. saiuei-s at 3:k- 3 30 

27. 14 doz. 10-in. plates at 75c 10 50 

27. 4 doz. lo-iu. oval vegetable dishes at $1.9(J 7 60 

27. 1 doz. %-gal. pitchers 1 50 

27. 1 doz. 1-pint pitchers 1 00 

27. 4 doz. Ivuives at 90c 3 60 

Total 



$254 85 



VOUCHER No. 292. GORDON & HARMON. 

1898. 

Apr. 27. 12 CX 48 shares at 50c $6 00 

" 27. 1 pair doubletrees 2 00 

Total 



$8 00 



VOUCHER No. 293. HIDE, LEATHER AND BELTIN(i CO. 

1898. 

pr. •22. m ft. 4-in. single volt bolt at 00c 30 00 

Less 60 per cent 18 00 

$12 00 

Total $12 00 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 294. INDIANAPOLIS WATER CO. 



Apr. 22. To 1 hydrant. 1 4-in. valve, 1 0-in. to 4-in. re- 
ducers, 2 valve boxes and 1 pipe, 85 lbs. 
lead, 1 3 to 2 reducers, 1 mach. tee and 
valve. fi-in.x3-in., 5-lb. jani. and labor. . . . $73 70 



Total 



$73 70 



1898. 
Apr. 1. 
" 5. 
" 12. 
" 19. 
" 20. 



VOUCHER No. 29.-). FRIEDMAN MFG. CO 



31 tulxs butti-rlnv, 1.240 lbs., at 8Vl>e. 
30 tubs butterine, 1.200 ll>s.. at 8i^c. 
30 tubs bulterine, 1.200 lbs., at 8i/jC. 
30 tubs butterine. 1.2(M) lbs., at 8%c. 
30 tubs butterine. 1.2<Kt lbs., at 8M;C. 

Total 



$105 


40 


102 


00 


102 


00 


102 


00 


102 


00 



$513 40 



133 



VOUCHER No. 200. HENRY TORT RX LUMBER CO. 

1898. 

Apr. 28. 1,000 ft. Ii/l.xl2-14 yoUow poplar at .$2.<»r. .$2<! r.(» 

" 28. 1,0(.X) ft. 1x12-10 piue at -1^1.80 l.S (K> 

" 28. 500 ft. 1x12-10 uppers at .fS.lO 25 '.0 

" 28. 4,000 ft. clear piue .shiufjles at $2.80 11 20 

Total «81 20 

VOUCHER No. 297. J. M. SOWDERS. 

1898. 

Apr. 7. 813 lbs. wliite fish at 4e $.-{2 o2 

" 14. 801 lbs. white fish at 4c 34 44 

" 28. 706 lbs. white fish at 4c 28 24 

$95 20 

Less rebate 3 00 

$92 20 

Total $92 20 

VOUCHER No. 298. CHARLES J. GARDNER. 
1898. 

Apr. 5. 37 tous ice at $1.75 per ton $(>4 75 

" 21. 30 tous ice at $1.75 per ton 52 50 

Total $117 25 

VOUCHER No. 299. THE AMMONIA SOAR POWDER CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 4. 1,290 lbs. chip soap at 3%c $48 38 

5. 1,661 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 62 29 

" 11. 1,229 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 46 09 

" 14. 1,729 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 64.84 

" 16. 1,444 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 54 15 

" 19. 1,772 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 66 45 

" 21. 2.868 lbs. chip soap at 374c 107 55 

" 27. 3,031 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 113 66 

Total $563 41 



VOUCHER No. 300. SCHNULL & CO. 



1898. 



Apr. 6. 100 cases Solano L. C. peaches, 200 doz.. at 

$1.60 $320 00 



Total 



$320 00 



134 

VOUCHER No. 301. INDIANAPOLIS DISTRICT TEL. CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 19. 24 G. Ed. key sockets at 15c $3 60 

" 19. 48 ceiling buttons at .$3.50, less 10 per cent. . 1 51 

" 19. 24 soft rubber bushings at %c 18 



Total $5 29 

VOUCHER No. 302. HUNTINGTON & PAGE. 
1898. 

Apr. 9. 1 Perfection sprayer $0 75 

9. 1,000 4-in. pot labels 95 

9. 500 3-in. pot labels 30 

9. 250 cane stakes 1 00 

16. 500 8-in. labels 70 

" 26. % oz. celery seed 10 



Total $3 80 



VOUCHER No. 303. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1898. 
Apr. 30. 4.500 gals, fresh milk at 12c per gal., for the 

month of April $540 00 



Total $540 00 



VOUCHER No. 304. D. H. DAVIS. 
1898. 
Jan. 5 and 6. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

return 

" 27 and 28. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

retmTi 

Feb. 9 and 10. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

return 

" 24 and 25. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

return 

Mar. 1 and 2. Fare from Brazil to Indianaix>lis and 

retm-n 

" 24 and 25. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

retm-n 

Apr. 5 and 6. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

return 

" 28 and 29. Fare from Brazil to Indianapolis and 

return 

" 28 and 29. Street car fare above time 

'• 28 and 29. Meals and lodging per bills attached. . 



$3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


3 


70 


1 


00 


8 


25 



Total $38 85. 



135 

VOUCHER No. 305. V. BACHMAN. 

1898. 

Apr. 1. 18 bbls. spring wheat flour at $5.35 $96 30 

" 16. 17 bbls. spring wheat flour at $5.35 90 95 

Total $187 25 



TOUCHER No. 306. TECHENTIN & FREIBERG. 
1898. 

Apr. 13. 1 pr. breast straps $1 00 

" 13. 1 cuiTy comb 35 

" 13. 2 hame straps 35 

" 20. 1 genuine hair-faced collar 4 00 

Total $5 70 



TOUCHER No. 307. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 20. To 1% squares 3 times, advertising $2 66 

" 26. To 1% squares 3 times, advertising 2 66 

Total $5 32 



TOUCHER No. 308. ALBERT GALL. 
1898. 

Apr. 12. 2 rug-s at $6 $12 00 

" 12. 1 rug 6 00 

" 12. 2 rugs at $2 4 00 

" 12. 51 yds. Ax. and border at $1.65 84 15 

Total $106 15 



TOUCHER No. 309. CLARKE & SONS. 

1898. 
May 2. To materials furnished and labor per- 
formed for the steam-fitting and 
plumbing for the new kitchen and 
sleeping-rooms, Dept. for Women. 

as per contract $910 00 

Less amount paid in previous esti- 
mate, March 10, 1898 700 00 

Amount payable on present "final" es- 
timate $210 00 

Total $210 00 



186 

VOUCHER No. 310. GEORGE J. MAYER. 
1898. 

Apr. 27. To 1 rubber stamp $1 25 

" 27. To 1 set Va-in. stencil letters and figures .... 90 

" 27. To paint and brush 25 

Total $2 40 

VOUCHER No. 311. G. A. CARSTENSEN. 
1898. 

Apr. 3. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 10. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 17. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 24. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total $20 00 

VOUCHER No. 312. MURPHY. HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 5. 806 yds. o8-in. Utica sheeting at lie $88 66 

5. 033 yds. Pepp. bleached muslin at 7c 44 31 

5. 136 yds. Amosk. ticking at 13c 17 71 

" 5. 375 yds. crash at 6.3c .?25 31 

Less 2 per cent 51 

24 80 

5. 60 doz. thread at 36c 2160 

5. 476 yds. barred muslin at 10c 47 63 

" 5. 1 gross button.s 1 25 

" 5. 1.046 yds. scnm at 5c 52 30 

" 5. 12 1-6 gross rubber vest buttons at 75c 9 13 

Total $307 39 

VOUCHER No. 313. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Superintendent 

1898. 
Apr. 30. To main pay-roll for month of April, 1898 $7,001 70 



Total $7,061 70 

VOUCHER No. 314. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent 

1898. 

Apr. 2. Henry Reiser, for music $11 50 

2. W. L. Merritt. for whitewashing 10 00 

•' 2. Carl Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

4. W. J. King, for entertainment 17 00 

" 5. James W. Hess, postage stamps 25 00 

" 7. Cathcart Cleland & Co.. medical l>ooks 8 78 

•* 9. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 9. Carl Rommel, for work as cai-penter 8 15 



13T 

VOUCHER No. 314— Continued. 
1898. 

Api'. 15. Heni-y Bei-ser, for music ijill 25 

16. W. L. MeiTitt, for whitewashing 10 00 

16. Carl Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

19. Standard Pub. Co., Sunday School supplies to 

July, 180S 26 75 

21. George L. .Tetfries, for entertainment 15 00 

22. Ind. Medical .Tournal Co., 1 subscription, year 
1897 1 fM) 

23. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

23. Carl Rommel, for work as cai-penter 8 15 

29. Henry Reiser, for music 11 25 

30. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

30. Carl Rommel, for work a.s carpenter 8 15 

Total $218 28 

VOUCHER No. 31.5. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 2. 1 bbl. apples $4 00 

4. 582.30 bu. potatoes at 63c 366 98 

" 6. 1 box lemons 2 75 

7. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 12. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 16. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 19. 1 box lemons 2 75 

" 20. 2,250 lbs. potatoes at 63c 23 63 

" 22. 2 bbls. onions 7 00 

" 23. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 23. 3,950 lbs. potatoes at 63c 4148 

" 25. 64 bu. potatoes at 63c 40 32 

" 26. 61.30 bu. potatoes at 63c 38 75 

" 26. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

" 29. 60.50 bu. potatoes at 6.3c 38 33 

" 30. 1 bbl. apples 4 00 

Total $589 99 

VOUCHER No. 316. KIPP BROS. CO. 

1898. 

Apr. 1. 1 doz. flex, blank books $0 35 

" 1. Half doz. crayons 20 

" 7. 1 bundle violin strings 2 00 

" 8. 1 case F. B. sponges 5 50 

" 19. 5 doz. hair brushes 10 00 

" 19. 1 only Webb brush 1 00 

" 20. 1 only Nicholas watch 1 25 

" 27. 1 only floor brush 1 00 

Total $21 30 



138 

VOUCHER No. 317. SAMUEL GEYER. 
1898. 
Apr. 25. 106.28 bu. oats at 35c $37 40 



Touil $37 40 



VOUCHER Xo. 318. DANIEL STEWART CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 2. VL' lb. commercial bromide at 85c $0 43 

" 2. 4 lbs. stronger aqua ammonia at 9c 54 

2. 1^ lb. nitrate sUver at $6.54 3 27 

" 2. 6 lbs. hydrochloric acid at lie 86 

" 2. 2 lbs. phosphoric acid at 34c 68 

" 2. 1 lb. iodoform 3 50 

" 2. 5 lbs. peroxide hydrogen, % 2 00 

" 2. i/i lb. resublimed iodine 1 68 

2. 1 lb. citrate lithium 2 25 

2. 5 lbs. bromide soda 2 50 

" 2. 5 lbs. bromide potassium 2 30 

" 2. 10 lbs. carboUc acid 2 30 

2. 3201 o lbs. cream tartar, 99 per cent., at 2Gc. . 85 67 

" 2. 10 lbs. glycerine at 14c 1 40 

" 2. 2 lbs. Hayden's viburnum comp 3 00 

'• 2. 10 lbs. soluble blueing at 34c 3 40 

" 2. 5 lbs. gum arable, selected, at 55c 2 75 

" 2. 1 lb. concentrated tincture 1 50 

" 2. 3 lbs. powdered boracic acid at 12c 36 

2. 5 lbs. white wax at 33c 1 65 

" 2. 15 lbs. paraffin at 9c 1 35 

" 2. J/o lb. Armour's scale pepsin at $7.<m» 3 50 

2. 1-5 lb. F. E. sarsaparilla comp., Lilly 3 80 

" 2. 1 lb. nux vomica, Lilly 68 

2. 1 lb. Trcticum. Lilly 54 

" 2. 2 gals, extract witch hazel and jug at 60c. ... 1 32 

" 2. 2 gals, cottonseed oil and jug at 40c 92 

" 2. 2 gals, castor oil and jug at $1.00 2 12 

" 2. 2 gals. ded. l>enzine and jug at 10c 32 

2. 5 gals, alcohol at $2.40 12 00 

" 2. 2 yds. isinglass plaster at 25c 50 

" 2. Vi doz. minum graduates 44 

" 2. i/a doz. 3 chamois skins 3 70 

2. 2 doz. M. T. capsules, 3 P. D. Co., at SOc 1 60 

" 2, 1 oz. sulphate codeine 4 40 

" 2. 2 oz. citrate caffeine 56 

" 2. 25 oz. quinine at 2-lc 6 00 

" 2. 4 oz. phenacetine at 90c 3 60 

" 2. 4 oz. ammonal 3 60 



139 



1S9S. 


Apr. 


2. 


« 


2. 


<( 


6. 


*' 


6. 


" 


6. 


" 


16. 


n 


16. 


« 


16. 


*' 


16. 


it 


16. 


4t 


16. 


" 


16. 


" 


16. 



VOUCHER No. SlS-Contanued. 

2 OK. ehloramld $1 44 

4 o«. oxalate cirum 32 

10 lbs. absorbent cotton at 27e 2 70 

2-5 yds. roll iodoform gauze, 5 per cent 1 62 

6-5 yds. spool, o-in., Rub. Adhes plaster 2 70 

1 lb. soluble citrate iron 50 

5 lbs. Arsenou's acid "Crystal" 75 

2 oz. chloralainid 1 44 

2 pts. absolute alcohol 1 50 

1 lb. xylol 75 

5 lbs. formaldebyde 3 00 

2 lbs. soft paraffin 40 

1/4 oz. hematoxylin 1 00 

$191 11 

Cr. by 1 lb. xzlol returned 75 

Total 



$190 36 



1898. 
Apr. 7. 
" 14. 
•' 21. 
" 30. 



VOUCHER No. 319. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

1,010 lbs. ham at .$7.22 $72 92 

512 lbs. ham at $7.22 36 97 

1,007 lbs. ham at $7.22 72 70 

1,012 lbs. ham at $7.22 73 07 

Total 



$255 66 



VOUCHER No. 320. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 

1898. 

Apr. 28. 24 ash table legs, 3-3, 2ft. 5Vi, at 22c $5 28 

" 28. 24 ash table legs, 2%x2%, 2 ft. lOVg, at 22c. . . 5 28 



Total 



$10 56 



1898. 
Apr. 7. 
" 14. 
" 21. 
" 29. 



VOUCHER No. 321. THE HITZ BAKING CO. 

10 bbls. butter craclvers, 0.51 lbs., at 6V2C $42 32 

10 bbls. butter crackers, 634 lbs., at 6% 41 21 

10 bbls. butter crackers, 615 lbs., at 6i/4c 39 98 

10 lbs. butter crackers, 626 lbs., at OVaC 40 69 

Total 



$164 20 



140 



VOUCHER No. •^22. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 



1808. 
Apr. 14. 
" 14. 
" 15. 
" 15 


1/1. tloz. tack claws at .ISI.OO 

1-12 (loz. No. 3 niola.sses faucets at $3.00 

2 only SxO oak rosettes at 35c 

2 only 9\12 oak rosettes at 40c 


$0 

1 
2 
2 

2 

1 


50 
25 
70 
80 


'• 15. 


1 tloz. each No. 50 li4-in., 8c; 2-in., 12c; 3-in., 
18c, rosettes 


3R 


" 15. 


1 (loz. each No. 421 2i/. in., 20c; Z^ In., 27e, ro- 
settes 


47 


• 1.-.. 


1 iloz. each No. 250 1 in., 5c; 1% in., 8c; 2^2 in.. 
ir»c 


'?8 


•• 15. 


1 iloz. each No. 400 1% in., 15c; 2% in., 20c; 2% 
In.. 27c 


6? 


" 15. 


1 doz. assorted rosettes 


on 


" 15. 


2 doz. No. 5 ''Yi ill- rosettes 


10 


" 16. 

• 27. 

• 29. 


1-6 doz. carpet stretchers and handles at $6.00 
1-6 doz. No. 2 Ames' steel shovels at $12.50. . 
1,000 1/4x1% Cars, bolts. $1.04, $10.40 


00 
08 
60 


• 29. 


2 8x2 njounted oil stones at $1.04 


08 


'• 29. 


2 2x2x% Ark hones at 50c 


00 










Total 







$12 91 



VOUCHER No. 323. SWIFT & CO. 

1898. 

Apr. 1. 1,247 lbs. pork loins at $6.08. . 

1. 1,647 lbs. lard at $5.20 

8. 1,233 lbs. liork loins at $0.08. 

8. 55 Ux><. bacon at lli/l-c 

" 14. 1,167 lbs. i>ork loins at $6.68. . 

" 22. 1,187 lbs. pork loins at $6.68. . 

•• 28. 1,190 lbs. pork loins at $6.68. 

Totjil 



$83 


30 


85 


64 


82 


36 


6 


33 


77 


96 


79 


29 


79 49 



$494 37 



VOUCHER No. .•?24. THE A. BURDSAL CO. 



1898. 

Apr. 2. 5 pals, jrasoline 

" 16. 1-12 doz. 1 rerfect floor varnish. . 

" 16. 1-12 doz. IM; Perfect floor varnish. 

• 16. 1-12 doz. 2 Perfect floor varnish. . 

• 10. 1-12 doz. 2V.' Perfect floor varnish. 

•' 16. 1-12 doz. 3 Perfect floor varnish— 10 in. at 20c 

• 16. 2 pint iKjttJes green carg. at 40c 

■' 16. 4 1-pt. liottles white enamel at 45c 

" 16. 4 Vj-pt. lx)ttles wldte enamel at 25c 

" 16. 1 lb. No. 100ft V. G. bronze 

" 19. 5 pals, pasoline at 12c 

Total ; . . . 



$0 60 





80 


1 


80 


1 


00 


1 


00 




60 



$7 80 



141 

VOUCHER No. 325. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 16. 1/. cloz. steel iiorcelain-lined soap dishes at .$3 $1 50 
" 22. 1 refrigerator 25 00 



Total .$26 50 

VOUCHER No. 326. FRANCKE HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 8. 1 hay knife 

" 20. 1/2 doz. 6-iii. garden trowels at .$3.75 

" 20. 3 Comb drawers locks at .$1.00 

" 20. 1 doz. table holders 

" 20. 1 doz. 196 brass hooks 

" 20. 1 doz. 194 brass hooks 

•• 20. y-2, doz. Airline paper holders at $5.00 .... 



$1 


25 


1 


88 


3 


00 




75 


1 


35 


1 


00 


2 


50 



Total $11 7J 

VOUCHER No. 327. KNIGHT & JILLfeON. 
1898. 

Apr. 1. 1,544 7-12 ft. 1 Byers' iron pipe 

2. 505 11-12 ft. 2 galvinized pipe 

9. 200 ft. % i5-ply K. & .J. special hose 

" 11. 1 No. 3 F. W. O. closet and spuds 

" 15. 3 asb. bushings for 3-in. A. P. cocks 

" 26. 3 %-3 ft. Mnrdock's hydrants 

'• 28. 1,000 ft. % 5-ply K. & .T. special hose 

" 28. 1 74-3 ft. Murdock str. washers 

" 30. 1 3 I. B. B. M. gate valve 



.$37 


53 


45 


53 


18 00 


3 


50 


9 


45 


7 


50 


90 00 


2 


13 


4 


50 



Total $218 14 

. VOUCHER No. .328. HENRY AUFDERHEIDE, Contractor. 
1S9S. 

May 2. To 2 doors in morgue $29 00 

2. To 2 stone caps for the same 5 00 

2. To time cutting two stone door sills 2 40 

2. To painting and glazing 6 50 

2. To brick work 15 20 

2. Material furnished and labor performed for 
the new kitchen and sleeping rooms for the 
Central Hospital for Insane, Department for 
Women 741 02 



Total $799 12 

VOUCHER No. 329. LIONS COMPRESSED YEAST CO. 

1898. 
Apr. 30. To 61 lbs. yeast for the month at 12iAc $7 62 



Total $7 62 



142 



1898. 
May 3. 



VOUCHER No. 3:^0. ADOLPH SCHERRER. 

To prof, services rendered in preparing plaii.s, 
speeiflcations and superintending the new 
Ivitclien, etc., at 4 i)er cent on total an)ount 

of $i>.510 $380 40 

Contracts witli II. Aufderlieide. aiiit.$.S.(;<Ki 00 
Contracts witli Clariic iV Sous, a nit., iilo (k) 



Totals $9,ol0 00 



$380 40 



VOUCHER No. 331. WM. B. BURFORD. 
1898. 

Mar. 1(5. 2.<Kio ward wants, form 9. % foUo. R. &: P $14 25 

" 18. ."•.(MM» daily reports, form 1. wh. cap. R. & P. . 53 20 

" 21. 2 Demy Vowel Indexes, full Ixl 3 00 

" 2<J. 100 rolls toilet paper 6 00 

Apr. 1. 1 doz. soft note tabs 1 08 

" 5. 250 death returns, men, ^4 folio, ptd 2 00 

" 5. 250 death returns, women, V^ folio, ptd 2 00 

" 5. 500 certificates, % folio, ptd 1 75 

" 0. 10 rms. ward paper 17 50 

" 7. 5.<X)0 prescrii»tion Manks 3 75 

7. Tabliing .">.(m»o 1 25 

Total 

VOTTIIER No. 3.32. THE H. LIEBER CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 29. l.O^Ki ft. job nddg., a.ssorted $18 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 3.33. RAGSDALE & SNOW. 
1898. 

Apr. 4. Casket for Alfred Anderson $7 00 

5. Casket for .lane True 7 00 

" 20. Casket for .Tas. A. D. Wilson 7 00 

" 21. Casket for Anna Morton 7 00 

" 2.3. Casket for Thos. .1. Wells 7 00 

" 29. Casket for Mary Siiiiilcy 7 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 334. .JOHN OSTERMAN. 
1898. 
May 3. To traveling jind other necessary expenses for 

nine months $39 75 



$105 78 



$18 00 



$42 00 



Total 



$39 75 



143 



1898. 


Feb. 


25. 


" 


25. 


" 


25. 


" 


28. 


" 


28. 


" 


28. 


Mar 


. 9. 


" 


9. 


" 


9. 


" 


25. 


" 


25. 


" 


25. 


Apr. 


6. 


" 


6. 


" 


29. 


" 


29. 


" 


29. 



1898. 
:\Iay 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 
" 28. 



1898. 
Apr. 20. 

" 22. 

" 22. 

" 22. 

" 23. 
May 9. 

" 10. 



VOUCHER No. 335. ALBERT O. LOCKRIDGE. 

By R. R. fav(> to and fnnu liomc .$2 40 

By lunch 30 

By ear fare to and from city 10 

By R. R. fare to and from home 2 40 

By hmch 30 

By street car fare to and from city 10 

By R. R. fare to and from home 2 40 

By lunch 25 

By street car fare to and from city 10 

By R. R. fare to and from home 1 70 

By lunch 35 

By street car fare to and from city 10 

By R. R. fare 1 00 

By lunch 25 

By R. R. fare 2 40 

By lunches 80 

By street car fares 35 

Total $15 30 

VOUCHER No. 33G. BAUSCH & LOME OPTICAL CO. 

2 doz. 7345 slips at 60c $1 20 

1 1660 stage micrometer 2 50 

2 oz. 7465 covers, VsxVA in., at $1.05 2 10 

3 1222 eye pieces at $1.20 $3 60 

3 1226 eye pieces at $1.20 3 60 

2 No. 7839 Perraffine at 20c 40 

500 CC 7780 Xylce 1 85 

2 pkgs. 7550 lens paper at 25c 50 

$8 55 

Less 25 per cent 2 14 

6 41 

Total $13 61 

VOUCHER No. 3.37. WM. B. BURFORD. 

1 gro. Faber penholders $3 60 

Rebinding dictionary 75 

250 p. quar. med. patients' property boolv. ... 5 45 

Paging 250 pages 30 

2,CKX) clothing requisitions, men. i/4 folio 14 25 

5-6 doz. Reynolds' fillers. No. 1 85 

1 doz. qts. Arnold ink 4 80 

Total $30 00 



144 

VOUCHEK No. 338. FRIEDMAN MFG. CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 27. -lu lbs. biitterine at 8%c $3 50 

May 10. 1.200 lbs. buttfriue at 8%c 105 00 

•• IT. 1.2<H> lbs. Inittorine at 8%c 105 00 

•• 24. l,2(Hi ll»s. bmtcriuf at 8%c 105 00 

Total $318 50 



A^OUCHEIl No. :i39. JAMES M. SOWDERS. 
1898. 

May 5. 725 lbs. fresh fish at 4c $21) 00 

•' 12. 810 lbs. fresh fish at 4e 32 40 

" 19. 774 lbs. fresh fish at 4c 30 90 

*' 2(5. 777 lbs. fresh li.sh at 4c 31 08 

$123 44 

Less rebate 4 00 

$119 44 



Total $119 44 



VOUCHER No. 340. LAAKMANN & SCIIERER. 
1898. 
May 24. For ccincntiii;? the water table in the new 

kitchen at the Female Dept., per agreement $12 50 



Total $12 50 



VOUCHER No. 341. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1S9.S. 
May 20. To 1.3S tons coal nsed tlnrin;; :'>'l. ilays 
^as was sliut ofT In March i>n acct. 

explosion $269 10 

Less amt. chjrd. for pis din-in^' sanic 

time 102 n5 

$107 05 

Total $107 05 



VOUCHER No. 342. OLDS & CO. 

1898. 

May 5. 2.075 lbs. chip soap at S'V'iO .flOO 31 

" 12. 2,755 lbs. chip soap at 3=He 103 31 

" 19. 2.750 lbs. chip soap at 3T,c 103 12 

" 2."). 2.725 lbs. chip soap at 3^1c 102 18 

Total $408 92 



145 

VOUCHER No. 343. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1898. 
May 27. 2,400 lbs. sal soda at 00c $14 40 

Total $14 40 

VOUCHER No. 344. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1898. 
May 17. 1 bbl. It. Col. Dralie cyl. oil, 53.2 gals., 

at 85c $45 48 

Less 25 per ceut. discount 11 37 

$34 11 

TotiU $34 11 

VOUCHER No. 345. AMERICAN OIL COMPANY. 
1898. 
May 21. 50 gals. Acme engine oil at 15c $7 50 

Total $7 50 

VOUCHER No. 34G. ACME MILLING CO. 

1898. 

May 2. 25 bbls. Straight flour at $5.14 $128 50 

9. 25 bbls. Straiglit flour at $5.14 128 50 

" 10. 25 bbls. Straight flour at $5.14 128 50 

" 10. 25 bbls. SU-alght flour at $5.14 128 50 

" 10. 25 bbls. StraigM flour at $5.14 128 50 

Total $642 50 

VOUCHER No. 347. CABINET MAKERS' UNION. 
1897. 

Dee. 14. 85 feet walnut lumber at 8c $6 80 

1898. 
May 12. 10 tables, as per order, as follows: 
" 12. 2 oali 4 ft. by 12 ft. IV2 in. tops, 1 in. shelves 

at $18.00 36 00 

" 12. 5 oak 4 ft by 8 ft., ly^ in. tops. 1 in. shelves, 

at $14.00 70 00 

" 12. 3 oak 3 ft by G ft., IVo in. tops, 1 in. shelves, 

at $8.00 24 00 

Total $136 SO 

VOUCHER No. 348. INDIANAPOLIS CHEMICAL CO. 
1898. 
May 11. 1,000 lbs. boiler compound at 7%c $75 00 

Total $75 00 

10 — Ins. Vouchers. 



1.46 

VOUCHER No. 349. BLANTON MILLING CO. 

1898. 
May 5. 35 bbls. spring wheat flour at .i;6.45 $225 75 

Total $225 75- 

VOUCHER No. 350. SYFERS, M'BRIDE & CO. 
1898. 
May 7. 200 doz. Solano L. C. peaches at $1.50 per doz. $300 00 

Total $300 CO- 

VOUCHER No. 351. GEORGE D. HARDIN. 

1898. 
May 18. 5,650 lbs. straw at 20c $11 30 

Total $11 30 

VOUCHER No. 352. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1898. 

May 3. 360 doz. eggs at 10y2e $37 80 

" 10. 360 doz. eggs at lOyoc o7 80 

" 17. 360 doz. eggs at lOVoC 37 80 

" 24. 360 doz. eggs at lOVaC 37 80 

Total $151 20 

VOUCHER No. 353. J. E. RYAN & CO. 
1898. 

May 3. 1,500 lbs. fine Pearl meal at $1.10 $16 50 

3. 5 bbls. Wisconsin rye flour at $4.00 20 00 

Total $36 50 

VOUCHER No. 354. WM. H. ARMSTRONG & CO. 
1898. 
May 18. y^ doz. Hicks' best magnifying thermometers, 

"with certificate" $12 00 

Total $12 00 

VOUCHER No. 355. HIDE, LEATHER AND BELTING CO. 
1898. 
May 26. 4% ft. 4-in. by. single volt belt, endless, 

at 60c $2 60 

50-10 per cent, discount 1 43 

$1 17 

Total $1 17 



14Y 

VOUCHEE- No. 356. LION COMPRESSED YEAST CO. 

1898. 
May 31. 59iA lbs. yea«t durrag the month at 121/20 $7 44 

Total $7 44 

VOUCHEE No. 357. W. C. FRAZEE. 

1898. 
May 1. 4,650 gals, milk tUmng the month at 12c $558 00 

Total $558 00 

VOUCHEE No. 358. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1898. 

May 1. 1,200 yds. crash $72 00 

Less 2 per cent , 1 44 

$70 56 

1. 30 boxes G. knit cotton at 52c $15 60 

" 1. 1 Hai-p. needles 90 

1. 12 3 gro. safety pins at 15c 180 

$18 30 
Less 2 per cent 37 

17 93 

Total $88 49 

VOUCHER No. 359. CONSUMEES' ICE CO. 
1898. 

May 4. Car 3895, 56,000 lbs. ice at $1.74 ton $48 72 

, " 14. Car 2789, 62,400 lbs. ice at $1.74 ton 54 29 

" 24. Car 2663, 50,800 lbs. ice at $1.74 ton 44 20 

Total $147 21 

VOUCHEE No. 360. INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 

1898. 
May 23. Advertising 70 woa-ds 3 times $2 10 

Total $2 10 

VOUCHEE No. 361. JOUENAL NEWSPAPER CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 20. Advertising 10 lines 3 times $2 00 

May 24. Advei-tising 10 lines 3 times 2 00 

Total $4 00 



148 



VOUCHER No. 362. JAMES COLLIER. 

1898. 

May 9. Casket for Rosie Jones $7 00 

" 16. Casket for Catherine Shilling 7 00 

" 20. Casket for Oren Sefton 7 00 

Total 



$21 00 



1898. 
May 6. 
" 6. 
" 13. 
" 13. 
" 18. 



VOUCHER No. 363. CHAS. G. GRAH. 

Ground 2 clippers and 2 springs $1 10 

2 new plates for clipper 2 00 

Ground 1 pair shears and 3 razons 1 65 

Ground 1 pair shears and 2 clippers 1 15 

2 new plates for repair clippers 2 00 

Total 



$7 90 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 3&i. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 



May 31. To 25.800 cubic feet of gas at $1.25 per 1,000. $32 25 
" 31. 2 outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 



Total 



$35 25 



VOUCHER No. 365. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS Co. 

1898. 
May 31. To gas service for the month ending May 30. 

1898 $1,388 89 



Total 



$1,388 89 



VOUCHER No. 3G6. HUNTINGTON & PAGE. 

1898. 

May 10. 2 double wheel hoes $16 00 

" 10. 4 set of scrappers 3 20 

" 10. 2 bushels grass seed 9 00 

Total 



$28 20 



1898. 

May 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 2. 

" 9. 

" 9. 



1898. 


May 


o 


" 


2 




2. 




2. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 




6. 


« 


6. 
10. 




10. 




10. 




12. 




12. 




13. 




14. 




14. 




17. 


" 


17. 




17. 




31. 



149 



VOUCHER No. 3G7. HOLLWEG & REESE. 

35 (ioz. Meak tea cups at 33f 1111 55 

12 doz. Meak saucers at 33c S 96 

17 doz. Meak lU-iu. plates at 75c 12 75 

5 doz. Meak soup bowls at 07c 3 35 

4 doz. :Meak 1 gal. pitchers at .•p3.G0 14 40 

3 doz. Meak 1 pint pitchers at .$1.00 3 00 

1 doz. Meak ewers 3 75 

6 doz. heavy tumblers at 35c 2 10 

1 doz. 75 molasses cans 2 00 

5 doz. steel table spoons at 35c 1 75 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 368. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

2(W doz. Yar. corn at 85c $170 00 

U bbls. Dingee pickles at $4.85 29 10 

4,198 lbs. Golden Rio coffee at 13%c. 577 23 

978 lbs. N. Y. cheese at 8-'>4c 85 58 

3.198 lbs. beans at -ly^c 71 95 

150 lbs. cuiTants at 7i/oc 11 25 

12 gals, mustard at 30c 3 60 

10 bbls. salt at 85c 8 50 

8 boxes L. L. raisins at $1.10 8 80 

1,005 lbs. peaches at 7c 70 35 

10 bags hominy, 1,000 lbs., at 97c. . . 9 70 

2,000 lbs. rice at 5%c 115 00 

6 lbs. cloves at 20c 1 20 

6 lbs. cinnamon at 25c 1 50 

6 lbs. allspice at 18c 1 08 

51 gals, molasses at .35c 17 85 

110 gals, syrup at 27c 29 70 

2,000 lbs. dried peaches at OVo 190 00 

1,025 lbs. dried apples at 7c 71 75 

100 lbs. grain pepper at 9c 9 00 

25 lbs. powdered sugar at $6.06 1 50 

5,081 lbs. granulated sugar at $5.78. . 293 68 

5.199 lbs. granulated sugar at $5.78. . .300 50 

2 doz. sardines at .$2.15 4 30 

2 doz. oysters at $1.85 3 70 

25 lbs. macaroni at 8c 2 00 

5 bbls. B. oatmeal at .$4.00 20 00 

2 doz. pineapples at .$2.00 4 00 

10 lbs. 4-X powd. sugar at .$6.06 61 



$58 61 



Cr. by eiTors in bill May 22. 



.$2,113 45 
1 30 



-$2,112 15 



Total 



$2,112 15 



150 

VOUCHER No. 369. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

May IG. 191 yds. butter cloth at SV^c $6 69 

" 16. ](>7.2 yds tennis bro. at 3Vi 3 50 

7. 462.3 yds. Amosk. Ucklng at 13c 60 16 

Total $70 35 

VOUCHER No. 370. H. T. CONDE IMPLEMENT CO. 
1898. 
May 12. 16 (P. & O.) spring tb. Sgb. ptd. shovels at 30c $4 80 



Total $4 80 

VOUCHER No. 371. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 

May 16. No. 27 30x96 galv. iron, 2 bales $10 00 

" 16. No. 10 Russia iron, 1 bale 

" 16. No. 27 30x96 C. iron, 1 bale 

" 16. 36 in. zinc, 1 sheet 

" 16. 1 gross mall, iron guard handles 

" 16. 12 doz. 3 gal. seamless granite buckets. . . 

" 16. 4 doz. V4 in- round rods, 12 ft long 

Total $124 11 

VOUCHER No. 372. SANDER & RECKER. 
1898. 
May 6. 1 commode $4 75 



33 


50 


3 


85 




85 


7 


75 


65 


76 


2 


40 



Total $4 75 

VOUCHER No. 373. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 

1898. 
May 6. V2 doz. steel pore, lined cups at $3.00. . . . 
" 21. 1 tea strainer (5c). 1 coCfee sti-ainer dOcK 
" 23. 54 lbs. twine at 10c 



$1 50 


15 


5 40 



Total $7 05 

VOUCHER No. 374. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 
1898. 

May 3. 13% lbs. Rainbow packing $8 10 

3. 50 %x4 inch bolts 150 

3. 2 5 hangers 2 00 

3. 15 hours, F. Gallon 7 50 

3. 15 houi-s, Ilomburg 7 50 

3. 15 hours, helper 3 75 

3. 4 %x6% hose pipes with cocks 1 20 



1898. 


May 3. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


u 


10. 


" 


10. 


t< 


10. 


1< 


10. 


It 


10. 


" 


10. 


« 


10. 


« 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


« 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


<( 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


(( 


10. 


« 


10. 


« 


10. 


t( 


10. 


It 


10. 


" 


10. 


1( 


10. 


" 


10. 


« 


10. 


<( 


10. 


i( 


10. 


" 


10. 


« 


10. 


<( 


10. 


« 


23. 


" 


23. 


" 


23. 


" 


''.^> 



151 

VOUCHER No. 374—00111311110(1. 

4 Rose sprinklers for above .$0 80 

305 3-12 ft % Byer's iron pipe 5 50 

24 %xy2 bushings 20 

24 i/oX% bushings 16 

24 %x% bushings 16 

24 2 C. I. tees 1 77 

12 2x6 nipples 48 

24 1x6 nipples 46 

24 %xG nipples 35 

24 % close nipples 20 

24 11/4x114x1 C. I. tees 1 17 

12 % brass unions 66 

6 2 brass coupling pin 2 78 

12 li/i; brass coupling pin 3 70 

12 11/4 brass coupling pin 2 47 

12 1 brass coupling pin 2 06 

12 % brass coupling pin 1 52 

12 1/^ brass coupling pin. 1 03 

12 % brass coupling pin 66 

4 lengths, V/^ brass tubing, I. P. size 19 20 

4 lengths, 1 brass tubing, I. P. size 13 12 

4 lengths, % brass tubing. I. P. size 9 60 

4 lengths, % brass tubing, I. P. size 5 67 

4 lengths, % brass tubing, I. P. size 3 72 

200 ft. 1/4 R. H. cut laces 72 

100 ft. 5-16 R. H. cut laces 45 

100 ft. % R. H. cut laces 54 

100 lbs. No. 1 white waste 5 75 

12 % Jenkins' Globe valves 7 92 

12 No. 14 Draper steel oilers 1 50 

24 % lock nuts 10 

12 12 Ind. burners 2 50 

12 16 Ind. burners 3 75 

12 % comp. bills, I. P. O. P 3 50 

24 % male union ells 2 97 

100 % fibre bibb washers 10 

1 set % No. 1 Armstrong dies 60 

1 set % No. 2 Armstrong dies 60 

1 % guide. No. 1 Armstrong stock 10 

24 % brass hose replices 40 

48 % Jerdon clamps 80 

12 lbs. U. S. metal polish 1 80 

5 lbs. graphite 1 00 

10 lbs. 11/4 tinned straps 1 .50 

10 lbs. 114 tinned straps 1 50 

5 lbs. 1 tinned straps 75 

5 lbs. •'54 tinned straps 75 

Total $148 59 



152 

VOUCHER No. 375. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 
1898. 

May 5. 1.007 lbs. ham at .S7.22 $72 71 

5. 02 ll)s. bacon at !Jr- 5 58 

" 13. 979 lbs. hams at .$7.22 70 68 

" 19. l.tRK) lbs. hams at $7.22 72 85 

*' 20. l.OtM) lbs. hams at $7.22 72 20 



Total $294 02 



VOUCHER No. 376. rARROTT-TAGGART. 

1898. 

May "). 8 bbls., .^27 lbs., crackers, at 4^-0 $23 72 

'• 12. 8 bbls.. 510 lbs., crackers, at ■iV2C 22 95 

" 19. 8 bbls., 520 lbs., crackers, at 4V2C 23 67 

" 26. 8 bbls.. 516 lbs., crackers, at 4i/>c 23 22 



TotiU $93 56 



VOUCHER No. .377. SYERUP & CO. 
1898. 

May 3. 1 l)ox hnuons $2 75 

5. 421.4i> bu. potatoes 316 ^ 

6. 1 bl)l. apples 3 50 

7. 1 bbl. apples 3 50 

10. 1 box lemons 2 75 

" 17. 200 bu. potatoes at 75c 150 00 

" 20. 1 bbl. apples 3 50 

" 24. 1 box lemons 2 75 

*' 26. 215.5(» 1)U. potatoes at 75c 161 88 

" 28. I bbl. apjtles 4 50 

" 31. 1 bbl. iipplt^s 4 50 

Total $^5 88 



VOUCHER No. 378. SWIFT & CO. 
1898. 

May 4. 1.1. "12 lbs. J ».. Ik loins at .$7.23 $83 29 

6. 4.614 lbs. lanl at .S.">.40 249 16 

" 13. 1,184 lbs. pork loins at $7.23 85 60 

" 20. 1.238 lbs. pork loins at $7.23 89 51 

" 27. 1.2fM'. lbs. pork loins at $7.23 87 19 

Total $594 75 



153 

VOUCHER No. 379. KIPP BROS. CO. 

1S98. 

May 12. 1% doz. spectacles at $3.50, $5 84 

" 14. 1 doz. Spaulding baseballs 12 00 

" 14. % doz. gloves at $9 1 50 

" 14. 1-12 doz. gloves at $18 150 

Total • $20 84 



VOUCHKR No. 380. THE H. LIEBER CO. 
1898. 
May 12. To photogx'aphic materials, the lot $6 75 

Total $6 75 



VOUCHER No. 381. CONSOLIDATED COAL AND LIME CO. 
1S98. 

May 2. 6 bbls. German Portland cement, at $3 .?18 00 

" 25. 2 bbls. Newark plaster at $2.25 4 50 

Total $22 50 



VOUCHER No. 382. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1898. 

May 6. V2 doz. wire screen scoops at $13.00 $6 50 

" 10. 41/6 doz. 214x21/2 No. 808 butts at $1.60. . 6 67 
" 10. 9% doz. 2x2 No. 808 butts at $1.20.. . 1120 
" 10. 41/6 doz. 3x3 No. 808 butts at $2.40 10 00 



$27 87 

Less 70-20 6 70 

10. 50 sets No. 2 Martin Stein pi. castors 

at .80c $40 00 

10. 50 sets No. 4 Martin Stein pi. castors 

at 90c 45 00 

10. 50 sets No. 3 Martin Stein pi. castors 

at 85c 42 50 

10. 24 No. 2 Martin rd. castors at 80c 19 20 

$146 70 

Less 60-10-3 51 23 

14. 1 34-in. scyamore butcher block 4 75 

19. 1 doz. 14-in. bouble-point needles 90 

19. 10 oz. cai-pet tacks at 6c 60 

21. 1 doz. 932 Corbin ward knob locks 7 50 

21. 1 doz. 535 Corbin ward rim locks 3 43 

21. 11-12 doz. 59 Corbin mort. nt. latches, at $16. 14 67 



154 

VOUCHER No. 382— Continued. 
1898. 

May 3L % doz. emery scythe stones at $1.50 $0 50 

" 31. Ve doz. India scytlie stones at $10.80 1 80 

" 31. 1 doz. No. 380 rim deadlocks 3 25 

" 31. 1 doz. 0100 brass chest locks 2 20 

" 31. 1 doz. 0104 brass chest locks 2 03 

Total $106 06 

VOUCHER No. 383. INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIR CO. 
1898. 

May 2. 6 beef, 3,812 lbs., at $6.63 .$252 74 

6. 6 beef. 4,230 lbs., at $6.63 280 45 

" 10. 6 beef, 4,145 lbs., at $6.63 274 81 

" 13. 4 beef, 3,015 lbs., at $6.63 199 89 

" 17. 6 beef, 4,390 lbs., at $6.63 29106 

" 21. 6 beef, 4.705 lbs., at $6.63 311 M 

" 26. 6 beef, 4,250 lbs., at $6.63 28178 

Total $1,892 67 

VOUCHER No. 384. A. KIEFER DRUO CO. 
1898. 

IMay 3. 5 lbs. white castile soap $1 02 

" 3. 1 lb. iodoform 3 75 

3. 10 lbs, S. & .1. cotton 2 50 

" 3. 5 lbs. sweet gum arabic 3 00 

3. 10 lbs. cai-bolic acid 2 50 

" 3. 2 lbs. carbolic ammonia 24 

3. 25 lbs. Epsom salts 38 

3. 2 lbs. S. N. bismuth 2 50 

" 3. 1 lb. tannic acid 95 

" 3. 2 lbs. chlorate potash 24 

3. 2 lbs. iodide potash 4 90 

" 3. 5 lbs. bromide soda 2 70 

" 3. 5 lbs. bromide potash 2 40 

3. 2 lbs. mallkdt chloroform 1 10 

" 3. 2 lbs. Bickel's mercury 1 50 

" 3. 75 lbs. gum camphor 27 75 

" 3. 1 lb. Green's anatine 85 

" 3. 1 lb. powd. capsicum 15 

" 3. 25 lbs. unguentin petroli 1 50 

3. % lb. F. E. Pa. berries 6 60 

3. 41/2 gals, alcohol 11 25 

" 3. 8 oz. sulphum 10 00 

3. 8 oz. chloralamid 6 00 

" 3. 4 oz. ammonal 3 80 

" 3. 2 oz. menthal 56 



1898. 


May 


3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




3. 




5. 




14. 




14. 




14. 




14. 




14. 


" 


14. 



155 

VOUCHER No. 3&4-Coiitiniied. 

5 oz. resocin $0 60 

25 oz. quinine and can 6 00 

2 oz. gallic acid 20 

2 oz. carb. guaiacal 2 80 

4 oz. antikamnia 3 60 

5 yds. J. & J. B. plaster 2 48 

5 gross No. 2XX corks 1 00 

6 doz. tootlibriislies, 4-row 2 25 

2 doz. medicine glasses 60 

2 doz. infant syringes 2 70 

1 doz. Tromer's malt ch 8 00 

2 lbs. caraway seeds 24 

2 lbs. 8y3-in. vanilla beans 18 00 

1 lb. purple analine 2 25 

¥5 lb. cas. lag. P. D. & Co 9 66 

1 oz. P. D. Co. P. E. belld. rt 75 

1 doz. Peters' pept. ess 7 75 

75 lbs. gum camphor 27 75 

$194 77 

Less error in prices 24 

Total $194 53. 



VOUCHEE No. 385. THE M'ELWAINE-RICHAEDS CO. 
1898. 

May 13. 12 li^x% gal. tees $1 20 

" 13. 24 %xy2xi/2 gal. tees 60 

", 13. 48 % close nipples 50 

" 13. 12 % fin. Boston. bibbs, I. P 9 25 

" 13. 2 No. 4 Nason steam traps 19 50 

" 13. 1 No. 2 Nason steam traps 4 50 

" 17. 6 l%x% gal. tees (no charge) .... 

" 25. 12 1-in. water ells 

" 25. 12 114-in. water ells 

" 25. 12 li/a-m. water ells 

" 25. 12 lx34-in. water ells 

" 25. 12 li4xl-in. water ells 

" 25. 12 IVoxli/i-in. water ells 

" 25. 12 1-in. water tees 

" 25. 12 ly^^-in. water tees 

" 25. 12 IVa-in. water tees 

" 25. 6 lx34-in. water tees 

" 25. 6 l^xl-in. water tees 

" 25. 6 Ii4xli4-in. water tees $14 00 14 00 

Total $49 55. 



156 

VOUCHER No. 386. SEVEIUX, OSTEKMEYER & CO. 

1898. 

May 2. 1,000 lb.s. bulk .starch, at 214c ?22 50 

2. 720 lbs. Battle Ax tobacco, at l»c 136 80 

2. 150 lbs. Greenback. %. at 27c 40 50 

2. 10 boxes Brooks' Crystal soap at $3.50 35 00 

2. 5 boxes Lenox soap at .$2.70 13 50 

" 10. 20 boxes Lenox soap at $2.70 54 00 

" 10. 2 gross Silicon at $9.25 18 50 

" 10. 10 boxes Ivory soap at $4 40 00 

" 10. 2 doz. Globe. W. boards at $1.85 3 70 

" 10. 52 gals, oil at 7c 3 &i 

" 24. 50 doz. brooms at $1.75 87 50 

Total $455 64 



VOUCHER No. 387. WESTERN UNION TEL. CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 3. To Greenwood, telegram $0 25 

May 14. From LaAvrenceburg. telegram 25 

" 8. To El Paso, telegram 75 

" 17. To Bloomington, telegram 25 

" 17. From Bloomington, telegram 25 

" 17. To Madison, telegram 25 

" 20. To Guilford, telegram 25 

Total $2 25 

VOUCHER No. 388. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 

May 7. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing $10 00 

" 7. C. Rommel, for carpenter work 8 15 

" 9. J. C. Jameson, for photographing material ... 11 00 

" 9. Chas. .7. Kuhn. for fruit and produce 9 70 

" 9. J. "W. Hess, for postage stamps 25 00 

" 12. Gertrude Rogers, for entertainment 15 00 

" 14. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 14. C. Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

" 16. G. A. Cai'stensen, for sermons 3 Sundays. ... 15 00 

" 20. HeniT Bciser. for music 11 25 

" 21. W. L. Merritt. for whitewashing 10 00 

" 21. C. Rommel, for work as carpeuter 8 15 

" 23. G. W. Shay, for trimming trees, part pay. ... 20 00 

" 27. Henry Beiser, for music 11 25 

** 28. W. L. ]Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 28. C. Rommel, for work as carpenter 8 15 

" 28. G. W. Shny, for trimming trees, part pay 20 0(> 

Total $210 80 



157 

VOUCHER No. 389. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 
May 31. Mum pay-roll lor luontli of May, 1898 .$7,078 15 

• Total $7,078 15 



yOUCHP}R No. 390. THE INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 
May 24. To advertising I14 squares 3 times .$3 00 

Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. 391. C. H. M'DOWELL. 

1898. 

May 22. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 29. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total $10 00 



VOUCHER No. 392. ROSS W. WEIR & CO. 

1898. 
June 2. 1.201 lbs., net. Imperial tea at 25c $300 25 

Total $300 25 



VOUCHER No. 393. SAM. MARKS. 
1898. 
June 11. 10,800 lbs. hay at 37y2C per 100 .$40 50 

Total $40 50 



VOUCHER No. 394. C. H. M'DOWELL. 
1898. 

June 5. For sei-vices as chaplain $5 00 

" 12. For sex-vices as chaplain 5 00 

" 19. For services as chaplain 5 00 

" 26. For sei-vices as chaplain 5 00 

Total $20 00 



158 



VOUCHER No. 395. FRIEDMAN 3IFG. GO. 

1898. 

June 2. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at 8%c $105 00 

7. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at 8%e 105 00 

" 14. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at 8%c 105 00 

" 14. 1 tub butterine, 40 lbs., at 8%e '. 3 50 

" 21. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at 8%c 105 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 39a E. B. MCOMB. 

1898. 
.Tune 29. 125 bbls. W. W. Straight flour at $.5.8(j $725 00 



$423 50i 



Total $725 00- 

VOUCHER No. 397. WM. B. BURFORD. 

1898. 

May 18. 1,000 No. 12 coml. envelopes $10 50 

" 18. printing same 1 30 

" 18. 10,000 61/^ 9360 envelopes 7 50 

" 20. 6 qr. Demy time book, ptd., full bd 7 50 

" 20. Patent binding 90 

" 20. 72 boxes Demson tables, 201 G 00 

" 20. 72 boxes Demson tables, 204 6 00 

" 21. 5,000 daily reports. W. L. cap.. R. & P 53 20 

" 23. 1 book, 2.0(X) receipts, puf . 8 00 

" 23. 100 wh. sh. blotting 4 00 

" 23. 1 rm., 40x48, hardware wrap 4 40 

" 23. 1 rm., 24x3G. manilla Avrap 2 40 

" 26. 6 6^4 Jr. Crown records, plain % bd 9 36 

June 7. 5 boxes wire staples 1 25 

" 11. 1,000 bakers' requisitions 1 25 

7. Tabbing 10 tabs 25 

" 13. 2 boxes No. 32 bands 1 20 

Total $125 01 

VOUCHER No. 398. BROOKS OII> COMPANY. 
1898. 
.Tune 2.3. 1 bbl. Col. Drake's cyl. oil, 53 gals., at 

85c $45 05 

I^ess 25 per cent 11 26 

$33 79 

Total $.33 79 

. VOUCHER No. .399. INDIANAPOIJS .TOT'RNAI^ NEWS*PAPER CO. 

1898. 
June 21. Advertising daily 10 lines 3 times $2 00 

Total $2 OO 



159 



VOUCHER No. 400. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1S98. 
June 30. For gas consumed for June, 25,600 cubic ft.. 

at $1.25 $32 00 

" 30. 2 outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total 



$35 00 



VOUCHER No. 401. FROMMEYER BROS. 
189S. 

June L 40 doz. cups at 33c $13 20 

1. 12 doz. saucers at 32c 3 84 

1. 10 doz. 10-in. plates at 75c 7 50 

1. 2 doz. 1-gal. pitchers at $3.60 7 20 

1. 9 doz. castor bottles at 75c 6 75 

1. 50 doz. No. 2 fibre chambers at $4.25 212 50 

1. 1 gross Mason's rubbers 35 

1. 5 doz. Mason caps at 21c 1 05 

Total 



$252 39 



1898. 
June 2. 
" 8. 
" 16. 
" 23. 



VOUCHER No. 402. J. R. BUDD & CO. 

360 doz. eggs at lOVaC $37 80 

360 doz. eggs at lOVsC 37 80 

360 doz. eggs at lOi/oC 37 80 

360 doz. eggs at lOi/oC 37 80 

Total 



$151 20 



1898. 
June 2. 



VOUCHER No. 403. HUNTINGTON & PAGE. 

1 doz. wire baskets $1 50 

3 lbs. hellebore 75 

1 Lewis pump 4 50 

1 bag moss 1 25 

Total 



$8 00 



VOUCHER No. 404. THE A. BURDSAL CO. 

1898. 

June 17. 4 qts. carg. yermilliou at 75c $3 00 

" 18. 5 gals, gasoline at 12c 60 

Total 



$3 60 



160 

VOUCHER No. 405. DANIEL STEWAET CO. 

25 lb.s. iivd. Jam. giuger $4 OO 

25 lbs. oxlio acid 2 00 

1. 10 lbs. carbolic acid 2 20 

1. 5 lbs. peroxide hydrogen 1 75 

1. 2 lbs. pyrophos iron 96 

1. 2 lbs. hypliosphite lime 2 30 

1. 1 lb. liyphosphite soda 1 10 

1. 1/4 lb. hypliospliite potash 30 

1. 5 lbs. po. boracic acid 53 

1. 2 lbs. chloroform 1 04 

1. 1 lb. phospliate iron 48 

1. 2 lbs. sulphate soda 22 

1. 2 lbs. gran. phos. soda 1(5 

1. 3 lbs. tartaric acid 1 05 

1. 4 lbs. sweet spirits nitre and jug at 15c 1 17 

1. 1/2 lb. said 1 73 

1. 5 lbs. gi"d. gentran root 50 

1. 2 lbs. Hayden Vib. Co 3 00 

1. 10 lbs. glycei-ine (can 5c) 1 35 

1. 5 lbs. grd. orange peel 50 

1. % lb. Armour's scale pepsin 3 55 

1. 5 lbs. F. E. spla. comp 3 80 

1. 1,000 pills, A. S. & B 146 

1. 500 quine. comp. and strych 15* 

1. 500 pills, 1 gr. permang.. pot 73 

1. 500 pills. 21/0 gr., zinc sulph 1 27 

1. 2 doz. M. T. caps 1 60 

1. Ml doz. sets allum gr. weights 88 

1. 1 doz. pts. mapleine 7 80 

1. 500 pills. % gr., prots. iod. mercury 4(5 

1. 4 oz. diliit. hydrocyam acid. lx»t. 9c 36 

1. 8 oz. phenacetine 7 20 

1. 4 oz. chloralouied 2 88 

1. 4 oz. antil^aniina 3 60 

1. 4 oz. sulplioiial 5 40 

1. 1 oz. sulp. codine 3 85 

1. 10 gals, alcohol (can 50c) 24 20 

6. ^2 doz. spools rubber adh. plaster 3 60 

(). 10-100 H. T. morphine, 1-6 gr., Wyeth's 2 30 

6. 10-100 II. T. strychnia. 1-0 gr.. Wyeth's 2 30 

6. 2-100 II. T. digataline. MO gr.. Wyeth's 46 

13. % yd. 7-in. Bella, plaster 2 48 

15. 2 gals. ])araftine oil (jug 20c) 90 

Total $109 04 



161 



1898. 
June 2. 



. 3. 

3. 

3. 

3. 

3. 

9. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
13. 
14. 
14. 
14. 
16. 
16. 
16. 
21. 
24. 
24. 
24. 
30. 
30. 



VOUCHER No. 406. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

3.115 lbs. beans at 2 l-6c $67 49 

100 doz. Yar. corn at 8oo 85 00 

1,000 lbs. lump starch at 2ysC 21 25 

25 boxes Lenox soap at .?2.70 67 50 

5 boxes Lenox soap, no charge 

53 gals, coal oil at lie 5 83 

5.116 lbs. gran, sugar at )f5.72 292 64 

3,699 lbs. Golden Rio coffee at 13%c 508 61 

120 lbs. Church's soda at 5c 6 00 

10 bbls. salt at S5c 8 50 

6 bbls. Dingee pickles, 1,200, at $4.85 29 10 

1 bbl., 100 pkgs., salt 1 78 

1/2 doz. No. 1 tubs at $5.50 2 75 

193 gals, vinegar at 7I/2C 14 48 

55 gals. sw't. clover syrup at 25c 13 75 

8 boxes L. L. raisins at $1.10 8 80 

120 lbs. Piel corn starch at 4c 4 80 

1 doz. Star mops 2 60 

50 cases Yar. corn, 100 doz.. at S5c 85 00 

12 doz. mop sticks at 50c 6 00 

10 bbls. B. oatmeal at $4.15 41 50 

25 boxes Lenox soap at $2.70 67 50 

7 boxes Lenox soap, no charge 

10 boxes Ivory soap at $4.00 40 00 



144 lbs. cuiTants at 7%c 

24 doz. Silicon at 67y2C 

12 gals, mustard in jugs at 30c 

50 cans extra Choix mushrooms at 24c. 

25 cans Cupid peaches at 12c 



10 80 
16 20 

3 60 
12 00 

3 00 



Total 



$1,721 29 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 407. J. R. RYAN & CO. 



June 1. 1,500 lbs. Pearl meal at $1.20 $18 00 



Total 



$18 00 



1898. 
June 15. 



VOUCHER No. 408. THE JOHN VAN RANGE CO. 

1 galv. iron hot oven, 5 ft. long, 30 in. wide, 
32 in. high, with sliding door on top and one 
on side; top compartment 12 in. deep, with 
2 perforated steel shelves with coils under 
each $55 00 



Total . 
11 — Ins. Vouchers. 



$55 00 



162 



VOUCHER No. 409. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

June 6, 695.2 yds. scrim at 5.2c 

G. 12 doz. dress combs at 75c 

6. 36 boxes tidy cotton at 50c 

6. 100 single spreads at 57.2c 

G. 848 yds. Utiea muslin at lie 

G. 192.1 yds. Pei). blea. muslin at 11.3c 

G. GGl yds. Pep. blea. muslin at Gc 

7. 400 yds. netting at 4c 

7. 42G.3 yds. Pepp. blea. muslin at 11.3c 

7. 234.1 yds. Utica bro. muslin at lie 

7. 12 boxes tidy cotton at 50c 

29. 129.2 yds. butter doth at 3.2c 



$38 25 


9 00 


18 00 


57 


50 


93 


28 


22 


59 


39 


66 


16 


00 


50 


14 


25 


77 


G 00 


4 


53 



Total 



$380 72 



VOUCHER No. 410. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 
1898. 

.Tune 8. 60 blankets at 90c $54 00 

" 18. 40 blankets at 90c 36 00 



Total 



$90 00 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 411. JOSEPH GARDNER. 



June 14. 1 box 4-X N. & G. Taylor bright tin $22 00 

14. 1 box 1-X Taylor bright tin 

14. 2 doz. No. 1 Springier i-oses 

14. 2 doz. No. Springier roses 

15. 4 No. 16 galv. iron wash sinks 

15. Galv. Iron exhaust pipe for steam cookiuj 

vessels , 



14 


20 




40 




50 


100 00 


21 


75 



Total 



$158 85 



VOUCHER No. 412. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 



1898. 



June 21. To advertising IVi; squares 3 times. 
Total 



$3 00 



$3 00 



1898. 



VOUCHER No. 413. W. C. FRAZEE. 



June 30. 4,.")(X> gals, fresh milk dclivorctl during the 

toonth at 12c $540 00 



Total 



$540 00 



163 

VOUCHER No. 414. SYERUP & CO. 
1898. 

.Time 3. 1 case strawberries $1 50 

4. 56 cases strawberries at $1.35 75 GO 

" 11. 57 eases strawberries at $1.40 79 80 

Total $150 90 

VOUCHER No. 415. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 
1898. 

June 18. 46 cases blackberries at $1.50 $G9 00 

•• 25. 61 cases raspberries at $1.35 82 35 

" 28. 4 baskets clieiTies at 75c 3 00 

Total $154 35 

VOUCHER Xo. 416. JAMES L. REACH. 
1898. 

June 2. 1 box lemons $3 50 

2. 675.25 bu. potatoes at 69c $466 05 

" 10. 1 box lemons 3 50 

" 18. 1 box lemons 8 50 

" 31. 5,900 lbs. potatoes at 69c 67 85 

" 28. 1 box lemons 3 50 

" 29. 6,175 lbs. potatoes at 69c 71 02 

Total $618 92 

VOUCHER No. 417. HILDEBRAND HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 
June 23. 1 ice box $12 00 

• Total $12 00 

VOUCHER No. 418. CONSUMERS' ICE CO. 
1898. 

June 1. 68,000 lbs. ice at $2.98 per ton $101 32 

9. 72,000 lbs. ice at $2.98 per ton 107 28 

" 16. 70,800 lbs. ice at $2.98 per ton 105 49 

" 27. 68,000 lbs. ice at $2.98 per ton 10132 

Total $415 41 

VOUCHER No. 419. LION COMPRESSED YEAST CO. 
1898. 
June 30. For the month June ending this date 551^ lbs. 

yeast at VIHc $0 94 

Total $6 94 



164 

VOUCHER No. 420. THE INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 
1898. 
June 20. Advertising 01 words 3 times $1 83 

Total $1 83 

VOUCHER No. 421. JAMES COLLIER. 
1898. 

June 8. For 1 casliet $7 00 

" 11. For 1 casket 7 00 

" 16. For 1 caslcet 7 00 

" 29. For 1 casket 7 00 

Total $28 00 

VOUCHER NO. 422. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1898. 
June 30. To gas services for the month ending June 

30, 1898 $1,388 89 

Total $1,388 89 

VOUCHER No. 423. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 
1898. 

June 2. To Greencastle $0 25 

" 10. To Rockville 25 

" 10. To Lafayette 25 

" 20. To Columbus 25 

" 20. To Columbus 25 

Total $1 25 

VOUCHER No. 424. KIPP BROS CO. 
1898. 

June 4. 1 bunting flag, 6x10 $8 00 

" 4. 1 gro. Winner cards 18 00 

4. 6 doz. police whistles at $1.00 6 00 

" 14. 3 celluloid balls 50 

Total $32 50 

VOUCHER No. 425. O. P. BARNELL. Agent. 
1898. 
June 15. 35 bbls. spring wheat flour at $7.40 $259 00 

Total $259 00 

VOUCHER No. 426. BOARD OF PUBLIC SAFETY. 

1898. 
June 15. Battery power for year ending June 15, 1898. $50 00 

Total $50 00 



165 



1898. 
June 1. 
" 3. 
" S. 
" 11. 
" 15. 
" 17. 
" 22. 
" 23. 
" 28. 



T 

1898. 
June 3, 
" 8. 
" 11. 
" 18. 
" 20. 
" 25. 
" 28. 
" 30. 



1898. 
June 2. 

" 2. 

" 9. 
, " 16. 

" 23. 

" 23. 



1898. 
June 11, 



15. 
15. 
15. 

15. 
15. 
16. 



VOUCHER No. 427. INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIR CO. 

6 beeves, 4,250 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 $271 15 

6 beeves, 3,840 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 244 99 

6 beeves, 3,920 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 250 10 

6 beeves, 4,030 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 257 11 

4 beeves, 2,810 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 179 28 

6 beeves, 4,120 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 262 86 

5 beeves, 3,990 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 254 56 

5 beeves, 3,665 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 233 83 

6 beeves, 4,070 lbs., at $6.38 per 100 259 67 

Total $2,213 55 

OUCHER No. 428. THE AMMONIA SOAP POWDER CO. 

2,665 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 $98 60 

2,016 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 74 59 

1,292 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70'. 47 80 

1,157 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 42 81 

2,086 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 77 18 

2,380 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 88 06 

2,284 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 84 51 

1,287 lbs. chipped soap at $3.70 47 62 

Total $56117 

VOUCHER No. 429. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 

59 lbs. bacon at 10c $5 90 

1,018 lbs. ham at $7.60 77 37 

1.010 lbs. liam at $7.60. 76 76 

1,008 lbs. ham at $7.60 76 61 

1.011 lbs. ham at $7.60 76 84 

64 lbs. bacon at 9c 5 76 

Total $319 24 

VOUCHER No. 430. WM. H. ARMSTRONG & CO. 

1 German single truss, 34 in. $1 50 

Less -25 per cent 37 

$1 13 

2 4-qt. hot water bottles, net 3 38 

3 H. R. syringes, % oz., net 1 14 

4 S. R. feeding tubes 4 00 

1 only Al. P. C. probe 15 

1 pair 5-in. P. C. scissors 1 00 

1 doz. plain % carved surgeon's needles 60 

Total $1140 



166 



VOUCHER No. 431. SPECIALTY MFG. CO. 
1898. 
June 6. 2 doz. fan. brushes, 75c per doz $1 50 

Total $1 50 

VOUCHER No. 432. PARROTT-TAGGART CO. 

1898. 

June 2. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 513 lbs., at 5V2C $28 22 

" 9. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 517 lbs., at 5y2e 28 44 

" 16. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 514 lbs., at 51/2C 28 27 

" 23. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 511 lbs., at 51/2C 28 11 

" 30. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 533 lbs., at 5y2C. 29 32 

Total $142 3© 

VOUCHER No. 433. SWIFT & COMPANY. 
1898. 

June 2. 1,120 lbs. pork loins at $7.25. $8120 

9. 1,363 lbs. lard at $5.75 78 37 

" 16. 1,059 lbs. pork loins at $7.25 76 78 

" 24. 1,236 lbs. pork loins at $7.25 89 61 

Total $325 95 

VOUCHER No. 434. SCHLEICHER & MARTENS CO. 
1898. 

June 7. 108 yds., 45 in., table cloth at 13c $14 04 

" 7. 52 j'ds. tapestry remnant at 47yoc 24 70 

Total . $38 74 

VOUCHER No. 435. GEORGE F. EDENHARTEE, Superintendent, 
1898. 

June 4. W. L. Merritt, whitewashing $10 00 

" 4. Carl Rommel, work as cai-penter 8 15 

" 4. Sol. Hathaway, 10 copies Independent to 

June, 1899 20 00 

" 4. George TV. Shay, part payment ti-imming 

trees 35 00 

7. Medico Legal Journal for Vols. XV and XVI 6 00 

7. Chas. J. Kahn Co., for fruit 4 92 

" 7. Alienist and Nemolozist for '98, subscription. 5 00 
" 7. Gutenberg Co. for 7 copies Daily Telegraph 

from January to July, 1808 27 30 

" 7. The Lawyers' Co-operative Pub. Co., for 1 

copy Clevenger's M. J. of Insanity 10 00 

" 7. A. M. Bunten. sheriff, return "NVm. BoswelK 

Putnam Co.. eloped patient 16 15 

" 8. Chas. Shake, for helping ti'ee trimmer 10 90 



167 

VOUCHER No. 435— ContiBued. 
1898. 

June 8. Chas. Lewis, for helping ti-ee trimmer $6 60 

" 8. George W. Shay, balance in full trimming 

trees 50 15 

" 8. George W. Shay, additional number trimming 

trees 15 00 

" 8. John Osterman, for expenses to Charity Con- 
ference, New York 59 90 

" 8. D. H. Davis, for expenses to Charity Confer- 
ence, New York 63 95 

" 9. J. F. Hulsopple, Sub Sentinel and Journal, 

March-June, 1898 16 80 

" 11. W. L. Merritt, whitewashing 10 00 

" 11. Carl Rommel, work as carpenter 8 15 

" 13. James W. Hess, for postage stamps 25 00 

" 13. Tribune Pub. Co., 1 copy Tribune for 1897-8. . 6 00 

" 18. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 18. Carl Rommel, work as carpenter 8 15 

" 27. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

Total $443 12 

VOUCHER No. 436. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 
June 30. Main pay-roll for month of Jime, 1898 $6,998 45 

Total $6,998 45 

VOUCHER No. 437. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 
1898. 
July 20. To gas service during the month ending July 

31, 1898, per contract $1,388 89 

Total $1,388 89 

VOUCHER No. 438. JNO. O'NEILL. 
1898. 

July 21. 35 bbls. spring wheat flour at $5.20 $182 00 

" 21. 1,000 lbs. corn meal at 95c 9 50 

Total $191 50 

VOUCHER :No. 439. GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 
1898. 

July 9. Air 28710 200 fuse plugs at 10c $20 00 

Less 50-10 per cent 11 00 

$9 00 

" 13. Air 28771 400-20-109 No. 1 Ed. lamps at ISc; 

F. D. No. 231% 72 00 

Total $81 00 



168 

VOUCHER No. 440. AMERICAN OIL CO. 

1898. 
July IG. 1 bbl. Acme engine oil, 52 gals., at 15c $7 SO 

Total $7 80= 

• VOUCHER No. 441. FRANCIS BERGMAN. 
1898. 
July 1. 10 kegs sal soda, 1,755 lbs., at 59c $10 35 

Total $10 35- 



VOUCHER No. 442. FRIEDMAN MITG. CO. 

1898. 

June 28. 30 tubs Standard, 1,200 lbs., at 834c $105 00 

" 28. 1 tub Standard, 40 lbs., at 8%c 3 50 . 

July 5. 30 tubs Standard. 1,200 lbs., at 8-%c 105 00 

" 12. 30 tubs Standard, 1,200 lbs., at 8%c 105 00 

" 19. 30 tubs Standard. 1,200 lbs., at 8%c 105 00 

Total $423 50- 



VOUCHER No. 443. V. BACHMAN. 
1898. 
July 5. 5 bbls. rye flour at $3.30 $16 50 

Total $16 50- 

VOUCHER No. 444. THE THOMPSON & CHUTE SOAP CO. 
1898. 
July 21. 35 bbls. Borax chip soap, 8,398 lbs., at 3%e. . $202 44 

Total $262 44 

VOUCHER No. 445. E. B. M'COMB. 

1898. 
July 27. 125 bbls. winter wheat flour at $4.00 . $500 00 

Total $500 00^ 

VOUCHER No. 446. C. J. TRUEMFER. 
1898. 
July 8. Making and hanging 7 large window awnings $35 00 
" 8. Making and hanging 2 large door awnings. . 14 00 

Total $49 CO 



169 

VOUCHER No. 447. BROOKS OIL COMPANY. 
1898. 
July 23. 1 bbl. Ex. Col. DraKe cyl. oil, 53 gals., 

at 85c $45 05 

Less 25 per cent, dis 11 26 

$33 79 

Total $33 79 



VOUCHER No. 448. A. O. LOCKRIDGE. 

1898. 

Old account balance due $2 00 

May 28. To railroad fare from and to Greencastle. ... 2 40 

" 28. To sti-eet car fares and lunch 60 

June 9. To railroad fare from and to Greencastle. ... 2 40 

" 9. To street car fare 05 

" 24. To railroad fare from and to Greencastle .... 2 40 

" 24. To street car fares 15 

July 7. To railroad fares from and to Greencastle. ... 2 40 

7. To street car fares 15 

" 29. To railroad fares from and to Greencastle. ... 2 40 

" 29. To street car fares 15 

Total $15 10 



VOUCHER No. 449. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1898. 

July 27. To 23,400 cubic feet of gas consumed during 
the month ending July 25, 1898, at $1.25 
per 1,000 $29 25 

." 27. Two outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total $32 25 



VOUCHER No. 450. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 
July 26. To 1^2 sqrs. advertising 3 times $3 00 

Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. 451. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 

1898. 
July 26. Advertisement, 10 lines 3 times $2 00 

Total $2 00 



170 



VOUCHER No. 452. DANIEL STEAVART CO. 

1898. 

July 1. 25 lbs. Epsom salts $0 38 

1. 5 lbs. hyposulphite sodii 18 

1. 5 lbs. bromide potissium 2 35 

1. 8 lbs. Eng. prepared chalk, Thomas' 45 

1. 2 lbs. chloroform, malkdt 1 04 

1. 2 lbs. absolute alcohol 1 25- 

1. 2 lbs. iodide potassium 4 90 

1. 10 lbs. glycerine 1 40 

1. 10 lbs. parafEae 70' 

1. 14 lb. benzoic acid 30 

1. V2 lb. nitrate silver 3 40 

1. 10 lbs. carbolic acid 2 20 

1. 1 lb. salicylate soda 50 

1. 100 lbs. sulphate copper 4 00 

1. 1 lb. Keith's concentrated tinct. avenue sotiva 1 40 

1. 2 gals, paraffin oil 50 

1. 1 doz. Ti-ommer's Ext. of Malt with cod liver 

oil 8 00 

1. 2 doz. No. 2 empty capsules, P., D. & Co 150 

1. % doz. 2-oz. graduates, tumbler-shaped 88 

1. 25 oz. sulphite quinine 5 25 

1. 4 oz. blue mass 15 

1. 4 oz. permanganate potassium 10 

1. 8 oz. chloralamid 5 76 

1. 4 oz. antikamnia 3 52 

1. 4 oz. phenacetine 3 60 

1. 4 oz. resorcine 88 

1. 1-500 granules calcium sulphide, % gr. each. . 81 

13. 1 lb. F. E. dandelion. L 1 25 

13. 1 lb. F. E. enonym. L. 1 50 

13. 1-12 doz. Steam's Cascara 1 25 

Total 



$59 40 



VOUCHER No. 453. MURFHY. HIBBEN & CO. 

1898. 

July G. 4 bales S. S. batts.. 2fX) lbs., at Gc $12 00 

6. 448% yds. ticking at 13c 58 27 

" 6, 572r, yds. Utica brown at 1 Ic 63 00 

6. 5981/j yds. Dwight Anchor, i- hl.-.-i.. at (ic 35 91 

'• 6. 50 doz. thread at 36e 18 00 

" 16. 1 case palm fans 4 50 

" 26. 726% yds. Masonville bleach at Oc 43 59 

" 26. 180^4 yds. Amoskeag ticking at 13c 23 43 

" 26. 10 doz. 503 hose at $1.65 16 50 

Total 



$275 20 



171 

VOUCHER No. 454. PETER F. BRYCE. 
1898. 

July 7. 501 lbs. butter crackers at 4% $23 80 

" 14. 502 lbs. buttei- crackers at 4%c 23 86 

" 21. 480 lbs. butter crackers at 4%c 22 80 

" 28. 482 lbs. butter crackers at 43/ic 22 90 

Total $93 36 

VOUCHER No. 455. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 
1898. 

July 1. 65 bams, 1,020 lbs., at $7.35 $74 97 

1. 51 hams. 990 lbs., at $7.35 72 77 

1. 53 hams, 1,007 lbs., at $7.35 74 01 

1. 6 bacon, 60 lbs., at SYsC 5 33 

1. 54 hams, 1,015 lbs., at $7.35 74 60 

1. 57 hams, 1,006 lbs., at $7.35 73 94 

Total $375 62 

VOUCHER No. 456. SWIFT & COMPANY. 
1898. 
July 1. 4,111 lbs., lard at $5.45 $224 05 

Total $224 05 

VOUCHER No. 457. HUNTINGTON & PAGE. 
1898. 

July 14. :^ bushel black wax beans $0 88 

" 14. V/s bushels Mack wax beans 5 25 

" 14. 1 bag 14 

Total $6 27 

VOUCHER No. 458. SYFERS, M'BRIDE & CO. 
1898. 
July 5. 100 cases, 200 doz.. Yul)a L. C. peaches, $1.70. $340 00 



Total $340 00 

VOUCHER No. 459. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1898. 

July 1. 300 doz. eggs at IOV2C $3150 

8. 360 doz. eggs at 10y2C 37 80 

" 21. 330 doz. eggs at 10y2C 34 65 

" 28. 300 doz. eggs at 10y2C 31.50 

Total , $135 45 



172 

VOUCHER No. 4G0. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 
1898. 

July 1. 78 cases Polk's tomatoes, 156 doz., at 90c $140 40 

" 1. 2 cases pineapple, 4 doz., at $1.40 5 60 

" 1. 3 lbs. Dunham's cocoanut at 27c 81 

" 1. 3 lbs. Baker's chocolate at 34c 1 02 

6. 1,486 lbs. starch at 2% 3158 

6. 150 lbs. smoking tobacco at 31c 46 50 

6. 10 bbls. salt at 70c 7 00 

6. 2,202 lbs. beans at l%c 36 70 

6. 180 lbs. N. Y. cheese at 71/20 13 50 

6. 54 gals, molasses at 30c 16 20 

6. 3,905 lbs. Golden Rio coffee at 12%c 497 89 

" 13. 797 lbs. N. Y. cheese at 7iAc 59 77 

" 13. 24 doz. Silicon at 671/2 16 20 

" 13. 56 gals, syrup at 25c 14 00 

" 13. 1,000 lbs. hominy at Ic 10 00 

" 13. Half gross stove polish at $5.88 2 94 

" 13. 6 doz. Mason's blacking at 37i^c 2 25 

" 13. 1,000 lbs. rice at 6%c 67 50 

" 14. 6 bbls. pickles, 1,200, at $5.00 30 00 

" 14. 2,436 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.65 137 63 

'• 14. 10 boxes Brooks' Crystal soap, box $3.40 34 00 

'• 14. 1 bundle paper bags, No. 30, $6.50, less 50 per 

cent 3 25 

" 14. 1 bundle paper bags. No. 20, $5.00, less 50 

per cent 2 50 

" 14. 1 bundle paper bags. No. 2, $1.00, less 50 per 

cent 50 

" 26. 22 cases tomatoes, 44 doz., at 90c 39 60 

" 26. 4,168 lbs. gran, sugar at $5.65 235 48 

Total $1,452 82 



VOUCHER No. 461. CONSUMERS' ICE CO. 
1898. 

.Tuly 1. 60.400 lbs. ice at $3.24 per ton $107 56 

6. 68.000 lbs. ice at $3.24 per ton 110 16 

" 13. 75.200 lbs. ice at $3.24 per ton 12182 

" 19. 68.000 lbs. ice at $3.24 per ton 110 16 

" 27. 64.000 lbs. ice at $3.24 per ton 103 68 

Total $553 38 



173 

VOUCHER No. 462. E. T. SMITH. 

1S98. 

June 30. 729 lbs. white fish at 4c $29 16 

July 7. 878 lbs. white fish at 4c 35 12 

" 14. 936 lbs. white fish at 4c 37 44 

" 21. 855 lbs. white fish at 4c 34 20 

" 28. 801 lbs. white fish at 4c 32 04 

$167 96 

Less rebate on lot 5 00 

— ■ $162 96 

Total $162 96 



VOUCHER No. 463. FRANCKE HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 

July IS. 300 ft. 36-in. wire cloth $9 00 

" 18. 100 ft. 30-in. wire cloth 2 50 

$11 50 

Less rebate 1 05 

$12 08 

June 2. 2 faucets 20 

Total $12 28 



VOUCHER No. 464. CHAS. G. GRAH. 
1898. 
June 2. 2 razors ground and 2 pairs springs for clip- 
pers $1 70 

July 12. 1 box W. soap 2 70 

" 13. 3 chppers ground 1 50 

" 13. 2 shears ground 30 

" 13. 3 clipper springs and 3 washers for clippers. . 25 

Total $6 45 



VOUCHER No. 465. INDIANAPOLIS LIGHT AND POWER CO. 

1898. 
July 30. To cmrent for arc light, 3 months ending 

July 31. 1898 $31 90 

" 30. Arc light carboning 3 months 10 60 

Total $42 50 



174 

VOUCHER No. 466. GEORGE HITZ & COMPANY. 

1898. 

July 2. 50 cases blackberries at $1.10 $55 00 

" L'. 2 boxes oranges at $2.50 5 00 

2. 7 boxes lemons at $4.25 29 75 

0. 7 baskets cherries at $1.00 7 00 

8. 41G.40 bu. potatoes at 09c 287 50 

*' 9. 1 box lemons 4 25 

" 13. 4 baskets cherries 5 00 

" 16. 1 box lemons 4 25 

" 21. 1 box lemons 4 25 

*' 21. 380 bu. potatoes at G9c 202 20 

•• 29. 1 box lemons 4 25 



$608 45 
Cr. by 3 cases blackberries returned. . 3 30 

$665 15 

Total $665 15 

VOUCHER No. 467. INDIANAl'OLIS ABATTOIR CO. 
1898. 

July 1. 5 beeves, 3.720 lbs., at $6.23 $23176 

5. 4 beeves, 2,950 lbs., at $6.23 183 79 

8. 6 beeves, 3,930 lbs., at $6.23 244 84 

" 12. 41/2 beeves, 3,460 lbs., at $6.23 215 56 

" 15. 5 beeves, 3.570 lbs., at $6.23 222 41 

" 18. 6 beeves, 3,850 lbs., at $6.23 239 86 

" 21. 6 beeves, 4.430 lbs., at $6.23 275 99 

" 25. 6 beeves. 3,930 lbs., at $6.23 244 Si 

" 28. 6 beeves, 4,050 lbs., at $6.23 252 32 

I 

Total $2,111 37 

VOUCHER No. 468. FROMMEYER BROS. 

1898. 

July 30. 40 doz. teacups at .33c $13 20 

" 30. 15 doz. saucers at 32c 4 80 

" 30. 10 doz. plates at 75c 7 50 

" 30. 4 doz. soup bowls at 70c 2 80 

" .30. 1 doz. covered butters 3 80 

" 30. 6 doz. teacups at XU- 1 98 

Total $34 08 

VOUCHER No. 469. THE INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 
1898. 
July 2.". To advertisement. 63 words. 3 times $1 89 

Total $1 89 



175 

VOUCHER Xo. 470. JAMES COLLIER. 
1898. 
July 25. 1 casket for Emiline Higgius $7 00 

Total $7 00 

VOUCHER No. 471. AV-M. B. BURPORD. 
1898. 

June 22. 1 doz. qts. Stafford's ink $4 80 

" 23. 5,000 postal cards 50 00 

" 23. Printing on 5,000 postal cards 3 73 

" 24. 100 rolls toilet paper G 00 

" 29. 10 rm. ward pai>er 17 50 

July 9. 1,000 Annual Reports, 52 pages 

9. 100 Annual Reports, 393 pages $426 69 426 69 

Total $508 72 

VOUCHER No. 472. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1898. 
July 30. 4,650 gals, milk at 12c $.558 00 

Total $558 00 

VOUCHER No. 473. C. H. M'DOWELL. 
1898. 

July 2. Services as chaplain .fo 00 

" 10. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 17. SeiTices as chaplain 5 00 

" 24. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 31. Services as chaplain 5 00 

Total $25 00 

« 

VOUCHER No. 474. WM. H. ARMSTRONG & CO. 
1898. 

July 28. 1 C. P. fern, truss, leather covered $3 00 

Less 25 per cent 75 

2 25 

Total .$2 25 

VOUCHER No. 475. JAMES L. REACH. 
1898. 

July 1. 1 car melons $189 00 

" 26. 12 melons, 7-23 3 00 

" 26. 12 melons 2 15 

" 30. 18 melons 2 70 

Total $196 85 



17G 

VOUCHER No. 470. GEORGE F, EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 

July 2. W. L. Merritt, for wliitt'washing $10 00 

4. Henry Beiser, for music 15 75 

4. George Donaliue, for eutertainmeut 3 00 

" (). Mercbauts' National, for .stamps 10 00 

y. W. L. Merritt, for wiiitewasbiug 10 00 

9. A. E. Manning, sub. for 8 copies World, years 

'98 and '99 8 00 

" 16. W. L. Merritt, for AvhiteWasliing 10 00 

" 18. Standard Pub. Co., for Sunday School sup- 
plies, July-October, 1898 26 76 

" 20. Austin expressage and freight charges 5 42 

" 21. James W. Hess, postage stamps 25 00 

" 21. The Bo wen-Merrill Co., for medical books 11 80 

" 23. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

'• 28, Merchant's Bank, for revenue stamps 20 00 

" 30. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

Total $175 73 

VOUCHER No. 477. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 
July 30. Main i)ay-roll for mouth of July, 1898 $6,971 90 

Total $6,971 90 

VOUCHER No. 478. LION COMPRESSED YEAST CO. 
1898. 
July 30. 65 lbs. yeast for the month at 12loc $8 13 

Total $8 13 

VOUCHER No. 479. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 
1898. 

July 1. To New Albany $0 26 

1. To Lawrenceburg 26 

" 16. To Frankfort 26 

'• 21. To Martinsville 29 

Total $1 07 

VOUCHER No. 480. D. II. DAVIS. 
1898. 
May 4 and 5. Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil $3 40 

" 12 and 13. Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil 3 40 

" 27 and 28. Railroad fai'e from and to Bra- 
zil 3 40 

June 1 and 2. Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil 3 40 



177 

VOUCHER No. 480— CouUuued. 
1S98. 
June 24 and 2."). Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil i?3 40 

July 6 and 7. Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil 3 40 

" 29 and 30. Railroad fare from and to Bra- 
zil 3 40 

Bus and street car fare, same 

period 1 25 

Meals as per receipts attached. . 6 75 



$31 80 
Cr. by error made in Jan., 

'98, fare. Jan. 4 and 5. .?3 70 
Cr. by error made in Jan., 

'98, fare, Jan. 27 and 28. 3 70 
Cr. by error made in street 

car fare and meals 1 20 

8 60 



$23 20 

Total $23 20 

VOUCHER No. 481. WM. B. BURFORD. 
1898. 

July 19. 10,000 leave-of-absence blanks $6 00 

" 19. Tabbing same, 10,000 2 50 

" 20. 3 gross Gillott's pens, at $1.70 90 

" 22. 5,000 O. E. pay envelopes 30 

" 25. Ptd. noteheads, ruled and tabbed. 2,000 2 90 

^' 27. 5,000 daily reports, Form 1. wh. cap., R. & P. 53 20 



• Total $G5 80 

VOUCHER No. 482. C. H. M'DOWELL. 
1898. 

Aug. 7. Services as chaplain $5 00 

" 14. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 21. Services as chaplain 5 00 

■" 28. Services as chaplain 5 00 



Total $20 00 

VOUCHER No. 483. JAMBS COLLIER. 

189a 

Aug. 6. Casket for Mary Doyle, of Boone County $7 00 

" 8. Casket for John Doyle, of Marion County. ... 7 00 



Total $14 00 

12 — Lsrs. VoucHEBS. 



178 

VOUCHER No. 484. SAMUEL G. MARKS. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. 23,755 lbs. timothy hay at $7 per ton, less $1. . $82 15 



Total $82 15- 

VOUCHER No. 485. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. 4,650 gals, milk for the month at 12c $558 00 



Total $558 00- 

VOUCHER No. 486. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL NEWSPAPER CO. 

1898. 
Aug. 23, 24: and 25. Advertising 10 lines 3 times $2 00 



Total $2 00 

VOUCHER NO. 487. INDIANAPOLIS SETNTINEL CO. 

1898. 
Aug. 23. Advertising li^ squares 3 times $3 00 



Total .$3 00 

VOUCHER No. 488. DANIEL STEWART. 
1S9S. 

Aug. 1. 319 lbs. cream tartar $82 94 

1. 1 lb. acetate potash 28 

1. 5 lbs. beeswax 1 40 

1. 5 lbs. white wax 1 75 

1. Vn lb. F. E. burdock. L 2 45 

1. 2 lbs. poke. Rt. L 1 08 

1. i/o lb. sub. gall, bis 70 

1. 25 lbs. paraline 1 75 

1. 2 lbs. pyrophos iron 1 10 

1. 5 lbs. i)er ox., % 2 00 

1. 5 lbs. bromide potassium 2 35 

1. 5 lbs. bromide ammonia 3 00 

1. 1 lb. phos. acid, 50 per cent 40 

1. 10 lbs. glycerine 1 50 

1. li lb. nitre silver 3 40 

1. 2 gross 2-dr. vials 1 30 

1. 1 oz. sul. strych 1 20 

1. 4 oz. percie acid 15 

1. 4 oz. phenacetine 3 60 

1. 4 oz. chloralnmid 2 88 

1. 4 oz. antikaninia 3 60 

1. 4 oz. ammonal 4 20 

1. 1 oz. sul. codea 4 25 



179 

A'OUCHER Xo. 488— Continued. 
1898. 

Aug. 1. 1 oz. mono, broiiu. caxaphor 

" 1. 10 gals, alcohol, inc 

" 1. 2 doz. medicine glasses 

" 1. 1 doz. Peters' peptic essence 

" 1. 1/4 doz. oil car gard 

2. 1-500 pill sulph. L. stiycb. 1-32-gr 

"2. 5 lbs. grd. gentlon root 

" 2. 2 jars hosp. malt milk 

6. 10-100 H. T. byos. bydrobromate, 1-100 

" 8. 1 oz. pure caffeine, ozs 

" 11. 5 lbs. abs. cotton 

" 11. 6 3 yds. spool Rut. Aah. plaster 

" 11. % yd. 7-in. belladonna 

*' 11. 2 lbs. caraway seed 



$0 


16 


25 


50 




70 


8 00 




20 




46 


1 


00 


6 


50 


4 


40 




65 


1 


35 


2 


70 


2 


70 




30 



Total $181 90 

A'OUCHER No. 489. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 

1898. 

Aug. 1. 600 yds. A. Stevens crash at 0V2C $33 00 

I. 807 yds. Utiea muslin at lie 88 77 



$121 77 

Less 2 per cent, discount 2 43 

$119 34 

13. 108 yds. marble cloth, T. O. B., at 9c 9 72 



Total $129 06 

VOUCHER No. 490. PARROTT-TAGGART BAKERY. 
1898. 

' Aug. 4. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 536 lbs., at $4.40 $23 58 

" 11. 8 bbls. butter crackers. 528 lbs., at $4.40 23 23 

" 18. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 516 lbs., at .$4.40 22 70 

" 25. 8 bbls. butter crackers, 518 lbs., at $4.40 22 79 



Total $92 30 

VOUCHER Xo. 491. GKORGE HITZ & CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 5. 50.40 bu. potatoes at 43c $2179 

" 6. 1 box lemons 4 50 

" 10. 106 bu. potatoes at 43c 45 58 

" 13. 430 bu. potatoes at 43c 184 90 

" 17. 1 box lemons 4 50 

■" 25. 1 box lemons 4 50 

Total $265 77 



180 

VOUCHER No. 492. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

1898. 
Aug. 31. To gas service for the month ending August 

31, 1898 $1,388 89 



Total $1,388 89- 



VOUCHER No. 493. KIPP BROS. CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 6. 2 only cocoa dippers at 22i4c $0 45 

" 10. li/o doz. spectacles at $3.50 5 25 

" 10. 1-12 doz. Bibles at $4.80 40 



Total $6 10' 



VOUCHER No. 494. HOLLWEG & REESE. 
)8. 

1. 40 doz. teacups at 33c $13 20 

1. 12 doz. saucers at 33c 3 96 

1. 8 doz. 10-in. dinner plates at 75c 6 00 

1. 5 doz. 1847 teaspoons at $2 10 00 

1. IS doz. heavy tumblers at 35c 6 30 

16. 6 2-gal. jars and covers at 414c 68 

24. 10 lbs. zubia wax at 3c 30 

24. % gross corks at 60c 20 

30. 1 gross Mason rubbei-s 25 

Total $40 89' 



VOUCHER No. 495. INDIANAPOLIS ICE CO. 

1898. 
Aug. 1. 1 car ice. 19.682. C. C, C. & St. L., 58,000, at 

$2.75 $79 75 

9. 1 car ice. 8,969, L. V., 55,900, at $2.75 76 86 

•' 16. 1 car ice, 2,677, C, C, C. & St. L., 49,600. at 

$2.75 68 50 

" 22. 1 car ice, 2.721, C, C, C. & St. L., 47,000, at 

$2.75 64 63 

" 27. 1 car ice, 2,849, C. C, C. & St. L., 43,000, at 

$2.75 59 13 

Total $348 57 



181 

VOUCHER No. 49G. G. HAUK & SOWDERS. 

1898. 
Aug. 4. 808 lbs. cleaned No. 2 white fish at 4c. 
" 11. 827 lbs. cleaned No. 2 white fish at 4c. 
" 18. 854 lbs. cleaned No. 2 white fish at 4c. 
" 25. 874 lbs. cleaned No. 2 white fish at 4c, 



Less rebate 



$32 


32 




33 


08 




34 


16 




34 


96 




$134 52 




4 


GO 


$130 52 







Total $130 52 



VOUCHER No. 497. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1-12 doz. No. 59 night latch, at $16 $1 34 

50 doz. No. 2 fiber chambers at $4.25 212 50 

12 lbs. 25 auld wire at 5%c 66 

Total $214 50 



VOUCHER No. 498. J. R. RYAN & CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 1. 1 pkg., 6 lbs., stock food $0 50 

3. 100 bu. white oats at 32c 32 00 

3. 700 lbs. cream meal at $1.10 7 70 

Total $40 20 



VOUCHER No. 499. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 
1808. 
Aug. 9. 2,734 lbs. K. R. lard at $5.07 $138 61 



Total $138 61 

VOUCHER No. 500. INDIANAPOLIS ABATTOIR CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 1. 6 beef, 4.420 lbs., at $6.34 $280 23 

5. 6 beef. 4,370 lbs., at $6.34 277 06 

9. 6 beef, 4.374 lbs., at $6.34 277 31 

12. 6 beef, 4,570 lbs., at $6.34 289 74 

16. 6 beef. 3,595 lbs., at $6.34 227 67 

20. 6 beef, 3,815 lbs., at $6.34 241 87 

24. 6% beef, 3,778 lbs., at $6.34 239 53 

29. 6 beef, 4,385 lbs., at $6.34 278 01 

Total $2,111 42 



182 

VOUCHER No. 501. COFFIN, FLETCHER & CO. 

1898. • 

Aug. 4. 50 hams, 1,010 lbs., at §7.45 $75 24 

4. 16 bacon. 102 lbs., at lie 1122 

" 10. 54 hams, 1,000 lbs., at $7.45 74 50 

" 18. 52 hams, 1,000 lbs., at $7.45 74 50 

" 25. 57 hams, 1,000 lbs., at $7.45 74 50 

Total $309 96 



VOUCHER No. 502. M. O'CONNOR & CO. 

1898. 

Aug. 4. 2,000 lbs. rice at 5%c $107 50 

4. 1 bbl. salt. 100 pockets 1 50 

4. 10 bbls. lake salt at 70c 7 00 

4. 112 gals. Sweet Clover syrup at 27c 30 24 

" 4. 283 gals, cider vinegar at 5c 14 15 

5. 720 lbs. Battle Ax tobacco at 24c 172 80 

" 5. 1 box bath bxncks 75 

" 5. 12 doz. 88 scrub-brushes at 65c 7 80 

8. 1,500 lbs. lump starch at 214c 33 75 

8. 1,159 lbs. N. Y. cheese at IVzC 86 93 

8. 200 lbs. Piel's com starch at 2i^^c 5 00 

8. 120 lbs. Church's soda at 5c 6 00 

8. 24 doz. silicon at 67y2C 16 20 

" 10. 30 cs. Yarmouth corn, 60 doz., at 87y2C 52 50 

" 10. 25 bbls. gran, sugar, 8.737 lbs., at $5.65 493 64 

" 11. 70 cs. Yarmouth com, 140 doz., at 87i^c 122 50 

"' 11. 5 bbls. gran, sugar, 1,754 lbs., at $5.65 99 10 

" 11. 12 doz. mop sticks at 55c 6 60 

" 12. 5 bbls. B. oatmeal at $4.25 2125 

" 12. 100 lbs. gr. pepper at 10c 10 00 

" 16. 10 lbs. pearl barley at 3V2C 35 

" 25. 6 bbls. Dingee pickles, 1.200, at $4.20 25 20 

" 25. 1 gross 88 scrub-brushes at 65c 7 80 

Total $1,328 56 



VOUCHER No. 503. OLDS & CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 1. 2,245 lbs. chip soap at SVtC $72 96 

5. 1,335 lbs. chip soap at 3Vic 43 39 

9. 1,355 lbs., chip soap at 3140 44 04 

" 12. 1,395 lbs. chip soap at 3%c 45 33 

" 19. 1,370 lbs. chip soap at 314c 44 52 

" 23. 1.370 lbs. chip soap at 314c 44 52 

Total $2M 76 



183 

VOUCHER No. 504. BROOKS OIL CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 25. 1 bbl. ex. col. Drake cyl. oil, 53 gals., 

at 85c $45 05 

Less 25 per cent, discount 11 2S 

ij!33 79 

Total $33 7& 



VOUCHER No. 505. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 4. 360 doz. eggs at lli/ac $4140 

" 12. 360 doz. eggs at ll%c 4140 

" 22. 360 doz. eggs at lli/ac -4140 

Total $124 20 



VOUCHER No. 506. ACME MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 2. 50 bbls. straight flour at $3.37 $108 50 

2. 25 bbls. straight flour at $3.37 84 25 

" 3. 50 bbls. straight flour at .$3.37 168 50 

Total $421 25 



VOUCHER No. 507. FRANCIS BERGMAN. 
1898. 
Aug, 1. 10 kegs, 1,730 lbs., sal soda at 59c $10 21 

• 

Total $10 21 



VOUCHER No. 508. V. BACHMAN. 
1898. 
Aug. 5. 35 bbls. spring wheat flour at $4.95 $173 25 

Total $173 25 



VOUCHER No. 509. LION COMrRESSED YEAST CO. 
189S. 
Aiig. 31. 67 lbs. yeast at 12Uc $S 37 

Total ,$8 37 



184 

VOUCHER No. 510. J. C. TARKIXGTON. 
1898. 
Aug. 29. 10 gals, chloro-naptholeum at $1.25 $12 50 



Total $12 50 



VOUCHER No. 511. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. To gas consumed during the month of 
August, 1898, 2,600 cubic feet, at 

at $1.25 per 1,000 $32 50 

" 31. Two outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

$35 50 



Total $35 50 



VOUCHER No. 512. WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 1. To Burnsville $0 40 

5. To Fort Wayne 26 

5. To Lebanon 26 

" 17. To Rockville 26 

" 20. To Dayton 26 

Total $1 44 



VOUCHER No. 513. CENTRAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 

Telephone exchange services from July 1 to September 30, inclusive: 

1898. 

Sept. 2. Superintendent's office $21 38 

2. Steward's office 21 38 

2. Gate office 9 00 

2. Pathological office 9 00 

2. Store office 9 00 

" 2. Men's Department office 9 00 

" 2. Women's Department office 9 00 

" 2. Superintendent's private study 9 00 

2. Officers' barn 9 00 

2. Tolls lines for May, 1898 50 

2. Tolls lines for June, 1898 15 

Total $106 41 



185 

VOUCHER No. 514. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 

Aug. 2. Hogan Transfer Co., for hauling range $1 00 

3. Adolpli Ascb, detective, return Henry Van- 
sickle, Chicago 23 25 

5. Merck's Market Report, subscription, 1 copy, 
1898-99 

6. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 

13. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 

17. R. L. Polk & Co., for copy Medical and Surgi- 
cal Directory, 1898 

18. Chas. J. Kuhn Co., for fruit and pi'oduee 

20. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 

23. C. R. Hanger, for return Robt. Sprouse from 

Rockville, Ind 

27. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 

31. L. A. Greinor, for veterinary services . . . 

Total $112 20 

VOUCHER No. 515. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. Main pay-roll for month of August, 1898 $6,959 95 



2 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


13 


25 


10 


00 


8 


70 


10 


00 


14 


00 



Total $6,959 95 

VOUCHER No. 516. KINGAN & CO., LTD. 

1898. 

Aug. 4. 1 tub butterine, 10 lbs., at $8.45 $0 85 

4. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at $8.45. ... 101 40 

11. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at $8.45 101 40 

18. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at $8.45 101 40 

25. 12 tubs butterine, 480 lbs., at $8.45 40 56 

29. IS tubs butterine, 720 lbs., at $8.45 60 84 



Total $406 45 

VOUCHER No. 517. THE YALE & TOWNE MFG. CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 19. 144 No. SVz duplicate kej's, chg. No. 5, 

at 12c $17 28 

" 19. 144 No. 6 duplicate keys, chg. No. 0, 

at 15c 21 60 



$38 88 
Less 25 per cent, discount 9 72 

$29 16 

" 26. 348 resettings at 25c $87 00 

" 26. Replacing worn parts and repairing... 3 75 

90 75 

119 91 
Total $119 91 



186 

VOUCHER No. til8. GEORGE D. HARDIN. 

1898. 
Aug. — . 8,380 lbs. straw at 20c per 100 $16 76 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 515. C. II. M'DOWELL. 
1898. 

:Sept. 4. For services as chaplain $5 00 

" 11. For services as chaplain 5 00 

" 18. For services as chaplain 5 00 

" 25. For services as chaplain - 5 00 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 520. THE INDIANAPOLIS NEWS CO. 

1898. 
Sept. 26. Advertisement, 61 words, 3 times $1 83 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 521. WM. LANGANSKAMP. 
1898. 
Sept. 20. Repairing copper coil and 2 l-in copper nip- 
ples $4 50 

Total 



VOUCHER No 522. KINGAN & CO., LTD. 
1898. 

Sept. 6. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at $8.45 $101 40 

" 13. 30 tubs butterine, 1,200 lbs., at $8.45 101 40 

" 13. 1 tub butterine, sample. 10 lbs., at $8.45 85 

" 21. 45 tubs butterine, 1,800 lbs., at $8.45 152 10 

Total $355 75 



VOUCHER No. 523. PIONEER BRASS WORKS. 

1898. 
:Sept. 19. 1 2%-in. gate valve stem $1 25 

Total 



187 

VOUCHER No. 524. J. R. RYAN & CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 8. 1,000 lbs. fine pearl meal at $1.15 $11 50 



Total .$11 50- 



VOUCHER No. 525. GEORGE J. MAYER. 
1898. 

Sept. 24. 1 No. lYz self-inking stamp $0 50 

" 24. 2 No. 3 self-inking stamps and ink 2 20 

Total $2 70< 



TOUCHER No. 526. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 494 yds. Utica broAvn muslin at lie $54 34 

1. 407% yds. 1/2 pep. bleach, muslin at 6%c. 28 03 
" 20. 20 doz. thread at sac 7 20 

$89 57 
Less 2 per cent 1 79 

$87 78 

Total $87 78- 



VOUCHER No. 527. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 7 prs. lace curtains at $1.25 $8 75 

" 1. 3 pieces gloria ribbon at 35c 1 05 

" , 1. 7-12 doz. curtain poles at $1.75 1 02 

" 1. 1 doz. pole rings 3 50 

" 1. 5-12 doz. curtain poles at $1.75 73 

" 1. 1 lot pole rings 75 

" 1. 5 prs. lace curtains at $1.25 6 25 

" 1. 1 doz. curtain poles 1 75 

" 1. 1 pole ring 3 50 

" 1. 12 pairs lace curtains at $1.25 15 00 

" 1. 3 pieces ribbons at 37i4c 1 13 

Total $43 43: 



VOUCHER No. 528. A. BURDSAL CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 18. 5 gals, gasoline at 12e $0 60 

Total $0 60- 



188 

VOUCHER Xo. 529. THE H. LIEBER CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 6. 1 doz. Flower's 14x28-in. sheet .$3 00 

9. 250 ft. 3-in. assorted molding at 4i,4c 11 25 

" 9. 250 ft 3-in. assorted tints, moldings, at 5c. . . . 12 50 

" 10. 1 French lltho, 13yoxl8 20 

" 10. 35 mounted chromos at 35c 12 25 

" 19. 42 mounted chromos at 35c 14 70 

•* 19. 15 Flower's 14x28-in. sheets at 25c 3 75 

" 19. 474 ft. 1-iu. No. 2555, cr. gt. and blue, at $1.50. 7 11 

" 19. 494 ft. 1 in. No. 2537 gilt at $1.50 7 41 

Total $72 17 



VOUCHER No. 530. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 
1898. 

Sept. 10. 1 doz. 18-in. 3-pronged tinned flesh forks $1 50 

" 14. 150 ft. %-19 Sweden wire rope 5 74 

" 14. 20 lbs. a.s.sorted tacks 1 50 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 531. J. R. BUDD & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 12 cases eggs, 360 doz., at 13c $46 80 

9. 12 cases eggs, 360 doz., at 13c 46 80 

" 20. 12 cases eggs, 360 doz., at 13c 46 80 

" 27. 12 cases eggs, 360 doz., at 13c 46 80 

Total 



VOUCHER No. 532. ACME MILLING CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 25 bbls. winter wheat flour at $3.30 $82 50 

2. 50 bbls. winter wheat flour at $3.30 165 00 

2. 50 bbls. winter wheat flour at $3.30 165 00 

Total $412 50 



VOUCHER No. 533. INDIANAPOLIS CHEMICAL CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 7. 1.000 ll>s. Acme boiler compound at 7%c $75 00 

Total $75 00 



189 

VOUCHER No. 534. V. BACHMAN. 

189S. 
Sept. 2. 35 bbls. spring wheat flour at $3.95 $138 25 



Total $138 25 



VOUCHER No. 535. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 7 cattle, 4,458 lbs., at $G.G7 $297 36 

G. 7 cattle, 4,389 lbs., at $G.67 292 75 

9. 7 cattle, 4,123 lbs., at $G.67 275 00 

13. 7 cattle, 4.571 lbs., at $6.67 304 89 

16. 7 cattle, 4,947 lbs., at $6.67 329 96 

22. 7 cattle, 5,317 lbs., at $6.67 354 64 

28. 7 cattle, 4,562 lbs., at $6.67 304 29 

Total $2,158 89 



A^OUCHER No. 536. CRALL & MEYER. 
1898. 

Aug. 29. 518 bu. potatoes at 45i/4c $235 69 

Sept. 20. 1,640 lbs. iwtatoes at 451/20 12 45 

" 21. 1,750 lbs. potatoes at 45y2C 13 28 

^' 22. 1,660 lbs. potatoes at 45i7^c 12 59 

" 24. 1.770 lbs. potatoes at 451/20 13 42 

" 26. 3,510 lbs. potatoes at 451/2C 26 61 

" 26. 1 bbl. sweet potatoes 1 75 

■" 27. 216 bu. potatoes at 451/2C 98 28 

Total $414 07 



VOUCHER No. 537. GEORGE HITZ & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 3. 1 lX)X lemons $5 00 

^' 17. 1 box lemons 5 00 

Total $10 00 



VOUCHER No. .538. INDIANAPOLIS GAS CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 28. To gas consumed during the month ending 
September 24, 25,900 cubic feet at $1.25 

per 1,000 $32 38 

■" 28. To two outside lamps at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total $35 38 



190 

VOUCHER No. 539. INDIANAPOLIS JOURNAL NE\VSPAPER CO, 
1898. 
Sept. 27. Advertising 10 lines 3 times $2 QO 

Total $2 OO 



VOUCHER No. 540. INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL CO. 

1898. 
Sept. 27. Advertising IM; squares 3 times $3 00 

Total $3 00 



VOUCHER No. 541. .JOHN MARSH & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 30. 1 new gear wheel for elevator $3 50' 

" 30. 4 hours' time, labor, two men 3 20 

Total $Q 79 



VOUCHER No. 542. WM. II. ARMSTRONG & CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 27. 1 single chamois pad truss $1 13 

Total , $1 la 



VOUCHER No. 543. FRANCKE HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 7. 6Mi ft. No. 25 link belting 50 W 

" 10. V2 gross awning liooks at $1.G0 80 

" 21. V2 gross 3Vi: aAvning hooks at .?1.50 75 

" 21. Vn gross 2 awning hooks at 75e 38 

" 21. Car fare 05 

" 21. 2 No. 10 B. & C. punches 65 

Total $3 23 



VOUCHER No. W4. DANIEL STEWART CO. 
1898. 

Sept 21. 1 lb. xylol 4:2 25 

" 21. 1 qt. absolute alcohol 1 50 

Total $3 75 



;91 

VOUCHER No. 545. SCHNULL & CO. 

1898. 

;Sept. 1. G(K) lbs. Piel lump starch at 214c $12 75 

1. 100 lbs. Greenback tobacco, 1^, at 29c 29 00 

1. 10 boxes Ivory soap, 54, at $4 40 00 

1. 1 box, 40 lbs.. Star caudles at Oc 3 60 

" 1. 2 boxes, 5 gross, clothespins at 00c 1 20 

8. 1 bbl. P. W. oil, 52 gals., at 71/jC 3 90 

8. 1 bbl. Bourbon oil, 52 gals., at 12i/oc 6 50 

Total $96 95 



VOUCHER No. 546. WARD BROS. DRUG CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 1 lb. gi-d. cardauion seed $1 15 

1. 5 lbs., 1 jar. m. milk 2 85 

" 1. 4 lbs. spirits nitre at 37c 1 48 

1. 1 lb. F. E. Gerba Santa arom. L 1 08 

" 1. 1/4 lb. oil lemon 70 

" 1. 25 lbs. eprom 50 

1. % lb. subgae bism 85 

" 1. 14 lb. armour scale pepsin 3 90 

" 1. 4 lbs. bt. stronger ammon 48 

" 1. V2 lb. salol 1 78 

1. 2 lbs. chloroform, P. & W.. at .55c 1 10 

" 1. 1 lb. hypophos. lime 1 32 

" 1. 2 lbs. bischrom potas. at 15c 30 

1. 5 lb. flaxseed at 3%c IS 

1. 25 oz. quinine at 22l^c 5 63 

1. 2 oz. menthol at 28c 56 

" 1. 4 oz. wintergreen oil 30 

," 1. 4 oz. phenacetine at 6.5c 2 60 

8. 8 oz. chloralmid at S2c 6 56 

■" 1. 4 oz. antikamnia at 95c 3 80 

■" 1. 4 oz. ammonal at $1 4 00 

*' 1. 4 oz. hypophos. mangenese 60 

" 1. 5 gross 4XX corks 70 

1. 5 gals, alcohol at $2.50 12 50 

1. 1 doz. P., D. Co. caps at 70c 70 

1. 1 doz. P., D. Co. caps at 70c 70 

1. Ys 77 Hyocine hydrobrom., 1-100 L 1 38 

1. 1.000 white sedlitz papers 30 

" 1. 1 pt. oil sassafras 55 

1. 1 pt. oil spike 20 

1. 1 pt. oil hemlock 38 

" 1. 1 pt. oil origanum 35 

" 14. 1^ gal. castor oiUjug 10c) at $1.20 70 



Total $60 18 



192 



VOUCHER No. 547. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 
Sept. 1. 3 boxes IX bright tin $39 00 

Total $39 OO 

VOUCHER No. 548. SWIFT & COMPANY. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 995 lbs. ham at $7.57 $75 32 

2. 3.582 lbs. lard at $4.74 169 78 

8. 1,000 lbs. ham at $7.57 75 70 

" 15. 1.040 lbs. ham at $7.57 79 18 

" 21. 1.07G lbs. ham at $7.57 8145 

" 21. 61 lbs. bacon at $12.00 7 32 

" 29. 1,064 lbs. hams at $7.57 80 54 

Total .' $569 29 



VOUCHER No. 549. THE SINKER-DAVIS CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 22. To putting new bottom in tank in boiler room. 

1,220 lbs. tank steel $30 50 

" 22. New bottom for tank in woman's building and 

iron for breeching, No. 16 steel, 240 lbs 6 00 

" 22. 100 lbs rivets 6 00 

" 22. F. Miller's time on tank and bottoms, 31 hrs. 

at 40c 12 40 

" 22. Wm. Leary's time, 41/0 hrs.. at 40c 1 80 

" 22. Landis. 7 hrs. at 40c 2 80 

" 22. Schieldiemier. 122 hrs. at 40c 48 80 

" 22. Waukel. IOV2 hrs. at 40c 4 20 

" 22. Ed. Leary. oCA/. hrs. at 40c 22 60 

" 22. Nester. 67 hrs. at 30c 21 10 

" 22. J. Jones. 1 hr. at .SOc 30 

" 22. Otto Noublu. 7 hrs. at 30c 2 10 

" 22. Henderson. 54 hrs. at 40c 21 60 

" 22. J. Perkinson. 72 hrs. at 20c 14 40 

" 22. Klein. 5 hrs. at 30e 150 

" 22. Perkins. 1214 hrs. at 30c 3 75 

" 22. Street car fares 3 65 

" 22. Drayage on iron and tools 1 00 

Total 

I 

VOUCHER No. .550. W. C. FRAZEE. 
1898. 
Sept. 30. 4.500 gals, milk for the month ending Sept. 

30. 1898. at 12c $540 00 



$203 50 



Total 



$540 00 



193 



vorcHKU N. 



r.l. OLDS \ roMI'AXY. 



18! >S. 
Sept. 1 
(I 

•• ir. 



1..">7<I llfS. cllip SdMp Mt ;'>'.ic. 

1.4iri Ills, cllip soap at .'{'.jc. 

l.:!7r> lbs. (hi]) soap at '.\Vic ■ 

'2.1. l..'!N."i lbs. chip soap at yVjC. 

I'L'. 1.. ■><;(» lbs. chip soap at oVi^'- 

2(5. 1.140 lbs. chip soap at 8i/4c. 

29. 1.1T."» lbs. chip soap at :PAv. 



$44 r)2 
4.". }t!) 
44 C!) 
4.-, 01 
44 20 

37 05 

38 19 



Total 



$299 65 



VOl'CHKK No. .-).-2. M. OCONNOK .V: CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 2." doz. i)arlor brooms at $1.7."> $43 To 

1. 10 aoz. whisk brooms at 90c 9 00 

2. 4.036 lbs. Gokleu Kio coft'ee at ll%c 174 23 

2. 949 lbs. Imp. tea at 2r.c 237 25 

8. 5." sials. X. <>. molasses at 20c 14 30 

8. 97 jrals. viiiciiar at ~h- 4 85 

8. 108 iials. .M. It. syrup at 18c 19 44 

0. 11 lbs. ciiinamou at 2.X' 2 75 

9. 10 lbs. urd. ciiinauiou at 2."»c 2 50 

1). 2 lbs. celery seed at 20c 40 

9. 4 lbs. un-d. mustard at 15c 60 

9. 3 lbs. whole mustard seed at 9c 27 

9. 1"'4 ll)s. whole mace at 75c 1 31 

9. 1 lb. allspice, "whole" 16 

'.1. 13 lbs. whole cloves at 14c 1 82 

•; 13. 1..500 lbs. rice at S^A- 82 50 

" 10. 188 fii\\s. vinejjrar at 5c 9 40 

" 16. 860 lbs. beans at l%c 14 .34 

" 16. 1.714 lbs. ixvim. su,i,'ar at $5.65 96 84 

" li;. 1 bbl. oatmeal. 200 3 90 

" 20. .'..(1117 lbs. -r.-in. sugar at $5.65 287 98 

" 21. 10 ll)s. 4-X powd. sugar at $6.18 62 

• 21. 11 o lbs. Bakers chocolate at 36c .54 

21. =^4 lb. Dunham's cocoanut at 28c 21 

21. 5 doz. Mason's rulibers for .iiirs at .30c 13 

" 24. 1.3(M» lbs. beans at l%c 21 67 

" 24. 1 libl. oatmeal. 200 3 90 

" 2(i. 3 bbls. oatmeal. fWO 11 70 

" 20. 5 bbls. lake salt at 80c 4 00 

" 26. i/o doz. rolling pins at $1.25 42 

" 29. 64 lbs. N. Y. cheese at 9Uc 6 08 

Total 

13 — Ins. Voucher.^. 



$1,356 86 



194 

VorCUKlt No. .".:,.-!. W.M. H. TIIo.MAS \- CUMI'ANY. 
1898. 

Sept. 21. 3 (loz. spertjules at .1;1.(m» ^3 00 

" 21. 1-12 (luz. spi'<ta<l«'s at $l..">u 13 

" 21. 1-12 (loz. spectacles at $3.n() •_'.". 

•• 21. 1-12 (loz. spectacles at ii;3.rM» 2'J 

Total $3 »37 

vorciiKU No. .-..".4. w.M. P.. r.rui(»ui». 

1898. 

Aug. 10. 1 Ik).x toilet papei- .$1; nti 

'• 10. 100 sh. Imff hlottin;;. wli. sli 4 (Mt 

" 10. 100 sh. Imff hlottiii}.'. cut Vs 4 t»0 

" 10. 25 pro. n4.S Est. Falcon pens 18 7.". 

" !."». 1 gro. 239 Est. i)ens ~~> 

" 25. 1 rm. 6 lbs. uiauilla wrap 2 4<i 

•' 29. 2,500 app. for position 20 7.". 

" 31. l.OtiO response to applications 7 25 

Sept. 1. 2 boxes No. 4 V. H. fasteners 30 

1. 4 boxes N(». 1 E. II. fasteners 10 

1.2 iim. L. I. liens. No. 5 1 9m 

1. 2 penholders, hard rubber .30 

1. 2 penholders. Crown No. 2 <•<• 

" 3. 10 rms. ward paper 17 50 

3. G.CMiO (i»(. 0350 envelopes 4 50 

Total $88 59 

A'orrilEIl No. .">.■>.-.. .FAMES COLLIElt. 
1898. 

Sept. 5. Casket for Mary Duffy. df Tippecanoe Co.. .$7 00 

" 20. Casket for l-Tliza Eancford. of Crawford Co. . 7 00 

Total $14 00 

VOUCHER No. ."..".(I. WESTEWN INION TELE<;RArH CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 10. Telejiiani to Ereedoni. Ind $0 2(? 

" 20. Telef^rani from En>:lish. liid 25 

" 27. Telej:raiii to Terre Haute. Ind 2(". 

" 27. TeleL'rain to Tene Haute. Ind 2t! 

Total .SI 03 

VOrCllEK No. .-..-.7. I. ION C(».MPKESSEl» YEAST CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 1. For i".\ lbs. of yeast iiiontli cudinjr Sept. ."'.n. 

ISOS. at 12'-jc $7 88 

Total §7 88 



195 
vorciii;!: no. r>r,s. j. m. sowpkhs. 

180S. 

Sept. s. TliL' Ills. No. J wiiiU' lish ;it 4c $1'S 88 

•• 1."). T.VJ ll>s. No. -2 wiiiti' fisli :iT 4c :!i> 08 

" ■2-2. TKi lbs li white ti.sli :it 4c 28 40 

" 2U. 814 lbs. 2 wliitc lish ;it 4c 32 56 

."pill) 92 
Less rebate 3 00 

$11G 92 

Total $116 92 

vorcHp:u no. .v.o. hkooks oil company. 

1898. 
Sept. 29. 1 bbl. Ex. Col. Dfake cyl. oil, .52 gals., 

at Soc !?44 20 

Less 2.") per cent, flis 11 0.5 

^33 1.5 

Total $33 15 

VOUCHER No. oGO. WILLIAMS & HUNT. 
1898. 

Sept. <*.. .3.20(t lbs. sal soda at 56c .$17 92 

•• 2i>. 1.6.57 lbs. sal soda at 56c 9 29 

Total $27 21 

VOUCHER No. .561. CONSUMERS' ICE COMPANY. 
IISIOS. 

Sept. 4. Car 321<». ice 34.500 lbs. at $1.75 .$30 19 

5. Car 3778.5. ice 32.100 lbs. at $1.75 28 09 

•• 10. Car 673. ice 44.6rK) ll)s.. at $1.75 .39 03 

•• 13. Car 6<il07. ice 37.200 lbs. at $1.75 .32 55 

• 28. Car 1.52.38. ice .50.000 ll»s. at $1.75 43 75 

Total $173 61 

VOUCHER No. .502. P. F. BRYCE. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 407 lbs. butter crackers at 414c .$21 12 

8. 495 ll>s. butter crackers at 4%c 21 04 

• 15. 495 lbs. butter crackers at iV^c 21 04 

• 22. 491 lbs. butter crackers at 4%c 20 87 

•• 29. 4!M> lbs. butter crackers at 414c 20 83 

Total $104 90 



196 

VUrcilEK No. r.c:;. TK(JV LAI'MiKV MAClllNKUY CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 28. 1 feed apron with chain for Duplex Maufxle. $15 30 
•• 27. 1 rec. apron with chain for Duplex Manjile. . 8 50 

Total .$24 00 

VorCIIKH .\o. .-.tU. K.NKUi r iV .IILLSO.X. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 1 4xliox4 ('. I. tees .- .$0 50 

" 23. 2 pr. No. 2 iralv. sink brackets at •;.-><• 1 30 

" 23. 16 lbs. % s<i. packing (luck at 25c 4 (X> 

" •S.^. ISYj lbs. 1-1(5 Kainhow packing at .">()(• 75 

" 23. 23 lbs. Vs I^iinbow packing at ."xic Il 50 

" 23. 100 ft. 14 in. R. II. cut laces 50 

" 2:'.. Hx> ft. 5-li; in. U. II. cut laces i\P, 

Total $25 18 

VOrCHEll No. .".ir.. .MANrF.VCTT'KERS" NATIUAL (iAS CO. 
1898. 
Sept. 30. (ias service for the month ending Sept. 3<». 

1898 $1,388 89 

Total $1,388 89 

A'OrCHEU No. .-)»;(;. L. E. WEBB. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 4 new shoes $1 50 

" 1.1 shoe reset 25 

" 9. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 14. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 18. 4 new sIkh's 1 50 

" 18. Splice bolt 25 

" 18. Set tire 50 

" 18. Repairs on wagon 75 

" 20. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 2<;. 1 new wheel 4 50 

Total $13 75 

VOI'CllEi: .\o. .-(m. (JE(tK(;E F. EDENll.VKTEK. Superintendent. 
1898. 

Sept. 2. .1. \V. lless. f(»r postage staniiis $25 m 

3. \V. L. Merrilt. for whitewashing 10 00 

" 5. ("has. .1. Kuliu for fruit and pro<luce 12 82 

" 5. ('has. .1. (Jardner for meat. sausag«'S. etc.... 12 88 
8. J. F. IDdsopjile. sub. 5 d. (! S. Sentinel. 2 d. 

and S. .lournal. July-Sept.. 1S9S 1(? 80 

" 8. Dr. Edenharter"s exixMises to and from Chi- 
cago. Ill 16 55 



]1)7 

VOrCIIEK No. riC.T— Continued. 
1898. 

Sept. 10. "NV. L. -Merritt, for whitewiisliiu-- .flo (id 

•■ 14. S. I>. Phillips, sheriff's rerurn of Kobt. Ilorlc- 

nuin. escaped patient f !J."i 

" 15. John Hopkins, press, for Vol. ;"»."> Am. .lonrnal 

of Insanity .l (K) 

" 17. W. I.. Merritt, for Avhite\nishiug- lo <M) 

" 24. AV. L. Merritt, for whitewashina- 10 00 

" 29. Rich »& McVey, for tnnin.u- piano o 00 

Total $140 00 

V0UCHP:U No. .-)C.S. GE()K(;E F. EDEXHAKTEK. superintendent. 

180S. 
Sept. 30. :Main pay roll for mouth of September. 1898. . .$(J.932 9.5 

Total $0,932 9o 

VOUCHER No. .569. Y. BACHAIAN. 
1898. 
Oct. 3. 7 bbls. spring wheat patent Hour at .$3.95. . . . .$27 65 

" 11. 10 bbls. sirt-ing wheat patent flour at .$3.95 39 50 

'• 11. 18 bbls. spring wheat patent flour at $3.95 7110 

Total $138 25 

VOUCHER No. 570. C. E. COFFIN & CO. 
1898. 

To 1 year's rent on Mt. Jackson farm 

of 60 acres, ending Noa*. 1. 1898 $740 OO 

Less cash paid 13, 1898. balance 85 50 

• $6.54 50 

Total $654 50 

VOUCHER No. .571. INDIANAPOLIS LKJHT AND POWER CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 13. To current for arc lights 3 months ending Oct. 

31. 1898 $31 90 

'■ 13. Arc light carboning 3 months ending Oct. 31, 

1898 10 60 

Total .$42 .50 

■ VOUCHER No. .572. NELSON MORRIS & CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 14. 10 tcs. K. R. lard. 3..346 lbs., at .$4.62yo $1.54 75 

Total $1.54 75 



198 

VOUCHER No. 573. MAMFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 

189S. 
Oct. 19. To gas sfiviii,' for The month ending Oct. 31, 

1898 .?l,:i88 89 

Total $1,388 8^ 

VOUCHER No. .j74. CHAS. G. GRAH. ' 
1898. 

Oct. 11. 2 pairs clippers ground $1 00 

" 11. 2 pairs shears ground 30 

" 11. 5 paii-s Ige. shears ground 1 25 

" 11. 2 pairs shears ground 30 

" 14. 2 razors grounil 1 00 

'• 14. 1 pair shears ground 15 

Total $4 00 

VOUCHER No. 575. WM. B. BURFORD. 
1898. 

Sept. 17. 12 do/.. No. 2 A. W. Faber pencils $7 20 

'? 17. 1.000 No. 3 Coin envelopes , 60 

" 17. 100 rolls Otsego toilet 6 00 

" 19. 1.000 clothing cards, 9i^.xlli4, r. and ptd 15 90 

Total $29 70 

VOT'CHER No. .^)7(;. .T. R. RYAN & CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 7. l.(J<JU lbs. tine corn meal at !?1.15 .$11 50 

7. 5 bbls. rye flour at $3.50 17 50 

" 1.3. 10 bu. rye at COc 6 00 

Total $35 00 

VOUCHER No. .")77. PETER NUTZ. 
1898. 
Sept.-Oct. For inciidiiig .")2 pairs shoes .$30 50 

Total $30 50 

VorciIIVR No. .-.78. g. a. CARSTENSEN. 
1898. 

Oct. 2. Services as diaplain $5 00 

" 9. Services as ciiaplain 5 00 

" 16. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 23. Services as chaplain 5 00 

" 30. Services as chapl;ii!i 5 00 

Total $25 00- 



11)0 

VOrC'IIEK Xi.. r.T!i. r.KOOKS OIL CO.Ml'A.W. 
1898. 
Oct. 18. 1 bbl. Ex. Col. Drake c.vl. oil. ."):! j;:ils.. 

at 85c .$4.'. ()."i 

Less '2i^ por ccMit dis 11 ^tl 

Total it.:•,:^ 79 

VOrCHEIi No. .'.Ml. E. H. MCO.MP.. 
1898. 
Oct. 24. 12.") 1(l)ls. winter wheat Straiiiiil IJimr at .S-'i-li.";. .$40;', 7." 

Total $403 75 

YOrCIIEIl No. .381. COFFIN, FLETCIIEU cV CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 6. 56 hams, 1,000 lbs., at $7.40 .$74 00 

• •* 13. 56 hams. 1.000 lbs., at $7.40 74 00 

" 13. 19 Enc. B. B., 1(X» lbs., at .$1.12 11 ,50 

" 20. 53 hams. 1.0(K^t lbs., at $7.4(t 74 00 

Total $233 50 

VOUCHER No. 582. L. E. WEBB. 
1898. 

•Oct. 7. 4 uew shoes $1 .iO 

8. 4 uew shoes 1 .Vt 

" 11. 4 new shoes 1 •">() 

" 12. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 12. Repairing ice hooks 50 

" 15. Repairs on wajron bed 1 .50 

" 15. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 16. Repairing: grocer's wagon 75 

" 18. 4 neAV shoes 1 .50 

" 18. 1 shoe reset 25 

" 20. 4 new shoes 1 50 

Totiil $13 50 

VOT'CHER No. .583. .J. R. BIDD & CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 5. 360 doz. eggs at 15c $54 00 

" 11. 360 doz. eggs at 15c .54 00 

" 19. 360 doz. eggs at 15c 54 00 

" 25. 300 doz. eggs at 15c 54 00 

Total $216 00 



200 

VOTCHKK No. r>iv». KLCIN l»Ali;V CO. 
1S98. 

Sept. ;i(t. 4<i U>s. Imiti-riiU' at S-'V $3 35 

Oct. 4. l.liod lbs. l)utterino at 8%c H.M) 50 

•• 11. l.iidd lbs. Imtterine at S%c 100 50 

" 20. 1.200 lbs. biitterine at 8%c 100 50 

" 25. 1.2(M) lbs. bufU'iiue at S%c 100 50 

Total $405 35 

V0UCHP:1J No. 585. INDIANAPOLIS <:AS CO. 
1S98. 
Oct. 24. To ;:as conttact <lminj^ the luontli endiujj: Oct. 

31. 18!tS. 3.(MIU ruble feet at $1.25 per 1,000. . $37 50 
■• 24. Two outside lauips at $1.50 each 3 00 

Total $40 50 

VOUCHER No. 5S0. INDI ANATOLIS SENTINEL CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 25. Atl. 2 squint's '■', tiuies $4 00 

Total $4 00 

VOl'CIIEK No. .-),N7. CENTKAL UNION TELEPHONE CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 2(1. Telephone service from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31. in- 
clusive, as follows: 

•' 26. Superintendent's office. No. 54!»1 $2138 

" 2B. Steward's office. No. .5492 21 38 

" 26. Gate office. No. 54!i3 9 00 

" 26. Supei-intendent wonians d. office. No. .".494. ... 9 00 

" 26. Superintendent's jirivate study office. No. 5495 9 00 

" 26. .Men's deparlnient office. No. 5496 9 00 

" 2<!. Store office. No. 5497 9 00 

•' 26. Patholosrical office. No. 549S 9 00 

" 2(;. Store office. No. 5499 9 00 

" 26. T<dl servic«' Sept., 1898. Sinitli to Sliipp. to 

Terre HiUite 45 

" 26. T«»ll service. .Vujr. 15. 1S9S. Pettijoliu to I'udd. 

to Millersville 15 

Total $106 36 

V( MCI IKK No. .-.SS. W. C. FKAZEE. 
1898. 
Oct. 31. 4.650 pals, fresh milk at 12c ,$.5.58 00 

Total $558 00 



201 

N'orciiHK .\(p. r>s;>. wakd I'.uos. i>uuc; co. 

1898. 

Oct. 4. 1 .i:ir Ildspilnl .M. milk. .". lbs .$2 8.") 

4. ir> lbs. paratin at l»c 13") 

4. 10 lbs. bromide potassium 4 !MJ 

4. Kl lbs. carbolic acid at li.'x' 2 oO 

4. 2 llts. Ilaydcifs vibiirnm coiiii). at ."tJl.oS 3 IG 

4. 1 lb. soluble citrate iron 62 

4. 1 lb. iodide potassium 2 48 

4. 2 lbs. jiowd. boric acid at ITc .34 

4. lo lb. suli>lio. carb. zinc at 02e 31 

4. 1 lb. F. E. Squills eoinp. for syr. L 1 03 

4. 2 lbs. F. K. ("aseara. ISST. P.. D. ("o 4 2S 

4. 2 oz. eldoralauiid at SOc 1 m 

4. 2 oz. sulfonal at T.">c 1 .~>0 

4. 4 oz. ])henacetiiie at Goc 2 00 

4. 2 oz. autikaumia at 95c 1 9i; 

4. 1 sal. diluted ext. Avitch hazel ~~> 

4. 4 .uro- N'«>- 2!) pill bo.xes at .50e 2 00 

4. 2.J oz. can sul. (juince at 23c 5 75 

4. 4 oz. l)lu«' mass 

4. 5 gross 3XX corks 

4. .") yds. S. & J. T-in. belladoiuia plaster 

4. 500 pills strychnia sulph.. 1-00 ijr. T. 

4. 1 doz. Tromnier's ex. malt with p]. L. oil. 

4. 2 oz. No. 2 capsules. P.. D. ("o 

Total $54 00 



VOrCHKi: No. ."iixi. THE SIXKKK-I>AVIS CO. 
1898. 

Oc^. 3. Lander"s time rolling tlues, O hours .^3 60 

3. Street car fare 20 

" 21. Taking out GO 4-in. tlues. clean, cut and re- 
place" in boiler 80 00 

" 21. Tank boiler 3-lG 48-in. dia.. 515 lbs., at 2i.jC. . . 12 88 

" 21. 12 lbs. 5-16-in. rivets * . . . . 1 20 

" 21. Leary's time putting new bottom in tank. 13i4 

hours at 40c 5 40 

" 21. Goddard's time putting neAv buttom in Tank. 

21% hours at 40c 8 GO 

" 21. .Tones' time putting new bottom in tank, it 

honi-s at 30c 2 70 

" 21. E. Miller's time putting new bottom in tank. 

21/2 hours at 30c 75 

" 21. Hudson's time putting new bottom in tank. 31 

hours at 30c 30 

21. Parkinson's time putting new bottom in tank. 

lOio hours at 30c 3 15 





12 




GO 


o 


00 




51 


s 


45 


1 


40 



189S. 

Oct. lil. 

" 21. 

•• lil. 

•• -24. 

'• 24. 

" 24. 



1S98. 
Oct. 7. 
•• Iti. 
•• 24. 



1S9S. 
Oct. :\ 



20 

20 
40 

40 
50 
15 



$37 


50 


:« 


75 


52 


50 



1898. 
Oct. G. 
fi. 
ti. 

<:. 
•■ ifi. 
•• 1(1. 



1898. 

Oct. 1. 

4. 

•• 1(1. 

2(1. 



202 

NOrcilK'K .\(i. ."'.Ml— ("outimu'd. 

(Jihbons' time imtliny; new Itottoin in t.iiilv, <> 

hours at 2(»c :$1 

.McAllister's time puttiuj; new Ixtttom in tank, 
1 hour at 2(»c 

Street car lares above nu'U 2 

l.eary's time i>uttin,u in copiK'r plugs, 8''!. hrs. 

at 4(ie 3 

4 copper pluj;s 

Street car fares 

Total $135 63 

VOT'CIIEIl Xo. r,91. CONSUMERS' ICE CO. 

Car 8()40. (!(),()<H> lbs. ice at $1.2.") 

Car 8510. 54.000 lbs. ice at $1.25 

Car G1737, 84.0(X> lbs. ice at $1.25 

Total $123 75 

VorclIEK No. .".i»2. HOLLWKC iV KEESE. 

25 (loz. tea cups at o3c $8 

8 (loz. saucers at 33c 2 

i:; (loz. tumblers at I'.oc 4 

Total $15 44 

VorciIKU No. .".!).;. .M. O'CONNOK \- CO. 

1.2(i<i li)s. Piel's starch at 2c 

2SS lbs. Battle A.\e toiiacco at 24t...c 

1(1 bo.\es Lenox soap, per bo.\ $2.75 

lb boxes Ivory soaji. iier box $4.00 

5 boxes Monkey soap, per box $3.50 

12 Ills, liattle Axe tobacco at 24Vl.c 

Total $182 50 

VOT'CIIKK No. .".:M. .IA.MES COLLIER. 

1 casket. I'lo Lon.ir. .NL-irion Co 

1 casket. .Mary HiMlly. .Icuninjrs Co 

1 casket. .\man<la Sommers. Morgan Co. 
1 casket. Eliza rairish. Tipjiecanoe Co. . 

Total $28 00 



2.» 
04 
55 



$24 


00 


70 


50 


27 


50 


4(1 


00 


17 


50 


o 


94 



$7 


00 


7 


no 


7 


00 


7 


00 



203 



VOLCIIKU No. r.it.-.. I.NDIANAI'OMS .lOlKNAJ. NKWSl'AI'KU CO. 
1898. 
Oct. '2n. Ad. in news Id lines :! times .$2 0<) 



TotMl 



?2 00 



VOrClIK-lt Xi.. .".;m;. TIIK I.NDIAXAI'OLIS .\k\vs co. 
1898. 
Oct. 24. All. ;! Times. 8tj words 



.i;2 58 



Total 



$2 58 



V0T'CIIP:R No. .-)!tT. ELLIPTICAL CARBON CO. 
1898. 
■Oct. 22. r,{\{) 7-lC,x"/sXl2 P. L. yperry at ."flG.dO per 1.000 .$5 00 



Total 



$8 00 



1898. 
Oct. 4. 
7. 
•• 11. 
" 14. 
" 18. 
•• 21. 



VOrCHP]R No. 598. CHAS. J. GARDNER. 

3,381 lbs. beef at .$0.20 $209 62 

3.697 lbs. beef at $6.20 '. 220 21 

3.790 lbs. beef at .$6.20 235 35 

3.880 lbs. beef at .$6.20 240 56 

4.052 lbs. beef at .$6.20 251 22 

.3.901 lbs. beef at .$6.20 241 86 

4.022 lbs. beef at .$6.20 249 36 

3.826 lbs. beef at $6.20 237 22 



Total 



$1,894 40 



1898. 


Aii^. 


•J. 


" 


17. 




26 


Sept 


7 


" 


30 


Oct. 


5. 


" 


13 



VOUCHER No. .599. D. H. DAVIS. 

Railroail fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn .$3 40 

Railroad fare, Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

Railroad fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

Railroad fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

Railroad fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

Railroad fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

Railroad fare. Brazil to Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 



204 

VOUCHER No. 509-Continued. 

Aufi. 17. I{:iilr(i:iil f.-ii-c. Ur:i/.il to IiKliMiciimlis and re- 

lurii $3 40 

1808. 

L'o. KailiDiid laic, liia/il to Indianapolis and rc- 

tnrn ;'• 40 

" 28. Itnilroad fare. F.ia/.il Id Indianapolis and re- 
turn 3 40 

31. Kailroad laic. Brazil to I ndiana])olis and iv- 

lui-n 3 40 

31. Meals, hold hills lor the above time !i T.'i 

.".1. Slfeel car lares foi- the ahove lime 1 10 

Total $48 25- 

NOrclIHU .\o. c.iKi. .IAS. .M. SOWDKKS. 
1898. 

Oct. 0. 714 Ills. .No. •_' white lish at 4c .$-JS 7,r> 

" 13. 731 lbs. .No. 2 white fish at 4e 2!l 24 

•' 20. 772 lbs. No. 2 white fish at 4c 30 SS 

•• 27. 711 lbs. No. 2 white tish at 4c 28 44 

$117 12 

Less rebate 3 00 

.i;ii4 12 

Total $114 12 



viH'cnKK .No. cdi. I'.vKKo TT 'r.voc.Mrr. 
isns. 

Oct. 0. S bills, butler crai-kers. .".2.". lbs., at 4i/ie .S22 31 

" 13. 8 bbls. butter crackers, oil lbs., at 4i4f 21 72 

" 20. 8 bbls. butter crnckei-s. .'.20 lbs., at 4Vie 22 10 

" 27. S bbls. butter crackers. ."(U lbs., at 4>Ac 21 42 

Total $87 55- 

VorcilKU No. (■.<i2. GEORGE HITZ <<: CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 3. 1 b(»x lemons $4 50 

o. 50 bu. peaches at $1.30 65 00 

" 14. 1 box lemons 4 50 

■" 22. 1 bbl. sweet i)otatoes 1 50 

" 22. 215 bask«'ts grapes at 13c 27 95 

*• 27. 220 baskets jrra pes at 13c 28 60 

" 27. 1 box lemons 4 50 

Teial $136 55- 



205 



VOrCIIKU NO. Co::, .iames l. khacii. 



1898. 



Oct. ."). .■'iSi' liuslu'ls potatoes at ;!7c. . . 

S. I'dU baskets jirapos at Itc 

11. I'SL'io bushels potatoes at :'.7c. 

l.". l*(i(» baskets lifapes at lie. .. . 

27. l.'i.'i biisliels potatoes at ."ITe. . . 



¥141 


:u 


IS 


<M) 


504 


ry2 


•>•) 


410 


~>~ 


o — 



Total 



$343 21 



is'.ts. 

(Jet. 4. 

4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
4. 
•• 14. 

•■ 14. 
•• 14. 
" 14. 

•• 18 
•• IS 



VOrrilEU No. (J(J4. SCIINULL *: CD. 

I'd bills.. t!.T."'.7 lbs., uraii. siiuai" at 

.><.").(;."( .<;:!Sd (-,4 

4.110 lbs. (loldeii Rio eotfee at 11 k-'" 472 «") 

l.ooo lbs. riee at r>i/4e 52 50 

10 bbls. Akron oatmeal at .fB.OO 39 00 

(■.22 Ills. Cheddar cheese at 9=;4f G(t 05 

1115 lials. cider vinegar at 9e 17 .55 

1o l>bls. lake salt at 70e 7 00 

n4io pils. Kuby syni]» at K'.c IS 32 

\-2 case La B. E.\. IVtit nnishroonis 

at $23.00 11 5o 

2 doz. fey. sifted peas at $1.50 3 <I0 

2 doz. sliced pineapples at $l.l>o. ... 3 SO 
1/^ case .1. Kare 14 k^J? sardines at 

.$12.00 00 

2 lbs. celery seed at 20c 40 

10 lbs. <:rd. cinnamon at 20c 2 OO 

25 lbs. liuht brown sngar at 4'%;C. ... 1 22 

2 lbs. Baker's choc, at 37c 74 

2 lbs. iHinham cocoannt at 27c.... 54 



Cr. l)v overcharge on vinegar. 



$1,077 51 
1 95 



$1,075 56 



Total 



$1,075 56 



A'OrCHFTR No. f.05. TECHEXTIN iV: FRIEBERG. 

1S9S. 

Aug. 17. lo doz. lVi-i»- snaps $0 50 

Oct. 2t;. 1 set single harness 22 00 

■• 20. 1 whalebone Avhip 1 25 



Total 



$23 75 



206 

VOl'CIiKIl No. <;(m;. a. (». lockimim;]-:. 
1898. 

Aug. 4. liiiih-oiiil Ijirc fniiu ( Jrcciicasilc 

4. 'lYausfiT. MH-; IuikIi. 1'(H- 

" 17. Kailrojid fare to and from (Jn'oicastk'. . . 

" IT. Tiausli'v. "ic; lunch, 4(tc 

" 2(1. Railroad fare to and from tiri'i'inastk-. . . 

" ^2^l. TranslVr. lOe; lunch, 50c 

Sept. 7. Kailroad fart' to and from (irci-ncastlf. . . 

7. Transfer 

" 30. IJailroad faro from and to ( Jri'cncastli'. .. 

" 30. Transfer. •_'(»<•; luneh. ."»()c 

Oct. .">. Kailroad fare from and to (ireencasile. .. 

r>. Transfer 

" 7. Kailroad fare from and to Greencastle. .. 

7. Transfer. 2(tc: luneh. $1.10 

1.".. Kailroad fare from and to (Jreeneastle. . . 

13. Transfer, o.jc; lunch, ."x- 

17. Kaihoad fare trom and to Greeneastle. . . 

" 17. Transfer 

" 20. Kailroad fare from and to (Jreeneastle. .. 

" 20. Transfer 

" 28. Kailroad fare trom and to Ureeneastle. .. 

" 28. Transfer, .-'.(le: hotel. .$2.05 

" 31. K.ailroad tare Irom and to (Jreeneastle. .. 

'■ 31. Transfers 



Total $35 70 



$1 


2(1 




r,(i 


2 


4(» 




4.". 


- 


4() 




('•11 


2 


4(1 




20 


•J 


40 




7o 


- 


4o 


•_. 


4(t 


1 


30 


2 


40 




<.H) 


11 


40 




20 


•> 


40 


2 


40 


2 


35 


2 


40 




30 



NOrciIKK .\<i. r,o7. FKANCKK Il.VKUWARE CO. 

1898. 

Oct. 29. 14 do/.. 2 H. wheelharroAvs at $60.00 $15 00 

" 20. 1 doz. l.">t> scoop shovels 13 25 

" 2!t. 1 doz. 3(>-in. sledjre handles at $1.2.". 1 25 



Total $29 50 



VorcilKK .No. t;oS. LION CO.Ml'itKS.^Kh YKAST CO. 

1898. 
Oct. 2'.». »;7 n»s. yeast at 12ii.c $8 37 

Total $8 SI 



207 



1S9S. 
Ocr. .-. 



•lit. 
2!>. 



VorCIIKK No. W!). .MIKPHV. HIF.BEN & CO. 

"'•!V4 yil«- arc-hery brown at .'l.-'lc $2 00 

l.-n yds. butter doth at :!.2f 4 .">!) 

.S.OOO yds. I'tica .IS-in. bro. at lie 330 00 

■JdO ll)s. Sunny Soutli batton at .5c 10 OO 

1(1(1 ('(ibinil)i;i bl:iukfts at .f;..".(t 350 00 

2(1(1 Liidoua bljinki'ts at .$1.75 350 00 

4'J4V, yds. Amos ticking at l-jy^c 53 03 

L'(» doz. (). X. T. thread a1 41c S 20 

Toinl 



.$1,107 82 



VOrCIIKU No. (Jld. W.AI. II. Alt.MSTItONG 

1898. 

Oct. 21. 1 singk' cliamois pad truss. 3(j in., SiiOl. at 

.$1.50. less 25 per cent— 37c 

'• 28. 2 doz. W. C. .T. H. N. bottles at .$lf;.20 

•' 28. V2 doz. No. 2.57 hypo, syringes at .$21.()(J. . . . 

" 28. 2 English ice cups at .50c 

" 28. 4 invalid rings 2 No. 3 and 2 No. S, at .$1..50 

" 28. 1/2 doz. S. R. Rec. tubes at $9.(X) 

" 28. 2 stomach tubes, B. & F., at .$1.35 

" 28. 2 pairs Seis 4 and 5 inch, at 7.5c and .$l.(iO. . 

" 2S. 1 Esmarch bdge. shears 

•• 2S. 1 Wright's P. P. shears 

" 28. 2 plain dressing fcps., long, at 75c 

" 28. 1 bullet prol)e. Al 

" 28. 2 1-yd. rolls oil silk 

" 28. 2 1-yd. rolls gutta I*, tissue 

, " 28. 2 24-inch Kelley pads at .$3.00 

" 28. Vj doz. hosp. size cat gut at .$15.(J0 

Total 



& CO. 



•$1 


13 


'.V^ 


40 


10 


50 


1 


00 


G 


00 


4 


5(^1 


2 


70 


1 


7.5 


1 


.3.5 


'2 


50 


1 


.50 


1 


40 




80 


7 


20 


7 


50 



.$82 98 



VOUCHER No. (111. rilLDEBRAXD HARDWARE CO. 

1898. 
Oct. 29. oVi doz. steel porcelain cups and saucers at 

.$3.00 .$16 .50 

" 29. 9 doz. steel porcelain cups and saucers at 

•$2.75 24 75 

" 29. 1% doz. steel porcelain bowls at .$2.00 3 33 

" 29. 5-6 doz. steel porcelain plates at .$1.80 1 50 

Total 



S46 08 



20s 

VOl.'CHKK No. CIJ. J>. 1'. K'ltWI.X A: CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 20. DHO KM I'iitnd blankets at iXX- .l;lt>2 (M) 

'• L»J. 170 11-4 I'atrol blankets at $1.TJ lltU 40 

" liO. Kio 10-4 Fremont blankets at .Sl.'iO ir.O 00 

" 120. :!.<Miu yds. .".s-in. Iticn at 111- 330 UO 

Tcitai $832 40 

yOUCHKK No. f.l.!. KlI'T I'.KOS. CO. 
1808. 

Oct. -JO. L' iluz. ceiliu.u,- brushes at .$TJ.(t)t .$24 dO 

•■ 20. 2 boxes ]iiiies at 4(lc 80 

Total .1:24 80 

VorCIIKU No. <;14. HIDK. l.H.VrilKK AN1» HKLTlNt; CO. 
1808. 
Oct. 20. .")7i-_. ft. l(i-iu. It. double ••>'oH bell" at 

$2.34 $134 .JO 

" 20. 44M; ft. Ki-iu. It. doubh^ --N'olt lielf at 

.$2.34 ln4 13 

" 29. oGVj ft. Ki-iii. It. dotible "A'olt belt" at 

$2.34 132 21 

$370 80 

Less <!() per cent discount 222 .>4 

$148 35 

'^ 20. 4 sides IJ. H. lace leathers, (id ft 13 13 

Total $161 48 

vorciiKK No. t •,!.-,. (;eou<;e w. stout. 

1808. 

Oct. 20. Ki.iMMt lbs. -ran. suuar at .i;."».:;3 $533 (\0 

" 29. 4.5(Hi lbs. (lolden Kio cofl'ee at 10V4<" 4(il 25 

" 20. 2.(HMI lbs. )iea beans. I*,:'.',., bn.. at $1.15 38 33 

" 20. 2.(KlO lbs. evaiioiated aiiples at 8%c 175 <X> 

" 20. 1.000 lbs. N. Y. cheese at lOc 1(K) 00 

" 29. 150 lbs. clean currants at GV->c 75 

" 20. 120 lbs. A. A: II. 1 11). soda at 5c 6 (X) 

" 20. 1(K> lbs. sifted iLirain pepper at lOc 10 00 ' 

" 29. 50 lbs. powd. sujiar at 5%c 2 81 

" 29. 50 lbs. candied citron at loc 5 00 

" 20. 25 lbs. rearn)arley at 3c 75 

" 20. 25 lbs. tapioca at 3c 75 

" 20. 2(M> trals. cider vinegar at 71/2C 15 00 

" 20. 12 lbs. i>repared mustard at 3(tc .'. tMi 

" 29. 10 boxes 3 Crown L. L. raisins at $1.35 ir, .lu 

" 20. 1 bill. salt. 1iM> packets 175 



I 
VOT'dlKK Nn. c.ir, ('(mtiinTiMl. 
IS'JS. 

Oct. L".l. t; l>l)ls. nili.ufc. l.liilO. jiicUlfs ;it .$:!..".(» .$lil <K) 

•• U'.t. 1(1 lil>ls. liiUf salt at 7(ti- 7 W 

•• lil). H.OCO lbs. lice ;it ."k- 100 00 

" liO. 1. .")(!(! Ills, liiini. s1;ircli at 1"'|<- 20 !',"> 

'• 20. TOO Ills. I'.artlc A.\ toliacco at 20c 203 00 

" 20. l.".(t lbs. (ii-eeiiback siuukiny tobacco at 20c. . . 43 50 

" 20. 2.") boxes Lennox soap at $2.70 G7 50 

" 20. 1(» boxes Brooks' Crystal soap a1 .$:'.. 5o 35 00 

" 20. 10 boxes Ivory soap at $4.oo 40 (M) 

" 29. 2 jii-oss Silicon at -1^(5.50 13 00 

" 20. 12 (loz. Com. mop sticks f<ii- cloth at 02V^c. ... 7 50 

20. 12 (loz. Com. mop sticks for bruslies at tioe. . . 7 80 

*' 20. (i (loz. Kisinji' Snii stove polish at 4.Sc 2 SS 

•• 20. 3 (loz. No. 4 .Mas.iii blacking at 40c 1 20 

•• 20. 1 (loz. IS-oz. cotton mops at .*f2.00. 2 00 

•• 20. 2 (loz. bath bricks at 37M>c 75 

'• 20. 200 (loz. 2^- lbs. Standard Cal. jieaches at 

.^1 ..50 300 00 

Total if;2.254 87 



VOT'CIIKIl No. 010. (JKOKliE F. i:i»EXHAKTEK, Snperiutcndent. 
1S9.S. 

Oct. 1. W. L. .Aleri'itt, for whitewashing- .$10 00 

3. Chas. .T. Kidin Co.. for frnit and iiroduce 7 05 

3. Chas. ,T. Oardner. for meat 1 75 . 

3. National Laundry Journal for 1S07-00. snb. . 2 00 
" 3. P. C. Walton, nianji.. .lanuary-.lnly. ISOS. sub. 

X. Y. rolyclinie 1 17 

" 5. A. O. Lockrids'e. expenses to Omaha and re- 
turn. Charity Organization 30 10 

S. W. L. Merritt. for whitewashing- 10 00 

" 10. I). Appleton & Co.. for 180S sub. to .Journal of 

Experimental Medicine 5 00 

" 15. AV. Iv. Merritt. for whitewashin.u 10 00 

*' 15. James AY. Hess, for postage stamps 25 00 

•■ 22. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

" 25. I.,awrenee Jones, labor boiler house 2 nigrhts. . 3 00 

•' 25. The Robert Clarke Co. for medical books. ... 7 25 

*' 27. Chas. J. Kuhn Co. for frtiit, produce 7 60 

" 28. Chas. J. (Gardner, for meat, etc 5 83 

" 28. Wilbur Austin, for expressage and freight 

charges 5 94 

" 29. A. Cook, for 7 nights' labor in boiler shop. . . . 10 50 

" 29. W. L. Merritt, for whitewashing 10 00 

Total $162 25 

14 — Ins. Voichers. 



210 

VOUCHER No. r.lT. (JKOKCK F. EDENHARTER. Superinteudent. 

1898. 
Oct. 31. Mnin iia.violl lor iiioiitli of October. 1898. .$0,878 2o 

Tol;il $6,878 2;> 

$227.0(X> 00 
Loss colli iiiu'i'iu cMsli 2.0<X) 00 

Total li-oiii luaiiitciKiiicc fund .i;22.".Or»0 00 



EXHIBIT Xo. 17. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Repair Fund 
During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1S98. 

VOT'CIIEU No. 1. A. 11. .MKYKK iVc CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 30. 1.") hu. lime, at I'fic .$:i (lO 

" .30. 1 1>1»1. Ncwhui-;:- i)last«>r 1 75 



Total $4 75 

VOTCIIEIt No. 2. FKANCKE A: SCIIINT)LEK. 
1897. • 

Nov. 19. 1 door bell 

" 19. 1 revolviiijr belt puiuli 

27. l.miO ft. 2-l(5xl(> plcluic li.Kkini:- 

27. l.(i<M» ft. 2-ir;xl2 picture backiiii; . 

27. 2().(i«M» 42 br. nails at 2.")c 

27. .") ;rr()ss 3-porc. ])ictnre nails at $T 

27. l.(MK) yds. tinned W. i)icture cord 

27. 10 jiross 110 wire screw-eyes at 1."h- 

27. 10 jj;ross 112 wire serew-eyes at 12',oc. . . . 

27. lo ;?ros.s lOtJ wire screw-hooks at 44c. . . . 



.•?1 


.")0 


1 


.10 


7 


.")0 


1 


.50 


."» 


m 


5 


00 


3 


30 


1 


.5(t 


1 


2.5 


4 


40 



Total $38 45 

VOUCHER No. ;;. IXI »I.^X.U'Ol.IS .MFd. AND CARP. UNION. 
1897. 

Nov. ."{o. l.fMMi ft. cicai- iiinc. 1.\12-H; 

" :{(t. 1.0.50 ft. \\U ash flooring' 

*' .".o. 2 poplar posts turned. 8x8-5 

•' 30. 40 poplar balusters. 20-2x2-1.5. 20-2x2-20. 

Tot.ii $110 20 



$.50 00 


52 


50 


3 


70 


4 


(M) 



211 

VOT'CIIKTI .M). 4. A. lU'ltltSAIy ("(). 
IS'JT. 

Nov. l(i. S jiJils. yjisoliiif .<;i 2(1 

" 30. 1 lit. No. tilMIO ]);ili' ;;(.1(1 2 (10 

" 30. 1 11>. No. KMio silver ] CO 

" 30. 1 lb. No. 4(100 c-opper 1 (iO 

Total $0 40 

A'CJl'CIIEi: No. .-.. DANIKI. STKNYAUT CO. 
1807. 

Nov. 30. 22S Ills. ('. wliilr -liic .$27 .-.C 

" 30. 50 gals, spirits iur|)cnliiic 17 7."i 

Total .$4.j 11 

VOUCHER No. (i. IXL>I.VNA1'(»LIS TAINT AND COLOR CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 20. 53.4 gals, turpeutiut' at 33i/oc .$17 S!> 

•' 20. V2 bbl. Adams' 8 W. W. brushes i;j 05 

Total .$30 94 

VOrCHER No. 7. L. E. WEBB. 

1807. 

Nov. 4. Repairing lamidry wagon .$0 7."> 

4. Set 2 tires 1 (lo 

" 4. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 4. liepairs on wagon 75 

'■ 10. lU doz. 30-in. frames 4 50 

10. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 13. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 13. Reitairing wheel 50 

• " 13. R<>pairiug :; la. I' 35 

" 10. 4 new shoes , 1 5(i 

" 20. Repairing wagon bed .10 

*' 20. Resetting 2 shoes .50 

" 2(\ Repairing ice hooks ,35 

27. 1 shoe i-eset 25 

" 27. Re])airing wagon rod 15 

" 29. 4 new shoes 1 50 

•• 2!». Sharpening 4 ))icks 00 

Total .$20 70 

VOUCHER No. 8. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Superintendent. 
1807. 

Nov. 30. Repair ))ay-roll for month of November. 1807. $600 85 

Total .$600 85 



212 

VOUCH KK No. ;t. L. K. WKI'.B. 
1807. 

Doc. 10. 4 slioL's ri'st't $1 fX» 

*' 10. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 14. 8 shoes reset •_' 00 

" 18. 8 shoes reset 2 00 

" 21.4 new shoes 1 TA) 

•' 21. S new shoes .'^ 00 

'* 22. S new shoes 'A no 

" 24. S shoes reset 2 00 

" 27. S shoes reset 2 00 

" 27. 4 new shoes 1 ~>0 

" 27. 8 shoes reset 2 no 

" 27. ^Makinjr 41 tools for latlie ."Jo 7.1 

Total .$52 25 



VOUCHElt No. 10. THE SINKI•:l:-I)A^•IS CO. 
1807. 

Dee. 20. 1 new da nip for head, as per old one .S.3 40 

20. 1 new shaft for spider, and Vtabbitt. 2 boxes. . 2 75 

20. 2 new holts, as per old ones .50 

Total $6 65 



VorcHEK No. 11. F.ALKE-KU.\rSS CO. 
1807. 

Dec. 1.5. ino feet 1-iu. Avalnnt .1:12 00 

•• 15. KtO feet lV--in. walnnt 12 00 

•• 1.5. IS balusters .-,() 

Total $30 30 



VOUCHER No. 12. CEOKCE F. EDENHAltTEK. Superintendent. 
1897. 
Dec. 31. IU>i>air iiav-roll for December. 1S07 .1:012 05 

Total !?012 05 



VOUCHER No. V.l A. B. :^^•:YER & CO. 
1898. 

Jan. :?. 8 l)bls. cement at .$3.15 .»;25 20 

3. 1 bbl. fire clay 75 

" 3. 15 bn. lime at 17c 2 .55 

Total .$28 50 



213 

TOUCHER No. 14. FKANCKE HARDWAKE CO. 

ISOS. 

Jan. IS. 1 mortise latrli nnd kiiolt $0 75 

" 18. 1 door bt'U 90 

" 18. 2 belt punches at 3Uc 60 

" 18. 1 mortise nijiht lateh 1 25 

" lit. 1 door cheek 3 .50 

" 19. 2 ni.ulit latches at . 1^1.25 2 50 

Total $9 50 

YOrciIEK No. 15. CLEMENS VONNBGUT. 
1898. 

Jan. 20. (i wood ornaments $2 40 

■• 20. 4 F. 5i/.x7-in. ornaments 20 

Total $2 60 

VOUCHER No. 10. H. J. REEDY ELEVATOR CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 18. :Machinist time, 16 hoiu-s, at 65c $16 90 

" 18. 4 cast-iron racks, ISVa each, at 5c 3 10 

Total $20 00 

VOUCHER No. 17. CHARLES F. WEHKING. 
1898. 

Jan. 20. Brick mason's time, 36 hours, at 60c. $21 60 

" 20. Helper's time, 36 hours, at 30c 10 80 

" 20. Cement 1 00 

Total $33 40 

VOUCHER No. 18. L. E. WEBB. 
1898. 

Jan. 1. 8 shoes reset $2 00 

" 1. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 12. 8 bolts. 17 in. long 2 00 

" 12. Repairs on wagon 50 

" 12. Repairs on ice hooks 75 

" 16. 8 shoes reset 2 00 

" 16. 4 new shoes 1 50 

'• 20. Stay-chain hooks 25 

" 20. King bolt 50 

" 28. 8 new shoes 3 00 

•' 28. 3 frames, 28-in 2 25 

" 28. Repairing ice hooks 35 



Total $18 10 



214 



VOUCHER No. 10. GEORGE F. EDEXHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Jan. 31. Reiiair pMv-roll for January. 1898 .$570 00 



Total 



$570 00 



VOUCHER No. 20. .70HN W. COONS. 



1898. 



Feb. 24. To 1 top for 5-gal. chemical fire-extiug., ex- 
press charges, etc $1 50 



Total 



$1 50 



VOUCHER No. 21. ALDEN SPEARES' SONS & CO. 



1898. 



Feb. 8. 406 lbs. weatherproof ast. cold water paiut at 

OV:!C $26 39 



Total 



$26 39 



VOUCHER No. 22. THE SIMPLEX ELECTRICAL CO. 



1898. 



Feb. 19. 1 m.-ll). Western iron repd.. seual 0272-0101. $2 00 

" 19. 3 71/2-lb. Western iron repd.. senal 022-021 6 00 

" 19. Expressage 1 93 



Total 



$9 95 



VOUCHER No. 23. SCHULTZ A: SOMMERS. 
1898. 

Feb. 26. Plasterers. 17 hours, at 45c. per hour... 

26. Lathing, 10 hours, at 30c. per hour 

" 26. 61/2 bbls. Adamant plaster at $1.05 

" 26. 1,100 lath 

26. IVa bbls. scim at 75c 

26. Plaster Paris 

26. Nails 



$7 


65 


3 00 


6 


80 


2 


50 


1 


15 




20 



Tot.-il 



$22 0." 



VOUCHER No. 24. .TOIIN MARSH .Vc CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 28. 1 new gear wheel for elevator $15 00 

" 28. 12 leathers for elevator valv»«s 15 00 



T(.tal 



$30 CHI 



21 o 

VOUCHER No. 25. BALKE-KKAUSS CO. 
1S9S. 

Feb. 9. 3 piec-t'S 10-10 10. 240 ft., oak 

9. pieces 10-10 8, 399 ft,, oak. (US ft.. 

at .>f2.50 .$16 20 !f;i<; 20 

•' 24. 2 1)1 .Is. Newark plaster 4 50 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 2(3. KIRKHOFF BROS. 
1S9S. 

Feb. 8. 159 ft. li^-in. yalv. pipe $15 90 

8. 70 ft. %-iu. galv. pipe 4 90 

8. 142 ft. 14-in. galv. pipe 8 52 

" 8. 1 1-iu. brass gate valve 1 25 

•• S. 6 %-in. brass solder nippers 1 20 

8. 13 1-iu. galv. tittings 1 30 

S. 14 %-iii. galv. fittings 1 00 

8. 12 i/o-in. galv. fittings 60 

8. 10 lbs. -wiping solder 2 50 

8. 2 plumbers' ;-.nd helper's time 42 00 

Total 

VOUCHER No. 27. THE M'ELWAINE-RICHARDS CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 1. 24 l-in. lip unions .■ |1 29 

" 1. 24 lx74-in. eoupliugs .32 

1. 24 lx74x% C. I. tees 71 

1. 24 1-in. R. & L. couplings 39 

" 1. 24 %-m. R. & L. couplings 32 

*' 1. 24 i/i-in. R. & L. couplings 16 

1. 24 1-in. St. ells 08 

1. 24 %-in. St. ells 44 

1. 24 Ti-in. St. ells 32 

1. 24 vi-iu. C. I. ells 34 

1. 12 i/4-in. l)rass unions 75 

1. 24 i4xVs-in. brass bushings 42 

1. 24 1-in. C. I. ells 43 

1. 24 1-in. C. 1. tees 62 

1. 24 1-in. mal. ells 52 

1. 24 1-in. gal. ells 90 

1. 24 i,.-in. gal. ells 40 

1. 12 2-in. gal. -ells 1 21 

1. 12 2-in. C. I. ells 58 

1. 24 lx"4-in. bushings 23 

1. 24 "4-in. lip unions 1 06 

1. 6 1-in. gate valves 3 00 

" 1. 12 ft. 14-iu- brass pipe 1 65 

" 1. 12 ft. Vis-iu. brass pipe 1 70 



$20 7a 



$79 n 



216 

VOrCHER Xi). liT— CouiimiiMl. 
1898. 
Feb. 1. L'4 ft. i/4-iii. niblxT i lilting- 

1. 1<M» sink bolts 

1. 24 brass closet screws, W. washers. N. P. .. . 

1. 1") lbs. l>ar Tin 

1. 1(H) lbs. white waste 

1. 1(10 ft. 1/4 cut laces 

1.1 pr. (j-in. Pease's comb pliers 

1. 1 pr. lO-in. Pease's coml) pliers 

" 1. 1 washer cutter 

" 1. (J frames for lOiu. twine 

1. 1 Jan. for (>-in. Stillson 

1. 12 .lunihd liui'ners 

1.1 Xiiiuara 1 turner 

1. 1"J Cornell basin, Cox 

1. t> 2-in. Bickett's vent elbow 

1. 12 Coler's rubber closet connections 

1. 12 Ohliger's rubber basin connections 

1. 12 VL'-in. gate valves 

12 l^-in. Jenkins Bros.' angle valves 

1. (j 1-in. W. AY. rad. valves, Jenkins Bros 

1. G %-in. AV. W. rad. valves. Jenkins Bros.... 

1. 1 48-in. Stillson wrench 

1. 2 (>-in. Snow's patent clamps 

1. 210 8-12 ft. %-in. galv. piix' 

1. 209 10-12 ft. li/4-iii. galv. pipe 

1. 211 ft. IVo-in. galv. pipe 

" 4. ;'. 4-in. expansion flue brushes 

8. 24 rubber seats for M. 3V»4 at 10c 

" 8. I Alford pat. hand vise 

" 8. 2 8-in. Snow's patent clanii)s 

" 12. 50 ft. lVi>-in. 4-ply Eng. hose 

15. 12 l(jxi(iXlO cesspool, witli l)ell trap and 

grating, at $1.75 

•• 10. 63 sheets 1-16 asbestos B. card, 305 lbs., at 6c. 

" 17. 5 sheets 1-16 asbestos B. canl. 21'-. ll)s.. at 6c. 

•' 28. 50 ft. 14 rubber tubing 

" 28. 50 ft. % rubber tubing 

" 28. 50 ft. iv, rubber tubing 

" 28. Kejiaii-s Ut\- ball cocks for ;iut. tanks 

'i'otal $184 30 

voT'cm:i: no. 2s. .\. hikijsae co. 

1898. 

Feb. 8. 5 gals, gasoline at 15c .$0 75 

" 26. 8 1-pints white enamel at 45c 3 60 



.$0 


50 




30 




80 


2 


40 


<i 


00 




36 




75 


1 


00 




55 




79 




23 




40 




60 


16 


50 


3 


00 




60 




50 


3 


12 


4 


94 


(} 97 


5 


67 


6 30 


1 


00 


6 


12 


11 


04 


14 


88 


6 


00 


2 


40 


1 


50 


1 


30 


7 


50 


21 


00 


18 


30 


1 


29 


2 


00 


3 


00 


3 


25 


2 


50 



Total $4 35 



217 

VOUCHER N(.. •_'!). GEOliCJE F. EDENIIAKTEU, SuiKM-intendont. 
1898. 
Feb. 28. Itcpiiir piiy-mll for FfliniMry. 181)8 $r>9G 00 

Total $596 00 

A'OUCHER No. 30. FEKTIG & KEETEKS. 

1898. 
Feb. 28. To to\u-hinjr up froscoing .'j;21 00 

Total $21 00 

VOUCHER No. 31. L. E. WEBB. 
1808. 

P>b. 1. 4 new shoes $1 50 

1. 2 draw-bands 2 00 

" 1. Repairs ou spring .seat 50 

" 1. 8 new shoes 3 00 

Total $7 00 

VOUCHER No. 32. MARTIN J. O'REILLY. 
1898. 
Mai". 24. To 4 new shoes $1 50 

Total $1 50 

VOUCHER No. 33. DANIEL STKWART CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 2. 425 lbs. putty bladders at l^Ac $6 88 

*• 2. 50 14-15 gals, boiled oil at 41c 20 89 

2. 50 gals, turpentine at 3<jV2C 18 29 

Total $45 56 

V0T:CHER No. 34. L. E. WEBB. 
1898. 

Mar. 10. 8 new shoes $3 OO 

'* 10. 2 new shoes 75 

" 10. 8 neAV shoes 3 00 

" 24. Set 1 tire and repah-s on wagon 1 25 

" 24. Repairs on spring seat 40 

" 28. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 28. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 30. Repairs on tunnel wagon 2 00 

Total $16 40 



218 

VOUCHER No. 3r>. CiEORGE F. EDEXIIARTEIt. Supeiintendent. 
1898. 
Mar. 31. To n-pjiir pay-n.ll for nioiitli of March. ISUS. . .$014 90 

Total $614 90 



VOUCHER No. :{<]. WM. MUECKE. 
1898. 
Apr. 21. To paintinf: walls in new kitchen, to 'i coats. 

l)er contract .$'J."> <»' 

21. To paint inj; gas-honse roof and fonndation. '.i 

coats and 2 coats, per contract 21 8.'» 

" 21. To part of ceiling in wash-house 1 4<l 

" 21. To painting morgue, per contract l."!i 00 

Total $G3 25 



VOUCHER NO. 37. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 
1898. 

Apr. 20. 15 bu. H. lime $3 (Kj 

'• 20. 1,000 No. 1 lath 2 25 

Total $5 25 



VOUCHER No. 3S. WM. EURICH. 
1898. 

Apr. 29. 1 front oven plate 

" 29. Yi top oven plate 

" 29. 2 long center irons 

" 29. 2 short center irons 

" 29. 1 l)ack lining strip 

" 29. 1 long center support .$8 40 $8 40 

" 29. 1 full set of Hre-brick linings 1 95 

" 29. 4 stove rods 50 

20. Fitting and repairing same 5 60 

Total $16 45 

(All for No. Richinond range.) 



VOUCHER No. 39. HKRNIIARIVr <V: 1>AMMEL. 
1898. 
Apr. 4. To half carload crushed stone $10 00 

Total $10 GO 



219 



VOUCH Kli Xu. 40. L. E. WEBB. 

189S. 

Apr. 4. To 4 new shoos .$1 50 

" 4. Set-screw for planor 50 

" 12. 8 new shoes 3 00 

12. 4 new shoes 1 .50 

" 12. Phite for I'liHiter 40 

" 18. Steel in pipe tonjis 50 

" 18. Kepairs on waicon 50 

" 18. 6 hip links 25 

■• 23. Iiepairin.i; wheel 75 

•• 23. Setting tire 50 

Total 



$9 40 



VOUCHER No. 41. CHARLES F. WEHKING. 
1898. 
To buildini? foundation for regulator house: 

Mar. 21. To briclunason's time. 21 hours .$12 60 

•• 21. To tender's time. 21 hours 30 

•• 21. To mortar furnished 2 50 

Total 



$21 40 



VOrCHER No. 42. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Apr. 30. Repair pay-i-oll for month of April. 1898 .'?613 50 



Total 

VOUCHER No. 43. THE SIXKER-DAVIS CO. 
1^98. 
Apr. 5. To 1 cutter as per old one, and 1 disc like 

sample .$4 40 



.$G13 50 



Total 



$4 40 



VOUCHER Xo. 44. DAXIEL STEWART CO. 



1898. 








pr. 2 


20<i lights. 


18x24. D. S. 


A 


•) 


2(M> lights. 


.5x11. D. S. 


A. 


•> 


IOC* lights. 


8x10. D. S. 


A. 


•> 


100 lights. 


13x1.3. D. S. 


A 


o 


lOo lights. 


14x28. D. S. 


A 


2 


100 lights. 


24x36, D. S. 


A 


o 


100 lights, 


24x48. D. S. 


A 


2 


ICMJ lights. 


.30x36. D. S. 


A 



.$81 00 .$81 00 



Total 



$81 00 



220 

VUltllEIi No. 4.",. MAKTIN J. OKKILLY. 
1898. 
May 18. Sliociusr liorsc. 4 now shoes .SI r»<) 

Total $1 r>() 



VOTCHKU No. 4(;. I.KWIS .TONES. 
1898. 
May 9. 5<» loads saml at loc $5 00 

Total $5 00 



VOUCllEK No. 47. W.M. LAN( JSKNKAMP. 
1898. 
May .3. Repairiuc: coffee kettle .<:42 <hi 

Total .S42 00 



VOUCHER No. 48. CHARLES KRAUSS. 

1898. 

May 26. To 1 ih'W T-lt. driven well piuui) $5 00 

" 2*'.. llei)airiii.ir .". puiiips. handles, ete 3 50 

Total $8 50 



VOUCHER No. 49. (UCOIUJE F. EI»ENHARTER. Superintendent. 
1898. 
May 31. To n-i'air pay -roll for May. 1S9S $602 90 

Total $«302 90 



V0T'CHF:R No. .-hi. THK SINKKlt I»AVIS CO. 
1898. 

May 27. To lM)rin.L' sinttinjr ho.x for i,-in. pk.ir .$0 2.". 

27. To 1 new brass irland antl new steel v.-ilve 

stem 4 .30 

" 28. To iMM'hip stuffinp 1m)x for Vj-in. pk;jr 25 

" 28. 1 new brass ^rland :ind new stii-l valve stem. . 4 30 

June 2. Borin;; and babbitinj; and reborini: rod box. . 3 75 

Total $12 85 



221 



1808. 



\v 



XOrciIKK X... .".1. L. K. \\'KHH. 



Sliiicinu 1 liorsc. 4 new shoes . 
SliDciim- l' Iku'scs. S new sliot's 

Kt'imiriiiii' li ice IkkiI^s 

Ki'p.-iirinu w .-moii 

1 do/.. (Iniihlc pipe liaiiiicrs 

Kt'imir wnuoii 

1 \'Ml\r wiciicli 

l{i'I>;iir siiijilt'tri'e honks 

Shot'iii.i;' horses. 4 iipav shoes . . . 
Slioeiii^ii' horses. S new shoes . . . 
Slioeinsi' horses. 4 new shoes . . . 

.". (h';iw-lp;in(ls U)V t\:\ix poh' 

Kep.-ui'in.u' corn iilow 

Shjirpcninu (i ice liooks 

Shoeinj;- horse, 4 new shoes . . . 

Shiirpenin.i;' .". cMi)e chisels 

Sharpenin.ii' hiirrow teeth. 4."»... 
Hook on sin.uletree 



Total 



$1 


.".() 


.". 


(N) 




•.HI 




.")lt 


4 


80 




.'O 


1 


li.'. 


1 


.-.0 


P, 


0<) 


1 


.")0 


1 


50 


2 


00 




00 


1 


.-.0 




:;(> 


1 


2o 




15 



$2G 50 



1898. 



VorCHKIt No. .■.2. H.VLKE tV KKAT'SS TO. 



May 24. l.OtH* ft. stock boards .'i;iS 00 

" 24. 270 ft. 1-in. poplar at 20c TIN 

June :;. 724 ft. 1-in. poplar at 20e 18 82 



Total 



$44 00 



VOrCHEK No. 5.3. TECHENTIX ^t FREIBERG. 
1S08. 

June 4. 1 111', ti'aces and hames .$5 00 

'■ 4. 2 crtip]ier loops 20 



Total 



$5 20 



VOT'CHER No. rA. KXKillT i^- .TILLSOX. 
1808. 

June 7. 12 1 Jenkins (ilobe valves .$11 70 

" 11. 207 0-12 ft. 114 galv. pipe 11 01 

" 11. 200 .5-12 ft. 114 Byers" pipe G 81 

" 11. 24 "1x5 niiniles 29 

*• 11. 24 1\4\% tees, -alv 1 40 



00 



\(>r('lli:K \(i. r»4— Continupd. 

isns. 

June 1 1 . 24 li/4x% j^alv. I'lls $1 15 

•• 11. 24 lx% galv. oils 60 

" 1 1 . Ii4 lx=H gsilY. tees 75 

•• 11. L'4 -VixVj «iil V. tees 55 

" 1 1 . 24 %xVo jralv. ells 49 

" n. c. 11 J siiilv. lip unions 87 

" 11. 12 1 '4 .ualv. lip unions 1 35 

" 11. 12 1 fxalv. lip unions 96 

" 11. 24 % .i;:>lv. lip unions 1 54 

" 11. 24 i/L' salv. lij) unions 1 27 

" 11. 12 IVi fin. brass union ells, male 5 38 

" 11. 12 % tin. brass union ells, male 3 27 

" 11. (i 1 tin. brass imlon ells, male 2 02 

'' 11. 12 ^'i comp. stop. S. B. I. r 4 03 

" 11. 12 2 fialv. union ells, male 16 

" 11. 100 % Bibb, washers. til)er 

" 11. lOO Vj Bibb washers, fiber 

" 11. lOO % Bibb washers, fiber 

" 11. 100 % Bibb washers, fiber $0 50 50 

" 11. 18 % Jenkins anjrle valves 11 29 

" 11. 3 2 Jenkins horz. eh. valves 6 41 

" 11. 3 2 P. & O. gate valves 10 80 

•• 11.6% Fuller hose nozzles 3 30 

" 11. 1 lb. •■'•i rubber hose Avashers 15 

" 1 1. 1 24 Stillson wreneh 2 00 

" 11. 1 Xo. 2 Samiders" center 1 80 

" 11. <i lx% (iem mixers 1 20 

" 11. (I No. 6 Gem mixers. N. P 1 20 

" 1 1. 1 M- solid dis., 2 l-12x2i/o 40 

" 11. 1 % solid dis., 21-12x2yo 40 

" 11. 1 1 solid dis.. 2 1-I2x2y^ 40 

•' 11. 1 1 14 solid dis.. 2 1-12x21/2 50 

" 11. 112 Diston cast-steel compass saw 30 

" 11. 24 y, C. I. ells 

" 11. 24 1 C. 1. ells .fill 111 

" 1:5. 1 .'! screwed draiua.ni- running trap.... 

" 13. 1 2 screwed draina,i;e running trap. . . . 

" 13. 12 3x2 screwed drainajie Y branch.... 

" 13. 2 3 screwed drainage long turn cll 

" 13. 2 2 screwed drainage long turn t'll 

" 13. 2 3 screwed drainage. 4.")(), ell 

" 13. 2 2 screwed drainage. 450. ell 

" 13. 12 % Jenkins (Jlobe valves .$23 .35 23 35 



Total $120 79 



223 

VorCIIKli Xn. ",. CLKMKXS VONNKdl'I'. 
ISOS. 
JUIU' !t. •_' tloz. S'A', Vru. tlllllblci- locks. ;it $TJ. . .$124 (H> 
S>. li do/,. ST.") Vru. lunililcr locks ;it $17... ;!4 00 

$r>,s 00 

Less 4.". ]KM- <-ciir 2(i 10 

.f:n !K) 

•• 14. !.">(» Ii. ■is-T.> wii-i' rope :it $:'..<;o ."> 40 

•• J4. km; U.S. li' A. P.. clin iwinc Ml li:'.c 24 38 

Tot.Ml $61 68 



VOUCHKR No. .",(;. ("ONSOLI HATED ("OAL AX1> Ll.MK CO. 

ISIKS. 

June s. l.doo white iiiiii' laths .$:i -J.") 

8. l.") l.u. liiiu- 8 (X3 

S. f, bl.ls. Star ceiiieut at $:r!.ir) 18 00 

8. -J. bills. Xcwark iilastcr 4 00 

Total $28 15 



YOUCHEK No. .",7. THE SIXKEK-DAYIS CO. 
1S08. 

June 7. To 1 iron itiillc.v. Ur.xti-in.. 1 lo-ic, $4 1.") 

" 9. To .urindiii.i:' :.' planer knives, l^-j lionrs 3 7") 

Total $7 90 



VOUCHER Xo. 58. HENRY COBURX LUMBER CO. 
1898. 

.Time G. 2.O00 ft. 1x12-10 No. 1 com 

6. 1,(KX> ft. 114x12-12 No. 1 pop 

G. 1,0(X) ft. 11/0x12-12 No. 1 ash 

G. 12.> pieces 2-8x.3y4, 16 ft., .J. T. floorins..$llG (m ."fllG (m 

G. 1,1(10 ft. 2x12-12 and 14 clear oak at .$:',..")0 ,38 .50 

Total .$155 15 



VOUCHER No. .59. CHARLES F. WEHKING. 
1898. 
Apr. — . 2.800 brick at .$5 .'?14 00 

Total .$14 00 



224 
VOUCHER No. 6U. L. E. WEBB. 



1898. 

June 4. 2 new shoes 

" 8. Repairs on lauiidiy wagon . 

'• 12. 8 new shoes 

" 12. 1 iron spring seat 

" 12. Sliarpening 8 sliovel plows . 

" 12. Repairs on fender ,,.,.,.,, ,,^ . 

. ' , '"'•■ Mil)] ' 

" 10. Repairs on laundry wagon'"» 

" 19. 4 new shoes . . . 

" 19. Singleti-ee repaired 

" 19. 1 shoe reset 

" 23. Repairs on laundry wagon . 

" 23. 4 new shoes 

" 24. 4 new shoes 

" 26. 4 new shoes 

" 28. 4 new shoes 

" 30. 8 new shoes 

" 30. Setting 4 tires 



•SO 


75 


1 


50 


3 


00 




75 




40 




25 


1 


25 


1 


50 




50 




25 


1 


25 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


3 


00 


o 


00 



Total .?22 40 



VOUCHER No. 61. GEORGE F. EDEXHARTER. Superintendent. 
1898. 
June 30. Repair pay-roll for June, 1898 .S.".n3 85 



Total .S593 85 



VOUCHEU No. 02. AMERICAN T>AUXDRY MACHINERY CO. 
1898. 

July 15. 1 R. II. liiugt' fnr No. 6 washer .S3 75 

15. Express on broken hinge sent us 30 

Total $4 05 



VOICIIER No. <;:;. BALKE A: KRAUSS CO. 
1898. 

July <;. 12 pieces l%xl2-24. 570 ft., at $3 .$17 28 

•• 14. 1.000 ft. 2-in. clear pine .52 00 

•• 14. 1.000 ft. 1-in. clear pine 50 00 

" 14. 2.00<» ft. 1-12-in. 10 .-.O i»0 

Total .$155 28 



30 


00 


13 


43 


3 


00 


2 


64 


9 


00 


5 


<J4 



225 

VOUCHER No. 64. INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 

1898. 

July 5. 20 50 lbs. Carter lead $52 00 

5. 40 1 lb. English vermlllion at 75c 

5. -±9 7-10 gals, turpentine at 27c 

5. 2 doz. 2%-in. Negro flat var. brushes at $1.50. 

5. 2 doz. 1-in. Superior flat biiishes at .$1.32. .. . 

5. 2 doz. 3-in. Superior flat brushes at $4.50. .. . 

5. 2 doz. lyo-in. Badger C. Flora 

Total $115 11 



VOUCHER No. 65. THE SINKER-DAVIS CO. 

1898. 
July 6. 1 new stud as per old one $0 75 

Total $0 75 



VOUCHER No. 66. PIONEER BRASS WORKS. 

1898. 
July 20. Repairing steam whistle .$2 50 



Total $2 50 



VOUCHER No. 67. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 

July 1. 1 box 1-X 20x28 best bright tin $12 00 

1. 1 bale No. 24 30x96 galv. iron 5 00 

" 1. 6 doz. 3-in. mall, iron cover handles 2 50 

" 1. 7 papers tinned rivets 1 55 

Total $21 05 



VOUCHER No. 68. THE A. BURDSAL CO. 
1898. 

July 27. 4 gals. B. asphalt at 40c $1 60 

" 29. 5 gals, gasoline at 12c 60 

Total $2 20 

15 — Ins. Vouchers. 



226 



1898. 


July 


16. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


1 •" 


:18. 


" 


18. 


" 


.18. 


" 


18. 


« 


18. 


(( 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


• •" ; 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 




18. 



VOUCHKK .\(). <;;». K.XKillT \- .IIIJ.SUN. 



I .") wiiisUc witli valvi' 

i;^8 lbs. white waste 

II llxs. % sq. duck packiiif; 

4% lbs. 1/4 Garlock packing 

514 lbs. % Garlock packing 

T)!/; lbs. V-.' Empire packing 

^ihi % Kclii)se packing 

12 11/2 salv. ells 

12 2 galv. ells 

24 1 C. I. ells 

24 % C. I. ells 

24 1/2 C. I. ells 

12 2 mall, tees 

24 1 female union ells 

24 % female union ells 

24 % male union ells 

24 yoX% C. I. tees 

24 V/iX% bushings 

12 i/j .Jenkins" angle valves 

12 % .Jenkins' angle valves 

6 1 Jenkins' angle valves 

12 14 Comp. bibbs. I. B., I. I' 

1 Climax steam joint damp for 7 pipe. . 
1 Climax steam joint clamp for 4 pipe. 
53M> j;:ils. Crescent engine oil 

Total 



$5 


03 


7 


59 


1 


05 





28 


2 


52 


1 


32 


3 


00 




75 


1 


00 




45 




35 




26 


1 


00 


2 


90 


2 


.50 


2 


So 




61 




25 


3 


70 


3 


76 


4 


54 


2 


04 


7 


00 


4 


00 


10 


44 



rs 65 



VOUCIIEli Xo. 7(1. TECHENTIN & FRIEBERG. 
1898. 

July 29. 2 pieces on back bands and repair back bands $0 80 

" 29. 4 plates and links on traces 1 00 

" 29. 2 turn-backs 1 25 

" 29. 1 trace carrier 20 

" 20. llcpairs on double harness and 2 brass rings. . 50 

Total 

VOUCIIEK No. 71. ANHEHSON BRUNER. 
1898. 

July 1. 10 ft. S-in. sewer at new kitchen at 40c $6 40 

1. 52 ft. 0-in. sewer at new kitchen at :iOc 15 00 

1. 30 ft. 5-lu. sewer at new kitchen at 25c ' (M» 

1. 40 ft. 4-in. sewer at new kitchen at 20c S 00 

1. 1 8-in. H. II. trap 75 

1. 1 8-in. curve 30 

" 1. 1 8-in. slant 2U 

/ " 1. 1 8-in. Y 30 



$3 75 



227 

VOUCHER No. 71— Continued. 
1898. 

July 1. 3 0-in. Y $0 GO 

1. 2 0-in. curves 30 

1. 1 u-in. tnip 50 

" ] . 5 4-in, curves "'0 

" 1. 2 4-in. elbows 50 

1. 2 4-in. ventilations 1 00 



Total $43 95 



VOUCHER No. 72. L. E. WEBB. 
189S. 

July 4. Repairs on laundry wagon .*pi 25 

" 4. Repairs on tunnel wagon 1 00 

4. 8 new shoe.s, 16th .^ 3 00 

" 4. Setting 2 tires, IGtli 1 00 

" 4. 4 new shoes, 9th • 1 .^lO 

" 4. Repairs on laundry wagon 1 00 

" 18. 4 new shoes 1 50 

" 23. Sharpening IG plow shovels SO 

" 23. 8 new shoes 3 00 

" 23. Setting 3 tires 1 50 

" 24. 9 bolts, 21 double 2 25 

" 24. 6 bars, 21 in., 11/2x1/2 2 00 

" 24. Repair ice pick 15 

" 24. Rod for plow 25 

" 28. Splice 7 bolts 70 

" 28. 2 bolts, 211/2 long 50 

" 28. Step on wagon 25 

" 28. 2 new shoes 75 

" 28. 2 bars, li/oxi/o 70 

i' 28. Set 1 tire , 75 

Total $23 85 



VOUCHER No. 7.3. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Superintendent. 

1898. 
July 30. Repair pay-roll for month July, 1898 $581 00 



Total .$581 00 



VOUCHER No. 74. BALKE t<t KR.VUSS CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 22. l.!") bushels H. lime at 20c $3 00 

Total $3 00 



228 

VOUCHER No. 75. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 

1898. 

Aug. 9. 242 10-12 ft. % Koger.s' iron pipe at $1.80 $4 37 

9. 203 10-12 ft. 2 Rogers' iron pipe at $5.70 11 62 

9. 239 5-12 ft. % galv. iron pipe at $2.80 G 85 

9. 24 % galv. ells 65 

9. 24 Frier balls 25 

" 9. 24 Prier cushions 25 

9. 6 14 Comp. bibbs hose. I. P. & S. B 2 50 

" 9. 10 lbs. Garloek packing, sect, rings, 2 7-16x414 6 00 

" 9. 1 No. 1 Saunders cutter 1 25 

" 9. 1 No. 1 3-wheel cutter 90 

9. 1 Plumber's Fi-iend 1 00 

9. 2% 50-f t. Chesterton Metolis tables 3 70 

Total $39 34 

VOUCHER No. 76. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. 100 lbs. solder $11 OCt 

Total $11 00 

VOUCHER No. 77. FAIRBANKS, MORSE & CO. 
1898. 

Aug. 13. To lalKjr repairing wagon scale $1 50 

" 13. Car fare 10 

Total $1 60 

VOUCHER No. 78. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. Repair pay-roll for month of August, 1898.. . $547 'Jo 



1898. 


Aug 


. 1. 




4". 




18. 




23. 




23. 




28. 




38. 




28. 




28. 




28. 




28. 




30. 




30. 



Total $547 65 

VOUCHER No. 70. L. E. WEBB. 

4 uew shoes $1 50 

4 new shoes 1 50 

4 new shoes 1 50 

8 new shoes 3 OO 

Repairs on ice hf>oks 50 

Repairing pinch bar 15 

Repairs on grocer wagon 75 

8 new shoes 5 00 

Repairs on laundry wagon 75 

4 new shoes 1 50 

Splice rod 50 

2 cold chisels 75 

8 new shoes 3 00 

Total $18 40 



229 



VOUCHER No. 80. MANUFACTURERS' NATURAL GAS CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 1. To 1,GG2 7-12 ft. of std. O-in. lino pipe; 1-6-in. 
patent sleeve; labor digging ditch for above 
pipe, laying pipe and back filling ditch, etc., 
etc., per contract; see letter of July 7, 1898 $700 00 

Total $700 00 



VOUCHER No. 81. JOS. R. ADAMS. 

1898. 

Sept. 28. To painting gate house at entrance $15 00 

" 28. Painting ceiling in morgue 4 50 

Total $19 50 



VOUCHER No. 82. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Sept. 28. Repair pay roll for September, 1898 $539 50 

Total $539 50 



VOUCHER No. S3. BALKE & KRAUSS CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 13. 5 bu. fire clay $2 50 

Total $2 50 



VOUCHER No. 84. THE SINGER MFG. CO. 
1898. 
Oct. 10. To repairs on 2 se^ying machines $5 70 

Total $5 70 



VOUCHER No. 85. CLEMENS VONNEGUT. 

1898. 
Oct. 26. 195 ft. 9-32 7 Swedes' iron rope at 2c $3 90 

Total $3 90 



230 

VOUCHER No. SG. FRANCKE HARDWARE CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 29. 20,000 No. 42 brass head nails at 25c 1,000 $5 00 

29. 1 do/-. No. 2 iinil hammers 3 20 

29. 1 doz. % liatchots 4 50 

29. 20 gross V/j 11 screws at $1.20 $24 00 

29. 20 gross 1^4 G screws at 74c 14 80 

29. 20 gross 1 6 screws at GGc 13 20 

$52 00 

Less 90 per cent 46 80 

5 20 

29. 1 keg. 10-d wire nails 1 55 

29. 1 keg 8-d wire nails 1 60 

29. 1 keg G-d wire nails 1 70 

29. 1 keg 4-d Avire nails 1 80 

29. 1 doz. 10-in. Stillson Avrenches 10 80 

29. 1 doz. 14-in. Stillson wrenches 14 40 

29. 45 lbs. 81 twine at 25c 11 23 

Total $60 98 



VOUCHER No. 87. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Supeilntendent. 
1898. 
Oct. 31. Repair pay-roll for month of October, 1898. . . $514 65 



Total $514 65 



Total from repair fund $10,000 00 



EXHIBIT Xo. 18. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Clothing 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. HENDRICKSOX, LEFLEK & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 30. 1 doz. gloves .$2 25 

" 30. 1 doz. gloves 2 25 

" 30. 12 doz. hats, assorted, at $12.00 144 00 

Total $148 50 



VOUCHER No. 2. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 12. 11 pairs rubber boots at $2.85 $31 35 

" 15. 9 rubber drill coats at .$2.75 24 75 

Total $56 10 



VOUCHER No. .3. NATHAN PLANT & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 2. 100 pairs men's kip shoes $115 00 

2. 100 pairs dong. shoes 98 00 

Total $213 00 



VOUCHER No. 4. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1897. 

Oct. 30. 743.3 yds. Amos stripe cheviot at 6.1c $46 74 

" 30. 97.2 yds cambric at 3c 2 93 

" 30. 522.1 yds. muslin, 36-in.. at 6.1c 32 65 

" 30. 214.1 yds. muslin, Dwight, at 6.1c 13 40 

" 30. 318% yds. muslin, Dwight, at 6.1c 19 90 

" 30. 199.1 yds. Henrietta cloth at 15c 29 89 

" 30. 564.2 yds. Am. Ind. prints at 4.2c 25 40 

' 30. 427.1 yds. Simpson dark prints at 4.2c 19 23 

" 30. 87.1 yds. gingham at 4.2c 3 94 

(231) 



232 

VOUCHER No. 4— Continued. 
1897. 

Oct. 30. 317.1 yds. Lancaster gringham at 4.2c $14 28 

" 30. 1 box crochet hooks 10 

" 30. 20 gross shoe hiees 3 00 

" 30. 21 gross white cotton tape at 30c 6 30 

" 30. 2 g. gross agate buttons at 55c ' 1 10 

" 30. 2 g. gross pearl buttons at $8 16 00 

" 30. 40 pa cl^ages hairpins at 5c 2 00 

" 30. 3,000 Hai-per needles at 90c 2 70 

" 30. 1 gross fancy garter Avebbing 2 40 

" 30. 4% doz. fine combs 1 73 

" 30. 12 doz. coarse combs at 75c 9 00 

Nov. 20. 480 yds. India linen at 10c 48 00 

" 20. 12 doz. bows at $1..50 18 00 

" 20. 40 doz. hose at $1.70 68 00 

" 20. 70.1 yds. muslin at 5c 3 51 

" 20. 51.1 yds. muslin at 4c 2 05 

" 20. 1,133 yds. mis. prints at 6.2c 73 65 

" 23. 934 yds. Canton flannel at 9c 84 06 

Total $549 96 

VOUCHER No. 5. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent 

1897. 
Nov. 30. Clothing pay-roll for month of November. 

1897 $222 10 



Total $222 10 

VOUCHER No. 6. PETER NUTZ. 
1897. 
Oct. 31. Repairing 49 prs. of shoes from Nov. 1 to Dec. 

31, 1897 $31 G5 



Total $31 65 

VOUCHER No. 7. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 19. S?; doz. underwear at $3.25 $28 44 

Dec. G. 2 doz. gloves 5 00 

6. 1 doz. gloves 4 50 

6. 1 gross hooks and eyes 1 50 

6. 1 gross shoe buttons 30 

6. 40 doz. hose at $1.75 70 00 

6. 80 doz. thread at 36c 28 80 

6. 6 doz. shirts at $4.50 27 00 

6. 419'^i yds. prints at 4.2c 19 00 

6. 412 yds. jejins at 26.2c 109 18 

6. 950 yds. Canton flannel at 8.2c 80 75 

6. 2 g. gross pearl buttons at $8.75 17 50 



233 

VOUCHER No. 7— Coutinued. 
1897. 

Dec. 6. 4141/2 yds. jeans at 26.2c $109 84 

" 6. 928 yds. Canton flannel at 8.2c 78 88 

" 13. 12 doz. gents' scarfs at $2 24 00 

" 13. 35 doz. gents' handkerchiefs at GOc 21 00 

•' 13. 25 doz. ladies' handkerchiefs at 45c 11 25 

" 13. 9% doz. ladies' handkerchiefs at 75c 7 25 

" 13. 28 doz. ladies' ties at $1.25 85 00 

" 13. 1-12 doz. shirts at $9 75 

" 13. 1-12 doz. ties at $3 25 

" 13. 40 doz. vests at $3.25 130 00 

Total $810 19 

VOUCHER No. 8. MANUFACTORS SHOE CO. 
1897. 

Dec. 7. 100 prs. ladies' shoes at $1.15 $115 00 

Total $115 00 

VOUCHER No. 9. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1897. 

Dec. 31. Clothing pay-roll for December, 1897 $205 25 

Total $205 25 

VOUCHER No. 10. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1897. 

Nov. 23. 1 piece witch cloth at $1.75, less error of lie. $1 64 
1898. 

Jan. 4. 42714 yds. indigo B. prints at 4.1 18 IS 

4. 40114 yds. Lane, gingham at 4.2c 18 06 

4. 623.3 yds. polar gray flannel at 14.2c 90 44 

4. 620.2 yds. Canton flannel at 8.2c 52 74 

4. 40 doz. ladies' hose at $1.69 67 60 

" 4. 30 pkgs. brass pins at 19c 5 70 

•" 4. 2 g. gi'oss black buttons at 35c 70 

" 4. 1 g. gross brass buttons 60 

" 4. 1 gross garter webbing 2 00 

" 4. 6 doz. fine combs at 45c 2 70 

" 4. 6 doz. safety pins at Ic 06 

4. 1 doz. each, 3 and 21/2 70 

" 4. 24 gross coat and vest buttons at 60c 14 40 

4. 12 doz. Sir John's collars at $1.05 12 60 

" 4. 2 gross dress combs at $9 18 00 

" 4. 40 doz. shoe laces at 12i^c 5 00 

" 4. 1 doz. tape measures 90 

4. 1 butter cloth. 120. at 3.2c 4 20 

" 4. 1 Archery Bro., 55, at 3.3c 2 06 

Total . $318 28 



234 

VOUCHER No. 11. MANUFACTOKS SHOE CO. 
1S98. 
Jan. 10. lfX> prs. ladies' shoes at $1.15 $115 00 

Total $115 00 

VOUCHER No. 12. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Jan. 31. Clothing pay-roll for .Tanuary, 1898 $194 00 

Total $194 00 

A'OUCHER No. 13. PETER NUTZ. 

1898. 
Feb. 28. For repairing 88 pairs of shoos for the months 

of .January and February $52 20 

Total $52 20 

VOUCHER No. 14. NATHAN PLANT ^r CO. 
189S. 
Feb. 5. 50 prs. ladies" shoes at $1.05 $52 50 

Total $52 50 

VOUCHER No. 1.5. SINGER MANUFACTURING CO. 
1898. 

Feb. 28. 10(1 No. 1 I. F. F. S. needles $1 20 

" 28. 100 No. 2 I. F. F. S. needles 1 20 

" 28. 1 rutiler 1 00 

Total .$3 40 

VOUCHER No. IC. I). P. FRWIN & CO. 
1898. 

Jan. 28. f>4 yds. salicia at tic .$3 24 

" 28. 44714 yds. Lan. gingham at 4^4 19 01 

" 28. 508% yds. Simpson dark prints at 4i4c. less 

2 per cent 22 44 

" 28. 30 doz. thread at .3Gc 10 80 

" 28. 2 g. gross agate buttons at 5.5c 1 10 

" 28. 2 g. gross agate buttons at Ooc 1 30 

" 28. 1 gross yds. garter webbing 2 25 

" 28. 1 g. gross safety pins. No. 3 1 92 

" 28. 110 yds. Franklinville duck at 20c 22 00 

Feb. 2. .30 jdcgs. 3 brass iiins at 19r 5 70 

Total $89 76 



235 

VOUCHER No. 17. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 

1898. 
Feb. 28. Clothiug pay-roll for February, 1898 $194 00 



Total $194 00 



VOUCHER No. IS. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 29. 1 pr. rubber boots $2 85 

" 29. 1 rubber coat 2 25 

Total $5 10 



VOUCHER No. 19. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 12. 12 doz. sliirts at $4 $48 00 

'• 12. 12 doz. Sir John's collars at $1.05 12 60 

" 12. 1 ea. brace, lXX-240, 1248-240, 1248-240 7 20 

" 12. 3 doz. braces at $2.40 7 20 

Total $75 00 



VOUCHER No. 20. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 1. 552.1 yds. Amos cheviot at 6c $33 44 

1. 274.3 yds. cambric at 2%c 7 90 

1. 524.3 yds. indigo blue prints at 4c $20 99 

1. 900.3 yds. Am. shirting at Sy^c 31 54 

" 1. 655.1 yds. Simpson fancy prints at 4.1c. 27 85 

1. 423.1 yds. Lane, gingham at 4.2c 19 05 

$99 43 

Less 2 per cent 1 99 

97 44 

" 1. 30 pkgs. wire haii-pins at 6c 1 80 

1. 3,000 needles at 90c 2 70 

1. 14 401 g. gross thimbles at $6 150 

" 1. 1 gross crochet hooks 1 00 

1. 1 155-22 G. G. P. D. butts 7 25 

1. 195 yds. Henrietta at loyoc .32 18 

" 14. 5 440 thimbles at $1.25 6 25 

$191 46 
Credit Y^ g. gi'oss silver thimbles 1 50 

Total $189 96 



236 

VOUCHER No. 21. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Mar. 31. Clothing pay-roll for March, 1898 $193 50 



Total $193 50 

VOUCHER No. 22. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 
1898. 

Mar. 30. 622.3 yds. Dwight bleach muslin at 6c $37 37 

30. 748.2 yds. Mason bleach muslin at Gc 44 91 

30. 554 yds. stripe cheviot at Gc 33 26 

30. 40 4-4 laces at IGc 6 40 

30. 2 8 spool tape, 77, 14, at 28c 3 92 

Apr. 12. 1 155-24 g. g. pearl buttons 7 25 

" 12. 1 80-28 g. g. pearl buttons 7 25 



Total $140 36 

VOUCHER No. 23. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent 

1898. 
Apr. 30. Clothing pay-roll for month of April, 1898... $190 75 



Total $190 75 

VOUCHER No. 24. FETER NUTZ. 
1898. 
Apr. 30. To repairing 70 prs. of shoes for March and 

April. 1898 $45 70 



Total $45 70 

VOUCHER No. 25. J. A. EIHIENSPERGER. 
1898. 

May in. 109 prs shoes for men at $1.10 $119 90 

" 10. Gl prs. shoi's for Avomeu at $1.10 67 10 



Total $187 00 

VOUCHER No. 2G. SAKS & CO. 
1898. 
May 9. 150 prs. slippers .$97 50 



Total $97 50 

VOUCHER No. 27. THE C. B. CONES & SON MFG. CO. 

189S. 
May 31. 2(1(1 prs. joaiis i)ants at 7.">c $150 00 

Total $150 00 



237 

VOUCHER No. 2S. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 

1898. 
May 31. 1,549.1 yds. plaid shiitiug at 4.2c $69 72 

Total $69 72 

VOUCHER No. 29. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
May 31. Clothing pay-roll for May, 1898 $193 75 

Total $193 75 

TOUCHER No. 30. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 

1898. 

June 2. 1 bicycle hose $2 25 

6. 90 doz. thread at 36c 32 40 

6. 30 pkgs. brass pins at 19c 5 70 

" 6. 30 boxes Avire haiii>ins at 3e 90 

6. 6 doz. combs at 50c 3 00 

" 6. 21 gross tape at 25c 5 25 

" 6. 1 gross fancy webbing 1 75 

6. 1 selisia, 60% yds., at 5.2c 3 31 

6. 13 Amosk cheA'iot, 605 yds., at 5.2c 33 28 

6. 8 Am. indigo. 448.1 yds., at 4c 17 93 

6. 8 Am. shirting, 442.1 yds., at 3.1c 14.37 

6. 12 Hnmbolt jeans, 632 yds., at 26c 164 32 

" 24. 72 doz. socks at 75c 54 00 

Total $338 46 

VOUCHER No. 31. J. A. EHRENSPERGER & CO. 

1898. 

June 17. 30 prs. -svonK'n's slippers at 75c $27 00 

" 17. 7(> prs. Avomens' shoes at $1.10 77 (XJ 

Total $104 00 

VOUCHER No. 32. HENDRICKSON, LEFLER & CO. 
1898. 
June 2. 1^2 doz. duck caps at $1.25 $1 88 

Total $1 88 

VOUCHER No. 33. THE SINGER MFG. CO. 
1898. 
June 30. 1 gal. oil 51 30 

Total $1 80 



238 

VOUCHER No. 34. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
June 30. Clothing pay-roll for June, 1898 $194 00 

Total $194 00 

VOUCHER No. 35. PPTTER NUTZ. 
1898. 
June 30. Repairing Go prs. shoes for the months of May 

and June, 1898 .$37 80 

Total $37 80 

VOUCHER No. 3G. MURPHY, IIIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

July G. 541 yds. gingham at 4i/ic $22 99 

6. 445 yds. McK. shirting 14 46 

" a. 4441/. yds. Am. ind. prints at 4c 17 78 

G. 435 yds. B. & W. at 3%c 16 32 

$71 55 

Less 2 per cent, on prints 64 

$70 91 

6. 28 doz. socks at 75c 2100 

6. 12 gross safety pins at 25c 3 00 

G. 30 doz. thread at 3Gc 10 80 

" 6. 2 boxes darners at 10c 20 

" G. 1.000 Haider's needles 85 

" 6. 28 pkgs. hairpins at 3c 84 

" 16. 12 doz. bows at 60c 7 20 

" 19. 24 gross buttons at 50c 12 00 

Total $126 80 

VOUCHER No. 37. J. A. EHRENSPERGER & CO. 

1898. 
July 7. 80 prs. women's shoes at $1.10 $88 00 

Total $88 00 

VOUCHER No. 38. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
July 30. Clothing pay-roll for July, 1898 $191 00 

Total $191 00 

VOUCHER No. 39. CHRISTIAN BUSCH. 
1898. 
July 30. Repairing shoes for month of July, 1898 $1 75 

Total $1 75 



239 

VOUCIIEK No. 40. THE SIX(;EK MFG. CO. 
1S9S. 

Aug. 11. To rcpMirs .$2 00 

" 11. 2(iO li and ;W. M. K. S. lUMMllcs 2 00 

" 11. 12 belts 2 40 

" 11. 12 04 flieck.s, sporiiigs 30 

Total .$7 3G 



YOUCIIER No. 41. D. P. ERWIN & CO. 

1S9S. 

Aug. 1. 3201/4 yds. Dwlglit bleach at Oc .$19 22 

1. 20914 yds. D wight half bleach at Oc... 12 56 

.$31 78 
2 per cent 63 

.$31 15 

" 1. 457 yds. Ainoskeag sheeting at 6c..... $27 42 

1. 112 yds. Franldin duclc at 20yoc 22 96 

.$.10 3S 
2 per cent 1 01 

49 37 

1. 30 pkgs. hairpins at 4c .$1 20 

2 per cent 02 

1 18 

Total .$81 70 



YOrCIIETt No. 42. .T. A. EHRE'XSPERGER & CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 13. 40 prs. Avonien's shoes at .$1.10 .$44 00 

Total $'44 00 



VOUCHER No. 43. MURPHY. HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 
Aug. 3. 40 hose at .$1.65 per doz .$66 00 

Total $66 00 



VOUCHER No. 44. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent. 
1898. 
Aug. 31. Clothing pay-roll for August, 1898 $193 25 

Total $193 25 



240 

VOUCHER No. 45. PETER NUTZ. 

1898. 
Aug. 31. To repairing 66 prs. shoes for months of July 

and August $33 25 

Total $33 25 



VOUCHER No. 46. D. P. EKWIN & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 1. 476% yds. Lane, staple at 4y2C $21 45 

1. 6151/2 yds. Simpson Bros, at 3%c 23 OS 

1. 601 yds. Am. J. B. at 4c 24 04 

1. 2.000 needles at 85c 1 70 

" 1. 40 hairpins at 4c 1 00 

1. 15 4-4 shoe laces at 15c 2 25 

" 1. 25 4-4 shoe laces at 15c 3 75 

$77 87 

2 per cent, discount 1 55 

$76 32 

Total $76 32 



VOUCHER \o. 47. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 8. 12 gross pearl buttons at 62y2C $7 50 

" 8. 6 doz. fine combs at 55c 3 30 

Total $10 80 



VOUCHER No. 48. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER. Superintendent. 
1898. 
Sept. 29. Clothin? pay-roll for September, 1898 $193 75 

Total $193 75 



VOUCHER No. 49. L. E. MORRISON & CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 13. 4 prs. rubber boots at $3.25 $13 00 

" 13. 3 rubber coats at $2.15 45 

Total $19 45 



241 

VOUCHER No. 50. MURPHY, HIBBEN & CO. 
1898. 

Oct. 27. 4 doz. gloves $17 57 

" 27, 891 yds. Canton flannel at 8i^c 75 74 

" 27. 921^ yds. Canton flannel at 8Y>e 7 M 

Total $101 15 

■ VOUCHER No. 51. GEORGE F. EDENHARTER, Superintendent 

1898. 
Oct. 31. Clothing pay-roll for October, 1898 $178 75 

Total $178 75 

Total from clothing fund $7,000 00 



EXHIBIT No. 19. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from, Plumbing 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 5. JOSEPH GARDNER. 
1898. 
Oct. 18. 3 galv. iron wash sinks '. $93 00 

Total $93 00 

VOUCHER No. 6. GEORGE W. KEYSER. 
1898. 

Oct. 22. To contract. 16 bath tubs complete $977 00 

" 27. To contract, 4 water closets complete. 
" 27. To 1 marble lavatory complete and 1 

slate urinal complete $273 00 273 00 

Total $1,250 00 

VOUCHER No. 7. KNIGHT & JILLSON. 
1898. 

Oct. 28. 12 3x2 tees, screwed drainage $4 79 

" 28. 4 3 S. traps, screwed drainage 4 56 

" 28. 2 3 running traps, screwed drainage 2 00 

" 28. 2 4 running traps, screwed drainage 2 85 

" 28. 2 4 S. traps, screwed drainage 3 70 

■" 28. 3 2 S. traps, sci-ewed drainage 3 00 

16 — Ins. Vouchers. 



242 



VOUCHER No. 7-Contiiiued. 
1898. 

Oct. 28. 3 2 nuuiiui; trniis. screwed drainage $2 05 

" 28. 6 3 4.") runninjj: ells, screwed drainage 1 88 

" 28. 6 3 short ells, screwed drainage ] 88 

" 28. 2 3 3--\vay ells, screwed drainage 1 26 

*' 28. 3 2 3-way ells, screwed drainage 1 11 

" 28. 3 4 tees, screwed drainage 1 97 

" 28. 3 3 tees, screwed drainage 1 20 

" 28. 3 2 tees, screwed drainage 77 

" 28. 3 4 short ells, screwed di-ainage 1 45 

" 28. 3 2 shoi-t ells, screwed drainage 52 

" 28. 6 3 short ells, screwed drainage 1 88 

" 28. 2 4 closet flange ells. screAved drainage 1 42 

" 28. 12 % comp. bibbs, I. P. S. B 4 25 

" 28. 12 % comp. bibbs, I. T. S. B 3 50 

" 28. 20 lbs. Aviping solder 2 40 

" 28. 3 No. 7 N. P. Fnller bath cocks 4 00 

" 28. 24 1 rnbber stoppers 1 10 

" 28. 24 114 rubber stoppers 1 30 

" 28. 24 11/2 rubber stoppers 1 30 

" 28. 24 2 rubber stoppers 2 60 

" 28. 24 % Boston S. C. bibbs. I. 1' 26 50 

" 28. 146 1-12 ft. 1 galv. pipe 6 19 

*' 28. 137 10-12 ft. 1% galv. pipe 8 04 

" 28. 140 5-12 ft. II2 galv. pipe 10 44 

" 28. 144 7-12 ft. 2 galv. pij.c 13 11 

Total 



$113 02 



EXHIBIT No. 20. 



$1,456 02 



Detailed ami Itemized Account of Expenditures from Painting 
Fund Daring the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. INDIANAroi.lS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 
1898. 

May 3. 2 bbls. B. oil. 105 7-1.1 gals., at 39c $41 15 

3. 5(» gals. Lillys' Crystal Finish at $1.25 62 50 

3. .53 3-10 gals, turpentine at 28c 14 92 

" .".. 10 gals. Jap. tiupeiitine at 45c 4 50 

3. 4.077 lbs. C. C. lead at 5c 203 85 

3. 2-25 lbs. C. C. French ocher at 3c 1 50 

3. 50 lbs. C. C. French zinc, dry. at 7c 3 50 



243 



1898. 


May 


3. 


" 


3. 


" 


3. 


(1 


3. 


<( 


3. 


" 


3. 


" 


3. 


" 


3. 


<( 


3. 


i( 


3. 


<i 


3. 


« 


9. 


" 


9. 


<i 


9. 


« 


16. 


" 


16. 


" 


16. 


" 


16. 


<i 


17. 


" 


17. 


'♦ 


23. 


" 


23. 


(t 


24. 


" 


27. 



VOUCHER No. 1— Coutinued. 

50 lbs. plaster Paris at Ic $0 50 

50 lbs. plaster Taris at Ic 50 

50 lbs. gilder's whiting 38 

15 lbs. Masury D. chr. green 1 85 

15 lbs. Masury L chr. yellow 1 91 

15 lbs. Masury orange chr. yellow 1 91 

15 lbs. Masury lamp black 1 So 

10 lbs. ]Masury burnt sienna j,. 1 06 

10 lbs. ^lasury burnt umber 98 

5 lbs. Masury I'rus. blue 1 70 

5 lbs. Masuiy Amer. vermilion 85 

50 gals. H. O. sizing at 35c IT 50 

50 lbs. putty at 2c 1 00 

10 lbs. L. chr. yellow 1 28 

5 lbs. deep English vermilion 3 75 

5 lbs. pale English vermilion 3 75 

5 lbs. C. C. net blue 1 25 

5 lbs. dry cobalt blue 1 25 

52 3-10 gals, turpentine at 2Sc 14 64 

51 gals. H. O. sizing at 35c 17 85 

2,003 lbs. C .C. white lead at 5c 100 15 

52 10-15 gals. B. oil at 39c 20 56 

Half ream K S. paper at .$2..50 1 25 

52 7-10 gals, turpentine at 28c 14 76 

Total 



$543 90 



VOUCHER No. 2. .JENKINS & DAAaS. 
1898. 
June 0. First and partial payment on painting of the 
' interior of buildings, Department for Men 
and Department for Women, as per speci- 
fications on file .$1,000 00 

Total $1,000 00 

VOUCHER No. 3. INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 
1898. 

June 6. 5 lbs. C. C. L. ohr green $0 62 

6. 10 lbs. C. C. L. ohr yellow 1 28 

" 6. 5 lbs. C. C. L. ohr English vermilion at 75c. . 3 75 

" 15. 1.001 lbs. C. C. L. ohr lead at 5c 50 05 

" 15. 1 bbl. turpentine, 53 G-10 gals., at 2Sc 15 01 

" 30. 5 gals, crystal finish at $1.25 6 25 

" 30. 20 gals, crystal finish, 18th, at $1.25 25 00 

" 30. 1,000 lbs. C. C. lead, 2.5th, at .5c 50 00 

Total S151 96 



244 



1898. 
July 2. 



VOUCHER No. 4. JENKINS & DAVIS. 

Fiual payment fur paiuting interior as per 
specifications for Departments for Men 
and Women $500 00 



$500 00 

INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 



Total 
VOUCHER No. 
1898. 

July 9. 200 lbs. C. C. lead at 5c $10 00 

9. 15 lbs. dry Fr. zinc at Tc 1 05 



VOU 

1898. 

Aug. 22. 

" 22. 

" 22 

" 22 

" 22 

" 22 

'* 22 

" 22 
11 oo 



Total . 
CHER No. 6. 



$11 05 

INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 



22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 



10 kegs Eagle lead, 2 "A lbs., at $5.40 

1 5-lb. yellow ochre in oil at 8c $0 40 

1 5-lb. chr. green in oil at 14i4c 



... 73 

22. 5 1-lb. Am. vermilion in oil at 20c 1 00 



58 
72 
. 63 
75 
5 lib. Paris blue at 30c 1 50 



1 5-lb. burnt umlter in oil at IIV2C. 

1 5-lb. lamp l)lack at 14V-;C 

1 5-lb. burnt sienna at 12y2C 

1 5-lb. chr. yellow at 15c 



12Vi; per cent, off 



$6 31 
79 



5-KiO lbs. Eagle lead at $5.40 

300 lbs. plaster Paris 

25 lbs. bladder putty at V^c 

3 bbls. R. oil. 444-03. 481-79. 453-68, 15511-15 

gals., at 31c 

1 bbl. turpentine, 52 gals., at 29c 

7 gals, liquid drier at 23c 

5 gross S. paper 

50 lbs. broken glue iB. 5) at 8c 

9 5-Ib. Mas. yellow ocher in oil at Sc. . . $3 GO 

4 5-lb. Am. vermilion in oil at 20c 4 00 

2 5-lb. burnt umber in oil at IIV2C 1 15 

2 5-lb. lamp black in oil at 14yoc 1 45 

1 5-lb. l)urnt sienna in oil at 12VI;C 63 

4 5-lu. chr. green in oil at 14Vi>c 2 90 



I2V2 per cent, off 



$13 73 
. 1 72 



23. 3 kegs Eagle lead. S41 lbs., at $5.40. 
23. 10 5-gal. crystal finish at $1.25 



$148 72 



5 


52 


27 


00 


2 


00 




38 


48 


28 


15 


08 


1 


61 




50 


4 


00 



12 01 
45 41 
02 50 



Total 



$373 01 



245 

VOUCHER No. 7. INDIANAPOLIS PAINT AND COLOR CO. 
1898. 

Sept. 15. 10 pils. Lilly's crystal liuish at ^1.20 $12 50 

" 20. 2 kegs Eagle lead, 549 lbs., at $5.40 29 65 

" 20. 20 gals, turpentine at 29c 5 80 

" 20. 5 gals. Lilly's crystal finish at $1.25 25 

•• 20. 2 10-gal. cans 1 50 

Oct. 3. 250 lbs. Eagle lead 14 38 

Total $70 08 

VOUCHER No. S. JOSEPH R. ADAMS. 
1898. 

Aug. 17. Painting wards, per contract $2,0G0 00 

Sept. 19. Painting Avards, per contract $290 00 

Total $2,350 00 

$5,000 00 



EXHIBIT No. 21. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Kitchen and 
Restoration of Rooms Fund, Daring the Fiscal Year Ending 
October 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. HENRY AUFDERHBIDE, Contractor. 
1897. 
Dee. 29. To materials furnished and labor performed 
in the reconstruction of the new kitchen 
and sleeping-rooms, Dep'tm't for Women, 
on account $1,500 00 

Total $1 500 00 

ApproA-ed— A. Scherrer. Architect. 

VOUCHER No. 2. HENRY AT'FDERHEIDE, Contractor. 
1898. 
Mar. 8. Estimate No. 3— To materials furnished and 
labor performed for the new kitchen and 
sleeping-rooms, Department for Women, 
since Dec. 28. 1897. on account $2..500 00 

Total $2,500 00 

Approved — A. Scherrer, Architect. 



246 

VOUCHER No. 3. HENRY AUFDERHEIDE, Contractor. 

1898. 
May 2. General contract for new kitchen and sleep- 
ing rooms for Central Indiana Ho-spital 

for Insane, Department for Women $8,600 00 

" 2. To steel beams, plates and corrugated arches 

for journal and reservoir 1G7 75 

" 2. To oak stairway from first story to second 

story, north wing 65 00 

" 2. To one-storj- addition, first story, north wing. 228 00 

" 2. To cement floor, east room, north wing 41 00 

" 2. To oak steps and platforms in kitchen 50 00 

" 2. To plaster coiling, noith wing, first story. ... 40 00 
" 2. To plaster coiling, south wing, first story, in- 
cluding plastering of east wall 45 00 

" 2. To finish for opening east room, noi-th wing. 3 00 

" 2. To excavation for tunnel in kitchen 24 00 

2. To brickwork for tunnel in kitchen 208 90 

" 2. To cleaning slack 5 00 

" 2. To closing up of openings, east wall, south 

wing 36 00 

" 2. To one extra door, south wing 22 00 

" 2. To one extra door, north wing 23 00 

" 2. To stone steps, south wing 12 00 

" 2. To closet under stairway, second story 15 50 

" 2. To trimming foundation walls, east room, 

north wing 3 50 

" 2. To window in skylight shaft 3 00 

" 2. To plastering east room, north wing 44 00 

" 2. To partitions for water closets and bath- 
rooms 98 77 

$9,735 42 
Deductions from original contract: 

" 2. To one window, south wing $6 00 

" 2. To windows, north wing 12 00 

" 2. To plastering and iKiinting up of ceil- 
ings in south and north wings 42 00 

" 2. To brick wall, east room, north wing. 32 40 
" 2. To bri«k work for steam and return 

pipe channels 131 50 

" 2. To exoava lions for steam and return 

pipe channels 15 50 

" 2. To deduct 4 windows in partitions, sec- 
ond and third floors 24 00 

263 40 

Total amount work done $9,472 02 

Credit— 
-" 2. Amount paid in previous estimates. $6,731 00 



247 

YOUniER No. :V-('(,iitiiiu.Ml. 
1898. 
May 2. Am"t paid out ul" uiainicnniici' fund. .$741 02 

7,472 (IL 



Total $2,000 00- 



" 2. Balance "tiual" to be paid from new kitchen 

and restoration fund .$0,000 00 

Appi'oved— A. Scherrer, Architect. 



EXHIBIT No. 22. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures From Kitchen 
U(/uipment Fund During the Fiscal Year Ending October Sly 
1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. THE JOHN VAN RANGE CO. 
1898. 
Apr. 23. Galvanized iron ventilating pipe connected to 

6 kettles and 4 steamers $35 00 

" 23. Battery of copper-cased urns consisting of one 

(1) KlO-gal. elevated hot water urn, two (2) 

80-gal. A'an's pat. coffee urns, tAVO (2) 60- 

gal. Van's pat. tea urns, with indicators, 

to sit on iron stands 875 dO 

" 23. 1 set of granite measures 2 20 

" 23. 1 ea. 1 pt. and 2 qt. gi-anite funnels 05 

" 23. 2 18-iu. Avood frame flour selves 1 30 

' " 23. 2 24-in. Avood pastry boAvls 1 50 

" 23. 2 5-in. wood potato mashers 80 

" 23. 6 assorted AVood spoons 1 00 

" 23. 3 No. 24 French fry-pans 90 

" 23. 3 No. 32 French fry-pans 1 20 

" 23. 3 No. 36 French fry-pans . 2 10 

" 23. 1 No. 90 Chinese sti-ainer 2 10 

" 23. 2 2-qt. seamless mixing boAvls 2 40 

" 23. 3 No. 400 plain ladles 1 50 

" 23, 3 No. 300 plain ladles 1 20 

" 23. 3 No. 200 plain ladles 90 

'• 23. 3 No. 100 plain ladles C9 

" 23. 4 No. 11 plain ladles ^^ 

" 23. 2 No. 400 pierced ladles 84 

" 23. 2 No. 200 pierced ladles 69 



248 

VOUCHER No. 1— Continued. 
1898. 

Apr, 23. 3 No. 180 skiimnei-s $0 90 

23. 3 No. 150 skimmers 69 

23. 3 No. 15 skimmers 24 

23, 3 No. 12 skimmers 18 

23. 3 No. Ii40 tlesli forks 1 20 

23. 3 No. liO flesli forks 1 05 

23. 3 18-in. 3-i)rong flesli forks 21 

23. 3 15-in. 3-prong flesli forks 18 

23. 6 No. KK) cake turners 1 38 

23. 1 doz. 12-in. forged basting spoons 75 

23. 1 doz. 16-in. forged basting spoons 1 17 

23. 1 doz. 18-in. forged basting spoons 1 25 

23. 1 12x15 wire ]>roiler 85 

23. 1 No. 23 wire broiler 65 

23. 1 doz. 0-qt. Kd. strong retinned milk pans. ... 1 57 

23. 1 doz. 10-qt. Kd. strong retinned milk pans. . . 3 06 

23. 1 doz. 12-qt. lid. strong retinned milk pans. . . 3 46 

23. 1 doz. G-qt. Rd. strong retinned pudding pans. 2 65 

23. 1 doz. S-qt. Rd. strong retinned pudding pans. 3 15 

23. 1 doz. lOqt. Rd. strong retinned pudding pans 3 37 

23. 1 each 20, 30, 40, 50 scoops 93 

23. 3 extra heavy 2-qt. dippers 3 00 

23. 6 40-qt. heavy dish-pans 9 00 

23. 6 30-qt. heavy dish-pans 6 00 

23. 6 21-qt. heavy dish-pans 3 48 

23. 6 17-qt. heavy dish-pans 2 82 

23. 6 14-qt. heavy dish-pans 2 04 

23. 6 10-qt. heavy dish-pans 1 86 

23. 2 large hotel graters 1 70 

23. 2 nutmeg graters 10 

23. 2 32-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 19 00 

23. 2 28-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 17 70 

23. 2 24-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 15 64 

23. 2 14-qt. copi)er sauce-pans and covere 12 24 

23. 2 12-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 11 50 

23. 2 8-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 8 84 

23. 2 6-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 7 48 

23. 2 4-qt. copper sauce-pans and covers 6 00 

23. 1 tin spicebox, G departments 2 00 

23. 12 galvanized iron soap cups 1 75 

23. 2 combination bread slicers 6 50 

23. 2 iron band ice picks 30 

23. 3 large hotel pot chains 1 50 

23. 2 No. 5 brass wire egg whips 3 50 

23. 1 10-in. cleaver 1 75 

23. 1 12-in. steel 90 

23. 1 doz. Koss potato knives 1 50 

23. 2 long-handlod kitchen forks 1 00 

23. 1 set steel skewers 80 



249 

VOUCHER No. l-Continued. 
1898. 
Apr. 23. 6 3-gal. coffee carriers, oblon?:, S(iuare cor- 
ners. 4X tin, boil, side liandles, spout and 

handles riveted on spout with lip .Sl!t .",<) 

" 23. 6 2-gal., same as above ]r, ~a) 

" 23. 6 2-gal. tea carriers, same as coffee If, 5o 

" 23. 6 1-gal., same as above 9 00 

" 23. 6 3-gal. soup cans, same as coffee carriers, ex- 
cept to have round corners, open spout, 

flat top on body 19 50 

" 23. 6 2-gal., same as above 10 50 

" 23. 1 No. 22 agate rice boiler 1 20 

$1,209 90 
Deductions on small ware 9 90 

Total $1,200 00 



EXHIBIT No. 23. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Furniture for 
Restored Rooms Fund, During the Fiscal Year Ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 1. SANDER & RECKER. 

1898. 
Mar. 23. 30 iron beds and springs at $5.50 $165 00 

Total $165 00 

VOUCHER No. 2. THE J. C. HIRSCHMAN CO. 
1898. 
May 14. To 520 lbs. sup. extra black drawings at 37V2C. $195 00 

Total $195 00 

VOUCHER No. 3. ALBERT GALL. 
1898. 

Aug. 2. 3 balls shade cord at 10c $0 30 

2. 11 shades at 68c 7 48 

2. 11 shades at 73c 8 03 

Total $15 81 



250 

VOUCHER No. 4. ALBERT GALL. 
1898. 
•Oct. 19. mat tin;: lunncrs with nilther ends $67 80 

Total $67 80 

VOUCHER No. 5. KIIT BROS. CO. 
1898. 
•Oct, 27. 2 ouly S-day docks at $7 $14 00 

Total $14 00 

VOUCHER No. 6. SANDER & RECKER. 
1898. 

Oct. 27. 2 doz. rockers at $22 $44 00 

Discount 1 61 

$42 39 

Total $42 39 

$500 00 

EXHIBIT No. 24. 



Detailed and Itemized Account of Expenditures from Greenhouse 
Fund During the Fiscal Year Fading October 31, 1898. 

VOUCHER No. 2. THE JOHN A. SCHUMACHER CO. 
1897. 
Dec. 29. Estimate No. 2— To materials and labor per- 
formed for the ne-\v green-house for the 
Central Hospital for Insane, on account. $1,500 00 

Total $1,500 00 

Approved.— Adolph Scherrer, Architect. 

VOUCHER No. 3. THE JOHN A. SCHUMACHER CO. 
1898. 
-June 30. To materials furnished and labor 
performed for the new green- 
house for the Central Hospital 
for Insane, as per agreement. . .$3,290 00 
Less amounts jiaid in previous esti- 
mates 2,460 00 

$830 00 

Total $830 00 

Amount payable on present (final) esti- 
mate $830 00 

Correct.— A Scherrer. 



251 

VOUCHER No. 4. ADOLF SCHERRER, Architect. 
1898. 
June 30. To services rendered in preparing plans, speci- 
fications and superintending the erection 
of the new green-house at the Central 
Hospital for In.sane, at 4 per cent, on 
amount of $3,290 jfl.'U GO 

1'otal $131 GO 

VOUCHER No. 5. F. J. MACK & CO. 
1898. 
Aug. — . To painting 1 extra coat on outside of new 

green-house ,«;7S 40 

Total $78 40 

$2,540 OO 



INVOICE 



Central Indiana Hospital for Insane 



Flscal ^'ear Endin(j October 31, 1898. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Housekeeper's department, D. F. W $6,573 25 

Housekeeper's department, storehouse 878 55 

Housekeeper's department, D. F. M 5,435 10 

Ward proi)erty, I). F. M 18,500 02 

"Ward property. I). V. W 18,464 02 

General kitchen. D. F. M 3,972 70 

General kitchen. I ). F. AV 5,463 15 

Dining department 081 95 

Marking room. I >. 1'. M 1,783 01 

Marking r(K»m. I >. F. W 263 45 

Si'winjr room 2,366 69 

Laundry 7,847 78 

Chapel, school, amusements 245 00 

Store 5,937 Oi 

Engineer's department 89,224 52 

Electrical department 36,162 44 

Carpenter shop 6,702 80 

Paint sho]) 331 40 

Plaster shop 146 50 

Fire depart luent 4,487 50 

Police department 98 25 

Tin shop 592 20 

Upholster sliop 641 21 

Bake shop 303 35 

Barber shop and diil) i-oom 161 00 

Butcher shop 314 11 

Florist's de|)ar1ment 4,022 46 

Garden and f;irin 2.175 65 

Offlcer.s" barn 1,333 00 

Library 1,400 00 

Surgical instruments 752 17 

DlsiKMisary 868 22 

Pathologleal dei.artnicnt 7,145 37 

Crrand toi;il $235,373 86 

(252) 



25J 



HOUSEKEEPER'S DEPARTMENT. I). l\ W. 

Superintendent's Ofliee. 

1 carpet .^LT) fH» 

4 shades l> <m» 

2 stands :; (m» 

2 office chairs Id ih) 

3 chairs, leather seats lij (XJ 

2 gas fixtures 1 <X) 

2 ink-stands ;*, oo 

3 letter tile cases HH) UU 

4 rugs ; 2 00 

1 typeAvriter with desk 75 00 

5 gas globes 1 (M» 

2 desks (W 00 

1 letter press 2 00 

2 waste-baskets 1 00 

1 rocking chair 1 00 

1 mimeograph lu 00 

2 cuspidors 50 

1 book-stand 2 00 

1 electric lamp 5 00 

1 step-ladder 1 00 

2 cane-seat chairs 2 00 

Total $321 50 



Physician's Office. 

1 carpet $25 00 

7 rugs -i 00 

1 clock 3 00 

4 shades 2 00 

4 chairs -4 00 

2 gas fixtures 1 50 

4 gas globes 1 '^ 

4 ink-stands 1 00 

2 book-cases 28 00 

4 desks . 80 00 

3 office chairs 15 00 

3 waste-baskets 50 

1 cuspidor 25 

1 lantern 1 00 

1 electric lamp "00 

Total ^1'3 25 



254 



General Office. 



1 carpet $^<^ 0^ 



1 clock . 

2 shades 



4 00 
1 00 



5 chairs, leather seats 20 00 

2 gas fixtures 1 50 

3 ink-stands 1 50 

1 iron safe 100 00 

1 file case 80 00 

2 desks 40 00 

2 teleplione switch-boards 225 00 

2 stools 2 00 

3 lanterns 3 00 

1 book-stand 1 00 

1 key rack 2 00 

1 table 10 00 

1 electric lamp 7 00 

4 russ 2 00 

1 scale 4 00 

3 chairs 2 00 

1 office chair 3 00 

1 stand 50 

Total $'>19 50 

Reception Room. 

1 carpet $35 00 

1 mirror 20 00 

2 shades 1 00 

4 upliolstered chairs 6 00 

2 upholstered sofas 8 00 

3 gas fixtures 4 00 

4 gas globes 1 00 

7 rugs 7 00 

1 marble-top table 6 00 

5 pictures 6 00 

1 cuspidor 25 

1 ink-stand 30 

3 upholstered rockers 10 00 

5 leather-seat chairs 15 00 

Total $119 55 

Superintendent's Private Office. 

3 book-cases $50 00 

4 rocking chairs 7 00 

1 upholstered chair 5 00 

1 office chair 5 00 



255 

1 desk no (M) 

1 carpet 45 on 

2 gas fixtures 1 .->() 

2 gas globes r>( » 

1 waste-basket .">(» 

4 rugs s oo 

3 shades :t do 

1 ink-stand 1 no 

2 cuspidors . 1 00 

1 book-stand 1 50 

1 chair 1 00 

1 table 12 (K) 

1 table cover 75 

1 clock 4 (M) 

1 electric lamp 7 <X) 

Total $1G3 75 

Office Hall. 

2 gas fixtures $lu (lo 

1 hat rack 5 00 

6 leather settees 20 00 

1 clock 5 00 

6 globes 1 50 

1 gong 1 00 

1 table 50 

3 wooden settees 6 00 

Total $49 00 

Parlor— Second Floor. 

1 carpet $50 00 

4 lace curtains 20 00 

4 shades 3 00 

1 gas fixture 00 

•I gas globes 1 00 

1 mirror 30 00 

5 rugs 20 00 

1 table 2 00 

Total •?132 00 

Hall— Second Floor. 

IGO yards carpet .$1W W 

1 portiere 55 *W 

2 gas fixtures 10 <XJ 

7 gas globes - 00 

1 water cooler and stand 4 00 

1 hat rack 3 00 



256 

3 shades 3 00 

1 couch 25 00 

1 leather rocking chair 12 00 

16 rugs 25 00 

1 wardrobe 20 00 

2 upholstered chairs 3 50 

1 upholstered rocking chair 4 00 

1 small book-case 3 00 

2 reed rocking chairs 1 50 

4 reed chairs 2 00 

2 marble-top tables 15 00 

2 sofas 12 00 

1 extension table S 00 

1 piano 300 00 

Total $668 00 

First Bedroom— Second Floor. 

1 rug $1 50 

4 shades 2 00 

1 carpet 10 00 

4 lace curtains, old 3 00 

1 gas fixture 1 00 

1 gas globe 25 

1 spring couch 10 00 

2 rocking chairs 2 00 

1 book-case 20 00 

1 electric lamp 7 00 

Total $56 75 

Second Bedroom— Second Floor. 

1 marble-top dressing case 20 00 

2 shades 1 00 

3 gas fixtures 4 00 

3 gas globes 75 

1 wardrol>e 20 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 8 00 

2 lace curtains, old 3 00 

1 chiffoniere 10 00 

1 bedstead 10 00 

1 chair 1 00 

1 box mattress 10 00 

12 pillows 10 00 

2 rugs 2 00 

1 carpet 15 00 

1 table 1 00 

Total $115 75 



257 



Third Bedroom— Second Floor. 

1 carpet $25 00 

2 shades 1 00 

2 gas fixtures 5 00 

1 water set 3 00 

9 pillows 9 00 

2 chiffonieres 20 00 

2 lace curtains, old 5 00 

5 rugs 5 00 

4 gas globes 1 00 

1 bedstead 10 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 8 00 

1 marble-top dressing case 10 00 

1 hair mattress S 00 

1 set springs ;5 00 

1 wardrobe 20 00 

1 rocking chair 1 00 

1 marble-top table 5 00 

Total .1:139 00 

Fourth Bedroom— Second Floor. 

1 carpet old $5 00 

3 shades 1 Ou 

3 chairs 1 50 

2 gas fixtures 2 00 

1 gas lamp 1 00 

3 scrim curtains, old 50 

2 rugs "5 

1 wardrobe 20 00 

Total ?31 75 

, Third Physician's Room— Third Floor. 

1 carpet $10 00 

4 shades 2 00 

1 bedstead 10 00 

1 hair mattress 8 00 

1 set springs 3 00 

1 book-case 8 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 8 00 

1 wardrobe 15 00 

1 cane-seat chair '<^5 

1 water set 1 50 

2 gas fixtures - 2 00 

3 gas globes "5 

1 marble-top dressing case 20 00 

1 upholstered rocking chair 4 00 

3 rugs 1 00 

17 — Ins. Vouchers. 



258 

2 pillows 1 00 

1 lounge 5 00 

1 table 2 00 

1 electric lami) 7 00 

1 upholstered <hair 2 00 

Total $111 00 

Secoiul I'hysician's Room— Third Floor. 

1 cari)et .$25 00 

2 shades 1 00 

1 bedstead 8 00 

1 hair mattress 8 00 

1 sot springs ' 3 00 

1 marbk^top wash-stand -4 00 

1 marble-toj) dressing-case 8 00 

1 wardrobe 20 00 

1 water set 1 5<) 

3 gas globes "5 

1 gas fixture 1 00 

1 rug 25 

1 upholstered chair 2 00 

1 lounge 4 00 

1 electric lamp 7 00 

1 upholstered rocking chair 5 00 

2 tables 2 00 

1 book-case 10 00 



Total $110 50 

Third Thysician's Room— Third Floor. 

1 carpet $6 00 

3 shades 1 50 

1 bedstead 8 00 

1 hair mattress 8 00 

1 set springs 3 00 

1 marble-top dressing-case 10 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 5 00 

1 wardrobe 10 00 

2 gas fi.vtnres 2 00 

2 gas globes 75 

1 water set 1 50 

1 table 1 00 

2 upholstered chairs 2 50 

1 arm chair 1 00 

3 prs. scrim ciu'tains 1 50 

1 electric lamp 7 00 

3 pillows 1 50 

1 couch 4 00 



Total §74 25 



259 



First Gnest Koom— Third Floor. 

3 rugs .s;() 7.-, 

4 shades 2 CM) 

1 carpet 15 00 

1 bedstead 10 00 

4 pillows 4 (10 

1 box mattress s <» i 

1 marble-top dressing-case 10 CH) 

1 marble-top wash-stand 5 00 

1 wardrobe 15 Of) 

1 table 2 00 

1 water set 1 50 

2 gas fixtures 2 00 

2 gas globes 50 

3 upholstered chairs 6 00 

1 upholstered rocking chair 3 00 

1 rocking chair 1 00 

Total 

Second Guest Room— Third Floor. 

1 table $2 00 

1 carpet, old 8 00 

2 shades 1 00 

1 bedstead 15 00 

4 pillows 3 00 

1 hair mattress 8 00 

1 set springs 3 00 

1 marble-top dressing-case 20 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 10 00 

1 wardrobe 15 00 

2 upholstered chairs 5 00 

1 water set 1 00 

4 gas globes 1 00 

• 2 rugs 50 

3 gas fixtures 4 00 

4 cane-seat chairs 4 00 

1 rocking chair 1 00 

1 gas lamp 4 00 

Total 

Third Guest Room— Third Floor. 

1 writing desk .'?- 00 

3 pr. scrim curtains 1 50 

1 bedstead 10 00 

1 hair mattress S 00 

1 set springs 3 00 

2 pillows 2 00 



$85 75 



?105 50 



260 

3 rugs 1 00 

1 gas fixture 2 00 

1 carpet 10 00 

1 table 1 50 

1 marble-top wash-stand 5 00 

1 marble-top dressing-case 15 00 

3 shades 3 00 

2 gas globes 50 

1 rocking chair 1 00 

1 water set, old 1 00 

1 lounge 5 00 

1 electric lamp 7 00 

1 chair TS 

Total $T9 25 

Third Floor Hall. 

2 gas lixtures $5 00 

1 linen box 1 00 

40 chairs 30 00 

2 sofas 15 00 

1 writing desk 2 00 

1 table 1 00 

KjO yards carpet 90 00 

4 gas globes 1 00 

1 clock o 00 

1 wardrobe 5 00 

3 shades 2 50 

1 upholstered rocking chair 2 00 

1 water cooler and stand 3 00 

2 rugs 1 00 

2 upholstered chairs 4 00 

2 buckets 30 

1 bi'oom 10 

1 rocking chair 1 50 

Total $169 40 

Superintendent's Dining Iwoom. 

1 sideboard $25 00 

1 dining table 10 00 

12 chairs 12 00 

3 gas lixtiu-es 3 00 

2 carving knives and forks 5 00 

1 cracker bucket 10 

1 broom 10 

1 dust-i)an 10 

1 ice-pick 10 

3 shades 4 00 



261 

1 breacl box 20 

1 carpet 2") (M) 

3 gas globes 75 

8 trays 2 do 

5 rugs 4 (JO 

l.gas stove 5 00 

2 disb-pans 50 

1 stand 2 00 

1 linen box 1 (M) 

1 side table 1 (Mj 

1 ice cbest oO Oo 

1 china closet 15 00 

Total .$145 85 



China. 

15 dinner plates $3 50 

29 tea plates 4 00 

25 dessert plates 3 50 

32 sonp bowls 4 00 

27 teacups 2 50 

27 saucers 2 00 

49 side dishes 4 OO 

1 soup tureen 1 00 

12 pitchers 3 00 

3 meat platters 2 00 

26 bone dishes 2 00 

12 small coffee cups 1 50 

17 small saucers 1 50 

20 individual butters 1 <>0 

12 chocolate cups and saucers 2 00 

5 vegetable dishes 2 00 

Total -fSg 50 



Silverware. 

23 tablespoons $11 00 

43 teaspoons 5 00 

22 dessert spoons ''^00 

39 knives 8 00 

38 forks "i" 00 

1 castor 2 00 

7 tea set pieces 1-^ ^^^ 

1 syrup pitcher 1 •'" 

1 silver water pitcher '^ "*' 

1 soup ladle 1 "" 

2 pickle castors 1 '^'♦-' 

1 butter knife •''0 



262 



23 sherbert spoons 
1 sugar spoon . . . . 
1 gravy spoon . . . . 



00 
50 
50 



Total ?67 00 



Glassware. 

41 glasses ?3 50 

1 celery glass 25 

2 cake stands 1 <Jt) 

8 fruit dishes 1 W> 

19 linger bowls 1 50 

23 sherbert glasses 2 00 

2 vinegar cruets 50 

17 salt cellars '5 

17 pepi)ers "5 

Total ?11 25 



Linen. 

18 table cloths S30 00 

250 napkins 30 00 

1 table cloth, colored border 2 00 

12 napkius, colored border 1 25 

50 doylies 1 50 

IS aprons 1 50 

45 tea towels 2 00 

49 fringed napkins 2 00 

2 canton flannel table covers 1 00 

1 chamois skin 25 

1 feather duster 10 

Total $61 60 



Officers' Dining Room. 

2 tables $9 00 

14 chairs 13 00 

3 shades 75 

7 trays 1 50 

3 gas globes 75 

1 sideboard 20 00 

1 towel rack 50 

1 dust-pan 10 

2 brooms 10 

1 linen bo.x 1 00 

1 mop-stick 10 



263 



1 feather duster 
3 dish pa us . . . . 

1 linoleum 

1 stand 

3 gas fixtures . . 
1 ice chest 





1(1 




1(1 


Ill 


(II) 




no 


1' 


1)1) 


1(t 


III) 



!?0 


50 


2 


(10 


f) 


00 


1 


00 


'2 


00 




50 




00 




00 




00 




00 




25 




50 


1 


00 


2 


00 



Total $G9 80 



Cliiua. 

2 pickle dishes 

30 dinner plates 

12 tea plates 

12 tea plates 

44 dessert dishes 

1 7 coffee cups 

15 eggs cups 

19 individual butters 

1 soup tureen 

9 soup bowls 

1 cream pitcher 

4 fruit stands 

4 milk pitchers 

2f) sancers 

Total $14 75 



Silverware and Cutlery. 

1 soup ladle $0 75 

1 water pitcher 

2 sugar bowls 

1 cream pitcher 

20 tablespoons 

45 teaspoons 

1 butter knife 

28 knives 

1 slop bowl 

1 syrup pitcher 

1 bell 

1 carving knife and fork 

2 bread knives • 

14 soup spoons 

28 forks 

Total *-3 50 



1 


00 


1 


00 




50 


3 


00 


5 


00 




50 


3 


00 




50 


1 


50 




25 


1 


50 




50 


1 


50 


3 00 



264 



Glassware. 

2 vln«'jrar cruets $0 50 

12 salt ct'llais 50 

12 poi>iR'i-s 50 

2 cake stands "^5 

3 fruit dishes 50 

17 water glasses 1 00 

1 celery glass 25 

1 chamois skin 20 

1 sugar bucket 20 

1 cracker bucket 20 

Total 

Linen. 

10 table clotlis -^S 00 

7 small table cloths 3 00 

110 napkins 5 00 

19 tea towels 1 00 

12 aprons 1 50 

2 Canton tiannel table covers 1 00 

Total 

Ward Hall Bedrooms. 

17 be.lsteads .«40 00 

17 bureaus 40 00 

17 wash-stands 2.5 00 

17 wardrobes "5 00 

33 chairs 25 00 

14 mirrors 12 00 

23 rocking chairs 20 00 

13 tables 10 00 

15 gas li.vtures 15 00 

13 cari>ets 25 00 

16 china water set.s 30 00 

24 window shades 30 00 

18 prs. scrim curtains 10 00 

5 lounges 15 00 

17 tumblers 50 

7 set sjirings 15 00 

8 husk mattresses IG 00 

16 hair mattresses 115 00 

2 box mattresses 15 00 

35 pillows 25 00 

14 brooms 1 50 

8 gas glolM's 1 50 

8 feather dusters 50 



$4 60 



$19 50 



265 

9 dust-pans HO 

5 step-ladders 1 50 

2 desks 7 qq 

2 rugs 1 00 



Total ^478 QO 



Rear Center and West Dormitory Bedrooms. 

41 hair mattresses $250 00 

40 husk mattresses 80 00 

3 sets springs 9 00 

39 bedsteads 115 00 

9 wardrobes 40 00 

70 hair pilloT^-s 50 00 

34 wash-stands 34 CO 

46 chairs 35 00 

33 china water sets GO 00 

11 tables 10 00 

35 bureaus 70 00 

33 gas fixtures 30 00 

52 prs. muslin curtains 40 00 

43 window shades 10 00 

30 brooms 3 00 

2 mops 25 

1 clock 3 00 

1 web brush 25 

18 cari^ets 35 00 

56 rocking chairs 75 00 

10 feather dusters 1 00 

10 dust-pans 1 00 

47 tumblers 2 00 

30 wisk brooms 1 50 

Total $901 00 



House Linen, Center Building. 

32 spreads $45 00 

63 sheets 30 00 

125 pillow cases 15 00 

275 towels 30 00 

28 blankets 50 00 

70 roller towels 30 00 

Total $200 GO 



260 



House Linen. Ward Hall Bedrooms. 

44 spreads $40 00 

70 shii-ls 25 00 

IL'o i.illnw cases 10 00 

35«» t<»\v<'ls "JO 00 

54 l.hiiikets 00 00 

Total $185 00 



House Linen, lU-ar Center and West Dormitory. 

no spreads -^100 00 

145 sheets 50 00 

212 pillow eases 20 00 

t!17 towels 55 00 

ll'ti lilaiiliets 165 00 

27 (lollies curtains 15 00 

Total $405 00 



Officers' Kitchen. 

4 tables §4 00 

2 ranges 225 00 

1 broiler 35 00 

5 chairs 2 (X) 

1 bread board 50 

2 ice chests 15 00 

2 cake molds 30 

1 sugar bucket 20 

1 coffee bucket 20 

2 milk buckets :!<» 

Ti larjie t in cans 1 .50 

1 oyster bucket 25 

1 clothes basket 25 

7 iron spoons 25 

it milk jars 50 

G water glasses 25 

2 egg beaters 30 

3 potato mashers 15 

2 rolling pins 10 

G cake cutters 30 

1 clock 3 00 

3 pudding moulds 30 

15 Jelly cake jtans 1 00 

lo pic |)iins 50 

4 c«»ffee pots 1 00 

1 spice box 50 



267 

4 cooking knives rjQ 

3 cooking forks jr; 

2 Avoodeu bowls 20 

10 dish pans 1 00 

12 bread pans 1 fiO 

2 skillets 2 Oi> 

12 tin pans 75 

25 doz. fruit jars 35 fjQ 

8 doz. jellj' glasses 2 2.") 

5 rice kettles 

2 flour sieves 

3 cullenders 

2 strainers 

10 plates 

6 cups and saucers 

1 sugar bowl 

11 doz. tin fruit cans 

5 tin cups 

2 dippers 

2 meat grinders 

1 meat pounder 

1 wash-board 

2 lemon squeezers 

2 tea caddies 

6 knives 

6 forks 

2 tablespoons 

1 scale 

10 table cloths 

10 roller towels 

18 aprons 

18 tea towels 

1 griddle 

1 hatchet 

11 buckets 

1 cake box 

2 ice-picks 

2 ice-cream freezers 

1 vegetable slicer 

3 funnels 

1 water pitcher 

3 skimmers 

6 roasters 

2 stew pans 

1 meat saw 

1 copper kettle 

3 iron kettles 

4 cupboards 

1 set measures 

1 grater 






<X) 




5<1 




no 




40 




50 




00 




15 


4 


00 




50 




10 


1 


50 




10 




10 




40 




20 




50 




51) 




2(t 


1 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


2 


00 




75 




50 




10 


2 


00 




50 




20 


2 


50 


1 


00 




15 




10 




15 


2 


50 




50 




50 


2 


00 


1 


00 


4 


r>0 


1 


50 




10 



1 


00 




10 




10 


1 


50 


2 


00 


2 


00 



268 

3 niuflin pans 

1 dust-|t:iii 

1 brcKnn 

13 veKt'tablc dishes 

14 platters 

6 liunf stone jars 

Total ^371 40 

Night Watch Kitchen. 

3 tabh's 

10 chairs 

1 range 

12 tahh' clotlis 

35 naplvins 

!» i'l.rons 

l.J t()\Vl«ls 

2G phites 

H! coffee cups 

2r. saucers 

7 vegi'table dishes 

3 meat phitters 

2 water pitchei*s 

1 ice-cream pitclier 

1 sugar Im»\v1 

1 castor 

1.*? l<nives 

1 1 forks 

!t teaspoons 

7 tablespoons 

13 water glasses 

1 spoonhohler 

2 salt ci-llais 

8 soup bowls 

1 colTe*' puts 

1 Avjtoilen bowl 

1 ice chest 

1 tea iK)t 

2 tea cans 

1 cl«M-k 

2 carving knives 

1 disii pan 

1 (hist |)an 

1 large l»uck«'t 

n crocks 

1 broom 

2 small buckets 

1 toaster 

1 meat poumler 



$4 


00 


4 


00 


87 


00 


4 


00 


2 


50 




00 




25 




50 




00 




00 




00 




00 




50 




10 




15 


1 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




50 




50 




50 




10 




10 




75 




40 




15 


8 


00 




20 




15 


1 


00 




40 




15 




10 




15 




50 




10 




20 




10 




10 



269 

1 tea si f:i iiKT ()r, 

2 cooklnji; wptjons 10 

1 bread board j 5 

1 ice pick ]q 

2 sliillets 50 

1 oyster budget lif) 

3 milk cans 25 

2 trays 15 

1 rice kettle 25 

1 bread box 25 

1 rolling- pin 10 

6 tin pans 30 

Total $130 10 



Officers' Barn. 

1 bedstead $5 OO 

1 hair mattress 7 00 

1 bnsk mattress 3 00 

1 set springs 3 00 

1 table 50 

1 bureau 1 50 

1 stove 2 00 

2 rocking- chairs 1 50 

1 wardrobe 2 00 

1 clock 3 00 

1 mirror 1 00 

1 dustpan 10 

1 broom 10 

1 chair 25 

Total $29 95 

Grand total Housekeeper's Department, D. F. W. $6,573 25 



STORE HOUSE. 

Steward's Office. 

1 safe 

3 office desks 

1 table 

2 office chairs 

1 clock 

1 mirror 

1 floor linoleum 

1 gas fixture 

2 gas globes 



!75 


00 


50 00 


2 


00 


4 


00 


3 


00 


1 


OO 


3 


00 


1 


00 



270 

4 window shades 1 00 

1 drop li«ht "5" 00 

1 cuspidiu- 10 

2 waste baskets 20 

Total $l-*7 55 

Trustee's OflBce. 

8 chairs ?32 00 

1 table 10 00 

1 stand 1 00 

1 mirror 2 00 

1 gas tixture and 1 globe 75 

1 water pitcher and G glasses 50 

G cuspidors 1 50 

1 floor linoleum 1- 00 

Total $59 75 

First Floor. 

Linoleum $0 50 

2 wardrolH^s 24 00 

2 stands 2 GO 

2 tables 4 00 

2 dressing cases 20 00 

2 feather pillows 2 00 

4 window shades 2 00 

2 beilsteads, double 14 00 

2 washstands S 00 

1 ndrror 1 00 

2 rocking cliairs 2 00 

8 cane-seat chairs . .' 5 00 

2 wasl> Itowls, jtitchei-s and slop jars 4 00 

2 water pitchers. 3 glasses, 1 tray 60 

1 gas fixture and 4 globes 3 00 

1 footstool 25 

1 box mattress 10 00 ' 

1 set springs 4 00 

2 carpets 20 00 

1 tin water can and foot tub 50 

1 stand 25 

1 broom 15 

1 carpet sweei>cr 50 

1 graulle bucket 25 

2 hair pillows 2 00 

1 lounge 4 00 

1 hair mattress 4 00 

Total $138 00 



271 



i> 

Store House Dormitory. 

2 wardrobes ^v; ^^^ 

32 chairs, old .^, q^ 

11 bedsteads, double 44 00 

3 bedsteads, single 10 00 

5 rocking chairs 10 OO 

12 bureaus 72 oo 

12 stands, small 11 00 

4 wash-stands 12 00 

1 box mattress 50 oo 

12 hair mattresses (M) 00 

12 husk mattresses 36 00 

26 hair pillows 26 00 

5 feather pillows 5 00 

3 mirrors 2 00 

20 cuspidors 2 00 

2 tables 1 oo 

17 water glasses 1 3.') 

10 water pitchers 2 50 

15 gas fixtures 3 00 

5 gas globes 50 

2 step-ladders 3 00 

3 granite buckets 50 

4 dust pans 40 

2 brooms 30 

1 mop stick 10 

2 wall brushes 75 

2 towel rollers 1*5 

15 whisk brooms 1 00 

2 boxes for bedding 2 0<> 

Total 



$329 65 



Bedding. 

32 spreads $16 00 

72 sheets 21 60 

165 pillow cases 16 50 

510 towels 30 00 

45 roller towels 4 50 

62 blankets 115 00 

Total 

Grand Total Store House 



$203 60 



578 55 



272 



HOUSEKEEPER'S DEPARTMENT, D. F. M. 

I'ublic- Hall, Offices, Parlor and Library. 

5 carpets ^200 00 

2 linoleuins 2G7 00 

43 rugs 50 00 

7 office chairs 35 00 

18 upholstered chairs 50 00 

24 plain chairs 48 00 

5 settees WO 00 

2 couches 20 00 

G desks 85 00 

2 tables 10 00 

G book-cases 120 00 

2 marble-top tables 10 00 

5 clocks 25 00 

G ink-stands 3 00 

2 door screens 3 00 

4 -waste l)askets 2 00 

2 medicine cases 8 00 

3 framed pictures 75 00 

3 hat racks 15 00 

2 folding step-ladders 3 00 

2 wooden benches 8 00 

1 wire door mat 8 00 

4 drop lights 28 00 

1 dictionary 8 00 

G yards rubber 5 00 

IG gas globes 3 00 

Total $1,114 75 



Tliird Floor, Hall and Rooms. 

8 carpets ?350 00 

2 carpets 16 00 

9 yards rubber matting 15 00 

5 bedroom sets, marble-top 100 00 

4 couches 4 00 

G upholstered diairs 20 00 

3 jdain <-amp chairs 6 00 

7 rocking chairs 21 00 

10 center and small tables 30 00 

8 feather pillows 10 00 

5 hair mattresses 25 00 

1 box spring mattress 8 00 

1 feather Iwd 20 00 

4 pi-s. bed springs 12 00 

5 chamber sets 10 00 



273 

1 caue-seat arm-chair 5 00 

1 mantel mirror 25 00 

2 large lookiug-glasses G 00 

3 book-cases 2.j 00 

1 carpet sweeper 1 00 

2 clothes baskets 3 00 

2 towel racks 50 

1 pr. lace curtains 2 00 

3 waste baskets 1 25 

1 hat rack 3 00 

10 plain chairs 20 00 

1 folding step-ladder 1 50 

1 tonet stand 3 00 

2 whatnots 3 00 

10 framed pictures 10 00 

1 chest of drawers 1 00 

1 linen cupboard 1 00 

9 window screens 4 50 

5 door screens 4 50 

2 upholstered chairs '. 15 00 

•6 prs. scrim curtains 2 00 

1 gas stick 10 

Total $784 35 



Fourth Floor, Hall and Rooms. 

5 carpets .^440 00 

1 linoleum 34 00 

4 bedroom sets, marble-top SO 00 

7 bedroom sets, half marble-top 25 00 

4 wardrobes IG 00 

15 plain chairs 7 00 

1 rocker ' 4 00 

5 couches 5 00 

^ cane rockers 3 00 

10 center tables 6 00 

8 rugs 16 00 

4 small rugs 2 00 

3 commodes 2 50 

2 cuspidors 20 

16 feather pillows 16 00 

7 hair pillows 7 00 

€ box spring mattresses 50 00 

4 hair mattresses 32 00 

5 prs. bed springs 8 00 

4 coal vases 2 00 

4 fire sets , . 1 00 

9 chamber sets 15 00 

4 looking-glasses 8 00 

18 — Ins. Vouchers. 



274 

10 water jrl«s.ses ^ 

'.) water pitihiTs 2 00 

1' towel racks 1 ^0 

1.3 prs. scrim cmtains 1 50 

12 book-cases 12 50 

18 Kas }jlol>es 2 00 

G flamed pietures ^00 

18 yards nil>l»er matting 15 00 

Total 



Officers' Dinins Room. 

1 carpf't ^ ^ 

lOi/L' .v<l«- linoleum ^ ^ 

1 extension table 3 00 

1 side-lMtanl ^ ^ 

12 chairs 12 00 

1 side table 1 00 

2 pantry tables 2 00 

2 framed pictures 5 00 

2 prs. curtains 2 00 

3 gas globes 25 

22 dinner plates 2 00 

11 soup plates 2 00 

24 tea plates -i 00 

9 pie plates 2 00 

1 syrup jug 50 

32 dessert dishes 2 50 

18 tablespoons 4 50 

12 tabl(> knives 3 00 

22 teaspoons 4 00 

1 silver sugar spcton 1 00 

12 table forks 3 00 

2 pickle forks 25 

1 butclier knife 25 

1 pickle castor 1 00 

1 cheese disli aixl si>oon 75 

4 sugar ImiwIs 2 00 

3 cream pitchers 1 00 

2 spoon-holders 1 00 

4 Canton flannel table cloths 1 00 

2 vinegar stands 1 00 

3 pepper stands 1 00 

1 sauce pitcher 1 00 

IS salt stands 2 00 

IS butter dishes, individual 1 00 

2 glass cake stands 1 00 

2 fruit dishes 1 00 

2 pickle dishes 75 



$829 20 



■ 275 

1 olive dish 

2 jelly stands 

1 slop bowl 

6 meat platters 

4 vegetable dishes 

2 ladles 

2 milk pitchers 

2 carving sets 

M naplvins 

4 table cloths 

6 tray cloths 

24 water glasses 

21 tea cups 

22 soup bowls 

21 saucers 

10 tea towels 

1 dust pan 

1 broom 

1 mop stick 

2 dish pans 

7 trays 

2 bread knives 

1 crumb brush and pan 

1 water pitcher 

1 knife basket 

2 side-board covers 

Total $124 00 



Fifth Floor, Bedrooms and Hall. 

11 carpets $50 00 

12 iron bedsteads 66 00 

20 bureaus 50 00 

IM wash-stands 10 00 

13 wardrobes 20 00 

19 plain chairs 11 00 

12 new rockers 33 00 

12 new tables 15 00 

12 hair mattresses 96 00 

12 feather pillows 12 00 

8 looking-glasses 1 00 

1 clothes basket 75 

Total $364 75 





50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


25 




50 


1 


(X) 


1 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 




2.-) 


1 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


25 




50 




10 




10 




10 




20 


1 


00 




75 




50 




50 




25 


1 


00 



27G 



Officers' Kitchen. 

5 plat«'s $0 40 

3 cups 10 

4 saiu-ers 1*^ 

2 sugar bowls 30 

6 knives 50 

6 forks 50 

2 stew pans 20 

4 tin pans 20 

2 choppint: bowls 30 

5 tablespoons 40 

teaspoons 60 

2 sugar boxes 1 00 

2 coffee pots 1 00 

1 steamer 50 

2 strainers 50 

8 tin buckets 1 00 

11 spice boxes 1 00 

11 pie pans 1 00 

2 stew kettles 1 00 

7 tin moulds 50 

9 cake pans 1 50 

1 wire egg basket 20 

1 tea canister 20 

1 wash l»asin 10 

4 sets muthn rings 1 50 

25 slut't-iron pans 2 00 

1 moi» bucket 20 

3 skillets 50 

1 soup kettle 50 

2 rice kettles 1 00 

4 iron k<>ttl»'s 1 00 

1 double range 30 00 

1 stove iM.iler 5 00 

1 frying kettle 50 

1 butcher knife 25 

1 skimmer 10 

2 i-lioii|iiiig knives 50 

1 griddle 50 

1 roaster 75 

1 bread iMiard 10 

1 biscuit heater 50 

1 potato masher 20 

1 ice cream freezer 1 00 

1 lish kettle 1 00 

1 gas stove 1 00 

1 copper ten kettle 1 00 

1 oyster kettle 1 00 

3 tables 2 00 



3 chairs r.ii 

1 biscuit cvitter 2n 

1 meat pounder 2t> 

8 cake cutters L'< » 

3 porcelaiu kettles 2 fi(» 

1 cream beater 1 1 1 

3 pepper boxes lii » 

4 roller towels 'm 

12 tea towels 2( > 

12 aprons 20 

5 table cloths 1 30 

360 glass jars 12 (K> 

6 earthenware jars 1 50 

1 step-ladder 50 

430 jelly glasses 5 00 

I slaw cutter 10 

II earthen jars 50 

1 clock 50 

4 iron siioons 50 

2 graters 20 

1 steam stand 3 00 

4 broilers 1 OO 

1 wash-board 20 

1 granite tea pot 1 2o 

1 large wooden bowl (KJ 

1 refrigerator, new 25 CH) 

1 refrigerator, old 5 00 

Total ■$]28 60 

Arcade Hall Bedrooms. 

8 bedsteads .?24 Cmi 

7 wash-stands 7 00 

8 bureaus 21 (lo 

5 wardrobes 25 00 

I couch 2 00 

10 plain chairs 6 00 

II rocking chairs 25~"0O 

3 tables .^ 3 00 

4 carpets 3 (^lO 

14 feather pillows • H W 

9 hair pillows 9 00 

8 hair mattresses G4 00 

8 hair bed springs 10 00 

6 water pitchers 2 00 

8 water glasses 20 

7 chamlier sets 10 00 

4 looking-glasses 1 (M) 

Total ?223 20 



278 



Rear Center Bedrooms. 

13 bedsteads $13 00 

13 wash-stands 13 00 

12 bureaus 24 00 

18 wardrobes 36 00 

24 <hairs 24 00 

10 tables 15 00 

18 feutluT pillows 18 00 

10 hair mattresses 128 00 

2 window blinds 25 

2 eai'pet rugs 1 00 

10 bowls and pitchers 4 00 

10 soap dishes 50 

7 looking-glasses 2 00 

10 water pitchers 2 00 

10 water j,'lasses 25 

5 gas globes ■ 1 00 

1 clothes hamper 1 00 

1 towel roller 10 

4 box spring mattresses 20 00 

1 step-la'dder 25 

12 cuspidors 1 00 

8 coal vases 6 00 

8 fire sets 1 60 

Total $311 95 



Ward Hall Bedrooms. 

3 bedsteads $8 00 

3 bureaus 5 00 

3 wash-stands 1 00 

3 tables 1 00 

8 chairs 4 00 

1 carpet 1 00 

5 feather pillows 5 00 

5 hair pillows 5 00 

4 hair mattresses 24 00 

4 l)ed springs 4 00 

2 rocking chairs 2 00 

5 wash bowls, pitchers and slop jars 7 50 

5 soap dishes 50 

5 water pitchei-s 1 00 

6 water glasses 15 

4 looking-glasses 1 00 

7 gas globes 1 00 

6 window curtains 1 00 

Total $72 15 



279 



House Linen, Center lUiildiiit:. 

42 spreads '. ii\-2 ( ii > 

60 sheets 2i • on 

87 pillow cases <; oo 

348 towels :;r, (in 

39 double blankets :;(» (jO 

3 single blankets 1 Oil 

4G roller toAvels ." < m» 

20 dresser scarfs 3 OO 

Total §144 00 



House Linen, Rear Center. 

35 spreads $35 0<i 

60 sheets 20 ( m > 

91 pilloAV cases 25 <ki 

53 double l)lankets 5t> 00 

35 single blankets 25 00 

85 towels 5 00 

12 roller towels 1 00 

Total $161 00 



House Linen, Arcade Hall. 

IS spreads $18 00 

33 sheets 10 OO 

19 double blankets 20 00 

2 single blankets 2 Ou 

148 towels 10 ( H t 

4 comforts 2 (M» 

66* pillow cases '. 25 00 

Total $87 00 



House Linen, Fifth Flooi'. 

38 spreads $38 OO 

63 sheets 25 0<» 

75 pillow cases ' 5 00 

170 towels 15 00 

48 double lilankets 80 00 

Total ?l^-!3 f»0 



280 



House Linen, AVard Hall Bedrooms. 

8 spreads H 00 

16 sheets 3 00 

16 pillow cases 2 00 

29 towels • 3 00 

14 double blankets 14 00 

2 single blankets 1 00 

Total 



$27 00 



FIRE HOUSE. 



Meeting Room and Dormitory. 

1 square table $8 00 

1 round table 1 00 

2 lounges 12 00 

1 cane-seat rocking chair 3 75 

6 cane-seat rocking chairs 10 00 

Linoleum 35 00 

Rubber on stairs 4 00 

36 bedsteads, single 198 00 

6 wardrobes 30 00 

6 rocking chairs 12 00 

36 chairs 36 00 

21 tables 63 00 

6 water pitchers 1 50 

18 water glasses 60 

20 carpets 50 00 

2 rugs 2 00 

14 window shades 9 00 

1 box mattress 16 00 

36 hair mattresses 216 00 

6 feather pillows 6 00 

6 hair pillows 6 00 

Matting 1 00 

3 dust pans 30 

2 brooms 30 

3 granite buckets 1 50 

2 mop sticks 20 

2 towel rollers 25 

2 cuspidors 75 

17 whisk brooms 1 50 

1 box for bedding 50 

Total 



$726 15 



281 



Bedding. 

56 blankets $5G OO 

66 spreads 54 00 

60 sheets 24 00 

60 pillow cases 10 00 

300 towels 30 00 

Total $174 00 

Grand total Housekeeper's Department, D. F. M. $5,435 10 

WARD PROPERTY, DEPARTMENT FOR MEN. 

87 baskets clothing $95 70 

50 bed steads, attendants' l.W 00 

540 bedsteads, ward 810 00 

28 bed-ticks 7 00 

208 brackets 40 16 

1 bed pan 1 00 

6 bells, dinner 1 .50 

123 blankets, double 184 50 

3,537 blankets, single 3,537 00 

26 bowls, sugar 4 08 

50 bowls, wash 9 00 

210 bowls, granite, wash 21 00 

557 bowls, soup 27 85 

2 bread boxes 10 00 

6 bread knives 1 50 

230 brooms, house 32 20 

68 brooms, whisk 3 40 

29 brushes, bathing 5 51 

3 brushes, crumb 1 05 

28 brushes, dust 5 60 

130 brushes, scrub 6 50 

25 brushes, web 17 00 

67 brushes, hair 10 75 

78 buckets, water 38 22 

191 buckets, water 93 59 

35 bureaus, attendants' 70 W) 

39 cupboards 78 00 

89 camisoles 60 74 

2 candlesticks 10 

19 cans, oil 1 90 

3 cases, medicine 4 50 

84 casters, dining 21 00 

506 chairs, corridor 151 80 

648 chairs, dining room 194 40 

19 chairs, strong 5 70 



282 

G4 chairs, iiK-kiug l-t-t 00 

15 chairs, l.arher 30 00 

1 chair, iuvaiid 30 00 

25 clocks 87 50 

71 coinlis. coarse 3 55 

10 toinUs. tine 50 

<>J5 chaiiihcrs 63 50 

17 checker boards 2 55 

714 cups, tea 21 42 

180, cups, fin 5 58 

137 cui>s. gninite 13 70 

G5 cruets, salt 3 25 

40!) curtains, window 89 98 

l'<! dippers, water 78 

11 dishes, c:ike 2 75 

17 dishes, butter 1 70 

47 dishes, dessert 94 

6 dishes, steak 60 

58 dishes, toilet soap 2 90 

46 dishes. ve.!,'etal)le 4 60 

88 dishes. veRetfible. granite 13 20 

17 forks, carving 1 70 

CAO forks, table 32 45 

54 gas globes 8 10 

13 gas sticks 1 95 

3 hat racks 90 

2 ice picks 30 

17 jugs 85 

18 knives, carving 4 50 

("44 knives, table 32 20 

I'J knife trays 1 20 

16 lambrequins 8 00 

24 lanterns 12 00 

315 napkins 15 75 

71 looking-glasses 71 00 

55 loiniges 162 00 

27 medicine glasses 1 35 

833 mattresses, hair 4.165 00 

711 mattresses, husk 1,066 50 

15 mattress needles 1 50 

161 mopsticks 16 10 

3 mouse traps 15 

828 napkins 41 40 

10 org.-ins 206 00 

36 pans, dish 7 20 

125 pans, dust 10 00 

1 piano 160 00 

6 piano stools 4 50 

313 pictures, ward 156 50 

347 pillow ca.ses. attendants' 34 70 

1,42<", pillow cases, ward 142 GO 



283 

712 pillows, bail- 519 70 

36 platters 13 32 

25 pitchers, cream G 25 

86 pitchers, syrup 12 90 

S9 pitchers, water 12 35 

122 pitchers, granite 24 40 

580 plates, dinner 29 00 

45 plates, tea 2 25 

32 plates, pie 1 GO 

458 plates, granite 22 90 

99 pots, coffee 24 75 

2 restraints anklets 5 00 

15 restraint belts 3 75 

S restraint gloves 8 00 

13 restraint wristlets 9 75 

20 rubbers, floors 10 00 

1 refrigerator 25 00 

24 sacks, clothing 6 00 

44 salt cellars 88 

202 saucers, granite 10 10 

642 saucers 19 26 

30 scissors 3 00 

7 screw drivers 35 

2 s. cans 50 

90 settees 180 00 

205 sheets, double 71 75 

2,152 sheets, single 538 00 

113 sheets, rubber 56 50 

322 spittoons 32 20 

9 spoon-holders 90 

616 spoons, table 30 80 

156 spoons, tea 7 80 

14 spoons, vegetable 70 

146 spreads, double 146 00 

984 spreads, single 590 40 

25 sprinklers 2 30 

52 stands, hall 52 00 

31 stands, wash 47 50 

17 stands, tlower 8 50 

2 stands, fruit 1 OO 

50 stand covers 12 50 

15 strands, ink 75 

3 stoves, gas 3 00 

36 step-ladders T2 00 

12 stretchers 12 00 

9 sja-inges 4 50 

234 table cloths 234 00 

86 tables, dining 129 00 

84 tables, side 8-4 00 

10 tables, clothing room 10 00 

28 thermometers 8 80 



284 

414 towels, attendants' 20 70 

1,155 towels, ward 57 75 

145 towels, dining room 7 25 

60 towels, tea 3 00 

24 towel racks 2 40 

65 tidies 10 25 

11 tubs 3 30 

27 tanks, wash 135 00 

G31 tumblers, glass 31 55 

4 violins 4 00 

124 waiters, tea 31 00 

1 water eooler 5 00 

11 wardrobes 22 00 

21 wash-boards 1 05 

8 drip-pans 4 00 

310 ward aprons 62 00 

2 bibs, ward 50 

388 aprons, attendants' 58 20 

24 brushes, shoe 4 56 

24 bath tubs 1,512 00 

12 carpets, attendants' 12 00 

64 carpet rugs 16 00 

113 cushions, chair 11 30 

5 easles 1 00 

36 foot stools 10 80 

62 gas bells 3 10 

7 sewing machines 70 00 

78 screens, heater 78 00 

14 slop jars 3 50 

20 tack hammers 1 00 

tureens 1 75 

16 yards matting 11 04 

4 electric fans SO 00 

1 operating table 50 

106 cotton mats 70 .50 

6 rubber boots 18 00 

6 rubber (.-oat s 12 00 

60 rocking chairs, large, new 276 00 

12 rocking chairs, small, new 10 80 

44 corridor chairs, new 110 00 



Tui.il Ward Troperty, 1). F. M $18,500 02 

WARD rnnrKKTY. DKrARTMEXT FOR WOMEN. 

40 clofhinir b.iskefs $12 00 

71 attenrljints' bedsteads 390 50 

846 wanl iM'^lsteads 423 00 

4 commodes 2 00 

15 Iron bedsteads 120 00 



• 285 

2 bed pans 2 00 

14 dinner bells ir» 00 

102 double bed blankets 102 00 

2,610 single bed blankets 2,01 o (i<i 

52 sugar bowls 4 IG 

43 wash bowls 4 80 

737 soup bowls .•}»] 85 

14 bread l)oxes 5 00 

13 bi'ead boards or. 

14 bread knives 2 lu 

207 house lirooms 2n 7i t 

74 whisk brooms M 70 

48 dust brushes 4 SO 

145 scrub brushes 11 GO 

70 hair brushes 3 50 

23 web brooms 3 55 

360 mop buckets 72 00 

28 attendants' bureaus 5G 00 

109 camisoles 32 70 

9 oil cans 45 

134 dining casters <)7 00 

351 corridor chairs 70 20 

961 dining room chairs 192 20 

6 invalid chairs 12 00 

473 rocking chairs 709 50 

24 clocks 36 00 

136 coarse combs 4 08 

70 fine combs 2 10 

771 chambers 77 1 o 

71 dish pans 10 65 

111 dust pans 11 10 

37 wash pans 2 95 

7 pianos 741 80 

12 piano stools 7 50 

1,179 ward pictures 587 50 

aS8 attendants' pillow cases 28 50 

2,648 ward pillow cases 264 80 

908 hair pillows . ." 681 00 

28 feather pillows 28 00 

45 cream pitchers 2 70 

59 syrup pitchers ■ 5 90 

129 water pitchers 19 35 

19 granite pitchers 6 50 

124 coffee pots 12 40 

49 rugs 49 00 

19 restraint anklets 9 50 

75 window shades 82 00 

62 floor rubbers 12 40 

124 clothing sacks 31 00 

80 salt cellars 2 40 

875 saucers 1" 50 



286 

25 scissors 2 90 

13 screw drivers 1 30 

13 sujrar cans 2 60 

118 settees 29 50 

232 double sheets 92 80 

3,634 single sheets 1.090 20 

386 rubber sheets 386^ 00 

99 spittoons ^ ^ 

39 spoon-liolders 2 34 

713 tablespoons 28 52 

331 teaspoons 9 93 

17 vegetable spoons 1 "^ 

158 double spreads 142 20 

1,222 single spreads 977 60 

31 enameled stands 4G 50 

208 hall stands 104 00 

29 wash-stands 14 50 

60 flower stands 24 00 

3 fruit stands 60 

185 stand covers 37 00 

90 indestructible blankets 270 00 

47 step ladders 37 60 

67 loungs pillows 20 10 

245 table cloths 147 00 

109 dining tables 130 80 

28 side tables 32 20 

18 clothing room tables 14 40 

42 thermometers 4 20 

471 attendants' towels 47 10 

2,713 ward towels 271 30 

185 tea towels 9 25 

42 towel racks 6 30 

549 tidies 54 90 

31 bath tubs 124 24 

3 wash tuV)s 75 

799 glass tuml>lers 23 97 

100 tea waiters 10 00 

25 wa rdrobes 37 50 

30 wash-boards 4 50 

5 water sets 2 00 

996 ward aprons 99 60 

68 ward bibs 4 76 

674 ward 1»onnets 67 40 

16 carpets 160 00 

811 tea Clips 24 33 

111 tin cups 2 22 

10 granite cups 50 

4 fee<ling cups 40 

12 salt cruets 36 

1,035 window curtains 517 50 

3 water dippers 15 



287 

65 butter dishes p, -)() 

66 dessert dishes 1 us 

48 stealv dislies <» 60 

25 toilet soap dislies 75 

174 vegetable dishes 1 7 40 

30 foot stools '.) (to 

18 carving forks 1 :',( » 

875 table forks S7 .'iit 

9 gas sticks 90 

16 hat racks 4 83 

81 gas globes 4 05 

6 ice picks 30 

19 carving knives 2 85 

765 table knives 7<; .".(t 

12 knife trays CO 

246 lambrequins 40 2( » 

21 lanterns 2 70 

1,931 napkins 05 

76 looking glasses 38 00 

100 lounges 350 00 

81 medicine glasses 2 43 

1 medicine tray 10 

901 hair mattresses 2.703 00 

836 husk mattresses 1.254 00 

204 mop sticks 30 60 

8 mouse traps 24 

6 organs 120 (Mt 

153 ward chemises 15 00 

151 ward drawers 15 10 

108 ward dresses 21 60 

332 ward gowns 60 40 

204 ward hats 10 20 

606 ward hoods (;o 60 

141 ward skirts 14 10 

112 ward vests 11 20 

KM) vegetable granite dishes 20 00 

S4S table napkins 50 88 

579 ladies' ties 11 58 

1 gas stove "\ 

25 banner staffs 2 50 

42 combination suits 21 00 

109 throws 21 80 

46 canvas dresses 23 00 

251 cotton quilts 351 00 

15 wire mattresses 3 75 

81 easels 12 80 

26 screens 7 80 

13 sprinkling cans 1 30 

7 tack hammers 70 

70 granite saucers 3 50 

5 wooden tanks 12 00 



288 

2 metal tanks 10 00 

17 milk cans 6 80 



Total ward property, D. F. ^V $18,464 02 



GENERAL KITCHEN, DEPARTMENT FOU MEN. 

1 kitchen ranjrc, Mith necessary articles, steamers, 
broilers, coffee, meat, vegetable, etc., kettles, etc .... $2,670 00 

3 double potato fryers 21 00 

8 steel f rj' pans 23 00 

12 I'ange oven pans 9 00 

6 griddle plates 20 00 

1 grease strainer 1 00 

2 heavy cullenders, Longfoot 3 50 

1 set granite measures 2 (K3 

1-pint and 2-quart granite funnels 50 

2 flour sieves, wood frame 1 00 

2 wooden iK>tato mashers 60 

6 wooden sixK)ns, assorted 90 

6 French fry pans 4 00 

1 Chinese strainer 1 75 

2 seamless mixing bowls 2 OO 

16 plain ladles 4 00 

4 pierced ladles 1 00 

12 skimmers 1 60 

6 flesh forks, three-pronge<l 6(» 

6 cake turners 50 

3 doz. basting spoons, forged 2 50 

3 doz. milk lunis 7 00 

3 doz. p\idding i>ans 8 00 

3 heavy retuniisl dish pans 3 00 

3 doz. potato knives 2 OU 

2 wire broilers 1 50 

2 large gi-aters 60 

16 copper sauce pans and covers 98 40 

1 spice bo.\ 1 00 

12 galvanizi'd soap cups 1 70 

2 coml>inati(>n bread slicei-s 3 00 

4 wire egg wliiiis 50 

1 cleaver 1 7."( 

1 steel 80 

1 doz. long-handletl kitchen forks 80 

6 coflfee carriers. 3-gals 10 00 

6 tea cariers. 2-gals 3 00 

6 tea carriers. 1 -gal 2 00 

6 soujt carrlj'rs. 'J-gals 10 ((O 

10 tables <>0 lK» 

5 tables (old I 3 0<j 



2sri 

1 beef clipper 7,-, 

7 sinks 4S no 

1 hash cutter .")."!( i( 1 

1 coffee can :>, on 

1 clock 1 no 

12 milk i)ans 1; <io 

2 wheel barrows TiO 

6 large diet boxes (old) 2 (k» 

5 meat tubs 4 (h» 

12 milk buckets (> 00 

50 feet rubber hose (old) oO 

3 mop sticks :{( » 

8 brooms 1 00 

8 scrub brushes 40 

2 iron band ice picks 20 

2 nutmeg graters 20 

1 small step ladder HO 

24 coffee pots (old) (i 00 

1 spice box 1 00 

2 apple parers 25 

2 meat pounders K) 

2 hatchets 40 

12 sheet iron pans 5 00 

6 1-pint dippers 50 

S 2-(iuart dippers 80 

422 pie plates 5 00 

450 tin fruit cans (old) 10 00 

150 glass fruit cans (old) 2 00 

10 large diet boxes 2 00 

75 small diet boxes (old) 3 (X) 

17 small diet boxes 00 

1 doz. chairs 1 50 

193 aprons 8 00 

100 dish towels 4 (M) 

39 roller towels 2 50 

12 meat sheets 1 75 

3 meat blocks 8 00 

4 carving knives 1 25 

12 range pans 10 (X) 

Miscellaneous tinware S 00 



CANNED GOODS. 

1,800 gals, canned tomatoes •. $540 00 

400 gals, green tomatoes pickled 80 00 

300 gals, pumpkin butter 90 00 

50 gals, catsup 20 00 

Total General Kitchen, D. F. M $3,972 70 

19 — Ins. Vouchers. 



290 



GENERAL KITCHEN, DErARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

(01(1.) 

2 ranges ?400 00 

1 ice chest 50 00 

2 Ice cream freezers 10 00 

1 iron kettle, large 40 00 

1 copper kettle 40 00 

4 steamers 5 00 

G hand wagons 75 00 

2 trucks 7 00 

1 meat block 2 00 

1 bread safe 2 00 

7 tables 5 00 

G milk cans, large 5 00 

1 iron sink 2 00 

2 wooden sinks 2 00 

50 1-gal. coffee pots 4 00 

36 1-quart coffee pots 2 00 

4 hatchets 1 00 

3 dippers, large 1 00 

1 clock 2 00 

3 carving knives 1 00 

2 flour sieves 50 

6 griddles 4 00 

12 roller towels 1 00 

24 dish towels 1 00 

100 aprons 5 00 

4 scrub brushes 50 

3 disli pans 1 00 

4 steamers 2 00 

4 roasters 2 00 

200 pie pans 2 00 

6 iron pans 1 00 

13 sugar buckets 4 00 

2 egg whips 25 

1 mirror 25 

4 rollingpins 50 

2 tea streamers 50 

3 iron spoons 25 

3 forks, large 50 

6 skimmei-s 50 

25 muffin pans 1 50 

20 tin tubs 11 50 

18 butter (Mips '. 1 UO 

40 diet l)(>xes 5 00 

24 soup buckets, large 5 00 

1 doz. 1-gal. milk l>U(kcts 1 00 

4 iron slop tubs 4 00 

20 chairs 2 00 



291 

1 tea box ."( i 

18 slop buckets 1 UU 

1 cupboard 50 

1 grinding stone 4 00 

1 meat pounder oO 

2 cleavers 50 

27 3-gal. coffee pots 5 00 

40 l-quart cups 1 00 

16 doz. glass fruit cans 7 00 



CANNED GOODS. 

3,200 gals, tomatoes $960 00 

250 gals, green tomatoes, pickled 50 00 

180 gals, tomato catsup 117 00 

125 gals, pumpkin butter 25 00 

200 gals, tomato butter 40 00 

200 gals, preserves 100 00 



(Nevs' Kitchen.) 

1 kitchen range, 6 ovens $550 00 

1 broiler 32 00 

5 roasters 275 00 

4 steamei'S with 8 steam boxes 180 00 

6 80-gal. iron kettles 510 00 

4 iron sinks 160 00 

1 small sink 6 75 

2 copper coffee urns 50 00 

2 copper tea urns 30 00 

1 hot water urn 15 00 

1 steam table 160 00 

1 steam heater 10 00 

i copper fruit kettle 110 00 

1 hash cutter 55 00 

3 meat blocks 36 00 

1 cupboard 10 00 

10 tables 60 00 

2 large copper boxes 15 00 

16 copper sauce pans and covers 98 40 

3 double potato fryers 21 00 

8 steel fry pans 24 00 

12 range oven pans 21 00 

12 range pans 12 00 

6 gi-iddle plates 27 00 

9 small fryers with handles 24 00 

2 floiu* sieves 2 00 

2 wooden pastry bowls 1 00 

6 assorted wooden spoons 1 00 



21)2 

C lai-KL' dish i»!iiis 1 80 

2 sfamh'ss mixing pans 1 00 

5 doz. imildiii;: pans 9 00 

3 (loz. milk pans 8 00 

2 laix»' Kiat.'is 1 00 

1 spice 1m).\ 2 00 

lli Kranitc soap fni)s 1 75 

2 brass wire CKP \vhii)s 50 

2 bmid slic.Ts 6 50 

1 steel 80 

2 doz. lonjr handled liitchen forlcs 90 

10 paring knives 5 00 

1 doz. steel skinuners 2 00 

2 ice picks 30 

2 carvinj.' forks 2 00 

2 nutniejr jnateis 1 00 

K! phiiu hidh's 4 70 

12 skimmers 2 00 

4 pierced huUes 1 40 

i\ tish foi-ks 2 20 

<; Hesli forks, tliree-i>ronjred 3 60 

2 wire toasters 1 50 

(! cake turners. 1 small step ladder 4 50 

ti soup carriers. .S-gals.; (i soup carriers. 2-gals.; coffee 

carriers, 3-gals. ; 12 coffee carriers. 2-gals.; G tea cai- 

riei-s. 1-jral 80 00 

2 square veRetable tubs 8 00 

I bread safe 10 00 

I refrij.'erator 750 00 

1 set trranite measures and funnels 8 (X) 



Total oi<l .111(1 new irenerai kitchen. r>. F. W.... $5,463 15 



DINIXC DEPARTMENT. 

I. Deitartnient for Men. 

36 aprons .$2 00 

7 butter knives 75 

2 brooms 15 

7 Imt.ter dishes 1 00 

2 bread ImkuhIs 25 

6 buckets 1 75 

79 chairs 22 00 

7 carving knives 1 50 

7 carving: forks 1 00 

10 curtains :•,."(» 

7 COffw pots 1 .")(! 

1 clock :5 (Kt 

1 i-uplMKird 3 00 



203 



84 cups 1> 2.". 

5 tasters 1,-) (Ml 

6 cracker dishes 1 50 

84 dessert dishes 1 73 

7 dish pans 55 

66 forks ■ 3 75 

14 fruit dishes 6 00 

6G knives 3 75 

5 moi)s 55 

84 napkins 5 00 

7 phitters 1 50 

66 pie phites 2 (X) 

5 pictures 2 00 

96 plates 8 00 

21 pitchers 3 00 

84 saucers 4 0() 

144 spoons 11 50 

14 sufjar bowls 2 50 

7 syrup pitchers 75 

1 sideboard 6 00 

14 salt and pepper boxes 15 

4 screen doors 1 75 

5 screen windows 2 00 

7 soup tureens 6 00 

72 soup bowls 5 75 

4 sinks 100 00 

84 tumblers 75 

9 tables 15 00 

84 table cloths 3 00 

42 towels 3 00 

8 trays 2 25 

28 vegetable dishes 2 50 

1 washboard 10 

* (New Dining Room.) 

141 chairs $71 (Ml 

12 tables 12(i (Ml 

1 coffee tank 15 00 

1 s-team table 25 00 

1 dish tank 1(H) 00 



2. DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

47 aprons .$3 25 

2 bells 75 

7 buckets 1 25 

76 bowls 4 50 

11 butter dishes 1 ">0 



T?J? 



294 

1 bread box W 

1 bread box 2 00 

2 benches 1 50 

3 cake-stauds 75 

11 cracker bowls 1 50 

9 carving knives 1 50 

2 clothes baskets 35 

1 clothes box 75 

1 clothes rack 25 

18 prs. curtains 5 00 

12 casters 17 50 

100 cups 2 75 

109 chjUrs 27 00 

17 coffee pots 5 50 

1 cupboju-d 2 50 

40 dish towels 1 00 

2 dish pans 15 

4 face towels 10 

2 feather dusters 15 

91 forks 75 

1 ice chest 3 00 

83 knives 2 25 

I looking-glass 40 

II meat platters 2 25 

11 milk pitchers 1 25 

12 mustard bottles 7 80 

1 meat board 10 

74 napkins 2 25 

1 cupboard, old 50 

126 plates 3 50 

12 pepi)er shakers 7 SO 

1 pepper can 10 

19 sugar bowls 1 25 

187 saucei-s 3 50 

14 salt shakers 9 10 

8 syrup pitchers 50 

70 soup tureens 38 50 

1 stand table 50 

6 side tables 4 00 

2 screen doors 75 

7 screen windows 1 50 

2 scrub brushes 10 

3 sinks 93 00 

10 teaspoon holders 60 

97 table cloths 75 00 

89 siK)ons .' 6 00 

74 tumblers 50 

12 trays 2 20 

10 tables 14 00 

64 teaspoons 4 00 

20 vinegar cruets 2 00 



295 

1 vinegar jug, 1 wash-board ir. 

42 vegetable dishes :i 5<j 

9 water pitchers 2 75 

Total Dining Department $9Sl 95 



MARKING ROOM— DEPARTMENT FOR MEN. 

86 coats $258 00 

63 vests 63 00 

309 pants 349 17 

292 shiits, colored 146 00 

lis shirts, white 47 20 

240 prs. drawers 120 00 

295 undershirts 147 50 

869 prs. socks 86 90 

112 suspenders 22 40 

43 prs. slippers 36 50 

98 prs. shoes 127 30 

91 felt hats 91 00 

15 straw hats 7 50 

23 caps 5 75 

108 neckties 16 20 

248 boxes collars 24 80 

15 prs. gloves 3 75 

Bedding. 

122 sheets, ward $30 20 

140 sheets, attendants' 35 00 

24 sheets, rubber 12 00 

1 sheet restraint 50 

93 pillow ca.ses 9 30 

92 aprons, attendants' 13 80 

45 aprons, ward 9 00 

238 towels, ward 11 90 

2\4 towels, roller 21 40 

60 mats cotton 4 50 

16 brushes, bath 3 04 

Office Fixtures. 

1 waste basket $0 25 

1 clothing basket 1 10 

4 rubber boots 8 00 

1 granite bucket 50 

1 book-case, small 1 50 

1 hair brush 25 

1 house broom 20 

1 whisk broom 15 



296 

1 counter •' ^^^ 

1 tol»iU<<l tlltlfl- 1 •"»" 

1 jh'jj: (lit U'l- ^"> 

2 ortlct- .liairs - <>0 

2 i)lain i-hnirs • 'J*^ 

1 roiul> "5 

1 ruhlM-r coat -^ ^^ 

1 ilisinfiHtaut laii 25 

2 oil i-ans 50 

1 tlustor 35 

1 ln<ikiM;;-;;lass 50 

1 hainnu'r 50 

2 tlai irons 30 

1 iron «-<K»lor 15 

1 irou last -5 

1 dust pan 1"' 

2 Ixixes iH'ii points 5<t 

3 ink-stands 30 

G stands of shclviuj; 18 (M) 

2 spittoons 20 

1 sin-inkler 15 

1 pr. srissofs 10 

2 uas stoves 1 50 

5 taJ)l»'s 10 00 

1 uionk«>y wifiicli 25 

Supervisor's Office. 

2 desks $7 00 

2 ottice cliairs 2 00 

3 eliairs 2 25 

1 stand ".") 

1 waste basket 25 

1 cemetery plat case 5 00 

1 hat rack 1 50 

1 clock 3 50 

Total Marking Room. I». V. M 



MATJKINC IJOOM— DKrAUTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

47 shawls. Iar;,'e .$78 00 

1 shawl, small 25 

9Vj doz. hoods 5 00 

40 prn. shoes 55 50 

58 fans 2 90 

34 prs. slippers 25 50 

3 shoe polish Imttles 30 

12>{. doz. lu)s.> 30 00 

ISVa doz. handkerchiefs 15 54 



297 

21/1. doz. tiR-kin.ir coiulis ] ];; 

3 doz. foarse eoiub.s 'J !!."» 

2 doz. tine combs 1 i n i 

25 gross shoe-strings :; 7.-, 

2 Imixos tidy cottons 1 (Mt 

37 piu'kagcs pins 7 u:; 

I gross urocliot needles li 4( i 

II gross safety pins, small It;.") 

11 gross safetj' pins, large i: 7.". 

15 papers darning needles 1 .",<i 

1 wardrobe 10 (j<i 

1 table 7.". 

1 mirror 1 (mi 

1 gas stove 2 (Ml 

2 flat irons 50 

1 hatchet 25 

1 step-ladder ,"»0 

3 chairs 2 00 

1 desk and stool 00 

1 lK)ok-case 3 Of> 

Total -Marking Room, D. F. W $263 45 



SEWING ROOM. 

402 yards dark calico !j;20 7!l 

372 yards light calico 14 88 

292 yards blue calico 13 14 

126 yards red calico 5 67 

79 yds. bleached table linen 47 40 

104 yds. red table linen 29 12 

104 yards halt-l)leached table linen 42 64 

264 yanls lu-4 sheeting 39 60 

706 yards 8-4 sheeting 84 72 

i^3 yards 42-iu. sheeting 18 :!4 

126 yards 58-in. Utica brown l."> 12 

70 yards bleached muslin 4 2(» 

162 yards half-bleached muslin 9 92 

20 yards colored Canton flannel 2 8<> 

983 yards unbleached Canton flannel 88 47 

859 yards cheviot 51 54 

204 yards gingham 9 18 

169 yards ticking 21 '.(7 

347 yards jeans 9o (i2 

190 yards Victoria lawn 22 80. 

278 yards bleached crash 16 68 

201 yards drapery Tm 33 

20 yards mole skin Ki 00 

30 yards table felt 4 50 

603 yards scrim 33 17 



298 

40 yards wool dress ;4uud.s tj <K) 

70 yards driliiug 2 80 

1(J8 yards cainl)rlc 5 04 

4 yards deniiu 32 

277 yards friufe'ed towels 44 32 

492 yards bath towels 44 28 

531 yarils roller towels 53 10 

3% gross pearl buttons 29 25 

IV/j gross black bone buttons 5 75 

6 gross pants buttons 3 00 

3% g. gross small agate buttons 3 85 

7 g. gi'oss large agate buttons 14 70 

2l» doz. thimbles 3 13 

141 doz. spools thread 50 76 

6 doz. spools silk thread 2 88 

18 doz. spools twisted silk 3 60 

4 gross hooks and eyes 40 

106 papers needles 10 60 

18 doz. machine needles 3 20 

5 doz. napkins 6 00 

r»i 2 doz. fringed napkins 9 63 

393 ladies' vests 127 55 

153 calico aprons 22 95 

73 white aprons 15 33 

104 neckties 5 20 

643 pillow cases 96 45 

251 sheets 128 00 

95 indestructible blankets 451 25 

2 muslin curtains 1 00 

2 table cloths 2 40 

22 curtain straps 75 

143 ilu'viot shirts 71 50 

24 nightshirts 12 00 

18 men's undershirts 9 00 

6 men's drawers 3 00 

74 gowns 48 10 

78 chemises 39 00 

11 ladies' drawers 4 40 

14 skirts 14 00 

7 woiden dresses 28 00 

13 calico drosses 26 00 

1 dress wa ist 75 

3 flannel shirts 1 00 

28 rocking chairs 10 00 

22 chairs 7 00 

1 chart 1 00 

button-hole scissors 6 00 

3 prs. shears 3 00 

13 window shades 8 00 

9 tables 20 00 

10 sewing machines, old 120 00 



299 

3 lap boards 50 

1 bucket 25 

1 clock 3 50 

1 step-ladder 50 

1 water tank 3 OO 

1 clothes rack 2 00 

2 quilting frames 1 00 

8 baskets 4 00 

3 fire screens, old 50 

3 tracing wtieels 75 

3 irons 50 

1 gas stove 1 00 

1 eyelet cutter 1 00 

8 tape lines 20 

2 granite cups 25 

1 hammer 50 

Total Sewing Room $2,366 69 



LAUNDRY. 

Machinery in use in laundry $5,612 15 

1 large counter 3 75 

2 ironing tables 200 00 

14 tables 99 00 

5 doz. clothes baskets 119 19 

8 baskets, old 1 80 

1 sieve 50 

1 pr. scissors 85 

1 clock 3 50 

2 laundry wagons 4 00 

3 tubs 30 

6 scrub brushes 60 

3 doz. granite pans 1 88 

4 doz. flat irons 19 20 

3 lbs. twine 50 

1 sprinkling can 25 

4 dust pans 53 

1 box clothes pins 50 

2 barrels chip soap 19 00 

1 keg soda 3 50 

2 wash-boards 25 

1 office desk 18 00 

1 oflSce chair 3 90 

7 granite buckets 4 60 

12 tack hammers 1 10 

1 mangle 1,250 00 

32 electric flat and polishing irons 192 00 

12 clothes racks 96 00 



300 

12 baski't ln-ncli.-s 24 W 

12 (lollies iM.Xfs 12 00 

Matt in;; in laundress's office and laundry 120 50 

2 iHiXt's stanli 4 05 

12 brooms 1 69 

4 hu.kcts 1 20 

1(M» feet %iu. liosi' 7 00 

1 hose nozzle 50 

2 soap boilers 20 00 

Total Lauiiilry ,$7.84'; 



CIIAl'EL, SCHOOL AND AMUSEMENT. 

Staye anil scenery $55 00 

1 or;raii 35 00 

1 screen 1 00 

2 stands 2 00 

1 clock 2 00 

1 mirror 50 

1 chest 50 

1 l)ook-case 1 50 

1 table 50 

14 cane-seiit chairs 2 50 

!Mj common chairs 24 00 

12 stable chairs 8 00 

;{(► benches 60 00 

1 water cooler ami stand 8 00 

1 ttiXiX 7 00 

1 family Bible 4 00 

ScluMil. hymn. etc.. books 15 00 

48 writing slates 2 00 

1 sta;re <'ari>et 2 00 

2 (U>z. dumb bells 2 50 

4 sets crotiuet 2 00 

Assortment of j^ames. pl.-iyiiii; cards, etc 10 00 



'I'ni.il Cliapcl. School, etc. 



STORE INVOICE. 

11. .-.lit lbs. snu'ar .^G13 06 

• i.lN'.t lbs. coll'ee (334 37 

1.o;;i lbs. butter ,Sf, no 

284 <loz. e^Kx 42 CA) 

1.200 lbs. oatmeal 23 40 

3,2JH; lbs. beans f^ 25 

2.(HKt lbs. rice 1,X) 00 



301 

7 l)ils. pickles 24 M 

241) gals. vinej;:u- IS (17 

220 doz. cans poathos :v.ii} (M) 

1J>4 tloz. cans corn 1<;!> 7r> 

172 doz. cans tomatoes KU SO 

119 lbs. pc[)p('r 11 !H) 

25 lbs. tai)ioca 7.") 

25 lbs. barley 75 

100 sacks table salt 1 75 

14 brls. lake salt 9 80 

124 lbs. corn starch .'5 10 

150 lbs. currants 9 75 

12 aals. mustard :] (M) 

10 boxes raisins i:j .~i(i 

2,000 lbs. evaporated apples 175 00 

50 lbs. citron 5 00 

•'^51/' gals, syrup 5 OS 

141/4 gals, coal oil 1 09 

5% doz. whisk brooms 4 58 

8-12 doz. carpet brooms 44 

24 doz. mop sticks 15 30 

12.8(f5 boxes matches 44 .50 

2 1-12 doz. shoe brushes 10 02 

12 5-12 doz. scrub brushes 8 10 

2-12 doz. wash tubs 92 

1 6-12 doz. wash boards 2 78 

241/2 lbs. candles 2 2o 

2.924 bars laundry soap 78 94 

1,940 bars toilet soap 77 CO 

1,320 bars kitchen crystal soap 4<> 20 

9 doz. granite buckets 49 32 

2 2-12 doz. bath brick 78 

1 4-12 doz. mops 2 ()7 

5 4-12 doz. shoe-blacking 2 12 

10 9-12 doz. stove polish 5 10 

10-12 doz. tack hammers 80 

• 3-12 doz. hatchets 1 08 

9 8-12 doz. chambers 41 08 

17 6-12 doz. teaspoons , 35 00 

17 3-12 doz. knives 54 75 

20 3-12 doz. forks 00 75 

10-12 doz. baskets 15 00 

29 4-12 doz. boxes silicon 15 S2 

2 doz. pineapples 3 SO 

12 prs. felt boots and arctics 20 00 

1 rubber coat 2 25 

15 lbs. macaroni 1 20 

122 lbs. twine 28 00 

602 lbs. sal soda 3 37 

150 lbs. smoking tobacco 43 50 

753 lbs. plug tobacco 218 37 



302 

1,850 lbs. I.nindry starch 32 38 

l,072J/{. lbs. clieese 107 25 

l«il lbs. bjiklii^' soda S 05 

20<J lbs. cotton batting 10 00 

750 blankets 1.202 40 

3'J ilonbie quilts 35 10 

424 yards sluK'ting, 36-in 53 00 

6,000 yards sheeting, 58-in 660 00 

20 doz. thread 8 20 

4 doz. medicine tumblers 1 20 

16 11-12 doz. cups 16 07 

19 5 12 saucers 18 45 

1 5-12 doz. tumblers 50 

19 11-12 doz. plates 15 33 

1 3-12 doz. vegetable dishes 2 37 

12 2-12 doz. butter dishes 3 63 

45 1-12 doz. des.sert dishes 16 34 

6-12 doz. soap dishes 1 50 

1 2-12 doz. syrup pitchers 2 33 

2 4-12 doz. cream pitchers 2 25 

2 7-12 <loz. water pitchers 9 30 

1 1-12 doz. water wash ewer 4 06 

8-12 doz. wash basin 2 40 

6 6-12 doz. spoonholders 2 28 

13 8-12 doz. platters 36 90 

2 5-12 doz. suf,'ar bowls 6 89 

5-12 doz. soup bowls 30 

1 1-12 doz. slop jars 9 75 

1 6-12 doz. shovels 18 75 

6-12 doz. picks 3 33 

4-12 iloz. tea trays 1 17 

1 10-12 doz. lawn nikes 8 25 

1 6-12 doz. gas globes 2 33 

10-12 doz. bod pans 6 67 

9-12 doz. lamp chimneys 68 

4-12 doz. lantern globes 20 

1-12 d(»z. lanterns 50 

4-12 doz. scissors 1 50 

3-12 doz. mouse traps 45 

750 feet garden hose 67 50 

1 pr. hip rubber boots 4 25 

12 doz. salt cruets 2 40 

] clock 5 70 

1 desk 8 00 

I* chairs 3 00 

2 mirrors 1 25 

1 cofTce mill 60 00 

4 gas glol»es 60 

1 hatchet 15 

2 ])roonis. old 20 

3 spittoons 30 



303 

2 butter testers 30 

1 waste basket, 1 cheese knife, 1 coffee tester 45 

1 wheelbarrow 3 W 

1 molasses auger, 2 screw drivers, 1 blacking brush. 

2 dust pans, 2 small step ladders 1 (x» 

1 molasses rack 1 00 

1 coal oil can, lot of paper bags, 3 baiTel covers 8 45 

7 ice hooks 7 00 

1 tobacco cutter, 3 scoops 1 50 

1 pr. platform scales 14 00 

1 pr. counter scales 9 00 

Total Store Invoice $5,937 04 

ENGINEER'S DEPARTMENT. 

12 boilers and heating apparatus $82,200 00 

4 engines 500 00 

7 pumps 1,700 00 

1 pump 600 00 

1 pump 250 00 

1 thread cutting machine, 2^/^ to 5 in 160 00 

1 thread cutting machine, i^ to 2 in 50 00 

1 lathe and drill press 440 00 

1 tee square 2 00 

2 looking-glasses 1 00 

1 3-in. iron body gate valve 4 00 

4 2-in. brass gate valves p. and c 12 00 

3 1 l-2S-in. Jenldns gate valves 2 00 

4 1-in. Jenkins gate valves 4 00 

8 %-in. globe valves, Crane 2 00 

10 %-in. Jenkins globe valves 4 00 

12 %-in. Crane globe valves 3 00 

4 %-in. common globe valves 80 

2 214-in. iron body gate valves 6 00 

1 2-in. p. and c. gate valves 3 00 

1 1%-in. Galvin gate valves 2 50 

2 li/4-in. Galvin gate valves 4 50 

1 1-in. Galvin gate valves 1 00 

8 %-in. Galvin gate valves 4 80 

8 %-in. lock shield globe valves 4 40 

5 %-in. lock shield globe valves 2 00 

5 %-in. lock shield globe valves 2 00 

19 %-in. lock shield angle valves 5 70 

7 1%-in. Jenkins angle valves 15 75 

2 1%-in. common angle valves 3 50 

1 114-in Jenkins' angle valve 1 75 

10 1-in. Jenkins' angle valves 10 00 

7 1-in. wood-handle radiator valves S 75 

2 %-in. wood-handle radiator valves 2 00 



304 

10 %-\u. .Iriikius iiii-lf valves 12 00 

7 '/•j-iii. .It'iikiiis" jin;:l«« valves 4 20 

:; %-lii. .leiikiiis an;:le valves 1 20 

10 Vi-1». .FiMJkins an;;le valves 3 50 

12 1-H-lu. Jenkins anjile valves 4 00 

3 2-ln. cluM-k valves, Jenkins G 75 

2 2-in. flieek valves, connnon 3 5f) 

8 l>-..-in. check valv«>s. Jenkins 14 00 

2 l':.-in. clieclv valves, common 3 00 

3 .'{-4-in. <-lieck valves, common 1 80 

3 I'/t-in. clicciv valves, common 3 00 

5 Yj-'in. ciiecU valves, common 2 00 

1 l>A-in. iK.se valve 1 75 

8 li'iri"- ln-ass steam ccM-ks 1(5 00 

11 IVi-in. brass steam cocks 15 40 

5 1-in. Itrass sti-am cocks • 5 00 

<i 3-4-in. brass steam co<-ks 4 80 

7 'o-in. l)rass steam cocks « 4 20 

S 3-S-in. brass steam cocks 4 00 

10 14-iii. sicMiii irau^'es 4 00 

IS 1-ln. radiator air valves :J 70 

t> V4-iii. radiator air valves 1 ()8 

«> 3-S-in. cylinder cocks 1 SO 

3 I'o-in. I'otts iniions 1 50 

1 li'i-in. I'otts nnion 40 

2 1-in. I'otts unions 70 

3-4-in. Potts unions 1 80 

10 V-j-in. comprt^sion bibbs (! 00 

8 3-8-in. «-onii)ression bibbs 4 00 

U 'I'-iii- brass unicm ells, tiuished 1 80 

15 lV4-in- brass union ells, finished 9 00 

12 1-in. brass union ells, tinishtnl 60 

ii :5-4-in. l>rass union ells, finished 3 00 

8 1-in. l»rass unii>ns 3 GO 

5 3-4-in. brass unions 1 50 

14 %-U\. brass unions 3 50 

13 3-H-in. brass tinions 2 34 

24 1-S-in. lirass miions 2 88 

<! 'J-ln. brass couplin.irs 1 so 

10 lV.-iii. bra.ss i-oui)linjrs li (m> 

S 1 V|-in. brass ciuijilin^'s 1 02 

12 1-in. brass cou|>lin»!s 1 20 

4 3-4-iii. brass c(»u|ilin^s 28 

11 Vj-in. brass couplin;rs ^5 

l(» 3-S-iii. brass couplings 40 

10 1-ln. brass tees. tinishtMl 1 80 

27 3-4-ln. bra.ss toes. tinlshe<l 4 32 

25 i/.'-ln. brass tees, linislied 2 25 

14 1-lu. brass ells. linislied j 92 

24 3-4-ln. brass ells, tiuished 2 G4 

30 Vj-iii- bra.ss ells, finished 2 52 



305 

2 paiiti'.v cocks, nickeled 

10 Itickctl closet connect ions 

4 Kickett closet conplinfi's 

6 extrac-tor rubber si)i-iugs 

50 rubber valves for Snow pnniii 

10 copper couplings 

12 2-in. rubber stoppers 

12 IVL'-iu- rubber stoppers 

24 IVi-iii- rubber stopi)ers , 

8 1-iii. rubber st()i)pers 

8 2-iii. Iva.vinond comb, ferrules 

1 4-in. liayinond comb, ferrule 

G 2-in. .■>-4 S. lead trai)s 

3 2-in. leail traps 

3 li/2-iu. S. lead traps 

3 1^-in. 3-4 S. lead traps 

3 li/4-in. 8. lead traps 

1 lV[>-iu. S. lead trap. Bowers. .' 

3 li4:-in. S. lead traps, Bowers 

11 glasses and balls for Bowers trap . 

2 4-iu. tra]) screens 

5 3-in. ti';!]) screens 

5 2-in. trap screens 

6 IVii-iu. IJaymond comb, solid nipples. . 
6 114-iu. Raymond coiub. solid nipples . 

I Monitor burner 

H) (4em .gas mixers 

8 ly^-in. Ketteuring t. p. mixers 

3 1-iu. elevator rubber valves 

12 sink couplings, lead pipe 

II sink strainers, open 

4 sink bkts.. galvanized 

8 i-ubber valves for Dean ptuup 

12 C. I. pump riu,gs 

1 5-in. steam whistle 

12 2-in. railing tees 

8 2-in. railing crosses 

6 2-in. soldering nipples 

5 ly^y-iu. soldering nipples 

3 Va-in. Potts tmions 

2 Vi!-l'iiit Detroit lubricators 

1 1-in. .let piunp 

48 14x."i-S-in. vScotcli gauge glasses 

1 4-in. Hue brush 

4 ;>-in. tlue lu-ushes 

4 No. 2 12-in. water gauges 

12 Powel patent oil cui)s 

5 plain oil cups 

7 114-iu. brass plugs 

3 1-iu. brass plugs 

20 — Ins. VorcHEKS. 



• ) 


GO 


•> 


4U 


1 


20 


G 00 


11 


00 


3 


25 


4 


20 


3 


m 


t> 


bO 


1 


20 


3 


GO 


1 


75 


7 


50 


3 


75 


3 


(JO 


•» 


25 


2 


25 


1 


50 


•> 


44 


1 


30 


2 


75 


2 


00 


3 


JK) 


3 


30 




20 


5 


00 


2 40 


3 00 




SO 


1 


10 


2 


GO 


2 


3(i 


4 


50 


5 


00 


3 


00 


1 


50 


2 


10 


1 


25 


12 


00 


u 


GO 


*> 


00 


8 00 


5 


60 


7 


,so 


1 


25 


1 


40 




4.". 



306 



6 3-8-ln. brass i)higs 

30 1-8-in. iH-ass i»lugs 

8 3-4-ln. brass bushings 

12 3-H-ln. Id-ass bushings 

16 %-in. brass bushings 

48 Iron sink bolts 

12 7-8x2i/4-in. steel set screws . .. 
12 3-4x2Vi-in. steel set screws . . . . 
6 3-4x3'/..-iu. steel set screws . . . . 

24 i/{.x2-in. steel set screws 

10 3-8xlV.'-in. steel set screws . . . 

6 ^xlVl'-in. steel set sa-ews 

8 3-4x3i^.-ln. steel set screws 

2 3-4x2Vj-in- steel set screws 

150 %-in. boss washers 

50 3-8-ln. boss washers 

40 5-8-in. boss washers 

25 3-4- in. boss washers 

45 Fuller balls 

6 gauge Avashers 

6 bath-tul) rubber rings 

205 3-4-in. hose washers 

60 1-in. fiber washers 

35 3-8-ln. fiber washers 

20 3-in. Cutler wheels 

15 2-in. Cutler wheels 

8 1-in. Cutler wheels 

4 2-in. P. «Jc C. valve seats 

G V/^-'m. v. ifz C. valve seats 

6 IVi-in. P. iV: C. valve seats 

11 lV-;-in. Jenkins disks 

23 2-ln. Jenkins disks 

29 IVriii. Jenkins disks 

25 1-in. Jenkins disks 

33 3-4-in. Jenkins disks 

44 Vj-iu- Jenkins disks 

8 3-S-in. Jenkins disks 

8 Jumbo liurners 

200 lava gas tips 

70 brass pillars 

1 2-lt. pendant <(>ik 

4 hose cdfks 

4 pillar cocUs 

24 2-ln. spun ceiling plates 

20 burner cups 

3 '.ii-in. telegraph Itnsin cocks . .. . 

9 i/i-in. Cornell l)nsin cocks 

1 No. 41/j comb. Fuller bath cock 

5 comi»re«slon nickel bath cocks 

10 V^ln. cftinpH'sslon stops 

2 1-ln. compression V)lbbs 





48 


1 


80 


1 


20 


1 


08 




96 


1 


44 


1 


80 


1 


68 




90 


2 


64 




90 




54 


1 


04 




32 


3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


60 


1 


25 


4 


50 




48 


1 


50 


6 


30 


G 00 


1 


35 


4 


00 


2 


25 




96 


1 


60 


2 


10 


2 


75 


1 


80 


8 05 


5 


80 


4 


00 


3 


30 


3 


08 




40 




80 


3 


00 


3 


50 




25 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


40 


5 


00 


3 


75 


13 


25 


5 


00 


4 


00 


G 


00 


1 


60 



30 



8 114-iii. sohlcrint:' nipiilcs 1 44 

16 1-iu. soldcriui;- uipples 2 ~t{\ 

26 3-4-iu. soldeiiug nipples 2 64 

36 14-iu. soklering nipples 2 52 

23 3-8-iu. soldering nipples 1 50 

24 14-iu. soldering nipples 96 

20 114-in. wash tray plugs 9 00 

20 basin plugs 3 60 

3 3-in. asbestos bushings 3 IM) 

7 lbs. paint 1 25 

6 ll>s. wiping solder 1 25 

3 copper tank balls 2 70 

3 Lorain syphon tanks 13 50 

1 Douglas tank 4 50 

2 4-iu. long lead binds 2 50 

15 3-4-in. Hudson hose menders 1 50 

8 3-4-in. hose couplings 80 

5 3-4-in. Fuller hose nozzles 3 75 

1 3-4-in. (Jem hose nozzle 40 

6 lanterns 4 50 

2 enameled buckets 80 

3 flat urinals, enameled 3 75 

1 enameled iron hopper 2 25 

3 enameled plush-rimmed hoppers 9 75 

1 gasoline torch 2 50 

1 Comer urinal 1 25 

5 G. I. boiler crabs 1 OU 

20 ft. %-in. rubber tubing 1 00 

10 ft. 3-S-iu. rubber tubing 50 

15 ft. J4-in. rubber tubing 60 

23 lbs. Garlock piston packing 18 40 

25 lbs. Garlock spiral packing 20 00 

18 lbs. square flax packing 7 20 

21 lbs. gum core packing 18 00 

26 lbs. 3-p. packing 20 80 

18 lbs. square duck packing 6 30 

* 30 lbs. asbestos rope packing 12 00 

31 lbs. Italian hemp packing 4 64 

22 lbs. 1-S-in. sheet rubber packing 14 30 

60 lbs. %-in. cloth insertion packing 27 00 

4 lbs. 1-8-in. vulcubeston packing 1 SO 

12 lbs. Eclipse gaskets 3 00 

590 lbs. lead pipe 26 05 

201 lbs. sheet lead 11 05 

6 elevator cogs 1 38 

8 7-in. leather elevator valves 6 00 

6 manhole bolts 1 20 

6 i4xl5-in. machine bolts 90 

18 3-Sxli^-in. machine bolts 54 

1 1-in. hose pipe 45 

15 balls wicking 90 



308 

1 Cl(»w hydrant S 00 

40 bai*s soap 1 GO 

M ft. lV4-ln. brass iiij)e 10 80 

7-J ft. 1-iii. lirass pipe 14 40 

7.S ft. :{-4-iu. hiass pijK' 14 04 

'24 ft. >o-iii. brass pipe 3 30 

J4 ft. 3-s-iii. lirass pijte 2 04 

r,nt ft. 1-M-iii. lirass piiR- 4 20 

50 lbs. Cn'sceiit jfrease 3 00 

3 huniiuer haiulU's 30 

13 shMlire hamlirs 2 00 

2 i£:\s ti.vtures. old 1 50 

r. i...-in. -au^'f ((Mks 2 40 

S brass coat lionks 80 

I Ni). 2 Victor air valve 16 

lo lbs. I'-in. tin straps 1 00 

lo Ib.s. lio-in tin straps 1 00 

8 lbs. 114-in. tin straps 80 

II lbs. 1-ln. tin straps 1 10 

5 lbs. ."'.^-in. tin straps 50 

4 lbs. '^-in tin straps 40 

1 3«;-in. Triiuo frame 1 50 

2 :i4-in. Trinio frames 3 00 

4 IS-in. Trinu) frames 4 00 

4 14-in. 'JYlmo frames 3 00 

1 3C»-in. Trimo jaw 90 

3 lo-in. Trinio frames 1 80 

1 24-in. 'lYimo jaw 75 

1 lo-iii. Trimo jaw 40 

2 14-in. Trimo jaws 1 20 

2 IS-in. 'IVimo ntits 50 

2 14-in. lYimo nuts 40 

3 iM-in. lYimo ntits 30 

2 rubber coats 4 50 

2 pr. nibbcr boots »> 00 

12 14-iM. Stillson wrenches 13 40 

12 Ht-in. Stillson wrenches ^ 12 00 

12 new scanicrs 9 00 

21 tile handles 1 20 

No. 14 steel ..ilers 1 08 

2 enameled <n]is 30 

2 IV-in. I. h. solid dies 1 50 

1 3-4-in. 1. h. solid die 50 

1 3-4-ln. r. h. solid die 60 

1 V/rin. r. h. solid die 1 00 

1 1-in. r. h. solid die 80 

1 '...-in. I. h. solid die 60 

1 3-S-in. r. h. soli.l die 50 

1 Vi-ln. r. h. solid die 45 

1 3-S-in. Annstroii;: ilie TA) 

1 1 in. 1. h. .\rnistroiii: die 1 *j." 



1 V-t-'ni. 1". li. Aniisli'oiii;- (lie in 

1 3-S-in. V. h. Anustron.n- die r.o 

1 No. 1 3-wlieel Barnes cutter li (m> 

1 No. 1 Saunders cutler 1 7.-, 

23 batli chairs j .-jo 

8 basin chairs .-)»; 

150 ft. i/4-iu. belt hicinji 11 (ui 

12 12-iu. baud smooth tiles 7 lin 

12 12-in. hand bastard tiles 7 Jo 

12 10-in. hand bastard tiles 1; li.'i 

G 10-in. hand smooth tiles ."! 48 

U 14-in mill bastard tiles 4 r»0 

12 Mi-in. half-round tiles 4 2(» 

3 12-in. flat second-cut files 2 I0 

4 14-in. square bastard files li 70 

8 12-in. square bastard tiles r, su 

12 10-in. hand smooth tiles i; (Mi 

2 S-iu. roimd tiles 50 

2 12-in. b. 7 s. wrenches 2 50 

1 14-in. Trimo Avrench 1 25 

1 1-8-in. pipe tap 20 

7 scroll taps 5 25 

4 10-in. Hock saw blades 80 

1 tap^-line, new 1 .5< » 

11 double-end drop forge wrenches 12 00 

2 Armstrong taps .'] 25 

4 patent steel clamps 4 tM) 

1 oil stone 1 25 

2 die stocks, old 1 75 

2 3-4-in. 1. h. pipe taps, new 1 .5( 1 

1 2-in. r. h. pipe tap, old 2 25 

1 i/4-in. r. h. pipe tap, old 2 Hi 

2 114-in. r. h. pipe taps, old 2 2<i 

3 1-in. r. h. pipe taps, old 1 05 

2 3-4-in. r. h. pipe taps, old 1 70 

3 V^-in. I", h. pipe taps, old 1 50 

2 3-8-in. r. h. pipe taps, old 1 25 

2 l^-in. r. h. pipe taps, old 90 

1 1-8-in. pipe tap. old 40 

86 %-in. shank drills, assorted sizes <"> 48 

25 ratchet drills, assorted sizes 5 50 

23 brace drills, assorted sizes (> 21 

1 IVa-in- pipe seamer 1 35 

1 114-in. pipe seamer 1 25 

1 1-in. pipe seamer 1 <•<• 

11 brace seamers, assorted sizes 4 05 

9 leather punches 3 60 

6 belt punches 1 20 

3 smith chisels 1 95 

2 smith punches 1 30 

1 Davis level 2 75 



310 

1 small la. lie 50 

1 1-in. plu;,' tap ^5 

1 1-ln. tapf r tap 1 40 

1 7-8-in. taper tap 1 40 

1 7-8-ln. plujr tap 1 25 

1 3-4-in. plug tap 1 00 

1 3-4-ln. taper tap 1 20 

1 5-8-ln. taper tap 1 00 

1 o-8-in. plus tap 1 00 

2 9-10-in. pluj; taps 90 

4 9-l«>-in. lK)ttoin taps 1 80 

2 9-lG-in. bottom taps, 14 ft. threads 90 

2 Vl»-in. plug taps 80 

2 V^in. taper taps 80 

3 7-16-plug taps 1 24 

1 7-lG-in. taper tap 38 

2 5-lG-in. taper taps 60 

2 r)-lG-in. phig taps 70 

1 y-8-iu. plug tap 30 

1 Vi-iti- plug tap 30 

1 Vi-'m. tai>er tap 30 

2 5-32-iu. plug taps 50 

1 combination belt punch 2 00 

1 No. 1 e.xpansion bit 1 75 

1 1-ln. auger 40 

1 l^^-iu- anger 45 

1 IVj-in. auger 50 

1 3-8-in. anger 20 

1 5-lG-in. auger 18 

1 GrfH'n River screw plate, 14 to 3-4 8 00 

1 brace 1 25 

1 hock saw 1 75 

1 hand saw 1 25 

1 18-in. Stillson wrench, new 1 75 

3 clocks 12 00 

2 tables 5 00 

1 desk 9 00 

3 chairs 2 50 

1 washer cutter 75 

1 14-in. jack plane 1 75 

1 corner brace 2 25 

1 10-in. p. pliers 1 50 

4 lbs. Dickson's lubricant .40 

1 center imnch 30 

10 cold chisels 4 00 

3 cap chisels 1 20 

4 prs. calipers 6 00 

2 spring dividers 3 00 

1 set rules 1 50 

2 plumb bobbs 1 40 

1 square 1 25 



311 

1 micronu'ter ?, 00 

1 set lathe tools ir. «X) 

1 chuck u 00 

1 rubber force pump 3 00 

1 plumber's friend 1 25 

1 gas main cleaning pump 7 00 

1 automatic drill 1 25 

8 closet screws, nickeled 80 

40 ft. 2-in. belt 3 fK) 

25 ft. 1 3-4-in. belt 2 00 

12 ft. 1-in. belt 90 

2 hand vises 3 00 

6 prs. smith's tongs 7 25 

1 1-qt. oil can 40 

1 receipting machine 50 00 

10 lbs. bar steel 1 10 

2 lbs. bar steel, small 28 

2 lbs. copper rivets 80 

1 rivet puncli 20 

4 sides rawhide lace leather 8 40 

3 wheelbarrows, neAv 10 50 

12 shovels, new 8 90 

10 lbs. salsoda 50 

10 tank rod holders 75 

12 lbs. rubber, old 50 

1 14-in. earthen bowl 75 

1 machine stand 3 00 

10 7-8x5-in. machine bolts 1 10 

15 3-4x6-in. machine bolts 1 61 

18 5-8x8-in. machine bolts 1 80 

10 5-8x5-in. machine bolts 1 00 

48 5-8x4-in. machine bolts 4 SO 

50 V^x6-in. machine bolts 4 00 

40 yox5y2-in. machine bolts 3 20 

30 yox4-in. machine bolts 2 40 

24 VoxSi-^-in. machine bolts 1 68 

18 y^xS-in. machine bolts 1 08 

28 7-16x5-in. machine bolts 1 96 

20 7-16x4-in. machine bolts 1 40 

27 7-16x3-in. machine bolts 1 62 

23 3-8x3-in. machine bolts 1 15 

10 M.x2i^ machine bolts 50 

14 lbs. Garlock packing 11 20 

1 lb. spiral packing 80 

20 lbs. waste 1 40 

40 gals. Crescent engine oil 8 00 

48 gals, cylinder oil 31 20 

13 lyo-in. ells, water fittings 2 60 

3 114-in. ells, water fittings 58 

3 1-in. ells, water fittings 48 

9 iy2-m. tees, water fittings 2 25 



812 



12 lV4-iu. «t*«'><. water fittings 

12 1-iii. te«'S, water fittings 

7 .■5x2-in. tees. Diirliiiiii littings 

1 3-in. tee. iMn-iiaiii fitting 

2 3-in. IS hinds 

12 4-in. loujiiings 

G .'{Vi-iu. (•<ni|)lings 

11 y-in. eoujilings 

17 2VL»-in- couplings 

50 2-iu. eunidings 

78 IVa-in. eonplings 

24 lV4-iu. couplings 

2(Hi 1-in. couplings 

29 ;i-4-in. couplings 

17 VL'-in. <<>iiplings 

20 y-8-iu. couplings 

9 2 IMrin. red. couplings 

3 2xS-4-iu. red. couplings 

12 lVl'Xli4-i>i- red. couplings 

21 li....vl-in. retl. ctuiplings 

17 IVjXl-in. ivd. couplings 

25 l.\:{-4-in. red. coui>lings 

10 Ixli-rin. red. couplings 

28 'i-ixVi-in. red. couplings 

V.i i/jx:i-8-in. red. couitlings 

11 8-8xi/4-in. red. couplings 

4 2x1 -Sin. bends. C. I 

12 l':.xl-s-in. bends. (". I 

9 l»4xl-S-in. bends. C. I 

24 Ixl-s-in. lieiids. ('. I 

2!> ;{-4x1-S-in. iM-nds. ('. I 

47 VuXl-S-in. bends. C. I 

2r» 2-in. caps 

IS IV-j-in. caps 

8 lV4-in. ciii>s 

18 1-in, caps 

2~> :{-4-in. cjii»s 

4(i •:.-in. .aps 

27 ;{-8-in. caps 

19 Vi-in. c;ips 

23 lV4xl-in. rtMlueed ells. galvMuized . 
ItJ 1 ;{-4-in. re«luce4l ells, galvanized . . 

13 3-4xij-in. reducnl «'l!s. galvnnized 
ir» U-in. n-ihu-ed ells. galvanize<l . . . . 

12 l>..r-in. redtniMl ells, gjdviinized . .. . 

14 I'/i-in. n^luccd ells, irnlvjinized . ... 

22 1-in. reduced ells, gjilvjinizcd 

8 3-4-in. nihUHil ells, galvanized 

25 Vj-ln. HKluceil ells, galvanized . . . . 

9 3-8-ln. reilui-e«l ells, giilviinized 

13 2x1 '..-in. redueed ells. f. I 



3 00 


2 80 


2 80 




40 




70 


4 


60 


1 


50 


2 


10 


2 


75 


7 


50 


9 


10 


2 


05 


10 


00 




80 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


80 




60 


1 


75 


1 


90 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


40 


1 


60 




98 




60 




80 


1 


60 


1 


20 


2 


10 


2 


00 


3 08 


3 


75 


3 


00 


1 


10 


1 


40 


1 


10 


2 


00 


1 


45 




90 


2 


GO 


1 


60 


1 


45 


3 


75 


2 


20 


2 


00 


•» 


40 




00 


1 


00 




00 


o 


05 



313 



1 2xl-in. ivdiu-o(l ell. jiMlvaiiizi'd . . . 

11 iy2xli4-in. reduced ells, C. I 

16 li/^xl-in. reduced ells, galvanized 
15 lyoxl-in. reduced ells, C. I 

19 lx3-4-in. reduced ells. C. I 

55 8-4xM>-iu. reduced ells. C. I 

8 %x3-8-iu. reduced ells. C. I 

29 2-lu. reduced ells, C. I 

17 li/l.-in. ells. C. I .. 

47 1%-in. ells, C. I 

40 1-in. ells. C. I 

28 3-4-iu. ells, C. I 

42 1/2-in. ells. C. I 

49 3-8-in. ells. C. I 

4 l^txl-in. reduced mall, ells 

3 lx3-4-in. reduced mall, ells 

4 3-4xV2-iii- reduced mall, ells 

15 2-in. mall, ells 

21 li/o-in. mall, ells 

20 1%-iu. mall, ells 

25 1-iii. mall, ells 

4 o-4-iii. mall, ells 

95 i/o-iu. mall, ells 

39 3-8-iu. mall, ells 

15 14-in. mall, ells 

2 2-I11. mall. St. ells 

12 11/,-in. mall. st. ells 

6 lJ4-iu. mall. st. ells 

30 1-ln. mall. st. ells 

28 3-4-iu. mall. st. ells 

11 i/o-in. mall. st. ells 

19 3-8-in. mall. st. ells 

5 2-in. mall, crosses 

8 li^-in. mall, crosses 

5 li/4-in. mall, crosses 

3 1-in. mall, crosses 

, 4 3-4-iu. mall, crosses 

26 i/l>-iu. mall, crosses 

41 2-in. mall, unions 

39 IV^-iu. mall, unions 

43 iy>-in. mall, unions 

63 1-in. mall, unions 

68 3-4-in. mall, unions 

56 ^/^-in. mall, unions 

14 3-8-in. mall, unions 

18 %.-iu. mall, unions 

9 2-in. mall, union ells, male 

5 li/^-in. mall, union ells, male . . . 
9 114-in. mall, union ells, male . . . 

9 1-ln. mall, union ells, male 

23 3-4-in. mall, union ells, male . . . 





20 


'2 


(N) 


2 


65 


1 


75 


1 


iH) 


4 


<;() 


1 


45 


3 


.so 


3 


40 


4 


67 


4 


11 


:', 


10 


.-! 


60 


•> 


20 




60 




45 




60 


•> 


07 


2 


00 


1 


90 


•7 


00 


3 


11 


1 


t>5 




no 




40 


1 


80 


1 


00 


1 


80 


1 


60 




90 


1 


11 


1 


1.-) 


1 


2(» 


1 


2<i 




6() 




60 


V2 


."•II 


10 


02 


11 


00 


9 


77 


9 


60 


7 


20 





4<l 


•> 


10 


3 


60 


2 


20 





60 





10 


4 


<H) 



314 

11 V^-in. mall, union ells, male 2 00 

6 IV^-ln. mall, union tees, male 3 00 

12 IVi-in. mall, union tees, male 2 90 

13 1-iu. mall, union tees, male i 95 

8 3-4-iu. mall, union tees, male 1 80 

12 ^/L>-in. mall, union tees, male 1 75 

4 2-in. mall, union ells, female 1 60 

19 ly^-in. mall, union ells, female C 79 

25 lV4-in. mall, union ells, female C 90 

29 1-in. mall, union ells, female 7 00 

21 3-4-in. uuill. union ells, female 6 20 

10 i/^-in. mall, union ells, female 3 00 

14 2-in. mall, union tees, female 4 00 

4 V/n-'m. mall, union tees, female 2 40 

10 li/i-iii- mall, union tees, female 4 10 

9 1-in. mall, union tees, female 3 17 

13 3-4-in. mall, union tees, female 3 60 

11 i/o-in. mall, union tees, female 2 10 

2 2-in. galvanized unions 80 

6 l^/^-iu. galvanized unions 1 60 

9 114-in. galvanized unions 1 75 

12 1-in. galvanized unions 2 00 

23 3-4-in. galvanized unions 3 10 

22 i^-in. galvanized unions 3 60 

1 8-in. C. I. tee 2 50 

4 4-in. tees 5 00 

2 4x2-in. reduced tees 3 00 

2 4x2M>-iu. red. C. I. tees 2 70 

1 4x3x3 C. I. red. tee 1 00 

8 3y2x3-in. C. I. red. tees 4 25 

8 3y2x2-in. C. I. red. tees 4 20 

7 Sy-in. C. I. red. tees 2 47 

18 3-in. C. I. i^. tees 3 65 

10 3x2-in. C. I. red. tees 2 4U 

2 3xiy2-in. C. I. red. tees 1 10 

6 3x3-4-in. C. I. red. tees 3 00 

12 2y.-in. (1. I. red. tees 2 90 

8 2y. x2xli/,.in. C. I. red. tees 1 70 

7 2V-.xlxVi-in. C. I. red. tees 1 60 

1 3-in. mall, tea 60 

1 6-in. C. I. ell 1 40 

3 5-iu. C. I. ells 1 SO 

1 4-ln. C. I. ell 1 20 

8 3y.-ln. C. I. ells 3 19 

3 3-ln. C. I. ells 1 40 

7 2y2-in. C. I. ells 2 00 

1 3-ln. C. I. ell, long turn 60 

18 2-in. r. and 1. couplings 1 95 

26 I'o-in. r. and 1. couplings 2 40 

20 l'/,-ln. r. and 1. couplings 1 90 

QO 1-ln. r. and 1. couplings 3 00 



315 

28 3-4-inch. r. and 1. couplings 1 40 

43 %-in. r. and 1. couplings 95 

27 3-8-in. r. and 1. couplings 90 

120 1-in. O. I. ret. bends 20 00 

12 3-4-in. C. I. ret. bends 2 60 

19 2-in. galvan. tees 6 47 

8 2x3-4-in. galvan. tees 2 40 

15 2x1, i^x3-4-in. galvan. tees 2 90 

24 11/4x1, %x3-4-in. galvan. tees 3 17 

24 li4x3-4-in. galvan. tees 3 15 

28 1x1, i4x3-4-in. galvan. tees 2 95 

16 lx3-4-in. galvan. tees 2 10 

18 3-4xlx3-4-in. galvan. tees 1 90 

26 3-4x%-in. galvan. tees 2 45 

23 3-4x%-in. galvan. tees 2 17 

30 i/^-in. galvan. tees 1 40 

30 3-8-in. galvan. tees 1 30 

15 2-in. mall, tees 2 40 

3 2xl-in. mall, tees 1 00 

12 2xli/2xl-in. mall, tees 2 10 

6 l%xl-in. mall, tees 1 90 

7 iy2xli/4xl-in. mall, tees 1 88 

14 li4xl-in. mall, tees 2 85 

28 l%x3-4-in. mall, tees 3 95 

9 l%xlx3-8-in. mall, tees 1 60 

25 lx3-8-in. mall, tees 2 10 

23 lxl%-in. mall, tees 2 00 

10 lx3-4-in. mall, tees 1 40 

8 3-4xl-in. mall, tees 1 09 

18 3-4-in. mall, tees 1 10 

18 3-4xy2x3-8-in. mall, tees 1 90 

150 y2-in. mall, tees 3 24 

6 %x3-8-in. mall, tees 40 

6 %x3-4-in. mall, tees 42 

^ y2x3-8xy2-in. mall, tees 45 

17 3-8-in. mall, tees 1 10 

14 3-8xy2-in. maU. tees 1 09 

18 i^-in. mall, tees 1 20 

58 y2-in. C. I. tees 4 00 

29 3-8-in. C. I. tees 2 10 

40 1-in. C. I. tees 617 

30 lx3-4-in. C. I. tees 5 40 

24 lx3-4x3-4-in. C. I. tees 4 95 

50 lx3-4xyo-in. C. I. tees 7 27 

50 3-4-in. C. I. tees 7 20 

19 y2x3-4-in. C. I. tees 2 14 

8 3-4x3-8-in. C. I. tees 1 10 

24 3-4xy2-in. C. I. tees 2 47 

24 3-4xy2x3-4-in. C. I. tees 2 45 

32 2-in. C. I. tees 7 40 

16 2xiy2-in. C. I. tees 3 75 



316 



6 2xl-in. ('. I. tees 

3 2xlV...xli4-i»- C- I- tees . . . 

8 2x1x1 -in. ('. I. tees 

14 li/'Xlxl-iii. C. I. tees 

11 IVjxiyiXl-in. C. I. tees 
24 i/^xlx3-4-in. C. I. tees . . 

9 IVjxlxl-iii. C. I. tees 

48 1%-iu. C. I. tees 

24 114x1 -in. C. I. tees 

29 li4x:^4-in. ( '. I. tees 

18 li4xlx:{-4-iii. C. I. tees . . 

6 1^x11,-1 n. C. I. tees 

13 2-in. CI. I-. and 1. ells. . . 
17 IVj-'iu. C. I. 1-. and 1. ells. 
23 lV4-in. C. I. r. and 1. ells. 

19 1-in. v. I. V. and 1. ells. . 

29 :i-4-in. CI. r. and 1. ells. 
48 14-iu. C 1. r. and 1. ells. . 
19 3-8-in. C 1. r. and 1. ells. 
22 Vi-in. CI. r. and 1. ells. . 

19 2-in. plugs 

17 IVrin. plugs 

18 114-in. plugs 

22 1-in. plugs 

42 3-4-in. plugs 

18 i/L>-iii- plugs 

8 3-S-in. plugs 

12 2xlVj-in. bushings 

10 2xlV4-in. bushings 

8 2xl-in. Imshings 

35 IVjXlVi-in. bushings ... 

12 IVi'Xl-in. bushings 

42 l'/4xl-in. bushings 

26 li4x."i-4-in. bushings ... 

30 lx:i-4-in. bushings 

20 IxV^-in. bushings 

9 lx3-H-in. bushings 

39 3-4xVj-in. bushings 

25 3-4x3-S-in. bushings . . . 

20 3-4xy4-in. busliings 

1«) i.jxX-s-in. bushings .... 
69 ri-SxVi-iii. buslungs . . . . 
20 .•{-Mx1-S-iii. bushings . . . 

2 4'jx4-in. busliings 

8 4x:Mn. busliings 

8 3',-;x2'-j-in. bushings .... 
5 3x2Vj-ln. bushings 

4 3x2-ln. bushings 

8 2Vl.x2-in. bushings 

5 2ijx1' j-iii. Itushings . .. . 
4 4-in. i>higs 



1 


90 


1 


11 


2 


95 


2 


40 


2 


30 


2 


65 


1 


95 


4 


60 


2 


95 


2 


90 


2 


65 


1 


40 


2 


00 


2 


49 


3 


48 


2 


80 


3 


50 


3 


77 


2 


05 


1 


90 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


80 


1 


79 


2 


40 


2 


65 




40 


1 


10 


1 


07 




95 


2 


10 


1 


05 


2 


00 


1 


80 


1 


95 


1 


40 




45 


1 


80 


1 


40 


1 


30 




95 


1 


19 




95 




87 


1 


40 


1 


40 


1 


00 


1 


10 


1 


13 




95 


1 


20 



31' 



2 2V2-iii- plnji's 

2 6-iu. flange iiuions 

3 o-in. flange unions 

3 4i2-in. flange unions .... 

3 4-iu. flange unions 

8 31/^-in. flange unions 

9 3-in. flange unions 

8 21^-in. flange unions 

18 2-in. flange unions 

4 li/^-in. flange unions . . . . , 

15 2x6-in. nipples 

12 2x5-iu. nipples 

3 2x4-in. nipples , 

14 2x3-in. nipples 

10 2x2i4-in. nipples , 

11 2-in. close nipples 

1 6x8-in. nipples - 

I 5x6-in. nipples 

4 5x4-in. nipples 

4 4x8-in. nipples 

5 4x6-in. nipples 

3 4x4-in. nipples 

3 4x2i^-in. nipples 

16 3x6-iu. nipples 

5 3x4-in. nipples 

6 3x3-in. nipples > , 

3 2i^x6-in. nipples 

6 2yox3-in. nipples 

14 i/^x6-in. nipples 

20 %x5-in. nipples 

18 i4x4-in. nipples 

12 i/4x3-iu. nipples 

10 %x2-in. nipples 

26 i/^xl-in. nipples 

T9 3-8x4-in. nipples 

9 lx8-in. nipples 

27 lx6-in. nipples 

6 lx5-in. nipples 

II lx3-in. nipples 

11 lx2-iu. nipples 

15 3-4x6-in. nipples 

20 3-4x5-iu. nipples 

17 3-4x4-in. nipples 

62 3-4x3-in. nipples 

16 3-4x2-in. nipples 

18 3-4xli/l.-in. nipples 

11 2x4-in. r. and 1. nipples . . 

10 2x3-in. r. and 1. nipples . . 
26 lVi>x4-in. r. and 1. nipples 
14 i^xS-in. r. and 1. nijiples . 
20 li/4x2-in. r. and 1. nipples 





(id 


2 


10 


2 


05 


2 


00 


2 


65 


4 


90 


4 


80 


4 


10 


5 


17 


1 


85 


2 


00 


1 


75 




60 


1 


49 


1 


00 




90 




90 




74 


1 


95 


1 


75 


1 


80 


1 


65 


1 


11 


2 


35 


1 


40 


1 


40 


1 


33 




95 




50 




58 




48 




39 




40 


1 


00 




95 


1 


00 


1 


97 




60 




90 




85 




97 




00 




10 




67 




(»4 




45 




60 




55 


2 


30 


1 


80 


2 


05 



318 



8 l%xl»^in. r. anil 1. uipples 1 00 

22 Ii4x4-in. r. and 1. uipples 1 90 

24 l>4x;{-in. r. and 1. uipples ^05 

24 li4xl'>--iu. r. aud 1. nipples 2 00 

24 Ii4x4-in. r. and 1. nipples 2 25 

40 lx4-in. r. aud 1. uipples 3 10 

19 lx3-in. r. and 1. nipples 1 10 

10 3-4x3-in. nipples ■I'J' 

3 3-4x2-in. r. and 1. nipples 1 07 

19 %x4-in. r. aud 1. nipples 27 

24 %x8-in. r. and 1. nipples 1 25 

7 V2x2-iu. r. and 1. nipples 38 

145 ft. 3-8-in. t'alvan. pipe 4 35 

245 ft. Mj-in. Kalvan. pipe 12 25 

137 3-4-in. galvan. pipe 10 22 

641 ft. 1-in. galvan. pipe 44 87 

428 ft. 114-iu. galvan. pipe 34 20 

208 ft. ly-i". galvan. pipe 21 80 

140 ft. 2-in. galvan. pipe 18 20 

70 ft 1-8-iu. bhu k pipe 1 40 

12 ft. Vi-in. l»l:»^lv pipe 24 

35 ft. 3-8-in. black pipe 87 

68 ft. 2yj-in. black pipe 12 44 

25 ft 5-in. black pipe 12 50 

244 ft 4-in. l>lack pipe 97 60 

60 ft 31/0-in. black pipe 21 00 

1,100 ft. iL-in. black pipe , 27 50 

187 ft. 3-4-iu. black pii>e 7 60 

1,U27 ft. 1-iu. black pipe 41 08 

38:i ft. IVj-in. black pipe 22 98 

140 ft li^-in. black pipe 10 50 

152 ft. 2-ln. black pipe 15 20 

144 ft. i/o-in. extra heavy black pipe 7 20 

80 ft 3-4-iu. extra heavy black pipe 5 GO 

125 ft 1-in. extra lieavy black pipe 11 25 

204 ft li,L.-in. extra heavy black pipe 20 40 

12 ft. 2-in. extra heavy black pipe 1 68 

2 HJx2<i-in. \v. ciiainclcd sinks 5 00 

2 18x24-in. w. euauicled sinks 6 00 

2 18x30-lu. w. enameled sinks 6 50 

2 2<^x.^8-in. sinks 3 50 

1 iron cliain 2 00 

2 jack screws 4 50 

12 14xir,-in. l)ell traps 10 80 

2 .stepladders 2 50 

ir> 3-in. trap lids 1 50 

3 4-ln. trap lids 36 

10 2-in. trap lids 80 

21 2-in. locknuls 44 

15 1-in. locknuts 28 

37 3-4-ln. locknuts 22 



319 



20 3-S-in. lookuuts 

13 %-m. lockuuts 

10 1-in. floor plates 

12 l^^-in. coiling plates 

5 114-in. ceiling plates 

7 1-in. ceiling plates 

6 3-4-iu. ceiling plates 

5 lengths O-in. soil pipe 

7 lengths 5-in. soil pipe 

9 lengths 4-in. soil pipe 

6 lengths 3-in. soil pipe 

8 lengths 2-in. soil pipe 

5 5-in. hubs soil pipe 

6 4-in. hubs soil pipe 

5 3-iu. hubs soil pipe 

7 5-in. oils soil pipe 

5 4-in. ells soil pipe 

8 3-in. ells soil pipe 

6 4-in. 1-8 bends soil pipe 

5 3-in. 1-8 bends soil pipe 

6 5-in. tees soil pipe 

3 4-in. tees soil pipe 

5 3-in. tees soil pipe 

500 lbs. old iron 

60 ft. 2 7-16-in. shafting 

9 pulleys 

90C» lbs. old brass 

5 old wheelbarrows 

5 old shovels 

6 machine hammers 

5 Trimo wrenches 

6 Stillsou wrenches 

2 sledge hammers 

4 coal hammers 

1 bench 

6 oil cans 

2 cupboards 

2 pr. chain tongs 

2 crowbars 

15 towels 

2 wash buckets 

2 tlue brushes 

24 Boston s. c. bibbs, 3-4-in 

12 3-4-in. comb, bibbs with s. b. 

24 2-in. rubber stoppers 

24 lV2-in- rubber stoppers 

24 IVi-in. rubber stoppers 

24 1-in. riibber stoppers 

18 lbs. sq. tlnx packing 

45 5-S-in. gauge glass washers. . . 
100 lbs. waste 





20 




12 


1 


00 


1 


44 




50 


1 


20 


-, 


05 





38 


3 


&\ 


4 


(JO 


1 


25 


1 


•20 





10 


v> 


<M) 


1 


08 


3 95 


2 


37 


3 


95 


1 


80 


1 


08 


1 


25 


18 


00 


11 


00 


45 


00 


6 


50 


3 


75 


2 40 


8 00 


4 


50 


3 


00 


3 00 


20 00 


1 


80 


6 00 


15 


00 


7 


00 


3 


75 




50 


5 


OfJ 


14 


40 


7 


80 


6 00 


4 


80 


3 


60 


2 


40 


5 


40 





40 



•62Q 

1 set plumlMT's tools l.> 00 

1 set iiiniliiiie tools 13 50 

300 tire l>ii<k -2 oO 

4 lK)ilei- i)okers 3 00 

50 ft. ;{-4-iii. hose 2 50 

50 ft. IMrln. hose -4 50 

150 ft. tire hose (used) 20 00 

1 iron stand 75 

4 iHJUeli vises 12 00 

8 pipe vises 15 00 

1 No. .'i Siiuuders' pij)e vise 32 00 

24 Iiidiiiii.'i Imniers 9 60 

2 Murdoc k service l>oxes 5 40 

14 14-in. Indiana burners 8 40 

1 oil boiler feeder 60 00 

1 emery whetd 12 00 

4 stoeks and dies . . , 32 00 

1 si)eed indieator 3 00 

1 ink stand 1 00 

2 iKJoks 4 00 

Total Kn-incer's 1 )(>partinent $89,224 52 



ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Klectrital iilant. wires, etc.. in use .$35,500 00 

1 lb. tape 50 

2 lbs. solder 40 

% lb. Cliatterson's compound 50 

1 arc lamp and switch ,30 00 

T~blow-iiot 2 ,50 

1 jrasoline furnace 3 00 

1 Maj:neto bell (oldl 2 00 

24 annunciators 18 00 

2 IxMicli vises and work bench 10 00 

1 <-«)mealonff 3 00 

1 block and tackle 5 00 

1 tool case 1 00 

1 'lock 3 00 

2 ladders 1 00 

I drill stock with drills 2 00 

1 accumulator case with secondary calls 30 00 

3 Immmers • 1 50 

1 louuKe 1 50 

4 chairs told) 1 OO 

100 ft. 3-4-in. hose (old) 4 00 

1 test lamp o 50 

2 work lamps 5 oo 

2 stoves 15 00 



321 

1 galvnuoiiH'ter H fK> 

1 angle brace with bits 3 00 

4 oil tanlis 20 00 

2 oil filters 30 00 

1 granite iron bucket 75 

2 whisk brooms 15 

1 wool cluster 1 OO 

130 32-c. p. lamps 65 00 

10 poi'celain ceiling cut-outs 2 25 

40 20-c. p. lamps 7 20 

11 key sockets 2 20 

2 attaching plugs 40 

100 ft. No. 12 B. & S. G., K., C. & B. electric light wire 1 25 
500 ft. No. 6 B. & S. G., weather proof electric light 

wire 10 00 

50 insulating socket rings 1 00 

1,600 ft. R.. C. & B. copper telephone wire 20 00 

1,000 insulated staples 1 50 

75 safety plugs 6 25 

600 ft. flexible lamp cord 15 00 

8 arc light globes 4 00 

200 porcelain knobs 1 50 

500 roimd carbons, cored 9 00 

10 glass insulators 1 00 

2.000 carbons, oval 32 00 

200 lbs. weather-proof telephone wire, iron 20 00 

36 insulators, with clamps 10 00 

27 wiring tubes 56 

11 wall receptacles 2 20 

48 wooden socket plugs 24 

3 gas attachments 45 

12 floor insulators, porcelain 2 50 

1 D. P. porcelain cut-out 20 

2 three-wire double three-wire branches 3 00 

30 gas shade holders 3 00 

22 electi-ic light shade holders 2 20 

2 porcelain keyless receptacles 40 

7 S. P. cut-outs 2 59 

4 IXI gas and electric lamp combination fixtures 8 00 

7 insulating points 7 00 

13 canopies 2 60 

5 gas globes 2 50 

4 electric lamp shades SO 

7 gross machine screws 7 00 

2 lbs. sheet asbestos 20 

2 lbs. phospho bronzed sheet 75 

3 oak pins 30 

2 oak brackets 20 

2 Ix'on brackets 20 

6 dry cells 2 00 

21 — IXS. VoL-CHERS. 



322 

I 4-c p. lamii 1 00 

3 plug s\\ ilcheti 00 

I I porcelain Swire M. A. cut-outs 11 00 

1 3U-aiup«'r main Hue 1 00 

4 lo aiiiiMT S. r. snap switches 1 00 

1 2U-aniit»'r I >. I*, snap switch 1 50 

2 lbs. hard rubber sheet 1 80 

14 safely talelies 3 50 

8 Wheeler reflectors 2 00 

1 half shade 75 

2 BBls. r. \- B. insulatinj; paint 4 00 

2 lbs. Kureka teniiiered brush copper 2 00 

1 stand lamp 75 

1' hermetirally sealed sockets 50 

10 wire terminals 1 00. 

1 desk 5 00 

1 exhaust fan 48 00 

2 ink wells witu rack 1 00 

1 3-h. p. motor 00 00 

24 gravity cells 18 00 

18 crow-foot zinc elements 2 70 

12 D. P.. S. throw lever switches 12 00 

l'(K» two- wire G. E. chats (two pieces) 4 00 

150 tliree-wire G. K. chats (tMO pieces) 4 50 

35 G. K. knol»s 70 

Total Electric Plant ?36,162 44 



CARPENTER SHOP. 

1 planinjr maehine $75 00 

1 f riezing machine 165 00 

1 mortising machine 50 00 

1 molding machine 178 75 

1 swinging cut-off saw 20 00 

1 joining saw. including table 30 00 

1 rip saw 10 00 

1 tenoning machine 40 00 

1 emory grinding machine , 10 00 

3 grinding stones with fixtures 25 00 

2 glue kettles with gas stoves 5 00 

2 boring maclijnes 12 00 

80 ft. shafting with pulleys and belts 150 00 

4 Iron vises 20 00 

2 heating stoves 12 00 

4 combination wrenches 9 00 

2 braces with tilts 2 50 

1 »li(Terenllal pulley IS OO 

2 jack serews l<i oil 



323 

1 speed indicator 1 oo 

2 spirit, Icvols :{ (M» 

1 baclv saw 1 r>0 

1 mitre saw • i no 

1 set paring chisels 10 OO 

2 machinist's hammers i 00 

1 nail hammer 40 

3 half hatchets 1 r»0 

100 ft. heavy sash cord S TA) 

1 side lace leather 3 oo 

4 oil cans 2 0<J 

3 otfice chairs 2 00 

1 office table 5 00 

1 office desk 6 00 

1 lonnge 2 00 

1 otfice steam radiator 15 00 

2 bench stools 3 00 

1 dry room steam fixture 35 00 

1 pr. counter scales 50 

3 augers 75 

2 oil stones, mounted 4 00 

1 blacksmith's anvil 4 00 

1 bead plane 30 

20.000 ft. moldings, assorted 50 00 

200 ft. worked baseboards 15 00 

100 ft. weather strips 6 50 

50 ft. carpet strips 1 80 

4 molded window heads 1 25 

9 molded transom bars 1 80 

10 wash-sink fronts 7 75 

fi<X) ft. picture backing 6 00 

12 paneled doors 34 00 

1.000 ft. pine scantling, assorted 20 00 

4,600 ft. pine joists 90 00 

2.000 ft. pine ceiling 65 00 

5.500 pine shingles 16 50 

400 ft. stock boards 75 00 

42 ft. cherry lumber 4 00 

800 ft. beveled siding 17 50 

2.500 ft. pine uppers. 1-in 125 00 

4,000 ft. pine uppers, 2-ln 200 00 

500 ft. electric wire molding 10 00 

3,000 ft. yellow pine flooring 80 Oo 

100 ft. ash lumber, 11/2 in 3 50 

1.500 ft. oak scantling, assorted 45 (>0 

1.000 ft. poplar lumber, 1^^ in 35 00 

500 ft. poplar lumber, 1 in 18 .00 

500 ft. ash lumber, 1 in 15 0<^) 

2.000 ft. ash flooring 60 00 

1.000 ft. oak lumber, assorted 30 00 

2,000 ft. oak flooring 70 00 



324 

19 heavy st r<'«Mi sbiitteif; 50 00 

200 lag screws, assorted 10 00 

3,000 caiTlage and machine bolts, assorted 70 00 

2 prs. double-acting spring hinges, large 8 00 

80 sash \vei;.'lits 7 00 

150 sets heavy truck casters 110 00 

1,000 broom aud moi) holders 37 50 

75 lbs. steel washers, assorted 2 00 

8U lbs. wire brads 3 50 

10 lbs. copper wire 3 00 

26 cans I.erage's prepared glue 10 UO 

50 ft. mirror glass 25 00 

8 perforated settee seats, large 16 00 

12 perforated settee seats, small 12 00 

173 perforated chair seats 37 60 

30 hopper rims 30 00 

73 shelf brackets 9 00 

50 turned table legs 28 00 

1<K> l)ed posts and cross bars 29 0<J 

84 cross slats f()r beds •? 00 

27 turned balusters, assorted 4 00 

'1 bakers peels, unfinished 40 

10 baker's peels, completed 38 00 

40 kitchen stimng paddles 10 00 

37 towel rollers 25 00 

30 towel racks, unfinished 35 00 

53 turned dipper handles 6 00 

30 wire wickets 12 00 

14 dust shoot doors 14 00 

5 clothes shoot doors 7 50 

80 strong chair slats 1 75 

31 do<M- panels 6 00 

14 fi(x»r rublx'r handles 5 00 

4 floor rubbers, complete 4 00 

90 grave boards 5 00 

84 bent wood chair circles 19 75 

105 window sashes, glazed 100 00 

98 window sashes, uuglazed 70 00 

2.4(X» lbs. wire and cut nails, assorted 90 00 

12 t ransoms, glazed 4 50 

4 trussel clamps 20 00 

4 large door clamps 15 00 

1 belt clamp 12 00 

20 wo«»d hand clamps 10 00 

12 iron hjind cl;imps 24 00 

44 iron liand cl:iuii>s. small 16 00 

Tj() brass screen clamps 4 00 

30 settee arm posts 8 00 

154 sets Martin's b«Ml cjistors. No. 4 50 00 

76 sets .Martin's li»>d (•.•istors. No. :', 20 0<> 

86 set.s Martin's lu-«| i-.isioi's. No. 2 1!» m 



325 

50 sets castors, assorted 25 00 

8 gross coat and hat hooks HO 0<) 

15 gross ceiling hoolcs 2(» iiO 

1 doz. brass ceiling hooks 2 OU 

1 gross carpenter chalk ~~> 

10 gross file handles 7 00 

12 hatchet handles 65 

40 crown brackets 12 00 

40 Yale pass locks, D. F. W 105 00 

18 Yale dead locks, D. F. W 25 00 

12 clothes shoot locks, Yale, D. F. W 20 00 

40 heavy brass door knobs, double 25 00 

36 heavy brass door knobs, single 16 00 

40 ornamental door knobs 20 00 

40 common door knobs 4 00 

6 lbs. blind staples 2 00 

18 Yale night latches 10 20 

12 Mortice bolts G 00 

12 store door dead locks 18 00 

8 rabbitted mortise locks 3 20 

3 doz. brass-necked bolts 30 00 

4 electric locks 20 00 

1 doz. square bolts 4 00 

6 show case catches 60 

3 doz. brass cased bolts "... 18 00 

3 doz. iron cupboard bolts 3 60 

2 doz. brass cupboard bolts 3 00 

2^^ doz. brass spring bolts 18 00 

18 doz. sash lifts 20 00 

12 doz. wardrobe locks, assorted 30 00 

5 iron till locks 8 00 

30 combination locks 18 00 

20 doz. drawer locks, assorted 20 00 

2 doz. chest locks 30 00 

1 doz. shutter locks 1 75 

ST doz. rim knob locks 9 60 

12 rim. dead locks 4 00 

18 electric cut-out box locks 5 50 

23 mortise dead locks 16 50 

18 iron padlocks 5 00 

72 yds. brass safety chain 8 50 

130 bent wood chair legs 14 00 

88 bent wood chair backs 12 00 

25 fire extinguisher brackets 15 00 

6 doz. mortise knob locks 60 00 

10 store door handles 2 75 

12 foot bolts 4 50 

1 doz. knob spindles 75 

6 gross shutter knobs 18 00 

5 gross drawer knobs 3 00 

10 piano locks 3 00 



326 

6 thumb latilu's 60 

3 doz. lu'jiv.v luck guards 2 50 

6 do/,. liiiiKO holders 75 

18 brass padlocks 16 20 

20 pn*. sinliiK blind hinpres 5 75 

300 lock escutcheon rings 5 00 

4 doz. curtain pins, large 9 00 

3K> doz. curtain hooks 1 75 

20 gross wrought staples, assorted 9 20 

1 doz. sash locks and lifts, combined 3 00 

20 gross stove bolts, assorted • 7 50 

13 gross machine screws, assorted 3 50 

8 gross picture nails 18 00 

2 chalk line reels and awls 40 

12 hanks chalk lines 1 75 

6 screw pulleys 3 00 

% doz. sash pulleys, small 60 

10 doz. drawer knobs 9 00 

6 prs. drawer handles 2 50 

4 doz. sash fasteners 10 50 

3 dt»z. commode buttons 1 80 

6 l>ell pulls 30 

2 doz. chain bolts 14 00 

20 gross screw hooks jnd eyes 28 00 

18 gross screw eyes, assorted 16 00 

5 doz. colled door springs 14 00 

1 d<iz. Kclipsic door springs 8 00 

3 doz. cuplM>ard turns 7 50 

2 doz. picture rod hooks 7 50 

12 bra.ss d<M)r pulls 2 25 

4 doz. lifting handles 6 00 

60 prs. chest handles 32 00 

2 doz. shutter bars 5 00 

1 doz. cooler tirrns 7 00 

4 doz. roimd door plates 2 50 

13,tHK) furniture nails 7 50 

48 doz. Yale key escutcheons 400 00 

1 doz. Ixtx cornel's 1 75 

9 doz. picture hooks 18 00 

3Vj doz. ell)ow c'ltches 3 60 

30 ll>s. glazier points 7 50 

12 doz. |)ai)ers steel carpet tacks 5 50 

2 doz. paiK'rs gimp tacks 60 

20 11)8. wpiH-r belt rivets 4 75 

22 lM)xes picture cord 7 50 

900 yds. wire picture cord 12 00 

8 prs. shutter flap hinges 2 00 

6 prs. bronzed loose pin butts 30 00 

1 1 |>rs. pin hinges 2 20 

75 prs. wrought brass butts, assorted 20 00 

300 prs. I >. F. W. door butts 18 00 



327 

200 in-a. wroujiht butts, assorted :.'(! (tii 

13 prs. cast butts t;i i 

73 wood rosettes 1 ~7> 

12 washita slips 1 50 

100 papers double pointed tacks 4 0(J 

C brooms 1 20 

4 lawn beuohes 10 00 

050 common wood screws, assorted 175 00 

300 gross round head blues, assorted 75 00 

75 gross flat head brass screws, assorted 60 00 

250 gross flat head brass screws, assorted 220 00 

KKJ gross round head nickel screws 225 00 

4 doz. cupboard turns 7 50 

12 lbs. register tins 1 75 

5 doz. door bolts 12 Ou 

7 Yale cupboard locks 4 20 

3 doz. heavy lock keepers 7 20 

6 doz. curtain rings 70 

1 doz. belt hooks 30 

11/4 doz. drawer pulls, brass 5 00 

1 doz. cupboard catches . ..'. 1 75 

17 prs. bronzed shutter butts 2 SO 

2 trip gongs 3 00 

1 gross buttons and plates 2 50 

5 gross hooks and eyes 7 50 

5 gross cup hooks 4 50 

36 yds. safety chain, nickeled 5 50 

30 prs. rod brackets 3 00 

2 doz. base knob door holders 2 75 

l^,:: doz. prs. nickeled hinges 75 

5 large door springs 10 00 

60 pass locks, D. F. M 60 00 

20 dead locks, D. F. M 14 00 

6io doz. crutch sockets 2 25 

70 prs. "T" hinges, assorted 12 00 

100 prs. strap hinges, assorted 30 00 

50 lbs. brass spnng wire 10 00 

ICk lbs. steel brads 1 00 

60 large chair rockers 20 00 

6 camp stands 4 50 

1 molded mantel -1 00 

11 laundry clothes racks 22 00 

3 doz. meat hooks 2 50 

50 angle irons for bedsteads 4 00 

80 sets bed irons, assorted 15 00 

30 hinge hasps 3 00 

12 hammer handles 1 20 

€ pick handles 1 00 

IV2 doz. brass hasps 2 70 

2 spirit levels 3 50 

1 packer ratchet 2 00 



328 

4 pre. jtllers 3 50 

8 butclHT's saw blades 5 50 

•JO doz. Illes, assorted 45 00 

1 expansive bit ^ 

2 cuunter brusht's 1 00 

3 prs. dividfis 1 50 

1 steel rulf ^ 

1 tram 1 ^ 

1 steel square 1 ^^ 

1 Klass (lutter's table 6 00 

li inm si|iiare)S 80 

1 euiiibiuation square 4 00 

1 patent au;;er handle 50 

1 shive wheel with ropes 1 50 

1 featht'r duster 20 

5 stepladders 4 00 

3 sprinkling cans 0<» 

•2 sliovels 1 50 

1 wlicrlbarn.w 2 50 

1 mirror 1 00 

1 emery grinder 1 50 

2 pinch bars 2 00 

Vj doz. cold chisels 80 

2 diamond glass cutters 10 00 

9 steel glass cutters 1 00 

1 set drawing tools 10 00 

1 set paring .liisels 10 00 

1 lx>ard rule 1 50 

1 la<e ii-aiher cutter 40 

1 hand wagon 5 00 

1 doz. screw drivers 8 00 

1 breast drill 3 00 

1 set auger bits 10 00 

1 difTen-ntial pidley 18 00 

2 tape lin«'s 5 00 

Hfx* ft. manilla rope 100 00 

l.iNHt ft. iniartcr sawed oak lumber 60 00 

2 lianil saws 3 00 

1 ink stand 50 

1 revolving belt punch 50 

1 corner brace 2 50 

1 glaiit nail pidler 1 25 

4 school liotisc liiwiks 40 

3 half liatdicts 1 50 

3 naii iiammcrs 1 00 

2 lathing lialclu'ts 2 00 

12 casket l>oxes 21 00 

20 sink drain boards 10 00 

16 sets lawn In-nch irons 32 00 

2 8le<ige hammers 1 50 

6 reams emery paper 25 00 



329 



20 quires emery (•U)tli -jc, (mi 

50 yds. jiiiruet. paper 1_' (hi 

100 ft. tly screen wire t; (jj 

200 lbs. barbed wire 8 00 

22 stand tops 11 00 

7 floor screens 14 00 

7 easels 3 50 

small tea tables 12 00 

180 lawn bencli slats 18 00 

3,200 ft. Avindow glass, A. D. S., assorted 160 00 

800 ft. picture molding, assorted 20 00 

2 veranda posts 2 00 

2 post diggers 4 00 

15 bed rails 2 00 

9 iron hose racks 20 00 

1 floor plane 2 00 

1 pr. tinner's snips 1 00 

1 set Jenning's bits 3 50 

1,000 ft. Georgia pine lumber 30 00 

20,000 furniture nails 5 00 

1 doz. hammers 3 20 

1 doz. hatchets 4 50 

60 gross wood screws 5 20 

400 lbs. nails 6 85 

Total Carpenter Shop 



5,702 80 



PAINT SHOP. 



50 gals, boiled oil $25 00 

50 gals, spirits turpentine 25 00 

21 gals. C. T. Reynolds' wood finish 47 00 

5 gals, orange shellac 13 50 

1,000 lbs. white lead 30 00 

25 lbs. Venetian red 2 00 

75 lbs. mineral paint 2 50 

50 lbs. yellow ochre 1 50 

150 lbs. putty 3 90 

150 lbs. white glue 10 00 

190 lbs. canned paints, assorted 54 00 

lagre oil tanks 40 UO 

1 paint mill 1 00 

170 paint and varnish brushes, assorted 73 00 

3 whitewash brushes 6 00 

Total Paint Shop 



?331 40 



330 

PLASTERER'S SHOP. 

H Idifkt'trt ?3 00 

I spirit level 1 00 

1 small pointing trowel 20 

1 cement jointer 1 0<J 

1 screw driver 30 

1 plasterer's trowel 10 

1 mortar hoe 50 

1 sand screen 1 00 

2 skim sieves 1 00 

1 wheelbarrow 75 

1 shovel 50 

1 pick 75 

68 hot-air registers 82 00 

3 barrels cement 9 00 

1 baiTcl fire-claj' 3 00 

2 bushels hair 50 

35 cement flags 35 00 

500 plastering laths 1 60 

800 bricks 4 80 

Total Plasterer's Shop $146 50 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

2 hose wagons $300 00 

1.600 ft. 2iL-in. hose 1,400 00 

4 Callahan nozzles 40 00 

1 1 rul>bcr coats 14 00 

17 rubber hats 8 00 

6 tire axes 6 00 

12 lanterns 72 00 

15 Spanner belts 8 00 

18 Spanners 9 00 

7 hydrant wrenches 7 00 

12 cotton ladder straps 6 00 

(i crowbars 9 00 

2 sledge hammers 4 00 

3 Nealy hose jackets 8 10 

21 iron hose. racks 5 40 

3,200 ft. IVjin. hose (worn) 800 00 

200 ft. 1%-ln. hose (worn) 16 00 

29 stretchers, complete 35 00 

150 ft. rope • 6 00 

5 laddors <oldi ; , . 4 OO 

200 hand grenades 20 00 

80 fire extingtilsliers, 6'i gals , 1,000 00 

67 tire e.\tiuguisliers. 3 gals 590 00 

27 fire extinguishers, IV^ gals 75 00 

Total Fire Department $4,487 50 



331 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



250 ft. li/o-in. hose (Eureka) $37 50 

300 ft. 74-in hose 17 00 

10 sprinklers 2 25 

1 li/^-in. nozzle 1 00 

2 1-in. nozzles 1 00 

4 benches 12 00 

1 stove, pipe and coal bucket 5 00 

1 clock 3 00 

1 lawn mower 5 00 

Rakes, shovel and hoe 2 50 

Stand and chairs 1 00 

Lamp 2 50 

Oil can 25 

Oil floor-cloth 2 00 

Hatchet and wrench 50 

Sickle 25 

Wash-basin 25 

6 towels 1 50 

5 badges 3 00 

2 window curtains 50 

1 mop 25 

Total Police Department 



?9S 25 



TIN SHOP. 



1 4-ft. cornice brake $90 00 

1 30-in. gutter header 15 00 

1 stovepipe crimper 10 00 

1 little giant punching machine 30 00 

1 squaring macliine 30 00 

1 circular machine 25 00 

1 circular machine, worn out 00 

1 forming machine 15 00 

1 folding machine 30 00 

1 grooving machine 30 00 

2 burring machines 10 00 

1 turning machine 5 00 

1 wiring machine 12 00 

1 setting-down machine, worn out 00 

1 swedging machine 15 00 

4 prs. hand snips 4 00 

1 pr. bench sheai-s 1 50 

1 pr. wire nippers 1 00 

2 prs. wing dividers 75 

1 pr. gutter tongs 1 50 



332 

3 in: plitTs '^^ 

5 haimiH'rs 1 25 

2 uiaiHlrel.s 5 00 

1 f iiiiiiol h(M-ii 2 00 

1 hatclM't stake 2 00 

1 s«|uart' litsiil 2 00 

1 coiulurtor stake 2 00 

1 candle mold stake 2 00 

1 erea«lup: stake 3 50 

2 doiiblo seamiriK stakes 10 00 

12 punches 60 

V> rivet sets 60 

2 cold chisels 20 

8 soldering copi>ers. worn 1 50 

1 siiuare 50 

1 steel rule 2 50 

5 mallets, worn 25 

8 hollow punches 5 50 

1 slating hammer 2 00 

1 slating riiiiier 2 00 

1 stove, worn 50 

1 raising Idock 50 

2 hrotuns, worn 20 

2 cuplKtards 1 00 

2 gasoline furnaces 15 00 

20 saucepan handles 1 00 

3 doz. dish pan handles 1 80 

50 lbs. brass castings 10 00 

1") lbs. trunk nails 75 

36 wash lK)iler handles 90 

144 handles, Avood 1 50 

5(1 ll)s. band iron 1 50 

50 lbs. iron rods 1 50 

300 lbs. wire 9 00 

1 pan edger 7 00 

1 gal. gasoline 10 

1 breast drill 3 00 

2 work bendies. worn 1 00 

1 box IXX X X 2nx28 bright tin-plate 25 00 

4 boxes IX 20X2S bright tin-plate 00 00 

25 sheets IC roofing tin-plate 2 00 

25 sheets galvanized iron 15 00 

2 sheets planished (-ojiper 4 00 

2 gross bticket ears 3 00 

(U) spriidvler heads 5 00 

2 doz. t«>a-pot spouts 75 

lO.lNH) rivets 5 00 

24 j»ipe liooks 1 00 

6 grater blanks 30 

30 screw tops 1 80 

50 llw. solilcr 6 00 



333 

48 tea-pot kuobs 50 

300 stove bolts 3 00 

1 sheet zinc 1 00 

20 sheets bhick iron ♦; 00 

MisceHanoous tinware 25 00 

Total Tiu Shop $592 20 



UPHOLSTERED Slior. 

9% yards carpet $4 75 

60 yards oil cloth 9 00 

IT yards silosia 1 70 

190 yards mattress ticking 28 50 

ItiS yards burlap 8 40 

1,030 lbs. hair 442 90 

50 lbs. lounge springs 2 50 

12 lbs. mattress twine 3 00 

G6 lbs. hemp twine 6 60 

190 lbs. tow 3 80 

GO lbs. tacks 6 00 

4 lbs. carpet thread 1 20 

CT spools thread 3 35 

1 bolt webbing 90 

18 bolts gimp 4 00 

G3 hanks cane 26 20 

12% yards rubber cloth 2 46 

3 lbs. broom nails 30 

300 lbs. broom corn, not good 00 

18% lbs. broom wire " 3 70 

28 !bs. broom twine 7 00 

900 broom handles 9 00 

3 boxes fui-niture nails 75 

16 upholstering needles 1 60 

4 gross broom locks 1 00 

3'carpet stretchers 3 00 

2 upholstering hammers 50 

2 prs. shears 50 

1 screw- driver 50 

1 brace 50 

6 broom needles 60 

1 broom machine ; 15 00 

1 broom press 5 00 

1 broom clipper 5 00 

1 broom cleaner 15 00 

1 lounge 2 00 

1 sewing machine 15 00 

Total Upholsterer Shop $641 21 



334 



BAKE SHOP. 



1 bread inniKlj, old 15 00 

1 bread I.emh. old 1 00 

1 br/>ad Ik>x. new 50 00 

1 proof Im.x 50 00 

2 scraiK'rs 1 00 

40 cake imiis. old 2 00 

74 bread pans 30 00 

2 bread iK-elers 1 00 

1 pr. scales 1 00 

1 mirror 50 

3 baskets 1 50 

1 Hour sieve 50 

1 stejt-ladder 50 

30 aprous 2 00 

30 towels 2 00 

1 shovel 15 

1 hatcliet 15 

1 rolling' |iin 25 

2 eake Ik. wis 4 00 

1 bowl knile 25 

3 tlour brushes 1 50 

3 brooms . . . ^ : 45 

2 mops 50 

1 wardrobe 2 00 

1 clock 4 00 

1 ice »>ox ■ 10 00 

25 lbs. suj:ar 1 50 

20 lbs. I)utter 1 80 

50 lbs. lard 2 50 

3 lbs. soda 30 

6 lbs. baking powder 1 00 

l.OiXi loaves bread 100 00 

5 brls. tlour 15 00 

Total Bake Shop 



$303 35 



BARBER SHOP AND CLUB ROOM. 



1 barber chair $38 00 

1 looking-glass bracket 50 

1 looking-glass 7 25 

1 bracket, small 75 

1 <up ca.se 9 00 

1 marble-top wash-stand 22 00 

2 wall brackets 3 75 

1 work stand 6 75 



1 hat rack 5 00 

1 doz. razors 12 00 

2 prs. clippers (5 (M) 

2 prs. scissors 2 00 

1 tool box 2 00 

3 shaving cups 3 00 

1 doz. chairs 8 00 

1 Avash-stand 2 00 

1 towel rack 50 

4 doz. toAvels 4 00 

1 water tank 4 00 

Club Room. 

7 tables $14 00 

28 chairs 7 00 

1 doz. spittoons 1 20 

7 chairs 1 75 

2 tables 2 00 

1 bucket 25 

2 spittoous 30 

Total Barber Shop and Club Room ,$161 00 



BUTCHER SHOP. 

3,000 lbs. fresh beef $186 00 

440 lbs. ham 32 56 

75 lbs. breakfast bacon 8 05 

1 meat rack 25 00 

2 meat blocks 20 00 

1 pr. scales 15 00 

12 meat pans 12 00 

4 butcher cleavers 6 00 

4 butcher saws '. 6 00 

3 butcher knives 1 50 

1 butcher scraper 1 50 

2 chairs 50 

Total Butcher Shop $314 11 



FLORIST'S DEPARTMENT. 

(a) Stove and Hot-House Plants. 

2 agave americani, large $50 00 

1 agave americani, medium size 5 CtO 

2 agave americani. variegated 50 00 

3 agave americani, small 1 50 

1 alamanda grandiflora 5 00 



336 

.'Jo asitiilislni I'latoir 11 50 

.J uspidistru elatolr, variegated ^50 

."• asitaraKUs i>luniosus nanus 1 50 

:.' as[»aragus ti'iiuissituus, large 1 00 

4 asparagus ti-nuissiiuus, small 50 

a aliM- al|ia picta 1 00 

•» aracia 1 35 

7o ahtt-asia 18 75 

50 a«al.vplia. niixtnl 12 50 

'J.*jr»<» altlicrnauthera. mixed 67 50 

435 acliyrantlies, mixed 13 00 

lli ageratuiii. large 1 50 

IS ageratuni. large variegated 3 00 

I aralia guiifoylei, large 5 00 

1". aralia guiifoylei. medium size 10 00 

II aralia guiifoylei. small 55 

1<K» basket plants, mixed 3 00 

:'.."» begonia rex. mixed 17 50 

LTiO begonia, large, mixed G2 50 

:{."»(i begonia, small, mixed 17 50 

1 7 cissus diseolor 4 25 

V2r> calla aethioiiiea. large 31 25 

7."> calla aeihiopica. small 11 00 

aS cyclaiiien persieum 10 70 

IL' !»iilH'rgia speciasa 10 00 

^'S> earuatiou. mixed, in bench 20 00 

320 carnation, mixed, in pots 48 00 

50 cactus, mixed 15 00 

1 cereus granditlorus, large 5 00 

5 cereus granditloruK' small 2 50 

1 (-ereus pliylocactu: 'urge 5 00 

I citrus tluhis 10 00 

II citrus 5 50 

45 cyi)erus alteruifo. ns. large 9 00 

100 fy|>erus alternlf >'ius. small 10 00 

330 chrysantliemimi mixed 82 50 

50 ctn-culigo reeurva 10 00 

fKM» coleus. mixed 25 00 

1 »'roton mobile. larg<? 10 00 

1 croton challenger, large 10 00 

1 croton foi-tilles 5 00 

1 croton ••(^ueen Victoria" 10 00 

1 croton nuiculatum catoni 10 00 

200 croton. mixed 80 00 

3f» cuphea )»latyeentra, large 4 50 

\'t cupiie;i pl:itycentra. small 75 

:W» cam]ianula. mixed 4 50 

•2 diefeubacliia. large 2 00 

15 diefenb;icliia. small 3 75 

3tlf» echeveria secunda glauca 00 

5(» euonymus august iiniin-s 10 00 



337 

50 euouyiniis JMitoiiiciis v;irit'j;;itiis TJ (M) 

5 emntheinum albesceus 1 <i(» 

GOO feru, mixed 00 00 

3 ticus elastica, lai'ge 75 00 

2 ficus elastica, medium 10 00 

1 lious clianrii 10 00 

1 tieiis i»arcelli variegated, medium 5 00 

1 licus i»arcelli variegated, small 5U 

1 ticus australis, large 10 (iO 

35 ticus elastica, small 17 50 

1 ticus stipulata repens 5 00 

25 fittonia verscbafifeltii 1 25 

25 fittonia pearcei 1 25 

10 fuclisia, mixed, large 1 00 

25 fuclisia, mixed, small 1 UO 

1,<MMJ geranium, mixed, large 150 00 

950 geranium, mixed, small 28 50 

25 geranium, ivj-leaved 1 25 

30 liydrangea hoi'tensia 15 00 

6 lioya carnosa 1 50 

20(.) hesporis tristis, sweet rocket 10 00 

100 liybiscus. mixed 30 00 

4 lieliotrope 50 

2 justitia preciosa 1 UO 

2 jasmin catalonica 50 

50 ivy 2 50 

70 lautana 7 00 

llO lycopodium, mixed 11 00 

5 lemon verbena 1 00 

50 marantba, mixed 12 50 

15 moouflower 1 00 

45 marguerite 4 50 

1<X> myosotis 5 00 

3 musa cavendisbii, large 30 00 

6 musa cavendisbii, small G 00 

9 nympliaea dentata 2 25 

5 nvmpbaea zanzibarensis 1 25 

50 oleander 2 50 

3 pandanus utilis 25 00 

50 poinsettia pulcberima 15 00 

5 pbilodendron pertusum 10 00 

5 palma latania burbonica, large 125 00 

2 palma cycas revoluta, large 50 00 

2 palma cycas revoluta, medium 10 00 

30 palma cycas revoluta, small 4 50 

1 palma pboenix dactylifera, large 50 00 

1 palma kentia forsteriana 2 00 

3 palma pboenix 25 00 

3 palma seafortbia elegans 25 00 

S palma rbapis flabellifomis 15 00 

"22 — Ins. Vouchers. 



338 

300 paliua, mlxetl 100 00 

30 iK»i»eromia metallica 7 50 

•J«X) iteperomia maculosa 20 00 

lli priinuhi chiia'iisis 60 

L',000 pansit's. luixeil 50 00 

ISO roses, liybi id tlioa 27 00 

i'A) rosf's hybrid perpetual, in pots 9 00 

9 roses Marechal Niel 1 35 

10 swalns5iJia gulegifolia alba 2 50 

32 snillax 3 20 

70 strobilanthes 7 00 

5<J sautoliua 2 50 

54) sanseviera zeylonica 10 00 

18 saneliesia nobilis variegata 4 50 

18 thunl)erKia fragrans 4 50 

125 vi(»lets California 18 00 

300 vines, mixed 15 00 

1 yucca aloefolia, large 5 00 

4 yucca aloefolia, small 2 00 

(b) Plants in Depax-tment for Women. 

1.330 plants, mixed, all sizes $133 00 

41HJ saucers, all sizes 4 96 

41 hanKing baskets, filled 10 25 

(c) Plants in Department for Men. 

2G1 plants, mixed, all sizes $26 10 

205 saucers, all sizes 2 05 

2 liaiigiiig baskets, filled 50 

(d) Bulbs and Tubers. 

3,000 tuberosa, large $30 00 

10,0<JO tuberosa. small 10 00 

300 cladium csculontum 15 00 

150 caladium purpureus 7 50 

200 c.'inna, mixed 10 00 

200 dahlia, mixed 6 00 

300 freesia refracta 3 00 

2.0<"»0 tulips, mixed 10 00 

Flower seed, mixed 6 50 

(e) Flower Pots aud Saucer.s. 

r,,(M»o pots, lM.-in $18 00 

3,(iO(» pot.s. 2-in 11 55 

»5.»^Kl pot.s. 2>i.-in 27 00 

5.000 iK>ts. 3-in 29 50 

S,00f> pot.««. 4-ln 70 00 

l,ij<Ml pots. .-.-In 26 85 

1,.VM» pots. fMii 39 50 



339 



300 pots, 7-in (i no 

200 pots, Sin 5 3". 

50 pots, 10-in 1 85 

12 pots, 14-in SO 

25 saucers, mixed sizes 15 

(f) Tools and Implements. 

3 tree pruuers $3 00 

2 pruning shears 2 00 

1 hedge shear 1 00 

1 handsaw 50 

1 handsaw, old 25 

8 mole traps 3 00 

1 hose reel 1 00 

200 feet garden hose 20 00 

1 wheelbarrow 1 50 

1 hatchet 75 

1 ax, old 25 

1 sand screen, old 25 

2 watering pots, large 1 00 

2 watering pots, small 50 

4 hose nozzles 1 00 

3 lawn sprinklers 1 50 

1 garden wagon 5 00 

1 step-ladder 1 00 

1 monkey wrench, old 15 

2 spades 1 00 

1 lawn edger 2 50 

2 shovels 1 00 

1 file 10 

3 trowels 1 00 

12 trowels, Cleves' angle 1 20 

2 weeders, excelsior 30 

2 forks 1 00 

1 hoe 50 

1 hoe, two prongs 50 

• 1 rake 50 

(g) Miscellaneous. 

1 office desk, no value $0 00 

2 chairs 50 

1 lantern 15 

1 lamp 25 

1 tin bucket 10 

2 thermometers 50 

1 scrub brush 10 

8 towels : 1 50 

1 greenhouse boiler and apparatus, heating, worn out. . 00 

100 hot-bed sashes 75 00 



340 

24 hol-lH'd l»o.\es 48 00 

40 lawn vnses 200 00 

1 aquarium 15 00 

446 lawn benches 892 00 



(h) Lawn Department. 

2 one-horse hi wn mowers $75 00 

1 20-ln. hand lawn mower 10 00 

3 18-in. hand lawn mowers 30 00 

1 IS-in. liand lawn mower, old 5 00 

4 15-in. liantl lawn mowers 40 00 

1 15-ln. hand lawn mower, old 5 00 

2 mowlnp scythes 1 00 

10 lawn rakes 5 50 

12 wooden grass rakes 3 00 

1 water bucket 26 

2 wrenches 50 

1 screw driver 15 

2 oil cans 20 

1 wheelbarrow 1 00 



(i) Road Department. 

5 shovels $4 00 

2 iron rakes 1 00 

1 Ice scraper 50 

1 lawn edjrer 75 

10 railroad picks 8 00 

9 spades, G scraping hoes, 1 wheelbarrow, 1 hand saw, 

1 hatchet. 1 steel road brush 12 00 

TmI:i1 ri..rists' Dcp.wtment $4,022 46 



GARDEN AND FARM. 

4 horses .^400 00 

3 horses 150 00 

1 horse 25 00 

3 sets two-horse harut-ss 35 00 

1 .set one-horse harness 10 00 

3 two-horse wagons GO 00 

1 one-horse wagon 20 00 

3 hay forks 1 50 

1 curry combs and brushes 2 00 

1 roller 10 00 

1 wheelbarrow 1 00 



341 



Farm and Garden Tools. 

310 hot-bed sashes and glass .$17r( uo 

1 kraut cutter 45 IK) 

2 two-horse plow-cultirators 25 00 

2 two-horse plOAVs 12 00 

1 shovel plow 2 (m) 

2 two-horse harrows 10 00 

3 hand cultivators 15 (X) 

2 hand drills lU uo 

4 wheel barrows 4 <»0 

8 manure forks 4 00 

25 garden hoes 4 00 

6 shovels 3 00 

6 cabbage knives 5 00 

150 ft. water hose 13 50 



Vegetables on Hand. 

375 bushels parsnips $187 50 

1.087 bushels turnips 217 40 

195 bushels beets 48 75 

25 barrels cabbage 10 00 

100 barrels kraut 600 00 

14 barrels pickled beans , 70 00 

Total Garden and Farm $2,175 65 



OFFICERS' BARN. 

5 horses $400 00 

1 express wagon 40 00 

1 carriage 400 00 

2 buggies 60 00 

2 sets carriage harness 40 00 

3 ,sets buggy harness 35 00 

1 express harness 10 00 

1 set dray harness 10 00 

1 set cart harness T . . . . S 00 

6 light weight robes 8 00 

7 heavy weight robes 20 00 

4 stable blankets 10 00 

4 street blankets 12 00 

4 rubber horse blankets 3 00 

4 fly nets 10 00 

3 brushes 5 00 

2 curry combs 1 00 

1 scoop 50 

4 forks 2 00 ' 



342 



3 shovels 

2 rakes 

1 spade 

1 liiwn mower 

1 saddle 

2 tons hay 

10 bushels oats 

1 feed cutter 

2 buKKy whips 

1 wheelbarrow 

100 feet 1-ln. lawn hose . . 
1 stove and connection . . . 

Total Officers' Barn 



LIBRARY. 



(a) Books at Department for Men. 



vol. A I'riucess of Darkness. 

vol. The Li'pacy of Cain. 

vol. Knight Errant. 

vol. The Other Man's Wife. 

vol. It's Fate or Fortune. 

vol. The Reproach of Annesy. 

vol. The Children of the Abbey. 

vol. .\t the World's Mercy. 

vol. Tlie Crossed Path. 

vol. .\pril's I^ady. 

vol. Tlie I>ead Secret. 

vol. In the Heart of the Storm. 

vol. Old Mortality. 

vol. Mosses from an Old Manse. 

vol. Morah's Choice. 

vol. Blind Fate. 

vol. A Hardy Norseman. 

vol. rjoethe's Faust. 

vol. Donovan. 

vol. Arabian Nights. 

vol. Fair Woman. 

vol. Cousin Harry. 

vol. Dore's Fortunes. 

vol. My Herd Love Story. 

vol. Mrs. Vercker 

vol. The McDermott's of Ballycorn. 

vol. fJrIuim's Fairy Tales. 

vol. Molly Baron. 

vol. The Match Maker. 

vol. Marvel. 

vol. Have Lived .-wid Loved. 



2 00 




50 




50 




8 00 




2 00 




14 00 




2 50 




3 00 




1 00 




2 00 




15 00 




8 00 






?1,133 00 



343 

1 vol. A Crooked Path. 

1 vol. A Crown of Shame. 

1 vol. A Little Rebel. 

1 vol. A Rogue's Life. 

1 vol. In the Golden Day. 

1 vol. A Life Romance. 

1 vol. A Modern Circe. 

1 vol. Lady Branksmere. 

1 vol. The Scarlet Letter. 

1 vol. All Sorts and Conditions of Men. 

1 vol. Second Thoughts. 

1 vol. Dick's Sweetheart. 

1 vol. Ardath. 

1 vol. A Born Coquette. 

1 vol. Jealous. 

1 vol. The Lamplighter. 

1 vol. A March in the Ranks. 

1 vol. Confessions of an Opium Eater. 

1 vol. Only the Governess. 

1 vol. Beppo, The Conscript. 

1 vol. The Deemster. 

1 vol. Heron's Worship. 

1 vol. Christie Johnson. 

1 vol. The Last Essay of Elia. 

1 vol. Our Bessie. 

1 vol. Double Cunning. 

1 vol. Pathfinder. 

1 vol. The Prairie. 

1 vol. Dawn. 

1 vol. Rose Douglas. 

1 vol. Claribel's Love Story. 

1 vol. The Bondsman. 

1 vol. The Old House of Sandwich. 

1 vol. Michael Strogoff. 

1 vol. Family Pride. 

1 vol. Rienzi. 

1 vol. Dora Thorn. 

1 vol. A Little Irish Girl. 

1 vol. Lady Audley's Secret. 

1 vol. The Deer Slayer. 

1 vol. Guild Roy. 

1 vol. Ruffin. 

1 vol. Cast Up by the Sea. 

1 vol. A Golden Heart. 

1 vol. The House of Seven Gables. 

1 vol. Family Secrets. 

1 vol. The Frontiersman. 

1 v.ol. Gulliver's Travels. 

1 vol. Lord Lyne's Choice. 

1 vol. On Life and Love. 

1 vol. The Devil's Die. 



344 

1 vol. The Last of the Mohicans. 

1 vol. The Pioneer. 

1 vol. Allan Quarteimaln. 

1 vol. Canillle. 

1 vol. A -Mad Ix)ve. 

1 vol. Ix)ve and Liberty. 

1 vol. The Son of I'rothos. 

1 vol. Louise do La Valllere. 

1 vol. Second Thoughts. 

1 vol. My Danish Sweetheart 

1 vol. Fhra. the Phoenician, 

1 vol. Kdniond Dantes. 

1 vol. Pairy Tales. 

1 vol. Master Kockaillar's Voyage. 

1 vol. Koniola. 

1 vol. Paul and Virginia, 

1 vol. Peg Woftington. 

1 vol. Consuelo. 

1 vol. The Conscript. 

1 vol. The Cliffords of Clyffel. 

1 vol. A Marriage at Sea. 

1 vol. I^st Sir Masiugbred. 

1 vol. Marries Beneath Him. 

1 vol. Don Juan. 

1 vol. Kit and Kitty. 

1 vol. Nellie's Memoirs. 

1 vol. l>octor Cupid. 

1 vol. The Man in the Iron Mask. 

1 vol. The Prozen Pirate. 

1 vol. The Heir of Lynne. 

1 vol. Lorna Doone. 
1 vol. Poo's Talc. 

1 vol. The Hunchback of Notre Dame. 

1 vol. The Four Sisters. 

1 vol. .John Halifax. 

1 vol. The Mysteries of Paris. 

1 vol. Ainia K;ironno. 

1 vol. .V Cliild's History of England. 

1 vol. Arunel of Lyonesse. 

1 vol. Sartor Kesartus. 

1 vol. Mad Cap Violet. 

1 vol. A Daughter of Heth. 

1 vol. Donald Ross of Heimra. 

1 vol. The .Miseries of Paris. 

1 vol. PlntMfch's Life. 

1 vol. Koiiihvorth. 

1 vol. Father and Daughter. 

1 vol. ('onfession of Harry I.K)requar. 

1 vol. 'f'hc Lost Iyov«>. 

1 vol. Margaret Mallaud. 

1 vol. The Fortunes of Nigel. 



845 

1 vol. The Mamsell's Secret. 
1 vol. Oliver Twist. 
1 vol. Mystery of Mrs. Blencarron. 
1 vol. Self Sacrifice. 

1 vol. Kssays of Elia. 

2 vols. Emerson's Essays. 
1 vol. Kith and Kin. 

1 vol. Rory O'More. 

1 vol. Queeuie's Whim. 

1 vol. Averie. 

1 vol. Merle's Crusade. 

1 vol. Modern Home Cook Book. 

1 vol. Lover or Friend. 

1 vol. Dr. Cain's Life. 

1 vol. Reveries of a Bachelor. 

1 vol. Married at Last. 

1 vol. The Old House at Sandwich. 

1 vol. Indiana Love Story. 

1 vol. Faneheon. the Cricket. 

1 vol. Not Like Other Girls. 

1 vol. The First Violin. 

1 vol. The Search for Basil Lynhurst. 

1 vol. The Sealed Package. 

1 vol. Handy Andy. 

1 vol. Herriofs Choice. 

1 vol. The French Revolution. 

1 vol. Lucille's Poems. 

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1 vol. Bacon's Essays. 

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1 vol. The Parnell Movements. 

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3 vols. The Rise of the Dutch Republic. 

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3 vols. The Life and Times of Lord Brougham. 

11 vols. Lord Brougham's Works. 

2 vols. History of Modern Philosophy. 
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12 vols. Edmund Burke's Works. 
9 vols. DeQuincy's Writings. 

1 vol. Comstock's Natural Philosophy, 

4 vols. Guizot's History of Civilization. 



346 

3 vols. History of the Girondist. 

6 vols. Thoreau's Works. 

3 vols. Ciail Hamilton. 

1 vol. Holland's Letters to the Joneses. 

1 vol. Manual of Geology. 

5 vols. I'arlcman's Works. 

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3 vols. Anatomy of Melancholy. 

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1 vol. Walker's Rhyming Dictionary. 

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2 vols. John Coleridge's Memoirs. 
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5 vols. Margaret Fuller's Works. 

10 vols. Chambers' Miscellaneous. 

1 vol. FN)reman's Historical Course. 

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26 vols. Thomas Carlyle's Works. 

16 vols. American Encyclopedia. 

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2 vols. Taine's English Literature. 
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1 vol. Ancient City. 

5 vols. Half Hours with Best Authors. 

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4 vols. Hawthorne's Works. 



347 

3 vols. Schiller's Works. 

4 vols. Curtis' Works. 

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5 vols. Node's Anibrosinae. 

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6 vols. Illustrated Library of Travels. 
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1 vol. My First Voyage in Southern Seas. 

4 vols. Pierce Family. 

1 vol. Character Sketches. 

1 vol. Health and Education. 

1 vol. Frederick Bremei". 



348 

1 vol. Genua u Bible. 

1 vol. Gt'i-iiuin New Tostatnent. 

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1 vol. I>»'Imm''s Works. 

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3 vols. Read's Poetical Works. 

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1 vol. The Prophet. 

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1 vol. Wyntt's Poems. 



349 

1 vol. Gray s I'oeiii. 

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3 vols. Ix)ndon Labor and the London Poor. 

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1 vol. Scramble Among the Alps. 



350 

1 vol. The Tropical World. 

1 vol. Harry Lorequer. 

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1 vol. StiTMf'.s Works. 

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3 vols. People's Library. 

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1 vol. The Villa on the Rhine. 

1 vol. Deep Down; Tale of Cornish Mine. 

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4 vols. History of the United Netherlands. 

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3 vols. History of the Jews. 
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2 vols. Contiuest of Peru. 

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3 vols. Prescott's Ferdinand and Isabella. 

1 vol. Prescott's Biographical and Miscellaneous. 

5 vols. History of Greece. 

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4 vols. History of Rome.- 
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1 vol. Old l':^iglish History. 

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16 vols. Abbott's History of Kings, Queens, etc. 

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6 vols. Lyt ton's Novels. 
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1 vol. John Godfrey's Fortune. 

1 vol. Mauport. 

\ vol. David Elglnbrod. 

1 vol. Old New England Traits. 

1 vol. Captain Maryatt. 

1 vol. Cascnlne. 



351 

vol. Slight Kemiriiscenses of the Rhine, 
vol. Useful Disciple, 
vol. Hood's Works, 
vol. Gil Bias, 
vol. Treading My ^A'ay. 
vol; Poetical Quotatious. 
vol. Scottish Minstrels, 
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7 vols. Old Bound .louruals, Reports, etc. 
vol. Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales, 
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vol. Dream Life, 
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vol. Stanley in Africa, 
vol. Life in New York, 
vol. Life of General Grant, 
vol. Bird Kingdom, 
vol. The Speaker's Favorite, 
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vol. Remarks by Bill Nye. 
vol. Baron Munchausen, 
vol. Death Shot. 
vol. Parlor Magic Cook, 
vol. The Devil's Die. 
vol. The Virginian Housewife. 
vol. English Harry, 
vol. The Young Adventurer. 
vol. Texas' Revenge, 
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vol. Plantation Jim. 
vol. Russian Fairy Tales, 
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vol. The Clemenceau Case, 
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vol. Blackbird Hill, 
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vol. Bible Illustrations. Our Lord, 
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vol. Bible Illustrations. Patriarchs, 
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vol. Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
vol. Oriental Fairy Tales, 
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vol. Young People's History of France, 
vol. The Invitation of Christ. 
vol. The Prairie Boys, 
vol. Woman Against Woman. 



iio2 

vol. lloyal IJlrtJuanls. 

vol. Tlu' Whlow Hodot Papers. 

vol. Ill the Forecastle— Sajior. 

vol. Wln'ii a Man's Single. 

vol. <;rai't' (!(Mi(l\viii. 

vol. The QiKH'u's Nt't-klace. 

vol. Tlu' Hoy ("onquoror. 

vol. The last of tlu- Mohicans. 

vol. 'V\n' VirKiiiian Housewife. 

vol. Hoinautic Stories from Swiss History. 

vol. IVrfoct Ktiiiuotte, or How to Behave. 

vol. The Muster of Ballentrae. 

vol. A (Joldeii Heart— Bertha Clay. 

vol. Bede's Charity. 

vol. Boys' Own Book lor Outdoor Sport. 

Vol. Be;; Wollinirton. 

vol. Bcytnid ('oni|»arison. 

vol. The American Chesterfield. 

vol. Hawthorne— The House of Seven Gables. 

vol. Young People's History of Germany. 

vol. l''airy Bells. 

vol. Hawtliorne— Twice Told Tales. 

vol. Housi-liold Book. Wit and Humor. 

vol. (hmxI Measure. 

vol. Hon Qui.xote. 

vol. A. A. I'roctor's Poems. 

vol. Barnaby Budge. 

vol. Klizabeth, or The Exiles of Siberia. 

vol. The Countess of Charney. 

vol. Grimm's Fairy Tales. 

vol. Honseliold Book. "NVit and Humor. 

vol. Sappho; a Bealistic Novel. 

vol. .Mrs. Vereker. 

vol. Tales from Spanish History, 

vol. 'Ifavels and Advcntin-es of Baron Munchausen. 

vol. Aesop's Fables. 

vol. A Hardy Norseman. 

vol. Charming Stories. 

vol. Famous .Men. 

vol. Paris With Pen and Pencil. 

vol. Stori«'s Fntm American History. 

vol. jjicey's Half Crown. 

vol. A Mad lAJve. 

vol. Kiisslan Fairy Tales. 

vol. The Prairie Boys. 

vol. The Knights of Red Castle. 

vol. The P«x'tical Works of Jean Ingelow. 

vol. Tiie Hero of the People. 

vol. Mr. and .Mrs. Spoopendyke. 

vol. Our Bessie. 

vol. Gulliver's Travels. 



353 

1 vol. .\ii(lci-sfii"s Fjiirv TmIcs. 

1 vol. Korky .Mountain AdvfiilvirfS. 

1 vol. The World's Dt'siii'. 

1 vol. Tho I loir of Lanncs. 

1 vol. Conuiu'rcial Travt*lor. 

1 vol. Corinnc of Italy. 

1 vol. (Joldsinith's I'ocnis and I'lays. 

1 vol. Misadventures of .lidin Nicholson. 

1 vol. \\ ard's A Itoniance of Auciout Egyjjt. 

1 vol. Marvel. 

1 vol. Tho Anti<iuary. 

1 vol. Life of (leneral I'liilii) Sheridan. 

1 vol. Union Orations. 

1 vol. Dr. Itamseau. 

1 vol. Kalph Fostei-. or A (jreat Success. 

1 vol. Famous Men. 

1 vol. Guy Mannerinf?. 

1 vol. Avoriufr— Rose N. Carey. 

1 vol. The Christmas Stocking. 

1 vol. The Mesmerist's Victim. 

1 vol. Adam Bede. Poems and Essaj'S. 

1 vol. Middle March— Eliot. 

1 vol. Mill on the Floss— Eliot. 

1 vol. Komola; Spanish Gypsy— Eliot. 

5 vols. Leather Stockings— Cooper. 
1 vol. Essays of Elia— Lamb. 

1 vol. I']dmond Dantes — Dumas. 
1 vol. The Count of Moute Christo. 
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1 vol. The Viscount of Barcelona. 

1 vol. The Man in the Iron Mask. 
15 vols. Dickens' Novels. 

6 vols. Eliot's Novels. 
12 vols. Irving's "Works. 

2 vols. Emerson's Essays. 
J-O vols. Thackeray's "Works. 

1 vol. The I'artisan. 

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1 vol. The Master of Balleutrae. 

1 vol. Arundel blotto. 

1 vol. The Clemenceaii Case. 

1 vol. Baron Munchausen. 

1 A'ol. Rogue's Life. 

1 A-ol. Eutaw— Sims. 

1 vol. Richard Hurdes. 

1 A'ol. The Foragers. 

1 vol. The Antiquary— Scott. 

1 vol. AVaverly— Scott. 

1 vol. Kenelm Chillingly. 

23 — Ins. Vouchers. 



354 

rul. Blackbird Hill. 

vol. Kosf of Ilciiuni. 

vol. I)on l^iilxot»'. 

Vol. TIfs. Iliiiiian ;iinl Divine. 

vol. Thf Itrlilf of Lnimiu'riuoor— Scott. 

vol. Mrs. Verokcr. 

vol. TliroiiKli <Iri*<Mi (JIasscs. 

vol. .Vn«lcrscu"s Fairy Taless. 

vol. Tlif W«M)iii>r at Anderson. 

vol. The Life of II. W. Beecher. 

vol. CorinrH' of Italy. 

vol. (»c«*an Tra;.'t'»ly. 

vol. I'vu Wottiii;.'t<>ii. 

vol. Indoor Sport."*. 

vol. A llanly Norseman. 

vol. All Sorts and Conditions of Men. 

vol. A Stran;;e Adventuress of a riiaeloii. 

vol. Family Affair. 

vol. .\ I'rivat»M'r's .Man. 

vol. The I<cIvo;:ii»' Case. 

vol. Itahyloii. 

vol. Twenty Years After. 

vol. I'riuie Minister. 

vol. Aesop's Fables. 

vfil. Kobinstm Cnisoe. 

vi»|. Tin- Parisians. 

Vol. Life of Lady Jane Gray. 

vol. .lane Kyre. 

vol. Christy .lohnson. 

vol. Uory O'.More. 

vol. Mieha Clark. 

Vol. The Deemster. 

Vol. .\urelian. 

vol. .Man-h in the Hanks. 

vol. A Little Irish (iirl. 

vol. Miss A»lvenline— John Nicholson. 

vol. Diekens* Character Sketches. 

vol. l<orna DcHtiie. 

vol. WhittJer's INn-ms. 

vc»l. Ethics of the Dust. 

vol. lU'Verles of a Bachelor. 

vol. Uepresentative Men. 

Vol. Addressi's by Henry Drnmniond. 

vtil. Kssays of I.,«»rd Bacon. 

vol. The Vi«arof Wakefield— Goldsmith. 

vol. Crawford. 

vol. I/Mil.se de La Va II lere— Dumas. 

vol. S<ui of FrotluKs. 

vols. Maeanlay's Hl8t<»ry of England. 

vol. History of IVndenls— Thackery. 

v«.l. Burlesqui's. Yellow Plush Tapers. 



ODD 

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1 vol. Round About Papers— George. 

1 vol. Donovan— Edna Lyall's Works. 

1 vol. We Two. 

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1 vol. Knight En-ant. 

1 vol. AVon by A^'aiting. 

1 vol. A Hardy Norseman. 

1 vol. Green Fiei<ls and Running Brooks— Riley. 

1 vol. Hymns of Cildhood— Riley. 

1 vol. Neighboi-ley Poems. 

1 vol. Afterwhile — Riley. 

1 vol. The Flying Island of the Night— Riley. 

1 vol. Pipe's O'l'an at Zekesbury— Riley. 

1 vol. Sketches in Prose. 

2 vols. Shakespeare. 
1 vol. Donovan. 

1 vol. Willie Reilly and Dear Coleen Bawn. 

1 vol. The Deemster. 

1 vol. Tom Brown at Oxford. 

1 vol. Roy O'Moore — Lever. 

1 vol. Scarlet Letter. 

1 vol. Romola— Eliot. 

1 vol. Dream Life. 

1 vol. .Tane Eyre— Bronte. 

1 vol. John Halifax— Mulock. 

1 vol. First Violin. 

1 vol. The Last of the Mohicans. 

1 vol. Essays by Bacon. 

1 vol. Donovan— Lyall. 

1 vol. lyorna Doone — Lyall. 

l,vol. East Lynne — Wood. 

1 vol. Study in Scarlet. 

1 vol. An Egyptian Princess — Ebers. 

1 vol. Astoria — Irving. 

1 vol. Vashti. Until Death Do Us Part. 

1 vol. Confession of an Opium Eatei*. 

1 vol. Hear the Nature's Heart— Roe. 

1 vol. The Earth Trembled. 

1 vol. Lourdes— Zola. 

1 vol. One Summer. 

1 vol. The Romance of a Quiet Watering Place. 

1 vol. Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush. 

1 vol. Charles O'Malley— Lever. 

1 vol. The Alhambra— Irving. 

1 vol. Hardy Norseman. 



356 

1 vol. Tli»- W«-«k of tli»« <;insv«'Uor. 
13 vols. liulwer Lytton. 

8 vols. (J«M»i'jr»' Kliot. 

vols. Dumas. 

G vols. VI«'lor IIii^o. 
15 vols, flunirs IMi-ki'iis. 
12 vols. Walli'i- S.I.I I. 
27 vols. Miiry .1. llnliin's. 
7 vols. Cliarlfs Ut-ailf. 

2 v«»ls. rii<-l«' 'roin's <'al»iii. 

1 vol. How of Oranm- lUossoins. 

10 vols. Thackfrny. 

1 vol. ('yclo|H'<lia of Hin'_'r:i|iliy. 
1 vol. A^raiiisl tin- Sin-aiii. 
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IS vols. ('oo|mt's Novels. 

11 vols. Ilyimi Hooks. 

27 vols. Misi-i'llaufous ( nivriiiiiitiii 1 •(.(•niin'nts. 

2S vols. Stat«« l»oruiii»*nts. 

ir> vols. I»ick»'ns' Novels. 

i;{ vols. Hulwci-'s Novels. 

1(» vols. Thaikeray's Novels. 

(i vols. «;eor;re l^iiol's Novels. 

." vi»ls. .Maeanlay's History of Kiiirland. 

Ti vols. Cooper's Novels. 

.' vols. r<Miper's Novels— Sea Tales. 

1 vol. Harry Ivoreinier — I/«'Ver. 

1 vol. Willii" Ueilly Carl. -toil. 

1 vol. Ilamly Aii.ly- l>4'ver. 

1 v.tl. Kory (>'.M.>r«' l.ev«T. 

1 v«»l. Ivaiiii.M' Si.ttl. ~ 

1 vol. Waverly S.-otl. 

1 v.>l. S.-.tttisli <'liiefs I'orter. 

1 vol. Tlia.ldeus .>f Warsaw -I'orter. 

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1 vol. <M«I Curi.isity Shop- Diekons. 

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1 v.d. .V.laiii Heile (Jeori.'.' Hliot. 

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1 v«»I. l(ol>iiis.>ii <"nis.M' It.'foe. 

1 vol. Swiss Family IJoltiiis.ni. 

1 vol. I»ream I. if.- .M.irvel. 

1 vol. Heverles of a I'.a.-liel.tr .Marvel. 

1 vol. Tom Hrowii at O.xfor.l— lluplies. 

1 vol. Tom Hr.twn's S«-1i.k»| Pays. 

Total. I.4.V. v.ilnnies. estimat.-.l at si.KMt 00 



i-Oi 



(III r.doks at r)oi)artinoiit lor Women. 

lUM vols. Ailiii.utnii Kditidu. 

13 vols. Biihver I.,.vtton's Works, 
fi vols. \'ict()r Iliiiro's Works. 

11 Vdls. li.iw tlionics W(irks. 

18 vols. Louisi' :Mulilliacli"s Works. 
15 vols. Dickons' Works. 

12 vols. Waller Scotfs Works, 
fi vols. (Joor.t;<' Kliofs M'orks. 

3 vols. Hla.-kwill. 

23 vols. Mary llohuL's" Works. 

14 Vdls. Ucadd's Novels. 

vols. .\ljifi-'s Xovols. 

4 vols. Laii.u's I'airy Hooks. 

7 vols. Corolli's Xovols. 

5 vols. Katy Did. 

10 vols. Avon Kdilion. 

6 vols. Trowbrid.s;e's AA'orks. 
10 vols. Kwin.c:'s Works. 

32 vols. .Southworth. 
14 vols. Steidiens. 

8 vols, llontz. 

2 vols. Halierton. 

3 vols. Hni-nett. 

2 vols. WarHeld. 

1 vol. KurnoTt. 

1 vol. Iki' .Marvel. 
1 vol. Saltus. 
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1 vol. EAviu.il-. 

3 vols. Laylor's Cycloiiedia of Political Sciences. United States History, 

7 vols. Johnson's New Universal Cyclopedia. 
1 vol. Lowlcss. 

1 4-ol. Kd.-ai- Wilson. 

1 vol. Tom .Folinson. 

1 vol. <;ood Luck. 

1 vol. In I lie Kiim's Court. 

1 vol. 1 toylc. 

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1 vol. Ten Years' I^abor. 

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1 vol. The iMichess. 

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1 vol. Oneida. 

1 vol. Andersen's Fairy Tales. 

1 vol. Uo))inson Crnsoe. 

1(> vols. SiKift'onl— Histoi-ic Characters and Famous Invents. 



358 

2 vols. Enjrlisb— Conquest of the Noithwest. 

Total at Di'jtartmeut for Women, 391 vols., estimated at $300 00 



Granil total Lilnary. 1.S4G vols., estimated at $1,400 00 



SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

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5 cards surgeon's silk 38 

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1 blunt hook 1 50 

2 bivalve vaginal speculums , 4 00 

1 Sim's vaginal si)eculum 1 50 

I uterine sound 1 00 

1 application fi>rceps 1 00 

1 Tlionias tissue forceps 2 00 

1 wire twisting forceps 1 00 

1 uterine p»»lypus forceps 1 50 

2 applicators 1 00 

2 prs. r. and 1. curAed scissors 1 50 

5 prs. straight scissors 4 75 

1 pr. large vulcellum forceps 2 00 

1 medium tenaculum 1 50 

1 small tenaculum 75 

2 sponge insiders 1 00 

1 set I'easleys ne^'dles 2 00 

3 Emmett's lU'iMlle holders 5 00 

1 uterine dilator 2 00 

3 polished chisels 2 50 

4 bone scrapers 2 <X) 

1 lead m:illet 1 .lO 

2 trepliining cases 10 (MJ 

1 Barrett ."^i-cdl <idr»ride silver battery 70 00 

2 Bai'licll's air c<»M<lcnsers tXMX) 

1 iKUie forceps 2 0«1 

1 iK>st mortem set 25 00 

2 major oiH'rating cases 35 00 

1 I.,oonard thrf»at forceps 2 70 

1 l»ox silkworm gut 90 

1 doz. s. r. feeiling t»il>es 5 40 

1 N. I*. Brewer vaginal speculum 1 80 

1 set ."» aluminiun trache.a tubes 12 50 



359 

2 Ceiiiird etliyl L-liloritK' 1 Ni 

3 !<. r. mats for trays •_' 2.j 

3 post mortem instnuiu'iu irays 4 o." 

1 4-quai't fountiiin syrinjje T(i 

1 jar ." yards 10 por t-ont. iodofdnn iiauzc 1 1.". 

1 jar ."> yards l)oratoo ,i;au/,c .".'. 

1 jar. ."i yds., carbolatrd ,i;au/.i' .")(i 

1 jar r> yards plain irau/.c .">."> 

1 jar r» yards sub .uanzo ."i." 

V2 doz. spriuji- catch b. d. artery forceps f. 7.". 

Yi doz. li. r. p. p. syringes 81 

1 Little's artery forceps 11." 

2 b. and w. wash basins sr» 

2 nail l)rnslies L*.". 

^j do/.. 1 'can's ]». c. artery forceps 4 ."»(i 

1 razor 7.~» 

1 larjre b. and w. pan iwi 

1 niedinni \>. ;ind w. ])an .",u 

1 small b. and \v. pan ."mi 

2 b. ami w. basins 1 (k» 

1 I)ud,iL;con sijliymojii-aplie 17 (Ml 

2 Lewis splints 24 (M) 

1 milliamper meter 2.") (mi 

pliysiciairs knives in case •» (mi 

2 Flint hammers 1 50 

2 Cammans stethoscopes 4 00 

1 case curved sounds 12 00 

1 Jarvis nasal speculum Oo 

1 uterine electrode 7r» 

1 AUis ether inhaler 2 00 

1 operatinsi chair 45 (Ml 

1 post mortem case, old 5 CM^i 

2 bristle probangs 3 tK) 

6 hypodermic syringes 10 50 

2 Hicks thermometers 3 tM3 

2 doz. surgeon's needles 2 00 

1 bottle catgut ligatures 60 

1 Leonard antiseptic minor case IS 00 

2 aspirators 10 tM) 

1 filiform bogie 1 00 

23 Otis bnllious sounds 7 (Ml 

1 largyngoscopic set in case G 00 

1 McKenzie light concentrator 8 00 

1 adjustable bracket 6 00 

2 Gerster's surgical bags 50 00 

4 prs. forceps 1 00 

1 return catheter 1 00 

1 flexible catheter 2 50 

2 air cushions 10 00 

2 magic atomizers 2 00 

1 operating table 5<i <»> 



360 

1 plaster saw 

1 boni' s|M)on 

1 siirn»^<'ii'^ iK>i-ket case 

1' doz. -4-qiuiit 1-. i. water bottles 

J/is doz. hyiKMleriiiir syriiijijes 

2 Euglisli Ice caps 

v.. doz. s. r. rectal tul)os 

1 Esniardi haiulajic shears 

1 Wi^lifs plaster i)aris handajre shears 

2 plain dressiii;,' forceps 

1 bulb and probe, aluiniiuun 

'2 1-yard rolls oil silk 

li 1-yard rolls jrutta percha tissue 

2 24-ln. Kelly pads 

lo doz. Iiosjiital size catgut 



1 


50 


1 


50 


5 


00 


32 


40 


10 


50 


1 


00 


4 


50 


1 


35 


2 


50 


1 


5<J 




75 


1 


40 




80 


7 


20 


7 


50 



$G 00 


2 


25 




50 


10 


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2 


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1 


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1 


75 




40 




25 



Total Siu-;:ical Instruments .$752 11 



DISPENSARY. 

Fluid extract cascara sajrrada 

Fluid extract burd<»ck root 

Fluid extract cannabis indica 

Fluid extract prickley ash berries 

Fluid extract buchu 

Fluid extract S(iniirs compound 

Fluid extract yerba santa 

Fluid fxtrait sarsaparilla compound 

Fluid extiact cranii* bark 

Fbiid extract scull caii 

Fluid extract witch hazel 

Fluid extract crouch ?n"ass 

Fluid extract hops 

Fluid extract cotton root 

Fluid extract rhatany 

I'luid extract waliou 

Fbiid extract erj^ot 

I'luid extract y«'llow root 

Fluid extract aconite root 

Fluid extract niatico 

Fhiid cxtraii c»d>ebs 

Fluid extra«-t poke ntot 

Fluid extract wild chen-y liark 

Fluid extract eucalyptus 

Fluid extract dandelion 

Fbiid extract cactus ;:randif1orus 

I'luid extract irelseniium 

I'luid extrai-t black «-oliosh 

I'luid cMraii b<-1ladoi)n:i 





SO 




m 


1 


50 


1 


50 


3 


00 


4 


00 




25 


1 


25 


3 


00 


1 


25 


1 


00 




s<» 




20 




40 


2 


50 




30 



3G1 



J'luid r\I l:icl iliuil;lli> 

Fluid cxtfacl ui'iiidcliM idhustii . . 

Fluid i'Xti-;icl VMicri.-iii 

Fluid cxli-jict (tpiiiuiii seed 

Fluid I'MiMci hl.Kk li;iw 

Fluid ('.\li-;icl lifidiMUc 

Fluid cxlrjict cr.-iuc's liill 

Fluid t'xtract stilliu.i;i;i (■oiuiiouud 

Fluid I'Xti'iict licorice 

Fluid cxti-acl st:ir iiTjiss 

Fluid oxti'Mct l)l:iclv willow 

Fluid (>xtr;ict lohcli;i 

Fluid ('Xir.Mci iiiid>;irl> nr<iiii;itic . 

Fluid ('Xti-;icl s\iccus soImiu 

Fluid cxii-.-icI u\ ;i ursi 

Fluid cxlr.-ict uux vomica 

Flui<l extract Icptaiulriu 

Tincture ciuchouia c(>iui>ouud ... 

Tincturi' ,i;-eutiau conipotuid 

Tiuciurc arnica 

Tiiicltu'e opium 

Tincture opium compound 

Tincture opium camiiliorated . .. . 

'J'iiiclure cardaiuon 

Tiuclure iron 

Tincturo kino 

Tim-ture iodine 

Tincture uinyer 

Tincture lavender (•(uiipouud .... 

Tincture vanilla 

Tim-ture capsicnm 

Tincture litiiacum 

Tincture di.yitalis 

Tincture cantliarides 

Tincture liyoscyamus 

'J'initure asjifoetida 

Tincture dandelion 

Tincture stramonium 

Tincture nux vomica 

Bromide potassium 

Iodide i>otassium 

Acetate potassium 

Bichromate potassium 

nUorato potassium 

Bicarbonate potassium 

Carbonate potassium 

Citrate potassium 

Bitartrate potassium 

Bora to soditim 

Hyposulithite sodium 

Bromide soditim 





in 


1 


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1 


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1 


<HI 




1 ■> 

70 




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40 




30 


1 


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1 


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35 




90 


2 


50 


1 


GO 


4 


80 


3 


45 


1 


20 


1 


00 




85 




30 


2 


50 




40 




SO 




40 


9 


00 


2 


00 




40 




25 




40 




30 




75 




30 




35 




25 


5 


7(» 


4 


75 




20 




30 




30 




25 




15 




25 


44 


00 




40 




25 


3 


60 



362 



Itli-arlMtiiati' sihUuiu 

Hroiiiitif aiiiiiiKHiiini 

('{irlxiiiaitf iiiiiiiioniiiiii ... 

I<Mli(i«* ainiiuuiitiiii 

Cliloridt' iiiiiiiioiiiiiiii 

I*yn>|»ln»splial«' iron 

Cltniti' iron 

1C<mIiii-<m| iniii 

l..ji«latt' iron 

Snlpliatf iron 

Sulpliatf /.Inr 

oxlili* /in«- 

Ari'tatf zin«- 

\'aI«Tinal«' zim- 

.VtH'iati' Irad 

Sulphat)- <-«,»pp«'r 

Salrylatf stnla 

IMiosphatf soda 

rt'rnianjrati' polas.>iiuui ... 

Citrati' lithinin 

Sulphat«> iK'rlMMTit'.s 

CnrlM)nat«' nia^rncsin 

Hy|K»pli«»s linu' 

ItMloforni 

< iuni caniplior 

Ston«' jars 

(.'austlr soil.i 

<%>n)rli syni|> 

Tin-pi-ntinc 

C.al oil 

Spirits ammonia aromatic 

SlH-liar 

(»ll <im1c 

(Ml pt'ppfrniint 

nil croton 

Oil lemon 

OH cinnamon 

Oil rosemary 

OH .lov.'s 

OH lajpnt 

< Ml sassafras 

OH spike 

<MI hemlock 

• Ml o|-;:iinnm 

<HI bhu'k pepper 

Oil lavender 

oil rotton.seed 

« Ml easior 

oil <-:im|iliorated 

oil plnienta 

t Ml u inlerirrii-n 



2 IMI 


1 1.') 


;{<» 


1 7.". 


4.-. 


.5.1 


40 


30 


■20 


1 (10 


30 


?,<) 


4o 


2 (X) 


40 


1 (Y) 


15 


3 00 


75 


40 


iM\ 


•2 .-0 


22 50 


10 00 


50 


50 


2 40 


50 


40 


1 (X) 


25 


40 


25 


1 00 


30 


GO 


20 


20 


60 


50 


50 


20 


20 


60 


40 


60 


25 


20 


30 



363 



Oil till- 

Acid tailiiiic 

Acid liydrochloi'ic 

Acid siili»luiric 

Acid cliruiaie 

Acid benzoic 

Acid C!irl)«)lic , 

Acid tannic 

Acid pliosyboric 

Acid salycylic 

Acid boric 

Acid lactic 

Acid hydrocyanic diluted 

Acid tliynuc , 

Acid citric 

Acid oxalic 

Acid picric 

Acid gallic 

Acid arseuious 

Acid acetic 

Acid nitric 

C4naiacol carbonate 

Antipyrine , 

Antilcanuiia 

Exalgiue 

Acetauilid 

Ammonal 

Chloralamid 

Resoreiue , 

Hydrastine 

Salol 

Salicine 

Chloral hj^drate 

Resublimed iodine 

Puritied chloroform 

Squibb's ether 

IJed oxide mercury 

Yellow oxide mercury . . . 

Bichloride mercury 

Mild chloride mercury . . 
Ammoniated mercury . . . 

Alum 

Papoid 

Buchu leaves 

Venice turpentine 

Lunar caustic 

lodole 

Spirits camphor 

Cinchouia bark 

Prepared chalk 

Common starch 



liO 


1 (M) 


1 00 


30 


1- 45 


1 40 


40 


30 


35 


35 


20 


25 


25 


2 00 


30 


25 


25 


20 


30 


2 80 


1 30 


8 40 


2 40 


40 


3 40 


4 00 


75 


30 


1 75 


83 


1 50 


1 60 


75 


2 30 


40 


30 


2 40 


40 


10 


25 


2 20 


30 


20 


90 


2 20 


60 


90 


40 


1 OO 



:MU 



AI>stM'lM-llt tidtnll 

Aiiiis«'|>tir iiiixy/A' 

H:ill«l!i^.-s 

Till oiiitiiu'iit li«>x«'s 

Filtfi-lliu |»ji|»»'l- 

IMII Ih)X.'s 

rivscriptliMi vials 

Hiiipty ijipsulcs 

Isinuliiss i»ljist«'r 

Hclliiiliiiiiia idjisirr 

KiiIiIn'i- ailln'sivt' plaslcr 

Spoll^'fS 

'I'notll lllUsiU'S 

Mortars aiitl pcsilcs 

<;ra<luat»'s 

Kvaporaiin;.' (iislu-s 

Iiiuiiivin 

llyilrtiiiicicr ami stand 

( ;iass pficolalor 

(iroiiiiil sloppi'ml Imttlt's 

Corlis 

LalM'Is 

1 >isp»'Usalor.v 

riiariiiai-nporia 

rrai-fif«' of pliariiiacy 

.M.MllciiH' rasr. D. F. .M 

IlaydtMi's viluirmini <niiipniiii(l 

Spirits ctlicr (•ompinim! 

Soliiltic lilut'inv: 

< Jlyccriiit' 

Dlsiilli'tl rxtraci witdiliazi'l 

Alroliol 

Aipia aininoiiia 

Halsaiii lir 

Sulpiialf atropia 

Siilpiiat<- i|uiiiiin' 

Siilpliatr nioniliia 

Citrate cafrfiiir 

rills coiiiitound ralliartic 

IMlts aloiii. stryclinia ami liciladoiina 

rills asalwllda 

Tills zliic. stilplin carliolat*' 

IMlls ilatiiriiK' 

rills «-ol«dil(Mini stil)diid)> 

rills iiH'rrtiry i>ri>lo. iodide 

IMlls di^'italine 

I'ills i|iiiuilie coiMiHiiiiid 

Pills plH-iin<-«>tiiit' and i|idiiin)> 

I'ills atitikainnin and codeine 

IMlls stryehida 

Tills pota*'si\ini perinaiiu'aDate 



1 


3(; 


3 


(M) 


1 


<K) 


1 


00 




20 


4 


20 


4 


45 





CAt 




40 


1 


tiO 




40 



2 •_>■) 



4 


oO 


5 


(K) 


1 


(H> 




r,o 


1 


50 


1 


00 


40 00 


2 


00 


G 40 


5 


<M) 


4 


00 


3 


50 


o 


00 


2 


00 




25 


4 


50 




48 




40 


14 


40 




40 




40 




30 


6 


00 




75 


1 


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1 


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2 


50 




20 




50 


1 


75 


1 


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1 


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2 


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50 



80-) 

IMlls Iii-t).\i(lt' iiiMii.u.-iiu'so 

llyixHU'niiic i.-ihli'is liyosfiiic liydrobroinatt' 
lIyi)(t(U'i-iiik- t.-ihh'ts morphia nnd air^iiia . . 

llyiiodcriuic tabU'ts morjihia 

llyiKKk'riiiif tablets diiiitaliiu' 

Ilyixidi'i-iiiic tal)h'ts strychnia siili)hat(' . .. . 

IlypodtTiuic tablets esciine sidphate 

Hypodermic tablets nitroglycerine 

Hypodermic tablets conine hydrobromate . 

Hypodermic tablets atropia sidphate 

Scale pepsin 

Succhorated pepsin 

Campho. phenique 

White resin 

Bismnth subnitrate 

Bismuth vallate 

Bismuth salicylate 

Rochelle salts 

Epsom salts 

White wax 

Yellow wax 

Paratlbi 

Sulplun- 

Peptic essence 

Dona van's solution 

Cosmoline 

Zinc ointment 

Balsam Peru ointment 

Sugar of milk 

White castile soap 

Lanoline 

White pinus caudensis 

Warburg's tincture 

Balsam copaiba 

Listerine 

l'eroxi<k' liydrogen 

t'ollodion 

Acetic ether 

Eucalyptol 

Ergotine 

llydrochlorate cocaine 

Acid carbolic crude 

T'rethan 

Wine colchicum seed 

PoAvdered extract digitalis 

Powdered extract mix vomica 

I'owdered extract henbane 

Powdered extract podophyllin 

Powdered extract colocynth compound . . . 

Powdered extract belladonna 

Powdered fennel seed 



1 


(lO 


s 


(M) 




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:i 


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2 


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50 




40 


1 


30 




25 


3 m 


1 


(M) 


1 


55 




70 


2 


00 


1 


25 


1 


00 




35 




20 


5 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 


2 


80 


2 


00 




40 




50 


1 


20 


1 


40 




40 




40 




40 




50 




40 




20 




7o 


2 


00 




GO 




40 




35 




30 


1 


m 




45 




40 




40 




40 




40 




20 


1 


40 




70 




15 



366 

Powdfi-fd oapslcuiu 1^ 

Powdered llshlK»ne -<• 

Powdered opium 2 70 

Powdered ;,'Uin aralMC 40 

PowderiMl mnlaiiioii seed 1 25 

Powdered c-autharldes 40 

Powdered ipeeac 1 4<» 

Powdered tl.ix seed 75 

Powilt-red an uilM>j;e 50 

Powdered licorice compound 40 

Powdere*! mustard 45 

i*owdere<l eubebs 20 

Powtlered lycopodium -iO 

Syruj* iiMlUle Irou 80 

Syrup tolu 40 

Syrup wild <-herry 20 

Syrup ipecnc 1 (K) 

Syrup Squill's comiiuuud 75 

Syrup hypophosphlte compound 115 

Aniline yellow 4<3 

Aniline frreen 1 40 

Aniline violet 1 00 

Creosote 20 

Mouscl's powder 10 

Tart.-ir emetic 10 

Whisky 4G 75 

Port wine 48 80 

Pei)ti»uizin{; tubes 2 00 

Silicate soda 75 

lirown Sequard's mixture 2 40 

.Malted milk 1 25 

Pipelines 40 

powder lH)xes 2 40 

Sur.ireon's lint 1 25 

M«ini»-l)romat«' of camphor 20 

Formaldehyde j;enerators 100 OO 

MiiTor 50 

Seidlitz iH)wdei's 50 

Pr.'s.ription case 20 tK) 

pour medicine cases 60 CK) 

1 cuplMiard 3 00 

2 countei-s 7 00 

Tin cans 3 00 

(;ns «tove 1 00 

TfK>th forceps 8 00 

S<ales 20 00 

Carltoys 1 50 

lMu;r mill 5 00 

1 .lock 5 00 

F.xtract of malt with codliver oil 8 50 



367 

Wood Mlcolidl 1 OU 

Bugine 3 00 



Ti.t.-il 1 »isi(t'iis:ii-y $868 22 

PATIIOLOcJICAL DEPARTMENT. 

i;ii Medical and Scientific Books. 

Suryleal Memoirs. Mercer. 

Diseases of the Testis. Curling. 

Medical Formulary. Ellis. 

Elements of Snrnery. Liston. 

Clinical Facts. ;Mayo. 

Pulmonary Consumption. Clark. 

Practice of Medicine. Eberle. 

Medical Student's Vade Mecum. Mendenhall. 

Dublin Dissector. HaiTison. 

Elements of General Pathology. Stille. 

Elements of Chemistry. Reynault. 

Treatise on Anatomy. Vol. I. Hornei'. 

Treatise on Anatomy, Vol. II. Horner. 

Experimental Chemistry, Vol. I. Henry. . 

Experimental Chemistry. Vol. II. Henry. 

Poisons. Christisou. 

Medical Dictionary, Vol. I. Hooper. 

Medical Dictionary, Yol. II. Hooper. 

Materia Medica, Vol. I. Harrison. 

^lateria Medica, Yol. II. Harrison. 

Practice of Medicine, Yol. I. Wood. 

Practice of Medicine, Yol. II. Wood. 

Surgery. Druitr. 

Obstetric Report. Miller. 

Operative Surgery. Yelpeau. 

Medical Dictionary. Dunglison. 

U. S. Dispensatory. Wood and Bache. 

Compendium of Medical Science. Weill and Smith. 

System of Surgery. Gross. 

iledical Dictionary. Thomas. 

I'hrenology, Yol. I. Spurzheim. 

Phrenology, Yol. II. Suprzheim. 

Treatise on Insanity. Ellis. 

Principles of Physiology. Combe. 

Disorders of Cerebral Circulation. Burrows. 

Derange Manifestation of the Mind. Spurzheim. 

Psychological Medicine. Tuke. 

Essays on Physiognomy. Lavater. 

Mind in the Lower Animals. Yol. I. Lindsay. 

Mind in the Lower Animals. Yol. II. Lindsay. 

Care and Cure of the Ins.-me. (Tranville. 



_' lO 



- 


<.j 


II 


(lit 


'» 


50 


4 


50 


G 


00 


2 


00 


2 


75 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 



3r;s 

Iii.-iiij.- <.r III*' IniltHl SlJilis aiitl <'auada. Tuke. 

I iijiirifs of tlie Nerves. Mitchell ^ i?! 

insanity. S|i!t7.lva 

Mill V««;:i-ial»l«' Neiiioiii-s. llarley. 
II<»|»itals for tlic insane. Klikliride. 
Insanity ami Us rn-vt-ntion. Tuke. 
«:«-ni'r-al I'arrsis. Austin. 

Itraln ami Nerves. 1 ><>\vse >;i 50 

Insanity and Its ("aii.se. Stearns 1 5(» 

Manual of Neeroseopy. Newth. 
Katioiuil 'i'lieraiieutics. Meryon. 

Manual <»f Insanity. Spiizka 

I >i>ca.ses nf Nose and Throat. Sajous 

.Mfdical Kiet-tririly. .Mailliolow 

I'aralysis. Hastian 

I linical .Mii-rosco|iy. Urycr 

l(Miil and IMeteties. I'avy 

Manual of IMet. ('lninil»ers 

^ ear MiK»k of Treatment. I'nkuown 

Syntln'tir i'liiloso|>iiy. Speuecr. 

Kf>lionsiliiiity In .Menial IMsease, Vol. I. Mandsley... 

U4-si>((nsiliiliiy in .Mental IMsease, Vol. II. .Mandsley. . 

.\niiiial i'arasltcs. Hcimeden. 

I'oiins of ^\■all•l•. 'i'yndall. 

\t'\v Ciieinistry. ('<Mike. 

Si-lcrosis of the Si>iual Cord. Atliaus 

.Modern Stirp'ry. Kolierts 

Mirio-Clieniistry of Poisons. AVormsley 

Asiatic <'hol<-ra. Wenal 

1 laiidlMiok of Insaniiy. KinhotT 

riisoundiH'ss of .Mind. Williams 

I'ihhIs. Smith 

.\natomy. Ilolden 2 50 

riH'inieal .\nalysis. Normandy. 

Year Book of Treatment, rnkiiown 

Nature of Mind, rrince 

Ilt-adaches. hay 

Mirroiomisi's Vadc .Mccmn. Ix-e 

I'larijcal Ilisiolo;:y. Oilihs 

limiiK'ni l»i>(i(»i-s. \o]. I. Hottany 

l.miiH'nt lioctors. \i>l II. I'.fttany 

Itroniides. Clarke. 

I iandhook of Therapeuties. Rinjrer 

Sleep and Its l>eranpeinents. Hammond. 

Hrain K.xliaiistion. Corniuir 

Nervous IHseases. Mileheil. 

Mi'iital IHseases. Stearns 1^ 7.- 

M all's riaee in Nature. Huxley. 

I.eelures on NervoUs Hiseases. Kaiiney ." ."0 

IMseases of llic .Nervous System. I{(»ss 4 ."ill 

I (i-ieascs of ilif NiT\ <iii«i S\ vii-iii ( ;.>\\ <«r .'! imi 





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3(JU 

Xei'vous ;iU(l .Mi'Uliil I >isc:iscs. (ii-;iy 

Nervous L)is«'iist's. llaiiiilion 

Systi'Ui of Tlit'i-.-ipcutics. Vol. I. ll;iif 

Syslcm of 'rilt'l-;l|M'llti<-s. \ol. II, ll;||r 

System of 'l"Ii(M:ii)culics. \'oI. 111. llnif 

Diseases of tlic Siom.-n-li. llwuhl 

Diii.irraiii of the Nerves. I'lnw cr 

Atlas of Anatomy. KviU 

System of .Medicine. XOI. I. Keynolds 

System of Metliciiie. \'ol. II. Keynolds 

System of Medieine. ^'ol. III. Keynolds 

Fevi'i-s. Jones. 

Kef. Handbook .Meil. Seienees. \i>]. I. I'.nek 

Ref. Ilandhook Mnl. Seiem-i s, Vol. II. Unek 

Ilef. Handbook :Me<l. Scienees. Vol. III. V.xuk 

Ref. Handbo<d< Med. Seieiues. Vol I \'. I'.nek 

Ref. Handbook Med. Sciences. \i>\. \ . I'.uck 

Ref. Handboidc Med. Sciences, A'ol. A'l. I'.uck 

Ref. Hau<lbook Med. Sciences. Vol. VII. P.nck 

Ref. Handbook Med. Sciences. Vol. VIII. liuck 

Obera .Minora. Sequin. 

Medical Dictionary. (Jould 2 75 

Medical Dictionary. Thomas 3 HO 

Diseases of Brain and Spinal Cord. McEweu 6 00 

Brain Suruery. Starr 3 00 

Iiiti'rnatianal Encycloi»edia of Suruery. \o\. I. Ashurst. 8 00 

International Kucyi-loi»edia of Sursery, A'ol. II 8 (K> 

luternational Encyclopedia of Surg:ery. Vol. Ill 8 00 

International Eucydopedia of Surgeiy. A'ol. lA' 8 OO 

International Encyclopedia of Sm-geiy. ^'ol. A' 8 00 

International Encyclopedia of Sur.gery. A'ol. VI 8 (X» 

International Encyclopedia of Surgery. Supplement... 8 00 

Medical I Ha.unosis. Alusser 6 00 

Diseases of the Nervous S.vstem, 2 vols. Gowers 4 (K) 

Practical Physiology. Stirling 2 (K» 

Diseases of the St(miacli. Martin 5 00 

Disinfection and Disinfectants. Rideel 4 50 

S?ltinal Concussion. Clevenger 2 50 

Mental .Medicine. Kegis 2 00 

Histology. Stirling 2 00 

Slirirery. Stimson 3 75 

AnaT(nny. Holden 3 00 

Di]ihtheria. Browne 5 (Xt 

Outlines of Anatomy. Campbell 1 00 

Clinical lectiires. < Jowers 2 00 

Principles of Surgery. Senn 4 50 

Aseptic Treatment of AVounds. Scliimmelbusch 2 00 

Histology. Schaefer 3 00 

Principles of Bacteriology. .Vbbott 2 75 

Tniuries of Nerves. Alitchell 1 75 

24 — Ins. A'oichkrs. 



370 



llamllMM.k i.r Skill lUs.-iisos. Voii llaslin;;er 2 75 

Imli^.-siiuii. II.Tsrli.'ll 2 00 

K|ii(l«'iiii<- aitd Isiilaijiiii Hospitals. McNtMl 3 50 

'IVxtlMink of Hy-i«'ii.'. Holu' 3 00 

< WMU'ial l'atli«tl<>'4\ . /i»'j:lt r 5 50 

Ncrv«»us I »is«'asi's. I »»Ti-uin 5 00 

Xen'ouK ami Mfiital Diseases. Gray 5 75 

l*athol«»tf.v and Morhl<l Anatomy, rjroen 2 75 

Mat.-iia Mi'dlra. Hiackrn 2 75 

Noniial Histology. IMersol 3 50 

Tiratis*- on riiarniai-y. Caspar 4 50 

Anatomy. <;ray S (K) 

Unman Anatomy. .Monis 7 00 

Intfrnational IMctionaiy. Webster 30 00 

Stamlanl l>U-tionary, \"ol. I. Funk 00 

Standard I»l<tionary. \'ol. II. Kunk 00 

Nat. .M»'dlcal Dictionary. \oI. I. Killin^rs 7 (h» 

Nat. .M«'«llcal IMctionaiy. Vol. II. I'.illinjrs 7 fM) 

Ilnstratcd IMrtionary of M«>difine. Oould 10 <mj 

IMrtionary of I'sydiolo^'ical Med.. Vol. I. Tuke 5 00 

Dictionary of I'sycliolo^Mcal Med.. Vol. II. Tuke 5 00 

.National Dispensatory. Stille 8 00 

Practice of rharmacy. Heniiugrton 6 50 

•Vnatomy of the Nervous System. Raimey 6 00 

Theory and I'ractice of Mwlicine. Pepper 6 00 

TlniM-y and Practi<-«* <»f Me<licine. Pepper 00 

ThiHiry and Practice of Medicine. Kol>erts 4 50 

Pnictice of .Medicine. Bartliolow G 00 

Practice of .Medicine. Osier G 50 

Theory an<I Practice of Medicine, ^^^littaker G 50 

Pra<'tice of .Medicine. I.yman 5 75 

Practice of .Medicine. Flint G 00 

Praitical .Medicine. I.<ioniis 7 00 

.Meilical Dia;:nosis. DaCosta 7 no 

Medical Dia>:nosis. X'ierodt 5 (Ml 

Physiology. Flint 7 (X) 

Physinlojry. Kirke 4 00 

Physiolo^ry. Fost«'r 5 50 

Obstetrics. .Noiris 8 00 

Ol>sletrlcs. Parvin 5 75 

Gynecolo^ry. Haldy 7 00 

< JyiMK'oloyy. t ;ood4'll G (X) 

I>lseases of Women. «iarri::us 5 00 

Diseases of Women. Thomas G 00 

Sur;iery. Kern S 00 

Surgery. Vol. I. .\L'ne\v S 50 

Snr;:i'ry. Vol. II. .V^micw S 50 

Stir;:ery. Vol. 111. .\i:ne\v S 50 

Oral Snrjrery. Garretson 10 00 

Dlsi'asi's of Children. Starr S 00 

TextlMMik of 1 iplitlialmoloi:y. Norris G <K> 



371 



Diseases ol' I lie Kvr. .Si-liweiiiii/. 

Diseases of the Eye. tirst eililion. Itoosa 

Diseases of tlie Kye. NOycs 

Diseases of the Kye, scvciitli cdii imi. IJuosa 

System of Electro-TluM'aiH'utics. Bijxt'low 

Electi-ieily in MiMrK-iiu- ami Surgery. Iiiel)i,ii- ami llnhv 

Medical Elect rii-iiy. .loiics 

Hyiiieiie. Ktilic 

Hyj;ieue. I'arkcr 

Hygiene and riihlic llcalili, YiA. 1. itiicU 

Hygiene and ruhii.- llcalili, \<-l. II. I'.uck 

Diseases of tlic Skin. Kdinisi 

Diseases of tlic Skin. 1 lydr 

The lUot Upon the Hrain. Ii'eland 

Throniih the Ivoi-y (Jate. Ireland 

Tivatnient of Consnniption. Harris 

Diseases of the Throat. Seller 

Diseases of the Nose and 'J'hniai. r.osworlli 

Diseases of the Nose and Throat, r.dswdrth 

Chest. Throat and Nasal Cavities. Iii-als 

Diseases of Nose and Throat. Ivins 

Medical Thysies. Draper 

Mannal of Chemistry. Simon 

Clu>mistry. Atttield 

A'enereal I Useases. Taylor 

Practical Dietetics. Thompson 

Fractures and Dislocations. Hamilton 

Tubercttlosis of Bones and .Toints. Senu 

Abdonunal Sur.si'ery. Keith 

Diseases of the Rectum. Kelsy 

Practical T'rinjilysis. Purdy 

Hy]>odermatic Medication. Bartholow 

Medical Ophthalmoscopy. Gowers 

Pulse Sensations. Ewart 

Counter Irritation. Gillies 

The Insane in Foreign Countries. Lethworth 

A Clinical Mannal. MacFarlane 

Anesthetics. Hewitt 

Post Mortem Technique. Heckton 

Post Mortem Examinations. Yirchow 

Mannal of Autopsies. Blackburn 

Urinary Deposits. Beale 

Medical Jttrisprudence and Toxicology. Chapman. . . . 

iMedical .Jurisprudence. Taylor 

Medical .lurisprudence. Vol. I. AVhitthaus 

Medical .Jurisprudence. Vol. II. Whitthaus 

iledical .Jurisi)rudence. Vol. III. Whitthaus 

Insanity in Its Medico-Ue.sal Relations. Buckham... 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. Shoemaker 

Practical Therapeutics. Hare 

Therapeutics. Its Prim-iples and Practice. Wood 



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lltiiiiiin .\li.iistr<.siii.s. I'iiit I. Hirst auil Pieisol 

Iliitimu .M«.nsiiositl«'s. I'Mit 11. Hirst and I'ieisol 

Iliiiiinn .Moiistrositii's. r.iii III. Hirst aiul IMtMsol . . . . 
Iliiiiiait .Mniislrosilii's. I'arl IN'. Hirst and IMiMsol.... 

HacttTlolnuy. Fraiikt'l 

HilctiTlolo^jiral TfVliiinli.iry. SalnliKMisnii 

Hjict«TloIoKl<al MctlKMls. HiicpiM' 

HartiTloln^ii-al (Jiiidf. KrotliiiiKliaiii 

The .Mli-rnsci)|M' anil Its Ui'Vflatious. Carpenter 

I'st' of tlif .Mlcn»sc(»pt". I-'ricdlat-nilcr 

.MtMlifai .Mlcntsropy. Wlu-ilit-rrd 

.Mt'ilii-al .Mirroscopy. Itccvcs 

Prai-tiral .Mii-ntsropy. .Millt-r 

.MIfri»Mn»plc Tt'clino|(>;;y. Frcy 

How to Work with tii»' Microsoopi'. licah' 

Manual of Ha«-t«'rit>Iittj:y. Stornbcr^' 

S»n-t'i<-al HarttM-iolii^'y. Scnii 

I'rai-tiral ratli<)l<i;ry. (JiMics 

.Morl.i.I Histolo;:y. r.My<-,' 

Siir^iral rallioldtry. HillrDlli 

ri-atliial I'allii>li)i:y. Wnodliead 

ratlinloiriral Anatmny and Ilistnloiry. DclaticM and 

rruddcn 

Studios in ratliol(»jri<-al Anatomy. Vol. I. Di-lalit'ld. . . . 
Stuilifs in ratlidiojrical Anatomy. Ndl. II. Delatield... 
ratlio|o;;iial and Snrjrical Treatment of Tumors. Scnn 

Sur;:iral I'allioloiry and TlirraiK'Htics. Warreu 

ratliolo^'ical .Vnatomy of the Nervous Centers. Fox. .. 
Strnrture of the Central Nervous System. Kdinuer. . . 

Midtlle and Hind Hrain. Hruee 

XtTVt'.s of the Human liody. Iluirhes 

Xpn'es of the Human Hody. Flower 

rsyi-liolonieal Meiliiine. .Mann 

Insanity. Savay:e 

Treatise on Insanity. Hammond 

Dineases of the Nervous System. Hirt 

NiM-vous I Mseases. Wood 

Diseases of the Nervous System. Handy 

TextlMiok of Nervous IHsea.ses. 1 >nna 

I Mseases of tiie Nervous System, .\lliia\is 

Dlsea-sif* of tlie Nervdus Sysicm. Uoseiitiial 

Mental I Mseases. t 'loustou 

Funetioual Nervous Diseases. I'uizel 

IMatfUosis uf IM-^eases of the Nervo\is System. Herler. 

Nervous I »i«iordi'rs. Jones 

Fandliar Form of Ni-rvous Diseases. Starr 

Nervous Diseases. Wel»l»er 

I'syrhiatry. .Ni-yiiert 

<'llniral I.eetures on Diseases of the .Nervous System. 

I lammond 

Nerve rrostratioii. Itons;) 





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Xci'vmis Discjisfs of « 'liildicii. S.iclis ."i (M> 

^leutal riiysiulo^ty. < 'Mriii'iiU'r .". <i<) 

Tlu> Bniiii as An Orjiaii of .Mind. Hastiaii l' ."><» 

riiysiolouy of Mind. .Maiidslcy ij no 

I'atliolo.uy of .Mind. .Maiidslcy L' nu 

Body and Mind. .Mandslcy 1 ."lU 

Intlueuce of tlic Mind rpon ilir I'.ndy. 'I'nl^r 

The Brain and Its I'nnciions. Lnys 

Di.''easos of Memory. IJiliot 

Functional Xervons .MTcdions. I'.rown-Si'qnard 

Intra-Cranial Tumors. lUamwcll 

Xnrsini;- tlio Xcrvous and Insane. Mills 

llysierieal or I'unctional I'aralysis. Bastian 

The Intinence of tlie Synipatlietie on IMsease. Fox. .. . 

Functions of ilie I'.rain. {''errier 

Histolo.iiy and riiysioIot;y of Cerebral (.'onvolutions 

IMchet 

The Brain and Spinal Cord. Ilorsley 

Diseases of the Brain. (!o\vers 

Hysteria and Brain Tumor. Jacobi 

Localization of Cerel)ral Diseases. Ferrier 

Syphilis of The Brain and Spinal Cord. Dowse 

Brains of Ciinunals. Benedict 

Surgery of the Spinal Cord. Thorburn 

Epilepsy and Other Convulsive Diseases. Gowers 

Diagnosis of Diseases of the Brain. Gowers 

Insomnia and Its Treatment. ^lacFarland 

The Human Brain. Kcker 

Paralysis from Brain Diseases. Basfian , 

The Cm-ability of Insanity. Butler 

Epilepsy. Hare 

Treatment of Nei-ve rmstrarion. Plaifair , 

How to Care for the Insane. (Tranger , 

Brain Work and Overwork. Wood , 

Syphilis and the Nervous System. Gowers 

Materia Medica. I'otter , 

Pain. Horning 

Tathogenic Bacteria. MacFarland , 

Atlas of Nervous Diseases. .laeob 

Atlas of Nerve Cells. vStai-r 

X-Rays for Everyl>o<ly. Frevert. 
Dissections. Illustrated. Brodie. 

Sanity and Insanity. Mercier 1 25 

Insanity tind Its Treatment. Worcester 3 50 

Centi-al Nervous Organs. Obersteiner 5 50 

Diseases of the Nervous System. Onierod 1 00 

Nursing and Care of the Nervous and Insane. Mills. . . 1 CK) 

Cerebral Palsies of Children. Osier 2 (Hi 

Headache and Neiiralgia. Corning 2 75 

Nervous P>xhaustion. Beard 2 75 

Sexual .Xeurasthenia. Beard 2 75 



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M.MitJil I Hsfiiscs. Sluiw 

Haii<ll»uok of I/«-pic.sy. Iiupey 

riii.i..k'iiii»li.v of liiKit'iia. Crookshauk 

rtoiualiis ami I^'iuoiiiaius. VauKlin 

Etiulot;y «»f OHst'Us ni'foiniitjos. Tall»ot 

Uric Acl«l lu CausatJuu uf Disease, llaig 

Trfutlse t>n HyKlt'»t«- Notter 

SystiMii i>f Suiuery. Vol. I. Dennis 

SyKti-ni of SuiKi'iy. Vol. II. Dennis 

Systi-ni of Surp'iy. Vol. III. Dennis 

System of Snrjreiy, Vol. IV. Dennis 

Diseases of the Skin. Kai^osi. 
Diseases of the Har. Hnsk. 
DlMea»e8 of the Throat. liiKalls. 
Tln> Kye in tJenet-al Diseases. Kuies. 

.MiMll.lnal Te«hnolo;jy. Curtis. 
Oi»hthalini«- and t)iitic Meinoiamla. Itoo.'sa. 
(lUiilf in rrinalysis ami Toxlt-olo^ry. Witlhaus. 

I'olsi.ns Kir»Mt and Detintion. Vol. I. Blyth. 

ruls.in> KITiM-t and Detection. Vol. II. Blytb. 

Asthma. Salter. 

Diseases of the Intestines. Bristowe. 

I>atholo$;i(al Aiuitoniy of Female Sexual Organs. Klob. 

KneyelniMMlla of Obstetrics, Vol. V. Grandin. 

Em yeloiKMlia of Obstetrics, Vol. VI. Grandin. 

KneyeluiM'dia of oltstetrics. Vol. VII. Grandin. 

Emyjlopeilia of oltstetrics. Vol. XI. Grandin. 

Kneyi-lopedia of oiistetrics. Vol. XII. Grandin, 

Thera|ieutie Handbook. Edes. 

Modern .Materia .Me«lica. Both. 

I'teriiie 'riiera|>eutics. Tilt. 

Infant I'l-edini;. Uouth. 

(ioiiorrlioea. Milton. 

Diseases of tiie Ijin;:s. See. 

Ciimatolnu'V. Bell. 

Aslatie fliolera. Weudt. 

T!iera|H'nties of Uesplratory I'a.ssages. .Taiues. 

Dl?.ea.ses of Women. Fuerst. 

lYi'allse on Syphilis. Whitley. 

Mammary <;ian<ls. Billroth. 

New Growths of the Items. Gasserou. 

Unman Ost<>o]o^'y. Ilojilen. 

Mislieal Thermonn-iry. Se<piin. 

I'rlnejples .-ind f'rai-tiee of Surgery, Vol. I. Hamilton. 

rrineiples and I'raetiee of SiiriL'ery, Vol. II. Hamilton. 

'I'reali.'M' on obstetrics. V(d. 1. CariM'ntor. 

Tmitlse on Obstetrics, Vol. II. Carpenter. 

Tn'jitlseon Olwtetries, Vol. IV. Carpenter. 

Gyne<'oli»jry, Vol. I. Hart and Barbonr. 

Gynei'olo^y. Vol. H. ll.irt and Barbonr. 
Malat*ia. Sternlwr^r. 



2 


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3 00 


4 


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4 


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375 



Yeuoivnl 1 >ist>;isi's. Kcycs. 

Treatment of Wnnnds. rildirr. 

Index of Snrji:ery. Ki'eilcy. 

Diseases of the Male Sexu:il Oiunns. r.cHicld. 

Minor Surs^ii-al (xynei-ology. .Muiidc 

Diseases of the Ovaries. Oshauseii. 

^Manual of Obstetrics. Venier. 

Diseases of tlie Joints. Kiirwell. 

Oesopliai^ns and Nose. MacKenzle. 

Renal and Urinary Affections. Dickinson. 

Diseases of Women. Tait. 

Diseases of the Bladder. Conlson. 

All)nmimiria. Dickinson. 

.Mannal of Snriiery. Clarke. 

rharniacoynosy. I'owei*. 

Text liook of Medicine. Strumphells 

Materia Medica and Pharmacoloyy. Cull)reth 

Diseases of the Spinal Cord. Bramwell 

Clinical Diagnosis. Simon 

Text Book of Histologj'. Clarkson 

Text Book of Bacteriology. Sternberg. 

Poisons— Their Effect and Detection. Blyth 

Fnnctional Nervous Disorders in Wqmen. Gillicuddy. . 

I'ractical Diagnosis. Hare 

Pathological Anatomy and Histology. Delafield and 

Prudden 

"Watts' Dictinn.-ny of Chomistry. A'ol. I. Morley and 

Muir 

Watts' Dictionary of Chemistry. "S'ol. II. [Morley and 

Muir 

Watts' Dictionary of Chemistry. Vol. III. Morley and 

:siuir 

AVatts' Dictionary of Chemistry, Vol. IV. Morley and 

Muir 

Essentials of Anatomy. Darling and Raimey 

Anatomy. (Jray 

« Human Osteology. Ilolden 

Chemistry. Altfield 

Manual of Chemistry. Simon 

Pi'actical Examination of Urine. Tison 

Food's Composition and Analysis. Blyth 

Text Book of Applied Therapeutics. Wilson 

Genius and Degeneration. Hirsch. 

Education of the Centi'al Nervous System. Halleck. . . 

Quaies' Anatomy, Vol. I, Pt. 1. Schaefer 

Quaies' Anatomy. Vol. I. Pt. 2. Schaefer 

Quai,es' Anatomy. Vol. IT. Pt. 1. Thane 

Quaies" Anatomy. Vol. II. Pt. 2. Thane 

Quaies" Anatomy. Vol. III. Pt. 1. Schaefer 

Quaies" Anatomy. A'ol. ill. pr. 2. Thane 

Quaies" Anatomy. Vul. :'>. I't. '.i. Schaefer 



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20 00 
3 00 
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giiiiii-s' Aiiatniny. V(.l. III. IM. 4. SclmctVr 

Qualfs* AiiMtoiiiy. A|»|»«li.\. StliiU'tVr .iiul Tliane.$2G 78 2G 78 

niiinitii Anatomy. Norris < 00 

Mcillcal .liirispnKh'iK-f. Wliitiliaiis COO 

.Mamiiil of Aiiatnmy. ll.iyiifs 2 50 

rrliuiplc (.r Hioh.fry. L' vols. SpciKcr 

Study of S4><io|o«:y. Simmkit 

I'riiuipli's of So(iolo;ry. 4 vols. Spi'iieer 

rrlii<i|.l.s of KthHs. 2 vols. Spoiuor 

I'riin-i|>l»'s of I'syrholo^ry. :: vols. SpoiiciT 

First I'riiu-lpU's. Sprii«-»'r 

Sorlal Statistics. SpciKcr 

Kdilratioii. Spt'iKcr 

Kvolmiou of .Man. ll:if<Ucl 

Kvolwtloii of .Man. Ilai'<'kt'l 

iM'sci-iit anil harwiiiisni. Schniitlt 

Kvolntion. LfCoiitc 

Man an<l tin- < Jlarial I't-iicMl. ^^■I•ilrllt 

Ktluraiion m> a Siicntf. I'aiii 

History of Kdni-ation. raiutiT 

Ht'liirlou and Sciciicf. Draper 

Kduialional Ucforini'rs. (iuick 

Life and iJrowlli of liaiifriia;.'*'. WliitiU'v 

Ancifnl Life History. Niclioison 

Otlicr Words Than Ours. I'roctor , 

'riic Sun. Youn^' 

i:cspoiisil>llitirs in Mental Diseases. Mandsloy. 

The Micr(»s«-o|M>. (iosse 

Krauinents of S«-leiu-e. 4 vols. Tyiulall 

New Fra;:iuents. Tyiulall 

Souiul. Tyndall 

Forms of Water. Tyndall 

Hours of Kxpt'rience in the Alps. Tyndall.... 

Darwiuia. Huxley 

Kvolutiou aiul Kthies. Huxley 

Man's Place in Nature. Huxh-y 

Dlsi-tiurses. ltlolo;rical and (Jeological. Huxley. 

ScleiK-e and Fducatiou. Huxley 

Science and Cliristian Tradition. Huxley 

Scjenci' and Hel)re\v Tradition. Huxley 

Methoil and Results. Huxley 

Hume. Huxley 

<M-iu'in of Sp«M-ies. \ol. I. Daiwin 

«M-iu'in of Spe<'ies. \ i«!. II. Darwin 

Descent of .Man. 1 >ar\vin 

Aidinnls an*l I'lants Fiider Dom(>sticaiion. \'ol. 

I. Darwin 

AiHinals and i'lants Fnder Domestication. Vol. 

II. Darwin 

Hxpri'ssioii of Kmo»iMii< in Mjni and .\ninials. 

Darwin 



3 



< t 



I''()riiis of I'lowcis. I »;ii\viii 

Power of ^lovoiiu'in in IMmiiIs. l>Mi-\viii 

lusectivorous riaiits. l>.ir\vin 

The Fonnatioii of Vegetablf .Mould. Darwin. . . 

Coral Koef s. Davwin 

Geological Observatitnis. I )ar\vin 

Journal of Kesearclios. 1 >ar\vin 

Life and Letters of Clias. Darwin. 1 )ai\vin. . . 

Life anH Lottt-rs of Clias. Darwin. Darwin. . ..$144 00 .$144 *»> 

Materia .Mediea, Tlierapentios and IMiarniacology. 

Butler 4 (lo 

Surgery of the Alinu-nlary ("an;il. .Maylard 7 .">0 

Surgery. Vol. I. Tarlv .5 50 

Surgery. Vol. IL l'ar]< ."> .jO 

Practice of Medicine. Wood and Fltz OO 

Bacteriology. Crookslaank ti ."0 

Clinical Examination of Blood. Cabot '. . . . .'! ."0 

Practice of ^Icdicinc. T.vson C .">o 

Genito. Urinary and Venereal Diseases. "Wlute and 

Martin 7 ~j() 

System of Legal Medicine. Vol. I. A. McL. Hamil- 
ton I : .")0 

S.vstem of Legal :\lcdi(ine. Vol. 11. A. :\lcL. Hamil- 
ton (] .% 

Principles of Sociology. Spencer 2 40 

Iveual and I'rinary Diseases. Saundley 2 00 

^lannal of Physiology. Stewart o ."(O 

Architecture of the Brain. Fuller ,5 00 

Telepathy and the Subliminal Self. Mason 1 .lO 

Angina Pectoris and Allied States. Osier 1 .^0 

Custody of the Insane. Folsom 1 .10 

Atlas of Gj'uecology. Schaefer 3 .oO 

^lental Diseases. Clouston 4 7.5 

.Medical Dictionary. Greene 8 r>0 

Hysteria. Preston 2 Oa 

System of Practical Therapeutics. Hare (5 tio 

^Practical Thei-apeutics. Vol. I. Foster (►.")<» 

Practical Therapeutics. Vol. II. Foster <>.■)(» 

Psychology of Feeling. Stanley 1 S(i 

Surface Anatomy. "Windle 1 (m» 

Death. Bromandle 2 .").■> 

Manual of Bacteriolog.v. ]\luir :; 2."> 

Eye Strain. Ranne.v 2 ihi 

Hallucinations and Illusions. Parish 1 .jO 

Atlas of Human Histology. Brass 10 <iO 

Manual of Electricity. Monell C (in 

Deafness, (iiddiness and Noises in Head. Woolcer.... 2 (ii> 

Mental Diseases. Kellogg •"> 1(» 

Atlas of Bacteriology. Lehman .! ."o 

Pathological Technique. Mallory and AVright 2 ."i<i 

Tuberculosis of the <Tenito-I'rinary (Jrgans. Senn.... 3 <io 



37.S 

Cllnlrjil Iii.imiosis. J.iks.li G 50 

Sfxujil I»is4iiilcrs III' Ihf -Mall- ami Fi'iiiak'. Taylor. ... :', (.M.) 

Malarial F.-vi-r.-s. Thayer :i 00 

Ia-khI .MimU.Iih'. I U-n.1.1 4 (Kt 

ClrciilatiiHi In tin" ('i-iitral Nervous System. Hruwnlii;:. 1 .jO 

ApiK'Udiiltls. Mluler 1 TO 

Nervous Diseases. I »aiia ."! 'K* 

Diseases i»f the Stnliiadi. Ilemmeter 1 00 

Ksseiitials <.f l'alh<tl«M:ieal Anatomy. Zollinger 3 00 

A <'onipeiiilinm of Insanity. Chopin 1 2'» 

Dlsea.ses of the Nervous System. .Mills (> 0(> 

Kssay on Haeteriolovry. Totter 1 «^>0 

Vurlous I'rayments. Spencer - 40 

Menial I H.seases. C'louston 4 2o 

Manual of Maeteriolo^'y. Hewlett 3 00 

Manual of l'athoh>;:y. ("oi.lin 3 00 

Sur«:i<'al lMa;;nosis ami Trealmeiil. .MiKonalil 00 

K.vereises in I'atholojry. Whila( ic 1 oO 

Kssentials ol' l'atliolo;ric:il AnMi()my. IJolliiijrer :• 00 

Treatment of Diseases li\ Klectric Currents. Mouell. 7 .")(> 

Year Hook of Treatment. Boyd 1 ">(► 

Medical Jurisprudence of Insanity. A'ols. 1 and II. 

Clevenp-r 10 00 

lnel»riety. Palmer 50 

Total value of 1 ks priced $1.8^ 13 

Old Nooks of tile list (estimated) .")!(» (M» 

Total value of medical Looks $2,348 13 

till l.alioralory I'tensils and Chemicals. 

1 No. 1 skeleton $3(! 00 

1 skeh'ton ;!5 (K) 

1 oak and ^lass ca.se for same lli 50 

1 skull 13 00 

1 cut skull S 00 

3 adj. lary. brackets 17 55 

3 s. s. eondi'U.sers 16 50 

1 K^un^re and ftihe 50 

1 eondensi-r ire)iairedi 1 20 

1 U«-eker l>alan<-e and wel;:hts 100 00 

2 ilist. tlasks. tJ4-o7. 1 40 

2 assay flasks. 2-o7, 20 

2 assay tlasks. 1t;-oz 40 

4 as.say tlasks. 4-o/, 54 

G assay tlasks, s-oz 1 00 

1 Cliaddoek support, 2 har 2 50 

1 welirhlnir lM»ttle, s»i\i."i 20 



379 

1 Argaud liunu'i'. ;j-S 

3 tiiangles 

2 vol. flasks. 200ec 

2 vol. flasks. 250eo 

2 vol. flasks. .">00cc 

2 vol. flasks. l,0(X)cc 

12 Nessler jars, select 

2 supports. G-R 

1 plat, tipped tongs 

2 Chaddock beaker clamps 

2 Chaddock t. t. clamps 

2 imiversal small clamps 

2 large holders for clamps 

1/^ doz. plppettes. 2cc 

2 only pippettes, 5cc 

2 only pippettes. lOcc 

2 only pippettes. 20cc 

2 only pippettes, .Wcc 

2 only pippettes, lOOcc 

2 At water desiccators 

1 doz. porcelain dishes, No. 3 

% doz. porcelain dishes. No. 4 

1-3 doz. porcelain dishes, No. 1 

2 sp. gv. l>ottles. 2.5cc 

2 sp. gi: bottles, 50cc 

1 weighing bottle, 50x2.t 

1 Young's water bath 

1 condenser. 20-inch 

2 soxhlet ext. tubes. 6-oz 

1 Fletcher Argand burner. ^;i 

1 set cork lx)rers. 1-12 

1 shai'pener for borers 

1 lb. rubber stoppers, 3-8-in. to 1%-in. . . . 

3 gross assorted corks, 3-8-in. to 2-in. . . . 

4 funnels, 2 1-8-in 

3 funnels, 2-')4-in 

2 funnels, 3 3-8-in 

2 funnels, 4-in 

1 Liebig condenser, 24-in 

3 aluminimi dishes, 274-in 

1 barium hydroxyde bottle, 4-oz 

1 soda potass, tartrate bottle, 1-lb 

1 sodium nitrate bottle, 4-oz 

1 Meimke's gas regulator, 5 adjustments 

2 oz. phosphomolybdic acid. 10 per cent. . 
2 oz. mlybdate amnion, liottle 

1 lb. c. p. borax cryst 

2 oz. nickel sulphate 

14 lb. potass, permanganate c. p 

14 lb. ix>tass. bisulphate c. p 

14 lb. copper sulphate 





50 




15 




70 




84 


1 


05 


1 


25 


4 


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54 




54 


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42 




20 




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3 


30 


3 


24 


1 


80 




75 


1 


15 


1 


68 




21 


4 


30 


1 


20 


2 


80 


1 


11 


1 


50 




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2 


50 


2 


70 




40 




45 




45 


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35 




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12 


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Vi lb. SniliUIll pjiospluito 

Vi n». iiiiiiiiMii 

^ Il». aiiiiiiou. oxjiliiif 

K U». zilllliioll. rliloritir 

Vj n». si.illuiii ••iirlMiiuili- 

Vj H». sniliiiiii c-;irl><>ii:itf. <lry . . 

% n». jiiniiKHi. i:irln(imi(' 

\^, III. iiiji::m*s. clijoriilf 

1 lb. MsIh'SIUS 

1 lb. .MMliiiiii liyili-iitc 

1 lb. pi.tJiss. liy.liMtc 

'J OS!, silver iiitniif 

2 o7.. sul|iiiiiiiilli<' :i<i(| 

.'ilMI llltlTS. T-ltlll.. .No. :'.. SWfll. 
.'{<M» int«>rs. H-rliii.. .\i>. .".. swell. 

.'MMt niters. 11-etlil 

'.ii»\ lilJei-s. l.'i -etiii 

>.... (Inz. rilllllels. •Jill 

'A if/.. /.iiH-. abs. I Ml 

1 «i/.. urilllilUii aeelate 

•J o/,. pierie ariti 

f-.. lb. aininiiii. lerrous snlpliale 

!/>> lb. aiiiiiial clian-iial 

V4 lb. aiiiiiioii. iiitrat4> 

>/4 lb. aiiiiixiii. sii!|iliate 

I ^^7.. brnliiilie 

1 lb. «'al<i\nii cliloriile 

1 <•/.. <iibalt ellliilitle 

1 111. arelie etiier 

2 lbs. foniialtise 

1 oz. iHMiual. imlijjti 

li oz. iodine resubl 

1 oz. litiiiDin carlMiiiati- 

1 wash liotile. H'.-oz 

1 water blast witii |iuiii|i 

'1 test tnlies. o-.s-iii 

4 aliiiiiiiiiiiii (lisiies. •J'...x."i-S-jii. 

1 ileissier ali<aliiiieter 

1 wlii;r-lo|» for r. burlier 

1 Itiliiseii blast iaiii|i 

1 plat, tbioelie erne., 'jrie 

1 tbMiehe tllter Mask 

1 filter tube, speeial 

1 iiillre tllter |»aper 

."'. etiinleiisers. 1 -pt 

■J S<|ilibii's .H-oz. sepy. t'niiliels . 

1 support for Jilpette 

4 fnrreps. brass, straiu'lil 

4 foreeps. iM'lit. brass 

4 foreeps. ivory tips ..,.,,... 
'J loreeps. steel, line 



14 
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20 
20 
20 
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2 furci'iis. sit'cl. |il:iiii :',tt 

2 furct'i»s. u<K'sc-iU'(k 7."» 

3 Sclit'lllijich's Imit'iifs .- 7r» 

2 piiK'tti's. L'.'xc 4(1 

3 ahiiiiimim dislu-s. L'"|-in 1 ,"»<» 

1 liifli.ii-(ls lilicr piiinii 1 :.'."> 

4 S4ii:irt> iiiclii's pint. Inil 1 :;4 

2 tlicnntmit'tcrs, :!.">( tec •_' 4ii 

2 tlu'rinuiiu'ti'is. .'.(Hiic 1.' i;r> 

1 UifllMnls Itliisl Mppni-iinis. CDliiIilrlc ."» (id 

1 Buuscii lil.isi l.-iiiip "J To 

1 set I-"iillcr iiiudcls (tf ln;iiu ili picci-si :! 4.") 

1 Sl't I'llUcl' II UK Iris of hl'.-lill. Xn. L' S .")(» 

1 scl I'ullcr IIKmIcIs (if l>l-;lill. Xn. 1 S ."lO 

1 iikmIcI (if lirniii ii' iiicirsi :! 4."» 

1 iikhU'I of hrniu (!• i)l('(('s) 7 •!."» 

1 nuxU'l of bi'jiin in vortical siMtioiis 1l' 7."* 

1 )no(U'l of liiaiii I ma II mint ill l>.s 7.", 

1 Auzout's Xo. 1 i syu. prep, of brain 7." 00 

1 model of spinal cnhniin l!i: (lo 

1 Auzont's nioilcl of .M;iuikin 7<»i nii 

1 2-.s:nl. inji-rtiiiu Pot tie j Pi 

4 o-.iral. in.jfcTin.i: liortlrs 11 '.ut 

1 u-jral. Injcctinu- horrlr 4 7i» 

1 (loz. 1-oz. tiasks 1 (M> 

1 tloz. 2-oz. flasks 1 (M> 

1 tloz. 4-oz. Hasks 1 IP 

Yz rloz. c.-oz. tiasks (Ml 

V2 <li>z. 1 c.-oz. tiasks 1 (K> 

1 (loz. 1-oz. hi-cakt'i-s !»."> 

1 (loz. 2-oz. lut-akcrs P."i 

1 (loz. 4-oz. hicakt'is 1 J(» 

1 doz. 8-oz. l»it'ak('rs 1 ?,0 

Vi doz. IC-oz. breakers fMl 

1 gross 3-iu. test tubes 1 2."> 

1 gross 4-in. test tubes 1 tU) 

1 gross .l-in. test tubes 'J 15 

I'gross C-in. test tubes 2 80 

1 gross 8-in. test tubes 4 8."i 

1 doz. 12-iu. test tubes 2 2<) 

1 doz. (i-in. test tubes 7<> 

1 doz. 8-iu. test tubes 1 lo 

1 pt. sell, fniuiel 2 !."> 

1 (It. Sep. fininel 2 2o 

1 doz. pt. gas bottles 1 2n 

1 doz. funnels 2 en 

% doz. (It. gas bottles 1 no 

Y2 doz. pipettes '.»."> 

% doz. 14-itt. Wolff bottles 1 .'.o 

14 doz. lij-pt. Wolff bottles 1 Cn 

^2 doz. 4-oz. spirit lamps 1 l."> 



•"•CO 

1 doz. Smiz. spirii l;iiiiits 1 25 

1 doz. 4-oz. n't. dish 2 75 

1 doz. 1-oz. si»t»c. lM»ttli's 1 65 

1 doz. 2-()z. spec. lM>ttlos 1 85 

1 doz. 4-oz. s|M'<-. iM.ttlfs 2 20 

% doz. 4-oz. Iii'll ^'liissos 1 50 

% doz. Vfiv/.. boll filassi's 1 69 

Vj doz. pt. wash lM)tth's 2 15 

Vj doz. hyroin. jars. 0x1 70 

Vj doz. hyioin. jai-s. 12x2 1 35 

1 doz. 1-oz. salt iiioutlis 1 10 

1 doz. l-S-i)t. clu'iii. salt mouths 1 10 

6 doz. Vrl»f- n'a;;('nts 10 50 

1 2-3 doz. i/j-pt. icairt'iits 3 75 

5-12 doz. pint roayi'iits 1 35 

7-12 doz. 1 qt. n'a;;t'iits 2 34 

V^ doz. (It. wash Ixitth's 2 75 

5-12 doz. l-oz. iva;renls 52 

V^ dnz. 1-..Z. W. M. rca^'onts 2 02 

7-12 doz. 4-oz. W. M. ica!.,'('nts 1 13 

J/^ doz. 1-dr. niiii. ^rradiiates 1 50 

V^ doz. 2 -dr. mill. };raduates 1 80 

1-6 doz. 1 W. W. inortar and pestle 75 

1-6 doz. ."! W. W. mortar and pestle 1 05 

1 doz. %-pt. chem. salt mouths 1 59 

1 doz. la-pt. «-hem. salt mouths 2 14 

1 doz. pint, rliem. salt mouths 2 70 

Vi II). 3-10-pt. filass tultiii;: 15 

51/. lb. I/, to % pt. jrlass tubinir 1 79 

I doz. No. <M> cvap. dishes 1 24 

1 doz. No. <» rvai). dishes 2 03 

% doz. No. 1 i'\!\]>. dishes 1 24 

1 gross baiT. piiM'ttfs 1 75 

1 No. 101 i»n>ss 37 

1 twine rt'el .">4 

1 lb. twiiir .">.■) 

1 doz. 2-oz. acm»' sriaduates 2 00 

'm doz. 4-oz. aciiH' .iriaduatcs 1 38 

1.^ doz. .S-oz. aciiu' ;:railMatt's 2 00 

1-8 doz. Hi-oz. at'iiie ;:i:i(luates 75 

% doz. 12<tcc. a<-iiu> firaduates 87 

^ doz. |)liit 11. M. funnels S3 

Vj doz. qt. II. .M. fuinu'ls 1 IS 

l-<» doz. 4-oz. mortar and pestle 48 

1 larp' s. s. and (' 15 

1 doz. .s-iii. stirring: rods . ; 17 

1 doz. loin, stirl•in^r rods 27 

1-«J doz. :\\u. s. s. iMitilfs 28 

1 doz. 12-in. stirring' rods 3S 

1-0 doz. 4-in. s. s. bottles 35 

1-r. doz. fi in. s. s. botllfs (JO 






1-G <l(i/.. tripDiIs 

14 tloz. Bunsfii liunii'i-s 

1-6 doz. S-iu. hlow ]iipcs 

1-6 doz. lll-iu. IiIkw pipes 

1 set cork liurcis 

1 test tube r:i<k 

1 doz. tlil)e holders 

1 doz. test tnl)e l)ruslies 

1-G doz. 4-riii.u' set. stniid 

1 filter stiuid 

6 doz. drawer inUls 

4 doz. S-iii. slieni-s 

% doz. 1-S-iu. lioni spoons 

1-6 doz. No. ;t horn spoons 

2 doz. 2i/4x4-in. m. jars 

2 doz. 2V4xS-iii. ni. jars 

1 doz. :ii4xll'-in. 111. jars 

1 doz. 21/l.xG-iu. 111. jai's 

1 doz. 8ioXl2-in. 111. jars 

3 doz. ."(' jxll'-in. 111. jars 

1 doz. No. ml (her siopjieis 

1 doz. 2-liole Xo. 1 ruhlier stopiiers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. 2 rul)l)er stoppers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. :'. rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. 4 rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. (J rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. 7 rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 2-hole Xo. N rubber stoppers . 

7 2-liole Xo. ;> rubber stoppers 

1 doz. 2-liole Xo. lt» rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. 1 rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. 2 rubl^er stoppers 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. :; rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. ~> rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hoIe Xo. G rubber stoppers . 
l.doz. 1-hole Xo. 7 rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. S rubber stoppers . 
1 doz. 1-hole Xo. 9 rubl>er stoppers . 
y^ doz. 1-hole X'o. 10 rul>ber stoppers 
y^ doz. Xo. solid rubl)er stoppers . . 
% doz. Xo. 1 solid rubber stoi)pers . . 
% doz. Xo. 2 solid rubber stoppers . . 
% doz. Xo. 3 solid rubber stoppers . . 
% doz. Xo. 4 solid rubl)er stoppers . . 
% doz. Xo. solid rubber stopiiers . . 
^2 doz. Xo. ('» solid rubber st((ppers . . 
% doz. Xo. 7 solid rubber stoppers . . 
% doz. Xo. S solid rubber stopiiers . . 
14 doz. Xo. It solid rubber stoppers . . 
V2 doz. Xo. 10 solid rubber stoppers . 





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3 C. C S. S. J'oiitiiu'litJil iiilrrosottpes 313 20 

1 centrlfiiu'i' 

2 sputiiiii tiilws 

1 llJUMUMllliril*' JItfJUllllll'Ill 

1 uriniiry iitijnliiin'nt >>-- •"><> '22 50 

1 raiiifi-a lurl.la !•"> 00 

1 .'Mil. projiMiloii ul»j(H-tlvo '•> To 

1 lin. |ir«iJ»Mti<ni <»l»jfc-tive 11 -•"' 

1 Vj-iii. pi-ojiH-iion (»l»ji'ttive '► <»0 

1 triple HosrpifiM' 



63 



I'l 


57 


17 


32 


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1 h. liiH'iiiiiiiii'it'r iji; 25 

1 covtT jrlnss ^a Uiii' 2 25 

1 autiM'Iavo ■!*> 75 

1 liot air s(tMili7.«T 

1 l>. thtTIIUMlU'tfl- 

1 tlnM-iiiosiat 

1 Uuiis«-ii liiiriMT -^21 .".: 

1 Naplt's Itatli 

1 (Irylii;: ovi-ii 

1(» win* l»asivfts 

1 lab. luiriifr 

1 hot air lioatcr 

1 albuiiiiiKiiiK'tfr 

1 sa<M'lian»iii(*l»'r 

12 ffriiu'iilalioii iiilx's 

3 tfra<liiat»>s 

1 KNv. roiiical ;.'railuat(' 

1 25«-c. coiiiral ^^raduato 

1 KMkT. ruiiical frraduat*' 

1 50Orf. conical ^raduati* 

1 l,0«n>cc. <<.iii«al >na<luat«« .$2 85 2 85 

1 50:r'. cyliiiilrical irraduat*' 

1 'jnor-c. cyliiiilncal iLrraduatc 

1 l.<MN»cc. cylindrical ;u'ra<l»iat»' $2 48 2 4.S 

f. LNHici'. cylindrical ;.'raduatos 4 5<> 

1 nice. Mohr piiM'ttc 

1 25<'c. Molir pipcttr 

1 5<tcc. Mohr piiM'ttc 

1 Kxtcc. Mohr )>ipcftc .$4 78 

H vol. pi|M>ttcs. 1, 2. .'!. 4. 5. lo. Ii5. ."»<• 

1 \V<»iniii«»uc| ciMiniinsr ajtparatus 

1 doz. I'asitMir dishes. KKi nnn 

'i d«t/-. inoisi cliandicrs. 1!»."» mm 

2 iM»tato cidtinc HUM'S 

1 aiililoxin tiask. 2-sido nocks 

1 doz. hactfrin tla.sk.><. lOOcc 

1 diw.. bacti'Ha fla.sks. 25(lc(' 

Vj doz. Iwicteria flasks. 5(K>cc 

'4 doz. bacteria flasks. l.<MK)rc 

3 doz. Kricnnicycr flasks. UtOoc 

2 do/,. Krlcnnicycr flasks. j.-iOcc 



4 


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1 


12 


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2 


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385 

1 iloz. Erleumeyer flasks, 500cc 

14 doz. test tubes and bases, 150-25mni 

2 j^rs. test tubes and bases, 150inin 

2 navy plate apparatus 

1 Kipp hydrogen generator 

1 doz. prep, dishes, 50-30mm 

^4 doz. prep, dishes. 105-40mm 

1 doz. cylindrical dishes. ISO-lOOmni 

2 doz. watch glasses 

1 doz. watch glasses, oOnim 

Vo doz. stender dishes, 80-54mni 

1 doz. stender dishes, 55-2.5niin 

1 doz. stender dsihes, 46-2.")Uim 

1 doz. stender dishes, 30-12nun 

2 doz. Steinbach dishes 

6 doz. cylindrical dislH>s, 120-.^)mm 

6 doz. Moore dislies 

Vj doz. stening i)lates 

% doz. lM)ttles 

1 doz. bottles 

l-(j doz. Xest beakers, 1-11-oz 

1 set cryst.-ilizMlioii dishes. .■">4-100. 58-120, 62-150, 66-70. 

TO-llX) 

G wash bottles, 500cc 

6 doz. 2rjOcc. jam .jars 

8 doz. .")(M)cc. jam jars 

1 only l.Klinni. ijorrelaiu mortar 

2 funnels, (i(> 

2 funnels, !M! 

2 funnels, 1 2( 1 

2 funnels, 1 ."►( t 

2 funnels. 200 .$2 29 2 29 

6 pinchcocks. No. 2 90 

6 test tube clamits 90 

2 iron tripods 30 

2 retort stands 1 50 

6 test tube brushes 45 

2 ifotato knives 30 

<■) SteAvart forceps 1 12 

1 set weight s 45 

.". gross slips 3 75 

."> oz. cover glasses, round 3 04 

1 oil hone 2 25 

1 Avater hone 68 

1 bow stra]) 1 50 

<i iilatinum necdlrs 1 35 

1 doz. wax pciici's- 1 50 

1 (l(iz. i.iiieltc s 38 

1 d(.z. caljiuets 15 00 

.". iiumse jars 4 5C 

25 Ins. Voucni'.Rs. 



1 


88 




38 


6 


00 


(> 


(H) 


3 


75 


3 


(j() 


11 


50 


.") 


85 


1 


13 




90 




90 


1 


52 


1 


50 


1 


32 


1 


88 


1 


69 


3 00 


1 


35 




57 


4 


50 


1 


80 


1 


50 


1 


80 


4 


05 


2 


93 




75 



386 



1UC» jjrrain fhroinlc aciH 45 

2 g-ritm osniio add 3 (Xt 

50 jjraius picric add 75 

100 yranis pyrojrallic acid 1 13 

30<'c. picni i-linmiif acid 23 

30 grains. si!v«M- nitrate 75 

100 ;:raiiis ;;lass wood 1 50 

2 jjrains ;rol(l chloride 1 20 

1 KHJiu hacinatoiu 1 50 

100 ^'ranis lead acetate 23 

100 ;;raius lithium carbonate 75 

1 kilo nuTcury bichloride 3 00 

1 ;,'rani plonif.'lucin 27 

1 timiu platliinin bichloride 34 

1 fxvnm rosaiiilinc hydrochloride 38 

30 grains tliyiuol 30 

10 jjrams uranium acetate 30 

1 kilo zinc, granulated 75 

500 grams benzol 52 

20<Hc. chloroform 45 

50<)«-c. ether 1 34 

UXV'c. IxH'chwooii creosote 04 

30<-c. pyridiu 30 

250(c. toluol 30 

50<Nc. kylol 75 

1.0<M>cc. alcohol. No. 4100 1 88 

lOiHc. alcohol motliylic 10 

3,00<»cc. formaldehyde, 40 per cent 4 05 

20oc\ glycerine 20 

lOOcc. aniline oil 30 

100«T. iK'rganiot oil 90 

lOOec. cedar oil 90 

lOOcc. turpentine 13 

30<-c. a.si)haltiun. No. 4005 27 

2fiO<'c. balsam with kylol 1 90 

30cc. damar with benzol 30 

SOOcc. lirunswick black 19 

SOcc. Dean medium 23 

SOcc. glye«'rine jelly 38 

30cc. gold size jg 

lOOcc. oil »»f «"loves 30 

lOOcc. Meyer albumen fixative 49 

30cc. white zinc cement .> 30 

500 grams Berlin blue 2 07 

100 grams Berlin blue, soluble 57 

30 grams celluloidin. No. 4306 93 

500 grams hard parafllne 3q 

500 grams soft paratline 27 

250 grams Pnissian blue yg 

250 grams vermilllon 90 

500 grams agar agar Y5 



387 

500 grains gelatine 68 

125 gi'ams peptonium siceuiu 75 

125 grams T^iebig extract ol' beef 90 

30cc. ammonia carmine 10 

10 gi'ams nigrosine 15 

10 gi'ams l)enzoazurin 10 

10 grams bengal rose 30 

30 grams colorless marine bine 30 

10 grams benzopnn)nrine 15 

10 grams blnerich scarlet 15 

10 grams Bismarck brown 15 

10 grams bine lumiere 30 

30cc. borax carmine 27 

lOOcc. Bnrrill stain 90 

00 grams carmine. No. 40 75 

18 oz. carminic acid 57 

GOcc. chenz. stain 45 

30 grams Congo red 30 

10 grams delta piirpuiine 15 

30 gi'ams eosin yellowish 45 

30 grams eosin bluish • 45 

3 grams Ehrich biondi, mixed 57 

10 grams f nchsin 38 

OOcc. Erlich stain 45 

lOOcc. Gibbs stain 75 

30cc. gentain violet 45 

100 grams gold orange 15 

10 gi'ams haematozlin 1 05 

10 grams iodine gi*een 23 

lOOcc. IlaefHer solution 57 

10 grams magenta 15 

10 grams malachite gi-een 15 

10 grams menthal blue 30 

10 gi'ams menthol gi'een 30 

10 grams menthol violet 23 

10 gi-ams menthyline blue 23 

10 grams orange napthol B 15 

10 grams orange napthol G 15 

10 grams orange napthol 1 15 

3 grams picro carmine 30 

10 grams rubln T 45 

10 grams rubin G 15 

10 grams saft'ronine 23 

10 grams sulpho indigatate soda 15 

10 grams violet blue 15 

lOcc. Zeihl solution 57 

500 strips red litmus paper 45 

500 strips blue litmus paper 45 

1 freezing attachment 19 50 

1 model B projection apparatus, with burner and plate. 60 00 
1 project, micro, for direct projection 60 00 



388 

1 incubator with tliormostat 70 13 

1 !.".(• ;.'ni 111 <luMiiical scale and ease 12 75 

1 sot Itniss wi'ijrlits, 1 t:rnin to 1 centigram 45 

1 rotao' i"«^i"k press 50 

1 lah. microtome, repaired 3 75 

1 steam sterilizer 18 00 

lo jrranis chrysoidin 15 

3 Maplala nnl 83 

1 llirr sulpliuric acid 83 

1 Nory tube apparatus for culture 1 88 

1 new m<Klel niinat. microme with knife 67 50 

t; j,'lass l>enches 1 13 

24 IwtUes 3 60 

4 doz. 250cc. jars 

4 doz. noOcc. jars $7 80 7 80 

1 cacli tulK? 25, 40, 50, 65, 90mm 70 

1 cacli tube 25, 40, 50, 05, 90mm 55 

1 each tube 25. 40, 50, 05, 90mm 55 

1 cacli tulx' 15<», 2(M>. 250mm 90 

1 each tube 1(M», 140, 180mm 73 

1 each tube 120, 140, 180, 220mm 1 00 

1 stewpan 90 

1 each 250. 500, 1,000, 2,000cc. funnels 1 35 

1 water bath 1 50 

1 niter 2 15 

1 No. 5S()5 forceps 45 

1 Xo. 5a50 forceps 20 

1 No. 5800 forceps 45 

1 No. 5870 forceps 60 

1 No. 5875 forceps 40 

100 No. 7055 lal)els 08 

loo No. 7000 labels 08 

HKi No. 7<M55 laJ)eIs 08 

1<N» No. 7070 labels 20 

1«M» No. l(]f¥) lalH'ls 60 

1 safety burner 9 00 

1 Dorenius urea apparatus 1 13 

3 wire racks for 49 tubes 90 

1 revolving Buretta stand 2 25 

2 adj\istable filter stands ! . . 1 35 

1 Cliaiubcrland filter 1 69 

12 iK)rcelain tubes for filter 1 88 

1 Haunu' arocinofor 2 44 

1 alcoholonicti T 96 

I lactometer . 38 

1 lacto.soope . . 3 00 

1 ploscoi>e 57 

1 urlnometer 45 

1 ice. pipette O. 01 1 31 

1 5cc. pi|>ette (J. 1 1 50 

•5 rnsteur bulb pijurtti'^ 1 13 



389 

] 500ec. Burette, witli glass stopcock 

1 lOOcc. Burette, with glass stopcock $2 72 2 72 

1 2,00()ce. Koch tlash 34 

1 nivolnlini;: apparatus for culture 6 75 

2 d. wash bottles for generator 3 (X) 

1 No. 1 filter pump 1 12 

1 separating filter, 180mm 1 50 

36 50cc. dropping bottles 5 40 

2 potato brushes 30 

2 hand brushes 30 

1 doz. Sternberg serum flasks : 1 50 

1 tube. 300mm 45 

1 corking pot 94 

1 stewpan 75 

1 percolator 38 

1 dehydrating apparatus 5 63 

12 No. 5255 rubber caps 34 

12 No. 52G0 rubber caps 38 

1 No. 5845 forceps 30 

1 230mjai. tray 38 

1 260mm. tray 45 

lOOcc. oil of cloves 30 

1 set weights 25 

3 grams Magdala red 10 

1 gross test tube taps 2 25 

12 gross slips 7 65 

4 doz. mailing boxes 2 25 

1 photo-mocro camera, complete 140 00 

1 extra plate-holder 3 19 

3 revolving micro tables 22 50 

1 lab. microscope, repaired 8 00 

1 doz. 5%x8 mus jars 9 20 

1 doz. 5%xl2 mus jars 9 25 

11 5%x8 mus jars 16 00 

2 doz. 7%xl2 mus jars 40 45 

6 lbs. assprted glass tubing, 3-16, 1-4, 5-16 inch 2 00 

% doz. weighing bottles, 2 oz. each 20 

Yq doz. weighing bottles, 4 oz. each 30 

1 doz. Vi-pt chem. tinct 1 40 

1014 lbs. glass tubing, Ii4x2-in 3 30 

% doz. weighing bottles, 1 oz. each 60 

1 doz. 1 pt. chem. s. mos 2 50 

V2 doz. dessicating jars 3 23 

5 No. 9 2-hole soft rubber stoppers 1 16 

1 doz. No. 5 2-hole soft rubber stoppers 90 

% doz. No. 4 1-hole soft rubber stoppers 66 

% doz. No. 10 1-hole soft rubber stoppers 1 80 

4 reagent cases 9 00 

1 milk tester 12 00 

1 milk bottle 19 

6 cream bottles 1 35 



390 



J i.r.-iiifr ;iMi<.iii;iii. iifid pipettes 

1 i-omlonstT iiioimtitiK 

I ol.Jeitlve ser. Ill M- • 

1 (»!»J«i-tJve ser. II -Vj 

1 ..|)J..ftlve Ker. II '/-. 

1 HliyKh eyepleer I 

'2 oak eablliets 

1 tlruwlnjr-lioaril 

:{ Jars 1S<)-12«J 

1 forfeits 

'_' Jars 

UNI lalH'ls 

1 compressor 

1 pl|W'lte. U e. e. iriO 

:; test tube supports 

'2 tables for eablnet 

1 Ksmark's apparatus 

l.OJM) Ial)els 

1 supiH)rt 

1 r»>^xl>' nius Jar 

3 I-1*J doz. rS^xS nius jars 

'4 (loz. No. 4 l-liol«' stttppers 

1 Saykas tlask ^xraduated 

1 Saykas Ua.sk uuKratlualed 

1 5-7 Zeiss lens 

1 No. 1 eentrlfupe 

1 |>o8t niorteuj ease 

1 brain sf<'li«iii kiiiff 

■J inous4* tootli tliural) forceps 

1 k'auuc 

1 McKwans eliiscl 

1 l>one foreeps 

1 Noj-es eye spe<'Uluni 

I ealiiarian hook 

1 Ileniniinnway lauiuiected tome. 

.". ey«' knives 

.'I Nest's l»t'akers 

1 l(lo\V-pilH> 

% (loz. brushes 

6 brushes. 12-in 

.*{ brushes. 15-in 

2 Hunsen buriiei-s 

2 IIofT elanipH 

.'I erueibles. No. (KK> r. b 

;{ enu'il>h'S, No. r. b 

'I crucibles. No. 1 r. b 

.'{ cnJcibles. No. 2 r. b 

.1 crucibles. No. 3 r. 1. 

1 tile, round 

100 niters. n>und 5'^ c. ni 

100 filters, round He. ni 



1 


50 


7 


20 


33 


00 


5 


25 


9 00 


3 00 


00 00 


10 


50 


2 81 




60 


4 


50 




38 


1 


50 




38 


1 


50 


18 00 


5 


07 




75 


2 


25 




74 


50 00 




22 


4 


50 


1 


80 


IG 


00 


20 00 


7 


00 


4 


25 


1 


30 




85 


1 


84 


2 


13 


1 


30 


1 


50 


4 


25 


2 


72 


3 00 


2 


93 




10 


1 


50 




90 


3 


00 




80 




36 




75 




90 


1 


20 


1 


50 




12 




54 




81 



391 



3 flasks, 32-oz 

3 flasks, 48-oz 

3. flasks, IC-oz 

3 flasks, 32-OZ 

3 flasks, 48-OZ 

1 susponding fuunel, 'Gin 

1 suspoiuling fuunol, S-in 

1 hot-water funnel on legs 

2 Thistle tubes, 10-in 

2 Thistle tubes, 20-in 

1 mouonieter, mounted 

1 measure 

5 ft. rubber tubing, heavy 3-lG-in. . 

5 ft. rubber tubing, heavy M-in . . . . 
10 ft. rublier tubing, heavy %-in. . . 
10 ft. rubber tubing, heavy 3-16-in. 
10 ft. rubber tubing, heavy %,-in. . . 
10 ft. rubber tubing, heavy 5-lG-in. 
10 ft. rubber tubing, heavy %-in. . . 
10 ft. rubber tubing, heavy i/^-in. . . 

1 support table, 9-in 

1 support table. 1.5-in 

1 pr. crucible tongs 

1 doz. triangles 

6 wire gauges, 4x4 

6 wire gauges, 5x5 

G wire gauges, 6x6 

G wire gauges, 8x8 

1 condenser still 

1 burner blow-pipe tube 

1 burner blow-pipe tube 

1 burner chimney 

1 burner crown 

1 burner fork 

1 burner gauze top 

1 burner plate 

1 burner star 

1 'burner tripod 

1 file, round 4-in 

1 file, round 5-in 

1 file, round 6-in 

1 file, round 8-in 

3 crucibles. No. 00 

1 tube for water analysis 

1 Kipp generator 

2 doz. reagents bottles 

2 glass caps for above 

1 pt. reagents 

1 glass cap for above 

Lot photographic material 

2 oz. squares % No. 7410 



1 


05 


1 


20 


1 


05 


1 


20 


1 


25 


1 


50 


4 


00 




20 




40 


5 


00 




50 




80 




90 




50 


1 


00 


1 


20 


1 


40 


1 


70 


2 


(50 


1 


25 


1 


75 




75 




50 




36 




48 




60 


1 


20 


15 


00 




20 




20 




20 




45 




50 




30 




60 




20 




25 




15 




20 




25 




35 




54 


2 


50 


4 


00 


8 


20 


1 


20 


3 


21 




60 


6 


75 


1 


60 



392 

1 oz. squares ^^ N<». 74 ITi 60 

'2oz. % No. 7435 2 50 

2 oz. circles % No. 7435 2 35 

1 oz. circles % No. 7445 80 

2 oz. covers % No. 744(; 2 10 

1 oz. microtome 12 00 

1 knife 3 25 

144 mailing; caRe.-* 72 

24 rubl)er cells, a-ssortinl 30 

1 lml». l>o.\ 10 III. Ill 45 

1 lml». Imi.v 2<> 111. Ill 45 

1 liiih. 1k»x 30 111. Ill 45 

12 Hristol l)oanls 90 . 

1 quire tniclnj; paptT 1 20 

12 crow quill peas 60 

6 crow quill pen-holders 40 

2 bottles drawlnK inlt 70 

12 i)encil8 e. h. No. 1935 1 40 

12 i)eucll8 c. h. No. 1940 1 40 

2 s|K)nKe rul)bers 70 

12 thumb tacivs 10 

12 c. h. pencils 65 

12 card-boards 30 

1 soap 25 

12 corks 1 60 

1 knife 35 

1 scalpel 35 

2 needles, No. fMMX) 1 20 

3 neeilles. No. ♦;<M)5 1 20 

3 needles. No. OTHOM 1 20 

200 sheets paper 50 

1 lb. cotton wool 40 

1 grass sodium rnrniinato 30 

Carlton <'iiiiier:is. lens <iiaph. shutter, 3 plate holders. . . 94 37 

1 Hciiipcrly flash light 3 02 

1 inside kit 1 12 

2 wave pans 2 55 

1 frame, flat 2 09 • 

2 vuh-anlte rubber tni.vs 1 92 

I developing tong 94 

1 camel's hair l)nish 51 

1 f(M-U88atlng cloth 51 

3 plates 38 

1 roller 1 28 

2 doz. 8lli>8 1 20 

1 micrometer 2 50 

2 oz. cavets 2 10 

6 es'epleces 7 20 

2 IbB. parafTioe 40 

500 c. c. Xyol 1 85 

2 packages pa|>er 50 



393 

Case 1 00 

^2 lb. acid acetic e. p. 90 poi* cent 4-1 

1 oz. acid ai-seaious pod. g. r 17 

14 lb. acid boracic anhydride 47 

14 lt>. acid carbolic c. p 28 

1 oz. acid chloric 1-12 34 

1 oz. acid chromic c. p. crys. g. r 39 

Vi lb. acid citric c. p. ci-ys. g. r 43 

1 oz. acid gaJlic pure 17 

2 lbs. acid hydrochloric 1.19 g. r 1 36 

14 lb. acid hydrochloric 40 per cent. g. r 88 

1 oz. acid hydrochloric 1.50 g. r Gl 

14 lb. acid lactic c. p. 1.21 35 

1/4 lb. acid molybdic c. p 72 

2 lbs. acid nitric g. r 1 36 

1 lb. acid nitric fuming g. r 88 

14 lb. oxalic acid c. p. crys. g. r 26 

4 oz. acid phosphoric g. r 92 

Yi lb. acid phosphoric mite lump g. r 28 

Vs lb. acid phosphoric aii;h. 1.70 g. r 40 

1 oz. acid puric c. p. cryst. g. r 31 

1 oz. acid pyrogallic resubl. g. r 40 

2 lbs. acid sulphuric c. p. g. r 92 

1 lb. acid sulphuriTs g. r 40 

1 oz. acid hydro siluofluoric 22 

2 oz. acid tannic g. r 64 

14 lbs. acid tartaric c. p. cryst 33 

1 lb. alcohol anylic c. p. g. r 98 

1 lb. alcohol ethylic absolute g. r 1 39 

1 lb. alcohol methylic c. p. g. r 1 48 

14 lb. aluminum sulphate c. p 36 

1 lb. aluminum and potassium sulphate p 41 

1 lb. ammonium and aluminum sulphate p .' . . 41 

Vi lb. ammonium carbonate c. p. g. r 40 

14 lb. ammonium floride c. p. g. r 62 

y2 lb. ammonium nitrarte cryst. c. p. g. r 42 

% lb. ammonium oxalate c. p. g. r 70 

^ lb. amiiionium sulphate c. p. g. r S2 

14 lb. ammonium sulpho cyanite c. p. g.r 29 

1 lb. ammonium sulpho hydrate g. r 89 

Yi lb. aniline p. g. r 39 

Yi lb. barium carbonate c. p. g. r 49 

% lb. barium chloride c. p. g. r 39 

Yi lb. barium hydrate c. p. cryst. g. r 34 

14 lb. baiium nitrate c. p 33 

Y2 lb. barium sulphate g. r 47 

1 lb. benzen c. p. g. r 1 04 

Yi lb. bismuth subnit 63 

Yi lb. bi-omine g. r 59 

Ys lb. brucine g. r 44 

1,4 lb. calcium chloride p. cryst 19 

26 — Ixs. Vouchers. 



394 

% lb. onlHurn sulpliato p. p. r 49 

»4 11). c-alciuin «>xi(h' from marble 24 

1 11). «-arlM. <lisuli>liitk' j;. r 64 

»/4 lb. auimal charcoal p 49 

1 lb. fhloroforin rt'cryst 1 27 

1 oz. cliromlnm sulpliate 29 

1 oz. C"opp<'r ac«*tate j) 1" 

1 oz. chrnmlum and |K)tassium sulphate c. p 35 

»4 II). copjK'r oxide v 49 

•4 II). ••op|K»r suli)hate cry.st. c. p 24 

1 oz. dextrose o. p 25 

1 oz. deidieiiylaniine c. p. cryst 56 

% lb. feiTlc chloride 30 

% lb. ferrous chloride p 30 

Vi 11). iron sulphate e. p. eryst 22 

V. III. iron sulphide jrran. g. r 34 

V, II). iron and ammonium sulphate c. p. crys 29 

Vi Il>. lead acetate c. p. g. r 23 

Vi 11). lead oxide p. brown 31 

Yi lb. lead oxide c. p. yellow 37 

V4 lb. magnesium chloride c. p. cryst 29 

% lb. magnesium sulphate c. p. g. r 23 

V4 lb. manganese chloride c. p. cryst 36 

1 oz. manganese sulphate p 21 

1 II). merctiry redistilled g. r 2 07 

'i lb. men-iiry bicldoride c. p 59 

1 oz. alpha iiaptliol recryst. g. r 58 

Vi oz. i)otassium metallic 66 

1 oz. i)otassium antimonate p. g. r 36 

1 oz. potassium ar^enite p 25 

Vi lb. potassium bichromate c. p. cryst. g. r 32 

Vi lb. potassium Itinoxalate p 29 

% lb. i>otassinm bisulphate c. p. ciyst. g. r 32 

Vi lb. iK)tassium bromide c. p. cryst. g. r 43 

V4 lb. potassium carlK>nate c. p. g. r 27 

V4 lb. potassium <'liiornte c. p. g. r 24 

V4 lb. potassium chloride c. p. cryst 24 

Vi lb. i)otassium chromate c. p. yellow 2t 

1 oz. imta.sslum cyanide c. p. g. r 35 

% lb. smilum i)hosphato c. p. cryst 34 

Vi lb. so<lium suli»hate p. cryst 18 

% lb. so«llum trisuli)hate c. p 18 

V4 lb. pot. fen-i <-yanide c. p 55 

Vi lb. pot. ferro cyanide c. p 36 

3 oz. pot. hydrate c. p 81 

V4 lb. pot. nitrate c. p. cryst 23 

1 oz. pot. i)ermangana8 g. r 22 

Vi lb- I)ot. sulphate c. p. cryst 24 

Vi lb. pot. sulphide g. r 49 

I oz. silver nitrate cryst. g. r 1 50 

1 oz. sodium metallic 50 



395 

1/4 lb. sodium acetate c. p. cryst 21 

V^ lb. sodium bioarbouate cryst 35 

1/4 lb. sodium bisulpliate c. p. ci'yst 3() 

14 lb. sodium borate fused g. r 44 

1^ lb. sodium carbonate cryst .'{9 

1/4 lb. sodium chloride c. p 40 

3 oz. sodium liydrato Jt('> 

1/4 lb. sodium and ammonium phosphate p 44 

1/4 lb. strontium nitrate p 44 

14 lb. strontium chloride c. p 32 

14 lb. suiplim- c. p 21) 

2 oz. tin foil p 24 

y^ lb. tib chloride p. stannous 25 

2 lbs. ammonia water. 22 per cent 1 38 

1 lb. zinc nu'lallic, 54 

14 lb. zinc metallic c. p. thin sheets 47 

14 lb. zinc cliloride p. dried g. r 34 

1/4 lb. zinc sulpliate c. p. cryst 18 

1 oz. urea p. ci'j'sl CA 

14 lb. mercuric nitrate 84 

1 lb. acid hydrochloric 04 

1 lb. oxalic acid, normal solution * 04 

1 lb. acid suli>huric, normal solution 04 

1 lb. ammonium chloride, normal solution. . . '. 04 

1 lb. ammonium hydrate, normal solution 60 

1 lb. .';odium carlionate, normal solution 70 

1 lb. sodium hydrate, normal solution TO 

1 lb. Nessler's solution 1 35 

1 box No. 22050 case 35 

1 oz. acid formic p 17 

1 oz. iodic auhydreons 1 32 

1 oz. malic p 89 

1 oz. phospho f ungstate c. p 54 

14 oz. acid salicylate p 13 

% lb. ammonium chloride g. r 52 

1 oz. ammonium molybdat c. p 41 

, 1 oz. ammonium phosphate c. p 17 

1 oz. antimony chloride p. c. p 19 

1 oz. cadmixim sulphate pure 47 

1 lb. calcium sulphate g. r 83 

1 lb. calcium carbonate c. p 99 

1 oz. cobalt nitrate pure 54 

14 lb. copper metallic 40 

1 lb. ether anhydrous c. p 1 58 

1 oz. gutta percha pure 79 

1 oz. indigo carmine 57 

% oz. indigotin 68 

1 oz. iodine c. p 52 

14 lb. lead acetate pure 54 

1 oz. magnesium thin ribbon 75 

V2 lb. magnesium carbonate g. r 50 



396 

>4 lb. nia«n«'Hluiii oxldo g. r "^3 

1 lb. umuk'aiu'fif tlloxlde pun- ^ !•* 

1 uz. iiH'nury nltnile c. p. iiy.si ^ 

1 «»z. iiuTrmy «»xl<I<> red -* 

1 (MS. iiu'tul f iikH»I»' n>st' ***- 

1 ot. iiu'tjil f iwJble wood '^- 

1 tiilH? <iHs' imper, red *j*^ 

1 tuU> « ;ri«'s' paiRT. yollow '-J 

»j <llllr«' tUIlUTl*' p!lp<T '-^* 

1 i|ulr»' wji.v paiHT '^^ 

Uj oz. |»hfiiyIhydra«iiK' «•. p 72 

1 »>z. potassium ar.><«'nit»> pure -1 

1 <i/, stMlitini pyrophosphate c. p. eryst 19 

Total t'lu'inif-als and Utensils $3,643 73 



(«•) Furnitun- and Fixtures. 

1 wanhub. .SI.". <Mi 

;: ofttre «l»airH 2ii .-30 

1 desk 10 •>() 

1 .lesk 14 <X> 

1 table n 00 

1 hat ra.-k 13 00 

1 roat raek '-i 00 

I rook, r 4 .50 

II rhalis 1»5 30 

3 lK)ok <as.- 52 50 

1 wardr«>ln- 15 00 

1 ehair n 00 

1 HH'tllHne caliinet ."> .">n 

13 1-12 doz. «aiie chairs UMJ U5 

2 book oa.««es 30 00 

21 pirttires and frames 101 45 

1 Hf.:., yds. liiiolriim 116 00 

J.V-j yd.s. llnoleutii a5 98 

.'.I'ir yd.>». linoleum 26 63 

M yds. linohMim 50 00 

«a»>.j yds. liiio|«>i)iii 104 00 

I !»aron««'ter TJ iki 

■_' IN-rsian Imlaixi > r»i( 50 

1 balaiw-c seale . . 10 00 

.". win- corpsi- protectors -jdO 00 

Total Inrnit\n-e and Fixtures $1,153 51 

• ;raiul Tni:!! $7.14.' ?,7 



1" 

Sixth Biennial Report . , 



Tmstees and 

Medical Superintendent 



. . OK THK . . 



NORTHERN 



Indiana Hospital for Insane 



AT LONGCLIFF, NEAR LOGANSPORT, 



Biennial Period Ending October 31, 1898. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

WM. H. RURPORD. COXTRACrOR FOR STATK HRIXTIXt; AND BINDIN'O. 

1898. 



thp: state of Indiana, ) 

EXKCTTIVE DePAKTMKNT, 

Dei'oiuber 2, ISHS. | 

Received by the (Governor, examined ;in<l referred to the Auditor of S.tate for 
veritication of the tiuancial .statement. 



Office of AuornjR of Statu, "i 

Indianapolis, December 3, ISl''^. / 

The within report, so far as tlie same relate.s to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasiirv, has l)een examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of Slufe. 



Dkckmheh 3, 189S. 

Returned l)y tlie Auditor oi State, with al)ove certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

(HAS. E. WILSON, 

Private Secretary. 



Fileil in the othce of the .Secretary '>i State of the State of Indiana, December 
3, 1898. 

W.M. D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the witliin report and delivere<i tf> the printer this 3d day of 
December, 1808. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



(3) 



NORTIIHkX INDIANA HOSPITAL l-()K INSANE. 



189», 



Trustees. 

CHARLES \V. SLICK, President, Mishawaka. 
BENJAMIN F. KEESLING, Vice-President, Logansport. 
RUFUS MAGEE, Treasurer, Lngans}>ort. 

Medical Superintendent. 
JOSEPH G. ROGERS, M. D., Ph. D. 

Assistant Physicians. 

JAMES W. MILLIGAN, A. M., M. D. 
ROLLAND F. DARN ALL, B. S., M. D. 

Medical Interne. 
WM. FLEMING WILLIEN, M. D. 

Steward. 
WALTER G. ZAHRT. 

Clerk. 
CHARLES W. GARRETT. 

Storekeeper and Quartermaster. 
AUGUST W. DORSCH. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



To the Hon. James A. Mount, Govirnor of Indiana : 

Sir — Pursuant to the requirement of the law, the Board of Trustees 
of the Northern Indiana Hospital for Insane respectfully submits its 
report and that of the Medical Superintendent, for the biennial period 
ending October 31, 1898. 

Under an act, approved March 5, 1897, the title of the Board of Con- 
trol was changed to Board of Trustees, and its members were re-ap- 
pointed as members of the new Board. Messrs. Scott, Uhl and Todd 
subsequently, at various times, on account of personal reasons, resigned, 
leaving records of excellent service to the State. The undersigned were 
severally appointed to be their successors and continue to serve at 
present. 

For details of operations and conditions of the Hospital, reference is 
made to the accompanying report of the Medical Superintendent. From 
intimate acquaintance therewith, the Board feel warranted in assuring 
Your Excellency that the institution has well fulfilled its intended object 
and that its conditions, material and other, have been maintained in a 
respectable manner, creditable to those who have done the work. Close 
economy and some privation as to very reasonable requirements has been 
demanded to secure the results attained within the means afforded, and 
it is a matter of congratulation that there were no deficits and no unpaid 
claims at the close of the last fiscal year. The cost of total maintenance 
has been proportionately among the lowest in the country. 

The subsistence has been plain, but good, with some occasional luxu- 
ries. The products of the farm and garden have been large and varied 
and have saved much outlay which otherwise would have been required. 
The clothing furnished by guardians to patients is usually of good quality 
and sufficient; that provided by the State for the indigent inmates is as 
good, if not better. In case of failure of guardians to so provide 
promptly, wants are met by the Hospital. There are guardians who 
hold themselves barred from making such provision by the fact that the 
State declares, in an act approved April 14, 1881 (2842 R. S. Indiana, 



1881), that all iusaue j>er3ou8 having a legal residence in any county of 
the State shall be entitled to he maintained and to receive medical treat- 
ment in the hospitals. It has always been a custom to permit guardians 
and friends to provide clothing. Usually a majority have been so sup- 
plied, very willingly and preferably on the part of guardians and friends. 

An act enabling and requiring guardians to provide for clothing and 
other minor \vaiit.s, in case estates are ample, is recommended. 

The clothing provided is well and systematically cared for and is as 
neat and clean as the habits of the various classes of inmate.s will permit. 
Clothing for women is made in the institution; that for men is competi- 
tively bought, but is largely made on speciKcations furnished by the Hos- 
pital. 

The patients all live in sunny, bright, well ventilated rooms, well 
warmed in winter, and sleep on clean beds, every-one equipped with wire 
springs and a curled hair mattress. Occupation, amusements, books, 
music and exercise are provided according to ability to accept and ap- 
preciate. 

The Board has every reason to believe that the medical care and super- 
v ion is close, careful, thorough and up to date. The training school 
certainly tends to elevate and improve the corps of attendants. 

The buildings are kept in repair and a few minor improvements have 
been made. The chief items are the renovation of the kitchen, includ- 
ing a new tile floor and the inclosure of the north loggias of four wards. 
Details are given in the Superintendent's report. 

In 1^97 a new cold store was built at a cost, for materials mainly, of 
$1,000, which has been in satisfactory operation for the past year. New 
walks of vitrified brick have been laid between all buildings at a cost of 
81, .')()(», for materials mainly. Most of the work on both improvements 
was done by Hospital mechanics, employes and patients. These items 
were met by a specific appropriation. 

The water supply of the Hospital has always been more or less deficient. 
Means to increase it have not been sufiicient. It is proposed to install a 
Pohle air-lift plant and increase the number of w6lls as may be needed. 
This is deemed to be the best available method to meet existing condi- 
tions. Details are reported by the Superinteuflent. To this end more 
boiler capacity and an addition to the boiler house will be required. For 
all these purposes an appropriation of S11,H50 is respectfully recom- 
mended. 

The matter of increase of capacity is specially important in view of the 
fact that there are more than a thousand insane patients at all times who 
can not be admitted into the hospitals of the State on account of lack of 
room ; many in Jails, over four hundred in poorhouses, and the test at 
their homes or vagrant. Every effort has been made in this district to 
afford hospital accommodation to the greatest possible number, and, l)y 



crowding, the Hosjiital has been iiia<le to hold six hiindrt'd and ten 
intuates. The two biiildiugs omitted from the plans fifteen years ago 
have been needed ever since, and more now than ever. They can l)e 
made to accommodate two hundred inmates. Moreover, the Hospital 
needs special wards for the sick in body and for those re'juiring special 
isolation. Designs have been made to meet this need. Conservative 
estimates of cost amount to eighty thousand dollars ('S80,()()0). Your 
Board earnestly urges an appropriation of this sum for this purpose, 
including ecjuipinent, ready for use. 

Improvements in farm buildings are very much needed, details of 
which are set forth in the Superintendent's report. The estimate for this 
is So, 000, and is recommended. 

The balance account shows the assets of the Hospital to be as follows: 

Real estate :?4!)2,91.S 81 

Personal properly 69,46") 88 

Total .?o62,384 69 

Indicating a gain for the biennial period of — 

Real estate 8,642 2M 

Personal property •'),ol7 69 

T(.tal $14, 159 92 

Funds and disbursements are set forth by months and years in the 
following : 

FISCAL SUMMARY. 

FISCAL YEAK 1896-7. 

.\pppropriation account maintenance S90.0flO 0<» 

Allowances in November $7,626 42 

Allowances in December 7,602 16 

Allowances in .January 7,61.S 63 

Allowances in February 7,542 9'.' 

Allowances in March 7,121 '■>() 

Allowances in April 8,000 76 

Allowances in May 7,435 96 

Allowances in June 7,000 67 

Allowances in July 7,990 73 

Allowances in August 7, 170 01 

Allowances in September 7,112 41 

Allowances in October 7,777 70 

90,000 00 



Approprialion account cold store $1,0U0 00 

Allowances in September S241 76 

Allowances in October /58 24 

1,000 00 



Appropriation account ol' walks $1,500 00 

Allowances in October 1,500 00 



FISCAL YEAR lSt»7-8. 



MAIXTKNAXCK 



Appn.prialion S90,0U0 OO $4,500 00 

Allowances in November $8,293 65 

Allowances in December 9,002 69 

Allowances in January 7,808 14 

Allowances in February 7,552 53 

Allowances in March 6,931 36 

Allowances in April 6,7(ll 35 

Allowances in May 6,518 48 

Allowances in June 6,332 06 

Allowances in July 7,648 05 

Allowances in August 7,199 36 

Allowances in September 7,922 91 

Allowances in ( )ctober 8,(»S9 42 

90,000 00 4,500 00 



REPAIR; 


$175 


17 


194 


46 


294 


97 


260 28 


183 97 


284 


15 


337 


•51 


563 97 


620 


89 


440 00 


1,144 63 



Iti the matter of maintenance, the total appropriation of $94,500 per 
annum now current and available for the biennial period ending October 
31, IHD!), has been scarcely sufficient to maintain the standard of care 
which the public requires in all particulars. Under the law the Board 
of Trustees can disburse only what is granted by the Legislature and can 
create no indebtedness, however urgent the need, and is under serious 
penal provisions to this end. (Section 2781, R, S. Ind. 1881). Accord- 
ingly, the management has made every effort to make the best possible 
provision with the sum allotted, but it is the firm judgment of this Board 
that, for the maintenance of the Hospital for the ensuing biennial period, 
some increase of appropriation should be made, and that it should not be 
subdivided into special funds, as for the last year. A solid current ex- 
pense fund secures simplicity in accounts, liberty of judgment on the 
j)art of the Board which is entrusted with the care of the Hospital, and 
facility in meeting emergent conditions. The balance account shows how 
the fund is spent, for what and how much for each class item, and always 
has done so. 

For the next biennial period, beginning Novetnber 1, 1899, and end- 
ing October 31, 1901, there will be required annually $100,000 for total 
current expense, including clothing, minor improvements and repairs, 



and it is respectfully urged that the ai)propriation be so phrased. Should 
there be provided an increase of room for inmates within the period, an 
addition at the rate of $160 per capita per annum will be required. 
The following is a 

SUMiMARY OF NKKDS. 

For biiiltlings, witli c;ipatity for 200 adilitionul inmates S80,OC0 

For water works, and additional boiler capacity and room for same 11,650 

For barn, silo and stables, witb 80 cattle and 16 liorse stalls 5,000 

Very respectfully, 

CHAS. W. SLICK, 
RUFUS MAGEE, 
B. F. KEESLING, 

Trustees. 



REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the liuanl of Trustees: 

Gentlemen — I beg leave to report the operations of the Northern 
IiuiiaDa Hospital for Insane for the two years ending October 31, 1898, 
and its present needs, as follows: 

MEDICAL HISTORY. 

MOVKMENT OF INMATES. 

Year Emling October SI, 1807. 

MOVEMKSr. 

Enrolloil N<>veml»er 1, l.">i*t"i 

A<iiiiitte<i 

Dischnr^cd 

Kcc'overed 

lnijirovf<l 

I'liimprnved 

Not iiLsane 

Died 

Average actually resident 

Enrolled O.tolior .il. 1S!»7 



MEN. 


WOMEN. 


TOTAL. 


813 


305 


61 S 


107 


84 


191 


70 


52 


122 


32 


25 


57 


26 


22 


48 


10 


5 


15 


4 




4 


31) 


. 14 


53 


297 


288 


585 


309 


323 


632 



Year Ending Odobei- .31, ISOS! 



.MOVKMKNT. 

Enr<»lU-d November I, 1897 

Admitted 

I)i»eli;irged 

lieci)vere(l 

Improved 

rnimproved 

Not insane 

Died 

Average netually re.-ideiil. 
Kiindled OcloI.er :{|, ISys. 



MKN. 


WOMEN. 


TOTAL. 


:;(i;t 


323 


632 


108 


57 


165 


66 


41 


107 


22 


IS 


40 


35 


18 


53 


2 


5 


■" 


39 


15 


54 


301 


303 


604 


312 


324 


i!36 



The movement of inmates since the opening of the Hospital, July 1, 
1888. is tabniated in the Appendix. The total number admitted to date 
is 2,261. 



11 

The Me«li('al l^iblcs appended show statistically the luajnr facts and 
results, (Specially ui' the last i)iennial period. 

Diujjnosis of Admitted Cases. In the two years past there have 
been admitted 356 patients. Of these, 64 (18 per cent.) were cases of 
acute mania; of chronic mania, there were 76 (21 per cent.); of mel- 
ancholia, 78 (22 per cent.); of epileptic mania, 15 (4 per cent.); of 
recurrent mania, 13 (4 per cent.); hystero-mania, 3 (1 per cent.); 
primary dementia, 4 (I per cent.) ; secondary dementia, 11 (3 per cent.) ; 
senile dementia, !» (2^ per cent, j ; paralytic dementia, !l (2^ per cent.) ; 
epileptic dementia. 3 (1 per cent.); epilepsy, simple, 7 (2 per cent.); 
general paresis, 28 (8 per cent.); paranoia, 14 (4 per cent.); kata- 
toiiia, 4 (1 per cent.); circular insanity, 1; aphasia, 2; chronic pro- 
gressive chorea, 3 (1 per cent.) ; idiocy, 1 ; not insane while in Hos- 
pital, 11. 

Diaj^uosis of Recovered. During the first year of the term, 57 
(30 per cent, of number admitted) were discharged recovered ; during 
the second year, 40 (24 per cent.). Combining the two years, of these, 
there were 46 recoveries from acute mania (72 per cent, of the number 
of this class admitted) ; of chronic mania, 3 (4 per cent.) ; of recurrent 
mania, 3 (21 per cent.); of melancholia, 39 (50 per cent.); paranoia (?), 
3 (21 per cent.) ; katatonia ( ?), 3 (75 per cent.). In the last two classes 
diagnosis was carefully considered ; nevertheless, the cases left the Hos- 
pital in apparent mental health, after reasonable periods of probation, 
following recovery. 

Duration of Recovered. Of cases with a primary diagnosis of 
acute mania, the largest number of recoveries occurred between the 
ninth and twelfth month ; a few sooner, and the remainder at varying 
periods up to three years. In melancholia, recovery occurred after 
irregular durations, from two months to five years ; in recurrent mania, 
all in tht' ninth month. In the cases of paranoia and katatonia, the ap- 
parent recovery was established after terms lasting irregularly from six 
« months to three years. 

Mortality. The number in Hospital during the year 1896-7 was 809 ; 
the mortality was 53 (6.55 per cent.); during the year 1897-8, the 
number in Hospital was 797; the mortality, 54 (6.78 per cent.). Com- 
bining the two years, the mortality is assignable to diagnoses, as follows : 
Acute mania, 6; chronic mania, 31; epileptic mania, 3; melancholia, 
13; primary dementia, 2; secondary dementia, 9; epileptic dementia, 
6; paralytic dementia, 2; senile dementia, 13; paresis, 20; progressive 
chorea, 1 ; idiocy, 1. 

The complications and immediate causes of death were as follows : 
Cerebral apoplexy, 8 ; pulmonary tuberculosis, 20 ; enteritis, 12 ; paresis, 
19; inanition, 2; septicaemia, 2; pneumonia, 4; cardiac thrombus, 1; 



12 

typhoid fever, 2; senile exhaustion, 7 ; la grippe, 3; nephritis, 2; maras- 
mus, 5; hepatic carcinoma, 1 ; gastritis, 1 ; status epilepticus, 2; erysipe- 
las, 1 ; organic brain disease, 6 ; organic disease of heart, 3; autotoxia, 1 ; 
exhaustion of acute mania, 2 ; pernicious anaemia, 1 ; cardio-renal dropsy, 
1 ; ileus, 1. 

Clinical Notes. Malarial maladies of many types, manifest and 
masked, have continued to make up a majority of the cases of intercur- 
rent disease. They have usually been amenable to simple treatment, but 
often obstinate, and in a few instances, in the form of enteritis, in old or 
feeble persons, have proved fatal. Typhoid fever appeared for the sec- 
ond time in the history of the Hospital, ii/ the fall of 1897 (4 cases, 2 
deaths). The above facts, more than anything else, demand an improve- 
ment in the water supply for general use, as it is impossible to prevent 
patients from occasionally drinking it, even although good water is al- 
ways available. 

Tuberculosis still stands at the head of the mortality list (18-?, per cent.) 
Isolation is secured as far as possible. Special accommodation is much 
needed, however. One outbreak only of erysipelas has occurred within 
the period. This was local and of short duration. Surgical cases have 
been numerous, but of minor importance. Good results have been se- 
cured by approved aseptic and antiseptic measures. Two cases of sep- 
ticaemia, infected before admission, through abrasions made by the inju- 
dicious use of rope restraint, resulted fatally. There were two Colles' 
fractures and two intracapsular of the hip. Carbuncle has been very 
successfully treated by sub-base injections of carbolic acid, 20 per cent, in 
glycerin. No major operations have been required. Formaldehyde has 
been depended on as the chief disinfectant, both in the form of a spray 
and as a gas from the burning of wood spirit in proper lamps, and has 
been liberally used. Nitrate of lead is freely employed to correct am- 
nioniacal odors, for which it has many advantages over everything else. 
Cleanness, fresh air and sunlight are ranked in practice as most efficient 
disinfectants. 

Clinical I)ia!::iiosis has been aided by the microscope and test tube to 
the fullest extent. A good collection of representative objects has been 
made, for comparison and study, illustrating normal and pathological 
Instology and bacteriology, and is being constantly increased. 

Clinical Hcconls. For the last year a very satisfactory system of 
case records ha.s been substituted for the huge tomes formerly in use. 
The current records are kept in proper clip books on the wards and the 
entries are mainly made by the attendants. Records of special examina- 
tions of all sorts are made l)y the medical start". As the sheets are filled, 
they are filed in envelopes in a i)roper filing case. Histories are much 
fuller and better in every way than formerly. 



18 

The Mortuary has been lighted by electricity and heated by gas and 
otherwise improved. Autopsies are frequent and results are carefully 
noted. 



ADMINISTRATION. 

Org'anizatioii. There has been no change in the general principles 
uuderlying the organization of the institution. Central control through 
responsible subheads and tenure based on fitness only constitute, now as 
heretofore, the foundation of its policy. With the increase of Hospital 
population, more attendants have been engaged. The ratio now is 1 to 
11. There are just enough other employes to do the accessory work 
well and without inconvenience. There are no sinecures. All are paid 
sufficiently to hold the experienced, and efficient and long service is 
rewarded by a slight increase of pay annually to attendants only. The 
opinion is warranted that the economic record of the Hospital is largely 
due to the reasonably liberal pay of its employes. This secures efficient 
and long continued service, and this makes possible the careful applica- 
tion of carefully conceived methods. 

Hospital Staff. Dr. J. W. Milligan continues to ably fulfill the 
duties to which for seven years he has been assigned in the department 
for women. Dr. Robert Hessler, after three years of service, on Sep- 
tember 30, 1897, resigned to take the position of pathologist at the Cen- 
tral Hospital for Insane at Indianapolis. His special qualifications were 
highly valued, and he retired with the good will of the entire population 
of the Hospital. He was succeeded by Dr. Rolland F. Darnall, of 
Greencastle, late of the staflJ" of Danvers Lunatic Hospital, Massachu- 
setts, graduate of DePauw University and the Medical College of 
Indiana, and ex-interne of the City Dispensary, Indianapolis. He has 
rendered conscientious and efficient service. 

In view of the need for further assistance in the care and supervision 
'of over six hundred inmates, the grade of Medical Interne was estab- 
lished in March, 1898, incumbents to l)e selected by the Medical Super- 
intendent from graduates of reputable medical schools, for a term of 
service limited to one year. On May 1 , 1898, Dr. Wm. Fleming Wil- 
lien, of Terre Haute, was engaged for this position, which he has since 
filled with commendable assiduity. 

No changes have occurred in the clerical force. Messrs. Zahrt, 
Dorsch and Garrett deserve commendation not only for duties well per- 
formed, but for continuous effort to improve administration methods. 

Accessory Departments. The personnel of accessory departments has 
undergone but little change during the biennial period; the bead men, 



14 

with one exception, have served for many years, and both understand- 
ing and performing their duties well, secure good service from their 
subordinates. 

Tlio Corps ot Att«'iidjiiits is stable and very respectable. All are 
taught that they are members of an honorable profession, and, as a rule, 
endeavor to make records worthy of it. The moral effect of the Train- 
ing School i.s very notable. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

In January, 18{>7, a school for attendants was organized and has since 
been maintained, with vacations during the hot months of each summer. 
Results have been satisfactory and warrant its coutinuance. Attendance 
is compulsory. So far, the instruction has been by lectures, from the 
entire medical staff, in conjunction with the text-books of Dr. Peter M. 
Wise. Hereafter, in addition, recitations will be conducted by the stafi 
and com|)etent tutors selected from the corps of attendants. Anatomical 
preparations, lantern illustrations, chemical demonstrations and the 
microscope are used as aids. Graduation is voluntary. The lectures 
are open to all, and many employes, not attendants, avail themselves of 
the opportunity afforded to increase their stock of knowledge. The course 
includes outlines of anatomy, physiology, hygiene, bacteriology, the 
diseases of the insane, the insanities, the care of the insane, general 
nursing, cookery, disinfection, thermometry, records, hospital house- 
keeping, minor surgery and emergencies. The staff use the abundant 
clinical material on the wards for bedside instruction in special cases. 
As opportunity is afforded, a limited number witness autopsies. 

ELOPEMENTS. 

A hundred years ago institutions for the insane were built like prisons, 
a strong cell for every inmate, shackles on many, massive bolts and f^ars 
everywhere and a high wall encompassing all, with a single sally port 
guarded day and night — an object of suspicious dread, the lunatic was a 
safe prisoner as well. He could not elope. Under the impelling influ- 
ence (»f humane sentiment a radical change has been gradually wrought 
since then in the ways and means of caring for the insane, and experi- 
ence has practically justified it, showing, as it has, that whatever adds 
to the mental, moral or physical ccmifort of the patient tends to cure, 
where cure is possible. The institution for the insane of the present day 
has come at length to be a hospital in which to minister to minds dis- 
eased ; it long ago ceased to be a jail. The paramount consideration is 



15 

the betteimeut of the patient ; every other one is and should be subor- 
dinate. To this end, at LougcliH', the largest liberty, compatible with 
the various tendencies and degrees of responsil)ility, is not only allowed 
Init fostered. Occupation and amusement, in doors and out, out-door 
life, long walks, dramatic and musical entertainment in the assembly 
hall, chapel service, meals for the majority in a central dining hall — all 
these enter more or less into the life of the patient. A certain few are 
restricted within narrower limits, where experience teaches it to be need- 
ful, but only for the time and to the extent absolutely re<iuired. Outer 
doors are kept locked ; small bed room doors, all having open panels to 
facilitate observation, are locked at night ; the windows of small rooms 
are covered, by steel wire guards; other ward windows are blocked so as 
to be opened only a few inches, above and below; personal, mechanical 
restraint is used only when absolutely needful on account of tendency to 
violence and destructiveness, and only on order of a physician, a record 
being kept thereof; care is taken that all means which can be used for 
harmful purposes are kept as far as possible from patients ; all are under 
the surveillance day and night of carefully selected and disciplined at- 
tendants. This is an outline of the limitation to liberty at Longcliff. 
The general public, even the most intelligent class, is unfortunately very 
ignorant of institutions for the insane and their management ; therefore, 
it is proper to emphasize the statement that the policy above indicated 
obtains in every reputable establishment for the insane in Christendom. 
As an unavoidable consequence of the practical application of such a 
policy, with the great good derived, there comes the little evil that 
not infrequently a patient will manage to evade the vigilance of at- 
tendants or employes and leave the Hospital. As a rule, the eloper 
is speedily secured within a short distance, but sometimes reaches his 
home, whence be is returned, if necessary, by the Sheriff, on order of 
the Superintendent. In no instance has any sort of calamity to others 
ensued, and in almost every case the elopers have either returned volun- 
tarily by themselves or have been returned to the Hospital by others. 
'Elopements have always occurred in institutions for the insane every- 
where, in later days, and always will unless we go back to the prison- 
like methods of the last century. Against such retrogression intelligent 
humanity would wrathfully protest. Of the two evils, we have chosen 
the lesser by far. The particular record of Longcliff, in this relation, 
will compare favorably with that of any other hospital in the land. In 
the future, as in the past, the management will certainly make every 
p xssible endeavor to prevent elopements, but that they will occur from 
time to time is certain. 



U) 



ECONOMIC HISTORY. 



Subsistence. The Hospital farm has continued to furnish a large 
amount of subsistence material, representing many sorts of food require- 
ments. Among these products may be noted for each of the last two 
years over 2,000 quarts of strawberries and like small fruits, from one to 
two tons of excellent grapes, and celery and asparagus often and for all, 
as acceptable luxuries. The herd has furnished about 160,000 pounds 
of milk annually, but more could be used, and, as the herd is developed, 
will be. The poultry yards have not fulfilled expectation, but have 
developed satisfactory results on occasions devoted to special feasting — 
Thanksgiving Day, Christmas, etc. The herd of Poland-China swine, 
prolific and profitable perhaps, but very susceptible to morbific influ- 
ences and quite unesthetic in habits of life, has been all converted into 
pork long ago, and the garbage is now composted to again feed the 
gn)und that gave it. The garden, farm and dairy are worked by skilled 
employes, long in the service, as a rule, who are especially efficient in 
securing the voluntary assistance of a large number of inmates, whose 
labor is very valuable to the institution as well as beneficial and agreea- 
ble to themselves. But the farm is unfortunately not a fount of every 
blessing. The markets of the world have to be sought to a very consid- 
erable extent. A liberal dietary of plain substantial food is provided, 
with occasional luxuries, and with as much variety as conditions will 
permit. 

The following physiological ration is the basis upon which bills of 
fare are made: Net proteids, 4.5 oz.; net carbo-hydrates, 14 oz.; net 
fats, -S oz.; these being the average daily food requirement of an adult 
man, according to the best authorities. For the sick and special cases, 
special diet is provided by a special cook, from the general kitchen, or 
by the attendants, each ward being equipped with a gas stove and cook- 
ing apparatus for this purpose. The iervice of food is carefully organ- 
ized, so that all may get their shares, and opportunity is provided for all 
to complain, criticise, or ask for more, which is not against the rule of 
this institution. All attendants and other employes are on record daily 
over their own signatures as to the quantity and quality of the food 
served to patients and to themselves. These food reports are carefully 
inspected daily by both the Superintendent and medical officers, and 
copies of adverse criticism, verbatim, are sent to the chef for special 
attention and report. 

F^U'in and (ianlrn. About the beginning of each year a scaled map 
is made of all arable laud, setting forth exactly the kind, location and 
extent of each planting of every seed used. Together with this is 
prepared a manual giving cultural directions, dates of planting, amount 



17 

of seed per row, number of rows, etc., with blanks for record of gathered 
crops. These are placed in the hands of the General Supervisor, who is 
responsible for the application of the year's program and has control, 
to a certain extent, over all farm and garden employes. When the year 
is finished these documents are filed as a record of the year's work, and 
are found to be very valuable for comparison and reference. 

All products are issued for use upon approved requisition, receipts and 
issues being recorded by the storekeeper. A detailed showing is set forth 
in the Appendix. For the year 1896-7, their market value was 
$10,428.33; for the year 1897-8, S9,985.95. 

During the past biennial period, the policy of rotation and active fer- 
tilization has been duly maintained. Eight hundred and seventy-seven 
cords of manure have been used and chemical fertilizers liberally applied. 
The irrigation system, which uses the waste water of the institution, has 
been in operation during the dry seasons with continued good results, 
and remains in excellent repair without expense. The fencing is in good 
order and the fields are clean. 

Live Stock. The herd of Holstein-Fresian cattle, gradually developed 
since the opening of the institution, ten years since, now numbers fifty- 
six, of which number twenty-one are milkers, the remainder mostly 
selected calves and young heifers coming on, with a few fattening for 
beef after long service as milkers. Beginning with a lot of ordinary 
cows and a registered bull, more than half the herd will now grade 
seven-eighths, and all are strongly marked with the characteristics of the 
breed. The product of each cow is carefully and separately weighed 
and recorded, together with other important events in the life of the 
animal. Following a careful tubercular test made two years or more 
since, which showed no tuberculosis, all have continued to be free from 
infection. The milk is promptly chilled by passing over a cooler filled 
with running ice water in pipes, and is then placed in the cold store until 
issued, under the care of a dairymaid, who also has charge of the butter, 
oheese and eggs. 

All the live stock, including the farm and driving horses, are housed 
in an ancient wooden structure costing $300, originally used as a tempo- 
rary shed for the shelter of certain wood-working machinery by the 
builders of the Hospital, fifteen years ago. It is a very open, rickety 
building, and with the wear of use, time and elements, has become un- 
worthy of its use and beyond repair. Its location directly in the fore- 
ground, as viewed from the railway station, makes it moreover a very 
undesirable frontispiece. 

There is available a good and in every way satisfactory location at the 
south end of the orchard. The stables and their belongings should be 
there established. Certain small accessory buildings could be transferred 

2— NORTHERK InSANF. 



18 

from their preeent site. The niaiu buildiug should be toru away. For 
the herd, there is needed now a good stable with capacity for winter care 
of eighty head, big and little, with adjacent storage room, a silo of proper 
capacity and a horse stable and carriage house, with necefsary shedding, 
etc. 

Certainly the animals which do so large a part in the production of 
farm products to the gross value of nearly 810,000 annually deserve warm 
and conifortal)le (juarters, and if possil)le they ought to have them. 

For this needed improvement $5,000 is a proper estimate and is recom- 
mended. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Walks, lu November, 1897, 22,005 square feet of vitrified brick 
pavement were laid, covering all walks, connecting all buildings, from 
six to twelve feet wide, according to location and need, on a substantial 
foundation of broken stone and sand, thoroughly underdrained. The 
material used was purchased competitively, as follows: 

Wabash Clay Company, Veedersburg, Ind.: 

y7,0OO glazed, embossed brick, at f 18 $<)60 00 

1,000 glazed, embossed quarters 10 00 

Ti'ire Haute Brick and Pipe Co.: 

41,000 No. 1 sidewalk brick, at .SI 1.8.") 485 85 

7,000 standard sidewalk lirick, at $10.85 75 95 

loU yards sand, at titiji cents 101 00 

3u8,';j rods four-inch drain tile at 18 cents 55 51 

!»i barrels Portland cement, at $3 28 52 

Hired labor and cartage 77 17 

Total $l,5oO 00 

The last General Assembly appropriated for this $1,500, which was 
expended as above. Most of the work, however, was done by employes 
and patient.^, to the value of $341.77, making the total value of the im- 
provement $1,841.77. 

It has been of great benefit in affording dry, clean and secure walk?, 
looks well, can be readily changed or taken up and will last indefinitely. 

('ol<l Store. Existing needs have been well met by the erection of a 
cold store containing an ice chamber 20 feet wide, 30 feet long and 20 
feet high ; two cooling rooms 12x14x10 feet and 12x1(5x10 feet, and two 
work rooms 12x15x10 feet, one side equipped for the care and issuance 
(»f meats, the other for milk, butter and eggs. The meat rooms are pro- 
vided with a very convenient overhead track and weighing scale, with 
windlass for handling meat without straining manual lifting. The milk 
room apparatus includes a very eflicient cooler by which the milk is rap- 
idly chilled to about 5S° Fahrenheit, ice water being furnished from the 



11^ 

well water mains, after passing through a lorig coil in the ice chamber. 
The milk is luuulled mainly and very easily hy means of an all metal 
hand pump, which can be readily scalded throughout by attaching its 
suction pipe to an adjacent hot water bil). Hot and cold water are in 
both work rooms, and all parts are well lighted, at night electric lamps 
being used. This establishment was built in l«i»7, finished during the 
winter and has been in regular use during the summer just passed. The 
ice chamber was filled early last winter; at present there remains an ovoid 
mass of ice 18x14x12 feet. The temperature in cooling rooms has been 
readily kept at from 38° to 42° Fahrenheit, according to the number 
and location of cold air inlets opened, of which no more than one-fourth 
have ever been used. 

The Assembly of 1897 appropriated $1,000 for this improvement. 
This sum was used to purchase competitively the necessary material for 
its construction, and to pay for the labor of mason and tinner. The 
wood work, painting, plumbing and drainage was done by the Hospital 
mechanics. The valuation, including the above, is $1,644.58. 

REPAIRS. 

A general condition of good repair has, as a rule, been maintained 
throughout the Hospital ; there are certain matters of needed improve- 
ment which have been necessarily passed by on account of lack of 
means for all. The most important repairs which have been made are 
the following: The old cement floors of the general kitchen, bakery and 
accessory ortices have been refaced with encaustic tile ; the mass of 
return, steam and water pipes, occupying a central trench in the kitchen, 
has been taken out, condemned and replaced by new work, run in a new 
brick tunnel outside of the west wall, the old trench being converted 
into an eight inch drain for the kitchen floor, sinks, etc., with proper 
traps, connecting with the adjacent sewer system ; the old cooling rooms 
Jiave been renovated, plastered and painted ; one now accommodates the 
kitchen cooler, the other has been converted into a light, airy bread 
room, adjacent to the bakery. The apparatus in the kitchen has been 
advantageously re-arranged and renovated where necessary. This 
department now compares favorably with any part of the Hospital. 
The cost of these renovations was $1,850. 

As a means of needed better protection in winter, the north loggias of 
wards 3, 4, C and D have been enclosed l)y glazed doors and sash, with 
steel guards, and storm sash have been procured for doubling certain 
specially exposed windows in the wards, and new entrance doors have 
been placed at ends of corridors in First and A wards, all at a cost of 
S378.83. 



18 

from their preeent .<ite. The niaiu buildiug should be toru away. For 
the herd, there is needed now a good stable with capacity for winter care 
of eighty head, big and little, with adjacent storage room, a silo of proper 
capacity and a horse stable and carriage house, with iiecefsary sheddiug, 
etc. 

Certainly the auimals which do so large a part in the production of 
farm products to the gross value of nearly §10,000 annually deserve warm 
and comfortable (juarters, and if possible they ought to have them. 

For this needed iniprovenient 85,000 is a proper estimate and is recom- 
mended. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Walks. In November, 1897, 22,00o square feet of vitrified brick 
l)aveiueut were laid, covering all walks, connecting all buildings, from 
six to twelve feet wide, according to location and need, on a substantial 
foundation of broken stone and sand, thoroughly underdrained. The 
material used was purchased competitively, as follows: 

Waliash Clay Company, Veedersburp;, Ind.: 

;i7,0OO glazed, embossed brick, at $18 $()(5() 00 

1,00(» glazed, embossed quarters 10 00 

Terre Haute Brick and Pipe Co.: 

41,000 No. 1 sidewalk brick, at 811.85 485 85 

7,000 standard sidewalk brick, at $10.85 75 95 

151 i yards sand, at 6(1^ cents 101 00 

3u8i'^(j rods four-inch drain tile at 18 cents 55 51 

!)i barrels Portland cement, at S3 , 28 52 

Hired labor and cartage • 77 17 

Total $1,500 00 

The last General Assembly appropriated for this SI, 500, which was 
exj)ended as above. Most of the work, however, was done by employes 
and patient!^, to the value of S341.77, making the total value of the im- 
provement 61,841.77. 

It has been of great benefit in affording dry, clean and secure walks, 
looks well, can be readily changed or taken up and will last indefinitely. 

(01(1 Store. Existing needs have been well met by the erection of a 
cold store containing an ice chamber 20 feet wide, oO feet long and 20 
feet high; two cooling rooms 12x14x10 feet and 12x1(5x10 feet, and two 
work rooms 12x15x10 feet, one side equipped for the care and issuance 
of meats, the other for milk, butter and eggs. The meat rooms are pro- 
vided with a very convenient overhead track and weighing scale, with 
windlass for handling meat without straining manual lifting. The milk 
room apparatus includes a very efficient cooler by which the milk is rap- 
idly chilled to about 5S° Fahrenheit, ice water being furnished from the 



!!♦ 

well water mains, after passing through a long coil in the ice chamber. 
The milk is hanflled mainly and very easily by means of an all metal 
band pump, which can he readily scalded throughout by attaching it> 
suction pipe to an adjacent hot water bib. Hot and cold water are in 
both work rooms, and all parts are well lighted, at night electric lamps 
being used. This establishment was built in 1M1)7, finished during the 
winter and has been in regular use during the summer just passed. The 
ice chamber was filled early last winter; at present there remains an ovoid 
mass of ice 18x14x12 feet. The temperature in cooling rooms has been 
readily kept at from 38° to 42° Fahrenheit, according to the number 
and location of cold air inlets opened, of which no more than one-fourth 
have ever been used. 

The Assembly of 1897 appropriated $1,000 for this improvement. 
This sum was used to purchase competitively the necessary material for 
its construction, and to pay for the labor of mason and tinner. The 
wood work, painting, plumbing and drainage was done by the Hospital 
mechanics. The valuation, including the above, is $1,644.53. 

REPAIRS. 

A general condition of good repair has, as a rule, been maintained 
throughout the Hospital ; there are certain matters of needed improve- 
ment which have been necessarily passed by on account of lack of 
means for all. The most important repairs which have been made are 
the following: The old cement floors of the general kitchen, bakery and 
accessory offices have been refaced with encaustic tile ; the mass of 
return, steam and water pipes, occupying a central trench in the kitchen, 
has been taken out, condemned and replaced by new work, run in a new 
brick tunnel outside of the west wall, the old trench being converted 
into an eight inch drain for the kitchen floor, sinks, etc., with proper 
traps, connecting with the adjacent sewer system ; the old cooling rooms 
have been renovated, plastered and painted ; one now accommodates the 
kitchen cooler, the other has been converted into a light, airy bread 
room, adjacent to the bakery. The apparatus in the kitchen has been 
advantageously re-arranged and renovated where necessary. This 
department now compares favorably with any part of the Hosj)ital. 
The cost of these renovations was $l,o50. 

As a means of needed better protection in winter, the north loggias of 
wards 3, 4, C and D have been enclosed by glazed doors and sash, with 
steel guards, and storm sash have been procured for doubling certain 
specially exposed windows in the wards, and new entrance doors i)ave 
been placed at ends of corridors in First and A wards, all at a cost of 
$378.83. 



20 

The rainwater supply to the laundry cistern has been doubled by an 
additional system of rain drains (830.25). 

The supplemental pumping station has required renovation, mainly in 
the item of a new thirty-horse-power boiler, replacing one too small and 
worn out by overwork (S48(».37). 

The rented telephones heretofore in use have been replaced by an 
excellent equipment, which belongs to the State, including a switchboard 
aud twenty-four stations in various parts of the Hospital, at a cost of 
8865.50. 

Within the last two years many minor improvements and repairs, 
involving some expense for material and much labor on the part of the 
Hospital mechanics, have been made, which were indispensable and of 
marked value practically. These, with all other betterments, are fully 
set forth, with lull values, including labor, in the inventory, which is 
summarized in the Appendix. 



NEEDS. 

Mililltt'liaiice. From the opening of the Hospital, in 1888, the 
amount of appropriation for general maintenance, including clothing, 
minor improvements and repairs, until October 31, 1893, five years, was 
885,000; for the next two years it was 895,000; for the next biennial 
period, ending October 31, 1897, it was 890,000 annually; for the two 
years ending October 31, 1899, it is annually 890,000, for maintenance 
excepting repairs, for which it is 84,500. One year of this last period 
has just closed, with no residue and no deficit. Meantime, the capacity 
in ten years has risen from 398 to 610. For a year past the Hospital 
has been kept crowded. The total per capita expense for the last year 
was 8 156. 20. This figure includes expenditures of every sort, excepting 
82,500 for new construction, and is based on a daily average actually 
resident of 605 inmates. It is decidedly below the average of State in- 
stitutions, and has reached a practical minimum, below which it would 
be unwise to go. As it is, privation as to some reasonable needs has been 
unavoidable. 

For the current expenses of the institution for the biennial period end- 
ing October 31, 1901, there will be required an annual appropriation of 
8100,000, and it is earnestly urged that this iuclude clothing, minor im- 
provements and repairs, without separation into special funds. Experi 
ence has unquestionably proven the superior wisdom of this method, 
which, until the last two years, was in most satisfactory operation from the 
beginning in all the new Hospitals of the State. The only special result 
of the recent subdivision of appropriations for maintenance has been a 
serious complication of accounts, without any advantage whatever. The 



21 

balance account of the Hospital ledger, under the system of book-keeping 
always used, sets forth in detail by cla8:«es every disbursement, so that even 
the most unskilled inspector may readily know for what the fund has 
been spent and how much lor each class of items. No one can know 
better than the immediate officers of an institution what that institution 
needs, and if they are trustworthy as to the general management of the 
Hospital, its inmates and its employes, they should certainly be trusted 
as to the application of the maintenance fund, without legislative specifi- 
cation as to how much shall be spent for each or any of the various items 
of expenditure, which practically all belong properly to maintenance. 

Of course, for new buildings, specific legislative appropriation is wise 
and proper. 

Hospital ('apjU'ity. On September 30 of this year there were 
enrolled as inmate.«, t>57 ; actually present, 610 ; on furlough at home, 
47; committed, but not admitted on account of lack of room, 43; in 
county asylums, 61 ; in jails, 9 — making a total of 770 insane persons in 
the district registered and located. The hospital capacity is 610. This 
figure has been attained by crowding the institution, but the possible 
limit has been reached and further accommodation can only be secured 
by the erection of additional buildings. There now, then, are 160 insane 
persons dependent upon this Hospital for whom there is no room avail- 
able. Each year the number of new cases admitted will closely approxi- 
mate 200 — for the fiscal year just closed it was only 165. The number 
applying for admission largely exceeded this, there being always between 
40 and 50 cases, duly committed after inquest, awaiting vacancies which 
can only occur l)y death or recovery sufficient to warrant discharge, for 
even the most hopeless, harmless dement can not be discharged to make 
rooaa for even the most promising acute case as long as there is any need 
whatever for custodial care. As a result of this provision of the law, in 
the absence of room for all, the incurable reap the advantage of hospital 
care and the curable are barred out, often under conditions of a most 
detrimental and distressing nature not only to themselves but to whole 
communities. When this law was enacted and applied to the three dis- 
tricts dependent on the new Hospitals, it was upon the assumptiDn that 
room for all classes of the insane would be provided and ready in 
advance of need. Such, unfortunately, has never been the case for 
more than a brief time. 

On September 30 there were enrolled in the four Hospitals of the 
State, 3,340 inmates; in the whole State, committed but not admitted 
for lack of room, 322; in county asylums, 424; in county jails, 38 — 
making a total of registered insane exceeding 4,000. Of the home- 
kept and vagrant not recognized in the above, 300 is a safe estimate, 
three or four to each county, which should certainly have room in the 



aggregate of the State's iusane, which then numbers 4,80<> — one to 675 
of tlie total population, which, according to the Bureau of Statistics, is 
2. 900, 000. The total present hospital capacity of the State is now 3,18S. 
There are, then, 1,112 insane citizens for whom the Hospitals can furnish 
no room. Last year 1,000 new or recurrent cases of insanity were 
admitted to the Hospitals, hut it must be borne in mind that even this 
startling number did not include those who asked and needed hospital 
care, but could not enter for lack of room. 

These conditions are not new. Since the beginning Indiana has failed 
to meet this growing need in a persistent, progressive manner. Vigor- 
ous and seemingly all-sufficient provision has been made from time to 
time, but at very long intervals, and the sum total has been proven to be 
inadequate and incommensurate with the growth of the State and the 
needs of those who are insane and those who are becoming so. That 
there has been in this State a proportionate increase of insanity in the last 
two decades, I do not believe; on the other hand, close observation of 
fairly accurate statistics leads me to the conclusion that there has been a 
proportionate decrease, and this I attribute to the wider care which, within 
the period named, the State has given to this class of its population. 
The ratio twenty years ago was one insane person to 565 of population. 
It is now one to 675. Could prompt and continuous supervision be ex- 
tended to every case of mental disease, the number of permanent recov- 
eries would certainly be greatly increased and the chances for hereditary 
transmission and dissemination of incurable defects would be greatly less- 
ened. Indiana will have done this when hospital capacity is in accord- 
ance with the normal ratio of insane to population and is kept progres- 
sively in such accordance, or, in brief, when there is kept ready a hospital 
place for one in every 675 of her citizens. Then will the thought work 
of the alienist cease to be largely a mathematical problem as to how many 
can be crowded into a given floor space and make room for something 
better and wider and higher, the individual and collective betterment in 
every way of all who are sick in mind and body also. 

On behalf of those who are here, those who are waiting to come and 
those who will surely come in the future, I ask more room, and room up 
to date in hospital fitness. This institution was planned fifteen years ago — 
it was not all built as planned — two large buildings were omitted because 
it was thought they would not be needed. They have been needed ever 
since, and more now than ever. Besides, the world has moved and medi- 
cal science with it. New lights demand new means. The Hospital needs, 
as an important part of the additional room required, special accommo- 
dations for those suffering from intercurrent disease of body requiring 
special and peculiar care, contiguous but separable, so that classification 
may be improved and sources of infection isolated ; in short, two infirmary 



2::! 

wards, one for each sex. It further specially ueeds more single rooms 
for special cases requiring quieter surroundings than are now available. 

The two spaces intended for the huihlings omitted from the original 
plan otter room f)r structures 145x121 feet. These, two stories high, can 
be arranged to accommodate each 100 inmates, approximately — the sick 
and iniirm below and the more vigorou.s above — in all, four wards, in two 
buildings, one for each sex, with total ca{)acity for 200 patients, with 
their attendants. 

For the erection and equipment of these buildings ready for use, in- 
cluding accessories, furniture, plumbing, heating and lighting apparatus 
and tunnels to adjacent buildings, §40,000 will be required for each. 

This estimate will not bear any deduction ; it is as low as has ever 
been attained in practice in the erection of new buildings for the accom- 
modation of insane patients. By means of alterations and annexes capaci- 
ties have been increased at less cost, but not in the case of entirely new 
constructions. 

Water Supply. From the opening of the Hospital, ten years ago, 
to the present time, one of the most serious needs has been an increase 
of the water supply. From time to time various sources have been 
developed and used advantageously, but the fact remains that during 
the dry summer months there continues to obtain a dearth of water tq 
such an extent that many uses are necessarily abandoned and a very 
rigid economy is required in all uses, excepting drinking and cooking- 
for which enough is provided by a special well and special system of pipes 
laid to all parts of the Hospital. In dry seasons the gardens, lawns, 
etc., can not be watered, and that used for water closets, urinals, sewer 
Hushing and bathing has to be doled with saving care. In case of fire 
the available supply would be very iuadeqimte. This fact has been 
vigorously presented in a report of a recent survey made by a special 
agent of the Board of Underwriters, which further emphasized the need 
for. much greater fire pump capacity. 

For the general supply, there is a dam and reservoir on a creek run- 
ning through the farm, connected by a 6-inch main 2,000 feet long, 
having a fall of 15 feet, with a 6xl0-inch duplex pump in the 
engine house, and with a reservoir adjacent. These reservoirs are 
simply excavations surrounded by dykes. In summer they are empty 
and the creek is dry. The water then is obtained from three deep wells, 
one in the boiler house, two others at a point 2,500 feet distant. These 
are each equipped with a deep well steam pump having water cylinders 
from 3^ to 4^ inches in diameter. For the two wells in the boiler house, 
steam is furnished from the main central battery; for the outlying wells, 
from a 30 horse power, semi-portable, Cornish boiler adjacent, wells and 
boiler being all housed together. This group, when in use, about eight 



24 

rooDths of the year, requires the attendance of a special engineer and 
furnishes 50,000 gallons in a run of 10 hours, and constitutes the main 
source of supply, the other well, at the boiler house, having a capacity 
for only 18,000 gallons in 24 hours. 

In winter, the quantity available from the reservoirs is ample for ordi- 
nary purposes, but it is often very muddy, and, when heated for bathing, 
quite malodorous. In summer, that from the wells is somewhat sulphur- 
ous, having a total hardness of eighteen degrees and occasionally showing 
beggiatoa under the microscope; but it is fairly potable, and it would 
answer every purpose were the quantity sufficient. The amount used 
daily in summer is HO, 000 gallons. The amount which should be avail- 
able for ordinary uses is 150,000 gallons, and to meet the requirement of 
fire protection as much more as possible ; enough ai least to make the 
possible output from the mains 20,000 gallons per hour — just enough for 
one standard fire stream. 

To accomplish the desired result with existing conditions, I recommend 
and urge the installation of an air-lift system, including an air com- 
pressor, with receiver, in boiler house; air pipe to and into wells Nos. 3 
and 4 (2,500 feet) ; discharge pipes up to adjacent tanks, and gravity 
pipes (2,200 feet) from tanks to a central basin of masonry, in east side 
of central reservoir at boiler house ; and also two new six-inch wells, 
with tanks and air and water pipes as above. 

The capacity of the wells named above has not yet been tested beyond 
a delivery of 105,000 gallons per day of twenty- four hours, but this amount 
can be safely depended upon, and a decided increase expected under 
the use of this system. The capacity of the compressor should be ample, 
80 that the number of wells may be increased at any time without change 
of or addition to the central plant. This can be done with comparatively 
small expense. This expansibility is an important advantage of this 
system. In this connection it is to be noted that this method of handling 
water is not new and untried, but, on the contrary, is now widely and 
successfully used under conditions such as obtain at Longclitf'. The 
water once delivered into the central basin referred to may then be taken 
up and distributed throughout the Hospital through existing mains by 
the duplex force pump now in use. This is large enough for ordinary 
uses, but for better fire protection should be replaced by one of larger 
size. 

The steam for power purposes is now furnished by any one of the 
present four Babcock and Wilcox boilers, each of one hundred horse 
power. While there is a present small surplus capacity, this surplus is 
not suflBcient to meet future needs, and the provision of an additional 
similar pair of boilers is recommended. To accommodate this plant, an 
addition on the east side of the boiler house will also be required, which 



should be somewhat larger than absolutely re()uirecl for present need in 
view of possible future expansion. 

If the new wells prove as good as those now in use, a system of this 
sort and size would furnish all the water now required with liberal 
measure by operation during the day time only. Any surplus would be 
stored in the reservoir outside the receiving basin, available for several 
hours' heavy draft m ease of Hre. 

The special advantages of the use of this method at Longclifi' would be : 

1. The delivery of a superior quality of water, as far as purity and 
clearness is concerned. 

2. Economical central supervision and control, regardless of multi- 
plication of wells. 

3. Indefinite expansibility. 

4. Moderate cost, as compared with any other method of increasing 
the water supply. 

The following is, in my judgment, a trustworthy 

ESTIMATE OF COST: 

Addition to l)oiler liouse, 46x40x20 feet $1,200 00 

Two water tube boilers, 100 horse power each 8,000 00 

Piping, accessories and labor 400 00 

Compressor, duplex, compound, capacity at 150 ft. lift, 22,500 gal- 
lons per hour, and receiver 2,500 00 

3J-inch air pipe to wells No. 3 and 4, 2,500 feet 350 00 

()-inch cast pipe from wells to basin, 2,200 feet 700 00 

Laying both above lines together 250 00 

Two new 6-innh wells 1,000 00 

Piping to and from same 1,250 00 

Basin and accessory material and labor 1,000 00 

Total $11 ,650 00 



AMUSEMENTS, OCCUPATION, ETC. 

For the last biennial terra, more than usual success has attended con- 
tinued efforts to afford amusement and occupation to inmates, both in 
frequency and variety. The assembly room audiences have grown 
gradually larger and the votaries of the dance seem more devoted than 
ever. Most of this time the service of an excellent orchestra has been 
available and has been used in every possible way. Concerts and plays, 
lantern exhibitions, the gramaphone, etc., have helped largely to vary 
the monotony of hospital life. In season, picnics, walking tours and 
fishing parties, the circus, sleighrides, etc., have all played their part in 
the general entertainment. A miscellaneous library provides good books 



auil magazines for all who will read. Parlor games are always available. 
The fine arts, too, are not neglected altogether, and a limited number 
find amusement for themselves and others in this manner. 

In purely useful occupations, about two hundred take part daily, and 
many others are engaged more or less in needle wi.rk of an artistic sort. 

As heretofore, religious services are held regularly excepting during 
the hotter months, and are well attended. 

Thanks are due to the publishers of the following newspapers which 
are sent grati.-< to the inmates : LaPorte Argus, South Bend Times, 
Milford Mail, Silent Ho!)sier, Logansport Deutsche Zeitung and Col- 
man's Rural World. St. Louis. Also for books, ma^-azines and illus- 
trated papers: To Miss L. M. Higgins, Miss E. Fuller, Mrs Fuller, 
Mr. J. T. Flanegiu, Mrs. M. Landry, Miss Etta Wright, Mrs. J. Z. 
Powell, Mrs. Henry Tucker, Mrs. Homer Kessler, Mr. W. F. Chappe- 
low, Mr. B. A. Kinney, and others. 

Recently, from a nameless donor, the Hospital has received a superb 
Regina music box with one hundred selections of the best music, which 
has already given much pleasure and benefit to the patients. Another, 
equally modest, has provided a very elegant cabinet for the box and 
music sheets. In the name of the entire population of the Hospital, I 
take occasion here to express grateful acknowledgment. 

The following is a list of major entertainments during the past two 
years, omitting dances and other regular functions: 

Santa Claus (a play), Christmas, 189(i. 

Amateur concert, January 2, 1897. 

Prestidigitateur, Professor Pray, February (i, ls<)7. 

Concert, Binjjley Singers, Februarys, 1S97. 

Mrs. Hutchinson's musicale, February "i'J, 18*17. 

Negro minstrels, Knights of St. .John, March 2, 1897. 

Concert, Tennessee .lubilee Singers, March 6, 1S97. 

Headings, Miss Webber, March 13, 1897. 

Corcert, Manhattan Trio, March 27, 1897. 

Poor Piliacody (a comedy), .\pril 6, 1897. 

.\ series of picnics, beginning .June 21, ending .\ugust 19, 1897. 

Fireworks and refreshments, .July 4, 1897. 

Concert, Manli.-ittan Trio. .July 16, lSi>7. 

Open-air concert, July 28, 1897. 

Open-air concert, .\ugust 7, 1897. 

Ci:-cus party, August 9, 1897. 

Open-air concert, .\ugu8t 25, 1897. 

Base ball, first game, July 17; last game, September 15, is<t7. 

King Winter (a cantata), Christmas, 1S97. 

Dramatic readings, .Vlr. and Mrs. Labadie. February 5, 1898. 

Hickory Farm (a drama). I'^ebruary 25. 189S. 

•Sung service, February 27, 189S. 

Cinematograph, March 2i>. 1898. 



DraiuiUic readings, April In, ISitS. 

Prize pliotograplip, with tlie lantern, I'rolVssor (iambic, April li-i, iNi'S. 

A Comedy of Errors, Logansport Dramatic Club, April IS, IXifS. 

Zouave drill, Knights of St. John, May -4, ISilS. 

()pen-air concert, June 24, ISilS. 

Fireworks and refreshments, July 4, 18Vt.S. 

The Doctor of Alcantara (opera), Dadswell'.s Amateurs, .\ugusi 17. 1S!)8. 

Circus party, September 8, 1898. 

Impeisonations, Mr. Rosslyn, September 20, 1S98. 

(iramaphone concerts, Octol)er 3 and 15, 1898. 

Trip Up the Rhine, with lantern, October 24, 1898. 

Some of the above entertaiuraeius were presented by professional 
players and musicians ; the rest by amateurs of Logansport, Delphi and 
Lougcliff, to whom is due a record of earnest thanks. 

Ill ('oiiclusion, I desire to record a congratulation upon the meas- 
urably successful course and termination of the first decade of this Hos- 
pital's history ; to gratefully acknowledge the services of the officers and 
employes who have helped to make it such, and to recognize, at the same 
time, the liberality, humanity and harmony which has marked the policy 
of your honorable Board. 

Very respectfully, 

Jos. G. Rogers, 
Medical Superintendent. 
LoNQOLiFF, November oO, 1898. 



APPENDIX 



(29) 



MEDTOAL TAHLKS 



Report of Medical Superintendent 



NORTHERN INDIANA 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



TABLE I. 



Movement of Inmate.-< from July 1, 18SS (the beginning), to October 



Whole number admitted I 1,271 

Whole number discharged [ 595 

Recovered , 326 

Improved : 185 

Unimproved i 48 

Not insane j 32 

Idiotic 4 

Transferred to other hospitals 89 

Improved 57 

Unimproved '; 32 

Died I 275 

Enrolled. October 31, 1898 312 



990 


2,-261 


437 


1,032 


2iW 


622 


IfXi 


291 


29 




2 


34 


4 


8 


HI 


170 


40 


{17 


41 


73 


148 


423 


324 


036 



(31) 



82 









I 






oq 



1 



.2 

1 






I 



< 

5 


IB^OX 


i§i 


1 


i 


s 


if 


ii 


j5 


MM 

-S3 






•uaiuo.u 
ill 


§lg^|Jif5sieg|5 




Pi 


•uaiV 




o 


IBJOX 


'^•-■ico>nae<9e4t~?^eom 


Is 


■aamoj^ 


i-< •t-lWC^'^ Ii-li-l jrH j 


1= 


•U9K 


C»Jf-l'^<O'4lOS0rHCS?^C^iC 


S 


a 

H 

O 

■« 

a 


"3 
1 


M^IOX 


•^r^MOO-CC^t-rHiOMt-iT*! 


s 


■Qdmo^ 


e^cOT-cf—cJ'j'tccs-rt-ii-ioo 


Is 


•now 


NCT>^t»e<ic».-ie«i-ie<i j® 


ls 


2 


Wox 






















1 




■aauo^ 


























•UBK 






















1 




6 

i 

a 


Wox 










— 






|e4 


■O" 


'naino^ 




















o 


•U9J\[ 










^^ 






je4 1 '^ 


9 

> 

A 

a 
'S 


•I«10X 




IM 


r-li-(« 


IMt-h 


jio jg 


•naino^ 








CM 1-1 


'■04 


lO 


•uajv 




<N 


TH.-IM 




■ CO 1 o 


o 

s> 
o 

a 

a 


•lB?ox 


coc4rti-i 


t~e<5i-Heo 


is; 


5 


•uaraojiji^ 


Ml-H-H '■ 


t-ieoi-HW 


:s|a 


•uapi 


^- :- 


to : jrl 


:2|S 


O 

u 

o 

> 


•l«?ox 


^aci-i«se<ic<i-*oci-ie"5r-io I g- 


•uauio^ 


j(N ji-KNeoeotDi—i-ii-no 1 Q 


1 


•now 


t-)WrHift ]o3i-<e<i -c-) jus 1 gj 


Admittkd. 


•I«iox 


S2SaS*S=2J:;::S2 | S 


'aanio^ 


ciooiot-^icaoooociou; 1 j 


•uaK 


a3»-o»ui«co05ooi--w^'* 


l§ 






X 

H 

i 


k 
a 

E 

a 

c 
iz 




\ 

> : 

c 


> 
^ 1- 




< 




3 : 


• ! 

■< 


c a 

s5 


_c 


1 

i 

1 



33 



pq 



:? 

I 






r 



IS 

e 

^3 



'TS 



g 



* 



< 
a 


•mox 






1 


•aamoAV |gi^ii|5||jg|J^ 


1 
i 
j 


•U9K ^i?;i?il?i^^jSi^ 




1 "mox 


t~ W^CJOJ 


«U5«Oj-«OJ 


\3 




•aarao^VV 


-- ;_ ; 


|t-iC)-1> |co 


Is 


'uayi ' '»"M'*'-i<M 


M"+-*i~e«:to 


S 


i 







§ 




o 
EH 


•uaoio^ u5me<SNeOr-i«ot~ 'c-\ '.t- 


1 = 


i 


•n9J\[ ; «Ot--?0(N«CM 


Or^^^g 


8 




2 

o 


•imox : : : : 
















1 


•n9iao^ 














- 








•uapi ': : : : 














Discharged. 


o 

Q 

o 


•mox 


C^CflrH '• 






r-t 


I-H 




1 1 

r 1 


•nanio^ ; : : : : 












M 


•uaj^ Ncirt : 






-< 


>-( 




1 *~ 


o 

u 
a. 

"S 


•moi : 


]rH(M 


(Mrt 




-- 


h 


•narao^ 


jrHrH 


(M '■ 




-- 


|. 




•napi : 


i i'H 


• i-l 






h 




■3 


•itjjOT « O US <M -* N CC Ss 


r-l 


1=5! 




•aeino^ 


cicciM ji-< jeoeo 


i-H JM 


h' 


\ 


= -uapi 


■"♦"McONWeq jeo 


iHi-cM 


\s ; 


>• 
o 


•T'giOX ■ «^-*«iT-<e<5Ni-io>i-ii-ie^o 


1 
1 "* 


•aaOIO^ CCNr-<1-lr-lr-lrH-l. -rt jcC 


1 55 ; 


"UOTW [MCd j(Mr-t -mi-l •Clt:- 


§3 








•IBlOT t->m^eQ(y:coi~t-eo-*i^in 


S 1 


A DM ITT 


■naniOM ot-u:t^oii-it~i-H-*ou;t- 


5 : 


•naTff IM X (NJ >0 f— t- O tr 05 00 C-l oo 


§ 




1 




H 

o 


St 

O 05 




^*n 


> 


O 


> 


: S 
<l 


o 


-: 


1 



3 — Northern Insane. 



34 



TABLE IV. 



Diagnoses of Admitted, Fiscal Year 1890-1 



niAGNOSES. 



Men. 



Acute mania 

Chronic innnia 

Eiiileptic innnia 

Recurrent mania 

llystero-niania 

Melancholia . 

Primary (Jcmentia 

Secondary dementia. 

Senile dementia 

Paralytic dementia.. 
Epileptic dementia. . 

Epilepsy 

(Jeneral paresi.« 

Paranoia 

Katatonia 

Circular insanity 

Aphasia 

idiocy 

Not insane 



Total . 



107 



Women. 


Total. 


1 




15 


29 


21 


39 


7 


11 


5 


10 


1 


1 


22 


41 




.3 


1 


6 


2 


4 




1 


3 


3 




2 


3 


18 


1 


10 


2 


3 




1 




1 




1 



84 



191 



TABLE V. 



Diagnoses of Admitted, Fiscal Year 1S97-8. 



DIAGNOSES. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Acute mania 

Chronic mania 

Epileptic mania 

Recurrent mania. . . 

Hystero-tnania 

Melancholia 

Primary dementia. . 
Secondary tlementia 
Senile dementia. ... 
Paralytic dementia. 

Epilep.sy 

General paresis 

Paranoia 

Katatonia 

Aphasia 

Progressive chorea.. 
Not insane 

Total 



108 



57 



165 



35 



to 



H 




iJ 


f^ 


m 


't-^ 


«J 


o^ 


H 


30 








o 




fi 




&1 




e 



i 



I 







•WOI 


■<fio— 'r. O!0iii-« • 


1(5 




■aaino^ 


: ItDinooM^w : | 


IS 




•uojv 


'4<iaiO'4<eM-4tf-l'>«><»3 '. 


s 




< 
c 

•< 
(- 

-<; 


•mox 


: : : : :•** : ■'^ : ''^ 




uaniOj^iY 






•U9KT 


: : : : i""* i i"^ ■ ^ 




i 

•< 
PS 

< 


•l«10I 


: i"* : : i i'^ : i 


1 °^ 




•uamo^ 








•uaw 


: i""" : : : i"^ : : '=^ 




o 

Si 

o 

i5. 
■< 
-9 
K 


•f^'X 


— r)i.--»'CC'M'MO'M • 


IS 




•a9ai0jiY 


j JC^ICOCO -i-ICO 1 • 


s 




•uare 


i-IOJOTM -Mi-ICCPl • 


s 




Rkccrkknt 
Mania. 


•l«;ox 


:::«:::::: 


<N 




•uotaOjYY 








•nsivr 


: : :^' : : : : ■ • 


(M 




2 

< 

o 

6 


•IB^ox 


:;;:;;;;:; i 




•uomOj\^ 








•aanjr 








< 


•inox 


coMioeot-eo '.'.'.'. 


g; 




•uecno^ 


; ;-*rtu:i<M ■ • i ■ 


■* 




<3 1 


•U9K 1 : : : : : 


o 


1 




DURATION'. 


Under two months 

Four months 

Six months 

Nine months 

One year 

I'lightecn months 

Two years 

Three years 

Four yenrs 

Five years 


• ii 

: 1 

o 
H 



36 



J 

i 






1 


•l«»oX 




5 1 


■UdtUO)^ 


|rO-*«-*M \ '•'-'r-i 


oo 


•noK 


^-l^5•0•«'lC« |t-l • 


SI 


Katatonia. 


•mox 


::--::::::: 


l-< 


-uaino^ 






•U9W 


•'•'-*'•• \ [•'• • 


•1 


o 

< 
PS 
■« 
&4 


mox 

•uoraOj\Y 


'. .'. '. :,w '.'.'.'.'. 


1 
1 




: 1 


•U3K 


::::•-'::::: 


i-< 


•< 

o 
ts 
u 

< 


•i«;ox 


JMPJN-* : '■ j^rH 


a 


•uamoAV 


■ f-i ji-ec j :•-"-' 


t- 


•uaw 


;i-iNi-ii-i ■ ; • ; ; 


to 


Recurrent 
Mania. 


•IB?0X 


:::-':::::: 


I-l 


•neuicjii^ 






•aoK 


1 • •!-(;;;;• • 


-■ ■ 


Chronic Mania. 


•inqox 


: : ■.^'-' i'^ : : 


00 


•aarao^V 


: : : : i-^ : : : : 


IH 


•n3K 


::::'-'::'-':: 


04 


1 

i 

< 
K 

■ e- • 

B 

o 


•1«10X 


r^-^(£-TT-~f ; ■ ; ; 


SJ 


■u9mo^ 


Jw'^Nrtrt : • ': : 


O 


•aow 


riMNiMMW ; ; ] ; 


M 




DURATION. 


Under two months .. . 

Four months 

Si.x months 

Nine months 

One yeiir 

Eiehtecn months 

Two years 

Three years 

Four years 

Five year." 


^ i 
^ 1 



37 









« 



S^ 



I 






S3 



•moi 


■l"}ox 


cc cc f. — 1 


^^'-'-^--IrS 1 


•UOIUO;^ 


••* ..-1 -i-tN .■*« ; 1 1* 


•U9K 


e<50JOTiOFH-««< ;i-cM3-.rH 1 CI 


'snqmojqx 

OBipJIIQ 


•uaaio^^ 




..:::;::::! : 


•iiapi 






•aopsnuqxa 


■aamoj^ 




: : : : ;r: 1 : : : 1 : 


•uare 




•r^ ........ I ^^ 


'snondei 
-UI3 sn^iijg 


•uaino^ 






•uajv 


:::|- 1 


'Bixoio)ny 


•uaoio^YY 






•uajv 


;;;•!-< 


::::::!'-' 


'tiiaoainaaj 


•aani0j\\ 




■■-< ; • • ■ 1 <-l 


■uajv 


r-l ■ • ■ • 


: : : : ;i-i 1 w 


"J.IBO JJ JO OSDO 


•aauioy^^^ 








•uaw 


r-<fH • . . 


;:;•;; 1 « 


•Sl^UB^Ua 


•aatno^ 


::•::: 


;r- ■ • • • 1 rH 


•uoj^ 


•r-l -IN . 


:;;;;; 1 eO 




•aamo,^ 






; ; ;»-<.■ ; 1 ■-" 


•ua^ 






; ;l-l ; • ; 1 >-( 


•adduQ^I 


•aamo^ 








•aare 


.NrH • ■ 


•;;;;; 1 


•SBiadisKia 


•uocao^ 


■.^ : : : 


:::::!'-< 


•uaw 








•sisoauj 


■aani0j\\ 






. . .5.1 : 1 c<i 


•uoHT 






.00 ; 1 00 


•BimcBondog 


•aatuo^ 




■.^ : 


:::::!-' 


•uapi 


l-H 




: . : : : 1 " 


•snaiSBJBj\[ 


•aaino^ 






: :-^ : : 1-^ 


•aoK 




'-"-' :•-'::::; 1 «^ || 


•iClHinaS 


•uaoio^ 






. .<M ; : 1 N 


•naK 






• ;(M ; ; [ <N 


•uopiuuuj 


•uatao^ 






: : : : ; 1 : 


•nai\[ 






: :^ : : 1 " 


;-siso[noj8qnx 
'.iiBuouqnj 


•narao^\ 


;CC • . -l-l . . . . . 1 -1< 


•naK 


:<M -rH -rt . . . 1 ^ 


•iJxeidody j 


•aotno^Y 


:::::•:•:: :| : 


luaqaaaQ 


•naro 


;i-l ;: ;IM •• -rH • 1 ■* 


03 



A 

< 
;s 


i 


<o"a 

"5 £ 


hipileptic mania 

Primary dementia. 


.= ■■5-3 J : 5 

"J; «>T >> 
» — — . "'a tj 


1 



38 



< 






i. 



I 



•I«10X 



lBaDji-oipjo3 



"IWIOT I eOGOt^FN-^^N^O^Ot-* 



■uainoj^ 



•xiOiO -i-ir-iM 



•aaK S 



e«eoc»i-iec 



■usmo^W 



•U9W 



■uanio^ 
•¥aK~ 



■«inia<ay 
snoiaiujaj 



'si^uqdo;^ 
pioqdXx 



■aomo^ 



•uaji 



■uamo^ 



•jaAi^j JO 
ismo'ui.iiwg 



'uamo^ 



•aaW 



'aoiqgnvqxg 



■8nanda(i(l3 



'viaooinaaj 



'uamo^ 
^uajf 



•uarao^W 



•aew I ®* 



■aaaio^ 



•naj^ 



•uatno.w 



•uaw 



-sifuaja^ 



'uamoj^Y 



•uaw 



laiBJgoiutiSJo 



■aacaoj^ 
nare 



'aSBqjjooiag 
[BjqajaQ 



'Bisajvj 



'iiamo^^^ 



•uajvT 



-snm8«jvj\[ 



sTSoinnjeqnx 
' Xj'Buoininj 



'uaniOj^ 



'naoio^ 



'aajf 



'oanioj^ 



•aajg 



'uamo^ 



•aare 



•^•^osi-i 



*; o B - c 
c _ si._ a 

- = = s =-± 0-'^ 2 

■S c = = s e! — S on r- 
--C^ u © " c, ■" ^ ^ 



39 



TABLE X. 



Duration of Disease of Admilted. 



Fiscal Yrar. 



DURATION. 


1 


1896-7. 






1897-8. 






Men. 


Women. 


. Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Two iiKinths, or less 


31 


28 
3 
13 
11 
9 
3 
3 

! 


59 
4 
22 
24 
29 
8 
6 
6 
3 


28 
7 
17 
19 
9 
7 
2 
5 
2 
2 
2 


8 
7 
12 
16 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 


36 


Three luonth:? 


1 


14 


Six months 

One year 


9 

.... 1 13 


29 
35 


Two years 


.... 20 


12 


Three years 

Four years 


....! 5 
.... 3 


9 


Five years 


2 


8 


Six years 


9 


3 




3 


Eight years " 






2 


Nine years 


1 

1) 




1 

10 
3 






4 
1 


3 
l' 


1 


4 


Fifteen years 


.... 2 








1 




i 




i 

2 

1 
4 
1 
7 

191 








1 1 


1 

1 
1 

l' 



















! 3 










....! 1 










1 6 


4 




4 










Totals 


. . . . i 107 
i 


84 


108 


57 


165 



TABLE XI 



Approximate Ages of Recovered. 









Fiscal 


Year. 






AGES. 


1896-7. 




1897-8. 






Men. 


Women.' 

1 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Between 10 and 20 years 


4 1 

7 

7 

1 i 


4 
17 
16 
14 
5 
1 


1 

1 7 

1 1 

2 

! 1 


1 
5 
6 
3 
3 


•1 


Between 20 and 30 years 

Between 30 and 40 years 


10 

9 
8 
4 

1 


12 

10 


Between 40 and 50 years 

Between -^O and iiO years 


10 
■5 
1 










Totals 


32 


2-") 


57 


22 


18 


40 



40 



TABLE XII. 



Approximate Ages of These Who Died. 





Fiscal Ykar. 


AGES. 


1896-7. 


1897-8. 




Men. Women. 

1 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Between 15 and 20 years 


1 
5 
9 
9 
4 




1 
6 
15 
10 
6 
10 








Between 20 and TO years 


1 
6 
1 

9 

T 

2 

1 


4 

11 

11 

7 

4 




4 


Between -JO ami 40 years 


2 
3 


13 


Between 40 and 5(1 years 


U 




2 9^ 




9 

1 
1 


5 9 


Between "0 and f-O years 

Between 80 and 90 years 


^ • 1 
2 1 


1 2 

2 3 


Totals 




:{9 


14 


53 jj 39 


15 , 54 



TABLE XIIL 



Number of Admissions to Hospital of Admitted. 







FiSCA* 


Ykar. 






NUMBER OF ADMISSIONS. 


1896-7. 

1 


1897-8. 




Men. Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


ToUl. 


One admission 


80 
17 
6 
2 

1 


61 
13 
6 
3 


141 
30 
12 

5 

1 


80 

18 

8 


42 

13 

1 


I'yy 




31 




9^ 








1 
1 




1 








1 






1 


1 












1 


1 




1 




1 
















Totals 


107 


84 


191 


108 


57 


16S 







41 
TABLE XIV. 



Occupation of Admitted. 





Fiscal Yiab. 


OCCUl'AT-ION. 


1896-7. 


1897-8. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Totol. 


Agent 


1 


1 

1 


2 

1 
2 
4 
1 
















Blacksmith 


2 


1 




1 


Blacksmith, wife of . . 


4 


1 


1 




1 










1 




1 




1 
3 




1 
3 
4 










1 




1 




4 












1 


1 










1 

1 


1 


Clerk 




1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
1 




1 


Cook.. 


i 

2 
1 
















l>eteitive 












5 




9 


9 




1 


1 


1 






1 


1 







.1 
1 


1 

1 

48 

28 








1 
50 


1 


2 




48 


50 


Fanner, wife or daughter of 


28 


18 


18 


1 


1 


Hostler 


1 




1 
18 








18 




6 


6 






1 


1 




1 
16 




1 
16 
11 






Laborer 




21 




21 




11 


7 




1 
1 


1 




1 
1 
4 




1 
1 
4 




1 










Machinist 




3 




3 






1 


1 










1 


1 


Manufacturer, wife of 








.1 


1 










1 


1 




2 




2 
1 








1 




2 
1 


2 


Milliner 






1 










1 


1 


Minister, wife of 






1 


1 
2 




Moulder 


2 














1 


1 


Newsboy . . . . 


1 
5 




1 

7 






^one 


2 


4 
1 

1 
1 
2 


2 


6 




1 












1 










1 




1 
3 




1 
3 




2 
















1 


i 










2 


2 






2 


2 










1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 




1 


Sawmiller ... 


i 





i 

1 




1 




1 


2 


3 






1 




i' 

1 
1 




1 
2 
1 




1 


Student 

Tailor 


1 


1 


i ? 


Tailor, wife of 




1 


1 1 




1 

2 




1 
2 

1 







Tramp 












1 












1 




1 




i 


S4 


i 










Totals 


I'lT 


191 lOS 


.57 


165 



42 



TABLE XV. 



Civil Condition of Admitted. 





CONDITION. 




Fiscal 


Year. 




CIVIL 


1896-7. 


1897-8. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Single 

Married 

Widow 




45 

47 


24 
45 
15 


69 

92 

15 

8 


44 
51 


14 

34 

9 


58 

85 

9 






8 


13 


13 


Unknown ... 













Totals 


107 U 84 I'Jl 108 

! ' II 1 


57 1 


166 







TABLE XVI. 



Clothing Supply of Admitted. 





Fiscal Ykar. 


SOURCE OF SUPPLY. 


1896-7. 


1897-8. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 




44 


31 


97 
94 


63 
45 


42 
15 


105 


County 


60 






Totals 


107 


84 


191 


108 


57 


165 







43 



TABLE XVII. 



Nativity of Admitted. 









Fiscal 


YlAB. 






NATIVITY. 


1896-7. 

1 


1897-8. 




Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


1 1 








1 




3 


1 
1 
1 


4 

1 
1 




1 


EriKland . ... 






















1 




8 


9 


17 


6 


14 




1 




i 

2 
2 

.52 




1 

5 
3 
94 
1 
1 
2 

2 






Irelrtrid 


3 

1 

42 
1 
1 


2 
55 


1 


2 




2 




29 


84 






Kansas 










2 


2 


1 


3 




2 





Maine ' 


1 




1 




3' 

1 


i 

3 


i 

6 

1 

1 

31 
2 
1 




New York 


4 

1 


4 


8 


New Jersey 


1 




1 

1 
9 

1 
1 






■ North Carolina 










Ohio 





21 
3 

1 
1 


i2 
3 


33 


Pennsylvania 


6 


Poland 


1 


Prussia 




1 


Russia 




1 

4' 


1 
1 
5 
6 

1 
1 






Scotland 


i 

1 

6 
1 

1 


1 
1 
2 




1 






1 


United States 


1 


3 


Wales 



















Totals 


107 


84 


191 


, 108 


57 

• 


m 



44 



TABLE XVIir. 



Admissions by Counties. 



COUNTIES. 



Fiscal Ykar. 



18iM5- 



Men. Women. Total 



1897-8. 



Men. 



Women. Total 



Cass 

Dekalb 

Elkhart 

Fulton 

Huntington . 

Jasjier 

Kosciutko. . . 
Lagrange — 

Lake 

Laiiurte 

Marshall . . .. 

Miami 

Newton 

Noble 

Porter 

Pulaski 

St. Joseph... 

Starke 

Steuben 

Wabash 

White 

Whitley 

Allen 

Grant 

Marion 

Switzerland . 

Totals . 



14 



107 



I'Jl. 



13 


6 


19 


3 


2 


5 


8 


.5 


13 


5 


3 


8 


8 


4 


12 


2 


2 


4 


4 


4 


8 


2 




2 


3 


2 


5 


7 





12 


5 




5 


. ( 


6 


13 







2 


4 


1 


5 


7 


2 


9 


7 




7 


7 


4 


11 


2 


1 


3 


3 


2 


F, 


5 


1 


6 


2 


6 


8 




1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 




















108 


57 


165 



45 



TABLE XIX. 



Admission by Comities, from Juhj 1, ISSS, the Beginning. 

Cass 220 

Dekalb 76 

Elkhart 154 

Fulton 67 

Huntingtou 94 

Jasper 45' 

Kosciusko 106 

Lagrange 34 

Lake 72 

Laporte. 167 

Marshall 97 

Miami '. 119 

Newton 41 

Noble 79 

Porter 94 

Pulaski 36 

St. Joseph 155 

Starke 37 

Steuben " . 61 

Wabash 84 

White 67 

Whitley 54 

Other counties 302 

Total 2,261 



FISCAL TABLES 



Report of Medical Superintendent 



MOETHERivr TKDIANA 



HOSPITAL FOR INSANE. 



(47) 



FISCAL TABLES. 



EXHIBIT No. 1. 



SUMMARY OF INVENTORY. 




PiKAi, Estate. 



Improvement? 

Total real estate. 



Personal Property Is 

General office 

Board room 

Medical office, including medical and surgical instruments 

Medii-al library 

Miscellaneous library 

Reception room 

Dispensary 

Pathological and chemical laboratory 

Mortuary 

Officers' quarters 

Administration kitchen 

General kitchen 

A^embly hall 

Central dining hall 

Employes' dining hall 

Employes' quarters 

Bakery 

Stores 

Sewing room 

Laundry 

Wards 

Shoe shop, stock and tools : 

Engineer's stock and tools 

Florist's stock and tools 

Carpenter's stock and tools 

Painter's stock and tools 

Dairy stock and tools 

Stable stock, vehicles and tools 

Farm and garden stock and tools 

Fire brigaiJe 

Musical instruments and orchestra music 

Meat room 

Milk room ^ 



Total personal property. 
Total real estate 



Grand total, inventory for fiscal year 



S28,8U 29 
460,884 53 



$489,695 82 



81,^3 30 

195 80 

1,139 11 

980 72 

320 60 

&50 43 

1,166 65 

313 25 

92 25 

4,161 12 

■474 94 

3,231 14 

2,:U2 69 

l,liK) 32 

506 62 

2,877 81 

182 81 

5,008 98 

462 56 

658 10 

22,.308 31 

30 (10 

1,2.50 75 

2,214 33 

502 28 

199 49 

1,927 46 

1,.5.35 .30 

6,546 05 

317 25 

318 00 



S64,048 42 
489,695 82 



$28,811 29 
4(54,107 .52 



$492,018 81 



Sl,371 11 

252 80 

1,19< 27 

1,022 37 

397 80 

.360 91 

1,157 12 

495 57 

116 99 

4,191 40 

482 09 

3,091 31 

2,407 69 

1,303 70 

585 39 

2,887 23 

181 14 

6,191 17 

(117 55 

643 77 

23,011 47 

30 00 

1,758 52 

2,547 29 

638 37 

166 17 

2,883 96 

1,925 45 

6,-556 41 

317 25 

378 35 

107 04 

19J 22 



869.465 88 
492,918 81 



8553,744 24 



$562,384 69 



Note — All fixed machinery is included in imjirovements. 
4— Northern Ixs ne. (49) 



50 



EXHIBIT No. 2. 



IIALANCK SHEPyr. 



Appropriation for Maintenance. 



Fiscal Yrab Ekdiko 




Stock 

Appropriation 

Real estate 

Pfi-sonal property 

Salaries and wages 

Inciilentai lal)or 

Freight 

Expressage .^ 

Telegr.i ms .' 

Postage 

Chaplain 

Ijouse furnishing 

X'cKetables 

Traveling expenses 

ProvcniU-r _. 

Newspai'crs and periodicals 

Tools an<l implements 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Hrick. lime, cement, etc 

Cleaning material 

Fresh meats 

Fresh fruits 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Harness 

Gas ..r 

Groceries 

Bedding 

Clothing 

Sewing room supplies 

Painters' supplies 

Building hardware 

Tinware 

Hoofs 

Eggs 

Butter 

Salt meats 

BreadstutTs 

Dispensary supplies 

tiueensware 

Trees, plants and shrubbery 

Advertising 

Furniture 

Undertaking , 

Vehicles 

Horseshoeing 

Lumber 

Poultry 

Hoots and s|ioes 

Black smithing 

Lard 

Electrical supplies 

Amusements 

Fees 

Engineer's supplies 

Books 

Hosiery 

Fresh fish and oysters 

Kitchen equipment , 

Oils 

Laundry supplies 

Seeds 



$489,695 82 

64,048 42 

42,596 12 

192 86 

94 42 
83 36 
62 82 

196 00 

95 00 

350 13 
204 18 
29*t 95 
704 56 
121 30 

228 £6 
487 45 

80 20 
l,'Xi:i 37 
3,8:38 14 

196 26 

420 55 

51 60 

5.016 50 

6,107 98 

1.099 08 

1,274 11 

134 76 

530 95 

329 95 

3:« 18 

136 28 

1.291 S3 

2,796 67 

1,174 17 

4,062 54 

604 85 

236 22 

1.35 06 

120 00 

351 58 
152 00 
110 45 
112 55 
f)98 .32 
.364 99 
501 35 

21 20 
455 76 

93 93 
160 67 

27.56 

82 12 
102 20 
147 90 

81 :{8 

229 24 
219 87 
172 55 
199 91 



$553,744 24 

'.Hj.doo 00 : 



$492,918 81 

69,»65 88 

41,160 54 

84 05 

105 06 

153 79 

49 47 

218 OO 

iK)0O 

512 48 

801) 46 

215 41 

716 311 

122 20 

293 73 

024 41 

27 48 

2.121 .39 

8,475 57 

208 30 

1.33 («5 

47 41 

6..559 39 

6.854 39 

777 39 

1.7.56 27 

139 33 

92 69 

207 67 

281 79 



1.286 96 

2,667 .37 

1,510.33 

4,240 24 

7.36 25 

331 66 

1.36 76 

119 90 

.^31 .31 

125 55 

80 00 

147 15 

178 71 

1.39 05 

712 60 

62 66 

299 91 

154 36 

193 88 

.58 

107 68 

119 60 

99 33 

:«6 00 

196 39 

134 34 

113 97 

1.52 3^ 



51 



EXHIBIT No. 2— Continued. 



Telephone .-ervice 

Mii.-iiinry 

Ri) mIs and walks 

Fuel 

Expense of legislative committee 

Napery 

Cutlery 

(Jlassware 

Live stock 

Contract construction 

Ice 

I'Mtliologieal and surgical equipment. 

I IcnlitiK apparatus 

I iisiirance 

Fertilizers 

t!ewers and drains 

Itischarge outfits 

War tax stamps 



Fiscal Yiab Ending 



October 31, 1897. 



Total §643,744 24 



8171 60 
250 29 
145 03 
400 00 

35 86 
621 58 

42 92 

97 48 
656 00 

26 00 
ir)8 90 

40 72 
l:;7 50 

7(1 ;")0 
209 24 

30 00 



October 31, ISaS. 



9643,744 24 



$435 15 



48 94 
626 47 


247 9.3 
28 12 
69 65 

476 00 


43 (X) 
156 25 



195 90 

12 38 

2 86 

1 43 

19 10 



8652 ;«4 69 8652,384 69 



EXHIBIT No. 3. 



Being a Lid of Disbursements on Account of Maintenance for the Fiscal Year 
Ending October -U, IS-OT. 



,4 



PAYEE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt Officers' pay-roll 

J. G. Rotrcrs, McdicMl Supt I Employes' pay-roll 

J. G. Rogers, Mediciil ."^upt ' Cash lnr emergent expense. 

.T. G. Rogers, Medical Supt ! Contingent fund 

R.C.Taylor ' Fresh meats 

Swift & Co ' Fresh meats 

Ben Fisher | Dispensary supplies 

John M .Johnston Groceries 

L. Dieckmann Groceries 

D.C.Beatty j Fre.-h fruit 

Andy Welch ' Groceries 

F. W. Kinney Poultry 

Ldgansport Creamery Co Butter 

Braun & Fitts Butter 

Taggart ^r .Johnson Breimlstufts 

Logan Milling Co Breadstuffs 

J. H. Foley Breadstuffs 

Martin Fossion Provender 

Weeks Btos Provender 

Wm. Porter ' Provender 

Elliott it Co i (xroceries 

Mallinckrrdt Chemical Co I Cleaning material 

W. H. Maxwell Cleaning material 

Wm. Heppe & Sons ! Cleaning material 

Standard Oil Co j Oils 

.1. D. Ferguson & .Jenks Clothing 

T. A. Spry I Clothing 



AMOUNT. 



86.36 68 

2,957 HO 

102 98 

500 00 

16 51 

828 21 

8 82 

3 00 
38 58 

.13 00 
10 00 
20 26 
10 88 

193 12 

4 84 
99 22 

277 52 
38 02 
.35 00 
33 01 

519 .30 

20 00 
10 40 
58 67 

102 49 

21 CO 
47 50 



52 



EXHIBIT No. 3-Coiitiuued. 



I'AYEE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOINT. 



57 
58 
59 
(iO 
61 
62 
li'l 
64 
65 
i'S 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
7.} 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
7i" 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
.S7 
88 
«!t 
<K) 
91 
!>2 

94 

•.15 
<.t6 
97 
98 '■ 
iti» 
100 1 



(S.W.^cyl. \d& Bros 

M.H.Xash 

Felix .MorKnn 

Loiithain & Barnca , 

I. E. Sutton 

IjO(faii.»pi)rt .lournal Co 

Parker A Johnston. .. » 

Wil.son, lluniiihreys & Co 

U.S. Murtlock 

Clemens Schloss 

E. S. Kice & Son 

Ca.«t'aris .Stone Co 

Holbrunor A: Uhl 

Loftan-port and Waba.'sli Val.GnsCo 
(i. A. Schae'e; 

F. .M. Bozer 

Fo.\ Si Uunkelbcrg 

r.L. Woll 

J.T. Flanegin 

J. C. Reg- r.«, Medical Supt 

J.C. Rosers. Medit-al Supt 

J. (i . Roscr.", .Medical Supt 

C^ucaly cV- .Mclirle 

1' . \V. Kinney 

!).('. Beatty 

Andy Welch 

II. J. Heinz Co 

J.T. Klliott &Son 

Wni. Ilepp" <V Sons 

Standard Oil Co 

W. lI.Maxwe 1 

L. I lieckniann 

_F. A. Dykeniann 

Tajrgart A' Johnson 

.r. H.Foley 

R.C.Taylor 

Swift A Co 

.-Vrinour A- Co 

Braun & Fitts 

Loganeport Creamery Co 

C. A. Dunkelberg 

Seybold & Bros 

•John (iray 

Fox <fc Dunkelberg 

M..J. Cri.sniond 

J. T. Flanegin 

Longwell A: Cuninpngs 

Canieroii, Aniberg & Co 

Wni. B^ Burfor.l 

A. B. Keeport & Co 

G . A. Schae fer 

Scott Price 

John I'alraer, Agt 

Lake MaxinUuckee Ice Co 

Logan.»iiort & Wabash Valley Gas Co. 

A. Burd.«al Co 

Ben Fi.-iher — 

P. \'an Schaack <& Sons 

J. E. Sutton 

Logansport Journal Co 

Louthain A' Barnes 

Cleinen.<> S(diloss 

A. (ireens (elder 

A.-h \- Hadley 

Felix Morgan 

E.S.Rice & Son 

ThoH.(}riffiths 

Stevens A: Bed wards 

James Conway 

J. <i. Rogers, Medical Supt. 

J. (». Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

Jacob. J. Todd, M.B.C 



Dry goods 

Bedding 

Bedding 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advert'sing 

Newspapers and adverti.-inif 

Luml er 

Plank Book.'', stationery and print'g 

Boots and shoes 

Toots an J ."hoes 

Building hardware 

Roa '8 and walks 

Vehicles 

(las 

Horseshoeing 

Fees 

Queens ware 

Undertaking 

Rools 

Otticers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expehso; 

Groceries 

Fre.sh fish and oysters 

F"resh fruit 

(Jroceries 

(Jroceries 

(Jroceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Groceries 

Breadstuff's 

Breadstuffs .' 

Breadstuffs and eggs 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats 

Butter 

Butter 

Provender 

Clothing 

Clothing and bedding 

(^ueensware 

Tinware 

Tinware L 

Blank books, stationery and printing. 
Blank books, stationery and printing. 
Blank books, stationery and printing. 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Hor.=eshoeing 

Masonry 

Contract construction 

Ice 

Gas 

Painters' supplies 

Dispensary sui)plies 

Dispensary supplies _. 

Newspaper.* and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

•(Newspapers ami advertising 

Boots and ^hocs 

Boots and shoes 

Furniture 

Bedding .• — 

Building hardware 

Steam, water and gns fitting 

SteaMi, water and gas fitting 

Incidental labor 

Oflicers' pay-roll 

Em ployes" pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expense 

Traveling expenses 



EXHIBIT N... 3— Continued. 



PAYEE 



OX ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



101 R.C. Taylor 

102 Swift A- Co 

lOH Axmour j£ Co 

104 F. \V. Kinney 

lu'> IJnuin .V Fitts 

lilt; I^opiinspoit Creamery Co 

1' 7 Hlliott ct Co 

108 I,. Uierkiiiiinn 

lOM Tapgart i Johnson 

110 Lo(?an Milling Co 

111 J. II. Foley 

112 D. C.Beatty 

ll:i Wiler .^- Wise 

lU i W. II. Thomas A- Co 

11^ ' Clemens Schloss 

mil (J.W Seyholii ct Bros 

117 n. \\'iler JtCo 

IIS A.-'h <V Iladley 

ll'.i Feli.x Morgan 

120 I John (Jray 

121 Troy Ljiunilry Machinery Co 

122 American Laundry Machinery Co. . . 
125 J.T. Flanegin 

124 S.W.Ullery &Son 

12.5 ! E. S. Rico .t Son 

120 Hen. Worthington Co 

127 Harke. ]>avis A: Co 

125 Ben Fisher 

IJH Will. Ilepre A- Sons 

l.;ii Win. Maxwell 

i:;i .<tan.lanl Mil Co 

i:-!2 Fox A- Duiikelberg 

VXi Wm. B.Barford 

134 Wilson, Humphreys <fe Co 

!:>"> Louthain i Barnes 

13»i L' ganspcrt Journal Co 

1'.7 .1. E.Sutton 

1 's Logansp.and Wabash Valley Gas Co, 

1'.'.' I'entral Union Telei'hone Co 

140 Logansport Mutual Telephone Co . . . 

1 il P.irker Sc Johnston 

142 AV.L.Fernald 

143 I'arke County Coal Co 

114 0. A.Schaefer 

Hi Stevens it Bedwards. .. . 

140 Dean Bros. Steam Pump Works 

147 L. Wolff .Manufacturing Co 

14S Montgomery Ward A: Co 

14;i i;eo. Cutter 

15(1 Electric Appliance Co 

15r Wm. Elliott A- Sons 

1 ">2 .Ja mes Con wa y 

l',3 Joseph Aman 

154 .1. (i. Rogers. Medical Supt 

I'o J. (t. Rogers. Medical Supt 

150 J. G. Rogers. Medical >'upt 

157 J. '4. Rogers, Medical Supt 

158 Lake Ma.xinkuckee lee Co 

159 Wm.Rowe 

100 Swift A- Co 

101 Tnggart & Johnson 

102 J. H.Folev 

163 D. C.Beatty 

HU Andy Welch 

165 L. Dieckmann 

166 1. T.Elliott A- Son 

167 Morgan Envelope Co 

Itj8 W\H.Ma.xweIl 

169 Wm. Heppe A Sons 

170 Standard Oil Co 

171 I5raun A Fitts 

172 Logansjiort Creamery Co 

173 F. W. kiiiney 



Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Saft meats 

Poultry 

Butter 

Butter 

(iroeeries 

(Jroceries 

Breadstuffs 

BreadstuDTs 

Eggs 

Fresh fruits 

Dry goods 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

House furnishing 

House furnishing 

Furniture 

Bedding 

Napcry 

Laundry supplies 

Laundry supplies 

Roofs • 

Building hardware 

Building hardware 

Building hardware 

l)ispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Queensware 

Ilank books, stationery ar d princing 
Blank books, stationery and printing 

Newspapers and advertising 

^ ewspapers n nd advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 



Telephone service 

Telephone serv.ice 

Lumber 

Lumber 

Fuel 

Horseshoeing 

Steam, water and gas fitting . 
Steam, wa'er and gas fitting . 
Steam, water and gas fitting . 

A'ehicles : . . 

Electrical supplies 

Electrical supplies 

Trees, plants and shrubbery . 

Incidental labor 

Blacksmilhing 

Officers' pay-roH 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for en ergent expenses . 

Ice harvest 

Ice 

Fresh meats 

Fr sh and salt meats 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs and provender. . . 
Fresh fruits and vegetables .. 

Groceries 

Eggs and groceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Oils an<l cleaning material .. 

Butter 

Butter 

Fish , oysters and poultry 



54 



EXHIBIT N(.. 8-Coi)tinued. 



FAVKE. 



ON ACCOl NT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 

IHO 

181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
IW 
195 
liKJ 
197 
198 
li"9 
200 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 
206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
21'.i 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
22H 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 

z^a 

'IV 
238 
239 
240 
241 
a42 
243 
244 
245 
246 



Piitrick Miihoney 

G. W.Seybold A: Bros 

H. Wilcr JcCo 

Joel H. \N'ooiliiiiin 

John Wiiniimakfr 

Fox Sc Liunkelberff 

J I. J. (!"ri,siii(ind 

U. P. Putnam's Sons 

Li)n(.'well ic Cuinuiings 

Clemens Si-hloss 

Walker & Rauch 

Ste\ enson iV Klinsick 

Tcrre Haute Distilling Co 

Parke. Davis & Co 

P. Van Sfhaac-k A' Sons 

Hen Fisher 

Parke County Coal Co 

(ieo. A. Sfhacfcr 

Henry Tucker 

Logansp.and Wabash Valley (>as Co 

Louthain A' Barnes 

JiOfransport Journal Co 

J. p;. Sutton 

htevens A" Bedwards 

J.L.Mott Iron Works 

A.BurdsalCo 

Barbee Wire and Iron Works 

E. S. Ric-e & Son 

Parker & .Johnson 

J. (J. Rogers, Medical Sujit 

.1. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. <i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. T. Elliott & Son 

Standard Oil Co 

Ben Fisher 

L. I) lock man 

Daniel Scoiten & Co 

Taggart A: Johnson 

J.H.Foley 

Logan Milling Co 

National Linseed Oil Co 

F. W. Kinney 

Wm. Rowe 

Swift A- Co 

Armour A' Co 

Logansport Creamery Co 

Braun A: Fitts 

D.C. Beatty 

•John Gray 

J. B. Winters 

Clemens Scbloss : 

Fox A' Dunkelberg 

H. Wilcr.feCo 

J. R. BakerA- Son's Co 

J. T. Flancgi n 

Max .1 en nines 

Wm. B. Burford 

Parke. Davis A' Co 

P. Van Schaack \- Sons 

W. H. .Maxwell 

Wm. Hep PC A- Son 

Bradner, Smith A Co 

American Laundry Machinery Co. . 

C. 0. Fenton 

Loutliain k Barnes 

Logansport .Journal Co 

J. E.Sutton 

Lognnsp't A- Wabash VaUey Gas Co. 

C.L. Woll 

Kroeger A- .''train 

P. H.. Martin 

Henry Tucker 

Montgomery Ward & Co 



Provender 

Clothing, bedding, etc. 

House furnishing 

Furniture 

Furniture 

Oueensware 

Tinware 



Hooks 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Bootfc and shoes 

Boots am) slioes 

Boots and shoes 

Dispen.'iary supplies 

Djspensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispens-ary supplies 

Fuel 

Horseshoeing 

Harness 

Gas 

Newsifapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Painters' supplies 

Building hardware 

Hardware and tools 

Lumber 

Officers" pay-roll 

Employes" pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Groceries 

Cleaning material and oils 

Cleaning material 

Groceries and eggs 

Groceries 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

lireadstuffs 

Provender 

Poultry 

Fresh meats 

F"resh meats 

Salt meats 

Butter 

Butter 

Vegetables 

Dry goods 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Oueensware 

House furnishings 

Furniture 

Heating apimratns 

Kitchen eiiuipment 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Dispensary suiipljes 

Dispensary supplies 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Launilry supplies 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertjsing 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Gas 

Undertaking 

Undertaking 

Live stock 

Harness 

Vehicles 



55 



EXHIBIT ^0. 3— Continued. 



PAYEE. 



oy ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOr.ST 



247 

248 ' 
249 
250 
2.51 ; 
252 I 
253 
2,54 ! 
255 
256 

257 i 

258 I 

259 I 
260 
261 
262 ' 
2tV'. 
264 I 
265 

266 , 

267 I 
268 
269 ' 

270 ; 

271 i 

272 ' 

273 i 

2<--) j 
276 
277 1 
278 

280 
281 
282 
28:i 
2.H4 1 

2a5 I 

286 
287 

288 1 

289 1 

290 1 

291 ; 

292 : 

293 , 
2i>4 
295 
2t)ti' 
o<»f 
29S 
•'99 
MOO 
MOl 
302 
303 
.3f>4 

:?05 

.•^06 
307 
30S 
.309 
.310 
311 
312 
.313 
.M4 
315 
316 
.317 
31.S 
319 . 



G. A.Schnefer 

Central Electric Co 

(Jiirlock Packing Co 

Knifrht A: .Jillsoii 

Stuvens A Bed wards 

J. H.CIo.v &Son 

James Conway 

C. L. Dilley A- Co 

E.S.Rice A Son 

Sherwood .ManufaeturingCo 

Parker \- .lohnson 

.J. G. Rogcr.s, .Medical Supt 

.J. (i. Ropers, -Sledical Supt 

J. G. Rojrers, Medical Supt 

•Jacob J. Todd, Trustee 

Chas.W. Slick, Trustee 

Louthain k Barnes 

Logan.sport .Journal Co 

H. F.Kapp 

J. E.Sutton .- 

Andy Welch 

Elliott & Co 

J. T. Elliott & Son 

Logan -Milling Co 

Tappart \' Johnson 

J.K.Foley 

L. Dieekmann 

Mills Bros 

Swift A: Co 

Win. Rowe 

Capital City Dairy Co 

Logansport Creamery Co 

Armour A: Co 

15en Fisher 

F. W. K'nney '. 

National Linseed Oil Co 

Alpheus Porter 

Martin Fossion 

J.D.Taylor 

Parke, Davis & Co 

P. VanSchaack A- Sons 

Clemens Schloss 

Line W. Pilling 

Armour Packing Co 

W. H.Thomas & Co 

(i . W. Scybold & Bros 

J.T. Flaneein 

F'ox A: Dunkelberg 

W.H.Maxwell .... 

Wni . Hcppe it Sons 

Geo. A. Schaefer 

Stevens A' Bed wards 

Henry Tucker 

Logan. A- Wabash Valley Gas Co 

.■\lston Manufacturing Co 

Wilson. Humphreys & Co 

Wm.B.Burford 

Long well i Cnmmings 

.Janie,~ Con ''■ay 

Centr.-jl Union Telephone Co 

.J. ('. Vaughan 

C. L.Woll 

Kroeger & Strain 

.Jos. A. A man 

Bridge City Construction Co 

W.L.Fernald 

Parker & .Johnston 

E. S. Rice & Son 

C.L.Dilley&Co 

J. G.Rogers, Medical Superintend'nt 
.J. G. Rogers, Medical Superintend'nt 
J. G. Rogers, Medical Superintend'nt 
Stevenson k Klinsick 



Horseshoeing 

Electrical supplies 

Engineers' supplies 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Steam, water ami gas fitting 

Incidental labor 

Brick, lime, cemert, etc 

Building hanlware 

Tools and implements 

Lumber 

Officers' pay-i oil 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Traveling expenses 

Traveling e^penses 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers 

Newspapers and adveriising 

Groceries .* 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs, eggs and groceries 

Groceries ' 

Vegetables 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Butter 

Butter 

Salt meats 

Dispensary supplies 

Poultry and fish 

Provender 

Provender 

Provender 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Napery 

Clothing, hosiery, bedding, etc 

Clothing 

Kitchen equipment 

Queensware 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Horseshoeing 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Harnets 

Gas 

Painters' supplies 

Blank hooks, stationery and print'g. 
Blank books, stationery and print'g. 
Blank books, stationery and print'g. 

Incidental labor 

Telephone service 

Seeds 

Undertaking 

Undertaking 

Blaeksmi thing 

Blacksmithing 

Lumber 

Lumber 

Building hardware 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

OflBcers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expense 

Boots and shoes 



56 



EXHIBIT No. 3— Continued. 



« 








e 
a 


PAVKE. 


ON ACCOINT <>V. 


AMOUNT. 


o 
> 









320 
321 
322 
.•m 
324 
325 
326 
327 
32« 
329 
330 
331 
3:^'> 
33i 
3M 
3V) 
a36 
33V 
3:58 
3:i'.( 
340 
311 

;U2 

34.5 
344 
34n 
34(5 
347 
348 
:54S» 

y.o 

351 
352 
:558 
354 
a'>5 
356 
357 
&58 
359 
360 
361 
362 
?63 
364 
365 
366 
367 
3(58 
•.V,9 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
376 
377 
378 
37H 
380 
381 
382 
383 
:'.84 
3X5 

■.m 

387 

:«8 

389 
390 
391 
392 



Clcnens Si-hlo88 

Lnuthaiii X Barnes 

J. E. Sutton 

Lugan!<|iort Journal Co 

K.U. Clo!<t;on, Agent 

J. F. Johnson 

('. L. DilleyACo 

LoKim. i Wiibash Valley Gas Co 

J^. \'iiushiin 

Kreis iJros. Manufacturing Co. . 

C.L. Well 

G. A. Schaefer 

VVhitall.Tatum & Co 

G. W.S<'vboId & Bros 

Wiler A- Wise 

Fox it Dunkelberg 

Jotin Gray 

J. W. Henderson <& Sons 

J. I). Ferguson it Jeaks 

J. T. Flanegin ,. 

Linton & (iraf ' 

J.L.Mott Iron Works 

Parker & Johnston 

E.S. Rice it Son 

Wilson, Humphreys & Co 

W m . Ro we 

Armour & Co 

W.C. Routh 

TagRart it Johnson 

J. II. Foley 

Niitioniil Linseeil Oil Co 

Capital City Dairy Co 

Loeanspurt Creamery Co 

F. W. Kinney 

Berry Bros 

A. Burdsal Co 

Ben Fisher 

F"ranklin MaeVeagh <& Co 

H. J.Hcin/.Co 

■r.T. Elliott&Son 

Standard Oil Co 

W. H. Maxwell 

Wm. Heppe & Sons 

L. Dieckniann 

J. (ji. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. I!. Rogers, Medical Supt 

W. L. Fern a Id 

J. P. Martin 

Swift i Co 

Wm. Rowe 

Armour it Co 

Taegart it Johnson 

J. II. Foley 

liOg-an Milling Co 

C.L.Dilley it C( 

Capital City Dairy Co 

Logansjiort Creamery Co 

F. W. Kinney 

L. Dicckmann 

Elliott it Co 

Modoc Soap Co 

Wm. Ilpi)pe & Sons 

W. H. Maxwell 

.1. F.Coulson 

Ben Fisher 

A. Burdsal Co 

.1. B. Messinger 

W. M.(Jrafris 

Phelps, Doilge & Palmer Co 

Wm.B. Burford 

Belfast Linen Co 



Boots and shoes 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Newspapers and advertising 

Insurance 

Sewers and drains 

Fertilizers 

Gas 

Seeds 

Seeds 

Undertaking 

Horseshoeing 

Pathological and surgical equipm't . 

Bedding 

Dry goods 

Sueensware 
ouse furnishing 

Furniture 

Clothing 

Tinware 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Steam, wa'er and gas fitting 

Lumber 

Building hardware 

Amusements 

Fresh meats 

j Fresh and salt meats an! lard 

I Lard 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstutfs 

Provender 

Butter 

Butter 

I Poultry 

I Painters' supplies 

Painters' supplies 

Painters' supplies 

(Groceries 

! Groceries 

Groceries 

Oils and cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Groceries and eggs 

Officers' piy-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Contingent fund 

Lumber 

Kitchen equipment 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats and lard 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstufts 

Butter 

Butter 

Poultry and fish 

Eggs and groceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material f 

Dispensary suppli'-s 

Dispensary sup^■lies 

Painte-f' supplies _. 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Boots anil shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Blank books, stationery and print'g 

Napery 



57 



EXHIBIT No. 3— Continued. 



PAYEE. 



UN ACCULN r OF. 



,AM UNT. 



■.m 

394 
395 

396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
4(H 
402 
4(« 
401 
405 
406 
407 
408 
400 
41(1 
411 
412 
413 
414 
41-. 
410 
417 
418 
419 
421) 
421 
422 
423 
424 
42.5 
420 
427 
4-jS 
429 
430 
431 
432 
4:« 
i:U 
4:>3 
436 
437 
4:iS 
439 
440 
441 
44£ 
443 
444 
445 
446 
447 
44S 
449 
450 
451 
452 
45:^ 
4-54 
455 
456 
457 
458 
459 
460 
461 
462 
463 
464 
4t>5 



J. W. Henderson Sc Sons 

.lolin (iniy 

J. D. FerKuson & Jenks 

Wiler & Wise 

H. Wik-r A- Co 

E. S. Kice \- Son 

J. T. Flanegin 

Fox it Dunkelberg 

LoKansport ife Wabash Valley Gas Co 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, >'eilieal Supt 

C. \V. Slick, Trustee 

W m . R owe 

Swift A- Co 

W.C.Routh 

.I.T.l-lli..tlA:Sou 

L. iJieckinann 

S. P. Luntz 

J. H. Foley 

Ta^gart & Johnson 

L.bolimano 

Boll. Conrad & Co 

J. T.^ Elliott Co 

F. yy . Kinney 

D.C Beatty 

Lng-ansport Creamery Co 

Arniinir A Co 

Smith & Uavis Mfg. Co 

T. A. Spry 

John Gray 

W. II. Maxwell 

Win. Heppe & Sons 

Standard Oil Co 

Indiana <.>il Tank Line 

E. S. Rice A Son 

McCray Ref and Cold Storage Co 

J. T. Flanegin 

Montgomery Ward & Co 

Snider A^ Alber 

tieo. A. Schaefer 

Jos. A. A man 

.lohn K . Redmond 

Logansport .Journal Co 

Louthain & Barnes 

J. E. Sutton 

Henry Tucker 

Parker Sc Johnston 

H.S. Murdoek 

Kroeger & Strain 

Mahlon Conovor 

John .1. Hildebrandt 

D. Hill 

Logansport A AVabash Valley Gas Co 

Central I'nion Telephone C<> 

C. L. Milley A Co 

Wm.B^Burf rd 

V. \'aiiSchaaek A Sons 

John Wyeth A Bro 

Ben. Fisher 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Si'pt 

.J. (J. Roger.', Medical Sujit 

Alex. Taggart 

J. H. Foley 

Bell. Conrad & Co 

L. Dieckmann 

J. T.Elliott Co 

Wm. Rowe 

Swift A Co 

Armour A Co 

S P. Lontz 

Armour Packing Co 

Logansport Creamei y Co 

F. W. Kinney 



Bedding 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Dry goods 

Hou.«c furnishing 

Tools and implements. 

Tinware 

tiuoensware 

Gn.' 



Officers' pay-roll 

Employes" pay-roll 

Traveling expenses 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats and lard 

Groceries 

Groceries and fruits 

Egg.* 

Breaclstuffs and groceries . . 

Brcadstuffs 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Poultry 

Fresh fruit 

Butter 

Butte'- 

Bedding 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material and oils 
Oils. 



Building hardware and tools 

Kitchen eijuipment 

Building hardware and roofs 

Tinware 

Queens ware 

Horseshoeing I 

Blacksmithing I 

Live stock 

New.-pjpers and advertising I 

Newspapers and advertising ] 

Newspapers and advertising 

Harness 

Lumber 

Boots and shoes 

I'ndertaking 

Fertilizers 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Trees, plants and shrubbery 

Gas 

Telephone service 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

OfiRcers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Brea.lstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Groceries 

Groceries, etc 

Groceries 

Fresh meats 

Fresh rpeats 

Salt meats and lard 

Eggs 

Butter 

Butter 

Poultry 



$4 .55 
2 60 

29 00 
9i 90 

24 SO 
600 

35 50 
55 40 
:i59 25 
6.36 66 
2,i»24 .34 

30 .55 

15 96 
977 88 
146 .33 
273 66 

49 26 
143 33 
417 98 

16 39 
620 

100 00 
81 84 
13 81 

4 GO 

25 87 
220 28 

52 50 
41 75 

90 59 

10 40 
84 34 
57 85 

13 25 
22 87 
30 00 
89 43 

22 29 
:«35 

17 90 

5 55 
275 00 

6 40 
6 40 
6 40 
985 

91 95 

14 00 
30 00 

131 29 
16 65 

23 GO 
470 04 

8<i 25 
5 00 
61 56 
U 70 
49 63 

15 20 
6J6 68 

2,948 26 

IS 00 

315 24 

119 00 

29 43 

410 75 

14 07 
7.58 63 
116 20 
119 93 
211 60 

15 70 

11 62 



O'i 



EXHIBIT No. 3-C.»Dtiuue(l. 







1 


1 


t 


PAYEE. 


ON ACCOUNT (IF. 


A.MOUNT. 


o 

> 




; 





* I 



466 
467 
468 
469 
470 
471 
472 
473 
474 
475 
476 
477 
478 

47y 

480 
481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
48(5 
4S7 
4&S 
489 
490 
491 
492 
493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
601 
502 
50i 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
50H 
510 
511 
512 
61:^ 
514 
515 
516 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
6^ 
52=> 
526 
527 
528 
52'.t 
530 
531 
632 
533 
634 
535 
536 
637 
538 



John Gray 

Snider & Alber 

Will, lleppe & Sons 

P. VanSchaack A Sons 

Terre llaute ]>istilling Co 

Parke, Davis & Co 

Ben. Fisher 

(J. A. Scbaefer 

Jas.O'Donnell 

Bridge City Construction Co 

E.S. Rice & S;>n 

A. W.Stevens 

J.T. Flancpin 

Central Electric Co 

James Conway 

Parker & Johnston 

Henry I ucker 

National Linseed Oil Co 

Log:in. and Wabash Valley Gas Co.. 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. (t. Rogers, Medical Supt 

Swift A- Co 

Win. Rowe 

Armour & Co 

Logansport Creamery Co 

Armour Packing Co 

L. Dieckmann 

Alex. Taggart 

Weeks Bros 

J.H.Foley 

Bell, Conrad & Co 

J. T.Elliott Co 

Bradner. Smith & Co 

Modoc Soap Co 

W.H.Maxwell 

Win. Heppe <& Sons 

F. W. Kinney 

National Linseed Oil Co 

Dennis Uhi & Co 

Logan, and Wabash Valley Gas Co.. 

W.H. Thomas A Co 

(J. W. Seybold & Bros 

Cincinnati Steel Range & Furnace Co 

J. T. Flanegin 

Snider k Alber 

Ben. Fisher 

Standard Oil Co 

A.Burdsal Co 

\Vm. B.Burford 

Kroezer A: Strain 

Geo. A. Schaefer 

J. B. Winters 

Bridge City Construction Co 

E.S. Rice A Son 

Parker A John.ston 

C.L. Dilley ACo , 

Scott Price 

J. (; . Rotrers, .Meilical Supt 

J. (J. Rogers, Meilical ."^upt 

Jacob J. T'.d.l, Trustee 

C. W. Slick, Trustee 

Dennis I'hl A Co 

Logan Milling Co 

Ale.x. Taggart 

Franklin .MacVeagh & Co 

J.T.ElliottCo 

L. Dieckmann 

.Armour Packing Co «. 

Logansport Creamery Co 

Swift A Co 

Wm. Rowe 

Armour A Co 

W.C. Routh 



Clothing 

Quecnsware 

Cleaning material 

Djspensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Disp nsary supplies 

Di8pensar.v supplies 

Hor.-'eshoeing 

Live stock 

Building hardware 

Building hardware 

Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Tinware and roofs 

Electrical supplies 

Incidental labor 

Lumber 

Vehicles and harness 

Oils 

Gas. 



Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Butter 

Butter 

Eggs, groceries, fruits 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Groceries ■. 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Poultry 

Provender 

Provender 

Gas 

Clothing 

Dry goods 

Kitchen equipment 

Tinware 

Queensware 

Dispensary supplies 

Engine rs supplies 

Painiers" supplies 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Undertaking 

Horseshoeing 

Boots and shoes ._ 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Tools and implements 

Lumber 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Masonry 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Traveling expenses 

Traveling expenses 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs and provender 

Breadstuffs 

Groceries 

Groceries 

(iroceries and eggs 

Butter 

Butter 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats 

Lard 



8127 .io 
66 20 
78 ai 
39 13 
64 38 
:J0 00 
13 24 
13 25 

2.50 00 
17 88 
.^3 39 
12 20 

137 40 
20 85 
48 18 
70 88 
57 a5 

17 15 

324 72 

6:16 66 

2,970 89 

771 97 

11 67 
175 30 

17 .V) 
211 61 
VA 52 

12 24 
2.50 90 
114 54 
116 00 
312 65 

26 50 

32 50 
10 40 
76 32 

10 89 

19 00 

18 00 
387 60 

80 0fJ 
63 2:^ 
99 90 
61 90 

33 20 

11 10 
45 62 
.32 OO 
76(17 

20 00 

12 75 

26 50 

17 92 

18 15 
8 IS 

:» 52 

127 71 

(>4:! 3.'. 

2,972 10 

27 80 

19 60 
289 24 

37 60 

13 70 
98 75 

4.53 76 
151 ■><• 
197 74 

15 60 
825 42 

13 50 
143 52 

33 05 



59 



EXHIBIT No. 3— CoDtinued. 



PAYEK 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



53i» I F.W.Kinney 

510 American iV ('(intinental SanitasCo. 

541 Will. Ilepiie & Sons 

542 1*. V(in Sdmaek & Sons 

54:< W.H. Maxwell 

.544 Snider A- Alber 

.545 ' H. J. ("rismond 

546 ; W. II. Thomas & Co 

547 Beckman & Co 

548 ( Wiler & Wise 

54!" i Daniel Stewart Co 

550 i Parke, Davis A Co 

551 i Henry Tucker 

552 Casparis Stone Co 

;>5:i j Wm . B. Burfonl 

554 Central Union Telephone Co 

555 I Logansport i Wabash ^'alleyGas Co. 

556 1 G.A.Scliaefer 

557 : Clemens Schloss 

V,8 P. Henderson & Co 

•>■>'.• 13. A. Stevens 

".f-U A.Burdsal Co 

'••il Stevens Bros 

•">iVj Bridge City Construction Co 

•"Hi3 Uinton tt Graf 

■>tvt E. S. Rice & Son 



Poultry 

Cleaning material. 
ClcaninK material . 
Cleaning material . 
CleaninK material. 

(Queens ware 

Tinware. 



Clothing 

Bedding 

I Clothing 

Dispensary supplies 

Dist>ensary supplies 

: Harness 

j Roads and walks 

I Postage 

j Telephone service 

Gas 

Horseshoeing 

i Boots and shoes 

! Trees, jilants and shrubbery . 

Trees, plants and shrubbery . 

Painters' supplies 

1 Lumber 

Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Building hardware 



Total . 



«8 54- 

(55 fit 

84 74 

20 00 

10 40 

6.S 51 

411 78 

387 58 

175 00 

108 06 

36 18 

17 46 

t» 15 

6« 02 

40 00 

20 W) 

419 28 

7 25 

9 15 

43 33 

-r, oo 

4!> 2;^ 

ii4 :i5 

3 70 

3 70 

24 05 



890,0C0 OO 



Appropriation . 
I)isbursements 



$90,000 00 
iiO.OOO OO 



I certify that the above is a correct transcript. 
November 25, 1898. 



W. G. Zahht, 

Steward. 



EXHIBIT No. 4. 



Being a List of Disbursements on Account of Maintenance for the Fiscal Year 
Endiwj October SI, 1898. 



PAYKE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



1 1 J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt Officers' pay-roll 

2 J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt j Employes' pay roll 

3 \ .T. (t. Rogers, Medical Supt i Cash for emergent expense 

4 t .1. G. Rogers, Medical Supt ! Contingent fund 

5 ; Swift A Ci> I Fresh and salt meats 

6 i W.C. Routh : Fresh meats 

7 Alex.Taggart ' Breadstiiffs 

8 ' D. Uhl A- Co Breailstuffs 

9 J.H.Foley Breadstuffs 



8636 68 

2,.S.55 80 

245 ."ig 

500 no 

831 89 
22 07 

20 8i 
.357 15 

21 65 



00 



EXHIBIT No. 4— Continued. 



I'AYKK. 



OX ACCOUNT OF. 



A.MnlXT. 



10 

II 
12 
13 

14 I 

15 I 
16 

18 i 
111 ' 
20 
21 ' 
22 
2.? ' 
24 ! 
25 

2e> 

27 

as I 

29 

.30 

31 

32 

3:? I 

34 

3.1 I 

36 

37 i 

SH 

39 

41 ' 

42 ; 

43 : 
44 ; 

45 
46 
47 : 

48 

49 ; 

50 i 

51 ! 

52 ; 

53 I 
64 i 
.55 ' 
56 ' 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
(VI 
63 

m 

65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 

74 I 

75 I 
76 



79 

80 : 
H\ , 
82 I 



Win. Hep pi' A- .Sons 

Morcan Envelope Co 

\V. H.. Maxwell 

SUindiinl Oil Co 

Franklin MiieVeagh <fe Co 

L. Dieckmiinn 

A rniour PackioK Co 

Mills Hros 

.J.T. Elliott Co , 

F. \V. Kinney 

Si lilt hern Fish Co : 

Niitinn.il Linseed Oil Co . : 

Joliii Griiy 

Sfhmiilt A- Heinly 

II. Wiler <V: Co 

VViierA Wise 

Gerts, Lumbard & Co 

Snider A: Allier 

Wm.H.Burford 

Ilaniel Stewart Co 

Ben. Fisher 

Central Eleetric Co 

J . T. Flanegio 

LoRansport Mutual Telepho e Co . . 

E. S. Rir-e & Son 

<T. A. Sehaefcr 

J. A . Ainan 

Parker & Johnston 

Lot,'.in.«p«rt & Wabash Valley Gus Co 

Parke County Coal Co 

Walker & Rauch 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

.I.e. Rogers, Medical Supt 

W.C.Routh 

Armour .V: Co .w 

Swift i Co 

Taggart tt .Johnson 

J.H. Foley 

D. Uhl \-Co 

Franklin MacVeagh & Co 

II.. I. Heinz Co 

.I.T. KlliottCo 

L. Diecktnann 

Armour Packing Co 

L.B.Custer 

Southern Fish Co 

F. W. Kinney 

D. C. Osborne 

Snider S: Alber 

E.G. Hill & Co 

P. Henderson it '"o 

.1. 1). Ferguson it Jenks 

.John Gray 

C. W.SeyboM A Bros 

H..I. Crisniond 

H.WilerA Co 

Ash it Had ey 

Wilerit Wise i 

Ben Fisher i 

Daniel Stewart Co I 

Whitall.Tatu-ii ife Co ! 

Win. Hepr'" it Sons I 

Standard Oil Co 

E. S.Rie»& Son 

W..J. Harnett I 

Wm. R. Rurford ! 

J. 'r. Flanegin 

L'lgansport it Wabash Valley Gas Co! 

Clemens Sehloss ' 

Walter Maibon i 

Wilson, Humphreys & Co j 

Henry Tucker I 



Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Clean ng material and oils 

(iroceries 

Eggs and groceries 

Butter 

Vegetables . . , 

Groceries 

Poultry 

Fish 

Provender 

Clothing 

Clothing 

House furnishing 

House furnishing 

House furnishing 

House furnishing 

Blank books.stationery and printing 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Electrical supplies 

' inware 

Tele '■ hone service 

Hardware 

Hor.-eshoeing 

Blacksniithing 

Lumber 

Gas 

Fuel 

Boo's and shoes 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Ca=h for emergent expenses 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats 

Rreadstuffs • 

Breadstuffd 

Brealstuff^ 

(Groceries 

Grocerie'' 

Groceries 

Eggs and groceries 

Butter 

Fresh fruit 

Fish 

Fresh fish and oysters 

•Vegetables 

Queensware 

Irees, i)lants and shrubbery 

Trees, plants and shrubbery 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Clothing 

House furnishings 

House furnishings 

Furniture 

Dry goods 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Tools and implements 

Undertaking 

Blank books. stationery and printing 

Kitchen equipment 

(}as 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Amusements 

Haraess 



SI 16 62 
31 2.5 
3 75 
9t> 17 
119 (N» 
119 74 
19S 26 
217 29 
456 92 

10 «9 
24 00 

23 00 
(U 85 

119 59 
H 25 

8 00 
22 20 
•22 68 

lilt 27 

15 17 

11 78 

16 50 

10 15 

6 25 

12 32 
15 50 

7 ii 

5 30 
6J3 2-3 
211 9.5 

44 75 

ivW 66 

2,794 17 

177 04 

9 45 
.H<11 12 
171 24 

21 i5 

11 15 
410 4<> 
119 00 

19 2!t 
869 &8 
152 .57 
210 88 

67 .50 

24 00 

6 40 
548 77 
114 95 

22 01 
24 T.i 

145 50 

23 45 
47 65 

5 50 

17 15 
44 50 

15.5 77 

7 40 
1(1 75 
27 32 

100 11 
m 61 
11 51 
.34 0<i 
82 43 

8 :« 

903 24 

6 .35 
• 46 75 

9 00 
5 40 



fil 



EXHIBIT Ko. 4— Coutiuued. 



PAYEE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



A. MOUNT. 



'.V 

ill 

9.S 
91 
!6 
W 
97 
98 
9',) 
100 
101 
10-J 

lo: 

lO-l 

10.5 

IMti 

HIT 
l(i8 
10.' 
110 
HI 
112 
11.5 
114 
ll.i 
IH) 
117 
lis 

110 
IL'O 

121 

l-JJ 

12:^ 
124 
12.'> 
1211 
127 
12.S 
120 
130 
1*1 
1:12 
ViS 
l:U 
1.35 
1.36 
137 
1:58 
L31» 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
14-5 
14*5 
147 
148 
149 
1.50 
151 
1.52 
1.53 
1.54 
155 



Eiirl .Stewart 

Holbrunerit Uhl 

G. A. Sc'hncrer 

J.G. Kf.jrers, .Meili.-ii! f^upt 

J. G. Ropers, .Meilical Supt 

.1 . (i. Kiiuero, Modioal Supt 

(". W. Slick, Tru.^tce 

.1. U. Koloy 

Alc.v. TiiKtrart — 

Lngiin .Mill ins Co 

W.C. Kouth 

Armour A' Co 

Southern Fish Co 

F. W. Kinney 

.I.T. Elliott Co 

Ij. Diei'kmann 

D.C. Heatty 

Ii0eansi>ort Creamery Co 

Frieilnmn Manufaeturing Co 

D.Uhl A- Co 

Fcreii.<on A: .Jcnks 

AV iler A' \V ise 

H.VViler&Co 

E . S . H ice A' Son 

I.N. Crawford 

J . T Flaiieerin 

S' ider A- .\lber 

Standard Oil Co 

Wni. Ileppe A Sons 

W. H.Porter 

.lohn Wyeth A Bros 

Ben Fi.'iher 

Lotrau.sport A Wabash Valley Gas Co 

Parke County Coal Co 

(J. A. Schaefcr 

A. W. Steven? 

Logansport Mutual Telephone Co.. 

Central rnionTelepbone Co 

Steven.'ion A Klinsii-k 

Win. B. Burford 

J.G. Rogers, Medi al Supt 

.f . (t. Rosers, Medtra! Supt 

J. (i. Roper^, Medical Supt 

.\rniour A Co 

W.C.Routh 

Swift A Co 

Mill." Bros 

Southern Fish Co 

F. W. Kinney 

Friedman Manufacturing Co 

Lofransport Creamery Co 

J. T. Elliott Co 

H..J. Heinz Co 

Franklin Ma'-Veaprh A Co 

r>.Uhl A Co 

National Linseed Oil Co 

.T.H.Foley 

L. Diei'kniann 

Standard Oil Co 

Wui. Heppe A Sons 

Modoc Soap Co 

P. VanSchaack and Sons 

Terre Haute Di-tilling Co 

Whitall.Tatum A Co 

Parke, Davis A Co • 

(^ueen A Ci 

Bau.-ch A Lomb Optical Co 

■John (!ray 

G . W. Seybolil A Bros 

Wiler A Wise 

W.M.Graffis 

H.C.Willey 

Buckeye Electric Co 



Vehicles 

Vehicles 

Ilorsoshoeing 

Ollicors' payroll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emcrseut expenses j 

Traveling expenses I 

Breads tuffs : 

Hreadstuffs I 

lireadsMiffs j 

Fresh meats j 

Fresh and salt meats and lard 

Fish 

Fish, oysters and poultry 

(iroc ries; 

(iroceries and eggs 

Fresh Iruit j 

Butter 

Butter 

Provender 

Clothing 

Dry goods 

House furnishing 

Hardw.ire '. . 

Tools a ikI implements 

House furni.>'hing 

Queens ware 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies I 

Dispensary supplies 1 

Gas I 

Fuel I 

Horseshoeing 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Teh'phone service ■ 

Telephone service 

Boot': and shoes | 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Oflficers' pay-roll I 

Employes' pay-roll 

Ca'h for emergent expenses 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats and lard 

Sa 1 1 meats 

Fresh fish and oyst-rs 

Fresh fish and oysters 

(Xvsters and jioultry 

Butter 

Butter 

Groceries 

(Jropcries 

( ! roceries 

Breadstuff< 

Provender 

Breadstuffs 

Egg- 

Oils 

Cleaning materjal 

Cleaning material 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supidies 

Dispensary supplies 

Pathological and surgical ef|uipm'nt 
Pathological and surgical e<iuipm'nt 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Dry goods 

Boots a nd shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Electrical supplies 



820 fJO 
.59 05 
8 25 
0.36 66 
2,761 22 
297 16 

20 50 
7 00 

29 50 
362 34 
18^5 43 
H.59 31 

30 00 
45 63 

517 57 

140 81 

7 .50 

12 80 
iOO 84 

19 SO 

7 50 
8!) 88 

8 31 

4 46 

5 25 

31 00 
34 Zi 
29 30 
58 58 
10 50 

22 33 
795 

913 56 
317 84 

21 00 
4 55 

21 25 
19 50 
.37 40 

17 P8 
636 68 

2,721 42 

167 50 

(111 13 

236 28 

106 20 

2.5 05 

24 00 

19 01 

214 48 

16 00 

129 08 

24 72 

424 17 

.306 59 

23 50 

18 05 
91 33 
82 16 
S4 36 
.3;} 00 
60 75 
12 73 
29 08 
:J0 00 
.54 91 
29 &5 
10 63 

8 58 
lOi" -55 

16 75 
210 60 

82 00 



62 



EXHIBIT No. 4-Coniiuued. 



PAYKK. 



US Aourxr OF. 



AMOUNT. 



I 

156 liOgMii.A- Wabiish Valley QasCo. 

157 I'urkf County Coal Co 

158 Parker A; Johnston 

15tt I. N.Crawford 

160 E..^. Kite A Son 

161 Wni. B. Burford 

162 Snider A All.er 

163 .I.T. Flaiiofrin 

164 J. (t. KoKcrs, Medical Supt 

165 J. G. Kosrers. Medieal Supt 

166 J. li. Roger.'!, Medical Supt 

167 W.C. Kouth 

168 Swift A Co 

169 Armour A- Co 

170 LoEan Milling Company 

171 D.Uhl 1-Co 

172 J.H.Foley 

17.i H.J. Heinz Co 

174 Franklin MacVeagh & Co 

175 J. T.Elliott Co 

176 Wui. Hci'pe <fe Son 

177 Friedman ManufacturingCo 

17S Lotran. Creamery Co 

17:' F. W. Kiitnev 

ISO Southorn Fish Co 

181 Wilson. Humphrey.' & Co 

]H2 John F. Coulson 

183 i Ben Fisher 

184 I John tiray 

185 I Snider A Alber 

186 Wm.B. Burforil 

187 i E.S.Kice A Son 

188 The Pantasote Co 

18it H. Wiier A-Co 

190 J. T. Flanegin 

191 Knight A .F.llson 

Iii2 Kroesrer & Strain 

193 Lofran. A Wabash Valley Gas Co. 

1V4 H.S.Munlock 

195 Parker A .Johnston 

litfi L.G. Patterson 

197 ' O. A. Schaefer 

198 J.C. Vaughan 

199 P. Henderson A Son 

200 J. <i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

201 J. <;. Ropers. Medical Supt 

202 J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

20:^ C. W. Slick. Trustee 

204 James O'Donnell 

205 Bon Fisher 

206 Kan id Stewart Co 

207 D.lhl A Co 

208 J. H. Foley 

209 F. B. Lux 

210 J.T. Elliott Co 

211 W. H. Maxwell 

212 Swift A Co 

213 Logansport Creamery Co 

214 W.C Routh 

215 Swift A Co 

216 Armour A Co 

217 ' Ti. Oieckniann 

218 F.W. Kinney 

219 Southern Fish Co 

220 , Standard Oil Co 

221 William Heppc & .Son 

222 Otto Shoe an.l Clothing Co 

223 Clemens Schloss 

224 John Gray 

225 (}. A. .Sehaefcr 

226 Logan. Mutual Telephone Co 

227 Central Union Telephone Co 

228 1 Erie Oil Works 



Gas 

Fuel 

Lumber 

Tools and implements 

T<>(ds and implements 

Blank books, stationery and print's. 

Queens ware 

Tinware 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats and eggs 

Salt meats 

Breadstuff's 

Breadstuffs and provender 

Breadstuffs 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Butter 

Butter 

Poultry and oysters 

Fish 

Cleaning material 

Dispensary supidies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dry goods 

Queens ware 

Blank books, stationery and print'g. 

Hardware 

Furniture 

House furnishing 

Kitchen equipment 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Undertaking 



Boots and shoes 

Lumber 

Insurance 

Horseshoeing 

Seeds 

Seed-! 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash lor emergent e:!cpenEes 

Traveling expense' 

Traveling expenses 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Breadstuffs ami provender. . 

BrtaiistuCFs and groceries 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Butter 

Butter 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Fresh and salt meats 

Eggs 

Fish and poultry 

Fish 

Cleaning matt rial 

Cleaning material 

Boot.s and shoPS 

Boots and shoes 

Dry goods 

Horseshoeing 

Telephone service 

Telephone service 

Engineers' supplies 



J751 44 
5s 75 

6 00 

5 45 

7 19 

31 16 
Z> 62 

11 59 
636 66 

2,702 93 
1.56 05 
167 05 
>m ,58 
103 25 

12 98 
331 25 

•23 15 

36 89 
5*8 68 

534 28 

94,59 

202 60 

17 00 

16 56 
24 00 

32 09 

6 60 
9 .3'> 

1-25 23 
48 15 
24.39 

3il5 
42 0.) 
72 45 

6 15 

18 20 

10 00 
633 36 

11 00 
5 58 

37 50 
24 25 
44 02 
15 62 

636 66 

2,>>56 12 

305 66 

17 70 
900 

5 80 
34 95 

400 98 
1H95 

129 60 

2S8 32 
57 55 

178 00 

19 00 
9 69 

500 46 

.303 01 

77 40 

8 6:^ 
:«) 00 
M 10 
itO 60 

18 35 

9 30 
116 96 

9 75 

6 26 
6 45 

.37 92 



63 



EXHIBIT No. 4— Continued. 



PAYEE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



A.MulNT. 



22it Logan, iind Wubash Valley Gas Co 

2^0 E. S. Ri(!e & Son 

231 Star Milk Cooler Co ...: 

2.52 Snider A- Alber 

i'iS J.T. Flanegin 

2.34 .J. W. Henderson & Son 

23.-. W. 11. Thomas A Co 

236 Mill.-; Bros 

2:M Kreis Bros. Manufacturing Co 

238 .).<;. Roger.*. .Medical Supt 

2;<9 J. (i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

240 J. (i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

241 S.P. Lont/ 

242 Southern Fish Co 

24:^ F. \V. Kinney 

244 Logan Milling Co 

2r> C. L.DilleyA-Co 

241". J. 11. Foley 

247 II. J. Heinz Co 

245 F.B. Lu.\ 

24i» J. T.Elliott Co 

2._i0 William Heppe & Son 

251 Logan. Creamery Co 

252 Swift A Co 

25." Swift & Co 

2;54 W.C. Routh 

2or, Rhodes Bros 

25ti I Wm. B.Burford 

2o7 Knight \- .lillson 

258 I (}. A. Schaefer 

2i9 D. Uhl \- Co 

260 ! Logan, and Wabash Valley Gas Co. 

261 Clemens Schloss 

262 .1. B. Winters 

263 I Snider & Alber 

264 I John (iray 

265 G.H. Wheelock A- Co 

266 Kreis Bros. Mfg. Co 

267 , E. S. Rice & Son 

268 The (ilobc Co 

-69 Ash \- Hadley 

|^"0 W. H. Porter 

2^1 I Terre Haute Distilling Co 

2'2 I P. Van Schaack A: Sons 

273 Parke. Davis & Co 

2^4 Ben Fisher 

2(5 Kroeger it Strain 

276 D.Killian & Co 

j-'S' J. (J. Rogers, Medical Supt 

•^'8 J. U. Rogers, Medical Supt 

2(9 .J. G. Rocers, Medical Supt 

28'> I Rhodes Bros 

281 J.H.Foley 

282 I W.C. Routh 

2-83 SwiU A-Co 

284 ! H.J. Heinz. Co 

2&5 ! F. B.Lu.x 

286 J.T.EIHottCo 

287 I Standard Oil Co 

'-^ 1 Wm. Heppe & Son 

289 P. Van Schaack & Son 

2W • Southern Fish Co 

291 Logansport Creamery Co 

292 Swit;t.t Co 

•r^"' F.W.Kinney 

2^4 J. A. Ainan 

295 I Bridge City Construction Co 

2yt> ! H.J.Crisraond 

'■^' H.Wiler A- Co 

298 J.T Flanegin 

2i'9 i E. S. Rice & Son 

-^00 Ashi Hadley 

•301 Ben Fisher 



Gas 

Tools and implements ., 

Kitchen equipment 

ti'ieeiisware 

'1 in ware 

Furniture 

Clothing 

Seeds 

Seeds 

Ottieers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Eggs 

Fish 

Fish and oysters 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuffs 

Groceries 

(iJroceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Butter 

Butter 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats and lard 

Provender 

Blank liooks. stationery and print'g. 

Kitchen eiiuipment 

Horseshoeing 

Seeds 

Gas 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

House furnishing 

Dry goods 

Queens ware 

Tools and implements 

Tools and implements 

Furniture 

Furniture 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Undertaking 

Undertaking 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Breadstuffs and provender 

<Troccries 

Fresh meats 

Fresh and salt meats and eggs 

Groceries 

(Jroceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Fish 

Butter 

Butter 

Poultry 

Blacksmithing 

Undertaking 

Tinware 

House furnishing 

Tinware 

Tools and implements 

Furniture 

Dispensary supplies 



8500 04 

7 05 

40 68 

16 72 

7 42 

825 

60 53 

36 00 

7 50 
1)36 68 

2.624 • 9 
l:'.2 iV) 

128 t)3 

24 00 

8 47 

14 25 
271 82 

15 03 

25 41 

129 60 
.■«35 91 

6(J 00 

18 10 

180 00 

642 26 

162 42 

62 60 

79 75 

13 25 

13 I 
5 50 

439 68 
5 65 

24 00 
55 08 
87 00 
77 18 
10 00 
22 25 
43 88 
20 00 

26 28 

16 12 
12 45 
30 00 

5 04 

10 00 
20 00 

676 66 
2,6:i9 25 

296 33 

390 00 
22 93 
15 0* 

894 65 

25 08 
129 60 
402 36 

.35 32 
81 45 
22 00 
24 00 
18 40 
204 00 
4 17 

17 84 

11 5."i 

12 70 

18 70 
18 15 

14 43 
•23 00 
11 00 



64 



EXHIBIT No. 4-CoDtiuued. 



I'AVKi-:. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



:t02 
.104 

•.m 

.S06 
.3(»7 
303 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
316 
317 
318 
3UI 
320 
321 
322 
.S2-H 
324 
Sa'i 
.326 
327 
.328 
329 
330 
331 
:«2 
3;53 
XU 
3:V, 
;«6 
;«7 
338 

a-59 

.340 
341 
342 
3(3 
344 
■Mr> 
.346 
347 
348 
349 
:<50 
351 

:«2 
353 
354 
355 
.•tt6 
357 
358 
%9 
360 
361 
:i62 
36:i 
364 
3<W 
36() 
367 
368 
369 
370 
371 
372 
37.3 
374 



1 li. A. Sflinefor 

Wulkcr .V HiiiK-h 

W. H Tlioi0ii8it Co 

! liiiiit'. Kvans & Co 

Joli !i ( I rny 

' Snider A- Alber 

J. (i. RdffCTs, Merliciil Supt 

, .1. (J. Rogers, Me'licnl Sui)t 

: J. (!. Roffors, Medii'dl .Supt 

i C. W. Slick. Trustee 

I W.C.Routh 

I Swift & Co 

I LoRnn iMilling Co 

D. Uhl .t Co 

I W.E. Ilurd 

j Logansport Creiimery Co 

; Armour Pncking Co 

; Southern Fish Co 

' .J.ll.l--olcy 

H..r. Hfiiiz Co 

J.T. KlliottCo 

. Troy Laundry Miic-hinery Co 

i Wilson, Humphreys & Co 

i The liecknian Co 

i John Gray 

H'erKuson & Jenks 

i AVilor .V Wise 

: (}. W. Seybold & Bros :. 

Buhl Stamping Co 

Snider i Alber 

Montgomery Ward Sc Co 

j .J.T. Flanegin 

I E.S. Rice & Son 

Ash .VHadley 

(J. .'V. Schaefer 

] Logansport & Waljash Valley Gas Co, 

E. D. Closson, agent 

Walter Maiben 

W.H. Thomas & Co 

Krocger & Strain 

Ben Fisher 

Parke, Davis i Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

I .1. <i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

i .T. (i. Rogers, Medical Supt 

' .1. ti. Rogers, Medical Supt 

I D.Uhl A- Co 

; .1.11. Foley 

; Logansport Creamery Co 

j Armour Packing Co 

Swift ct Co 

W. C. Routh 

Armour it Co 

Mills Bros 

Southern Fish Co 

L. Dieekmann 

Parke, Davis X- Co 

Daniel .Stewart Co 

Wilson, Humphreys & Co 

Bon Fisher 

J.T Elliott Co 

Troy Launilry Machinery Co 

S'nndard Oil Co 

The I'antasotcCo 

Ash it llaiiloy 

Snider A' Alber 

.Sliroyer .t I'hl Co 

Smith A: Davis Maufacturing Co 

Wiler A- Wise 

Wm. B.Bnrford 

Casparis Stone Co 

A. W. S'evens 

J. B.Clow &bon 



Horseshoeing 

Boots au'l shoos 

Bedding ; 

Clothing 

Dry goods 

House furnishing 

Oflieers' pay-r<dl 

Emnloyes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses.. . 

Traveling expense? 

Fresh me ts 

Fresh and salt meats and eggs 

Breadstufl's 

Breadstuff's 

Provender 

Butter 

Butter 

Fresh fish 

Groceries 

(■ifoceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Bedding 

Bedding 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Napery 

Kitchen ei|uipment 

Oueensware 

Tinware 

Tinware 

Hardware 

Furniture 

Horseshoeing 

Gf 



Insurance 

Boots and shoes 

Boots and shoes 

Undertaking 

Painters' supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Oflficers' pay-roll 

Emiiloyes' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses 

Breadstuff's 

(iroceries 

Butter 

Butter 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Salt meats 

Vegetables 

Fresh fish 

Kggs 



Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies : .. 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary su I plies 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Furniture 

Furniture 

House furnishing 

Hosiery 

Bedding 

Dry goods 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Roads hnd walks 

Steam , water and gas fitting 

Steam, water and gas fitting 



65 



EXHIBIT No. 4— Coutiuued< 



PAYEE. 



:i7o 
376 
:577 
378 
379 
380 
381 
382 
38:5 
384 
38.5 
.386 
387 
388 
389 
.390 
391 
392 
393 
394 
39o 
396 
397 
398 
399 
400 
401 
402 
40:5 
404 
4ft5 
406 
407 
408 
409 
410 
411 
412 
41:; 
414 
415 
416 
417 
US 
419 
420 
421 
422 
424 
424 
425 
426 
427 
428 
429 
430 
431 
432 
433 
434 
4&5 
436 
437 
4:'>s 
439 
440 
441 
442 
44:5 
444 
445 
446 
447 



[ E. S. Rice & Son 

J. T. Flanegin 

C. A. fScliieren A Co 

G. A. Schiiefer 

Logiinsjiort it W'aWash Valley Gas Co, 

Central Union Telephone Co 

Stevenson A- Klinsick 

Parker X- .lohnston 

j Daniel Killian & Co 

J. A. Anian 

j J. G. Rogers, .Medical Supt 

J. ti. Rogers, Medical Supt 

W.C.Routh 

Armour A: Co 

I Parke , Davis & Co 

West Disinfei'ting Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

! Bausch & Lomb Optical Co 

! D. rhl ct Co 

i Southern Fish Co 

I Logansport (dreamery Co 

i Armour Packing Co 

[ Louis Dieckmann 

I Weeks Bros 

I J.H. Foley 

I H..T. Heinz Co 

J. T.Elliott Co 

' P. VanSehaaok &Sons 

' Wm. lleppe & Sons 

i Troy Laundry Machinery Co 

I Lease Soap Co 

I -Standard Oil Co 

; G.A\^Seybold& Bros 

I H.Wiler A-Co 

Helvie A: Sellers 

W.H. Thomas & Co 

Wiler A Wise 

The Duck Brand Co 

.John Gray 

G. A. Schaefer 

Logansport Mutual Te'ephone Co . . . 

Logan sport A Wabash Valley Gas Co , 

Wm.B.Burford 

.1. T. Flanegin 

Snyder A Alber 

Barbpe Wire and Iron Works 

E.S.Rice A Son 

The Globe Publishing Co 

W.M.Graffis 

Hartford Steam Boiler Insp.&Ins.Co 

Kroeger A Str.iio 

Parker A Johnston 

J. B. Clow & Son 

C.L.Dilley A Co 

Jos. A. .A man 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Snpt 

J. G Rogers, Medical Supt 

C. W^ Slick, Trustee 

.Jas.O'Donnell 

Dennis llhl A Co 

L. Dieckmann 

J.H.Foley 

W.C.Routh 

Armour A Co 

Daniel Stewart Co 

Ben Fisher 

Swift A Co 

Southern Fish Co 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

Logansport Creamery Co 

J.T ElliottCo 

F. MaeVeagh A Co 

W.H.Thomas & Co 

5 — Northern Insane. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



Tools and implements 
Tools and implements 
Engineers' supplies.. 

Horseshoeing 

Gas 

Telephone service 

Boots and shoes 

Lumber 

Undertaking 

Blacksmithing 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll ... 

Fresh meats 

Fresh and salt meats. 
Dispensary sut)plies. . 
Dispensary supplies.. 
Dispensary supplies.. 
Pathological and surgical oquipment 

Provender 

Fish 

Butter 

Butter 

Eggs 

Breadstuffs 

Breadstuflfs 

Groceries 

Groceries 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

Cleaning material 

House furnishing 

House furnishing 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Bedding 

Bedding. 

Horseshoeing . ._ 

Telephone service 

Gas 

Blank books, stationery and printing 

Tinware 

Queensware 

Building hardware 

Building hardware 

Books 

Boots and shoes 

Insurance 

Undertaking 

Lumber 

Steam, water and gas fitting 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Blacksmithing 

Officers' pay-roll 

Employes' pay-roll 

Traveling expenses 

Traveling expenses 

Breadstuflfs 

Fresh fruit 

Groceries 

Fresh meats 

Fresh meats 

Dispensary supplies 

Dispensary supplies 

Salt meats 

sh 



AMOUNT. 



Butter 

Butter 

Groceries 

Groceries «. 

Clothing 



iJh 



EXHIBIT Ko. 4— Continued. 



PAYBK. 




AMOUNT. 



( I 

44>» John liriiy | 

My J.T.FIanepin 

450 Stevenson A Klinsiek 

151 Snider \ Alber 

452 Yale \ Towne .Mf^.Co 

453 E.S. Rice A Son 

4^ J. W. Henderson A Sons 

456 Montgomery Ward Jt Co 

456 WoU A- Barnett 

457 Loifunsport A' Wab.Hsh Valley Gas Co. 
45S Maxiukuekee Lake Ice Co 

459 Parker A Johnston 

460 J.C.Barrett 

461 Central Union Telephone Co 

462 Logansport Mutual Telephone Co . 
465 American Electric Telephone Co — 

464 Wm.B.Burford 

465 J. C. Vaughan 

466 Ind. Rubber and Insulated Wire Co. 

467 Troy Laundry Machinery Co 

46S Geo. T. Johnson 

Total . 



Dry ^fods 

Tinware 

Boots and shoes 

Oueensware 

BuildiuK hardware ] 

Buililing hardware i 

Furniture 

Tools and implemenUi 

Undertaking j 

Gas ' 

Ice { 

Lumber ' 

Live .■'tock ' 

Telephone service 

Telephone service 

Telephone 

Blank books, stationery and printing. 

Trees, plants and shrubbery 

Electrical supplies 

Cleaning material 

Cle.iniue material 



$70 88 
73 5« 

l&i 00 
65 21 
32 88 
21 96 
18 00 
37 15 
10 00 

396 50 
43 00 
67 ."» 

47.S 00 
6 00 
6 -Ir) 



VJOO 
50 84 
31 00 



«90,000 00 



Appropriation ISOjOOO 00 

Disbursements . 'XfiOO 00 



I certify that tbe above is a correct transcript. 
November 25, 1898. 



W. G. Zahrt, 

Steuxird. 



EXHIBIT Xo. 5. 



BALANCE SHEET. 



APPROPRIATION FOR REPAIRS. 
For the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 189S. 



Appropriation of 1897 

VTages 

Lumber 

Hardware 

Gla.-'s 

Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Painters' supplies 

Electrical supplies 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Sewers and drains 

Masonry 

Roof, 

Paper hanging 

Tile floors 



Ily425 19 

594 81 
121 26 

74 45 
739 76 
157 SI 

4.? * 
l.\3 .^3 

;<2 S.S 

191 90 

i:« S2 

18 00 

201 6t 



14,500 00 



ToUl »l,500 00 



14,500 00 



67 



EXmiilT No. 6. 



Being a lAd of Di^ursements on Account of Repairs for the Fiscal Year 
Endintj October -//, /.S'.W. 



PAYEE. 



OX ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



8 

10 

11 

12 

1.3 

U 

1.5 

16 

17 

U 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

•24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 t 

.30 

31 i 

.32 

3.3 ! 

34 I 

354 

36 I 

37 ! 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
4.5 1 

48 

49 j 

50 I 

51 i 
52 
53 I 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
.59 



.T. (t. Roper.", Medioal Supt 

J. <i. RoKcrs, Medi'^al Supt .• 

Knight & .Jillsoii 

Parker .t J(«hn.ston 

J. U. Rogers, Medical Supt 

E.S. Rife & Son 

.Stevens Bro.* 

•f. G. Roeer.s, Meiiii-al Supt 

[nd. Rubber and Insulated Wire Co. 

I. X. Crawford 

A. Burdsal Co 

W.H.Stewart 

.I.T. Flancgin 

Parker A .Johnston 

E. S. lii'-e & Son 

A. W. Stevens 

.1. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

Stevens Bros 

Parker & .Tohnston 

A. Burd.-al Co 

E.S.Rice & Son 

J. T. Flanegin 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Roger.^, Medioal Supt 

J. T. Flanegin 

National Linseed Oil Co 

.1. G. Rogers. Medical Supt 

Parker & .Johnston 

Stevens Bros 

E.S. Hice A- Son 

Standard Oil Co 

.I.T. Flanegin 

J. B. Clow &Son 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Roger.s, Medical Supt 

Yale <t Towne Manufacturing Co 

E. S. Rice A- Son 

Parker ic .Johnston 

Thomjison Lumber Co 

C. L. Dilley A: Co 

A. Burdsal Co 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

.1. (t. Roger.-:, Medical Supt 

Knight & Jillson 

C. L.Dilley Jc Co 

E. S. Rice Jt- Son 

J. T. Flanegin 

Electric Appliance Co 

Stevens Bros 

Thompsiin Lumber Co 

Logansport Wall Paper Co 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

J. G. Rogers, Medical Supt 

A. W. Stevens 

J. T. Flanegin 

Terre Haute Brick and Pipe Co 

C. L.Dilley & Co 

Barbee Wire and Iron Works 

E.S.Rice &Son 



Mechanics' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expen.-'es . 
Steam, water and gas fitting . 

Lumber 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Building hardware 

Lumber 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Electrical supplies 

Hardware 

Painters' supplies 

Roofs 

Roofs 

Lumber 

Glass 

Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Jjumber 

Lumber 

Painters' supplies 

Hardware 

Roofs 

Mechanic.-;' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses . 

Roofs 

Painters' supplies , 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Lumber 

Lumber 

Hardware 

Painters' supplies 

Roofs 

Steam, water and gas fitting . 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses . 

Hardware 

Hardware 

Lumber 

Jjumber 

Sewers and drains 

Painters' supplies 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses . 
Steam, water and gas fitting . 

Sewers and drains 

Hardware 

Roofs 

Electrical supplies 

Lumber 

Lumber 

Paper hanging 

Mechanics' pay-roll 

Cash for emergent expenses.. 
Steam, water and gas fitting. 

Roofs 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Brick, lime, cement, etc 

Hardware 

Hardware 



8141 
7 
7 

18 

146 

7 

40 

1.55 

10 

1 

37 

17 

15 

45 

4 

138 
:',6 
10 
31 
9 
.33 

1:^6 
13 
4 
29 

138 

40 

26 

5 

4 

.50 
18 

185 

12 

16 

7 

39 

13 

6 

.56 

183 
19 

211 
19 
12 
10 
.33 
.30 
25 
18 

199 
3:i. 
7 
7 

108 
20 
34 
17 



t)» 



EXHIBIT No. 6— Continued. 



1 



e 
> 


PAYEE. 


ON ACCOUNT OF. 


AMOUNT. 


(in 


8cott Price 

Jus. Leffel A Co 

U. S. Encaustic Tile Works 


Masonry 


S191 90 


61 


Steam, water and gas fitting 

Tile floors 


440 00 
807 (>4 


6S 


Lumber 

aiass 


266 11 


04 


E. S. Rice i Son 


70 88 




Total 






W,500 00 










Appropriation $4,500 00 

Disbursements 4,500 Oil 



I certify that the above is a correct transcript. 
November 25, 1898. 



W. G. Zabrt, 

Steward. 



EXHIBIT No. 7. 



BALANCE SHEET. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATION OF 18W FOR GOLD STORE. 
For the Fiscal Year Ending October -U, 18-97. 



Special appropriation of 1897 

Galvanized iron work 

Lumber 

Paints 

Hardware 

Masonry 

Glass 

Cement Doors 

Pipe fittinK 

Brick work 

Tin roofing 

Equipment 



«1,000 00 



Total .".., $1,000 00 $1,000 00 




69 



EXHIBIT No 8. 



Being a List of Disbursements on Account of Special Appropriation of 1891 
for Cold Store for Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1897. 



PAYEE. 



UN ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



Scott E. Price Masonry 

J. B. Clow k. Sons Pipe lilting 

Nil tioniil Sheet Metal Roofing Co Tin roofing 

Steven.'! Brcis Luinljcr 

U.J. Crismond Galvanized iron work 

A. Hurdsal Co Paints 

Parker k. Johnston Lumber 

I. N. (.'rawfonl Hardware and insulating paper 

Knifrht k, Jillson Pipe fitting 

E. S. Rice A: Son (Jlass and hardware 

Scott E. Price Cement floors 

Chas. Barnes Brick work 

David Miller Brick work 

J. W. Moyer Equipment 



Total. 



S98 67 

24 29 

118 80 

495 .'52 

44 79 

10 72 

28 63 

26 39 

13 27 

15 27 

34 00 

4 55 

2 60 

S2 50 

$1,000 00 



Appropriation . 
Disbursements 



$1,000 00 

1,000 00 



I certify that the above is a correct transcript. 



November 25, 1898. 



W. G. Zahrt, 

Steward. 



EXHIBIT No. 9. 



BALANCE SHEET. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATION OF 1897 FOR WALKS. 
F(yr the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1897. 





$1,237 80 
.55 51 
101 00 

28 52 
77 17 


$1,500 00 


Brick .. . 
























Total 


$1,500 00 


$1,500 00 







70 



EXHIBIT No. 10. 



Being a List of Disbursements on Account of Special Appropriation of 1807 
for Walks for Fii^ccd Year Ending October SI, 18U7. 



PAYEE. 



ON ACCOUNT OF. 



AMOUNT. 



Wfibash Clay Co 

Terre Haute Brick and Pipe Co. 

Dennis Uhl Jlc Co 

John Harvey 

Gottlieb Schaefer 

C.L.Dilley &Co 

John IJurkhart 

David Miller 

Chas. Barnes 

Sain'l Brentlinger 

AuKiist Brennecke 

Willard Price 



Brick 

Brick 

Drain tile . 

Sand 

Sand 

Cement . .. 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 

Labor 



Total 



r>76 00 

r.61 80 

55 51 

Tfi 00 

25 00 

28 52 

20 00 

18 26 

18 11 

10 00 

945 

1 35 

tl/>00 00 



Appropriation . 
Disbursements, 



IU500 00 
1,'>00 00 



I certify that the above is a correct transcript. 



November 25, 1898. 



W. G. 



Zahrt, 

Steward. 



71 



EXHIBIT No. 11. 



Amounts Charged to Counties for Clothing for the Biennial Period Ending 

October HI, 1S!>s. 



COUNTY. 



18i)(V 



18'.l7-8. 



Allen 

Cass 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Elkhiirt 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Huntington 
.Fasper 



.Jennings ., 
Kosciusko . 
Lagrange .. 

Lake 

Lapoito 

Murion . . . . 
Marshall . 

Miami 

Newton 

Noble 

Orange 

Owen 

Perry 

Porter 

Pulaski... 
Ripley 



Shelby 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. .Joseph . . . . 
Tippecanoe ... 
Vanderburgh . 

Wabash 

White 

Whitley 



Total «3,a50 28 



«9 09 ' 


«9 49 


395 97 


:i44 22 


4 55 


14 00 


133 65 


119 69 


152 n6 


174 53 


121 26 


165 54 


2 23 


8 50 


135 47 


12(i 00 


48 23 


.Vi 63 


22 35 


13 60 


110 a5 


84 59 


25 20 


19 82 


83 60 


t;9 02 


325 3() 


336 68 


17 64 


4 38 


187 47 


192 07 


266 05 
m .53 


259 11 


101 55 


93 67 


109 47 


18 05 


8 75 


25 85 


2;^ 10 


9 95 


5 .35 


• 234 94 


253 18 


55 21 


27 27 


5 05 


13 60 


17 40 


10 95 


108 90 


118 95 


145 .30 


113 90 


2:^8 90 


269 W 


9 65 


2 95 


16 43 


20 79 


73 43 


101 32 


54 70 


88 00 


82 29 


85 14 


«3,a50 28 


$3,a30 78 



72 



EXHIBIT No. 12. 



Products of Fartn and Garden, 1S90-7. 

Apples, 800 pounds, at Ic $8 00 

Apples, crab, 537 pounds, at 3c 16 11 

Asparagus, 1,316 pounds, at 5c 65 80 

Beans, wax, pickled, 30 gallons, at 40c 12 00 

Beans, dried, Lima, 436 pounds, at 4Ac 19 62 

Beans, green, Lima, 1,822 pounds, at 3c 54 60 

Beans, navy, 80 pounds, at 2c . . 1 60 

Beans, string, 5,743 pounds, at 8c 459 44 

Beef, fresh, 1,779 pounds, at 6^c Ill 19 

Beets, table, 1,965 pounds, at Ic 19 65 

Blackberries, 203 quarts, at 8^c 17 26 

Cabbage, early, 18,036 pounds, at 2c 360 72 

Cabbage, summer, 32,266 pounds, at Ic 322 66 

Cabbage, winter, 25.002 pounds, at Ic 250 02 

Cauliflower, 1,196 pounds, at 8c 95 68 

Carrots, 175 pounds, at Ic 1 75 

Celery, 12,306 heads, at 2c 246 12 

Celery, root, 50 pounds, at 10c 5 00 

Cherries, 70 quarts, at 8^c 6 46 

Chervil, 2 pounds, at 18c 36 

Chives, 13 pounds, at 18c 2 34 

Corn, sweet, 4,456 pounds, at Ic • 44 56 

Cucumbers, 2,113 pounds, at 5c 105 65 

Cucumbers, pickles, 880 gallons, at 30c 264 00 

Currants, 04 quarts, at 8^c 5 44 

Dill, 6 pounds, at 40c 2 40 

Eggs, 403 dozen at 13c 52 42 

Egg plant, 252 pounds, at 8c 20 16 

Endive, 123 pounds, at 10c 12 30 

Gooseberries, 83 quarts, at 8^c 7 05 

Grapes, 1,567^ pounds, at 2c 31 35 

Hay, timothy, 95 tons, at S6 570 00 

Horseradish, 802 pounds, at 5c 40 10 

Ice, 1,000 tons, at S2.25 2,250 00 

Leek, 20 pounds, at 12c ... 2 40 

Lettuce, 2,564 pounds, at 10c 256 40 

Milk, 175,734 pounds, at 1 ,\c 2,745 84 



73 

EXHIBIT No. 12— Continued. 

Mint, 60 pounds, at 5c go 00 

Okra, 20 pounds, at 10c 2 00 

Onions, Barletta, 768 pounds, at 3c' 23 04 

Onions, general crop, 3,124 pounds, at Ic 31 24 

Onions, green, 8,844 pounds, at Ic . . 88 44 

Onions, sets, 264 pounds, at lie 29 04 

Parsley, 21 pounds, at oOc 6 30 

Parsnips, 8,329 pounds, at Ic 83 29 

Peas, green, 8,256 pounds, at3}c 268 32 

Peppers, red, 50 pounds, at 20c 10 00 

Peppers, mango, 50 pounds, at 10c 5 00 

Peppers, Sweet Spanish, 55 pounds, at 10c 5 50 

Potatoes, 2,520 pounds, at 1 j^c 42 00 

Potatoes, 4,611 pounds, at l,i,c 61 48 

Potatoes, 4,527 pounds, at l^c 52 81 

Potatoes, 20,524 pounds, at Ic 205 24 

Potatoes, sweet, 1,137 pounds, at 2c 22 74 

Pumpkins, 550 pounds, at ^c 2 75 

Radishes, 2,511 pounds at 3c 75 33 

Raspberries, 214 quarts at 8^c 18 19 

Rhubarb, 2,474 pounds at 3c. ^ 74 22 

Rutabagas, 7,969 pounds at Ic 79 69 

Rye, 24 dozen bundles at 25c 6 00 

Sage, 10 pounds at 10c 1 00 

Salsify, 2,310 pounds at 2c 46 20 

Sauer kraut, 1,040 gallons at 20c 208 00 

Spinach, 1,125 pounds at 8c 9000 

Strawberries, 331 quarts at 8^c 28 13 

Squash, 1,875 pounds at -ic 9 38 

Slimmer savory, 10 pounds at 40c. 4 00 

Sweet marjoram, 40 pounds at 40c ... .... 16 00 

Sweet basil, 10 pounds at 40c 4 00 

Swiss chard, 1,1U0 at 8c 88 00 

Taragon, 10 pounds at 40c • 4 00 

Thyme, 5 pounds at 40c 2 00 

Tomatoes, 24,975 pounds at ^c 124 88 

Tomatoes, Red Pear, 93 pounds at 2c 1 86 

Tomatoes, Yellow Pear, 64 pounds at 2c 1 28 

Turkeys, 485 pounds at 11-^c 55 78 

Turnips, 6,169 pounds at Ic 61 69 

Total $10,428 33 

6 — ^NoRTHERN Insane. 



74 
EXHIBIT No. 18. 



ProducU of Farm and Garden, 1S97-S. 

Apples, crab, 12i pounds at 3c $0 38 

Asparagus, 690 pounds at 5c. . 34 60 

Beans, dried, Lima, 222 pounds at 4c 8 88 

Beans, green Lima, 2,018 pounds, at oc 60 54 

Beans, navy, 200 pounds at 2c 4 00 

Beans, string, 4,895 pounds at 8c 391 60 

Beets, table, 3,651 pounds at Ic 36 51 

Blackberries, 68 quarts at 8jc 5 78 

Cabbage, early, 9,162 pounds at 2c 183 24 

Cabbage, summer, 3,865 pounds at Ic 38 65 

Cabbage,, winter, 73,615 pounds at Ic 736 15 

Cardoon, 450 pounds at 10c 45 00 

Carrots, 4,303 pounds at Ic 43 03 

Cauliflower, 384 pounds at 8c 30 72 

Celeriac. 100 pounds at 18c 18 00 

Celery, 4,300 heads at 2c 86 00 

Cherries, 26 quarts at 8Ac 2 21 

Chervil, 5 pounds at 18c 90 

Chickens, young, 92 at 30c ■ 27 60 

Chives, 10 pounds at 18c 1 80 

Corn, sweet, 9,169 pounds at Ic 91 69 

Cucumbers, 1,583 pounds at 5c. 79 15 

Cucumbers, pickles, 800 gallons at 30c 240 00 

Currants, 123 quarts at 10c 12 30 

Dill, 18 pounds at 40c 7 20 

Ducks, 12 at 50c 6 00 

Eggs, 393 dozen, at 13c 51 09 

Egg plant, 752 pounds at 8c 60 16 

Endive, 50 pounds at 10c 5 00 

Fodder, 50 shocks at 10c 5 00 

Gooseberries, 307 quarts at 8ic 26 10 

Grapes, 7,114 pounds at 2c 142 28 

Horseradish, 73() pounds, at 5c 36 80 

Hay, timothy, 44 tons, at 86 264 00 

Ice, 800 tons, at 82 1,600 00 

Leek, 10 pounds, at 10c 1 00 

Lettuce, 2,737 pounds, at 10c 273 70 

Loofas, 200, at 5c 10 00 

Milk, 159,800J. pounds, at l-j^^c 2,496 88 

Mint, 50 pounds, at 5c 2 50 



75 
EXHIBIT No. 13- Continued. 

Oats, 200 (loz. bundles, at 50c $100 00 

Okra, 35 pounds, at 10c 3 50 

Onions, Barletta, 332 pounds, at 3c 9 96 

Onions, green, 4,068 pounds, at Ic 40 68 

Ouions, "icneral crop, 8,474 pounds, at Ic 84 74 

Onions, sets, 135 pounds, at He 14 85 

Parsley, 200 pounds, at 30c 60 00 

Parsley, root, 200 pounds, at 20c 40 00 

Parsnips, 19,888 pounds, at Ic 198 88 

Peas, green, 3,287 pounds, at 3ic 106 83 

Peppers, celestial, 32 pounds, at 10c 3 20 

Peppers, kaleidoscope, 66 pounds, at 20c 13 20 

Peppers, mango, 37 pounds, at lOc 3 70 

Pumpkins, 1,506 pounds, at ic 7 53 

Potatoes, 3,638 pounds, at l^-c 48 50 

Potatoes, 11,212 pounds, at- l^c 130 80 

Potatoes, 52,918 pounds, at nc 352 79 

Radishes, 4,160 pounds, at 3c 124 80 

Raspberries, 419 quarts, at 8^ 35 61 

Rhubarb, 3,693 pounds, at 3c 110 79 

Rutabagas, 2,200 pounds, at Ic 22 00 

Rye, 100 doz. bundles, at 25c 25 00 

Sage, 10 pounds, at 10c 1 00 

Salsify, 2,100 pounds, at 2c 42 00 

Saner kraut, 1,000 gallons, at 20c; 200 00 

Spinach, 1,141 pounds, at 8c 91 28 

Squash, 14,059 pounds, at ^c 70 29 

Strawberries, 1,778 quarts, at 8|c 151 13 

Summer savory, 10 pounds, at 40c 4 00 

Swiss chard, 4,337 pounds, at 6c 260 22 

Sweet marjoram, 40 pounds, at 40c 16 00 

Sweet basil, 20 pounds, at 40c 8 00 

Tarragon, 10 pounds, at 20c 2 00 

Thyme, 5 pounds, at 40c . . 2 00 

Tomatoes, 18,028 pounds, at ^c 90 14 

Tomatoes, red pear, 43 pounds, at 2c 86 

Tomatoes, yellow pear, 405 pounds, at 2c 8 10 

Turkeys, 771 pounds, at 16c 123 36 

Turnips, 18,950 pounds, at Ic 189 50 

Veal, 179 pounds, at 12^c 22 37 



Total $9,985 95 



76 
EXHIBIT No. 14. 

Revenue from Sales of Waste Material and Other Sources for the Fiscal Year 
Ending October .il, ISfH. 

CONDENSED SUMMARY. 

Making patients* clothing $115 40 

Rags, 25 lots 14 44 

Bones, 6 lots 2 85 

Calves, 16 51 00 

Hides, 3 11 05 

Horse (condemned), 1 5 00 

Hat, 1 25 

Caps, 3 60 

Curtains, Nottingham (condemned), 7 pairs 70 

Coffee pot, 1 . 36 

Toaster, 1 13 

Rebate on pay-roll . . . ' 4 66 

Total «205 94 

EXHIBIT No. 15. 



Revenue from Sales of Waste Material and Other Sources for the Fiscal Year 
Ending October -iU 1898. 

CONDENSED SUMMARY. * 

Making patients' clothing S83 60 

Rags, 8 lots 10 37 

Calves, 11 56 00 

Hides, 2 4 61 

Horse (condemned), 1 . . 5 00 

Boxes and barrels 2 40 

Tea lead , .45 

Hats, uniform, 11 7 70 

Medicine for non-inmate 1 00 

Razors, 2 70 

Lather brushes, 2 17 

Razor strop, 1 59 

Total $172 59 

The several sums set forth in the above statements (Exhibits Nos. 14 
and 15) were paid into the General Fund of the State Treasury monthly, 

and the Treasurer of the Hospital holds quietuses therefor from the 
Auditor of State. 



FIFTH BIENNIAL REPORT 



Trustees and Medical Superintendent 



SOUTHERN INDIANA 



HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE 



EYANSA^ILLE, INDIANA, 



Biennial Pei-iod Enclin.Li" Octo'ber 81. 1898. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B.BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 

1898. 



-: OK INDIANA, ) 

(CECrTIVE DeI'ARTMKNT, >• 

'OLi.«, Ind., November '.M), 1898. j 



THE STATE OE INDIANA, 
Ex 

iNPIANArOT 



Received by the (iovenior, examined and referred td the Auditor of State for 
veriticatioii of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, ) 

' Indiana roLis, December .'!, 1898. / 

The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the State 
Treasnrv, lias been examined and found correct. 

A. C. DAILY, 

Auditor of State. 



December 1, 1898. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted to 
Secretary of State for publication, upon tlie order of the Board of Commissioners 
of Public Printing and Binding. 

CHAS. E. WILSON, 

Private Secretary. 



Filed in the office of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, Decem- 
ber 1, 1898. 

WILLIAM D. OWEN, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer this 3d day of Decem- 
ber, 1898. 

THOS. J. CARTER, 

Clerk of Printing Bureau. 



(3) 



SOUTHERN INDIANA HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



1898. 



Board of Trustees. 

WILLIAM K. GARDINER, President Washington, Ind. 

WILLIAM R. McMAHAN, M. D., Vice-President Huntingburgh, Ind. 

WILLIAM L. SWORMSTEDT, Treasirer EvansviUe, Ind. 



Medical Superintendent. 
G. C. MASON, M. D. 

Assistant Physicians. 

.JOHN F. (;L0VEK, M. D.. 

S. KENOSHA SESSIONS, M. D. 

Steward. 
CHARLES G. SEFRIT. 

Bookkeeper and Supervisor of Amusements. 
MARY T. WILSON. 

Storekeeper and Superintendent of Farm. 
LOUIS F. KATTERJOHN. 



(4) 



REPORT OF BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



To the Hon. James A. Mount, 

Governor of the State of Indiana: 

The Board of Trustees of the Southern Indiana Hospital for 
the Insane respectfully submits this, its biennial report, setting 
forth its observations on the results of the work and the general 
condition of the Hospital for the biennial period ending Octo- 
ber 31, 1898, together with recommendations that seem to it 
necessary. 

And herewith it also submits the report of the Medical 
Superintendent of the Hospital, to which it begs to refer you 
for much detail touching the condition, workings and neces- 
sities of the Hospital that seems unnecessar}- to wliolly repeat 
in this report. 

ORGANIZATION OF BOARD. 

The present Board of Trustees was organized on April 13, 
1897, by the election of William R. Gardiner as President, 
William R. McMahan as Vice-President, and AVilliam L.Sworm- 
stedt as Treasurer. Upon the reappointment of Mr. Gardiner, 
at the expiration of the term for which he was originally 
app6inted, the same organization was continued, and is still 
maintained. 

APPOINTiMENT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT. 

On May 19, 1897, the resignation of Hr. A. J. Thomas as 
Medical Superintendent of the Hospital was accepted by the 
Board of Trustees, to take eftect July 15, following. And on' 
the same day the Board appointed Dr. George C. Mason, of 
Oakland City, Indiana, to succeed Dr. Thomas. Dr. Mason 
entered upon the discharge of the duties of such Medical 
Superintendent on the day that the resignation of Dr. Thomas 
took effect. 

(5) 



CHANGE UF OFFICERS. 

Dr. Mason made some changes in the official roster, result- 
iMif in the a})p<)intmcMit of Charles G. Sefrit as Steward, and 
Drs. L. S. Truslcr and S. Kenosha Sessions as Assistant Physi- 
cians. In March, 1898, Dr. Trusler resigned, and on the first 
da}' of the following April, Dr. John F. Glover was appointed 
to succeed him. 

Miss Mary T. Wilson was retained as Bookkeeper. She also 
acts in the capacity of Supervisor of Amusements. 

As the time of the Storekeeper was not wholly occupied 
with the w^ork of that place, Louis F. Katterjohn was ap- 
pointed Storekeeper, and the additional duties of Superin- 
tendent of the Farm were imposed upon him, at a small in- 
crease of salary. The services of the Farm Superintendent 
theretofore employed were dispensed with, thereby saving 
S32.50 per month. 

The official corps seems to have been wisely selected, with a 
view to capability and harmony in the performance of the 
service. 

The Board commends the Medical Superintendent for his 
efficiency, industrious application to the work, interest mani- 
fested in the well-being of those placed in his charge, and the 
conscientious integrity with which he discharges the multi- 
farious duties of his office. 



NEW WING. 

The adilitional wing designed for men was furnished as far 
as the ap[»ropriation for tliat purpose, §4,000.00, would admit : 
but the same was not as anjply supplied as it should be for the 
comfort of its occupants. It was opened for occupancy in 
November, 1897, and rapidly tilled with 132 patients. Yet 
there are on tile at the Hospital 310 applications for admission. 
lo5 of which seem to l>e urgent eases. For lack of room none 
of these can be received until some of the patients now in the 
Ilosjiital shall be discliarged or die. No doubt the increase of 
applications in the luture will more than eciual in number the 
vacancies thus made. These urgent cases are, in great part. 



unt'oi'tumites confined in tlio county Jails. Others ai"e prac- 
tically imprisoned in the infirmaries and private liouses. None 
of these enjoys the Ijenefits of the special attention and treat- 
ment so very necessary for his well-heing and cure. 

Many of the jails in the district are seldom, if ever, relieved 
from the necessity of holding as prisoners within their walls 
more or less of these stricken beings. In these wretched 
quarters the unfortunates generally become rapidly worse, and 
often permanently insane, as the result of absolute imprison- 
ment, inattention and want of treatment. This is certainly a 
condition that calls loudly for reform in the interest of human- 
ity, both with respect to the neglected and helpless subjects, 
and the un[)leasant and hurtful influence upon those in the 
midst of whom they are retained. 

It also imposes additional l)urdens on society by the increased 
cost of maintaining them in such an objectionable way. Take 
one county in this Hospital District as an illustration : The 
jail there has had as many as five insane men and women at 
one time, and nearly always has one or more imprisoned and 
receiving practically the treatment of the ordinary criminal. 
Insane persons l^ave been in continuous confinement for more 
than a year. The jailer is allowed forty cents per day for each 
prisoner, except the insane persons, for the food furnished. He 
receives one dollar per day for each insane prisoner. To this 
should be added the cost of clothing and other essential expense. 
This county is not an isolated instance. Many counties liave 
had a more distressing experience. Often the per diem allow- 
ance to the jailer for care of the insane is larger than the sum. 
paid in the county to which reference is made. For economi- 
cal* reasons therefore it will at once be seen that there is a prime 
necessity for increased capacity of the hospitals of the State. 

In this Hospital, which is operated under the approved 
systems of scientific care for insane persons, the entire cost of 
board, clothing, medicine, attention of competent physicians 
and trained nurses, has averaged for the fiscal year just closed, 
only fifty-one and two-third cents per day for each patient. 
This price also includes the cost of repairs to the Hospital 
buildings, machinery and equipment. The item of food supply 
alone is covered by fifteen and two-third cents per day, or but 
a little more than one-third of the cost of this item in the jails. 



(iRiJUNDS. 

Lake No. 1 has been finished, and this completes the system 
of lakes so far as undertakeo. 

The old orchard had become almost worthless and was grow- 
ing more so. To provide for fruit in the future there have been 
set out 175 apple trees, 100 peach trees, 25 Japan and 25 dam- 
son plum trees, and 2,000 blackberry shrubs. And for addi- 
tional shade 50 North Carolina poplars and 50 elms. 

HORSES AND VEHICLES. 

It became necessary to purchase several articles of this 
character lor the use at the Hospital, which were procured at 
the following prices : 

One span of horses . $250 00 

One farm wagon 52 00 

One express wagon 98 0(» 

( )ne steward's wagon 110 00 

One set of coach harness 40 00 

One single-buggy harness ^. . . . 20 00 

The Steward's old wagon was applied to the payment of the 
cost of the new one at the price of $25.00. The old express 
wagon was sold for the sum of $15.00. 

FARM AND GARDEN. 

Especial attention is directed to the Medical Superintendent's 
report of the management of the farm and garden. The prac- 
tical results are therein fully set forth. Note also the winter 
use of some of the garden products, which is greatly enhanced 
by the more extensive employment of the greenhouse for that 
purpose. 

REPAIRS AND MINOR IMPROVEMENTS. 

In the spring of 1897 the earthen piping for drainage from 
tlie engine room became rotted, presumably by the action of 
the steam, and bursted. It was laid necessarily deep in loose 
sand, and its replacement was extremely difficult, owing to its 
proximity to buildings. It was replaced with iron piping. 



Owing to faulty construction of pipiuij, some of tlie cisterns 
overtiowed and ran into the basement of the main buihling. 
This re([uired a new line of pipiiig of G33 feet, which coat in 
place $403.80. 

It became necessary to suppl}- thi.' })lace of an old worn pump 
and heater with new ones at a cost of $625.00. 

Repairs were made to the roofs of the Hospital buildings to 
the extent of $257.10. 

The old coal bins had gotten out of repair, were dangerous 
to the firemen and the boilers, and were renewed at a cost of 
$98.04. 

Flues for boilers and repairs to the washing machines were 
procured at the aggregate expense of $206.50. 

Repairs to the floors in the bathrooms and closets were made 
at a cost of $80.00. 

The greenhouse was repaired, with some alterations, to suit 
the conditions necessary for the propagation of plants for 
flowers and vegetables. This was done at an expense of 
$598.60. 

The hose and reel house for the storage of Are apparatus had 
become very much out of repair, and in making the necessary 
repairs thereto it was given a little greater height, and an 
upper story thus formed, in which bedrooms were constructed 
for the use of employes, who are thus kept at night close to 
the apparatus, thereby creating an additional safeguard to the 
Hospital structures. 

Cement floors were placed in the bakery and power house, 
ovens repaired, and painting done in various parts of the 
buildings. 

LESSER REPAIRS. 

Many items of necessary repairs and material therefor of a 
minor character are not the subject of special reference in this 
report. All of this, however, is represented by vouchers in the 
exhibits of the report of the Medical Superintendent. 

SEWAGE. 

Reference to the reports of former Boards reveals the insur- 
mountable difiiculties under which they labored in their ettbrts 
to secure some practical solution of the sewage fjuestion that 



10 

liad come to aliiKjst threaten tlie life of this Hospital. Legis- 
lation of a direct nature, and limitations upon the use of aji- 
propriations had lieretofore hedged the management so as to 
shut out the possibility of the adoption of the Ohio River or 
Pigeon Creek as a channel of effluence. The intermittent til- ] 
tration i»lan had proven a failure, and the unavoidable condi- ^ 
tions had given rise to damage and injunction suits against 
the Boards and their sureties and the Medical Superintendent, 
in which they were charged with maintaining a nuisancf. 
These suits are still pending in the courts. 

Shortly after the organization of the present Board, one of 
its members. Dr. McMahan, was sent on a mission of inquiry 
and investigation tliat led to the adoption, in substance, of the 
plan of precipitation and filtration. The sum of $18,000.00 
had been appropriated by the Legislature for the disposition of 
the Hospital sewage, and the work of construction was begun. 
And now this Board is pleased to report that, with the aid of 
the labor of inmates of the Hospital, the work has been com- 
pleted within the sum appropriated for that purpose. Also 
that the operation of the plant is meeting the most sanguine 
liopes. The problem has been solved. 

The Medical Superintendent has treated of the manner of 
its operation in his report presented herewith. In accomplish- 
ing this work, and in order to its successful accomplishment, 
the automatic flushing closet system was changed to the Clow 
l)atent. This had the effect to reduce the «|uantity of water 
passing through the Hospital pipes. Additional machinery 
was placed in the power house, and the machinery peculiar to 
this work in an additional small building erected for the i»ur- 
pose, except a small electric motor and pump, which are in a 
tank building, where the purified water will in summer be 
pumped into an elevated tank for distribution. This will inci- 
dentally furnish the means of irrigation for large portions of 
the farm, to the great benefit of the crops. 

As the Medical Superintendent has drawings and illustra- 
tions of the plant in. his report, the Board deems it unnec( ?- 
sary to re[)eat a detailed description thereof. 



11 



RUCU.MMENDATIOXS. 



Addition for Woiiieu. — The facts heretofore set forth sliow 
the absolute necessity of increasing the capacity of the Hospi- 
tal, unless a large portion of the wards of the State are to be 
abandoned to the cruel fate of criminals, and to the worse fate 
of l)eing rendered incurable. Tliis Board is therefore con- 
strained by every impulse of human feelings, as well as a just 
sense of economy, to strongly recommend the erection of an 
Addition for Women similar to that heretofore built for men, 
for which, and for the necessary furniture therefor, an appro- 
priation of $46,000.00 is essential. 

Cottages for Consumptives. — There has never been any sepa- 
rate building for the tuberculous inmates, and there is no way by 
which they can be kept from the other inmates and the attend- 
ants. You will at once understand that this condition should 
not continue. The construction of a separate building for 
these consumptives is therefore recommended, and this, with 
proper furniture, will cost $12,000.00. 

Detention Hospitals. — It is strongly, and this Board thinks 
wisely, urged by the Medical Superintendent that there should 
be two Detention Hospital Cottages, in which to receive new 
patients. The reasons given therefor seem to be conclusive. 
For this purpose an appropriation of $46,000.00 for buildings 
and furniture is asked. 

Boilers and Boiler House. — Since the occupancy of the Addi- 
tion for Men, the construction of the sewage plant and the 
pumps for water supply, the boiler capacity has been overtaxed 
to a dangerous degree. In case of accident, which is very 
liable, great suffering might be entailed. In order to place 
three additional boilers, which are essential, more room will 
be recjuired, and this, including the boilers, will cost $13,000.00. 
An appropriation for this is urgently recommended. 

Laundry. — The Board heartily joins in the reasons given by 
the Medical Superintendent for a new Laundry, and in the 
recommendation for an appropriation of $12,000.00 therefor. 

Assembly Room. — The Assembly Room, where amusements, 
entertainments, dances, and Sunday school and religious serv- 
ices are held, has become wholly inadequate for such purposes. 



12 

A new Assembly Koom with increased capacity should be con- 
structed. The estimated cost of a suitable building for these 
purposes is $14,000.00. 

Dairy Farm. — The cost of milk to the Hospital — about 
$2,500 annually — aftbrds strong reason why there should be 
the establishment of a dairy in connection with the IIos}»ital 
service, as a measure of economy as well as to insure the best 
quality of milk for use. To do this it will be necessary to 
purchase eighty acres of land in the neighborhood, construct 
buildings and buy the necessary cows; for which an appro- 
priation of $12,000.00 will be required, which is also recom- 
mended. 

Maintenance and Repairs. — It will be apparent, when tlie 
increased })0[iulation caused by the opening of the new wing 
is considered — an increase not only of patientg, but likewise 
of attendants — that it will be necessary to increase the Main- 
tenance Fund for 1899-1900 to at least 3100,000.00, and the 
Kepair Fund to at least |6,000.00. And if an Addition for 
Women shall be constructed as recommended, for the second 
year of the coming biennial period the Maintenance Fund 
should be $110,000.00 and the Repair Fund $8,000.00. 

For the simplification of accounts it is suggested that the 
Maintenance and the Repair Funds be placed under the one 
head of Maintenance Fund. 

RECAPITULATK )N. 

Maintenanre and Repair Funds first year $106,00(1 

Maintenance and Repair Fund second year 118,000 

Total $224,000 

AcUlition lor Woiiu-n, and furnitiiro $4(5,000 

Building for tuberculous patients, and furniture 12,000 

Detention cottages, and furniture 4(i,000 

Additional boilers and boiler room l.S,000 

Laundry 12,000 

Assembly Room ' 14,000 

Dairy 12,000 

Total $155,000 



13 



THE ESTIMATES. 



Tlie Board desires to call especial attention to the fact that 
the increased cost of supplies renders it absolutely essential 
that the Maintenance and Repair Funds should not be less than 
the amounts herein estimated. The various amounts of esti- 
mated costs of the proposed new structures have been recom- 
mended at sums believed to be not above the actual ret^uire- 
ments of the proposed work. 

IN CONCLUSION. 

Tlie Board begs to assure you that it is thoroughly imbued 
with the spirit of economy that should be rigidly enforced in 
the management of all public att'airs. But economy, it suggests, 
can not justly be placed against the necessity of liim who is 
bereft of reason and stands a helpless object of charity, except 
in the sense that justice requires us to go only to the discharge 
of the full duty imposed upon a common brotherhood. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM R. GARDIXER, 
WILLIAM R. McMAIIAN, 
WILLIAM L. SWORMSTEDT 

EvANSViLLE, Indiana, December 1, 1898. 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT. 



To tin ILfitornhlj JJoard of Tnisfjis : 

Gentlemen — In compliance with the reciuirenients of the 
law, the following report of the operations and needs of the 
Southern Indiana Hospital for Insane for the biennial period 
ending October 31, 1898, is respectfully submitted: 

MOVEMENT OF PATIENTS. 



For the Fi.^cal Year Emliini (H,,l„r Jl, 1S97 



Movement. 



Men. Women.' Total. 



Enrolled November 1, 1896 214 

Admitted 33 

Discharged — | 

Kecovered 15 

Improved 

Unimproved 2 

Idiotic , I 

Not insane ' 

Died 13 

Enrolled October 31, 1897 ." 217 



221 


435 


21 


54 


14 


29 


3 


3 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


6 


19 


215 


432 



MOVEMENT OF PATIENTS. 



For the Fiscal Year Ending October SI, 1898. 



Movement. 



Men. 



Women, 



Total. 



Enrolled Novoml.er 1, 1897 217 

Admitted 95 

Discharged — 

Recovered , 18 

Improved ! 1 

Unimproved ! 1 

Idiotic 1 

Died 14 

Enrolled October 31, 1898 I 277 



215 
73 



14 
257 



432 
168 



3 

1 

28' 

534 



(14) 



15 

During the first year of the bieiiniul period there were dis- 
charged recovered 29 — 5.93 per cent, of the total number treated 
and 53.7 per cent, of the number admitted. During tlic ^<econd 
year 27 were discharged recovered — 4.5 per cent of the total 
number treated and 16 per cent. o.f number admitted. It will 
be seen that the per cent, on number admitted is much lower 
during the second year than during the first year. This is due 
to the admission, upon the opening of new building, of many 
cases of long duration, who had been confined in the county 
Jails and infirmaries and whose admission had been delayed on 
account of want of room. 

The per cent, of death on number treated during the first 
year is 3.88: during the second year, 4.66. 

In the Appendix will be found the Medical Statistics. 



GENERAL CONDITION. 

The last two years have blessed the patients with unusual 
health. Scarcely any disease than what is consequent to in- 
sanity and tuberculosis has had a place in our wards. In this 
time there has been only one death from acute disease, and 
that was a case of pneumonia in March, 1897. The Hospital 
has been free from an epidemic of any kind. One case of 
measles developed in an employe, but by strict isolation there 
was no further infection. The general sanitar}^ condition is 
most excellent. This is brought about and maintained by 
strict cleanliness and a rigid adherence to hygienic principles. 
Careful attention is given to the food of the patients, What- 
ev;,er is purchased is of the highest quality. Much care is also 
exercised in keeping them properly clothed. The plan of 
keeping the patients outdoors as much as possible and of giving 
them abundant daily exercise has done much towards preserv- 
ing good health and securing quietude on the wards. For this 
reaeon we are seldom called upon to use either mechanical or 
chemical restraint. 

Our water supply is ample — in fact inexhaustible. It has 
been tested by long-continued droughts, and the consumption 
of as much as one hundred thousand gallons daily has made no 
diminution in its amount. Its source is in the coarse gravel and 



16 

sand at a deptli of about eighty feet. It comes forth pure and 
8parklin£2^. and to tliis good water we attribute mucli of the 
liealth of tlie patients and employes. 

Special attention is given to the classitication of patients, 
and this order of things is maintained as closely as possilile. 
On account of the overcrowding we can not have all we desire 
in this line. 

In the Men's Department there is the epileptic ward, and we 
lind this arrangement an excellent one and that it is conducive 
to bettering the condition of the epileptics. Removing the 
epileptics from the various wards disposes of a very disturbing 
element, and placing them on a ward to themselves has a quiet- 
ing influence over them, caused chietiy by their sympathy for 
each other in having an affliction of like nature. I iind that 
in placing the epileptics together they are much more easily 
controlled, live more peaceably and outbreaks of violence on 
the other wards now seldom occur. 

In all cases where patients die suddenly or under peculiar 
^circumstances, or in cases of suicide, the Coroner is called in 
to view the remains and, if necessary, hold an inquest. 
Within the biennial period the Coroner has been called in two 
instances — one in the case of an old woman, who died sud- 
denly, and the other in the case of the suicide of Samuel 
Myers, of Knox County, Indiana. This patient was admitted 
March 5, 1898. lie committed suicide by leaping over the 
railing of the corridor of the third floor in Central Block. 
He was a patient whose insanity was mild and he spent much 
of his time doing light work within and about the building. 
He was thus engaged, and while passing along the corridor, in 
charge of his attendant, he suddenly leaped over the railing, 
his head striking the platform of the rotunda steps, twenty 
feet below. He died in about fifteen minutes after the injury. 
His record of incjuest did not rate him as suicidal. 

The practice of reporting promptly all deaths, accidents and 
injuries, or any unusual occurrences to the Secretary of the 
Board of State Charities is strictly followed. 



17 



NUTRITION. 



Nutrition must Ijo classed us one of tlie greatest factors in 
cure among the insane. (Tiven bad nutrition and food of jioor 
quality and all else fails. Our food here is of the highest 
quality and we see that it is well ])re])ared. We get the best 
beef in the market. The number of hindquarters always 
equals the forequarters used. I believe in rigid economy in the 
State institutions, but never to the extent to be a detriment to 
the patients either in food or clothing. 

EMPLOYMENT. 

Many of the most violent and disturbed patients have their 
attacks averted by employment. In some mysterious way 
there seems to be a superabundance of energy stored within 
them and it must have its channel of exit. Especially is this 
so with the epileptics. If this stored energy can be made bene- 
licial to the patient and tlie Hospital at the same time, good 
results have been doubled. . We strive to tind the best and 
most profitable employment for the unfortunates in our care. 
Forty-six per cent, of our male population is employed on the 
farm and in the garden, lawns, laundry, carpenter sho[), baker 
shop, boiler house, kitchen, etc. Thirty-five per cent, of our 
women work in the laundry, sewing rooms, kitchen, and also do 
light work in the halls, and in the spring we allot some ground 
to them that they may dogardening,in which they have personal 
interest. 

RELKJIOUS SERVICES AND AMUSEMENTS. 

« 

The value of amusement as a curative agency is well under- 
stood by all alienists, and it is given much prominence in the 
Southern Hospital. Amusements, music, recreation and fiowers 
are among our best remedial agents. On each Sabbath we have 
two regular services, the Sabbath school in the morniiig and 
preaching by the chaplain in the afternoon. 

On Friday evening of each week we have the dances, in 
which the patients are eager and joyous participants. On 
account of insufficient room, not nearly all the patients who 
desire to come to the dances, and who would be benefited by 
coming, can liave the benefit of this recreation. 
2 — Southern Iksane. 



18 

Strouse's Ili^-h Art Baiul and ilie Ilowell Band entertained 
the patieutf* with their excellent music (juite often, and all 
gratis. 

Entertainments are fre(iuently given by theatrical troupes 
from the city, and our em]»Ioyes have rendered some very 
creditable and interesting programs. 

Each evening of the holiday week is given for some enier- 
taiument for the benefit of the patients. 

Recently we have fitted out a wagonette which carries fifty 
patients comfortably, and witli this we take tliem to the fairs 
and shows, and (jiiite often, on pleasant afternoons, we take 
them driving into the country, and this they very nni<-li njipn- 
ciate and it proves helpful to them. 

The use of entertainment, recreation and amusement pro- 
duces many excellent results. We find that it not only does 
much as a means of cure, but it has a pleasing efl:ect upon the 
patients in making them contented, dispelling homesickness 
and it renders life here more homelike and takes away what- 
ever [trison features that may seemingly be attached to it. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

The Training Chiss, which was organized several years ago, 
is maintaining its high standing, and through it we train 
attendants so that they reach the highest possible standard in 
the work of caring for the insane. It is certainly one of the 
indispensable features in all hospitals. We have a course of 
two years — tlie year beginning the first of November and end 
ing the June following. There are two lectures given each 
week and there are also frequent ([uizzes. All attendants are 
re(juired to become members of the Training Class, and for 
promotion and graduation they must pass a rigid examination. 

The lecturers are: The Superintendent. Dr. John F. Glover, 
Dr. S. Kenosha Sessions, Miss Mary T. Wilson. 

SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

At tlie last session of the Legislature an api>ropriation of 
§1.^,000 was made to provide an efiicient means lor the disposal 
of sewage at the Southern Hospital. As no outlet could be 
obtained for a sewer, either through the city of Evansville or 
to any adjacent stream, the sewage was permitted to pass away 



19 

■Hhroiigh an open, ditch, tuul this was made a cause for coniphiint 
by the farmers through whose land it passed. The Board of 
Trustees was therefore compelled to institute some other 
method than the usual one for the disposition of sewage. It 
wisely sent one of its members east to examine some of the 
modern sewage systems, and a rei)ort was made in April, 1897, 
recommending that known as the "Plan of Precipitation and 
Filtration." 

About two hundred yards west of the Hos})ital are the exits 
of two sewers — one from the Hospital building and the other 
from the laundry. These em[)ty into a trench enclosed in a 
frame building in which are a thirty-three-disc filter press, a 
sludge i)ump, a water pump, two mixers, having a capacity of 
three hundred gallons each, and an electric motor furnishing 
power to the machinery. One mixer contains lime and fur- 
nishes to each gallon of sewage thirty grains in summer and 
fifteen grains in winter. The other contains alum, which fur- 
nishes to each gallon of sewage fifteen grains in summer and 
seven and one-half grains in winter. The solution, in these 
mixers, is kept constantly agitated by large revolving paddles, 
and from each mixer is conducted a continuous stream, which 
meets the sewage at the point of exit and becomes thoroughly 
mixed with it. After this mixing the solution passes to 
settling basins — -just west of the building — these are six in 
number, having the dimensions 16 feet by 14 feet and 7 feet 
deep. In these basins the solid matter of the sewage is pre- 
cipitated. After withdrawing the water from a basin, by 
means of a pipe especially constructed for this purpose, the 
solid matter is thrown into a sludge well and from thence it is 
conducted b_y a large pump to the filter press, liaving thirty- 
three press plates, and here the sludge is made into disc-like 
cakes, weighing about thirty pounds each, which are easily 
handled and provide us with an excellent fertilizer for our 
farm and garden. The water, by means of gateways, passes 
through all the basins in a diagonal course so as to give ample 
time for precipitation, and it passes from the sixth basin to the 
filter beds, of which there are four, making a total area^of 
more than one-fourth acre. Three of the filters have the di- 
mensions of 40 feet by 80 feet, and the iourth 27 feet by 80 
feet, and the depth is b feet. The walls are composed of brick 
and are one foot in tliickness — are plastered within with 



20 

cement. The bottoms of the filters are paved with brick, and 
over this is a coat of cement plastering-. On the bottom of 
the filters rows of four-inch tiling are laid — four feet apart, 
and these all conv^erge to a semi-circular basin from which the 
water tiows to a ditch. The filter beds have a depth of four 
feet; three feet four inches of this is composed of gravel, and 
eight inches over the top is composed of coarse sand. By 
means of distril)uter8 the water is disposed over the filters — 
each filter being used six days at a time. The water passes 
from the filters into a ditch lined with limestone rock — is clear, 
transparent and without any perceptible odor. After the 
filter has been used six days the film, which has formed on 
the sand, is taken oft', the sand spaded up and stirred thoroughly 
and some additional sand added. After two or three weeks' 
rest the filter is fully renovated and is again as good as new. 

The cost of making and e(|uipping the sewage plant was 
eighteen thousand dollars ($18,000). For the present our filter 
beds are amply sufficient and no more will be needed until we 
have a considerably larger population. 

I feel certain that a correct and satisfactory solution, accord- 
ing to the most modern methods, has been made of the vexed 
sewage problem at the Southern Hospital and I believe there 
will be no more complaints from this source. The Board of 
Trustees is to be complimented for its wisdom and untiring 
energy in arranging and perfecting a system, which so satis- 
factorily solves the sewage problem for the Soutliern Hospital 
and which has so greatly annoyed the management of the 
institution during all its former years. 

Following are the descriptive plans and a photograph of the 
buildings. 



NDEX TO MAP 



SEWAGE PLANT AND IRRIGATING SYSTEM 

AT 

The Southern Indiana Hospital For Insane, 

EVANSVILLE, INDIANA, 

A. Laundry sewer. 

B. Hospitiil sewer. 

C. Channel in sewage building. 

D. Screened basin. 

E. Pipes leading from screened basin to [irecipitating basins. 

F. Precipitating basins. 

G. Pipes taking water from precipitating basins into Sump well. 

H. Pipes taking solid matter from precipitating basins to sludge well. 

I. Sludge well. 

J. Sump well. 

K. Pit basin for sludge pump. 

L. Pipe for additional filters. 

M. Pipes taking water from precipitating basins to filter basins. 

N. Pipe taking water from sump well (J) to pump (5) back to filter basins. 

0. Pipes taking water from catch basin (V) to first and third filter basins. 
P. Distributers. 

Q. Side distributers. 

R. Catch basins into which tiling leads from filter basins. 

S. Pipes taking water from catch basins (R) to catch basin (W). 

T. Pipe taking water from catch basin (W) to sump well (X). 

U. Ditch. 

V. Catch basins for filter basins. 

W. Catch basin. 

X. Sump well receiving water from catch basin (W) and alsu from which water, 

for irrigating purposes, is pumped into a tank (Z) on roof of pumphouse 

(AD). 
Y. Sewage pipe to be used in turning the channel of water in case of repairs. 
Z. Tanks in irrigating pump and motor house. 

AB. Gate ways. ' 

AC. Filter basins. 

AD. Irrigating pump and motor house. 

AE. Concrete walk. 

AF. Irrigating Humes. 

1. Motor in sewage building. 

2. Pump in pump pit. 

3. Mixers — one lime, one alum, which is carried by two 2-inih pipes to 

sewage channel. 

4. Filter press, consisting of thirty-three press plates, placed over channel (C). 

5. Water pump. 

(21) 



2-2 



IRHKJATING PLANT. 



To i»rovi(Je a means fordisi»osiiig of our sewage water dur- 
ing tlie summer season and at the same time utilize this water 
80 as to irrigate our farm and garden, there has heen, as a part 
of the sewage system, an irrigating plant erected and equipped 
for these pnrposes. Just south of the third filter a building 
14 by 14 feet has Iteen erected, and on top of this is a tank four 
feet in depth and six feet in diameter. This tank i« eighteen 
feet from the ground, and is connected by a jtipe to a sump 
well just south of the building. By opening a valve in a 
basin, where the water discharges from the filters, the whole 
of the stream of water coming from the filters is thrown into 
a sump well, and this in turn is forced by a pump into the tank 
from which the water flows into flumes, to which may be con- 
nected, at proper distances, troughs extending from either side 
of the flumes to any desired distance — all of which act as dis- 
tributers of water over the farm. We are enabled by this 
l»rocess to irrigate fifty acres of our farm, and we confidently 
expect an abundant return in the way of farm and garden 
products. 

FAK.M AND GARDEN. 

Twenty-two acres of wheat were sown, from which were 
yielded six hundred and seventy-three bushels. From our 
meadow we received eleven tons of good timothy ha}'. In the 
appendix a statement will be found of the farm and garden 
products. 

Pifigery. — We are very careful to keep our piggery in good 
conditioji. The slops are fed in troughs, which are often 
cleansed, and we keep removed from the pen all the oftal and 
debris; the fences are frequently whitewashed and lime is scat- 
tered freely over the places where malodors would likely arise. 
We have never had cholera among our hogs and we attribute 
it to a free use of antiseptics and a strict adherence to clean- 
liness. The keeping of hogs brings us a source of revenue, 
which if we were compelled to dispense with, would mean 
quite a material loss to us. We now have one hundred and 
forty hogs in excellent condition, and these are fed mainl}- 
from the slops of the Hospital. We always separate our hogs 



23 

and feed on corn fully six weeks before killing for use, ISince 
the Ist of November, 1896, there have been furnished from tliis 
source 22,707 pounds of lar«l. 

GROINDS. 

Seven acres of lawn were prepared and a large number 
of flowers and trees planted. All during the summer months 
we had great ({uantities of flowers for decoration of lialls and 
for the use of patients. In September of this year a large 
basket of bou<iuets was prepared by the women ]»atients and 
presented to the soldiers of the l.')9th Indiana Regiment upon 
their return to Evansville. 

There were planted 175 apple trees, 100 peach trees, 25 Japan 
and 25 damson plum trees; also 50 North Carolina poplars, 
50 elms and 2,000 blackberry shrubs (Snider variety). 

liMPROVEMFNTS AND REPAIRS. 

Many substantial improvements and needed repairs have been 
made during the period. 

Hose and Reel House. — Our hose and reel house has been so 
repaired as to make a two-story building of it. The first floor 
is used to store our fire apparatus, to which 250 feet of hose 
have been added. The second floor of this building consists 
of four rooms and a halhvay. The rooms are comfortabl}'^ 
furnished for employes' (quarters. The cost of these repairs 
was ^781.00. 

Greenhouse. — The greenhouse built in the year 1896 was 
found inadequate for the propagation of plants (flowers and 
vegetables). By repairing and changing this building we have 
been enabled to secure fifty feet additional room. The cost of 
repairing was §598.60. 

Garbage House. — West of the general kitchen a garbage 
house has been erected.- It has a grouted brick floor, concave 
in form, catch basin and sewer connection. Also pipe and 
hose connection. By this cleanliness is promoted and a better 
sanitary condition obtained. This work was done at an ex- 
penditure of §80 00. 



24 

Coal Bin. — The old coal bin, used for storing coal after beiog 
removed from curs, was replaced with a new one at a cost of 
§1>8.04. 

Additional Electrical Machinery. — To secure power to operate 
the sewage plant made it necessary to purchase an additional 
dynamo and engine. Leading firms submitted proposals. The 
Fort Wayne Electric Corporation was awarded the contract 
for : 

One 1,000-light dynamo at $1,125 00 

One Buckeye Automatic Cut-oft engine (100-liorse 

power) ^ 1,125 00 

Marble switch-board and wiring 411 Sti 

The engine and dynamo operate by direct contact and are 
constructed on the most modern plan. All machinery was 
placed in position by the Company. 

A contract was made with the Grote Manufacturing Com- 
pany for replacing one " I '' Marsh Steam Pump and one 300- 
horse power Goubert Heater at a cost of $625.00. 

Serving Boom. — A sewing room for the Department for Men 
was opened. Two seamstresses are employed here. All the 
sewing, mending and marking of articles for the Department 
for Men is done. This woi"kroom has been in operation but a 
few months, but is already showing good results. 

Diet Kitchen. — A diet kitchen has been prepared. This room 
is in the basement near the General Kitchen. It is furnished 
with a gasoline stove, hot and cold water connection, and all 
necessary utensils. The special diet for the sick is prepared 
by the nurse selected for this work. I find this an excellent 
plan and much more preferable than having the special diet 
prepared in the General Kitchen. 

Painting. — The interior of some of the halls have been re- 
painted; also the General Kitchen, Butcher Shop and Baker 
Shop. We now have a painter employed whose whole time is 
taken up in this work. 

MINOR IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS. 

Two water coolers were placed in the sick-halls. The auto- 
matic Hushing closet system was changed to the Clow patent. 

Tiling was repaired in all the bath rooms, water closets and 
hearths of the halls. Screens were placed in all the dining 



25 

roo!n windows of the IIos[)ital Buildiiiii:. Four organs were 
purchased and placed in tlie lialls for use of piitients. 

The hair was taken from all our mattresses and jtillows and 
thoroughly washed and new hair added to increase the weight 
of tlie mattresses from ten and twelve pounds to twenty-two 
pounds. Additional lawn benches were purchased and placed 
in the grove for use of patients. An iron railing was placed 
along one side of the platform at railway station. 

There were expended in repairs for boiler Hues, §169.00. A 
cement floor was made in the bakery at an expense of $55.00. 
Kepairing rooting of the Hospital building and administration 
house occasioned an expenditure of $257.10. 

INSANE CONVICTS. 

In dune, 1897, the Governor, under the statute of 1895, 
ordered the transfer of two insane convicts (both colored) from 
the Reformatory at Jetlersonville, Indiana, to this institution. 
One of the convicts ordered here by the Governor escaped on 
the night of July 4, 1897, by breaking or withdrawing the 
screws which fastened the screen in a water closet on the sec- 
ond floor. Up to the present time nothing has been heard 
from the man. His family lives in Christian County, Ken- 
tuck}^ and no doubt he made his way there. I find from the 
records that all the facts in the case were reported to the 
Governor. As an escape of a convict had not occurred in the 
history of the Hospital, it was thought best to do this. 

NEEDS. 

ADDITIONAL BUILDINGS. 

In the erection of additional buildings it has been the custom 
of the State heretofore to wait until the jails and infirmaries of 
the counties of the hospital district become much crowded 
before taking steps toward relief. This brings about a bad 
condition of affairs. It is very unjust to the unfortunate insane 
and it also fills the new building at once with patients who in 
the main have become incurable on account of their long 
detention in their homes or in the county jails. Such a pro- 
cedure on the part of the State is neither wise nor economical. 
It should not be put in the light of being compelled to come to 
the relief of the sufiering because it can no longer be endured. 



26 

The w ij'o uikI ju^t course is certainly to anticipate these thinners, 
provide room in advance, and thereby enable a cure to be 
hrouofht to thousands who otherwise become hopelessly insane 
and a burden to society. The Southern Hospital has a recent 
and convincing evidence of the evil effects of such a course. 
During the year 189G-97, when only the acute and most urgent 
cases were receivetl, there was 53.7 per cent, of the number 
admitted sent home cured. When the new building was opened, 
in November, 1897, and the greater number of the persons 
admitted were those who had been detained for a long time in 
the county Jails and the intirmaries and in their homes, we find 
for the year 1897-98 there was but It) per cent, of the number 
admitted sent home cured. 

NEW WINU. 

Three years ago a new building was erected for the depart- 
ment of men. Its capacity is one hundred and thirty-two. 
The location is northwest of the main building and is con- 
nected with the rear wing by means of a colonnade. The 
capacity of the hospital for men was thus increased by one 
hundred and thirty-two. while that for women remains the 
same. It can readily be seen that this makes an unequal 
division of the men and women patients received and neces- 
sarily forces overcrowding in the women's department. In 
order to give some relief I have taken one ward in the mens 
department for women, and this is a condition of things that 
should not continue to exist in any hospital. I have done this 
to somewhat relieve the pressing demands for admission and I 
consider it more humane and better to have women in one of 
the wards of the men's department than to have them impris- 
oned in the jails of our counties, in which there can be no 
proper care for them and where there is but little hope of 
recovery. In the ward used for women in the department oi 
men the precaution was taken of having all locks changed so 
that no key but the one belonging to the women's department 
will open the doors. 

To make the capacity of the Hospital equal for men and 
women there must be built an addition similar to the new 
wing constructeil for men. Just northwest of the Hospital there 
is a good site for a building, and when completed harmony and 
-ymmetry will be given to the Hospital building as a whole. 



For the construction of this building there will need to be an 
appropriation of at least $40,000.00, and for the equipment of 
same S6,000.00. 

To prove to you the necessity for additional room, as a con- 
vincing argument, I need only cite you to the jails and infirm- 
aries in the various counties in our hospital district. They 
contain man}' who are dangerously and violently insane. There 
are on file now in the Hospital 310 applications and 155 of 
these are cases that urgently need the care of a hospital. 

DETENTION HOSPITAL COTTAGES. 

In effecting a cure for the insane much depends upon the 
first impressions and intlueuces and at the verv threshold of 
treatment much jjood mav be thwarted bv havino: a patient, 
taken from his relatives and friends and from his quiet home 
life and ushered into a ward of strangers where there are 
noises and violence. Too often the acutely insane, many of 
whom are curable, become permanently insane on account of 
this kind of treatment, and they become a burden to the State 
for the remainder of their lives. To meet this pressing iieed, 
and to keep abreast with the advanced treatment of the insane 
of to-day, and at the same time to furnish the room needed, there 
should be two Detention Hospital Cottages built, one for men and 
one for women, and they should have ample room to accomo- 
date forty patients each. These cottages would be so built, 
arranged and furnished as to make the surroundings as near 
homelike as possible and the advantages that would accrue 
from this method of treatment is incalculable. It is humane, 
it is justice, and the ffreat State of Indiana can not afford to do 
any less than the very best things for her insane. For the erec- 
tion of these cottages S40,000 will be required, and for equip- 
ment, S6.000. 

COTTAGES FOR TUBERCULOUS PATIENTS. 

A building separate from the main hospital is needed to 
properly care for our consumptive patients. At present those 
suffering from tuberculosis are scattered throughout the vari- 
ous wards of the institution, and they are not only a menace 
and a source of infection to the other patients but to the 
attendants as well. An appropriation of SIO.OOO is needed for 
the construction of these cottages, and S2.000 for the equipment 
of same. 



28 

The report relating to this condition made by the Board of 
State Charities to the Governor July 22, 1898, speaks for itself: 

No separate provision was made for caring for tuberculous patients. There 
is no tuberculous ward an<l the increase of tuberculosis cases in this Hospital, as 
given by the Superintendent, is notable. It, of itself, is sufficient to indicate the 
need of a hospital in which such patients can be kept. For the two years, 1890 to 
18'J2. the number of deaths was fifty-four. Six of these, or one in nine, were 
from tuberculosis. For the years 1892 to 1894 the total deaths were tifty-two. 
Seven of these, or one in seven and one-half, were from tuberculosis. For the 
years 1894 to 1896 there were forty-nine deaths. Of these fifteen, or one in about 
three, were from this cause. For the year 1897, up to November 1, there were 
nineteen deaths, seven of which were from tuberculosis, or one in little less than 
three. 

Since this report was made it is known that the number of 
deaths for the biennial period, 1896-1898, was forty-seven. 
Fifteen of which were from tuberculosis. 

LAUNDRY. 

The laundry building is faulty in construction and, besides, 
it is now much too small in which to do the amount of work 
retjuired. It is a two-story building, having on* the first fioor 
the receiving department, the dry coil room, the washers and 
the engine. On the second floor are the mangle and the ironing 
and assorting rooms. A large stove used for heating the irons 
is placed in a small side room to the upstairs department, and 
just underneath, where the ironers stand, are the washers and 
the drying room. During the summer season the heat becomes 
intense in the second-story room — in fact, it is so great that it 
borders on criminality to have patients and employes work in 
such a place. During the winter the steam generated below 
ascends into this upper room and makes it impossible to do 
starching and ironing that will make the clothing tit for use. 
With the arrangement of the building — and the small amount 
of ground adjoining it — it would in no sense be advisable to 
attempt to make an addition, for this would in no way correct 
existing faults. What is urgentl}- needed is a new one-story 
building erected and equipped after the modern methods of the 
best laundries, and for this we have a suitable location just east 
of the boiler house and within a convenient distance to our 
power house. A new laundry is one of the pressing necessities, 
and for this purpose there will be needed an appropriation of 
§12.000. 



29 

The Board of State Charities reported the following to 
Governor James A. Mount, July 22, 1898: 

The laundry is very unsatisfactory. Tlie l)uil(lin^' is far too small and the 
equipment iiisiittieient for tueetiiig the reiiwirements. Washing and drying are 
done upon the first floor, while upon the set'oml Moor is an ironing room. Some 
of the women in ironing are compelled to stand direetly over the driers helow — 
their feet being separated therefrom i)y a single board lloor. This, added to the 
extreme heat of this season, renders this a j)laee wholly unfit for such work. In 
the winter it is even worse, for the steam arises and fills the upper room, and the 
persons employed work all the time in the damp atmosphere. The moisture ruins 
the laundering of starched clothes. On account of lack of room it is impossible to 
iron the underclothing. 

POWER HOUSE AND BOILERS. 

Witli additional buildings there conies the necessity for more 
boilers and an addition to the power house. Uur boiler service 
is insufficient for present demands, and the boiler and power 
house is crowded to its utmost capacity. At present if one of 
our boilers should become disal)led the hospital w^ards could 
not liave sufficient light and heating and in severe winter 
weather the patients would suffer much from cold. It is very 
essential that we should have more boiler-house room and three 
additional boilers. This is the iirst and most important step 
towards new buildings. Additional room would be worthless 
to us without additional boilers. For thi;^ purpose, according 
to an exact estimate, $13,000.00 is needed. 

ASSEMBLY ROOM. 

Our assembly room seats about one hundred and seventy- 
•iive persons, and even this number makes a very crow^ded con- 
dition. The present demands require that it should seat five 
hundred and fifty. For want of room man}- of our patients 
do not receive the benefit to be derived from amusements, and 
especially the church and Sabl)ath-school exercises. A large 
number are therefore deprived of one of the best means of 
treatment, and there exists a necessity that provision be made 
for more room. On account of the surroundings the capacity 
of the present assembly room can not in any way be increased. 
The only proper relief will come in a new building for this 
purpose entirely apart from the Hospital. Just southeast of 
the Hospital, and w^ithin easy distance, is a very suitable loca- 



30 

ti<jii for ail assembly aiitl ainu.sL'iiioiit rooiiu and if tlie Southern 
Hospital is to be [H'epared and equipped to do justice to tbe 
insane it must liave an appropriation to erect a new buildinsjf. 
For tins purpose $14,000 are needed 

The ground floor of the assembly room we now have can be 
used as a reading room for the employes and patients. As it 
is now, the em})ioye8 have no place to spend their evenings ex- 
cept in the rotunda. A room for this purpose is very much 
needed, and it would prove a great help and blessing to the 
employes and the patients. The upper portion of the room 
can be floored and divided into sleeping rooms for employes, 
making eight in all, and, as we are very much crowded — three 
■l)ersons occupying one small room at [)resent — this would make 
a convenient and wise arrangement. 

The following is a report of the Board of State Charities ta 
the Governor, July 22, 1898, concerning the need of an assem- 
bly room : 

There are some conditions that exist in the institution that demand im- 
provement. The increased population and changed conditions are such that the 
provision originally made, according to the first plans, are not equal to the de- 
mands. The chapel is very small. It will not accommodate over one-third of 
tlie inmates. 

DAIRY. 

It is an acknowledged fact now that a good dairy is an in- 
dispensable part of a hospital equipment. It not only saves 
much money to the State, but it provides the means by which 
j)ure, fresh milk can be obtained, and, besides, it gives easy em- 
l)loyment to a goodly number of patients. In order to main- 
tain a dairy it would require additional land. We have now 
only one hundred and sixty acres altogether, and the tillable 
portion is all needed for our gardening. Last year the cost of 
milk per gallon was fourteen cents, and the total for the year 
was $2,492.5t). 

Ex})erieiiee establishes the fact that where the lIosj)ital owns 
its own dairy, good, pure milk can be furnished to the patients 
at about seven cents per gallon, 'i his would make an annual 
saving of rS1,24().28, and would within a few years pay for the 
land necessary for the establishment of a dairy. Eighty acres 
at least will l)e required to supi)ort a dairy that will meet the 
jtresent Hospital needs. To purchase this amount of land, buy 



tlio cows, and erect the necessary Itnildiiiii's there will Ik- needed 
an appropi'iation of §12,000. 

MAINTENANCE. 

The appro})riation for tl)e year Noveniher 1, iSlilS, to Novem- 
ber 1, 18!l!i, is $82,000 fur maintenance and $4,000 for repairs. 
These sums were hxed upon tlie basis of low i)rice8 and wlien 
the enrollment was l)nt four hundred and thirty-two patients. 
We now have enrolled five hundred and thii-ty-four patients, 
and prices are decidedly higher in nearly all food products, 
and for clothing also. If the management of the Southern 
lIos[)ital rs to care for its insane, as the State of Indiana in- 
tends it shall be, done, and as the friends and relatives wish 
them cared for, it must have an increased appropriation for 
maintenance. Without this additional appropriation the 
Su[)erintendent and the Board of Trustees will be prevented 
from discharging what they clearly see to be a conscientious 
duty to the insane under their care. 

The daily average of patients present for the last fiscal year 
was 459. The daily average for the coming year will not be less 
than 480. Thus, with a material increase of the number of pa- 
tients present, and with a very decided increase in food products 
and clothing, since the time the appropriation was made, it will 
be impossible even to maintain the present number of patients 
unless the quality or quantity of food is reduced, and this I am 
not willing to do. I would much prefer to have the complaint 
made against me of feeding and clothing the patients well 
than to be parsimonious in order to make a showing of econ- 
omy to the public. W^itliout any additional buildings an appro- 
priation of $90,000.00 will be required and $6,000.00 for repairs. 
Basing' our estimate ujjon the supposition that an appro- 
priation will be granted for additional buildings, there must 
necessarily be an increased appropriation for maintenance 
over the preceding figures. If the appropriation for the 
new wing for w^omeu is made available at once, there is no 
reason why the building should not he ready for occupancy by 
January 1, 1900. This building is to contain 150 patients. 
After completion it would probably require six months to re- 
ceive this number of patients, so that for the first year of the 
biennial period there would prol)ably not be more than eighty 



32 

additional patients present on an averae^e. By November 1, 
li>01, the beginning of the second year of the biennial period, 
u'e would have 150 additional patients to maintain, and thus 
the natural re([uireraent for an increased appropriation for 
luaintenatice for these years. 

Maintenani-e from November 1, 1899, to Novemher 1, litOO $100,000 

MaintenaiR-e from Noveraher 1, 1900, to Novemher 1, 1901 110,000 

Repairs for 1899-1900 6,000 

Repairs for 1900-1901 8,000 

I will add here that I believe it is much better to have the 
maintenance and repair funds under one and the same head, 
and that should be known as the Mawtemnice Fund. 

The following is a summary of the appropriation's needed. 
These figures are given showing what is actually needed, and I 
have not made them upon the supposition that a much larger 
amount is to be asked for that the necessary amount may be 
obtained. The estimates made in this summary are based 
upon an administration having for its end strict economy and 
the best possible good for the patients. 

SUMMARY. 

Maintenance for 1899-1900 .• $100,000 

Maintenance for 1900-1901 110,000 

Repairs for 1899-1900 6,000 

Repairs for 1900-1901 8,000 

New wing for Department for Women 40,000 

Equipment for same 6,000 

Two Detention Hospital cottages 40,000 

Equipment for same 6,000 

Cottages for tuberculous patients 10,000 

E(iuipment for same 2,000 

Laundry and equipment 12,000 

Power house and additional boilers 18,000 

Assembly room 14,000 

Dairy 12,000 



GOVERNOR S VISIT. 

Governor James A. Mount visited the Hospital November 
9, 1897. He spent much of the day in ins[)eoting the wards, 
and his visit was a pleasant one and nuu-li appreciated b}' us. 



33 



liOARD OF STATE CHARITIES. 



The (jiiai'terly ami monthly statistical reports liave Ijeeii 
promptly made, and reports of all deaths and serions accidents 
have been made at the time of occurrence. The Board has made 
its usual number of visits and I feel that the members come 
with sincere and deep desires for the welfare "of the Hospital 
and to help the management to obtain for the patients the 
highest degree of good and the best supervision possible. 
It is chietly through the labors of this Board that Indiana to- 
day occupies sucli an advanced ground in the management of 
her charitable and benevolent institutions. I thank the mem- 
bers for their good wiir and for the assistance rendered the 
Hospital, and I hope our future relations may always be pleas- 
ant and conducive to the best interests of the institution. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

Dr. John F. Glover and Dr. S. Kenosha Sessions are the 
ward physicians. They are possessors of strong characters, have 
first-class ability and are armed with a wide and valuable ex- 
perience. Their work iu the Hospital is paiiistaking, earnest 
and conscientious. They are a good right arm to the Super- 
intendent, I thank them for such a high grade of service as 
they give me. 

Charles G. Sefrit fills the position of Steward and he comes 
up to the full measure of the standard required. He possesses 
excellent judgment, exercises strict economy, and through his 
industry and energy his service to the Hospital becomes the 
be'st obtainable. 

Miss Mary T. "Wilson fills the position of Bookkeeper with 
exactness and ability unexcelled. She is especially to be com- 
mended in her work as supervisor of amusements. Xo hospital 
could have a better service. 

Mr. Louis F. Katterjohn, the storekeeper and superintendent 
of the farm, fills his position with credit to himself, and he has 
done much to make the farm profitable to the State. 

I am pleased with the zeal and earnest efforts put forth by 
the heads of departments, the attendants and employes, in 
fulfilling their duty. I fully appreciate their devotion and 
their good work. 

3 — SoLTHERN Insane. 



34 



CONCLUSION. 



In concluHioii, I tliauk tlie Board of Trustees for help and 
support in my work as Superintendent. Your wise suggestions, 
your unity in action and your very liberal support have made 
my labors here pleasing, and I hope you may see in them a 
fruition which will greatly enhance the Hospital's interest and 
prove a rich blessing to the patients. 

Very respectfully, 

G. C. MASON, 
Superintendent. 
Southern Indiana Hospital kok the Insane, 

EvANSViLLE, Ind., November 10, 1898. 



APPENDIX. 



(35) 



GENERAL MEDICAL STATISTICS. 



TABLE L 



Movemei}t of Patients from October 31, 1890 [Begiiininig), to 

October 31, 1898. 



Men. 



Whole number admitted . . . 
Whole number discharged . 

Discharged, recovered 

Discharged, improved 

Discharged, unimproved. . . 

Discharged, idiotic 

Discharged, not insane .... 

Whole number died 

Remaining October 31, 1898 



Women.! Total. 



618 


540 


233 


189 


186 


147 


17 


19 


23 


16 


4 


4 


3 


3 


108 


94 


277 


257 



1,158 

422 

333 

36 

39 

S 

6 

202 

534 



(37) 



38 



TABLE II. 



Total Number of Patients Admitted, Discharged and Died in the 
Biennial Period — November 1, 1896, to November 1, 1898. 



Men. Women. 



Total. 



Remaining (October 31, 1896 
Admitted (hiring 1S9()-189S.. 



Total treated during 1896-1898. 



Discliarged, recovered: . . 
Discharged, improved. . . 
Discharged, unimproved. 

Discharged, idiotic 

Discharged, not insane . . 



Total number discharged during 1896-1898. 

Total number died during 1896 -1898 

Remaining October 31, 1898 



214 

128 

342 

33 
1 
3 
1 



38 

27 

277 



221 
94 

315 

23 
9 
3 
2 

.1 



38 

20 

257 



435 
222 

657 

56 

10 

6 

3 

1 



76 

47 

534 



Per cent, of deaths on number treated during 1896 1897 

Per cent, nf deaths (in number treated during 1897-1898 

Per cent, of recoveries on total number treated during 1896-1897. . 
Percent, of recoveries on total number treated during 1.S97-1X98. . 
Per cent, of recoveries on total number admitted during 1896-1897. 
Per cent.-of recoveries on total number admitted during 1S97-1898. 



3.88 
4.66 
5.93 
4.5 

53.7 

16 



39 
TABLE III. 



Admissions by Counties — Biennial Period, 1896-1898. 





Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Crawford 


4 

13 
9 
10 
.3 
9 
7 
2 
7 
10 
5 
6 
6 

13 

15 

/ 

1 

1 

128 


3 
11 
5 
•6 
5 
6 
9 
3 
4 
8 
3 
2 
7 
2 
16 
4 

94 


7 


Daviess 


24 


Dubois 


14 


Oibson.. 


16 


Greene . 


8 


Harrison 


15 


Knox 


16 


Martin . 





Oranee 


11 


Perry 


18 


Pike 


8 


Posey 


8 


Spencer 


13 


Sullivan 


15 


Vanderburgh 


31 


Warrick 


11 


Marion 


1 


Vigo. 


1 


Total 


222 







TABLE IV 



Diagnosis of Those Ad miffed — Biennial Period 1896-1898. 



• 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Mania, acute 


18 
16 
12 
19 


12 

15 

18 

9 

1 

2 

33 

1 

2' 

i' 


30 


Mania, chronic 


31 


Mania, recurrent 

Mania, epileptic 


30 

28 


Mania, hysteric 


1 


Mania, puerperal 


2 


Melancholia 


■ 40 
2 
14 
2 
3 
2 


73 


Dementia, senile 

Dementia, terminal 

Dementia, paralytic 

Paranoia . ... • 


3 

14 
4 
3 


General paresis 


2 


Not insane 


1 








Total 


128 


94 


222 







40 



TABLE V. 



Alleged Cause of Insanity of Those Admitted — Biennial Period 

1896-1898. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



Amenorrhea 

Death in family 

Domestic trouble 

Disappointed love. . . . 

Kpilepsy 

Financial trouble . . . . 

Heredity 

Intemperance 

Injury to head 

Insomnia and anxiety 
Irritation from eyes . . 

I-» grippe 

Menopause 



Morphine habit 

Mental overwork 

Masturl'ation 

Paralysis 

I'uerperal state 

Religious excitement . . . . 

Spinal meningitis 

Specific 

Suppressed menstruation. 

Senility 

Sunstroke 

Typhoid fever 

Traumatism 

I'nknown 



16 
3 

40 
5 
3 
2 



Total. 



2 
27 

128 



1 
12 



34 



19 

94 



1 
3 
2 
1 

28 
3 

74 
5 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
3 
8 
5 
3 
8 
1 
3 
4 
3 
2 

46 

222 



41 



TABLE VI. 



Duration of Insanity Before Admission of Those Admitted Dur- 
ing Biennial Period 1896-1898. 



Duration. 


Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Less than one month 

One month 


15 

10 

10 

3 

3 

3 

10 

12 

14 

12 

3 

16 

17 

128 

! 


6 
7 
3 
5 

2* 

6 
8 

15 

6 

2 

16 

18 

94 


21 
17 


Two months 

Three months 

Four months 

Five months 

Six months 


13 

8 

3 

5 

16 


One vear 


20 


Two years 


29 


Three vears 


18 


Four vears 


5 


Over five vears 


32 


Unknown 


35 


Total 


222 







TABLE VIL 



Age of Those Admitted During the Biennial Period 1896-1898. 



• 


Men. 


Women . 


Total. 


From fifteen to twenty 


8 
21 
17 
18 
15 
14 
11 
12 
7 
2 


6 
12 
10 
22 
11 
5 
9 
12 

\ 

1 


14 


From twentv to twentv-five 


33 


From twentv-five to thirtv 


27 


From thirtv to thirty-five 


40 


From thirtv-five to fortv 


26 


From forty to forty-five 


19 


From fortv-five to fiftv 


20 


From fiftv to sixtv 


24 


From sixtv to seventv 


11 


From seventy to eighty 

Unknown 


4 

4 






Total 


128 


94 


222 







42 



TABLE VIII. 



Civil Condition of Those Admitted During the Biennial Period 

1896-1898. 



Men. 



Women. 



Total. 



S'iiikI*'- • • 
Married . 
Widowed 

Total 



71 
50 

7 



128 



33 
53 

8 



94 



104 
103 

15 



222 



TABLE IX. 



Nativity of Those Admitted During the Biennial Period 1896-1898. 





Men. 


Women. 


Total. 


Belgium 




1 
••■■■- 

71 

2' 

8 

i 

1 
3 

2 

1 


1 


F^ngland 


1 

2 

106 

4 

1 
9 
1 


1 


Gennanv 


6 


Indiana 


176 


Illinois 


4 


Ireland 


3 


Kfntnckv 


17 


Kan^>a.H 


1 


Missouri 


1* 


North Carolina . . 




1 


Ohio 


1 
1 


4 


Scotland 


1 


Tennrs-soe 


2 


Not known 


3 


4 






Total 


128 


94 


222 







43 
TABLE X. 



Occupation of Those Admitted During Biennial, Period 1896-1898. 



Men. 



Women. Total 



Attorneys . . . 
Bookkeepers. 

Barbers 

Blacksmiths . 
Butchers . . . . 
Clergymen . . 

Clerks 

Carpenters. . , 
Farmers . . . . 
Gardeners . . . 
Housework . . 
Laborers . . . . 

Miners 

Physicians . . 

Painters 

Salesmen . . . . 
Seamstresses . 
Stone mason. 
Teachers . . . . 
Not known . . 



Total 



1 
2 
1 

2 
1 
1 
5 
3 
62 
1 



23 
4 
1 
1 

2 



1 

1 

16 



128 



83 



10 



94 



1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
3 

62 
1 

83 

23 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

26 



222 



TABLE XI. 



Cause of Death of Those Who Died -During Biennial Period 

1896-1898. 



Men. Women.' Total. 



Apoplexy 

Abscess of lungs 

Cystic degeneration of kidney and dilatation of heart, 

Chronic diarrhioa 

Epileptic convulsions 

Fatty degeneration of heart 

Fracture of skull 

Inanition 

Nephritis 

Pneumonia 

Paretic dementia 

Pulmonary oedema 

Tuberculosis . , 

Uremia 



Total 



27 



6 
1 

20 



1 
1 
1 

1 
8 
1 
1 
7 
2 
1 
6 
1 

15 
1 

47 



44 



TAIU.K XIJ. 



JJaily Accrage Daring the Biennial Period 16V0-16'9S. 




November, 1896, 
LK'ct'iiil)er, 1896. 
Jamiary, 1S97 . . 
Keliriiary, 1897 . 
March, 1897 . . . . 

April, 1897 

Mav, 1897 

June, 1897 

July, 1897 

August, 1897.. . . 
September 1S97 . 
October, 1S97. .. 
November, 1897. 
December, 1897. 
January, 1898 .. 
February, 1898. . 
March, 1898.... 

April, 1898 

May, 1898 

June, 1898 

July, 1898 

August, 1898.... 
September, 1898, 
October, 1898 . . . 



200 


204 


404 


201 


204 


405 


201 


203 


404 


200 


204 


404 


199 


206 


405 


202 


205 


407 


202 


203 


405 


203 


202 


405 


205 


202 


407 


201 


201 


402 


199 


198 


397 


195 


197 


392 


198 


199 


397 


214 


216 


430 


221 


227 


448 


230 


228 


458 


236 


229 


465 


241 


229 


470 


243 


229 


472 


243 


229 


472 


243 


230 


473 


246 


231 


477 


246 


229 


475 


248 


228 


476 



45 






^ 



h- ( 


se 


1—4 


« 

S 




■^ 


w 


^ 


h^ 


-*j 


w 


» 


< 


« 


Eh 


-»* 



CO 






I 



CQ 



i 

X 

< 


•i«;f>x 


^^^0§35^| 


I 




J.'' 




■ i 


•aamoAV 


N ?3 ?! pf 1 ?i ?4 53 ?5 ?3 cl 51 ?i 


•U9IV 


d eo CQ 'Ml— •.-;"♦>: o-* tot- i 
S53?iS?ic1ei5i5l53S51 [ 




•l«10X 


MIMrHrlr-lrHeCr-lrHCCMi-l 1 C5 


•uauiOjYV 


:'"' : ■ : ••-"""-'s*' | ■ to ' 


•U8K 


rJi-n-Hr-lrti-1TJ ■ .i-llMi-l CO 


d 

o 
« 

cs 
o 

03 


o 
H 


•IB^OX 


jlM^-^O 


•i-H ^OOtDr-IO 00 


■uamo^V 


: : ;■*■* 


: : :«^ j'^ls 


•uam 


• 5^ r1 • i-l 


;i-l ;iraiNi-l-»)< r- 




•mox 










(M 


Ol 


■aamo^ 










ei» 1 cq 


P-H 


•a9iij[ 














o 

c 

c 


•PMOX 






r • 




1 


naniOjV^^ 






•f-H 


■ '"' i 


•U9jvr 












— > 
c o 


•I8?ox 


r h : 








rt CO 


•aemo^^ 


: : :- : 










- 


•aapi 


•^ ; i : 








"!" 1! 




•l«?ox 


'. '. :^ : 








r-t 1 o5 ; 


• uamOj\\^ 


: : :*^ : 








rl 1 00 


•aaK 










H i 


P 

>■ 

o 
o 


•IBjox 


jrtrtrtio 


>-i |oolo.-i?o a» 


•nerao^ 


: : i-^-* 


\ |coei -ec ■* 


•n8K 


|r-lr-l |i-l 


rH jiOCOi-HCC 1 >o 


ED. 


•lB?ox 


jtO(NCOO?U3N5D'tl— 1-33 1 'i" 


MITT 


•aemOyVV 


: : : I ^i 


a 


•UOK 


••*i-li-lrtU3<Mi*(N(MlCO 1 m 


i 

i 
I 


o 




November 

December 

February 

iMlUTh 

April 




3 
< 


s 

"a 


o 
o 

5 


H 





46 



1«>"X 



-r '«"-r t?; 1^ ».* >-C tC c^ lO ».C »o 



< 






O 
53^ 



05 









r 






■aatno^ 






« in n = e^ o •♦•.■: i~ 03 e* r- 



Wox I 



i-HOi-i'M'»i-« ■MMOOM'* 



•OOOIO^^ 



•aaw 



"l«10I 



•aamoj^ 



•new 



'I«10X 



•aomo^ 



■UBK 



mox 



*a9iao^ 



•uaw 



mox 



'aamo^ 



•U9jg 



mox 1 ^ 



■asoio^ 



•a»H 



•Wox 



■aemo^ 



t ^ 



•a9K 



f-IC4f-li-(i-l 



C-li-i -f-i -Mi-i- 



r- <o i-i i-i ej -r o N ii 



••♦t-i .C4i-i^t-li-i 



ecefl •»-< •MO"< 



lO ■* rH i-H ,- N OO C*»^ 



MMri -.-H 



i-i -ecc^ ■■— -aaar 



'WX gjg»->c»omo>nooi-'-«'« 



■aotno^ 



•09^ 



ST. Tl l~ >.t •* ■» i.-^ CO e<5 ■* « ■* 



m •-• ^ -q* «o Si lA C4 in t- I-I 00 



> " g - >- t. >>c^ it^;; 



47 



FARM AND GARDEN. 



ReTyoff for the Fiscal Year Ending (htoher 31, 1897. 

During the year the Farm and Garden was charged as fol- 
lows : 



Implements 

Seeds and pla ts 

Feed 

Wagons 

Fertilizer and miscellaneous. 

Hlat'ksmithing 

Wages to farm hands 

Board of farm hands 

Garbage 

Movable property 



f47 


25 


210 


11 


124 


68 


150 OO 


184 


35 


12 


90 


1,088 


56 


240 


oa 


275 OO 


989 41 



Total. 



J, 322 26 



PRODUCTS. 



Lettuce 1,527 

Radishes l,455i 

Beets 95 

Parsley 19 

Onions 2,21U 

Onions "4f\r 

Turnips 196| 

Sweet potatoes 169 

Celery 88 

Pork 14,273 

Kale 109J 

Salsify 7 

Popcorn 330 

Beets 35 

Strawberries 189.^ 

Cauliflower 85 

Rhubarb 44 

Cabbage 3,541 

Peas 37j 

Potatoes 138il 

Blackberries 120.] 

Apples 280i 

Green corn 398 

Watermelons 1,463 

Green beans 165 

Xavy beans 38 

Egg plant 4 

Cucumbers 25 



pounds $305 38 

dozen 

bushels 

bunches 

dozen 

bushels 

bushels 

bushels 

bunches 

pounds 

bushels 

bushels 

pounds 

dozen 

gallons 

pounds 

bunches 

heads 

bushels 

bushels 

gallons 

bushels 

dozen 



bushels, 
bushels, 
ilozen . . 
dozen . . 



87 33 

61 62 

1 90 
110 50 

44 66 

43 05 
101 40 

12 85 
716 26 

41 42 
7 00 
6 60 
3 50 

94 75 

17 00 

2 20 
106 24 

28 21 
80 51 

18 08 
57 80 
31 84 
74 30 

120 70 

62 70 
2 40 
2 50 



4.H 



I'uiupkiii.s IH 

Canteloupen ^'^2 

Culer 64 gallons. 

Okra •'' dozen. . 

I'eailies 4] bushels. 

Toni:it(.es 22 dozen.. 

Cucmiibers 46i bushels. 

ToniatDCB l*»2i{ bushels. 

(iraj.es -,987 pounds. 

Grapes lO.l bushels. 

Products stored 



$•■) 


70 


21 


13 


6 


40 




50 


2 25 




66 


36 


90 


.S7 


00 


29 


87 


7 


88 


254 


90 



Total $2,695 89 

To tlie foregoing credits is added the value of labor done by 
farm hands and teams on work outside the regular farm work 
and from which the farm derived no profit. There is also added 
the value of the wagons, implements and stock on hand at the 
close of the year, making the total credits due the farm, 

I'roduits $2,695 89 

Hauling and otiier outside work 315 78 

Farm property 800 50 

Stork hogs 502*50 

Total S4,314 67 

Total proceeds $4,314 67 

Total charges 3,322 26 

Net proceeds ?!'^2 41 

FARM AND GARDEN. 



Riport for the Fiscnl Year Ending Ortoher 31, 189S. 

l)nring the year the Farm and Garden was charged as fol- 
lows : 

Farm propcrt v $800 50 

Hogs ■ ^02 50 

Seeds and plants '-2( 82 

Blacksmithing li* 80 

Feed 394 92 

Fertilizer and miscellaneous charges 62 30 

Stock hog 8 00 

Garl>age 367 W) 

Board of farm labor 360 00 

Wages to fari;i 82* 61 

Total ... $3,570 45 



49 



I'KUDL'CTS. 



Cabbage OiO')? 

Turnips 2")6 

Means 30i 

Fork lo,5-->4 

1*11 mpki lis 1,5.S.S 

Celery 9S 

Parsley 94 

Leaf tobacco 4 

Lettuce 1, 9:52.1 

Cantaloupes 520 

Sweet i)otatoes. .- 493 i{ 

Flour 21,479 

Cucumbers 190^ 

Tomatoes 688f 

Cucumbers 58.1 

Ureen corn 2,461 

Grapes 8,031 

Green onions 1,558 

Kale 46? 

Potatoes 567 

Radishes 3,064 

Strawberries 141. I 

Peas 926 

Beets 70 

Rhubarb 101 

Onions lOJ 

Green Beans 4,0684 

Mangoes 43 

Beets 103^ 

Sweet peppers 226 

Blackberries 143i 

Peaches 10 



heads . . 
bushels 
busiiels 
pounds. 



$126 42 



bunches, 
buncihes. 
pounds . 
pounds . 



bushels., 
pounds. . 
busiiels . 
bushels. . 
dozen . . . 
dozen . . . 
pounds. . 
dozen . . . 
barrels . . 
bushels. . 
dozen . . . 
gallons. . 
gallons. . 
dozen . . . 
bunches, 
bushels. . 
gallons. , 
bushels, 
bushels, 
dozen . . , 
gallons, 
bushels. 



Total 



95 


48 


42 


52 


776 


20 


39 


70 


22 06 


4 


70 




28 


193 


25 


13 


15 


472 


95 


483 


75 


152 40 


407 


49 


5 


85 


184 


58 


120 


46 


38 


95 


47 


85 


455 


13 


117 


20 


63 


48 


92 


()() 


3 


8(» 


10 


10 


6 


15 


406 


85 


43 


00 


82 


80 


35 


15 


29 


30 


1 


-5(1 



581 1(1 



To the foregoiiis: credits is added the vegetables stored and 
the implements and stock on hand at the close of the liscal 
year, making the credits due the farm as follows : 

Vegetables consumed $4,581 10 

Vegetables stored 229 70 

Farm property 860 -29 

Hogs 607 50 



Total. 



5,278 59 



Total credits ?6,278 5'.t 

Total charges 3,570 45 

Net proceeds S2,708 14 

4 — Southern Insane. 



50 



INVENTORY. 



Fisrai Year 18^0-1897. 

Land, buildings and niacliinery $504,441 64 

Otfifes, general and medical libraries $2,957 70 

Reception rooms 4o4 79 

Siiperinlendent's (juarters 2,440 14 

Superintendent's and oHicers' dining roijms 699 55 

Superintendent's and officers' kitdien 463 54 

Officers' (juarters 1,708 10 

Dispensary and surgery 1,391 51 

Employes' quarters 3,681 70 

Employes' dining room 363 92 

(ieneral kitchen 2,404 48 

Bakery 58 16 

Assembly room 625 71 

Sewing room 450 50 

Laun<lry 110 14 

Ward property 23,604 76 

Power and motor house 487 96 

Carpenter and paint shops 298 22 

Stable 1,659 30 

Farm 800 50 

Stock hogs 502 50 

Tools on grt)unds 179 36 

Vegetables stored 254 90 

In store 2,022 49 

47,619 93 



Total $.552,061 57 



51 



INVENTORY 



Fiscal Year 18V7-1S9S. 

Land, building and machinery $506,668 31 

Offices, general and medical libraries 3-2,928 13 

Reception rooms 450 25 

Superintendent's (jiiarters 2,415 74 

Superintendent's and officers' dining rooms 692 56 

Superintendent's and officers' kitchen 464 19 

Officers' quarters 1,691 02 

Dispensary and surgery 1 ,427 60 

Employes' quarters 4,044 89 

Emphwes' dining room 410 29 

General kitchen 2,480 04 

Bakery 52 35 

Assembly room 475 71 

Sewing rooms 506 10 

Laundry 132 63 

Ward property 25,437 03 

Power and motor houses 646 44 

Carpenter and paint shops 423 66 

Stable 1,217 71 

Farm property S60 29 

Hogs 607 50 

Tools on grounds and lawn benches 554 43 

Vegetables stored 229 70 

In store 82126 

48,969 52 



Total $555,637 83 



52 



SEWING ROOM. 



Schedule iShowing Worh Done During the Fiscal Year LS9G-LS9/. 



Akticles. 

* 


Made. 


' Marked. 

1 


I 
Mended. 


AprotiH 


223 


503 


1,017 
26 




Bibs 


36 


36 

636 

12 

146 

4 

7 




Blankets . . . . . 




Blankets, rubber 

Bonnets 


95" 

8 


228 


Camisoles 


75 


Caps 




2 


Canopy bars 


14 
351 




Chemises 


m 
3 
2 

106 

110 

43 

13 

17 

160 

"676' 

9 

429 


1,264 


Cloaks 


3 


Combination suits 


17 


69 


Collars 


2 


Coa's . . . . 




458 


Coals, over 




116 


Coats, rubl)er 





9 


Corsets and covers 


3 
113 
756 
494 

15 
204 

12 
276 


10 


Curtains 


139 


Curtain straps 




Dresses . 


.... 

2,447 

155 


Dresses, canvas 


Drawers 


3,490 


Dust cloths 


Gowns . ... 


169 

27 

55 

229 

4fi9 

72 

775 

444 

4!U 

27 


1,862 


(iloves 


Hats 






Handkerchiefs 






Hose 




2,933 


Hoods 




Napkins 


1,058 


184 


Pants 


1 457 


Pillow cases 


1,156 
11 
36 


671 


Sa<'ks, clothing 


8 


Sackn, tea 




Shawls 


28 
334 

12 
364 
113 

91 
216 
222 

79 
360 
121 
145 

24 
140 1 


13 


Sheets 


939 
12 
20 
18 


1,230 
.5 


Sheets, restraining 


Shirts 


1 839 


Shirts, nijfht 


300 


Shirts, under 


892 


Shoes 






Skirt,s, under 


274 


433 


Slippers 




Spreads 


30 


33 


Suspenders 


43 


Tablecloths 


66 
24 


407 


Tablecloths, fancv 




Tags 





53 



SEWING ROOM— Continued. 



Articles. 


Made. 


Marked. 


Mended. 


Towls 


1,232 


702 

143, 

46 

66 

9,060 


88 


Vests 


1,487 
324 


Waists, under 

Wrappers 


190 
15 

7,698 


Total 


23 718 







SEWING ROOM. 



Schedule Shoiring Work Bone During the Fiscal Year 1,S97-LS9S. 



Articles. 


Made. 


Marked. 


Mended. 


Aprons 


■ 657 

4 

17 


1,004 

4 

17 

81 

58 


207 


Aprons, dispensary 




Bibs 




Blankets 




Bonnets 


75 


38 


Camisoles 


137 


Caps 




29 




Canopv bars 


1 
460 




Chemises 


431 
13 

147 

234 
44 

160 
29 

100 


941 


Cloaks .... 




Combination suits 


54 


105 


Coats 


141 


Coats, over 




5 


Collars 






Rovers, corsets 


9 
424 
160 




Curtains 


46 


Curtain straps 




Cuffs 


• 13 




Cushions, for wagon 


12 

530 
15 

469 
45 
27 
27 

353 




Dresses 


580 

5 

1.025 

' 45 

27 

27 

457 

102 

!)93 

1,693 

49 

610 


759 


Dresses, canvas 


180 


Drawers 


1,024 


Dresser scarfs 


Dust cloths 




Gloves 




Gowns 


422 


Hats 




Handkerchiefs 






Hose 




939 


Hoods 






Napkins 


646 

38 

31 

1,265 

9 


10 


Oversleeves 




Pants 


391 

667 

9 


798 


Pillow cases 


181 


Pillow ticks 





54 



SEWING KOOM— Continued. 



Articles. 



Sacks, clothing.. .. 

Shawli 

SlieclB 

Shetts, restraining. 
Sliefiw, riihher . . . . 

Shins 

ShirtH, night 

Shirts, under 

*^hoe9 

Shirts 

Skirts, under 

Sli|>}ier8 

Spreads 

Splashers 

Suspenders 

Tablecloths 

Tablecloths, fancy. 

Tag* 

Ties 

Vest* 

Waists, shirt 

Waists, under 

Wrappers 



Made. Marked. 



47 



1,370 
6 



82 
16 
42 



42 
542 



22 
14 
21- 

287 

33 

382 



6 
24 
18 



82 

85 

1,242 

4 

13 

472 

247 

465 

259 

104 

141 

114 

31 

14 

91 

135 

7 

3,452 

30 

287 

6 

236 

18 



Mended. 



196 



1,094 

84 

496 



232 
31(» 



14 



11 
195 



Total : 8,282 16,579 



465 
"52 

s.ssi; 



AKTrCLES PREPARED BY HOUSEKEEPER. 



1896-1898. 

Blackberries 42 gallons. 

Klackberry jam 18 ({uarts. 

Cherries •. :iU (juarts. 

Grapes, canned 144 gallons. 

(Jrape jelly 1,53 gallons. 

Gooseberries 20 cjuarts. 

Mangoes 184 gallons. 

Plums, canned 86 gallons. 

Plum preserves 16 gallons. 

Plum butter 22 gallons. 

Peaches ,55 gallons. 

Pickles, cucumber 26 barrels. 

Pickles, tomato 140 gallons. 

Pickles, mixed 25 quarts. 

Strawberries 1.') quarts. 

Tomatoes, canned 466 gallons. 

Tomato catsup 172 gallons. 

I^ard 22,707 pounds. 



55 



The following is a complete list of voiieliers [)ai(l during the 
fiscal year ending October 31, 1897, the originals of which, 
properly signed and sealed, may be foutid on file in the ofiice 
of the Auditor of State. Duplicate coi)ies are on tile in the 
business office of this Hospital : 



O 0) 

<v o 

•^ 5 



Name of Claimant. 



Nati'reof Claim. 



Amount. 



Eichel & Weil Pk. and Prov. Co 

Adler Bros 

Ev. Roller Flour Milling Co. . , 

Vickerv Bros 

Michael Ward 

Armour & Co 

J. V. Bnining & Son 

Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . , 
J no. Gilbert Dry Goods Co ... , 

Keok eS: Bacon 

Dr. A. J. Thomas 

VVm. Schnute 

E. C. Johnson 

Boetticher, Kellogg it Co 

Chas. Wahnsiedler 

American Laundry ^lach'ry Co, 

R. ct J. Farquhar & Co 

Cook & Ad kins 

Chas. Leich & Co , 

DeForest Coal Co 

Standard Oil Co 

Wm. Elmendorf 

Dr. A. J. Thomas , 

Yickery Bros 

Eicher& Weil Pk. and Prov. Co 

Chas. W. Brizius & Co 

Swift A Co 

J. F. Bruning & Son , 

H. J. Heinz & Co 

Adler Bros 

Michael Ward 

Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . 

Keck & Bacon 

Toriau & Barbour Hat Co ... . 

Gumberts Bros , 

Jno. Gilbert Dry Goods Co ... , 

Douglas Dallam 

Blackman & Lunkenheimer . . 

Boetticher. Kellogg & Co 

E. C. Johnson 

Dr. A. .J. Thomas 

Evening Tribune , 

Strohm, Fisher ct Co 

Evansville Drug Co , 

DeForest Coal Co 

Hirsch Bros 

Heilman Machine Works , 



Fresh meats 

Groceries .• • • • 

Flour 

(Grocers' sundries. . . . 

Milk 

Butterine 

Coffee 

Ice 

Dry goods 

Buttons 

Contingent expenses. 

Brick 

Paints and varnish . . 

Hardware 

Pipe, ells and tees. . . 

Repair material 

Seed 

Stove pipe 

Drugs 

Coal 

Oil and turpentine . . 
Horseshoeing 



$748 

.522 

216 

173 

150 

107 

55 

15 

31 

17 

11 

11 

9 

6 

4 

6 

1 

32 

280 

18 

4 

Pay-roll \ 2,555 

Groceries and poultry 

Beef and sausage 

Flour and meal 

Butterine 

660 lbs. coffee 

6 barrels kraut 

10 barrels apples 

1,240 gallons milk 

Ice 

Dry goods and notions 

One dozen pairs gloves 

Spectacles 

Spool cotton, etc 

One pair brogans 

Queensware 

Hardware 

Window glass 

Contingent expenses 

Subscription 

Tissue paper, etc 1 

Drugs 42 

Coal 477 

Cold wood 151 

Heater attachment 65 



746 

695 

228 

117 

115 

30 

16 

155 

10 

89 

12 

3 

1 

1 

13 

19 

1 



28 
10 
00 
14 
00 
50 
50 
48 
79 
80 
50 
50 
35 
45 
83 
25 
70 
05 
98 
50 
24 
10 
55 
88 
11 
50 
50 
50 
00 
75 
00 
32 
87 
00 
00 
25 
25 
25 
60 
85 
85 
00 
50 
41 
16 
87 
75 



56 



\'()L(IIKK8— Coiitiimed. 






Namk ok Claimant. 



Natibe of Claim. 



48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
.'.3 
54 
55 
5«5 
57 
58 
5!> 
60 
HI 
62 
68 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
6!t 
70 
71 



74 
7") 
76 
77 
7H 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
1(K) 



Amount. 



Chas. Wahnsiedler 

J. H. ( Jreeiie Electrical Co . . . 

Anchor Supply Co 

Davidson Blount Co 

Win. Khnendorf 

L. E. Long 

(leo. M. Uhl 

I. Gans 

Ev. Trans. Cab Line 

Haneisen iS: Co 

Smith & Bntterfield 

(.ieupel Bros 

Fowler, Dick \- Walicer 

(ieo. D. Bowen 

Peter C. Miller 

Dr. A. J. Thomas. Med, Sup't 
Eichel tS: Weil Pk. and Prov.Co 

.\dler Bros 

Chas. W. Brizius «& Co 

Michael Ward 

Armour iS: Co 

.1. V. Bruning i^ Son 

Anton F. Kiefer. . . .' 

Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . 

Vickerv Bros 

.NIorgan Bahcock 

Keck tS: Bacon 

G. H. Lewis 

Wm. B. Burford 

The Lottie Hotel 

Wm. (i. Warren 

Dr. A. .1. Thomas 

Cook iV .Vdkins 

H. M. Taylor 

John Lamhert 

Julius Niednagel 

L. M. Baird 

Boetticher, Kellogg iS: Co 

Wm. S<hnute t*c C'o 

E. C. Johnson 

H. Stoermer 

Chas. Leich A Co 

.\merican Endoscope Co 

Wm. H. Armstrong »S: Co 

De Forest Coal Co 

Chas. Wahnsiedler 

Standanl Oil Co 

J. B. (irecn Electrical Co 

Heilman Machine Works 

Ev. Ix^athcr and Belting Co. . . 

Wm. Elmendorf 

A. Duerringer 

Walz Seed Co 



Plumbing supplies 

Electrical supplies 

Packing and rope 

Repairs to wagons 

Horseshoeing 

< )vercheck rein 

Flower pots 

Christmas goods 

Rent for wagonette 

Christmas goods 

Paper 

Christmas goods 

Christmas goods 

Evergreens 

Music 

Pay-roll 

Beef and sausage 

Groceries 

Flour and meal 

Milk 

Butterine 

Coffee and tea 

Salt meats 

Ice and ice hooks 

Dried apples, etc 

I Apples 

Dry goods 

Shoes 

Stationery 

Legislative committee . . , 
: Entertainment 

Contingent expenses. ... 

Tinware 

Plants 

Flower pots 

Plants 

Cement 

Hardware 

Lumber 

White lead 

500 brick 

Drugs 

Endoscope 

Surgical supplies 

Coal 

Radiators and phimbing 

(^il and turpentine 

Electrical supplies 

Repairs to engine , 

Leather belting 

Blacksmithing 

Blacksmithing , 

. I Garden seeil 



$23 91 
18 20 

1 50 

4 35 
3 95 
1 00 

10 75 
23 75 
6 00 
9 40 
3 00 
3 00 
33 61 

5 00 
21 00 

2,562 15 

847 92 

594 65 

232 50 

155 00 

105 00 

94 20 

89 96 

16 32 

14 20 

5 60 

60 93 

13 80 
102 89 

14 00 
12 00 

12 04 
1 20 

14 00 

5 40 

1 00 
8 30 

16 80 

6 66 

3 00 

2 75 
49 66 
26 50 

6 03 

452 13 

154 50 

26 70 

21 10 

13 51 

4 86 
6 40 
4 65 
1 45 



57 



VOUCHERS— ContinncMl. 



O ^ 



5> 



Name ok Claimant. 



Naturk ok Cj-aim. 



Amoint. 



101 I L. PC. Long 

102 J. P. Davies 

103 -H. Koch & Sons 

104 Cieorge \V. Ainory 

105 J. H. Mesker A: Co 

lOG P. B. Trii)Iett 

107 ; Dr. A. J. Thomas 

108 1 J. B. Wilson, Trustee 

109 S. B. Bovd 

110 EicheKS:"Weil Pk. and Prov. Co. 

111 VickeryBros 

112 Iglehart Bros 

113 Michael Ward 

1 14 Titzer Bros 

115 J. F. Bruning l^- Sons 

116 Anton Kiefer 

117 Keck i*c Bacon 

118 .John Gill>ert Drv Goods Co 

ll'J Torian c<: Barbour Hat Co 

120 Anchor Supplv Co 

121 Dr. A. J. Thomas 

122 P. B. Triplett 

123 Philij* W. Frev 

124 J. W. Pepper '. 

125 Harding c^- Miller 

126 F. Lauenstein 

127 Keller Printing and Pub. Co . . 

128 Sherman Decorating Co 

129 Boetticher, Kellogg & Co 

13't Blackman & Lunkenheimer . . . 

131 I Wm. H. Schnute & Co 

132 .J. B. Greene \- Co 

133 Stephen Schreiber 

134 De Forest Coal Co 

135 Standard Oil Co 

136 ! J. B. Greene <X: Co 

137 Charles Wahnsiedler 

138 I Charles Leich & Co 

139 Smith c^c Bntterfield. .' 

140 H.J. Schlaepfer 

141 i C. C. MoKinney 

142 I William Elmendorf 

143 J. O. Flickner \- Son 

144 Walz Seed Co 

145 John Lambert 

146 Henry B. Smyth 

147 ; Dr. A. J. Thomas 

148 ! Dr. J. B. Wilson, Trustee 

149 Wm. L. Swormstedt 

150 Eichel & Weil Pk. and Prov. Co 

151 \ Adler Bros 

152 I Chas. Brizius eS: Co 

153 I Michael Ward 



One bit for gray horse 

Soap 

Laundry stove 

Disinfectant 

Wagon gates 

Freight and expressage 

Pay-roll 

Traveling and other expenses.. 
Traveling and other expenses.. 

Fresh beef 

Groceries 

Flour 

Milk 

Corn and apples 

Coffee 

Salt meats 

Dry goods 

Dry goods 

Hats 

Grommets 

Contingent expenses 

Contingent expenses 

Legal services 

Cornet 

Repairing music boxes 

Subscription papers 

Blanks 

Painting 

Hardware 

Queensware 

Lumber 

Time detector keys 

Repair to scales 

Coal 

Cylinder oil 

Electrical supplies 

Engineers' supplies 

Drugs 

Medical books 

Ice bags 

Fertilizer 

Horseshoeing 

Whips 

Garden seed 

Flower pots 

Tiling 

Pay-roll 

Trustee 

Trustee 

Fresh meats 

Groceries 

Flour and meal 

Milk 



10 75 

200 00 

65 00 

37 95 
85 00 

8 30 

2,550 74 

30 00 

43 00 

778 28 

481 48 

220 00 

161 50 

127 28 

99 00 

90 56 

161 36 

85 26 

4 37 

1 Oft 
36 52 
25 00 
50 00 
25 00 
23 31 

8 fO 

2 00 
40 00 
35 42 
30 30 

49 
]• 
15 
412 

i: 

6 

1 

28 05 
10 55 

1 50 
28 (0 

5 25 
4 (0 

2 15 

6 75 
2 37 

2,566 47 
35 00 

38 00 
912 72 
574 89 
270 00 
166 62 



00 
00 
19 
68 
00 
10 



5X 



VOUCH KliS—Ccjiitiiiued. 



J i Namk of Claimant. 

l.')4 i J. F. HruninK t^ Son 

15"> ■< FrieiJniJui Mfg. Co 

15)> Kritilmai) Mlg. Co 

157 iNew lA'baiioii Creamery Co. . . . 

15S i Vickery Bros 

16S> ) Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . . 

ItfO I Keek A Baron 

101 I Jno. (Jilhert Drv Goods Co 

1«J2 i Fowler. Diik &' Walker 

1«;} I (i. II. I^wis 

1H4 . Wni. |{. Biirford 

16-') Ciinil). Teleg. ami Teiep. Co . . . 
IGti S. H. Boyd, Trustee 

167 i Dr. A. .r. TiKjinas, Snpt 

168 I Keller I'rinting and I'ub. Co . . 
16'.» Worthington F>ng. an<l Print.Co. 
17<» Bennett i*i Co 

171 J. K. Hoing iS: Co 

172 Cook A: .Vdkins 

\T.i Harding i^: Miller 

174 Walz See<l Co 

17'") ; John Lambert 

176 I Wm. H. Schnnte & Co 

177 ; Boetticher, Kellogg i'^ Co 

17H A. Dnerringer 

171) 1 Cha.s. Walinsiedler 

18(» i Chas. Leifli A- Co 

181 ! Illinois Pnre .\lnminum (^o.... 

182 Del'.. rest Coal Co 

183 Standard Oil Co 

184 Ileilman Machine Work.s 

185 I Ev. Leather and Belting Co. .. . 

186 I J. B. Greene Electrical Co .... 

187 Augiistns Alh-n 

188 William Elmendorf 

189 Dr. A .1. Thomas Snpt 

M»0 Eichel A Weil I'k and Prov. Co 

191 Vickerv Bn.s 

192 Igleharl Bros 

VXi Michael Ward... 

194 J. ]•'. Brnning & Son 

IHS A.IIer Bros 

196 John H. Conn 

197 Ev. Ice and Cold Stfirage Co.. . 

198 Ilarrv Joseph 

199 KeckA I'.acon 

20() L. Locwenthal Sons A Co 

201 Ooiiglas Dallam 

202 William IlnL'hes 

203 Anchor Sn|>plv (,'o 

204 ; Jno. (;ill.ert Dry Goods Co. .. . 

205 , Singer Manufacturing Co 

206 I L. W. Ix)omis 



Natikeoi- Claim. 



i;ofice 

Bntterine, February, 1S'J7 
Butterine, March, 1897... 

Butter 

Salt meats 

Ice 



Dry gootls 

Dry goods 

Dry goods 

1 pair men's shoes 

Sta'ionery 

Telephone rental 

Con. and trav. expenses . . 

Contingent expenses 

landing medical journals. 

Printing programs 

City directory 

Furniture 

Milk pans 

Violin and bow 

(irass and garden seed . . . . 

Flower pots 

Lumber and glass 

Hardware 

I>lacksmithing 

Plumbing 

Drugs 

Medicine cups 

Coal 

Oil and turpentine 

Work on steam puojps. . . . 
Belt grease and jiacking . . 
One knife switch 



Hay 

Horseshoeing 

Pay ndl 

Fresh beef 

(troceries 

Flour 

Milk 

CoflTee 

Grocer's sundries 

Fish 

Ice 

.Men's clothing 

r>ry goods 

Men's clothing 

Shoes 

Women's hats 

Duck rojje and grommets. 

Cambric 

Machine needles 

Tinware 



Amount, 



jl04 ;i6 

107 10 

107 10 

12 80 

72 24 

10 62 
190 45 
1.H6 12 
134 60 

1«50 
85 42 
50 45 
45 00 

8 29 

6 00 
5 00 
4 00 

25 00 
12 00 

4 50 
15 05 

5 40 
22 11 

11 33 
10 40 

7 35 
40 35 

4 17 

297 72 

27 62 

24 62 
10 35 

1 00 

25 69 

6 45 
,615 63 

837 41 
4^ 
261 
161 



19 
00 
25 
88 50 
51 23 
37 00 

15 96 
137 75 
127 76 
122 50 

93 00 
27 95 

16 56 
4 93 
1 00 

43 20 



59 



VOUCHERS— Continued. 






Name ok Claimant. 



Nature OK Ci,aim. 



207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216* 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 
226 
227 
228 
229 
230 
231 
232 
233 
234 
235 
236 
237 
238 
.239 
240 
241 
242 
•243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
2nl 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 



Amoint. 



Ev. Mattress and Lounge Fact'yj 

I. A. Thiele. ■ 

George F. Weikel 

Evansville Water Works 

William IT. .>(lumte & Co 

Boetticher, Kellogg A: Co 

L. M. Baird 

Chas. Walinsiedler 

E. C. Johnson 

Heilman Machine Works 

Chas. Leich »S: Co 

H. J. Schlaepfer 

DeForest Coal Co 

J. B. Greene Electrical Co 

Ev. Leather and IJelting Co... 

WalzSeed Co i 

Herrman Bros. Mfg. Co 

Wm. Elmendorf 

L. E. Long 

Dr. A. J. Thomas 

Philip \V. Frey 

Wni. Smith Transfer Co 

Dr. A. .1. Thomas, Sup't 

Wm. R. McMahan, Trustee . . . 

W. R. Gardiner, Trustee 

Eichel & Weil Pk. and Prov. Co. 

Vickery Bros 

Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . . 

Iglehart Bros 

Michael Ward 

Swift ^' Co 

J. F. Bruning & Son 

C. H. Parsons 

Armour Packing Co 

Marsh-Scantlin Bakery 

Jno. Gilbert Dry Goods Co. . . . 

Bitt«rman Bros 

W. J. Dallam & Son 

Anchor Paving Co 

('has. Wahnsiedler 

August Schmidt 

Heilman Machine Works 

E. C. .Johnson 

Boetticher, Kellogg & Co 

Evansville Drug Co 

DeForest Coal Co. 

(Teorge AV. Armory 

Standard Oil Co . ." 

Thorn j)son A: Chute Soap Co. . . 
J. B. Greene Electrical Co ... . 

Wm. H. Schnute & Co 

J. (t. Launert »S: vSon 

! J. E. Hoing c<t Co 



Mattress and i)illows.. 

Coal oil stove 

Repairs to ovens 

Water pipes 

Lumber 

Hardware 

Cement 

Plumbing supplies . . . 

Paint 

Pig lead 

Drugs 

Trusses 

Coal 

Electrical supplies . . . 

Packing 

Garden seed 

Plow points 

Horseshoeing 

Harness pieces 

Pay-roll 

Legal services 

Hauling water pipes. 
Contingent expenses . 
Traveling expenses. . . 
Traveling expenses. . . 

Fresh beef 

Groceries, salt meats . 

Ice - • 

Flour 

Milk 

Butterine 

Coffee and tea 

Potatoes 

Butterine 

Bread 

Dry goods 

Spectacles 

Men's shoes 

Stone floor in bakery 
Plumbing supplies . . 
Repairs to range. ... 

Repair work 

Paint 

Hardware 

Drugs 

Coal 

Disinfectant 

I Turpentine and wax. 

Chip soap 

1 Zincs for battery. . . . 

' Lumber 

i Repair to buggy .... 
1 Furniture gimp 



$9 50 


1 25 


135 00 


121 56 


46 70 


18 04 


13 00 


8 60 


5 40 


3 20 


36 14 


3 75 


269 91 


2 26 


3 73 


21 60 


10 00 


4 30 


2 00 


2,832 09 


50 00 


8 00 


3 93 


43 00 


12 75 


738 22 


(520 75 


182 26 


174 00 


166 62 


156 00 


102 40 


60 25 


60 00 


6 58 


22 09 


3 00 


1 50 


55 00 


49 35 


39 55 


37 00 


3 60 


2 69 


18 70 


191 88 


57 50 


23 30 


9 52 


6 00 


4 90 


2 50 


2 50 



60 



VOUCHERS— Continued. 




2«(» J. L. Allen 

261 Win. Elmendorf 

262 C. 1'. Wack 

263 Dr. .\. J Tliomas 

264 Dr. A. .1. TIimiikis 

266 Blackmail it Liinkenheimer . . . 

266 Al)c- Eiclu'l, Mortgagee 

267 Allien Bros 

268 Vi.kerv Bros 

26'.t ("ha.s. W. Briziiis & Co 

270 ,J. K. Bnining ct Son 

271 Swift ^ Co. . 

27'J .John ( iilliert Drv Goods Co. . . . 

273 W. J. Dallam i';:"Son 

274 Ki'ck A Baton 

27o P. C. Miller 

27t> Blackinan it Lunkenheimer. . . . 

277 Win. H. Scliniite it Co 

278 Boettichor, Kellogg it Co 

279 Charles Walinsiedler 

280 E. C. .Johnson 

281 EvansviUe Drug Co 

282 DeForest Coal Co 

283 Thomas C. Warlev it Co 

284 William I'elz. . . . '. 

285 Kester Electric Co 

286 Ev. l^"ather and Belting Co. . . 

287 J. P. Davie.«s 

288 Walz Seed Co 

281> C. C. McKinnev 

291 Hornhroukit Co 

291 Hermann Bros. Mfg. Co 

292 .John S. Wilson 

29:« William Elmendorf 

294 Wack it Co 

295 .J. B. (Jreeiie Electrical Co 

296 Worthington Kng. and Prin.Co. 

297 Standard Oil Co 

298 Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co. . . 

299 Michael Ward ».. 

300 Dr. A. .J. Thomas, Snpt 

301 Dr. A. .J. Thomas, Snpt 

302 P. B Triplett. Steward 

303 Dr. A. .J. Thomas, Snpt 

.304 Al.e Ei.hel 

30.') .\dlcr Bros 

3n(i Iglchart Bros 

307 Ev. Ice and C«dd Storage Co. . . 

30.S Virkerv Bros 

309 Michael Ward 

310 .Vrinonr Packing Co 

31 1 (^has. W. Brizius it Co 

312 B. Titzer 



Hi 



Horseshoeing 

Healing j)owders 

Contingent e.xpenses 

Pay-roll 

Queensware 

l<>esh beef 

Groceries 

Salt meats and grocer'ssundries 

I'lour and meal 

Co flee and tea 

liutterine 

Dry goods and notions 

Shoes and slippers 

I3ry goods 

Music 

(Queensware 

Enmber 

Hardware 

I^lnmbing supplies 

Paints 

Drugs 

Coal 

Boiler compound 

I'^lues for boilers 

Brush-holders 

Hemp and packing 

Chipp'd soap 

I^'ertilizer, etc 

l-'^ertilizer, etc 

Hand carts 

Mower sections, etc 

Navy beans 

Horseshoeing 

Breeching straps 

Sockets.. 

Printing diplomas 

Oil and tnri)entine 

Ice 

Milk 

I'ay-roll 

Contingent expenses 

Contingent expenses 

One bath tub 

Ercsli beef 

Groceries 

I-'lonr 

Ice, salt meats, etc 

Grocer's sundries 

Milk 

Butterine 

Bread 

Apples and plums 



$16 50 

4 95 
1 00 

8 60 
2,6(t7 5(t 

14 82 
835 10 
465 74 
171 13 
271 52 
118 80 

39 00 
96 64 
57 00 
56 43 
13 40 

15 60 
153 63 

18 68 

10 20 

9 40 
9 05 

162 10 

185 22 

26 15 

16 00 

11 51 
200 00 

24 32 
18 00 

11 00 
3 75 
1 35 

5 30 
60 

3 36 

<■) 00 

42 61 

192 93 

161 26 

2.580 64 

17 00 

6 10 
75 00 

818 51 
519 r,6 
210 00 
189 60 
170 86 
166 62 
110 04 
47 43 

12 15 



61 



VOUCHEKS— Continued. 



Name of Claimant. 



S5 



Natireof Claim. 



Amount. 



813 
314 
315 
31() 
317 
31S 
319 
320 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
,345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
360 
361 
362 
363 
364 
365 



L. Loewenthal & Sons 

H. E. Bacon 

Jno. (iilliert Dry (ioods Co. 
Dr. A. J. Thomas, Supt. ... 

Philip W. Frey 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Supt 

C. H. Ellert 

Evening Trbune 

Demokrat Co 

Evansville Journal Co 

Evansville Courier Co 

Chas. Leich & Co 

F. M. Petersheimer 

De Forest Coal Co 

Haueisen & Co 

J. B. Greene Electrical Co . 

Anchor Supply Co 

Blackman & Lunkenheimer 
Cook and Adkins 

G. W. Warren Co 

Eichel, Arnold & Co 

Heilman Machine Works. . . 
Boetticher, Kellogg & Co. . . 

E. C. Johnson 

William Grainger 

William Elmendorf 

L. E. Long 

Walz Seed Co 

Chas. F. H. Saval 

W. R. McMahan, Trustee . . 
W. R. Gardiner, Trustee . . . 
W. L. Swormstedt, Trustee. 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Supt 

Adler Bros 

Abe Eichel 

Ev. Ice and Cold Storage Co 

Chas. W. Brizius & Co 

Michael W^ard 

Enderle Karn & Co 

Friedman Mfg. Co 

Chas. D. Brandis 

C. F. Hopkins 

Benjamin Titzer 

Vickery Bros 

Keck & Bacon 

Jno. Gilbert Dry Goods Co . 

AncTior Supply Co 

Wm. B. Burford 

Blackman & Lunkenheimer 
Boetticher, Kellogg & Co. . . 

Haueisen Sc Co 

C. H. Ellert 

Chris. Neipp 



Men's clothing 

Hosiery and ta})e. . . . 

Dry goods 

Salary 

Legal services 

Emergent expenses. . 

Rubber stamps 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Drugs 

Surgical instruments 

Coal 

Fireworks and flags . 

Wire 

Rope 

Queensware 

One tin dipper 

Violin strings 

Sand 

Repairs 

Hardware 

Ground glass 

Seed potatoes 

Horseshoeing 

Harness 

Navy beans 

Ditch assessment. . . . 
Traveling expenses. . 
Traveling expenses. . 
Traveling expenses. . 

Pay-roll 

Groceries 

Fresh beef 

Ice 

Flour and meal 

Milk 

Coffee, tea, spices . . . 

Butterine 

Grapes 

Peaches 

Plums 

Grocer's sundries. . . . 

Dry goods 

Dry goods 

Duck and grommets. 

Stationery 

(Queensware 

Hardware 

Crofjuet sets 

Rubber stamps 

Toilet paper 



$20 33 


15 


90 


7 


65 


105 


55 


50 


00 


11 


93 


2 


65 


5 00 


5 


00 


5 00 


5 


00 


44 


35 


10 


85 


1.33 


27 


49 


00 




88 


8 


30 


3 55 




35 


2 


25 




40 


10 


80 


10 


69 


3 


50 


15 


70 


IT 
/ 


65 


5 


40 


1 


50 


37 


29 


32 40 


23 


30 


21 


45 


2,596 


15 


660 


60 


600 80 


208 


60 


191 


00 


166 


81 


132 


86 


110 


82 


22 


50 


14 30 


2 00 


98 


62 


165 


44 


84 45 


7 


50 


154 


55 


54 


91 


19 


28 


6 


90 




70 


8 GO 



62 



VOUCHERS— Continued. 



- ul 
3 « I 






Namk ok ("kaimant. 



Natireoi' Claim. 



Amoi'Nt. 



;•;») E. C. Johnson 

;;67 Chas. Leicli A Co 

368 Uel'orest Coal Co 

369 ! Chas. Walinsiedler 

370 I Kv. Leatlur & Belting Co.. . 

371 ' Standard < )il Co 

372 J. H. (Jreene Electrical Co.. 

373 Frank Tardy 

374 liraiiiliall Dupaniuet Co 

37o Will. II. Stiiniite tV Co 

376 Orr. (iriflith \ Co 

377 Will. I'.lmt'iulorf 

378 : Hfilman Plow Co 

379 j L. E. Long 

380 \ Wal/.Seed Co 

3S1 Dr. (J. C. Mason, Sup't 

382 Cumb. Telp. and Teleg. Co. 

383 Dr. (i. C. Mason, Snp't 

384 Vickerv Hros 

38o Eicliel & Weil 

386 Cha.s. Hriziiis i^c Co 

387 Ev. Ice anil Cold Storage Co 

388 Michael Ward 

389 Enderle Karn & Co 

390 William .1. Moxley 

391 Jiio. *.i. Xeunian Co 

392 (ieorge ( arnev 

393 .\dler Mros..." 

394 Harrv .Insepli 

395 Val.Schmitz, Sr 

396 Stroiise »V Hms 

397 ' W. ( iroKs iV Son 

398 ! Jno. (nlherl Drv Goods Co . 

399 Keck iV Bacon." 

400 W. .1. Dallam \- Son 

401 David C. Cook Piih. Co 

40J Mcintosh P.. and (). Co 

40.{ Evansville Demokrat 

4<i| KvaiiHville .loiirnal Co 

Mio I'^vansville ( oiirier Co 

406 Evansville Tribune Co 

407 Kred (iciger t^ Sons 

40H Chas. .lackel 

4()1» Wm. H. Schnute A- Co 

410 Smith .V I'.iittertield 

411 W. W. Kiml.ail A- Co 

112 llardini: A Miller 

4I.S .Ino. (iijl.crt Dry fioods Co. 

414 P.lackman iV Liinkenheiiuer. 

41o .1. E. Hoinm^icCo 

416 (has. I^ich i^ Co 

417 J. B. (ireenc Electrical Co.. 
41.*< K. M. Petersheiui 



Window lights 

Drugs 

Coal 

Plumbing supplies 

Hose and nozzles 

Turpentine, etc 

Batteries, etc 

One bushel charcoal 

Covers for steamers 

Lumber 

Cast steel 

Blacksmithing 

Plow 

Whip, etc 

Garden seed 

Pay-roll 

Rental and tolls 

Contingent expenses 

Groceries 

Beef and sausage 

Flour and meal 

Ice 

Milk 

Coffee and tea 

Butterine 

Potatoes 

Grapes . .^ 

Fish and oysters 

Clothing. .'. 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Dry goods and shades . . . 

Marking tape 

Shoes for patients 

Sunday-school supplies . . 

Carbon and slides 

Advertising 

Advertising 

.Vdvertising 

Advertising 

Hair for mattresses 

Renovating mattresses. . . 

Lumber 

Typewriter 

Organs and tuning pianos 

Organs 

("arpet 

(^ueensware 

Stool 

Drugs 

Battery supplies 

Surgical supplies 



$0 30 
66 27 
154 65 
130 39 
42 00 
30 81 

4 05 
75 

15 25 
2 43 

1 00 
8 10 
7 50 

2 45 

2 35 
2,639 36 

62 74 
35 99 
612 98 
775 30 
2-J8 00 
178 05 
161 87 
150 60 
114 70 

39 78 

3 80 
3 00 

134 00 
93 25 
73 00 
42 50 

40 63 
10 SO 

1 ir, 
58 88 

5 35 
3 70 
3 10 
3 10 
3 10 

508 00 
50 00 
24 67 
80 00 
79 00 
7.'> 00 
71 .50 
S 98 
1 00 
84 48 
49 79 
26 40 



63 



VOaCIIERS— Continued. 



Namk ok Claimant. 



Natcrkok Claim. 



AMor>T. 



De Forest Coal Co 

Standard Oil Co 

Heiliiiaii Machine Works. . . 

Clias. Wahnsiedier , 

Ev. Leather and Belting Co . 

Hornhrook A' Co 

Walz t*eed Co 

Marsh Bros 

Joseph Nienalier 

William Elmendorf 

Fred. C. Allhoti' 

Alhert Fisher 

L. E. Lonf( 

M. J. Wood 

Heilman Plow Co 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Sup't 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Sup't 

Wm. Eichel 

Adler Bros 

Vickery Bros 

Enderle, Karn & C o 

Chas. W. Brizius & Co 

Michael Ward 

Evansville Ice and C. S. Co. 

Friedman Mfg Co 

Jno. G. Neuiuan Co 

Loewenthal & Co 

C. P. Parsons 

Jno. G. Conn 

Jno. Gilbert Drv Goods Co . 

H. E. Bacon . . .' 

W. J. Dallam 

G. H. Lewis 

Torian Barbour Hat Co. . . . 

Lahr-Hopkins Co 

Stroube c't Bros 

L. Loewenthal Sons A Co . . . 

Fred ( ieiger & Sons 

Cook & Adkins 

Chas. Jackel 

Singer Mfg. Co 

S. (-rugenheimer Co 

I. (ians 

L. J. Wilgus 

Julius Niednagel 

Blackman A: Lunkenheimer 

Bittenuan Bros i Crnrab trav and brush 



Coal 

Oils 

Packing 

Engineer's supplies 

Belting 

Wagons 

Road wagon 

Repairing buggy 

Lumber 

Blacksmithing 

Repairs to buggy 

Stabling horse 

Repairs to harness 

Threshing rye and oats. . 

Repairs 

Contingent expenses 

Pay-roll 

Fresh meats 

Dried fruit and groceries 

Groceries 

Coffee and tea 

Flour and meal 

Milk 

Ice 

Butterine 

Potatoes 

Dried peaches 

Potatoes 

Fish 

Dry goods 

Dry goods 

Shoes 

Women's shoes 

Men's hats 

Dry goods 

Clothing 

Clothing 

Hair for mattresses 

Tinware 

Repairing mattresses . . . . 

Machine 

Furniture 

Chair seats 

Trees 

Bulbs and plants 

Queensware 



A. Duerringer 

Davidson Blount & Co 

Grote Mfg. Co 

Adam Weikel 

Wm. B. Burford Stationery . 

Evansville Courier Co ! .Advertising 



Repairs 

Repairing wagon. 
Pump rigging . . . 
Vitrified brick. . . 



$159 00 


31 


55 


5 


00 


9 


98 


21 


40 


150 00 


85 00 


14 00 


5 


54 


4 


95 


1 


15 


4 


10 




35 


5 


14 


4 


80 


35 


20 


2,630 


13 


830 99 


724 29 


644 39 


182 


10 


275 00 


163 


12 


154 


50 


120 


70 


56 


20 


30 


00 


14 24 


1 


21 


578 81 


251 


79 


109 


00 


82 


85 


82 


66 


78 


25 


52 


25 


52 00 


507 


00 


85 


25 


72 40 


33 00 


22 


50 


2 


25 


92 60 


23 70 


82 81 


2 


50 


2 


60 


5 


60 


189 00 


320 00 


265 41 


1 


30 



(A 



VOLX'HEHS— Continued. 



^ 3 
3 C 



Name ok Claimant. 



Nati'kk of Claim. 



Amount. 



472 
47.i 
J74 
17.') 
I7i; 
177 
47S 
47'.t 
ISO 
4S1 
is-j 
4S:{ 
ls4 
48.-) 
48G 
487 
488 
481) 
490 
4iM 
4!»2 
49:5 
4!i4 
495 
49H 
497 
498 
499 
.")0() 
501 
.502 
5():< 
504 
50.-) 
500 
507 
508 
.509 
510 
511 
512 



Evansvilie Demokrat 

Kvansville .Journal Co 

I'ruiik Wilder 

Haiiscli i\: I^inil) Optical Co. . . . 

( lias. Leich & Co 

W. T. Keener Co 

K. M. I'etersheim 

I'hilii) W. Frey 

DeFon-st Coal Co 

Hirsch Bros 

Kvan-sville Leather A- Belting Co 

Standard Oil Co 

Kifliard F. Fairchild 

Win. II. Sciinute iV: Co 

Boetlit-her, Kellogg & Co 

E. C. Johnson 

C. C. MtKinney 

Walz Seed Co 

Ileldt Bros 

Herruian Bros 

W H. Blue 

.1. L. .\llen 

Wni. EIniendorf 

.1. B. (ireene Electrical Co . . . . 

J. B. tJreene Electrical Co 

('has. Wahnsiedler 

J. B. (ireene Electrical Co 

J. B. ( Jreene Electrical Co 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co. . 

Bedford, Weikel «S: Nugent 

Kvansville Waterworks 

Orr. (JriHilh \- Co 

Suhrheinrich Bros 

L. M. Baird 

W. R. (Jardiner, Trustee 

W. R. McMahan, Trustee 

Dr. (J. C. Mason, Supt 

Mary T. Wilson 

Wtu. H. .'^chnute iS: Co 

Dr. (i, C. Mason, Supt 

Smith & Butterfield 



Total. 



Advertising 

Advertising 

Newspapers 

Microscope attachment. 

Drugs 

Medical books 

Surgical appliances .... 

Legal services 

Coal 

Wood 

Belting, oil cups, etc . . . 

Turpentine 

Painting 

Lumber 

Hardware 

Paints 

Horses and fertilizer 

Seed wheat and timothy. 

Bone dust 

Land roller 

Oats 

Corn 

Blacksmithing 

Electric irons 

Wiring for telephone . . . 

Plumbing 

Electrical supplies 

Remodeling telephones.. 

Iron valves 

San<l 

Water pipe 

Rod iron 

Brick 

element 

Expenses 

Expenses 

Contingent expenses.. . . 

Traveling expenses 

Fixing up hose house. . . 

Pay-roll 

Games and books 



$1 


60 


1 


30 


26 


65 


86 


70 


58 


15 


14 


55 


2 60 


50 


00 


241 


05 


1.50 00 


61 


50 


18 


10 


109 


00 


55 


35 


15 


64 


5 


85 


275 00 


31 


75 


27 


00 


24 


00 


17 


18 


12 


24 


10 


85 


124 


00 


99 00 


46 


91 


34 


92 


49 


00 


29 


00 


18 


90 


9 


40 




84 


115 


50 


30 00 


15 


45 


14 


50 


19 


37 


14 


70 


729 


00 


2,685 


41 


24 


75 


$76,500 00 



The above and foregoing vouchers were paid from the 
appropriation for maintenance and repairs, which by act of 
the General Assembly was placed at §76,500. By these claims 
this amount was exhausted, as shown bv the footing. 



65 

Tlie vouchers set forth close to the following accounts as 
shown by the books of the institution : 

Furniture ami lixtures $320 55 

General lil)rary 15 90 

Carpets 7150 

Curtains and shades K5G 30 

Bedding 482 71 

Toweling 163 56 

Table linen 200 74 

Cutlery 42 35 

(Jueensware 221 22 

Tinware 153 88 

Decorations 31 03 

Plants and shrubbery .• 89 20 

Sewers and drains 470 71 

Maintaining grounds 850 59 

Traveling expenses 395 65 

Telephones ." 278 19 

Advertising 38 80 

Printing and stationery 619 12 

Expressage 32 86 

Hardware 33 04 

Painting and painters' supplies 22 95 

Miscellaneous repairs to building 679 37 

Fish and oysters 209 10 

Poultry 752 44 

Dried fruits 422 52 

Canned fruits 57 60 

Tea 230 20 

Vinegar 63 69 

Ice 1,168 64 

Dress goods 313 97 

Muslins 303 52 

Ginghams ' 99 53 

' Men's clothing 841 62 

Underwear 188 53 

Shoes 361 05 

Stockings 188 50 

Gloves 1 7 25 

Hats 153 08 

Surgical ap[)liances 218 59 

Medical library 53 10 

Druggists' sundries 91 35 

Electricians' supplies 103 77 

Oil and waste 110 64 

Farm implements • 47 25 

Seeds and plants 210 11 

Live stock 250 00 

Feed 187 11 

5 — Southern Ix.^ane. 



m 

Vehicles and harness. $2<3 85 

F{ol)e«i anil whips 19 45 

Misrellani-oiiM Klahle siipplifs 2!» 29 

Laiindrv soap . •!'•> 27 

Starch '. W) 37 

Hilling 18 95 

Kepaii'4 laundry maohineiy 250 53 

Wo.nl ' ". 301 87 

T.)(.ls 1 70 

Candles and matches 8 60 

KiTtilizer 184 35 

ICepairs to boilers and engine 585 43 

Tools lor use on grounds 39 70 

Minor improvements 1,717 34 

Repairs to furniture — mattresses and pillows 1,297 87 

Training-school supplies 6 00 

Sunday-school supplies 78 88 

Clirislmas goods 137 92 

Religious services 397 50 

I 'outage and telegrams 75 20 

Hlacksmithing 94 40 

Miscellaneous food supplies 283 06 

Cereals 81 45 

Wages to farm 1,088 56 

Brooms, brushes, mops, etc 244 52 

Wages to housekeeper and girls 1,143 00 

Salaries to ofticerK .' 4,472 14 

Salaries to assistant physicians 2,403 33 

Salary to Superintendent's secretary 540 00 

Wages to attendants 10,217 19 

Musii- an«l amusements 427 80 

Soap, sapolia, silicon, etc 857 02 

I'.ngineers' supplies 165 14 

Wages to nightwatches, usher and other general employes 1,828 05 

Wages to laundry 1,184 73 

Wages to carpenter 718 85 

Legal services and miscellaneous administration expenses 318 90 

I'.readstufls. . . , 3,427 55 

Fresh meats 9,430 08 

Salt meats 1,046 39 

I'.iilter 1,34143 

Kggs 700 42 

Vegetahles 1 ,153 38 

Fresh fruits 291 22 

Sugar 1,.379 38 

CoHee 1,189 39 

Molasses 283 41 

Milk 1,924 66 

Toliacco .S82 09 

Wages to cooks, butcher and Iiakci 2,332 91 

Wages to sewing room . . 239 33 



67 

Spool cotton, tape and buttons $1()2 73 

Drugs 402 44 

Coal 3,232 37 

Wages to engineer and firemen 3,013 33 

Wages to stable 300 00 

Total S76,500 00 



SUMMARY. 

Food supplies $25,436 01 

Salaries and wages 29,062 57 

Heating and lighting 4,507 82 

General repairs 2,752 08 

Clothing 2,629 78 

Furniture and fixtures 2,084 26 

Grounds 1,456 20 

Minor improvements 1,717 34 

Soa}), sapolio and other cleansers 857 02 

Tobacco 382 09 

Farm and garden 729 29 

Laundry '. 746 82 

Stable 566 52 

Administrative expenses 1,758 62 

Religious services 397 50 

Amusements 644 60 

Drugs and surgical appliances 771 48 

Total $76,500 00 



EXPENDITURES BY MONTHS. 

« 

November, 1896 • $4,980 59 

December, 1896 5,769 74 

January, 1897 6,218 35 

February, 1897 5,716 19 

March, 1897 6,172 02 

April, 1897 ' 6,169 90 

May. 1897 5,451 03 

June, 1897 6,091 61 

July, 1897 5,497 81 

August, 1897 5,917 03 

September, 1897 6,966 75 

October, 1897 11,548 98 

Total $76,500 00 



68 



I'lXMFIC AIM'HOPIUATIONIS. 



I T'RXISHINf; FUND. 



By the act of the General Assembly, approved March 8, 
1897, the sum of four thousand dollars was appropriated for 
furnishing the new wing constructed underact of the General 
Assembly of 1805. The appropriation was exhausted by the 



following claims 



o S 



NaMK ok t'l>\IMANT. 



Natire of Claim. 



Amount. 



1 Wilson Mercantile Co 

2 J. E. IIoiDgi^ Co 

3 i S. Ciiigenlieini & Co 

4 I Keck A Hacon 

•'> I Jno. (Jilbert Dry (loods Co . . . 

6 i S. Ciiigenheim iV Co 

7 Jourdan Ixiescli Kurniture Co. 

8 Fred ( ieiger i*i Sons 

J> Jno. (Jilbert Dry Goods Co . . . 

10 Blackman A: Liinkenheimer. . . 

Total ... 



Blankets i $1 ,071 00 



Mattresses and pillows 

Furniture 

Bedding and linen 

Linen and toweling 

Chairs 

Furniture 

Furniture 

Toweling, bedding and window 

shades 

Queensware and cutlery 



1,051 65 
549 90 
376 50 
205 94 
196 00 
156 30 
11 70 

26;? 06 
117 95 

$4,(NI0 00 



69 



SEWER FCND. 



By act of the General Assembly, approved March 8, 1897, 
the sum of eighteen thousand dollars was appropriated for the 
purpose of "disposing of sewage." During the fiscal year 
ending October 31, 1897, this appropriation has been reduced 
by $5,303.33, thus leaving a balance at that date of $12,690.67. 
The nature of claims against the sewer fund is as follows : 



O 4) 



1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
.21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 



Name ok Claimant. 



Natire of Claim. 



Amoint. 



George M. Uhl 

French & Clements* 

L. M. Baird 

Evansville Journal Co 

Evansville Courier Co 

Dr. A. J. Thomas, Supt 

Grote Manufacturinor Co 

Rensselaer Manufacturing Co. 

Suhrheinrich Bros 

George M. Uhl 

L. M. Bainl 

William Smith 

Eichel & Arnold 

Dr. A. .1. Thomas, Supt 

.Tames D. Saunders 



City Waterworks 

C. H. Davies&Co 

Bedford, Weikel & Nugent . . 

George M. Uhl 

L. M. Baird 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Supt 

C. H. Davies & Co 

Heritage Saulman 

Heritage Saulman 

Heritage Saulman 

George' M. Uhl 

Wm. H. Schnute & Co 



Charles Wahnsiedler. 



Total. 



Sewer pipe 

Legal services 

Cement 

Advertising 

Advertising 

Pay-roll for lahor . . . .• 

Drilled well 

Iron valves 

Brick 

Sewer pipe 

Cement 

Hauling pipe 

Stone and sand 

Labor pay-roll 

Plans and specifications sewer 
plant 

Water pipe 

Sewer vats . . 

Gravel and sand 

Sewer pipe 

Cement 

Pay-roll 

Filter i)asins 

Cleaning ditch 

Sewer work 

Labor at sewer vats 

Sewer pipe 

Erecting building over sewer 
plant 

Changing flush tanks on ac- 
count sewer 



$152 88 

15 00 

3 00 

1 70 

1 70 
112 52 
606 75 

89 90 
75 00 
36 48 
14 80 

2 00 
.36 93 

245 28 

220 00 

20 24 

1,259 25 

35 25 

1 88 

1 80 

72 12 

713 40 

70 00 

62 00 

50 00 

1 80 

948 60 

453 05 



$5,303 33 



EARNINGS. 



Sale of rags and bones 



$33 5Q 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS. 

Approjiriatioii $76,500 00 

Expenditures 76,500 00 



FURNISHING NEW BUILDING. 

Appropriation $4,000 00 

Expenditures 4,000 00 



DISPOSAL OB' SEWAGE. 

Appropriation $18,000 00 

Expenditures 5,303 33 



Balance . $12,696 67 

EARNINGS. 
W. L. Swormstedt $33 50 



Paid to State Treasurer a> shown by quietus. No. 1369 $33 50 



71 

Tlie following is a complete list of vouchers [>ai(l during the 
fiscal year ending October 31, 1898, the originals of which, 
properly signed and sealed, may be found on tile in the office 
of the Auditor of State. Duplicate cojjies are on file in the 
business office of this Hospital. 




1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
H 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

r.i 

14 
15 

1() 

17 
18 
IV) 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2(1 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 



William Eichel 

Igleliart JJros 

Anna M. Kennedy 

Friedman Mi^i;. Co 

H. Karn & Co 

Acller IJros 

Ev. Ii'e and Cold Storage Co.. 

Vickery Bros 

G. PI. Lewis 

•Jno. Gilbert Dry (ioods Co. . . 

Boetticher, Kellogg & Co 

Wm. H. Sc'hniite tS: Co 

Blackman & Lunkenheimer . 

S. (iiigeniieim cV Co 

Joseph Tliorbecke 

( ha.s. Leich 

F. M. Petersheim 

De Forest Coal Co 

Chas. Wahnsiedler 

American Laundry M'ch'y Co 

.Jno. Hubbard & Co 

Walz Seeil and Buggy Co 

William Elraendorf 

L. E. Long 

Dr. G. C. Mason, Sup't 

Dr. G. C. Mason