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Full text of "Documentary journal of Indiana 1906"

INDIANA 
STATE LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
1 and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act; Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/documentaryjour190602indi 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



Officers of State 



STATE OF INDIANA 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS, TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS OF THE 

SEVERAL BENEVOLENT AND REFORMATORY INSTITUTIONS, AS 

REQUIRED BY LAW TO BE MADE TO THE GOVERNOR, 



Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1906 



BY AUTHORITY 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING 
1907 



lOG 

INDIANA STATE LIBRARY 



RREFACE. 



STATE OF INDIANA, 
Office of Secretary of State, 

Indianapolis, October 1, 1907 



I 



lu accordance witli the requirements of an act approved February 3, 
1853 (1st G. cS: H. , p. 538), the several administrative officers of the State, 
and the Trustees and Superintendents of the Benevolent, Reformatory and 
Educational Institutions thereof, have submitted lo the Governor and filed 
in the Executive Department the rei)«*ts requir^ of them for the fiscal 
year ending October 31, 1906, and theyalendidlrVyear ending December 31, 
1906, respectively, which have been entered ■6f fSCord in the order of their 
reception and delivered to the Secretary ^ Siateifor publication under the 
order of the Board of Commissioners of Public Ej*inting and Binding. 

One thousand copies of reports are n<J^ T3mind in two volumes, and 
issued to the officers and persons designated by law to receive them. The 
usual number of copies of each report have also been bound in pamphlet 
form and delivered to the responsible officer or Superintendent of each 
Institution for distribution in such manner as they may deem for the best 
interests of the State. 

HARRY SLOUGH, 
Clerk Bureau of Public Printing. 



(3i 



CONTENTS. 



VOL. 2. 

Pages. 

Board Health 550 

Eastern Insane 116 

Boys' School ' 49 

Tax Commissioners to Legislature 118 

iTorthern Insane. 82 

Veterinarian... - 16 

Charities Report 172 

Forestry Keport 194 

Feeble-Mincled Youth 88 

Southern Insane 97 

Custodian State House 92 

State Normal 41 

Public Library Commission 121 

Blind Institute 69 

Deaf Institute 91 

Indiana University 20 

Central Insane 570 

Department Inspection 250 

Adjutant-General 350 

3086 



(4) 



TWENTY-FIFTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 



State Board of Health 

of ^Indiana 



Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1906. 
Statistical Year Ending December 31, 1906. 



TO THE GOVERNOR. 



INDIANAPOLIS: 

WM. B. BUKFORD, CONTRACTOE FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING. 
1907. 



THE STATE OF INDIANA, ) 

Executive Department, V 

November 20, 1906. ) 

Received by the Governor, examined and referred to the Auditor of State 
for verification of the financial statement. 



Office of Auditor of State, 

Indianapolis, November 28, 1906 



.] 



The within report, so far as the same relates to moneys drawn from the 
State Treasury, has been examined and found correct. 

J. O. BILLHEIMER, 

Auditor of State. 



November 28, 1906. 

Returned by the Auditor of State, with above certificate, and transmitted 
to Secretary of State for publication, upon the order of the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Public Printing and Binding. 

FRED L. GEMMER, 

Secretary to the Governor. 



Filed in the o|fice of the Secretary of State of the State of Indiana, 
November 28, 1906. 

FRED A. SIMS, 

Secretary of State. 



Received the within report and delivered to the printer November 28, 
1906. 

HARRY SLOUGH, 

Clerk Printing Bureau. 



(|) 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



T. Henry Bavis, M. D,, President Richmond. 

Geo. T. McCoy, M. D., Vice-President Columbus. 

W. N. WiSHARD, M. D Indianapolis. 

F. A. Tucker, M. D Noblesville 

J. N. HuRTY, M.D., Phar. I)., Secretary Indianapolis. 



(3) 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Indiana State Board of Health, 



Hon. J. Frank Hanly, Governor of Indiana: 

The State Board of Health presents herewith its twenty-fifth 
annual report. 

There is reported herein the transactions and work of the 
Board, an account of expenditures for the year ending October 
31, 190G, and a report of the work of the State Laboratory of 
Hygiene, which is a department of the Board. The report also 
contains the vital statistics for the calendar year. 

TRANSACTIONS AND WORK OF THE BOARD. 

The State Board of Health now exists and acts under the health 
law passed in 1891. There are five members, four being appointed 
by an appointing board composed of the Governor, the Secretary of 
State, and the Auditor. These four members appoint a secretary, 
who thereupon becomes a member of the Board. All members 
serve for four years. 

Quarterly meetings shall be held, and the Board may hold as 
many special meetings as may seem to it proper. During this 
year four regular and four special meetings were held, the min- 
utes of which fully set forth the work done. 

The quarterly reports of the secretary presented at the regular 
quarterly meetings give specific accounts of his office and field 
work. It will be noted that visits are made from time to time 
by the secretary to different parts of the State. The reasons for 
making the same, and the results accomplished, are given in 
detail in his reports. It is believed that these visits are of benefit 
to the health cause, for the people so assert in letters and com- 

(5) 



6 

mimications to the press, and medical and local societies, and 
teachers' and farmers' institutes which have been addressed, have 
always passed resolutions of thanks for the advice given and serv- 
ices rendered. A further reason for believing that visits made by 
the secretary are profitable and of advantage to the people lies 
in the fact that one hundred and sixty-seven requests were re- 
ceived from various parts of the State for inspection of sanitary 
conditions and advice concerning the same. The requests came 
from the governing authorities of counties, cities and towns, from 
school authorities and private citizens. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

The vital statistics are collected for the calendar year. They, 
therefore, can not be presented "until after December 31. After 
all reports are received it will require about ninety days to 
an-ange, tabulate and analyze the data. The mortality statistics 
are accurate, but the birth and disease statistics are inaccurate. 
This condition is explained and a remedy recommended in an- 
other place in this report. Original certificates of death are re- 
ceived at this oftice, and carefully arranged and indexed, and 
citizens may consult the same and secure transcripts without fee. 
There is an average of 17 applications per week for transcripts 
of death records. The sanitary usefulness of death records is 
applied immediately upon receipt of the same. 

EPIDEMICS. 

ISTo widespread epidemics are recorded, but, of course, there 
were a number of local epidemics. The same are specifically set 
forth in the special report on vital statistics. 

Smallpox existed every month in the year, but it has been in 
mild form and only occasionally fatal. Prompt quarantine and 
.general vaccination in the localities where it appeared has always 
succeeded in extinguishing it. The State Board has again and 
again informed the people that vaccination is the only safe and 
practical prophylaxis for smallpox. 

The deaths from diphtheria have decreased in the last six years 
as follows : 1900, deaths 746 ; 1901, 554 ; 1902, 424; 1903, 462 ; 
1904, 314; 1905, 366. This decrease we attribute almost entirely 
to the now general use of diphtheria antitoxin. It took some 



time to overcome ignorant opposition and the prejudice against 
the remedy, but now the people generally understand the situa- 
tion, and by demanding its use the good results are secured. It is 
now the widespread opinion in the medical world that antitoxin 
is a specific against diphtheria if administered before the disease 
is far advanced, and that the only reason why diphtheria deaths 
are recorded is because many cases are not treated until the 
attack has continued for several days. The prophylactic use of 
antitoxin is not practiced to the degree it should be. If it were 
used in all outbreaks for immunizing, the number of cases would 
be gTcatly diminished. 

There were fewer scarlet fever deaths and fewer cases and out- 
l)reaks for the year ending IS^ovember 1, than in the same period 
for any year since 1900. Typhoid fever also shows a decrease 
by the same comparison. The statistical report to be made up 
after December 31, when all data will be at hand, will give full 
details of diseases, epidemics and deaths. 

STATE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE. 

Especial attention is invited to the report of work done in the 
State Laboratory of Hygiene. There are two divisions to the 
laboratory — the chemical division and the bacteriological and path- 
ological division. The last is devoted entirely to disease preven- 
tion work and the first to hygienic water analyses and to food 
and drug analyses. AYe feel sure that the work of the laboratory 
pi eves fully its usefulness; indeed it is a true economy on account 
of its disease and adulteration prevention Avork. The bacterio- 
logical and pathological division has .been termed "the life-saving 
station" and the chemical division 'Hhe money-saving station." 

RECOMMEiNDATIONS. 

In accordance with the law, which makes it the duty of the 
State Board of Health to make such recommendations as to health 
statutes as may seem proper, we recommend as follows: 

A REGISTRATION LAW. 

The registration law passed in 1899, and under Avhich the mor- 
tality statistics have been so correctly collected, was declared un- 
constitutional by the Supreme Court in February, 1904, This 



8 

law was an amendment to the health law of 1891, and it was 
discovered that the title of the amended law was incorrectly 
qnoted in the new act, one line being omitted. This was the sole 
point npon which the decision was based. As the law of 1891, 
which now became operative, contained some provisions for regis- 
tering deaths, births and contagions diseases, the Board decided 
to continue the system which prevailed nnder the new law, and to 
this date mortality statistics have been collected through the 
momentum acquired from the law of 1899. 

The necessity of an efficient registration law plainly exists, and 
the authority and power conferred upon the State Board of 
ITealth for its enforcement should be sufficient in every way. 

SANITARY SCHOOLHOUSES AND TEACHING HYGIENE IN THE 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

We suggest a statute requiring that all schoolhouscs hereafter 
built shall conform to natural sanitary laws ; also that the act 
should contain a clause requiring that hygiene be taught in the 
public schools. ISTot less than 10 per cent, of school moneys are 
now wasted on account of unsanitary schoolhouses, in which start 
most of our epidemics, and in which are laid the foundations in 
many for consumption and other diseases in after life. Massa- 
chusetts, Michigan and other States have statutes of the character 
we propose, and better health and progress among the school chil- 
dren has thus been secured. 

A STATE HOSPITAL FOR INDIGENT CONSUMPTIVES. 

Massachusetts, IsTew York, Rhode Island and others have pro- 
vided State hospitals for consumptives, and Maryland, Pennsyl- 
vania, Michigan and other States are considering the matter. 
Both humanity and economy demand such institutions in every 
State. At present fully 1,000 poverty-stricken consumptives are 
being cared for at public expense or by private charity in Indiana, 
but in such manner as to spread the disease and not restore to 
health a single patient. The proposition to establish a State 
Hospital for indigent consumptives is not one to unnecessarily 
spend money, but is a measure to more wisely expend the money 
ROW devoted to caring for these unfortunates. 



We believe all of these recommendations are wise, and would, 
if put in force hj the State, save money to the people and materi- 
ally promote the public happiness. 

POLLUTION OF STREAMS, WATER SUPPLIES AND SEWERS. 

Indiana is an inland State, and is fortunately supplied with 
numerous streams and lakes, and except in the central and south- 
ern portion there is yet abundance of ground water. It is appar- 
ent that our streams and lakes are valuable assets, and should be 
jealously protected from pollution or other destruction. They arc 
sources of beauty and refreshment to the land, sources of a valu- 
able food supply, and must eventually furnish public water sup- 
plies. It is this last fact which makes it urgent that early action 
be taken for their preservation. 

The experience of the Indianapolis and of the Muncie Water 
companies demonstrates that the ground water is limited, is grow- 
ing less and less, and is inadequate for the public supply. For 
a few years both of the cities named had an abundant pure 
supply, but gradually the (Quantity diminished and new wells 
were bored. This did not relieve the situation, for the new wells 
penetrated the same water bearing stratum as the old ones, and no 
increase in quantity was secured. 

The Muncie Water Company relieved the situation for a time 
by making up the deficiency with filtered water from White 
Eiver, but lately the oil wells above Muncie so badly polluted the 
river with kerosene products that it was impossible to filter the 
water. This drove the Muncie Company to dam a small creek 
and establish a water shed. It is certain, however, if stream 
pollution is permitted to continue, that this supply for Muncie 
can not be depended upon. 

The Indianapolis Water Company has been compelled to put in 
extensive filter beds, costing five or six hundred thousand dollars, 
to filter the water from White River. This filtered water is at 
present mixed with deep well water (the amount of the latter 
diminishing daily), and this constitutes the Indianapolis supply. 
The lesson is — -Indianapolis must very soon depend entirely upon 
the river, and if the gross pollution which now exists is permitted 
to continue, filtration will become more and more difficult and 
expensive, and Indianapolis, and also other cities on the shores 



10 

o±' White River, will be sorely injured, possibly to a degree to stop 
their growth. What has occurred along White River will in time 
occur in all parts of the State, and now seems to be the time to 
apply the remedy. We propose a law similar to that of Massa- 
chusetts, where these same problems arose some years ago, and 
which the said law has satisfactorily solved. This law should 
make it unlawful to deposit sewage, factory wastes, or any pollut- 
ing matter into streams or lakes, aud it should provide that within 
a certain time that all cities and towns shall dispose of their 
sewage by well proven methods known to sanitary science ; and 
that all factories shall, witliiii twelve months from the going into 
oft'ect of the law, dispose of their wastes in a sanitary way. All 
of this has Ix'on repeatedly accomplished in other States. 

As cities and towns are continually making expensive mistakes 
in the matter of establishing public water supplies and in building 
sewers and drains, it seems wise to adopt the successful method 
pursued in Oliio, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and other States, 
to prevent such mistakes, with tlioir coiiscqneut money loss and 
sanitary failure. This method is to require by statutes that all 
plans and specifications for public water supplies, and for sewers 
and drains, shall be submitted for the approval of the State Board 
of Health before the same may be constructed. 

For the State Board of Health to properly execute a law of this 
kind, controlling stream pollution, the water supplies and sewer 
construction,' a sanitary engineering department would be re- 
quired, and therefore said law would necessarily create such de- 
partment. There should be a competent sanitary engineer ap- 
pointed by the State Board, and a proper appropriation given for 
the enforcement of the act. 

We believe a wise law of this character is absolutely necessary 
for the promotion of the welfare of the State, and would be an 
economic measure, and for these reasons we propose the same. 
We further believe that the protection of the lakes and streams 
from pollution-destruction, is a subject which will not down, and 
the question about the matter is, Shall the State attend to it now, 
or do so after disease, death and pecuniary loss compel action? 



11 

THE rURE FOOD AND DRUG LAW. 

We call yolir special attention to tlie report of the chemical 
division npon the work done in the enforcement of the pnre food 
and drug law. We think this report will plainly show the value 
of the department, and it will also show the lameness of the 
present law as discovered hy trials in the co^j.rts. TTnder the 
present law it must be proven that the vendor of adulterated foods 
and drugs hnowingly sold or had in his possession to sell, and in 
the case of preservatives, it must every time he proven that the 
special preservative used is injurious to health. Until these 
faults are removed, Ave can not hope to promptly and adequately 
punish offenders. We therefore recommend the repeal of all laws 
nnd parts of laws pertaining to food and drug adulteration, and 
the enactment of a statute embodying the main principles and 
features of the national pure food and drug law. 

The water work of the chemical laboratory appears to be of 
special value. One hundred and forty-six public Avater supplies 
haA'^e been examined, of which Y4 AA^ere good, 43 bad, and 29 of 
doubtful character. Five hundred and forty-tAVo private sup- 
plies were analyzed, including deep driven and bored wells, and 
shalloAv driA^en and dug Avells. Of these, 236 Avere good, 54 Avere 
suspicious, and 202 AA^ere bad. These results are indicative of 
the character of the public and private water supplies of the 
State, and show the necessity for their careful supervision. 

We hope that full consideration of these recommendations Avill 
secure your support, and that the same will be recommended in 
your message to the Legislature. 

Approved by the Board, ISTovember 16, 1906, and ordered to be 
submitted to the Governor. 

T. HENKY DAVIS, President. 
. GEO. T. McCOY, Vice-President. 

E. A. TUCTvEE. 

J. K IIUKTY, Secretarv. 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



RECEIPTS. 
I'.y appropriation $10,000 00 

DISBURSEMENTS. 
1905. 

Nov. 30. May Stuart, salary $50 00 

" 30. Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

" 30. Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

" 30. Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

" 30. Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

" 30. Dr. Helene Knabe. expense 9 35 

Dec. 15. Dr. T. Henry Davis, Health Officers' conference 26 20 

" 15. Dr. C. M. Eisenbeiss, Health Officers' conference.... 35 25 

" 15. Dr. F. A. Tucker, Health Officers' conference 25 95 

" 15. Dr. W. T. S. Dodds. Health Officers' conference 10 00 

" 15. Prof. Severance Biirrage, Health Officers' conference. 10 00 

" 15. Dr. Helene Knabe, sanitary work. . . 4 70 

" 31. May Stuart, salary 50 00 

" 31. Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

" 31. Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

" 31. Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

" 31. Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

1906. 

Jan. 4. Henry W. Bennett, P. M 100 00 

" 12. Indianapolis Telephone Company 27 55 

" 12. Wm. B. Burf ord 97 43 

" 12. Dr. .L N. Hurty, expense 114 92 

" 12. Dr. Chas. E. Ferguson, services 27 00 

" 12. Adams Express Co.. services .^ 5 95 

" 12. American Express Co., services 7 60 

" 12. "U. S. Express Co., services 5 65 

" 12. Western Union Tel. Co., tolls 3 02 

" 12. J. L. Anderson, expense draj^age 1 90 

" 12. Crossett & Bates, "Pediatrics" 2 00 

" 12. Leo Lando, merchandise 3 50 

" 12. Geo. J. Mayer, rubber stamp 80 

" 12. American Public Health Association, dues 5 00 

" 12. Parke, Davis & Co., merchandise 5 50 

" 12. American Toilet Supply Co 3 75 

" 12. Wm. H. Armstrong & Co., merchandise 9 25 

" 12. Dr. T. Henry Davis, President 14 05 

" 12. Dr. Wm. N. Wishard 10 00 



Jau. 


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Feb. 


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28. 


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Mar, 


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Apr. 


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13 

Dr. F. A. Tucker $11 45 

May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salaiy 50 00 

Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Ethel HofiEman, salary 50 00 

Henry W. Bennett, P. M., stamps 100 00 

May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Nellie Prendergast. salary 44 00 

R. E. McCormack, labor 9 75 

F. E. McCarmack, labor 6 00 

J. L. Anderson, expense and drayage 6 83 

Dr. T. Henry Davis 15 20 

Dr. Wm. N. Wishard 10 00 

Dr. F. A. Tucker 11 70 

Dr. Geo. T. McCoy 12 25 

Henry W. Bennett, P. M., stamps 100 00 

May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Nellie Prendergast, salary 40 00 

Wm. B. Burford, printing and stationery 474 54 

Neostyle Co 20 00 

Indianapolis Tel. Co., rent and services 29 15 

J. A. Downey. Postal Guide, 1906 2 50 

Postal Tel. Cable Co., service 29 

Western Union Telegraph Co., service 6 14 

American Toilet Supply Co., laundry 3 75 

American Express Co 11 50 

Adams Express Co 3 06 

U. S. Express Co 9 21 

Bobb-Merrill, books and merchandise 7 78 

British Food Journal, subscriptions, 1906 1 95 

W. H. Bass, lantern slides 15 00 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 3 88 

Dr. J. N. Hurty, expense 38 69 

Geo. J. Mayer, letter outfit 5 00 

Dr. T. Henry Davis 14 65 

Dr. Geo. T. McCoy 12 00 

Dr. F. A. Tucker 11 45 

Dr. Wm. N. Wishard 10 00 

Dr. Helene Knabe, expense 15 34 

May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 



Apr. 


. 30. 


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May 


3. 


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June 


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27. 


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July 


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14 

Alice Christian, salary , $50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Nellie Prendergast, salary 40 00 

H. W. Bennett, P. M., stamps 100 00 

Dr. Wm. N. Wishard 10 00 

Dr. T. Henry Davis 14 25 

Dr. F. A. Tucker 10 70 

May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Nellie Prendergast. salary 40 00 

Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 31 67 

H. W. Bennett, P. M., stamps 100 00 

Dr. A. W. Brayton, services 5 00 

Dr. A. W. Bitting, services 12 50 

Dr. J. McLean Moulder, services 10 00 

Dr. J. N. Taylor, services 10 00 

Dr. F. A. Tuclipr 20 70 

Dr. Geo. T. McCoy. 66 45 

Dr. T. Henry Davis 23 70 

:May Stuart, salary 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 50 00 

Adams Express Co., services 77 

American Express Co 4 30 

U. S. Express Co. 3 35 

American Toilet Supply Co.. laundry 3 75 

American Medical Association, dues, 1906 5 00 

Bobbs-Merrill Co., merchandise 1 86 

H. M. Brinker, books 3 75 

Charity Organization, books 4 50 

Indianapolis Calcium Light Co., lantern exhibit..... 5 50 

Dr. J. G. Nehrbas, express 2 89 

Western Union Tel. Co.. messages 3 19 

Indianapolis Blue Print Co., merchandise 13 15 

Frances Pharmacy Co., merchandise 4 50 

The Schofield Pierson Co.. book 3 00 

Chas. Mayer & Co., merchandise 65 

S. D. Kiger & Co., merchandise 1 00 

J. L. Anderson, expense 5 72 

.1. N. Hurty, Secretary, expense 49 19 

Wm. B. Burford. printing, stationery, etc 829 98 

Dr. T. Henry Davis, Board meeting 14 40 

Dr. Geo. T. McCoy,, Board meeting 12 25 



15 

July 13. Dr. Wm. X. Wisliard, Board meeting $20 00 

" 13. Dr. F. A. Tucker, expense 69 15 

" 13. Dr. F. A. Tucker, Board meeting 14 20 

" 13. Indianapolis Telephone Co., rent and tolls 30 70 

" 30. H. M. Bennett, P. M., stamps 100 00 

" 31. May Stuart, salary 50 00 

" 31. Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

•• 31. Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

" 31. Florence Froschauer, (salary 50,00 

•• 31. Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

" 31. Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 50 00 

Aug. 23. H. W. Bennett, P. M., stamps 150 00 

" 31. May Stuart, salary 50 00 

'• 31. Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

" 31. Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

" 30. Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

" 81. Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

" 31. Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

" 31. Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 50 00 

Sept. 15. H. W. Bennett, P. M.. stamps 200 00 

" 30. May Stuart, salary •••• 50 00 

" 30. Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

" 31. Alice Christian, salary 50 00 

" 30. Florence Froschauer, salary 50 00 

" 30. Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

" 30. Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 50 00 

Oct. 12. Dr. T. Henry Davis 14 40 

" 12. Dr. Geo. T. McCoy 12 25 

" 12. Dr. Wm. N. Wishard 10 00 

" 12. Dr. F. A. Tucker.. 10 80 

" 12. Merrick Fox Typewriter Co 125 00 

" 12. Indianai>olis Telephone Co 29 55 

" 12. Wm. B. Burford 594 27 

" 12. Pettis Dry Goods Co 72 86 

" 12. Addressograph Co. ; 139 13 

" 12. Prof. R. L. Sackett 300 00 

" 12. W. H. Bass Photo Co 16 20 

" 12. G. B. Steckert & Co 48 90 

" 12. Dr. J. N. Hurty 219 38 

" 12. Schoheld Pierson Co 6 25 

" 12. Smith-Premier Typewriter Co 8 50 

" 12. W^estern Union Telegraph Co 6 50 

•' 12. J. L. Anderson 4 55 

" 12. American Express Co 9 70 

" 12. Adams Express Co 1 25 

" 12. U. S. Express Co 2 52 

" 12. American Toilet Supply Co 5 00 

^' 12. Parke, Davis & Co 115 

" 12. F. A. Hardy & Co 5 75 

" 12. Open Air Quarterly 8 00 



Oct. 12. 


" 12. 


" 12. 


" 27. 


" 27. 


" 27. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


'• 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 29. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 


" 31. 



16 

Dues National Tuberculosis Association $5 00 

Indianapolis Calcium Light Co 10 00 

Lederle Antitoxin Laboratories 41 25 

Dr. A. W. Brayton 25 00 

Parke, Davis & Co., merchandise. 26 25 

J. L. Anderson, postage stamps 200 00 

Dr. J. N. Hurty, expense 22 97 

Dr. Geo. T. McCoy, expense 24 08 

Dr. Wm. N. Wishard, expense 18 10 

Dr. F. A. Tucker, expense 26 65 

Bobbs-Merrill Co., directory 2 10 

Leo Lando, hygrometer 3 00 

United Press News Association, clippings 12 50 

G. E. Stechert & Co., text books 11 82 

J. L. Anderson, expense 2 04 

American Express Co 4 88 

Smith-Premier Typewriter Co., repairs 7 00 

Dr. J. W. Strange, express 80 

Addressograph Co., addi-esses. 33 

New Telephone Co., tolls 20 

Wm. B. Burford, printing, stationery, etc 716 82 

Western Union Telegi-aph Co., services.. 149 

I. L. Miller, services 67 50 

May Stuart, salaiy 50 00 

Maude Linn, salary 50 00 

Alice Christian, salai-y 50 00 

Florence Frosehauer, salary 50 00 

Ethel Hoffman, salary 50 00 

Lillian R. Chandlee, salary 50 00 

Balance reverted to General Fund 187 21 

Total $10,000 00 



STATE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE. 



LABORATORIES. 

EQUIPMENT FUND. 

Balance from 1905 $619 70 

DISBURSEMENT. 

Capitol Furniture & Cabinet Co., furniture $600 00 

Central Supply Co., merchandise 10 00 

Total $610 00 

Balance 9 70 

Total , $6ia 70 



17 

MMNTENANCE FUND. 
1905. 

Nov. 30. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary and expense $188 79 

" 30. H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 30. L. W. Bristol, salary 60 00 

" 30. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

" 30. Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 60 00 

" 30. Philip Brodus, salary 40 00 

Dec. 19. Aquos Distilled Water Co., water 3 GO 

" 19. Hogan Transfer Co 8 01 

" 19. E. J. Kust, electric wiring 15 00 

" 31. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary ■ 125 00 

" 31. Prof. H. E. Barnard, expense 13 60 

" 31. H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 31. Mrs. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

" 31. Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 60 00 

" 31. Louis W. Bristol, salary 60 00 

" 31. Philip Brodus, salary 40 00 

1906. 

Jan. 12. Oliver Typewriter Agency 125 00 

" 12. E. H. Sargent & Co., haemometer 35 00 

" 12. Sanborn-Marsh Electric Co., merchandise 7 44 

" 12. Vonnegut Hardware Co., merchandise 7 64 

Dec. 12. H. E. Zimmer, rubber tubing- 3 72 

" 12. Joseph Gardner, copper ovens 6 5(i 

" 12. American Toilet Supply Go 14 65 

" 12. Daniel Stewart Co., drugs 10 40 

" 12. Aquos Distilled Water Co., water 1 20 

" 12. L. S. Ayres & Co., cloth 2 00 

" 12. Hogan Transfer Co., freight and drayage 2 43 

Jan. 12. Central Union Tel. Co 35 

" 12. Wm. Langsenkamp, merchandise 20 75 

" 12. Lilly & Stalnaker, merchandise 2 15 

" 12. Schrader China Co., jars 2 20 

" 12. L. E. Morrison & Co., rubber apron 75 

" 12. Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., merchandise 265 78 

" 11. Eimer & Amend, chemicals and apparatus 128 11 

" 31. Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

" 31. Dr. Helene Knake, salaiy 60 00 

" 31. Effie Stephens, salary 50 00 

" 31. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

" 31. Prof. H. E. Barnard, expense 9 75 

" 31. H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 31. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

" 31. Norris Thompson, salary 15 00 

" 31. Philip Brodus, salary and balance due for November 

and December 51 39 

Feb. 17. Sandborn-Marsh Electric Co 23 00 

" 17. Capital Furniture & Cabinet Co 22 90 

" 20. Freaney Bros., plumbing 209 34 

Jan. 1. Balke & Krause Co., lumber 5 76 

2-Bb. of Health. 



18 

Jan. l2. Oliver Typewriter Agency, ribbon ....;;..; $0 To 

•' 15. lndiauaix)lis Blue Print Co 1 jjo 

" 17. Geo. J. Mayer, rubber stamps 1 05 

" 17. AVm. Langseukamp, repairs 1 00 

'* 17. Daniel Stewart Co., drugs 8 87 

" 20. The H. Lieber Co., frames 2 00 

" 22. Vonnegut Hai-dware Co., merchandise 6 10 

" 23. E. H. Eldrldge Lumber Co 3 50 

" 23. Sehrader China Co., jars 90 

" 29. Hogau Transfer Co 2 00 

" 30. Pettis Dry Goods Co., cotton 1 10 

Feb. 1. Royse Electric Co., merchandise , 88 

1. Shorti-idge High School, gas hood 5 00 

" 14. Torsion Balance Co., merchandise 1 25 

" 17. Dr. T. Victor Keene, express ' 95 

" 18. Dr. T. Victor Keene, expense , 3 88 

" 21, Columbia School Supply Co., weights 3 25 

" 22. Bliss-Swain Co., two coats 3 00 

" 23. H. E. Bai-nard, expense 23 04 

" 23. R. W, G, Owen, widal test 1 00 

" 28. Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

" 28. Dr. Helene Kuabe, salary GO 00 

" 28. Effie Stephens, salaiy 50 00 

" 28. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

" 28. H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 28. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

" 28. Norris Thompson, salary 35 00 

" 28. Philip Brodus, salary 40 00 

Mar, 13. Bausch «& Lomb Optical Co., merchandise 2 95 

" 13. Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., merchandise 252 40 

" 31. Dr. T. V, Keene, salary 150 00 

" 31. Dr. H, Knabe, salaiy . 60 00 

" 31, Effie Stephens, salary 50 00 

" 31, Prof. H. E, Barnard, salary 125 00 

" 31. H. B, Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 31, Nellie M. Coney, salaiy 50 00 

" 31. N, Thompson, salary 35 00 

" 31. Philip Brodus, salary.. 44 28 

Apr. 5. American Can Co., merchandise and freight 52 47 

" 5, ET>erhard Faber, merchandise 15 55 

" 7, E. H. Sargent & Co., merchandise ■ 53 48 

7, E. H. Sargent & Co., merchandise 63 20 

" 10. Arthur H. Thomas Co., merchandise 174 71 

" 16. Frank Bird Transfer Co., drayage 1 00 

" 16, American Toilet Supply Co., laundry 18 55 

" 16. Aquos Distilled Water Co., water 7 40 

" 16. Badger Furniture Co., desk stools 6 00 

" 16. LiUy & Stalnaker, merchandise 5 65 

" 16. Joseph Gardner, test tube racks 2 00 

" 16. H, E, Zimmer, soap .44 

" 16. Daniel Stewart Co., drugs and merchandise, '. 7 07 



19 



Apr. 16. Hogan Transfer Co ^- '^ 

" 16. Wm. B. Burford, printing and stationery 1^ *>» 

•' 16. The H. Lieber Co., framing 8 Oo 

=' 16. Vonnegut Hardware Co., mercbandise 2 58 

" 16' Ed. Z. Franlcs, automatic water still '^^ ^ 

" 16. A. Daigger, laboratory supplies 142 13 

" 16 Prof H E Barnard, traveling expense and mercban- 

'. ■ 18 61 

dise 

" 30. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 12o 00 

" 30. H. B. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 30. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

" 30. N. Thompson, salary 35 00 

" 30. Philip Brodus, salary ^^ oo 

" 30. Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

" 30. Helene Knabe, M. D., salary ^^ '^ 

" 30. Effie Stephens, salary oO 00 

May 29. Postage stamps i-n on 

" 31. Dr. T. V. Keene. salary .• loO uu 

" 31. Dr. H. Knabe, salary ^^ ^^ 

*' 31. Effie Stephens, salaiy ^^ ^ 

'• 31. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

" 31. H. E. Bishop, salary : ^^ ^ 

" 31. Nellie M. Coney, salary 20 00 

" 31. N. Thompson, salary 35 00 

" 31. Philip Brodus, salary ^ -i:^ -^ 

June 29. Prof. H. E. Barnard, expense 24 13 

" 29. Dr. T. V. Keene, expense 1" '^ 

" 30. Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

" 30. Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 60 ^ 

" 30. Effie Stephens, salary 50 00 

" 30. Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

" 30. H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

" 30. Nellie Prendergast, salary 40 00 

" 30. N. Thompson, salary 35 00 

" 30. Philip Brodus, salary 42 86 

July 20. Eimer & Amend, merchandise 8 00 

" 20. G. E. Stechert & Co., text books 23 18 

" 13. Hogan Transfer Co ^ ^^ 

" 13. American Toilet Supply Co.. laundry 16 05 

" 13. Parke, Davis & Co., tubes 5 00 

" 13. Joseph Gardner, merchandise and labor 56 20 

" 13. Central Supply Co., merchandise 1 48 

" 13. Daniel Stewai-t Drug Co., merchandise 9 77 

" 13. H. E. Zimmer, merchandise "^5 

" 13. Leo Lando, magnifiers 4 50 

" 13. Wm. Langsenkamp, repairs ^ ^ 

" 33. Pettis Dry Goods Co., merchandise 135 

" 20. E. H. Sargent & Co., merchandise • • 24 77 

" 13. The H. Lieber Co., merchandise • 2 30 

" 13. W. B. Burford. printing, stationery and supplies 48 63 

" 13. Vonnegut Hardware Co.. merchandise 3 45 



July 


18. 


" 


23. 


" 


18. 


All J,'. 


9. 


July 31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


>< 


31. 


•' 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


•• 


31. 


Aug. 


23. 


" 


23. 


'♦ 


25. 


" 


29. 


<( 


29. 


" 


29. 


" 


29. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


« 


31. 


" 


31. 


Sept 


. 1. 


" 


1. 


" 


4. 


" 


6. 


" 


G. 


" 


8. 


" 


10. 


•' 


10. 


" 


11. 


" 


11. 


" 


14. 


" 


14. 


" 


18. 


<( 


18. 


" 


29. 


" 


30. 


(( 


30. 


« 


30. 


" 


30. 


<( 


30. 



20 

Columbia School Supply Co., liydi'ometer jars $5 33 

Arthur H. Thomas Co., merchandise 86 40 

Ballweg & Co., boxes 22 50 

Prof. H. E. Barnard, expense attending National and 
Slate Dairy and Food Association meeting, July 

IG to 24, 190G 74 10 

Dr. T. V. Keene, salaiy 150 00 

Dr. Helene Knabe, salary GO 00 

Dr. Ada SAveitzer, salary 16 00 

Effie Stephens, salaiy 50 00 

Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

Mrs. Nellie M. Coney, salary 37 50 

Norris Thompson, salary 35 00 

Philip Brodus, salary 44 29 

Dr. D. W. McNamara, samples and services 11 83 

Henry W. Bennett, P. M., postage stamps 100 00 

Chas. L. Bragg, samples, traveling expense, wages... 24 88 

H. E. Barnard, samples for analysis 2 87 

Norris Thompson, samples for analysis 2 40 

Will D. McAbee, samples and expense 18 37 

Will D. McAbee, wages one week 10 00 

Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 60 00 

Dr. Ada Sweitzer, salary 30 00 

Katherine Loechle, salary 40 00 

Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

H. E. Bishop, salary 60 00 

Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

Norris Thompson, salary 35 00 

Philip Brodus, salary 44 29 

Chas. T. Bragg, expense samples, traveling 18 65 

Chas. T. Bragg, salary one week 10 00 . 

J. J. Hinman, services in laboratory 25 00 

Chas. T. Bragg, expense samples and traveling 6 10 

Chas. T. Bragg, salary 5 00 

C. E. Canaday, expense samples and services 4 20 

Will D. McAbee, expense samples and traveling 32 75 

Will D. McAbee, salary two weeks 20 00 

Lea Bros. & Co., National Standard dispensatory 8 00 

Lea Bros. & Co., National formulary 65 

J. J. Hinman, expense samples and traveling 10 54 

J. .T. Hinman, salary 5 00 

Will D. McAbee, expense samples and traveling 23 80 

Will D. McAbee, salary one week 10 00 

R. E. Bishop, expense samples for laboratory 23 53 

Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 75 00 

Dr. Ada Sweitzer, salary 30 00 

Katherine Loechle, salary four days 5 00 

Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 



Sept. 30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


" 


30. 


Oct. 


1. 


" 


8. 


" 


8. 


" 


9. 


" 


16. 


" 


12. 


•' 


12. 


^ " 


12. 


" 


12. 


" 


12. 


" 


12. 


Sept 


.15. 


" 


15. 


" 


15. 


•• 


15. 


•' 


15. 


" 


15. 


" 


15. 


<' 


15. 


" 


15. 


" 


15. 


" 


15. 


Oct. 


1. 


« 


1. 


Sept 


.15. 


" 


15. 


♦' 


15. 


Oct. 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


12. 


" 


31. 


" 


.31. 


" 


31. 


•' 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


" 


31. 


« 


31. 



21 

H. E. Bishop, salary $75 00 

Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

N. Thompson, salary 35 00 

I. L. Miller, salary 15 00 

Philip Brodus, salary 42 90 

Norris Thompson, expense samples, drugs, etc 17 74 

R. E. Bishop, expense samples for laboratory 32 41 

R. E. Bishop, salary two weeks 20 00 

Norris Thompson, samples for laboratory 24 10 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., merchandise. 132 02 

American Toilet Supply Co., laundry 13 70 

E. H. Eldridge Lumber Co., lumber and supplies 15 00 

Pitman-Myers Co., chemicals and supplies G9 02 

Wm. B. Burford. printing, stationery and supplies... 78 84 

J. A. Diggle, gas heater connections, etc 27 71 

H. E. Barnard, expenses Aug. 30 to Oct. 10 35 79 

Vonnegut Hardware Co 3 70 

W. F. Williams Mfg. Co 75 

Stephens Photo Supply Co 2 25 

Daniel Stewart Co 4 50 

Public Drug Co 70 

Chas. Coonly & Co 60 

G. A. Senrick & Co 75 

Robert P. Milton 80 

Leo Eliel 60 

Otto C. Bastian 80 

G. E. Cimmerman 65 

Columbia School Supply Co 2 60 

Central Supply Co 53 

Indianapolis Gas Co. 3 75 

Berterman Bros 4 00 

H. E. Zimmer 6 80 

Hogan Transfer Co 75 

American Express Co 55 

The H. Lieber Co 3 80 

Robert Worthington, labor 9 00 

R. E. Bishop, expense samples and salary 50 39 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., merchandise 23 04 

H. E. Barnard, expense 11 28 

Dr. T. V. Keene, salary 150 00 

Dr. Helene Knabe, salary 75 00 

Dr. Ada Sweitzer, salary 30 00 

Mrs. Florence M. Cai*per, salary 38 50 

Katherine Loechle, salary 7 70 

Prof. H. E. Barnard, salary 125 00 

H. B. Bishop, assistant, salary 75 00 

Mrs. Nellie M. Coney, salary 50 00 

Norris Thompson, salary 35 00 

Philip Brodus, salary 44 29 

Total $9,994 61 



22 

Appropriation .$10,000 00 

Disbursement 9,994 Gl 

Balance reverting to General Fund $5 30 

RECAPITULATION. 

Balance from Equipment Fund, lOO.j .$('.19 7U 

Appropriation General Fund 10,000 (»(> 

Appropriation Laboratory Maintenance Fund 10,000 00 

Total $20,019 70 

EXPENDITURES. 

Equipment Fund $010 00 

Expense Fund 9,812 79 

Laboratorj^ Maintenance Fund .' 9,994 61 

Total $20,417 40 

Balance $202 30 

Reverting to General Fund 192 GO 

Balance Equipment Fund $9 70 

Secretary's salary $2,400 00 

Chief Clerk's salary 1.000 00 

Total $3,400 00 



Minutes of Transactions 



Quarters. 



(23) 



FIRST QUARTER. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 

December 14, 1905. 

Present: Drs. Davis, Eisenbeiss, Tucker and Hurty. 

Meeting called to order by the President at 12 m. The work of 
the Health Officers' Schbol for Town Officers was reviewed and 
approved. 

Adjourned to meet at 2 p. m., Friday, December 15. 

ADJOURNED MEETING. 

December 15, 1905. 
Called to order by President Davis. 
Present: Drs. Davis, Eisenbeiss, Tucker and Hurty. 
The two days' meeting of the Health Officers' School were 
reviewed, and the proceedings ordered written out. 

The following resolution after the discussion was adopted: 

RESOLUTION CONCERNING THE NATIONAL PURE FOOD LAW. 

Whereas, Eood and drug adulteration has become a very great 
evil, causing enormous injury to the health and life of the people, 
and also causing them great monetary loss; and 

Whereas, It is certainly true that the State food and drug laws 
do not furnish practical protection on account of their varying 
standards and requirements; therefore it is 

Resolved, That the Indiana State Board of Health, which is 
charged with the enforcement of the Indiana pure food and drug 
law, most respectfully requests the Senators and Congressmen 
from Indiana to give their support to the Heyburn Bill, now 
before the Congress of the United States. 

Passed unanimously. 

Ordered, That no more equipment or apparatus or large orders 
for supplies shall be purchased, except by order of the Board ; but 
the Secretary may purchase such minor supplies as are necessary 
for the proper conduct of the laboratory. 



25 



KEGULAK MEETmO OF THE STATE BOARD OF 

HEALTH. 

Jamiary 12, 1906. 

AFFAIRS CONSIDERED OF THE FOURTH CALENDAR QUARTER 
OF 1905 AND THE FIRST FISCAL QUARTER OF 190G. 

Present: Drs. Davis, Wishard, Tucker and Hiirty. 

Called to order by President Davis at 2 :20 p. m. 

Minutes of the last regular, and special meeting of- December 
14, read and approved. 

Report of Secretary for tbe last calendar quarter called for and 
read as follows : 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF SECRETARY. 

Comparatively speaking, smallpox has almost disappeared from 
the State. ISTo deaths from the disease occurred for the last three 
months, and only straggling mild cases over the State have been 
reported. In December small epidemics (less than ten cases) 
of very mild form occurred in Allen County, in Fort Wayne, also 
in a railroad camp in Johnson County. Only two of the nine 
cases in the camp ceased working during the attack. The cases 
were not reported for some time, as they were not suspected of 
being smallpox. Less typhoid occurred in the last calendar quar- 
ter of 1905 than in the same period of 1904. An epidemic was 
investigated by Dr. Knabe at Cambridge City, and full report 
by her is added hereto. Typhoid, as usual, was first in order of 
area of prevalence in October and ISTovember. Bronchitis was 
first in December. An unusual amount of tonsilitis was reported 
in ISTovember. 

VISITS AND INSPECTIONS. 

jSTovember 1, Vincennes. — Account of meeting of the State 
Charities Association, to deliver an address upon tuberculosis. 

IN'ovember 12, Cambridge City. — By Dr. Knabe, account ty- 
phoid. I 

l^ovember 14, Columbus.— Account of conference with local 
authorities, and to deliver an address on public health before the 
local sanitary association. 



2fi 

!N"oveml3er lY, Xokomo. — On aceoimt of smallpox. 

jSTovember 28, Mooresville.- — On account of smallpox. 

I^ovember 26, ]^ew York. — Account of iSTational Tubercu- 
losis Exhibit. 

December 8, Cambridge City. — On account of typhoid fever, 
and to deliver an address upon public health before the local 
teacliers' association and citizens. 

December 5, Lafayette. — On account of smallpox in Tippe- 
canoe County north of the city. 

December 12, Delphi. — On account of conference with local 
authorities, and to deliver an a(hli-oss u]ion public health before 
tlio Oracle Club. 

December 12, MiddletoAvu. — Dr. Kuabe, to investigate an in- 
stance of wholesale poisoning, supposed to be l)y ptomains. 

Complete reports of these visits are given herewith. 

Vincennes, ]^ovember 1. — The State Charities Association hold 
annual meetings in various parts of the State. This year the five 
days' meetiug was held in Vincennes. Addresses were made on 
the diiferent days by the Governor, tlie Lieutenant-Governor, and 
many eminent men from other States. The evening of l^ovember 
] was given up to a consideration of tuberculosis. The principal 
speaker of the evening was Dr. Frank Billings, of Chicago. In 
his address he made an argument for the creation of a State hos- 
pital for consumptives, ^\'hich was based principally upon the 
experiences of physicians. He told in detail of the distressing 
and heart-rending incidents met with in general practice, and 
how it is possible for the State to save hundreds of lives annually ; 
also prevent the breaking up of homes and the making of widows 
and orphans. ^'The first step,'' said Dr. Billings, "in the fight 
against tuberculosis by the State, is the establishing of a State 
hospital where poor and deserving people smitten with the disease 
may be taken and cured. If the State is not interested in saving 
helpless women and children, who shall be interested ? If the 
State is not interested in protecting and preserving the homes, 
who shall be? If the State is not interested in preventing the 
creation of widowhood and orphanage, who shall be interested ?" 
Your secretary .was the second speaker, and was assigned the 
duty of presenting the consumption statistics of the State. This 



INDIANA STATE LIBRARV 



27 

was done bv charts and tables drawn froin the statistics of the 
State Board of Healtli. 

Colnmbus, November 14, — The Board of Health of the city of 
Colnmbus invited me to meet with them on November 14 to 
consider the water supply of the city and needed sanitary re- 
forms.. At the same time I was invited to deliver an address in 
the evening before the Women's Sanitary Association,, In the 
matter of the public water supply, the board was advised to adopt 
filtration works and not deep wells. Columbus has an unfailing 
soft water supply in the east fork of White River. It simply 
needs filtration. Some members of the council and many citizens 
advocate deep wells; the objections to which are that they always 
furnish hard water and invariably in time give out, as has been the 
case at Indianapolis, Muncie, and Fort Wayne. This is also true 
of numerous cities throughout the United States. Columbus has 
only a partial sewage system. It is very small indeed for the 
size and wealth of the community. The board was advised to 
advocate the building of a sanitary system of sewers. The proper 
procedure would be to employ an expert sewer engineer to visit 
the sewer system leading to every lot. It would, of course, be im- 
possible to build this system all at once, but it would be possible 
to gradually construct it. 

In the evening at the First Christian Church I addressed the 
Women's Sanitary Association, making suggestions how the said 
association might proceed to better affairs and conditions in Co- 
lumbus, and also presenting in a general way the tuberculosis con- 
ditions in the State. . 

Kokomo, November 17. — Two mild cases of smallpox were dis- 
covered at the borders of the city, and there was a dispute among 
the physicians as to the nature of the disease. For this reason 
the State Board of Health was called upon for a visit. Upon 
arrival I was taken to see the cases. They proved to be unques- 
tionably smallpox, and all precautious were taken accordingly. 

Mooresville, November 23. — In answer to an urgent telephone 
message from Dr. Brackney, Health Officer, I went to Mooresville 
to see a case of supposed smallpox. The patient was 32 years old, 
and he proved to have a plain attack of severe chickenpox. He 
had an excellent vaccination mark, and all of the symptoms 
pointed to chickenpox rather than to smallpox. No quarantine 



28 

was held, and there was no increase of cases. The children in 
the house had all recently had chickenpox a few weeks before, 
and this man, a boarder in the honse and a traveler, had very 
likely contracted it from the children. He had never had the 
disease before. 

ISTew York, l^ovember 26. — Permission granted, I visited ]^ew 
York, IvTovember 26, and remained there fonr days, attending the 
American Tuberculosis Exhibition. 

AMERICAN TUBERCULOSIS EXHIBITION. 

The American Tuberculosis Exhibition, which opened Novem- 
ber 27 and closed December 9, was under the auspices of the 
ISTational Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuber- 
culosis and the Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of 
the Charity Organization Society. The exhibition was in the 
west wing of the American Museimi of ISTatural History on 
Seventy-seventh Street, near Central Park. The object of the 
exhibition was to show the methods that are being adopted 
throughout this country and in Europe to prevent and cure con- 
sumption. On the night of l^ovember 27, before an audience 
of at least 1,500, in the lecture amphitheater of the Museum 
building, addresses were made by Dr. Thomas Darlington, Health 
Commissioner of I^ew York ; Mr. Morris K. Jessup, philanthro- 
pist; the President of the Museum, and Mr. Talcott Williams, 
editor of the Philadelphia Press. On Wednesday evening, 'No- 
vember 29, another large audience assembled in the Auditorium, 
and the subject of the evening was "Tuberculosis and the Labor 
Unions." This meeting was addressed by several labor leaders, 
among them J. W. Sullivan and Prof. Graham Taylor. Mr. 
Samuel Gompers was sick and could not attend. This meeting 
was also addressed by the well-known leader in philanthropy, Mr. 
Edward T. Divine. The speakers traced out clearly the relation- 
ship which the laboring classes have with tuberculosis. Mr. 
Sullivan in his speech made plain how the rich people are 
directly and immediately interested in the suppression of the dis- 
ease. It was Mr. Sullivan who told the story, which I found 
was well known in IsTew York, about Mrs. McKinley's fine dress 
being made in a sweatshop by consumptive women. It was 
supposed all the time that this dress was constructed in the 



29 

magnificent Eiftb Avenue establishment from which it was pur- 
chased. The address of Prof. Taylor was exactly to the point, 
was eloquent, and his plea for the life and health of the laboring- 
classes aroused much enthusiasm. Dr. Divine, scholar and phil- 
anthropist, who gives his whcfle life to charity work, delivered 
an address which was not second in effectiveness to that of Prof. 
Taylor. On the evening of December 1 another public meeting- 
was held in the Museum auditorium. A crowd assembled, and 
not less than 2,000 were present. Dr. Herman Biggs presided. 
The speakers were Dr. Plick, superintendent of the Henry 
Phipps' Institute ; Dr. Trudeau, of the Saranac Sanatorium ; 
Dr. Bowditch, of the Sharon, Mass., Sanatorium, and Drs, Evans 
and Jacobi, of Chicago. There were present Dr. Jacobs, of 
Baltimore, and several of the faculty of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
"versity;* also Drs. Pruden, Korthrup, Knopf, and others repre- 
sentative of the ]S^ew York City medical . profession. Philadel- 
phia was also fully represented, and prominent among the gentle- 
men from that city was Dr. Ravenel, who has made the brilliant 
experiments upon tuberculosis infection, through the intestinal 
tract. On the stage sat the millionaire philanthropist, Henry 
Phipps, who will give $5,000,000 for the institution which bears 
his name. Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan, who is the treasurer of the 
Exhibition Committee, was present in the audience. This meet- 
ing on Friday evening, December 1, was of such moment as to 
warrant the term "epoch making." 

THE EXHIBITION. 

Upon entering the exhibition room, the first exhibit to attract 
attention was a section, full size, of a cell in the Clinton Prison. 
This cell illustrated ventilation and all sanitary features. Dr. 
Ransom, physician of the Clinton Prison, was present, and in 
another part of the room exhibited statistical charts, photographs, 
and drawings illustrating how tuberculosis had been expelled 
from the prison and was no longer produced by living in that 
institution. The ISTew York City Board of Health exhibit was 
very extensive and complete, and illustrated the work it is doing 
with ninety-eight large frames showing charts, pictures, diagrams, 
blanks, and the like. Dr. Biggs estimates that 85 per cent, of all 
tuberculosis cases are reported. Of the remaining 15 per cent, ten 



3d 

never call a physician, and the other, five is the result of neglect on 
the part of practitioners. We might ask : When will it be possible 
to make such a report as this in Indianapolis ? Further illustrations 
of the work of the 'New York Board of Health were shown in 
two large books two feet square 'and six inches thick. These 
books showed by pictures, charts, statistics and running account, 
the work of the City Board in its fight against tuberculosis since 
the same was begun. The JSTew York Bellevue and Allied Hos- 
pitals had striking exhibits. One of these was "a typical dark 
interior bedroom, one of 360,000 in l^ew York city, as the visit- 
ing nurses see them." The above was the sign over this repro- 
duction. The bedstead, bed clothing, and indeed everything in 
the room, were transferred from a real case. Of course, the arti- 
cles had been disinfected, but the room was exactly like those 
found in the tenements, minus the dirt. By the side of this 
exhibit was another of the same room after it had been re- 
modeled and alterations effected by the visiting nurses of the 
tuberculosis clinic of Bellevue and Allied Hospitals and by the 
Tenement House Department. In the remodeled room a window 
had been cut through, the room itself made clean, papered with 
light colored paper, and made at least 50 per cent, more habitable. 
The Kew York City Tenement Department represented its work 
by two large cabinets of 41 leaves each, showing photographs, 
four on each leaf, on both sides. This made eight to a leaf, 201 
photographs in all. These represented tenement house condi- 
tions. This association also showed 24 frames 2 by 3 feet, which 
made plain how diflicult it was for the poor to live in New York, 
and how productive of disease such methods of living must be. 
Other exhibits illustrative of the above conditions of tuberculosis 
were made by the Presbyterian Hospital Dispensary and the 
Gouverneur Hospital, the St. Joseph Hospital for Consumptives, 
the Bellevue Hospital, the I^ew York State Hospital for Incipient 
Consumptives, the Stony Wold Sanatorium, the Loomis Sana- 
torium, Sanatorium Gabriels, Saranac Lake Hospital, Toronto 
Free Hospital, Moskoka Sanatorium, Colorado Association 
Health Farm, Agnes' Memorial Sanatorium, White Haven Sana- 
torium, Pennsylvania; Johns Hopkins Hospital, Tuberculosis 
Department, showing the Phipps Dispensary; Visiting Nurses' 
Association of Baltimore, the Hampton Negro Conference, the 



31 

Massachnsetts State Board of Health Hospital, the Boston Antl- 
Tnbcrcnlosis Association, Sharon Sanatorium of Massachnsetts, 
the Pottenger Sanatorinm of California, Craigmore Sanatorinm, 
Colorado National Jewish Hospital, Maine State Sanatorinm, 
Dr. Brooks Sanatorinm at T^ew Canaan, Conn., the Gaylor Farm 
Sanatorinm, Sea Breeze Hospital, United States General Hos- 
pital, Ft. Bajard ; the ISTewport Anti-Tnberenlosis Association, 
the Sonth Mountain Camp Sanatorinm, California Mountain 
Side Sanatorinm, Cal. ; Maryland State Board of Health, Massa- 
chnsetts State Board of Health, and the Indiana State Board of 
Health. 

To detail all of these exhibits would, of course, be exceediuglv 
tiresome, but to see them would be interesting and instructive, as 
I found it to be. Dr. Biggs remarked that the growth of the 
work of preventing tuberculosis astonished him. "What we see 
before us," said he, ''has all developed within the last twelve 
years, and it represents a work of humanity and for medicine 
which is inestimable." There were exhibited models of sleeping 
shacks, at least a score of different methods of disposing of sputum 
in a sanitary way, and there were also large models in plaster 
of tenement blocks in ISTew York, as they appeared before they 
were torn do^vn, and again as they appear after being built in 
accordance with the new tenement law of the city. The Tene- 
ment Commission of ISTew York lias the power to condemn build- 
ings and to force their demolition. They can not, however, com- 
pel rebuilding, but if the owner docs rebuild, then the tenement 
must be constructed according to certain principles laid down in 
the law, and which are specifically prescribed by the Commission. 
The immense factor of unsanitary tenements in the production 
of disease has only to be mentioned to be admitted and under- 
stood. The plaster models of the old tenement building occupied 
a table 4 by 2 feet, and were in exact proportion. The rentals 
from this one block, as represented in the model, amounted to 
$115,000 per year. This was called the "Lung Block," and be- 
longed principally to the Trinity Church Corporation. It is this 
coi*]3oration which put up the strongest opposition to the passage 
of the law creating the Tenement House Commission. The model 
in plaster showing the new buildings was on a table 5 by 7 feet, 
and by looking in at the windows it was plain how every room 



32 

was provided with light and air. It is the belief of the tenement 
workers that the providing of pens and awful quarters increases 
pauperism and miserable living and does not, as is contended bj 
tlie owners of these awful tenement blocks, provide shelter for 
those who wonld otherwise be shelterless. 

The pathological exhibit was not so extensive as that shown at 
the Baltimore meeting in Jannarj, 1904. It was, however, as 
much to the point. The Phipps Institute exhibited 45 specimens, 
showing as many tissues infected with tuberculosis. Pruden, 
Larkin, Wilson, Delafield and Wood made an interesting exhibit 
<»f acid-fast bacteria, to which class tubercle organisms belong, and 
all had many pathological specimens. Dr. Pruden exhibited seven 
specimens of lungs which were labeled "Carbon Lungs." The 
placard announced that most of the specimens were taken from 
jicrsons who had died from other diseases than tuberculosis, but 
whose lungs were found to be filled with soot, making them 
black. With these lungs were exhibited those of an Eskimo and 
of a young child, showing how the lungs of a human being look 
when normal. The Eskimo was accidentally killed, and never 
lived in a region where soot is known. Dr. Pruden also exhibited 
a gelatin plate with the following notice: "The scattering of 
liacteria in the air when sneezing." In this notice was printed 
the following: "In sneezing, a fine spray or fluid from the nose 
or throat is driven into the air. In this way the air for two 
or three feet in front of the person who sneezes or coughs without 
covering mouth and nose, may be contaminated. If he be a 
consumptive, these secretions may contain tubercle bacilli. This 
specimen shows what was coughed four feet away when a 
student coughed and sneezed after rinsing mouth and nose with 
a culture of prodigiosus. The red spots growing luxuriantly 
upon the plate make plain the contamination of the atmosphere 
by coughing and sneezing." Other plates exhibited by Dr. 
Pruden show how flies carry tubercle bacilli on their feet. Flies 
were permitted to feed upon sputum, and then were placed in a 
glass box, the air of which was sterile, and allowed to walk over 
the gelatin plates. On some plates tubercle bacilli were growing, 
and on others bacillus prodigiosus, which, as we know, makes a 
more striking illustration. 

The Saranac Laboratory showed cultures in tubes and bottles 



33 

of tubercle bacilli, also illustrating the chemical composition of 
this organism by showing in proportion amounts of wax, acids, 
fat, tissue, etc., which constitute the bacillus. To illustrate the 
enormous scale upon which these experiments were conducted, 
where a pound of tubercular bacilli must be grown, two 
ounces of powdered bacilli Avere shown. Dr. Trudeau also 
showed tuberculin, and bacilli emulsions. Conspicuously posted 
in large letters on a banner was the following resolution passed 
in regular meeting by the ISTew York Medical Association: 

"Whereas, There is no specific medicine for tuberculosis known, 
and the so-called cures and. specifics and special methods of treat- 
ment widely advertised in the daily papers are, in the opinion of 
this Society, without special value and do not at all justify the 
extravagant claims made for them, and serve chiefly to enrich 
their promoters at the expense of poor, and frequently ignorant 
or credulous consumptives; therefore 

"Resolved, That a public announcement be made that it is the 
unanimous opinion of this Society that there exists no specific 
medicine for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis; that no 
cure can be expected from any kind of medicine or method ex- 
cept the regular accepted treatment which relies mainly upon pure 
air and nourishing food." 

Cambridge City, December 8. — Upon invitation from the town 
authorities I visited Cambridge City to confer with them upon 
various public health afl^airs and especially in regard to typhoid 
fever, an epidemic of this disease having prevailed very lately. 
It was also arranged that at the time of my visit I should address 
the Township Teachers' Association and citizens. With Dr. J. 
B. Allen, Health Officer, I visited, twelve premises where typhoid 
fever existed or had existed. All but two of these were found to 
be exceedingly unsanitary; just the kind of places where typhoid 
should prevail. The disposal of sewage is exclusively by the pit 
method, there being no sewers in the town. The evils of this 
method were gone into extensively, and the town council was 
urged to at least begin the building of a proper sanitary sewer 
system. As is always the case in such instances, I suggested 
that a competent sanitary engineer be engaged to lay out the 
entire town in a comprehensive system of sanitary sewers, and 
that the tovtm construct the system as rapidly as finances would 

3-Bd. ofHeaUh, 



34 

permit Where sewage disposal is in pits, open to the air and 
polhiting the soil, there typhoid fever will be. In all, twenty-four 
samples of water were analyzed from Cambridge City, and of 
this number fourteen were fonnd to be badly polluted, two were 
suspicious, and the others passable. 

Before the Township Teachers' Association I spoke upon 
"What Teachers Could Do to Benefit Pupils by Sanitary Meth- 
ods." The address was very kindly received, and a resolution of 
thanks and confidence was passed. 

Lafayette, December 5.— On account of an urgent telephone 
message from Dr. ITiner, County TTealth Officer, I visited Lafay- 
ette to settle a dispute in regard to the diagnosis of cases of 
smallpox. Upon arrival I found south of the city, in the country 
about three miles, a family of fonr, all afflicted with variola. 
Three of the cases were mild indeed, and the fourth could not be 
called severe. Quarantine was established, vaccination recom- 
mended, and all other precautions taken. 

Delphi, December 12. — This visit was made to confer with the 
authorities in regard to needed public sanitary M'-orks. Delphi 
has an excellent water supply from deep wells, but no sewers. 
Sewage disposal is affected entirely by pits. The usual argument 
against this method was presented ; also the usual advice given 
that the city employ an expert engineer to lay out the place in a 
comprehensive system of sanitary sewers, the same to be built as 
rapidly as finances would permit. The authorities were also 
urged to give strong support to the Health Officer in his efforts 
to raise the standard of public health. 

In the evening I addressed the Oracle Club in the auditorium 
of the city high school. The title of the lecture was "Public 
Health Is Public Wealth," and was illustrated by lantern slides. 
The lecture was well received, and a vote of thanks given, to- 
gether with a resolution of confidence in the State Board of 
Health and praise for its work. 

REPORT OF TYPHOID FEVER EPIDEMIC AT CAMBRIDGE CITY, 
INDIANA, INVESTIGATED BY DR. HELENE KNABE. 

Pui'suant to the order of the State Board of Health, the undersigned 
went to Cambridge City, November 14, 1905, to investigate the epidemic 
of typhoid fever which had been reported from there. This investigation 
disclosed the following facts: .: 



35 

Cauibridge City has a population numbering 1.700, is situated on White 
Water River, and part of the town is bisected bj' a small canal. The 
streets are fairly kept and reasonably dry. 

There is no general system of sewage in this town, but some of the 
residents whose lots border on the canal have connected their stables and 
outhouses with the latter, and the seAvage is washed into the water. 
These, however, represent only a very small percentage, and In the larger 
part of the town the surface privj' is the only means for the disposal of 
tilth. During the last summer this condition resulted in a singular boy- 
cott, because the farmers objected to having the vaults emptied into 
their property, and as a result the tilth of the whole town accumulated 
for several months, unfortunately through the hottest season, when flies 
were plentiful. All the wells in Oambildge City are very shallow, usually 
from sixteen to twenty feet, penetrating only into the gravel and 6nly 
protecting the people from drinking the immediate surface water. 

At times, for instance during heavy rains, or when the river is high, 
I he canal overflows and floods a large area of the tract surrounding the 
canal, including a lot upon which the garbage of the town is dumped. 
This place is very unsightly and malodorous at all times. 

Cambridge City is supplied with water works, but this water is not 
used for dripking purposes, because the water from the canal occasionally 
gets into the pipes, badly polluting the supply. In fact, one of the cases 
sick at the present time is known to have been infected through drinking 
water which came through one of the water works pipes. 

From the records of the Health Officer I learned that there had been 
two cases of typhoid fever reported during .July. Another case was re- 
ported on September 1. These three eases soon recovered and I was not 
able to see the persons. At the present time there are eight cases in 
various stages of the disease. Four persons have recovered from slight 
attacks of typhoid fever, but I was able to make a positive diagnosis by 
the Wldal test. Two deaths haA^e occurred so far. Raymond Goodwin, 
who died October 15, and Mrs. Brier, who died November 10. Some of 
the cases can not be traced to any definite source, and it is my opinion 
that flies are responsible in these instances. The conditions surrounding 
some iiouseholds are so unsanitary that they are a menace to the whole 
community. In one instance a family consisting of a father, mother and 
six children ranging in age from one to twelve years, live in a miserable 
little house made on the order of a woodshed, with a tiny kitchen added. 
The house has two rooms, one bedroom just large enough to hold two 
plain double beds and leave a space of two feet between beds and wall. 
The other room contains an old lounge, a stove, two chairs and a baby 
carriage, and is not large enough to accommodate the whole family at 
one time. Either one of the rooms has only one windoAV, which, need- 
less to say, is never opened. Bedding was given to the people a short 
lime ago bj^ the "Charity Organization of Cambridge City." The fathei-, 
James Goodwin, and two of the cliildren, Mary, ten, and Mamie, eight 
years old, are sick Avith typhoid fever. The children are recovering, 
Avhile the father Avas at the height of the disease at the time of my visit. 
The whole house is in an extremely filthy condition. The AA^ay these 
people live is best shown by a r^'uiark wliieh one of the cliildren made 



36 

some time ago when asked if ]Mnmie slept alone, as the physician had 
directed. The child said, "Oh, yes, nobody sleeps with her except mama, 
baby and my other sister.' 

The surroundings of this house are as bad as they can possibly be. A 
vei'y dirty hogpen and an outhouse in even a worse condition are about 
sixty-tive feet away and on a considerably lower level than the well, 
which is a few feet from the house. The ground is streAvn with filth for 
many feet around. These people did not disinfect anything, even though 
the physician who' attended the case stated that he gave them disin- 
fectants and instx'ucted them in their use. 

The schoolhouse of Cambiidge City is a three-story brick, in which 
nine rooms are used for teaching purposes every day. It is heated by 
furnace, but there is no system of ventilation. The rooms on the third 
floor are used for the high school pupils and the lower grades are on the 
first and second floors. I also inspected the outhouse, finding it in a 
very unsanitary condition. There is no system of flushing it and the 
odor was very bad. It was stated that disinfection was practiced twice 
a week, but I advised that it be done every day regularly. The vault is 
cemented and connected by a pipe Avith the river. A sample of water 
from the well in the school yard was collected for examination. 

During my stay at Cambridge City I made inspections at different 
houses situated at a low level, and found in two of them patients suffer- 
ing of tuberculosis. Another case of suspected tuberculosis was referred 
to me by one of the physicians for diagnosis. The physical, as well as 
the examination of the sputum, showed the case to be far advanced. 
Two other cases suspected of having typhoid fever gave negative Widal 
reaction. 

On Friday, November 17, I inspected the Suuny Side Dairy, managed 
by Mr. Moffitt. The stable was in bad condition, lacking the gutter. 
Horses were kept in the same stable and the .ground in front of the door 
was soaked with the seepage from the stable, making it almost impossible 
to get into it. A very dirty trough was used to water the cows. The 
milk cooler as well as the buckets and bottles, are kept in a box outside 
the house, where they, of course, will be aired well, but are also open to 
the dust. The well is near the house and only about 35 to 40 feet away 
from a privy that is no credit to the owner of the place. I went also 
to the .Jersey Dairy, in charge of Mr. Coop. The place is situated on a 
high ridge and the sm-roundings as good as could be required. The stable 
gives shelter to twenty-five cows. In one corner of the large square build- 
ing some horses were kept, but they are entirely remote froni the cows. 
The cows are watered from a spring in the woods, which is well pro- 
tected and is not likely to be polluted. The milkhouse is scrupulously 
clean and is provided with a cooler according to the law, and the whole 
place is kept as well as can be under the circumstances. Mr. Coop asked 
to be given a copy of the rules of the State Board of Health governing 
the operation of dairies. 

Summary. — Number of patients visited, eighteen; cases of typhoid 
fever, twelve; tuberculosis, three far advanced cases and one incipient 
case; lagrippe, two; Widal tests, seven; positive, five; negative, two; 
dailies inspected, two; one schoolhouse inspected; samples of water sent 
to Laboratory of Hygiene, ten; many typhoid circulars distributed. 



TtlE THIRD ANNUAIv HEALTH OFFICERS SCHOOL FOK TOWN 

OFFICERS. 

The third Annual School for Town Health Officers was held 
in Indianapolis December 14 and 15. All tomi officers were 
summoned as usual and attended. The Claypool Hotel was head- 
quarters, and all sessions were held in the auditorium of the 
hotel. The first session was promptly called to order December 
14, at 10 a. m., by Dr. F. A. Tucker of the State Board of 
Health. The first paper was entitled "Insects and Disease," 
and was read by Dr. Hurty. This paper was discussed for fif- 
teen minutes, and then a lecture was given by Prof. Severance 
Burrage, entitled "The Science of Disease Prevention." The 
conference adjourned at 12:15 to visit the laboratories and to 
call upon the Governor at 2 o'clock. 

The Governor received the health officers very graciously, shak- 
ing hands with each one, and made a short speech in which he 
particularly urged them to make every effort to collect accurate 
vital statistics, for, said he, "Accurate vital statistics are of the 
greatest importance to the State, and they furnish the particular 
foundation upon which must stand disease prevention work." 
Dr. Tucker read a paper entitled "The Prevention of Tubercu- 
losis," which was discussed at length. Dr. Tucker's essay dealt 
with the extent and destructiveness of tuberculosis in Indiana; 
it exhorted the officers present to thoroughly inform themselves in 
the important public movement against tuberculosis; to inform 
themselves in the early diagnosis of the disease, and to spread 
among the people the knowledge that in its early stages consump- 
tion is one of the must curable of maladies. Dr. Davis then 
read a paper entitled "The Air We Breathe," which was also 
discussed with interest. This paper briefly and clearly reviewed 
the extent and character of the atmosphere and its very great im- 
portance to health. This paper was remarkable for concentra- 
tion, and contained enough points and facts to serve the general 
writer for several papers. Dr. Knabe read a paper entitled "A 
Laboratory View of the Infectious Diseases." In this paper Dr. 
Knabe told the officers how the infectious disease problem looks 
from the laboratory. She made plain how gTcat the service was 
which the laboratory could render in the early diagnosis of dis- 
eases. The session closed with another lecture from Prof. Bur- 



88 • 

rage continuing the subject of the forenoon. Prof. Burrage is an 
excellent teacher, and presents his ideas clearly, and he made 
plain to his hearers the fundamental principles of disease pre- 
vention. 

The evening session was called to order at 8 p. m. by Dr. Davis. 
RejDorts of health officers were listened to for an hour and a half, 
five minutes being allowed to each officer. At this point Dr. 
Davis suspended the reports until the next session to hear a 
lecture by Prof. H. E. Barnard, Chemist of the Board, entitled 
"Polluted Water in Indiana." Prof. Barnard reviewed the 
water work so far done in the laboratory, and made plain the 
benefits derived therefrom. He reported that the laboratory was 
now making a sanitary sur\^ey of White River, and within an- 
other year expected to have maps, analytical tables, and a full 
history showing this system as it now exists and giving its prob- 
able future usefulness. Prof, Barnard said that one of the great 
problems in Indiana today was that of the prevention of stream 
pollution. . 

The fourth session v/as called to order at 9 a. m. December 15 
by Dr. Davis. Dr. T. Victor Keene, Superintendent of the 
State Laboratory of Hygiene, gave a lecture entitled "Experi- 
ences in Sanitary Work in Indianapolis." In this lecture Dr. 
Keene related in detail the experience of the Indianapolis Health 
Department in its efl'orts to secure pure milk and pure wa.ter. He 
also told many interesting and instructive experiences in medical 
school inspection in the management of infectious diseases. Eol- 
lowing this. Prof. Barnard gave a lecture, "Eood Adulteration 
in Indiana." Prof. Barnard reported that to date over 1,000 
samples of foods and drugs had been, examined, and 49 per cent, 
were found not up to standard or adulterated.. Of 132 samples 
of vanilla, only 11 met the standard. Of 145 vinegars, only 12 
proved to be what they were sold for. Of 58 samples of lime 
water purchased in various parts of the State, only 33 were 
found up to standard. Prof. Barnard truly stated this was a 
deplorable condition, and it should be righted as soon as possible. 
After Prof. Barnard's paper on "Food Adulteration in Indiana," 
and after some discussion, the following resolution was adopted : 

Whereas, The members of this Association, being fully aware of the 
viciousness of food adulteration, both as an insidious attack on Uie 



39 

public Health and as an economic fi-aiul, and realizing uif ncci'ssiiy I'm- 
a National Pure Food Law to control interstate commerce in Inods, ami 
believing that such a laAA' would relieve tlie conditions wJiich ninlvc 
Indiana a dumping ground for llie products ot other states; 

Resolved, Tliat this Association urge the Senators and Congi'essnieii 
of this State to use their strongest efforts to secure the passage of tlie 
Ileyburn bill. 

Tlnaniiiionslv carried. 

The next order was a lecture entitled "The Tnbercnlosis Sana- 
torinm," by Dr. H. H. Cowing, Health Officer of Delaware 
Connty. Dr. Cowing had lately visited the various sanatoria in 
the East, remaining for some time at the Adirondack Cottage 
Sanatorium, which institution was founded by the well-known 
Dr. E. L. Trudeau. Dr. Cowing reviewed the disposition and 
methods of cure by the outdoor life, plain food and regular liv- 
ing. In conclusion, he exhorted the health officers to keep con- 
stantly in mind the necessity of a State Tuberculosis Sanatorium 
in Indiana, and that they lend their fullest influence and efforts 
to secure the same. The exercises closed with a lecture by Dr. W. 
T. S. Dodds, of Indianapolis, upon "The Early Diagnosis of Con- 
sumption with Clinic," Dr. Dodds said that physicians did wrong 
to wait for the appearance of the classical symptoms of tuberculo- 
sis, but they should tell the patient of his affliction. The cure of 
tuberculosis, he said, depended largely upon discovery of case when 
in its early stages. The early symptoms were: "tired feeling," 
accelerated pulse, rise of temperature in the afternoon, with pos- 
sibly sub-normal temperature in the morning, a dry, hacking, or 
rather an unproductive cough, for there is really no such thing 
as a dry cough. Even in apparently dry, hacking coughing, the 
patient sprays droplets of spittle into the air. If, with these 
symptoms, there is a loss (if weight, and even if the sputum does 
not show the presence of an organism, and unless it is positively 
known that the said symptoms are due to other causes, it should 
be assumed that incipient tuberculosis exists. 

As usual the attendance at the close had gro^vn very small, but 
those who Remained were enthusiastic, and from every indication 
one would judge they desired to hear more. Several officers took 
occasion to remark that this Avasthe best conference or school they 
had so far attended. 



40 

REPORT OF THE INVESTIGATIONS AT MIDDLETOWN, INDIANA, 
SUSPECTED PTOMAINE POISONING. 

By Dr. Helene Knabe. 

I was sent to Middletown December 12 to investigate some cases of 
suspected ptomaine poisoning which had occurred at the Welsh Hotel 
November 30, after the guests had partaken of a hearty dinner. 

On my arrival I visited Dr. Waters, tlie Health Officer of the town, who 
was one of the guests at that dinner and made sicli at that time. The 
doctor was kind enough to furnish me with a list of the names of the 
persons which were sick with what. seemed to be poisoning, and he also 
gave a A'eiy clear history of the state of affairs as they occurred Novem- 
ber 30. I found there were about twenty-four cases at the hotel and 
twelve cases outside. The persons who are named in the following list, 
"outside cases," had not come in contact with anybody from the hotel, 
nor had they obtained any food from there. Still the symptoms are 
identical with those at the hotel and in some of these cases they were 
very severe. The time during which this sickness appeared was the week 
from November 26 to December 3. 

The list of cases in their order of occurrence is as follows: 

November 28 — 

At Hotel: *Lamb, Leon (waiter). 
November 29, 8 to 12 p. m. — 

At Hotel: *Bicksler, Mr.; *Elliott, E. L.; * Waters, Dr. S. C; *Welsh, 
Mrs. Anna (owner of hotel), slightly sick next night; *Munden, Mrs. 
(cook), sick three days. 

Outside Cases: Fink, boy, age five, mild, no diarrhea; *Snellenberger, 
Mr.; *McKenzie, Mrs., mild case; *McKen7;ie, Mr., severe case; *Wallace, 
Dr., severe case; *Tylde, Mrs., severe case. 
November 30, 3 to 8 p. m. — 

At Hotel: *Kent, Mrs. (landlady); *Burk, Marion (waiter); Jackson, 
OUa (waiter), sick next morning; *Munden, boy, ten years (the cook's 
son); *»jooper, Frank; *Cooper, Edna; *Cooper, Carrie, mild; McRoy, Mr.; 
Pritchett, boy, age ten years; *Miller, E. P.; Daniels, .T. K, took dinner to 
nurse who did not get sick; Levy, Mr., mild; Levy, Mrs.; * Waters, Mrs., 
immediately after dinner went to Indianapolis, taken sicU there at 7 p. m.; 
Boarder (traveling man), taken sick at noon; * Wright, Miss Sarah (laun- 
dress), taken sick at 11 p. m.; *Bicksler, Mrs. 

Outside Cases: *Cassada, John; Hodson, Gertrude; *Moore, Mr. (works 
in restaurant). 

December 3 — 

Outside Cases: *Wood, Mr., severe; Wood, Lee, severe; Young Man. 

*Cases seen by Dr. Knabe. 

The attacks in every case began veiy suddenly with vomiting and 
purging. Most all of the cases at the hotel commenced shortly before 
supper on the evening of November 30. In all cases the prostration was 
pronounced and strychnine and nitroglycerine had to be given hypoder- 
mically. Dr. Waters, who had been sick the day before, attended the 
people at the hotel. Some of the patients complained of severe cramps 



41 

111 arms and legs, ami iu the cases of Mrs. Weisii, Mr. Daniels, and Mrs. 
Bicksler these cramps appeared in the slightest over-exertion every day 
since. Dr. Thoraburg, who treated Mr. Daniels during his attack stated 
that the vomitus of the patient was of a decided pink color, resembling 
that of a weak solution of Potassium Permanganate. During my stay 
at the Welsh Hotel I endeavored to find out the ways in which food is 
prepared there, but nothing that is not in keeping with the laws of 
cleanliness was to be seen anywhere. Mrs. Kent is always in the kitchen 
during meal time and supervises everything. The cooking utensils are 
of enameled ware and a few frying pans of the ordinai-y kind are also in 
use. All dishes and cooking utensils are kept very clean and the same 
can be said of the cupboards and. in fact, the whole house. 

The menu for the Thanksgiving dinner consisted of roast turkey and 
duck, potatoes, celery, stewed cranberries, oyster dressing and ice cream. 
The fact that three guests for dinner and one for supper, as well as the 
landlord, Mr. Kent, and the chambermaid, did not get sick, though they 
had eaten of all the victuals which were provided, makes it doubtful that 
the cases were food poisoning. The question was raised that it might 
be the work of a person who desired to bring the hotel into disrepute, 
but as Mrs. Kent is always there before meal time and stays in the 
kitchen until all guests are served, makes it rather difficult to see how 
anyone could get at the food without being seen by her. 

The cases that occurred in Middletown during that week are so much 
alike to those in the hotel, showing the same symptoms, viz.: vomiting, 
purging, profound prostration and remarkably quick recovery. The cases 
on the list marked with a star I have seen personally, and of the others 
the history was given by the attending physician, and all cases outside 
of the hotel I have carefully traced as far as possible and excluded any 
connection with the cases in the hotel. 

The people at the hotel had not eaten the same food in the same amount 
and many of those who became ill had eaten very sparingly, while of 
the ones who escaped the trouble some had eaten heartily. There seems 
to be no ground to think the ice cream caused the sickness, because some 
cases occurred before Thanksgiving dinner, when they did not eat any 
cream. The same reason would rule out the oyster dressing and the 
vegetables; also no canned eatables were used and all the guests did not 
eat of every one of them. Also the fact that with the exception of two 
of the patients none that had been sick on November 29 was sick again on 
November 30. For Mrs. Welsh's case there is also an explanatioa, be- 
cause this lady is in some legal difficulties and thought she was poisoned 
by her antagonist; she is very nervous and naturally would not get well 
so quick. 

It is impossible for me to come to a solution of the question, and as in 
no cases vomit was saved the examination of which would probably have 
given a clue to the cause of the trouble, I can not see how it is to be 
settled definitely. 

During my stay at Middletown 1 visited the schoolhouse. It is a brick 
structure containing six rooms. The water is supplied by the public 
water works of the town, and the building is heated by steam. The 
schoolhouse is supplied with toilet rooms for the girls, which are in the 



42 

basement and are in good condition, there being one of the usual public 
toilets with automatic flushing system. The toilet rooms for the boys 
are on the same order and some distance away from the main building. 

While inspecting the room in which the smallest children are taught, 
I noticed that many of the children had bad colds, and the teacher stated 
that many of them had stayed home a few days, and at the time of my 
visit five were away. Inspection of the throat did not show anything 
alarming. The phai'uyx was pale, tongue very slightly coated and the 
papilla reddened, giving the appearance of a mild degree of the so-called 
"strawberry" tongue. There was a hollow cough, entirely unproductive, 
present in all cases affected, and slight coryza. I spoke to Dr. Waters 
about it, suggesting that it might be a mild epidemic of scarlet fever, and 
he promises to watch for any cases developing among other children. 

Some cases of a skin disease that seem to have been brought there 
from Anderson proved to be scabies, and the treatment which the doctor 
has given is making an end to that. 

In closing I would like to call attention to the unsanitary condition 
of the waiting room in the Terminal Station at Anderson. There is no 
yentilation except when the door is opened, aud the appearance of the 
floor under the cases of a candy department that is in the front part of 
the room was anything but sanitary. 



HYGIENIC I^ABORATORY. 

The Bacteriological and Pathological Laboratory is now in full " 
operation. Dr. Keene commenced regular work January 1, 1906. 
Prior to this Dr. Keene gave considerable time to the making out 
of lists for apparatus, furniture, etc., also in arranging the labora- 
tory. Outfits for collecting samples of sputum and blood, and for 
diphtheria cultures have been sent to all applicants, and to Janu- 
ary 1 the following examinations have been made: 



EXAMINATIONS MADE IN DIVISION OF BACTERIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY UP TO 
AND INCLUDING DEGEMBEPv 31, 1905. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 

Tuberculosis 59 20 79 

Typlioid 22 4 26 

Diphtheria 30 15 45 

150 



43 



CHE-MICAI. LABORATORY. 

The analyses made to date are publlsliod in the monthly bulle- 
tin for ISTovember, and following is a snmmary: 

SUMMAKY. 

Foods. 

Number 
Number Adulterated 

Found or Varying Total Percentage 

to be of from Nuniljer of 

Articles Good Legal of" Articles Adulera- 

Examined. Quality. Standard. Examined. tion. 

Butter 4 4 8 50.0 

Cream 28 18 46 39.1 

Milk 225 57 282 20.2 

Lard 5 7 12 58.3 

Olive oil Go 40 105 38.1 

Oysters 21 5 26 20.0 

Sausage 36 67 108 65.0 

Miscellaneous meat products 10 7 17 41.0 

Codfish .. 4 4 100.0 

Cream of tartar 107 1 108 1.0 

Lemon exti-act 15 214 229 93.4 

Vanilla extract 11 121 132 " 91.5 

Vinegar 12 133 145 91.7 

Miscellaneous food products....... 19 1 20 5.0 

Total food products 558 679 1.237 54.97 

Drugs. 

Alcohol 63 32 95 37.6 

Lime water 33 25 58 43.1 

Tr. of Iodine 2 19 21 90.5 

Total 98 76 174 43.6 

The following' table shows the statns of smallpox for the quarter: 

No. of No. o. 

Oases Counties 

Reported. Deaths. Invaded. 

October, 1904 226 18 29 

October, 1905 

November, 1904 355 12 37 

November, .1905 84 5 

December, 1904 472 8 38 

December, 1905 . . .". 112 1 13 

By the above table comparison shows: Cases decreased 81 

per cent. ; deaths decreased 97 per cent. ; area invaded decreased 
82 per cent. 

Ordered, That the Secretary's report be spread of record. 



44 

AMERICAN TIN PLATE COMPANY. 

The following letter was read by the Secretary: 

Hon. Board of Health of Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind.: 

Gentlemen — We hereby respectfully request that you renew our per- 
mits for emptying into streams waste water, etc., from our several plants 
in this State, comprising the following: Elwood, Anderson, Gas City and 
Muncie. Yours very truly, 

THOMAS O'BRIEN, District Manager. 

After discussion it was ordered that the permits of last year 

be renewed. 

ORDERED. — The Secretary was given permission to purchase cer- 
tain supplies for the Bacteriological Laboratory, a partial list of which 
was presented. 

SPECIAL MEETING. 

March Y, 1906. 

Called to order by President Davis at 10 a. m. 

Present: Drs. Davis, McCoy, Wishard, Tucker, and Hurty. 

President announced the special meeting was called to consider 
sanitary surveys of three schoolhouses, as an urgent demand had 
been made by citizens. 

SCHOOLHOUSE AT WINGATE. 

Survey. — This is a two-story slate roofed brick building built 
about 1890. It contains four recitation rooms, four cloak rooms 
and two halls. Main building 37 by 52 feet. Hall 17 by 18 feet, 
outside measurement. Basement under main building about 6V2 
feet, with dirt floor. Two furnaces are used to heat the building, 
and their foundations had to be dug about 18 inches below the 
level of basement floor to set them up. Even with that, they are 
too close to the floor above, and there is danger of setting fire to 
the building, as the joists above them are charred and blackened 
with the heat. The walls of the building are built solid from the 
foundation, with no stone or slate between the basement and main 
building to check the rise of moisture. 

The schoolrooms are 25 by 34 feet, with 14-feet ceilings in 
lower and 12 -feet ceilings in upper rooms. Each room has a 
four-foot cloak room attached. There are ventilators in each 
room connected with the basement for the supply of fresh air, and 



45 

opening into the attic for the outlet of the foul air, but are not 
satisfactory. The teachers state that they have to open the win- 
dows to air the rooms, and that if the windows are open in one 
room, they can not keep the other rooms warm. (Many of the 
pupils were wearing wraps in the room that day.) 

The rooms are papered, but owing to the moisture in the walls 
the paper is coming off badly in every room. The plastering is 
badly cracked in the two lower rooms, the west upper room and 
both halls. The floors are badly worn in the lower rooms and will 
need repairing next fall. The windows have good blinds ; the 
floors are oiled and clean, the seats in good shape and of height to 
suit the pupils. The stairway is 5 feet wide to a 7-foot landing, 
then divides into two 3-foot reverse stairways to the hall above. 

The janitor stated that it was impossible to keep the rooms 
Varm on cold, windy days, and that school had to be dismissed 
last year for several days on that account; he said that moisture 
would accumulate on the walls in cold weather so that the paper 
would come loose and the water run down to the floor. In wet 
weather that Avater came into the basement, making it very hard to 
keep the furnaces going, although it had never gotten into the fire- 
boxes. He also stated that the ringing of the school bell or slam- 
ming of the front door to the hall would shake the whole building. 
He did not consider the building dangerous. 

The enumeration of pupils is 190. There are three and one- 
half school districts attending this school now, and if more room 
was available there would be two and one-half more that would 
be brought there. There are five teachers — four in the school 
building and one in the town hall, which is being used as a school- 
room for the overflow pupils. The Trustee, Mr. H. T. Van 
Cleave, states that he will have to add more rooms to or rebuild 
the schoolhouse or repair and practically rebuild three others in 
the county districts. He thinks it economy to tear do'^vn this 
building and put up a modern one that mil accommodate all the 
pupils in one school. He also says the tow^nship is out of debt 
and can build. 

H. M. Dickinson, Principal, stated the building was unsani- 
tary, could not be properly heated and was too small and could 
not be remodeled to advantage. 

J. M. Allhands, Assistant, stated same as above and also said 



46 

tlicrc lind been a gi'eat deal of sickness from colds and sore throat 
in his room, which he was snre was caused by dampness of the 
walls and the impossibility of keepings the rooms at a nniform 
temperature. 

Dr. T. 11. Allhands, Health Officer, has had two cases of pneu- 
monia and several cases of tonsilitis among the pnpils that he con- 
siders as directly traceable to the nnsanitary condition of the 
school building. 

R. IST. Cordig, Member of Town Council, thinks the Ijuilding is 
wholly inadequate to the needs of the school, that it is unsanitary, 
improperly constructed, and can not be remodeled economically, 
and advises that a modem sanitary building be erected. 

J". A. Long, Postmaster, endorses Mr. Cordig's views. 

Summarif. 

The building is unsanitary, improperly constructed, can not be 
remodeled or added to economically, and it is respectfully recom- 
mended that it be condemned for school purposes to take effect at 
end of present school term. 

After full consideration the folli^wing proclamation was 
adopted: ; ' 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Slate Board of 
Health that the schoolhouse at Wingate, Montgomery Connty, Indiana, 
is unsanitary and unfit for housing school children; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned and shall not be used 
for school pui-poses after April 1, 1906. 

Any violation of this order shall be promptly prosecuted hy the At- 
torney-General according to the statutes provided. 

SCHOOLHOUSE AT CLAYTON. 

Survey. — This is a two-story brick, with belfry tower, contain- 
ing four rooms 27x38 feet, two recitation rooms 12x22 feet, two 
halls and one 5-foot stairway. The building is well lighted and 
kept in neat, clean condition. Walls are painted and papered, 
good blinds at the windows and heated by soft-coal stoves in each 
room. Ventilated by doors and windows. Was built in 1883. 
The chimney at the south end of the building is split at the top 
for two or three feet and the wall is cracking and bulging outward 
at the junction of the upper and lower rooms. The brick in the 



47 

walls is very soft and conld be easily broken and crushed and 
shoAvs by its freshly broken condition that the whole wall on the 
south end is in danger of collapse. There is an iron rod run 
throngh the walls over the door of the entrance hall to keep them 
from collapsing and the wall is badly cracked to the belfry tower. 
There is no basement under the building, but a coal cellar has 
been dug under the northwest corner. The trustee who had this 
work done failed to build a wall under the foundation of the 
building, and as the Avater runs into the cellar whenever it rains, 
this corner of the building has settled and threatens to give down. 
A person jumping up and down in one of the upper rooms causes 
the whole building to quiver and windows and doors to rattle. 
The floors in the schoolroom are worn out, and it must be rc- 
floored, and the halls in one or two rooms need replastering. 

The enrollment is 194. There are five teachers and the high 
school course. The room used for the high school course con- 
tained 70 pupils. There are three districts combined in this 
school and the Trustee desires to bring in one or two more, or 
otherwise he will have to rebuild two one-room houses. Tlu; 
schoolyard contains two and one-half acres of ground and is well 
jidapted for the purpose. The water closets are screened and 
have dug vaults. There are no walks to them. 

. A talk with Mr. Miller (a member of the Advisory Board) and 
others shows that the citizens consider the building unsafe for use. 
Dr. A. K. Gilbert, Township Trustee, stated that he had an archi- 
tect furnish an estimate of cost of adding two rooms and remodel- 
ing the building, and that it would cost about $6,000 to do the 
work. 

It is respectfully recommended that the building be condemned 
as absolutely dangerous to life as well as unsanitary. 

After full consideration the following proclamation of con- 
demnation was adopted : 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION. 

Whereas, It lias been shown to the satisfaction of the State Board of 
Health that the schoolhouse at Clayton. Heudriclis County, Indiana, is 
unsanitary and unfit for housing school children; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned and shall not be used 
for school purposes after April 1, 1906. 

Any violation of this order shall be promptly prosecuted by the At- 
torney-General according to the statutes provided. 



48 

SOHOOLHOUSE AT AVON. 

Sanitary Survey. — The building is a fonr-room, two-story brick 
with a slate roof. ISTo basement. It was built in 1880, but 
burned down and was rebuilt in 1885 and an additional story 
added. The walls of the lower story are about 14 inches thick 
and the upper walls about 9 inches thick. The walls are begin- 
ning to crack and split open around the windows and doors. The 
rooms are 2iyox30 feet. There are two halls 10x30 feet and a 
single narrow stairway. 'No cloakrooms and no heat in the halls. 
The partition wall between the two lower rooms is cracked from 
bottom to top and beginning to open. The floors are worn out 
and full of cracks and the rooms all need replastering. The 
building is heated by two "Johnson's Ideal heater and ventilator 
furnaces," one in each lower room and heating the room above by 
a hot air pipe. There are ventilators in the floors of the lower 
rooms besides the ones connected with the heaters, but they have 
to be kept closed, as it is impossible to warm the rooms when they 
are open. There are no ventilators in the rooms above. The 
walls have been painted, floors oiled and blinds at the windows. 
Desks in fair condition and of suitable heights for the pupils. 
The building has been well taken care of. The water closets have 
good gravel walks leading to them and are screened. There is a 
good frame barn about 30x60 feet on school lot. The location of 
the buildings is bad, the ground being low and without any outlet 
for drainage. The Danville and Indianapolis interurban line 
runs within fifty feet of the front door, having taken sixteen feet 
off of the school ground for right-of-way. 

The enrollment of the pupils is 135, there being five districts 
combined in one school. There are four teachers. Mr. E. E. 
Blair, Township Trustee, reports the township out of debt. 

Summary. 

The building is old, improperly constructed, and is unsafe and 
unsanitary at the present time. If repaired, will have to be 
strengthened, newly floored and plastered, and two additional 
rooms built to accommodate the number of pupils in attendance. 
The location is very bad, being so low that it is surrounded by 
water in wet weather, and there is no means of drainage. -^ I 



49 

Would respectfully recommend that the building he condemned 
and a new one be erected in some better location. 

Inspection made February 1, 1906. 

After full consideration the following proclamation order was 
adopted : 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION. 

Whereas, It Ijas been shown to the satisfaction of the State Board of 
Health that the schoolhouse number 6 at Avon, HendriclvS County, In- 
diana, is unsanitary and unfit for housing school children; therefore, it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned and shall not be used 
for school purposes after April 1, 1906. 

Any violation of this order shall be promptly prosecuted by the At- 
torney-General according to the statutes provided. 

Ordered, That the next lot of report blanks for reporting births 
and contagious diseases be so arranged that three birth blanks be 
inserted for one contagious disease blank. 

Ordered, That when a new lot of death certificates be printed 
that the word "chief" be stricken out in the phrase "chief cause" 
and inserting "immediate," making the phrase read "immediate 

cause." 

Committee. — Upon suggestion of the President, Drs. Wishard 
and McCoy were appointed a committee to report at the next 
meeting on the advisability of requiring that certificates of births 
and deaths be reported occurring prior to the seventh month of 
gestation. 

PROPOSAL FOR CO-OPERATION. 

The following letter was read : 

Department of Interior, 
United States Geological Survey, 

Hydrographic Branch, 
Washington, D. C, January 30, 1906. 

Dr. J. N. Hurty, Secretary State Board of Health, Indianapolis, Ind.: 

Dear Sir— During my visit to your office on January 20th the proposi- 
tion that the Geological Survey enter upon co-operative work with the 
Indiana State Board of Health was discussed briefly. It seems desirable 
to enter upon some negotiations with the object of bringing about some 
mutual arrangement whereby investigations of the character of stream 
waters of the State of Indiana may be carried on during the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 1906. 

There are several lines of investigation which would be profitable and 
beneficial to the interests represented by both parties above mentioned. 

4-Bd. of Health. 



50 

The first is a general investigation of the character of the water flowing 
in the sti-eams of the State. The principal purpose of such work will be 
to determine the water resources and their damage by pollution. It is a 
generally accepted idea that waters in streams which drain inhabited 
countries are not constantly fit for doinestic consumption in their raw 
state. In observing conditions in Indiana during the past few years it 
has become the conclusion that all of the Indiana drainage areas are at 
one or more points densely populated. Therefore, the above contention is 
true for the entire State. Accepting these premises, it is apparent that 
the cities using sui'face waters must eventually provide meansi for their 
purification. It is also true that the larger cities of Indiana must, for 
many reasons which will not be reviewed here, eventually take their sup- 
plies from the running streams. It folloAvs that one of the most useful 
lines of investigation will be to determine the character of such waters 
and their variation from day to day, so that there will be on hand just 
the data necessary for the intelligent installation of purification systems. 
The determination most useful in such cases are turbidity, color, odor, 
total solids, suspended solids, lime, magnesia, iron, sodium, potassium, 
chlorides, sulphates, carbonates and bicarbonates. The usual practice in 
such an investigation as is here proposed is to establish permanent sam- 
pling stations at chosen points along the rivers and to have forwarded 
from such stations 4-ounce samples of water each day. These samples 
when received at the laboratory are then stored in larger bottles, each 
station being represented by a storage bottle in the laboratory, until a 
sutficient amount is accumulated to make it advisable to determine the 
ingredients and characteristics above noted. Such a result will repre- 
sent the composite of the various samples. Generally such analyses are 
made every week or ten days. 

If this arrangement is desirable an appropriation could be made by 
both parties. That made by the Survey could be expended in salary 
for a chemist to be furnished by the Survey, while the State appropria- 
tion could be expended for the salaries of local observers and for such 
transportation charges and laboratory equipment as would be found 
necessary, adjustments being made at the end of the year, so that the 
expense of each party could be equal. This is a very simple plan and 
of undoubted benefit. Its usefulness, however, is confined more or less 
to the future when the cities decide to provide water purification systems. 

Another plan would involve an investigation of the pollution of the 
streams, that is, a determination of the effect of sewage and industrial 
wastes, and the extent of their influence down stream. You will note 
that such an investigation would be directed more exclusively toward 
sewage disposal than water supply. It seems as though under the pre- 
vailing conditions in Indiana this would be a more immediately useful 
work than that previously described. It would also involve investiga- 
tions concerning the effect of various industrial wastes and the best 
methods of disposing of them or recovering valuable ingredients therein, 
which in practice has the same final result. Under such an arrangement 
the Survey wo^ild provide a man who would do practically all the field 
work and a part of that in the laboratory, while it would make use at 
the same time of some of the laboratory assistants which you have al- 
ready provided. 



51 



It is hope.1 that you will .iv. il.is u.attor ycnu- considon.tion hn. 
present it to the Board of Health for a<.tion if it .s ch.-nu.a w.s... 
Vei^y I'esiHH'tfiilly, 

I\I. (). LEIGHTON, 
Hydrosrapher in Gluug.^ Oivision of Hydro-Kcononucs. 

After consideration, it was moved by Dr. Davis, that, inasniucl. 
.st ^e^s now at the command of the Board would not admU 
of CO opeiation as proposed, therefore, the Secretary should in- 
form Mr Leighton and say that the Board would present the ma - 
ter to the nex? General Assembly and ask for a special appropria- 
tion for making sanitary stream surveys. 

HAM PEDDI/ING. 
Ordered, That the following letter should be sent out to all 
county health officers : 



WARNING. 



appear to be all right until slices are put n.to the ^J"^' ^J^j^ '^^ ,^^,^ 

public in the papers. 

P S The Laboratory of the State Board of Health is open for free 

food'd^.^ water ailyses, -o.^ ^J^ --1^^^!^! 
logical examinations. Rules governing laboiatoij tiee woi 



SECOND QUARTER. 



Regular Meeting. 



AFFAIES CONSIDERED OF THE FIRST CALENDAR 

QUARTER OF 1906 AND THE SECOND 

FISCAL QUARTER OF 1906. 

April 13, 1906. 

Present: Drs. Davis, Wishard, McCoj^, Tucker and Hurty. 
Called to order bj President Davis at 2 p. m. 

Minutes of the last regular and special meeting of March Tth 
read and approved. 

Report of the Secretary for the first calendar quarter called for 
and read as follow^s: 

REPORT OF SECRETARY. 

The statistics shov7 for this quarter a marked diminution in dis- 
eases and death as compared with the same quarters in all of the 
statistical years beginning 1900. The death figures appear in the 
appended tables, also the prevalence of disease. Smallpox during 
the quarter shows a decided decrease, and the special table for this 
disease makes this plain. 

No. of No. of 

Cases Counties 

Reported. Deaths. Invaded. 

.January, 1905 : 238 7 27 

January, 1906 80 10 

February, 1905 381 8 35 

February, 1906 152 15 

March, 1905 251 1 29 

March, 1906 124 16 

By the above table comparison shows: Cases decreased 59 per 
cent. ; deaths decreased 100 per cent. ; area invaded decreasd 55 
per cent. ^ 

(52) 



53 

VISITS AND INSPECTIONS. 

The Secretary during the quarter made five visits in answer to 
urgent invitations and herewith are full accounts of said visits. 

REPORTS OF VISITS AND INSPECTIONS DURING THE QUARTER. 

Rushville, January 9th. — The Secretary visited Rushville on 
this date to confer with Prof. William O. Headlee, County Su- 
perintendent, and the trustees of the county in the same way as 
set forth in the records of the visit to Connersville, and the same 
work was done and the same results secured as were so happily ac- 
complished at Connersville. While there, W. H. Smith, city 
health officer, called my attention to a case of sickness which fol- 
lowed the administration of Dr. Hand's cough and croup cure. 
Accordingly a bottle of this medicine was purchased and exam- 
ined in the laboratory. The symptoms recorded by Dr. Smith 
were those of the action of morphine, and so the medicine in ques- 
tion was examined for this drug. The analysis showed morphine 
to be absent and the depressant action noticed was, I believe, due 
to the presence of lobelia. 

Lebanon, January 20th. — On the above date I visited Lebanon 
to address the Boone County Teachers' Association in regard to 
the public health work of the State Board of Health, and to confer 
in regard to school sanitation in that county. In addition to 
eighty teachers, there were present many citizens. The usual 
phases of the subject were gone over and a promise was given by a 
rising vote of all teachers present, that they would study the con- 
tagious disease circulars of the State Board of Health, and from 
time to time teach their contents to their pupils. 

Connersville, January 25th. — The Secretary went to Conners- 
ville to attend the meeting of the sixth Councilor District of 
Physicians, to read a paper in regard to the work of the State 
Board of Health and to discuss the "Combat Against Tuberculo- 
sis." The meeting was very successful and was largely attended, 
and the Secretary believes that good results followed his visit. 
Advantage was taken of the visit to call upon the County Super- 
intendent, Prof. Calvin Ochiltree, and arrange with him to later 
meet the trustees of the county and, if possible, effect an organiza- 
tion for health work in the schools. Prof. Ochiltree was very 



54 

mncli pleased to enter the work niid fi,2;veecl to call n meeting of 
the tnistces on February 5tli. 

Connersville, February 5tli. — Tn accordance with the arrange- 
ments made witli Prof. Ochiltree on January 25th, I visited Con- 
nersvil]e and met the trnstees of the connty whom he had kindly 
called together. School hygiene was fnlly considered in general 
conference and the following work was recommended to the 
Trustees : 

That they should, as soon as possible, put all their schoolhouses 
in first-class sanitary condition. Windows were to be fixed so that 
they could be raised and lowered for purposes of ventilation. 
Doors were to be properly fitted and valve ventilators put into out- 
side- doors where transoms did not exist. Schoolrooms heated 
with stoves were to have jackets placed around the stoves, and 
teachers were to be instructed in thorough ventilation. It was 
agreed that trustees would order their teachers in cold weather to 
watch the students carefully, and if any of them should show 
sleepiness or heaviness, work would stop, and windows would be 
raised and the students marched around the room or given arm 
exercises while the air was being changed. It was also agreed 
that the water supplies would be looked after very carefully and 
that water buckets and tin cups would be entirely banished. Each 
trustee was asked to supply the address of his teachers to the State 
Board of Health, and there Avould be sent to them one of the en- 
velope packages containing circulars upon the prevention of vari- 
ous diseases. The teachers were to inform themselves in regard 
to the contents of said circulars and at appropriate times teach 
from them to their pupils. Every one of the trustees expressed 
himself as highly pleased with the ideas advanced and all prom- 
ised to do the very best they possibly could for the health of the 
school children under their charge. 

Evansville, March 25th. — On this date I visited Evansville in 
order to deliver a public lecture upon the work of the State Board 
of Health and general hygiene. The visit was made upon invita- 
tion of the Mayor and the Monday Club. A large audience was 
in attendance which entirely filled and crowded the floors and gal- 
lery of Grace Methodist Church. The lecture was well received 
and a vote of thanks was passed. I believe much good will result 
from this visit. 



55 

A notable event concerning hygiene in the State occurred in In- 
dianapolis during the week commencing March 5th. This was 
the Indiana Tuberculosis Exhibition, held in Tomlinson Hall. 

The exhibition was essentially the same as was presented at 
ISTeAV York, Philadelphia, Boston and ISFewark. It came direct 
from jSTewark to Indianapolis and from here it went to Chicago. 
The exhibit was under the direction of the Indianapolis Board of 
Health and the Indiana State Board of Health and was open 
every day and evening for one week. The program was as fol- 
lows : 

EVENING TROGRAM. 

Opening' Exercises, Monday, March 51h, S p. lu. 
Governor J. Frank Hanly, presiding. 

The exhibition was formally opened by Hon. Charles A. Bookwalter, 
mayor of Indianapolis. 

Address, Mr. Chas. R. Williams, editor of the Indianapolis News. 

Tuesday, March Gth, S p, m. 

Mr. .Tohn H. Holliday, presiding. 

Address, ''Sociological Importance of Tuberculosis," Dr. John "W. Mc- 
Caskey, Fort "Wayne. 

Wednesday, March 7th, 8 p. m. 

Hon. John W. Kern, presiding. 

Address, "The Hospital and the Sanatorium a Necessity in the Com- 
bat Against Tuberculosis," Dr. Hugh A. Cowing, Muncie, Ind. 

Thursday, March Sth, 8 p. m. 

Mr. Andi-ew M. Sweeney, president State Life Insurance Co., pre- 
siding. 

Address. "The Open Air Treatment of Consumption," Dr. J. W. Pettit, 
Ottawa, 111., director of the Ottawa tent colony. 

Friday, March 9th, 8 p. m. 
Hon. Charles Henry, presiding. 

Address "What Well People Should Know About Tuberculosis," Dr. 
Geo. T. McCoy, Columbus, Ind. 

Saturday, March 10th, 8 p. m. 

Hon. Hugh T. Miller, Lieutenant-Governor, presiding. 

Address, "Municipal Conti-ol of Tuberculosis," Dr. Arnold Klebs, Chi- 
cago, 

Address, "The Promise of Victory Over Tuberculosis." Dr. Robert 
Babcock, Chicago. 



56 

Ai'TERNOON PROGRAM. 

Twenty-Minute Talks. 

Monday, March 5th, 4 p. m. 
"What is Tuberculosis?" Dr. Frank B. Wynn, Indianapolis. 

Tuesday, March Oth, 4 p. ni. 

"How to Make Home Safe Against Tuborcnlosis," Dr. .T. C. T'.lossoni, 
Mt. Summit, Ind. 

Wednesday, March 7th, 4 p. ra. 

"Tuberculosis a House Disease; It is Infectious but not Contagious," 
Dr. U. H. Rittei", Indianapolis. 

Thursday, March Sth. 4 p. m. 

"What I Saw at a Tuberculosis Sanatorium," Dr. Win. George, In- 
dianapolis, . 1 I 
Friday, March 9th, 4 p. m. 

"Tlie Sanatorium Treatment of Beginning Tuberculosis," Dr. Theo. 
rotter, Indianapolis. 

Saturday, March 10th, 4 p. m. 

"Tuberculosis Work of the Charily Organization," Dr. C. S. Grout, 
secret a ry, Indianapolis. 

The total attendance was 5^128. All lectures were well at- 
tended. On Saturday night, when Dr, Klebs and Dr. Babcock 
spoke, and Lientenant-Governor Miller presided, it was necessary 
to move some of the exhibit and place additional chairs to seat 
those in attendance. Ten thousand circulars concerning the pre- 
vention of tuberculosis were distributed. During the week the 
Indianapolis ISTews printed two editorials upon the subject of pre- 
venting tuberculosis and gave daily illustrated accounts of the ex- 
hibit. Other papers gave good descriptions and abstracts of the 
addresses. 

Through the influence of Mayor Bookwalter, whose heart and 
actions are in all good works, the City Hall was secured without 
rent. The forces of the city and the State Boards of Health un- 
packed and displayed the exhibit, a work which engaged ten men 
for twenty hours. The printing was given without charge by two 
large printing concerns, and the expenses — 'freight, hauling 
frames, burlap, expenses of speakers, etc., amounting in all to 
$225 — were paid from subscribed funds. 



57 . 

The p.itholooical exhibit from the Medical College of Indiana, 
the medical department of Purdue University, attracted wide at- 
tention. 

As part of the Secretary's report there is given herewith reports 
of the bacteriologist and chemist. 

KEPOKT OF THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY FOR THE FIRST 
CALENDAR QUARTER OF lOOG. 

By H. E. Barnard. 

I herewith submit a report of the work of the Chemical Department 
of the Laboratory of Hygiene since its establishment to date, together 
with an outline of proposed worlv for tlie coming summer and recommen- 
dations for desirable and necessary legislation. 

Owing ,to llie time spent in equipping the lalwratory regular worlc 
was not begun until October, when inspectors were sent out and analyt- 
ical investigations conjmonced. The laboratory has, therefore, been in 
active operation for six mouths. During that time we have analyzed 
1,984 samples of food products and 541 of drugs. Of these analyses 2,177 
have been reported in full in the November and January bulletins and 
need no further mention. In the last month we have examined 50 sam- 
ples of molasses, 31 samples of honey, 40 miscellaneous food samples, 
221 samples of drugs, such as sodium phosphate, sulphur, beeswax, etc. 
Of these unreported food samples 65 per cent, have been pure and 35 per 
cent, adulterated, and of the drug samples 3S per cent, have been pure 
and 62 per cent, advilteratod. In passing I may observe that all the sul- 
phur samples were adulterated, and that most of the beeswax was paraf- 
fin. So that to date the analytical work on foods and drugs has given us 
the following results: 

Total number of samples examined 2,398 

Total number of samples pure ■ 995 

Total number of sampies adulterated 1,403 

Percentage of adulteration 59.47 

Much of our time has also been devoted to the sanitary analyses of 
waters, usually sent in by members of boards of health and health offi- 
cers. We have examined 272 samples of water and have found 125 sup- 
plies polluted and unfit for drinking or domestic purposes. It is evident 
that the shallow dug well, supplied by surface water, is a menace to the 
health of the individual and the community. Of 113 shallow well waters 
analyzed 85, or 75.3 per cent., have been polluted by sewage. Many sup- 
plies were actually dangerous. Many others were evidently liable at any 
time to pass out of the safe class and become foci for the spread of water 
borne diseases. The driven or deep wells are a much safer source of sup- 
ply. Our results show that 43.4 per cent, of the wells examined have 
been contaminated, but the large percentage of polluted supplies is in a 
great measure due to the fact that well ov^^ners call all bored or driven 
wells deep Avells, when tlie results of our analyses indicate that they 
really should be classed as shallow or surface water wells. 



58 

The salaiT list of the laboratoiy for the last six months approximates 
$2,100. The normal running expenses are not over $100 a month. If, by 
reason of abnormally heavy expenses during the month of October inci- 
dent to the collecting of 4,000 samples of food products, we set the total 
expense of the laboratory since it was opened for work at $3,000, J of 
which has been used in the water laboratory, we find that the cost of col- 
lection and analysis^of each food sample has been 80.6 cents and of each 
water sample $3.68. If on the othr-i- hand we credit the laboratory with 
the regular fees for the analytical work done, the fees paid the chemists 
of the Ohio Food Commission for example, it appears that the laboratory 
has earned: 

In 301 milk analyses at $2 per sample $602 

In 2,097 food and drug analyses at $5 10,485 

In 272 sanitary water analyses at $10 2,720 

A total of $13,807 

A practical saving to the State over the cost of operation of $10,807. 

Outline of Proposed Work. — We have still on hand about two hun- 
dred samples of food products collected last fall. These samples will be 
analyzed and the results reported in an early bulletin. We have on hand 
several hundred samples of drugs, chiefly tinctures, which are now in 
process of analysis. We also have before us the examinations of more 
than 200 samples of patent and proprietary medicine, such as blood reme- 
dies, catarrh and cough cures, toilet preparaiions. etc. 

This work will soon be completed, and it will then be necessary to 
collect other samples. The present laboratory force can not afford to 
leave their analytical work to act as inspectors for more than brief 
periods, and it will be advisable that a deputy food and drug inspector 
bo employed throughout the summer months. One of the most important 
branches of food inspection is that of dairy products. And beginning 
with the month of May we should endeavor to secure from cities and 
towns samples of milk for analysis. We shall have to rely upon local 
aid for making the collections, and we have already received assurances 
of assistance from several health officers. Unfortunately there is no ade- 
quate law now on the statutes by which we can punish the sellers of 
illegal milk, and we shall be forced to conduct prosecutions in local courts 
under local ordinances. 

Many analyses of butters have shown that much oleomargarine is be- 
ing sold asi butter throughout the State, and investigation shows that no 
attention is paid by restaurant keepers and dealers to displaying the signs 
"Oleomargarine used or sold here." I find that. there is on the statutes 
a law passed in 1882 which is amply sufficient to control the situation if 
it can be applied. There is some question as to its present legality, how- 
ever, and I suggest that it be tested in court, that if necessary it may be 
amended so as to be operative. 

I think it advisable to make, a special study of the quality of the soft 
drinks so largely consumed in the summer months. Their composition is 
at least uncertain, and I believe in many cases of positive injury to the 
consumer. « 



59 

The c'ondiliou of the public niul private water supplies is deplorable. 
While it may never be possible to eradicate completely the filthy disease 
produciug family wells so situated as to be a cesspool for eltiueiits from 
the baruyard aud sink drains and privy, careful systematic inspection of 
public supplies is possible, and should be made in the future for the pur- 
pose of tinding out the condition of the water systems. I have collected 
from every large town and city statistics of their public water supply, 
giving; source, system of operation, per capita consumption and number 
of persons supplied. During the sxunmer we should analyze as many of 
the public supplies as possible and arrange to make systematic inspec- 
tions several times each year. For the isolated farmhouse well a chem- 
ical analysis is usually quite sutticient to determine the quality of the sup- 
ply, but in order to arrive at a correct valuation of the purity of a public 
system operated perhaps under changing conditions both the chemical and 
the bacteriological analyses must be made. 

It must be remembered that as the work of the laboratory becomes 
known throiigliout the State an increasing number of miscellaneous sam- 
ples of foods, drugs and water is constantly coming in for analysis, and 
therefore due consideration must be given this routine work, which, while 
perhaps not of special importance to the publie^at large, is frequently of 
great value in impressing the w^orth of the laboratory upon individual 
citizens whose support we desire. 

Suggestions for Xew Legislation. — The present pure food law, while 
admirable in its general plan- is wholly useless as a means of bringing 
violators of the provisions of the law to justice. This is due to the fact 
that the penalty clause of (he law was evidently "written in" by interests 
opposed to the bill, so that at present offenders must "knoAvingly sell" 
"articles injurious to health," thus making it necessary for the board to 
prove not only knowledge on the part of the seller but also the injurious 
composition of the goods. The bill should l)e simply amended so that the 
penalty clause will read in effec; : 

"All persons violating the provisions of this act shall be for the first 
offense subject to a fine of $10 and coi-ts; for the second offense sul)ject 
to a tine of $50 and costs; f(jr the third offense; subject to a tine of $100 
and costs, and three months in jail." 

A specific milk law is absolutely necessary. Last fall I endeavored 
in two cases to secure conviction: of persons guilty of selling preserved 
and Avatered milk. At Jeffersonville the grand jury refused to indict be- 
cause it was so evident the olTenders could not be convicted und-er the 
law, and at Terre Haute the justice of the peace before whom a case of 
watering was brought reloased the offenders because it was impossible 
to prove the vendor knew the milk to be adulterated. The loss of these 
two cases, one tried under tlie general food law and the other under the 
specific ihilk law, proved how futile it was to attempt to convict an of- 
fender under the present food statutes. 

At the present time the supervisioji of the State Board of Health over 
public water supplies is limited and pi-oductive of small results. With a 
water laboratory at its disposal the board should be given control of all 
public supplies. If a law which has l)een in successful op<,'ration in 
Massachusetts for some years could be enacted, giving the supervision 



60 

of all public waters to the board, with authority to grant improvetQeuts 
aud extensions after due examination of the conditions, not only would 
the quality of the present supplies be improved but waste of money and 
endangered health would be prevented. 

The disposal of sewage, household and manufacturing wastes is also 
a problem capable of being efficiently attacked by means of the labora- 
tory, and prompt measures are necessary if we are to conserve the purity 
of the streams and ponds which are the natural source of water supply. 

While I realize the limitations placed upon the board in the matter of 
increasing the salary of the chemist, because the amount to be paid is 
fixed by statutes, yet I venture to suggest to you for your consideration 
the folloAving facts: 

First — $1,500 per year is wholly inadequate compensation for the serv- 
ices required of your chemist. 

Second — -He is in charge of two laboratories, food and water,, as either 
department is sufficient to command his undivided attention. The Board 
of Health of Massachusetts employs two chemists as heads of their food 
and water laboratories, paying each of them $2,800 per year. 

Third — He accepted this position with your board with full knowl- 
edge of present conditions, yet to do so refused a position as head of the 
government import laboratories at $2,000 per year, for he received the as- 
surance of your secretary that he would strive to have the salary in- 
creased at the earliest opportunity, and had faith that the board would be 
able to secure the necessary legislation. 

The work required of the Laboratory of Hygiene is bound to increase 
rapidly as its availability aud value become known, and the expense of 
operation will thereby become greater. As already suggested, food in- 
spectors are necessaiy. A food law without inspectors to see that it is 
enforced is bound to become crippled and to lose its value. While I do 
not believe in a corps of deputies. 1 do think that we should have at least 
one competent man on the road all the time and the funds available for 
another if he is needed. We also must have funds to conduct prosecu- 
tions, for we can not always rely on local prosecutors to convict offenders. 
It is evident that more money is needed for the successful operation of 
the laboratory if it is to attain to its fullest usefulness, and I beg to sug- 
gest that an increased appropriation of $5,000 be asked of the incoming 
legislature. 

REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL LABORATORY FOR THE 
FIRST CALENDAR QUARTER OF 1900. 

By T. Victor Keene. 

The Bacteriological Laboratory was put into commission January 1, 
1906, although much work had been done previous to the formal opening 
of the laboratory. Since the laboratory has been opened a great deal of 
our time and energy has been spent in devising a systematic method of 
keeping a record of the work done, as well as devising metliods of tech- 
nique. 

Method of Keeping Records. — It was early seen that it would be 
necessary to devise some method of keeping the records so that they 



61 

could be readily referred to. All the records are now kept as follows: 
We have one card containing a fnll history of the case. This history 
card gives the clinical history of the case and the record of when the 
specimen was sent to the laboratory, when it was received, when the re- 
port was mailed, and of course the results of the finding. This one card 
contains full information regarding the case. These cards are kept in 
consecutive order, each card being given a number. It is very obvious 
that the persons most liable to refer to this record are the physician in 
the case and the patient, so we have a cross-index system containing the 
name of the patient, the nature of the specimen, result of the examina- 
tion and the file number of the card giving the complete history. This 
file by patients is kept alphabetically. Each physician of the State who 
submits for examination a specimen of any variety is given a separate 
card in our index file of physicians, and on this card we have a record 
of the date on which we made the examination for him for typhoid fever, 
diphtheria or tuberculosis. This card also refers back to the card con- 
taining the complete history of the case. The index to the physicians and 
patients is alphabetically arranged. 

As a further aid in completing our cross-index we have a set of cards 
giving the name of both the physician and the patient, arranged by coun- 
ties, so that at any time we can refer to any individual county and in a 
few seconds know just how much work and what variety of work the 
laboratoiy has done for any particular section of the State. This method 
of keeping the records is an original one. The idea of course is the card 
system in common use in many lines of business. These records are re- 
ferred to much oftener than would be supposed. We have on a few occa- 
sions had physicians complain that reports had not been sent to them. 
Reference to the record shows at once the exact date the report was 
made. We have on two occasions had physicians allege that examinations 
made in our laboratoiy gave certain findings, while examinations made 
by other physicians gave entirely different findings. Referring to our 
record we are able at a glance to tell iust exactly what our findings had 
been, and in both cases they were exactly similar to the findings reported 
by other physicians. 

Letter to Medical Societies. — It has been very obvious for some time 
that the physicians throughout the State at large did not know about the 
laboratory. Wliile the health officers of the State have been informed re- 
garding the same, it seemed to us that they had failed to inform the 
physicians of their respective communities regarding the laboratory, as it 
was an almost daily occurrence for physicians from various parts of the 
State visiting Indianapolis to drop into the laboratory and express great 
surprise at the existence of the same. Various means of acquainting the 
profession of the existence of the laboratory, its scope of work, etc., were 
discussed, and it was finally decided to address a letter to the secretary 
of eveiy medical society of the State apprising them of the fact that the 
laboratory was now ready to receive specimens and advising them how to 
ship the same, etc. We further asked the secretary to bring up the mat- 
ter before the society and extend to the society an invitation to submit 
specimens to the laboratory. We have received answers from nearly half 
of the letters sent out, and nearly all the answers received seemed to show 



62 

that the writer had not been aware of the existence of this laboratory. 
However, this work ^vill reach only a small percentage of the iihysicians 
in the State, and I would respectfully re<'Ouimend that the board authorize 
the issuing and sending out of a letter to every physician of the State 
apprising him of the existence of the laboratory and inviting him to send 
in specimens. The cost of such a letter need not be great. I feel cer- 
tain that the expenditure would be justified, and that it will greatly in- 
crease the amount of service we would render the public. 

Organization of Laboratory Proper. — There are a great many solu- 
tions, reagents, stains and varieties of culture media which have to be 
made up in the laboratory. We have practically spent the greater part 
of the time since the tirst of the year in getting our laboratory stocked 
with these things. 

We have on hand at this time twelve liters of Ziehl Neilson's Carbol- 
fuschin, eight litres of Gabbet's Sulphuric Acid decolorizing solution, 
-three litres of Loeffler's Methyline Blue Solution, one litre of Wright's 
Blood Stain; si>\ litres of Delafield's Haemotoxylin Solution, one litre of 
Eosin, and numerous other stains in smaller quantities. These stains, 
which we have made up in such large quantities, are stains Avhich im- 
prove as they become older, and it is always a matter of great con- 
venience to a laboratory to liave old stains to use, as they are much niore 
reliable and certain in their results. We have the stains made up to do 
practically any variety of bacteriological and pathological work, although, 
of course, Ave do not have the stains made which deteriorate Avhen in 
solution. In addition to the stains we have made up and ready for imme- 
diate use the various hardening and fixing solutions used for the preserv- 
ing of tissues, including the. Kaiserling solution for the preservation of 
gross pathological specimens., We are from time to time, as opportunity 
offers, adding or collecting interesting pathological specimens, and while 
we may not be able to make much of a show at this year's meeting of 
the Indiana State Medical Society, it is our ambition to each year have 
an interesting exhibit before the State Medical Society from the Labora- 
tory of Hygiene of the State Board. 

We have made up a large variety of culture media, including the 
various sugar broths, gelatines and agars. While we fully realize that 
for the time being at least research work in the laboratory must be made 
secondary to the routine work, Ave haA^e, hoAvever, been doing such as our 
time AA^ould alloAv. Practically all the research work we have done has 
been along the lines of culture media. 

Diphtheria Serum. — The manufacture of blood serum for diphtheria 
diagnosis is a difficult proposition, as the media dries up rapidly and tends 
to become contaminated A'ery easily. AVithin the last few months Wes- 
brook, superintendent of the Laboratory of Hygiene of the Minnesota 
Board of Health, published a paper advocating the use of a small amount 
of glycerine in the blood serum, claiming for it that such serum did not 
dry out so rapidly, and that the presence of the glycerine Avould prevent 
the growth of certain varieties of bacteria. I'his was in keeping with a 
Avell-kuoAvu fact that vaccine virus if marketed in glycerine did not tend 
to become contaminated, as the glycerine was sufficiently antiseptic to 
destroy large numbers of bacteria. Wesbrook further claimed that the 



63 

diphtheria bacillus was not affected by alycerine, but grow iciulily. It is 
veiy obvious that if his claims were warranted the glycerine soruni would 
be much better than serum without it, so we hnve been experimenting 
with blood serum with A^arious percentages of glycerine in it, .-uhI havi' 
found that blood serum containing 5 per cent, glycerine nuiki's .-in ad- 
mirable culture media for diphtheria bacilli. We expect lo use lliis 
glycerine serum instead of the plain serum hereafter, as it is suinriur to 
plain serum. 

Typhoid Fever. — Com-ade, in the Deut. Mod. Woch.. January 11, 1!)()(), 
published a paper on the result of some observations he had been malving 
on the early isolation of typhoid bacteria from the blood of tjq)hoid pa- 
tients. It is a well-knoAvn fact that in practically all cases of typhoid 
fever by the time the individual sickens with the disease the typhoid 
bacteria are in the blood. It is further Avell known that there are several 
features which make its isolation very difficult, the most prominent of 
wliicii is the fact that shed blood is about ten times as germicidal as 
blood in the blood vessels, due to the coagulation of the blood and the 
breaking down of the white blood cells into nuclenic acid. Conrade's 
work was as follows: He di-ew blood from patients into a sterile pipette, 
in which was a small amount of a 5 per cent, solution of ox bile, the ol)- 
ject of the ox bile being to prevent coagulation* of tlie blood. This blood 
was then put in a culture media in a broth of special formula, and the 
typhoid bacteria grew readily in most cases. It at once occurred to us 
that this could be utilized in a practical way in a public liealth laboratory, 
and we are at present working on the following hypothesis: 

We know absolutely tliat we can get typhoid bacteria from the blood 
the first or second day. We know further that it is only a matter of a 
few hours before they have grown in suflicient numbers in tlie tube that 
we can see the actively motile bacteria under the microscope. The 
identity of the typhoid bacteria can be established by discovering a motile 
organism present, and subjecting this motile organism to the action of a 
typhoid bacteria it will agglutinate: if it is not the typhoid organism it 
will not agglutinate, so the plan we have in mind for utilizing these ob- 
servations in this laboratory was as follows: 

We would put out an outfit composed of a small sterile pipette, sealed 
at both ends and having in its bulb some of the ox bile solution. The 
physician would be instructed' to break off both ends of the pipette, which 
would of course allow the bile solution to flow out, but a sufficient 
amount would adhere to the walls to prevent the blood from coagulating. 
He would then draw his blood under aseptic precautions and inoculate a 
tube of media of the variety needed. This he would ship to us and we 
would incubate it, and at the end of twelve hours examine the culture to 
determine whether or not there were any motile organisms present. If 
there were any motile organisms present we would test the organism with 
a known typhoid serum, and if the same agglutinated we would be cer- 
tain that the organism was a typhoid organism. The difficulty in the 
way of making the test lies in the fact that the postal regulations do not 
allow the shipping of li(]uid media, so it is necessary to devise some va- 
riety of solid media Avhich would work. We have spent a great deal of 
time working with various modifications of gelatine and agar, all of 



64 



which we have found unsatisfactory. We are at this time working on a 
culture media the solid pait of which will be composed of a low melting 
paraffin, the idea being that this being a solid media it will conform with 
the requirements of the government in regard to shipping, but being a low 
melting paraffin it will at once become a fluid media when put into the 
incubator. The practical advantage of this work, if after experimenta- 
tion it is found to be as practical as it seems to be in theoiy, we will be 
able to aiTive at a diagnosis of typhoid fever at the very beginning of the 
disease, as early as the first or second day; whereas with the Widal Reac- 
tion, which we at present use, and which is in common use in public 
health laboratories, we are only able to arrive at a diagnosis not earlier 
than the fifth day, and usually about the seventh or eighth day. 

Below is subtended a statistical table of the amount of worlc done in 
the laboratory since the first of the year per county: 



TUBERCULOSIS. 



County. No. 

Adams 3 

Allen 3 

Bartholomew 3 

Benton 6 

Blackford 5 

Boone 3 

Carroll 3 

Cass 1 

Clay 4 

Clinton 15 

Crawford 5 

Daviess 3 

Decatur 8 

Dekalb 1 

Delaware 3 

Elkhart 6 

Fayette 1 

Foimtain 9 

Franklin 3 

Grant . 4 

Hamilton 11 

Hancock 7 

Harrison 1 

Hendricks 15 

Henry 14 

Howard 2 

Huntington 5 

Jackson 2 

Jay 2 

Jefferson 4 

Jennings 1 

Johnson 2 

Knox 11 



Countu. No. 

Kosciusko 5 

Lagrange 6 

Laporte 13 

Madison 12 

Marion 76 

Martin 1 

Miami 5 

Montgomery 6 

Morgan 2 

Noble 5 

Owen 2 

Parke 7 

Perry 4 

Pike 1 

Posey 12 

Putnam 1 

Randolph 1 

Ripley G 

Rush 3 

Shelby 2 

Spencer ■. 1 

St. .Joseph 2 

Sullivan 4 

Tippecanoe 3 

Tipton 4 

Union 5 

Yermillion 6 

Vigo 7 

Wabash 3 

Wayne 27 

Wells 5 

Whitley 2 

White .<... 2 



65 



DIPHTHEBIA. 



Govntii. No. 

Allen 9 

Blackford 1 

Carroll 1 

Franlvlin 1 

Hamilton 4 

Hendricks 3 

Huntington 1 

Jasper 4 

.Jefferson 4 

Laporte 6 

Madison 1 



County. No. 

Marion 14 

Marshall 2 

Montgomery 1 

Rush 3 

Spencer 1 

Tippecanoe 1 

Tipton 1 

Vermillion 2 

Vigo ■■ . ] 

Wabash 1 

Wayne 6 



TYPHOID. 



County. No. 

Clinton 3 

Elkhart 1 

Fountain 3 

Hamilton 1 

Jennings 1 



County. No. 

Laporte 5 

Marion 

Posey A^ 1 

Vigo 9 

Wayne 16 



The following circular letter from Surgeon-General Wyman 
was presented for action: 

March 15, 1906. 

J. N. Hurty. M. D., Phar. D., Secretary State Board of Health, Indianap- 
olis, Ind.: 

Sir — In accordance- with the provisions of section 7, act of Congress 
approved July 1, 1902, I have to inform you that the Fourth Annual Con- 
ference of State and Territorial Boards of Health with the Public Health 
and Marine Hospital Service will be held at the New Willard Hotel, 
Washington, D. C, on Wednesday, May 23, 1906. at 10 o'clock a. m. 

Your board will be entitled to representation in the said conference 
by one delegate. It is requested that your board will submit a type- 
written report of any State or municipal health legislation enacted dur- 
ing the past year in relation to public health, sanitation or kindred sub- 
jects. This report will be for publication in the transactions and will not 
be read at the meeting. 

A program of the subjects to be discussed will be announced in a 
subsequent communication. 

I would request that I be informed in advance of the name of the 
delegate who will represent your Board. 

Respectfully, 

WALTER WYMAN, 

Surgeon-General. 
J. W. K. 



5— Bd. of Health 



66 

After consideration it was ordered that the Secretary should be 
the delegate to represent the Board at the said Conference. 

Ordered, That an annual health officers' school be held each 
year the last Thursday and Friday of June, and the Secretary to 
prepare programs. 

Ordered, That Drs. Tucker and McCoy represent the Board as 
delegates to the annual meeting of the ITational Association for 
the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis, which would be held 
May 17th, 18th and 19th in Washington, D. C. 

Ordered, That copies of the following circular be sent to the 
presidents of all county medical societies: 

CIRCULAR. 

Dear Doctor— It will be appreciated if you will call the attention of 
your Society to tlae fact that the Bacteriological Department of the 
Laboratory of Hygiene, of the State Board of Health, is in good working 
order and ready to receive specimens for examination. We have already 
received a great many specimens for examination from various parts of 
the State, but we have not received as many from your locality as we 
expected to receive. 

There is enclosed herewith a circular of directions as to the manner 
of shipping specimens. We are permitted by law to undertake only 
such work as is related to public health, and to this end we examine 
sputa submitted for examination for tubercle bacilli; samples of, blood 
from suspected typhoid fever patients for the Widal Reaction, and cul- 
tures made from sore throats, suspected to be cases of diphtheria. 

We are pi-epared also to undertake practically any laboratory ex- 
amination that might be desired by the physician, provided, of course, 
the same is a matter of public health administration. We will examine 
urine for tubercle bacilli, although we do not make a chemical examina- 
tion of urine nor examine for any other elements than tubercle bacilli. 
We will mail to any physician, requesting the same, a full set of outfits 
for the collection and shipping of specimens intended for examination to 
the laboratory. We shall be glad to send you an equipment of the same, 
should you desire it. 

We hope to make the Laboratory a power for good in the State, and 
are desirous that the physicians of your Society and section of the State 
become as interested and use the Laboratory as freely as the physicians 
of other sections of the State have already done. 

SPECIAL MEETIATG. 

May 18, 1906. 
Special meeting called to consider the sanitary surveys of certain 
schoolhouses and to take proper action, 



61 

Called to order by the President at 2 p. m. 
Present: Drs. Davis, Wishard, Tucker and Hiirty. 
Sanitary surveys of the schoolhoiises at West Newton and Val 
ley Mills read as follows : 

SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT WEST NEWTON, DE- 
CATUR TOWNSHIP, MARION COUNTY. 

By J. N. Hurty. 

In response to au invitatiou of the Trustee, Mr. J. D. Sanders, and 
several patrons of the school, the State Health Officer made an inspection 
of the schoolhouse at West Newton, April 23, 190U. This schoolhouse is 
known as West Newton School No. 3. 

Site. — The site comprises about two acres. It is high and rolling 
and well drained. It is in eveiy way satisfactory. 

The Building. — The building is frame, built in 1876. There are three 
rooms above and three below; no basement; narrow box winding stair- 
way, heated by Ideal Heaters, which are not satisfactoiy. There are 
two fire escapes on the building. The foundation is brick and somewhat 
washed by water, but not dangerous, nor could it be termed bad. The 
steps are in bad repair; the floors are worn and very poor, yet the build- 
ing can not be said to be dilapidated. 

First Floor. — The building is entered by a vestibule facing the west. 
From the vestibule a narrow winding stairway leads to the upper story. 
Two doors open from the vestibule, one into the primary room and one 
into the room for the Sixth anti Seventh Grades. 

Primary Room. — It is 24x3. ■\12, total 8,640 cubic feet, furnishing 
space for forty children. There aij 41 seats; enrollment 41, average daily 
attendance 32. The light is admitted from three sides and the teacher 
is compelled to look into the light. Considerable space in this room is 
occupied by the Ideal Heater. Blackboards glossy and teachers com- 
plain of this. 

Sixth and Seventh Grade Rooms. — This room is 24x30x12, total 8,640 
cubic feet. Enrollment 26; average attendance 22. Floors worn, glossy 
blackboards. Much space in this room is occupied by the large Ideal 
Heater. It is lighted from three sides and the teacher is compelled to 
look into the light. 

Third, Fourth and Fifth Grade Rooms. — -This room was built on to 
the main building some time after first construction. It is entered by a 
vestibule built inside the room. The said vestibule is used as a cloak 
room. The room is 30x30x12, which is 9,600 cubic feet, supplying space 
for 48 pupils. There are 50 seats, enrollment 46, average attendance 40. 
Glossy blackboards, floors worn, considerable space occupied by the large 
Ideal Heater. The light is admitted from three sides, and the teacher is 
compelled to look into the light. 

Second Floor. — Second floor is reached by a winding narrow box 
stairway, which opens into a vestibule. Vestibule is lighted by two 
windows and is used for a cloak room. One room opens into a narrow 



68 

hall, which has been created by building a partition through a room 
which is immediately above the primary room. The room partitioned ofE 
as described is used for a laboratory, is lighted from three sides, floors 
are worn, blacliboards glossy, and is heated by the Ideal Heater iu the 
room below. 

Eighth Grade Room. — This is the high school room and it is 30x30x12, 
which malies 9,600 cubic feet, space for 48 pupils ; enrollment 52, and 
average daily attendance not given. The room is lighted from three 
sides. Glossy blackboards, floors worn, heated by the heater in the room 
below. Teacher faces light. 

Third and Fourth Grade Room. — This room is the second story of 
the addition which has before been described. It is 30x30x12, making 
9,600 cubic feet, furnishing room for 48 pupils. It contains 50 seats; 
glossy blackboards; lighted from tliree sides; the floors are worn. The 
teacher is compelled to look into the light. Warmed by the Ideal Heater 
in the room below. 

Remarks. — Whooping cough prevailed in the school towards spring, 
but no epidemic diseases. Coughs, colds and catarrhs prevalent every 
winter. 

Opinion and Recommendations. — It is very plain that this schoolhouse 
is not sanitary. On account of defective lighting the eyes of both teachers 
and pupils are being injured, and on account of defective heating and 
ventilation their general health is being injured. It is very apparent that 
the building can not be repaired so as to make it sanitary, and I there- 
fore recommend its condemnation. 

After consideration of the above survey, and after hearing argu- 
ments from patrons for and against condemnation, which argu- 
ments were duly considered, the following order of condemnation 
was unanimously passed; 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
WEST NEWTON, MARION COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at West Newton, Decatur Town- 
ship, Marion County, Indiana, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
it is therefore 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned and shall not be used 
for school purposes from this date, May 18, 1906, foi-ward. And in tlie 
event of the trustee or any school teacher or any person violating this 
Older of condemnation, then the Secretary of the State Board of Health 
shall duly inform the Attorney-General, who will bring prosecution as in 
the statutes provided. 

REPORT OF SANITARY SURVEY OF VALLEY MILLS SCHOOL- 
HOUSE, MARION COUNTY. MAY 14. 

Site. — The site is excellent in every way. It is high ground and sur- 
rounded with few trees. « 



69 

Building. — The building is an old frame with a much worn founda- 
tion, holes are torn or broken in, and there are cracks in the foundation 
in several places. The building is one story. The plaster is off in places 
and there are cracks in the ceiling and walls. 

Eighth Grade Room. — This room is 24x32x14 feet, making the cubic 
contents 10,752 feet. This supplies space sufficient for 51 pupils. The 

enrollment is , and the attendance is . The light is introduced 

from two sides. ■ On the west side there are four windows and on the 
south there are two windows. The teacher is compelled to look into the 
light. Each window has eight glass lights, 12x18 inches, making the 
total glass area for the whole room of 72 square feet. The required 
amount would be 128 square feet. The room is therefore not properly 
lighted. The blackboards ai-e glossy and chipped in places. The room 
is heated by a stove and there are no ventilating shafts. 

Primary Room.— This room is 24x24x14, making in all 6,064 cubic 
feet, furnishing space for 30 pupils. The enrollment is — , the attendance 
is — . The arrangement is such as to compel the teacher to look into 
the light. The room is heated by a stove. There are no ventilating 
shafts. The floor is bad. 

Outhouses. — These are well separated and are in passable condition. 

Water Supply. — The water is carried from a well at a farmhouse, 
about one-eighth of a mile distant. The well at the schoolhouse furnishes 
water which is impure and is not liked by the children. 

Opinion and Recommendations. — It is my opinion that this school- 
house is unsanitary in every particular and unfit for school purposes. 1 
recommend that the same be condemned. 

Ater consideration of the above survey, and after hearing argu- 
ments from patrons for and against condemnation, which argu- 
ments were duly considered, the following order of condemnation 
was unanimously adopted. 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDETVINATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT 

VALLEY MILLS, DECATUR TOWNSHIP, MARION 

COUNTY, INDIANA. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Valley Mills, Decatur Township, 
Marion County, Indiana, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shall not be used for said purposes from and after this date. May 18, 
1906, and in the event of the trustee or any school teacher or other person 
using the said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary of the 
Indiana State Board of Health shall duly inform the Attorney-General, 
who will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906. 



70 

Documents concerning the schoolhoiise at Monument City, Polk 
Township, Huntington County, were read as follows: 

MONUMENT CITY, HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Monument City, Ind., 1906. 
To the State Board of HeaRh: 

We, the undersigned, residents and patrons of School District No. 7, 
in Polli Township, Huntington County, Indiana, respectfully request that 
you make an examination of the school building in said district as to its 
fitness for school purposes, and that you make known its condition to the 
Trustee of said Township. 

Geo. C. King, John Ammerman, Mathias Chrisman, Homer 
Dillin, Davfd M. Prilaman, Joseph Forest, S. J. Ellis, 
John A. Ellis, Seth Davis, S. J. Fair, Monroe Bailey, 
Stephen Weeks, J. F. Vickery, C. E. Hefner. 

REPORT OF SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT MONU- 
MENT CITY, HUNTINGTON COUNTY, POLK TOWNSHIP. 

Survey Made May 10, 1906, by J. N. Hurty, Secretary. 

Site. — The schoolyard covers about one acre and is well situated. 
The ground is high, gravel is found a short distance beneath the surface 
and the natural drainage is excellent; so good, indeed, as not to require 
tiling. 

Building. — The building is brick with a stone foundation; no base- 
ment, two stories, two rooms, built about twenty-five years ago. The 
walls are sound; no cracks. The entrance is by one front door, which 
opens into a small vestibule lighted by one window. No provision for 
warming vestibule. 

Primary Room.— The primary room is on the first floor and is entered 
through a door from the vestibule. It is 36x24x12 feet, which makes 
9,504 cubic feet, furnishing space for 47 pupils. The room contains 52 
desks, enrollment 43, average attendance 40. The desks are of the old 
wooden variety, yet are of good condition. Wraps are hung on hooks 
which are attached to the east wall of the room. The floor is in bad 
repair. Ldght enters by six windows, three on each side. Each window 
contains eight panes of glass, 12x18 inches. This does not furnish enough 
light, for the total number of square feet amounts to 72, and if the nile 
of one-sixth of floor area should be in glass is followed there should be 
192 square feet. In other words, there is not quite one-half as much 
light as sanitary science demands. The blackboards are slate and the 
room is warmed by a stove. There are no ventilating shafts. 

High School.— The high school room is on the second floor and is 
reached by a nari-ow stairway of twenty steps, in which there is one 
turn. This stairway is not of the variety known as "box stairway," but 
is, nevertheless, such in a general way, because it is so narrow and so 
confined in a small vestibule. If this schoolhouse were ever to catch on 
fire there would certainly be a pile of corpses to count in and upon the 



71 

stairway. This schoolroom is 36x22x10, making 7,920 cubic feet, which 
space is sufficient for 39 pupils. There are 40 seats, enrollment is 29, and 
average attendance 27. Floors are worn; no ventilating shafts; black- 
boards are slate. The room is lighted by six windows, three on each 
side. Each window pane is 12x18 inches, eight in each window, making 
72 square feet of lighting surface. The sanitary requirements for light- 
ing surface for this room would be 192 square feet. The room is heated 
by a stove. 

The Water. — The water is supplied from a drilled well, which the 
trustee said was 110 feet deep. From this it is fair to presume the water 
is potable. 

Outhouses.— The two outhouses are ordinary frame and are widely 
separated. 

Sickness. — The testimony was to the effect that no epidemics had 
prevailed among the school children Avithin the last few years; but, as 
would be expected, coughs, colds, and acute catarrhs were all frequently 
reported. 

Recommendations. — As the above report, measurements and all con- 
siderations show this schoolhouse to be unsanitaiy and not up to stand- 
ards, I therefore recommend its condemnation. 

After due consideration the following order of condemnation 
was unanimously adopted: 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT 

MONUMENT CITY, POLK TOWNSHIP, 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Whereas, It has been shown ro the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Monument City, Polk Township, 
Huntington County, Indiana, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shaU not be used for said purposes from and after this date. May 18. 
1906. And in the event of the trustee or any school teacher or other 
person using the said schoolhouse for school purposes then the Secretary 
of the Indiana State Board of Health shall duly inform the Attorney- 
General, who will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

REPORT OF SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT ROCK 

CREEK CENTER, ROCK CREEK TOWNSHIP, 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Survey Made May 10, 1906, by Ti-ustee W. D. Cline. 

Site.^ — The site is bad. It is low, wet and undrained, and can only 
be drained with difficulty. 

Building. — The building is brick with stone foundation, built in 1890. 
It was originally a one-room building, but lately it had been made into 
two rooms by a rough board partition. The building is entered by a 



72 

vestibule provided with hooks for vvTaps. The vestibule is not warmed, 
and the schoolroom is warmed by stoves. There are large craclis at the 
angle formed by the ceiling and side walls. There is no basement. 

Primary Room. — This room is 27x30x14 feet, making 11,340 cubic 
feet; this is only room for 56 pupils. There are 40 desks; enrollment — ; 
attendance 27. The room is lighted by three windows on the west side 
and one on the north side. They are so situated as to admit light from 
the right side of the children. Each pane of glass is 8x22 inches, making 
58 square feet. The floor area is SIO feet, and there should be one-sixth 
of this area in glass — this would require 135 square feet. The room, 
therefore, has only about one-half as much light as sanitary conditions 
require. The floor is in good condition. The desks are almost new and 
of several different sizes. 

High School Room. — This room is 16x25x14, making 6,720 cubic feet, 
furnishing space for 34 pupils. There are 25 seats. The enrollment is — ; 
attendance 20. The room is lighted by three windows, two on the east 
and one on the north; each window has twelve panes of glass, 12x22 
inches, making in all 58 square feet of glass surface. The floor area is 
264 square feet, and one-sixth of this, or 44 square feet of glass, is re- 
quired. The lighting is therefore sufflcient. The light falls from the left 
shoulder of the pupils. The blackboards are slate. 

Opinion and Recommendations.— I am decided of the opinion that 
the site of this school building is damp and low and difficult to drain 
and should be condemned. The school building has no basement beneath, 
is damp, hard to heat by stoves, has no ventilating ducts, the lighting of 
one room is insufficient, the vestibule is not heated and is an unfit place 
for wraps. I recommend that this building be condemned for school 
purposes. 

After due consideration of the above survey, the following order 
of condemnation was unanimously adopted: 



PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSB AT 
ROCK CREEK CENTER, ROCK CREEK TOWNSHIP, 
HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the sehoolhouse at Rock Creek Center, Rock Creek 
Township, Huntington County, Indiana, is unsanitary and unfit for school 
purposes; therefore it is 

Ordered, That said sehoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shall not be used for said purposes from and after this date, May 18. 
1906. And in the event of the trustee or any school teacher or other 
person using the said sehoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary 
of the Indiana State Board of Health shall duly inform the Attorney- 
Generah who will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906, 



73 

SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT KENNARD, GREENS- 
BORO TOWNSHIP, HENRY COUNTY. 

By Deputy E. H. Brubaker. 

New Castle, Ind., May 4, 1906. 

The building is a frame structure, which was originally one-story, 
consisting of three rooms and a hallway, with no basement. Then some 
years later the second story was added, making six rooms in all. The 
building is located on a lot of ample size and is reasonably well drained, 
with gravel walks leading up to the building from the street. The 
building is in a bad state of repair. On windy days the building can be 
felt to vibrate under the influence of the wind. On one extremely windy 
day the teacher felt alarmed, fearing that the building would collapse 
under the force of the wind. In one place the weather boarding is oft', 
exposing the framework, which is decayed. 

The blackboards are all slate and in good state of repair. The plaster- 
ing is ei'acked and in some places is off. The rooms are all lighted by 
narrow windows and the north room on the ground floor is very dark, 
especially on cloudy days. 

The rooms are all heated by stoves and on moderately cold days it is 
impossible to get any of the rooms warm enough, sometimes the tempera- 
ture of the rooms is not above (jO degrees all day. This is especially true 
on windy days. 

I was informed that there were many cases of colds and coughs, sore 
throats and pneumonia and allied ailments among the pupils and teachers, 
attributed to the cold and illy ventilated condition of the rooms. Many 
of the days the teachers and pupils wear their heavy wraps during school 
hours. 

The stairs leading to the second floor are steep and dangerous, rising 
14 feet in the same distance, and are protected by no railing. They are 9 
feet wide. In all of the rooms the floors are in bad repair, with holes in 
same with boards and pieces of tin nailed over them. 

In the lower rooms the wraps and the dmner pails or baskets are 
hung in the schooh'ooms; Upstairs they are kept in the hall. 

The desks and other fixtures are only in a fair state of repair. 

The only means of ventilation is by windows. 

The enrollment during the past winter was as follows: Primary 
room, 35; second room, gTades two and three, 38; third room, grades three 
and four, 38; fourth room, 38; fifth room, 38; high school, 28; making a 
total of 215 pupils. The enrollment will show an increase for next winter. 
I was not able to learn the average attendance for last winter. 

. A large number of the patrons are complaining and are dissatisfied 
with the building. 

The girls' outhouse is 112 feet north of the west wing of the build- 
ing and the boys' outhouse the same distance north of the east W-ing of 
the school building. The two being about 100 feet apart. 

The schoolhouse is in a very unsanitary and unsafe condition, the 
latter being enough to condemn it. I would recommend the condemna- 
tion of the schoolhouse for school purposes. 



74 

After due consideration of the above survey, the following 
proclamation of condemnation was unanimously adopted: 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
KENNARD, GREENSBORO TOWNSHIP, HENRY COUNTY. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Kennard, Greensboro Township, 
Heni-y County, Indiana, is uhsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shall not be used for such purposes from and after this date. May 18, 
190G, and in the event of the trustee or any school teacher or other person 
using said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretaiy of the 
Indiana State Board of Health shall inform the Attorney-General, who 
will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906. 

REPORT OF SECOND SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
AVON, WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP. HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

By J. N. Hurty. 

E. E. Blair, Trustee. 

In response to a petition from patrons, J. L. Anderson, Deputy State 
Health Officer, made a sanitai-y survey of the schoolhouse at Avon, 
February 1, 1906. Said survey was duly presented to the State Board 
of Health at a special meeting held March 7, 1906, and after due con- 
sideration of the evidence presented the schoolhouse was condemned. 

Due notice of the complete proclamation of condemnation was duly 
posted on the schoolhouse and the trustee was formally notified by Dr. 
W. J. Hoadley, Health Officer of Hendricks County. 

Now come Edward Mills, D. W. Carter, and C. D. Hollingsworth, 
composing the Advisory Board of Washington ToAvnship, Hendricks 
County, and present the following petition, which was received April 28, 
1906: 

"We, the undersigned citizens, taxpayers and patrons of School No. 
6, in Washington Township, Hendricks County, State of Indiana, re- 
spectfully petition you to reconsider the action of your Honorable Board 
concerning the inspection of Schoolhouse No. 6, located at Avon, in said 
Washington Township, and for the purpose of reconsidering the matter 
we desire to call your attention to the following facts: 

First. The building as it now stands was originally built as a two- 
story building and was not built as a one-story building and an additional 
stoiy added thereto, as represented to you. 

Second. The roof of said building is a good slate roof, and in good 
condition except in two places around flues. 

Third. The floors of the various rooms: are considerably worn, but 
these conditions could be remedied by reflooring. 



75 

Fourth. If the phiu for hoatiiiz the house is not sufficient we believe 
tliat it could be made sufficient without much exi>euse. 

Fifth. While the plastering is cracked in a few places, it is only 
where the leaks above referred to have damaged it, and it could be re- 
paired with little expense. 

Sixth. The outer Avails of said building are apparently in as good 
condition as they were when first constructed. Upon careful examina- 
tion we are unable to find any serious defects or cracks in the outside 
walls and only one small crack in the partition wall between the two 
lower rooms. 

Seventh. There has been some drainage constructed for the school- 
liouse lot, and if It is not sufficiently drained it will be a very easy matter 
to put in whatever amount of ditching is necessary to drain the same. 

Eighth. The schoolhouse as it now stands is centrally located, and a 
good barn and sheds have been erected on the schoolhouse lot to accom- 
modate the scholars and patrons of the school. Said buildings may not be 
entirely modern, but the same is well ventilated and lighted and if its 
sanitai-y conditions can be improved we will appreciate any suggestions 
you desire to make. 

Ninth. As persons interested in having the right thing done we 
believe that this schoolhouse building is sufficient to accommodate the 
demands of the district in the township in which it is located, and that it 
can be put in the proper condition at very little expense. We also believe 
that it will be an unnecessaiy and useless burden to the taxpayers of the 
township to have the building torn down and a new one constructed. 

We, therefore, ask you to consider the above facts and we ask you 
to make a careful investigation as to the true situation in regard to the 
sufficiency of the present building for school purposes." 

D. W. CARTER. 
EDWARD MILLS, 
C. D. HOLLINGSWORTH. 

Advisory Board. 

SECOND SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE. 

Upon Monday, .Ipril 30, 1906, State Health Officer made a second 
sanitary survey of the said schoolhouse as follows: 

Site. — ^The schoolyard is about two acres in extent. One-third is low 
wet gi'ound. Trustee E. E. Blair, upon being questioned, said that in 
the winter of 1905 and 1906 fully one-third of the schoolyard was covered 
with water for a period of many days. At one time it was necessaiy to 
wade through water two inches deep, with mud beneath, to get coal from 
the coalhouse immediately in the rear of the schoolhouse yard. 

Mr. J. Langston, Principal, upon being questioned, said that In rainy 
weather the schoolhouse was very damp; the walls at times being so 
moist that the blackboards could not be used. At these times the atmos- 
phere in the room felt damp. 

The trolley line runs within 42 feet of the front door and the noise of 
the passing cars Is bound to be detrimental to the school, as attention to 
books and recitations will be disturbed and confusion caused. 



76 

The water supply is from a dug well which is IS feet deep and which 
is immediately in the center of the trolley track. The top of the well 
has been covered over with briclc and the water piped to a pump 12 feet 
away. This well may become polluted at any time through the dropping 
of excreta upon the track from passing trolley cars. 

Conclusion. — The site is unsanitary and unfit in every particular for 
a schoplhouse. 

. Building. — The building is brick with a brick foundation. No base- 
ment, two stories high, four rooms, built in 1884. Cracks were discovered 
to exist on all sides of the building. The roof is slate and although not 
waterproof at the present time, could easily be made waterproof. The 
building is heated by two Peck-Williamson Ideal Heaters. These heaters 
are in the lower rooms and lake up a great deal of space. According to 
the plan of these heaters they receive cold air from the outside and after 
warming introduce it into the lower and upper rooms. 

There is also an appliance by which these heaters are designed to re- 
move the foul air from near the floor of each room. According to the 
testimony received from the trustee, teachers and pupils these heaters 
are not adequate and do not maintain a uniform or proper temperature 
and do not properly pjimp the foul air away. At this point I will say that 
if the heaters were satisfactory they would be the first ones of the kind 
that I have ever known which were. 

A winding stairway, 4 feet wide Avith 23 steps, leads to the upper 
story. The outer edge of the stairway is protected by a strong banister 
and the entrances to the two rooms in the upper story are through two 
small doors, one on each side of a narrow vestibule. This constitutes a 
firetrap, and if the house should catch on fire while school is in session 
many lives would doubtless be lost upon this steep, winding, narrow 
stairway. If the schoolhouse is remodeled the stairway must be so con- 
structed as to lessen to the fullest degree possible the danger from acci- 
dent by fire. 

The total enrollment during the last term was 135, with a daily 
average attendance of 104. This makes an average absence of 31, or 22.9 
per cent. Much of this absence was caused by sickness, for coughs, colds, 
catarrhs, headaches, and rheumatism prevailed among the children. The 
children are reported as continually complaining of cold feet in cold 
weather. 

A marked unsanitai'y feature of the present building is the fact that 
the cold damp halls is the only place for keeping wraps. 

Intermediate Room. — On the first floor, 30x21^x12 feet, making 7,740 
cubic feet in all. The room contains 38 seats, with 40 pupils enrolled, 
average daily attendance 26. The cubic space is sufficient. The floor is 
badly worn. Light falls over the right shoulders of the pupils. Blnck- 
boards are painted, but not glossy. Ceiling cracked in several places. 
Seats vary in size to fit pupils of dilTerent ages. 

Primary Room. — On first floor, on west side, 30x21^x12, 7,740 cubic 
feet in all; 36 seats, 42 pupils enrolled, average daily attendance 32. 
There is an abundant cubic space for each pupil. Floor much worn. 
P.lackboards painted, but not glossy. Ceiling much cracked. Seats vary 
in size to fit pupils of different ages. < 



Grammar Room. — This is the east room, in second story, 30x21^x14, 
mnlviug 9,030 cubic feet. The room contains 33 seats, 20 pupils enrolled, 
average attendance 24. There is ample cubic space for each pupil. The 
light falls over the right shoulders of the pupils. Blackboards painted, 
but not glossy. Ceiling is cracked. Floor much worn. Seats are proper 
size. 

High School Room. — This is the west room in second story, 30x21^x14, 
making 9,030 cubic feet in all; 25 seats, 27 pupils em-olled. average attend- 
ance 22. Floor badly worn. Cracked ceiling. Blackboards painted, but 
not glossy. Light falls over left shoulders of pupils. 

History. — There were four teachers in this building last year. The 
Principal, Mr. J. Langston, says the schoolhouse is very unsanitary. He 
asserts that the heating and ventilating are far from what they should 
be and that the almost continued dampness is. a cause of rheumatic 
pains. One lady teacher last term quit on account of bad health after 
three and one-half months service. She claimed the unsanitary condi- 
tions of the schoolhouse caused her illness. The teacher who took her 
place taught five weeks, for she claimed her health was being injured by 
the unsanitary surroundings, namely, continued dampness, uneven warm- 
ing and poor ventilation. 

Trustee Blair reports that none of the four teachers will accept a 
position for the next year, although the patrons of the school especially 
request that they be employed again. The refusal of the teachers to 
tach in this school building is announced by them to be because of the 
unsanitary surroundings. 

Opinion and Recommendations. — I am very confident that the school- 
house at Avon is unsanitary. It is insufficiently ventilated and warmed, 
and in two of the rooms the light is introduced over the right shoulders 
of the pupils. It is also unsanitary because of its dampness and because 
of the cold damp halls where wraps are kept. 

The water supply is not now polluted, but the well is in a dangerous 
situation, and may become polluted at any time, and this threatens a 
further unsanitary condition. The site has already been shown to be low 
and wet. It could be drained and filled at considerable expense. 

I recommend that the former condemnation be not repealed and that 
it do stand. 

In order to put this schoolhouse in good sanitary condition the grounds 
•must be well drained and filled: a basement must be placed under the 
entire building, with foundation walls built of stone or vitrified brick or 
other impervious material. The said basement must have a cemented 
floor and an efficient heating and ventilating system must be supplied. 
Cloakrooms properly warmed, lighted and ventilated, must be constructed. 
As for the enrollment for next year, according to the estimate of the 
trustee, it will be 160. and so it is plain that an addition must be built to 
the present schoolhouse if it is remodeled, for there is not a square foot 
of space for more pupils in the present structure. 

After due consideration of the arguments of a paid attorney 
and of citizens of the township, which were all duly weighed and 
considered, the former condemnation of this schoolhouse was 
nnanimonsly reaffirmed. 



78 

REPORT OP SANITARY SURVEY OF SCPIOOLHOUSE AT KENT, 
REPUBLICAN TOWNSHIP, JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Made April 17, 1906: 

In accordance with reqnest of County Superintendent and several 
patrons of the school, I made an inspection of the schoolhouse at Kent, 
Jefferson County, Indiana. 

Site. — The site is not a good one. It is not high and dry and yet 
can not be said to be wet. The schoolyard is too small and it is impos- 
sible to add more ground on account of the residence district adjoining. 

Building. — The building is an old dilapidated two-story frame struc- 
ture, stone foundation. The plastering has fallen off in many places and 
cx'acks are frequent. There is no basement. Both rooms are heated by 
stoves and there are no ventilating shafts. The windows are brolien and 
in a ramshaclile condition. On standing in the center of the room and 
jumping up and down the walls of the building would shake. One floor 
has been placed on top of another until now there are three floors in the 
room. The rooms are lighted by three windows on each side. The light 
admitted is not sufficient. Both rooms are overcrowded and complaints 
are frequent. The report of the teacher shows that colds, coughs, and 
rheumatism are frequent. There have been no reports of diphtheria or 
other infectious diseases. The per cent, of attendance during last term 
was 90. 

Opinion and Recommendations. — My opinion is that this schoolhouse 
is unsanitary and unsafe for school purposes and I therefore recommend 
its absolute condemnation, and the condemnation of the present site. 

After due consideration of the above survey the following order 
of condemnation was unanimously adopted : 



PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
KENT, REPUBLICAN TOWNSHIP, JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Kent, Republican Township, 
Jefferson County, Indiana, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shall not be used for said purposes from and after this date. May 18, 
190G, and in the event of the trustee or any school teacher or other person 
using said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary of the 
Indiana State Board of Health shall inform the Attorney-General, who 
will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906. 



79 

SANITARY SURVEYS OF SGHOOLHOUSES AT MADISON. 
By J. N. Hurty. 

UPPEK SEMINABY. 

Made April 18, 1906. 

Site. — The site is a good one, but area is not quite suflScient. 

Building. — The building is very old, having been built over sixty-five 
years ago. The front part of originally four rooms has been added to 
from time to time until now there are eight rooms, and their aiTange- 
ment is such as to be a threat against life in case of fire or special alarm. 
The building is two stories, walls craclied and unsafe, no basement, worn 
floors, dangerous stairways, warmed by stoves, no ventilating shafts, not 
sufllciently or properly lighted. The facilities for the care of wraps are 
poor and unsanitary, and repulsive odors from the privies enter some of 
the rooms when windows are open. It is entirely unnecessary to make a 
detailed description of each room, for the whole building and every room 
is veiy unsanitary. 

Recommendations. — I recommend that the schoolhouse be condemned 
for school purposes. 

After due consideration of the above account of the Upper 
Seminary Schoolhouse at Madison the following order of con- 
demnation was unanimously adopted : 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF A SCHOOLHOUSE AT 

MADISON, JEFFERSON COUNTY, KNOWN AS 

THE UPPER SEMINARY. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Madison, Indiana, known as the 
Upper Seminary, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; therefore 
it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shaU not be used for said purposes from and after July 1, 1906, and 
in the event of any school officer, school superintendent, teacher or other 
person using said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary of 
the Indiana State Board of Health shall inform the Attorney-General, 
who will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906. 

. SANITARY SURVEY OF FULTON SCHOOLHOUSE AT MADISON. 

Site. — The site is high, dry, naturally well drained, and good in all 
ways. 

Building. — Brick, built in 1875. One story, two rooms. Insufficiently 
and improperly lighted, heated by stoves, no ventilating shafts. Entrance 
is through an unwarmed vestibule where wraps are kept. 

Recommendations. — This is an old, damp and unsanitary building, 
and I recommend that it be condemned. 



80 

After consideration of the above sanitary survey the following 
order of condemnation was unanimously passed: 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION OF A SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
MADISON, KNOWN AS THE FULTON SCHOOLHOUSE. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Madison, Indiana, linown as the 
Fulton schoolhouse, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; there- 
fore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school pui'poses 
and shall not be used for said purposes after December 1, 1906, and in 
the event of any school officer, school superintendent, teacher or other 
person using said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary of 
the Indiana State Board of Health shall inform the Attorney-General, 
who xwill bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special session, 
May 18, 1906. 

SANITARY SURVEY OF WALNUT STREET SCHOOLHOUSE AT 

MADISON. 

Site. — The site is low and is liable to flood from Crooked Creeli, near 
by. On one occasion the water was seven feet deep in the lower school- 
room and the washings from the privy floated around the schoolyard. 

Building. — The building is stone, built in 1864. Two stories, two 
rooms. Insufiiciently and improperly lighted by cross-lights. Building- 
is damp at all times. Stairway to upper room narrow and of the kind 
known as box stairAvay, which is a great danger in case of fire or panic. 

Recommendations. — I recommend that this school building be con- 
demned for all school purposes. 

After due consideration of the above survey the following order 
of condemnation was unanimously adopted: 

PROCLAMATION OP CONDEMNATION OF A SCHOOLHOUSE AT 
MADISON, KNOWN AS THE WALNUT STREET SCHOOLHOUSE. 

Whereas, It has been shown to the satisfaction of .the Indiana State 
Board of Health that the schoolhouse at Madison, Indiana, known as the 
Walnut Street Schoolhouse, is unsanitary and unfit for school purposes; 
therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned for school purposes 
and shall not be used for said purposes after December 1, 1906, and in 
the event of any scliool officer, superintendent, teacher or other person 
using said schoolhouse for school purposes, then the Secretary of the 
Indiana State Board of Health shall inform the Attorney-General, who 
will bring prosecution as in the statutes provided. 

Passed by the Indiana State Board of Health in special Session, 
May 18, 1906. 



81 



HEALTH OFFICERS' SCHOOL. 

Dear Doctor. — The Annual Health Officers' School will be held in 
Indianapolis Thursday, June 28-29. The headquarters will be at the 
new Claypool Hotel, and all sessions will be in the auditorium on the 
eighth floor. 

A formal summons will be sent to you about ten days before the 
meeting. Preserve the summons, and also secure certificate of attendance 
when you come, from the clerk at the auditorium door. The two docu- 
ments will give you a legal claim against your Board for your expenses. 
An interesting and instructive program will be prepared. 

Any suggestions in regard to subjects to be considered and for the 
conduct of the conference wiU be thanlifully received. 

This conference is for all officers — county, city and town. Remember 
the date, June 28-29. Very truly yours, 

J. N. HURTY, 

Secretary. 

By order of the State Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE INDIANA STATE BOARD 6f HEALTH TO THE 

CONFERENCE OF STATE AND PROVINCIAL BOARDS OF 

HEALTH OF NORTH AMERICA WITH THE PUBLIC 

HEALTH AND MARINE HOSPITAL SERVICE, 

HELD MAY 23, 1906, WASHINGTON, D. C. 

As the Legislature of the State of Indiana has not been in session 
since the last report of this Board, there are no new Health Laws and no 
changes to record. 

The campaign against tuberculosis by the State Board has been 
actively carried on. Lectures upon this subject and the general subject 
of the preservation of the public health have been supplied to thirty-two 
teachers' institutes and farmers' institutes during the winter. Over 
25,000 health circulars have been disti-ibuted. During the weeli begin- 
ning March 5 a tuberculosis exhibition was given in Indianapolis under 
the auspices of the Indianapolis Commercial Club and the Indiana State 
Board of Health. This exhibition was secured from the National Asso- 
ciation for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis. It was held in 
Tomlinson Hall at Indianapolis. Lectures upon different phases of tuber- 
culosis were given every night and every afternoon. The Governor and 
Lieutenant Governor of the State took active part in the work. Five 
thousand and one hundred and twenty-eight people visited the exhibition, 
and each visitor was supplied with a pamphlet treating of the prevention 
of tuberculosis. 

During the past year the State Board has condemned twenty-eight 
schoolhouses as unsanitary and unfit for school purposes, and twenty-five 
new school houses have been constructed and three remodeled. The 
Indiana law gives full power to the State Board of Health in this matter. 
The Legislature of 1903 gave to the State Board two laboratories, which 
together constitute a State Laboratory of Hygiene. The laboratory con- 

6— Bd. of Health. 



82 

sists of two divisions — chemical and pathological. Each division has a 
skilled superintendent, with assistants. The work of the chemical 
division to date has been concerned mostly with making food and drug 
analyses, for the enforcement of the piu-e food and drug law. It has, 
however, made over 500 sanitary water analyses and has commenced the 
sanitary survey of White River. The bacteriological division is doing 
such work for the medical profession and the people generally as pertains 
to hygienic bacteriology and pathology. The Hygienic Laboratory has 
not yet finished its first year's work, but it is growing constantly, and 
numerous acknowledgments from citizens are received concerning its 
usefulness. 

It is now seven years since the State Board, under a special law, has 
been collecting accurate mortality statistics. The statistics of births and 
cases of infectious diseases have not been heretofore a credit to the State, 
as the statutes did not permit of their accurate collection. An improve- 
ment, which is expected will be striven for by the Board, will be a law 
to be presented to the Legislature of 1907 which will make it possible to 
collect accurate birth and infectious disease records. 

The Board takes pride in calling attention to the decreased death rate 
in 3905 as compared with the preceding five years. This decrease is 0.3. 
The figures show for 1905 a death rate of 14 per 1,000, and the average 
for the five preceding years was 14.3. This means a saving of over 700 
lives. There also appears a decrease in the death rate by the same com- 
parison in tuberculosis, typhoid fever, diphtheria, scarlet fever and pneu- 
monia. There is a slight increase in cancer and in deaths from violence. 
Smallpox has been epidemic in many parts of the State, but has been 
mild, with very few mortalities. The total deaths from this disease for 
the year 1905 numbered 35. It is thought fair to conclude that at least 
some part of the reduction in the deaths from infectious diseases has 
been due to the activity of the State Health Department. 

Approved and ordered forwarded as the report of the Board for 
the year ending May 1, 1906, to the Surgeon-General of the 
United States Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. 



SPECIAL MEETING. 

June 28, 1906. 

Called to order at 12 m. 

Present : Drs. Davis, McCoy, Wishard, Tucker and Hurty. 

Dr. Davis stated the object of the special meeting was to con- 
sider the matter of causing the Health Officers of the State to 
inspect and report upon the condition of the slaughter-houses in 
their respective localities. 

The object was thoroughly discussed, and the following order 
was adopted: 



83 

ORDER CONCERNING THE INSPECTION OF SLAUGHTER AND 
PACKING HOUSES. 

The State Board of Health herewith directs tliat county, city and town 
health officers shall inspect all slaugliter and packing houses within then- 
respective jurisdictions and report their findings to tlie State Board. The 
facts of the said inspections shall be recorded upon the printed forms 
supplied by the Board, and all reports must be made and returned within 
ten days after receipt of this order and the said inspection forms. The 
Secretary is directed to prepare forms for the purpose set forth above 
and submit them to the President for his approval. When duly approved 
by the President the Secretary shall send said forms to all county, city 
and town Health Officers with a letter of instructions. The Secretary 
is also instructed to gather in aU the reports possible, and tabulate and 
analyze them and report the matter at a further meeting of the Board. 

The annual Health Officers' School opened the morning of the 
28th, and the first session had adjourned at the hour of the 
meeting of the Board. Various features of the school were dis- 
cussed, hut no orders or resolutions were passed. 

Adjourned to meet June 29, at 12 m. 



ADJOITKlSrED MEETING EROM JUNE 28. 

June 29, 1906. 

Called to order at 12 m. 

Present: Drs. Davis, McCoy, Tucker and Hurty. 

The Annual Health Officers' School adjourned at 12 m., and 
the meeting was to consider the work done and to allow all neces- 
sary bills. It was the general opinion that the most fruitful dis- 
cussion related to the inspection of meat and of slaughter-houses, 
which discussion was led by Dr. A. W. Bitting, State Veterin- 
arian. It was 

Ordered, That the Secretary should prepare a full report of the 
school and publish the same in the Monthly Bulletin. 



THIRD QUARTER. 



"KEGULAK MEETITs^G OF THE STATE BOAKD OE 

HEALTH. 

July 13, 1906. 

AFFAIRS CONSIDERED OF THE SECOND CALENDAR QUARTER 
OF 1906. AND THE THIRD FISCAL QUARTER OF 1905-1906. 

Called to order by President Davis at 2 p. m. 

Present: Drs. Davis, McCoy, Wishard, Tucker, Hurty. 

Minutes of last regular and the special meetings of May 18 
and June 28 read and approved. 

Report of the Secretary for the last quarter called for and 
read, as follows: 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 

The health of the State, as shown by reports to this Board, 
was generally better during the quarter ending June 30 than in 
the corresponding month last year. Smallpox still prevails to a 
slight degree, generally in mild form. There were no smallpox 
deaths during the quarter, the summary being as follows : 

Cases decreased 31 per cent., deaths decreased 100 per cent., 
area invaded decreased 21 per cent. 

The table presented herewith shows the data of the disease dur- 
ing the quarter. jSTo marked epidemics are to be recorded. The 
work in the Laboratory of Hygiene has been going on as usual, 
and it is a pleasure to report that these departments are meeting 
with increased favor from the people and physicians of the State. 
The reports of the Bacteriologist and of the Chemist have been 
published each month in the Bulletin, and are here sunmiarized 
for the quarter. Mortality statistics, have been collected, tabulated 
and analyzed as usual; and the statistics pertaining to births, 
contagious diseases and marriages will be collected as soon as pos- 
sible. '^ 

(84) 



85 

SMALLPOX KOK QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30. 190G. 

No. of No. of 

Cases Counties 

Reported. Deaths. Invaded. 

April, 1905 151 4 18 

April, 1906 97 11 

May, 1905 125 2 11 

iNIay, 1906 112 14 

June, 1905 114 4 13 

June, 1906 '. . 58 8 

ISTotices of the condemnation of the schoollioiises at Madison 
and Kent, Jefferson County; and of West ISTewton and Valley 
Mills, Marion CoTinty; of Rockcreek Township and Polk Town- 
ship, Huntington County, w^re formally made out and sent to 
the officers having jurisdiction on May 26, 1906. Instructions to 
said officers being duly given. 

VISITS AND INSPECTIONS. 

May 22, Monroeville. — On account of inspection of schoolhouse 
and to confer with town authorities in regard to general sanitary 
matters. The report of this survey was presented at the special 
meeting held June 28, and action taken. 

May 28, Zionsville. — On this date, in accordance with a request 
from the school trustees of Zionsville, I visited the place and made 
a sanitary survey of the schoolhouse. I was met by the three 
trustees and three or four other citizens, and the schoolhouse was 
thoroughly inspected. I deem it unnecessary to here give all the 
facts secured by the inspection, because the trustees immediately 
agreed that all changes and improvements recommended should 
be made before opening the school in the fall. 

May 28, Shelbyville. — I visited this city upon request of the 
City Board of Health, who wished to have a consultation in regard 
to the sanitary affairs of their city. Upon arrival I was met 
by the members of the Board and, together with the Mayor, we 
held a consultation. The authorities named desired to draw up 
and have passed, if possible, a local ordinance controlling the 
meat supply and in regard to the removal of nuisances affecting 
the public health. The subject was discussed for fully two hours, 
and then we rode over the city inspecting various unsanitary condi- 
tions. ' I think my visit was productive of good,' for ordinances 
governing the subjects named above have since been passed, and 



86 

are being enforced. The Mayor of Shelbyville and tlie Board of 
Health passed a resolution of thanks for the visit and help ren- 
dered. 

May 30, Michigan City. — I visited Michigan City in accord- 
ance with an invitation from the Lake County Medical Society 
in order to read a paper on the subject of "The Early Diagnosis 
of Tuberculosis," and to deliver an illustrated lecture to the public 
upon "Tuberculosis ; Its Prevention and Cure." I was cordially 
received by the representatives of the association named and by the 
city and county health officers. I think not a little good was 
accomplished for the public health cause. 

June 22, Richmond. — On this date I visited Richmond in order 
to deliver a lecture at a called meeting of citizens upon the "Pre- 
vention of Tuberculosis." A good audience gathered in the High 
School auditorium, and afterward the Wayne County Anti- 
Tuberculosis Society was organized with 96 charter members. Mr. 
Jesse Reeves was elected president. 

The Annual Health Officers' School was^held June 28 and 29. 
The Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, was made headquarters, and, 
with the exception of two sessions, the meetings were held in the 
auditorium of the hotel. The following program was carried 
out and, in addition, a special lecture was given by the Secretary 
concerning "Recent Improvements in Antitoxin," 

PROGRAM. 

First Session, June 28. 

10:00 a. m. — Called to order by T. Henry Davis, of Richmond, Presi- 
dent of the State Board of Health. 

Welcome Governor J. Frank Hanly 

Needed Medical and Health I/egislation Glen Kimball, Marion 

The Weak Places in the State's Sanitary Service, and How They May 

Be Strengthened J. N. Taylor, Crawfordsville 

Discussion. 

Second Session, 2 p. m. 

The Prophylaxis of Syphilis A. W. Brayton, Indianapolis 

Discussion. 

Eyes, and How to Care for Them .J. McLean Moulder, Kokomo 

Discussion. 

Slaughter-House and Meat Inspection '.A. W. Bitting, Lafayette 

Discussion. 
Question Box. 



87 

Third Session, 8 p. m. 

Tuberculosis Symposium. 

The Health Officers' Opportunity in the Combat Against Consump- 
tion Geo. T. McCoy, Columbus 

Treatment of Joint Tuberculosis at Sea Breeze. .F. A. Tucker, Noblesville 

Home and Foreign Sanatoria (Lantern Illustrations) 

J. N. Hurty, Indianapolis 

Discussion. 

Fourth Session. June 29. 9 a. m. 
Question Box. 

How to Manage the Milk Supply H. E. Barnard, Indianapolis 

Discussion. 

Widal and Diazo Tests for Typhoid Fever. .T. Victor Keene, Indianapolis 

Discussion. 

The attendance was 241. All city, .county and town health offi- 
cers were summoned. The interest and discussions were excellent. 
Sveral letters received since the meeting from various gentlemen 
who attended confirm the belief that the conference resulted in 
much good for the public health cause. 

SANITARY SURVEY OF SCHOOLHOUSE AT SPICELAND, HENRY 
COUNTY, JUNE 29, 1906. 

This building belongs to a society known as "The Spiceland Acad- 
emy." 

Site. — The site is satisfactory in every way. Indeed, it is a beautiful 
park and has excellent natural drainage. 

Building. — It is an old frame building and has been painted within 
the last two years. It has two stories, four schoolrooms, two halls, three 
cloakrooms. The stairs are of easy ascent, floors throughout the building 
are bad; foundation is stone; no basement. There is a dugout, or hole, 
beneath the building in which are placed two ordinary wood stoves with 
galvanized iron jackets. From these jackets tin pipes conduct heat to 
the various rooms above. This is a makeshift furnace, receiving all its 
air from the dugout or hole. It is therefore true that the rooms above 
receive ground air and frequently damp air which has been warmed by 
passing over the surfaces of the stoves. This heating arrangement is un- 
sanitary, inadequate and dangerous. In addition to this makeshift 
furnace stoves are placed in each room. 

The building is too much shaded. Large, beautiful shade trees spread 
their foliage on every side, obstructing sunshine, light and air. 

Primary Room. — This room is 33x33x13 feet, 52 seats, enrollment 50; 
lighted by eight windows; ventilation by windows alone; no ventilating 
ducts. There is ample space in this room for the children enrolled and 
the light is ample, but the teacher is compelled to look into the light. 
Slate blackboards. 

Room No. 2. — This room is 33x33x13 feet, contains 39 seats, enroll- 
ment 36. It is lighted by eight windows, blackboard is painted on the 



88 

walls and shiny and chipped in places. Part of the blackboard is wood; 
the ceiling is brolven and has fallen off in several places. This room is 
heated by a coal stove in conjmiction with the makeshift furnace above 
described. 

Room No. 3. — This room is 24x45x13; contains 50 seats; enrollment 
not given. It is lighted by eight windows; teacher is compelled to look 
into the light; blackboards are painted on the plaster walls and shiny and 
chipped. The room is heated by a coal stove in conjunction with the 
makeshift furnace above described. 

Room No. 5. — This room is 33x24x14 feet, and contains 42 seats; en- 
rollment is 46. There is ample space and light for the pupils, but the 
teacher is compelled to look into the light. The slate blackboards are 
satisfactory. The room is heated by a wood stove in conjunction with 
the makeshift furnace above described. 

Outhouses. — There are two outhouses for the sexes, but both are old, 
dilapidated frame affairs in an awful condition. 

Opinion and Recommendations. — In addition to what has been told 
above, the testimony is to the effect that in cold weather school is fre- 
quently dismissed from this building or the children hover around the 
stove to keep warm. Inquiry developed the fact that coughs, colds, 
catarrh and I'heumatism prevail every winter among the students. All of 
this is to be expected from the survey above given. It is my opinion the 
schoolhouse is unsanitaiy in every way and it is certainly true that many 
children have been injm-ed in their health in thp past while attending 
school in it. Indeed, I have no doubt that many children have not only 
suffered from siclvuess, but also have died in after life from injuries re- 
ceived to their health in this damp, poorly lighted, poorly heated and in- 
sufficiently ventilated old schoolhouse. 

I recommend that the above schoolhouse at Spiceland, Indiana, be 
condemned . for school purposes, the condemnation to go into effect June 
1, 1907, and that the Spiceland school authorities be ordered to make 
certain sanitary improvements for this winter. The following proclama- 
tion of condemnation is recommended: 

PROCLAMATION OF CONDEMNATION BY THE INDIANA STATE 

BOARD OF HEALTH, FOR PUBLIC SCHOOL PURPOSES, OF 

THE FRAME SCHOOLHOUSE AT SPICELAND, HENRY 

COUNTY, KNOWN AS THE SPICELAND ACADEMY. 

Whereas, It appears to the satisfaction of the Indiana State Board 
of Health in regular session July 13, 1906, that the frame schoolhouse 
belonging to the Spiceland Academy, situated in the town of Spiceland, 
Henry County, Indiana, and used for public school purposes in said town 
of Spiceland, is unsanitary, causing sickness among the pupils, and is 
unfit for school uses; therefoi'e it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned and it shall not be used 
for school purposes the coming school term of 1906 and 1907 unless the 
following improvements are made, to-wit: 

First. All windows shall be made easily movable for ventilation pur- 
poses and shall be provided with dark-colored shades, so light may be 
properly tempered. 



89 

Second. All stoves shall be provided with galvanized iron jackets 
and the unsanitary and dangerous jacketed stove arrangement in the hole 
beneath the building shall be abolished. It is recommended that a base- 
ment of proper size, with walls and cemented floor be made, supplied with 
efficient furnaces, taking air from the outside. 

Third. Decent outhouses shall be supplied for the sexes and shall 
be kept clean and decent, with good walks leading to them. And it is 
further 

Ordered, That, as the said schoolhouse at Spiceland, Heni-y County, 
Indiana, can not be made truly sanitary by repairs, and as the improve- 
ments ordered are merely temporary makeshifts intended to obviate the 
necessity of closing the school at Spiceland. Henry County, Indiana, the 
coming winter, therefore the said frame schoolhouse, belonging to the 
Spiceland Academy, at Spiceland, Henry County, Indiana, is finally and 
absolutely condemned for public school purposes and shall not be used 
for such purposes after July 1, 1907; and any board of school trustees, or 
any township trustee, or any school teacher, or any other person who 
shall violate this proclamation of condemnation and shall hold school in 
the said schoolhouse after July 1, 1907, shall be prosecuted in the courts 
of the State by the Attorney-General as in the statutes provided. 

Passed July 13, 1906. 

After discussion the above proclamation was unanimously 
passed as an order of the Board. 

REPORT OP INSPECTION OF THE SCHOOLHOUSE AT BMINETSTCE. 

By T, Victor Keene. 

May 31, 1906. 

Approaches. — The only approach to the school building is a gravel 
road. There are pieces of an old wooden sidewalk remaining, but the 
gravel road is the approach commonly used. This is a good roadway, 
hut in rainy weather it is certain to be muddy. The schoolhouse is 
located ten feet off this road. Leading from the road to the entrance of 
the building is a wooden walk about six feet wide and in fairly good 
repair. 

Grounds.^ — The ground is located on a high point, with excellent 
drainage. The entire area of the ground is about one acre. The build- 
ing is located on the roadside of the ground at about its center, thus 
dividing the ground into two play lots — one for the boys and one for the 
girls. It is fairly well sodded and well drained. On the grounds are two 
closets of the type ordinarily seen in country schoolhouses, but both are 
in a very dilapidated and dirty condition. One closet is 75 feet from the 
driven well, from which the water supply for the school is taken, but the 
dl-ainage from the closet is away from it instead of towards it. 

Description of School Building. — The schoolhouse is a two-story brick 
building, with brick foundation and no basement. The building occupies 
an area of about 50x25 feet, with a small hall in front, about 12x10 feet. 
The building is in a very dilapidated condition; the walls bulging, and 
in some places to such an extent that it can be readily seen with the 



90 

naked eye. Efforts have evidently been made from time to time to 
stregntlien the wealcened walls, for there are numerous bolts and braces 
present. The interior consists of four rooms, about 25x25 feet. The 
rooms are ail of the same dimension and general height. Each room has 
five windows, 2^x6 feet. The windows were in good condition, every 
window in the biiilding being easily raised and lowered, and the glass 
plates were all intact. Each room was heated by a stove, which was 
not surrounded by protective screen. I was told that in the winter time 
those children sitting near the stove suffered because of tne heat, while 
those far removed from the stove were always complaining of lack of 
heat. 

The blackboards in all the rooms were made by painting the plaster- 
ing with a heavy black enamel paint and were glossy and very hard on 
the eyes. In many places they were cracked and chipped. The ceilings 
were all of painted wood and were 15 feet high. The plastering on the 
side walls was loose and in many places had fallen off. The floors were 
all shaky and unsafe. In one room, owing to the bulging of the brick 
wall, the joists had slipped out of the sockets in the brick wall and the 
floor in that part of the room sagged three inches. In places the bricks 
in the wall were so loose that they could be picked out with the hand. 

The primary room was much too small. This room was about 25x25 
and accommodated 67 pupils. The seats were old fashioned straight- 
back ones, and owing to the bad condition of the floor many of the seats 
were not level; in some instances one of tlie seats would be two inches 
lower than the other, although the desk in front would be perfectly level. 
The desks were old and were of different sizes and models. This primary 
room was always overcrowded, according to the statement of the teacher. 
Treading from one side of this primary room was a cloaliroom, 18x6. The 
cloakroom did not have enough hoolis to accommodate the number ol 
pupils in the school. It was necessary for a child before entering the 
cloakroom to pass into the schoolroom, as the only entrance was by way 
of the schoolroom. This is a very bad condition. 

Although the roof had apparently been shingled very recently and 
was in good repair, the statement was made to me that eveiy time it 
rained or stormed water lealvcd into the room, and I know this to be a 
fact, because it was raining at the time the writer was inspecting the 
school, and in one portion of the rickety floor was a puddle of water, 
and water could be seen dripping down the wall. The blackboards in 
this room were in bad condition, being glazed. The seating capacity of 
"this room was much less than its floor area would seem to indicate, owing 
to the fact that the heating was by a stove.which caused a loss of con- 
siderable floor space. The other room on the ground floor was of much 
the same type as the one just described — had tlie same glazed black- 
boards, the same number of windows and window arrangement, the same 
heating plan, the same variety of desks, the same cloaliroom arrangement, 
except that the area of this cloakroom was about 12x0 and contained a 
small round window about 18 inches m diameter. Only 30 pupils are in 
this room, it being used for pupils from eight to flfteen years of age. 
This room was in a worse condition than the one previously described, 
for the reason that the floor was less solid and the brick wall less safe. 



91 

It would have been a very simple matter to have picked out part of the 
wall with the hands, the bricks were so loose. 

Halls. — From the downstairs hall a set of winding- steps about six- 
feet wide lead to the second story. This stairway was solid, but in case 
of tire, if there would be any resulting panic, it is hard to see how It 
would be possible to avoid injury to pupils on this stairway. It is, how- 
ever, well lighted. 

On the second floor there are two rooms of the same size as the ones 
just described. 

Water Suppl3^ — The teacher of the school informed me that all the 
drinking water used Avas obtained from a driven well, which is said to be 
101 feet deep. There were no water buckets or cups at all in the school, 
the children going to the well and drinking freshly drawn water. There 
were two cups on chains attached to the pump. 

Surroundings. — There are no houses nearer than 250 feet. 

Managing Board. — Mr. J. C. Blunk, of Littlepoint, is trustee, and 
Mr. H. A. Blunk and H. K. Lee, of Hall, R. R. No. 2, are the members of 
the Board of Education. 

Local Feeling. — There seemed to be considerable local feeling against 
the use of the building. Several citizens told me that whenever a storm 
came up they immediately went to the schoolhouse and removed their 
children; that in several instances the teacher had taken it upon himself 
to dismiss the school because of a storm. Mr. H. A. Blunk, a member 
of the Board, stated that it was his desire to repair the building to such 
an extent as to make it safe, which he admitted was not the case at the 
present time, and to then, later, if possible, secure the abandonment of 
several small district schools by uniting them into one large school, and 
then erecting a modern building at an expense of from $16,000 to $20,000. 
Mr. J. C. Blunk, Trustee, would not express an opinion regarding the 
situation. He admitted that the building was unsafe, but seemed to 
think the building could be repaired and made so. He stated that he 
personally did not think it advisable to repair the building for at least 
a year, for it could probably be done cheaper later than at the present 
time. However, he expressed himself as perfectly willing to do anything 
that seemed desirable. Mr. H. K. Lee did not exprss any opinion. 

This schoolhouse is the property of the township, and the township 
will be the body that will have to build a new building or repair the old 
one. The township at this time is nearly out of debt, according to the 
statement of the Trustee, and is in a position financially to do anything 
which may bfe indicated. 

I recommend that this building be condemned, as in my judgment it 
is impractical to attempt to repair it. 

After discussion this school' building at Eminence Avas con- 
demned. 



92 

REPORT OF INVESTIGATION OF TYPHOID FEVER EPIDEMIC 
AT GREENCASTLE. 

By Dr. Helene Knabe. 

The undersigned was sent to Greencastle, Indiana, April 10, to investi- 
gate an epidemic of typhoid fever which has appeared there. 

Upon my arrival I conferred immediately with Dr. W. M. McGaughey 
and Dr. Hutcheson, the local and county Health Officers. Fifteen cases 
had been reported, one of whom had died April 7. The majority of the 
cases were children, some in school, others below six years. Only a few 
adults were sick at the time. 

There were a few cases known to have a little fever during the pre- 
ceding weeks, but none of them had been diagnosed typhoid fever. The 
physicians in whose practice the cases occurred gave me their addresses 
and I obtained specimens of blood from all of them. I was also fortunate 
in meeting four persons who had not been under a physician's care at 
all, but in every case enough of a history could be obtained to suspect 
typhoid fever, and here also I took blood for Widal tests. Other cases 
had been diagnosed lagrippe, nervousness, remittent fever, etc. 

Of the twenty-two specimens of blo'^od to which I applied the Widal 
test every one showed a pronounced reaction, thus clearly demonsti'ating 
that the infection is now widespread in Greencastle. 

The universal belief among the citizens of Greencastle was that the 
infection had come through milk obtainea from the Forrest Hill Dairy, 
owned by Mr. J. W. Lemmink. Two sons of this family were sick for a 
short time in March, though not diagnosed typhoid fever, and as most 
of the patients had been taking mill?; from this dairy they suspected it 
first of all. Careful consideration of the circumstances, however, seems 
to show that a cause other than milk was at work here, for some of the 
families in which typhoid fever has appeared use no milk; others do not 
get it from the Forrest Hill Dairy. 

An investigation of the sanitary conditions in Greencastle reveals de- 
fects enough to account for the spread of typhoid fever, or any other in- 
fectious disease. The town has about 5,000 inhabitants and its location 
is near the river. Part of the streets are macadam and reasonably dry; 
others are not improved and in very bad condition. 

Greencastle has no sewer and many dwellings are provided with 
surface privies, which do not often require cleaning, since after a rain 
the soft earth absorbs nearly all of their contents; at the same time water 
appeal's m many a cellar in town. Not infrequently I found people who 
stated that their cellars were damp during the greater part of the year. 

The cleaning of streets is not given sufficient attention. Many of 
the alleys are in a very bad condition, for instance, the alley on Vine 
street, behind W. L. Deuman's property, is a regular dumping gi-ound. 
Center street, bordering the campus of De Pauw University, is strewn 
with all kinds of filth. On Water street, very near to the point where 
it crosses Washington street, I saw a large accumulation of waste from 
a grocery store, decaying vegetables, etc. Besides these places mentioned 
there are many others equally as bad. ■= 

Very unsanitary is a contrivance which I now wish to describe. A 



93 

part of the hotels aud residences are supplied with cesspools, from which 
a line of tiling is laid, eventually di-aiuing at some point in an open gutter 
on the streets. These drains in warm weather give rise to a condition 
that is no credit to any town. The day of my visit to these places was 
cool and damp, and the heavy ram had washed away most of the con- 
tents of these cesspools, still there hovered the strong odor of urine about 
the outlets of the drains. Residents of the place declared it was not at 
all uncommon during the summer, after a rain sufficient to overflow the 
cesspools, to find their contents lying in the gutter, covered with flies and 
emitting a most unpleasant odor. 

One place standing in sore need of betterment is in the rear of 
Florence Hall, which is used for a boai'ding house for De Pauw students. 
The untidy back porch, with its dirty uncovered barrel, half filled with 
waste from the kitchen; the outhouse a short distance away, which drains 
its foul contents into a shallow ravine after a rainfall, where a tiny 
stream of water washes away some of the tilth, to distribute it where 
the ravine extends in the immediate vicinity of dwellings; these are con- 
ditions which, if not changed very soon, will surely give trouble in the 
coming warm season. There are also several cesspools in this location. 
One of them is leaky, the seepage appearing on the slope at the side of 
the ravine; the other two were filled to the brim, when I saw the place, one 
of them having run over the week before on account of heavy rains. 

An old well is also to be found in this vicinity. The brick with 
which it is built over is crumbling away, aud as it is on the level with 
the grass, with no railing there to hinder any one from walking right 
into it, there is reason to suppose that some one may come to his death 
by drowning. The well should at least be fenced in. 

"Water Supplies. — Greencastle receives a large part of its water from 

water works. The filters are laid in the bed of Creek. A large 

open well receives the filtered water. From here it is pumped into a 
standpipe over thirty feet high, and thence passes into the general pipe 
system. The water has been of good quality until a year ago, when it 
began to be muddy after heavy rains. Nothing was done, however, to 
get at the root of the trouble. Since the present epidemic of typhoid fevei 
appeared the Health Officer sent some of the water to the State Labora- 
tory and the examination showed the water to be badly polluted. 

When I visited the water works I noticed that there was an intake 
from the creek. I suggested that there might be the source of the trouble. 
The engineer stated that it was sealed, however, but when the water in 
the creek was high he could see the muddy water come in from the filter, 
an evidence that the filter was damaged. 

At the present time I am certain of 37 cases, four of which may be 
accounted for by direct contact, because they developed subsequently to 
nursing a patient in their house. In eleven instances two cases occurred 
in the same family, but seven of them came so near together that I could 
not positively determine whether or not one of the patients had been in- 
fected from the other. I am inclined to believe the infection in the ma- 
jority of these cases occurred at the same time. In one family three 
cases occurred at the same time. Two of the little patients are in school; 
the oldest sister, age sixteen, at home. These three cases were diagnosed 



94 

as remittent fever. I did not liave a chance to get blood from the younger 
children, and they are not included in the above number. If the state- 
ment of the attending physician — "all three had the same trouble" — is to 
be taken as correct, the number of cases rises to thirty-nine, for the blood 
of the older sister gave a positive Widal reaction. Three other cases of 
whom I was unable to get any blood on account of temporary absence 
were children, two of whom had been with their mother in Muncie four 
or five weeks ago and when there a short time became sick. The diag- 
nosis was "indigestion." Now the mother is in bed with fever and her 
blood shows positive Widal reaction. (Mrs. Maxwell.) The third case is 
Mrs. Detro's little boy. She stated that he had been sickly and is now 
very anemic. Mrs. Detro has been under a physician's care for "nervous- 
ness." Her blood shows also a typhoid reaction. 

Of thirty-nine cases (omitting the three last mentioned) twenty-four 
have the city water as their house supply and seven drink it every day in 
school. Four cases, including the deceased, had their places of employ- 
ment down town, and probably used the city water there. In six of the 
houses where typhoid fever is now present the water supply is from a 
dug well; in three cases cistern water is used. 

The first case which appeared this winter was that of a teamster, 
Mr. GladweU, and he stated that he had been drinking almost anywhere 
around the country, from little ditches, etc., so that there is a probability 
of his having been infected outside of the city. The other case, Irving 
Brown, age seven, at watercress which he and several boy friends were 
picking at a branch outside of the city. This branch of water is known 
to receive sewage, and the child fell ill on the fourteenth day after eating 
the cress. 

Taking it altogether, the water and general unsanitary conditions 
seem to me the most potent factors causing this epidemic. 

Summary — 

Number of cases reported 15 

Cases diagnosed by Widal reaction 22 

— 37 
Remittent fever (see above) 2 

Total 39 

INSPECTION OF DAIRIES AT GREENCASTLE. 

In connection with the investigation of the epidemic of typhoid fever 
at Greencastle I inspected the following dairies: 

De Pauw farm dairy, owned by Mr. Hariy Nugent and Dr. Bence. 
This dairy does not supply many customers; ten milk cows are kept. The 
stable is not very well arranged, providing also shelter for the horses. 
The floor on which the cows stand is covered with boards; waUs and ceil- 
ings are not as clean -as they ought to be. The stable also held many 
chickens. The water is used for washing the, cans and is taken from a 
spring. This spring is covered by a small stone house. Bottles a^nd milk 
cans are kept outside. 



95 

Dairy of Mr. Sidener: Thirty-five cows. The bam floor is partly 
wood and partly clay, which was very soft on the day of my visit. I hap- 
pened to get there dui-ing milking time. Neither the man who did the 
milking nor the cows did look very clean. The milk can was kept in the 
stable during milking time. Harness and other utensils were hanging in 
the same barn. One cow was sick, probably hurt, having horned itself a 
week before with other cows. 

Dairy belonging to Mr. Paul Tucker: Twenty-five cows. Barnyard 
very dirty. The- dung from the stables had not been hauled away for 
several weeks and was heaped up around the barn so that it was trouble- 
some to get inside without wading through it. The cows did not look 
very clean, neither did the inside of the stable. The milk is taken into 
the house, down a small, dingy stairway into a kitchen in the basement. 
There it is strained and filled into cans or bottles. This kitchen was 
clean when I saw the place. The trough around the cistern pump con- 
tained chloride of lime. Filtered cistern water is used for cleaning and 
scalding cans, etc. 

Forest Hill dairy, owned by J. W. Lemmink: On account of the 
suspicion which people had regarding the spread of typhoid fever from 
this place I made a thorough examination of the whole place. The dairy 
is several miles away from town, in the open country, with buildings 
situated on a little hill. A large barn accommodates the cows. About 
one-quarter is utilized for the horses, but they are far removed from the 
cows, and between them is a high board wall. The floor is made of clay 
and is diy and hard. A wooden gutter behind the cows is kept very 
clean, and everything is in good condition. I saw this dairy at milking 
time, and dare say it was done in the cleanest way in which I have yet 
observed. The air in the stable, both doors of which were open, was 
very good, and the cows were very clean. Mrs. Lemmink, who did the 
milking, used a two-quart cup to receive the milk. When half filled this 
was emptied into a bucket which stood covered in the barn door. The 
straining was done on the side porch, where a table, bottle rack, etc., 
were provided for this purpose. Cans, strainer, etc., as well as the table 
and small tubs in which the bottles were scalded, were scrupulously 
clean. Some of the bottles were kept in the bottle rack, mouth down- 
ward, others in boxes provided with oilcloth cover, and all very clean. 

The milk is rich and of good quality, as shown by the examination 
made in the Laboratory of Hygiene, which showed 5 per cent. fat. The 
house in which Mr. Lemmink and his family live is old, but the rooms are 
kept clean and tidy. A privy vault at the side of the house opposite from 
the porch where the milk is handled is not in good condition, and Mr. 
Lemmink stated that he was preparing to remove it and make a new 
one further away. Its drainage does not come near the house, nor could 
it go into the spring from which the water is used. This spring is quite 
a distance from the house and also from the barn, but some seepage from 
the barnyard is evidently getting into it, as shown by analysis of the 
water which was made a short time ago in the Laboratory of Hygiene. 
When I saw the place the barnyard was clean and dry. Mr. Lemmink 
stated that the coavs were kept in the barn only at. milking time, except 
in very cold winter. One case of typhoid fever occurred in this house 



96 

two years ago; other cases have been found in town more or less at all 
times. There were also several cases in town before the two children, 
Charles and Lawrence, were sick this winter. Both children had no 
symptoms to make any one suspect typhoid fever, and as Dr. Hutcheson, 
who is the family physician, veriiied the statements made by Mr. and 
Mrs. Lemmink in every particular I have no doubt that they were true. 
Dr. Hutcheson's books showed that he was called only once, because the 
children were sick vnth acute symptoms, having had a very hearty meal 
the day before, and twice after that time some members of the family 
came to the doctor's office for medicine. 

There is, of course, no doubt that both of the children had a mild 
case of typhoid fever, because their blood gave a positive reaction to the 
Widal test 

The foregoing investigations I have carried out to the best of my 
ability, taking great care not to be biased by any opinion advanced by 
persons with whom I came in contact. 

HELBNE KNABE, M. D. 

Renewal of Permits. — After consideration of applications, the 
rene^val of permits to the J. T. Polk Co., Greenwood, and to the 
plants of the American Tin Plate Company at Elwood, Ander- 
son, Mnncie and Gas City, were ordered, and the Secretary was 
directed to notify the parties concerned. 

It was ordered that H. E. Barnard should represent the Board 
at the iN'ational Association of State Dairy and Pood Depart- 
ments, to be held at Hartford, Conn., July IT, 18, 19, 20, 1906, 
his expenses to be allowed. 



FOURTH QUARTER. 



EEGULAR MEETING OF THE STATE BOARD OF 

HEALTH. 

' October 12, 1906. 

THE AFFAIRS OF THE FOURTH FISCAL QUARTER AND OF THE 

THIRD STATISTICAL OR CALENDAR QUARTER 

CONSIDERED. 

Called to order by President Davis at 2 :30 p. m. 
Present : Drs. Davis, McCoy, Tucker, Wisbard, Hnrty. 
Minutes of last regular meeting of July 13, 1906, read and 
approved. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 

I bave to report that the work of tbe various departments bas 
gone on without interruption and without friction during the 
quarter. 

The Secretary made- twenty visits during the quarter, as fol- 
lows : 

July 2, Spiceland, on account of inspection of schoolhouse, at 
request of citizens. 

July 9, Frankfort, account of inspection of tuberculosis condi- 
tions and conference with city Health Officer. 

July 25, South Bend, account of tuberculosis exhibit and lec- 
ture to public audiences. 

July 30, Kennard, account of inspection of schoolhouse, at 
request of citizens. 

July 31, Petersburg, on account of inspection of schoolhouse, at 
request of citizens. 

August 6, Kokomo, to meet the County Superintendent and 
Trustees of the county to consider the subject of school hygiene. 

August 8, Greensburg, on account of tuberculosis exhibit, and 
to lecture to Teachers' Institute and to public audiences at night. 

7-Bd.of HeaUh. (97) 



98 

August 20, Decatur, on account of tuberculosis exhibit and to 
lecture to Teachers' Institute, and to lecture to popular audience 
at night. 

August 27, Merom, to lecture before the Merom Chautauqua 
upon the subject of "The Prevention of Disease." 

August 30, 'New Castle, to consider school hygiene before the 
Teachers' Institute, and to meet the County Superintendent and 
Trustees. 

September 5, jSToblesville, to lecture before the County Teach- 
ers' Institute upon the subject of "School Hygiene," and inspect 
schoolhouse. 

September 7, Monticello, to lecture before the County Teachers' 
Institute and meet with the County Superintendent and Trus- 
tees to consider school hygiene' 

September 16, Ottawa, 111., to visit the Ottawa Tent Colony, 
and to study the outdoor treatment of tuberculosis as practiced at 
that place. 

September 20, Madison, on account of tuberculosis exhibit, and 
to make public lecture on the subject. 

September 25, Columbia City, to appear before the AVhitley 
County Medical Society, read a paper upon "The Prevention of 
Disease," and to deliver a public lecture in the evening. 

September 26, Peru, to lecture upon the work of the Board of 
Health and the prevention of disease before the Y. M. C. A. 

September 28, Richmond, to meet Prof. Sackett and Dr. Davis 
to consider the proposed employment of Prof. Sackett to make a 
sanitary survey of White River. 

October 2, Rochester, to meet with the Fulton County Medical 
Society to present the subject of "Disease Prevention," and to 
lecture in the evening upon the "Prevention and Cure of Tuber- 
culosis" before a popular audience. 

October 8, Muncie, to lecture before the State Charities Confer- 
ence upon the subject of "Tuberculosis." 

" October 10, Muncie, to read a paper before the Indiana State 
Federation of Women's Clubs, title, "What Can the Federation 
Do to Help Forward the Public Health AVork." 

October 11, Winona, to read a paper before the Women'^ Fed- 
eration of Literary Clubs, title, "Tuberculosis; Its Prevention and 
Cure." 



99 

TUBERCULOSIS. MEETING AT SOUTH BEND. 

On July 25, upon invitation of the St. Joseph Medical Society 
and the health authorities of South Bend, I visited that place, 
carrying with me the tuberculosis exhibit of the Board. Upon 
arrival said exhibit was promptly put into position, and at 
2 o'clock a lecture upon the "Prevention of Disease" was delivered 
to an audience of about five hundred persons. In the evening 
the exhibit was visited by one thousand persons, and when gath- 
ered in the audience chamber I made an illustrated address upon 
the ''Cure of Tuberculosis in the Incipient Stage." The following 
day, July 26, another audience inspected the exhibit and further 
addresses were made. The South Bend daily papers published 
full accounts of the meeting and the addresses, and gave editorials 
upon the subject. It is believed that this visit was attended with 
good results, and was many times worth the work and expense 
given to it. 

SCHOOLHOUSE AT KENNARD. 

The school building at Ivennard was condemned by the State 
Board of Health last fall, and the authorities were in dispute as to 
the location of the new building. The controversy ran high, and 
at last all concerned agreed to abide by the decision of the 
Secretary. Accordingly I visited the place, met the committees of 
citizens, inspected the various proposed sites, and made my recom- 
mendations. I have since learned that a second compromise was 
effected, and the old site was adopted. 

PETERSBURG SCHOOLHOUSE. 

The schoolhouse at Petersburg is brick, a very old structure, and 
unsanitary in every respect. The people of the city know this to 
be true. Several letters were received from citizens asking the 
State Board of Health to make inspection of the building. All 
of these represented that the majority of the patrons were afraid 
of the present schoolhouse because of its cracked walls and general 
unsafe condition, and also because it was unsanitary. They were 
told to petition the State Board of Health in regard to the build- 
ing to show that the people were in favor of action. Accordingly 
the following petitions were received. The first one was dated 
May 11, the second August 3, accompanied by a letter signed 
by the Treasurer and Secretary of the School Board: 



100 

PETITION. 

Petersburg, May 11, 190G. 
State Board of Health: 

Gentlemen— We, the undersigued patrons ot the Petersburg public 
school, do hereby petition you to visit this place and malve an examina- 
tion of the school buildings here. In our judgment the building is unsafe 
and unsanitary and should be condemned, 

DR. T. W. BASINGER, 
Ex-Secy. County Board of H., and 69 others. 

Petersburg, August 7, 1906. 

We are enclosing you a certified copy of the petition gotten up here 
in the last few days relative to the building of a new schoolhouse. Mr. 
Nichols, president of the School Board, is out of town and will not be 
home for ten days. His absence accounts for his not joining us in the 
affidavit herewith attached. 

The original petition is liept here to file with the clerk of the town, 
to which officer you are referred if you deem it advisable for further in- 
formation. The petition is to be brought before the^Town Board for the 
purpose of securing a permit in accordance with the law to proceed to the 
erection of a school building. 

In the last town election there were 189 votes polled. Since then, 
owing to the closing down of the glass factory, about eighty voters have 
gone from here, leaving at this time about 409 voters in the corporation. 
As you will observe, there are 851 signatures to the petition, making 
almost 86 per cent of the present voting population of the town. Some 
voters are out of town and were not canvassed. In all there are not more 
than twelve or fifteen voters in the corporation opposed to the plans of the 
School Board, and they are under the direct influence of interested parties. 

J. R. CHEW, Treasurer. 

H. H. TISI.OW, Secretary. 

PETITION. 

Petersburg, August 3, 1906. 
We, the undersigned taxpayers and patrons of the Petersburg, In- 
diana, public schools, knowing the unsanitary and dangerous condition of 
the public school buildings in said town, and fuither knowing the said 
school buildings are inadequate to properly accommodate the large num- 
ber of school children in said town, hereby ask that a new and com- 
modious school building be erected at the earliest possible date. 

I. H. LAMAR, M. D., and 350 others. 

On account of these petitions the Secretary visited Petersburg 
on July 31. A delegation of citizens, headed by the members of 
the School Board just named, and accompanied by the entire 
town board, accompanied the Secretary to the building. A very 
casual inspection shows it to be unsafe, for the walls on every side* 



101 

are cracked. It is braced with iron rods running tbrough the 
building from all four directions. The floors are in bad repair, 
every room improperly lighted, insufficiently ventilated, and in- 
sufficiently warmed. The stairway leading to the upper story is 
boxed part of the way, narrow and steep. It is unnecessary to 
here detail the size of the rooms with the lighting facilities, be- 
cause the whole building is so bad from every point of view. 
There are closets for the sexes in the basement which are hardly 
possible. They have cemented floors, but are dimly lighted by 
windows which enter just above the ground level. The entrances 
to said closets are from the rear of the building, and the children 
must walk from the front around the building to use them. As 
said above, every feature of this building is unsanitary, and it is 
also unsafe. I, therefore, urgently recommend its absolute con- 
demnation for school purposes. The building is occupied at this 
time, has had some repairs and further bracing, and it perhaps 
would be best not to close the building, but to let it be used this 
winter, and to pass an order of condemnation to take effect June 
1, 190Y. It is to be regretted that the petition could not be 
attended to sooner. Had it been possible for the Secretary to 
make the survey soon after the first petition was received, which 
was May 11, the condemnation might have been early enough 
to secure a new building for this winter. 

KOKOMO. 

On August 6 I visited Kokomo to meet the County Superin- 
tendent and Trustees of the county to consider the subject of 
school hygiene. Two hours work was consumed in discussing 
what could be done to better the sanitary surroundings of the 
school children in the country schools of Howard County. The 
fact in regard to the prevalence of imperfect vision in school 
children was presented, and a sample of Snellen's vision chart was 
shown. The Trustees were urged to purchase a supply of these 
charts, and to direct their teachers to watch the children closely 
and examine the eyes of all who wrinkled their foreheads when 
looking at their books and who would be discovered glancing at 
their work at various angles. They were urged also to require 
that the teachers examine the ears of children who seemed dull 



102 

and would ask to have questions repeated. The Trustees were 
unanimous that thej would attend to this. Further recommenda- 
tions were given in regard to ventilation and lighting the school- 
rooms, also in regard to keeping them clean. Prof. E. E, Roby, 
County Superintendent, formulated the recommendations in writ- 
ing, and they were agreed to by all present. I am confident this 
conference with the Trustees of Howard County was attended 
with excellent results. 

Meeting of County Commissioners. — Einding that the County 
Commissioners were in session, I called upon them with the 
secretary, Dr. R. H. Smith. In a general conversation upon the 
care of the public health the facts of the relations of the County 
Board to the work were fully brought out. All three of the Com- 
missioners were deeply interested, and a formal meeting of the 
County Board of Health was called. An order was issued au- 
thorizing the County Officer to have circulars printed upon the 
prevention of various diseases and circulated throughout the 
county. An order was also passed that the Secretary should also 
employ a deputy when necessary for the disinfection of houses 
which had been occupied b}^ cases of infectious diseases. It is 
certainly true that this conference with the County Health Board 
resulted in much good. 

GREBNSBURG. 

On account of an invitation from the Decatur County Medical 
Society and the County Superintendent of Schools, I visited 
Greensburg August 8. Dr. Knabe accompanied me to aid in the 
management and presentation of the tuberculosis exhibit. We 
had two meetings, one in the afternoon and one in the evening. 
The tuberculosis exhibit was placed in position in one of the 
large rooms of the high school building, and during the day was 
visited by several hundred citizens and all of the teachers, num- 
bering 210. A lecture upon school hygiene was delivered before 
the teachers in the afternoon ; and in the evening, the hall being 
crowded and overflowing, an illustrated lecture upon tuberculosis 
was given. A vote of thanks was offered for the instructions, and 
also a vote of confidence and approval of the general work of 
the State Board of Health. 



103 

DECATUR. 

I visited Decatur August 20 in answer to an invitation of the 
citizens of the city and the eonnty superintendent. The tuber- 
culosis exhibit was taken along and placed in position in the 
If dure room of a church where the teachers' meetings were held. 
This exhibit was visited by several hundred citizens and all of 
the teachers. In the afternoon a lecture upon school hygiene was 
delivered before the institute, and in the evening a popular illus- 
trated lecture upon the prevention and cure of tuberculosis. The 
audiences in both instances were large. In the evening all who 
applied could not be admitted. As in former instances of this 
kind, resolutions of thanks and confidence and approval of the 
work of the State Board of Health were passed. 

MEROM. 

On August 22 I visited Merom, Sullivan County, to lecture 
upon disease prevention and the public health at the Merom 
Chautauqua, This Chautauqua Assembly has become quite cele- 
brated. The grounds are situated on the east bank of the Wabash 
River, overlooking vast areas of beautiful country, the Wabash 
being visible in its windings for many miles. It is a beauti- 
ful spot, and a fit place in which to study the questions which are 
usually presented at assemblies of this kind. The audience num- 
bered about fifteen hr.ndred, and close attention was given to the 
teachings which were offered. 

NEW CASTLE. 

August 30 I visited 'New Castle to address the annual Teachers' 
Institute upon the subject of school hygiene and the general pre- 
vention of disease. The conference was held in the court room of 
the county court house. Two huildred and fifteen teachers were 
present, and probably one hundred citizens. The address, which 
was along the usual lines, was well received, and a warm resolution 
of thanks was passed. 

NOBLESVILLE. 

September 5 I went to ISToblesville to lecture upon school 
hygiene and tlie general prevention of disease before the County 
Teachers' Institute. Over three hundred teachers were present 



104 

and a number of citizens. This is the third time the Secretary 
has been invited to l^oblesville, and he thinks this indicates that 
the people of that coimty have become deeply interested in dis- 
ease prevention work. Much of this interest is undoubtedly due to 
the work of Dr. F. A. Tucker, who has persistently made known 
to the public the advantages to be derived from the ounce of 
prevention. Close attention was given to the lecture, and a resolu- 
tion of thanks was passed. 

The Britton Schoolhouse. — This schoolhouse is in Delaware 
Township, Hamilton County. I visited this schoolhouse to make 
a survey of the same in company with Dr. F, A. Tucker, Septem- 
ber 5. 

Site.— The site is satisfactory, having good natural drainage 
but no artificial drainage, which hardly seems necessary. 

Building. — The building is an old dilapidated frame, stone 
foimdation, no basement, and only one room. This room is 
30 X 24 feet. It contains 48 desks and has^an enrollment of lY. 
The floor is bad : ceiling is broken in places, and has fallen off ; 
no cloakroom ; heated by stoves ; ventilation only by windows and 
doors ; roof is in bad condition. Windows are six in number, 
three on each side, and furnish sufficient light, but are objection- 
able on account of cross-lights. The chimney is cracked and rests 
upon the joists which support ceiling. The chimney is unsafe. 
Further evidence in dilapidation lies in the fact that the paper is 
coming off. 

Outhouses.— These are separate for the sexes, but dilapidated, 
and in places in awful condition. 

Conclusion.— This schoolhouse is unfit for school purposes, and 
I recommend that it be condemned. 

MONTICELLO. 

September 7 I went to Monticello to lecture before the Coimty 
Teachers' Institute. The meeting was held in the audience room 
of the high school building. Early in the spring the old high 
school building at Monticello was abandoned, thus necessitating 
the construction of a new one. The new building is beautiful, 
well built, and every attention has been given to sanitary features. 
The audience numbered over three hundred, and the usual lecture 



105 

was received with attention and respect, and the usual vote of 
thanks was passed, containing a clause expressing confidence in 
the work of the State Board of Health and approval of what it 
had done. 

OTTAWA, ILL. 

I visited Ottawa, 111., September 16, in order to become 
acquainted with the work being carried on there in the cure of 
tuberculosis in the Ottawa Tent Colony. This institution was 
founded three years ago by the Illinois State Medical Society in 
order to make plain to the people that incipient tuberculosis was 
curable in the climate of this region. The institution started 
with three patients, an ordinary frame dwelling for an adminis- 
tration building and an old frame structure for surgical and 
general purposes. In three years the institution has grown until 
there is now found upon this beautiful site a large administra- 
tion building, which cost thirty thousand dollars, and seventy-five 
tents, all arranged in streets. The site of the colony is on the 
high western banks of the Illinois River. The view from the 
administration porches is very beautiful. The winding river and 
the fertile bottoms to the north and woods and meadows to the 
south. The grounds are laid out with curved paths and flower- 
beds, and the shrubbery has been tastefully placed. Dr. J. W. 
Pettit is the presiding genius, and is aided by Dr. Butterfield. 
There Avere fifty-seven patients at the time of my visit, and five 
nurses. The treatment of the patients is the well known out-door 
life, with an abundance of plain, well cooked food given at 
regular intervals and under rational directions. 

The bathhouse, which is a separate building, furnishes every 
facility required in such a building. Life is entirely out of doors, 
the tents simply sheltering the patients from the dews and rain. 
At night when they are in bed the flaps at both ends are opened, 
and the air blows over their faces and their bodies all night. 
All tents have wooden floors and are very simple and plainly 
furnished. Dr. Pettit is a master in this work, for he has built 
up this institution from nothing until it has become known all 
over the United States as one of the best conducted and most 
successful of private sanatoriums for consumptives. I secured sets 
of blanks used at this institution, also took copious notes in regard 



106 

to the management of patients and in regard to diet, entertain- 
ments, and the various points used in the cure of the disease. This 
visit was most satisfactory, and the benefit derived can not be 
expressed in a few words. 

MADISON. 

In conjunction with Dr. Geo. T. McCoy I visited Madison 
September 20 in order to hold a tuberculosis symposium. The 
tuberculosis exhibit was carried along, and was shown in one of 
the rooms of the high school building. Many hundred people 
visited the exhibit, and T)y. McCoy and myself explained its 
various features. Addresses were delivered in the afternoon and 
the evening. In the afternoon the audience was small, but atten- 
tive and appreciative. In the evening it was large and overflowing 
the high school. It is certain that this visit to Madison was 
attended with good results. Many citizens expressed their ap- 
proval and offered their services in procuring proper legislation 
in pushing onward the general health cause. 



COLUMBIA CITY. 

In response to a cordial invitation from the Whitley County 
Medical Society, I visited Columbia City on September 25. In 
the afternoon I read a paper before the Society entitled, "The 
Preparation of Antitoxins, Methods of Purification and I^otes 
Upon Its Administration." The paper was given mostly to a con- 
sideration of diphtheria antitoxin. Its history was perfectly re- 
viewed, and its preparation was entered into quite minutely. 
Special attention was given to the purification and concentration 
of the remedy as discovered and invented by Dr. Gibson of the 
New York Board of Health. The notes upon the administration 
were kindly received and thoroughly discussed. In the evening, 
under the auspices of the society, a public meeting was held in 
the Methodist Church, where I gave my usual illustrated lecture 
upon the prevention and cure of tuberculosis. Close and appre- 
ciative attention was given, and a cordial vote of thanks was 
passed. * 



107 

PERU. 

On September 26 T visited Peru to deliver an illustrated lecture 
upon ''Tuberculosis ; Its Prevention and Cure" before the Y. M. 
C. A. I was greeted bv a large audience, which filled the hall to 
suffocation. Tlie effort was certainly appreciated, for a iinani- 
nions vote of thanks was passed, and several speakers offered con- 
gratulations and confidence upon the work which was being done 
by the State Board of Health. 

RICHMOND. 

I went to Pichmond September 28 to confer with President 
Davis and Prof. Sackett in regard to making a sanitary survey 
of White Piver. The object of the survey was to determine the 
degTee and amount of pollution which this stream receives, so 
that authoritative data could be presented to the coming Legis- 
lature in regard to the matter. 

Upon arrival I first met Dr. Geo. H. Grant, County Health 
Officer, who expressed himself as highly concerned in regard to 
the typhoid existing in the city. He reported seventeen cases in 
September, and at the time of the visit there were eight in the 
City Hospital. Many mild cases had existed, as was proved by 
blood examinations made in the State Laboratory. Mr. Barnard, 
Chemist of the Board, had visited at Pichmond and made a survey 
of the water works, and numerous analyses were made, and his 
report is inserted herewith. A review of this report shows that 
the Gorman gallery had certainly received water from the river. 
Subsequent examinations by workmen discovered a large hole, 
probably four inches in diameter, leading through the bank, thus 
confirming the work of the chemist. This hole was stopped up, 
and appropriate cement walls built along the river's edge at the 
said gallery. This has completely shut off the river, and analyses 
since these improvements show the gallery water to be without 
fault. It is now believed that the Richmond supply is satisfactory 
in every respect. It is very probable that not a little of the 
typhoid was spread by the public water ; yet it is certain that very 
many cases were caused by polluted wells. Together with Dr. 
Grant I visited the homes of six of the patients lying in the 
hospital with the fever. All of these homes might well be termed 



108 

typhoid homes. They all had shallow wells with dirty back- 
yards, and open, reeking outhouses. ISTone of the families were of 
that degree of cleanliness and neatness which is necessary to 
keep typhoid at a distance. While two of the patients whose 
homes were visited might have secured their disease from the 
public water supply, it is more than probable that they caught it 
at home. . ' 

In the evening, with Dr. Davis, I called upon Dr. Charles Bond, 
City Health Officer, and there the typhoid situation . was thor- 
oughly considered. Reports of the facts obtainable, together with 
the opinions of several physicians, pointed to the conclusion that 
the outbreak had passed its height and was now on the decline. 
It has not been deemed necessary to recommend to the people 
that the water from the public water supply be boiled, because 
only one of the galleries was found to be suspicious, and the 
source of its supply was so quickly corrected. 

It was arranged with Prof. Sackett to commence the survey 
of White River as soon as he possibly could, and he would be 
paid from the general funds of the Board at the rate of $250 
per month. 

REPORT OP EXAMINATION OF THE RICHMOND WATER SUPPLY. 
H. E. Barnard, Chemist. 

In response to a request from Dr. T. Henry Davis, health officer of 
the city of Richmond, and Howard Dill, superintendent of the Richmond 
Water Works Company, on August 27, 1906, I visited the various sources 
. of supply, collected suitable samples for chemical and microscopical analy- 
sis. The results of the examination are as foUows: 

The water supply of the city of Richmond is furnished by the Rich- 
mond Water Works Company, and- consists of a double system, employing 
both direct pressure on the mains and gravity system with reservoir. 
The water is taken from two sources, one the Cooper well, so called, and 
the other a chain of gallery wells sunk along the bank of the East Fork 
of the Whitewater at varying distances from the river. 

THE COOPER WELL. 

The Cooper well is situated near the center of a natural basin having 
a watershed two and one-half square miles in area. This watershed is 
largely cultivated land, and consists of several farms, each with a group 
of buildings, and has an approximate population of thirty persons' and a 
large number of cattle and hogs. None of the farm yards or buildings 
are nearer than forty rods, and none are so located that drainage flows 



109 

in the direction of the well. The well consists of ti large bricked basin 
covered and protected. The basin is about twenty feet deep and fifteen 
feet in diameter, and contains normally ten or twelve feet of water. The 
well is sunk in a bed of gravel overlaid with two feet of black loam. The 
gravel is fine and the bed evidently covers the entire area of the water- 
shed, and is, in fact, a large natural filtei-. The well is supplied with 
water from this gravel bed. a surface or shallow well water derived from 
the rains falling- upon the watershed and modified by slow filtration and 
oxidation of organic matter. The temperature of the water is nearly con- 
stant at 52 degrees P. throughout the year. An analysis of the water 
shows a normal water containing a small amount of iron, which slowly 
precipitates when the water is exposed to light and air. Tathogenic and 
sewage bacteria are absent. The water from the Cooper well flows l)y 
gravity through a 16-inch pipe to the pumping station, being carried over 
the eight feet of elevation at the crest of the. basin by a syphon, and there 
enters a receiving basin, is mixed with gallery water and pumped directly 
to the mains, the overflow going to the reservoir 

THE WHITE GALLERY. 

The White gallery, so called, is simply a well which extends under 
the ground horizontally for some hundred feet. It is arched over with 
brick laid in cement and built upon a stone foundation, and so con- 
structed that water can enter only from the bottom. The gallery is 100 
feet from the bed of the river, and derives its supply from the water- 
shed extending above and away from the river for an eighth of a mile 
or more, and from infiltration from the East Fork of the Whitewater. 
The analysis of the water shows no pollution whatever. The water is of 
the same composition as the river water, except that a more complete 
oxidation has taken place, as is shown by decreased albuminoid ammonia 
content, the absence of nitrites and increased nitrates. 

• It is evident that the earth banlv, 100 feet or more in thickness, be- 
tween the gallery and the river is acting as an efficient filter and is re- 
moving entirely all of its undesirable characteristics that are present in 
the river water itself. 

THE HILL GALLERY. 

The Hill gallery, so called, is constructed like the White gallery, being 
a brick arched gallery 600 feet long, some 150 feet from the bed of the 
river, which it parallels. The composition of the water is excellent and is 
identical with that from the White gallery. 

THE GORMAN GALLERY. 

The Gorman gallery, located along the river bed some twenty-fivf 
feet from the bank, and the nearest gallei-y to the pumping station, is 
constructed like the other galleries. It receives water from the Hill gal- 
lery, and under usual conditions delivers a mixed supply. The sani])le 
analyzed was takeu at the lower end of the gallery after the supply had 
been cut off from the Hill gallery, and represents as nearly as possible 



110 / 

the water which collects in the Gorman gallery. The composition of the 
water is very similar to that of the raw river water. The albuminoid 
ammonia is higher than in the other gallery samples, the nitrates lower; 
nitrites are present, and the sample examined showed B. coli present in 
both 5 c. c. and 1 c. e. samples. It is evident that the Gorman gallery is 
receiving water from the river that is not fully oxidized, and that the 
twenty-flA^e feet of earth between the river and the gallei-y is insufficient 
to purify properly the water. 

THE RESERVOIR. 

Under ordinaiy conditions the water service is by direct pressure on 
the mains, but, as an auxiliary supply, a reservoir is provided with a ca- 
pacity of 8,000.000 gallons. The reservoir is twenty-five feet deep, cover- 
ing an area of two acres, and has a cemented bottom and sloping sides 
built of stone laid up with loose .joints. The interstices between the 
stones are filled with mud and sludge, and afford a foothold for algae and 
grasses. The composition of the wattr in the reservoir, as is indicated 
by the several analyses made of samples collected on different days, is 
practically constant and is an average of the supplies from the Cooper 
well and the other galleries. There is a decided increase in albuminoid 
ammonia and nitrite contents, together with lowered solids and hardness. 
The increased ammonia contents are due to the presence in the supply 
of decomposing organic matter, and the lessened solids to tlie precipita- 
tion of iron and calcium salts in the form of sludge, due to the continued 
exposure of the water in the reservoir to the sun and air. A bacterial 
examination of the water made on a sample kept at ordinary summer 
temperature for twenty hours showed but 31 per cc, after forty-eight 
hours' growth, a very favorable showing indeed. There is a perceptible 
odor to the water at the resers'^oir, which becomes pronounced after the 
water has stood in a closed receptacle or is heated. The odor is due to 
the decomposition of a plant of the order "characeae." known as "chara." 
The characeae are plants which occupy an intermediate position between 
the algae and the higher cryptograms. The plant has a distinct stem, 
with whorls or branches at regular intervals. These branches are some- 
times spoken of as leaves, and at the lower end of the stem assume a root- 
like form which fastens the plant to the mud" and gives it stability. This 
characteristic of the plant makes it impossible to eradicate it except by 
taking away its means of support. This can be done by cementing the 
walls of the reservoir. The characeae injure the water only by rendering 
it unpleasant to the taste and smell. This species possesses the property 
of secreting calcium carbonate, and properly serve in a measure to soften 
the water in the reservoir. 

SUMMARY. 

The water supplying the city of Richmond is of excellent quality, 
free from an excess of organic matter and iron. The water from the 
Cooper well is slightly harder than that from the galleries, and contains 
a slight amount of iron that precipitates out on standing. 



Ill 

The White aud Hill galleries provide a supply of pure, well-tiltered 
water, probably largely derived from the East Fork of the Whitewater. 
The filtx'ation is perfect, and the distance between the galleries aud the 
river insures continued efficiency of the intervening earth well as a lilter. 

The Gorman gallery receives water from the river which has not 
been thoroughly puriried. It is of practically the same composition as the 
river, containing high albuminoid ammonia, nitrites and the bacilli coli 
communis. The Gk)rman gallery is located too near the river, for while 
all sediment is removed, the filtration is not sufficient to remove patho- 
genic bacteria, and oxidation of organic matter is not completed as in the 
case of the other galleries. The reservoii- is Avell located, protected against 
outside contamination, and, except for the presence of the chara, in good 
(•ondition. The chara can best be eradicated by drawing off the water, 
cleaning out the interstices between the stones forming the sides and 
washing with a strong cement, so that the crevices are filled and no lodg- 
ment provided for mud and sediment. It is not necessary to put a cement 
floor on the side of the reservoir, as has been done to the bottom, as a 
comparatively inexpensive wash avIU serve the same purpose. 

In enlarging the capacity of the system, water taken from the basin 
near tlie Cooper well or from gallei-y wells located at least 100 feet from 
the river bank will be entirely satisfactory, free from the possibility of 
present or future pollution, and of a moderate hardness and well adapted 
to the uses of a public water supply. 

ANALYSES WATER FROM SYSTEM OP RICHMOND WATER WORKS COMPANY 



O. O 



Ammonia, free ..._ 

Ammonia, albuminoid. 

Nitrates 

Nitrites 

Chlorine 

Iron.. 

Hardness 

Total solids 

Fixed solids 

Odor 

Color 

Turbidity 

Sediment 

B.coli. 

Bacterial count 



Calcium carbonate 

Magnesium carbonate. 



.<054 

.0040 

.0050 

.0000 

.250 

.0200 

26.60 

12.60 

34.60 

None. 

0.0 

None. 

None. 

Absent 



26.42 
11.95 






.0036 

.0142 

.0500 

.0015 

.275 

Trace. 

22.50 

34.30 

26.20 

None. 

0.0 

Mark'd 

None 

Pres'nt 



22.59 
11.35 






•305 D 
o o 



0) o . 



.0014 

.0046 

.1500 

.00' 

.250 

Trace. 

24.20 

37.30 

26.60 

None. 

0.0 
None. 
None. 
Absent 



24.99 
10.82 



.0048 

.0132 

.0700 

,0015 

.250 

.0000 

18.100 

30.40 

22.80 

None. 

0.0 

None.. 

None. 

Absent 

31 
per cc. 



.0014 
.0076 
.1000 
.0015 
.250 
.0100 
20.10 
37.20 
2i.00 

0.0 
Slight. 

t 
Absent 



u 




» 




a 


>. 




ki 


u .0 


® . 


oS^<-^ 




t. .^ 




_ 


tf 


W 



2sd 
ce - 



.0020 

.0158 

.1200 

.0016 

.200 

Trace. 

20.10 

38.50 

25 00 

« 

0.0 

None. 

None. 

Absent 



.0014 

.0040 

.1000 

.0000 

.300 

.0050 

24.10 

35.60 

27.20 

None. 

0.0 

None. 

None. 

Absent 



.0010 
.f074 
.0700 
.0003 
.275 
.0000 
22.50 
32 70 
25.00 

None. 
0.0 

None. 

None. 

Absent 



'•■"Decided musty, t Very slight. 



ROCHESTER. 



On October 2, in response to an invitation of the ^'University 
Association of Rochester," I visited this place to give my illus- 
trated lecture npon the "Prevention and Cure of Tuberculosis." 



112 

I was surprised to be made the honor giiest of a dinner by Dr. 
Shafer, who had invited the physicians of the county to said 
dinner in his new sanatorium. The occasion was most enjoyable, 
and the communication with these practitioners of the county was 
surely beneficial to the public health cause. 

In the evening my lecture was delivered in church, that was 
filled and overflowing. Upon arrival I was unable to get in at the 
front, and was compelled to enter through a rear door. Mr. 
Bidder, editor of the Rochester Republican, manipulated the lan- 
tern, and among the audience was Senator Stephenson and Mr. 
Barnhart, editor of the Rochester Sentinel. The superintendent of 
the schools, the mayor and the president of the Rochester College, 
with teachers and citizens, were present. A resolution of thanks 
and approval, also commendation of the work of the State Board 
of Health was passed. 

MUNCIE. 

On October 8 I visited Muncie to deliver the usual illustrated 
lecture upon "Tuberculosis ; Its Prevention and Cure," before the 
meeting of the citizens with the State Charities Association. At- 
torney-General Miller presided; and State Senators Kimbrough 
and Ilendee, together with prominent citizens, were present in the 
audience. Gen. Miller, as presiding officer, made an address in 
which he approved and urged others to help in the work of 
creating a State health farm for consumptives. My lecture was 
followed with fifteen minute remarks by Dr. Hugh Cowing, 
Health Officer of Delaware County, and the same time was given 
to "The Social Aspect of Tuberculosis," by Mr. Fagg, of Evans- 
ville. This meeting was a very great success, and doubtless much 
good was accomplished. 

MUNCIE. 

October 10 I visited Muncie to lecture before the Indiana Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs, The lecture was entitled "What Can 
the Women Do to Help On the Public Health Cause?" The 
exercises were held in the Commercial Club rooms, the same being 
crowded to overflowing. The lecture called the attention to the 
fact that almost one thousand mothers in the ages of eighteen to 
forty died annually of one disease, and this is a preventable 



113 

disease ; that tlipi'r sisters, the women of tho State, conld certainly 
do a gTeat deal to bring before the peojde the importance of pre- 
venting tuberculosis. Many of the well known methods now prac- 
ticed in this work were reviewed and detailed, special stress being- 
laid upon the point that "success lay in edueation." Resolutions 
of thanks were adopted on account of the lecture, and expressing 
confidence and approval in the work of the State Board of 
Health. 

DEATHS AND DISEASES DURING THE QUARTER. 

Total deaths 8,812. In same quarter last year 8,525. There 
was more smallpox than in same quarter last year, and fewer 
deaths, but other infectious diseases show no diminution. 

The following table gives the smallpox comparisons : 

No. of No. of 

Cases No. of Counties 

Reported. Deaths. Invaded. 

July, 1905 31 3 6 

July, 1906 , 18 1 6 

August, 190.5 10 5 

August, 1906 : 40 3 

September, 1905 '. 19 8 

September, 1906 51 2 10 

Typhoid fever seems not to have prevailed as extensively as in 
the corresponding quarter last year, as the table makes plain: 

No. of Counties No. of 

Cases. Invaded. Deaths. 

July, August, September, 1905 2,167 74 403 

July, August, September, 1906 1,633 49 254 

In September many letters from physicians spoke of the preva- 
lence of mild typhoid fever, and blood tests in the laboratory have 
given the Widal reaction in instances where the disease was not 
suspected. 

PROSECUTION OF BUTCHERS. 

The prosecuting attorney of the Indianapolis district was duly 
informed of the adulteration of sausages and chopped meats found 
in the Indianapolis Market. The attorney thereupon began 
direct prosecution in the Marion County Criminal Court in July, 
1906. Fourteen meat dealers were arraigned, their names appear- 
ing below in the report of the Chemist. The first case tried was 

8— Bd. of Health. 



114 



against Harry Matzke, charged with using sodium sulphite as a 
preservative and color keeper in Hamburg steak. 

The trial attracted much public attention, for the defendants 
brought expert witnesses from Chicago and other places to testify 
to the harmlessness of sulphite of soda in food as a preservative. 
The trial extended over three days, and evidently the jury was 
not convinced that sodium sulphite was injurious to health, for 
it stood seven to five for conviction. 

Upon consultation with the prosecutors, it was decided that as 
all the dealers promised not to use preservatives hereafter, that 
it would be best not to bring the accused to trial, and accordingly 
the cases were dismissed. Following is the record of the dealers 
and the articles adulterated. 

Food samples collected by H. E. Barnard and Norris Thomp- 
son on the East Market in Indianapolis, Indiana, Tuesday, June 
19, 1906, with the results of analyses made in the Chemical 
Division of the Indiana State Laboratory of Hygiene : 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from A. Stuckmeyer, made by 
A. Stuckmeyer. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .173 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from F. Piltz, made by F. Filtz. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .147 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from F. W. Hebble, made by 
P. W. Hebble. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .164 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from "William Gruud, made by 
William Grund. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .429 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Sam Davis, made by Sam 
Davis. Preserved with borax, amount not determined. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Sam Davis, made by Sam 
Davis. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .226 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Steinmetz Bros., made by 
Steinmetz Bros. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .482 per 
cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Harry Matzke, made by 
Harry Matzke. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .260 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Thos. Dietz, made by 
Thos. Dietz. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .101 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from J. Deschler, made by J. Deschler. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .121 per cent, of the same. ' 



115 

Article — Sausage, purchased Iroiu Hilyemeier & Bro.. made by Hilfj;e- 
lueier & Bro. Preserved with sodium sulphite, coutainiiig .lOG per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purcluised from Steinmetz Bros., made by Stein- 
metz Bros. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .295 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Harry Matzke, made liy Harry 
Matzlie. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .090 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Bologna, purchased from F. Filtz, made by F. Filtz. I're- 
served with sodium sulphite, containing .147 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Weinerwurst, purchased from F. W. Hebble, made by All)crt 
Worm. Preserved with borax, amount not named. 

Ai'ticle — Weinerwurst, purchased from Sindlinger Fresli Meat and 
Provision Co., made by the Sindlinger B^resh Meat and Provision Co. Pre- 
served with sodium sulphite, containing .025 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Veal loaf, purchased from Harry Matzke, made by Harry 
Matzke. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .135 per cent, of the 
same. 

Food samples collected by 11. E. Bishop and Pliilip Brodits on 
the East Market in Indianapolis, Indiana, on Tuesday, June 19, 
1906, with the results of analyses as made in the Chemical Di- 
vision of the Indiana State Laboratory of Hygiene : 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Chas. Mock, made by 
Chas. Mock. Presei"ved with sodium sulphite, containing .131 per cent, of 
the same. 

Ai'ticle — Hamburger steak, purchased from W. H. Pleckman, made by 
W. H. Heckman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .501 per 
cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Fred Wuster, made by 
Fred Wuster. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .020 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Geo. Woessner, made by 
Geo. Woessner. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .170 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Thos. Castor, made by 
Thos. Castor. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .144 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, ]:>urchased from A. L. Heckman, made by 
A. L. Heckman. Preserved Avith sodium sulphite, containing .014 per 
cent, of the same. 

Article — ^Hamburger steak, purchased from E. F. Overman, made by 
E. F. Overman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .030 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from Henry Coleman, made by 
Henry Coleman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .319 per 
cent, of the same. 



116 

Article^Hamburgei- steak, piirclaased from J. G. Schilsa, made by J. 
G. Schilsa. Preserved with borax, amount not determined; preserved with 
sodium sulphite, containing .015 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purcliased from Joe Cook, made by Joe 
Cook. Preserved witli sodium sulphite, containing .298 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from H. W. Heckmah, made by H. W. 
Heclvman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .160 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Geo. Woessner, made by Geo. 
Woessner. Preserved Avith sodium sulphite, containing .258 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Chas. Wecksler, made by Chas. 
Wecksler. Preserved with ^sodium sulphite, containing .188 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from IMeier-Meuser Packing Company, 
made by Meier-Meuser Packing Company. Preserved with sodium sul- 
phite, containing .06.3 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Meier-Meuser Packing Company, 
made by Meier-Meuser Paclving Company. Preserved with sodium sul- 
phite, containing .045 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Veal loaf, purchased from .Toe Cook, made by Joe Cook. Pre- 
served with sodium sulphite, containing ,279 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Frankfurter, purchased from Meier-Meuser Packing Com- 
pany, made by Meier-Meuser Packing Comjiany. Preserved with sodium 
sulphite, containing .050 per cent, of the same. 

Collected June 23, 1906. 

Article — Hamburger steak, purchased from L. Nageleison, made by 
L. Nageleison. Preseiwed with sodium sulphite, containing .141 per cent, 
of the same. 

Article— Sausp.ge, purchased from L. Nageleison, made by L. Nagelei- 
son. Presei'ved with sodium sulphite, containing .240 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from Henry Coleman, made by Henry 
Coleman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .054 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Henry Coleman, made by Henry 
Coleman. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .076 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from Jos. Parent, made by Jos. Par- 
ent. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .083 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from Steinmetz Bros., made by Steiu- 
metz Bros. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .068 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from H. Matzke, made by H. Matzke. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .214 per cent, of the same. , 



n 



Article — Veal loaf, purchased from H. Matzke, made by H. Matzke. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .234 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburser, purchased from H. Matzke, made by H. Matzko. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .194 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from Jos. Fischer, made by .Tos. 
Fischer. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .039 per cent, of 
the same. 

Ai'ticle — Hamburger, purchased from Chas. Cherdou, made by Chas. 
Cherdon. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .201 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Chas. Cherdon, made by Chas. Cher- 
dou. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .075 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from William Grund, made by Wil- 
liam Grund. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .430 per cent, of 
the same. 

Article — Sausage, purchased from Meier-Meuscr Packing Company, 
made by Meier-Meuser Packing Company. Preserved with sodium sul- 
phite, containing .040 per cent, of the same. 

Article — Hamburger, purchased from Sindlinger Fresh Meat and 
Provision Company, made by Sindlinger Fresh Meat and Provision Com- 
pany. Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .402 per cent, of the 
same. 

Article— Sausage, purchased from Sindlinger Fresh INIeat and Provi- 
sion Company, made by Sindlinger Fresh Meat and Provision Company. 
Preserved with sodium sulphite, containing .312 per cent, of the same. 

INSPECTION OF SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

In Jnly Dr. Dav.is directed that an inspection of slaughter- 
houses in the State be made. Accordingly a blank was prepared 
and supplies of the same sent to all city and town health officers. 
Of the 390 officers of this class, 351 promptly replied hy making 
surveys of the slanghter-honses furnishing meats in their juris- 
dictions. Upon review of the records it appears that of 460 
slaughter-houses inspected 77 per cent, were exceedingly unsani- 
tary, 16 per cent, passable, and only 7 per cent, in good condi- 
tion. Some of the terms used in describing the conditions were: 
"revolting," "horrible stench," '-^rotting blood and entrails," "in- 
describably awful," "sickening." 

In August letters were sent to the authorities of cities and 
towns where uusanitary slaugliter-houses were reported, calling 
attention to the necessity of correction. It was recommended that 
an ordinance be passed excluding meats from any slaughter-house 
which was not sanitary according to the definition laid down in 
said ordinance. The ordinance read as follows : 



118 

An Ordinance Regulating tlie Meat Supply, Prescribing the Sanitary Con- 
ditions of Meat Shops, Butcher Shops, Slaughter Houses, Fish Mark- 
ets, and Public Eating Houses; Prescribing How Meats and Carcasses 
of Animals Intended for Human Food Shall Be Handled, Empower- 
ing OfRcers for the Enforcement Thereof, and Repealing All Ordi- 
nances in Conflict Therewith. 

Section 1. Be it ordained by the Mayor and Council of the City of 
, That it shall be unlawful, within the corporation of the 



City of — , to sell, barter or give away the flesh of any 

animal intended for human food, which animal has not been slaughtered 
and the carcass prepared and kept and handled according to the regula- 
tions given in this section; and, tlie carcass of any animal offered for sale 

for human food within the corporation of the City of , 

which has been prepared otheiTvise than according to said regulations, is 
hereby declared to be unclean and is condemned as uuflt for human food 
and it shall be the duty of the City Police, and of the City Health Ofiieer 
and his Deputies, and the power is hereby given to said oflScers to sum- 
marily seize and drench with kerosene oil any animal carcass or parts of 
a carcass which they may discover within the corporation of said City, 
Avhen to their knoAvledge rhe carcass or parts of a carcass have not been 
slaughtered, prepared and handled according to said regulations, and, 
any person convicted of selling such carcass or parts of a carcass shall 
be fined in any sum not less ihan tAventy-five nor more than one hundi'ed 
dollars. 

Regulations. 

(1) The animal shall be absolutely healthy and sound. 

(2) All slaug;hter houses or abattoirs in which slaughtering is done 
shall have water-tight, hardwood, asphalt or cement floors, be well 
lighted, thoroughly ventilated and drained, supplied with an abundance 
of pure water, windows and doors provided with screens, ceilings, side 
walls, posts, pillars, partitions, etc., shall be frequently whitewashed or 
painted, or, when this is impracticable, they shall, when necessary be 
washed, scraped or otherwise rendered sanitary. When floors or other 
parts of slaughter houses, abattoirs or butcher shops, as tables, racks, 
trucks, trays, counters, refrigerators, meat blocks, etc., or other parts of 
the equipment, are so old or in such a condition that they can not be 
readily made clean and sanitary, they shall be removed and replaced or 
otherwise put in a condition approved by the City Health Ofiieer. And, 
all equipment shall be kept clean and in a sanitary condition at all times. 

(3) All slaughter houses or abattoirs shall be provided with tanking 
npparatus for tanking and making all offal into fertilizer, which apparatus 
shall be in rooms separate from the killing rooms, but said tanking ap- 
paratus is not required if all offal is buried, cremated, or hauled away for 
tanking elsewhere. Said slaughter houses or abattoirs shall also be pro- 
\-ided with ample cold storage facilities and all carcasses shall, as soon 
as properly dressed, be placed in cold storage until taken away, or said 
carcasses may be immediately removed elsewhere to cold storage. Said 
slaughter houses or abattoirs shall also be provided with proper facilities 
for rendering lard and tallow, and said facilities shall be in a room de- 
voted excusively to said purpose. 



119 

(4) All employes of said slaughter liouse, abattoir or butcher sliop 
shall be clean in person, and, when at worlc shall wear aprons or smocks 
made of a material that is readily cleansed and kept sanitary, and the 
same shall be cleaned daily, if used; and spitting upon the floor or urinat- 
ing thereon or other befoulment is absolutely forbidden. 

(5) Said slaughter houses, abattoirs and butcher shops shall be pro- 
vided with proper facilities for washing hands and also with proper water 
closet facilities, which shall at all times be kept clean. 

(6) Swine shall not be fed on ofCal at the said slaughter houses, 
abattoirs and butcher shops, and the surroundings shall be kept clean at 
all times. The carcasses of swine fed upon offal are hereby declared to be 
unclean and are condemned and if offered for sale or are given away and 

-are discovered within the corporation of the City of , the 

same shall be seized and drenched with kerosene oil, as heretofore set 
forth and commanded. 

All ciarcasses and parts of carcasses intended for human food, dur- 
ing transportation from the slaugliter houses or abattoirs, shall be care- 
fully covered with canvas or white cloth so as to exclude all dust, dirt 
and flies or other insects, and such canvass or cloth covering shall be 
kept clean by frequent washings. 

(7) It is provided that nothing in this section shall prevent the sale 
of animal carcasses, or parts of carcasses, or meats, which have been 

shipped into the City of . from any other point where the 

slaughtering houses or abattoirs are subject to inspection by the United 
States Government; and it is further provided that nothing in this sec- 
tion shall prevent any farmer or other person not regularly engaged in 
the sale of meats, from selling in said City any surplus meats he may 
liave "from his family supply, unless said meats upon inspection prove to 
be o'" diseased or injm-ed animals or spoiled, or have been prepared or 
kei)t under unsanitaiy conditions, and in such instances the penalties 
and disposal as has heretofore been described shall be enforced. 

Sec. 2. All butcher shops, meat markets and fish mai'kets within the 

corporation of the City of — , shall, from the first day of 

May until the first day of November, be provided with self-closing wire 
screens to all doors and windows, and said screens shall be close fitting 
and kept in good repair. Said shops and markets shall at all times be 
kept clean and free from all foreign and noxious odors, and all blocks and 
tools used in said places shall be kept clean and free from taints. All 
meats and fish intended for human food shall be so kept and handled as 
to not allow dust from the streets to settle thereon. 

Sec. 3. Every hotel, restaurant. Inn, tavern, boarding house and 

public eating house within the corporate limits of the City of 

shall be kept clean and free from all offensive or unwholesome substances. 
Every such hotel, restaurant, inn, ravern, boarding house and public 
eating house shall, from the first day of May until the first day of October 
of each and evei-y year, be provided with self-closing wire screens to all 
doors, windows and other outside openings, and all such screens shall 
be close fitting and kept in good repair so as to exclude flies and otliei' 
insects. The kitchen connected with any s\ich place shall be kept clean. 
well ventilated and well lighted and in a sanitary condition. The tables. 



120 

table linen, dishes, cooking utensils and all other articles used iu and 
about such place shall be kept thoioughly cleansed and free liom all 
taints and foreign odors. All persons employed in or about any such 
place shall keep themselves and their clothing clean. All jparings, refuse, 
vegetables, fruits, meats and other waste matter, together with all slops, 
shall, within a reasonable time, be promptly removed from within such 
hotel, restaurant, inn, tavern, boarding house or public eating house, and 
deposited in the proper receptacle outside the building occupied by such 
estabUshment. All cellars and other- places used by any such establish- 
ments as places for storage for fruits, vegetables, meats or other articles 
intended for human food shall be thoroughly disinfected whenever re- 
quired by the Board of Health of said City, and shall be kept clean and 
free from all decayed matter of every description; and every such cellar 
or place of storage shall be so constructed as to exclude rats, mice and 
other vermin. All such hotels, restaurants, inns, taverns, boarding houses 
and public eating houses shall be subject to inspection by the Board of 
Health of said City at any and all times during business hours, and it is 
hereby made the duty of the members of said Board and of each of them, 
to make frequent inspections of all such places and to promptly enforce 
the provisions of this ordinance. 

Sec. 4. It shall be unlawful for the proprietor or manager of any 
hotel, restaurant, inn, tavern, boarding house or public eating house with- 
in the corporate limits of the City of , either in person or 

by or through any employe, to serve to any customer or patron any 
watered milk, or any milk which has been "skimmed," or from which any 
of the cream has been taken before the milk is so served, unless there shall 
be posted in a conspicuous place in such public eating house a card stating 
in the English language that the milk served in such place is skimmed milk. 
And it shall be unlawful to place any preservative in any milk served to 
any customer or patron of any such place. All milk and butter intended to 
be served to customers and patrons of any such hotel, restaurant, inn, 
tavern, boarding house or public eating house shall be stored in some 
clean wdiolesome receptacle, separate and apart from all meats, fish, fruits, 
vegetables, and where if will not come in contact with the odors arising 
from the kitchen, or other odors of an injiu'ious nature. The proprietor 
or manager of every such hotel, restaurant, inn, tavern, boarding house, 
or public eating house, shall, upon demand, deliver up to the Food In- 
spector of the City of , samples of the milk served to 

customers or patrons of such place, and it is hereby made the duty of said 
Inspector to make analyses of such milk and to file with the Common 
Council, once each month, a w^ritten report of the analyses. 

Sec. 5. Any person, persons, company or corporation violating any 
of the provisions of this ordinance shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined, 
except as otherwise herein provided, for each offense, in any sum not 
less than one ($1.00) dollar nor more than fifty (.$50.00) dollars, and each 
day's violation shall be deemed a separate offense. 

Sec. 6. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage and publication once each week for two consecutive 

weeks in the - — . a daily newspaper printed and publislw?d 

in said City of - — , Indiana. 



121 

Very few replies to our "ordinance letter" were received, but 
it has been learned that several cities and towns passed the law 
either entire or modified. Among these places are Newcastle, 
Monticello, Auburn, Warsaw, Marion, Logansport and Sullivan. 

THE SECOND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIA- 
TION FOR THE STUDY AND PREVENTION 
OF TUBERCULOSIS. 

WashingtoD, D. C, May 16-18, 1906, Reported by Geo. T. McCoy. M. D.. 
Member of the Indiana State Board of Health, Columbus, Indiana. 

To the President and the Members of the Indiana State Board of Health: 

Gentlemen— As your representative I attended the second annual 
meeting of "The National Association for the Study and Prevention of 
Tuberculosis," which convened in Washington, D. C, May 16, 1906. 

The first meeting was held in conjunction with the Association of 
American Physicians, and was addressed by Dr. Simon Flexner, of New 
York, on the subject of "Immunity in Tuberculosis." The meeting was 
presided over by Dr. Frank Billings, of Chicago. There were 500 dele- 
gates present at this first meeting, showing the interest the public is tak- 
ing in the crusade against tuberculosis. Dr. Edward L. Trudeau, of 
Saranac Lake, New York, also addressed the meeting, detailing some of 
his results in preventive inoculation among animals. Dr. Trudeau was 
encouraged from his success to predict that the same results would ulti- 
mately be accomplished in treating human beings. 

The general attendance of the meetings was something less than the 
first meeting, in 1905, but the character of the papers presented was be- 
yond the standard then obtained. 

The scientific work this year was grouped in five sections, two new 
ones (surgeiy and tuberculosis in children) having been added. 

Many important and timely subjects were discussed. "Tuberculosis 
Nostrums" was the title of a characteristic paper by Samuel Hopkins 
Adams, of New York. He finds cause for the encouragement in the fact 
that the whole -matter of nostrum control is under adjustment. Patent 
medicine bills have been agitated in many State Legislatures and the 
press of the country is taking a more commendable stand upon the 
subject. 

"Three Cases of Placental Tuberculosis," illustrated by lantern slides, 
was the subject of a very interesting paper by Dr. Alfred Scott Warthin, 
of Ajm Arbor. In the discussion Dr. W. H. Welch, of .Johns Hopkins 
University, stated that the evidence Is becoming stronger and stronger 
that conveyance from mother to fetus is at least not so very extraordinary, 
and is probably far more frequent than is commonly supposed. Twenty 
cases of placental tuberculosis have been reported. Dr. Welch regards 
the question of placental lesions as a subject of really fundamental im- 
portance in the etiology of tuberculosis. That tuberculosis in the new 
born does not more frequently develop has been explained in two ways: 
first, that the bacilli get in late, and hence there is no time for tuber- 



122 

culosis to develop; and, second, that the fetus is relatively insusceptible. 
The fetal blood may be filled w^ith tubercle bacilli, and no localized lesion 
be developed. There is abundant evidence to show that tlie fetus may 
harbor tubercle bncilli for weeks without the development of lesions. 

"The Serum Diagnosis of Tuberculosis" was presented by Drs. King- 
horn and Twitchell, of Siiranac Lake The results of their experiments 
seem to show that it is not a specific sign of the presence of tuberculosis, 
and that it is of no value in the early diagnosis of the disease. ("The 
Serum Prognosis of Tuber(?ulosis" is attracting much attention, and is 
likely to become a valuable aid to the clinician.) The same may be said 
of the Opsonic Index of Wright and Douglas, especially in its relation to 
the treatment of tuberculin. 

"The Tlierapeutic Use of Tuberculin Combined with Sanatorium 
Treatment of Tuberculosis" was the subject of an exhaustive report by 
Dr. Trudeau, in which he presented a summary of the impressions gained 
from its' use at Saranac Lake since 1890. Tuberculin is a powerful agent 
and must be used with care. Fever reaction is not necessary, and every 
effort should be made to avoid its production; hence very minute doses 
are to be used in the beginning. The danger from tuberculin lies wholly 
in its faulty administration. Six months are almost always necessary 
for tlie treatment, and in many cases a year would be better. The reac- 
tion of the patient is of more value in determining the dosage than is the 
Opsonic Index. As a result of liis experience Dr. Trudeau still holds to 
the opinion formed years ago. namely, that tuberculin aids in the sana- 
torium treatment of tuberculosis, but he regrets that there is no standard 
strength for tlae preparation, and that there is so little known positively 
about the action and the sti'ength of the dose tliat would give the best 
results. Therefore its use must be left largely to tlie skill and judgment 
of the physician in each individual case. 

One of the most important sessions was tliat devoted to "Tuberculosis 
in Children." A number of valuable papers were presented in this sec- 
tion, and the discussions were tlie most spirited of any during the entire 
meeting. In the absence of Dr. A. Jacobi, Dr. David Bovaird, of New 
York, presented the subject of "Sources of, and Portal Entry of, the In- 
fectious Agents in Tuberculosis of Infants and Young Children." Dr. 
Bovaird has had a large experience in autopsies on cliildren, and was 
well qualified to speak of the sources of infection as displayed in post- 
mortem findings. He said that while there were records of cases of local 
infection, tuberculosis of the skin, bones, the eye, etc., where there was 
no doubt that the infection came from contact of tuberculosis material 
with the part affected, tliey are so rare as to form an almost negligible 
quantity in the general consideration of the subject. The results of 
autopsies showed that infection came almost solely from two sources, the 
inhalation of the tubercle bacilli, or its ingestion with food. In this con- 
nection it is remarkable how few cases of intestinal tuberculosis are found 
even when the lungs are seriously affected, and where the patient must 
have been swallowing millions of tubercle bacilli every day. Reasoning 
from this standpoint, the drinking of milk from tuberculosis cows is not 
attended with very grave dangers, but the apparent protection of the 
intestinal glands in those having the disease in the lungs, may not extend 



123 

to the nou-tuberc-ular. He did not advocate any relaxation in the strin- 
jiency of milk laws on this account. Tuberenlosis of the inlestlnal tract 
is much more common among children in English, German and French 
hospitals than in American hospitals. 

"Protection of Infants and Young Children from Tuberculosis" was 
the subject of a paper presented by Dr. John Lovett Morse, of Boston. 
This is an. exceedingly difficult problem, especially in the crowded environ- 
ment of tenements, and after such diseases as measles, whooping cough 
and influenza. The danger of infection of the children is greatest on ac- 
count of their association with tuberculous parents. The parent should 
not be allowed to keep and handle the child; they should be separated at 
the earliest possible moment if the child is to escape infection. The 
establishment of as many playgrounds and places of outdoor exercise and 
enli^rtainment as is possible should be urged upon those in authority, the 
results largely depending upon the amount of money that the public is 
willing to spend in its campaign of education and in making provision 
b .'• means of sanatoria and other institutions for the care of less fortunate 
individuals. 

Surgeon General Wyman addressed the Association in its last session 
on the methods employed by the Government for the prevention of the 
spread of consumption among Government employes. General Wyman 
related that in accordance with the resolution passed by the Association 
last year, the President had appointed boards of inquiiy to determine the 
best method to be folloAved in the sanitation of public buildings, and the 
conduct of the employes in relation to tuberculosis. Under the terms of 
the executive order the public buildings under the War and Navy De- 
partments will be inspected by boards of medical officers appointed by 
the respective Surgeons General of these two departments. All other 
public buildings will be inspected by boards appointed by the Surgeon 
General of the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service. The reports 
of these boards will be made under two distinct heads: first, unsanitary 
conditions immediately remediable; and, second, unsanitary conditions 
requiring structural changes. A start has been made in the City of 
Washington, and with the experience gained there the inspections will 
be gradually extended throughout the United States. The organization 
of this great work, as outlined above, has been most carefully considered, 
and it is confidently expected that great good will result. 

In the absence of Dr. Herman Biggs, President of the xissociation, 
the annual address was delivered by Dr. Lawrence F. Flick, of Phila- 
delphia, Vice-President. Dr. Flick spoke of the good work accomplished 
by the Association during the past year, prominent among which is the 
establishment of tuberculosis exhibition meetings throughout the country, 
and the bringing to this country the "International Tuberculosis Associa- 
tion" in 1908. The local exhibitions held in a number of cities of the coun- 
try during the past winter accomplished a great deal of good in educating 
the people. The program is to be extended to other cities and towns. 
The advisability of establishing permanent exhibitions in the large cities 
is to be considered. For the Congress he urges the raising of a fund of 
$100,000 for expenses, and the early opening in Washington City of an 
office for arranging the details of the meeting. Dr. Flick asserted that 



124 

the strength of the National Association lay in the fact that its ambition 
to eradicate consumption could be gratitied. He advocated the establish- 
ment of hospitals, sanatoria, convalescent farms, public dispensaries, 
where the poor could be served, and the scientific care of the afflicted in 
their homes. He with others criticises the medical schools for turning 
out gTaduates unacquainted with the best methods of diagnosis, and the 
best means of combating the disease. To create a more widespread in- 
terest in the subject of the prevention of tuberculosis, he recommended 
the establishment of a lecture bureau, providing speakers to visit every 
part of the country, and disseminate knowledge of how to combat the 
disease successfully. 

The emblem of membership of the National, State and Local Tuber- 
culosis Associations was declared to be the double red cross. 

It would be impossible in a report of this kind to more than mention 
the many excellent papers presented, and the earnest discussions follow- 
ing the reading of each paper. One must have been there to appreciate 
the great work accomplished at this meeting. . The attendance at each 
session was remarkably good, and the best of attention was given to the 
reading and discussion of papers. The coming and going of members 
during the reading of papers, that is often so annoying at large meetings 
of this kind, was not noticed. 

Besides the pleasure of listening to the reading and discussion of 
papers, the mingling with the delegates and listening to the .words of 
wisdom from the lips of the great men in the profession in quiet conversa- 
tion was a pleasure that one can scarcely forget. The whole meeting 
seemed to b pervaded with an atmosphere of earnestness and deep 
learning. 

It was with much chagrin that your representative noticed the marks 
of evident suiijrise upon the countenances of inquiring members when 
the statement had to be made that the great State of Indiana, one of the 
foremost States of the Union, had no plan to care for her unfortunate 
consumptives. i 

Ordered, That Secretary's report be spread of record. 

PETERSBURG SCHOOLHOUSE. 

After full consideration of the report of sanitary survey of the 
Petersburg Schoolhouse as presented in the Secretary's report, the 
following proclamation was adopted : 

PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, It is satisfactorily proven to the State Board of Health 
that the schoolhouse at Petersburg, Pike County, Indiana, is unsafe and 
xery unsanitary; therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned as unfit for school use 
and purposes, the said condemnation to be in effect on and after June 1, 
1907, and all school authorities and all teachers are commanded under 
pain of prosecution not-to use said schoolhouse for school purposes on or 



125 

after said date. June 1, 1907. Unauimously passed this 12th diiy of Oc- 
tober, lOOli, in regular session of the In-liana State Board of Health, all 
members being present. 

Attest: Pres. 

Secy. 

NEW BRrri'ON SCHOOLHOUSE. 

After full consideration of the report of sanitary survey of the 
Britton Schoolhouse, as appears in the Secretary's report, the 
following proclamation was adopted: 

PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, It is satisfactorily proven to the State Board of Health 
that the schoolhouse known as the New Britton Schoolhouse, situated in 
Hamilton County, Delaware Township, Indiana, is old, dilapidated and 
unsanitary; therefore it is 

Ordered, That said schoolhouse is condemned as unfit for school uses 
aiul purposes, and shall. not be used for school purposes after this date, 
Ovtober 12. 190G. And any school authority, teacher or other person or 
persons Avho shall violate this condemnation order shall be prosecuted as 
in the statutes provided. Any person who tears down, mutilates, dis- 
figures or destroys this card without due authority from the State Board 
of Health shall be prosecuted. 

Passed this day, October 13, 1906, in regular session of the 
Indiana State Board of Health, all members present. 

Attest : Pres. 

Secy. 

Ordered, That the Secretary subscribe for the clippings as fur- 
nished by the United Press Association of Indianapolis at the rate 
of $5 per month until January 1, 1907. 

DR. T. VICTOR KEENE. 

The President read the following letter : 
Dr. T. Henry Davis: 

Dear Sir — I hereby tender my resignation as Superintendent of the 
Laboratory of Hygiene, to talce effect November 30, 190(i, as it is my in- 
tention to re-enter the practice of medicine. 

Very respectfully, 

T. VICTOR KEEXE. 
September 24, 190G. 



126 

After due consideration of Dr. Tveene's resignation the following 
resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the resignation of Dr. T. Victor Keene, as 
Superintendent of Laboratory of Hygiene, to take effect November 
30, 1906, be accepted, and in accepting said resignation the Board 
wishes to convey to Dr. Keene its sincere thanks for the very com- 
petent way in which he has conducted the work of the Laboratory 
and that its best wishes for his success go with him in his future 
work. 

The following letter from Ledei'le Antitoxin Laboratories was 
read : 

October 5, 1906. 
State Board of Health, Indianapolis, lud.: 

Gentlemen — ^We beg to submit the following proposition for supply- 
ing the local Boards of Health throughout the State of Indiana with diph- 
theria antitoxin for the free treatment of those in the State too poor to 
otherwise procure antitoxin. This is the same plan that is now in force 
in Ohio and Avhich is working out very satisfactorily there. 

We are sending you, under separate cover, by mail, a package of anti- 
toxin as we prepare it for the Ohio State Board of Health. You will 
notice we have a special label for them. We enclose herewith a clinical 
report blank, one of which is enclosed in each package of antitoxin 
shipped to the Ohio State Board of Health. We propose to prepare the 
packages for your State Board in the same manner as we prepare those 
for Ohio. We will ship you a stock of the various doses required, 1,000, 
2,000, 3,000, 4,000 and 5,000 units, together with memorandum sheets in 
triplicate similar to the set enclosed marked number one. Upon shipment 
of a lot of goods to any Board of Health in your State one of these blanks 
properly fiUed out should be mailed to us, another to the Board of Health, 
and thfe third copy kept for your own file. Upon receipt of this memo- 
randum we will forward bill for the goods from this office and take care 
of the account in future. 

It is not customary with us at the figures we quote on these goods 
to exchange them, but in order to promote the use of antitoxin Ave will 
permit the return to you of unused antitoxin by your local boards Avithiu 
a period of thirty days from its receipt. This gives the local board ample 
opportunity to know whether there is likelihood of the remedy being re- 
quired and at the same time permits of the antitoxin being used in 
another locality, as during the period named its efficiency has not been 
affected. We enclose blanks, marked set number two. Upon receipt of 
any return goods from a local Board of Health you will have a set of 
these blanks filled out, mailing one to this office, keep one for your file, 
and the third send to the local Board of Health. Upon receipt of this 
blank we will charge your stock account with the amount of goods you 
have reported received from the local Board and Avill credit the account 
of the local Board with the necessai-y amount. 



127 

From time to tiiuvi you uiny ordt'r from us such stock as may be re- 
quired to Iveep your own in j^ood condition, making a point, liowever, of al- 
ways sliippiiis" your oldest stock first. At the end of each month a slock 
statement Avill be rendered you from this office. This will be made up of 
all the stock shijiped you during the mouth, plus such as you have received 
fi-om local Boards less such as our memorandums show has been shipped 
from your office to Boards of Health. The balance shown on this state- 
ment should agree with your stock on hand at the end of the month. This 
yon can have checked up and return to us with your O. K. 

We will supply this antitoxin to the Boards of Health throughout 
your State at the following prices: 

1.000 units .$0 75 

2,000 imits 1 2.J 

3.000 units 1 75 

4.000 units 2 25 

5,000 units 2 75 

We will pay any transportation charges on these goods to your office 
and also such expenses as you may have in shipping the goods to local 
Boards of Health. E'ach week or month, as you prefer, a bill of expense 
for transportation charges may be furnished us. 

We enclose a copy of a circular which Dr. Probst used in instructing 
the Boards of Health in his State concerning the arrangement he had 
made with us. You may find some suggestions in this that you will care 
to make use of. 

We believe that we have covered fully the plan as is at present in 
operation in Ohio, and shoidd you have any suggestions which you feel 
will promote its better working out in your State, we shall be glad to en- 
tertain them. We believe we can have this plan in operation within a 
week or ten days after receiving a favorable report from your Board. 
A'ery truly yours, 

LEDERLE ANTITOXIN LABORATORIES. 
By L. D. Bell, Secretary. 

After consideration the Lederle letter was laid upon the table 
for the present. 



FIRST 



ANNUAL REPORT 



State Laboratory of Hygiene 



Year Ending October 31, 1906. 



There are two Departments: 

Department of Bacteriology and Pathology, 
Department of Chemistry. 

9— Bd. of Health. (129) 



REPORT 

OF 

The Chemical Department 

LABORATORY OF HYGIENE 



Year Ending October 31, 1906 



H. E. Barnard, B. Sc, H. E. Bishop, B. Sc, 

Chief of Department of Chemistry. First Assistant Chemist. 

NoRRis Thompson, 

Second Assistant Chemist. 



(131) 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE 
CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE LABOR- 
ATORY OF HYGIENE. 



By H. B. BARNARD, B. Se. - 

At the opening of the chemical department of the laboratory 
several fields for investigation were waiting, each one of which 
deserved immediate attention. The public and private water sup- 
plies of the State, hitherto unguarded and uncontrolled by other 
than local watchfulness, were in great need of inspection, and the 
food and drug laws, which had been on the statute books in one 
form and another for many years, and which had never been put 
into operation because of lack of facilities for the necessary lab- 
oratory work, were waiting enforcement. The question of pure 
water is primarily one of health, that of pure foods and drugs is 
concerned both with disease prevention and the suppression of 
economic fraud. The health and wealth of citizens are each 
equally to be safeguarded. 

The chemical laboratories were, therefore, equipped for both 
lines of work and separate rooms fitted up, one for water and one 
for food and drug analysis. This division was made necessary 
because of the impossibility of making water analyses in a labor- 
atory used for other work. The division of effort thus outlined 
has operated admirably in practice. The laboratories, though 
devoted to entirely different uses, are so arranged that work can 
be carried on in each simultaneously by the same corps of chemists. 

During the year Harry E. Bishop, B. Sc, Assistant Chemist, 
has had charge of most of the work of the water laboratory and of 
the department in the absence of the chemist. He is a skilful and 
resourceful analyst and has filled the position with entire satis- 
faction. Since the first of January ISTorris Thompson has been 
on the analytical force and has done much valuable work in con- 
nection with food and drug analyses. During the summer months 
Jack Hinman assisted in the food laboratory, and although he was 
drawing no salary for his services he did much work that is to be 

(132) 



133 

commended. To Mrs. E. T. Couey, clerjc of the department, is 
due much credit for the conscientious and thorough mauncv in 
Avhic'h she has performed the work of the office. 

But little attempt has been made to enforce the food law 
through the courts. In November, 1905, several cases involving 
the sale of adulterated milk were presented to the Grand Jury of 
Clark County, but since it was impossible to prove the knowing 
violation of the law necessary under the present statute no indict- 
ments were returned. Milk cases were also brought in a justice's 
court in Terre Haute, but it was impossible to convict the de- 
fendants for similar reasons. In June of this year a number of 
cases were brought against dealers in meats in the city of Indi- 
anapolis who were selling products preserved with antiseptics in 
violation of the food laws. One case only came to trial, that of 
the State vs. Matzke, before the Criminal Court of Marion 
County. The case involved the necessity of the State proving the 
drug employed to be poisonous, a fact well established by elaborate 
investigations of the United States Department of AgTiculture 
and physiological experts, but not easily shown except by expen- 
sive expert testimony. The jury was unable to agree as to the 
verdict to be rendered and no further steps have been taken to dis- 
pose of the case. 

The experience gained in these few cases is sufficient to show 
the need of some changes in the present food law that will make 
it possible to punish violations by fine and imprisonment when- 
ever such measures seem necessary to secure a proper observance 
of the law. 

In the following report is summarized the result of a year's 
work. Special studies have been made of the public water sup- 
plies, private supplies, cistern and deep well waters in the water 
laboratory, and of many cases of foods and drugs in the food and 
drug laboratory. 

THE PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY. 

When this country was entirely agricultural, and the population 
widely scattered, the family water supply was of necessity the farm- 
house well ; but as the crossroads settlement grew to a village and 
with the passing years attained a city's attributes, the well became 



134 

■unsafe and the supply inadequate. Water became more and more 
a necessity; the few gallons that sufficed for the daily needs of 
the early settler would no longer satisfy the householder, who 
must have running water in kitchen and bathroom, sewer con- 
nections and lawn sprinklers. So public water supplies were 
sought and built either by private capital or public funds. Many 
cities and towns built their own water systems and sold the serv- 
ice at cost to the consimier ; many other supplies were constructed 
by companies or corporations looking for profitable investments. 
The service has extended until at present there are but few com- 
munities that do not have a water supply. Fire protection alone 
makes an adequate supply a necessity even where the water is not 
employed for domestic uses. With the rapid development of 
public water systems, there has not always been manifested the 
wisdom in a selection of a source of supply that is desirable. 
To the early settler, water was water, a fair conclusion where there 
could be no pollution; so it was that the first corporations build- 
ing reservoirs and sinking wells consulted primarily the cost of 
installation and but secondarily the character of the supply. That 
policy did provide water -works, but as the years have passed by, 
one system after another has been abandoned at heavy loss and 
new ones constructed. 

The water supply, furnishing as it does water for drink- 
ing and domestic purposes, becomes an important factor in 
determining the health of a community. Indeed it is the most 
important of all the agents which administer to healthful 
life. Certain diseases are largely water borne, particularly 
diseases of the intestinal tract, such as cholera and typhoid fever, 
and the quality of water supplied to perhaps 90 per cent, of a 
town's population, is of first importance. This is realized more 
and more and the consumers today refuse to drink water that a few 
years ago was used without the slightest fear. Whenever typhoid 
fever is reported in a community, the water supply, whether it 
be from a well or the public main, should at once be brought under 
suspicion. And more than that, the water supply should be in- 
vestigated before fever breaks out. It is not enough to lock the 
stable door after the horse is stolen, though that practice is the one 
usually followed. Water supplies should be constantly subjected 
to rigid inspection. Their source should be of known purity, 



135 

• 

and every condition surrounding the distribution of the water 
such that contnuiiuation is impossible. It is the province of the 
health boards to control the water supply of cities and towns. 
Their powers in this direction are almost uidimited. The so- 
called police powers of common law which give them the author- 
ity to protect the public health, authorize every action that may 
tend to prevent disease. 

A prominent feature of the work of the Laboratory of Hygiene 
is to assist local health officers in determining the character of the 
local water supplies. But before satisfactory and reliable assist- 
ance can be given, a thorough knowledge of conditions is neces- 
sary, and, therefore, due of the first steps in our work was to ob- 
tain a full report of the various public supplies of the State. In 
order to obtain this information the following blank was sent to 
every health officer and superintendent of water companies: 

PUBLIC WATER SUPrLY. 



Town or City County 

Does your town own or operate a public water supply? 

Ai'e there any private companies supplying water for public use?. 
If so, give corporate name of sucli 



Wlien were the worljs built and by whom' 



Is the source of supply a pond, stream, spring, or well? 

If from a pond, state area, average depth, kind of bottom, etc. 



Give approximate area of watershed; wooded or cleared land; and num- 
ber of inhabitants vhereon 

Are the shores of the pond frequented by picnic parties, or occupied by 
summer cottages? 

If from a stream, give approximate volume of water flowing under normal 

conditions 

Does the stream receive any sewage or waste from manufacturing oper- 
ations above the intake of the supply? 

If so, state approximate amount 

If from springs or wells, give depth, quantity of water flowing, character 
of soil, subsoil, and underlying strata, etc. Are wells bored, driven or 
dug? 



136 

Is the water supplied by gravity, or pumped to standpipe or reservoir? 

If standpipe, give capacity; if reservoir, give capacity, area and depth. .. . 

Does the supply ever develop an unpleasant odor or taste? 

If so, of what character ? 

Is the supply a soft or hard water? 

How many miles of distributing mains are in use? 

What kind of pipes are used for the mains? 

What kind of pipes for service pipes? 

What is the average daily consumption in gallons? 

Has the water ever been analyzed? If so, by whom and when? 

State percentage of population using public water supply. 

State number of families using the supply described 

Are there many private wells still in use within the radius reached by the 
public supply ? 

(Signature) 

(Postoffice address) 

(Date) 

REMARKS. (Here give any facts or information relating- to the subject 
not incorporated in above answers) 



From the records obtained, the following figures concerning the 
public water supplies of the State of Indiana are compiled. One 
hundred and forty-one cities and to^vns are provided with water 
systems; 84 cities and towns own their own supply; 51 are under 
the control of private corporations. The ownership of six other 
small supplies could not be determined. Seventy-five systems are 
supplied with driven wells ; 9 small systems employ dug wells ; 
7, springs; 3, flowing artesian wells over 1,200 feet deep; 29 
supplies are obtained from rivers, of which the Ohio supplies 5 
cities, the White. River and forks 5, and the Wabash 2. All of 
these river supplies receive sewage in large quantities, and but 
three of the systems depend upon filtration to purify the water. 
It is evident that this unsanitary condition will eventually result 
in serious epidemics. Ten supplies are from lakes, Lake Michigan 
furnishing the water for four cities. All of these cities empty 
their sewage into the lake and occasionally complain that the 
water supply is polluted. jSTinety-three of the supplies are gravity 
systems, while 41 are operated by direct pressure upon the mains ; 
56 systems have standpipes and 31 reservoirs as storage basins. 



137 

Nine of the supplies are filtered either by the slow sand filtration 
process or after oheniieal treatment. Nine of the supplies are 
nsed wholly for fire and hydrant purposes and arc not nsed f(n' 
drinking. Six of the supplies are reported as bad, one as some- 
times bad, and one fair. The rest of the supplies, in the opinion 
of the informers, are of good quality. One thousand, seven hun- 
dred and thirty miles of distributiug mains are in use ; 1,711 miles 
of these are of cast iron and 19 miles of wood. Eight hundred 
and ninety-one thousand people use the water from public sup-' 
plies for drinking purposes, while 1,757,000 people are wholly 
' dependent upon private wells for their water ; or two-thirds of the 
entire population of the State depend upon the private supply, 
while one-third uses public waters, A reasonable estimate allows 
one well to every five persons. There are, then, 351,000 wells in 
use in this State, the majority of which are so located as to be 
liable to pollution by household and by barnyard sewage. 

It is of course impossible for the State Board of Health to 
examine all these private wells. It can, however, exercise a rigid 
control over the purity of the 141 public systems and as well, 
through the aid of local health officers, condemn annually a large 
number of the polluted private supplies. 

Of the 141 supplies of the State which furnish the water for 
891,000 inhabitants, or 33.3 per cent, of the population, we have 
been able to obtain information as to the sanitary character of 
but 41 systems. It is the desire of the Laboratory to develop 
eventually a system of inspection that will record at least four 
times a year the sanitary condition of every public water supply iu 
the State. In no other way can the public health be safely 
guarded and purity of the water supply be assured. 

Three factors determine the value of a water supply: First 
and of most importance is freedom from disease germs ; second, 
the supply must be so abundant that it will furnish sufficient 
water to check the most extensive fire ; and, third, .it must be of a 
•character that adapts- it for use in domestic economy, such as for 
toilet and laundry purposes, and for industrial use in boilers and 
as wash-water in mechanical operations. The water which most 
clearly satisfies these requirements is a so-called surface water, 
water which falls to the ground as rain, and flowing over unin- 
habited areas, collects in natural basins as lakes or rivers. The 



138 

water as it reaches the earth is as pure as it is found in nature. 
As it flows over the surface of the ground it dissolves mineral 
matter from the rocks and soil and takes up organic constituents 
from decayed leaves and grasses. When it reaches a resting place 
in a natural basin, all suspended particles are gradually precip- 
itated and the chemical action of light and air rapidly oxidizes 
and destroys the dissolved organic material accumulated in the 
rush through forests, over meadows, stony pasture lands and cul- 
tivated fields. 

Surface water supplies are usually soft and palatable, and 
whenever properly protected against pollution furnish the safest 
of potable waters. The water supplied ISTew York, Boston and 
Chicago is of this class. 

When surface water reaches a river it flows rapidly away from 
its origin and is exposed to all forms of pollution. Rivers have 
wrongly enough been considered the sewers of industrial activities 
rather than arteries bearing the great necessity of life, and they 
are continually subject to contamination. They receive the un- 
treated and unpurified sewage of cities, and the ofi^al of manufac- 
ture, so that in an unpurified state, river water is no longer to 
be considered suitable for public supply. When no other supply 
is obtainable it is possible to so purify a sewage laden stream that 
it again becomes suitable for consumption. The process of purifi- 
cation removes disease germs as well, and depends upon sediment- 
ation, filtration, nitrification and oxidation of organic matter to ac- 
complish this. Some river waters like the Ohio and Missouri carry 
large quantities of silt, silica in suspension, that it is with great 
difficulty removed by filtration. If given time, however, the silt 
subsides and as it precipitates it carries dowm with it most of the 
injurious bacteria, and the water so purified again becomes suit- 
able for use. Other waters are more advantageously treated by 
allowing them to flow onto beds of sand and gravel through which 
they slowly percolate. Gross impurities remain on the top of the 
filter, while organic matter, bacteria, etc., passing slowly over the 
surface of the grains of sand as a thin film, is subjected to the 
action of countless millions of so-called nitrifying bacteria and is 
changed from its organic to an inorganic and harmless state. The 
slow sand filtration system of purification is employed with much 
success by many cities of this country. Lawrence, Mass., was one 



139 

of the first cities to adopt the system on the heavily polluted Mcr- 
rimac River water. In ISOO, Iwfore the installation of the filter, 
the typhoid death rate was 123 per 100,000; after the filtration 
system was placed in use there was a rapid decrease in the death 
rate nntil in 1903 it was but 33 per 100,000. 

The deep well supply is very popular with many cities and Avater 
companies. Deep well waters, that is, waters that come from strata 
lying in or below an impervious layer of stone or clay, in this State 
the limestone formations, are not liable to be contaminated by sew- 
age and are more easily obtained and distributed than surface 
waters which have to be brought miles from their source or purified 
at great expense. Deep well waters are not desirable as public sup- 
plies for several reasons. In the first place the supply is always 
limited. If the watershed is large or if the wells are sunk in a 
valley which conveys underground waters flowing off an extensive 
watershed, the supply. may be ample. But if the watershed is not 
large, the supply of water underlying it will be limited, and no 
number of wells can obtain the necessary amount of water. It is 
inevitably the case that the deep well system gives out as the 
demand increases. Deep well waters are usually hard and fre- 
quently contain much iron. Hard waters are not desirable for 
domestic or laundry purposes, and when used for making steam, 
have to be ''broken" or softened before they are suitable for use. 
The deep well supplies now in use in Indiana are for the most 
part furnishing a safe water at the present time, and some of the 
systems are supplied with an abundance of water. But as far as 
the majority of the systems are concerned, it is inevitable that 
sooner or later the supplies will prove inadequate. 

The composition of the public waters of Indiana, as determined 
by analyses made during the past year, is illustrated by the fol- 
lowing tables : 



140 



WATER SUPPLIES 



INDIANA 
1906 



683 TOTAL NUMBER SUPPLIES EXAMINED 




MISCELLANEOUS 



QUALITY OF SUPPLIES 



683 TOTAL NUMBER SUPPLIES EXAMINED 




141 



WATER SUPPLIES IN INDIANA 



PUBLIC SUPPLIES 
1906 



145 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




M ISCELLANEOUS 



PRIVATE SUPPLIES 



542 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




142 



CONDITION or PUBLIC 
WATER SUPPLIES IN INDIANA 



1906 





57 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




42 GOOD 


DEEP i 
WELLS^ 


10 BAD 




5 DOUBTFUL 




40 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




11 GOOD 


SHALLOW. 

wells' 


20 BAD 




9 DOUBTFUL 




18 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




6 GOOD 


STREAMS* 


2 BAD 




■ ' 




10 DOUBTFUL 




23 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




10 GOOD 


SPRIMGS* 


11 BAD 




2 DOUBTFUL 




■ 




8 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 




5 GOOD 


PONDS < 


BAD 




3 DOUBTFUL 




IHI 



rk 



14^ 

n 

In all, the water from 146 public supplies has been analyzed, 
and of this number 74 supplies were of good quality, 43 were bad, 
and 29 were of such character that they were classed as doubtful. 
Most of the bad waters were taken from shallow or driven wells 
located in the public square or by the side of the street where they 
were exposed to all sorts of pollution. In order to better illustrate 
this point we have made another classification based on the source 
of the sample. Of the 57 deep or subsurface waters used as public 
supplies, 42 were entirely free from pollution, ten were classed as 
bad, and five were of doubtful quality. Several of the bad and 
most of the doubtful waters were so classed because of the high 
content of ammonia, chlorine, and iron present, and not because 
there was any evidence of pollution by sewage. Certain waters, 
especially from the coal and gas belt, have a high chlorine and am- 
monia content, which renders them undesirable for drinking or 
domestic use, although there is no claim that such waters are ca- 
pable of producing disease. Of the shallow or surface wells but 
11 could be passed as pure, while 20 were undoubtedly bad and 9 
were evidently in a transition stage from good to bad. If we class 
these last wells as bad, a condition they will doubtless reach event- 
ually, we find that but 11 out of the 40 shallow wells used as 
public supplies were above suspicion. But 6 of the 18 stream 
supplies were- pure ; 2 were undoubtedly bad and 10 were receiv- 
ing sewage either directly or as the runoff from cultivated and in- 
habited ground. ISTone of the 8 pond supplies were bad, although 
3 were of douhtful quality. Of the 23 springs, 10 were good, 11 
bad and 8 of doubtful quality. It is not probable that these bad 
springs were true spring supplies. They were evidently waters 
draining off inhabited areas and breaking out at some fault a 
short distance below the surface, rather than deep gTOund waters. 

PRIVATE WATER SUPPLIES. 

At least 2,000,000 citizens of Indiana are dependent upon wells 
for their water supply for drinking and domestic purjDoses. In 
country districts no community system is possible and in many 
small villages the expense of installing a public supply is as yet 
sufficiently prohibitive to compel the continued use of the well. 

In pioneer days the first desideratum for hom.e-making was an 



144 

abundant supply of pure water, and a flowing spring was quite as 
attractive to th& early settler as fertile acres. When springs were 
not found the dug well supplied the family with an abundance of 
pure wholesome Avater. Unfortunately the conditions of early 
days, when pumps were not obtainable, made it advantageous to 
dig the well as near the kitchen door or barnyard as possible, thus 
saving the task of carrying water long distances by hand or with 
the aid of the shoulder yoke. The same well's still supply later 
generations, but instead of furnishing pure water, they now all 
too frequently are but pools of filtered sewage, the effluents of the 
barnyard, kitchen sink or adjacent privy, liable at any time to 
bring sickness to the user, or an epidemic to the commimity. 

It is usually thought that if a well is thirty feet from a contam- 
inating source it is safe from pollution; that if, perchance, any 
seepage does take place, the effluents will have been made as pure 
as water from the skies, in the mysterious laboratory of the earth. 
Such reasoning has long been proved false. If a well is freely 
used, so the level of the water is below that of the water in the 
surrounding earth, inflow will take place for a distance of one 
hundred feet laterally, and in the direction from which the ground 
water flows for a much greater distance. Hence, ordinarily a 
source of filth, in order to contaminate a well, must be within one 
hundred feet, or, in extreme cases, two hundred feet, except in 
the direction from which the ground water flows. But this is not 
the whole truth, for the original source of filth may be much far- 
ther removed and have gradually defiled the soil in the direction of 
the wellj until it has extended within its influence. Cesspool 
filth has been known to seep through the soil for a distance of two 
hundred yards and poison wells. 

In a small rural village the supply of water may have been of 
unexceptionable quality for an indefinite time, but as the place 
grows, population becomes more dense, the gTOund water is drawn 
on in excess of the supply, the drainage area of the well is in- 
creased and the water becomes less pure, both from this cause and 
from the increased amount of sewage returned to the soil, which is 
sure to be saturated with organic matter beyond its power of oxi- 
dation, and pollution of the wells is inevitable. 

During the past year we have made a large number of analyses 
of water from private wells. In many cases the samples were not 



145 

submitted for analyses nntil illness, nsnally typhoid fever, aroused 
the family, or more frequently tlie family physician, to question 
the purity of the supply. Tlie blind faith in the purity of well 
water, especially when it has been used by several generations of 
the same family, is one of the chief reasons why typhoid fever so 
constantly ravages coimtry districts. The honor of the family 
well is held as inviolate as the honor of the family name, and any 
hint or suggestion of possible impurity is met with a laugh of 
scorn. We have heard time and again the statement, ''My Well 
water is the best in the coimty or State," and have found by 
analysis that it was but little better than raw sewage ; clear and cool 
perhaps, but nevertheless reeking with the putrefactive bacteria 
of the privy vault and filthy hogpen. 

The condition of the private well is best illustrated by graphic 
representation, and the following charts indicate clearly the re- 
sults of a year's work and as well hint what will have to be done 
l)efore the character of the water nsed by the country householder 
is as good as that supplied the residents of cities and towns where 
public water systems are in use. 

If these charts are summarized we find that 492 private well 
waters have been analyzed, of which 2eS6 were pure, 202 bad and 
54 of doubtful quality. If we class the doubtful waters as bad, 
since they will eventually reach this condition, we see that 256. 
or 52 per cent., of the private well supplies are of such quality as 
to be unsuitable for drinking and domestic use. If this figure 
holds good throughout the State we can readily see why the ty- 
phoid returns from the country districts are always high. Making 
another classification based on the source of the waters, we find 
that of 150 deep well waters analyzed but 25 were bad, while 111 
were of good quality. The deep well is evidently a satisfactory 
private supply if it is derived from true second water. Of 342 
shallow wells, 177 were undoubtedly bad, 125 were good and 40 
were of doubtful quality. It is not surprising that many wells 
are polluted, because the universal custom of grouping the house, 
barn and water supply within easy reach of each other has made 
the well the center of drainage area for all household sewage and 
farmyard waste. Great numbers of these old wells are still in 
common use, and, save where analysis has proven the water to be 
a filtered sewage, of good repute in the community. The impor- 

lO-Bd. of Health. 



ue, 



CONDITION OF PRIVATE 
WATER SUPPLIES IN INDIANA 



1906 



ISO TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 



DEEP 

WELLS|25 BAD 




342 TOTAL NUMBER EXAMINED 



SHALLOW 

WELLS 1177 BAD 




27 TOTAL NUMBER rXAMINED 



13 GOOD 



CISTERNS 



3 DOUBTFUL 



147 

tance of an analysis of these well waters can not bo over estimated. 
In some toA\Tis Avliere pnblic sentiment has been aroused, a 
series of analyses has shown that hardly a single well in the 
thickly settled village was suitable for nse, because of the 
presence of sewage effluents. "Where such conditions exist, and 
our results convince us that they are by no means uncommon, a 
water supply brought from some uncontaminatcd source becomes 
a public necessity. 

THE CHEMICAL ANALYSES OF SOME SO-CALLED 
CISTEKIT WATEES. 

AVhen suitable ground or surface water is not obtainable the 
collection and storage of rain water is resorted to. In some parts 
of the world no other water is used for drinking purposes. This 
has been the case in the city of 'New Orleans until continually re- 
curring epidemics of yellow fever spread by mosquitoes bred in 
cisterns and water tanks forced the introduction of a munici- 
pal water supply. Indiana has an abundance of both ground and 
surface waters, but, since in some cases the water is not suitable 
for use and more particularly because of the adaptability of rain 
water to domestic and laundry purposes, cisterns are common in 
all parts of the State. Cistern water is rain water collected from 
a flat surface, usually a roof, and stored in vaults, generally under- 
ground but sometimes built in cellars. The character of the water 
is entirely dependent on the condition of the roof which is washed 
by the rains and the suitability of the storage reservoir. The 
roof of a house, exposed as it is to the dust from the streets, 
excrement from birds, fallen leaves and mossy growths, is not an 
attractive nor sanitary place from which to collect drinking water, 
and the gutters and down pipes should be so arranged that the 
first water which falls is not allowed to flow into the cistern. After 
the roof is well cleansed the subsequent rainfall may reach the 
cistern in a fair degree of purity. 

A question of first importance in considering a rain water 
supply is the material out of which the walls of the storage 
cistern are to be made. Slate and stone are the most suitable 
materials but are not often available except for small cisterns. 
Brick walled cisterns lined with cement are by far the most 



■148 

common, and tliougli the hardness of the water is somewhat 
increased bj the solubility of the lime salts in the cement, 
thej are easily built and at low cost and if properly con- 
structed, well adapted for the purpose. Tanks of wood make good 
cisterns provided they are kept full, but if there is fluctuation in 
the water level, organic development will occur and impart a dis- 
agreeable taste and odor to the water. Cement or concrete cisterns 
arc rapidly coming into use and, aside from increasing its hard- 
ness, do not injure the quality of the water. Cisterns so con- 
structed are very desirable and are to be preferred above all other 
kinds where a large volume of water is to be stored. One form of 
cistern that is frequently built has a partition wall across it mak- 
ing a chamber that is filled with charcoal or other filtering mate- 
rial. When new this construction furnishes a water with a less 
pronounced ''cistern" taste than is obtainable from the ordinary 
form. This arrangement is not desirable because the water is 
simply strained, never purified, and the filter or retaining basin 
rapidly becomes filled with filth that can not be readily removed. 
The suitable location of the cistern is of first importance in de- 
termining the quality of the water it furnishes. Frequently it is 
in the back yard, exposed to drainage and seepage from gar- 
bage piles, accumulated filth and open privy vaults. During the 
past year we have analyzed the water from 27 cistern supplies. 
Of the entire number v^e found but 13 that could be classed as 
potable; in all the other cases the cisterns had evidently received 
water from the surrounding ground as well as from the roof. 
Several samples, notably numbers 56, 294 and 396 (see p. 149), 
were nothing but sewage effluents, and were dangerous waters for 
use. 

A good cistern water should be soft, free from sediment and 
vegetable growths, and its chemical composition should be prac- 
tically that of rain water. It should be free from chlorine and 
nitrates and low in solids. The following tables show the compo- 
sition of some of the cistern waters analyzed during the past year 
and are sufficient condemnation of the average cistern supply as 
a source of water for drinking and domestic purposes. 



149 



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150 



THE mTERPKETATION OF WATEE AI^ALYSES. 

The problems of the water analyst are many and varied. Every 
new sample submitted for examination brings with it its own pecu- 
liar conditions, and must be considered, not in relation to other 
analyses, but as an original study. The evidences of the mound 
builders ^re passed minoticed by the casual observer, and an up- 
turned flint bears no story, but the skilled eye and trained knowl- 
edge of the patient student gives to each a meaning that reveals 
the history of prehistoric days. Water, like clay and stone, bears 
evidence of its previous history no less intelligible to him who 
can read the records. To a chemist each determination in the 
course of a water analysis has its value, and the sum of these, 
when added to a knowledge of surroundings, reveal's the purity or 
the pollution of the water, conditions which are so often falsely 
interpreted. 

In the course of our work we are frequently asked to explain 
the results of our analyses and to tell why, in the case of two 
analyses apparently similar, we have classed one supply as pure 
and condemned the other as polluted. We also meet with prej- 
udiced opinion, born of a mistrust of the chemist's ability to judge 
of a water's purity, a condition of mind unfortunately too often 
the result of experience with some dabbler with test tubes who 
made snap judgments based upon imperfect analyses of unsuitable 
samples, or again with men who believe that the less an analyst 
knows about the sample at hand the more free from prejudice will 
be his opinion concerning it. We even more frequently suffer 
because of that admiration for chemical knowledge and belief in 
chemical clain^oyance which expects us to decide from a sample, 
while you wait, if a certain water caused the death of a person a 
year since, in a distant town, under unknown conditions, a mark 
of appreciation very trying to a man who knows his own limita- 
tions. Hardly a day passes but we receive from some anxious 
person or a physician who should be better informed, a vest pocket 
sample of water or a perfume bottle containing traces of its orig- 
inal^ contents, whisky flasks, catchup bottles, piccalilli jars, marked 
sample 1 and sample 2, and a request for immediate examination. 
With a view to dispelling some of these illusions and placing the 



151 

work of the water laboratory more clearly before its patrons it 
will be well to discuss in imteclmical phrases just what is meant 
by water analysis and the conditions that make it necessary. 

The correct interpretation of analytical results requires a knowl- 
edge of the source of a water, its surroundings, geological horizon 
and past history. Every water has its own characteristics. The 
presence of any given element of its composition is interpreted ac- 
cording to the kind of water under consideration. Spring water 
is, of course, colorless ; river water of equal purity is probably 
colored and turbid ; pond water may contain considerable amounts 
of organic vegetable matter without liecoming unusable, which, if 
present in a well water would place it in the polluted class. Deep 
well water normally may contain large amounts of chlorine, while 
an equal amount in a surface or dug well would be a mark of sew- 
age pollution. 

In the examination of a water we classify the substances found 
in it as mineral and organic. This distinction is not altogether a 
permanent one, for the mineral and organic conditions are depend- 
ent on one another, and in part pass into each other. The mineral 
constituents are usually potash, soda, lime, magnesia, iron and 
alumina, in combination with chlorine and sulphuric, silicic, ni- 
tric and carbonic acids. The organic constituents are, first, living 
organisms — animal and vegetable; second, the products of organic 
life, such as albumen, urea, tissue, etc. ; third, products of the 
decomposition of organic matter. 

The ordinary methods of analysis determine the form and 
amount of these constituents at the time the water is analyzed. 
It is usually not necessary to determine the mineral constituents, 
but only those factors which are influenced by the presence of sew- 
age or contaminating material. Sewage is very rich in organic 
matter, chlorine and solids, and so a determination of these com- 
ponents will give us the information we desire. The organic mat- 
ter contains large amounts of nitrogen, which analytical processes 
enable us to determine with great accuracy in four forms, namely, 
as organic nitrogen, as ammonia, as nitrous acid and as nitric 
acid. This order represents the order of change from organic 
nitrogen to its most highly oxidized condition. If we find am- 
monia present in the last form, that is, as nitric acid, we know that 



152 



whatever organic matter was present has been oxidized or de- 
stroyed, and the source of danger removed ; but if we find much 
ammonia or nitrons acid present we see that oxidation is not com- 
plete, a proof that the source of pollution is not far from the sup- 
ply, and therefore the water must be regarded as unwholesome. 

It must be understood that the various constituents determined 
in a water analysis are not of themselves injurious; they are but 
indexes of pollution, and the factors found are valuable only as 
they are comparable with factors predetermined on a water of 
known purity of the same class. That this important fact may be 
perfectly understood, below are given detailed analyses of both 
good and bad waters of several classes : 



SPRING WATERS. 

Potable. Polluted. 

Odor Slight vegetable. None. 

Color 0,0 0.0 

Turbidity Slight. Very slight. 

Sediment Wliite flocculent. Very slight. 

Free ammonia 0010 .0046 

Albuminoid ammonia 0014 .0260 

Nitrates 0500 2.4000 

Nitrites 0001 .0003 

Chlorine 3000 5.0000 

Total solids 30.00 35.00 

Fixed solids 26.40 31.20 

Hardness 13.80 13.80 

Iron 0000 .0000 



DEEP WELL WATERS. 

Potable. Polluted. 

Odor None. None. 

Color 10.00 0.0 

Turbidity None. Very slight. 

Sediment None. Much red. 

Free ammonia 0056 .0310 

Albuminoid ammonia 0000 .0048 

Nitrates .0000 1.0000 

Nitrites 0001 .0040 

Chlorine 2000 8.5000 

Total solids 37.60 131.80 

Fixed solids 32.50 104.60 

Hardness 11.80 27.20 

Iron 0440 .0400 



153 



DUG WELL WATERS. 

Potable. Polluted. 

Odor None. None. 

Color 0.0 0.0 

Turbidity Slight Slight. 

Sediment Much red. None. 

Free ammonia 0010 .0030 

Albuminoid ammonia 0(X)0 • .0560 

Nitrates 0100 .0300 

Nitrites 0000 .080<^ 

Chlorine 2000 12.8000 

Total solids 35.00 98.10 

Fixed solids 31.40 . 75.50 

Hardness 15.50 22.60 

Iron 0500 .0000 



CISTERN WATERS. 

Potable. Polluted. 

Odor Vegetable. None. 

Color 5.0 5.0 

Turbidity Very slight. None. 

Sediment None. Very slight. 

Free ammonia 0060 .0050 

Albuminoid ammonia 0100 .0126 

Nitrates 0000 .1200 

Nitrites 0000 .0020 

Chlorine 1000 3.5000 

Total solids 2.60 54.00 

Fixed solids 1.10 45.00 

Hardness 1.00 9.40 

Iron 0000 .0000 



In every analysis given above the polluted samples were of 
better appearance than the pure waters, and when subjected to 
ordinary physical examination would have been accepted as pure. 
The high ammonia, nitrate, nitrite and chlorine factors obtained 
showed that on the contrary the snpplies were heavily polluted 
with sewage and absolutely unfit for drinking or domestic nse. 

Bacteriological examinations, that is, the determination of the 
number and kind of bacteria present in water, are necessary in 
many cases, but a single bacterial analysis is so subject to experi- 
mental error that the results obtained are of small value. For the 
purpose of judging the efficiency of filter beds and water purifica- 
tion systems, bacterial' tests are most valuable ; the filtered water 
may be changed but little from raw water so far as chemical analy- 
sis can determine, and yet bacterial tests may show that a source 
of danger is largely or entirely removed. Clark and Gage say:* 
''In the examination of samples of s]n'ing water collected in the 



■''Am. Pub. Health Ann. Report, Vol. xxix. 



154 

proper manner the degree of purity is shown almost absolutely hj 
chemical analysis. The complete analyses of samples from a large 
number of domestic wells show that polluted waters that might 
become unfit for consumption at any moment are more plainly in- 
dicated by a single chemical analysis than by a single determina- 
tion of B. Coli. The presence of B. Coli at the time of examina- 
tion may indicate actual danger to health, and its absence even 
in the most polluted of these waters, chemically, may indicate 
lack of imminent danger, but the chemical analyses are certainly 
the most decisive." 

Water analyses are desirable whenever the supply is subjected to 
probable pollution because of unfavorable location, or when sick- 
ness occurs of a type usually communicated in a water supply. 
We receive many samples for analysis collected from sources 
known to be polluted. Such examinations are unnecessary. It 
does not need extensive chemical analyses and a dozen plate cul- 
tures to prove the presence of filth in a stream that is used as a 
sewer for a city, nor is it necessary to waste time over the water 
from a dug well that by reason of its location must be a cesspool 
for household wastes or barnyard washings. 



The Public Water Supply of the 
State of Indiana 

BY 

H. E. BARNARD, B. Sc. 



(155) 



WATER SUPPLY OF INDIANA. 



ADAMS COUNTY. 

Berne. — No public supply. Water is obtained from private 
wells and cisterns. The town is located directly on the Mississippi 
and St. Lawrence watershed. 

Geneva. — This town is supplied for the most part by private 
wells. Most of the wells are driven ; two or three open wells. A 
few cisterns are in use. 

ALLEN COUNTY. 

Fort Wayne. — This city has its own water supply, built in 18Y9. 
The water comes from wells bored 60 to 150 feet through soil, 
gravel, sand, blue clay, hardpan into rock. It is pumped into a 
reservoir that has a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons. The water is 
hard and at times has a metallic taste. There are 100 miles of 
distributing mains in use, and the service pipes are lead. About 
3,500,000 gallons are used daily by about 90 per cent, of the popu- 
lation. There are about 10,000 taps. 

Monroeville.^ — Water supply is from private wells. 

BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY. 

Columbus. — The water system is owned by the city and was 
built in 1870. The water is taken from East Fork of White 
River just below the junction of Flat Rock and Driftwood Fork. 
The water is obtained from a gallery well which extends diag- 
onally across the river. Sewage enters the river a short distance 
below the intake of the water supply. The supply is insufficient 
and must soon be increased. The water is moderately hard and 
flows through twenty miles of cast iron mains. The service pipes 
are of wrought iron. There are about 2,500,000 gallons used 
daily by about 890 families. Very few families use the water for 
drinking or domestic purposes, getting the water for that pur]30se 
from private wells. 

(156) 



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158 

Elizabethtown. — The supply of this town is from both dug and 
bored wells, depth from 30 to 100 feet, through substrata, gravel 
and limestone. There are three deep public wells. Hard. 

Hartsvill'e. — Six public wells. The water is hard. IsTearly half 
the families have private wells, some of which are dug and some 
drilled, the wells being from 18 to 100 feet deep. 

Hope.- — Private wells and cisterns. Most of the wells are 
drilled. 

Jonesvii'le. — From private wells, driven 18 to 24 feet deep ; 
free flow. Soil is sandy loam, subsoil is sand so deep it is not 
known what the character of the underlying strata is. 

BENTON COUNTY. 

Boswell. — Two town wells, the rest private. About ten persons 
use the water from the town wells. Well's are driven from 50 to 
220 feet. One of the town wells is shallow. 

Earl Park. — 'No public supply. Private wells nearly all deep 
and bored to an average of 100 feet. 

Fowler.- — The Fowler Utilities Co. was built about 1895 by the 
Seckner Contracting Co., for the town of Fowler, but is now under 
private control. The supply is from four driven wells, two 600 
feet deep, and two 200 feet. The water is pumped to a standpipe 
with a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons, and 75,000 gallons per day 
are pumped. The wells are driven through black loam soil, clay 
subsoil, rock and gravel at a depth of 100 feet and so on down. 
The water flows through five miles of cast iron mains into galvan- 
ized iron service pipes. About 98 per cent, of the people, or 400 
families, use the water. The water is considered pure, although 
it contains a large per cent, of iron. Practically no wells in 
the town. 

Otterbein.- — Private wells about 40 feet deep, extending into the 
gravel. , | 

Oxford.^ — Town owns the lease of the public supply, which con- 
sists of three- driven wells 143, 159 and 175 feet deep, driven into 
gravel. It is supplied by gravity. There are 314 miles of cast 
iron distributing pipe and the service pipe is galvanized ifon. 
About one-sixth of the population, or 153 families, use the water. 



159 





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160 

BLACKFORD COUNTY. 

Hartford City. — Hartford City owns its own public water sup- 
ply, which was built in 1894, and consists of seven driven well's 
260 feet deep. This water is pumped into a reservoir with a ca- 
pacity of 385,000 gallons and then goes through lY miles of cast 
iron mains. Lead and galvanized iron service pipes are used. 
There are 950 service lines, but there are several families on some 
of these lines. The daily consumption is about 400,000 gallons 
and about G5 per cent, of the people use the water. The water is 
hard. 

Montpel'ier. — The Montpelier Light and Water Co. supply the 
water for this city. Their plant was rebuilt in 1905 by the above 
named company. Their supply consists of deep wells and a spring 
m old quarry basin of approximately one-half acre in area. The 
wells average 200 feet in depth in rock, and are drilled. The 
water is pumped throiigh about six miles of cast iron distributing 
mains. The service pipes are lead and galvanized iron. One-half 
million gallons consumed daily. About 75 per cent, of the popu- 
lation, or 200 families, use the water. There are also private 
wells in use. 

BOONE COUNTY. 

Jamestown. — The water of this town is apparently pure. The 
supply is from driven well's owned by the different families, and 
ranging in depth from 40 to 120 feet. 

Lebanon. — The water supply of this town was built in 1894 by 
Bynum, Brenton & Fall. The supply is from wells ; one is 42 
feet deep, another 230, another 90. They are driven through black 
loam, subsoil, stiff clay, blue clay into gravel. The watershed is 
wooded and cleared land. The water is pumped to a standpipe 
holding 189,000 gallons. . The water is hard and when heated gives 
off the odor of decayed leaves. There are IS^A miles of cast iron 
mains. The service pipes are lead. About 65 per cent, of the pop- 
ulation use 300,000 gallons a day, and there are 900 taps in use. 

Thorntown. — 'No public water supply. Private dug and driven 
wells. 

Zionsville. — ISTo public supply. < 



161 






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162 

BROWN COUNTY. 

iNTashville.- — The water supply is altogether from wells, mostly 
dug, although there are quite a number of driven wells. The soil 
is sandy, with a gravel subsoil and underlying strata of clay. 

CARROLL COUNTY. 

Delphi. — The city purchased their supply in 1903. It comes 
from three springs flowing from gravel', underljdng strata and blue 
clay. The water runs to the reservoir by gravity and from there 
is pumped to the standpipe, which holds 27,000 gallons. The 
reservoir is 60 feet in diameter and 14 feet deep, with a capacity 
of 350,000 gallons. There are 4f miles of mains. Wooden pipes 
are used to reservoir and the rest are iron, with lead and iron serv- 
ice pipes. Four hundred and twenty- five families, or about 85 
per cent., used about 250,000 gallons daily. The water has been 
analyzed. 

Flora. — Springs and wells furnish the water supply. Some 
wells are driven, and these go through black subsoil, blue clay and 
into hardpan just before striking water. 

CASS COUNTY. 

Logansport. — Logansport owns its own water supply, which was 
built in 1875. The water comes from Eel River. This stream 
averages about five feet in depth and 250 feet wide. There are 
several picnic grounds above the city and along this stream, and 
also a park just at the city limits. The water is pumped into iron 
mains, and lead and iron pipes are used for service pipes. The 
water is soft and is muddy. About one-half of the people use this 
water, the rest getting their supply from private wells. The city 
water is considered to be badly polluted. 

CLARK COUNTY. 

Charlestown. — The water supply in Charlestown is from private 
wells, two springs and private cisterns. The water is clear, ample 
and is considered pure. 

Clarksville. — Supply from driven and dug wells, 



163 





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164 

Jcffersonville. — The Jeffersonville Water Supply Co. furnishes 
the water for this city. This was built in 1887 by S. R. Bullock 
& Co., and the water is taken from the Ohio River. The water 
receives a large amount of sewage or waste, mostly from a dis- 
tance, the nearest point being the city of Madison, 50 miles above. 
A standpipe 15 feet in diameter and 150 feet in height has the 
water pumped into it. The water is soft. There are 12 miles of 
cast iron mains, galvanized iron being used for the service pipes. 
Twenty-five per cent., or 600 families, use daily about 1,000,000 
gallons. The Water Company is installing a water supply system 
from driven well's, the quality of which is excellent. 

Sellersburg. — Wells and cisterns furnish the supply for Sellers- 
burg. Some of the wells are from 12 to 35 feet in depth, and are 
through clay, subsoil, slate, cement rock and limestone. Some few 
wells pass into sand and gravel. Much of the water is of inferior 
quality, and little else than surface water. 

CLAY COUNTY. 

Brazil. — This city o^vns a public water supply of drilled wells, 
but when there is a fire the water has to be pumped from a mud 
pond. The inhabitants on the watershed number about 1,000, and 
the land is cleared. The water is 'hard and is pumped direct in 
cast iron mains, with lead and iron service pipes. About 500,000 
gallons are used daily, but is not used for domestic purposes ex- 
cept after boiling, as most of the drinking water is obtained from 
private wells. The city is putting in more drilled wells and ex- 
pects soon to have sufiicient water from this source to serve all 
pu-rposes. 

Bowling Green. — Supply from dug wells. 

Carbon. — Supply is from wells. Water is of good quality. 

Center Point. — Water supply from wells driven and dug ; depth 
from 16 to 60 feet through soil, yellow clay IVo to 2 feet, subsoil, 
white clay, blue clay, black jack, slate and coal. The water at 
times has a mineral, sulphur, sweetish and vegetable taste and is 
very hard as a rule. The supply is not the best in the shallow 
wells. 

Clay City. — Families have own wells, dug through clay and sub- 
soil with an underlying strata of rock and coal. 



165 



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166 

Staunton. — The water used in Staunton is from private wells 
usually about 17 feet deep. Probably 80 per cent, of these wells 
go dry one or more times a year. Water is good when supply is 
plentiful. 

CLINTON COUNTY. 

Colfax. — All private wells. Some are driven, and range from 
27 feet to more than 100 feet deep. Dug wells are different 
depths, some not more than 12 feet. 

Frankfort. — The Frankfort Water Works Co. supplies this city 
with water from driven wells. The wells are 85 feet in depth, 
through 20 feet of an impervious blue clay into a gravel strata 
from which water is taken at 30 feet. The reservoir is 20 feet 
deep and covered and is filled by direct pressure. Capacity 
300,000 gallons. The water is hard and about five years ago 
became unpleasant to taste or smell. There are 16 miles of mains 
of wrought iron laid and lined with cement, and the service pipes 
are galvanized iron. There are 1,650 connections with mains, 
and 75 per cent, of the people use this water. The daily consump- 
tion is about 1,000,000 gallons. 

Kirklin. — ISTo water suj)ply but private wells. 

Michigantown. — Private wells bored, driven or dug from 10 to 
50 feet deep. 

Possv'ille. — Both dug and driven private wells furnish this 
water supply. The greatest menace to health is a number of false 
wells dug in the bottom of cellars for purpose of drainage. Many 
of them reach down to the strata of sand from which the private 
wells get their water. 

C3RAWF0RD COUNTY. 

Alton.- — Cistern water used altogether. Sometimes during a 
drouth or low water, water from' the Ohio River is used. 

English. — The English Water Company which was built in 
1895 by W. L. Luckett and Jno. V. McCoy, furnishes the supply 
for this town. The water comes from three springs with a ca- 
pacity of 1,000 l>arrels a day. There is one mile area of wooded 
watershed, about 1,000 inhabitants living thereon. The < water 
is supplied by gravity, and there are four miles of iron mains 



167 

in use. Galvani/cd iron is nsed for the service pipes. Abont 
1,500 gallons per day are nscd by six hundred families, or 100 
pei: cent, of the population. 

Leavenworth. — Tiie water for this town is supplied Iw the 
Leavenworth Water Co. from bored well', pumped into a reservoir, 
size 60x80x10. This plant was established in 1896. The well is 
YT feet deep through sand and gravel. There is a bad taste oc- 
casionally cansed by decayed leaves that have blown in the reser- 
voir. There are 7,140 feet of cast iron mains and galvanized iron 
service pipes; 2,700 gallons are used daily, and 10 per cent., or 
about 16 families, use the water. There are also two public 
wells and quite a number of private wells and cisterns. 

Marengo. — Grant & Davis Water Co. supply this town. The 
company was established in 1004. The supply is from a spring 
in limestone, with a capacity of .5,000 to 10,000 gallons per hour. 
Water is pumped into closed reservoir that holds 1,200 barrels 
in form of cistern. The water is hard. Cast iron is used for 
the mile and a half of mains, and gaspipes, usually black, are used 
for service pipes. Fifty families, or 30 per cent., use the water, 
and aboiit 6,000 gallons daily is consumed. There are also pri- 
vate wells. 

]\^illto"\^^l. — Private wells and cisterns supply this town. T)ug 
wells run 30 feet in depth and bored wells run 200 feet throj^igh 
soil, lime and clay, subsoil soapstone, under this sand, gravel and 
deeper limestone rock. 

DAVIESS COUNTY. 

Elnora. — The only public water supply in this town is from 
three driven wells on the streets, and this is supposed to be pure 
and wholesome. Private wells are generally driven, and have 
an average depth of about 15 feet. Soil and subsoil is sandy, and 
underlying strata is gravel. The water is hard. 

Montgomery. — There are two public wells 20 to 25 feet in 
depth. As this is very shallow there is no way of accounting for 
the lack of typhoid fever. One well most used is within three feet 
of an uncemented street drainage pipe. The private wells are 
dug from 15 to 40 feet deep, but generally they are 20 to 25 feet. 
Supply is small and is almost entirely exhausted during dry 
weather. The soil is clay. The entire corporation of Montgomery 



168 

is a watershed drainage north, south, east and west. There are 
700 inhabitants on this cleared land, and 25 per cent, of the 
population use the water from the public wells in dry weather, 

Odon, — Odon is built in a slight depression between two areas 
of upland, each several miles in extent. There is no public water 
supply. The private wells are dug from 12 to 20 feet in depth. 
Some wells in the lower part of town are contaminated with sur- 
face water in wet weather, which causes a bad taste. The water 
is both hard and soft. 

Washington. — The City Water Co., established in 188Y by C. 
E. Gray, supplies the water for this town. The supply is pumped 
from a stream to the standpipe, which holds 240,000 gallons of 
water. The water sometimes becomes muddy and has a bad odor 
and taste. Ten miles of iron distributing mains are in use, with 
service pipes of the same material. About 400 families use the 
water and the average daily consumption is 1,500,000 gallons. A 
new filter is being put in. . 

DEARBORN COUNTY. 

Aurora. — The City of Aurora Water Co., a private company 
which in 1904 had the Phoenix Construction Co., of Chicago, 
build their plant, furnishes this city with their water supply. The 
water is pumped from the Ohio Eiver into a reservoir holding 
280,000 gallons. IsTo sewage or waste above the intake nearer than 
Cincinnati, which is 28 miles above Aurora. The water is puri- 
fied by the N". Y. Continental Jewell Filtration Co.'s system. 
The water is soft and flows through 8 miles of 10-inch cast iron 
distributing mains. Galvanized iron is used for the service pipes. 
About 200 families are now using the water at the rate of about 
150,000 gallons per day. This system was completed during the 
past year. 

Lawrenceburg. — The supply for this town is from driven pub- 
lic wells ranging in depth from 40 to 70 feet, private wells and 
cisterns. The water is supposed to come from the Great Miami 
River. 

Moores Hill. — ISTo public supply. Private wells are dug from 
20 to 35 feet deep. Water is from 8 to 15 feet deep. The soil is 
clay with limestone strata. During dry falls the water in the 
wells gets very low. 



169 

DECATUR COUNTY. 

Green sbnrg. — A private concern called the Greenshurg Water 
Co., supplies Greensburg with its water. This was established in 
1889 by the Lndlow Valve Manufacturing Co. The supply is 
from bored wells going through yellow cl'ay and limestone int(» 
rock. The water is puniped direct. There are about ll miles of 
cast iron mains with galvanized iron service pipes, wliich supply 
about 400,000 gallons of water per day. About 500 families, or 
40 per cent., use this water. There are al'so private wells in use. 

Millhausen. — Supply from private dug wiells. They range 
from 24 to 40 feet in depth. Water first class. 

Westport. — Bored and dug wells, and cisterns supply Westport 
with water. 

DEKALB COUNTY. 

Auburn. — In 1898 the Arbuckle-Kyan Co., of Toledo, Ohio, 
built the w^ater-works for the city of Auburn. The water comes 
from five 10-inch drilled wells 94, 224, 234, 238, 242 feet deep 
with a pumping capacity of 1,000,000 gallons every 24 hours. 
The water is pumped direct into the mains, of which there are 
9^ miles of cast iron pipe. The service pipes are lead and gal- 
vanized iron. About 600,000 gallons daily are consumed by 50 
per cent, of the population, or 460 families. There are also pri- 
vate well's. 

Garrett. — In 1896 the City of Garrett built its own water plant 
and gets its water supply from bored wells. These wells are 
bored 150 feet through blue clay into gravel, and the water is 
pumped direct into the mains. About eight miles of mains are 
used in distributing the water, and the service pipes are of gal- 
vanized iron and lead. There are about 500 families using the 
water, or 90 per cent., and the average daily consumption is 
600,000 gallons. 

St. Joe. — No public supply. 

Waterloo. — The Waterloo Water & Light Co. was built in 1902 

by the Olds Construction Co., of Ft. Wayne. This plant furnishes 

_ the water supply for the city. The wells are drilled 768 feet in 

depth, the water" is pumped in a reservoir with a capacity of 

105,000 gallons, and 8,500 feet of mains are used, made of cast 



170 





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171 

iron witli oalvanizod 'won service pipes. Al)ont 20,000 irnlloTis 
are used per day, but only a few of the people nse the water, 
aViont 20 families, or 1 per cent, of the population. 

DELAWARE COUNTY. 

Alhanv. — Six years ago the Albany Water & Light Co., nsing 
a system of drilled wells, began supplying the city of Albany 
with water. The wells are drilled 165 feet, and the water is sup- 
plied by direct pressure. About five miles of cast iron pipe dis- 
tribute the water. The service pipes are of cast iron, and 75 per 
cent, of the population use this supply. 

Eaton. — About a dozen families in Eaton are supplied with 
water piped from a deep well. This water is pumped into an ele- 
vated tank by a gas engine. Private wells supply the rest of the 
town. 

Muncic. — ]\[Tnicie is supplied with water by the Muncie Water 
Works Co., a private conceiii. The water is taken from deep 
wells and White River and Buck Creek. The watershed of Ruck 
Creek is 15 square miles. In the summer there are frequently 
picnic parties along "White River above the intake. Each stream 
at point of intake has an inflow of 5,000,000 gallons daily. There 
is no waste or sewage received in the stream other than that from 
the oil wells, and that is equal to 15 per cent, of the flow of the 
stream at low water. The wells are drilled about 100 feet and 
the supply comes from rock. The water is pumped direct into 
the mains, which are of cast iron. Wrought iron and lead are 
used for the service pipes. The water from White RiveT has an 
unpleasant taste of salt and oil. About 3,500,000 gallons are used 
daily. An auxiliary pump house has now been erected on Buck 
Creek and line run to filter plant at main pumping station to de- 
liver water to filter, from which it is pumped to consumers. 

Selma. — All private wells. About half of them range in depth 
from 65 to 125 feet, and the rest of them from 20 to 40 feet. A 
few cisterns are used for supplying the drinking water. 

DUBOIS COUNTY. 

Birdseye. — Private wells and cisterns supply this town. 
Huntingburg. — In 1893 Huntingburg established a public water 
supply. The water is obtained from a pond covering 20 acres, and 



172 





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6 feet deep, witli a iniid bottom. Th(> wntorshcd is about .">()() 
acres in extent, and is jiartly wooded and ]>artl_v cleared, with 
abont 20 inhaliitants tliereon. Tlie water is jinnipcd from the 
pond into a stand]n])c that has a cajiacitv of 125,000 gallons. At 
times the water develops an unpleasant odor and taste as of decay- 
ing vegetable matter. This water is soft. Four and one-half 
miles of mains are nsed, and these are made of in in with galvan- 
ized iron service pipes, 100,00-1: gallons of water Ix'ing nsed dailw 
and abont 000 families, or 75 per cent., use the water. The city 
is buihling a new pond or lake in addition to the present one, 
which will lun-e an average depth of 20 feet, and cover from 40 to 
50 acres. The watershed will be the same as the old pond, tlic 
ncM' one being immediately below the old. The old pond will Ix; 
nsed as a catch basin. 

Jasper. — The town of Jasper bnilt its water supply about 10 
years ago and uses the water from the Patoka river. The water 
is pumped into a reservoir, and from there flows through about 
four or five miles of distributing mains or iron. One thousand 
families use this supply. The water is soft. In the spring the 
water is not clear, but otherwise is fine water. There are two 
reservoirs in Jasper, but only one is in use. 

ELrKHART COUNTY. 

Bristol. — There is no public supply in Bristol. 

Elkhart. — The Elkhart Water Company, a corporation mainly 
o"v\Tied by Chicago capitalists, was built in 1884. This sui)ply 
consists of five dug wells 34 feet in de])th, in gravel mostly. The 
water is medium soft and gets yellow after a fire. The mains are 
of iron and the service pipes lead. Al)out two-thirds of the popu- 
lation use the water. 

Goshen- — In 1880 the city of Goshen built a public supply. 
There are two open wells 40 feet in diameter and 35 feet deep, 
with a sand bottom, and this water is pumped to a standjiipe. The 
water has an irony taste. About 27 miles of distributing iron 
mains with iron and lead service pipes are in use. About 3,000,- 
000 gallons are consumed daily. Probably only 100 families use 
the water, as wells are plentiful and that water is used. The 
public supply is good. 



174 





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175 

Nappanee. — This town ow^ls a bored well IGO feet deep. The 
water is pumped into a tank 20 feet in diameter and 24 feet deep, 
with a capacity of 75,000 gallons; from this the water flows 
through six miles of iron mains. Very often an unpleasant odor 
and taste develops. About -"^00 families, or 50 per cent, of tlic 
people, use the water, and tliere are 200,000 gallons used dailv. 
There are also many private wells in use. 

Middlebury.^ — There is no regular public water system in this 
town. There are three wells from which six or eight families get 
their water, but the majority of the pco]^l{' have tlicir own wells. 
Some of these wells are driven, a few are drilled, and there are 
still a few open wells in use. 

Millersburg. — Every one in this town owns their own well, 
most of them being the tubular w^ells. There may be a very few 
open wells still in use. The well's go through sand and clay loam 
one foot, yellow clay two feet to eight feet, sand and gravel 10 to 
20 feet, and water is reached 12 to 20 feet from the surface. 

FAYETTE COUNTY. 

Connersville. — In 18G9 the city of Connersville had a public 
water system built by the Holly Water Works Co., of Massa- 
chusetts. This water comes through a hydraulic canal which is 
fed by the west fork of Whitewater river and is pumped from 
the canal' into the city mains. The watershed consists of 250,000 
acres, partly wooded, partly cleared and having about 6,000 in- 
habitants thereon. The flow of the stream is about 5,000,000 
gallons daily. The water at times develops an odor of decaying 
mosses and grasses and is soft. Fifteen to eighteen miles of dis- 
tributing mains are in use. These are of iron, w4th lead and iron 
service pipes. The supply is ample for fire purposes, but is not 
good for drinking purposes, and nearly all the people use well 
water for domestic supply. About 1,000,000 gallons per day of 
the city water is used. . 

FLOYD COUNTY. 

GeorgetowTi — Four dug wells supply this town wdth its water. 
These wells are 43 feet, 41 feet, ?>7 feet and 28 feet deep and are 
all seep well's. One of them develops a sulphur odor and taste at 



176 

times. The water is hard. One of these wells fills up by an un- 
derground supply about 10 feet from the top at every large rain. 
About 50 per cent, of the population use this supply. 

FOUNTAIN COUNTY. 

Attica. — In 1889 Attica rebuilt her public water supply. The 
supply is from bored wells 100 feet deep and bored through loam, 
gravel, w^ater, clay, hard pan, into the gravel and sand contain- 
ing the water used. This water is pumped to a covered reservoir 
200 feet above pump, which has a capacity of 500,000 gallons. 
The flow of the water is 1,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. There 
are six or seven miles of cast iron mains in use, with galvanized 
iron service pipes, and 600 families or about 98 per cent, of the 
population use the water, the average daily consumption being 
275,000. There are but few private wells in use. 

Covington. — The Covington Light and Water Co, built in 1893 
and owned by a corporation, furnishes the water in this town. 
There are two springs which are fed by large streams of water. 
The springs are about 15 feet deep and 18 or 20 feet square. The 
water is pumped to a standpipe about 100 feet high and about 16 
feet in diameter. There are eight or ten miles of cast iron m-ains. 
The service pipes are white metal. About 50,000 gallons per day 
are used, and about 80 per cent, of the people use the water. The 
water has been analyzed several times and has always been found 
to be a pure supply. 

Hillsboro. — Private wells, which are driven from 70 to 85 feet 
deep furnish the water supply at this place. 

Veedersburg. — The town of Veedersburg owns a system of two 
bored wells which was built in 1898. These wells are 36 feet 
deep, going through sandy soil', gravel, subsoil, while the underly- 
ing strata is shale, and 65,000 gallons of water are used each day. 
The water is pumped to a standpipe holding 90,000 gallons, from 
which the water flows through two and one-half miles of cast iron 
mains. Service pipes are of galvanized iron. About 33 per cent, 
of the inhabitants use this supply. The area of the watershed is 
eight acres, with about 25 inhabitants thereon. 

Wallace.— ^o public system. Private wells dug from 22 to 40 
feet and natural springs supply the water. Town is well drained 
by natural waterway. 



177 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Ih'oiikville. — Brookville (^viis its own pulilic water siii)|)ly. It 
was built in 1891 by Thomas ITardman and the water comes from 
a stream. It is primped to a reservoir. At times it becomes mud- 
dy and fisliy, but in winter is clear and c;ood. Four-incli, 8-inch 
and 10-inch cast iron mains are nsed, witli iialvanizc(l inm for 
service pipes. Seventv-five per cent, of the families use the water, 
but it is not nsed for cooking. All the people nse cistern water 
for drinking and domestic purposes. 

Laurel. — There are several to^vn wells in Laurel, and these with 
private wells furnish the supply. Most of the wells are driven, 
going through gravel and alluvial deposit. In the main part of 
toAvn water is found at a depth of 21 feet, and in the upper part 
of town at 30 to 40 feet. One dug w-ell which belongs to the town 
is 48 feet deep. The dug well in the main part of to^^^l is the 
one mostly used. Both these w^lls are sealed with cement. 

Mt. Carmel. — ISTo public supply. 

Oldenburg. — ISTo public supply. 

FULTON COUNTY. 

Kewanna. — Supply for Kewanna is from private wtIIs from 
65 to 90 feet deep. Water haijd, containing much lime. 

Eochester. — In 1893 the town of Koch ester built its public 
water supply. The water is taken from a lake three and one-half 
miles square. It is about 20 feet deep, with muck and sand bot- 
tom, and is fed by springs and Mill creek. The watershed con- 
sists of seven square miles of cleared land and about three square 
miles of wooded land, with 200 inhabitants living thereon. There 
are many picnic parties along the shore of the lake. The water is 
pumped to a standpipe that holds 105,000 gallons. The water has 
an unpleasant odor, like steam from heated, stale rain water, and 
is very soft. Ten* miles of iron mains are in use and the service 
pipes are of lead and galvanized iron. About 150 families, or 25 
per cent., use on an average 400,000 gallons per day. This is not 
used for drinking at all, as every family has a private well. 



12-Bd.ofHealtli. 



178 







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179 

GIBSON COUNTY. 

Ft. Branch. — ISTo public supply. 

Ilazloton. — AVolls, cisterns and springs furnish tlic Avator for 
this toAvn. Land is well drained. 

Oakland Citv. — Tn the fall of 190,3 a private stock company 
bnilt the water system which fnrnishes Oakland City with its 
snpply. Tlie water is taken from a pond covering about 19 acres 
and Avith an average deptli of 12 feet. Tliis has a mud bottom. 
The Avaterslied is about 70 acres in extent Avitli nine inhabitants 
liA'ing on it. The Avater is pumped to a standjnpc having a capac- 
ity of 60,000 gallons. Tn the summer a slight odor is noticeable. 
About four miles of cast iron mains are in use, having galvanized 
iron service pipes. About 200 families, or 40 per cent., use 50,000 
gallons per day. The Avater is soft. 

OAvensville. — 'No public supply. 

Patoka. — Most of this Avater supply is driven Avells from 10 to 
28 feet deep. Sandy soil Avith gravel underlying. 

Princeton. — The Princeton Water & Light Co., a private com- 
pany, was built in 1893. The water is taken from the Patoka 
KiA-er. The Avatershed consists of 350 square miles, 75 miles of 
Avhich are timbered lands and » the balance cleared. Population 
averages 30 to the square mile. The nonnal floAv of the Patoka 
River is about 4,800 gallons per second. There are several small 
toAA^is located above the Avater station and scAvage is receiA'cd in 
the river aboA^e the intake. A standpipe Avith a capacity of 120,- 
000 gallons is used. The Avater is soft and has an unpleasant 
odor and taste at times. Ten miles of cast iron mains with gal- 
vanized service pipes are used. Three hundred thousand gallons 
per day are consumed. About 200 families, or 30 per cent., use 
this supply, but there are also 600 Avells in the tOAvn. 

GRANT COUNTY. 

Fairmount. — Pairmount OAvns its own supply, Avhich was built 
in 1894 by the Howe Pump Co., of Indianajiolis. This supply 
consists of six artesian aa^cH's, from 40 to 100 feet in depth. These 
wells are bored through black loam, subsoil, blue clay, underlying 
strata limestone. The water is pumped by suction and forced 
through mains by pressure. The Avater is hard. They have five 



180 

miles of cast iron mains, with galvanized iron service pipes. Four 
hundred and seventy-five families, or 10 per cent., use the water, 
and there are many wells in the town. 

Gas City. — In 1898 the Seckner Contracting Co., of Chicago, 
built for Gas City its water supply. This is bored wells 300 feet 
in depth, through sandy loam with sandy subsoil. The water is 
forced from wells into reservoir by air compression. The reservoir 
has a capacity of 4,500 barrels, and is 45 feet in diameter and 12 
feet deep. There are 10 miles of cast iron mains and galvanized 
iron service pipes. Four hundred and forty taps are in use, or 
QQ 2-3 per cent, of the population use the water. There are also 
private well's used. 

Marion. — Wells from 120 to 200 feet deep bored into stone fur- 
nish the water supply for Marion, and are owned by the city. 
The resen^oir which holds the water has a capacity of 900,000 gal- 
lons, and the new one when completed will hold 2,000,000 gallons. 
This water has an odor and taste of gas. Twenty-five miles of 
mains of cast iron, with galvaliized service pipes, arte used. Twen- 
ty-six himdred families, or 75 per cent., of the population, use this 
water and about 1,500,000 gallons per day are consumed. The 
water from one of the wells is of a medicinal character. 

Upland. — The Upland Water Works Co., a private corporation, 
furnishes the water supply for this town. The works were built 
in 1892. The water is from a drilled well 250 feet deep, 50 or 
60 feet being in limestone. The soil is clay subsoil, blue clay, 
and perhaps a strata of gravel. The water is pumped direct into 
the mains by a force pump. The water is hard. About two 
miles of distributing mains are used, these and the service pipes 
being of galvanized and wrought iron. The water was analyzed 
several years ago by the State Board of Health. One hundred 
and eighty-five families, or 75 per cent., use this supply. There 
are several private wells in the town, being either drilled or bored 
to gravel 100 feet or more. 

GREENE COUNTY. 

Bloomfield.— The Home Light & Water Co., built in 1904 by 
Geo*. Cadogan Morgan, of Chicago, supplies Bloomfield with its 
water. This is from wells 275 feet deep, capable of supplying 
275,000 gallons daily. These wells are bored through 12 feet of 



181 

clay, then sand rock the balance of the way. It is pumped to a 
standpipe, this holding 35,000 pillons. The water tastes and 
smells of sulphur and is soft. The cast iron mains are fonr and 
one-half miles in extent, and the service pipes are of galvanized 
iron. The water has been analyzed by Robt. E. Lyons, of Indiana 
University. Ninety-two families, or 25 per cent, of the popula- 
tion, consume 30,000 gallons per day, 

Linton. — The Linton Water Co., a private company, built in 
1902 by F. H. Beeman & Co., Louisville, Ky., furnishes the water 
supply of Linton. There are six bored wells averaging 85 feet in 
depth, and now furnishing 300,000 gallons per day, which is half 
the capacity of the wells. The wells are bored through clay loam, 
then 25 to 30 feet blue clay and then 25 to 30 feet good gravel, in 
which the w^ater is found. The Avater is forced into the mains by 
direct pressure, there being IIV2 miles of cast iron mains in use. 
The service pipes are galvanized wrought iron. The water was 
analyzed in 1902 by Dr. J. IST. Hurty, of Indianapolis, Four 
hundred and fifty to 500 families, or 25 or 30 per cent., consume 
daily 300,000 gallons. There are a great many private wells used, 
practically all shallow wells, some of them dangerous. The pub- 
lic supply wells are drilled in Buck Creek Valley, a small' stream 
which goes dry often, in fact is probably dry seven months out of 
the year. This empties into Bee Hunter ditch about a mile south 
of water station. 

Lyons. — ISTo public system. There are a few drilled wells from 
120 to 200 feet deep, but the majority are about 15 to 30 feet 
deep. The soil is mostly clay and black loam, the black loam be- 
ing decayed vegetable matter. 

"Worthington. — The Straw Board Rivers & Co., a private con- 
cern, built in 1897, furnishes the water supply for Worthington. 
This consists of wells bored 50 feet. The water is pumped to a 
standpipe which is 20x100 feet. 

HAMILTON COUNTY. 

Atlanta. — ISTo public supply. 

Arcadia. — There are two public wells drilled 220 feet deep. 
The majority of the citizens own their own drilled wells, ranging 
in depth from 50 to 250 feet. 



182 



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183 

Carniel. — No public system. . 

Cicero. — ISTo public supply. 

l^oblesville. — The Noblesvil'le Water & Light Co., a private 
couipauy, built in 1801 and 1S92, gets the supply for Noblesville 
from driven wells. There are 15 of these wells, ranging in depth 
from 60 to TO feet through hard pan or blue clay into a gravel 
water bed. There are also two limestone wells 350 feet deep,.oper- 
ated by air compressor into reservoir, from which the supply is 
pumped into the water mains. The water from the other wells is 
pumped direct. The reservoir holds about 50,000 gallons. There 
are 12 miles of cast iron mains, with lead and galvanized iron 
service pipes, in use. Five hundred and fifty or GOO families use 
this supply, or about 20 per cent., and 400,000 gallons daily are 
consumed. 

Sheridan. — 'No public supply. 

Westfield. — Xo public supply. 

HANCOCK COUNTY. 

Fortville. — ISTo public supply. 

Greenfield. — Greenfield's supply is from driven wells the water 
from which is pumped. There are several miles of cast iron mains. 
About 90 per cent, of the people use the supply, and 200,000 
gallons daily are consumed. 

HARRISON COUNTY. 

Corydon. — There are two public water supplies in Corydon. 
The town has a spring which furnishes water, and a private con- 
cern, the W. H. Keller Co., built in 1903, which gets its supply 
from the creek. This water is pumped into a reservoir 60x80 and 
8 feet deep. There are about five and a half or six miles of mains 
of cast iron used. Service pipes are of galvanized iron. About 
200 families, or 50 per cent., use the supply. 

Elizabeth. — This toAvn is supplied with water from two public 
wells bored 120 and 78 feet in depth, one dug well 30 feet deep, 
eight private wells and two private springs. 

I^aconia. — No public supply. 

Mauckport. — Public wells from 60 to 70 feet, bored, and one 
dug. 

New Middletown. — No public supply. 



184 





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185 

HENDRICKS COUNTY. 

Brownsburg. — No public supply. 

North Salem. — ISTo public supply. One well is 800 feet deep 
with flowing water. 

Plainfield. — No public supply. 

HENRY COUNTY. 

Knightstown. — This town is supplied with water from a system 
of wells, which was built in 1894 by the Boughen Engineering 
Co., of Cincinnati. The wells are all bored to about 60 feet in 
depth, through four feet of soil, 15 feet of gravel, 40 feet of shale 
into limestone. There are eight of these wells. This water is 
pumped direct in day time, but standpipe service is used at night. 
The capacity of the standpipe is 100,000 gallons. Six miles of 
cast iron mains are used and the service pipes are galvanized iron. 
Two hundred and seventy-five families, or 50 per cent., use the 
supply, which averages about 60,000 gallons, consumed daily. 

New Castle. — In 1889 this city built its own piiblic water sup- 
ply, consisting of wells drilled from 106 to 170 feet deep. The 
water is on top of a limestone strata. It is pimiped to two res- 
ervoirs with a capacity of 9,000 gallons each. These are 10 feet 
deep by 40 feet wide. The water is hard. Cast iron mains 10 
miles in extent are used, with galvanized iron service pipes. About 
750 families, or 75 per cent, of the population, use the water, and 
the average daily consumption is 750,000 gallons. 

Middletown. — Middletown's supply consists of three artesian 
wells bored by the to^^ai in 1896. These wells are 86 feet in depth 
and the flow is about three barrel's a minute. There is an odor of 
sulphur at the dead ends of the mains. Four or five miles of 
cast iron mains in use. Galvanized iron used for service pipes. 
Two hundred families, or 50 per cent, of the population, use this 
supply. 

HOWARD COUNTY. 

Greentown. — A private plant has recently been installed in this 
town by the Delon & Co. Water Supply Co. The supply is a 
drilled well 100 or 125 feet deep of 4-inch galvanized iron pipe. 
The water is pumped into a covered reservoir 12 feet in diameter 



186 





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187 

by 12 feet in hoiiilit. As yet thcvo lias been only one mile of mains 
laid and this is of galvanized iron. About 25 families arc using 
the water as yet. There are also many drilled wells iu the town. 

HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Andrews.- — ISTo public supply. 

Hunting-ton. — In 1890 a public supply of drilled wells was es- 
tablished for the city of Huntington by William MeGrew. These 
well's are drilled to a depth of 100 feet through soil, blue clay, 
subsoil, clay, underh^ing strata stone. The water is pumped to 
a standpipe having a capacity of 500,000 gallons. At times the 
water has the smell and taste of mossy river water, but it is be- 
lieved if the mains were thoroughly flushed the water would be 
all' right. There are over 22 miles of distributing mains used, and 
they are of cast iron pipe with lead service pipes. One million 
gallons daily are consumed and 1,500 families, or 65 per cent!, use 
the water. 

Markle. — ISTo public supply. 

Roanoke. — Private wells furnish the supply for this town. 

JACKSON COUNTY. 

Brownstown. — In 1898 the Phoenix Construction Co., of Chi- 
cago, built for Bro-wnstown their water supply. This consists of 
one dug well 15 feet in diameter and 25 feet deep, Avith a capacity 
of 400 gallons per minute in summer, and in winter it can 
not b© exhausted at all. Water enters through strata of gravel 
20 to 25 feet deep, which extends to White Piver, one mile dis- 
tant. Water comes to within 12 feet of the surface in summer. 
The soil is sandy. The water is pumped into a reservoir holding 
90,000 gallons. There are two miles of mains of cast iron Avith 
service pipes of galvanized iron. About 33 1-3 per cent, of the 
people, or one hundred families, use the water. 

Seymour. — The Seymour Water Co., a private company, had 
its plant built in 1889 by W. E. McMillan. The, water is taken 
from east fork of White River and pumped to a standpipe 16 
feet in diameter by 100 feet high. The water shed includes all 
that portion of the state drained by oast fork of White River 
above the intake of the Avater supply. Xo sewage or Avaste is re- 
ceiA^ed in the stream nearer than Cohunbus, thirty miles above. 



188 



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189 

The water is soft. Cast iron pipes 10 miles in length, with 
wrought iron service pipes. Alx>ut 550 families, or from 20 to 30 
per cent, of the people, nse the snpjily. About 1,000,000 gallons 
daily are used. The water company has completed recently a fil- 
tration plant with a capacity sufficient to filter the entire sup])ly 
for the city. This is known as the Continental-Jewel filtration 
system. 

Crothersville.^ — No public supply. 

JASPER COUNTY. 

Remington. — The Remington water works, o^\Tied by the town 
and built in 1897, gets its supply from bored wells. There are 
.three of these wells ; one a 1-inch well, is 360 feet deep, 2-inch well 
is 250 feet deep, 3-inch well is 200. The soil is black loam, un- 
derlaid by slate, then hard rock, almost like marble. The water 
is pumped to a reservoir. 

Rensselaer. — Rensselaer owns its own water supply, which was 
built in 1898 by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co., and which con- 
sists of a drilled well. This is drilled in rock something over 800 
feet deep. A tank holding 100,000 gallons and over 100 feet high 
has the water pumped to it. There are five miles of cast iron 
mains, with lead and galvanized iron service pipes. Two hundred 
and seventy-two families, or 50 per cent, of the population, use 
the supply, and the average daily consumption is 300,000 gallons. 
There are also a good many private wells in use, all drilled in the 
rock. 

JAY COUNTY. 

Dunkirk. — A system of four driven wells, built in 1894, con- 
stitutes the water supply of Dunkirk. These wells are driven 200 
feet and the Avater is pumped to a reservoir. The water is lime- 
stone. About 10 miles of distributing mains of iron, with lead 
and galvanized iron service pipes, are in use. Three hundred and 
fifty families, or 60 per cent., use the supply. 

Portland. — Portland owns a supply of artesian wells built in 
1890 by Pred Bimel. These wells are 100 feet deep with a flow of 
300,000 gallons daily. They are driven through clay soil into 
limestone. There are 15 miles of cast iron mains, with lead serv- 



190 

ice pipes, wliicli are supplied by gravity. Three liimdred thousand 
gallons are consumed daily. About 300 families, or 50 per cent., 
use the M^ater. There are also private well's in use. 
Eedkey. — !N"o public supply. 

JEFFERSON COUNTY. 

Madison. — This city owns its own public water supply, built 
in 1871, and which gets its supply from the Ohio River and five 
wells. The current of the river is two miles per hour. The well's 
are bored, average depth being 100 feet, through fine sand all the 
way. The supply is good, though hard. The water is pumped 
to a reservoir 80 feet in diameter and 20 feet deep with a ca- 
pacity of 720,000 gallons. Twenty miles of distributing mains 
of cast iron, with iron and lead service pipes, are used, and 1,100,- 
000 gallons are consumed daily. Six hundred and fifty families, 
or 95 per cent., of the people use the supply. 

Brooksburg. — Supply is from private cisterns. 

JENNINGS COUNTY. 

Vernon. — The town of Vernon owns its public supply, which 
was built in 1893, and which gets its water from the Muscatatuck 
Creek. The watershed is from 25 to 50 square miles. The water 
is pumped to a standpipe eight feet in diameter and 75 feet high. 
The water is soft. Two miles of cast iron mains, with cast iron 
service pipes, are in use. Eighty families, or 60 per cent, of the 
people, use about 20,000 gallons daily. jSTone of the people use 
the water for drinking or domestic purposes, as that is supplied by 
private cisterns. 

ISTorth Vernon.^This town built its o^m public supply in 1892 
and gets the supply from the north fork of the Muscatatuck River 
and also from numerous springs. The watershed area is 15 miles 
long and two miles wide. Fifty per cent, is cleared. The water 
is pumped to a standpipe, which holds 90,000 gallons. The water 
is soft. Six miles of cast iron distributing mains are used with 
cast iron sersdce pipes. Three hundred and fifty families, or 50 
per cent, of the population, use the supply, and 250,000 gallons 
daily are used. The plant was built by the Bohen Engineering 
Co., Cincinnati. 



191 

JOHNSON COFNTY. 

Edinbiirg. — In 1893 Edinbiirg lind 1)uill for liic town a tlug 
well, Stevens fr Berhvnrds, eontractoi-.s, Logansport, Ind., building 
the same. This woW is 20 foet deep and If! feet wide, and dug iu 
a gravel bed. It is a\;i11c(1 witli an IS-inoli wall of liard brick lai<l 
in cement, gravel bottom. The water ordinarily stands about 10 
feet in the well, but with the pump running continuously the 
water stands about four feet in the well. It is pumped to a stand- 
]npc having a capacity of 42.,500 gallons. Water is hard. Four- 
inch, 6-inch, 8-inch and 10-inch glazed iron pipes are used for the 
four and a half miles of distributing mains; galvanized iron is 
used for service pipes. The supply is used by 125 families, or 
about 33 per cent, of the population, and 1G9,205 gallons are 
consumed daily. 

Franklin. — The Franklin Water & Light Co., owned l)y the city 
and built in 1890, furnishes the' water supply for this toAvn. The 
supply is from bored wells 150 to 200 feet deep with the water 
pumped to a standpi]ie and reservoir, the capacity of the stand- 
pipe being 12,000 gallons. At times the water develops a smell 
and taste like pond water. The supply is hard. Cast iron mains 
eight miles in length, with galvanized iron service pipes, supply 
the 275,000 gallons daily, which is used by 50 per cent, of the 
people. Private wells and cisterns are also used. 

Greenwood. — The Citizens' Water & Light Co., a private com- 
pany, built three years ago, furnishes Greenwood with its public 
water supply. The water is from an 8-inch cased drilled well 
68 feet deep, which is pumped into the mains. There are three 
and a half miles of cast iron di'^tributing mains, the service pipes 
of which are of galvanized iron and lead. There are about 20 
families, or 5 per cent, of tlie people, using this supply, and 50,000 
gallons are used daily for all purposes. I^early all the families 
have their own wells. 

KNOX COUNTY. 

Vincennes. — The Yincennes Water Supply Co., a private 
corporation, built in 1886 by S. E. Bullock &: Co., of jSTew York, 
gets its supply from the AVabash River. The water is pumped to 
a standpipe after being filtered, the capacity of the standpipe be- 
ing 600,000 galhms. The distributing mains are of cast iron, 



192 



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193 

and enameled, there being 18 miles of mains in use. The service 
pipes are galvanized iron. Three hundred families, or 10 per 
cent, of the population, use this supply, and the average daily con- 
sumption is 800,000 gallons. At least 90 per cent, of the people 
use the water from driven wells in their yards. 

KOSCIUSKO COUNTY, 

Claypool. — 'No public supply. 

Etna Green. — No public supply. 

Leesburg. — Private driven wells furnish the supply of this 
town. I 

Mentone. — Dug, driven and bored wells furnish the water for 
this town. Some of it is of bad quality. 

Milford. — Milford owns a system of wells built in 1902, which 
furnishes the public water for this town. There are four wells 
driven 408 feet to gravel and sand. The water is pumped to a 
standpipe. Over two miles of distributing mains of cast iron, 
with galvanized service pipes, are in use. Fifty-five families, or 
25 per cent., use this supply. 

Pierceton. — In 1897 this town had a tubular well built, eight 
inches in diameter, by the C. L. Olds Co., of Ft. Wayne. This 
well is 212 feet deep through soil, clay, gravel and sand. It is 
pumped into a supply tank with a capacity of 500 barrels. Cast 
iron pipe is used for the distributing mains, of which there are 
about two miles, and gas and lead pipe are used for service pipes. 
Seventy-five per cent, of the population use the supply and about 
15,000 to 20,000 gallons daily are used. 

Silver Lake. — No public supply. 

Warsaw. — A private company, called the Warsaw Water Works 
Company, furnishes the supply for Warsaw. The water is taken 
from a small lake about 100 acres in area with a sandy and 
marshy bottom. The watershed is about 300 acres with residences 
half way around, farm and marsh rest of the way. There is a 
standpipe, but it is seldom used, though it is full at all times. The 
water is pumped by direct pressure. The water develops a fishy 
taste and smell, and at times of decaying growths. Six miles 
of mains of cast iron, with galvanized iron service pipes, are 
used. There are 725 subscribers for this supply, or about 25 per 

X3—Bd. of Health. 



194 




195 

cent. About 1,000,000 gallons per day are nsed. All drinking 
or water for domestic nse is from private wells, as tlic iml)lic 
supply is not fit, i 

LAGRANGE COUNTY. 

Lagrange. — Lagrange owns and operates its public water sup- 
ply, whicli was built in 189-3 by Gordon Co., Hamilton, O. Tliis 
consists of six wells, average depth 90 feet, soil glacial drift with 
reservoir under three or more clay strata. These wells are bored 
and pipes driven in bore with perfect plugging. The water is 
pumped direct into the mains, of which there are four and one- 
half miles. The mains are of cast iron, with galvanized iron serv- 
ice pipes. There are 230 families, and 50 business houses, or 55 
per cent, of the population, using the supply. These wells are 
supposed to be bored into a large lake or reservoir which is struck 
at 90 feet. The water is very abundant and potable. 

Wolcottville. — ISTo public supply. 

LAKE COUNTY. 

Crown Point. — In 1895 and 1896 the Seckner Contracting Co. 
built a system of wells for Crown Point. These wells are of six- 
inch pipe and are 81, 75, 69 and 57 feet. The soil is clay and 
water sand. This Avater is pumped to a reservoir and then to a 
standpipe. The standpipe is 12x100 feet and the reservoir is 
8x10 feet. The water is hard. Six miles of mains are used of 
cast iron. The service pipes are galvanized iron and lead. About 
40 per cent, of the town use the water and 100,000 gallons ]ier day 
are consumed. Many private wells are also used. 

East Chicago. — In 1894 the city of East Chicago l)uilt their 
public system. This has been in the hands of a receiver since No- 
vember, 1903. The water is from Lake Michigan and is pumped 
to a standpipe 16 feet in diameter and 95 feet high. The lake re- 
ceives waste from the Standard Oil Company's plant at Whiting. 
The water tastes and smells of petroleum and decayed organic 
matter and is soft. Twenty-five miles of cast iron mains, with 
lead and galvanized iron service pipes, are used. Fifteen hundred 
to 1,600 families, or 95 per cent, of the population, use this sup- 
ply, and 3,000,000 gallons daily are consumed. 



196 







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197 

Hammond. — Hammond owns its own public supply, which was 
built in 1S92 by the Lake Water Co. The source of the supply is 
Lake Michigan. The lake receives sewage, etc., from South Chi- 
cago, 111. The water is pumped direct from the lake into the 
mains, of which there are from 65 to 67 miles. There is an odor 
and taste of petroleum from the Standard Oil Co. at Whiting. 
The mains and service pipes are of iron. The cutire population 
uses this supply and about 6,000,000 gallons per day are con- 
sumed. 

Hobart. — The supply of Hobart is from wells which were built 
by John P. Dales. These wells are dug and driven through sub- 
soil, and the water is pumped to a standpipe. There are four 
miles of cast iron mains, 8-inch, 6-inch and 4-inch, and 115 famil- 
ies use the supply, or 35 per cent, of the population. Twenty-two 
thousand gallons per day are used. The standpipe holds 56,000 
gallons. 

Lowell. — Lowell owns an 8-iuch bored well 187 feet deep, which 
was built for the town in 1898 by the John P. Dales Co., of Chi- 
cago. The well is bored 80 feet through solid rock, and the water 
rises to within five feet of the surface. The capacity of the lift 
pump is 500,000 gallons per day. This water is pumped to a 
standpipe 100 feet high and 20 feet in diameter with a capacity 
of 80,000 gallons. At times the water develops an unpleasant 
odor and taste. The supply is soft. Cast iron mains four miles 
in extent and of 4-inch, 6-inch and 8-inch pipe distribute the 
water. The service pipes are %-inch gas pipe. Two hundred and 
forty families, or 70 per cent., use the supply. 

Whiting. — The Standard Oil Co. built a plant at Whiting about 
15 years ago, and still own it. The water is taken from Lake 
Michigan and is supplied by direct pressure. Occasionally the 
water develops an oily taste. Ten miles of mains are used, these 
and the service pipes both being of iron. The entire population, 
probably from 1,000 to 1,200 people, use the supply, and from 
500,000 to 1,000,000 gallons per day are used. 

LAPORTE COUNTY. 

Laporte. — In 1870 the city of Laporte built its public water 
supply. The water is obtained from Pine and Stone lakes with a 
large well and pumps five miles east in Little Kanlcakee bottom. 



198 

The area of the two lakes is about one and a half square miles, 
depth of the lakes is estimated at 12 feet, with places 50 feet 
deep, sandy bottom mostly. The watershed area is about four 
square miles, one- fourth wooded and three-fourths cleared, with 
400 inhabitants tliereon. There are many summer cottages on 
these lakes and picnic parties are held there often. The well of 
the Little Kankakee is sunk at the foot of the eastern slope, upon 
the marsh, and is of brick. It is 30 feet in diameter, 25 feet deep 
and is covered. The bottom is sand. This is pumped by electric- 
ity, which is generated at the pumping station at Laporte. The 
water is distributed from the reservoir by Nordyke pumps. The 
reservoir is part of Lily Lake fenced off and is about 60 feet in 
diameter and five feet deep. The water is hard and the water 
from the well has considerable mineral salts in it. Cast iron 
is used for the mains and wrought iron for the service pipes. 
One million gallons a day are consumed, and about 50 per cent, 
of the population use the water, but it is not used for drinking or 
domestic purposes as that supply is all from private wells. 

Michigan City. — The Michigan City Water Co. was established 
in 1888 and the city now controls it and owns most of the stock. 
The state also has a water plant for supplying the State Prison. 
The water is taken from Lake Michigan, and is supplied by di- 
rect pressure. At times the water develops an unpleasant odor 
and taste. It is soft, and there are 18 miles of mains used. 
These are of cast iron, and the service pipes are iron and lead. 
About 1,300 families, or 25 per cent, of the population, use the 
supply, and 2,700,000 gallons per day are consumed. There are 
many private wells used, these varying from 15 to 50 feet. The 
intake is at a depth of about 42 feet, not entirely below the depth 
of driftwood. It is also at the distauce from the shore where slush 
ice is common and often the current takes the sewage from the 
city at least into the neighborhood of the intake. But when the 
conditions are such as were evidently contemplated when the 
plant was built, pure water is obtained. 

Westville. — ISTo public water supply. 

LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Bedford. — Tliis city owns its water plant, which was built in 
1892. The supply is taken from the east fork of White Kiver, 
and is pumped to a standpipe having a capacity of 36,000 gallons. 



199 

















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The water is soft and there are 10 miles of distributing mains. 
These mains are of cast and wrought iron and the service pipes 
are galvanized iron. Four himdred families, or 25 per cent, use 
the water, and 1,500,000 gallons daily are consumed. The water 
is not filtered and is not used for drinking purposes except by very 
few. Private wells furnish most of the drinking water. 

Mitchell. — Bored and dug well's furnish the supply for this 
town. 

Oolitic. — ISTo public supply. 

MADISON COUNTY. 

Alexandria. — In 1894 the Segner Contracting Co. built a sys- 
tem of wells for Alexandria. These wells are drilled 300 to 900 
feet deep, and one is a flowing well, which is connected with the 
pumping station by common iron pipe, but it is to be replaced 
with wood pipes. The water is pumped to a standpipe with a 
capacity of 235,000 gallons. The water is hard and at times has 
a slight taste of iron. About four and a half miles of cast iron 
distributing mains are used, with galVanizod wrought iron service 
pipes. About 800 families use this supply and the average daily 
consumption is 500,000 gallons. There are also many private 
wells. 

Anderson.— Eleven or twelve years ago the city of Anderson 
built a public water supply, which gets its water from White River. 
This stream is very variable, volume indefinite, slow current, shal- 
low; no sewage goes in the stream within three miles above the 
intake of the supply at present. The water is supplied by direct 
pressure from clear well. There are thirty-one miles of distrib- 
uting mains of standard cast iron with lead and galvanized iron 
service pipes. About 2,100 taps are used, or about 50 per cent, 
of the people use the water, and the average amount used daily 
is 2,000,000 gallons. There are also many private wells. A me- 
chanical filter plant has been installed recently and is doing good 
work. During hot weather a grassy odor was noticeable in the 
raw river water, but is not in the filtered. 

Elwood. — The Elwood Water Co., a private company, built in 
1891, furnishes Elwood with its public water supply. The sys- 
tem is one of driven wells ranging from 100 to 175 feet in depth 
and furnishing from 15,000 to 20,000 gallons per day. The soil 



201 





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202 

is loose subsoil, and hardpan with an nnderlying strata of gravel". 
The water is pumped into the mains except in case of fire, when 
water from a reser\^oir is forced into the mains. At some of the 
hydrants there is a musty odor. Iron mains are used 17 miles in 
extent and iron and lead service pipes are used. Seven hundred 
or 800 families, or five or six per cent, of the population, use the 
supply and about 100,000 gallons per day are consumed. Many 
private wells are used, these generally being shallow or from 10 to 
20 feet in depth. 

Frankton.— In the fall of 1809 the W. II. Wheeler Co. built 
for the town of Frankton a ]mblic system. This supply consists 
of a dug well 25 feet deep, dug in water bearing gravel. The water 
stands 11 or 12 feet in the well, which is 20 feet in diameter. The 
water is hard. Three miles of mains of cast iron are used, with 
iron service pipes. There are about 60 or 75 taps in use, but less 
than one per cent, use tliis water for drinking, the drinking water 
coming from private wells. The public supply is used mostly for 
sprinkling lawns and streets, and 50,000 gallons daily are used. 

Ingalls.— rlSTo public supply. 

Lapel. — No public supply. 

Orestes. — No public supply. 

Pendleton. — All private wells, mostly drilled from 40 to 150 
feet. 

Perkinsville. — ISTo public supply. 

Summitville.— The Summitville Water Co., built in 1902 
and owned by the town, furnishes the public water supply. The 
supply is from a drilled well 400 feet deep, drilled through Tren- 
ton rock into shale. The water at times develops an unpleasant 
odor and taste and is sometimes the color of brick. It is hard. 
Three miles of cast iron mains, with galvanized iron seiwice pipes, 
are in use, ]S[inety families, or about -30 per cent of the popula- 
tion, use the water. 

MARION COUNTY. 

Broad Ripple. — ISTo public supply. All water used is from 
private wells, 

Indianapolis. — The city of Indianapolis is supplied with water 
by the Indianapolis Water Co., a private company, built in 1870. 
The supply is obtained from deep wells and a canal from White 



203 

River, which is (hiinniod nltoul 10 miles nliovi' llic iutnkc, IIium 
providing a largo storage reservoir. This rescrxoir m- hike is 
largely frequented by visitors and during tlio summer season tliou- 
sands visit the ])ark along its sluu-es each day. Canoeing and bf»at- 
ing is not piv>liil>itcd and all waste iVoni tlic adjacent park Hows 
into the river. The stream also receives sewage in large (juanti- 
ties from above the intake. The average depth of the wells is 300 
feet, capacity 18,000,000 gallons every 24 hours; and the capacity 
of the filtration system is 24,000,000 gallons per 24 hours. The 
water is supplied by direct pressure system. There are 270 miles 
of mains used in distributing the water, and these are of cast iron 
with lead pipe used in the streets. There are 16,000 taps in 
service, and including factories and school's, etc., the nundier is 
estimated at 100,000 using the supply. The city owns and op- 
erates water works in that part of the city called Brightwood. 

iNew Augusta. — Private wells supply this town. 

Southport — ]Sro public supply. 

MAllSHALL COUNTY. 

Argbs. — In 1897 this town built a public supply, which con- 
sists of a well driven through soil, sand, subsoil, clay, underlying 
strata of l»lue clay. The water is pumped to a cistern which is 
entirely enclosed. Its capacity is 800 barrels. Cast iron is used 
for the mains, of which there are five miles, and galvanized iron 
is used for service pipes. Porty or fifty familie~s, or 10 per cent., 
use the supply, and about 30,000 gallons per day are consumed. 
There are also many private well's driven about 20 to 30 feet. 

Bourbon. — The Union Water, Light & Power Co., a private 
concern, built in 1899 by Duke j\l. Farson, of Chicago, furnishes 
Bourbon with its public supply. This consists of bored wells 8 
inches in diameter and 150 feet deep. The water is pumped to 
a standpipe with a capacity of 60,000 gallons. Four miles of 
standard cast iron pipes are used for the mains, with galvanized 
iron for service pipes. About 25 families use the supply for all 
purposes and about 100 for sprinkling, or four per cent, for do- 
mestic purposes and 10 per cent, for all purposes. An average 
of 30,000 gallons per day is used. There are many private well's 
in this town. There is also a reservoir with a capacity of 20,000 



204 

gallons, with a force pump wliicli is used for fire purposes. This 
is separate from the standpipe. 

Bremen. — Twelve years ago the town of Bremen built a public 
system of wells. There are six of these well's bored to a depth 
of 65 feet, through soil, muck, quicksand, clay, hard pan, then 
limestone or slatey layer into gravel. The w^ater is pumped to a 
standpipe holding 2,Y00 barrels. This water is hard. Iron and 
galvanized iron service pipes are used for the five miles of dis- 
tributing mains. Two hundred thousand gallons daily are con- 
sumed and 90 per cent, of the population use the supply. There 
are many private w^ells in use. 

Plymouth. — This town owns a system of flowing wells from 40 
to 200 feet deep, which were built about 10 years ago. The water 
is supplied by direct pressure and contains sulphur, iron and mag- 
nesia. The mains are of iron and some wood pipes are used. 
The service pipes are of iron. About 150,000 gallons daily are 
consumed. 

MARTIN COUNTY. 

Loogootee. — 'No public supply. . 

Shoals. — No public supply. 

MIAMI COUNTY. 

Amboy. — Private drilled wells supply this town. 

Bunker Hill. — ISTo public supply. 

Converse. — In 1892 the town of Converse had built a system of 
drilled wells 240 feet deep. These wells are drilled through clay, 
soil, subsoil, gravel, shale and rock. The water is pumped to a 
tank on steel trestle, with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. There is 
no odor or unpleasant taste, but it leaves a red deposit. The water 
is hard. Cast iron is used for the two miles of mains, and gal- 
vanized iron is used for service pipes. About 180 families 
use the supply, or 75 per cent., and 135,000 gallons daily are 
used for all purposes. 

Macy. — No public supply. 

Peru. — The city of Peru built a system of drilled wells in 1878. 
These wells are about 470 feet in depth and are drilled in lime- 
stone. Part of the water is pumped to a reservoir. The water is 



205 

hard limestone. There are ahont 25 miles of distributing mains, 
and these are of cast iron with lead service pipes. Probably 1,700 
families nse the supply, and 1,500,000 gallons daily are con- 
sumed. There are many private well used. 

MONROE COUNTY. 

Bloomington. — The Bloomington Water Works Co., built in 
1893 for the city, gets its supply from a pond which is 32 acres 
in area and 15 feet deep, with a mud bottom. The watershed is 
ll/o miles square and is both wooded and cleared, with three fami- 
lies living thereon. The water is pumped to a reservoir and from 
there is pumped direct into the mains. The water is filtered 
through a bed 60 feet square and 8 feet deep, filled with 3 feet 
of sand and gravel. Fourteen miles of mains are used, these 
consisting of cast iron pipes for distributing mains and galvan- 
ized wrought iron for service pipes. Seven himdred families, or 
40 per cent, of the population, use this supply, and probably 60 
per cent, use cistern water. About 30 per cent, use water filtered 
through charcoal and gravel. 

Ellettsville. — "No public supply. 

MONTGO^IBRY COUNTY. 

Alamo. — 'No public supply. 

Crawfordsville. — The Crawfordsville Water & Light Co., built 
in 1885 by Commegys & Lewis, is owned by a private company. 
The supply is from springs and wells, the springs being 12 to 18 
feet deep and the wells 50 to 200 feet deep. The wells are driven 
through soil, sand and gravel to a depth of 200 feet, then follows 
400 feet of shale. The water is pumped to a standpipe. from a 
reservoir, the standpipe being 16 feet in diameter by 175 feet high, 
and the reservoir is 12 feet deep and 80 feet in diameter. There 
are about 15 miles of cast iron mains, and wrought iron is used 
for the service pipes. About 500 families use the supply and 
1,000,000 gallons are used daily for all purposes. There are 
many private wells also in use. 

Darlington. — A private company o'utis and operates a supply 
for this to^vn. The water is taken from a spring. Two miles of 
distributing mains are used, and these and the service pipes are 
of iron. Fifty families, or about 33^ per cent, use the supply. 
Many private wells are also used. 



206 





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207 

Ladoga. — lio public supply. 

Linden. — ISTo public supply. 

New Ross. — 1^0 public supply. 

TVaveland. — ]^o public supply. 

Wayneto^vn. — No public supply. 

Wingate. — Private well's furnish the supply for this town. 

MORGAN COUNTY. 

]\rnrtinsvillc. — In 1893 the town of Martinsville built a dug 
well 35 feet deep. The water is pumped direct into the mains, 
of Avhich there are seven mile,'^ of cast iron. Eighty per cent, of 
tlie ]io])ulatiou use about 000,000 gallons daily. There are also 
many private wells in use. 

j\Iooresville. — A private company called the Public Service 
Company furnishes Mooresville with its public supply. Built 
in 1904, this supply consists of two drilled wells. One is an 
8-inch well bored 311 feet, but this is not in use. The other is 
40 feet deep, then drilled through rock eight feet. This well is 14 
feet in diameter, walled with brick and then an 8-inch space be- 
tween the wall, and the clay is solidly concreted. This is walled 
down for 20 feet with the brick. Most of the water in this well 
rises from the bottom through drill holes and stands at a height of 
about IS feet. The rate of the flow is about 150 gallons per min- 
ute. There are 3^4 miles of mains, and these are of cast iron 
with galvanized iron service pipes. About 78 families use the 
supply, or IS per cent, of the population, and the average daily 
consumption is 15,000 gallons. 

Paragon.^ — Driven wells furnish the supply for each family. 

NEWTON COUNTY. 

Brook. — No public supply. 

Goodland. — Private wells bored and dug furnish the supply. 

Kentland. — Iventland owns a well which was bored in 1895 for 
gas and is about 1,100 feet deep, with the water supply coming 
from a depth of about 300 feet. This is bored through black soil, 
clay subsoil and sand and clay. This water is pumped to a reser- 
voir 20 feet in- diameter and 20 feet high. The water has an un- 
pleasant odor and taste of carbon bisulphide. 



208 



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209 

and is soft. Two miles of irou mains, with galvanized service 
pipes, are used. Eighty-five families use the water, or about 40 
per cent. There are also private wells in the town. The water 
from the hydrants varies in color from milky to almost black. 

Morocco. — Private wells bored to limestone rock furnish this 
town with its supply. 

Mount Ayr. — Private wells bored from 50 to 200 feet supply 
the water for public use in Moimt Ayr. 

NOBLE COUNTY. 

Albion. — In 1895 this town had Olds, of Ft. Wayne, build for 
it a system of driven wells. These wells are 97 feet deep and are 
driven through soil, black loam, subsoil, blue clay; underlying 
strata, gravel. The water is pumped by direct pressure and is 
hard. Iron pipes are used for the mains and service pipes and 
about eight miles of distributing mains are in use. Two hundred 
and fifty families, or 60 per cent, of the population, use this sup- 
ply, and about 50,000 gallons daily are used. 

Avilla. — Avilla owns its own water supply, which it 
built some time ago ; this consists of a drilled well 100 feet deep, 
the water from which is pumped to a reservoir 18 feet high by 18 
feet in diameter. The watershed is 1^/4 square miles cleared and 
with 750 inhabitants. The supply is slightly hard and fiows 
through 1% miles of distributing mains. These mains are of 4- 
inch iron pipes with %-inch galvanized iron service pipes. Sev- 
enty-five families use the water, and an average of 500 gallons 
daily is used. Bored wells owned by the people are also used. 

Ligonier. — Sixteen years ago Ligonier built a public water sup- 
ply, and in 1904 and 1905 a new plant was installed. This sup- 
ply is of driven wells, four in number, 65 feet, 126 feet, 82 feet 
and 92 feet in depth. These wells are driven through upper soil, 
sand and gravel, 10 feet deep, blue clay about 30 feet deep, then 
water gravel. About 170 feet is sandstone and beyond that fine 
sheet water. The water is pumped to a tank that holds 100,000 
gallons. Cast iron is used for the distributing mains, and gal- 
vanized wrought iron is used for service pipes. ISHne miles of 
mains are used to distribute the water, and 350 taps are used, or 
about 50 per cent, of the people use the supply, and an average of 
200,000 gallons per day is used. 

14-Bd. of Health. 



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211 

Tvcn<l;illvillc.- The lowii (tf Kendallvillo inslallod ;i puM'io. Avator 
sujiplj in 1SS7, which consists of driven wells, raiiuiiiii in i}v[)th 
from 50 to 70 feet. The wells are driven through hard pan at 'M) 
feet to water gravel. The water is supplied by direct pressure. 
This town is located at the source of the Elkhart Rixcr watershed. 
Ten miles of cast iron mains, with galvanized iron and lead scr\-- 
ice pipes, are in use. Every 24 hours .'jOOjOOO liallons of water 
are pumped, and 450 families, or 50 per cent, of the people, use 
the supply. 

OHIO COUNTY. 

Rising' Sun. — Water from cisterns and driven wtdls supply this 
towTi with its water. 

ORANGE COUNTY. 

French Lick. — A public supply is being installed in this town 
which will get its supply from a stream 3x3 feet square. The 
hotels use the mineral water which comes from numerous springs, 
and also water which is pumped from French Lick Creek and is 
filtered by private filters. 

Orleans. — N"o public supply. 

Paoli. — In 18.95 a private company built a water supply in 
Paoli which was afterward sold to the town. The source of the 
supply is Lick Creek, which is inexhaustible and of good qual- 
ity. This is pumped to a reservoir. Cast iron is used for the 
mains, and galvanized and black iron for the service pipes. One 
hundred families use this water, or about 40 per cent. There are 
also several private cisterns used and several public wells that are 
deep. 

West Baden. — The West Baden Springs Co., a private com- 
pany built 12 years ago, furnishes the supply for this town. The 
source of the water is Lost River, a stream the volimie of which 
is unknown. The watershed is cleared land 6 square miles in 
area with no inhabitants. The reservoir holds 1,000,000 gallons 
and is 600 square feet in area and 10 feet deep. There are two 
miles of mains of cast iron pipe, with galvanized iron service 
pipes. Fifty families, or 50 per cent, of the population, use this 
supply. The water is soft. 



212 

OWEN COUNTY. 

Gosport. — iN'o public supply. 
Spencer. — No public supply. 

PARKE COUNTY. 

Diamond. — "No public supply. 

Eockville. — In 1903 Rockville established a public water sup- 
ply for the business portion of the town, which consists of driven 
well's, 106 feet deep. Twenty-four hours' flow raises five feet of 
water in a tank 18 feet in diameter. The well is driven through 
hardpan. The water is pumped to a tank holding 34,000 gallons. 
Iron is used for the mains and service pipes and about one-half 
mile of distributing mains are used. The business portion of the 
town and a few families living in the business section are the only 
ones using the supply. This is only a small plant erected by the 
town to supply business houses, court house, jail, electric light 
plant, etc. The resident district is supplied entirely by wells. 

Rosedale. — 'No public supply. Water is from cisterns and driv- 
en wells. 

PERRY COUNTY. 

Cannelton. — The Cannelton Water Works, a private corporation 
built about 12 years ago by W. W. Taylor, furnishes this town 
with its water supply. The source of the supply is the Ohio River 
and the water is pumped to a reservoir 150x100x20 feet. The 
water is soft. Four miles of distributing mains are used, these 
being of wood with galvanized iron service pipes. Two hundred 
families, or 50 per cent., use 25,000 gallons per day. The Secre- 
tary of the Board of Health reports that the water at times de- 
velops a very bad odor, and that the reservoir is nothing but a 
mud hole on the side of the hill, not protected in any way, and 
with a green scum over it most of the time. 

Tell City. — Tell City owns a plant which was installed in 1902 
and was built by A. C. Kennedy, of Rockport. The supply is 
from wells situated on the banks of the Ohio River, but water is 
said not to be derived from the river. The wells are 80 feet deep 
through soil, yellow clay, slate and gravel and sand. The water is 
pumped to a standpipe with a capacity of 110,000 gallons. There 



213 

nvc four or fivo miles of mains of iron used, with service pipes 
of galvanized iron. Fifty per cent, of the inhabitants use this 
supply. 

Troy. — Private driven and dng wells furnish this to^\^l with 
its snpply. 

riKE COUNTY. 

Petersburg. — Petersbnrg owns a pnblic water snpply which was 
bnilt in 1901, and Mdiich is called the American Light & Water 
Co. This supply is taken from White River, and this receives 
waste and sewage from all factories and cities on both forks 
above the intake in very large quantities. This water is pumped 
to a standpipe which holds 120,000 gallons. There is both an 
unpleasant odor, musty, and a bad taste. Five and a half miles of 
mains are used, these being of cast iron with galvanized service 
pipes. One hundred families, or 20 per cent, of the population, 
use the water, and 50,000 gallons per day are consumed. The 
schools are supplied with water from deep drilled wells. 

Winslow. — TTo public supply. 

PORTER COUNTY. 

Chesterton. — Private wells and cisterns furnish the supply for 
this town. 

Hebron. — 'No public supply. 

Valparaiso. — The Valparaiso Home Water Co. furnishes the 
supply for this city. At present it is the property of a private com- 
pany, but as soon as the city pays oif the bonds against it, it will 
become the property of Valparaiso. The plant was bnilt in 1886 
by the Henry E. Smith Co., of Bay City, Mich. The water is 
taken from a lake two square miles in area and 25 feet deep, with 
loamy bottom. The watershed is eight square miles in area, with 
50 inhabitants thereon in winter and 200 during the summer 
months. Picnic parties are held there frequently in the summer. 
This water is pumped by direct pressure. When water stands in 
the pipes in hot weather it develops an unpleasant odor and taste; 
it is soft. Thirteen miles of wood mains, with lead service pipes, 
are used. One thousand families, or 65 per cent, use the supply 
and 950,000 gallons are used daily. The greatest trouble experi- 
enced with this supply is to control the ground adjacent to the 
lake during the summer. 



214 





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215 

POSEY COUNTY. 

Cyntliiiinn. — This town lias tlirco piiMio wells two of wliicli arc 
drilled 180 feet dee]i; the other is a due; well, 40 feet deep. TIk; 
scboorhoTise well is drilled, hnt is hardly a success, as the water 
has been muddy at times. Most of the supply is from cisterns 
and dug wells. 

Hensler. — !N'o public snpply. 

Mt. Vernon. — The Mt. Vernon Water Works Co., a private 
concern, built in ISSG, with a Dcutch Gravity System Filter plant, 
added in 1003, controls the water supply for Mt. Vernon. The 
water is taken fnnn the Ohio Tliver. The nearest town above 
the intake is Henderson, Ky., which is 20 miles above. A stand- 
pi])e is used with a capacity of 100,000 gallons and the supply is 
of soft Avater. Nine miles of distributing mains of cast iron, with 
lead and galvanized iron, are used in distributing the water to the 
450 families nsing the supply. About 50 per cent, use the water, 
and 750,000 gallons daily are consumed. There are also many 
private wells used. 

New Harmony. — The water supply for this town is from two 
private tanks, one owned by M. B. Pote, and whicb was built in 
1805 for him by W. W. Robb, the other being owned by Artliur 
Dransneld, and built by himself five years ago. The water su]i])ly 
for these tanks is from driven Avells about 35 feet deep, driven 
through sand 3 feet, hardpan two feet, fine wdiite sand five feet, 
a 4-foot strata of coarse sticky gravel, with sand 10 feet, 2 feet 
of coarse gravel and then white sand. The water is pumped by 
gasoline engines to the wooden tanks holding 200 barrels and 350 
barrels. The water is hard. A i'ittle over a mile of mains are 
used, with iron for the pipes and service pipes. Fifty families 
are using the water and about 1,000 barrels daily are consumed. 
jMany driven wells are also owned by the people. 

Eoseyville. — No public water supply at present, but one is con- 
templated. 

PULASKI COUNTY. 

Francisville. — No public supply. Bored wells used.. 
Monterey. — No public supply. 

Winamac. — No public supply. A few dug wells are used, but 
the majority are driven wells from 40 to 60 feet deep. 



216 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Bainbridge. — l^o public supply. Town has four bored wells 
from 75 to 160 feet deep. Bainbridge is on the highest point on 
the Monon Bailroad. Contiguous lands all cleared. 

Greencastle. — The Greencastle Water Works Co., a private com- 
pany built in 1887 by Bullock & Co., of jSTew York, furnishes 
the supply for Greencastle. The water is taken from the Big 
Walnut stream, the source of which is in Boone County. The 
watershed is both cleared and wooded. The water is pumped to 
a standpipe 130 feet high and 30 feet in diameter. The water 
is medium. Cast iron mains with galvanized iron service pipes 
constitute the nine miles of distributing mains. Between 800 and 
900 families, or 85 per cent., use the supply, and an average of 
75,000 gallons per day are used. It is used by several railroads 
going through Greencastle and by mills. There are very few 
wells, say 3 per cent., the remainder use cistern water. 

E-oachdale. — No public supply. 

Bussellvillc. — jSTo public supply. 

RANDOLPH COUNTY. 

Farmland. — ISTo public supply. 

Lynn. — I^o public supply. 

Parker. — I^To public supply. 

Eidgeville. — 'No public supply. 

Union City. — In 1873 this city built a system of wells for fur- 
nishing the public water supply. Two of these wells are dug to 
a depth of 35 feet, with a capacity of 275,000 gallons, dug 
through sand and gravel; four wells are drilled through lime- 
stone, furnishing 500,000 gallons per minute, but these wells are 
only used when the dug wells are not sufficient, as in case of fire 
or drought. The water is pumped into mains with pressure suf- 
ficient for fire. Seventeen miles of mains of wood and iron, with 
lead service pipes, are used. Five hundred families, or 90 per 
cent., use this supply, and the average daily consumption is 306,- 
000 gallons. This supply is also used by Union City, Ohio. 

Winchester. — The Citizens Water & Light Co., built by them in 
1900, and which is a private company, furnishes the water supply 
for this town. The supply is obtained from drilled wells 200 



217 





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feet deep and 10 inches in diameter. A brick reservoir is used, 
20 feet deep and 20 feet in diameter, covered. Tlie water is 
pumped through the mains by direct pressure. This supply is 
hard. Seven miles of iron mains and iron and lead service pipes 
are used. About 275 families, or 50 per cent, use 500,000 gal- 
lons per day. 

RIPLEY COUNTY. 

Batesvil'le.— The Batesville Water Works Co., built in 1902, 
and owned by a private company, furnishes the water supply for 
this town. The supply is from ponds and a spring. One pond 
is located in the Yair Grounds inside of the half-mile track; 
depth six or eight feet, with white clay bottom. There are also 
two small ponds connected to water works. The watershed is 
about 60 acres, jiartly wooded and with one family living on 
grounds. Picnic parties are frequent in summer and boating is 
allowed on the pond. The spring is 18 feet deep and supplies 30,- 
000 gallons of water per day: clay and sand bottom. This spring 
is dug. The water is pumped to a tank holding 50,000 gallons, 
and the water often develops an unpleasant taste and smell like 
that of swamp water. There are three miles of mains in use, 
these being of cast iron, with rod iron and lead for the service 
pipes. About SO families use this supply and an average of 60,000 
gallons per day are used. 

Versailles. — ISTo public supply. 

RUSH COUNTY. 

Carthage. — No public supply. 

Rushville. — In 1896 Rushville had built by Howe, of Indian- 
apolis, deep tubular wells. The water from these wells is pumped 
to a reservoir holding 400,000 gallons and about 32 feet in diame- 
ter. This water is hard. Cast iron and galvanized iron com- 
pose the 14 miles of mains and service pipes. Four hundred fami- 
lies use this water, or 50 per cent., and the average daily con- 
sumption is 1,500,000 gallons. 

SCOTT COUNTY. 

Scottsburg. — 'No public supply. The wells are mostly bored 
through dark soil, subsoil clay, with strata of quicksand. A 
public supply wilj soon be built, 



219 

SHELBY COUNTY. 

Morristo\vn. — No public su]ip]y. One well, SO feet deep, sup- 
plies a good many of the inhabitants living in that section. 

Shelbyville. — The Citizens \\'aler & Light Co., bnilt 21 years 
ago by Commeygs & Lewis, is owned by a private company. The 
supply is from driven Avells from 50 to 75 feet de.e]i in gravel. 
The snpply is pumped direct to mains, 15 miles of wliidi are used, 
these being cast iron. Three hundred families use this, nr alxmt 
10 per cent, of the po]iulatiou. The average daily ciiiisiiiiipliou 
is 1,500,000 gallons. 

SPENCEK COUNTY. 

Clirisney. — ISTo public sup])ly. 

Dale. — j^o public suppl,y. 

Grand View. — Xo public supply. 

Eockport. — A private company, called the Eockport "\^''ater 
Works Co., built in 1877 by A. IT. Tvennedy, and getting the sup- 
ply from deep wells, furnishes this town with its public water 
supply. These well's are 90 feet deep through hardpan, about 20 
feet from the surface, into gTavel. The water is pumped to 
standpipe holding 60,000 gallons. This water is hard. Six miles 
of distributing mains are used, these being of cast iron with gal- 
vanized iron service pipes. Nearly all the population uses the 
su]>ply and about 450 taps, consuming daily 250,000 gallnns, are 
in use. 

St. Meinrad. — Li 1S7-1: this town luiilt a supply consisting of 
well and spring. The s])riug is pij^cd into the well, going about 
300 feet under ground. The land is all cleared on the watershed 
and about 200 inhabitants live thereon. The flow is from 500 to 
1,000 gallons per day. The well is 15 feet deep, through rich 
ground subsoil, some clay, underlying strata mostly slate. The 
■svell is dug and the vein of water comes from what was fonncily 
an old coal bank. The water is su])plied by gra\'ity fnmi ihe 
spring to the well. The water tastes and smells of iron and sul- 
phur. An iron pump is used and the pipe connecting the spring 
and well is of galvanized iron. On top and on the other side 
of the hill iY(>]\\ the source of jlie water sii|)|)ly, about 200 feet 
distant, is a cemetery. There is a very suinll' brook between the 
spring and the cemetery. 



220 

ST. JOSEPH COUNTY. 

IN'ew Carlisle. — Twenty-six years ago a system of driven wells 
were built for this town by G. Morgan, of CHicago. These wells 
are 118 feet deep, driven through gravel and with a capacity of 
33,000 gallons per day. This water is pumped to a reservoir 
holding 33,000 gallons, and which is 16 feet deep and 20 feet 
in diameter. The supply is hard. Two miles of wooden mains, 
with galvanized iron service pipes, are used. One hundred fami- 
lies, or 99 per cent., use this water, and the 33,000 gallons are 
used in a day's time. 

Mishawaka. — This town owns a public supply which takes its 
water from the St. Joseph River. This river receives sewage 
from above the intake of the supply and during the summer 
months there are many picnics held there. The water is forced 
into the mains at 40 pounds pressure. The mains are iron and 
iron and lead service pipes. This supply is not used for drinlv- 
ing purposes at all, that water coming from private wells. 

IsTorth Liberty. — Two town wells and private wells supply this 
town. 

River Park. — iN^o public supply. Driven wells furnish the 
water. 

South Bend. — In 1873 the city of South Bend had a system 
of artesian wells built for its public water supply. There are 63 
of these wells with an average depth of 95 feet, and during 1905 
these pumped 1,485,555,108 gallons. The well's go through sand 
and gravel. A standpipe holding 30,000 gallons, and direct pres- 
sure is used. Seventy-two and one-half miles of mains are used 
and these are of cast iron with lead to curb and galvanized iron 
from curb. Six thousand families use this supply, or 50 or 60 
per cent, of the people, and 4,064,529 gallons daily are consumed. 
Many piiivate wells are in use. 

Village. — Driven wells owned by the different families and 
from 90 to 110 feet in depth furnish this supply. 

Walkerton. — In 1897 this town had three driven wells built for 
its public supply. These wells are driven 40 feet and water comes 
to the surface and would flow. They are driven into gravel. 
This water is pumped to a standpipe Avith a capacity of 1,000 bar- 
rels, this beiug 80 feet on a derrick and is 20 feet deep and 16 feet 



221 



M .S 





222 

in diameter. The water is hard. There are three? miles of dis- 
tributing mains used, these being of cast iron. Three hundred 
families use the water, or 50 per cent, of the population, and 60,- 
000 gallons are used daily. 

STARKE COUNTY. 

Hamlet. — ^o public supply. Private driven wells. 
Knox.--]Sro public supply. 

Korth Judson. — Private driven wells furnish the Avater for this 
toAvn. 

STEUBEN COUNTY 

Angola. — A private company, called the Angola Electric Light, 
Power & Water Co.^ which Avas built in 1892 by the Kinney, 
Croston & Pilliod Co., gets their supply from bored Avells with 
an average depth of 100 feet. These Avells are bored through 
sandy loam surface, clay and deep gravel. Wlien the mains are 
not flushed often the Avater develops a musty smell and taste. 
Holly pumps are used. Seven and one-half miles of distributing 
mains are used, these being composed of iron Avith galvanized 
iron and lead service pipes. Four hundred and fifty families, 
or 20 per cent., use 300,000 gallons every 24 hours. Many 
private Avells, driven from 35 to 100 feet deep, are used. When 
thoroughly flushed the water appears pure, but the mains are not 
flushed often enough and the Avater is often orange color and full 
of sediment. 

Ashley. — ^o public supply. 

Tremont. — ISTo public supply. There is a driven toAvn aa-cII 
about 90 feet deep which goes through gravel, subsoil clay, hard- 
pan ; underlying strata from Avhich Avater is taken is gravel. 

Hudson. — ]Sl o public Avater supply. 

SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Carlisle. — 'No public supply. 

Farmersburg. — Private Avells and cisterns furnish the supply 
for this toAvn. ' < 

Shelburn. — No public supply. 



223 

Siillivjui. — Sullivan now OAvn^ a public system, the su])ply of 
which is taken from a small ci-eek. This was huil'l by IIowc & 
Co. eiii'lit years ac'O. This creek receives much water from several 
coal mines above the dam and is far from bcinj^ a satisfactory 
supply. It is pumped to a standpipe 80x20 feet and from there 
flows throngh eisjht miles of mains havinc: <z-nlvanized iron service 
pipes. About 450^000 2:allons per day are nsed, but only for 
sprinkling" and such purposes, the water for drinkiuc: and domestic 
purposes coming from private wells. The town is now figuring on 
sinking wells. The water is very hard and smells and tastes of 
sulphur. 

SWITZERLAND COUNTY. 

Vevay. — This town o^\^^s and operates a water sujiply wliirh 
was built in 1895 by Guild & White, of Chattanooga, Tenn., and 
which gets its water from the Ohio Itiver. This water is pumped 
to a reservoir 16 feet deep and holding 1,500,000 gallons. In 
summer it develops a somewha.t stagnant odor and taste. The 
wat.er is soft, and four miles of distributing mains are used, these 
being of cast iron dipped, with galvanized iron service pipes. 
Sixty-two per cent, or about 200 families, use this water for fire, 
sprinkling, and other purposes, but it is not used at all for drink- 
ing, as this water comes from private wells. 

TIPPECANOE COUNTY. 

Clarks ITill. — 'Ro Dublic supply. 

Lafayette. — In 1875-76 the city of Lafayette built a public wa- 
ter supply consisting of driven wells 85 feet deep, and 5,000^)00 
gallons can be pumped in 24 hours. The su|)ply is pumped to a 
reservoir 28 feet deep and with a capacity of 4,200,000 gallons. 
The water is hard and 50 miles of cast iron distributing mains 
are in use, extra strong %-inch lead being used for service pipes. 
The average daily consumption of water is 2,500,000 gallvms, and 
5,000 families, or 25 per cent, of the population, use this supply. 
Many private wells are also used. 

West Lafayette.— A pi-ivate company called the West Lafayette 
Water Works Co., and built in 1803, furnishes this town with its 
supply, which is taken from driven wells 70 feet deep. A reser- 



224 



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voir is used whicli is 50 feet high and about 35 feet in diameter, 
the water being supplied from this by gravity. Cast iron mains 
are used and galvanized service pipes. About 500 families use 
the supply. Private wells are used also. 

TIPTON COUNTY. 

Tipton. — The city of Tipton built a system of driven wells 
in 1892, these wells being from 300 to 600 feet deep, the water 
coming from limestone. This water is pUmped into two 20,000 
barrel cisterns. The supply flows through 10 miles of cast iron 
mains, lead and galvanized iron being used for service pipes. 
About 700 families, or 75 per cent, of the population, use this 
water. The water is good. 

Windfall. — !N'o public supply. 

UNION COUNTY. 

Liberty. — In 1894 the town of Liberty built a supply, the 
source of the supply being five springs. These springs are walled 
in with cement at the surface and piped into a reservoir through 
a 4-inch galvanized iron pipe. JSTatural pressure is used. The 
reservoir is 80x75 feet and 14 feet deep in center. In the latter 
part of the summer a mossy taste and odor develops. The water 
is hard. Five miles of mains are used of galvanized iron, iron 
and lead pipe being used for service pipes. There are about 250 
families using this water. 

VANDERBURGH COUNTY. 

Evansville. — In 1900 Evansville completed new water works 
with Holly pumps. The supply is taken from the Ohio Kiver, 
and is pumped direct from intake into the mains. This supply 
is soft water. Eighty mile? of distributing mains of cast iron, 
with wrought iron galvanized for service pipes, are used. Four 
thousand families, or 50 per cent., use the supply, 9,000,000 gal- 
lons daily being used. 



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227 

VERMILLION COUNTY. 

Cayuga. — !N"o pnWic sii]ip]v. 

Dana. — A system of driven and dng- wells for nse in case of fire 
and for sprinklinc: purposes, together with private driven well's is 
the supply for this town. 

]Ji[ewport. — ISFo publie supply. 

VIGO COUNTY. 

Terre Haute. — A private eompany called the Tcrre Haute 
Water Works Co., and ow-ned by them since 1873, gets its supply 
from the Wabash River. All sew^crs discharge below the intake. 
The "water is pumped through filters direct. In the winter the 
water developed an especially bad woody taste, wdiich is due to 
plant life in the water. Sixty miles of mains are used, these be- 
ing of cast iron with a little wrought iron, and lead and galvan- 
ized iron service pipes. Probably 40 per cent, of the population 
use the public supply and 60 per cent, are supplied by private 
wtIIs. 

WABASH COUNTY. 

I^orth Manchester. — This toAvn owns a system of flowing wells 
which was built in 1894. These wells are driven 100 feet deep 
and are 14 in number, flowing about 55,000 gallons in seven 
hours. These are driven through clay top soil, gravel and sand 
below, and the Avater is pumped to a standpipe 1 feet by 110 feet 
high, holding approximately 102,000 gallons. The. supply 
is hard. About five miles of distributing mains of iron, with gal- 
vanized iron service pipes, are used. Two hundred families, or 
25 per cent, use daily 70,000 gallons. 

Roann. — 'No public water supply. 

Wabash. — Wabash is supplied wnth its water by the Wabash 
Water" Co., a private eompany built in 1886 by Samuel "Bullock 
& Co. The water comes from bored wells 60 feet deep, bored 
through a layer of very hard blue clay, then into gravel. This is 
pumped to a standpipe 100 feet high and 25 feet in diameter and 
covered. The water is medium hard. Twenty-six miles of mains 
of cast iron, with service pipes of the same, are in use. Fifteen 
hundred, or 75 per cent, of the families, use about 750,000 gallons 
per day. There are some private wells on the south, but not on 
the north side of the city. 



22B 

WARREN COUNTY. 

West Lebanon. — 'No public water supply. 

WARRICK COUNTY. 

Boonville. — This city owns an artificial lake 6 to 13 feet in 
depth, which was built in 1896, The watershed consists of 
200 acres with three houses thereon. A standpipe is used and 
the water is pumped to it. This standpipe is 100 feet high and 
is 20x30 feet. The water from this supply is soft. Iron on steel 
is used for the nine miles of distributing: mains, and 350 families 
use the water. There are also many private wells in use. 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

Campbellsburg. — No public supply. 

Hardinsburg. — ISTo public water supply. 

Livonia.- — Private bored wells furnish the supply for this town. 

N^ew Pekin. — ISTo public supply. 

Salem.^ — This town has a system of springs which they had 
built in 1884, and which is owned by Salem. The watershed is 
1,000 acres, wooded and cleared and with about 75 inhabitants 
thereon. The flow from these springs averages 125,000 gallons. 
The water is hard and the soil is clay, limestone subsoil. A res- 
ervoir with a capacity of 60,000 gallons is used. At times the 
water develops a taste of mud and rotten leaves. After hard 
rains the water becomes muddy, but this will be remedied soon by 
improvements. About five miles of mains of iron are used, with 
gas pipe for service pipes. Four hundred families, or 66 2-3 per 
cent, of the population, use the supply, and the average daily 
consumption is 80,000 gallons. A few private wells are used. 

WAYNE COUNTY. 

Boston. — ISTo public supply. 

Cambridge City. — The only public supply Cambridge City has 
is for sprinkling and fire protection. The taste and appearance of 
well water used is good, but the nearness of many of the wells to 
privy vaults is not assuring that in the future the water may not 
be contaminated. , 

Centerville. — No public water supply. 



229 




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of Analysis. 

1906 






Date 
March 30, 






•joqnin^ ^ 
i£io;uaoqui "^ 



230 

Dublin. — Private wells furnish the supply for this town. 

Hagerstown. — Private wells from 18 to 105 feet deep furnish 
the water supply for Hagerstown. 

Milton. — ISTo public supply. 

Richmond. — The Richmond Water Works Co., a private con- 
cern, built in 1884 by S. L. Wiley Construction Co., gets its sup- 
ply from a well 25 feet deep, drawing 500,000 gallons, with a 
capacity of 1,000,000 gallons per day, and from a system of gal- 
lery wells. This water is piped to a reservoir having a capacity 
of 8,000,000 gallons. The watershed area is about eight square 
miles with 12 families living thereon. The water at times has a 
fishy smell and tastes of old wood. The water is hard. Thirty- 
eight miles of mains are used, these being of cast iron with lead 
service pipes. Two thousand families or about QQ 2-3 per cent, of 
the population, use the supply, which consists of about 2,000,000 
gallons per day. 

AVhitewater. — There are two public well's in this town, about 
20 feet deep into clay. 

WELLS COUNTY. 

Rluffton. — In 1884 Bluffton had built a system of driven wells 
about 500 feet deep. The water is pumped by compressed air 
into a well 30x60 feet and 30 feet deep, cemented and cleaned 
annually with the fire hose. The water is hard, and 4.5 miles of 
distributing mains are used of cast iron having lead pipe %-inch 
in diameter and weighing 2^2 pomids. Four hundred and eighty 
taps, with some others in flats, supply 60 per cent, of the popula- 
tion with 350,000 gallons per dsij. 

Liberty Center.— Private drilled well's from 60 to 160 feet 
deep supply this town. 

Ossian.-^ — 'No public supply. 

Poneto. — ISTo public supply. 

WHITE COUNTY. 

Brookston. — ISTo public supply. 

Monticello." — In 1895 the town of Monticello built a dug well 
20 feet deep, having 14 feet of Avater. The soil is gravel. This 
well has a brick wall. The water is pumped to a standpipe with 
a capacity of 126,000 gallons. The water is medium hard. A 



231 





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232 

little more than five miles of distributing mains are used, these 
being of iron. Three hundred families, or 40 per cent, use this 
supply, and 200,000 gallons per day are consumed. The well 
is 60 feet below the level of the town, being in the river bottom. 
The well is 12 feet in diameter and until the last year flowed from 
outlet five or six feet below surface when not pumped. 

Monon. — l^o public supply. 

Wolcott. — "No public supply. 

WHITLEY COUNTY. 

Churubusco. — :In 1898 this town had a well bored 385 feet 
deep, over 100 feet being in rock, by the Seckner Water & Light 
Co. The water is pumped to a standpipe 100 feet high, 10 feet 
in diameter and holding 2,000 barrel's. At times the water de- 
velops an unpleasant taste of dead water, but this is usually 
when the pipes have not been flushed. Two miles of mains of 
cast iron distribute the water to the 200 families using it. About 
100 per cent, use the supply and 30,000 gallons per day in sima- 
mer are consumed. A new well is being put in by Miss Josia 
Kingdom, but the water has not as yet been turned into the mains. 

Columbia City. — This city built a system of drilled wells in 
1894, these wells being from 200 to 800 feet deep, drilled in rock. 
The water is pumped to a standpipe by direct pressure. The 
water is soft and at times tastes of iron. Twelve miles of dis- 
tributing mains of iron, with lead service pipes, are used in car- 
rying the 400,000 gallons which are used daily by 75 per cent, 
of the people. About 15 private well's are in use. 

South Whitley. — This town built four bored wells in 1896, 
with an average depth of 50 feet. The water is pumped by direct 
pressure. The water is hard and at the end of the pipe line has 
a dead taste, or stagnant. Iron is used for the 2 3-5 miles of 
mains and lead is used for the service pipes. About 40 families, 
or 25 per cent., use this supply, and 90,000 gallons per day are 
consumed. 



233 




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234 



THE I^SPECTIO^ AI^D CONTROL OF FOOD AND 

DRUGS. 

In the absence of national legislation on the subject it has 
remained for the several States to solve the problem of pure food 
as best they might. Inability of the individual State to interfere 
with interstate commerce has been one of the chief drawbacks to 
the framing of an entirely satisfactory pure food law, A State 
can, provided the means are afforded it, regulate the manufac- 
ture and sale of all home products. But when all other States are 
allowing the manufacture of impure goods it becomes an impossi- 
bility for any one State to keep such goods from coming over its 
borders. Notwithstanding this vital defect in the working of any 
local pure food law, every State has some form of a food law on 
its statute books. 

Pure food laws are a part of the police power of the State, 
and as such are subject to the broadest interpretation. The ex- 
tent to which a State may go to protect public health and prevent 
fraud is indefinable and unlimited. The laws are justified by the 
unquestioned fundamental right of the State to provide for the 
protection and preservation of health. Even before the enact- 
ment of special food laws, it was an indictable offense to mix 
anything in the food made and supplied for human consumption 
which would be unwholesome and deleterious to health, and the 
wilful adulteration or mixing unwholesome ingredients in foods 
was considered an act dangerous to the public health and, to life, 
and constituted a public nuisance. 

The State food laws were first intended to prohibit the sale of 
foods injurious to health. The statutes were strictly drawn for 
this purpose and the courts have in all instances upheld them. 
This class of adulteration has been so rigidly restricted that its 
extent is much less than formerly, except in the case of the use of 
antiseptics and coloring materials. The contention is made that 
the use of the extremely small quantities of antiseptics necessary 
to prevent fermentation and decay in no way imperils the life or 
health of the consumer. But the courts frequently have held that 
"It is not the quantity but the nature of the substance which the 
act prohibits." 

By far the greater part of the adulteration of food is not an 



.235 

attack upon the health of the consumer, hnt an economic frand, 
and consists in forcins; n^ion him withont his knowlcdn;e products 
different from what they purport to he, lacking in valnable con- 
stituents or made from cheap inoredients so prepared as to coun- 
terfeit the gennine article. It is to the suppression of adultera- 
tions of this class that most recent legislation has been directed. 

The food law under the provisions of which the laboratory is 
operated dates back only as far as l.'^99. Earlier than this there 
had been some food legislation, chiefly of a specific character, 
but lack of enforcement rendered it of little value. In 1883 the 
oleomargarine bill was enacted, making it obligatory upon dealers 
in oleo to label their product. The General Assembly in 1905 
re-enacted all food laws passed by earlier legislatures, making 
such changes therein as were suggested by a committee appointed 
to revise the code. The present food law of the State was given 
in full in the annual report of the State Board of Plealth for 
1905, together with the food standards and definitions adopted 
July Y, 1905, by the State Board of Health. These rulings fur- 
nish a definite basis for work in the enforcement of the pure food 
law. The definitions and standards adopted are those established 
as official for the United States Government or given in the latest 
edition of the Pharmacopoeia. The analytical methods employed 
are the official methods approved and adopted by the Association 
of Official Agricultural Chemists. 

In the absence of any definite information as to the character 
of the foods and drugs sold in the State, before a proper enforce- 
ment of the law could be undertaken, it was necessary to learn 
of conditions that needed a remedy. In order to get this infor- 
mation, and to be fully advised as to the conditions of the mar- 
kets throughout the State, the first step taken towards law enforce- 
ment was to send out inspectors to every section, for the purpose 
of taking samples of foods and drugs for analysis, and to spread 
among manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers of those products, 
information as to the character of the law, its provisions and 
intentions. Proper observance of food and drug laws, which are 
technical in character and the meaning of which is not easily in- 
terpreted, can only follow a clear understanding of the law. The 
inspectors have given much attention to this phase of the work, 
which is educational rather than corrective, and their results con- 



236 . 

firm the idea that law violation is more often tlie result of igno- 
rance and unskilful preparation, than of wilful misrepresentation 
and fraud. During the year, L. W. Bristol, Bert W. Cohn, 
Chas. Bragg, Wm, McAbee and R. E. Bishop have acted as food 
and drug inspectors, and have visited nearly all the larger cities 
and towns of the State at least twice, and in some cases three 
times. The cities so inspected were Indianapolis, Anderson, Mun- 
cie. Ft. Wayne, South Bend, Elkhart, Goshen, Hammond, Michi- 
gan City, Whiting, Peru, Marion, Alexandria, Elwood, l^obles- 
ville, Lafayette, Crawfordsville, Brazil, Greencastle, Terre Haute, 
Vincennes, Evansville, ISTew Albany, Madison, JefFersonville, 
Washington, Eranklin, Edinburg, Martinsville, Bloomington, 
Richmond, Connersville, Columbus, Covington, Attica, Williams- 
port, Veedersburg, Hillsboro, Kokomo, Huntington, Huntingburg, 
Boonvill'e, Salem, Mt. Vernon, Delphi, Logansport, Auburn, Tip- 
ton, Plymouth, Rushville, Oakland City, Princeton, Wabash, La- 
porte, Albion, Valparaiso and Rochester. In addition to the col- 
lection of samples for analysis the inspectors made note of the 
character of the stores and markets visited, and have reported all 
unclean, filthy or unsanitary places, visited slaughter-houses, and 
examined into local health conditions. 

The results of these investigations are described under the title, 
"Condition of Groceries, Markets and Slaughter-Houses." 

In addition to the regular inspectors who have been engaged 
entir-ely in work outside the laboratory, the chemical force has 
also made frequent inspection trips for the purpose of purchas- 
ing samples and investigating unsatisfactory conditions. The cost 
of inspectors' traveling and hotel expenses and the purchase of 
samples has been $1, 584.20. The number of samples brought in 
and analyzed was 5,200 ; the cost per sample was, therefore, 30.46 
cents, a figure which is very low in view of the fact that at least 
a part of each inspector's time was occupied in other than food and 
drug work. 

Much work has also been done at the laboratory for the pur- 
pose of informing wholesalers and manufacturers as to the char- 
acter of the products they were handling. These samples have 
been sent to the Laboratory accompanied by proper information 
as to their source. The results of the analyses which have been 
furnished the dealers have been heartily appreciated by them, and 



237 

have contributed largely in assisting them to remove their stock 
of adulterated goods and as "well have assured them that the qual- 
ity of new invoices was satisfactory. Manufacturers and whole- 
salers all over the State have taken advantage of the opportunity 
the Laboratory has afforded for this work, and have not failed to 
express their appreciation of the assistance they have received. 
The Laboratory was opened for work about the 1st of September, 
1905, and in this report is enumerated all the work done since 
that time up to the end of the fiscal year, covering, a period of 
about 14 months. During that time there have been analyzed 
3,641 samples of food products, and 1,559 samples of drugs. Of 
the total number of food products examined 57. Y per cent, have 
been pure, while of the drug samples 37.5 per cent, have been pure. 

The expense of maintaining the Food and Drug Laboratory 
from September 1, 1905, the time when work was commenced, 
to October 31, 1906, including salaries of chemists, clerk and 
janitor, laundry bills, sundry drug bills, apparatus to replace 
breakage during the year, postage, etc., was $4,588.43. The total 
number of food and drug samples analyzed was 5,200, thus mak- 
ing the cost per sample 88.24 cents. The total cost per sample for 
collection and analysis was $1,187. Included in this estimate are 
many expenses that were not actually incurred in the food and 
drug work. For instance, much of the office work consists in an- 
swering queries and sending out information concerning the food 
and drug laws, and much of the time of the chemist is occupied 
in executive rather than in analytical and inspection work. 

The following summary gives in detail the character and va- 
riety of the work done and the analytical results : 



238 



RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF FOOD SAMPLES. 



Articles Examined. 


Good. 


Bad. 


Total. 


Per Cent, 
of Adul- 
teration. 




22 
70 
27 
4 
8 
5 

44 



2 

1 



15 

7 

7 

29 

248 

56 

53 

5 

13 

22 

4 

29 

2 

4 

27 

132 

22 

1 

36 

10 

368 

141 

9 

4 

10 

446 



3 

16 

10 

52 

4 

4 

1 

40 



3 

63 

2,098 


26 

7 

11 

16 

67 

■ 

8 

6 

7 

4 

4 

8 

1 

1 

19 

8 

287 

136 

29 



97 

6 

6 

3 

1 

15 

56 

9 

2 

79 

11 

93 

88 

11 



3 

147 

4 



2 

6 

187 

16 

2 



19 

2 

18 

17 

1,543 


48 
77 
38 
20 
75 
5 

52 
6 
9 
5 
4 

23 

8 

8 

48 

256 

343 

189 

34 

13 

119 

9 

35 

5 

5 

42 

188 

31 

3 

115 

21 

461 

229 

20 

4 

13 

593 

4 

3 

18 

16 

239 

20 

6 

1 

59 

2 

21 

80 


54 1 


Beer 


9 1 


Butter 


28 9 




80 


Catsup 


89 3 


Cheese ; 







15 3 


Ciders 

Ciders, orange 


100.0 

77 7 


Ciders, bottled apple 


80 


Codfish 


100 


Coffee 


34 8 




12 5 




12 6 




39 5 




3 I 


Extract lemon 


83 7 


Extract vanilla 


71 9 




85 3 


Fruit in tin 







81 5 


Ginger ales : 


55 5 


Honey 


17.1 


Juice, grape 


60.0 
20 


Lard 


35 6 


Olive oil 


29.8 




29 


Malt extract 


66 6 




68.7 


Molasses ... ... 


52.3 


Milk . 


20.1 


Meat, fresh 

Meat, canned 


38.4 
55 









23 


Spices 


24.7 




100.0 


Syrups, table 





Syrups, miscellaneous 


11 1 


Syrups, sorghum 


37.5 




78 2 


Vinegar, malt 


80.0 




33.3 


Vinegar, rarragon 

Vegetables, canned ... 


0.0 
32.2 


Whisky 


100.0 


Wine 


85 1 


Miscellaneous food products 


21.2 






Total .... 


3,641 


42 3 







239 



PERCENTAGE OF ADULTERATION 
OF FOOD PRODUCTS IN INDIANA 



YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31 1906 



BAKING POWDtP 

BEER 

BUTTER 

CARBONATED DRIN^S 

CATSUP 

CHEESE 

CHOCOLATE COCOA 

CIDERS 

CIDERS ORANGE 

CIDERS BOTTLED APPLE 

COOFISH 

COFFEE 

COLORS 

CONDENSED MILK 

CREAH 

CREAM OF TARTAR 

EXTRACT LEMON 

EXTRACT VANILLA 

EXTRACT MISC 

FRTS PRVS JELLS JAMS 

GINGER ALE 

HONEY 

JUICE CBAPE 

JUICE LIME 

LARD 

OLIVE OIL 

OYSTERS SHRIMP ETC 

MALT EXTRACT 

MAPLE SYRUP — SUGAR 

MOLASSES 

HILK 

MEAT FRESH 

MEAT CANNED 

ROOT BEER 

SARDINES 

SPICES 

SUMMER DRINKS 

SYRUPS TABLE 

SYRUPS MISC. 

SYRUPS SORGHUM 

VINEGAR CIDER 

VINEGAR MALT 

VINEGAR DISTILLED 

VINEGAR TARRAGON 

VEGETABLES CANNED 

WHISKEY 

WINE 

MISC FOOD PRODUCTS 



80 






240 

It has been the custom of the Laboratory to publish from time 
to time in the Monthly Bulletin of the State Board of Health sum- 
maries of the work, giving names of dealers and manufacturers of 
products both good and adulterated. The press of the State has 
also given, wide publicity to the results of the Laboratory in fre- 
quent popular articles, and as well by occasionally reporting in 
full the results, has contributed largely to a better understanding 
of what the Food and Drug l^aw is, and of the conditions of the 
markets which make its enforcement necessary. The Bulletin has 
also been distributed widely among manufacturers, wholesalers, re- 
tailers and the public, and has served to convey much informa- 
tion as to the character of the food and drugs sold. The health 
officers of many cities and towns have acted as food and drug in- 
spectors and have devoted much attention to the quality of the 
goods sold in their cities. The cities of Indianapolis, South Bend, 
Ft. Wayne, Crawfordsville, Terre Haute, Evansville, ISToblesville, 
Newcastle and Columbus have done valuable work, particui'arly in 
controlling the quality of their milk supply. It is, of course, very 
desirable that every city have its own milk inspector and a proper- 
ly equipped laboratory where the necessary analytical work may be 
done. In the absence of such facilities, however, the State Lab- 
oratory endeavors to assist local authorities, and has furnished 
material help in many instances. 

MILK. 

During the fall of 1905 our inspectors visited most of the 
larger cities and towns and collected samples of milk which were 
shipped to the Laboratory for analysis. The quality of the milk 
supplies thus investigated was found to be good. In only a few 
instances did it appear that preservatives or coloring matter had 
been used. The results of the examination show that of the 461 
samples analyzed 368 were pure and 93 were adulterated. These 
figures do not express the true character of the milk, however, so 
far as wilful violation of the law is concerned, for most of the 
milks reported as adulterated were so classed because they con- 
tained a slightly lower fat content than that required by law, and 
not because they bore evidence of having been skimmed or wa- 
tered. The control of the purity of a milk supply by Laboratory 
methods is satisfactory in so far as it insures the sale of milk of 



241 



MILK ANALYSES BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 



Locality. 



No. 
Above 
Stand- 
ard. 



No. 
Below 
Stand- 
ard. 



Total No. 
Samples 

Col- 
lected. 



Percent. 
Below 

Stand- 
ard. 



Percent. 

Total 
Solidsin 

Lowest 
Sample. 



Per Cent. 
Fat in 
Lowest 

Sample. 



Alexandria 

Anderson 

Bourbon 

Brazil ■ ■ 

Broad Ripple 

Bridgeport 

Cartersburg 

Carmel 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Elkhart 

Elwood 

Evans ville 

Fowler 

Franklin , 

Ft. Wayne 

Greencastle 

(ireenfield 

Ilagerstown 

Hammond 

Huntington 

Indianapulis 

.Tetfersonville 

Kokiimo 

Lafayette 

Lebanon 

Marion 

Michigan City 

Martinsville 

Mt. Vernon 

Muncie 

Noblesville 

Napoleon 

New Albany 

New Castle 

Oakland City 

Petersburg 

Rockville 

RuBsiaville 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Vincennes 

Washington 

Forty-two towns 



6 

8 
1 
5 
1 

1 
2 
6 
1 
8 
5 
19 

2 
8 
3 
2 
1 
6 
7 

12 

13 

17 

13 

5 

13 

15 

4 

4 

11 

6 

1 

16 
5 
4 
7 
1 
1 

77 

45 

2 

4 



368 






6 


1 


9 





1 


1 


6 





1 


1 


1 





1 





2 


5 


11 


1 


2 


4 


12 


1 


6 


5 


24 


1 


1 





2 


6 


14 





3 





2 





1 


6 


12 


1 


8 


7 


19 


6 


19 


2 


19 


1 


14 


1 


6 


2 


15 





15 


1 


5 





4 


3 


14 


2 


8 





1 


3 


19 


2 


7 


1 


5 


1 


8 





1 





1 


15 


92 


11 


56 


1 


3 


1 


5 


93 


461 





11.1 


16 6 


100.0 





45.4 
5G.0 
33.3 
16.6 
20.8 
100.0 


42.5 







50.0 
12,5 
37.0 
.31.5 
105 

7.1 
16.3 
13.3 


20.0 



21.3 
25.0 



21.0 
28.5 
20.0 
12.5 





16.S 
19.6 
33.3 
20.0 



20.1 



11.23 
9.79 



6.75 
10.40 



10.21 



10 70 
6.79 
1170 
10.83 

11.78 



11.21 
11.66 



10.28 
10.51 



10.08 
9.46 
12.27 



3.0 
3.1 

2.4 



3.0 

1.9 

1.7 

2.0 

1.55 

2.00 

2.4 



3.0 

3.1 

1.155 

1.4 

2.6 

1.3 

3.2 

2.8 



2.3 
2.4 

1.6 

1.1 

3.02 

2.0 



1.5 
1.4 
3.0 
3.0 



standard composition, free from added water, color and preserva- 
tives. But it does not c^iard against unsanitary conditions of 
production and handling that are of far more importance to the 
public health than the frauds practiced by unscrupulous dealers. 
The healthfulness of the cows, well kept dairies, and suitable appli- 
ances for cooling and marketing milk before it becomes the host 
of myriads of abnormal bacteria, are factors which can not be 
neglected if a city's milk supply is to be kept clean and whole- 
some. It is obvious that State inspection of dairies can not well be 
undertaken. The State can not keep a host of inspectors to cover 
36,000 square miles nor control the conditions of thousands of 
dairieB, Such work should be the duty of sanitary officers ap- 

16-Bd.ofH»alth. 



242 

pointed for the purpose by each city. Several cities of the State 
have already nndertalven such inspection and report that at the 
beginning of the work but few dairies were found that were prop- 
erly arranged and handled. Indianapolis is requiring of its milk 
dealers the observance of scrupulous cleanliness about the barn 
and milkhouse, and milk inspectors make frequent inspections to 
see that the regulations are lived up to by the producers, l^ew 
Albany has recently adopted a comprehensive, milk inspection ordi- 
nance that may well be adopted by other cities. It differs from 
the usual ordinance in 'that no license fee is charged the dairyman 
for his permit to sell his produce. Instead he pays a veterinarian 
for inspecting his herd at least four times a year. This the dairy- 
man is usually willing to do, for such inspection is now a part of 
the routine of successful dairying. 

CREAM. 

Of the 48 samples of cream examined, 10, or 39.5 per cent., 
were classed as adulterated. The standard fat content of cream is 
18 per cent., and it is apparent from the results obtained that 
many dealers put out cream containing much less than that. One 
sample examined contained only 4 per cent, of fat and was in 
truth nothing more than a rich milk. We have found no evidence 
of cream thickeners, gelatine compounds, etc., having been used. 

BUTTER. 

Of the samples of butter analyzed 27 have been good and 11 
adulterated. The condition of the butter market is worthy of 
serious attention. A single inspection of the city market of In- 
dianapolis showed that of nine samples of so called "dairy butter" 
purchased, six were oleomargarine. Several of the samples so sold 
were wrapped in brown paper which when taken from the butter 
was found to bear the stamp "oleomargarine." It is evident that 
the dealers using such a stamp were doing it only for the purpose 
of complying with the regulations of the Internal Revenue De- 
partment, rather than to give any information as to the article 
purchased. The stamp was nearly illegible and so placed as to be 
entirely hidden from the purchaser. The addition of the word 
"oleomargarine" in such a fashion does not, however, comply 



243 

with the Govornniont ro2;nl;itions. Tho ro<2,-iilati(iiis for the sale 
of oleomargarine by retail' dealers as laid down by the Internal 
Revenue Department arc as folloAvs : 

"Each retailer's wooden or paper packacjc must liave tho name 
and address of the dealer printed or branded llicrcdn, likewise the 
words 'ponnd' and 'oleomargarine' in letters not less than one- 
quarter of an inch sqnaro, and the cpiantity Avritten, printed or 
branded thereon in figures of the same size (one-quarter of an 
inch square), substantially as follows: 

1 

2 : . 

o 

o 

["V2] pound 1. Here give dealer's name. 

Oleomargarine. 2. Here give street number. 

(Letters Vj^-in. sq.) 0. Here give name of city or town." 

"The words 'oleomargarine' and 'pound,' which are required to 
be printed or branded on retailer's wooden or paper package, in 
letters not less than one-quarter of an inch square, and the quan- 
tity which is required to be written, printed, or In'anded thereon 
in figures of like size, m.ust be so placed as to be plainly visible to 
the purchaser at the time of delivery to him. Illegible or con- 
cealed marks and brands are not those contemplated and required 
by the law and regulations. It will not be deemed a compliance 
with this regulation if the word 'oleomargarine' and the other re- 
quired Avords and figures shall be illegibly branded or printed or so 
placed as to be concealed from view, by being on the inside of the 
package, or by folding in the stamped portion of the paper sheet 
used for wrapping or otherwise. The required words and figures 
must be legibly printed or branded and conspicuously placed, and 
no other word or business card should be placed in such juxtapo- 
sition thereto as to divert attention from the fact that the con- 
tents of the package are wholly oleomargarine. 

"The foregoing regulations rel'ative to the marking or brand- 
ing of retail packages apply equally to sales of colored and uncol- 
ored oleomargarine. 

"The color of the ink with which the words are printed must 
be in the strongest contrast to the color of the package." 

We have never yet purchased oleomargarine as such or under 



244 



the disguised name of "dairy butter" that was properly marked. 
The dealers stontly maintain their rights to sell oleomargarine 
under fancy names. They insist that it is called "dairy butter" 
by the trade: that, in fact, long continued usage authorizes the 
sale of oleomargarine when dairy butter is called for. The phrases 
"Country Roll," "Jersey Roll," etc., are also applied to oleo- 
margarine. Of course, such misleading terms are used only to 
deceive the customer and promote the sale of oleomargarine. There 
is no contention nowadays that oleomargarine is not as wholesome 
as butter; the illegality of its sale consists in the fact that the re- 
tailer purchasing it for 15 cents a pound or less, is able by selling 
it. as butter to make an enormous profit. 

Within recent years a very large business has been built up in 
the manufacture and sale of so-called renovated butter. Reno- 
vated butter is made from butters that are unsalable because of 
their appearance, odor, rancidity and general unfitness for con- 
sumption. Renovated butter stock is collected throughout the 
country much as soap grease is collected. It is hauled to some cen- 
tral depot and there melted, strained, treated with acids or alkali 
or blown with steam until it is deodorized and its rancidity is re- 
moved. The butter is then rechurned, usually with milk, and 
worked up into salable form. The better grades of renovated but- 
ter are of fine appearance and of good quality, and large amounts 
of renovated butter are manufactured yearly, and yet after fre- 
quent inquiry of dealers in butter we fail to find that the renovated 
article is ever sold. It undoubtedly comes to market as creamery 
butter, and the extent of the imposition practiced by butter deal- 
ers or house to house vendors must be very great. 

BUTTER-LEGAL. 



Laboratory 
Number. 


Brand. 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Butyro- 
Reading. 


1801 










3812 










3«14 .... 






Indianapolis 




3942 






Princeton 

Elwood 

Ft. Wayne 


42.0 


5706 


Creamery .. 




44.2 


5898. 


Zoeller-Mertz 

Amos R. Walton 

B. C. Murphy 


44.2 


5918 




Ft. Wayne 


44 


6040 






43 9 


6428 






44.0 


6615 . . 


Dairy 

Dairy 

Dairy 




Market House, Indianapolis . . 
Market House, Indianapolis.. 
Market House, Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis 


44.0" 


6616 


Bajrick 


43.8 


6620 


44.2 


4682 




42.8 











245 

BUTTER-ILLEGAL. 



Labora- 

tor.v 
Number. 



1.385 
3668 

3734 

3813 

6fil2 
6613 
6614 
6618 
6619 
6617 
4150 

4151 
4848 



Brand. 



Butter.... 
Creamery. 
Creamery. 



Dairy 

Dairy 

Dairy 

Dairy. .. 
Dairy. .. . 
Dairy. 
Country . 

Country .. 
Country .. 



Retailer. 



Court House 
Grocery 

Court House 
Grocery ... 

Court House 
(Jrocery 

EUiker 

M.J.Carlisle. 

Lewellen 

Kimberlin 

Williamson . 

M. B.Groff... 



Where 
Collected. 



Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Market House 
Market llou>e 
Market Hou,«e 
Market IIou.=e 
Market Hou^^e 
Market House 
Princeton 



Brazil 

Terre Haute. 



Butyro- 
Rcading. 


Hal pen 
Test. 






49.9 
49.6 


Light... 
Light... 


51.2 
51.9 
50.7 
51.1 
50.3 
50.0 
50,0 

48.0 
41.9 





















Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargiirine. 

Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleomargarine. 

Oleoma garine, 

Starch Present. 
Oleomargarine. 
Not butte'". 



CHEESE. 



Of the 19 cheeses analyzed all have been pure. The use of pre- 
servatives is not uncommon in soft cheese, such as the so-called 
"ITeufchatel'' or cream mixtures, but on the whole we find but 
little evidence of adulteration in this dairy product. 



CONDENSED MILK. 

Condensed railk is made by evaporating milk to one-half or 
one-third its original volume and adding cane sugar. In report- 
ing the results of the analysis of the samples examined, we have 
given the amount of fat present in the sample and also the amount 
of fat present in the original milk. The results show that every 
sample but one examined, was made from normal whole milk ; no 
preser^^atives were present. Several samples of so-called evap- 
orated cream were analyzed, but proved to be simply whole milk 
evaporated to a creamlike consistency. Aside from this resem- 
blance they were in nowise condensed cream. Under the new 
food law this misleading term or name will be abandoned and the 
product will be sold for what it is, simply evaporated milk. 



246 



UNSWEETENED CONDENSED M[LK-PURE. 







Where 
Collected. 





to 


12 




a 0373 


7.80 


4.17 


29.94 


1.31 


1.87 


9.00 


4.66 


32.07 


1.35 


1.93 


7.80 


3.22 


31.97 


1.70 


2.42 


9.00 


4.89 


30.00 


1.29 


1.84 


7.50 


3.62 


28.35 


1.45 


2.07 



Remarks 



277 
1753 
3678 
3783 
4452 



'Greenville" 

'Pet" 

'Columbia" . 
'Highland".. 
'Top Notch" 



Greenville Milk 
Condensing Co., 
Greenville, 111 . . 

Helvetia Milk 
Condensing Co., 
Highland, 111. . 

Borden's Con- 
densed Milk, N. 
Y.City ... 

Helvetia Milk 
Condensing Co , 
Highland. Ill .. 

Van Camp Pack- 
ing Co., Effing- 
ham, 111 



Terre Haute. 
Indianapolis 

Irvington 

Indianapolis 
Berne 



SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK-PURE. 



4154 
4455 



"Shield' 
"Star". 



Michigan Con- 
densed Milk Co., 
New York 

Michigan Con- 
densed Milk Co., 
New York 



7.80 


3.22 


74.52 


1.69 


2.42 


8.40 


3.65 


78.40 


1.60 


2.30 





SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK-ILLEGAL. 




4453 


"Leader" — 


Michigan Con- 
densed Milk Co., 




6.60 


2.71 


76.10 


1.70 


2.43 


Made 

from 

milk 

deficient 


___ 







in fat. 



ICE CREAM. 

The product sold as ice cream is of varying composition, tlie 
basis of which is a cream or milk mixture flavored and frozen. 
Genuine ice cream should be made wholly of cream, properly fla- 
vored. Such a mixture will not remain in a solid condition long, 
and the practice of adding some solidifier such as gelatin or gum 
tragacanth has become common among dealers. Starch may also 
be employed as a thickener. The U. S. Department of Agriculture 
standard for ice cream requires that at least 14 per cent, of butter 
fat be present. "Under this standard none of the six samples of 
ice cream analyzed were pure. Three contained large quantities 
of gelatin. 



247 



ICE CREAM. 



o <s 

la 


Manufacturer. 


Wh«re 
Collected. 


Fat, 

Per 

Cent. 


Qelatin. 


Starch. 


Remarks. 


4422 
4423 
4424 
4425 
412(5 
4427 


Wm. Downey 

Chas. Crome 

N. Y. Candy Store. . 

John Noble 

Wittneri Hubbick.. 
Mrs. J. L. Turner 


South Bend.. 
South Bend. . 
South Bend. . 
South Bend.. 
South Bend . 
South Bend.. 


8.6 
12.0 
11.5 
11.5 
10.0 

7.0 


None.. . 
None. .. 
Trace. . 
Much... 
Mucli.. . 
Much.. . 


None .. 

JNone ... 
Trace... 
None ... 
None ... 
None .. . 


Low in fftt. 
Low in fat. 
Low in fat. 
Not pure cream. 
Not pure i-ream. 
Not pure cream. 



BAKING POWDER. 

Baking powder is a leavening agent now in general use which 
has taken the place of the cream of tartar and saleratus mixture 
formerly employed in raising bread. It acts in the same manner 
as the older preparation and leavens the bread by the formation 
within the loaf of carbon dioxid. Baking powder is composed 
of acid and alkaline constituents so prepared that when brought 
into contact with water a chemical reaction takes place between 
the acid and alkaline carbonate with the resulting liberation of 
carbon dioxid. 

The value of a baking powder depends, therefore, on the amount 
of gas liberated in the process of bread making. A good powder 
is one so compounded that the acid salt, which may be bitartrate 
of potassium, calcium acid phosphate, or alum, is present in just 
the quantity required to set free all of the carbon dioxid in the 
bicarbonate of soda, the alkali usually used. ISTormal halving 
powders will give 10 per cent, and over of thoir weight as gas. 
All powders producing less gas are deficient either because of 
deterioration by age or improper compounding. 

In reporting the results we have given the percentage of carbon 
dioxid capal)le of being liberated in the process of baking, and 
have also desig-nated the character of the powder. Several of 
the samples were not of the composition claimed for them and 
a large number, 26, or 54.1 per cent., were low in carbon dioxid. 
Probably many of the powders classed as illegal were up to the 
standard when packed, but had deteriorated with age. Tliis can 
not be taken into consideration, however, either by the housewife 
or the chemist, and it becomes the duty of the manufacturer to 
recall his stock before it is so old as to be worthless. One sample 



248 

contained less than 2 per cent, of available carbon dioxid, and a 

cook using this powder would have to employ at least 20 teaspoon- 
fuls to the quart of flour. 

BAKING POWDER-LEGAL. 



O 3 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 






Remarks. 



1719 

3314 

3362 
3393 

3404 

3457 

3458 
a590 

3483 

4193 

4208 
70 

1208 

1413 

1613 

4663 

4666 

4677 
5213 

5236 

5347 

5818 
5974 



Cream of Tartar 

Home-Made . .. 

Good Luck 

Ladies' Friend. 

Fehring's 

Midway 



Columbia Grocery Co., _ 
Indianapolis 

Wabash Baking Powder 
Co., Wabash 



Common Sense 
Monarch 



Faultless 



Rinne's 



Royal .. 
Jubilee 



Reliable 

Club House 

American . . 

Egg 

Clabber 



Miami 

Imperial . 



LaBaw's . 



Empire 

Enterprise . 



The Southern Mfg. Co., 

Richmond, Va. 
Canby, Ach & Canby, 

Dayton, 0. 

Wabash Baking Powder 
Co., Wabash 



J. F. Lowe & Co., 

Columbus 

Canby, Ach & Canby, 

Dayton 
Reid,Murdock<& Co., 

Chicago 

Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 

C.H. Rinne 



Canby, Ach & Canby, 

Dayton 

Grocers' Supply Co., 

Indianapolis. 

Franklin MacVeagh Co. 
Chicago 

E. Ottenheimer & Son, 

Louisville 
Egg Baking Powder Co , 
New York 
Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 

H.C. Porter & Co 

Mayer Bros. Co., 

Ft. Wayne 
Waba»h Baking Powder 

Co., Wabash 

Wabash Baking Powder 

Co., Wabash 

J. B Digman 

Wabash Baking Powder 
Co., Wabash 



Indianapolis 

Columbus . 

Columbus.. 
Columbus.. 

Columbus.. 

Columbus .. 

Columbus . . 
Indianapolis 

Columbus 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Elwood 



Princeton 

Huntington. . 

New Albany . 

Indianapolis. 

Terre Haute. 
Peru 



Ft. Wayne . .. 

Nappanee — 

Veedersburg . 
Richmond . .. 

Greencastle.. 



12.86 

13.89 

14.70 
14.23 

13.11 

10.97 

12.66 
11.70 

10.24 
11.18 
13.25 
13.8 

10.19 

10.62 

10.72 

11.60 

10.30 
11.00 

10.22 

14.41 

11.6 

14,8 

15.0 



Cream of tartar pow- 
der. Pure. 

Phosphate 'powder. 
Pure. 

Alum powder. Pure. 

Phosphate powder. 
Pure. 

Alum Phosphate 
powder. Pure. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Pure. 

Alum powder. Pure. 

Cream of tartar pow- 
der. Pure. 

Phosphate powder. 

Pure. 
Phosphate powder. 

Pure. 



Cream of tartar pow- 
der. Pure. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Pure. 

Cream of tartar pow- 
der. Pure. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Pure. 
Phosphate powder. 

Alum phosphate. 



249 

BAKING POWDER-ILLEGAL. 



o u 

11 



Brand. 



176 

1678 

16SI 

1749 

3315 

3352 
3353 

3J54 

S355 

3364 
3375 

3376 
3383 

3H5 

3417 
3456 

3458 

3480 

3469 

3569 
3591 

3608 

3653 

3716 
6251 



Clabber* 

Queen Flake. 

Bon Bon 

Egg 

Kenton'-' 



Bon Bon . .. 
M.O'C.*.. .. 



Manufacturer. 



Hulman Coffee Co., 

Xerre Haute 

Northrop. Robertson & 
Currier, Lansing, Mich. 

J. C. GrantChemical Co., 
St. Louis 

Egg Baking Powder Co., 
New York 

Kenton Baking Powder 
Co., Cincinnati 



Where 
Collected. 






Calumet*, 
Jersey . .. 



Lion 

Bakers' De- 
light''- 



Reliable. 
Olyrapia. 



Purity. 



Elk 

Clabber* 

Yukon. . 

Purity. .. 

Cameo... 



J. C.Grant Chemical Co.. 
E. St. Louis 
M. O'Connor & Co., 

Indianapolis 

Calumet Baking Powder 
Co., Chicago 



Dayton Spice Mills Co.. 
Dayton, 

Wabash Baking Powder 
Co., Wabash 



Grocers' Supply Co., 

Indianapolis 

Eddy & Eddy, St. Louis 

Canby, Ach & CanbyCo., 
Dayton, 

Sheridan & Co., 

Pittsburgh 

Rethwisch & May. 

Columbus 
Hulman Coifee Co., 

Terre Haute 

Reid, Henderson & Co., 
Chicago 
! 
Sheridan & Co., 

Pittsburgh 

Cameo Baking Powder ! 
Co., Chicago 



Brazil 

Salem 

Salem 

Indianapolis 

Columbus... 

Columbus ... 
Columbus — 

Columbus — 

Columbus 

Columbus — 

Columbus — 
Columbus — 



:oc 



Remarks. 



Empress 

N.Y. Store's 
Phosphate 

AVhipped 

Cream 

Pure Cream 

Tartar 



Imperial. 
Imperial. 



Pettis Dry Goods Co., 

Indianapolis 

Pettis Dry Goods Co., 

Indianapolis 

Geo. J. Ilaiumel, 

Indianapolis 

M.J.Stewart, 

Indianapolis 

Criterion Mfg. Co., 

Indianapolis 

Meyer Bros 



Columbus. 

Columbus 

Columbus — 
Columbus 

Columbus — 

Columbus 

Columbus — 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis, 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis 
Ft. Wayne. .. 



7.02 

9.87 

8.91 

8.52 

7.11 

8.42 
4.00 

2.04 

8.05 

11.89 

6.42 
7.60 

5.06 

6.33 

5.70 
6.29 

7.70 

4.72 

194 

9.25 

4.44 

8.76 

5.32 

6.84 
9.80 



Alum phosphate 
powder. Lowgrade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Below standard. 

Alum powder. Low 
grade . 

Phosphate powder. 
Low grade. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Low grade. 

Alum powder. Low 

grade. 
Alum phosphate 

powder. Very low 

grail e. 
Alum phosphate 

powder. Very low 

g-rade. 
Alum powder. Low 

grade. 

No phosphate pres- 
ent. Pure but 
wrongly labeled. 

Phosphate i)owder. 
Low grade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Low grade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Very low grade. 

Pho^pha*e powder. 
Low grade. 

Very low grade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Low grade. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Lowgrade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Very low grade. 

Alum pho.'phate 
powder. Very low 
grade. 

Phosphate powder. 
Low grade. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Very low 
trrade. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Low grade. 

Alum phosphate 
powder. Very low 
grade. 

Alum powder. Low 
grade. 

Below standard. 



'•'Samples were old stock and had undoubtedly deteriorated with age as analyses of 
fresh goods showed them to be well above the legal standard. 



250 

CREAM OF TARTAR. 

Potassium bitartrate, ordinarily known as cream of tartar, is the 
agent once much used together with sodium bicarbonate or cook- 
ing soda, for leavening bread, biscuit, etc. The development of 
the modern baking powder has largely diminished the nse of cream 
of tartar and now but small quantities are sold. During the 
year we have examined 256 samples of cream of tartar, collected 
for the most part from drug stores, of which 248, or 96.9 per cent, 
of the samples were pure. This condition is somewhat surpris- 
ing in view of the fact that cream of tartar was formerly one of 
the most heavily adulterated food products. All of the adulterated 
samples were bought at grocery stores and consisted of mixtures 
of alum, gypsum and starch. One of the samples was so carefully 
compoimded that its acidity was exactly that of normal cream of 
tartar. Other samples were poorly made, and one was so low 
in acidity that it had no value as a liberator of carbon dioxid. 

COFFEE. 

Of the 23 coffee samples analyzed, 15 have been pure and eight 
were classed as adulterated because of the use of facings or the 
admixture of chicory and roasted cereals. The adulteration of 
coffee is now rarely practiced, since the introduction of the cheap 
Brazilian and Central American products which sell as low as 
seven cents a pound does away with the necessity of artificial 
coffee substitutes. Coffee is faced or coated by some manufac- 
turers for the purpose, as they claim, of retaining the aroma of 
the coffee. Such treatment, however, is more frequently em- 
ployed to make a low grade coffee look like a better article. The 
facing or polishing of coffee with sugars, water, albumen or any 
other preparation, is illegal. But one sample, and that a package 
coffee, contained chicory. The chief fraud of the coffee trade con- 
sists in the sale of inferior gTades for the more desirable higher 
priced berry. The amount of Mocha coffee imported from Arabia 
each year is but a tithe of the coffee sold as Mocha. The same 
is true of Java coffees. It is probably true that almost all of the 
so-called Mocha and Java coffees on the market are nothing but 
the better grades of Central American coffees. 



251 

COFFEE-LEGAL. 



B 


Brand. Manufacturer or Retailer. 


Where Collected 


Remarks. 


3065 




G.E. Bursley & Co., 

Ft. Wayne. Ind 
F. Widlar & Co., Cleveland, 
A.B. Walter & Co.. 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Thompson & Taylor Co , 

Chicago 
Durand & Kasper, Chicago . . . 

Henry Finske -. 

McNeil & Higgins Co. .Chicago 
J. H. Conrad & Co.. Chii^ngo . . 
Hulman & Co . Terre llauto . 
Court House Grocery (West^ . 
Court House Grocery (West). . 
Court House Grocery (West) . . 

Arbuekle Bros , New York — 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 

John A. Smith Co.. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 


Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

South Bend... 
Michigan City. 
Michigan City. 
Michigan City. 
Indianapolis.. . 
Indianapolis. .. 
Indianapolis.. . 
Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 

Columbus 

Indianapolis... 

Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 




3066 




Pure. 


^071 




Pure. 


3118 




Pure. 


3161 
3167 




Pure. 
Pure. 


3224 




Pure. 


3-259 
3275 


Conrad's 


Pure. 


.3308 
3 ?07 , 
3308 

3386 

3746 
3616 

3748 


Kona Blend 

Best African Java. . . 

Arbuckle's Ariosa... 

12}^c 

Gloria Fruit, substi- 
tute for coffee 

12%c 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 

Colored Com. 
labeled legally. 
Pure. 

Cereal drink. 

Pure. 
Pure. 











COFFEE-ILLEGAL. 



176Vi 


mAc 




Indianapolis... 

Ft. Wayne 

South Bei.d... 
Indianapolis... 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Indianapolis... 
Indianapolis... 


Adulterated. 


3064 
3110 




Tilfer Coffee Co., Detroit 

National Grocery Co 

W'.F. McLaughlinA Co'.""" 
Chicago 


Adulterated. 


3349 

3385 


XKXX.'....'...' .".'.'.'.. 


Adulterated. 


3387 




Adulterated. 


3731 




Court House Grocery 

Court House Grocery 




3736 




Adulterated. 









CHOCOLATE AND COCOAS. 

Cocoa and chocolate are preparations made from the cocoa 
bean. The gi'onnd kernel of the cocoa bean is known as chocolate. 
When a portion of the cocoa bntter or fat of the bean is removed 
by pressure, the resnlting product is called cocoa. Chocolate and 
cocoa are adulterated by the admixture of starches, such as arrow- 
root, wheat and corn starch, or by the use of cocoa shells. Of 
the 28 samples of cocoa analyzed 22 were pure and six were adul- 
terated. Of the chocolates 21 were pure and two were adulterated. 
Several samples of sweet chocolate prepared in cake form as a 
confection contained added starch. One cocoa sample contained a 
large excess of cocoa shells. 



252 



CHOCOLATE-LEGAL. 



■^^ 
tJ 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Remarks. 



414 

448 
1331 

1698 

1718 

1721 

1725 

1739 
1744 
3061 

3109 
3121 

3122 

3123 

3226 

3425 

3671 

3697 

3698 
3699 

3700 



Ros • Vanilla 
Luncheon 

Monsoon 

Rose 

Swiss 

Instantaneous 

Genuine Swiss 

Milk. 

Breakfast Milk.. 

Chncol'te Menier 
Lowney's Sweet 
Cleveland Pre- 
mium No. 1 

Menier 

Knickerbocker. . 

Red Ribbon 

Wilbur's No. 1.. 

Vienna 

Puritan Pure 

Foods 

Blue Ribbon 

Premium 

Vanilla Sweet... 
Premium JNo.l. . 

Premium 



Cleveland Choc, and 
Cocoa Co., Cleveland 

Siirague. Warner & 
Co., Chicago 

Cleveland Choc, and 
Cocoa Co., Cleveland 

S.L. Harriett, Bo.''ton 

S. F.Whitman & Son, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

F. L Cailler 

Peters, 

Vevay, Switzerland 
Menier, New York... 
Lowney 

Cleveland Thoc. and 
Cocoa Co. .Cleveland 
Menier, Chicago . . . 
Manhattan Cocoa 
and Choc Co.,N.Y. 
Runkel Bros., 

New York 
H. Wilbur & Son, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Runkel Bros., 

New York 

Puritan Pure Foods 

Choc.N Y.&(!hi. 

Knickerbocker Choc. 

Co., New York 

Hershey Choc. Co., 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Hershey Choc Co 

W.BaKer & Co, 

Winchester. Va. 
Rockwood&Co.,N.Y. 



Vineennes ... 

Washington. 

Evansville .. 
Kokomo 



Indianapolis , 

Indianapolis , 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis. 



Ft. Wayne.., 
South Bend 



Sonth Bend 
South Bend 
South Bend 
Lafayette ... 
Columbus ... 
Irvington 



Irvington. 
Irvington.. 



Irvington. 
Irvington. 



1.53 
1.90 



4.08 



3.37 



0.78 
0.65 



2.42 



2.22 



Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 



CUOCOLATE-ILLEGAL. 



447 


Batavia 


Batavia Preserving 
Co., Batavia, N. Y. 
Croft <k Allen Co.. 

Philadelphia 


Washington.. 
Michigan City 


1.50 
1.18 


.75 
.64 




3155 


Swiss Process... 


Contains foreign 
starch. Adul- 
terated. 

10 per cent, for- 
eign starch. 
Adulterated. 



COCOA-LEGAL. 



374 
375 
376 
1337 
1570 

1655 
1697 
1723 



Justice 

Rose's 

Hershey 's 

Red Ribbon 

Powell's Break 
fast 

Pure 

Golden Rod 

Blocker's Cocoa 



Wm. H.Baker, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Cleveland Choc, and 

Cocoa Co., Cleveland 

Hershey's Choc. Co , 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Runkel Bros., 

New York 

Alex.M. Powell. 

New York 
Brooks ChocolateCo., 
Chicago 
Rockwood Co., 

New York 
F.C.Blooker, 

Amsterdam 



Vineennes .. 
Vineennes . . 
Vineennes . . 
Evansville . . 

Jeflfersonville 
New Albany. 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis 



3.37 


2.22 


5.09 


2.88 


5.48 


2.50 


5.58 


3.18 


4.29 


2.65 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 



253 



COCOA— LEGAL-Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



a o 



Remarks. 



Blocker's Dutch 
Cocoa 

Purity 

Golden Lion 

Pure Soluble 

Bedford 

Wilbur's Break- 
last 

American Break- 
fast 

Croft's 

Puritan Pure 
Foods 

Bedford.. 

London 

Leader 

Empire 

Rose's 



F.C.Blooker, 

Amsterdam 
Huyler, New York... 
Rockwood & Co.. 

New York 
C J. Van Houten & 

Zoon, Holland 

J. H. Barker & Co.. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

H. 0. W. Wilbur & 
Son.,Phila'phia, Pa. 

Manhattan Choc, and 
Cocoa Co., New York 
Croft & Allen, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Puritin Pure Foods 
Co., New York 

Knickerbocker Choc. 
Co., New York 

H.O. Wilbur & Sons, 
Philadelphia 



Atkinson <fe Co., 

New York 

Atkinson & Co., 

New York 

Cleveland C.C. Co... 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 



South Bend . 

South Bend. 
Columbus 

Columbus 

Irvington 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 







4.55 


2.84 


5.23 


2.61 


4.44 


2.32 


4.58 


2.97 


4.87 


2.83 


4.30 


2.67 


3.15 


1.70 











Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Contains arrow- 
root starch, but 
is properly la- 
beled. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 



COCOA-ILLEGAL. 



Prepared Break- 
fast, Eureka. .. 



Webb's , 

Justice 

Purina 

Homeopathic 

Webb's 



Kenwood Preserve 
Co., Chicago 



Jos. Webb & Co., 

Milton, Mass. 

Wm.H. Baker, 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



Halston Purina Co , 
St. Louis 



J.S. Frye <fe Son, 

London, Eng. 



Jos. Webb & Co., 

Milton, Mass. 



Washington.. 


6.33 


3.80 


Jeifersonville 


7.09 


3.85 


Kokomo 


4.32 


2.25 


Indianapolis. 


1.71 


.94 


Indianapolis. 


1.96 


1.17 


Covington ... 


7.47 


5.08 



Contains excess 
ofshells. Adul- 
terated. 

Excess ofshells. 
Adulterated. 

Contains foreign 
starch. Adul- 
terated. 

25 per cent, for- 
eign starch. 
Adulterated. 

50 per cent, arrow- 
root St arch. 
Adulterated. 

Excess of shells. 



TEAS. 



But few teas were examined and these were all' pure, if we 
except the addition of coloring matter usually known as facing. 
The Board of Tea Experts of the Treasury Department which 
has fixed the standard of purity, quality and fitness for consump- 



254 

tlon of tea imported into the United States, allows tlie importa- 
tion of teas which have a minimum amount of coloring substances 
not deemed unwholesome or deleterious to the consumer. In line 
with this decision we have not classified faced teas as adulterated. 

LEMON EXTRACTS. 

In the analysis of lemon essences or extracts we have required 
that at least five per cent, of pure lemon oil should be present. 
Many terpeneless lemon extracts are sold as pure extracts, but as 
they contain no lemon oil, or are made from oils from which the 
ter])enes have been removed, they must be considered to be adul- 
terated. The sale of compound lemon extract is not allowable. 
The value of an extract for flavoring purposes depends upon the 
amount of pure lemon oil present, and the compounding of oil of 
lemon grass, citral and dilute alcohol makes a fraudulent product. 

The action of certain manufacturers of flavoring extracts in 
attempting to override the standard wliich we have adopted for 
lemon extract by claiming that their products made from citral, 
or with a "washed out oil," are pure lemon extract, and therefore 
not adulterated, calls for special attention on the part of whole- 
salers and retailers to the fact that our standard for lemon ex- 
tract reads as follows: 

"Lemon extract shall contain at least five per cent, of the pure 
oil of lemon dissolved in alcohol." 

Under this ruling, which is in accordance with the standard 
set by the United States government and by all the States that 
have adopted a standard, the extracts made from the "terpeneless" 
lemon oil and from "washed out oil" must be considered to be 
adulterated. While oil of lemon owes much of its characteristic 
aroma to citral, it is none the less true that lemon extract, as we 
know it, does not depend for its flavor on the citral alone, but that 
its character is influenced to a considerable degree by the ter- 
penes present in normal oil of lemon. Limonene, the chief ter- 
pene of lemon oil, is an essential constituent, and when blended 
with the citral gives the true flavor of lemon. 

To claim that extract made from citral and "washed out oil" is 
made from lemon oil is as fallacious as the statements of the 
vinegar manufacturer that his compound of acetic acid, water 
and color is cider vinegar because the acetic acid is present. 



255 



Terpeneless extracts can legally be sold if they are so labeled, 
but when lemon extract is ordered, only the standard article should 
be supplied. 

The results of our analyses show that but few pure goods are 
sold, and that. most of the so-called lemon extracts are inferior 
substitutes, of little value to the housewife. We found but 56 
pure extracts out of 343 examined, while 287, or 83.7 per cent., 
were either low in lemon oil, contained no lemon oil at all, or 
were artificially colored with yellow dyes. 

LEMON EXTRACT-LEGAL. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



AVhere 
Collected. 



o o 



02 



Color. 



4611 

4681 

4864 

4989 
4991 

5025 

5066 

5278 

5329 

5359 

5361 

5838 

5849 

5881 
5930 

5931 

5976 
6023 
6050 
6056 

6067 

6094 

6123 

6148 

6152 
6249 

6292 

6313 

6335 



Dean's 

Mayflower 

Our Dream 

Diadem .. . 
Viking 

Puritan . . . 

Eddy's.... 

Coon 

Real 



Wabash Baking Powder 

Co., Wabash 

Parke, Davis Co., 

Detroit 
A. Coburn & Co., 

Philadelphia 
E. R. Durkee, New York. 
Jos. Burnett & Co., 

Boston 
Steele & Atwood, 

Chicago 
G. E. Callaway, 

Cambridge City 
McMonagle & Rogers, 

Middleton, N. Y. 
Hulman & Co., 

Terra Haute 
Schnull & Co., 

Indianapolis 
E.R.Webster Co., 

Cincinnati 
Geo. Loesch, Drug Store, 
Ft. Wayne 
Christian Bros., Drug 

Store 

Ed Mertz, Drug Store .... 
McMonagle & Rogers, 

Ohio 
Moellering Bros., 

Ft. Wayne 
Eddy & Eddy, St. Louis.. 

H. N . Janner, Goshen 

F.H. Benzer, Elkhart... 
Kenyon Medical Co., 

Elkhart 
Houseworth Bro., 

Elkhart 
Coonley Drug Co., 

South Bend 
H. L. Spohn, South Be-nd. 
S. T. Applegate, 

South Bend 

Leo Eliel, South Bend . . . 

Thompson & Taylor Co., 

Chicago 

Jos. Strong Co., 

Terre Haute 
Jos. Strong Co., 

Terre Haute 
J. M. Callender, Laporte 
T. H. Boyds, Laporte 



Roachdale . .. 

Laporte 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Frankfort — 

Cambridge Cy 

Muncie 

Attica 

Veedersburg . 

Covington — 

Ft. Wayne ... 

Ft. Wayne ... 
Ft. Wayne ... 

Ft. Wayne . . . 

Ft. Wayne .. 
Greencastle.. 

Goshen 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend . . 
South Bend . . 

South Bend .. 
South Bend . 

Indianapolis. 

Terre Haute.. 

Terre Haute.. 
Laporte ...... 

Laporte 



.9060 

.8335 

9104 
.9453 

.8306 

.8570 

.8051 

.8170 

.8430 

.8370 

.9169 

.8495 

.8330 
.8369 

.8350 

.8698 
.8701 
.8444 
.8355 

.8548 

.9396 

.8698 
.8341 

.8342 
.8456 

.8668 



,8342 
.8406 
.8281 



89.70 



1.70 

2.00 

5.10 
6.00 

9.50 

5.00 

5.90 

6.50 

5.20 

7.0 

0.0 

7.6 

5.4 
5.5 

6.6 



.70 5 7 
.5 5.9 
.816.7 
.54 7.9 



7.5 
14.9 



715.0 
96:5.8 



.92 6.8 
.42 5.4 



78.806.0 



88.76 



Not natural. 

Natural. 

Natural. 
Natural. 

Natural. 

Natural. 

Natural. 

Tropaelin. 

Natural. 

Natural. 

Dinitrocresol 

Natural. 

Natural. 
Natural. 

Natural. 

Not natural. 

Not natural. 
Not natural. 

Not natural. 

Colorless. 

Natural. 
Not natural 

Natural. 
Natural. 

Natural. 

Natural. 

Natural. 
Natural. 
Not natural. 



256 



LEMON EXTRACT-LEGAL.-Continued. 



O IS 

11 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


it 

02 


< 


o 
a 
o 

B 

1-5 


Color. 


(^■^m 




W. H. Williams, 

Valparaiso 
Heineman & Sievers, 

Valparaiso 
Oak Drug Store, 

Plymouth 
Chickasaw Drug Store, 

Peru 
Porter the Druggist, 

Peru 
Thieband & Co., Peru.... 
Ed M. Moran, 

Michigan City 
Otto Kloepfer, 

Michigan City 
Whiting Drug Co., 

Whiting 
Jof eph Burnett Co., 

Boston 
Chapman & Smith, 

Chicago, 111. 
John N. Bey & Co., 

Vincennes 
Walsh, Boyle & Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
Schaefer & Schaefer. 

Chicago 
Franklin McVeagh Co... 
Franklin McVeagh Co... 

D. C. Peters, Laporte 

Kaplinsky & Moran 

Heineman & Sievers 

J B. Wehrle 

E.P.Whinery 

Hutchins & Murphy 

E.H.Wilson 

H.H.Ice 


Valparaiso... 
Valparaiso.. . 
Plymouth — 


.8644 

.9443 

.8819 

.8269 

.8^18 
.8305 

.9420 

.8581 

.8281 

.8249 

.8665 

.8559 

.8236 

.82.35 
.8498 
.8281 
.8345 
.8281 


79.72 

44.64 

75.14 

92.07 

90.64 
91.00 

46.00 

82.16 

91.71 

92.68 

78.93 

82.93 

93.06 

93.09 
85.00 
91.72 
89.84 

91 m 


5.1 

6.5 

5.4 

8.6 

5.6 
12.2 

5.7 

6.0 

5.7 

10.0 

5.16 

6.20 

5.30 

6.25 
5.50 

5 '.62 
5.00 
8.70 
6.10 
8.10 
7.80 
7.90 
5.70 




fif^P8 




Natural. 


64'?^ 




Not natural. 


6485 




Natural. 






Per 

Per 
Per 






fiPiOfi 












6514 






6537 




MichiganCity 

MichiganCity 

Whiting 

Terre Haute.. 

Martinsville . 

Vincennes . .. 

Washington.. 

Huntington.. 
Huntington.. 
Evansville . . . 

Laporte 

MichiganCity 
Valparaiso. .. 
Anderson — 

Muncie 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis. 
Muncie 




6552 




Natural . 


6565 




Natural. 


m 




Natural. 


303 

385 


Chapman's... 


Natural. 
Natural. 


433 
1092 


Silver Seal... 


Natural. 
Natural . 


1429 
1298 
9036 


Club House.. 
Club House.. 


Natural. 
Natural. 
Natural. 
Natural. 


^098 




Natural. 


•^906 




.82^^8 93.00 


Natural. 


2419 




.8173 
.8241 
.8309 
.8294 


94 71 
9i.91 
91.00 
91 34 


Natural. 


2505 




Natural. 


2727 




Natural. 


2958 






■^474 




.8238 93.00 












O 4) 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Town. 


o 
a 
o 

a 


o 3 


Remarks. 


3973 




F. W. Green 


Elwood 

New Albany. 


6.89 
7.87 < 

5.34 < 

6.87' 


)2:7i 

M.97 

n.oo 


Pure. 


3486 






Pure. 


3989 


Owl 


E.R. Webster & Co., 

Cincin 
Boener-Fry Co., 

Iowa City, 1 


nati 
owa 




40''4 


Albion 








Pure. 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL. 



o a> 

£a 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


it 

Orb 

m 


^6 

ll 
o o 

< 


o 

3 
o 

s 

ID 


Color. 


16 


Premium 

Waldorf 

Improved 
Brand 


Grocers' Supply 
Co., Indianapo- 


Columbus 

Columbus — 

Columbus 


.8745 
.9734 

.9821 


76.01 
22.73 

14.27 


2.25 
0.0 




19 
21 


Edwin, New York 

J.C.GrantChem. 
Co. .Chicago, 111. 


Naphthol yellow. 



257 



LEMON BXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 





Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 




Is 

o o 


o 
a 

O 

9 

s> 


Color. 


-§^ 










^>- 




<-^ 








02 


< 


h^ 




29 




Reid, Henderson 
&Co., 






















Chicago, 111. 


Franklin 


.9713 


24.78 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


62 


Gold Arrow ... 


Newton Tea and 
Spice Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Elwood 


.9439 


44.86 


0.0 


Natural. 


80 


Roids Superior 


Roads Extract 
Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
















Alexandria .. 


87.93 


74.22 


2.12 


Natural. 


84 


Standard 


Atwood & bteele 
Co., 










Naphthol yellow. 






Chicago, 111. 


Alexandria . . 


.9769 


19.39 


0.0 




127 


Seely's 


Seely Mfg. Co., 










Natural. 






Detroit, Mich. 


Muncie 


.8560 


82.90 


4.25 




128 


Sachs-Prudens 


Sachs-Prudens, 










TropEeolin. 






Dayton, 0. 


Muncie 


.9657 


29.95 


0.0 




133 


Link's 


Link & Nelson, 
















Paris, 111. 


Brazil 


.8412 


87.79 


6.56 


Turmeric. 


134 


Shaffer's 


Wabash Baking 
Powder Co., 
















Wabash, Ind. 


Brazil 


.9078 


62.41 


.95 


Natural . 


157 


Eddy's Double 
Strength 


Eddy & Eddy. 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Brazil 


.8611 


80.96 


5.20 


Dinitrocresol. 


161 


Napoleon 


Forbes Chem. Co., 
















Chicago, 111. 


Brazil 


.9911 


"6.48 


1.34 


Naphthol yellow. 


164 


Keystone 


Bement, Rea & 

Co., 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
















Brazil 


.9690 


26.95 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


178 


Chapman's 


Chapman & 
Smith, 
















Chicago, 111. 


Brazil 


.8631 


80.19 


5.40 


Naphthol yellow. 


180 


Rex 


Frank Tea & 
















Spice Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Brazil 


.9408 


46.14 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


185 


Viking 


E. R. Webster 
& Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Terre Haute.. 


.9415 


46.32 


0.0 


Natural. 


190 


Jos. Strong & 
Co. Real 


Terre Haute Cof- 
fee & Spice 
















Mills, T. Haute 


Terre Haute.. 


.8508 


84.67 


7.60 


Dinitrocresol. 


191 


Pure and Sure. 


Frank Tea & 
Spice Co., 












193 


VanDuzer's 
Fruit 


Cincinnati, 0. 
Van Duzer & Co., 


Terre Haute.. 


.9324 


51.12 


0.0 


Turmeric. 






New York 


Terre Haute.. 


.8259 


92.39 


5.00 


Turmeric. 


195 


Bastine's. 


Bastine & Co., 
















New York 


Terre Haute.. 


.8530 


83.94 


3.10 


Natural. 


198 


Standard 


Gillettes Chem. 
Works, 
















Chicago, III. 


Terre Haute.. 


.9559 


37.41 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


245 


Baker's Pride. 


Terre Haute Ex- 
tract & Cheese 
















Co., T. Haute 


Terre Haute.. 


.9685 


27.40 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


271 


Norton'sSt'nd- 
















ard 


Bement, Rea & 
Co.,TerreHaute 


Terre Haute.. 


.9797 


16.52 


1.10 








Natural. 


272 


Crown 


C. W. Bauermeis- 
















ter,'l'erre Haute 


Terre Haute.. 


.9366 


48.97 


0.0 


Tropaeolin. 


273 


Ideal 


C. W. Bauermeis- 
















ter, Terre Haute 


Terre Haute.. 


.9648 


30.73 


OC 


Dinitrocresol. 


286 


Our Pride 


Gast & Strosler, 
















Louisville, Ky. 


Martinsville . 


.9840 


12.49 


0.0 


Natural. 


287 


TropicalFruit. 


C. A.Schrader, 
















Indianapolis 


Martinsville . 


.9819 


14.46 


.759 


Naphthol yellow. 


289 


Diadem 


Schnull &Co.. 
















Indianapolis 


Martinsville . 


.8719 


76.98 


3.52 


Natural. 


290 


Eddy's Special 


Eddy & Eddy, 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Martinsville . 


,8589 


81.84 


5.06 


Dinitrocresol. 


302 


Viking 


E. R. Webster & 
Co., 












^ 




Cincinnati, 0. 


Martinsville . 


.9591 


35.20 


0.0 


Trop 



17-Bd. of Health. 



258 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



w . 










t*i • 






o a> 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 




c o 


.1-1 

o 
a 

o 

a 


Color. 


c3^ 








£o 


°t> 




1-^ 








rn 


< 


k) 




304 


Our Special . .. 


Reed & Hender- 
















son, 

Chicago, 111. 


Martinsville . 


.9709 


25.17 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


309 


Delmonico . . . 


Roosa & Ratliflf. 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Martinsville . 


.9371 


51.48 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


311 


Monogram 
Triple 


J. C.Perry & Co., 
















Indianapolis, Ind. 


Martinsville.. 


.9020 


65 73 


0.92 


Natural. 


336 


Bey's 


Frank Tea & 
Spice Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Vincennes 


.9383 


48.05 


0.0 


Natural. 


349 


Special 


Eddy & Eddy, 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Vincennes 


.9197 


57.10 


0.0 


Dinitro.cresol. 


350 


Immense 


Winter Spice & 
Ext. Co., 
















Chicago, 111. 


Vincennes 


.9784 


17.81 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


352 


Oriental 


Jas H. Forbes, 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Vincennes 


.9837 


12.77 


0.0 


Natural. 


358 


Silver Shield.. 


John N. Bey, 
















Vincennes, Ind. 


Vincennes — 


,9692 


26.77 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


362 


Delmar 


Franklin Extract 
Co., 
St. Louis, Mo. 
















Vincennes. .. 


.9785 


17.70 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


370 


Our Own 


B.C. Bult Mass.. 
















Vincennes, Ind. 


Vincennes 


.9318 


51.43 


0.0 


Natural. 


381 


Ben Hur 


Bain & Chapman, 
















St. Louis, Mo 


Vincennes 


.8708 


77.36 


2.50 


Dinitrocresol. 


382 


Splendid 


Jas. H. Forbes, 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Vincennes 


.9501 


41.26 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


383 


Risch'sPerfect 


Risch Bros., 
















Vincennes, Ind 


Vincennes 


.9338 


50.42 


0.0 


Natural. 


395 


Blanke's Ex- 
position, 


C. F. Blanke & 
Co., 
















St. Louis, Mo. 


Vincennes 


.8839 


72.42 


3.10 


Natural. 


413 


Perfection 


Cincinnati Ex- 
tract Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Vincennes 


.9624 


32.65 


0.0 


Natural. 


429 


Dr. Pierce's. .. 


Dr. Pierce's Flav. 
Ext. Co , 
















Indianap'is, Ind. 


Washington.. 


.9388 


47.78 


0.0 


Natural. 


431 


Creme 


Royal Remedy & 
















Ext. Co., 
















Dayton, 0. 


Washington.. 


.9616 


33 31 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


446 


Superior 


E. W. Gillett, 
















Chicago, 111. 


Washington.. 


.9184 


57.74 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


449 


Gilt Edge 


Frank Tea & Sp'e 
Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 
















Washington.. 


.9269 


53.77 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


467 




L. V. Logan, 

New York 


Washington.. 


.9332 


50.72 


0.0 








Tropaeolin. 


531 


Kingery 


Kingery, 
















Phil'a, Pa. 


Brazil 


.8484 


85.46 


3.60 


Natural. 


548 




Bunton Drug Co. 
J.S. Madison .. 

H. J.Werker 

W. C. Watjen ... 


Terre Haute . 
Terre Haute . 

Vincennes 

Vincennes.. .. 


.8755 
.8260 
.9219 

.8986 


75.64 
92.36 


1.50 
5.00 


Natural. 


572 




Turmeric. 


645 




56.11 


Naphthol yellow. 


663 




fi6.43 


1.12 


Natural. 


681 




R. G. Moore 

C.S.Miller 

Clark & Sons. .. 


Vincennes. .. 

Vincennes 

Princeton... " 


.8700 
.9274 
M2d 


77.64 
53.53 
90.43 


.72 

.56 

5.30 


Turmeric. 


694 




Turmeric. 


747 




Turmeric. 


762 




F.S.Clapp 


Washington.. 


.8862 


71.50 


156 


Dinitrocresol. 


778 




A.F.Schmidt.. . 
J.N.Jones 


Washington.. 
Washington.. 


.8631 
.8245 


80.19 
92.80 


4.00 
9.90 


Turmeric. 


801 




Tropaiolin and 






turmeric. 


855 




J. F.Bomra 


Evansville... 


.8265 


92.21 


3.75 


Natural. 


872 




Meek & Albers... 
H. J. Schlaepper. 
W. H. Foeus 


Evansville . 
Evansville .. . 
Mt. Vernon.. 


.9455 
.8335 
.82.39 


43.87 
90.14 
55.18 


0.0 

3.75 

1.10 


Natural. 


885 




Turmeric. 


910 




Natural. 


928 




Dawson & Boyce. 


Mt. Vernon.. 


.8398 


88.22 


5.00 


Turmeric. 


940 




D. & H. Rosen- 
















baum 


Mt. Vernon . 


.9003 


65,69 


.31 


Natural. 


964 




Porter the drug'st 
Blue Drug Store. 
Chi.casaw Pharm. 
Bradley Bros 


Peru 


.8237 
.8833 
.9205 
.8213 


93.03 
72.65 
56.77 
93.67 


7.31 
2..30 
1.77 
5.47 


Dinitrocresol. 


990 


Peru 

Peru 


Dinitrocresol. 


1001 




Dinitrocresol. 


1010 




Wabash 


Turmeric. 



259 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



>, . 

O (D 






>^ 


>>^ 


_: 




h4 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. nY.^^f'^.. 
j Collected. 

i 




o o 

< 


o 

a 
o 

a 


Color. 


W?i\ 




R. E. Clark 

Butterbaugh&C( 

M. Kaylor 

Crown Chemica 


Wabash 

) Wabash 

Huntington 


.8218 
.9355 

.8476 


93.74 
49.55 
85.73 


6.25 

0.0 

5.50 




1055 




Tropeeolin & tur 


1077 
1145 


Crown 


Natural. 
Turmeric. 






Works, 












1146 


Tri-state 


Evansvilh 
Lewis Seitz Gro- 
cery Co., 


) Oakland Citj 


' .9221 


74.27 


.62 


Natural. 


1159 




Evansvilh 
Ranke & Nuss- 

baum 

EvansvilleChem- 


Oakland Citj 


.9110 


60.52 


.81 


Dinitrocresol. 


1163 


Crystal Pearl . 


Ft. Wayne.. 


.9393 


47.51 


.94 


Natural. 






ical Works, 












1175 




Evansville 

Dreier & Bro 

H. G. Sommers 
Meyer&Bro.&Co 


Oakland City 
Ft. Wavne .'. 
Ft. Wayne ... 
Ft. Wayne... 


.9292 
.8803 
.8195 
.8490 


52.68 
73.81 


.75 
2.10 


Dinitrocresol. 


llSfi 




Turmeric. 


1198 




94.13 


3.11 


Turmeric. 






85.26 


3.00 


Natural 


1243 




PeLlens & Lewis. 
FrankTea&Spice 


Ft. Wayne . . . 


.9071 


62.74 


.75 


Dinitrocresol. 


1287 




Co., Cincinnati 
Grocers' Chemi- 
cal Works, 


Mt. Vernon .. 


.9319 


51.38 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


1289 


Standard 


Evansville 
Cook Grocery Co., 


Evansville. .. 


.9338 


50.42 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


1297 


Priscilla 


Evansville 
Franklin Mac- 
Veagh Co., 


Evansville. .. 


.9717- 


24.38 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


1348 


Sauer's 


Chicago, 111. 
C. F.SauerCo.. 


Evansville . . . 


.9629 


.32.27 


0.0 


Turmeric. 


1368 


Bain's Fault- 


Richmond, Va. 


Evansville.. 


.8674 


78.58 


5.00 


Tropaeolin. 




less 


Meyer Bain Mfg 

Co., St. Louis 

Forbes Chemical 












1369 


Napoleon 


Evansville. .. 


.9544 


38.47 


0.0 


Tropseolin. 


1392 


Gilt Edge 


Co , Chicago 
Berdan & Co., 


Evansville... 


.9923 


5.55 


0.0 


Natural. 


L407 


Mader's 


Toledo 
Wabash Baking 
Powder Co., 


Huntington.. 


.9681 


27.77 


.50 


Naphthol yellow. 


444 


Kline's Pure . 


Wabash 
Wabash Baking 
Powder Co., 


Huntington.. 


.9383 


48.05 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


446 


Puritan 


Wabash 
Moellering&Mil- 
lard Co., Ft. 


Huntington.. 


.9399 


47.18 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


488 


St. George..:. 


Wayne 
Lewis Seitz Gro- 
cery Co., 


Huntington.. 


.9556 


37.62 


1.50 


Natural. 


490 


Pure Food 


Evansville 
Eddy & Eddy, 


BooDville . . . 


.8662 


79.04 


2.93 


Natural. 


505 


Star and Cres- 


St. Louis 


Boonville 


.9437 


44.98 


0.0 


Tropasolin. 






Bement & Seitz, 












509 


Our Choice ... 


Evansville 
E. W. Gillette, 


Huntingburg. 


.9565 


37.02 


.31 


Natural. 


526 


Kehoes 


ur L , Chicago: lluntingburg. 
Wabash Baking, 
Powder Co., i 


.9743 


21.89 


1.06 


Natural. 


593 




^ „ ^ Wabash JeflFersonville 


.9223 


55.93 


.43 


Natural. 


564 




Drexler,Heft&Co 
A. Englehard & 




.8758 


75.49 


3.16 




573 


Cherokee 


JeflFersonville 


.9331 


50.77 


3.75 


Tropajolin. 






Son Co., 












580 


Boss 


Louisville 
BossChem.Wks., 


Jefferssnville 


.9767 


19.59 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


581 


Oak Flavoring 


N. Y. 


Jeffersonville 


.9776 


16.82 


0.34 


Dinitrocresol. 




Extract 


Oak Extract Co., 












603 


Columbia 


Louisville 
Columbia Extract 


Jeffersonville 


.9700 


26.04 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


617 


Owl 


<;o., N. Y. 
E. R. Webster & 
Co., Cincin- 


New Albany. 


.9672 


28.59 


0.31 


Natural . 




















nati, 0. 


New Albany . 


.8745 


76.01 


2.90 


Tropajolin. 



>60 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



>, . 

u u 
o ea 

11 

2 =1 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 




>> • 

^ 03 

3l 


O 

e 
o 

a 


Color. 


-^^ 










:i> 




I-; 








M 


< 


J 1 


16?0 


Big 5 


















Cincinnati, 0. 


New Albany . 


.9588 


35.43 


0.12 


Dinitrocresol. 


1652 


Ottenheimer 
Pine 


















Louisville, Ky. 


New Albany . 


.9112 


60.89 


0.71 


Natural. 


1653 


Rutter's 


E. W.Gillette & 
















Co., Chicago, 111. 


New Albany . 


.8320 


90.58 


5.06 


Dinitrocresol. 


1665 


KingB 


Ullman, Dreifus 
& Co., Cincin- 
















nati, 0. 


Salem 


.9537 


38.96 


1 00 


Natural. 


1674 


White Cap 


Heekin Spice Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Salem 


.9375 


48.48 





Tropivolin. 


168V 


Puritan 


Glazebrook, Ru- 
therford, Thomas 
Co., Louisville, 
















Ky. 


Salem 


.9459 


43.63 


0,0 


Natural. 


1688 


Crescent 


Ohio Falls Ex- 
tract Co., 
















Louisville, Ky. 


Salem 


.9792 


16.98 


0.43 


Natural. 


!76(i 




Atlantic Chem. 
















Co., Chicago, 111. 


Indianapolis. 


.9692 


26.77 


0.0 


Naphthol yellow. 


1764 


Purity 


Banner Ext. Co., 
















Cincinnati, 0. 


Indianapolis. 


.9567 


36.89 


0.0 


Tropa^olin. _ 


176D 


Special 


Souders Mfg. Co., 














Concentrated. . 


Oayton, 0. 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 


.9222 
.9754 
9125 


55.97 
20.80 
60 30 


0.0 
0.0 
31 




176S 




1820 




H. B. McCord 




1834 




H. M. Phillips... 




9314 


51 63 


1 24 




1848 




Elkhart 


8566 


82 69 


3.80 
3.80 


Tropgeolin. 
Natural. 


m?, 




Central Drug Co. 


Elkhart 


.8371 


89.05 


1883 








9387 


47 83 


00 




1921 








8472 


85 87 


4 83 




193?, 




0. J. Bee?on 


Goshen 


.8965 


67..32 


1.93 




1946 




G.W. Rule. 


Goshen 


.8467 


86.04 


5 60 


Turmeric. 


1957 




Public Drug Store 


South Bend.. 


.8206 


93.77 


3 50 


Dinitrocresol. 


1986 




C.Ooonley & Co 


South Bend.. 


8935 


68 52 


1 87 




?09n 




R.P. Milton.. ... 
T. H. Boyd .fe Co . 
Bieknell & Co 


South Bend.. 

Laporte 

Hammond . . . 


.8876 
9126 


70.93 
60 25 


2..37 
56 




2062 






21^3 




.8401 


87.82 


1 12 


Dinitrocresol. 


?,136 




J. W. Weis 


Hammond . .. 


.8209 


93.77 


5.00 


Dinitrocresol. 


2146 




M.Kolb 


Hammond . . . 


.8298 


91.23 


3 30 


Natural. 


2165 




Summer's Phar- 
macy 


Hammond .... 


.8365 


89.24 


3.85 








Turmeric. 


2176 




Corner Drug 
Store 


Valparaiso.. 


.8424 


87.37 


2.03 








Natural. 


2ISS 




W. U. Letherman 


Valparaiso. . . 


.8264 


92.24 


10 40 


Tropajolin 


2238 




Ben Fisher 


Logansport . 


.8209 


93.77 


6,56 


Dinitrocresol. 


2249 




G. W.Hoflmann.. 


Logansport . . 


.9418 


46.14 


00 


Dinitrocresol. 


2261 




W. H. Porter 


Logansport .. 


.9072 


62.69 


.32 


Dinitrocresol. 


2'^77 




Red Cross Phar- 
















macy 


Logansport .. 


.9051 


63.64 


3.25 


Natural 


2297 




M. VV. Murphy. .. 
Lytle &Orr 


Delphi 

Delphi 


.8492 


85.19 


5.77 




2311 




.9457 


43.75 


00 


Dinitrocresol. 


23*^3 




W. W. Johnson . 
Wells Yeager 


Lafayette 


.8215 


93.62 


2.81 




2373 










Best Co 


Lafayette 


.8665 


78.93 


2.56 


Turmeric. ' . 


2393 




Sehultz & Bos- 
well 


Lafayette 


.8329 


90.32 


1 .56 








Turmeric. 


2399 




Anderson Drug 
Co 
















Anderson 


.8451 


86.58 


4.30 


Dinitrocresol. 


2460 




Buck & Brickley. 


Anderson 


.8904 


69.75 


1 60 


N atura 1 . 


2483 




People's Drug Co. 
V. E Silverburg . 


Muncie 

Muncie 


.81' 85 
.8361 


91.60 
89.36 


6.40 
2.48 




25?n 




Naturnl. 


2544 




Physicians Drug 
















Store 


Muncie 


9321 


51.27 


0.0 


Turmeric. 


2554 




W. H.Bereley.... 
E. C. Robinson... 


Alexandria . . 
Ale.xandriii .. 


.8398 
.9085 


88.19 
62.07 


700 
00 




2581 




Natural. 


2610 




Stringfellow & Co 


Elwood 


.82n7 


92.45 


8 06 


Tropreolin. 


2621 




F. W.Green 

J.H. Kute 

F.L. Saylor 


Elwood 

Elwood 

Elwood 


.8381 
.8544 
.8857 


88.73 
83.46 
71.70 


3.50 
1.06 
1 84 




2628 






264R 




Dinitrocresol. 


2659 




W.Cogswell 

Jay Bros 


Elwood 

Kokomo 

Kokorao 


.8255 
.8918 
.8269 


92.51 


'?.(\F, 




26K9 




69.19 1.50 1 
92.08 6.25 1 




2685 




L. Mehlig 


Dinitrocresol. 



261 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



>. . 










>l • 






c o 








>> 


j2 (U 

li 

o o 


o 




u a 
2 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 




a 
o 

a 


Color. 


■Szi 










Ji> 




hJ 








02 


< 


IJ 




2699 




W.Scott 

Hollowell&Ryan 
F. H.Hubbard... 
J. C. Lindsay 


Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Tipton 


.8310 
.9400 
.9301 
.9465 


90.88 
47.13 
52. '^5 
4.i.26 


5.90 

0.0 

.20 
0.0 


DinitrocreFol. 


2709 




Dinitroeresol. 


2757 




Natural. 


2770 




Tropoeolin. 


2779 




Moore Bro.s 

S. Rosenthal 

L.T. Harker 

A.B. Carr 


Tipton 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Indianapolis. 


.820;^ 
.9488 
.8470 
.8214 


93.95 
41.95 
85.94 
a3.64 


3.44 
0.0 
1.56 

4.68 


Natural . 


2794 




Tropo?olin. 


2806 




Turmeric. 


2857 




Natural. 


2882 




F.H.Carter 

Weber Drug Co.. 
W.H.Hoyt& Co. 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 


.8223 
.8210 


93.41 
93.75 


4.81 
3.98 


Natural. 


2945 




Natural. 


2999 


Revolution 








Chicago 


Kokomo 


.9138 


59.72 


1.03 


Natural. 


3002 


Pure 


Arctic Mfg. Co., 
















Grand Rapids 


Kokomo 


.9633 


53.03 


0.0 


Dinitroeresol. 


3007 


Sailor's 


Atwood & Steele, 
















Chicago 


Kokomo 


.9165 


58.58 


.50 


Dinitroeresol 


3015 


Jenning's 


Jersey Extract 
Co., Grand Rap- 
















ids 


Kokomo 


.9554 


37.76 


0.0 


Natural. 


3035 


T.H.Johnson 








Mfg. Co.. De- 
















trot, Mich 


Ft. Wayne.... 


.9160 


43.56 


.02 


Turmeric. 


3154 


Rival 


Duran & Kasper, 
















Chicago. 111. 


MichiganCity 


.8777 


74.82 


2.83 


Natural. 


3171 


Special 


LakotaMfg. Co., 
















Chicago, 111. 


MichiganCity 


.9680 


27.86 


0.0 


Natural. 


3185 


Epicure 


















Stewart & Co 


Hammond . . 


.9676 


28.22 


0.0 




3186 


American 


American Chemi- 
cal Works, Chi- 
















cago, 111 


Hammond ... 


.9732 


22.92 


0.0 


Natural. 


3276 


Perfection 


Cincinnati E.x- 
traet Co., Cin- 
















cinnati, 


Indianapolis. 


.9631 


32.11 


0.0 




3278 


Pure Concen- 


















Hulman Co.. 
















Terre Haute 


Indianapolis. 


.8560 


82.69 


4.40 


Dinitroeresol. 


3.565 




Crescent Extract 
Co.. New York.. 


Columbus — 


.9735 


22.64 


0.0 








Natural. 


3396 




StandardMfg.Co., 
















Decatur, 111. 


Columbus 


.8507 


84.70 


4.20 


Natural. 


3398 


ProBond 


M.O'ConnorACo., 
















Indianapolis 


Columbus 


.9602 


34.40 


.56 


Natural. 


3413 




Eddy & Eddy, 

St. Louis 
















Columbus — 


.8736 


76.35 


0.0 


Dinitroeresol. 


3433 


Monogram 


J. C. Perry i Co., 
















Indianapolis 


Columbus — 


.8997 


65.94 


1.60 


Natural. 


3439 


Chapman's — 


Chapmanife Smith 
















Co., Chicago, 111. 


Columbus — 


.8863 


71.46 


4.06 


Tropajolin. 


3461 


High Grade 


Eddy A Eddy, 
















St. Louis 


Columbus 


.8363 


89.14 


10.00 


Dinitroeresol. 


3464 


Deeter's 
















Double 
















Strength 


J.P.DeeterCo., 
















Chicago, 111. 


Columbus 


.9587 


35.51 


0.0 




3465 


Lyon's Old Re- 
















liable 


W. W. Lyons & 
Sons, North 
















Vernon 


Columbus ... 


.9754 


20.80 


0.0 


Natural. 


3542 




A. G. Baldwin ... 


Noblesville... 


.9330 
.9829 


50.82 


0.0 


Natural. 


3558 




Charlton, 

Indianapolis 


Indianapolis. 


13.52 


1.2 








Natural. 


3606 




Pettis Dry Goods 
Co 

















Indianapolis. 


.8353 


89.61 


5.87 


Turmeric. 


3613 


Empire State.. 


Geo. .1. Hammel . 


Indianapolis. 


.9601 


34.47 


0.0 


Turmeric. 


3618 




J.H.Forbes, 

St. Louis 


Indianapolis. 


.9)67 


43.13 


0.0 








Dinitroeresol. 


3658 




ZippMfg.Co., 
Cleveland, 0. 
















Indianapolis. 


.8369 


89.11 


7,00 


Dinitroeresol. 


3659 




Zipp Mfg. Co., 
Cleveland, 0. 
















Indianapolis. 


.8324 


90.46 


6.88 


Dinitroeresol. 


3662 


Perfection 


Cincinnati Ex- 
tract Co.. Cin- 
















cinnati, 


Indianapolis. 


.9624 


32.65 


0.0 


Dinitroeresol. 



262 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



o ® 

11 
O 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


it 




o 
a 

O 

a 


Color. 


-^z 








P. 


^> 




^ 








in 


<: 


i-:i 




3696 


Chapman's 


Ch;ipman-Smith, 
















Chicago 


Indianapolis. 


.8642 


79.65 


6,75 


Dinitrocresol. 


3721 




Geo.Tenney Co., 
















Indianapolis 


Indianapolis. 


.9401 


47.08 


2.68 


Tropajolin. 


3774 




Van Duzer & Co., 
















iNew York 


Indianapolis. 


.8427 


87.34 


6.40 


Turmeric. 


3846 




CO. Maple 


Bloomington. 


.9199 


57.02 


0.0 




HK4S 




Bowles Bros., 
Drugs 


Bloomington. 


.8328 


90.35 


1.09 










3«o3 




J. W.O' Harrow.. 


Bloomington. 


.8308 


90.93 


4 68 




3S86 




Biavis Chemical 
Co., Jefferson- 






















ville 


JeflFersonville 


.9399 


41.18 


0,0 




H,H74 




Wm. C. Pfau, 
Jeffe-sonville 


Jeffersonville 


.82R6 


93.85 


3.10 








Natural. 


3890 





Chas. U. Knoefel.l New Albany . 


.9313 


51 .68 


.20 




3896 




15. Doolittle, 1 














.Jeffersonville Jeffersonville 


.9624 


33.65 


3.84 




3904 




C. E. Crecelius... 


New Albany . 


.9385 


47.94 





Tropaeolin. 


3908 




McDonald-itock- 
















dellCo 


New Albany . 


.8271 


92.02 


4.50 


TropEeolin. 


3921 




Floyd Parks 


Jeffersonville 


.8927 


68 83 


1 50 


Natural. 


39 8 




Doherty's Drug 
Store 


Jeffersonville 


.8430 


87.24 


5..30 








Turmeric. 


393h 


Souders' Reg- 
ular 


Royal Remedy & 
Extract Co., 
















Dayton, 


Noblesville... 


.9316 


50.01 


0.0 


Natural. 


3936 


Ko-We-Ba 


Kothe, Wells & 
Bauer, Indian- 


















Noblesville... 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Indianapolis. 


.9564 
.8361 
.9321 
9319 


37.0? 
89.36 
51.27 
51 .38 


.40 
2.43 
0.00 

.5 




?5'n 






?,544 








4856 


Red Cross 


John Doltean — 


Naphthol yellow. 


4866 




T. H. & B. Amt.. 
Lafayette Chem. 








0.0 




4946 
















W'ks, Lafayette 


Indianapolis. 


,9796 


16.46 


2.7 


Tropaslin. 


4990 


Double 


J. P. Dieter & 














Strength. 


Son, Chicago 


Indianapolis. 


.9651 


30.44 


0.0 


Dinitrocresol. 


5029 


Messina 


Jennings & Smith 
















Grand Rapids 


Frankfort — 


.9548 


38.16 


.3 


Not natural. 


5039 


McCook & 
















Baker's 


Souders, Dayton. 


Crawf'dsville 


.9230 


47.82 


1.0 


Naphthol yellow 


5011 


Robb's 


W. F. Robb 


Crawl'dsville 


.9800 


16.26 


.3 


Naphthol yellow 


5064 


Crown 


F. A. Frohnappel 


Cambridge 
















City 


.9895 


7.72 


.5 


Dinitrocresol. 


5065 


Happer's 


Uapper, Findlay, 


Cambridge 














Ohio 


City 


.9697 


26.33 


0.0 


Not colored. 


5077 


Napoleon 


Forbes Chem. Co 
















Chicago 


Indianapolis. 


.9927 


5.25 


2.3 


Naphthol yellow 


5103 


Quantity 
















Quality 


Gus. Klippel 


Indianapolis. 


.9806 


15.67 


1. 


Not colored. 


5157 




WabashBak.Pow. 
Co., Wabash 


Edinburg . . .. 


.9079 


62.36 


1.0 








Natural. 


5210 


High Grade ... 


Johnson Drug Co. 
















llushville 


Rushville — 


.9806 


15.67 


2.3 


Colorlets. 


5266 




Parke Davis & Co. 
















Detroit 


Muncie 


.9278 


53.48 


.3 


Natural. 


h^V 




Geiger-Tinney, 
















Indianapolis 


Attica 


.8990 


66 25 


3.6 


Tropselin. 


5360 


Empire 


McNeil lliggins 
















Co., Chicago 


Covington — 


.8170 


94.76 


0.0 


Coal tar. 


5363 


Gold Seal 


C. CallahaQ Co. 
















Lafaye;te 


Covington 


.9189 


57.45 


.3 


Natural. 


5703 




F. W. Green, Kl- 
wood 








3.24 




58;'5 


Ft. Wayne... 
Ft. Wayne ... 
Ft. Wayne ... 


.8718 
.9353 
.9445 


77.00 
49.64 
44.5 


3.4 
1.2 

28 


Natural. 


5K54 








5865 






Not natural. 


59U 


Keystone 


A.R Walter .... 


Ft. Wayne . .. 


.9473 


43.8 


.2 


Tropwiin. 


5972 


Enterprise 


WabashBak.Pow. 
















Co., Wabash 


Qreencastle.. 


.9239 


55.2 


1.0 


Coal tar. 


5MT5 


Koon 


B r i n k m e y e r- 
KuhnCo.Indpls 


Greencastle.. 


.9369 


49.1 


.4 








Naphthol iellow 



263 



LEMON EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL- Continued. 



ojZ; 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 







>. • 


^ 




>. 




O 


Where 


-r> 


a 


Collected. 


.- ca 


o o 


a 




^'^ 


Ji> 




rJl 


< 


hJ 



Color. 



6005 

6011 
6018 
6021 

6033 

6060 
6664 
6074 
6085 

6088 
6144 
6128 
6136 
6257 

6262 

6267 

6271 

6291 

6351 

6368 
6383 
6394 

6410 
6417 
6444 

6473 

6491 
6533 
6558 
6577 
6581 

6584 

6601 



Lafayette Chem. 
W'ks, Lafayette 



Telmo 



Steele-Wideles, 
Chicago 

Franklin Mac- 
Veagh, Chicago 



Swing. 



B. De.=enburg Co. 
Kalamazoo 



Baker's Pride. 
Cole's Leader. 

Keystone 

Our Special 

American 



Old U.S. P. 
Blossom 



Terre Haute Ex 

& Chem. Co 
Wabash Bak.Pow 

Co., Wabash 
Bement Rea Co , 

Terre Haute 
Reid Henderson 

Co , Chicago 

American Ex. Co. 

Cincinnati. 

McNeil Higgins 

Co., Chicago 



McNeil Higgins 
Co., Chicago 



Battle King . 



Shore Medicine 

Co., Rochester 

Huntington Gro. 

Co. 



Mammoth . 
Epicure 



Franklin Mac- 

Veagh, Chicago 

S.E. Wart& Co , 

Pittsburg 

Felix W. Klemn. 



Goshen 

Goshen 

Goshen 


.9757 
8490 
.9493 


20.5 
85 27 
41.70 


2 

3^4 

.3 


Goshen 


.9518 


40..S0 


5.1 


Goshen 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 


.9r94 
.9469 
.9514 
.8367 


35.0 
43.(10 
40.55 
89.16 


5.1 
0.0 
00 
2.5 


Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend.. 
South Be.nd.. 
South Bend.. 


.8655 
.8450 
.8490 
.9412 
.9600 


79.32 
81 .3fi 
85.27 
46.46 
31.52 


5fi 
2.3 
5.0 
1.7 
1.3 








.3 
1.0 


Brazil 


.9254 


54.48 


Brazil 


.8768 


75.14 


5.0 


Brazil 


.9766 


19.67 


.5 


Terre Haute. 


.9766 


19.67 


0.0 


Laporte 

Hammond . .. 
Valparaiso .. . 


.9725 
.8 06 
.94£8 


13.92 
87.96 
43.71 


0.0 
4.4 
0.0 


Valparaiso ... 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 


.9535 
.9482 
.8266 


39.80 
42.29 
92.18 


0.0 
1.9 
4.3 


Rochester 


.9404 


4681 


3.4 


Rochester 

Peru 


.9621 
.9167 
.8502 
.9547 
.8490 


32.87 
58.80 
84.88 
38.22 
85.27 


0.0 

.9 

2.2 

3.1 

.5 


Michigan City 

Whiting 

Hammond ... 


Hammond . . . 


.9885 


8.64 


0.0 


Hammond ... 
Hammond ... 


.9540 
.9525 


38.78 
39.80 


0.0 
.3 



Coal tar. 
Coal tar. 
Not natural. 

Dinitrpcresol. 

Coal tar. 
f^olorless. 
Natural. 
Not natural. 

Dinitroeresol. 

Natural. 

Dinitroeresol. 

])initrocresol. 

Aniline. 

Not natural. 

Coal tar. 

Trtipaelin. 

Coal tar. 

Tropajlin. 

Dinitroeresol. 
Natural. 
Naphthol yellow. 

Naphthol yellow. 
Naphthol ■> ellow. 
Natural. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Arcificial. 
Dinitroeresol. 
Not natural. 
Naphthol yellow. 

Naphthol yellow. 

Artifi eial. 

Nai hfhol yellow. 



VANILLA EXTRACTS. 

We have examined 189 samples of vanilla extract, and found 
53 to be pure and 13'6, or 71.9 per cent., adulterated or below 
standard. Many driig'g'ists' samples were made from the vanilla 
bean, but because of faulty methods of preparation are low in 
vanillin content and mnst therefore be classed as impure. A true 
vanilla extract is made by macerating the vanilla bean with sugar 
and extracting the mass wnth diluted alcohol. Adulteration of 
vanilla extract consists of substituting, wholly or in part, the in- 
ferior and cheaper Tonka bean for the vanilla bean, or the addi- 



264 

tion of the artificial coiimarin to weak extracts of tlie true bean, 
or even preparing solutions of artificial vanillin or artificial cou- 
marin in dilute alcohol', colored with caramel or coal tar dye to 
represent the true extract. 

Extract of Tonka has a decided value as a flavoring medium, 
and if compounded with extract of vanilla, can be sold if labelled 
"Extract of Vanilla and Tonka." 

VANILLA EXTRACTS-LEGAL. 



>> . 

o a 

11 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Town. 


a 

'c 

> 


Remarks. 


3970 
3984 






Marion 




Pure. 




Atlantic Import Co., New York 

E. R. Webster Co., Cincinnati 

Dr B E Miller 


Wabasb 

Sent in by them.. 
Albion 


.15 

.05 

05 

.125 

.137 


Pure. 


3987 
3995 


Owl 

Premium. 
Cub 


Pure. 
Pure. 


3999 
4007 


Conkle's 

Kothe, Weils & Bauer, Indianapolis 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


Pure. 
Pure. 



Sa 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 





C 




a 


u 


4) 














c 


a 




re 


o 


* 


> 


o 


o 



Remarks. 



131 
6fi7 
177 

1767 
3411 

3562 

650b 
1489 

2928 
2978 

3522 

4612 

4680 

4946 

4705 
5000 

5037 

5067 

5146 



Link's 

Chapman's 
Diadem . . . 



St. George. 



Deans 



Van Duzer, 



Purity. 



Link & Nelson. . . 
W.C. Watien .... 
Chapman & 

Smith Co 

Rchnull &Co 

Eddy ct Eddy, 

St. L uis 
Dr. Price's. 

Chicago 



Brazil 

Vincennes . .. 

Brazil 

Indianapolis 

Columbus 

Indianapolis 



Lewis Seitz Gro- 
cery Co 

T.N. Heiins 

Navin's Phar- 
macy, No. 1 ... 

WillE.Axline.. 

Wabash Bak. 
Pow. Co., Wabash 
John Wyeth & 

Bros. Phila 

Lafayette Chera. 
Wks, Lafayette- 
Hollo well & Ryan 
Van Duzer Ex 
Co., New York. 
Shapp & Dolme 
Chicago 
G. E. Callaway, 
Cambridge City 
Decatur Ex. Co., 
Decatur, 111. 



Boonville . . . 
Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 
Noblesville .. 



Roachdale 
Laporte 



Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis 
Crawfords'lle 
Camb'ge City 
Franklin 



.05 
.05 


None. . 
None. .. 


None. .. 
None. .. 


.1125 
.075 


None... 
None... 


None... 
None. .. 


.10 


None... 


None... 


.1125 
.10 


None... 
None... 


None... 
None.. . 


.0875 
.10 


None... 
None. .. 


None... 
None... 


.075 
.10 


None. .. 
None... 


None... 
None... 


1.0500 


None ... 


None ... 


.1500 


None ... 


None ... 


.100 


None ... 


Present. 


.250 


None ... 


None . . . 


.100 


None... 


Present. 


.100 


None. .. 


None. .. 


.0625 


None... 


None... 


0875 


None . .. 


None . .. 



Pure. 
Pure. 



Pure. 
Pure. 



Pure. 



Pure. 
Pure. 



Pure. 
Pure. 



Pure. 
Pure. 



Pure. 

Pure. 

Properly la- 
beled. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pui^. 

Pur§. 



265 



VANiLtiA EXTRACTS-LEGAL- Continued. 













a 






o o 

11 


Brand 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


s 


a 


"S 

a 

OS 


Remarks. 












«8 




51f»8 




Wabash Bali. 
Pow.Co., Wabash 


Edinburg ... 


.0625 


None.. 


Present. 








Pure. 


•^n^ 




Home Remedy 
Co., Laporte . .. 

Nickey Drug 
Store 






None . . . 


None . . . 








Pure. 


s?fin 




Muncie 


.0625 


None... 


None . . . 








Pure. 


5^35 




J. P. DietprCo... 
Hulman Ex. Co. 


Attica 


.100 


None . . . 


None ... 




5S45 


Hulman's.. 


Pure. 






Terre Haute 


Attica 


.075 


None. .. 


Present. 


Pure. 


5348 


Sender's ... 


Royal Remedy & 
















Ex. Co., Dayton 


Veedersburg. 


.100 


None ... 


None .. 


Pure. 


5^'i4 




D. H.Wallace .. 
P.W.Green 


Veedersburg. 
Elwood 


.0ri25 
.0625 


None . 
None ... 


NTone ... 
None ... 


Pure. 


5702 




Pure. 


5707 


Royal Blue. 


W.J.Quan&Co., 
















. Chicago 


Elwood 


.100 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


5717 


Zipp's 


ZippMfg. Co., 
















Cleveland 


Alexandria .. 


.0625 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


5804 




Chas.W. Ralston 

Home Remedy 

Co., Laporte ... 


Evansville. .. 
Laporte 


.0625 
.0200 


None ... 
None .. 


None ... 
None ... 


Pure. 


5805 










Pure. 


5929 




McMonagle & 
Rodgers 


Fort Wayne.. 


0875 


No'ne ... 


None ... 








Pure. 


5932 


Puritan — 


Moellering Co. .. 


Fort Wayne.. 


.0875 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


5973 


Enterprise . 


Wabash Bak. 
















Pow.Co. .Wabash 


Greencastle.. 


.0800 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


5986 


Monogram . 


J.C.Perry & Co., 
















Indianapolis 


Greencastle. 


.1125 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


6036 


LightHouse 


National Gro. 
















Co.. Chicago — 


Goshen 


.100 


None .. . 


None ... 


Pure. 


6140 




Archie Mfg. Co.. 
















Grand Rapids 


South Bend.. 


.075 


None"... 


Pre.«ent 


Pure. 


6250 


Coon 


Thompson & Tay- 
















lor Co., Chicago. 


Indianapolis. 


.1125 


None .. . 


None ... 


Pure. 


6265 


Cole's 


Wabash Bak. 














Leader . . . 


Pow.Co., Wabash 


Brazil 


.2-500 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


6266 


Keystone .. 


Bement Rea Co., 
















Terre Haute 


Brazil 


.Vif.O 


None... 


None ... 


Pure. 


6312 




Jos. Strong &Co., 
















Terre Haute 


Terre Haute.. 


.0875 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


6395 


Opal 


J. A.Tolman, 
















Chicago 


Valparaiso... 


.250 


None ... 


Present 


Pure. 


6443 




Shore Med. Co... . 


Rochester 


.1125 


None .. . 


None . . 


Pure. 


6585 


Renroh — 


Henry Horner 
















Co., Chicago . . 


Hammond . . . 


.0875 


None ... 


None ... 


Pure. 


6586 


Klemn s.... 


F.W. Klemn, 
















Chicago 


Hammond . . 


.100 


None ... 


Present 


Pure. 


6602 


Seal 


Kenwood Pres. 
















Co., Chicago — 


Hammond . . . 


.1125 


None... 


None ... 


Pure. 



VANILLA EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL. 



tie 

h5 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


.S 
"fl 

OS 

> 


a 

o 
O 


"3 

a 

03 


Remarks. 


.30 




Reid, Henderson 
&Co 

Roads Bros. Mfg. 
Co 

Superior Extract 


Franklin 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Huntington.. 


.0625 

.05 

.075 
.075 


None ... 

None ... 

None ... 
None ... 


None ... 

Present. 

Present. 
Present. 




50 
' 57 


Climax 

Superior . . . 
Gilt Edge.. 


Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 


1393 


Berdan & Co 



266 



VANILLA EXTRACTS -ILLEGAL-Continued. 



2a 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Remarks. 



1394 

1408 

1430 

1438 
132 
135 

642 

■ 162 
16>i 

179 

676 
192 

194 

690 
196 

199 

1761 

1766 

3316 

226 
3366 

270 
274 
337 



340 
3394 
3397 

348 

351 

357 



360 
361 



363 
3419 



837 



Venus. 



Mader's 

Club House 

Hoosier 

Dauntless 
Shaffer's . .. 



Napoleon . 
Keystone . 
Ilex 

Pure and 
Sure 

VanDuzer's 
Fruit 

Genesee 

Snow White 

Koon 

Pure and 
Sure 

Norton's 

Standard. 
Ideal 

Bey's Pure. 

Jewel 

king B'.'.'.'.'. 

Special 

Oriental 

Silver 
Shield... 

Colored 

Del mar 

Golden Rod 



Royal Rem. <fe 
Ex. Co 



Wabash 
Pow. Co. 



Bak 



Franklin Mc- 
Veagh Co 



Atwood & Steele. 

Hulman Extract 
Co 

Wabash Bak.i 
Pow. Co 



H. J. Werker.. 

Forbes Chem.Co. 

Bement,Rea&Co 

Frank Tea & 

Spice Co..,. . 



R.G.Moore. 



FrankTea&Spiee 
Co 



Van Duzer & Co. 



C.S.Miller ... 
Sprague, Warfier 

&Co 

Franklin Me- 

Ve^ghCo .... 
Lafayette Chem 

Works 

Brinkmeyer, 

Kuhn & Co.... 



FrankTea&Spice 
Co 

E. H. Bindley & 
Co 

Crescent Extract 
Co 



Bement,Rea»fe Co 
C. W. Bauermeis- 

ter 

FrankTea&Spice 

Co 



E. Bierhaus 

Standard Mfg. Co 
Ulmann, Dreifus 

Co 

Eddy & Eddy .... 

Jas. H.Forbes . .. 

John N. Bey 



Hulman & Co — 
E. Bierhaus & 

Sons 

Frankin Extract 

Co 

Kothe, Wells & 

Bauer 



John Bey & Co... 
John L&vel & Son 



Huntington. 

Huntington . 

Huntington . 
Huntington. 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Vincennes . . 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Vincennes . . 

Terre Haute. 
Terre Haute. 
Vincennes . 
Vincennes . .. 
Terre Haute. 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Columbus 

Terre Haute., 

Columbus — 

Terre Haute., 

Terre Haute.. 

Vincennes . . . 

Vincennes . . . 
Columbus — 

Columbus ... 
Vincennes .. . 

Vincennes . .. 

Vincennes .. . 

Vincennes . . . 

Vincennes . . 

Vincennes . . . 

Columbus 

Vincennes . .. 
Evansville .. . 



0.25 

.10 

.05 
.075 

.00 

.075 

.0375 

.00 
.00 

.10 

.0875 

.0375 

.025 

.025 

.00 

.0875 

.00 

.0375 

.1125 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.125 

.075 

.00 
.00 

.00 
.05 

.00 

.05 

.075 

.0625 

.Oft 

.25 

.00 
.05 



Present. 

Present. 

None ... 
Present. 

Present. 

None .. . 

None ... 

Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

None ... 

Present. 
None .. . 
None ... 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

None .. 
Present. 

Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

None ... 

Present. 

Present. 

None ... 
None ... 



Present. 

Present. 

Present, 
Present, 

Present, 

Present, 

Present. 

Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 
None ... 
Present. 
Present. 
None ... 
Present. 
Present 

Present 

None ... 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

None ... 
Present. 

Present. 
None .. . 

Present. 

Present, 

Present. 

Present. 

Present, 

Present. 

Present. 
Present. 



low 
low 



Van'lin syn 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Colored with 
caramel. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Colored with 
caramel. 

Colored with 
caramel. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Colored with 
caramel. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Pure, 
grade. 

Pure, 
grade. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
theti6. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Van'linsyn- 

thetic. 
Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'linsyn- 
thetio. 

Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Colored with 
caramel. 



267 



VANILLA EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Remarks. 



Pure Food 
Perfection. 



Crane 

Silver Seal 



Gilt Edge 



Tropic 

Fruit... 
Gilt Edge 



Diamond. 
Crystal 
Pearl. .. 



Splendid. 



Pure.. . - 

Empire 

State . 



lOe Special 
Perfection. 
Reliable.. . 



Lion 

Sauer's. 



Oriental . 
Regular . . 



Green City. 
Crescent.. , 



Standard Chem, 
Co 

Perfection Ext. 
Co 



Meek & Albers. .. 
Royal Rem. tt Ex 

Co 

Walsh, Boyle & 

Co 

Royal Rem. <fc Ex 

Co 

Frank Tea&Spice 

Co 

L. V. Logan 

Dawson & Boyce 



Evansville ... 

Evansvilie ... 

Evansville .. . 

Washington.. 

Washington.. 

Washington.. 

Washington.. 
Washington.. 
Mt. Vernon .. 



A. B. Judson. . 
D. & H. Rosen- 
baum 



Ragan Bros. 



EvansvilleChem. 

Works 

Porter the Drug 

gist 

Blue Drug Store 

J.H.Forbes 



Oakland City 
Oakland City 

Mt. Vernon .. 

Evansville . . . 

Evansville. .. 



Peru. 
Peru . 



Geo. J.Hammel 
Chickasaw Phar- 
macy 

Bradley Bros.. 



Frank Tea & 

Spice Co 

Cincinnati Ex. Co 
Butterbaugh &Co 
Grocers'-Chem. 

Wks 

Schaefer & 

Schaefer 

Indpls. Fancy 

Gro.Co 



Indianapolis 

Princeton 

Indianapolis 



Peru 

Wabash . . . 
Indianapolis. 



H. Karn & Co ... 
C.F.SauerCo... 



H. G. Sommers .. 
Meyer Bros. &Co, 



Bement & Seitz .. 

Royal Remedy & 

Extract Co 



G. C. Pharmacy 
Co 



A. Holmes. 



Mt. Vernon... 
Indianapolis 
Wabash 



Evansville. .. 
Huntington.. 

Irvington 

Irvington .. . 
Evansville. . 
Evansville. . 
Indianapolis 
Ft. Wayne.. 
Ft. Wayne . . 



Huntingburg, 
Noblesville .. 



Jeffersonville 
JeflFersonville 



.00 

.025 

.05 

.0375 

.00 

.00 

.00 
.00 
.00 
.075 

.00 
.00 

.075 

.00 

.00 

.00 
.025 

.05 

.09 

.025 

.0375 

.00 

.00 

.00 
.00 
.075 

.00 

.0375 

.075 

.075 

.125 

.1125 

.0875 

.0875 

.0875 

.0625 
.025 

.025 

.025 

.00 
.025 
.00 
.00 



None ... 

Present, 

Present. 

Present. 

None ... 

Present. 

Present. 
Present. 
None ... 
Present. 

Present. 
Present. 

None .. . 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 
None ... 

Present. 

None .. . 

Present. 

None .. . 
None . . 
Present. 

Present. 
Present. 
None. . . 

Present 

None. . 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

None... 

None.. . 

None. .. 

None. . . 

Present. 
Present. 

None. .. 

None . .. 

Present. 
None . . . 
Present, 
None... 



Present. 

Present. 

None .. 

Present. 

None ... 

Present. 

Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 

Present. 
None ... 

Present. 

Present. 

Present 

Present. 
Present 

Present. 

None ... 

Present 

Present. 
Present. 
None. . 

Present, 
Present 
Present 

Present. 

None . .. 

Present, 

Present, 

Present 

Present 

Present 

Present 

Present 

Present 
Present 

Present 

None .., 

Present. 
None . .. 
Present, 
None ... 



Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'Iin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'linsyn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Artificial. 
Artificial. 
Van'linsyn- 

thetic. 
Artificial. 
Artificial. 

Colored with 

caramel. 
Artificial. 



Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Pure, low 
grade. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 
Artificial. 
Artificial. 
Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Artificial. 
Col. with 

caramel. 
Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Vanil'n syn- 
thetic. 

Vanil'n syn- 
thetic. 

Vanil'n syn- 
thetic. 

Col. with 
caramel. 

Col. with 
caramel. 

Col, with 
caramel. 

Col. with 
caramel. 

Artificial. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Low grade. 

Artificial. 
Low grade. 
Low grade. 
Low grade. 



268 



VANILLA EXTRACTS-ILLEaAL-Continued. 



o * 

u a 
o d 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 





c" 


c 


^ 


^ 


rt 


3 


S 








o 


> 


o 



o 



Remarks. 



]8:« 
1551 

1574 

1579 

1867 

1889 

1618 
1619 

1917 
1664 

1685 



2015 

3000 
300t 
3036 



2067 
2990 



2161 
3170 

3277 

2299 
2316 

2357 
2461 
2487 

2515 
2^120 
2631 
2716 
2728 

2793 



2814 

2898 

3501 
4857 
5020 
5167 

5170 

5242 
5296 

5341 



Kingan's 

Best 

Cherokee. 

Model 



Big 5 



King B . 



Better than 
Best 



Revolution 

Sailors 

Schmidt's 
Pure 



Special 

Perfection 



Red Cross 
Perfection 
Gold Arrow 



High Grade 
Our Best. 



Mammoth. 



H.M.Phillips.. 

Kingan Bro . . 
A. Englehard k 

Son 

E Ottenheimer 

Bros 

Central Drug 

Store 



F. J. Goldman .. 



Banner Extract 
Co 

H. N. Jenner 

Ulmann, Dreyfus 
&Co 



Ulmann, Dreifus 
<k vjo 



R.P.Milton 



W. H. Hoyt k Co. 
Atwood k Steele. 

T. H.Johnson 
Mfg. Co 



T. H. Boyd & Co . 

Woodson & Wil- 

lits 



Dakota Mfg. Co. 

Cincinnati Ext. 

Co 

H. M. Murphy .. 

Lytle k Orr 

J.D.Bartlett ... 



People's Drug 
Store 

V. E. Silverburg.. 

T.W.Green 

J.H.Kute 

Hollowell &Ryan 

Hutchings k 
Murphy 

S. Rosenthal 



H.Mehlig 

H. J.Huder... 
C.L.Mitchell. 



Shafer & Co 

Newton Tea <fe 
Spice Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Robbins & Co.. 
Greensburg.Md 

Best & Son 

Sachs-Fenders 
Co., Dayton 



Franklin 
MoVeagh, Chi- 
cago 



Auburn 

Jeflfersonville 

JefTersonville 

Jeffersonville 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

New Albany . 

New Albany . 
Goshen 



Salem . 



Salem 

South Bend. 



Kokomo. 
Kokomo. 



Ft. Wayne. . 
Laporte 



Michigan 
City.... 



Michigan 
City ... 



Indianapolis, 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Anderson 



Muneie.. 
Muncie.. 
Elwood.. 
El wood.. 
Kokomo 



Kokomo. 
Tipton... 



Tipton 

Indianapolis 

Noblesville .. 
Indianapolis 
Frankfort 

Columbus. . .. 

Columbus. . . . 
Muncie 



Anderson .. 



.00 

.0375 

.00 

.00 

.075 

.075 

.00 

.25 
.0375 

.0375 

.0375 

.10 

.00 
.00 

.05 
.0375 

.05 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.025 

.0375 

.00 

.0375 

.0^75 

.0375 

.0375 

.00 

.00 

.00 
.175 

.075 

.0375 

.00 
.075 
.025 

.200 

.200 
.100 

.0750 



Williamsport .000 Present 



None . .. 
Present. 
None . .. 
Present. 
None. .. 
None. .. 
Present. 

Present. 

None... 

Present. 

Present. 

None . . 

None. .. 
Present. 

Present. 
None... 

None. . . 
None. .. 
Present. 

Present. 

None... 
None. .. 
None . . . 
None . .. 

Present. 
None . .. 
None ... 
None. . 
None . .. 

None... 
Present. 

Present. 

None. .. 

None . .. 
Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

Present, 

None . .. 

Present. 



Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present. 

Present 

Present. 
Present. 

Present. 

Present, 

Present. 

None . . . 
Present, 

Present, 
Present 

Present, 

Present, 

Present. 

Present. 
None. .. 
None . .. 
Present 
Present, 

None . .. 
None . .. 
Present, 
Present, 
None ... 

Present, 
Present 

None , .. 

Present 

None . .. 
Present 
Present 

None. .. 

Present. 

None. .. 

Present. 



Present. 



Low grade. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 
Artifieifll. 

Artificial. 

Col. with 
carMHu-l. 

CoLwith 
caramel. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Low grade. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Col. with 
caramel. 

Artificial 

Artificial. 



Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 
Low grade. 



Col. with 

caramel. 
Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Artificial. 
Low grade. 
L(>w errade. 
Artificial. 
Low grade. 

Low grade. 
Low grade. 
Low grade. 
Artificial. 
Artificial. 

Artificial. 

Artificial 
(butyric 
ether). 

Van'lin syn- 
thetic. 

Col. with 
caramel. 

Artificial. 

Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 



Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 
Not genuine. 

Improperly 
labeled. 



Artificial. 



269 



VANILLA EXTRACTS-ILLEUAL-Continued. 



>> . 

t^ 1- 
o © 








a • 


a 






^■5 
u 3 

O 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


g 


S 


Remarks. 


^Z 








CS 


o 






^ 








> 


o 


o 




5977 


Standard.. 


Standard Chejn- 
ical Works, St. 
















Louis 


Greencastle.. 


.075 


Present. 


Present. 


Improperly 


5979 


Vanilla 
Flavor.... 


Cincinnati Ex. 










labeled. 






Co 


Greencastle. . 


.100 


Present. 


Present. 


Improperly 
labeled. 


fin54 


Acme 


Acme Ex. Co , 
















Jackson 


Elkhart 


.125 


Present. 


Present. 


Adulterated. 


6086 


Swing 


B. Dessenburg 
















Co., Kalamazoo. 


Elkhart 


.0375 


None. .. 


None. . . 


Below stan- 
dard. 


6474 




Huntington Gro. 
Co 


Rochester — 


.1125 


Present. 


Present. 








Adulterated. 









MISCELLANEOUS ELA YOKING EXTEACTS. 

Under this head we have classed a variety of products occa- 
sionally used for flavoring cakes, confections and dessert prepara- 
tions. 

But four out of twenty-four samples examined were legal. In 
most cases the goods were misbranded or improperly labeled, most 
of the pineapple, banana, strawberry, raspberry, peach extracts, 
etc., being sold as pure fruit extracts. 

As a matter of fact it is impossible to make them from the 
fruits, and they must be made from solution in alcohol of syn- 
thetic organic preparations laiown as compound ethers. Some 
of the compound ethers possess a remarkable resemblance to fruits. 
Butyric ether has a distinct pineapple flavor, and a mixture of 
amyl acetate and butyric ether counterfeits very closely the flavor 
of the banana. 

If these extracts are marked "Artificial Eruit Flavors" they 
can be legally sold. 

BANANA EXTRACT-ILLEGAL. 



O <D 

u. a 

2 ^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


02 




Color. 


Remarks. 


63 
3722 


Standard.. . 


Jaques Atwood 
Co., Chicago and 
St. Louis 

GeigPF-Tinney 
Co., Indianapolis 


Elwood 

Irvington — 


.9542 
.9075 


38.60 
62.55 


Naphthol 
yellow... 

Tropseolin. 


Not properly 
labeled. 






Not properly 
labeled. 



270 



STRAWBERRY-LEGAL. 



SI 

h5 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Place Where 
Collected. 


02 


<1g 


Color. 


a 
ce.2 

"o 


o c 
o 


1412 


Hopper's. .. 


Hopper & Co., 

Eindlay, 0. 


Huntington.. 


.9109 


60.99 


Anilin dye 


Properly la- 
beled. 



STRAWBERRY-ILLEGAL. 



3720 



Geiger-Tinney 
Co., Indianapolis 



Irvington 



.9075 



62.55 



Anilin dye 



Not properly 
labeled. 



PINEAPPLE-LEGAL. 



1410 



Cooks and 
Bakers . . 



Souders & Co., 

Dayton, 0. 



.9380 


48.20 


Dinitro 








cresol 


Properly la- 
beled. 



PINEAPPLE-ILLEGAL. 



285 
20 

1409 

1439 

3723 



Old Home. 



Mader's... 



Standard. 



Geiger-Tinney 
Co., Indianapolis 

J. C. Grant Chem- 
ical Co., Chicago 



WabashBak. Pow- 
der Co., Wabash 
Ind 



Jaques Atwood & 
Co., Chicago 



Geiger-Tinney 
Co., Indianapolis 



Martinsville. 


.8956 


67.69 


Columbus 


.9646 


30.49 


Huntington . . 


.9511 


40.41 


Huntington.. 


.9345 


42.52 


Irvington — 


.9144 


59.59 



TropEeolin. 



Naphthol 
yellow.., 



Colorless .. 



Naphthol 
yellow.. 



Tropffiolin. 



Not properly 
labeled. 



Not properly 
labeled. 



Not properly 
labeled. 



Not properly 
labeled. 

Not properly 
labeled. 



MISCELLANEOUS EXTRACTS-ILLEGAL. 



1411 
1428 

6303 
3604 
3607 



Nectar Ext. 
"Hopper'' 



Rose Ext. .. 



Peach Ext. 
"Club 
House "., 



Almond. 
Nutmeg. 
Ginger . . 



C. H. Hopper & 
Co.,Findlay, 0. 

E. W.Gillett, 

Chicago 

Franklin Mac- 
Veagh & Co., 
Chicago 

Pettis Dry Goods 
Co 

Pettis Dry Goods 
Co 

Pettis Dry Goods 
Co 



Alexandria . 


.9485 


42.12 


Huntington . . 


.8786 


74.48 


Huntington. . 


.8803 


73.81 


Indianapolis. 


.9107 


61.10 


Indianapolis. 


.8901 


69.88 


Indianapolis. 


.9205 


56.77 



Not properly 
labeled. 

■Not properly 
labeled. 



Not properly 
labeled. 

Not properly 
labeled. 

Not properly 
labeled. 

Not properly 
labeled. 



271 



ORANGE EXTRACT -ILLEGAL. 



o o 

Ta 
IS. 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Place Where 
Collected. 


si 


<5 o 


Color. 


'3 q 


O a 

o 


56 

87 
1437 

3602 


Standard.. . 

"Hopper".. 

"Standard" 


Jaques Atwood & 
Co., Chicago 
and St. Louis .. 

C. H. Hopper & 
Co.,Findlay, 0. 

Jaques Atwood & 
Co., Chicago . .. 

Pettis Dry Goods 

Co 

W. M.Hoyt&Co. 

DeBoe-King Co.. 


Anderson — 

Alexandria . . 
Huntington.. 

Indianapolis 
Anderson 

Elkhart 


.9457 

.8543 
.9439 

.8472 
.9450 


43.75 

69.09 
44.80 

85.88 
44.18 

62.82 


Naphthol 
yellow .. 

Natural. .. 

Naphthol 
yellow .. 

Natural... 

Not nat- 
ural, ar- 
tificial . . 


+ .2 
+ .8 

+ .1 
+ 9.4 


.075 
,80 

.037 


5285 


Ft. Dearb'n 


3.55 


6057 


Not nat- 
ural, ar- 


















1 










ORANC 


rE EXTRACT LEGAL. 




4386 




Zipp&Co.,Cleve- 
land.O 


Michigan City 








+ 30.1 


5.64 












RASPBERRY-LEGAL. 


4522 


Hopper's. .. 


E. H. Hopper & 
Co.,Findlay, 0.. 




.9230 


55.60 


Methyl 
violet ... 








Properly la- 
beled. 


RASPBERRY-ILLEGAL. 


1454 
3614 


Double 


E. W. Gillett, 

Chicago 

VanDuzer& Co.. 


Huntington . . 
Indianapolis. 


.9747 
.9365 


21.49 
49.02 


Veg. color. 
Veg. color. 


Not properly 

labeled. 
Not properly 

labeled. 












HONEY. 













Of the 35 samples of honey analyzed but six, or 17.1 per 
cent., were impure. Comb honey is not subject to adulteration, 
but strained honey is frequently mixed with glucose or sugar 
syrup. We have found some samples purporting to be pure 
"White Clover" honey and containing a piece of honey comb, to 
be nothing but glucose syrup. 



272 



HONEY-LEGAL. 



o » 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Polarization. 



Di-' 

rect. 



In- 
vert. 



90 
160 



25? 
265 
317 



394 
1303 
1343 

1344 
1363 
1455 

1546 

1559 

1563 

1710 
1737 

3152 
3165 
3240 

3661 

3692 

3967 
3968 

3969 



Weber's White 
Clover 



Warranted Pure . . 

Lamon's 

Scott's Pure Bees 
Honey 



York's. 



"Heshinia," War- 
ranted Pure 

J. J. Co-ley 

Viekery Bro 



Pure White Clover 



Pure Extracted. 



White Clover 

None Such 

Scott's Pure Bees' 



Scott's Pure. 



California Sage... 
"Basswood," VVis- 

consin 

"Buckwheat," 

Michigan 



Cleveland Health Food Co. 

Cleveland, 
Weber Honey Co., 

Cincinnati 
Fred Coffman, Terre Haute. 
Lamon Gohl Syrup Co., 

Chicago 
CM. Scott Co., 

Indianapolis 
Geo. W. York, Chicago . . 
H. A. Ross Apiary, 

Evansville 
J. S. Tisserand, Evansville. 
.1. S. Tisserand, Evansville. 
Viekery Bro., Evansville... 
John Sunderman, 

Huntington 
Fred W. Muth Co., 

. Cincinnati 
Overbacker Glucose Co., 

Louisville 
C.A. Weber & Co... 

Cincinnati 
C. B. Tyrrell, Davison, Mich 
Walter S. Pouder, 

Indianapolis 
Durand & Kasper, Chicago. 
McNeil-Higgins, Chicago.. . 
C. M. Scott Jc Co., 

Indianapolis 
Court House Grocery Co., 

Indianapolis 
CM. Scott & Co., 

Indianapolis 



Alexandria .. 


-19.6 


Brazil 

Terre Haute . 


-16.4 
-11.8 


Terre Haute . 


—14.0 


Martinsville. 
Vincennes . .. 


-12.4 
-17.4 


Evansville . . . 
Evansville. . . 
Evansville. .. 
Evansville... 


-9.4 

-16.0 
-23.2 
-17.4 


Huntington. 


-12.6 


Jeffersonville 


-17.0 


Jeffersonville 


-19.4 


Jeffersonville 
Kokomo 


-15.6 
-10.0 


Indianapolis. 
Michig'n City 
Michig'nCity 


—18.6 
- 5.8 
-18.4 


Indianapolis. 


-13.6 


Indianapolis. 


-11.4 


Irvington 

Indianapolis. 


-13.4 
-13.8 


Indianapolis. 


- 9.8 


Indianapolis. 


-16.2 



-20.0 

-20.4 
-14.9 

-16.1 

-18.2 
-18.9 

- 9.1 
-17.3 
-24.6 
—18.9 

-17.8 

—19.3 

19.8 

18.2 
-17.6 

-21.5 
- 6.3 
-23.5 

-21.3 

-20.4 

-16.5 
-19.5 

-13.8 

19.5 



Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 



MAPLE SYRUP. 

"No other articles come to our tables under such false colors as do 
maple syrup and sugar. The results of the analyses of 54 well 
known brands indicate that the real maple syrup rarely or never 
is procurable and that the syrup sold under that name is a prod- 
uct of the cane instead of the sugar maple. The high price which 
maple syrup commands because of its peculiar flavor has led man- 
ufacturers to prepare all sorts of imitation goods, and the gTcat 
demand, largely in excess of the normal supply, enables them to 
sell their spurious products at the price of the true article. Cane 
syrup, made by dissolving cane sugar in water, is colored with 
caramel, a burnt sugar, and flavored with decoctions of com 
cobs, hickory bark or maple chips and sold to the public under 
the name of "Fancy Vermont Maple Syrup." Several samples 



\ ^ -273 

analyzed have contained glucose syrnp, one brand containing over 
50 per cent. Maple products, although owing their sweetness to 
sucrose, the same sugar that is produced by sugar cane or the sugar 
beet, possess a peculiar aromatic odor and delicious flavor, which 
renders them much more valuable than ordinary cane sugar prod- 
ucts. Since it is this characteristic which fixes the price and 
creates the demand, as well as furnishes a valuable product for the 
farmer, we insist that all syrup or sugar sold as maple shall 
be pure. No compounds of cane and maple can be sold unless 
marked "cane and maple," with the percentage of each ingredient, 
and all goods sold as "syrup" in packages bearing pictures of 
maple grocers or sugar houses shall be considered to be intention- 
ally misleading and misbranded, 

MAPLE SYRUP-LEGaL. 



h a 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Polarization, 









cS <a 








Jlj o . 
















<l§0 


o 


<D 




03 >.— 


o 


O 




S--S 


a 


S 


^ 


,=^.Sc 










OD 


O 


< 


CO 



4933 
4985 
5001 

5168 

5176 
5244 

6607 
6610 



Native Purity 

Gold Bond... 

Standard of 
Ohio 



Maple Forest 



White Label. 



Goddard's 
Pure 



F. N. Johnson, 
Bellef't'ne.O. 

F. N. Johnson, 
Belleft'ne, 0. 

Art. E. Crane, 
Garrettsv'le, 0. 
Maple Forest 

Syrup Co., 
Maple Grve, Vt. 
Travis & Co., 
Middlefield, 0. 

Jos. Goddard, 
Muncie, Ind. 



Goddard's 
Pure 



Jos. Goddard. 
Muncie, Ind. 



Indpls 

Indpls 

Indpls 

Columbus 
Columbus 

Columbus 
Noblesvle 

Muncie.. . 



+ 59.4 
+63.2 

+66.4 

+63.6 
+59.8 

+29.8 
+61.8 

+ 62.0 



-19.5 
-20.6 

-22.0 

-18.9 
-19.8 

-13.8 
-22.0 

—22.0 



59.3 


None 


.67 


5.4 


63.0 


None 


.73 


5.0 


66.4 


None 


.64 


4.0 


62.0 


None 


.56 


4.0 


59.8 


None 


.49 


3.2 


32.8 


None 


.59 


1.6 


63.4 


None 


.49 


1.8 


63.6 


None 


.58 


2.8 



Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 



Low 
Grade 
Pure. 



Pure. 



o a> 

ea 2 
h a 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Ash. 






CO 



Remarks. 



3450 

3438 

4044 
4042 



Ko-We-Ba... 
Maple Forest 



Vermont's 
Finest Quality 
Standard of 
Ohio 



Kothe, Wells & 
Bauer, Indpls. 

Maple Forest 
Syrup Co. 

Maple Grove, Vt. 

Welch Bros. Ma- 
ple Co., 
Burlington, Vt. 

Arthur HJ. Crane, 
Garrettsville, 0. 



.550 

.50 

.60 
.55 



.62 



9.20 
8.80 



+56.6 


-20.9 


+39.8 


-17.8 


+54.0 


-22.4 


+52.6 


-21.9 



58.7 

43.3 

57.4 
55.7 



A pure maple syrup. 

A pure maple syrup. 

A pure maple syrup. 
A pure maple syrup. 



18-Bd. of Health. 



274 • 

MAPLE SYRUP-LEGAL-Continued. 



o » 

is 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Ash. 


;2oW 




u 

.2 

"o . 
Cu a 
^ o 

a o3 

a"" 

M 


6 

O 

u 

a 


4062 






Broad Ripple 

Daleville 

Carmel 

Ft. Wayne... 


.55 
.72 
.32 


11.2 

9.6 
12.0 
9.6 
8.4 
7.2 
10.8 
9.6 
8.0 

6.8 
10.0 
9.2 

10.4 
10.8 


+560 
+62.2 

+54.0 
+54.4 
+58.6 
+ 67 8 
+55.0 
+60.2 
+ 64.2 


-20.5 
-23.4 
-19.3 


57 5 


4063 






62.9 


4067 






55.1 


4104 








4T'0 




Made by Farmer 

Made by Farmer 

Made by Farmer 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Columbus 

Columbus . 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Ft. Wayne.... 
Indianapolis. 


.71 
.52 
.64 
.55 
.51 
.74 
.74 

.55 
.62 
.73 

.60 

.67 


-20.4 
-20.4 
-20 2 
-21.3 
-21.7 


58.9 


4121 
41 ?4 




70.2 
56.8 


41 W 




61.2 


4129 






64 6 


4137 




Made by Farmer 




4157 




+60.0 
+62 2 


-21.3 
-24.1 


61.5 


4158 




M. Owen & Son, 

Parkman, Ohio 




4187 




63.1 
56.4 


4194 












41'»5 




John Elliott, 

Fremont, Ind. 
J. Todd, Bedford, Ind.. 














4?n4 


+50.6 


—19.8 


53.0 









MAPLE SYRUP-ILLEGAL. 



>> 

O 4> 












tl 


6 




He 

O B 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Ash. 


:2oa 
< 




1- N 

a.2 
1— 1 


o 

o 

a 


Remarks. 


293 


New York 
State, Maple 


Arthur Jordan <fe 
Co., Indianapolis. 


0.114 


2.32 


+ 59.6 


- 22.0 


61.0 


Largely cane su- 


1417 


Belle Isle .... 


E. A. Carbonneau 
& Co 


050 


.99 


+ 61.1 


- 18.7 


61,0 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


130 


Maple Forest. 

Champion- 
Vermont.. . 


Maple Forest Sap 
Co., Maple Grove, 
Vt ... 


.146 
.078 


3.52 
1.56 


+ 59.1 
+ 62.6 


- 21.0 

- 21.4 


60.6 
63.6 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


146 


Champion Syr. and 
Refinintr Co., 

Indianapolis 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


1459 


G.&R 


Grossville & Ra. 
Co., Chicago 


.036 


.99 


+ 59.3 


- 21.2 


60.9 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


175 


Oxford 
County 


Schnull & Co., 

Indianapolis 


.190 


.000 


+ 41.2 


- 19.8 


46.2 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


3310 


Champion 


Champion Syr. and 
Refining Co., 

Indianapolis 


.078 


3.05 


+ 55.4 


— 22.2 


58.7 


gar syrup. 
Largely cane su- 


246 
247 


Pure Sap 

Gold Leaf.... 


W.D.HuflFmanCo., 
Indianapolis 

Huntington Maple 

Syr.andSugarCo., 

Huntington, Vt. 


.195 
,175 


2.32 
3.92 


+ 64.3 
+ 0.0 


- 4.0 

- 20.7 


51.7 
15.6 


gar syrup. 

Glucose, 7.2%. 
Largely cane 
sugar. 

Peculiar syrup. 
Largely cane 


353 


Absolutely 
Pure 


Austin-NicholsCo.. 
New York 


.052 


2.32 


+ 20.7 


- 13.8 


26,1 


sugar syrup. 
Very dilute cane 


3418 


Old Manse 
Canadian Sap 


Wm. R. Manierre.. 


.130 


3.92 


+ 56.0 


- 20.6 


58.1 


sugar syrup. 

Largely oane su- 
gar syrup. 



275 



MAPLE SYRUP-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



2S 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Ash. 






< a 




o o 




o.-^ 




■^ rt 












^^ 


3 


'-' 





Remarks. 



418 Seal . 



3649 

12j1 
1259 
3701 
1501 

1621 
4033 

1637 
1062 
3183 
3257 

4014 
294 



325 
326 

1742 
4053 
3463 

3609 



Ohio. 



Champion — 
Maple Grove 
Dolmonico . ., 
Charm 



Vermont 

Pure Quebec 

Our Best 

Kinzee 

Royal Blue.. 
Monarch 



Green Moun- 
tain Sap 



Canada Sap.. 
Champion 

Fort Henry .. 

Canada Sap.. 
Sugar Grove. 
Maple Forest 

Log Cabin 



Schnull &Co., 

Indianapolis 

Western Reserve 
Syr. Co., 

Cleveland, 0. 

Ragon Bros , 

Evansville 

Standaird Syr. Co., 
Cleveland 

W. D. Huffman x 
Co., Indianapolis 

Franklin Mae- 
Veagh & Co., Chi- 
cago 



Ottenheimer & Son, 
Louisville 

Williams Bros. & 
Carbonneau, 

Detroit 

Goodwin Preserve 
Co., Louisville. . . 

Stevenson & Gross, 
Chicago 

W.J.Quan&Co., 
Chicago 

Monarch Maple Sy- 
rup Co., 
Providence, R. I. 

New England Ma- 
ple Syrup Co., 

Boston 

Burlington Pack- 
ing Co., Burling- 
ton, Vt 



Scudder Syrup Co., 
Chicago 

Champion Syrup 
Ref. Co., 

Indianapolis 

W. Va. Preserve 
Co., 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



Scudder Syrup Co., 
Chicago 

Kenwood Preserve 
Co., Chicago . . 



Maple Forest Syr. 
Co., 
Maple Groves, Vt 

Towle Maple Syrup 
Co., St. Paul, 
Minn., and Bur 
lington, Vt 



.225 

.324 
.080 
.050 
.300 

.065 
.052 

.135 
.138 
.020 
.136 

.090 

.080 

.100 
.136 

.054 

.120 

.118 
.200 

.112 
.199 



5.88 

4.00 
3.05 
1.96 
5.48 

2.74 
1.96 

2.32 
3.05 
1.56 

2.00 



2.80 

2.80 
2.80 

2.00 

2.00 

2.40 
2.80 

2.40 



+ 62.0 


- 20.6 


62.6 


+ 34.1 


- 21.3 


40.9 


+ 31.8 


- 21.2 


40.1 


-t- 55.2 


- 21.7 


58.2 


+ 80.9 


+ 40.3 


30.6 


+ 64.8 


- 20.9 


64.9 


-t- 61.5 


- 20.2 


61.8 


+ 33.3 


- 20.9 


41.0 


+ 40.5 


- 21.3 


46.8 


+ 47.5 


- 20.2 


51.2 


+ 55.6 


— 20.7 


57.8 


+ 64.4 


- 21.6 


65.1 


+ 59.6 


- 20.6 


60.7 


+ 59.8 


- 21.7 


61.2 


+ 39.8 


- 20.6 


45.4 


+ 59.4 


— 21.5 


60.8 


-F 74.6 


- 14.7 


67.1 


+ 47.7 


- 21.1 


51.7 


+ 131.4 


+ 113.8 


13.2 


+ 27.4 


— 20.9 


36.3 


+ 14.4 


— 21.3 


56.9 



Contains cane 
sugar. 

A dilute syrup, 
containing cane 
sugar. 

A dilute cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Glucose, 28.75%. 



Largely eane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Dilute canesu- 
gar mixture. 

Dilute cane su- 
gar mixture. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar. 

Largely cane su- 
gar. 

Largely cane su- 
gar. 

Glucose, 4.0%. 
Largely cane 
sugar. 

Largely cane su- 
gar. 

Glucose, 67.5%. 
Largely glucose 
syrup. 

Largely dilute 
cane sugar 
syrup. 

Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 



276 



MAPLE SYRUP-ILLEGAL-Continued. 











_^c« 


A 


X « 






O C3 










S ° 


o o 






^■5 








c-S- 


fc-X3 


PhS 


© 




2 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Ash. 






II 


o 


Remarks. 


iJ 








< 


a" 




cc 




3617 


Ohio 


Western Reserve 
Syr. Co., 
























Cleveland 


.310 


4.40 


+ 42.4 


— 20.4 


47.2 


Nota pure maple 


3%d 


Green Moun- 
tain Sap 


Burlington Pack» 
Co., 
Burlington, Vt. 












syrup. 






.164 


2.80 


+ 64.0 


- 21.7 


64.4 


Largely cane su- 


















gar syrup. 


3673 


Canada Sap.. 


Scudder Syr. Co., 


















Chicago 


.138 


2.40 


+ 65.2 


- 22.8 


66.1 


Largely cane su- 


3685 


Pure Quebec. 


Williams Bros. Co., 












gar syrup, 






Detroit, Mich. 


.128 


2.80 


+ 55.2 


— 21.1 


57.3 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


3704 


Green Moun- 
tain Syrup. 


Tovvle Maple Syrup 
«^o., St. Paul, 
Minn., and Bur- 


















lington, Vt 


.090 


1.20 


+ 63 2 


- 22.0 


64.0 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


4052 




Court House Gro- 


















cery, Indianapolis 


.028 


3.20 


-t- 40.0 


- 19.0 


44.4 


A cane sugar 


3828 


Canadian 
Club 


Arcadia Maple Co., 












syrup. 






Importers 


.172 


2.00 


+ 8.0 


— 16.2 


18.1 


A dilute syrup. 
Largely cane. 


3786 


Maple Grove. 


Standard Syrup 


















Co., Cleveland ... 


.024 




+ 53.2 


- 20.9 


55.7 


A cane sugar 


3830 


Maple Grove. 


Standard Syrup 












syrup. 






Co., Cleveland. . . 


.012 


2.00 


+ 50.8 


- 21.7 


54.5 


A cane sugar 


1043 


Western Re- 
serve Ohio 
Maple Syr. 


Western Reserve 












syrup. 






Syr. Co., Cleveland 


.27 


4.00 


-f 30.4 


- 20.9 


38.5 


Nota pure maple 
syrup. 


1734 


Old Manse ... 


Wm. R. Manierre.. 


.16 


3.20 


+ 51.2 


- 20.2 


53.6 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


3162 


Blossom B ... 


McNeil-Higgins 


















Co., Chicago 


.12 


2.40 


+ 52.0 


— •20.9 


54.8 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


1700 


Maple Tree . . 


AVestern Reserve 
Syr. Co., 


















Cleveland 


.27 


3.6 


+ 36.0 


- 20.6 


41. 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


3164 


Triumph 


Poinier Syr. Co., 


















Green Bay, Vt. 


.08 


3.2 


+ 58.0 


— 21.1 


59.4 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


3166 


Laurel 


Walsh, Boyle & Co., 


















Chicago 


.15 


1.6 


+ 57.0 


- 22.0 


59.3 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


3149 


Probono 


Durand & Kasper 


















Chicago 


.23 


2.8 


+ 67.8 


- 20.6 


66.4 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 


1416 


Belmont 


Chicago Concen- 
trating Co., 


















Chicago 


.06 


2.8 


-1- 58.4 


- 21.1 


59.7 


Largely cane su- 
gar syrup. 



277 



MAPLE SYRUP-ILLEGAL— Continued. 



O 4) 

1-4 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


< 


< 




^1 


1 

3 
CO 


Remarks. 


64 


Belmont . 


Chicago Con- 
centrating Co., 
Chicago 


Elwood 


.2 


.4 


+ 47.6 


-22 


51.1 


Cane sugar 
syrup. 
Adulterated 


79 


Old Manse 


Wni. R. Mani- 
erre, Chicago 


Alexandria 


.32 


1.6 


+32.2 


-23.1 


40.7 


Cane sugar 
syrup. 
Adulterated 


- 365 


Mapline.. 


New Orleans 
Coffee Co 


Vincennes . 






+99.4 


+77.6 


16.5 


No maple 
present. 
Glucose 
73.7%. Not 
true to label. 
Adulterated 


4066 






Indianap's. 


.49 


6.4 


+61.6 


-21.5 


62.4 


Small 








amount 




















cane sugar. 
Adulterated 


4123 


Ohio Ma- 
ple Syrup. 




South Bend. 


.43 


6.8 


+65.0 


-20.4 


61.4 


Contains 






cane sugar 
Adulterated 


4127 






Columbus.. 


.16 


2.0 


+60.6 


-21.3 


61.5 


Caramel 








color. Al- 
most wholly 




















cane sugar 




















syrup. 
Adulterated 



278 



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279 

MAPLE SUGAR-LEGAL. 



&.: 






>> 7i 










2 3 






■fl-sa 


Where Collected. 




^<5S 


1^!5 




JS 


e2o = 


1-1 




< 


< 


4134 


Rockford 


1.14 
.90 
.98 


16 


4189 




5 2 


4140 


Sanborn 


9 6 









MOLASSES. 

Molasses is made from the juice of cane or other sugar produc- 
ing plants, and is commonly understood to be the liquid material 
draining from granulated sugar made from sugar cane, either by 
natural' percolation or by being treated in centrifugal machines. 
The commercial term, molasses, however, applies to other syrups, 
including that made from sorghum. The perfection of sugar 
making processes has increased the amount of cane sugar obtain- 
able from a given quantity of juice and. consequently diminished 
the molasses residue. 

With the diminishing of the quantity the quality of the mo- 
lasses has also depreciated until frequently it is unsuitable for 
table use. It has become a common custom, for that reason, to 
add glucose, or com syrup, to these dark, strong residuums, and 
thereby produce a lighter colored and more attractive syrup, of 
finer body and flavor. 

While this addition produces an article of increased value from 
a commercial standpoint, the use of glucose in improving the grade 
of molasses is considered by all authorities to be an adulteration, 
and is prohibited by our law, unless goods so blended are properly 
branded. 



280 



MOLASSES-LEGAL. 



be 
11 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


© o o 


coo 

1— 1 


6 

o 
u 
o 
a 
CO 


Remarks. 


122 

288 


Fancy Open 
Kettle 

New Orleans- 
Dark 


New Orleans Coffee 
Co., New Orleans. 

Natetrez Molasses 
Co.. New Orleans. 

American Grocery 
Co , Louisville. .. 

Walsh. Bo.vle & Co. 

New Orleans 

Botts-YoungMolas- 
ses Co., New Or- 


Muncie 

TerreHaute 

Princeton.. 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Evansville. 

Salem 

Irvington .. 

West Indi- 
anapolis.. 


+40.0 


-18.4 


43.9 


Pure. 
Burnt - low 


1188 


+38.8 
+23.4 
+29.2 

+48.4 

+34.8 

+47.2 
+ 41.0 

+ 66.4 


-9.4 
-13.0 
-13.6 

-5.9 

-16.7 

-18.7 
—11.2 

+17.1 


37.2 
26.7 
31.1 

40.8 

38.7 

49.5 
39.2 

37.0 


grade. 


1246 
1271 


G.R.N. CM. 
Open Kettle. 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 






Pure. 


1304 


Walsh-Boyle Co- 
Chicago. 
New Orleans Coffee 
Co., New Orleans. 




1670 




Pure. 


3706 




Pure. 
Pure. 


3283 


Plantation 
Compound.. 


Champion Syrup 
Kefining Co., 

Indianapolis 


Formula 75% 
N. 0.; 25% 
glucose; la- 
beled cor- 
rectly. 



MOLASSES-ILLEGAL. 



Quaker N.O. 



Fountain ... 



O.K 

Last Year, 
1904 



Dove 



Golden Eagle 



Quaker. 



Crescent Pre.serve 
Co., Indianapolis 



Fromhold Bros., 
Indianapolis. 

Lafourche Planta- 
tion 



Zinsmeister Bros., 
New Albany 



Seheffel & Wheat. 
Louisville 



New Orleans Mo- 
lasses Co., 

New Orleans 

New Orleans Coffee 
Co., New Orleans 



M. H. Alexander &: 
Co., New Orleans 



Delta Packing Co., 
New Orleans 

Crescent Preservej 
Co., Indianapolis! 



Anderson .. 


+114.4 


+40.4 


55.6 


Vincennes.. 


+51.6 


+14.5 


27.9 


Vincennes.. 


+ 79.8 


+55.4 


18.3 


New Albany 


+ 78.6 


+47.0 


23.7 


New Albany 


+110.6 


+89.5 


15.9 


Salem 


+ 119.4 


+99.6 


13.3 


Indian'pls.. 


+46.4 


-16.0 


46.9 


Columbus 


+99.4 


+73.7 


19.3 


Irvington .. 


+73.4 


+43.5 


22.4 


Indian'pls.. 


+88.6 


+43.1 


30.4 


Columbus.. 


+137.8 


+128.0 


7.3 



Glucose 33.6% 
Adulterated. 



Glucose 13.5% 
Adulterated. 

Glucose 65%. 
Adulterated. 

Glucose 
present. 
Adulterated. 

Glucose 61%, 
Adulterated. 



Glucose 47%. 

Adulterated. 
Sulphurous 

acid present. 

Adulterated. 
Glucose 45.7% 

Adulterated. 



Glucose 36.3% 
Not true to 
formula. 

Glucose 33 2% 
Adulterated. 

Glucose 74.5% 
Adulterate'd. 



281 



SORGHUM MOLASSES. 



Sorghnm molasses is made by evaporating sorghiim juice to 
the required consistency. Most of the product on the market is 
made in a small way by concentrating in open pans, l^one of 
the sugar is removed because of the difficulty with which it can 
be freed from the starches and nncrystallizable sugar. Sorghum 
syrup, because of the presence of large quantities of saccharine 
matter, is very liable to ferment, and the use of preservatives to 
check fermentation is not uncommon. We have, recently had oc- 
casion to examine a sample of sorghum syrup which was preserved 
with boric acid and beta naphthol, and also contained whiting as 
a filler. Much glucose is used with sorghum syrup. Some sam- 
ples examined contained as high as 80 per cent. Six of the 16 
samples examined Averc adulterated. 



SORGHUM MOLASSES-LEGAL. 



>> . 

o o 

II 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


o o o 

a 


C3 

» o o 
1— 1 


o 


Remarks. 


11^8 




C.W. Adams & Co , 
Louisville 

Jos. Colegate, 

Velpen, Ind. 
Jos. Colegate, 

Stendal, Ind. 

Walsh, Boyle & Co., 

Chicago 


Oakland 
City 

Princeton. . 

Princeton. . 

Mt. Vernon. 
Mt. Vernon. 

Evansville . 
Evansville . 
Booneville . 

JeflTerson- 
ville 

Irvington .. 


+41.4 

+26.6 

+27.0 

+23.2 
+26.6 

+ 19.4 
+35.6 
+43.4 

+41.0 
+ 117.2 


-5.7 

-12.1 

-12.3 

-13.2 
-6.1 

- 9.4 
-18.0 
-12.9 

-7.4 
+60.7 


35.4 

29.1 

22.0 

27.3 
24.5 

21.6 
40.3 
42.3 

36.4 
35.1 




1209 
1?,14 


Country 


Pure. 
Pure. 


1240 
1^48 


Cane Juice. . . 


Pure. 
Pure. 


1296 
1376 


Indiana 


G.F. Smock, 

Curdsville, Ky. 


Pure. 


1481 




From Farmer 

Boniface, Weber & 
Allen, JefiFerson- 


Pure. 


157"^ 








Compound. .. 


, 


3712 


Crescent Preserve 
Co., Indianapolis 


Pure. 

Glucose, 46.9. 
True to for- 
mula. 









282 














SORGHUM MOLASSES-ILLEGAL. 






o o 








i 








1-1 

O 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 




» o o 


o 
o 


Remarks. 


■^^ 








.i:^'5 


a 


^ 




h^ 








P 


t—{ 


to 




1197 




Bement & Seitz, 

Evansville 


Princeton .. 


+76 4 


+44.4 


24.0 








Glucose, 68%. 
















Adulterated. 


1^07 


Fenesee 


National Molasses 
















Co., St. Louis .... 


Princeton .. 


+ 142.0 


+ 135.0 


0.52 


Glucose, 80%. 
A glucose 
syrup. 


1232 


95% Pure, 
Diamond 
Island 


Bement & Seitz, 
















Evansville 


Mt. Vernon. 


+73.2 


+55.8 


13.0 


Glucose, 73%. 
Adulterated. 


1333 




Bement & Seitz, 

Evansville 


Evansville . 


+79.6 


+56.5 


25.0 








Glucose, 60%. 
















Adulterated. 


3G95 


Our Pride — 


Davenport Refin- 
ing Co., Daven- 


















Irvington .. 


+ 121.2 


+ 115.8 


11.5 


Glucose, 62.7. 






Not true to 
















formula. 


341 


Fountain 


Fromhold Bros., 
















Indianapolis 


Vincennes . 


+ 128.2 


^- 125.4 


2.1 


Glucose. 72%. 
Adulterated. 



283 





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284 

MEAT PRODUCTS, STEAKS, SAUSAGES, PRESSED MEATS, ETC. 

Considerable work has been done in investigating the quality 
of the fresh prepared meats sold on our markets. Samples sent 
in by our inspectors from diiferent cities show a decided difference 
in composition so far as the use of preservatives is concerned. 
The dealers of certain cities evidently have relied entirely upon 
borax, and in other places they have used sulfites as preservatives. 
Collections of meat from the Indianapolis city markets showed an 
almost universal use of sodium sulfite in chopped meat. 

Of twenty-one samples of Hamburger steak, which is prepared 
by mincing scraps of beef, eighteen contained sulfites, which, cal- 
culated as sodium sulfite, the salt usually used, ranged in amount 
from .015 per cent, to .501 per cent. 

The sulfites are used for two reasons; they are preservatives 
and they act as colorants by preser\'ing the color of the blood 
corpuscles by forming oxyhaemaglobin, which is of a bright 
red color. They are the most dangerous of all the preservatives 
used in food products, not only because of their physiological 
action on the individual, but because they possess the property of 
masking the odor and appearance of decay so that putrefaction, 
usually intelligible to the senses, is not noticed until the meat is in 
an advanced stage of decomposition. Sulfurous acid, or sulfites, 
produce a marked toxic effect on the individual, even in doses as 
small as are employed in preparing meats, and even when their 
inhibition is not attended by apparent ill effect, it is probable that 
they may produce kidney lesions of a serious character. Their 
use is absohitely prohibited by the German government and by the 
new national food laws of this country. 

The claim by the users of these preservatives that it is im- 
possible to do without them and that their abandonment would 
injure business is a specious argument, and endangers the public 
health. The use of proper precaution in handling meats, coupled 
with a realization that meat so aged that its odor and evidences of 
decay must be masked to appear presentable is not fit food for 
human consumption, will make it possible for the public to obtain 
wholesome provisions. 

It is probable that many dealers who resort to the use of ^pre- 
servatives do so under the impression that they are not injurious 



285 



to health. This belief is fostered by the fact that they see no ill 
effects following their use in their customers (a fact, however, 
which a physiologist and post mortem can alone determine), and 
the extravagant claims for healthfiilness advanced by the manu- 
facturers of these vicious products. 

As the result of the revelations at the city market legal pro- 
ceedings were instituted against 30 of the dealers selling goods 
containing sodium sulfite, and by agreement of counsel for the 
county and the defendant, one case only was tried. The results 
of this trial, which extended over a Aveek and which was bitterly 
fought by the defendant with the assistance of Chicago lawyers 
and the president of the comj)any manufacturing the preserva- 
tive used, was that the jury disagTeed. The outcome of the case, 
however, was that of a victory for the State, since by the advice 
of their counsel the dealers in meats throughout the city aban- 
doned at once the use of sulfites or other illegal meat preserva- 
tives. Later examinations of meats sold throughout the city show 
invariably the absence of sulfites. For a time much complaint 
was heard that meats could not be kept ^vithout them, but as the 
dealers became accustomed to the handling of their meats they 
found that they had no difficulty in keeping them fresh and at- 
tractive even when no chemical preservatives were employed. 

Preservatives, whether they be called Preservaline, Antisour, 
or by any other name, are illegal. The only preservative agents 
permissible in the curing of meats are salt, saltpeter, wood smoke, 
vinegar, sugar and spices. 

SAUSAGES-LEGAL. 



2a 

O 3 



Manufacturer. 



Where CoUected. 


Preserva 
lives. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


IndianapoHs 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 


Indianapolis 


Absent. 



4462 
.4465 
4498 
450:i 
4446 
4492 
4494 
4559 
4561 
4562 
4565 
4566 
4569 
4571 
4573 



Kingan & Co 

William Grund 

Sindliuger k Co 

Meier & Meuser 

D.T.Buser 

Louis Schwab 

People's Provision Co.. 

E. F. Overman 

Paul Brandlein 

E. I leckhummer 

Joe Schott 

Elliott Dressed Beef Co 

Joe Cook 

Charles Mock 

A. Stuckmeyer 



286 

.SAUSAGE-LEGAL-Continued. 



Manufacturer. 



Where Collected. 



Preserva- 
tives. 



F.Filz 

Kingan 

Rolla Hippie 

Frank Strodie 

Liekauf Packing Co... 

Eckart Packing Co 

Cherry Street Market . 

A.Haller 

Grice Meat Market 

Eckart Packing Co 

S. Davis 

Louis Schwab 

L. J. Unversaw 

Kukner & -ons 

Topp & Moore 

0. M. Stewart 

L. J. Unversaw 

L. J. Unversaw 

K. Schussler 

Kingan & Co 

H.C. Maas 

Indianapolis Abattoir. 

Albert Worm 

Acme Grocery Co 

Central Meat Market . 
Barnetc Butcher Shop. 

C. W.Grim. 

Kinzie Meat Market. . . 



Indianapolis . 

Noblesville 

Indianapolis . 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne .... 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne.... 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 

Muncie 

Muneie 

Muncie 

Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis 
Crawfordsville 
South Bend... 
South Bend... 
South Bend... 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent, 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



SAUSAGE-ILLEGAL. 




Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Borax. 



Frankfurt 

Knoblock 

Wienies 

Wienies 

Pork 

Wienies 

Wienies 

Wienie.« 

Conies 

Polish 

Garlic 

Garlic 

Wienies 

Wienies 

Conies 

Frankfurts 

Frankfurts 

Frankfurts 

Pork 

Pork 

Frankfurts 

Pork 

Pork 

Wienies 

Wienies 

Wienies 

Pork 

Majestic Breakfast 

Frankfurter 

Pork 



0. M. Stewart, Muncie 

Hammond & Co., Chicago 

Jones & Co 

Halburg, Terre Haute 

R. B.Pauly, Terre Haute 

John Halburg, Terre Haute 

Fred Herman, Terre Haute 

F. A. Brown, Terre Haute 

F. A. Brown, Terre Haute 

Geo. Schidel, Terre Haute 

Geo. Schidel. Terre Haute 

C. W. Kern, Terre Haute 

Kingan & Co., Indianapolis 

VV m. Herman, Terre Haute 

Wm. Herman, Terre Haute 

Kingan & Co., Indianapolis 

Hammond & Co., Chicago 

Vj. J . Stumpp, Washington 

C. J. Bernes, Washington 

C. J. Bernes, Washington 

G. H. Hammond Co , Chicago 

Swift & Co., Chicago 

W. H. Lowery 

Hammond Co.. Chicago 

Swift & Co., Chicago 

Evansville Packing Co., Evansville 

Evansville Pork Co., Evansville 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co., Indianapolis 
Schwarzohild & Sulzberger, Kans. City 

Swift & Co., Chicago 

Wm. Rauscher, Huntingburg 



Muncie 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Vincennes .. 
Vincennes . . 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Washington. . 
Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Oakland ("ity 
Evansville .. 
Evansville .. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Huntington. . 
Huntingburg 



Present. 
Present. 
Present 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 



287 



SAUSAGE-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Borax. 



Wienies... 
Wienies... 

Pork 

Garlic 

Wienies... 

Garlic 

Pork 

Pork 

Wienies. . 

Polish 

Tongue 

Pork 

Pork 

Shamrock, 
Wienies . . . 
Wienies.. . 
Wienies. . . 
Bologna.. . 
Bologna.. . 
Bologna.. . 
Bologna... 
Bologna... 
Bologna.. . 
Bologna.. 

Ham 

Bologna.. . 
Bologna.. 
Bologna.. , 
Bologna.. 
Bologna.. 

Ham 

Liverwort 
Liverwort 
Liverwort 



Wm. Rauscher, Huntingburg 

Louis P. Bornwasser, Louisville 

Louis P. Bornwasser, Louisville 

Louis P. Bornwasser, Louisville 

Kingan & Co., Indianapolis 

Fred Kurtzman, Hammond 

Fred Kurtzman, Hammond 

Fred Kurtzman, Hammond 

Hammond Packing Co., Hammond 

Armour <fe.Co., Chicago 

Armour & Co., Chicago 

Armour & Co., Chicago 

Albert Worm, Indianapolis 

Albert Worm, Indianapolis 

Gibson Meat Market 

Kingan & Co., Indianapolis 

Kingan & Co., Indianapolis 

Bonwayton, Louisville 

Bonwayton, Louisville 

Hammond & Co., Chicago 

Jones & Co., Brazil 

Fred Herman, Terre Haute 

FA. Brown , Terre H ante ... 

Geo. Schidel, Terre Haute 

C.W.Kern, Terre Haute 

Glum Nagle, Terre Haute 

John B. Zuber, Vincennes 

C. J. Ptumpp, Washington 

•C. J. Bernes, Washington 

Armour & Co., Chicago 

Evansville Packing Co., Evansville 

Wm. Rauscher. Huntingburg 

Schwnrzchild & Sulzberger, New York 

Duffer. Terre Haute 

Fred Herman, Terre Haute 

Armour & Co., Chicago 



Huntingburg 
JeflFersonville 
Jeffersonville 
Jetfersonville 
Irvington . .. 
Hammond .. 
Hammond .. 
Hammond . . 
Hammond . 
Hammond .. 
Hammond .. 
Hammond 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Irvington 

Irvington . . .. 
Jeffersonville 
Jeffersonville 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Vincennes .. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Oakland City 
Evansville... 
Huntingburg. 
Indianapolis. 
Terre Haute . 
Terre Haute . 
Terre Haute . 



Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present.' 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 



SAUSAGE ILLEGAL. 



11 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Borax. 


Sodium Sulfite. 


4466 
4469 
4471 
4473 
4474 


Sam Davis 

J. Deschler 

Hilgemeier & Bro 

Steinmetz Bros 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Fort Wayne 

Fort Wayne 


Present. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Ab.'ent . 
Absent.. 
Absent . 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Present. 


Absent. 

.121 per cent, present. 
.106 per cent, present. 
.295 per cent, present. 
.090 per cent, present. 


4481 
4489 
4490 
4495 
4504 
454'' 


H. W. Heckman 

Geo. Woessner 

Chas. Wechsler 

Meier & Meuser Pk. Co 

Meier & Meuser Pk. Co 


.160 per cent, present. 
.258 per cent, present. 
.188 per cent, present. ■ 
.063 per cent, present. 
.045 per cent, present. 
.240 per cent, present. 


4544 






4352 




.075 per cent, present. 
.312 per cent, present. 


4556 




4644 


H. G. Wigemann 


Absent. 


4648 


Eckart Packing Co 













288 



SAUSAGE— ILLEGAL-Continued. 



o o 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Borax. 


Sodium 
Sulfite. 


4(i5fi 


Jonn Melber 

J. p. Cabill 


South Bend 

Soutn Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis. ... 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Noblesville 

Ft. Wayne 


Present 




4fi!i7 






4658 


M. Bain 

L. Taberski 

J. Lake 

Hallers 

Eckart Packing Co 

Fred Jans 

Albert Worms 






4650 
4660 


Present 


Absent. 


4670 






4776 






4798 
4808 


.210 per cent, present.. 
.2976 per cent, present. 
.1017 per cent, present. 


Absent. 


48''0 


Albert Worms 




4846 






458^ 




Absent 

Present 




5921 


Eckart Packing Co 


Absent. 



HAMBURGER STEAK-LEGAL. 



1-5 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Borax. 



Sodium 
Sulfite. 



4479 
4481 
4486 
4558 
4560 
4563 
4564 
4567 
4568 
4570 
4572 
4574 
4577 
4578 
4642 
4643 
4645 
4725 
4728 
4729 
4732 
4733 
4734 
4741 
4744 
4750 
4753 
4760 
4819 



Paul Brandlein 

W. Simon 

Elliott Dressed Beef Co . . 

E.F. Overman 

Paul Brandlein 

"F. A. Winterdorfer 

Joe Sehott 

Fred Wuster 

Joe Cook 

W. Simon 

Chas. Mock 

F.Filz 

F. E. Vickard 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co 

J.P.Mollett 

J. N. Linn 

S. Hanna General Store .. 

F.Filz 

A. Stuckmeyer 

Simon (City Market) 

Wm. Grund 

Elliott Dressed Beef Co . . 

S. Davis 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co 
Sindlinger Fresh Meat Co 

H.H Merkin 

A. Cherdron 

Theo.Deitz 

Albert Worm 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Ft. Wayne . . 
Ft. Wayne . . 
Ft. Wayne .. 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapoljs 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
i^bsent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



289 



HAMBURGER STEAK-ILLEGAL. 



Manufacturer. 



Where Collected. 



Borax. 



Sodium Sulfite. 



A Stuckmeyer 

F. Fih: 

F.W. Hebble 

Wm. Grund 

Sam Davis 

Steinmetz Bros 

Harry Matzke 

Theo. Dietz 

Chas. Mock 

Joe Cook 

W. H. Heckman 

Fred Wuster 

Geo. Woessner 

Tbos. Castor 

A. L. Heckman 

E. F. Overman 

Henry Coleman 

J. G. Schisla 

L. Negeleison 

Henry Coleman 

Jos. Parent 

Steinmetz Bros 

Joe Fi"cher 

Chas. Cherdron 

Wm. Grund 

Sindlinger Fr. Mt.Co 

H. Reinewald 

E.H. Quillen 

C. D. Hinzey 

James Lake 

John Wesolowski 

WolfBrazy 

Hnffer Bro« 

Peter Hirschanner 

P. W. Goble 

S.J. Benzenbower 

Albert Worm ( Weinie.s^ 

EckartPk.Co.( Frankfurters) 
Geo. Keller (Frankfurters).. 



Indianapolis.. 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis.. 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indiannpolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapoli.'!. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis.. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 
Indianapolis. . 

Ft. Wayne 

South Bend... 
South Bend .. 
South Bend .. 
South Bend... 
South Bend... 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Indianapolis. . 

Ft. Wayne 

Crawfordsville 



Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent . 
Ab.sent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Present. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Present. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Absent.. 
Present. 
Present. 
Absent.. 



.178 per cent. 
.147 per cent. 
.164 per cent. 
.429 per cent. 
.226 per cent. 
.482 per cent. 
.260 per cent. 
.101 per cent 
.131 per cent. 
.298 per cent. 
.501 per cent. 
.026 per cent. 
.170 per cent. 
.144 per cent. 
.014 per cent. 
.030 per cent. 
.319 per cent. 
.015 per cent. 
.141 per cent. 
.054 per cent. 
.083 per cent. 
.068 per cent. 
.0.39 per cent. 
.201 per cent. 
.430 per cent. 
.402 per cent. 
.260 per cent. 
.360 per cent. 
.220 per cent. 
.140 per cent. 
.220 per cent. 
.110 per cent. 
.138 per cent. 
.0^^ per cent. 
.074 per cent. 
.211 per cent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
.1596 per cent 



present, 
present, 
present, 
present. 
pre.«ent. 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present, 
present. 



present. 



FRESH MEATS-LEGAL. 



Jopp & Moore.. . 
Ruskner & Sons 
Dan Gorman. .. . 



Muncie 
Muncie 
Muncie 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



MISCELLANEOUS MEATS-LEGAL. 



U b 

o o 

1^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Pre.servatives. 


4731 


Holstiner 




Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis . . . 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis . .. 
Ft. Wayne 




47.'S9 


Tripe 


Indianapolis Abattoir. 

F. Hilgemier 




4756 


Liverwurst 




4730 


Metwurst 

Metwurst 


Kingan & Co 




475? 


Kingan & Co 

Sindlinger Co 

Meier-Mueser Packing Co. . . 
Frank A. Uhl 




4746 
4743 

4748 


Liver Pudding 

Blood Pudding 

Blood Pudding 

Smoked flam 


Absent. 
Absent. 


5920 


Ft. Wayne Grocery Co 


Absent. 



19-Bd. of Health. 



290 



MISCELLANEOUS MEATS-ILLEGAL. 



C <D 

u S 

2 3 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Borax. 


Sodium Sulfite. 


4834 


Fresh Meat. . 
Fresh Meat... 
Fresh Meat .. 
Fresh Meat. . 
Fresh Meat... 
Minced Ham. 
Pressed Ham. 
Boiled Ham.. 
Bologna 
Pressed Ham. 
Frankfurter.. 
Frankfurter.. 


Bill Thomas 

J. 8. McDonald . ... 

Benzenlower 

0. M. Stewart 

Dan Gorman 

J. Frederick 

Albert Worm . . 
Ind'polis Abattoir.. 

Eckart Packing Co . 

Geo. Keller 

Shaw & Thompson. 


Muncie 


Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent . 
Absent 
Present. 
.1302% . 
Present. 
Excess . 
Present. 
Present 
Present. 


.047 per cent, present. 

.038 per cent, present. 

.1195 per cent, present. 

.385 per cent, present. 

.448 per cent, present. 

Absci t 

Absent. 

Absent. 

Abfent. 

Absent. 

Absent. ■ 

Absent. 


4835 






4837 
4838 
4840 
4i47 
4808 
4817 
4fi03 
5922 
5044 
5049 


MuDcie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

T^t Wayne . . 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Ni'blesville . 

Ft. Wayne . 

Crawtordsvill 

Crawfordsvill 


e 
e. 



FRANKFURTERS-LEGAL. 



c » 

Is 

IS 

h5 


Manufacturer. 


Where Collected. 


Preservatives. 


4736 
4740 
4751 
4771 
5045 
5046 


Meier- Me user Packing Co 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co 

H. Merklin 

Eckart Packing Co 

Armour & Co.. Chiengo. 

Switt & Co , Chicago 


Indianapolis 

In^lianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Crawfordsville 

Crawfordsville 


Absent.. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



HAM LOAF-LEGAL. 






Manufacturer. 



Where Collected. 



Preservatives. 



4671 

4737 
4773 
4774 
4784 
4810 
48 9 
4814 
4816 
4818 



Eckart Packing Co.. 
Nelson Morris Co .. 
Eckart Packing Co.. 
Eckart Packing Co . 

Kingan i Co 

Xingan ife Co 

Kingan <& Co 

Coffin-Fletcher 

Swift & Co., Chicago 
Kingan & Co 



Ft Wayne . 

Indianapolis 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne .. 

Indianapolis 

Iiidianapoli-' 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 



Absent 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Ab--ent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



VEAL-LEGAL. 



si 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 

Collected. 


Preservatives. 


4849 




Meier-Meuser Co 

F. W. Hebble 

F W. Hebble 




4576 
4727 
4757 


Veal Loaf 

Veal Loaf 

Veal Loaf 

Veal Loaf 


Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . . . 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis . .. 


Absent. 
Absent. 


4813 















291 

BOLOGNA-LEGAL. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Preservatives. 



F. Filz 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co. 
Sindlinger Fresh Meat Co . 

F.Uhl 

P. Brandlein 

Eckart Packing Co. 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co. 
Meier-Meuser Packing Co. 

Coffin-Fletcher Co 

Geo. Derleth 

Meier-Meuser Co 

A. Janert . 

Bills & Boettecher 

Coffin-Fletcher Co 

Kingan & Co 

Kingan ife Co 

Coffin-Fletcher Co 

Indianapolis Abattoir 

Shaw & Thompson 

Swift ife Co., Chicago 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Ft. Wayne . 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
In 'ianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Crawfordsvill 
Crawfordsvill 



Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
.Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



WE[NER SAUSAGE-LEGAL. 



Sindlinger Fresh Meat Co 

Geo. Derleth 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co 

Sam T. Brown 

Albert .Janert .. 

Wm. Toll. 

Kingan & Co 

Kingan & Co 

Indianapolis Abattoir . . . . 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



Absent. 
Ab.-ent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



MISCELLANEOUS MEATS-LEGAL. 



1-^ 


Article. 


Manufacturer. 


Borax. 

Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent. 


Sodiuui Sulfite. 


4459 

41fi8 


Dried Beef. .. 




N. E. Specialty Co., Cleveland, 

Nelson Morris & Co., Chicag i. 

Armours, Chicago 

Amiours, Chicago 

Wm. Grund, Indianapolis 

Indianapolis Abattoir 


Absent. 


4461 
4497 
4464 
4478 


Ham Loat. . . 
Ham Loaf.. . . . 
Pigs Foot Jelly 
Fresh Tripe .. 




Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 
Absent. 



MISCELLANEOUS MEATS-ELLEGAL. 



Bologna 

Weinerwurst 
Weinerwurst 

Veal Loaf 

Veal Loaf.. .. 
Frankfurter., 



F. Filz 

Albert Worm 

Sindlinger ( -o 

Harry Matzke 

•Joe Cook 

Meier-Meuser Packing Co 



Absent . 
Present. 
Absent . 
Absent. 
Absent . 
Absent . 



.147 per cent, present. 

Absent. 

.U2.'i per cent, present. 

.153 per cent, present. 

.279 per cent, present. 

.050 per cent, present. 



292 



MEAT PRODUCTS, CANNED. 

Under this heading we have analyzed 20 samples of miscel- 
laneons articles, nine of which have been pure and 11 adulterated. 

MISCELLANEOUS MEAT PRODUCTS-LEGAL. 

CANNED. 



>> . 










P s 












Brand. 


Manufacturer or 
Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Remarks. 


1ti24 


Fresh Lobster, 










"Crown"' 


L.PiekertFishCo 


New Albany. 




SifiT 


Ham Loaf 


Libby, McNeil & Libby, 










Chicago. 


Indianapolis. 




3570 


Salmon, "Sea Rose". 


Thlinket Packing Co , 
Portland, Ore 


Indianapolis. 




857«i 


Hamburger Steak .... 


Libby's, Chicago 


Indianapolis. 




8578 


Boned Chicken, 










"Columbia" 


Mullen-Blackledge Co .. 


Indianapolis. 




:m2 


Potted Chipken, 










"Jeddo" 


Court House Grocery Co. 


Indianapolis. 




3rt45 


Deviled Tongue, 










"Lion" 


Fairbank Canning Co... 


Indianapolis. 




152S 


Selected Shrimp 


Thos. R.Levy Co.. 

Cincinnati. 


JeflFersonville 




1713 


Gold Label Shrimp 


Edw.T. Russell & Co., 

Boston. 


Kokomo 





MISCELLANEOUS MEAT PRODUCTS-ILLEGAL. 

CANNED. 



1691 


Vienna Sausage, 
"Red Star" 


Cicero Canning Co., 










Chicago. 


Salem 


Preserved with Borax. 


356fi 


Deviled Ham 




Indianapolis. 


Preserved with Borax. 


3577 


Potted Turkey, 










"Columbia" 


Mullen-Blackledge Co . 


Indianapolis. 


Preserved with Borax. 


3579 


Dried Beef, 










"Wedding Ring". 


Bloomington, Ills 


Indianapolis. 


Preserved with Borax. 


.3583 


Chicken Tamale 


Libby, Mo.'Veil & Libby 










Co , Chicago 


Indianapolis. 


Preserved with Borax. 


3771 


Codfish, Shredded... 


J. N. Bearsly Sons, 










New York City. 


Indianapolis. 


Preserved with Borax. 


3777 


Frankfurters, 












Gabriel Triat Co.. 

Frank furt-on-Main. 


Indianapolis. 








Preserved with Borax. 



LARD AND LARD COMROUNDS. 

Our analyses have shown that much of the lard known as lard 
or pure leaf lard, contains beef stearine, put in to raise its melting- 
point and thereby stiffen it. Pure lard must be made from the 
molted fat of the hog and contain no added ingredients ; the incor- 
poration of beef stearine or lamb suet constitutes an adulteration. 
The compounds made from cottonseed oil and beef stearine are 
wholesome products, but such goods must be sold for what th6y are 
and not as lards. Under the operation of the Federal Meat In- 



293 



spection Law, the addition of not to exceed 4 per cent, of lard 
stearine wall be allowed. This ruling will be followed in this 
State. 

Of the 42 samples of lard examined dnring the year, 27 have 
been passed as pure, while 15, or 35.6 per cent., have been adul- 
terated, either by the addition of cottonseed oil or beef stearine. 

LARD-LEGAL. 



Brand. 



Danville . . 

Lard 

Leaf Lard 

Lard 

Ivory 

Farmer 

KettledRen'd 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Campl ell Bros., Danville, 111 

Griffin Bros 

C.B.O'Donnell 

P. J.Bernes 

E. Godel J: Son. Peoria, 111.. 
Indianapolis Abattoir . ... 

Coffin-Fletcher 

Meier- Meuser Co 

Deschler Jc Co — 

Wm. Grund 

Harry Heckman 

(|hadwick it Co 

Kingan & Co 

E. C. Murphy, Goshen 



Brazil — .... 
Terre Haute . 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . . . 
Oakland City. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis. 
Iridia'apolis. 
Richmond . . 
Goshen 





C m 


o . • 


^H 


>>ca 


p. 


■^ UO 








« 


a 


50.0 


None . 


50.1 


None. 


50.3 


None. 


49.4 


None . 


50.0 


None . 


51.7 


None . 


50.9 


None , 


51.4 


None. 


51.1 


None. 


48.9 


None. 


49.9 


None . 


50.3 


None. 


51,0 


None. 


51.2 


None. 



Remarks. 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
P-.re. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Piire. 



LARD-ILLEGAL. 



h u 
o a> 

£a 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


-a 
o .— 

si;* 

?5 


Halphen 
Test. 


Remarks. 


86 


Pure Lard 

Home Ren- 
dered 

Hog Lard — 

Best Kettle 
Maao 




Alexandria .. 

Brazil 

Washington.. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

New Albany . 

New Albany . 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Ft. Wayne ... 


510 

49.8 
48.6 

49.2 
52.2 

49.2 

49.8 
51.0 
51.8 
51.8 
50.0 
53.6 
49.8 


Very 
Strong.. 

Light..... 

Light 

Medium.. 
Medium.. 

Light 

Light 

Light 

Light 

Light 

Light 

Strong..., 
None 


Largely 
Cottonseed oil 

Small per cent 
Cottonseed oil 

Small per cent 
Cottonseed oil 

Much Cotton- 
seed oil 


148 

470 
3620 

3621 


W.B. .Jones <fr Co.... 
H. .J. Kramer 

Court House Grocery 
Court House Grocery 


1606 


Magnolia 


seed oil. 

Small per cent 
Cottonseed oil 

Sm.Tll per cent 
Cottonseed oil 


1692 
4973 


Butchers 
Lard 


Zeinmeister Bros 

Hilgemier A: Bro 

Hilgemier & Bro 

Hilgemier & Bro 

Sindlinger Pro. Co.. . 

Albert Worm 

EckartPkg.Co 


4975 




present. 


4976 




present. 


4977 




present. 


4984 




present. 


5919 




present. 






present. 



294 



OLIVE OIL. 



Olive oil is the expressed oil of the mature fruit of the culti- 
vated olive tree, and must he free from admixtures of other vege- 
table or animal oils. Until within recent years it has been difficult 
to purchase pure olive oil, but at present there is little oil imported 
that is not genuine. Our work shows, however, that many of the 
oils on the Indiana market are adulterated with cottonseed or pea- 
nut oil. Of the 188 samples examined 56, or 29.S per cent, w^ere 
adulterated. Many of these adulterated goods were pure cotton- 
seed oil', prepared and bottled in this country under a foreigTi 
label, that of "E. Loubon et Cie, I^Tice," being most coinmonly 
used. Many of the druggists' samples of olive oil have been 
found to be pure cottonseed oil, otherwise known to the drug trade 
as "sweet oil." One sample marked "Pure Olive Oil," bore the 
following label : "Those using olive oil should be very careful 
to discriminate between the medicinal olive oil and the impure 
sweet oil, which on account of its impurities is only used for 
external and mechanical uses." And yet the sample was nothing 
but the sweet oil the customer is cautioned against usinff. 



OLIVE OIL-LEGAL. 



>-. I. 

Sa 

2 = 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Specific 
Gravity. 


Butyro 
Refracto- 

meter 
Reading 

at 
15.50° C. 


Halphen's 
Test. 


103 






.9168 
.9163 
.9165 
.9168 
.9170 
.9164 
.9163 
.9164 
.9144 
.9156 
.9166 
.9164 
.9166 
.9162 
.9157 
.9158 
.9168 
.9156 
.9161 
.9164 
.9163 
9168 
.9168 
.v*166 
.9171 
.9163 
.9164 
.9159 
.9164 
.9168 


66.6 
66.8 
67.5 
66.3 
67.5 
67.8 
67.6 
66,5 
67.7 
66.4 
67.4 
67,2 
67.2 
67.1 
66.5 
67,0 
66.6 
66.8 
66 9 
66.9 
67.0 
67,5 
66,6 
66,6 
66.6 
67,0 
67.2 
67.2 
67.0 
67.0 


Normal. 


200 

772 
787 


W. W. Kaufman 

A.P.Schmidt 


Terre Haute 

Washington 

Washington 


Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 


379 


J. A. Risch 

J. F Bomm .... 


Normal. 


859 




Normal. 


886 


H.J. Sehlaepfer 

D. & H. Rosenbaum 

Porter & Co 

E.G.Clark 




Normal. 


9i5 

972 
1027 


Vlt. Vernon 

Peru 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Huntington 

Ft. Wayne. 


Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 


1048 




Normal. 


1073 
1118 


M. Kaylor 

J. C. Hutzell 

A. Deutsch & Co 

C.B. Woodworth & Co 

Meyer Bros. & Co 

Pellena & Lewis 


Normal. 
Normal, 


1133 
1142 


Oakland City 

Ft. Wayne 


Normal. 
Normal. 


1201 


Ft. Wayne 


Normal. 


1219 


Ft. Wayne 


Normal. 


1985 


Fvansville 

Huntington 

Huntington. 


Normal. 


1434 
1440 
1441 


Tuttle & Hubble 

McCaffrey & Co 

E. Ball 

N. A. Moore & Co 

Houseworth Bros 


Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 


1547 




Normal. 


1729 


Elkhart 


Normal. 


1901 


Elkhart 


Normal. 


1944 


G. W. Rule 

J M Callender 




Normal. 


2043 




Normal. 


2065 


T. H. Boyd & Co 


Laporte 

Michigan City 

Michigan City 

Hammond 


Normal. 


2095 
2109 
2163 


Kaplousky & Moran 

E. W. Lindemann 

Summers' Pharmacy 


Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 



295 



OLIVE OIL-LEaAL— Continued. 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Specific 
Gravity. 



Butyro 
Refracto- 

meter 
Reading 

at 
15.50° C. 



Halphen' 
Test. 



Bu?john & Schneider 

Red Cross Pharmacy — 

M. M. Murphy 

Schultz ifc Borwell 

Anderson Drug Co 

.T.B. Wehrle 

H.H.Ice 

People's Drug Store 

V. E. Silverburg 

F. L. Saylor 

W. Cogswell 

W.Scott 

W. M. Birk 

H. J. Huder 

I. N. Heims 

Weber Drug Co 

E.H.Wilson 

Navin's Pharmacy 

J.B.Cook&Son 

Pettis Dry Goods Co . .. 
Court House Grocery Co 

J. E. Karns 

J. E. Karns 

■ Gentry Drug Store 

Bowles Drug: Store 

William C. Pfau 

Sch^Yaninger Bros 

Charles D. Knoefel 

McDonald-Stockdell Co. 

Conner's Drug Store 

Floyd Parks 

Doherty's Drug Store 

•MontaniBros 

B. Doolittle 



Logansport. . . 
Logansport. .. 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Muncie 

Muneie 

Muncie 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 
Columbus . . . 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Bloomington 
Bloomington 
Jeffersonville 
JefFersonville 
New Albany . 
New Albany . 
New Albany . 
Jeffersonville 
Jeffer?onville 
Indianapolis. 
Jeffersonville 



.9162 
.9169 
.9172 
.9125 
.9169 
.9168 
.9161 
.9165 
.9166 
.9170 
.9171 
.9161 
.9172 
.9176 
.9169 
.9175 
.9171 
.9168 
.9163 
.9162 
.915i 
.9157 
.9166 
.9174 
.9165 
.916H 
.9165 
.9149 
.9161 
.9165 
.9168 
.9147 
.9159 
.9164 



67.0 
67.0 
67.2 
67.0 
67.0 
67.2 
67.0 
67.1 
66.8 
67.0 
66.7 
67.0 
67.5 
67.0 
67.1 
67.0 
67.0 
67.1 
66.5 
67.5 
66.8 
67.0 
67.2 
67.9 
67.2 
67.1 
67.1 
66.0 
67.0 
66.0 
67.1 
67.0 
67.0 
66.9 



Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 
Normal. 



Retailer, 



Where Collected. 






Halphen' 
Test. 



0. J. Beeson 

H. N. Jenner 

0. J. Beeson 

F.H.Bentz 

O.D.Walls 

Houseworth Bros 

E. J. Finehout. 

Coon ley Drug Co 

Public Drugstore 

Chapin Park 

F. W. Meissner, Jr 

0. C. Bastian 

E. C. Zahrt 

A. E. Kepert 

E. R. StanflFer 

J. W. Weise 

B.S. Wallick 

Heineman-Sievers . . . . 
New Land Drugstore. 

Peoples Drug Co 

Oak Drug Store. ....... 

R.E. Murphy 

Chickasaw Drug Co ... 

Blue Drug Store 

M.W. Hamaker 

1. Prince 

Consumer Grocery Co 
Consumer Grocery Co 

W. A.Rchofield 

Glick & Shane 



Goshen 

Goshen 

Goshen 

Blkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend.. 
South Bend. . 
South Bend.. 

La Porte 

South Bend.. 

La Porte 

Hammond . .. 
Hammond . . 
Hammond . . . 
Valparaiso. .. 
Valparaiso. .. 
Valparaiso. .. 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



64.5 
64.4 
64.2 
64.6 
64.2 
64.6 
64.4 
61.4 
64.7 
64.3 
66.4 
64.8 
66.4 
66.9 
66.0 
65.9 
66.2 
66.7 
65.7 
66.6 
66.8 
66.6 
66.5 
65.8 
66.5 
62.1 
62.4 



62.4 
62.4 



None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 



296 

OLIVE OIL-LEGAL-Continued. 






Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



p^aj3 d 



,Cm+j._,— ( 



Halphen' 
Test. 



5015 
507rt 
5208 
52U9 
5243 
5268 
5342 
5767 
5841 
5852 
5855 
5862 
5883 
5908 
5965 
5988 
6902 
6507 
6524 
6529 
6539 
6559 
6578 



H.E.Gaddis 

Robt. Keller 

Ru^h County Grocery 

A. B. Flinn 

Ed Goeble & Co 

J. Bryan & Son 

H. W. Darling 

Blue Front Drug Store 

Geo. Lnesch's Drug Store . 
Christian Bros. Drug Store. 

H. E. Beverforden , .. 

L. J. Zollinger 

Ed Mert/, 

F.D. Hoham 

W. W.Jones 

W.Craig 

F.Stahlhut 

Porter the Druggist 

City Drug Store 

R. M. Lindeman 

E. M. Moran 

L. H, Mattern 

OttoNegele 



Indianapolis. .. 
Indianapolis. .. 

Rushville 

Rushville 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Williamsport .. 

Tipton 

Ft. AVayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. AVayne 

Ft. AVayne 

Ft. AVayne 

Greeneastle 

Green castle '. . . 
Indianapolis. . 

Peru 

Michigan City 
Michigan City 
Michigan City 

AVhiting 

Hammond 



62.4 
63.2 
62.5 
62.4 
63.1 
62.1 
62.5 
64 2 
64.2 
64.1 
64.2 
64.1 
64.3 
64.6 
64.3 
64.5 



67.2 
66.6 
67 
66.0 
66.6 
66.3 



None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
Non«. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 



OLIVE OIL-ILLEGAL. 



2 '^ 



618 

648 

666 

700 

739 

759 

811 

819 

826 

931 

958 

999 

1547 

1886 

1928 

226i 

2325 

2375 

2448 

2499 

2572 

2585 

2600 

2607 

2778 

2801 

2818 

2860 

2885 

2911 

3380 

3489 

3502 

3540 

38 J5 

3854 

3874 



Retailer. 


AVhere 
Collected. 


it 

ft* 


1 <C 

la" 
20:5 

eqapH 


Halphen's 
Test. 


Remarks. 


G. Reiss 


Terre Haute. . 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . 
Princeton .... 
AVashington 
Oakland City. 
Oakland City. 
Oakland City. 
Mt. Vernon .. 


.9195 
.9196 
.9203 
.9200 
.9191 
.9204 
.9162 
.9234 
.9219 
.9204 
.9187 
.9219 
.9226 
.9196 
.9207 
.9189 
.9186 
.9161 
.9161 
.9189 
.9209 
.9236 
.9216 
.9207 
.9214 
.9221 
.9189 
.9227 
.9209 
.9216 
.9218 
.9202 
.9204 
.9225 
.9232 
.9156 
.9225 


70.2 
70.0 
70.2 
70.2 
70.3 
70.8 
65.6 
73.5 
71.6 
71.2 
70 4 
72.9 
72.3 
69.5 
70,4 
69.6 
68.5 
67.8 
74.8 
69.1 
71.3 
72.9 
71.0 
70 5 
71.5 
71.5 
68.0 
72.2 
71.0 
72.0 
72.0 
70.3 
70.3 
72.1 
73.4 
65.0 
72.1 


Medium.. 
Medium.. 

None 

Trace 

Strong — 

Trace 

None 

Strong.... 
Strong.... 
Medium.. 

Trace 

Strong..,. 
Strong.. .. 
Strong.. .. 
Trace. .. 

Strong 

Light .... 

Strong.... 

Strong.. .. 

Moderate. 

Moderate. 

Moderate. 

Moderate. 

Slight.... 

Medium.. 

Medium. 

None. .. 

Moderate. 

Slight.... 

Strong 

Strong..... 
Slight.... 
Slight.... 

Strong 

Strong — 

None 

Slight.... 


Contains cottonseed oil. 


H J Werker. ..;. 


Contains cottonseed oil. 


W.C. AVatien 

C.P. Miller 

H.G. May 

F S Clapp 


Contains peanut oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 


C. Kightly 


A dark green inferior oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 


A. G. Troutman 

Daw.=on & Boyce 


Cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 


Chickasaw Pharm'cy 


Peru 

JefiFersonville 

Elkhart 

(ioshen 

Logansport . . 
Lafayette — 
Lata V ette ... 
Ander.-on — 
Muncie 
Alexandria . . 
Alexandria .. 
Alexandria .. 

Elwood 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Indianapolis 

Indianatiolis. 

Indianapo'is. 

Columbus .... 

Noblesville .. 

Noblesville.. 

Noblesville... 

Bloomington. 

Bloomington. 

Noblesville... 


Cottonseed oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 


F.J. Goldman 


Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonsedd oil. 


W. H. Porter 


Contains cottonseed oil. 


AV.AV.. Johnson .. . 
AVells-Yaeger-BestCo 

Cassell Bro.< 

R. P. AVhitney 

City Drug Store 

E. 0. Robinson 

F C Jones 


Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 
Cotton.'eed oil. 
Cottonseed oil present. 
Cottonseed oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 


Stringfellow & Co . .. 


Contains cottonseed oil. 
Contains cottonseed oil. 


L T Harker 


Contains cottonseed oil- 


H. Mehlig 


Very inferior quality. 


A. B.Carr 


. Cottonseed oil. 


F. H. Carter 

E. W. Stuckey 

J.B. Cook &Son 

F.E.Ross 

C.L.Mitchell 

A.G. Baldwin 

C. 0. Maple 


Not a pure olive oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 
Not a pure oil. 
Not a pure oil. 
Cottonseed oil. < 
Cottonseed oil. 


John 0' Harrow 

Ed Fenton 


Verj' inferior oil. 
Cottonseed oil. 



297 



OLIVE OIL-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



>> ■ 

l-t >-> 
o o 

I-. a 


Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 






Halphen's 
Test. 


Remarks. 


ct'^ln 






.9223 

.9217 

.9228 

.918 

.916 

.910 

.915 
.917 
.915 


72.6 
72.5 
72.5 
69.1 
67.0 
61.4 

66.5 
68.2 
66.4 
69.0 

68.3 
72.4 
69.7 


Moderate 
Moderate. 
Moderate. 
Moderate. 
Strong.. . 
btrong 

Strong 

Strong 

Negative. 
Strong 

Negative. 

Strong 

Negative. 


Cottonseed oil. 


3281 

3282 
2499 
5022 
5199 

5201 
5202 
5306 
5970 

6137 


Court House Grocery 
Court H()u.se Grocery 

E P. Whinery 

Given-Campbell 

F.B.Johnson 

Ashworth ife Stewart. 
Hargrove & .Vlullin.. 

C. B. Merritt 

Badger & Green 

T.S.Kusel 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Muneie 

Frankfort 

Rushville .... 

Rushville .... 
Kushville .... 
Fran K fort.. . 
Greencastle.. 

South Bend.. 


Cottonseed oil. 

Cottonseed oil. 

Cottonseed oil present. 

Cottonseed oil present. 

2C% cottonseed oil pres- 
ent and lard oil. 

20% cottonseed oil. 

Cottonseed oil present. 

Not a pure oil. 

Almost pure cottonseed 
oil. 

Not a pure oil. 


fil58 


J. W. Temperly 

Shore & Wilson 


80% cottonseed oil. 
Not a pure oil." 


6447 


Rochester.... 





PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS. 

Under this heading is put all products made from fruit and 
sugar, either cane or ghieose, and including fruit butters, fruit 
preserves, fruit jellies and jams, etc. 

TLe base of the imitation fruit jelly, jam, etc., is apple juice 
or apple pulp, obtained principally from the waste parings and 
cores of the apple drying or evaporated apple factory. These 
waste products are partially dried at the factory, packed in bales 
or barrels, and shipped to the manufacturer of fruit products at 
a very low cost. Upon arriving at the factory the stock is boiled 
for a time in open kettles and then placed in large closed copper 
kettles and heated by blowing with superheated steam until the 
clear apple juice drains out of the mass to the bottom of the kettle. 
It is then drawn off into tanks and serves as stock for making all 
varieties of jellies and preserved fruits. 

Eor the production of a satisfactory jelly or jam large quanti- 
ties of sugar are necessary for jellifying and preserving the fruit. 
The cost of this sugar contributes largely to the cost of manufac- 
ture. Cheaper sugars in the form of glucose and glucose syrup are 
therefore employed as a substitute for cane sugar. Glucose is a 
wholesome and nutritious article of food, and no objection can be 
made to its use except that , products containing it are sold at 
prices not warranted by their actual cost. In some cases sac- 
charin, a coal tar product of no food value but of great sweetening 
power, is used where a very sweet article is desired. Saccharin 



298 

has antiseptic properties which make its use profitable. Its in- 
fluence on the system is not determined and its employment is not 
allowable. 

The apple jnice and glucose syrnp are mixed in the necessary 
proportions, colored with a coal tar dye to counterfeit the genuine 
product; flavored with compound ethers, synthetic fruit ethers, 
technically kno^\Ti as ethyl buterate, amyl acetate, etc. ; preserved 
by the addition of benzoate of soda or salicylate of soda, and ul- 
timately placed upon the market as pure currant, raspberry, or 
strawberry jelly. 

Foreign coloring matter is employed in preparing fruit prod- 
ucts for two reasons : one is that the color of fruit is not very 
stable and is liable to be destroyed during the process of preserv- 
ing, and, furthermore, that goods packed in glass will lose their 
color Avhen constantly exposed to the light on the grocer's shelves. 
The other reason for the use of dye colors is that they enable tlie 
manufacluret to use fruit of deficient color and thus to conceal 
inferiority. Apple stock uncolored is readily distinguished, but 
when dyed a Vrilliant crimson passes to the eye of the inexperi- 
enced buyer for the ^^enuine fruit color. The preservation of this 
color is important, n? the value of the jelly or jam m/j table use 
or in tliC siol-: k om is doubtless enhanced by the attractiveness of 
its coloring, 'hut the possibility for deception as to quality and 
purity afforded by the use of coloring matter overbalances any 
argument in its favor. By the judicious use of coal tar colors 
apple jellies flavored with small quantities of the true fruit, or 
by the artificial fruit ethers, can be given the appearance of the 
genuine article, or a cheap fruit or a vegetable pulp can be mixed 
into a jam, and jellies made from glucose and starch may be 
served to consumers who demand pure goods. 

The harmfulness of the coal tar dyes depends on their composi- 
tion. Many of them are quite innocuous, but are always liable to 
contain metallic impurities, such as zinc, copper, tin, lead, and 
arsenic retained during the process of manufacture. Others are 
distinctly injurious and entirely unsuitable for use in food 
products. 

The cheap food products have undoubtedly become a necessity 
in the homes of the poor, where they have supplanted, to a large 
degree, more costly forms of food. But the apparent demand for 



299 



low-priced food does not amount to a license to the mannfacturer 
to place adulterated goods on onr market nor authorize him to 
lower, still further, the cost of production by making entirely 
fraudulent articles that would not command a sale at any price 
if honestly labeled and sold for what they were. 

The custom of labeling jellies made from apple stock with 
some trade name that does not in any way lead the purchaser to 
suppose he is getting something which he is not is becoming more 
common. The sale of the cheap and wholesome apple jellies is 
thus placed on an honest basis and relieves the trade of the re- 
sponsibility incurred by meeting the demand for cheap goods 
with base imitations. 

Compoimd fruit products can legally be sold if they are labeled 
"Fruit Jellies" instead of "'Currant," "Strawberry" jellies, etc: 
and if they bear a formula correctly stating the name and per- 
centage of the ingredients used in their production. Of the 119 
samples examined 9Y, or 81.5 per cent., have been illegal. Some 
of these goods were meant to l)e the pure article, but the majority 
of them were imitations. In many instances the manufacturer had 
evidently attempted to mark properly his goods, but notwith- 
standing this he had failed to comply with all the details of the 
labeling' clause. 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS— LEGAL. 



o o 

s = 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Remarks. 



97 
248 

295 

307 

335 
338 
339 



CrabappleJelly- 
Purity 



Orange Pie Fil- 
ler-Rex, Imi- 
tation 



Jam. Compou'd— 
N.Y. State Jams 



Raspberry Jelly— 
Queen City, 
Compound 



Home Made Ap- 
ple Butter.. . 

Plum Preserves — 
Dragon 



Pure Apple Jelly 
— Lemon 



E. J. Dailey, 

Detroit 



Hulman & Co., 
Terre Haute 

Webster Preserv- 
ing Co., 
Webster, N.Y. 



J.Keller, . 

Cincinnati 



WilliamsBro.Co., 
Detroit 



WilliamsBro.Co 
Detroit 



WilliamsBro.Co 
Detroit 



Alexandria , 

Terre Haute. 

Martinsville 

Martinsville 

Vincennes . . 
Vincennes . . 
Vincennes . . 



Present. 



Present. 



Coal-tar 
dye . . . 



Pure. 



Properly 
labeled. 



Properly 
labeled. 



Properly 
labeled. 

Properly 
labeled. 

Pure. 



Pure. 



300 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS -LEGAL— Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Remarks. 



Currant Jelly— L. 
P.C 



Quince Jelly 

Cranberry Jelly. . 
Elderberry Jelly, 
Apple Butter 



Raspberry Jelly- 
Charm 



Raspberry Jelly — 
L.P.C 

Plum Preserves- 
Morning Dew ... 

Pure Currant .Jel- 
ly—Silver Jelly 

Mince Meat— 
Bessire & Co 



Plum Jelly 

Fruit Jelly- 
Plum Flavored 

Red Cherries .Jam 



Louisville Pre- 
serve Co., 

Louisville 

CruikshankBros. 

Allegheny, Pa. 
S. B. Powers, 

Dayton, 0. 
Cruikshank Bros. 

Allegheny, Pa. 



F. MacVeagh & 
Co., Chicago 

Louisville Pre- 
serving Co., 

Louisville 

American Gro. 
Co., Louisville 

Walsh. Boyle & 
Co., Chicago 

B.&Co.,Indpls.. 

W.D. Huffman, 
Indianapolis 

Williams Bros. 

Co., Detroit 

Reid, Murdock & 

Co., Chicago 



Evant^ville 



Irvington 

Indianapolis, 

Indianapolis, 
Indianapolis, 

Huntington.. 



Booneville. 
Salem 



Michigan Cty 
Indianapolis. 



Indianapolis. 

Columbus 

Indianapolis. 



Present 



Properly 
labeled. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Piire. 



Properly 
labeled. 



Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 



Properly 
labeled. 
Pure. 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS-ILLEGAL. 



51 


Red Currant Jel- 
ly— Genesee — 

Blackberry Pre- 
serves-Queen 
City 

Pure Peach Jam 
Royal Blue 

Apple Jelly— Mrs 


Batavia Preserve 

Co., Gene.'ee Co. 

New York 

J. Weller & Co., 
Cincinnati 

W. J.Quan&Co., 
Chicago 

W.D.Huffman, 
Indianapolis 

Reid. Murdock & 
Co., Chicago 

Blue Grass Can- 
ning Co., Uw 
ensboro, Ky — 

Cresi'ent Preserv- 
ing Co., Indpls. 

Champion Syrup 
Refining Co., 
Indianapolis 

Hulman Preserve 
Co., Terre Haute 










54 


Anderson — 

Elwood 

Elwood 


Present 

Present 
Present 




and salicylib 
acid present. 


69 






71 




Saccharine 


81 


Blackberry- 
Monarch ....... 

Apple Butter— 
Ky. Colonel .... 

Currant Jelly- 
Home Made — 

Pure Apple But- 




present; 
adulterated. 

Salicylic acid 
present; 
adulterated. 


91 


Ale.xandria . . 


Present 




136 


Coal-tar 
dye.... 

Coal-tar 
dye.... 


present; 
adulterated. 


142 


Brazil 


Present 


Apple stock; 
adulterated. 


145 


Currant Jelly- 
Buffalo 


Adulterated. 














Adulterated. 



301 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS-ILLE(JAL-Contim.od. 



u a 


Brand. 


Miiniil'acturcr. 


Where 
Collected. 


Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 


Color. 


Remarks. 


159 


Apple Butter- 
Belle Farm .... 

Raspberry Jelly 
Dauntless 

Strawberry Jam 
Rex 


St. Louis Syrup 
and Preserve 
Co., St. Louis 

Hulman Preserve 
Co., Terre Haute 

Hulman Preserve 
Co., Terre Haute 

Faulkner-Webb 
Co., Indpls 

Lamon-Gohl Syr. 
Co., Chicago.. .. 

Chicago Syr. and 
Refining Co., 
Chicago 

Ind. Wholesale 
Gro. Co., Indpls. 

Champion Syrup 
and Refining Co. 
Indianapolis 

Schrader <fe Co., 
Indianapolis 

Mrs. Stewart, 
Lawrencev'le 111. 

Kenwood Pre. Co. 
Chicago 

Hulman & Co., 
Terre Haute . . . 

W. D. Huffman, 
Indianapolis 

St. Louis Syr. and 
Pres_. Co., St. 


Brazil 

Terre Haute.. 

Terre Haute . 

Terre Haute.. 
Terre Haute.. 


Present 
Present 

Present 

Present 
Present 




Adulterated 


181 






241 




apple stock: 
adulterated. 




Plum Preserves.. 

Currant Jelly- 
Banquet 

Currant Jelly — 

Peach Butter— 
Buifet 


Apple stock 
present; 
adulterated. 


268 




269 






275 


Coal-tar 
dye.... 




282 


Martinsville.. 


Present 


Saccharine 
present; 
adulterated. 




Champion Black- 
berry Jelly 

B.&Co.'s Black- 
berry Pie Filling 

Home Made 
Plum Jelly 

Kenwood Rasp- 
berry Jelly 

Blackberry Flav. 
Fruit Jelly 

Apple Jelly — 
Delmonieo 

Blackberry Jam. 

Pure Quince 
Jelly-Blue La- 
bel 




284 




apple stock; 
adulterated. 

Wrongly la- 
beled; adul- 
terated. 

Saccharine; 
adulterated. 


318 
345 


Martinsville.. 


Present 


Coal-tar 
dye — 


475 


Washington.. 






present; 
adulterated. 

Wholly arti- 


1233 
1242 


Mt. Vernon.. 
Mt. Vernon.. 


Present 
Present 


Coal-tar 
dye.... 


ficial; adul- 
terated. 

Adulterated. 


1258 


Coal-tar 
dye ... 


present; 
adulterated. 


1288 


Curtis Bros. Co., 
Rochester 

E.Y.Dailey&Co., 
Detroit 

Huffman & Co- 
Indianapolis 

Huffman & Co., 
Indianapolis 

Dow & Snell Co., 
Toledo 


Evansville . . . 
Evansville. .. 

Huntington.. 

Huntington.. 


Present. 


Adulterated. 




Currant Jelly- 
Sugar and Fruit 

Plum Jelly— Mrs. 




1365 
1404 


Coal-tar 
dye . . . 


Adulterated. 




Raspberry Jelly.. 

Rlackberry Pre- 
serves- Tri- 
umph, Com- 
pound 




1405 
1422 


Present. 


Coal-tar 
dye ... 


present; 
adulterated. 

Saccharine 
present: 
adulterated. 






Wrongly 










labeled. 



302 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS— ILLEGAL— Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Remarks. 



1427 



1442 



1449 



1462 



1463 



1524 



1533 



1534 



1575 



1604 



1730 



1736 



1763 



3005 



3012 



3016 



Maraschino 
Cherries— Club 
House 



PeachJelly— Out- 
ing, Compound. 



Strawberry 
Jelly— (jrenesee 



Plum Jam — 
Home Made 



Apple Butter- 
(-rold Seal . 



PlumJelly-H.A 



Plum Jelly -Pre- 
mium, Adulter 
ated 



Apple Butter- 
Empire, Adul- 
terated 



Cherry P'serves- 
Veribest 



GrrapeJelly Ohio 
Valley 



Elderberry Jelly 
Cruikshank's 



Cherries, Crerae 
de Menthe — 
Choice Fruit. . 



Cherries. Creme 
de Menthe 



Pure Apple But- 
ter—New Eng- 
land 



Currant Jelly- 
Comet 



Cherries— In 
Creme de Violet 



Franklin Mac- 
Veagh & Co., 

Chicago 



Leroux Cider and 
Vinegar Co., 

Toledo 

Sprague, Warner 
& Co., Chicago 



St. Louis S.vr. and 
Refining Co., 

St Louis 



St Louis Syr. and 
Refining Co , 

St. Louis 
A. Holmes, 

Jeffersonville 



A. Holmes, 

JefiFersonville 

Louisville Pre- 
serving Co., 

Louisville 

E.Ottenheimer & 
Son, Louisville 

E. Ottenheimer& 
Son, Louisville 

Cruikshank Bros. 
Co., Allegheny, 
Pa 

Cincinnati Ext. 
Works, Cincin- 
nati 

Cincinnati Ext. 
Works, Cincin- 
nati 

E.E.Dailey&Co.. 
Detroit. 

Comet Preserving 
Co., Chicago... 

Cincinnati Ext. 
Co., Cincinnati. 



Huntington . 

Huntington. 
Huntington. 

Boonville ... 



Present. 



Present. 
Present. 



Coal-tiir 
dye ... 



Present 



Boonville Present, 

JeflFersonville 



.Jeffersonville 

Jeffersonville 
Jeffersonville 

New Albany. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 



Kokomo. 
Kokomo. 



Present. 



Present. 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye . . 



Coal-tar 
dye . . . 



Kokomo. 



Present. 



Present 



Present. 



Present 



Coal-tar 
dye . . . 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Adulterated. 



Adulterated. 



App.le stock; 
adulterated, 



Adulterated. 



Adulterated. 



Apple juice; 
adulterated. 



Apple juice; 
adulterated. 



Adulterated. 



Sacch9,rine; 
adulterated. 



Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 



303 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS-ILLECJAL-Continued. 



>> . 

h J-l 
o a> 

h a 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 


Color. 


Remarks. 


3163 


Strawberry Jam 
— Count 

Apple Butter 

Currant Jelly 


Cornet Preserv- 
ing Co., Chi- 
cago 

Hoosier Packing 
Co., Indianap- 
olis 

Hoosier Packing 


MichiganC'y. 
Indianapolis. 




Coal-tar 
dye . . 




3236 


. Present. 


Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 


3237 










Co.. Indianap- 
olis 






Coal-tar 
dye . . 








• 


Made from 
apple stock, 
salicylic 


3250 


Raspberry Jelly. 

Currant Jelly... 

Blackberry Pre- 
serves 

Jelly 


Elgin Dairy 

Elgin Dairy 

B.&Co., Indpls. 
B.&Co., Indpls. 


Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 




Coal-tar 
dye . . . 

Coal-tar 
dye ... 

Coal-tar 
dye . .. 

Coal-tar 
dye . . . 


acid pres- 
ent, adul- 
terated. 


3251 




Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 


3252 

8''61 


Present. 


Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 

Adulterated, 






Much free 
sulphuric 


3289 


Currant Jelly 
Queen City, 
Compound 

Orange Marma- 
lade, Superior . 

Strawberry Jelly 
— Champion, 
Compound 

Fruit Jelly- 
Compound, 
Currant Flavor 

Fruit Jelly- 
Compound, 
Crabapple Fla- 


J. Weller&Co.. 
Cincinnati 

Webster Preserv- 
ing Co., Web- 
ster, N. Y .... 

Champion Syrup 
Refining Co., 
Indianapolis.. . 

Webster Preserv- 
ing Co., Web- 
ster, N.Y 

Webster Preserv- 
ing Co , Web- 
ster, N.Y 

Fromhold Bros., 
Indianapolis 

B. & Co., Indpls.. 

Champion Syr. 
and Refin'gCo., 
Indianapolis. .. 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis. 
Columbus ... 




Coal-tar 
dye . . 


acid pres- 
ent, adul- 
terated. 


3290 


Present. 


Compound, 
adulterated 


3313 




Wrongly 


3321 
3322 


Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus . . 

Columbus... 
Columbus ... 


Present 
in large 
amount 

Present 
in large 
amount 

Present. 
Present. 




labeled, 
adulterated 










Raspberry Pre- 
serves— F.B.C. 

Raspberry Pie 
Filling -B. & 
Co.'s 

MinceMeat— Old- 
fashioned 




3351 






3374 
3100 


Coal-tar 
dye — 


present, 
adulterated. 

Adulterated. 
Salicylic acid 














present, 
adulterated. 



304 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 






3402 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Currant Jelly - 

NewYork state. 
Compound 



3403 Apple Butter- 
Pure 



3420 



3421 



342-2 



3423 



3434 



3435 



Raspberry Jelly- 
Buffet, Com- 
pound 



Webster Preserv- 
ing Co. Web- 
ster, N.Y 



Currant Jelly - 
Buttet 



StrawberryJelly 
—Buffet 



Strawberry Pie 
Filling-B. & 
Co.'s 



Champion Syr. 
and Kefin'gCo., 
indianSpolis 



Indiana Whole- 
sale (xro. Co., 
Indianapolis.. 



Indiana Whole- 
sale Gro. Co., 
Indianai>olis.. 



Indiana Whole- 
sale Uro. Co., 
Indianapolis. 



B.&Co., Indpls. 



Columbus. 



Columbus... 



Present. 



Present. 



Color. 



Remarks 



Coal-tar 

dye Saccharine 

present, 
adulterated. 



Columbus. 



Columbus 



Currant Jelly- 
Purity— Exwa- 
eo,C<impoun(l. 



Raspberry Jelly 
— Hurity-E.K- 
waco 



E.xley-Watkins 
Co., Wheeling, 
W. Va Columbus 



Columbus 



Columbus 



3436 Plum Jelly- 
Compound-Pu- 
rity— Exwaco . 



3437 



3446 



Exley-Watkins 
Co., Wheeling, 
W. Va 



Columbus.. 



Exley-Watkins 
Co., Wheeling, 
W.Va Columbus. 



Strawberry Jelly 
— Purity — Ex- 
waco, Com- 
pound 



Preserved 
Quinces — Lip- 
pincott 



Exley-Watkins 
Co., Wheeling, 
W.Va 



Lippincott&Cree 
Co., Cincinnati 



Columbus 



Columbus 



Present. 



Present. 



Coal-tar 
dye.. . 



Coal-tar 
dye... 



Coal-tar 
dye. 



Coal-tar 
dye... 



Coal-tar 
dye. 



Coal-tar 
dye — 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 



Wrongly la- 
beled, adul- 
terated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 



Adulterated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 



Present. Coal-tar 
dye.. 



Present, 



Present. 



Present, 



Coal-tar 
dye.. . 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated 

Adulterated. 



305 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS-II/LEGAL-Continued. 



o o 

Sa 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. Remarks. 



3447 



3448 



3462 

3547 



3552 



3553 



3595 



3641 



3646 



3647 



3648 



3654 



.3660 



Strawberiies— 
New York State 
Jams 



Strawberry Pre 
serves— Lippin- 
cott 



MarasohinoCher- 
riea 



Webster Prcerv- 
ing Co., Web- 
ster, N.Y 



Lippincott&Cree 
Co., Cincinnati. 



MaraschinoCher- 
ries 



Black Currant 
Jam 



Black Raspberry 
Preserves — Pur- 
ity ;.... 



Pineapple— Mon 
arch, Marasch- 



Red Raspberry 
Preserves - 
Banner Brand. 



Raspberry Jelly 
—Compound ... 



Blackberry Jelly 
—Queen City 



Raspberry .Jelly 
Champion 



Black Raspberry 
— Thelraa ... 



Strawberry Pre- 
serves — Es- 
waco , 



3664 Crabapple Jelly- 
Compound 



Cincinnati Ext. 
Co., Cincinnati. 



Austin. Nichols & 
Co., New York. 



Cruikshank Bros 
Co., Allegheny, 
Pa 



Reid, Murdock & 
Co., Chicago . 



Lamon-Gohl Syr, 
Co., Chicago 



Webster Preserv- 
ing Co , Web- 
ster, N. Y 



J. Weller Co., 

Cincinnati 



Champion Syr. 
and Refining 
Co., Indianapo 
lis 



Columbus , 

Columbus . 
Columbus . 



Franklin Mc- 
Veagh Co., Chi- 
cago 



Exley-Watkins 
Co., Wheeling, 
W. Va 



Webster Preserv- 
ing Co., Web- 
ster, N. Y 



Currant Jelly- 
Compound .. 



Webster Preserv- 
ing Co., Wheel- 
ing) W. Va 



Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis, 

Indianapolis 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 



Present, 



Present, 



Present 



Present 



Present, 



Present 



Present 



Present. 



Present 



Coal-tar 
dye .. 



Coal-tar 
dye .. 



Coal-tar 
dye . . 



Coal-tar 
dye .. 



Coal-tar 
dye . 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Adulterated. 

Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated 



Adulterated. 



Adulterated. 



Salicylic acid 
present, 
adulterated 



Adulterated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated 



Adulterated. 



Adulter.ated. 



Salicylic acid, 
adulterated 



Labels' do not 
agree, adul- 
terated. 



Saccharine 
present, 
adulterated 



Adulterated. 



20-Bd. of Health. 



306 



PRESERVED FRUITS, JELLIES AND JAMS— ILLEGAL-Continued. 



O (S 

u a 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 


Color. 


Remarks. 


3674 


Raspberry Pre- 
serves— 
Belmont 

Gooseberry Jam. 

Elderberry Jelly. 

Grape Jelly 

Apple Jelly 

Fruit Preserves- 
Niagara 

Grape Jelly- 
Compound .... 

Jelly 


Chicago Concen- 
trating Co., 

Chicago. 

Chas. Southwell 
&Co., London, 
England. 

Cruikshank Bros., 
Allegheny, Pa. 

Cruikshank Bros., 
Allegheny, Pa. 

CruikshankBros., 
Allegheny, Pa. 

John Boyle &Co., 
Baltimore, Md. 

Syrup Refining 
Co , Indianapolis 


Irvington 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 


Present. 






3764 




present, 
adulterated. 


3768 


Present. 
Present. 
Present. 

Present. 




present, 
adulterated. 


3769 






3770 






4025 
4026 


Coal-tar 
dye. .. 

Coal-tar 
dye. .. 

Coal-iar 
dye... 


Adulterated. 


4n''8 






Improperly 
labeled, 
adulterated. 












Salicylic acid, 
adulterated. 



PRESERVED FRUITS PUT UP IN TIN PACKAGE. 

We have examined 13 samples of fruits, blackberries, straw- 
berries, etc., put up in tin. All' of the samples were pure, con- 
taining neither coloring matter or added preservatives. The 
difference in character between goods put up in glass and those 
put up in tin is very apparent. 

CANNED FRUITS, CHERRIES-LEGAL. 



o eo 

11 

t-5 


Brand. 


Manufacturer 
or Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


"3 a 

J, a 


«3 

1! 

CO 


Color. 


3 P. 
Oh 


> • 

si 

Ph 


1747 


Pitted 


Curtice Bros. & Co., 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Raid, Murdock & 

Co., Chicago 

Fort-Stanwix Co., 

Rome. N.Y. 
Corbin Sons & Co., 
Chicago. 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Irvington 

Irvington — 


699 
593 
636 

705 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


Natural. 
Natural. 
Natural. 
Natural. 


45 
37 
33 
33 




3585 
3687 
3688 


White Horse 

Algonquin 

White Seal 


None. 
None. 

None. 
None. 



BLACKBERRIES LEGAL. 



297 
1759 



Fredonia Beauty. 
Jumbo 



Fredonia Packing 
Co., Fredonia, N.Y. Martinsville . 
Miller Bros. <fe Co., 

Baltimore. Indianapolis. 



691 
549 



0.0 
0.0 



Natural. 

Natural. 



None. 

None. 



307 



MISCELLANEOUS CANNED FRUITS-LEGAL. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer 
or Retailer. 







u 














Where 


a s. 


.^J 


Collected. 


V'- 


•^ u 




!jvj 


OPh 




D- 


CO 



Color. 



1740 

1741 

3627 
3679 

3686 



Jones' Favorite 
Apple Sauce. .. 

Table Preserves, 
strawberries. . . 

Strawberries 



Monogram Apri- 
cots 



Hartland Fancy 
Yellow Peaches 



W. N. Clark & Co., 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Curtice Bros., 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Miller Bros. & Co., 

Baltimore, Md. 

J. C. Perry & Co., 

Indianapolis. 

Corbin Sons & Co., 

Chicago. 



idianapolis. 


66.8 


0.0 


idianapolis. 


40.0 


0.0 


idianapolis. 


76.0 


0.0 


vington — 


51.0 


0.0 


vington — 


32.0 


0.0 



Natural, 
Natural 



None. 

None. 
None. 

None. 

None. 



BLACK RASPBERRIES-LEGAL. 



o tv 

s ^ 
1^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer 
or Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 




it 


Color. 


C ft 
a, g 

a >- 

Sec 
a, 




35P? 




Reid, Murdock & 
^ Co., Chicago, 111. 
Kidwell Bros. & 
Co., Baltimore... 


Indianapolis. 
Irvington 


632 
538 


0.0 
0.0 


Natural. 
Natural. 


32 
50 




3711 


American 


None. 
None. 



CANNED GOODS. VEGETABLES. 

One of the leading staples of the modem grocery store and an 
essential of every well-stocked larder is an assortment of canned 
vegetables. These goods are put np in tin and sterilized by heat 
and will keep indefinitely in any climate, thus providing the 
table with apparently fresh vegetables when they are long out of 
season or can not be obtained. Of the 20 samples of sweet com 
analyzed, 15 were pure, free from preservatives, saccharin or 
bleach. Four contained saccharin and one sample was a field 
corn boiled until soft and mixed with com meal gruel. It was 
solid in the can and possessed none of the qualities of a sweet corn. 

Canners and packers are accustomed to regulate the value of 
their output by increasing or diminishing the quantity of water 
in which the goods are packed. The least quantity of water found 
was 61 per cent, and the largest amount 82.6 per cent. That is, 
the first sample contained 39 per cent, of solid matter, the second 
17.4 per cent, or less than one-half as much. The weight of the 
contents of the cans varied from 567 to 616 grams. 



308 



Of the ten samples of canned peas examined five were pnre 
and five adulterated. One sample was a "soaked" pea, that is, 
made by swelling np dried peas and' canning them as fresh, 
thongh it is obvions that goods so packed lack the fresh, succulent 
flavor which makes the vegetable desirable. 

Tour samples contained saccharin. Some years ago saccharin 
was extensively used by packers, but at present no up-to-date 
house relies on this coal tar sweetener as a substitute for sugar. 
ISTone of the peas were colored with salts of co]:)per. The use of 
copper in greening vegetables is not an /Vmerican trick and most 
of the goods so colored are of French origin. 

All of the canned tomatoes were pure, free from added color 
and preservative. 

Two of the three baked beans were pure. One contained 
saccharin. The same ratio of adulteration was found in the 
canned beans, one sanijde of which was sweetened with saccharin. 

Four of the six samples of mushrooms were illegal, two because 
of the presence of sulphurous acid, one because it was sour and 
one sample consisted of pieces and stems. 

Two of the five samples of asparagus contained small quanti- 
ties of sulphurous acid. 

CANNED GOODS-SWEET CORN-LEGAL. 






Brand. 



Manufacturer or 
Wholesaler. 



Where 
CoUected. 



o ° o 



:^6c5 



0) c 



§5 



•o2 



dz; a 



1722 

1716 

3241 

3253 
3273 

3291 

3297 
3596 

3638 



'Hindi", 



'Betty's Hulled 
Green" 



'Empire". 



'Swain's Best" 
'Logan Elm". 



'Summer Gar- 
den" 



'HoHy" 

'Cording's 
Choice" ... 



'Delicious" 



The Wayneville 
Can Co. .Wayne- 
ville, 

A.E.Betty Can 
Co., Dayton, . 

Winters & 

Propliet,Mt. Mor- 
ris, N.Y 

C. W. Swain Can 
Co.,Salina, 0.. 

Scioto Canning 
Co., Circleville, 
Ohio 

Chambers Can 
Co., Lewis- 
creek. Ind 

Walsh-Boyle Co., 
Chicago. 

Coal Creek Can 
Co., Wingate, 
Ind 

Chambers Can 
Co., Lewis 
Creek, Ind 



Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



552 




605 


61.0 


580 


81.8 


585 


76.4 


622 


75.8 


602 


82.6 


575 


78.0 


580 


77.8 


602 


81.0 



0.0 

0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 
0.0 



12.0 

16.0 

15.6 
20.0 

13.2 

15.0 
13.2 

12.0 
12.8 



309 



CANNED GOODS -SWEET CORN-LEG AL-Continuerl. 



t. 5 
o s 


Brand. 


Manufaeturer or 


Where 


fCon- 

sof 

in 


u 

V 






> 


Wholesaler. 


Collected. 


°CdS 


o o 


T^.S. 


^ ''ts ^ 




-^zi 








-"5'j 


.«o 


ri.'^ 


'o t^l^ c 


a).- 


ij 








fi- 


m 


< 


CU 


3639 


"El Mar" 


Brinktneyer, 
Kuhn & l!o., In- 


















dianapolis 


Indianapolis. 


578 


76.2 


0.0 


12.8 




3667 


"Silver Dollar" . 


Silver Creek Pre 
serv. Co., Silver 


















Creek, N.Y. ... 


Indianapolis. 


567 


74.0 


0.0 


13.6 




3681 


"Emerald" 


Portland Pack- 
ing Co., Port- 


















land, Me 


Irvington — 


589 


79.1 


0.0 


12.0 




3682 




(xrafton Johnson 
Co. (Greenwood. 


Irvington 


584 


78.6 


0.0 


14.0 










3690 


"Algonquin" 


Ft. Stan wis Can 


















Co.,Rome,N.Y. 


Irvington — 


566 


80.6 


0.0 


8.0 




1726 


"Winore Ker- 




















Winore Can Co., 
Dayton, 


Indianapolis. 


616 


71.5 


0.0 


24.0 











CANNED GOODS-SWEET CORN-ILLEGAL. 



1751 


"Premier" 


Francis. Legeetl 
& Co., New York 


Indianapolis. 


597 


79.1 


0.0 


12.0 


Sac- 
cha- 
rin. 


3588 


"Wish Bone"... 


J. F. Humphreys 
Co., Blooming- 
ton, ill 


Indianapolis. 


586 


78.1 


0.0 




Sac- 






cha- 


















rin. 


3626 


"Holly" 


Walsh, Boyle k 
Co., Chicago — 


Indianapolis. 


579 


72.8 


0.0 


15.6 








Sac- 
cha- 


















rin. 


3708 




Grafton Johnson, 
Greenwood, Ind. 


Irvington ;... 


609 


79.2 


1.3 










Sac- 
cha- 


















rin. 


3254 


"■■'Cook's Delight.. 


WarrensburgCan 
Co., Warrens- 
burg, 111 


Indianapolis. 


566 


79.9 


0.0 


2.8 


Not a 
sweet 
corn. 



'■'Made from field corn and corn meal. 



CANNED PEAS-LEGAL. 



>> . 

o <o 

11 

1-^ 


Brand, 


Manufacturer or 
Retailer. 


Where 

Collected. 




si 


6°- 
xn 


o 

S a . 
= S J! 

5^^ 






3294 


Noble 

SHver 

Dollar . 
YalePride 

PettipOwn 
Polk's 
Best.... 


Yale Canning Co. 
Yale, Mich. 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Irvington 


45 
36 

42 

45 

34 


601 

616 

569 
601 

581 


0.0 

0.0 

0.0 
0.0 

0.0 


17.6 

21.6 

20.4 
16.8 

15.2 






3295 






3296 


Yale Canning Co. 

Yale, Mich. 

Indianapolis 

J. T.Polk Co., 
Greenwood, Ind. 




Hard. 


3589 






3689 













310 



CANNED PEAS-ILLEGAL. 





































^o 






U tH 














cSr-l 






o o 














^^,n 


cS 




^^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer or 


Where 


c 




a-^ 




u 


II 


Retailer. 


Collected, o^, 


S'S , 


o ft 


Ao5 




a 


-q 






Oi 


■" 


M 


o 


Cn 


rt 


3274 


Standard. 


Martinsvillenan- 
ning Co., Mar 




















tinsvilJe 


Indianapolis 


44 


594 


0.0 


12.0 


Saccharin 




?.-m 


Calumet.. 


Assan Baine Co., 






















Indianapolis 


47 


575 


0.0 


9.6 






















Peas. 


3623 


Little 
Hoosier. 


J. C. Perry & Co., 




















Indianapolis. 


Indianapolis 


bU 


598 


0.0 


8.0 


Saccharin 




3625 


Silver 
Dollar 


Silver Creek Pre- 
serve Co., Chau- 




















tauqua, N. Y... 


Indianapolis 


47 


600 


0.0 


11.2 


Saccharin 




3709 


Bay View, 
Early 
June.. .. 


Bay View Can Co 




















Huron, N.Y. 


Irvington.... 


13 


595 


0.0 


24.0 


Saccharin 


Rotten 



CANNED GOODS-TOMATOES-LEGAL. 



O 4> 

1-5 


Brand. 


Manufacturer or 
Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


a . 

O m 

"a 


PM 




Color. 


> • 
(In 


3235 
3272 
3292 


Buffet.... 
Standard. 
Cadet 


W.T.Bacon Co., 

Indianapolis. 
Martinsville Canning Co., 

Martinsville, Ind. 
J. C.Perry & Co., 

Indianapolis. 


Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 


952 
967 
947 


94.2 
94.8 
93.6 


0.0 
0.0 
0.0 


Nat'ral 
Nat'ral 
Nat'ral 


None. 
None. 
None. 



CANNED GOODS-BAKED BEANS-LEGAL. 



>> . 

t- a 


Brand. 


Manufacturer or Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Preservatives. 


1758 
3680 


Phoenix ScbnuU & Co., Indianapolis — 

Polk's Best J. T. Polk, Greenwood. Ind 


Indianapolis 

Irvington 


None. 
None. 



CANNED GOODS-BAKED BEANS - ILLEGAL. 



3624 



May Day. 



Greenwood Packing Co., 

Greenwood, Ind. 



Indianapolis. 



Contains Sac- 
charin. 



311 



CANNED BEANS-LEGAL. 



Brand. 



Golden Wax. 



Manufacturer or 
Retailer. 



Curtice Bros., 

Rochester N. Y. 
John Fisher <fe Co., 

Baltimore, Md. 



Where 
Collected. 



Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



o9. 



6^ 



559 
573 






^3 



0.0 
0.0 



13.2 
36.0 



CANNED BEANS-ILLEGAL. 



Monarch. 



Indianapolis. 



23 530 



0.0 



10.4 



Sac- 
char- 



CANNED GOODS, MUSHROOMS-LEGAL. 



o <0 














u a 
o s 


Brand. 


Manufacturer or 


Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


1^ 


Remarks. 
















4450 


Champignons, 


N. Y. Store 




n 


Legal. 


4451 


Champignons, 
Bland's Extra. 


N.Y. Store 


Indianapolis... 












CANNED GOODS, MUSHROOMS-ILLEGAL 





Brand. 


Manufacturer or Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


XJl 


Remarks. 


3760 




Louis Freres & Co., France 


Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 


80.6 

14.8 








3761 




fiteS; Corroded top. 


3785 
4449 




RodierFils&Co.. 

Bordeaux 
Vallet & Co., 

Bordeaux, France 


Corroded top. Sour. 
Pieces and stems. 



CANNED GOODS, ASPARAGUS-LEGAL. 



o © 


Brand. 


Manufacturer or Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


1^ 

. * 

I! 

CO 


1738 


Ceres 

C.C. C 

Phoenix 


M.C.Shea&Co 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Irvington 





3628 
3691 


Courtland Canning Co., San Francisco, Cal 


0.0 












CANNED GO JDS, ASPARAGUS-ILLEGAL. 



Signature 



Hickmott Asparagus Canning Co., 

Bouldin Island, Cal, 
Corvilles Pk. Co., San Francisco, Cal 



Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



5.10 
7.70 



312 

SPICES. 

At tlie time of the opening of the Lahoratorj, if the statements 
of wholesalers in spices are to be believed, the Indiana public did 
not know the character of pure spices, and was only content when 
supplied with imitation goods which contained so much starch, 
ground cocoanut shells and sawdust that the most susceptible 
palate would not respond unless tempted with teaspoonful doses. 

We were informed that if pure, full strength goods were sold, 
the consumer would return them because their strong characteristic 
flavor excited his suspicions. 

The results of the examination of 248 samples of spices .cor- 
roborated in a measure this statement of the trade. 

In the January Bulletin of this year we said : 

"Of 68 samples of ground cloves purchased from drug stores 
22, or 32.4 per cent., were adulterated by reason of added cocoa- 
nut shell's, dirt, etc., while of .52 samples collected from grocery 
stores 25, or 48.1 per cent., were impure. 

"One sample of ground cloves consisted of wheat starch, cayenne 
pepper and a small amount of cloves, and other samples were al- 
most entirely cocoanut shells. 

"Twenty-three samples of ground mustard were examined and 
seven proved to be grossly adulterated with wheat or corn starch 
colored with turmeric. 

"Seven samples of capsicum, or cayenne pepper, out of 22 ex- 
amined were adulterated. 

"But the pepper samples were most heavily adulterated and of 
84 samples analyzed 47, or 55.0 per cent., were impure. 

"Ground olive stones are evidently the chief adulterant, al- 
though the various starches are much used. Some samples con- 
tained ground olive stones, wheat and buckwheat flour, together 
with a small percentage of pepper." 

Our analyses of spices collected the summer "following the open- 
ing of the Laboratory showed a very, great difference in the qual- 
ity of the spices sold ; but six of 52 black peppers and one of 35 
cloves were impure. This remarkable improvement is due to the 
position taken by the wholesalers and spice grinders of Indiana, 
who since the publication of our first analyses have refused to 
handle other than pure goods. Their repeated statement that the 



313 



spice business has never been better than during the last year 
is a sufficient denial of their former argument that pure spices 
were not in demand by their customers. 

It is only fair to the manufacturers to say that the analyses fol- 
lowing were made on old goods, probably put in stock by the re- 
tailer before the pure food law went into actual effect. 

BLACK PEPPER-LEGAL. 



Brand. 



Matiufaeturer. 



Where Collected. 



Remarks. 



Strictly Pure 

Sterling , 

Dove 

Monarch 

St. George 

Dove 

T.&T 

Pure 

Mall 

Dove 

Pure 

Pure 

Strictly Pure. 

Pure 

Mi-Go 

Pure Spice. . 

St. George.. . . 

Newton's 

Pure 

Golden Rod.. 

Premier 

Golden Rod. . 
Pure 



Thompson & Taylor, 

Chicago, 111. 

Jos. Strong, Terre Haute 

Frank Tea and Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Reid, Murdock & Co., 

Chicago, 111. 
Bought of J S. Modison. 
Bought of Chickasaw 

Pharmacy 

Bought of R. E.Clark... 
Bought of Butterbough 

&Co.... 

Louis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Evansville 
Frank Tea and Spice Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Thompson & Taylor 

Spice Co., Chicago, 111. 
Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Bought of Meyer Bros. & 



Frank Tea and Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 

Frank Tea and Spice Co , 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Frank Tea and Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Hulman <fe Co.. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Sherman Bros. Co., 

Chicago, 111. 

Meyer Bros. Coffee and! 

Spice Co., St. Louis, Mo. I 

Woolson Spice Co i 

Lafayette Gro. Co., 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Meyer Bros. Coffee and 

Spice Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Frank Tea and Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Lewis Seitz Gro. Co.. 

Evansville, Ind. 
Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Evansville, Ind. 
Newton Tea and Spice 

Co., Cincinnati, 

Woolson Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 
Ullmann, Dreifus & Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Woolson Spice Co., 

Toledo. 0. 

Francis H. Legeett & Co., 

New York 

Ullmann, Dreifus & Co , 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Woolson Spice Co., 

Toledo, 0., 



Martinsville . ... 
Vineennes 

Vincennes 

AVashington 

Terre Haute . . .. 

Peru 

Wabash 

AVabash 

Oakland City.... 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Ft. Wayne 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Huntington 

Boonville 

Boonville 

Boonville 

Boonville 

Jeffersonville. . . 

Jeffersonville ... 

Jeffersonville ... 

New Albany 

New Albany 

Salem 

Salem 



Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 



314 



BLACK PEPPER— LEGAL-Continued. 



o a> 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where Collected. 


Remarks. 


2935 


Ed. Haas' Choice 
Table Pepper .. 


F. Widlar&Co., 

Cleveland, 0. 

M.W.Edmond 

Thompson & Taylor, 

Chicago, 111. 






■)9qfi 


Delphi 


Pure. 


3157 
3350 


Michigan City.. . . 

Columbus 

Columbus 


Pure. 
Pure. 


3371 


Knight & McLain .... 


Pure. 



BLACK PEPPER-ILLEGAL. 



Nickel. 



Ceylon 

India MilIs)Com- 
pound) 



Dove . 



Strictly Pure .. 
Pure Brunings. 

High Grade — 



India Mills (com- 
pound) 



Geiger-Tinney Co., 

Lafayette, Ind. 

Frank Teaand Spicepo., 
Cincinnati, 0. 

Jos. Strong & Co., 

Terre Haute 

B. Bierhause & Sons, 

Vincennes 

Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 

Bement Seitz, 

Evansvil'le,Ind. 

J. F. Bruning & Co., 

Evansville 

Gillett, Chicago 



Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Evansville 

Parson & Scoville, 

Evansville 

Jno.N. Bey & Co., 

Vincennes 

Frank Tea and Spice Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 

Karn & Co., Evansville . 

Woolson Spice Co 



J. P. Bruning & Son, 

Evansville 



J. P. Dieter & Co., 



Chicago 



A. Holmes, 

Jeflfersonville 

Louisville Spice Co., 

Louisville, Ky. 

A.Kahn, Louisville, Ky. 



Englehart & Co.. 

Louisville, Ky. 



Martinsville , 
Martinsville , 
Washington.. 
Washington . 
Washington.. 
Oakland 



Oakland . . 
Princeton 

Princeton . 
Princeton . 
Princeton. 



Mt. Vernon 
Evansville . 
Evansville . 

Evansville. 



Huntington ... 
Huntingburg , 

Jeffersonville . 

Jeffersonville . 
Jeffersonville 

Nevp Albany . . 



Adulterated with for- 
eign starch and olive 
stones. 

Adulterated with 
buckwheat. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with 
wheat flour. 

Adulterated with 
buckwheat. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 

Adulterated with 
wheat flour and 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with 
wheat starch. 

Adulterated with 
wheat flour. 

Total ash, 7%; insol- 
uble ash 92%. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 

Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 

Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 

Adulterated with 
wheat flour and 
ground olive st(?nes. 

Adulterated with 
wheat flour and 
buckwheat flour. 



315 



BLACK PEPPER-ILLEGAL- Continued. 






Brand. 



Manufacturer 



Where Collected. 



Remarks. 



1667 
1680 

1690 

1707 
1714 

2908 

2985 

2993 
3010 
3057 
3116 

3148 

3309 
3359 
3374 
3377 
3378 
3407 

3128 

3441 

3561 
3637 

3724 



Standard. 



Singapore. 



Anchor 



Reed's 



Standard Spice Mills, 

St. Louis, Mo 

Cabell, Banye <t Co., 

Louisville, Ky 



Ullman-Dreifus Co., 

Cincinnati, 

Bought of Williams Bros 

S. P. Dieter Co., 

Chicago, Til 

Bought of H.J. Iluder.. 



Thompson & Taylor Co. 
Chicago, 111 



Richmond Extract Co., 
Richmond 

F. P. Wilt & Co., 

Ft. Wayne 

Thompson-Taylor Co., 

Chicago 



Steele-Wedeler, 

Chicago, 111 



Bought of Court House 
Grocery Co 



Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Reed, Henderson &_Co., 
Chicago 

Grocers' Supply Co., 

Indianapolis 

Bought of J. B. Cook & 
Son 



Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 



Bought of Jose Newson 
& rfon 



J. C. Perry and Co., 

Indianapolis 

Bought of A. Bushman.. 

Wixon & Co.. 

Chicago, III. 

Bought of Court House 
Grocery 



Salem — Adulterated with 

wheat starch. 



Salem Adulterated with 

buckwheat and 
ground olive stones. 



Salem Adulterated with 

wheat flour. 

Salem Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 



Kokomo Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 

Indianapolis. .. Adulterated Total 
ach, 6.19%; insolu- 
ble ash, 2.21%. 

Kokomo I Adul erated with 

corn starch and 
ground olive stones. 

Kokomo Adulterated with 

wheat starch and 
ground olive stones. 



Kokomo 

Ft. Wayne 

South Bend . . 

Michiean City 



Indianapolis Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 



Columbus Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 



Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated. _ Total 
ash, 6.97%; insolu- 
ble ash, .66%. 

Adulterated with 
shells and wheat 
starch. 



Columbus Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 



Columbus Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 



Columbus Adulterated with for- 
eign starch. 



Columbus Adulterated. Total 

ash, 6.94%: insolu- 
ash,.80%. 



Columbns Adulterated with 

wheat starch and 
ground olive .stones. 



Columbus Adulterated with 

corn starch. 

Indianapolis Adulterated with 

wheat flour. 



Indianapolis Adulterated with 

ground olive stones. 

Indianapolis ' Adulterated with 

I ground olive stones. 



316 



BLACK PEPPBR-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



o o 

9, ^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where Collected. 


Remarks. 


3728 

3751 
3833 


Good 

Finest Quality. .. 


Bought of Court House 
Grocery 

J. B. Bright & Son 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis. ... 
Bloomington 


Adulterated with 
wheat starch and 
ground olive stones. 

Adulterated. Total 
ash, 7.11%; insol- 
uble ash, ]. 01%. 

Adulterated with 








wheat and buck- 
wheat flour and 
ground olive stones. 



GROUND MUSTARD-LEGAL. 



1147 




Parson & Seoville, 

Evansville 
Frank Tea and Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 

Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Dwinell-Wright Co., 

Boston 
E.Widlar&Co.. 

Cleveland 

H.J.Tooley 

C.C. Scheldt 

John Vorwald 

Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 
Nixon & Co., Chicago ... 
Kothe, Wells <fe Bauer, 

City 
H.I. Quick 

E.J. Gillies &Co.. N. Y. 
Pettis Dry Goods Co..... 
W.B. Bright & Son 


Oakland City 

Princeton 

Booneville 




117fi 




Pure. 


1496 
1705 


St. George 

Royal 

Globe 


Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 


2997 






SS19 


Columbu,s 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus . 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


Pure. 


3323 




Pure. 


SSfil 




Pure. 


H4in 






3432 




Pure. 
Pure. 


3452 






347-' 




Pure. 
Pure. 


3479 


Gillies Spice 
Mills 


Pure. 


3738 
.3749 


Finest Quality... 


Pure. 
Pure. 



GROUND MUSTARD-ILLEGAL. 



298 
637 

1482 
3367 
3388 

3392 
.3727 



Our Special 



Payne & Clarkson 

Frank Tea and Spice Co , 
Cincinnati 

E. W. Gillette. Chicago.. 

Knight & McLain 

J.B. Cook&Son 



Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 

Court House Grocery — 



Martinsville 

Evansville . . 

Boonville 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus ... 
Indianapolis 



Adulterated with 
wheat starch. 

Adulterated with 

wheat starch. 
Adulterated with 

corn starch. 
Adulterated with 

foreign starch. 
Adulterated with 

wheat starch and 

colored with 

turmeric. 

Adulterated with 
wheat starch. 

Adulterated with 
corn starch. 



317 



CAYENNE PEPPER— LEGAL. 



si 
II 

1^ 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where Collected. 


Remarks. 




4?1 




Jos. Strong <fe Co., 

Terre Haute. 
Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute. 
Bought of Geo. L. Hoehn 
Dwindell & Wright, 

Boston, Ma"s. 
Meyer Bros. Coffee and 
Spice Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
R.J.Thornton, 

Louisville, Ky. 
Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 
Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati, 0. 
Bennett, Simpson & Co., 

London, Eng. 
Bought of Pettis Dry 


Washington 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Huntington 

Boonville 

Jeffersonville — 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Indianapolis 

Bloomington 

Wabash 


Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 




1?f?7 


H. & Co 




1267 






U"!? 






1479 
1f>44 


Meyer Bros. Pure 




S^<^1 






34fit 






3478 
3739 


African 




3836 


SchnuU & Co 




1210 








1022 




Meyer Bros. & Co 

Summer's Pharmacy 

J. D. Bartlett 


Ft. Wayne 

Hammond 

Lafayette 




^173 






2354 















CAYENNE PEPPER-ILLEGAL. 



o <s 

si 

a 

1-5 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


-a' 
■< 

3 

o 
H 


3 ■ 

B 


Remarks. 


3305 


Bought of Court 

House Grocery Co.. 
S Herr 








Adulterated with wheat starch. 


504 








Adulfer'd with much foreign starch. 


601 


G.W.J. Hoffman.... 

A. G.Troutman 

Houseworth Bros ... 
Court House Grocery. 
Jno. N. Bey & Co., 

Vincennes. 








Adulter'd with much foreign starch. 


834 


Oakland City. 
Elkhart...... 






Adulter'd with much foreign starch. 


1863 
3726 


10.55' 


2.03 


Adulterated. 

Heavily adulter'd with wheatstarch. 


438 








Heavily adulter'd with wheat Hour. 













ALLSPICE-LEGAL. 





Brand. 


Manufacturer or Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


38t» 




Frank Tea & Spice Co., Cincinnati, 

Reed, Murdock & Co., Chicago, 111 

Butterbaugh & Co., VVabash, Ind 


Vincennes. 


477 




Washington. 


1067 




AVabash. 


1197 






Ft. Wayne. 


1250 


Pure 


Frank Tea & Spice Co., Cincinnati, 

Frank Tea A' Spice Co.. Cincinnati, 


Mt. Vernon. 


1257 
1276 


Dove 


Mt. Vernon. 
Mt. Vernon. 


1361 
1389 
1480 
1485 


Pure 

Perfect 

Meyer Bros. Pure Spice 




Evansville. 


A H Perfect & (^0 


Huntington. 


Meyer Bros. Coffee & Spice Co.. St Louis, Mo. 
Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., Evansville, Ind 


Boonville. 
Boonville. 



318 

ALLSPICB-LEGAL-Continued. 



Brand. 



Manufacturer or Recailer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Pure. 



Pure 

Golden Rod 

Pure ■ ■ ■ 

Pimem'o Royal. 



Triumph. 



Quaker 

Finest Quality. 



Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., Evansville, Ind 

R. J. Thornton, Louisville, Ky 

R. J. Thornton, Louisville, Ky 

VVooIson Spice Co., Toledo, 

Ullmann, JJreifus & Co., Cincinnati, 0. . . . 

R. J. Thornton & Co., Louisville, Ky 

Dwinell-\Vright Co., Boston, Mass 

F. W. Meissner, Laporte, Ind.. 

Wells-Yeager-Best Co., Lafayette, Ind. . . 

Thompson & Taylor Co., Chicago, 111 

F. Widlar & Co., Cleveland, 

F. Widlar & Co., Cleveland, . . . 
Grocers' Supply Co., Indianapolis, Ind . 

F. P. Wilt & Co., Ft. Wayne, Ind 

Thompson & Taylor Co., Chicago, 111 

Durand & Kasper,Chicago,in 

Thompson & Taylor Co., Chicago, 111 

Court House Gro. Co., Indianapolis, Ind. . 

CC. Scheldt, Columbus, Ind 

E.J. Gillies & Co., New York 

Heekin Spice Co., Cincinnati, 

Nixon & Co., Chicago, 111 

Schnull & Co., Indianapolis, Ind 

Kothe, Wells & Bauer, Indianapolis, Ind 

Pettis D. G. Co., Indianapolis, Ind 

J. B. Bright & Son, Indianapolis, Ind. . . . 
Schnull & Co., Indianapolis, Ind 



Boonville. 
Jeffersonville. 
Jeffersonville. 
Jeffersonville. 
•feffersonville. 
New Albany. 
Kokomo. 
Laporte. 
! Lafayette. 
Kokomo 
Kokomo. 
Kokomo. 
Kokomo. 
Ft. Wayne. 
So. Bend. 
Michigan City. 
Michigan City. 
Indianapolis. 
Indiannpolis. 
Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Bloomington. 



ALLSPICE-ILLEGAL 



12.36 
1302 


Pure 


F. C. Dietz, Mt. Vernon, Ind 

Sherman Bros, it Co., Chicago, 111 

Hulman & Co., lerre Haute, Ind 


Mt. Vernon. 

Evansville. 

Huntingburg. 


v^^ 






3317 








3472 




H.J. Fooley, Columbus, Ind 


Columbus. 



GINGER-LEGAL. 




D. & H. Rosebaum 

Housworth Bros 

Myers Drug Store 

0. C. Boston 

Summers Pharmacy. . 

W. C. Letherman 

G.W.Hoffmann 

Rogan Bros 

J.D. Bartlett 

Cassell Bros 

Buck & Brickley. 

Physicians Drug Store 

W. H.Bireley 

City Drug Store 

E. D. Robinson 

J. H. Green 

F. H. Gerhart 

S. Rosenthal 

L. T. Harker 

B.H.Wilson 



Mt. Vernon. 

Elkhart. 

South Bend. 

South Bend. 

Hammond. 

Valparaiso 

Logansport. 

Lafayette. 

Lafayette. 

Anderson. 

Anderson. 

Muncie. 

Alexandria. 

Alexandria. 

Alexandria. 

Elwood. 

Kokomo. 

Tipton. 

Tipton. 

Indianapolis. 



319 



GINGER -LEGAL-Continued. 



>> . 

o o 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



3507 
992 
1128 
1840 
1896 
1910 
1939 
1993 
2023 
2054 
2142 
2185 
2366 
2534 
2676 
2821 
2980 
3491 
3511 
3899 
3932 



C.L.Mitchell 

Blue Drug Store 

J. C. Hutzell 

H. M. Phillips 

F. J . Goldman 

Leonard & Bentz 

0. J. Beeson 

A. Coonley X' Co 

R. P.Milton 

J. M.Callender 

J.W. Weis 

Corner Drug Store 

Wells- Yeager-Best Co. .. 

Shaw & Jackson 

Jay Bros 

H. Mehlig 

Navin's Pharmacy No. 1 

^rank B. Ross 

A.N.Truitt 

B. Doolittle 

Doherty's Drug Store . .. 



Noblesville. 

Peru. 

Ft. Wayne. 

Auburn. 

Elkhart. 

Elkhart. 

Goshen. 

South Bend. 

vSouth Bend. 

Laporte. 

Hammond. 

Valparaiso. 

Lafayette. 

Muncie. 

Kokomo. 

Tipton. 

Indianapolis. 

Noblesville. 

Noblesville 

Jeifersonville. 

Jeffersonville. 



GINGER-ILLEGAL. 



2854 W.M.Birk-.. 
2893 Chas. D. Knoefel 



Indianapolis 
New Albany 



Adulterated with 
ground olive stones. 



GROUND CLOVES-LEGAL. 
Collected from Drug Stores. 



ii 


Brand. 


Druggists. 


Where 
Collected. 




H 


m 


Remarks. 


577 




J. S. Madison 

Baur 

H. J. Werker 


Terre ITaute.. 
Terre Haute.. 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . .. 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes ... 
Evansvillr- .. . 
Mt. Vernon.. 


5'7i' 


0'32' 


Pure. 


615 
653 




Pure. 
Pure. 


669 


W. C.Watjen 

R. G. Moore 

C.S.Miller 

Meek & Albers 

Dawson & Boyce 

Porter The Druggist ... 

Butterbaugh & Co 

H. G. Sommers — 

Meyer Bros, cfe Co 


Pure. 


684 

702 
883 




Pure. 
Pure 
Pure. 


932 
975 




Pure. 


1065 


Wabash 

Ft. Wayne ... 
Ft. Wayne . . . 

Auburn 

Elkhart.. . 
South Bend.. 
South Bend.. 

Laporte 

Laporte 


.;::: 






Pure. 


1195 




Pure. 


1211 




Pure. 


1813 




Pure. 


1909 
1964 
1997 


Leonard & Bentz 

Public Drug Store 

C. Coonley & Co 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


2fm 

2028 
2056 




D.C.Peters 

F. W. Meisner 

T H. Boyd&Co 

E. W. Lindemann 

J.W. Weis 

M.Kolb 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


2105 
2141 
2" 56 


Michigan City 
Hammond ... 
Hammond . .. 
Logansport.. . 
Logansport.. . 

Delphi 

Lafayette — 









Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


2240 
2281 
2294 
2334 


Ben Fisher 

Red Cross Pharmacy... 
M.W.Edmonds 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


2426 


J B. Wehrle 




Pure. 


2440 


City Drug Store 








Pure. 


2467 




Buck & Brickley 


Anderson — 






Pure. 



320 



GROUND CLOVES-LEGAL-Continued. 
Collected from Drug Stores. 



O S) 

2a 

h-5 


Brand. 


Druggists. 


Where 

Collected. 


< 

o 
H 


O m 


Remarks. 


249rt 




People's Drug Store 

Shaw & Jackson 

Physicians Drug Store.. 


Muneie 

Muncie 

Muneie 

Alexandria .. 
Alexandria . . 
Alexandria . . 

El wood 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 
Noblesville .. 
Noblesville .. 


i'.u 


o.'ig 


Pure 


?fiS7 




Pure 


?f>4Q 




Pure 


''577 




Pure. 


?58£» 




E.G. Robinsor/ 

P. C. Jones 


Pure. 


?fin4 




Pure. 


2612 
2678 




Strin^fellow & Co 

Jay Bros 

L. Mehlig 


Pure. 
Pure 


^m"), 




Pure. 


?746 




F. H.Gerhart 

S. Rosenthal 

H. Mehlig 


Pure. 


2796 




Pure. 
Pure. 


2837 




Francis Pharmacy 

E. W.Stucky 

I. N. Heims 


Pure 


2920 






?9S4 




Pure; 


3508 




C.L.Mitchell. 


Pure. 


a"!!? 


A.W.Truitt 


Pure. 











Crystal 

Dove 

Nickel 

Monarch 

Dove 

T. &T 

Dove 

Pure 

Perfect 

Gauntlet 

St. George 

Golden Rod. . 

GiYries'"Miiis 
spices 



Collected from Grocery Stores. 



Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 
Frank Tea & Spice Co , 
Cincinnati 
Jos. Strong & Co., 

Terre Haute 
Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 
Reid, Murdock & Co., 

Chicago 

, Evansville. ... 

Frank Tea & Spice Co.. 
Cincinnati 
Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 
Thomp.'ion & Taylor 

Spice Co., Chicago 
Frank Tea & Spice Co.. 
Cincinnati 

Geo. L. Hoehn 

Thompson & Taylor, 

Chicago 
Huntington Grocery 

Co.. Huntington 

E.R.Durkee&CcN.Y. 
Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Evansville 
Lewis Seitz Gro. Co., 

Evansville 
Ulmann Dreifus Co., 

Cincinnati 
Thompson & Taylor, 

Chicago 
A. H. Perfect & Co , 

Ft. Wayne 
Thompson & Taylor Co., 
Chicago 
Durand & Kasper, 

Chicago 
Thompson & Taylor, 

Chicago 
Walsh, Boyle & Co., 

Chicago 
Heekin Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 
J.C.Perry Co.. 

Indianapolis 
Wixon tt Co., Chicago.. 

E. J. Gillies & Co., N.Y. 



Terre Haute . 

Vincennes . .. 

Washington.. 

Washington.. 

Washington.. 
Oakland City. 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Princeton — 



Mt. Vernon . 
Mt. Vernon . 



Evansville . . 

Huntington. 
Huntington. 



Boonville . . . . 
Boonville .. . . 
Jeffersonville 

Kokomo 

Ft. Wayne.. .. 
South Bend. . 
Michigan City 
MichiganCity 
MichiganCity 
Columbus — 



Columbus . 
Columbus . 



Columbus . 



Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 

Pure. 
Pure. 

Pure. 



321 



GROUND CLOVES-ILLEGAL. 



'- a 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Remarks. 



437 
1155 

1177 

1227 

1252 

1277 

1283 

1301 

1329 

1468 

1507 
152 

1529 

1542 

1565 
1590 
1646 

2998 

3300 

3347 
3356 

3444 

3454 
3471 

3740 
600 



626 
717 



1035 
1882 



Malabar. 
Pure 



Pure 



Pure. 



Pure. 



Pure. 



Pure 

Triumph. 



Quaker. 



John N.Bey, Vincennes 

Bruning & Co., 

EvaDsville 

Frank Tea & 8pice Co., 
Cincinnati 

Frank Tea & Spice Co., 
Cincinnati 

Frank Tea & Spice Co., 
Cincinnati 

Sherman Bros. & Co., 

Chicago 

Meyer Bros. Coffee and 
iSpiee Co , St. Louis 

Sherman Bros. & Co., 

Chicago 

Karn & Co., Evansville. 



Bement, Seitz & Co., 

Evansville 

Arabian Mills, Chicago. 

Hulman & Co., 

Terre Haute 



R.J.Thornton & Co., 

Louisville 

R.J.Thornton & Co., 

Louisville 

Woolson Spice Co., 

Cincinnati 
Thornton, Louisville. . . 

R.J.Thornton & Co., 

Louisville 

Grocers Supply Co., 

Indianapolis 

Court House Grocery, 
(west) Indianapolis 



C.C.Sheidt... 
John Vorwald 
Indianapolis . . 



H.S. Quick 

Pettis Dry Goods Co 
G.W.J. Hoffman.... 



G. Reiss... 
I. J. Biggs. 



R.E.Clark 

Central Drugstore. 



Washington.. 
Oakland City 

Princeton 

Mt. Vernon.. 
Mt. Vernon .. 
Mt. Vernon .. 
Evansville. .. 



Evansville. . 
Evansville. . 



Booneville... 
Huntingburg, 

Huntingburg. 



Jeflfersonville 
Jeffersonville 



Jeffersonville 
Jeflfersonville 



New Albany. 
Kokomo 



Indianapolis. 

Columbus 

Columbus .. 



Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Columbus. 



Indianapolis 
Terre Haute, 



14.47 
10.71 



Terre Haute. 
Princeton . 



Wabash . 
Elkhart. 



5.74% 



5.86 



6.37 
5.97 



.34 



82% 



0.62 



1.14 
0.69 



Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
wheat starch. 

Adulterated with 

cocoanut shells. 
Adulterated with 

cocoanut shells 

and wheat 

starch. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells 
and wheat 
starch. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated. 
Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 
cocoanut shells. 

Adulterated with 

cocoanut shells. 
Adulterated with 

foreign starch. 
Adulterated with 

cocoanut shells. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated with 

cocoanut shells. 
Adulterated. 
Excess cocoanut 

shellsand stems; 

adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated with 

starch. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 



21— Bd. of Health. 



322 



GROUND CLOVES-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



si 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Total Ash. 
Insol. Ash. 


Remarks. 


1978 




Meyers Drug Store 

0. C. Boston 


South Bend.. 

South Bend.. 
Valparaiso. .. 
Valparaiso. .. 

Logansport .. 
Delphi 


7.01 

8.07 

6.19 


0.51 
1.27 

1.02 




'>mi 




cocoanut shells. 
Adulterated. 


?18R 




Corner Drug Store 

Heineman & Sievers . . . 

W.H.Porter 

M. M. Murphy 

W. H. Bireley.. .. 


Adulterated. 


'^?i;^ 




Adulterated with 


^?68 




cocoanut shells. 


9.m 




large amount of 
cocoanut shello. 
Adulterated wiUi 


?'>fi-' 




cocoanut shells. 


^fiSfi 




W.Cogswell 

L.T.Harker 


Elwood 






wheat starch an d 

cayenne pepper. 

Small amount of 


i^8n7 




Tipton 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis 

Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 


6.47 
8.31 


1.07 
0.50 


stems; adultera- 
ted. 


?,85n 




W. M.Birk 




'?8fir. 




A. B. Carr 


Cocoanut shells 


w<p 




F. H. Carter 


5.84 


0.58 


present; adul- 
terated. 


W48 




Weber Drug Co 

E. H.Wilson 




?9fi7 




6.25 


0.89 


present; adul- 
terated. 
Adulterated. 


?98| 




Navin's Pharmacy No. 1 
WillE. Axline&Co.... 

A. Gc. Baldwin 


Adulterated with 


;-«S3H 








foreign starch. 


3546 




Noblesville . 






ted with cocoa- 
nut shells. 
Adultera.ted with 














cocoanut shells. 



MISCELLANEOUS SPICES-LEGAL. 



2858 
4;552 
4164 
4165 
4167 
4168 
4173 
4175 
4177 
4178 
4180 
4181 
4183 
4184 



Powd. Ginger Jama. 

Triumph Ginger 

White Pepper 

Cinnamon 

(xinger 

Allspice 

Diadem Cinnamon .. 

Diadem Ginger 

Diadem Allspice 

Diadem Sage. 

Quaker Cinnamon. . 

Quaker GSnger 

Quaker Allspice 

Quaker Mace 



Francis Pharmacy 

Sent in by Grocers' Supply Co 

Sent in by SchnuU & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

."^ent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull <fe Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 

Sent in by Schnull & Co 



Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 



Z.SOfc 
3.2 -'Zr 
6.75% 
4 6S% 
3.94% 
4.43% 
3.50% 
4.87% 
3.17% 
7.00% 
4.85% 
2.41% 



TOMATO CATSUPS. 

AVe have examined 75 samples of tomato catsup and found 67, 
or 89.3 per cent., to be adulterated. The adulteration in many 
instances was due to the use of benzoate of soda as a preservative 
without declaring the fact on the label. Other samples contained 
coal-tar dye or an excess of starch. Under the ruling of the State 
Board of Health one-tenth of one per cent, of benzoate of soda can 



323 



be used in making tomato catsup if the fact of its presence is 
stated on the label, but coal-tar dye or otlier dye is not allowable. 
Tomato catsup naturally made is brown in color, and the unnat- 
ural desire on the part of the consumer for a highly colored prod- 
uct, together with the fact that the use of color made it possible 
to employ gTeen and inferior stock, induced the manufacturer to 
resort to artificial color. At the present time, however, the public 
taste has completely changed, and all high grade catsups are now 
sold uncolored. The use of starch as a filler and of saccharin a? 
a sweetener is both illegal and unnecessary. Several bottles of ar- 
tificial goods bore a compound label which was pasted directly on 
the bottom of the package in such a way that its presence would 
not likely be detected. Such labeling is an evasion of "the law as 
the goods might as well bear no label whatever. 

TOMATO CATSUPS-LEGAL. 



o o 

11 

2 s 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Where 
Collected. 


Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 


Color. 


Starch. 


Remarks. 


140 


Lippinoott . 
Club House. 
Chili Sauce. 

Beefsteak . . 

Hoffman 
House — 

Lippinoott. 
Blue Label. 

Pure Gold. . 


Lippinoott Co., 
Cincinnati . . . 

Franklin Mac- 
Veagh & Co., 
Chicago 

Joseph Camp- 
bell Preserve 
Co., Camden, 
N.J 


Brazil 

Huntington 
Huntington 

Huntington 
Vinoennes. 

Columbus.. 

Indianapo- 
lis 

Jefferson- 
ville 


Present. 

Present. 
Present. 






Legally la- 
beled. 

Pure. 


1424 






1435 






Legally la- 
beled. 

Legally la- 
beled. 

Legally la- 
beled. 

Legally la- 
beled. 


1443 


Joseph Camp- 
bell Preserve 
Co., Camden, 
N.J 


Cochineal 




387 


J. Weller Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 

Lippinoott & 
Cree Co., Cin- 
cinnati 

Curtice Bros , 
Rochester, N. 
Y 


3449 








3554 


Present. 
Present. 


Cochineal 

Coal-tar 
dye. .. 


Excess 


1576 


J. Weller & Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 


Legally la- 
beled. 

Legally la- 
beled. 



324 



TOMATO CATSUPS— ILLEGAL. 






Brand. 



JManufacturer, 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Starch, 



Remarks. 



235 

283 



291 



299 



300 



366 



367 



369 



1395 
1414 

1415 

im 

1445 

1367 

1467 
1476 



Sunny Side 



Crystal . . 

Yankee 
Doodle 



Bordeaux 



Butler's 
Tomato 
•Ketchup. 



Tobasco 
Pepper. 



Standard.. 



Phoenix 
Home 
Made.. 



Ever'body's 

Old Tavern. 
Standard.. . 

Perfect 

Sunlight . .. 

Matchless.. 

Butler's 

Star 



Hirsh's 
Standard. 



Tip-Top Ketch- 
up Co., 

Cincinnati 



Hulman & Co., 
Terre Haute 

American Rel- 
ish Co., 
Indianapolis 

Standard Pack- 
ing Co., 
Indianapolis 



Tip-Top Ketch- 
up Co., 

Cincinnati 



Geo. A. Boyle 
St. Louis 

Hirsh Bros., 

Louisville 



Standard Pack- 
ing Co 

Greenwood 
Packing Co., 
Greenwood, 
Indiana 



Berdan <& Co., 

Toledo 
Hirsh Br<>s., 

Louisville 



A. H. Perfect & 
Co.,Ft.Wayne 

Royal Packing 
Co., Chicago.. 



Acme Preserve 
Co., Adrian, 
Mioh 



Tip-Top Ketch- 
up Co., 
Cincinnati, 0. 



Star Packing Co 
Hamilton, 0. 



Hirsh Bros., 
Louisville. 



Elwood. 



Terre Haute 



Martins- 



ville 



Martins- 
ville 



Martins- 
ville 

Martins- 
ville 

Vincennes . 



Vincennes . 
Vincennes . 

Huntington 
Huntington 

Huntington 
Huntington 

Huntington 
Evansville. 
Boonville .. 
Boonville .. 



Present 



Present 



Present 



Present 



Present. 



Present 
Present 



Present 



Present, 



Present. 
Present. 



Present, 



Present. 



Present, 



Present 



Present. 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye .... 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye — 



Coal-tar 
dye .... 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 

Excess 
Excess 



Excess 



Excess 
Excess 



Excess 
Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Bulk goods; 
saccharin 
present; 
adulter'd. 

Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Ad ultera'd. 



Illegally 
labeled; 
adulter'd. 

Adultera'd. 



Label on 
bottom; il- 
legally 
labeled. 

Adultera'd. 

Saccharin 
present; 
adulter'd. 



Adultera'd 



Saccharin 
present: 
adulter d. 



Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present; 
adulter'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present; 
illegally 
labeled. 



325 



TOMATO CATSUPS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 






Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Starch 



Remark!. 



1290 
1508 
1523 

1558 

1672 

1677 

3008 

3009 

3062 
3063 

3150 

3168 

3181 
3238 
3256 

3243 
3280 

3288 
3373 



Blue Label. 

Home Jer- 
sey 

May Day . . . 

Goodman's 
High 
Grade . . . 

Cadet 

Hoosier 

Queen ofthe 
.Gas Belt.. 

Hero 



Perfect. 



Mother's 
Choice... 



Pride of 
England 



Matchless . 

Home Made 

Acme 

Yankee 
Doodle . .. 

El Mar 

Rose Bud .. 

Excellent.. 



Curtice Bros. 
Co., Roches- 
ter, N.Y 



Jersey Pack Co, 
Hamilton, . 

Greenwood 
Pickling Co., 
Greenw'd.Ind. 



Kahn <feCo., 
Louisville 



J. C. Perry & 
Co.. Indiana- 
polis, Ind ... 

Crescent Pack- 
ing Co., In- 
dianapolis .. 



Spencer & Ho- 
gin Co., Ma- 
rion, Ind 

Am. Relish Co , 
Indianapolis. 



Evansville. 
Huntingb'g 
Huntingb'g 

JeflFers'ville 



Salem 
Salem . 



Present 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Present 



Present 



Present 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



A. H. Perfect, 
Ft. Wayne ... 

Early Packing 
Co., Xenia, 0. 



Van Camp 
Packing Co., 
Indianapolis. 

Acme Preserv- 
ing Co., Adri- 
an, Mich 



C F.Claussen 
& Son,Chicago 

Thatcher. Kell- 
er Co., IndpJs 



Am. Relish Co., 
Indianapolis. 

Brinkmeyer, 
Kuhn & Co , 
Indianapolis. 

Bt. of Court 
House Groc'y 
Co., Indpls. .. 

Bt. of Court 
House Groc'y 
Co., Indpls. . . 



Excellent Can- 
ningCo., Indi- 
anapolis 



Kokomo . .. 
Kokomo . . . 

Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 

Mich. City . 
Mich. City 

Hammond . 
India'polis. 

India'polis. 

India'polis. 
India'polis. 

India'polis. 
Columbus . . 



Present 

Present 
in exc's, 



Present 



Present 
in exc's 



Present, 



Present 
in exc's, 



Present 
in exc's. 

Present. 



Present 
in exc's. 



Present, 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye. ... 

Coal-tar 
dye — 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Present 
in exc's 



Present 
in exc's. 



Present. 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Excess 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Improperly 



proper] 
kbeled. 



Excess 



Excess 



Excels 



Excess 



Slight 
Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Excess 



Excess 



Coal-tar 
dye 



la. 



Saccharin 
present, 
adulter'd. 

Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present. 
adulter'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 
Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adulterfa'd. 



Adultera'd. 
Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 
Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



326 



TOMATO CATSUPS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



t-3 



Brand. 



Manufacturer. 



Where 
Collected. 



Benzo- 
ate of 
Soda. 



Color. 



Starch 



Remarks. 



3406 
3424 

377 

3440 
441 

474 

3597 

3598 
120J 

3619 

1215 

3644 
1230 

3651 
1245 



Log Cabin. 



Butler's 



Live Oak... 



Cadet 

Delmonico 

Standard. 

Love Apple 

Polk's Best 
Bordeaux . 



Marion County 
Preserving 
Co., Indiana- 
polis 



Columbus . . Present. 



Tip-Top Ketch 
up Co., Cin- 
cinnati 



Columbus . Present. 



Hamilton Can- 
ning Co., 
Hamilton, 0. 

J.C.Perry & Co , 
Indpls., Ind. 

W D. Huffman 
& Co., Indpls. 



Bxley-Watkins 
Co., Wheel- 
ing, W. Va .. . 



J.T.Polk&Co. 
Greenwood, 
Ind 



Butler's... 



SweetHome 



Kentucky 
Moonshine 



Rose Bud . 



Delmonico. 



J.T.Polk & Co., 
(ireenwood, 
Ind 

Standard Pack- 
ingCo.,Indpls 



Huffman & Co., 



Tip-Top Ketch- 
up Co., Cin- 
cinnati 



Sweet Home 
Catsup Co., 
Indpls . . . 



Kentucky Can- 
ning Co., Ow- 
ensboro, Ky.. 



Court House 
Grocer? Co , 
Indianapolis. 

W.D. Huffman, 
■ Indianapolis. 



Vincennes . 








Washingt'n 


Present. 


Washingt'n 


Present. 


Indpls ..... 


Present. 


Indpls 


Present 


Princeton.. 


Present 


Indpls 


Present 


Princeton.. 


Present 



Coal-tar 
dye — 



Coal-tar 
dye .... 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Indpls. 



Mt. Vernon 



Indpls. 



Mt. Vernon 



Present, 



Present, 



Present, 



Coal-tar 
dye — 



Coal-tar 
dye .... 



Coal-tar 
dye — 



Coal- tar 
dye .... 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Coal-tar 
dye 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 



Saccharin 
present, 
adulter'd. 



Illegally la- 
beled. 



Adultera'd. 



Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present: 
adulter- 
ated. 



Saccharin 
present; 
illegally 
labeled. 



Saccharin 
present; 
adulter- 
ated. 



Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present; 
adulter- 
ated. 



Saccharin 
present; 
adulter- 
ated. 



Excess Illegally 
labeled. 



Excess 



Excess 



Excess 
Excess 



Adultera'd. 



Illegally 
labeled. 



Adultera'd. 



Saccharin 
present; 
adulter- 
ated. 



327 



TOMATO CATSUPS-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



















o s> 


Brand. 


Manufacturer. 


Wh.-re 
Collected. 


Benzo- 

ate of 
Soda. 


Color. 


Starch. 


Remarks. 


1268 


U.S 


Standard 
Packing Co., 
Indianapolis. 

J. T.Polk Co., 
Greenwood, 


Mt. Vernon 


Excess 
Present. 


Coal-tar 
dye 




Adultera'd. 


1292 


















Ind 


Evansville. 


Present 


Coal-tar 
dye 


Slight 










1342 


Daisy 


W.D.Huifman, 








Excess 


Adultera'd. 






Indianapolis. 


Evansville. 


Present. 


Coal-tar 
dye 


Excess 


Saccharin 
present; 
adulter- 
ated 


4579 


Royal Blue 


W. J.Quan & 
















Co .Chicago.. 


Noblesville 


Present. 


Normal.. 


None. 


Adultera'd. 


4855 


Flower Cy.. 


Purity Pres. 
















Co.,Riehmo'd 


Indpls 


Present. 


Normal... 


None. 


Saccharin 
present. 


5240 


Home Made 


T. A. Snider & 
















Co.,Cinci'nati 


Munoie 


Present. 


Coal-tar.. 


None. 


Adultera'd. 


5708 


Magpie 


W.J. Quan Co., 
















Chicago 


Elwood 


Present. 


Normal... 


Pre'nt 


Adultera'd. 


5888 


B.B. B. ... 


Lisbon Pickle 
















Works 


Ft. Wayne. 


, Present. 


Coal-tar.. 


None . 


Saccharin 


5919 




Crescent Pres. 
Co , Indpls. . . 


Danville. .. 


Present. 


Coal-tar 




present. 


















dye 


Pre'nt 


Adultera'd. 


6028 




Greenwood Pk. 
















Co 


Goshen 


Present. 


Normal... 


None. 


Saccharin 






present. 


6037 




H. Wichert, 

Chicago 


Goshen 




Normal... 


Much. 








Adultera'd. 


6045 


Butler...... 


Tip-Top Ketch- 
up Co., Cin- 
















cinnati 


Elkhart . .. 




Coal-tar 
dye 


Pre'nt 










Saccharin 
















present. 


6083 


Matchless.. 


Acme Pres. Co., 
















Adrian, Mich. 


Elkhart.... 


Present 


Normal.. . 


Pre'nt 


Adultera'd. 


6092 


Silver Seal. 


Walsh, Boyle 
















Co. .Chicago.. 


' Elkhart..".. 


Present. 


Coal-tar 
dye 


Pre'nt 


Adulteratd. 


6105 


Monarch . . . 


Reid, Murdock 
















& Co. .Chicago 


South Bend 


Present. 


Coal-tar 
dye 


Nor- 
mal. 


Adultera'd. 



BEERS, WINES AND SUMMER DRINKS. 

While certain classes of beverag'es, notably those containing 
greater or less quantities of alcohol, are consumed throughout the 
year, during the hot sunuuer months the people demand a light, 
refreshing, attractive beverage that is not consumed at other sea- 
sons. In the sunimer months, too, the consumption of malt li- 
quors is largely increased. The number and variety of the sum- 
mer drinks is- very large. For the most part they are produced 
by bottlers and dealers who supply the local market, although cer- 
tain of the fruit juices have obtained a widespread sale through- 



328 

out the country. In order to determine the purity of these sum- 
mer drinks we have collected and analyzed many samples of the 
products sold on the Indianapolis market. The results of our 
analyses follow the remarks under each class described below. 

The production of malt liquors in this country as an industry 
is second only in importance to the production of breadstuff s. 
Their consumption is steadily on the increase, as is also the amount 
consumed in proportion to other kinds of alcoholic beverages. 
Beer is prepared largely from malted grain, usually barley, al- 
though other substances, such as corn, rice and glucose, frequently 
enter into its composition. Properly defined, beer is a beverage 
produced by alcoholic fermentation from a hopped infusion, either 
of malted cereals, preferably malted barley exclusively, or with 
the addition of unmalted or prepared cereals. Besides the malt 
and sugars which enter into the composition of beer, and which, 
in the form of infusions, are converted by yeast into alcohol, hops 
are also employed to give a palatable bitter to the product. Be- 
sides the malt or some fermentable sugar and the hops no other 
constituent should be present. The chemical composition of the 
finished product is, however, very complex, the principal con- 
stituents being alcohol, various sugars and carbohydrates, nitro- 
genous matter, carbonic, acetic, succinic, lactic, malic, and tannic 
acids, bitter and resinous extractive matter from the hops, glycer- 
ine and various mineral constituents, consisting mainly of phos- 
phates of the alkalies and alkali earths. 

The names given to different kinds of malt liquors relate to 
various attributes, as the country where they were produced, as 
English, German, Bavarian beer, etc. Thus porter is simply a 
beer of high percentage of alcohol and made from malt dried at 
a somewhat high temperature, which gives it its dark color. Ale 
is a pale beer, likewise of high attenuation and made of pale malt, 
with more hop extract than porter. Stout has less alcohol and 
more extract and still less hops than porter. These terms are used 
chiefly with reference to English malt liquors. The terms used 
for German beers, such as Erlanger, Munchener, etc., are for the 
most part names of places, and are applied to beers made in im- 



329 

itation of the beers originally brewed in those cities. Export 
beer is beer that is specially prepared with a view to long-keeping 
qualities. 

The analyses made at this Laboratory comprise 27 samples, 
this number being about all of the different brands and varieties 
of beer obtainable in Indianapolis. The analyses were made prin- 
cipally for the purpose of determining the extent and nature of 
their adulteration or the use of antiseptic and preservative agents. 
As a basis for determining adulteration, however, it is necessary 
to know the chemical composition of the sample, and for that rea- 
son a complete analyses of all the beers has been made. Results 
of the analyses show very little adulteration either in imported or 
domestic beers. Several of the samples examined, namely, ISTos. 
4349, 4355, 4358 and 4359, contain sul'phurous acid or sulphites; 
none contained benzoic or salicylic acids, and but one sample, 
which was a Weiss beer, contained saccharin. An examination of 
the tabulated results shows that none of the beers departed widely 
in composition from the normal products. The imported beers 
have a high alcohol and extract content, and were brewed from a 
much heavier wort than were the domestic beers. From a chemical 
standpoint the domestic beers were very uniform in composition, 
there being no great difference in either the alcohol or extract 
content. 



330 





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332 



MALT EXTRACTS. 

True malt extract is a syrupy fluid made by extracting and 
digesting coarsely powdered malt with water and evaporating the 
strained liquid to the consistency of thick syrup. Such an extract 
contains at least 70 per cent, of maltose and converts starch very 
rapidly. At the present there are on the market a very large num- 
ber of so-called malt extracts which are widely advertised as a 
tonic and nonintoxicating malt food. These extracts are, for the 
most part, simply heavj^ beers, containing considerable quantities 
of alcohol and extract and no diastase. Two of the three samples 
of so-called malt extract examined contained 5 per cent, of alcohol 
each and 8 per cent, and over of extract, largely maltose. In 
other respects the samples were merely heavy beers. The third 
sample analyzed was of quite different composition, being low in 
alcohol and high in extract. 



333 



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334 



WINES. 



American wines are rapidly becoming known for their excellent 
qualities and are competing with European brands for a reputa- 
tion. That there are many imitation wines on the market has 
been common knowledge, but the most pessimistic observer would 
hardly wish to concede that more than 50 per cent, of the cheap 
wines never saw a grape. The results of the analyses of 20 
samples of wines ]'>urchased at drug stores and grocery stores show 
this to be a fact. The first seven samples analyzed were wholly 
artificial products. They were made by soaking fruits, possibly 
raisins, fortifying the extracts with 12 to 15 per cent, of ai'cohol, 
adding large quantities of glucose, in one instance over 20 per 
cent., and in addition sweetening with saccharin to further de- 
velop the sweet taste. These samples contain salicylic acid and 
benzoate of soda as well as the saccharin, which is of itself a pre- 
servative. Evidently the original maker used a preservative to 
stop fermentation, and then the bottler used some more preserva- 
tive of a different character to keep the goods after they had left 
his hands. The two blackberry cordials examined were entirely 
artificial, and consisted of glucose symp colored with coal-tar dye 
and preserved with salicylic acid and benzoate of soda, flavored 
with synthetic flavors to counterfeit the missing blackberry. Wine 
has been adulterated for 2,000 years, but the harvest time of the 
manufacturer of artificial goods is evidently the present. An at- 
tractively labeled bottle marked "Purity Guaranteed," and filled 
with a decoction of salicylic acid, benzoate of soda, saccharin, glu- 
cose, grain alcohol, synthetic flavors, glycerine, coal-tar dye and 
water, meets a ready sale as pure California port or sherry, de- 
pending upon the aromatic employed. 

Samples IN^os. 1782, 1783, 1784, 3548, 3788, o7S9 and 3790 
are evidently grape products of a fair degree of purity, although 
of poor quality, ^.lost of them contain either saccharin or some 
presen'ative which necessitates their being classed as illegal. 

Samples ^^os. 3787, 3791 and 3792 are evidently pure and 
free from any preservatives or saccharin. 



835 





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336 



GINGER ALES. 

Ginger ale is a nonalcoholic beverage made by carbonating a 
dilute solution of extract of ginger, sugar and some simple acid 
in water. It is a pleasant and refreshing beverage when properly 
prepared. The formula employed and the method of preparation 
varies greatly with the different manufacturers. Examination of 
the analyses shows very little uniformity of composition. The 
: amount of residue on evaporation varies from 3 to 20 per cent, 
and the sucrose content from nothing to 8.44: per cent. Since a 
sweet drink is desired, many of the manufacturers resort to the 
use of saccharin to develop this taste, since saccharin is much less 
expensive than sugar and is not fermentable but is in itself a pre- 
servative. The use of saccharin is condemned by most medical au- 
thorities and all- food experts. It was formerly much used by can- 
Iners and packers of vegetables, such as tomatoes, sweet com, etc., 
:but at the present time it is no longer employed by reputable man- 
iufacturers. It has no place in the manufacture of a summer drink 
:and its use should be discontinued. One sample was preserved 
[with salicylic acid and one was colored with dinitrocresol. 



337 



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888 



MISCELLxiNEOITS FKUIT BEVEKAGES. 

Three of the four ciders analyzed were preserved with either 
benzoic or salicylic acid and the fourth sample was lentirely 
artificial ; three of the five grape juices contained sulfurous or 
salicylic acid. Of the four lime juices examined three were of 
full strength and free from preservatives. Of the four root beers 
analyzed three were free from presen'atives, saccharin or glucose. 
One of the samples contained 40.96 milligrams of SO2 per liter, 
which had evidently been added as an antiseptic. 



339 





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Manufacturer. 


Klee & Coleman, Indianapolis 

Pure Water Co., Berkly, Cal 

Kleo & Coleman, Indianapolis 

(Jrau Bottling Works, Indpls. ... 
Yunckle Bottling Works, Indpls. 
Jacob Metzger Co , Indianapolis. 




California 

Crystal . 
Orange Cider. 
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Manufacturer. 


W. A. Ross&Bro., 

Belfast, Ireland. 
Evans Sons <& Co., 

Liverpool, Eng. 

C. C.Brandt & Co., 

San Diego, Cal. 




Rose's 
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India'polis 
India'polis. 




3 

c 


C. F.Blanke & Co., 

St. Louis, Mo. 
The Chas. Hires Co., 

Malvern, Pa. 
The Chas. Hires Co., 

Malvern, Pa. 

Sprague, Warner & Co., 

Chicago, 111 




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Tonic 

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4276 
4280 



84:^ 



CARBONATED SOFT DRINKS. 

Included under this title is a variety of products made by the use 
of various syrups and carbonated water. Some of them are plain 
sugar syrups flavored with lemon or vanilla. Others purport to 
be made from fruit syrups, such as strawberries, raspberries, etc. 
Still others sold as tonics contain various root extracts. While 
the composition of these drinks varies widely, yet one fact is 
very noticeable — nearly all of them contain large quantities of 
saccharin and very small quantities of cane sugar. ISTo preserva- 
tives were present in any of the samples ; indeed, the large amount 
of saccharin used obviated the necessity for sugar syrup and of 
itself assisted in arresting fermentation. The analyses of these 
samples are given in full for the purpose of supplying data con- 
cerning the much used simimer drinks. 



344 



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345 



VINEGARS. 



Cider. — It has many times been asserted by those engaged in 
enforcing pure food laws that vinegars are subject to adulteration 
to an extent perhaps greater than is the case with any other ar- 
ticle of food. 

Analyses of samples of vinegar collected from every part of 
Indiana offer good evidence, that, in this State, at least, the state- 
ment is not overdrawn. 

Two hundred and thirty-nine samples of cider vinegar were 
analyzed and 187 were found to be adulterated. 

Of adulterated samples 157 were artificial and 30 were below 
the standard required for cider vinegars, in acidity or solids, or 
both. 

The striking fact to be noticed in the summary of results is 
that nearly 80 per cent, of the vinegars examined were adulterated, 
a finding which is remarkable in view of the fact that our State is 
well able to make every gallon of vinegar consumed within it. 
The home product is displaced by the artificial, acetic acid solu- 
tion,, colored with caramel, to the loss of the farmer or local man- 
ufacturer, and the defrauding of the consumer who pays cider 
vinegar prices for a cheap, spurious product, lacking all the pe- 
culiar aroma and delicate flavor which has given cider vinegar its 
reputation. 

When the standard of acidity and solids is fixed all vinegars 
which do not come up to the standard are adulterated, and the 
manufacturer or dealer in such an article is liable for violation of 
the pure food laws. The practice of saving the first pressing from 
apple pomace for cider and then wetting down the exhausted 
cheese with water before a second pressing produces a diluted cider 
which is low in solids and malic acid and which will never make 
good vinegar. Imperfect acetification is regularly met with. 
In such cases the vinegar has not been sufficiently aged or 
has been kept out of access to air. The oxidation of alco- 
hol to acetic acid can only take place in the presence of a liberal 
supply of oxygen, and vinegar makers should not expect that cider 
put into a cool cellar in unvented barrels will make vinegar. 

The quality of a vinegar is sometimes injured by an abnormal 
fermentation or the development of moulds, or by the presence of 



346 

vinegar eels (Angiiilliila Oxophila). Foreign substances are oc- 
casionally accidentally introduced into vinegar which injure its 
color or render it injurious to health. The common practice of 
using as a funnel a wooden bucket with a lead tube or of em- 
ploying a lead spigot, leads to the formation of sugar of lead 
(lead acetate), which is an active poison. 

The manufacturers of artificial vinegars are all located outside 
the State where we have been unable to reach them except by 
correspondence. The business methods of some of these firms are 
nefarious, and the opportunity that will be given us under the new 
Federal law for keeping products of such firms off our markets, 
will afford us a welcome relief. One firm in particular, the 
"Red Cross Cider & Vinegar Co.," of St. Louis, has been a per- 
sistent violator of the law. Their method has been to send a 
salesman through the state offering to sell a quantity of cider 
vinegar at a price somewhat below the market price, and to throw 
in one barrel with every six purchased. A guarantee of purity is 
pasted on every barrel which covers the entire head and reads 
thus: ' ' 

"iN^OTICE. 

We will forfeit $100.00 for every barrel of vin- 
egar bearing this certificate that is not the product 
of pure apple juice. This vinegar is pure, fer- 
mented apple juice and is warranted to more than 
fill the requirements of the pure food laws. 

The Red Cross Vinegar Co." 

This guarantee and the strong assertion of the salesman has 
convinced many dealers that their goods were genuine. In fact 
in some instances the first few barrels shipped have been pure, al- 
though the last consignment was invariably a fictitious article. 
These artificial vinegars, while formerly simply colored distilled 
vinegar, are now very skillfully made ; the dealers, starting with a 
distilled stock, add apple solids, salts of potash, malic acid, phos- 
phoric acid, or some other substance that produces a heavy precip- 
itation with lead .acetate; sugars, colors and flavoring essences, 
until their blend not only resembles cider vinegar in appearance 
and flavor, but has most of its chemical characteristics. It is 
impossible for the honest manufacturer or dealer in cider vinegar 
to compete with these spurious articles. 



347 






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355 



MALT VINEGAR. 

The practice of selling colored distilled or spirit vinegar for a 
malt vinegar is very common. A charitable explanation of this 
violation of the law is that long continued trade in the imitation 
product has in a way fixed the name of ''Malt" on the colored 
distilled vinegar, although it should be applied only to nondis- 
tilled goods made by the alcoholic and acetous fermentation of 
grain infusions. 

Of the 20 samples of malt vinegar examined, but four were 
genuine malt vinegar, the rest were simply colored distilled vine- 
gars. 



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357 



GRAIN VINEGAR. 



Grain vinegar is imcolored distilled vinegar. Ten of the 15 
grain vinegars analyzed were illegal, either because of the addi- 
tion of caramel color or an acidity below the 4 per cent standard. 



358 



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359 



MISCELLANEOUS FOOD PRODUCTS. 

Under this head is placed a variety of subjects such as obesity 
cures, soda fountain syrups, coffee essences, vegetable butters, 
sausage fillers, junket tablets, pudding preparations, table sauces, 
etc. Of the 80 articles of this class 17, or 21 per cent., were 
illegal. 

DRUGS. 

Drugs are primarily intended for the cure of disease or the cor- 
rection of abnormal conditions. ^ATiile food adulteration is an 
economic fraud and rarely works an injury to the health of the 
consumer, the adulteration of drugs, either by lessening their 
strength or adding foreign ingredients, places in the hand of the 
physician an inferior article not adapted for the use to which it 
is put. When such drugs are used in the treatment of disease the 
adulteration becomes dangerous. A preparation of morphine may 
be prescribed by a physician for the relief of pain, the dose is 
fixed ; if results are not forthcoming because of the adulteration or 
the weakening of the strength of the article, the dose is increased. 
When the bottle is empty the prescription may be refilled, this 
time with a full' strength article. If the patient, thinking the drug 
is the same as before, takes a double • dose, serious results will 
follow. Again, if the physician who prescribes a certain drug does 
not get the results he expects with his patient, he may change the 
prescription entirely, when all the fault may be due to an adultera- 
tion of the medicine in question. Certain classes of drugs are very- 
liable to adulteration ; indeed, some things which are pharma- 
copoeia preparations are rarely or never carried in stock by drug- 
gists as pure articles. This is true of blr.ck antimony, precipitated 
sulphur, and beeswax. Other goods frequently called for 
both by prescriptions and customers are very liable to be of in- 
ferior strength. The tinctures prepared by the dispenser we 
have found to be frequently below standard. The same is true of 
many of the extracts ; on the other hand chemicals, such as potas- 
sium iodide, Rochelle salts, sodium phosphate, zinc sulphate, 
boric acid, cream of tartar, etc., are evidently not adulterated. 

Two conditions operate against the sale of pure drugs. The first 
is the fault of the druggist himself who may either be unfamiliar 



360 

with the preparation of the articles he dispenses, or who dele- 
gates to boys or untrained clerks the preparation of medicines 
which can only successfully be produced by a skilled pharmacist. 
Secondly, the lack of care in the purchase of stock. While the 
wholesalers for the most part carry pure lines of goods, there are 
some concerns (fortunately for the honor of the drug trade in 
Indiana located outside the State), that make a practice of supply- 
ing low grade, cut rate drugs which they know to be impure 
when they sell them. The grocer may excuse the sale of adul- 
terated goods on the plea that his customers want cheap things, 
but the druggist has no such excuse. Realizing that the prepara- 
tions that he dispenses are to be used as medicine, usually by 
people not familiar with the drug they are taking, it becomes his 
duty to see that the drugs he sells are of normal strength and 
purity. The selling of patent medicines and fraudulent remedies 
which purport to be curealls and relief for every disease, has never 
been regulated in Indiana. Enormous quantities of worthless 
mixtures of alcohol or bad whisky with caramel and bitters, or 
even preparations containing morphine, opium, heroin, cocaine 
and habit forming drugs, are sold without restriction. The use 
of cocaine is on the increase among the poorer classes, especially 
among the negroes. The habit is formed by the use of so-called 
catarrh cures which are, in fact, nothing but cocaine preparations 
put up and sold for the purpose of satisfying the cravings of the 
cocaine fiend. Fortunately for the people, the Federal Food and 
Drug Law which compels the placing on the label of every pack- 
age containing alcohol, morphine, opium, cocaine, heroin, chloro- 
form, chloral hydrate, and acetanilide, a statement of the quantity 
of such ingredients present, will make it clear to the purchaser 
what he is buying and will tend to suppress the manufacture and 
sale of a large number of worthless preparations. During the 
year there have been collected and analyzed 1,559 samples of 
drugs. Of this number 596 have been pure and 963, or 62.5 per 
cent., adulterated. This percentage of adulteration is very high 
and indicates either a demoralized drug market or extreme care- 
lessness on the part of the druggist and dealer. 



361 



RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF DRUG SAMPLES. 



ARTICLE EXAMINED. 



13 




o 


73 


o 


ca 


^ 


fq 



®373 



Alcohol — 

Ammonia, Aqua Ammoniae 

Bay Rum 

Beeswax, yellow, Cera Flava , 

Beeswax, white, Cera Alba 

Black antimony 

Boric acid, Aeidum Boricum 

Chloroform 

Glycerine, Glycerinum 

Lime water. Liquor Calcis 

Miscellaneous drug samples 

Potassium iodide, Potassii lodidum 

Potassium chlorate, Potassii Chlotas 

Rochelle salts, Potassii et Sodii Tartras 

Siilphur flowers .. 

Sulphur precipitated. Sulphur Praecipitatum 

Sulphur lotion 

Spirit of camphor, Spiritus Cam phorae 

Sodium phosphate, Sodii Phosphas 

Salicylic acid, Aeidum Salicylicum 

Syrup iodide of iron, Syrupus Ferri lodidi. .. 

Tincture iron, Tinctura Ferri Chloridi 

Tincture iodine, Tinctura lodi 

Tincture arnica, Tinctura Arnicae 

Tincture opium, Tinctura Opii 

TSartaric acid, Aeidum Tartarioum 

Z jnc sulphate, Zinci Sulphas 

Total '....... ■ .. 



100 


32 


7 


68 


68 


10 


27 


60 


2 


67 


2 


41 


14 





2 


1 


14 


48 


91 


7-'> 


10 


5 


7 





5 


4 


4 





4 





17 


124 


1 


2 


30 


77 


7 





1 





47 


9 


39 


188 


21 


112 


72 


9 


1 


80 





1 


3 





596 


963 



132 
75 
78 
87 
69 
43 
14 
3 
62 

166 
15 



4 

4 

141 

3 

107 

7 

1 

56 

177 

133 

81 

81 

1 

3 



1.559 



21.2 
90.8 
12.9 
69.0 
97.1 
95.8 
Oi.O 
33.3 
77.4 
45.1 
33.3 
00.0 
44.4 
00.0 
00.0 
88.0 
66.6 
71.8 
00.0 
00.0 
16.0 
78.5 
84.2 
11.0 
98.9 
100 .0 
00.0 

62.5 



862 



PERCENTAGE OF ADULTERATION 
or DRUGS IN INDIANA 



ALCOHOL 
AMMONIA 
BAY RUM 

BEES WAX YELLOW 
BEES WAX WHITE 
BLACK ANTIMONY 
BORIC ACID 
CHLOROFORM 
GLYCERINE 
LIME WATER 
MISC. DRUG SAMPLES) 
POTASSIUM IODIDE 
POTASSIUM CHLORATEl 
ROCHELLE SALTS 
SULPHUR FLOWERS 
SULPHUR PRECIPITATED 
SULPHUR LOTION 
SPIRIT OF CAMPHOR 
SODIUM PHOSPHATE 
SALICYLIC ACID 
SYRUP IODIDE OF IRON | 
TINCTURE IRON 
TINCTURE IODINE 
TINCTURE ARNICA 
TINCTURE OPIUM 
TARTARIC ACID 
ZINC SULFATE 



YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31.1906 
10 20 40 60 



80 



^^HP^ 








1 


jSf """■""^^■" 


■Hi 




1 






Hi 






" 


" 


^™ 


S 


s 


PHBHI^H^I 


















^■■taHi^^H 




g^ 




I^^^H^HJIj^B 










Hj* 


B^s 


■iSSSS' 




^ 


■ 


m 




s 




™ 


™ 


1 


■ 




^ 


Hi 






^ 


Hi 


■1 


^^ 


^ 


am^ 


IB 


^ 


HI 





60 



80 



363 



ALCOHOL. 

Thirtv-two of the 132 samples of alcohol analyzed were impure 
or below standard. In almost every case the alcohols were but 
slightly below the pharmacopoeia standard of 94.9 per cent, by 
volume. One sample only was diluted with water and in no case 
was methyl alcohol substituted for the grain alcohol purchased. 



364 



PURE ALCOHOLS. 



o « 

>4 a 

1-^ 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Specific 
Gravity at 
15.5°C. 


o o 
<5 


609 






.8182 
.8181 
.8195 
.8150 
.8178 
.8199 
8200 
.8186 
.8199 
.8189 
.8200 
.8183 
.8190 
.8193 
.8186 
.8198 
.8195 
.8192 
.8196 
.8194 
.8184 
.8191 
.8190 
.8200 
.8181 
.8183 
.8199 
.8193 
.8198 
.8195 
.8191 
.8194 
.8197 
.8185 
.8194 
.8192 
.8183 
.8193 
.8185 
.8196 
.8180 
.8183 
.8192 
.8186 
.8183 
.8189 
.8188 

.818;; 

.8198 
.8188 
.8194 
.8152 
.8178 
.8182 
.8188 
.8176 
.8185 
.8178 
.8183 
.8197 
.8191 
.8177 
.8187 


94 46 


622 


G. Reisg 


Terre Haute 

Vincennes 


94.48 


688 


C.S.Miller.... 

I. J. BicKs 


94,13 


no 


Princeton 


95.29 


111 


A. F. Schmidt 


94.56 


890 




Evansville 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 


94.03 


909 


AV. H. Fogug 


94.00 


929 


Dawsoi. & Bovoo 


94.36 


944 


D. & H. Rosenbaum 

Porter, the Druggist 


94.03 


968 


Peru 

Peru 

Peru 


94 28 


987 
1005 


Blue Drua Store 


94 00 
94.43 


1016 


Bradley Bros 


94.26 


1120 


J. C. Hutxell .... 


Ft. Wayne 


9418 


1158 


Ranke & Nussbaum 

Creier & Bro 

H. G. Somraer.s 


Ft. Wayne 


94.36 


1174 


Ft Wayne 


94.05 


1190 


Ft Wayne 


94.13 


1207 


Meyer, Bros. & Co 


Ft. Wayne 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Elkhart 


94.26 


3951 
3950 


Bowles Bros 

John W.O' Harrow 


94.10 
94.15 


1870 


Central Drug Store . 

G. W.Rule 


94.41 


1945 


Goshen 


94.23 


1959 


Public Drug Store 

D.C.Peters 


94.26 


2043 


Laporte 


94.00 


2036 


F. AY. Meissner 


94.48 


2042 


J. M. Callender 


Laporte 

Michigan City 

Val paraiso 


94.43 


2077 




94.03 


2189 


W. C. Lethe-rman 

Heineman & Sievers 


94.18 


2207 




94.05 


2262 


W.H.Porter 

M.W.Edmonds 




94.13 


2285 


Delphi 

Jefferson ville 


94.23 


3877 


Wm. C. Pfau 


94.15 


2326 


W.W.Johnson 


94.08 


3884 


Schwaninger Bros 




94.38 


3889 
3900 


Chas. D. Knoefel ' 

B. Doolittle 


New Albany 

Jefferson ville 


94.15 
94.21 


3901 


Crecelius 


94 43 


3909 


McDonald-Stockdell Co 




94.18 


3917 


Conner's Drug Store 

Floyd Parks 

Doherty's Drug Store 




94.38 


3922 
3929 


Jeffersonville 

Jeffersonville 


94.10 
94.51 


2378 


Wells-Yaeger-Best Co 


94.43 


2400 


Anderson Drug Co . 




94.21 


2431 


City Drug Store 


Anderson 

Anderson 


94.36 


2459 


Buck k Briekley 

H. H.Ice 

People's Drug Store 

E.P.Whinrev 


94.43 


2480 


Muncic 


94.28 


2490 


Miincie 


94.31 


2503 


.Muncie 

Muncie 


94.48 


2533 


Shaw k Jack.oon : 

Physicians' Drug Store 


94.05 


2538 




94.31 


2575 


City Drug Store 




94.15 


2617 


F. W. Green 


Elwood 


95.24 


2635 


J. H.Kute 


94.56 


2647 


F. L. Saylor 


Elwood 


94.46 


2668 


Jay Bros 




94.31 


2712 


Hollo well & Rj'an 




94.61 


2795 


S.Rosenthal 


Tipton ... 


94.38 


2826 


Francis Pharmacy 

W.M.Burk 


94.56 


2847 




94.43 


2887 


F. n. Carter 

E. W.Stucky 

I.N.Heims 

Navin's Pharmacy 


Indianapolis 


94.08 


2914 


Indianapolis 


94.23 


2924 




94.69 


2979 


Indianapolis 


94.33 









365 



ALCOHOLS BELOW STANDARD. 





Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


"•TO 
02 


o o 

< 


Remarks. 


553 
573 


Buntin Drug Co 


Terre Haute . . . 
Terre Haute ... 
Terre Haute . .. 

Vincennes 

Vincennes 

Evansville 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Huntington... 
Huntington . . . 


.8203 
.8225 
.8228 
.8349 
.826* 
.8222 
.8203 
.8308 
.8475 
.8262 
.8235 
.8223 
8219 
8227 
.S236 
.8227 
.8209 
.8279 
.8201 
.8202 
.8236 
.8229 
.8265 
.8237 
.8382 


93.93 
93,36 
93.29 
89.72 
92.12 
93 44 
93.87 
90.93 
85.77 
92.30 
93.09 
93.41 
93.53 
93.31 
93.06 
93.31 
93 77 
91.78 
93.98 
93.95 
93.06 
93.26 
92.21 
93.03 
88.70 


Slightly below standard. 
Slightly below standard. 


598 
659 
677 
845 
1024 
1060 
1078 
1086 
7l2b 


Geo. J. Hoffman 

W.C. Watjen 

R. G. Moore 

John Laval & Son ... 

R.E.Clark 

Butterbaugh & Co 

M. Kaylor 

Schaefer & Schaefer . 


Slightly below standard. 
Much below standard. 
Below standard. 
Below standard. 
Slightly below standard. 
Below standard. 
Much below standard. 
Below standard. 
Below standard. 


1217 




Ft. Wayne 

Elkhart 


Below standard. 


1850 
821c 


Housvvorth Bros 


Below standard. 
Below standard. 


1919 




Goshen 

South Bend . . 
South Bend .. 

Hammond 

Hammond . . . 
Valparaiso . . 
Logansport .. 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Anderson — 
Alexandria — 

Elwood * 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Noblesville .... 
Noblesville . 


Below ,'tandard. 


2007 
2021 
2118 
2145 


O.C.Boston 

R.P.Milton 

Bicknell&Co 

M.Kolb 


Below standard. 
Slightly below standard. 
Below standard. 
Slightly below standard. 


2181 
2233 


• Corner Drugstore 


Slightly below standard. 
Below standard. 


2302 
2312 


M.M. Murphy 


Below standard. 
Below standard. 


2394 
2447 


Schultz & Boswell 


Below standard. 
Much below standard. 


2584 
2609 
2694 


E. C. Robinson . 

Stringfellow & Co .... 
W.T.Scott 


.8264 1 92 24 
.8233 93.14 
.8238 93.00 


Below standard. 
Below standard. 
Below standard. 


2753 


F. H. Hubbard . 


.8246 
.8749 
.8223 
.8275 


92.77 
75.87 
93.41 
91.90 


Below standard 


2811 
3504 
3536 


H. Mehlig 

C.L. Mitchell 

A. G. Baldwin 


Heavily watered. 
Below standard. 
Below standard. 









AQUA AMMONIA. 

U. S. p. Aqua Aramonia contains 10 per cent, by weight of 
gaseous anunonia. Of the Y5 samples examined, which were col- 
lected from both drug and grocery stores, but seven were up to 
strength; 90.8 per cent, were weak, dilute solutions, ranging from 
20 to 96 per cent. TJ. S. P. strength. The so-called ammonia water 
dispensed by grocers for laundry purposes is rarely or never as 
strong as it should be. There is always some loss of strength as 
the stock grows old, but it is evident that the chief cause of 
weakness is not due to deterioration but to wilful dilution with 
water in the endeavor to produce a cheap article, to satisfy the 
demand of an ignorant public for a quart bottle for ten cents. 



366 



AQUA AMMONIA-LEGAL. 






Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



786 H. J. Lindeman 

796 J.N.Jones 

1106 Bradley Bros. 

1831 H.M.Philips 

2103 Kaplansky & Morgan 

2192 W.e. Letherman 

3521 WillE. Axline &Co.. 



Washington.. . 
Washington... 
lluutington . . . 
Auburn ..... . 

Michigan City 
Valparaiso. ... 

Noblesville ... 



AQUA AMMONIA-ILLEGAL. 



497 S. Herr 

506 Fred Keller 

536 O.K.Horner 

575 J.S.Modison 

587 Geo. J. Hoifman 

611 Baur 

624 G. Reiss 

635 E.H.Robinson 

641 H.J.Werker 

660 W.C. Watjen 

680 R.G.Moore.... :.... 

689 C.S.Miller 

713 I.J. Biggs 

727 E. Shoptaugh 

735 H. G.May 

764 P.S.Clapp 

775 A.F.Schmidt 

809 C.Kightly 

818 A. Young 

831 A. G. 'L'routman 

858 J.F. Bomm 

874 Meek& Albers 

894 H.J. Schlaepfer 

914 W. H. Fogus 

923 Dawson & Boyce. 

9.39 D. & H. Rosebaum 

954 Joe Haney 

973 Porter the Druggist.. . . 

984 Blue Drug Store 

1141 C. B. Woodworth & Co. 

1846 Houseworth Bros .. .. 

1184 E.G. Sommers 

1897 Leonard & Bentz 

1931 O.J. Beeson 

1948 G.W. Rule 

1983 C.Coonley &Co.. ... 

1998 0. C. Bostin 

2017 R.P.Milton 

2033 D.C.Peters 

2044 J. M.Collender 

2150 N.Kolb 

2225 Busjohn & Schneider . 

2232 Ben Fisher 

2247 G. W.HofiFman 

2258 W.H. Porter 

2298 M.M. Murphy 

2358 J. D. Bartlett 

2388 Schultz & Buswell 

2780 L. Mehlig 

2711 Hollowell &Ryan. .., 

2732 Hutchings & Murphy.. 

2738 F.H. Gerhart 

2938 Weber Drug Co 

3488 Frank E.Ross 

3518 Truitt& Son 



Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute.. 
Terre Haute.. 
Terre Haute.. 
Terre Haute.. 
Terre Haute.. 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . . . 
Vincennes . .. 
Vincennes . . . 
Princeton . .. 

Princeton 

Princeton — 
Washington.. 
Washington.. 
Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Evansville . . . 
Evansville. . . 
Evansville . . . 
Mt. Vernon .. 
Mt. Vernon .. 
Mt. Vernon .. 

Peru.. 

Peru 

Peru 

Ft. Wayne . . . 

Elkhart 

Ft. Wayne . . . 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Goshen 

South Bend . 
South Bend. . 
South Bend . 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Hammond . . . 
Logansport.. . 
Logansport. . . 
Logansport.. . 
Logansport. . 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis. 
Noblesville . 
Noblesville .. 



367 



HOUSEHOLD AMMONIA-ILLEGAL. 



o © 



4863 
5873 
5886 
5894 
5917 
5928 
5941 
6004 
6030 
6055 
6258 
6573 



Brand. 



Retailer. 



Red Cross.. 
Golden Key 

Victor 

White Star. 

Oxfords 

Standard. .. 

Triumph .. 

Eagle 

Maple City. 
Inlanders . 



Carter & Schober 

E.Miller 

Joe Loos 

G. E. Bursley 

Amos R. Walter . . . 
Ft. Wayne (grocery Co. 

F.T. Mensch 

T.B. Iloflfman 

A. J Bicknell. 
Robins Swinehart 

Kramer & iSons 

Braidich Bros. 



Where 

Collected. 



Indianapoli 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
b't. Wayne . 

Goshen 

Goshen 

Elkhart ... 
Laporte — 
Whiting . . . 



46.0 
45.0 
88.0 
86.0 
39.0 
25.0 
78.0 
69.0 
46.0 
29.0 
32.0 
20.0 



BAY RUM. 

Seventy-eight samples of bay rum were analyzed, of wliicli 10, 
or 12.9 per cent, were adulterated. In every case the adulteration 
consisted in the use of methyl or wood alcohol. Most of the 
samples so adulterated contained hut small quantities of ethyl 
alcohol. The use of methyl alcohol in such preparations is in 
violation of good business ethics and the pure drug law. 



BAY RUM— ILLEGAL. 



1-3 



876 
1223 
1918 
1988 
2191 
2245 
2257 
2672 
2703 
2304 



Retailer. 



Meek & Albers . .. . 
Pellins & Lewis ... 

H. N. Jenner 

C. Cooniey & Co. . 
W. C. Leatherman 
G.W.Hoffman . .. 

W.H.Porter 

J. Bros 

U. Scott 

L.T. ■Barker 



Where Collected. 



Evansville . 
Ft. Wayne . 

Goshen 

Soutli Bend 
Valparaiso. 
Logansport 
Logansport 
Kokomo . .. 
Kokomo . . 
Tipton 



31.0 
26.8 
52.3 
16.9 
21.6 
35.8 
35.8 
38.5 
42.9 
4.8 



3.6 

11.83 

3.9 

25.0 

7.83 

1.7 

4.3 

8.0 

2.0 

36.16 



BLACK ANTIMONY. 

Of 45 samples of black antimony but tw^ were pure antimony 
sulfid. All the others were almost entirely fraudulent. But seven 
of the entire number contained any antimony sulfid whatever, 
powdered coal, graphite or charcoal, mixed with small quantities 
of oxid of iron and marble dust being the usual article dispensed 
as black antimonv. 



368 



The excuse of the wholesaler of such fraudulent mixtures is 
that black antimony is used only as horse medicine. Such an 
argument is a severe reflection on the intelligence of the veterina- 
rian, for anyone who would knowingly prescribe a compound of 
coal and marble dnst as a cure for disease knows no medicine. 

BLACK ANTIMONY— LEGAL. 



2a 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Remarks. 



5369 
558 1 



Beam & Lynn... 
Freehafer & Co 



Newcastle.. 
South Bend . 



Pure. 
Pure. 



BLACK ANTIMONY- ILLEGAL. 



k1 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 






Remarks 



5082 
5092 
5096 
5112 
5142 
5155 
5187 
5194 
5245 
5252 
5315 
5320 
5330 
5331 
5334 
5338 
5343 
5365 
5366 
5367 
5368 
5370 
6371 
5375 
5372 
5373 
537u 
5377 

5378 
5379 
5382 
5383 
5380 
5385 
5386 
5387 
5388 
5389 
5727 



C.G.Mueller 

W, H.Kern 

Maas Pharmacy 

Chas. W. Lambert 

A. W. Owen 

W. B.McCullough 

Ernst Stahlhut 

H. M. Holmes 

E.P. Whinery 

H.H.Ice 

Geo.D.Cook 

J. P. Buekner 

Dan Holler 

H.W. Harbauch 

J.O. Rcid 

C. F. Robinson 

B. J. Winger 

Corner Drug Store 

L, E. Kinsey & Co 

G. F. Mowrer 

W. M. Pence 

White's Pharmacy — 

Otto C. Bastian 

Coonley's Drug Store . 

E. A.Schiffer 

J. W. Papozinski 

W. M. Patterson 

Eliol Pharmacy 

Louis C. Kreider 

Public Drug Store 

Economical Drug Store 

R. Fink 

Fred A. Kusel 

V. Neidbalski 

Henry L. Spohn 

R. H. Kuss 

E. A. Fink 

G. A. Sentrich & Co . . . . 

F. A. Mason 



Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis, 
Indianapolis. 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Covington.. .. 
Crvington.. . 

Attica 

Attica 

Attica 

Attica 

Williamsport 
New Castle.. . 
JNew Castle... 
New Castle... 
New Castle... 
South Bend. . 
South Bend.. 
South Bend. . 
South Bend 
South Bend . 
South Bend . 
South Bend . 

South Bend.. 
South Bend . 
South Bend. . 
South Bend 
South Bend . 
South Bend.. 
South Bend. . 
South Bend . 
South Bend . 
South Bend.. 
Marion 



43.88 
37.48 
50.90 
45.96 
96.82 
93.50 
23.62 
42.70 
51.62 
96.12 
88.30 
97.46 
96.96 
94.82 
36.36 
97.12 
96.58 
97.50 
96,82 
96.40 
42.50 
48.40 
96.20 
97.40 
85.48 
43.94 
98.00 
67.08 

45.24 
46.84 
98.08 
23.60 
49.10 
91.00 
43.. 58 
64.90 
48.60 
92.10 
97.34 



Coal and marble dust. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal dust. 
Coal dust. 

17% Antimony Sulfid. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Largely iron. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Charcoal present. 
Charcoal present. 
Charcoal present. 
Charcoal and marble. 
Marble dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Marble dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Iron oxid, 2%; Anti. 

Sulf., 38%. 
Marble dust present. 
Marble dust present. 
Coal dust present. 
Anti. Sulf.. 1.4%. 
Marble dust. 
Graphite present. 
Anti. Sulf., 51%. 
Anti. Sulf., 30%. 
Coal and marble dust. 
Coal dust. 
Coal dust. K 



369 



GLYCERINE. 



Of the 61 samples of glycerine analyzed 47, or 77 per cent., 
did not conform to the standard of the TJ. S. Pharmacopoeia, In 
no case was there evidence of fraud, but the larger number of 
samples of inferior quality indicate that the trade uses little 
care in purchasing this article. Many of the samples contained 
free sulphuric acid, butyric acid, acrolein, etc., due to improper 
purification in the process of manufacture, and several contained 
a large amount of sugar. 

GLYCERINE-LEGAL. 





Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


it 


H2SO4. 


Butyric 
Acid. 


a 
"o 

< 


Remarks. 


884 


H J. Schlaepfer . .. 

Bradley Bros 

Meyer Bros. & Co ... 

H.B. McCord 

F. J. Goldman 

J. M. Callender 

Meyer's Drug Store. 
J. W. Weis 


Evansville... 


1 ?5n 








Pure 


iins 










Pure. 


noi 


Ft. Wayne . . 

Auburn 

Elkhart 

Laporte 

South Bend.. 
Hammond ... 

Delphi 

Anderson — 

Muncie 

Elwood 

Kokomo . .. 
Indianapolis 


1.254 
1.257 
1.246 
1.260 
1.240 
1.257 
1.250 
1.246 
1.256 
1.256 
1.250 
1.247 






Pure. 


18vlR 









Pure 


1885 







Pure. 


?(Mn 








]9m 










?]^f) 








Pure 


nm 


M.W.Edmonds 

City Drug Store 

Shaw & Jackson — 

J.H. Kute 

Hutchings &Murphy 
H.J. Huder 










9^m 








Pure. 


^'>?Q 








Pure. 


n^n 








Pure. 


1^7?,3 










9:^^^ 








Pure. 















GLYCERINE-ILLEGAL. 



499 
537 
552 
605 
619 

633 
643 
711 
726 

738 
799 



822 
833 
842 
864 
873 
938 
959 
986 
1028 
1042 

1059 
1136 

1155 
1187 



S.Herr 

0. K Horner 

Bunton Drug Co 

A. Baur 

G. Reiss 

E.H.Robinson 

H. J. Werker 

J. J. Biggs 

E. Shoptaugh 

H.G.May 

•J. N. Jones 

Chas. Kightly 

A. Young 

A. G. Troutman. .. 
John Laval & Son . . 

J. F. Bomm 

Meek & Albers 

D. & H. Rosenbaum 

Joe Haney 

Blue Drug Store 

R.E.Clark 

Fowler & Kerlin 

Butterbaugh & Co . . 
C.B.Woodworth&Co 

Ranke & Nussbaum 
H. G. Sommera 



Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute . 
Terre Haute . 
Terre Haute . 

Terre Haute . 
Vincennes . .. 

Princeton 

Princeton ... 

Princeton — 
Washington . 

Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Oakland City 
Evansville. 
Evansville . 
Evansville. 
Mt. Vernon 

Peru 

Peru 

Wabash ... 
Wabash . . . 



Wabash ... 
Ft. Wayne . 

Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 



1.233 
1.248 
1.244 
1.246 
1.247 

1.254 
1.247 
1.256 
1.259 

1.256 
1.246 

1250 
1.241 
1.242 
1.256 
1.259 
1.249 
1.254 
1.253 
1.242 
1.242 
1.230 

1.250 
1.260 

1.256 
1.253 


Present 
Present 

Present 

Present 
Present 


Present 
Present 
Present 

Present 

Present 
Present 
Present 


Present 

Large 
amount 

Present 


Present 

Present 
Present 


Present 

Present 

Present 
Present 


Present 
Present 
Present 
Present 
Present 
Present 




Present 


Present 

Present 
Present 


Present 
Present 
Present 
Present 
Present 






Present 


Present 
Present 


Present 



Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 

Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 

Ca. salts present. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 

(Sugar present.) 
Below Phar. stand. 
Beliiw ^'har. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 

Ca. salts present. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 

Sugar. 
Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 



24— Bd. of Health. 



370 



GLYCERINE -ILLEGAL - Continued. 



o « 

_o a 


Retailer. 


Where 
Collected. 


it 


H2SO4. 


Butyric 
Acid. 


.5 
'» 

"0 




Remarks. 


15^15 


Pellens & Lewis 

Ashton Staman 

Ifousewonh Bros . .. 

Central Drug Store . 

O.J. Beeson 

G. W. Rule 


Ft. Wayne ... 

Auburn 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Goshen 


1.255 
1.250 
1.237 

1.250 
1 ?o8 






Present 
Present 
Present 

Present 
Present 

Present 




1808 
1.85^ 




Present 


Below Phar. stand. 


1868 






Acrolein pre.^ent. 


1936 




Present 
Present 




1«>4q 


Goshen 

South Bend.. 
South Bend.. 

Laporte 

Hammond . .. 
Valparaiso. . . 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Lafayette — 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Alexandria . . 
Alexandria . . 

Kokomo 

Indianapolis 


1.26(1 
1.247 
1.251 
1.240 
1.216 
1.247 
1.236 
1.247 

1.250 

1.260 
1 '^30 




1984 


C.Coonley &Co 

R. P. Milton 

F.W. Meissner 

iM. Kolb 

Corner Drug Store .. 

Lytle&Orr 

W. W.Johnson 

Schultz <fe Boswell .. 

Anderson Drug Co .. 

Caswell Bros 

Buck & Brickley 

W. II Birely 

City Drug Store 

F.H.Hubbard 

Francis Pharmacy.. 




2022 
2035 
21 ."il 




Present 


Below Phar, stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 


2179 
2313 

2:^29 




Present 
Present 


Below Phar. stand. 
Below Phar. stand. 


2390 








Ca. salts present. 
Below Phar. stand". 


2402 






Present 


Ca. salts present. 


211fi 


Present 






2462 


l.r50 








B&low Phar. stand. 


2nfi0 


1.242 
1.254 

1233 
1.249 






Present 


Ca. salts present. 


25fi8 








2754 








Chlorid. present. 


2830 




Present 


Present 


Below Phar. stand. 



LIMEWATER (LIQUOR CALCIS). 

One hundred and sixty-six samples of limewater were analyzed, 
and of that number 75, or 45.1 per cent, were below the U. S. P. 
standard. Limewater is simply a saturated aqueous solution of 
pure unslaked lime, the most easily prepared article to be found 
in a drug store. And yet the large number of adulterated samples 
would indicate that in nearly fifty per cent, of the drug stores of 
the State this article is not properly prepared. The explanation 
is doubtless that water is added to the jug containing the lime 
long after all of the lime has been dissolved. A number of the 
samples were entirely neutral, having no more alkalinity than tap 
water. The ignorance or greed of anyone who will dispense tap 
water when asked for something to correct acidity in milk fed an 
infant can only be suitably corrected by a severe application of 
ojfficial punishment. 



371 



LIME WATER-LEGAL. 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 






E. Shoplaugh 

Clara & Sons 

John Laval & Son. . . 

Dawson <fe Boyce 

Fowler & Kerlin 

Dreier & Bro 

Pellens & Lewis 

Meyer Bros. & Co 

Ashton Staman 

H.B.MoCord 

H. M Phillips 

Public Drug Store 

D.C. Peters 

P. W. Meissner 

Kaplousky & Moran . 
E. \V . Lindemann. .. 

Bicknell & Co 

Heineman ifc Sievers . 
Busjohn & Schneider 



Red Cross Pharmacy 

J. D. Bartlett . 

City Drug Store 

Buck & Brickley 

Shaw <fe Jackson 

F. L. Saylor 

L. Mehlig 

W. Scott 

Hutchings & Murphy . ... 
W. M.Birk 

E. H.AVilson 

A. W.Truitt 

Will E Axline & Co . . .. 
A. Gr. Baldwin . . . 

G. A. Senrich & Co 

Chas. Coonley 

Robert P. Milton 

Otto C. Ba?tian 

Public Drug Store 

Eliel's Pharmacy 

E. A.Schifier 

White's Pharmacy 

H. E. Freehafer & Co 

Fink Bros 

Louis C. Kreidler 

Fred A. Kusel 

Meyer's Drug Store 

Samuel T. Applegate 

Otto J. Klner 

Ralph H. Kuss 

Smith <fe Brown 

MofFet & Morgan. 

G. W.Steele 

Maas Pharmacy 

Owl Pharmacy 

Hoskins & Miller 

Theo Otto 

A. H. Fehring 

Crescent Drug Store. . 
Lytle's Corner Drug Store . 

Andrew's Drug Store 

City Drug Store 

King Drug Store 

F. A. Mason 

L. Mehlig 

Meyer Bros. Drug Store . 
Christain Bros. Drug S'ore 

Beverforden 

L. J. Zollinger 

0. J.Buson 

CD. Walls 

Coonley Drug Store 

Louis 0. Kreidler 



Princeton 

Princeton 

Evansville 

Mt Vernon 

Wabash 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Auburn 

South Bend 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Michigan City 
Michigan City 

Hammond 

Valparaiso 

Logansport .... 



Logansport 

Lafayette 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Muncie 

Elwood 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo . .. 
Indianapolis. .. 
Indianapolis. . 
Noblesville — 

Noblesville 

Noblesville. ... 
South Bend ... 
South Bend — 
South Bend.... 
South Bend... 
South Bend — 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend — 

South Bend 

South Bend — 
South Bend ... 

South Bend 

South Bend — 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend ... 
Knightstown . 
Crawfordsvjlle 
Crawfordsville 
Indianapolis. . . 
Indianapolis . . . 
Indianapolis. .. 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Cotumbus 

Kushville 

Muncie — . . . 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Marion 

Kokomo 

Ft. Wayne . . 
Ft. Wayne . ... 
Ft. Wayne . .. 
Ft. Wayne 

Goshen 

Elkhart 

South Bend ... 
South Bond ... 



115.2 
111.7 
114 3 
IW.O 
117.7 
114.3 
101.1 
121.2 
120.0 
108.2 
120.0 
108.2 
114.3 
123.5 
134.1 
117.7 
110.6 
100.0 
110.6 
117.7 
110.6 
114.3 
108.2 
116.3 
105.9 
124.6 
115.2 
128.2 
114.3 
105.9 
109.3 
120.0 
117.7 
102.2 
101.0 
108.4 
116.8 
108.4 
108.4 
115.7 
104.0 
104.0 
106.3 
115.7 
108.4 
113.7 
111.4 
109.5 
107.3 
110.5 
124.6 
117.6 
124.6 
103.4 
115.3 
121.2 
131.6 
110.4 
124.6 
141.0 
105.8 
113 
127.0 
120.0 
106.0 

lon.o 

105.0 
106 
110.2 
113.6 
107.3 
115.7 
120.9 



372 

LIME WATES-LEGAL— Continued. 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



PL, 



Senrieh & Co 

S. T. Applegate 

J. E.C.F. Harper 

Gibson & Riedel 

McDonald, Stockdell&Co. 

Otto C. Bastian 

Houseworth Bros 

Fred A. Kusel 

T.H.Hoyds 

A. E. Keport 

E.R. Star 

W. H. Williams 

Heineman-Sievers 

Oak Drug iS tore 

G.D.Keith 

Chicasaw Driis Store 

L. 11. Mattern 

Bickenel & Co 

Sommers Drug Store 



South Bend. 
South Bend. 

Madison 

Madison . . . . 
New Albany 
South Bend. 

Elkhart 

South Bend. 

Laporte 

Hammond . . 
Hammond .. 
Valparaiso. . 
Valparaiso. . 
Plymouth 
Rochester .. 

Peru 

Whiting 

Hammond . . 
Hammond .. 



109.4 
117.8 
113.6 
113.6 
106.0 
108.3 
118.8 
118.8 
123.1 
103.1 
117.8 
.107.3 
113.6 
107.3 
109.4 
108.3 
lOii.3 
107.3 
108.4 



LIME WAT E P. -ILLEGAL. 



W.H. Fogus 

M. Kaylor 

Ranke & Nussbaum 

H. N Jenncr 

G. W. Rule 

C.Coonley & Co 

T.H.Boyd&Co 

Woodson & Willetts 

J.W.Weis 

Summers Pharmacy 

W. 0. Letherman 

Ragan Bros 

People's Drug Store 

V. E. Silverburg 

B C. Robinson 

F. Clones 

Jay Bros 

HuUowell & Ryan 

Moore Bros 

L. T. Harker 

Francis Pharmacy 

A.B.Carr 

E. W.Stuekey 

I. N. Heims 

Weber Drug Co 

G. E. Oiiiimerinan 

K. L. Spobn 

W.M.Patterson. 
Economical Drug Store 
J. W. Papoczyn^ki 

E. A. Fink 

V. Neidbalski 

Mowrer's Drug Store ... 

Beam & Lynn 

Corner Drug Store 

L. E. Kinsey & Co 

W. Lambert 

B.T.FL-her 

H.M. Holmes 

Dunham tte Jacobs 

Given-Campbell Co 

AV. D.Coleman 

John A. Hook 

C. G. Mueller 

Hargrove A Mullin 

F. B. Johnston & Co 

H.H.Ice 

P. E. Ross 

Moore Bros 



Mt. Vernon ... 
Huntington .. . 

Ft. Wayne 

GosUen 

Goshen 

South Bend... 

Laporte 

Michigan City 

Hammond . 

Hammond . . . . 

Valparaiso 

Lafayette 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Alexandria .. . 
Alexandria. . . 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis 

South Bond 

South Bend, .. 
South Bend... 
South Bend .. 
South Bend... 
South Bend . . . 
South Bond... 
South Bend... 
JNew Castle ... 
New rastle . .. 
Newcastle .. 
Indianapolis, . 
Indianapolis. . 

Columbus 

Indianapolis . 
Frankfort 
CrawCordsville 
Indianapolis . 
Indianapolis . 

Rushville 

Rushville 

Muncie 

Noblesville ... 
Tipton 



7.0 
11.7 
67.0 
49 4 
55.8 
71.7 
29.4 
90.6 
45.9 
97.6 
91.7 

4.7 
64.7 

5.8 

4.7 
11.7 

4.7 
87.0 
77.6 
71.7 
57.6 
77.6 
57,6 
83.5 
28.3 
96.9 
35.8 
,5 
75,8 
,9 
33.7 
98,9 
52.6 
,9 

8,4 

7.5 
30.5 
20.2 
96.4 
,3 
14,0 
33.0 
59.0 
77.6 

0.0 
-42.3 
Tl,6 
11.7 
11,7 



373 



LIME WATER-ILLEGAL-Continued. 



03 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



5691 
5756 
5880 
5910 
5958 
6013 
6025 
6049 
6073 
6087 
6109 
6127 
6153 
6:^36 
6369 
6418 
6453 
6473 
6494 
6522 
6530 
6546 
6553 
6564 
6603 



S. Rosenthal. .. 
H.H.Hubbard 

Ed. Mertz 

F.D. Hoham .. 
C. 0. Haines . .. 
J. A. Bickel. 



Tipton 

Kokomo . .. 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Danville . .. 
Goshen 



H. N. .Jenner I Goshen 



F.H.Benz. 

E.B.Felt 

B..J.Finehout 

W. M. Patterson 

Chapin Park 

Leo Eliel 

.J. M. Callender 

M.Kolb 

L. Tanner 

Edw.L. Fieser 

R.E. Murphy 

Blue Drus Store 

City Drug Store 

E. W. Lindeman . 

Kramer 

Otto Kloepfer 

Whiting Drug Store , 
W . C. Ijeatherraan . . . 



Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend — 
South Bend — 
South Bend . .. 

Lapnrte 

Hammond 

Plymouth 

Rochester 

Peru 

Peru 

Michigan City . 
Michigan City . 
Michigan City . 
Michigan City . 

Whiting 

Valparaiso 



12.0 
71.6 
88.2 

3.0 
54.7 
87.3 
94.6 
29.4 
82.0 
39.9 
93.6 
52.6 
33.6 
84.2 

8.4 
42.1 
81.5 
31.5 

2.6 
35.7 
97.3 
52.6 
79.0 
75.7 
91.5 



PRECIPITATED SITLPIIUR (sULPTITJE PEAECIPITATUm) . 

Of the 141 samples of precipitated sulphur analyzed but 17 
were pure. All the other samples, or 88,0 per cent., contained 
large quantities of calcium sulfate. But few samples contained 
more than 55 per cent, of sulphur, and in most of the samples the 
calcium sulfate content was about equal to that of sulphur. This 
condition is undobutedly the result of careless preparation. 

Precipitated sulphur is a preparation made by boiling a mixture 
of powdered sulphur and slaked lime, filtering the solution, and 
adding hydrochloric acid. The precipitate is then filtered and 
washed. Precipitated sulphur contains no calcium sulfate and 
leaves no sediment on ignition. 



374 



PRECIPITATED SULPHUR-LEGAL. 




Maas Pharmacy 

Owl Pharmacy 

Theo Otto 

Owl Drug Store 

H. F. Beverforden.. .. 

Otto C. Bastian 

T.J. Goldman 

Blie! Pharmacy 

H.E. Preehafer&Co 
Central Pharmacy . . 

R. H. Russ 

H. L. Spohn 

J. W. Papoczynski . . 



Indianapolis. 
Indianapolis. 
Columbus. 
Muncie. 
Ft. Wayne. 
South Beiid. 
Elkhart. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend, 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 



PRECIPITATED SULPHUR-ILLEGAL. 



11 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Oh 


SI 


Remarks. 


715 


I.J. Biggs 


Princeton 

Washington 

Oakland City 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Peru 


51.3 
54.1 
51.9 
51.1 
48.6 
51.5 
50.9 
53.6 
40.8 
94 3 
54.0 
51.0 
50.7 
51.8 
50.8 
51.4 
54.1 
51.8 
53.7 
52.1 


48.7 
45 9 
48.1 
48.9 
48.6 
48 5 
49.1 
46.4 
50.2 
5.7 
46.0 
49.0 
49.3 
48.2 
49.2 
48.6 
45.9 
48.2 
46.3 
47.9 




780 


A. F.Schmidt .'... 




836 






866 


J, F. Bomm 




880 
"978 


Meek & Albers 


Adulterated. 


1*095 
ll61 


Schaefer ife Schaefer 

Ranke ife Nussbaum 


Huntington 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 


Adulterated. 


1181 






1828 


H.B. McCord 




1842 


H. M. Phillips 






1878 


Central Drug Store 


Elkhart 




1894 


Elkhart 




1911 




Elkhart 

South Bend 




1995 


C. Coonley ife Co 




2049 


J. M. Callender 

T. H. Boyd & Co 




2060 






2183 


Corner Drug Store 

W.Scott 

Francis Pharmacy 






2706 
4143 


Kokomo 

Indianapolis 


Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 



PRECIPITATED SULPHUR-ILLEGAL. 



>> . 

o a> 

si 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


hi 

^ ffl 3 

Of 


4876 


Coonley's Drug Store 


South Bend 

South Bend 


47.1 


4877 


Fred A. Kusel 


49 1 


4878 
4879 


E.A.Schiffer 

White's Pharmacy 


South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend ■. 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend 


48.6 
47.9 


4882 
4883 


Meyer's Pharmacy 

Wm. M. Patterson 


46.7 
47.3 


4885 
4887 


E. A. Fink 

Public Drug Store 


47.3 
47 .-7 
44.6 


4893 


Applegate's Pharmacy 

Otto C. Baftian 


4894 


South Bend 

South Bend — 


45.3 


4895 


V.Niedbalski 


48.3 


4896 


Louis Kreidler 

Economical Drug Store 


48,2 


4897 


South Bend 


47.1 



375 



PRECIPITATBt) SULPHUR— ILLEGAL-Continued. 



I. I- 
o © 



Ketailer. 



s» 



Where Collected. 



4899 

4900 

4901 

4902 

4948 

4955 

5004 

5033 

5055 

5059 

5062 

5074 

6078 

5115 

5118 

5126 

5180 

5190 

5197 

52n8 

5259 

b26i 

5277 

52»7 

5293 

5298 

5302 

5305 

5316 

5325 

5340 

5676 

5684 

5693 

5696 

5698 

5712 

5714 

5716 

5724 

5729 

5733 

5738 

5741 

5745 

5747 

5752 

5823 

5837 

5847 

5868 

6066 

6072 

6077 

6090 

6103 

6111 

6138 

6144 

6151 

6365 

6370 

6387 

6392 

6399 

6412 

6419 

6424 

6433 

6440 

6448 

6455 

6461 



Morer's Drug Store 

L. E. Kinsey & (Jo 

Beam ife Lynn 

W. M. Pence 

A. C. Fouche 

Columbia Drug Co 

Dunham & Jacobs 

W. D. Coleman 

Morgan & Dick 

Oean Pharmacy 

T.E.Mills 

John A. Hook 

C. G.Mueller 

Chas. W. Lambert 

HoskinsA Miller 

B. T.Fisher 

Crescent Drug Store 

H.M. Holmes 

Phenix Drug Store 

M. Stewart 

Nickey Drug Store 

Physician's Drug Store . . 

Stevens & Nicolls 

Henderson Drug Store . . . 

City Drugstore 

E.T. Brickley 

Anderson Drug Co 

G. B. Cook 

Geo. D.Cook 

Hedges' Drug Store 

A. B. Donovan 

A.W.Truitt 

Moore Bros 

City Drug Store 

City Drug Store 

Opera House Drug Store 

Dr.T. L.Saylor 

C. C. Robinson 

City Drug Store 

Bradley Bros 

Evans 

Davis Drug Store 

A. W. Leedy 

Meek Drug Store 

J. Bros 

L.Mehlig 

C O.Scott 

Meyers Bros 

Geo Loesche 

Christian Bros 

L.J. Zollinger. 

C.D.Walls 

Housworth Bros 

E.B. Felt 

E. J. Finehout 

Public Drug St< re 

W.M.Patterson 

T. A.Kuael 

Senrich & Co 

Samuel T. Applegate . . . 

E. R.Stanffer 

M.Kolb 

Ben S Wallick 

W H.Williams 

Heineman-Sievers 

People's Drug Store 

L. Tanner 

Oak Drug Store 

Shadel's Drug Store 

U. Rinard 

Shore & Wilson 

Ed. L. Fieser 

Geo. V. Dawson 



New Castle 

New Castle 

New Castle 

New Castle 

Knight?town ... 
Knightst'wn ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Crawfordsville . 
Crawfordsville . 
Cambridge City. 
Cambridge Ci'y. 
Tndianapidis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 
Indianapolis ... 

Colnmbus 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Mnncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Anderson 

Anderfon 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Covington 

Covington 

Williamsport .. 

Noblesville 

Tipton 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Elwood ...... 

Alexandria — 

Alexandria — 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend.... 

South Bend — 

South Bend — 

South Bend — 

South Bend — 

Hammond 

Hammond 

Valparaiso — 

Valparaiso — 

Valparaiso 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 

Rochester 

Rochester 

Rochester 



46.3 

48.5 
47.6 
33.9 
42.2 
44.3 
29.0 
48.7 
48 5 
4S 
52.9 
38.0 
45.7 
47.0 
47.0 

48 5 
44.5 
49.2 
44 8 
47.3 
47.8 
49.5 
49.0 
46.5 
47.3 
49.2 
49.2 
49.0 
49.0 
49.2 
44.5 

49 7 
49,5 
47.2 
47 4 
48.5 
47.3 
46.5 
48.5 
48.5 
48.0 
46.0 
50.0 
47.2 
48.8 
45.8 
-50.0 
44.9 
49.2 
49.2 
46.8 
47.6 
49.1 
50.0 
48.0 
47.7 
48.6 
49.2 
47.6 
46.9 
47 
48.9 
49.1 
48.5 
49.7 
45.9 
49.2 
50,2 
48.3 
49.8 
48.3 
48.7 
48.9 



376 



PRECIPITATED SULPHUR— ILLEGAL-Cbntinued. 



o o 

1-^ 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



t, eS 3 



6469 
6479 
6488 
6497 
6503 
6509 
6520 
6547 
6555 
6569 
6579 
6592 
6596 



Geo. D.Keith 

R. B. Murphy 

Chickasaw Drug Co 

Blue Drug Store 

M. W. Hamaker 

Porter the Druggist 

Thieband & Co 

Kramer Drug Co ... 

Otto Kloepfer 

Whiting Drug Store 

Otto Negele 

Bicknell&Co 

Sommer* 



Rochester 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Michigan City 
Michigan City 

Whiting 

Hammond . . . . 
Hammond . . . . 
Hammond. ... 



47.6 
31.6 
49.8 
47.9 
49.7 
46.5 
47.6 
47.9 
47.9 
48.3 
49.6 

48:7 



BEESWAX. 

Beeswax is prepared by melting the honey free comb made by 
the bees, and skimming and filtering off the impurities. It is very- 
liable to adulteration, as is shown by the results of our analyses. 
Of 87 samples of yellow or natural beeswax, 60 contained paraffin 
in quantities ranging from 10 per cent to 100 per cent., while but 
two out of 70 samples of bleached or white wax were free from 
paraffin. 

Beeswax is worth 50 cents a pound, paraffin but 10 cents, a 
difference which readily explains the heavy adulteration of this 
article. i 

BEESWAX, YELLOW-LEGAL. 



t- S 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



5827 

5840 

5884 

64iil 

6436 

6548 

630 

655 

685 

850 

921 

933 

977 

1037 

1080 

1109 

1815 

1830 

1843 

1861 

1968 

2025 



Meyer's 

Geo. Loesche 

Ed Mertz 

Heineman-Sievers ... 
Shadel's Drug Store . 

Kramer Drug Co 

G. Reiss 

H.J. Werker 

R.G.Moore 

John Loval & Son — 

W.H.Fogus 

Dawson & Boyce 

Porter, The Druggist. 

R. E.Clark 

M. Kaylor 

Bradley Bros 

Ashton Staman 

H.B. McCord 

H.M.Phillips 

Housworth Bros 

Public Drug Store 

P.Milton 



Ft. V/ayne. 

Ft. Wayne. 

Ft. Wayne. 

Valparaiso. 

Plymouth. 

Michigan City. 

Terre Haute. 

Vincennes. 

Vincennes. 

Evansville. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Mt. Vernon. 

Peru. 

Wabash. 

Huntington. 

Huntington. 

Auburn. 

Auburn. 

Auburn. 

Elkhart. 

South Bend. 

South Bend. 



377 



BEESWAX, YELLOW-LEGAL-Continued. 



>> • 

c at 

s == 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



2032 
2091 
2522 
2384 
2969 



D.C. Peters 

Kaplansky & Moran 

Ragan Bros 

Schultz & Boswell . . . 
E.H.Wilson 



Laporte. 
Michigan City. 
Lafayette. 
Lafayette. 
Indianapolis. 



BEESWAX, YELLOW-ILLEGAL. 



la 



5851 

5861 

5902 

6124 

6129 

6139 

6358 

6380 

6490 

6532 

6570 

6598 

505 

516 

564 

576 

602 

614 

672 

705 

732 

745 

767 

814 



1021 
1052 
1069 
1100 
1129 
1194 
1927 
1954 
2044 
2139 
2158 
2215 
2267 
2280 
229] 
2341 
2453 
2468 
2511 
2524 
2614 
2655 
2665 
2688 
2734 
2772 
2787 
2936 
2953 
3506 
3545 



Retailer. 



Where 
Collected. 






Percent. 
Paraffin. 



Remarks. 



Christian Bros 

H. P. Beverforden . . . 

F.D.Hohan 

H. L.Spohn 

Chapin Park Store . . 

T. A.Kusel 

A. E. Report 

J. W. Weise 

Chickasaw Drug Co . 

E. W. Lindeman 

Whiting Drug Co — 
Sommers Drug Co . . . 

S. Uerr 

Fred Keller... 

Bunton Drug Co 

J. S. Madison 

C. W. J. Hoflfman.... 

Baur & Co 

W.C. VVatjen 

C.S.Miller 

E. Shoptaugh 

H.G. May 

F.S.Clapp 

C. Kightly 

Meek & Albers 

Bradley Bros 

Butterbough <fe Co 
Schaefer & Schaefer. 
J. C.Hutzell 

II. N. Jenner 

G. W. Rule 

F. W. Meissner 

M.Kolb---- ••-•••' 
Heineman & Sievers 

Red Ceoss Pharmacy 

Casseil Bros 

Buck & Briekley — 

E. P. Whinrey 

V. E. Silverburg 

Stringfellow & Co ... 

F. L.Saylor 

W. H.Bireley : 

L. Mehlig 

Hutchings & Murphy 

.1. C. Lindsay 

Moore Bros 

I. N. Heims 

C.'L."Mitchen ".!"..'!!'. 
A.G. Baldwin 



Ft. Wayne 

Ft. AVayne .... 

Ft. Wayne 

South Bend. .. 
South Bend... 
South Bend . . 
Hammond . . . . 
Hammond . . . . 

Peru 

Michigan City 
Whiting . . . . 
Hammond . . . . 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute . . 
Terre Haute . . 
Terre Haute . . 
Terre Haute . . 

Vincennes 

Vincennes 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Was-hington .. 
Oakland City . 

Kvan.«ville 

Mt. Vernon . . . 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Huntington. . . 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne . . . 

Goshen 

Goshen 

Laporte 

Hammond 

Hammond 

A^alparaiso .. 
Logansport — 

Logansport 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Alexandria . . . , 

Kokomo . . 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Indianapolis. ., 
Indianapolis. ., 
Noblesville . . ., 
Noblesville 



28.6 
25.8 
16.0 
28.9 
25.9 
21.6 
27.8 
29.6 
14.3 
30.0 
23.9 
29.4 



20.0 
30.0 
90.0 

5.0 
30.0 
55.0 
20.0 

5.0 
100.0 

5.0 
40.0 
10.0 
70.0 
70.0 
70.0 
70.0 
50.0 
70.0 
Not pure wax 

75.0 
Not pure wax 
70.0 
75.0 
80.0 
90.0 

5.0 
Not pure wax 

5.0 
70.0 
10.0 
80.0 

5.0 

Not pure wax 

16.0 

15.0 

. 5 

:^o.o 

Not pure wax 
Dirty 

85.0 

10.0 

10.0 

80.0 
Not pure waxl 

75.0 

10.0 

70.0 

70.0 
Pure paraffin 

75.0 

70.0 

80.0 

80.0 

30.0 

10.0 

80.0 

95.0 



378 

BEESWAX, WHITE-LEGAL. 



O o 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Per Cent. 
Paraffin. 


562 


Buntin Drug Co 


Terre Haute 




22U 


Heineman & Sievers 


Valparaiso. ..'. 


Iv'onc. 



BEESWAX, WHITE-ILLEGAL. 



515 

582 


Fred Keller 

J. S. Madison 


Brazil 

Terre Haute ....... 


75 

Pure paraffin. 

30 


599 


Geo. J. Hoffman 

Baur 


Terre Haute 


613 




20 


631 


G. Reiss 




85 


654 


H.J. Werkes 




20 


673 


W. E. Watjen 

R.G. Moore 

C.S.Miller 

H.G.May 

F.S. Clapp 

H. J. Lindenmann 




85 


687 


Vincennes 


20 


701 


Vincennes 


85 


742 
769 


Princeton 


25 
15 


795 




80 


804 


J. N. Jones 

C. Knightly 

M'eek & Albers 

W.H. Fogus 

Dawson <fe Boyce ... 


Washington 


20 


817 
882 
920 
934 


Oakland City 

Evansville 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Vernon 


15 
20 

20 
30 


949 


D. H. Rosenbaum 


95 


981 


Porter, the Druggist 

Blue Drug Store 

Bradle Bros 

R. E.Clark 

Fowler & Kerlin 

Butterbaugh & Co 


90 


993 
1017 


Peru 

Wabash 


90 
20 


1034 
1053 
1064 


Wabash 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Huntington 

Huntington 

Huntinifton 

Ft. Wayne 

Ft. Wayne 


15 

Pure paraflRn. 

95 


1079 


M. Kaylor 


20 


1097 
1110 
1130 
1193 


Schaefer & Schaefer 

Bradley Bros 

J. C.Hutzell 

H.G.Somuiers 

Ashton Stamon .. 


15 

Not pure wax. 

20 

75 


1816 


Auburn '' 

Auburn 

Elkhart 

Goshen 


20 


1829 
1859 


H.B.McCord 

Housworth Bros 


15 

20 


1924 


H. N. Jenner 


20 


1955 


Goshen 

South Rend . 

South Bend 

South Bend 

Laporte 

Laporte 


15 


1967 
1980 
2026 


Public Drug Store 

Myers' Drug Store 

R P. Milton 


70 
25 
30 


2030 
2043 


D.C. Peters 

F. W. Meissner 

J. M.Callender 

T.H.Boyd & Co 

Koplansky & Moran 

J.W. Weis 

M.Kolb 

W. C. Letherman 


15 
20 


2052 
2055 
2092 


Laporte 

Laporte 


15 
15 
20 


2140 
2153 
2199 


Hammond 

Hammond 

Valparaiso 


80 
10 

15 


2239 


Ben Fisher 


Logansport 

Logansport 

Logansport 

Delphi 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 


90 


2271 
2282 


W.H.Porter 

Red Cross Pharmacy 


10 
10 


2310 
2319 


M.M. Murphy 

Lytle <fe ')rr 


85 
35 


2338 




70 


2383 




20 


2410 


Anderson Drug Store 

City Drug Store 

Casfill Bros 

Buck & Brickley. 

E. P.Whinrey 


Pure paraffin. 


2437 
2451 


Anderson 


90 


2471 
2510 


Anderson 

Muncie 


90 
90 


2552 


Physioiar)f<' Drug Store 


Pure paraffin. 


2564 


W.H.Bireley 

F. L.Saylor 




30 


2650 
2675 


Elwood 


Pure paraffin. 
Pure paraffin. 


2693 


L.Mehlig 

Hollowell &Ryan 






2718 




90 


2773 


Tipton 

Indianapolis 

Noblesville 

Noblesville 


10 


2947 
3530 
3544 


Weber Drug Co 

WiUE Axline & Co 

A.G. Baldwin 


80 
80 
95 



379 



BEESWAX. 

The biityro-refractometer of Zeiss can be used advantageously in 
determining the purity of a beeswax, the refractive index being 
very different from that of paraffin, its chief adulterant. If care 
is taken to control the temperature at which the reading is made it 
is possible to determine accurately the percentage of adulteration. 
The addition of each ten per cent, of paraffin decreases the butyro 
reading 1.6 degree. Based on this constant difference one of the 
assistant chemists, N^. Thompson, has plotted the following curve, 
taking for a basis for work definite mixtures of beeswax and 
paraffin. 



380 




381 



He has also determined the change in melting point for dif- 
ferent mixtures of beeswax and paraffin and the results are plotted 
in the following curve. 




SPIRITS OF CAMPHOR (SPIRITUS OAMPHORAE). 

U. S. p. spirits of camphor is prepared by dissolving 100 
grams of camphor gum in 800 centimeters of alcohol and making 
up to one liter. But 30 to 70 samples analyzed contained a suffi- 
cient quantity to satisfy this formula. One sample contained but 
16 per cent, of the required amount. 



382 



SPIRITS OF CAMPHOR-LEGAL. 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 






I.J. Biggs 

A. F. Schmidt 

H. J, Lindeman . 

J. N. Jones 

W. H.Fogus 

Schaefer & Schaefer .. 

Bradley Bros 

C.B.Woodworth 

.F.J. Goldman 

0. J. Beeson 

0. J. Beeson 

Mevers Drug Store 

R.P.Milton 

City Drug Store . 

Woodson & Willelts — 
Kaplanski & Moran . . . 

J.W.Weis 

Busjohn & Schneider.. 

W. H.Porter 

M. M. Murphy 

J. D. Bartlett 

W. Scr- .- 

Schu! ~^ swell 

Blue i^^unt Drug Store 

Francis Pharmacy 

Weber Drug Co 

E. H. Wilson 

W. R. Axline&Co 

F. W. Mei^sner , 



Princeton , 

Washington.. . 
Washington.. . 
Washington.. . 
Mt. Vernon ... 
Huntington. . . 
Huntington .. . 

Ft. Wayne 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

Goshen 

South Bend ... 
South Bend . . 
Michigan City 
Michigan City 
Michigan City 

Hammond 

Logansport 

Logansport ... 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Kokomo.. .... - 

Lafayette 

Tipton 

Indianapolis.. 
Indianapolis.. 
Indianapolis. 

Noblesville 

Laporte 



149.0 
324.0 

95.0 

95.0 
108.0 
100.0 
117.0 
102.0 
106.0 
132.0 
118.0 

95.0 
118.0 
116.0 
115.0 
147.0 
104.0 
115.0 
121.0 
108.0 
113.0 
107.0 
102.0 

95.0 
106.0 
108.0 
101.0 
118.0 
110.0 



55.5 
51.0 
75.6 
75.6 
72.9 
67.5 
59.4 
67.8 
55.5 
48.9 
58.8 
65.7 
59.1 
66.6 
74.1 
72.0 
72.6 
72.6 
78.0 
76.8 
74.7 
73.2 
76.2 
79.2 
78.9 
75.1 
74.1 
71.7 
93.0 



SPIRITS OP CAMPHOR— ILLEGAL. 



R, G. Moore 

E. Shoptaugh 

Clark & Sons 

F. S.Clapp 

A. Young 

A. J. Trout man 

John Leval & Son — 

J. F. Bomm 

Meek & Albers 

Dr. H. Rosenbaum ... 
Porter, the Druggist . . 

Blue Drug Store 

Chickasaw Pharmacy 

Bradley Bros 

Fowler & Kerlin 

Butterbaugh & Co 

J. O.Hutzell 

Dreier & Bro 

H. G. Sommers 

Meyer Bros. & Co 

Pellins & Lewis 

Ashton Staman 

H.M.Philips 

Hammond Bros 

Central Drug Store . . . 
Lennard & Bentz . ... 

H. N. Jenner 

Public Drug Store — 
O.C.Bostin 

E. W. Lindeman 

Bicknell & Co 

F. W. Meissner 

D.C.Peters 

M.Kolb. 

Corner Drug Store 

W. C. Letherman 

Heineman-Sievers. . 

Ben Fisher 

Red Cross Pharmacy . 



Vincennes 

Princeton 

Princeton 

Washington.. . 
Oakland City . 
Oakland City . 

Evansville 

Evansville 

Evansville . . .. 
Mt. Vernon ... 

Peru 

Peru 

Peru 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Wabash 

Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne .... 

Auburn 

Auburn 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Goshen 

South Bend ... 
South Bend ... 
Michigan City 
Hammond — 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Hammond . ... 
Valparaiso. . . . 
Valparaiso. . . . 

Valparaiso 

Logansport ... 
Logansport ... 



73.0 


62.1 


81.0 


61,2 


53.0 


44.1 


83.0 


77.4 


74.0 


61.0 


89.0 


61.2 


79.0 


60.0 


68.0 


77.0 


86.0 


75.9 


62.0 


56.4 


80.0 


47.1 


93.0 


76.5 


90.0 


54.4 


62.0 


56.1 


85.0 


51.6 


85.0 


61.2 


69.0 


76.9 


58.5 


56.0 


67.0 


59.6 


88.0 


55.2 


86.0 


53.5 


88.0 


75.3 


87.0 


54.0 


67.0 


63.0 


67.2 


83.0 


89.0 


75.0 


87.0 


56.0 


84.0 


59.1 


62.0 


57.0 


60.0 


50.4 


90.0 


62.4 


87.0 


67.5 


82.0 


61.5 


89.0 


64.5 


58.0 


78.6 


79.0 


76.2 


60.0 


49.2 


42.0 


56.4 


80.0 


45.0 



383 



SPIRITS OF CAMPHOR-ILLEGAL -Continued. 



o a> 

si 

1^ 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



StJco 



«> o 



2290 
2312 
2327 
2:^45 
2370 
2401 
2416 
2433 
2449 
2457 
2475 
2484 
2500 
2516 
2545 
2574 
2-583 
2595 
2623 
2629 
2640 
2665 
2670 
2686 
2708 
2743 
2812 
2845 
2858 
2883 
290* 
2917 
2927 
2972 
3491 
3498 
3514 
3535 



M.W.Edmonds 

Lytler & Orr 

W. W. Johnson 

Ragan Bros 

Wells-Yeager-Best 

Anderson Drug Co 

J.B. Wehrle 

City Drug Store 

Cassel Bros 

Buck & Brickley 

H. H.Ice 

Peoples Drug Store . . . 

E.P. Whinery 

V, E. Silverburg 

Physicians Drugstore 
City Drug Store 

E. C. Robinson 

F. C. Jones 

F.W.Green 

J. H.Kute 

F.L.Saylor 

W. Coggswell 

Jay Bros 

L Mehlig 

Hollowell & Ryan 

T. H.Gethart 

H Mehlig 

W.M.Birk 

A.B.Carr 

F.H.Carter 

H.J.Huder 

E. W.Stueky 

I. N. Heims 

Navin's Pharmacy . .. 

Frank Ross 

C.L. Mitchell 

Truitt & Son 

A. G.Baldwin 



Delphi 

Delphi 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Lafayette 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Anderson 

Ande son 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Alexandria 

Alexandria . . .. 

Alexandria 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Kokomo 

Tipton 

Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 
Indianapolis .. 

Noblesville 

Noblesville 

Noblesville 

Noblesville .. .. 



90.0 
78.0 
75.0 
16.0 
85.0 
49.0 
85.0 
58.0 
16.0 
42.0 
62.0 
77.0 
58.0 
72.0 
66.0 
53.0 
71.0 
76.0 
75.0 
82- 
77.. 
85.0 
62.0 
88.0 
80.0 
82.0 
52.0 
85.0 
66.0 
86.0 
85.0 
58.0 
76.0 
33.0 
.'^9.0 
72.0 
83.0 
81.0 



75.3 
64.5 
68.4 
39.3 
67.8 
54.7 
78.0 
51.9 
34.8 
40.8 
78.6 
51.9 
59.1 
58.2 
60.3 
52.8 
45.6 
75.0 
76.5 
62.1 
58.8 
77.4 
78.0 
60.0 
76.6 
72.9 
62.1 
58.2 
59.4 
76.5 
54.3 
53.2 
48.9 
79.5 
54.9 
76.5 
76,5 
60.0 



SYRUP OF IODIDE OP IRON (SYRUPUS FERRI lODIDI). 

Of the 56 samples of syrup of iodide of iron analyzed but 9, 
or 16 per cent., were below standard. 

SYRUP OF IODIDE OF IRON-LEGAL. 



o a> 

11 

2 3 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Per Cent. 
U.S. P. 
Strength. 


4954 


Columbia Drug Co ; 


Knightstown 

Knightstown 

Indianapolis. 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


160.0 


4958 


J. H. Trees 


116.0 


5007 


Dunham & Jacobs 


106.0 


5016 


Ed Hoshour 


186 


5080 
5099 


C.G.Mueller 

Maas Pharmacy : 


lOt.O 
96.0 


5107 


Owl Pharmacy 


188 


5111 


Chas. W. Lambert 

Hoskins & Miller 

B.T.Fisher 


106 


5121 
5124 


Indianapolis 

India'^apolis 


1^8.0 
194.0 


5135 


B.M. Keene 


192.0 


5143 


A. W. Owens 




lOt.O 


5193 


A. H.Fehring 




192.0 


5192 


H.M.Holmes 


Columbus 


196.0 



384 



SYRUP OF IODIDE OF IRON-LEGAL-Continued. 



o o 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent. 

U.S. P. 
Strength. 



5258 
5265 
5273 
5276 
5283 
5355 
5679 
5695 
5720 
5737 
5768 
5769 
5771 
5772 
5773 
5774 
5775 
5776 
5777 
5779 
5780 
5782 
5784 
5785 
5786 
5787 
5788 
5789 
5790 
5791 
5792 
5793 
5794 



Nickey Drug Store 

Physicians' Drug Store 

Owl Pharmacy 

Stevens & JSJicolls 

D.B.Campbell 

G. G. Graham 

F. E. Ross 

City Drug Store 

F. A. Mason 

Hildebrand & Ansley .. 

Leo Eliel 

J. W. Papozinski 

G. E. Cimmerman 

Economical Drug Store 

Robert Milton 

Henry L. Spohn 

E A.Schiffer 

Public Drug Store 

R.Fink 

Otto J. Klaer 

R. H. Russ 

Meyers' Drug Store 

V. Neidbalski 

Fred A. Kusel 

W. M. Patterson 

White's Pharmacy 

Otto C. Bastian 

G. A. Senrich & Co 

Louis C. Kreidler 

L. E. Kinsey <fe Co 

Geo. F. Morer 

W. M. Pence 

Daniel Stewart 



Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Muncie 

Veedersburg 
Noblesville . 

Elwood 

Marion 

Marion 

South Bend. 
South Bend 
South Bend . 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend . 
South Bend . 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend 
South Bend. 
South Bend 
South Bend 
South Bend 
New Castle . 
New Castle . 
New Castle . 
Indianapolis 



194.0 
184.0 
182.0 
182.0 

96.0 
102.0 
180.0 
196.0 
180.0 
190.0 

98.0 
182.0 
170.0 
186.0 
184.0 

9i.O 
196.0 
ICO.O 
180.0 
138.0 
196.0 
112.0 
192.0 
196.0 
102.0 

96.0 
186.0 

94.0 
186.0 
110.0 
178.0 
186 
110.0 



SYRUP OF IODIDE OF IRON-ILLEGAL. 



5150 
5183 
5297 
5301 
56911 
5770 
5778 
5781 
5783 



D.H.Miller 

Crescent Drug Store. 

E. T.Brickley 

Anderson Drug Co .. 

S. Rosenthal 

H. E.Freehafer & Co 

E. A. Pink 

Central Pharmacy... 
Chas. Coonley & Co . 



Franklin... 
Columbus .. 
Anderson . . 
Anderson .. . 

Tipton 

South Bend 
South Bend 
South Bend 
South Bend 



88.0 
52.0 
54.0 
58.0 
88.0 
90.0 
88.0 
82.0 
74.0 



TINCTURE OF ARNICA— TINCTURA ARNICAE. 

I^ine of the 81 samples of tincture of arnica analyzed were 
prepared with methyl alcohol, 

TINCTURE OF ARNICA-ILLEGAL. 






Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent. 
Methyl 
Alcohol. 



Per Cent. 

Ethyl 
Alcohol. 



1015 
698 
llfiO 
1191 
2230 
2570 
2916 
2977 



Bradley Bros 

C. S.Miller 

Ranke & Nussbaum 

H. G Sommers 

B. Fisher 

City Drug Store 

E. W. Stucky 

Navin's Pharmacy . 



Wabash 

Vincennes . . 
Ft. Wayne .. 
Ft. Wayne .. 
Logansport . 
Alexandria^ . 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



35.4 
32.4 
3t.3 
40.7 
28 7 
2.1 
33.3 
31.15 



1.8 
3.2 
8.1 

22.5 

32.3 

7.5 

5.9 



385 



TINCTURE OF IODINE (TINCTURA lODI). 

But 21 out of 1.33 samples of tincture of iodine analyzed were 
of full strength. This corresponds to 84.2 per cent, adulteration. 
The fault is doubtless in the method of preparation, neglect to use 
the proper quantities of iodine and potassium iodide, or incom- 
plete solution of the chemicals. 

TINCTURE OF IODINE -LEGAL. 



RetaUer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent, 
of Purity. 



Chas. D. Knoefel 

Chas. E. Crecelius . . . 
Chas. W. Lambert . . . 

Theo.Otto 

(ieo Loesche 

Ed. Mertz 

F. B.Dilley 

K. L. Neidlinger 

J. A.Bickel 

Public Drug Store . . 

Senrich <& Co 

Samuel T. Applegate 

Leo Eliel 

McDonald-Stockdell 

Averitt & Dorsey 

T.H.Boyds 

Jos. W. Weiss 

W.H.Williams 

G.D.Keith 

M. W. Hamaker 

Ed. M. Moran 



New Albany . . 
New Albany . . 
Indianapolis . 

Columbus 

Ft. Wayne .... 
Ft. Wayne.... 

Brazil ..• 

Brazil 

Goshen 

South Bend... 
South Bend... 
South Bend. .. 
South Bend . . 
New Albany . . 
Terre Haute . . 

Laporte 

Hammond 

Valparaiso ... 

Rochester 

Peru 

Michigan City 



104.5 
171.8 
132.0 
101.8 
137.9 
101.0 
104.3 
138.3 
109.4 
106.5 
102.4 
110.7 
106.1 
106.5 
101.7 
100.0 
100.2 
106.8 
129.3 
105.7 
108.3 



TINCTURE OF IODINE— ILLEGAL. 



524 


Shultz & Co 


Brazil 


80.0 


696 


C.S. Miller 


63.8 


820 




Oakland City 

Evansville 


65.0 


893 


H. J. Sfhlaepfer 


83.9 


1031 


R.E.Clark 


AVabnsh 


65.0 


1113 


J. C.Hutzell 


Ft. Wayne 


90.6 


3840 


Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Bloomington 

Blcomington 


79.5 


3845 


C. 0. Maple 


61.6 


3851 




86.2 


3852 




91.1 


1807 




55.6 


1982 


C. Coonley & Co 


South Bend 


74.3 


3880 


Wm.C. Pfau 


JeflFersonville 

JefFersonville 

New Albany 


85.5 


3885 




80.3 


3910 


McDonald Stockdell Co 


40.8 


3915 




New Albany 

.JeflFersonville 

Jeffereonville 

Knightstown 

Knightstown 

Cambridge City 

Indianarolis 

Crawfordsville 

Cambridge City 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


81.3 


3923 
3930 


Floyd Parks 


80.3 
67.2 


4947 


A. C. Fouche 


72.8 


4951 
4971 


SiT'ith & Brown 

Dr. W. A. Johnston 


70.8 
58.0 


5006 




23.5 


5032 
5060 


Morgan & Dick 

F.T.Mills 


85.7 
64.7 


5071 




87.6 


5095 


W.H.Kern 


60.3 


5100 


Maas Pharmacy . ... 


73.. 'i 


5108 




83.8 
-..79.8 


5122 




5128 
5131 


B.T.Fiiber 

G.T.Traub 


" 87.8 
57.7 • 



25-Bd. of Health. 



386 



TINCTURE OF lODINE-ILLEGAL-Continued, 



O 01 

11 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Per Cent, 
of Purity. 


5134 


B. M. Keene 


Indianapolis 


87.6 


5136 


K. C. Wo d 


75 3 


S141 


A. W. Owen 




79 5 


5149 


D.H.Miller 


Franklin 


95 7 


5175 


A. H. Feb ring 




95.6 


5178 


Crescent Drug Store 




75 5 


5186 


Ernst iStahlhut ; 




76 4 


5'91 


H. M. Holmes 




65 4 


5198 


Phoenix Drug Store 




72 6 


5-'0i 






85 5 


5264 


Physicians' Drug Store 




40.0 


6271 


' 'wl Drug Store 




81.5 


5275 


Stevens & Nicolls 




68 8 


5281 


Walker Bros 




79 


5292 


City Drue Store 

A. W Truitt 




30.0 


5675 




41 9 


5681 


H. Mehlig 


Tipton 


78 


5704 


King Drug Store 


Elwood 


76 


5715 


City Drug Store 




83 7 


5718 


Model Drug Store 




61 9 


5723 


Bradley Bros 




98 


5728 


Evans 




62.6 


5734 


Davis Drug ."^tore 




95 1 


5736 


Hildebrand & Ansley 




67.4 


5740 


A. W. Leedy 




80 


5749 


F.H Gerhart 




88 8 


5754 


G. E. Meek 




59 


5821 


Meyer Bros 


Ft. Wayne 


76 8 


5842 




Ft. Wayne 


75 


5856 




Ft. Wayne 


61 8 


5'<'^6 


L. J. Zollinger 

T.D.Hohan 


Ft. Wayne 


96.8 


5907 


Ft. Wayne 

Brazil 


65.1 


5991 


N. M. Mendenhall 


76 1 


S993 


S. Herr 




77 9 


5994 


F. M.Scbultz 


Brazil 


71 


6000 


T.W.Inglehart 


73 9 


6068 


Elkhart 


72 2 


61 n 


H. L. Spohn 




60 


6164 


J. E. C.F.Harper 




38.0 


6165 


C. R. McLeland 




88.9 


6166 


J. P. McDermont 




57 8 


6269 


Fred Keller 




36 6 


6384 






45.0 


6286 


(t. W. J. Hoffman 




75.3 


6288 


E. Hampton 




68.4 


6290 


City Hall Pharmacy 




81.6 


6300 


Wm. P. Henner 




95.1 


6 '02 


Red Cross Pharmacy 


Terre Haute 


98.8 


6?()4 


R. H. Burns ifeSon 


Terre Haute 


75.7 


6 '07 


Cook & Black 


82.7 


6309 


Big Four Pharmacy , 




88.9 


6310 


C. T Dawson 




58.9 


6517 




South Bend 


67.5 


6328 


E. f!.Zahrt 


Laporte 

Laporte 


73.9 


6339 


F. W. Meissner 


88.9 


6352 


A. E. Kepert 


95.6 


6359 


E. R. Stanferr 

M.Kolb 




74.6 


6W6 




78.3 


6381 


Ben S. Wallick 


Valparaiso 


97.5 


6402 




53.8 


6408 


Peoples Drug Store 




64.0 


6415 






41.5 


6431 






75.0 


6138 


W.Rinard 


Plymouth 


90.7 


6445 




34.0 


6451 


Edw. Fieser 




53.0 


6458 


Geo. V.Dawson .. . 




40.8 


6177 


R. E. Murphy 


Peru 

Peru 


86.3 


6493 




81.6 


6506 


Porter, the Druggist 




62.2 


6517 




Peru 


87.4 


6521 


City Drug Store 


Michigan City 

Michigan City 


75.3 


6527 


E. \V. Lindeman 


84.9 



387 



TINCTURE OF IODINE— ILLEGAL— Continued. 






Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent, 
of Purity. 



6544 
6550 
6556 
6566 
6575 
6587 
6594 



Kramer Drug Store. 

Otto Kloepfer 

L. Mattern 

Whiting Drug Store 

Otto Negele 

Bicknell & Co 

Sommers ... 



Michigan City 
Michigan City 

Whiting 

Whiting 

Hammond 

Hammond . .. 
Hammond 



89.4 
76.4 
32.9 
82.7 
94.4 
54.1 
89.3 



TINCTURE OF IRON (TINCTURA FERRI CHLORIDI). 

Of 17Y samples analyzed 138, or 78.5 per cent, were below the 
U. S. P. standard of not less than 13.28 per cent, of anhydrous 
ferric chloride. The low percentage of iron may be due to the 
use of impure chemicals, incomplete solution, or carelessness in 
preparation. We have prepared several samples according to the 
ofl&cial U. S. P. method and had no trouble in producing a normal 
article. 

TINCTURE OF IRON-LEiiAL. 



>% • 

O CD 

«"! 

u a 


Retailer. 


AVhere Collected, 


it 


be 

a.li 

a) u 
o S 

Ph 


Remarks. 


498 


S. Herr 


Br.nzil 

Brazil 


.9436 

1.0483 

.9723 

.9402 

.9673 

.9975 

.9797 

.9685 

.9814 

1.0147 

.9791 

.9840 

.9740 

1.0326 


125.1 
112.9 
142.6 
112.9 
1,38.8 
170.0 
159 5 
142.6 
133.5 
166,6 
148 6 
153.5 
140.9 
179.7 


Pure. 


513 


Fred Keller 


Pure. 


707 


r. J. Biggs 




Pure. 


725 




Pure. 


750 






Pure. 


798 




Washington 


Pure. 


861 






Pure. 


936 






Pure. 


989 


Blue Drug Store 

J.C.Hutzell 


Peru 


Pure. 


1112 


Fort Wayne 


Pure. 


1923 




Pure. 


2377 


Wells-Yaeg^r-BestCo 

E. P. Whinrey 




Pure. 


2501 




Pure. 


2755 


F. H. Hubbard 




Pure. 










o a> 
h S 


Retaih 


r. 


Where Coll 


3cted. 


Per Cent. 
U.S. P. 
Strength. 


4946 


A.C.Fouche 

J. H. Trees 




Knightstown 
Knight.'-town 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 




106.0 


4957 




100.2 


5098 


Maas Pharmacy 

Chas. W. Lambert 

W. B. McCuUough 




112 2 


5114 




101.2 


5153 


Franklin 
Columbu 
Columbu 
Covingtoi 
South Be 






110.9 


5163 


Theo.Otto 






100.0 • 


5172 


A. H. Fehring 


i 




104.4 


5321 








106.2 


5397 


Henry L. Spohn : 


ttd. 




100.0 



388 



TINCTURE OF IRON-LEGAL-Continned. 



O 01 

h3 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent. 
U.S. P. 
Strength. 



5400 
5406 
5410 
5742 
5948 
6098 
6155 
6294 
6301 
6329 
6346 
6353 
6500 
6505 
6545 
6575 



Robert P. Milton .... 

Economical 

R. Fink 

Meek Drug Store 

C.L.Thompson. ... 
Public Drug Store . . . 

Leo Eliel 

Red Cross Pharmacy 
Averitt & Dorsey — 

E. C. Zahrt 

T.H. Boyds 

A. E. Kepert 

M. W. Hamaker 

Porter the Druggist . 
Kramer Drug Store . . 
Otto Negele 



South Bend .. 
South Bend ... 
South Bend... 
South Bend ... 

Danville 

South Bend ... 
South Bend .. . 
Terre Haute . . 
Terre Haute . . 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Hammond . ... 

Peru 

Peru 

Michigan City 
Hammond . ... 



100.0 
100.0 
125.1 
123.7 
106.2 
106.8 
102.5 
102.5 
123.1 
108.7 
116.9 
145.0 
101.2 
112.5 
101.2 
105.6 



TINCTURE OF IRON-ILLEGAL. 



549 


Bun ton Drug Co 


Terre Haute 


99.4 


637 


Terre Haute 

Oakland City 

Knightstown 

Indianapolis 

Crawfordsville 

Cambridge City 

Cambridge City 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 


65.5 


821 




53.5 


4952 




89.6 


5008 
5034 
5056 


Dunham & Jacobs 

Morgan & Dick 

Dean House Pharmacy 


57.3 
88.4 
86.6 


5070 
5075 
5081 


J. N. Marson ... 

John S. Hook 

C. G. Mueller 


89.6 
92,0 
44.1 


5094 


W. H.Kern 


73.1 


5110 




88.4 


5120 




Indianapolis 


62.2 


5127 


B.F.Fisher 


Indianapolis 


81.1 


5138 


R. B.Wood 


Franklin 


94.0 


5140 


A.C.Owen 


Franklin 


86.6 


5148 


D.H.Miller 

Crescent Drug Store - 




78.6 


5179 




76.2 


5185 


Columbu.* 


97.5 


5189 


H.M.Holmes 


Columbus 


67.0 


5196 




Columbus 


86.6 


5246 


E.P.Whinery 




54.8 


5249 




64.0 


5251 


H.H.Ice 




70.1 


5255 




Muncie 


88.4 


5272 




Muncie 


79.2 


5280 


Walker Bros 


Muncie 


86.6 


5286 


Henderson Drug Co 




46.3 


5290 


Anderson 


84.1 


5300 


Anderson Drug Co 

Geo. D. Cook 

H. Songer 


85.9 


5317 




68.3 


5346 


Veedersburg 


73.1 


5353 


W. H. Wallace 




45.9 


5357 


A.M. Booe 




60.9 


5390 


H. E. Freehafer & Co 


South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend 


74.3 


5391 


Fred A. Kusel 


90.7 


5392 


J. W. Papozinski 


68.8 


5393 




25.1 


5394 


Mowrer's Drug Store 




20.1 


5395 


South Bend 


82.5 


5396 
5398 
5399 


White's Pharmacy 

Leo Eliel 

G. A Senrich & Co 


South Bend. . 

South Bend 

South Bend 

South Bend... 

South Bend 

South Bend 

New Castle 


75.9 
70.0 

72.7 


5401 




75.4 


5402 
5403 
5404 


W.M.Patterson 


57.9 
73.8 
33.8 


• 5405 


E.A.Fink 


South Bend 


75.4 


5407 


South Bend 


94.0 


5408 


W. M. Pence .... 


Newcastle 

South Bend 


'32.7 


5409 


Otto C. Bastian 

Meyer's Drug Store 


71.5 


5411 


South Bend 


87.4 



389 



TINCTURE OF IRON— ILLEGAL— Continued. 



o o 

is 

1-^ 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



Per Cent. 
U. S. P. 
Strength. 



5412 

5413 

5414 

5415 

6416 

5117 

5418 

5672 

5677 

5686 

5689 

5699 

5711 

5713 

5719 

5720 

5722 

5730 

5732 

5735 

5739 

5744 

5751 

5755 

5819 

5820 

5833 

5843 

5853 

5867 

5876 

5906 

5947 

5952 

5957 

5959 

5961 

5967 

5969 

5981 

5983 

5989 

5992 

5995 

5996 

5998 

6001 

6015 

6069 

6122 

6145 

6149 

6263 

6270 

6283 

6285 

6287 

6289 

6299 

6303 

6306 

6308 

6311 

6316 

6340 

6560 

6367 

6375 

6382 

6403 

6409 

6116 

6132 

6439 



E. A.Schiffer 

V.Neidbalski 

R.H.Kuss <feCo 

Otto J. Klaer 

Chas. Coonley 

Cimmerman's Pharmacy 

Beam & Lynn 

A. G.Baldwin 

A. W. Truitt 

J. C. Lindsey 

Red Cross Drug Store 

F. W. Green 

Dr. F. L. Sayler 

E.C.Robinson 

Model Drug Store 

W.H.Bireley 

Bradley Bros 

Evans 

Davis Drug Store 

Hildebrand & Ansley 

A. W.Leedy 

Jay Bros 

C.O.Scott 

T.H.Hubbard 

Lay <fe Hawthorne 

Meyer Bros Drug Co 

Geo. Loesche 

Christian Bros 

H. F. Beverforden 

L. J. Zollinger 

Ed. Mertz 

F. D.Hohan 

J. W. West 

J. C. Marsh 

C. 0. Haines 

C. C. Gottier 

J. E. Dunlavy 

W.W.Jones 

Badger & Green 

C.C. Gottier 

W.Allen 

F.C.Dilley 

l.Herr 

F. W.Schultz 

O.K.Horner 

T. W. Inglehart 

H. L. Neidlinger 

J. A.Bichel 

House worth Bros 

H.L.Spohn 

Senrich & Co 

Samuel T. Applegate 

N.M. Mendenhall 

Fred Keller 

Geo Reist 

G. W. J. Hoffman 

C.Hampton 

City Hall Pharmacy 

W. M. Henner 

R. H. Burns & Son 

Black & Cook 

Big Four Pharmacy 

C.T.Dawson 

Otto C. Bastian 

F. W. Meisner , 

E. R. Stanffer 

M.Kolb 

Jos. W. Weise 

Ben S. Wallick 

Newland Drug Store 

Peoples Drug Store 

L. Tanner 

Shadel's Drug Store 

W.Rinard 



South Bend 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend., 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 
New Castlo . 
Noblesville . 
Noblesville . 

Tipton 

Tipton 

Elwood 

Elwood 

Alexandria . 
Alexandria . 
Alexandria . 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Marion 

Kokomo . .. . 
Kokomo . . . . 
Kokomo . .. . 
Indianapolis 
Ft. Wayne.. 
Ft. Wayne.. 
Ft. Wayne. . 
Ft. Wayne.. 
Ft. Wayne.. 
Ft. Wayne. . 
Ft. Wayne.. 

Danville 

Danville — 

Danville 

Greencastle. 
Greencastle . 
Greencastle. 
Greencastle. 
Greencastle. 
Greencastle. 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Goshen 

Elkhart 

Souih Bend. 
South Bend. 
South Bend. 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
Terre Haute 
South Bend. 

Laporte 

Hammond ... 
Hammond . . 
Hammond . . 
Valparaiso. . 
Valparaiso. . 
Plymouth. .. 
Plymouth ... 
Plymouth . . . 
Plymouth... 



72.7 
95.6 
89,0 
61.2 
59.5 
30.0 
38.2 
70.1 
44.5 
86.0 
92.7 
88.4 
96.3 
89.7 
64.0 
84.2 
83.5 
84.2 
62.2 
98.1 
92.7 
59.1 
97.6 
81.0 
38.0 
81.2 
58.1 
65.6 
89.3 
90.0 
89.3 
81.2 
88.1 
95.6 
88.1 
68.1 
94.3 
96.2 
96.2 
88.6 
95.0 
75.0 
87.5 
95.7 
83.1 
76.8 
65.0 
98.7 
93.1 
86.2 
92.1 
95.0 
83.7 
53.1 
56.2 
88.1 
82.5 
65.0 
72.5 
61.9 
68.7 
90.6 
57.1 
95.6 
84.3 
80.0 
96.8 
68.7 
45.0 
95.0 
74.4 
81.8 
86.2 
88.1 



390 



TINCTURE OF IRON-ILLBGAL-Continued. 



si 

t-3 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Per Cent. 
U.S. P. 

Strength. 


6446 


Shore & Wilson 




71 2 


^452 


Ed.W.Fieser 




44 3 


6466 


G.D.Keith 




70 6 


6478 


R. E. Murphy .. 


Peru 


51 2 


6492 


Blue Drug Stme 

Thieband & Co 


87.0 


6515 




95 


6528 


E. W. Lindeman .... .... 


Michigan City 

Michigan City 

Michigan City 

Whiting 


73 7 


6536 


Ed. M. Moran 


95 


6551 
6557 


OttoKloepfer 

L. H. Mattern 


95.6 
71 2 


6567 


Whiting DrugCo 


Whiting 


76 8 


6588 


Bicknell & Co 


Hammond 


93 7 


'6595 


Sommers Drug Co 


72.5 











MISCELLANEOUS DRUGS. 

We have devoted some time to the examination of drugs in the 
form of chemicals commonly carried in stock by druggists. The 
samples analyzed were for the most part of good quality. 

Of the seven samples of potassium iodide all were pure and up 
to the standard. Of the nine samples of potassium chlorate five 
were pure and four below standard. Two of tlie three samples 
of zinc sulfate were pure. The third sample, although pure, 
was improperly labeled. 

All the fourteen samples of boric acid were pure, as were the 
seven samples of sodium phosphate, the four samples of Rochelle 
salts, and single samples of tartaric and salicylic acids. 

BORIC ACID-LEGAL. 



si 


Retailers. 


Where 
Collected. 


SB . 


Remarks. 


815 
825 
852 


C. Rightly 

A. Young 


Oakland City 

Oakland City 

Evansville 

Ft. Wayne 


100. 
99.9 

100. 

100. 
99 9 
99.8 
98.9 
99. (t 
98.7 

100. 
99 2 
99.9 

100. 

100. 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


1150 


C. B. Wood worth & Co 


Pure. 


1165 


Ft. Wayne 


Pure. 


1177 




Ft. Wayne 


Pure. 


12:^7 


Pel lens & Lewis 

M. Kolb 

A nderson Drug Co 

Moore Bros 

F. H.Carter 

E. W.Stucky 

Weber Drug Co 

E.H.Wilson 


Ft. Wayne 


Pure. 


2154 




Pure. 


2407 
2784 
2891 


Anderson 

Tir>ton .... 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 


2921 
2952 
2968 


Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

Indianaplois 


Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure.< 









391 



POT. CHLORATE-LEGAL. 



U It 
O 9 



Retailers. 



Where Collected. 



Remarks. 



1049 Fowler & Kerlin 

1125 J.C.Hutzell 

1148 C. B. Woodworth <feCo 

llfi2 Ranke & Nussbaum... 

2251 G. W.HoflFman 



Wabash 

Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Ft. Wayne . 
Logansport 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 



POT. CHLORATE-ILLEGAL. 



1101 Schaefer & Schaefer. . 

1913 Leonard & Bentz 

1979 Meyers Drug Store — 

2368 Wells-Yaeger-Best Co 



Huntington 
Elkhart.... 
South Bend 
Lafayette . . 



Not Pure. 
Not Pure. 
Not Pure. 
Not Pure. 



SODA PHOSPHATE-LEGAL. 



770 S. F.Clapp 

805 J.N Jones 

900 H. J. Schlaepfer... 

103S R.E.Clark 

1082 M. Kaylor 

1224 Pellens & Lewis.., 

3842 Gentry Drug Store 



Washington 
Washington 
Evansville. . 

Wabash 

Huntington. 
Ft. Wayne . . 
Blaomington 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 



ROCHELLE SALTS-LEGAL. 



1226 Pellens & Lewis... 

2083 Woodson & Willits 

2197 W. C. Leatherman . 

2422 J. B.Wehrle 



Ft. Wayne . . . . 
Michigan City 
Valparaiso. .. . 
Anderson 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 



POT. IODIDE-LEGAL. 



963 
974 
994 
1081 
1180 
1181 
2657 



Joe Haney Peru 

Porter the Druggist Peru 

Blue Drug Store Peru 

M. Kaylor I Huntington. 

Dreier & Bro ! Ft Wayne . . 

Central Drug Store j Elkhart 

W. Cogswell Blwood 



Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 
Pure. 



ZINC SULFATE-LEGAL. 



901 
1083 



1225 



H. J. Schlaepfer 
M. Kaylor 

Pellens & Lewis 



Evansville. 
Huntington 

Ft. Wayne . 



Pure. 

Pure but im- 
properly la- 
beled. 

Pure. 



SALICYLIC ACID-LEGAL. 



392 



PRECIPITATED SULPHUR-ILLEGAL. 



O ® 



Retailer. 



Where Collected. 



'r'3'y 
a, 



Remarks. 



715 

780 

836 

866 

880 

978 

1095 

1161 

1181 

1828 

1842 

1878 

1894 

1911 

1995 

2049 

2060 

2183 

2706 

4143 



I.J. Biggs 

A.F.Schmidt 

A. G. Troutman 

J. F. Bomm 

Meek k Albers . 
Porter the Druggist. 
Schaefer k Scbaefer 
Ranke k Nussbaum 

Dreier k Bro 

H.B. McCord 

H. M. Phillips 

Central Drug Store . 

F.J. Goldman 

Leonard k Bentz 

C. Conley & Co 

J.M. Callender 

T.H.Boyd&Co 

Corner Drug Store . . 

W.Scott 

Francis Pharmacy. . 



Princeton 

Waihington . 
Oaklancl City 
Evansville. .. 

Evansville 

Peru 

Huntington... 
Ft. Wayne ... 
Ft. Wayne ... 

Auburn 

Auburn '. 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

Elkhart 

South Bend.. 

Laporte 

Laporte 

Valparaiso .. . 
Kokomo ...... 

Indianapolis 



51.3 
54.1 
51.9 
51.1 
48.6 
51.5 
50.9 
53.6 
49.8 
94.3 
54.0 
51.0 
P0.7 
51.8 
50.8 
51.4 
54.1 
51.8 
.'^3.7 
52.1 



48.7 
45.9 
48.1 
48.9 
48.6 
48.5 
49.1 
46.4 
50.2 
5.7 
46 
49.0 
49.3 
48.2 
49.2 
48.6 
45.9 
48.2 
46.3 
47.9 



Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
AduUi rated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 
Adulterated. 



TARTARIC ACID-ILLEGAL. 



1-:) 


Retailer. 


Where Collected. 


Remarks. 


2356 


J.D.Bartlett 


Lafayette 


Sodium sulfate pres- 
ent. Adulterated. 



INSPECTION OF GROCERY STORES, MARKETS AND 
SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

rreedom from adulteration is an important requisite in foods. 
It is of even greater importance that the foods be handled in a 
cleanly manner, protected from dirt and flies, and kept from the 
outside contamination that is often more to be feared than mere 
adulteration. Proper care of stores and markets can only be se- 
cured at the price of eternal vigilance of the health officer or food 
inspector. Several cities of the State, notably Indianapolis, 
Crawfordsville, Ft. Wayne and Columbus, through local inspect- 
ors have done much to abolish filthy conditions and have secured 
reasonably satisfactory results. The State Food Inspectors 
have made note of the conditions of the stores and markets which 
they visited during the summer of 1906. Their instructions were 



393 

to note the general condition of the stores as to cleanliness, the 
way in which stock was cared for, as to protection from flies, dirt, 
etc., the condition of the rear room or store room in the back, and 
the condition of the refrigerator, taking special pains to notice its 
odor and appearance. The reports handed in by inspectors are 
given below : 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

Minnesota Grocery Co., 1037 B. Washington. Inspected August 21, 
1906. Floor clean; rear clean; dried fruit wormy; other goods satisfactory. 

Carter & Schober, 911 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floor clean; refrigerator clean and free from odor. 

Henry Prange, 620 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. Floor 
and wall clean; goods satisfactory. 

Harrig's Grocery, 617 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floors and wall clean; goods satisfactory. 

Frank Lindeman, 410 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods and rear room rather dirty. 

Standard Grocery, 358 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floor clean; rear satisfactory. 

Court House Grocery, corner Washington and Alabama. Inspected 
August 21, 1906. Floor clean; goods clean; meats rather dirty and mussy. 

Chas. H. Rinne, 344* W. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

D. Dugan, 411 W. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. Floor 
clean; goods dirty. 

Day's Aurora Tea Store. Inspected August 21, 1906. Floor clean; 
goods dirty. 

Chas. Schwier, 1016 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. 
Floor dirty; refrigerator filthy; uses newspapers to wi-ap bread, etc. 

John Spier, 940 E. Washington. Inspected August 21, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean. 

I. Prince, 225 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Goods dirty; floor dirty; refuse in rear; fly specks everywhere. 

R. M. Mueller, corner Delaware and New York streets. Inspected 
August 22, 1906. Floors and goods in excellent condition. 

Consumer's Grocery Co., 305 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected Aug- 
ust 22, 1906. Goods in satisfactory condition; rear part of store dirty; 
dead flies thick. 

C. W. Verbarg, 539 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Goods and floor clean; refrigerator clean. 

J. Sutphen, 531 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods rather dirty. 

F. Stahlut, 547 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

Frank Gross, 642-644 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 
1906. Excellent condition. 



394 

Wm. Ball, MO Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 5^2, l906. 
Floor clean; walls and goods dirty and fly specked. 

J. H. Kahn, 901 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

A. A. Scott, 870 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods dirty. 

Standard Grocery Co., 766 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 

22, 1906. Floor and goods clean; refi'igerator dirty. 

Thos. Nevens, 735 Massachusetts avenue. Inspected August 22, 1906. 
Everything sticky and dirty; filthy. 

N. A. Moore, corner Illinois and Ohio streets. Inspected August 23, 
1906. Excellent condition; goods, floor and walls very clean; refrigerator 
clean and sweet. 

M. C. Shea & Co., 219-223 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 
1906. Floor clean; refrigerator clean; rear room very clean. 

Stone & Bussey, 503 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods clean; refrigerator satisfactory; rear part rather dirty. 

J. M. Carvin & Son, 606 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Goods., floor and rear clean. 

Chas. Railsback, 738 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Goods fairly clean but fly specked; floor rather dirty. 

P. J. Ryan, 843 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 1906. Goods 
in satisfactory condition; floor clean. 

Con. Bauer, corner Capitol and Indiana avenue. Inspected August 

23, 1906. Store fairly clean; refrigerator smeary and sticky. 

W. A. Schofield, 1516 Central avenue. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Floors and goods clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Purfeerst & Miller, 1601 N. Alabama street. Inspected August 23, 
1906. Floors clean; goods in good condition; refrigerator in excellent 
shape. 

M. Clifeord, 225-227 E. Sixteenth street. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Floors clean and goods in satisfactory condition. 

Glick & Shane, corner Sixteenth and Illinois streets. Inspected Aug- 
ust 23, 1906. Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

O. F. Volkening, 1301 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods in fairly good condition; refrigerator fair. 

A. W. Berryhill, 1(X)3-1005 N. Illinois street. Inspected August 23, 
1906. Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Columbia Grocery Co., corner Illinois and Market streets. Inspected 
August 23, 1906. Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

W. Y. Heller, 1303 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; refrigerator in excellent condition. 

Grubb & Co., 1306 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; refrigerator ill smelling. 

Carl Gising, 1267 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. Floor 
clean; goods in satisfactory condition; refrigerator clean. 

E. A. Allen, 1236 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean. 

Duncan & McJenkins, 1239 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1^6. 
Goods In good condition; refrigerator clean. 



395 

C. W. Dill, 1230 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. Goods, 
floor and refrigerator clean. 

Martin & Anderson. 1133 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Goods, floor and refrigerator clean. 

C. L. Scbindler, 1081 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods clean; refrigerator and meat satisfactory. 

Geo. Bredewater. 1031 Oliver avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Floor, refrigerator and goods clean. 

Schooler & Goldsberry, 2703 College avenue. Inspected August 24. 
1906. Goods clean; floor clean; refrigerator satisfactory; place in excel- 
lent condition. 

Gosney Bros., 2713 Asbland avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; rear part rather dirty. 

H. E. Gaddis, 2403 College avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Beckerich Bros., 2128 College avenue. Inspected August 24, 1906. 
Goods and floor clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Robt. Keller, 1076 S. Bast street. Inspected August 25, 1906. Goods, 
floor and refrigerator clean. 

R. Freund & Co., 1033 S. East street. Inspected August 25, 1906. 
Goods and floor satisfactory; refrigerator clean. 

John Stevens, 501 Buchanan street. Inspected August 25, 1906. Floor 
and goods dirty; rear part dirty; open buckets of preserved fruits have 
flies in them. 

M. Roth, 933 S. East street. Inspected August 25, 1906. Refrigerator 
clean; satisfactory. 

F. T. Meyer & Co., 802-806 S. East street. Inspected August 25, 1906. 
Floor clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

H. E. Schortemeier, 602 S. East street. Inspected August 25, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods fair; refrigerator fairly clean. 

Geo. Amt, 353 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 25, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean; refrigerator clean. 

F. E. George, 1110 Shelby street. Inspected August 27, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean. 

Enterprise Grocery, 1058 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Cook & Co., 1036 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Arnholter Bros., 948 Virginia avenue. Floor and goods clean; re- 
frigerator clean. 

C. Behnke, 840 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean; rear excellent. 

C. H. & E. H. Schrader, 803 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 
1906. Floor and goods excellent; rear clean. 

Neph. King, 738 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean; refrigerator clean. 

J. H. Rothert, 649 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. 
Goods and floor clean; rear clean. 

C. Douglas, 636 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1096. Goods 
ftnd floor clean; rear satisfactory. 



396 

Hammond & Pasquier, 613 V^irginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 
1906. Goods, floor and refrigerator clean. 

S. E. Woolensnider, 601 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. 
F'loor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Mrs, N. Vinci, 310 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1906. Floor 
clean; goods fly specked. 

J. H. Madden, 308 Virginia avenue. Inspected August 27, 1900. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Peter Liehr, 433 N. Davidson street. Inspected August 28, 1906. 
Goods, floor and refrigerator clean. 

J. C. Thomas, corner Noble and Michigan streets. Inspected August 
28, 1906. Goods and floor clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

H. E. Schortemeier, 640 New York street. Inspected August 28, 190G. 
Goods and floor clean. 

W. M. Kriel, 301 N. Noble street. Inspected August 28, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; refrigerator clean. 

R. Brattain, 770 W. New York street. Inspected August 28, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

H. G. Ai'szman, 443 W. Ohio street. Inspected August 28, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

FRANKLIN, IND. 

F. N. LaGrange. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor clean; 
rear very clean. 

H. C. Strickler & Son. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor 
in excellent condition. 

L. H. Dunlap. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor clean. 

J. A. Schmith. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods clean; floor clean; 
bad odor from rear. 

H. N. Dunlap. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor clean. 

A. A. Whaley. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor clean. 

J. R. Fleming. Inspected August 30, 1906. Goods and floor clean. 

EDINBURG. 

Chupp Bros. Inspected August 30, 1906. Floor and goods clean; ex- 
cellent condition. 

Maley & Hyde. Inspected August 30, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
rear part clean. 

F. Winterberg. Inspected August 30, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
excellent condition. 

C. A. Mutz. Inspected August 30, 1900. Floor and goods clean; i-ear 
clean. ■ i! *!^[ 

G. M. Carvin. Inspected August 30, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
rear of store satisfactory. 

Wells Bros. Inspected August 30, 1906. Refrigerator clean. 

COLUMBUS. 

H. J. Tooley. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor and goods clean. ' 
J. B. Joy, 314 Third street. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor and 
goods clean; meat rather dirty. 



397 

Weekley & Brown, 30G Third street. Inspected August 31, 190G. 
Floor and goods clean; rear satisfactory. 

John Yorwald, 302 Third street. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean. 

Knight & McLain, 240 Jackson street. Inspected August 31, 190(5. 
Floor and goods clean. 

Rethwitcli & May, 231 Washington street. Inspected August 31, 190G. 
Goods and floor clean. 

Jos. Newsom & Son, 414 Fourth street. Inspected August 31, 190G. 
Floor clean; goods dirty. 

Frohman Bros., 434 Fourth street. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean. 

H. L. Gaines, Postoflice block. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor 
and goods in excellent condition. 

Geo. Winans, 531 Washington street. Inspected August 31, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; garbage in rear smells badly. 

J. V. Hughes, 521 Washington street. Inspected August 31, 1906. 
Floors and goods in satisfactoiy condition; rear clean. 

J. F. Lowe & Co., 426 Fifth street. Inspected August 31, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean. 

A. Mathi, 1519 Seventeenth street. Inspected August 31, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean. 

Von Amgis Grocery, corner Tenth and Sycamore streets. Inspected 
September 1, 1906. Floor and goods in good condition. 

The Sycamore Grocery, 714 Sycamore street. Inspected September 
1, 1906. Floor and goods satisfactory. 

MUNCIE. 

H. C. Adams, 515 S. Walnut street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Goods and floor satisfactory; rear very clean. 

C. A. Cropper, 510 S. Walnut street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Everything in excellent condition. 

Ed Goeble & Co., 416 S. Walnut street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; refrigerator clean. 

H. W. Jones, 217 S. Walnut street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

J. R. Guthrie, corner High and Main streets. Inspected September 5, 
1906. Floor and goods clean. 

Xenia Peterson, corner High and Washington streets. Inspected 
September 5, 1906. Floor and goods in good condition. 

White & Haines, corner High and Washington streets. Inspected 
September 5, 1906. Floor and goods clean. 

A. B. Phillips, 108 W. Washington street. Inspected September 5, 
1906. Floor and goods clean. 

W. W. Trullender, 118 N. Walnut street. Inspected September 5, 
1906. Floor and goods clean; rear clean. 

Sterling Cash Grocery, corner Jefferson and Main streets. Inspected 
September 5, 1906. Goods, floor and refrigerator clean. 

Lake Carey, 305 E. Main street. Inspected September 5, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean. 



398 

T. Bryan & Son, 325 E. Main street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; rear rather dirty. 

H. G. Mauzy & Co., 405 E. Main street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

W. R. Wright, E. Main street. Inspected September 5, 1906. Goods, 
floor and rear clean. 

Scott & Yingling, 121 E. Charles street. Inspected September 5, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

E. L. Addison, corner High and Jackson streets. Inspected September 
5, 1906. Floor and goods clean. 

E. S. Secrest, 117 W Charles street. Inspected September 6, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; rear satisfactory. 

H. G. Krull, corner Kirby avenue and Monroe street. Inspected Sep- 
tember 6, 1906. Floor, goods and rear clean. 

Sam Moore, Kirby avenue. Inspected September 6, 1906. Floor and 
goods clean; meats fairly clean. 



ANDERSON. 

Norris, 1006 Main street. Inspected September 7, 1906. Floor and 
goods clean. 

B. F. Timmons, 937 Main street. Inspected September 7, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean. 

Geo. W. Hadley, 926 Main street. Inspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor clean; goods clean; refrigerator clean. 

J. L. Phillips, Noi'th Side Square. Inspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; refrigerator clean. 

Masters & Shackford. 22 W. Eighth street. Inspected September 7, 
1906. Floor and goods clean: refrigerator excellent; ill smelling chicken 
coops in rear. 

Madison & Son, 33 W. Eighth street. Inspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

W. H. Wood, 1010 Meridian street. Inspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; rear very clean. 

Geo. W. Hadley, 1017 Meridian street. I-nspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Masters & Shackelford, 1031 Meridian street. Inspected September 
7, 1906. Floor and goods clean; refrigerator excellent. 

Brown Pettit, 1109 Meridian street. Inspected September 7, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

Mike Graney. Inspected September 7, 1906. Floor, goods and re- 
frigerator clean. 

Yellow Front Grocery, 1210 Meridian street. Inspected September 7, 
1906. Floor and goods clean; refrigerator rather dirty. 

C. P. Durham, 1117 Main street. Inspected September 7, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; refrigerator fairly clean. 

Elliot & Son, 22 W. Fourteenth street. Inspected September 7,^1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

Fair View Grocery, 603 W. Fourteenth street. Inspected September 
7, 1906. Floor and goods clean; ill smelling chicken coops. 



399 

NOBLBSVILLE. 

Craig & Hayes, 13 S. Ninth street. Inspected September 11, 1906. 
Goods, floor and rear clean. 

A. D. Couden, 15 S. Nintli street. Inspected September 11, 1906. 
Goods and floor in excellent condition; rear clean. 

H, Deck, 33 S. Ninth street. Inspected September 11, 1906. Goods 
and floor clean; refrigerator clean. 

Caylor's. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods clean; rear 
satisfactory. 

L. W. Wild, Ninth street. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor 
clean; cakes covered with syrup exposed to the flies. 

Carlin & Moss. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods in 
excellent condition. 

Caylor & Trissel. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods 
clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Applegait & Barber, W. Logan street. Inspected September 11, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; rear excellent. 



TIPTON. 

Haynes & Shuck. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor, goo*is and 
rear clean. 

W. N. McGraw. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods 
clean; rear satisfactory. 

Ramsey Bros. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor, goods and rear 
clean. 

Kirby & Winders. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor, goods and 
rear clean. 

Hash & Matherly. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods 
clean; rear satisfactory. 

M. Bath. Inspected September 11, 1906. Floor and goods clean. 



ELWOOD. 

Cavan's. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor and goods clean; rear 
clean. 

Star Grocery. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor, goods and rear 
clean. 

F. Aledndorf. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor, goods and re- 
frigerator clean. 

Bicknell & Mahan. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor, goods and 
refrigerator clean. 

ALEXANDRIA. 

N. DePoy. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
rear clean. 

J. L. Grider. Inspected September 12, 1906. Floor, goods and rear 
dean. 



400 

MARION. 

G. B. Campbell, 321 Adams street. Inspected September 12, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean. 

Swayzee's Market, 120-124 S. Washington street. Inspected Septem- 
ber 12, 1906. Floor and goods clean; rear clean. 

Boshorne & Marrone, 116 N. Third street. Inspected September 12, 
1906. Floor and goods clean. 

A. F. Norton, 205 N. Third street. Inspected September 12, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; meats passable. 

G. W. Day & Co., 219 N. Third street. Inspected September 12, 1906. 
Floor, goods and refrigerator clean. 

Economy Market Co., corner Fifth and Washington streets. Inspect- 
ed September 12, 1906. Floor and goods clean; meats excellent. 

Hiatt & Lrenferty. Inspected Septembr 12, 1906. Floor and goods 
clean; rear excellent. 

KOKOMO. 

J. P. Bireley & Co. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floor, goods and 
rear clean. 

McKee & Rule, 28 E. Walnut street. Inspected September 14, 1906. 
Floor and goods clean; refrigerator clean. 

Sulavan's Pure Food Stores. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floors, 
goods and refrigerator clean. 

M. F. Hall, 1 N. Buckeye. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floor 
and goods clean; rear clean. 

McKaffrey &. Co. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floor, goods and 
rear clean. 

William Bros. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
refrigerator satisfactory. 

Philip Bernd. Inspected September 14, 1906. Floor and goods clean; 
rear passable. 

SOUTH BEND. 

I. Miller. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; refrigerator in 
good condition, butter, milk and meat separate; store in excellent condi- 
tion. 

Joe Loos. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; other conditions 
good. 

De Wall Grocery. Inspected October 2, 1906. Back end of store 
dirty; no odor in refrigerator. 

Zoller-Mertz. Inspected October 2, 1906. General conditions good; 
refrigerator satisfactory; butter, milk and meats separate. 

Barnett Bros. Inspected October 2, 1906. Sawdust on floor; refriger- 
ator in good condition. 

The Blake Grocery Co. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; 
goods and refrigerator in good condition. 

J. M. Sartin. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor and shelves 'dirty; 
store in a mussy condition. 



401 

Chas. W. Crofoot. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor and shelves 
clean; goods clean. 

Brodbeck Bros. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; refrigerator 
clean. 

J. E. Williams Bros. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; shelves 
clean; store in good condition. 

Brown Grocery. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty and mussy; 
no refrigerator. 

J. A. McCoUougb. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
clean; rear room satisfactory. 

Jos. Sommers, Meat Market. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty 
and greasy; refrigerator ill smelling. 

Langs Grocery. Inspected October 2, 1906. Good condition; clean. 

Kirks Market. Inspected October 2, 1906. Sawdust on floor; refrig- 
erator clean. 

A. L. Shropp. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor slightly dirty, other- 
wise store in good shape. 

F. W. Mueller. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor, shelves, back room 
and refrigerator clean. 

Chas. Wagner. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor, shelves and rear 
room clean and in good condition. 

Mueller-Johnson. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor and refrigerator 
clean; rear room satisfactory. 

Fred Rostister. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor and shelves clean; 
refrigerator satisfactory, meat, butter and milk separate. 

Hiram Bishop. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor, shelves, rear room 
and refrigerator clean. 

D. N. Becker. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves and 
refrigerator clean. 

Bon Ton Grocery. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
and refrigerator clean. 

Wesley Brown. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; refrigerator 
in good condition. 

Eaymon DeVoss. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
mussy; refrigerator satisfactory. 

Edward Doane. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; back room 
and refrigerator clean. 

A. Harper. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; genei-al condi- 
tions good, I 

Oliver Keene. Inspected October 2, 1906. Everything in good condi- 
tion. 

Post Grocery Co. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; refriger- 
ator clean. 

Scott & Brady. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
mussy. 

W. Livengood. Inspected October 2, 1906. Floor clean; rear room 
and refrigerator clean. 

Thomas Grocery Co. Inspected October 2, 1906. Front of store in 
good condition; rear room dirty. 



26-Bd. of Health. 



402 

FT. WAYNE. 

Ft. Wayne Grocery Co. Inspected September 25, 1906. Front of 
store clean; rear very dirty; meat market at side of grocery, sawdust on 
floor in front; rear filttiy and greasy; refrigerator ill smelling. 

Amos R. Walter. Inspected September 25, 1906. Floor dirty; re- 
frigerator dirty; butter, milk and meats separate; general conditions good. 

F. T. Mensch. Inspected September 25, 1906. Store clean'; floors and 
shelves clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

G. H. Buck & Son. Inspected September 25, 1906. Store in satis- 
factory condition. 

GOSHEN. 

F. B. HofCman. Inspected September 27, 1906. Store clean; refriger- 
ator satisfactory. 

M. A. Cornell. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and shelves in 
good condition; rear room and cellar clean. 

W. W. Poyser. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
clean; refrigerator in good condition. 

Chicago Fair. Inspected September 27, 1906. Refrigerator clean and 
sweet; floors and shelves dirty. 

B, C. Murphy. Inspected September 27, 1906. Store very mussy; 
back room filthy, trash all around. 

A. J. Bickel. Inspected September 27, 1906. Everything in good con- 
dition. 

C. F. Bickel. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floors, rear room and 
refrigerator clean. 

H. F. Philippi. Inspected September 27, 1906. Store in good con- 
dition. 

Paul Bros. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor clean; general con- 
dition clean. 

Golden & Gemberling. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor clean; 
store in good condition; refrigerator clean. 

F. M. Swinehart. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and refriger- 
ator clean; rear room in good condition. 

liilley & Sons. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and back room 
clean. 

Robbins-Swinheart. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor dirty, oth- 
erwise in good condition. 

J. J. Hoffman. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and shelves 
clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

W. A. Griffin. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
in good condition; rear room dirty; slight odor in refrigerator. 

Meyers Meat Market. Inspected September 27, 1906. Both front 
and rear room clean; refrigerator sweet. 

Frank Ludwig, Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and refriger- 
ator clean. 

Herman Bros. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor clean; refriger- 
ator in good condition. 

Boyer Greiner. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor clean. 



403 

Shick Bros., Meat Market. Inspected September 27, 1906. Every- 
thing clean. 

C. A. DeLong. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor and refriger- 
ator clean; reai- room d^rt3^ 

W. A. Paul Co. Inspected September 27, 1900. Floor clean; general 
conditions good. 

LAPORTE. 

Huscre Grocery Co. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor and stock 
dirty; shelves mussy. 

E. C. Hall & Bro. Inspected October 4, 1906. Everything in good 
condition. 

Woolf Grocery Co. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor clean; general 
condition good. 

J. M. Strong. Inspected October 4. 1906. Floor clean; no refriger- 
ator; meat hanging on wall. 

C. F. Miller & Co. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor dirty; shelves 
clean; refrigerator satisfactory. 

J. A. Schumm. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor and rear room 
clean; refrigerator in good condition. 

Kleinfeld & Khanu. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor and stock 
dirty. 

J. S. Minich. Inspected October 4, 1900. Floor and shelves clean; 
refiigerator in good condition. 

Boyd W. Grandstaff. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor, shelves and 
ice box clean. 

Booserman Grocery. Inspected October 4, 1906. Floor dirty, other- 
wise in good condition. 

Palm Bros., Meat Market. Inspected October 4, 1906. Sawdust on 
floor; refrigerator sweet and clean. 

MICHIGAN CITY. 

Chas. Romel. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and stock clean; re- 
frigerator in good condition. 

J. B. Van Pellen. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor dirty; goods and 
refrigerator clean. 

Henry Finckie. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor dirty; stock clean; 
refrigerator slightly ill smelling. 

Sam Hunzikcr. Inspected October 5. 1900. Floor clean; shelves 
clean; refrigerator clean. 

G. M. Edwards. Inspected October 5, 1906. Eveiything in good 
condition. 

Frank E. Gielow. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and stock clean. 

A. H. Lohsand Grocery. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and 
shelves clean; rear room satisfactory. 

Fred J. Krueger. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and rear room 
dirty. 

L. B. Ashton. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and stock dean; 
rear room in good condition. 



404 

Ray, Ebert & Co. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor ana stock clean; 
refrigerator in good condition. 

Gillden Bros. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor dirty; stock clean 
and in good condition; rear room and refrigerator clean. 

M. E. Clark. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor, stock and refriger- 
ator clean. 

G. Cruse & Co. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and goods clean. 

L. W. Muse. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor dirtj^; goods clean; 
rear room dirty. 

lamest Arch. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor and goods clean; re- 
frigerator satisfactory. 

D. A. Reading. Inspected October 5, 1906. Floor dirty; stock and 
refrigerator in good condition. 

WHITING. 

Braidicli Bros. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor dirty; rear room, 
shelves and stock dirty. 

Heyden Place Co. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and shelves 
clean. 

M. A. Balla Grocery. Inspected October 8, 1906. Sawdust on floor; 
refrigerator satisfactory. 

Jas. Allison. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor clean; shelves clean; 
in good condition. 

The "Whiting Market Store. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and 
goods clean; refrigerator clean* 

HAMMOND. 

J. J. Austin. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and refrigerator 
clean. 

H. T. Burk. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor clean; stock clean; 
meat market in rear; refrigerator satisfactory; rear room clean. 

Wm. A. Berriger. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and shelves 
clean; meat market in rear, sawdust on floor; refrigerator clean. 

M. Maginot. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and stock clean; gen- 
eral conditions good. 

M. Griswold. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and shelves clean; 
meat market in rear: refrigerator in good shape. 

S. A. Southack. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor clean; stock dirty; 
shelves mussy; refrigerator fair. 

Mrs. Bertha Grimes. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor clean; stock 
and refrigerator dirty. 

H. W. Warwick & Co. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor clean; stock 
clean; refrigerator dirty. 

A. H. Bunde. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor dirty; stock, rear 
room and refrigerator clean. 

F. R. Nason. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor and refrigerator 
clean. 

M. M. Koch. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor, stock and rear room 
clean. 



405 

Hursh & Warwich. Inspected October 8, 190G. Floor dirty; stock 
and refrigerator clean; rear room mussy. 

Hammond Meat Market. Inspected October 8, 1906. Floor, refriger- 
ator and rear room clean. 

VALPARAISO. 

C. E. Shield. Inspected October 9, 1900. B'loor dirty; stock clean. 

Wm. Gossill, Meat Market. Inspected October 9, 1900. Sawdust on 
floor; refrigerator clean. 

W. C. Windle. Inspected October 9, 1906. Floor, stock and re- 
frigerator clean. 

J. W. Seib, Meats. Inspected October 9, 1906. Sawdust on floor; 
refrigerator clean; rear room dirty. 

Leety & Sons. Inspected October 9, 1906. Floor clean; stock, re- 
frigerator and rear room clean. 

F. Beyer. Inspected October 9, 1906. Floor and stock in good shape. 

HeiTick & Herrick. Inspected October 9, 1906. Floor dirty; stock 
mussy. 

PLYMOUTH. 

I. Miller. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor clean; rear room and 
stock rather dirty. • 

Enterprise Grocery. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor, rear room 
and stock clean. 

W. A. Beldon. Inspected October 10, 1906. Sawdust on floor; re- 
frigerator and rear room clean. 

W. P. Suit. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor, stock and rear rooin 
clean. 

A. M. Reaves. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor clean; stock dirty; 
refrigerator and rear room dirty. 

Geo. Vinalls Grocery. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor, stock and 
rear room clean. 

L. J. Southworf. Inspected October 10, 1906. Floor and stock clean. 

ROCHESTER. 

Millie Grocery Co. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock, rear 
room and refrigerator clean. 

W. H. Lowi-y Grocery. Inspected October 12, 1906. 

Shore & Wilson. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock, refriger- 
ator and rear room clean. 

L. E. Downey. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor clean; stock and 
refrigerator in good shape. 

H. Brothers. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock in fairly 
good shape; refrigerator clean. 

J. F. Kepler. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor and stock clean; 
rear room dirty. 

L. W. Davidson. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor and stock clean. 

F. A. Kilmer. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock clean; 
rear room clean. 



406 

PERU. ; 

Kelly & Allman. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock and re- 
frigerator clean. 

B. F. Weimer. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock, refriger- 
ator and rear room clean. 

Woods & Vaner. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock, refriger- 
ator clean. 

E. A. Schram. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor and stock clean. 
Peru Mercantile Co. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock 

clean. 

Glennon Wendt. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock and refrig- 
erator clean; rear room dirty. 

S. W. Smitb. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock and rear 
room clean. 

J, W. Miller. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock mussy. 

F. I. Derberts. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock and 
refrigerator clean; rear room floor dirty. 

W. T. Hanson. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, stock and refrig- 
erator clean. 

John Devine Grocery. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor clean; stock 
dirty; meat market in rear of store; refrigerator clean. 

Petty-Drums. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor, shelves, stock 
dirty; meat market in rear; dirt around the refrigerator. 

J. D. Helderle. Inspected October 12. 1906. Floor clean; stock 
mussy; refrigerator fair. 

.W. Petty Grocei-y. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock 
and refrigerator clean. 

J. J. Glennon. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor dirty; stock and 
rear room clean. 

McCaffrey & Co. Inspected October 12, 1906. Floor clean; stock 
clean; meat market in rear. 

MADISON. 

L. Danner. Inspected October 6. 1900. Grocery in good condition; 
back shop satisfactory. 

Bilz & Kalb. Inspected October 6, 1906. Meat market satisfactory: 
refrigerator clean. 

Spauldiug & Thomas. Inspected October 6, 1906. Store and rear 
room in good condition. 

Gus Yunker Meat Market. Inspected October 6, 1906. In very satis- 
factory condition. 

J. F. Wells Grocery. Inspected October 6, 1906. Very satisfactory. 

J. W. Temperly Grocery. Inspected October 6, 1906. In very good 
condition. 

Chas. M. Short Grocery. Inspected October 6, 1906. Everything in 
good condition. 

JET'FBRSONVILLE. 

Best & Co., Grocery. Inspected October 6, 1906. In good condition, 
M. J. Kenor, Grocery. Inspected October 6, 1906. Grocery satisfac- 
tory; meats screened off. 



407 

NEW ALBANY. 

R. L. Grossheider, Grocery. Inspecterl October 6, 1906. In good 
condition. 

W. O. Davis, Grocery and Meats. Inspected October 6, 1906. Store 
in good condition; refrigerator foul. 

DANVELLE. 

H. V. Hunt Groceiy. Inspected September 28, 1906. Stocli clean; in 
good condition. 

J. B. Brien. Inspected September 28, 1906. In excellent condition. 

B. F. Howell & Son. Inspected September 28, 1906. Store in good 
condition. 

H. H. Mills. Inspected September 28, 190G. Stock clean; refriger- 
ator satisfactory; floor dirty. 

J. M. Holman, Meat Market. Inspected September 28, 1906. Floor 
and refrigerator clean. 

J. D. Darnell, Grocery. Inspected September 28, 1906. In good con- 
dition. 

GREENCASTLE. 

Zeis & Go. Inspected September 27, 1906. Stock in good condition; 
general conditions poor; many flies. 

Enterprise Department Store. Inspected September 27, 1906. Groc- 
ery department good. 

Wm. Haspel, Meat Market. Inspected September 27, 1906. Very 
dirty; many flies; refrigerator dirty. 

Egger & Cooper. Inspected September 27, 1906. Condition fair. 

C. H. Meikel. Inspected September 27, 1906. Condition good. 

J. C. Browning Grocery. Inspected September 27, 1906. Stock clean; 
meat department dirty. 

R. S. Cooper. Inspected September 27, 1906. Floor dirty; general 
conditions good: refrigerator in excellent condition. 

T. E. Evans. Inspected Septeinber 27, 1906. Store in good condition, 

J. L. Peters Grocery. Inspected September 27, 1906. Grocery satis- 
factory; meat market in fair shape. 

W. Craig. Inspected September 27, 1906. Everything in good condi- 
tion. 

T. A. Moran. Inspected September 27, 1906. Good condition. 

E. C. Caldwell. Inspected September 27, 1906. Store and goods in 
fair condition. 

C. H. Cook. Inspected September 27, 1906. Store in good shape. 

W. H. Allen. Inspected September 27, 1906. Good condition. 

BRAZIL. 

Hudson & Hudson. Inspected September 27, 1906. Shop clean; re- 
frigerator clean. 

G. H. Jones & Go. Inspected September 29, 1906. Everything In 
good condition. 



408 

Jones & Co. Inspected September 29, 1906. Conditions very good 
in store; refrigerator only fair. 

G. H. Jones & Co. Inspected September 29, 1906. Store very clean; 
refrigerator fairly clean. 

Hudson Bros., West Side. Inspected September 29, 1906. Store and 
refrigerator clean; rendering department only fair. 

G. H. Jones & Co., 512 W. Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Store in excellent condition. 

G. H. Jones & Co., 702 Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Store and refrigerator clean. 

G. H. Jones & Co., 818 Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Store clean; refrigerator not very clean. 

M. C. Stewart. Inspected September 29, 1906. Refrigerator good; 
racks rather dirty. 

G. H. Jones & Co., Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Store and refrigerator very clean; racks rather dirty. 

G. H. Jones & Co., 18 N. Meridian street. Inspected September 29, 
1906. Store clean; refrigerator fair. 

R. S. Stewart, 641 B. Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Store and refrigerator clean. 

James Hunter Grocery. Inspected September 29, 1906. Store clean; 
stock good. 

A. Comparon, 802 N. Vandalia. Inspected September 29, 1906. Store 
in fairly good condition. 

Joseph Dascamps. Inspected September 29, 1906. In fair condition. 

Mc. Rulle, 255 N. Ashley street. Inspected September 29, 1906. Re- 
frigerator very dirty; stock good. 

M. C. Murphy, 565 E. Main street. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
Very good condition. 

Chevallier Bros., 557 Main street. Inspected October 1, 1906. Con- 
dition fair. 

Monarch Grocery. Inspected October 1, 1906. Everything in good 
shape. 

T. C. Cole, 515 E. Main street. Inspected October 1, 1906. Condition 
good. 

E. N. Evans, 212 E. Main street. Inspected October 1, 1906. Store 
clean; stock satisfactory. 

R. H. Bolin & Son, 217 E. Main street. Inspected October 1, 1906. 
Good. 

I. S. Easter Meat Market. Inspected October 1, 1906. Refrigerator 
fair; meats and groceries good. 

J. A. Krider. Inspected October 1, 1906. Good condition. 

Collier & Thompson. Inspected October 1, 1906. Store and stock 
fairly good. 

Kinzan Bros. Inspected October 1, 1906. Conditions fair. 

S. T. Gonter & Co. Inspected October 1, 1906. Good. 

J. A. Decker. Inspected October 1, 1906. Store fair; meat depart- 
ment dirty. 

Geo. Ostwalt. Inspected October 1, 1906. Store and stock in satis- 
factory condition. 



409 

Gibbons Bros. Inspected October 1, 1906. Good condition. 

J. Bogle. Inspected October 1, 1906. Everytbing in very good sliape. 

A. W. Sliafer. Inspected October 1, 1906. Good condition. 

TERRB HAUTE. 

J. W. Maud. Inspected October 2, 1906. Very dirty junk sbop and 
grocery combined. 

P. O. Sullivan. Inspected October 2, 1906. Very dirty store. 

Bauemeister Gi-ocery. Inspected October 2, 1906. Fair condition. 

Frank Smirtz, 113 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. E'air- 
ly clean; refrigerator new but dirty. 

W. H. Fink, 112 Wabasb avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Con- 
ditions good. 

J. W. Hoff, 120 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Very 
dirty shop; air foul; two dogs in shop. 

H. C. TroAvbridge, 119 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Shop clean. 

G. P. Willis, 128 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Nice 
clean shop; racks in refrigerator dirty. 

Jonas Strause, Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1900. In fair 
condition. 

E. A. Hollingsworth, Fourth and Cherry. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Both grocery and meat market clean. 

Wm. Fuhr, 212 S. Fourth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. In 
good condition. 

C. W. Nagel, 210 S. Fourth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store 
in good condition; refrigerator clean. 

B. S. Rockwood, 204 S. Fourth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Everything clean and satisfactory. 

J. W. Brown. Inspected October 2, 1906. Conditions fair; refriger- 
ator clean. 

W. H. Mori-is, Fifth and Ohio streets. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Grocery and meat market clean; refrigerator clean. 

A. R. Norris, 417 Ohio street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Refriger- 
ator clean; in fair shape. 

Wright & King Co., 647 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Both meat market and grocery in excellent condition. 

W. W. Kaufman. Seventh and Wabash avenue. Inspected October 
2, 1906. Good condition. 

P. A. Brown. Inspected October 2, 1906. Meat market in good con- 
dition. 

J. B. Ryan, 802 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Not 
much of a store. 

S. Bressette, Eleventh and Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 
1906. Grocery and meat market satisfactory; refrigerator fairly clean. 

Tine & Voight, 1141 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Meat market fair; grocery in good condition; refrigerator dirty. 

Geo. Burgets, 1209 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Very 
clean; refrigerator excellent. 



410 

F. W. Hoff, 1300 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. In 
good condition. 

Thos. G. Lowe, 1353 "Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Store in fairly good shape. 

E. R. Pence, 1367 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Grocery and meat market both satisfactoiy. 

0. H. Clifton, 1513 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. Good. 

G. C. Baesler, 1404 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Meat market very good. 

O. C Hancock, 1529 Wabash avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Good condition. 

W. R. Scott, 530 S. Second street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store 
clean; refrigerator dirty. 

Nat Kemper, 530 S. Third. Inspected October 2, 1906. Good con- 
dition. 

John C. Vendall, 1101 S. Eighth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Store clean. 

J. T. McCullough, Ninth and College avenue. Insipected October 2, 
1906. Store very clean; refrigerator exceptionally clean. 

H. H. Thomas, 1222 College avenue. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Good condition. 

Herndon Bros., College and Thirteenth. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Store very clean. 

Keplin & Kahane, 100 S. Thirteenth. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Good condition. 

B. Reemer, 465 S. Thirteenth. Inspected October 2, 1906. General 
conditions good. 

L. T. Scott, 1328 Poplar street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Good. 

Oedink Bros., 1320 Poplar street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store 
satisfactory. 

J. F. Liehr, 1200 Poplar street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Goods 
and store clean. 

H. Valentine, 1123 Poplar. Inspected October 2, 1906. Meat market 
in good shape. 

H. Valentine. Inspected October 2, 1906. Grocery stock and store 
clean and in good condition. 

.7. Van Duzer, 1101 Poplar. Inspected October 2, 1906. Conditions 
good. 

n. Handick, 1004 Poplar. Inspected October 2, 1906. Conditions 
fair. 'j 

John Dammershausen, E'ifteenth and Liberty. Inspected October 2, 
1906. Store in fairly good condition. 

Fred Schanefeld. Fifteenth and Liberty. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Store and stock in vei-y good condition. 

O. Vokley, 1540 Liberty street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Every- 
thing satisfactory. 

J. B. GaUiger, 1801 Liberty street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store 
and stock clean; good. 

J. W. Fritz, Fourteenth and Locust. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Meat market and grocery fair. 



411 

P. C. Noban, 835 N. Thirteenth street Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Refrigerator clean; store fair. 

Fritz 0. Fry, Locust and Thirteenth. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
In fair condition. 

C. S. Smith, 934 Locust. Inspected October 2, 1906. In fair con- 
dition, 

Franli Byrne, 901 N. Eighth. Inspected October 2, 1906. Veiy good. 

G. W. Hess, 321 N. Ninth. Inspected October 2, 1906. In good con- 
dition. 

A. Ray & Co., 005 Tippecanoe street. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Everything satisfactoiy. 

Andy Rowe, 827 Sixth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store in 
fairly good condition. 

J. W. Rood. 614 Locust street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Store and 
stock in fair shape. 

J. H. Helmick, 830 N. Sixth. Inspected October 2, 1906. Both 
grocery and meat market good. 

H. S. Thomas, 402 Locust street. Inspected October 2, 1906. Very 
good condition. 

J. Pendigast, 1033 N. Fourth street. Inspected October 2, 1906. 
Grocery and meat market fair. 

J. P. Fagan, 400 N. Foui'th street. Inspected October 2, 1906. This 
store is an excellent one. 

John Formahlen, Fourth and Eighth avenue. Inspected October 2, 
1906. In fairly good condition. 

R. D. Pierson, 302 Hancock. Inspected October 2, 1906. Fairly good. 

C. W. Ferguson, 2034 N. Third street. Inspected October 2, 1906. In 
good condition. 

SLAUGHTER HOUSES. 

Snyder's. JefCersonville. Inspected October 6, 1906. Horrible con- 
dition of filth and stench ; very old tumble-down buildings, impossible to 
clean; offal fed to hogs; slaughter house only, as carcasses are hauled 
away soon after killing; fat and tallow rendered in filthy kettle; entire 
surroundings could not be worse. 

Wm. Haspel, Greencastle. Inspected September 26, 1906. This 
slaughter house is in a very dirty condition. The hides are salted down 
on the killing floor; the ofCal is thrown through a Avindow to the ground 
where it is eaten by sickly looking hogs or left to decay. This pile is 
about a foot thick and ten feet in diameter. Flies go from the rotting 
reluse to the interior of the house, as no screens are in the building. They 
wash the house occasionally and at certain seasons of the year the stream 
which flows nearby overflows and floods the yard, house, etc., washing 
everything away. There are two other slaughter houses in Greencastle, 
both In fair condition, although not screened nor sanitarily kept. 

E. H. .Tones & Co., Brazil. Inspected September 29, 1906. This 
slaughter house is in very good condition; there are cement floors and 
the water supply is abundant for keeping the place clean. 



412 

Steward's Slaughter House, Brazil. Inspected September 29, 1906. 
This place is in a fair condition, although not screened. The temporary 
storage room was clean. 

Terre Haute Abattoir & Stockyards Co. Inspected October 1, 1906. 
The surroundings of this place are very dirty and the platform where 
the meat is loaded on is unclean. The slaughtering rooms are in good 
condition, having a plentiful supply of water; there are no screens in the 
windows. The room where the fertilizer is made is in direct connection 
with both killing rooms. The manager promised to clean up and use 
screens, and the inspector recommended that the fertilizer room be 
separated by a partition from the rest of tlie plant. The cooling room 
was in excellent condition. 

Valentine & Co., Terre Haute. Inspected October 1, 1906. This is a 
new slaughter house; conditions are good, although no screens are used 
and there are many flies. Manager promised to use screens; excellent 
cooling room. 

Anderson Dressed Beef Co., Anderson. Inspected September 9, 1906. 
This slaughter liouse has rather good external appearance and consists of 
three rooms; the cooling room is fairly clean, although an odor is notice- 
able; the slaughtering room had considerable refuse on the 'floors; the 
rendering room is very fllthy, the tanks being covered with grease and 
dirt, with refuse all around and the walls coated with dirt; a decided 
odor is noticeable in this room. The offal is fed to the hogs and they 
wallow in a pool of blood and water. 



LABORATORY OF HYGIENE 



REPORT 



Bacteriological and Pathological 

Division. 



Year Ending October 31, 1Q06. 



T. Victor Keene, M. D., Helene H. Knabe, M. D., 
Superintendent. Ass't Superintendent. 

Ada Sweitzer, 
Assistant. 

(413) 



CHARACTER OF WORK AND AIMS 



Bacteriological and Pathological Division 



STATE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE. 



The practical work of this laboratory is the examination of 
samples of sputum, the examination of diphtheria cultures, the 
examination of samples of blood and the examination of curet- 
tings and other pathological specimens, to aid physicians in making 
diagnoses, to the end that the people may be benefited. It is ob- 
vious that if diagnosis of disease is made more accurate and made 
earlier, that more cures can be made and more lives saved by the 
medical art. It not infrequently happens in regard to diphtheria 
that the physicians of a neighborhood differ as to the diagnosis, 
some contending for diphtheria and others for tonsilitis or other 
forms of angina. In such instances, the laboratory can make ac- 
curate decision, which is a great point in the isolation and quar- 
antine of the disease for the purpose of its control. In consump- 
tion, the microscopical examination of the sputum is of great 
importance, for frequently patients will not accept the clinical di- 
agnosis of physicians, and then they do not observe the health 
rules for disease prevention, and go on spreading the disease. 
And again, in such instances, the patient is lost, because he neg- 
lects to apply proper methods of cure, but goes on taking medicine 
in the hope of relief. 

Blood examinations to diagnose typhoid fever are at this time 
a necessity. This is because at certain stages of these maladies 
it is impossible for the clinician to make absolute diagnosis. As 
it is with diphtheria, so it is with typhoid, the unrecognized and 

(414) 



415 

mild cases spread the infection. As for the differentiation of 
typhoid and malaria^ it is true that in not a few instances this 
can he done in the lahoratory only. At the Indiana Soldiers' 
Home a year ago and at Richmond in the summer of 1906, it was 
discovered through the laboratory that epidemics of typhoid pre- 
vailed, most of the cases being mild, but competent to spread the 
disease in virulent form. This discovery was of much importance 
in staying the further spread of the disease. 

Examinations made are herein tabulated and summarized. The 
tables show total number of examinations, and results by counties, 
and are followed by summaries. 



REPORT FROM THE DIVISION OF BACTERIOLOGY 

AND PATHOLOGY OF THE INDIANA STATE 

LABORATORY OF HYGIENE. 

January.— A number of the specimens which appear in this 
month's report were examined during October, November and 
December, before the State Laboratory of Hygiene was formally 
established. Indeed, many of the physicians who had keenly felt 
the need of such an institution for a long time began to send 
specimens to the State Board of Health as soon as it became known 
that an appropriation had been made by the Legislature for this 
purpose. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS 

Positive. Negative. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 69 72 141 

Diphtheria 23 18 41 

Blood (typhoid) 18 6 24 

February. — We did not receive many specimens and were rather 
glad of it, because of the number of outfits for the collection of 
sputum, blood and diphtheria cultures which were to be sent to 
all parts of the State. These outfits are prepared and shipped by 
the employes of this laboratory. Letters have also been written 
to the health ofiicers and the secretaries of the county medical 
societies, explaining the rules governing the work in this labora- 
tory, and inviting the physicians to avail themselves of our ser- 
vices. 



416 

Of the 21 examinations for bacillus diphtherise, 13 were posi- 
tive, and of these six specimens were received from Fort Wayne, 
three from Michigan City and three from Indianapolis, these 
specimens having been sent by one physician respectively from 
each city. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 29 66 . . 95 

Diphtheria 13 8 . . 21 

Blood (typhoid) 8 2 . . 10 

March. — We note Avith pleasure the increase of specimens sent 
for diagnosis, as this is only the third month since the formal open- 
ing of the Laboratory of Hygiene. 

Diphtheria has not been much in evidence, only four of eight 
cultures giving a positive result. As might be expected, there is 
an increase in typhoid fever, because this disease is more prone 
to occur during the seasons Avhere either heavy rains or the melt- 
ing ice and snow increase the volume of surface water. As a 
consequence, many places which during the previous months had 
been polluted with excreta from persons suffering with typhoid 
fever, are now covered with water, which, receding, carries with it 
the dangerous bacteria, to distribute the disease in other places. 

Of the 20 positive Widal reactions, six were found in blood, 
obtained from patients residing in Indianapolis, five others came 
from Michigan City. The examinations of sputum have increased 
considerably in number, Marion, Wayne and Clinton counties 
furnishing each a large percentage of the 142 examinations of this 
character. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 51 91 . . 142 

Diphtheria 4 4 • • 8 

Blood (typhoid) 14 1 . . 15 

April — Typhoid fever is still on the increase. Greencastle, 
Putnam County, has quite an epidemic of this disease, 26 speci- 
mens from this town alone having been submitted for examination, 
all of them giving a positive Widal reaction. Laporte County, 
as represented by Michigan City, is in evidence with five positive 



417 

reactions. The remainder of the specimens are pretty evenly 
divided, with the exception of Marion and Vigo counties, which 
have three positive Widal tests each. The tuberculosis situation, 
judging from the specimens received this month, is bad indeed, 
nearly one-half of all cases showing the presence of bacillus tuber- 
culosis. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 95 87 . . 182 

Diphtheria 4 2 .. 6 

Blood (typhoid) 42 5 . . 47 

May. — Our records for this month show that we have made 
more examinations for tuberculosis than for any other disease. 
ISTearly two-thirds of 168 samples of sputum contained tubercle 
bacilli. Thirteen positive Widal examinations came from nearly 
as many counties. The number of examinations to determine the 
presence of bacillus diphtherige was almost double that of last 
month. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 109 59 . . 168 

Diphtheria 5 6 . . H 

Blood (typhoid) 13 . . . . 13 

June. — There is very little to be said of this month. Laporte 
County furnished six cases of typhoid fever, although not all of 
them were from one town. 

Of the 139 specimens examined for tuberculosis the majority 
gave a negative result. Diphtheria does not seem to prevail very 
extensively, as only ten cultures were submitted for examination 
during the month, and of these six did not contain diphtheria 
bacilli. This, with the exception of January, is the first month 
which shows more specimens with a negative result. We hope the 
cause of this is that the physicians avail themselves of the services 
of this laboratory in those cases which present but slightly sus- 
picious symptoms, and if this supposition is correct it will mean 
that a long step toward the stamping out of this disease has been 
taken. , , , 

27— Bd. of Health. 



418 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 47 92 139 

Diphtheria 2 2 4 

BJood (typhoid) 11 5 16 

July. — During the month of July, 1906, the examinations made 
in the Division of Bacteriology and Pathology of the Indiana 
State Laboratory of Hygiene were as follows : 

1. EXAMINATIONS FOR BACILLUS TUBERCULOSIS. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 

Sputum 74 115 , 189 

Urine 2 5 7 

Feces 3 3 

Total 76 123 199 

2. WIDAL TEST FOR TYPHOID FEVER. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 
Blood ...34 8 1 43 

3. EXAMINATIONS FOR BACILLUS DIPHTHERIA. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 
Culture from throat. 3 5 8 

4. EXAMINATIONS OF BLOOD FOR PLASMODIUM MALARIA. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 
Blood 2 11 13 

5. BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF MILK. 

Number of samples 3 

These three samples showed very high counts, due probably to 
the unsatisfactory way in which they were shipped. 

6. MISCELLANEOUS SPECIMENS. 

Pathological growths 16 

Examination for tetanus (positive) ; 1 

Anthrax (horse) 1 

Suspected tapeworm (negative) 1 

Piece of beef for pus 1 

Pus for gonococcus (negatiA-e) 1 

Total 21 



419 



7. SUPPLIES SHIPPED OUT. 



Sputum outfits 149 

Widal blood outfits for Widal tests. 73 

Diphtheria outfits 16 

Malaria slides 2 

We note that the number of positive Widal tests was four times 
greater than that of the cases in which the result was negative. 
Reports of the attending physicians show that many of these 
cases of typhoid ran a very mild course. 

Of the 228 specimens of suspected tuberculosis, 60.9 per cent, 
were negative. The number of pathological specimens has been 
unusually large. Many of them were pieces of new growths, 
which upon examination, proved to be carcinoma. 

Several of the miscellaneous specimens are worthy of note. In 
one instance, cerebral fluid from a horse was sent in. The owner 
of the animal suspected anthrax, having lost within a short time, 
four horses kept in the same stables. Microscopical examination, 
however, revealed the presence of a mixed infection of meningo- 
cocci and otlier bacteria. Another was a case of tetanus, due to an 
explosion of a toy pistol. The spores of B. Tetanti were found in 
smears made from the wound immediately after death of the pa- 
tient. 

There have been 374 reports and letters sent out from this 
Department. The kind letters received from physicians of the 
State show an increasing appreciation of the assistance rendered 
them by the Laboratory of Hygiene, an appreciation which is very 
gratifying to those who have charge of the work. 

August. — The month of August shows an increase in the num- 
ber of blood examinations for typhoid fever, 65 per cent, of the 
specimens giving a positive Widal reaction. 

Of the specimens examined for tuberculosis, 46.8 per cent, 
showed the presence of tubercle bacilli. 

The head of one dog was received to be examined for rabies, and 
ISTasri bodies were found in the brain. In connection with this 
disease, it seems necessary to call the attention of physicians to 
the fact that the head of the animal supposed to be rabid must be 
submitted, because scrapings from the wound caused by the animal 
are not satisfactory for such examinations. 

There are still specimens coming in which are not prepared 



420 

according to the rules of this lahoratory, and on account of the 
danger to the examiner, we can not examine them any more. The 
manner in which the accompanying blanks are filled out by the 
physicians is also very far from satisfactory. In some cases, even 
the physician's name is omitted, and reports on such cases can not, 
of course, be made. 

There were 291 specimens examined in the laboratory from 
August 1st to September 1st. 

1. EXAMINATIONS FOR BACILLUS TUBERCULOSIS. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 

Sputum 51 102 153 

Specimens from wall of abscess cavity 1 . . 1 

Urine 6 6 

Feces 2 2 

Pus 1 1 

Total 52 111 163 

2. EXAMINATIONS FOR BACILLUS DIPHTHERIA. 

Positive. Negative. Total. 
Cultures from throat 4 2 6 

3. WIDAL TESTS FOR TYPHOID FEVER. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total, 
Blood 67 35 2 104 

4. EXAMINATIONS FOR PLASMODIUM MALARIA. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. TotaL 
Blood 2 5 1 8 

5. SPECIMENS OP BLOOD FOR GENERAL EXAMINATION. 

Pernicious anemia 1 

Simple anemia 2 

Total 3 

6. SUSPECTED HYDROPHOBIA. 

Dog's head (positive^ 1 

Tissue from arm (unsatisfactory) 1 

Total 2 



421 

7. MISCELLANEOUS SPECIMENS. 

Pus examined for gonococcus (positive) 2 

Piece of steak for pus cavity 1 

Pathological tissues— 

Sai'coma ^ 

Fibrous polyp ^ 

Filtrate from urine "•- 



Total 



.291 



Letters received 62 

Reports and letters sent out 354 

Telegrams sent 6 



SUPPLIES SENT OUT. 



Sputum outfits 209 

Blood outfits for Widal tests 117 

Serum cultures for diphtheria 38 

Blood outfits for malaria 23 

September. — During this mouth tlie number of Widal tests 
made in the laboratory was higher than in any of the preceding 
months. The reason for this is that in all parts of the State oc- 
curred many cases of intestinal diseases resembling typhoid- fever. 
Those physicians Avho have availed themselves of the services of 
the laboratory for the past year are now aware of the fact that it 
is impossible to recognize a mild case of typhoid fever by the 
clinical symptoms only. ]\rany of the cases which occurred during 
the past year were very mild or were attended by symptoms atyp- 
ical in character. In nearly all cases, however, where there was a 
true typhoid infection, regardless of the clinical aspect of the case, 
the Widal reaction was present. 

The results of our records now show that the majority of speci- 
mens received during this month came from patients suffering with 
acute intestinal disorders other than typhoid, and this demon- 
strates clearly that the laboratory fulfills the purpose for which it 
was created, viz., to assist the general practitioner in making a 
correct diagnosis of all doubtful cases where infectious diseases 
are suspected. The time saved in this way is very valuable to 
physicians, as well as patients, and especially in case of diphtheria 
the lapse of a few hours may seriously interfere with the chances 
of the patient's recovery. 



422 

Considering the number of specimens of sputum received for 
examination, we see that physicians are beginning to send more 
specimens from patients in whom no tuberculosis is present. This 
shows that any one of these cases will be given the proper treat- 
ment before the dread disease is established in the system, a fact 
which will be of the utmost importance in the economy of this 
State. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Tuberculosis 68 104 . . 172 

Diphtheria 4 9 3 16 

Typhoid fever 39 90 2 131 

October.— The month of October has brought a heavy increase 
in the number of examinations of serum cultures to determine the 
presence of bacillus diphtherise. This disease seems to be dissemi- 
ntited pretty well throughout the State, as we have received cul- 
tures from many different counties. Out of 50 examinations of this 
kind, bacillus diphtherise was present in 30 cultures. Twelve cul- 
tures were found negative, i. e., micro-organisms other than diph- 
tb(>ria -were the cause of inflammation of the upper air passages. 
The majority of these cases of true diphtheria occurred in chil- 
dren, although there was one case in an adult terminating farally 
of which we received the culture after the death of the patient. In 
many of these cases the clinical symptoms were very slight, but the 
microscope revealed the fact that diphtheria bacilli were resp-in- 
sibl'e for the trouble. We have no hesitation in saying that, had 
these mii'd cases been allowed to go on as simple sore throat or 
tonsilitis, tJiere would have resulted an epidemic of diphtheria 
many times as severe as that, which the State Board of Health is 
combating at the present time. 

In regard to the typhoid fever situation it is still grave enough, 
and we do not expect much abatement of this disease until the ad- 
vent of winter. 

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Sputum (tuberculosis) 47 75 . . 122 

Diphtheria 30 12 8 50 

Blood (typhoid) 48 48 . . 96 



423 

SUMMARY. 

As we loolr over the records at the close of the first year in the 
history of the Indiana State Laboratory of Hygiene, we note with 
appreciation the favorable aspect of conditions as we see thera 
now. The early months of this work, before the formal opening of 
the laboratory, disclosed more clearly every day the dire need which 
existed in this State for just such an institution as the Labora- 
tory of Hygiene. ISTearly every specimen of sputum received at 
that time was teeming with tubercle bacilli. Practically all of 
these specimens came from people who had been under physicians' 
treatment for years. Slight colds, bronchitis and other diseases 
of the respiratory tract had followed each other closely in these 
patients, but as the price of a sputum examination was too high 
for most of them, no attempt was made in this direction ; indeed, 
in many cases, the physician was compelled to donate his services 
during the years which elapsed from the appearance of symptoms 
of advanced tuberculosis until the death of the patient. 

After the formal opening of the laboratory the question of get- 
ting in touch with the physicians of this State was the first to be 
solved. This was done through the newspapers, the Bulletin of 
the Indiana State Board of Health, and also by writing letters to 
the various medical societies. To address each physician as we 
would have liked to do was out of the question ; also was it impos- 
sible to send oue of the physicians employed in this laboratory to 
speak before the various medical societies and demonstrate the 
proper manner in which specimens should be sent. The physi- 
cians, however, soon began to make more use of the laboratory. 

As the months passed by we noticed a remarkable change in con- 
nection with examinations for tuberculosis. Where, in the early 
part of the year one question on the record blanks, viz. : "How 
long have you been treating the patient?" was answered with — 
"Several years'" — there appeared instead, "Two or three months." 
Now, at the end of one year, it is rare indeed to find it stated on 
any blank that the patient has been under treatment even as long 
as one month. The usual answer now received on this question is 
either, "Patient has just come under my observation" or "This is 
the second visit." 

The great importance of this change becomes at once apparent 
when we consider the chronicity of tuberculosis. Whenever the 



424 



physician is enaWed, at the time a patient comes to him, to have 
the sputum analyzed, he can at once take the proper measures to 
prevent this disease. Even in cases v/here tubercle bacilli are 
found the disease may be arrested. 

A very notable instance of this character which we have had the 
good fortune to observe occurred during the past year. The spu- 
tum of Miss Mary Yeach, residing at Mt. Summit, Ind., was sent 
for examination December 26, 1905, with the result that tubercle 
bacilli were present in small numbers. She was treated according 
to the rational method and specimens of her sputum were sent oc- 
casionally for examination. The bacilli persisted for about six 
months, then we did not hear from this patient for two months, 
and on August 3, 1906, another specimen was examined with 
negative result. This seemed so astonishing to the examining 
pathologist that inquiry was made to ascertain the probability of 
a mistake in sending the sputum. Since then, however, Ave have 
examined sputum from this patient repeatedly and are in posi- 
tion to record a case in which tuberculosis has been arrested in a 
resident of this State, merely by proper treatment, instituted at an 
early stage of the disease, without change of climate, as the pa- 
tient never left her home. 



WIDAL EXAMINATIONS MADE WITH THE BLOOD OF SUS- 
PECTED TYPHOID FEVER OASES. 

Counties. Positive. 

Adams 4 

Allen 3 

Bartholomew 5 

Benton 1 

Blackrord 1 

Boone 3 

Carroll 4 

Cass 5 

Clark 1 

Clay 2 

Clinton 7 

Dearborn 

Decatxir 2 

Delaware 

Elkhart 

Fountain 4 

Grant 

G reene \ 



Negative. Doub 
3 


tful. Total. 

7 


3 


6 


1 


6 




1 




1 


1 


4 




4 


2 


7 




1 




2 


1 


8 


2 


2 


2 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


1 • 


5 


5 

1 


2 



425 

AVIDAL EXAMINATIONS— Continued. 

Counties. Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 

Hamilton 4 5 1 10 

Hendricks 1 6 .. 7 

Hancock 1 1 1 3 

Han-ison 2 . . . . 2 

Henry 4 3 .. 7 

Howaid 1 ] . . 2 

Jackson 3 1 .. 4 

Jefferson 10 10 . . 20 

Jennings 3 . . . . 3 

Johnson 3 3 ., 6 

Knox 1 . . 1 

Kosciusko 3 4 ., 7 

Lake 1 2 .. 3 

Laporte 24 5 . . 29 

Lawrence 1 . . . . 1 

Madison 7 1 . . 8 

Mai-ion 69 53 . . 122 

Marshall 5 . . . . 5 

Montgomei-y 1 3 .. 4 

Newton 1 1 .. 2 

Noble 4 7 . . 11 

Owen 1 . . . . 1 

Porter 1 . . . . i 

Posey 1 1 .. 2 

Putnam 26 4 . . 30 

Randolph 7 6 . . 13 

Ripley 2 . . 2 

Shelby 2 1 3 

Spencer 6 2 .. 8 

St Joseph 2 2 .. ,4 

Switzerland ] . . . . 1 

Tippecanoe 3 . . . . 3 

Tipton 1 4 . . 5 

Union 1 3 .. 4 

Vepmillion 1 . . i 

Vigo 13 2 . . 15 

Wayne 32 33 1 66 

White 2 4 1 7 

Total 294 200 5 499 



426 



SPUTUM EXAMINATIONS. 

Counties. Positive. 

Adams 3 

Allen 5 

Bartholomew 16 

Benton 7 

Blackford 5 

Boone 14 

Carroll 4 

Cass 2 

Clark 6 

Clay 9 

Clinton , 13 

Crawford 10 

Daviess 10 

Dearborn 

Decatur 5 

Dekalb 1 

Delaware 8 

Elkhart 11 

Fayette 3 

Fountain 15 

Franklin 2 

Fulton 1 

Gibson 3 

Grant 2 

Greene 1 

Hamilton 14 

Hancock 7 

Harrison 4 

Hendricks 25 

Henry 22 

Howard 1 

Huntington 2 

Jackson 5 

Jasper 2 

Jay 2 

Jefferson 10 

Jennings 2 

Johnson 4 

Knox 10 

Kosciusko 9 

Lagrange 12 

Lake 1 

Laporte 8 

Lawrence 

Madison 14 

Marion 92 

Marshall 1 



Negative. 


Total. 


4 


7 


17 


22 


14 


30 


2 


9 


8 


13 


6 


20 


4 


8 


6 


8 


6 


12 


5 


14 


22 


35 


5 


15 


6 


16 


1 


1 


14 


19 


2 


. 3 


5 


13 


14 


25 


1 


4 


20 


35 


2 


4 


8 


4 


2 


5 


6 


8 


2 


3 


22 


36 


6 


13 


6 


10 


26 


51 


24 


46 


7 


8 


7 


9 


8 


13 


4 


6 


2 


4 


15 


25 


1 


3 


3 


7 


12 


22 


4 


13 


11 


23 




1 


24 


32 


2 


2 


19 


33 


152 


244 


3 


4 



427 

SPUTDM EXAMINATIONS— Continued. 

Counties. Positive. 

Martin 2 

Miami 8 

Monroe 2 

Montgomery 6 

Morgan 2 

Newton ! 

Noble 3 

Orange 1 

Owen 1 

Parke 3 

Periy 1 

Pike . . 

Posey 13 

Pulaski 7 

Putnam 5 

Randolph 21 

Ripley 4 

Rush 8 

Scott 2 

Shelby 4 

Spencer 2 

Starke 8 

St. Joseph 1 

Sullivan 10 

Switzerland 2 

Tippecanoe 8 

Tipton 8 

Union 2 

Vanderburgh 1 

Vermillion 12 

Vigo 8 

Wabash 9 

Warren 4 

Washington 1 

Wayne 47 

Wells 10 

White 7 

Whitley 4 

Total 640 863 1,503 



'Negative. 


Total. 


3 


5 


8 


16 


1 


3 


16 


22 


2 


4 


2 


2 


8 


11 




1 


3 


4 


10 


13 


5 


6 


2 


2 


14 


27 


9 


16 


12 


17 


■62 


53 


6 


10 


3 


11 


. . 


2 


10 


14 


7 


9 


5 


13 


2 


3 


15 


25 




2 


11 


19 


8 


16 


- 7 


9 


1 


2 


16 


28 


15 


23 


14 


23 


3 


7 


1 


2 


57 


104 


6 


16 


11 


18 


3 


7 



428 



DIPHTHERIA BY COUNTIES. 



Whole 
Number of 
Cultures 
Counties . Examined. Positive. 

Allen 12 10 

Bartholomew 1 

Blackford 2 

Carroll 2 

Daviess 3 

Decatur 2 

Delaware 1 1 

Elkhart 1 

Fayette 1 1 

Fountain 4 3 

Franklin 1 1 

Hamilton 4 4 

Hancock 4 3 

Harrison 1 1 

Hendricks 3 1 

Howard 1 1 

Huntington 1 

Jasper 4 2 

Jefferson 10 3 

Kosciusko 7 2 

Laporte 7 3 

Lawrence 9 5 

Madison 9 6 

Marshall 2 

Marion 27 18 

Montgomery 7 7 

Newton 4 3 

Noble 2 

Posey 2 1 

Putnam 1 1 

Rush 3 

Spencer 2 1 

St. Joseph 1 

Tippecanoe 2 1 

Tipton 2 1 

Union 1 

Vermillion 4 2 

Wabash 2 1 

Wayne 10 4 

Wells 4 3 

White .' 5 2 



Negative. Doubtful. 
2 

1 

1 1 

1 1 

2 1 
2 



Total 171 



92 



11 



429 



SPUTUM EXAMINATIONS BY MONTHS. 

Months. ' Positivi 

January 69 

Felbruarj'- 29 

March 51 

April 95 

May 109 

June 47 

July 74 

August 51 

September 68 

October 47 



Negative. 


Total. 


72 


141 


66 


95 


91 


142 


87 


182 


59 


168 


92 


139 


115 


189 


102 


153 


104 


172 


75 


122 



Total 640 



803 



1,503 



WIDAL EXAMINATIONS, WITH BLOOD, BY MONTHS. 



Months. 



Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 



January 18 

February 8 

March 14 

April 42 

May 13 

June 11 

July 34 

August 67 

September 39 

October 48 



6 




24 


2 




10 


1 




15 


5 




47 
18 


5 




16 


8 


1 


43 


35 


2 


104 


90 


2 


131 


48 




96 



Total 294 



200 



499 



DIPHTHERIA BY MONTHS. 



Months. 



Positive. Negative. Doubtful. Total. 



January 23 

February 13 

March 4 

April 4 

May 5 

June 2 

July 5 

August 2 

September 4 

October 30 



18 




41 


8 




21 


4 




8 


2 




6 


6 




11 


2 




4 


3 




8 


4 




6 


9 


3 


16 


12 


8 


50 



Total 92 



68 



11 



171 



As shown in the notes appended to the records of each month, 
several epidemics of typhoid fever and diphtheria occurred during 
the past year. Allen County has suffered most heavily from diph- 



430 

theria according to our records, as we find that ten out of twelve 
examinations of serum cultures showed the presence of diphtheria 
bacilli. ISText to this comes Marion County, with eighteen positives 
out of twenty-seven examinations. We also received cultures from 
numerous other counties, but none of them gave as many positive 
results. Our records in Widal reactions show the largest number 
of positive results in Laporte County, where 25 of 29 cases were 
found to be typhoid fever. It is a notable fact that we have re- 
ceived specimens of this kind from physicians in Michigan City 
every month for the past year, and in a very small percentage only 
the result was negative. Wayne County is represented with 32 
positive out of 66 examinations, and Jefferson County has 12 pos- 
itive reactions from a total of 20 tests made. Marion County 
showed 69 positive reactions in 122 Widal tests ; but it should 
be taken into consideration that this is only a small part of the 
Widal examinations made in this county, as the Indianapolis City 
Laboratory conducts the majority of these examinations in the 
above named city. 

If the means to conduct a campaign of education among the 
citizens of Indiana are placed within the reach of the physicians 
connected with the Laboratory of Llygiene, the latter "will be 
made the principal life-saving station of the State and results will 
not be long in forthcoming, as indeed they are showing now. 

We are safe in saying that every physician who has availed 
himself of the services of the Indiana State Laboratory of Hygiene 
has materially benefited his community and incidentally every 
citizen in the State of Indiana. 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR t906. 



(431) 



REGISTRATION REPORT, J906. 



This report is for the calendar year 1906. The population figures 
are estimated from the census of 1900, according to the method of 
the United States Census Bureau. 

In the following tables the causes of death are arranged according 
to the Bertillon classification, which has been adopted by all of the 
registration states of the country. This international classification 
was used by the United States Bureau of the Census in its last sta- 
tistical compilation of causes of death. 

Table 1 is a classification of all deaths with rates per 100,000 
population, classified and arranged according to the international 
system. 

Table 2 is a classification of deaths from all causes by months, 
ages, color, nationality and conjugal condition. 

Table 2 A is a recapitulation of the classified deaths by months, 
ages, color, nationality and conjugal condition. 

Table 3 gives death from all causes by counties, months, ages, 
color, nationality and conjugal condition. 

Table 4 gives deaths from certain diseases by geographical sec- 
tions and by counties. 

Table 5 gives death rates from certain important causes, by coun- 
ties in geographical sections. 

Table 6, annual death rates for seven years, 1900 to 1907, with 
averages of cities of 5,000 population and over, compared with rural 
and state rates. 

Table A gives births by counties, months, color and nationality of 
parents. 

Table B gives births by counties, number of children born to each 
mother, grouped ages of parents, still births, plurality and illegit- 
imate births. 

Table C gives, by counties, the marriages by months, color and 
nationality. 

Table D gives, by counties, the marriages by grouped ages. 

BIRTHS. 

The number of births reported in the State of Indiana during the 
year 1906 was 45,300, of which number 23,469 were males and 
21,831 females. Of the total males, 23,013 were white and 456 col- 

28>Sd.ofHeftltb. U33) 



434 

ored. Of the total females, 21,418 were white and 413 colored. In 
the preceding year 44,114 births reported; males, 22,281; females, 
21,333. October had the largest number of births, 4,263, and June 
the smallest, 3,255. September had the greatest number of deaths, 
3,146, and June the lowest, 2,429. The births (45,300) rate 17.1, 
exceed the deaths (35,992) ; rate 13.5 per 1,000 population. 

The nationality of parents shows as follows: American-born 
fathers, 40,166; American-born mothers, 40,919. Foreign-born 
fathers, 2,901; foreign-born mothers, 2,360; Nationality not re- 
ported, fathers, 1,798 ; mothers, 1,586. 

Of the number of children born to each mother, 13,210 were 
first; 9,779, second; 7,059, third; 4,841, fourth; 3,333, fifth; 2,352, 
sixth; 1,627, seventh; 1,128, eighth; 685, ninth; 433, tenth; 254, 
eleventh; 306 were twelfth child and over, and 293 were not re- 
ported. 

As to the ages of parents, 648 fathers and 4,795 mothers were 
under twenty years of age. In the age period of 50 to 60 there 
were 928 fathers and 23 mothers; age period 60 to 70, there were 
111 fathers, and between 70 and 80 there were eleven fathers. 

One thousand one hundred and three still births, also reported 
as deaths. The illegitimate births numbered 806, of which 429 were 
males, and 377 females. The plural births numbered 862, of which 
455 were males, and 407 females. There were four sets of triplets 
in this number of pluralities. 

MARRIAGES. 

The total marriages reported, 26,225. This is an increase over 
the preceding year of 615. October had the greatest number of 
marriages, 2,762, and May had the smallest number, 1,675. The 
general statistics on marriages will be found in Tables C and D. 

DEATHS. 

The total number of deaths reported in 1906 was 35,992, with a 
rate of 13.58. In the preceding year 36,502 deaths, with a rate of 
13.78. Males, 19,009; females, 16,983. White males, 18,247; col- 
ored, 762 ; white females, 16,317 ; colored, 666. American-born, 16,- 
715 males, 15,402 females; foreign-born, 1,992 males, 1,446 females; 
nationality not reported, 302 males and 135 females. Single males, 
9,220; females, 6,979; married males, 6,938; females, 5,781; wid- 
owed males, 2,525 ; females, 4,129 ; conjugal condition not reported, 
326 males and 94 females. 



435 

The number of deaths, Avith rates for the years named, appear in 
the following table : 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906 


Deaths 


35,516 


36,544 


34,069 


33,892 


37,240 


36,502 


35,992 




14.1 


. 14.5 


13.5 


13.4 


14.0 


13.7 


13.5 







Of the total number of deaths, 8,004, or 22.2 per cent, of the whole 
number, occurred in the first year of life. This is almost one-fourth 
of the total. 

Two thousand four hundred and sixty-two deaths occurred in 
the age period of 1 to 5, making the total loss of children under 5 
years of age 10,466, or 29.0 per cent, of the total deaths. This is 
23.1 per cent, of the total births reported. In the age period of 5 
to 20, there were 2,585 deatlis, or 7.1 per cent, of the total number. 
The total loss under 21 years of age is 13,051, or 36.2 per cent, of 
the total deaths. In the age period of 20 to 50, practically the 
prime of life, there were 7,942 deaths, or 22.0 per cent, of the total 
deaths. There were 360 deaths of persons over 90 years of age, a 
decrease of 25 from 1905. 

The following table, giving deaths by months, shows March with 
the greatest number of deaths, with January, April, August and 
September having about the same. June had the lowest number 
of deaths, as was the case in 1905. 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mch. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


3,110 


2.924 


3,321 


3.142 


2,765 


2,429 


2,845 


3.136 


3,146 


3,101 


3,049 


3,024 



March and April had the most tuberculosis deaths; March had 
most pneumonia ; August and September were highest with diarrhoe- 
al diseases, and October had the greatest number of typhoid deaths. 



436 



PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATfl FOR LAST SEVEN 
YEARS, WITH AVERAGE. 

The following table gives the principal causes of death in their 
numerical order, for the past seven years, and also the yearly av- 
erage for each cause, and Chart No. 1 gives a graphic representation 
of the principal causes for 1906 : 

PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH IN INDIANA FOR THE LAST SEVEN YEARS WITH AVERAGE. 





1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 


1. Pulmonary tuberculosis 

2. Pneumonia 

3. Organic heart disease 


3,364 
2,744 
1,759 
2,049 
1,334 

1,361 
1,145 

1,056 
1,046 
1,440 

1,109 
470 
676 

1,281 
530 

228 
686 
391 
522 
345 

746 
196 
242 
298 
256 

111 
325 
381 
447 
323 

223 
274 
424 
125 

261 

287 

107 
374 

141 
27 
85 
19 


4,169 
3,384 
.1,754 
1,776 
1,463 

1,247 
1,066 

1,264 
1,113 

1,198 

986 
574 
704 
493 
513 

480 
662 
236 
562 
462 

554 
254 
180 
370 
184 

204 
354 
406 
553 
263 

142 

243 

1,049 

137 

124 
181 

85 
197 

149 
48 

161 
21 


3,952 

2,758 
1,860 
1,779 
1,391 

1,183 
1,133 

1,272 
1,209 
1,217 

762 
648 
641 
440 
530 

417 
605 
187 
484 
391 

424 
278 
162 
352 
209 

197 
366 
339 
509 
277 

150 
390 
302 
145 

181 
164 

87 
161 

150 
36 
67 

75 


3,915 
2,634 
2,108 
1,449 
1,601 

1,318 
1,164 

1,346 
1,217 
1,013 

762 
596 
613 
477 
527 

466 
519 
341 
523 
411 

462 
254 
152 
276 
220 

197 
311 
335 
365 
211 

191 
437 
348 
163 

129 
148 

85 
131 

164 
62 
73 

195 


4,436 
3,487 
2,180 
1,629 
1,622 

1,726 
1,296 

1,435 
1,259 
1,013 

935 
665 
561 
542 
596 

672 
530 
347 
571 
427 

314 
283 
172 
325 
266 

226 
375 
345 
538 
184 

207 
229 
434 
164 

140 
94 

91 
116 

192 

48 

212 

97 


3,998 
3,124 
2,182 
1,700 
1,795 

1,908 
1,423 

1,351 

1,424 

928 

901 
637 
678 
494 

578 

535 
498 
460 
540 
450 

366 
338 
167 
285 
253 

231 
338 
306 
352 
218 

189 
194 
591 
194 

179 
136 

88 
116 

133 

85 

6 

35 


3,854 
2,890 . 
2,208 
1,823 
1,796 

1,766 
1,549 

1,496 

1,417 

913 

777 
768 
699 
602 
.591 

576 
524 
481 
460 
460 

402 
321 
284 
276 
274 

269 
265 
254 
240 
235 

230 
228 
224 
174 

170 
157 

112 
102 

101 
93 
23 

8 


3,955 
3,003 
2,007 
1,743 




1,571 




1,501 




1,253 


8. Cerebral congestion and hem- 
orrhage 


1,317 
1,240 




1,103 




890 


12. Other circulatory diseases 


622 
653 


14. Other forms of tuberculosis . . . 


620 
552 


16. Broncho-pneumonia 

17. Other digestive diseases 

18. Cerebro-spinal meningitis 

19. Bronchitis 

20. Diarrhoea and enteritis 

21. Diphtheria and croup 

22. Suicides 


482 
576 
349 
523 
421 

467 
276 




194 


24. Other respiratory diseases 


311 
237 


26. Diabetes 


205 
333 


28. Convulsions of infants. '. 


338 
429 




244 




190 


32. Other genito-urinary diseases. . 


285 
481 




157 




169 


36. Whooping cough 

37. Diseases of female genital 


166 
93 


38. Malaria 


171 




147 




57 




89 


42. Smallpox 


64 






Total 


29,208 


29,965 


,27,880 


27.909 


30,981 


30,404 


30,092 


29,484 







437 



PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF DEATH 




IN INDIANA 1906 

20100 3Q0O 




40{00 
V3PUL.TUBERCULOSIS 



ORGANIC HEART DISEASES 
INFANTILE DIARRHOEA 
ACCIDENTS 

DISEASES OF INFANTS 
'BRIGHTS DISEASE 
CEREBRAL CONGESTION AND HEMORRHAGE 



CANCER 



—3 TYPHOID FEVER 
PARALYSIS 



^~ OTHER CIRCULATORY DISEASES 
5* STOMACH DISEASES 

OTHER FORMS OF TUBERCULOSIS 
LIVER DISEASES 
BRONCHO -PNEUMONIA 
■ OTHER DIGESTIVE DISEASES 
CEREBRO -SPINAL MENINGITIS 

■ ;, ^ ■■■ ■■ i BRONCHITIS 

i^^ DIARRHOEA AND ENTERITIS 
^^:^ DIPHTHERIA AND CROUP 
5* SUICIDES 
^ MALFORMATIONS 
^ OTHER RESPIRATORY DISEASES 
^ RHEUMATISM 
"" DIABETES 
^ SIMPLE PERITONITIS 
p , i ' ■ jk:^ CONVULSIONS OF INFANTS 
^3 SIMPLE MENINGITIS 
DYSENTERY 
^3- ACUTE NEPHRITIS 
^^ OTHER GENITO- URINARY DISEASES 






g?^---^ INFLUENZA 

^ ILIAC ABSCESS 

^ SKIN DISEASES 

^ WHOOPING COUGH 
W DISEASES OF FEMALE GENITAL ORGANS 
Bg MALARIA 
^ SCARLET FEVER 
^ HOMICIDES 

^ MEASLES ■■ - 190S 

jy SMALLPOX ^-AVERAGE FOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 

C H A R T N 0. 1. 



488 



TUBERCULOSIS. 



Tuberculosis still goes on its murderous way in Indiana, yet a 
slight decrease as compared with preceding years appears. All the 
following tables and diagrams show a slight decrease. Whenever 
possible the State Board of Health calls the attention of the people 
to the facts that tuberculosis is preventable, that it is curable if 
taken in its early stages, and that through private and governmental 
effort it can be greatly reduced. 

HAVOC WROUGHTiBY C0NSUMPTI0N|IN INDIANA IN 1904-1905-1906. 



1904. 


1905. 


4,978 


4,492 


1,807 


1,745 


3,171 


2,793 


867 


987 


490 


315 


2,703 


2,694 


3,396 


3,307 



1906. 



Total consumption deaths 

Male deaths 

Female deaths 

Mothers, age 18 to 40, prime of life. , 
Fathers, age 18 to 40, prime of life. . 
Orphans made under 12 years of age 
Homes invaded 



4,456 
1,675 
2,771 
917 
255 
2,353 
3,283 



Annual cost to the people, $10,000,000. 



ALL FORMS TUBERCULOSIS 
Deaths by months, with average for last seven i 



Months. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 




417 
422 
454 
455 
405 
394 

382 
392 
343 
366 
316 
399 


389 
440 
433 
449 
420 
348 

394 
403 
309 
350 
357 
370 


402 
389 
459 
444 
405 
323 

320 
331 
353 
305 
320 
345 


368 
350 
445 
411 
383 
363 

373 
340 
354 
306 
333 
388 


420 
414 
550 
459 
502 
400 

397 
390 
347 
365 
352 
582 


419 
407 
461 
426 
391 
361 

361 
355 
306 
326 
326 
353 


415 
394 
443 
439 
398 
331 

329 
367 
307 
344 
346 
343 


404 




402 


March 

April 


463 
440 
429 




360 


July 


366 




368 




331 


October 


337 
335 


December 


397 



ALL FORMS TUBERCULOSIS. 
Deaths by ages, vnth average for last seven years. 



AGES. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years. . 
25-30 years . . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years . . 
40-45 years. . 
45-50 years. . 
50-55 years. . 

55-60 years. . 
60-65 years. . 
65-70 years. . 
70-75 years . . 
7.5-80 yea/8. . 
80-90 years. . 
90 and over . . 



1900. 



155 
74 
42 
23 
12 



90 
532 
690 
627 

457 
388 
346 
269 
218 

209 
185 
159 
124 
78 
36 



1901. 



135 
62 
34 
23 
17 

63 
99 
417 
718 
595 

519 
386 
310 
248 
185 

190 

200 

171 

118 

81 

42 

2 



1902. 



113 
68 
31 
17 
12 



401 
672 
598 

464 
346 
311 
235 
224 

181 
153 
155 
124 
76 
38 
1 



1903. 


1904. 


109 


144 


59 


99 


24 


42 


23 


25 


14 


13 


64 


68 


92 


126 


436 


501 


707 


725 


572 


614 


491 


509 


374 


436 


267 


316 


225 


286 


217 


232 


193 


206 


166 


189 


143 


152 


116 


136 


74 


75 


30 


47 


2 


3 



1905. 



108 
85 
26 
18 
11 

63 

97 
449 
697 
574 

464 
419 
273 
245 
222 



1906. 



126 
62 
38 
31 
24 

64 
106 
411 
681 
577 

464 
375 
242 
260 
221 



153 


171 


165 


170 


165 


162 


122 


122 


72 


9& 


34 


35 




4 



Average. 



127 
72 
34 
23 
14 

63 
101 
449 

698 
594 

481 
389 
295 
281 
217 

186 
175 
158 
123 
79 
37 
1 



439 



DEATHS IN INDIANA 



TUBERCULOSIS ALL FORMS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



-1906 



I -AVERAGE FOR LAST SEVEN TEARS 



CHART 2 




JAN FEB HAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV OEC 



COMPARISON BY AGES 



700 




















CHART 




1 


































1 
























































































'^ r 
























































































P 








































^1 


'• 












































,1. 
' 1 
























300 




























































t 




n 


H 






































i-t- 


u 

Li 




1^^ 


n 




































1 

y 




1 ^ 




■U«& 












100 


















d 


111 


II' m 


in 








SO 




■ P 








.nil 


y. 


jli ill' lli J 


k 


im 






1 




It 


IH 


[^ 


li. 


Ik 




ti 


u 


11 


12 


1^ 


M 


la 






soo 



300 



1 2 3 4 5 10 IS 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 5S 60 65 70 75 80 90- 

1 2 3 4 5 to 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



440 



PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS, 
Deaths by Mortihs, viiih average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average 




300 
300 
318 
339 
266 
301 

244 
271 
212 
274 
248 
291 


368 
390 
388 
408 
378 
310 

349 
254 
266 
302 
321 
335 


358 
353 
416 
409 
368 
297 

295 
300 
296 
266 
288 
306 


324 
318 
399 
365 
339 
326 

323 
293 
318 
261 
297 
352 


379 
372 
485 
409 
448 
359 

358 
332 
302 
322 
317 
353 


395 
379 
421 
380 
346 
330 

310 
308 
263 
266 
287 
313 


359 
349 
391 
386 
337 
282 

284 
312 
253 
289 
302 
310 


354 




351 




402 




385 




354 




315 


July 


309 




310 




273 




283 




294 




323 







PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS. 
Deaths by ages, with average for last seven years. 



AGES. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 




43 
13 
9 
3 
3 

31 

59 

318 

543 

491 

338 
289 
252 
199 
158 
155 

131 
113 
92 
50 
29 


76 
35 
14 
12 

7 

28 
84 
389 
676 
559 

490 
356 
287 
223 
174 
166 

182 

148 

105 

73 

37 

2 


59 
33 
16 

7 
6 

28 

75 

373 

626 

553 

435 
329 
299 
225 
196 
166 

140 
137 
112 
70 
36 
1 


53 
28 
11 
10 

7 

35 

59 

393 

666 

535 

461 
343 
244 
213 
194 
175 

151 
123 
107 
67 
25 
1 


72 
48 
23 
14 
9 

32 
101 

457 
687 
582 

486 
412 
271 
262 
209 
186 

175 
137 
121 
65 
39 
3 


53 
37 
13 
10 
3 

37 

75 

411 

650 

538 

437 
385 
254 
219 
200 
139 

151 
154 
111 

66 
28 


60 
27 
19 
10 
8 

31 

76 
359 
625 
535 

429 
342 
220 
231 
198 
155 

145 
147 
103 
76 
31 
4 


59 


1-2 years 

2-3 years 


31 
15 




9 




6 




31 




75 


15-20 years 


385 


20-25 years 


639 


25-30 years 


541 


30-35 years 


439 


35-40 years 


351 




261 




224 




189 


55-60 years 


163 


60-65 years 


153 


65-70 years 


137 


70-75 years 


107 


75-80 years 


66 


80-90 years 


36 




1 









'441 



DEATHS IN INDIANA 



PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



1-1906 



-AVERAGE rOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 



CHART 4 



400 




JAN FEB HAR APR HAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



COMPARISON BY AGES 




1 2 3 4 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 SO 55 60 65 70 75 80 90- 

1 2 3 4 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



442 



CONSUMPTION DEATH RATES PER 100,000 BY COUNTIES FOR 1906, IN INDIANA. 
State Rate, 168.2. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams 

AUen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford. . . , 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass , 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford. . . 

Daviess 

Dearborn . . . 

Decatur. ... 

Dekalb 

Delaware. . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette. ... 

Floyd 

Fountain. . . 
Franklin.. . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant. . . . . . 

Greene. . . . . 

Hamilton . . . 
Hancock . . . 

Harrison. . . . 
Hendricks. . 

. Henry 

Howard. . . . 
Huntington. 

Jackson. . . . 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson... . 
Jennings. . . . 

Johnson. . . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko. . 
Lagrange. . . 

Lake 

Laporte. . . . 



Tuberculosis, 
all forms. 



169.1 
164.3 
221.0 
102.7 
65.2 

178.4 
164.4 
140.2 
153.1 
166.3 

125.6 
182.1 
215.1 
203.8 
162.1 

173.2 

121.7' 

142.7 

161.7 

145.5 

151.7 
174.4 
175.6 
183.0 
180.4 

167.7 
140.6 
192.0 
155.8 
172.0 

226.4 
145.5 
164.1 
155.7 
125.8 

195.3 
77.1 
163.3 
292.3 
234.2 

248.9 
135.6 
133.0 
117.6 
130.9 
152.6 



COUNTIES. 



Lawrence. 
Madison. . 
Marion. . . 
Marshall. . 
Martin. . . 



Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 



Newton . 



Noble. . 
Ohio. . . 
Orange. 
Owen. . 
Parke. . 



Perry, ., 
Pike. . . , 
Porter. . 
Posey. . 
Pulaski. 



Putnam . . 
Randolph . 
Ripley. . . 
Rush. . . . 
Scott 



Shelby ' 

Spencer. . . . 

Starke 

Steuben .... 
St. Joseph . . 

Sullivan. . . . 
Switzerland. 
Tippecanoe. 

Tipton 

Union 



Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion. . . 

Vigo... 

Wabash 

Warren 



Warrick. . . . 
Washington. 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitely.... 



iTuberculosis, 
all forms. 



213.4 

112.9 

236.2 

93.6 

12.6 

180.5 
189.5 
146.9 
202.9 
72.0 

84.6 
296.2 
304.5 
138.1 
145.2 

231.6 
253.9 
101.7 
185.3 
105.6 

144.2 
145.4 
139.2 
184.4 
282.4 

159.7 
186.2 
111.4 
115.9 
160.4 

170.0 
211.1 
157.0 
153.8 
103.6 

184.1 
93.1 
205.1 
111.5 
130.0 

131.5 
228.0 
•242.8 
132.0 
92.4 
150.0 



MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF TUBERCUIjOSIS DEATHS. 

January— The total number of deaths from tuberculosis was 412 ; 
of these 355 were of the pulmonary form. Of the total number, 195 
were males and 217 females. Of the males, 37 were fathers in the 
age period of 18 to 40 and left 77 orphans under 12 years of age. 
Of the females, 64 were mothers in the age period of 18 to 40 and 
left 130 orphans under 12 years of age. We credit consumption 
with the destruction of 101 fathers and mothers in the useful period 



443 

of life and the production of 207 orphans. How many of these poor 
children will find their way into the orphan asylums can not be told. 
The homes invaded by the disease were 330. Two hundred seven 
of the total consumption deaths were in the age period of 15 to 40, 
which is 52 per cent. 

February — The total number of deaths from tuberculosis was 372, 
and of these 325 were of the pulmonary form. Of the total num- 
ber, 196 were females and 176 males. Of the males, 30 were fathers 
in the age period of 18 to 40, and left 67 orphans under 12 years of 
age. Of the females, 77 were mothers in the age period of 18 to 40, 
and left 161 orphans under 12 years of age. Number of homes vis- 
ited by the disease, 354. Total number of orphans produced, 168. 
Thirty-three of the deaths were under 15 years of age; 274 in the 
age period of 15 to 50, and the remainder were above 50. 

March— The total number of deaths from tuberculosis was 406, 
and of these 343 were of the pulmonary form. Of the total number 
195 were males and 211 females. Of the males 36 were fathers in 
the age period of 18 to 40, and left 77 orphans under 12 years of 
age. Of the females 87 were mothers in the age period of 18 to 40, 
and left 179 orphans under 12 years of age. The number of homes 
visited by the disease was 398. The total number of orphans pro- 
duced was 256. There were 59 consumption deaths of persons over 
60 years of age. 

April — Total number of deaths from tuberculosis, all forms, was 
411. Of these 359 were of the pulmonary form. Of the total num- 
ber 191 were males and 220 females. Of the males 39 were fathers 
in the age period of 18 to 40 and left 80 orphans under 12 years of 
age. Of the females 83 were mothers in the .same age period as 
above and left 167 orphans. The number of homes visited by the 
disease was 386. Total •number of orphans produced, 247. Two 
hundred and ninety-five deaths were in the age period of 15 to 50, 
which is 17.7 per cent, of the total. 

May — Total number of deaths from all forms, 376, 318 being pul- 
monary. Of the total number, 147 were males and 229 females. 
Of the males, 37 were fathers between the ages of 18 and 40, and 
left 77 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the females, 73 were 
mothers of the same age period as above, and left 149 orphans under 
12 years of age. Number of homes invaded, 372. Total number of 
orphans created, 226. Number of widows created, 37 ; number of 
widowers, 73. 

June — The total number of deaths from tuberculosis, all forms, 
was 317, 275 being pulmonary. Of the total number, 143 were males 



444 

and 174 females. Of the males, 27 were married and in the age 
period of 18 to 40, and left 57 orphans under 12 years of age. Of 
the females, 66 were married and in the same age period as above, 
and they left 133 orphans under 12 years of age. Total orphans 
created by the disease under 12 years of age, 190. The number of 
homes invaded was 287. 

July — Total number of deaths, 319. Forty-five of these were 
other forms than pulmonary. Of the total number, 143 were males 
and 176 females. Of the males, 25 were married and were in the 
age period of 18 to 40, and they left 50 orphans under 12 years of 
age. Of the females, 57 were married and in the age period just 
named, and they left 116 orphans under 12 years of age. The total 
number of orphans made by this disease in one month was 166. The 
total number of homes invaded, 291. 

August — Total number of deaths, 351, 297 pulmonary, 54 other 
forms. Of the total number, 106 were males and 195 females. Of 
the males, 22 were married and in the age period of 18 to 40, the 
prime of life, and they left 48 orphans under 12 years of age. Of 
the females, 75 were married in the same age period as above and 
left 157 orphans under 12 years of age. The total number of or- 
phans was 205, and the homes invaded numbered 816. Two deaths 
occurred in the age period of 80 to 90. 

September — Total number of deaths, 291 — 240 pulmonary, 51 
other forms. Of the total number, 136 were males and 155 females. 
Of the males, 23 were married in the age period of 18 to 40 and left 
46 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the females, 58 were married 
in the same age period as above and left 126 orphans under 12 years 
of age. Total number of orphans made by the disease this month, 
172. Homes invaded, 251. Two deaths, both women, occurred at 
80 years of age. Nineteen, 10 of whom we^e women, occurred in the 
age period of 70 to 80. 

October — Total number of deaths 323, of which 267 were of the 
pulmonary form and 56 other forms. Of the total number, 134 
were males and 189 females. Of the males, 29 were married in the 
age period of 18 to 40 and left 59 orphans under 12 years of age. 
Of the females, 66 were married in the same age period as above and 
left 139 orphans under 12. The total number of orphans made by 
the disease this month was 198. Homes invaded, 296. Thirteen 
tuberculosis deaths occurred of people over 70 years of age. 

November — The total number of deaths was 323, of which 284 
were of the pulmonary form, and 39 other forms. Of the total 
number, 129 were males and 184 females. Of the males, 28' were 



445 

married in the age period of 18 to 40 and left 58 orphans under 12 
years of age. Of the females, 76 were married in the same age 
period as above, and left 156 orphans under 12 years. The total 
number of orphans made by the disease this month was 214 ; homes 
invaded, 299. As usual the greatest destruction was in the useful 
period of life, 15 to 50, wherein 228, or 70.5 per cent., of the total 
deaths occurred. 

December^ — Total number of deaths, 329, of which 293 were of the 
pulmonary form. The male deaths were 165, females 164. Of the 
males, 31 were married, in the age period of 18 to 40, and left 69 or- 
phans under 12 years of age. Of the females, 56 were married, in 
the same age period as above, and left 116 orphans under 12 years of 
age. Total number of orphans made by the disease this month, 185. 
Homes invaded, 291. By age periods the tuberculosis deaths were: 
Under 5 years, 19; 5 to 15, 10; 15 to 40, 173; 40 to 60, 77; 60 and 
over, 50. 

PNEUMONIA. 

A slight decrease appears for pneumonia, inasmuch as the num- 
ber of deaths in 1906 was 3,392, and the average annually for the 
last seven years is 3,419. In large cities pneumonia leads as a 
cause of death, but it is second to consumption in Indiana. The 
tables by months and by age periods, with their accompanying 
graphic charts, show the pneumonia status in this state. 



44C 



PNEUMONIA. 
Deaths by months with average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 




375 
435 
616 
498 
234 
94 

62 
65 
56 
89 
136 
223 


655 
673 
646 
466 
280 
120 

72 
74 
90 
156 
202 
389 


473 
535 
497 
371 
207 
104 

70 
97 
113 
169 
196 
307 


450 
424 
419 
330 
240 
129 

83 
86 
114 
134 
246 
389 


579 
750 
761 
576 
326 
115 

101 
69 
86 
135 
251 
353 


601 
781 
656 
265 
189 
90 

82 
69 
88 
148 
253 
372 


490 
439 
541 
404 
232 
119 

88 
82 
98 
189 
300 
410 


517 




576 




592 




415 




244 


June 

July 


110 
79 




74 


September 

October ' 

November 

December 


92 

145 
226 
349 


Totals 


2,883 


3.823 


3.319 


3,044 


4,102 


3,594 


3,392 


3,419 



PNEUMONIA. 
Deaths by ages, with average for la^ seven i 



AGES. 



1900. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years. . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years. . 
25-30 years. . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years . . 
40-45 years . . 
45-50 years . . 
50-55 years . . 
55-60 years. . 

60-65 years. . 
65-70 years . . 
70-75 years. . 
75-80 years . . 
80-90 years. 
90 and over. . 



542 
206 
113 
53 
40 

82 
64 
85 
95 
92 

91 
104 

89 
107 
116 
107 

181 
162 
163 
162 
195 



1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


758 


692 


703 


919 


898 


714 


248 


246 


216 


326 


251 


262 


123 


113 


107 


145 


97 


127 


73 


47 


57 


87 


63 


67 


46 


39 


34 


p3 


28 


46 


12ff 


93 


102 


145 


90 


91 


66 


55 


57 


72 


71 


50 


139 


93 


88 


128 


89 


95 


130 


107 


83 


108 


83 


77 


119 


86 


72 


98 


79 


89 


115 


96 


58 


104 


90 


86 


121 


80 


78 


114 


107 


104 


142 


104 


77 


105 


98 


106 


110 


87 


103 


137 


106 


112 


159 


118 


89 


137 


130 


130 


179 


112 


132 


136 


140 


137 


218 


142 


164 


195 


173 


155 


244 


205 


172 


225 


237 


216 


246 


192 


202 


261 


270 


229 


191 


200 


192 


268 


226 


232 


216 


181 


204 


271 


237 


232 


25 


24 


27 


42 


28 


25 



Average. 



746 
250 
118 
64 
41 

103 
62 

102 
97 
90 

91 
101 
103 
109 
125 
120 

175 
208 
223 
210 
219 
24 



447 



INDIANA 



PNEUMONIA DEATHS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



1-1906 



-AVERAGE FOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 



CHART 6 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



SOOr 



COMPARISON BY AGES 



CHART 7 



N» 



400 



400 



200 

100 



200 

100 




Mi 



II IB 111 Kj I 
Jiiil 



1 2 3 4 5 10 IS 20 25 30 3S 40 45 SO 55 60 65 70 75 80 90- 
\ 2 3 4 S 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



448 



MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF PNEUMONIA DEATHS. 

January — Pneumonia caused 415 deaths, rate 184.8 per 100,000. 
In the corresponding month last year, 558 deaths, rate 248.6. This 
is a decided improvement, for which we should be grateful. One 
hundred forty-seven of the deaths were under 15 years of age, 92 
between 20 and 50. 138 over 50, 3 were 90 and over. 

February — Pneumonia caused 403 deaths; rate, 197.8. In the 
corresponding month last year, 741 deaths ; rate, 362.2. In the pre- 
ceding month, 415 deaths; rate, 184.8 per 100,000. There were 12 
fewer in February than occurred in January. Of the total pneu- 
monia deaths, 187 were males and 216 females. It is quite unusual 
for females to lead in this disease. Of the total number, 142 were 
under 15 years of age, 84 between 15 and 50, and the remainder 
were over 50. The right comparison is by the corresponding month 
last year, when there were 741 deaths, being a difference in favor of 
February of this year of 334. 

March — Pneumonia caused 469 deaths; rate, 208.9 per 100,000. 
This is an increase over the preceding month of 66 deaths. In the 
corresponding month last year, 599 deaths. By this comparison, 
which is the right one, there is a decided improvement to be noted, 
as there is a difference of 130 deaths. Seventy-five of the deaths 
from pneumonia were under one year of age, 73 in the age period of 
1 to 5, 70 between 5 and 30, 113 between 30 and 60, 54 in the age 
period of 60 to 70, 51 from 70 to 80, 44 from 80 to 90, and three 
over 90. 

April — Pneumonia caused 386 deaths. In the corresponding 
month last year, 223 deaths, an increase of 163. Fifty-four pneu- 
monia deaths were under 1 year of age, 75 between 15 and 50, and 
132 over 50. Two men over 90 years of age died from the malady. 

May — Pneumonia caused 213 deaths. In the corresponding 
month last year, 170. By this comparison, there is an increase of 43 
deaths. Of the pneumonia deaths, 68 were under 5 years of age, 17 
between 5 and 20, 32 between 40 and 60, 18 between 60 and 70, 32 
from 70 to 80, and 16 were 80 and over. 

June — Pneumonia caused 111 deaths. In the corresponding 
month last year, 91 deaths. Forty-seven pneumonia deaths were 
under 5 years of age ; 9 were from 5 to 20 ; 7, 20 to 40 ; 12, 40 to 60 ; 
27, 60 to 80 ; 9, 80 and over. 

July — Pneumonia caused 85 deaths. In the preceding month, 
111, In the corresponding month last year, 63. Of the pneumonia 
deaths, 25 were under 20 years ; 12 in the age period of 20 to 50 ; 14 
in the age period of 50 to 70, and the remainder 70 years and over. 



4:40 

August — Total number of deaths. 79. In the corresponding 
month last year, 61. Of the pneumonia deaths, 14 were under one 
year of age ; 13 were 1 to 5 ; 23, 5 to 50 ; 17, 50 to 70 ; 11, 70 to 90, 
and one was over 90 years old. 

September— Total number of deaths, 93. In the corresponding 
month last year, 85. Of the pneumonia deaths, 30 were under 1 
year of age • 17, 1 to 10 ; 6, 10 to 20 ; 6, 20 to 40 ; 10, 40 to 60 ; 10, 60 
to 70 ; 10, 70 to 80 ; 6, 80 and over. 

October— The total number of deaths from pneumonia, 176. In 
the corresponding month last year, 138. Of the pneumonia deaths, 
59 were under one year of age, 38 in the age period of 1 to 5 ; 11 in 
the age period of 60 to 70 ; 17 in the age period of 70 to 80 ; 4 were 
over 80, and 2 over 90 years. 

November — The total number of deaths from pneumonia was 302. 
In the corresponding month last year, 219. Of the pneumonia 
deaths, 83 occurred in the first year of life, 39 from 1 to 5 years ; 45 
were in the age period of 70 to 80, and 26 in the age period of 80 
to 90, and 2 were over 90. 

December — The total number of deaths, 408. In the correspond- 
ing month last year, 347. Of the total deaths this month 210 were 
males and 188 females. By certain ages the deaths were: Under 
1 year, 106 ; 1 to 10, 42 ; 10 to 30, 31 ; 30 to 50, 47 ; from 50 to 70, 
69 ; 70 and over, 91. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

The typhoid fever deaths in 1906 numbered 913, which is a slight 
decrease as compared with the annual average, 1,100, for the last 
seven years. As shown in the tables herewith, and by the graphic 
charts drawn therefrom, typhoid has gradually fallen since 1900. 
The four last months of the year show more deaths from typhoid 
than the eight preceding months. 



^9 -Bd. of Health. 



450 



TYPHOID FEVF'^. 
Deaths by months, with average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 



January. . 
February. 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October. . . 
November. 
December. 

Totals 



1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


109 


74 


66 


61 


36 


51 


39 


52 


50 


37 


53 


55 


35 


29 


40 


49 


41 


55 


62 


34 


40 


39 


41 


45 


45 


61 


26 


32 


44 


35 


31 


39 


55 


33 


39 


27 


27 


28 


42 


58 


48 


29 


65 


81 


88 


64 


70 


57 


52 


144 


148 


176 


120 


107 


121 


96 


245 


198 


237 


. 193 


138 


203 


155 


323 


222 


225 


165 


167 


154 


168 


208 


' 185 


155 


104 


137 


101 


148 


144 


88 


88 


72 


67 


65 


86 


1,440 


1,198 


1,217 


1,013 


1,013 


928 


913 



Average 



130 
195 
203 
148 

87 

1,100 



TYPHOID FEVER. 
Death by ages, loilh average for last seven years. 



AGES. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years. . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years. . 
25-30 years. . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years . . 
40-45 years. . 
45-50 years. . 
50-55 years. . 
55-60 years . . 

60-65 years. . 
65-70 years. . 
70-75 years. . 
75-80 years. . 
80-90 years. . 
90 and over. . 



1900. 



13 
14 
18 
26 
22 

105 
136 
229 
193 
120 



1901. 1902. 1903. 1904, 



15 
14 
12 
18 
19 

91 

87 
178 
177 
146 

78 
70 
75 
49 
34 
36 

33 

25 

24 

5 

8 



9 
15 
29 
19 
20 

77 
98 
167 
169 
139 

117 
69 
73 
58 
37 
31 

22 
25 
21 
13 
4 



4 
13 
12 
17 
16 

77 
102 
160 
136 
102 

62 
61 
49 
45 
33 
35 

18 
21 
19 
12 
11 
1 



74 
82 
133 
137 



1905. 



11 
14 
16 
11 

18 

72 
74 
125 
136 
94 

64 
45 
49 
46 
32 
31 

30 

20 

19 

9 



1906. 



12 
11 
13 
19 
18 

65 
85 
138 
120 
94 

76 
62 
34 
37 
36 
22 

18 
16 
10 
15 



Average. 



95 
161 
152 
112 



451 



INDIANA 

TYPHOID FEVER DEATHS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



- AVERAGE rOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 



CHART 8 




JAN FE8 MAR APR MAY JUKE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



160 



120 



80 



40 



20 



COMPARISON BY AGES 

CHA.RT 9 



i 




j 1 1 


^- 1 "1 




■ ! 1 ! R 




' i ' B''i P P 


'bipUIII! ^. h i i ! 1 p,ll[ililjlliiiliiR 



120 



40 
20 



I 2 3 4 S 10 IS 20 2S 30 35 40 45 SO 55 60 65 70 75 80 

1 2 3 4 S 10 IS 20 25 30 35 40 45 SO 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



452 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OP TYPHOID FEVER DEATHS. 

January — Fifty-two counties report 175 cases of typhoid fever, 
with 33 deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 273 cases 
were reported with 50 deaths in 40 counties. In the preceding 
month there were 306 eases in 47 counties, wath 66 deaths. 

February — Thirty-eight counties reported 117 cases, with 29 
deaths. In the corresponding month last year 42 counties reported 
202 cases, with 32 deaths. In the preceding month 52 counties re- 
ported 175 cases, with 33 deaths. 

March — Two hundred and fifty-eight cases were reported from 46 
counties, with 37 deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 
197 cases in 37 counties, with 30 deaths. In the preceding month, 
117 cases in 38 counties, with 29 deaths. 

April — Two hundred and eleven cases reported from 62 counties. 
The disease was epidemic in Daviess County, which reported 11 
cases, with 1 death; in Jackson, with 6 cases and 1 death, and in 
Parke, with 8 cases and no deaths. 

May — Ninety-four cases reported from 32 counties, with 40 
deaths. The disease was epidemic in the following counties : Clark, 
15 cases ; Vanderburgh, 11 ; Washington, 15. 

July — Two hundred and twenty-eight cases reported, with 44 
deaths, from 49 counties. In the preceding month 94 cases, with 
40 deaths, in 32 counties. The disease was epidemic in the follow- 
ing counties : Bartholomew, Clark, Howard, Jefferson, Morgan and 
Wayne. In Wayne County, at Hichmond, many cases of sickness 
of an unusual nature appeared, some doctors calling the type of 
disease "summer grippe." Several physicians became suspicious 
and blood from these patients was sent to the Laboratory of Hy- 
giene and was found to give the Widal reaction. It is estimated 
there were at least 200 cases of this mild typhoid fever in Richmond 
in July. 

August — Four hundred and forty-six cases reported from 68 
counties, with 93 deaths. In the corresponding month, 228 cases 
reported, with 48 deaths from 49 counties. In the corresponding 
month last year, 360 cases, with 125 deaths from 72 counties. The 
disease was epidemic in Adams County, 11 cases; Clay, 18; Daviess, 
14; Delaware, 12; Madison, 12; Noble, 16; Vanderburgh, 35; 
Wayne, 50. We have every reason to believe that the disease, al- 
most without question, existed in every county in the state either 
in mild or severe form. 

September — Nine hundred and seventy-seven cases reported from 
76 counties, with 143 deaths. In the preceding month, 446 cases in 



453 

68 eonnties, with 93 deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 
1,080 cases in 96 counties, with 186 deaths. The disease was epi- 
demic in the following counties : Bartholomew, 22 ; Clay, 20 ; 
Daviess, 30; Fayette, 20: Howard, 25; Lawrence, 33; Marion, 60; 
Montgomery, 17; Vanderburgh, 23; Vigo, 20; Wayne, 17; Wash- 
ington, 15 ; Whitley, 25. 

October — Seven hundred and thirty-two cases were reported from 
73 counties, with 150 deaths. In the preceding month, 977 cases 
reported from 76 counties, with 143 deaths. In the corresponding 
month last year, there were 711 cases in 72 counties, with 152 
deaths. The disease was epidemic in the following counties : Bar- 
tholomew, 11 cases ; Delaware, 25 ; Howard, 15 ; Jeiferson, 35 ; Madi- 
son, 25 ; Montgomery. IJ Noble, 17 ; Parke, 14 ; Posey, 27 ; Putnam, 
12 ; White, 17. 

November — Seven hundred and ninety cases of typhoid fever 
were reported in 73 counties, with J35 deaths. In the correspond- 
ing month last year, 570 cases from 62 counties, with 101 deaths. 
Several epidemics were reported. In Daviess County there were 16 
cases and 2 deaths Fayette, 10 cases and 2 deaths ; Hancock, 16 
cases, 1 death ; Jackson, 10 cases, 2 deaths ; Jay, 12 cases, 3 deaths ; 
Lagrange, 15 cases, no deaths; Madison, 17 cases, 5 deaths; Noble, 
10 cases, no deaths ; Parke, 29 cases, 2 deaths ; Putnam, 10 cases, no 
deaths ; Vanderburgh, 12 cases, 1 death. We recognize from these 
reports that not a few cases of mild typhoid are diagnosed as ma- 
laria, diarrhoeal trouble, etc. We also recognize that many typical 
cases are not reported owing to thoughtlessness and disregard of the 
law on the part of practitioners. 

December — Six hundred and seventy-four cases were reported 
from 50 counties, with 79 deaths. In the corresponding month last 
year, 712 cases from 47 counties, with 66 deaths. The disease was 
reported as epidemic in C.lark County, 15 cases; Daviess. 17; Dela- 
ware, 24 ; Martin, 17 ; Noble, 17 ; Parke, 18 ; Spencer, 26 ; Union, 25 ; 
Washington, 20. 

DIPHTHERIA. 

Diphtheria caused 402 deaths in 1906, or 61 less than the average 
(463) for the last seven years. January is the most fatal month, 
and July the least fatal. The gradual decrease of deaths from 
diphtheria is largely due to the more general and earlier use of anti- 
toxin, although the teachings and warnings of the health depart- 
ment must have had some good effect. 

The tables giving the number of deaths by months and by ages, 
follow herewith: 



454 



DIPHTHERIA. 
Deaths by months, with average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 




90 
70 
68 
30 
J4 
13 

15 
40 
64 
111 
125 
105 


110 
61 
39 
29 
23 
23 

15 
24 
38 
74 
56 
62 


49 
35 
32 
27 
30 
16 

7 
21 
39 
48 
63 
57 


61 
49 
27 
22 
12 
16 

15 
23 
35 
69 

77 
56 


51 
35 
29 
32 
22 
18 

10 
12 
11 
21 

35 

38 


32 
31 
27 
13 
13 
8 

16 
15 
34 

82 
41 
54 


33 
23 
26, 
16 
8 
12 

11 

13 
36 

77 
82 
65 


61 




43 




35 




24 




17 


June 

July 


15 
13 


August 

September, 


21 
35 
69 




68 




62 






Totals 


745 


554 


424 


462 


314 


366 


402 


463 







DIPTHERIA 
Deaths by ages, with average for last seven years. 



AGES. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years. . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years. . 
25-30 years. . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years. . 
40-45 years. . 
45-50 years . . 
50-55 years. . 

5.5-60 years. . 
60-65 years. . 
65-70 years. . 
75-80 years . . 



1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904, 



52 
73 
106 
94 
76 

230 

70 

24 

4 

1 

2 
1 



60 
58 
65 
80 
53 

143 

51 

23 

7 

3 

1 
3 
1 
1 

2 



51 
36 
61 
39 
45 

122 

46 

14 

1 

1 

1 
..... 



50 
59 
56 
64 
46 

141 

28 

9 

3 



1905. 



23 
35 
48 
53 
41 

114 

28 
10 
7 
3 

1 
1 



1906. 



26 
45 
51 

47 
58 

124 

35 

10 

1 



Average. 



129 

41 

13 

3 

1 

1 
1 



455 



DEATHS IN INDIANA 

DIPHTHERIA AND CROUP 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



1906 



P- AVERAGE rOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 
CHART 10 




JAN rEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



COMPARISON DY AGES 









« 










CHART 


11 














! 










1 

1 












120 










































? 
































1^ 
































11 




















80 












\~^^ 

> "^^ 






























^^ 


























































N 


« 
























40 


y jiMiM 


H 


,\V 


u 
























t 


w 






















tn 


■ 




1 


















■ 


1^1 ■ 












' 










1 




BLwM 


■yj 


y|yi 


i 


— i!^ 


-^ 


■^ 


— ^ 


- 


ih« 


_5a 



120 



80 



40 



20 



12 3 4 
2 3 4 5 



5 10 15 20 25 30 3S 40 50 55 
10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 55 30 



450 



SCARLET FEVER. 

Scarlet fever caused 101 deaths in 1906, or 41 less than the av- 
erage annual number of deaths for the last seven years. 

The tables given herewith and the graphic charts drawn from 
them, show the scarlet fever situation in Indiana : 



SCARLET FEVER. 
Deaths by ages, with average for last seven years. 



AGES. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


• 1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 


Under 1 year 


7 
17 
22 
20 
18 

42 

7 
4 

1 


7 
14 
29 
18 
22 

37 
8 
4 
2 
3 

1 
1 

1 


11 
13 
17 

24 
14 

43 
14 
3 
3 
1 

1 


13 
9 
17 
22 
19 

55 
19 
3 
3 


13 
27 
33 
25 
18 

61 
11 

2 
1 


10 
18 
20 
17 
14 

38 

11 

1 

1 

2 


5 
13 
10 
15 
10 

27 
8 
2 

10 

, 1 


9 
16 


2-3 years 

3-4 years 


21 
20 
16 


5-10 years 


43 
11 


15-20 years 

20-25 years 

25-30 years 


2 
3 
1 


30-35 years 




1 
1 




















i 


i 






80-90 years 






1 




















Totals 


138 


147 


144 


163 


192 


133 


101 


142 



SCARLET FEVER. 
Deaths by months, with average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 




17 
15 
17 
16 
12 
9 

I 

5 
14 
13 
20 


24 
18 
27 
18 
9 
12 

5 
5 
4 
3 

10 
14 


22 
19 
18 
11 
5 
3 

6 
6 
8 
19 
24 
9 


22 
13 
10 
9 
4 
6 

13 
8 
13 
16 
18 
34 


24 
24 
33 
22 
15 
9 

4 
6 
7 
12 
17 
19 


18 
11 
20 
21 
11 
4 

14 
6 
5 
5 

11 
7 


11 
9 
12 

7 
7 
10 

7 
3 
6 
8 
14 
7 


19 




15 




19 


April 


14 
9 




7 


July 


7 




5 


September 


7 
11 


November 


15 
15 







457 



INDIANA 



SCARLET FEVER DEATHS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



-190G 



■ - AVERAGE FOR LaST SEVEN YEARS 
CHART 12 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



COMPARISON BY AGES 



CHART 13 




458 



DIARRHOE AL^DISE ASES . 

The diarrhoeal deaths under five years of age numbered 1,823. 
which is 83 more than the average for the last seven years. "That 
diarrhoeal diseases are fatal mostly in infancy and old age plainly 
appears in the table following. 

The tables and charts show the status of the disease under the 
conditions and for the periods and ages stated: 



DIARRHOEAL DISEASES, UNDER FIVE YEARS OF AGE. 
Deaths by months, loiih average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 


January 


19 
11 
21 
13 
32 
111 

480 
627 
436 
198 
80 
21 


14 
12 
17 
26 
19 
81 

468 
500 
393 
167 
64 
15 


15- 
14 
14 
21 
29 
116 

455 
569 
337 
130 

56 

23 


11 
22 
20 
17 
25 
83 

323 
475 
275 
140 
36 
22 


29 
30 
33 
24 
29 
54 

307 

498 
344 
204 
49 
28 


26 
30 
36 
22 
35 
116 

359 
469 
343 
186 
54 
24 


28 
25 
29 
39 
42 
71 

321 
484 
447 
232 
66 
39 


20 
20 




24 




23 




30 




90 


July. ' ; 


387 




517 




368 


October 


179 
58 




24 






Totals . 


2,049 


1,776 


1,779 


1,449 


1,629 


1,700 


1,823 


1,740 







DIARRHOEAL DISEASES, FIVE YEARS OF AGE AND OVER, 
Deaths by months, with average for last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 


Januarj' 


27 
22 
32 
21 
26 
15 

139 
137 
118 
69 
36 
26 


30 
22 
24 
17 
28 
31 

130 
169 
123 
72 
39 
42 


25 
23 
28 
28 
30 
25 

129 
170 
86 
59 
39 
27 


24 
20 
27 
23 
40 
36 

93 
131 
116 
64 
26 
22 


30 
38 
37 
28 
33 
30 

73 
110 
104 
63 
32 
33 


32 
29 
42 
27 
28 
44 

87 
152 
94 
67 

28 
28 


26 
36 
35 
41 
30 
29 

78 
119 
130 
92 
39 
40 


27 
27 




32 




26 




30 




30 


July. 


104 




141 




110 




69 




S5 


December 


31 


Totals 


668 


727 


669 


622 


611 


658 


695 


6o2 







459 



DEATHS IN INDIANA 

DIARRHOEAL DISEASES 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



- i9oe 



AVERAGE rOR LAST SEVEN VE&RS 











UNDER FIVE YEARS 
CHART 14 




OF 


AGE 












500 


















n 










500 
















1 


i 












400 
















1 

i 
■ 


■ 








400 














— 




s 


Ih 










300 
















1 


1' ' 








300 
















II 


H 








9nn 














■ 1 


■ 






200 
















■nil- 

i|i 




■ 








100 
50 














1 


1 


1 






100 












■ 


1. 




t 


■»- 




SO 


Bm 


Mm 


■■inla 


1 


libg 


JAN 


FEB 


MAR 


APR 


HAY 


JU 


ME 


JU 


LY 




At 


G 


SEPT 


oc 


T 


NOV 


DEC 





FIVE YEARS AND OVER 
CHART 15 




JAN . FEB HAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



460 



DIARRHOEAL DISEASES 
Deaths hy ages, with average for last seven years. 



AGES. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years. . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years. . 
25-30 years. . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years. . 
40-45 years. . 
45-50 years. . 
50-55 years. . 

55-60 years. . 
60-65 years. . 
65-70 years. . 
70-75 years. . 
75-80 years. . 
80-90 years. . 
90 and over. . 

Totals. . . 



1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Average. 


1,305 


1,118 


1,070 


894 


1,068 


1,115 


1,240 


1,115 


534 


513 


533 


421 


384 


406 


417 


458 


152 


139 


140 


110 


112 


130 


116 


128 


44 


28 


34 


19 


40 


36 


31 


33 


34 


17 


13 


11 


21 


13 


20 


18 


25 


36 


23 


12 


31 


29 


17 


24 


1 


9 


8 


11 


13 


10 


6 


8 


8 


13 


7 


6 


4 


8 


8 


7 


11 


15 


14 


9 


15 


17 


12 


13 


9 


13 


15 


12 


13 


16 


21 


14 


9 


32 


12 


20 


14 


10 


10 


15 


19 


18 


28 


14 


15 


22 


17 


19 


22 


13 


14 


15 


19 


20 


19 


17 


21 


22 


20 


24 


19 


13 


14 


19 


31 


31 


30 


36 


33 


25 


30 


31 


43 


46 


57 


37 


37 


51 


37 


44 


63 


62 


60 


45 


57 


72 


59 


59 


77 


91 


73 


67 


68 


68 


90 


76 


82 


70 


80 


98 


88 


93 


99 


87 


69 


83 


98 


91 


88 


95 


107 


89 


94 


107 


102 


94 


89 


104 


124 


102 




22 


11 


14 


12 


13 


18 


13 






2,653 


2,498 


2,442 


2.060 


2,240 


2,366 


2,512 


2.389 



461 



DEATHS IN INDIANA 

DIARRHOEAL DISEASES 

COMPARISON BY AGES 



I 


1 - 1906 














CHART 


- AVERAGE 
16 


FOR LAST 


SEVEN 


rEARS 












































1200 


1200 












































f55 










































i 
































• 










inoo 


1 










































1000 




t 












































1 














































1 












































Rnn 


1 










































800 




! 


























; 
















1 






























1 












1 


























1 
















1 


























1 












600 












































i 






































— 






1 










i 


















1 








Al)f\ 


1 


1 
























j 














400 




s> 










































i 


vN 










































1 


i 


















.-_ 







i 












9nn 


^ 


1 




















1 












200 






1 








































inn 




■n 


































1 




inn 




^^' 


III 




























-^,ln 


In In 11 


Ig 






i, 


11 


n 


If, 


ii. 


M^^ 


■^ 


1^ 


1^ 


■^ 


l£ 


la 


■a 


Ii. 


IIP 


i 


t 


L. 


Lb 





1 2 3 4 5 10 tS 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 SO G5 70 75 80 90- 

1 2 3 4 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



462 



INFLUENZA. 

Influenza caused 224 deaths in 1906, which is a large decrease as 
compared with the average (477) for the last seven years. How- 
ever, the disease existed, but not in epidemic form, in every county 
in the state, deaths occurring in 73 counties. The northern sanitary 
section was freer from the disease and had fewer deaths than either 
the central or southern section. The tables and charts herewith 
show the status of the disease : 

INFLUENZA. 
Deaths by months, vrith average for lust seven years. 



MONTHS. 



January. . . 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June : 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October. . . . 
November. . 
December. . 

. Totals. 



1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


53 


269 


60 


31 


45 


114 


53 


70 


349 


84 


51 


90 


221 


44 


98 


180 


51 


87 


146 


151 


48 


101 


128 


37 


60 


70 


37 


30 


34 


42 


15 


37 


20 


15 


7 


19 


12 


4 


10 


7 


7 


2 


12 


9 


8 


7 


2 


5 


4 


4 


10 


3 


9 


5 




2 


1 


3 


7 


3 


1 


4 


3 


13 


5 


8 


7 


4 


4 


8 


8 


12 


8 


10 


18 


12 


11 


11 


30 


17 


• 36 


26 


21 


12 


424 


1,049 


302 


348 


434 


591 


224 



89 
129 
108 
66 
24 



477 



INFLUENZA. 
Deaths by ages, with average for last seven years. 



AGES. 



Under 1 year. 
1-2 years. . 
2-3 years. . 
3-4 years. . 
4-5 years. . 

5-10 years. . 
10-15 years. . 
15-20 years. . 
20-25 years . . 
25-30 years. . 

30-35 years. . 
35-40 years. . 
40-15 years. . 
4-5-50 years. . 
50-55 years. . 
55-60 years. . 

60-65 years. . 
65-70 years. . 
70-75 years. . 
75-80 years. , 
80-90 years. . 
90 and over. . 



1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. Average, 



22 


2 


5 


27 


6 


5 


33 


1 


6 


33 


6 


7 


43 


12 


16 


41 


14 


16 


57 


5 


28 


103 


35 


27 


159 


35 


53 


151 


39 


58 


180 


51 


74 


26 


7 


9 



8 


3 


7 


9 


7 


9 


6 


16 


13 


14 


9 


17 


19 


32 


22 


40 


37 


47 


73 


67 


61 


86 


94 


132 


15 


23 



35 

7 
4 
2 
2 

5 
4 
5 

8 
7 

7 

9 
11 
14 
17 
10 

26 
45 



463 



INDIANA 



INFLUENZA DEATHS 

COMPARISON BY MONTHS 



t906 



- AVERAGE FOR LAST SEVEN YEARS 



CHART 17 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



COMPARISON BY AGES 



100 



80 



CHART 18 




80 



SO 



40 



20 



20 



m 



1 2 3 4 S 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 SO 55 60 6S 70 75 80 90- 

1 2 3 4 5 10 15 20 25~ 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 90 



4 04 



SMALLPOX. 

This disease prevailed throughout the year, but usually in very 
mild form. It was epidemic in a few localities, as shown in the 
monthly analyses appended. The deaths numbered 8, as against 35 
in 1905, said deaths occurring, two in Marion County, four in Jef- 
ferson County, and two in Sullivan County. 

SMALLPOX. 
Table giving number of deaihs by months for the last seven years. 



MONTHS. 


1900. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


Total. 


Aveiage 

for seven 

years. 


January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 


1 
4 
2 
3 
2 
2 


2 
2 
4 
1 
3 
3 


4 
2 
3 
8 
1 
2 


51 
55 
31 
21 
10 
3 


8 

3 
6 

7 
3 


7 
11 
3 
3 
3 
4 


i' 


73 
79 
46 
43 
26 
17 


10 
11 

7 
6 
4 
2 


July 


3 


1 


15 
1 

7 
10 

4 
18 


4 
14 
.2 

i' 

3 


6 
3 

17 
18 
13 
8 


3 


1 


33 
18 
31 
33 
19 
32 


5 
2 


September 


2 


1 
2 
1 
1 





2 
3 


4 
5 


November 




3 


December 


1 


1 


4 


Total 


19 


21 


75 


195 


97 


35 


8 


450 


64 







State rate 168 2. 



MONTHLY ANALYSIS. 

Eighty cases of smallpox were reported in 10 counties, namely: 
Allen, 52; Elkhart, 1; Kosciusko, 2; Lawrence, 1; Scott, 4; Switzer- 
land, 9 ; Tippecanoe, 2 ; Wayne, 1 ; Whitley, 1. There were no 
deaths from this disease during the month. The epidemic in Allen 
County presented no severe cases and no deaths. In the correspond- 
ing month last year 238 cases of smallpox, with 7 deaths in 27 coun- 
ties, were reported. 

February — One hundred and fifty-two cases of smallpox were re- 
ported in 15 counties, with no deaths. In the corresponding month 
last year, 381 cases in 35 counties, with 8 deaths. In the preceding 
month, 80 cases in 10 counties, with no deaths. The disease was 
epidemic at Fort Wayne in Allen County — 62 cases in all. It was 
also epidemic in one locality in Cass County, 5 cases; epidemic in 
Clark, 17 cases ; epidemic in Crawford, 16 cases ; epidemic in Floyd, 
14 cases; in Fulton, 8 cases, somewhat distributed; Howard, 5 cases, 
somewhat distributed ; Jackson, 3 cases in one locality ; Jay, 1 case ; 
Miami, 5; Perry, 2; Putnam, 1; Switzerland, 5; Tippecanoe, 1; 
Wells, 1. 



465 

March — One hundred and twenty-four cases were reported in 16 
counties, with no deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 
251 cases in 29 counties, with one death. In the preceding month, 
152 cases in 15 counties, with no deaths. The disease continued epi- 
demic from last month in Allen County, 38 cases being reported. It 
was also epidemic in Clark, 8 cases ; Crawford, 16 ; Floyd, 13 ; La- 
porte, 14; Miami, 8 ; Whitley, 10. In other counties the cases were : 
Boone. 1 ; Clinton, 1 ; Fulton, 3 ; Greene, 1 ; Marion, 7 ; Martin, 1 ; 
Putnam, 1 ; Spencer, 1 ; Vigo, 1. 

April — Ninety-seven cases reported from 11 counties, with no 
deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 151 cases in 18 coun- 
ties, with 4 deatlis. In the preceding month, 124 cases in 16 coun- 
ties, with no deaths. The disease was epidemic in mild form in the 
following counties : Adams, 15 ; Allen, 20 ; Clark, 18 ; Floyd, 7 ; 
Huntington, 7; Marion, 9; Miami, 15. A few cases not epidemic 
occurred in the following counties : Clinton, 1 ; Daviess, 1 ; Greene, 
3 ; Howard, 7. 

May — One hundred and twelve cases reported from 14 counties. 
with no deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 125 cases 
of smallpox were reported from 11 counties, with 2 deaths. The 
counties reporting this disease were as follows : Adams, 10 ; Allen, 
44; Clark, 10; Crawford, 2; Fayette, 1; Floyd, 12; Fulton, 1; 
Henry, 1; Marion, 4; Miami, 2; Putnam, 1; Vanderburgh, 5; Vigo, 
1 ; Washington, 20. 

June — Sixty-three cases reported from eight counties, with no 
deaths. In the corresponding month last year, 114 cases in 13 coun- 
ties, with 4 deaths. In the preceding month, 112 cases in 14 coun- 
ties, with no deaths. The disease was epidemic in Adams County, 
14 cases ; Allen, 17 cases ; Miami, 11 cases ; Shelby, 10 cases. Other 
counties had the following number of cases: Carroll, 2; Floyd, 2; 
Grant, 2 ; Jay, 9 ; Vigo, 2. All of the cases reported were very mild. 
In no instance was it reported in severe form. 

July — Eighteen cases reported from six counties, with one death. 
The said death was an infant three daj^s old, which was born broken 
out with the disease. The mother had recovered from a mild attack 
and had been dismissed from the pest house in Jefferson County. 
The following counties reported the disease present: Allen, 9 
cases; Clark, 1; Jay, 2; Jefferson, 2 cases and 1 death; Shelby, 4, 
and Vanderburgh, 6. It is very probable this does not represent 
all of the cases, for we are certain scores of cases of mild smallpox 
have occurred during this month. In Pulaski County, at Monterey, 
100 cases of a mild eruptive disease have occurred. Many phy- 

30-Bd. of Health. 



466 

sicians unhesitatingly pronounced this smallpox, while others have 
termed it "mixed infection." The cases are so mild, and as no 
deaths have occurred, it has been impossible to establish effective 
quarantine or to induce the people to vaccinate. 

August — Forty cases reported from three counties, with no 
deaths. The f olloAving counties reported the disease present : Ful- 
ton, -10 cases; Miami, 10 cases: Pulaski, 20 cases. It is very certain 
this does not represent all of the cases, for, without doubt, many 
mild attacks have escaped diagnosis. After seven years of smallpox 
in the state, very many physicians are found who fail to diagnose 
the disease in mild form. 

September — Fifty-one cases reported from ten counties, with two 
deaths. The counties reporting the disease present were : Fulton, 
6 cases ; Jefferson, 16 ; Johnson, 1 ; Miami, 4 ; Montgomery, 3 ; Shel- 
by, 5 ; Starke, 6 ; St. Joseph, 1 ; Sullivan, 8, with two deaths ; Wa- 
bash, 1 case. We are again compelled to remark that these figures 
do not tell the whole story except as to deaths, for, mthout doubt, 
many mild attacks have escaped diagnosis and many people have 
had the disease without even seeing a.physician. 

October — There were 118 cases reported from nine counties, with 
three deaths. In the same montli last year there were no cases of 
smallpox, and of course no deaths. The counties reporting the 
disease present this month were : Allen, 2 cases ; Delaware, 1 ; Ful- 
ton, 3 ; Jefferson, 61 ; Lagrange, 8 ; Miami, 3 ; Ripley, 1 ; St. Joseph, 
28; Vigo, 1. The three deaths occurred in Jefferson County. As 
remarked every month, it is true that there were cases of this disease 
which were never reported. 

November — There were 216 cases reported from 14 counties, with 
no deaths. In the same month last year there were 112 cases in 13 
counties, with 1 death. The following counties reported the disease 
present: Clark, 1 case; Daviess, 1; Fulton, 3; G-rant, 2; Henry, 1; 
Jefferson, 83; Jennings, 1; Marshall, 4; Miami, 60; Pulaski, 17; 
Ripley, 2;' Starke, 6; St. Joseph, 33. Although 'seven years have 
elapsed since smallpox first appeared in this state, and although it 
has been present every week in the state in that time, still there are 
physicians who can not diagnose this disease when it appears in mild 
form. Mistakes in this respect seem no fewer than were made seven 
years ago. 

December — There were 393 cases reported from 19 counties, with 
1 death. In the same month last year, 112 cases from 13 counties, 
with 1 death. There is a decided increase in cases and a slight in- 
crease in area of prevalence. The following counties reported the 



467 



disease as present : Allen. 1 ; Benton, 1 ; Cass, 2 ; Clark, 1 ; Daviess, 
1 ; Elkhart, 2 ; Pulton, 65 ; Grant, 5 ; Howard, 2 ; Jasper, 2 ; Jeffer- 
son, 62; Marion, 5, and 1 death; Marshall, 8 eases; Miami, 62; Pu- 
laski, 34; Starke, 16; St. Joseph, 12; Wabash, 3; Washington, 8. 

VIOLENCE. 

The violence deaths numbered 2.210, as against 2,050 in 1905. 
The term violence includes accidents, suicides and homicides. The 
accidental deaths numbered 1,836; the suicides, 281, and the homi- 
cides. 93. No deaths by mob violence in 1906, and but 1 in 1905. 
Steam cars, trolley cars and machinery killed 834. 

The Violence Chart following compares the violence deaths with 
the average for the last seven years, and by it it appears there was a 
decided increase in violence deaths over preceding years. 

VTOLENCB. 

Comparison of 1906 with average of the last seven years : 

JAN. 



DEC. 



NOV. 



OCT 




MARCH 



APRIL 



SEPT. 



MAY 



JULY 

Average deaths per month for seven years, 1900-1906. 
Deaths per month for the year 1906. 
Eleven months show more than average. 
One month shows same as average. 



468 

MONTHLY RECORD OF VIOLENCE DEATHS. 

January — Violence : Of the 122 deaths by violence, 5 were mur- 
ders, all males and all killed hy shooting. The suicides numbered 
31, 12 being females and 19 males. Concerning the methods of sui- 
cide, 4 chose hanging, 3 males and 1 female; 1 chose drowning; 5 
gunshots ; 1 cutting throat ; 12 carbolic acid ; 4 morphine and the re- 
mainder by other poisons. Of the 196 accidental deaths, 76 were 
males and 20 females. Railroads caused the deaths of 81 males, and 
other causes were as folloM^s: Fractures and crushing injuries, 17; 
gunshots, 6 ; burns and scalds, 11 ; drowning, 8 ; falls and falling ob- 
jects. 9 ; mine accidents, 3 ; electricity, 3 ; suffocation and poisoning, 
the remainder. 

February — The deaths by violence numbered 109 — 84 males and 
25 females. There were 5 murders, 20 suicides and 89 accidental 
deaths. Of the 5 murders, 3 were males and 2 were females. Two 
of these were by gunshots, one by knife wound, one by homicide and 
one by blow on the head. Of the suicides, 14 were males and 6 fe- 
males. The methods chosen were : 7 males, gunshots ; 2 males, 
hanging; by opium and its compounds, 2 males and 4 females; 
chloral, 1 female: carbolic acid, 2 males and 1 female; not named, 1 
male. Of the accidental deaths, 20 were caused by railroads, 2 by 
interurban trolley cars, 12 by crushing injuries, 19 by burns and 
scalds, 5 by gunshots, horses and vehicles, 1; explosions, 7; falling 
trees, 2; strangulation, 3; frozen to death, 1 ; dog bite, 1; poison by 
drugs, 3 ; not named, 8. 

Note. — It will be observed that death rates this month in com- 
parison with the preceding month are higher, although the number 
of deaths were fewer. This is because there were three more days 
in January than in February. 

March — The deaths by violence numbered 112, 20 females and 92 
males. Of the violence deaths, 7 were murders, 20 suicides and 94 
accidents. Of the suicides, 9 chose gunshots, 3 hanging, 5 carbolic 
acid, 3 poisons. Of the accidental deaths, railroads caused 18 ; 
street cars and intei'urbans, 3 ; crushing injuries, 21 ; burns and 
scalds, 12; drowning, 6; gunshots, 8; mine accidents, 6; falls, 7; 
poisons, 6 ; other methods, 7. 

April — The deaths by violence numbered 124, 85 males and 39 fe- 
males. There were 2 murders, 28 suicides and 94 accidents. Seven- 
teen were killed on steam railroads, 2 on interurbans, 19 by burns 
and scalds, 10 by droAvning, 7 by asphyxiation, 3 by horses, and 
others in various ways. 



469 

May — Deaths by violence numbered 152, an increase over the pre- 
ceding month of 28, and an incr